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TIMES 


THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 






told of IRA 

death diary 


By Stewart Tendkr, Ofme Reporter 

Provisional IRA plan to 19 and August 5 last year”. tl 

create bloodshed and havoc m Mr Amlot said the bombing n 
London and 12 resorts last plan was “the work of Prov> h 


summer was revealed by a 
“bombing calendar” discov- 
ered when police raided a 
Glasgow flat, the the Central 
Criminal Court was told yes- 
terday . 

In a basement nearby, po- 
lice uncovered six days later 
“one of the most significant 
and deadly collections of ter- 
rorist material ever found in 
this country' 1 , the court was 
tokL One expert estimated 
there was enough material for 
at least 24 bombs. 

The results of the raids last 
June were described yesterday 
on the second day of the trial 


sional IRA. No doubt the 
object was to create havoc and 
bloodshed throughout the 
country.” 

■ Pour bombs were destined 
for targets in London and the 
other 1 2 were allegedly intend- 
ed for Brighton, Dover, Rams- 
gate. Blackpool, Eastbourne, 
Bournemouth, Torquay, 
Great Yarmouth, Folkestone, 
Margate, Southend and 


Report, page 3 
During the raid on the 


wh ms «*vuu way vu me uuu n .. . ..... 

of the Belfist man accused of Su 

bombing the Grand Hotel PObre found a money belt 

Brighton, in 1984 on the last ‘ d 5wT 

night of the Conservative 

Party conference. SSSL* 

On Tuesday, Mr Patrick 
Joseph Magee, pleaded not 
guilty to seven charges con- 

netted with the Brighton * 

bombing, including five 

counts of murder.Heandfour ^Toe belt^was worn by Mr 

others pleaded not Ste Sh KiS? 2 
conspirii g to caus e egtegons 

lan year between January and SSSc 

YtetenteyMr RoyAntlot, {*££ **. rfhi * 

for the prosecution, said the m J^ a T . ... , . 

five, three men and two Mr Amtotsaid the catendar 
women, were arrested at the was “deatfiy agnate" be- 
Glasgow fiat on June 22. The cam* the day alter the >nu<i 
raid revealed “an outrageous found the 

plot to place 1 6 bombs — each first of the bombs, planted by 
with either a 24 or 48-day Mr fcfegee, as suggested by tlie 
delay — in twig country to ca k n 4sr. 
expiode on consecutive days, A bomb of 3VSH* of expkv- 
except Sundays, between Jufy sivehadbeenleft inaroomat 


the Rubens Hotel opposite the 
mews of Buckingham Palace 
in Victoria. It included a 
booby-trap device and had 
" been left in a bedside cabinet, 
which had to be unscrewed. It 
was due to explode at 1pm on 
July 29. 

- When the cellar was 
searched six days after the raid 
at the Glasgow flat, other 
devices were found in prepa- 
ration. Mr Amlot said nine 
months after the bombing at 
Brighton Mr Magee was using 
the same modus operandi to 
place a bomb. 

After the Mast at the Grand 
Hotel police could not trace a 
man caQed Roy Walsh who 
stayed in Room 629, the seat 
ofthe bomb, the month before 
the Conservative Party con- 
ference. They found ms Lon- 
don address was filse. 

He stayed in the hotel with a 
second unknown person, paid 
in cash and was discreet. On 
the last night in Room 629 Mr 
Walsh ordered a bottle of 
vodka and soft drinks. 

In early June f985 a Mr T 
Morton stayed in Room 112 
at the Rubens Hotel. This was 
the room where the bomb was 
found, and Mr Morton's ad- 
dress, proved to be false too. 

What Mr Magee was arrest- 
ed, hK fingerprints and part of 
a palm pnnt was found on the 
registration card for Mr Walsh 
at the Brighton Hotel, Mr 



i from Mr ScargJU yesterday as he leaves the High Court in Manchester. 


first of the bombs, planted by STa iSSZkZ 

ca * enaar ’ the registration card wassuxti- 

A bomb of 3vabs of expio- lar to Mr Magee's hand- 
ave had been left in a room at writing. 


Tomorrow Government faces 

biggest poll test 

® .. vr' Thfli . • iArfatr "ll'rtTTf " T*nrtlf • IWr o/lAnlrm raw* 



,Xhe Government today Tory Party for adopting an 
faces its b^gest test of elector- over-abrasrve approach which | 
aT opinion ^before thenext deters tmddfe-o^the-toad'vbt- 1 
General Section with about eis and success fbrthe Alii- : 
tv^sMhirds of Britain" s electors mice would intensify those 
fovinglheoppott uni lyto vote doubts. . | 

m focal ejections and two vital Avoidance of defeat, how- 


British Rap’s 
commuter buffi 
in training to 
improve the 
network 


par ti a m en tar y by-dections. 

It is tearing itself for fosses 


ever, would offerlarge conso- 
lation for what the Tories 


to both the Labour -Party and regard as inevitable losses in 
the Alliance rathe elections to the council polls. 



— ^Sfcld — 

The Times Portfolio 
Gold dqgy c om petition 
prize of £4,000 was 
not won yesterday, so 
today there is £8,000 
to be won* Portfolio list, 
page 24; rules and 
how to play, information 
service, page 20. , 


Airport strike 

Manchester airport was set to 
be plunged into chaos from 
midnight last night as mem- 
bers of the Transport and 
General Workers Union de- 
rided on a 24-hour strike. 

New president 

Colin Cowdrey, the former 
England cricket captain, is to 
be president of MCC in their 
bicentenary year, 1 987Page 38 


A new breed of managers; who 
know how to lead will ensure 
that Europe will achieve in- 
dustrial success once again, 
savs the company consultant 
Nick Thornely in an introduc- 
tion to today’s nine-page Gen- 
era] Appointments section 

Pages 27 to35 


decide who tuns the 32 Lon- - 
don End*? ikoffiey Smith, page 4 

and Welsh district, councds p®!feg times, page HI 

and 12 Scottish region jand ' . . ■■ — : 

island co uncils , where it "is Jubilant after thp taiwa (til. 
defending 1 ffiany of tbe seals lup opinion poll which put 
won in' 1982 when the Falk- them ahead in Ryedale and 
tends factorundoubtedfyben- within striking distance of the 
efiied the Gmsepajive Party. Tories ii^W^ Derbyshire, the 
]g addition, the InnerJLoth Alliance -.yesterday mounted 
don Education Authority ; will nn enersetic last eflfort to take 

be directly elected for the fiat ihemb^T 

- .. Only two of the Alliance's 

Rat it is tireootoome of the 25 MPs were left in Westmin- 

■ cb Sd!LJ sten while the rest went to . 

YSSiPvZSSlZ *** Yorkshire and Deibysbire. 
North Yorkshire, where the ... .. . w _ 
Government is 'defending a . Aimed with the j»ff show- 
majority of 15.000 afcdT6^)0O, ^the Tones on 3?percem, 


Scargill Building 

6®e tooff* 

Colts pension 

By Peter Davenport By Lawn 

. Bunding societies are to be 
Mr A rmy Scar^Il, the allowed to provide personal 
Na ^ mal pension pte^s to the lublic, 
Umon of Mbtwarttm^ftwn ^ Stewart, Economic 

S^re^y to the Treasury said 

the ChfefCfostable J Tte Liouncement, con- 

Yorkshire s®r wraagfil tainp H fo a parliamentary 
, ... written answer, was welcomed 

by the Building Societies As- 
at the Hfeh Comrt m Maac^- sociation and building society 

Km^rTfciijS chieft y**ri*y- h wijl open 

bcea s^tmg exemplary dam- „p a new multi-million pound 
^ a ^. rf y”y ii 4. fiTC nrarket for the building society 
r™* JFS**?* industry, and Ifad to 
h ors aad 43 ramntgs to reach widescalerecniiunent by soci- 
a^nmnnaons verdict against ^ bf fund-management ex- 

Ttey decided Aaf he'^ ^J ^^^Stewart sa3' that butid- 
teen d^Ined ingsodeties would be given ,k a 

*!!?*" powerto invest inasubsidiaiy 
i l . of associated company estab- 

qa estio ned by 'Pfidtoe about lifted for the sole purpose of 
alleged speeding on tfee Ml. making provision for pensions 
The judge, Mr Jpstice SI- on a money purchase basis.” 
immBrowa, awarded costs j n addition, he said that the 
jptot l he miter’ 5 , hytg. subsidiny would need to op- 
Es ™ n ^^_K t ^ ™* erate as a unit trust authorized 

f* 8 ®* under the financial services 

hag to had been expected, legislation. 

S?ri fi£2i® StS "■ 11,10 1116 personal pension plan 

“aS^S; Mr Crreafll ?!> ^ 


Building societies 
to offer personal 
pension schemes 


By Lawrence Lever 


. outside h& home aear Barns- 
ley m July 1982 while being 
''(pesthmed by 'police about 
alleged speeding mi the Ml. 

The judge, Mr Justice Si- 
mon Brown, awarded costs 
against the miller's leader. 
Estimates at die end of the 
case, which - lasted twice as 
long as had been expected, 
said that costs would ran into 
six CgHres. 

After the case Mr Scargill 
said that although be had been 
instructed to brhg the action 
by the national executive of 
the NUM, he did not expect 
the union would have to part 
with any funds towards the 


Building societies are to be invest a proportion of their 
allowed to provide personal funds in their own fixed- 
pension plans to the public, interest accounts, although 
Mr -Ian Stewart, Economic there are likely to be limits on 
Secretary to the Treasury said the exact proportion, 
yesterday. A spokesman for the Build- 

The announcement, con- mg Societies Association said 
tained in a parliamentary yesterday: “We warmly wel- 
written answer, was welcomed come the Government's an- 
by the Building Societies As- nouncement. It will allow us 
sociation and building society to offer a competitive service 
chiefs yesterday. It will open to the public." 
up a new multi-million pound • A warning to building 
market for the building society societies not to lend money 
industry, and lead to recklesly to bome-owners 
widescale recruitment by soci- was given by Mr Roy Cox, 
eties of fund-management ex- Chairman of the Building 

p#use — -.-r- . Societies Association 

Mr Stewart said' that build- yesterday, 
ing societies wouldbe given “a Mr Cox said that building 

power to invest inasubsidiaiy societies had promised home 
of associated company estab- loans worth a total of £3 
Usbed for the sole purpose of billion last month — a record, 
making provision for pensions At the BSA annual confer- 
ee a money purchase basis." ence in Bournemouth, Mr Cox 

In addition, he said that the said that imprudent lending, 
subsidiary would need to op- would lead to increased levels 
erate as a unit mist authorized of mortgage arrears and en- 
under the financial services courage borrowers to over- 
legislation. stretch themselves. 

The personal pension plan “For many years building 
regime is contained in the societies effectively had a 
Social Securities Bill pioneer- choice of creditworthy appli- 
ed by Mr Norman Fowler, cants seeking to purchase 


^ on 34 per cent 

sive impact on the pattern of 

politics ami flKGovenmrem^^ ^ B^td 

approach m the run-up to the 

next ejection. retnm to West 

.Defeat in either to the - . 

Alliance could send shivers . m Betper, 

through the Conservative par- Matkxac^ana BatewelL they 
liaraemary perty mid lead io were making unashamed pleas 
calls for reconsideration of the to Labour voters loswrtchaiKi 
whole campaigning strategy of vote tectkalfy for the Affiance 
the party machine -under Mr to defeat the Tones. 

Norman Tebbit, the Canser- in Brioer, ; Dr Owen was 


vafive Party chairman. 


In Belper, Dr Owen was 
observed receiving pledges of 


“Based upon the number of 
people and organizations who i 
hare already indi c ated support 
for my action, in addition to : 
tire contributions I wfll be | 
miring, there will be no costs 
to the union,” be said. 

However, Mr Scargill re- 
fused to disclose tire organiza- 
tion or infiriduafs involved or 
indicate how much fina n c ia l 
support they had offered. He 
added that after the 
arineworikefs* onion had been 
placed in receivership he was 
not pud any salary between 
.March and November last 
year. That money, estimated 
at about flSJMM, would be 
going towards the costs. 

Mr Scargill said that he had 
successfully fought. 29 libel 


Mr Tebbit is under attack in transfers ^ of allegiance, 
some senior quartern of the . continued on page 2, cel 3 



‘Concern’ over Telecom discounts 

By Jerrany Wamer • leaked by members of BTs wrote to BT that discrimina- 
Bnsmess Correspondent 100 Guh, which comprises the tory price cuts of this sort 


The Office of Telecom- 
munications, . . the 


corporation's most valued 
aj&ofiiers. BT had tried to 
swear the business customers 



Arts ^ 
BWaiods 
ramps *5 

BmiatsS 2I-M 

£*** Is 

Cowl “ 

Crai5*((hl43 



m m ___ m 1 ujv - l/y-iTT r rSriTtv J 

. to fear of Dotting 


— . i PV* \ ... _■ UUO. A AIK. l»OII AO IU 

to B n tish . Tdccom to eaqueg ofie r favoured customers with 
“concero - ora ^pons jurat ^ telephone lines or more 
BT is atxwt.ti 5 °® r S5J2Z discounts of between 15 and 
discoantttoitsmajorbusmess 20 per cent on then- local, 
c-ustomere an effort to national and" mtemational 
compete wit h Its rn/al, Merco- raffc in rtfiim fora fecfliiy fry, 

^Communications. Professor Bryan CmsIwe. 

Details of the plan were director-general of Oftel. 


German costs 
lowest for 
27 years 

ByDaridSmiA 

The cost of living in* West 
Germany last month was tow? 
er than a year ago, the first 
time tins has happeiwd ior 
nearly '27 years. Prices were 
down 02 per cent,. making 
Germany the first, major econ- 
omy to have a’ negative mfte- 
tion rate as a result of the 
collaose in oil prices. 

Desoite this, the “iMs. is a great day tor 

Bundesbank appears, defer- 

mined to take no nsks bv the uren m the street. _ ■ 

SlSgite monetmy pofey. It "fife for 

SrfpJ vesienlay to leave ordinary decent trade mm- 

JbK If ttfll wte ytioas 

linere ^ price felt page 21 more^carefidlv before de6»- 


would. have to be justified 
with detailed figures. 

Mercury said it believed 
BPs plan was probabl" 


unon uk icimb u 

Government ticence. 

.Mr Gordon. Owen, 
Mercury's mana»ng director, 
said that, if reports of the plan 
were true, it appeared to be an 
abuse of BTs monopoly posi- 
tion and a manipulation of 
tariffs which was not justified 


Seortary of State for Social 
Services, is not scheduled to 
become law until 1988. 

. The structure proposed yes- 
terday by Mr Stewart makes it 
dear that societies will not be 
undenvriting or insuring the 
pension funds, although they 
will be providing the fund- 
management services. 

Societies will be able to 

Reagan 
warning 
to Syria 

Washington — President 
Reagan arrived back here 
yesterday to warm praise for 
his success in getting 
America's allies at the Tokyo 
summit to take a tough stand 
against international terror- 
ism (Michael Binyon writes). 

Before leaving Tokyo, Mr 
Reagan gave a clear warning 
that the US would not hesitate 
to strike at countries support- 
ing t er rori sm , including Syria, 
if evidence implicated them. 

Asked at a press conference 
whether the summit declara- 
tion on terrrorism was a 
warning to Syria as well as 
Libya, he replied: “Yes. ..Wei 
intend this to make them 
think and- realize. . .that they 1 
will have to face all of us 
united if we get evidence they 
were supporting terrorism”. 

He added the summit had 
discussed “possible tools or 
weapons in this war against 
terrorism.’' 


properties which represented ! 
good security to lend on. Now 
they are having to work bard 
to obtain an adequate volume 
of sound business. It is a 
natural temptation to relax 
lending standards in order to 
obtain the desired volume of 
business, and societies do 
need to tread very cautiously 
in this area," he said. 

Conference 
key to 
jail dispute 

The result of talks intended 
to settle the jails dispute could 
depend on the case leaders of 
the Prison Officers’ Association j 
are able to make to its annual 
conference on May 20 (Peter 
Evans writes). 

Both rides agreed ’the gap 
with management was narrow- 
ing after a meeting yesterday. 

But prison officers at the 
conference, will expect to see 
the outcome before making up 
their minds. 

Mr Phil Hornsby, an assis- 
tant secretary of the associa- 
tion. said yesterday he did not 
think it ’would be possible 
before the conference to hold 
the ballot to lift formally the 
threat of industrial action. 

. Yesterday’s talks were still 
about talks. Sir Brian Cubbon, 
Permanent Under Secretary at 
the Home Office, darifieda 
letter By Mr Hurd to the POA 
on April 22 about manning 
levels, pay. allowances and 
studies on.working practices. 


Victory in rail strike damages battle 


woo anhistoric legal batfleto 
male rail unions pay Mm 
damages forastrike which left 
bun stranded. 

The ruling by judge 
Henfaam at Sheffield County 
Court could open the flood- 
gates to cfefrns fn»a other 
conmnitarsaffected by unoffL 
rid stoppages. ' 

After 'hearing fie had- won 
the two-day case Mr Angus 
Falconer, aged 55, a former 
Royal uarxICommaiider, said: 
“This is a great -day for 


sfons arc forced on members 
by tinpot administrators who 
run some trade muons." 

Mr Falconer, of Crimicar 


ages from the National Union 
of Rattwaymen and Aafaf who 
called the 24-hour strike oa 
January. 17 test year without a 
ballot 

He had bought a return rafl 
ticket to London for a business 
meeting and to see a doctor. 
But he was- forced to stay in 
London because of the strike 
which caused him to miss a 
meeting in Sheffield. 

The judge swarded Mm £53 
sped^ -damages — the cost of 
his* overnight stay M Lon- 


don — and £]00 general dam- 
ages. Costs were awarded on a 
scale which means the rail 
unions will pay about £6,000 of 
the estimated £10,000 costs 
for the County Court bearing. 
Of the outstanding £4,000, 
about £3J)O0 has already been 
raised by donations sent to Mr 
Falconer by weU-wishers. 

Referring to the unions* 
claim that their actions were 
sot aimed at Mr Falconer and 
no harm was intended to him, 
the judge - said: “X find mi - 
sympathy with that argument 

“To say harm to passengers 
was a consequence and not the 
objbet of the action seenu, to 
me to be nahe.” 


He added: “The defendants 
were reckless m that they 
knew and appreciated the 
result of their actions on the 

plaintiff ami others, but never- 
theless they pursued it.’' 

The judge said that by 
buying a mart in advance df 
his journey, Mr Falconer had 
entered into a contractual 
agreement with British RaD 
Board but foe beard was 
preve nted f rom carrying out its 
contractual obligations by the 
actions of the rail unions In 
calling a strike without s 
ballot as required by law. 

Mr Patrick Elias, for the 
rail unions, indicated that an 
appeal may be made against 
die decision. 


The Chernobyl disaster 

Double checks 
on radiation as 
unease spreads 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Soviet, authorities yes- 
terday gave the first hint of the 
magnitude of the costly de- 
contamination programme 
now being carried out in a 
wide area of the Ukraine 
around the stricken and still 
leaking nuclear reactor at 
Chernobyl. 

The area has been declared 
prohibited territory to all for- 
eign journalists and diplo- 
mats, but a report from two 
special Tass correspondents 
said that all roads in the region 
were now being washed down 
regularity by a special fleet of 
lorries. 

They said that radiation- 
control check-points had been 
established at all major cross- 
[ roads and that local radio had 
been instructed to break its 
earlier silence and carry regu- ' 
lar reports on radiation levels. 

The account, the fullest yet 
released by the agency, came 
amid growing indications of 
unease among ordinary Soviet 
citizens, who are only now 
beginning to appreciate the 
seriousness of the disaster. 

The report said that double 
radiation checks were now 
being made on all local pro- 
duce, but also claimed that 
livestock evacuated from the 
high-risk exclusion zone ex- 
tending 18 miles from the 
reactor were still being tended 
rather than put down. 

Despite its propagandist 
tone, the report said that “the 
situation remains 

disquieting”. 

Earlier, despite the official 
Tass claim of “calm, confident 
and full-blooded life” continu- 
ing in the Ukrainian capital of 
Kiev after the broadcast of the 
first public health warnings 
there earlier this week, French 
students contacted from Mos- 
cow said that pregnant women 
were being evacuated from the 
city some 60 miles from the 
damaged reactor, and that 
young Soviet children were 


being urged 10 stay indoors. 

Yesterday morning at the 
bugs Kiev railway station near 
the centre of Moscow, three 
t rains which arrived from the 
Ukrainian capital were all 
packed with unaccompanied 
children, which one Westerner 
estimated was 70 per cem of 
the passengers disembarking 

In an interview with the 
communist party paper 5 &i%7- 
skava Rossiya, Mr Grigori 
Rivenko. the Kiev region 
Communist Party leader ad- 
mined yesterday for the first 
time that some Soviet workers 
in Chernobyl had shirked 
their responsibility in tackling 
the disaster, which occurred in 
the early hours of April 26. 

Danish demand 7 

EEC food ban 7 

• Claiming that it was not 
enough to give out only 
optimistic information — 
which until now has been the 
official party line — Mr 
Revenko added:“You cannot 
hide a sin: individual workers 
were found who in the diffi- 
cult conditions, did not dis- 
play the necessary 
steadfastness and willingness 
to be at the from line.” 

His frank remarks to the 
paper, which has been in the 
vanguard of Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov's recently discred- 
ited campaign for more open 
reporting in the Soviet media, 
jarred glaringly with Tass, 
whose simultaneous despatch 
from the Ukraine boasted that 
there had been no deserters. 

In the interview — which 
caused great interest among 
Muscovites who had previ- 
ously received only carefully 
sanitized offical accounts of 
the emergency — Mr Revenko 
also acknowledged that there 
had been problems with the 
evacuation, which was inex- 
plicably delayed for some 36 
hours. 


Radioactive cloud may 
return to Scotland 

By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 

More radioactive material be swept hack over Scotland 
may fall on Scotland in the with rain.” 
wake of the Chernobyl disas- He calculated the chances of 

ter, the National Radiological suffering from cancer as a 
Protection Board said yesler- direct result of the radiation as 
day. The Scottish Office said slightly less than one in a 
radioactivity in some Scottish mtilion in England and slight- 
milk was the highest ever ly more in Scotland, 
recorded, but far below risk Levels of radioactive caesi- 
levek. um in milk were still rising in 


More than 100 anxious 
callers an hour telephoned a 
special inquiry unit set up in 
Edinbuigh as ministers has- 
tened to set up similar units in 
London. 

Dr Roger Clarice, secretary 
of lhe protection board, said: 
“The meteorological office say 
that some of the activity might 


be swept hack over Scotland 
with rain.” 

He calculated the chances of 
suffering from cancer as a 
direct result of the radiation as 
slightly less than one in a 
mtilion in England and slight- 
ly more m Scotland. 

Levels of radioactive caesi- 
um in milk were still rising in 
some northern areas “as we 
would expect” Dr Clarke 
went on. 

Environmental campaign- 
ers called on the Government 
yesterday to issue daily infor- 
mation bulletins instead of the 
present “patchy, confusing 
shambles”. 

Information service, page 20 




HOME NEWS 


THF. TIMES THTfRSDAY MAY 8 1986 


Labour leaders I Party fortunes at stake as Britain goes to polls today 


‘misled party 
on its nuclear 


Consistent 
pattern to 
results 


defence policy’ HJS. 3 ' 


By Henry Stanhope 


When Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher came to power in 
1 979 she was surprised to find 
that her Labour predecessors 
had not only developed the 
controversial £1 billion 
Chevaline warhead for Polaris 
but had also done the “essen- 
tial groundwork” for the 
£10 bUlion Trident missile de- 
cision. 

A book published today, 
four days before the nest 
defence White Paper, accuses 
the former Labour prime 
mi misters Lord Wilson of 
Rievauixand Mr James Calla- 
ghan, of such “excessive 
secrecy” on nuclear policy 
that they could be blamed for 
misleading their party. . 

Mr Christopher Coker, of 
the London School of Eco- 
nomics, says that, despite 
holding office for a consider- 
able period. Labour govern- 
ments held only one 
Commons debate on nuclear 
weapons, compared with the 
four Mrs Thatcher held within 
a few years of her coming to 
Number 10. 

Mr Coker also criticizes the 
“extraordinary” endorsement 
by Mr Denis Healey of the 
deal offered to himself and Mr 
Neil Kinnock by President 
Chernenko in 1984, when the 
Soviet leader offered not to 
target anv Russian missiles on 
Britain if all nuclear bases in 
this country were removed. 

In A Nation in Retreat , he 


also accuses successive Con- 
servative governments since 
the war of lacking a sense of 
purposes in their defence poli- 
cies. 

He says that the Royal Navy 
may have only 35 warships by 
the' end of this century and 
only 20 of those operational. 
The Merchant Navy was on 
an even more alarming de- 
cline. 

Despite a naval budget 
which in real terms was 60 per 
cent higher three years ago 
than it was in 1 950, the cost of 
equipment was now so high 
that the Royal Navy could no 
longer afford to stay in the 
“teg ship league”. 

As for the Merchant Navy, 
it had lost more vessels is the 
past few years than it had 
during the whole of the Sec- 
-ond World War. In the past 
decade it had lost 30 million 
tonnes, compared with the 12 
million tonnes that the U- 
boats sank in five years. 

Mr Coker adds: “The man- 
power situation is equally 
alarming. 

“The number of merchant 
officers fell from 41,000 in 
1975 to 28,000 in 1982, and 
the number of ratings by 
12.000. The jobs on which 
Britain has traditionally relied 
as a seapower are being lost at 
the rate of 5,000 a year. 

A Nation in Retreat (Brassey’s; 
£1195). 


- By Hugh Clayton 
A few key results will give a 
sound guide to the fortunes of 
the parties in today's elections 
for more than 5,000 seats in 


Radar discovery 
to extend range 

By Onr Diplomatic Correspondent 


Cruise missiles at Green- 
ham Common may have to be 
re-programmed and bomber 
pilots throughout the world 
will probably need to think 
again about their tactics, as the 
result of a British break- 
through in radar technology. 

Marconi Radar has perfect- 
ed a technique, for “bending" 
radar waves round the curva- 
ture of the earth and extending 
their effective range from 
about 50 to 200 miles. 

It works only over the sea, 
where the salt in the water 
attracts the radar beam and 
ensures that it bugs the surface 
as it passes beyond the hori- 
zon instead of zooming off in a 
straight line into space. 

But the implications could 
be enormous for ships and 
coastal defences — and for 
strike aircraft which have so 
far been able to evade detec- 
tion until the last minute by 
attacking at low-level, ducking 
below the horizon. Pilots in 


future should have no hiding 
place. 

The scientific principle has 
long been understood and 
research has been carried on 
by Marconi since die 1960s. 
But until now the very weak 
radar signals transmitted back 
to the operator have been 
drowned by the “clutter*' 

What has led to the Marconi 
announcement is a break- 
through in processing technol- 
ogy which has enabled tech- 
nicians to pick out the real 

radar signal. 

The company expects inter- 
est from overseas, particularly 
from the United States, where 
scientists have been concen- 
trating on extending the range 
of radar by bouncing high 
frequency signals off the 
ionosphere. 

It is thought likely to be 
particularly effective in pro- 
viding warning of slow-mov- 
ing. ground-hugging cruise 
missiles. 


Protection Festival 
‘a threat’ short of 
to industry £50,000 


By Anthony Bevins 
Political Correspondent 

Labour’s proposed system 
of employment protection reg- 
ulations would kill off manu- 
facturing industry. Mr Kenn- 
eth Garke, the Paymaster 
General, said yesterday. 

He told a conference of the 
Engineering Employers' Fed- 
eration in London that 
Labour’s proposals were “a 
short-sighted attempt to put 
back ana multiply the burdens 
on business that we have tried 
to lift over the last few years”. 

“Employers would be de- 
terred from the business of 
hiring people if new workers 
meant more expensive legal 
rights and problems. The first 
victims of Labour's policy of 
workers’ rights would be the 
people who are out of work.” 
But Mr Clarke, the Depart- 
ment of Employment's Com- 
mons representative in Cab- 
inet, said that Labour's policy 
also posed a particularly dan- 
gerous threat to manufactur- 
ing industry “where patterns 
of employment are undergo- 
ing the greatest change and 
where we need the maximum 
flexibility of labour”. 

He said: “We need a sound 
and profitable manufacturing 
base. We need to earn enough 
from manufacturing to sup- 
port our service seam- and our 
educational and welfare" 


By Ronald Fanx 

This year’s Edinburgh In- 
ternational Festival has been 
hampered by competition from 
the Commonwealth Games 
and Arts Festival which are 
also taking place in the city 
this summer, Mr Frank Dob- 
lop, its director, said j 


The festival opens from 
Aognst 10 and is about ! 
£50,000 Hades' target for spon- 
sorship and donations. 

**We are a little bit at risk at 
the moment because of the 
naturally very attractive sport- 
ing demands of the Common- 
wealth Games," he said. 

The Edinburgh Festival has 
a budget of SIS million oi 
which £300,000 was raised 
last year from spousorship and 
donations. 

The the me of the fortieth 
festival will be the eighteento- 
ceotnry Scottish Enlighten- 
ment, the intellectual 
movement which spread 
throughout Europe. 

* It will be celebrated in 
Edinburgh with music, theatre 
and exhibitions. 

The festival will have a 
record number of 300 perfor- 
mances, including concerts by 
nine orchestras from four 
countries including the Toron- 
to Symphony, the Oslo Ph3- 
barmooic and the Moscow 
Virtuosi. 


for more than 5,000 seats in 
209 councils throughout 
Britain. 

Labour and Alliance leaders 
wound up their campaigns 
yesterday insisting that they 
would score significant vic- 
tories. 

There are several reasons 
why it will be hard to work out 
a consistent pattern from all 
the council results. 

One is that elections in most 
are being held for only a third 
of the seats; another that 
turnouts are often as low as a 
quarter of the electorate or 
less. Dozens of key wards are 
held with majorities in single 
or double figures. 

Birmingham: One of the lam- 
est English councils with poll- 
ing in 39 of the 117 seats. A 
vital result for the two largest 
parties: Conservative-held un- 
til 1984, Labour now just in 
power. 

London, Camden: Elections 
for all 59 seats with Labour 
holding 33 and Conservatives 
26: a disaster for Labour and 
the pollsters if Conservatives 
capture it. 

Cambridge: Volatile, with a 
Labour majority of one in an 
area where Conservatives 
were shocked to lose control in 
1985 county poll. 

Crewe and Naotwkh: Hung 
with the two largest parties 
almost neck-and-neck. Labour 
must capture it if it is to live 
; up to its own expectations. 
Cheltenham, Exeter, Glou- 
cester: All bung in once appar- 
ently impregnably Tory shires. 
Will Tory support slip further? 
Lothian region: Polling in all 
49 seats with Labour now the 
largest party holding 23. Can 
Labour capture it outright 
after last year’s success in 
Edinburgh council? 

Brighton: An important test of 
strength for the two largest 
parties. Labour two seals be- 
hind Tories. 

London, Richmond: Only 

Tory and Alliance councillors 
here. Alliance needs badly to 
retain control. 

London, Wandsworth: A cru- 
cial battle between textbook 
Thatcherism and characteris- 
tic so ulh-of-th e-Thames hard 
London-left Labour. One of 
the most important of all the 
council results. 



Politicians 
failing to 
end terror. 


Affiance of smites from Mr David Steel, liberal leader, his candidate, Mrs Elizabeth Shields, and Dr David Owen. 


Steel confident of 
Ryedale triumph 


Sleepy voters see 
some low blows 


A Liberal victory in the 
Ryedale by-dectioa was al- 
most in the bag, Mr David 
Steel, the party leader, said 
last night after a Gallup poll 
put his candidate eight points 
ahead of the Conservatives. 

Speaking at an election 
meeting in Mai ton. North 
Yorkshire, addressed by both 
the Affiance leaders, Mr Steel 
said he sensed a revulsion over 
high unemployment and its 
economic and social costs. 

Dr David Owen, SDP lead- 
er, said: “There is a great 
danger that in the months 
before the next election the 
Government will do what Tory 
governments have done before, 
sometimes with success, I 
regret to say, and seek tn buy 
the election. 

“A‘ bit of tax relief will be 
provided to encourage people 
to believe that the country's 
problems are all solved." 

The Liberal candidate, Mrs 
Elizabeth Shields, made an 
appeal to Labour supporters in 
the constituency to vote for her 
to defeat toe Tories. 

The by-election campaign 
muled on a sour note yesterday 
over an election leaflet which 
listed villages allegedly at risk 


of losing their bos services 
under the Transport Act. 

It was printed on only one 
side of the paper, and an- 
nounced indirectly and in ex- 
tremely small print that it 
originated from the Liberals. 

Tories came to their morn- 
ing press conference armed 
with photocopies of the offend- 
ing leaflet which, they said, 
had been “selectively 
distributed" in threatened vil- 
lages. They shook their heads 
gravely over this latest inci- 
dent of Liberal trickery — 
although they stopped short 
of asserting that the 1ms routes 
were actually safe. 

Mr Neil Balfour, Conserva- 
tive candidate, confessed that 
he thought toe leaflet repre- 
sented “the most damaging 
and persistent lie propagated 
in this by-election”. 

Challenged with underhand 
conduct, the liberals laughed 
uproariously and produced 
copies of the leaflet printed on 
both sides, which made its 
source unmistakable. They ad- 
mitted that one or two copies 
aright have come off the 
printer half-finished. 

CamfWMiuBiJiL j Spam K3 

Mrs E SHekis (All 17-170: P Bloom 

(Lab) s:&3 6- C tnaj 16.142. 


By George H01 


Below-ibe-belt issues domi- 
nated the scene as the Ryedale 
by-election campaign entered 
its final stages yesterday. 

Liberal and Conservative 
campaigners dwelt inelegantly 
on the state of their 
opponents’ stomachs and on 
local smells, while the strug- 
gling Labour camp castigated 
the voters for being sleepy. 

Mr Roy Jenkins. SDP MP 
for Glasgow Hillhead. said 
that the constituency had a 
“pretty good smell to his 
political nostrils. He amazed 
the “intensely party political 
rodomontades (extravagant 
boasts)" such as those deliv- 
ered in the constituency by Mr 
Norman Tebbit, chairman of 
the Conservative Party. 

Mr Jenkins said that such 
campaigning appealed to Con- 
servatives with “less sensitive 
stomachs", but not to more 
fastidious members such as 
Mr John Biffen, Leader of the 
House of Commons. 

“Labour is making certain 
efforts to drag itself bad; from 
the wilder shores of 1983 
lunacy”, Mr Jenkins said. 
“But it remains true that the 
two-party system, with its 


rigidities and violent reversals 
of power, has come to serve 
the people of Britain and the 
performance of Britain in- 
creasingly badly.” 

Mr Tebbit repeated his 
charge that the liberals were 
planning to introduce rating of 
agricultural land, a charge 
denied again yesterday by the 
Liberal candidate. Mis Eliza- 
beth Shields. ■ 

Mrs Shirley Haines, the 
Labour candidate, invited 
Mrs Barbara Castle, former 
Secretary for Transport and 
for Health, to support her. 

“The dark mare is coming 
up on the outside and adding . 
that touch of clrff-Iianging 
which this slightly somnolent 
area of the country needs", 
Mrs Castle declared, with a 
well-remembered exuberance 
of metaphor, 

Mrs Haines, pressed to dis- 
close whether she too thought 
the local electorate was som- 
nolent, sugg?sted that the 
constituency needed a Labour 
member to liven ft up. If that 
is so, the signs are that ■! 

Mrs E Shields (AD 17-170: P Bloom , 
(Lab) &S16. C IN) 16.142- I 


Tories braced for losses is biggest poll tests 


Continued from page 1 
But they encountered a 
determined move to resist 
them by the Labour Party 
which had at least two dozen 
MPs in the constituency 
yesterday. 

The Labour vote has dearly 
held firm throughout the cam- 
paign, and indeed the Gallup 
poll put its support level lower 
than the private canvassing 
figures of all three parties. 

Labour issued its own can- 
vass returns purporting to 
show that it was squeezing the 
Liberal vote down to 27 per 
cent with itself on 34 pa cent 
and the Tories on 37 pa cent 
And Mr Roy Hatlersley, 
Labour’s deputy leader, de- 
clared at a press conference 


that with maximum effort in 
the next 36 hours Labour 
could win the seat 

There was, however, no 
disguising the mood of expec- 
tation within the Allance 
camp and it will be a surprise 
if the final result is not a 
diffhanger between it and the 
‘Conservatives. 

Mr David Alton, the Liberal 
chief whip, declared that the 
Alliance was “poised” for a 
sensational win. 

“We believe that many, 
forma Labour voters will 
switch tactically in order to 
defeat Mis Thatcha. We were 
told by the pundits at the start 
of these campaigns that the era 
of three-party politics was 
ova. But one Fulham does 


not make a summer”, he said. 

Mr Christopher Walmsley, 
the Alliance candidate, re- 
marked: “We are gathering 
ourselves for the important 
final dash.” 

But the poll figures woe 
received with calm at the Tory 
headquarters. Mr Patrick 
McLoughlin, its candidate, 
said that he was “exceptional- 
ly confident” 

In the wake of the poll both, 
the Conservative and Labour 
parties renewed their on- 
slaught against the Alliance. 

Mr Hatlersley said that only 
the Labour Party could get the 
Government out “The na- 
tional mood is now passion- 
ately anti-Conservative. The 
opposition to the Prime Min- 


ister in particular and to ha 
policies in general grows every 
day.” 

Only one party could 
achieve that growing wide- 
spread national aim of getting 
ha out, only one party could 
displace the Government and 
replace it, he said. “The Tory 
defeat which grows daily 
more certain, will be brought 
nearer and put beyond donbt 
by supporting the one party 
which could achieve victory at 
the next General Election. 
That party is the Labour 
Party” he said. •• 

Mr Tebbit appearing at one 
of the final Conservative pub- 
lic meetings in Matlock, at- 
tacked the Alliance as being 
the soft option. 


At Ryedale there was cau- 
tion in all parties about the 
Gallup poll which showed the 
Alliance on 47 pa cent and 
the Tories on 39 percent. But 
a confident Mr Steed predicted 
that one oftte casualties of the 
two contests would be Mr 
Tebbit 

Whatever the results of the 
by-elections, the local elec- 
tions seem certain to provide 
certain evidence of toe Labour 
Party’s recovery. . . 

Recent national opinion 
polls have seen it gaining' at 
the expense of toe Affiance. 
Labour has hopes of gaming 
up to 20 councils and taking a 
majority of the London: bor- 
oughs of which it at present 
holds 12. 


Unionist fight against 
deal is losing ground 


Woman held Victorian values not 
uh£?£L enough, Runcie says 


By Richard Ford 


The Mure of Unionist 
protests against the Anglo- 
Irish Agreement highlights toe 
divisions between moderates 
and extremists and the uphill 
struggle they have in making 
their opposition effective. 

By framing an agreement 
that did not rely on Unionist 
input, unlike the power-shar- 
ing experiment of 1974, offi- 
cials judged that Unionists 
would have difficulty in find- 
ing a target to attack. 

Since the signing of the 
agreement almost six months 
ago the Unionists' boast that 
they have a coherent strategy 
of opposition has appeared 
hollow. 

At first the campaign was a 
success, with a mass rally 
outside Belfast City Hall But 
since then there have beat 
various setbacks. 

A challenge in the High 
Court over the legality of the 
deal failed. 

‘ A protest on the day of the 
firet meeting of the Joint 



Ministerial Conference ended 
in violence. Similar violence 
erupted at the end of a Young 
Unionists march from Lon- 
donderry to Belfast at the new 
year. 

By-elections after the resig- 
nation of IS Unionist MPs 
achieved 418,230 voles 
against the agreement, but 
that was short of the 500,000 
they bad wanted and was 
accompanied by the loss of 
one seat at Westminster to the 
Social Democratic and La- 
bour Party. 

The leadership has also 
failed to persuade Protestant 
representatives to withdraw 
from boards running educa- 
tion, health and social ser- 
vices. 

Although 17 Unionist-con- 
trolled councils have, been 
adjourned, that strategy was 
dealt a blow when five Official 
Unionists on Belfast City 
Council voted with opposition 
groups to end the suspension. 


in double 
killing case 

Police investigating toe 
killings of a dressmaker and 
ha baby aged six months in 
Westbury, Wiltshire, were 
yesterday qaestiooing a local 
woman, aged 50, who was 
arrested in Stone, Stafford- 
shire. 

Mrs Jeanne Sotdiffe aged : 
39, and ha daughter, Heidi, 1 
had their throats art In the 
attack a week ago at then- 
home in The Butts, Westbury. ! 

Mrs Sutcliffe had been beat- 
en about the head at least 10 
times with a blunt i ns tru m ent 
before tbe attacker slashed ha 
throat 

Mrs Sutcliffe’s eldest 
daughter, Linda, aged 15, 
found the bodies when she 
came heme from school with 
ba father, Paul, aged 44, a 
mathematics teacher, ba 
brother, David, aged 14, and 
ba other sister, Anna, aged 
seven. 

Wiltshire detectives trav- 
elled to Staffordshire, on 
Tuesday night to .arrest the 
Mrs Heather . Arnold. 


By Clifford LougJey, Religious Affairs Correspondent 


The traditional work ethic 
may well be obsolete and 
Britain can no longer be 
sustained on mid-Victorias 
values, tbe Archbishop of 
Canterbury, Dr Robert 
Runcie, said in an Industry 
Year service in London yester- 


In what appeared to be an 
oblique criticism of govern- 
ment economic policy. Dr 
Runcie said at St Paul's 
Cathedral that, without a cor- 
porate commitment to “one 
nation”, fears, tensions and 
bitterness would fester. 

. Without' that, “tbe corro- 
sive cynicism which, regards 
self-interest and not public 
interest as the sole dynamic of 
our people win drive us into 
warring groups”. 

The common purpose of 
work was not (he creation of 
wealth but the creation of 
worth. 

Industry Year demanded a 
moral commitment in the 
nation to create the conditions 


in which industry would flour- 
ish, he said ' 

“If we are to persuade our 
young people: to pursue a 
career in industry we need to 
show them how industry can 
balance efficiency and produc- 
tivity with care and 
humanity.” 

Managements and unions 
were still mo often locked in 
confrontations of mutual in- 
comprehension while owner- 
ship . and decision-making 
were stffi too narrowly distrib- 
uted Industry created we alth, 
but inequality increased too. 

“We know thai mid-Vic- 
torian Values cannot sustain 
us”. Dr Runcie said “Above 
all we must face the spectre of 
long-term unemployment 

“It may well be that toe j 
traditional work ethic is obso- i 
lete. Perhaps we need a new 
'contribution' ethic to give 
people a proper sense of 
status, purpose and 
belonging.” 

Photograph, page 5 


NOTICE OF URGENT PUBLIC AUCTIONS 

DUE TO A LIQUIDITY CRISIS 

PUBLIC AUCTIONS TO BE HELD OVER 2 SESSIONS 

AN ISLAMIC COLLECTION OF 

SIAN CARPETS 

RUNNERS.. AND OTHERS FROM THE MORE IMPORTANT WEAVING 
CENTRES OF THE EAST 

TuUth. Russian. Man, PiMsumia. Bokhan, Keshan, Ispahan. Qum. 9k Henkes. Kaiser- 
. Jtlwre too nu me rous to Bet. 

NOTE: Owing to the urg ency Ot waggi n g iun ed a m cash these items era being at 
t ensure complete disposal 

Y 11TH MAY AT 3 P.M. PREVIEW FROM 11 A.M. 


Welsh chapels face a bingo hall bMte 


STREET 


GRANGE LID. 28 RDSSLYN NIL, HAMPSTEAD, LONDON NWS Tafc 81-794 912 

hvmBiMR be KCWMd m * MgMM comma and M o*ft can*. 

IltUmimhuwm mw iwhbb fcr dmw ■ w wibl 


Salem, SQoam, Betoesda 
and Bethaaia — the names 
trip off toe Welsh Noncon- 
formist tongue, bat the S^KH) 
chapels of Wales are now 
facing their greatest cr isi s 
since toe days of the religious 
revival, when hell-fire preach- 
ers promised eternal damna- 
tion to those who Strayed from 
the narrow oath. 

Today those preachers 
would torn in their graves, for 
mcreaangly the chapels are 
being tarned into bingo halfe, 
storage depots and even, heav- 
en forbid, a brassiere factory. 

A group of academics have 
now formed toe Chapel Heri- 
tage Society to save from 
demolition toe best of toe 


buildings which are failing 
into decay. 

Although toe- chapels are 
basically of toe same oblong 
design, they vary enormossfy 
in their appearance because 
often the money was only 
enough to braid a reasonable 
frontage. This led to some 


“The Trellwyn Methodists 
have built a church. 

Tbe front looks like mi 
abbey, 

Bnt thinking they can fool 
tbe Lord, 

They’re built the back part 
shabby." 

* The Lord presumably, is no 
longer footed because Noncon- 
formist Wales has tamed its 
back on Him and more than 


half the surviving chapels have 
ageing memberships of fewer 
than 25 people. 

Rural depopulation, televi- 
sion, disenchantment with 
warnings of eternal flames for 
minor misdemeanours and a 
general more cynical attitude 
have coahhied to diminish toe 
drape! tradition. 

Within Nonconformity were 
toe seeds of its own fi™nrfai 
destruction, fa the movement 
split into Baptists, Calvinists, 
Wesleyans and a host of other 
denominations. 

In one small North Wales 
village, which has a population 
of fewer than 500, there are 10 
dispels. 

Professor Antony Jones, of 
toe Glasgow School of Art, 


who has produced a hook on 
the subject, believes that con- 
gregations should bury then- 
narrow theological differ- 
ences, decide which chapel in 
dun- area to preserve, 

A spokesman for the Welsh 
Folk Museum, near rarJHf, 
said yesterday: “The crisis Is 
deepening and unless action . is 
taken soon a vital part of the 
heritage of Wales wfll be lost." 

The 4,000 chapels built in 
Wales daring the last ce ntury 
were erected because of the 
revival and disenchantment 
with the English-speaking es- 
tablished church. 

Faced with a new cynical 
age, toe chapels need more 
titan Bread of Heaven. They 
need money. 


Police leaders from. 16Euro- 
pean countries . yesterday 
launched a scathing attack on 
politicians for allegedly hin- 
dering foe battle against inter- 
national terrorism. 

They criticized govern- 
ments for not acting strongly 
enough against toe killers, 
failing to agree on vital extra- 
dition fegisfcmon and prevent- 
ing the police from combating 
toe violence. 

.Htsr Gfaiia Schroder foe 
German president of toe 
Union Jmonationafe des 
Syndicate de Police, said: 
“Countries should take a step 

- back politically and let the 
police get on with toe work" 

If pofice were -pul muter 
political pressure that, often 
resulted m .toe truth being 
obscured. ' 

Heri Schrod er was speaking 
at the t/ISPs . annual confer- 
ence in. Glasgow. The police 
leaders are collectively re- 
sponsible for repres e nting 
600.000 pofice officers ' in 
Weston Europe. ' ■ 

. He said'politicians regularly 
bad foe wrong attitude to 

- - ter rori sm and. only acted con- 

stracrivdy when things bad 
gone too far. 

Herr Schroder added: "We 
should be left tedoftourtiwil 
way, efficiently: and calmly. 

We cannot have politicians 
taking over .as police 
commissioners." ...... 

He saftl .that he and his 
coBeagnes were angry that a 
European accord designed to 
facilitate extradition of terror- 
ists had not been ratified by all 
countries. Great Britain was 
one of the countries which hal 
not vet signed. t 

“That is-why when we hear 
ofdecfaratiansmade in places 
like Tokyo and otter summits 
we find them hardly credible," 
he said. 

“We have to pet to the root 
cause of terrorism., and fast 
When WPC Yvonne Fletcher 
. was shot dead in the streets of 
Britain outside toe Libyan 
embassy that wasn't enough to 
provoke action. When weap- 
ons are being imported from a 

- foreign country in diplomatic 
tegs something must be dote, 
because the police are not 
prepa re d to tolerate it 

“But all of a sudden politi- 
cians do deride to act and 
bombers are sent into a for- , 
eign country. . . 

“We take a very. yery bitter 
attitude towards develop- 
ments onthe terrorism scene, 
especially when some people 
look "upon the death or WPC 
Ffeteberandsay.^Afteralf itis ... 
on^ the death off one 
policewoman'" 

Die conference also de- 
manded Wp for toe pofice to 
take on the European drug 
barons, who were making 
“frightening fortunes" and 
football hooliganism, which 
was spreading, rapidly 
throughout Western Europe. 
Tenor and toe summit, page 9. 

Bishops; 
urge S A 
boycott 

By Ova* Religions .Affairs 
Correspondent 
Roman Catholics are rec- 
ommended not to invest in 
South Africa and to boycott 
South African goods, in a 
repon published today by the 
Catholic bishops of England 
and Wales. - 

The report from the bish- 
ops' committee for interna- 
tional affairs, which has the 
authority of all toe bishops, 
urges “practical steps to influ- 
ence the South African au- 
thorities' to bring about the & 
end of apartheid". 

The bishops quote evidence 
of widespread ill-health 
among South African blades, 
with about a third pf. black 
children stunted in growth. 

Two thirds of the total popula- 
tion have no say nr the 
government, and half, the 
adult population is. illiterate, 
the bishops say, while in 1 984, 
Britain supplied T 3 per cent 
of South Africa’s recorded 
merchandise imports - and 
took 7.8 pa cent of ; its 
exports. 

: Migration and tourism woe 
two other areas where British 
links with South Africa were e 
strong. 

The r e po rt asks: “What can 
foreign governments, business 
interests, public opinion, 
churches and other institu- 
tions- do to contribute to a 
path of change in South Africa 
involving the least possible 

- violence? The overwhelming 
answer to this question given 
by blade South Africans is: 
step supporting apartheid.” . 


Ford Bridgend 
to lose 600 

Ford is to dim its 1,500 4» 
workforce at its Bridgend 
engine plant in South Wales 
by more than 60(7 jobs during 
toe next five years, in a move 
to increase productivity. 








>1 . 


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The Brighton hotel blast trial 


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J toiled plot to 
terror with 16 


< A plot td explode 1 6 bombs 
. around the country was foiled 
When Strathclyde police dis- 
covered what was going on 
and arrested live people in a 
Glasgow flat, the Brighton 
bomb trial jury was told 
yesterday.' 

Mr Roy Amlot was outlin- 
ing the Crown's case on the 
second" day of the trial at the 
Central Criminal Court in 
which a Belfast man, Patrick 


Monday July 29, 1985, to though these are. the setting 
indicate how deadly accurate times and dates'*. Mr Amlot 
this calendar is.” said. 

Against that date was the ■ Ticks indicated that those 
"Time: 1300” with a bombs had already been set 


little *Y* alongside it- and 
“Location London.” Then fol- 
lowed the information,' “First 
floor, 112, Front, Rubens 
Hotel, Buckingham Pal a c e 
Road.” Then followed. “BT 
plus 48”. 

“It is deadly accurate be- 


Ma^ a^d 35, > abused 7f caise <£y 

fi^ ,Un S 1 | ie tfo'^ccthat killed found. the bomb in room 11 %. 

‘ anf i h^°w!fp n ^ ^ ODX of *he Rubens 

“JS 11 B'rifeoftheCluefWtap HoteT, Mr Amlot said. “It 


during the Tory Party conier- 
. ence. on October 12, 1984. 

Mr Magee is also accused of 
murdering the five. Four oth- 
ers, Gerard McDonnei, aged 
34, Peter Sherry, aged -30, 
Martina Anderson, aged 23, 
and Ella O'Dwyer, aged 26. 
deny conspiracy to cause ex- 
" plosions last year. 

In the ground-floor flat- in 
" Glasgow, detectives found on 
. one of the defendants details 
of the Ideation of bombs as 
well as their type,! the exact 
time and date . of explosibn, 
Mr Amlot said. 

They discovered the precise 
position of a bomb placed in 
the Rubens Hotel in Bucking- 
ham Palace Road,' central 
London. Also markdd was the 
exact time and date, July 20, 
of the planned explosion. 

Mr Amlot said, .that in a 
cellar not flu* away from the 
flat, the police found sufficient 
; explosives for the remaining 
15 bombs andseveral time and 
power units (TPUs) marked 
with intended locations and 
dates. The timers inside some 
of the TPUs were set and 
running.' 

“Th«e five defendants con- 
stituted the udits to prepare 
and prime the Bombs” coun- 
sel said. 

The two-bedroom flat in 
Langside Road, Glasgow, had 
been rented nine days before 
by a man and a woman. There 
was a new lock and chain on 
the door. 

“McDonnei had a loaded 
Browning automatic pistol in 
the waistband of his trousers”, 

; Mr Amlot aid. “Tbere was a 
second Browning "pistol in a - 


was running, rt had been set 
and it would have exploded on 
Monday July 29, at almost 
precisely 1300 hours.” 

The letters “BT” meant the 
bomb had been booby- 


Etnd There were initials against 
fol- some of the locations which 
list could relate to the names 
ens some of the defendants used, 
ace In McDonnefs money-belt 
BT an accurate diagram for the 
Rubens Hotel bomb had been 
bo- found. The letters, “MTS”, 
fay stood for “Mercury Tilt 
1 12 Switch", the booby-trap 
ens device. 

“It . Further information seized 
set from McDonnefs money-belt 
on indicated that after the Ru- 
ost bens Hold bomb, a device 
was planned to go off in 
the Torquay on July 30. 
by- Then was to follow a bomb 


trapped. “Anybody touching *■ in Great Yarmouth on July 
“I 31, one in Folkestone on 


Mr Amlot said there was a 
list of 16 locations with the 
group apparently opera ting in 
two separate squads — .“team 
A” and “team B”. 

The sites for “team B” were: 
Brighton Jane25 

Torquay June 11 

Itouraemootit July. 3 

Southampton June 17 

Blackpool . . June 29 

Eastbourne - July! 

it, unless as fortunately was 
the case, it was fay an. explo- 
sives officer, would have set 
the bomb off", counsel added. 

The bomb" had a 48-day 
delay timer. 

Mr Amlot said the letters 
“H” and“B” appeared against 
locations in the bomb calen- 
dar. He said “H” stood for 
hotel. The prosecution could 
not be sure what the “B” 
indicated, but it could be 
“beach”. . 


August 1 one in Margate on 
August 2, one in Southend on 
August 3 and one in South- 
ampton on August 5. 

A week after the arrests, a 
bomb case was discovered by 
plice in the cellar of 17 James 
Grey Street, not far from 
Langside Road. It included six 
TPUs marked with the loca- 
tion and proposed'dates of the 
six remaining 48-day bombs. 
... -Each TPU needed only a 
detonator and explosive to 
complete the bomb. 

Mr Magee had a piece of 
paper with a list of figures and 
letters which. -coincided pre- 
cisely with the bomb calendar. 

It was dear, Mr Amlot said, 
that all five were working as a 
team. Each had a false 
identity. 

Each of the five also had a 
good deal of money mainly, 
totalling more than £10,000. 

Mr Amlot said: “The bomb 


The calendar gave details of cache was not discovered until 
16 locations and dates. Mr six days after their arresL” 


Amlot said: “This was an 
outrageous plot to place 16 
bombs to explode .on consecu- 
tive days except Sundays be- 
tween July 19 and August 5 
last year. 

“The object was to create 
havoc and Bloodshed through- 
out the country.” . 

One bomb had already been 
pjaced and some of the de- 
vices were - to have been 


grey handhag m tfte.latg& of . booby-trapped. 


On June 23, anti-terrorist 
squad officers and an explo- 
sives expert went to the Ru- 
bens Hotel “no distance from 
Buckingham Palace and the 
front of it overlooking the 
Palace Mews”. 

In a bedside cabinet in a 
yellow plastic lunchbox in 
room 112, they found the 
booby-trapped bomb. 

It contained three-and-a- 
half pounds of gefignits simi- 
lar to a type manufactured in 1 


- . the bedrooms.? ’ 7:V- ~ : The first nine bombs had lar to a type manufactured in 

Thehandb^alsp'cdinained 24-day delay timers and the southern Ireland, 
a false Ore passport with Miss - last seven 48-day timers/" It was labelled, with the time 

Andersorfs-phbtc^raph m it.: Mr Amlot said foe calendar it was due To gD offTmaiching 

Mr McDonnel was wearing appeared to show that- the accnrately witii the -bomb 
. around his waist amoney-beb group was operating in two calendar, 
containing what the prosecu- separate squads — “team A” Mr. Amlot sakt “There is 
tion claimed was a' bomb and “team B*Mn the case of overwhelming evidence that 
calendar.^ . ^ . " “team. B” there were dates the materials used to make up 

Mr Amlot sakt “Fm going against six resorts. that bomb came from the 

to go down, the column to . , “It looks- very much, as cache. found in the cellar at 

James Gray Street”. 

WM He alleged that Mr Magee 

booked into the hotel on June 
: 15 using the name T. Morton 
and using an address in 
Woodford Road, Watford. 
His fingerprints were later 
discovered on the hotel regjs- 
. nation card and on the bomb 
‘ calendar. 

Mr Magee denies planting 
• the time-delay device in room 
629 daring September; 1984, 
causing the explosion and 
murdering Mrs Shattock, Mrs 
Muriel MacLean, wife of the 
president of the Scottish Con- 
servative . Association, and 
three others: Sir Anthony 
Berry, aged 59, MP for Enfield 

Sir Anthony Berry and Mrs Jeanne Shattock, who died In Southgate, Mr Eric Taylor, 
the Brighton explosion. aged 54, chairman of the 

__ i • 4 * ii j! i party's north-west area, and 

Tory chief fell through *a wsrwsSS 

spvpii floors of hotel Mr Amlot said Mr and Mrs 


air Auurany owij anu jruiuc ^ihuvu, "w uieu u 

the Brighton explosion. 

Tory chief fell through 
seven floors of hotel 


The “miracukms” escape of 
a Conservative Party official, 
Mr Gordon Shattock, in the 
IRA bond) attack on the 
Grand . Hoed, Brighton, was 
described to tire bomb trial 
jury in the Central Criminal 
Court yesterday. 


terrifying flash that appeared 
to come from the area of the 
bathroom .doorway followed by 
a tremendous noise. 

“He was blown of the bed, 
away from the bathroom. 
There was no floor and he 
started to foil into a pit He 


Mr Shattock, chairm a n of aware of huge concrete 

« rAitemma frnxA « WPCT- - » ■„S o l . UU. 


the Conservative Party's west- 
ern' area, fell from the sixth 
floor to the basement, but was 
able to escape from the rubble, 
Mr Roy Amlot, for the prose- 
cution, said. 

MrShattock's wife, Jeanne, 
aged 52, was one of the five 
people ItiBed in the explosion. 

Mr Amlot said that Mr 
Shattock had been woken by 
noisy guests at .about 230am. 
He and his wife were staying 
in room 628, next fo room 629 
where the prosecution says the 
bomb had beat concealed. 

“Mr. Shattock was only 
dozing st the time of the 
explosion,” Mr Amior said. 
“He W aware m 

the explosion. He recaUeda 


pieces descending with him. 
He fell in a tight bon . end 
finished up right down in the 

basement. 

“Miraculously he found he 
coaid move.” 

Mr Shattock found a way 
onL Bat his wife, who had been 
in the bathroom, was kflled 
instantly when she was blown 
acrosd a corridor into a cop- 
board hi room 638. 

Mr Amlot said a doctor who 
examined Mrs Shattock ’s 
body found pieces of cera mic 
material embedded m her 
which bad dearly come from 
the dividing wall between, the 
bathrooms of rooms 628 and 

629. 


MacLean had spent the time 
between i 1 pm and 1.45 am in 
room 629 drinking with 
friends on the night of the 
explosion. 

“When their friends left 
they went straight to bed and 
to sleep”. Mr Amlot said: 

Mr MacLean was woken by 
the explosion to find himself 
trapped by large ceiling joists, 
plainer and masonry. He had 
dropped almost to the floor 
below.” 

Mr MacLean was rescued 
after about two and a half 
hours.Mrs MacLean was 
Mown into the next room and 
was severely injuredShe died 
a month, la ter. 

Sussex police set out imme- 
diately to trace everyone who 
had stayed m room 629 up to 
48 days before the explosion. 

• They traced everyone ex- 
cept a Roy Walsh, who rave 
an address in Bracksneld 
Road, London SE4. 

The Rearing continues 
today. * . 


Award for worm firm scheme 


For the past six yeare, Mr 
Peter Cowin, a Rea angler 
and zoologist, from Tyneside, 
has been investigating meth- 
ods of producing the worlds 
perfect rag worm. 

From harvestag ordinary 
earthworms for anglers bait, 
the 26 -year-old entrepreneur 
now plans to breed 
rag worms a year at Britain s 
first rag worm farm- ; 
Yesterday Mr Cowm, a 

post-graduate of 

CfofcSs fry, & 

dent Industrial Sooe^ 

£1,090 innovation vor 

ness Award, foLomfo^, ■ 

Prou dly tfepfe gg; 

est snperwfons, bred |n ao- 


oratory conditions; on a secret 
protern diet in Newcastle upon 
Tyne, Mr Cowin said he 
planned .to make his first 
mfliion pounds throng selling 
fishing bait by 1990. 

He wifl plough Ms £2,000 
award into the £250,000 in- 
vestment in Ms company, 
Seatbafc which wilf be set up 
early next year. 

Ho father, Mr Kenneth 
Cowin. and Dr Peter OOve, an 
expert in marine inverteb rates , 
also of Newcastle University, 
are Involved in the venture, 
which aims to supply a third of 
Britain's rag worms. 

**At present wild ragwonns 
are harvested fa the North- 


east or imported from Ireland, 
retailing at between £12 and 
£26a kflo. Bm my worms, bred 
m optimum laboratory and 
outdoor conditions, will cost 
much less,” Mr Cowin said. 

Not surprisingly, Ms post- 
graduate studies are on the 
aqua-culture of the rag worm, 
a marine version of the earth 
worm, which can grow to three 
feet in length. 

Mr Cowin said be had tried 
countless diets, fndoding 
newspaper, to produce the 
perfect formula for the worms. 
He plans to rarest part of Ms 
expected £560,000 turnover 
nest year into research. 


THETlMto inUkbDAy inriV 

Free local 
calls idea 
for phone 
kiosks 

By Bin Johnstone 
Technology Correspondent 

Local calls from telephone 
kiosks could be made free and 
the costs of the network could 
be subsidized by the revenue 
from advertising billboards, 
under a plan to privatize call 
boxes compiled by a CVoydon- 
based company of computer 
experts. 

■The company. Real Time 
I Associates, has called on Brii- 
; ish Telecom to sefl or fran- 
i cfaise its kiosk network, which 
the computer experts claim 
can make money instead of 
losing millions each year. 

In the financial year 1984- 
85 the network of 76,500 
public telephone kiosks lost 
£42 million, despite collecting 
£162 million in revenue. 

The Croydon company has I 
put its plans to Oftel (Office of 
Telecommunications), the 
telephone consumer watch- 
dog. These plans contain a 
number of ideas to change the 
economics of the call boxes. 

They include: 

• Unking rural telephone 

boxes to local exchanges by 
using cellular radio, the tech- 
nology now used in car tele- 
phones, Greta Scacchi, star of Heat 

• Issuing subscribers with of-the new Channel 4 seas 

telephone cards for use in „ 

kiosks. The call is billed to the I |T*€1 TTIO TA1 
subscriber along with domes- ^ ttUlil 1U1 
tic caHs. The card system Channel 4's summer sched= 
would reduce the number of nfes, starting later this month, 
kiosks vandalized for money, are intended to mfltwmtn its 

• Ins t all i n g three times as ratmgs by bolstering drama 
many kiosks in urban areas as and documentary content 

at present, to encourage great- Among 12 new drama seri- 
er use and minimize lost sales als is the award-miming Three 
through vandalized call boxes. Sovereigns for Sarah* starring 

• Providing operational costs Vanessa Redgrave, a true 

of the service from the rove- story about the Salem witch 
nue paid by advertisers. trials. 

• Fire local telephone calls. The season opens with a six- 

British Telecom has a duty part examination of television 

under its licence to provide called Open the Bax, which 
the public call box network. It includes footage of 
is not clear whether BT could filmwi by a concea l ed camera 
“sub-contract** that as they watched television, 
responsibility. A timely three-part doco- 


HUivic Ncvva 



Greta Scacchi, star of Heat and Dart, at yesterday's laun c h 
of-the new Channel 4 season (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 

Drama for Channel 4 

Channel 4's rammer sched± mentary in June called Too 
ules, starting late' this month. Hot to Handle investigates the 
are intended to maintain its dangers of nsdear power and 
ratings by bolstering drama the risks and myths ssrround- 
and documentary content mg radiation. 

Among 12 new drama serf- Mr Jeremy Isaacs, the 
als is the award-wimung Three company's chief executive. 
Sovereigns for Sarah, starring said be expected Channel 4 to 
Vanessa Redgrave, a true bold its 10 per cent share of I 
story about the Salem witch viewing, ahead of BBC 2, now : 
trials. that “roe raooker tidal wave” 

The season opens with a six- had passed, 
part examination of television Films include the first trie- 
called Open the Bax, which vision screenings of Heat and 
includes footage of families Oust, Paris Texas, Raging Bull 
filmed by a concealed camera and Wetkerby, as wefl asa 20- 
as they watched television. film tribute to James Cagney 
A timely three-part does- in Angnst 


Gold gang 
‘cleaned 
out 9 banks 
court told 

The gang disposing of gold 
from Bmajn’s biggest robbery 
“cleaned out” local banks in 
the West Country when thev 
withdrew £10 million in c&sn 
in a matter of weeks, a court 
was told yesterday. 

“There wasn't enough mon- 
ey left to pay them and the 
Bank of England stepped in,” 
Mr Michael Corkery. QC, for 
the prosenttion. said at the 
Central Criminal Court. 

Mr Kenneth Noye^ged 38. 
a company director, of Holly- 
wood Cottage. School Lane. 
West Kingsdown, KenLis al- 
leged to be the mastermind of 
the gold “laundering" opera- 
tion. 

The court was told that 
when Mr Noye was ques- 
tioned about his alleged in- 
volvement in the disposal of 
£26 million in gold bullion 
stolen by armed robbers from 
a Brinks-Mat vault at 
Heathrow Airport in Novem- 
ber 1983, he said that his life 
would be in danger if he 
talked. 

The police found 11 gold 
bare at Mr Noye’s house- 
Mr Noye is accused with 
Brian Reader, aged. 45, a 
dealer, of Winn Road. Grove 
Park, south-east London: Mi- 
chael Lawson, aged 37, a 
company director, of Top 
Danfora Road Hextable, 
Kent; Thomas Adams, aged 
25. an asphalier, of 
Grantbridge Street, Islington, 
north London; Matteo 
Constantino, aged 66. a jewel- 
ler. of High Road Whetstone; 
Garth Chappell, aged 42, a 
director, of Stonewalls. Litton, 
Somerset; and Terence Patch, 
aged 41, a contractor, of Vee 
Road Felton. Bristol. 

They all plead, not guilty to 
conspiring with others to han- 
dle stolen gold between No- 
vember 1983 and February 
last year. All except Mr 
Lawson further deny conspir- 
ing to evade value-added fax. 
The trial continues today. 


Eating-out [ § 

survey T i 

puts steak , § 

at the top ’ 

British taste is slow to 
change, but salad is now as Jl_ 

popular as chips, according to ie & 

a coontrywide survey, of the an V h ° ^ 

nation's eating-out habits. 7*® 

Today's issue of Caterer and f IS . 

Bote I keeper reports that ky* ,lL 

prawn cocktail Is still by far the ' “ 

the favourite starter, and steak tan f 

the first choice as main coarse. the 

Of 996 people interviewed ght . 

more than an eighth ate out fay , “ 

once a week, and more than list ^ 

four rat of 10 once a month, p 

but there was a marked reluc- ihe cojn - 

lance to leave a tip. an- ..Ljjv" 

One victim of changing taste the ‘ 

is Black Forest gateau. For Jng JL n j£ 
years this held top place as the iun 

nation's favourite dessert, but werc 

suddenly if is chosen by only 5 a ■[ ex- 
percent of customers, on a par Jr . 

with biscuits and cheese. lSes 

Londoners eat out more Ias 

than anyone rise, but claim to 
have the largest share of rode 
and arrogant waiters. Scots m 

have a disproportionate liking l ° » iar- 

for soap and for broccolL S °f a 

People in Wales and the n S* di«i 

South-west were most likely to by r “ jst 

experiment when eating out, ler- co, o- 

and least likely to tip. North- wn nl ns- 

erners are increasing their [aff foe 
consumption of steaks, while im afon -. 

the South-east and East An- 
glia have developed a taste for ^ iclise 

cheesecake. r H< 


Camera will 
fight cancer 


Better treatment of cancer 
patients was promised yester- 
day, thanks to a new £200,000 
camera which will help scien- 
tists to find the most effective 
way of killing tumours. 

The camera, installed at 
Charing Cross Hospital, Lon- 
don, will monitor “magic 
bullet” therapy, in which anti- 
bodies armed by radioactivity 
or drags home in on cancer 
cells nod destroy them.- Until 
now researchers have not been 
able to see exactly how effec- 
tive the. treatment is. 


ad 

= • of 
Bnt- j 0 

rican h e 


A POSITIVE MESSAGE ON CHERNOBYL FROM 


FRIENDS OF THE EARTH... 








happen again. 


The nuclear accident happened , 
2000 miles away. Yet we in Britain 
were still warned not to drink 
fresh rainwater. 

What does that say about the 
likely effects of a similar accident 
here? 

And does anyone now doubt 
that it could happen? 

Of course we are tempted to 
say "We told you so," for we warned 
at the Windscale Inquiry we warned 
at the Sizewell Inquiry we have 
warned for fifteen years that there 
was danger in the combination of 
human fallibility and technology with 
such unprecedented capacity for 
environmental harm. 

But there’s no satisfaction in 
being proved right on this issue. 

What matters is that a similar disaster 
in Britain is as avoidable as it is at 
present predictable. 

Nuclear power amounts to 
only four per cent of Britain's energy 
supply. 

Think about it. 

. . .all that danger, all that cost, 
all the unsolved problems of waste 
for just four per cent of our energy. 

When we have 300 years' 
supply of coal. 


When we have North Sea Oil. 

When we have North Sea Gas. 

When we haven’t even started 
to conserve energy. 

When we haven't even started 
to explore alternative energy sources 
. . .such as sun, wind and waves. 

You now know that the human 
cost of nuclear energy is too high. 
This is the time to add your voice to 
ours. Demand that no more nudear 
power stations are built. 

So, join us now. Or at least give 
us financial support. Someone has to 
speak on your behalf — we have the 
expertise and experience to do it. 


; I W5WTTO JOIN THE CAMEMGN FOR SAFER 
| ENERGY IN BRITAIN 

| Here is my contribution of 

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| I also want to join Friends of the Earth 


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I -d 









THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


Tokyo commitment 


Nationals in Libya • Education 


COMMENTARY 



El A1 bomb incident 
discussed with 
Syrian ambassador 


Summit pledge of action 


INVESTIGATIONS 

The Syrian Ambassador had 
called at the Foreign Office last 
week at the Government's re- 
quest and on May 5 at his own 
request. Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
Secretary of State for Foreign 
and Commonwealth Affairs, 
said during Commons question 
time when asked to confirm a 
story in The Times that a Syrian 
diplomat was to be expelled. 

I can say only (he said) that in 
connexion with a police in- 


terrorism. 

Mr Merlyn Rees (Leeds, South 
and Morley. Lab); Would the 
intention at Tokyo and in 
Europe to limit the number of 
diplomats from certain coun- 
tries require an amendment of 
the Treaty of Vienna? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: No. For 
example two years ago we took 
action in relation to the total or 
near total establishment at the 
Libyan People’s Bureau and 
more recently asked for a reduc- 
tion of numbers and will con- 
tinue to do so in suitable cases. 
Mr Robert Jackson (Wantage, 


vesugaiion involving custody of Q; There is reason to welcome 
a man called Hindawi charged 
with conspiracy to murder and 
an attempt to destroy an aircraft 
in service, investigations are 
continuing. 1 cannot say any- 
thing that would prejudice the 
judicial process. 

I can confirm that we dis- 
cussed the El A1 bomb incident 
with him. I can go no further 
while investigation is 
continuing. 

Mr David Sumberg (Bury 
South. C). who raised the issue, 
asked if the decisions reached at 
Tokyo relating to terrorism 
would be extended to all coun- 
tries engaged in state-sponsored 

terrorism 

Sir Geoffrey Howe said other • „ 

govemments were well aware of 

the Government's commitment abavt Syrian diplomat? 
to measures of this kind. It was the anion being taken against 
dear the measures agreed in terrorism in the Middle East but 
Tokyo and in Europe were that is not dealing with the cause 
intended to be annlied in suit- which is the Palestinian 


dear the measures agreed in terrorism in the Middle East but 
Tokyo and in Europe were that is not dealing with the cause 
intended to be applied in suit- which is the Palestinian 
able proven cases to other proble m^ 
examples of state-sponsored Sir Geoffrey Howe: The search 


for progress in the peace process, 
in the Middle East continues but 
it must be said the procedures 
for that process are not looking 
- too hopeful, but we continue to 
look for them. 

Sir Geoffrey Johnson Smith 
(Wealden. C): In dealing wixh 
terrorism it is vital to get 
agreement in extradition proce- 
dures. Would he take steps to 
persuade America of the. im- 
portance we attach to the Senate 
passing the Extradition Treaty 
Bill? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe; ! entirely 
agree with that point. 

The Prime Minister and I 
underlined to the President and 
the Secretary of Stave the im- 
portance we attach to the 
ratification of that treaty. They 
left us in no doubt of the 
commitment of the administra- 
tion to that end and they and we 
are doing everything possible to 
secure the right- answer from 
Congress. 

Mr Donald Stewart (Western 
Isles, SNPk Would he exercise 
caution even in the justifiable 
indictment of Libya so that he 

does not fall into the trap of 
putting all the Arab nations 
against us to satisfy the aims of 
. the United Siaies-Israel axis? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: There is no 
question of this Government 
taking any action to satisfy the 
aims of that or any other axis. It 
would be wrong to allow the 
justifiable condemnation of Lib- 
yan state directed terrorism to 
lead us into conflict with any 
other Arab state. 


TERRORISM 


Does- the Foreign Secretary 
share the view of President 
Reagan and Vice-President 
Bush that Syria would be a 
suitable candidate for unilateral 
American action possibly 
involving sea-launched cruise 
missiles? 


Most of question time to 
Foreign Office ministers was 
occupied by exchanges about 
international t er ror ism . During 
these Mr GreviUe Janner 
(Leicester West, Lab) pointed 
out that Libyan planes were sriH 
permitted to land in this coun- 
try. Why? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: There are a 
few air services between Libya 
and most other countries of 
Western Europe. There is still a 


Out »hat happened over, the . .. tries . and . the . difference*., so 
incident of the BeU Shipping -which the Nicaraguans are en- 
Line executive who was stopped gaged in the frontiers' of 
at Dublin airport with £300.000 Nigaragua. 
in his suitcase, who was working * 

in conjunction with Control Mr Nicholes win 
Risks, a London company? (Macclesfield, Ck Perns 

was being taken into the Repub- 
lic of Ireland? . ' might encounter, bear 

Sir Geoffrey Howei if ms fects the sad expend 

are correct they certainly te- Colombo at the end i 
serve attention, whether by the \ ftad two cohsti 

proseadion authorities or by the . Mr ^ Mrs French, wfa 
Secretary of State for Northern j n ^ plane which blew. 

Ireland or myself I do not fortunately escaped 
know. . Injury. 

Mr David Atkinson (Bourne- . 

mouth East, Ck When be does Sfr i 
meet his Irish counterpart wiE. 
be ask when he proposes to put 

to an end to his country's ad vtce about specific jjr 
counter trade with Libya of food 

for arms for the IRA? for ^people . abou t to to 


Or does he share the view of substantial British community 


Prime Minister Craxi of Italy 
that further unilateral action 
against a state which sponsored 
terr orism would be a breach of 
the agreement reached in 
Tokyo? 


tly in Libya who are dependent to 
aa some extern on these services, 
ed including those coming from 
of this country. We have taken 
in account of all the circumstances 
and the point has not been yet 


Or does be share the view of 
prime Minister Nakasone of 
Japan that every country has the 
right to interpret the Tokyo 
communique as they wish? 

These three questions were 
put in the Commons to Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, Secretary of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, by Mr Denis 
Healey, chief Opposition 
spokesman, who after putting 
them, added to Labour cheers 
and laughter What is left of the 
Prime Minister’s neat achieve- 
ments in Tokyo after that? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe dismissed it 
all as a confusing question. It 
would be interesting to know, he 
commented, what alternative 
proposition Mr Healey fa- 
voured. Did he or did he not 
wish to see effective inter- 
national action against terror- 
ism? In' Tokyo there was a 
commitment to effective inter- 
national action which was not 
related to prospects of military 
action. 



Mr Nicholas Winterteo 
(Macdcsfieid, Q: Perhaps his 
department might do mare to 
advise people m this country 
who are going w countries such 
as Sri Lanka on the dangers they 

might encounter, bearing in 
mind the sad experience at 
Colombo at the end of last 
week? I Kad two constituents, 
Mr and Mrs French, who were 
in the plane which blew up but 
fortunately escaped serious 
injury. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe; I tmder- 



to hSscoumtry's advks about, specific probto 
with Libya of food that might arise. There is a ceed 
he ERA’ for . people about to travel to 

study conditions in the country 
Howe: I have no they are to visiL 


Sir Geoffrey Howe: .1 have no 
evidence whatever to suggest 
that the Government of the 
Republic of Ireland is concerned 
in the supply of arms to the LRA. 


Mr Alan Berth (Berwick-npon- 
. - . , . Tweed, Lk Syria provides a 

in the supply ofarmsxo the IRA. haven for some particularly 

iiff. M m ruthless terrorists. If he rcc- 

Mr Norman Goranan (Greenock ■ that wnnld te favour 

and Port Glasgow, Lab); There 

terrorism. Has the Foreign Sec- „ 

retary m recent times brought to ^ treomey now t; n 
the attention of Mr Shultz the . surra we feronred at foe 
deep disquiet, felt 1 by many " conference and by the ( 
people in this country concern- 
jng American Sponsored terror- effective actions art out 
ism in Nicaragua? “ «** communique u 

and by the European < 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: There is a city. Whether or not a i 


CampbeU-Saroors: Insurance 
assi sti ng terrorism 
reached where that situation 
should be changed. 

Mr Dale Cam pbdl-Sa vo • 
(Workington. Lab): Those gov- 
ernments who refuse w act to 
ban kidnap insurance assist 
terrorism. Would he meet with 
the Irish foreign minister to find 


Sfr Geoffrey Howe; The mea- 
sures we favoured at the summit 
conference and by the Commu- 
nity countries are the coBedive 
effective actions set out is detail 
in the communique in Tokyo 
and tv the European Commu- 
nity. Whether or not a measure 


total difference between those should be taken against a given 
terrorist organizations dedi- slate depends on whether that 
cared to the infliction of in- state is involved in t errorism so 
discriminate damage on as to make the response sng- 
innooem people in third coun- gested suitable- 


Inheritance tax clause approved 


Liberals suggest education re-think 


FINANCE BILL 


The clause of the Finance Bill bad sugge 
putting into effect the structural fer tax w 
changes that .convert capital few other 
transfer tax into inheritance was that way. 
approved in the Commons by 
206 votes to 114 - Government 1 ne 

- SEi 

Dr Oonagta McDonald, an their ass 
Opposition spokesman on Trea- lifetime. ; 


sury and economic affairs, said 
when the committee stage of the 
Bill was resumed, that the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer 
bad suggested that capital trans- 
fer tax was anti-enterprise, but 
few other countries viewed it in 


The tax would not fall on the businessmen and everyone else 
super-rich. They would be in a to order their affairs in terms of 
position to make disposals of ti* e i f °'Y I 1 interests rather 


the not-so-rich members of the 
community, but even there the 
tax avoidance business was 
already underway. 

Mr Peter Brooke. Minister of 
State. Treasury, said the legisla- 
tion conferred freedom on 
businessmen and everyone else 
to order their affairs in terms of 


their assets during their own 
lifetime. At best it would fell on 


than takir 
because of 


| decisions simply 
iscaJ imperatives. 


Bill to ban plastic 
bullets rejected 

^ to the rest of the UK. 

POI IPIN(3 Displaying one of the bullets 

rULiUliiu l0 ^ House, be asked how 

„ '■ many more would have to die 

Plastic bullets could become a before the use of this lethal and 
necessary tool for the police in barbaric weapon was abolished. 


Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Debate on 
crime prevention. 

Lords (3); Gas Bill, committee, 
third day. 


HOUSE OF LORDS 

The great debate on education 
had turned into a slanging 
m natch — a debacle, lady 
Secar, leader of the Liberal 
peers, said when she opened a 
House of Lords debate on the 
situation in schools. 

She declared: We are felling 
lamentably to deliver the goods 
educationally. If we do not 
improve our educational 
achievements we shall deicine 
economically and will not re- 
cover socially. 

The events of the past 12 to 15 
months were made all the more 
sad because in some ways they 
had the most creative and 


Education that they had had for 
a long time. 

Some of his ideas (she said) 
have been of the kind that we 
welcome greatly. 

The dispute had meant that a 
seat many children had been 
deprived of education which 
they were entitled to receive and 


tion and to put forward sugges- 
tions on how. they could raise 
the level of debate on this 
subject which had sunk so 
lamentably low in the past few 
years. 

Lord McIntosh of Haringey, for 
the Opposition, said that the 
present position had been 


which they needed. It bad meant arived at as a result of a number 
that a great many parents had of years of devaluing the im- 


been extremely anxious about 
their children' s educational 


poriance of education and the 
resources which needed to be 


prospects and consequent career given to it. It was a shocking 
prospects. It had also meant that situation that for the first time 


many people had been dis- 
couraged from entering the 
teaching profession. 

Calling for a re-think on 
education, she suggested the 
setting up of an all-party 
committee of the House to 


concerned Secretary of State for examine the problems of educa- 


defence expenditure had over- 
taken educational expenditure. 

It was-the deliberate policy of 
the Government to restrict the 
resources available to educa- 
tion, using the excuse of felling 
rolls and ignoring the 
overwhelming evidence of the 


increasing need for further re- 
sources and farther attention to 
be paid to the educational 
system. 

. Nearly one-tfiird of the 
schools had leaking roofs and 
other defects, a quarter stilt had 
outside tofleu and a third were 
overcrowded despite falling 
rolls.. 

Lord Kirkwood (SDP). in a 
maiden speech, said science 
graduates did not want to go 
into secondary school teaching 
because the morale of the pro- 
fession' was at an all-time low. 
Teachers felt undervalued ty 
society and that was reflected in 
their low pay scales. 

The Bishop of London (Dr 
Graham Leonard) said ther was 
too much gloom and doom in 
education. 


Arms supply inquiry sought 


terrorism and maintain- Opposing the Bin. Sir Eldon MIDDl F PACT 

Im* order in the fiitiirr CriflWKr c. oam. IIIIMWW» Wlw ■ 


ing public order in the future, Griffiths (Bury St fidmwMfc O 
Sir Eldon Griffiths, par- said the polire were entitled to 
liaraentary adviser to the Police have all necessary means of 


Federation, said 
Mr Dennis Cana van (Falkirk 
West. Lab) had sought leave, 
under the 10-minute rule proce- 
dure. -to bring in a Bill to 


protecting themselves and the 
public against the attacks of 
violent men in view of the 
increased use of guns by crim- 
inals and of petrol bombs in 


prohibit the useof plastic bullets demonstrations and riots, 
tn the UK. The motion was The Association of Chief 
rejected by 184 votes to 85 votes Police Officers had been looking 
— majority. . _ at the pros and cons of baton 


ne Mid plastic bullets had rounds. The experience of the 


- caused blinding, paralysis, brain 


Northern Ireland 


damage and death. If their use showed that, selectively used. 


was allowed to continue in 
Northern Ireland it was only a 


they could and did make riot 
control easier and safer and 


matter of time before it spread could and did save lives. 


The Opposition demanded dur- 
ing question time in the Com- 
mons that inquiries be made 
into allegations that arms were 
being procured in Britain for use 
in the Iran-Iraq war, and that a 
house in Victoria Street, Lon- 
don. near the House of Com- 
.mons. was being used for the 
export of arms to Iraq. 

Mr Donald Anderson, an Oppo- 
sition spokesman on foreign and 
Commonwealth affairs, asked: 
How does the minister reconcile 
his declared policy on arms with 


the supply of Chieftain spare 
parts? 

What investigation has the 
Government made of allega- 
tions that a building in Victoria 
Street is the main entrepot for 
the procurement of arms for 
Iraq? 

He also asked what applica- 
tion had been made for the 
extradition to the United States 
of people for supplying arms to 
Iran. What investigation bad 
been made about the illegal use 
of the diplomatic bag by Iran for 
the export of arms? 

Mr Timothy RentoaMinister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, replied: Recently 
no new applications for the 


export of arms which would 
significantly prolong theconflict 
on either' side has been ap- 
proved or given an export 
licence. 

On the question of Iran 
procurement, if it is wished to 
export any war material, it 
would have to be covered by an 
export licence. We have not 
received any applications. 

If we obtained any evidence 
of illegal activities, we should 
take the appropriate steps with- 
out delay. 

I am not aware of any United 
States request for extradition, 
but I should pass it to the Home 
Secretary to look into. 


Risks taken by those who work in Libya 


PROTECTION 

British citizens who continued to 
live and work in Libya did so at 
their own risk. Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, Secretary of State for 
Foreign and Commonwealth Af- 
fairs, said during Commons 
questions. Their protection 
could not be the only consid- 
eration of foreign policy, bat Ik 
hoped the day would never cook 
when the Government was heed- 
less of their safety. 

There was no doubt the risk 
from terrorism to innocent peo- 
ple would be more likely to 
increase in the case of inaction 
by countries such as Britain. 

Our consistent advice since 
April 1984 (he said) has been 
that British citizens choosing to 
live and work in Libya do so on 


consular assistance and protec- 
tion is limited. 

We have more recently ad- 
vised the withdrawal of depen- 
dants and non-essential staff. 
Our consol in Tripoli is in close 
contact with representatives of 
the British community which 
now numbers around 3.500. 

Mr Richard Douglas (Dunferm- 
line West. Labg In view of 
recent statements by the US 
President and Vice President in 
relation to the possibility — 
indeed probability — of the US 
taking action against state-spon- 
sored ter r ori sm in other coun- 
tries. what advice is the Foreign 
Office giving to British nationals 
in Syria, Iran, Iraq and 
elsewhere? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: Our advice 
to travellers in all areas where 
tension is increased or where the 
risk of terrori st violence is 
substantial — for example in 


their own responsibility and that certain parts of Beirut - is that 


Science report 

Fresh clues to the 
cause of acid rain 

By John Newall 



Research at Lancaster Uni- 
versity is showing that the 
devastating effects of add rain 
are due to more than sulphuric 
and nitric adds formed in the 
atmosphere from sulphur di- 
oxide and nitrogen dioxide, 
SO’ and NO 2 . 

The Lancaster team led by 
Professor Terry Mansfield 
Imre experimentally exposed 
plants and trees to the same 
concentrations of SO? and 
NO 2 as those found In forests 
devastated by add rain, bat 
found they had little or no 
effect. 

This led the scientists to 
conclude other factors must be 
at work. Now they have grow- 
ing evidence to suggest rim* 
these extra factors are ex- 
tremely low tempera tores in 
the winter and relatively' high 
ozone concentrations formed 
by sunlight acting on hydro- 
carbon gases in the summer. 

If the research proves the 
case against winter tempera- 
tures ami ozone; then the most 
likely conclusion is that while 
add rain weakens plants and 


trees, they are actually killed 
by winter temperatures, ozone 
and possibly other factors. 

Snch findings wonld 
strengthen the case for limit- 
ing e mi ssi o ns from oil refiner- 
ies and vehicle exhausts as 
well as from coal and oil 
burning power stations and 
domestic and indastrial fires 
and furnaces. 

Refineries and vehicle ex- 
hausts are the main sources of 
the hydrocarbons from which 
ozone is formed by sunlight. 

The T-flnfftgfof team nw; 
four experimental green- 
houses which can be filled with 
any desired mix of air pins 
various pollutants ami set to 
any required temperature. 

During the past few months 
they have been exposing 
plants and trees to air contain- 
ing SCfc and NOi at the levels 
found in areas devastated by 
acid rain, while at foe same 
time Mowing in cold air to 
bring foe temperature rapidly 
down to -6C.INext they wfll 
reproduce the summer 
conditions. 


they have to make their own 
judgements at their own risk and 
responsibility. 

Mr Cyril Townsend 
(Bexley heath. Ck As be wonld 
not wish to have British na- 
tionals expelled from Libya 
solely on foe grounds of their 
being British, will be confirm 
that no Libyan students will be 
expelled from this country solely 
on foe grounds of their bring 
Libyan? Their training in this 
country is vary much in our long 
terra interest. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: Action 
taken in respect of Libyans, 
whether students or otherwise, 
resident in this country is taken 
mi the basis of evidence and 
grounds of security consid- 
erations and not on the basis of 
any general categorization. 

Mr Alan Beith (Berwick-upon- 
Tweed, Lk Does he believe that 
British nationals, whether at 
borne or abroad, are safer from 


Fire death 
mystery 
of family 

A father told an inquest 
yesterday about the night that 
the woman with whom he was 
living, her four children and a 
family friend died in a fire at 
their Manchester home. 

John Allison was awoken 
shortly after going to bed by 
the family friend. Karen Dun- 
lop. aged 16, who helped to 
look after the children. “She 
I said she could smell smoke." 

The girl stayed upstairs with 
the rest of the family while Mr 
Allison dashed to a neigh- 
bour’s house to raise the 
alarm. 

Mrs Gloria Heap, the wom- 
an with whom he was living, a 
divorcee, her four children 
and Karen all died in the fire 
on February 19 at the semi- 
detached house in Moston. 
Greater Manchester. 

Mr Leonard Gorodkin, the 
city coroner, said all the 
victims died from carbon 
monoxide poisoning. - 

He said: “It was a most 
terrible tragedy for a family to 
be wiped out like this. The 
cause of the fire seems to 
remain something of a 
mystery. 

He recorded verdicts of 
accidental deaths in all cases. 


terrorism bow than before the 
bombing raid or does he share 
the assessment of Mr George 
Shultz, US Secretary of State, 
that Colonel Gadaffi may be 
more dangerous now than 
before? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: I have not 
seen (hat particular assessment 
but there is ao doubt that foe 
risk of terrorism and injury to 
innocent people as a result of it 
would be more likely to increase 
in the case of inaction by 
countries such as our own 
Mr Andrew MacKay (Berkshire 
East, C) said some people wonld 
not be particularly sympathetic 
to British nationals who found 
themselves in difficulties in 
Libya as the dangers had been 
made abundantly dear to them 
and they were extremely fool- 
hardy to go there at this time. 
Sir Geoffrey Howe I understand 
the point. We have no legal 
means of preventing British 


citizens visiting or remaining in 
Libya, but our advice to them 
has been very dear. 

Mr Ernest Ross (Dundee West, 
Labk WiD he make it quite dear 
that British nationals who have 
mart-fed Libyans and now five in 
Libya wfll have no impediment 
pot in their way, or the way of 
their families, when they wish tn 
visit relatives? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: In today's 
world many people are parties to 
cross-natiosal marriages of that 
kind and governments have to 
treat them sympathetically. 
There is no question, of any 
retaliation or measures by oar- 
selves against others solely be- 
cause of their nationality or 
marital status. 


EEC BUDGET 


Called on during question time 
is foe Commons to Hock any 
proposal to increase foe EEC 
limit of 1.4 per cent VAT, Mrs 
Lynda Chancer, Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, replied that any 
such proposal wonld require the 
unanimous agreement of the 
member states and approval by 
national parliaments. She saw 
no sign of that happening. 

