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■.i H ^ 'ftri- :'c^i 1'^ 


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No 62;452 - 

-■A _i:i^ 



FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


for disclosure 


By Anthony Bering Political l Correspondent. 

The House of Commons is interference with the work of ■ - Mr John Cartwright, SDP 
be asked to punish The. this parti cnlar committee. Ev- MP for Woolwich; said during 
m«and Mr Richard Evans, eiy teals of this kind is also a ' Prime Ministers questions 
1 lobby reporter, for commit- . further threat to the effective that it was ironic that 


to be asked to punish The. 
Times and Mr Ri char d Ev ans , 
its lobby reporter, for commit- 
ting a serious contempt of 
Parliament in leaking a draft 
select committee report on 
radioactive waste disposal last 
December. 

The Co mmi t t ee of Privi- 
leges, which is chained by Mr 
John Bifien; Leader of the 
House, yesterday found “that 
a serious contempt was com- 
mitted by whoever enabled 
The Times to obtain a copy of 
the draft report of the ebair- 


turtner threat to the effective that it was ironic fiat 
. operation • • - of. other . committees, designed to 
committees.’*. throw light on the workings of 

■It said that Mr Evans had Whitehall, shonffl be in 
“shown scant respect for the of eflgti|whjn g the rules 

traditions and rules of the of secrecy around their affafrs 
House in. dus matter. foar.foey would condemn if 

“He has openly, drawn at- they occurred in Whitehall, 
tendon to the leaks he- has The 1 last tim e the priv ileges 

committee recommended six 
Parliament 4 months* exclusion from foe. 

11 *~ — 11 Commons as a punishment 

pubticised-aod he has commit- -for journalists publishing foe 
ted breaches ofprivilege in leaked contents of select com- 


manof ^^environment com- foie -way on a number 'of mitteeworic was in 1975, after 

miflpp hv fhp lAiimalict mhn h" r j: «• > 


minster _ without 
some restriction as 
this policy.**. 


miaee, by the journalist who occasions.”, 
wrote the .artidearid by foe It also said t] 
editor of The Times who Wilson, the c 
published it”. Times, .“ must 

With MrTony Benn oppos- sbaroofrespera 
ing the report, sue Conserva- serious conte 
live, and five Labour MPs House. The pr 
recommended foal Mr Evans fishing leaks Ex 
should be barred from foe mittees has ck 
pfeancis of foe Commons far paDcy of his newspaper,' and 
six months and that The foe newspaper itself should 
Times should lose one of its not be allowed to continue its 
accredited parliamentary lob- work in the Pi 
by passes for the same period, minster withe 

The Prime Minister y ester- some restriedm 
day refused to be dntwnon the this policy.”, 
matter, saying during Com- ■ ■ - - 

mens questions that it was a 
House of Commons matter 
and for the House to decide. 

The report, which is expect- . *u K 
ed lo be considered by foe .. 1$ lA* 

House before foe Whitsun 1 

recess on May 21, saki that it 
hgd ncflieen possible to 
"“aSess precisely fa&£xteoto£~ 
foe damage actually done by 
the leak” of the committee’s p- 
draft. • - J' S V ‘ . 

But the privile g e s commit- 1 \ - 

tee said that it had been V 

convinced by foe evidence of 
Sir Hugh Ito^Cpsservative -f flaiue™. 
chairman of foe c^frOTmcnt ■' V 

done oh. this occasion”. ; . j 


occasions.”. The 'Economist - disclosed do- 

lt also said that Mr Charles tails ofa draft report on wealth. 
Wilson,, the editor of The tax. The Commons voted 64 
- Times, ** must bear a major to 55 in support of an amend- 
share of responsibility for this meat from Mr Paul Phannn n, 
serious contempt of the now Secretary of State for 
House. The practice of pub- Trade and Industry, that al- 





New risk Chinese 
facing puzzle 
stricken over 
reactor an hour 


fishing leaks from select com- though, the leak was to .be 
mittees has dearly been foe regretted no further action 


should be taken. 

Mr Bean, made it dear in 
foe Commons yesterday foal 


work in the Palace of West- the iiwn» of’ disclosure of 


stmering 
a- result of 


«s> 


information on radioactive 
waste for outweighed any con- 
sideration of News Interna- 
tional and the current dispute 
at Wappipg. 

Mr Dale CampbeH-Savours, 



Swiss beat the Drum 


Race leader UBS Switzer- 
land heads srto foe English 
Channel yesterday on her way 
to victory in foe round-the- 
world yacht race. 

The Swiss boat, skippered 
by Pierre Fehbnann (pictured 
left), is doe at Portsmouth in 
time for a champagne break- 
fast today well ahead of Dram, 


foe British boat owned by pop 
singer Simon Le Bon. 

Drum was yesterday hold- 
ing on to second place ahead of 
a groop of foer yachts which 
are all likely to finish late mi 
Saturday. UBS Smtzjtriaud. 
looks certain to dip 2 1/2 days 
off the previous record of 120 
days for the drcnmnavigatioB. 


Labour MP for Workington, TT.^. 1 __ ___ V 
said foal without condoning if OW (it fill If 
the actions of News Interna- . , 

tional the public would con- iri/ifimo 
damn foe Honse if it took foe Y ivlllllij 

irresponsible action of expel- p - 

were found 


/Gmcem 

yOvtrtl] 



age anKHmied fo 


m 


tional the public would con- 
demn foe House if it took the 
irresponsible action of expel- 
ling Mr Evans. 

Mr Chris Moncriefi) chair - 
man of thcLobby Journalists 
and chief political correspon- 
dent of foe Press Association 
news agency, said yesterday; 
“Journalists wifi -never refuse 
confidential documents of 
public interest, passed to them 
either . from government 
sources.' MPs or anyone, eLe. 

. Continued on page 2, col 5 


Hailsham move to 
cut legal aid cost 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Afairs Correspondent 


on 


U e ^? eof arrival in Tokyo 

III® POIIS " From Darid Watts, Kyoto _ . 



David Butler 
analyses the results 
of yesterday’s by- 
elections in West 
Derbyshire and 
Ryedale and the 
local elections 


; From ftmd Watts, Kyeto _ . 

The Princess . of Wales tacks before, including one 


walked off the .jet which 
brought her to Japan last-night 
and told a beaming Grown 


during a royal ski trip. 

- The Royal-couple, who left 
the airport rather behind 


Prmce Hiro that foe was schedule, had no eventsched- 
feelfnk“olcay”. " ' uJed for their first evening 
Both foe Prince ahd'frfo- . after: foe late arrival from 
cess slept well on foe flight Canada. Because of the late 
from Vancouver and there is arrivaHhe -crowd outside the 
no need to change the royal airport was relatively .small 
itinerary after foe feinting But more than 10,000 peo- 
speU which foe Princess sufi- pie gathered outside foe 
fered at Expo 36, according to Omiya Palace, to welcome 
foe palace spokesman. them to their temporary home 

Despite her protestation of Today they start their tom- 
good health, the Princess with a full schedule in the 
looked slightly wan and sub- ancient capital, beginning 
dued as foe came down the with a visit to the detached 
stairs of foe airliner into foe royal palace at Shugaku-in, 
full glare of television lights 
and the flashes of some 200 
cameras at Osaka airport 
She smile d' only faintly 
during foe brief reception 
ceremony, but the _palace 
spokesman insisted: “She’s a . 
very healthy lady.” 

He denied press reports that 
she had suffered feinting at-' 


— 


There was no winner again 
yesterday to The Times. Port? 
folio GoM dafly competi- 
tion, so today there is £12,090 
to be m Tomorrow the 
weekly prize is £16,000, dou- 
ble foe asnal amount be- 
cause no one won. test week. 
Portfolio fist, page 33; 
rales and how to play, infor- 
mation service, page 20. 


Watt verdict 

A pathologist told an inquest 
into foe death of Steve Wall, 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

A ffreman’s story of how he 
foamf-Mr Norman Tebbit and 
his wife under rubble after the 
bombing of the Grand Hotel, 
Brighton, two years ago was 
toti to a jmy at the Central 
Ointinal Cofet yesterday. - 
On foe third day of the trial 
of the Belfast man whir has 
pleaded not. gmlty to the 
bombing foe court heard a 
series of statements and evi- 
dence from police, the fireman, 
and wives and husbands whose 
partners were killed as a result 
of the blast on the last night of 
foe Conservative Party’s an- 
nua] conference. 

The court was told how foe 
fireman discovered Mr Tebbit 
and his wife after be saw two 
hands sticking out of the 
nibble in the hotel. They were 
later rescued. 

The statements included de- 
tails of what happened to Mr 
John Wakeham , foe govern- 
ment Chief Whip, and the wife 
of Sir Anthony Berry, a Con- 
servative MP killed by the 
blast. 

The court heard bow people, 
were woken by the blast early 
on foe morning of 12 October 
Mr Wakeham fell from his 
bedroom, room 428, to the 


had an extraordi- 1 foyer of the hotel. 


narily chequered career since 
ft was completed in the 1650s. 


Lady Berry, in room 328, 
beard a bang. In her statement 


Security for foe visit is she said she felt she was 
unobtrusive. Some 7,000 po- felling and everything was 
lice are on duty in connection fa lling with her. She said: 
with foe visit which, by the “The noise was terribleJ 
standards oftbe recent Tokyo thought I was dying orgoing to 
summit, is not heavy policing, die.” 

Diana bom, page 9 Tebbit’s ordeal, page 3 


Anxious Tories at the polls 


The Government was last 
night anxiously awaiting the 
outcome of the biggest test of 
, opinion before the next Gen- 
eral Election. * - . . 


By Philip Webster Political Reporter 

last '• But an extremely dose re- voters had foe opportunity of 
the suit appeared likely at West ending the control of the 
t of Derbyshire, where the Gov- Militant-dominated Labour 
ten- eminent is defending a 15 ,325 party. 

majority. Early indications in Seventeen of foe 34 city 


foe Scottish boxer, that, foe Britain’s electors had the op- 
was ” flabbergasted*" by the portunity to vote in district 


damaged stale of his brain. A council elections in England 
verdict of misadventure was and Wales, the London bor- 


Mort than twfomb of foe constituency suggested a 
ritain’s electors had foe op- 70 per cent tura-ouvand the 
ntunity to vote in district Alliance was pmning hopes on 
Ainril elections in Enfomd wctiqti. voting by Labour 


recorded Png®3 

Quake fears 

Thousands fled their homes 
on America’s west coast m 
fear of t irial waves after an 
earthquake in foe f&nate 
Aleutian Islands, off Algj^- 

Spring recess 

The Commons will adjourn 
for the spring recess on Friday, 
May 23 and return on Tues- 
day, June 3. 

Britain and Portugal. today 

edebrate the 600th anmvwra- 

rv of foe Treaty of Windsor 
foe foundation stone of tne 

Anglo-Portuguese alhjnar- 

Spectal Report, pages 1 w 


toons m Seventeen of the 34 city 
jested a council wards returning coun- 
and the cillors were held by Labour, 
lopes on with most observers predict- 
Labour ing that they would • lose 
sufficient seats to surrender 
Labour their overall majority. 
:thatMr The Alliance could then 


The Lord Chancellor’s offi- 
cials have put forward a 
radical package of cost-cutting 
proposals for legal aid work 
which would fundamentally 
change lawyers’ working prac- 
tices and bring about large 
savings in foe legal aid bDL 

The proposals have been 
tabled during current negotia- 
tions between -the • Lord 
Chancellor's Department and 
foe profession on legal aid 
fees, now under way within a 
timetable agreed in the wake 
of the Bar’s successful High 
Court action against Lord 
Hailsham of St Marylebone. 

They go far wider than was 
indicated in talks in foe 
autumn before the legal pro- 
ceedings were launched after 
Lord Haiisham’s offer of a 
routine 5 per cent uprating for 
inflatioa 

The Government is con- 
cerned that present working 
practices do not provide the 
best value for money for the 
taxpayer from foe £320 mil- 
lion a year legal aid scheme; it 
says legal aid firms are ill 
organized to do the work and 
that courts' administration, 
particularly listing of cases, 
could be improved. 

A key proposal is that both 
solicitors and barristers be 
paid on a new system of 
“fixed” or “standard” fees for 
certain categories of cases. 

For solicitors that would 
mean that instead of foe 
present hourly basis, legal aid 
work would be paid on a fixed 
rate. So a “guilty plea” bearing 
in foe magistrates’ court, for 
example, would be paid a set 
sum, and not according to the 
hours spent 

For barristers, it would 
mean abolishing the tradition- 
al “fee with brief* in large 
numbers of cases. There 
would be “sessional” or block 
fees for a morning or 
afternoon’s work in foe 
magistrates* court; and fixed 
or standard fees for a number 
of cases in foe Crown court. 

At present lawyers are paid 
after the case, and through a 


lengthy and complex process 
of assessment called taxation. 
The proposal is that for all 
shorter cases, pleas of guilty, 
appeals from the magistrates' 
courts and jury trials of up to 
three days, they have the 
option of a fixed fee graded for 
foe type of work. 

If adopted, the proposals 
could change the system of 
payment in 90 per cent of 
cases before the Clrown court 

In addition officials are 
asking solicitors to consider a 
change in foe rules which 
requires a solicitor to accom- 
pany a barrister in the Crown 
court so that in certain cases a 
barrister would be able to 
appear alone. 

That would cut costs, as foe 
client, and foe legal aid fund, 
would not need to pay for two 
lawyers; it comes in the wake 
of a change just agreed by foe 
Bar and foe Law Society in foe 
roles so that barristers may 
appear unattended in 
magistrates’ courts. 

Third, officials want to find 
ways of improving foe listing 
of cases so that the barrister 
briefed for the case is more 
likely to end up taking foe case 
in court. Frequently at foe last 
minute counsel are changed 
and the client finds be has a 
new barrister. That would also 
reduce the need for a solicitor 
to attend counsel. 

Another result would be 
better presentation of the case: 
ifa banister is certain he will 
be conducting the case, he 
may spend more time on its 
preparation. 

On the solicitors' side, foe 
proposals are being viewed 
cautiously. One difficulty with 
fixed fees, they say, is that they 
may be an incentive to do foe 
minimum amount of work 

The Bar is more enthusias- 
tic. It was foe Bar which put 
forward the standard fees 
proposals for the Crown court 
in response to the first moves 
by officials for changes in the 
magistrates’ courts, arguing 
that the same arguments for 
savings and control applied. 


FVom Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

After 13 days, the Soviet 
authorities have still failed to 
neutralize the stricken 
Chernobyl nuclear reactor, and 
are taking steps to avert a melt- 
down, which would pose a fir 
greater risk of radioactive con- 
tamination than has already 
occurred. 

Western envoys were first ; 
alerted that there was concern i 
about such a possibility when a 
West German scientist in 
Washington was approached 
by a Soviet representative ask- 
ing for advice on preventing “a 
hot, molten mass” melting 
through the concrete founda- 
tions of a reactor building. 

The scientist, Thomas Roser, 
of the German Atomic Forum, 
did not elaborate, but his 
account followed die disclosure 
in yesterday's Pravda that 
members of foe emergency 
team were working under as 
well as next to the damaged 
reactor. 

Later, a Western diplomat 
with access to satellite photo- 
graphs said: “They have a hell 
of a problem stifl.” 

Pravda reported that the 
accident was far from being 
nearly over, as some Western- 
ers had expected, and thou- 
sands of volunteers were 
struggling to control foe crip- 
pled reactor. Helicopters were 
dropping sand, lead, clay and 
other materials on it to smoth- 
er the Raking radioactivity. 

Because the Kremlin has 
withheld information. West- 
ern scientific officers in Mos- 
cow were unable to say with 
confidence bow great foe dan- 
gers of a melt-down were. 

One said that if it happened, 
the reactor would soon hit the 
high Ukrainian water-table, 
causing an effect “like a 
nuclear boiler”. 

A Western diplomat said it 
had been learnt that it was 
nearly a week before 30,000 
residents were evacuated from 
the town of CheraobyL 
As the Soviet press widened 
its coverage yesterday, it 
emerged that foe plant- was 
under-staffed on the night of 
foe fetal accident because of 
the approach of May Day. 

Sovieiskaya Rossiya said: 
“Many people, including staff 
at foe power plant, had gone 
on holiday.” 

Trains packed, page 7 


From a Correspondent ; 

Peking 

A Chinese maid who works 
for an American family ^ in 
Peking arrived for work an 
hoar late on Smday, the first 
day what docks had been 
officially pat forward by an 
hoar. 

Asked if she bad forgotten 
about the time change or bad 
overslept, the maid replied, 
that no, she was tally aware of 
foe time change and bad not; 
overslept Bnt she bad thought 
that the change appGed only fo 
Chinese and not to foreiaiers, 
whom (she had- assumed) re* 
mained on tire old time. 

It is a typical example of the 
state-sponsored pandemoninm 
that has broken out with the 
introduction of daylight saving 
to China. 

The idea, according, to a 
Communist Party circular, 
was to save energy, specifical- 
ly 13 billion kilowatt hours of 
electricity amuxaHy. 

Chinese clocks are sched- 
uled to be tinned back one 
bonr at 2 am on September 14. 
Moreover, the new systemjvas 
supposed to foster among 
workers “the good habit of 
getting np early and going to 
bed early, tints enhancing 
their efficiency". 

Bnt given foe national reac- 
tion this week and China's 
sheer size (it sprawls across 
five time zones but has tradi- 
tionally operated on Peking 
time), the aathorities may jnst 
as. well have decreed mass 
confusion seasoned with a 
dash of hysteria. 

Long-distance bases, some 
river boat lines and the 
country's rafiraads, for exam- 
ple, confined to raa on the aid 
time while China's national 
airline annomiced that aD its 
flights (as well as those of 
foreign camera operafeag in 
China) would be postponed 
one hour. 

Travellers fans faced the 
prospect of missing connecting 
flights and trains, 

T • 

Many Chinese feated that 
-the time change woold affect 
their health. 

In modern China convention 
has it that breakfast at 6 am, 
lunch at 12 noon and dinner at 
6 pm keeps one fit 
Concerned citizens won- 
dered if the new time would 
uudnly shorten or lengthen the 
intervals between meals. 


Dhaka poll protest 

By Michael Haratyn, Dhaka 
first protest meeting Although Sheikh Hasina 


The first protest meeting 
against the “election robbery” 
try foe Bangladeshi govern- 
ment was called yesterday by 
Sheikh Hasina Wazed. leader 
of (he principal opposition 
party, (be Awami League. 

Sheikh Hasina said that a 
public meeting would be held 
tomorrow in the street outside 
the party office in Dhaka. 


said last night that the party 
would call for re-polling in at 
least 50 constituencies where 
terror tactics and vote seizures 
were used, she also indicated 
that those Awami Leaguers 
who were elected would take 
their seats. 

Ershad explains — Page 10 


d Wales, the London bor- supporters. sufficient seats to surrender 

oughs, and foe 12 Scottish But yesterday. Labour their overall majority. 

Region and Island Councils. ' workers were daiming that Mr The Alliance could then 
But Conservatives were BiU _Moore, foeir ..candidate, find itself with the chance of 
rw! nervous ’ at the two was receiving firm. support at taking power with Ccmserva- 
^M^lw^le^nsfo 5**°“ tive support 

.•dedale and West Derby- Ashbourne, and Wirkswonh. Altogether in foe local elec- 
ire A Gallup opinion poll One of the most crucial tions, 15,700 candidates con- 
owed the Alliance clearly in local, election results was tested 5,180 seats mi 209 
lend arRvedale. awaited in Liverpool, where councils- 


Sugar inquiry likely 



most nervous ai ine two 
parliamentary by-elections in 
Rvdedale and West Derby- 
shire. A Gallup opinion poll 
showed foe Alliance clearly in 
foe lead ar Ryedale. 


The Government is aboot 
to Older a Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission investi- 
gation into the sugar industry. 

Mr Paul Cbannon, Secret 
lary of State for Trade and 
Industry, is expected next 
week to refer to foe commis- 
sion two competing £480 mil- 


lion takeover bids for S & W 
BerisfonL foe commodity 
trading group which owns 
British Sugar. 

The bids have been made by 
Tate & Lyle and Hillsdown 
Holdings, the foods group. 

Referrals, page 21 


City invests 
£1^5m to earn 
Games golds . 

Britain’s pre p arat ions for the 
Olympic Games were given a 
boost yesterday when it was 
announced that Mmet HoJd- 
ings. a City insurance jjroup, 
wfo contribute £L5mfllftm to 
assist up-and-coming compet- 
itors with training expenses. 


Tributes flow for Shinwell the fighter 


1o see how Swindon 
works, look whtfs 

working there. 

Swindon works well. There's no better evidence 
than the companies who have profited from it. 



' JJyPaoIVaflely 

Generous tributes were paid 
by potftkans after the an- 
nouncement of.-flre death of 
Lord Shinwefl, the contama- 
dons Labour Jftuty. veteran 
who died yesterday at the age 
of-lOl. 

He had c o n t ra cte d doable 
pneumonia after leaving hos- 
pital .sis weeks ago and re- 
fused to return for tr eatm e nt . 

• Ineritebij, as Lord Shinwefl 
had been the only survivor of 
the first and second Labour 
governments and the early 
years of the Labour movement, 
the eulogies concentrated' on 
more recent years. . 

Lited -TVhitefcnr, deputy 
. Prime Minister, said: “Forme 


in foe last three years in the 
House of Lords I remember 
him a$ a great character, 
always amusing, always coar- 
tebBs. These are very remark- 
able . characteristics from 
someone who. had been snch a 
fighter in politics all his life.” 
la foe Lords yesterday thun- 
der re verberated over the or- 
nate, impervious chamber, 
which embodied so much of 
what the elder statesman had 
once so despised, for all the 
world as if the staunch social- 
ist was continuing his fight. 

Lord Cledwyn of Penrhos, 
for foe Labour Party, said that 
he was “a pugnacious 
Gydesider who became a 
great minister of stale” and 
“jm archetypal rebel who be- 


. came a respected 
parliamentarian”. 

. For the Social Democrats, 
Lord Diamond recalled “his 
doggedness in fighting for 
fairness for his fella* man”. 

The Leader of the Opposi- 
tion, Mr Neil Kinnock, 
praised Lord ShinwelTs belief 
that "strength and powm- 
should be used to help those 
who were* not strong or 
powerful.” 

The former Prime Minister, 
Mr James Callaghan, who 
serve# is - a junior minister in 
the post-war Labour govern- 
ment in which Emanuel Shin- 
weft was a Cabinet minister, 
said: “He brought a feeling of 
passion and belief to every- 
thing be-daL He could stir his 


audience. That hi foe early 
days of the Labour 
movement—was important m 
conveying a sense of couvrctJOfl 
that things could be done” 
Mr GrevBle Jauner; Labour 
MP for Leicester West and 
former president of foe Board 
of Deputies of British Jews, 
who spent much of foe last two 
days with Lord Shinwell, sank 
“He was interested in life nntil 

fee moment he left ft. A legend 
has passed away ” 

The Queen sent a message 
of condolence to Lord 
Shinweffs son, Ernest The 
funeral will be at Golders 
Green crematorium at 330pm 
today. 

Obituary, page 18 
Century of change, page 20 


well educated. High productivity here is matched 
only by the quality of life. Yet overheads are low and 
communications excellent. 

Heathrow is an hour by road, London just 50 
minutes by train. The opening oftheM25 has slashed 

journey times toGatwick. 

To find out how this rare combination of advantages 
can work for you, get the Fact File. 

Contact Douglas Smith, Industrial Adviser, 

Gvic Offices, Swindon. Tel: (07931 26161. Telex: 444449. 

sWlNDON 

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Shorter working week 
may be discussed in 
prison staff dispute 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


A reduction in the working 
' week of prison officers, which 
- could imply more overtime, 
' not less, is on the agenda for 
their talks with the Home 
~ Office. 


The amount of overtime 
officers work is one of the 


have not yet been thought 
through. 

A meeting yesterday be- 
tween POA leaders and Prison 
Department officials dis- 
cussed the proposals in the 
letter. But Mr Phil Hornsby, a 
POA assistant secretary, said 
afterwards of the reduction in 


■'&J22FTEL * hours: -That is one of the 


'. the dispute. A ban on over- 
- time, which illustrated the 


. reliance of the system on it. 
I was disclosed before riots and 


.. arson hit prisons. 


issues we are getting clarifica- 
tion on. We haven't reached 
that." 

He was unwilling to discuss 
the implications, which are 
likely to create a dilemma for 


department's case for cutting 
them. Or the POA could 
admit that there was ineffi- 
ciency which could be saved 
by a streamlining of duties; the 
same staff could work harder. 

Overtime working by prison 
officers averages about 16.5 
hours a week, on top of the net 
working week of 40 hours. 
Overtime makes up on aver- 


said that settling a shorter May 20. 

week, and this year’s pay . The issue could be resolved 


claim, depended on the threat in 31 1 ® ast Jhree ways, 

of industrial action being lift- one of ®[hich could 


ed. If it was, he would ask the one of the parties to 

Treasury to settle the deal as meaispute. ... 


officers' earnings. 

In the longer term, manage- 
ment is to put forward propos- 
als for new pay arrangements 
and working practices for 
detailed discussions, with a 
view to new arrangements by 
April 1987. 

Today foe POA's national 
executive will have a report on 


soon as reasonably possible. 
Mr Leon Brinan, when Home 


The lost hour could be 
made up by extra overtime. 


yesterday's meeting, with a 
further one expected with 


Secretary, had given an under- w j** c k would be a negation of 
- taking on the shorter week, Mr what the Prison Department 


Hurd said. has been arguing and would 

hardly be acceptable to it 
» Prison officers expea it to More officers could be taken 
■ be reduced from 40 hours to on. which would add to costs 


39 hours, but the implications and undermine 


Home Office officials next 
week, the hast chance, before 
the annual conference, of pre- 
paring a pa c k age that can 
persuade members to lift the 
threat of industrial action. 
Thai can be done only by a 
further ballot 


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Scargill 
gets help 
with bill 


BR pension fund 
to show treasures 


By Frances Gibb ; 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Coca - Cola, the drink com- 
pany, fad some of foe - fizz 
taken out of its hundredth 
birthday celebrations yester- 
day when tire House of Lords 
ruled that it had no exclusive 
right to its distinctively - 
sliaped hotfle. - 

The non -alcoholic drink 
has been sold in the United 
King dom for more than 6ft 
years, and foe company 
dawned it was entitled to 
register foe bottle as' a 
trademark. ‘ 

But foe five law lords ruled 
that the company had no right 
to its bottle ami dfsadsscdlts 
appeal against a nzfiag by the 
Court of Appeal, which upheld 
a decision of foe High Coart. 

Giving judgment. Lord 
Tempteman saud that the bot- 
tle could not be registered 
under foe Patents Act. 1977 
b ecau s e it was “not a novel 
product". Nor could it be 


hiii' . v > 1 ■ f i.-. 1 h -■ • ■ 1 





,y l - 




Trade unionists are to help 
pay Mr Arthur ScargiU’s esti- 
. mated £100.000 legal bill for 
-his unsuccessful High Court 
..damages claim, he said 
.- yesterday. 

The miners' leader refused 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 
Hitherto unknown treasures acts against US citizens and 


to say how many people had 
. come forward with offers of 
cash or to which unions they 
„ belong. 

But he told reporters after a 
„ meeting of the National 
-Union of Mineworkers na- 
tional executive in Sheffield 
that the NUM would not have 
'to settle the bill. 

"The amount of assistance 
being promised from very 
wide sections of the raove>- 
ment are considerable, and it 
would appear there will be no 
cost whatsoever to the 
NUM," Mr Scargill said. 

After he lost his claim 
against South Yorkshire po- 
lice, who he alleged falsely 
imprisoned him outside his 
home, Mr Scargill said he 
would be donating the salary 
still owed to him duringeight 
months of the miners' strike to 
the costs biiL 

Yesterday he was adamant 
the matter was not discussed 
at the executive meeting and 
he repeated that the court 
action had been authorized by 
the executive on September 
16, 1982. 

Mr Scargill said the union 
would go before foe High 
Court od May 14 in an 
attempt to have the receiver- 
ship imposed against foe 
union during the long-running 
pit dispute discharged 


from foe British Rail Pension 
Fund's art collection are to be 
exhibited at the International 
Ceramics Fair and Seminar at 
the Dorchester hotel in Park 
Lane from June ! 3 to June 1 6. 

The Kind came to the rescue 
of the fair organizers after an 
American porcelain collec- 
tion. scheduled for exhibition, 
was withdrawn because of 
fears over terrorism. 

In a last minute switch, 46 
items from the fund's reserve 
collection, at present in store, 
are to be shown instead. 

The long promised exhibi- 
tion was of Chinese Ming and 
Qing porcelains from the col- 
lection formed by Mr and Mrs 
Ira M. Roger, normally on 
shown at the Jacksonville Art 
Museum in Florida. 

News that the Roger collec- 
tion would not after all make 
its European debut at the fair, 
was announced to the organiz- 
ers by telegram. 

It read: "Because of the 
increasing threat of terrorist 


property the Trustees of the 
Ira and Nancy Kroger Foun- 
dation have voted to with- 
draw its Chinese ceramics 
from the exhibit at the Inter- 
national Ceramics Fair." 

The trustees went on to 
explain that "the decision was 
reached, not . only out of 
concern for the people in- 
volved, but also out of respea 
for the irreplaceable nature of 
foe objects themselves". 

A large group of the BR 
Pension Fund Chinese porce- 
lains are on loan to the Dallas 
Museum, but happily the 
reserve collection contains 
some superb pieces. 

The exhibition will include 
a prancing Tang horse, an 
equestrian drummer of the 
Wei dynasty, an apparently 
unique Longquan celadon 
bell, a Yuan dynasty blue and 
white fish bowl and an eigh- 
teenth century rose-vene rou- 
leau vase decorated with 
exotic birds in a rocky 
landscape. 


Royal Marines freefall parachutists jumping into foe 
Thames yesterday to raise money for the Save foe Children 
Fund. They had intended to set a five-man stacking record, 
bnt only four linked up (Photograph: Snresh Karadia). 


Act 1956 because it was not 
"an artistic work". 

: The botdebad been accept- 
ed for registration under tire 
Patents and Designs Act 
1907, bat that expired in 1940. 

“A rival manufacturer must 
be free to sell any container or 
article of ™«ilar shape, pro- 
vided tire container, or article, 
is labelled or packaged in a 
manner which avoids confu- 
sion as to* the origins of foe 
goods, or of the article," Lord 
Te®pIamfflo said. 

Law Report, page 28 


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Ed 


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It: r^i; * »L*;i r 1 1 


£20 m for 
sports 
on BBC 


British nuclear record gives 
confidence, Thatcher says 


Scotland buys Bernini 
bust for record £3m 


piece of sculpture has ever 
fetched on the open market. 


Expansion for 
airports urged 


fetched on the open market, 
brings a year-long heritage 
struggle to a conclusion. 


The Association of British 
Travel Agents yesterday called 
on the Government to consid- 
er a second runway at Gatwick 
airport and a fifth terminal at 
Heathrow. 

The association also said 
the Government should con- 
sider easing curbs on night 
flying in view of the new 
generation of quieter aircraft. 


By Oar Sale Room Correspondent 

The announcement that the chairman of the BBC, and its 
National Gallery of Scotland impending sale was an- 
bas acquired Bernini's marble nounced a year ago as a means 
bust of Cardinal dal Pozzo for of satisfying the lax problem 
£3 million, more than any • posed by bis death, 
ece of sculpture has ever The family indicated that it 
iched on the open market, would prefer the bust to go to 
ings a year-long heritage Scotland. However, the Edin- 
nggle to a conclusion. burgh gallery was, at the time, 
w •„ c„^ caught up in its battle to Taise 
the £8.1 million required to 
Cjuu«l It at a knockdown Mantegna's “Adoration 
ice. For insurance purposes Tr .u* 
c bust is valued at £7.5 m3- of ^ e omorL 

•n, the difference having # 

en absorbed by foe Treasury of ^ National 

lieu of capital transfer tax. i 

with the advantage of the nch 

The bust comes from Castle well-wishers who had offered 
jward. the famous Van- to help with the Mantegna. In 
jgh house where the televi- the event he has also secured 
m series. Brides head, was £1.25 million from the Na- 
ned. It belonged to the tional Heritage Memorial 
nily of the late Lord How- Fund. 

1 of Henderskeiie, former Sale room, page 4 


The gallery has, in fact, 
acquired it at a knockdown 
price. For insurance purposes 
the bust is valued at £7.5 mil- 
lion, the difference having 
been absorbed by foe Treasury 
in lieu of capital transfer tax. 


The bust comes from Castle 
Howard, the famous Van- 
brugh house where the televi- 
sion series, Brideshead, was 
filmed. It belonged to the 
family of the late Lord How- 
ard of Henderskeife, former 


The BBC is embarking on 
its costliest and most extensive 
sports coverage this summer 
with the World Cup, Wimble- 
don, foe British Open golf 
championship and the Com- 
monwealth Games taldng foe 
mam share of prog ramming 
over the next four mouths. 

The summer's highlights 
will also include Prince 
Andrew's marriage to Miss 
Sarah Ferguson m July and a 
new selection of British and 
American dramas and plays. 

“I cannot remember a sports 
season like this. We will be 
spending up to £20 nuUion," 
Mr Jonathan Martin, head of 
BBC television sport, said. 

However, foe summer's 
greatest attraction will almost 
certainly be the royal wedding 
at Westminster Abbey on July 
23. Selina Scott and Frank 
Boujgh will begin, the 
morning's coverage on Break- 
fast Time , and David 
DouMeby and Sue Lawley will 
coordinate live coverage of the 
ceremony. 

On the drama side the BBC 
will air seven Sunday plays 
starting on Jnly 13, including 
performances by Paul Scofield 
in Only Yesterday . Hazel 
O'Connor [days the leading 
role in a fire-part serial called 
Fighting Back, about a young 
unemployed mother. 

Hell’s Bells heads the new 
entertainment and comedy 
section on BBC- 1 , with Derek 
Nimmo starring as a bishop 

Topping foe documentary 
selection is a £1.7 millinn 
series called Africa, 

The BBC wili also be show- 
ing a selection of feature films 
this summer with special trib- 
utes to James Mason and 
John Huston. 


By Anthony Bevins, Political Ctarespondeiit 

The Prime Minister said Mr John BtfiTen, Leader of 625 miles of Chernobyl (Our 
yesterday that foe excellent foe House, announced later Environment Correspondent 
record of foe nuclear industry that there would be a Com- writes), 
in Britain would itself restore mons debate next Tuesday cm ' 
public confidence in the wake foe Select Committee on the 

of foe Chernobyl disaster. Environment's report on ra- foe ten m tmre rt wifi 

Answering Commons ques- dioactive waste. operate m^nMin fiom &mir- 


Protests 
mark Irish 
link talks 


public confidence in the wake 
of foe Chernobyl disaster. 

Answering Commons ques- 
tions after a lengthy Cabinet 
discussion on foe ramifica- 
tions of Chernobyl, Mrs 
Thatcher agreed that there 
should be no panic decisions 
and told MPs: 

“The record of the nod ear 
industry in this country has 
been excellent because in civil 
installations there have been 
no fatalities in this country. 

“Provided we go on, as we 
shall, in safety in design, 
manufacture, mode of opera- 
tion, and maintenance I be- 
lieve that record will continue 
and give the public confidence 
once again." 

Mrs Thatcher also said foal 
she sympathized with a point 
made by Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, that informa- 
tion on radioactivity should 
be put in a form which 
ordinary people could 
understand. 


In response to that report, 
foe Government announced 
last week that h so longer 
planned to dispose ofmtenue- 
diate4evel nuclear waste at a 
new storage site to be devel- 
oped by the Nuclear Industry 
Radioactive Waste Executive 
(Nirex). 


day. consignments arriving 
before then will be checked far 


radiation by 
authorities. 


ByRtchardFerd 

“Loyairet"; -protests is 
Northern Ireland will mark 
the fifth meeting of the Joint 
Anglo-Irish MmatmaJ con- 
ference' in London today, 
when security cooperation 
and the - adminiuftgtjOT^flf 
justice will top the agenda. 

The dunce of venue is part 


• The. shutdown, of -foe by the Britifo and 

Magnox mirlear power sta- 

tinne ac ri.m ixuWt k«r 4i» thecentrepieoe of the Anglo* 


lions, as demanded by foe 
anti-rmdear lobby in the after- 


math of the Chernobyl disas- 
ter, would cause a 


. Next week's debate wffl be * crias .-ia foe - United 

the Commons^' which wifi Soofouia. -Eectricny ..Board, 
enable Nirex to start test ® House. pf Lords com- 
drillingforthe low-kvri wasm .raittee yesterday: 
storage safe ar Bradwdl in • "fff qirf rtitpinr 

Esax; Elstow m Bedfordshire; reactors, for example those at 
ftilbedt : m Lincolnshire; and Hunterston, which had com- 
Socth Killingfaolme m South plexed 21 years' successful 
Humberside. operation, were of a complete- 

• The Government decided, j ^tiifife rem design from thatat 
vesterdavioiomtheEET.han GhemobyL 


With ifoe Government and 


Sortanti ita^tTtoarS 

setting tip “taficr about 




• The Government decided, 
yesterday to join the EEC ban 
for the rest of the month on 
some food sent from within 


Call to end religious oath in courts 


By our Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The religious oath in crimi- more likely to serve the cause bt 
nal proceedings should be ofjustice" pj 

abolished and replaced with This would “provide the 
an undertaking to tell foe necessary reminder of the _ 
truth, the all-party law reform soleranity ofthe occasion, and y. 
group. Justice, recommended of the importance of the m 
yesterday. information". ^ 

Its report, Witnesses in the The report, which says that cc 
Criminal Courts, says that a witnesses in trials are not in 
simple, non-religious under- accorded the treatment and in 
taking to speak the truth status they, deserve, also rec- p< 
would be "more meaningful, ommends that a court "should kr 
more generally acceptable and be able to call witnesses on the nc 


taiy of >Stato ’iur -Northern 
LM. M1U UkU -IUlT iwpu4 Llrdand, is anxious; to do 
ctors, for exunple those at nothing that i wifi end the 
nterston, which had cem- aHempt to break the political 
ted 21 years’ successful deadlodc 
^ ration , were of a complete- Althou^i it was envisaged 
linerent design from that at that the conference, jointly 
eraobyL chased by Mr King and Mr 

PUrfiament r page4 Fetcr Barry, ^the re public's 
Chernobyl reaction, page 7 Munster for Fore^n Affairs, 

would meet frequently, there 
have been gaps of eighfand a 
half weeks between foe fast 
two meetings, and link has 
emerged to change' things 
visibly in the north. .. 

At today's meeting there 
wifi be reports cm the woirk of 


basis of an application by one 
party, or on its own volition. 


Witnesses should also be **9 subcommittees of Civil 
encouraged- by the court to Servants investigating foe ad- 


volunteer information during ministration of justioe^in the 
questioning, or at the end of it, north, _8nd fo® harmonization 


on points covered. When anti-violence legislation in 
complaints about trials are parts of the island. There 


investigated by Justice, it “not ^ be reports also on cross- 
infrequently appears that im- border security cooperation 


would be “more meaningful, 
more generally acceptable and 


portsint information was I mid . relations between the 


known to a witness, but was 
not brought' out ' ' 


al Ulster Constabulary 
foe community. 


The Committee of Privileges 

No leaks punishment in 154 years 


MPs want 




If the House of Commons 
confirms its Committee of 
; Privileges recommendation to 

■ ban a lobby reporter on The 
! Times for publishing a leaked 

■ draft select committee report, 
it will be the first time 
punishment has been carried 
out for 154 years. 

In the most recent “leak" 

■ case, Mr Mark Schreiber, a 
reporter for The Economist , 
was to be banned for six 
months, but MPs overturned 
the Committee of Privileges 

1 recommendation by 64 votes to 
55. Not only did a majority of 
MPs present not want to 
puisne the issue to pnnisb- 
. meat; only one in five tinned 
tip for the debate at afi. 

The last case of punishment 
was ia 1832, when Thomas 
Sheehan, proprietor of the 
Dublin Evening MaB, was 
committed into the custody id 
the Serjeant of the House, and 
later discharged after being 
admonished by the Speaker. 

He had published foe con- 
tents of a select committee 
draft report on tithes in Ire- 
land, which had not been 
agreed by the committee or 
seen by the House as a whole. 
Having committed a “high 
breach of- privilege", be suf- 
fered foe worst penalty, im- 
prisonment, which is still open 
to MPs to nse. 

The "ancient and undoubted 
privileges" of foe House of 
Commons, as they are called 
when the Speaker claims them 
from the Crown at the opening 
of every parliament, were first 
granted id Tudor times as a 
protection from foe King, 


By Colin Hughes, Whitehall Correspondent 


to punish 
The Times 


though later used to protect 
MPs from constituents. 

Those claimed specifically 
by foe Speaker enshrine abso- 
lute privilege on freedom of 
speech in debate, freedom 
from arrest, and access to foe 
Crown. But other privileges 
are born of specific resolutions 
by the Honse. 

The Commons, for example, 
has right to “exclusive cogni- 
zance of matters arising within 
Its precincts”, and the right to 
punish for contempt. Punish- 
ments range from admonish- 
ment or reprimand, to the 
power lo exdude (even MPs, 
whose seats can be declared 
vacant), to imprisonment. 

Cases going back to 1580 
show that publication of pro- 
ceedings has always been re- 
garded as possible contempt. 
Until foe late eighteenth cen- 
tury publication of any parlia- 
mentary debate was likely to 
lead to iimprisoimaept. 

But leaks from select com- 
mittees were not spe c ifically 
incorporated until a resolution 
of the House in 1837, when the 
True Sun newspaper pub- 
lished evidence to the Poor 
Law Act select committee 
before k was reported to the 
Honse. 

Although no action was 
taken (because foe True Son 
apologized), it was agreed then 
that, “according to foe un- 
doubted privileges of this 
Honse", evidence and docu- 
ments of select committees 
which have not been reported 
to foe House "ought not to be 
published by any member of 
such committee, or by any 
other person". The only' sub- 


stantial amendment to foe rale 
was in 1980, allowing public 
hearings to be reported. 

Mr Michael Ryle, Clerk of 
the House, concluded in a note 
of Jose 1985 to the Commi ttee 
of Privileges (always chaired 
by the Leader of the Honse 
and formed of 12 members on 
proportions of party strength 
in each par liamen t), that foe 
rale b “mandatory for all 
practical purposes". The Priv- 
ileges Committee recommend- 
ed action a gainst serious cases 
of contempt, where the leak 
interfered with committee 
proceedings. 

Expulsion from die Honse is 
a standard form of punish- 
ment, bnt has only recently 
been applied to MPS. Mr 
Garry AlUghan MP was ex- 
pelled in 1947 for contempt, 
after he alleged that MPs took 
drink and bribes from Journal- 
ists hi return for leaking 
reports of party meetings. 

The Honse found that the 
only two members responsible 
were Mr AUighan and another 
MP. Two Journalists of the 
Evening News were called to 
the Bar of die Honse for 
refusing to answer questions, 
bat the details came out before 
their appearance, they an- 
swered foe questions, and no 
action was taken. 

In most other cases an 
apology at the Bar has won 
leniency. No action was taken 
against the fora Mr John 
Junor in 1957 when he apolo- 


Prmleges Committee had rec- 
ommended a reprimand. 


The only case of an MP 
being punished after admitting 
taring leaked a document was 
Mr Tam Dalyefi, ia 1967. He 
passed evidence to foe Science 
and Technology Committee on 
Porton Down, foe defence 
research establishment, to The 
Observer , and was reprimand- 
ed by foe House, bnt Lord 
Astor, foe proprietor, apol- 
ogised and was let off. Mr 
Dale CampbeU-Savonrs, La- 
bour MP for Workington, has 
twice admitted leaking evi- 
dence to the Public Accounts 
Committee, bnt no action was 
taken. 


. Continued from page 1 
There seems to be a growing 
tendency on the part of politi- 
cians to want to keep as a cosy 
little secret among themselves 
information they acquire at 
the taxpayers' expense, until 
they see fit to release it. 

“What this case makes dear 
is that the rules of privilege 
involving select committees. 


' ^ 


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» .. - * f * ♦ ' ‘ : 






which date back 1 50 years, are 
now hopelessly out of date and 


::g| 

' '"mm 


now hopelessly out of date and 
are in need of radical 
revision." 


Yesterday’s report said that 
the editor of The Times and 


gized for writing an article 
which attacked MP$ for voting 
extra petrol rations to party 
organizations, although the 


The Times has long held a 
leading place in the history of 
contempt cases affecting select 
committees. In 1899 foe Select 
Committee on the Cottage 
Homes Bin, after publication 
of its chairman's draft report, 
said that “the premature and 
nnantfaorized publication of 
confidential and privileged 
documents has become part of 
a regular system of The Times 
newspaper". 

Only two years later, in 
1901, the Civil List Select 
Committee found that The 
Tima had poblisbed same of 
its papers marked confiden- 
tial, and recommended that 
the Speaker either exclude its 
journalists from foe lobby or 
take any action which might 
prevent future leaks. No action 
was taken by the House, and 
there is no record of the 
Speaker following up the 
House's recommendation. 
Leading article, page 17 


Mr Evans had argued that 
publication of the leak had 
been in the public interest; 
that the rales of privilege were 
out of date; and that no 
disrepect had been intended to 
Parliament. 

As for foe source of foe leak, 
foe committee said: “If foe 
person responsible for this 
case is ever identified, he 
should be severely punished." 

Mr James Wallace, Liberal 
deputy chief whip, said: 
"Richard Evans is a much- 
respected investigative jour- 
nalist It will be outrageous if 
the penalty proposed by foe 
Privileges Committee is car- 
ried out. particularly in foe 
light of the last ten days when 
foe establishment has been 
patting itself on the bade 
because of its supposed open- 
ness in dealing with nuclear 
matters." 

Mr Evans said: “I am very 
surprised by the recommenda- 
tions, although iu foe back of 
my mind T knew there was a 
possibility they would want u> 
make an example of me." 




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HOME NEWS 


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trial of finding Tebbit 
°"' 1 wife *1 ' ’ * 




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- ; A fireman ^ . By Stewart Teadkr, CrimeReporter 

r Grand Hold in Brigb^aiW Tg iKjH? n ? 1 res P° Dd - 

bombing attf!* Mr Hattsaid he.tookjioldof 

across a male hand aSTI t^aJe hand and asked Mr 

SSFjei SEAS waslam ’ Mr 


■vJ> 



a jury at Central 
Crum rial Court was told ves- 

^o^ d b Ws 

• senior minister, and the other 

“lohiswifeMaiareL ° 

Detoils of the fireman's 
. jjjsooway was given on the 

■ third day ofthe trial of Patrick 

:£s£ Magee aged 34, from 
rsejfim, who has pleaded not 
^guilty to seven charges involv- 
" “S ^e-I984 bombing, mdud- 
;mg five counts of murder. He 
1 nnd four others have pleaded 
^not guilty to a charge of 

"in 10 031136 ^Pl 0 ®! 00 ® 

Yesterday the jury heard a 
^statement from Mr John Hall 
a Sussex firemari, called to the 
• hotel after the blasr on Octo- 
^ on the last night 
of the Conservative Party 
•'-conference. 

* - Mr Hail and other, firemen 
;.rame to toe rabble at the front 
;of the inside of the hotel He 

• .heard a female voice above 
the din °f an alarm bell Mr 
Hall tried to look over the 

■_ nibble and said* “I looked and 
saw two hands." He took bold 
..of the female hand and it was 
Mrs Tebbit The fireman said 
" he asked her if she could feel 
him in case the hand beJ< 

. to a third person, but 


him, 

was. 

Mr HaM said; "I told him I 
would get some- help but be 
•earned on gripping and asked 
me not to ga” Tbe fireman 
stayed with Mr TebteCthen 
Secretary of State for Employ- 
ment and now chairman ofthe 
Conservative Party, - for a 
time. 

In his statement the fireman 
said he also spoke to Lady 
Beny, who was injured with 
pains in her back and asking 
where her husband was. Sir 
Antony, Conservative MP 
for Enfield Southgate, was 
later found , dead near by- 
in her statement to the court 

Lady Berry said that when she 
and her husband bad original- 
ly checked in to room 328 in - 
the hold, she had chosen the 
bed nearest the bathroom but 
later that day changed her 
mind mid had taken the other 
bed. On the night of the blast 
her last sight other husband at • 
■shortly . after 2J0. am was 
seeing him standing by putting 
. on his pyjamas. 

Mr John Wakeham, Gov- 
ernment Chief Whip, de- 
scribed in his statement to the 
court what happened to him 
when the blast occurred. His 
wife, Roberta, was killed. 

Mr Wakeham went to sleep 
and then “the next thing I fan 


remember is being woken by a 
loud bang and a blinding flash 
of light I formed toeimpres- 
sion I was still in my room but 
in actual fad I was m the foyer 
of the hotel". 

Mr Wakeham said be 
thought he heard his wife's 
voice asking. what they should 
do and he told her that they 
had to waft. 

Mrs Jennifer Taylor lost her 
husband Eric in the blast. He 
was chairman of the North- 
west Area Conservative Asso- 
ciation. In. her statement Mrs 
Taylor said the couple went to 
. bed about 2 am. When the 
bias happened she felt herself 
Efted upwards and then had 
the sensation of felling 

_ She said: “When I finished 
felting • I opened my eyes, 
believing I had been 
dreaming." 

She found herself on the 
ground and called out for her 
husband, she made contact 
with Mr Gordon Shattock, 
whose-wife died in the blast 
He told her to stay still and 
then the two met up, holding 
hands and looking for a wav 
out ■ J 



Law urged 
to spare 
children 
from court 


Dr Anthony Traffbrd told 
the court that Mis Muriel 
Maclean, wife of the chair- 
roan of the Scottish Conserva- 
tive Baity, died after four 
weeks on life support systems 
m a Sussex hospital 
The hearing continues 
today. 


Rail union 
judgement 
criticized 

By Frances Gibb 
•Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The court ruling that rail- 
.way unions can be sued by 
'ticket holders for losses and 

- inconvenience caused by in- 
"dustriai action called without 

a secret ballot, provoked a 
/ sceptical reaction from labour 

- lawyers yesterday. 