Mr Antony Maricro (Northamp- 
ton North, C) asked if she could 
confirm that if. the European 
Community were to come up 
with a budget that raised foe 
ceiling the Government would 
turn this down flat. 

Mrs Chalken He is dreaming 
dreams of things be might like to 
happen and we intend to ensure 
should not happen. If a fetter 
supplementary budget were to 
come forward it would depend on 
exactly why ft had come forward. 

There has been a 25 per cent fell 
in the value of the dollar against 
the ECU (European Unit of 
Account) that could not have 
been foreseen. We have to cope 
with reality and not blind theory. 

Sbe added later that they had 
to ensure that the EEC Budget 
Council rigorously scrutinized 


NICARAGUA 


The Contras and Nicaraguans 
who have resorted to armed 
struggle against their own gov- 
ernment did not seek to advance 
their cause by terrorist acts in 
third countries. IVfr Timothy 
Eggar, Undersecretary of State 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 

Afifeirs, said during Commons ,, uuini uacwivmrjniKic 
quesuon time exchanges these days one hears, com- 

Mr Denis Healey, chiefOppo* plaints about hospital cots. . 
si tion spokesman on foreign and The more local foe issue .the 

Commonwealth affairs, had more 7 Mis ShlyMn appears to 
£“L tbe be at home With iL Her range, 

ter- 

'KUSrtf&a autor, d* 

States in a most blatant form of Ryedale Conservative, is the 


Geoffrey Smitii 


- The Hg tiffiereace between 
foe by-efection campaigns hi 
RyedaJe and WestEterbysfclre 
fies not in the strength of foe 
Co nse r vati ves, but in foe 
strength of Labour. . 

In both constituencies, there 
is a groundsneff of protesx 
against foe Government Bht 
m West Derbyshire, fife has 
up .to now been fejriy evenly 
divided between Liberal and 
Labour. 

The question tfere is wheth- 
er- fe foe fmai days of the 
campaign it has been, possible 
far foe liberals , to persuade 
enough Labour waverexs to 
switch their voles to defeat foe 
Conservative. 

. In Rv-edafe, however, the 
Lffteral b widely, seen as the 
ebriaas candidate to support if 

the Conservative . is to be 
beaten. As I have been round 
foe doorsteps in parts of fob 
large and varied constituency, 
I have been left in no doubt 
that Mhe. Elizabeth Shields is 
garnering most of the aati- 


: That is the liberal 
Party, despite a halfhearted 
attempt at seemly public cau- 
tion, ts privately confident of 
victory. The Liberals will now 
suffer* blow if they faflto win. 


Drumbeat of 
anxiety 


U is because they nay 
strengthen foe tendency for 
foe protest vote to concentrate 
era the liberals that Hre Con- 
servatives have beta Tenting 
their indignation on the Gal- 
ltxp poll conducted for York- 
shire Tdevisftmand foe Daily 
Telegraph. 

Thb poll, potting the Uber- 
ais eight points ahead bt 
Ryedale, which strikes even 
them as a bit too good to be 
trn^ may not Iom foe Conser- 
vatives any rotes. It may even, 
as foe y gfaan, harden foe 
determination of foeir sup- 
porters to go to foe polls. 

But it is also likely to 
confirm the belief, that a vote 
far foe / Liberal candidate 
would be wefi worthwhile for 
the disgnintfed. 

. Much of foe disgrontiement 
in Ryedale seems to come from 
local issues. Or, as Mr David 
Steel prefers to " think of it, 
from foe load consequences of 
national policies. 

Always in foe background, 
there is foe drumbeat of 
anxiety on unemployment. To 
fids is added worry over load 
bus services,’ foe schools, 
small farms, and the proposed 
closure of the FUey Coast- 
goard Station. The pensioners 

are resentful about foe modes- 
ty of foefrrise, and everywhere 


most articulate and assured ol 
the three candidates on nation- 
al questions - though he is 
liable to put his foot in it bn 
occasion. 

drug running plotting toe WKt Derbyshve Lib- 

murder of an American ambas- Mr Christopher 

sador in central America? Walmstey, would be more 
So. long as President Reagan likely than Mrs Shields to 
supports such activities he has make an impact at Westimn- 
no right to claim to be an ster, I believe, if he can 


state terrorism, since the 
Contras engage in horrifying 
alrocitieSy including torture 'and 
mutilatioii. against innocent 
women and children and are 
now being accused in the US of 
drug winning and plotting the 
murder of an American ambas- 
sador in central America? 

So long as President Reagan 
supports such . activities he has 


Dickens SS&SeSXK 
the effort shouldbe mM>s to stop 

Q sy ddte safety ^p^ses at source so that they 
did aoteat up the large amount 


opponent of state terrorism. 

Mr Eggar? Mr Healey is trying 
to draw a parallel which does 
not stand up to any examination 
between US action in Libya and 
in Nicaragua. In Libya Gadaffi 
has committed the Libyan Gov- 
ernment to organizing and 
directing a world-wide cam- 
paign. of terrorist violence 
against innocent people outside 
Libya. 


manage to get elected. • 


Knows her 
te 


Yet Mrs Shields has the 
kind of qualities that -can 
easily be underestimated. 
While sbe is unlikely ever to 
win an election through the 
drama of IMS' campaign, sbe is 



Saleroom 


£117,096 paid for 
surrealist box 

ByGeraldiuNjmraii.Sfog^ 


Sir Richard Attenborough, president of the 'Muscular 
Dystrophy Group, preparing yesterday to present petitions 
to the Commons from more than SMOO people calling for 
the provision of outdoor electric wheelchairs for foe severely' 
disabled. With him is a sufferer, Adam Myers, meed 11, of 
Wembley, north-west London (Photograph: Bill Warhnrst). 

Twins born to giraffe 


Beraardine, a giraffe at foe 
Longleat safari park in Wilt- 
shire has become the first te 
give birth te twins - one male 
and one female - in captivity. 

“We had noticed that Ber- 
1 nardiue was pretty targe and 
we joked that maybe she would 
hare twins, but we were as- 
tounded when it actually 
happened," Mr Ian Small, a 
Longleat spokesman said. 


But w hen the staff arrived 
yesterday morning they found 
the giraffe with two healthy 
calves. 

"She had no help from a vet 
or anyone else and now foe 
calves have started walking 
and feeding," Mr Small said. 

The calves will spend a few 
weeks fn a special pen until 
they are sturdier. 


A foretaste of the surprises 
on the way, when Christie's 
auctions at West Dean in West 
Sussex next month the furni- 
ture and works of art from 
Edward James's various 
homes, ■ came with the 
$181,500 (estimate $40,000- 
$50,000), or £117,096, paid for 
a box by the American surreal- 
ist Joseph Cornell, in New 
York on Tuesday night 

It had been in. store since 
James ' gave up a California 
home in the 1950s. Edward 
James died. last year and his 
estate was left, to foe Edward 
James Foundation, which 
runs West Dean as a crafts 
college. 

While most of the material 
from California has been-, 
shipped to England for sale, it 
was thought (bat the work of 
an American surrealist would 
sell better in America. James, 
who inherited great wealth, 
was one of the first patrons of 
the surrealists in . the 1930s 
and a collector of the boxes 
with carefully orchestrated 
contents which Cornell adopt-; 
ed as an an form. 


This is one ofhis earliest-It 
was included in the exhibi- 
tion, Fantastic Art, Dada, 
Surrealism, at foe Museum of 
Modem Art in New York in 
1936-37 with foe title, “Ele- 
ments - of Natural 
Philosophy". The box con- 
tains 55 glass bottles with 
miscellaneous, contents' and 
two picture cards. 

The sale of contemporary 
art included a new auction 
‘.price record for foe sculptor, 
Davfd Smith, at- $1,320,000 
(£851,652). The 7ft welded 
sted sculpture ofl963 comes 
from his “Voltri-Bolton 
Landing" series and is consid- 
ered one of foe artist's greatest 
works. 

Christie's .had. a near miss 
with Jasper Johns’s “Target” 
of 1961, which was unsold just 
below foe; reserve, at $2 mil- 
lion. The sale totalled £3 6 
■ million. At Christie’s East a 
model of a dovecot, described 
as “Whieldon type* sold for 
$33,000 (£21,290) adjust an 
estimate of $1,500 to $2,500; 
foe purchaser considered it a 
genuine Whieldon piec&_ 


through a foolish lapse when 
the mod is bknring in her 
direction. She is assiduous, 
apparent!}' sincte-urinded, and 
she knows her home territory. 

She comes to polling day in 
What most be a vary different 
frame of mind from her La- 
bour opponent, Mrs Shirley 
Haines. 

The one consolation for Mrs 
Haipes is that she can never 
throughout . this campaign 
have suffered from the illusion 
of false hopes. 

From what I have seen, she 
has known that she has noth- 
ing to win, so she has sensibly 
dedded that she better not lose 
anything either. . .... 

There is a point here that 
may, I suspect, be of wider 
significance. Not so long ago. 
Labour candidates oftoi gave 
the impression that they 
thought the world was against 
them. In politics, that easily 
becomes ‘ a self-fulfflliag 
assumption. 

. But neither in Ryedale. nor 
la West Derbyshire hare the 
Labour' candidates and their 
immediate • entourage dis- 
played such paranoia, ft may 
only be a matter of style, tert it 
is qitfte an important one- . _ 

The hnmediate. question is 
whether foe Affiance wiH be 
given a new infashm of hope, 
lit whether 'any improvement 
is k st&fg will depend as much 
as anything upon . how 'foe 
Other parties comport ' them- 










f 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Local councils urged to 
seek ratepayers’ views 
for improved services 


Local councils often have 
no clear idea of their aims in 
providing services, many of 
which are a result of historical 
accident rather than a re- 
sponse to people's needs, a 
National Consumer Council 
report states; 

The services continue be- 
cause the councils lack an 
established system of finding 
out what ratepayers want, and 
do not provide enough infor- 
mation for the ratepayers to 
make judgements, the report, 
published today, maintains. 

It urges authorities to re- 
spond more to the communi- 
ties they serve by developing 
ways of measuring their own 
performance. 

It suggests an increased use 
of statistical studies, surveys 
and discussions with tenants 
and other consumers. 

Councils should also make 
themselves more accountable 
by publishing wider details of 
their performance than simply 
financial figures, the report, 
based on a iwo-year study 
carried out in collaboration 
with two local authorities, 
states.. 

Mr Michael Montague, the 
consumer council chairman, 
said yesterday that many con- 
sumers allowed sloppy stan- 
dards from their council, 
while the authorities! own 


Liverpool 
puts £40m 
into homes 

Liverpool's left-wing La- 
bour councillors yesterday an- 
nounced plans to spend 
£40 million to boost their 
housing programme. 

Mr Derek Hatton, the Mili- 
tant-supporting deputy coun- 
cil leader, said the package 
would create 5,000 new jobs in 
the building industry. 

He insisted that the an- 
nouncement had not been 
deliberately timed for the eve 
of today's local elections, 
claiming' that agreement had 
been struck only yesterday 
with contractors. 

The package includes 14 
contracts for 573 new council 
homes, and eight new con- 
tracts for improving and con- 
verting 703 others. 

Another eight demolition 
contracts will see the end of 
some of the city's worst tene- 
ments. 

About £5.5 million will be 
spent on 22 contracts for 
environmental improvements 
and another £15 million on 
street works. The councillors 
have also earmarked £4. 1 mil- 
lion for improving school 
buildings. 

About £20 million of the 
£40 million cost of the 
projects will be covered by a 
“deferred purchase 
arrangement" — a deal struck 
with financial institutions last 


Bamber sent 
for trial 

Jeremy Bamber. the fanner 
accused of murdering five of 
his family, was committed for 
trial to Chelmsford Crown 
Court by Maldon magistrates 
yesterday. 

Mr Bamber. aged 25. of 
Goldhanger. Essex, who has 
been in custody for seven 
months, is charged with shoot- 
ing his parents. Nevill and 
June, both aged 61. his sister. 
Sheila CatTell. aged 27. a 
fashion model, and her twin 
sons. Daniel and Nicholas, 
both aged six. on August 6 last 
year. 

The family were shot 31 
their home. White House 
Farm, Tolleshuni D’Arcy. 
Essex. 

No application was made 
for bail. 


figures told them nothing 
about consumer satisfaction. 

“We get the services wc 
deserve. Telling the council 
what we want doesn't make us 
agitators or malcontents - just 
responsible consumers," Mr 
Montague said. 

The study tested, perfor- 
mance for six different ser- 
vices provided by Cambridge- 
shire County Council and 
Newcastle upon Tyne City 
Council, including housing 
repairs and maintenance and 
refuse collection. 

The authorities were select- 
ed because of their established 
concern for consumers. 

It suggests practical meth- 
ods of improving councils’ 
awareness, such as checklists 
of questions for people to rate 
the service they receive. 

The consumer council, a 
government-funded body, will 
itself be publishing guides on 
consumers' rights in each 
category. 

The report contains some 
criticism of the councils for 
not having clearly defined 
objectives. 

“it was disappointing to 
learn that they were rarely 
specified in a concise, concrete 
way, and for some services we 
s us pea that many authorities 
have no dear idea of what 
they are trying to do at ail," it 
says. 


Attempt to 
heal car 
plates rift 

By Clifford Webb 
Motoring Correspondent 

The motor trade is so divid- 
ed over proposals to change 
the annual vehicle registration 
identifier from August to an- 
other month that the Govern- 
ment may be forced to impose 
its original choice of October. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Secre- 
tary of State for Transport, 
has announced that he is 
prepared to change his mind 
about switching to October 
commencing next year “if the 
weight of opinion in the motor 
industry as a whole changes 
and provided this is acceptable 
to die police". 

By throwing the hall back 
into the indnstry's court be has 
in effect told the two main 
trade bodies, the Society of 
Motor Mannfactnrers and 
Traders (SMMT) and the 
Motor Agents Association 
(MAA) to heal the present rift 
between them or he will im- 
pose a solution. 

The two sides have arranged 
to meet next week bat last 
night the prospects of agree- 
ment remained slim. 

The MAA, which repre- 
sents most of Britain’s ga- 
rages. said a change to 
October would cost the trade 
np to 180,000 new car sales 
next year because dealers 
would not be able to offer 
attractive part exchanges on 
used cars so near the “dead" 
winter months* 

For that reason it was 
strongly in favour of July. 

The SMMT said October 
was the month preferred by- 
British vehicle manufacturers 
because it would reduce peaks 
and troughs of sales caused by 
the letter change in August 
and resnit in fewer workers 
being laid oft in the dosing 
months of the year. 

Neither body has come near 
to obtaining a majority view 
from its members. 

Austin Rover wonld like to 
see the year identifier abol- 
ished. It does not accept the 
MAA claim that annual sales 
will suffer. It is unlikely to get 
its wav because the police say 
the year registration letter is 
the first thing witnesses re- 
member and is a great help in 
(raring cars. 


Misleading headlines 
on university funding 


The Press Council has up- 
held a complaint against The 
Times over two headlines 
which gave a misleading im- 
pression of university fin- 
ances. 

By not responding to a 
professor's criticism, the 
newspaper failed to make 
amends, which it could have 
done by publishing a correc- 
tion, clarification or letter, the 
council said. 

In a feature on the govern- 
ment White Paper on public 
spending, one report was 
headlined: “Increase in fund- 
ing for universities". One of a 
strip of headlines at the top of 
the page read: "University- 
boost". 

The introduction spoke of 
selective increases amounting 
to £20 million a year over 
three years, and another para- 
graph said university spending 
was being cut in real terms by 
1.6 per cent next year. 

Professor M.J. Rennie, head 
of the depart men t of psycholo- 
gy at Dundee University, 
complained that the two head- 
lines were misleading, giving a 
damaging impression that 
universities would gain from 
financial policy, and the editor 
(ailed to make amends. 

Most readers would not be 
familiar with the present poor 


slate of funding of Britain's 
universities. Professor Rennie 
said, but even many who were 
would assume that the head- 
lines told the truth. 

Mr Michael Hoy. managing 
editor of The Times, replied 
that nobody reading the story 
could form any opinion other 
than that the increases were 
selective. While the headline 
might not be ideal, it could in 
no way be suggested the article 
was misleading or damaging, 
he said. 

The Press Council’s adjudica- 
tion was: 

From its introduction, the 
article made dear that increases 
in university funding to which it 
referred were selective, and lhai 
university spending was being 
cut in real terms. 

However, the two headlines 
“Increases in funding for 
universities" and "University 
boost" were misleading and 
contrary to ihe mam thrust of 
the article. They were likely to 
lead readers to believe the 
budget proposed was. overall, 
beneficial to universities when 
the reverse w-as true. 

By not responding to the 
complainant's criticism, ihe pa- 
per cfieciiiely failed to make 
amends for its misrepresenta- 
tion which il could have done by 
publishing a correction, 
clarification or fetter. 

The complaint against The 
Times is upheld. 


It recommends that council 
members and officers should 
recognize that their true func- 
tion is not to provide services 
for their own sake. Rather, 
they are there to give people 
access to useful services which 
would not otherwise be 
available. 

The introduction of proper 
“performance measurement" 
could act as a catalyst for a 
general change in attitude. 

It is acknowledged that the 
consumer-value provided by 
some services can be much 
harder to pin down than 
olhere. such as housing re- 
pairs. but the report empha- 
sizes that there is room for 
improvement in most areas. 

“In several services, we 
encountered extraordinary 
gaps in the authority's knowl- 
edge about a service which 
prevented even the most rudi- 
mentary evaluation. 

“Few library authorities, for 
example, know who their 
users are, even in terms of 
numbers," the report says. 

It concludes that councillors 
should be convinced of the 
benefits of a consumer-direct- 
ed approach. 

Measuring Up. Consumer 
assessment of local authority 
services: a guideline study (Na- 
tional Consumer Council. 18 
Queen Anne's Gate, London 
SWIH9AA; £8V 




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Campaign continues to improve food labelling 


The Consumers' Associa- 
tion today promised to contin- 
ue to fight the Government for 
better food labelling and more 
information about the 3,500 
additives now in use. 

A survey carried - out by 
Which ? magazine said that by 
shopping around even inside 
the same shop it may be 


possible to find other versions 
of the same product with fewer 
additives. 

“As public concern about 
additives has Increased in 
recent years, manufacturers 
and retailers have responded 
by changing the additive con- 
tent of their products. Even so, 
it coukl be quite a while before 


you find anything tike (he fall 
range of revised products 
available in your super- 
market," the report said. 

A survey of 1,000 packaged 
products found only 140 with 
no additives listed at all. When 
additives were present “four 
was not an uncommon number 


and 28 items had 10 additives 
or more". 

Some additives are known to 
cause intolerance reactions, 
although there is no medical 
evidence, that they cause more 
long-term problems. 

“All additives should be 
listed on the label by the E 
numbers," Which? said. 


court day 
‘costs up 
to £4,000’ 

Every time a High Court 
case has to be adjourned, 
leaving a court without any 
work for the day. more than 
£4,000 of taxpayers' money is 
wasted, a judge said yesterday. 

Mr Justice French made the 
remark when it seemed that an 
adjournment of a case, at the 
request of lawyers, might 
leave his court empty fora day 
when there was a .waiting list 
of hundreds of other cases. 

Later a spokesman for ihe 
Lord Chancellor's Depart- 
ment. which administers the 
courts, said i hat just providing 
a courtroom at (he High Court 
cost £1.000 a day. 

The cost of running a 
courtroom at a crown court, 
where serious criminal cases 
are heard, could be as much as 
£1.300 a day. 

High Court officials are 
constantly urging lawyers to 
give them plenty of warning if 
they want to cancel a hearing. 

The £4,000 figure given by 
Mr Justice French is under- 
stood to include his own 
salary, the wages of cc*un staff 
and the. cost of providing him 
with a personal clerk. 

High Court judges earn 
£55.625 a year and Lords 
Justices of Appeal £60.7 50 a 
year. Circuit judges hearing 
cases in crown and county- 
courts throughout England 
and Wales received £36.500. 


We don’t restrict mortgages to your 
first home. A second or holiday home 
will also be considered. 

And, of course fifty. 

property is a dffi 
great investment. 


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Jf you’re looking around lor a- mortgage 
you’ll have seen a lot of interest rates. 

But have you seen one better than ours? 
A quarter of a percent, or so, may not 
look much, but some swift calcu- 
lations will show you just how 
much it’ll save you. JSh 




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A mortgage with us can buy more than a bouse. It can 
_ one you already have a better place to live. 

home, bring us your plans 

to help. So whatS the point 


make the 
If you have. 

•\M-d 5 Rt&AdE ,, :.RATE' '■ i\.s% 11.7% Apr- 


At The Royal Bank of 
Scotland we’ll give you a 
mortgage of up to three times 
your salary (and one times a 
second salary) to buy your new 
home. And we give mortgages 
up to 95%, Definitely a 
point worth remembering. 








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THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 



WHAT CAR? CARS OF THE YEAR AWARDS 1 

FIAT UNO 70 SL 

‘Best small Hatchback 

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ALLTHE BEST SUCCESS STORIES 

HAVE A HAPPY ENDING. 

HERTS OURS 


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El'. 













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* ** If trig SL 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Sharp Senate rebuff 
for Reagan over 
arms sale to Saudis 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

\ SfWrP rebtrfr 10 Praa- 
dent Reagan, the Senate has 
voted decisively against his 


But opponents denounced 
Saudi Arabia for undermining 
the Middle fast peace process, 
supporting the Palestine Lib-. 

eration Organization and for 
condemning last month's US 
air raid on Libya. 

The proposed sale includes 
Stinger anti-aircraft Side- 

fSSSrs ^sip“ adltopoon 

Senate had. explicitly rejected 


10 seu *354 million 

l&ob million) of advance 
arms to. Saudi Arabia. 

TJe surprisingly large vote 

~ Jr 2 ! T. enough to 
enable the Senate to override 
Mr Reagan's promised veto of 


a proposed arms sale: The 
House of Representatives was 
due u> vote last night, and was 
certain to reject the deal 
Twenty-nine Republican 
senators joined 44 Democrats 
in voting against the sale, even 
though Senator Richard Lu- 
gar, chairman of the foreign 
relations committee, warned 
them that they were “taking a 
headlong plunge in 
opposition” to the president 
Asked in Tokyo about -this, 
and about some reverses of his 
tax revision programme, Mr 
Reagan remarked; “Just wait 
until the old man gets home.” 
The Congressional opposi- 
tion, mustered by Senator 
Alan Cranston, a Democrat 
from California, came despite 
the fact that Israel and its 
main lobby group in Washing- 
ton did not oppose the sale. 


American support to moder- 
ate Arabs, and would help 
Saudi Arabia fight radical and 
listfon 


.fundamentalist forces. 

Last year the Adminstration 
was forced .to withdraw a 
proposed arms sale to Jordan. 
The pro-Israel lobby is Con- 
gress is preparing to stop 
delivery of advanced surveil- 
lance aircraft first sold to 
Saudi Arabia in 1981. 

• RIYADH: Arms deals were 
the main topic of discussion in 
the past three days between 
the Secretary of State for 
Defence, Mr George Younger, 
and Saudi officials (a Corre- 
spondent writes). 

In particular, Mr Younger 
discussed the Saudi desire to 
establish an offset investment 
programme on the £5 billion 
Tornado-Hawk-Pilatus deal 
with the Saudi Minister of 


Defence and Aviation, Prince 
Sultan bin Abdukriz. 

Mr Younger said that offset 
proposals had been discussed, 
ana officials instructed to 
evaluate them and produce a 
definitive paper. 

Mr Younger and Prince 
Sultan have decided to make a 
government-to-government 
deal that would spell out bow 
an offset programme would be 
implemented. 

An offset investment pro- 
gramme strives to offset large 
military or technological pur- 
chases with investment m the 


purchasing country, often in- 
ofte 


volving transfer of technology. 

Although the US Senate 
voted 'against a $354 million 
missile deal. Prince Sultan did 
not ask Mr Younger for 
alternative British missiles. 

Mr Younger stressed, how- 
ever, that Britain would be 
willing to try to meet the 
kingdom’s weapons needs. 

Prince Sultan said the 
Americans were fine to make 
conditions, but the Saudis 
were also free, and would buy 
weapons wherever they 
wanted. 

He was waiting for the 
Reagan Administration .lo ful- 
fil ns promise to veto the 
Senate decision. 


Israel to become 


third SDI ally 


From Our Correspondent, Washington 


Israel has become the third 
US ally — after Britain and 
West Germany — to join 
President Reagan's controver- 
sial Strategic Defence Initia- 
tive (SDI) research prog- 
ramme. 

Mr Yitzhak Rabin and Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the Israeli 
and US Defence Ministers, on 
Tuesday signed a memoran- 
dum of agreement, or “guide 
lines” for participation by 
Israel 

The memorandum, which 
is classified, is designed to 
provide “a comprehensive ba- 
sis for laboratories, research 
establishments, companies 
and industries, or other 
entities” in the joining coun- 
try to participate is develop- 
ment of die SDI research 
programme, a senior. Penta- 
gon official said. . \* *" ; - 

British and West German 
firms are competing with 
American companies for re- 
search contracts in the multi- 
billton-doUar SDI project, 
which the Reagan Administra- 
tion hopes Japan and Italy wdi 
soon join. 

• JERUSALEM: Israel has 


three mam reasons for joining 
the SDI programme, and none 


of them has anything to do 
with possible Star Wars (lan 


Murray writes). 

The first is political By 
joining the project, Israel 
hopes to make its dose alli- 
ance with the US even closer. 
Mr Shimon Peres, the Prime 
Minister — who has had the 
embarrassment of discovering 
accredited Israeli diplomats 
•tying on the US. and of 
finding a reserve Israeli gener- 
al accused of arranging to sell 
American arms to Iran — is 
aware that be needs to take 
every opportunity to prove 
that Israel is a loyal US ally. 

As an extension of this idea, 
Israel will now press for equal 
opportunities with European 
Nato countries in winning 
-pdefente- contraets-This shows 
that the second main reason 
for joining is economic. 

.. TW third reasonis strategic. 
With the exchange of technol- 
*ogy permitted under foe agree- 
ment, Israel hopes to be able 
to get research which can hdp 
counter the threat of Sam 
missiles 


Acquitted 
judge to 
face panel 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 
The Australian Govern- 
ment, moving to defuse 
threatening political and con- 
stitutional crisis, yesterday 
announced a judicial inquiry 
into allegations of misconduct 
by Mr Jnstice lionet Murphy 
of the High Court 
Mr Lionel Bowen, the At- 
toroey-General, told. Partra- 
roent the inquiry would be 
conducted by a panel of three 
Although the judge was 
acqidttedlast week, on appeal, 
of attempting to pervert the 
course or justice, farther seri- 
ous allegations hang over hhn- 
A policeman has chimed that 
Mr Justice Murphy asked him 
re act as an informant in retnra 
for promotion, and transcripts 
published yesterday of conver- 


sations between the judge and 
a Sydney 


fnrther- 


Mr Morgan Ryan, 
solicitor, raise 
questions. 

Through it all, however, Mr 
Jnstice Murphy has refused to 
resign, even though it is 
understood that a majority of 
his colleagues do not want bhu 
back on the beach. 


After Chernobyl: Europe works out how to cope 



Danes want plant 
in Sweden closed 


From Christopher Follett, Copenhagen 
A resolution calling on the coping with increased radia- 


A nuclear alarm the size of a cigarette 

sale in West Germany. Developed by thi _ 

search Centre, the device was originally meant for workers 
at nuclear plants, and sounds an alarm at one millirein. 


packet has gone ou 
the Israeli Nuclear Re- 


EEC extends food 
import ban list 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 
Senior EEC diplomats met Britain argues that the EEC 


Danish Government to de- 
mand that Sweden close its 
Barsebdck nuclear power sta- 
tion gained momentum in Par- 
liameut yesterday when it was 
supported by the leftist Oppo- 
sition majority. 

After yesterday's first read- 
ing, the resolution is certain to 
be passed after its third read- 
ing by the end of the month . 

BarsebAck is just 12 miles 
from the Danish capital on the 
other side of the narrow Baltic 
straits. 

Yesterday's move coincided 
with the pabUshing of a report, 
which contained guide! ines for 
public health authorities, by 
the Copenhagen-based Euro- 
pean eadq nailers of the 
World Health Organization 
(WHO) ou the consequences 
of last month's acrid exit at the 
Chenobyi nuclear power plant. 

WHO had called together 
radiation experts and scien- 
tists from II eastern and 
western countries to assess the 
dangers resulting from the 
accident and according to 
them, restrictions on food 
imports axe now not generally 
justified on health grounds. 

WHO summoned the ex- 
perts after many of the 33 
countries in its European re- 
gion appealed for advice in 


turn levels after the accident. 

In the report, the experts 
expressed strong dissatisfac- 
tion with the Soviet Union for 
not giving sufficient or timely 
information on the accident* 
They called for improved in- 
ternational systems for moni- 
toring nuclear fallout and 

better co-ordination between 
nations. 

They said there was now, 
generally speaking, no radia- 
tion danger outside the imme- 
diate area surrounding the 
disabled power station. 

They said that sneb precau- 
tions as avoiding going out- 
doors. gardening, farming, 
drinking rain water and taking 
iodine tablets and banning the 
import of fresh food from 
eastern European countries — 
except the Soviet Union — 
were no longer necessary. 

The scientists also said that 
milk posed no general risk for 
infants and that breast feeding 
was safe. They warned howev- 
er that radioactive rainfall 
may cause some restrictions in 
some areas. 

The lack of full information, 
however, made a proper as- 
sessment of the long-term 
consequences impossible, the 
group said. 


yesterday to deride on the 
implementation of an EEC 
ban on food imports from 
areas of Eastern Europe affect- 
ed by fell-out from the 
Chernobyl disaster, but were 
unable to agree immediately 
on which countries and prod- 
ucts to include in the prohibit- 
ed list. 

Officials said the list, origi- 
nally confined to six countries 
of the Soviet bloc, would be 
extended to Yugoslavia. 

Trade and consumer affairs 
ministers on Tuesday consid- 
ered a proposal from the EEC 
Commission banning imports 
into Western Europe of fruit 
and vegetables, milk, fresh 
meat ana other products from 
Soviet bloc countries within a 
625-mile radius of Kiev. 

The ministers referred the 
proposal to tactical experts, 
and it was discussed yesterday 
by EEC diplomats empowered 
to take derisions when the 
Council of Ministers is not in 
session. 

The next ministerial meet- 
ing is not until Monday, when 
foreign ministers meet in 
Brussels, by which time it may 
be too late to prevent foe- 
arrival in Europe of contami- 
nated foodstuffs. 

Officials said serious differ- 
ences had arisen over whether 
Austria, Yugoslavia, East Ger- 
many and Albania, which 
were all omitted from the 
original proposal, should be 
brought within the EEC's 
cordon sanUm/e. 


should act only on the basis of 
a strictly limited list of nations 
and products where there is 
scientific evidence for a ban, 
and should review the ban* 
weekly to ensure that the 
restrictions are lifted as soon 
as possible. 

One diplomat said that 
although the EEC had to “err 
on the side of safety”, such 
measures should not be an 
excuse for trade protection- 
ism. Italy, which has already 
taken unilateral measures 
against imports from Eastern 
Europe and from fellow EEC 
states, insists that the ban 
should be comprehensive. 

Sources said West Germany 
had resisted attempts to place 
East Germany on the pro- 
scribed list 


Ministers complacent, 
says Bonn Opposition 


From Frank Johnson, Bonn 

The West German Cabinet ccmed about the wide differ- 


yesterday considered the 
country’s stale of radioactivity 
— and of public opinion — 1 1 
days after the Chernobyl di- 
saster amid Opposition accu- 
sations that- it is being 
complacent about both. 

Ministers have assured the 
public that levels of radioac- 
tivity are back to normal, but 
their Social Democratic and 
“Green” opponents say this 
cannot be true of the whole 
country. 

The Government is con- 


ences among the country's 
various Land governments in 
dealing with the effects. 

• ROME: If radioactivity lev- 
els decrease in some 900 
animals being held on the 
north-eastern' border. Italian 
authorities will allow them to 
be taken to their original 
destination (Peter Nichols 
writes). 

But if their levels of radioac- 
tivity do not fall, the animals 
from Poland will presumably, 
be returned to that country. 



Nudear containment: how nuclear cores, are protected in various types of reactors. 


Johannesburg - An explo- 
sion on the internal fire-escape 
of a supermarket in Ber.morc, 
an affluent white suburb of 
Johannesburg, caused panic 
among lunchtime shoppers 
but no injuries (Michael 
Hornsby writes). 

Black' smoke billowed from 
a shattered first-floor window 
as police cordoned off the area 
and searched the building. 

The blast occuned at a 
branch of the Pick ’n Pay 
supermarket chain, and coin- 
cided with a sit-in pay strike 
by some 6.000 black employ- 
ees of the company at more 
than 30 of its stores. 

The firm's branches were 
manned yesterday almost ex- 
clusively by whites. 


Jail for water 
diet father 


Melbourne (Reuter) — Mar- 
cus Barnes, the father of a 
ihree-ycar-old girl who died 
after being kept on a water diet 
for four weeks to cure a cold, 
was sent to jail for IS months. 

Barnes, a nurse, and the 
child's mother. Joanne Eaton, 
aged 26, were found guilty of 
manslaughter. They practise 
natural medicine. 


Briton scales 


Katmandu (UPIl — A Brit- 
ish woman and an American 
photographer have scaled the 
22.240ft Kantega peak in east 
Nepal. 

Alison Hargreaves from 
Derbyshire, the only Briton 
among the 13-member Ameri- 
can expedition, and Marc 
T wigjii, 25. from Seattle 
climbed the main peak 
through the difficult north 
west ridge. 


Heart-liras 


woman dies 


Scottsdale (UP!) — Mary 
Gohlke. the world’s longest- 
surviving heart-lung trans- 
plant recipient, has died after 
a fall. 

She was 50. She survived 
more than five years with her 
new organs. 


New York — Bishop Donald 
Pdoite. an Algonquin, has 
been ordained as the first US 
Indian Roman Catholic bish- 
op. four centuries after the 
first Christian missionaries 
reached the continent. 


Atoll test 


Wellington (Reuter) - The 
French exploded their second 
nuclear device for 1986 at the 
South Pacific test site on 
Mururoa Atoll. 


US settles 
{ island land 
dispute 


Koror. Palau (Reuter) — 
Authorities at a US missile 
base in the Marshall Islands 
said yesterday they have set- 
tled a long-standing land 
rights dispute with islanders. 

A spokesman artbe base 
said that the dispute, which 
led to sit-in protests at the base 
on Kwajalein atoll, was solved 
through the intervention of 
the Marshall Islands 
President. 

Police evicted the islanders 
two weeks ago when they 
staged demonstrations at four 
sites in protest against a lease 
agreement and the atoll’s use 
as a nudear defence base. The 
islanders had gathered at near- 
by Ebeye island vowing to 
return to Kwajalein and repos- 
sess their ancestral land. 

The base spokesman, said 
the islanders would be relo- 
cated elsewhere and given 
more money for fearing their 
land. They currently receive 
an annual payment of $1,200 
(£800) each. 

Kwajalein is part of the 
MarsbaBs group, a UN Trust 
Territory under US adminis- 
tration. The US wants to 
replace the- trusteeship with a. 
Compact of Free Association, 
which would guarantee US 
use of the range for at least 30 
years. 




,;.>lSUNDS^^^.^v : 
.Ujae* * 


r* s ■■ 



US eases gun 
control laws 

. n..n mntl 


Washi 
law in the 


ion — Gun control 
ae US is to be loosened 
firsi overhaul of ids 


. lha ttTSI (JVCI ucau* v# — - 

GunComol M i» !8S2? 
(Chrisiopber Thomas wrrtes)- 
Th* new measure restrict 


I ne new _ _ 

minimum sentences for those 


urin g guns m violent cnines. - 



Mayor Omt Eastwood of Carmel presiding over his first 
council meeting. litter, he fulfilled his election promise to al- 
low more ice cream parlours in the California resort. 


Politicians 

mourn 

Defferre 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 


Within hours of arriving 
back in Paris yesterday from- 
the Tokyo summit. President 
Mitterrand flew to Marseilles 
to pay bis last respects to his 
friend and loyal political sup- 
porter , Gaston Defferre. 
whose death he described as a 
great loss for France: ' 

M Defferre, aged 75, was 
Socialist Mayor' of Marseilles 
for the past 33 years. 

News of his death brought 
in a flood of tributes from all 
parts of the political spectrum. 
M Jean-Oaude Gaudin. presi- 
dent of the centre-right UDF 
in the National Assembly, 
described him as a great 
figure of French political life 
M Jacques Chirac, the 
GauDist Prime Minister, said 
bis disappearance caused him 
great personal sorrow. 

Obitoaiy, page 18 


Arms talks under a cloud 


By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 


Thefifth— and most crucial 
- nwud of die American- 
Soviet arms reduction talks 
ge& under way in . Geneva 
today with both rides Warning 
the other for the lack of 
progress so Ear and for failing 
to five op to the spirit of last 
Novembe r's Resgan- 
Gerbacbov swagrit. 

A decision whether or not to 
hold a foDow-ap summit later 
this year, as was agreed last 
November, could well hinge on 
the progress made during the 

present six-week session. 

- The Russians have mode a 
second summit subject to two 
conditions — the US must stop 
soaring the fntentatioual di- 
mate and there inrat be an 


The Russians blame the 
lack of progress so far on 
Washington's determination 

to press ahead with its “Star 
Wars”progranmie and its con- 
of offensive 


weapons. 

A commentary in Tass said 
the present deadlock conld 
only be broken if Washington 
abandoned its hope of gaining 
military superiority over the 
Soviet Union and instead tried 
to achieve equality in arms and 
security. 

The Americans say that Mr 
Gorbachov is more interested 
in propaganda and in trying to 
split the western alliance with 
superficially tantalizing pro- 
posals, such as his January 15 


£*st moath, Moscow pat off 
indefinitely a meeting between* 
Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, the 
Soviet Foreign Minister, and 
Mr George state. bis AKeri* 

can counter-part, which was to 

have lakJ the ground work for 
foe next summit, because of 
the US air strike against 
Libya. 

It is nnlikely the Russians 
w91 agree to revive that meet- 
ing anti! they see how the 
current talks are progressing, 
particularly the session deal- 
ing with mediimFrange weap- : 
ons in Europe. - 


weapons by the year 2000, 
than in serums negotiations. 

The ‘Russians' wedge-driv- 
ing tactics have so for proved 
ineffective. Nato has brushed 
aside Mr Gorhachoy^ plan for 
abolishing Euro-missiles (on 
condition that Britain and 
France abandon plans to mod- 
ernize their own nuclear 
forces). Instead the alliance 
has backed President 
Reagan's zero-option counter- 
proposal which would elimi- 
nate all medium-range 
missiles in Europe by 19%). 

However Moscow has not 


abandoned its attempts to 
separate the US from - its 
European allies. - 

A visit to London last month 
by Mr Viktor Karpov, foe 
chief Soviet negotiator, as well 
as the letter from Mr 
Gorbachov which Mr Leonid 
Zamyatin, the new Soviet 
Ambassador to Loudon, deliv- 
ered to Mrs Thatcher last 
week, wore both intended to 
persuade Britain to hold sepa- 
rate talks with Moscow on 
freezing Britain’s Polaris force 
at existing levels. 

Britain has blushed , aside 
the Soviet overtures. 

Mr Max Kampelman, the 
chief US negotiator, said on 
arrival in Geneva that be was 
not bringing any new propos- 
als to the negotiating table. 

In his arrival statement, Mr 
Karpov indicated that he was 
not bringing any sew ideas 
either. Instead, he called on 
foe US to respond to Mr 
Gorbachovas January IS pro- 


In these drcumstamxs the 
chances of reselling an “inter- 
im agreement” on mediura- 
range missiles - one of foe 
stated objectives of last 
November's summit - which 
foe two leaders amid sign at 
foeir proposed next meeting do 
not took promising. 



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Hopefully, in all d^artments.- 

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It's just = that for some years now 
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to improve their performance. 

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We're backing the management's ambi- 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


-I / 


2SL 


Terrorism and the Tokyo summit 

Reagan is inspired 
by sense of unity 


From Sank Hogg and David Watts, Tokyo 
The Tokyo summit has 1 
been the “most successful of 
the six I . have attended”. 

President Reagan said at a 
press conference before he' 


returned to Washington 
yesterday. 

Mr Reagan had been in- 
spired by the "sense of- unity” 
at the summit. He added: “All 
we sought to accomplish was 
achieved.” Among the allies, 
"the marriage is happier than 
I've ever seen it” 

Mr Reagan stressed several 
times in the course of the press, 
conference shortly before he 
left Tokyo that future, action 
against terrorism would be co- 
ordinated. "We together- will 
decide upon what fs most 
appropriate,” he said. 

However, he evaded a ques- 
tion on whether the French 
would in future grant overfly- 
ing rights to US bombers. He 
said that “we can take whatev- 
er action is necessary”, but 
denied that he was p lanning 
further missile attacks. 

President Reagan also de- 
nied that the attack on Tripoli 
was intended to "get one 
man”, although be added that 
he did not think "any of us 
would have shed tears if that 
had happened” 

Questioned repeatedly as to 
what extra, measures his allies 
had agreed- to take. President 
Reagan said that their discus- 
sions at the summit had 
covered "all the things that 
could be seen as tools” but 
had not thought it appropriate 
to put some of them down in a 
statement. •• 

Mrs Thatcher, too, had 
hinted in her press conference 
that the counter-terrorist dec- 
laration would lead to further 
measures. 

Asked if the declaration 
could be interpreted as a 
warning to other governments 
not to assist Libyan terrorist 


activities, the [President 
saidrWhat we have made 
plain is that if we have the 
same kind of irrefutable evi- 
dence with regard to other 
countries, they will be subject 
to the same treatment” 

„ Later Jn response to another 
question about the involve- 
ment of other countries, he 
added:" We intend this to 
make them think also and 
realize that they're covered by 
will 


this agreement that they 



President Mitterrand bows 

out from Tokyo airport, 
have to face all of us united, if 
we get evidence that they are 
doing this.” 

He said that a decision on 
the denial of entiy to those 
expelled by one of the seven 
would be "a decision that we 
will all make”. 

He also confirmed that 
there was a deadline of June 
30 for the withdrawal of 
American oil firms from 
Libya. 

In a statement at the begin- 
ning of his press 'conference. 
President Reagan clearly at- 
tempted to assuage the feel- 
ings of Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone, the Japanese Prime 
Minister, who has not been 
seen to do well out of the 
summit.. The "triumph at 
Tokyo” was due in no small 


part to Mr Nakasone's chair- 
manship. President Reagan 
said. Thanking his Japanese 
hosts, the President said: “We 
are in their debr”. 

More practically. President 
Reagan suggested that the 
economic declaration would 
help to achieve "greater stabil- 
ity of the yen-dollar rate, 
something both the United 
Slates and Japan desire”. 

This was dearly intended to 
soften the blow of US Trea- 
sury Secretary Mr James 
Baker's refusal to intervene to 
bring down the yen. It may 
also signify a dawning realiza- 
tion in the US Administration 
that the fall in the dollar has 
been dangerously rapid m 
recent weeks. 

Touching on other econom- 
ic issues. President Reagan 
said firmly that the summit 
had given the green light for a 
new trade round, even though 
no date was specified. 

He claimed that the eco- 
nomic prosperity of the sum- 
mit countries demonstrated 
the wisdom of free market 
policies, and advocated the 
same polities to developing 
countries. 

President Reagan was no- 
ticeably emollient on the 
Chernobyl disaster, subject of 
another summit declaration. 
He welcomed the change in 
attitude in the Soviet Union 
that had taken place "in the 
last few days”. 

He passed quickly over the 
question of another summit 
with the Soviet leader. Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, which 
was said lo be implied in a 
message from Mr Gorbachov 
delivered via a letter to Mrs 
'Thatcher. President Reagan 
said be had not received any 
“direct message” that Mr 
Gorbachov wanted another 
summit 


Japan oil Syrians linked to 

suppliers sll j c Jd e bombings 
reassured ® 


By Our Foreign Staff 


Tokyo (Reuter) — Japan 
vesterday sought to assure its 
Middle East oil suppliers that 
its policy towards them had 
not changed despite the Tokyo 
summit declaration against 
terrorism, naming Libya as a 
major culprit 

Mr Shintaro Abe, the For- 
eign Minister, told the Lower 
House foreign afiains-commii- 
tee not to jump to conclu- 
sions. “We, as the summit 
host country, played a role of 
co-ordinating views. It is only 
natural for each summit coun- 
try to make its independent 
decision based on its own 
treaties and domestic laws.” 

The declaration called for a 
ban on arms sales and curtail- 
ment of diplomatic ties with 
countries sponsoring tenor- 
ism. It specifically named 
Libia. 

The Prime Minister, Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone, yesterday 
said Japan would act on its 
own in deciding whether or 
not to implement the 
measures. 


US snspidoas of Syria's 
complicity in bomb attacks 
and assassinations directed' 
against the West were first 
voiced covertly —and then ever 
more publicly — after the 
suicide bombings of the US 
moltmatioBal force Marine, 
base in Beirut on October 23, 
1983. . 

CIA investigations into the 
chtnghtpr, in which more than 
240 American servicemen 
died, never produced the iden- 
tity of die track bomber who 
drove smiling into the Marine 
compound early that Sunday 

morning. 

Senior US officials from 
Lebanon who met at a confi- 
dential seminar in Norway on 
the multi-national force last 
year woe forced to admit that 
they still could not name the 
-or ganizati on which planned 
the attack. 

But the same officials laid 
great emphasis on Syria's 
raOt” in obstructing the work 
the four-nation internation- 


al army and on encouraging 
militias to attack it. 

American intelligence 
agents did claim later that 
they received htiormation that 
Iranians and Syrians had both 
been behind the Marine 

f«aah. 

They said that several Irani- 
ans bad been trained in the 
Syrian towH of Zabadani on 
the Lebanese border and then 
sent into Lebanon to organize 
the bomb attacks. 

The closest the Americans 
have come to identifying Syria 
as a culprit in recent bomb 
attac ks came only a few weeks 
ago when Greek police blamed 
a Lebanese woman member of 
the Syrian Social Nationa l is t 
Party for planting the bomb 

that exploded on a TWA flight 

over Argos. 

The woman, who lives in the 
northern Lebanese dty of 
Tripoli, and whose has band 
was a militiaman who died 
fighting in Lebanon, denied 
the change. 


^ imp “ ,l!e “ — 

Stinging Gorbachov attack on US 


rom Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

in a slinging new attack on 
: United Slates for its recent 
raids on Libya. Mr Mikh a i l 
irbachov.ihe Soviet leader, 
med in a- Kremlin speech 
it a similar crisis over Syria 
Iran could break out at any 
imenL . 

*The aggressor sustained a 1 
iral and political defeat in 
jv*. Virtually the entire 
^-national community con- 


demned, in one form or 
another, the actions of the 
United States, but the White 
House would not calm down,” 
he sakL"lt is bristling with 
new threats, now not only to 
Libya, but also to Syria and 
Iran. This means another 
crisis, caused by a striving for 
hegemony, can break out at 
any moment” 

Speaking at a dinner in 
honour of the visiting Marxist 
President dos Santos of Ango- 


la, Mr Gorbachov claimed 
that the world had just lived 
through an "acute crisis” as a 
result of the bombing of 
Libya. He argued that no 
pretext about "international 
terrorism” could justify the 
actions taken by the US. 
“These actions themselves are 
the worst manifestation of 
terrorism, state terrorism, 
when a strong power claims 
the licence of ‘lynching’ coun- 
tries it does not like.” 



MVID BELLAMY ON 
BRITAIN'S COUNTRYSIDE 



serial number of Country 
io countryside conserva- 
avid Bellamy traces the 
tory of Upper Teesdale and 
it she 



bmlinson wriiesabottt the 
■' Nature Conservancy 
es Jarvis offers a view on 
idscape; Stuart Housden 
ons consider the conflict 


between skiing and nature conservation 
in the Highlands; Ralph Whitlock 
discusses the future of a Wiltshire wood 
once threatened and now held in trust 
as a wildlife refuge; and, in a colour 
feature, Gordon Winter describes 
Canada’s fine record in the management 
of national parks, 

Tkejnck of the week's 
finest properties 


COUNTRY OF 

On sale now 








A well-pleased Mrs Thatcher at Heathrow yesterday on 
her return from the Tokyo economic summit. 

As other summit leaders and marine products. 


left, the Canadian Prime Min- 
ister, Mr Brian Mulroney. 
addressed the Diet as part of 
bis official visit In bis speech, 
and later in discussions with 
Mr Nakasone, he called on 
Japan to liberalize its markets 
and import Canadian wood 


With the departure of most 
of the delegations yesterday, 
the centre of Tokyo returned 
to a semblance of normality, 
while the headquarters of the 
Cbukaku-Ha radical leftist 
faction which had threatened 
to destroy the summit was 
searched by police. 


Ballot-rigging and 
violence mar 
Bangladesh poll 

From Michael Hamlyn, Dhaka 


Bangladesh yesterday wit- 
nessed a massive nationwide 
effort to destroy any serious 
pretence of a return of 
democracy. 

In the elections held to form 
a new Parliament reports from 
all round the country’ spoke of 
ballot boxes seized, polling 
booths captured by gangs of 
hooligans, presiding officers 
terrorized and the forces of law 
and order rendered powerless. 

Even before any vote had 
been counted it was dear that 
there was interference by- 
gangs supporting the govern- 
ment-led Jatiyo Party on a 
grand scale. 

It is reasonable to point out 
that in elections all over the 
sub-continent, and particular- 
ly in India, there are frequent 
reports of misbehaviour by 
political parties and by gangs 
of toughs anxious to subvert 
the democratic process. 

What happened yesterday- 
in Bangladesh was on a quite 
different scale, however. 

! visited the constituency of 
Dr Kamal Hossain. a former 
presidential candidate, in 
south-east Dhaka early yes- 
terday morning. Polling was 
going* on peacefully at the first 
polling station I called at in a 
Maniknagar primary school. 

By 9.15 am, 196 men and 31 
wenien had voted - around 7 
per cent of the total — and a 
short queue had formed at the 
gate. 

At the next port of cal! in 
Jatrabari there was a very 
different scene. A large, angry 
crowd gathered outside the 
polling station, surrounding a 
police lorry urging the inspec- 
tor and hts men to act to 
prevent what was going on 
inside. 

A yellow patch marked the 
wall where a small bomb had 
exploded, and where men 
armed with billhooks had torn 
down the stand of the Awami 


League, Dr Hossain's party, 
before proceeding inside and 
ejecting the League's agent 
watching the poll. 

The men then seized the 
ballot forms and, stamping 
them in favour of the Jatiyo 
Party, stuffed the ballot boxes 
with 'them. 

While this was happening, ! 
arrived but was not allowed in 
by the policeman at the gate. 
When finally an Indian col- 
league manag ed to enter with 
Dr Hossain. the presiding 
officer tamely explained that 
be thought the agent being 
ejected was being "sent out by 
his friends.” and that the men 
sniffing the boxes was normal 
procedure. 

Later, driving through the 
same district I saw a running 
battle going on between sup- 
porters of the Jatiyo Party - and 
another group too far away to 
see w hich party they belonged 
to. Both sides were wielding 
long bamboo poles seized from 
a building site, and some were 
brandishing knives and axes. 

Out in the countryside, mat- 
ters were if anything worse. In 
the Paiash Narsbindi constit- 
uency — an attractive area of 
small industries and rice and 
jute — I met a presiding officer 
whose polling station was 
invaded early in the day by 
some 25 thugs who drove out 
the agents of ail the candidates 
except the Jatiyo Party, and 
voted 1,800 times. 

”1 did not want to be a 
presiding officer,” he said 
unhappily, ”1 was forced to do 
it. I called for the police twice 
but no one came. I have not 
cancelled the polling here 
because if I do 1 shall have to 
go through all this all over 
again” 

Ballot boxes were sealed at 
many other polling stations 
after invasion by gangs of 
thugs in nn numbered Jeeps. 

Leading article, page 17 


Iraqi raid 
on main 
refinery in 
Tehran 


The minister is Mr Behzad 
Nabavi. the current holder of 
the heavy industries' portfolio 
who was. at the time of the 
killings, a Minister of Stale for 
Executive Affairs. 

According to a Tehran dai- 
!v. RessaJai. which has pub- 
lished, without comment, 
accounts of a new investiga- 
tion into the affair, another of 
the suspects. Muhammad 
MuhammadL a former charge 
d'affaires in Kabul, recently 
committed suicide while un- 
dergoing imerrrogation. 

Also held, according to the 
same paper, is Khossro 
Teheran i. Iran's security chief 
until 1 S months ago- 



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new 


Bahrain (Reuter) - Iraqi 

tor to 

aircraft bombed Tehran's 

ird :o 

main oil refinery yesterday as * 

;n;in- 

an Iraqi commander said a ’ 

Th,» 

new Iranian offensive was 

:x 2 ir«- 

imminent on the southern ; 

>02 re- 

Gulf war fronL 

ining. 

Witnesses said an Iraqi jet 

I the 

dropped "a bomb as big as a 

;a: we 

car” on the refinery, starting a ; 
blaze which lasted for three 

tills is 

hours. 

incee- 

A military communique in 

row’er 

Baghdad said "squadrons of 

es full 

planes" attacked the 200,000 

nines 

barrels-a-day complex. Iran’s ■ 

does 

second biggest refinery, and . 

aniJ 

"reduced it to ashes.” But 

•dcast 

witnesses in Tehran said the 

ie to 

fire was well away from the 

oucly 

refinery's two vital catalytic : 
cracking towers. 

:n:ngs 

A second air raid alert was 

i sian 

broadcast on Tehran radio 

on. as 

four hours after the raid, and 

•pan.' 

anti-aircraft fire was heard. 

irr.£iS 

but there was no sign of 
another attack. 

' what 

• Minister questioned: .An 

:ss:\e 

Iranian Cabinet Minister and 

•s the 

a number of other high- 

rmly. 

ranking officials are under 

way it 

interrogation in Tehran in 

own 

connection with the assassina- • 

!c iike 

tion on August 30. 1981. of 

■s can 

President Muhammad-Ali 

e in- 

Rajai and the Prime Minister. 

to ge: 

Mr Javae Bahonar (Hazhir 
Teimourian writes). 

ns Tor 




; !im: 


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Mil 

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10 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


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all because they're invariably too small for the big institutions to bother with . . . 
until they've gone up that is — but before then, they're a real opportunity for the 
small investor to get in first for a change. Second, because let's face it, however 
good a "blue chip" is, it is literally impossible to make a fortune out of a small 
investment in a leading share. To do that, you have to buy shares that are low- 
priced . . . preferably mere pennies . . . sell them, and then successfully "switch" 
into another penny share. That way, it's at least technically possible. 

In 1883, every single one of the top ten best-performing shares has been 
a penny share on January 1st. (Source: The Observer and Datastream.) In 
fact, all of the 1983 winners were up around 500% or more and 6 of them had 
been recommended in The Penny Share Guide. 1984 continued the progress, 
and in 1985, 16 out of the top 20 best performing shares of the year were 
'PENNY' shares . . . and of these 16 'penny' shares, 15 HAD BEEN 
RECOMMENDED IN THE PENNY SHARE GUIDE! 1985's Share Race winner 
Wire and Plastic (with a rise on the year of + 750%) proved once again our point 
about the sheer logic of penny share investment ... the downside is strictly 
limited, but the upside is almost literally infinite! 

Indeed if you had followed The Penny Share Guide's advice (given two 
months running) and bought Polly Peck at 18p, with a £1,000 investment... and 


then let's suppose you had sold it at the recent high of 3,000p*. . . you could 

have made £ 160 , 000 ... not a million, but well on the way. 

At least with penny shares, the small investor (or the large investor using a 
small part of his funds) stands a fighting chance ... at least with penny shares it s 
possible! Don't miss out entirely on this exciting area of the stockmarket. 

The penny share market is a world apart from the rest of the stockmarket. And 
the rules forjudging which ones to buy and when to sell them are very different 
from what you are used to, if you have been investing in blue chips up to now. But 
that is where we can help you. 

Right now, many respected investment analysts believe we are on the verge 
of the greatest Bull market of all time. All the signs are there. Shares are cheap 
by historical standards and profits are expected to improve following the end of 
the recession. 

The fuse is lit, and by the time you read these words the upwards movement 
may already be under way. All you have to do now is complete and return the 
enclosed application form to us. That way, you could be ready to take advantage 
of the next "Polly Peck" or "Wire and Plastic" . . . or. indeed any of 1986's 
winners, amongst which we feel sure there will be a fair spread of penny shares, 
certainly if past performance is anything to go by. 

* Subsequently, \ of course, there has been a 10 for 1 free issue t Adjusted for scrip issue 


THE SHEER LOGIC 
OF 'PENNY SHARES'! 


MIGHTY OAKS FROM LITTLE 
ACORNS GROW 

Taking every company in the UK stockmarket, 
these were the Top Ten outstanding shares in 
the country over 1985, in the Daily Telegraph 
Share Race: 

1 . Wire and Plastic* recommended PSG 37p 

recent high 315p + 751 % 

2. Somportex* recommended PSG 20p 

recent price 186p + 830% 

3. Regalion Properties 

4. British Benzol* recommended PSG 16p 

recent price 69p + 331 % 

5. Sangers Photographies* recom. PSG 26p 

recent price 78p + 200% 

6. Parkfield Group* recommended PSG lOp 

recent high 235p + 2,250% 

7. Ashley Industrial* 

8. Unigroup* recommended PSG 41 p 

recent high 110p + 168% 

9. A & P Appledore 

10. Tozer Kemsley* recommended PSG 24p 

recent high 78p + 225% 

*a penny share on January 1st 19 85 

(prices current February 1986) 


Of course, past performance is no guarantee of future success, but as 
you can see, 7 of the top 10 had been recommended In PSG, Wire 
and Plastic twice in fact so there was plenty of time for subscribers to 
buy. Two of the top ten, Regalion and Appledore, were NOT penny 
shares, the rest were, so again you can see how the leading rises were 
heavily weighted towards the 'penny share' sector. Unigroup, we can't 
really claim much credit for, because we did in fact suggest selling that 
well before the major rise occurred, but the essential point remains the 
sheer to of the situation . . . 'penny' shares are far more likely to show 
the highest % rises in the market Intidentally, the 1984 Daily Telegraph 
Race winners, Pentiand Industries and Samuelson Group, both 
continued their upwards progress aid finished only just outside the top 
ten for 1966, which goes to show that with 'penny' shares you need 
patience to give them time to perform in the first platt, and patience to 
stay with them once they're into their stride. 

A FINAL WORD ON 1SSS 

The real excitement has obviously been at Wire and Plastic, which 
always were good solid value; hence our strong recommendation at35p 
and 37p around the summer of 1984, but it took the 1986 arrival of 
Saatchi's finance director to get the shares motoring!. Today they've 
been 310p! That just could not happen with an ICI — they might have 
moved a farthing on the news! With penny shares, one single, simple, 
solitary event can ratficafty transform them — sometimes overnight . . . 
but not always overnight by any means. Pentiand Industries for 
example, is today truly a legend and shows how a 'penny* share really 
can perform . . . given the time. In July 1978 we spotted them at the 
equivalent of *6%p, today they've been an incredible 320p, a 4,704% 
rise, reminiscent of BeUair and Polly Pack In their time. SfanHarly. Lance 
too proved that 'penny* patience can be a virtue — their shares have risen 
from their ori^nal recommendation in our May '81 issue when they were 
the equivalent of **3 !4p, to their recent 38p, much of it achieved in '85. 
This is the potential and the world of penny shares, truly a world apart 
from the rest of the market 

'adjusted for sc rip issue. * m adjusted for rights issue. 


• PENNY SHARES ARE MORE 
AFFORDABLE 

There is one undoubted factor in favour 
of low-priced shares, namely that more 
people can afford to buy them. And the 
more people that buy a share, the 
greater its chance of rising. 

• PENNY SHARES HAVE MORE 
ROOM TO GROW 

It is hard to see how a giant company like 
ICI, Imperial Tobacco, Distillers or the 
other stockmarket leaders could ever be 
ten times larger than they are today. But 
many companies with low-priced shares 
can and will be. 

• PENNY SHARES BENEFIT FROM 
OWNER MANAGEMENT 

No one can deny that a man usually 
works harder to build and maintain a 
business of his own than he does to build 
up someone else's. This fundamental 
fact of human nature contributes to the 
faster growth of many smaller com- 
panies. And of course, the interests of an 
owner/manager are very much in tune 
with those of the company's share- 
holders. He wants to see the company 
grow. He wants to see the share price 
double or triple, because it will have a 
meaningful impact on his personal 
fortune. 


• HOW THE PENNY SHARE GUIDE 
CAN HELP YOU 

Here at the Penny Share Guide, we 
spend our whole time studying penny 
shares, analysing their prospects and 
selecting the few that could become real 
winners. We are the only regularly- 
published guide on penny shares, and 
over the years we have acquired a 
tremendous amount of experience, con- 
tacts and background knowledge, all of 
which is at your disposal when you join 
us. 

• WHAT YOU GET 

Every month, you will receive a full list of 
new recommendations; news of other 
penny shares here and overseas; an alert 
about which shares are 'on the move' . . . 
and why. 

• WHAT TO DO NEXT 

See for yourself how The Penny Share 
Guide can help you by trying it out for 
one year — current issues of The Penny 
Share Guide are strictly reserved "for 
subscribers only". Join them today by 
becoming a subscriber yourself. To be 
sure of receiving the next issue on time, 
you must post your membership form off 
as soon as possible. 


SPECIAL 

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM 

£20 OFF FIRST YEARS MEMBERSHIP 

Please complete and return this form to: - 
The Penny Share Guide Ltd. (Subscription Dept.), 
FRBEPOST (No stamp required), 4 Abbots Place, 
Abbey Road, LONDON NW6 1YP 
FROM: T 8/5 

NAME BLOCK 

ADDRESS CAPITALS 

PLEASE 

POSTCODE 

Dear Sirs, 

Please send me The Penny Share Guide, 
starting with the next issue. I have completed the mem- 
bership details above. 

Ltfi MS OTMH ass Mi HI 


TO: BANKPLC*! 

BRANCH CODE & FULL ADDRESS . * 

I 


A/CNAME A/C No I 

Please pay to National Westminster Bank PLC (60-1P-43T), 

2 St. Alphage Highwalk. London Wall. London EC2 for the | 
account of The Penny Share Guide Ltd.. Account’ number 1 
46980784, the sum of £39.50 on the date you receive this order and ■ 
thereafter £59.50 on the same day each year until counter-manded 1 
by me. 

Date Signature 


The Penny Share Guide is published monthly 
by The Penny Share Guide Ltd., and mailed 
First Class, to subscribers only, around the 
middle of every month. All applications will be 
acknowledged. 

PLEASE RETURN THE WHOLE OF THIS 
FORM DIRECT TO US. 


For official 
use only 
Membership 
No. 



ol 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 4986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


11 


•1 


Royal tour of Canada and Japan 

Princely advice to stop 
youth violence in 
the age of automation 


The Prince of Wales has 
called on youth to concern 
itself with bringing out the 
“latent abilities" in people and 
thus help combat a drift into 
subcultures, alientadon and 
violence. 

. The Prince made his appeal 
m a dinner speech to a room 
mil of young achievers here on 
Tuesday night, at the end of 
his and the Princess of Wales' 
visit to British Columbia. 

The eight-day visit was tied 
to Vancouver’s centennial and 
the opening of Expo 86, -the 
city's World’s Fair. 

The royal couple also called' 
at a number of other cities; 
Victoria and Nanaimo on 
Vancouver Island; and Ke- 
lowna, Kamloops and Prince 
George in the province's 
interior. 

Large crowds turned out to 
cheer them. The largest turn- 
out was recorded on Tuesday 
as the Prince and Princess 
dedicated a park at Burnaby, 
just outside Vancouver, and 
toured a number of pavilions 
at Expo 86. 

Tens of thousands gathered 
along the royal route through 
the Expo grounds, and at some 
points the crowds were 20- 
deep. 

Several thousand others had 
gathered earlier to see them in 
Burnaby. It was a warm, 
sunny day and the crowds 
were in a warm,hospitable 
mood. 

In his speech in Vancouver, 
the Prince paid tribute to the 
“obvious gins and abilities” of 


From John Best, Vancouver 

the young people attending 
the farewell dinner^ 

"But wfaat should concern 
us,” he went on, “is how to 
bring out the latent abilities 
and talents so often hidden in 
the rest of ns, or wasted. Those 
who are left out tend to retreat 
into subcultures governed by 
rituals of their own that can 
lead to alienation and even 
violence." 

Primitive societies dealt 
with this problem through 
initiation rites. The challenge 
faring Western society was to 
find a contemporary form of 
initiation rite that can bdp 
young people cope with these 
"explosive transitions” from 
boyhood to manhood, girl- 
hood to womanhood, youth to 
“person". 

This was particularly rele- 
vant at a time of heavy unem- 
ployment and “the rapid 
onward march of automation 
in every field". 

He added: “We all have 
something to contribute. But 
we often need imaginative 
leadership to bring it out." 

He told his young listeners 
that they are capable of bring- 
ing new hope to people's lives, 
and added this j>lca: “Help 
them to believe in themselves. 
Let them know that somebody 
is concerned about them . . . 

Canada, the Prince said, 
was ayonng, pioneering coun- 
try with great potential. The 
contrast with Britain was 
“quite extraordinary. We'll 
W8lcfa with fascination to see 
how you develop that poten- 


Sabah Christian 
leader sworn in 

From M.G.G. Pillai, Kuala Lornpur 


Datnk Joseph Pairin 
Kitingan. leader of the Chris- 
tian-dominated Sabah United 
Party, was sworn in as Chief 
Minister of Sabah yesterday 
within hours of his party's 
landslide victory in a mid- 
term State Assembly election. 

The SUP won 34 of the 48 
seats and reduced the two 
main Opposition parties to 
playing minor roles in the new 
Hous& It also all but wiped 
out the Berjaya Party leaving 
it with only one seat. 

Bui the results also indicat- 
ed dearly that Sabah volets 
preferred to keep their dis- 
tance from the Malaysian 
central Government, winch 
had forced the SUP after its 
April 1985 State Assembly 
election victory to form a 
coalition instead of ruling 
alone. 

Meanwhile, President 
Mahathir, who is expected to 
come in for some criticism 
after the SUP landslide, yes- 
terday reshuffled his Cabinet 


m a bid to dose ranks with it 
and his ruling coalition. 

The new Cabinet Prime Holster 
and Home Attaint: Datuk Seri 
Mahathir Muhammad; Deputy 
Prime Minister and Natio ns ! and 
Rural Development: Ghafar Baba; 
Rnancm Mr Batin Zainuftfn; Pubfc 
Works; Datuk Sarny Variks Labour 
and Manpower Detuk Lee Kim Sal; 
Welfare Services; Datuk Abu 
Hassah Oman Justice, and Mn- 
istsr in the Prime MMstsr'S 
De partme nt Datuk James 
Hinlr iir in ilia Prime 
Dep art me nt. Datuk Khan Yaakob; 
Defence; Datuk Abduflah Ahmad 
Badawfc Housing and Local Gov- 
ernment: Datuk Chan Sang Sum; 
Foreign: Tunku Ahmad Rith a ud oo n; 
Trade and Industry; Tunku 
uraah; Transport 
SBc Primary 
Leong, En- 
ergy, Post and Telecommunica- 
tions: Datuk Lao Moggie; Puttie 
E nte rpri s e s ; Datfn Randall Aziz; 
Education; Aratuar Ibrahim; Land 
Datuk 
Datuk Rais 


Regional Development I 
Adam; Infor m a ti on. DatuH 
■ Technology 

bk Stephen Yi 


Atfib 

Yatan; Sonne*, Technology and 
Environment Datuk Stephen Tong; 
Health: Datuk Mak Hon Kamc Fed- 
eral Territory; Datuk Shahrir 
Samad; Cutture. Youth and Sport 
Datuk Suiaiman baud. 


Police are 
‘closer’ 
on Palme 

From Christopher Mosey 
Stockholm 

The chief of the Stockholm 
Ktlice, Mr Hans Hobner, 
esterday hfatad that there 
oay have been an “fnterna- 
j pnal motive" behind the 
: ebntary 28 assassination of 
klr Olof Pabne, the Swedish 
Vftne Minister. 

Swedish poBce have scaled 
lawn their hunt for Mr 
>alme’s killer, leaving only 75 
tolice out of the original 
pedal force of 300 on the Job. 
*Mr Hohaer said: “We wffl 
on finite to work with it antfl 
re have solved the murder. In 
he beginning, we had only a 
a order and two ballets. To- 
lav, «e know almost exactly 
io'w that murder took place- 
-We know much more about 
be international motives that 
an be part of the pfctris*. we 
now a lot about the national 

***V*fahare gathered a lot of 
xaterial about people and 
roups that could be of interest 
j the investigation” 

Mr Holmer said poh eewe re 
loser to solving the murder 
txaii thev were two months 
go, but he could not say how 

lose. . . „ 

Thev are continuing to qMS- 
ion Victor Gtramrsso^ajgd 
X the man they origtoaHy 

barged with 

leased because of a lack of 

'^Qumarson was a former 
tember of 

I'orkers* Par& .®J5t 
signed against Mr Palmes 
>ft-wing policies- 


Tax return 
sweetener 
for Spain 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

Spain's Socialist Govern- 
ment, which is seeking re- 
election next month, has 
postponed the deadline for 
making this year’s income tax 
returns until after polling day 
in an attempt to avoid upset- 
ting the dectorate. 

An estimated 7 million 
Spaniards — .25 per cent of 
those who can vote on June 22 
— would otherwise have bad 
an income tax returns dead- 
line in the last week of 
campaigning. 1 . 

But the Cabinet has bad to 
ask die Council of State, a 
watchdog body which vets 
proposed BOls and decrees, to 
study whether the Finance 
Ministry can alter The tax rules 
in this way. 

The coinciding of the 
Spaniards' dreaded annual en- 
counter with the taxman and 
the general elections is one of 
the consequences of the bur- 
ned decision by Senor Ffelipe 
Gonzalez, the Prime Minister, 
to have an early poll 
Senor Oscar Alzaga, one of 
the leaders of the right-wing 
Opposition, admitted yester- 
day that the early poll had 
caught them seriously un- 


otuor Gonzalez had repeat- 
edly promised a general elec- 
tion only at the end of his four- 
year term. 

As a farther election sweet- 
ener, Madrid's underground is 
to delay its previously-an- 
nounced increase in fores until 
after polling day. 


Jail preferred to bail 

From Harry Debetins, Madrid 


Df 


falsi 6 cation of public docu- 
ments, was imprisoned after 
being extradited from West 
Germany, then allowed to live 
under house arrest in Madrid, 
pending an appeal gainst 
conditions set for his provi- 
sional liberty.' 

On Tuesday, the National 
Court confirmed the 300 mil- 
lion pesetas bail set by a lower 
court. 


tiaL I hope you’ll value your 
heritage and learn from the 
mistakes of others." 

As an example of others* 
mistakes he cited the lack of 
farsightedness in the exploita- 
tion- of the Amazon rain 
forests. 

In Canada too “the tempta- 
tion must be enormous to 
exploit natural resources 
where they are easiest to get 
at". 

• TOKYO: The Prince and 
Princess of Wales arrive in 
Japan tonight on a five-day 
tour that has aroused great 
media interest (David Watts 
writes). 

The royal couple fly to 
Osaka airport but will begin 
their tour of the country in the 
ancient capital of Kyoto. 

They will stay at the Omiya 
palace, where theprevious 
Prince of Wales was put up 
during his visit to Japan in 
1922. 

There will be no formal 
programme for the royal cou- 
ple tonight, but tomorrow 
their extremely busy schedule 


it will stan with a visit to 
tbeShugaku-in palace, and the 
programme includes a garden 
party given by the Governor 
of Kyoto prefecture and a 
reception given by the Japan- 
British Society of the Kansai, 
the St Andrew's Society and 
the British Chamber of 
Commerce. 

That will be followed by a 
dinner given by the Foreign 
Minister, Mr Shintaro Abe. 



\ / 

Mr Sadeq al-Mahdj (left), the new Prime Minister of Sudan, is congratulated after his election at the National Assembly. 


Suharto family threat 
to sue over ‘smear’ 


Jakarta (Reuter) - The 
family of President Suharto of 
Indonesia has issued a sting- 
ing rebuttal of corruption 
allegations published by The 
Sydney Morning Herald and 
has threatened to sue the 
journalist who wrote them. 

The President's half-broth- 
er, Mr Probosutedjo, a leading 
businessman who often acts as 
man for the President’s 
ily, launched the counter- 
attack on Tuesday. 

The allegation that Mr 
Suharto, his wife, family and 
business associates had used 
their positions to accumulate 


it wealth in the style of 
farmer President Marcos of 
the Philippines was regarded 
as insulting by the Govern- 
ment here and triggered a 
diplomatic row between Aus- 
tralia and Indonesia. 

Indonesian newspapers yes- 
terday highlighted a statement 
by Mr Probosutedjo that he 
would sue the Australian 
paper's foreign editor. Mr 
David Jenkins, for defama- 
tion and had hired a British 
lawyer to do so. 

He said Mr Jenkins had 
smeared an d humiliated the 
President 


Ethiopians admit 
defection at last 

From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 


The Ethiopian authorities 
have annonneed the defection 
of Dteft Wolde Giorgis — 
who. as head of the Ethiopian 
Relief and Rehabilitation 
Commission, had the task of 
co-ordinating international aid 
for victims oi the 1984 and 1985 
tontines there — six months 
after he left the country and 
(ailed to return. 

Mr Da wit's flight was re- 
ported by The Times early this 
year, but neither he nor the 
Ethiopian Government would 
then confirm the details. He 


has been in the United States 
recently. 

Now Addis Ababa radio has 
broadcast an announcement 
saying: “While others in Ethi- 
opia were striving to save the 
lives of their fellow-country- 
men, Da wit betrayed his coun- 
try and exchanged his dignity 
for personal gain." 

A former army major, he 
was Governor of Eritrea — 
where a guerrilla war has been 
going on for more than 20 
years - before becoming head 
of the relief commission in 
1984. 


Offer to 
rebels 
by Sudan 
Premier 

Khartoum (Reuter) - Mr 
Sadeq al-Mahdi. voted in as 
Prime Minister by Sudan’s 
parliament, has extended an 
olive branch to neighbouring 
Ethiopia and called on Addis 
Ababa- backed rebels in the 
south to negotiate a peaceful 
settlement. 

Mr Mahdi, who was sworn 
in on Tuesday, said on state 
television that he would more 
than reciprocate any move 
taken by Marxist-ruled Ethio- 
pia to improve relations with 
Sudan. 

The two countries have 
been at political loggerheads 
for nearly a decade. 

Relations were even further 
strained over Ethiopia's sup- 
port for the rebel Sudan 
People's Liberation Army, 
which has been fighting gov- 
emmem troops in southern 
Sudan since 1983. 

Ethiopia, which sent a dele- 
gation to Tuesday's session of 
parliament, claims that Khar- 
toum is continuing to support 
secessionist rebels in its Tigre 
and Eritrea provinces. 

Mr Mahdi also called on the 
Sudan rebels to lay down arms 
and begin talks on a peaceful 
seulement, something they 
have so far rejected. 

• ADDIS ABAJSA; Ethiopia 
demanded in talks starting 
here yesterday that Somalia 
recognize existing boundaries 
between them as a precondi- 
tion for lasting peace (Reuter 
reports). 

Mr Goshu Wolde. the Ethi- 
opian Foreign Minister, said: 
“If Somalia recognizes the 
existing boundaries of Ethio- 
pia ana respects its territorial 
integrity, other differences be- 
tween the two countries are 
not insurmountable." 



years' celebration means 



rs for you. 


TWA has been flying passengers across 
the Atlantic for 40 years. That's why we're No.1 
across the Atlantic now 

Now we're celebrating And we'd like you 
to celebrate with us. 

So we're offering a range of exciting and 
money-saving deals to those of you who book 
TWA transatlantic flights for travel completed 
by 12th June 

Look at what you can get flying TWA 
now: a Hertz car for only $40 a week (that’s 
about £27),TWA flights in Americafor only $40 


l^mencan Airplan, American Express. Jfitways North American Travel and Premjec 


each (minimum six, maximum eight) -and a stay 
in a Hilton Hotel for$40 per person per night 
These are the exciting offers TWA is makingto 
celebrate its 40 years' service 

So make sure you plan your visit to the 
USA around TWA These schemes are operated 
by selected tour operators*. Certain conditions 
apply so check with your Travel Agent 

You’ll enjoy it more, find it more conven- 
ient and a lot more enjoyable to be flying with 
the airline that leads the way to the USA- and 
has been doing it for 40 years. 

Leading the way to the USA 


86 


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12 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 



We talk and you listen, no. 
You talk and we listen, yes. 


ALFRED MARKS 



Executive Secretary 


SENIOR SECRETARY 
DULWICH VILLAGE 

SiibB friendly office 


Marty audio accurate 
and onianisatiooal - 


Central London 

■ .Arthur .Andersen & Co. Mjrwgemeni Gmsulunrs ftoneofihe 
Oliwtrv* largest hrmsitf consulranb*itha rtputaion for 
enipM ingonlv the boi .u all levels. 

tti? are seeking to recruit an experienced PA for one of our 
met* prextigu hi> seowan.i! posLs-ihjf of'EvecuineSecreiaiy 
to the Ramier-in-Churgeof the Consultancy Prjciice in London. 
Vm « ill be expected t< i provide an exceptional Venice which 
retlecis i he seniority of rhe post jpd be able to deal with people 

.11311 levels. Tills will involve you direct 1\ in d>ecby-to-diy 

management of this most suctessfu I area of our praa ice. 

Tlie successful candidate w ill be aged 26+. educated to ‘O' 
level standard and luve proven organ csiuonal and 
ndminisrratn e .skills. A high standard of typing Is required and 
there will be the opportunity to train on the latest VANG office 
technology. Shorthand is not essential, but would bean 
advantage. 


£11,400 

Previous experience at a senior level in a large professional or 
commercial organisation is essential. You should also have 
excellent presentation and ermimunicat ion skills and the 
ability to work under pressure; 

VTt bel ieve chat this wan excel lent opportunity’ for a really 
first -class executive .secreratyro move to one of the most " 
prestigious and demanding jobs available. 

If you would like to apply, please .send a detailed curriculum 
viuie i enclosing a daytime telephone number ) tc* 


Mrs M. Hermessy 
Recruiting Officer; 
Arthur Andersen & Ox 
i Surrev Street, 

London WG2R2PS. 


SECRETARY/PA TO DIRECTOR 

AppUeafions are reviled (nan experienced Secretaries 
already working at senior level to assist busy female 
Director. 

Applicants should possess excellent written and oral 
communication skills, a high standard of typing, the 
ability lo work on their own initiative and aMe to 
organise the day to day naming of the office. 

Knowledge of Wordprocessors preferably 1CL 8801 
would be a distinct advantage. 

Preferred age range 23 - 25 although may suit some- 
one wishing to return to work after having a family. 

Salary negotiable around £8.750. 

Benefits include prof) I sharing. Luncheon Vouchers. 
Season Ticket Loan. 22 days holiday. 

Applications In writing please lo:- 

Mrs. Jan Hawfces, 

C1PFA Services Ltd, Heron House, 

10 Dean Farrar Street, 

London SW1H OCX. 


DIRECTOR’S SECRETARY 
MAJOR TRADE 
ASSOCIATION 

Good educational background, business 
training and excellent secretarial skills 
and experience at senior executive level 
essential. Likely age 30 - 45. Salary a 
£9,500 on incremental scale, gener-ous 
LVs plus pension scheme. 

C.V. to General Secretary, 
Chemical Industries Association Ltd., 
Alembic House, 93 Albert Embankment, 
London SE1 7TUL 


WANG OIS SUPERVISOR/ 
LEGAL SECRETARY 

Partner responsible for an OIS 140 system with 
25 peripherals requires an audio secretary. The 
job which is a demanding one requires a knowl- 
edge of glossaries and decision processing as 
well as a capacity to organise back-up and the 
regulation of documents on this system. The 
Partner concerned also conducts a private 
client/trust/tax practice which involves quite a 
heavy toad of audio typing. 4 weeks hols, LVs, 
9am-5pm. Good salary 

Please apply in writing with CV to David Biddle 

Biddle and Co 
1 Gresham Street 
London EC2V 7BU 

t TOP FLIGHT I 
I SECRETARIES! | 

* Sec/PA for Computer Company i 

$ in SW15. £11,500. | 

i Graduate Secretary for W1 Solid- t 
£ tors. £8,850. | 

* Audio Sec, Mayfair Company, t 

% £9,000 | 

£ Tel Carol Wisby on 947 0319 or I 
t 946 4424 . | 

ADMINISTRATOR 
Salary up to £15,000 

Mature person with top administrative experi- 
ence and secretarial background required to 
manage Chelsea Arts Club for twelve 14 hour 
days In every twenty eight days. Must be able to 
handle money, people, employees, stock con- 
trols. social events, computers and everything to 
do with a small business. 

Please telephone in the first Instance 01-352 
0973. 


JOIN THE *H" TEAM 

Be pan of the action on our dynamic temp- team which ,1 
win keep you busy providing new chaDer^es in a wide 
variety of assignments throughout London- If you are 
bright and enthusiastic with skills of 80/l00sfa or audio 
504- typ and good WP exp. wii can earn exce l l e nt rates 
on our team. Age 19-25. Please call 

437 6032 

HobstoneS 


m_ L p ^ KA ^®*L 8EcneT «* Y / PA 

y k^Wnofor as« to work tor 4 Dtroctarc 
benin (hr UK Young aod MmflyCowtni 
urScn 1 «■ A«Ba WUH* on 620 sag? 

consultants , suite scb. 
HOUSE. ROOD LANE, LONDON ECS. 


.Arthur 

Andersen 

&& 

MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS! 


Word processing experience 
deskate. 

Non smoker preferred. 
Substantial salary acconing 
to experience. 

Ring M a ure en O'Brien; 
01 299 1731 

Or write with C.V. to: 

9ENEBM. MMUBER, 
ESTATES GOVBUfORS, 
OUk CQUEGE. 
GALLERY ROAD. 
DU1MIC11 SEZ1 7AE 


SECRETARY 

ranked far busy bet friendly 
Fulham developers office. 
Varied and ia i e re tu ng work 
for mo Directed and dw 
Sales and Marketing Hn- 
avr. Age w& asm + 5 
«uki holiday & free touches. 
Gmuaa-Howaid Day ok 
61-738 7133 


Secretary to 
the Director 
of a Major 
International 
Company 

One of the top 
secretarial positions in 
the East Midlands 



Tfte Company is a "btate dafT <x^ras£rtion «rat worldwide 
interests. Highly profitable and sfiB expanding, jthas arr unnv^tod 
reparation for quality and inriOvabtL Headquarter are inapfe&rara 
East Midlands location'. 

The Job involves providing a top-class con fi de ntia l a ectoadfr 
service to a Director of the cott^pany where ajmrwunerrt and a 
professional approach are essential requirements. ariyoomacr troth 
personnel at all levels and deep involvement, wiffi tfie mmimuth 
supervision, in speciai projects and the Director's daWHiarxtotiaa, ■ 

Applicants must have retevanr experience ar Dreqqror Sow, 
Executive level within a Tnedairi/laige otganisarioiv: Impeaatjfe 
secretarial sfcffls including shorthand and knowledge of efedranfc 
office equipment PoBe, perscinajity^confidenc&«9entirt.Aejd 
under 35. • - . \ >.. - 

Ttia Rewards are fufy negotiable and w9 atoacr tha latest 
calibre. Relocation assistance. Superb modem office. Compre- 
hensive benefits. Further cares progression. V - ’ / 

■This enjoyable and denendreg job will offer eft tfc variety, 
responsibility and involvement you are tookingfbr. Phase sareffult 
CV in strictest confidence to Cathy Homer, Thai Re cnirtnwi - 
link, Bernard House, PkcacfiBy Ptaza. M anc h ester tm ©&_>_ 

Please name any comparaes in whcmyqudo nat^^ 
AppBcationS from either sex. 


BADMINTON SCHOOL, BRISTOL 

G-S-A- Boarding and Day. 340 Oris 7-18. 

HEADMASTER’S SECRETARY 

Apptkatlons arc invited tor this key post to start hi August. 
U win w a demanding rob noulrlng efficiency, discretion, 
good humour and personal commitment Salary according 
fo age and experience, with 8 weeks holiday. Aoconmoda- 
tton available. 

Please write lo (he Headmaster with CV and two referees. 

BADMINTON SCHOOL. WESTBUHY-ON-TRYM. 
BRISTOL. BS9 3BA. 


ASSISTANT TO 

OPERATIONS GENERAL MANAGER 

West London removals storage and shipping 
company seeks mature 25-30 year old with 
some experience in related industry desirable 
but not essential. Substantial salary package 
negotiable depending on age and experience. 5 
day week 9-6. 

Initial enquires to Simon Newman 
on 01-221 2661 


MAGAZINE 

PUBLISHING 

Bright efficient young person with excellent typ- 
ing and organisational skills to work on 
production/subscriptions of monthly business 
equipment magazine. 

Salary £7,000 - £7.500 depending on experience. 

Ring Tracey Baines on 01-730 0403. 


40 ISH??? 

RETURNING TO WORK??? 

Parmer's PA/sccrmry required for West End Char- 
tered Engineers with international practice. Good/ 
accurate typing is necessary but ability to maintain 
sense of humour under pressure is as important. 

01-629 9777 


SECRETARY TO CHIEF EXECUTIVE 

Experience of working wtth senior personnel re- 
quired. Ability to use own initiative as he travels 
a great deal. Must be able to communicate with 
people from all walks of Hfe. Baste smir re- 
quired. Salary commensurate lo skills. 

Please contact Sarah Dawkins 
01-629 7688 


£10500 

COMPUTER WIZARD 

Ttts {xesUQious and htaHy 
specofiscd Prwing Company 
basts: ki the Wast End is 
foofong for a Sec/PA to wok 
lor ttar Treasurer. 

You and be of Graduate cali- 
bre, numerate and should 
! law wfeuiieriencBDl cent- 
iliter systems such as BM 
ftsplayiirter wait Tartpacfc 4, 
Hepoteack and Lotus 123. 

Ties is » Ideal opportunity 
tor a calm, composed and ! 
wB organsed Sec/PA who 
mays TfguranwV. raw tech- 
nology and fcvetopeig their ! 
own seas of respoRsb&ty. I 


PA/SECRETARY 

With common sense and a seosa of humour 

Required for a small friendly office in WC1. The 
job involves a wide variety of tasks and respon- 
sibilities. You should have Aodio/Shorthand 
skills and SO wpm typing, WP experience would 
be an advantage tot not essentiaL Salary is c. 
£8,000. 

Contact Maree on 01-242 5049 
for further details- 


PA SECRETARY 

Ability to do elementary 
bookeeping. Experience of 
Wordstar important Small City 
company in financial services to 
the film industry. • 

Ring 01-236 2830 


SECRETARY/PA Wl 

£l0,000pa 

Confident, efficient secretary req’d to work hi 
private home of young Israeli and his wife. In- 
volved in steel but work varied and interesting 
inc] much contact with Sotherbys and Christies. 
Shorthand not essential but a help. Typing and 
telex needed. Lunch provided. Please nng Kate 
01-486 2367 

(NO AGEHCSSt 


SECRETARY /RECEPTIONIST 
£9,500 

For bright friendly Wl Ad Agency. Most be 
intelligent, presentable, enthusiastic with skills 
55/70. Duties will include greeting clients and 
general secretarial work. 

Please send photo and CV to: 

Laura Howard, No. 3 Bromley Place, 
Conway Sl, London W1P 5HB. 


SECRETARY/PA 

£9,500 

To handle all ad mf ntetraBOn. typing and recephon for suc- 
cessful specialist recr u itment ronratttant . Small pleasant 
offices In Hegoil Street. Electronic Memory Typewriter. 
Hours 9.30 - 6.30. 

Te l e p h one Peter LrddeS 
on 01-734 6895 


NON-SECRET ASIAL 


Personal Assistant 
Deputy Director’s Office 

HENDON 

£10,668 - £11331 pa inc 

A senior post providing PA and 
administrative support to the Deputy 
Director. His office is central to the 
academic and administrative work of the 
Polytechnic, involving a wide range of 
important policy issues. 

A complete command of administrative 
and secretarial skills commensurate with 
extensive experience m a post at a similar 
senior management support level is 
essentiaL 

Write enclosing SAE (mm 9in x 4ia) and 
ipotiDg ref Z163A for farther details and 
an application form: Personnel Office, 
Middlesex Polytechnic, 114 Chase Side, 
London N14 5PN. Closing date 19th May. 


- A career in advertising sales 

VM are fooMng for a person wtn te 
Copabta Ot cooanaaicatog uullmi l alw aly at ttw NgtnM tamL 
Aduptatafa to a vaoaly of eommaro ta l enteonmepB. 
Poreunite nfthout bring atgamao ra iw. 

Inspired by vwy high mcowa Inkad mtzkahmhf id results.. 
Totefly confidant in thoir ibdty to squire now skOs. 

MM to co-opareiB with cofisgoss to reacti raoUsti atyoctires. 
lacking tm appcxlunfor to ariMv* Mr tuB pounfist 

H you have the capital qaafi&es Bated above than 
you ahotrid pot there to work vritb oa lo oar mutual 
benefit Please pboae ritber Martin Macterafa or 
David Johnston an 01 235 0412. 


BENEFITS 

+ £10,000 sec 

As smtey to tta Deputy CW 
Executive o I ttte h taroab o ial 
Sank yoivA eqoy a breydre 
tetti ante or no overtime. 

Om enraspoadanre, ueraorel 
wxt. raoaMog «s*sre. day 
ate tram araopremts n lux- 
teous umxnfiogs. 

Excafient tretete package. 


We talk and you l isten.no. 

0 

You talk and we listen; ves. 


EXECUTIVE WGH FLYER! 
£U«N ' : 

We are tookiu® for a mp Btfat p um aaii mthtept wfA 
good secrenrial sbBs as woric wretfei ■ OwrfEwoitive of 
one of are major diems. Yon wifi be treaty invtitod in 
his veiy denureefiagaed cradai work, foseiirealtsigam- 
sstion to sodafinag m foasSa levels, Yoo »stt find tier work 


For fmib» details ploae pboae tfoye reeriie orSse 
WjtJey on 486 6717 Afizad Maris RbcAntmem 
Consultant. 


/fet ALFRED MARKS 



i» I.'l.M 







Annabel on 01-7M 2567 
SkB> Fry BecnmnienL 

So^aIth 

Y^ccnotment 




SUPER SECEETARIE& 


■jsa 


Success 


West End Office 
629 9686 


BILINGUAL 

cep 

£10,500+ 

FuB seoBtarra support for MO of 
JUP mtmawoaf dnoi at their 
tfcheail office toon) «i modem 
tew nr Wafonf. Hertt 

tetenss German/Engksh oius 
tete sh/tHang/audu sMs. 


Of C.V. te Sandra. 

Vtakww fleemomeBL 
20 The Paraoe. waftnd. 
Harts. WD1 2AA 


NOPf-SECRCTARlAL 


receptionist 

! GMOHMI nr» cm ate rnw 
i in Kniqh t rto d ge. swj nexi- 
Ma Min n mriude wiy 
manUMS end nourm uvr 
out EXMmfK* 

Dal iw omcUmi. Good ap- 
pearance and pepraoum* is 
iswnmi v> M amutv ro work 
wtm gndi, Keen, rnnuy 
tram. Pay im in c&JJOO 


Company secretarial 

ASSISTANT 

TOterloo c£10,000 

Investors in Industry is the world's largest source of private • - 
venture capital We have invested in mote than 8j000 companies over the 
past forty years. ^ _ 

We now have a vacancy in our Company Secretarial department 
for an assistant to our Assistant to the Secretary (Statutory). The work 
•will involve: 

• maintaining the Credit Act and Disclosable Interests 

registers 

• handling our Trade Mark adminis tration 
■ dealing with Stockholders* cpieries 

• preparing entries for professional publications 

as well as an interesting range of Company Secretarial and project work. 

Candidates should have at least 2 ‘A’ levels or an equivalent 
standard of education, and have gained ar least 2 years* general 
commercial and administrative experience in an office environment! 
Preference will be gjven to applicants who: 

• are studying for the ICSA exams 

f m have experience within a Company Secretarial department 

• are non-smokers in the office - 

• are under 30 years of age. 

Our attractive financial sector package includes a concessionary 
mortgage scheme, free medical insurance, profit s hari n g , a non- 
conmbutory pension scheme, free lunches and a season ticket loan 
scheme. 

Interested? Please contact Carolyn Wolsey for an 
application form. . '■ 

Investors in Industry pic 

91 Waterloo Road, London 5E1 8XP. V 

Teh 01-928 7822 ext 2217. mMM 


THE CREATIVE USE OF MONEY. 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TELEPHONIST 

ADVERTISING 

TfM cBortf is B kHK&ng Wast 
End Agency- anvt .sppsar- 
ance and - moaOent 
telephone rarer am ea- 
sardWL Duties to Mude- 
t o iephone wbrtc (Monarch 
BwNchboanf). radramg MSi- 
tore anti hraxSing general 
enquiries. Hours &a)am - 
ssopm, or variable be- 
tween 8am a 8pm. Good. 


THE NATIONAL TRUST 
fof Places of Historic 
Interest or Natural Beauty 

SECRETARIES - 
APPEALS SECTION 


The National Trust is seeking to 


ten Secretaries at 


.. . Trost the preserva- 

tion of l|ie countryside and sound geo graphi cal leaowfedgg 
vrtMtid be an advamasi.' - 

Saknyr RaqgB £ 6^78 - £ 7 J 838 . depenefing on age and 
experience- 

Please apply in. writing, eadosng CV. kx . 

Miss Elizabeth Allmaric 
Pfenoand Section 
The National Trust . 

36 Qmta Arne's Gate 




May 1986 





















wore* a tmrrifluQo + ***■ 
pcra» Switey »x* in asm 
OtF team to SWI head ofliM 
Sure 80 55 •» WPee owr 
DmjHKta. ■ CapM • PNUf. TAD 
9384. after 7pm 741 2864. 


■MMUTt MB. To ran smidf 
company in Wl. Good 9*C 
* prgantuaonaiafemicgsatuaL 
Lanauagn-an asm etSOJDOO 
M. Tot Ot -409* 2838 






Bins 01-584 52S2 | [j-. g) 






fWtiwre.il on page 31 













r- 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS/LAW 


New Costa Rica leader 
to convene summit 
on Contadora proposal 



From Martha Honey, San Jose, Costa Rica 


Dr Oscar Arias, who is 
being sworn in today as Presi- 
dent of Central America’s 
most democratic and stable 
nation, plans to use the occa- 
sion to project himself as a 
peacemaker in regional affairs. 

After the inauguration fes- 
tivities, his first act as Presi- 
dent will be to convene a 
summit of the ten Latin 
' American heads of state who 
have arrived here. 

The summit will concen- 
trate on the deadlocked 
Contadora peace proposal, 
and the leaders are expected to 
sign what is being termed a 
“declaration of peace". 

However, Nicaragua’s Pres- 
ident Onega will be absent. He 
said last week that he would 
not come for fear of demon- 
strations by Nicaraguan exiles 
and Contras living in Costa 
Rica. 

Nicaragua is being repre- 
sented by its newly-appointed 
ambassador, Senor Claudia 
Chamorro, who has liule po- 
litical influence. 

Also absent will be US Vice- 
President George Bush who 
will attend the inauguration 
but leave just before the 
summit. 

Despite their absence, the 
roles of the US and Nicaragua 
in Central America are certain 
to be centra] to .the discus- 
sions, and relations with these 
two countries promise to be- 
come the most difficult for- 
eign policy issues Dr Arias will 
face. 

Since his election in Febru- 
ary, Dr .Arias has been more 
outspoken on foreign affairs 
than his predecessor. Setter 
Luis Alberto Monge. 


To the annoyance of Rea- 
gan Administration officials. 
Dr Arias opposed US military 
aid to the Contras, and has 
vowed to try to expel anti- 
Sandinista guerrillas from 
Costa Rican territory. 

His task is not easy, because 
guerrillas have for three years 
operated across the northern- 
border, and the US-backed 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force 
(FDN) is trying to increase its 
presence in Costa Rica. 

However, 'Dr Arias has 
sought and found support 
from other Latin American 
countries. 

In addition. Argentina and 
Peru are likely to help with 
police and security training 
and equipment, thus lessening 
Costa Rica's dependence on 
the US. 

The disbursement of SI 60 
million (£107 million) in US 
aid. World Bank and Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund cash 
has been suspended for 
months, a move which several 
Arias aides and press accounts 
internet as a form of political 
retaliation. 

However, tbe Costa Rican 
Central Bank president. Senor 
Eduardo Lizano, insists that 
the money is held for “purely 
technical reasons”, including 
Costa Rica's failure, to cut its 
public payroll, reduce govern- 
ment subsidy on basic grains, 
and substantially devalue its 
currency. 

One of the first tasks of the 
Arias administration will be to 
try to negotiate a new standby 
agreement with the IMF to 
secure the release of the 
blocked funds. 

Dr Arias said recently that 


he fears that the US, which 
gives more aid per capita to 
Cos la Rica than to any coun- 
try except Israel, may retaliate 
by cutting its annual aid 
package. 

This appears to be happen- 
ing. with estimates that the 
current fiscal year's grants will 
total only $130 million, com- 
pared with more than $200 
million last year. 

Dr Arias's most concrete 
and probably difficult domes- 
tic task is to adhere to his 
campaign pledge to build 
80,000 new public sector 
houses in tbe next- four years. 
He has named one of his most 
competent and left-leaning 
supporters, Senor Fernando 
Zumbado, as Minister of 
Housing. 

Senor Zumbado, a dose 
adviser during the campaign, 
had been expected to receive a 
more important political post 
But Dr Arias has filled the top 
foreign and security posts with 
party centrists or conserva- 
tives. 

Despite his more indepen- 
dent foreign policy stand so 
far, bis appointments have 
disappointed some left-wing- 
ers in his National Liberation 
Party. 

• NEW YORK: Costa Rica, 
with one of the highest per 
capita debts in the' world, 
defaulted on its commercial 
bank loans by foiling to make 
an - interest payment last 
month, bankers said yesterday 
(Reuter reports). 

They said Costa Rica failed 
to make a $19 million interest 
payment on April 28 and did 
not settle tbe default within 
the five days allowed. 


WMBM 




ljw\ TV* V • T ^. V ; 

mm 


The US battleship Missouri, on which the J 
Gate bridge in San Francisco for a $475 n 



Pilot ‘glad to be home 9 

From a Correspondent Peking 


The first Taiwanese com- 
mercial pilot to defect to China 
told foreign reporters at a 
press conference in the Great 
Hall of the People yesterday 
that he was glad to be in the 
motherland. 

“People (in Taiwan) are 
subjected to severe mental 
pressure,” said Mr Wang 
Xljne, aged 56, who on Satur- 
day flew a Taipei-bound China 
Airlines Boeing 747 cargo jet 
to Canton, where he surren- 
dered to Chinese authorities. 

He said that life under 
nationalist role had proved tin* 


much for him and added: 
“There are corrupt officials in 
Taiwan, privileges are ram- 
pant economic crises are nu- 
merous, and traffic is chaotic.” 

Mr Wang left his wife of 30 
years and his two children In 
Taiwan. His wife said she. 
could not believe he would 
remain in China. 

Meanwhile, Peking authori- 
ties insisted that China Air- 
lines should send officials to 
Peking to meet representatives 
of the dvtt aviation, adminis- 
tration of China to decide what 
to do with the aircraft. 



Mr Wang Xjjue: Pressure in 
Taiwan was too much. 


Law Report May 8 1 986 


Council’s duty of care in 
inspecting foundations 


Jones and Another v Stroud 

District Council 

Before Lord Justice Fox. Lord 

Justice Neill and Lord Justice 

Ralph Gibson 

[Judgment given May 7] 

Where a claim was brought 
against a local authority for 
negligence arising out of the 
approval of plans for the erec- 
tion of a building and failure to 
inspect the foundations at the 
time of erection, unless the 
building was “doomed from the 
start” there was no breach of the 
authority's duty of care, and 
consequently die cause of action 
against the local authority did 
not arise, until the condition of 
the property gave rise u> danger 
to the health or safety of persons 
present on the prcmises- 

Thc exception of a building 
doomed from the start was 
limited to extreme cases of gross 
defects which were likely to be 
disclosed almost immediately. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
when allowing an appeal b> the 
plaintiffs. Mr Alfred Jones and 
Mrs Jillian Jones, from a de- 
cision of Mr Victor We llings. 
QC. sitting as an official referee, 
given on May 23. 1 984 that the 
plaintiffs' claim against Stroud 
District Council, the successors 
to Stroud Rural District Coun- 
cil, for negligence and breach of 
statutory duty in approving 
plans for the erection of a house 
ai Edge. Gloucestershire, was 
statute-barred. 

Mr Christopher Symons for 
Mr and Mrs Jones-. Mr Philip 
Naughion for the local author- 
ity. 

LORD JUSTICE NEILL said 
that the house was built in 1064. 
since when it had suffered 
damage by subsidence. 

The plaintiffs had bought it in 
1975. At about the end of 197b 
Mr Jones had noticed for the 
first time that the comer of one 
bedroom had started to move 
away.- 

Ai about the beginning of 
1977 the plaintiffs had in- 
structed a chartered engineer. 
He hod expressed the opinion 
that the main causes of the 
damage to the house wens: 
subsidence of the subsoil be- 
cause of the extreme climatic 
conditions of 1976; the footings 
were bearing on materials 
susceptible to subsidence: weak- 
ness in the basic construction 
concept- and water penetration 
to the underside of the concrete 
footings. 

The plaintiffs had decided to 
have work done which would 
both remedy the damage and 
effect further improvements 
and additions. Their scheme of 
work had been carried out by a 
firm controlled by Mr Jones. 

The plaintiffs had lived in the 
house unn! 1980. when they 
sold it. 

The wni in the proceedings 
was issued on May 1. |9$1. 

The judge had dismissed the 
plaintiffs' claim on she basis that 
it was statute- barred. 

Having reached the conclu- 
sion that the local authority had 


been negligent and that the 
damage was directly attributable 
to that failure, the judge had 
based his derision that the claim 
was statute-barred on the speech 
of Lord Fraser of Tullybelton in 
Pirelli General Cable Works Ltd 
v Oscar Faber A Partners ([1983] 
2 AC U. 

It appeared that the judge had 
decided the issue of limitation 
on two alternative grounds: that 
some significant movement of 
material had probably occurred 
before 1975, and therefore more 
than six years before the issue of 
the writ, or that by reason of. 
defective foundations the house 
had been “doomed from the 
start" and was certain to en- 
danger the health if not the 
safely of the occupiers so that 
the cause of action arose in 1964 
when the house was builL 

Considerable assistance was 
to be derived from Investors in 
Industry Commercial Properties 
Ltd r South Bedfordshire Dis- 
trict Council i The Times, 
December 31. 1985:119861 1 All 
ER 7g7j. To the live propo- 
sitions set out in that case by 
Lord Justice Slade it was nec- 
essary to add a sixth based on 
Lord Fraser's speech in the 
Pirelli case to the effect that time 
ran against the owners as a class, 
and if lime ran against one it 
also ran against his successors in 
title. 

It followed from those propo- 
sitions. and in particular Lord 
Justice Slade's third propo- 
sition. that until the condition of 
the property gave rise to danger 
to the health or safety of persons 
present on the premises no 
breach of ihc duty of care had 
taken place and accordingly no 
cause of action had arisen. 

U had been argued that it 
would be unjust ill he cause of 
action against the local author- 
ity were to arise in a particular 
case at a later dale than the 
cause of action against the 
builder because that might affect 


Summary of wages 
book insufficient 


Olber v Northampton Bor- 
ough Council 

A summary extract of ac- 
counts in a wages book could 
noi be described as the equiva- 
lent of the wages book or its 
computer equivalent for the 
purposes of section 1 7(| j of the 
Local Government Finance Act 
1981 

The Queen’s Bench Di- 
visional Court (Lord Justice 
Watkins and Mr Justice Mannl 
so held on April 28, allowing an 
appeal by way of case stated by 
the Northampton Justices, 
brought by the applicant Mr 
John Oliver, who sought to 
inspect the wages books relating 
to employees engaged by an 
entertainment centre which had 
been set up by the council. 


Battle lines drawn in Rome 


Fast food versus high fashion 


The most exquisite of Italy's 
great fashion designers wfll 
today challenge in a Rome 
court the right of the world’s 
best-known purveyor of ham- 
burgers to bring “noise and 
disgusting odours" to the ele- 
gant streets of the Piazza dl 
Spagm. 

McDonald's versos 
Valentino promises to be a 
battle between giants. Bot It 
will be more important for the 
social issues involved than far 
the legal question of whether 
large-scale frying which at- 
tracts the sar faurban crowds 
can be pmrisbed under the 
penal code. Valentino wfll 
satisfy a sizeable body of 
opinion if be succeeds. 

Tbe branching of a fast-food 
emporium, the biggest of the 
worldwide McDonald's chain, 
provoked an extraordinary 
shock, more than the promot- 
ers can have foreseen. Some of 
the reasons are obvious 
enough. 

The site is dose to the 
Piazza di Spagna, which is not 
mdy one of Rome's most 
beantifnJ squares but a part of 
tbe city associated with highly 
cultivated living (or for that 
matter, dying, because it was 
there that Keats met his 
tragically early death). 

Another obvious reason was 
that McDonald's opening co- 


From Peter Nichols, Rome 


kidded with the start of the 
period In which international 
terrorism and tbe United 
States became closely involved 
with each other, and so nnin- 
hiMtedly American an estab- 
lishment looked like it might 
be an inviting target for the 
terrorists. 

The third of the more 
obvhms objections came from 
c on servative-minded Romans 
who still retisb the idyllic idea 
of their dty as Eorope's last 
stroughoLd of file lavish and 
lengthy lunch. Tbe newspa- 
pers have been full iff touching 
reminiscences of a happy 
childhood spent playing on the 
sun-swept Spanish Steps in 
the Piazza di Spagna and of 
the genuine smells emerging 
from the kitchens of the 
decorous little restaurants, 
which once perfumed old 
Rome. 

The Roman lunch had be- 
come a rarer occasion, howev- 
er, long before McDonald's 
entered the scene. In part a 
survival of European habits of 
two cestnries ago, when heavy 
eating remained an afternoon 
ami notan evening pursuit, the 
long lunch was kept here hi its 
place of honour. 

Eating in a hurry would aiso 
have threatened to upset tbe 
peaceful afternoon sleep- that 
many Romans regarded as 


essential to a wefl ordered life. 

That ingenuous form of 
hedonism could not survive the 
bitter reality that Rome was to 
become, in a remarkably short 
space of time after the war, the 
capital city iff the world's 
seventh industrial power. 

One effect of tbe country's 



social transformation was that 
Rome, with notable reluctance, 
began to surrender something 
of its easy-going ways - 
though by no means alL as 
business people and industri- 
alists still complain. 

At the same time, the social 
changes brought a heavy mi- 
gration into the cities from the 
countryside and from the 
South, an experience which 
gave to Rome in a special 
sense among the cities a 
variety of social problems. 

The hope of finding work in 
Rome had much less, sub- 
stance than in cities snch as 
Turin and Milan where indus- 
try was already established. 


The immig rants settled on the 
outskirts and their presence 

brought the budding specula- 
tors who constructed the huge 
dormitory submits destined to 
be left for years without basic 
urban services. 

Tbe whole dty is now facing 
the problems of the first 
generation of people who have 
reached adulthood. the chil- 
dren of poor immigrants, in 
these soulless zones. 

What has all this to do with 
McDonald's descent on Piazza 
di Spagna? Almost everything, 
because McDonald's immedi- 
ately became one of the centres 
for Italian young people to 
gather, many of them from the 
harsh background of un- 
planned suburbs. 

By whatever is the opposite 
of a stroke of genius, the Rome 
authorities first placed an 
underground railway station in 
Piazza di Spagna and then 
went on to allow McDonald's 
to open a few hundred yards 
away. 

The difficulty of trying to 
make fast food cohabit with 
Piazza di Spagna is symboli- 
cally illuminated by tbe 
Valentino complaint that the 
noise and smells upset his 
atelier which stands directly 
above the interloping burger 
chain. But tbe real issues go 
deeper than high fashion 
against fast eating. 


Britain 
presses 
China for 
damages 

From a Correspondent 
Peking 

' British and Chinese officials 
are holding ihe first round of 
high-level talks in a bid to 
resolve British claims against 
China, many of which pre- 
date ihe Communist revolu- 
tion of! 949. 

A five-member British dele- 
gation - representing the 
Bank of England, the Foreign 
Office and London's Council 
of Foreign Bond Holders - 
began a week-long series of 
meetings on Monday with 
representatives of the Chinese 
Foreign Ministry and Bank of 
China. 

At issue are British Govern- 
ment corporate and private 
claims for loss of property and 
indemnities arising from the 
turbulept war years in China 
through the 1949 revolution 
and the early 1950s, when 
many foreign assets and prop- 
erties were nationalized or 
confiscated by the new regime 

A British official in Peking 
declined to estimate the totaJ 
amount involved but said the 
f!92 million face value of 
outstanding Chinese Railroad 
Bonds held by British and US 
investors, as well as the bonds* 
accrued interest arrears total- 
ling £132 million, represented 
“just one small part of what 
we're talking about". 

The defaulted Chinese Rail- 
road Bonds, issued between 
1895 and 1937 and repudiated 
by the Communists after 
1949. have attracted consider- 
able attention in the West as 
the Government of Mr Deng 
Xiaoping seeks to borrow 
funds from Western capital 
markets for its modernization 
drive by floating new bond 
issues denominated in yen 
and deutsch marks. 

Both the Bank of England 
and US banks have indicated 
they will attempt to block any 
sterling or dollar denominated 
issue by a Chinese borrower 
until the railroad bonds ques- 
tion is settled. 

In Hong Kong the old bonds 
are auctioned as collectors' 
items. 

• US delegation: Mr James 
Baker, the US Treasury Secre- 
tary, and a delegation of 32 US 
Government officials arrived 
here for the sixth annual 
meeting of the Sino-US joint 
economic committee. 

Over the next 2‘A days, they 
are expected to raise with the 
Chinese the possibility of 
concluding a bilateral invest- 
ment treaty. 


the right of the local authority to 
recover against the person 
primarily responsible for the 
damage. 

The answer was that that the 
obligations of the local authority 
and the builder were not co- 
terminous. In many cases an 
action for negligent work might 
lie against a bunder where there 
was no claim whatever against a 
local authority. 

Unless the doctrine of 
“doomed from the start" ap- 
plied. no cause of action arose 
against the local authority until 
some time after the end of the 
drought in 1976. 

It was to be remembered that 
in Pirelli the chimney was built 
with defective material so that 
on one view the cracks which 
appeared a few months after 
completion were inevitable. 

It seemed that Lord Fraser 
intended to limit his exception 
io extreme cases where the 
defects were likely to be dis- 
closed almost immediately. The 
words were not intended to 
apply to such a case as the 
present, where the defect, al- 
though serious, might not have 
led to any danger to health or 
safety for too many years. 

The view that the “doomed 
from the start” exception was 
limited to gross defects and to 
rare cases was in accord with 
what Lord Fraser had said in 
Pirelli and with the judgment of 
Lord Justice Lawton in 
Ketteman v Hansel Properties 
L/rf([l984] 1 WLR 1274. 1288). 
as wefl as with the judgments of 
experienced official referees at 
first instance. 

In those circumstances the 
plaintiffs had a claim against the 
local authority and it was not 
statute-barred. The appeal 
should be allowed. 

Lord Justice Ralph Gibson 
and Lord Justice Fox agreed. 

Solicitors: Herbert Smith & 
Co; Rowbeny Morris, Glouces- 
ter. 


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• - ■*- ■- v —— »»t» ’* 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Preacher of the liberation 


THE TIMES 






PROFILE 


ALLAN BOESAK 


T here was an expectant stir 
in the congregation 
packed into a church in a 
coloured (mixed-race) 
suburb of Cape Town one 
day last January as Dr Allan 
Boesak, most magnetic of the new 
breed of turbulent priests challeng- 
ing the moral conscience of South 
Africa's ruling white tribe of Afrika- 
ners. took his place in the pulpit and 
began to preach in his distinctive 
high-pitched voice. 

Earlier in the day. President 
P.W. Botha had opened Parliament 
— a body with segregated chambers 
for whites, coloureds and Indians, 
but no seats for the African two- 
thirds of the population — by 
announcing the creation of a new 
“National CounriT on which 
blacks would be allowed to negoti- 
ate with the Government. Dr 
Boesak was not expected to sound 
grateful for this concession, and he 
did not disappoint 
His text was taken from the first 
book of Samuel chapter 5. verses 1- 
6, and told how the Philistines had 
taken the ark of God and set it up in 
the house of Dagon. how they had 
found the idol lying on its face the 
next morning, how they had set it 
up again, only to find it overturned 
and broken once more. The sym- 
bolism was clear. The Philistines 
were the Afrikaners, the ark of God 
the ’ Dutch Reformed Church 
(DRO. and Dagon the false deity of 
apartheid. 

In his dosing catechism on the 
evils of the Botha government. Dr 
Boesak returned to his opening 
theme, promising his cheering audi- 
ence repeatedly that "Dagon will 
fair. It was a typically fiery 
performance. The intellectual con- 
tent was slight, and there was more 
than a touch of showmanship, but 
the sermon's pace and shape were 
beautifully judged as Boesak ham- 
mered home a simple message: 
liberation will come. Passion alter- 
nated with humour, and every so 
often he would slip from English 
into wicked mimicry of govern- 
ment ministers in an Afrikaans 
more fluent than that spoken by 
most Afrikaners. 

“It does give me some satanic joy 
to speak Afrikaans because I know 
it hurts them", he admits. "When I 
speak Afrikaans it hurts them far 
more than (Bishop) Desmond Tutu 
does, because Desmond is English, 
he's Anglican and he comes to them 
from a totally different psychologi- 
cal framework. When I get up there 
and say things in Afrikaans, and say 
them in words so familiar and with 


so much Reformed Church con- 
tent, it drives them crazy.” 

Boesak is the epitome of die 

“cheeky Kaffir", the blade man who 
declines to accept his subor d i nat e 
status. He springs also from that 
special group of South African 
blacks known as Cape Coloured, 
who share the Afrikaners’ laugnagr, 
faith and blood. When he speaks of 
the certainty of black liberation, he 
does so from the heart of the same 
Calvinist tradition that has enabled 
Afrikaner theologians to proclaim 
that apartheid is divinely ordained. 

Boesak is Assessor, tire second 
highest position in the Sendk&kak 
or Mission Church, the branch of 
the segregated DRC which minis- 
ters to the coloured community. He 
leapt into international prominence 
in 1982. at the age of 36, when he 
was elected President of the World 
Alliance of Reformed Churches, 
some 70 million peo- 
ple in 150 denominations. 


I t is an office he will hold until 
1989. The meeting of the 
Alliance in Ottawa at which 
he was elected also adopted a 
motion, introduced by him, 
declaring apartheid to be a heresy 
and a sin. The two mam white 
branches of the Dutch Reformed 
Church in South Africa, the 
Nederduitse Gerefbrmeerde Keric 
and the Nederduitsch Hervonnde 
Keric, refused to endorse the decla- 
ration, and their membership of the 
Alliance was suspended. 

In September of the same year, at 
the four-yearly synod of the 
Sendingkerk in Gape Town, Boesak 
was instrumental in g etting a 
“confession” adopted which simi- 
larly branded apartheid a heresy. 
The confession has been under 
consideration over the last four 
years by local congregations and 
will come back to the next synod, in 
September, for ratification. Boesak 
says that any attempt by seconded 
white ministers and conservative 
coloured colleagues to block ratifi- 
cation would provoke a major crisis 
in the Church. 

For Boesak, “religion is about 
politics" in the sense that the 
Church “must be concerned about 
the conditions in which people 
live". To complaints from the 
government that priests should 
stick to the spiritual sphere, he has a 
short answer “Afrikaner national- 
ism is unthinkable without the 
Dutch Reformed Church, so it is 
quite hypocritical of them to say we 
an» meddling in politics when one 




-4L 

■ -'Vi 


Fiery performer: Allan Boesak, the most magnetic of South Africa's turbulent priests 


thinks of the role that just one man, 
DJI Malan, played in their own 
history" — a reference to the DRC 
pastor who in 1948 became the first 
prime minister of the apartheid era. 

His own “political coming of 
age", as he puts it, was wi thin the 
black consciousness tradition. He 
was a great admirer of Steve Biko, 
who was bludgeoned to death in 
security police custody in 1977. 
Black consciousness, he says, 
helped him through the crisis of 
identity — “that schizophrenia of 
in-betweenness" — which man y 
politically-aware coloureds experi- 
ence, and .gave him a self-confi- 
dence be had previously lacked. 

He became uncomfortable, how- 


ever, with the movement's empha- 
sis on blackness per se, and could 
not accept that a white, simply by 
virtue of his colour, was rendered 
incapable of identifying with the 
black man's struggle. He finally 
broke with black consciousness 
three years ago when he played a 
leading role in the formation of 
the United Democratic Front, the 
multi-racial coalition of anti- 
apartheid groups that shares the 
political aims of the underground 
African National Congress (ANQ 
and has become the most widely- 
supported radical opposition to 
the government still Oust) within 
the law. 

Last August, Boesak was arrest- 


ed on the eve of a protest march 
that he was to have led' to 
PoDsmoor Prison outside Cape 
Town to demand the release of its 
most famous inmate, the ANCs 
Nelson Mandela. Held in solitary 
confinement for three weeks in a 
prison in Pretoria, he emerged 
somewhat thinner (he is fond of 
good food and an excellent cook) 
t6 be charged on September 20 
-with subversion, a crime that 
carries a maximum possible pen- 
alty of 25 years injaiL Released on 
bail of 20,000 rands (about 
£6,650), he is due to appear in 
court next Monday. 

Among the subversive acts of 
which be is accused is the advoca- 



Y et for all that he insists, 
the Church's duty to 
warn against counter- 
violence is greatest pre- 
cisely when its use 
seems theoretically most justified. 
"1 really don’t believe that vio- 
lence can ultimately solve 
problems”, be says. “I am desper- 
ately afraid of what violence does 
to people, the soul-destroying 
element of violence, the ease with 
which- one dips into using vio- 
lence, and foe difficulty of break- 
ing a cycle of violence once it has 
begun.” Two months ago, at a 
funeral service in Lawaaucaxop, a 
blade township near George, east 
of Cape-Town, Boesak himsetfbad 
to leap down from the altar to 
rescue a m a n in Hang er of being 
beaten to death by other mowers 
who believed he was a police 
agent - 

Boesak, born in tire small rural 
town of Kakamas in the semi- 
desert of the north-eastern Cape; 
was the seventh of eight children 
of a school-teacher father and a 


seminary in Ge, . 

1968i Ordained as a mvvstar in the 
Sendingkerk the coloured 
• branch of the Dutch 
Reformed Church, and 
assigned .to a congregation 
in Paari. 

1970-76: Further studies at the - 
Kampen Theoiogtcal 
Institute in HoSand. Writes 
doctoral fresis on black 
" theology- 
1981: Becteti chairman of the 

Affiance of Black Reformed 
Churches In Southern Africa 
which rejects theotagicaf - 
arguments for apartheid. 

cy of foreign economic disinvest- 
ment in South Africa and a 
boycott tif schools. If be were, 
found guilty of the former, it 
would set an interesting precedent 
in view of last month’s call — by 
Bishop Tutu, soon to become. 
Archbishop of Gape Town and 
Metropolitan of the Anglican 
Church in Southern Africa — for 
punitive economic sanctions. 

Boesak agonizes over the moral- 
ity of violence. From a strictly 
theological point of view, he 
believes, the case for counter- 
'violence against the South African 
state is almost unanswerable. He 
can find no good argument why 
Galvin’s concept of “public 
avengers” raised up by God “to 
punish unrighteous domination” 
should not apply to the ANC 


1963: Admasses inaugural mflMfng 
of the United Democratic . 
Front, of which he remade a 
p a tron . .. . 

1985: Briefly detained In March - 
wttie leading protest march 
to Parliament in Cape Town. 
Arrested again in August on 
eve of march he was to have 
led toPoSsmdbr Prison 
outside CapeTown to 
demand the rateasa trf- 
' Nelson Mandela. Held for 
three we eks and then • 
charged with subversion. - 
Stift awaiting trial. 

seamstress mother. His father died 
when Boesak was seven, and the 
family moved to Somerset West, 
also in the Cape:' One of bis 
earliest memories is of his father 
trying to bay hisacool drink on a 
hot day and being told by the 
shopkeeper that the dimks in the 
refrigerator were only for whites. 

After studying theology at tire 
University of the Western Cape, 
he was ordained as a nrinhrterat 
PaarU in the heart of Cape wine- 
growing country. It was there he 
met his wife, Dorothy, a teacher 
and a member ofhis congregation. 
They now have four cbxhuen — 
three girls, Lieneke, aged 15, 
Helen, 12 and Ptitare, nine, and a 
boy, Allan junior, who is seven. 
There followed six years of study 
at tire Kampen Theological Insti- 
tute in Holland, punctuated by a 
semester at an ecumenical semi- 
nary in New York' where he 
became fascinated by the oratory 
of black Baptist preachers. He and 
his famil y returned to South 
Africa as the 1976 Soweto uprising 
broke out, a taming point in bis 
own potftfcal education as wd) as 
that of his country. 

Early last y tar a smear cam- 
paign, started apparently by mem- 
bers of the security police, who 
had bees keeping him under 
surveillance for political reasons, 
forced Boesak to admit to the 
existence of “a relationship" with 
a white wo man who worked as an 
official in the South African 
Cbimcfl of Churches, He looks 
bade now, with relative calm, on 
“three months of sheer hdl”. His 
wife stood by hinraud; although 
he was temporarily . suspended 
from Church duties, he was' later 
reinstated The incident has cer- 
tainly not doused his political fire. 


Michael Hornsby 










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«:I 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


15 


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Eleanor has presented herself 
has become used to loneliness, 
and reviving memories of his 
far past unsettle him as he 
ponders what she wants from 
him. An unmistakable aura of 
romance surrounds the ques- 
tion to which she herself 
seems hardly to know the 
answer. She is widowed; and 
perhaps never loved her hus- 
band. Alastair sees little in her 
now of the talented girl be 
remembers. Yet the hope of 
love has stirred; and in rela- 
tion to his daughter-in-law 
something between love and 
flattery soon begins to stir 
also. His brilliant son has 
become a television personal- 
ity, which does not particular- 
ly impress his father, who 1ms 
employed ah equal intell£ 


See life 
as it 
really is 


FICTION 


Elaine Feinstem 

AN AFTER DINNER’S 
SLEEP 

By Stanley Middleton 
Hutchinson. £9.95 

the good mother 

By Sue Miller 

Goliancz, £9.95 

ELLA 

By Dee PbiDfps 

H odder & Stoughton, £9.95 . 


more dutifully as a 
r of education. He can- 
not but speculate why. so 
resourceful and assured a ghd 
should choose to come and 
stay in Alastiir’s home, while 
his son is abroad. No one's 
motivation is entirely dear. 
And m the end, even for those 
-who want love most, there isa 
total inability to risk, such 
- commitment. Middleton’s 
achievement . is to make us 
care, painfully. 

Sue Miller’s novel is also 
rooted in the concerns of 
ordinary life but, since it is set 
in the United States, the 
expectation of happiness in all 
the characters is much higher. 
Puri tanism is the only enemy. 
And so the divorce with which 
the book opens has been 
coolly enough undertaken, 
with no quarrel ova- custody. 
There are hint* that the part- 
ing may be more pointful for 
the child Molly, but the wife is 


able to co oquer ter only 
feelings of jealousy, arid will- 
ingly arranges ter own life 
around her child’s welfare. A 
good mother, who has never 
found, much pleasure in sex, 
she soon surprises herself by 
discovering an exciting lover. 

What neither she (nor the 
reader) predicts, is the way 
this relationship comes to 
I precipitate a court battle for 
the custody of the child. I 
found this novd much more 
than an attempt to make use 
of the current obsession with 
the sexual molestation of chit* 

. dren. There is no villainy, no 
behaviour inexplicable, how- 
ever outrageous it first ap- 
. pears, and most readers will be 
overwhelmed with pity for 
those damaged by weu-mean- 
. mg, permissive assumptions. 

In a context where sexuality 
as a positive good is taken so 
completely for granted, it is 
quite difficult to remember 
how very far this was from 
being the case as recently as 
the Fifties. Dee Phillips has 
caught perfectly the very taste 
and smell of days when sexual 
curiosity had a piquancy and 
danger unknown today; days 
also, unfortunately, of anxiety, 
shame, and helplessness for a 
girl quite ignorant of contra- 
ception. The novd succeeds in 
making us believe in the 
family hypocrisy which im- 
poses abortion on her, even as 
the parents' marriage disinte- 
grates; and Dee Phillips is 
particularly penetrating about 
the mother’s behaviour. “It’s 
not for herself die’s objecting. 
She just has to watch it with 
Dad ail the time.” We are not 
entirely surprised when the 
poor placatory wife is finally 
left But the bitterness is 
certainly 'sobering. The old 
code was nostronger a defence 
against malice, injustice, and 
the general propensity human 
beings seem to have for mutu- 
al destruction. 


Caviare for General Classic 


Can this be the hardback 
bargain of the decade? With 
nearly 900 large, glossy pa g es , 
10 maps. 16 full-colour pages, 
over 250 other illustrations 
and 30 scholarly contributors 
(all but four from Oxford), this 
luxurious volume weighs in at 
almost two-and-a-half kilos, 
making it, at £10 a kilo, only 
half the price of smoked 
salmon. The detailed story 
spans 800BC to 200 AD, and 
an Introduction and Envoi 
take it considerably further. 
The scope of the book, the 
refinement of its pedigree, the 
superb illustrations (with cap- 
tions which are models of 
information) and its 1pok and 
feel proclaim another glitter- 
ing Book Gub triumph, des- 
tined to be the toast of School 
prize-givings all over the 
country. 

Those who find the time to 
read it may, however, have 


Peter Jones 


THE OXFORD 
HISTORYOFTHE 
CLASSICAL WORLD 

Edited by John Boardman, 
Jasper Griffin, . 
and Oswyn Murray 

Oxford, £25 


misgivings. The categories 
into which history is 

divided (mostly “literature”, 
“history”, “an" .etc.) are the 
sort of imimaff native and 
restrictive stereotypes from 
which we really ought to be 
getting away. Sometimes I 
wonder ifuufividnal contribu- 
tors know wbat others have 
said. There is some cross- 
referencing. bat it is fairly 
spasmodic, and when the 
chapters on “Hesiod and 
Myth” "Greek Religion” and 


No 1 in UK and USA 

John > 



“...masterpiece” 


was the opinion of . . 

Anthony Clare, Sunday Times 
David Hughes. Mail on Sunday and 
Gilbert Adair, Critics Forum, BBC Radio 

Have you read it yet? 

.Hodder & Stoughton, 19 95 


“Greek Art” can all discuss 
myth without making refer- 
ence to each otter, and the 
chapter oa “Drama” can get 
away with no reference to 
myth at all, I fed that a little 
whip-cracking from the edi- 
tors was needed (although I 
know — experto erectile— what 
a ghastly job they must have 
had). Stilt, the impact of the 
book suffers. 

More importantly, the book 
advertises itself as resolutely 
populist, being addressed to 
that fine old trooper. General 
Reader. But the literary con- 
tributors in particular tend to 
talk about authors as if the 
General were fully conversant 
with them already. The excel- 
lent chapter on Lucretius, 
where the General is taken 
through De Renan Natura 
and helped to admire the view 
on the way, was surely a better 
way to proceed. Again, there is 
no appendix of terms used. 

Contributors are scrupulous 
about p* pl a in mg fefhniffaK tias 
ad loc, but if the General's 
memory lets him down, be 
will be floundering to relocate, 
definitions. The poor Index 
does not help. The conse- 
quence of all this is that some 
fine scholarly writing is easily 
accessible only to Generals 
who have served time with the 

Classical Light Infantry. 

Finally, Oxford lit-hist bias 
shows np rather badly when 
classical mathematics, sek 
ence, and niedidne, subjects 
of lasting interest and impor- 
tance, are given so little 
room. So modi for bbune- 
singmg: the praise-anger takes 
over. Oxford was surely right 
to give tiie poor old Romans 
and Hellenistic Greeks equal 
space with their more popular 
Greek predecessors, and to 
encourage contributors to 
look forward to the riches of 
the Classical Tradition. With 
one excruciating exception, 
(step forward — but no, no, I 
can't, not again), the scholar- 
ship » (as one would expect) 
impeccable and the writing 
beautifully judged. 


New voice of our old Empire 


T imothy Mo is the most 
important living chronicler 
of his birthplace, Hong 
Kong; it is perhaps an invidi- 
ous position, a Virgil singing of arms 
and plastic, but in the circumstances 
of that colony's imminent demise a 
necessary one. His accomplished first 
novel. The Monkey King, depicted 
Hong Kong as wicked, greedy, and 
intensely comic; now, in An Insular 
Possession, he has traced the origins 
of that interesting condition to the 
Opium Wars of the early Nineteenth 
Century — in the turbulent wake of 
which the colony was established. 

The novel itself is set in the 1830s, 
at the time of tins Etrie local 
difficulty; yet it is an aspect of the 
curious but agreeable obliquity of 
Mo’s narrative that the principal 
combatants, the English and the 
Chinese, are consigned to subordi- 
nate roles. His two central characters 
are young Americans, traders so 
disgusted with the traffic in opium 


Peter Ackroyd on a historical novel 
that goes to the roots of history 


AN INSULAR POSSESSION 
By Timothy Mo 

ChattoA. Windus. £9.95 


reports or private letters, diary entries 
or intimate conversations. There are 
occasional false notes, but the delight 
he takes in creating these heteroge- 
neous styles is successfully communi- 
cated and therefore shared. 


He is a great impersonator, in other 
words, but it is not a question merely 
of pastiche. It has been said that a 
novelist should not undertake a work 
which does not educate either himself 
or his readers, and An Insular 
Possession is as much an an of 
creative scholarship as it is of 
imagination. Timothy Mo has la- 
boured over the past (the research 
must have been extensive), and he 
has so lovingly recreated it that it 


that they set themselves up as the 
'crusading editors of the Lin Tan 
Bulletin and River Bee. Gideon Chase 
is an incipient Sinologist, while 
Water Eastman is no more than a 
.daring entrepreneur; arid it is thro ugh 
their respective fortunes that .Mo 
faithfully restores the old life of South 
China. 

So An Insular Possession is an 
historical fiction. There was a time 
when this classification would have 
amounted to a term of abuse, since 
the historical novel was considered 
(together with romantic fiction and 
science fantasy) as the last haven of a 
tired imagination 

I t was the era of “PritheesT and 
strange objects known as dirks or 
poniards. But in recent years the 
importance oftte form has been 
recognized. If “postmodernism” 
means anything, ills in its disavowal 
both of conventional realism and self* 
conscious experimentalism; and this 
is precisely the area where historical 
fiction has come into its own. In 
simple terms, it increases the 
novelist's options.' he can choose his 
style, and.thereby choose his world. 

And so it is that in An Insular 
Possession Timothy Mo has con- 
structed. a polyphonic narrative. He 
has created a rich and elaborate 
narrative voice while at the nnw 
time be has managed beautifully to 
reproduce the idioms and cadences of 
early . Nineteenth-Century prose, 
whether in the form of newspaper 



surrounds him with its own myster- 
ies; it is like an echo-chamber, in 
which his own voice is magnified. 

Dearly he decided to write a “big” 
book at the same time: but if it 
displays a Victorian scale if also 
acquires a contemporary significance: 
An Insular Possession has a largeness 
borrowed from, recent fictional epics 
set in Australia and in India. This is 
the literary version of Montezuma's 
revenge, as those born in quondam 
colonial territories are seized with the 
desire to explain their own past (and 
therefore, of course, themselves) in 
novels which are more exuberant, 
more extravagant, and often more 
interesting than the native English 
products. Timothy Mo is in the same 
tradition as Carey or Rushdie. 

His is a complex imagination, as 
well, of which mockery and obliquity 
are the two most important elements. 
The tone of the narrator is one of 
humorous irony, but this effect of 
distance is displayed by the characters 
themselves who are seen variously 
drawing or photographing the local 
territory. 

E veryone is sketching or cap- 
turing their own especial 
scene, just as each character 
is a prisoner of his or her own 
particular verbal style — whether it is 
the romantic bravura of colonial 
conversation, the polysyllabic absur- 
dities of the local newspapers, or the 
demotic lingo of the native Chinese. 
They are all attempting to arrest or at 
least -to define a world which persists 
in changing — and from this springs 
the comedy as well as the pathos oi 
the book. 

This sense of change is in fact 
evoked by the novel's consistent use 
of the present tense —apparently veiy 
much like Chinese fiction, which is 
described here as “occurring in an 
immediate present” so that there is 
“no sense of recession or distance 
from the past, or superiority to it.” 
This in turn confirms the speculation 
of one of the principal characters: 
“But what is good and what is bad? 
Can it be just a matter of perspective, 
with one seeing it quite differently 
from another?” An Insular Possession . 
suggests that this is indeed so. and 
Timthy Mo has written a novel in 
which various interpretations of the 
past can be suggested with equal 
lucidity. This is an "historical novel” 
in a deeper sense, then, since it is 
concerned primarily with the nature 
of history itself. 


John Ashbery is the Salvador 
Dali of contemporary verse in 
English — by which I mean 
thaz.be is a master draughts- 
man who has designs on his 
audience to convince us that 
he is really a genius. Like Dah, 
he has no one recognizable or 
characteristic mann er. His 
work is an anthology of styles. 

He writes poems in which 
nothing is certain, and mean- 
ing is consistently withheld. 
Some of his earlier books(Tm 
thinking particularly of The 


The poet in cloud of smoke 


POETRY 


Robert Nye 


Tennis Court Doth, published 
in 1962) consist of verse of 
such remorseless obscurity 
that there was even an anec- 
dote current that he wrote it 
by selecting the seventh line 
down on the seventh page of 
every seventh book in his 
library. If not true, then it still 
tells a truth. Ashbery is many, 
voices in one man. He's a" 
joker, a trickster, a down. 

What is remarkable about him 1 
is that, having said all this, 1 
still have to say that the work 
in his Selected Poems (Carca- 


net, £16.95) often has a quality 
of pure mesmerism: 

Each servant stamps the read- 
er with a took. 

After many years he has been 
brought nothing. 

The servanfs smile is the 
reader's patience. 

The servant goes to bed. 

The patience rambles on ' 
Musing on the library s lofty 
. holes. 

Now I cannot understand this, 
the unrhymed sestet of a poem 
provocatively entitled 
"Sonnet", and after several 
readings I am convinced that 
being understood is no part of 
Ashbery’s purpose; yet these 
lines are by no means uncom- 
mon in possessing a power of 
fascination which keeps draw- 


ing the reader back. Instru- 
mental in this process are of 
course other brief and mostly 
didactic passages which can 
immediately be understood: 

This poem is concerned with 
language on a very plain 


look out a window 


ndo 


You have 


Or pretend to fidget You 
it but you don't have iL 
You miss it. it misses you. 
You miss each other. 

What it comes down to is this, 
perhaps: that Ashbery’s work 
intrigues because it concen- 
trates a playfully profound 
imagination upon the whole 
problem of meaning and iden- 
tity; and comes up with no 
, answers, only alternative 
questions in the form of verse 
that in a sense replaces the joys 
. and anxieties that inspired it 
He always seems determined 
to puzzle out some more-than- 


peTsonal truth from all the 
accents and accidents of its 
saying, with a result that while 
be has do single “voice" he 
often rises to an unquestion- 
able authority of tone. He will 
baffle you. But he will haunt 
you. It's worth working 
through the bafflement to the 
ghost, in my opinion. 

To return to my original 
figure: while Ashbery, like 
Dali, can turn out work that 
seems merely jewelled and 
meretricious, his is neverthe- 
less a real and disturbing 
talent. In the comer of the 
most stagy Dali picture you 
will often find a well-drawn 
boat or wrist-watch. In the 
comer of Ashbery’s most rhe- 
torical and evasive poems you 
will often find lines as memo- 
rable and truthful as any 
going: 

The poem is sad because it 
wants to be yours, and 
cannot be. 


What ‘s a plain level? It is that 
and other things. 

Bringing a system of them 
’ into play. Play? 

Well, actually, yes. but 1 
consider play to be 
A deeper outside thing, a 
dreamed role-pattern. 

As in the division of grace 
these long August days... 
Ashbery has been compared 
with Wallace Stevens, hailed 
even as a "philosophical" 
thinker. I regard this as a 
serious misrepresentation of 
his gifts. An English reader of 
this most accomplished and 
eccentric of living and work- 
ing American poets is more 
likely to be reminded of 
Edward Lear there is a similar 
manic despair informing 
Ashbery 's jokes and inven- 
tions. and the tension between 
that concern with language on 
a very plain level, and the 
hectic refusal to come clean 
about whatever it is that 
pricks him into verse makes 
for some extraordinary effects, 
the finest of which do not 
preclude tenderness. 


Snob who made a go of life 


PATRICIA 

HIGHSMfflfS 



‘an extremely clever novel .. 

sheisefforttesshsupenor 
to other writers of suspense 

stones... there isnoone 

quite Eke her.’ 

Anita Brookner 
The Spectator 


OVE L 

‘unconrforfaWe.fi^htesiKig, 
compulsive and, worst of aE, 
terribly believable. If s 
vintage Highsmrth.’ 

Richard Raynor 

TimeOut 

£ 9.95 


In The Story of My Life 
Augustus Hare repeats a story 
told him by Lady Winstanley 
about Samuel Rogers, the 
poet. 

Rogers met Lord Dudley at 
one of the foreign watering- 
places, and began in his vain 
way, “What a terrible thing it 
is tew one’s fame pursues 
one, and that one can never 
get away from one’s own 
identity! Now I sat by a lady 
the otter night, and she began, 
‘I fed sure you must be Mr 
Rogers’” — “And were you T 
asked Lord Dudley. 

Hare collected anecdotes 
and ghost stories from the rich 
and socially eminent whom he 
assiduously head-hunted. He 
was the very best land of snob, 
choosing the most beautiful 
and most comfortable bouses 
to -be invited to and giving 
excellent value in return for 
hospitality,- He was funny, and, 
had a gift for friendship, and 
was the centre of many sketch- 
ing parties attended by fash- 
ionable ladies. He was a first- 
rate water-colourist, and in 
general had good taste; though . 
why he thought Samuel 
Wyatt’s Herstmonceux Place 
was ugly is a mystery. 

Possibly it was because its 
building involved the destruo* ‘ 
tion of most of Herstmonceux 
Castle, to which Hare was 


Woodrow Wyatt 

AUGUSTUS HARE 
Victorian Gentleman 
By Malcolm Barnes 

Allen & Unwin, £20 


anv attached. His 
family lived in it for less than 
100 years, but he spoke and 
wrote of it as though they had 
been there for centuries. He 
was brought up in its proximi- 
ty from' babyhood by his 
adoptive mother Maria, sister- 
in-law of the awful Julius 
(oddly given four times more 
space than Augustus in the 
D.N.B.), who held the valu- 
able family living of 
Herstmonceux. 

Maria was the widow of 
another Hare clergyman, and 
she believed in breaking the 
spirit of children to make 
them acceptable to God. Feel- 
ing the task of physical chas- 
tisement unsuitable for a lady, 
she sent frequently for her 
brother-in-law to administer it 
to Augustus. He would be told 
to go. upstairs and prepare 
himself for his uncle’s arrival, 
who would then whip him on 
his bare buttocks. 

Augustus Hare’s parents 
were feckless, extravagant 



BOOK 



FAIR 


SBRDAY HAY lift 
2pa-7pa. 

M0VQAY HAY 12th 
14.3Qao-7jUB. 

HIM 

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RusaQ $4. Lowfcn MCI 

Onofliufi t* at psjl 
111 tekftL tarbmd. Ms. 


FOTLES AST GALLERY 

The Distinguished 
Japanese Embroiderer 

YOSHIE UEKI 

AN EXHIBITION OF 
FLORAL EMBROIDERY 


10-6. daffy until 14 May 
113-119 Chferist Cram Basd 
London W.CL2 


wanderers abroad,' mainly in 
Italy. The birth of Augustus, 
their fifth child, in 1834- was 
an unwanted burden. The 
childless Maria was as eager to 
adopt him as his parents were 
to get rid of him. Maria 
affected a grief for her dead 
husband which could only be 
assuaged by self-punishment 
induced by religious fervour 
and the unfortunate Augustus 
found himself an extension of 
the self-punishment and the 
recipient of an upbringing 
excessively harsh even for the 
sternest Victorian families. 

Yet Maria doted on him 
and he on her. The compound 
was a sentimental sado-mas- 
ochism marking Augustus all 
his life. Augustus ted grand 
notions ofhts place in society. 
With the family money main- 
ly dissipated, be set out to 
augment his income of £60 a 
year by writing, preparing 
travel guides, and sketching. 
Through these activities be 
acquired celebrity and an 
ability to live handsomely on 
his own resources and those of 
his admiring friends. When be 
died in 1903, he left £31,000- 

Mr Malcolm Barnes de- 
serves out thanks. He has been 
responsible for the rediscov- 
ery of Augustus Hare and his 
books, which were best-sellers 
in the Victorian times, and 
which his life spanned almost 
to the dot Here Mr Barnes 
gives us more information 
about Augustus than there is 
in his autobiography and his 
strange book. Memorials of a 
Quiet Life, about his insuffer- 
able adoptive mother. 

Those who have not sam- 
pled the fascination of Augus- 
tus Hare would do well to start 
by reading Mr Barnes's book, 
which has done us and Augus- 
tus a great service. 

Augustus would be particu- 
larly delighted with the genea- 
logical table showing his 
common descent with the 
leen and the Queen Mother 
the eighth Earl of 
Strathmore. 



Can our maths 
teachers cope 
with computers? 

Evidence suggests that their training 
is inadequate. Do their employers fear 
they’ll be lured into industry? 

. . . Maths co-ordinators in primary 
schools are proliferating. How does this 
help children? 

In The Times Educational Supplement 
this week, there are 16 pages on the teaching 
of mathematics.. 

PLUS — Giles Radice and Schools for 
the People 5 

— Curtain call for Nicky Harrison 
— Do examiners’ mistakes blight 
candidates chances? 

— Reinterpreting Shakespeare 

in the national newspaper for everyone 
concerned about education 


THE TIMES 


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THE TIMES 

DIARY 


Waldheim 
charge 

In a new allegation against Kurt 
Waldheim, Labour MP Geoffiney 
Robinson claims that he was 
allegedly involved in the deaths of 
two British commando prisoners 
in the last war. The claim is the 
subject of an early day motion 
debate in the Commons. In it, 
Robinson alleges that Waldheim 
initialled reports of the German 
army's interrogation in Salon ica 
of a PoW named Fishwich, who 
died in a concentration camp, and 
Sgt John Dry den, who dis- 
appeared without trace. Robinson 
says Waldheim initialled the re- 
ports in the German Army Group 
Fs Department in Salonica. 
Meanwhile in America, extremist 
groups comprising American Jews 
of Greek extraction have threat- 
ened to kill him if he sets foot 
there. 

• As the chairman of British 
Airways seeths over the delay in 
privatization I hear that senior 
managment are now calling 
Heathrow ■’King's Cross**. 

Diorama drama 

The charity dedicated to preserv- 
ing Nash's Diorama in Regent's 
Park - not far from St John's 
Lodge — yesterday made its first 
legal breakthrough against the 
Crown Commissioners. ' The 
Commissioners want to turn the 
Grade One listed building, built in 
1832 to house Louis Daguerre's 
prototype cinema, into luxury 
flats and in January won a 
summary judgement for pos- 
session. 'Yesterday in the High 
Court the umbrella charity plan- 
ning to restore the Diorama as a 
theatre and cinema museum won 
an appeal, and the case will now go 
to a fUll bearing probably next 
year. Hours after the decision, 
news came through that the 
relevant post-GLC quango had 
turned down the Commissioners' 
application for planning per- 
mission for residential conver- 
sion. Two years ago a public 
inquiry forbade them from turn- 
ing the Diorama into offices. Fred 
Reynolds, of the charity, told me: 
‘'This is the best news we have had 
in our campaign to keep the 
building open to the public." 

Brief encounter 

Midnight visitors at a remote 
Little Chef near Doncaster earlier 
this week could have been for- 
given for believing they were 
witnessing a scene straight out of a 
Le Carre thriller. Two men, 
accompanied by bodyguards, 
emerged from separate limousines 
to exchange muffled words before 
swapping vehicles and roaring off 
in opposite directions. Nothing 
sinister. They were Norman 
Fowler, Social Services Secretary, 
being whisked north from West 
Derbyshire for the morning press 
conference at Ryedale, and 
Kenneth Baker (Environment) 
heading south from Ryedale to do ; 
the same in West Derbyshire. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘What concerns me is the safety level 
of Kenneth Baker's statements* 


Priorities 


- Funny folk, our elected repre- 
sentatives: while a mere three MPs 
have signed early day motions on 
Chernobyl, 13 have put their 

• names to an EDM congratulating 

- snooker champion Joe Johnson 
: and 38 to another thanking 

■ - Castleford and Hull Kingston 

Rovers for providing such splen- 

■ did entertainment in the Rugby 
i League final. 

i Brotherly 

I The only non-Liberal candidate 

■ fighting for the .Alliance in the 23- 
T seat Southwark and Bermondsey 
; local government elections is SDP 

candidate Jamie Hughes, brother 
| of local Liberal MP Simon. 

I: Brass tacks 

The muck slung in the West 

• Derbyshire by-election campaign 
\ was mild compared to that in 1944. 
; Reporting on the fight, between 
: the Duke of Devonshire's son. 

Lord Hartington (Tory), and local 
lad Charlie White (Ind), The 
Times wrote: “During recent 
meetings, Lord Hartington has 
been asked several times if he can 
milk a cow. He said yesterday that 
: he was tired of being asked, this 
question from the opposition: but 
he challenged Alderman White to 
shovel muck at any farm in West 
“ Derbyshire that Alderman White 
cared to choose. The loser could 
give £5 to the Red Cross.." In those 
wartime days of petrol rationing. 
Lord Hartington went electioneer- 

- big by pony and trap, while his 
agent, a Major Twrford, rode 
round on the son of Papyrus, a 
Derby winner. It didnH wort 
Charlie White, who hoofed it, 
emerged victorious. 

PHS 


Vote-and keep Whitehall out „ 



The man in Whitehall knows best 
One of the odder aspects of recent 
politics has been the conversion of 

this liberal anti-statist government 
to die doctrine of civil service 
infallibility. 

A Cabinet which draws its 
intellectual sustenance from 
Hayek and Harris (of Highcross) is 
also an administration of cen- 
tralizers. Ministers once set*on 
“de-privileging” the permanent 
secretaries now appear to believe 
them capable of huge feats of 
managerial competence. 

They believe Treasury officials 
who claim to know that a council 
300 miles from London should be 
spending such and such a cen- 
trally-determined amount. They 
even think that Whitehall can 
deliver better health, education 
and transport services than town 
and county halls. . 

The point is not whether criti- 
cism of council effectiveness or 
efficiency is justified. It often is. 
But where does that unalloyed 
faith in central bureaucracy come 
from ? It is because (say ministers 
in private conversation) civil ser T 
vants are cleverer. 

Cleverer they may be, but to 
hold up Whitehall as the epitome 
of management skills! How many 
permanent secretaries have Har- 
vard MBAs; how many had any 


by David Walker 


preparation at all for senior 
management? 

Last week PA, the management 
consultants, gave the Home Sec-, 
retary a report which identified' 
“waste" of up to one fifth in the 
cost of running the prisons. Look 
at the National Health Service. 
Financially soundly run? Hardly. 

Patently a straight comparison 
cannot be made between ideal 
types of central and local admin- 
istration. But just set side by side 
with council functions the running 
of the Metropolitan Police, social 
security and the Manpower Ser- 
vices Commission. Are they such 
convincing examples of the ef- 
ficient management of scarce, tax- 
generated resources? Are they an 
advertisement for further 
centralization? 

Waste there certainly is in local 
authorities. Waste is teaching 
empty chairs, providing services 
that locals do not need or want (for 
example taking elderly people into 
residential care when they want to 
remain in the community), taking 
1 00 hours to do a job that could be 
done in 80, paying over the odds 
for goods, spending money on 
administrative overheads rather ' 
than front-line services. 


But national Diktat wiU not 
work. Whitehall targets cannot 
ensure that the public gets full 
value from the £1,700 spent each 
year 'per household mi schools, 
roads, libraries and the rest. 
Redeployment of people and 
- building cannot be secured by 
direction from above. Local foe- 
tors should determine local ser- 
vices: local geography, the pattern 
of private sector provision, local 
enthusiasms — ail should, all be 
taken into account in deciding, for 
example, which schools are to 
dose when rolls fall. 

In a series of reports, John 
Banham of the AuditGommissioh 
has demonstrated that councils 
can cut spending without cutting' 
services. Comparisons with the 
private sector show that in refuse 
collection and transport the best 
25 per cent of councils are fully 
cost competitive. 

Agreed, some councils — Liver- 
pool. Lambeth — are badly man- 
aged. But the cause is insufficient 
local accountability. There are 
three weaknesses in the way 
councillors can be forced to tackle 
management problems more eff- 
ectively. 

First, finance. Banham has ar- 


gued that government grant 
should be paid to for fewer 
councils and so make local market 
forces (ie local voters) determine 
the level of spending. If people 
want above-average levels they 
should meet the cost themselves. 

Next information. At present, 
council, accounts are not available 
until six to nine months after the 
end of the financial year. But 
electors should not be kept in the 
dark. Every year c o mprehensive 
statistical profiles of the council 
should be . made available in every 
public library. Accounts should 
present performance yardsticks. 

. Draft budgets should be presented- i 
widely before' final decisions are 
taken. The scope for creative 
accounting needs to be much 
reduced so that, for example, 
transferring, revenue spending to 
capital, account does not mask a 
failure to take difficult decisions. 

The district auditor should be 
given greater powers, perhaps 
issuing reports before, not after, 
councils take silly or illegal spend- 
ing decisions. 

But there is a last step. It is one 
which voters need to take today 
into the polling booth to pass 
judgement on their connciHois. 
Without that participation local 
government will be replaced by 
central administration, to the 
ultimate disadvantage of us alL 


a 




Task eternal: Philip Howard dips into the book of the century 

Yetis, yuppies and wimmin 



The careful journalist avoids 
superlatives, which tend to be 
value judgements. But what the 
hell? Today the greatest English 
book this century is finally pub- 
lished. the crown of a work started 
in 1858, the last word for the 
present on the Queen's English, 
dedicated with permission to the 
Queen, the record of our language 
and (because language is man's 
distinctive attribute) our life. 

Its title Se-Z is boring; but its 
contents are not. It is the fourth 
and final volume of A Supplement 
to the Oxford English Dictionary 
(Oxford, £90). A se is an ancient 
Chinese plucked musical in- 
strument with 25 strings, some- 
what similar to the zither. The last 
word in the great work is Zyrian, 
the Komi tribe and its language 
from the northern central USSR. 

Between them lie the new words 
and meanings of our century, 
copiously illustrated by quota- 
tions from our best and not-so- 
good writers, and echoing in 
language the world earthquake of 
our times. 

The book has deep roots. It 
started with a paper to the 
Philological Society in 1857. In 
1878 James Murray took on the 
active preparation of the dic- 
tionary, with instructions from the 
Delegates of the Press to complete 
it in 10 years. Few editors of large 
historical dictionaires live to see 
Z, and Murray died before the- 
final volume appeared in 1928. 

An unsatisfactory Supplement 
appeared' in 1933. Then the dic- 
tionary languished, though the 
language did not until 1957, when 
a young New Zealand don, Robert 
Burchfield, was appointed to pre- 
pare a new Supplement. The 
Delegates and be reckoned that a 
single volume of about 1,275 
pages would do the job, to be 
completed within seven years. But 
they had reckoned without the 
quantum leap that was going on as 
English became the world lan- 
guage, and the lexical profusion of 
the new sciences and jaigorn. 

Here we are 29 years later with 
four volumes, more than 50,000 


new words divided into hundreds 
of thousands of senses, 500,000 
citations from printed sources, 
6,000 pages: our English recorded. 
It has been worth waiting for. 

Se-Z records and illustrates the 
new language of our generation, 
from sputnik to yuppie, and from 
Watergate to young fogey, who 
was exciting bored ridicule as long 
ago as 1909. Following the prac- 
tice introduced by Dr Johnson, the 
Supplement cites , the best writers 
of our century as - well as the 
earliest printed users of a word; so 
that for example we find Rose 
Macaulay comparing Wracs to the 
camp-followers of previous centu- 
ries: "Now the women who go 
with armies are not encouraged to 
be so useful to them, they are 
called Ats and Wrens and Waafs 
and Wracs and are kept behind the 
battle lines and are only a small 
consolation to the troops.” 

Wimmin was introduced into 
English by H. G. Wells and 
Grumpy out of Snow White and 
the Seven Dwarfs (where I find my 
' first misprint), neither of them an 
obvious feminist. 

The Times is held responsible 
for the introduction into English 
of sensationalization, unsocial 
hours, situation in its weasel-word 
use, as in “the coal situation”, up- 
market. yeti , though we bad to 
wait 14 years for the crass- 1 
reference to Abominable Snow- 
man, and, I am ashamed to say in. 
a piece I wrote, shambolic. 

’ It is awesome to watch all the' 
old methods of word formation 
spawning as prolificaliy as foe cod. 
Wysiwyg is an acronym from our 
brave new jargon of VDUspealc 
What You See Is What You Get! It 
is odd how difficult it has been to 
find 1 early printed evidence for 
common phrases such as in no 
uncertain terms ( 1 958). to wear the 
trousers (1931), and to fail by the 
wayside (not until 1 965 after Luke 
viii 5).The Oxford lexicographers 
have been unable to track inability 
to run a whelk stall as a pejorative 
comment on somebody's com- 
petence farther back than to John 
Burns in 1894. - 


There are two principal reasons 
for the unexpected magnitude of 
the Supplement the systematic 
treatment of the jargon of every 
academic discipline from atomic 
physics to linguistics; and the 
open-door policy ‘to other Eng- 
lishes from around the world. 

Murray, working from the apex 
of the British Empire (if his 
Scriptorium, first at Mill Hill and 
then in North Oxford, can prop- 
erty be so described), fended off 
overseas words’ until they had 
become firmly entrenched in Brit- 
ish use, treating them like illegal 
immigrants. His successor, boim 
and educated at Wanganui, New 
.Zealand, has a more liberal and 
realistic attitude to overseas 
Englishes and loanwords from 
foreign languages. 

I think Burchfield is also more 
permissive, as we all are, about 
demotic language such as a right 
Charlie. "I find all that cobblers 
embarrassing” and “without wist 
ing to cast nasturtiumsT. 

. He has notoriously recognized 
some of the oldest and dirtiest - 
words in the English 1 language. 
You can look for those yourselves, 
if you must T do ask myself 
whether the Wang Corporation 
knows what wang/whang now 
means in some circles. There has 
been no discernible public re- 
action to the inclusion of the 
famous four-letter and other sex- 
ual words. Homosexual, vocabu- ' 
lary in print remains difficult to 
trace, despite the liberalization of 
attitudes; it is still a coded argot 

The linguistic climate of the last 
30 years, in particular struc- 
turalism under its arch-priest 
Noam Chomsky, has been unfav- 
ourable to historical lexicography. 
Structuralists argue that one must 
examine language synch ronically: 
the history of words, they say, is 
theoretically unsound. 

One must analyse the grammar 
of such sentences as Colourless 
green ideas sleep furiously, and ' 
ignore the past roots of language. 
One must distinguish between 
longue and parole. 

Such an approach would have 


been inconsistent with Murray’s 
parent volumes. And it was un- 
likely to appeal to Burchfield, 
whose early work included 
transcribing the text of the 
Ormuhun. 20,000 lines of ver- 
sified homilies, written in the late 
12ilj century m the East Midlands 
by an Augustinian . canon called 
Onn, ana of great linguistic 
interest. Also (although- this is 
frivolous) structuralist grammar is 
less, fun to read than the rich, 
messy, gossipy history of words. 

There has been continual pres- 
sure, including anonymous death 
threats from groups wishing to 
suppress racial vocabulary or to 
remove male chauvinism from the 
language. A famous judgement in 
the High Court upheld the 
determination of the OED to 
record unfavourable senses of Jew, 
not because it is anti -semi tic, but 
because its scholarly function is to 
record English as it is, not as we 
should like it to be. 

There have been running 
skirmishes over trademarks and 
names, -from Yale locks to a 
resounding victory in a colossal 
tug-of-war with Weight Watchers 
Inc. The language belongs to all of 
u$ who use h, and nobody can 
make a monopoly of a word of it, 
not even the Oxford lexicog- 
raphers (though Robert Maxwell 
found himself prohibited by law 
from calling' one of his publica- 
tions The Pergamon Oxford Dic- 
tionary of Perfect Spelling ). . 

Making dictionaries is like 
painting the Forth Bridge. Since 
the first volume of the Supplement 
appeared 14 years ago, enough 
□ew words have already come into 
the language to fill another vol- 
ume. The completion of the 
Supplement and the introduction 
of- computerization and other 
technologies mean that the OED, 
which nearly foundered after 
1933, will -carry on recording 
English continuously for as long as 
it is spoken. The mighty river of 
English flows on. And its great 
historical dictionary navigates 
with it, issuing its latest but by no 
means its last report today. 


There is a whiff of 1964 in the air 
reminiscent of the chatra in the 
political climate which, heralded 
the ejection of the Tories 2-. yem^ 
ago bv Labour under Harold 
Wilson. It is only a whiff but John 
Biflfem with his acknowledgement 
of Labour’s ren a issance, has 
plainly scented it, and his political 
nose is acute. How real the 
comparison wiih 1 964 is may be a 
little dearer after today’s by- 
election results, even though it is 
the Alliance, and not Labour, 
which is the challenger. But it may 
be more instructive to examine 
the historical parallels man to. 
build psephologjcal castles in the 
sands of today’s results. . 

Among the many si mien ties 
between now and then is that 
between the two Labour leaders. 
Both Harold Wilson and Neil 
Kin nock rose by bidding for the 
support of the left. Both revelled 
in anti-capitalist rhetoric; both m 
their rising years wooed left-wing 
audiences with anti-American ut- 
terances or denunciations of the 
Pentagon, and Wilson, though not 
a unilateralist challenged Gait- 
skell on the grounds that he should 
not fight the parry conference over 
unilateralism. As leaders, how- 
ever, both tried to shift their party 
away from fundamentalist social- 
ism; after modifying the left with 
the bogus undertaking to “de- 
negotiaie” Polaris Wilson kept it, 
though Kin nock is unlikely -to 
have that sort of success today. 

Again, there is similarity in the 
emergence of both to wider 
popularity. Tories, remembering 
Wilson's innuendos during the 
Bank Rate “leak” case, said the 
country would never vote for such - 
an unpleasing little man. But 
Wilson's pipe-puffing homeliness 
had wide appeaL Today, Kinnock. 
at first ridiculed as a Welsh wind- 
bag, is achieving popularity by a 
humorous candour of style and 
fighting the Militants. 

But much more striking than 
the personalities is the similarity 
between the political and social 
climate them and now. In the early 
1960s there was a huge surge of 
support for Labour among sal- 
aried and professional people, 
after fundamentalist socialism 
had apparently been abandoned. 
University common rooms seem- 
ed bursting with people anxious 
for Labour to win. many of whom 
later got jobs in Whitehall. There 
are signs of a similar mood among 
opinion-formers again, now that 
Labour has relegated nationaliza- 
tion and th&like to the back of the 
shelf! has its own version of 
“market" folk and even accepts 
union ballots and council house - 
sales. . 

Once again Labour is beginning 
to. appeal to upwardly mobile and 
progressive people. Once again it 
is trying to conceal real politics - 
and is parading its friends in the 
world of entertainment — as in 
this week's party political broad- 
cast which bad no politicians but 
only Glenda Jackson and other 
“personalities” (including some 
actors known more for their rales . 
than themselves) proclaiming 
their Labour votes on grounds. of 
law and order, the caring services 
and so on. Wilson, who loved 


showbiz parties at No 10. must 
have relished iL 

Once again Labour is being 
made to look appealing, and it is 
succeeding because the Tories are 
gening a reputation (deserved or 
001 )% being unfair. In the early 
1 960s. from the time of the Sefwyn 
Lloyd pay policy (which seemed 
aimed at such vulnerable groups 
as the nurses) and health service 
charges, the idea began to “take 
bold of a forge section of the 
middle-class that Conservative 
government was not *foir* gov- 
ennmenL" I wrote those words on 
September 20, 1 963, a year before 
the Wilson victory. 

Today, becatse of the state of 
schools and hospitals; because the 
government’s tax remissions at 
the top have not been matched for 
people on modest middle-class 
incomes; because of big City 
salaries and unemployment, a 
similar mood is emerging. In the 
early 1960s a Liberal revival had 
.paved the way far Labour by 
driving a. wedge through the 
middle-classes, many of whom 
“have come to believe that i 
.Conservatives are interested only 
in the problems erf the man with at 
feast a fairly comfortable in- 
come — that they do not under- 
stand the worries of people with 
limited incomes who must rely 
heavily os state services . . 
Again the words are. from Septem- 
ber 1963, box me the Tories sure 
the) 1 have pp relevance now? 

This government has achieved a 
huge and beneficial - transforma- 
tion of social attitudes by its 
conquest of inflation, promotion 
of enterprise, shrinking of the state 
sector, and encouragement of 
personal responsibility, especially 
in industrial relations. But it has 
not learned how to respond to new 
problems. And so now. it faces 
enemies on two fronts: the Alli- 
ance. capable of whining seats like 
Ryedale, and Labour, able to 
capture cities and industrial areas. 
In this squeeze lies the danger that 
Labour may just (as in 1964) 
manage to become the largest 
parlia me nt a r y party. 

There are also great differences 
between the two periods. In 1964, 
Labour had really got its left in 
retreat and under control. There 
was no infiltration of the.son that 
drove die Social Democrats oul 
Labour is visibly no longer the 
party of the 1960s. The ham left is 
now dangerous, rampant and 
unconcealed, not least in local 

f wenunem. It ctmld be the 
ones* best friend. But as the 
election draws near die. camou- 
flage and the JCinho&chfom will 
thicken. Whether or not the Tory 
vote splits to Labour's advantage 
depends aa l the government ' 

The old adage holds that elec- 
tions are .more lost by. govern- 
ments than ‘won by oppositions. 
This government could lose if it 
cannot find the political imagina- 
tion to understand why many of 
its natural supporters begin to 
look elsewhere, and why admira- 
tion for Mrs Thatcher is turning to 
irritation. The Tories have to shift 
then .thoughts from thories to the 
way other people are thinking if 
they arc to keep power. They (to 
not have a lot of lime. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

From cashpoint 
to 



Arabs adrift in a Washington desert 


Washington 

It is a time of deep despondency 
for Arab ambassadors here. What 
influence they had is waning 
further in the face of falling oil 
prices, the administration’s ob- 
session with Libya and the cu- 
mulative acts of terrorism that- 
have besmirched all the Arab 
states, however innocent. 

Against the background of 
Gadaffi-supported terrorism and 1 
anti-American demonstrations in 
the Arab world, the administra- 
tion has shown little interest in 
further thankless diplomacy. 
There are no plans to revive the 
moribund US effort to nudge 
Israel. Jordan and the Pales tinian 
delegations towards talks. A gen- 
eral pessimism and weariness has 
settled over the officials Healing 
with the Middle East; the Lnunedi- 
ate concern is to combat ex- 
tremism. Wary of 

hnmf j!.. . -cr : 


Sb !ti£ S™ George 

Shultz, the Secretary of State, has 
effectively left the Atabs to stew in. 
their own juice. 

President Rea- 
gan ana Shultz came to office 
determined to take an even- 
handed approach in the Middle 
East and to encourage pro-western, 
Arab moderates. Both feel let 
down, humiliated by radicals such 
as Syria and frustrated by the 


collapse of the 1982 peace plan 
and initiatives in Lebanon. As 
disagreements between Arab lead- 
ers grew, US anger over terrorism 
rose. When Shimon Poes re- 
. placed the intransigent Menacbem 
Begin as Israeli prime minister, 
sympathies veered sharply to- 
wards Israel. 

Meanwhile the public percep- 
tion of the Arabs, which improved 
after President Sadat's Jerusalem 
trip and the Camp David agree- 
ment, has worsened. Arabs are 
commonly regarded as feckless 
and unreliable. “Non-violence is 
foreign to the political culture of 
the Arabs generally, and of the' 
Palestinians particularly," the 
publisher of the New Republic 
wrote recently. “It is a failure of 
the collective imagination for 
which no one is to blame.” A 
childrens’ television cartoon — a 
crude but effective measure of 
popular stereotypes — recently 
portrayed a fai shaikh in league 
with a devious Russian as two 
villains cheating at basebalL 

Even Saudi Arabia, America's 
staunchest friend in the Arab 
world, is now being blamed for the 
fall in oil prices, which has hit 
Texas hard. The Saudis, it is being 
said, are trying to drive US oil 
producers out of business and thus 
increase US dependence on im- 


ported oil. And on the subject of 
arms sales to Arab countries. 
Congress has just voted against a 
relatively minor deal with Saudi 
Arabia, even though Israel and its * 
influential lobby group, the Amer- 
ica-Israel Public Affairs Council, 
take a neutral stance. 

Of course the influence of the 
Israel lobby cannot be ignored in 
American politics. It is well- 
known that strong-arm tactics 
have been used to uphold Israel's 
interest in Congress. Paul Findley, 
a former congressman targeted by 
the lobby for being pro-Arab, 
wrote a book last year on ways that 
pro-Israeli activists ensured their 
opponents’ defeat But the Arab 
world tends to blame its diffi- 
culties on “the Jewish lobby", 
glossing over the cycle of mis- 
understanding that has contrib- 
uted to today's mutual mistrust. 

A group increasingly caught in 
the middle are those Americans of 
Arab descent, numbering between 
three and four million. Open 
hostility has increasingly been 
shown to Arab immigrants, es- 
pecially those newly arrived. The. 
Arab communities in Michigan 
and California have reported 
vandalism and random attacks 
against them and last year there 
was a series of bomb attacks -one 
fatal — on Arab activists. . 


The National Association of 
Arab Americans, which cam- 
paigns for a more even-handed 
-.Middle East policy, has said that 
one' consequence of Gadaffi ter- 
rorism is that Arab-Americans are 
now seen as unpatriotic. Former 
Senator James Abourezk, chair- 
man of the American-Arab Anti- 
Discrimination Committee, rec- 
ently had a cheque for a Kennedy 
campaign returned by aides fearful 
of accepting money from any 
Arab-sounding source. 

State Department Arabists 
acknowledge that Arab interests 
are hardly .heard now hardly 
heard. A former member of the 
America-Israel Public Affairs 
Council argues that Washington is 
now so pro-Israel that radical 
sentiment in the Middle East 
might be further inflamed. News- 
paper writers have suggested- that 
ignorance of the Arab world might 
lead America into actions which 
would damage its effectiveness as 
a mediator. 

Most professional Middle East 
watchers predict that eventually a 
new US attempt will -be made to 
tackle the fundamental Palestin- 
ian grievances. But for now, 
Libyan terrori sm has set the US 
on another course. 

Michael Binyon 


Just about everything that could 
go wrong is going wrong. The 
American space shuttle blows Up- 
Soviet nuclear plants meh down. 
The Delta rocket malfunctions 
and has to be destroyed. Japanese 
radicals aim .rockets at world 
leaders — and miss. Two million 
Americans cancel their European 
holidays. Sylvester Stallone backs 
out of a visit to France . . . 

Correction. Sylvester Stallone 
backing out of a visit to Europe is 
good news.' But all the 
rest . . . And qow they have this 
crazy theory that maybe, ifagood 
enough computer operator could 
get into the system, he could have 
caused the Delta rocket -to blow 
up- 

WeU, I don't accept that for a 
moment. For a start, why would a 
good hacker — I believe that's the 
word — warn to get inside the 
'system and blow up a rocket, when 
he could have so much more fun 
altering his bank' balance in his 
favour? To the tune of ten 
noughts? And for another thing, I. 
don't believe in the conspiracy 
theory of history. I believe in the 
accident theory. 

At which point I have a confes- 
sion to make. I have one of these 
new-fangled bank cards which you- 
have to queue up to use outside a 
bank in the rain. You put the card 
in the machine, punch a few 
numbers and watch the mariiiim 
eat your card without getting 
anything bade 

The first time this happened I 
went inside the bank to com- 
plain— I only had to wait two 
days for it to open — and ask for 
a n ex planation. They were very 
prompt and obliging. 

“What has happened, sir.” they 
explained, “is that the machine 
has eaten your card without giving 
you any money. That’s all there is 
to it” 

“And what are you going to do 
about it?" I demanded. 

“We’re going to overtook it this 
once, but don't let it happen 
Next please.” 

They gave me back the card, 
which had teeth marks on it, and I 
left the bank, happening to notice 
the newspaper placard outside 
( American Rocket Disaster") but 
thinking nothing about it. It took 


the a week or two to iron out the 
marks in the card and get the 
hologram, working again, and on 
my next visit to the bank I just 
happened to notice the newspaper 
h e adline again: "Reagan Decides 
Not To Bomb Libya After All, But 
Just To Let The Sixth Fleet Sail 
Up And Down For a While, That 
Should Really Scare Them.” _ 

Would you believe, I had the 
same trouble with the bank card 
again? In some strange way it got 
taken into the system, chewed up, 
and ejected inside the bank smell- 
ing of spearmint. 

“We’re beginning to regret giv- 
ing yon this card,” the bank 
manager told me strictly. “Just to 
keep you out of our hair, we're 
going to give you lots and lots of 
money. But try and make it last." 

The funny thing was that when l 
came out of the bank I noticed the 
newspaper headlines had already 
changed: “Surprise Decision To 
Bomb Libya After Alb Even 
Reagan Seans Surprised”. And 
now I real i ze, looking back, that it 
was my cash card that had done it. gh 
. The decision to bomb Libya was 
taken, not fry Ronald Reagan, but 
by my cash card.' 

How .do I know? Because every 
time I have used the card since, 
something terrible has happened. 
Rockets . . . nuclear disasters 
. . . cancellation of American holi- 
days— yes, even that. My wife 
works in a travd agency. She came 
home one day, shaken, *>nd told 
me that two million American 
bookings had been wiped off the 
computer. Just like iiiat. 

“It was almost as ifsomebody, 
somewhere, had got inside the 
system and done it.” 

I didn't ..say anything. What 
could I say? Darling, I went to the W 
bank to get £20 and I’ve destroyed 
the British tourist industry? No- 
body would believe me. 

only mention it aU now 
because I've run out cf-casbagain. 

TTiis morning I have to go to the 
rank and use my card. Heaven 
mows what’s going to happen litis 
time, or which bit of the system g 
the card ingoing to lake over.' Give ” 
fortes by-election victories, I 
shouldn’t wonder. Stranger things 
have happened, though not many. 

Just thought I*d warn yoii,. 





THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


17 


27 23 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9DD Telephone: 01-481 4100 


„ , „ A VOTE FOR EDUCATION 


the- Inner London Education 
Authority. They should be of 
interest to a much larger 
number of people than those 
ot inner London, and within 
London to more electors than 
those with children who are 
dependent on Dea schools. 

Direct elections for Ilea 
should be seen as a pilot 
scheme — a challenge to the 
public to vote on education 
separately from any "wider 
political allegiance. Voting in 
any ejection usually involves 
choosing on general grounds a 
party with particular policies 
which, other things being, 
equal, the voter would not 
wish to suppprt The first Ilea 
direct elections offer the 
chance to break free from this 
constraint Many ordinary La- 
bour-voting parents, like other 
citizens, dissent strongly from 
the educational theories in 
vogue with the reigning La- 
bour Ifea. If they take the 
opportunity to vote for educa- 
tion in its own right, they set 
an example which would male?- 
the system of Ilea elections 
worthextending. 

The case against the present 
Labour flea is that it has 
politicized education by delib- 
erately subordinating educa- 
tional standards to arelentless 
attempt to achieve equality. 
There has been repeated ev- 
idence of low educational stan- 
dards. In 1980, for instance, 
H.M. Inspectors reported that 
“many pupils of all abilities 
achieve less than they are 
capable of." The reason was 
not lack of resources, pro- 
vision of which was “generous, 
almost to a fault." Instead, the 


little from their pupils, and the 
practice of mixed ability teach- 
ing (the last, of course, a hall- 
mark of - educational 
egahtariamsrn.) Since then, the 
improvement for which the 
Inspectors called has not 
- materialised. Research by the 
National Council for Educa- 
tional Standards, together with 
flea’s own' data, show that 
examination results are virtue 
ally unchanged at 30 per cent 
below the national -average, 
despite the fact that at the age 
* of 11, Ilea pupils were up to the 
national average. 

Moreover; where there is 
exceC nee. Ilea can hardly 
conceal its hokility. Recent 
statistical evidence has placed 
voluntary aided (church) 
schools at the top of London 
schools in terms of results. In 
that context. Ilea voters should 
mark the words in the May 
issue of London Labour Brief- 
ing by Mr Steven Cowan, Ilea's 
deputy leader, on the subject 
of “Political Priorities for the 
next flea." His view is that 
“progress needs to be made to 
reduce the proportion of 
school places under the control 
of the churches. Their presence 
and practices are racist and 
segregationist. . Their 
institutionalised position 
within die educational system 
is an anachronism in a city 
with growing numbers of Mus- 
lims and - other 
denominations."- Some par- 
ents who know the benefits 
their children receive from this 
kind of school now have the 
chance to defend them, with- 
out prejudice to their general 
political opinions. 


Others who do not want 
equal-value indoctrination on 
homosexuality and against 
“heterosexism”to which their 
children are increasingly sub- 
ject can pronounce a verdict 
on another of Mr Cowan's 
dicta. “The Labour group 
between 1981 and 1986 mil 
to satisfactorily address dis- 
advantage and discrimination 
on grounds of Class and Sexual 
Orientation. Racking away 
from these two crucial areas 
would render Ilea's equal 
opportunities policies 
tokenistic and liberal, benefit- 
ting middle class interest 
groups only." At the least, 

" ordinary London voters may 
fed enlightened by the curious 
assumption that sexual 
orientation of the kind referred 
to is .taken to be relevant only 
to the non-middle classes. 

Or again, voters may care to 
study Ilea's confused but insid- 
ious undermining of school 
sixth forms in favour of ter- 
tiary colleges. Ilea claims to be 
consulting parents of 16-19 
year olds in the London bor- 
oughs but it is a question how 
thorough this consultation is. 
The effect of the policy, how- 
ever, seems likely to be that if 
the already scarce teachers of 
such subjects as Mathematics, 
Physics and Chemistry go to 
the Sixth form colleges the 
secondary schools will be fur- 
ther deprived. 

London voters, including 
Labour voters, at least have 
much to occupy their minds 
and inform their votes if they 
choose to look at the Ilea 
recordjf they prefer education 
to politicisation and indoc- 
trination, they know what to 
do about iL 


HOME TRUTHS FROM MOSCOW 


Rarely can the cliche “too little 
too late" have been more 
justly applied. The measures 
taken by the Kremlin to 
mitigate the effects of the 
nuclear disaster at. Chernobyl 
have been both extremely 
restricted in scope and ex- 
tremely delayed, and nothing 
that is undertaken from now 
on should obscure this feet. 

Nonetheless, in the past few 
days the Soviet authorities 
have displayed a glimmer of 
recognition that their initial 
response to the disaster — to be 
more precise, their lade of 
response — was an error, and 
they have taken small steps to 
limit the damage. 

Officials of the International 
Atomic Energy Agency have 
been received in Moscow. A 
team of American doctors has 
arrived to treat some of the 
victims. A press conference 
has been held at which min- 
isters gave what is now the 
official version of events at 
Chernobyl And the popula- 
tion of the Kiev area has been 
advised (albeit more than 10 
days after the event) to spurn 
leafy vegetables and long walks 
in the open air. 

All these developments are 
welcome and could just 
contribute, in the long tenn, to 
an improved relationship be- 
tween the Soviet Union and 
the West and to a little more 
openness within Soviet soci- 
ety. But they need to be seen in 
perspective. 

Soviet information about 
the accident has been handled 
on three distinct levels. It is 


unofficial, quiet diplomacy 
which has brought the IAEA 
officials and American doctors 
to Moscow. They will be privy 
to information which may 
never be given wider currency. 
The Soviet authorities may 
also be using diplomatic chan- 
*nds to. inform governments 
directly. affected by the disas- 
. ter. It is to be hoped that this is 
the case, because the informa- 
tion emanating directly from 
Soviet _ sources is not only 
inadequate, but propagandis- 
tictoboot 

That also applies to the 
second level of information 
about the disa&en ihat being 
provided for foreign consump- 
tion. Senior Soviet, officials 
travelling abroad, Soviet dip- 
lomats and a Moscow press 
conference have been used to 
provide details to worried 
foreign governments. 

All have been models of 
Gorbachov-style burea u cra t s: 
accessible, well-presented and 
plausible. Their information, 
alas, has been incomplete, not 
to say misleading. Nor have 
they shown the least under- 
standing of the concern 
aroused outside the Soviet 
Union by Moscow's failure to 
report the accident promptly. 

How could 'even adjacent 
countries expect to be in- 
formed before Soviet people 
had been informed, journalists 
in Moscow were asked dis- 
ingenuously this week. How 
could the Soviet -authorities, 
the riposte should come back, 
be so dilatory in informing 
their own people of the im- 


mediate and long-term dan- 
gers to which they had been 
exposed? 

Which brings us to the 
highly selective and at times 
misleading information that 
has been supplied to the Soviet 
public including those living in 
the disaster area. While the 
flow of information has been 
increased in recent days, key 
facts have been omitted: the 
confusion ax the site after the 
accident; references to mis- 
takes and mistaken judge- 
ments on the part of local 
officials; and problems in the 
chain of communication that 
put people at risk. . These 
details have not been vouch- 
safed to the people who need 
them most They have been 
regaled instead with cheerful 
pictures of Kiev residents go- 
ing about their normal busi- 
ness. 

Now the Soviet authorities 
might aigue that a surfeit of 
facts — especially for a public 
unused to. adverse facts — 
could cause panic. But panic, it 
seems, has not been avoided. 

They might argue that by the 
time the authorities in Mos- 
cow realized the extent of the 
accident, the immediate dam- 
age — to the plant, to the land 
and to the people — was 
beyond repair. But those argu- 
ments stand only for leaders 
who inspire no trust— either in 
their subordinates or in their 
people. And until they do 
inspire such trust, there can be 
little optimism about the long- 
term effects of Chernobyl on 
Soviet society and on 
Moscow’s relations with the 
West 


THE GENERAL SAYS VOTE 


With yesterday's elections, the 
final results of which should be 
known in a few days. President 
Ershad of Bangladesh seems 
poised to accomplish the civil- 
ianization of his military re- 
gime. But his success in that 
regard, if success it turns outto 
be, has been seriously under- 
mined by the violence and 
widespread abuses which 
marred polling day. These 
have overshadowed wnat 
seemed until yesterday a 
shrewd political transforma- 
tion. , • 

These elections are the mst 
since 1979. The General bad 
planned three previous dec- 
lions which be ted to abandon 
under threat of boycott. He 
made sure, therefore, that a 
fourth boycott would not be 
feasible. , , ... 

in the first instance.** 


party, the Awami League, 
whose workers and local lead- 
ers saw their own influence 
dimini sh as that of the new 
council officials has emerged. 

When the general an- 
nounced his derision to move 
to the next stage of the 
electoral 'process and hold 
parliamentary elections, there- 
fore, he found the Awanri 
League prepared to go along 
with him. The pressure from 
its cadres to share the spoils 
rather than completely lose out 
■was too great for its top 
leadership to resist this time. 

At the same time, General 
E«had Has effectively, hired to 
his side many of the principal 
leaders of the other political 
party, the Bangladesh Na- 
tional Party. So, when the 
BNP leader. Begum Khaleda 
Zia, dedared a boycott bf 


■ time, of course, he never had 
any intention of taking un- 
necessary risks. Bangladesh is 
still under martial law, al- 
though its manifestations have 
been somewhat reduced, last 
week the General also banned 


this bv banning the electoral yesterday’s ri«tions,ffie 

nmcess with the local govern- era! knew he had little to fear, 
process wi t *, A M{IV party proved too weak to 


meni elections held last May. 
These were organised on a 

non-party basis. A 

was obvious that tiiey baa 

produced vaiagl^dcoun*^ 

with a vested interest m 
supporting the poUuol st^ 
tures that the general was 

nortantlv, their success in 

extending patrMUjg 

the country’s largest political 


enforce an effective boycott on 
its own. Incidentally, ft would 
also have been ioo depleted to 
fight an effective election — 
declaring a boycott was per- 
haps its only way out 
This means that General 
Ersbaffs prospects of securing 
what he wants out . of .the 
election looked bright as poll- 


all demonstrations against the 
elections. In the light of 
yesterday's outrageous scenes 
at polling stations, with the 
government’s own party 
reportedly involved, such a 
ban must now seem somewhat 
ironic. 

If the complete election 
results do indeed justify the 
GeneraTs confidence, he will 
proceed next to a presidential 
election in a couple of months 
when he will change his uni- 
form for a civilian head of 
state's clothes. At that point 
the military dictatorship will 
have successfully completed 
the transition to civilian con- 
trol 

But nothing much else will 
have changed. After •' all, 
Bangladesh is used to military 
rulers donning mufti after 
holding elections. The country 
foiows that this is normally the 
least controversial way for the 
army to keep a share of 
political power. But General 
Ershad’s rule will remain 
controversial if it seems to 


ing day dawned. At the -same have been continued by fraud. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Underlying purposes of EEC Bill 


From Sir Edward du Cam, MPJor 
Taunton (Conservative) 

Sir. Your distinguished correspon- 
dents, Messrs HorsfiekJ and Price 
(May 61 are right to complain that 
there h as been (as yet) little public 
discussion of the far-reaching 
proposals contained in the Euro- 
pean Community (Amendment) 
Bill now before Parliament. The 
Bill proposes far-reaching 
constitutional changes: the direc- 
tive powers, of the Commission 
are to be massively enhanced; the 
national veto is to be reduced in 
scope; progress towards European 
political union is to be accelerated. 
Thus, whether British people ap- 
prove or disapprove, the establish- 
ment of a European super-state is 
under way. 

Eighteen Conservative mem- 
bers of Parfa'ameni tabled an 
amendment to the BUI on its 
second reading on April 23 draw- 
ing attention to the dangers. It was 
not called. Ten Conservative MPs 
voted against the Bill and 1 2 more 
abstained from the vote but the 
second reading was carried by 319 
votes to 16Q. So the juggernaut 
rolls on. 

I suggested in a speech that the 
BQl be referred to a special 
standing committee to permit the 
taking of evidence from informed 
non-pari iamcn tarians and to al- 
low scope for further consid- 
eration. This proposal was refused 
by the Government spokesman. 