The common view wa». «hat 

- Wednesday's ruling by Judge 
-Henham at Sheflfidd County 

..Court would be overturned by 
•foe Court of Appeal ■ r 

Mr Robert Simpson, lcctnr- 
«er in labour law at too London 
^School .of Economics, said 
ftha^in bisv|ewtheiqi!ing was 
.wrong, and contrary to a 1982 
House of Lords decisionio foe 
caseofLonrhovShdl ; 

, Hesaidr^Tbere isjtmrsnch 
-principle in Engfish law that 
.someone who aimers wrongas 
a result of an unlawful act has 1 
A cause of action. He most 
prove an existing tort” 

‘ The only conceivable tort in 
. -such a case would involve 
.interference with business by 

- unlawful means. 

' But one ofthe ingredients of 
. that tort was that toe defen- 

- dan is, in this case toe railway 
unions, had intended to cause 
damage specifically to the 

..plaintiff, the rail traveller. 
;That was obviously not the- 
.'.case, Mr Simpson said. 

; The two rail unions in- 
_yolved have said that they 
intend to appeal against the 
.'judgement, in which Judge 
Henham ordered that toeypay 
£153 damages to a Sheffield 
-businessman, Mr Angus Fat- 
concer, who was stranded in 
'London during a one-day rail 
strike last year. 


Guideline ‘threat’ 
to mental study 


Research into mental. disor- 
ders, including schizoph renia, 
would be seriously hampered 
if new guidelines proposed by 
toe Mental Health Act Com- 
mission were implemented, a 
leading professor of psychiatry 
said -yesterday. 

Developments in brain sci- 
ences meant that some real 
understanding ofthe causes of 
disorders such as schizophre- 
nia and Alzheimer's rfi-wayf 
“may at last. be within our 
grasp”. Professor Robert 
KendeD, Professor of Psychia- 
try at Edinburgh .University, . 
said. . . ' ■: --- 

Bur the guidelines posed “a . 
most serious threat’' topsychi- 
atric research. * 

Under the-' commission’s 
gratelines, published, last year 
air. patients, involved in re- 
searcto, .whether in hospital or 
in toe <fonunimfty ami wheth- 
er informal or detained pa- 
tients, would . have to give 
consent at three levels to 


■‘non-therapeutic” research 
from which the patient would 
not directly benefit, Professor 
Kendefl said in the British 
Medical Journal. 

The patients themselves 
would have to give “real 
consent”, a second o pinio n 
would be needed from another 
consultant agreeing that toe 
patient had capacity to con- 
sent and toe patient's relatives 
would have to be fully 
informed. ' 

If the guidelines were ac- 
cepted, Professor Ken dell 
^ saki, “they would have a 
“profoundly, damaging ; effect 
- oa,mpst-4>rrns .of psychiatric 
research in this country. Clini- 
cal research into dementia 
would vjrtually cease” . ■ 

.. Simply to take a.-Wood 
sample: from . 5G patients a 
second consultant would have 
to interview every patient 
The guidelines would make 
“simple and uncontentious 
proposals impracticable". 


^ ^ glimpse of bride. The route to 

and &o®i Westminster Abbey (above), and (right) Prince Andrew and Miss Sarah Ferguson. 

Family affair at the Abbey 

D» A tl -I. . _ _ . • 


By Alan Hamilton 

The wedding of Prince An- 
drew and Mbs Sarah Fergu- 
son on July 23 will be more of 
a family affair than that of the 
Prince and Princess- of Wales 
five years age. 

Although the Government 
has not made the day a public 
holiday, many thousands are 
expected to line the proces- 
sional route to and from the 
Abbey, in spite of the reported 
decline in holiday bookings 
from American tourists afraid 
of terrorist acts. 

Because Prince Andrew is 
only the Queen's second son, 
there win be fewer diolo mafic 


and official representatives 
among more than 2,000 guests 
at toe Abbey, but otherwise 
the occasion will be accorded 
' the foil ceremo nial pa im ply 

Prince Andrew and hfa sup- 
porter, Prince Edward, will 
leave Buckingham Palace by 
carriage and travel by the 
Mall, Admiralty Arch, Trafal- 
gar Square and Whitehall to 
the West Door of the Abbey. 
The route through the Arch is 
at his own request as an 
acknowledgement to the Navy 
in which be is a serving officer. 

The Prince's carriage wiO be 
accompanied by a Captain's 
Escort of the Life Guards. 


Like the Princess of Wales 
on her wedding day. Miss 
Ferguson will leave from the 
Queen Mother's home at Clar- 
ence House, and will follow a 
similar route to the Abbey 
under Admiralty Arch. 

It is expected that, depend- 
ing on the weather, toe brfoe 
mil ride in either the Glass 
Coach or an open landau 

The Palace said yesterday 
that the bride's bouquet is to 
be made by toe Worshipful 
Company of Gardeners and 
floral decoration in the Abbey 
is to be handled by the 
National Association of Flow- 
er Arrangement Societies. 


By Tim Jones 
A Scotland Yard officer said 
yesterday that toe Govern- 
ment may have to change the 
law to spare children who 
have been sexually abused 
from the trauma of a trial, 

Dei Sup! Peter Gwynn said 
the law should allow video 
taped evidence given by chil- 
dren to be accepted without 
them having to be present. 
Such videos can be shown 
now only with toe consent of 
toe defence. 

. He told a conference of 
international experts in Car- 
diff: “This is our next chal- 
fenge. We have not been put 
off so far. If we show ourselves 
to have a sound basis we may 
ask toe Government to chance 
the law." 

Mr Gywnn, who is chair- 
man of a new joint police and 
social services team dealing 
with child sex cases in Bexley, 
south London, said that since 
an experiment had begun in 
March officers had taken 14 
video tapes of children mak- 
ing allegations of sexual abuse. 

Videos, he said, could also 
be used to spare a child from 
seemingly endless interviews. 

. The attitude of some profes- 
sionals, would also have to 
change. “Adults are usually 
believed above children. 
There is a popular mythology 
that children fabricate. We 
have got to believe toe child 
until proven otherwise.” 

Dr Neil Frude, of the de- 
partment of psychology. Uni- 
versity College Cardiff told 
delegates to the conference, 
organized by the National 
Society for toe Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children, that sexu- 
al abuse had been found to be 
far more common than had 
ever been seriously suggested 
“No fewer than 10 per cent 
of girls experience sexual 
abuse in childhood The fig- 
ures for boys are less, but still 
at least 6 per cent are sexually 
abused" 


Boxer 

required 

ringside 

surgery 


r 

9 

it 


A ringside operation was 
the only thing that could have 
saved Steve Watt, aged 29, the 
Scottish welterweight champi- 
on, when he collapsed after a 
fight, an inquest was told 
yesterday. 

But such an operation 
would have been impossible, 
Mr Peter Richards, a neuro- 
surgeon, said 

Watt, of Iveagfa Close, 
North wood, north-west Lon- 
don, died from brain 
haemorrhage due to rapid rise 
in pressure, after the referee 
had stopped his fight against 
Rocky Kelly in the tenth 
round at toe West Hotel 
Fulham, west London, on 
March 14. 

_ Dr Helen Grant, a patholo- 
gist, told the inquest that 
Watt's brain had been dam- 
aged because of previous 
bouts. She said that there were 
gaps in toe brain and also 
holes where nerve cells should 
have been. 

“1 was flabbergasted by the 
damage." 

Recording a misadventure 
verdict. Dr John Burton, the 
Hammersmith coroner, wel- 
comed new regulations which 
will see professional fighters 
have regular brain scans. He 
said that an ambulance should 
always be available at boxing 
contests and there should be 
direct transfer to a hospital 
with neurosurgical facilities. 

Mr Richards suggested that 
boxers should also be given a 
psychological test at annual 
periods. 

The referee, Mr Sidney 
Nathan, said that he had 
slopped toe fight because Watt 
had begun to wilt. He was ina 
position where he could not 
defend himself: 

Mr Nathan, who has been a 
referee for 28 years, added that 
Watt returned to his comer 
after he told him: “I am all 
right" He then collapsed and 
doctors were immediately at 
the ringside. 


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advice on 
computer 

By KO Johnstone : . 

Technology Correspondent ■ 

British Telecom's Yeflov 
Pages service is abont to go 
electronic, allowing armchair 
shoppers to call up informa- 
tion on mkrocorapnters con- 
nected to a telephone system. 




Student to sue 
over train fall 

Mr Paul Dungey, aged 23, a 
student, of Deep Dak Lane. 
Nenleham, Lincoln, is to sue 
British Rail for negligence and 
damages after being cleared 
yesterday by Abergele magis- 
trates, North ‘Wales, of a 
charge, brought by the railway 
board, of leaving a carriage 
while the train was moving. 

He was seriously injured 
after falling from a tram at 
Colwyn Bay station, and had 
.pleaded not guilty to the 
charge. 


Bomb victims 
flown home 

Two British holidaymakers 
Injured in a bomb explosion 
which destroyed a Sri Lank a n 
aircraft at Colombo have been 
flown to London. 

Miss Rosemary Ann 
Simmons, aged 24. and her 
friend, Mr Simon Carter, aged 
29, both of London, were in a 
stable condition in Queen 
Mary's Hospital yesterday. 


Companies which advertise 
in Yellow Fans wifi havetheir 
services detailed on the system 
free of charge. 

Users of the electronic ser- 
vice will pay only' telephone 
es to have the pages 
tyed on their home com- 
parers. The computers, 
equipped with ther appropriate 
electronic black boxes and 
programmes, wifi be connected 
to BT computers at Reading,' 
which bold the mfematton. 

A test run for the service, 
which will allow advertisers to 
update information in seconds, 

win begin in January next year 
in Reading, Guildford and 
London. If successful it will be 
extended at the ead at the 
year. J - 

The ease of updating infor- 
mation such as prices, special 
offers and new products, is 
seen as one of the mam 
advantages of toe new service. 


Pregnant 
addict 
test case 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

A test case on whether 
behaviour; by a pregnant 
mother which puts her foetus 
at risk, can be taken into 
account when her fitness as a 
parent is at issue, is to come 
before the House of Lords. 

A committee of law lords 
yesterday granted leave to 
appeal in a case in which 
magistrates made a care order 
for a baby girt whose mother, a 
drug addict, had continued to 
take drugs throughout 
pregnancy. 

The girl, aged one, was born 
suffering from severe drug 
withdrawal symptoms and af- 
ter six weeks in a special baby 
unit, was placed with foster 
parents by Berkshire County 
Council. 

Lord; Bridge of Harwich, 
sitting with Lord Brightman 
and Lord Goff of Clueveley, 
said that the case raised issues 
they ought to consider on 
appeal • 

The appeal against a deri- 
sion last March by the Court 
of Appeal which upheld toe 
magistrates’ care order, will be ' 
beard later in the year. 














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Retired judge banned 

. John Pickering, a retired _ Pickering, aged 61, a former 
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f . Tjrntchj™ considerable straitened fi- 

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after he admitted a drink- result of his marriage 
driving charge. difficulties. ■ 


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Male pregnancy ‘achievable soon’ 

By Our Science Correspondent 


Straw scientists believe that 
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giro birth to babies in the 
“foreseeable fbtnre^ nccord- 
ing to an article in Ne» 
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The article quotes a tending 
expert in human embryo re- 
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the bowel wall where it might 
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The procedure would m- 
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Cases where such a preg- 
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flight include men married to 
incurably infertile women, or 
women whose lives would be 

endangered through pregnan- 
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professor Alan Trounsoa, 


director of the Institute of 
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bonrne, is reported as having 
refused hundreds of requests 
from men wishing to have a 
baby. “I think the risks to the 
child and the male ‘mother' 
are tod b% at present; but with 
careful evaluation these risks 
could be reduced.” 

Mr John Parsons, senior 
registrar and lecturer at King's 
College Hospital- London, 
sayss “It" can be done, and 
cedoabtedJy someon e wffl do 
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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


PARLIAMENT MAY 8 1986 


Food embargo 


Terrorism 


Privilege case 


Loophole fear 
in proposed 
ban on food 


RADIOACTIVITY 

The West German health 
authorities were aware of a 
loophole in the provisional EEC 
agreement fin- banning food 
imports from the Soviet Union 
and Eastern Europe and would 
be taking necessary precautions. 


Mr Tim Eggar, Under Secretary 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs, said in the Commons. 

He was referring to what 
many MPs from aO parts of the 
House said was a danger for the 
United Kingdom, stemming 
from the inner-Gemun trade 
agreement — whereby produce 
i»n 


East Germany might come ei- 
ther from the USSR or the other 
countries being proposed for the 
banned list. All of them were 
within a 1.000 kilometre radius 
of Chernobyl: Hungary, Poland, 
Rumania. Bulgaria. Czecho- 
slovakia and Yugoslavia. 

Mr Eggar told MPs the pro- 
visional agreement was ex- 
pected to be approved on 
Friday, in which case the ban 
would come into effect at mid- 
day on Saturday. 

Mr Edward Taylor (Southend 
East. O who had raised the 
matter, said if there was a real 
danger of contaminated food 
reaching the United Kingdom, 
why had the loophole been left? 
If there was not a real problem, 
was not Mr Eggar's answer a 
rather silly public relations 
ploy? 

Mr Eggar said the greater part 
of the German Democratic 
Republic did not foil within the 
1.000 kilometre radius. The ban. 
if approved, would have direct 
effect throughout the Commu- 
nity. It would be up to the West 
Goman authorities to give ef- 
fect and practice to it 
Mr Michael Shersby (Uxbridge, 
O asked about the likely effect 
upon cattle and pigs. Would it 
be safe to eat their meat six 
months from now? What dis- 
cussions was the Government 
having with the food industry 
about that? 

Mr Eggar said the provisional 
ban included fresh meat and 
offal from Eastern European 
countries. The Government 
would be keeping the ban under 
constant review as new scien- 
tific evidence came in over the 
next few weeks. 

Dr Mark Hughes (City of 
Durham, Lab) said it was un- 
acceptable that the whole British 
community was left at risk 
because it was entirely possible 
for pork, bacon and several 
vegetable products to pass 
through the loophole in East and 
West German trade, 

Mr Eggar: Dr Hughes must be 
careful not to exaggerate 1 fears 
and stir up concern which is not 
justified. 

Hie Community countries 
are responsible for checking the 
origin of goods that come in. 

Sir Richard Body (Holland with 
Boston, Cf. How are we going to 
have safeguards in respect of 


commodities from Rumania, 
Bulgaria, Poland and elsewhere 
when they come through East 
Germany? 

Mr Egsar said if would up to the 
West ’Germany authorities to 
give effect to the ban. They were 
aware of the loophole and be 
was sure they would be taking 

necessary precautions. 

Mr Ralph Howell (Norfolk 
North. C): Mr Eggar has con- 
vinced nobody with that an- 
swer. Why cannot (his ban come 
into operation immediately? 

Mr Eggar- said that under 
Community preedure, it could 
not come into effect until all 
member countries had given 
their agreement. That was ex- 
pected on Friday, with the ban 
coming into effect on Saturday. 
Mr Charles Kennedy (Ross, 
Cromarty and Skye. SDP) said 
Mr Eggar’s initial response to 
Mr Taylor did not go as for as it 
could have done, because it 
made dear there was an unfilled 
loophole. 

Mr Eggar There is no loophole. 
If imports do come through East 



ipntatnsk 
Germany from other Comecon 
countries, it would be the duty 
of the West German authorities 
to make sure the origin was 
checked. 

Mr Robert Jackson (Wantage, 
C) suggested that the West 
German Government would 
never have agreed to the pro- 
visional ban if they had thought 
they could not check the origin 
of foodstuffs. 

Mr Eggar said he entirely 
agreed. The European Commu- 
nity, meeting earlier in the week, 
were convinced it was a prac- 
tical possibility. 

Mr Bvynmor John, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on agri- 
culture, asked if Mr Eggar was 
satisfied that every Government 
would agree to the ban. 

Would he reconsider the 
question of the loophole on 
inner-German trade? How 
would the West Germans know 
where produce had come from? 
They would have only the word 
of another Government It was 
not fair of the West Germans. 
Mr Eggar said that if the West 
German Government were con- 
vinced they could bring in the 
necessary measures to ensure 
the ban. the United Kingdom 
should have no reason to doubt 
iL 


Kinnock: 
public 
must be 
told facts 


NUCLEAR BLAST 


In the wake of die Chernobyl 
disaster there was widespread 
feeling that the coordination of 
information between relevant 
Government ministers was 
inadequate. Mr Ne3 Kinnock, 
the Lender of the Opposition, 
said during Prime Minister’s 
question time in the 
Commons. He called for dear 
and explicit information to be 
provided to the public. 

Mr Kmnocfc mid: The best 
assurance against uxyustified 
alarm is candid information 
and coherent organization of 
the information. Will she now 
ensure therefore that dear and 
explicit information is 
provided to the general public 
about the farm, the incidence 
and the implications of 
radioactive contamination in 
Britain? • 

Mrs Thatcher: I read what the 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment (Mr Kenneth 
Baker) said yesterday. I think it 
was an excellent statement. It 
was very well received. After 
the arrival of the radioactive 
cloud over the United 
Kingdom last Friday, the 
Minister for Agriculture set up 
an incident room to provide 
expert advice on foodstuffs. 

The Department of the 
Environment acted as overall 
department in order to 
monitor, coordinate and 
disseminate relevant 
information and act as a focal 
point. 

Mr Kinnock: Will she take 
action to remove the inconsis- 
tencies apparent in the informa- 
tion and that it is put in a form 
which the general public can 
dearly comprehend? 

Mrs Thatcher That is one 
reason for the Department of 
the Environment information 
room. It acts as a clearing house 
for information. I sympathise 
wriJh his request to try to put the 
information in a form which 
ordinary people can understand. 
Mr Ian Lloyd (Havant, Cy. In 
the context of the Chernobyl 
disaster can I refer her to the 
tendentious, inaccurate and 
damaging advertisement pub- 
lished by Friends of the Earth in 
The Times today? Would she 
agree that the damage done to 
western economies by Opec 
over foe last decade would pale 
into insignificance if the western 
governments were to be pan- 
icked into dosing down foe 
nuclear industry? 

Mrs Thatcher: I agree. The 
record of foe nudear industry in 
this country has been excellent 
because in civil installations 
there have been no fatalities in 
this country. Provided we go on 
— as we shall — in safety in 
design, manufacture, mode of 
operation and maintenance I 
believe that record will continue 
and will give the public con- 
fidence once again. 


Many views on ritual slaughter 


ANIMAL WELFARE 

The Government is giving care- 
ful consideration to the Farm 
Animal Welfare Council report 
on ritual slaughter and the many 
comments received on it from 
interested parties, Mrs Peggy 
Fenner. Parliamentary Sec- 
retary for Agriculture. Fisheries 
and Food, said in the Commons. 
The response will be issued as 
sow as possible, she added. 

Mr Patrick Nicholls 
(Teignbridge, C) said toleration 
of the rites of religions minor- 


ities could not be absolute. We 
have (he went on) a constructive 
report, published as long ago as 
Jniy, 1985. If in the end we have 
practices which would be abhor- 
rent to the vast majority of 
people if they knew what was 
involved, that is a problem foe 
Government most tackle and 
tackle sooner rather than later. 

Mrs Fenner: This is an ex- 
tremely important report. We 
have had a large number of 
comments and observations 
from a wide range of interested 
persons and are now giving them 
the deepest consideration. 


Mr David Maclean (Penrith and 
the Border. Q said agriculture 
had enough enemies in the 
conn try without being associated 
in the slightest with pandering 
to this barbaric practice. 

Mrs Feimer This issoe has been 
debated in Parliament on several 
occasions over foe years. 

The view has prevailed that 
foe religions req uirem ents of foe 
Jewish and Muslim commu- 
nities should be respected in the 
absence of conclusive evidence 
that animals killed by this 
religious method suffer more 
than stunned animals. 


A marvellous and safe country 


TOURISM 


American tourists should con- 
tinue io come lo Britain, a 
marvellous and very safe coun- 
try, Mrs Thatcher, the Prime 
Minister, said during Commons 
questions when a Conservative 
MP suggested an early invita- 
tion to Mrs Nancy Reagan to the 
royal wedding would help re- 
verse foe worrying fall in foe 
number of American visitors. 


Mr Patrick McNair- Wilson 
(New Forest. C) asked: Has she 
had time to consider foe worry- 
ing fall in foe number of 
Americans planning to visit this 
country since the Libyan bomb- 
ing. particularly since this in 
completely unjustified? 

Is she aware of any plans to 
invite the United States first 
lady to the royal wedding, since 
an early invitation followed by 
an early acceptance might weU 
go some way to reversing this 
trend? 


Mrs Thatcher: This is a matter 
not for me but I am very much 
aware of the reports of foe 
reduction in the number of 
tourists from America coming 
lo this country. I have also had 
something to say about it. 


Correction 

A reported remark yesterday 
concerning a house in Victoria 
Street, London, being used for 
the export of arms should have 
referred to Iran, not Iraq. 


All committed to fighting terrorism 


TOKYO SUMMIT 


Tire success of foe seven-nation 
economic summit in Tokyo had 
been almost universally rec- 
ognized, Mra Margaret 
Thatcher, foe Prime Minister, 
told the Commons when she 
reacted to criticism of foe 
summit by Mr NeO Kfaaock, 
Leader of the Opposition. He 
bad described the statement on 
terrorism as permissive and 
vague. 

Mra Thatcher, frk a long sum- 
mary of foe achievements of foe 
three day meeting, said: The 
hallmarks of this summit were 
unity and confidence: unity in 
our determination to see that 
those who practice state terror- 
ism do not succeed; confidence 
that our economic policies are 
right and will bring greater 
prosperity to our peoples. 

The summit would 
home to those who 
terrorism the heavy costs which 
they would incur in future. 

Mr Khtaodt commented that he 
recognized foe genera! worthi- 
ness of foe summit statement on 
terrorism, but what about foe 
view of foe Japanese that foe 
implementation of foe state- 
ment was "a matter left to each 
country’s judgement" and that 
there was “virtually nothing 
which Japan could do in a 
concrete way."? 

Did not this somewhat reduce 
foe validity of the declaration on 
terrorism? 

What was the Prime 
Minister's response to foe post- 
summit statements by President 
Reagan and Vice President 
i? Did she agree with Signor 


Craxi that military action was 
“precluded by the Tokyo 
agreeme n t."? Obviously dif- 
ferent views were held by foe 
Japanese, foe Americans and 
the Italians on whaf’Missian 
aocamplished” meant Could 
the Prime Minister clear up foe 
confusion? 

if foe permissive and vague 
statement on terrorism was 
supposed to be foe concrete 
achievement in Tokyo (he said) 
this summit reached new levels 
of snupation, selfishness and 
superficiality. 

Mra Thatcher Whatever he 
tries to say he cannot detract 
from foe great success of foe 
summit which has been almost 
universally recognized. His own 
statement is benaL 

The declaration on terrorism 
was dear and all the countries at 
the summit were committed to 
it. Britain would be monitoring 
its application. 

Sir Frederick Bennett (Torbay. 

C) said some kind of agreement 

on extradition laws being co- 
ordinated was essential in the 

long term to help the fight 
against terrorism. 

Mrs Thatcher told him that 
improved procedures on extra- 
dition were one factor high- 
lighted by foe seven nations at 
foe summit. 

Sir Anthony Bock (Colchester 
North, C) asked if she could be 
more specific about the 
consideration of further 
measures for combating 
international terrorism. 

Mrs Thatcher: A number of 
proposals were made, varying 
from completely excluding 
Libyan people's bureaux, as we 
have done, instead of reducing 
them, to taking sterner action 


to reduce the amount of oil we 
lake up from Libya. These will 
be further considered and if 
necessary further 

recommendations will be 
made. 

Mr Dale GunpheU-Sarours 

(Workington. Lab) asked if 
President Reagan was now able 
to take unilateral action against 
Syria as a result of his dis- 
cussions with the Prime 
Minister? 

In the light of the 
Government’s apparent desire 
to damp down on. lddnap 
insurance, had this question 
been raised with other heads of 
state or was she now turning a 
blind eve? 

Mrs Thatcher replied that the 



Aitfcca: W3I political 
wrestling coatiaoe? 

communique specifically men- 
tioned Libya. It did not specify 
any other state. Had it done so 
there would have bad to have 
been similar evidence on state- 
sponsored terrorism. 

The Home Secretary (Mr 


Douglas Hurd) was considering 
foe question of kidnap insur- 
ance 

Mr Michael Foot (Blaenau 
Gwent, Lab) pointed out that 
foe communique said action 
against terrorism should be 
taken through the UN. Did that 
mean she and President Reagan 
repented the raid on Tripoli 
which had not been taken in 
concert with the UN? 

Mra Thatcher said foe UN 
Genera] Assembly statement 
condemned terrorism most vig- 
orously but it had not taken 
effective action in that regard. 
Mr Jonathan Aftkea (Thanet 
South, Q: Was she dismayed by 
bow difficult il proved to per- 
suade the French President to 
to foe robust wording of 
s communique on terrorism? 

Did she notice foe admiring 
comment of the US Secretary of 
State who said “Margaret really 
wrestled old Francois to the mat 
cm this one”? Will that political 
wrestling have to continue to 
keep the EEC sound on terror- 
ism? (Laughter) 

Mra Thatcher I deny it ab- 
solutely. We took a robust line. 
Gradually the other countries 
came along and, in the end, we 
got very considerable coopera- 
tion from all summit countries. 
Mr Dennis Skinner (Bolsover, 
Lab): Will she call upon all those 
Tory MPs with directorships in 
companies trading with Libya to 
give them up? Will she tell the 
party chairman that if he gets 
any money for Tory funds from 
companies trading with Libya 
be should send the money back? 
Mrs Thatcher Perhaps he 
might recall foe action of foe 
NUM in frying to get help from 
Libya. (Cheers) 


Early debate on ‘Times’ reporter 


PRIVILEGE 


A debate would beheld before 
the Whitsun recess on the 
recommendation of foe Com- 
mons Select Committee of 
Privileges that Mr Richard Ev- 
ans, Lobby Correspondent of 
The Times, should be sus- 
pended from the lobby for six 
months for leaking a report of 
foe environment select commit- 
tee on radioactive waste, Mr 
John Biffen, foe Leader of the 
House, said during business 
questions when Opposition 
MPs protested at foe punish- 
ment proposed. 

Earlier, Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher, the Prime Minmster, 
said during questions that it was 
a matter for foe House of 
Commons and the House of 
Commons would decide. 

She was replying to Mr John 
Cartwright (Woolwich, SDP) 
who asked: Has she read foe 
Committee of Privileges' recom- 
mendation that Richard Evans 


by suspended from the lobby for 
six months? 

It is ironic that a select 
committee set up to shed light 
on Government departments 
should be guilty of establishing 
foe same rules of secrecy around 
their affairs as they would 
condemn in Whitehall. 

If this House punishes 
journalists bnt lets the source of 
the leak go scot-free it would be 
pompous and unfair. 

During business questions 
later Mr Hmnfrcy Matins 
(Croydon North West, C) asked 
when the matter would come 
before the House. 

Mr Biffen: I would like to 
underline what the Prime Min- 
ister has said, namely that it is in 
every sense a straightforward 
House of Commons occasion. 
Nonetheless, I think foe House 
would like to have this matter 
resolved fairly speedily. 1 hope 
foe debate can be arranged 
before we go for the Whitsun 
recess. 

Mr Tony Been (Chesterfield, 
Lab): Chi foe report of the 


privileges committee, I was foe 
one dissenting voice. Will he 
assure us foal there will be an 
absolutely free vote and no 
Government backbenchers will 
be under any pressure whatever 
to suspend the membership of 
the lobby rights from the 
journalist concerned at a time 
when the offence with which he 
was charged was that he made 
available information about nu- 
clear safety when foe Govern- 
ment and others are now 
boasting about high levels of 
openness we now enjoy? 

Although I have no time for 
News International and its 
proprietor, the issue is one this 
House of Commons must be 
able to discuss free of any 
Government whips of any kind. 
Mr Biffen: It would be trivializ- 
ing this particular topic if it were 
related to News International or 
its proprietor. The Prime Min- 
ister bra said it is in every sense 
a House of Commons occasion 
and I think he should draw a 
generous interpretation from 
that 


Mr Dale CampbeU-Savoora 
(Workington, Labk The public 
will condemn foe House of 
Commons if it takes foe ir- 
responsible action of expelling 
The Times journalist, particu- 
larly when ail Mr Evans did was 
to report a conversation that be 
had with an MP who himself 
had breached privilege. 

Would not Fleet Street be 
wise in foe event that such an 
expulsion would take place to 
withdraw its lobby correspon- 
dents in protest? 

Mr Biffen: It will be a lively 
debate. 

Mr Charles Kennedy (Ross, 
Cromarty and Skye. SDP). who 
asked for an early debate said: In 
a week when we have rightly 
criticized the Soviet Union for 
secrecy, it would be a travesty if 
the Mother of Parliaments in its 
attitude to Mr Richard Evans 
doing his job were to take an 
equally ham-fisted approach. 

Mr Biffen: It is my intention 
that the debate should take place 
before the Whitsun break. 


Fair deal 
promised 
for tunnel 
Bill 

CHANNEL TUNNEL 


Violent scenes no credit to printers 


WAPPING 


The recent violence outside the 
News International printing 
plant at Wapping was quite 
deplorable, Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher, foe Prime Minister, 
said during questions in foe 
Commons. The police, 300 of 
whom had been injured there, 
should be supported and not 
condemned, she said. 

Sir Eldon Griffiths (Bury St 
Edmunds, O, parliamentary 
adviser to the Police 
Federation, had asked: While 
she was so splendidly batting 
for Britain in Tokyo, did she 
notice that back home in 
Wapping 140 British police 
officers were injured, many of 
them very badly, by those 
masquerading as peaceful 
pickets outside that printing 
plant? 

Did she also notice than an 
MP described these officers as 
"all that is rotten in our 
society"? I wonder if she agrees 
with foal and if she would like 
to invite the Leader of the 
Opposition (Mr Neil KinnockX 
on behalf of the Labour Party, 
to remove that smear from the 
Metropolitan Police? 

Mra Thatcher I saw foe 
reports on the activities last 
Saturday night outside 
Wanting which one can only 
totally and utterly condemn 
and say they were quite 
deplorable, and the terrible 
effect on the police. I also saw 
foe remarks to which be refers 
which I would also totally and 
utterly condemn. 

We support the police in the 


way they do their duties. I note 
that 300 police have bora 
injured in the disturbances 
outside Wapping. 

! also note that the Labour 
Paify condones these tactics 
which lead to violence oh the 
picket line at Wanting; votes 
against the Public Order BED; 



Soiey: Provocative action 
by some people 

votes against the Prevention of 
Terrorism Act; tolerates 
Labour councils which harass 
the police; and cheers speeches 
at its party conferences which 
describe foe police as the 
enemy. 

Our view is totally different. 
We support and admire the 
police. 

•Later, during foe Commons 
debate on crime prevention, Mr 
Douglas Hurd. Home 
Secretary, said that more than 
350,000 police man hours had 
been absorbed at Wapping, 
because of the print workers' 


dispute with News 
International 

Last Saturday, more than 370 
officers bad to be made avail- 
able. That inevitably affected 
the service the police could 
provide elsewhere. 

Passions coukl run high in 
industrial disputes, but die po- 
lice were not there to take one 
side or the other. They were 
neither pro-Murdoch nor anti- 
Murdoch. 

He had listened to foe con- 
cerns of a group of MPs in a 
meeting at foe end of last week. 
He bad now written to their 
leader (Mr Harry Ewing. Falkirk 
East, Lab) and he proposed to 
publish that reply, because it 
made dear how foe Metropoli- 
tan Police Commissioner was 
handling foe police operation 
and the pattern of violence at 
Wapping. 

Remarks about ‘'police riot" 
or accusations made outside 
Parliament of foe police being 
“all that is rotten in our society" 
were not only untrue but deeply 
offensive, not least to the 175 
officers injured at Wapping last 
Saturday. (Conservative 
cheers). 

It was right for the unions to 
look again at what was being 
done in their name. 

There was a long and honour- 
able tradition among trades 
unionists of peaceful and lawful 
protest. No one doubted foe 
prim workers' feelings. He 
hoped that a settlement of the 
dispute could soon be reached. 

It is dear, though, that these 
demonstrations and pickets are 
attracting to foe scene people 
who are prepared to resort to 


violence and come intending 
violence. 

The scenes that followed did 
no credit to the cause of the 
print workers and did not 
enhance their public support 

He hoped foe union leaders 
would reconsider their- tactics 
and seek to do things less likely 
to cause disorder. 

He bad met a delegation from 
the print unions at foe Home 
Office earlier in the day and as a 
result there would be a meeting 
between the union leaders and 
the Deputy Assistant Commis- 
sioner of foe Metropolitan Po- 
lice to discuss future handling of 
affairs at Wapping. 

I welcome that development 
(he said). 

Mr Clive Soiey, an Oppo- 
sition spokesman on home af- 
fairs, said he had seen foe police 
video on the trouble at Wapping 
which showed about six people 
throwing objects which might 
have been bricks or smoke 
bombs, from behind a line of 
demonstrators. 

The mounted police had then 
charged foe crowd but foe video 
'did not show what happened 
next as it was out of range of the 
cameras. 

It was possible a number of 
people had been intent on 
getting the police to charge foe 
demonstrators by throwing mis- 
siles at them, so creating a 
serious public disorder problem. 


Parliament today 

Commons (9.30): Private 
Members' Bills: Safety at Sea 
BiD and Civil Protection in 
Peacetime Bill, remaining 
stages. 


The Channel Tazraei Bill 
would be dealt with fairly and 
without any attempt to see that 
there was a denial of legitimate 
debate, Mr Jehu Biffen, Leader 
of foe House, assured Conser- 
vative MPs who, daring bad- 
ness questions warned the 
Government against trying to 
telescope progress on die Chan- 
net Tunnel BiD because they 
would meet obstacles. 

Mr David Crouch (Canterbury, 
Ck Did he hear The World a 
One programme on foe BBC 
today? He would have heard dm 
Chairman or foe Channel Tun- 
nel group. Lord Pennock, talk- 
ing of Parliament mocking about 

the Channel TraaeJ Bffl. As a 
supporter of the BiD 1 am also a 
great s u pporter of foe Par- 
Uameataiy system and I do 

rather resent the attitudes of 
anyone outside this House talk- 
ing of Parliament mocking about 
as ft proceeds to examine a B3I 
of this nature. 

Will be ensure the procedures 
of this House with regard to fob 
hybrid Bill will not be telesc oped 
lo suit the Government's pur- 
poses and therefore put ft 
jeopardy the right of the people 
of Kent to have their voices 
beard and views taken into 
account? 

Mr Biffen: If Lord Pennock has 
referred to Parliament as muck- 
ing about, foe fact is that Lari 
Pennock is a member of dm 
House of Lords and I think he 
sbotdd show the dae regard that 
we ail expect of one another as 
politicians. 

He added that there shoold be 
foil and fair discussion of the 
matter. 

Mr Jonathan Altkeu (Thanet 
Sooth, Cy. The people of Kent 
really do want fair play and a 
fair bearing and a fair timetable 
for this BilL There are 100 
legislative obstacles and the 
Government is going to trip up 
on every single one tmtil it starts; 
to see sense in this matter. 

Mr Biffen: This is a major 
matter and it will be dealt with 
fairly and without any attempt to 
see that there is denial of 
legitimate debate. 


Tributes to 
Lord Shinwell 

In a tribote in the House of 
Lords to the Latov peer, Lori 


Viscount Whiteiaw, Lori 
dent of the Council and Lender 
of the House, said: He made us 
all feel encouragingly young, not 
jnst by his longevity but by his 
own example. We stoB miss him 
very much and extend ear 
condolences to his family. 

Lord Ctedwyn of Penrtos, lead- 
er of the Opposition peers, said: 

He was the archetypal rebel who 
became a respected par- 
liamentarian, the pugnacious 
Clydesider who became a great 
Minister of Defence. 

Lord Diamond, leader of the 
SDP peers, spoke of Lori 
ShinwelTs "doggedness fa fight- 
ing for fairness far his fallow 
men throughout his life*', add 
Lord Paget (Lab), who has sat 
next to Lord Shimnefl in the 
House for years, commented: He 
was pictured as a bare-knuckle 
fighter tot there was within him' 
an extraordinary kindness and 
sympathy. & 

• In the Commons, Mr Ncfl 
Kinnock, Leader of the 
Opposition, and Mr John 
Biffen, Leader of the Howe, 
added their tribotes fa Lori 
ShinwelJL 

Mr Kinnock: It can truly he 
said that Manny used the 
Hone of Commons in the most 
robust fashion and he enhanced 
its standing as democratic 
forum of the nation. 

1 am sure the whole House 
will want to pay tribute to 
Manny and Ms remarkable 
Parliamentary career in both 
Houses of Parliament. 

Mr Biffen: I count ft a great 
privilege to have bees fa fob 
House for a period when I 
shared with Lord Shbnwell 
common membership. 

He was one of its compelling 
characters who combined a £ 
good appetite for both dissent 
and yet at the same rtn*» 
loyalty. He bad great 
distinction .in the Labour 
movement and across the floor 
of the House I am very happy 
to pay my respects. 


Press Council rulings 


Daily Telegraph guilty of race bias 

he Daily Teleeranh was rnlmzr ftf HpfrflHantC an/? inA_ in flvul on/l Him Afhow rVwinc f Rea orl! 


The Daily Telegraph was 
criticised by the Press Council 
today for introducing descrip- 
tions of race into a number of 
court reports. 

Mr R Borzello. of Camden 
Passage, north London . com- 
plained that die newspaper 
reported the colour or ethnic 
origin of defendants and vic- 
tims in sex crime cases incon- 
sistently and unfairly. He 
complained that it showed 
bias against black defendants 
and in one case falsely implied 
that the crime was racially 
motivated. 

The council said that of 
eight stories cited by foe 
complainant, three contained 
irrelevant references to the 


colour of defendants and vic- 
tims in a multiple rape case. It 
was not improper, however, 
that foe newspaper failed to 
identify foe colour or race of 
defendants or victims in other 
reports cited. 

The newspaper reported 
that a white girl aged 16 told 
the Central Criminal Court 
that she was raped "about 30 
limes" by a gang of black 
youths in Bruton. She was 
giving evidence at foe trial of 
seven unemployed youths 
who denied raping her and her 
friend. 

Mr Borzello complained 
about the references to the 
colour of the defendants and 


victims in that and two other 
Telegraph reports of the same 
case. A police officer was 
quoted in The Sun as saying 
he had investigated rapes in 
Brixton and there was no 
significance in the case that 
foe girls were white. 

Mr Borzello cited four other 
reports of rape cases in which 
colour was not mentioned and 
a fifth case of a sex prowler 
who was described as white. In 
foe last case foe newspaper 
bad violated foe council's 
ruling that people’s race or 
colour should be introduced 
into newspaper reports only 
where il was relevant. Re- 
sponding, Mr William 


Colour had no place in rape report 


A Daily Express report 
should not have given the 
colour of defendants and their 
victims in a gang rape trial, the 
Press Council ruled today 
The newspaper report of the 
case said: "Laughing, snigger- 
ing blacks fought over the 
whimpering girls like a nimal s, 
the jury heard." The com- 
plainant, Mr R. Borzello, of 
Camden Passage, north Lon- 
don, claimed this falsely re- 
ported court testimony, but the 


council said it was not satisfied 

that the words were not used. 

The reporter, Mr Joe Wood, 
said that the words com- 
plained of were not given as 
direct quotations, but as his 
summary of evidence, which 
be believed to be justified. 

Mr Borzello complained 
that it was improper of the 
Daily Express lo give details of 
the colour of the defendants 
and foe victims, when that had 


no relevance to the case, and in 
the context of the newspaper’s 
reports, was both prejudicial 
and pejorative. 

The Press Council said to its 
ruling that H was not satisfied 
that the words complained of 
were not used in court. The 
complaint against the Daily £ 
xpress in respect of them was 
rejected. The complaint that 
the paper improperly gave 
details of the colour of defen- 
dants and victims was upheld. 


Deedes, foe former editor,, 
said in past rulings that the 
council had said race or colour 
should only be given in news- 
paper reports when it was 
relevant. There would always 
be differences on what was 
relevanL “When there are, we 
have to agree to differ," he 
said. 

The Press Council's adjudi- 
cation was: 

The Press Council has ruled 
repeatedly that people’s race or 
colour should not be introduced 
into newspaper stories in a 
prejudicial or pejorative context 
unless it is relevant to the story. 

Of the eight Daily Telegraph 
Stories cited by the complainant, 

three contained irrelevant ref- 
erences to the colour of the 
defendants and victims in a 
multiple rape case. They identi- 
fied foe defendants as black 
youths and the victims as white 
girls. No evidence was reported 
that the crimes had been racially 
motivated and the newspaper 
should not have introduced the 
defendants' colour or race into 
foe story. 

To this extent, the complaint 
against the Daily Telegraph is 
upheld. The Press Council finds 
it was not improper that foe 
newspaper failed to identify the 
colour Or race of defendants or 
victims in other reports cited by 
foe complainant. 


Rolls sales 
start the 
year well 

By Clifford Webb 
Motoring Correspondent 

Rolls-Royce cars are enjoy- 
ing a mini-boom so far this 
year in both home and over- 
seas markets. The company 
reported yesterday that sales 
in foe first four months were 
20 per cent up on foe same 
period last year. 

Mr Peter Ward, managing 
director sales and marketing, 
said: “We have made an even 
better start to the year than 
last year. It is probably our 
best January to April perfor- 
mance for foe past four years.” 
Demand for foe £92,995 
Comiche convertible, which is 
built at foe company's Lon- 
don coach works, Mulliner 
Park Ward, is particularly 
strong in foe United Stales 
where more than 250 were 
sold last year. 

In spite of the present 
buoyancy, Mr Richard Perry, 
Rolls-Royce chief executive, is 
determined not to repeat foe 
near disastrous rush for 
growth in 1980-82 which left 
its dealers over-extended with 
unsold stocks that bad to be 
heavily discounted. 

Motoring column, page 34 


Saleroom 


Hand coloured books 
sold for top prices 


By Geraldine Norman 

Sale Room Correspondent 

Illustrated books which 
graced the library at Berkeley 
Castle before it was sold to 
Madame Tussaud’s were en- 
thusiastically competed for at 
Sotheby’s yesterday. They had 
been sent for sale by foe Earl 
of Berkeley Will Trust and, 
little read, were in spanking 
condition. 

Daniel Thomas Egerton’s 
12 hand coloured lithographs 
of Views in Mexico, loose in 
foe publisher’s original 1840 
portfolio, made £27,500, 
against an estimate of only 
£8,000-£ 12,000, and were 
bought by a European private 
collector. 

The other big price was 
£16.500 (estimate £8,000- 
£10.000) fora similar set of 13 
news of th e Bermudas by 
W.HallewdL an officer who 
was garrisoned in Bermuda 
from 1846-47. The hand col- 
oured lithographic plates are 

extremely rare. 

It was a good day for 
topographical illustrations 
generally, with many private 
collectors bidding directly or 


leaving bids with agents. En- 
glish views were in demand, 
with Thomas Mahon's aqua- 
tint plates A Picturesque Tour 
through the Cities of London 
and Westminster and West- 
minster Illustrated selling for 
£10,450 (estimate £5,000- 
. £7,000) to Quaritch. The sale 
totalled £487,471 with 12 per 
cent unsold. 

Sotheby's sale of jewels for 
collectors saw more selective 
bidding, with enthusiastic de- 
mand for high-quality items, 
in good condition, but less 
interest in run-of-the mill 
items. A late nineteenth -cen- 
tury bracelet, that had come to 
Sotheby’s from Holland in 
mint condition, apparently 
never worn, sold for £7,920 
(estimate £4,00&-£6,000)- A 
gold, ruby and diamond 
brooch, in foe form ofa pair of 
dancing shoes, which was 
given by A1 Jolson, foe Ameri- 
can singer and entertainer, lo 
his wife. Ruby Keeler, around 
1935, in memory of foe pair of 
shoes she had worn in a film, 
secured £2,970 (estimate 
£1.000-£l,500).The sale to- 
talled £365,464 with 22 per 
cent unsold. 


Chess lead 
held by : 
Beilin 

Golombek 

Correspondent 

At the end of round seven; 
with two more rounds to go, 
the lead in the Lloyds Bank 
Jersey International tourna- 
ment in Jersey was held by the' 
Norwich international master, 
Robert Beilin, with six points. 

Next came the Essex player*! 
A.H. Thomson, with 5V4, fol- 
lowed by foe British ladies* 1 
master, Miss SJackson and 
foe 15-year-old Gary Quillan' 
and A.C.P Milnes and van 
Putien with five points each. ' 

In round seven, Jackson 
drew a short 15-move game 
with Quillan, whereas Belli 
won a long game of 52 moves. 

In the eighth round, Beilin 
plays Thomson, Quillao! 
meets Milnes, and Miss Jack- 
son plays Reddin. 

Results in Round 7: Thomson 
Vi Quillan Vu Beilin l Reddin Q. 
Moettelli 0 Konings 1 , Milnes I 
Home 0, Delanoy 0 Jackson I; 
van Putien 1 ]* Blancq a Cuilia 
0 Gouret l, Wqjciedwwski 0 
Benson I, Fulton 1 Paul ton 0, 
Murray 0 Burgisser 1, Blow 1~ 
Neve 0, Soesan | Plant 0, 
WaterfiekJ fc Scott Vi, Flewiu (£ 
Whitley 1. Baccot Vi Walker Vu 
Godfrey % Murray Vi, Capsey 0 
Quote 1. 


S== 











a 




Relatives’ consent for 

#I f!® may be sought 

while patient is alive 

Proposals io riB,,,,i,,s - Sodal S"™** Comspoadent 

yyff.iss 


TIMES FRIDAY MAV 0 1 


'-if I - 4 


i | 4 *" . 

v ■ 

! * • 

” < 


Jr ^ 

r ' «», 

‘ - <i: 


£fe f / or °° n <* o Wns 

^W'stssS 

’.The move comes after new 
legislation in the United States 
making it a legal requireiJSS 
for hospjtais to ask for donor 
Organs, or to ensure there are 
|pod reasons for not making 
gjch a request, before ventila- 
fore are switched off 

-.Mr Ray Whitney, a junior 

JSSf 1, a vS e oAJSS 

r;*? 1 ** and Social Security, is 
l. u ^ die system on a visit 
iP N ®^ State later this 

SSL wb j c i- together with 
Honda and California, is one 
£ three states soferfo 
introduce the “required 
truest" legislation, aTft fc 

mng to follow suit. 

\ Pf Acheson, the 

chief medical officer, has writ- 
ten to the British Medical 
Association, the royal colleges 
ttf medicine and surgery and 
the Joint Consultants Com- 
mittee, asking for their views 
0n a similar but voluntary 
system here. y 

j Tte approach comes after a 
drop last year of 1 12 to 1,334 


t ™Ptente and a rise info? 
waiting list to a record level of 
more than 3,300. 


non are willing to have their 
organs used. 

ffs^ssSSSS SASt&s 

.•e.itb.wS'iaanE’ <?« ■< 


T . . HUfiiuuiI- 

ate. it is a very sensitive area, 
but I dunk there is alray 
forward without legislation if 

the medical profession was 
pre Pa x «d'lo take it up through 
a code of practice". ^ 

It was not, he said, some- 
thing ministers “would want 
to rush into. We would want 
to see how Its working in the 

ir l K w !i Stales 811(1 ^ reaction 
of the doctore” 

After publicity about last 
J^ars fell in. the number of 
b^ey transplants, the rate 
£“-y«r is higher, with an 
90 performed in the 
British Isles in the first four 


would increase the number of 
donor organs. 

“The vast majority of doc- 
tors realize that transptema- 
uon is necessary but ft is 
ormcult for them to set the 
teH rolling and approach 
greying relatives. In the Unit- 
ed Slates they can now say *thc 
law requires that I ask you’ 
making it easier for them to 
break the ice." 

Ministers are also a«tfinp . 
one of the 14 regional health 
authorities to run a pilot 
sebeme .where every patient 
on admission io hospital 
would be asked if he or she is 



HOME NEWS 


National policy is 
demanded for 
boarding schools 


5 — 


r 

9 

X 


-V '.: ■■ £■ .; .. . 


Heart research cash drive 


i r 1 




'> * 




Journalist 

, =wins libel 
: damages 

' Mr John McCririck, a rac- 
ing journalist, won substantial 
nbel damages in the High 
Court in London yesterday 
over allegations in The Star 
that he was in debt to his 
bookmakers and that he had 
given television publicity to 
one bookmaker for payment. 

His counsel, Mr Richard 
Walker, told the court that the 
allegations appeared in a 
/highly sensational" article in 
^March 1984 “There was and 
4s no truth whatsoever in 
“fery serious allegations," Mr 
Walker said. 

Frank Curran and Peter 
•Hooley, Star journalists, and 
fix press Newspapers,; the 
paper's publishers, acknowl- 
edged the allegations ’ wens 
untrue and offered unquali- 
fied apologies. 


monThc -T? U1 ™ ara ‘Our would be asked if he or she 

SESSStts msmbS 

continues. 106 trend s *^ n 35 Possibly controversial, 

io. saaftasaf 


Railmen 
lose claim 
on deaths 

Train drivers who suffer 
mental anguish after suicide 
victims throw themselves in 

front of speeding trains are not 
entitled to damages from the 
Criminal Injuries Compensa- 
— Board, the “ 


Jke progress in heart re- 
arch and surgery which 
saves the fives of young and 
old alike was celebrated yes- 
terday by Lord Murray, for- 
mer general secretary of the 
Trades Union Congress, and 
Tama Dwell, aged two. 

They were among patients 
saccessfidly treated for heart 
conditions who helped launch 
a Key Supporter fund-raising 
campaign by the British Haut 
jo which donors 
*i0 be asked to sign a four- 
year covenant intfaul of mnl . 


an annual donation. In 
this way, the foundation hopes 
to secure long-term finance 
with which to set ap more 
research prefects. 