Your correspondents are also 
right to assert that almost over- 
night and largely unnoticed by our 
fellow dozens, Britain's right to 
decide many practical matters, 
and even her own destiny, is being 
surrendered to the majority vote 
and the interests of other nations 
not all of whom share our par- 
liamentary traditions. It is not as if 
the record of the European 
Community exactly commands 
respect in practical matters. Its 
incompetence in financial 
management is outstanding. 

This is the first year of so-called 
strict budgetary control". How- 
ever, the events of the past few 
days have shown that the assur- 
ances given to British MPS last 
year when EEC spending limits 
were raised from 1 to 1.4 per cent 
of VAT revenue are proving to be 
worthless. - 

We were assured that the 
Commission would not propose 
budgets to the Ministerial Council 
which breached the limits, but 
they have done so. We were 
assured that ministers would not 
accept any such budget, but they 
have done so. 

We were assured that there was 
little likelihood of any supple- 


mentary budgets, but a supple- 
mentary budget is now said to be 
inevitable. We were further as- 
sured that any “exceptional” over- 
spend would be clawed back, but 
tills assurance has been entirely 
forgotten. 

We have been told repeatedly 
that the 1.4 rate could not con- 
ceivably be increased to 1.6 per 
cent before 1988, but this is now 
being considered as a possibility 
this year. 

Ministers in the UK, as your 
correspondents rightly point out, 
do a disservice in attempting to 
conceal the fundamental purposes 
of the Bill. If it were only an 
attempt to accelerate cooperation 
and in particular to establish a 
Common Market that would be 
possibly meritorious. It is how- 
ever more, much more. It is a 
substantial step towards political 
integration, common laws and 
fiscal harmonisation. That is a 
very different matter. 

Yours faithfully. 

EDWARD du CANN, President, 
Conservative European Reform 
Group, 

■House of Commons. 

May 7. 

From Mr Curbs de Serpa- 
Pimemei 

Sir, With reference to today’s 
letter from Mr Horsfield and Mr 
Price it might be useful to point 
out.- that the preamble to the 
Treaty of Rome of 1 957 aimed “to 
lay the foundations of an even 
closer union among the peoples of 
Europe". Thus, the intention of 
the current Single European Act 
would seem to be a logical 
consequence to that original 
objective. Since the UK member- 
ship of the EEC was endorsed by a 
national referendum in 1975, it 
surely cannot be denied that the 
ultimate aim to create a European 
political union has been approved 
by a majority of the British people. 

Secondly, the writers' implica- 
tion that the Act necessitates a loss 
of UK sovereignty is debatable. 
While Parliament retains the ul- 
timate power to repeal the Euro- 
pean Communities Act 1972 and 
to withdraw the UK from the 
EEC if it so wished, -it can be 
argued that no effective deroga- 
tion of sovereignty has ever been 
made to the EEC 
Yours faithfully, 

CARLOS de SERPA- 
PIMENTEL. 

Kingston Polytechnic, 

School of Law, 

Gipsy Hill, 

Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey. 
May 6. 


Heritage fire risk 

From Mr B. J. Ash well 

Sir, The letter (April 28) from the 

chairman of the British Automatic 

Sprinkler Association raises a very 

important point but unfortunately 

the sprinkler is not always the 

answer. 

I have been professionally in- 
volved with two West Country 
cathedrals over the last 35 years. 
At both, of these the central 
crossing tower with its wealth of 
timbers and the “flue” effect of a 
tower with louvres presents the 
greatest potential disaster threat to 
the entire fabric. 

Both towers have stone vaults at 
or close to the four arches which 
carry the walls, floors, bells and 
roof above. The weight carried by 
these arches is very approximately 
4,000 tons. 

At one of the two cathedrals 
there is a sprinkler system which 
operates when there is sufficient 
heat and/or smoke in the tower. 
But the sprinklers continue to 
operate until switched off man- 


A fire can therefore start in 
the night, which the sprinklers put 
out and, without anyone knowing, 
(alarm bells tend to ring unheard 
or disregarded), they would con- 
tinue to discharge water. 

This would be collected in the 
four comers of the tower above the 
vault The weight of each pool 
would be something in excess of 
35 ions, which could be sufficient 
to collapse the vault, a major 
disaster in itself 

The obvious alternative is a fire 
extinguishing gas sealed under 
pressure in containers at each level 
of the tower with swivelling 
heat/smoke sensors which would 
direct a jet of gas at the fire 
immediately the sensor activates. 

Can modern technology do this 
for us ? If ii could there would be 
the enormous bonus of no “dam- 
age by water”. 

Yours feithfiiUy, 

B. J. ASHWELL, 

Back Edge. 

Stroud. Gloucestershire. 

April 29. 


Village schools 

From Mr Michael Pollard 
Sir, As Mr C. J. Bunyan points out 
(April 281 the Education (School 
Premises) Regulations Act 1981 
poses a threat to village schools 
which has been gleefully seized 
upon by education authorities, 
like his in Wiltshire and mine in 
Norfolk, opposed to small schools. 

However, on its own this threat 
would be more apparent than real 
since (as has been publicly admit- 
ted in Norfolk) there is no 
possibility that schools — even 
many large ones in the towns — 
can be brought up to the required 
standard over the next five years. 

A more serious practical hazard 
is the pressure befog brought on 
education authorities by Her 
Majesty's Inspectorate to regard 
village schools as not “educa- 
tionally 'viable”. This enables 
authorities to quote “expert 
opinion" when they wish to rid 
themselves of their admin- 
istratively inconvenient small 
schools. 

The feet is that many villages 
rightly regard their schools as 
treasured possessions. The con- 
sequent parental and community 
support results in a high lew! of 
resourcing, much of which would 
be lost to the education service if 
the children were transferred to 
other schools. 

. If, therefore, what HMI means 
by .“educational viability" in- 
cludes the provision of books and 
equipment it is likely that children 
who are bussed from their own 
communities to others for their 


primary education will be worse 
off not better. 

Wiltshire parents should take 
heart, however. In Norfolk, con- 
certed pressure against s mall 
school closures, exerted both in 
individual communities and on a 
county-wide basis, has already 
reprieved many threatened 
schools and is tikety to save many 
more. No view from County Hall 
is more frightening than the sight 
of rebels moving along the hedge- 
rows. 

Yours faithfully, 

MICHAEL POLLARD, 

Orchard House, 

Great Cressingham. 

Tbetfond, 

Norfolk. 

A teacher's worth 

From Mrs K. M. Dunabin 
Sir, Apart from wondering how 
poor a poor headmistress is - 
many people, including grade I 
teachers, see most heads as rich, or 
at least comfortably off — may I 
question the statement made in 
her tetter (April 29) by Mrs J. E H. 
Oliver? 

Surely her head of chemistry did 
the assessing of an A-tevel 
candidate's examination work at 
school and was therefore already 
being paid, and well paid, for that 

1 Vs hours' work; 70p was surely 
only meant as a sweetener. Few of 
us get paid twice over for doing a 
single job. 

KATHLEEN M. DUNABIN, 

2 Hinton (Descent, 

Appleton, 

Warrington, Cheshire. 


Alternative prayers 

From the Reverend Joseph A. 
Keller 

Sir, The Book of Common Prayer 
may well be ousted by the Auer- 
native Service Book in the An- 
glican Church. Supporters of the 
BCP will be delighted to know that 
I .sell more copies of the King 
James version of ihe Bible than I 
do of the Jerusalem Bible, the New 
English Bible and Good News 


versions combined. In 1985 my 
best selling book was called A 
Jewish Family in Britain. 

This is a Roman Catholic 
bookshop! 

Yours oecumenicaUy, 

JOSEPH A. KELLER, Manager, 
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral 
Bookshop, 

Cathedra] House, 

Mount Pleasant, 

Liverpool 


Making best use 
of our energy 

From the President of the Institute 
of Energy 

Sir. Your leader of May 1 is 
welcome because it recognises the 
influence of time scales on energy 
policies, but in one or two places 
you appear to miss the point 

Youbegin by posing a dilemma 
where none exists: should bne 
have an energy policy, you ask. or 
should one remain flexible. Why 
not a policy to be flexible? To give 
an example, during the 1984 coal 
crisis the generating boards were 
able to switch to oil and nuclear 
because their policies bad been 
aimed at diversity of supply (in 
electricity generation, the varying 
load demand dictates that a 
proportion of the inventory is 
unused most of the time, so 
diversity of plant types is 
economically reasonable). Scope 
for flexibility exists also in other 
fields. 

The central problem is that 
plant time scales are long, but fuel 
prices may change quickly. When 
deciding on a new energy invest- 
ment one ought to take account of 
the probable fuel price over the 
operating life of the installation 
(whether it is a coal mine or a 
domestic heating device): difficult 
enough for the specialist, but quite 
impossible for the man on the 
omnibus. It is this incompatibility 
of time scale that rules out 
conventional “market preference” 
in energy matters: we are not 
choosing wallpaper, there is an 
objective reality to be judged. 

The one thing that we can 
predict with confidence is that fed 
prices will be erratic, so we should 
choose policies where they matter 
least. Le^ other things being equal 
broadly a preference for options 
.with high capital cost, high energy 
conservation, low fuel consump- 
tion and fuel diversity. 

It is not realistic in assessing 
energy investments to assume 
constant future fuel prices in real 
terms; and you. Sir, should not 
confuse predictions with policies 
and write ’as though ottering the 
one compelled rigidity about ibe 
other. 

Yours sincerely, 

P. C. WARNER, President, 

The Institute of Energy, 

18 Devonshire Street, Wi. 

May 2. 

Chernobyl disaster 

From Mr Stanley C. Bedford 
Sir, Apropos the Soviet nuclear 
disaster. Dr Edward Timms (May 
5) quotes - . . . never send to know 
for whom the beO tolls; it tolls for 
thee." 

Very api but the gravamen of 
Western criticism is the feet that 
the Soviet Union did not toll the 
bell 

Yours faithfully, 

S. C BEDFORD, 

Donkey Drive, 

Wharf Lane, 

Bourne End, Buckinghamshire. 
May 5. 

Bookshops at hay . 

From MrJ. R. Anderson 
Sir, There is much more to the 
decline of the small bookshop 
than appears in Bryan Appleyanf s 
otherwise perceptive article (April 
26). This includes: 

1. Manipulation of public taste by 
the large chains with their Book 
Gub subsidiaries which arti- 
ficially restricts the range of books 
available. 

2. The imposition of minimum 
order cash limits by some publish- 
ers which imposes an unreason- 
able constraint on the small 
bookseller who has to either delay 
orders until a backlog equivalent 
to the minimum is reached or 
build up a minimum order by the 
speculative addition of items for 
stock. 

3. Chaotic conditions at the 
publishers — e.&, books advertised 
in advance which are delayed 
sometimes for several months 
before publication; ultra short 
print runs resulting in an' order 
placed on the same day that the 
book was press received being 
rejected as “out-of-print”; and, 
another aspect of the foregoing, 
premature disposal of stocks by 
remaindering. 

The leisurely days when cash 
flow and the cost of stockholding 
were not considered have gone but 
one wonders whether the pen- 
dulum has not swung too fer. 

Yours faithfully, 

J. R. ANDERSON, 

4 Vardon Drive, 

Wilmslow, Cheshire. 

April 26. 

Holy writ 

From the Dean of Durham 
Sir, When I was Dean of Jesus 
College, Cambridge, I once sug- 
gested in all innocence that the 
traditional Latin grace, then no 
longer intelligible to the majority 
of undergraduates, be translated 
into English. My colleagues' forth- 
right rejection of my proposal 
owed nota little, I gathered, to the 
sentiment that what was perhaps 
tolerable in an ancient and foreign 
longue would offend the agnostic 
conscience if published in a lan- 
guage understanded of the people. 

I sometimes wonder whether 
my own (and others') pre- 
disposition to The Book of Com- 
mon Prayer and the Authorised 
Version of the Bible betrays a 
similar preference for the gentle 
aesthetics of religion over the 
harder questions concerning the 
reality of the God 1 worship and 
the credibility of the gospel I 
embrace. 

Yours fa ithfully. 

PETER BAELZ, 

The Deanery. 

Durham. 

April 22. 


ON THIS DAY 


MAY 8 1882 

Twenty -four hours after he had 
arrived in Ireland to take up his 
appointment as Chief Secretary 
Lord Frederick Cavendish, 
together with the Permanent 
Under-Secrctary, Thomas Henry 
Burke, uw murdered by members 
of a Fenian group called the 
Invmcibtes. In 1883 James Carey, 
a member of the group, turned 
Queen ’a evidence and fine of his 
associates were executed. Under a 
new name he sailed for South 
Africa but an Invincible, Patrick 
O'Donnell, had been planted on 
board. On July 29. 1883, when the 
ship was off Cape Town, he shot 
Carey dead. 


ASSASSINATION OF 
LORD F. CAVENDISH 
AND MR BURKE 
DUBLIN, May 7. 

A crime of the most appalling 
nature was committed last night. 
The Chief Secretary for Ireland. 
Lord F. Cavendish, who only 
yesterday was sworn into ofice, and 
Mr. Burke, the Under Secretary, 
were assassinated in Phoenix Park. 
The facts, so far as they can be 
ascertained, are these: The Chief 
Secretary and the Under Secretary 
were walking in Phoenix Park near 
the Viceregal- lodge, about 7.30 
pjn, after having been engaged up 
to a late hour in Dublin Castle 
upon business connected with the 
release of the suspects and other 
official matters. Lord F. Caven- 
dish, anxious to acquire as soon as 
possible an acquaintance with the 
duties of hifi new office, had been in 
the chambers of the Castle all day, 
and, with Mr. Burke, desired to 
enjoy a little of the refreshing air of 
summer evening. They were 
unarmed, as they apprehended no 
tger, especially under what 
seemed the auspicious inaugura- 
tion of a policy of conciliation. 
Suddenly they were set upon by 
four men, who, armed with knives 
or daggers, made a deadly on- 
slaught upon them. A boy named 
Jacob states that. while 
birdnesting in the path, he saw 
about 200 yards from where he was, 
near the road, a group of men who 
seemed to be wrestling. He thought 
they were roughs, and did not pay 
much attention to them. He then 
saw two men fall to the ground and 
the others, four in number, jump 
on a car and drive rapidly off 
towards Chapelizod. which lies in 
the direction opposite to the city 
He cannot give any description of 
the appearance of the men. A Mr. 
Maguire and a friend riding on 
tricycles, had passed Mr. Burke 
and Lord F. Cavendish shortly 
before the murder. They were then 
on their way along the main road 
through the park. Returning, the 
tricyclists found the Chief Secre- 
tary lying on the main road in the 
centre of the carriageway, and Mr. 
Burke prostrate upon the pathway. 
Both were in large pools of blood. 
Mr. Maguire immediately in- 
formed the police at Park-gate 
Station of what he had seen, and 
the police, proceeding to the scene 
of the murder, conveyed the bodies 
to Steevens's Hospital On exami- 
nation it was found that Mr. Burke 
had received several stabs near the 
region of the heart, and that his 
throat was cut almost completely 
across. Hifl clothes were much tom, 
and his hands bore marks sugges- 
tive of a fierce and protracted 
encounter with his assaila n ts. Lord 
Frederick had been stabbed several 
places about the chest; one wound 
was through the right hmg and was 
very deep. At the time of the 
occurrences there were numbers of 
people scattered through the park, 
and it is a remarkable feet that 
many persons sitting or walking 
within a few hundred yards of 
where the bodies were found heard 
nothing of the a flair . 

After the Chief Secretary and 
Mr. Burke had discharged official 
duties they proceeded on an out- 
side car to the Phoenix-park-gate, 
and there, dismissing the driver, 
walked on together towards the 
Viceregal-lodge. Before the bodies 
arrived at the hospital, word had 
been brought to the hospital that a 
man bad been murdered in the 
park- The doctors, Dr. Myles and 
the resident pupil hurried to the 
park, and met near the gate the car 
conveying the two gentlemen. On 
ission to the hospital the 
Chief Secretary was pronounced 
dead, while there was a gleam of life 
in the Under Secretary . . . 

LATER. 

. . The work of blood must have 
been done in a couple of minutes, 
and as if to make it the more 
shocking, it was committed in full 
view of the Lord-Lieutenant him- 
self, who was walking in the 
grounds in front of the Viceregal 
Lodge along with Colonel Caulfeild 
and saw a group of mm struggling, 
but attached no importance to it* 
thinking it was some horseplay or 
wrestling on the part of some of the 
humbler classes who frequent the 
park . . . Colonel Caulfeild, in the 
mwantimp, had his attention at- 
tracted by a man, who gesticulated 
and called “Murder!" The Lord- 
Lieutenant was about to proceed 
Over with him to see what was the 
matter, but his Excellency was 
persuaded not to do so test he 
might be insulted . . . 


How long, O Lord? 

From Mr D. P. E. Smart 
Sir, The question which Mr David 
Selman poses in his tetter (April 
29) has a distressingly simple 
answer, the duration of an organ 
voluntary is of practically no 
importance, as no one will be 
present for more than the first few 
bars. 

The general custom in this 
country is for the congregation to 
leave almost aa soon as the 
organist's fingers have touched the 
keys. 

Yours etc 
D. P. E. SMART, 

Magdalene College, Cambridge. 


w. 


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*2 





YHkTIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
May 7: The Queen and The 
Duke of Edinburgh this room- 
ing attended a Service of 
! Thanksgiving and Intercession 
■ for British Indusuy and Com- 
merce at St PauTs Cathedral. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received at the 
steps .of St Paul's by the Right 
. Hon the Lord Mayor (Sir Allan 
Davis) and at the West Door by 
the Dean (the Very Reverend Dr 
Alan Webster) and Chapter 
together with the Bishop of 
London, the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and representatives 
of other Churches. 

The Archbishop of Canter- 
bury preached the Sermon, and 
representatives of industry and 
commerce took part in the 
Service. 

The Marchioness of 
Abei'gavenny, Mr Kenneth 
Scon and Major Hugh Lindsay 
were in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. Colonel-in-Chief. 
Royal Corps of Signals, arrived 
at Roval Air Force Lyneham 
this afternoon in an aircraft of 
The Queen's Right from West 
Germany. 

Mis Malcolm Wallace was in 
attendance. 

By command of The Queen, 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Richards (Marshal of the Dip- 
lomatic Corps) called upon Her 
Excellency Mrs Malineo Tau at 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
May 7: The Prince of Wales was 
represented by Mr Peter 
Palumbo at the Memorial Ser- 
vice for Sir Huw Wheldon 
which was held in Westminster 
Abbey today. 

May 7: The Princess Margaret. 
Countess of Snowdon, as Patron 
of the Dulwich Picture Gallery 
Appeal, this evening attended i 
Reception held at the Gallery. 

Lai$y Elizabeth Cavendish 
was in attendance. 

May 7: The Duke of Gloucester, 
as President of the British 
Consultants' Bureau, today vis- 
ited the offices of Ove Arup 
Partnership at 2 Dean Street and 
8 Fiizroy Street, London. In the 
evening His Royal Highness was 
present at a Reception and 
Dinner for the presentation of 
The Pritzker Architecture Prize 
at Goldsmiths' Hall. London. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
May 7: The Duchess of Kent, 
Patron, today attended the 
Opening Concert of the 
Newbury Spring Festival at St 
Nicholas Parish Church, 
Newbury. 

Mrs Alan Henderson was in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Kent, a Trustee, 
this evening attended a Recep- 
tion at Australia House for The 
Duke of Edinburgh's Common- 
wealth Study Conference. 

Sir Ricbard Buckley was in 
attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
May 7: Princess Alexandra. 


Forthcoming marriages 15-year-old 

and Miss^CJL Sykes Md M^s P^McGifl leads Jersey 

betwwn^Nigd Cayzcr, of chess match 

Thnepley House. Lundie, Dun- G f Mra P.M. Harvey andfoe late 0 ^, 1 ™, ^ ^ ^d in 

-SSss 

r'&'S 


MrNJLCayzer 
and Miss FLCJL Sykes 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel Cayzcr, of 
Thnepley House, Luodie, Dun- 
dee. second son of Mr and Mrs' 


Mr R.W. Harvey 
and Miss PJL McGifl 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, youngest son 
of Mrs P.M. Harvey and the late 


OBITUARY /v- 

M GASTON DEFFERRE 
Mayor of Marseille and reforming socialist 


the late Sir Richard and Lady 
Sykes, of Stedmere, Driffield. 

Yorkshire. 

Mr J JL Chisholm 
and Miss JLE. Bowden 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, son of Mr and 


Mrs Roderick Chisholm, of of Gussage, All Saints, Dorset, 
Alresford, Hampshire, and Jo- and Philippa (Wiz), elder daugb- 
sephine. daughter of Mr and ter of Mr and Mrs David 
Mrs David Bowden, of Chelten- Hutchison, of Westerham, 
ham, Gloucestershire. Kent. 

Mr MJL CockeO . . ______ 

announced Miss SJC Horikawa 
bSwSfSSk, young 
of the late Mr P.G Gocfcell and 
of Mrs H.C. Gasket!, of 


of Ladywood. Worcestershire. 

m. u i » Correspondent writes). 

The 15-year-old from Bootle 
now has 5*6 points and is 
T^e engagement is announced followed by the Norwich rater- 
belween James, younger son of “ Szi? „ aeu >r Rnhert RHiin. 
Mr and Mrs Peter Hawksfield, 031,01,31 masxer Rotert - - ^ 


game against the Dutch player 

Van Putten (Our Chess 

Correspondent writes). 

The 15-year-old from Bootle 
now has SVi points and is 
followed by the Norwich inter- 
national master Robert BcUin. 
together with another English 
bMh 

ter of Mr and Mrs David points. 

Hutchison, of Westerham, gB»BS&g 

KeaL i ilss*?: 

Mr RJL Lazarus 83?S SU8ST? 

and Miss SJC. Horikamt gSSVimSSf’a 

The engagement is annotated ^ 

between Rtwer.dder son of Mr Murray i: Queree O. Baccot 1. causey 

and Mrs Norman A Lazarus, of had llw ' lwf - 


London, NW6, and Kimi, elder 
■ daughter of Mr and Mrs Rich- 
ard Horikawa, of Philadelphia, 
United States. 


Mr TJ*. Everett 

and Miss P-E. Henderson 

The engagement is announced 


Mr DJ.T. Shaman 
and Miss FA. Gould 
The engagement is announced 


between Timothy Paul, son of between David Sharman, Royal 
Mr and Mis PA. Everett, of Navy, son of Mr and Mrs AT. 
Chorleywqod. Hertfordshire, Shan nan, nff^htn nnw , Smrey, 
and Patricia Eileen, eldest and Fiona, elder riaHghtiy of 
daughter of Mr aud Mrs W.L. Lieutenant-Commander and 
Henderson, of Selkirk, Borden, Mrs d.G. Gould, of Naples. 
Scotland. Italy. 

Mr N.C. Ganratt 
and Miss CM. Jenkins 
The engagement is announced 


Mr L. Treadwell 
and Mbs CS. Roberts 


between Nicholas, elder son of The .engagement is announced 
Major and Mrs J.R. Gamut, of between Luke, son of Mr CJ. 
Rolvenden, Kem, and Calh- TreadwdL of Midhurst, and 
erine. daughter of the late Mr Mrs P. Treadwell, of Win- 
John Ganon Jenkins and of Mrs cheater, and Caroline, daughter 


Geraldine Jenkins, ofT unbridge 
Wells. Kent 


Lieuienam-oenenu air jonn — - — ns--*--, 

Richards (Marshal of the Dip- UlDIierS 

lomatic Corps) called upon Her THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 

Excellency Mrs Malineo Tau at May 7: ^ nc^ Atetandra, xhe Speaker and Mrs WealberilJ 
10 Collingham Road. SW5 this P*®® 11 gave a dinner yesterday evening 

morning in order to bid farewell Blind Assoration. this after- speaker’s House. Tlie guests 


to Her Excellency upon 
relinquishing her appointment 
as High Commissioner for the 
Kingdom of Lesotho in London. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the British 
Academy of Film and Tele- 
vision .Arts, was represented by 
Mr Reginald Collin (Director of 
the Academy) at the Memorial 
Service for Sir Huw Wheldon 
(Fellow of the Academy) which 
was held in Westminster Abbey 
today. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
May 7: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother this afternoon 
visited The Queen's Flight at 
Royal Air Force Benson. 

Her Majesty travelled in an 
Aircraft of The Queen's Flight. 

Lady Angela Oswald. Sir Mar- 
tin Gilliat and Captain Niall 
Hall were in attendance. 

Luncheons 

Norwegian Chamber of 
Commerce 

Mr Peter Miller, Chairman of 
Lloyd's, was the guest ofhonour 
at a luncheon held by the 
Norwegian Chamber of Com- 
merce in London at the Savoy 
Hotel yesterday. Mr Ole Sig 
Kvemdal, president, presided 
and the Norwegian Ambassador 
was among the guests. 

City Limy Club 
The Lord Mayor, accompanied 
by the Sheriffs, attended a 
luncheon at the City Livery 
Club. Sion College, yesterday. 
Mr Norman Royce, president, 
presided The Lord Mayor, Sir 
John Welch, vice-president. Mr 


m Speaker's House. The guests 
were: 

Mr Andrew Barnett. MP. and Mm 
Bennett. Mr David Gilroy Qovan. MP. 
and Mrs Bevan. Mr Timothy Brinton. 
MP. and Mrs Brin! on. sir Antony 


noon opened Redbridge House, ™ 

the new Training Centre of the Mr Andrew bom 
A ssociation in the London Bor- £ 

ough of Redbridge. mp. and B Mr?‘B?uL 

Udy Angela Whiteley was in 

attendance. Howard. Mr Michael Knowles. MP. 

auviHHiiu. and Mrs Knowles. Mr W yn Roberts. 

MP. and Mrs Roberts. Mr Allan 

n e . , j , . Stewart. MP. and Mrs Stewart. Mr 

Klirhnovc mdnv John Mar* Taylor. MP. and Mra 

DulUudVa lUUitV Taylor. Mr Peto- Thunmam. MP. and 

.. n . . . * . . r . Mrs Thurnham. Mr Jonn Watson. 

Sir David Attenborough. 60; Sir mp. and Mrs Watson, me Rev peler 
i.mpc Rlvth Oft- Mr lark aiM Mrs Price. Mr and Mrs Alan 

James Blytn. *«, MT J3CK a^oke Turner am MJUor-General 

Charlton. 51; Professor Maurice am mb muhmi waisn. 

Cranston, 66; Miss Heather Glaziers* Company 
Harper, 56: Professor Fnednch ^ ^ Mayor Lid the Lady 
CH „ 87: c Mr Mayoress and the Sheriffs and 

Hoffman, 5-; Sir Charles were present at the 

Illingworth, 87; Sir Brian livery dinner of the 

KeHeit. 64; Mr Norman Glaziers’ Company at the Man- 

Lmiioni. MP, 44; the Right Rev ^ Qn House falsl 3r nighL The 
Graham Leonard, 65 Miss immediate past master. Colonel 

F ?i , - ,l £i 0tt ’ r KS 1 M- H. SeySphUh'ps. presided, 
of Limhsfarne, 72; Mr Robert S. as s i5led by the Upper Warden 

R*^. 52 v and the Renter \Sden. The 

53; Mr John SnagK, 82, Mr Mayor, the 
Justice Waterhouse. 60. ■ den, Mr David Q 

— 7 ” the Master of the 

.Alderman and Sheriff Chris- pany also spoke, 
topher Collett Mr Sheriff Jack British College of 
Neaiy. Mr EJeputy Bernard optidans (Optoni 
Morgan and the Rev Arthur Mr Georee Millei 
Brown also spoke. Others [^ BriSScSuS 
present included: mic Opticians (( 

Hr Preridedlastnighl 

Deputy wunbum Horioc* and Aider- the headquarters c 

man and Colonel CrevUle Soma, able Artillery 

Lord Auckland Armoury House, 

Lord Auckland was host at a 
luncheon held yesterday at the 
House of Lords for members of SSSmSJmx 
the coun of the Blacksmiths' SK h 
C ompany and their guests. Mr ^ 1311 H 

A. W. Pennington, Third War- Ninth Interna tion 
den. and Mr P. N. G. Rayner, on Ballistics 
Renter Warden, attended. Vis- The ninth Intern 
count Tonypandy, Mis M. tics Symposium di 
Shepherd and Mr A, Stevens' at Bee ken House 
were among the guests. Military College 


and the Renter Warden. The 
Lord Mayor, the Renter War- 
den, Mr David Calcutt QC, and 
the Master of the Cutlers’ Com- 
pany also spoke. 

British College of Ophthalmic 
Optidans (Optometrists) 

Mr George Miller, President of 
the British- College of Ophthal- 
mic Opticians (Optometrists), 
presided last night at a dinner at 
the headquarters of the Honour- 
able Artillery Company, 
Armoury House. City Road, 
EC1- The guests included Dame 
Jill „ Knight, MP, Sir Richard 
Meyjes. Master of the Worship- 
ful Company of Spectacle Mak- 
ers. and Mr lan Hunter. 

Ninth International Symposium 
on Ballistics 

The ninth International Ballis- 
tics Symposium dinner was held 
at Bee ken House at the Royal 
Military College of Science, 


of Dr and Mrs J.M. Roberts, of 
Twyfoid, near Winchester. 


Shriven ham. on April 30, with 
delegates from over 17 countries 
in attendance. The guests were 
Professor F. R. Hartley, Prin- 
cipal and Dean' of RMCS, and 
Mrs Hartley, Coun cellar V. G. 
Day. Chairman of the Vale of- 
the White Horse District Coun- 
cil and Mrs Day. Mr Neill 
Griffiths of the Royal Ar- 
mament and Research and 
Development Establishment 
presided and Mr J. Blackofen 
represented the American De- 
fense Preparedness Association- 
Newspaper Society 
The annual dinner of the News- 
paper Society was held last night 
at Grasvenor House: The Presi- 
dent, Mr D R Thomas, 
accompanied by Mrs Thomas, 
was in the chair. The Hon 
Douglas Hurd. MP. and Mrs 
Hurd were principal guests. 
Among others present were the 
Duke of AthoQ, Sir Bernard and 
Lady Audley, Sir Eric and Lady 
Cbeadle and Sir Edward 
Pickering- 

Receptions 

Dnhrich Picture Gallery 
Princess Margaret was present 
last night at a reception at 
Dulwich Picture Gallery to 
mark the success of the gallery's 
appeal Dr Basil GreenhilL Mr 
Peter Bowring and Mr GQes 
Waterfieki were the hosts- 
Invalid Children's Aid 
Association 

Mr Donald Chilvers, Chairman 
of the Invalid Children's Aid 
Association, and Mrs Chilvers 
were hosts at a reception last 
night at 10 St James's Square. 

Woolmen’s Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Wool men’s Com- 
pany for the ensuing yean 

Master. Mr Ivan HutehlDson; Upper 
Warden Mr Arthur Hammow and 
Under Worden. Mr David Ins. 


Latest wflls 

Lord Stafford, of Swynnerton 
Park. Stone, Staffordshire, a 
governor of the Royal Agri- 
cultural Society of England, past 
president of the Staffordshire 
branch of the Country 
Landowners* Association, presi- 
dent of Stafford Rugby Football 
Club and the Staffordshire 
Association of Boys' Clubs left 
estate valued at £7,417,105 net. 
Mrs Olive Warriner, of Sabine 
Way. South Darley. Matlock. 
Derbyshire, left estate valued at 
£273^313 new she left all her real 
estate to the Forestry 
Commission. 

Other estates include (net. be- 
fore tax paid): 

Brown. Miss Peggy Rosa 
Durward. of Worthing £356.924 
Edwards. Mr Harold John, of 
Rude £331.335 


M Gaston Defferne. the . 
veteran French Socialist lead- 
er and Mayor of M a rs e il le for 
the past 33 years, died y ester- ' 
day after a all at bis home. He - 
was 75. 

Deflerre was always on the 3; 
right of the Socialist Pany, a 
domineering patrician figure, 
social-democrat in his' views, 
outspokenly anti-communist. 

Though a wily operator on. 

! his home ground at Marseille, 
in national affairs he was a 
poor political strategist, and 
his pugnacious, uncompro- 
mising style prevented him 
from reaching the very top. . 

Bat he was an ardent re- 
former, and will be reman- . 
bared for two major changes. 

As Minister for France Over- 
seas in 1956, be was the 
architect of a law that gave 
autonomy to the African colo- 
nies and paved the way for 
their independence. 

Then; in 1981-82, as Pres- pea 
dent MitteramTs Minister for . ists 
the Interior, he put in motion in 1 
the Socialist master-plan for 0 
decentralization of some pow- in 
os from Paris to the regions, acce 



Brown. Miss Peggy Rosa Nimes. in 1910. into a Proles- 
Durward. of Worthing £356.924 tarn bourgeois family of 
Edwuds. Mr Harold John, of Cevenol stock. He studied at 

Aix umvwsi^-, tfam followed 

Burlsesdon £327,952 ^ father s footsteps as a 

Kay,- Mrs Beatrice Mary lawyer, and joined the Social- 
Bargrave. of Forth Navas, ist Party in 1933. - 

Cornwall £318.061 As with many of his genera- 

Ker. Mr Johnnie George tion. it was the Resistance that 
Skipton, of Bi deford-. £ 47_^9 brought him to the forefront 

ASS? oSstS 85 a kader- He fought bravely 
Patrick, of Worthing .. £348,752 M ^ Qf tfcSocialistS' 

“Brutus” maquis in Provence, 
went on missions to London 
and Algeirs, and was taken on 


Then; in 1981-82, as Presi- become Leader the Sociat- hrthis efeuRreot, hedonistic, 
dent Mitteran<rs Minister for . ists in the National Assembly disorderly, dty, part Catholic, 
the Interior, he put in motion in 1967. part Levantine, be siood out 

the Socialist master-plan for On de Gaulle's restgnathm, - as ait austere, order-loving -- 

decentralization of some pow- in 1969, . the Socjafeis did Protestant, somewhat puritan- 
ers from Paris to xhe regions, accept him as their candidate--; icaL He actually disliked pas- 
Though he has king been but he fared disastrously, scor- Os. the ubkprilous local drink. u 
linked with Marseille, ing only five per cent of the . and never touched it -He* 
Defferre was in foct born near vote. Somehow he lacked the didn't play boules, either. Yet 
Nimes. in 1910. into a Protes- charisma needed to te a he was accepted, for his shccr 


mayor vdro nifes over his 
realm, itice a feudal baton and 
uses it as a power4rase for Us 
national career. 

Deflerre did mach forMar- 
ariHe in the post-war decades. 
Inheriting an intensely corrupt 
city ("Fiance's Cbtcsgo^X he 
znaraged^ to clean up its civic ” 
affairs, balancing its -bra^a 
for the fina tin® ioAi yeanL 
' He largefy sdlved its fews. 
ing crisis, bmhnewhospfrals. , ' 
schools and. motorways, and - 
in 1977 opened the SmM&tr m, 
outside. Paris. Fct aD 'thfr fc. ■ 
was wktely popular; with a . 
strong personal, .fbfiowiju. - 
among many who - would not 
nonraally vote Socralia. . . 

- Marsttilk was his fieCTheie 
his- wont was law. As well as 
mayor, he was director , end 
chief sharchokler of foe lead- 7 
ing local daily, Le Prenatal; 
which- foe Socialists had ap- 
propriuedat the Liberatioit. - 

In “this ebullient, hedonistic, . 
duortferiy,dty, panCathoiic, 
part Levantine, he stood out 
as an austere, onJer-kmng 
Protestant, somewhat puritan- 
kaL He actuafiy dislikedpaS- ' 


successful national standard- 
bearer of the LdL 
Tact, and the common 
touch, were not his strongest 
points; he was tbo much the 
autocratic bourgeois to appeal 
widely to the working-class. 
When Mitterrand, after 197), 
set about rebuilding the ailing 
Socialist Parry, Defferre swal- 
lowed his pride and rallied zo 


Deflerre carried on a long- 
running food with tte local 
Communists; who were strong 
in Mareeillc. He never allowed 
them to join his rahnitiistnh 
tion. even hr the heyday of the - 
Union of the Left. 

It is true that after 1981, 
when the Communist? joined 
foe Government, -his attitude 


Mr M. de la Fargue and Algeirs, and was taken on 

and Miss R. McGarr to foe committee of the dan- 

d^mSwalia Fatty in occn 

April 12, 1986. of Mr Michael de ^ 

la Fargue, eldest son of Patricia . well-armed Commu- 
and Philip de la Faigoe, of n 'st maquis m the hills near 
Centenary. Zimbabwe, and Marseille foiled at crucial 
Miss Rosemary McGarr, of moments to give Brutus the 
Pietermaritzburg. help ft needed, and Defferre’s 

Mr SJL Devlin life-long dislike of foe Com- 

and Miss C.M. Hedley- munists may well have de- 
^ Bn d e,s . ... . . rived in part from this. 

At tbeJLiberation he was 

in the City 01 London on _ ..r kin.,nAjii.> 

Thursday, May 1, between Mr briefly mayor of Mangle, but 
Stuart Devtin. son of the late Mr fo e communists then won 
and Mrs Richard Devlin, of control of the mairie for eight 
Geelong. Australia, and Miss years. He moved into national 
Carole Hedfey-Saunders.daugh- politics where he was soon a 
ter of Mr and Mis F. Hedley- -prominent figure: from 1945 


to foe committee of foe dan- then on, te remained loyal to 
destine Socialist Party in occu- the Socialists' new feader. and 


him, despite his misgivings, to them mellowed a Uttie: but 
about his plans for alliance he remamed - sceptical * of 
with foe Communists. From whether they couM: ever be 


foe two men got on welL . 

So when the Left finafly 
won power in 1981, Defferre 
was effectively given the rank 
of Deputy Prime Minister, 
with foe bizarre title of Mims- 


life-long dislike of the Com- -ter -for the- Interior and for 
munists may well have de- Decentralization. 


rived in part from this. 

At the Liberation he was 
briefly mayor of Marseille, but 
foe Communists then won 
control of foe mairie for eight 
years. He moved into national 
politics where he was soon a 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS wA 19 MEMORIAM 
£4 a Em + IS* VAT 

I mid i mum 3 lines) 

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name and per ma nent address of the 
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day between 9.00am and 12 noon. 
tsi-W US Mf). For publication Ihc 
following day phone by 1.30pm. 


MARRIAGES 


ELKERTOildFUMT - On May 3rd 
1986. at SL Mary Magdalene 
Church. Stoke Bishop. Bristol. Justin 
James, son of Mr- And Mrs. James 
Elkerton. of Maewonh. Kent, to 
Pamela Anne, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Geoffrey Float, of Bristol. 

SALMON : BOLT 

The marriage took place recently at 
the Memorial ChapeL Royal Military 
Academy. Sandhurst between Cap- 
tain Andrew Salmon Royal Marines, 
elder son of Mr C. J. Salmon, of 
Poolborougfi and Mas Elizabeth Bon. 
youngest daughter of Mr & Mrs Bri- 
an Bolt of Plymouth. Devon. The 
Bnde was given In marriage by her 
rather and was attended by Miss C 
BolL Dr John Rinner was best man. 
A reception was held at Uw Indian 
Army Memorial Room and the hon- 
eymoon was in Cnm 


IKAlfX- on 5th May 1986. tn hosut- 
tal Tatiana, beloved mother of Peter 
and grandmother of Natalya. An- 
nette and Michael. Service Russian 
Church. EnnUmore Gardens. SW7. 
Mon 1201 May. 1986. 2.00 pun. foL 
lowed by private uuemmenL 
Flowers can be sett to J.H. Kenyan 
Lid.. 49 Marion Rd_ W8 SLA. 


FRASEK-CASEY Peter, aged 71. 

Peacefully on 18th April. Ramsey. 

We of Man. Lair of McLeods, Calcut- 
ta and Unldare. Dublin. Beloved 
husband of MarjpreL 4 Laurys Ave- 
nue. Ramsey. 

FREEMAN - On May 2nd. peaceftiUy 
in hospitaL Mary (MoUy) Brooke 
Freeman, of Harwell, aged 91 yean. 

Devoted wife of the Me Percy Free- HOWELL - Newton n. nrMim 
man and much loved aunt and great 

aunt of the Short Freeman and m vwmf* 

Godenne families. Requim Mass at SSfi 
the church of The English Martyrs, 

Did cot on Friday 9th May al 12 a 

o'clock and Memorial Service at SI Ne wton, on 

Matthews. Harwell on Saturday hJlSSto 

|7Ut May al 4 pjn. Family flowers w pitvatecrananon. FamUy Oowers 

only please. Donations if desired to « ea5e - 

He»P T** Aged c/o R A H Barker STEVENSON On May 1st peacefully 


Funeral Directors. 40 
Road. DMcoL Oxford. 


Hilda Qcce in her 97th year. Widow 
of W.D. Stevenson, beloved mother. 




- We see Jetus. who was made a 


irate lower dun me angels lor 
me suffrrlna of death, oowned 

m 

with glory and honour. 


Hebrews 2 9 


DOMNnHORNE-TAIT. On 6th May al 
Queen Chartottes. io AIKon uwe 
Harperi and Dewar, a son Hugo, a 
brother for James and Sophie. 
FIELDING - On May 6th 1986 to Ange- 
la mee Stokes) and Stephen, a 
daughter. Elizabeth Maty Anne. 
FUULICtt - on 2nd May to Ann me£ 
Robinson) and Patrick, a son William 
Patrick E dward. 

GOOOE HP AT- on May 6th near Parts, 
to Rokaya (nee Jajbtiayi and Ste- 
phen. a daughter. Rmane. 

HALE -on May 6Ui 1966 at High Wyc- 
ombe Hoapiui to JIU met Fountains) 
and Robin, a son Nicholas Mark. 
DtWM-on May 6Ui to Jane (net Mont- 
gomery) and Nicolas, a daughter, a 
sister for Anna and Claudia. 

LEWIS - to Julie (oe6 Everfm and 
LLoyd on April loth 1986 a son - 
Joseph CaL 

McCALL On 5 May In Melbourne. 
Australia to Niamh wee Muirooney) 
and Simon a daughter (Feneua 
Scat tefl). 

MMWmO - on 2nd May 1986. to 
Annabel (nee Davies) and Charles, a 
dau ghter, a staler (Or Sam. 
OWUUtOfiY on 2nd May at British Mil- 
itary Hospital. Hong Kong to Jane 
fnee Holrayd-Tayfer) and James. 
Twin sisters for Flntan. 

ROS5 On April 29th to Judith <nee My- 
ers) and Brian, a son James Terras 
Ge orge. 

SALVE5EN - cm 5th May. In Edin- 
burgh. to Nicola (nee Stetoi and 
MichaeL a son. Andrew. 

SO on 3rd May 1986 at Middlesex 
Hospital. London to Barbara inee 
Barazefxn and Alex a son. Antony 
Tsetst ng. brother to AU»a. 

STONE - on May 6Ui to Henry and 
Antonia bie£ Rowe) a son. Beniamin 
J ames. 

TAUNTON FENTON - To Jarquf and 
Anthony a darling daughter. Emuy 
Marglt at the Royal Free Hospital. 
Hamnsteadim 19th ApriL a sister tor 
Robert mid Timothy. 

-’on May m at St. Thomas' 
Hospital, to Hilary uw# Taylor; and 
John, a da ughter. Natasha Lacy. 
WESTBOTTon 1st May 1966 to Arne-' 
B Cnee MerefMdi and Robert a 
daughter. Katherine Mary and a son. 
Raul william at Pranas Margaret 
Hospital Windsor. A hratfae i mm w. 
t» for Marx ^ 



DEATHS 


BAM - on May 6th X 986. after flghbng 
leukaemia for a whole year. Elaine 
of 69 Burlington Rd. London. SW6. 
and formerly of Singapore. Beloved 
wife of Mickey and dearest mother of 
Fiona. Tiffany and Leonte and only 
daughter of Reg and Betty ScammelL 
Funeral AD Saints Church at Putney 
Bridge.' Fulham. London. SW6. at 
3.00pm. Tuesday 13th May. fol- 
lowed by tresnabon al Putney vale. 
Any donations to •Royal Marsden 
Hospital- Leukemia Research Fund". 
Downs Rd. Sutton. Surrey. 

BLACK All FB - On May 3rd X986 
peacefully af his home. Drummond 
Gamar aged 77 years of Cuckfield. 
Sussex. Much loved husband of Bet- 
ty. father of lan and Laiate. Funeral 
service at St MarKffs Church. 
Staplefleld. Sussex, on Friday May 
9th at 2.1 Sum, followed by crema- 
tion at the Surrey, and Sussex 
Crematorium. Worth. Family flow- 
ers only please, but donations if 
desired lo Luketnia Research c a 
H A. Brooke & Son. 36 Whrtsfleld 
Rd. Haywards Heath. Sussex. Tel: 
464391. 

BRME - On May 3rd at the Plaxtoi 
Nursing Home. Dorothy May Cum- 
berland. daughter of the late Major 
General and Mrs C.G Brittan. loved 
mother of Unity and Sally, grand- 
mother and great grandmother. 
Funeral private, no flowers please. 
BURGASS - Pax Archibald on May 
6th. Very much loved by Ms wife 
Pamela. Service Car Colston Church. 
Nottingham. Tuesday 13th May at 
1 1.45am. followed by cremation. 
Flowe rs may be sent lo Radcttffe & 
District Funeral Service. 59 Main 
Road. Radcufre-on-TrenL Notting- 
ham. TeL 06073 2267. 

BtriLH* On May 4th at Foxleigh 
Grove. HoiyporL Helen Alexandra 
Butler late of PUJ on. Barnstaple. Be- 
loved widow of Anthony, loving & 
much loved mother of Valerie & 
Richard. Funeral Service at Stough 
Crematorium Monday I2ih May al 4 
pm. Thanbsgtving Sendee * Inter- 
ment of ashes at SL Peter's. 
Tawstoctc. nr B a rn s ta pl e on Wednes- 
day 4th June at 3pm. Family flowers 
only. Do na t i o ns U desired lo Cancer 
Rettef. Nat West Banfc. Eton or 
Lloyds Bank. Barnstaple 
COPHAM - on May 6th 1986. Joseph, 
loving husband of Jo. father of Derek' 
and VaKrie. ana grandfather of Piers 
and S um. • 

CREED - peacefully at Coring on 
Thames on 6th May 1986. aged 84 
years Margaret mother of Caroline. 
Etteabeth and Richard, widow of Sir 
Thomas Creed K.B.E.. MC. Q.C.. 
Funeral private at her request 
do BRETON on May 3rd at NetherMgh 
Rolvenden Layne. Cranbrook. Kent. 
Major Baron Nonnoa de Breton. 
Drany loved husband of Helen. Fu- 
neral Pr ivate. 

DROWER peacernny on 3rd May at St 
Peter's Hospital. Chertsey. Phyllis El- 
len aged B3 years. Funeral Service at 
Woking Cremator! am Tuesday 13th 
May at 2.00 pm. NO flowers by re- 
quest. Any donations to SL Peter's 
HospitaL Chertsey. Any enquiries to 
Woking Funeral Service. (00862) 

61754. 



Saunders, of BaJcombe, Sussex. 
Mr BLHL Rojterson 
and Mra HJfJL Marsland 
The marriage took place quietly 
at Si John the Baptist Church, 
Widford, Hertfordshire, on 
April. 24, of Mr Bany Hugh 
Rogerson and Mis Heather J.R. 
Marsland. widow of Wing Com- 
mander Guy Marsland, RAF. 
Mr A^JL Tabor 
and Miss C.G. MaguagM 
The* marriage took place on 
Saturday, April 12, at the 
Church of San Martino, Porto- 
fino, Italy, of Mr Hamish Tabor, 
son of Mr Anthony Tabor, of 
Tbe Court, Chetnole, 
Sherborne, Dorset, and Mrs 
Anthony Stainton, of Warthili 
House, Meckle Wartle, 
Aberdeenshire, and Miss Caro- 
lina Giovanna Magnaghi, 
daughter of Conte Massimiliano 
Magnaghi, of Lausanne, 
Switzerland, and Mine Philippe 
Saint Amand, of Aunene, 
France. Don 'Gianni .and Mr 
Alexander Sherbrooke 
officiated. 

The bride who was given in 
marriage by her lather, was 
attended by Catriona German 
Ribon, Alexandra Magnaghi. 
Charlone Magnaghi, Anne Saint 
Amand, Tom Sherbrooke and 
Fergus Dunnipace. Mr Charles 
Butter was best man. 

A reception was held in the 
Hotel Spleodido, Portofino. and 
the honeymoon was spent in 
Venice. 

Meeting 

LeathorseUers’ Company 
At a court meeting held at 
Leatheraeilers’ Hall on Wednes- 
day, May 7. 1986, tbe honorary 
freedom and livery of the 
Leathered Jens’ Company was 
presented to Colonel and Alder- 
man Sir Ronald Gardner- 
Thorpe, in recognition of his 


to 1981 he was almost contin- 
uously a deputy for Marseille, 
and under foe Fourth Repub- 
lic be was five times a Minis- 
ter, notably in foe Overseas 
post where he showed a for- 
sighted awareness of foe need 


for France to relinquish Jher he applied himself to them 
empire. ' vtithgreal«ieijy. Hehadlor^ 

Contemptuous of the been at . _ 

Fourth Republic, -he wel- ization,. haying suffered over, 
corned de Gaulle’s return to . foe years from what be saw as 
power in 1958, and wannly the “interfering bureaucracy" 
supported his policy of giving of Paris, both at the mairie of 
freedom to Algeria. But he Marseille and, since 1974, as 
also believed that France President of -the Proven^ 


whether they could: ever be 
tamed into true democrats. - 

In 1983 be beat off a tough £ 
challenge from foe Jlighz to ' 
retain control ..'of Marseille 
town hall after a bitter dectiou 
ampajgn based cm fow and 
order. 

Defferre was wannly pro- 
European and pro-Nato,. an 
upholder of Western liberal 
values But he was neither art 
inspired orator nor a gifted 
political thinker, less the ide- 
ologist than theman of action. 

He had asharp. tongue, and. as 
authoritarian streak: but his 
Integrity wastotaL 

It was said of Defferre that 
he was foeiast public figure in 
France to. defend his honour 
in a duet in 1967 he was 
involved in a swond fight with g 
a Gaullist depuw whom he 9 
had iBsultetL-Defcre won by 
draw'll^; blood first 

Though wefl-offi he pre- 
ferred* a simple lifestyle, and 


ization, having suffered dyer ^smart parties. lit this, if .in 
foe years from what be saw as nothing else,- he. probably had 
tbe “interfering bhreauaatgr" : more in common with his first 
of Paris, both at the mairie of ', wife; Andree Aboulker, a keen 
Marseille and, since 1974, as' Communist, than with bis two 


Here his main task was to 
elaborate and apply foe com- 
plex plans for shifting some 
power from central Govern- 
ment to local bodies, and 
notably to new directiy-electT 
ed' regional assemblies. The 
project fell behind schedule, 
unsurprisingly; but Defferre . 
made a good start by granting 
a special sem ^autonomous 
statute to Corsica. 

He regarded there reforms 
as the crowning of bis life's 
work, and though nowpver-70 


needed a strong centre-left .regional council 


alternative to Gauflism, ex- 
cluding foe Communists. 

* In 1963-4 he tried to build 


In the major reshuffle of 
1 984< Etefifenre was replaced By 
M . Rare. Toxe and he was 


up this coalition, with himself' switched to foe planning and 
as prospective presidential regional developinent portfo- 
candidate; but be was foiled by . . fro, a .first step towards 


as prospective ; presidential regional ^ 
candidate; but be was foiled by . . lfo. a ffi 
factions within . foe Socialist retirement. 
Party which never really trust- He was a 
ed him. Nonetheless, he re- ofthatverj 
tained enough influence . to. non, the.loi 


He was a supreme example 
of that very French phenome- 
non. foe long-serving, big-dty 


subsequent wive* Marie- An- 
. loinette Swaters. a member of 
a rich shipping fomily, and 
Edmonde Charies-Roux, the 
novelist and former editor of 
the French Vague, both of 
them women of great elegance 
and sophistication. 

His first two marriages end- 
ed in divorce; his thud wife 
survives him. He had no 
children. 


Dr Lorenzo Minio-Paluello, 
FBA, one of foe foremost 
scholars to leave Italy in tbe 
1940s in disgust at foe Fascist 
regime, died on May 6. He was 


• Bora on September 21, 
1 907, Minio-Paluello was edu- 
cated at Padua University, foe 
Sorbonne and foe Ecole des 
Hautes Etudes, Paris. He re- 
turned to Padua where he was 
an assistant -librarian at foe 
university from 1929-3Z • 

— - — - — " — With the rise of Fascism in 

man Sir Ronald . Gardner- his native land, Minio- 
"SSPftL PaI«Uo left for England. He 

his fnterest in the company's excellence as a scholar was 
activities. quickly recognised and he 


DR LORENZO MINIO-PALUELLO 

linio-Paluello, "became a welcome member of his edition of 
the foremost Oriel College. In 1948 he was last, volume 
e Italy in the appointed .Senior Lecturer in luuinus Codii 
at foe Fascist Medieval Philosophy, mark- account of the 
May 6. He was ing the beginning of a lifelong translations of 
academic association with the are among tin 
Atpifliw •)! university. ties for the Ar 


His first published work, 
after he arrived in England, 
was Education in Fascist Italy 
(1946). This was followed in 
later years by editions of 
Aristotle's Categoriae and De 
inierpretalione, and of the 
medieval lj»»n translation of 
Plato's Phaedo. 

He also contributed articles 
to classical and philosophical 
journals; but his greatest con- 
tribution ttx scbolandup was 


Memorial services 


mond Macttoooflti, BactoauafiBa 
short Illness. Born 24tn March 1915. 
and was known as the Macdonogh. 
Loved by his widow Wendy, his chil- 
dren. Jeremy. Katherine. Gitea. 
Gareth. Kevin nd by his grandchil- 
dren. He will be mated by all whs 
knew him. Requiem Mass at Ihe 
Church of our Mas! Holy Redeemer 
and St Thomas More. Cheyne Road. 
Oieteea at lO.OOam Tuesday 13th 
Mar 1986. Burial followed at Rich- 
mond Cemetery- Family nowers 
only. Donations If desired to Si 
Stephen's Cardiac Anneal. *Ch'Lo Ml 
Scerdi Ol te' - Moran - K6S1 

MEASURES - On May Ist 1986 Cath- 
erine Mary, after a short Illness, 
beloved mother of Ann and Robert 
and grandmother of Caroline. Juliet 
and Jennifer. Funeral Friday May 
9th. Service at St Andrews CD arch. 
Kimball on. Huntington. Camus at 
11.30am. Family flowers only. Do- 
nations if desired may be sent to 
Wootitreen Animal Shelter c/o T.L. 
Gouoou. 64 High SL H«1 Weston. St 
Neots. Huntington. Cambs. 

REYNDERS - On 5th May 1986 al Ms 
home after a long illness, nxk Chris 
Dan Reynders. beloved husband of 
Evelyn, dearest rather of Suae and 
Salty and stster Joan. Funeral ser- 
vice will take plan at St Mary's 
Church. Beckonshefaf. an Monday 
13th May at 3.15pm. Flowers may 
he sent to H.C GthmteM Ltd. Til 
bury House. Shepherds Lane. 
BeckonsfleM. Bucks, or donatWM 
Mariecune Memorial Foundation. 28 
Benjrave Square. Loudtm SW1X 
8QG- 


CAUSTM - Harol d Edwin who died on 
May 8th 1982. Remem b ered today 
and everyday with love, gratitude 
and pride. 

COMPTON SKINNER Nigel Stanley. A 
Service of Thanksgiving will be heM 
al SL Katharine's Parish Church. 
Knockholi. Nr Sevenoaks. Kent, on 
Thursday May 22nd at 12 noon. 

CtfRLE A Service of Remembr a nce 
and Thanksgiving for the life of Peter 
Curie. Second Master of The King's 
School. Worcester. wHl be held at 
11.30am on Saturday. 31st May In 
Worcester Cathedral. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


COMPTON on May 4th 1986. The fu- 
neral will take place on Friday, 9th 
May ai 3'pm at Wotton Church. Nr 
Dorking. Surrey. Flowers and emtul- 
nes Mease to Sherlock A Sons. 
Trems^House. Dortung. Tet 0306 


Sir Huw WheMon 
The Prince of Wales was repre- 
sented by Mr Peter Palumbo 
and Princess Anne by Mr Regi- 
nald Collin at a memorial 
service for Sir Huw Wheldon 
held in Westminster Abbey 
yesterday. The Right Rev Ed- 
ward Knapp- Fisher. Sub-Dean 
of Westminster, officiated, as- 
sisted by - tbe Rev Alan Luff, 
Precentor and Sacrist. Canon 
John Oates and the Rev Dr 
Colin Morris. Head of Religious 
Broadcasting, BBC Sir David 
Attenborough and Sir Paul 
Wright read the lessons. Profes- 
sor Ralf Dahrendorf. Sir Robin 
Cooke and Mr Paul Cox gave 
addresses. Miss Jessye Norman 
sang “Dido’s Lament" by Henry 
PurcelL The Right Rev Erie 
Roberts Canan Gwilym Morgan 
and the Ven C. Wirton-Davies 
were robed and in the Sacrar- 
ium. The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress of Westminster at- 
tended. Among others present 
were: 

ana Miss Meaan WlwJrlon (daughters). 
Mr and Mrs Richard Rees (brottwr-m- 
law and stsiert, MBS Nan Wheldon 
tmten. Mr and Mrs AJed Vaughan. 
Mr and Mr* Wynn Rees. Mr Stenban 
Rees. Mr and Mrs OffWoonw Davies. 
Mbs Janet Rees. Mr Cruflydd Rees. 
Mr Sion WhekUm. Mr Rod Waldo- 
Lewte. Mr ana Mrs Kenneth dance. 
Mr* Ann Pauj-Hunne. Dr Ule Uhde. 

5*f Chrtsiooher Une. Mr 

sprosufi. • 

_The Swedish Ambassador. Lord 
El wyn- Jones. CH. Lord Buxton of 
ABa. Lord Hill of Luton. Lord 
Bernstein. Lady RedctUTe-Maud. Lord 


Edmund -Davies. Lord Kenyon, Lord rucadtonsil the Rev David Bumx'Art 

and Lady ChatfonL Lord ana Lady in oiukmO. Mr Alan Steoui (Royal 

5r ro S£3rtMw Wh rt£' F2SS" Academy of Dramaur Art) andMra 
Qedwyn of Penrttos. CH. Lady sieaUL Councillor Mr* Rachel Cki«m 


of Shuibrede. Lard Rayne. Lord Ron 
of ipsden. Baroness Seear. : Lord 
Vfrtmuck. Laid Heyrock Wales 
University) with Dr W Emm Evans: 
Mr , Francis Pvm. mp. Mrs Shirley 
Williams, the Hon Mark Bonham^ 
Carter. Sir John and 'Lady Ackroyd. 
Sir Roger Cary. 

Sir John Sparrow (ViceChabman 
of Qjutl of Governors. London School 
of Economics and Political Science; 
witn Dr I G Patel (director). Professor 
R A Pinker and Mrs W Weinberg . 
tpresKlenl. American Friends of LSE* 
Mr Jusnc* Mars Jones (nresMent. 
University College of North Wales) 
with Professor M Wynn Humwirev- 
Daviea and Mr G R Thomas: Sr lan 
and Lady Tneuwwan. Sir Geraim 
Evans. Sir Robert and Lady Lumy. Sir 
Cdward Pickering. -Sr Talbot 
Duckntanion. Sir Dents ana " 
Forman. 'St .Geoffrey coat. 

Tooley (Royal 
Oaident. Gene 

yurborne Forces). Sir Kennetn 

Sir Hugh casson. (34. and lanr 
Casson. Sir Kenneth Bradshaw. Ate 
Chief Marshal Sir Kenneth cross. Sr 
Slew art Crawford. Sir Richard and 
Lady Dobson. Dame Mary Gram. 
Vice Aonurat Sir lan and udy Hogn 
Sir John PtumBTsir Michael, and LaSi 
Stewart. Sir Roy Shaw. Sir Jmnes and 
Lady Redmond. Dame Maiy&irirton. 
Sir Oeorg and Lady Solti. Gngadler 
Sir Edgar WHJiams. Lady iCharies). 
Curran. Lady iPadi Bryan. Ihe Mayor 
amt Mayoress of Richmond upon 
Thames. 

Mr Smart Young (chairman, the 
BOara of oniemon. BBC) with Sir 

Mr Alan Protberoe. Bngadwr J‘ 
Drummond (Royal Ulster _ Rules 
Assoctanoni. ossud-w l R Bam 
(Royal Welch PusUtertL- Mr A . . 
Buirher (Oarricfc dub). Mr L 
Eyervhed-Marmi iCaucneMer FesUval . 
Theatre Trusts Mr S' w BonarJee 
(SandfOrd si Mania. (Ouscn or 
England) 'TYuML Mr M ttemimnB 
icaiatto. Virago, Bddtey Head and 
Jonathan cane) and Mrs FKhihartiL 
Mr COI In Young f 
Television SchooU. 

lOxfam). Mr V Harrnp »» 

Day). Mr Graham Benson iSAFTAj. 
Mr AniOfuTBanicr IMonmouth FMiw) 
amf Mrs Barrier. Mr _ Stanley Oxley 

V Mr Peter Mar-, 
r T A Owen . 
council), Mr Anthony 

Film tmotutei. Mr John 

Hewlura (Internal Institute of Ownmu- 
rucationu. the Rev Davw Bisnap '"Art 
in chUKMs"). Mr Alan Stoalh (Royal 
Academy of Drauwur Art) and Mrs 
Steam. CouncHtor Mra Rachel Dickson 
(chairman. Richmond Parish * — 
Chart iv i. Mrs P Ubay " 




RetnhardL 
' FHm and 


if ,fW 

I7| r2 " I r." 

i 


Heywood (nmsMuiing me Boerd of 

Heywood. Mr W vTSack tMlddteaex 
Hospital Med krai School). Mr J Crtst 
CServ Ices Sound, and Vision Corpora- 
uonL .M r. O QoraBn iWest KCTU 
Cornish A^odatlon). Mr D E P 
Jenkins • (Gresham College). Mr 
Jocelyn Sevens (Kova) omwr - at 
Art). Mr 
Community Arts 

Wuifams ^Owyoddiflion «nri. w 

Oakley i Royal Surrey Oolf Club). Mr 
A R Jay. Mr J v Rewse-Oavies. Mist 
Wtetma Wayne. Mr and Mrs Huw 
Thomas. 

Mr Klnosley Amis. Mr Michael 
Bwrau. Mr Raymond Baxter.- Mr and 

dier M !M • S Mccora M& Man 
Malcolm. Mr - John ProfuSo. 
Jennifer Hnitw.-Mr and IVtej — — - 
Muir. Mr andMirs Derek 
— ' ■trs Robert- Bototoso _ 

Mr and Mrs Shertdan RugortL 

Mrs M C wmtino. Mr and uSTc 
Wimour. Mr Ricbard Cawsloo. Mr 


Sir John Buigh, Chairman of tbe 
Court of Governors of tbe 
London School of Economics 
and Political Science, regrets he 
was unable to anend the me- 
morial service for- Sir Huw 
Wheldon yesterday due to ab- 
sence abroad. 

Sir Eric St Johnston 

The Secretary of State for the 
Home Department was repre- 
5!?* & fl r r Lawrence Byford. 

Inspector of 
Consiabulary, who also gave an 
address at a service of ihanks- 
fW for foe life 0 f Sir Eric ft 

Hr?" at St 

James s, Piccadilly. The Rw 

officiated, .as- 
sisted by the Rev M n 

Whitehom and Cotoid S 


his edition of foe second, and 
last, volume of Aristoteies 
Latinos Codices , a complete 
account of foe medieval Latin 
translations of Aristotle which 
are among foe chief authori- 
ties for foe Aristotelian texL 

For this, and for his other 
works, he was in 1957 elected 
a Fellow of foe British 
■ Academy. 

Minio. as he was usually 
called, was highly respected 
for his learning, and liked for 
his friendly and' helpful 
bearing. 

From 1956 to 1975 he was i 
Reader in Medieval Philoso- 
phy, and from 1962 to 1975 
Professorial Fellow of Grid 
College. 


Baron, an Endowment Trustee 
of Bromsgrovc School, read the 
lesson. Among those present 
were: 

LadvSI Johnston iwMow). Mr TA St 

gom-o vtaw and dauqbteno. Mr A H 
gfreer i grandson i. Mr and Mra R 
Cannon ibrottwr-ln-law and stater). Mr 
and Mrs M Cannon. Mr and Mrs C 
Cannon. Mr and Mrs R Bunwood- 
TS l 9 r i. Mr B H Burwood 1 Taylor. Mra 
J S Johnston. Mm C St Jonostan. Mr 

JBt JolxMon. Mr R “ — 

Umtenam Cotontd 1 SI 
R Si Johnston. 

UkJv LanttUm. inii ManerofL Lord 
Boarttown. Lor d _ Gray o f Maunton. 
JJted.Burnhanr icnatnuaii.-sidi rratn- 
wim mtBSmwm 
n> and Lady 


Rwesenung aw House m Commcnef). 

— nd Mra Lawson. Sir 
Lady Hill-wood. 




John 

MeijoDOlUaii Poueh 

gJlg^Mr Anthony Finn and Mr John 

Mr s E p«k iprcMdenL 
M^teoooiuao PoUc* Coiteoe assoo- 
ahonl- Mr David Hebn (AJUed Lyons) 
wlbt MrR E Shottotr Colonel P F 
j pto«g <33rd Signal IteWment fVM. Mr 
C Cranoaea ictiairmair. Association of 
ynwsrata «i London) with Mr John 
Dwyer: 

„ ‘ ' . - Mr Alan F King (Polic* 
Mutual Assurance AawrtaOonL MrH *" 

e Bryant (pn^btefX. QW Bromsgrovum " 
ob>- MofoTOenertt G & Sinclair. Mr 
saner iconmakanr Com- — •*- 


toana^ng tUraclort and Mr 
tcomniandant.. Pahoe 











27 




HUf 


22_ 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1 986 


19 




* -Ocwj. 

.. *4 


THE ARTS 


: 1 . 


Television 

Jarring 
parallels 

“That W&s a rotten way to ran 
arerolntam" Gwege V said of 

the General Strike. “I cook! 
have done it better myself' In 
coameniorating its sixtieth 
he might 

mtc written a better musical. 
Demised by DavM BenedktHS, 
and filmed at the Old Vk. 
What a Way to Run a Revoht- 
tum! (Channel 4) was a two- 
boar extravaganza *fa»f see- 
med to have a bemused idea of 
where it was going. 

Drawing his material from 
Hansard and “other contem- 
porary sources" Benedicts 
created obvious, often jarring 
paraltels between then and 
now, hot he never derided 
whether in dramatizing the 
miners' strike his model 
should be No6J Coward, Neil 
Dam or Tim 'Rice. la -his 
indecision, the strike went by 
the board. 

Set in the House at Com- 
mons, No 10 and the salon of a 
very vnconfident hostess cal- 
led Maisie, the musical was 


it had created by supping 
crude, raacoos lyrics more 
appropriate to Jems Christ 
Superstar. Despite the silly 
things that politicians say, I 
have doubts that Hansard was 
the source for Sir William 
Joynson- Hicks’s line "I am 
the cosmic commander" or 
Chorcbill's boast that he 
woald be as famous as the 
white cliffs of Dover. 

There were some good per- 
formances, from Gary Ray- 
mond as die broodmg, ubi- 
quitous miner, Stephen Hart- 
ford as Stanley Baldwin and 
Gordon Gosteknr as the 
Speaker. At the end, though, 1 
was prompted to think not of 
politics or poverty bat the 
message George V made to his 
band-leader when the Grena- 
diers played Richard Stranss’s 
Elektra : “His Majesty does 
not know what the hand has 
just played, bat it is sever to be 
played again". 

Tire 1926 strike was respon- 
sible for the senior member of 
the Coglan family ending up in 
Hastings. The Cogtens formed 
the traaen of ForeverEttgland 
(BBC2), Beryl Bunfaiidge’s 
first of six programmes exam- 
ining the north-sooth divide. 
In stomping oat on her own, 
having previously followed in 
J -B. Priestley’s footsteps, the 
results were slightly unsteady. 

The family — an ancuiioas 
krt of fishermen and braiders— 
was confusingly presented nor 
did they have anything flhnnl- 


land. 1 don't really know very 
much about the Northerners", 
said one old gjrL Bainbridge’s 
desire to see every pebble as a 
predoas stone resulted in a 
gallant attempt to discover 
echoes of die Empire rather 
than the bingo bail. 

What she found in Hastings 
was a confirmation of good old 
British insularity. But it was 
beautifully filmed, and no one 
else has the power of reducing 
people to their most ordinary 
and fallible while at the same 
time elegizing them. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Theatre 



in monotony 


TroOnsand 

Cressida 

Barbican 


When actore complain about 
the unfair power of the direc- 
tor-designer alliance, it is pro- 
ductions like this collabor- 
ation between Howard Davies 
and Ralph Koltai that They 
have in mind. The -play has' 
been advanced to the period of 
the Crimean War and set 
inside a requisitioned man- 
sion whose gutied hail and 
staircase supply the environ- 
ment for every scene from 
Helen's boudoir to the battle- 
field. 

On first view at Stratford 
test Jane, the confident novel- 
ty of this image went a long 
way to overriding objections. 
Second time round, its mam 
success lies in the comedy of 
anachronistic detail, as where 
Cressida watches The parade 
go by through binoculars, or 
the Achflles-Hector handclasp 
is immortalized with a flash 
photograph. 

Of ilm set itself, though, its 
main effect is to crush every 
sceiremto a deadening reitera- 
tion' of the destructive futility 
of war. This is paralleled in 
performance by the sense that 
Greeks and Trojans alike are 
sickened by the conflict but 
can find no way of admitting 
this, much less of bringing the 
war to an end. 

Cressida (Juliet Stevenson) 
and Helen (Lindsay Duncan) 
supply diagrammatic evi- 
dence of the plight of women 
in the equation of “wars and 
iety"; A goddess on the 
battlefield, Helen in person is 
presented as a resplendent but 
terrified whore, hauled about 
by a monocled Paris (Sean 
Baker) and attended by a gang 
of carousing heavies who sus- 
pend Pandarus upside down 


from a balcony and remove 
his trousers when he visits her. 
In Cressida we see what 
turned Helen into foe.doomed 
figure she has become: a 
resourcefully guarded girl 
whose defences are brutally 
penetrated when once she tells 
m amongst the Greeks, when 
she undergoes the equivalent 
of a gang-bang. 

The intention is dear to see, 
but it is often achieved by 
perverse readings of the lines 
(particularly in the case of 
Cressida). The real objection 
is that the production yields a 
monotonous mmaiMt jn both 
camps while offering eccentri- 
cally detached individual per- 
formances — few of which 
(excepting Anton Leaser's 
Traihis) have undergone any 
development since the show 
first appeared. 

You get the point that 
Pandarus and Tbersitcs occu- 
py the roles of clown crvfljans, 
observing the war from the 
sidelines. What this means is 
that they come on and do their 
routines like speciality acts. 
Ahm Armstrong's Thersites, a 
greasy Geordiem pebble-thick 
: fun mimick- 
in a saucepan helmet 
he then cannot get off 
Clive Merrison, dad in white 
suit and Panama hat, takes 
Pandarus through a series of 
wild transformations from Dr 
Miracle to a hard-spectacled 
apparation of death, but with- 
out much trace of his given 
role in the plot. 

Some episodes still work 
ext remely well, notably the 
Ajax sub-plot, conducted by 
Peter Jeffrey's beadmasterly 
Ulysses m a restrained comic 
style remote from the rest of 
the show. In the one piece of 
major recasting, Cfive Mantle 
plays Achilles as x bulking 
lachrymose lout seemingly 

even dimmer than Ai&x- 




Irving Wardle Clive Merrisoa's hard-spectacled apparition of death 


Concert 

LSO/Bernstein 

Barbican/Radio 3 


With- Bernstein himself on the podium 
(and not seldom a couple of inches above 
it) to conduct three of bis biggest and 
bravest concert works, with the Queen 
and Prince Philip doing a rare honour to 
a living composer, and with tickets 
priced at np to £100, this was obviously 
intended to be the big one. And so it 
turned out the other evenings m the 
Barbican's Bernstein Festival begin to 
seem like normal concerts. But, though a 
cynic might argue' that Bernstein is too 
modi the showman not to deliver the 
goods, the truth is that these three works, 
and these three performances, took us 
progressively to the heart, and also to the 
mind, of the Bernstein problem. 

First was Chichester Psalms, which 
may not be easy >to play or ring, but 
which presents few difficulties of under- 
standing. Aled Jones used his extraordi- 
nary technique to extend the treble solo 
of the middle movement in long phrases, 
and his control was more than compen- 
sation for the lack of precarious ethereal- 
ity in Ms singing; to project at once youth 


and expertness is his great strength, and 
it was well employed. He also sounded 
much better in this hall than did the 
London Symphony Chorus and the LSO, 
who found no way to make, a real 
pianissimo, and sounded thudding and 
undisciplined in the first movement's 
choric dance. 

. Then Gidon Kramer joined foe or- 
chestra for the Serenade. Here again the 
sound was unfortunate, and possibly 
might have been improved if Bernstein 
had used something less than- foil 
symphonic strings; though then the 
prominence of foe percussion would no 
doubt have been still greater. One 
listened, however, as little as possible to 
the accompaniment, maned by slurred 
playing from the violins in the foster 
figuration and by intonation problems in 
tire orchestral solos. What mattered was 
foe outstandingly accomplished, vital 
and intelligent solo performance from 
Kramer. I hadno idea there was » much 
in this music. 

Perhaps Bernstein was surprised top, 
though there seemed to be recognition in 
his appreciative smiles at what Kroner 
was up to. The tone was set in the 
opening high melody, which was at once 
a {rare, achievement and a cause for 
anxiety, a song of compelled beauty; it 
was a very persuasr ve and suggest! ve way 


in which to play Bernstein. But no less re- 
markable was Kremer’s fierce virtuosity 
in the quick music, his range of response 
in the adagios and his willingness to 
boogie-woogie in the finale, even though 
the earlier parts of his performance had 
indicated foe value of an east European 
sensibility in Bernstein. 

The Second Symphony had one 
thinking rather of an east European 
colleague, Shostakovich^ and about 
whether Bernstein too might not be the 
victim of a misfit between private and 
public expectations. On foe face of it, 
with its Auden programme, the work is a 
study of Modem Man, but the question- 
ing that goes on in the music, most 
notably through its technique of devel- 
oping variation, seems to be inwardly 
directed, and it was good to be so quietly 
and beautifully reminded of that by the 
piano soloist, Krystian Zimennan. He 
also gave an excellently fleet, nightmar-. 
ish scherzo that dances on the edge of 
West Side Story. Bernstein meanwhile 
led a proud aha powerful performance, 
towards a dose that yet left the questions 
open about that other Bernstein who 
once imagined it. 

Paul Griffiths 

0 The whole conceit will be shown on 
BBC2 on Saturday. . 


Opera 

LaFiUedn 

regiment 

Opera-Comique, 

Paris 


It has been suggested that June 
Anderson, heard to powerful 
effect as Semiramide at 
Covent Garden a fortnight 
ago. has been busy staking out 
the old Joan Sutherland terri- 
tory. If so, then she has put 
several more poles in the 
ground with La Fide du 
regiment at the Opera-CO- 
raique. Marie, foe regimental 
daughter in question, was foe 
role Sutherland brought back 
to Govern Garden after a long 
sojourn in oblivion just twen- 
ty years ago with Pavarotti by 
her side. Miss Anderson has 
with her in Paris an even 
greater master of be! canto, 
Alfredo Kraus. Together they 
deli veras dazzling a display of 
vocal pyrotechnics as 1986 is 
likely to provide. 

Donizetti's jolly opera was 
written for the old Opera- 
Comique in 1840, but with a 
thousand performances not- 
ched up it fell out of fashion 
after foe First World War. 
There was a revival in 1979, 
but everyone seems happy to 
forget about that. 

The plot may be military, 
but the sentiments are strictly 
Georgette Heyer. Marie, 
found abandoned as a baby on 
foe battlefield with no more 
than a note pinned on her, is 
brought up as foe mascot of 
the glorious 21st Grenadiers. 
Her mother, the haughty Mar- 
quise of Biricenfeld, comes 
across her but claims her as no 
more than niece and hauls her 
off to the family chateau to 
learn non-military manners. 
Inevitably all comes out well 
in the end and Marie goes off 
with her lover Tonio, who has 
enrolled in the glorious 21st 
with a view more to manning 
Marie than a major military 
career. Once Fitle was seen as 
a morale-boosting work — the 
first act is set in the Tyrol 
while the French troops were 
in occupation — and Lily Pons 
was in the habit of adding foe 
"Marseillaise" to the finale in 
times of national stress. But ' 
such days have long since 
gone. 

At the Opera-Comique Bru- 
no Stefano chooses instead a 


The Barber of. 
Seville 

New Theatre, Cardiff 


Possibly there is an int 
production of The Barber oj 
Seville to be done which places 
the opera firmly in a Parisian 
boulevard-theatre context, 
making explicit the historical 
links between Rossini's char- 
acters and foe archetypes of 
the commedia detl'ane. For a 
few minutes Giles Havergal's 
new staging for WNO seems 
to aspire to such heights. 
Russell Craig's bold and in- 
ventive designs certainly de- 
serve better filing. The set is a 
town square dominated by a 
three- tiered wooden platform, 
each level festooned with the 
faded drapes and battered 
props of a travelling show. On 
this the players, gaudily cos- 
tumed and over-powdered 
like pantomime dames, per- 



jure Anderson, a latter-day Sutherland to the life 


room in a military museum, 
foe one of course devoted to 
the glorious 21 sl There, 
somewhat implausibly, Marie 
is dusting foe showcases when 
she fells into a reverie featur- 
ing her gallant Tonio. And foe 
opera begins. After this spe- 
cious stan foe production 
improves swiftly, helped by 
some smart costumes by Ber- 
nard Arnould. Stefano is not 
out for raucous Laughter — 
blessed relief — but gentle 
smiles, and from the start it is 
dear that the main task is to 
provide a showcase of a 
different kind: one for two 
brilliant voices. Sensibly, he 
opts for a type of musSe 
famasque where foe soldiers 
all come to life and turn out to 
be excellently drilled, as in- 
deed they should be in such an 
opera. 

After singing a series of 
ladies who are either deranged 
(Luda, Elvira) or wicked 
(Semiramide) June Anderson 
displays open good humour as 
Marie. She may at times ' 
sound just like Sutherland, 
especially in tire secure perfec- 
tion of foe upper register. She 
even looks like Sutherland in 
foe part — see the picture 
above. But she indulges, if 
memory serves, in less thigh- 
thwadang. She may be vivan- 
di&re as well as mascot to the . 
21st, where every man is a 
father and every mail a poten- 
tial husband — no marrying 
outside the regiment! But she 
is not so much the Amazon 
that the love of Tonio the 
Tyrolese becomes incredible. 

The start of Act II, where 
Marie has to learn courtly 
manners but instead breaks 
into the rousing Rataplan of 
the first act, is a joy. But Marie 
is basically an excuse for foe 
prima donna to display all her 


prowess and — something 
which can be overlooked — to 
spur on the tenor to display all 
Jus. Donizetti cunningly at the 
end of Act I and again in the 
middle of Act H juxtaposes 
tenor and soprano arias. 

Alfredo Kraus and June 
Anderson operate on the 
"anything you can sing I can 
sing higher" basis. And, 
helped by a theatre notably 
smaller than those they nor- 
mally perform in (the Co- 
mique holds 1,400), they go 
very high indeed. Kraus, in a 
fetching pair of fawn Tyrolean 
pants, showed full relish for an 
unaccustomed comic role and 
flashed white teeth and high 
Cs alternately at a delighted 
audience. His prolonged ab- 
sences from Covent Garden 
should be a source of concern 
to the board of the Royal 
Opera House. 

Fille is basically a two- 
character opera. But Michel 
Trempont's roly-poly Sulpice. 
foe sergeant who saved the 
infant Marie, oozes bonhomie 
and Helia THezan (once 
Glyndeboume's Charlotte in 
Wert her) plays the Marquise 
de Birkenfela as though she 
were auditioning for another 
lady of noble rank expert in 
men and matters military, the 
Grand Duchess of Gerolsiem. 

The orchestral score is on 
the thin side, but Bruno 
Gampanella makes all he can 
of it. Parts is after the two stars 
and the performances in 
which they are appearing are 
going to becor 


ticket indeed. 


rare a very hot 


John Higgins 

• La Fille du regiment contin- 
ues until May 20, with Alida 
Ferrarini and Vincenzo la 
Scola alternating with Ander- 
son and Kraus. 


form foe piece to a few 
onlookers. 

This promising concept is 
then pursued less than half- 
heartedly. Havergal clutters 
every aria and ensemble with 
irrelevant business and spuri- 
ous gags: a mysterious hand 
appearing from behind a cur- 
tain to tune Figaro’s guitar or 
two small boys prancing 
around him dining** Largo al 
factotum”. Most bizarre of all 
istheattemptin the last trio to 
suggest that Rosina would be 
quite interested in fostering a 
menage a trois with Figaro 
and the Count. 

That the audience found 
much to amuse them can, 1 
think, be attributed to Robert 
David MacDonald’s new En- 
glish translation, anachronis- 
tic, unsubtle and unfaithful 
though it may be. It allows 
Donald Adams to turn 
Banolo into a crusty old rogue 
straight out of D'Oyly Carte, 
yet which towered so far 


above the rest of the cast that 
it was beyond reproach. Della 
Jones, as Rosina, also showed 
something of her usual quality 
later on, when her neat colora- 
tura and incisive enunciation 
matched her pert stage 
presence. 

Pete- Brooder’s foppish 
Alma viva hit some good early 
top notes, but he faded both 
vocally and as a personality. 
Gwion Thomas’s Figaro cut 
an attractively youthful figure, 
and the pleasant baritone 
timbre has potential. However 
he, too, lacked dramatic 
weight. 

Work in the pit was patchy. 
Such an experienced Rossi- 
nian as Henry Lewis should 
have concentrated on main- 
taining better rapport with his 
singers, instead of pressing for 
a heavy, ungraceful orchestral 
sound that was simply too 
loud for the voices in many 
places. 

Richard Morrison 


Jazz 

Chico Freeman 
Ronnie Scott's 

The star of foe Chico Freeman 
Quartet is not really its leader, 
a young saxophonist from 
Chicago praised for his will- 
ingness to blend past with 
present, but its pianist, Kenny 
Barron, a name long taken for 
granted among the ranks of 
jazz's foot-soldiers. 

Barron will author no revo- 
lutions, but each solo is lull of 
genuine substance, every 
phrase betraying impeccable 


BEST MUS1CALT985 

LENNON 


ASTORIA 

THEATRE 



taste, utterly devoid of haste 
and chatter even when the beat 
around him (stoked by a fierce 
drummer, Freddie Waits) is at 
its most intense. 

Gifted though he is, Freejr 
man's playing lacks coher- 
ence: he seems to find it hard 
to concentrate. Wildly inap- 
propriate gargoyles jutted 
from foe angles of "Sentimen- 
tal Mood"; an over-extended 
Latin piece found him doo- 
dling with a synthesizer, a 
kind of musical gravity leads 
him to Coltrane-by^nxmbers 
crescendos. Once upon a time, 
six months with Thetonious 
Monk would .have knocked 
him into shape. 

Opposite Freeman, a pair of 
white gloves are all that 
remain of Neasden’s Queen of 
Soul as Mari Wilson tackles 
“Everything Happens to Me" 
and “Hi-Fly", transforming 
herself from a likeable pop star 
into a likeable semi-jazz 
singer. 

Rlcbard Williams 


Recital 

Horne/Katz 

Covent Garden 


Not every diva win bless 
rather than corse him who 
sneezes loudly during her 
performance. But the cry of 
“gesundheitT with which 
Marilyn Horne interrupted 
her witty spoken introduction 
to a group of songs by Rossini 
epitomized the warmth and 
audacity of Tuesday’s long- 
awaited redial 

Her Rossini, centrally pla- 
ced, presented her visiting- 
card and his. There was her 
recent' Govern Garden Semi- 
ramide to remember, in foe 
little “Canzonetm spagnuote" 
which pops up again in foe 
opera's opening chorus. This 
was foe beLcanto Horae, gur- 
gling her way through a dmin 
of wryly understated “ai-ee"s, 
with the fingers of Martin 
Katz providing plectrum-light 


piano accompaniment. And 
for the composer’s own carte 
de visile. “L'addio di Ross- 
ini”, Horne delicately bal- 
anced, as only she can, 
seriousness of tecbniqne with 
near-frivolity of performance. 

Mahler’s Des htaben Wun- 
derhom songs are not, per- 
haps, the repertoire which first 
springs to mind as typically 
Horae's. In her steel-tipped 
mezzo and Katz's almost brit- 
tle playing, these were grim 
tales indeed: not a trace of 
sentiment, bm an tire bright 
detail of an old-style child's 
picture-book, from foe savage- 
ry of 'Das irdische Leben ’* to 
the menagerie she made of 
'Lob des bohen Vet-stands”. 

The second half of the 
evening saw Miss Horne ex- 
panding into foe fresh New 
Worid breezes of Samuel 
Barber’s Six Songs, and into 
. the sheer joy of vocal artistry 
in five turn-of-the-century 
Italian songs. 

Hilary finch 



nhi MET MK1UMXIS* WilEBi S*1CX 

Blenstock House 


WHY IT P/YS TO SELL SIiyER AT PHILLIPS 



ssilv 

sokitrifse iHu5tarat«d. rbexrrs inoneoftheir 
xecent fine silver sales. 

EveryFriday a great-deal of silver comes 
under foe fracwnecon average 250 lob 

silver to SdShefrieki Plate. We 
currently accepbng items for inclusion 
masal&approxinwhdy4weeksi7om 
now and also for a fine silver sale on 

4fojuly 

Should you have eilwer that you wish to 
be tnduoed, please contact me head of 
our silver department. Eric Smith, on 
01-629 6602 . oct Z38. and d tecover why 
it can pay you to sell silver at Phillips. 


7 Blenheim Street New Bond Street London W1Y QA5. 


irtsimN - PARIS • NEW YORK • GENEVA • BRUSSELS 

Art Axiom 


At Auctioneers. 


Bum's 



Tonight at 7.00 then 
May 15, 20, 24 only 


“ENO's striking new 
production is quite unlike 
any other operatic 
experience you are ever 
likely to have... an 
astounding achievement” 
Guardian 

David Pountney’s 
“intelligent and daring 
production ... a powerful , 
beautiful... orchestra] 
performance under 
Mark Elder” Tirrm 

"Thomas Allen (Faust) ... 
it is marvellous work as is 
Graham Clark as h is 
Mephisto” Financial Times 


English National Opera 
London Coliseum 
SL Martinis Lane 
London WC2 
Box Office 01-836 3161 
Credit Cards 01-240 5258 


‘Thomas Allen 

sings with notable j 
eloquence and 
beauty of tone” 
Times 

“Thomas Allen 

...atourde 
force of singing 
and acting 
Guardian 

"The work gains 
much from 

Stefanos 
Lazaridfs's 
atmospheric 
sets which are 
lit with notable 
skill by 

NrckChetton" 

Observer 


"His 

unmissable” 

Financial Times 


/ % 

a'o 

^Vn,t\vr v 


An auction 
where you can 
even afford 
the time. 


If the prices don’t put some auctions out of your 
reach, the viewing and sale times certainly will. 
Sotheby's Conduit Street Sales an? devised tn fit 
in with .your lifestyle. So then? an? evening and 
Sunday viewings, with the sale on the following 
Mondav evening. 

You'll find many complete room settings of 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works of art. 
As few pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take homeand enjoy Delivery is inexpen- 
sive and easily arranged on the sp»L 

Msa or Access Cards are accepted. And as l« >ts 
start from as little as £2f HJ, time won’t be the only 
thing you can afford. 

VIEWING TIMES 

Thursday 8th May 12 noon -8.1)0 pm 

Friday Sih May 9JMiam.7JM)pm 

Sunday JIth May 10.00 am-l.oo pm 

Monday 12ih Mat 9.00 am-2.(J0 pm 

NEXT SALE 

Monday 12th May 5.30 pm-y.oo pm 


SOTHEBY’S 

coNDurrst 

SALEROOM 

ESTH1986 



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ire 




Tamils blamed 
as Colombo 
bomb kills 1 1 


Colombo (Reiner) — Eleven 
people were killed and about 
100 wounded yesterday when 
a bomb wrecked two floors of 
the Central Telegraph Office 
in Colombo. 

A National Security Minis- 
try spokesman said ihe the 
bomb was planted by guerril- 
las fighting tor an independent 
state for minority Tamils. 

He said authorities suspect- 
ed the island's biggest rebel 
group, the Liber ation Tigers of 
Tamil Eelam (LTTE), set off 
the blast which ripped through 
the bottom two floors of the 
colonial-style building in the 
heart of the capital 

The spokesman said the 
LTTE was also suspected of 
being behind the bombing of 
an Air Lanka plane at Colom- 
bo airport last Saturday which 
killed 14 people, mainly 
foreigners. 

Two people were arrested in 
connection with the latest 
attack. 

The explosion, on the 
ground floor and heard more 
than a mile away, caused the 
first floor ceiling to collapse on 
telegraphists only minutes af- 
ter they started working. 

It was powerful enough to 
stop all clocks at exactly 9.23 
am in the red-tiled white- 
washed building, located less 
than 500 yards from President 
Junius Jayewardene's official 
residence. 


Panic gripped the city as 
ambulances and fire-engines, 
their sirens screaming, raced 
to the building. 

Rescue workers, including 
pedestrians, carried injured 
out of the building on to the 
footpath and gave emergency 
aid as victims waited, bleeding 
and crying, to be ferried to 
hospitals. 

A spokesman for Colombo 
General Hospital said six 
people died before they were 
admiued. 

Two women were among 
the dead but it was not known 
how many victims were mem- 
bers of the public or among 
the 250 staff employed at the 
building, where the public 
book cables or international 
telephone calls. 

Many residents fled home 
after the blast, fearing a Sinha- 
lese backlash against Tamils 
in the capital similar to 1983 
riots in which 400 people were 
killed. 

“I rushed to the building to 
see what happened." one eye- 
witness said. “1 pushed 
through broken wood and iron 
girders. I heard screaming all 
round." 

Parliament postponed until 
tomorrow a debate on the 
national security situation de- 
manded by the opposition 
after Saturday's Air Lanka 
bombing and other recent 
guerrilla attacks. 


Sogat to seek control 
again of £17m assets 


By Michael McCarthy 


The print union. Sogat *82, 
will today seek to purge its 
contempt of court in the News 
International dispute and to 
regain control of its assets 
worth £17 million. 

The union will apologize to 
the High Court and promise to 
withdraw its instruction to 
wholesalers not to handle 
newspapers produced at Mr 
Rupert Murdoch's plant at 
Wapping, east London. 

For three months Sogat has 
been in breach of a court order 
to lift the “blacking’* instruc- 
tion on News International's 
titles. The Times. The Sunday 


Times. The Sun and the News 
of The World.. 

Mr Justice Michael Davies, 
describing the breach as 
“flagrant** on February 10. 
fined the union £25.000 for 
contempt of court and ordered 
the sequestration of its entire 
assets, from bank accounts to 
office furniture. 

In March Mr Justice Taylor 
gave a sharper edge to the 
order by sequestrating the 
union's fleet of 79 official cars. 

Sogat was known to have 
quickly paid its officials in 
advam? for a limited period, 
just before the sequestration. 



Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen visits Stoke-on 
Trent; she opens the National 
Garden Festival. 10-20; and 
later opens the Beth Johnson 
Association Sheltered Housing 
Scheme. 3. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother attends a gab perfor- 
mance of ballet. Royal Opera 
House. Covenl Garden. 7.25. 

Princess Anne visits the Lon- 
don School of Economics. 
Houghton St, WC2. 2.45; and 
later attends the annual dinner 
of the Chief Constables Club. 
The Savoy Hotel. WC2. 7.45. 

Princess Margaret, accompa- 
nied by The Duke of Gloucester, 
attends a reception at Kenwood 
House, Hampstead. 12. 


The Duke of Gloucester 
opens the Cbunril for Education 
in World citizenship’s new of- 
fices at Seymour M.ews House, 
Seymour Mews. Wl. 5.05. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends a fashion show, Mayfair 
Hotel, Berkeley St, Wl, 6.50. 

The Duke of Kent visits 
Bombay, departs Heathrow. 6. 

The Duchess of Kent attends 
a gab performance of Chess. 
Prince Edward Theatre. Old 
Compton StWI. 7.50. 

New exhibitions . 

Two sculpture and one 
painter work by three new 
artists; Oxford Central Library, 
Westgate; Mon to Fri ,10.30 to 7, 
Thurs and Sat 10.30 to 5 (ends 
May 15). 

Pointings of Heswall; Heswall 
Library, Telegraph Rd; today 10 
to i and 2 to 7.30, tomorrow 10 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,040 


fr 

■ I 

r. 


ACROSS 

1 Island state shown in un- 
usually accurate burlesque 
MO). 

6 Olympian land measures 

14) . 

10 Dupe is heard calling for 
help (7). 

11 Ed's fury uncontrolled, as 
was Zola s on his behalf (7). 

12 Dear girl accommodates 
team that includes writers 
(9V. 

13 According to Holmes the 
woman's first name (5). 

14 Could the coot with this 
bird, conceal its baldness? 

15) . 

15 Doctor outside is taking up 
boy. being violently dis- 
turbed (9). 

17 Give us a haircut, say, that's 
crude (9). 

20 Church music taken by the 
president (5). 

21 Moral code — of Christians 
for instance, and here in 
Rome (51 

23 Did Miss Cardew's govern- 
ess appear in such rainbow 
colours? (9). 

25 20's tail is only item on the 
menu (7). 

26 Aircraft control obtainable 
from retailer only l7). 

27 Girl of the month a one- 
time Mexican Indian? (4). 

28 He pays laxi - odd way to 


1 Found direction in class 15). 

Concise Crossword pane 14 


2 A sheet from Paddy’s Jour- 
nal? (4-5 J. 

3 At which gamblers made 
five bob once with a couple 
of flukes (5.3.6). 

4 Delayed, thanks to rider's 
mishap (7). 

5 Right in the matter of cos- 
tume (7). 

7 Ransack the Spanish wood 
up here (5). 

8 Jack Ketch’s item of under- 
wear (9). 

9 Exclude pop? I'm so crazy 
with this thing about mum 
(7.7). 

14 Message for taxi io take 
member to music school (9). 

16 Restaurant serves up jammy 
confection to one in the 
gunners (9). 

18 Work on newspapers can so 
get one down (7). 

19 Vegetable with gammon for 
Anthony Rowley (7). 

22 Dog -or horse, say? (5). 

24 In which Hiawatha finally 
went West (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.039 


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t^nis&BUjriBEgmiiigis 

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Scargill 
to pay 

6-figure 

costs 

Continued from page 1 
recently been awarded would 
also go towards the costs of tbe 
latest action. Expenses on his 
side, he had been 

“minimal** by using junior 
counsel. - 

Tbe case, which ended yes- 
terday, arose from an incident 
outside Mr Scargili's bunga- 
low home in tbe early hours of 
July 18, 1982, wbea. sur- 
rounded by seven policemen 
and four police cars, he was 
questioned for up to 30 min- 
utes about allegedly speeding 
at np to 120 mph in his union 
Jaguar white returning home 
from a London radio interview 
conducted by the daughter of 
the Prime Minister. Miss 
Carol Thatcher. 

He was later cleared of the 
speeding offence at a 
magistrates' court. 

Dif ing die High Court case 
Mr George Carmen, QC for 
Mr Peter Wright, Chief Con- 
stable of South Yorkshire, 
said that it .was a trivial matter 
brought by “a fading and 
flawed public figure", and that 
en trustin g the upholding of 
civil liberties to Mr Scargill 
was “as dangerous as entrust- 
ing Satan with the task of 
abolishing sins". 

Mr ScargiU admitted he was 
disappointed at the outcome of 
the case lmt Insisted that if 
necessary he would do the 
same again. “I am used to 
reverses and setbacks and 
used to having my position 
vindicated as time goes by." 

He was asked if it had been 
worth bringing the case over 
such a trivia] matter. 

“I don’t like being detained 
on the pavement outside my 
own home. I brought this 
action because it was true. I 
would do so again because civil 
liberties and human rights in 
this country are mider threat 
and unless they are challenged 
it is easy to see them bring 
eroded. 

“I don't think die verdict 
has damaged my credibility. 
That stands the test of time," 
he said. 

Mr ScargiU, who said he 
preferred the jury system as 
being “infinitely better than a 
single individual sitting in 
judgement", made it dear that 
he did not intend to appeal 
against the derision. 






The Princess of Wales, speaking at the dinner and looking welL 

Princess carries on 


From John Best, Vancouver 


The Princess of Wales 
joined her husband for a final, 
strenuous round of pavilion- 
hopping at Expo 86 yesterday 
apparently none the worse for 
a fainting spell at the same 
World's Fair site on Tuesday 
afternoon. 

The Royal couple scheduled 
visits lo the British Columbi- 
an, Australian and Japanese 
pavilions at the fair before 
departing by air for Japan, 
where they will spend six days 
as guests of the Japanese 
Government 

At a dinner on the eve of 
their departure following an 
eight-day visit to British Co- 
lumbia. the Prince of Wales 
made light of the spell which 
overcame the Princess a few 
hours earlier during a tour of 
the California pavilion. 

“My wife is feeling much 
better now," he said, adding: 
"It is really entirely due to the 
advantageous conditions that 


pertain in British Columbia ~ 
the weather and the general 
fragile conditions which have 
ensured that she's about to 
have sextuptas. which is real- 
ly why she fainted. 

"It’s not actually true but 
there we are." 

The Princess did indeed 
look refreshed and better fol- 
lowing a rest m the Royal 
Suite at the Pan Pacific Hotel 
to which the Royal couple 
retired after emerging from 
tbe California pavilion. 

And the waiters who served 
heir table reported that the 
Princess ate all that was on her 
plate. The dinner consisted of 
fillet of red snapper, a kind of 
fish, with fruit and sherbet for 
dessert. 

Altogether the Royal couple 
visited five pavilions on Tues- 
day. including the British one. 

Their gruelling day also 
included a mid-morning visit 
to Burnaby, a Vancouver sub- 


urb. where they dedicated a 
new park; lunch with the 
commissioners of the 54 na- 
tional pavilions at Expo; and 
the dinner at night 

Tuesday was a beautiful, 
sunny day in Vancouver, but 
quite hot on the Expo 
grounds. To reach the Califor- 
nia pavilion, the royal couple 
walked about 100 yards in the 
sun from the US site, their 
previous stop. 

Some time after entering the 
California pavilion the Prin- 
cess suddenly put her hand to 
her head, tottered and started 
to fall over. She was caught by 
her personal physician. Sur- 
geon Commander lan Jen- 
kins, who helped her to a rest 
area, aided by the Prince of 
Wales. 

After resting about ten min- 
utes the Prioress felt strong 
enough to walk out of the 
building without help. 

• Stress factor: The P rin cess 


may have collapsed beeaxseof 
a dangerous combination of 
travel stress, overwork and 
low block! pressure, a medical 
specialist said yesterday 
(Thomson Prentice writes). 

Since the Royal couple flew 
to British Columbia last 
Wednesday, drey have trav- 
elled on six internal flights to 
engagements around tire prov- 
ince. But not enough time for 
adjustment to "jel lag" from 
the initial flight may have 
been provided, said Dr Mal- 
colm Camitheri, medical <fi- 
necior of the Positive Health 
Centre, an holistic health clin- 
ic in Harley Street. 

“Tbe dose, warm condi- 
tions in which the Princess 
fainted are similar to those m 
which guardsmen feint on 
parade. They can provoke a 
stowing down of the heart raie^ 
which means that insufficient 
blood reaches tbe brain." 

Tour wrap-up, page 11 


The Awaan leader wot so 
fe u: to accuse Genoa! 
Erahadof perswliy ordering, 
the ba r gin g of ballets re hi 
home . constituency . of 


Angry cro w ds of uttdMt 
voters vrare btoddng some 
polling stations ra Dhaka last 
right and reteug to aflaw 
efnriakto leave. 

Poll violence, page 9 
Leading article* page 17 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


to I and 2 to S, Sat lOlo 1, Mon 
10 to* I and 2 to 7.30, Tues 10 to 
1 and 2 to 5 (ends May 13). 

Alastair Hull: Afghanistan; 
Old Bruns Farm. St Leonards, 
Tring, Herts; Mon to Sun 10.30 
to 7 (ends May 18). 

Britain at Bay: The Home 
Front 1939-45; Falmouth Art 
Gallery. Municipal Buildings. 
The Moon Mon to Fri 10 to 4:30 
(ends June 2). 

New work by Charles Oakley; 
Arts Council Gallery. Bedford 
St. Belfast; Tues to Sal 10 to 6 . 
(ends May 30). 

Last chance to see 
Drawing for sculpture by | 
Emily Honhung and lustreware j 
by Janet Lewis; Bohun Gallery, 
Station Rd, Henley-on-Thames, 
Oxon, (0 to 5.30. 

People of the Ice: Inoit art; 
Ginnel Gallery. 16 Lloyd Street, 
Manchester, 9 to 5.30. 

Music 

Concert by the Schubert En- 
semble of London; St George's. 
Brandon Hill. Bristol 1. 

Concert by the Hague Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; 
Sheldonian Theatre. Oxford, 
7.30. 

Concert tbe by Guildford 
Philharmonic Orchestra and 
Choin Si David's Hall Cardiff, 
8 . 

Recital by Rachel Cooper 
(soprano), Andrew Mayor (bari- 
tone) and Nigel Foster (piano); 
St Mary’s, Aytesbto-y, 1.10. 

Concert by the Arioso Quartet 
with Ulrich Heinan (cello): Bir- 
mingham and Midland In- 
stitute, Margaret St. 

Birmingham, |. 

Concert by the Medici String 
Quartet with John Bingham 
(piano); Taliesin Arts Centre, 
University College, Swansea. 
7.30. 

Concert by the London Ba- 
roque; New Hall Winchester 
College. Culver Rd, 7.30. 

Talks, lectures 
Sixty Years of Physics, by 
Prof Sir Nevill Mott; 
Attenborough Lecture Theatre 
I, Leicester University. 2.15. 

Regeneration in inner .urban 
areas, by Piers Gough; The 
Huntingdon Centre. The Vino- 
yards, The Paragon. Bath. 6.15. 
General 

Secondhand Book Fair; 
Queen's Hall. Leicester Univer- 
sity. 10 to 4. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Thomas Hancock, pio- 
neer of the rubber industry, 
Marlborough. Wiltshire. 1786; 
Jean Henri Dunanc. founder of 
the Red Cross, Geneva. 1828: 
Harry S. Truman. 33rd Presi- 
dent of the USA 1945-53, 
Lamar. Missouri. 1884. 

Deaths: Antoine Lavoisier, 
chemist. Paris. 1794; John Stu- 
art Mill, political economist, 
Avignon. France. 1873; Gustave 
Flaubert. Croisset. France. 
1880; Paul Gauguin. Atuana. 
Marquesas Islands. 1903; Os- 
wald Spengler, philosopher, 
Munich, 1936; Gordon 
Selfridge, founder of the Lon- 
don stare. London. 1947. 

VEday. 1945. 


£10,000 bonds 


The winning numbers in this 
month's £10.000 Premium 
Bond prizes are: 12BW 656306. 
Tbe winner lives in Worthing; 
2LZ 894101 (Shropshire); 12TB 
492898 (North Yorkshire); 
J5YK 173S85 (Burnley); 17YZ 
096171 (London Borough of 
Hackney). 


Books — paperback . 

The Literary Editor's selection of interesting books published Hits week 
FICTION 

For Sylvia. An Honest Account by Valentine Addend (Methuen, £3-95) 
Living on Yesterday, by Edtth Templeton, introduction by Anita Brookner 
(Hogarth Press, £3.95) 

wwakeflekf a Crusade, by Bernice Rubens (Abacus. £3J>0) 


Solstice, by Joyce Card Oates (Pavarme, £255} 

The Therapy of Avram Blok, by Simon Louvish (Black Swan, £3.95) 
NON-FICTION 

Autobiography, by GX Chesterton, introduction by Richard Ingrams 


Autobiography, by GJC Chet 
(Hamtsh Hamilton .£5.95) 

Cec9 Beaton, by Hugo Vickers 


Cec9 Beaton, by Hugo Vickers (WeWenfeW & Nicoisdn, £8.95) 

Into the Thfctfes, Style and design 1927-1934. by Klaus-Jurgen Sembacb, 
translated by Judith FB6on (Thames & Hudson, 8L95) 

S elec ted Poems, by UJL Fanthorpe (Penguin, £2-95) 

PH 


Weather 

forecast 

A depression to NW of 
Scotland will fill tearing a 
showery airstream over 
most areas. Later, an 
occlusion wifi approach 
theSW. 


• 6 am to midnight 


The pound 


Austria Sch 
Belgium Fr 
Canada* 

OanmmtiKr 
Finland Ukk 
France Fr 
German* Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong KongS 
Instead Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yon 
Netherlands Gid 
Nonray Kr 
Portugal Etc 
South Africa Rd 
Spate Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dm 

Rates lor anal denomination bank notes 
orty as supptad by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Retea Price Index: 381.6 
London: The FT Index closed down 22X 
at 1345.7. 

Radiation unit 

A public information unit 
handling inquiries about levels 
of radiation throughout Britain 
after the Chernobyl explosion 
has been set up by the 
Government. 

The telephone number of the 
new Department of Environ- 
ment radiation information unit 
is 01-212-3434. 


Times Portfolio Gotti rtries are as 

follow, . . , 

1 Tones Portfolio ts free. Purchase 
of The Times H no) a condition of 
taKuio part 


Roads 

London and So u t h e as t A303& West- 
bound delays on Wandsworth Rd at the 
junction with Cedars. Ctapham. A406: 
Tratflc congestion between 10 am and 
330 pm on the North Circular Rd et 
Chtewjck between Gurmerabury Awe end 
the Chiswick roundabout Aft Delays et 
Ctoptwm High St 

Tne Wdtandx SBc Contraflow between 
junctions 4 (Bromsgrove) and 5 
(Drortwfchj; two lanes open southbound 
and only one lane open northbound. Mft 
Contra fl o w between junctions 15 and 18 
Stoke-on-Trent. A 480: Delays - at 
Sharesrtfi Just off Junction 11 otthe M6. N 
! of Wolverhampton. 

Watesand West A3ft Repairs and lane 
donees et Tamar Bricfae between 
UsJteard and Plymouth. A3ft Temporary 
traffic fights on Sherborne Causeway 
between Yeovfl and Mdboma; delays. 
A420c Temporary traffic fights at Two Mle 
HB. Ktegswood, delaying traffic traveflteg 
between Bristol and Ct ite penh e m. 

The North: Mft Roadworks b et w ee n 
junctions 32 end 33 detaymgtraffic in both 
(tractions. Mfil: Btacow raatge: Lane 
Closures at jwetian M61/MS due to 
construction of new motonmy tank on M81 
at Walton Summit *74: Corareflow be- 
tween Gretna Green near TodNte Mega. 

Scottemfc Aflffc Aberde e n: Ckybound 
carriageway dosed at Budcsbwn; single 
fine traffic. A74: Contraflow at Pwrei 
Bridge. S of Lesmsgow, Lanarkshire; 
delays Ifcety. Gtesgow: Width resmaJons 
on Maryfw-Rd between- Queens Cross 
and Nonhparfc Sc dfreretans- 

Partiament today 

Commons (2.30): Debate on 
crime prevention. 

Lords (3Y. Gas Bill commit- 
tee, third day. 


m mm 



1 HT 

PM 

HT 

i as 

252 

7.1 

as 

2X0 

as 

12.7 

aiz 

127 

az 

1159 

11 

1 11.7 

757 

11.7 

1 S3 

&41 

55 

1 62 



1 5.1 

6.11 

51 

1 4.3 

159 

45 

1 as 

1253 

as 

i 55 

11.18 

52 

6.9 

7X4 

12 . 

&6 

65S 

85 

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322 

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10.18 

25 

4 5 

1X1 

45 

e.6 

7X7 

65 

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558 

65 

aa 

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54 

1-S 

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42 11X3 

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s.1 

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52 

4X n>fl? 4X . 
tret- lew? Tfffllt** 


















«IOT3?8W ! iS£ 





THURSDAY MAY R 1 935 


TBDE 



TIMES 



FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


'-i.. 

* , 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1345.7 (-22.8) 

FT-SE 100 
1610.1 (-26.1) 

JJSM (Datastream) 


THE POUMD 


US Dollar 
1.5375 (+0.0025) 
W German mark 
3.3827 (+0.0437) 

Trade-weighted 
76.3 (same) 



calls for 


supervision 


The Governor. of the Bank 
of England, Mr Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton. yesterday called 
for the supervisors of banks 
and securities markets around 
tne world to coordinate their 


• By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
He said: “With banking and vefory codes internationally 


regulatory responsibilitiesL 






Bestwood 
lifts bid 









Bestwood, the investment 
holding company, looked set 
to win the takeover battle for] 
the Cbuntry Gentlemen’s As- 
sociation last night, after it 
increased its offer to 7 shares 
for 2. The new offer values 
each. OGA share at £11.32, 
with Bestwood at 485p. 

Mr Tony Cole, chairman ofj 
Bestwood, said: “I am ex- 
tremely confident of 
succesfu! conclusion” 
Bestwood has acquired 12.5 
per cent of GCA's shares a nd 
received acceptances from 
holders of a further 33 .5 per 
cent, taking the total lo 46 per 
cent. 

Bestwood's original offer 
was 2 for 1 or I share phis 
350p in cash for one. The 
partial cash alternative has not 
been increased and will there- 
fore lapse on Friday, May 9. 


Debt bites 


Royal Bank of Scotland 
yesterday reported pretax 
profits for the six months to 
March 31 up from £75.9-' 
million to £92.7 miffion. Hie 
bank said that its performance 
had been hampered by a rising 
charge for bad mid doubtful 
debt and a sharp increase in 


expenses. Its shares fefl I4p to 


Tempos, page 23 


Profit up 19% 


Niirdin & Peacock reported 
a pretax profit for theyear to 
January 4 of £15,7 nriDum, up 
19.3 per cent on lhc‘ previous 
year. Turnover wasop22 per 
cent to £728 miOioh, and the 
dividend' fin- the year vas 
raised to 4.05p. 


fempus, page23 


Property sale 


added that as financial 
markets became increasingly 
international, -• supervisors of 
securities, market in different 
countries should be prep are d 
to establish dosfcr relation- 
ships and exchauge confiden- 
tial information. 

Mr btigti-Pbmberton’s re- 
marks, in a speech to the 
London International Capital 
Markets Conference, repre- 
sent the first time the Bank has 
pushed fora harmonization of 
both banking and capital mar- 
ket supervision rules 
internationally. 


capital markets becoming 
closer and -borrowers moving 
between them, I wonder 
whether banking and securi- 
ties supervisors should not 
now be putting their beads - 
together internationally.” 

It was important that regu- 
lators <jf different markets 
reached an understanding to 
minimize duplication in re- 
porting requirements and to 
coordinate, action, be said. 
This needed to be done with- . 
out overriding statory obliga- 
tions governing the regulators 
of different countries and 
without reaving gaps through 
which business could slip 
unregulated 

The Bank is already dis- 
creetly pressing for stronger 
and. more co-ordinated super- 


through its membership of the 
Basle Committee. 

Mr Leigh-Pemberton added 
that there was a need for more 
exchange of information be- 
tween different regulatory 
bodies as the distinction be- 
tween banks and other finan- 
cial institutions became 
increasingly blurred.The 
Governor’s remarks follow a 
hard-hitting speech given on 
Tuesday by Mr George 
Blunden, the Bank’s deputy 
governor, insisting that moves 
to tighten regulation of British 
tanking markets would con- 
tinue even though if it meant 
patting British banks at a 
competitive disadvantage 
internationally. 

Mr Blunden warned foreign 
banks operating in the United 


Kingdom that they would be 
subject to the same superviso- 
■ty rales as British banks or risk 
being reported to their own 
supervisory authorities. 

• Mr Paul Volcker, chair- 
man of the US Federal Re- 
serve Board, yesterday urged 
Congress to pass legislation 
granting broad powers to 
banking regulators to prevent 
failures resulting from ’’un- 
usually severe economic 
conditions” in certain regions 
of America, writes Bailey 
Morris. 

He testified in support of 
eme r g e ncy legislation which 
would expand the authority of 
the three largest banking agen- 
cies to acquire failing banks 
and to arrange purchases of 
bankrupt institutions with as- 
sets of S250 million or more. 


Trafalgar House in agreed 
£80m bid for John Brown 


ByRidaidlauter 

Trafalgar House, the ship- 
ping, industrial and oil con- 
glomerate, yesterday an- 
nounced an agreed takeover 
bid for the John Brown en- 
gineering group which it help- 
ed rescue last year by taking a 
29.9 percent stake as part of a 
refinancing package/ 

The two companies have al- 
ready worked together on a 
number of internati onal cons- 
truction and engineering pro- 
jects, including contracts in 
the united States and Soviet 
Union. Trafalgar's chief 
executive, Mr Eric Parker, 
said John Brown would retain 
its identity after the merger, 
adding: “We’ve no plans to 
change the nature of John 
Brown’s busiiress, but we hope 
tire merger win remove their 
problem of a lack of financial 
musde.” 

If successful, the takeover 
wifi end one of the longest- 
running distress stories in 
British industry. Battered by 
tire recession of the early 
1980s, John Brown hovered 
near demise on a number of 
occasions before last sum- 
mer’s £70 million rescue pack- 
age which also involved a 
rights issue and the cbnver- 



Eric Parker: John Brown 
identity will remain 

sion of some £37 million of 
bank debt into share capital. 
John Brown lost £3.3 million 
in the six months ended Sep- 
tember 30 and Trafal gar said 
yesterday the formal offer 


document would probably re- 
fer the whi 


veal a small loss for tire whole 
year. However, Mr Parker 
confidently predicted a sur- 
plus for 1986-87. 

Trafalgar is offering one 
share for every 10 John 
Brown, valuing each share at 
30p and the entire company at 
about £80 million. John 
Brown shares rose 6p to 2 
yesterday while Trafalgar 


back a similar amount to 
296p. - 

Trafalgar also announced 
its results for tire six months to 
March 31 yesterday, reporting 
pretax profits up from £57.4 
million to £72.7 million. The 
interim dividend was raised 
from 5.4p to 6J2p and the 
company expects a similar 15 
per cent increase in the fare! 
payment The halftime fig- 
ures were very much a mixed 
tag with property and cons- 
truction profits slightly down 
and contributions from oil 
and gas exploitaion almost 
halving because of filling en- 
ergy prices. 

The rise in profits stemmed 
from Trafalgar’s other two di- 
visions. Shipping, aviation 
and hotels profits almost tre- 
bled to £153 million with fell- 
ing oil prices helping tire com- 
pany and the group's luxury 
liners producing record reve- 
nues. Returns from property 
and investment rose from 
£28.6 million to £41.4 million, 
although this also included 
profits from the sale of invest- 
ments in French Kier and the 
London Evening Standard as 
well as provision for losses cm 
Trafalgar’s six per cent stake 
in tire Tricentrol oil groups 


Burnett & Hallamshire, tire 
troubled coal-mining group 
which wrote off £49J nrnlkm 
on speculative Californian 
property developments last 
year, has sold its third Califor- 
nian development for $28.1 
million (£18.3 million). 


Whessoe dip 


Whessoe is holding its inter- 
im dividend at 2.5p, after 
reporting pretax profits down 
from £2.02 million to £137 
million for the six months to 
March 29. Turnover slipped 
to £47.83 million from £482 
million. 


Shops bought 

W H Smith & Son has paid 
£800,000 for 75 per cent of 
Paperchase Products, which 
trades in two greeting cards 
and fashion stationery shops 
in London. 


Philips’ slip 


philips Lamps' pretax in- 
come fell from 532 million fl 
to 394 million fl (£103 mfi- 
lion) in the first quarter of tins 
year on sales down from 14.23 
billion fl to 1 3.06 billion fl. 


Takeover offer likely 
for Aitken Hume 


The long-awaited 
Aitken Hume, the banking to 
investment group which has 
hada spate of boardroom de- 
partures, is expected today. 

The moving force behind 
the bid is thought to be Mr 
Nicholas Oppenheim, deputy 
chairman of Aigyle Trust, tire 
financial services bedding 
company. Aigyle Trust yester- 
day dented speculation that it 
was the likely bidder. 

Mr Oppenheim, however, is 
on several other boards, in- 
Steriing Trust, a K- 
deposit taker, and 


By Alison Eadie 

bid for International Trust, the in- 
vestment trust, and Kellock 
Trust. 

Aitken Hume's shares fell 
2p to 150p yesterday on 
Argyle’s denial, valuing the 
company at £68 million. The 
most recent departures from 
Aitken’s boardroom have 
been Mr Michael Soorey, the 
finance director, and Prince 
Michael of Kent, a non- 
executive director. 

Last November Mr Timo- 
thy Aitken resigned as chief 
executive after it was agreed 
that a more establishment 


Sterling Life, a life assurance * style of management was 
company, both of which are needed. Mr Tony Constance 
subsidiaries of Aigyle. He is took over as chief executivein 
aTco a director of Dewey March -with 'Mr Jonathon 
Warren, the Lloyd’s insurance Aitken. cousin of Timothy, 
broker. Smaller Companies' remaining as chairman! 


Park Place ‘yes’ to bid 


Park Place, the company 
r unni ng training courses for 
accountants and other profes- 
sorial groups, has agreedto a 
£49.4 million cash offer from 
Wolters Samsom Groep, a 
Dutch company specializing 
in technical and business pub- 
lishing. 

Directors of Park Place, 
speaking for 8 per cent of the 
shares, have accepted tire of- 


By Oar City Staff 

for. Morgan Grenfell, adviser 
-to Wolters, was also inlying 
shares in the market 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS- 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

KIjSJs 176545? (-22D8) 

KSSoow 15953.85 (+53J0) 

HongKonff uuw f+7>t9l 

iSSS. « “||?| 

Sydney; AO 1247.0 1+oJj 

SSSSSwr* - 2086.9 (-22.4) 


SS^nBra! . 49950 (Same} 


Diptoma 306p J-flgpJ 

Bectroconfflcmms ~ 4t4p (- mp) 
gjtpthan* *"♦ - — _ 23UPp»W 

interest rates 

LaxSetvfca 

Tear Kemstay — — 2Q6P HiPI 

London: 

Bank Base: 10%* ... im4% 

vssssass&s 

bupjra» 

^ssn^ vm ‘ 


CURRENCIES 

GOLD 

HESS ISSS*' 

£: FFrlOJfff r£76l23 



Park Place shares rose 23p 
to 333p, against an offer price 
of 335p. Before the announce- 
ment of the bid approach, the 
shares were 260p. 

The two companies are in 
related areas and believe that 
together they can develop new 
publishing and training prod- 
ucts and exploit international 
markets. Wohers can also give 
Park Place additional finan- 
cial strength. 


Wimpey 
stake 
is placed 


By Judith Huntley 


’Grove Charity Management 
ced 14f 


has placed 14.9 per cent of 
George Wimpey, the construc- 
tion, housebuilding and prop- 
erty group, on the market for 
£73.08 million, reducing its 
slake in tire company to 35 per 
cent. 

S G Warburg & Co, tire 
merchant bank advising 
Grove, said: “Grove has no 
present intention of disposing 
of any further shares in Wim- 
pey.” Brokers to the placing 
were Rowe & Pitman and 
Mullens & Co. 

The placing has been taken 
up by a number of institutions 
which paid I74p per share for 
tire 42 million. 25p ordinary 
shares, showing a 5.5 per cent 
discount. Mr Kenneth Costa 
of S G Warburg said Grove 
derided to sell to diversity the 
risk and spread of its invest- 
ments. 

Speculation has been rife 
that any willingness by Grove 
to sell part of its stake would 
lead to a takeover bid from a 
rival, possibly Trafalgar 
House. George Wimpey wel- 
comed the placing — a compa- 
ny spokesman said the move 
should discourage speculation 
about Wimpey mid that it was 
preferable to have 35 per bent 
of tire company in the hands 
of one shareholder than nearly 
50 per cent 

Commercial property, page 25 


Bank keeps 
control 


By Graham Seaijeant 


The Bank of England is to 
retain reponsibility for super- 
vising dealings between bro- 
kers in certificates of deposit 
and wholesale markets in 
currency and gold options and 
futures, Mr Ian Stewart, Eco- 
nomic Secretary to the Trea- 
sury, said in a written 
parliamentary answer 
These markets were origi- 
nally to be brought into the 
scope of the new machinery 
set up by the Financial Ser- 


vices BilL They deal in adm- 
its of ; 


mum units of £100,000 and 
£500,000 respectively, but the 
gold and currency markets in 
particular were caught up in 
the general clause covering 
sales of all options and futures 
to the public 

This still leaves a number of 
issues in the Financial Ser- 
vices BilL Dealers in Euro- 
bonds and some international 
securities may be disappoint- 
ed in their campaign for 
special treatment of dealings 
between professionals. 

The Government also has 
to announce a decision on the 
campaign by representatives 
of the new City self-regulatory 
organisations for legal 
immunities. 


Unigate sale 


Unigate has accepted an 
offer by Mejeriselskabet Dan- 
mark (Co-op Denmark) to 
acquire Bod Foods, a wholly- 
owned Danish subsidiary of 
Uni gate, at an undisclosed 
price. Co-op Denmark will 
appoint another Unigate sub- 
sidiary, St IveL, to continue 
marketing Bod's products in 
Britain. 


Bridport wins 


Bridport-Gundry has de- 
clared its offer for Halls 
Barton Ropery Co uncondi- 
tional after receiving accep- 
tances for 91 per cent of the 
shares. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Sir Nigel fails to 
let in the light 


Trafalgar House continues to pro- 
duce results and pay dividends 
normally designed to satisfy the most 
fastidious fond managers, yet the 
performance of its shares has a faded 
look. Fashions change and Trafalgar 
is no longer fashionable; or perhaps 
more accurately it does not do 
currently fashionable things. True 
Lord Hanson and Sir Gordon White 
can buy companies in sunset in- 
dustries and be credited with magical 
powers of letting in light; but not, it 
appears, Sir Nigel Broackes and Eric 
Parker. Trafalgar’s purchase of the 
rest of troubled John Brown will not 
immediately change this perception. 

Trafalgar is clearly in an unlucky 
phase. The strategy of adding first 
Scott Lithgow and John Brown to its 
existing engineering interests made 
sense in the context of thriving oil 
exploration and the imaginative 
EuroRoute cross-Channel bridge and 
tunnel scheme. EuroRoute came 
second to Channel Tunnel Group 
(which may still turn out to be an al- 
batross round a hung Conservative 
Cabinet’s neck) and the collapse in oil 
prices casts a bleak shadow over Scott 
Lithgow as well as undermining 
Trafalgar’s direct involvement in oil 
and gas. After the shut-out by the 
Vickers-CameU Laird management, 
the John Brown aquisition might 
only fuel suspicions that Trafalgar 


has flexed its muscles just to make 
sure they are still in working order. 

Its muscles will be needed, but Sir 
Nigel Broackes does not pump iron 
for display. Trafalgar’s acquisitions 
tike its disposals always have a 
certain logic. The company will have 
had a thorough look at John Brown's 
books since it took its 30 per cent 
stake in last August’s £70 million 
refinancings package. Secondly, en- 
gineering is very much Trafalgars 
ome country — indeed Sir Nigel's 
interim report to shareholders point- 
edly underlined Trafalgar’s “long- 
term commitment to the construc- 
tion and engineering industries”. 

That said, Trafalgar, though not 
lacking its habitual optimism, at 
presemhas more problems on its 
books than opportunities. Its profile 
has become blurred, its way ahead 
less clear. 

Given the nature of the shut-out 
offer, the choice for John Brown 
shareholders is little wider than the 
one that faced Hobson. Shares worth 
1 1 8p seven years ago can now be sold 
in the market for about 29p or 
exchanged for Trafalgar House paper 
worth a penny more. Either way it is 
the awakening from a nightmare that 
at times must have seemed endless. 
Should they take the shares, life will a 
lot less worrying and might even be a 
little dull for the next year. 


Promise and confusion 


One of the most promising, and at the 
same time most confusing outcomes 
of the Tokyo summit, is the apparent 
agreement of the leaders of the West- 
ern industrialized countries to em- 
bark on a period of co-ordinated eco- 
nomic management 

James Baker, the US Treasury Sec- 
retary, a man clearly determined to 
leave his mark on history, regards the 
agreement as the most important step 
towards restoring exchange rate stab- 
ility- since the break up ofthe Bretton 
Woods system in the early seventies. 

Nigel Lawson, after sitting and 
participating in the horse trading 
over whether a brake should be put 
on the dollar’s fall, or whether the 
Japanese really have suffered any 
pain because of the yen’s rise, probab- 
ly sees things a little differently. 

The summit accord on economic 
policy co-ordination has to be put in 
context, and that context is the global 
medium term financial strategy idea 
which dominated the IMF interim 
committee meeting in Washington 
last month. 

The idea, and it is a simple one, is 


that just as it has been helpful in Brit- 
‘ fo 


ain for the Government to operate on 
medium term targets for public 
borrowing and monetary growth, so 
it would be helpful for the major 
economies, both to be aware of and to 
attempt to slot in with other coun- 
tries’ targets. 

The aim is not the direct one of re- 
storing exchange rate stability, but 


rather removing the policy inconsist- 
encies and imbalances which lead to 
currency volatility. 

So far so good, and everyone at the 
summit appeared to agree that this 
was a Good Thing. Unfortunately at 
this point the summit communique 
got a little lost It specified a list of in- 
dicators — growth rates, inflation, in- 
terest rates, budget deficits, current 
account and trade balances, money 
supply, reserves and exchange rates — 
which will be monitored to form the 
basis of this policy co-ordination. 

James Baker, in his post summit 
interviews, implied 'that goals would 
be set for these indicators, and correc- 
tive action taken when the goals are 
not met This, of course, is optimism 
about the powers of economic policy 
taken to absurd extremes. 

Apart flora the feet that the British 
Treasury is reluctant to publish, and 
claims no expertise, in the forecasting 
of interest and exchange rates, there is 
a clear difficulty, in the notion of si- 
multaneously targeting the pound, 
base rates and the money supply, and 
co-ordinating such targets with those 
of other countries. 

The beauty of medium term finan- 
cial strategy, if such an expression is 
appropriate, was its simplicity. To at- 
tempt to design a global MTFS based 
on different governments juggling a 
large number of balls in the air and 
occasionally throwing them to one 
another, is asking rather too much. 


King & Shaxon set to 
take Smith St Aubyn 


By Our Banking Correspondent 


Irving Trust, the US 
group, yesterday bowed out 
(he tattle for Smith St Aubyn, 
the discount bouse, opening 1 
the way for King & Shaxon, 
another discount house, to 
take over its smaller rival 
By the time the Irving offer 
— worth £8J5 million — dos- 
ed yesterday, the US bank had 
received acceptances of 1.9 
million Smith St Aubyn 
shares, or 8.97 per cent of the 
company. Irving bolds no 
other mares of its own. The 
US bank said it could see “no 
justification for revising its 
offer and in. the interests of 
removing uncertainty has ac- 
cordingly decided to lapse its 
offer with immediate effect”. 

The directors of Smith St 


Aubyn initially recommended 
Irving’s offer until King & 
Shaxon entered with a higher 
bid worth £12.8 million, forc- 
ing the directors to recom- 
mend that instead. At that 
stage Irving had received ac- 
ceptances of 21.5 per cent of 
Smith St Aubyn shares, but 
withdrawals rapidly reduced 
tile number. 


King & Shaxon announced 
yesterday that it had so far 
received 36 per cent accep- 
tance for its ordinary share 
offer and 5.6 per cent for its 
cash offer. The result gives the 
discount house control of 38.5 
per cent of Smith St Aubyn 
shares, and the offer has been 
extended until May 20. 


W German prices fall for 
the first time in 27 years 


Consumer prices in 
Germany have fallen over the 
past 12 months — the first 
such decline for nearly 27 
years. But no early relaxation 
of monetary policy is 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

West has dropped by 30 per cenL living The German authori- 
The Federal Statistics Office 


Final cost-of-living figures 
for April given by the Federal 
Statistics Office yesterday, 
showed a &n of ff I per cent in 
the index. Compared with 
April 1985, the cost of living 
was down by 0.2 per cent tire 
.first 12-month decline since 
June, 1959. 

The 12-month rate of infla- 
tion in March was 0- 1 percent 
The fall in the cost of Bring in 
Germany over tire past year is 
tai]gety because of lower oil 
prices. \ 

In April the cost of heating 
ofl ana-petrol fell by 4*2 per 
cent Since April last year the 
price of heatfog .oil and petrol 


said that, without this fall, tire 
cost of living would have risen 
by 1.6 percent over the past 12 
months. 

The central council of the 
Bundesbank, at its fortnightly 
meeting yesterday, left mone- 
tary -policy and interest rates 
unaltered. Herr Kail . Otto 
' Poll I, president of the 
Bundesbank, has resisted do- 
mestic and international pres- 
sure for Germany to lead a 
new round of international 
interest rate cuts. 

The discount rate, was low- 
ered from 4 to 3-5 percent on 
March 7. but the Lombard 
rate has.' remained at 5.5 per 
cent since August 

The Bundesbank's reluc- 
tance to reduce rates is unlike- 
ly : io be materially affected by 
the good news on the cost of- 


ties argue that interest rates 
need to be held, for reasons of 
domestic monetary control, 
and io line with las month's 
revaluation of the mark with- 
in tire European Monetary 
System. 

The benefits of the April 6 
EMS realignment continue to 
come through. Tire Belgian 
National Bank announced 


yesterday that it is to reduce 
bank 


rate from 8.75 percent to 
8.5 percent from Monday. 

This wifi be the third reduc- 
tion since the change in EMS 
parities agreed at Ootmarsum 
in the Netherlands last month. 

Only West Germany is ex- 
periencing falling consumer 
prices, although this could 
occur m several countries in 
the near future. In March the 
Netherlands had an inflation 
rate of 0.7 per cent. 


Laporte pay 


Laporte Industries accounts 
for 1985 show that the salary 
of the chairman, Mr R M 
Riogwaid. was £161,750 
against £127,879 in 1984. In 
addition, be received an annu- 
al performance bonus of 
£117,1 15 (£86,142) and a fur- 
ther lone-term performance 
bonus of £131,043, making a 
total of £409, 908. 


Offer success 


The application list for the 
public offer of stares in 


Westbury 

scribed. 


closed oversub- 


£6m hotel 


Beacontree Estates is to 
build a 124-room four-star 
hotel at Reading to be leased 
for 125 years to Norfolk 
Capital Hotels for £6 million. 


Salomon man 


Dr PeierCoym, a director of 
zbank-istojoinSalo- 


Commerzl . 

mon Brothers as head - ofiis 
new West German subsidiary 
in FrankfurL 



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+14 348 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1 986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


23 


27 =2SL 


C TEMPUS~~^ 



■Hanis Queensway is on the 
■prowl once more. -The rights 
issue announced yestenfay 
opens the way to yet another 
acqraation. Sir mip Harris, 
theGhainnan and chief exec- 
utive, admitted he was watch- 

wg Comet closely, and there 
I. are .bound to be other 
Opportunities. 

. The stated' reason for the 
•rights-, issue 'is to provide 
[ 'flexibility for further expan- 
sion, especially m the electri- 
cal area. 

The company has little 
need of the money internally, 
despite, an annual capita] 

[ spend of about £50 minion.. 
In April borrowings st o od at 
£60.3 million, but that was a 
seasonal peak. The rights 
issue win raise £71.6 million 
after £2.5 . million expenses 
nod a- sale and. leaseback will 
bring in a further £24 million 
As a result the company'will 
be left with net cash of more 
than £35 million. 

Assuming shareholders ap- 
prove an increase in share 


quarry 


ticularfy in the Debenhams 
. outlets. Bad weather at the' 
start , of the year and high 
interest rates ' hampered 

growth. 

Trading in the out-oftown 
stores is now showing useful 
gains but it is not so buoyant 
on die high street Lower 
interest rates should hdp 
later ■ in the 

year.Repigauization win also 
help. Mr . Peter Carr, who 
reraaioed at Debeobams after 
the bid by Burton Group, is 
leaving to join Queensway 
this week as manag ing 

gains, prtS^^^ould^^m 
£47 million this war, against 
£33.1 million. That makes 
the p fe ratio IS allowing for 
the increased capital. The 
rating allows little leeway. 

Bank of Scotland 


to 


Bank of Scotland yesterday 
announced an IB per cent 
improvement in pretax prof- 

its for the year to February 

capital, it will also have 33.8 _ 28, despite a surge in ex- 
miniba authorized but ' penses related to establishing 


unissued shares, worth £84 
million at the ex-rights price 
of249p. With a combination 
of these shares and cash, 
Harris Queensway might be 
able- to. afford to spend £180 
; million. • : 

Cynieswere suggesting yes- 
terday that the .rights issue 
was designed to deflect atten- 
tion away from the underiy- 
: g : trading performance, 
which was disappointing. 
This,, however,, was heavily 
disguised by the way the 
figures were presented, 
i Reported profits were up 
I 'from £273 million in the 12 
| months to December 24 1984 
to. £39.6 million in the 13 
months to January 26 this 
year. The change in year end 
makes exact comparisons dif- 
ficult, though the company 
| says profits m the 12 months 
to January 1986 were £35 
million. Stripping oot proper- 
ty profits that implies an 
increase of up to 26 per cent 
That may look impressive, 
hut it owes much to the 
contribution from the now 
1 wholly-owned operations in 
Debenhamsand to the acqui- 
sitions of Rayford Supreme 
and Pennywise- In addition 
the new stores, 17 for 
Queensway, 15 out of town 
for Ultimate; and 43 for 
Carpetland, will have made 
an important contribution. 
Unusually, the company de- 
clined to say fruits existing ' 
i- stores' performed,- wiiich^ 
.would have .been more wony- ? 
,ing "had margins' not in- 
; creased from 7;3percenlto8 
percent . 

In fairness, it was a year of : 

| change and uncertainty, par- 


new business ventures. . 

The pretax profit 

■ rose to £95.2 million 

£80.4 million the year before 
as net income rose 15.6 per 
cent over the same period. 
The bank said that the in- 
come improvement came 
largely from a substantial 15 
per cent growth in sterling 
lending business. 

However, a stronger ster- 
ling exchange rate against the 
dollar helped to erode the 
value of foreign currency 
business, giving an increase 
in total advances of -9.2 per 
cent to £53 bflfion. 

The increase in pretax 
profits does not match the 
growth in the previous two 
years of about 25 percent, but * 
the bank said that hi g h initial 
expenses in setting up opera- 
tions were partly responsible. 

Total expenses rose during 
the year from £165.3 million 
to £191 J million as the bank 
developed its own Visa card 
operation and started up joint 
credit card ventures with the 
Automobile Association and 
with Marks and Spencer. 

Staff numbers rose by 3 per 
cent last year and are expect- 
ed to Increase by the same 
amount this year, compared 
with previous increases of ' 
about 1.5 per cent 

The bank said that it was 
going through a period of 
rapid development and: that 


next two yeaxs, after which iis 
involvement in the scheme is 
due to end. 

Nurdin 
& Peacock 

The decline of the indepen- 
dent grocer has been a feature 
of the retailing scene for 
many years, Nurdin & Pea- 
cock, the cash and carry 
wholesale group has not 
found this, an obstacle 
growth, however. 

Its strict policy of selling 
exclusively to the retailer and 
at the keenest of prices en- 
abled h last year to dock bp 
an improved performance for 
the twenty second successive 
year. 

It now has 2.4 million 
square feet of wholesale space 
in 33 warehouses, making ita 
leading cash and carry wl 
saler. 

Yesterday, the company 
reported pretax profits for the' 
year to January 4 of £15.7 
million, compared with £133 
million in the previous year. 
This was an increase of 1 9 per 
cent on turnover of £728 
million, up 22 percent 
Established branches' 
showed an increase in sales ol 
14 per cent, weU above the 
rate of inflation. 

The company is continuing 
to expand its selling space, 
more by upgrading its exist- 
ing locations rather than by 
opening in new locations. 

Nurdin & Peacock’s prime 
“Peacock” brand has been 
around for some years and 
covers more than 400 food 
and non-food lines. 

At the beginning of this 


year, a restricted range of 26 
fast-selling items was 
launched under the “Happy 
Shopper” label and has so im- 
proved to be highly 
successful 

The retail price, which is 
pitched at a competitive lev- 
el is marked on the items, yet 
the retailer is allowed a 
margin as good as be will earn 
from other similar 'items. 

This, range, and the ex- 
panded floor space, will allow 
Nurdin & Peacock’s pretax 
profit to show further gains 
tins year. 

Stockbrokers’ analysts are 
looking for an improvement 
to between £17 million and 
£17.5 milli on. On a reduced 
tax charge of 36 per cent, 
earnings per share should 
reach 14.8p; exceeding last 


the costs related to this ^ would year’s 1 2.3p by 20 per cent 


not last much beyond next 
year. Participation in the 
highly successful Marks and 
fitiencer credit card, launched 
last year, has not so for 
produced profits for the bank, 
but is expected to do so in the 


The shares were marked 
down by lOp to I78pori~the 
announcement. J 
They are now standing on 
what must be a rdativley 
modest raring iff 12 times 
prospective earnings. . 


Loss soars 
at Barker 
& Dobson 

■ Barker & Dobson, the con- 
fectionery manufacturer based 
at Liverpool reports higher 
. losses for 1985 and is passing 
the dividend. An interim divi- 
dend of 0-lp was paid for 
1984, but no finaL 
Last year, the trading loss 
tripled to £6.7 million, com- 
pared with £223 million, 
despite an increase in turn- 
over from £22.76 million to 
£25.42 million. The pretax 
loss climbed from £2.12 mil- 
lion to £6.66 million. 

Tfae loss on discontinued 
activities was £6.03 million, 
which is made up of a loss of 
£5.87 million by the retail 
division up to its sale last 
September and a deficit of 
£ 1 66,000 by the property divi- 
sion to its sale in October. 

Barker's auditors have giv- 
en a qualified report on the 
r esults of the discontinued 
activities. 

In brief 


• JAMES FISHER: Total divi- 
dend 3.3p (3_2p) for 1985. 
Turnover £39.63 million 
(£35.07 million). Profit, before 
tax and extraordinary items, 
£3.04 million (£2.84 million). 
Extraordinary debit, net of tax, 
£1 1.87-miIlion (£870,000). Earn- 
ings per share (net basis) 6.7lp 
(U.OSp). With tittle prospect of 
any recovery in freight rates, the 
board decided last year to' sell 
the Sir John Fisher and the 
Thamesfieid (deep-sea, bulk- 
carrier vessels) and disengage 
from deep-sea shjpowaing. 

• UNREAD: Mr D G Lynafi, 
the chairman, told tfae annual 
meeting that, at this stage, it 
appears unlikely that tfae profit 
for tfae first half-year will match 
last time. 

• SOUTH AFRICAN BREW- 
ERIES: Year to March 3 1 , 1 986. 
Turnover R 5, 74 7. 8 million 
(£1,796 million), against 
R5, 359.2 million. Pretax profit 
R245.9 million (R235JI mil- 
lion). Total dividend 37 cents 
(36 cents). Earnings per share 
82.5 cents (80.4 cents). 

• TIGER OATS: Half-year to 
March 31, 1986. Turnover 
R 1,8 55. 7 million (£580 million), 
against R1J94.5 million. Pretax 
profit R100.5 million (R75.7 
million). Interim dividend 105 
cents (90 cents), 

CITY OF OXFORD 
INVESTMENT TRUST: Total 
dividend for the year to March 
31, 1986, 8p (7.25pl Net pretax 
revenue £476,777 (£445.442). 
Earnings per share 8.07p 
(7.48pL Net asset value per 
share 327. h>(255.4pX 

• WORCESTER GROUP: Sa- 
vory Milln, the broker, is to 
bring the group to tfae unlisted 
securities market, via a placing 
of 900,000 ordinary shares at 
] l Op per share. Hus puts this 
Midlands-based company on an 
historic price-earnings ratio of 
115 and values it at about £5 
mflfion. Dealings are expected 
to start next Tuesday. 
Worcesters .main activity is 
making gas domestic .central 
heating systems. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


£72m cash call helps push 
shares into deeper gloom 


'86 


More company news 
on page 26 



Introducing a new name™ 
WILLIAM M. 

M 

LIMITED 


William M. Mercer Fraser Limited brings together 
the consulting practices of William M. Mercer-MPA 
and Duncan C. Fraser & Co. The merger, fully effective 
from 1st May, 1986, will give the benefit of wide- 
ranging and substantiaLresourcesto our clients in the 
UK and internationally. 

Our new firm will practice in the whole field of the 
employer-employee relationship including specifically 
pensions, actuarial advice, employee benefits, 
compensation and personal financial planning 


UK Offices 

London •Binningfram * Brentwood • Chichester- Edinburgh 
Glasgow . Leatherhead - Leeds * Liverpool ■ Manchester 
Newcastle • Watford 


Rnmpftan Offices 

Brussels -Dublin -Frankfort* Geneva-The Hague 
Madrid - Paris - Zurich 


Other offices in Australia, Ganada, Hong Kong, Japan, 
New Zealand and USA. 


Share prices continued to 
slide yesterday, as dealers took 
note of Tuesday's sharp in- 
crease in bank lending and 
sterling M3, another substan- 
tial cash- call — this time from 
Harris Queensway - and Wall 
Street's renewed decline. - 

There was. also caution in 
front of today's two by-elec- 
tions, at Ryedale and West 
Derbyshire, so that the two 
important indexes closed at 
iheir lowest levels of the day, 
with the FT 30-share index 
falling by 22.8 points' to 
1,345.7 and the FT-SE 100 
turn Wing by 26.1 points to 
1,610.1. 

Gilts lost three quarters of a 
point as hopes of another early 
cut in interest rates faded 
behind the inconclusive out- 
come of the Tokyo Summit. 

Stores tumbled as Harris 
Qseensway called for £72 
million for its expansion and 
produced profits below best 
expectations. The shares 
dropped 26p to 248p. Elec- 
tronic issues turned sour, hit 
by lower profits from Philips 
Lamps, down £1 and 3/16 to 
£14 and 13/16 and Diploma 
50p dpwn at 306p. 
Electrocomponents, at 414p, 
Eurotherm 320p, Uni tech 
230p and Lex Service Group 
379p, were among those to 
give up I3p to 25p in 
sympathy. 

Banks were firm at first. 


pan icuJ arty Lloyds, which 
rose 15p at one stage, on 
unsubstantiated reports that 
Prudential had acquired a 
n ear-30 per cent holding. 
However, the mood quickly 
changed as Royal Bank of 
Scotland announced profits 
well below expectations. Its 
shares dipped 14p to 938p, 
with other clearers similarly 
lower, but Uoyds ended un- 
changed on balance. 

Fears of competition if 
building societies are allowed 
to enter the pensions field 
upset life insurances, where 
Prudential declined ]5p to 
839p and Sun life fell 25p to 
842p. Composites remained 
unsettled ahead of next week's 


quarterlies, with Commercial 
Union down Sp to 324p. 

Leading industrials weak- 
ened by 7p to 20p. including 
Beecbam at 383p. BP 545p, 
Glaxo 925p, Grand Met 330p 
and ICI 934p. But AJUied- 
Lyous resisted the trend, at 
3 lOp, up Sp, as recent rights 
issue talk faded. The results 
are due today and dealers are 
hoping for profits of up to 
£270 million, against £219 
million last year. 

John Brown received a sur- 
prise bid from Trafalgar 
House, as that company pro- 
duced its results. Brown 
jumped 5p to 28p - matching 
the terms from Trafidgar, 
which lost 4p to 298p. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


BPP (l60p) 
Brookmoura ( 1 C 
Chancery secs 
Cranswtck M 
Davies DY (155pj 
Debtor (130p) 

KQ 

Granyn Surface {5 

Jarvis Porter (if 
Jurys Hotel 1115 
Lae hd (if 
Lexicon (lit 
Lodge Cara 
Macro 4 (it* 
Manvale M (115 
Musterfin. »05p) 
Realty Useful 



199-4 
215 +22 
288 
83 
103 
204 
144-3 
28-1 
218-2 
83-2 
125-2 
121 -2 
138 -2 
. 108 
159-1 
suspended 
92 
138 
158 
119 


Splash Prods 
Templeton (21 ‘ 

Sigma* 1101 p) 

fSS ffflns 

Underwoods (li 
Usher (Frank) (I00p) 
WoMcoms (1 Sop) 

Wickes (140p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

BS N/p 
F&C Euro N/P 
Greycoat N/P 
Hsstanr N/P 
Inti Leisure F/P 
Low & Bonar N/P 
Ratners N/P 
Saatchi &SN/ 

Sale TUney 
Share Dreg 
(Issue price in brackets). 


S N/P 
N/P 

I F/P 


72-2 
208 
74 
97 
224 
181 
101 
185 -1 
181 


15 

10 -1 
258 
10 

53-12 

45 

40-8 

B 

350 


ME PC, long taJked-of as a 
possible target for Trafalgar. 
Fell I6p to 340p. In dull 
buildings, Wimpey slipped 6p 
to I83p as Grove Charity 
Trust- placed nearly 15 per 
cent of its 49 per cent bolding 
with institutions. 

Rotaflex rose 5p to 343p, on 
the company's continued re- 
jection of the Em ess Lighting 
terms. 

British Aerospace was sup- 
ported by US buying at 555p. 
up 7p. but Jaguar retreated i 8 
per cent (o 478p. TI Group 
added 4p to 5$3p. on contin- 
ued hopes of a bid from BBA 
Group, 7p easier at 268p. 

Profit-taking knocked Up 
from Tozer, Kemsley. at 206p 
and Lad brook, recently de- 
pressed by a chart “sell" 
signal weakened another 8p 
to 324p. Monopoly worries 
unsettled S & W Berisford. 
!3p down at 223p. while the 
rival bidders, Hillsdown, at 
300p and Tate and Lyle, 586p, 
fell by Up and 5p in 
sympathy. 

Rowntree, at 51 3p. gave 
back !7p of its recent rise, 
inspired by reports of a bid. 
Higher profits did little for 
Nurdin and Peacock, at 178p. 
down 4p. H Samuel “A" rose 
lOp to I25p, in anticipation of 
a formal bid from Ratners. 6p 
better at 157p in ex-rigbis 
form. 


RACS rescue hits profits at CWS 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


The Co-operative Wholesale 
Society (CWS) yesterday re- 
ported depressed profits fol- 
iowing the absorption of south 
London's loss-making Royal 
Arsenal Cooperative Society 
(RACS) at the beginning of 
last year. Borrowings were 
up £22 million in the 
year to mid-January. 
Mr De nnis Landau. CWS 
chief executive, said of the 
RACS rescue; “It was an 
enormous and daunting finan- 
cial prospect and a big man- 
agement challenge." 

But trading losses at the 
RACS were slashed during the 
year as a big refurbishing drive 
went ahead, leaving the over- 
all CWS trading profit up 8.7 
per cent at £21.2 million on 
sales of £2.344 billion, also up 
almost 8.7 per cent However, 
near £5 million jump in 


interest charges on borrowings 
reduced CWS profits after 
interest to £14 million com- 
pared with £15.5 million the 
previous year. 

CWS, which is based in 
Manchester, is the biggest 
single organization in the co- 
operative movement Tradi- 
tionally it has been the 
wholesaling and manufactur- 
ing supplier to the indepen- 
dent retail societies. But it has 
also emerged as an important 
retailer in its own right since 
merging with RACS at the 
beginning of last year and 
taking on South Suburban, 
another troubled south Lon- 
don society, the year before. 
Retailing now accounts for 
more than a fifth of CWS 
turnover. 

Announcing the CWS annu- 
al results in London, Mr 


Landau said the trading profit 
was far better than expected in 
view of the considerable extra 
commitments taken on. 

Profits from the CWS tea 
estates in India, which were at 
a record level in 1984. were bit 
last year, dropping by £1 
million. 

Mr Landau said: "One im- 
portant consequence of the 
Royal Arsenal transfer of en- 
gagements to CWS has been a 
substantial increase in CWS 
borrowing and this, combined 
with high interest rates, has 
imposed a significant cost 
penalty.” 

CWS retail operations cov- 
ering the old Royal Arsenal 
and South Suburban areas had 
trading losses in the year of 
£2.8 million. When CWS took 
over the Royal Arsenal that 
society alone was running at a 


ADVERTISEMENT. 


... oi CCCCU U n T l INC ...... O l CCCCU II 

' I LL JJL J I IU I Line • ' C LCDDCD II 


Another optical fibre 
‘first’ for Florida network 


The first Pfessey export high- 
speed optica] fibre communica- 
tions system is now in service for 
the United Telephone Company 
of Florida. 

Installed by Slrombeig- 
Carison • Corporation, the 
Florida-based telecommunica- 
tions subsidiary of Plessey, the 
new 565 Mbit/s transmission 
system links several ofU oiled's 
exchanges. 

The system will eventually 
extend for more than 300 miles 
with numerous spurs along the 
route. ' 

MODERNISATION 

This programme of modernisa- 
tion includes upgrading the 
140Mbit/s Lightwave systems 
already supplied by Plessey to. 
565 Mbit/s. 

foftmn^UmtedTetephone^s 
high density Florida traffic 
wffl be earned on optical fibre 
systems, with most of its routes 
operating at 565 Mbit/s. 

For more than a decade 
Plessey has been developing 
arid combining the technolo- 
gies of opto electronic devices, 
digital multiplexing, digital line 
Systems and optical fibre 
connectors to create optical 
fibre transmission . systems 
second to none. 



Tray Todd, piesdeat afUnfaedTelepliMe 

Company of Florida, ‘arts over 1 to optical 
fibre system, with Ernest LJwk. presi- 
dent rfStromberg-Carison, waUMug. 

Today, worldwide, there are 
over J 1000 km of Plessey 
optical fibre systems carrying 
operational lraffic,under instal- 
lation or on order. 

With this success, Plessey 
has notched up a suing of fusts. 

They include one of the first 
optica] fibre systems to carry 


normal traffic in the UK, the 
first long-wavelength optical 
fibre system in normal traffic 
service in the world, Britain s 
longest optical fibre link (at the 
time the longest operational 
unrepeatered optical fibre fink 
in the world) and the world’s 
first commercial contract for a 
565Mbil/s optical fibre system 
carrying operational traffic, 
now installed between 
Nottingham and Sheffield. 


Plessey at Comms’86 


An outstanding opportunity to 
see just how wide-reaching 
PlesseyisracnornmnlcatMiiismll 
be .on Stand F22/3Q at Com- 
mankations 86, to be held at 
the National Exhibi tion Centre 
at Bjmmgham from May 13 
toMaylfr 

On display willbe exchange 
racksforSystem X,BriiishTele- 
com’s new public digital 
exchanges for which Plessey is 
prime development contractor. 

Also exhibited is the Plessey 
ISDX family of digital 
exchanges for business — for 
thirty to thousands of tines 
which make available - truly 
integrated communication of 
voice, text and data. 

ISDX can link the business 
world to the emerging public 
and private Integrated Services 



Ptesey BUT lets tbe exeatife bmdfe 
»*o telephone calls pha tBgia] dm 


Digital Network. 

- Plessey shows its strengths, 
too, in key systems for the 


smaller business, and in facsi- 
mile, voice messaging, video 
conferencing, payphones- plus 
a range of feature phones for 
home and office which include 
the I5DT deskphoue that allows 
the executive to handle two 
telephone conversations plus 
digital data simultaneously. 

Examples of Plessey 
strengths in fibre optics trans- 
mission together with packet 
switching and data networks 
will also be on display. 


O PLESSEY 

Technology is our business. 


‘FrieMorFoe’ 
stemma 
foe safer 


A new Pfessey ‘who gries there* 
electronic test system has been 
ordered by (he MoD. 

Called Plessey ALTF (Auto- 
matic Launch TestFatiEty) itwffl 
automatically check an aircraft's 
Identification Friend or Foe 
equipment before take oft. 

This will prevent aircraft from 
taking off with fanlty identifica- 
tion systems, and thus risking 
attack from thelrowii side as well 
as hostile forces. 

The new Plessey system will 
be nsed at RAFahfieMsin theUK 
and abroad, and there are 
possible orders from NATO 
countries also. 


Office 

security 


Plessey has handled two new 
electronic systems to make office 
telephones and faf^hmife 
machines far more confidential 
The Plessey VoiceloK 100 
Secure Telephone uses an 
encryption device in a standard 
push-button lype phone to 
scramble voice in digital form. 

To talk in secure mode, both 
panics press a red button on 
their Voiceloks. After a code 
is keyed in, all conversation 
becomes completely .unintel- 
ligible lo anyone accidentally 
or deliberately intercepting it 


FAX SECURITY TOO 


TVith its Faxlok data encryp- 
tion unit, Plessey can prevent 
facsimile messages being sent 
to unauthorised addresses or 
being intercepted. 

The unit connects to Group 
3 fax machines operating at 
speeds up to 9.6kbit/sandauto- 
matically sends in secure mode 
unless otherwise. instructed. If 
the receiver lacks Faxlok. or the 
current enciyplfon code, the 
transmission is termimtetl 
When receiving, a machine 
with Faxlok ■ automatically 
distinguishes secure transmis- 
sions from ordinary transmis- 
sions, and is thus fully compat- 
ible with Group 3 non-Faxlok 
machines.- 


• new 
ler to 1 
3rd to 

jmin- 
The 
:xam- 
ioard- 
ining. 

1 the 

intwe 
this is 

iitage- 
jower 
esfull 
itious 
. does 
l and 
ideas: 
ve lo 
oudly 
inings 

i stan 
an. as 
ipany j 
irnals „ 
'what 

issive 
is the 
:rmly. 
way it 
own 
le like 
-s can 
e in- 
to get 
ns lor 


w-l 



trading loss of about £10 
million a year. 

The Co-op as a whole has its 
toughest battle with supermar- 
ket chains like J.Sainsbury 
and Tesco Stores in the South- 
east And it faces increased 
competition from other gro- 
cery chains such as Asda and 
Safeway 

Bui Mr Landau claimed 
that considerable progress had 
been made south of the 
Thames, with more than 60 
stores refurbished. 

And there was now a pros- 
pect that the contraction oi 
overall Co-op selling space 
had been reversed. Develop- 
ment of smaller Co-op outlets 
as new-style convenience 
stores under the Late Late 
Supershop banner looked like- 
ly to provide a way of keeping 
good sites within the Co-op. 



ry 


PL£5Sn. ^mtwLSBX. BWTai/u* and tow*»*dirrw* i »«<r'V IhfPhtsrrCum/merrle. 


10 














finance and industry 


TTTF. TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


-%Jd- 

From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up, to give you your overall lotaL Cheek 
this against the daily dividend figure 

E uUishcd on this page. If it matches you 
avc won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card- You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


ACCOUNT 


Retreat continues 

DAYS: Dealings began April 28. Dealings end May 9. jContangn dayMnyO. Settlement day May 19. 
§Fonward fra rgains are permitted on two previous business days. 



DAILY DnODBMiy 

£ 8 , 000 : 

Claims required for 
+ 47 points 

Claimants should ring0254-53272 



1986 

Hqh Low Company 

Mea 

Cft go i 

Morn 

am 

Bence 

VU 

^ F7E 



• .. 

567 

22 <63 




15 




•-10 

*26 



785 

-5 

623 






28 17.1 

320 220 VVmtmat 

270 




BREWERIES 


Lopa 


Coomr.«de 


Ford Motor 


Ibstock Johmcn 


Barlow- Rand 


Aberdeen Conur 


Waterford Glass 


Aiiken Hume 


Casket (SI 


Cam pan 


BiUon (P| 


Rotork 


Silenuught 


Gerber Enetsy 


Haziewood Foods 


Samuebon Gp 


Pritchard Sen 


Appkyard 


Cultens 


Wholesale Fitting 


Red team Gbss 


Sketchley 


RHP 


Prop Hldgs 


MowsAircraA 


Bui[din£.Road 


Industrials A-D 


BuiklmsJloadi 


& iS 

%% 

08 69 

ire iso 

zea ire- 

11* 77 

2S1 217 
248 153 
23* IE3 
39 'a 30V 

5*0 as 
313 223 
315 228 
251 IBS 
305 410 
319 195 


BotXKngtani t*» 

fro-n IMBSWI 400 
Bidnw (H PI 107 

Butuwrood Brew 550 
dan (MMwm) 515 
DMM U A} 810 
DSM 671 

QraeraS man 1B7 
Given* tang 235 
Cumw* 306 

Hants* 3 i m w *83 
Hlghiand Don 83 

bnorgoraDn 0t3» 166 

l>tai tM* 281 

Mntah Thomprai 112 
Uortana 2*9 

SA BtMTM 190 
Scot & NOW 197 

Ssscrara £37*. 

van . *30 

wnaeraw *A* 275 

DO -S' 283 

mmnad tmr 235 
Watvrtumn ft 0 483 

Voting 'A' 300 


-I *6 

.. aio 

-6 7.0 

M2 
.. 107 

.. IB* 
-7 2M 
-3 7* 

-3 72 

-5 103 

.. 84.1 

■ U 

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-a 28 

9.1 

*3 

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-16 158 

-8 102 
-7 102 

98 

-a 122 

-10 04 


L«surr 


Property 


Indusmab L-R 



Industrials UR 


HE23E3E5ai 


Industrials L-R 



BRITISH FUNDS 



Years) 
idO'.a .. 

120 

». .. 

65 

97V*.. 

23 

ior> -*■ 
102 's -*. 

137 

123 

100'z . . 

102 

96V .. 

23 

100'* 

104 

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66 

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93 

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61 

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11.6 

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102 

101 -V 

85 

92': -'* 

62 

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9.4 

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109 

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97 

107V«-’. 

15 

83 1 * .. 

10 

1B5V -'j 

104 

92V .. 

54 

lOB'i -*i 

103 

101V -V 

93 

so'ire-v 

33 

1I2V 

115 

111V -V 

112 

«7'»* .. 

34 

99V -V 

83 

1WV 

S3 




FINANCE AND LAND 


8*0 -2 18 08 .. 

156 +6 11J3 7.0 8.8 

*83 • 278 58 *8 

178 

£20 .. 171 08803 

250 .. &7 22 305 

*3 +3 ....... 

as 41 18 8*108 

335 47 104 3.1*80 

170 .. 6.1 32 73 J 

188 68 46 288 

am 38 -1 

£45 42 HO 178 .. 

Ml -1 


FOODS 


48 36b 
195 160 
393 291 
2*1 ISO 
138 1» 
111 78 z 

128 102 
109 112 
87 57'.- 

136 82 

285 845 
160 140 
142 112 
2D 15 
188 127 
131 100 
245 172 
298 215 
180 113 
<53 330 
101V 79 
10 73* 
410 335 
118 102 
225 179 


AKZON/V Bmri 
A3ad CofcKk 
Auwiuian 
Anchor Chortcta 
BTP 

Bayer 0M50 


flr Benzol 
Canning (MQ 


Do 'A' 

Cory I H0CM4) 

Oral 
0o DM 

Bfc ft Erererd 

Fcaacti MmiB 
Hattmd g*rm*} 
Hdtacn 
HOMMt DM50 
tap Own tad 

\ssr 

ss* .... 


170 13»V Ramotal 
322 216 SMA am 
65 38 SuKMfl Bpwlnan 

213 166 wcaanhSm nwt 
185 67 YoreaffteChem 


£42 V -V 

183 -6 

37B -10 

212 ms 

158 -2 

C90V -A. 

123 

136 44-2 

79 -1 

133 

2S3 -1 

i«a 

136 

18V • .. 
167 -1 . 

129 -I 

198 -3 

274 S 

146 •-* 

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CB7V -1 

B34 -7 

383 ms 

112 -2 

220 

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321 

82 41 

in s 

128 -1 


400 98 .. 
38 18181 
68 24 184 
6.1 28128 
57 8.7 228 
700 7.7 . . 

10-3 84166 
60 68188 
. . . . 878 

61 88 22.1 

65 68138 
88 48 84 

66 48 88 
05 48 6l2 

IOO 84138 
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68 4.4 178 
128 4.7 118 
64 44 118 
214 48 114 

47.1 58 108 

118 38144 

47 42 17.7 

32 18 227 

68 48 88 
88 24162 

:: 9*8 

11.1 68 188 

48 a£ 11.1 


-4 

4.1 

27161 

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67 .. 
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23 165 

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163 

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45 93 

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121 

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84 104 


10 

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63 

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M3 

54 203 

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24 173 

45 

114 

14 283 

-7 

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-18 

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74 

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15 204 
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68 143 

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♦1 

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69169 

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67145 

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14 169 

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63 

19 8*3 

-2 

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25 182 


318 

275 

Eastern Prod. 

280 

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M3 

61 69 

2H 

150 


216 

♦3 

100 

65 62 

277 

214 

S3 

253 


93 

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1 4ov 29v a**r 

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25 

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1 ut 

WV BMP 

106 

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1 28V 17V Becirokix (AS -fl 

226V 

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92 

BBofi (Si 

60 

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1 2BV 18V Erttttta 

£24 

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282 

EurOyh Chfere Cby 361 

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167 

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I 2BV 19V Encase* 6M V 

E25V 

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99 

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Eftattre Hoorn 



40 

27 306 

1 177V 136 

Euopata Panel 

M7 

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61 

61 WO 

140 

112 

Do 5% Rrf 

178 


7.1 

68 .. 

3*2 

168 

hM 

316 

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59 

13 173 

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111 

Erode 

117 


43 

39 123 

220 

127 

Ezparael tor 

200 

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64 

62 *63 

413 

315 

Exta 

380 


63 

23 223 

34 

22 


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07 

21 425 

41 

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Feedee-Afftc tad 

36 



37 679 

143 

106 

FenotakSl 

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7,1 

53 200 

75 

60 

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65 


60 

7.7163 

018 

408 

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565 

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19 

29 

124 

Bt 

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54 

67 67 

89 

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60 

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19 7.1 

133 100 Pogrety 114 

4i v 2 Vi Foflres Oraon N/v 32 v 
199 157 Fothem# A Henrey 198 

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IM 

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84 

7.1 175 

8B5 

256 

GKN 

330 

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17.1 

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925 

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423 

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160 

33 769 

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410 

Gdrxig Kerr 

450 

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181 


266 

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225 

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Hstaw 

256 

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Hapwonn Cereoic 

200 

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Howard Macttaery 



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115 

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15V 

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£15*. 

+v 

690 

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310 

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Huratag Assoc 

295’ 

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114 

39 68 

115 

BB 

Ftadtag Qroc* 

115 


68 

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188 

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315 

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273 

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295 

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285 


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585 

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Jmson ClBintae 

565 


793 

49 162 

183 

133 

Johnson Menhey 

178 

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38V 

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330 

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303 

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107 

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138 

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Jonw ft Shtameo 

112 

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263 

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Jouden (Thom**) 

243 

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105 

68 301 

29 

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Kc-rrotzoo 

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Ketan 

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17 

64 162 

257 

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Keteey tad 

257 


114 

64 123 

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106 

Kismsdy Smeie 

123 


29b 

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233 

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181 

183 

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CSV 

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576 

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606 

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ai ftl 444 

28 b 28 no 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


m ~t 

i53 «-a 

84 -3 

371 *3 


.07 48128. 
mo 85 41 


:JMM( M 


INSURANCE 


aaOMy 


226 189 Abbey Ltf* 
28'* 22 Ale* 6 Aim 
28’. 23 AM Gen 
290 223 Brmoek 
8T7 807 ftnm 
335 228 Com (Mon 
301 235 £qtay8-UM 
419 213 -Si 


70S 631 HMtlCE 
349 287 HoggfioUron 
639 522 LAga ft Gai 
897 7*2 Lraton 6 Mm 
*20 261 UnUkStav 
7 A 35V ttnh ft MUn 
285 238 UW 

*50 381 Ratoge 

<20 338 j^wttOp 
48* 3*8 OeSatWr-rai 


772 520 Sun AOanca 
927 772 Sal LBa 
575 390 Tram i n aranxy 
474 399 WUa Fiber 


ms 08 68 .. 

A 100 43 .. 
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78 28200 
•—15 <28 62 .. . 
•-6 1U U .. 
-6 98 38 .. 

-16 *14 88 28 
-10 41.1 *8 288 

-6 *14 48 87 

-* 134 44 145 

•-18 358 47 S3 

• -IT 3*8 48 294 

-7 214 58107 

-4. 220 62 .. 

-4 714 48 88 

-6 USb 49328 

• -V 62.9 45 .. 

•-15 37.1b 446S4 
■-7 116 14 .. 

-6 368 40748 

-8 15.7 43 174 

-5 15.7 38163 

88 28338 
-18 22.1 3.0 678 

mSS 338 40 .. 

• .. 138 28 20.1 

•-17 126 28214 


64 -3 . 55 78 40 

gf +3 au -w«3 

* ..255 7.1 M3 

38 - ..-.18 <4124 

» -*3 156 64X21 

69 +T 42 51 56 


328 48178 

518 

106 54 50 


PAPER. PRINTING, ADVERTS 


CINEMAS AND TV 


225 

178 

Anpta TV 'A' 
GranaAen 

220 


129 

59161 

46 

27 

*3 

• 

29 

84 66 

2*0 

176 

HIV N/V 

208 


114 

53 93 

330 

263 

LWTrtdm 

3*9 


213 

61 MO 

337 

188 

Scot TV LA- 

337 

m*a 

150 

*3 104 

225 

153 

TVS N/V 

225 

+2 

114 

61 103 

43 

31 

75W 

39 

• .. 

23 

87107 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


*35 328 Stand IM 406 -10 130 32 138 

336 208 Kennedy Brookw 238 «-7 ftl QS 123 

» 312 Udtortw 32* 6-8 151 50 153 

5*5 *47 UKiPrtHtml* 531 •-. 143 27166 

100 80 Mount darioes B2 23 24 138 

105 57 Prince Of W HeM( 78 2.1 27 M.1 

79 H-i am* Meet 72 •-•> 28 32 152 

*OS TTl'l StaOy HoM* *A* 376 • .. 58 13 US 

0T 56 Si am 70 17 24178 

an M6 Ihaeme Fqrb 183 -6 78 48 152 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



10 *'. 

105 -V 


UNDATED 

38'. Coneob av 46V 

*2 34'. Wa Ui 3'J% Wi -'. 

52*. 44V Cony 3'^ S2‘* -V 

3*'« 29'. -new 34. US -V 

30V 8*’j Corsets 2',* 26'. -'. 

29S 2* '.Treed 2W 29V -V 

INDEX-LINKED 

122S114>. Trees a 2% 1SBB 122 
105'a 98 'a Trees IL 21b 1990 105'. . . 

117*. 1CBF. Troaa 0. 2% 1B9B 117V 
IMS 95'. Tree* IL2'r% am 10*S -S 
10**1 9B'i Ten 113 'A 2003 10*'. •»*■ 

107S SB'sJiem L P. 2009 107*. +S 

103S 82STV«w HJ’>% 2003 1DS‘*®+'« 

1O0S 97 Tress (L2'j*b 2011 103S +', 

99S 76S Trees IL2'r% 2013 gzs 
lOI STS Trees 52*1*4 2018 100S +S 

80S 86') Trees 52' 2020 99'- *S 


33 

23 193 

16 

69 182 

33 

61 110 

13 

20335 

21 ' 

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14 

29 35 B 

119 

24S.1 

63 

23 204 

12 

20 413 

11 

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121 

37 113 

17.16 64 152 

S3 

63 19.1 

07 

62 107 

66 

24 117 


13 173 


13 373 

61 

14 225 

33 

66 94 

110 

20 267 

64 

23 163 


26 162 

29 

27 65 


64 260 

83 

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65 99 
24 169 

14 

21 

107 

63 

61 83 
23 373 
15 .. 
53152 
21 151 

263 

2BB 

21 212 
23169 

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64 63 


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BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


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160 


1-7 

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196 ISO 
370 173 
334 235 
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159 







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113 

63 

105 

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111 


161 

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1.7 

219 


ELECTRICALS 


355 180 A BSaa 346 «-6 114 S3 257 

5K ISO Aimsal .482 -10 18 03 365 

99 61 AprtcB Compuans 9* -3 UB 22 74 

80 63 Alien 73 

300 205 Alienee Carp 27s •-$ 38 13 88 

56 *6 AWK Flda*y 56 .... 173 

1" M ?L S * C 205 ms £1 13 148 

25 •- ,0 ’F 

22 JZ g 3 "- 25 •"* 64 13 68 

585 379 SortOD* 530 -ft 1Q0 13 162 

2B0 217 Br Tefsccm 886 S 93 44 149 

112 75 Brawn Bowl mm 102 *1 *8 42 94 


227 

17B A 

239 

19* A 

114 

98 A 

600 

2*3 A 

HO 

B0 A 

288 

172 A 

3*3 

207 A 

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130 A 

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32 

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355 A 

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395 

2S5 A 

483 

333 ' A 

83 

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313 

263 A' 

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283 

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363 s 

82 

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MS 

277V B 

488 

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420 a 

310 

2is a 

200 

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174 

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132 

to a 

390 

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495 

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205 

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78 B1 

138 

8*V BJ 

173 


174 

149 B 

250 

179 B 

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35 Bk 

373 

189 B 

284 

187 Be 

368 

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289 

220 Be 

ia*j 

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953 

258 Be 

22'. 16V Be 

123 

re Be 

343 

323 Br 

88 

02 Br 

43 

33': Br 

44 

35 Br 

199 

110 ft- 

102 

139 Br 

136 

115 Br 

2*5 

188 Br 

1*3 

87 Br 

323 

198 Br 

383 

296 Bi 

105 

34 Bn 

28 

15 Bn 

49 

25 Be 

190 

15ft Bn 

29 

19 Bn 

82 

52 Bn 

303 

200 Bu 

238 

138 Bu 

S3 

59 Bu 

85 

SB Ca 

61 

2BV Cl 

88 

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400 

253 Ca 

7* 

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23 

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48 Cft 

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te'.- cn 

ra cn 

389 

133 cn 

133 

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8*0 

516 Or 

358 

280 A 

48 

a o> 

216 

132 Or 

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500 

380 A 

223 

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06 

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68 

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66 

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64b 66 65 

66b 65 66 

60 

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62 

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10 

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68 

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166 

33147 

11.18 

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07 

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14 

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03 

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66 

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43 

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83 

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4J 

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64 

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360 329 Rreriaaure 

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Lucas 601 

tail gp Ml 

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PUBLISHERS 


Haynes MIMe 
Home Onan 
— m ende a t 
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taameun Sent 
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148 74 Crewttier (J) 

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HO 69 Foster (John) 

113 68 OasM Bruftm 


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• Be Attend ■ Ex al b Forecast Attend • interim 
{gyment passed f Price at suspension g Dhttend and 
vj«d emtadu-gpecial paymSTk Pre-mwger hgmes a 
rorawsteaiUnoso Ex (Hhor r Ex riefits a Ex scrip or 
stwe sptttTcc^me .. Itosi^Scartffirta. . 





























































































































THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


27 =22^ 


'“'A 


Questions 
• oyer new 
security 

County Bank and Ricteud H- 
ns recently announced new 
tomi of security - tradeable 
epuity in a single commercial 
property - is first and fore- 
most a financial instrument 
The property is almost 
secondary. 

Both agree that the new 
securities - to be called prop- 
erty income certificates — are 
financial vehicles which hap- 
pen to apply to property 
giving the investor an asset- 
backed flow of income. And 
they will have to stand up to 
comparison with other forms 
of investment. 

Ellis and County Bank hope 
to have three or four buildings 
valued at about £30 million 
each ready for flotation by the. 
end of the year and intend to 
release about 40 per cent of the 
equity in any one building at a 
time, which can be done with- 
out incuning tax difficulties. 

But there are questions . 
about the need for and sire of 
a new securities market trad- 
ing in commercial property. 
EUis and County Bank say 
market research .convinced 
them it would be viable, and 
presumably profitable. 

But it is unlikely that such a 
market would survive if frag- 
mented. The property indus- 
try is aware of this and Elite 
and County Bank are talking 
with the Royal Institution of 
Chartered Surveyors and with 
Mercantile House Holdings, 
both of whom are promoting 
the selling of units in single 
commercial properties. Tne 
aims are the same, namely to 
bring liquidity to an illiquid 
market, but the method dif- 
fers. The EUis-County Bank 
vehicle is aimed at the profes- 
sional investor while the 
unhisalion advocates want to 
see investment widened to in- ' 
dude the man in the street 


i By Judith Huntley 

Arlington Securities, the But the 
property company which spe- more diffici 
oafoes in developing business pany like E 
parks, win tomorrow unveil successfully 
us intention of coming to the retail and' c 
market for a full listing, isalsoinvol 
capitalizing the company at tial market 
£50 million. Homes, .i 

. U will be followed to market Spey hawk a 
m a few weeks by Bredero, the - Bredero i 
Dutch developer, which won a mix of uadi 
hmd-fougbt battle to develop company b 
a £90 million office project in this will giv< 
the heart of Hammersmith, worlds in th 
West London. On one I 


Securities to seek full listing 


But the market may have 
more difficulty valuing a com- 
pany like Bredero, which has 
successfully developed mixed 
retail and' office schemes and 
is also involved in the residen- 
tial market, through Bredero 
Homes, .as indeed are 
Spey hawk and Rosehaugh. 

Bredero is choosing to be k 
mix of trading and investment 
company because it believes 
this will give h the best of both 
worlds in the long term. 

On one hand it ’will have 


Arlington may be called one profits growth from trading 
of the growing hand of proper- and on the other it should 



ty trading companies which 
has made its name in a 
relatively new area of the 


retain a high quality asset base 
from its investments. 

There has been a re-struo- 


market. Bredero, on the other titring before the flotation. All 
hand, is a mixture of trading the British property activities 
and .investment company, are now contained in Bredero 
more m the traditional moold. Properties, the 100 per cent 
The market now loves the owned subsidiary of 
so-called “merchant Verenigde Bedrijven Bredero, 

. developer.” The likes of Lon- the Dutch company quoted in 
don & Edinburgh Trust, Amsterdam. 

Rosehaugh and Speyhawk all The British companies were 
bear witness to that formerly owned by Brederp 


This is a model of Bredero ’s 
most ambitions project to date, 
the £90 railiHm Centre West 
office and retail development 
at Hammersmith, West Lon- 

and Breevast, quoted Dutch 
companies, with Bredero own- 
ing 36 per cent of BreevasL 
Mr . Alan Chisholm, the 
group managing director, says: 
The company will go farther, 
faster if h is not a 100 per cent 


don. Phase one will have 

90.000- sq ft of 'offices, a 

46.000- sq ft shopping centre 
and the new transport inter- 
change for London Regional 

subsidiary of a Dutch compa- 
ny. It will open new doors for 
finance and offer a better 
management structure for the 
UK. team.*' 

The Dutch parent company 
will sell some of its shares in 


Radical ways pay at Norwich Union 


• Norwich Union 
Insurance’s views on 1985 


for die property sector. The 
insurance company says 
once again that its good per- 
formance for its poficy 
holders is attributable in do 
fittie measure to its heavy 
investment m property. 

Last year Norwich 
Union invested £494 mflfimi 
In Britain, with £185 mB- 
lion going into property. Its ' 
radical approach to the 
sector resnlted in 38 percent 
of itew investment money 
being put into property com- 
pared with 32 per cent in 
equities. . 

Most of its rivals In the 
institutional field have been 
redneng their investment 


in property, which averages 
about 15 to 20 per cent of 
their overall investment. 
Mr David Barker, the 


says:“Norwich Union is 
the biggest developer of- retail 
property in the UK. Bat 
why are we so keen on putting 
money into property? Cer- 
tainly we expect to get a high 
initial return from rents — 
more than 7 per cent from the 
property investments made 
in 1985. 

“ This is well ahead of 
yields we see quoted in the 
press and well ahead of the 
'yield from ordinary shares. 
And we know it is not long . 
before the growth in income 
froan rents starts to over- 
take the yields from gflts.” 


• Capital & COtmties' 
withdrawal from making an 
offer for Ben tails, the fern- 
fly-controUed department 
store company, raises in- 
teresting questions about the 
natare of retailing and re- 
tail assets in the ament 
market. 

Ben tails wanted to re- 
tain its department store on 
what is a prime site in the * 
West London sabnrb of 
Kingston-npon-Thames. 

Bat Cap Co argues that it 
would have been worth 
substantially more without the 
store, which is to form part 
of the £110 million redevelop- 
ment of the site being un- 
dertaken by Ben tails with 
Norwich Union Assurance. 


Britain's largest shopping 
centre developer. 

CapCo was in the final 
running with Norwich Union 
to win the right to develop 
Bentalls' site but lost by a 
hair's breadth. Sensing 
dissension in the Bentall fam- 
ily camp, which owns 57 
per cent of the company, the 
developer tested the mar- 
ket by announcing that it 
might make an offer for 
the department store operator. 
In the event, blood proved 
thicker than water and CapCo 
withdrew. 

Bentalls' shareholders 
will have to wait until 1989 to 
receive rental income ac- 
cruing from the development. 


Transport, which owns most of 
the island site. The company 
has had a protracted planning 
battle to win permission for 
the project. 

Bredero, taking its stake below 
SO per cent. Bui it will 
maintain a substantial 
shareholding .as a long-term 
investment. The flotation on 
the London market will give 
Bredero several million 
pounds of new money. 

There have been additions 
to the Bredero board. Mr 
Michael Davies is the non- 
executive chairman and is 
chairman of Tozer Kemsley & 
Millbourn 1 Holdings). Mr Pe- 
ter Rrms ton- Williams is a 
non-cxecptive director and 
holds the same position at 


Ashley Centre at Epsom, Sur- 
rey. its home town. Bredero 
has retained a substantial pan 
of the income from the £35 
million centre as pan of its 
Strategy for building a strong 
asset base. The project was 
developed with Friends' Prov- 
ident Life Office and Epsom 
and Ewell Borough CounriL 

Bredero has permission for 
a 270.000-sq ft retail scheme 
at Aberdeen with 30.00Q sq ft 
of offices. And its St' Albans, 
Hertfordshire, retail develop- 
ment. The Mailings, is 70 per 
cent leu The company has a 
£100 million development 
programme, excluding its 
plans for the big office devel- 
opment at Hammersmith. 

Bredero's profits grew from 
£371,000 to more than '£2 
million between 1981 .and 
1985 while net assets rose 
■from £1.87 million to more 
than £18 million. 

Arlington Securities, oper- 
ating in an expanding area of 
the property market — growth 
industries — saw its pretax 
profits rise from £2.42 million 
in 1984 to £3.01 million in 
1985. 

It says that all its significant 
land holdings could be worth 
£800 million when developed. 

Arlington wants to raise £ 1 0 
million before expenses from 
the flotation. It is going for a 
foil listing. 


BAYER AKT1B4(H5ELLSCHAFT 

THe Annual General Meenrg oi 9avw 
A kt cti gesefecbnft «dl be held oo 19th 
lune 1986 bi Cologne Rjvmcro of a 
Dividend of 20" * ta> the year 1985 will be 
proposed. 

Cop«s oi me Conpanys Annual 
Repon for 1985 in German will be 
available hom:- 

HyrfctQs Bant. United, 

HiO Samuel & Co Limned. 

Wemwpn. Bfinwn United. 

S G Vfartiuig & Co Ltd 

The report in English is m course of 
preparation 

Owed Kingdom Sharehokters who 
wish to attend a°d vote at the Annual 
General Meeting should bv Uth 3une. 
1986. inform S G Wfarburg A Co Ltd-. 
Bond Deoartmenr. 53 King Wdbam Street. 
London EC4R 9AS, who writ make tfw 
necessary anangemems'on thee behalf. 

Under Section 125 of me German 
Companies Act. 'he Board of 
Management IS only obliged to pfEMtte 
information on orepouts and nommaticre 
rtvii may be made enr shareholders if the 
parties ooncamed wove theu standing as 
snniehokten. in 9 r -«0 nme 

BAYER AJCTENGE5ELL5CHAFT 
8th May. 1966 


wssmfm 

I'Amnint' ___ 


company. 

Bredero Properties is best 
known for its town centre 
shopping schemes, notably the 


Mercers Company. And it 
intends branching into out-of- 
town shopping centres with 
leisure facilities. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN... 1050% 

Adam & Company 10.50% 

BCC1 TQ.50% 

Dbbanfc Sawngst- 10.75% 

Consohdaied Crds 1050% 

Comwental Trust 10.50% 

Co-operauve Bank ....10.50% 

C. Hoare & Co -.10.50% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 10.50% 

LLoyds Bank 10.50% 

Nat Westminster 10.50% 

Royal Bank of Scotland -....10.50% 

TS6 10.50% 

Citibank NA 10.50% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 


O 




AUCTION 

MAJOR RESIDENTIAL AND 
COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT SITE 
. FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 



it Over the laStdecadfi.P^ 
lias been gix>win^Tapidly internationaJly 
and has achieved tkatgrowtti without 
diliitmg tHe strength of its balance sheet. 
Indeed at the 31st December; 1985 oiip 
investment reserve on an International 
basis as disclosedin the published Accounts 
represented 48% erf the life fimcL In the 
United Kingdom alone the investment 
reserve represented 5S% of the life fund. The 
life fund itself is valued oh very stringent 
actuarial bases and very few, if any, other. 
British Offices can produce a balance sheet 
of this strength. The ability of the Office to 
grew so rapidly and at the same time 
continue to build its free reserves is due to 
the success of our investment policies and 
the cost effe ct i veness and .efficiency of the 
service we render to interm edi aries and 
policyholders through the exploitation of 
information technology :* )} 

* Extract from the Statement by E. W. Phillips, MBE 
at the Annual General Meeting on 7th May 1986. . 


E.W. Phillips, MBE, Chairman, 
Friends' Provident Life Office 


The selection of a Life Office 
for a with-pnofit policy is usually 
made on the twin criteria of past 
performance and future 
projections. 

Past performance tables 
provide a guide to- Offices which 
nave consistently performed well. 
But the ability to meet future pro- 
jections depends very lamely on th 
financial strength of the Office. 

Friends' Provident has an 
excellent track record of past 
performance and a financial 
strength few can match. Facts . 
which we feel sure your Insurance 
Broker or professional financial 
advisor will readily confirm. 
Indeed the majority of our 
business comes through 
professional recommendations. 

V\fe recommend you take 
expert advice. You will soon 
discover why so many people say 
that when it comes to Life 
Insurance, it pays. to know who 
your Friends are. 


76.96 acres prime development site located .on West State 
Road 84 in Broward County. Approximately 7 miles* west 
of Fort Lauderdal e-Hollywood, international Airport. 

Excellent potential for multi-family residential or 
commercial development. Adjacent to Pine Island Ridge 
Condominiums and Golf Course. This area is experiencing 
steady economic growth supported by a stable population 
base and well planned development. 

Auction July 22 , 1986 . 

GSA representatives will be on site May 12, June 12 
and July 21 from 9AM to 4PM. Individual appointments 
are also available. A S2$0,Q00 cashiers check 
is required to participate. 