Tania, of Folkestone, Kent, 
was born with a rare and 
serioas heart defect, but is now 
fit and active after reconstruc- 
tive surgery in Jane 1984 
Lord Murray, who is 
63, underwent a quadruple 
bypass operation about the 
same time as the girl, and 
joined in the celebration 
launch with other former pa- 


ent 

tients, including a boy aged 
who receovered from a 
hoie-in-tbe-heart operation, 
and a father and two of his 
children who all had success- 
fid operations to treat an 
inherited heart condition. 

lord Tonypandy, the former 
Speaker of the House of 
Commons who is the 
foundation's president, «*m- 
“These men, women and chil- 
dren are some of the wonderful 
exam ples of what ran be done 
now as a result of heart 
research/) 


The Government should 
introduce a national boarding 
Spools policy, according to 
Mr Eddy Double, chairman of 
the Boarding Schools 
Association. 

He told its annual confer- 
ence in Ambleside, Cumbria: 

; A national policy for board- 
ing education is not just highly 
desirable and vitally im- 
portant. 

“Boarding education is at 
nsk in the independent sector 
from the threat of direct, 
conscious political action and 
in maintained schools from 
the haphazard effects of bud- 
getary pressures." 

He said boarding education 
was "a national resource" 
which should not be subject to 
financial constraints. The 
Government and local au- 
thorities should work together 
to ensure it was maintained 
and improved. 

Mr Double, Principal Edu- 
cation Officer (Schools) for 
Lincolnshire, proposed a na- 
pooliim arrangement 
with all local education au- 
thorities sharing the cost of 
providing boarding education 
and making annual payments 
“according to a nationally 
agreed formula". 

He also urged the Depart- 
ment of Education and au- 
thorities to form a consortium 
which could provide an effec- 
tive forum for the planning of 
boarding education. 


Mr Double said that all 
children would benefit from a 
period of residential ed- 
ucation. 

The theme of the three-day 
conference is “Boarding Edu- 
cation and the Real World". 

Mr Richard Barter, head- 
master of Seven oaks School, 
emphasized the importance of 
boarding schools encouraging 
children to have those “dura- 
ble qualities and attitudes” 
such as love of hard wort, that 
would continue to have value 
“in the real world". “We 
should enhance personal atti- 
tude and understanding for 
the future,” he said. 

“Through giving them more 
first hand experience, for in- 
stance of the business world, 
we wiJl encourage in them a 
shift from passive to active 
which will help them in the 
future.” 

Mr James Graham, head- 
master of Sibforth School, 
said boarding schools were 
valuable for students with 
special learning difficulties, 
particulary dyslexia. 

He said that they needed a 
supportive and sympathetic 
school environment and an 
appropriate curriculum to en- 
able them to develop confi- 
dence and competence. They 
needed a school atmosphere 
that was not competitive but 
where each individual was 
valued for himself. 


I 

ope 

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lion 
A 


poetdr wins 
court review 

£ Dr Rpyoe Darnell, a consul- 
tent microbiologist, was^yes- 
.ffrday granted a judicial 
review of the decision by Mr 
Norman Fowler, Secretary of 
Stele for Social Services, that 
lit should be dismissed. 

" Dr Darnell, dismissed after 
a clash with colleagues over 
the management of the micro- 
biology laboratory in Derby, 
was granted an expedited 
hearing of his case against Mr 
Fowler by Mr Justice Hodg- 
son in the High Court. 

Fire in hotel 

-• More than 2,000 guests and i 
450 staff were moved out of J 
the Grosvenor House hotel in 
London for a short time 
yesterday after fire broke out 
in a ventilation shaft. Nobody 
was injured. 


ry-rr j — Court of] 
Appeal decided yesterday. - 

In a test case r uling the 
judges upheld the decision of 
the board, and the divisional 
court who refused in March 
last year to grant judicial 
review of the board’s decision, 
that any psychiatric injury 
suffered by the drivers was not j 
attributable to a crime of I 
violence and could not be 
compensated. 

Lord Justice Lawton, sitting 
with Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Sir John Megaw. j 
said that their decision was of . 3 
importance to about 250 ei* 
grne drivers who had sfflefod 
fKychia trie . injuries in .similar j 
ar tem$tehces.' ! Figures in 
1981 showed that'219 pimple 
committed suicide by: throw- . 
mg themselves in front of 
trams and another 36 were 
seriously injured. 

In the four cases before the 
court the driven, Albert 
Wilks, of Briton Feny, Neath, 
West Glamorgan; Cyril Webb, 
of Alrager, Stokeoa-Trent, 
Staffordshire; Sidney Warner, 
of Worcester Park; and Harry 
Clack, of Horsham, both Sur- 
rey, all had the misfortune of 
running over and killing 
someone. 

In three cases a verdict of | 
suicide was recorded but in 
Mr Clack's case the deceased 
was a senile man, aged 84, 
who may not have known 
what he was doing. But all four | 
drivers suffered psychiatric 
injury as a result of the deaths. 

Leave to appeal to the 
House of Lords was refused- 

Law Report, page 28 


;e people 



Science report 

Instrument helps to 
measure wind shear 

. . By Andrew Wiseman 

Aviation experts and meteo- mate or overestimate wind i 



i w * 

uZ 

i ! * ‘ 


3 


relogists know that wind 
shear, varying wind speeds 
and directions at differing 
heights, have been responsible 
for several aircraft accidents 
daring take-off or 
They happen when 
flying at relatively slow 
speeds, encounter sadden wmd 
changes or down draaght; lose 
height and crash. 

A great deal has been 
discovered about the connec- 
tion between thunderstorms 
and wind shear. But scientists 
are also aware that the meteo- 
rological phenomenon can oc- 
cur in comparatively good 
weather. In fail, the Heathrow 
Meteorological Office regular- 
If issues wind shear alerts; 
unconnected with 

thunderstorms. 

Now, a West German re- 
search group from the Aachen 
Institute of Air and Space 
Travel has completed the first 
stage of a project concerned 
with the precise in-flight mea- 
surement of wind shear, which 
should ultimately provide pi- 
lots with useful information 
about this potentially danger- 
ous occurrence. 

‘In the past it had proved 
difficult ro calibrate wind 
speeds accurately on board an 
a|rcnaf( even with the advent of 
modern INS (inertial naviga- 
tion systems) equipment- It 

could be done only by first 
establishing the air aud 
ground speed of an aircraft 
and saberacting one from the 
other. 

rEieo a small error in oik of 
these large values inevitably 
led to an incorrect answer, 
which would either nnderesti- 


■?r T? 


stren gth and direction. Yet, 
without that information wind J 
shear could not be calculated. 
Clearly a more efficient metb- j 
od was needed. 

What the Germans did was i 
to equip a single-engine sports i 
plane, a Socate Morane. with a 
4m long vertical device at- 
tached to its port wing, so rhat 
2 m protruded above and 2 m 
below its surface. That instru- 
ment, basically a hollow pipe, 
could identify up to 100 wind 
values per second from 16 
pressure gauges distributed 
along its leading edge. That 
information was fed into an 
on-board computer and data 
processor, which worked out a 
wind shear profile. 

To check the accuracy of I 
their findings, the Germans 
carried out simultaneous ex- 
periments, using the Morane, 
a Domier 28 research aircraft 
and a meteorological ground 
station. The results of all three 
separate tests coincided to a 
large extent 

With more sophisticated 
equipment on board the 
Morane it is hoped to study 
the effect iff wind shear by 
establishing precisely what 
happens at each stage In the 
chain: weather conditions 

causing wind shear; aircraft 
reaction to wind shear; pilot’s 
reaction to the plane's altered 
frying altitude 'and, finally, 
changes in that altitude after 
pilot r e a cti on. 

Only when all these factors 
had been scientifically estab- 
lished and analysed would it 
be possible to suggest counter 
measures which could prevent 
farther accidents. 


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THE TIMES ERIDAY MAY~9 1986 


45,000 lines 


*»»*7 i 


57-34 TONNES 












OVERSEAS NEWS 







W‘ 






As Kiev exodus mounts, Soviet authorities issue pictures in effort to allay fears 


with 



As the Fima aaisl «pber W.Iker, Moscow 

from Kie? polled in at 9 45am 

P»» being greeted fey 
relieved relatives 


P«**ay the Sov£ SodSE 


unclear disaster was m- 
nustateable, with hundreds of 
wobko and children spilling 
on to tbs platform, some 
expressing relief finally to 
j. e escaped the fear of 
«d«t»n in the Ukrainian 
capital. 


™ that extra planes arid 
toms provided to transport 
Kiev residents were related to 
the summer holiday rush, 
raps* arriving in Moscow had 
other explanations. 

The hastily-packed over- 
mgbt bags and worried frees 
were evidence of the level of 
concern. 

“There is no question of 
keeping children in Kiev a 
momem longer, the risk is too 
great Every mother that I 
know there wants to get her 
children away, 1 * an 

elderly grandmtlier who ar- 
rived with her daughter and 
two grandchildren. 

“When the television start* ■ 
ed warning ns abont health, we 

dedded to get away and X have 
no idea yet when we wOJ be 


„ -- could be 

overheard arguing heatedly 
about levels of radioactivity. 

“The worst thhm about it is 
ttat no one really knows what 
is going on," another woman 
holding a baby said. “What is 
the paint of aaffidog the 
health of your children and 
living all day worrying about 
what is happening in the air.? 1 * 

Uniformed , Soviet nrilifa 
and tough- loo king 

pbtiadothes security police 
were mingifrig with the. huge 
crowds at the station attempt- 
ing lo prevent Western corre- 
spondents from obtaining 
first-hand information afawS 
the mowing mood of panic in 
the Ukrainian capital, more 
than 60 miles smith of the' 
stricken plant. 

Apparratly under orders to 
prevent the exodus 


A number of the passengers 
spoke of the difficulties in 
buying tickets and confirmed 
reports that long queues had 
been building up at ticket 
offices in the dty, which has a 


arrested a crew from the 
American NBC television net- 
work and then ordered Felicity 
Barringer, a reporter for Tie 
New York Timex, to leave the 
station as she was condoctnig 
“vox pop" interviews. 

. More from 70 per cent of the 
seats on the overcrowded ham 
which ! met were taken up by 
women and duktren, and a 
similar proportion was report- 
ed by Westerners who watched 
the arrival of other Kiev trains. 


. Kiev resklents say that the 
unease began to gather mo- 
mentum at the be ginning of 
the week when the loral health 
authorities broke an earlier 
silence and issued televised 
warnings against letting chil- 
dren outside for more than 
short periods and against eat- 
ing leaf vegetables. 

The mood grew more anx- 
ious after a change in the 
direction of the «iml resulted 
in new orders to wash down all 
interiors of flats with cold 
water and to avoid .swimming 
in outdoor reservoirs. 

Another woman arriving 
yesterday said there were con- 
tinual rumours about the safe- 
ty of the Kiev water supply and 
of the milk. 

“The best thing seemed to 
be to take the simple precan-' 
tins of getting the children oat 
until the situation becomes 
dearer. Some people say that 
could take months, 1 * she 
explained. 

-In rural communities scat- 
tend m the rich agricultural 
hinterland around Kiev, the 
growing sense of panic has 
residents to In- 
in a bizarre variety of 
remedies la an effort to 
counter the radiation. 

One Soviet source told me 
that the most widely believed- 
in cure was the drinking of 
“* spirits over 40 per cent 



Mr V. Taranov, engineer of the weeded nuclear plant at Chernobyl, in the care of two 
doctors at the Forest Meadow sanatorium 50 miles math-west of Kiev. 


EEC imposes ban Student in 
as members argue c ^ ear 

after tests 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 
As EEC governments con- included. ..The Commission 

said that in the circumstances 
it was empowered to take 
unilateral interim action to 
ban fresh meat and live cattle 
and pigs. 


tiuued to disagree on the 
implementation of a ten on 
Soviet bloc food exports first 
proposed four days ago, the 
EEC Commission yesterday 
took action to ban fresh meat 
from Eastern Europe with 
immediate effect. 

Commission officials said 
any further delay would be 
“most unfortunate 11 and 
would render EEC emergency 
plans to counteract Chernobyl 
radiation ineffective. 

The Commission said it was 
extending untfl lunchtime to- 
day the deadline for member 
states to agree on the range of 


products to be 
Soviet W( 


m 


) viet bloc natiqi&affected by 
£teradfiyl feffiarat 
- The Qrigjnal: d e a dl ine was 


$ant diSevisnces-jsraain hot 
only ovetthe food products to 
'be prohibjiedbutalsoovCTthe 
last European .countries to be 


On Tuesday the Commis- 
sion proposed a ban on im- 
ports of fruit and vegetables, 
milk, fresh meat and other 
products from six Soviet bloc 
nations within a 625-mile 
radius of Kiev. EEC trade ami 
consumer ministers refereed 
the proposal to ex- 

perts, however, and It was 
further considered by EEC 
diplomats on Wednesday. 

The diplomatic group add- 
ed Yugoslavia to the list of 
countries but still excluded 
Austria, East .Germany and 
Albania. The diplomats also 
added shellfish, poultry, eggs 
and other fbodstuffii to' the 
Coimnisaon's original prod- 
ucts list. - - 


After tests at St George’s 
Hospital, Lincoln, Miss 
Gwyneth Walker, a Russian 
language student from Lin- 
coln who was studying in 
Minsk at the time of the 
• nuclear accident ai Chernobyl, 
has been told that she received 
only very slight doses of 
radiation. 

Miss Walker, of Greetwefl 
Road, Lincoln, who is a 
student at Liverpool Polytech- 
nic, has been told by doctors 
that she will, suffer no long- 
term effects. 

She is hoping to go back to 
Russia for ter studies and said 
bpr main concern nowwas fin 1 
the Soviet people who did not 
have the benefit of tests or 
treatment for radiation. - 

The daughter of a Lincoln 
solicitor, tiie 'was sent to 
Moscow from Minsk with 
other students from Britain 
and was immediately flown 
home. 



A photograph released by Tass of two children from Kiev, Natasha and Nadya, playing in a 
.. i after being evacuated from their homes. 


Baths full 
to brim 
in worried 
Warsaw 

From Roger Boyes 
Warsaw 

Warsaw householders have 
been filling their baths to the 
brim and pouring water into 
oM bottles and backets that 
slop on to the carpet in the 
corridor in the latest symptom 
of nuclear panic after the 
Chernobyl accident 
On Tuesday night and 
Wednesday two rnmonrs 
swept the Polish capital and 
industrial heartland around 
Katowice: the first message on 
the telephonic grapevine was 
that poisonous chemicals had 
escaped into the Vistula River, 
and the second rumour quickly 
determined that the 
were radioactive. 

The fallout it was had 
reached the tap water. Yester- 
day the authorities took the 
unusual step of denying gos- 
sip. “It is trne, M a spokesman 
far the Warsaw dty council 
said, “that the water in the 
Vistula hasn't been crystal- 
dear for some years now, but 
the current level of pollution is 
the same as for years ... the 
water is fit for drinking. It can 
also be used for washing. 
Therefore storing water m 
baths, pots or buckets is 
pointless." 

According to Polish mea- 
surements handed to the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy 
Agency in Vienna, radioactive 
contamination of water from 
the mains ranged from 1.5 to 
14.9 becqnereis per litre and 
between 1.7 and 19.7 
becqnereis per litre in surface 
waters. 

This compares with the 
10,000 becqnereis per litre 
concentration deemed as po- 
tentially dangerous by the 
agency. Milk still has a rela- 
tively high contamination rate 
— up to 700 becqnereis per 
Ktre — but is still within the 
safety limit of 1,000 
becqnereis per litre as recom- 
mended for children by the 
agency. 

However, water and ground 
contamination is likely to re- 
main for some time. 


Fist fights as fallout panic hits Greek shops 


FhRtfMarioModiaiH 

Athens 

Greece has been gripped by 
a panic-buying spree for the 
lasttwodays,wilh housewives 
battling; in supermarkets, for 
the last can of evaporated 
milk, bottle of mineral water, 
or bag of frozen vegetables, 
because of radiation fears after 
the Soviet nuclear disaster. 

Fist fights broke out and 
police were called to food 


stores to control hysterical 
crowds as they raided delivery 
trucks to secure stocks of 
Decontaminated food. A run 
on iodine forced the Health 
Ministry to ( issue a public 
■warning that 'the product was 
as unnecessary as it was toxic. 

The authorities said pas- 
teurized cow's milk would go 
on sale 'again today under 
strict supervision. 

The Government said it was 
consulting with other EEC 


states on the question of 
seeking damag es from the 
Soviet Union to compensate 
producers. Greece has also 
lodged a protest with Moscow 
after 40 Greek students visit- 
ing the Soviet Union were 
forced to stick to their pro- 
gramme against their will and 
visit Kiev after the nuclear 
accident 

• MADRID: Spain has pro- 
hibited the import of various 
foodstuffs from the Soviet 


Union, Poland, Czechoslova- 
kia, Hungary, Romania and 
Bulgaria because ofthe risks of 
radioactive contamination 
(Richard Wigg writes). 

They indude fresh meat 
and vegetables, freshwater fish 
and milk and dairy products. 

At the same time Madrid 
officials hope Spain can step 
up its food exports to those 
West European countries tak- 
ing similar measures against 
East Europe. 


Sweeping 
changes at 
top in 
Pentagon 

Washington — In the hope 
of reducing disastrous clashes 
between US aimed services in 
times of combat, the Senate 
has unanimously approved 
the most sweeping reorganiza- 
tion of the military hierarchy 
in almost 30 years (Christo- 
pher Thomas writes). 

A series of blunders led up 
to the planned changes, in- 
cluding the felled hostage 
rescue mission in Iran in 1980, 
the terrorist bombing of the 
Marine barracks in Lebanon 
in 1 983, and the inter-service 
rivalry that hampered the 
1983 invasion of Grenada. 

By 95 votes to nil, the 
Senate approved a Bill that 
would broaden the advisory 
role of the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff — the 
highest ranking military offi- 
cer — while giving field com- 
manders more control over 
fighting forces in combat. 

Bekaa killings 

Beirut (Reuter) — The 
corpses of Nassib al-Khatib. a 
Lebanese politician, and his 
three bodyguards were found 
riddled with bullets in a car in 
the eastern Bekaa valley. 

Toyota recall 

Tokyo (Reuter) — Toyota 
Motors is recalling 218,000 
Town Ace and Master Ace 
light commercial vehicles pro- 
duced between October 1982 
and July 1985 because of 
problems with the power 
steering. 

Four-day fire 

Peking (Reuter) — Fifty-six 
people died fighting a four-day 
forest fire which threatened 
farms and villages in Y unnan, 
southwest China. 

New York job 

Mr James Mellon, former 
British Ambassador in Copen- 
hagen, leaves London today to 
become the new British Trade 
Commissioner in New York, a 
post that carries ambassado- 
rial rank. 

Fraud charge 

Hong Kong (Reuter) — Si- 
mon Yip, a Hong Kong finan- 
cier extradited from San 
Francisco, was remanded in 
custody on charges of conspir- 
ing to defraud the Overseas 
Trust Bank of $66 million 
(about £45 million). 

Airbus back 

Kuwait (Reuter) — A Ku- 
wait Airways airbus, stranded 
in Iran since four Arabs 
hijacked it there 17 months 
ago, has at last been flown 
back to Kuwait The hijackers 
murdered two Americans be- 
fore surrendering. 


: Top judge 
escapes 
car blast 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

The President of Spaii 
Supreme Court and chief judi- 
cial officer. Professor Antonio 
Hernandez Gil escaped un- 
hurt yesterday when an explo- 
sion hit his official car in 
central Madrid. . 

» U damaged only the boot 
pnd police said the attack's 
lade of precision made it 
jinlikely to be the work of 
-ETA, the Basque separatist 
organization. 

Only 13 days ago, five civil 
guardsmen were killed in cen- 
tra! Madrid by a car bomb 
attack claimed by ETA. 

Professor Hernandez GO, 
aged 71. is a prominent figure 
apart from his present legal 
stature. He presided over Par- 
liament while the democratic 
constitution of 1978 was being 
drawn up. 

He was chosen by the 
Government to lead Spain’s 
Judicial Council, the self- 
governing body of judges and 
magistrates which performs 
similar functions to those of 
the British Lord Chancellor. 

The Supreme Court is in- 
volved in a controversy affect- 
ing one of _ its members 
accused of misconduct, and 
Professor Hernandez Gil wiu 
have to deal with iL 
The Supreme Court judge's 
driver, who was also unhurt, 
told reporters he had stopped 
for traffic lights, but the car 
had begun moving again when 
the blast occurred. Had it still 
been standing still the d am a ge 
would have been much worse, 
he said. 

Police were investigating 
whether the explosive had 
been placed in a small Renault 
parked near by. or if i t was 
fired from a grenade launcher. 

Later, Professor Hernandez 
Gil coolly told a Malnd ra^o 
station: “I am satisfied I have 
not created a grtvej 
problem. Besides Uhl the 
wore! has not happened to 
me." 



Poles need vetting 



From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 

Pities who want to watch vintage flhns, jaunty pop pro- 


jt&r& 

Muhammad 


Abbas be-' 


hind bars in a Genoa court 
which yesterday reduced jail 
sentences for arms offences 
imposed on him, and tiro 
ed Palestinian hi- 
jackers of the Italian enrise 
ship Acbfile Lanro. The 
mam hijacking trial is to 
start next month. 


"Western satellite television 
wfiU have to he vetted by the 
police to decide whether they 
are a suitable audience for 
Papas *pd Dynasty, according 
to uew regulations coming into 
force this month. 

Polish viewers are to be 
finked into a Soviet satellite 
television network that will 
also cover East Germany and 
Czechoslovakia, but this will 

be operational only in fomr 
years. 

Meanwhile Poland is in 
reach of several Western satel- 
lite channels, including the 
British Sky Channel, the 
Swiss Tetecrab and the Dutch 
Echo TV, which are carried on 
the West European ECS 
satellite. 

Many Poles would fike to 
tone into these channels, but 
aKforfiddanidnFM bnv 
from ©wsisg anything but 
standard receivers. 

But from this month the 
state radio inspectorate will 
issue special permits to a few 
people - poles deemed to be 
appropriate i huum of the 
satellite fere of soap open, 


pammes, sports and interna- 
tionafly-orieoatated news. 

However, the aspiring view- 
er will have to explain why he 
needs a receiver and will have 
to obtain a reference from the 
police, 

The viewer can have his 
permit withdrawn if be tries to 
watch satellite tefevisioii in a 
place other than his officially 
registered home. Officials 
from the Communications 
Ministry say, rather disingen- 
uously, that the point is simply 
to maintain aesthetic 
standards. 

“Jnst think what it troald do 
to our skyline if everyone 
wanted to install his own 
antenna,** said the director, 
Mr Jannsz FgjkowskL “You 
must keep some spatial order 
in the landscape. 1 * 

Urn main reason, however, 
seems to be that the authori- 
ties are nervous about losing 
the monopoly of the airwaves 
and are worried that satellites 
will start to beam specifically 
anti-communist. material mft* 
Polish households. Hence the 
need for a police reference. 


Thousands flee homes 
for fear of tidal wave 

San Francisco (Reuter) — 

Thousands of people fled their 
homes yesterday on America's 
West Coast, fearing tidal 
waves, and Japan and Hawaii 
also issued warnings after an 
earthquake in the remote 
Aleutian Islands off Alaska. 

The United States Earth- 
quake information Centre in 
Golden. Colorado, said the 
earthquake, measuring 7.7 on station on Adak to higher 
the Richter scale, was one of ground. It said the tide had 
the worst in almost 30 years. It risen five feet above normal, 
had caused damage on Adak In San Francisco, thousands 

island, about 80 miles west of of people jammed roads over- 
the epicentre. looking beaches to watch for 

The US Navy moved 2,500 unusually high waves but 
ofthe 5.000 personnel at its air went home disappointed. 



The oldest alliance, 600 years on 

V 1-*. Achfitivl OmtfiSV Onmn Mi) CmI 




Britain and Portugal today 
mark the 600lh WWvMPOOf 

sjssys s sfe&f 


(Nicholas Ashford wnles). 

The two countries plan to 
celebrate the anniversary in a 
manner befitting the world’s 
Oldest surviving alliance. 

A memorial service will be 
held at St George's chapel on 
Monday which will be attend- 
ed fcv the Queen, President 
Soares, Dr Cavaco Silva, the 


prime Minister and Senhor 
Piles de Miranda, tht Foreign 
Minister. 

Throughout the year a series 
of : cultural, educational, so- 
dak business and diplomatic 
events -are taking place to 
ce&fcrate t iiie oldest alliance”. 

. Specud Report; pages 11-13 


Nasa puts off 
launch of 
Atlas rocket 

From Michael Binyou 
Washington 

The National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration 
(Nasa) has postponed for four 
weeks the launch of the Adas 
Centaur rocket, which was due 
to put into orbit a military 
communications satellite on 
May 22. 

The postponement follows 
three consecutive launch fail- 
ures and has grounded the 
main space vehide capable of 

^T^eAtlas Centaur, an obso- 
lescent DOn-reusable rocket, 
has a firet-stage engine similar 
to that of the Delta rocket 
which inexplicably foiled 71 
seconds after blast-off last 
week. 

A terse Nasa statement said 
the delay was necessary “to 
ensure that all items critical to 
a successful launch have been 
thoroughly analysed.”. 

The postponement leaves 
the US without any means of 
payloads into space 
the next six weeks, - 


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THE STOCK EXCHANGE 



T«e StockEychange 


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^^£010 




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2£349wM*&3 


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It’s true that The Stock Exchange has been 
expanding recently -into such areas as international 
securities and traded options. 

But into aircraft? Electronics? High fashion? 
Well, yes and no. 

As Britain’s central market in securities. The Stock 
■ Exchange’s central role is to provide an 



opportunity for companies in all of these industries 
-and hundreds of others- to find people who want 
to invest in them. 

In the most recent full yeai; 1985, members 
of The Stock Exchange channelled over £4.8 billion 
into industry. . 

£4.8 billion of new investment- most of it to 


Nor was 1985 an exceptional year In 1984, 
the sum was even larger- and the^signs are that in 
1986, it will be larger still. 

So, next time you see an expanding company 
or indeed a new product, take a close look. \bu may 
well find it has our name on it ; ; 1 ■ _ : 


THE STOCK EXCHANGE 

London • Belfast • Birmingham • Bristol - Dublin • Glasgow • Leeds - Liverpool - Manchester * Newcastle 




rrifcfc:- 

















\2*>\ 


CIA chief 


jTHE TIM ES FRIDAY MAY <? \ QSfi 




OVERSEAS NEWS 


on secrets reports 




aSSssfa 

sass-^sa 

^f|^opeStiZ' 1U ' 

4&SSGJSR 

Of prosecutions against The 
Times * The Wash- 
l!g£? Post - Newsweek, TUne 
raa^zme and The Wasting, 
on^ Times. No American news 
rBMizatjon lias previously 

IhJ>. I ^ W,sh ? ns mside stories 
about security matters. 

resterday Justice Depart- 
mem officials said privately 
were not keen to mount 

nmomiti... -r-i UUJ “ 


font publishing a jiew story it 
ms prepared based on leaked 
< Mssmed docwnent&, ■ 

Th zPast said it had still not 
decided whether to run the 
story- It is understood the 
£kcle relates to Mr Ronald 
veiton, a former comm unica- 
Pops specialist at the National 
Sfunty Agency, who feces 
frtal on charges of setting 
MCTets to the Soviet UrrionT^ 
T“-«W quoted Mr Casey 
as telling its -editors that 
“we've already got five abso- 
lutely cold violations”, an 
apparent reference to a law 
banning disclosure of infor- 
mation about codes, ciphers 
or. communications mtelli- 
Senre activities of the US or 
any foreign government. 

Referring to the latest story 
Prepared by the Post, Mr 



SK25»ss 5 Sf 

idea of moumino a nvii <. torsi “fra not threatening 


Liberties. Union said yester- 
day that the Reagan Adminis- 

2H?r ~ dear, y trying to 
establish the notion that we 
have an official secrets act and 
that they can threaten the 
pros to keep them from 




Russians 
say ball 


ie, 

nd 


nowm 


US court 


recommend that you be prose- 
cuted under the intelligence 
statute.” 

Mr Casey’s threat of action 
a sara,5t The Washington Post 
and hemweek apparently re- 
lated to stories about the 
interception of messages by 
US intelligence between Colo- 
tfel -'Gadafll and the Libyan 
People's Bureau ..in Fa<^ 

Germany. 

Newsweek reported that 
Colonel Gadaffi had 
toreatening statements to- 
wards President Reagan in an 
intercepted telephone 
conversation” . 

Mr Morton Halpera. the I 
senior official of the Civil | • 

Stones fitter Port-au-Prince’s „ 
land they were occupying as 


From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 


riL 

nd 

be 

nil 

im 

sl- 

as 

is 

>w 

he 


“We have done our part — it 
is for the other side to lake the 
nextsiep.” Mr Viktor Karpov, 


chief Soviet delegate, said 
yesterday as negotiations re-' 
sumed with the Americans on 
controlling nuclear and space 
weapons. 

He was speaking while wait- 
ing to receive the US delega- 
tion. headed by Mr Max' 
Kampelman, at the Soviet, 
diplomatic mission. 

. Pointing out that the Rus- 

ianc Ivarl nm . 


'er 

en 

st 

ut- 

ter 

sl 

is 


sians had pm forward propos- 
als in all Lhree areas of thq 


decision 


From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 


From David Watts, Kyoto 

i!?£! e _ c *! cfc “ oa *» a CTa » coming at afl, such has been 


Key rebel 
base falls 
to Burma 


\ 





m 

Experienced traditional pol- 
iticians triumphed over new- 
comers and extreme right- 
wingers in a series of 
nominations this week for 
congressional seats and 
governorships. 

Democrats breathed a loud 
sigh of relief when followers of 
the political maverick. Mr 
Lyndon LaRouche, foiled to 
follow up their startling vic- 
tories in Illinois in March, 
where they have effectively 
forced Mr Adlai Stevenson; 
the Democratic cawHirfatp f or 
governor, to withdraw. 

The only nominations won 


Geoige Shultz, 'the Secretary 
ot State, whom it considers a 
compromising pragmatist. He 
had the active support of 
Senator Jesse Helms, the other 
right-wing Senator from 
North Carolina. 

Terry Sanford, a framer 
hheral Democratic governor 
oflhal-state who left office 21 

years ago, took an early lead in 
the race for the Democratic 
nomination for the seal 
In Ohio, another former 
governor, Mr Janies Rhodes, 
made an extraordinary politi- 
cal comeback at the age of 76, 

nPTAntinn 4mA « «■ 


In Ohio’s Senate primary 
Senator John Glenn for the 


A decision by the South 
African Government to pro- 

juuu uienn ror me °I 

Democrats comfortably beat a v t0 the 

candidate put up by Mr homeland, 

LaRouche u p °y mt some 60 miles north of Pre- 

- . . tona, has been greeted with 

In affirnd set of elections on outrage by members of the 


quite like the Japanese, but 
tire current “Diana boom” is 





— — - — — •**.“*'- uj /u, 

• i «•%. ujuy uuminanons won ® e * ea ting two rival Repubb- 
by LaRouche candidates were w ^° said he was too old 
by defeult in congressional > orlhe jo*> of governor. He lost 
districts in Ohio and Texas, to a democrat in 1978, but if 

elected in November, he will 


? i * i 



— * 


i -vu^iwaiuudi 

districts in Ohio and Texas, 
where no Democrats filed 
At the same time moderate 
Republicans were jubilant at 
the victory of_Represemative 
James Broyhill in North Caro- 
lina. who fought a bitter and 
costly battle to ward off a 
challenge for the Republican 
nomination to the Senate 
from Mr David Funderburk, a 
protege of the militant New 
Right. 

Mr Funderburk resigned 
last year as ^ambassador -to. 
Romania, arid bitterly criti- 
cized the State Department for 
its soft line towards the com- 
munist regime. 

He has been associated with 
the New Right’s attempt to 
- - — ■ - Mr 


- — - UV WfU 

serve an unprecedented fifth 
term. 

ss 



— — — r . v * -iwnum uil 

i uesday m Indiana, voters set 
the stage for a replay of the 
ctosest congressional race of 
1984, giving the Democratic 
representative for the eighth 
district Mr Frank McOoskey, 
the nomination over another 
LaRouche candidate. Mr Mc- 
Closkey will fece Mr Richard 
McIntyre. In i984 he defeated 
Mr McIntyre by just four 
votes. 

The voter turnout in all the 
Primaries was extremely low. 
But party activists were 
pleased that in the circum- 
stances, which usually favour 

extremists — J -■*— • 

ditional 

to bold 

The New Right is trying 
mud to consolidate its hold 
over the Republican Party, 
and has set its sights on the 
first b« test of the presidential 
candidates in Michigan in 
September. Vice-President 
George Bush wiD be pitted 
against Mr Jack Kemp, a 
representative from New 
York, and badly needs to wm 
□ -he is to maintain his 
momentum as the Republican 


5T" i J ■ U11 ' u,uc, » ui ine 

official white Opposition in 
Parliament. 

It was “incredible” that the 
Government was 
ahead in the teeth of intense 
domestic and international 
opposition to the creation of 
such tribal enclaves wi thin 
South Africa, Mr Peter Soal, 
the spokesman on homeland 
affairs of the Progressive Fed- 
eral Party, said. 

The decision to make 
KwaNdebele South Africa's 
fifth “independent" tribal 
homeland on December 11 
this year was announced in a 


the concentration on the 
Princess. 

When a Tokyo television 
reporter interviewed a string of 
young people about the recent 
Tokyo summit of the seven 
udostriafized countries, man y 
young girls thought the British 
delegaC- n was feeing led by 
the Princess of Wales. 

Mrs Thatcher's well-nigh 


breaking all records. 

For Japanese girls Dana is 
foe princess of their dreams. 

She's a commercial dream 
come true for every bnsiuess- 
maa from the TV networks to 

foe corner noodle shop and foe 

big publishing empires. ' 

offefo^Diana dombnri” — a S£SS ? i " 

tasty rice-based dish topped a 

with fried chicken. 

A hairdresser offered her •"““MWeffew weeks for Bnt- 
firet SO cnstomersT^DiS "^““hood m Japan, 
cut” for foe equivalent of £1 - - “L thepnbfishing field, there 
a tempting bargain in Janan » . Princess Diana Fashion 
where a lady's hair-do noraud- — "* — 

ly costs £35 or £40. 

In the last few weeks there 
have been several hour-long 
television programmes rm- 


From Neil Kelly 
Bangkok 


The capture by Burmese 
troo ps of Pain, an important 
stronghold of Karen rebels on 
the Thai border, is probably 
the beginning of the end for 
the 3 7- year-old Karen rebel- 
lion, according to Christian 
missionaries who provide aid 
to Karen refugees inside 
Thailand. 


force the resignation 


■■■ momentum- as toe Republican 
Mr Lyndon t fipnMnmier. He has already 

iVwSSir- 



The . 
Minister, Mr 
Enrile, said 


From Keifo Dalton, Manila 
Philippines Defence of more than 100 “Marcos 


Rhodesia war 
tax evaders 
told to pay up 


Ponce 
iy he 




Juan 

. — yesterda: __ 
would oppose, for reasons of 
national security, the issue of a 
new passport to deposed Pres- 
ident Marcos to allow him to 
return from exile in Hawaii 
Mr Enrile had said earlier 
that Mr Marcos — whom he 
served as Defence Minister for 
1 6 years — would immediately 
be arrested if he returned from 
Hawaii, where he fled on 
February 25 after the success- 
ful civilian-backed military 
revolt led by MrEnriie and the 
chief of the armed forces. 
General Fidel Ramos. 

On the instructions of Presi- 
dent Aquino the Foreign Min- 
istry also cancelled the 
passport of Mr Marcos's Ma- 
nila lawyer. Mr Rafael Recto, 
who returned from Hawaii at 
the weekend. 

Mr Redo said Mr Marcos 
was willing to face arrest and 
defend himself in court on 
corruption charges, if he was 
issued with a new passport 
Government raaio quoted 
the Foreign Minister, Mr Sal- 
vador Laurel, as saying Mr 
Recto's name was among a list 


agents whose passports had 
been withdrawn “in order to 
protect the ’Government”. 

The staunch opposition to 
the return of Mr Marcos* and 
the cancellation of Mr Recto's 
passport, are strong evidence 
that the Aquino Government 
is not about to buckle under to 
US requests to give Mr Mar- 
cos the means to leave Hawaii 
and settle in another country. 

This suggestion was made 
by President Reagan and reit- 
erated by Mr George Shultz, 
the US Secretary of Stele, 
during their talks last week 
with Mr Laurel in Bali. Indo- 
nesia, during the foreign 
ministers' meeting of the As- 
sociation of South-East Asian 
Nations. 

• Sboliz arrives: Mr Shultz, 
who arrived yesterday in Mar 
nfla for a 26-hour visit, said 
the US was ready to help the 
Philippines resolve its finan- 
cial problems and rebuild its 
armed forces (Reuter reports). 

He is also almost certain to 
discuss the position of Mr 
Marcos with President 
Aquino. 


Harare (AFP) - Small-scale 
black businessmen told by 
guerrillas fighting the pre- 
independence Rhodesian re- 
gime to avoid paying taxes as 
pan of a civil disobedience 
campaign, are now befog 
forced to repay all they owe to 
the Zimbabwe Government 
The blade business commu- 
nity owes millions of dollars 


ur uviim me l 

Minister of KwaNdebele. 

Mr Soal pointed out that 
apart from the blatant contra- 
diction it presented with the 
Government’s claim to be 
moving away from apartheid, 
a court verdict was still pend- 
tog on the legality of the , re- 
transfer last January of part of aL 1 
foe territory of another home- - 
land to KwaNdebele. ■" " - 
.The 10 ethnically-defined 
tribal homelands are seen by 
most blacks, and by opinion 
wraad, as an integral part of 
foe divide-and-ruk apartheid 
system. The outside world- 
recognizes none of the 
independent" homelands. 

. KwaNdebele is a generally 
impoverished tract of land, 
which at the end of 1984 had 
estimated population of 


UK MUfJ I 

royal couple's romance. 

For their arrival two sta- 
tions were running document- 
ary specials about her life and 
a fo roS was p lanning to run an 
interview. 

But any Japanese could be 
forgiven for not realizing that 
*•“ Prince of Wales was 


- - --- - - b mr wmmnm m M 

Book; Process Diana, Mag- 
nificent Fashion and Portrait 
of Love, and the more mun- 
dane Story of Princess Diana. 
Magazine prices run up to £4 
but there are special pendants, 
touches and pottery costing 
anything up to a hundred 
times that 

Few Japanese can elahn the 
Princess's statuesque build, 
but that has not prevented foe 
fashion industry from offering 
afl sorts of variations mi foe 
Diana theme at truly regal 
prices. 

Department stores are ran- 
ting displays of British goods 
highlighted by yet more photo- 
graphs of the royal couple. 


Karen guerrillas last week 
abandoned Palu, which they 
have never tost before, after 
in fen try, supported by artil- 
lery, captured a hill overlook- 
ing it. 

Palu is a large Karen settle- 
ment going back to the early 
years of the century, a military 
base and one of foe biggest 
trading links between the area 
and foe outside world. The 
Karens impose a 5 per cent 
levy on foe trade, their main 
source of revenue, which has 
been drying up as they have 
steadily lost territory during 
the past two-and-a-half years. 

Thai military officers and 
Western relief workers say 
Burmese soldiers now occupy 
the civilian section of Palu 
village, where they burned 20 
houses, while some rebels are 
stifl holding out in military 
fortifications to the east. 


tolks — strategic and medium- 
range missiles and weapons in. 
space — Mr Karpov added: 
“We do not feel new proposals 
are needed from us because 
those already made open foe 
way to agreement.” 

In reply to the US conten- 
tion that no response had been 
forthcoming to its strategic 
arms reduction proposal of 
November 1 — incorporating 
ideas presented earlier by the 
Russians — he said his 
delegation's reaction had 
“been sufficiently critical for 
the US to understand that this 
proposal would not serve as a 
basis for agreement They 
know that. We su gges ted a 
solution opening the way to 
agreement The other side 
should say yes or suggest 
something else.” 

He said the .American Stra- 
tegic Defence Initiative re- 
mained a stumbling block. 

Did he expea this fifth 
round to pave the way for a 
summit later in the year? 
“La’s wait and see,” he said. 

After the appointment off 
Mr Yuli Kvitsfosky, who 
headed foe Soviet space and 
defence weapons group, as 
ambassador to Bonn, Mr! 
Karpov has taken over that 
role, opposite Mr 
Kampelman. , 

Replacing him as bead of] 


•T- 

gh 

to 

a- 

ie 

a 

■er 

is 

.■si 

w. 

er 

es 

slI 

□t 


in 

ng 

id 

li- 

nt 

*s 

as 


al 

se 

IT. 

of 

he 

id 

ar 

5 


foe strategic weapons i 


Mr Alexei Obukhov, formerly 


directing foe medium-range 
missiles group. His US coun- 
terpart is Mr Ronald Lehman, 
replacing Mr John Tower, 
who resigned. 

Mr Obukhov has been re- 
placed by his former deputy, 
Mr Lem Masterkov. His US 
opposite number is Mr May- 
nan] Glitman. 

Mr Kampelman said he 
hoped foe Soviet side's reorga- 
nization “will produce a rein- 
vigoration towards 
agreement" 


Dn 

-*st 

in 

id, 

ng 

he 

to 

17. 

jn 

Uy 


» 


xd 

nd 

uc- 

ck- 

tse 

ul- 


V L 
las 
■st- 
Kl, 
or 
ue: 
be 
tal 
he 
m 


an 


in^ unpaid taxes going hack to 
foe white minority 


1975, when 

government was in power. 


176,700, most of them related 
ethnically to the Ndebele of 
south-western Zimbabwe. 

Last January, however, the 
Government almost doubled 
KwaNdebele’s population by 
the forcible transfer of the 
Moutse district from foe 
neighbouring homeland of 
Lebowa, which has refused 
“independence”, to Mr 
Skosana’s semi-feudal fief- 
dora. Relatively well-devel- 
oped, Moutse has a 
population of about 120,000. 


-The people in pemer today 


GATEWAY 

BUILDING SOCIETY 

FOR INVESTMENTS OF £10,000 AND ABOVE 


Columns may move 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

The controversial striped office, said yesterday that M 

Jacques Chirac, as Mayor of 
Pans, had always disapproved 
of foe project, and hinted 
strongly that M Chirac, as 
frime Minister, may decide to 
have the 260 columns moved. 


_ w«.wtwi«bi ow 

columns by Daniel Buren may 
yet be removed from foe 
Palais Royal in Paris, where 
they are in foe process ofbeing 
erected, despite foe Culture 
Ministry’s decision earlier this 
week that the work should be 
completed. 




% 


J 

ihe 

mi 

Tie. 

ost 

■ta 

«u 


i 


.•Y: 

oss' 

on 

.88 

3ns 

09 


!& 

lob 

els 
ing 
Ihe 
■ in 
mi 
nc~ 
lils 


M Denis Baudouis. spokes- 
man for tbfe- Prime Minister’s . 


.“The Buren columns are 
virtually finished. We shall see 
later what decision needs to be 
. taken.” M Baudouis said. 


NET 

ANNUAL INTEREST 


Sabah victors must heal Muslim rift 


■ -V& 



Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Reu- 
ter) - Sabah’s Christian-dom- 
inated Government most heal 
a growing rift with Muslims to 
hold on to its renewed mandate 
and return stability to the east 
Malaysian stele, potitkol ana- 
lysts said yesterday. 

‘The Kadazan tribe-based 
Parti Berea tu Sabah (PBS), 
«hkh won an absolute msyor* 
ity in this week's state elec- 
tions, now needs to join the 
federal coalition of the Prune 
Minister. Datuk Seri Dr 
Mahathir Mohamad, to rule 
effectively. 

Sabah is the only one of 
Malaysia’s 13 states not ruled 
j»v a member of the 11-party 
multi-racial National Front. 

In the second election in Just 
put a year, the PBS crushed 
its archVri»sL the Malay Mus- 
lim United Sab-b National 
Organization (LSNOk and 
the federally-backed and nom- 
inally multi-racial Berjaya 
party, by winning 34 of the 48 
i purmblV' S£UtS> 



'i! 


r**' 


elected state assembly scats. 
Previously, it had .5 seate. 

The U5NO retained 12 of 
its 16 seats while Bejivskept 

„nly oneof itofow. The&tafo 

Chinese Coosdidaied Part? 
the other seat, bat its 


took 


bolder promptly crossed over 


to the PBS. which can nomi- 
nate another six seats. 

The Christian Chief Minis- 
ter. Datuk Joseph . Pains 
Kitingjuv called the second 
election — just lOmontteafter 
coming to power in April 1985 
— after a spate of defections by 
bis assemblymen to the Oppo- 
sition robbed bin of a 
majority. 

■ Muslim unrest against his 

ad mini stration and court cases 
challenging his rule also 
prompted him to seek a hew . 
mandate. 

Five people died amT20 were 
wounded in a wave of arson, 
bombings and rioting by Mas-. . 
lint activists .against die PBS ' 
Government in March. .They, 
alleged it discriminated 


against Mbs Out civil servants 
and was auti-Islamk. 

- Analysts said the PBS could 
heal the Mmfim-Ctuistian rifir 
by attracting more M ndims, 
. especially those with high 
religions and p olitical stand- 
. ing, and giving the party a 
more. maiiti-Taaal and -ecu- 
menical complexion. 

The PBS was founded just 
over a year ago os an anti- 
federal, Christian Kadazan- 
backed platform to air 
grievances over poor job op- 
portunities for non-Muslims 
aid allocation of development 
fends by the previous Berjaya 
Government. 

If . must now reduce empha- 
sis on these problems to 
Muslim goodwill, the 
said, . 

Datuk Pairin yesterday ap- 
pointed three Deputy Chief 
Ministers — a Kadazan, a 
Chinese and a Malay — in an 
effort to prove that the PBS 
was tnulti-rarifiL 
Christian form a 

Hurd of Sabah's 1.2 million 
population, Muslim Malays 
and • .Bgjans another third, 
ethnic Chinese some 20 per 
cent and small tribes form the 
rest 

“Musfons, who are a signifi- 


cant common ity in the state, 
most be appeased by the PBS 
to ensure they do not become 
restless and fry to disrupt the 
PBS administration once 
more,” one analyst said . 

Others said the PBS should 
bring political stability to the 
state by ensuring that its 
government was not weakened 
toy farther defections in the 
Mate Assembly. 

Previous Sabah govern- 
ments have been plagued by 
crossovers which Datuk Panin 
has pledged to outlaw. Pro- 
posed legislation says an as- 
semblyman wanting to defect 
must resign his seat 
The analysis said the PBS 
feced an uphill task in frying 
to revive foe recession-hit oil 
and timber-based state econo- 
my. 

Koala Lumpur, 625 miles to 
w«t across foe South 
China.Sea, controls security, 
devejopment, oil revenue- and 
immigration to the state, on 
foe northern tip of Borneo. 

The federal Government 
has congratulated Datuk 
Pairin on his' victory and 
analysts said PBS was now 
likely to be accepted into the 
coafiton as it bad shown it had 
mnftikadal support 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


Ershad explains away poll violence as ‘normal’ 


Frota Michael Hamlyn 
Dhaka 

Tie Bangladesh martial law 
with its credibility 
adly battered by the blatant 
ffror tactics used at the polls 
y sap porters, tried y ester- 
ay to limit the damme. 
President Ershad called in 
tae foreign journalists, all or 
bom had seen the effects of 

w violence and ballot-rig- 

and explained that 
«ngs were not so bad as they 
eemetL 

He said the election to the 
worry's Parliament “went 
ell, so far as 1 know, except 
w a few places, which usually 
appeos". 

First he played down the 
tient and the significance of 
w misbehaviour. “There was 
ot a sign of violence,” be said, 
except in a few booths, where 
ival parties dashed. It's a 
ormal feature of a developing 
ation.” 

Secondly be wanted to 
(tribute blame for such dis- 
irbances as there were to the 
(her side.“Electoral violence 
as started long ago. it was 
Carted by the Awami 
-eague," he said. 

Thirdly he pointed to the 
ariy results that were being 
nblished. “The parties are 
eck-and-neck," he said. “No- 
ody in this country could say 
lis election was rigged.” 

It is indeed true that the 
ariy results show the parties 
eck-and-neck. With counting 
ompleted in 183 of the 300 
eats open for election, the 
atiyo party, which supports 
ie President's policies, has 
on 78 seats: the Awami 



Armed Bangladeshi troops preventing voters near Dhaka from polling, saying that the booths 


League, the priodpal opposi- 
tion party. has won 55; the 
minor parties in coalition with 
the Awami League have won 
another 1 9. Independents have 
taken 20 seats, the other minor 
parties have 12. 

The team of Britons here to 
observe the election as neu- 
trally as possible, considering 
they were brought by the 
People's Commission for Free 


Elections set np by the Awami 
League, insisted that nothing 
could be judged from the early 
results alone. 

The three members of the 
team were adamant that what 
they had seen on election day 
showed a massive and wide- 
spread attempt to rig tin 
elections. 

“If results are announced 
based on the voting we saw 


yesterday,” said Lord Eanals, 
the leader, “they are based on 
a fraudulent election.” 
Between them Lord Ennals, 
Mr Martin Brandon Bravo, 
Conservative MP for Notting- 
ham Sooth, and Mr David Lay 
of the BBC saw assistant 
presiding officers filling ballot 
boxes with ballot papers, 
though there were no voters 
present; they saw voters’ lists 


were already closed at 10am. 
indicating that 100 per cent of 
the register had voted, even 
though the register was three 
years old; and they saw vio- 
lence and intimidation of vot- 
ers and party agents. 

“We felt that the principal 
offender was the Jatiyo 
Party,” said Mr Bravo yester- 
day. 

Though the blame is over- 
whelmingly to be put on the 


Sheikh Hasina, who has 
alleged election fraud. 

government party, all indepen- 
dent observers agree there is, 
some evidence of the 
misbehaviour of members of 

other parties. 

Renewed polling will take 
place in those polling stations 
which were dosed on orders of 
the presiding officers. 

And, according to General 
Ershad, the Parliament will be 
summoned within a month of 
the official announcement of 
the results. 

He is anxious to come to an 
agreement with the Opposi- 
tion on a number of policy 
issues, that would not be 
disturbed by possible changes 
of government in the future, he 
said. 

“Let as have a broad con- 
sensus on certain major na- 
tional issues,” he said, 
indicating that the though be 
thought the Jatiya Party 
would probably win the elec- 
tions which were now being 
declared, the Awami League 
would not be far behind. 






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Liberals united by 
fear in Colombia 
presidential race 

From Geoffrey Matthews, Bogota 


II used to be said that the 
| only difference between the 
two political parties in Colom- 
bia was that the Conservatives 
went to the nine o’clock Mass 
and the Liberals, at ten. 

Certainly in ideological 
terms there has never been 
much to distinguish them, as 
confirmed by the campaigns 
of the two main candidates in 
the current presidential elec- 
tion race. 

Yet Colombian history has 
often been stained by merci- 
less, senseless and bloody civil 
wars between liberals and 
Conservatives, the last of 
which >n the 1950s claimed an 
estimated 200.000 lives, and 
fears of a new violencia — as 
that last tragic conflict was 
known — have made the 
election result a foregone 
conclusion. 

Nobody here doubts that on 
May 25 the Liberal candidate, 
Senor Virgjlio Bareo Vargas, a 
technocrat, will be elected to 
succeed President Belisario 
Beta n cur Cuartas, a titular 
Conservative whose four-year 
terra ends m August 

President Betancur was a 
very different kind of Colom- 
bian politician, Liberal or 
Conservative. An idealist and 
populist (and indeed extreme- 
ly popular until this last year 
of his administration), he 
coyly described himself as “to 
the left of the right” and 
steered a somewhat radical 
course in domestic and foreign 
policy, the cornerstone ofboth 
being peace. 

It was on his initiative that 
the Contadora group was 
formed by Colombia, Mexico, 
Venezuela and Panama to 
seek negotiated solutions to 
the various conflicts raging in 
Central America. 

At the same time he offered 
generous amnesty terms to 
Colombia's various revolu- 
tionary guerrilla groups in a 
bid to end the political vio- 
lence which has convulsed this 
country since the sectarian 
bloodletting of the 1950s. 

In the end, everything was 
to blow up in his face in the 
nightmare events of last No- 
vember. First, the belligerent 
subversive April 19 move- 
ment (Ml 9), which earlier had 
broken off a ceasefire pact, 
took the Palace of Justice in 
Bogota in a siege which was to 
end the next day in a blood- 
bath when government troops 
stormed the building. 

A week later the Nevado del 
Ruiz volcano erupted in cen- 
tral Colombia, killing 25,000 
and adding to the mood of 
national gloom. 

The M19 action fuelled the 
view among Colombians that 
the Government had ceded 


Horror of 
Grenada 
executions 

St George’s, Grenada (Reu- 
ter) — A prosecution witness 
in the Maurice Bishop murder 
trial testified yesterday that a 
soldier had slashed the former 
Grenadian Prime Minister's 
throat and sliced a finger from 
his corpse to get a ring. 

Another witness said the 
bodies of Bishop and his 
associates were burnt “like 
frying eggs" in an army camp 
the day after they were execut- 
ed during a coup on October 
19, 1983. 

Eighteen former left-wing 
leaders are on trial for the 
murders, which resulted in the 
US invasion of the Caribbean 
island six days later. Among 
the defendants are Mr Bernard 
CoarcL the former Deputy 
Prime Minister, his wife Phyl- 
lis, and Mr Hudson Austin, 
the ex-army commander who 
led the coup. 

■ Miss Shirley Ann-Marie 
Charles said that after Bishop 
had been executed by a firing 
squad she had watched Cap- 
tain Lester Redhead, a soldier 
in the People's Revolutionary 
Army, slash his throat and cut 
off a finger with a ring on it. 

Helped by a soldier, she had 
carried down Bishop's bullet- 
riddled body to the bottom 
square at Fort Rupert. The 
second prosecution witness, 
Mr Christopher Bowen, a 
former soldier, said be saw the 
bodies of Bishop and his 
associates being burnt at an 
army camp at Calivigny, in 
the south of the island, the 
following day. “I saw bodies 
frying like eggs in a frying 
pan,” he said. 

He said Lieutenant 
Callistus Bernard, one of the 
defendants, then threw the 
bodies into a latrine hole. 


too much to the guerrillas in 
the quest for peace, while also 
generating criticism of Sen or 
Betancurs efforts within 
Contadora, particularly after 
the M 19 arms used in the siege 
were traced conclusively to 
Nicaragua. 

The Liberals have always 
been Colombia’s majority par- 
ty, and historically the Con- 
servatives can only gain 
power, as Seflor Betancur did 
in 1982, when the Liberal vote 
is split. 

This time the Liberals are 
united, a circumstance pro- 
duced by the conservative 
candidacy of Senor Alvaro 
Gomez Hurtado, the Liberals' 
beie noire and the most con- 
troversial Colombian 
politician. 

Senor Gomez's misfortune 
is to be the son of the 
reactionary conservative Pres- 
ident widely blamed for the 
poisoned sectarianism that led 
to the first vioiencia. 

The Liberals are capitaliz- 
ing on fears that Seftor Gomez 
would revive old party hatreds 
and so add to the spiralling 
climate of political violence. 

Such fears, however unjusti- 
fied, led Senor GOmez to lose 
by a landslide in bis previous 
bid for the presidency in 1974 
and will do so again now, even 
though his policies are no 
more right-wing than those of 
Senor Barco. 

Both would take a stronger 
line on subversion, provide 
incentives to private business, 
take a much more pro-Wash- 
ington line, and prove less 
active in Contadora than So* 
nor Betancur. 





President Betancur. a final 
year ot unpopularity. 

The third candidate is 
Jaime Pardo Leal of the 
Patriotic Union, a left-wing 
movement newly founded by 
former members of the 
nation's biggest guerrilla 
group, the Moscow-line Revo- 
lutionary Armed Forces of 
Colombia (FARQ, which has 
agreed a series of ceasefire 
pacts. 


Contadora 
demand 
by Arias 

From Martha Honey 
San Jose 

Dr Oscar Arias, aged 45, a 
laywer and economist educat- 
ed in Britain, was inaugurated 
yesterday as Costa Rica's 
youngest-ever President. He 
pledged in his inangura! ad. 
dress to sign the Contadora 
Act on Jane 6 and to demand 
“the fixing of a timetable for 
the complete fnffiLmeiit of 
agreed commitments”. 

He called the Contadora 
Act which aims to negotiate 
an end to the war in Nicaragua 
ami to remove US and other 
foreign troops and military 
advisers from the region, “a 
faithful reflection of the long- 
ing to see democracy spread in 
Centra] America and on the 
continent”. 

He reiterated Costa Rica's 
“nnsbakeable faith in the 
search for a peaceful solution 
through diplomatic means”, 
bat said that an; diplomatic 
negotiations should not be 
prolonged. 

He is convening a summit 
meeting of the ten Latin 
American Presidents who at- 
tended the ina agination, all of 
whom have been active partici- 
pants in the Contadora peace 
process. 

President Daniel Ortega of 
Nicaragua, who says be will 
not sign the agreeement an til 
(he US ends its support tar the 
rebel Contras, was dissuaded 
from attending became Costa 
Rican officials feared he would 
provoke public demonstra- 
tions and steal the limelight 
from Dr Arias. 

However, Dr Arias told a 
press conference later fiat be 
believed Nicaragua was seri- 
ously thinking of signing the 
Contadora Act. 


16 Romanians defect 
at Seville cup match 


Seville (Reuter) — At least 
16 of about 1.000 Romanian 
football fans attending 
Wednesday's European Cup 
final in $eville have sought 
political asylum in the city, 
police here said yesterday. 

A spokesman said five fens 
approached stadium police 
before ^ and during the 
evening's game and 1 1 more 
went to police headquarters 
overnight One had gone first 
to the West German consulate 
before the match and was 
taken to the police 


At least four more Roma- 
nians failed to board chartered 
flights home and were unac- 
counted for, he said. 

The defectors, who were all 
male and aged 30 to 51. 
remained at police headquar- 
ters while their asylum re- 
quests were being processed. 

Their team, Steaua Bucha- 
rest, beat Barcelona on a 
penalties shooi-out to become 
the first team from a commu- 
nist country to win the Euro- 
pean Cup. 

David Miller, page 37 














I 


1 





ii 


THE 



TIMES 




May 9 , 1986 



« i ii)m 


iH-iUr 


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1 U'' 


(( FOCUS )) 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 

PORTUGAL/l 



Allies through 


six centuries 


Poj^gal is often, and correct- 
ly. described as Britain's old- 
est ally. The description tends 
to be of more emotional than 
practical significance in mod- 
em limes; and beyond die 
dement of good will has little 
obvious relevance to either 
country's needs. Both have 
been members of Nato since 
its foundation, and both are 
now members of the European 
Community. 

But there were periods in 
the past when the alliance was 
of great significance to both 
countries. The Treaty of 
Windsor, signed in the Chapel 
Royal of the castle on May 9, 

1 3S&, 600 years ago today, had 
considerable influence on Eu- 
ropean affairs. 

Even now it is for from 
dormant. In 1982, at the time 
of the Fafldands war, Britain 
made a secret request to 
Lisbon for its aircraft to be 
allowed to use the base at 
Lajes in the Azores. Tbe 
Portuguese replied that they 
would agree if the request was 
made undo* the terms of tbe 
Treaty of Windsor, and that 
was done. 

Similarly during theSccond 
World War Portugal, a neu- 
tral, gave rights to use the 
Azores first to Britain, and 
then to tbe United States, after 
London had invoiced the An- 
glo-Portuguese alliance. 

When it was si gned be- 
tween Richard 0 of England 
and John ! of Portugal, the 
treaty seemed little d i ffere nt 
from many other such treaties, 
which reflected the shifting 
alliances of the period. But it 
stuck because it reflected gen- 
uinely Shared interests in tire 
two countries.' 

These interests were in two 
main areas. One was com- 
merce: England and Portugal 
were both maritime, trading 
nations, and each had goods 
the other wanted. Even more 
important, however, was the 
military-strategic link. Portu- 
gal, with its long land frontier 
with Spain, needed support 


against the expansionist de- 
signs of its larger neighbour. 
England, is giving flat sup- 
port, was acting to prevent too 
great a predominance of any 
single Continental country, 
whether Spain or, later, Napo- 
leonic France. 


Relations between England 
and Portugal go back at least 
to tbe time of the Crusades. In 
1 147 a body of Gusaders set 
off for the Holy Land from 
Dartmouth, and en route were 
asked by Afonso Heuriques, 
first King of independent 
Portugal, to help in driving 
out the Moors. They took pan 


guese decisively defeated the 
troops of John of Castile, who 
had invaded Portugal, at 
Aliubarrota in 1385. 

The battle established Por- 
tuguese independence, and tbe 
value of the English link, in 
the following year the far- 
reaching Treaty of Windsor 
was signed, formally commit- 


ting the two countries to the 
detent 



ice of each other's inter- 
ests and territories “for ever”. 
It was quickly followed by the 
marriage of the Portuguese 
King to Philippa of Lancaster, 
daughter of John of Gaunt. 

John and Philippa's chil- 
dren included Henry the 
Navigator, who played a lead-' 
in g part in setting off the 
remarkable expansion of Por- 
tugal overseas. 


The state arms 


in the capture of Lisbon, and 
many of them stayed on. 

Trade developed — textiles 
from England and wine, dried 
fruit, salt, honey and wax from 
Portugal More political l in k s 
came in tbe 14th century in a 
conflict over tbe succession to 
the throne of Castile. 

John of Gaunt from his base 
in Bordeaux and King Ferdi- 
nand I of Portugal both 
daimed tire throne, and decid- 
ed to pool their efforts, signing 
the Treaty of Tagilde in 1372. 
A new treaty was signed in 
1373 between Ferdinand and 
Edward UL 

After the death of Ferdi- 
nand, John I of Castile 
claimed the Portuguese 
throne: This was indignantly 


The Treaty of Windsor was 
regularly con finned during the 
15 th century. Portuguese in- 
terest waned in the 16th, and 
the treaty fefl into abeyance 
during the 60 years from 1580 
to 1640 when Portugal was 
united with Spain. 

But after the overthrow of 
rule from Madrid Portugal 
turned to England again. In 
I66L, when Portugal was once 
again under serious threat 
from Spain, an important 
treaty of alliance was signed 
with the newly restored 
Charles 0, by which Charles 
married Catherine of Bragan- 
za and England committed 
itself again to defending Por- 
tuguese territory. 

English troops were landed, 
and in two battles at Ameixial 
and Montesdaros they and 
the Portuguese routed a Span- 
ish invasion force. 




From sea to shrine: Traditional-style fishing boats at Albufeha and the sanctuary of Boi 
Jesus do Monte near Braga, visited by thousands of pilgrims every year 


were restored by tbe end of the 
century. 

In foe First World War 
Portugal was initially neutral, 
but sent troops to fight on foe 
Allied side after Germany had 
declared war on it. 


developed further in the Me- 
thuen treaties of 1703. One 
treaty declared in lapidary 
terms that England would buy 
Portuguese wines, and Portu- 
gal English woollens, and this 
laid the foundation for the 
rapid growth of Anglo-Portu- 
guese trade and, not least, the 
production of port along the 
Dpnro valley by British 
families. 


Arthur Wellesley, later Duke 
of Wellington, landed and 
defeated Junot; and a liberat- 
ed Portugal provided the start- 
ing point for the Peninsular 
Campaign, which took Brit- 
ish, Portuguese and Spanish 
troops up to and beyond tbe 
Pyrenees. The Portuguese 
army was trained and com- 
manded by British officers. 


By the Second World War 
links were already less close 
between Portugal and Britain, 
and Dr Salazar, foe Portu- 
guese dictator, had some polit- 
ical sympathy for the Axis 
powers. But he maintained 
Portuguese neutrality and ex- 
erted himself to keep Franco's 
Spain out of the war. Once it 
was clear which way the war 
was going he was increasingly 
helpful to the Allies, not least 
by allowing use of foe Azores. 


rejected by most Portuguese, 
and John. M 


_ Jasler of A viz, was 

proclaimed King. 

A force of English archers 
was despatched to Portugal, 
and with their help the POrtu- 


Portugal did not get this 
help for nothing. Catherine of 
Btaganza brought a bige dow- 
ry of two million cruzados as 
well as Tangier and Bombay; 
and a wide range of privileges 
for English merchants had 
already bom included in earli- 
er treaties. 


During the Seven Years 
War there was again an inva- 
sion of Portugal, by a Franco- 
Spanish force which withdrew 
after military assistance was 
sent from Britain. Far more 
serious was tire occupation of 
Portugal, in 1807 by foe 
French during the Napoleonic 
wars. The Portuguese royal 
family left for Brazil with an 
escort of British warships just 
before they reached Lisbon. 


The commercial links were But the following year Sir 


For the remainder of the 
1 9th century British influence 
was predominant in Portugal, 
aod tbe alliance . remained 
strong, if at times one-sided. 
Tensions arose over colonial 
policy in Africa, and there was 
a serious crisis in 1890 when 
Britain sent Lisbon a stiff note 
over Portuguese claims to a 
continuous stretch of territory 
from Angola to Mozambique. 
Portugal had to abandon the 
daims, with considerable re- 
sentment, but good relations 


In Portugal today, a democ- 
racy again, the British pres- 
ence is much less marked than 
it was. But there is an aware- 
ness. learnt in history lessons 
at school of the part that 
Britain has played in Portu- 
guese affairs, if also a sense 
that if Britain often helped it 
also often took undue advan- 
tage of its greater strength. 

But a predisposition to be 
friendly and, more practically, 
the response to the British 
request at foe time of the 
Faiklands war showed that 
after 600 years the alliance 
does live on. 


Peter Strafford 


The legacy of 
a revolution 


It is hard to exaggerate the 
importance of Portugal's 1974 
“Revolution of the 
Carnations**, when the armed 
forces ended a hopeless colo- 
nial war by sweeping away 
both a 50-year-old dictatorial 
regime and an overseas empire 
which was then the oldest in 
the world. 

Politically and economical- 
ly, tbe revolution marked the 
most significant watershed 
this century for the small 
nation of nine million people. 

It brought them back to the 
west European mainstream 
and provided tbe basis for foe 
country’s incorporation in the 
European Community from 
January 1 this year. 

Yet socially foe conse- 
quences have proved to be less 
decisive, or at least less direct- 
ly identifiable with the revolu- 
tion. Twelve years after the 
events of April 1974, it is 
fashionable to emphazise how 
Portugal has returned to its 
much-loved conservative ways. 

Even in politics it is possible 
to question the lasting impact 
of the more revolutionary aims 
of 1974. 

The centre-right govern- 
ment of Senbor Anita! Cavaco 


Silva, elected last October, he 
a Cabinet of many technocrat} 
seeking pragmatic answers ti 
Portugal's problems. Mani) 
young Portuguese in that elec 
(ion and in the presidents, 
election which followed wen 
evidently less attracted to tin 
politicians identified with foil 
more radical ideals of 1974. 

Expresso, Portugal's lead 
ing weekly, conducted a pol 
for tbe anniversary whiclj 
reveals that more than 50 pei 
cent of young Portuguese con 
fess they prefer to obey order? 
rather than give them. 

Portugal is a small country 
without ethnic, religious oil 
linguistic problems, but, a? 
western Europe's poorest na- 
tion, it does have serioml 
regional and social inequal- 
ities. 

Its working and rmal class- 
es are still more defereutia 
than in neighbouring Enrope-j 
an countries, so the post-197^ 
democratic rulers lade foci 
corresponding pressure and 
stimulus from below. 

Yet foe advent of the fresU 
winds of democracy brought 
the nation many benefits amid 
tbe painful upheaval of 1974J 
Continued on next 



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Tel: 01-283 53M Telex: 883064 and 886950 
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NEW YORK 

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9 West 57th Street, suite 3755. New York. N Y 10019. 
Tel: (232) 223-0370 and 223-0378 
Francisco Norton de Matos. Representative 


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12 . 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


3 ORTUGAL/2 


(( FOCtlSD 


f-J! .. ■ • .. 



'■ ,V.\. = 

Holiday pleasures: Lush foliage and stunning views in an Azores village; toboggan fan ran at Funchal, Madeira 

A touch of home in the Algarve sun 


le British have been coming 
Portugal for centuries. To- 
iy they still outnumber the 
u fists of any other country 
ith the exception of 
■ighbouring Spain. 

The Algarve with its sunny 
aches, golf courses and ho- 
ls which are open all the year 
their favourite destination, 
iris of the Algarve have 


become virtually English colo- 
nies. with English pubs and 
restaurants. English estate 
agents and English as the 
unofficial language. 

But increasingly Portugal is 
being discovered by tourists 
from other countries. 

Portugal is a small country. 
But within its borders the 
tourist can find a wide variety 


tele do Lobo. 
guaranteed inflation- 
proof holiday 

Surrounded by the pine trees, the sea and the sun of 
Portugal's Algarve, Vale do Lobo. established for over 
20 years, is southern Europe's most exclusive and 
luxurious holiday resort. 

Imagine miles of sandy beach, swimming pools, a 
leisure centre, and virtually every sports facility you can 
think of. including a 27 hole championship golf course, 
and Roger Taylor's 12 court tennis centre. 

If you are currently planning a holiday for around 
£50 to £200 per person, per week, then the luxury of 
Vale do Lobo can be yours for a fixed price for the next 
five years. 

If you would like a copy of our brochure and details 
of our 5 star, five year inflation-proof Holiday Club, ask 
the operator for Freephone 8818 (24 hour service). 



is different , so is 
Vale do Lobo. 

Vale do Lobo Holiday Club. 31 Si. George Street. London W1R 9FA. 
Telephone 01-493 9098. We arc open on Saturday. 


of landscape, historical re- 
mains and monuments. From 
the mountains and forests in 
the north with their medieval 
stone villages to Roman and 
Visigoth rains and terraced- 
vineyards, through the high, 
dry central plateau dotted 
with giant olive and cork trees, 
to the warm, sunny beaches of 
the south. 

Lisbon itself lies on seven 
hills on the estuary of the 
Tagus. The sights include St 
George's Casde above the city. 
The best way to reach it is to 
climb up through the laby- 
rinth of narrow streets and 
alleys of the Alfama. which, 
through history, quartered 
Goths. Saracens and Jews. 

On the outskirts of Lisbon 
by the riverstand the beautiful 
Manueline monastery and 
cloisters of the Jeronimos. The 
Belem tower, where the ships 
of Vasco da Gama and other 
explorers moored, stands in 
the water. 

Just 20 km down the coast 
are the resorts of Cascais and 
Estoril. In the bills 25 km west 
of Lisbon sits Cintra. a 
favourite haunt of British 
tourists for more than 300 
years. The Cintra Royal Pal- 
ace dates from the 14th centu- 
ry. The !9ih century Pena 
Palace sits on a pinnacle 
surrounded by gardens with 
more than 3.000 varieties of 
plants and trees. 

A days itinerary from Lis- 
bon could include visits to the 
14ih-centurv Baiaiha monas- 


tery. the picturesque fishing 
village of Nazare with its 
brightly coloured boats, and 
Obidos, a charming medieval 
walled town. 

In the north are the Douro 
Valley and the city of Oporto, 
famous for the port trade. A 
trip along the Douro through 
the terraced vinyards or a 
journey across the river at 
Oporto to the old bodegas to 
taste the port are evocative. 

In the centre of . the country 
are Estiemoz. Evora and 
many forti fied old towns. 
Evora is the most 
architecturally interesting 
town in Portugal, with styles 
from the Roman temple of 
Diana to the Renaissance. 

There is tourist accommo- 
dation all over the country. 
The most unusual are the 
poiisadas . government-run 
hotels in converted monaster- 
ies. forts or castles or in 
modern, specially constructed 
buildings. 

Martha de la Cal 

The nine 
islands 

The nine Portuguese islands 
that lie in the Azores archipel- 
ago, 900 miles from Europe 
and 2,000 miles from Ameri- 
ca, are one of the vital strategic 
points in Nato defence. 

The Portuguese air base at 
Lajes on Terceira Island is 


One view of Portugal 






jo M3 ia jaipoire 


In Purtu^ai. you con lore on out golden beaches <or practice 
jr toWHinte 5p:<rt 

You can get a heauuhii sunun in ilie summer tor in the 
trig, or autumn 

Vi.ni can go lishinn in our tranquil lakes -or you can try lor 
_;er tish in our casinos . 

You can dine simply cm delicious fnesh s2i dints 'Or you can 
aOUrmciAVere in the Michel in Guide - Iol> ot times'. 

In Portugal, vou can find whatever holiday you 
hl A 4 k vour travel agent lor details, or send tor 
ce brochure - well turn your ideas about 
'tucal upside down 5 

Portugal. A lot more holiday tor a lot less mcmev \ 


PORTUGAL 


w 



AIR 

PORTUGAL 





rented by the US government 
and is an important stopover 
and fuelling point. It has 
played a part in Middle East 
conflicts. The Americans 
must, however, obtain per- 
mission for any use of toe 
base, particularly flights out- 
side the Nato area. 

The islands were discovered 
in the 14th century by Portu- 
guese navigators. Coloniza- 
tion began in toe 15th century 
by Portuguese of Moorish 
origin, Jews, farmers from toe 
north of Portugal and by 
Flemings and Bretons. There 
was also a scattering of En- 
glish. Scots. I talian*, and 
North Americans. 

Christopher Columbus, on 
his return from his first voy- 
age, anchored hisships off the 
island of Santa Maria. 

The Azores have their own 
assembly and regional govern- 
ment The total population is 
under 300,000. more than half 
of whom are formers raising 
vegetables, fruit, cattle, tea, 
sugar cane and grapes. Others 
are tuna fishermen or whalers. 

The climate is temperate 
and damp because of the Gulf 
Stream, which has turned the 
islands into a vast garden of 
exotic plants. 

Emigration is a tradition. 
The main emigrant communi- 
ties are in north America, 
Brazil and toe Bermudas. On 
America’s New England coast 
there are entire towns with 
Portuguese names. These are 
inhabited by the descendants 
of crews taken on by Nantuck- 
et whalers in toe Azores. 

Whaling in the Azores be- 
gan in toe 16th century. The 
fishermen of Faial and Pico 
are toe only ones in the world 
who still confront the im- 
mense cachalots in fragile, 
open rowing boats with har- 
poons. 

Each of toe nine islands has 
its own characteristics, but all 
have volcanic valleys, crater 
lakes of many colours, medici- 
nal spas, natural swimming 
pools and deserted sandy 
beaches. 

There is much tourist devel- 
opment, particularly on Sao 
Miguel toe largest and most 
developed island. There is 
now an airline service between 
all toe islands, except outlying 
Corvo. Small boats also ply, 
between them. 

MdelaC 

Madeira 
exotica 

Legend has it that Madeira 
was discovered in 1346 by toe ] 
Englishman Robert Macfaim, 
who was shipwrecked there! 
with his mistress. History | 
books give the credit to Joao 
Gon calves Zarco, a Portu- 
guese explorer who landed 
there in 1419 and named toe 
island Isla de Madeira — 
wooded island - and claimed 
it for Portugal. 

Irrespective of who discov- 
ered it, ties with England have 
always been dose. English 
merchants settled there in the 
15th and 1 6th centuries and 
when Charles II married Cath- 
erine of Braganza in 1 660 they ! 
were given special privileges. 

A large British garrison was 
stationed in Madeira during J 
the Napoleonic wars, when 
Portugal was allied with Brit- ! 
ain. Many of the soldiers | 
married local girls and re- j 
mained on the island. 

British tourists have long 
enjoyed its spectacular volca- 
nic mountains which rise out 
of the sea, its exotic fowersjtt 
grariou5 living and its famous 
old hotels. 

Madeira has been, some- 
what forgotten of late, but it is 
being rediscovered. The air- 
port runway has been extend- 
ed to take planes that can fly 
direct from London. The local 
government is also encourag- 
ing foreign investment 

A project to establish a free- 
trade and offthare banking 
zone on the east of the island 
was approved in 1980. 

Madeira depends heavily 
on tourism. Madeira wine is 
the island's biggest export but 
it imports much more than it 
exports. Its rocky terrain 
makes forming extremely 
difficult 

The greater part of toe 
island remains unoccupied. 
The 300,000 inhabitants are 
concentrated in the south 
around Funchal, the capitaL 

MdelaC 


The fresh winds 
blown in by revolution 



From previous page 

76 and ushered hi much badly- 
needed chance. 

Liberty brought a regular 
consultation of the wishes of 

the people, not ready made 
solutions for their problems. 
Some would say there have 
been far too many elections, 
indsding four in the past 
seven months. 

In all these polls the Portu- 
guese have shown a remark- 
able attachment to 
maintaining an eqmUbrimn. 
Perhaps that is to be explained 
by toe experience to 1974 of 
lurching within weeks from a 
right-wing dictatorship to an 
attempted people's democracy. 

Ever since the elections for 
the first constitutional govern- 
ment in 1976, a m ajor it y of 
Portuguese have shown them- 
selves aurally opposed to con- 
centrating power on either the 
left or toe right 

That, of conrse, has not 
meant there are no Portognese 
voters wanting to install a 
communist dictatorship, or no 
voters casting a frightened 
“Da” to stop that, or no voters 
wanting to return to a thinly 
disgnised version of the Sala- 
zar regime. Bat the majorities 
(have been consistently for the 
centre-left Socialists or the 
centre-right Social Democrats. 

Except for the Comnnmists, 
all the familiar Emopean par- 
ty labels are more or less 



Maria Soares: Emphasizing an elder-statesman role 


An extra problem for 
the Prime Minister 


deceptive in the Portuguese 
context Led by Dr Mario 
Soares, now President, the 
Socialists got many middle- 
class votes because of the fight 
they pnt np against the Com- 
munists at tire height of the 
revolution. 

The Social Democrats, a 
hybrid party anyway, have 
fluctuated largely according to 
which leader was in the ascen- 
dant — at times well to the* 
right of other European social 
democratic parties, at others 
more like a Roman Catholic 
centre party. 

The voters refused the 
“grand design" of Dr Franris- 
co Sa Garariro, Prime Minis- 
ter until hfo death in 1980, of a 
centre-right coalition govern- 
ment conpled with a right- 
wing president. 

They preferred to re-elect 
instead President Antonio 
Eases, a femur army general 
of centre-left views. 

Something very similar hap- 
pened earlier this year when 
Professor Diogo Freitas do 
Amaral, a right-wing candi- 
date, obtained more than 46 
per cent of the rotes in the first 
round of the presidential con- 
test in January. 

He finally went down last 
February before Dr Soares, 
the candidate of the centre- 
left, who obtained tbe backing 
of the Comranists. 

So Senhor Cavaco, too, 
failed to get the President he 
wanted, and Portugal em- 
barked last March, tike 
France, on its own experience 
of “co-babitatioo”. 

The Prime Minister has an 
additional problem. He has 
headed only a minority gov- 


ernment since tbe general 
elections last October. His 
party obtained no more than 
29.8 per cent of the votes, or 88 
seats, in Portugal's 250-seat 

tingle chamber parliament. 

The Socialists, severely 
punished by tbe voters for an 
economic nnsterity pro- 
gramme they had implement- 
ed, obtained 20 per cent, or 57 
seats. 

The October elections in 
feet marked a new point of 
departure for all Portuguese 
parties, and perhaps recqpii- 
tion of the feet that, how e ver 
important tbe 1974 revolution 
was, a new generation of voters 
most increasingly be heeded. 

As president, Soares is 
emphasizing an elder 
statesman's role, seeking to 
avoid interfering with the gov- 
ernment His five-year term 
coaid provide the political 
stability badly needed for 
Portugal"* economic develop- 
ment and adjustment to the 
Common Market 

The sense of a change of 
generation will also be provid- 
ed by the Socialists' electing a 
new party leader to succeed 
him next month. 

In spite of revisions in 1982, 
the Portuguese constitution 
provides for a semi-presiden- 


tial system of government 

Senhor Cavaco, after haring 
last month's Budget amended 
on crucial tax proposals by the 
Opposition, is evidently look- 
ing for as opportunity to go to 
tbe country and win a 
majority. 

His business-like conduct of 
affairs as Prime Minister has 
created a good impression. 

Signs of an improvement in 
the economy, wife real wages 
going ap for the first time in 
more than two years, might 
tempt him to try his lock. 

However, tbe Portuguese 
voters might react 
unfavourably to any politician 
they judge to be plunging their 
country so soon again into 
costly elections. Senhor 
Cavaco may be forced to 
soldier on. 

So long as be has to do that, 
the 45 MPs of the Democratic' 
Renewal Party, launched last 
year to be the vehicle for 
President Eaaes when he 
stepped down, are crucial to 
parliamentary arithmetic. 

It was they who saved 
Senhor Cavaco's budget and 
his government from an even 
worse mauling by the 
Opposition. 

Richard Wigg 


VISIT A LEGEND - NOW 



at REID’S MADEIRA 


Madefra is Europe's tropical island and 
for many visitor* the legendary Reid's 
Hotel u Madeira. 

Why not enjoy thb Stand's warm and g-nde 
summer cfcnale and see Madeira and 
Rdds fine gardens in hill bloom. But be 
warned, visit us once and It may wefi 
became a habi 

W«haul tearing the hertd you can saL 
«**feurf. sfcki dve. play tennis. have a 
sauna, swim in our heated sea water 
pools; or you can wale in the magnificent 
scenery of tht* enchanted bland. 

With some 350 tuff lor a maxanum ol 
300 guests you wfl opener ce a standard 
of service matched by few hotels. Vou 
*■ deep bePw*n crop knen sheets tn 
comfortable air comMoned rooms, and 
depending on tour mood you can cine m 
fractional or •'formal st*iot»«diigs 
oflertog French. Italian. Madeiran and 
Portuguese cubine. 

Yes. perhaps you should male* the 
legend a ready -now. 


FOR IMMEDIATE RESERVATIONS 
• Georges Urn partner. I General 
MotagerL RetcTs Hotel P.O Bo* 40i. 
P9000. Funchal Code*. Madeira 
Portugal. Tel Funchal 2300 1 Teles 
72 1 39 Retd * P or • HJ?X - The Leading 
Holds oT the World - Tet 01 -583 3050 cr 
A Your Travel Agent 

If wu would Sit our brochure and hi rdier 
information please send the coupon lo 

RddsHctd MADERA 

PO Box 277. London SW l V 4^_ 


NAME. 


ADORESS- 


T/ 91 5(86 



TTXTEL MANUEL GONCALVES 


QUALITY 

QUALEDADE 


. IN A WIDE RANGE OF TEXTILE PROI XJCTS 
. NUMA VASIA GAMA DE PRODUTOS 


Hl.MM-'AKTEKN 
Esc HITcwirrn Entvais 

VII. Ml -•* t nshit IX> VALE PO HtW It VM FAMALK.V.) 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 



PORTUGaL/3 




On the long road to recovery 


PonugaJ appears to be on the 
ro«d lo economic recovery 
after a decade of mountiS 
deficits, high unemployment, 
stagnating investments and 
burgeoning foreign debt. 

There are several reasons 

. optimism. The country is 
Poised to save over a bOfion 
collars a year through the drop 
in oil prices. The spectacular 
decline of the dollar in relation 
to the escudo has bow j t 
easier to pay for essential 
imports such as food, raw 
materials and equipment. 

Portugal will also receive 
large sums from the EEC, 
which it joined on January 1, 
for roads, highways, dams, 
irrigation schemes, airports, 
schools, hospitals, sewage dis- 
posal. forestation, rural infra- 
structure. tourist facilities and 
professional training centres. . 

Finally, the present govern- 
ment under the Social Demo- 
crat Prime Minister, Senhor 
Anibal Cavaco Silva, inherit- 
ed a considerably improved 
balance of payments situation 
from the former government 
under Dr Mario Soares.. 

Portugal is hoping to attract 
foreign investment by stress- 
ing membership of the EEC, 
cheap labour and fiscal bene- 
fits. “We are encouraging 
foreign investment that will 
produce for export or import 
substitution and provide 
jobs,” Dr Miguel Cadtihe, the 
Finance Minister, said. “We 
also want to see it directed 
toward advanced technology 
and areas where we have no 
experience." 





Now they 
even hurry 
the port 
over lunch 


Busy times: Glueing soles at an Oporto shoe factory and a boy lends a hand with the grape 

harvest in die Donro valley 


Foreign investment in 1985 
was worth £200 million, an 
increase of 53 per cent over 
1984. It was mainly in bank- 
ing. cellulose paste, chemicals, 
mining and electro-mechani- 
cal industries. The biggest 
investor was Britain, with 
Barclays Bank, Wiggins Teape 
and Rio Tinto Zinc to the fore. 

Early this year the Portu- 
guese government and Fiat 
signed a £9 miliion contract to 
make auto components for 
export. Japanese and Brazilian 
companies and others are 
studying projects in electron- 
ics, precision mechanics, com- 
puter software and food 
processing. 

Economic growth, which 
was estimated at 2.S per cent 
in 1985, is expected to in- 
crease to four per cent m 1 986. 

Inflation fell from 3Q per 
cent over the past few years to 
19.3 per cent in I98S and is 
continuing to falL Dr Cadtihe 


predicts it will be at 12 per 
cent by the end of the year. 
Because of reduced inflation, 
real wages, which had dropped 
below 1973 • levels, should 
become positive and permit 
an increase in private con- 
sumption of about 3.5 per 
cenu. 

The government plans to 
allow the balance of payments 
deficit to rise in order to 
stimulate growth and new 
industries. “The foreign debt 
will be allowed to go up Tor the 
next three or four years to 
permit investment in export 
or import substitution 
industries". Dr Cadilhe said. 
“The deficit will correct itself 


about the future, many prob- 
lems remain. Unemployment 
still stands at 11 per cent 
Portugal's agriculture is the 
most backward and under- 
developed in Europe. The 
state companies such as ship- 
building, transport and steel 
continue to gobble up govern- 
ment foods without producing 
returns. One hundred thou- 
sand workers are owed many 
months of back salaries. 

Entry into the EEC has 
brought not only community 
funds, but the threat that 
Portugal’s industries may be 
unable to stand up (o the new 
competition. There is also the 
threat that a more aggressive 


There is a danger that the more aggressive 
Spain may flood the country with products 


when these industries pro- 
duce. We need a billion dollars 
and 'six or seven years and 
then we will be over the 
hump." . . . . 

The government is putting 
great faith in the Portuguese 
private sector’s ability to re- 
spond to the EEC challenge 
and overcome' an inertia 
which is the result of 50 years 
protectionism under the re- 


and industrialized Spain, just 
across the border, may flood 
the country with. Spanish 
products. 

At the same time the United 
States is threatening to limit 
imports of Portuguese wines, 
textiles and other products 
because of the accession of 
Spain and Portugal to the 
EEC The US argues that entry 
will cos it vast sums in lost 


gime overthrown by the 1974 • exports of grains and other 
revolution and the subsequent products, 
turmoil and nationalizations. Finally, the political future 
But in spite of optimism of the country continues to be 


doubtful. Senhor Cavaco Silva 
heads a minority government 
based on only 29 per cent of 
the vote. He is determined to 
reduce the state's role in the 
business and industrial sector 
and -promote the role of 
private investors. He also 
wants to liberalize the labour 
laws to permit dismissals and 
attract investment However 
the Opposition has successful- 
ly blocked or modified most of 
his projects. 

Recently Parliament voted 
to lower the price of petrol 
against the wishes of the 
government which wanted 
the billion dollars saved on oil 
imports used to pay off debts. 

The government will soon 
present its controversial la- 
bour legislation. Most busi- 
nessmen see it as necessary to 
attract investment They say 
no one is willing to increase 
the work force when demand 
is high if they cannot lay them 
off when demand foils. 

If the labour laws and other 
future government proposals 
are turned down by parlia- 
ment it might become neces- 
sary to form another 
government in the next few 
months — either from among 
the parties in parliament or to 
take the problem to the voters 
in a general election. 


Opono. serious, grey and 
hardworking, keeps its re- 
nowned wines at a distance. 
The 80 or so lodges where port 
is prepared and aged before 
being shipped around the 
world are clustered unobtru- 
sively in shabby Vila Nova de 
Gaia, facing the city across the 
deep Donro River ravine. The 
wines themselves are pro- 
duced miles away up the river. 

However, the sanctum of 
the port trade is in the city 
itself. It is a solid, rather 
imposing stone building called 
the Factory House, the do- 
main since the 1 8th century of 
the British Association, a 
group of wine shippers — H at 
present — who dominate the 
port trade today. The past is 
very much alive at the Factory 
House. The 1 8 ih -century am- 
bience encourages a certain 
formality, and a respect still 
remains for time-consuming 
civility in what is after all a 
highly competitive business. 


Old formalities'stiU 
dominate the city 


MdelaC 







Each of the nine islands of the Azores has an individualised landscape. 
They have one point in common, however. The presence of luxuriant, 
exuberant greenery which includes all the colours of the. rainbow and is 
speckled with bright flowers. Then there are the wonderful lagoons at the 
bottom of craters. 


A pace of life in which there is time to stop and appreciate living. 
Nature in all its original splendour. Invitations to discover and experience 
a different world, repeated on.each of the nine islands of the Azores. 



For further information on the Azores contact: 

Azores Tourist Board 

Raa Marcelino Lima 9900 HORTA AZORES 
Telex 82125 GRAZOR P 


Bui port is a business, and 
traces of the 20th century are 
unavoidable even tn the Fac- 
tory House. The time- 
honoured Wednesday lunch 
for members and their guests 
is no longer the unhurried 
affair it once was. Now, 
among the younger members 
at least, one senses a brisk 
willingness to forgo the third 
glass of vintage port at the end 
and get back to the office. 

If port is no longer a British 
monopoly, the most impor- 
tant firms are still largely 
British. British firms were well 
established in the wine ship- 
ping trade in Opono early in 
the 1 8th century. By 1755, the 
year of the devastating Lisbon 
earthquake, they had gained a 
monopoly in the trade. The 
Portuguese growers who sup- 
plied them with wine had 
become so enraged with their 
price-fixing practices that the 
formidable prime minister of 
the time, the Marques de 
Pombal, stepped in and broke 
the cartel by making port 
production a government 
■monopoly. 

. There followed a difficult 
time for the British shippers, 
but they learned to live with 
state control and by 1786 had" 
become prosperous and secure 
enough to start building the 
present Factory House. By the 
early pan of the 19th century, 
the British mercantile com- 
munity was a solidly estab- 
lished feature of Oporto. 

While everybody applauds 
the enterprise and tenacity of 
the pioneer shippers, opinions 
are divided on the quality of 
their wines. Many of the early 
ports seem u> have been at 
best indifferent wines to which 
sugar, elderberry juice and 
other potions were frequently 
added. They would not have 
met the stria standards laid 
down by the Insiituio do 
Vinho do Panot Port Wine 
Institute), the state- run body 
which now watches over the 
quality of port. 


Port wine grapes are grown 
in terraced vineyards on the 
upper reaches of the Douro, 
where the river threads 
through steep hills of schist. 
The grapes are pressed up- 
river and then the young wine 
is brought down to Vila Nova 
de Gaia. The process is care- 
fully watched by the institute. 
The none must be produced 
within the strictly demarcated 
growing area and does not go 
anywhere without the permis- 
sion of the institute. 











With a ctacr ol 16 direct sendees and 13 via Lisbon, 
there is no belter Hay from Heathrow to Lisbon. Oporto, the 
Algarve and Madeira 

Scheduled service reliability, a wide efnee of tares from 
Sunsave/s to Navigator Class, superb food and wme. and die . . 
fines! Portuguese hospitality -at/ on TAP and only on 




from Heathrow 

There really is no othpr choice 







, s*^L*ai 







Wine cultivation is 
strictly demarcated 


Despite the Britishness of 
port, the British have been 
drinking less and less of iL 
Their place has long since 
been taken by France, which 
bought 40.9 per cent of the 
634,596 hectolitres Portugal 
exported in 1985. Belgium is 
the next biggest buyer, with 
Portugal itself and the United 
Kingdom third and fourth in 
the line with about ten per 
cent each of the market 
However, the British are 
still the leading buyers of the 
prestigious and costly vintage 
pons, and they are buying 
more and more of them. The 
British have also taken to a 
relative newcomer in the qual- 
ity market, the somewhat less 
expensive, late bottled vintage 
port 

Many producers see the up- 
market ports as the most 
probable area for expansion. 
The bulk of port production, 
the tawnies, rubies and whites, 
are wines that have been 
blended from the products of 
different harvests, matured in 
wood for a number of years 
and bottled when they are 
ready to be drunk. 

Every so often, though, a 
harvest, or vintage, of unusu- 
ally good quality will induce 
shippers to set aside the entire 
year’s production for ageing 
separately. This product be- 
comes what is known as 
vintage port. 

Peter Coliis 



. . . Bom, in the beautiful Douro valley in north eastern 
Portugal, by the will of God with the help of its mountain 
people and by the loving care bestowed on it throughout its 
years of ageing and maturing. 


’ i 







PORTLY is {fie He* Portygujjso 
* - ^folBng.cwBpBny {he rntona- 

. "tonal trades. 

regular s^vms 
3 P«=«redTf 3 BBSSte. VQRfLKE 
3 range of maTome 
transports. »-and .frwrr E ipopt,. 
AfrtC 8. _are£ ;Amanci ccrnp'k}«ng 

.cwwantbrttJi mnSwased -a no 

reefer eargDS&ndtemcafe and dry 
w KquH ou9< lansporodonL 


PQfTTLINE % a are* carnsar-v. 1- 
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THETIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 



SPECTRUM 


IS 


glJgWTi 




commuter service is 



•V • /•: • 

' i: V 



shake-up under the 


much-travelled eyes of 


its new chief 


W hen Chris Green took 
over as head of British 
Rail's London commuter 
services, he set himself 
the task of discovering the problems at 
first hand. By June he plans to have 
travelled on every line under his 
control giving him, he claims, an 
unrivalled knowledge of the network. 

Before his arival in London early 
this year, Green had earned a reputa- 
tion as something of a miracle worker 
for the way he transformed BR's 
Scottish Region and put new fire into 
the beans of its staff. He hopes his 
travels throughout his network will be 
the first step to another transforma- 
tion. It is a major task in a region 
which embraces lines to points as far 
away as King's Lynn. Ramsgate, 
Weymouth, Newbury, and Northamp- 
ton — a total of 2,350 miles. 

He has been working his way 
through the region, travelling on a 
differem line each week. His secretary 
books him a room at a hotel — this 
week, apan from a couple of unavoid- 
able nights in London, it's Tunbridge 
Wells, and next week it will be 
Winchester and Watford — and be 
joins commuters from Monday to 
Thursday, returning home to his 
family at the weekend. 

He recites the statistics ofhis empire 
with obvious satisfaction: “We have 
6,700 coaches, 930 stations and 41 ,000 
staff, every week we run 50,400 trains 
carrying eight million 'passengers; 
every day there are 400,000 passengers 
coming into London during the peak. 
The London and south-east network 
represents almost half BR's passenger 
revenue and two-thirds of all the 
passenger journeys. It generates £600 
million a year of BR's total business of 
£1 billion." 

If Green reveals an extraordinary 
dedication to his job it is because he is 
no ordinary BR executive. Brought up 
among a family of teachers in Rich- 
mond. Surrey, he enjoyed an early 
taste of commuting by travelling every 
day to St Paul's School. He thinks be 
might have bad a train set as a child, 
■but had no desire to be an engine 
driver. 

He studied modem history at Oriel 
College. Oxford, and when he graduat- 
ed in 1965 briefly considered a career 
in the Ministry of Transport. Instead, 
he opted for management training at 
British Railways, which at the time 
was reeling under the Beeching axe 
and hardly seemed to offer a bright lad 
much of a future. “I saw the positive 
things that Beeching was doing; I think 






V t; ■■■ 



If rumoured changes in the 
laws concerning the alloca- 
tion of radio frequencies for 
West End stage shows were to 
go through. Chess, due to 
open next Wednesday at the 
Prince Edward theatre, would 
not be in production. And six 
hugely successful musicals 
would have to come aft at 
least temporarily. Some 
could be adapted^ but only. 


say die experts, at great cost 
in terms of sound and move- 
ment; others would probably 
be beyond, salvation. - 
: A few weeks ago such 
legislation seemed to be the 
likely outcome pf-a govern- 
ment inquiry . now .looking 
into the allocation of radio 
waveband frequencies. Now; 
however, these aze signs that 
strong ■ protests may have 
brought about a change of 
heart 

A very small object is ai the 
heart of this potentially very 
large problem . It is the radio 
microphone. ’ 

It consists of a transmitter 
die size of a cigarette packet, 
and a minute microphone 
worn cither on the head or 
chest. Because there are no 
wires or cables, "composers: 
and choreographers are now 
able to write and design 
musicals in a way that they 
have never done before, and 
performers can spin, leap, 
dance and move to places on 
the stage with a freedom 
previously inconceivable. 

In setting the poems of 
TiLEliot to music orches- 


He's getting there: Chris Green takes a breather from his train-bopping marathon 


the nation got over-emotional at that 
time", he says. 

He was attracted to railways not so 
much by the roar of the loco shed or 
the smell of steam, but by "the sheer 
logistics of running trains and organiz- 
ing people - that's the fascination". 

After rising rapidly through the 
ranks, his flair for organization and 
motivation has landed him with what 
many would describe as the toughest 
job in British RaiL “We have half BR's 
passenger business so it's tough by 
definition. We certainly have the most 
demanding passengers in our sector — 
travelling with us every day on split- 
second timings. They know the system 
as well as we do and are quick to 
criticize. But I like to crack problems." 


T he thing that has struck him 
most forcibly about his trav- 
els on the commuter services 
has been the cynicism of 
passengers, the "them and us" attitude 
towards British RaiL More positively, 
he says he has been impressed by the 
strength and the humour of the staff 
“There's a lot of talent to be built on, 
and I think what they're looking for is 
a more cheerful, more colourful 
railway, and an amnesty in which the 
public doesn't go on nagging at them 
for things that aren't their fault” 

His immediate reaction has been to 
launch Operation Pride, the first 
coordinated drive to improve the 


quality of service covering the newly- 
constituted London commuter region. 
It is a three-stage plan which, be says, 
will radically improve the London and 
south-east rail network and "take it 
into the first division ofEuropean rail- 
ways". 

"The first priority is to restore the 
quality of service standards. Our 
efforts to reduce the government 
subsidy, which has fallen quite dra- 
matically by £100 million in the past 
three years, have not been achieved 
without pain, and I think what you’re 
seeing now is some ragged edges of 
quality, which is what we’re 
attacking.” The first stage of the 
campaign aims to ensure that the drive 
- to reduce the subsidy does not result in 
more cancellations or cutbacks in 
cleaning or punctuality. 

Analysis has shown that problems 
of cancellation and punctuality are 
confined to 20 per oent of the network. 
Perhaps the worst offender has been 
the Victoria to Brighton line, which 
has difficulties with modern si gnalling 
equipment He also believes there are 
"far too many cancellations” on the 
Fenchurch Street to Southend line and 
on the Liverpool Street to Shenfidd 
and Colchester routes — people have a 
right to expect better, he says. Task 
forces have been detailed to solve 
these problems and already he says 
that the number of cancellations is 
falling and punctuality is improving. 


The second stage of Operation Pride 
has been the decision to recruit 1,700 
new staff — carriage cleaners, booking 
clerks, train crews and staff for the 
telephone inquiry bureaux. Twenty- 
six mobile gangs will be set up to give 
stations a clean-up every three 
months. Lighting at stations is being 
improved to make passengers, particu- 
larly women, feel safer at night. 


Thfe radio mike 
has transformed 
the choreography 
of the modem 
musicaL But • 
interference waits 
in the wings 



Chess stas; Efaune Paige 


tested for five electronic syn- 
thesizers and performed loan 
audience sitting round 270 
degrees of a circular s age. 
Cats makes uso of 12 radio 
mikes. Starftghi Express has 
2L Chess will nse 17. . 