For brochure only, call (800) GSA-1313. For additional 
information, inspection appointments and brochure call ■ 
(404) 331-2711 or write the address below. 

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 
REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL DIVISION (4PD) 

75 SPRING STREET 5W ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30305 




direc- - 
ifirm , 
r s ► 






'WSSmt 

'V 

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195/197/199 

j I LLS u D T , 

LONDON SW7 N- -•<'%/> t 

- A I rcchold In\ cs[rn(rni'. 

■ '.’Ppnrtuniiv with cxrir-inc- r . 
Office, Hotel or Residential. ^ 
De\ ? elopment potential c 

v _ A ■ : ; '■ ANifLtiL'': ' - o- ; 


Weatherall 


Smith 

01-4056944 















Finance ajnd industry/jlaw 


THE TIMES iHuRbDA* Ma* 8 lyso 


\8I£ The Royal Bank 

of Scotland 
?IV\ Group pic 


RESULTS FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 1986 


SUMMARY OF KEY FIGURES (unaudited) 

emonths 
ended 
. 31.3.86 

Smonths 

ended 

31.3.85 

12 months 
ended 
30.9.85 

PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 

£92.7m 

£75.9m 

£1 66.3m 

PROFIT. ATTRIBUTABLE TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS 

£55.3m 

£42.1 m 

£94.8m 

EARNINGS PER 25p ORDINARY SHARE 

19.5p 

17.1p* • 

35.7p 

DIVIDEND PER 25p ORDINARY SHARE 

4.0p 

3.6p 

*nnntntnfl 

9.6p 


GROUP PROFIT 

The directors of The Royal Bank of Scotland Group pic report the following results lor the six months ended 31 March 1966: 

CONSOLIDATED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT 6 months emonths 12 months 

(unaudited) ® nded ended ended 

1 ' 31.3.86 31.3.85 30.9.85 


OPERATING PROFIT 

The company and Its subsidiaries 
Share of profits of associated companies 



PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 

Taxation [based on UK corporation tax at 37% per cent. (1985 42% per cent.)] 


PROFIT AFTER TAXATION 

Minority interests 


PROFIT BEFORE EXTRAORDINARY ITEMS 

Extraordinary items 


PRQFTT ATTRIBUTABLE TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS 

Ordinary dividends 


RETAINED PROFIT 


EARNINGS PER 25p ORDINARY SHARE 


DIVIDEND PER 25p ORDINARY SHARE 


3.6p 

Restated 


SUMMARISED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET 


ANALYSIS OF PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 


Assets 

Cash and short tetm funds 
Investments 

Advances and other accounts 

tin 
3419S 
537 JJ 
10,309.8 

Em 

3.545.6 

557.4 

10.434.1 

tin 

3349.5 

4898 

10884.7 


14.06&7 

14.537.1 

14.524.1 

Premises and equipment * 

■J55JJ 

361.4 

4247 

Other assets 

808 

73J 

823 


1OO10.5 

14-971.8 

15.031.1 


6 months 
ended 
31.346 


Smooths 12 months 
andad ended 

31.385 30-9-35 


THE COMPANY AND ITS 
SUBSIDIARIES 
Interest and investment 
income recowabte 

Interest payable 


1,4834 

( 1 . 1084 ) 


Nel interest income 
Other operating Income 


Liabilities 

Deposits and custom ere' 
current accounts 
Notes *i circulation 
Other haM ties 


Dated loan capital 
Undated loan capital 
Minority interests 
Shareholders' funds 


13408.4 

338.1 


Staff expenses 
Premises anjj equpment 
expenses' mctudmg depredation 
Other expenses 


(1854) 

Bad and doubtful debts charge -spedfc (294) 

■general (34) 


Fdtowng a decision by the directors, freehold and tong leasehold biddings are no 
longer deprecated as the labile and appearance of these properties are 
maintained to the hflhast possible standard with Hie cost charged against 
operating profit The eflecl on profits ot Ihts change 15 not material. 


Profit on sates of premises 
Profit on sales ot investments 


SHARE OF PROFITS OF 
ASSOCIATED COMPANIES 


CONTRIBUTIONS TO PRE-TAX PROFIT 
(Exdudmg profit on 6 months 

sales ot pram isos) ended 


PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 


Domestic 
International 
Related servees 


B months 

Gmonths 

12 months 

ended 

ended 

erased 

81.088 

31.085 

30.&B5 

% 

% 

% 

55 

53 

48 

12 

21 

23 

33 

28 

28 


Operating profit of Charterhouse pic 
and its subsidiaries and associated 
company included in the above figures .134 


Average base rata 
Average margin between base 
rate and retail deposit rate 


^ lntMn ^t^gtyen ham dc^ nor comprise kaacooum within thonmanlngotSectipn 254 of the ComparriesAet 7985. 

Fun accounts tar the year ended 30 September 1885 on which the autttore gave an unquaBhed report ham bom fifed with the Registrar of Companies. 


The unaudited profit before taxation for the six months ended 31 March 1986 amounted to C9Z7 million, an increase of 
El 6.8 million or 22.1 per cent, over the corresponding period last year. There has been a 14.0 per cent increase in the 
earnings per ordinary share from 17. Ip in 1985 to 19.5p. 

The principal contributions to this increase came from higher net interest earnings of 15.8 per cent and.fee income 
ahead by 22. 1 per cent Offset against this was an increase in costs of 1 9.0 per cent and a higher bad debt charge. 

Average base rate was 1 1 .9 per cent compared with 1 1 .5 per cent last year and the average margin between base 
rate and retail deposit rate went from 3.0 per cent to 3.6 per cent 
One haft of the increase in the charge for bad and doubtful debts flows from the accounts of subsidiary companies 
recently acquired. The increase of 1 2 per cent in this charge for toe Clearing Bank is, nevertheless, disappointing and 
reflects continuing problems encountered particularly by the oil service and shipping industries. 

This is toe first time that we have fully consolidated toe operating profit figures of Charterhouse pic (fbrmerty The 
Charterhouse Group pic) and whilst this has increased our overall costs it is pleasing to report a substantial contribution 
to profits from this source. Comparative figures have been adjusted accordingly, 

On 30 October 1985, the company issued US$350 million undated primary capital floating rate notes on a perpetual 
basis to strengthen its capital base and to redeem US$150 million of dated subordinated loan capital. 

The directors have declared half year dividends on the 11 per cent and 5% per cent cumulative preference shares 
at the rate of 3.85 per cent and 1 .925 per cent respectively. These dividends will be paid on 30 May 1986 to those 
preference shareholders registered on 9 May 1 986. The directors have declared an interim dividend on toe ordinary 
shares for toe year to 30 September 1 986 of 4.0p per share compared with 3.6p per share in 1 985'. This interim dividend 
will be paid on 1 July 1 986 to those ordinary shareholders registered on 30 May 1 986. 


Chairman’s Comments 

On this, the first occasion on which we announce our profits since toe merger of our clearing bank operations in 
September 1985. 1 am pleased to report that a further substantial Increase has been achieved. This is heartening and 
tangible evidence of the success of our merger policy and we shall continue to pursue vigorously our dual objectives of 
expanding the range of our services and of creating a structure that will enable us to provide these services in a form 
that our customers require. 

Examples of developments in the last six months which demonstrate this policy have been the introduction of toe 
Complete Pension Scheme by The Royal Bank of Scotland and the announcement, in February 1986, of our Intention 
to form a new, specialised subsidiary company to offer a full range of debt factoring services. 

A further significant step in the development of the Group's securities and investment management services has been 
the recent acquisition by our merchant banking subsidiary, Charterhouse plc.of Tilney & Co. toe major Liverpool-based 
stockbroking firm. 

The immediate future infill result in.many fundamental changes in the structure of toe financial services industry and 
we intend to build on the operating strengths derived from the merger and subsequent developments to ensure the future 
prosperity of the Group. 


Michael Harries 
Chairman 


A copy dt Hw Interim Statement is ovaitebte tan the Secretary. The Royal 88nk Ot Scotland Group pic, 36 Si Andrew Square, Edinburgh EH2 2YB. 


ik 


New powers could 
be delayed, warns 
home loans chief 


APPOINTMENT: 


Albany 
MrMJB 
Men? ten 
Mobrgate 
AffismuM 

Phfl tp M cMtan 

Carey . have : 
directors. 

Oo 




By Lawrence Lever 


Mr Roy Cox, chairman of the 
Building Societies Associa- 
tion, warned yesterday that 
there was a 50-50 chance that 
the paref gBE of the Building 
Societies Bill would be de- 
layed for four or five months 
after January 1 1987, when it 
is scheduled to come into 
force. 

He told the association's 
annual conference at Bourne- 
mouth the delay would put 
building societies at a serious 
competitive disadvantage in 
certain areas. 

He said: “Some markets axe 
changing so quickly that 
b uilding societies axe in dan- 
ger of mining the boat if the 
legislation is delayed.” 

He named estate agency, 
money transmission services, 
housing and personal pen- 
sions as areas where it was 
essential for societies to re- 
ceive new powers as soon as 
possible. 

The main reason for the 
possible delay is the conges- 
tion offegjslation in the Lords, 
which means the Bill will not 
receive its second reading 
there until the middle of next 
month. Mr Mark Boleat, dep- 
uty secretary general of the 
BSA, said if procedures in the 
Lords took a significant time 
the Bill would 'not receive 
Royal Assent before the sum- 
mer recess. 

A Treasury spokesman said 
this was vital for a January 1 
implementation of the Bill 
because of the formal struc- 
tures, which the new Building 
Societies Commission will 
have to implement under the 
legislation. 

Mr Cox dismissed new 
competition in the mortgage 
market but advised societies 


not to abandon prudent lend- 
ing policies. 

He said: ‘"One hears talk of 
new entrants ur the market, 
including the National Home 
Loans- Corporation, the 
Household Funding Corpora- 
tion, the' Mortgage Corpora- 
tion and the Household Mort- 
gage Corporation, as well as 
the Prudential insurance com- 
pany, Citibank and many oth- 
ers. it is difficult to obtain 
definite figures but I would be 
surprised if between, them 
these institutions lend £2 bil- 
lion gross this year and the 
figure is more likely to be 
nearer 10 £1 biffion. 

“At most, the banks will 
make gross loans of about £8 
million.” Bat societies, he 
forecast, win make gross loans 
of about £30 billion this year, 
leaving them with between 75 
and 80 per cent of the market 
- “a very healthy share”. 

He confirmed a record £3 
.billion worth of mortgage, 
commitments by. the societies 
last month. 

On the question of the 
Financial Soviets Bill, Mr 
Cox said the BSA had made 
unsuccessful overtures to the 
Committee of London and 
Scottish Banks to form a 
single self-regulatory organisa- 
tion (SRO) with the banks. 

The idea, that there should 
be one SRO adapted to the 
needs of multi-branch organis- 
ations which provided finan- 
cial services, was rejected by 
the committee. 

The BSA has also held talks 
with Sir Kenneth Benill, 
chairman of the new Qty 
watchdog, the Securities and 
Investment Board, over -tire 


said Sir Kenneth “was saying 
no slowly” although' the posi- 
tion maybe different if build- 
ing societies were given fond 

mangement powers in relation 
to personal pensions. 

The ESA also had prelimi- 
nary talks with NAS EMM and 
EUTIRO (the Life and Unit 
Trust Intermediaries Regula- 
tory Organisation). - Mr Rich- 
ard Weir, secretary general of 
the BSA, said formal discus- 
sions with the two bodies, 
which are dire to merge into a 
single SRO, would take place 
shortly. 

Mr Cox also revealed that 

the BSA has proposed a code 

of practice to the government 
relating to the sale of 


“This code would basically 
provide that existing loans 
could not be sold except in 
exceptional circumstances : 
and that new loans capable of 
being sold should be deariy i 
classified as being such when i 
the loan is made and the bor- 
rower be required to agree spe- 
cifically to the loan being of 
that nature,” he said. • - - 


phot Aadexvod ha& become 

general manager , for foe i 
west re£an. . 

Heron - Corporation: ^^ 
Gotta Robots has jomed the 
board. 

National Westminster 
Bank: Mr Bsfert Hobfew, 
has bear made, a dircmorof 
tire eastern regional boanL 

Christian Saivcsenr Mr 
ABcfc Rasfcm bas. became a 
iKm-execuuve director., 

Kkmworc. Season, bonsr 
dateSfegfagipHarifoa-COTe. 
Mr R T Fox, Mr DAE R 
Pteake and Lori Ruckle? have 
been appo int e d di rect cai. 

Dobson Farit Industries: tb 
Gordon MarshsBhas become 
a non-executive director. 

Racai 
Mr PhS 
production director of Racai 
Positioning Systems and Mr 
Material Pmsbwri technicri 
director of i&c^Svvty. _ 

Bcazcr Leech: Mr Bob Roh- 
msoahasbecomechairraanof 
the Midland region and. an 
executive director of Bearer 
Homes, tire house building 
division of C . H. -Bearer 


APPOINTMENTS 


aiding societies. Mr Cox 


• THOMAS FRENCH: The 
company has sold its subsidiary, 
LiDeys Narrow Fabrics, based m 
Dotty, to Marling Industries, 
for about £610,000. 

• DAWSON INTER- 
NATIONAL: The (Bensac 
Knitwear (Hawick) subsidiary 
has announced plans fa- expan- 
sion costing £1 .25 million. Over 
toe next five years, this invest- 
ment wifi add 50 per cent so 
capacity and involve expansion 
at the company’s locations in 
Hawick and Anxoaxh in Scot- 
land. Ote nma c is a manufac- 
turer of luxury k ni t w e ar . 


KhQsfiefd Group: The new 
main board comprises Mr 
David Hawkins a Mr John 
Mansfield (managing direc- 
tors). Mr Join F theriry (op- 
erations div ectoi ) and Mr 

Adrian Kerr (personnel 

- -- - * 

auraorj. 

J D KiBgsfiekt Mr Anthony 
Bams and Mr Robert' O'Dell 
have joined the board. Mr 
Aiastair McEwan, Mr John 
Qulncey and Mr Christopher 
White have bees named as 
associate directors. 

Turriff Corporation: Mr 
John L Wyatt joins tire board 
as cbief executive. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• SILENTNIGHT HOLD- 
INGS: Year to Feb. 1, 1986. 
Total dividend lp (2.7SpX 
Turnover £71.29 million 
(£79.78 million). .Pretax profit 
£270,000 (£2.23 million). Earn- 
ings per share 0.56p (6-29p). The 
board explains that the results 
were affected by the strike last 
year at SUenmight Beds, but the 
second-half improvement more 
than made good the first-half 
loss of £820,000. 

IWA HOLDINGS: Dividend 
O.lp (same) for the year to Feb. 
2, 1986, to maintain trustee 


• MOLYNX HOLDINGS: 
Dividend 1.5p (Ip) Tor 1985. 
Turnover £2.03 million (£1.8 
million). Pretax profit £243,178 


1986. No interim dividend 
(same). Pretax profit £184.913 
(£170.315). Earnings per share 


(£121.616). Earnings per shore 
S. 5 p 14 . 52 d 1 


S.5p(4.52 p\ 

• RODIME: Three months to 
March 31, 1986. Turnover 


3.49p (3.04p). 

• FREEMANS: Mr J C 
Brooman, the chairman, reports 
in his annual statement that 
there is a favourable outlook fin- 
mad order this year. Continuing 
growth in the number of agents 
and in sales per agent will mean 
improving results, although tire 
arid, wet spring affected the 
Stan of the year. 

• APV HOLDINGS: The 
board is strongly advising 
shareholders to refect SSebe's 
bid and it is confident that they 
will find tire company's reasons 


£18.34 million (£1&29 million). 
Pretax profit £101,000 (£4.09 


status, payable on July 31. 
Turnover £8.74 million (£10.18 
million). Pretax profit £30,000 


million). Earnings per share 
3-3p (29.8p). 

• ROTAFLEX: Excess lighting 
has now posted its offer docu- 
ment'to Rotaflex shareholders. 
•But the board of Rotaflex is 


advising shareholders to reject 
the offers. |t win shortly be 
writing to them, giving its 
reasons. 

• UNITED FRIENDLY 
INSURANCE: Final dividend 
Of 12.1p (lOp), making I7_2p 
(14.6p), payable on May 22, for 
1985. Pretax profit £9.6 minion 
(£6.8 million). Earnings per 
share rose to 36. 1 p (28-Sp). 

• THIRD MILE INVEST- 
MENT: Total dividend for 1985 
■2Jp (l.9p). Turnover £1.62 
million (£907,000). Pretax profit 
£242J00 (£179,000). Earnings 


(loss £170,000). Earnings per 
share 0-1 4p (loss 2.02p). 

• DIPLOMA: Six months to 
March 3d, 1986. Interim divi- 
dend l-25p (same). Turnover 
£44.73 million (£46.11 million). 
Pretax profit £5-58 million 
(£7.81 million). Earnings per 
share 6.0p (8.0p). 

• CENTREWAY TRUST: No 
dividend (nil) for 1985. Turn- 
over £2.55 million (£L56 mfl- 


iion). Profit on ordinary 
activities before tax £8(XOOO 
(loss £133,000). Loss per share 
4J2p (6 Jp). 


compared with the previous 
quarter (figures in rand 000) 
show group income at 87,791 
(I06JE5Q) and pre tax income at 
73^241 or £19.53 million 
(96-292). Earnings per share 
were down to .49 cents (56 
cemsX 

• BMW: A dividend of 12^0 
maria (same) has been declared 
.for 1985, along with a one-for- 
fbur rights issue St 185 marks a 
share ££54.50). 


for this compelling. 

• HIGH; GOSFORTHP ARK: 


• LONDON ENTERTAIN- 
MENTS: Six months to Feb. 28, 


Dividend of ISp (ISp), plus a 
special bonus of 5p for 1985. 
Turnover slipped to £636,906 
(£643.945). but profit before tax 
soared to £82,449 (£35.185). 

• WINTERBOTTOM EN- 
ERGY TRUST: Net asset value 
(unaudited) per ordinary share 
totalled 118.4p after deduction 
of prior charges at par scad 
120Jp jailer deduction of prior 
charges at market value. 

• TRANS-NATAL COAL: Re- 
sults for the quarter io March 31 


• BARRACK MINES: The 
co mpany reports a 31 .per cent 
inc r ea se in net. profits to 
A us$949,000 (£443.457) for the 
six months to December 3 1. 

• METRAMAR MINERALS: 
Net operating loss rose to 
AosS929,00Q .. (£434.112), 
against Aus$654,00G for 1985. 

• ENERGY RESOURCE 
SERVICE: The net asset value 
at April 30 stood at $7.43 or 
479p per share. 

• RONALD MARTIN 
GROUP* Mr Martin Abramson, 
the chairman, says in his annual 
report that the first three 
months of the current year have 
started on budget and he expects 
the group to continue its 
progress. 




Public Limited Company 

INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING DESIGNERS AND CONTRACTORS 


Continued growth in profits 


□ Pre-tax profit up 1396 - profit attributable to shareholders up 37%. 

□ Final dividend of 3.0p proposed: total for the year 4.5p - an increase 

of 1496. . : . . 


□ Good performance from UK operations with high levels of activity in 
the oil, gas and chemical sector. UK mining companies return to 
profitability. 

□ Increased volumes of work in the mechanical and electrical sector 
despite intense competition. 

□ IDC acquired during 1985, extending the Group's engineering 
capability in design and construction. 

□ Current year commenced with order book comparable to recent 
years and encouraging volume of enquiries for future work. 


PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 



Summary of Results 


Turnover 
Value Added 


■profit on ordinary activities 
before taxation 


Profit attributable 
to shareholders 


Shareholders' 1 fii n ri s 


198S 

s 

1684 

£000 

£000 

432J5Z2 

382,769 

217,650 

201,439 

16£61 

14645 

9,500 

6,914 

61655 

48.662 


*%*?**■ mth the 

■ Registrar of Companies The Auditors reports are tinquaMed 


•The Annual General Meeting will be held m London on Friday, 30th May, 1986 
Copies of the Annual Report 10S5, containing the Chairman* Statement m m and 
w j a Rewow of tbs.Year. may toe obtained from the s©crerarv " 

Matthew Hall FUG, Matthew Hall House. 1 Baker Street, London WfcM lARlStephone '01-933 9384 



[ Ort*? 

H’li i 











THE 


s 



27 


TIMES 



May 8, 1986 ™ 



bg.West has taken quite 
a uauenog. during the 


1 ** 




* ^ 




■i. i-. 


■'V. 




1 


*. 4l *y 


p*j* two decades. The 
Wd empires have seen 
t “pwdves surpassed in 

XfJSjj* ^ EasuS S 

-feWES 11 ^ 6 * the Far East. 
But toe .tideis now on the turn. 

old, antj-mdvistrial attitudes 

reversed^ *°- decl hte are being 

fadustrial relations proWems 

• S2lh- Spu S li ^. wages are now 
reaching the East, where they stiQ 
have to catch up with the West 
whew it conjes to balancing the 
political powers of employers and 
]ne employed. Countries which 
become .nch on sweated labour 
bay 6 to-gO through painful times 
before rate shares are arrived at. 

In the .West we have been 
through . out pain tamer.- The 
deadwood has been cut away and ' 
our ' to si ness communities are 
bristling with tightly run. profit- 
able- and. expanding companies. 
The harsh, school of recession has 

■ thrown up, a generation of new 
m a n agers who know how to lead, 
now to weffk and how to win. 

■ The evidence is all around us. ’ 
John Egan has worked miracles at 
Jaguar., the management team at 
British Airways has succeeded in 
rekindling morale from the merest 
ashes bringing the company back 
to the .forefront of its industry. In 
the high -street Lords Sieff and 

. Rayner, Ralph HaJpern, Terence * 
Conran and a host of Jess , famous 
- names are Building success upon 
success; 

i - Behind . these famous “shop 


window” successes, however, lie 
thousands of equally dramatic 


The West will win on 


■ stories; in Jess glamorous indus- 
tries. Peter. Bullock, ; 


. „ for instance, 

was brought into James Neill 
Holdings to rescue Neill Tool after 
turning round Flymo for 
EfcoraJux. The company, belea- 
guered by every marketing, man- 
agement and production problem 
imaginable, was losing £3.5 -mil? 


the industrial front, 


says Nick Thornely, 


thanks to the new 


lion a year Just by tightening .up 
the leadership Buttock n "* " ‘ 


. ....... multiplied 

the share price by five, and the 
company recently took over Spear 
and Jackson. 

Bullock is typical of the new son 
of manager who sets bis goals and 
will not be deviated. He spends 
money on Training and motivating 
people and it pays off. 

Colt International, where the 
spontaneous “We’re Backing 
Britain’’ movement started a few 
years ago. is now under the 
dynamic new leadership of Martin 
Wylie. He has steered the compa- 
ny successfully through the recent 
depression in particularly difficult 
market conditions. 

. Now we; must harness this new 
energy and move forward to win 
back the world markets we have 
lost during the last generation-To 
do that we need to spread enthusi- 
asm 'and optimism 'throughout 
industry. Contrary to popular 
belief people are not motivated by 
money. Once they have what they 
believe to be a fair rate for the job, 
they' need other things to inspire 
them to greater efforts. ■ 

All people have ideas on- how 
their companies could be more 


breed of managers 


who know how to lead 



efficient, but they are not encour- 
aged to voice them. Management 
simply has to give them permis- 
sion to speak, finding the keys to 
release the ideas and turn them 
into positive suggestions. 

Any company which has run a 
suggestion scheme — and most 
sizeable ones have — will tell you 
that only about 5 per cent of 
people bother actually to put 
Forward their ideas, even if there is 
a prospect of considerable finan- 
cial reward dangled in front of 
them. They will spout on about 
what is wrong with their job in the 


pub. and grumble to the family at 
home, but will not make any effort 


to change things at the place of 
work. 

In order to get the best from any 
workforce, management must 
make sure they feel involved in 
the whole company, its hopes and 
its plans. People need to feel proud 
of their jobs and their employers. 
Pride is an enormous source of 


eneigy. A skilled craftsman will 
work twice as hard to produce 
something be will be proud of at 
the end -of .the day. That pride, 
however, has to be instilled from 
above, it does no.t grow 
’spontaneously. 

Employees must be informed of 
everything that is going well, they 
must feef their suggestions are ' 
bearing fruit and that they are 
receiving recognition and thanks 
for what they are doing. Firstly, 
however, the company must set 
up a system for the collection of 
ideas, while at the same time 
inspiring people to think • 
creatively. 

.By involving everyone in the 
company’s goals it is possible to 
cut costs without losing jobs. 
There is always wastage in any 
company, but only the people 
working on the spot can see 
exactly where it is and how it can 
be avoided 

Industrial Motivation runs a 


scheme called Quid Each Day, 
which sets out as its initial target a 
saving of £1 every day for every 
employee. It may not sound litre 
much, bur if you have a workforce 
of thousands it soon adds up. It 
also acts as a foundation for a 
change of attitudes, and eventual 
savings can escalate fantastically 
once everyone is working along 
the right lines, aiming at the same 
goals and enjoying the challenge. 

To feel good about their work 
people always need to face chal- 
lenges, but they must be carefully 
planned and attainable — nothing 
is more depressing than failing to 
meet a challenge. Performance can 
also be improved by setting people 
realistic deadlines. If you give 
someone forever to solve a prob- 
lem that is exactly bow long he or 
she will take. 

Many jobs can become repeti- 
tive and dull, but it is possible to 
keep people thinking and ques- 
tioning and laughing with imagi- 
native schemes. Laughter is one of 
the great untapped sources of 
energy in Britain. Happy people 
feel better, and work better. 

The secret for building all these 
incentives into your management 
style is to have a structured 
scheme running throughout the 
company, and including all the 
motivating factors. The results can 
be stunning. 

The new breed of managers has 
realized that although technology 
has an important role to play in 
their future success, people are 
stilt the most valuable commodity 
any employer has. 


All employers know how expen- 
sive recruiting, training and em- 
ploying people is, but have they 
worked Out the potential rewards 
of using people properly? The 
financial managers have always 
worked out exactly how best to 
utilize their buildings and their 
capital equipment, yet they sel- 
dom sit down .and work out the 
cost of badly managed workers. 
They talk about “increasing 
productivity” as an abstract goal, 
without taking the time and 
trouble to sit down and work out 
exactly how to motivate people to 
achieve it. 

It is no good achieving short- 
term financial . goals by laying 
people off. or by offering others 
more money to stay. The human 
being needs more than that to 
stimulate him throughout a career 
of up to half a century. To 
improve people's work attitudes 
you have to improve their quality 
of life. 



ne-off: half-hearted in- 
centive schemes to 
boost sales or increase 
production can only 
ever produce short- 
term results, and will only ever 
motivate a small percentage of 
people. To motivate the majority 
you have to become involved with 
their Jives and their feelings, their 
hopes and their aspirations. It 
takes a lot of management time 
and effort and is not a route far the 
lazy boss, but the returns are 
incalculable. 

The only sure way of failing to 


take. full advantage of our new 
found strength is to surrender to 1 
. negative thinking, ll is nol hard to 
find voices bewailing our contin- 
ued decline and problems. The 
media can always turn up exam- 
ples of industrial strife, board- 
room corruption, overmanning, 
inefficiency, greed and all the 
other deadly sins. It is vital that we 
do not come to believe that this is 
the whole picture. 

For every example of manage- 
ment or union abuse of power 
there arc a hundred companies full 
of hard-working, conscientious 
individuals. The good news does 
not moke interesting reading, and 
if a company wants to broadcast 
its success story it will have to 
blow its own trumpet very loudly 
to be heard above the moanings 
and gnashings of teeth. 

Industry Year is a- brilliant start 
to our newly reformed position, as 
is the recent boom in company 
magazines and trade joumais 
which take positive views of what 
is going on around them. 

We are a nation of massive 
potential strength — now is the 
lime to grasp the nettle firmly. 
Once a renaissance is under way it 
spirals upwards under its own 
steam. Nothing boosts morale like 
winning, and small victories can 
be nurtured into immense tri- 
umphs. We arc now all set to get 
back on top. It simply remains for 
us to do it. 


HI 


Sick Thornely is managing direc- 
tor of Industrial Motivation, a firm 
of incentive scheme organizers 


— Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 — 


— Appointments Phone: 01-481 


A 








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Officer level are superb. 

For a comprehensive information pack please 
write to Arthur A. Wilson, Assistant General • 
Manager, South Western Regional Health 
Authority, 26/27 King SquaFe r BristofBS28EF,-or L - 
tetephone our Employment Section on Bristol 
(0272)423271 exL 281 : 

- Closi ng date for applicati ons is 1 6th May 1986. 


Equal Opportunities Employer. 


Southwestern 

Regional Health Authority 



of& 


Computer Sales Consultants 


London c£35k Package+Car+Stock Options 


Our client is a public company and the 
leading supplier of computer systems to the 
accountancy profession with over 1400 
multi-user installations and a rapidly 
growing client base in the financial sector 
Many of their clients are currently 
upgrading to the company’s new generation 
of Unix based systems. 

To meet this increasing demand, the 
sales team for the South Hast is set to 
expand and the need is for mature sales 
executives to develop both new and 


existing business within the profession and 
associated markets. A background in 
accountancy is essential, as is at least two. 
years’ experience in sales or in runn ing your 
own business. 

You will have the confidence and . 
personal credibility to work at senior level, 
and will be looking for a professional 
environment in which your career and 
talents can flourish. 

To apply, please telephone or write to 
Brian Burgess quoting Refi CM 039. 


Llovd 
ian 

Associates 


International 
Search anjd Selection 


160 New Bond Street London WIYOHR. 
Ietephone-0l -408 1670. 



NON-MARINE DIRECTOR DESIGNATE 


SALARY c£30,000 + CAR 


Our clients, a medium sized Lloyds Brokerage with a varied portfolio of business intend to 
recruit an experienced Director/Producer to develop and oversee operations within their 
Non-Marine treaty division. - 


At the present the majority of their reinsurance income is generated from European sources. 
They intend to expand that business and add to it through their Australian and North 
American contacts and are therefore seeking an experienced producer who is familiar with 
these particular areas. 


This is a new appointment, offering excellent prospects, and likely to command a salary 
c£30,000 + car + benefits. 

For an initial discussion, in the strictest confidence, contact 
Nicholas Burrell, Director - Insurance Division. 


Ref 58409 


INSURANCE PERSONNEL SELECTION LIMITED 


ip 


Lloyds Avenue House 6 Lloyds Avenue Lond0n_EC3N 3ES.':; 

: Tel: 01-481 8111 - 



* 


have you been too busy working 


to FIND THE RIGHT CAREER? 


Pnrupars manv ofus have been hvi^ved in ttteriay to 

day necessities of iwngthat we have given fittie ttougrt 
to how we mg* enhance our careers. 

. vje are iust too busy working to make ihe ti me to find 

our true vocation, trie is a paradox wrtiWt ustsfly 

change but not 

knowtfighowWgosboutiL 

Oiusid Lander can change all that A 

Vitearea&oupofsp^g^^ 

SSZ^S-r^ 








Rytti^y^rawehavetieen^riVBTgfortiTebesL 
Now-fts your turn? 


Telephone us to arrange ? confidential personal 
assessment without obligation, or write to 
The Mrrmistrator Ref, 

35/G7 Fitzray Street London W1P 5AE 


LONDON 01*5806771 

BIRMINGHAM 021-6438102 
BRISTOL 027232367 

MANCHESTER 061-22B 0089 
NOTTINGHAM 094937911 
GLASGOW 041-332 1502 
BELFAST .0232821824 


® CHUSID LANDER 


| Rt 


Recruitment Consultancy 

with a dynamic young pic 


P 


6 


Michael Page Partnership is one of the largest UK recruit- 
ment consultancy groups specialising in the financial 
sector. In the 10 years since inception, our unrivalled 
success has enabled us to maintain sustained expansion. 
Our plans for 1906/87 enable us to offer management 
cuter paths Wconaiking opportunities second to none. 
Continuing growth in the demand for our services has 
created the need to expand our consultancy teams 
throughout the UK: you will join one of toe most 
rejected names in the business and be part of 
one of our tight knit teams of recxuitnvent 



HP 


What w seek is yoqr energy, your impatience for success. 
You should he in your twenties, presentable, articulate 
and persuasive; your impressive track record to date will 
have been gained either a s an accountant or as a success- 
ful financial recruitment consultant. 

In return vee offer a high starting salary, a profit sharing 
scheme, and, after a qualifying period, a company car, 
medical insurance, pension and employe*: share sdteme. 
Please write in toe first instance to Richard Robinson 
ACMA, Managing Director. Michael Page* 
Partnership. 39-41 Parker Srreer, London 
WC2B 5LH. (Tel: 01-831 2000). ' 


a 


i 


ft 


ft 


5 


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d- 


3 


Mil 


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Michael Page Partnership 

International Recruitment Consultants 


A mmberdf the AddismtR^ PIC group ’ 


js: 



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the 

toil 

irae 


■■be 

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i *: i 1 1 3 twrn * U> J 33 




Vertical Sales OTE £42K + car 

Rve famous clients of ours have coved out a 
recognised niche in ‘ the Vertical Software 
solutions market place Should you have 
experience setting to Commodity Brokers, 
Solicitors. Insurance Brokers* Accountants, the NHS 
or Manufacturing organisations then. please 
■telephone for delate of your next career move. 
■ Vou couto be pteasantty surprised. 

Wang Sales OTE £50K + car 

One of the mod successful new and second user 

WANG dealers tn LONDON and the HOME 
COUNTIES requires winning solution sales staff with 
matching track records. Top grade support plus 
the best microfmini compiler range in the 
business makes your future career assured. So why 
not join the best. 


j 


1 




Micro Sales OTE S20-32K + .car 

If you hove more than 9 month* successful IBM or 
compatfole micro solution seffing- experience 
then we have 26 separate expanding 
organisations wfth locators from LUTON to 
LEAT1-ERHEAD &fram BRACXNH1 to BRENTWOCX) 
from which to choose SALES SUPPORT people are 
also urgently nco d o d especially those with 
comma, experti se . 

BM PCM Safes OTE £WGH + car 

Everyone is copying Big Sue so why not join the 
throng? Our dents ae on extremely sucoesrfUt Plug 
Corrpattote Manufacturer with ambitious expan- 
sion plans this ftcdL They urgenlly require mature 
soles people with BM mahltame (brGSDJ expertise 
to attactkthe laiger BlueChipaccourts. VbtyaHroo- 
tivecompany benefits &quolity car prodded ' 

nent Specialists PbassieiBphone 


The Sales Recruitment Specialists 

UNIVERSAL COMPUTER ASSOCIATES LTD 

Trafalgar Hew*. G r m v ffle Place, London, NW7 3SA 
Tthphom: 01-959 1198/36T1 



on 0t9S83Qt 
after houscmd at 


ITALY 

OPERATION MANAGER 


Fast expanding UK company distributing 
Homeware/DIY products for world market seeks 
experienced Manager to coordinate manufacture 
and sales. 

Suitable applicant would be a fluent Italian speaker 
with English mother tongue. . 

This challenging position provides considerable au- 
tonomy for an ambitious self starter. 

An- innovative and enthusiastic approach to the job 
is- vital. 

Salary would not be an object for correct applicant 
Apply in writing wfth CV to our Italian head office: 

Caltech industries, 

PO Box 57, 

25087 Sato (BS), 

Italy. 


Assistant 

Company Secretary 

Salary up to £20,000 p.a. 

faiteuiationaJ Computers Limited, a member of the SKI PLC Group, 
vtrith vuoridwkte operatkyBarteainual turnover exoeetftigE I bflSoahasa 
vacaray far an Assistant Company Secreteiy at its Putney Headquarters. 

The m ain tas k wiHfaetoasist UreConipary Secretary hi servicing the 
. UK-b ased compares in the ICL Group and ensuring compliance with 
^catutoryandStot^Bcchange requirements. The AssistartSeai?t3jywW 
atto haveam^jar role to piannirigarto imptenrenting ttre progressive 
computensationofaUappropriate Secretariat functions. 

APPfcamsmust be qualified Chartered Secretaries and preferably 
gadua tesa gBd2 8+.Experienceshoufctindudeatlea5tfiweyBarstoa . 
Q3mpaySeaetariatappo«ntrTiemmaput3ifccoiT^)ary 

■ Please write vvtth a concise cxxnpfehefTshreCVtxteteJhone for an 
appeca£tonfoitn.tal&Ciow5orvlCLJCLHtx^ 7 High Street PUtne* 
Lcjndan SW1 5. Ttt 01-788 7272 Ext 2060 

ICL lsan equal opportunWeiein pf qy M 


VVfe should be talking to each other: 


A MEMBER OF THE $7Q PLC GROUP 




ELECTRICITY 

CONSUMERS’ 

COUNCIL 

IN 
Ol 

OFFICER 

(£13,057 - £16,434 inc LW) 

This is a new post created to 
meet the training and develop- 
ment needs of the 13 statutorily 
independent Councils compris- 
ing a national network of lay 
and professional representatives 
of electricity consumers. Based 
at the ECC, the Officer is re- 
quired to . have substantial 
experience and skOl in identify- 
ing training requirements and 
designing and presenting appro- 
priate courses. The post holder 
will also be expec t ed to identify 
needs and opportunities for per- 
sonal. professional and 
organisational development 

The post demands excellent 
skills in personal and written 
communication, the ability to 
operate at a national and local 
level and to absorb a complex 
knowledge base quickly. 

Applicants from a broad range 
of public sector, industrial or 
consumer-related environments 
will be welcome. A secondment 
would be considered. For fur- 
ther information please contact 
the Electricity Consumers' Council, 
Brook Howe, 2-16 Toningtoa 
Place, London WC1E 7LL. 

Tel: 01-636 5763. 

Closing date for applications is 
Wednesday 28 May 1986. 


HARPUR 

TRUST 



Clerk to the Trust 

cJE30,000 Bedford 

The objective of the Hatpur Trust is to provide 
finance and Facilities for tour well known Bedford 
schools, the dderiy and local charitable causes. 
The Trust is directed by a nonexecutive 
Governing Body. The offices arid staff of twenty 
art located in the centre of Bedford. 

The Clerk it effectively the Governors’ Chief 
Executive Officer, Administrator and spokesman 
for the Trust. The Clerk is responsible for provid- 
ing information for decision taking and assisting 
rite Governors on policy and planning matters. 
Tne present Clerk retires shortly. 

The person appointed felikdy to be aged 40 to 
early 50s with a record of success in the Civil 
Service. Armed Forces, professions, industry or 
com m erce. This is a demanding position requir- 
ing particular attention to detail. 

Remuneration wiD be approximately £30,000 

plus car andotber benefits. • 

- • • Apphmamfidenaein:- 
AHA Searcfj Consohm* 

4/S De Wdden Court, 85 New Cavendish Street, 

. London 1VIM7RA. . A 



CITY OF LONDON 

Guild Church of 
St. Lawrence Jewry 

The Corporation of London, being patrons, in- 
vite applications for the incumbency of their 
official church. St Lawrence Jewry next 
GuBdhafl. Candidates should be not more than 
55. There is a founbedreomed maintained flat, 
wfth roof garden, as pert of the c hur ch struc- 
ture. The person appointed WN be expected to 
take part in the c er emonial and social activities 
eftoa Corporation. 

Farther particulars and forms may be obtained 
from the Town Clerk, P.O. Box 270, Gufldhafl, 
London. EG2P 2EJ, and completed forms must 
reach tiie Town Clerk's Office not later titan 
: noon on Friday. 23rd May»19M. Duties to oom- 
-merae-on- Wednesday. 1st October. 


Locations: London, Paris, Munich* 
c.£ 20 , 000 + Car + Mortgage + Banking Benefits 


SECURITY PACIFIC 

EUROFINANCE. INC 

Security Pacific Eurofinance Ind, part ofthe huge 
worldwide financial services organisation Security Pacific 


worldwide financial services org an i s ati o n Security Pacific advantage, iticposopn win mwave an 

S cion, are rapidly expanding their financial systems aevefopflifcrvr taxn arvMy&is « ImiUiOnaL : 

range into Asset Based Finance with associated rayinmiexristhnrsi S rtTa so e s i ^ ai^cyay ron y - 

[services and banking systems. implementation. and tequiKstemdivitiqal wrefj ch e 


financial services Kid banking systems. 

Vfith officestn London and across Europe, they are 
embarking upon a m^or systems development 
programme, to both drive and react to rapidly changing 
business areas. • 

They are now seeking Senior Analyst Programmers 
to develop and implement systems on VAX and PCX 
utilising BASIC, FMS, DBCNET, PSI. DATATRIEVE, 
ODD, au-in-I andin the near future 4GLsand 
relational database products- The successful candidate 
wilt have at least lt-i: yeas commercial experience 
on VAX (preferably BASIC), good analysis experience, 
and a solid understanding of accounting and/or 
financial systems. Experience in ainy of me above 


untitiesand 4th generation rook wiSbeadEstmcr t;- 

advantage: The position wilt involve afl aspects of 
sysrensaevekwmemfiomaxudysist/fitnetioniti- ; ‘ - 

lequirtnrtntstngrfsy ggredp ij^ahdc p^agroto ie 1“ //! 
jm plwtirn iariQi^aMieqmpestemtBvidBaiwididie 
drive and energy to execute and manage projects through ■ '■ 
ro completi on . ' - : - • ' - : 

In atkiitiontba range oftao king benefit* Aar ~~ -7 ' 

Cbncribmory^^^mfl&Inst^an^biidt&edkxBw, 
deposition irxvoh^monddyaavelroEinopeanoffieefc : 
Wuy axe also lagauhkioldngfiumdi^^ 
sm^backgroimdtoviodtmeat r fim s ftpFF 240.000} 

orfAuradi fwDM 72.000). FhencyrnfrenthmOerman^-^ 


or write quoting 


...Lloyd 
Chapman 

1 Associates 


International 
Search and Selection 

l<k) New Bond Street London W1Y0HR 
WephoneOT -408167a 


A direct lint 



Interface is the organisation special" 
ising in the confidential promotion of 
Senior Executives. 

InterExecdientsdoiiotiieedtofiiK! 
vacancies or apply for appointments. 

InterExeds qualified specialist stafii 
and access to over 100 unadvertised 
vacancies per week, enable newappoint- 
ments at senior levels to' be achieved 
rapidly, effectively and confidentially. 

Fora Mu t u ally exploratory meeting rt fcp booc 

London ©01-930504178 

19 Clnring Cro* Road. WC2. . 

Bindnehato® 021-632 5648 

HgRnniadi, Nt wStpet 

Bristol ©0272 277315 

30 Bddva Street. 

Edinburgh © 031-226 5680 

47a G cor y. S tr u t. 

Leeds © 0532 450243 

BStPahStaet 

Manchester ©061-236 8409 

hBfacrflag^FnlaerSRt • - /\ 



Insight Programme 

CRAC tuna tnalgfK faco Management courses for mdsns 
wNch ere designed to enebto them w eseees iheir own 
*P* w 1 e e end mete more tnfomied career choices, the 
coorsee are Incenrive end WgMy parbdpetive In ayte. 

We need tweo Courses Menegmo' manage » pontoKo of 
coureae, twBd end mainse hi Hnke wfth CVeen Services, 
ml carry out the vfts) public reMom rota with Industry. 
R rspo m ibiWes wiB foefvtfe managhgatetionswithaiip- 
poitar companies, and developing neer case study maerisL 
YoowaiprobefaiyQa you ng (mW iw e ntta s ). a graduate, have 
Eor m o r e yea rs of mode esperienoa. a Hwety personality, end 
edean driving ficebce. Ydu m«y be <ooMrw lor e change In 
yoilr career' Jtath. or a greater degree of in dependence. fri 
yogr wortetyta. 

Hw edanr w tn be around Ol M0 wfth good pension 
btneflis. piue a car for necessary travenng. 

AppHadon farms end fab de sc ription from the Director, 
CRAC tneigfct Aogremme. Brntnen Street. Cambridge 
C82 ItZ-falechone: Q223 35BS1 Eat 203. 

CMC mm Owe* nonareh and Advisory Gsntro) h 
a regtaored eduemarm eftsrity acd aaMpaadteCtiBusfap- 
raent agenoc 




The 

Institute of 
Metals 


The Institute of Metals Is a chartered Engineering Institution which 
acts both as a professional qualifying body and as a learned society 
in the field of metals and materials. and invites applications for a 

TRJUNMG LIAISON OFRCER't Education t TmMng Dapartment 

To be lesponsDIe for i mple ment ation of the Institute's poficy on 
approved training and responsfcle experience including,- 

• Negj8a^wtthfcKJustrWcoi«ern»fodewtoFapproytotra^ 
senemes 

- Assessment of the traWng and enrertoncs Of-'IMMiUal appli- 
cants against the requirements foe Institute for membership 
mdoffoe Engineering Councti for registration as CEng,TEngor 

- Liaison with professional advisors and kivotvement in the work of 
foe Younger Members Committee and Technician Uaston 
Committee. 


App licants must be a registered Chartered Engineer with relevant 
Indust rial experience and preferably a Professional member of the 
Institute of Metals (MIM). 

Salary accordtog to qualifications and experience, five weeks an- 
nual holiday, attractive central location. 

Applications giving full details of age. qu alific ations and experience, 
current position and responsibilities should be sent otMr MO Stam- 
l ! UTS \ CEng MIM. The Institute if Metals. I Carlton ' Hotise Terrace. 
London SWIY 5DB no later than 30 May 1986. ■ 


EXPORT MARKETING MANAGER 

BQgh Quality KnRwear 

Attractive Negotiable Salary + Car 

Ourctient is a branded sobskfiary of a well known international group. 
Reporting to trie Marketing Director this key appointment offers an 
exerogonri oapon m uty tp a Marfaang/Sakxrrrcgtivg who can 
ctmunne sound commercial ptarmftig/biwfgetary co n trol with creative 
marketing concepts. Key tasks wiD be to improve the efficiency of 

overseas agentacs in maarinasmg sales and to expkrit the c ompetiti ve 
advantage presented by recem ravestmemand Ac Gompim^ worldwide 
r q m ra t i o n for mnovauve egscHence. 

gradirat^ ca-eqmvafont, should {ReiEetdti; havea jhx 
fecoro in tcxtue/ckKning products aim the abiKty to nndea 

ymMve travel conumtments. A Contiaeatailangaagc, prefer^}] 

French or German,’ would be a decided advantage! "Ffie comoanv 
located in Scotland. ' - ■ ■ 

Interred candidates male or female fooukt contact' 



















IJStOi 


*-** _ 


THE 


>AY MAY 8 19S6 





ar&d H«a& 

!• «o; 


J '" •• r - -- «- 

V ■/•■• 

:v' > 

r •. - jr . . , 




s - 1 
■» 


ENGINEERING & SITE SERVICES 
MANAGER 

(Ph^macfenticalsand Jbimal Health) 

SSt*? 60 * .® 15311 °* a irttemalional group producing 
fSS? eu 5 a i. anc ! v ©tsrinaiy produce. The major research and 
fjromicOOT acuity in this country needs a Services Manager to 
«-or^nate a wide variety of activities on site. Reporting to the Site 
J^rector. the Manager will be responsible for the efficient day-to- 
aay running of all technical add administrative faciliti es , the 
panning snti development of new plant and buildings the 
promon ofhigftgualitysupport toservice the needs of biological 
Wwuctjonff arid phannacseutica] research and liaison with 
planning and water autttorttiesacd other external agencies. 

graduates and must be able to 
demonstrate previous experience (and success) in the planning 
mm 3 coronussioning crf a large scale, and complex chemical/' 
totogical praises and, ideally, should have relevant experience 
witn.- a multi-national pharmaceutical company. Well developed ' 
P ei ®aBri& inai«g«iifeht‘dcilte driD be needed- 

Ibe company offers a generous benefits package including car; 
contributory penstoa..mecfi c al health and a bonus scheme. 
L<xati^.Norft^ 

Please send full career history, in total confidence, ta 

Ni cho las Potter quoting reference 236iT. 


General Sales Manager | [ General Manager 


£20,000+ profit share -fear Basildon 

Electronic Office Products Ltd is a highly successful 
company setting business equipment to major accounts 
througbom Essex. Having aevetotedrapidDymour 15 
years of operation and on the brink ofhiilhcr expansion we 
now seek to .strengthen our senior management team. Ufc 


sdectii^traiiiingafldm 
supervising the work of the sales oS 
the Group MD and your prospects 
the comjraoy'S, will be excellent. 
Please senotufi cv to: Anne Dofcor, 


force of 30 and 
buwfll report to 


PER, Block A, Brookla 

Cambridge CB2ZUDU 


Sales Manager 

'Building Industry Products 

c£16,000+car Bristol 


34 Yoxk Street, Twickenham, Middlesex TW 1 3XJ1 
Telephone: 01-891 330L 


^spedaEsts in the desagp 
for the buOdinc 
otakefuD 
and marketing 
npetidvie 



PER, MinsterHoiKe, 

Bshhrin Street. Bristol BSf lUf. 
Tet Bristol (0272) 277217. 


Textile Trader 

£14,000 +car Central London based 

My clients, a well established grey cloth trading company, 
are well known in various sectors oi the Lextilelndustrv. 
They seek ^Trader rojoin their London based sales/ ■ 
marketing team. The position demands the developmen t of 
existing acccnmu ana openmcoi new accounts nationwide.- - 


existing acccmnis and openmcoi new accounts nanonwide.- 
Tbe Trader must have the ability to negotiate high volume 
con tracts at senior management level.This is an excellent 
career opportunity for a dynamic, intelligent person- with a : 
proven track record in sales. Experience ui die textile trade 
would be advantageous. The post offers a first class 
opportunity for a highly motivated salesperson to join a 
company where hard work is rewarded Starting salary is 
£14.000 plus a car. good benefits package and regular 
salary reviews. Sounds challenging? 

Telephone: Richard Jordan, on 101) 950 3484 or send cv 
to: PER, 4 th Floor, Rex House, 4- 12 Regent Street, 
London SW1Y4PP. 


Electrical Engineer 

c£ 1,600 monthly ' Belgium 

ResponsfiiilitffiscommisaorantQLliaisonandshe. 
maintenance for new steel works. A background covering 
sted worksor similar operations involving AC/DC drives 
and HNC important. 

Send fid! cv ta Paid Rowland. PER International 4th 
Floor, Rex House, 4-12 Regent Street, London SW1Y 4PR 


Challenging 

Opportunities 


Thisestoblishetfmarket leader rnanufacturingUPVC 
windows will see tumover/profil doubleihis year. Exqnng 
plans for a new product to consolidate their premier 
position has created these demanding opportunities. 

Production Manager 

Negotiable from £15,000 East Mids 

InttesTuglr pra&UJ^rpte supervfeca 1 20 strong 

modenuoaa utaenuing unit with nxponsibiliiv hum order 
intake tpdespaidi/delivery jmcompassiflg stock. Quality . > 
^nd pTOouctK)iHx>niit>l, TTiahnaalin ehigb standards and 
fiais^wUhs^eswcnairespecifiecf targets are met cost 
effectively. AscertaimngiTranpower/capttal investment. . 
needs are further keyfimetions. With sound experience a; 
similar level in the UPVC market, yoiiU be ambitious, aWe 


skills. A®oodcomnwnk^pr/organiseryouTJ be familiar 
with production control systems. Outstanding rewards 
include potential progression to board level. 

Field Sales Professionals 

c£ 10,000 + commission +car 

SdBngUPVG windows tckxal authorities, in the Wot 
Midlands and North ofEngiand. your proven record in . 
selling to local authorities is essentia] -as is the ability to . 
conduct tedmical negotiations. The package wiB reSed ' 
yoor expertise and reward success. 

PboncjDavid Cofl, PERBmn in gjh am , oh (021) 236 6971 
for further infbnaatimi. 


TbO financial-services sector vrifl shortly ondergo a major revolution follotfring 
the introduction of new legislation. The Vtoolwich, witbassets of £Z3ba, 3,000 

staffarKdover400brarK^es,arecurrent!ypn3parrngtodiver^intoanew 


To ensure toatlheVVbolwich is at Ihe forefront of totensvoluBonw*e are actively 
seeing to recruit a graduate of the highest caTfore, looking for a career in 
accountancy, to strengthen our Ffoanclal Managemert 
As Finance Analyst you wflliJevtorkin^p^ 




The Society offers an attractive salary reviewed annual!* 

| ijv Owyieij . « .knuAaHrf i 4 off «aehii irant anH 9 ft rbn/n 


terms, controuiory ^ - 


The National Trust 

far-Fhces of Hktoric Imereti or Kmmri Benny 

Historic Buildings 
Representatives 

■ Tbe National That is seeking to appoint twa 
Historic Bnfldings Rcp reient fliracs K iB 
Mordmmbm (Scots' Gap, Nonhambertand) 
and SocahWhes p.J mde i te , Dyfed) Rggoosl 
Offices. 

Responsibilities indode tbe ore and 
cotuemriou of hinnfic'boaMS, dieirciiaieius 
aodgudens. 

A keen iotewstia the work of the NsnoniTVuK 
is cssentnL Both apponjunests^fer a ■ 
rfiatl^wg mg anri demanding wppnrluniry fOTS 
graduate, aged 25-45, wkb a good degree in an 
arosntyeaoreqAtvak3tteiperK!)Ce,Bndwide _ 


social and arc h ite ctura l history, vernacular 
buildings and industrial history. ' 

Regarding tbc vacancy in Whies, a knowledge of 
Walesand arr^aEty to speak Welsh is desirable. 
Both posts involve considerable traseflrng for 
whichacar orill be provided. Assistance «vQl be 
. grien vriih tdocatiea ex p enses. 

.Salary Range; 3&Q P^, Plus a 

centribmory pension scheme. 

Please write for further dnaih and application 
form, enclosing SAE, ue 
Mi» Margaret Harris 

FenOood Officer IL Jfil 

The National Trust . . Y|R 

36 Qoeta Anftc’s Gate 

Loodoo.-JSWtH 9AS. ' WEttO* 

Closing Date: 21 MwlSSfe . . . " . 


JOBHUNTERS 

■frerjob bHiBgiafonatdoa padc aadweUrdenihon 
»m»niOMfi(mvlin place taaudtaeowr 454 nca iota 
•Shone tefa4ma(Sil2W0raaiir»ri»B> 


PER. fEH FknOtai Mmae. WFtodBmn Gate.SheOe«dSI4UR 

i mi i mriflunWia a r ,— * 


c£18,000 + car . . South Wales 

The company is an estabfched market leader in ihe 
manufacture') of kits for. Commercial vehicles. This position 
will involve full responqbiliMnr lhc«>QtdinaB0n,_ 
direction and control cJall day-to-day on site operational . 
activities. The emphasis wiQ He on maintaining continued 
profitability thronch maximBingi efficiency arid improving 
qualitj' aandacds.' Applicants wS have manufactwina. 
production or engineering experience within bodybuilding 
or a sunilar field together with demc>nstraWccDnahtorcW n 
and administrative abilities. This should be coupled with a i 
positive, but flexible approach tommagernerirarid effective 1 
decision making and motn^tiooifl sktili An" attractive ■ 
beoe£ts package will include refocationassisrance where 
necessary, and the opportunity for a folUEcbpard . 
appointment. — y- , - . 

Contact; Wayne Travis. 


Sales Engineer 


c£15,000+car • 

My client, manufaenrrers of electronic assemblies far a 
variety of industries, seek a qualified engineer wiih sound 

bw*r(alge of production eicctrostics and contract selling to 

Send fafl ci UK Bruce Cobtu, PER, 4th TlooriPeasI 
Assurance House. Greyfmrs, Cardiff CF I 3AG 

Inventory Planning 
Manager 

£14^00 Bridgend, South Wales 

Miles Laboratories Ltd, pari of tbe Bayer Group, 
manufacture a wide range of pharmaceutical and 
- diagnostic products for international and domestic-markets 
at their factiitvin Bridgend. South Wales. This key position 
has the dual objectives of maintaining customer service and 
optimising inventory holdings with tnc use of a state-of-the- 
an ctimpuierised MRP system. Vou will be responsible to 
the Materials' Manager for a team of planners in dose 
liaison with other key operating disciplines. Operating 
across three discrete product ranges, your role will involve 
regular detailed discussions with marketing management. 

In your early thirties with a mathematics or science degree, 
VOU should also be able to rlimlnv nhvintin mananaifteBt 



Technical Representatives 

£10,000 basic + car +b»iefits S/SE England 

' International Twist DriU Company wish ro strengthen their 
UK ■Cleveland; sales force with two posts to cover South 
and South East England and London. A Sound engineering 
background and the ability to succeed in a sales, 
enri ronmert its required Knowledge of the engineerii^ 
tool distributor industry preferred. 

Contact: Stephen Milk, PER. _ 

Bank field House, 

New Unioa Street, ( rrr .tnnpt aunl 


Coventry CV I 2 PE. 
TeL (8203)23265. 


CLEVELAND 


Engineer 

Attractive salary South Coast 

Borden (LHC ) Limj led, a leatfine synthetic resin and PVC 
packaging him manufacturer, is" seeking an Engineer within 
their development engineering department at their UK 
head office near Southampton. Reporting to the 
Hngimi ring Manager, the successful candidate wiE cover 
all aspects or engineering, involving process development 
and deterrairtanon of capital project requirements. 
.Candida! esraust have a degree in chemical or mechanical 
engineering with relevant industrial experience. The 
position oners an excellent career with good prospects for 
promotion within a major m te mati onalcom pany. 
Relocation expenses u appropriate. PreferrM age 25-35. 
Career detafls in writing to; Mrs^ V M Sturgess, Borden 
(LIK) Ltd, North Baddesley, Southsnpton SQ52 9ZB. 


Electrical Engfoeer 

Attractive salary Soufe Cambridgeshire 

CbarGeigy Plastics, a leading mamtfacturer ofsynthetic 
resins andcx>mposites,w’ish to recruit a yenrng Electrical 
Engineer to work on their site based south ofCambridge. 
The eitguieerw)ll be involved in a wide variety of project-, 
work, ranging from the design of building services to the 
implementation of software projects, using PLCs and 
microcomputers. Liaison with other disci plines and end- 
user departments is an unportant part of the job. as is the 



4QA. Telephone (0223) 832121. 


^^DA76BT- Telephone number. Crayford (0322) 526232 extension 5752. 

are welcomed from both mai Brad women. 


■OPERAflONS MANAGER 



WOOLWICH 

EQUHA^E M-DING sooety 



icWThiirr: 


SuccessnA yOuna office furniture company 
Is .^tabHshlng important- new key rate. 
Reporting to the chief executive, you wHI 
take complete control of operations ensur- 
ing quality service from order to execution. 

Yeu wffl probably be 25-40 yrs okJ and have 
mwagemwa-or sales experience in the 
furniture industiy or some related field such 
HamnatnriinrtnrdMkiB Most tolQtlanHS 

a r logical, -practics^Sibte nature: which 
finds omainsii^, trouble-shooting and prat* 
lam solving a; challenge! 

Please ring Mrs Tate for 
further de&fis. 


DIRECTOR 

Consumers’ Association 

Constnners’ Association.' a membership organization with B00, 000 subscribers, 
is. seeking a Director to succeed Peter Goldman, who leaves next yeaa The 
Director is responsible for managing a business until an annual turnover of over 
£25m and a staff of - some 400, and for the campaigning activities of tbe 
Association. 

The. business is largely publishing, based' on testing' and research, and 
includes Which? magazine. Gardening from Which?. Holiday Which?, the Good 
Food Guide and other magazines and books of consumer interest Campaigning 
is research-led and includes pressure on Government and business and 
maintaining close contact with Westminster* Whitehall and the media. 
Candidates must have: 

• a record of management achievement In business and/or-in a substantial 
not-for-profit operation 

• a commitment to campaign on behalf of all consumers 

• the intellect and ability to lead a team of highly professional people 

• - en appreciation of the need for rigorous research 

• excellent communications skills - .... 

• political awareness 

Those who wish to he considered or who wish- to dominate a candidate 
should write, enclosing a cuiTJcultun vitae, .to the management consultants who 
arendvising the Association: . - . 

The Chairman. Spencer Stuart, Brook House, 113 Paris Lane, London WlY 4HJ. 

. Telephone: 01 403 1238, 


'91^080424 - 



, REGULAR PART TIME 
, FINANCIAL JOURNALISM 

TnveHragrtr Review seek persons wffli financial 
exp«*w*: to monitor and comment on invest- 
menfe. toeal owwsitunity for people wufi wntins 
wimw to accept a signtficam workload on 
auradQle but regular tasls. Successful applicants 
kn6wted 9e of the private in- 
lestrpere.n^el, Bcmuneration will be attractive 
to well ^ aahriaf . people. 

Pled* write'^tvtos details of inrahflcaUons and 
'experience to:- . 

*fomes wootten. svork) investor. 7-1 1 Lcxmgtpn 

9U London win - shq 


MANAGEIHEKT CONSULT AHCY 
£25,000-£30,000pa 

OutttiaAmz carve opportuoay wiib Horbnt^T HOUSE, LOQdOfl 
Wt. ]&ten « witored otanagnitau. wMmng asd omwltmcy. 
As Senior Con«iJuni/ Associate Director In d, die job (cqnijts 
‘ MHA/ACACATA icandidaus wrik riewfiesmt bnwNangc, int 
finance onceuted. hn*«tesS experience to divise and present 
Uitotd fttiaoce-boic irammg proyamme* u . Itlwscbip' 
otjanijaiioos. and for comuhing pn>tem 
ImpnaaVe penoosJ and ajmiwinicaiwn daBf demoastiabie ia- 
kku in ininine and an innovative, enogetic ap prondi are 
essential. 

Full want details, with current saiay and day time telephone 
number, m tbe first instance ux 

G. McCaU Engtotad, 480 FuBiam Road, 
London SW6 5NH. Tet 01 381 3084. 


ope 


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J Hii i iM&S Thu kSDA V i*iA * 6 i ^od 


GENERAL 



U 

special coMcttons 


S2232S-S2526S 


The Di re c to r of Special Collections 
is one of the senior managers within 
the division of Humanities and Social 

western manuscripts, maps, music and 
stamps. 

Co-operating with fellow 
mractom. ynmwiU mate a. major contri- 
bution to the formulation of policy, 
planning and theeHocataoiiaf reaouroes 
within the division. 

You must have a considerable 
record of scholarly achievement - 


inch lfti wg p nWlrfhtvl WQT&S -Inn 

relevant field. Proven managerial ability 
Is essential. 

y>n» ft rre.h at- riqfral lo ht kI an q.p pli- 

cation form C to he returned hy 29 Megr 
1986) writs to CwU Service Cn mrmfiBlr rn. 
Alancon Link. Bastngstofca, Hants 
RG21 UB. or telaphone Baaingatote 
(0256) 468551 (answering service 
operates outside office hours). 

Please quote refi 6/6873. 

An. equal o ppor t uni ty c imfluy ar 


LARGE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER 
WITH £75 MILLION WORLDWIDE TURNOVER 

SEEK 

MANAGING DIRECTOR 
AND SALES DIRECTOR 

SALARIES: NEGOTIABLE 

PLEASE WRITE IN THE STRICTEST CONFIDENCE TO:- 

BOX NO F46, 

C/« THE TIMES, 

P O BOX 484, 

V8RGINA STREET, 

LONDON El. 

ENCLOSING FULL CURRICULUM VITAE. 



BANKING 


Due to the continued expansion within the City, many of our Merchant and International 
Banking Clients are conducting intensive recruitment campaigns for staff in the following, 
areas; - 


MARKETING OFFICERS 


£20-30K 


For Bonkers with marketing experience who wish to 
further their careen within toe developing special prod- 
uct area for their global cu s to m ers. 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS £16-20K 

Recently qualified ACA'a to move into International 
and Merchant banking within corporate finance, capital 
markets, iuviomrai or marketing. 


CREDIT ANALYSTS 


S12-15K 


Graduates with at least 2 years corporate credit analysis 
experience to work with the marketing officers on new 
European business proposals. In several of these posi- 
tions formal credit training will be provided. 


SPG ANALYST/PROGRAMMERS £14*18K 

RPG n/m profawrinoah working an IBM system 38 
with knowledge of Banking or Treasury Dealing systems 
preferably MIDAS and AAPITI padtagas. 

BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYSTS £12-25K 
If yoo have been invoked in finance, accounting, deal- 
ing or banking systems in mainframe or micro computer 
analysis, preferably IBM related then we have a number 
of excellent career opportunities. 

IBM/MVS PROGRAMMERS 
& AUDITORS £14-18K 

We require a range of IBM analyst nronsmm and 
auditors. IMS DB/DC or CIGS/DU COBOL expaTtiw 
coupled with knowledge of fenjni exchange, frniumry 
aeairiues and capita] market systena ora mramum of 2 
years comp ute r a u d iti n g in this ana. 


FOR FURTHER DETAILS OF THESE AND OUR OTHER CURRENT VACANCIES 

PLEASE CONTACT 

Ponsa&RccxratmeQtScrvices Limited 

TWs 01-236 1113 


THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, OXFORD 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR 
(ADMINISTRATOR) 

SALARY SCALE ®,790 - *12,955 

This is a key management post The successful applicant will be 
responsible for financial monitoring and p lanning , as well as for 
office and personnel management Applicants should have at least 4 
years experience in the financial management and administration 
of an arts organisation or similar body; a diploma in arts 
administration or other similar professional qualification would be 
an advantage. 

Further details from the Director, Museum of Modem Art, 30 
Pembroke Street Oxford 0X1 IBP. (0865) 722733. 

Closing date : Wednesday 28th May 1986 . 



Are you earning £20,000 -£100,000 p.a. and seeking a 
new job? 


Connaught has probably helped more executives to find 
new appointments through its successful executive 
marketing programme than any other organisation 
Contact us for a free confidential fee assessment meeting. 
If you are currently abroad, ask for our Expat Executive 
Services. 


01-7343879 


(24 hours) 


The Executive Job Search Professionals 






|| The British Library |;V 

. V-. ’* v ’ 



m i 


I HI 

^ li r 


PATHOLOGISTS 

SEVERAL POSITIONS 

VABIOUS LOCATIONS IN AUSTRALIA 

Appflcottons cue invited from suitably quawted ana 
experienced Dcrtborogafe tor current or expected 
vacancies at the tallowing Departmental 
laboratories: 

Afouiy. Usmore and Tamworth, New South Wales 
Rockhom pi on, Queensland 
Bendigo. Victoria. 

The vacancies include positions of Senior Specialist 
[Pat h olo g y A&63.037 pa and specialist pathology]. 
A$43,936 to AS59.799 plus A$1642 pa Odmtntsfrcttan 
allowance. 

Applicants should hold a medical degree regrs- 
frabie In Australia* and possess an appropriate poet 
graduate Qualification in pathology. 

The Australian Department of Health operates re- 
gional pathology laboratories in motor pravmCKd 
towns In the eastern states of Australia. These hospital 
based laboratories provide routine diagnostic sec- 
vtoes. covemng me metfor disciplines of pathology, to 
public and private hospitals and general prac- 
titioners wfltiln the regions. 

The mam duties of the position of Senior Specialist 
ate as the officer In charge, to be responsible for The 
day to day administration of the laboratory, as weB 
os performing routine diagnostic pathology. The 
main duties of me Speaansf are to provide asset- 
emee to the Senior SpecraUsMrvcharge especially In 
the discipline at Anatomical Pathology. 

The success** applicant win be permanently ap- 
pointed to the Australian pubte Service with con- 
ditions of service mduding four weeks annual leave 
with bonus payment, cumutaltve paid sick leave, 
three months long service leave after ten yean 
continuous service; aid a contributory superannu- 
ation scheme. 

Con di tions o> service for Senior Spedattris aid 
Specialists are currently under review. 

Air fares to Australia and removal expenses up to 
approved limbs and an accommodation aHowonce 
until permanent housng a obtained may be pad 
To be eugibie loi permanent appointment to these 
positions, applicants must be Australian citizens 
However, applicants who have permanent resident 
status may oe offered fixed term engagement 
pending the granting of ataenshp. 

Further Information may be obtained from Dr D. M. 
Steele. Counsellor (Health) Australian High Com- 
mission. Australia House. The Strand, London, tele- 
phone (Of) 4366000 

Written applications, which should indude o Hri 
curriculum vttae. together with names and 
adOesses of three referees should be forwarded to: 
The Secretary 

AusfraBqn Deport men t of Hcoffa 
PO Box 100 
WODEN ACr 2606 
AUSTRALIA 

BV^ June 6. 1986 

Detailed information on the Departmental 
laboratories may be ob toned Horn Dr David Hakey 
at the above address or telex AA62M9. 

The Australian Department of Health is an equal 
opportunity employer and supports and encour- 
ages a non -smolung environment 
• Registration with a Side or Territorial medical 
board is necessary m order to practise medreme 
In AusfraBa An medtaoi boards have drawn up 
tab of overseas medtaoi qualifications which ate 
acceptable, without further examination for regis- 
tration. Basic university qualifications gatned in 
Britain, the Republic of Ireland and New Zealand 
are generally acceptable far immediate regis- 
tration throughout Australia 

- FJJ.CPA F.R.CP. (a 

D.C.P. CJICP [C] 

(Unrv. of Sydney) Ff. Path (SA) 

F Ac. Penh M. Med Path 

MR.C. Path (Univ. of Cape Town) 


CATHOLIC CHILDREN’S SOCIETY 

(Arundel & Brighton, Portsmouth and 
Southwark) 

FINANCE OFFICER 

SALARY NEGOTIABLE 

The Catholic Children's Society provides a compre- 
hensive child care service through it adoption and 
foste ring work, residential homes and community 
projects. 

Due to a forthcoming re ti rement we have a full-time 
vacancy tar a Finance Officer who would be re- 
sponsible to the Director for the day to day 
administr ati on of the Society's Finance section. 
This includes the bookkeeping, covenant, legacy 
and Insurance a dm ini st r a t i on. 

K to envisaged that the successful candidate win 
have a wide axerience and backyound in finance 
and wffl be sympathetic to the aims and ethos of the 
Catholic Children's Society. He/she wil have 
responsibility for budgetary control, and wffl assist 
other personnel in the preparation of annual bud- 
gets tor individual projects. Computer experience 
would be advantageous. 


The person we are seeking vVS 
in a small but busy office and be 
on their own Wtetive. 


a varied rota 
te of working 


For junker infomation/discussion please corona Mr. 
Peecock cm 01-668 2181. 


ApoBcation forms and lob description ere avati- 
ao te tram: The Cathotic Children's Society, 48 
Rutaefi HiS Road, Puriey, Surrey CR2 2XB. 

Cbsing date for c omple ted appBanima 30tk May 
1986. 


DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

£14,150 - £18,045 pa (Scale 27) 

NAHA is the representative organisation for heatth 
authorities In England end Wafes. 

The Deputy Director post is a key appointment in this 
influential Association. He/she wtH be expected to 
take a major lead in policy development and in the 
representation of the Association's views to Ftarfia- 
ment Government and national organisations. 

A highly motivated and responsible person with good 
communication abIBties la requried. Relevant experi- 
ence In die VHSD, Civil Service or a national 
representative organisation is desirable. 

Application forms and farther detaBs avaS- 
abre from PfuRp Hunt, Director, NAHA, 
Gareth borne, 47 Edgtbaaton Park Road, 
Birmingham, BIS 2RS. T elep hone; 021 
471 4444. 

Closing date for applications Wednesday. 4 
June 1986. 


The National Association 
of Health Authorities 
\in England and Wales 


NAHA 


GENERAL DENTAL 
COUNCIL 

London WI 

The council wishes to appoint an Administrative 
Assistant n hdp with the administration of the 
Counafs jurisdiction over the conduct and fitness to 
practice of registered demists from August. 1986. 

Applicants, aged not less than 23. should have a 
degree Or *A’ levrb and must be fluent in oral and 
written English. Salary will be on a. scale between 
£7.439 and £10.261 according to age and experience. 

Full details and an application tons may be obtained 
from: 

Miss Rambrifae. General Dental Council, 

37 Wiapok Street London, WJM 8DQ- 
Tefc 01-486 2171 


Director of 
the National 
Gallery 


Sir Michael Levey is retiring in January 198*1 and the Civil 
Service Commission, acting on behalf of the Trustees at the 
National Gallery invites applications for the post of Director 
„ of the National Gallery 

xt A rrTri\T AT For further details and an application form 

INAI 1U1NAL (to be returned bv 10 June I9S6) write to 
GALLERY Civil Service Commission, Alencon Link, 

^YtLY/o’ Basingstoke. Hants R.G21 IJB, or telephone 

Basingstoke ( 0256) 46855 1 (answering service 
Ml w fr' operates outside office hours). 

HI HI Please quote ref: G/6829- 


Trading 

Administration Controller 

Executive Trouble Shooter 

London/Essex c£20.000+ car 


A medium sized, rapidly expanding 
Import/export business seeks a manager to be 
responsible for trading administration . Initial 
base is the central London head office. 

The ideal appficant will be aged over 35 
with exper i ence of managing and ccntrdllng 
staff . The new man or woman must be capable 


c£20,0Q0 + car 

The ability to work under press u re and 
pay attention to detail Is essential. The 
successful candidate will be asetf-starter. who 
can plan well ahead and keep the Directors up to 
date. Future expansion plans include the 

Improvement of office systems and 
computerisation. Promotion prospects and 


rfrevftafisingthe growing administration of rhe remunerationare flexible and should not bar 

Company The work wfi) also tauoh* the overall outstanding candidates. 


responsibility few the Those with appropriate 

paperwork concerned with D |* experience should write in 

tfOlanaOrr confidence to RN Orr. 

Si^Sl^ CU5 * 0ma B n - - quoting Reference M261 1, 

documentattoo. & "BTtliBTS ^teMwnefarafomi. 

Management Consultants 

12 New Burlington Street London W IX IFF Telephone 01-439 6891 


You are a aanioi executive eanrog over £20.000 p a 
success^ barO'Wbngandsuooentv- 

UNEMPLOYED. 

Over 75% ol the top positions are never advertised 1 
F*ectii?r Hum & Asscoaies are a special lean 
estaPftshea lo he<o redundam. expaL or those seeing 
a :narceio fmo {he ngnt pasdtm crudity =tk} 
professionally tbrougfl rfte umcivemseo too matvei 


For a free confiderma 1 discussion 

phone Paul Fletcher 
Today (SUNDAY) on 0923 55602 
FLETCHER HUNT & ASSOCIATES 
Premier House, 77 Oxford Street WiRirb. 
Tel; 01-439 1188 


THE BIOCHEMICAL 
SOCIETY 


(re-advertisement) 

The Socwty has a vacancy at te London effleas for are- 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

tassruyaatf sn issss* m «- 

ch«f (wacutlve. company mortis. 

SSSffSS?SSBf&^ 

waft twrwnum supervision. Sotey &£1D,00CL afmr to wort rafctbiy 

Purtfwr details may be obrakwd from: 

&*****■. Tlw aoc h m w i c af Soetn, 

7 court. High HoOxm, London WC1R SOP U 

- to whom appftcatxsngving Ucmr (Mate should be made by 27 ifm, 

Prawws appttaRtt need not »*1 was. 



( 3 ID 0 APPOINTMENTS 

NEWS PRODUCER 

To join the newsroom team working primarily on the 
preparation and production of the station’s news 

Radio Lancashire 
(Based Blackburn) 

£9£16 — £14^024 
plus allowance of £971 p^. 

OLMyiitand CuuoillctMdiib pfo^cffiiin^nlCiUUiriU 

newsreading, interviewing ana reporting, in add-on 
you may produce feature pregrammesandtakepart i 
^announcing duties. Journalistic experience af sub* i 
ecWororrepcfterteveL good mierwhonevoice and ! 
current driving lienee are essential. (Ref.9695/T) | 

REPORTERS 

Radio Derby 
(1 Year extracts) 

Racfio Leicester 

E8^28-ei0^81 
pto attowance of £S69 pa. 

Are you a young ambitious reporter with at least three 
years’ journalistic experience? ff so, we now have 
vacancies that may interest you. Your dute w» 
primarily be reporting, interviewing, buflefin writing 
and newsraadirtg. A good miefophone voice and 
current driving licence are essential. 

RadioDerby (one year contracts only) (Ref.9706/T) 
Radio Leicester {Ref. 9705/T) 

We are an equal 
opportunities employer 

Relocation «xpon*#»con»ld«rod tor permanent paata. 

Contact us immedtaWy for appBcstfonflormfouofii 
approprtata ref. and endow «A».)B8CAppoininranta, 
London W1 A !AA.7feUM-9Z7 5799. 



CITY 

A vacancy fias arisen for 
a trainee broker. The 
syccesaful applicant win 
be aged 23+ and of a 
smart appearance. No 
previous experience 
necessary as fuH train- 
ing given. ! 

For a confidential inter- 
view ring Nfo U#CW on 
01-283 2942. 


CV* PLUS MTOmi HELP 
au frtv ms March M vice. TH. 
BCT*hatn«Ma 104427} 72209. 
CV*S proTcraoaaav wrlltan. 
anm M siyle VHb/Accpm. 
Trt PMS as 02406 J 3 «T. 


IMF 

DATABASE 

administrator 

US firm requires in- 
structor to leach IMS 
internals in Europe 
and USA. Salary plus 
or minus £20.000 per 
annum plus expenses, i 

01-589 7374 


"WM A». sonnets Cur 

ricuHim Vita, Drofesnanalhr 
**** ** » 


guidance for 

ALL AGES! 

8 - Sdwtfdmta. Prwp*,* 

1 ^ 34 filing 

« Mvts asdCratHaja^np, 




ARABIC 

FREELANCE 

TECHNICAL 

TRANSLATORS 

REQUIRED 

A large Computer 
Company seeks to 
establish further 
contacts with 
experienced Freelance 
Technical Translators 
working into Arabic. 

Please write with 

full CV to: 

The Editor 
F/M8 Arabic ! 
Translation 
Programme 
PO BOX 121 
Reading RG20TU 
Berkshire 


nnuiVMEWKii/eaftsuLTAaiT 

- «q stun » Wib Manny 

' 5 ° r v'mtx Mcnon. 
oMi commmian 
EJO-! 2.000 pa TTJW- 

Tcl Mr » wrwm 01 

“S^pss loffirei oi yeo 3064 


A ”T‘Wcoao wmi reonxi 

IjH ay SWt wan apanta M^k a 
*ggW ».WuWlc vM KMiVMlIMl 
“"areas id hwo the d«mIk bav 
5'*r* *l«s. and naum Ftrxwte 
M SO Ml * foMnuanon 
nrodWB, in Tjr cr oo 

o h. T« *21 Q7tM , 

“teHrtmenj T«nart Oommrr. 

Proprrrv 

■a®®? «wndu»fl dtsdrawnt 
^itwn on * or London , mm 
Arm, Erwtiuiupsrp 
glto wll Unana a to on ml 

m ore missrjjrt itm 

P^rewtKe. Antuicaumw iti ron- 
.laJfr® Aridu, Ldjunun M 











O 04 





THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


APPOINTMENTS 


General 

Manager 

, . £ 35,000 + 

Leisure Industry-London 

5 * ra ’ e 8>3’ staff motivator, manager, financial planner. 

" ^ f.jP^Mbteanay of abilities has been tried and tested in 
fifing, manufacturing or the service sector, rite MD of a 
major £multi-milHon leisure group is keen to meet you. 

The topic? General Manager of one of our client* most 
profitable units, employing around 500 staff and based at a 
highly prestigious location in central London. 

Th ®J ew ?«te? A totally absorbing challenge, £35,000+ pa and 
substantial benefits, including an appropriately 'executive' car. 

vi in tiw first instance please write with fuH c.v. to 

Nudeus Advertising limited. Ref: GM722, 93 Newman Street, 
London W1P3LE. 

Applications will be forwarded to our dient unopened unless 
addressed to the Security Manager listing companies to which 
they may not be sent 

NUCLEUS 

advertising 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

This new recruftmera consultancy with a strong dfent list in City banks is 
expandin g its operation and is now looking for two addttbnal experienced 
consultants. This experience could have bMn obtained either into personnel 
function of a bank or in another consutancy/ageney. 

Our aim is to cover all levels of jobs within banking, an otMctiva we have 
achieved within our first tour months of operation. We are looking for strongly 
seif-motivated people who want to eem a good basic salary together with vary 
high bonus element for meeting- reatfinwe targets. 

H you ere in ter ested please call me. Tom Kemfgan, on 01-588 4303 up until 
7pm, or (0277) 223045 after 8pm or write with fel cm. to: Tom Kerrigan 
Associates, 20 Wormwood Street, Bishopagate, London EC2. 


CAREER MOVES FOR COMPUTER PROFESSIONALS 


SALES 


ACCOUNT MANAGERS 


LONDON 

& HOME COUNTIES 


£t8k BASE c£40k GTE 
GUARANTEE 
CAVALIER SRI 


IBM mainframe market place. The prod lias include Relational Da t abase. 4GL and Electronic 
Mali Software packages. The successful applicants should be In possession of a track record 
of high achievement gained selling related products into the IBM min i/tnainframe market 
place. These positions represent tne first stage of a planned business expansion and will 
present definite opportunities of career advancement for the amblUous. In addition to the 
Very achievable on target earnings on Offer, other generous benefits indude non-contributory 
pension, private health care, health insurance and a substantial guarantee. 

REFTB 13255 


MAJOR ACCOUNTS W. LONDON GRANADA/SIERRA OH1A 

MANAGER £17,000 BASIC 

DATA COMMUNICATIONS £37,000 OTE 

One of the leading and most successful data communications companies in the (LK- Is 
urgently recruiting for a new key position. The position of Major Accounts Manager requires 
the combined skifis of large account development and team management The successful 
applicant should be a top sales professional with several years major account development 
experience at a senior level within the data comma industry. The brief will be to maximise 
profitability of a select list of Major Accounts through your own sales expertise as well as 
through the motivation of your own sales team. The seniority of this role Is reflected in the 
excellent earnings package. Other benefits include definite career advancement in this 
growing company, quality company car. pension and BCJPA. REFTL 13562 


BUSINESS MICROS 
SALES EXECanVES 


LONDON 

NATIONWIDE 


XR3L SIERRA 2GL 
EARNINGS UP TO £50K 
£14k BASIC £30k OTE 


SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE CITY £40kOTE 

FINANCIAL SYSTEMS £2 Ok BASIC 

GUARANTEE 

The Financial Systems Division of a major and long established computer group is recruiting 
a Sates Professional to sell at senior levels within the City. The company has enjoyed 
considerable success through the sales of their Banking and Investment Software packages. 


This dynamic micro computer sales organisation Is recognised as one of the leading 
independent business systems groups in the UJL Following their explosive but planned 


sett-motivation, and o proven track record In business micro sales such as IBM and Compaq. 
Their Impressive po rtfolio of clients includes numerous public companies. This is a superb 
opportunity to j'ofn an established, rapidlygrowingcompany who have gained nationwide 
credibility In the total solutions sales arena. Excellent company benefits include backup 
from top technical support divisions, high earnings incentives and a choice of superior 
company car. REFTL 13563 


highly professional approach and the ability to generate new busl ness. This represents an 
outstanding opportunity to join a respected and specialised organisation with further career 
advancement a strong possibility. In addition to the very achievable on target earnings on 
offer there Is also a non-contributory pension, private health care, company car and a 
guarantee. REr TB 13269 


BANKING & COMMUNICATIONS 


PROJECT LEADERS CITY OF LONDON £30k + CAR 

(GLOBAL BANKING SYSTEMS) 4- BANKING BENEFITS 

To maintain their leading edge In the development of large sophisticated Global Banking 
Systems, the Information Systems Division of this Internationa) Merchant Bank wish to 
recruit experienced Project Leaders. The successful applicants are likely to have extensive 
knowledge of Eurobond Dealing, Foreign Exchange anobr Money Market Systems as these 
are the three main areas currently being developed. The Project Leaders appointed should 
be self motivated individuals who not only lead by example but have a proven ability to 
communicate and work under pressure to tight timescales. Developments are centred on 
IBM equipment, however, the company place more Importance on business awareness than 
a particular hardware experience. The salary and bene fits on offer reflect the importance 
of these roles. REFTR 13070 

GRADUATE ANALYSTS C. LONDON TO £20.000 

fr PROGRAMMERS (BANKING) + CAR 


ANALYST/CONSdLTANT CITY TO £25,000 

INVESTMENT BANKING + CAR (£8,000) 

Our client is an international company who are currently providing banking systems on a 
worldwide basis. At present they require a Systems Analyst or Consultant to complement 
the section which is responsible for the portfolio investment management systems. 
Candidates should have considerable knowledge of investment banking systems and a 
proven track record of analysis and design. Suitable applicants should have good academic 
qualifications, the determination to excel in a demanding environment and possess 
comm unicat Ive skills expected of high calibre professionals. Tne company will review salary 
after four months service and in addition will reward employees who are prepared to work 


Our client is an international company who are currently providing banking systems i 
worldwide basis. At present they require a Systems Analyst or Consultant to complerr 
the section which is responsible for the portfolio investment management syste 


after four months service and in addition will reward employees who are prepared to work 
abroad on a temporary basis. In addition to a very competitive salary, the benefitspaefcage 
includes a company car of your choice. BUPA and a pension scheme. REF TM 13552 


COMMUNICATIONS 

CONSULTANTS 


LONDON 


TO £30,000 
+ CAR 


and Investment Management systems. Ideally aged mid 20’s to late 30‘s and possessing a 
good degree, candidates should have gained several years experience In Data Processing 
and preferably a broad knowledge of a variety of applications. Ban king experience although 
preferable. Is not essential, as full training will be given in this and any new hartfwane&oftware. 
Salaries are excellent dependent on experience in addition to comprehensive benefits. 

REFTP 12996 


A number of International consultancies and systems houses are currently recruiting 
Consultants with a communications background. They will be advising clients from a variety 
of areas intending finance, industry and science, on hardware&oftware selection, planning 
and implementation. Candidates presently performing a technical, support or marketing 
role are Invited to apply, particularly those who have worked for a large user or major 
computer or communications supplier. Degree level education, business acumen and good 
inter-personal skills are essential. 

REFTT 13404 


DAlA 


We have many other National and International vacancies, please contact one of our Consultants for details. 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS ! 
21 CORK STREET, LONDON W IX 1HB 


COMPUTER EMPLOYMENT LTD. BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE PEOPLE BUSINESS 


24hrs (10 lines) 3*01-439 8302 
. r" '• S' 01-437 5994 

•EveningsG Weekends X (0892) 28736 . 

: X (0252) 27703 



tom!<errigai\ 

ASSOCIATES LTDl 


RECmm^NT CONSULTANTS- 



Sales Director 


The Quest For Quality 


MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY GROUP 
of Great Britain & Northern Ireland 

UK REGIONAL MANAGER 

This is a new senior post bated it the HQ in 
Smnb-Wesi London, r esp on s ib le for overall 
planning and strategy of regional development and 
for the administration erf tile professional Regional 
Staff. 

Suitable candidates betw een 35- 5Gwfll have 
bdd a senior position in MARKETING, SALES, 
CHARITY FIELD MANAGEMENT re closely 
related work, with experience in m a nag i n g people. 
Good communication dolls e ssenti al, with the 
ability to enthuse and motivate the team and 
voluntary supporters. 

The Group has 400 Brandies serviced by 9 
Regional Organisers, and raised £2.75 mi l l i on in 
1985. Extra income is now urgently needed for 
medical research, and the creation of this new post 
is intended to make a substantial contributionto 
•hi*- FIGHT 

Salary commensurate with 
position, age & experience. 

Please write to John Gilbert, 

35 Macaulay Road, Q apham , 

London SW4 OQP, giving details of MUSCULAR 
experience and present salary. dystrophy 



ARCHITECT 

We require an Arctetect 
to prepare designs for 
additions and alterations 
to domestic dwellings in 
Sydney. Australia. 

The wort is varied, chal- 
lenging s»t wall pad. 

I shafl be staying at the 
White House Hotel aid 
you can contact me there 
between -Friday 9-May 
and Wednesday 14 May. 
1986. 

Rag 01-387-1200 and 
ask (or Taiy Dana. 


ACCOUNTANT 

■ART^H 




)> Rank Tayfor Hobson are intenationally recognised as market leaders in 
metrology instrumentation. Onr products are used by major indnstries in 
over 100 countries. 

Vital to the ongoin g success and expansion of the Comp any is the 
appointment of a Sales Director of the highest calibre who will manage, 
lead and develop all sales activities, both directly and through agents and 
distributee, on a global basis flririt ffoinan yth fi T Hl piTvpriTWstfrfv ahiTHy firv 
analyse both die present and fittnre requirements of the market place and 
initiate plans which will enable still further penetration into existing and 
poten ti a l m a rke ts world wi de. 

Probably in your early 4(JTs and a degree-level Engineer or Physicist, you 
most have a proven success record in profitable capital equipment sales 
at senior executive level, preferably involving instrumentation with a 
significant software content; certainly ycra have sufficient technical 


expertise to liaise eff e ct i vely with engineering management both of 
easterners and within the Company. Substantial experience of the North 
American market would be an advantage. Equally, we are looking for 
someone with the co mm ercial acumen needed to play a leading role in the 
broader management of the Company. 

The post (which has arisen from internal management moves) is based in" 
Lefoesten The remuneration and benefits are substantial, and negotiable, 
fit addition there is an armualperfbrmance award based on die Cfornpany's 
success, together with an executive car; private health insurance and the 
usual benefits one expects from a major company. The Company employs 
around 1,000 people worldwide and is growing strongly. 

Please contact the Company^ adviser; Peter S Phidlay, of Cripps, Sears & 
Associates IicL, Personnel Management Cansrihazds, 88-89 High Hdborn. 
London WC1V SLH. Hek 01-404 5701. 



) Rank Taylor Hobson 

Cripps, Sears 


immkhv and quartet ter 
ninn ay ewm w wbib . ex- 




BLAZER OF COVENT GARDEN 
AND BOND STREET 

are expanding. We have vacancy for a useful 
career minded manager with a proven trade 
record in retail management. 

Please contact Liz Price on 01-409 2841 


SALES NEGOTIATOR 

Enthusiastic, energetic, hard-working sales nego- 
tiator required for fast moving firm of Estate 
Agents. Mid 20’s. Great career prospects. Car 
owner. Experienced preferred but not essential. 

01-736 6009. 


Two international opportunities with a world leader 
up to £ 15 . 000 +.bonus + car + benefits 


tf you've gained export-refuted 
experience in an international FMCG 
company, there's no doubt you U find the 
move to the world's largest health-care 
company a rewarding one. 

As an Export Area Manager you'll 
eniov unusually wWe scope to make 
vou! mark. Your objective wifi be to 
assist local distributor management in 
Sablishing V* developing franchises 
for fcev product flW "Jjjj 

feminine hygiene, ffontel arfo 
health c are) ihroughoij ia WtetY* 
ChS/lenging Th.fo World 
Working from our Slough Hp out 
SSSb around a third of your m on 
teritory 9 you'H be practically irtvohred m 
Tracts Of local marketmg. 

distribution, merchant. * 
ra-ning and - in, 3^ 
manufacture under hcence - progress- 


chasing and raw materials control, in 
short, you’ll be responsible for ensuring 
that the business runs efficiently and 

profitably. " 

Probably aged 25-33 with sound 
commercial awareness, you must be 
capable of operating effectively on .your 
own initiative and influencing distrib- 
utors positively. 

Benefits are those expected of a 
leading international employer, end 
will Include relocation assistance if 
appropriate. 

Have you got what ft takes to 'run 
your own show*? If so, telephone for an 
application form or write with detailed 
cv to Mrs Anne Dunn. Personnel Officer. 
Johnson & Johnson limited, Brunei Way. 
Slough, Berkshire 5L1 1XR. Tel: Slough 
{07531 31234.* 



rr^r^n 

i*n 


NEGIOT 


REQURED - AT ALL LEVBjS 
Dec to nwiiroed o qMBBioo by 

ACRE ESTATES 
Hwne ww tor farther deufls 
ofhaw YOUcotddjoin one of 
Wes London's man profes- 
soral amt dynamic Emu 
A gents. 