. Not rally do audiences love 
it, they, have also crane to 
expect iL “Ever move perfect 
sound in hi-fis and compact 
discs at home wwanw that 
people are used to high 
quality, .sound”, explains 
Nick Alton, associate produc- 


MUSIC AND MOVEMENT 


cr zo Cameron Mackintosh 
for Cats and tea Mistrobies. 
**Why come to the theatre if 
it's so much better sc home?” 

The threat to aH this stems 
: front the dux &oo of the 
Deportment of Trade and 
Industry to cease 405-fcne 
Mack and white broadcasting 
and . to set: up an inquiry A 
to. reappraise the 
entire ose of the spectrum. 

From their birth in the 
early 1970s, and particularly 
after Cots made it all look so 
exciting, the radio mikes 
have behi coexisting peace- 
fully, iq an amicable free-for- 
all, with other users of the 
lame brad — namely the 
broadcasting semes. When 
friction seem ed likely, techni- 
cians met first to decide 
betw e en themselves who 
murid use what. 

in preparation far the nfght 
when the Queen attended a 
preview of Sioriight Express, 
long discussions were hdd^ 
between sound engineers and* 
life BBC and IBA. There was 
no iateriaznee. with the 
sound. Two nights later, as if 
to prove how dicey the 
system can be, the press office 
forgot to fell ibc Stariighl 
Express sound tewnthat the 
BBC was anting again: the 
fesafrwasraaybem^tifelnter- 
feresce being so bad that the 
principal singers were 
inaudible. 

When fife decision was 
made to re-examine the allo- 
cation of the frequencies, 
fes&cstab&shed user* Iflce foe 
emer gency services ami 
broadcasters simply pul in a, 

fkwrr awm l w m f S/ tiia f ! h i ~ In n ' ti a ti w w 


H is strategy’s final part in- 
volves the selling and mar- 
keting of London’s 
commuter rail network. 
That includes cheap fares aimed at 
attracting people on to under-used off- 
peak services and attractive deals for 
people travelling to London for a night 
out. Eteiiiaps the boldest move will be 
a complete change of image. The drab 
train colour scheme, which has pre- 
vailed since 1964, w31 be replaced by 
bold colours. 

"The bright colours will be a signal 
to people that things are changing. We 
want to show that we’re not tradition- 
alists, we’re out in the market looking 
for business. Tire new image and 
bright colours will invite people to 
come and try the service. I guarantee' 
that by September everybody will 
havequite a dear idea about what the 
London and south-east network is all 
about.” _ 

Frank Barrett 

gnu** u w pn n im. ires 


It is wot so modi that Chess 
would suffer if radio micro- 
phones did not oast in its 
present form, it wouldn't be 
there at afi. 

For tills rock-and-roll me- 
tical, with its 37 characters 
sharing Z6 radio micro- 
phones, has choreography 
which depends- on unham- 
pered movement, loud sound, 
and yet at the same time 
extreme clarity for voices, so 
that tire lead singers can get 
across foe story in their 
songs. None of tins would be 
conceivable if they were har- 
nessed to hand microphones 
and the cables that go with 
than. 

Jesus Christ Superstar, 
comparable hi kind, did have 
to rdy on hand microphones: 
nrnnrtw were devoted to work- 
ing out how 26 singers could 
move about, attached to thefr 
leads, without muddle. The 
result? One chorus stayed to 
tire rigkt of tire stage, the 
other to . the left; only the 
principal singers moved more 


or less at will, but stffl they 
had to tfifif in the - middle. 
Today’s hMjw igr — thcT 
ability to jump, twist, tans 
against loud sound and yet 
stiffbe heard — Is what is 


One scare from Chess dem- 
onstrates the 'difference tire 
radio microphone can make. 
The American dess player is 
giving a press conference. He 

struts, sits down, leaps to hit 
feet, and circles the stage, 
wiute reporters and television 
crews fire off questions as 
they, too, jump and duster 
around him. The words are aH 
in a song, to heavy accompa- 
nftnent. The chess, player 
becomes fr ac tio us ; a. brawl 
beaks out 

Without foe radio Bribe 
only the star, holding rhod 
microphone, could move. The 
reporters would have to sit, 
The brawl would take place - 
without song - or ebe the 
sung words would be indeci- 
pherable behind the load 
mnsic and general xrnnpas. ■ 


their applications for the bits 
best stated to their needs. 
And, it seems, a finfe more. 

For whe n those not already 
rec ognize d were allowed in 
they found themselves "left 
wifothe scraps-, ip the words 
of Andrew Broca of Auio- 
ggapfe, . sound engineer or 
designet on 13 of the current 
or forthcoming musicals. The 
scraps mate bets efthe fre- 
quency so ffi-sttited w radio 
microphones that they would 
not be worth using. 

What enraged him, and the 
musical lobby that rapidly 
. befit .tap to fight .the threat- 
ened legislation, was that he 
.vim unofficially told that 
those who mete to get the 
band he wanted — people 
ca&cenred with animal track- 
ing and cordkss telephones— 
were of “serious industrial 
importance”, while musicals 
were "only amusement". 

The radio microphones are 
crucial, , according to Nick 
ABott. Take them awhy “and 
why bother to spend £18.50 
on a seat?", he says. 


CaroU oe Moorehead 



Beware the loan arranger 


O 













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No one can doubt that the 
days of mortgage shortages are 
gone — probably for good. In 
the past few months an in- 
creasing number of financial 
institutions have begun posh- 
ing an unprecedented 
amount of money at home- 
buyers. 

The frenetic competition 
has led to more generous 
lending terms, lower interest 
rates and special offers of all 
sorts. The Midland Bank is 
giving subsidies, on survey and 
legal fees to people who switch 
their home loan from another 
lender. The Trustee Savings 
Bank is offering, free house 
contents insurance to tempt 
new borrowers, and Lloyds 
Bank has. even established its 
Black Horse estate agency 
chain to 'provide a complete 
property-buying package. 

A few months ago hawk* 
generally lent only up to 80 to 
85 per cent of. a property’s 
value. TheyarenowwiUingto 
go to 90 and even 95 per cent 
In short, the mortgage market 
has become a bonanza for 
borrowers —so much so that 
Roy Cox, chairman of the 
Building Societies Associa- 
tion, felt obliged this week to 
warn bis members against 
"reJaxing.lending standards in 
Older to obtain an adequate 
volume of business" In other 
words do not lend to those 


As the boom in mortgage lending continues, 
there arc fears that home-buyers may 
be borrowing themselves into bankruptcy 



§&• 


T 


who cannot afford the 
repayments. 

How did the boom dome 
about? In essence, it, is the 
result of basic alterations in 
financial markets and in the 
priorities hanks and others 
have set themselves. 

Until the end of foe 1970s 
the budding societies had over 


90 per cent of die mortgage 
market, mainly because no 
other institutions took an 
interest In 1979, however, the 
big clearing hanks realized 
that much of theirinteroation- 
al lending, particularly to Lat- 



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ACROSS 

1 Galapagos lizard (6) 
5 Gregarious (6) 

8 Vishnu consort (3) . 

9 Ruffle (6) 

10 Skivvy (6) 

11 Covered walk (4) 

12 Not Hack piebald (8) 
14 Items (6) . 

17 Sut»g smefl<6) 

19 Polynesian skirt (8) . 
22 Greasy (4) 

24 Gross overcharge 

CU) 

25 Show dearly (fi) 

36 Sk*<3) 

27. Grammar (6) 

28 Annual (6) 


a mmwmm amaumml 


0 JHrJHJM JBJI 


!>■ ratal tl A. UMi Ora* PU; 


DOWN 

2 Four penny coin <5) 

3 Choose to refrain (7) 

4 Germfree state (7) 13 Oevwness(3} 

5 EdgaalontfSl . is Ponderously (7) 

6 Bread flake (3) 16 Girl (3] 

7 Heavenly (7)- 17 Attractive (7) 


18 Bizarre coJkction ( 7 ) 
20 . Take over (S) ... 

21 Join on (5) . 

23 Nearby (3) 


LASKYS HAVE A NATIONWIDE NETWORK OF STORES 


SOLUTION TO NO 945 

ACROSS: 8 Demonsaation 9 Old lO^pegjous II Theft 13 Pat- 
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DOWN: lAdnnt 2 Smutke 3 Undertow 4 Sir up 5 Gang 6 Pi- 
lose 7 Unison 12 Hue ldTurnfoic IS Rye ldHumana. I7As- v 
uxe '18 Yeoman 20 Chany 21 Reduce 23 Oboe - ' 


■ in America, ' was going 
seriously wrong. They also 
noted that -foe UK home loan 
market offered higher returns 
than almost any other kind of 

lending 

From the start the banks, 
were aggressively innovative. 
In general they offered the 
same interest rates to borrow- 
ers of large amounts .as to 
smaller borrowers, undermin- 
ing the building societies' 
commercially indefensible 
practice of charging more' to 
bigger borrowers. By 1981, 
they had picked up more rhaq 
20 per cent of the mortgage 
market 

But the enthusiasm of -the 
borrowing public took the 
banks by surprise. They lent 
more than expected and had 
to withdraw to catch their 
ftroath. By .1984 they had 
, adopted a more systematic 
approach. 

They had also noticed that 
home loans produced aH sorts 

of profitable spin-off business, 
such as life and . property 
insurance, and helped to con- 
soudate their hold oyer their 
clients. “It was an important 
to providing a full range 
of fi n a n cial services to our 
customers”, says Peter Sey- 
mour of National Westmin- 
ster, the largest mortgage 
lender among the banks. 

.Foreign tankk, nota bly 
ftp™ Japan, France ami West 
Germany, have also been 
attracted by the high returns. 
Lacki^ a retail branch net- 
work they have elbowed in 
thrwgh i syndteated loans ar- 

■ rang™ by institutions such as • 
the ftu* of Scotland, wUteft 


. then lends money to home- 4 
buyers. 

Even more noticeable are 
US and Canadian leaders such 
as Citibank, Chemical Bank, 

, Salomon Brothers, and Cana- 
dian Imperial Batik of Com- 
merce. Their motives are 
mixed. High returns are again 
the main incentive, but Citi- 
bank is also keen to establish a 
retail banking presence in 
Britain and sees mortgages as, 
oneway in. 

Whether this bonanza will 
last forever is another ques- 
tion. The fierce competition 
over the past year has already 
cut down significantly the 
amount of profit which tend- 
ers can make on the business. . 
Mark Boteat, deputy secretary V 
general of the ESA, says: 

Profits have already sunk as 
low as they can go without 
lenders actually losing money 
-on mortgage business." - 
Tire effect of this could be to 
.reverse the influx of . new 
lenders. "Ifinterest rates con- 
; tinue to fall, maiding ft even 
harder to make profits, many 
lenders will withdraw", says 
: John Bayiiss, the general man- 
ager of Abbey National. 

Lower profits are unlikely to 
deter- the clearing Han Ira, 
though, Mortgages have be- 
come an integral part of their 
ordinary business and to pun 
out of foe market would be z0 
blow to . their customer 
relations. 


In foe meantime, is this 
orgy offending renting us into 
a nation of bankrupts? The 
British have always been more 
conscientious than . most 
.about repaying home loans, 
but foe number of houses 
repossessed more than 
doubled in the past two years 
— from about 0.12 per cent to 
0.25 per cent of all home 
loans. Last year 17,000 fern- 
uies-and individuals lost their 
homes. The number of repay- 
ments in arrears »i»> 

■ “We are worried that people 0 
ar * bemg encouraged to buy 
without befog told about foe 
tuU costs”, says Betty Thomas, 
chief research officer for the 
National Consumer Councfl. 
“The problem is compounded 
by home-ownership being 
pushed down foe income 
sole, helped by foe.otistence m 
of special offers. It is often 
council house buyers who are 
worst affected." 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Corespondent 


1i 1 - 

£%'i - ■ 



m ‘ S' . 


:• • > > 


^ K 

* it ’k*. 


















FRIDAY PAGE 



-Jjg gg young men will venture out in 
- ^bgelchairs next week on a journey 
Jro m John o’Groats to Land’s End 
_Thgy will raise funds for research 

may allow them one flay to 

again. Libby Purves reports 





...» 




. i 

firs 






0 


for the 


big push 



Healthier care 
on the cards 


a 


When you are dealing with 
paraplegics or quadriplegics 
the one possibility you never 
mention is that they might 
walk again. You talk of better 
wheelchairs and specially 
adapted can, of useful lives 

r t by other paraplegics, of 
inspiration of the Stoke 
Mandeville Olympics, of a 
thousand compensations and 
fulfilments. But you don't 
suggest that once the spine has 
been severed — whether high 
or tow — its owner is going to 
get better. 

For as long as anyone can 
remember, that has been re< 
ceived wisdom among those 
who work in the field. As one 
experienced doctor said to me: 
“It’s the one thing you must 
get into their heads; that they 


Defiant dare; (from left) Danny Aykroyd, Simon Barnes with Dylan the dog, and Andy Haynes ready for a seven-week trip 


are in that wheelchair for life, 
and must leant to five with it”. 

Nobody, so far, can mend 
the living spine. People who 
are otherwise perfectly healthy 
have to sit in wheelchairs ail 
their lives, and a high -propor- 
tion of them are young: sport- 
ing and motor accidents, 
military and violent incidents, 
have increased the numbers of 
spinal cord injuries in the 
world. Victims come to terms, 
sometimes magnificently, 
with what has happened; but 
they are not encouraged to 
hope. 

Not until now. But next 
Wednesday three young men 
will set out from John 
O'Groais in their wheelchairs, 
malting for Land’s End. The 
thousand-mile journey win 


take seven weeks, and wear 
out a dozen wheels. They have 
ultra-light sports chairs which 
win top 30mph downhill, and 
tough track models for moun- 
tains and rough toads. They 
plan to cover up to 36 miles a 
day. with only one day off a 
week. 

On the way they will stop at 
spinal injury units and be es- 


corted by spinning crowds of 
other wheelchairs: they will 


collect money for the Interna- 
tional Spinal Research Trust 
from sponsorship and sum- 
mer tourists; but above all, the 
three men will be proclaiming 
that they intend, within their 
lifetimes, to make the return 
journey to John o’Gioats on 
foot. “I'd run it, if I could”, 
said Simon Baines. “But I 


A THOUSAND MILES IN A WHEELCHAIR 


Day 


From 


To Daly 


MAY 14 
15 


16 

17 

18 
IS 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 

26 
27 
28. 
29 

- 30 
31 

JUNE 1 
2 


Johno'Qroata 
Lathemn 
Helmsdale 
Golspie 
Artgay 
- Alness 
Inverness 
Aviemora 
DaJwtwmte 


Latfiaran 

Helmsdale 

Golspie 

Ardgay 

Alness 

Inverness 

Aviemora 

Daiwtmirae 



PukJcfay 

Perm 


Kinross 

Edinburgh 


35 

20 

17 

27 
26 
17 
32 

28 
41 
27 
IB 
27 


Total 

mUes 

35 

55 

72 

.99 

125 

142 

174 

200 

241 

268 

286 

313 


3 

4 

5 

6 
7 

a 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

JULY 4 


Mosspsulbm 
* . Rest Day 
Cartfete 
- Shap 
Lancaster 
Blackpool 


: Galashiels 
MpsspauHnn- 
.>• Carlisle 


37 

30 

31 


.'350 
380 , ■ 


Rest! 
Liverpool 
Wrexham 
Oswestry 
Shrewsbury 
West Bromwich 
Worcester 
Malvern 
Cheltenham 
Rest Day 
Oxford 
Newbury 
Rest Day 
■ Salisbury 
Bournemouth 


Step 

Lancaster 

Blackpool 

Southport 

Liverpool 


29 

31 

27 

36 

22 


440 

471 

498 

534 

566 


Wrexham 

Oswestry 
Shrewsbury 
West Bromwich 
Worcester 
Malvern 
Cheltenham 
Oxford 


35 
15 

19 

36 

20 
10 
27 
40 


SSI 

606 

825 

661 

681 

691 

718 

758 


Newbury 


32 

38 


790 

826 



Bournemouth 

Weymouth 

Brtdport 


Exeter 


28 

35 

20 

40 


854 


909 

949 


rTymouui 


25 

39 


974 

1013 


Bodntin 

Summercourt 

Redruth 

London 


Usksard 
Bodmin 
Summercourt 
Redruth 
Land's End 


20 

13 

15 

15 

27 


1033 

1046 

1061 

1076 

1103 



suppose it may be safer to 
walk.” 

It is a wonderful piece of 
bravado: a young men's defi- 
ant dare. Simon is 22, a 
commodity broker, an ex- 
Terrrtorial Red Beret para- 
chutist who fell on an obstacle 
course: Andy Haynes is 21, a 
building labourer who had a 
motorbike accident. Danny 
Aykroyd is 23, a top-grade 
gymnast. When a tyre blew 
out on his car, be emerged 
from the crash unmarked out 
with a spinal lesion. John 
Hick, who is masterminding 
this “Great British Push”, is 
30, another car victim; he was 
a British Army officer. 

In feet, there is a strong 
military atmosphere about the 
whole enterprise, and not only 
because of the tight planning 
and scheduling of the thou- 
sand-mile journey. ft is, after 
all, a soldier’s attitude, when 
in a tight comer, to spot a 
chance and, as John says “go 
for it” with aO his strength. 
The Push team, and Peter 
Ban yard of the ISRT, think 
they have seen a chance: and 
they are not going to let it slip 
for want of money. 


contain all the genetic infor- 
mation necessary to put spinal 
cord lesions together again. 
We have to get that informa- 
tion together. 

“There are two dues; one is 
that if the cord is damaged, it 
does form connectors, using 
cells called astrocytes. They 
can't find new pathways for 
nerve fibres, though. But in 
the nerves of the limbs, fibres 
are capable of growing, and 
restoring function. They use 
cells called Schwann cells. So 
between them, astrocytes and 
Schwann cells can do both 
jobs. If we can use the new 
techniques to make a cell that 
has both gene-expressions, we 
could perhaps restore the lost 
fibre pathways and hence 
normal function.” 


They intend to 
make the return 
journey on foot 


Their chance is Dr Geoffrey 
Raisman, a harassed neurobi- 
ologist who currently spends 
more time on the telephone, 
organizing resources, than in a 
laboratory. He works for the 
Medical Research Council ax 
Mill Hill in London, has put 
together an exceptionally good 
team to work bn spinal cord 
regeneration, and wants a 
million pounds to fund a five- 
year research programme 
leading to clinical develop- 
ment and eventual treatment. 

He explained without hesi- 
tation why he is prepared to 
extend hope so publicly to the 
country’s 50,000 paralysed 
victims of spinal coni injury. 
“Money. We haven’t got the 
money to do this research. We 
have enough to keep the group 
together but we need collabo- 
rators, in the field of genetic 
engineering." 

It is dud infant science, 
genetic engineering, which has 
provided the impetus for the 
breakthrough. “You see, there 
are cells in the body which 


As for the eventual treat- 
ment the closest parallel is 
skin-grafting: cells are taken 
from one part of the patient's 
body, grown (and in this case 
altered by genetic engineer- 
ing), and replaced to help 
another part. ■ 

Dr Raisman wants five 
years to decide whether the 
system is feasible; more time 
thereafter for development 
Despite one large individual 
donation, it is only fund- 
raising which win keep the 
research impetus going for 
that crucial five years; al- 
though one suspects that once 
Dr Raisman's case is proved, 
there would be so much world 
interest that development 
money would be easy to get It 
is. after all, “a cure for the 
whole world, and for all time; 
and it applies to other diseases 
of the central nervous system, 
as well as paraplegia'’. 


Paraplegia, though, is the 
condition most in Dr 
Raisman’s mind. Research, he 
says, advances along a broad 
and dissipated front Some- 
times “you suddenly spot a 


condition which is tantalizing- 
ly close to tbe frontier — so 
you make a special effort to 
push out in that direction”. 
The image of the great push 
recurs. 

Bui what about the charge 
of awakening in tens of thou- 
sands of hitherto resigned 
people a wild hope that they 
might stand and walk again? If 
Dr Raisman was in a wheel- 
chair. how much would he 
dare to hope for himself? “1 
wouldn’t hope at all. Not for 
myself. Let's say the idea 
works, and development 
starts — it’s still got to be 
delivered to all the people.” 

So Danny and Simon and 
Andy will push themselves the 
length of Britain as spring 
turns into early summer, arms 
and shoulders aching, necks 
stiffening from the bobbing 
motion that wheelchair ath- 
letes use to get momentum, 
and heads reeling from what 
Simon most dreads — “the 
business of answering ques- 
tions and smiling all the 
time”. 

They have also, learning 
about tbe research, been tbe 
firsi to lake on the 
unaccustomed burden of half- 
fearful hope. But they are 
philosophical. As Simon says: 
“I was a bit apprehensive at 
firsL They drum it into you 
not to think about a cure. 
When 1 realized what the 
research could mean . . . well, 

1 just had to learn to be 
realistic. What keeps you level 
is that it isn’t just for yourself 
there are the tetra and 
quadriplegics too. And there 
was a three-year-old at Stoke 
Mandevflle when I was there, 
a three-year-old paraplegic. 
That’s a real sickener. We 
aren't the worst off” 

International Spinal Re- 
search Trust, Nicholas House. 
River Front. Enfield. 
Middlesex. 

The Great British Push, c/o 
Welbeck Public Relations. 2 
Ended Street, London H 'CZ 
Donations can be received by 
any branch of Barclays Bank 
.or the Nationwide Building 
Society. 

© TknM Newspapers Ud, 19B8 


Some patients in South Wales 
are to carry special “credit 
cards”. Three thousand peo- 
ple who attend the doctor’s 
surgery at Rhydyfelin, near. 
Pontypridd, are to take pan 
in a Department of Health 
funded study of personal 
computerized records as a 
means of improving patient 
care 

The patients will be asked 
to carry their own computer 
‘smart card" with them 
whenever they attend the 
surgery or visit the local 
pharmacy. Robert Stevens, a 
pharmacist from the Welsh 
National School of Pharma- 
cy. developed the technology 
behind the scheme. Each card 
has a microchip memory 
capable of carrying informa- 
tion on up to 400 medica- 
tions and limited infor- 
mation on the holder's 
medical history. It can be 
read and amended by com- 
puter at either of the 
locations. 

At the surgery, doctors will 
use the card to print prescrip- 
tions and to check what drugs 
the patient is taking. At the 
pharmacy the card will be 
used to check for possible 
adverse (hug interactions, to 
add information on drugs 
dispensed and to print labels. 

Tbe scheme should help to 
rationalize prescribing. If ev- 
eryone in the UK bad a card 
the potential savings for the 
NHS could be enormous. 


( 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


D 


the link between smoking and 
bowel disease is backed by 
Other evidence and must now 
be considered established. 
He is more cautious about the 
link with the Pill but says 
(presumably because of the 
Pill’s known vascular effects) 
it could suggest that Crohn’s 
disease is caused by a vascu- 
lar problem. 


Pillow talk 



Smoker’s chances 



Insomniacs 
who resort to 

might find re- 
lief if they cut 
down on caf- 
feine . ; Most 
commonly found in coffee and 
tea. it also lurks in chocolate, 
sod drinks and painkillers. 
Sleep will not be disturbed if 
caffeine intake is restricted to 
the equivalent of three instant 
cups of coffee after lunch — 
and none after 7pm. 

This tough advice comes 
from Dr Malcolm Bruce, of 
the Institute of Psychiatry in 
London, who admits, howev- 
er, that there is a wide range 
of tolerance to caffeine. His 
recommendation is based on 
a number of factors, including 
the time that the kidneys take 
to clear the body of the drug 
(caffeine stays far longer in 
the bodies of pregnant women 
and those on the Pill, for 
example). 

For the record, one cup of 
instant coffee contains be- 
tween 60 and lOOmg of 


mg . 

caffeine: filtered or percolated 

We' ' 


Smokers may 
run a de- 
creased risk of 
getting ulcer- 
ative colitis 
bat they are 
more likely 
than non-smokers to develop 
Crohn's disease, another 
form of inflamma tory bowel 
disease, according to a major 
study that has jnst been 
published. It also provides 
evidence, though not conclu- 
sive, that there may be an 
association between the con- . „ . t 
traceptive pill and bowel All IT) the bag 
disease. 


coffee has 150mg. while decaf- 
feinated contains just 2-3mg. 
.4 cup of tea will give you 40- 
60mg and hot chocolate or a 
small bar of chocolate con- 
tains 2Smg. Painkillers, ton- 
ics ana some cold 
preparations contain between 
30-SOmg. 


The Oxford Family Plan- 
ning Association contracep- 
tive study has followed over 
17,000 women since it began 
in 1968, and die organizers 
decided to see what their data 
could reveal about bowel 
disease. 

Findings jnst published in 
the British Medical Journal 
show that in any one year 0.17 
per tbonsand women non- 
smokers would get ulcerative 
colitis when they joined the 
study but only 0.11 per 
thousand smokers would. Tbe 
picture was the reverse for 
Crohn’s disease however: the 
incidences were 0.05 per 
thousand women a year in 
non-smokers bat 0.17 per 
thousand women in smokers. 

Women using the Pill were 
more likely to have both 
diseases than those using 
other forms of contraception. 
Incidences for ulcerative coli- 
tis were 026 per thousand 
women a year in users and 
0.11 per thousand in non- 
users. For Crohn’s disease 
the corresponding figures 
were 0.13 and 0.07. 

Professor Martin Vessey, 
coordinator of the study, says 



Anyone who 
has shopped 
in an Ameri- 
can supermar- 
ket will 
probably have 
cursed tbe 
way that they pile groceries 
into strong brown paper bags 
without handles, so that 
goods have to be clutched to 
the chest instead of carried in 
plastic bags that can be held 
three or four at a time. 

But the Americans may be 
doing their backs a good turn, 
according to research by the 
Osteopathic Association of 
Great Britain, reported in last 
week's New Scientist. 

The association carried out 
a simple experiment to find 
out the effect of tbe two 
systems on a group of 24 
volunteers carrying shopping 
weighing a typical 5kg. The 
British way caused greater 
muscular strain, although 
some of the group managed 
to minimize the stress on 
their tower backs by tensing 
their abdominal muscles. 


Olivia Timbs and 
Lorraine Fraser 


SATURDAY 



£20,000 to be won 



Sptondtf cotonm mthtuaun: Oaxaca. Mbboco 


It’s happening in Monterrey 


Mexico can’t help being in the limelight. Financial 
tremors over her international debts were qtrickly 
. followed by a devastating, headline-grabbing 
earthquake, a matter of months before tte anriv^ ofthe 
world’s footballers and their attendant cnens-^™ 
rural Mexico, Alan Franks found 1 towns af splendid 
- colonial architect®*; mndBed by mo ® OT 

Mi Engtamrs World Cap base, is a iMod 
dty setin peacefaJ carntfrysiite sammided by the 
sierra- Next month, it's all happening . . . 


Restoration 
comedy 
Running a 
stately home 


West End 
revisited . 
Tom Hulce, back 
on a London stage 


The old girls’ network 


Businesswomen in 


the US have found 


their own way of 


maJdng contacts 


Can you always get your copy of The Times? 

Dear New**wt,jdea*odefiver /rove aeaeopyonia'Ibnaa 


NAME, 


address. 


L unch hour in Boston, 
Massachusetts, and the 
skyscrapers disgorge 
their load of office workers 
into the midday sun. 

Picking their way across 
dockland debris in their de- 
signer shoes, a group of sleekly 
dressed women home in on a 
mock-up ■ railway carriage 
marked Victoria Station: Pur- 
veyor of Prime Rib and 
Potable Spirits. Inside, they 
dive into the coyly-named 
ladies’ waiting room to touch 
up their image and sales pitch 
before signing up for a busi- 
ness lunch with a difference: 
quiche or chicken teriyaki and 
coffee, with not a gateau or 
potable spirit in sight The 
emphasis is firmly on the 
business — a strictly-regimen- 
ted hour and a quarter of it 
This is the weekly meeting 
of the Leads Club for Success 
Oriented People; one of a 
growing number of exclusive 
clubs designed to help women 
make their own connections 
in a man's world. “Network- 
ing” is tbe name of tbe game — 
old girls' networks, that is. 

Barbara Brown, importer of 
sculptured radiators and co- 
ordinator of tbe Leads Club 
Boston Chanter, takes her 
place at the head of the table 
on the stroke of noon. Intro- 
ductions are made and each of 
tbe dozen or so members and 
their guests gives a 30-second 
selfpromotion. Then it is 
down to the weekly “lead 
exchange” a ritual shuffling of 
pieces of paper bearing names 
and telephone numbers. Every 
week, each member is sup- 
posed to bring at least two 



leading ou Boston netwuckers get down to work 


“leads”, or possible business 
contacts for someone else. 
These are carbon copied and 
filed. 

Three 10-minute talks fol- 
low. Interior designer Barbara 
Goodenoiigh bands round her 
favourite teddy bears for a talk 
on collectables. Marketing 
consultant Carol Masden dis- 
tributes closely-typed “Points 
to PondeT. Her talk is sprin- 
kled with “objectives", “com- 
munications vehicles” and 
“timeframes”. Family coun- 
sellor Cathy Estey describes 
her seminars on such topics as 
“The Moving Experience". 
She also wonders whether 
joining a mailing list service 
would help her “gain 
visibility”. 


exclusive rights in tbeir field, 
and an average increase in 
business of some 16 per cent 

Ali Lassen, who founded 
the first Leads Gub in Orange 
County, California, in 1978 
sees it. simply as a cost- 
effective form of advertising. 

“They know that they spend 
one hour 15 minutes each 
week as an investment”, she 
says. “We figure that each 
person has a lead potential 
value of 250 leads. With a full 
chapter that’s 7,500 leads — 
and that’s t just first 
generation.” 


T hen it's round the table 
for 30-second promo- 
tions again, and tbe 
meeting is closed briskly at 
U5pm. 

The Boston Leads Club is 
one of 114 networking dubs 
across the United Stales, each 
with a dosed membership of 
no more than 30. Most have 
breakfast rather than lunch- 
time meetings; all run to the 
same strictly-regimented 
schedule. Members pay a total 
of $300 For tbe first year (less 
after that), and subscribe to an 
impressive list of conditions. 
In return,- they are promised 


Back at Victoria Station, 
members are divided on the 
benefits. A lawyer specializing 
in pre-nuptial agreements says 
her firm is gening increasingly 
unwilling to pay up each week 
without some more tangible 
result Others — including an 
insurance agent who claims to 
have netted Si, 000-worth of 
business — are happier. 

In feet, men themselves arc 
now casting glances at the 
women's networks as an alter- 
native to the squash-dub 
board meeting ana the bar- 
room business deal. Ali Las- 
sen is developing men-oniy 
Contact dubs - at their own 
request. 


Sally Dugan 


© Wm Ntonaum LM. int 


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10 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Collusion 

course 

South .Africa is more serious than 
it is prepared to admit about the 
attempts by the Commonwealth 
“eminent persons group" to help 
bring about peaceful change. In 
March the seven statesmen who 
comprise the diplomatic task force 
appeared to have to fight tooth 
and nail with the Pretoria authori- 
ties to win a 50-minute private 
visit with the imprisoned black 
nationalist leader Nelson Man- 
dela. Botha's reluctance, I now 
discover, was a front 10 mislead 
his right-wing critics. A month 
before, the group's co-chairman, 
former Nigerian head of state 
Olusegun Obasanjo, was secretly 
allowed to visit Mandela to pre- 
pare the way for the official 
meeting with the eminent persons 
group. If known at the time, the 
collusion of the Botha regime in a 
visit by a statesman representing a 
hostile' black state would have 
caused a storm. As it is, the 
likelihood seems to be that the 
group will be allowed another 
strictly unannounced session with 
Mandela later this month. 

Finesse 

David Owen's Commons motion 
congratulating his local soccer 
team, Plymouth Argyle. on 
promotion to the Second Division 
must have bothered Michael Foot 
The former Labour leader is a 
keen supporter of the dub. But put 
his name to a motion by Owen? 
Fortunatelv. a Cornish Tory MP, 
Robert Hicks, also an Argyle 
.supporter, has come to Foot's 
rescue. Indignant that Owen had 
congratulated a club he seldom 
watches. Hicks yesterday tabled 
an amendment, which Foot has 
signed, echoing the congratula- 
tions. but adding that they look 
forward to welcoming Owen to the 
ground next season. 


BARRY FANTONI 



“Knowing Arthur, he'll claim 
it as a victory' 

Model Manny 

; Portrait painter Waldron West, 
who decided nearly two years ago 
that he wanted Lord Shinwell as a 
: subject, finally got his sitting last 
week - only days before the old 
Labour warhorse was stricken 
with his fatal illness. Although he 
hoped for a second sitting. West 
thinks his sketches will be ade- 
quate for the eventual tribute in 
oils. West says that when they met 
Shinwell was “as bright as a 
button". Shinwell was just old 
enough to be the painter’s father. 
West is 82. Meanwhile, I pass on a 
surprise Shinwell wish: that the 
’ last words of tribute at the Golders 
Green cremation today should be 
uttered by none other than Sir 
John Junor. editor of the arch- 
Tory Sunday Express. “I am 
.staggered," Junor told me. 

Masterstroke 

Sir Hugh Casson. former presi- 
dent of the Royal Academy, was 
so upset at the theft of his eighi- 
year-old yellow Mini (YUV 41T) 
-from outside the Royal Festival 
; Hall on Saturday night that he is 
offering one of his lesser water 
colours as a reward for its re- 
trieval. 

Generosity 

Labour's candidate in Ryedale, 
Shirley Haines, seemed to have 
developed an ambivalent attitude 
to victory. Leaflets carrying the 
-legend “Shirely Haines wants you 
to win this by-election" were 
delivered to homes in the constit- 
uency, including that of Liberal 
candidate Elizabeth Shields. She 
was touched. 

Bumpy rides 

For the third time in recent years 
Mrs Thatcher’s arrival in a coun- 
try has coincided with an earth- 
quake. At midday on Tuesday she 
touched down in Anchorage, 
Alaska, and within hours the 
-nearby Aleutian islands were 
rocked by three quakes causing a 
Pacific tidal wave: The previous 
. occasions: Mexico in 1981 and 
Italy in 1983. Number 10 spokes- 
man Bernard Ingham tells me: “I 
> remember Italy well. The chande- 
liers rattled. In Mexico at dinner 
'with the ambassador we actually 
*feh the earth move." 

Overtaxed 

‘.Talk about being tied up. A 
'■ London accountant, anxious to 
son out a client's urgent tax 
mailers, telephoned Chatham 1 
district to speak to the tax 
inspector. Sorry, said the switch- 
board operator, he is inundated 
with work and a computer system 
is being installed — “He won’t be 
taking any calls until September." 

PHS 


During the last 50 years there has 
been a steady rise in violent crime 
in Britain, with cases of burglary, 
robbery and severe assault now 
commonplace — a trend reflected 
by the official figures, which show 
a seventeen-fold increase in seri- 
ous crimes since 1900. Most of us 

know friends, neighbours or coI-‘ 
leagues who have been burgled, 
mused or assaulted. Even the 
Labour Party now notices that 
something is amiss. 

Some of this rise is no doubt due 
to the increased reporting and 
recording of offences, but the 
genera] pattern cannot be ex- 
plained in these terms. 

Crime in Britain seems to have 
followed a rough U curve over 
time. Britain in 1900 was not only 
a much less violent and dishonest 
society than it is today, but also 
less violent than it had been in the 
middle of the 19th century. For 
the period between, say, 1890 and 
1935, there was very’ little change 
in the crime figures. Short-term 
fluctuations in crime rates can 
often be explained by such factors 
as an increase in the proportion of 
lower-class males aged between 15 
and 25. Unemployment or other 
hardship may well produce more 
crime, but cannot account for the 
long-term trends. In 1900 or 1930 
there was for more poverty, slum 
housing and social inequality than 
today, but there was also for less 
crime. 

This trend applies to many 
other European countries, notably 
Sweden, a country that escaped 
the disruptive effects of war. 


The strange 
death of 
moral England 

by Christie Davies 


Illegitimacy or the misuse of 
drugs and alcohol show a similar 
pattern. What we are witnessing is 
the growth, maturity and strange 
death of respectable England. In 
Victorian and Edwardian Britain 
the state and institutions of society 
saw to it that individuals were 
responsible for their own actions. 

One of the few present-day 
parallels with the Britain of a 
century ago is Switzerland, where 
the intensely local character of 
social organization and the 
people's unshaken belief in an 
ethic of personal responsibility 
have enabled them to survive the 
growth of cities, modern industry 
and the influx of foreign “guest- 
workers'* without incurring dis- 
order. 

In Britain the growth in stale 
power has resulted in large and 
impersonal schools and police 
forces with no moral authority. 
Individuals thus “liberated" from 
the old local social controls are 


now able to evade personal 
responsibility for their actions. 
The significant factor causing the 
rise in crime over the last half 
century, has not been social 
deprivation but the belief that 
crime can be explained, and even 
excused, by deprivation or 
discrimination. 

Some believe that there has 
been no growth in crime and that 
concern fin- personal safety is 
merely panic sustained and cre- 
ated by television and newspapers. 
There are, no doubt, many cases of 
unwarranted panic - over airline 
safety or food additives, for 
example. But fear of crime is based 
on direct experience through 
acquaintance with its victims. 

There is some justification for 
sociologists’ use of the term 
“moral panic" as regards fear of 
rape. Although such data as we 
have indicates that rape is a 
relatively rare crime, with a wide 
range of culpability, ft has now 


(along with racial: attacks) been 
firmly removed from the list of 
dimes that can be the robjertofa 
■ moral panic. Yet feminist rape 
consriousnes&rraisiBg groups have 
done more to make women fearful 
of venturing out alone or at night 
than all the lurid. horror stories of 

the press, because- they can use and 
manipulate the for greater power 
of small groups and personal 
contact. 

The concept of -mass panic is 
frequently .used to undermine the 
view that crime, has worsened, 
implying that -there is a universal 
and erroneous tendency to believe 
in a moral decline from past 
virtue. Our ancestors' horror at 
the . outrages committed by 
“Mohocks’* or “Sweaters", “Ark 
ruffians" or “Chalkers", “Teds* 
of “Cosh boys" is used in an 
attempt to undermine the experi- 
ence of our own times, that our 
streets and public places are not as 
safe as they should be. What is 
missing is' the general belief that 
violence and brutality is deddmng 
and that everyone is becoming 
more civilized, though from the 
late 1 9th century to the first half of 
the 20th this view was commonly 
held mid expressed by such 
shrewd observers as George Or- 
well or Geoffrey Gorer and even 
by Welsh judges and Scottish 
clergymen. It is significant that we 
can no longer perceive our im- 
mediate past in this optimistic 
way. Jeremiah Kinnock, your time 
has come. 

The author is Professor of Soaai- 
agy at the University of Reading. 




David Watt 


Richard Ford analyses the Protestant-Catholic numbers game 


Mapping out a new 



Belfast 

Nowhere is the population num- 
bers game watched with such 
obsessive interest than in North- 
ern Ireland, with the hope on one 
side of permanent loyalist ascen- 
dancy, on the other its eventual 
overthrow. Many Protestants 
have adopted a “laager" mental- 
ity. convinced that it is only time 
before their majority evaporates. 

While emigration and birth 
rates are scrutinized by academics 
and civil servants — in Belfast, 
London and Dublin — Protestant 
fears are fuelled by more mundane 
observation. The appearance of a- 
Roman Catholic artefact in the 
window of a house is nowadays 
deemed worthy of public com- 
ment by a Unionist politician. 

Thai increased mutual sus- 
picion has produced a a shift of the 
two populations which may not 
have been intended by either side 
but which may have profound 
political implications. Just as the 
province's politicians are talking 
about the possibility of repartition 
being forced on the population by 
a deteriorating situation, research 
has shown that during the 1970s 
the two communities — now es- 
timated at 940,700 Protestants 
and 586,400 Catholics — were 
quietly separating themselves out 
Because the very feci of the 
Union with Great Britain rests on 
the principle of consent, it is 
crucially important to Protestants 
that they remain a majority, but it 
is now clear that they are a 
majority only in an increasingly 
concentrated part of Northern 
Ireland. 

Past projections based on birth 
and death rates between 1961-66 
seemed to suggest the inevitability 
of a Roman Catholic majority 
within the foreseeable future, 
principally because of the dis- 
proportionately larae number of 
Catholics under 15. But a study by 
Dr Paul Compton of Queen's 
University suggests that the 
possibility is receding and would 
come about only if there were an 
unprecedentedly high level of 
Protestant emigration. He points 
to a felling Roman Catholic birth 
rate, down from a 1971' average of 
3.64 children born to married 
women under 60 to 3.24 in 1983, 
with an even greater decrease in 
Belfast. Although the average 
number of children born to non- 
Roman Catholics remained virtu- 
ally unchanged at about 2.3, 
Compton says that if the present 
trend continues there could be an 
equalization of family size 
throughout the province within 25 
years. 


But while Unionists remain 
confident of a majority in any poll 
on a united Ireland in the near 
future, shifts of population and 
uncertainty about what may hap- 
pen in the event of the Anglo-Irish 
agreement failing has raised the 
spectre of redrawing the border —a 
subject on which Mrs Thatcher is 
reported to have asked for a paper 
during her crash course on the 
Irish issue. 

Protestants in predominantly 
Roman Catholic areas bordering 
the Republic fear that Unionist 
politicians in the east of the 
province would be prepared to 
abandon them in the interest of 
holding a smaller but more 
homogeneous Protestant area. 
There is an historical precedent: in 
the early 1900s Unionist strat- 
egists concluded that the present 
six counties were the most of the 
historic province of Ulster they 
could successfully hold for a 
lengthy period and county Cavan, 
Monaghan and Donegal, with 
substantia] Protestant minorities, 
were incorporated in the Irish Free 
State. ' 

In any discussion on repartition 
the River Bann, with a. growing 
Roman Catholic majority to the 
west and the east overwhelmingly 
Protestant, is frequently taken as 
the prospective new border. Al- 
ready the RUC is making long- 
term plans for policing the west on 
assumptions that the population 
may become increasingly hostile. 

A study of the province's 26 
district councils by Compton and 
a colleague, John Power, shows a 
drop from 17 to 15 in the number 
with Protestant majorities and a 


corresponding increase from nine 
to 11 of those with a Roman 
Catholic majority. Although the 
majority/minority position was 
not affected, six local authority 
areas near the border have seen an 
increase in the number of Roman 
Catholics of up to 26 per cent 
while other A*nnminatfo n y re- 
mained static or declined by up to 
6 per cenL 

In four other districts Roman 
Catholic increases range from 4.5 
per cent to 21.5 per cent, while 
increases in other denominations 
were moderate. The population 
dynamics, say Compton and 
Power, has bought a “marked 
increase in the Roman Catholic 
proportion of all these districts, 
which with the exception of 
Armagh and Down, are the Ro- 
man Catholic majority districts 
west of the Bann." The increase in 
the size of the Roman Catholic 
population in areas where they 
were already a majority suggests 
that the eastward drift by Roman 
Catholics into the Protestant 
majority region in the 1950s has 
been reversed. 

In r the years. 1971-1981 the 
Belfast area witnessed a decline in 
Roman Catholics and a rapid 
increase in Protestants; there was a 
dramatic fell in the small number 
of Catholics living in Lame, 
Castlereagh and other Protestant 
areas. Atlhough many of these 
changes are a result of political 
tension and a deeply held belief in 
safety in numbers, there remains a 
substantial Roman Catholic 
population in Belfast of 118,600, 
referred to ominously by one 
loyalist discussing partition with 


MSSMi 



an SDLP politician as “the hos- 
- tages in west Belfast." 

Compton and Power say their 
findings point to “the develop- 
ment of a greater regional segrega- 
tion of Roman Catholics from 
Protestants in Northern Ireland. 
Without exception, districts with 
Roman Catholic majorities be- 
came more Catholic between 
1971-1981. The majority Prot- 
estant region similarly became 
more Protestant although this did 
not apply to all districts. What 
may be termed the ‘Solidly Prot- 
estant Area*, that is districts with 
increasing Protestant majorities, 
has therrfbre been shrinking in 
extent." They add tbat.the emer- 
gence of a process of polarization 
could produce “a de facto 
repartition" of the province. 

But any attempt to redraw the 
border by using the crude line of 
the River Bann, giving predomi- 
nantly Roman Catholic areas west 
of ft to the Republic, would be 
fraught . with danger, leaving 
significant and probably alienated 
minorities oh ‘either side. In -the 
predominantely loyalist east. 
158,000 Roman Catholics would 
be living in Belfast, Moyle and the 
southern area of Down, with 
smaller numbers elsewhere; in the 
west, 90,000 Protestants would 
remain in Armagh, Fermanagh, 
the east bank of Londonderry and 
part of Strabane. 

Even attempts at redrawing the 
border on a smaller scale would be 
difficult, probably involving at- 
tempts at resettlement of rural 
people deeply attached to then- 
land. 

Repartition would be offensive 
to nationalists, anger the Union- 
ists —with their “not an inch” 
mentality — and would encourage 
the terrorists into thinking they 
could drive the British’ from the 
island entirely. 

It is doubtful that a smaller 
province would prove economi- 
cally more viable than the present 
six counties, although it would 
have a shorter border to defend 
and would be culturally more 
homogeneous. 

However, it is unlikely that any 
border change, major or minor, 
could be achieved without vi- 
olence, economic and soda! 
disruption and a significant move- 
ment of population. Neither is it 
certain that it would, resolve the 
present dilemma of two dashing 
identities. 

In foe words of Frank Millar, 
general secretary of the . Official 
Unionist party. “What would 
emerge would be a nasty, reaction- 
ary, and impoverished state". 


Talking to an American friend 
about the Tokyo summit meeting'' 
this week, tasked what he feought 
of Mrs Thatcher's, remarkable 
performance. “I guess the lady 
kind ofwem ape", be replied This 
agreeable - picture of the Prime 
Minister as a sort of Que en Kong 

On ra»mp a g g- no doubt mufoifCS 

the elemental aspects of . her 
behaviour very nicely bin finis to 
take account of ' its. dnrwdly" 
calculated mgredients. . Sir Geof- 
frey Howe pointed to these when, 
he remarked that perhaps . die 
agreement of the summit nations 
on a declaration agains t terrorism 
would make military action less 
necessary in future. 1 

This is not just ratiqnalftgtiop 
after the event. The British delega- 
tion went to Japan wfth.a decided 
view that the top priority wasto 
try, first, to repair some , of the 
damage to the Western affiance , 
caused by the Americsm raid on 
Libya and, secondly, to head off 
an even more d amagi n g rep-- 
etition. This meant findin g a 
formula for concerted action 
strong enough to calm American 
public opinion but not so bellig- 
erent and obsessive about Libya 
that it made European opinion 
more nervous and resent&L ••• 

In the end Mrs Thatcher can 
congratulate herself that she has 

decl a ratio n that strikes about 
right note. It soothingly supports 
tire Americans in -their dentskm 
that so-called “ teiiurist states" (as 
opposed to freelance terrorist 
groups) are the mam problem, and 
promises non-mftitzry measures 
against them that look good and 
strong on paper; at the same time 
il satisfies European sensibilities 
by leaving plenty of scope for 
individual national interpreta- 
tions. 

Admittedly tire summit ver- 
biage contained little on actually 
fighting terro ris m, but summits 
are more to do with political 
public relations than taking sera- ' 
ous decisions. Military, security 
and diplomatic experts can dis- 
cuss, and perhaps even agree 
upon, practical measures; the 
summit provides at least tire 
appearance of political wiH in n 
form dramatic and com 
enough to penetrate tire minds 
ordinary voters. 

For the moment; appea ranc e is 
enough to gjve everyone a breath- 
ing space. Preadent Reagan and 
his advisers can get on with 
protecting their installations and 
their citizens without having to 
test the Europeans' loyalty all the 
time: The European governments, 
can consider what to do about 
terrorism without being distracted 
by constant accusations of being - 
American puppets. So for so good. 
The processes of damage limita- 
tion me in train' and tire memo- 
rable spectacle of Mrs Thatcher 
dronming her chest and throwing 
grown men and women about like 
toys has contributed to them. Let 
nobody imagine, however, that we 
are o ut of tire jungle. 

Consider tire debit and credit 
balance of the affair from the point 
of view of the British government. 


which has probably come off less 
than man. On tire phs .itde 
me popular in tire US 

result of having supported 

Reagan, and foe. Nate aHies. fat 
general are a bit. teas unpopular 
than if Britain had refused to co- 
operate. This popularity is not 
necessarily tang-fasting and is in 
any case difficult to encash (as is 
shown by the lack of progre ss of k 
the hew extradition faiS through 
tire Senate); nevertheless Mrs 
Thatcher has a perirenal KXJ from 
Reagan which should be valid" for 
the two remaining years of his 
office. She has probably earned the 
riglrt not to be asked to authorize a 
second attack on Libya , from 
British territory. 

Another important, and not 
generally noted, phis is tire feet 
that a feed prece d ent has been 
established about tire use of tire 
US air force bases fa- Britain. 
Whitehall was alarmed by tire 
vagueness of the Chorchia-Tru- 
man “•understandings" feat are 
su p posed to cover obis question 
and is now relieved that the 
Americans arc stiff prepar e d to * 
in ter p ret the words “Joint dec- 
ision** as giving Britton a dear 
right of veto, though whether titis 
veto would app^m practice to the 
nuclear bases m aS emergency 
drcumstancesfe another question. 

However, we stiff face a for- 
mjdabfebffl on thedebrtside: 

• We have revived att tire <tid 
European suspicions of befog a 
Trojan horse for the Americans, 
certainly decreasing our effective^ 
nessand authority within the EEC 
for some time. 

• Our pnbfic figures, bufldfogs - 

aad ahemd are now prime targ«j 
for every brand oFArab terrorist, 
irre sp e ctiv e of Gadafffs fete. a 

• However much they are ex- 
honedL Americans wm remain 
unc o nvi n ced that they run little 
risk in spending their money in 
Britain this summer. 

• Anti-Americanism in tibia coun- 
try has reoaved a very unwelcome 
boost. It is for4etebed ts suppose 
tlmtteCon$ervathresaregD(iig.to 
lose the next election on this issue 
but at test Labour will find its 
umZateralist defence , programme 
less of a crippimg disadvantage 
than it would otherwise have 
been, ;- - 

- Even more troubling than any 
of these drawbacks, though, itthe. 
constant threat of tire whole thing 
hap pe ni ng again. If another 
American {jane Were blown up ax 
hijacked in tire next month, who ▼ 
can suppose, even in the post- 
summit donate, Hat', 
could resist pressure for 
attatk on Gadaffi?No doubt next 
time it would be launched from 
the Shah Ftattedaimedattheoil 
installations (rfowibat the Ameri- 
can off /companies., me being 
disengaged) That would avoid 
some of the worst European 
repe rcus s io ns: But any mihtary 
action against Libya; or Syria for 
that matter, is found to reopen 
and widen the political Atlantic 
divide. In the end, the only means 
of preventing this are the eternal 
vigilance and genuine co-opera- 
tion of the technicians. 






r- 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


'•r ■ 


*• « 




have a point 


Violent crime is emerging as one 
of the consequences of China's 
post-Mao economic polices. For 
some Chinese, the temptations 
and strains of the new emphasis 
on money and self-reliance are too 
greaL “There is a conspicuous rise 
in killings and serious injuries 
because ordinary civil disputes are 
becoming more acute," Zheng 
Tian Xiang, president of the 
Supreme Peoples Court, conceded 
in his report to the recently 
concluded National Peoples Con- 
gress. 

Until now the party has 
acknowledged that, inflation, loss 
of foreign exchange, trade im- 
balance and even corruption have 
Increased since the promulgation 
in 1980 of Deng Xiaoping's poli- 
cies advocating individual enter- 
prise. the pursuit of profit and 
wide differentials in wealth. 

But the party denies that there 
is any relationship between certain 
forms of violence and economic 
reform. In January, the magazine 
Outlook criticized foreign journal- 
ists for alleging such a connection, 
and in the same month the 
English-language Beijing Review, 
while admitting that the rise in 
crime coincided with reform, said 
there was no link. 

Increased crime, the magazine 
explained, arose from the linger- 
ing effects of the old society and 
from the “external bourgeois 
ideology" which had seeped into 
China as il opened its doors to 
greater foreign trade. 

The party, however, does not 
believe its own propaganda. The 
Peoples Daily of February l 
examined the increase in the 
number of criminals organized 


Jonathan Mirsky examines a by-prodnet 
of China’s modernization programme 

An open door 
to crime 


into complex family, clan and 
institutional networks which faci- 
litate crime and protect their 
members from prosecution. Legal 
officials, the party paper observed, 
too often failed to prosecute 
because they feared that a crack- 
down would inhibit modern- 
ization. 

Supreme Court president 
Zheng's disclosures of the rise in 
murder and assault during civil 
disputes were buried in the usual 
statistics intended to prove that 
tough official retribution dimin- 
ishes violent crime, or “frightens 
the monkey by killing the 
rooster"- In 198 L Zheng said, the 
crime rate was 8.9 per 10,000. In 
1985 it had dropped to 5.26, 
compared with -10.1/10,000 in 
Japan, and 48/10,000 in the US. 
Serious crimes — murder, rape, ’ 
robbery and gang hooliganism — 
had decreased by 35.9 per cent 
since August 1983, when the anti- 
crime drive began with 30 execu- 
tions before a huge crowd- fo 
Peking's Workers Stadium. Since 
then somewhere between 10- 
20.000 criminals have been shoL 

Such claims are common when- 


ever the executioners of the Min- 
istry of Public Security become 
especially active. In early 1984, 
the vice-president of the Supreme 
Court announced that the serious 
crime rate for 1983 had fallen by 
44.7 percent since the executions 
began. 

During an unprecedented news 
conference in the winter of the 
same year, the Ministry of Public 
Security declared a 36 per cent 
drop for J984, adding that “it is 
good to have some people exe- 
cuted so as to educate others.” In 
the summer of 1985 the Justice 
Ministry also recorded a 36 per 
cent decrease. It appeared that 
Chinese crime was vanishing. 

Behind the statistical four lies a 
grim truth: the new economic 
policies have contributed to social 
unease, instability and violence. 
The party has laid down that 
getting rich fast is good form, and 
that inequalities between rich and 
poor stimulates modernization. In 
this overheated atmosphere fo 
which the state no longer guar- 
antees a livelihood and individ- 
uals must look after their own 
security, high and low level - 


corruption and wheeling and deal- 
ing have become widespread -- 
and are increasingly enforced by 
murder and assault. 

In the countryside, for instance, 
communes have disappeared and 
the family or small co-operative 
must secure its own welfare. 
Traditional 'family and . dan dis- 
putes over land and water are once 
again breaking into local .warfare. 
*3n places where dan power is 
strong . . .social order declines," 
said Chinese. Peasant. News two 
years ago. “Local headmen, replace 
basic level officials, dan mftfadtfiy 
replaces government author- 
ity — and party leadership is 
harmed." Rural violence occursas 
well when poor peasants gripped 
by what the Chinese call “the red- 
eyed disease" — envy — attack 
and occasionally kill neighbours 
who have done well under the new 
policies. 

But one group stands out as 
particularly violent: the urban 
unemployed.- These are usually 
badly educated young men, dis- 
illusioned and . warped by the 
prevailing sleaze and corruption, 
who have turned to murder, rape 
and .armed robbery. The names of . 
this underclass appear on public- 
notices of executions; after they 
are shot , red ticks are scrawled 
across their photographs. They are. 
as much products of the new 
economy as the minister and vice- 
minister of astronautics recently 
apprehended for embezzling $46 
million in foreign exchange: But 
there, is "a diflaencc instead of [< 
bullets in the back of the neck, the 
embezzling ministers received 
only “serious di^pUnaiywarn- 
ings within the party". 


Today’s noise pollution is to- 
morrow's nostalgia. That’s tire 
belief of Maurice Cowley, a sound 
freak who has been collecting 
noises for as long as he can 
remember. I first met him fo 
Oxford Street, where Ire was 
leaning over an evening paper 
seller with a microphone; record- 
ing the paper-seller's distinctive 
cry of “Abbalabbalabaa!" 

“Doesn't sound much like 
‘Standard’, does it?" he said to me. 
^That’s because it’s not. Pve 
recorded this bloke once a year for 
twenty years, so I know that what ■ 
he’s really shouting is ‘Star, News, 
Standard!’, only of course it’s got : 
gradually corrupted over the 
years." 

Maurice is a film round record- 
ist by trade, so his ears are attuned 
to our surroundings much more 
than yours or mine. That’s how he 
can spot the way a sound moves 
from ugliness to sweetness. He 
points out that 40 years ago a 
plane just sounded like a loud 
plane, but now it sounds like a 
nostalgic light, aircraft. Again, fo 
the 1920s and 1930s the biggest 
musical threat to the public ear- 
drum was the round of the 
saxophone. 

. “Remember how writers like 
Aldous Huxley were always going 
on about the braying or the 
moaning of the negro saxo- 
phonists? Nowadays we call them 
jazz classics and pay £10 for a 
scratched 78. Well, my mission is 
to capture on tape now the noises 
that people dislike or take for 
granted, so that they are not lost 
by the time they've 1 been ma rt*- 
obsolete." 

One. of the rounds in his 
collection, for instance, is a thud, 
followed by a groan, followed by a 
cuck. It rounds familiar, but you 
can’t put a name- to ft until he 
explains that it’s a car seat-belt. 

“You pull the seat-belt down to 
fasten it, too quickly, so the inertia 
acts and it jams halfway across 
your chest. You groan. You let it 
out slowly, then pull it across 
slowly until you jam it in the hole. 
Simple, but vital.” 

Cme of thesounds he is proudest 

of capturing js British Rail crock- 
ery, vibrating at high speed. 


“I was sitting .having breakfast 
.on the way to Bristol one day 
. when ! . became aware of this very 


fast clicking noise. It came from 
my cup and saucer. You know 
how it is when the cup is hotqtiite 
centred in the saucer, and the 
speed of the train causes them to 
chatter against each other? Again, 
a basic noise, but youhave to spot 
it first and then get it on tape. 
There's another noise very like il 
Know what itis?” 

Er, no, actually. 

“Bottles on top of a fridge. 
People .leave wine and whisky 
bottles on a fridge, two of them 
touch, and when the fridge comes 
■ on, they main* this highly evoc- 
ative chattering noise, a bit like 
glass monkeys talking. There's 
another -noise which is a bit like 
electronic monkeys chattering, 
and that’s the noise they put- in 
pedestrian crossfogs for blind 
people who can't see the green 
light 

“Of course, blind people are 
very sensitive to round. It was a 
Mind friend who first alerted me 
to the round of tissue boxes. You 
know those perforated tops to 
tissue boxes? Well, when you're 
t e aring them off, you can actually 
hear the difference fo sound as you 
stop tearing the perforation -and 
sfart tearing the box itself, because 
the tops never come awaycleanly. 
It goes from a fast clicking to the 
sound of rhubarb tearing." ’ .■ 

Other . rounds in Maurice's 
collection are the slapping of 
shrouds again** aluminium yacht 
masts, _ the musical " tinkle of 
scaffolding being dismanti^n the 
sligh tly off-station radios pre- 
ferred by scaffolding workers, the 
unearthly “boring” noise which 
precedes air traffic announce- . 
rneius, the whirring noise with 
which car park tickets ..are dis- 
S^ged, tire singing of tyres on. the 
aevem Bridge, a burglar alarm two 
sfreets away, and the dying bcll- 
uxe noises made by some car-tyre 
compressed air machines — Slot 
unlike the hell noise of old-style 
Mai^can railway crossings”, rays 

_^Yhen I last saw Maurice he was 
recording a car. More precisely, he 
was recording fee high-pitched 
yiuenu ng noise made by wind- 
screen wipers left going after the 
™ has stopped railing. To me it 
kuVto^Maujice ft is a 
!™ of poetry. But then Maurice, 
in fos own way, fo a kind of poet 






l 







Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone 01-481 4100 




, >£« 
- . ^ 


• 


*?£ h ° ld ourselves respon-. 
001 Lord Derby or the 

■ rN House of Lords, but to the 

ej* «f bSSwu *? £ 

a 5? I ? cy fitaes s of that 

■ :C'=& W ^9 h , ** think proper to 

• .* >?!, publish. Whatever we consider 
; -*■■ ,r ?° ** “Uurions to the public 

- V Of. *t is our dirty to 

w thhold; but we ourselves 
.:; “W we public ai laree are 
' ’ 35 good judges on' that 

. " Ppwt zs the leader of the 

J S Opposition—..” So ran a sub- 
: V ! ;i sequently much-quoted Times 
' .%$ k ^ der {rom the middle of the 

nineteenth century. It remains 
' ' : ~'S, ^ basis of our journalistic 

- : ^ ideals. 

■ r 3 5* “According to the un- 
'v 5, doubted privileges of this 

‘ > :' ia £<% House, and for the due protec- 
^ d °n of the public interest, the 

- -7 • Evidence taken by any Select 
- ... , Committee of this House, and 

• • Documents presented to such 

. 1 Committee, and which have 

. ~ not been reported to the 

: . "VJ House, ought not to be pub- 
u- . :> lished by any Member of such 
1 ■ «■*. ■ • Committee, or by any person”. 

^ So ran a rather less often 
. .7^ quoted resolution of the House 
of Commons from a few years 
i ? Jjs. earlier. It re mains the basis of 
^ • i* ■ the decision of the Committee 

..V* 1 :,r St °f Privileges yesterday that 
** The Times be restricted in its . 
access to the House and that a 

• named journalist be sus- 
pended from the par- 
liamentary lobby for six 

./V ; months in pttmshxnent for 
; ‘ xfy publishing a draft report of a 
a Select Committee last Decern- . • 
r » ber. 

At some time in the near 
^ future the whole House will 
- * : have to vote on which of these 

", Irs 5 two venerable precepts can 

. 7 : “ * make the greatest contribution 

" to good government in Britain 

in the last quarter of the 

is.,,. .. twentieth century. Is it the 
1 y ^ ■ freedom of journalists to pub- 
;1 s V y lish frets in the pubh'c interest i 
'■ ^ that have been legally obtained j 
.. " . - in the course of their normal < 
professional life or is it the i 

right of the House to exact J 

■ - - . s t exemplary punishment on a < 

newspaper, a part of whose s 
j business has been to work bard j 

. .*■ with the Select Committees to 1 
■m expose the poor workings of i 
the British administrative ma- c 
,** chine. If the House is wise, it c 

. will reject yesterday’s acfvice v 

i . from its Privileges Committee t 

5 whose report mingles af- t 

• ” fronted pride with calculated r 

. I' unfairness in a way that will c 

damage an important ex peri- i 
ir-v ment in parliamentary scru- t 
tiny far more than it can ever \ 
: ^ lessen the determination of ( 

’■ .*• The Times to publish what will 


PRIDE AND PRIVILEGE 


■. 

■ ■‘•■UiCJ: 


*• best inform- its readers. 

• There willahvaysbc friction 
i between a free press and 
- institutions which want' to 
l control or censor the flow of 
1 news. There is constant, ten- 
sion between the press and the 

7 executive branch of govern- 
». ment in Whitehall. As the 
> Westland affai r showed so 

• dearly, there is similar tension 
between the Select Commit- 
tees and the Civil Service' 
machine. In trying to. prise 
information from the exec- 
utive the press and the House 
of Commons ought to be sHfra. 

The advent m I07D of a new 
generation of investigating 
committees- was widely wel- 
comed, not least by news- 
papers which saw in them 
friends and accomplices. The 
Times appointed a reporter to 
give special full-time coverage 
to the new committees. As a 
result of that editorial de- 
cision, it has published a much 
greater number of stories than 
its competitors concerning 
their work. Amongst them 
have been a number of “leaks’* 
of Select Committee delibera- 
tions and reports. It is the 
publication of these — 
culminating in the revelation 
last December of the Environ- 
ment Committee’s anxieties 
about the safety of the nuclear 
industry — that is now said to 
constitute the “serious con- 
tempt of the House” for which 
we are to be punished. 

Amongst the stated reasons 
■ for the Privilege Committee’s 
decision are the alleged impact 
that the leak had upon the 
subsequent deliberations of 
the Environment Committee, 
on the way that party political 
considerations “which we had 
so far avoided” began to creep 
in after the Times reporUhad 
been published. . 

MPs. in Select Committees 
are supposed to behave in a 
more inquisitorial and less 
overtly political manner than 
they do on the floor of the 
House. Under cover of 
Committee zoom daikness 
some indeed succeed in 
putting facts and fairness be- • 
fore politics and party. Others 
use the daikness for the more 
devious . tricks that 
characterise politicians the 
world over. Leaks rarely occur 
unless someone sees an advan- 
tage in leaking- A. journalist 
cannot give uphisprofessibnal 
opportunity and duty to in- 
form just because the source of 
tile information comes from 
within or around a Select 
Committee. 

And as for the Committee 


MR REAGAN’S PREDICAMENT 


President Reagan returned 
from his modest success at the 
Tokyo summit to a warm 
welcome from his Cabinet and 
a cold reminder from Congress 
that politics continues as nor- 
mal Both tiie Senate and the 
House of Representatives 
have this week rejected a US 
arms sale to Saudi Arabia, 
worth a substantial $354 mil- 
lion, by overwhelming major- 
ities of 73 to 22, and 356 to 62 
respectively. 

Such lopsided figures 
strongly suggest that Mr Rea- 
gan cannot make good on his 
earlier threat to push the sale 
through over Congress’s oppo- 
sition. He needs the support of 
one-third of one House to veto 
the Congressional resolution. 
It is just possible that he might 
win over eight Senators to 
sustain a veto. Given both the 
current lack of sympathy for 
Arab countries among US 
voters and the fact that elec- 
tions are due this year, how- 
ever, it must be considered 
unlikely. Mr Reagan may have 
to accept this defeat. 

That has a number of inter- 
national implications — not 
least that Britain may be able 
to snap up a profitable arms 
contract abandoned by Con- 
gress. it also points up a 
curious paradox of domestic 
American politics: namely. 


vote against military aid) to 
vote for a compromise mea- - 
sure. 

Oklahoma Congressman 
Dave McCurdy has proposed . 
that in the first instance 
humanitarian aid should be 
granted to the Nicaraguan 
rebels, and a decision on 
military aid postponed for 45 
days to enable negotiations to 
proceed. After 45 days, there 
would then be a further 
Congressional vote on the 
matter. The White House 
regards this measure — and it is 
difficult to contest its judge- 
ment — as little more than a 
delaying tactic. It will again 
lobby vigorously against it and 
in favour of unqualified mili- 
tary aid on June 9. Whether 
President Reagan succeeds in 
overriding the Congressional 
veto then will be an important - 
-test of his second term. 

Even if he loses , that vote, 
however, he will Have been 
defeated on what is essentially 
a side-issue of his Presidency — 
something that is noteworthy 
because be regards it as such 
rather than because of its 
intrinsic importance. That is 
not true of - the Congressional 
budget, the reordering of 
which goes to the heart of the 
so-called “Reagan 

revolution”. 


new revenue. They have 
merely announced that they 
will raise $10-12 billion some- 
how. But the political con- 
sequences of this act are likely 
to be considerable. 

. The Democrat-controlled 
House, nervous of being the 
first to propose taxes in an 
election year, will now be able 
to increase .the Senate's tax 
proposal more than somewhat 
and yet claim to the voters that 
it has done no more than 
refine a Republican tax hike. 
As a further result, over the 
next four yearn, there is now 
likely to be a tendency for the 
severe requirements of the 
Gramm-Rudmau budget- 
balancing legislation to be met 
by tax increases rather than by 
cuts in spending, notably 
domestic spending. 

Mr Reagan is often thought 
to be an intransigent figure in 
politics. On a few very care- 
fully selected issues — notably 
the derision to proceed with a 
“Star Wars^ missile defence — 
that reputation has some basis 
in fact In most political 
disputes, however, he acts 
upon the maxim that the US i 
government must be carried 
on. In the process, he fre- 
quently obtai ns more than half 
a loaf His plan for tax reform, 
for instance, only, recently 
regarded as becalmed indefi- 
nitely, has just emerged from 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



member who is a genuine and 
diligent seeker after truth, is he 
really to be deflected from his 
aim by the occasional shaft of 
daylight upon his delibera- 


Relaxing curb 
on dog owners 


Wrangle over a mansion for art 


tions? And if he is so easily 
deflected, is he in the right job? 
The fact that the subject of the 


- report in question was nuclear 
safety is merely an added irony 
m the aftermath of Chernobyl 
The Committees were created 
to counter the growing power 
of Whitehall They have got to 
know their enemy too well 
They, have taken on his ways. 

If Committee deliberations 
satisfy criteria of public in- 
terest, what they do deserves 
reporting, and no attempt to 
censor information about 
them will deter the able re- 
porter. Unless the reporter’s 
editor considers the informa- 
tion unsuitable for publication 
(on grounds of his own percep- 
tion of commercial 
confidentiality, national se- 
curity or whatever) no attempt 
to censor it will succeed. What 
yesterday's adjudication 
against The Times sbowed, 
sadly, was how little MPs 
seemed to grasp that point. 

It is not for reporters or their 
editors to weigh up niceties of 
confidentiality or fair dealings 1 
in Committee rooms: those are 
private tasks for Committee 
chairmen and their members. 
Provided information is got 
cleanly, without bribery or 
subterfuge, it should be open 
to publicity. To punish a 
newspaper or a reporter for 
that is either to mistake the 
nature oftbe press or, worse, to 
make an individual or his 
newspaper the scapegoat for an 
institutional breakdown, for 
the fact that Parliament still 
dwells in a nineteenth century 
procedural world, strong on 
privileges, weak on perfor- 
mance. 

It is argued that, by conven- 
tion, the lobby reporter is a 
“guest” of Parliament That is 
indeed so. But it is a conven- 
tion that has worn thm. 
Journalists are in Parliament 
within a 200 year old tradition 
of reporting the activities bf* 
the legislature to the people. 
They work in corridors and 
behind closed doors. Their 
behaviour as “guests" is not 
that of guests at a Sunday 
lunch party. 

,A suspicion lingers that the 
Committee of Privileges, like 
tile watchdogs of many an 
embarrassed institution, has 
lashed out in anger. Fortu- 
nately there is still time for the 
frill House to take a calmer 
view. 


American politics: namely. And last week the Senate nitely, has just emerged from 

that a uniquely popular Presi- passed by 70 votes to 25 a ' the Senate Finance Committee 

dent finds himself and some of budget resolution of over one with a top tax rate of 27 per 

his most important policies trillion dollars that ignored Mr cent - almost one third of its 

continually stymied by what Reagan’s initial budget pro- level when Mr Reagan came 

• irt effect a Congressional posal and indeed reversed into office and as near to the 

many of its priorities. It con- American conservative dream 

inniher area Where until wined, from the; White House of a “flat tax” as is practicable 

Anotner area oersoective, no significant cuts m the Teal world. 

m^mestic spending: it mo- In dealing with the Senate’s 


r Niraraeua. De- in domestic Spending; it pro-. 

^ 1Cy a ^^lobbKtot posed a defence budget that 
spue a m^r lobbymg eii J10 bi |ii 0 n from Mr 

by the Reagan’s figure; and it defied 

Reagans thePresident’s oft-repeated 

aid to the Contras rn opposition to. raising taxes by 
narrowly by the lower House t,n I2 hfliion m 


cent — almost one third of its 
level when Mr Reagan came 
into office and as near to the 
American conservative dream 
of a “flat tax” as is practicable 
m the Teal world. 

In dealing with the Senate’s 
budget proposal, however, the 
President now must deride 
whether, it is an issue for 
compromise or for defending 


From Mr David Orem 
Sir. The Government is to dis- 
continue the imposition of the dog 
licence. Its reason for so doing is 
understandable in that it is ex- 
tremely uneconomic io collect and 
subject to large scale evasion. _ 

The obvious answer seems io be 
to increase the licence fee to a 
realistic level to cater for the cost 
of administration and public 
cleaning and to minimise evasion 
by the obligatory display of a 
prominent licence disc on the 
dog’s collar in a similar fashion to 
the vehicle road fend licence. 

Naturally, reduced require- 
ments should be demanded of 


the blind, OAPs etc, but stray or 
unlicensed dogs could be dealt 
with by the financial resources 
available. 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID GREEN, 

' 60 Windmill Road, 

Hampton Hill Middlesex. 

Mayo. 

From Mr Tony Peterkin 
Sir, In general terms I am opposed 
to increases in legislative restric- 
tions on the individual but I am 
also most concerned by reports 
that the Government intends to 
abolish the dog licence. 

I am disabled and operate from 
a wheelchair. Bui when I go out 
alone I use a special hand- 
operated go-karL Once I greatly 
enjoyed the freedom and indepen- 
dence which this gave me, but 
over the years my Hie has been 
made a misery by the dogs which 
roam the streets free and unsuper- 
vised. Indeed, in a civilised soci- 
ety, it is disgraceful that l or 
anyone else, should run a risk of 
encountering loose, snarling dogs 
when going about our lawful 
business in public places. 

To make matters worse, the 
police tell me there is little they 
can do unless I actually get bitten 
— and even then, a) the wound 
must “puncture the flesh”, and b) 
it is up to the victim to prove that 
the dog in question had “fatten or 
attempted to fate someone rise 
previously” 

Yours sincerely, 

TONY PETERKJN, 

129 Manor Road, 

Barton-te-Ctey, Bedfordshire. 

May 5. 


From Mrs Carole Ryley 
Sir, As an avid dog lover I 


Sir, As an avid dog rover I was 
very disappointed at the scrapping 
of the dog licence. 1 cannot see the 
reasoning for this. At present there 
are far too many dogs roaming the 
streets and worthwhile causes 
(such as theRSPCA and Canine 
Defen oe League) are left to dear 
up the abused, discarded and 
unwanted dogs. 

Could not some form of licence 
be given to breeders of pedigree 
dogs and all other dogs (male or 
female) be neutered or spayed? 
This would be one way of keeping 
the dog, population down. If things 
stay as they are we win be 
inundated with unwanted pup- 
pies, ill-treated bitches in pup, not 
to mention the unfortunate dog 
who grows too fag and is aban- 
doned. 

Yours feithfufly, 

CAROLE RYLEY, 

16 Moxon Close, 

Pfaistow, El 3. 

May 6. 


Education challenge 

From the Editor of The Times 
Educational Supplement 
Sir, In attacking the ILEA and the 
dangers of political indoctrination 
in school Roger Sermon (May 6) 
chose to attribute all his pet hates 
to “the para-educational 
establishment” — a figment of his 
imagination whidi managed to 
take in local government, the 
colleges of education and The 
Times Educational Supplement. 

Having set up his tar^t, he then 
smeared all concerned with 
“trendy opinions” and blamed 
them for every current ill from the 
decline of the classics, reductions 
m A-Jevel German and Russian 
teaching, the spread of sociology, 
political indoctrination mas- 
querading as peace studies, and 
development studies, to London's 
anti-racist and anti-sexist pro- 
grammes. 

Fortunately, The TES is on sale 
each week and anyone who is 
tempted to believe it supports the 
things Dr Scruton hates can see 
' from themselves what rubbish this 
is- His rhetoric does, however, 
contain a grain of truth. Political 
indoctrination is wholly repug- 
nant, under the guise of peace 
studies or anything- else, and 
anyone who has evidence to back 
up allegations of scandal should 
produce ft. 

Yours faithfully, 

STUART MACLURE, Editor, 

The Times Educational Supple- 
ment. 

Priory House, 

St John's Lane, ECI. 


fast month. A further vote is 
expected on June 9. But fiat 
has been scheduled by Mr Tip 
O’Neill, the 

House Speaker and Rader of 
the Democrats, m order to 
enable moderate D®n«» 


opposition to raising taxes by . his own vision of proper 
suggesting $10-12 billion in budgetary priorities. Will he 


sew tax revenue for the cotn- 
ing fiscal; year and $40 biflion 

over three years. . . 

The “courage” of the Senate 
in-proposing new faxes in ail 
election year must be heavily 


enable moderate aua iificd by . foe. observation 

(-ho ^ b^edfcr 


iwm, » — wka- tnat uiey nave 

sped&ing • 


impose on a divided admin- 
istration the decision to con- 
tinue opposing any and every 
tax increase? And if be (foes, 
will be be able to sustain that 
derision, over Congressional 
opposition? The final test of 
■the Reagan revolution is about 
tostart • 


Manny for all s easons 

From the Director General of Help 
the- Aged. 

Sir, In the Mermaid Theatre, back 
m September, as Lord Shinwel! 
. was launching bur lifeline scheme 
for isolated, elderly people, he 
hem lo speak to a deaf 90-yearrold 
lady, seated in the front row. 
“Manny”, she exclaimed is sur- 
prise, “are you stD alive?” 

Alas, no longer, but Lord Shin- 
well win remain for us, and all 
who care for old people, the very 
model of zest, optimism and 
involvement in life that should be 
the true inheritance of age. 

In his later years he worked hard 
with us to help the aged. We shall 
miss him sorely. 

JOHN MAYO, Director General 
Help The Aged, 

St James’s Walk, ECI. 

May 8. 


From the Secretary of Save 
Britain's Heritage 
Sir, Mr Fred Koch's aims in 
proposing to turn St John's Lodge, 
Regent's Park into a study centre 
for the art of the 19th century 
(report. May 7) are praiseworthy. 
Though, in contrast to the Soane 
Museum, the house would be only 
rarely open to the public, it would 
provide London with an im- 
portant new amenity. The ques- 
tion is whether this is fair 
recompense for the loss of the 
Victorian interiors and particu- 
larity those created during the 
occupation of the house by the 
third Marquess of Bute. 

What seems extraordinary is 
that Mr Koch's architects have 
failed, or refitted, to see the value 
of these interiors and their rele- 
vance to their client’s intentions. 
Lord Bate was a patron on a scale 
to which Mr Kocfa himself aspires. 
His rooms, fully restored, would 
provide the perfect setting for the 
Koch collection. 

Your, report is somewhat 

mislftading in gti g gpCTfng tha t 

objectors to the present proposals 
are concerned only about minor 
details. You suggest that Bedford 
College did “unspeakable things” 
to the house. Bedford College was 
guilty of the usual alterations 
which institutions make to fine 
buildings but, to its credit, it kept 
St John's Lodge essentially intact. 
It would seem ironic if the house 
were now ruined by a combination 
of philanthropic intentions and 
architectural ineptitude. 

Surely Mr Koch’s own refined 
artistic taste should enable him to 
see the value of what is at risk and 
to instinct his agents to modify 
their proposals. 


enlightened curator with substan- 
tial funds could have established. 


Yours sincerely, 

KEN POWELL. 

Save Britain’s Heritage, 

68 Battersea High Street, SW1 1. 
May 7. 


From Mr Julian Hart noil 
Sir, Your correspondent’s report 
(May 7) of the dispute concerning 
St John's Lodge and its proposed 
use by Mr Frederick Koch as a 
centre for the study of Victorian 
art quotes Mr Gavin Stamp's 
doubts about the quality and 
extent of the collection. 

Having acted for Mr Koch on 


The buying programme continues. 

As the majority of the works 
have been acquired outside this 
country the suggestion that a 
refusal of the plans for St John's 
Lodge would provoke a mass 
application for export licences 
overwhelming the funds of British 
museums is false; so, too, is the 
belief that the late Lord Clark's 
Turner is part of the collection. . 

Westminster Council and En- 
glish Heritage are not facing a rich 
man who wants to get his own way 
with threats of export and plans to 
“gut” the building. They are being 
asked to let Schultz's cloakroom 
be moved, accept the funds 
needed to carry out urgent repairs, 
and allow some adaptations to the 
building. 

An enlightened decision is re- 
quired. In return, London will 
have a major collection which 
reverses the flow of art across the 
Atlantic and which will be of 
lasting benefit to scholars and art 
lovers. This is not “crude bluff and 
blackmail” but an unique 
opportunity. 

Yours faithfully, 

JULIAN HARTNOLL, 

14 Mason’s Yard, 

Duke Street, 

St James's, SW1. 

May 7. 


Learning lessons of Chernobyl 


From Dr R. Russell Jones 
Sir, The conflicting statements 
issued by Government ministers 
on the likely health effects of the 
Chernobyl disaster reveal a basic 
misunderstanding about the ef- 
fects of ionising radiation at low 
levels of exposure. The realisation 
that there is no threshold below 
which radiation is harmless has 
been a fundamental tenet of 
radiobrology for the past 30 years. 
The International Commission 
for Radiological Protection 
(ICRP) accept this, as do the 
National Radiological Protection 
Board in this country. 

The levels recommended by the 
ICRP are not safety levels: they 
are action levels above which the 
risk to the public is deemed 
unacceptable. There is, of oourse, 
considerable debate as to whether 
these levels are set too high. For 
example, the permissible public 
exposure limits around nuclear 
facilities in the UK are 20 times 
higher than those which are 
allowed in Germany, Japan or the 
USA. 

Nevertheless the statements 
made by Kenneth Baker. and 
Mi chad Jopfing demonstrate 
dearly that they do not under- 
stand even the basic principles 
upon whidi these recommenda- 
tions are made. Many readers may 
find that observation even more 
disturbing than the accident itself. 
Yours faithfully, 

ROBIN RUSSELL JONES 
(Chairman, Friends of the Earth 
Pollution Advisory Committee), 
University of London, 

Royal Postgraduate Medical 
School 

Hammersmith Hospital 
Ducane Road, W12L 


From Mr E. G. Ling 
Sir, It is said that electricity 
generated in nuclear power sta- 
tions is cheaper than that gen- 
erated by other means. 

Have we the assurance of the 
estimators that in arriving at this 
conclusion they have taken into 
account the cost of disposal of 
waste, de-commissioning and fi- 
nal decontamination and demo- 
lition? A contingency sum for a 
meltdown should also be in- 
cluded. 

Yours faithfully, 

E G. LING, 

7 Napier Road, 

Redland. 

Bristol Avon. 

May 6. 


From Mr David Black 
Sir, J think I have never en- 
countered the word reassure, and 
its various derivatives, so fre- 
quently as in the past few days in 
discussions of radiation levels 
after the Chernobyl accident 
(Early medical reactions lo Aids 
offered a rather similar picture.) 

When will “experts" realise that 
reassurance has precisely the op- 
posite effect from the one in- 
tended? If 1 am being reassured it 
implies a) that I am being com- 
forted, b) that I am not being given 
the facts. The message is dean I 
am thought to be in need of 
comfort therefore there is some- 
thing to worry about; and the facts 
are either unknown or too awful to 
communicate to me. 

Reassurance increases anxiety. 
Facts allay it or at least allow one 
to make sensible decisions. 

Yours faithfully. 

DAVID BLACK, 

Sa Stock Orchard Crescent N7, 


Proms at the Garden 

From Mr B. J. Dennis- Browne 
Sir, What a splendid event is the 
week of Midland Bank opera 
proms at the Royal Opera House. 
After visits to performances there 
over the last thirty years, and 
having heard opera at most of tiro 
mqjor opera houses around the 
world, I have no doubt m saying 
that at £3 this must be the musical 
bargain of the year - anywhere! 

I heard Tuesday's Tales of 
Hoffmann, my first prom, sitting 
on the floor at the rear of the stalls 
area and the sound of the or- 
chestra under Charles Dutoit that 
evening was of e x tra or dinary clar- 
ity and warmth. Could it be that 


the removal of the stalls seats 
helped to improve the acoustics, 
in which case there seems to be 
only one answer! 

All thanks, therefore, to the 
Midland Bank's initiative and 


ON THIS DAY 


several occasions, I know the 
collection well. It is a scholarly 
collection concerned with many 
aspects of the nineteenth century, 
including literature, theatre and 
architecture; it is not confined to 
English an, nor only to major 
works. 

The nineteenth century 
abounds with unfashionable art- 
ists who occasionally produced 
minor masterpieces and the 
collection is full of these discov- 
eries. Book illustrations by En- 
glish, American and French 
artists, together with the books for 
which they were intended, are a 
major feature. Artists' letters, 
diaries and notebooks are all now 
pan of the collecting policy and 
requests are being received weekly 
for access to this material. A 
further feature of the collection 
relates to architects' drawings. 

This is not a group of flamboy- 
ant pictures bought at high prices 
but rather the kind of collection an 


MAY 9 1850 


generosity. Much though I deplore 
Covent Garden’s stall prices at 


Covent Garden’s stall prices at 
£40, for music-making and 
“theatre” of this calibre L for one, 
shall happily contribute the 
“discount” of £37 arising from the 
bank's subsidy to the Musicians* 
Benevolent Fund. 

Yours faithfully, 

BERNARD J. DENNTS- 
BROWNE, 

Rokeby, Winterbourne Grove, 
Weybridge, Surrey. 

May 1. 


GCSE standards 


From the Secretary to the Joint 
Matriculation Board 
Sir, It is a pity that in her 
admirable summary of the new 
GCSE examination (“Countdown 
to a classroom revolution” April 
25) Lucy Hodges repeats an ill- 
founded myth still cherished by 
educational journalists. 

A glance at the published results 
of any GCE board will show that 
in present examinations can- 
didates are not in practice “allo- 
cated grades according to 
predetermined proportions , as 
stated in the article, or that “about 
10 per cent are awarded a grade A, 
30 per cent a grade B and so on, 
and a cenain proportion have to 
fair. 

To show how far practice 
departs from what were never 
more than broad guidelines on 
standards, may I quote the Joist 
Matriculation Board O-level 
percentage awards in two subjects 
in 1985: 


Chemistry 
Grade A 
154 

Woodwork 
Grade A 
AA 


Grads B 
24.8 


Undassffiad 

15.1 


Grades 

17.2 


Unclassified 

17.6 


From 1623 ert exhibitions were 
noticed in The Times. In the 
second half of the 19th century the 
Royal Academy's annual 
exhibition was often accorded two, 
sometimes three, or even four 
notices ■ The article below was by 
Samuel Phillips , art critic of The 
Times, 1845-54. 


Lucy Hodges is correct in saying 
that m present examinations can- 
didates are lo a large extent ranked 
agamsi each other, but the boards 
are very careful to ensure that the 
grades represent constant stan- 
dards of performance. Variations 
between subjects reflect different 
standards of performance by those 
who take them. 

. The important shift of emphasis 
mthe GCSE will be the attempt to 
define the levels of attainment 
clearly and to provide candidates 
of differing ability with the 
Opportunity to demonstrate pos- 
itive achievement, whatever their 
grade, 

Youre faithfully, 

COUN V1CKERMAK Secretary, 
Joint Matriculation Board, 
Manchester M 15 6EU- 
April 28. 


THE EXHIBITION OF THE 
ROYAL ACADEMY. 
THIRD NOTICE 


... In England more especially 
the tendency and the gifts of our 
leading painters, encouraged by the 
taste of the public, have conduced 
to exuberance of colour and bold' 
ness of effect; and the efforts which 
now remark, founded expressly on. 
the principles of the Tuscan 
schools, have the merit of novelty, 
careful study, and a desire to raise 
the character of the English school, 
for purity and c or rec tn ess. Mr. 
Easdake has undoubtedly contrib- 
uted by the spirit of hia produc- 
tions. and the extent of his 
acquirements in the scientific and 
historical branches of his profes- 
sion, to give this direction to the 
taste of one class of connoisseurs 
and artists in the present day. His 
own works are not free from the 
defects incidental to such a mode of 
treatment. In “The Good 
Samaritan," to which we have 
already adverted (and which has 
been purchased by Prince Albert 
since the private view), the colour- 
ing of the principal figure leaves 
much to be desired; the flesh tints 
are idealized to a monotony of 
carnation; the shadows. inafawH of 
being thrown in with the effect of 
masses, are stippled with infinite 
minuteness; and the general effect 
has an extreme mildness, which 
may heighten the pathetic charac- 
ter of the subject at the expense of 
its reality and force ... 

Perhaps it is in this place that we 
may most fitly advert to the work 
of Mr. Poole. “The Messenger 
announcing to Job the irruption of 
the Sabaeans" (389). but it leads us 
from the purer regions in which we 
have just been treading to a 
convulsive and unnatural style for 
which we can entertain little 
sympathy. The scene depicted is 
the same to which Blake’s powerful 
drawing first gave shape and terror. 
“I alone am escaped to tell thee" is 
the cry of the messenger who 
reaches the tent of the Patriarch— 
everything else is lost. A lurid and 
disastrous glare pervades the tent, 
and falls gfenting on the melan- 
choly group-but the effects of 
shade and colour are violent, and 
the expression of physiognomy in 
the chief actors comparatively 
ineffective. “Solomon Eagle "was a 
more forcible composition— “The 
Inventory of the Convent" a purer 
piece of colour. Mr. Poole has an 
evident proneness to the fantastic 
. treatment of his subjects, bat we 
entreat him to sober down his great 
powers to daylight and reality. 

The same remonstrance may be 
addressed with greater force to Mr. 
Millais and his imitators, who are 
attempting to engraft themselves 
on the wildest and most uncouth 
productions of the early German 
school with a marked affectation of 
indifference to everything we are 
accustomed to seek and to admire. 
Mr. Millais’s principal picture 
(518) is, to speak plainly, revolting. 
The attempt to associate the Holy 
Family with the meanest details of 
a carpenter's shop, with no con- 
ceivable omission of misery, of dirt, 
end even disease, all with 

the same loathsome minnteiH«n. a 
disgusting; and with a surprising 
power of imitation tha picture 
serves to show how far mere 
imagination may fall short by 
dryness and conceit of all dignity 
and truth. The picture of Arid and 
Ferdinand (504), by the same 
artist, is less offensive in point of 
subject and feeling, bat scarcely 
more pardonable in style. We do 
not want to see Ariel and the Bpirits 
of the Enchanted Isle in the 
attitudes and shapes of green 
goblins, or the gallant Ferdinand 
twisted like a posture-master by 
Albert Durar. These are mere 
caprices of genius; but whilst we 
condemn th em as deplorable exam- 
ples of perverted taste, we are not 
insensible to the power they indi- 
cate over some of the most curious 
spells of art. Mr. Hunt’s picture of 
“The Fugitive Druids” (553) has a 
good deal of originality in its 
conception and carefol handling in 
some of the figures, but it aim fay 
the same intolerable pedantry , . . 


Mailed fist 


From Mr Jeffery Bates 
Sir, Contemplating the picture in 
your columns today of the new 
stamps commemorating Domes- 
day Book I wonder if we should 
draw any particular conclusion 
from the fact that the 31p stamp, 
which will mainly be used on 
letters to America, shows a martial 
figure leading his troops we know 
not where. The 17p stamp, for 
home consumption, depicts peas- 
ants toiling on the land. 

Yours faithfiilly, 

JEFFERY BATES, 

29 Brookfield Road, 

Headingley, West Yorkshire. 

May 1. 


A spring bouquet 

From Sir John Curtiss 
Sir, May L through the columns of 
your newspaper, offer my thanks 
and congratulations to the Royal 
Parks Superintendent and all his 
team of gardeners for the magnifi- 
cent display we have been treated 
to this spring. 

Perhaps it is because of the 

unpleasantly long winter we have 
suffered this year, but the spring 
flowers seem more abundant and 
more glorious than ever before. 

Thank you all very much. 

Yours faithfiilly. 

J.B. CURTISS, 

21 Carlisle Mansions, 

Carlisle Place, SW1. 

May 2. 






imi •Jt' 





COURT 

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SOCIAL 


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or telephoned (by tefrphone sute- 
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Amouncemems can be received by 
telephone between 9,00am and 
5-30pm Monday lo Friday, on Satur- 
day between 9,00am and 12 noon. 
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Coral and Social Page announce 
meats can not be aoa 
telep h one- Ewjunirf ta 81- . 

(after lOJOunL or send to: 

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ASH - on April aotti (a Carolyn and 
Ghrtsupher. a son (Andrew Samuel 
Carto n Aflhi a brouter tor John. 

BROMAQE - On 2nd May to Gina and 
Rohm, a daughter Jennifer Elizabeth. 

■HUTTON - to Hugo and taabcOe hi 
Monaco. May 7th a daughter Swfla 
May. 

CODRMflTOM - On May 5 to 
PhOomena (life Toweyj and Edward 
a daughter. Locy Emma, a staler to 
Jessica. Sam and Joseph. 

Ml BOULAY - On 601 May 1986 In 

-. Winchester to Clair uwe Monday) 

- and Mark, a son (Edward Mario- a 
brother for Alexandra. 

H A WES - On May 1st at Queen Char- 
loon HoapttaL to Joami (pie 
Davies) and Bruce, a son. Jack WB- 
U am . a o rothc r for Alice. 

. HAUL* On 6th May at Leeds General 
taferiwi y. to Elaine Cnfe Parker) 
and PMUp. a son. Simon Philip. 

JENKINS - On April 20llt In Sattsbory 
to Bee infe Benldge) and Nicholas, a 
: son Wnilam Henry mchmond. 

LAWS - On May 7th. to Scuta and 

. Fergus, a daughter. 

LOUSE - on 2nd May in Leeds, to Helen 
me* Kmrpeti and HUooo. a kkl Kpr- 
rta Mark. 

■AY - On May 4th to Diana Cnfe 
- Tamp tin) and James, a son Henry 
Jame s Otto, a brother for George- 

■MOUNT - On 90th April to Franca 
tnfe T while) and Gary, a lovely 
daughter. Louisa Frances, a staler for 
~ William and Matthew. 

H rtm AH - On 3rd May at WMpps 

* Cross HosPttaL to Lucy idn Starega) 

- and Raymond, a son. Edward Ray- 
mond Joseph. 


• On 6 (h May at Princess 
w.-’i Mary HospttaL Nrwcasde-upon- 
V. Time, to JuHc and Geoffrey, a 
► daughter. Lotdw Victoria. 

c WKHCA - On May Tib at nr Royal 
vBnksHoiBilBL Reading, to GHstahie 
Orta Semenp) and Kim. a daughter 
Laura Margaret Louise, a sister tor 

^ Seuerine. 

" MYA - On April 27th to Amefta tiife 
Uttle) and Rad), a daughter Arabella 
■ ■■ -• Tanastoa. 


TL BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
v- -.May & The Queen arrived at 

- StoKe-on-Trent Station in the 
?*?.' Royal Train this morning and 

was received by Her Majesty's 
-Lord-Lieutenant for Siaflord- 
> ..shire (Sir Arthur Bryan), the 
. Chairman of Staffordshire 
County Council (Councillor F. 
A. Cholerton) and the Lord 
Mayor of the City of Stoke-on- 
Trent (Councillor J.P. Biririn). 

The Queen drove to the 
National Garden Festival at 
Stoke-on-Trent and was re- 
ceived by the Secretary of State 
for the Environment (the Right 
Hon Kenneth Baker. MP) and 
the Chairman of National Gar- 
den Festival '86 Ltd. {Coun- 
ciUor R. Southern). 

^ .. - Her Majesty declared the 
... National Garden Festival open 
\ and afterwards walked through 
■* the Labyrinth gardens, visited 
- ' the South Cable Car Station, the 
' ' Etruria Pavilion and viewed the 
formal gardens. 

;:*■ The Queen then attended a 
.. Reception in the Wedgwood 
-.Festival Hall and subsequently 
honoured the Chairman and 
■ Board of Directors of NGS '86 
' (Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire) 
Ltd with her presence at 
'' ' luncheon. 

In the afternoon The Queen 
visited the Greenhouse 2000 
. complex and then travelled by 
«• train to Maypole Hill Station, 
where Her Majesty viewed the 
“ Department of the Environ- 
ment exhibit 

- The Queen later opened the 
-- Beth Johnson Housing Assori- 

aiion Sheltered Housing 
Scheme. 

*•-; Her Majesty travelled by Brit- 
n ish Waterways Board narrow 
brat along the Caldon Canal 
and was received upon arrival at 
.-.the Scheme by the Chairman, 
Beth Johnson Housing Assori- 
aiion (Professor M. Harrison) 
and the Director (Mr D. Joy). 

- The Queen visited residents' 
homes and unveiled a 

- : commemorative plaque. 

I The Marchioness of 
■> Abergavenny, Mr Robert 
" Fellowes and Major Hugh Lind- 
: 'say were in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. 
President of The Duke of 
Edinburgh's Commonwealth 
.'.Study Conference, left 
Heathrow Airport. London this 
... ■ evening to visit India, where His 
T Royal Highness will open the 
Sixth Commonwealth Study 
Conference in Bombay. 

I! . - The Duke of Edinburgh will 
r- subsequently visit Australia. 

... . Brigadier Clive Robertson is 
. ~ in attendance. 

~ The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, Chancellor of the 
University of London, this 
' afternoon visited the London 
''School of Economics. Houghton 
Street. WC2 (Director. Dr I. 
Patel). 

r. Her Royal Highness was re- 
"ceived by the Vice-Chancellor of 
the University (the Lord Flow- 
'! ' ers) and the Principal (Mr P. 

• Hdwdl). 

\ - The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 

- -Phillips this evening attended 
* .1 the Annual Dinner of the Chief 
_ (Constables Cub at the Savoy 
■- Hotel. London. WC2. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
.' ceived by the President of the 
Club (Mr Charles Me Lachlan, 


Chief Constable of 
Nottinghamshire). 

Mrs Richard Carew Pole was 
in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
May 8: Queen Elizabeth Tbe 
Queen Mother, accompanied by 
The Princess Margaret. Count- 
ess ofSnowdon. was present this 
evening at a Gala Performance 
of Ballet given in aid of the 
Royal. Ballet Benevolent Fund 
at '(he Royal Opera House. 
Covent Garden. 

The Lady Griralhorpe and Sir 
Alastair Aird were in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
May 8: The Princess Margaret. 
Countess ofSnowdon, as Patron 
of tbe Friends of the Iveagb 
Bequest, Kenwood, was present 
ibis afternoon at a Reception 
held at Kenwood House, Hamp- 
stead Lane. 

Mrs Robin Benson was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
May 8: Tbe Duke of Gloucester 
was present this afternoon at a 
Reception given by the Friends 
of the Iveagh Bequest. Kenwood 
at Kenwood House, Hampstead 
Lane. Later His Royal Highness, 
as Patron of tbe Council for 
Education in World Citizen- 
ship, opened their new Head- 
quarters at Seymour Mews 
House, Seymour Mews, 
London. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
was present this evening at a 
Fashion Show in aid of PHAB 
(Physically Handicapped and 
Abie Bodied) at the May Fair 
Intercontinental Hotel, Berkeley 
Street. London. 

Mrs Euan McCorquodale was 
in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
May 8: The Duke of Kent left 
Heathrow Airport. London this 
evening to visit India where His 
Royal Highness will attend the 
sixth Commonwealth Study 
Conference in Bombay. 

Sir Richard Buckley is in 
attendance. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron 
of the Sunshine Coach Scheme 
of the Variety Club of Great 
Britain, this evening attended a 
gala performance of Chess at the 
Prince Edward Theatre. Old 
Compton Street. London W1. 

Miss Sarah Partridge was in 
attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
May 8: Princess Alexandra, 
President, this afternoon at- 
tended the 212th Annual Gen- 
eral Court of the Royal Humane 
Society and presented the 198S 
Stanhope Gold Medal to Mr 
David M. Garner at 
Haberdashers' Hall, London 
EC2. 

Miss Mona Mitchell was in 
attendance. 

Her Royal Highness, Patron 
of the Guide Dogs for the Blind 
Association, later received the 
Earl of Lanesborougb upon 
retiring as President of the 
Association. 


Mr W. Kay 
and MissHJL Hawkins 
The engagement is announced 
between William, second son of 
the late Mr Wilfred Kay and of 
Mrs Patricia Kay, of Droitwich. 
Wor ce st er shire, and Helena, 
youngest daughter of Sir Hum- 
phrey and Lady Hawkins, of 
DunkekL Johannesburg. 

Mr A.C. Beveridge 
and Miss M.C. Carmichael 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander Craig, son of 
Mr and Mrs LA.. Beveridge, of 
Lartoert, Stirlingshire, and Mary 
Campbell, daughter of the Rev 
W. and Mrs Carmichael, of 
Edinburgh. 

Mr H.V.T. Bland 
and Miss AJ5. Leatkart 
The engagement is announced 
between Hugh, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs H.V. Bland, of 
Manor Farm. Foxbill, 
Wan boro ugh. Wiltshire, and 
Anna, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J.H. Lea than. ofCuflo 
Hill, Hillsborough, co Down. 