PLEASE APPLY PAUL OR 
SIMON FHANKLM 
01-579 0901 EsSng Office 


POSITION 

An exdttag career Is open 
lo individuals 1 22+1 who 
are smgle-nttnded and »n- 
teresud In their cr*m 
future. This t> an op pottu - 

nny to earn over £ 20 K 
P-a. and earn shares in a 
nationwide group. 


01-439 8431. 


UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS 


BRUNEI. UNIVERSITY 

RUL T tmnmm lo 


j >3- 

* 1 1 W il 7 1 1 ; i sTurti 


The Department of Govanunem often places for fell 
time and part time research degrees. 

The man requirement for the M, PHIL is a disserta- 
tion (normally 2040.000 wonts). Degrees are also 
designed to give a thorough grounding in research 
meiJxxfe.. Students will be expensd lo attend three 
courses. 

J. Core course in Methods of Research 

L Political Science; Sate of toe Discipline 

3. Graduate Seminar • 

The M.PHIL Is peri of a wide postgraduate pro- 
gramme. This also includes a master s course in public 
and serial admimsiraiion with specialist options cho- 
sen from community and race relations, education, 
health, bistory of social policy, housing, personal social 
services, social security and the voluntary sector. 
Further information and applications from A.M_ De- 
partment of Government Brunei University, 
Uxbridge. Middlesex, UB8 3PH. 



Sales Professionals 

Computer Services 

London/Midlands/Manchester 


Basic Salary: up to £20,000 p-a. 

Dettak is a major US. supplier of 
specialist software based products and 
services primarily to the I. B .M. market They 
have an established and impressive U K. 
account base, comprising mostly Times Top 
1,000 companies. Deltak is the world leader 
in its field, operating in 26 countries and 
serving 5,500 clients. Their history is one of 
excellence. Their products and sendees are 
suppOed on a contractual basis with values 
ranging up to and beyond £200.000 p.a. and 
negotiated at the highest level. 

Hence their requirement is for senior 
level sate professionals with style, business 
acumen, conceptual flair and the desire and 
ability to advance their career. It is 
envisaged that candidates will have a 
combination ctf consultancy and sales 
prowess, as well as being adept at account 


Targeted Earnings: £30,000/£50,000+ 

management and account development 
given the provision of first class support 
facilities and staff. Previous experience 
will have been gained with a major 
computer system manufacturer and 
earnings aspirations must be in excess of 
£50.000 p.a 

In return, Deltak offers a top ranking 
remuneration package, including high basic 
salary, substantial guarantee and prestige 
motor car, along with medical and pension 
plans and business expenses. Further 
benefit wifl be gained from an excellent . 

' training programme. A relocation package 

will be considered where necessary. 

For further details, contact as 
recruitment consultant to Deltak, 

Stephen Andrews on 01 -493 7303 
(24 hr answering service) or write to hhn at 


Arlington Consultants Ltd. 

Search & Selection 

157-160 Piccadilly. London WlVONQ 01-4937303 


Super Secretaries 

Confined frost page 12 


TEMPTING 


Soot >htfi o I A r c W cH uiCWi 
jMCfl a bright mUiususlic «tr. 
KfflioiM iiwtr friendly ream. 
Duifey include typing i«6wRni. 
cwitrhbwrfl.' dealing mud w 
. UOHsrv greeunq \bffoTV. 
vrrtpqu* ftowers ana eagbog 
lunch** one* a wnk liar M 
peowe Pleas* eaN 4612 
GiwOoriutl Rpc Conw. 
KCCmOWST required ny tea* 

iP9 Design Conyuitanry » ws 

TO 3T<w Clams, order courier* 
and tarns Dear wnn man and 
«m*raJ "thyr ouiips Saurv 
£7.000 son* typing and aood 
H^niiinn Iw-te-nMY Pleas* 
call dll Asia Oonc Cornu Ree 
Caps 

TRXVttKM CO D |H. 

Ser rettty Busy. tt>- 
feiMing in young 

J2E«*£2 skim ao.6o-.tW: 
hdwi W - Pfwm : manner him 
•*» agents Mr 

M ■ «&. Sat C8 10060 
ST™“3E.2* W Broifltnwi*. 


NWIO £9^500 
Agyoi assh 


U« •* PA 
8UK 


WELCOME for ro un on^ 
cote leaser l9Hh wHh tvouhv 
aur typing ggntf rtfucdlion 
4 MTcneri eutloah tt tuMWl 
araiablc Mayfgk \earn « Pran. 
Dnrkwvr* tn itnunou> oftKrs 
. A ***lp)arf tommttr n OOO 
wnv miaw a amanita perv»i 
-*»vte Outn*a at sn 
K8CJ7.O0I0 con* l 

COLLEGE LEAVER no *. funat 
rm swi Mvennmg agenev. 
l«> oi orwustno. aiarw-. 
Wtooe* m neme t»i>i cwnfui 
rotironmew Sm^iww I»p 

■ng.nooa eauralnn ft a i Mirk i* 
ewtm 1 < to 5i«> pa ' oe 
nut Jnye* OIM 9 

6807 ooto iRrr. Com I 

MVMMA1S START r-O’Jirrfl t(r 
latl 1 80 uyn. i audio eiirPry 
m busy Minding \aiuanon nr 
ponm-m m h-Mlino CrUI, 
Ao*n>v Bated Iwfueen Ham 
merMnifii and Shenhent' 

Him.- i* 4 rtMtundniaeiHl varied 
mtk inammMIH vow 'Pal- 
ly n*fr feo*. PWk Call FMna 
Oumod M ManJi and Baivont 
on 01 93? 87«>. 


EXTREMELY MISV So prgtn 
wnn ut Mil want in mierwt- 
itm poninon ai MMnneev 
MMJ« PH. Cwthw AIIWTJ 4n0 
Blue Chip twnw cmms. 

Covrm Carom Burra. 1 IQ 

rieet fttWlB W 


KOIH MOIDAYl Extnmeh, 
mw wnn «> beotungt m 
Iwhing. Current Attain. MMu 
‘ Eadow Aooni» ale Covent car. 
den Bureau. 1 10 FTeel SI.. £ 04 . 
495 7696. 


STEPPING STONES 


Royal College Of General Practitioners 
Certification Assistant 
£4,430 to £7,434 ins. 

Career p* lor bright Crtirpe leaver with fan accurate tj> 
Itifl and oroanwnd sMUl RosBatuftie fob involving 
pn>cwroappi>ca»in» ewWKatoon from Meoxal Prae- 

otmKTV. Aged 16 to SO. 

write to: The AdmintarsOve Secretary. Joint. OuntnitlM 
on Pni Graduate Training 41 Tlfe Raval GoUege of General 

PrarflOoren. J J Pnnces Cate. London SW7 1PU. Td: 01- 
681 6232 ext- S36. 














_ 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 



Group 
:ial 


Young Graduates 

Train in investment Operations 


This is a unique opp o rt u nity to charmri 
your drive and ambition into a role 
which can provide a springboard to 
unlimited prospects. Become part of 
the nest generation, of operations 
management with tins major American 
Company and help to maintain its 
impressive level of success. Providing 
a comprehensive range of in v estmen t 
and financial services, the Company 
has an innovative approach, substantial 
backing and is poised to continue its 
current rate of significant expansion. 

You will spend a pproximately two 
years enjoying broad experience foam 
ground floor level whilst receiving 
informal training in various depart- 
ments. You will assist primarily in 
providing support by reconciling, 
checking, processing and settling 
accounts but are likely to gain 


exposure to a very wide variety of other 

mat terc. 


A recent or imminent graduate in 
business or a related discipline, you 
axe highly flexible and welcome 
responability; You are a self starter with 
initiative and above all have leadership 
potential 

You will be ^ aqp< ^ in modern offices in 
foe City and will command a com- 
petitive salary and c o mprehensive 
benefits. More importantly you win 
enjoy rapid personal development mid 
a particularly rewarding careen 

Please telephone for an Application 
Fonn or write with c& to Sue Jagger of 
Cripps, Sears & Associates Limited, 
P e rso nn el Management Consultants, 
88-89 High HbUxan, London WC1V 6LH. 
Tel: 01 -404 5M. 


Cripps, Sears 


Begin at the end of the Rainbow 

Young Accountants 

£15-25,000 + car + benefits 


Your future matters to us. We can obtain for 
you the highest possible salary with unrivalled 
career prospects in some of the most 
prestigious companies in the UK where the 
only limit to your success is your own ability. 

Our diems include leading merchant banks 
and Blue Chip Companies in financial services, 
pharmaceuticals, health-care, the computer 
industry and other commercial sectors at many 
locations in London, the Home Counties and 
the South East. 

They seek qualified accountants for positions 
that offer accelerated career and salary 
progression in areas that indude:- corporate 
finance. financial control and, management. 


financial analysis, corporate planning, 
financial and management accounting, 
management information and systems 
development and international audit. 

Remuneration packages are extremely 
attractive and can indude a company car, 
subsidised mortgage, bonus, profit sharing and 
share options, pension, BUPA and a full 
relocation package (if appropriate). 

If you are a newly/recently qualified 
accountant, or with further experience aged 
23-32. considering the best career move 
available please send your career and current 
salary details to BARRY C SKATES or 
telephone him for an informal discussion. 


MKA SEARCH INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 

Berkshire House 

Queen Street 

Maidenhead SLA INF 

Telephone: 0628 7JW56 


ACCOUNTANTS 

RECENTLY 

PROFESSIONALLY QUALIFIED 

searching for an opportunity to develop those newly acquired alnUa. in r small 


and searching for an a 
but dynamic Finance 


lepartment. 


We require two innovative Accountants in order to fulfill this Council's require- 
ment for a Chief Accountant and a Management Accountant. Both Dosts. created 


ment for a Chief Accountant and a Management Accountant, Both posts, created 
out of a major re-organisation call for considerable initiative in developing new 
financial services. 


The remuneration package includes a salary of up to 15K, generous leave and 
pension benefits together with flexible working hours. 

Thses posts will initially be based in Caterham. However, construction of new 
centralised offices at Oxted is being considered. Both locations have easy access 

to the M25 and M23. 

For further details and an application form please telephone:- 
The Personnel Section on <0883) 45211 or write to the Head of Person- 
nel and Management Services, Council Offices, Harestone Valley Road, 
Caterham, Surrey CR3 6YN. 


TANDRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL 







PIP 

wk 



MSp ElAN 
HOLDINGS 
EC METERS 
INS n ACT 







FARMILOE & 






m 







£20-33,000 + car 


Ascneofora , Maii^einemConsaltai^yoa’flbeirfayingavitaIrateiniijd«>ir>& 

re^XMisetothedaJtengesoftoday. 

Based in London, yooll be advising some of the country's most successfol and 
innovative private enterprises. It’s demarafing, creative wort Because yotfll be helping 
them solve tough and complex problems; helping top management implement change 
and so improve efficiency and profoabilfty. 

Wbrit, in bet, which will test your intellect, broaden your experience and quickly 
develop your business and technical skills 

Rapid expansion means that we now seek graduate Accountants (ACA, ACMA, ACCA) 
and MBAs, aged 27-35, wiih line experience of financial management, ideally including 
treasury. Involvement with financial institutions would be of particular interest 
Ffersimal skills, of course, nmst impress. 

Take .up the challenge. Send full personal and careerdetaiis (indudingdaytune 
telephone number) to Martin Manning, quoting reference 3028/T on both envelope 
and letter. 


WWIVIIW 

Management Consultancy with Haskins SeHs 


P-O. Box 198, HOIgate House, 26 Old Bailey. London EC4M7PL 



FINANCIAL CONSULTANCY 
A GROWTH AREA OF THE MOMENT 
AND OF THE FUTURE - DON’T MISS OUT’ 


FPS (Management) Ltd is a leading firm of financial consultants and because of phenomena! 
expansion in 1986 is looking for outstanding individuals to complement its London based team of 
professionals. U1 


The right individuals (aged 23+ and based in London) will be energetic and intelligent, hirfiiv 
motivated, hardworking and able to absorb new ideas quickly. & y 

Full training will be provided. . 

Remuneration expected to be in excess of £1 5,000, and lead to management in the first year 
This is a superb opportunity to develop your own business and career path in a erowimr ——L, * 
and in an exciting industry. - ^ wmpany 

For further details phone the Recruitment Manager on 01 240 9058 



?FiCE SY 

ANA V 


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n 



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■V ■ 


\ '.^S 


»■ 




Train In Recruitment 

CJE10.000 


, I time work cxpcritwr. 

recruitment with 2 A^^Sr din ^ Specia ^ 1x1 A”’ 01 "®* 1 *? 
GZZ™* with 20+ stall; we can offer full tmlnhw mch*ih« 



lb discuss call DAVID mCHELL, 


International Opportunities 

Package £20.000 + 

DIVISiON has current vacancies within leading firms 


Specialise in Taxation 

London EC4 

£13,000-£1 5,000 + atii package 

IJeTte Division of one of the most prestigious International Arms of 
Chartered Accountants seek ACA/ACCA's (or confident referrals) for 
training in taxation. They oflfer a wide variety ofcorporate and 
personal taxation. Full training for ATII and early opportunities far 

consultancy and tax planning mwohement Call BUZA fl E THBA RBER 
for more information and a free brochure. — 

Personnel 


75 GRAYS INN ROAD, LONDON, WC1X 8US 01-2426321 


Disbursements 

Controller 


; ;•/ * • ** I ’- ,'* ; *♦ »» « Z 


Control and manage c. £14,000 


Dun & Bradstreet, the worid’s leading business 
information company, requires a Disbursements 
Controller with management experience and the initiative 
to implement new systems and controls. 


a 

the 


team of 5, you wffl be responsible for ensuring that 

company’s payments are processed correctly and also for 
managing the Treasury functions. 

Aged 304- and a part-qualified accountant with a proven 
management record, you must have a thorough knowledge 


r J r »VM uuu 

pension plan operation. Good communication aMia and a 
methodical approach are also essential 
Hie competitive salary is accompanied by a private 
health-care scheme and genuine career opportunities. 
Please send full career and salary details to 
Mrs C Ball, Dun & Bradstreet limited, 

26-32 CEfton Street; London EC2P2LY. 


Dun & Bradstreet Limited 


a 
Dun 


OFFICE SYSTEMS 
ANALYST 

Use vour financial flair 
arid technical nous 

£12-15,000 + Car Herts 


Part of THORN EMt. Rumbetows is a m^or company in its 
own Tight in the fast moving. highly awwierdat electrical retafi 
budness. 

Our current requirement is tor a Senior Office Systems 
AnalysnoacfmWster and take over end-user control of our 
micro-mainframe link. The emphasis is very much on financial 
systems, working on spedal prqeasand proi/kfing a user support 
and training faafcy. 

(deafly youH have wide ranging experience of PCX 
mai n frame communication systems and other office irformaflon 
systems but equally important will be your “business" 
^jpreriation-pcssiDly linked with an accountingifijaraal 
backgrtxirvlBth&-vwycwrrKJstcocnmunicatewetwizhaQ 

levels and have the ability to express technical complexities In 
simple user language. ■ . 

PanofasmallhigWyprofesstaiaiteamyDuTIbebasedarour 

HeadquaitereintttelttiamCrDssOuttraMefexiensivelytoourretail 

outlets and offices throughout the U.K. 

If you 're educated to at least W level standard In a refcvanr 

nurrerate suQect enjcywsridng with peopfcwrdref^ the - 

'prospect of worfiig on a rrariety of software programmes and . 
their commercial applications this isa superb opportunfty. 

In the first instance send your career detafls to: Unda Blythe. 
Personnel Manager, Rumbelows Limited, TlrlrtfQr House, 

Trinity Lane, Waltham Ooss. Herts. 


RUMBELOWS 


BRITAIN’S 


MOST EXCITING 


PROFESSIONAL 


CONCEPT 


The CharterGroup Partnership has been launched as a 
Public Company to provide 120 medium-sized firms of 
chartered accountants with a central resource which will 
enable them, to compete on equal terms and in all 
professional respects with the major national and inter- 
national practices. 

The CharterGroup Partnership will pay particular 
attention to the training standards and marketing of 
member firms thereby improving the range and style of 
services offered by them to their clients. 

To ensure the success of The CharterGroup Partnership 
we wish to recruit wen experienced staff or the highest 
calibre. 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE £35,000-£55,000 


This is a Board level appointment for a Chartered Accountant with 
good commercial flair who can establish The CharterGroup Partnership 
in die market as a leading name in the accountancy profession. 

Liaising closely -with the Board on the selection of member firms, 
with the training directorate and the technical review staff the Chief 
Executive will need to be technically strong, commercially astute and 
fully able to appreciate the needs of member firms. • 

‘ An excellent administrator who can establish good press and 
public relations with the assistance of the Company's advertising and 


PR consultants the Chief Executive must have an enthusiastic 
approach to marketing for member firms and the Company. 

At the same time as providing full liaison and support for member 
firms, the Chief Executive must take responsibility for the budgets, 
financial disciplines and reporting systems of the Company; thereby 
ensuring a sound commercial basis for optimum profitability. 

This is a demanding role calling for exceptional communication 
skills and the ability to advise and -assist member' firms whilst 
managing a unique public company: 


TRAINING DIRECTOR 
£30,000-£40,000 


Playing a key role in the development of The CharterGroup the 
Training Director is most likely to be a Chartered Accountant with 
sound training experience gained either in the professional or a pro- 
fessional environment. 


TECHNICAL 
REVIEW STAFF 
£20,000^£30,000 


Establishing and running training courses and seminars for 
member firms, organising lecturers of the highest standard for student 
and CPE courses and seminars, and developing training material for 
member firms is an important part of this position. Keeping member 
firms folly conversant with courses and seminars and monitoring 
student progress is another area of responsibility. 

The establishment of regional training centres for student and 
CPE courses and seminars will be vital, as will the development of new 
training material and assistance to the Chief Executive in the develop- 
ment of client brochures and technical releases and technical and 
procedural -manuals for sale to member firms. 

There is also a need for attendance at University “milk rounds" 
and assisting member firms in student recruitment programmes and in 
the development of member firms’ staff recruitment brochures. 

This Board appointment calls for' strong administrative and 
organisational abilities combined with a positive attitude to successful 
training to the highest standards. 


Having established the format of a peer review checklist, the 
appointees will be travelling throughout the countiy visiting member 
firms’ offices to carry out review's on audit procedures, audit pro- 
grammes and quality' control disciplines. 

Chartered Accountants probably aged 27 to 34 with technical 
review' experience gained in a large firm will find this an interesting and 
rewarding opportunity' and will report on the results of reviews to the 
Chief Executive and Board 

High technical standards, good communication skills and the 
personal discipline to keep up to date on all aspects of audit work and 
work procedures are essential attributes. 



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Based in London's New Docklands, the suc- 
cessful applicants will be mobile as nation- 
wide travel to member firms will be art integral part 
of the job. 

Send full curriculum vitae, in the strictest 
confidence, to Martin Pollins, Chairman, Cornelius 
House, 178/160 Church Road, Hove, East Sussex 
BN3 2DJ. 


The CharterGroup Partnership 



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A WINNING TEAM 


yours aaeien 


ROBERT CHUCK 
PmbtBOaapctim: Coil Servant 
*The CM Service was 
Interesting but promotion 
was slow. Here the harder 
you work, the sooner you get 
to the top!" 


Join the Professionals 


ALANJDUNKLEY 
Promts Oauptm: 

HcW Manager 

'In Catering I was working tong 
hows for very tote reward. At 
Mariowe- Sqchs I find myself 
in a stimulating enviroirnera 
where hard work pays!* 



NIGEL HARPER 

Previous Occupation: Jeadter 
'One aspect of teaching! 
particularly enjoyed was die 
opportunity d meeting people 
. . . the difference at Marlowe- 
Sachs is that meeting people 
makes money!* 


PRESTON WHITFIELD 
Prpwus OaupatanoBanister 
1 enjoy working with a team 
of 'young professionals going 
places . . .Not only do! make 
my diem's money grow, but 
l*ve trebled my own income In 
just two years.' 


VIRGINIA FORTESCUE 

1 have worked ki a variety, of different sendee Industries, and 
ran my own business. At Msriowe-Sachsl Fee)] have Found my niche 
Here rm paid welt retain my hard-earned independence, and look 
to my mam interes- making money for Investors. 


Mariowe Sachs are intermediaries in the field of UnitTiusts, Pensions, Investments (onshore and 

Marlowe Sadis. 

28 GreviUe Street, 

London EON 8SU 

Tel: 01-242 2420 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCYAPPO 


Nationwide Appointments 

Openings for P.E. II Finalists, Newly Qualified and 
Recently Qualified Chartered Accountants in London, 
Home Comities, Birmingham? Bristol, Cardiff, E. Anglia, 
Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham, Sheffield, 
Southampton and Scotland. 

A special search can be made in the area of your choice, 
without charge or obligation. 


Overseas Appointments 

relocation in 1986. - 

We are currently recruiting for 

.Africa, Australasia, Can**, Cftribtoiv Em* 
H§ong Kong, Middle East, S. America and IiAA^ 


MILLS AND ALLEN MONEY BROKING 
(SERVICES) LIMITED 

This major financial services company in die City has openings 
for the following key personnel. 

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER 

- Range £25k - £3 5k 

To mana ge and control a' major telecommunications centre with 
a team of support personnel. Voice transmission experience is 
essentia] and a thorough technical knowledge of both speech 
and data communications is required. Major project 
management experience would be preferred. 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT MANAGER 

- Range £20k - £25k 

To provide technical support in a multi-supplier machine 
environment to development staff and management Relevant 
experience will include programming, data communications, 
database knowledge, software development and hardware 
evaluation. 

COMPUTER SERVICES MANAGER 

- Range £20k - £25k 

To provide, a professional service in all aspects of back office 
operations including computer centre. Previous computer 
operations management experience is essential and a 
development background is preferred. Candidates will need 
strong inter-personal skills to succeed in this role. 

The Company is a subsidiary of a U.K. PLC, with offices in all 
international financial centres. The working environment is 
demanding, and exacting. Potential candidates should therefore 
be resilient dedicated and be prepared to demonstrate 
exceptional leadership qualities. 

The above posts, in addition to normal company benefits, also 
cany the provision of a company car. 

Please reply in writing with current C.V. to: 

Mrs. E. Mbzley, Personnel Officer, 

Mills and Allen Money Broking (Services) limited, 
8th Floor, Adelaide Honse, 

London Bridge, London EC4R 9HN. 


01-623 1266 


Jonathan 


ren 


01-623 1266 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER £25,000 

FCA/FCCA with leasing experience and strong man-management skids. 

LEASING TECHNICIAN £25,000 

Highly competent piftingfetructuring specialist with 2/3 years experience of 
formulating medum/big ticket transactions. 

LEASING ADMINISTRATORS £Neg 

We seek ambitious administrators with strong documentation skffls for positions, 
ranging from big ticket to sales aid. 

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT £15,000 

ACA/ACCA, or exceptional finalist, to control fufl financial function reporting 
directly to the Financial Director. 

For the above 4 vacancies contact Peter Haynes or Jffl Backhouse. 

INVESTMENT ANALYST c£25,000 

A major international securities house is seeking to recruit a graduate, aged 25 
to 35, to join their Japanese equity research team. Although experience of this 
specific market is not. required, applicants must have two to three years' 
investment research experience within a stockbroking or institutional 
environment They must also be able to d e mon s tr a te good market sense and 
imagination in generating sales ideas, present wen to c Bents, and tie willing to 
make regular visits to Japan to conduct in-depth research. In addition to the 
earnings level incScated, a 'banking' benefits package is available. 

For the above vacancy contact Roger Steare. 

CREDIT ANALYSTS £12-£17,000 

A number of our clients seek to strengthen their marketing support function. We 
wiH be interested to hear from experienced credit people with a background in 
corporate, bank or country analysis. In most instances there wifi be the 
opportunity to move Into a marketing role. 

For the above vacancy contact David WfiBams. 

Ad applications will be treated in strict confidence. 


pnanianvvrc^ 

Recruitment Consultants * * 

170 Bishops gate, London EC2M 4LX. Tel: 01-623 1266 

Sales & Marketing 


DIRECTOR 

SALES AND MARKETING 

A new appointment by the Printing House of the University of Oxford. As 
a member of the Management Committee, the successful candidate wffl 
jom a prestige book and journal manufacturer recognised over the years 
as a market leader not only at home, but world wide. 

Responsibilities will include the effective management of Sates and 
Cus *°™ Br S®™? 088 * the development of market opportunities matched 
against available resources, plus business pfarmino In terms of annual 
budgets and strategic plans. 

Applicants of good education and background must have a record of 
success in Sales an d Ma rketing and the ability to work constructively at 
art levels. A salary, attractive for those already earning up to £20 000 
pa., is negotiable. Based in Oxford, relocation expenses are available 
where necessary, plus a company car and a range of substantial 
benefits. 

Please write, wtth CONCISE C.V. to: 

David A. Peters, rarai 

9, North Warren, M 

Aideburgh, 

Suffdk. I PI 5 5QF. 


ALEXANDER McKILLOP. CONSULTANTS 


A SALES OPPORTUNITY 
TO EARN £25,000+ p-a. 

Com hill Publications would like to talk to 
aniculaie, positive communicators capable of 
working on a range of prestige publications from 
our Covent Garden office. 

Call David Conway or Ben Crocker on 
01-2% ISIS 


PART TIME VAC ANCIES 

“WWICBI -MXWTARY. 
«ood m tymrm tor 

nnwB* library Wj. Pmerantu 
wim knowiMwaf iibm rasing. 
PROr wHcmun, 3«uv»*«k. 
gHtalVMMM Phone Oi- 


OfUOUATE TWUtOXS muired 
for young prtujmatva ptJMnii- 
ing company. FuU tramm 
flhen. SUrtin, salary £6.500- 
Tcwpnone 01-229 3088 act 
201 JutM Yaw 


FINANCIAL AND 
ACCOUNTANCY 


ACCOUNTANT - 
PART-TIME 

Mayfair magazine puftmnen 
require MmedMciy expert 
mad accountant to pnpn* 
montMy and auanerMy 

WMtmi ml accounts. £x- 

cniefii appornuwy in small 
expanding firm. Tetephone 
Francos Loach on 01-493 
2990. 


UMN8 /UBWMHTUWON ChM 

with banking qa. Eurngaan 
Oly aank. tii.Ooo pa. wg. 
01-404 4854 COrreffMr Agy. 
















D uring the 1980’s the management consultancy business 
has become an Increasingly competitive market place. 
At Touche Ross, we firmly believe our growth achievements 
over the past few years to have been significant, even 
impressive. 

The figures above may speak volumes about our recent 
past, but perhaps even more for our future, and for the future 
of people joining the company in 1986, when an even higher 
percentage growth increase seems likely. Clearly; opportunity 


providing reasoned, practical solutions to often complex 
assignments emanating from every aspect of business life. 
In this type of constantly changing environment you will be 
able to gain a much broader base of business experience 
than would have been possible from a pure line vole: . r 
An excellent training programme allied to a wealth of 
knowledge available from more experienced colleagues will 
help ensure your short and long-term success. Exceptional 
men and women are progressing to partnership In 3-4 years" 


is the key word of our proposition. Opportunity for constant and thrive in our open, informal structure which is geared to 
intellectual challenge. Opportunity for personal achievement, strategic seif direction. 


And opportunity for rapid career development 

This upward trend, jinked tc our commitment AT„ 
for excellence, creates a continuous require- u - 
ment for top-calibre people with a good Manage 

first degree and appropriate professional 

qualification, particularly in Accountancy or Economics. 


& Touche Ross 

Management Consultants 


The nature of our work is essentially problem solving; Tel: 01-353 8011. 


Salary will not present a barriet A company 

pRacg car is also provided. If you wish to consider 
" T j°* nin 8 us in London, Manchester or Glasgow 
A)nsuttanis please write or telephone in absolute confidence, 

to: Michael Hurton, (Ref 2654), louche Ross 

& Co n Hill House, 1 Little New Street, London EC4A 3TR. 


[tax 


TAX CONSULTANTS 

Contact us for probably the widest range of career opportunities in the 
Legal and Accountancy professions. 

Laurence Simons —Legal Profession 
Mark Brewer — Accountancy Profession 
Michael Page Partnership, 39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH. 


MkJiadftgeftrtnership 

International Recruitment Consultants 


b Marie Brewer — Accountancy Prof 

ael Page Partnership, 39-41 Parker Street, Loi 

Gabriel Duffy Consultancy 

INSOLVENCY 

A selection of current opportunities for Insolvency 
specialists in Public Practice. 

MANAGER Senior rale in Top SO London Firm. Pre? ACA/ACCA .to £2S£00 
MANAGER Top 20. London based prior to Midlands partnership c£20,000 
ASSISTANT Bristol office Wo B\ BANCWJPTCY. Manager potential Bug 

AOHHWSTTUTDG Top SO London Finn. Newly quafified to specialise? cEIS.000 


BaiKefeNeW^^SWiKy 
A member of the Addison PagyPLCgmup 

01-831 2000 



ADMHSSTTUTOfl Top SO London Finn. Newly quafified to specialise? c£1 6,000 

NMBNSTRATQR Bankruptcy & liquations. Top 20. Good prospects ei4,0Wt- 
ASStSTANT Mai 18 months experience required- Large City Firm £10-12,000 

■Fbr further details of these and other vacancies please contact Frances 
BeuvMc or Nccfci Comer on (01) 623 4295 or write to them at. Gabriel 
Duffy House, 17 St Switfiins Lane, EC4N SAL 


CREATIVE 

ADMINISTRATOR 

with a flair for systems 

c. £18,000 + benefits 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


WYCOMBE DISTRICT COUNCIL 

TECHNICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 
OFFICER 

£22/22 to £24,680 per annum (plus lamp sum ear allowance) 

Foflowlng the appointment of the existing posthokfer to a senior position 
with another Local Authority, appfications are Invited to fffl this key Chief 
Officer post in the corporate management of the CowiaTs structure. 

Wycombe District Council Is situated in beautiful countryside, in the 
County of Buckinghamshire, including the River Thames as the south- 
ern boundary. The District has a population of approximately 159,000 
covering art area of 125 square miles. A large part of the District is 
within the the Green Belt and the Chfitems area and there are mqny 
attractive villages, some of which have been designated conservation 
areas. Communications are excellent with the railway and M40 travers- 
ing the District, the latter giving easy access to the M25. 

The successful candidate wffl be proitessionaiiy qualified, having at least 
5 years experience in a senior professional capacity, and wffl direct and 
lead a team of senior professional officers, and be the Council's 
professional adviser in tire key areas of dvH engineering, including 
highways and sewerage (agencies), refuse, public cleansing, bunding 
control, car parks, transport, parks, sports centres, halls etc., and other 
essential services to the Council and the community. • 

Centred of . a mufti-mflfion pounds budget, leadership of a large 
profoessionai team and management of the Council's DLOs DEMANDS 
1MANAGEFUAL SKILLS OF THE HIGHEST ORDER and only those 
applicants with proven possession of these qualities will be considered. - 

Benefits include a kimp sum car allowance (at present E2.043 pa) with 
car teasing plus a generous relocation expenses' package. 

We are an equal opportunity employer. Application forms 
(s.a.e.) from Personnel Manager, Council Offices* Queen 
Victoria Road, High Wycombe, Bucks, HP11 IBB. 
Telephone 0494 26100 Ext 3122 

Closing Date: 23rd May 1986 


Preparations for expanding the 
Society’s services in 1987 have created 
a number of challenging and varied 
opportunities . . . none more so chan 
this one.in our growing Banking 
Division. 

Responsible for a pare of the Society's 
clearing operations, you will use your 
creativity and initiative to review and 
enhance our working methods and 
introduce computerised banking 
systems, whilst ensuring we maintain 
our high level of productivity, 
efficiency and customer service. 


f 


NATIONAL 

BUILDING SOCIETY 


Either a graduate or person qualified to 
a professional (eveLyour 
administrative experience, coupled 
with your creativity,, is crucial. Your . 
experience in money transmission 
must have been gained in a large 
financial organisation and indude at 
least five years in a supervisory role. 
Knowledge of computerised systems is 
essential, as are skilled negotiating and 
interpersonal skills. 

The negotiable salary is accompanied 
by the benefits expected of a large 
financial institution together with the 
usual company benefits induding re- 
location expenses where appropriate. 
Please send full career and salary details; 

as soon as possible, to Mr W Whitehead. 

Abbey National Building Society, 

Abbey House, Baker Street, 

London NWI 6XL 



Young Accountant 

career opportunity 


Central London 

Our efient one of the mcjst prestigious 
financial services groups, seeksa recently 
quafified accountant aged mid 20s. 

The essence of this varied and challenging 
rote is to control a small team prepwing 
financial and management Information for 
part of the group’s largest business area. 
This will provide an excellent introduction 
to the flnWx^^et^ and the opport u nity 
to demonstrate both accounting^^=j= 
and organisation skins. % {I 


£17-20,000 4 - benefits 

have the potential arto determination to 

P^gess rapidly within this group w 


Salary is negotiable and benefits 

non-contributory pension and sul 
mortgage. 

David Tod 

Ifl 01-405 3499 

^■■B^quotingref 















i Hb TIMES TH U K5pA V MaV 3 iy$6 


^HORlZONsl) 


A guide to career 
development 






A turn-up for the blue collar 


• • v - g^S iy th hj^ B Sv <a ^,^g With an increase in the 
,,, . . ... 'i ■ % ■ ' , — -r- 

• " ;• "rMS* ^ nznas1 ' ssmm ^ P° wer 

311(1 8131118 0fblue C0llar 

some ways resemble them. Since stnhw 

fl£Sff V !?*** y meet sooner or 
rater, that is bound to remove the social 

¥*S“* 81 taw in the UK, 
to many kinds of mann^ work. • 

Eton, often a sensitive indicator of 

SShii^ 86 ! k” b** a School .of 
“ ^ nown 10 states as the 
school of m a n i ac s — where pupils who 

2k mBI 5? d m tiiese matters can tinker 
23? *"* t00,s * 71181 and the 


■> 


k . 


work, interest in these 
jobs is growing fast 
Godfrey Goizen looks at 
a variety of the options 


!*; ^ '»• 

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jfits 


schoors highly regardedlrt department 
; is where Jonnah Behrens developed a 
: taac for carpentry which lay dormant 
. until be became dissatisfied with the life 
» a merchMt banker afto efeht years in 
the family firm. 

I By that time he was too old for an ap- 
prenticeship so he got a job as a 
maintenance man with a firm of boat 
nuuders m Teddington. “They, were just 
completing their feist wooden boat when 
I joined, bat there’s still an awful lot of 
carpentiy behind those fibreglass hulls." 
That was the work ■ to which lie 
progressed when be had demonstrated 
his abilities and he stayed with them for 
four years. “There wasn’t a lot of money 
m it — maybe eighty quid a week —but I 
learned a tremendous' lot," be says, “If 
you can work within the confined spaces 
and narrow tolerances ofa boat, you can 

build pretty much any thing .** 

Domestic carpentry came easily after 
that and it was one cube skills he offered 

The plumber’s job is 
acquiring a new status 

when he set up on his own as a general 
handyman in 1980. His starting costs 
were quite modest “I had quite a lot of 
tools already and I bought a circular saw 
— you need to be able to work quickly if 
you’re ‘ doing this - sort of thing 
commercially." 

There was no problem, about getting 
work. “I^e never had to advertise. Any 
number of friends and friends of friends 
needed work done on their houses. If you 
advertise you’re apt to gel jobs you don’t 
much want to. do." He has kept his 
relationships on a businesslike footing, 
though. He charges an hourly rate based - 
on labour. and materials, though he- 
admits that on bigger assignments, when 
be is asked to give a quote, it can be diffi- 
cult to estimate the time element in 
advance — if you under-estimate, it is 
you who has to foot the bHL 

There is also a »«srwnit aspect to his 
work. Mid-summer and the early, 
months of the year tend to be quiet, 
whereas in spring and autumn he often 
has more to do than be can comfortably 
handle. In order to get a more even flow 
— and because ofhis interest m designing 
as well as making things — be is turning 
to producing furniture So for this has 


consisted , of one-offs "for private dients, 
'but he is now preparing some prototypes 
for Conran winch may mark the begm- 
ningof a new phase. 

when he first began be worked from a 
studio near his house in Putney, but as 
business - grew be moved to a sharwa 
workspace in the East End. “It’s much 
better for suppliers,” he says. “You can 
get anything there, more or less round 
the corner. In feet we run an additional 
trade of our own, supplying British 
hardwoods to other craftsmen." HBs next 
step will be to move out of Ten don 
altogether and he is now looking for an 
old house in the country to do up. “One 
of the advantages of this business is that 
once you’ve built up your contacts, you 
can operate more or • less from 
. anywhere." 

That was certainly true for the gold 
and silversmith Ernest Blythe. When the 
lease on the Shepherds Market premises 
■ that he shared with his partner Hances 
Beck ran out, they simply moved to 
Buckingham, whore they bought and 
renovated an old pub. They now work in 
what used to be the cellar. “It pro vide* 
the two things you most need in our 
craft. Security and lots of room,”- he says. 

Security is mostly required for work in 
progress. They generally have a number 
of pieces on the go at the same rinn* 
ranging from individual rings to major 
pieces like the trophy they fterign<»d for 
the winner of foe Whitbread round-the- 
world yacht race. The publicity that kind 
of commission brings, plus the feet that 
thqy have won a number of major 
international competitions means'foat 
they can do without advertising. 

He and Beck split the work between - 
them. “She does the desig n* , I mostly 
make from them. We also use some 
outworkers for specialist tasks tike 
setting the potishing stones.” He keeps in 
contact with them on his trips to London 

— be travels up at least a couple of times 
a week to buy bullion and gemstones. He 
and Beck also have to keep an eye cm 
fashions. "The Royal Eknrily is a 
tremendous influence," he says. “When 
Princess Diana takes to wearing sap- 
phires, everyone wants them.” fhangK 
m taste also mean that some of their 
work consists of altering existing pieces 

— though they try to discourage clients 
who want to take apart what are 
sometimes unique pieces of Victorian . 
jewellery. 

Blythe says that you don't needs lot of 


capital to get started as a goldsmith and 
that the tools can last a lifetime. 
Nevertheless the fejlure rate among 
makers is very high. “It’s extremely 
difficult to estimate costs on an elaborate 
piece until you have some experience of 
bow much time something like that is 
going to take." 

Blythe by training and Behrens by 
inclination were quick to focus on what 
they were best at Xtisca Cantacuzmo 
feels she is getting there now with her silk 
screen designs for scarves and etched 
windows. These two apparently dispa- 
rate themes are related because they both 
depend on the effect of light on 
materials. 

She was not trained as a designer, 
though she comes from a family where 
interest in design has always been strong. 
Her father is Sherban Cantacuzmo, an 
architect and writer who is now Secretary 
of the Royal Fine Arts Commission. She 
reads En glish, but she doesn’t think that 
her lack of formal training is a handicap. 
“There are things I missed out on, 
obviously, but if you come to design 
from outside you bring to it a freshness 
that can get dissipated in the schools.” 

Training came by doing. She has 
worked a lot with Johnny Gray, a kitchen 
designer — and nephew of Elizabeth 
David — who led the trend away from the 
stark, laboratory-like kitchens that were 
popular in the early seventies. Through 
him she got her mst really important 
commission, designing windows for the 
architectural historian Charles Jencks- 

That was followed by a period when 
she tried to spread her wings by working 
with a partner. “Part of the object was to 
motivate each other," foe says. “Motiva- 


For the financially secure 
motivation can be a problem 


lion cad be a problem if you're 
financially secure and also have other 
responsibilities — it’s a middle class 
dilemma,. in feel" She now thinks they 
tried to do too much, too quickly. Tfc 
tried to be designers, manufacturers and 
retailers and in the process got involved 
in aspects of business they didn’t know 
enough about. 

For instance, they rightly felt they 
ought to be doing mail order selling, but 
they that they the 

amount of pre-planning that was in- 
volved to do foul successfully. They 
overlooked the feet that you have to 
have a product that can be easily 
described or illustrated within foe con- 
fines of a limited budget. 

She now works on her own from home 
and relies on word of mouth and a well 
produced portfolio of work to show 
potential clients. So what advice does she 
have for the many people who, like 
herself want to break away from 
conventional career paths? “Just do it," 
foe says bluntly. “But don't spend too 
much money setting it up. After that, it's 
only by malting mistakes and learning 
from them that you can develop foe 
confidence in your own ability that you 
need to give your work some direction." 




outside London 

Birmingham. Bristol. Leeds. Manchester. Nottingham. Southampton. 


Pnc^WatertHHJseoffersyouttiechancetoloma 
regional office witfiina rapidly expanding U.K. Tax 
practice. This exciting development within a large 
international accountancy practice is an idea) 
opportunity for VAT specialists. You will receive six 
months training in London with an experienced team 
of tax partners and consultants. You will then have the 
opportunity toestablish a new function at a regional 
office, with expert technical bapk-up from our 
centralised resource in London. • 

You should have either HM Customs and Excise 
training and experience, at SEO or HEO grade, or 
an accountancy or legal qualification. Successful . 
candidates will have already gained substantial VAT 
experience, wide practical knowledge of the relevant 


legislation and must have the ability to communicate 
with senior management 
‘ Candidates, likely to be aged about 30, will be 
offered an attractive salary including a London 
weighting or accommodation allowance during the 
period of training and later where appropriate a 
relocation allowance Those appointed at managerial 
level will be offered a car. 

Please write, in confidence, with detailed CV to: 
JohnRJownend, 

Price Waterhouse, 

SouthwarkTowers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London SE19SY 


Price Hateriiou.se 







into Practice .. . 

London Salaries up to £ 30,000 

w r^^Wnml^onaltJracrices are seeking K> aged between 26 and 35. The successful candidate 

capitalise ' wouldpreferably M pnd (relevant teeperi^* of 
CXpana in foe financial community, financial institutions either from within or from a 

iff 00 Scoffer excellent career oppor- specialist rote in a practisrogfttmandbe ready id apply 

Xjjese could Accountants with their knowledge to a wide range of audit/invesrigaaons 

amities to ambinous^ w L ose specific market assignments and develop, the firm's business in this 

couidmhMce. and esdtingsectm- of ie economy. 

7 l ^ je “Sl r m v ran pe of skills and add new impetus Remuneration "packages would be competitive and 

prospects of partnership excellent. 

. . * f r ort ^ cr and most dynamic of Applicant should -write, enclosing a full Curriculum 

Our client is one offoe large* involve- Vitae, quoting ref. PD2000 to Nick Bakez^ FCA, 

foe mtenraaonal atmma and they PubEc Practice Division, 39/41 Parker Street, 

jpent in banking and . number London WC2B 5LH or telephone him on 

Oil 01-8312000. 

of commerriaBy minded, ambitious ALAS, 




Michael Page Partnership 

International Rmuirrrx^Qxistilianis 


A members} the Addison FbgHQpwp 



BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY APPOINTMENTS 


Young accountants for the 
“Big Bang” 


Imminent City deregulation has resulted in extraordinary opportunities for 
newly qualified accountants. There is considerable scope for rapid 
promotion and exposure to the new global banking environment 


Timing is critical and those interested in finding out more (even if only to 
reject this area as an option) should call us on the number below to 
arrange for an informal discussion with one of our consultants while 
these entry level positions are still available. 


Listed below are a selection of our current vacancies designed to give a 
"flavour" of the market 


US Investment Bank: EC2. c. £30,000 package. ACAfe 24-27. 

UK Merchant Bank: EC4. £28,000 package. ACAfe/MBAfe. 

Venture Capital: City. £ Neg. ACAS+ commercial experience. 

US Commercial Bank: EC4. £20,000+ mortgage. Newly Qualified ACA/ACCA’s. 
Financial Control: International bank. £20,000+ benefits. ACA/ACMAfe. 
Management Accounting: UK bank. £20,000+ benefits. ACMA preferred. 
International Audit: US bank. £18,000+ mortgage. ACA Newly Qualified. 

US Securities House: EC2. £22,000 package: Related experience essential. 


Interested applicants should contact Keith Allen or David Ryves on 
01-930 7850 or write to the address below with brief details. All enquires 
will be taken in strictest confidence. 


Robert Walters Associates 

Recruitment Consultants 

66-68 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4RF. 
Telephone: 01-930 7850. 


r 

9 

it 


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You don’t 
need to 
join the 
Air Force 
to fly high 



Ambition and the desire to 
succeed leads people in 
many different directions. 

But all high-fliers need 
excellent equipment and 
resources-and, above all, 
first class training- 

Trident Life, part of one of 
the world's largest financial 
groups, needs more successful • 
sales people to increase the 
power of its presence in the field. 

To those who have the personal 
qualities and will to succeed, we 

offer ab initio training, up-to-date products, and a remuneration 
package which takes the lid off your earning capacity from foe word go. 
You don't have to be currently in sales (any more than you'd have to be a 
pilot to join foe RAF), but if yoji are-fine. Either way, you'll find that the 
combination, of our methods and your commitment can open the door to 
undreamed of success in a career you may never have considered. Also, 
opportunities exist in all areas of foie country. 

If you would welcome foe challenge of a career where rewards are 
directly related to your ability and enthusiasm, then, if you’re aged 28 to 
50 and can demonstrate maturity det e r m ination and a record of 
sustained success in your current undertaking, find out how to become a 
high flier with Trident Life. 

Write or 'phone: 

Terry Fielding-Smifo, 

Sales Director, Trident Life 
Assurance Co. Ltd., 69 London 
Road, Gloucester 0452-500500. : r~. , , : 7 • 

A menjtjer of the Laureraan Cioup of Companies Wdeitt Life ABURSCS CofflpOiy Limited 


Trident Life 


Retail Operations Controller 

c£25k + car ' 

* Professional Merchandising and imaginative retailing flair have 
created sustained growth and ambitious but realistic Business 
Objectives for our client, a 60 branch specialist retailer of accessories 
for the home 

* Th e-requirement is fora retailer; a well-schooled growing 
professional with a demonstrable empathy for retailing and a trader’s 
instincts and possessing sound house-keeping skills. 

* The task is to manage and control the Retail Business at branch level 



stores operations are maintained and developed. 

* An attractive, results linked remuneration package of c£25k + car is 
offered with a Directorship envisaged in the near terra. The Board 
see this new appointment as a career opportunity 

Please write in complete confidence to The Managing Director. 

Tanstead Associates Ltd 


executive search 

& SELECTION 


Infest End House 
11 Hills Place. London WiR lAG 

01-430 1881 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTES OF 

DC MEESTER DESIGN LTO 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 

Holler a hnk, glvra thai thr 
crMwre d I hr abovroamM 
Company. Mhca m bring valiai- 
Evtty wound up. arr nraiprcd. on 
or brfonrSOMav 1986. lo wnd In 
Omt Ml OmMua and wnonti 
thro- j aai mct ana gnowns. 
Ml partmitan of tlwi drOM or 
damn, and Hr namn ana ad- 
dracr* « Bwi 8000 lor. ill «yv 
to inr undrrngwd DAVID JU- 
LIAN BUCHLEP FCA Of Amur 
Amanra 6 Co. P O Bo* 56 I 
Surrey StrvM. Lonoon was 
2NT. I hr Liaiadaior for Ihr vud 
Company, and. if so reoouro ov 
now* in wnnag from mr umj 
LMHO dJMr. personally or r» thru 
Sosolon. 10 comr m and xi»* 
Efmi d»MS or CIPIM af turn niw 
and piarn aa shall Da tp««<fl*a in 
nurtl nouen. Of in drtauU UmM 
they wUI Da noudN from <ha 
Moeffl of any (KSnOuqon nude 

be f ore wen MB are pro*M. 
Dated IMS 1TM1 day of April 


IN THE MATTER OF 

BROCKBRIDGC UMTTJEZJ 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 

None* 8 hereby given mat the 
rredbore of the above-named 
Compa n y- wNdi n Demg vonm- 
larily wound up. are rewdred- on 
or before me 6U1 d» of June 
1966. 10 MM In Ihefr Ml Chets- 
Dan and surname*. their 
aanre m ee and drempuora. M 
immcmart of then- debts or 
atauns. and the name* and aa- 
dnnnol Dior Sobcuors iM any), 
lo the undeeMpned IAN DAVID 
HOLLAND. of KJOSONS. 
COLUMBIA HOUSE. 69 
ALDWYCH. LONDON WC38 
4DY. the IJmmliUnr of the wd 
Company, and. H so required ay 
nonce W wnlinp from the said 
uomdaior. are. personally 01 oy 
mar Solicitor*. 10 come m and 
prove mao- debts or dawn* el 
such him and place as shall oe 
reeciHed m such nonce, of in de- 
fault thereof they will be 
nertuded from the nenefn of any 
fbstnDuiion mane before wen 
MU are proved. 

QaiSed DUS 88U1 day of aprIL 
1986. 


THE COMPANIES ACT V98* 

PARLIAMENT STEEL LIMITED 

NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN, 
pnanl to arenon 688 d me 
Companies Ad 1986. Dial a Meet 
lop of lf»e CredMsn of Die above- 
named Company v»UI he field ai 1 

Surrey Street lonoon. WC2R 
2 nt on (he isi day 01 May 1986. 
at 1130 O'clock In the lore noon, 
for the p ur poses mentioned in sec- 
tion 689 and 690 of me saw aci. 

dated an i Tin da- of abth 

1986 

By Order of the Board 

ft. VALENTINE 


RE ORDCN STEELS R.K1 LIMIT- 
ED FORMERLY LIDCELL 

STEEL SUPPLIES LTD. BV OR- 
DER OF THE HIGH COURT 
DATED THE 28TH JANUARY 
1986 NEVILLE BCXLEY FCA. 
Of 533. BRIGHTON ROAD. 
SOUTH CROYDON HAS BEEN 
APPOINTED LIQUIDATOR OF 
THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPA- 
NY WITHOUT A COMMITTEE 
OF INSPECTION 

DATED AOTH APRIL 1966 


HE rtCA TRANSPORT LIMIT. 
CD BY ORDER OT THE HIGH 
COURT DATED THE 22ND Oc 
TOBEH 1983. NEVILLE ECKLFY 
FC-A. OF 333 BRIGHTON 
ROAD. SOUTH CROYDON HAS 
BEEN APPOINTED LlOUCDA 
TOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED 
COMPANY WITHOUT A COM- 
MITTEE OF INSPECTION. 

DATED 29TH APRIL 1986. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARTTY COMMISSION 

Charily ■ Natl If Eleanor Smirk 
Hr me Mntnittf 
sl BartnoioiMw's ho&prbl 

The Charity CHimDfMnm mb- 
omr 10 mane an Onw aptmming 
Hufsere of Un» Chanty. Conn of 
the mail Oroer may Oe ooiamed 
from [hem iref oo?ai| . 
13 38- LSI at Si. AibanS House 
S7-60HaymarWI. London sw iv 
“Ox. Oshmk ana swmm 
may be will in mom wuhm one 
monui from today. 


Coadsaei on MM page 


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■3 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


Afl dbjnficd advcnucmcnis 
on be accepted by te l ep ho ne 
(caccpi Announcements). The 
deadine is 5.00pm 2 days prior 
to publKauon tie 5-OOpm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you ■raft io send an advertise- 
■mm hi writing please include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If you have any 
queries or probl em s relating to 
your advertisement once it has 
appeared, please contact our 
Customer Services Department 
tv telephone os 01-481 4100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MV SON nearly IS. normal But 
Rodino conce n tr a tion tn dam 
durxruii. will on ruioreO nnd 
Kit yr fort©* levels ip 
S tSwIand. parents with SCT U- 
tar HNS RCfttV- IO BOX G27 

TV RESEARCHES prepartog con- 
sumer daromentara on tanMing 

RW ***W nutaPVaaorr ns 
totner nepenOKn 01 Arms 

soeoawono m urtt kuchcav. Re- 
ply to BOX B65 
tO MM AMDOBOH SfECUL - 
May 1946 sod Top. smooth 
runner, uwfl. nay owner, of- 
fer! 0959 74519 
■MAYFAIR BOVS’ Harley. Wd- 
mcT. LURUbir. Jenkins. 

Reearctwr srns (ntnemanoa. 
rmunoemm BOX GS4 
THE ALEXAKOER MSTTFUTE 10 
Balderton Si . London wi Tri 
OI 039 6183. 

CASSANDRA Please phone 
01*55 01900 


SERVICES 


FIND NEW nUTFMERS thru* 
Hedl Fnfer hilroducuons. 
5 lA.E 14 Beaurfiamp PI. SW3. 
01357 6066 High success rate. 
Men 4006 m tUvnand. 

HAVE YOU THOUGHT OF actnnr 
mg WoedlaiHl for amendy 
investment. We olln- genuine 
adv ice to those wtstang to enjoy 
ownenmp. Many properties 
grplUlp. mrouetioul IW LlK. 
Tree lands. TM 0566 51948. 

CAUBRE CVS proteswonalty 
written and produced cumtu- 
turn nhr doewnenb. Details: 
01-580 2959. 

TV SERVICES. Shoo and cal 
Transformation. 428 Bury Old 
Road. Pmiwich. Manchester. 
Tel: 061-773 1519. 

SELECT PROEMDS Exduwve to- 
iroduetMRS for the uiutuchcd. 
58 Maddox Street. London Wl. 
Telephone 493-9957 

COMPANY COLF Davs organised 
for staff or rurt ca pers An y lo- 
cation Tel 0734 077722 

SP RIWO T1 M E THIS YEAR coUkl 
Dr ready feauuf id for your fam- 
ily emectaOy if a proDteiu- 
annkmg loved one recants 
effective and recomwed treat- 
ment for ttns illness ai Clows 
House which is set in beeuttfut 
and sectuded surroundings. For 
Illustrated prospectus, contact 
The Life Anew Trust. Freepost. 
Satobury SP3 6BR or 074783 
6S6 

FRIENDSHIP, Lost or Marriage. 
All ages, areas. DaleUne. Dent 
tQiC» 23 AButgnon Road. Lon- 
don W8. TcL 01-938 lOll. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US VISA MATTERS E S Gudeon 
LS lawyer 1 7 BuWrodc SI Lon- 
don w 1 01 486 0813 


WANTED 


LARGE WARDROBES A Mirrors. 
Desks. Bookcase etc A Pre 1940 
furmlure Tee 01585 0148 or 
01-228 2716 day or mqhL 
FJL CUP Tickets wanted. 
WlmMfedon Tickets Best Prices 
pmd 103221 330308 
FA CUP and Wimbledon tickets 
wanted plus debentures Best 
prices nans. Ol 225 0857 
FA CUP FINAL. WIcnMedoo tuck- 
ets wanted Top price* paid on 
Ol 701 8283 iTI 
F A CUF TICKETS A Wimbledon 
HcfcetsJiougM and Sold. 01-486 
1596 

WIMBLEDON TtCXETS required 
Ol 928 1775. 


FOR SALE 

CLVHDESOURNE TICKETS 

•mod required from 6 (twit stall 
tickets opening rugtii 128 Mayi 
Sma- Boctancya In eqmva- 
lent on etthcr 30 May. 4 June. 6 
June. 1! June. Ring 01 388 
2424 ejctn 2284. 


NUTS M MAT. Ui u rp eata ble as 
price roes inevitable. CEC pro- 
BranHMe Video £319 14m col 
£>59. Remote £(99. Whttxl 
stocks Iasi Tops 91 Lower 
SkMneSLSWl 01-7300953. 

■NMBTS OF NETTLEBED. Com- 
plete furnishing sc h emes tn me 
nenod style Finest quality rep- 
bca lu r n tmre from our own 
workshop. £2 mutton stocks. 
NemeBfd 104911 641115. 

Bournemouth i0202> 29368a 
Tamtam 1039287) 7445. 

Berkeley. Gtov (0463) 810952. 
NWH1 quality wool carpets At 
trade prices and under, also 
available lOCTi mflra. Large 
room size remnants under half 
normal Drier Chancery Carpets 
Ol 405 (MSS 

CANCELLATION 2 super seats for 
Monte carlo Grand prw includ- 
ing attractive vhia apartment 
lor t week - negotiable. Can 
01035 93 369281. 

BWIV DAY! Box is let Tickets 
and box for 8 people pits car 
Ptekmg for 2 cars. For further 
details letephane; 10572) 
377161. 

THE TIMES. 1795-1908. Other 
hues avail. Hand bound ready 
tor presentation also 

"Sondaw £12 -SO Remember 
When. 01468 6323. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT, Cats. 
Slarnghi Exp. Chen. Les Mts. 
All iheaire and snorts 
T*t: 821-6616. 8280498. 

A -Ex visa ■ Dmcn- 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cota 
Me setts etc. Nationwide 
detlvertes. Tel: (OSBOi 860039 
tWBM 

SEATPMDERS Any event Inc Les 
Mis. Govern Gan. SarUghl Exp. 
Wimbledon. Ctvndebourne. Ol- 
B28 I67B. Ma)or credit cants. 
*N®°*ER TABLE. Riser Wrung. 
60 By 3ft Stale. Jews. Vtaorl- 
Ml. £700 Ono. Teh 0739 
810262 

W WIFT i em , CATS, Starlight 
Exp. Chess. Les Mts AU meatre 
end sport Tel 631 3719. &57 
1715 AU motor crvdH cants. 
F-A CUP B WIMBLEDON TMwM 
fteughl and SoM Telephone: 
01-930 0277 Ol 930 0698. 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS. * 

Sought and said. Tri 01-881 
3347 or 01791 2286 


ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRfTANNKA 

lah^ESdSTSJ 

£1200. Absolutely as new * 
£660. 01499 6411 


RESISTA 
CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFFERS 

Wlcandm CMrlcoplaM TBes. 

deem natural only £8 96 
w* yd * VAT. Wool milt 
Berber carpets dm wide 
Hesuui backed C4 36 per sq 
yd + VAT. While stocks task 
2S5 New Kinds Road 
Tamos Green. SW6 

Tel: 01-731-2588 

Free MttmaWH 
Expert ntung. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


■nTRDATDUE T GtWWOHM 
an angmai Times reewspapa* 
dated me vciy day they were 
Born. £12.80 0492-31303. 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


NAWOMC ■ CARGO 

iGekmrmatsen): Private codec 
lor wanes io amuse of sbuh 
Q uantin' lea down saucers. 
0641 80448 

COLO A SILVER Stomp repUHl 
roHectKm. sonny Unnied issue. 
092 82 2123 evenings 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 



THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

London's leading spectatM In 
new and restored pianos for the 
largest genuine selection avail- 
able 30a Mgngaie Rd. NWS. 
01-267 7671. Free catalogue. 
PIANOS* HJLANE A SONS. New 
and reconaittoncd Oimw at 
reasonable prices 326Bnphton 
Rd . S. Croydon 01488 3513 


Give Direct 
To Cancer 
Research 


pg dptifSOsoenoso. 
gi doaenand Kdbnoas 
W mqoroun Uxxaranev, 
anx^Peiif year doamon or 
hjRcypBestfinBahm nsctdi 
Sad taEOl Bn 13, Roan Sh. 
Until bn ftKb. Landba VCW UK 


yachts, planes & 

SPORTING 


maos M SPAIN. Lew Head's 
exclusive Temw vSin offers 
Utahns. 1 bedroom and 2 bed- 
room ap a rtment s for sale in 
idyntc sorroondirg* on the Cos- 
ta M Sol. For details of 
mspectWa fhonts and Brices, 
letephane or write Bilan 
Gilmore. Snorttftme Marketing. 
Courier House. Lnshtmr Ore*. 
cenL Weston- super -Mare. 

Avon. BS24 9JL. lelephooe 
0934 812642 


CLUBS 


MEDICAL SECRETARY i58L of- 
fers wide ■ et tp n rau e. good 
skills London area. Please tel 
Winchester 6962] after 7 pm. 

YOUMC CHELSEA BflfPCI dub 
and school '18-JO age pvopl 
Tel. 01573 1665 


SHORT LETS 


WIMBUDOtt. June. -tpty-Aug. 
dbt mi IOIN lit author's friendly 
Use. £100 tor 2 p.w. Inc break- 
fast: or £70 for 1. Tel Chve Ol 
643 0073 

HYDE PARK ST. W2. 2 bwdnn 
nai wtm tin. Avan now m end 
July or longer. 0286 75267 
LUXURY SE RVIC IUI FLATS, 
central London from £525 pw. 
Ring Town Hse Ape 373 3453 
LUXURY SERVICED Apartments 
near Stoane Square. Aabion 
worth Ltd Ol 581 8008.17) 
SERVICED APAimHEMn In 
KmartgCon Col TV 24hr swbd. 
Ux. Coffllngham Apts 373 6306. 


FLATSHARE 


M SUNNY BLOOMSBURY FLAT 

bean Mid double roo m to let 
£70 me exrcgf own phone. Gas 
coal lire. basm. v quiet, share k 
& b 3 l\. Ol 242 7711. 


MARVLEBDHE p rot ewtanal per- 
son required io share with 1 
other, o wn d nuMe roam, near 
station. £7000 pw exclusive. 
Tel Ol 724 0059 alter 6 30pm 


SU N g r ow IH A I) Tube. O. r m 
spacious luxury CH flat with toe 
garden tor Prof F. n. i £300 
pent met. 249 3666 aft 7 JO pm 


UUNMERSMmL Lovely roam tn 
family house COS pw inclusive. 
Tea. 602-4312. 


ML Lor o<r tn new dec tee. 
CH. 15 irons Centre Oty. £53 
PW UKL Tet 01-902 2603. 

WJ. 2 in f to share lux hse. ot. 
gdn. nr tube. £130 £170 
pem exet. Ol 993 3389 evens 
w. KENSINGTON Prof M/F for 
super Oik flat, nr tube. £46 
pw excL Tel: Ol 381-6398. 

CMSWKK prof. reUable male, 
req to share charming gdn flat 
nr river stilt ' other. Own 
room, ch £49 60 pw Tet 994 
7911 before 1 200 hra 
FRED A TERRE SW6. Monday - 
Friday. O R In tunny CH QaL 
Close Time. bus. shops. Suu 
N S mate £55 Per week. Tet 
01 731 6102. 

STJONMS WOOD. Lux bed strung 
room in ML Suit praf person. 
Nryhots 3 transport. Avail 
12th May. £55.00 p.w 01-289 
9466 

CHELSEA SMfS - Prof m or f 27 
+. n. l to share spacious lux (lai 
nr Stoane Sq. o t. £40 pw. 589 
7779. 

CHISWICK prof gentleman, rang* 
like dogs, lux houS* O R. CH. 
Gdn. nr lupe and buses. £46 pw 
tod 01 994 4795 
CLAPHAM COMMON / Baiter- 
sea. Share bouse. Own targe 
room £46 p w. Prof ooty.-TeL 
Ol 228 5031 

PLKURSC HWL SHARE anait- 
ment. professional person. 
Meats if required. Bristol (0272) 
744296 

FLATMATES Selective Siartns- 
Well estab uiiroductocy service. 
Pise tel tar appt 01-589 asoi. 
313 Brampton Road. SW3 
NS. o r. wash mash. PtccadlBy 
Use or 4 stops Moorgste. T.v 
and video. £160 p-Cjil btOsex- 
tr a. tan ung Tel 01-559 2811. 
MLT0TT CRT HD. 3rd person to 
share enormous CH RaL All 
lacs. £225p.m. nhn bflb. , 
TSL636 7672 altor Tpju. | 
NR IU C I MUR ID BRHWE prof 
m f.-n .-s. 2630. o/r ana share 
of comtortable tunne. £42.00 
pw excI Tet 01-892 3247 
HWio ugM sunny tUL prof 
M F. 25+. N.-S. O/RM. £145 
p.C-ra. CXCI. Tel 01 961 4320 
(Aft er 7.0 0p mt 

NWS PCED A TERRE Acnmunn- 
datton nr. Tube. Mon-Thur. 
Comfortable O/R. £36 nw to 
pieasant Fist. Tel: Ol 267 6580 
PUTNEY HEATH SW1S prof F. 
n M r tn tux flat. £«8pw ind. 
(Day) Ol 3Q3 6239 x 201: 
( Eves) Ol 788 6896. 

BATTERSEA Prof person for 
shared flat. O/R. £160 pom 
end 2233835. 

CHEUEA ton c.h. Large o/r 1 
prof#r. n.s. 21 +. Refv.ro. 
£260 00 ncm- toe. 01-360 8615 
CLAPHAM prof f. sh flat o, r. c < h. 
£165 pem Ind. nr buhe. pool. 
Tel: 720 8966 eve» 

CLAPHAM. Prot m/f n/s shr Ige 
mxd hse £138 pun. excL Tel 
01-720 2SS6 after 6 pm 
DULWICH pm to shr* true hse. 

13 mins city £55 tLW. TeL628 
oioid EUzatoetn/693 SSISeva 
FMD-A-FLAT tSbartng/Rental) 
home -owners no fee 36 Kings, 
Rd. SW3 01-684 8012 
FULHAM SWS prof. F. O/R. 
Lovely flat £180 pm excluatve. 
768 9622 tOI T36 6298 VHV 
HAMPSTEAD prof m n,s o/r In 
imu rial £160 P c m. excL 
Phone 794 Mrs lafter 7 p.m.1 
lUWOllT SH I IIPOE FLAT. Stm 
large rm with male <22 yrsk 
£29 pw. 01-684 8635 
MARIE VALE Prof temple to shr 
good flat dose io tune N/S 
■O R £46 pw. 286 2364 time. 
STRCATHAM near Station. Mod 
ernlULO-R CIBOpcm all met 
674 1670 after 7 pro. 

**». 3rd person Ige rm. Own 
TV IO nun BR'tube £160 
pr.m. Tel Otve 01-643 0073. 
SWH CLAPHAM Own room to 
house. 3 months only. £130 
PCm excL T/H- 01 223 6101. 
TUFNCLL PARK MIR. Large 
room to family house. £40p.w. 

Tel 01 272 7620.- 
U /NORWOOD 2 n«L 2 F or cpie. 
rtose HR. igp lux flat. £90 pem 
each exc. Tel: Ol 771 0672 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


. MAY/JUKE 
REDUCED 

f«W tr £49 

NAPLES £S9 

MCE era 

P«J«A £69 

ATJBKS £79 

GgRONA £7Slttl 
LISBON £79 

MALAGA £89 

raRFU *£gg 1 

TBL AVIV £119 , 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
. London W 1 H 4 DH. 


CHEAP FUCIIR WaridwMr. 
Ring HTT 01-930 2455. 


DISCOUNT FARES Worldwide 
Jirouer Travel 01-734 l&i2 


NEW YORK £250 rtn. Rome 
JU iSnn Europa ox *57 szos. 


USA from £99. Malar travel. Ol 
486 9257. 1ATA 

uikiuiiiuis on raghts/nots 
to Europe. USA 6 man destm- 
- Hans. Diplomat Travel. 01-730 
2201. ABTA IATA ATOL 


LOWEST ADWARES Florida. 
Jamaica N. York. Toronto. 
Atnca. India. Far Last 01-737 
2162 0669 ABTA. 


CHEAPEST FUSHTS W/WWE • 

Benz Travel Tel Ol 386 6414. 


CHEAP . FU6HTB Worldwide. 
Haymarket 01-930 1366. 


CKW FLMHTE Worldwide.' 
HaymarttM 01-930 1366. 


LOW FARES WOftUnnDC - 

USA. S America. MM and Far 
East, s Africa Trayvale. os 
Margaret StreeL Wl. Ol 580 
2928 i visa Accepted) 

N/ YORK MtaDU LA. Cheapest 
fans on major U& scheduled 
earners. AHo transaUanik* 
charters A Hiatus to Canada Ol 
684 7371 ABTA. 

ROUND WORLD £796 econ CMb 
fr £1699. First ir £2036. Syd- 
ney lr £669 rm. Ootumbus. 
Cutters Gardens, to Devonshire 
Squire. EC2. Ol 929 42S1. 
CAMARW8 DNRBA Oreece. Stm 
Hat 82F. sandy beaches. 3.10 
17 May -Oct fr £139 Bb. 
Lunarscape 01-441 0122 smut. 
WSCOUNTS 1st /Economy tick- 
ets Try us UtSL FLIGHT 
BOOKERS 01-387 9100. 
MIAMI. J AMAICA. M.VORK. 
Worldwide cheapest fans. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke SI 
Richmond ABTA Ol 940 4073 
RELIABLE LICENSED 6 Bonded 
low cost flight experts: Europe 
A W wide Freedom Holidays 
01 -741 4686 ATOL 432 IATA 
SPAM, PORTUGAL, GREECE. 
FTWhn from thus* VjX nlrpom. 
Many late snecui often. Fatdor 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUMSIA For that per f ect holiday 
with stmny days & carefree nts. 
Ideal SnrtngL Sdnuner-Tuntstan 
Travel 01-573 4411. 

USA, CANADA, AND EUROPE. 
LOWEST AM FARES. AHO 
Chib and Fmt BEStfare oi 
394 1642. AM! 1400 
ALI C ANTE. Faro. eu:. 

Dtmood Travel ATOL 1783- 
01-581 4641. Horsham 68541 
AUSSIE. NJE.. Sooth Africa. 

L S.A. Hong Kong. Best Fame 
01-493 7775 ABTA. 

ECUADOR TRAVEL spedaU** in 
Latm America & Europe air 
fares. TeL- 01 437 7534 ABTA- 
LA MAHOA fhghB Oswlck IO 
. Murcia. Beach Bay Hobdays- 
Tei 0432 270185. AMI 

vm/ma. £6 is p*tin £S4S ad 
m a wr came ra to AUS/NZ. Ol- 
884-7371. ABTA 
TURKEY BEACH HOTELS from 
£199 H B. plus tore w/sports. 
Mat Turkey. Ol 326 1006 
SOUTH AFRICA Johurg front 
£465. 01684 7371 ABTA. 


and fairytale casttos. him hours 
trotn Ostende, in the Belgium 
Ardennes. The ponauuies are 
endless A wealth at acttvttes 
are offered tar the whole (am- 
ity. Hobdays from £20 per 
person per week in cottages, 
farms, vacation vntagrs or ho- 
tels. Find out more, ask for the 
Brlsud brochure (ram Sdgtum 
Rental Service. 179 Setekrn 
park Road, s Crovden. 02 
aJJ. Telephone Ol 661 6109. 
or LEMnite Omtlalr Bureau, 
□uropstem. Mtnuan. Aberdeen- 
shire. Scotland Tel 077 982 
249. Aba 24181 or Contact 
your local AbU travel Agent. 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
a. w £306 re, £645 Auckland 
o.w £420 rtn £774. Jahorg 
a - w £264 rtn £470 Las Ange- 
* toe w £192 rtn £385. London 
Flight centre 01370 6332.' 

AM TICKETS SPECIALISTS 
New York £249. LJl £379. To- 
ronto £219. jnarg WH. 
hfcuroM £309. Sydney £639. 
Aurfcland £749 Dartatr 130 
jenrora Street Cl 859 7144 
GOMG ABROAD? Alley « 

. wheeter weea ta e tit- ready-to- 
wear bghtw eight A tnrncai • 
rolls, tundos. bostecy A aocra- 
socles. 129 Regent SL. 
LONDON Wl. 

MENORCA, TENERVE, Greek R- 
lanos. Algarve . Villas Apts 
Pensions Tbveniaa. Holidays/ 
Flights. Brocbarea /bookings, 
ventura Hobdays. Tel 0742 
331 100. 

WORLD WIDE Flights. Spertal- 
Istw In Flrat A Out Class A 
Economy to Australia. Far East. 
S. Mttcn. USA. LUbon. Faro A 
Geneva. Pita* Travel Centre 
01-666 7028 ABTA 


L CALL Far-some of the best neats 
an nts vseu. ants: basandw 
htre. TW LOodcn 01 636 50CXX 
Manchester 061 832 200a Air 
Travel Advisory Bureau, 

LATM AMERICA. LOW rest 
fUflllts c.a Rio £488. Lima 
C48B rtn. Atm Snwd Group 

hktoday Amrneya, JLA a-747- 

CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 

town IMq 12 Perth crewe d 
motor yacht 2 wks Jane 3,17 
■ £366 Inc fltefood.w. sports, oi 
326 1008 Alai 2091. 

GENERAL 


CHEAP FARES WORLDWIDE 

Specialise in 1st A Bnsineiie 
Ctac long haul fin. ten Ex- 
press. 01459 2944. 

COACH TOURS M ITALY. The 
Secret South. A Taste of Tosca- 
ny or Splendours of the Veneto- 
A select mo of value tor money 
roach lours Also vioas A hotels 
wHb swimming pools and etty 
weekends Free- brochure (ram 
Magic ol Italy. Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bush Green. W12 BPS 
Tel. Ol 749 7449 (24 hrs 
service) 

TAKE TORE OFF to Parts. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. L ai— on e. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne & Dieppe Time OIF. 2a. 
Chester Ch»e. London. Swix 
TOO. 01 235 Bom 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


DORDOGNE deUghUtd oM cot- 
tage Historic vUage- avaa 9vh 
to 30 Aug. stm 4. £175 pw. BV 
cycling, riding, swi mmin g, 
canoeing, tennis. Gastronomic 
paradise lei Ol 274 95S1 
mn- Wends. 

BRITT AMT /DORDOGNE cottages 
and farmhouses dome with 
pools. June, early July reduc- 
tions. 0295 337477. 

UIIU A VILLAS M BRITT ANT. 
June Bargains, suu some high 
availability. Just France. (0373) 
826283. 

SELF-CATERING 
- GREECE • 


RMUCtKATE LONDON 
DOSSES FOR UW 6 
COMPANY LETS 
nUUIDS Bond new trfer- 
MUt 4 boose wiUi pavttf. 

nt/uust rd. a beds. Z bants, 
doe new £«0 pw. 

HYDE nUK. W 2 Moo bouse, 
mtm> desayted D a wrr bob 
Ranted. 2 Beds. 2 basa/z 
racep. My eospged tat font 



HOLIDAYS 

ABTA IATA ATOL 1482 





ea Gaiwtok. Pan World Holi- 
days 01 734 2802 
3 IMPLY CRETE Angto Greek 
family offer beatmfli) prtvale 
vntas/Studko. Many wtm 
POOH, tfatm arranged- Haase 
rtwg 01 994 4462/5226 
GREECE. Urawollt waviv cheap 
tltgh is. vUa rentals etc. Eras Hoi 
Mays. 0 1-434 1647. AM Alto. 
RHODESLuxuip ape/hoM from 
£129 P-PJnc. TeL' Siratna 0706 
862814. 

SHIATHOE Lux. bench VIBB. 6/8 
pen. 2 wks from £280 md Ot A 
free w/aurtlng. 10932)246342. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


W Back £4 25 pur. . 
MtiMIMHV g HUE 3W7 
Chantmo tyrtmt hse m nc 
fond. 3/4 beds. 2 tern 28 
bans. My equCfKd tat £600 

SOOTH KBISOKrrOH. SW7 Lgs 
HRftyn hse perfect ky emertan- 
dd. 5 bats. 3 racep. 2>i nabs. 
Mi' emiped kit Lgp gdii. Gas 
ch. £900 pw 

MfUmtmtm or Ate Main 
01 2U 7441 

M OH BfanqAM BdmL . 
Untoo SW7 

■i LETTING ■ 


MONTROSE HOUSE 


BELLGRAVE SQ SW 1 

2 BEXWOOP4ED LUXURY 
FLATS tarnished or mttar- 
netted. Quwl Mews off 
Haiton SL 2 Bathrooms, dou- 
ble reepuon room and tally 
fined Mutton- Flats have bal- 
conies and roof gardens, 
p ea p ena re UfT- and video en- 
trance phones. Lock-rei 
garaging available CO LETS 
tor 6 months or longer, from 
£600 per week. For viewing 
contact swab or Jo on Ol- 
235 8835,9087. 


a HOLDINGS 


RRBW/CHB5H BORDERS 
Sprats nod Muse Mb prase. 
vtUitim fTT^T) and antes- 2 good 
size tews. bJul nutWs.4 bed, 2 
ban. Co U 1 yi +. E37S me. 

PHBJJHORE QARD8IS W 
Band new UNFURKtSHED Hat 
Rsceg. 2 ML ? UK. Bnd ht U»fl 
M. Co let £350 pw rnd CH/Oni 

KAJBflWaCO 

B1-2S 0433 


LONDOR. Lnsnry famished 
apartments, tuny serviced, 
chon* of Mayfair or aGaeani to 
Kensington Ptoace. From £300 
- £550 pw. 3 months - 2 years. 
MomUCunm M anageme n t Ltd. 
Ol 491 2626 .(Telex 299186). 


SOUTH KE HSB dBTDW kfflns from 
Lvcer ant lube. 2 <Bde bed oat 
with tafl length windows am 
high cetUngv kb. w, dryer, 
bath, video entrance phone, uo 
and res porter CoicL£24epw. 
Goddam A South Ol 930 732L 


Wl LARGE LUXURY Fwrdahed' 
Oat. 3 bMs. 2 recesis. kMcben 
and2batbatt «n suite), gas CH. 
Chw. Ail anoMastoas. Long M 
Pref. C35QPW. Tei 01429 
6102. OL 


FJWJOAFP tMnagmene GmrieeS) 

LM require ix u pertWd in central 


nr waning ap cflrants 01 - 221 - 


PAVOION RD. SW1 
. Elegant .fbmisbod. Erne 
mews cottage. DdMitnil 
dWc reccpL. Fully fitted 
left -study. 2 dblc beds, 
bathroom with shower. 
£575 pw. ; 

-OkIsm Office:' ; - 
D1-S89 5211 


RANDOLPH AVE. W9 
SmitninE imerkir-dc- 
signed 3rd JL flai in, 
Ltttle Venice. Reoepu 3 
dU beds. 2 baths, senur 
furn. £350 pw. 12 mdeb. 
Ring io. '• ■ ■ 

Little Venice Office: 

0K286 4896 


MMHIJBB 


Earfy nett »cek the Britisli 
Amateur Ru^>' L^gue Assoa- 
aaon (BARLA) wffl tutoom 
.the names of the ID teams who 
win make hiswiy «**? 
forming the first oaflon ai araa- 

leur 

stride forward by the borgeoa- 


KUCBYL1 

DIARY 

Keith Maddh 



i. a total of 29 dabs ap ^ied to 
join the new togoe, the torow 
area leading the way wilh Raw 
applications. Offices tayecow 
from femons amazeis si des m 
Cumbria, Humbeiside. Greaser 
Manchester, Lancashire, 
Merseyside and Yorkshire. 
There is one application that 
demonstrates the growth or the 
game in the South, South 'L ot- 


LETTING? 


WE HA VS WAITING 
COMPANY TENANTS 

LOOKING? 

CAtl US NOW 
TO SEE bETTER 
HOUSES S FLATS 

Buchanans 

351 7767 


HAMPSTEAD OfflCE 

81-794 1125. 


ABSOLOTELT 

FABULOUS 


Oppou ee nbr «» onraK BtfnNy 
oexae Ltox n oo c ink *p- 
pemed tnxaooeue. lohtrc- 
.cpwm. done tbom.k * b.|a>u 
prao. Fiee putaat C=Sp.«. Rc& 

vOl Iff 

622 4851. 


25 WEYW)UTH ST, Wl 



LOWEST FARES 

Pbrtf £S9 N vm El 98 

fmUon m UI/8F £331 
LanM £320 Mtont £188 
Nakrtti E325 annex* 8*20 
Jotyey E*#D Bangkok £333 
C» 1205 Katmandu £440 
DbVShu E335 Rmgoon £350 
Hono Kong E5I0 Cttomta £42 
rant rale er Meotara* 

soa t saw 

21 Srata* S. Lwtai Wl 

tymzmor w 

MAJOR C/MBDS ACCB'nsU 


TUSCANY A UM BI BA. Over 
1.000 seif catering yropertiee 
ranging iron simple tarnt- 
houses * to luxury villas a 
anartramis in mdent caaOes * 
Utalu. vab hire ana r «vaB- 
aMt or wee edramgrel our 
special rales on (bahts, rar Ml* 
or tain. Colour c atoi og u e s 
trealUbie tooen Owner Travel . 
Ltd. 102 Sl Johns wood Ttr~ 
rare. London NW8 Tel: 01 <886- 
9451. Credit Cants. 
IATA/ ABTA 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


A Different 
Portugal... 



abtaatol CV Travel fT) 




’UP UP & AWAY 

Nairoia, Jo ‘B ote. Cairo. 

Etabai. Istanbul, Singapore. 
K.L Do&L Bangitok. Hong 
Kong. Sydney. Europe. & Tbc 
Americas: Flamingo Travel, 3 
New Quebec Sl Marble Arch 
London WIH 7DD. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday KXOD-13JOO 


BARGAIN Am FARES 

PAW Rtn 

SYDNEY £389 E8*S 

JO BURG £246 £430 

TEL AVIV £99. £179 

NEW YORK. £139 EZ75 

los ANoa.es. £192 £385 

BANGKOK-^-.. £220 £380 

TORONTO £182 

£210 

MANY OTHER BARGAINS - 
DECKBtS TRAVEL 
01-370 6237 


Early Hay Spec Us 


.28? $S*g? 

■ GEHOHA 16» Ir Ol 
. .AUCANTE ms trESB 
■TAUtPERS 10« Ir £71 
' HERAXUON 13/5 Ir £112 


mg an frt-7Z3 *9M 

HTA/tHTAMTOl IWt) AC0E5S/WSS 


More (owcost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 

■ Fart, export, high-tech 
service - Free worldwide 
hotel & car hire-pass 
• up to G0% discounts 
Open 9-6Mon-Srt 
- On-tbe-Spot 
Imtnanlsatlon, Insurance, 
Foralgn Exchange, 
Map & Book Shop 


01-581 0891 
(9890132 - 24 hr 
braaxnc Mnfca) 


ALBANY! ALTOOUTWE. VOto 

Holidays of dtsOnclkm tor tbe 
VOTV few. TO: 01-491 OOOB. 73 
a JamteH StreeL swi. 

SFRMG BANK HOLPitvdf «0-. 
las to Algarve with stair A torn 
poola.HtfirwfIts.22 May 2 whs 
PMtner & Parker 01-4934728. 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE- Vffia 
Holidays of dMtaKUan far toe 
very lew. Tet 01-491 0802. 73 
SL Jatness Street. SWI. 

ALGARVE. Surfer* villas with 
Pools. Tbe vua Agency. Ol 
824 8474. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAZARR O H UntpoBl resort In S. 
Spam villas Apts Sal FR OM 
Murcia (Nr Lo Manga] May 
Sueq aa. Bracti Bay Hots 0432 
270185 . ATOL. 

AI ATRI A Due to canreBMloii. 
ant avaD Jufy/Aug. sww 4. 
Private rnttl -imnk Goff. 
C200pw. 01-482 0557 am 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


lux flBis/twuM*: £200 - £1000 

p.w. dual feei req. punos 
Kay & Lewis. SotiOi of Ue Park. 
Ctwtsea effler. m-5 ta Bill or 
North of. me Park. Regenra 
Park o ffice. 01-722 8138. 
NEGOTIATOR Dynamic, hard- 
work i ng person. 22 yrs+ u 
MpWemeM our saorenm team 
in Sl Johns Wood. Previous ex- 
pertenre pre f erre d tm nqt 
manual .Must be car owner. 
Beta- & Bwcnaff 886 7861. 
•ROMPTIM PARK GRES. Immac 
l bed Dai ta tun devef wh aa 
the parks. Receptdln won bale. 
If +8- GtoCJL/CiLw. Paricuia 
apace. £160 pw. Barnard Mar- 
cus 602 act 

[ NUIMMtTtX nmpleMy reno- 
vaied tantipbed - flat Due 
bedim, living rm wtm Ottro 
kK. bathroom, washing ma- 
cula*. CO LET. £138 p.w. Tel: 
Ol 607 6136.01 630 7031 
HM P MCAR SPECIALISTS ore 
currently seeking good quHBy 
rental accoemiadmn In 
central London tar waBtna 
company tenants 01-937 968L 
•TOCKLEY, M4 WPfT 2dW bed 
Oal m no btock. Ctase sin. Open 
Plan large lounge. TBstefutydec 
■nd furn. Available now. £100 
pw 244 7365. 

FANTASTIC VALUE to a JDters - 
Wood- Newly dec and furn. 
Cline ip Amman school. 3 
beds, retro any sn ap ped wl 
WC. CH- £200 P W. 244 7383. 
FULHAM SWB. Newly refUr- 
bWwd is ta- llai 1 Me I angto 
bs un tt rec. k & b. Use of gdn. 
AwuB Ckrtang Co leL £160 pw. 
8anaM * Co 736 500ft 
■URATE PLAGE WK. Snomtog 
bouae. 2 Hds. targe recap, mod 
Mt/dto. roof lerr Mh view. 
Qus. ant*, exr transport, fieoo 
pw 0*9.-243 1188/229 894a 
KTHtn e GT OR RLHIHTA 1K8. Lux 
I dWe bedroom (tM. Lge Recep. 
K&a Fiffly tarnished. £170 
pw. AvaH now. Co Lei only. 
TO: Ol 629 TT7T EW 5254 
PARSOtt GREEN, FULHAM - 
TocxOy reborn 6 DM luxury un- 
fnnustml family house. Aval 
noVL £400 pw. Buchanana 581 
7767. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


HAMPSTEAD Smrrtt. quiet OaL 
ta< Heam). 2 beds, tag 
reran / dining w FF ML ah appH- 
smera- open Hra. Co. tor pref. 
£215 p.w, T« 794 8574. 


on ox 238 8861 tar the best p. 
teetton of nuntobed flats and. 
bauves to rent to KHgmebrtdge. 
Ketutngfon and Chetm. 


avad a rage, for dtpfomaif. 
executives. Long & Stan i«t» in 
au areas. Unfriend A Go. 48. 

AfeenorteSU/lt 01-499 8354. 


SWI BeauBtaBytanusttod 1 bed 
flat in portend atone. Recep 
whb Ma bed. totety matter 
dining Bole, kit bath. £226pw. 
Coous 01438 826 L. 


8 Co have a large setoetton of 
nan and (waxes avsusM* tor x 
week * from £l 80 pw. 499 . 
MM. 


MCHMOMD/KEW - UtafunUshed 
4 town. 2 6am fanny house. 
AO macfihws. c iP t alu s A car- 
pats £278 pw. Hnrtwnana 351 
7767. 

ST. GEO R GE ' S SQUARE. SWI. 
Beamfoi 2 bedroaned OaL 
wm large balconies. Ntewty 
decorated a tuny sokl £200 

- pw. Jetudfer Dean 727-1788.' 

- SWI Lovely 1st Door flat over- 

looking garden square.. 3 beds. 
1 recep. K&B. Cloaks. AH ma- 
chines. Co Jet £300pw_ JCH 
828 0040. 

AMEHKAH Bank urgently re- 
quires luxury oecs and houses 
from £200 - d.ooapw. Ring 
Burges* Estate Agents 881 6150 
■EAUnFU. CAFE TOWN tara. 
* house 10 let or wap tar N~ Lan- 
deo home from Aug. Phone: 

788 3249. 

HEW A Rill CHUFF tar may 
properties in sr Johns Wood. Re 
rats Park. MAtda vale. Swns 
Cotta HBnuisiead01-8B6756l 
BELGRAVIA CHELSEA 

KMGHT88R1DGE flats/homes 
avaiUbie now. £ioo-looo pw 
B urgess 01-881 8136. 

CHALK. FARM S/C 2 bed IUL 
talEsr equtoped. new decor. Suit 

2 Pratt, n/s. 12 mth mm com- 
pany 1st. £120 PWOI 2672708 

NARROW. Fully furnished eend- 
deuaied boose. 3 be dro oms. 2 
receptions. CH. garden 060 
pw. RUN! 01-867 2661. 

HMMATE. N10. Ftety tarntahed 
ground Door Dae . 2 ueds. 
lounge. Mutton phono. Rental 
£128 pw. 0438 850457. 
MORGAN* WALK. Resrily superb 

3 bed tut ovortooung Thames. 
£275 pw. Btananans 361 
778 7. 

FMttlCO SWI Lovely ranodeOM 
2 bed IM overlooking sq gdns. 
£175 pw. Buchanans 361 

7767. 

SW7 GARDEN SQUARE. Sunny 
npflaL DWe barm, recep. k a 
k FuHy tarotolied. £160 p.w. 
3/4 raoplhB. TO Ol 937 0234 
S*T 9881 The number so remem- 
ber when seeking best rental - 
orogenies in central and prime 
London areas £iBO/£2.000pw. 

ILL CoaarANY seeks fUru prop- 
erties tn best London areas. 
CABBAN a GASELEE tEstato 
Agents) 01-889 8481 . 

DR G ENTLV WAN1HH Quality 
flats a booses ta central Lon- 
don. Long a snort kb. Sdiflet 
Flats. 486 9144/0. 


[Ms sad ostMs DmagboBt 
LNge roorat GotqpavM I jw 
on. £500. PL 7. 

ar«M«i 7 

aeMak. 


MKYFAKL Wl Lax S/C tarn 
. Oats. 1/2 bedrm. La raoep*. 
fully eautoped from E178PW. 
SBon. tong lets.. 01 429 2846. 


TH A M E S VILLAGE W4~ 2 bed 
ssbc QaL gdns bordatog Rtrer. 
£180 pw pnonr itaa gg — ft 
• OF *iO 4886u. ■ .. ;T: 

■nm eh 1 1 ji an 1 1 111 

St Jetato wSSd " 

att N. West arras, ai-438 rrtl; 


the BARLA Cup competition, 
putting in a surprise appSeanan 
which deserves admiration for 
audacity. 

The roles and regulations R*»ch 
will control and. guide the 10 
Twmc are severe to the pOTH ’of 
be rng Draconian. There is bo 
doubt thar only dubs meeting~ 
the h i g h standards win. be 
chosen, and the two bottom 
- dubs wiQ. have to apply for re- 
election each season, and face a 
challenge from . ambitious 
outsiders. 

- Tbe national adifiiutsmuor of 
. BARLA. Maurice Oktroyd, 

says “The successful dobs win 

have had to state their playing 
achievements, prove their 
fipan gjal suitability and have 
their ground facilitiesand pitch 
rigorously inspected by a five- 
man National League sob- 
committee. We are dxssinineil 
to have Tbe best standards at 
every conceivable fcveL" - 
Each' team wflJ be handed an . 
I I-pdnt charter outimii^ what 
is required, and one of the 
regulations emphasizes 
BARLA’s sharp publicity sense. 
Chib secretaries are ordered to 
.telephone tbe final scores is 
their home matches to the 
appropriate newsp a pe r s and 
broadcasting media within IS 


minutes of die end of die pane, 
«ad any dub dfeffcuhfrtf ' 

' fined uflL The cdSats® 
away team •«** * 

. uk 

The profea a oaa 
this top atnaaeur 
apparent in the . . 
team* ■roust prot*^ 
able programme — 
game. with no place f 
dupiicaied sheen run 
last mimuc. 

- Learning from * k - 
esperien c e of the 
game, with its .finme 
earned by-tad wa * 
officials wfll tafce 
for allocating .daus&- far 
pemed fixtureSv tterefey aw 
« e rmp fa g oddseuDd 
log. Chibs felling » pE 
fined £25a The — ^ 
of three farther 
each dub's 
permit payers wtff.be 

Ok t ro yd says: “h’s • 
many clubs .win have 
di sap p oi nted this first 
round, but with tv*n 
places cvcay wa 
have aa annual 
prove tfaerosehes and 
entry." 

Rugby Leagu e 
eagerly waking flas 
mens. Almost censinly 
the top a m m eo r dubs 
National League-. wffl 
trigger gk*t** dun many 
divtskm - profe s sio nal 

.With the Rugby* 

ptp at d joi e aa u ^r. 
gangway between the a 
the new Sapef League 
become i reafity, 
heady boom da^ft far 
atkm, farmed in 197 
unbroken nm of 
devdopmero. . 


JUDO 


WWONL Range of- 2 fed 
taWMe Okto. £128 . £148 pw. . 
Pnonc 01 9404888. 