Mr RJL Qevety 
and Miss J-B-T. Greeawell 
The engagement is announced 
between Rupert John, elder son 
of Mr and Mis John Clevely, of 
Lattcrs Farmhouse, 

Hilden borough, Kent, and Jo- 
anna Beatrice Tasweli. elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Basil 
Green well, of Tanners, River. 
Petworth, Sussex. 

Mr U. Crawley 
and Miss F Jf . Kirkland 
The engagement is announced 
between Laurence James, elder 
son of Mr and Mrs EJ. Crawley, 
of London SW19. and Frances 
Hilary, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs T. Kirkland, of Bodington 
Hall, Leeds, Yorkshire. 

M FXLRJVL de Hennin 
de Bonssn-WaJcowt 
and Mile LM.MX. HoOesfebz 
duTreox 

The engagement is announced 
between Francois, only son of M 
and Mme Yves-H. de Hennin de 
Boussu-Watooim, of Brussels, 
Belgium, and Isabelle, second 
daughter of M and Mme Pierre 
Hollenfeltz du Treux, of 
KapeUenbos, Belgium. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr M. Delve 
and Miss SjG- lies 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, second son of 
the late Mr Gordon Delve, and 
Mrs Marion Qelve.; of West 
Derby,, and Sandra GaiL eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Ronald 
lies, of Haywards Heath, 

Sussex. 

Mr B.A- Lawrence 
and Miss ZL Young 
The engagement is announced 
between Brett Anthony, son of 
Mrs Jeanne Lawrence, of 
CroxJey Green, and. (he late Mr 
Brian Lawrence, and Karen, 
daughter of Mrs Nancy Young 
and Air Leonard Young, both of 
Redditch, Wonxsiershire. 

MrCJ. Moore 

and Miss MG. Mason Pearson 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher John, eWcr 
son of Mr and Mrs J. Moore, of 
HenfiekL West Sussex, and 
Marie Gabrielle. daughter of Mr _ _ . 

and Mrs E. Mason Pearson of lYiaiTlJiSCS 
lgblham, Kent ° 

Mr AJ. CTMaDey 
and Miss RJVL Wniis 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, eldest son of 
Mr Janies O’Malley and the late 
Mrs Joan O'Malley, of Salford, 
and Rebecca, only daughter of 
Mr David Willis of Thessa- 
loniki. and Mrs Gunilla Willis, 
of Heme Hill, London. 

Mr G.C Theobald 
and Miss EA. Corse 
The engagement is announced 
between George Carmichael, el- 
der son of Mr and Mrs Peter 
Theobald, of GomshaU, Surrey, 
and Elizabeth Ann. elder daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs George Corse, 
of Karen, Nairobi, Kenya. 


J.A. Cooke- 


MrG. Meat 
and Miss 
Yartoroogb 
Tire engagement is announced 
bewteen Giles, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Alan Vicar, of 
Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex, and 

Jane, daughter of Mr and Mis 

Cooke- Yarborough, of 

Longworth. Oxfordshire. 

Mr D.CE. Wilson 
and Miss CS. Heslop 
The engagement is announced 
between. Colin, twin son of Dr 
and Mrs E.M. Wilson, of Esher. 
Surrey, and Caroline, second 
daughter of Mr and Mrs JA-B. 
Hesfop, of Chcam, Surrey. ‘ 
MrMJLWOsM 
and Miss J-S. Whynrent 
Tbe engagement is announced 
netween Hugh, son of Mr and 
Mrs M.D- Wilson, ofYeJvenon, 
Norfolk, and Jane, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs S. Whyment. of 
Farm Street, London. WI. 


Mr N J\ ThompseH 
and Dr AjLB. Giddias 
The engagement is announced 
be t w een Nicholas, only son of 
Mr and Mrs Peter Tbompsell, of 
Coventry, and Amanda, only 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Grey 
Giddins, of Worthing. 

Mr N.V. Todd 
and DrJil Howie 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs N.V. Todd, of 
Lambley, Nottinghamshire, and 
Jane, eldest da ugh to - of Dr and 
Mrs RJK. Howie, of Hamilton. 
Lanarkshire. 


Mr J.C. Goodbody 
and Miss E. Fernandez 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. April 19, at St 
Columba's Church, 

Knightsbridge, of Mr Jonathan 
Goodbody. son of Dr and Mrs 
Richard Goodbody, of Chan- 
dlers Ford. Hampshire, and 
Miss Ernesiina Fernandez, 
daughter of Don- and Doha 
Norbeno Fernandez Macedo. of 
Arselia. Guerrero, Mexico. Tbe 
Rev Dr J. Fraser McLuskey 
officiated. 

A reception was held at 
Qaridge's hotel. 

Mr G. Maitland Smith 
and Mas LE- Whyte 
Tbe marriage took place on 
Saturday. May 3, 1986, in 
London, between Mr Geoffrey 
Maitland Smith, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs Philip J. Maitland 
Smith, and Miss I Enid 
Whyte, second daughter of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald O. 
Whyte and tbe late Mrs Susan 
Whyte. 

Mr D. Morrison 
and Miss AJL Hunt 
The marriage took place on 
1, in London, of Mr Da' 
Morrison, only son of Mrs 
Marie Morrison and the late 
Edward Morrison, and Miss 
Amanda Hunt, eldest daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Bryan Hunt 


Meeting 


Royal Hamane Society 
Princess Alexandra, President of 
the Royal Humane Society, 
presented the 1985 Stanhope 
Gold Medal to Mr David Mi- 
chael Garner yesterday at the 
annual court of tbe society held 
at Haberdashers' HalL The Hon 
Edward BaiHieu. chairman, pre- 
sided and Commandant G. 
Clarice, Home Office Fur Ser- 
vice College, was the guest 
speaker. 


rate tbe sixtieth anniversary of 
the RNC Dartmouth GreynvQe 
Term 1926-1929 joining foe 
Royal Navy as cadets during the 
General Strike. Others present 
were: 

vm-Adnirai sir PMr Onaon. near 
Admiral CRT WUccxi. CssOina G B 
Barstow. E W Briggs and HT Harm, 
commanders D R DufT. D T Mcfiarnei 
tout H A Stuart-Mentetn. Lieutenant- 
Commanders C J Cardew and AL 8 
Hogg and ftfc- J A C o tU M irw Mercer. 


Dinners 


The Independent Broadcasting 
Authority was represented at the 
memorial service for Sir Huw 
Wbeldon held in Westminster 
Abbey on Wednesday by Mr 
John Whitney. Director Gen- 
eral. Mr John Thompson. 
Director of Radio, and Mr 
David Glencross, Director of 
Teievision- 


Lancheon 


University College London 
Sir James Ligh thill, provost, 
presided at a luncheon held 
yesterday at University College 
London in honour of the Prime 
Minister of Sri Lanka and Mme 
Premadasa. Among those 
present were: 

Th* Sri Lankan High Cormntetorer. 
Mr Bradman Wtwrakoon. Mr K H J 
V/Dayadasa. Mr Alandia WOesena. 
Major -Genoa] 1 H Baker. Rofessor P 
T Klra«Ln. Dr Nigel Hints and Mr P 
T w aketey. 

Service luncheon 

RNC Dartmosth Greynrile 
Term 1926-1929 
.Vice-Admiral Sir Richard 
Smeeton presided at a luncheon 
held at tbe Naval and Military 
Club yesterday to commemo- 


Chief Constables’ Onb 
Princess Anne was foe guest of 
honour at foe dnniial dinn er of 
foe Chief Constables' Club held 
last night at the Savoy HoteL 
Tbe Hon Douglas Hurd. MP, 
was also present and Mr C 
McLactilan. Chief Constable of 
Nottinghamshire, presided. 

Parish Clerks' Company 
The Parish Clerics' Company 
held a dinner last night at 
Painter-Stainers' Hall. . The 
speakers were Mr AlH. Green,. 
Master, Mr Ronald Ellen and’ 
Mr John Garnett. 

Association of British Factors ' 
Mr MA Maberiy, Chairman of 
the Association of British Fac- 
tors. was host at the annual 
dinner held last night at 
Fishmongers’ HalL Mr Kenneth 
Clarice, QC MP, Paymaster 
General was the principal gnest 


O 

The Coningsby Club enter- 
tained at dinner last night at the 
Carlton Club Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, QC MP. Mr Jonathan 
Baker was in foe chair. 

Royal College of 
Professor Barbara E 
President of tbe Royal College 
of Pathologists, was host at a 
dinner held at 2, Carlton House 
Terrace last night. Among the 
guests were: 

Processor Str Ttieo Crawford. ProCrv 
sor Sir Joon Dade. Sir Robert 
W attains. Professor J R Anderson, 
profewar R C Curran, professor J E 
Banatiala and Mm a A Prtoaaox. 

Service dinners 

Honourable Artillery Company 
Colonel BA. Kay,, president, 
presided at the annual dinner of 
the Honourable Artillery Com- 
pany Saddle Gob held last night 
at Armoury House. Mr John 
Reid, tbe principal guest, Mr 
Douglas Mann and Mr Jeremy 
Fern also spoke. 

160 Transport Regiment 
RCT (V) 

The Honorary Colonel, Colonel 
R-L. Wallis and the. officers of 
160 Transport Regiment RCT 
(V) held a regimental dinner last 
night at Penhale Camp. Corn- 
wall Major R-M. Wilkinson 
ided and the guest was 
)nd JA. Butler, Colonel of 
Volunteers. 


OBITUARY 

LORD SB 


CSTWELL' 


cause 


ths and In Memoriam 


WHITE - On 10 th April at Park Hostf- 
lal. DavylwOne. to Jane tnfe 
GoHnaiu and David, a son. Alexander 
Janies. 

HUON - on SOi May. at Oiartotte. 
North Carolina, to Joanna (nfe 
Parker) and Jeremy, a son. Michael 
James O'Brien, a brother for Sarah 
and Carolyn. 


MARRIAGES 


DC mrCKObWAYY - on 3rd May to 
Brussels, Johan, eldest son of M. and 
Mvr. Joxef De Rycfcer of Ttanrai 
Belgian, and Vanessa Anne. «dy 
daughter of Mr and Mm Donato WaO 
of Bshopston. Swansea. 

LLEWELLYM-LLOYD 
The marriage took place SattsUay 
May 3rd at St Michael's Church. 
Bray, of Mr Edward John UeweOyn- 
Uoyd. son of Mr and Mrs Tf. 
LieweUyn-Uoyd of Kingston. Surrey 
and Mtss Kathryn Etbabeth 
Westbrook daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Robin wesORdka of Maidenhead. 
Berkshire. 


DEATHS 


JULUM - Dr. Lydia Ida Huber Tor- 
ranee. KXH. M.D- MACLB. 
F.R.CO.G. Hon- F.IXXSl Peacefully 
at Greenwich Hospital an 6 th May 

1986. Wklow of the late MN-Arthor 
1-L- Aden, of Calcutta: daughter at 
the late Dr. David Watt Torrance, 
founder of the Scottish Mission Hos- 
pital. Tiberias. Thanks^vtng service 
at SonfMds Methodist Church. 
Banchory Road. Blackheatti. SEA at 
2JO pm Tuesday 20Ui May. fol- 
lowed by interment at Charlton 
Cemetery at 3.30 pm. and after- 
wards refreshments at Aldington 
House. 107a Blackheatti Path. SE3. 

iraraas^ 1 ^ 8 ChwpelL Tet 

AYRC • On May 6 th peacefully at 
home. Margaret, treasured wife of 
Brtniey. mother of Jennifer. Susan 
and Patience, and Cranny of nine. 
Family and village funeral Twyford. 
Leicestershire. Saturday May 10th at 
12.00 noon. Family flowers only. 
Donations to Save the Children 
Fund. Memorial Service later. Enatd- 
nes and donations to B Cum*. 
Funeral Director. Tilton on the HUL 
Leicestershire Tel: Tilton 233. 

BROWN - On Sunday 4th May. whilst 
ckmMng In the Lake DtttrlcL David 
ChnsOan. aged 26 . Dearly loved son 
of Elizabeth and Peter and brother of 
Ctere and Kase. Farndy bwtd Rich- 
mond. Memorial service to be 
announced a a later date. 


EUy. on 6th May 1986. 
suddenly but peacefully at the 
. NufOeld KospUsi. Woking, widow of 
. Jasper George, modi toyed mother 
of Nicola. Beverley, fata and Carolyn 
and adored Grandma. Funeral at SL 
James's Church. Weybrldge. on 
Monday 12th May at 10 . 30 am. Fam- 
ily flowers only- but donations |f 
desired to Brookiands Housing Soci- 
ety. or The League of Friends of 
Eneamere Hospital, both C.-O 
Chi ay's of Weyoridge. 

CONNOLLY - Suddenly on May 2nd. 
Ffeter of 6 Wheatstone Grove. 
StechfonL Birmingham. Beloved 
husband of Mary- Deeply mourned 
by mother, sisters and relatives 

Da HOCHEnm LABPEKT - On May 

6lh very suddenly at home Stamen 
Douglas John, commander. Royal 
Navy, aged 46 years. The most be- 
los.«d husband of QnalbeUi. loving 
father of benjamin and Jotwn. 
dearest son or Palsy and Die tele 
Douglas, and aroma of Marianne 
and Andrew. Funeral Service at Afl 
Saint# Church. Piddle Trpfrmtde. on 
Monday 12th May at 2.t5nin. Floral 
tributes to Woods at Dorchester. 


ELKMGTON an May 6th 1966 In Ms 
98th year at Newport. Shrops hir e 
George Ernest MC. FRCS. Much 
loved hu s b a n d, father and grandfa- 
ther. Funeral Private- Service of 
thanksgiving fbr his life to be 
nounced later. No flowers please, bat 
do na bons if desired for St Nicholas 
Church Fund. Newport and The 
League of Friends of Newport Cot- 


fiOWRMC - On May 7th John Somer 
vine. Major (retired) M.C. Of 
Braeside. Radley. Abingdon. Oxon. 
peacefully at the age of 90. *We who 
a re lef t grow aid*. 

NMMSON-TOnMa ■ OP the 6th May 
1986. peacefully at home in Untpg. 
North Yorks. Mabel Louisa Maude 
(Mamie) widow of Uie late Amyas 
and dearly loved mother of Dlcfc ami 
Roger. Funeral Service at SL 
Lawrence’s Church. Flawon at 
2-30pni ob Tuesday 13th May tot- 
towed by private inlcnunod at 
Goverhara. 


■ (M May 7th peacefufly in hos- 
pital. after a tong ttuwss. Henry 
James Hamilton, aged 72. of 
Blackmans Cottage. Bodey. Hants. 
Beloved husband of Helen* and most 
Aar father, step-father am grandte- 
»«■. Cremation private, but a 
memorial service wta be held tn Lon- 
don at a later date. 

WNG - Noel of reading Lane. Hayes, 
suddenly on 5th May In hospital. Be- 
loved husband or Monica and dear 
father of Jobn. Frances. Anna. MSk 
ct«* am loving ui -. T n f fjm .gr gt 
Christine. RIP. 

■MCKENZIE DODDS - On May 71b 
1986. tragfcaoy fouowtng a road ac- 
cident in Brighton. Susannah Alison 
Mackenzie Dodds, of High Wyc- 
ombe. aged 19 years. She wtb be 
lovingly r e m embered am sadly 
dimed by her family am mends. Fu- 
neral service at SUBob 
C re mat orium. Amenham. an 
Wednesday May lath at Hun. Flow- 
era am enquires to G. Newm an 4 t 
Son. 3 Trafalgar SL Brighton. <0373 ) 
681822. by 6pm Tuesday. 

MOO PALUCLLO - Lorenzo. Peace- 
fully at the Radcllflie inftrmery on 
May 6Uv aged 78. Beloved husband 
of Magda, father of Ma r gher t ta and 
Roberto. gramftaUier of Susie. Kate 
am Mika. Requiem mass on Monday 
May 12th at 11am la SI Aleyshn 
Chmch. Oxford, followed by b u rial 
41 Woivercote Gementry. Flowers to 
Reeves & Pain. 288 Abingdon Road. 
Oxford. 

KkO-vujum. - cynttua Louise 
tnee Ruse), suddenly on April 30 th 
1986. at The Royal Sussex County 
HoRpttel. The Funeral Service win 
take Mace at Woodvale Crematori- 
um- Lewis Road. Brighton, on Friday 
May PUi. at 4.30 pm. “l-Oie bears au 
things, betievea an Himp. hopes all 
things, endures au things - 

RAMSEY, CSC - R J. on 7th May. 
husband of Artetle - private funeral - 
no flowers please. 

REYHDERS - On Etb May 1986 at Ms 
home after a tang Illness, Dick Chris- 
tian Rcyndeis. beloved disband of 
Evelyn, dearest father of Susie and 
Sally and aster Joan. Funeral ser- 
vice will take place at St Mary's 
Church. BeacoftsfleM. on Monday 
I2ih May al 3.25pm. Flowers may 
be sent ta H.C. Ctlmstead Ltd. Til- 
bury House. Shepherds Lane. 
Beaconsflekf. Bucks, or donations 
Marie Curie Memorial Foundation. 
28 Betgrave Square. London SW1X 
BOG. 

RICHARDSON - On May 6th. Ebba. 
peacefully in Si John's Kwgng 
Homo. Funeral wrvtoe id be held al 
FTam Pa rota Church. FranL Tun- 
bridge Wens, on Tuesday l3Ui May 
al 1 1 00am followed by interment In 
the Churchyard. Any enquiries to 
Ebbutt Funeral Service- 01-688 
6536. 


- On 2m May 1986. Percy 

* Richer, unexpectedly am painlessly 
(as he would have Uked) a bri&lant 
man. who combined dedication with 
humour, shrewdness with generosity 
am warmth with great character. He 
twill be sadly missed by many. Deep- 
ly mourned. WUh love from Julian. 
Lucy, family and mends. 

ROSE - Peacefully on 7m May 1966. 
aged 83 years. Atoert Fettc of 
Cerrards Cross, dearly loved father 
of Peter am a much loved grandfa- 
ther. Funeral Service takes place at 
Barham Cronatoctura. on Wednes- 
day May 14th al 4 pjn. Flowers to 
C.W. Lyons & Son Lid. 70 MUttmy 
Road. Canterbury (463608). 

STANAWAT - On May 6th 1986 In 
hospttaL Ida EJtzabeth aged 83 yearn, 
beloved wife of the late Frederick 
Stanaway and the mother of John. 
Propriator of the Harrow w ebshop 
since 193a will be sadly missed by 
afl family. Harrovians am friends. 
Funeral service at Pinner Hew 
Cementry. Harrow on Friday 9th 
May a( 12 noon. Flowers am en- 
quires to J. A Massey & Sons. 16-18 
Lowlands Road. Harrow. M KM wan c. 
teL 01-422 1688. 

TAYLOR - On Friday 2nd May peara- 
fufly ta hospttaL Alec Mlchaet MBner 
aged 74 years. Bel oved node and 
Godfather to Joanna Hobson am 
Roger Taylor. Requiem service at SI 
Pauls. Kn&itsbridge. waton Place. 
London Swi. Wednesday May 14th 
at Z-Sopm. followed by cremation at 
Putney Vale. Flowers to J H Kenyon 
Ltd. 74 Rochester Row. SWI by 12 
noon. Tel: 01-834 4624. 


Birthdays today 


Mr Alan Bennett, 5% foe 
Rev C.WJ. Bowles, 70, 
David Cuthbertson, 86; Mr 
Terry Downes, 50, the Rev 
Professor GW. Dvcmore, 77; 
Mr Albert Honey, 50, Mr Carlo 
Maria Ghitini, 72; Mr ftnebo 
Gonzales, 58; Dt Douglas 
Guest, 70, Vice-Admiral Sir 
John Hayes, 73; Miss Glenda 
Jackson, 50; Sir Francis Ken- 
nedy. 60, General Sir Peter 
Leng, 61; Lord Justice Uqyti, 
57; Miss Geraldine McEwan, 
54; Sir Philip Mansfield, 60; Sir 
David Plastow, 54; Dr Bernard 
Rose, 70; Mr Patrick Ryecart, 
34; Admiral Sir Victor smith. 


73; Lord Stewart, 63; 
B ar b ara Woodhouse, 76. 


Mrs 


Reception 

Coirocft for E dwcn tion- 
in World Qdzenslu p . 

The Duke of Gloucester, Patron 
of tbe Council for Education in 
World. Citizenship, was the 
guest of hono ur at a reception at 
foe new CEWC headquarters in 
Seymour Mews, London^ last 
night Dr John Rae,- chairman, 
was host 


On May SOi at borne Col 
RonaM Vincent Thompeoa O-BX- 
Deer husband of Marcia am father 
of Richard am John. Service at St 
Mary's Church. Rtverhem at 
2-iSten on May x3th roUow*d by 
private cremahcai service. Family 
flowers only. Donations If desired to 
Hospice al Home, c/o Francis Chap- 
pell A .Son. 3 London 
Sevenoeks. 


- On May 7th 
peacefully at home. Rear Admired 
Anthony Woodtftrid, CB CHE LVO. 
Much loved hisband. father and 
grandfather. Funeral private. 

YOUNG, Mary Newton tnfe Gregg) Ott 
April 27th ta Red Bank. New Jam. 
USA. widow of W. Wallace Young, 
mother of Alison F. Brewster am 
John N.K. Young. Memorial Service 
at SL Barnabas Epwropal Church. 
Upper M ar ttxau. Maryland, on 7th 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


tOWDt A service of thanksgiving lor 
the life of Dents Joseph Cowen will 
be held at St Peter am St PauL Ot 
Bowdeu nr Market Harborough. on 
Monday. May 12th at 3 pm. 

REES - A service of thm a gmng f ta 
tbe life of H.H Ceralnl Rees win be 
held In the Chape) al SI. Davpfi) 
School. Ouuth Road. Ashftrt. Nr. 
Staines. Middx, an Saturday. Slat 
May I986.al 3pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


M A RGIE - aemeno- remembered 
with love on the seventh Mmveraary 
of her death Oeorgs, Anne. JuUel. 

JOHNSTON - Tbe Thanktttvteg Scr- 
vke tor the Hto of Sir Charted 
Johnston GCMC will beta the Crypt 
Chape) of SL Paul's Cathedra) on 
Thursday June 12m al noon. 


St Anne’s School, 
Windermere 

Members of foeSianniteAssod- 
ation of St Anne's School, 
Windermere, are reminded that 
the triennial reunion will 'lake 
place at school on Saturday, 
May 17, 1986, commencing at 
noon. 


Reed’s School 

As part of Reed’s School's five- 
year development plan, foe 
governors have decided to move 
foe administrative offices from 
2-4 Russia Row in foe City of 
London lo tbe school at Cob- 
ham from June 1, 1986. 


Latest wills . 

Mr John Richard Knowles, of 
College Avenue, Sc ar boro u gh, 
former, breeder and exhibitor of 
highland cattle, and a former 
medium- Iasi bowler and leading 
batsman with Scarborough and 
York Cricket Clubs, left estate 
valued at £1,056,858 neL 


University news 

Liverpool 

Dr Michael Owen. Talbot, 
reader in the department of 
music, has been appointed to 
foe James and Constance Alsop 
chair in music. 

Grants 

Wrtlramr Trust: £105000 lo Prate 
y»r CR Hopkina tor a Weficome Trust 
ircturtotiip. 

Cwnnnswon lor Racial equably: 
XVS. 83 S to Mr C Bait-Tovtm tor s 
tecfurcshlo In community manors. 

.ssSFi! 

Harm for a congenital matfantteUons 
regnlry 

sremre wa EMwto] Research 
Counnl: U 7 DJ 19 re Dr JF SParpev- 
ScjvBrt. * nuclear wueture grant 
1986-89 for tnc aepanmeoi of pnvs- 

ICS 


Lord Shin well, CH, PC the ■ 
elder statesman of tbe Labour 
Party who was held in great 
affection by political foe. and 
friend alike, died yesterday, 
aged 101. 

An apprenticeship m the 
tough Clydeside politics of the 
early years of the century . 
instilled in ‘ShinweU the 
staunch socialist principles 
which were to remain whh 
him during more than half a 
century in both Houses of 
Parliament. 

He held Cabinet posts un- 
der Attlee as Minister of Foci 
and Power, a controversial 
stewardship which resulted in 
his beinemoved subsequently 
to the war Office and -■ the 
Ministry of Defence. ' 

But the public will remem- 
ber him as tbe politician of 
fiery temperament and sharp 
wit who never shrinked from 
speaking his mind. They saw 
in him both the spirit of 
individuality and of Labour 
orthodoxy which the passage 
oftimeandan elevation to the 
peerage did nothing to 
quench. 

Fipamiri “Manny” Shin- 
wen was bom in Spitalfields, 
east London, on October 18, 
18S4, the son of Samuel 
Shin well, as East End do thing 
manufacturer. He left school 
at the age of li to be 
apprenticed to the tailoring 
trade. 

He soon west to Scotland 
where, as a young man, his 
interest was caught by 
Clydeside politics. 

At the same time he read 
widely, particularly bodes on 
English grammar. The subject 
fascinated him, and he got 
into the habit of noting unusu- 
al words in a little book. Thus 
he acquired his discriminating- 
taste m English usage. 

When be was only 22 he was 
elected to the Glasgow Trades 
Council of which he was twice 
president, and five years later 
be took a hand in trade union 
organization among the sea- 
men in the Clyde ports. 

Here, he learnt revolution- 
ary politics, and on “Red 
Fnday”, January 31, 191 9, the 
authorities' panicky handling 
of a strike led to a dash with 
tbe police in the Glasgow 
streets. For his part in this 
ShinweD spent several months 
iniaiL 

Seven years as a Glasgow 
councillor gave him excellent 
training in a robust school of 
dialectic, but when he entered 
the Commons in 1922 as 
member for Linlithgow he 
shrewdly tempered his style to 
tbe parliamentary tradition. 

’ He. was defeated in 1924 
after a few months as ftariia- 
mentary Secretary to the De- 
partment of Mines, but was 
returned again far Linlithgow 
in 1928. He was Financial 
Secretary to tbe War Office in 
1 929-30. and then returned to 
his post at the Mines Depart- 
ment until he lost his seat in 
1931. 

ShinweD thought be had 
been betrayed by his leaders 
and his sense -of injustice, 
nourished during four years of 
political exile, flared up in the 
astonishing onslaught on 
Ramsay MacDonald at 
Seafaam Harbour in 1935. In 
one of the most savage elec- 
tions in' modern times, he 
drove his old chief out of 
politics. 

Three years later occurred 
the extraordinary incident 
when Shinwefl, provoked by a 
remark from Commander 
Robert Bower, a Conservative 
member and former naval 
boxing champion, crossed tbe 
floor of the House and struck 
him in the face. ShinweU then 
turned on his heels and 
stalked out of tbe chamber, - 
muttering angrily lo himself 
During the Second World 
War, ShinweU, like Lord 
Winterton, and largely in con- 
sort with him (“Arsenic and 
Old Lace” they were called), 
took upon himself .the role of 
constructive critic believing 
the country needed a “win the 
war” Government. Churchill 



of Fuel and Power, and Attlee, 
gave it to him when Labour 
won the 1945 election. ; 

ShinweU at once addressed 
bhnself to the task of getting 
tbe mines fully under state . 
control. The Bill introduced 
that December was the 
Goveroraenfs first measure 
for the nationalization of. a. 
basic industry. 

Hope was high in Labour 
ranks that the tr ans feren c e of 
ownership would give a fillip 
to production, but vesting 
date. January 1, 1947, found 
Britain at tbe point of crisis.' 


. In 1955,;tefcftjfie;&atiow 
Cabinet and moved u the 
back be nc h es. In the same 
year, be published' ins- aptobi- 
ography. Conflict Without 

Shinwefl exerasedwifo zest 
his right as a veteran ;jif the 
Labour Party. ■-..though a 
remarkably youthful one - to 
keep it up to scratch. He spoke 
out . v^broosly -agiuittt the 
abandonment of the prindpie 
of public ownership. . .... ■ . 

When Labour camfehack to 
power in 1964, Sfaftrwrfh was 
though; ministerial 


Although Shinwefl had .of- office wasout of the question, 
ten warned of the^ possibility — ^ 


of shortages, he had denied 
emphatically that there would 
be any dislocation of industry 
or dosing of factories. So 
when, unexpectedly and per- 
functorily, on Friday, 
Feburary 10. j947, he told the 
Commons drat much of the 
nation's industry would have 
to dose because of coal sbort- 
he encountered a storm 
criticism. 

In subsequent debates and 
questionings he was not. con- 
vincing and there was some 
surprise that he remained at 
his posL He bore the brum of 
the charge of having failed to 
plan ahead, but first the 
miners, to whom be had given 
the five-day week, and. then 
the Prime Minister publicly, 
expressed confidence in him. 

ShinweU was moved to the 
War Office in October of that 
year and ceased to be a 
member of the Labour 
Cabinet.. 

He. was bitter at what he. 
regarded as enforced removal 
from an office of whkb he had 


andfae.wasstiliftdTc^oilHisr- 
asm foe life and politics, .- 

Elected chairman : of . the 
Parliamentary Labour Party, 
this quondam rebel - of the 
1920s proved adroix aL bri- 
dling the new left-wing rebels 
of the 1960s, ami be exercised 
afl his skills in the -task of 
keepii£ the party on a steady 
course m Support ‘ of the 
Government. - 

Though some of The newer 
members were- restive trader 
what they -saw as ShinwriTs 
authoritarian handling of par- 
ty meetings, the majority, was 
content and Shinwefl was 
twice re-elected. 

However, his mettlesome 
qualities brought- him - into 
conflict with ministers- and 
backbenchers in 1967 wheohe 
expressed bitteF opposition to 
the Governments derision to 
apply for niembershtpMif the 
EEC, a stance many thought 
incompatible with his position 
as chairman. 

At a perty meeting he lost 
ins temper and became heai- 


been proud, and in which her. odiy embroiled with the For- 
bad hoped to integrate the . eign Secretary and Leader of 
three power industries; but he- foe House and on another 
soon found himself more at occasion he differed strongly 


ptiid him the compliment of ^ foture ofthe wboIe 
always hstening with interest However. ShimiXSti- 


hoxne with foe problems of 
military organization than he 
had been with those ofindns- 
tiy.and he got on wefl with his 
Army colleagues: 

He returned to foe Cabinet 
in March, 1950, when be 
became Minister of Defence. 
He was soon confronted with 
tbe military implications of 
the Korean situation, mount- 
ing tension in Berlin, and 
terrorism in Malaya, while 
Russia was busy testing nucle- 
ar bombs. 

He was largely responsible 
for carrying out the “phased 
defence programme”, and did 
bis utmost to modernize the. 
armed, forces. For him, the 
Western Alliance was vital 
and he was a strong supporter 
ofNata 

1 His views on the issue of the 
nuclear deterrent underwent a 
change. He had been one of 
;tbe “fathers of the British 
‘ contribution to the deterrent”, 
but . in Labour’s years of 
opposition after 1951, he ar- 
gued for contracting out of it 
By 1958. he was speaking 
strongly against the “onward 
march or that detestable 
.apparatus”, and in 1960 he 
warned GaitskeD, who bad 
pledgxl himself to reverse the 
party conference vote against 
retention of the nuclear deter- 
rent, that he was endangering ~ 


to his speeches. 

only 

that ShinweU stayed out of the 
wartime Coalition Because- he 
had refused a junior post 
Nevertheless, he would cer- 
tainly have liked the Ministry 


However, ShinweU's politi- 
cal influence within the party 
waned during these opposi- 
tion years; he had been unseat- 
ed from its national executive 
as early as 1941, and failed to 
gain re-election in 1952 and 
1953. 


with foe Leader of the House 
and. the Chief Whip on the 
matter of party discipline 
which he wished to see en- 
forced more striedy. •’ 

Munnurings against Win 
fed eventually to his resigna- 
tion and he retired once more 
to foe back benches where be 
continued to oppose foe prin- 
ciple of British membership of 
foe EEC 

He was made a life Peer in 
1970, and he continued well 
into his 90s to be a vigorous 
and outspoken member of foe 
House of Lords, alive to all the 
mam issues of foe day. 

For several years he had 
chaired foe influential all- 
party House of Lords Defence 
Study Group, but no single 
action of his caused so much 
surprise as his resigning foe 
Labour Whip in March, 1982, 
as a protest against what he 
saw as Ieft-'wing milimcy. 
Though he remained-a Labour 
Party member, he sat there- 
after with foe Independents in 
foe Lords. 

The Labour Story (1963); 
Tve Lived. Throu&i It . Ail 
(1973); Lead wuhihe Left sad 
My First Ninety-Six Years 
(1981) were further publica- 
tions based on personal 
reminiscences. 

Lord Shinwefl was three 
times married; his first wife, 
Pay, to whom he was married 
for 52 years, died in 1954; in 
1956 he married Dinah Mey- 
er, of Denmark, who died tn 
1971; and in 1972 he married 
Mrs Sarah Hum, who - also 
predeceased him. -. 


COMMANDER TREVOR LLOYD-HUGHES 

Commander Trevor Uoyd- 
Hughes, who spent much of 
his distinguished career as a 
policeman in tbe criminal 
intelligence branch of New 
Scotland Yard, died at his 


home in Hertfordshire on 
May 7. He was 52. 

„ After military service with 

the ' Royal Army Ordnance 

Corps and the Royal Military .SAS. 


west London; and, in foe 
1960s, be was involved in foe 
investigation which led to foe 
smashing of the criminal gang 
run by the Kray twins. 

During foe Iranian.Embassy 
siege in 1980 be acted as a 
senior negotiator with foe 
terrorists before the building 
was eventually stormed by the 


Police, he joined foe Metro- 
‘~’itan Police m 1957, where 
enjoyed a varied and 
eventful career. 

He was CID Commander of 
No 7 area, covering north- 


all royal residences in foe 
Metropolitan police district 
He dealt personally with tbe 
case of Michael Fagan, who 
entered Buckingham Palace 
on two separate occasions in 
1 982, being arrested during his 
second iatnisibn after waking 
foe Queen in her bedroom. 
Lloyd-Hugbes .combined 
energy with, out- 


Uoyd-Hughes was later ap- standing detective work, win- 


pointed Detective Chief Su- 
perintendent on A District, 
based at. Cannon Row police 
station, with responsibility for 
foe investigation of crimes at. 


mug the respect of . his 
colleagues. He was officially 
commended eleven times. : 
He leaves a widow and two 
children. • -v> 




Appointments 


Deputy Secretary in 
tbe Health and Personal 
Services Policy Group. Mrs 
Ann BowteU to be Deputy 
Secretary responsible for Social 
Security policy and Mr NJJ. 
Montagu to be Under Secretary 
in charge of the Social Security 
division dealing with National 
Insurance contributions, state 
and. occupational pensions, all 


of Mr James Gntaaess ro be 
..jointed chairman of. toe 
lie Works Loan Ctimims- 
sion. Miss Vena Ot Palma, and 
Mr Peter BfackBcfrf to :be 
reappointed commissi oners. , 


Latest appointments include ‘ . 

Mr Join Fawcett to be ambas- 
sador to Bulgaria in succession 
to Mr J.M.O. Snodgrass. 

Mr Merryu Leigh BomdlBon to 

be Lord-Lieutenant for Powys in charge or tlw Social Security Mr John Fonder, a add 52, a 
m succession to Colonel John division dealing with National senior iSJZxae ^n'th 

Wh ° " ™ n! ^ butio1 ^ Hereford and WorS^EdDca- 

rennngon July i5. afl uon Authority, to be dlrectorof 

Dr RasseU Cannae, -deputy .Department of Health and So- vihe Microelectronics Education 
director of the Science and cial Security. -'-'Support Unit 

Engineeenng Research Dr Alan Hayes, duriiman of • - ' ’. 

ICTs plant protection division, legal .. 

lo be chairman of the European Mr Ralph Haauhon Lownle to 
Trade Committee in succession bea CSradi iudw oh tte Soulfa- 
to Mr Michael Rendle. . ™ 


Council's Royal Observatory.- 
Edinburgh, robe direct of the 
AngSo-Australian Observatory. 
Mr Stracfcan Heppell -to be 


yyf: 

A*\, 


* 

- 

,r ■» - 


-.r- 


•r , c 
i j 

iX ’ 
«■- 

JA- ’*■ 
S* ' 


,1C'* *" 


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-V •• .• 

















THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


19 


THE ARTS 


■sc 


Television 

Lovable 



I£**Poo| seems to hm re- 
jilued Ireland as the mythical 
*"** of lovable rogai who 


. j ihjs man mo 

wmwfcal passes at employ- 
neat. Acuf (BBCl) and lie 
Bntken McGregor (TTV) an 
both comedy series which 
- support the idea- that the 
vumm Liverpool seas* of 
vfenmr and tie hums Lirer- 
peol capacity for family loyal- 
ty are proof against alt the 
fidsdWes of inner city 
decay. 

True, one of the McGk 

brothers did remark in I 

right's , adventure that it was 
so -tong since Liverpool people 
had seen a pound note that 
they had forgotten what the 
Queen's face looked like; how- 
ever, grace foe introduction of 
foe pound coin, this qafr coaid 
' have equally well referred to 
poverty or to the new money. 

Bread is written by Carta 
Lane with all her wonderful 
facility for idiosyncrasy, ft 
ch r o ni c l es the nooejwak 
activities of the five children of 
a Uverpori-Irish matriarch. 
The most impressive character 
k the oldest brother, a flashily 
dressed Damn Duran done 
played with panache by Peter 
HowitL His. metier is fidrfWng 
social security; another broth- 
er has a straight job, the third 
deals in fonk and the yoongest 
devotes all his flagging ener- 
gies to his gfrtfnend. The only 
sister in foe dan does as much 
gfaunoaMnodelfing as she can 
manage withont taking off her 
rape whistle. The women m 
both comedies foil into two 
categories - the amusing, 
gossiping crones and moronic. 


The idea that humiy con- 
quers aO also ties behind 
TheBrotkers McGregor which 
concerns the two grown-up 
sons of a Liverpool mother — 
one half-cast ami one white — 
who nm a decrepit car busi- 
ness. There 1 is a slightly 
greater, -inlriisioD of reality in 
thfc ecenario. with some sug- 
gestion of hard times spar- 
kling -wittily among all the 
plucky working-class fi ghting 
instinct Lost night oar heroes' 
problem was that everyone, 
tried to pay them in kind 
rather than in cash, leaving 
them with a pfle of nnwanted 
exchange goods and no cars to 
sdL 

Both series are shot, ob. 
tocatipn, and make ranch of 
characteristk Liverpool vistas 
down empty streets of back-to- 
back cottoge&wfcichead 
abruptly at a misty void, 
behind which a high-rise de- 
velopment looms. However, as 
with the genre of Irish come^ 
dies in the cinema, there is an 
ostrich-like avoidance of any 
distresssing real-life aspect of 
the location. The characters 
act as if they had never heard 
of Derek Hatton and could not 
pronounce the worth Toxteth 
if they tried. This is comedy 
which acts less as a safety- 
valve than as a Eire-blanket. 


Theatre 


DonaMOoapv 


Devotion in drag 


La Cage aux folles 

Palladium 


Indulging In the pleasure of 
hindsight, I suspect that one 
mqson for the huge Broadway 
success of Harvey HerciemY 
and Jerry Herman’s musical fe 
that it domesticated bomosex- 
uality to the state of orthodox 
^ ramify life, and that as an 
adaptation from the French 
(that trusted old Anglo-Saxon 
safety-valve) it was all- hap- 
pening a long way off 

The. show Eras given thou- 
sands of people a good right 
out and muse (Aids notwith- 
standing) have (tone Some- 
thing to erode sexual pre- 
judice. Any production that 
does that is at least earning its 
keep. But, moved away from 
the gay bars and bath-houses 
of Times Square and a good 
deal closer to its Riviera 
setting, the piece does disclose 
some yawning cracks that 
were less visible on its home 
ground. 

Arthur Laurents, its direc- 
tor, was speaking no more 
than the truth- when he de- 
scribed it as an oki-fesbioned 
show. It tells the story of a 
young man (Jonathan Morris) 
who is ashamed of his mother, 
and requires her to quit the 
premises when his grand pro^- 
spective in-laws come to cafl. 

It happens that his “mother” 
is a -man; but, switch the 
genders, and we are back up to 
the neck in the sickliest form 
of Victorian melodrama. Nor 
are the boy and his fiancee at 
all redeemed by the writing. 


They are there simply to 
provoke a crisis between their 
homosexual elders; and, in so 
for aslhey project any charac- 
ter at aB, it is one of priggish 

ego asm. 

If you go along with that, 
the picture emerges of two 
. devoted partners identical in 
all respects to ordinary parents 
except that they happen to be 
of. me same sex. Simulta- 
neously, however, they are 
presented at work in their St 
Tropez drag-dub attended by 
hordes of boys. in frocks and 
leotards brandishing whips 
and letting loose with the can- 
can; At whit* point, moral 
crusading gives way to tourist 
titillation; with the result that 
homosexuals are presented on 
the one hand as affectionate 
human, beings ^ on the 
other as a pack of screaming 
queens. 

I admired a good deal of Mr 
Rerstriin’s Torch Song Trilogy 
but it is hard to find anything 
to admire in his book for this 
piece. Nor, to complete the 
catalogue of complaints, .does 
Mr Herman's score rise above 
family- musical mediocrity. 
Than are a rousing title 
number in the gypsy vein, a 
witty invocation of Souza 
when AlbLn (the “wife”) is 
trying to go straight and a 
credibly impassioned melody 
to back up Albiris defiant 
statement of identity in “I Am 
What I Am” (a homosexual 
equivalent of “My Way”) 
Otherwise it is routine echoes 
of cafe squeeze-boxes and 
night-dub galops. 

The power of the show — 
which is considerable when it 


does appear — resides in the 
big production numbers, and 
in the central partnership of 
Deris Quilley and Georae 
Hearn. Jointly they do build 
up, in much truthful detail, 
the sense of a 20-year mar- 
riage, as much on the dub 
stage as in their kitsch-packed 
living room; and the sense of 
betrayal when Georges (Mr 
Quilley) co nfe sses to his part 
in the boy's plot is painful and 
touching. 

Beyond that, Mr Quilley 
acts prin cipally as a vastly 
accomplished feed for Mr 
Hearn, playing an ageing drag- 
queen with a marvellous sense 
of the passage of time and the 
exhilaration of still holding an 
audience. His very walk, along 
the moonlit harbour to the 
cafe, tells you an about him-. 

aririiU yrmniwl hat charting hie 

face, poised to the finger-tip 
and overcome with scrupu- 
lous modesty when required 
to ape the coarseness of mas- 
culine behaviour. It is a 
performance of the utmost 
relaxation and selection, m 
which every gesture tells and 
from which passion, when it 
does emerge, blows the roof 
off 

The Cagelles chorus-line 
supply the expected quota of 
teasing glamour on a breath- 
takingly lavish scale, for which 
honours go equally to the 
choreogapher (Scott Salmon) 
and the costume designer 
(Theoni V. AJdredge), whose 
work evokes the lascivious 
fairy fantasies of Richard 
Dadd. 



Tritthfial marital detail: George Hearn (centre) and Deals Quilley (right) with Jonathan Morris in La Cage aux folles 


The Chalk Garden 

Chichester 


Irving Wanfle 


Interviewed by John Higgins 
15 years ago. Enid Bagnold 
denied that this, her most 
regarded play, had become a 
period piece. Time works 
many wonders. This “sophis- 
ticated comedy” is now 30 
years old, and the elements 
that speak for all ages and 
conditions have their work cut 
out transcending those which 
evoke mid-Hfoes gentility: 
the Indian Army connections 
of the two principals; the then 
vogue bemoaning of eroded 
social ceremony; the complete 
absence of such mundane 
intrusions as television or 
radio; the lighting of a ciga- 
rette to suggest worKDiness, if 
not to say turpitude; above all. 
the stringently grammatical 
speeches fraught with facile 
metaphors. 


Against all this, the univer- 
sal theme of thwarted affec- 
tions and moral redemption 
emerges from tire crucible of a 
large bouse in Sussex, where a 
fairly grand old widow 
(Googie Withers) dotes on her 
spoiled, neurotic teenage 
granddaughter (Sophie Thom- 
pson), does her best to regulate 
the caprices of her nerve- 
strung manservant (Richard 
O’Callaghan) and is in her 
turn tyrannized by the de- 
cayed butler (unseen) who 
makes his existence felt by 
means of the drawing-room 
telephone and who is given to 
monumental sulks. 

The grandmother has taken 
on her daughter’s daughter. 
Laurel, after the latter experi- 
enced (or, as we later learn, 
fantasized) a sexual assault on 
the eve of her mother’s remar- 
riage. The play opens with 
Miss Withers interviewing ap- 
plicants for the post of com- 
panion to this delinquent 


pain; by default, the job goes 
to Dorothy Turin as a but- 
toned-up and almost saintly 
figure dripping enigma and 
possessed of a decisive knowl- 
edge of gardening. 

This is where the symbol- 
ism starts to earn its keep. 
“The soil cannot give you 
what it has not got” declares 
Miss Turin, astonished that 
rhododendrons have been 
planted in chalky earth. The 
poetic representation of fe- 
male nurture in terms of 
horticulture (already signalled 
by the granddaughter’s name) 
is a well-tilled plot, and — at 
least in this production by 
Ronald Eyre — it comes as 
something of a surprise to find 
that we are meant to take 
seriously, as the meal of the 
thing, the grandmother's emo- 
tional selfishness in trying to 
“force” Laurel the way she 
“forced” Laurel’s mother. 

Miss Withers’s acute timing 
and rather gusty delivery are 


seen to best advantage in the 
opening scenes which estab- 
lish a routine and pretty 
dogged fight-comedy portrait 
of a country house beset by- 
domestic crises; in her Jater 
confrontations with her visit- 
ing daughter (Deborah Grant) 
these charms are comprehen- 
sively betrayed by the artifi- 
ciality of the dialogue. Miss 
Turin’s contribution is digni- 
fied and eminently watchable, 
but her role necessarily la lie 
apart when, precipitated by 
the visit of an elderly judge 
(John McCall um) and an- un- 
accustomed glass of wine, she 
reveals the dread secret of her 
past. 

The real problem is that one 
can see the denouement ap- 
proaching like an illuminated 
motorway sign in the distance, 
and cannot quite believe that 
that is all there is to -.the 
evening. 

Martin Cropper 


Cinema 

Penetrating vision of 
despairing alienation 


Vagabonde (15) 

Renoir; Minema 


Love Letters (18) 
Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road 


Celia Brayfield 


Billy the Kid and the 
Green Baize Vampire 
(IS) - "" 
Cannon Tottenham ; . 

Court Road 1* : 


Agnes Varda is not a prolific 
director. She has made only seven 
pictures in the 31 years since La 
Poinie courtr, and nine years 
separated her previous feature 
L'Une chante ; f 'autre pas and 
Vagabonde. which earned off the 
Golden Lion, the International 
Jury Prize, the. International 
Critics’ Prize and the Catholic Jury 
Award at the 1 985 Venice Festival. 

Vagabonde (the original French 
title is Sans Toit ni ioi) is a close-up 


female portrait, like Cleo de 5 a 7, 
Le Bonheur and L’Une chante, 
T autre pas, but it has hs own 
contemporary feeling of alienation 
and despair. It opens with the 
discovery of the body of a young 
girl, frozen in a ditch in the wintry 
south of France. She turns out to 
have been a runaway and drifter 
whom many people in the 
neighbourhood remember having 
seen around.. On the soundtrack 
Varda’s own voice questions what 
these people who encountered the 
girl in the last weeks of her life may 
have felt about her. . 

. Each gives, bis version, uncon- 
cerned. linhivolved. Some, it 
seems, briefly befriended her, some 
tried to employ her. some sought to 
exploit her, some genuinely wanted 
to help. No one was able to save 
her. Vanda does not accuse, nor is 
she surprised. Mona (the name the 
girl gave herself) is a victim of the 
times, and they are times of 
persona] isolation, when no man 
feels himself his brother’s keeper. 

The portrait created through 
Sandrine Bonnaire, the marvellous 
19-year-old actress from Pialat’s A 
Nos Amours and Police, is without 
sentiment or compromise. There is 



plight forces them to question their 
own lives. 

In shooting, Varda allowed the 
story to lake its own natural course, 
following Mona's peregrinations 
around the bleak wintry south, 
deciding on the action and writing 
the script day by day, picking up 
non-professional actors en route 
and mixing them with the pre- 
selected cast. The method has its 
perils, but they are all overcome to 
give the lough, documentary tex- 
ture which makes this Varda’s best 
work to date and one of the most 
singular films of the period. 


Amy Jones is a younger woman 
director from America. Having 
produced her debut film. Slumber 
Party Massacre (a low-budget ex- 


ploitation picture which opens next 
Cot 


Nothing appealing except her insolent independence: Sandrine 
Bonnaire’s uncompromising portrait of Mona in Vagabonde 


nothing appealing about Mona, 
except her insolent independence. 
She is guarded and secretive. In a 
rare communicative moment she 
says she wanted to escape life as a 
shorthand-typist; otherwise we 
guess nothing about her back- 
ground or origins. Wc see her only 
as die is: a curious, grubby vagrant 
who steals and stinks. 

She is a nobody, and yet some- 
thing in her disturbs the people 


whose lives she casually invades. 
The shaky freedom which is all she 
possesses in various ways attracts 
or challenges them. A farm girl, 
imprisoned in a family group, is 
jealous; a reformed drop-out envi- 
ously reproaches her irrespon- 
siblity. A prosperous woman 
agronomist experiences more com- 
plex anxieties and guilts as a result 
of the encounter. These people may 
be helpless to save her, but her 


week at the ICA). Roger Corman's 
New World. Productions rewarded 
her with the chance to go straight 
and serious in Love Letters. The 
film sometimes wears its 2 rt on its 
sleeve, with a lot of piano and cello 
and Chopin on the soundtrack and 
an overall lack of humour, but it is 
able, intelligent and attractive, with 
an authority that compensates for 
the small budget. 

Jamie Lee Curtis (revealing tal- 
ents not evident in her days as the 
screaming victim of teenage horror 
pictures) plays a 22-year-old career 
woman who falls in love with a 40- 
year-old happily married man 
(James Reach). Her handling of 
this ultimately doomed affair is 
conditioned by letters left by her 
dead mother, revealing that she too 


had a lover but was too timid! to 
take the chance to break out from a 
disastrous marriage. 