Ktrsuinssp * n * n 

• tot 637 0821. 


’g^tfgysgg 

WlMan 8 San 947 313a. 

WlLOwntat UMAri yr i 
beam, lounge ML total . SeH 
ronote £8o p.w. Tel n w 
i3ii after a cun. 
gnUMKTI«L SttotoH 1 fed 
naL an new. gtfrjuu Sato 
tab*. £128 pw. UK CH gad 
CHW 01-431 00X7 latter fimL 
ARC Am - 01-9X7 4BGB ba- 
ting A ManagnaraL Flat* B 
Hora e* avattabto mmo 
ASTEALll UMno. 0etook.raOX. 
IV. ptwn a . to i v k a a . 060 pw. 
Otfer* 627 2610 HomHoctoora. 
ENELSEA UM not toatoony flat 
Double fe to p um , reran, alls, 
panto. Long let- 6228828. 
CHELSEA- Aftraatve 1 dbte bed 
flat Recto. JOM Co ML 
£L20gw. JCH. 828 004ft 
CHEYME PLACE 8W3 Lite TUm. . 
3 row HE Non Glaring. 

£18 0 p.w. Tan 9484896 
orr Lux fedak. own kflefeo. 

. pbonc. gratae. £48 pw. O Ot e ra 
62726tOMartMIDCaHn 7<tays. 
GARDEN 1 dbte fedtm. partuna. 

raOA. pteme. CH. £88 gw.Otfv 
. era . 627 2610 Horaeiocatora. 
HAMBY TUG0 2 bedrm. recpC 
CH. pttonc. MB* tnc. 1300 pw. 
OOierc 627 asiO Haraetacanr*. 
LUXURY 1 Mm nr tube- CH. 
wuner. garden. raepL CBS pw. - 
Odwra827 2610Ho m N oca to ra. 
MDDOOt 2 dbte toedm. no*. 
pool*. CH. paltix £88 pw. OOr 
era Ion 627 2610 HametoeatBix 
HO D EP O M T I BtdU. TV. CH. 

waslier. phone. £38 pw. OOtera 
: 827 2610 Hornaotatan k 


pbone. or tube. £78 pw. Offers 
627 2610 Honnowra Ok 9 
JVT LOVERS! 3 bedrm. kto* OK. 
recpt. ptwna. pTdng. Csaa pw. 
Otfera627 2610 Homekxaiara- 
STH KEN QDN SaSurwy ftata 
Mtow. Steep* 3. 4-6 week* 
-only. £196 pw^ 3730667. , . 
SW U roam ta CH M ull prof 
M/F £216 pen Ito 8/R. brae* 
Off 491 8899, eves 223 8889. 

W» Ownmqwn et ia mH ii g l bed 
fee. nan ksb. eaooow. At- 
. ten Bates 8 Co. 499 1868. 

WON’T LAST! 1 AW fe tfru L ar 

tube, rarpets. s/c. £67 puf, om- 
en 827 2610 HomtecteJn . 


McSorley 
ready for 
big chance 

^ From Philip Nkltsm 

■ Belgnde 

The extent to which London 
has lost iis traditional rote as 

producer of the tenting judo 
ffghteis can be, teen in the 
composition qf the British seam 
competing in the' men's Euro- 
pean championships which start 
here today and nm until Son- 
day. Not one member comes, 
from the cajriiaL- 
In fact, of the seven nun in 
the team no less than four oome . 
from one Midlands clnb — Mac 
Abbot's Wolverhampnm Jnda 
Club — while two are prodoGn. 
ofTony McGonncff’sIudo Cen- 
tre in- the^ Lake District. . 

OfawrsethiswUibcaslight^ 
odd event from tta Brimh point 
. of view for it is the first time far 
a decade 'that the British team 
has aot-ro d uded Ned- Adams, 
the Olympic • -silver; medal 
winner. -After his defeat at the 
British open be remains un- 
decided over . his competitive 
future and did not ask to be 
included .in the team for the . 
1986 European championships. 

In his |^oe is the 21 -year-old 
Scot, Martin McSoricy« who- at 
last has an dpp omzi BTy to 
compete in . ,a major inter- '- 
national after paying second, 
fiddle to Adams fw so fang — 
desjtite reasonable snocess on : 
the international tircmL . 

**I know that tlusfemy chance 
to show what I can-'do,* said' 



‘v BreteK qpfcit ractiods -. 

McSortey. It htttenr difficult 
far McSoriey to matore in terns 
..of ,■ etiernaaoBal coinpietdion 
. white under the titadow of tbe 
jpUDtisfaudy talented. Adams 
and, rerfgfcaiHy, be cannot 
aqnce to .inott then broroe 
medal status on tiiisnocaaon. 

The test chances of top 
rnedafe, therefore, mH come 
from fi* competitors from 
Waivisfun^non, particularly 
iCernth Brown,' 
who is dne to add to his medal 
. taffy after an unhappy period 
smee Ins Olympic bronze in Los 
Angeles, ms British open win 
Jan month — his fifth in a row, 
w^efa is no meanJeat as he is 
only. 23 years old — showed 
agam his quick-silver reactions, 
which be will need if be is to 
hem strong opposition from 
Richard MeUilo (France) and 
the Soviet Union's Yury 
Sokolov — now down -from 
light-middleweight. to 
tighrarigbL 


experienced cook/chef 

To liitaHo tar Camay in central Londoa. OOier Mp 
kept .Own s/c Rat bedroom. sttttnB room, bamroran. 
uidta. Mnarata entrance. TV and use of car. Non smotar, 
dog tower and someone prepmd to travel abroad tar hoU- 
dan pretarretL Ceneroua free tax top satary. 

ExceOeni referancra regtrired. 

Write twodtay copy refermoai to;- CMdtey. 10 Comwafl 
Terrace. Regents Parte. Landtm. NWLor rtngOl 4864468. 


tome, ibis 2 nod. OOf. One. % 

5J5 TbUBy mwvtM. * 

£44JX)ft Ol 732 3974 teveU. 


SOMERSET A AVON 



lu'SiurtfttTmitf 

42«U Earl* Court Road 
Lmadon WB fiEJ 
Long-Haul 01-603 ISIS 
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■ic nctgrnn Yacht. 6c 
Omul to. 0836 221666 . 


Ui HOLIDAYS 


MooincBniai*. 
1 Tweed v agi 4 (Mbs 
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ACTIVITY HOUDAVS 


LEARN TO DRIVE HadOW to 
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CORNWALL & DEVON 


DARTMOUTH, DEVON. Extra* 
Uto 9 TO! b> our lamfllHy 
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. grounds ot Regency nous*. Coo- 
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LAKE DISTRICT 


SOPERB asrarto* eottagn tar 2-9 
to htstenr SBmH HalL Ltole 
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Victorian lama house In vitm*. 
Stns 8 + cot. 1 bam. a inower 
rmx. d/wasfer. w.-mara. + »■ 
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.WALES 

R8K XGTH CENTURY tanalMUSe 
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SOUTH OF THE 
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SUSSEX 


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DOMESTIC & 
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STTUATTONS WANTED 


■ORLY Expolenced chef sera* 
grtMgtera tarectara chef pori- 
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GORDON BLEU COOK i8fa seeks 
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PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHABTTY COMMBSICN 
Charity - Tbe Donkey sanctuary 





.potato make a Scheme for US* 
Chanty. Crates of the draft 
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from today, - 



FRANCE 




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FOOTBALL 

Wimbledon are hop* 
for third time lucky 

weeks today looking for the win 

riSsstaesKtt: ffi 
&rsua-ss%£'& etiad 1 ® - 

Wimbledon three points away . i^SeMSSm fi™i 

cffltS.SSor* 

-season; more than 1 3j300, saw £Q^ ^ &sth 
one of the team’spoorcst home “S" street 
performatices- The Chmtton * Alex MacDonald, wi 
manager,. Lennie Lawrence; was steered Heart of Midlothian 
encouraged -by the size of the *1°* the premier 
crowd." He said: TThe support champtonship this seal 
was terrific and it made it all* named as the 
worthwhile. I hope we can tet Brewers' Ptaahafity ** 
5,000 of them to buy season tie Yeas: MacDou 
tickets; which wfll bring m the his long-serving defend) 

- finance to help improve the assistant manager, 
team." Jardme, in the season's 

- Wimbledon went to Bradford ^ On Sunday Jard 
on April L6 to play their vote d as the Scottish 
rearranged game, after a Writers’ Flayer of the Year. 
pcs^OTMi^t on February 1 . MacDonald can collect » 

22! - feBSassssas 

dtoys later they returned to Dundee United's 
Yorkshire, only for another 5? Uona * defender, 
downpour to cause a inn* Gough, has won the ' 
postponement. Player of the YeaiTawaixL 

■ DertjCmmty need two • ^ The Middlesbrough defends 
8am ^ *° fnak e Irving Nhmass/lro bee» 

^ tie. second vised by a specialist to 

because of knee 

Own at Swansea City. Two Nattrasa; a pfrl 31 
goals by Trevor Christie, one a - Midd^roSfor ^ 

from Jeff SrfSraSbfo! 
y baoti er pushed them to the Newnstle Uninvi *- - 

TUESDAY’S FO OTBATT . RESUL 

rounttonSotfcco&wieriBi^ SSS?? 5 1 Cnm rf ij 

^UTIOHAL™ K^SHtoftert; 

o iRttfll wm 5-3 on P0Sr|AU. COMBHUtne 


•WtoAL USto UWVLLhU 

Writers' Player of the Year. 

MacOonaid can collect 
. other major pri z e this 
when hisdnb meet Aberdeen 


pSBSES®?w 



gg“»0- Otonfrouaemrir 1. ' . - . 
gNfflAL IJEACUEi PM 
Ewrton T. HuddoisMd oThK 

Sg sff 8 GC 6 G 6 

3- OownRy 1j 

^^«TK)f(ALia7C|tSWtoWt»lfl 

jra raAU. COM BINATION: 
ace 4, SwkKton Z Ftdbtan ft 
4, monk 1; R«d _ 

^a^asssr. 










THE TIMES THURSDAY MAX 8 i*$o 


Si* Oi\ i 


RACING 






Smart Shadari set for 
triumphant return 
in Ormonde Stakes 


« Sharflan, the good four- 
year-old that Michael Stoute 
trams for the A® Khan, looks 
poised id pick up the 
Ormonde EBF Stakes at Ches-. 
ter today on his seasonal 
debut 

. Although he has not ran 
since last autumn, fitness 
should not be a problem as he 
won first time out at Sand own 
last year by ten lengths. Later 
m the season he went on to 
record two more resounding 
triumphs in much better races. 

*«.¥!** i 05 ^ the Great 
VolUgeur Stakes on a disquaii- 
v cation, Sbardari gained just 
compensation at Ascot where 
he won the Cumberland 
Lodge Stakes by six lengths. 
Then on bis final appearance, 
at Newbury, he was even more 
impressive, winning the St 
Simon Slakes by IS lengths. 

'j Today the hid core of his 
opposition comprises 
Lemhili, Eagling and Gold 
and Ivory, the three who 
; dominated the finish of the 
! John Porter Stakes at 
Newbury last month. Rising, 
the Irish challenger, and 
Range Rover, who began last 
season in such style by win- 
ning ibe Grosvenor Stakes at 
this meeting. 

I saw Range Rover go really 
well in an early-morning gal- 
lop on Newmarket Heath last 
week, but unlike Lemhili, he 
wGI not appreciate any more 
rain. 

. His owner. Lord Derby's 
, best chance of a second suc- 
cess at the meeting, ___ 

Old Domesday Book’s 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


SP Tuesday, lies with 
High Tension, who is my nap 
to win the Eaton Handicap. 

After High Tension bad 
worked really well on the ' 
Round gallop cm the Lime- 
kilns last Friday his trainer, 
Gavin Pritchard-GordOn, said 
“f think that you will find th^t 
he is a much improved horse 
this season,” 

If this is the case, there i& 
every chance to suppose that' 
High Tension is well in 
today's race with 8st 61b to 
carry. My nap certainly im- 
proved as lak season ’ pro- 
gressed and was a bit unlucky 
to lose a similar race to 
today's, at Newbury on a 
disqualification. After that he 
ran well at Doncaster to fini sh 
fourth in the November 
Handicap. 

Anyone who was at Bath ten 
days ago and watched Plaid 
spin round that sharp course 
like a top when winning the 
Somerset Stakes by five 
lengths wfl] have no qualms 
about his ability to tail around 
Chester’s tight left-handed 
turns. 

But with the best will in the 
world it is hard to envisage 
him giving even 4lb to Steve 
Cau then's mount. Faraway 
Dancer, who must be the day's 
short priced banker. 

First trine out this season 
Faraway Dancer finished sec- 
ond in the Craven Stakes at 
Newmarket, one length be- 
hind DantingBraye and half a ‘ 
length in front of his stable 
companion Mashkour.In the 
meantime Dancing Brave has 


won the 2,000 and Mashkour 
the .White Rose Stakes at 
Ascot So the form looks gilt 
edged. . 

It is also pertinent to point 
out that when he won the 
Haydock Dream Mile last 
October Faraway Dancer had 
Plaid five lengths behind in 
second place. 

My mole at Manton reports 
that Canthen will also win the 
EBF Sceptre Maiden Fillies’ 
Stakes on Varyas Bay, who is 
expected to become Michael 
Dickinson's first winner on 
the Flat for Robert Sangster. 
By that top class two-year-old 
Storm Bird, -out of the fast 
mare Queen of Cornwall, 
Veryan Bay certainly has plen- 
ty of fast blood in her veins. 
And I am led to believe that 
her homework has lived up to 
that pedigree. ’ 

Perron, a decisive winner at, 
Doncaster on Monday and at’ 
Epsom before that, is after a 
quick treble in the Ouhon 
Handicap. With his weight 
increased by just a 71b penalty, 
he will be & better in today 
than in the future when the - 
hand! capper has had the op- 
portunity to reassess him. His 
improvement has been 
brought about by being 
hobdayed. 

At Salisbury Wabarah, who 
is a half-sister to that fast filly 
Labitfa by Shirley Heights, is 
expected to continued er train- 
er Harry - Thomson Jones' 
good recent, run with two- 
rear- olds by winning the 
Redenham Maiden Hflies* 
Stakes. 



'Western Dancer (right) holding Pearl Ron's late Chester Cup challenge 

Cook steps out for third Cup 


Western Dancer provided 
Pan! Cook with his third Ches- 
ter Cup success yesterday when 
he landed the five-year-old a 
short-head winner from 
Run, mi whom Philip 
• Robinson put up SIB overweight. 
The pair [hushed three lengths 
dear of Withy Bank, with the 
fusBrite, High Plains, bmi in 
ninth place. 

“It was one of the roughest 
races I have ridden in this 
season, bnt 1 snppose that was to 
be expected with 22 runners. 1 
know Western Dancer would get 
the a ttend ed two and a quarter 
miles on this track, hot I don't' 
know about any other coarse. He 
battled really courageously to 
bold off Pearl Ran,” said Cook, 
whose previous victories in the 
race were Credo, while he. was 
stfll an apprentice in 1964, and 
Mahbah Aly three years later. 

Philip Robinson, whom 
trainer Gordon Price pot np in 
preference in an apprentice be- 
cause of his experience, said: *T 


was taken back by beaten horses 
in the straight” 

Price Said: “We don't regret 
the 5!b overweight that Philip 
pot up. He has ridden for os 
before, and we expedally wanted 
an experienced professional. 

Western Dancer trained by 
Con H organ, who was at Salis- 
-bnry, has four owners, [Deluding 
Leslie ' Spencer a director of 
HQJs. The gelding has now woo 
two big bookmaker- sponsored 
races, the Tote Ebor Handicap 
last August and the Chester 
Cup, now sponsored by 
Ladbrokes. Spencer said: 
“Western Dancer's next target 
is die Queens Vase. 

Dick Hem, the West Dsley 
trainer, served notice that his 
horses are beginning to find 
their Conn after a slow start to 
the season by celebrating his 
first success this term when his 
progressive filly Salchow beat 
the Aga Khan's Aldvna by two 
lengths in the Cheshire Oaks. 
The Henry Cecil representative. 


Locayan Princess, was a neck 
away third. 

Kab AJ-Said and Yasser 
Idliby, owners of the beaten 
favonrite One Liner in the 
opening Red Dragon Malden 
Stakes, also provided the 
favourite,- Comme L'Etoile, far 
the Cheshire Regiment Handi- 
cap. This rime - they were 
successful with the Jeremy 
Hindiey-trained colt ro mp ing 
home to a five lengths victory. 

Michael Hills, on Comme 
L'EtoSe, never let pacemakmg 
MDeometer get far away, and 
with jnst over half a tnBe to 
cover, went to the front on the 
top weight. Comme L'Etoile was 
chased into the straight by 
RoclcaU, but was drawing far- 
ther away all die time. 

The FA Cup finalists and 
League winners Liverpool had 
something else to celebrate when 
chib director Syd Reakes'S colt 
Flaxley beat the strong favonrite 
One liner In the opener. 


Harrington 
appeal 
sad news 
for Barton 

The result of the Newton 
Williams Handicap Chase, run 
at Hereford on Easier Monday, 
was changed for a second time 
yesterday after the jockey Marie 
Harrington won tus objection 
against the winner. Castle 
Warden. 

Play the Knave, Harrington's 
mourn, was originally declared 
the winner of the £2,500 race 
from the even money favourite 
Castle Warden. But 40 minutes 
later, after bets were settled and 
the jockeys had weighed in, the 
judge Peter Roffe-Silvester re- 
inspected the photo-finish print 
. admitted he bad given the 
wrong result, and reversed the 
first two pladng5._. 

Harrington argued that bad be 
known bis horse was second 
. rather than first, he would have 
lodged an objection against 
Castle Warden for interference 
after the last fence. 

Yesterday, Harrington took 
his case to' the Jockey Club 
headquarters at Portman 
Square, and, after a hearing 
lastmgan hour, was told that the 
Peter Bailey-Lrained horse 
would be given the race. The 
disciplinary committee also 
took the view that Paul Barton, 
the jockey of Castle Warden, 
was guilty of careless riding, and 
suspended him far four days 
from today. 

Harrington, for whom the 
outcome was an additional 
cause to celebrate his 25 th 
birthday, said “I'm very 
pleased at the decision. It's just 
unfortunate it wasn't sorted out 
on the day.” Mr Roffe-Silvester 1 
has since resigned from the | 
Jockey Club's panel of judges. 

In a separate inquiry. Model 
Lady, the winner of the Bourne 
Leisure Group National Hunt 
Flat Race at South well on 
March 29, was disqualified after 
her jockey, Trevor Williams, 
was found to have claimed a 71b 
allowance to which he was not 
entitled, being 25 years of age. 


TENNIS 


CHESTER 


Going: good to soft 
Draw: tow nimbus best 

2.15 EBF SCEPTRE MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: £3J)5flfc 5f) (B 
runners) 

IBS 
1W 

107 

108 

109 

110 




22 resss*ffiOAS{jTaytorStiodei 
I 0 SAUOBIfE Jonas Qaboumej 

o suwas 


r Lady Browrtmcft) W Hem 82. 
■awyng-p 

i Mohammad) MSffloteB-12. 
~~(PauraqHGeci&-12. l 


W Oran 2 
Pa* Eddery 6 


VERYAN BAY (USA) Sangsw)lS W Octtm Ml 
Evans Veryan Bay, 2-1 Oomtno Bose. 92 Miss Stages, 12-1 Steers Era. 16-f Oh 
final. 20-1 Saucier. 

Chester selections 

By Mandarin 

2 IS Veryan Bay. 245 HIGH TENSION (nap). 3 15ShardarL 345 
Faraway Dancer. 4 15 Ferion. 445 My Kind of Town. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Silvers Era. Z45 Tension. 3.15 Shardari. 3.45 Faraway 
Dancer. 4. 15 Music Machine. 4.45 My Kind Of Town. 

' 1 By Mrcfadel Sody - - 

2.45 High Tension. 3.15 Shadari. 4,15 PERION (nap). 

2.45 EATON HANDICAP {E3^S5: 1m 4f85yd) (12) , . . 

2®> -U252? SWP-Y P0W(Mf» « MncfccHj J Ttee48-H) 

S 3SS ^SSSS^SSMSSSST^^ 

204 1400- STAMXA8D BREAKFAsriA CtorB) B HVs 4-6-12: 

205 4004*4 PAGAN SUH (T RafflHfen) A Batty 5-88. 

206 120004- HUH TENSION (Lent Demy) OftSeftnH 


^45 DEE STAKES (3-Y-O: £16£G0: 1m 2? 85yd) (S) 

402 100 JAMSK) 

403 .132® PUUDtA Oidrt 

405 - 112-0 EYE’S ERROR 

406 1118 FARAWAY _ _ 

408 31221- ORQimSO(i)Biluaq'(8MMotained]BHU8-l2-.B1lnMn4 
412 8222-1 TOP GUEST (E Ittte) GWrtflfl B-12 L PM Eddery 3 

a-llftowDencen 5-1 PWd. 11-2 Ewe Bror. 10-1 OrtentM SaUer. 12-1 TUP 
Guest. 16-1 JanWa. 

f7t. 

13) 5L at Bath {1m 

“.sSST 0 


Font JAMSMStfi In Korrts ML aerflarfl 
£7272. good. Sep 11.14 ran). PU0(&13) beat Gorgon 
2f. £41 oTcxnd. Apr 2S. 6 ran). Previously <9- 1 ) 3 1 /2L.Nei 

(1m If, m/ud. soft. Apr 17, 1 lrw>L FARAWAY DAMtaR(8-7)1L Craven Stakes rurmer- 
tpta Qubeas rawer Darning Brevn(8-7jrath EVE’S BMON (B-7) 8 1/2L. 5th at 1 1 {8f 
Group 3. £15400, soft. Apr 17 l Lastyear EVE'S ERROR (9-0) 2 1/1 L Currngh runner-up 
10 Flo* ot Steel (9 Group 2, £1 7329. good «o salt. S ran). OMENTAL SOURER (B- iS 
10 3f4L 681 of 10 bfllnnd SpttndkJ Moment (8-ft hi French Group 3, previously. (98) 
short Madwemertam Ferniy Rriendffi-2) at Santxey (ft. E4894. eon Aug 15, 9 rant 
TOP GUEST (9-0) beat Bananas (98) 3L at BtMeriey{im2fmdn,£l 409. aor£ Apr 12, ifc 

StoLj»oh: FARAWAY DANCER 


4.15 OUlTON HANDICAP (23,1*1 &5f) (8) 

2DD491 KTOGCSTTt^UUTY CT(MV«dni)JBostBy5-1M 
) (R Duration) J Dou 


207 02200-1 COLO^JAMESIO 

209 002133 RECOR D WW— 

210 3030-12 SLEMTHBiiH 
M 820083 BOUM PALACE (N 


211 

?T2 00-3020 REGAL STEEL 
215 058324 SKVBOOT {Mrs 




QPjralwti-Gcrtoo INI II M 

■*M*»e S OfcvW — RCoelaM k, 
Plonq) P Haydn Jones 884 . ONheimt 
™»J VtfWts4-M(Bex) NCboBortmlO 
[MHEMWbv 4-7-13 N CartateTl 


502 2DIM01 BRIDGE STR gTUUrr 

504 00884 DUCXnJOH^^H 

505 008000 

508 00-ntl^Hto 


511 40TO-04 MUSIC 
515 000000- UTTLE STARCH' 
S17OQ2H0-Lfni£BOftlCD) 
tfl Potion, 4-1 
River JO-1 PWlip, 12-1 




PlatNRI .. . 

Rptwaon) E Carter 7-7-7. 


. factor 


7-2 Pagan Sun, 4-1 Silent Journey. 5-1 BcWn Pataca. 13-2 Stately Form. 7-1. 
Colonel James, 10-1 Hfth Tension. Record Wing, 12-1 others. J 

FORM: STATELY FORM behind bin mmjearma}. be« effort tot »ir®4) a 21/ 

sgsagBs ssssssasm 

Selection: MGHTEtwON 


3.15 ORMONDE EBF STAKES (Grwip fit £24,514: 1m 51 B8yd) (9) 


tFtoW, 

-1 UtllaBofl 

W o d d ro wn ■4w^6LS«xto^ winner ft OTEecea 
an 1 1/2L bade in 4th (5t. £3896. soft. Apr 26, 1 0 
taChenfosCIUU<8-12WY0(ft«iMi(4MJPt8- 
Oct 15 ronLPBKJM (8-1) beat BoSnEmMy {9-lOjl 
6) 0. away Bth ot 11 {5f, £3811, good). Pre- 

(7-9) 2 

ER^-12) 6 1/2L away 8* &. £ 3792. heavy. Apr 23 , 9 


r on Monday, PHLP{H)7Lmyttiol1 
7-13) baa taantwn p- 11)2 1/a. if Epeore, 
id OERRY RtVER (7-12) 6 1/2L away mh (51. £ 3792, heavy. Apr 23, & 
. Newtxay mnnar-tfla JO Broadwater Music ©-0)(5t 


R«e7 


0120-3 GOLD AMO IVORY 
D232-1 LEMWU. IS " 


302 
304 

306 112011- SHAROAMJH H A» 
4000-10 BRUWtCO (T Ramsdep) R 


307 

308 


402380 CHAUWRE 



%45LADBROfS W)TELS HANDICAP {3-Y-O: £3j80: 7ft (9) 

602 100208- HARAABAHttSA)(HA1MafctounrtH Thornton Jones 9-7 

503 2301-4' DOQMAT1C (A SamueQ R Jonrutti Houtfimn 9-6 SCaaltan2 

.604 231V TOPPESHAMME (USA}p) (Larfy H da WaUtrt fc Weymet 9-5 E GoeM (3)9 

505 230218 BOUAMTX; tJtCLE (P^Wt) H IMwOT &-10 

607. 1300-00 HYMN OF HAftLEO 
508 11 MY HKD OF TOWN 

513 038121 EXAABHATTONfBJd 

6U $01-40 DAtCWG TOM (BF) U Tiyney)^ Fairtura 8-0. 

515 003032 AUCTION MAN 8*9 B Gifins) R HoAhstiead 7-12. 

5« My KM Of Town, 7-2 Bcamkatten. 4-1. 11-2 To(a»et»mme. 8-1 

Auct ion Man. 10 -1 Romantic Unde, 12 A Oftwra. 


Anderson) 6 Prtaftani-Gordon B-10 . 
(ARudoSJRJl 



MSawtofM. 
lnmson 48-10 
RJVWtonw 54-10. 

OeWatdanlHCeci 4-8-10 _ 

(A Htcharos) H OT teJ W IL-. 

312 0/13041- HAMOB ROWS) (Q (la d Derbyl J W jPgr 4*10- 

313 03308-1 RtSWG (Lord Nsasp) K Prontwgast(W) 48-10- 
5-2 SnanJari. 11-4 Lomfai. 7 S EOgfing. 11-2 Gold And Ivory. B-T FUstog, 14-1, 

Ranee Rower. 20-1 Chaumere. 25-1 other#. 


309 11310-2 EASJMG ( 

310 248811 HILTON- 



I son 9-1) beet Beam Zero 
TOPfe*tAMME(8«bere 
ran). ROMANTIC UMSL£ 
AbnaroseJS-g 2L at Hawk 
LECH <8« good m to Og 
I 15. 17 ran). MY IQNDOFB 



16 

„ f. £478ajood » soft Oct 5. 13 ren). 

# Rest (9-Zfei NeoemWl (71. £50®, good to soft. Apr 
N (9-1 21 oast Unex-Asmedn-11) 1 1/2. at Warwpck (8t 
MttjApr 28. 17 nmL EXAMNATTON (9-7T&B81 HaM And 
... , .£2777, pood to sofi. Apr 28. 18 ran). AUCTION IAAN (9- 

0) par caught and deafen a short head by Heavy Brigade (98) mTh«sk(8IMtti, £2656. 
Bood to son. Apr 19. 17 ran. 
sSecftow IVY IOND OF TOWN 




Chester results 

Gflkvv good to soft 

2.15 FLAXLEY (S Pert*, 2(H): 2.. 


Samsm 
ALSORAN. 
(4th). Run By 
ran 1S1. 141 


Rjn*e«r. 

. iDBtie Doubhsyou. 7 
rjn ni. n, 3L 2L 3- R BpQjfffMd at 
. Ucoer Longdon. Tote: £21.60: £580, 
£fsa DR 0840. CSF: £4149. 1 mm 
05 06 sac .. 

• 2.*St1m4f85yd)1.CpilWEL«nWLE 

■gffijMMjgatf 

. Mirage (4th) 7 ran. a 2L 2B. IS. 3LJ 
Hm5w at Newmariff Twe^ EZgL ELCT. 
£2.10. Df: £880. CSF: £1flS8.2mh<7J8- 

*128 (2m 2f 97 yd) 1. WESTERN 
. DANCER (P Cook. 14-1): 2. Peart ftonff* 

. Robmson. 1IHL 3. (M 


uBel. 
_.25 

_i*dy. 

Eurattnk (5»). New OwrA 
Marsoom. in mL 2L«, 2L 
Baffle# at Diddot TOte: EKL90: £1- 
SajEZOQ. £2J0- DF: £10&2a C5 
£132&- Tricast £915,73. 1 nnn 47^ 



Ol Harmony. 11-2 Bandysnn 
»gn. r Gtadha pwk. 

BdESSHE 


vwm- £2.40. £2-60. ELOO WjMiaL 

CSF; £7063. Trtcatt £767.02. 1 min 1908 


8- IV 4. 


( Pulse i 


.ALSO 


wn b ■ 

. BxXCtva. 12 Sternal 
Dan Man no, Pams 


Cnottft 22 Ald0 a »^t » 

•• . Awpburv 33 For A LW« (w*)- -tacKra"- 

£4370. CSF- £135.66- Trtcast E1D9r *3- 
- 4 r*ns 1049 sec ^ 

8£fl 11m 41 Sjtffl 1. S AL CH OW (W 

• owTlKm. 14 AUato® IS81VZS .. 

S!"i nk. 1SI. 20). A WHern^Wtel 

■jfegaAtffegjs 

sasssssiR 



Martboraagh. 


Hannan at 


£13723. 1 mm W83 sac. After »»»“ 

'aS^JS^ggSSS 

Wacapot E135AO 

* Salisbarj’ 


Oar*. 6-1 *•*)’, % 
14-1) Sfl RAN 7 
pBager. 10 GurW® 15 


E2Z86. ThCM g®? 6, 

atmr a stewards inquir y resp ite stands- 
330(50 1. OUB. EStftnTtBWmifflgn. 

wfisassarasrs* 

^aesf. £IO». imm ■ 

30)i3. » L — \ Ranwdar. 7 W 

Sail pur' 


4*4 v 

T MB' £9,7a OAI. UTO 

%srsrrs &£ 

Tean 
uma 

Aunl . I.. — 

38SSS H3E 

BSL&SSkeaA 

HagBnifiWtfg 


Cheltenham 

Gok«So& 

5.15 (2m 4f etl) 1. B ee ro e rMB (Mr O 

£1.70. DF: £16JH CSF: £ 1186. 

5l 50 (3m If eh) 1. lath e* (Mr H 
Wheater>-1k 2. 

RotHii (7-1 1 9 ran. NR: DartngaM. 121 

ds issaaF* 1 * 

Gesedeh goes 
straight 
to Epsom 

Gesedeh, second favourite for 
the Oaks, will not run again 
before the Qtsoid classic, bui is 
likely to havea private gallop at 
Yarmouth racecourse. Plans lbr 
the filly were outlined by her 
trainer Michael Jarvis at Salis- 
bury yesterday after be saddled 
Ambrosini to win the Horserace 
Betting Levy Board Apprentice 
Handicap. 

Jarvis said: “Gesedeh ‘is in 
great form but I'm anxious to 
give her experience on a left- 
handed course is time for 
Epsom. Yarmouth would fit the 
bilL” 

Ambrosnti was a first winner 
from 10 rides forTteier Hutton, 
aged 18. who has been with 
Jarvis since leaving school. He 
took the fillv to the front 200 . 
yards from home and she was 
soon dear, beating Celestial 
Drive by three lengths. 

Paul Eddery, in trouble with 
the stewards twice during April, 
landed his first winner since . 
returning from suspension when 
partnering De Rigncur is the 
Wiltshire Handicap at Salis- 
bury yesterday. 


Pradier on 
trial at 
Longchamp 

Pradier (Erie Legrix) can 
strengthen his chum to being a 
realistic French candidate Tor 
the Derby at Epsom by winn 
the Prix de Suresoes over 1 


SALISBURY 


Going: soft 

Draw: high numbers best, low may be favotnod 
on soft 


1.30 W1NGANTON MAIDEN STAKES (Drv L 3-Y-O: 
£2,364: 1m 2f) (14 runners) 

4 04- ASSEMBLY W Ham 90 i BPraetvC 

13 04- DEMON FATE (USA) F Durr 90 G Butter 13 

15 048 EATON SQUARE P Watayn 98 —4 

•31 S- WTOTOA SjwwitW) M Robots 1 

32 088 NOBLE VB0NG S-MeAor 90 MWigb »14 

33 8 PEGMARMERiSAJM Jwn98 W Wood* (31 8 

37 ROJBAYOH JonnsofvHougnorM JRM7 

39 0- RUSSIQ K CtmngrtanvRnma 98 TQNbdZ 

41 SLANGI VAH H Candy 98 RCm*9 

44 8- TAfiACOS D Bsw»m9-Q_ AHcOUteS 

ALCOA KSR) C Austin 8-11.. 


341 BEDEfMAM MAIDEN RtUES STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£536: 51) (10) . 


1 

2 
3 

7 

8 
S 

11 

12 

15 

16 


BALLANTRAE R Voors£^6-11 

DOWMSVttW LAm% UtwreB-11 


2 BLUE TANGO 0 
0 


JANS COMTESSAR BOSS 8-11. 
JOSJE SifiTH P Cote 811 , 


HA PETITE USSIE M E Ranos 8-11 . 

MY ISABEL RHsision 8-11 

PHOEBE ClMttnaf) 8-11. 


WABARAH H Thomson Jonas 8-11 . 
YAVARRO D Lang 8-11 


S WMhnrth 18 
_ NWgtao? 

MMhrl 

T Octal) 9 

J Reid 6 

_ AMcGtom5 
_ J warns 

— A Moray 3 


. 9-4 Blue Tonga 7-2 My Isabel, 4-1 Waberalt. 11-2 Ma 
Petite Lassie, 8-1 Josle Smith. 12-1 -Downswew Lady. 16-1 
offlers. 


3J0 EDDIE REAVEY MAIDEN AUCTION STAKES 

(£1,014:51) (11) 


46 

47 

51 
53 

Stengi vwi. 18-1 


0 ASHFORD LASS P Birooyne 811 SYpljpesy 12 

RS1M AFFAI? G ifawood 8-11 GStertceylB 

KRBWICX JDumop8-11 BRoese 11 

AfMr. 100-30 Kriswfck. 4-1 Assembly. B-1 
Square, 12-1 Mtota 18-1 Roubeyd. 20-1 


Salisbury selections 

By-Mandarin- 

I 30 Mtoto. 2 0 Problem Child. 230 Fonnatune. 3 
0 Wabarah. 3 30 Sparsbolt. 4 0 Benisa Ryder. 4 30 
Folk Dance. 5 0 Bushido. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1.30 Mtoto. 230 Kampglow. 3.0 Wabarah. 3.30 
Revelina. 4.0 Tonquin. 5.0 Zaajer. . 


3 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

11 

16 

17 

19 

21 


11 

(5)2 


BKHW P Heynes 64 

D GREY WOLF TK3EH R Hannon 8-4 

HIGtFALLlTM LYMEY R Hannon 84 Htemtenl 

002 SARASOTA A JPn 84 BRooseT 

3 S PARSHO LT P Cots 84 KPnstteM8 

0 SUriBtSMai.RBoss84 MMMarl 

00 BETTA WWnj Bndgsr 8-1 — 6 

4 PRBMUM GOIti K CLmngham-BroNfi 

8-TAMcGtoee5 
MLTtasrasB 


Rain keeps 
Lendl 
and Lloyd 
waiting 

New York — Heavy rain 
halted the final first-round 
match in the Tournament of 
Champions after the top-seed. 
Ivan Lendl, had raced to a 6-3, 
2-2 lead over Italy's Francesco 
Cancelloni- 

The match was to be com- 
pleted yesterday with the winner 
returning to face Britain'^ John 

Uoyd in the second round at the 
West Side Tennis Club. 

Lloyd, who is ranked fortieth, 
rallied from a 0-3 deficit- in the 
second set to beat the American, 
Tom Wameke. a qualifier. 6-4.. 
6-4. Tm playing reasonably 
writ" said Llovd. “I'm gearing 
up my game for' Wimbledon, 
where I always play my besL" 

Achieving first-round vic- 
tories before the rain were the 
second seed. Boris Becker, of 
West Germany, who beat 
Spain's Juan Aguilera 6-2. 6-4. 
and the third seed, Joakjm 
Nystrom. of Sweden, who de- 
feated Larry Stefan ki. of the 
United States. 6-2. 6-2. 

Other successful seeds Were 
Yannick Noah, of France, Brad 
Gilbert, of the United States. 
Thierry Tulasne. of France. 
Andres Gomez, of Ecuador. 
Jimmy Arias, of the United 
States and Andreas Maurer, of 
West Germany. 

Giant task 
too big 
for Felgate 

Jonathan Southcombe. a 6ft 
7in. 20- year-old from Torquay, 
claimed his 15th British victim 
in a six-week spell, when he beat 
the Essex player. David Felgate, 
in the opening round of the 
Lawn Tennis Association's 
Spring Circuit tournament, at 
Bournemouth yesterday. 

Southcombe, who has spent 
the last three years in France — . 
“at least I can make some 
money there” — reached the 
second round with a 6-2. 6-7, 7-6 
win after Felgate, the British No. 

1 1. and a member of the 
’European Cup team earlier this 
year, had missed a match point 
at 6-5 in the final set. 

Southcombe might have won 
the match before it was stopped 
on the centre court because of 
bad light on Tuesday nighL 
Having coasted through the first 
set, he served for a 5-2-lead in 
the second before making mis- 
takes which enabled the 22-ycar- 
okl Felgate to scramble beck. 

SINGLES: FbM round: J 


Southcomoe {Devon) bt D Feuaie I Es- 
sex). 6-2, 6-7 7-6. Second round: T Pnam 


2.0 DORSET HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,664: 1m) (18) 


883 PROBLEM CHUJRVSroyffl 8-12 Cf 

130- M^RflTMOLES (O U McCojn 812 R 

080 ifiCHBMTSU S MMor 8-12 



. 1 008 OH TO GLORY J Duriop 9-7 G Baxter G 

5 040 GEORGES QUAY R Hannon 9-1- ANeOmS 

7 SOS PROBLEM CHUR VT 

8 

B . 

10 080 BRENT RNERS0E G BMfrig 8-12. 

11 008 MARKHJUS M Haynes 8-11.. 

14 0W- BALNACRAIQ J Douglas-Home 8-9, 

15 048- NO ST0PPMG R Harmon 8-9..., 

16 008 STANFORD VALE C 

18 800 EA5TBM PLAYER D 

19 048 WHIRLWG WORDS P _ 

20 001- AVENTWO J Swefrtfe 86 

22 000- CRACON GIRL J EoOey 0-6 
24 008 NO JAZZ C Bercsteso 
26 008 HREPROOPD Manes 64 

28 -M3 COSMCnJGHTMUMMr 

29 000- C8UAG P Batey 03 
11-4 AvenOna 7-2 Merrymote*. 5-1 Sontofa Veto. 6-1 On 

To GLory. 8-1 Rraprool. lrf-1 Cosmc FBgftL 12-1 MarkeUus, 
14-1 omen. 

£30 STOCKBROQE HANDICAP (£2,977: 7f) (20) 

1 200- HAB8 LAO (OnOLateg 4-108 R Quest 3 

3 448 HHJJO SUN9MNE (D) L Holt 7-94 — AKmbw(7)20 

4 300- HW COUNTRY (0) 0 Ssworffl 4-0-3 A MeGtene 16 

7 0300 KAMPGLOW DTlKW *8-13 

B 020- APR5- POOL LGoOrel 4-8-13 

9 000- CRNffiOURNE M Btenshew 4-6-12 — 

10 OfM SBUU£tOtBR W WtaKnan 4-8-12— 

11 440 WGH PITC»fe>jp) M Ksynea 7-8-10™ 

12 3-10 F0RMA1TME (5)6 ArtWWW 48-10. 

13 004 EVBfY EFFORT R Holder 4-88 

16 680 DOLLY A Moors 4-8-r 

18 no- SAmeoURNEJ Speenu 4 

19 000- M(3(Y MCX M Uslter 5-£&. 

23 A00 KAVAKA R Hsnnon 4-8- 

24 080 PEANOAY ( 

26 OOO- JABARABAI 

28 -430 H OPEFUL KATE ! 

29 0-00 SUPERRROST J I . 

31 308 PAMELA HEANEY (D) H Bessisy 

4-78RMMsef5)19 

32 000- S&en* GAM (U8AJW Jarvis 4-78 MThoesu 10 

4-1 Single. 5-1 Helo SunsMne, 6-1 Fair Country. 7-1 Every 

Effort, s-itomiw, Formatune. 10-1 DoBy. 12-1 Hopeful 
Kane. 14-1 HabsuscL 18-1 1 ~ 


008 REVHJNA D Thom 6-1 . 

0 SANTO nRNCESSMFeemersione-Godtoy 8-1 MMM4 

SNAPSHOT BABY RVoorspuy 8-1 D Brown 3 

58 Sperahott. 1KM0 Pramkm GoU. 9-2 Reveina. 6-1 
Gray Won Tiger. 8-1 Sarasota. 14-1 Hg Ma tetin Lymey, 20-1 
otners. 

A0 WINCANTON MAIDEN STAKES (Div (h 3-Y-O: 
£2,364: im 21) (14) 

5 008 AUTUMN RUTTER R Hamm 98 L Janas (H 4 

6 3-22 BENBARYDBl(BnCH»gMl98 PCoofcT 

8 8- BXXETH Canity 98 ZH RCteeatS 

10 3- COWAGE H JoniKOD-Hougran 98 JRaUII 

18 RVllflOFG Harwood 68-. GStaffleyS 

19 -> ro UUjP EED AHEAP R Smyly 98 PRterfflaoo8 

Ttt 


WOMBT8 SWGLES: First round: P 
Taserova (Cr) m L Gould (Essex). 6-1 . 84 


20 200- GAN0ON(USA)PCoIb 98--- 
■DO-- HOME OR MttY D Bsworffl 98 


44 XMGS CRUSADE Girons 98 
38 MAKE PEACE I BBttng 98. 



26 4- MOON MADNESS JOtrtop 90 

30 000- MR SAWAS J Dougias-Honw 98 
52 OB- 0RA7FY P Wahryn S-1 1 
60 T0N0UN J ToMr 8-11 
7-2 Moon Madness. 4-1 Coinage^ ftttteof. 6-1 Ganoon, 
8-1 Auunn Rutter. Bento Ryder, Make Peace. IB-1 King's 
Crusade. 12-1 Bfltet, 16-1 otnere. 

430 CITY BOWL HANDICAP (£2,750: 1m 6f) (11) 

1 4F1-4 FOLK OANCE I BakMg 48-10 Jltotffltos9 

4 -too WTUmOHJD) M Usher 4-8-11. 

5 008 MASTER FRANCS MBbntttord 488- 
7 903 SUGAR PALM (KR Hannon! 

10 080 COUJSTO p) K Brassey 5-88. 

11 1/00- N05TER PUER (USA) D Bs»cni 

888JtedceCoyle{7)7 

13 398 WUGWGBiraDOutfiton 4-7-13 SCnokyS 

14 098 WCH00WER (OW Wrfman 9-78 — ML Items 2 

15 -144 BRKMOCR JACtoUES t Austin 5-7-7.— CRMttr (5) 6 

16 800 MY CHARA PEff^ Mrs B Wanng 5-7-7 RFB*8 


19 008 CAWARRAI 


me 


5-7-7- J Carter (7) 10 


9-4 Fofc Dance. 7-2 Bnsadtor Jacques. 4-1 MuWon. 9-2 
Sugar Palm, 8-1 Master Francis. wadGmger. 10-1 Imfflgowar. 
Noster Puer, 16-1 others. 

5 JO WINCANTON MAIDEN STAKES (Dhr IIL* 3-Y-O: 
£2364: 1m 21) (14) 

>98 —7 

-G Starkey5 
_ T Quinn 13 
-MMtolO 
N Howe 6 


318 BStNTORA BOV M Haynes 98. 

BIBHDOG Harwood 98 

0 COLEMAN HAWKINS P Makn 98.. 
0- DAMHBO L CoOraB 9-0 


030- CXWAAN P Wahrvn 9-0 
■2- FLORAL CHARGE M 


7 
9 
11 
12 
14 
17 

21 008 GAY CARUSO K 
23 

29 002- 
45 
48 

S 0- MA FEATHERS R 
59 000- THEREAFTER W 
62 00- VITRYC James 8-t 
3-1 Floral Charge, 7-2 


GAY CARUSO K Braasey 98-. 

H0TURBAJJ Dunlop 98 

BKXJRAOA81A D EtoMfth 98- 

ZAAJBt J Dirtoo 98 

BHOKBI WAVE H C andy 8-11. 

8-11M 


R JoteaotvHouteem 98 - J Rate 8 

98 TLccas12 

RFoa 1 

_AMcG*ooa4 
„ B Rouse 11 

RCBOrt3 

P R o w ra n 14 
_ O Mdtay B 
. J Blae a JMa 2 
11-2 DlwasR, 6-1 


8 - 11 . 


Bushido. 

Mouradteia. 8-1 Zaafor, 10-1 Broken Wave, Hotu. 16-1 offlers. 


M R Ratcnnova (Cz). 78. 6-2: N Zvereva 
(USSR) tn L Mesto (USSR), 6-3. 6-2; A 
Tiezzj (Arg) m N Bykova (CZL 6-3. S-1. 

90 and still 
sail going strong 

Kathleen God free celebrated 
her 90th birthday yesterday as 
guest of honour at a luncheon 
oven by the All England Tennis 
Zlub at Wimbledon. Known as 
Biddy to close friends and KJtty 
by an admiring public of the 
1920s and '30s. she was the 
finest woman all-round games' 
player in her prime. 

She not only remains the 
oldest Wimbledon singles 
champion of 1 924 and 1926. but 
won the All England badminton 
title in 1920. 2 F, 22. and 24, was 
a lacrosse international and 
gained an ice skating medal at 
the age of 10. Bui as remarkable 
as anything was her feat as a 
nine-year-old when she bicycled 
with her mother, father, sister 
and governess from London to 
Berlin in 1905. a mere matter of 
600 miles. 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 


(7 JO imtess stated) 

FOOTBALL 

Second division 

Bradford v Wimbledon 

SMUtNOPF RUSH LEAGUE: Gleravon v 
CftftorviBB/7.ia. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Rrat dMskm: New- 
castle v Evemn (78): Sheffield Urwed v 
Hug West Bromwich v Derby (7.0). 
SaeondrMaloK Grrmtew v Notts County 
(7.0): Scunthorpe v Blackpool (78): 
WOMM v MidfflrabrourtrfT® 

LL COMBUSTION: ' 


The 

Giilion 


ag, trained ai 
James Bethel], was 
i spell ibr his 

owner, Maggie 
Hraih. She has eight horses, 
divided equally between Bethel! 
and Oliver Sherwood, and this 
was her seventh winner since 
Christmas. 


furlongs at Longchamp today. 

Patrick Biancone's colt did 
not race as a two-year-old, and 
won impressively on his debut 
in the Pnx Ksamondo on April 
7. The son Of Lightning fol- 
lowed up in the Prix la Sorellina 
15 days later, and the third horse 
that day. Saiyf, who was beaten 
five lengths, went on to run 
-Miscrown to a short head in 
Milan's Premio Ambrosiano.’ 

The Aga Khan's Altayan 
(Yves Saint Martin) looks the 
roost dangerous of Prather's 
three opponents. He won his 
. only race, the Prix Cboisy-te- 
Roi, by just a short bead. 

• Chester racecourse is" 
overcoming the setback of the 
grandstand fire, loss of tele- 
virion coverage for the big May 
meeting, and the demotion of 
two important races — the Dee 
Stakes and Cheshire Oaks — 
from Group status. 

ChariesTofler. thedeik of the 
course, said: “Television has 
made no difference to our. 
attendances which, on the first 
day. were up on 1984 and a 
small percentage down on last 
year. Despite the loss of BBC 
television coverage, Ladbrokes 
and other firms have been very 
good and stuck with us for 
sponsorship. 1 am very hopeful 
that we shall be tack on 
' television next year with cover- 
age supplied by Channel 4'. 

Point-to-point results 


FIFE Hunt; - 
Of Bundody. 
OUve Press. 


OU Fool Rk Stream 
Fooish Haro. Opera 


— — — Flying Acs. 

Carr-flate. Mdnlfc Bronza mowe.^ 

Blinkered fist time 

SALISBURY-. 3JSQ Bens vtin. 430 
CmanaBelBL 


SEDGEFIELD 


Going: good to soft 

5.45 RSHBURN CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£676: 2m 41) (14 
runners) 

3 800 FELIXSTOWE UU) (C) J Johnson 7-11-0 

4 3P IP BARLEY BRAKE R Baft 10-11-7 CDteteto 

5 008 ROYAL OPPORTUWTY (B)(C8) ROodS 8-t 18 PMMB 

7 0000 STAR EVOrrjFWwfl 18 RBNMW 

9 003F ATHENS STAR (BHD) J Brartoy 11-10-13 CCowtey 

11 MOB HYIK I Anderson 910-H — 

12 2BBP GRAMSAL(D) MISS GROSS 
11-10-11 JWHTbteteMOR 

7-10-10 D Condo! 

10-10 DKaAroi 

15 PS20 BAVAL (F*B IC8) (BF) D Ybottwi 9-1 0-1 0_ PA FteraB 

15 048 G0L0 FLOOR (fflJBrafflm 9-10-7 — StenonJteraa 

16 0030 GALTMII (BMO) T SH 7-193 CPrtace 

19 F8F MJADQRWSkro 5-10-1 HCesoo 

• 23 0FPP CAim&MOHJUSCHjqto 13-108 MMtSgra 

5-2 BavaL 3-1 Athens Star. 4-1 QrangeML 6-1 Son of 
Manedo, 8-1 Star Evednt 12-1 offlers. 


13 2F0B MOSSY CONES ®)W A 

14 2200 SONOFHANAOOJWWB 


18 0002 PERFECT MAGE W Storey 6-1 0-13.. 

21 -403 PRMGE BUBBLY M Avtton 5-10-11- 

22 004U CWBSETT Q Hal 5-108 — : 

23 0000 AmELLMA Mss Z Green 5-10 
11-10 Hardy Ranch, 4-1 Go On Joe, Perfect Image, 6-1 

fcnpags. 10-1 offlers. 

7.15 SftMERE HANDICAP CHASE £1,732: 3m 
600yds) (It) 

2 21F2 UNSCRUPULOUS JUDGE (C-INW A Stephenson 

9-11-13CGot* 

3 4240 CASA KNME(BF| DINS 11-118 HrKB»M(7) 

6 408 LA BOEUF(C8)D Lamb 10-11-2 RLasffl 

7 080 STRAWMLL (C-O) E Alston 11-11-1 KDoolsa 

0 048 HAPPY WORf^RM W Easterhy 11-11-1 PTtadk 

9 2sn TARMGHT IB-O M Sksuw 9-10-13 RDuaraody 

12 4PPF TWIRJGHT(C-5) J Chsnton 11-108 REamsbaw 

13 31PS [TS A CAPPER (6a JR Turner B-104 INSSfflen(7) 

15 20U1 KEtoSTEAO (WJ) w Fartgnlm 8-104 (8sx)_ J Haaran 

16 268 BU8TAPHA J Hates ilrT RmO 

19 40PP PURPLE BEAM (08) TBsmn 7-108.. 


Sedgefield selections 

By Mandarin 

5 45 BavaL 6 15 Bickeretaffe. 6 45 Go On Joe. 7 
15 Unscrupulous Judge- 7 45 Mendriita. 8 15 
Mirpur. 


6-2 Unsoupuiws Judge, 7-2 Tar Knight 5-1 NewatBBd. 6- 
1 Mustepha.8-1 Its A Capper. 10-1 CasaKi4)e, 1M Stoma 
7-45 A I HANDICAP CHASE (£1,295: 2m 4f) (11) * 

3 13U4 GOWAN HOUSE (D81W A Stephenson 7-11-7 R Larob 

4 2143 IBDEmA (BkfaP Gangs 10-1 1-5 ASftigtr 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Charfton 
Bnaol Rovers (38t Fulham v Queen's 
Park Rangers (128); Futfiam v Miitwan 
(68* Tottenham v MllvvaU (28) 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Cap 
flnaL second leg: Tottenham v Arsenal 
(78). 

HERTS SENIOR CUP: Final: Barnet v 
Stevenage pa Bishoe's Stontonfl. 
CAPITAL LEAGUE: Enfield v Brentford 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Premier 
(MsIok Cottar Row v Watfflam Aboey. 

BUILDING SCS« EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Braintree v Tiptree: Wisbecn v 
StowmaftceL 

GREAT MIS WESTSIN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier cCvisAw. Chippenham » Bristol 
Manor Farm (6.45L Exmouth v Chard 
(7.45) 

NEIC GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
L E AGU E: Premier efi vision. Hoibeacn v 
Ampfflrtl. 

. NORTH WEST COUNTIES LEAGUE: First 
dhiteton: Fomw V Leek; Man v 

NemerfieW v StatyBndfle 


Congwon: 

ceifc 


6 40DO SEAI 

7 P240 RAT 


1 0 Braraan 10-11-4. 
)J Johnson 8-11-3. 


6.15 STANDEY inOMPSQN MEMORIAL 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.130: 3m 600yd) (10) 

2 1F20 R.YMGOATS (USA) nfS) W McGnie 

8-118ttrKAmtereon(7) 


3 388 THUS StUERSMCPsker 19-1 1*S— Mr LttedsOB 
Tff)RnmBr< 

6 0013 BCKERSTAFFEf 


7 P412 FAR BA VAIS) 

- B MID «L-TDTB)Jttn0fl 9-19-11 

12 MOO TABWZ Q0LD (QJJonnson 7-195- 

13 0401 BRKhUKMAASpOlt 5-190 (5e*l. 

21 POP SLQNC STREET J fatter 3-198 — - 

22 880 BRIGAD&t GREEN C H0)M 8198 


r 6-1 1-2.. 


MWEutertiy 5-l1-l._ 


5 2D8 RAOASURYI 


MMnobsr 

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BYouUenl 
HrS Woods ( 

urn.. 

j: D Condsll (7) 

RDuuauuily 

— IfrPAwry 


8 1000 SAINT-MUMifWq l*s DCutam 12-118 R 

9 09F RABWSW J HrS s 11-118. Mr T Read 

10 OOPS LEGALEMPBKM M Naigmon 8-10-11— M Hammond 

3 Si MKMH£S£t8sn£5 

MF44U TUMBLE JMTCunrghsm 

18 3012 SHOOLBI PRMCE F Vftfcar 8 

•« cm BtErtatnB&as^ 

8.15 SEEDLING NOVICE HURDLE (£932: 2m 4f) 
(IB) 

2 DPH POfaBH YREBB-AScoas-ii-S DOete«s(7) 

3 0033 FROSTY TOUCH Mrc E Stock 8-118 REwnte* 

5 2140 JACK OF CLUBS McLean 6-1 18 — 

6 0120 SHEUKSE HOT ©faMreJ BVT 


11-4 Brigarona. 10980 WU-TtX, 5-1 Fair BavanL 6-1 
BWvarstalio, 8-1 Flywig Oats. 10-1 Three StWteR, 

MyaawM posts, novbe chase 

2 “2: * aa EY 80 TT BanteS 7-118 MBmm 

! £SS Bg mnCQJ Oraton 8 - 11-4 Z^SLZSXz 

4 dpm connector o Ye*™ 7-iM^Iirp A Parmfl 

5 B 3 U- rafiTKaSON w A o 

6 M4 GOON J0£ JRdanlson 12-1 M 

l "SSL'S*!? 1 M fl 1 *WB 7-11-11 M 

J SS S? Boftoon 8 - 11 -* — MrPDMs 

16 Vfi OOOO GOWGffiRLB Swam 6 - 10 - 13 .. lfcs££! 


14 9- C AST1E T RACK EABCT 5-118 

IfiflPW FUTtmaiE(B)R Peacock 7-118 
19 00 PANAVBTA W A Stepnenson 6-118. 

24 P-04 RUnuHR Barr 7-118.: 

25 -00D WTA8 LOVE Denys ante 5-1 18— 
27 ODD SPRWGVALE HD RRster 5-118 - 


H18MrTDSttBJ(7) 

MAMBB (7) 


.CGraat 


29 2P00 WNTBtS 50VERSGN G Ottwfl 6-118 GW 

30 01 MIRPUR Mrs G Rewtev 4-10-iaI 


01 MIRPUR Mrs G tto wte y 4-10-13 
32 MPP CAP THAT j R Tuner 5-108 .. 


as 

PTacfc 


PNMtei ( 

_ MrSStrteml. 

34 080 CB.TIC FLORA Mre M Thomas 5-108 CUmoo 

£ f aB MUTNB M Bterte S-1M A town 

39 40n KSS WOODY J Hatiare 6-194 PTudc 

42 FOOS PlAYMG N Prngle 7 *lM — 

44 6000 8AM0NIA B Ufluaruon 8-108 BDteanoad 

l38^aS^5Sc£w l R M 5t '** n ^ r& PW? 

offlers! 


RUTqmt. 10-1 Mirpur. Ritas Low. 12-1 


ESSEX THAMES-SIDE TROPHY; Final; 
Wtaimainstow Avenue v Grays. 

CRICKET 
TOUR MATCH 
(11.30 » 6.30) 
WORCESTER; Worcestershire v Indians 
BRITANNIC ASSURANCE 
COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
(1 1.0, 1 10 overs minimum] 
CHELMSFORD: Essex v Kent 
OLD TRATTORDl Lancs v Hampshire 
LORD’S: Middlesex « Lercestersture 
NORTHAMPTON: Northerns v Gtoucs 
TAtMTON: Sonerset v Glamorgan 
THE OVAL; Surrey v WarwCkotere 
HEADINGLEY: YOfkStWQ v Sussex 

OTHER MATCH 
THE PARKS: OxKjjO Unlw v Notts 
SECOND XI CHAMPtONSWP: OkaelMb 
□erhysnra v Ncrthamptoncturs: Bristol! 
GtoucesnraiMS v Somereet: Leic es ter. 
LeicasterBhire v Glamorgan: Edghasten: 
Wanmckstire v Lancashire 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

SECOND DIVISION: Blackpool Borougn v 
SaBey (7 30): MansIteU Uarteman u 
Fulham (8-0). 

OTHER SPORT 

RACKETS: Caiaenary championships (at 
Que en's C trA?). 

EQUESTRIANISM: Royal Windsor Show. 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 








We offer you 173 First Class business 
connections to Germany every week. 



JAGUAR 


V*H >, H hdhllMa 

BORAX 






BB/T/SB 



GUINNESS OVERSEAS 


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TELECOAX 


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Pola roid 



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Vickers 


an 


IIS .llllill 

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hum 


Lucas Aerospace 



Kodak 


CD 


EOJBEB 13 


PEAT 

MARWICK 


C Bertelsmann 



NIXDORF 

COMPUTER 



SIEMENS 


PHILIPP HOLZM ANN 


BASF 


Dresdner Bank 



(gnlinenlai ‘ MBB 

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Deutsche Bank 



MERCK 


Mercedes-Benz. 


BOSCH CMTRGi ) 



Hoechst 




Bayer 


SAVE 




In 1985, we carried 1.175.324 pas- 
sengers between Great Britain and 
Germany. So we can certainly claim 
some credit for promoting the 


excellent economic relationship 
between the two countries. 

In other words, we’ve given wings 
to the business boom. The Anglo- 


German connection however is not 
just a business affair. We’re de- 
lighted to have you travel with us 
privately too. 
















fi>v 4 


BBC. 1 


tv-am 


and NHcfc Owen. 


CHOICE 


Pinofihet 



. should beoln at home 


No 1: Gavritov with LSO). 

_ SUM News 

895 Thts Week’s Composer: 
O ctegh em. Marian 
motets, and Mass based on 
fws own Chanson and 
. toment on his death. With 
Pontanum Mustces. Also 
Josquin's Nymphos das 


Ensemble 


Ptey«{G major 


Polyphony), York Hoter 

(Piano Concern), end David 
Matthews (In the dark 
time). Conductors: Mark 
Elder and Qgar Howarth 
11.10 Park Lane Sextet; 

Strauss (String Sextet, 
Capriccio). and Reger's 
Sextet in F. Op IIS 
11-57 News. 1230 Ctoeedown. 


"»«i and Miriam 
O Rb%. in this third 






gg^Wjbreast- and 

1130 KSSt^? rNoonwfth 

™**» I SovsrdaiB and 
Moira Stuart, fnciudss 
tow headlines with 
subtitles 12J55 Regional 

1 U» Pebble mih at One with 

A.7«?ng the guests are 
who 

talks about his and 

career; and Rita 
PanW^daughiar-in. 
jaw of Sylvia, one of the 

Fawcett Library, an 
historical collection of 
feminist books, 
documents and 
n»tjorabffia housed tn the 
j£5?» 'Polytechnic. 1.45 I 

22S SSfiSH 

news. 

3JB Lay on Five from 
Westminster Sports 
Centre, presented by 

RoeBa Benjamin and 
Robin Stavens 4.10 Laurel 
and Hardy. Cartoon 4.15 
"TOff Briggs. Part ten of 

4^0Ufy»es3l!^£Lf 

*«33Sg^S“ rt "- 

HewsroundSJJSBIuB 
Peter- In the studio, along 
his 84 models of 
football grounds around 
the country is John Le 
Manre. When he has all 92 
English Football League 
grounds John Is turning 
fife attention to Test Match 
^ouj^sandWlmbJedoa 

5-35 Go tar ttL The Priestley's 
from Glasgow take up ttie 

heaJthychBiafma 
_ (Ceefax) 

6^0 News with Sue Lawley and 

635 £^^-W*3er- 

730 Topol (he Pope , 

presented by John Peel , 

and Janice Long. * 

7-30 EaartEndara.Thepofice's ■ 


investigating the daring 
bank robbery, does not 
deter the protection racket 


MO Tomorrow's Wodd. A - 
celebration of the 
programme's 21 st 
birthday, divided into six 
chronological sections, 

recalling thaiiiggest^ 

stories, entfing with an 
assessment cxthesertes. 

9-00 News with Jti&a SomervBje 
and John Hufnphrys. - - 
_ Weather. 1 . 

9-30 Bread. The second in 
Carla Lane's comedy 
series about a Liverpool 
family coping with the 
ejects of unemployment 
10W Question Thne. Sir Robin 
Day's panel comprises BU 
Morris, Suzanne Reeve, 
Lord Young and Ian 


IT V/LONDON 

■; i I I I 


in nation 


BBC 2 jr CHANNEL 4 








Show at 


a review of last night's 
BiropeanCupfliS;and 
the last of Steve Davis's 
. snookerflps. 

5-45 Nbws with Carol Barnes 
BM Thames news. 

8JS HelplVrv Taylor Gee with 
. paws of a Bereavement 




Bleriotto 





pomecy senes about two 
half-brothers who nm a 
dubious second-hand car 


Wriggfesworth. 

11-00 Brarfi, BrazB. This third of 
tour films about the South 
American country 
examines the north-east, 
an area that has suffered 
12 droughts in this 
century, (rt 
1149 Weather. 

11-50 Local Election* 88. David 
Dlmbleby presents the 
results from the local 
elections and the two 
parliamentary by- 
elections. Professor Ivor 
Crewe co m ments: Pater 
Snow analyses the 
results; and Sir Robto Day 
assesses reaction in' 
Westminster. Ends at ' 
230. 


8.10 Bookmark. The final 
programme of the series, 
presented by Ian Hamilton. 
Timothy Mo talks about 
Ms book, An insular 
Poss ession; A. Alvarez, 

• from the North Cormorant 
'oil platform in the North 
Sea, muses on Ms latest, - 
„ Offehore; and Dr Robert 
~ r Bunarfiaw comm en ts on ~ 
Nigel WUhams'fikn about 
. 'S to T tee last volume of 
the_ supplement to the 
OJED.ofwhtehDr 
^ Burchfield is editor. 

9J» TteCtajnrayanL Comedy 
- about a car 

dealer, who; after an 
-- acodent, believes he has 
• psychic powers. Starring 


Episode two of the four- 
part drama, written by 
Fanukh Dhondy, mdse 
to London's East End. 
Starring Tkn Roth, 21 a 
Mohyeodto, Gwyneth 
and lan Dury. 

025 bpenSpaceeTheCtiBs 
Connection A new series 

begins with this film 
documentary made by the 
• Chita Sofidartty Campaign 



Ken Bruce (s) iijgo 


any De AngeU (s) 1.05pm 
Jacobs (s) i5s Gloria 


[ ■ vv-Miwiu, wvingoy am 

Winfrith Heath. 

830 Club Mix presented by 
SmHey Culture and Saz 
Samrabove. The guests 
frfcHJoe watfbrd ftfcffiaBe'rr 
John Barnes; Kanda 
Bongo Man, one of Zaire's 
lop Minds; and dub 
Prof® 8 ® Joan Breeze. 

930 What Now? Episode six of 
the seven part drama 
SBfteJ. written by Ptm 
Hpdmond. about a group 
of unemployed vouna 


Geography. 


Radio 3 


On medium wave. VHF variations at 
end of Radio 3 
635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Morning Concert Bach 
(Suite No 2 'm B minor. 


(Journey Into 


730 Schubert Nobuko Imai 



Radio 1 


WORLD SERVICE 




630 News; Financial Report 
630 Brain of Britain 1986. 

___ First round: Mkflands (rt 
730 News 735 The Archera 
730 Any Answers? A chance 
to air your views on 
some of the subjects raised 

- in last week's Any 
Questions? ' ' ' ' 

7-40 Mexican Journey. Hugh 


(Suite No 2 in B minor, 
BWV 1067; with Barthold 
Ku^en.fiuts), Schubert 
(Gretchen am Spin tirade: 
Norman .soprano), 

Dvorak (symphonic poem 
The Golden spinning 
Wheel). 830 News 

835 Concert (contd): Debussy 
(Aimons-nous at 
domions: Jane, with Mady 
Mespte.soprano). 

- - Mendelssohn (Sextet Op- • 
HO.tor piano.strfngs), 
Prokofiev (Piano Concerto 


Wtorw 12 JXJ News 12 J» News Atout 
Bittern liis Radio Newsreel izao Music 
Now 130 News 131 Outlook LM 
Ftandera and Swam 145 Book Choce 
Meantime 230 News 209 
Re*j?w of the British Press 2 . 1 S Trairami 


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1 





40 


THURSDAY MAY 8 1986 


High security 


for Robson’s 


flight of hope 


Tight security surrounded 
the England World Cup squad 
when they flew out of Gatwick 
yesterday en route to Colora- 
do where they will undergo 
altitude training in prepara- 
tion for the cauldron of 
Mexico. 

Following recent terrorist 
outrages, no rides were being 
takea. The players and offi-. 
trials were driven by coach 
through to a special area 
beyond passport control and 
not allowed to walk through 
the airport terminal A 
Gatwick security officer said; 
“1 have not seen anything like 
it before.” 

England's manager, Bobby 
Robson, said before the 
party's departure that they 
were determined not to let 
anybody down. He said: “The 
supporters want us to do welL 
and I think they are expecting 
us to do welL 

“It won't be easy. It’s a big 
mission, a difficult mission, 
but we won't be found lacking 
in application or determina- 
tion. We know what's at stake 
and we know we are represent- 
ing the country.” 

Robson will be hoping that 
the scenes which greeted the 
Argentinians on their arrival 
in Mexico City yesterday are 
not repeated when England 
touch down there for the 
finals, which begin on May 3 1 . 
Angry words and punches 
were exchanged between foot- 
ball officials and reporters 
covering the former world 
champions's arrival. 


The healing 


Seville. Spain (Renter) — 
Liverpool and Jnventns sup- 
porters were brought together 
in an emotional reconciliation 
here yesterday, one year after 
the European Cop final in 
Brussels where 39 died. 

The Mayor of Seville, where 
this year's Gnal is staged, 
presided over the ceremony in 
which delegations exchanged 
gifts. “This is a moment to 
remember the victims and to 
begin rebuilding onr 
friendship,'' Liverpool's May- 
or. Hugh Dalton, said. “As 
teams. Liverpool and Jnventns 
were innocent: the clubs were 
disgraced by a few 
supporters,*' Giogjo Cardetti, 
the Mayor of Turin. replied. 

Despite being stabbed at the 
Heysel stadium, 22-year-old 
Steven Jackson said the trage- 


dy had not destroyed his love 


of footbalL “We want to be 


good ambassadors for oar 
dab,” be said. 


Newsmen blamed the offi- 
cials for the chaos, saying they 
failed to issue enough passes 
for a Press conference which 
eventually had to be 
abandoned. 

The trouble has fuelled 
criticism in the captial that the 
Mexicans are ill-prepared to 
handle one of the world’s 
major sporting showpieces. 

The Argentinian captain, 
Diego Maradona, was jostled 
by a crowd of onlookers who 


ice to the 
Mexican forward, Hugo San- 
chez, currently playing with 
Real Madrid and the leading 
scorer in Spain. 

The independent Radio 
Red station said such nation- 
alistic outbursts were exam- 
ples of poor sportsmanship. It 
said it hoped Mexican sup- 
porters would show greater 
hospitality -when other teams 
arrived. 

The leading daily sports 
newspaper, Ovaciones, echoed 
the sentiment in an editorial: 
“Mexico is an example of 
disorganisation simply be- 
cause nobody bothered to 
organise the reception of the 
Argentine players." 

After being escorted to bus- 
es by a strong contingent c* 
police, the players were take* 
to a nearby hotel where they 
enjoyed a traditional Argen- 
tinian breakfast of wine and 
beef and spoke to reporters 
who managed to slip through 
the security cordon. 

Their manager, Carlos 
Bilardo. said the squad would 
spend the remainder of the 
day resting after their ordeal. 
He said they would move into 
lodgings at the America Fooi- 
ball Cub's sporting complex 
today. 

Argentina will play the 
World Cup holders, Italy, 
Bulgaria and South Korea in 
Group A first round matches 


Real keep 
hold of 


their cup 


Players who failed 
to reach Mexico 


West Berlin (Renter) - Real 
Madrid retained the UEFA 
Cup on Tuesday night the 
eighth time they have won a 
European trophy, ’despite 
Cologne's valiant effort to 
make up a 5-1 deficit from the 
first leg. The West Germans, 
who were forced to play their 
home leg at least 350 
kilometres (220 miles) from 
their stadium because of vio- 
lence by their supporters at 
their semi-final in Belgium, 
won 2-0. Real won 5-3 on 
aggregate. 

Cologne attacked constantly 
and were rewarded with goals 
from Be in in the 23rd minute, 
and Geflenkirchen in the 
72nd. Bat they ran np against 
stubborn Spanish resistance, 
and found Agnstin, the Real, 
goalkeeper outstanding 
Real's only threatening at- 
tempt at goal was from 
Gordfllo who hit the bar. The 
dab have woo the European 
Cup six tunes and have now 
taken the UEFA Cup two 
years miming. They wiD not 
go for a treble, having earned a. 
place in the European Cup 


Tony Morley and Bobby 
Robson stood side by side 
when England's new manager 
set out for Mexico four years 
ago. Robson is now within 
sight of his destination — the 
squad flew out yesterday — but 
somewhere along the way 
Morley got diverted on to the 
ro3d to Hong Kong. 

Morley, a winger who 
played in Robson's first match 
in charge, a 2-2 European 
Championship draw in Den- 
mark. is playing for Seiko after 
an unhappy £130,000 move 
from Aston Villa to West 
Bromwich Albion three years 
ago. Osman. Rix. Mariner, 
Armstrong and Clemence 
have all long since disap- 
peared from the international 
scene, too, after being in that 
original Robson squad. 

Ironically, having left Ips- 
wich Town in an attempt to 
restore his England standing, 
Osman could not regain his 
place after a £200.000 move to 
Leicester City in the summer. 

. Robson tried 61 players in 
his 42 games over the past four 
years and a glance at the early 
squads is like a trip doom 


memory lane. He immediately 
discarded Keegan. Mills and 
McDermott, but Neal (now 
player-manager at Bolton 
Wanderers and hoping for one 
more Wembley appearance in 
the Freight Rover Trophy 
final), Thompson. Coppell 
and Mariner were briefly 
retained. 


Gregory (Queen’s Park 
Rangers), Lee (Liverpool), 
Devonshire (West Ham Unit- 
ed). Blissett (Watford) and 
Duxbury (Manchester Unit- 
ed) were others tried. 


England's first World Cup 
qualifying match saw the in- 
troduction of Tottenham 
Hotspur's utility man. Gary 
Stevens, but it was not until 
the sixth of the eight qualify- 
ing matches that his Everton 
full back namesake joined the 
Worid Cup traiL 


Aston Villa's midfield play- 
er. Hodge, is the most recent 
recruit for Mexico, leaving 
earlier contenders, such as 
Williams (Arsenal), Mabbutt 
(Tottenham) and Hunt (Aston 
Villa), to wonder what went 
wrong. 


Multiple Sclerosis is merciless. 

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And there’s no cure. 

'let. 

Every penny you contribute to the Multiple 
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It also brings some comfort to die many 
thousands who suffer the misery of impaired speech, 
loss of eyesight incontinence and paralysis. 

The much-publicised evencs of the past twelve 
months have demonstrated iust how generous 
people can be when they believe in a cause. 

Our cause is very important 

Please give as much as you can. 

Because the sooner we find the answer the 
sooner we can ensure that the lives of those nearest to 
you are nor tom apart 


If charity begins at 
home, imagine yours being 
torn apart 



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Tdcplvmcrni "<oiUn- C.mi Bank I'M i 1 


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YACHTING 


Cudmore 
will not 
defend title 


By Barry Pickthall 


Ten leading America's Cup 
skippers descend on 
Lymington next week to do 
battle for the Westerly Royal 
Lymington Cup, Britain's pre- 
mier match-racing champion- 
ship. Harold Cudmore. the 
man who has made this event 
all but his own .in previous 
years, will not be there to 
defend the title he has won six 
limes before. 

Cudmore. who is skipper of 
Britain's America's Cup chal- 
lenge and added the Congres- 
sional Cup earlier this year to 
the 10 previous international 
match race titles he has won. 
blames pressure of work in 
masterminding Britain's 12- 
metre hopes in Fremantle for 
not appearing this year. 


In his place are Chris Law 
and Eddie Warden-Owen. the 
two leading -helmsmen from 
the British challenge, and 
Lawrie Smith, who has been 
sailing with Kevin Parry’s 
Australian Task Force *87 
Syndicate this winter, to up- 
hold national honour against 
skippers from the United 
States. New Zealand. Italy and 
West Germany. * - 

Another invited helmsman 
not taking part is Stefane 
RobertL who has left the Aga 
Khan's Azzurra Syndicate. 
His place' has now been taken 
by his fellow Italian, Lorenzo 
Bortolotti. who skippered 
Azzurra in the recent 12 metre 
world championship. 





THE 


TIMES 


SPORT 


reached out to touch him. 
When police pushed them 
back they became angry and 


began chanting “Hugo. Hugo. 
Hugo”, a referenc 



Robson and Robson: England's captain, Bryan (left), and manager Bobby at a reception before their departs* for Menace 


• Middlesbrough's teenage 
midfield player. Colin Cooper, 
has signed a new one-year 
contract Cooper made his 
second division debut in 
March and played eight games 
in the club's unsuccessful fight 
to avoid relegation. 


T- J. 


Dunnett guaranteed seat on committee 


Nineteen top Football 
I pfl g ut* chair man and directors 
are contesting the eight places 
on the League's new-look man- 
agement committee. Only Jack 
Dunnett, the League president, 
is guaranteed his seat on the re- 
formed committee. He is unop- 
posed as the representative for 
the third and fourth divisions. 

' There are 10 contenders for 
the first division's four {daces 
and eight nominations for the 
second division's three seats. 
Ballot papers have been sent 
out and the results should be 
known on Tuesday. 

The new committee will 
come to power after the 
League's annual general meet- 
ing in London on May 23, 
although a new president wiD 
be elected by the meeting. 

The nominations are: First 


division: David Dein (Arsenal), 
Doug Ellis (.Aston Villa). Ken 
Bates (Chelsea). Phil Outer 
(EvertonX John Smith (Luton), 
Ron Mackenzie (Newcastle), 
Maurice Roworth (Nottingham 
Forest), Ben McGee (Sheffield 
Wednesday). Irving Scholar 
(Tottenham), Geoff Smith 
(Watford). Second division: Bill 
Fox (Blackburn), Brian Bedson 
(Brighton). Ron Noades (Crys- 
tal Palace), Chris Needier 
(Hull), Maxwell Holmes 
(Leeds), Ian Stott (OldbamX 
Derek Dooley (Sheffield Unit- 
ed), Alan Everiss (West 
Bromwich). Third and fourth 
divisions: Jack Dunnett (Notts 
County). 

• Leicester City have dis- 
missed Gerry Summers, aged 
52. their coach, and are now 
looking for “a younger man” to 


■lake over his dirtier and eventu- 
ally succeed Gordon Mflne, ihe 
club's present manager.The fil- 
bert Street board want M3ne to 
appoint a No. 2 to groom as his 
successor so he can ultimately 
become general manner. 

The fixture ofboth Milne and 
Summers looked under threat 
as Leicester struggled to avoid 
relegation, but they secured 
their first division future with a 
win on the last Saturday of die 
season. 

Teny Shipman, Leicester’s 
chairman, that a fresh 
ap pr o a ch was needed at the 
dub and that Milne accepted 
this Portsmouth's" 

chief scout, Derek Healy, has 
become the first victim of the 
club's failure to reach the first 
division. After four yeazs at 
Fratton Park Healy has bees 


told that his contract is not 
being renewed. 


• Gyorgy Mezei, Hungary's 
manager, has been forced to 
rede out three players from his 
squad preparing for the Worid 
Dip in Mexico. Tibor Nyilasi, 
an outstanding forward, has 
stiD not recovered from a back 
operation five weeks ago and 
his replacement,/ Andras 
Torocsik. has been ruled out 
because of an ankle injury. 


Peter Hanmch, a nudfi c M 
player, who was recalled to toe 
national side after a yea's 
absence; is also injured and 
misses the finals. The squad is 
currently in a seduded 


camp in toe Austrian Alps, 
they leave for Mexico on May 
19. 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Glazzard 
set to 
steal show 


By Jenny MacArthnr 

Although Britain's four Eu- 
ropean team gold medal win- 
ners are all competing at the 
Royal Windsor Horse Show 
which starts today in the 
Home Park, it is the less 
experienced Geoff Glazzard 
who looks set to dominate the 
showjumping classes. 


-Glazzard, who is in his first 
year of sponsorship with 
N.R.G. Vision, is bringing 
four on-form horses, headed 
by the nine-year-old, 
Petrwood Fleetline, on whom 
he won the area international 
trials at the Newark and Notts 
Show last weekend. 


He has a second top-ciass 
contender in Steve Hadley's 
former ride, Sunorra, now i5. 
who showed all her old zest 
when winning the AIT at 
Taplow last month. Idle Ge- 
nius. a winner at Leicester this 
week, and the less experienced 
Kid Curry, winner of a good 
class at Taplow, make up 
Glazzard’s complement 


For the four medal winners 
— Malcolm Pyrah, John and 
Michael Whitaker and Nick 
Skelton — Windsor is a last 
outing before next week's 
Nations Cup meeting in 
Spain. John Whitaker is riding 
Next Ryan's Son, winner of 
the main dass at Newark, and 
the grey gelding. Milton. 


Pyrah will jump Toweriands 
Diamond Seek 


GOLF 


Made to measure for Davies 


From John Hetmessy, Chantflly 


The Hennessy Cognac Cup, 
which starts today, has attract- 
ed the biggest field in the 
seven-year history of the 
Women’s Professional Golf 
Association, a gathering of 104 
players. The total including 
six amateurs, would have been 
105 had not the air attacks on 
Tripoli and Benghazi fright- 
ened off Patty Sheehan, the 
leading name from the United 
States. 

The strength of. the entry is 
hardly surprising, since the 
tournament's prize fund of 
£60,000 is also a record, with 


In the absence of Miss 
Sheehan, the limelight fefls on 
Laura Davies, the Surrey play- 
er, who took the WPGA tour 
by storm last year in her first 
season. More to the point, the 
French wiD recall the memora- 
ble fight and fright Miss Da- 
vies gave to Jan Stephenson, of 
Australia. last year's expensive 
importation, before surrender- 
ing in the last round. 


Yet the tournament -wifi 
possibly be won on and around 
the ex pansi ve, . undulating 
greens. A blazing streak with 
the putter can always cut; the 
long hitters down to rize. . 


£9.000 going to the winner and 
at least £1,000 to the first 16 


players m the final order on 
Sunday. 


The course, 6303 yards long 
and wide open, is made to 
measure .for Miss Davies* 
whose prodigious drives bring , 
all five par fives into range, 
except perhaps the 527 yards 
18th, and takes toe bite out of 
the most testing par fours. 


A cosmopolitan tussle coidd 
be on the cards at the deazh* 
with toe formidable French 
amateur champion, Marie- 
Laure de Taya, anxious to 
improve on her third place last 
year, with the gifted young 
Swede, Lise lone Neumann, 
already showing signs of bur- 
geoning supremacy, and wfth 
Murid Thomson, of Scotland, 
bubbling with confidence after 
her victory at Woburn last 
week 


CYCLING 


Ampler triumphs in depleted field 


Uwe Ampler, of -East Ger- 
many, snatched a narrow vic- 
tory in toe first event as. the 
Peace race got under way in 
Kiev yesterday, overshad- 
owed by toe disaster nearby at 
Chernobyl (Reuter, reports). 
Ampler, son of the 1963 Peace 
race winner, Klaus Ampler, 
took toe 7km. time trial by 
0.22sec with a time of 8min 
36.09sec. 

Viktor Klimov, of the Sovi- 
et Union, winner of toe 1984 
race, was second, more than a 
second foster than Bulgaria’s 
Nencfao Staikov. The race was 


starting in toe Soviet Union 
for the first time, although it 
had been threatened by the 
accident at the nuclear power 
station on April 26. The 
Ukrainian capital is only 
130km from Chernobyl. 

Soviet authorities insisted 
that toe cyclists would not' be 
in any danger from radiation, 
but nine teams decided to pull 
out, leaving only. 10 countries 

These were, in order of team 
standings after yesterday’s tri- 
al East Germany, . Soviet 
Union, Czechoslovakia, Bul- 
garia, Poland,- France, Cuba, 


Hungary, Mongolia and Syria. 

The field travel through 
parts of Poland, and Fast 
Germany before finishing in 
Prague oh May 22. Today's 
first stage of 138km goes 
through the stre ets of Kiev. 

• ALBACETE, Spain (Reu- 
ter) - Jon Eguiarte, of Spain, 
won the 200km fifteenth stage 
of the Tour of Spain race 


yesterday, with a time of 4hr 
39min 20sec Sean Kelly, of 


Ireland, won toe pack sprijil to' 
lake second place, 26 seconds 
behind; Manuel Dominguez, 
of Spain, was third. 


ker in at least 
one class before the horse flies 
to Spain, but will otherwise 
rely heavily on Firefox, who 
“takes a lot of getting going 
outside”. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Skelton, who defends his 
title in tomorrow evening's 
Toshiba Gentleman's Jump- 
ing Championships, is riding 
the reliable. Raffles St James, 
and a new partner, Feiner 
Keri, while Michael Whitaker 


bringing his World Cup 


ride. Next Warren Point. 
Whitaker's wife, Veronique, is 
without her top horse. Gingo, 
who is recovering from a foot 
infection, but she has 
Coggeshall Spot On for 
tomorrow's Ladies Jumping 
Championship. Notable ab- 
sentees from that class are 
Janet Hunter and Liz Edgar, 
who are both competing 
abroad. 


Coe’s opener 


Sebastian Coe opens his 
summer track racing pro- 
gramme when he competes for 
Haringey in toe first GRE 
British Athletics League divi- 
sion one match of the season 
at Alexander Stadium. Bir- 
mingham, on Saturday. Coe 
runs in the 4 x 400m relay and 
is also expected to turn out in 
I he 800m. partnering his 
Northern Ireland internation- 
al dubmate. Steve Martin. 


The Louis 




awards 


Mrs Marva Louis, the wife 
of Joe Louis, and her son. Joe 
Louis Junior, will be toe 
guests of honour at the World 
Boxing Council's dinner to 
commemorate the birthday of 
Joe Louis at toe Royal Lancas- 
ter Hotel London, on May 16 
(Sriknmar Sen writes). 

Mrs Louis will present 
WBC awards to 13 British 
worid champions: Jack Kid 
Berg, aged 77, Terry Allen. 
Terry Downes. Howard 
Winstone, Walter McGowan. 
Ken Buchanan: John Conteb. 
John Stracey, Jim Watt, Alan 
M inter, Maurice Hope. Char- 
lie Magri and Dennis Andries. 
Proceeds from toe dinner will 
go to toe WBC Sports Medi- 
cine Foundation. 



Nomination 


Sir Robin Cater, the former 
Walker Cup gotier, has been 
nominated as captain of the 
Royal and Ancient Golf Chib, 
St Andrews, for 1986-87- Sir 
Rotyin, who retired in 1983 as 
chairman of toe Distillers 
Company, played in the Walk- 
erCup in 1955 and represent- 
ed Scotla nd on five occasions. 


Davis date 




Shoot-out 


Malcolm Cooper's closest 
rival has denied him the 
chance of repeating, in Edin- 
burgh. his six-medal haul at 
the last Commonwealth 
Games. The Olympic gold 
medal winner's place in the 
England prone rifle pairs has 
gone to his wife, Sarah. But he 
admitted: “I don’t mind too 
much; Sarah deserves ’ her 
place." 



Warsaw (Renter) — The Po- 
land- Finland Davis Cup ten- 
nis tie. dire to start here 
tomorrow but postponed be- 
cause of fears of radiation 
leakage after the Chernobyl 
nuclear accident, will' be 
played ftom.May 23 to 25.:- 


Curtain-raiser 


Berne (Reuter) — A men's 


downhill in Las Lenas, Argen- 
r World 


tina, wiU usher in the World 
Cup Alpine skiing season this 
year for the second successive 
year. The opening-race win be 
on A u gu st 


Pierre Fefahnaim (above), 
skipper of LtBS Switzerland, 
is favosrite to cross the Ports- 
mouth finishing line first in 

the . Whitbread rotmd the 
world race. He was reported to 
be 270 mfles ahead. of Dm, 
toe yacht of toe pep singer, 
Simon Le Bon. 


Seoul role 


: SeoutfReuier) — The South 
Korean sports 'minister. Park 
Sae-jik. yesterday took over 
from Ron Tae-woo as head of 
too organising committee for 
the : 1 988 Olympics andihis 
September’s . Asian'. Games; . 



food for 




DAVID 

MILLER 


fe n the 



— provides useful evidence for 
toe btantoni; Ohmcfc 
C ommi t tee to their 
counter toe- Soviet Union's 
aari -p rofcsri onal camjpaiga. 

The impassioned pfa* 
against the encroachment $ 
professionalism' into the: 
Olympic Gaines fry Mam- 
Glamor at toe recent meeting: 
of toe Ass o ci atio n of National* 


has, Far toe moment, co&ar-- 

rased Joan Samaranch fe 
hid to .Htfionafor the Games ' 
and check the alleged Mori. ; 
cal prinripati iltotoiffflt- - 
tetaJitarin . countries total 
demha tfomof themedate, V.~. 

is SeooL Lance Cross, of- - 
New Zealand, and Chafes 
Palmer, ot .- Britain, spoke. 
st r ong l y to Cantor of an ope* 
Olympics and a removals fee . 
hypocrisy of ! some officials 
who try to- pretend, that tbe.. 
cempetctas. iatheiaajw 
Olympic sports are not folk; 
due and for aH practical 
proposes professxonal whaf-- 
evtx there nationality. The 
Stead* team pteyingte Seville.' 
test right transit anything, ^ 
more regularly than toe pro-/. 

iskmals of Spain, F ng t Bn H, - . 
Italy and elsewhere: twice a' 
day other than on match days. 


Wrong move 
over tennis 


Is the Kiev team any less 
profession iif (has toe Atietice 
Madrid ride .which they bat- 

played? Fire members of the 

S tesh a s i ft w e reto Romania V 
tost Olympic football team. As 
GeneralStofchev, Bulgaria's 
member of toe IOC has said, 
it is .a nonsense to claim that 
today's top Olympians are 


The oofy diflaence between " 
the United .States and Soviet 
Union -Is m who pnjyides toe 
money , which sustains toe 
comp eti tors. The NOCs in 
Seori have dom toe Olympics ' 
a dts-serrice, which the IOC 
wffi.be. hard-pressed to re- 
verse. The IOC need, in suck 
chrcarostuces, more effective 
pnbSc relations. What fright- 
etwd the NOCs, of <om$£ was 
toe prospect of professional 
tennis. The forage <rf McCor- 
mack and McEnroe penetrates 
every spots 7 bffiririV cen- 
sdeosness. It was ml unwise 
move for the IOC to welcome 
trams bach Into die fondly. 
Without professional .players 
teams' win stage ait irrelevant 
Olympic competition. .1 

• Has Bobby Robson cho- 
sen the best option by taking 
his squad to the desolation of 
Sahilln, 50 miles ontride Mon- 
terrey, snnply because it is at 
altitude? Theme who have been 
there, mad seen the lack of 
recreational opportunity, 
question the wisdom. 


ftp***/* .it 

if:-:"*, i V j ; 


m 


iz n z *■ 



Pining for beer 
and home- 


U seems that Robson may 
have forgotten his own experi- 
ence of 24 years ago when 
Waiter Winter-bottom took 
England to a mountain resi- 
dence at Coya, ontside 
Rancagna to Chile. The Enf^l 
gjtish mining company pet 
every possible fedBty at the 
team's disposal yet to less than 
a week there were half a dozes 
malcontents pinning for beer 
and skittles and home. 

Bobby Chariton and Jimmy 
Armffeld were scat hin g abori 
the attitude of some of their 
coQeagnes towards the tornna- 
meat In which more resolatioo 
might even have carried them 
past Brazil, the eventnal win- 
ners. Short on ability, England 
are going to need any piece of 
incidental advantage^ they can 
find- An unbroken view of the 
distant Stela Madre may 
eventually palL 
Perhaps Robson was wortf 
ried about experiencing stou- 
ter hostile crowd disturbance 
outside toe hotel as Ramsey's 
squad had in the centre w 
Gnadalqjaram 1976. HecoeW 
have learned mure about this 
and other aspects of Mexico 
from the extensiv e knowledge 
of Sr Alf Ramsey. Strangely. 
Robson has pnt off several 
appointments with toe former 

England managpr Sir AifS 



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available, w illingly , to AW 
Fergnson, instead. 

• My snggestioB that there is 
a possibility, in three-day 
eve nt i ng , for riders to hr 
exhorted by toe sponsors of 
their horses beyond the pm* 
of discretion, has, predictably, 
caused some indignation., “ 
spons o rs recognize the risj 
and have voluntarily rejectee 
it. so roach the better. Luaw» 
Green tells me that, wire 
Regri Realm nnaWe ». 8° JJj. 
the worid championships m*r 


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pressed hertoi — 

far a cowse tfeat fo l “ D5V 
So she won't g*. 


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