Amy Jones's own screenplay 
deftly intertwines the two motifs — 
the girl's affair and the memory of 
her parents’ difficulties — gradually 
drawing them together until "the 
young woman is actually copying 
out the old letters to send to her 
lover. The notion is intriguing and 
never over-stressed. The only evi- 
dent concessions to New World's 
■commercial priorities are the! at- 
tractive nude shots of Ms Curts. 

Fans of Pot Black may well 
derive some special pleasure from 
Billy the Kid and foe Green Baize 
Vampire; otherwise it is hard to 
imagine what will be the audience 
for this good-natured British oddi- 
ty. Written by Trevor Preston, a 
veteran of television series films, 
with iQusic by George Fenton, it is 
an essay in “rockeretta”, with 
musical numbers veering in style 
from 'Wall to Lloyd Webber. 1 

The story involves a fight-io-foe- 
finish snooker championship be- 
tween bizarre opponents, a young 
Londoner with a cowboy fetish 
(Phil Daniels) and a Yorkshire 
Dracula (Alun Armstrong). Alan 
Clarke, who previously directed 
Scum for the cinema, gives it a style 
of lurid colour. Expressionist sets, 
extravagant make-up, fancy angles, 
stylized performances, distorting 
lenses and a general repertory of 
effects derived from pop promo 
videos. 


David Robinson 


Concerts 


LPO/Tennstedt 

Festival Hall 


It was the birthday of Johan- 
nes Brahms, and a concert fit 
for the feting. KlansTennstedt 
was the man who made it so, 
with live London Philharmon- 
ic at their most eager, bending 
their backs to be driven as 
only their principal conductor 
can drive them. 

There was liule time, even 
.when Brahms would have 
perhaps rather liked it, to 
stand and stare in Wednesday 
night's Fourth Symphony. 
Each paired interval, each 
cross-current of metre in the 
first movement was tugged, 
then pressed towards its desti- 
nation, and the. third move- 
ment cut its dash with razor- 
edged chording. 

In hands other than Tenn- 
stedt’s this approach would 
have seemed unnecessarily 
irascible. But, while some 
listeners may have felt a 
longing for more horizontal 
space, as it were, Tennstedt 
provided it vertically by the 
sheer depth of harmonic reso- 
nance set up in each deep-dug 
chord, and in the brightly- 
textured ensemble playing. 

Brahms cannot, though, live 
bv depth-charges alone. If 
attention to texture and tim- 
bre were all the performance 
of his Second Piano Concerto 
would have been equally ex- 
citing. As _ it was, Feier 
Donohoe foiled to capitalize 


-on the perfectly balanced tem- 
pi of its orchestra! introduc- 
tion to develop a performing 
profile of his own. He took 
over with characteristic lucid- 
ity, but sacrified evolution by 
percep ti ve phrasing to a more 
static virtuosity of changing 
timbres. Despite the warmth 
of Robert Truman's justly- 
applauded cello solo, this was 
a merely efficient performance 
with a vacuum at its heart. 


Dutch orchestra's perfor- 
mance otherwise had the vir- 
tue of instrumental clarity in 
this or- that strand of the 
texture, even if the -strands 
were not always woven into 
the most compelling associa- 
tion with each other, or pro- 
pelled with the sheer force of 
rhythm that generates the 
music's enduring strength. 


Hague PO/ 

Lombard 

Barbican 


Prokofiev’s more modest 
demands on the orchestra 
Hilar y Finch . were capably met in framing 
J the alternately poetic ana 

■ impassioned solo playing of 
Dmitry Shkovetsky in the D 
major Violin Concerto, No 1. 
His performance of the central 
scherzo movement, in partic- 
ular, Imparted that theatrical 
dimension that is never far 
from this composer’s music, 
but its fairy-tale quality at the 
beginning and end of the outer 
movements was only inter- 
mittently evoked in the 
conductor’s -episodic app- 
roach. 


A changeabout of most of the 
players in the Hague Philhar- 
monic Orchestra between tire 
first and- second items of their 
programme on Wednesday 
night gave everybody a chance 
to play themselves in, as well 
as a breather, before they 
doubled and trebled up for the 
ultimate Bite eg. Spring after 
tire interval. Alain Lombard 
conducted it warily, as if half- 
expecting even .now that tire 
notes might strike some spon- 
taneous combustion and 
scorch him. 

Would that they had, before 

b e in g doused by that thump- 
ing superfluous final chord 
that Stravinsky dubiously ex- 
plains away somewhere by 

a rrai«ang Rachmaninov of 

putting him up to it. The 


He look Beethoven's Eighth 
Symphony all too seriously at 
the start of the programme, 
before the visitors had fully 
taken the measure of an 
unfamiliar ball in terms of 
balance, especially among the 
strings. The wind playing had 
a tangy quality,, with the horns 
and clarinets at opposite ends 
ofa wide tonal spectrum in the 
third movement trio, but a 
leaden pulse suffered to con- 
strict that movement and the 
finale. 


Noel Goodwin 


Dance 


Jones and Zane 

Sadler’s Wells 



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SUZANNE BERT1SH 
JONATHAN KBIT 
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, 13 May-7 June 

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ALMEnMfflEfflBE 



MARCEL MAKCEAU 
INTERNATIONAL 
SCHOOL OF MIME 
IN PARIS 
. ADDmONS 


Mime, Acting, Classical Dance, 
|Modn»Jaz2, Fearing, Acrobatics . 1 


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Problem: how can a work 
commissioned and already 
performed by another compa- 
ny be a preview when given by 
BUI T. Jones, Arnie Zane and 
Company at Sadler’s Wells 
this week? It is the pro- 
gramme's finale and the title. 
How to Walk an -Elephant, is 
the best thing about it The 
walking elephant incidentally 
comes straight out of Balan- 
chine's Bourgeois Genril- 
homme and was funnier there. 

Fever Swamp, the other 
group work given, is much 
livelier: a bouncy, jolly piece 
using lots of little jumps, foils 
and recoveries to a cheerful 
score by Peter Gordon, under 
imitation palm-trees designed 
by William Katz. 

The most enjoyable piece in 
this programme is Shared 
Distance, a duet we first saw 
danced by Jones and Zane 
themselves a few years back. 
On Wednesday night the ex- 
traordinarily tall Heywood 
McGriff Jr and fairly small 
Karen Peariman carried off its 
virtuoso partnering with cool 
aplomb. They also caught a lot 
of the friendly rapport and the 
air of collusion that give its 
gymnastic manoeuvres charm 
and humour. AD the same. I 
fed there is a lack of form and 
condusiveness about the cho- 
reography. It could be put 
together in any other order 
ami not suffer at all Several of 
the works just stop without 
ever reaching a definite end. 

Yet Jones and Zane are 
obviously concerned with 
form; why dse would they 
accompany Jones's new solo, 
M-A-K-E, with a recorded 


bodies into harmonious or 
counterpointing patterns, at 
first on opposite sides of the 
stage, later both of them 
balanced on a small central 
pedestal. Die poses are strik- 
ing; the movement is less so. 
Yoshi Wada’s score uses 
home-made giant pipes elec- 
tronically tre a ted: an inge- 
niously laborious way of 
employing craft and technol- 
ogy to reproduce the drone of 
bagpipes. 

John Perdval 


Kibbutz Dance 
Company 
The Place 


Since 1979 the Kibbutz Dance 
Company must have become 
our most frequent visitor 


among dance troupes; this is 
its fifth London season. Sur- 


prising. perhaps, because the 
company is small, without 
stars, and has neither the 
glamour of ballet nor avant- 
garde originality. Its appeal 
relies on a middle-of-the-road 
modern repertory and the 
earnest commitment of its 
dancers. Typically, the pro- 
gramme to be repeated at The 
Place tonight (there is a free 
children’s show with different 
works this afternoon) derives 
from both local and interna- 
tional sources. 


affecting episodes, strongly 
presented by the cast, whether 
thrashing about on their 
knees, hurling themselves 
down in grief or gamboling 
joyfully with changing part- 
ners. 

A* work for five women. 
Black Milk, is by Ohad 
Naharin, a former pupil of the 
company’s founder Yehudit 
Amon now working in New 
York. Do his roots or his 
present environment explain 
his enigmatic theme, which 
has the cast all smearing mud 
from a bucket on their feces 
before undertaking their tac- 
tile abstract patterns in which 
an odd-woman-out motif be- 
comes half-apparent? 

As contrast, Down North 
shows mainly comic charac- 
ters and episodes from life in 
the for north of Sweden. It is 
by the Swedish choreographer 
Mats Ek, son of Birgit 
CuUbera. He has inherited her 
originality but not her lucid- 
ity. However, he does display 
a capricious sense of timing to 
enliven steps apparently 
based, like the music, on folk 
an. 


discussion, terribly earnest, 
analytical and detailed, 


about 

photographs of an avant-garde 
dance concert at Judson 
Church, New York, in 1963? 
Jones's gestures are often in- 
teresting, but he seems to 
dance more with his arms 
than the rest of his body, 
which is limiting. 

In Black 1 town, a duet by 
Zane. for Jones and McGriff 
the two men move amis and 


The opening work is created 
by Rami Be’er, a dancer in the 
company. He is obviously 
interested in exploring aspects 
of Israeli culture. An earlier, 
work of his, based on a 
Hebrew poem, represented the 
death of a man with his- 
cMdhood rocking-horse as 
symbol of his struggle for life. 
This time be shows Los 
Aiados, based on songs from 
the Sephardic Lariino tradi- 
tion, combining Eastern and 
Spanish influences. The mu- 
sic, collected and composed 
by Oded Zahavi, is vaned in 
manner. A translation of the 
words would be heipfuL but I 
am told that they deal with 
death, prayer and carnal love. 

Some of the choreography 
might gain from being less 
static, but there are lively and 


The naivety of the humour 
is best when presented wijh sly 
polish, for instance by Anal 
Asulin as a lady quietly getting 
ho 1 own way, and there are 
passages of attractively bizarre 
invention, notably Rami 
Be’er’s dance with one foot 
shod, the other bare. 

J.p. 


• Andrew Motion was incor- 
rectly described in the inter- 
view with him on this page on 
April 26. He is Emforial 
Director oF Chatto and 
Windus. Our apologies; . 


Music-theatre 

Mass 

Guildhall School 


Bernstein's Mass exposes it- 
self so utterly one wants to 
give ita big hug and tell it to go 
away and grow up. not criti- 
cize it. Only if one were to take 
it seriously as a religious work 
would it appear so vulgar and 
blindly self-indulgent that it 
had to be countered. As it is, 
the self-indulgence is essential 
to an almost appalling, in 
every sense, act of self-display. 

In an age when such things 
are not done (what may we 
know, say, of Elliott Carter's 
soul?) Bernstein appears be- 
fore us not only in all the 
sentimental externals of his 
personality but also in his self- 
doubts and in the limitations 
of which he is accutely aware. 
What we see is a showbiz 
liturgy with songs of question- 
ing, a sort of “Kiss Me 
Kierkegaard”. But what we 
hear is the Passion of Lenny. 

All the performers can do is 
to put it across with as much 
of a show of honesty and 
energy as possible, and that is 
exactly what happens at the 
Guildhall School orMusic and 
Drama. It also helps very 
much that the orchestra and 
chorus are all young students: 
a production of studied pro- 
fessionalism would be embar- 
rassing in all the wrong ways. 
Nevertheless, credit is due to 
the conductor Justin Brown 
and the producer Bill Bryden 
for steering even such ready 
resources to make the very 
best of themselves and of foe 
work. 

Mr Brown has the knack ofl 


recent work in foe theatre and 
for television might well Have 
made him suspicious of the 
pfaonily religious, brings i ex- 
hilarating vigour to the crowd 
scenes, though there is a neat 
point of criticism in having 
the Cross support a basketball 
net. Richard Morris agonizes 
amiably with foe role , of 
Celebrant. There are repeat 
performances tonight and, 
tomorrow. 


Paul Griffiths 


making tight control errupt in 
- Mr Bryden, whose 


panache. 


The 





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THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


A li 


spanned a century of radical change 




.- * ; 


QAQ Mrs Punk hurst arrested during 
X yl/O a suffragette demonstration. 


1914 


The first known 
picture taken. 


1010 Manny S (unwell is on the far left in the dock during a trial in Glasgow when he was charged with inciting a 
JLy ly riot and later jailed for fire and a half months. 


1922 


When he first 
became an MP. 


By Paul Vallelv 


Bismarck was the First 
Chancellor of the German 
Empire and Queen Victoria 
still had 17 years to reign on 
the day in October 1884 that 
Emanuel Shinwell was born in 
Spitalfields in the East End of 
London. His life was to span 
what was perhaps (be most 
radical century of change in 
the modem epoch. 

He was bom into an age of 
glorious imperialism and na- 
scent technology. Marx had 
died the year before and 
already the process had begun 
which would lead to the ame- 
lioration of the lot of the 
British working class by "en- 
lightened exploitation** of the 
people and resources of the 
colonies. Gladstone was pre- 
paring to deal with the Irish 
question 

Britain's position at the 
centre of that domination of 
one area of the world was weil 
established. Only five days 
before Shinwell's birth Green- 
wich was accepted as the 
universal meridian and that 
year the first edition of the 
mighty Oxford English Dic- 
tionary was launched 

New techniques which 
would consolidate and further 
that expansion were being 
developed in Europe day by 
day. 

But that time also saw the 
sowing or seeds from w hich the 
world was to reap a bitter 
harvest In 1896, the year that 
Shinwell left school at the age 
of 11. helium and radioactivity 
were discovered. Theodor 
Herzi published his pamphlet 


The Jewish Stale and the 
Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel 
instituted the eponymous 
prizes for achievement by way 
of compensation for his other 
legacy to the world — the 
invention of dynamite. 

Seven years later when 
Shinwell. who as an appren- 
tice had waved flags in the 
street to cheer men on to the 
Boer War, married his first 
wife and joined the Indepen- 
dent Labour Party tbe political 
and technological advances 
were continuing- with equal 
impetus. 

By the time Shinwell was 21 
the theory of relativity had 
been formulated and the zip 
fastener was invented. 

Shinwell's first excursion 
into practical politics was in 
1911 when he organized the 
Clydeside dock strike. His 
work in the docks excused him 
service in the First World War 

In 1919, at the age of 35, be 
was imprisoned for five and a 
half months on charges of 
inciting a riot In Germany and 
Italy fascist parties were 
formed that year. 

Emanuel Shinwell was first 
elected to Parliament in 1922, 
the year in which the Tories 
non the general election and 
Labour eclipsed the Liberals 
as the opposition. 

Two years later, aged 40, he 
became Minister of Mines in 
the first Labour government. 

He was re-eiected in 1928, 
the year in which women got 
the vote. The following year 
Shinwell became financial sec- 
retary to the War Office. It 


- - ; , • • ■ Hr*-?**?**- ' < 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother opens Bible House, the 
headquarters of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society. Swindon. 
3.45 

Princess Anne attends Queen 
Mary College’s thanksgiving 
service. St Michael's. Comhill. 
EC3. 5.20: and later attends a 
reception. Drapers' Hall. 
Throgmorton Ave. EC2. 6.40. 

Princess Alice. Duchess of 
Gloucester, visits Trinity - The 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,041 



ij‘ i 
p&iy 

■ m&wmw&m: 



ACROSS 

1 Passionate love for a tall 
bird with a long neck. (St. 

5 Wiring a bionic man to 
cam a basket of stones (M. 

8 Shaped like Gilbert's ivoncs 
MOt. 

9 Talent is present here I4t. 

10 Animal tottered out. 1 l-j\ ing 
fellow in rags 1 14|. 

11 Measure of refractive power 
represented in a peridot O. 

13 Girl with recorder has 
rhythm . . . I 7 ). 

15 hut her doc is sard to 

show arrogance (">. 

18 Infernally like the Happy 
Hypocrite (7>. 

21 He showed » hat depths sail- 
ors can sink toto.St. 

22 Teenagers' first public evam 
(4» 

23 Intrusive cong heard by 
cral 1 101. 

24 Vacation in a remote place 
( 6 >. 

25 My. that's English wnr*. in 
stone 18). 


DOWN 

1 Annoyed with repctitiv, 
ornamental border Ci. 


2 Functions performed ly. 

C't»iici*A‘ cross'* urd page 14 



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"I Sir Oswald Mosley and his Black Shirts were 

X gaining attention and growing in strength. 


r / j 


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1947 WarCttEra *** 1979 


Mrs Thatcher is 
Prime Minister. 


1984 


was the year Wall Street 
collapsed. 

When Ramsay MacDonald 
went into coalition in the 
National Government to main- 
tain his premiership, Shinwell 
sided with the bulk of tbe 
Labour Party which refused 
allegiance. 

Shinwell was 51 in 1935 
when he stood against Mac- 
Donald. defeated the prime 
minister and then held his 
constituency of Seaham for the 
next 35 years. Baldwin became 
Prime Minister, Italy invaded 
Ethiopia, the Germans re- 
introduced conscription and 
outlawed the Jews. 


When war broke out Chur- 
chill offered Shinwell a post in 
the War Cabinet as Minister 
of Food. Shinwell, ever the 
rebel, decided to remain a 
member of the opposition. 

The last year of the war 
brought a new Labour govern- 
ment in which Shinwell be- 
came Minister of Fuel. It was a 
new age. Family allowances 
and the birth of the modem 
education system were intro- 
duced. So was the Cold War. 

Under Shinwell the mines 
were nationalized. But in 1947, 
the year of the first supersonic 
flight, he was forced from 
office after a series of contra- 


dictory statements to the Com- 
mons over the coal shortage in 
that most severe of winters. He 
moved to the War Office and 
also became Chairman of the 
Parliamentary Labour Party. 

In 1950, the year the Korean 
War began and Russia was 
busy testing nuclear bombs, he 
became at the age of 66 
Minister of Defence 

Steel was nationalized just 
before Labour lost office in 
1951. From then on Shinwell 
began to speak increasingly 
strongly against the unclear 
deterrent. In I960, the year 
Holy Loch became the British 
base for US Polaris missiles. 


he warned Hugh Gaits ke II 
that the issue would split the 
Labour Party.. 

But in opposition Shinwell's 
political influence diminished. 
In 1955, the year that Char- 
chill resigned, he retired to the 
backbenches. 

Manny Shinwell was 80 in 
1964 when Harold Wilson was 
elected Prime Minister with a 
majority of foer and Shinwell 
became a crafty and authori- 
tarian chairman of the parlia- 
mentary party. He rescued 
the post m 1967. He was angry 
that the Labonr government 
had begun overtures to enter 
the Common Market which he 


vehemently opposed. 

He was made a Life Peer at 
the age of 86 in 1970 when the 
first Russian spacecraft land- 
ed on the moon. Well into his 
nineties be remained a fully 
active member of the House of 
Lords and as late as 1979 — 
the year in which Britain 
elected its Gist woman prime 
minister — be was seen to stay 
op on til the dawn for an all- 
night sitting. 

Maintaining his indepen- 
dent spirit to tbe end he 
resigned the Labour Whip in 
1982 over the growth of Left- 
wing militancy in the party. 


OA Celebrating bis 
century. 

It is now almost t»o years 
since he 11 celebrated his one 
hundredth hkfhday * n 
Royal Gallery of She House of 
Lords. Much of thi"£ lK V rrsa “ 
tion was about the 
strike, led by Arthur Scargiiu 
which was then at its height 

The echoes resonated back 
about 60 years to the speech 
Shinwell made to the miners 
during the General Strike in 
1926. 

In Shin well's centuri so 
much had changed, and so 
little. 

Obituary, page 18 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 




Hospice m the Fvlde. Bispham. 
Blackpool. 12.45: and later visits 
St Winifred. Home for Retired 
Priests. Blackpool. 2.20: then, as 
Patron, the British Limbless Ex- 
Service Men's Association, she 
opens the Forces Help Society. 
Lord Robert* Workshops bun- 
galows and Constance Green 
Wing at the Blackpool Home. 
Lyiham Rd. Blackpool. 2.55. 

The Duchess of Kent attends 
a charity ball. National Sports 
Centre. Card! IT. 7.40. 

New exhibitions 
Paintings by Robert Jenkins: 
The Ginnel Gallery. Lloyds 


washers cO>. 

3 Government loan is 
grabbed, we hear |7). 

4 The Kmc in mounting debt 
- what J millsioni-! (7). 

5 The From is in a strong 
w ind - put eojt on (9j. 

6 Sister started holding one by 
the end of the dance O). 

7 Fault is to do with receiver 
( T ). 

12 Frenzied Pierides capture 
nvj'dcn and hide ■*)). 

14 Most of family science is the 
study of friction (9i. 

lb Heroin's concealed near ihe 
coast n 

17 This property sounds hum- 
Me to some <’’i. 

15 It was once sworn by Henry 
itoOiKlI 7 !. 

19 '"onst.mi amount of illu- 
mination O. 

20 Dual purpose weapon for 
two men i7». 

Siiiuiiiin in Puzzle No J7.U4D 


House. 16 Lloyd St. Manches- 
ter. Mon to Fri 9 to 5.30. (ends 
May 30). 

Paintings by Geoff Masters, 
Shirley Magilton and Louise 
Swarbrick; Central Library, 
Lion Yard. Cambridge; 10 to 5 
daily (ends May 14). 

Paintings by John 
Greensmith, Wendy Jelbert, Su- 
sanna Lisle. Barry Smith and 
Rex Tray home; The Wykeham 1 
Galleries. Stockbridge; Tues to 
Sat 10 to 5 (ends June 7). 

Music 

Concert by the Bath Georgian 
Festival Orchestra: Pump 
Room. Bath, 7.30. 

Concert by the Guildhall 
Orchestra: Central Hall. York 
University. 8. 

Two Choirs International 
Concert by Hervormd Kerkkoor 
'De Hocksieen' and the Sine 
Nomine Singers: Si Margaret's. 
Lowes loft 8. 

Harp recital by Susan Drake: 
Mere Parish Church. Wilis. 
7.3a 

Concert in memory of David 
M unrow: Si James The Greater. 
I^eicester. 7.30. 

Concert by the Hague Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; The Royal 
Hall. Nottingham. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Peter Wright: 
Rnihwell Parish Church. 8. 


Roads 


London and Southeast: AID: South- 
bound delays atone Dawion Rd between 
Downham Rd and Enfield Rd. A501: Water 
repairs reducing road wtdm along City Rd 
between CiusweH St and East Rd. M2S: 
Cuckwee delays due to lane closures 
between (unctions 4 and 5. 

The Midlands: MG: Contraflow between 
punctata 15 end 16. N ol Stoke-on-Trent 
MS: Roadwoncs SVJ of Banmanem be- 
tween junctions « end 5. Ml: Contraflow 
between functions 15 and IB 
I Nort ha mpton). 

Wales and Weft A3& Repairs and lane 
closures at Tamer Budge between 
Uskeard and Plymouth. A3« Temporary 
hgnts ax Sherborne Causeway between 
VeovJ and Mdbome. expect delays. A 420; 
Gas repairs witn temporary hgMs ai Two 
Mue HA. Kingswood; delays lor traffic 
■ravelling between Bristol and 

Qnpuanham. 

The North: MO; Contraflow between 
luncnons 31 and 32. M81: Construction oi 
a new motorway imk on the M6I af Walton 
Sununti: lane closures. AI (M£ Bodge 

E int repars in operation and contraflow, 
ad mg ton. 

Scotland (Glasgow): Niddrie Rd n 
ctowd between Prince Edward Si and 
Allison Si. dnrersHjns m operation. A947 
(Aberdeen): One lane each way m 
Anderson Drive, between Kmqsgate and 
Queers Rd rgunoaoout long delays. A96 
(Aberdeen}: Single fine traffic at 
Bucks hum approach with care 
Enformadon suppled by AA 


Food prices 


Tbe British asparagus season 
started a little late this year. This 
eagerly awaited gourmets* de- 
light will not disappoint tbe 
palate as it seems the cold 
weather which delayed - its 
growth has if anything enhanced 
its flavour. Asparagus is now 
carefully graded into five cate- 
gories marked by a coloured 
wrapper namely jumbo (yel- 
low). extra selected (blue), se- 
lected (red), choice (green), and 
kitchen and sprue priced from 
£ I JO to £3.00 a lb. 

As supplies of hothouse toma- 
toes are building up. prices are 
casing to I6-18p a ib. Good 
heads of round lettuce are 
plentiful at l8-24p and cos and 
webs 38-45p each. There is 
celery from Guernsey this week 
to supplement produce from 
Spain and Italy at 30-S0p a head 
and good quality watercress 
from 25-35p a bunch. 

Cape brocolli 50-70p a head 
and cauliflower 35-65p are good 
buys. Avocados from South 
Africa and Israel at 30-60p each 
are in good supply. There is a 
wide variety of fruit including 
strawberries 55-75p a half 
pound. Cape Packhams Buerre 
Hardy and Comice pears 45-55p 
a lb. Home grown rhubarb is 
reasonably priced at 20-35p a Ib. 

Special meat offers at shops 
and supermarkets this week are: 
Tesco: New Zealand shoulder of 
lamb 66p a lb. Beef fore rib on 
the bone £1.64 a Itr. Sains bury' 
New Zealand leg of lamb £ 1 .34 a 
lb. frozen chicken (up to 3'£ lbs) 
48p a Ib: Safeway: frozen mince 
beef 79p a Ib. 5Ibs packs 69p a 
lb: Marks & Spencer butcher 
style pork sausages 99p a lb. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Giovanni PaiskJIo, 
composer, Taranto, Italy, 1740; 
John Brown, abolitionist. Tor- 
rington, Connecticut, 1800; Sr 
James Barrie, Kirriemuir. I860; 
Lillian BayKs, of the Old Vic 
and Sadlers Wells, London. 
1874; Jose Ortega y Gassctt, 
philosopher and writer, Madrid. 
1883. 

Deaths: William Bradford, 
Pilgrim Father and Governor of 
Plymouth Colony, Plymouth. 
Massachusetts. 1657; Count von 
ZinzendorC, leader of the Mo- 
ravian Church, Herrubu, 1760; 
Friedrich *oi Schiller, poet and 
dramatist. Weimar, Germany, 

1 80S; Joseph Gay-Lussac, 
chemist and physicist, Haris, 
1850. 

The German garrison in the 
Channel Islands surrendered, 
1945. 


Weather 

forecast 

A depression to the NW of 
Scotland will fin as a further 
Atlantic depression takes its 
place, a weak frontal system 
win move across the W of the 
country. 


The pound 


Australia S > 9m 

AustnaSdi 24.60 

Belgium Fr 73L05 

Canada s 2.20s 

Denmark Kr 13.02 

Finland Mik SJG 

France Fi 11.13 

Germany Dm 3^0 

Greece Dr 212-00 

Hong Kong J 12.4C 

Ireland Pi 1.155 

Italy Lira 240000 

Japan Yen wwg n 

Netherlands GW 3.93 

Norway Kr 11.13 

Portugal Esc 23100 

South Africa Rd 4.1O 

SoamPra wa ne 

Sweden Kr 1141 

Switzerland Fr 7 w 

USAS ff; 

Yugoslavia Dnr 530-00 

Ra;os for small dwommanan l 
onfv os suwXiefl Dy Barclays 

Retail Price Index.- 361.6 

London - The FT Index closed 1 
13369 


bank nw« 
Bar* PLC 
































^ A 


•.V“ 




^>- "' } :?V> 

W/ •*• .«-] 


\ 


STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 
1336-9 (-8.8) 

FT-SE 100 
1602:6 (-7.5) 


US Dollar 

1.5455 (+0.008) 

W German mark 

3.3653 (3.0827) 

Trade-weighted 

76.2 (-0.1) 


Evered bid 
raised 

Evered Holdings has raised 
its hostile bid for the 
McKechnie engineering group 
by offering McKechnie share- 
holders the aitemativeof tak- 
ing convertible preference 
shares. ; 

The four-fpr-five share 
swap offer r emain s but inves- 
tors can opt to take Evered 
convertibles on a fiye-for-two 
basis for half their stakes. '• 

McKechnie, which fost 4p 
in the market to 252p yester- 
day, again rejected the bid as 
misconceived and ladiprously. 
low. 

P-E offer 

Hoare Govert, the broker, is 
bringing P-E International to 
the market with an offer for 
sale by tender of 4.4 miDioii 

shares at a minimum price of 

1 65p. At this price die compa- 
ny would be capitalized at 
£1 9.8 million. The application 
list will open at lQam next 
Thursday. 

..Tempos page 23 



issue 


. By Teresa l*ooIe - f 

Lqrd'Ffeyaeir, dieihahman of 
Marks and Spencer, yesterday 
ruled put the need for a rights 
issue to finance the company’s 
£1.5 billion four-year expan- 
sion plan. 

■ Announcing a 20 per cent 
improvement in pretax profits 
to£365.8 million for the year 
to the end of March, be said: 
“I think it is overioQked that 
Marks' and Spencer has gen a 
very strong balance sheet. Fop 
what we have outlined there is 
no need for ds to' go lothe - 
market-” 

The company intends to 
increase selling space by up to 
2 million square feet to 9.5 
million square feel by 1990 as 
well as stepping up lhe store, 
modernization programme. 
Forjy-fbur stores were con- 
verted to the new style last 
year and a further 2.7 million 
square feet in 63 stores will be 
modernised this year. 

■Despite. M&S*s search for 
more space. Lord Raynersaid 
the company had no intention 
of entering the takeover battle ' 
for Woolworth against Dixons 
Group. 


Oil set for 
temporary 
price rise 

ByDavidTYo 



Lord Raynen no plans to 
join Woolworth battle 

_ Total sales in 1985-86 were 
up 46 per cent to £3.73 
billion, with turnover in the 
United Kingdom ahead in all 
divisions. 

The previous problem ar- 
eas, women's and children’s 
wear, showed a strong recov- 
ery arid' overall clothing sales 
improved nearly .14 per cent 
by. volume. 

Hood sales showed -a near- 
13 per cent volume increase 
while homeware and footware 


were up 20 per cent. The 
company’s overall average 
price inflation was 3 per cent. 

■ Chargecard, launched a year 
ago, now has more than 1.2 
' million holders and was used 
to make purchases worth £320 
million ,of which 85 per cent 
; was general merchandise and 
the rest food. 

New holders are still being 
added at a rale of 10,000 a 
week and the company esti- 
mates that the card increased 
sales by 2 per cent, or some 
£65 million. 

Losses on the card were just 
more than £10 million but hs 
operation is expected to move 
into profit in three years' time. 
The average purchase made 
with the card is worth £23. 

Capital expenditure was 
lower than anticipated at £140 
million but is expected to rise 
to. about £350 million this 
year. 

- The group's positive cash 
flow resulted in an increase in 
interest receivable from £4.6 
million to £12.5 million. 

A net cash outflow is expect- 
ed for ihe .cuirent year and the 


out as 
) 20 % 


company will be seeking exter- 
nal finances. 

Mr Keith Oates, the finance 
director, said: “The anticipat- 
ed levels of debt will be 
comfortably within our bor- 
rowing capacity.** 

Progress was also made 
overseas with a strong turn- 
around at the Marks and 
Spencer division in Canada 
where profits of CS3 million 
replaced the previous year’s 
C$1 million losses. 

The first M&S out-of-town 
megasiore will open at the 
Metro Centre. Gateshead, 
Tyne and Wear, in October, 
and further edge-of- town 
Stores are planned at 
Cheshunt. Hertfordshire, 
South Gyle, Edinburgh, Cam- 
bridge and Wilmslow. 

The flagship store, at Mar- 
ble Arcb, will increase footage 
by. 40 per cent over the next 
two years. 

Theboard is recommending 
the retention of a slightly 
greater proportion of the net 
income because of the size of 
the investment programme 
and the total dividend is 
increased 15 per cent to 3-9p. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Blanket immunity for 
negligent regulators 


Berisford bidders 
both face referral 


EuroFenies up 

European Ferries Group re- 
ported pretax profit of £48.4 
million for the year to Decem- 
ber 31, 1985. up 9 per cent on 
1984. Turnover was up IS per 
cent to £280- mitlioa.- The 
dividead was raised by 0.45p 
lo4.75p. 

-Tempos, page 23 

£269.5m profit 

Aflied-Lyons made taxable 
profits in the year to March ! 
of £269.5 miUhffl against £219 
million. The dividend was 
raised by 27 percent to 9 Jjx . : 

Tenqns, page 23' 

Hambro £33m 

Hambro PDC, which owns 
Hambro Bank, yesterday fore- 
cast a pretax operating profit 
of not less than £33.5 million 
for the year to March 31 as 


World ofl prices have start- 
ed lo rise as North Sea oil 
looks set to pass $15 a barrel 
by the weekend in the wake of 
new support for Ozganizatibn 
of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries* (Opec) policies 
from China and EgypL . 

The seed to build up aocks 
in the United States has 'Belp- 
ed push prices on the US fixt- 
ures market beyond $15 and 
beading for $16, but cautious 
oil industry analysts .suggest 
the price will drop to $13 a 
barrel and remain there until 
winter buying programmes 
start. 

Prices have finned because 
China has said it will leave-its 
oil export policy unchanged 
and not step iip exports to cus- 
-tom efj who piwouslytxHjght - 
Ofcec oil. ■ V • 

- Egypt said it has ent exports 
by 200,000 barrels id 670,000 
a day, affoough it has told 
Opec this is a result of internal 


- By Jeremy Warner, Brainess Correspondent 

The Government is about to pampering businesses. 
caD a halt to die fast-moving Hfllsdown it w 
£48® million takeover . battle “totally nitfoir” if its 


part of a document sent to ixletia axis and has nothing to 
shareholders outlining details do with requests from Opec to 


of its offer for Hambro Trust. 

839 covered 

Posgate A Denby, the 
Lloyd's underwriting agency, 
has obtained errors and omis- 
sions cover for syndicate num- 
ber 839, one of its larger syn- 
dicates. The committee of 
Lloyd's ordered the syndicate 
to stop writing new business 
after April 30, because it could 
not obtain e&o cover. 

Bigger stake 

Wolters Samson Groep has 
bought a further 2.17 million 
Park Place shares. 14.8 per 
cent of the company, at 333p a 
share; givingit control of 22.4 
per cent. WSG has made an 
agreed offer for Park Place. 

Tf r 'T huvC Woolworth Holdings ye* 

l/ujo terday unveiled its defence 

William Sinclair Holdings document against Dixons 
and Imperial Chemical Indus- Group’s £ 1 .53 billion bid with 
tries have agreed in principle & hard-hitting attack on 
for I Cl to acquire the Sinclair Dixons’ “unwdeome and ill- 


support its attempts to push 
prices up. 

Analysis say prices are ris- 
ing because the 20-day strike 
in the Norwegian sector of the 
North Sea - which removed 
almost a million barrels a day 
from world production sched- 
ules — is being reflected in de- 
liveries to refineries, ]with 
traders having to pay more for 
crude which is available and 
can be delivered, as opposed 
to “paper" barrels which are 
often traded several times. 


for S&W Berislbril, tlie com- 
modity trading a nd sugar 
group, industry sources said 
yesterday. 

Sir Gordon Borne, Direc- 
tor-General ofFair Trading, is 
expected to recommend soon 
that both competing takeover 
bids for the company should 
be refereed to the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission for 
k^estigatiod.- 

Mr Paul Channon, Secret 
taiy of State for Trade and 
Industry, is likely to endorse 
the recommendation next 
week.- - 

The decision wfll caose sop- 
prise and confaskm m the 
City, where it bad been widely 
assamed tint although the hid 
by BerisfbrdV sugar rind, 
T*te& : Lyle, wwud be re- 
ferred, the competing offer by - 
flimm'Hold^gs -weald be* 
given the cowheadi ... 

Combining Tate A Lyle witii 
BeridbnTs British Sugar off- 
shoot would give the group 94 
per cent off fee UK sqgar 
market Hfflsdown, on the 
otiuer hand, has no sugar 
refining interests at the 
moment 

A reference of both offers 
would signals significant shift 
mGovenimeBt mergers policy, 
with the rremergence -of the 
principle of eveb-handed treat- 
ment ; -of bads in competing 
takeover situations. . ; . . 


Hfllsdown said it would be 
. “totally unfair” if its takeover 
bid were referred, 

Mr Harry Solomon, the 
food manufacturing company's 
deputy chairman, said: “If Sir 
Gordon examines each offer i 
on its merits, as we believe he 
- should, he would find a dear 
case for referring the Tate & 
Lyte bidirot no justification for 
an investigation of oar merger 
proposal -whatsoever”. 

He added that Hflbdown’s 
food manufacturing business- 
es used less than 1 per emit of 
all sugar produced in Britain 
and would therefore be incapa- 
ble of exploiting a merger with 
British Sugar to the detriment 
of Tate & Lyle. 

Tate & Lyle has been lobby- 
ing chO servants, ministers, 
MPs and. Lords with the 
argument that a ratified sugar 
. indnsfryv would be good: for 
. Britain, strengthening its posi- 
tion in the. Emvqiefln Commu- 
nity and the world market. 

Tate & Lyle said it would 
cooperate with a six-month 
Monopolies Commission in- 
quiry, but Hfllsdown has not 
yet decided whether to see ft 
through. 

• HBbdown was yesterday 
cleared of the need to make a 
cash alternative offer for 
Berisford at a price higher 
than its share offer. 


mentnf bids in competing ^ 
takrover sanations. meeting of the Takeover Pan- 

el, follows a gaff by Kktnwoit 
The Government has for Benson, Hfllsdown ’s merchant 
several years referred only bank, which triggered the cash | 
mergers tint would lead to a alternative possibility by boy- 
redaction fai competition. On a ing too many Berisford shares 
number of occasions' this has in the stock market The Panel 
left the field dear to. rival said it was satisfied the action 
bidden -which . do not own was “inadvertent**. 


Arrogance of Dixons shows lack 
of confidence, says Woolworth 


for ICI to acquire the Sinclair 
McGill Agricultural Seed busi- 
ness. The terms are being 
discussed. 

Kuwaiti trim 

The Kuwait Investment Of- 
fice has reduced its 


shareholding in Hi 
son to 3.97 million 
percent). 


Robin- 
res (8.7 


Dixons' "unwelcome and in- 
judged offer." ■ . 

Sir Kenneth Durham, chair- 
man of Woolworth, criticized 
Dixons' - “cacophonous arro- 
gance, which indicates its lack 
of confidence.” He saldfWe 
know where we are going and 
how to get there." 

■ Sir Kennethrwho took over 
only a few weeks ago from Sir 


By AfisonEadie 

Terence Beckett, said he bad 
never seen such a good team 
of young managers in his life 
as the WoolwQvifi managere. 
Sir, Kenneth was previously 
chairman of Unilever. 


qualified to ran a business of 
Woolworth’s size and diversi- 
ty. 

Dixons hit back with a 
carefully-prepared list of ques- 


. Woolworth, -in tbe deftnee ■*» ™s ujiy Wool- 
document, emphasized, the accounted for stock 

achievements of the manage- 5? extraondiimry 

ment sines it took over 3 fc Comet profits had 


years ^Tand^sed. the *«-* **. B & Q 
belief, that this management growth had slowed. 


was better placed than any 
other to maximize the future 
growth- of : Woolworth. It 
claimed that Dixons was not 


growth ted slowed. 

The acrimonious bid battle 
is soon expected to move into 
a higher gear. The first dosing 
date is May 22 



STOCK MARKETS I MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Oppenheim bids 
£91m for Aitken 


Dow Jones 1782.12 1+6^2) 

ESS DOW „.’t607&24 (+12^39) 

Hang Seng" f384-21 L^*| 

AnwttfdMK Gen — ™ 

Sydney; AO 124Z.3H-4.7J 

Frankfurt 

Commerzbank .. uowo 

Brussels: a . 

Paris: CAC Ctosed 

SKjf&neral Ctosed 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Base: IfflMfc -IMr . 

3-month !ntertanl| 1 10%-lOWk 

buying rats 

^me Rate 860% 

FMerai fitnds 6^4% 

3-month Treas^Bjte6l»*Dt , }b 

3 Dyear bonds 120- 'as^a 


CURRENCIES 


Ailad-Lyons 


" By Rkltard Lander 

Mr Nick Oppenheiiiu the Mr Oppenheim. who is also 
financier, yesterday launched chief executive of the Argyle 
his takeover bid for. Aitken Trust financial services hold- 
Hume Interaatidnsl, the di- ing group, would become 
versified ■ fi nancial services managing director of 
+I2p) group which has been beset by Tranwood and would be sue- 
boardroom ^ rifts- and plunging ceeded as chairman by Mr 
profits.. Ron Peet, chairman of the 

Pledging to ' concentrate Stockley property company. 
Aitken’s energies in- fewer Initial shareholder sound- 
ar^lMr Owiaiheim'is valtt- fogs had been encouraging and 
ins ms target at about £91 the offer has . already been 
million with an alkpaper bid accepted by the _ 1928 Invest- 
from Tranwood Group, the meni Tnist which owns 6.8 
Bear. Brand hosiery .-group . per cent of Aitken. Tranwood. 
where, he-has been chairman itself has built up a. 1 .2 per oent 


rancoorgani2foga£i..S million shareholding, 
rapital injection toe months Mr Oppenheim' said 

' ... ' ' , ... *' Aitketfs Canadian NCI tn- 
- The Ariken board wui meet vestment trust would be the 


Prudential 


Londov 

E: $1.5455 
L- DM33853 
t SwFr2.8W3 
PFriO-7lW 

£: YanZ52JB9 

6 lnd«w:76J2 


New Vane 

. 

S: DM2.1775 
$: Index; 1125 

ECO£n/a 
SOB £1 .17519 


today to- consider the ap- 
proach. 

Tranwood is .offering nine 
shares for every Aitket^ valu- 
ing Aitken at 198p a share 
after Tranwood .rose.l.lip to' 
22p yesterday. Aitken dosed 
. idp foghernt 17%. ' - 
: If.tlfiff Wd3s folly successful. 

Aitken shareholders would 
.Own 89 percent of Tranwood 


first divestment if the take- 
over succeed edNo decisions 
ted yet been taken on. the 
other divisions. 

-Aitken?* impressive profits 
growth record: came : to an 
abrupt halt last November 
when it announced that inter- 
im pretax profits had col- 
lapsed from. £3.08 million to 
£743,000, - 


Troubled 
Inmos 
may close 

By Clare Dobie 

\ Thorn EMI is considering 
dosing down Inmos, the trou- 
, bled semiconductor company, 

? among a range of other op- 
* tionSu The preferred solution 
is to bring in a trading partner, 

, but Thorn may sell share- 
? holdings in Inmos to financial 
, institutions or tell its opera- 
; lions entirely . 

ProgreK at Inmos, Britain's 
largest chip manufacturer, has 
. been disappointing since 
| Thom acquired 76 per cent of 
\ the shares from the Govern- 
; ment for £95 million, two 
years ago. At the time. Inmos 
was expected to break into 
: profit fairly soon-after acquisi- 
tion but it is Mill losing 
money. Thorn has continued 
to invest in new plant and 
Inmos is absorbing about £40 
million cash a year. 

% Innios was set up in 1978 to 
"put Britain at tfie forefront of 
chip technology. 

Thorn would like to attract 
backing for Inmos from a 
hardware manufacturer, pref- 
erably one which would use 
Inmos’s new transputers in its 
products. Floating Point, an 
American group, has agreed to 
use the transputer but is not 
expected to take a share 
holding. If Thorn foils to bring 
in a partner on the preferred 
basis, it will invite backers 
from the City to lake equity 
stakes. 

Thorn is prepared to lose 
control of Inmos on suitable 
terms, though it would like to 
retain a substantial interest If 
it fops to raise money by I* 
bringing in new shareholders, I 
Lnmos may have to dose I 
down. I 


Standard to 
seek Tokyo 
listing 

- By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Standard Chartered Bank, 
the international banking 
group, yesterday announced 
that it intended to seek a stock 
exchange listing in Tokyo. 

Standard is the subject of a 
£1 .16 billion bid attempt by 
Lloyds Bank and has said that , 
part of its defence strategy 
would be to gain listings on 
stock markets other than Lon- 
don. where the bank believes 
it is undervalued by investors. 

Lord Barber, the chairman, 
told the annual meeting that 
the Tokyo listing would dem- 
onstrate to shareholders in 
that region Standard 
Chartered's commitment to 
the Far East- However, the 
listing is seen by the bank as a 
long-term strategic move since 
it could take up to six months 
to achieve. It is bring spon- 
sored by Yantai chi Securities 
and Goldman Sachs, which is 
also helping with the defence 
against Lloyds. 

Standard is also considering 
seeking a listing m New York 
and may apply for seperate 
listings of the main compo- 
nents of the group in their 
respective local stock markets. 

The bank is still awaiting 
the forma) Lloyds offer docu- 
ment which, under takeover 
rules, must be published by 
next Tuesday. Standard’s- 
shares yesterday continued to 
foil towards the level of the 
Lloyds bid, dropping close to 
%Wp. When uoyds first 
launched its 750p-ft-share of- 
fer Standard shares were trad- 
ing as high as 890p. 

• The London International 
Financial Futures Exchange 
(Liffe). which opened for busi- 
ness in September 1982, trad- 
ed its 10 millionth contract 
yesterday. 


The Department of Trade and In- 
dustry has made a complete 
climbdown in the face of intensive 
City lobbying over the legal liabilities 
of the new self-regulatory organiza- 
tions, which are the centrepiece of 
consumer protection under the 
Financial Services Bill. A clearly 
unhappy Paul Channon, the new 
Secretary of State, announced yes- 
terday that the SROs would be given 
virtually blanket immunity against 
actions for damages. Some leaders of 
the newer SROs had maintained that 
they would dissolve themselves if 
they were not given this concession. 

The effect of the decision is to take 
away the common law right to sue for 
damages on the grounds of negligence 
from investors or members of an 
SRO. Both the organizations and 
their staff win now be immune from 
such actions. They can only be 
challenged if acting in bad faith, while 
individual members of an SRO 
remain liable under the common law. 

Mr Channon and Michael Howard, 
the minister chiefly responsible for 
the Bill, say they have not been 
bulldozed into reversing the 
Government's stated policy. Mr 
Howard's excuse for backtracking 
was that it was necessary “to get the 
system to work". It was, in the words 
of Mr Channon, “a pragmatic de- 
cision designed to get the system of 
SROs off the ground and to get 
members to serve”. 

In other words, the Government 
was successfully bullied in a manner 
which does not bode well for the 
future. It shows that, with delays to 
the Bill and the Stock Exchange big 
bang looming, the Government may 
need the SROs more than the City 
does, which gives the professionals 
strong bargaining power. 

Mr Channon and Mr Howard 
consider that immunity will bolster 
investor protection rather than 
slacken it They argue that SROs will 
be more willing to take disciplinary 
action against their members if they 
do not have the threat of massive 
lawsuits in the background. 

They argue that the experience of 
the Stock Exchange, which has 
successfully operated without immu- 
nity so far, is not relevant to the 
growing internationalization of mar- 
kets, which brings in overseas institu- 
tions, used to a more litigious North 
American environment. 

There is some sense in this, 
although the precedent of introducing 
legal immunity for the Council of 
Lloyd's under the 1982 Act is already 
generally regretted. That argument 
does not, however, justify extending 
immunity to preclude actions bought 
by members of the public for 
damages against an SRO. The statu- 
tory compensation scheme which will 
apply to investors will be severely 
limited, a point which Mr Channon 
did not appear to have grasped 
yesterday. It is important that this 
should be given more substance if 


investors are to lose their right to sue 
the regulators. 

To give a blanket immunity of this 
nature is a very blunt way of solving 
the problem. Some sort of limited 
immunity — say limiting actions 
against an SRO to prevent recovery 
of more than a certain sum — would 
have at least not been so fundamental 
a derogation of the law of negligence. 
Mr Howard admitted that “it was not 
an easy decision”. 

Moreover, it is arguable that the 
fear of negligence actions is one thing 
which keeps professions and rep- 
utable bodies on their toes. It imposes 
from within very careful procedures 
and checks to ensure that affairs are 
properly carried out An SRO not 
facing such discipline would not have 
such strong incentives to proper 
internal management. This seems 
likely to place even more stress on the 
supervision of the supervisors by the 
Seoirities and Investment Board. No 
wonder many of the more thoughtful 
City folk are beginning to wonder 
whether self-regulation was such a 
good idea after all, given the compet- 
itive pressures already emerging. 

Sound requirement 

Building societies have plenty on- 
their minds. Their main preoccupa- - 
tion — the Building Societies Bill — 
opens up new areas to explore. At the 
same time the Financial Services Bill, 
and the self-regulatory regime it 
introduces, will have a significant 
impact on societies. True, their 
traditional activities of taking depos- 
its and granting mortgage loans do 
not constitute investment business as 
defined in the Financial Services Bill 
but building societies are responsible 
for about a quarter of all sales of life 
assurance, by virtue of their link with 
the provision of home loans. 

Societies which do not merely act 
as agents referring the business will 
require authorization under the Bill. 
The society — or a subsidiary — will 
have to join a self-regulatory 
organization or seek authorization 
direct from the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board. This is a sound 
requirement societies’ life assurance 
activities often fell below their stan- 
dards in other aspects of their - 
business. Many do not provide their 
customers with a proper choice of 
policies, or taper policies to individ- 
ual needs. ; 

The duty of “best advice,” pro- 
posed by MIBOC, would require 
societies to amend their current , 
practice and take reasonable steps to i 
seek out and recommend what they 
genuinely believe to be the best 
product for a particular customer, 
available from any company in the 
market. And, if an endowment policy 
is not suitable, the society must not 
recommend one. The society that 
maintains agencies with the same 
companies year in and year out. 
would become a thing of the past. 


TEMPLETON 1 
INTERNATIONAL 





Templeton, Galbraith & Hansberger Ltd.: 
welcome new shareholders 

“Since the end of the year the trend in profits has continued owing to a further 
increase in assets under management which by 31st March, 1986 had reached ; ; 

$8.5 billion, an increase of 23 per cent, since the year end and 64 per cent since 
31st March, 1985. We estimate that profits after tax for the first quarter of this year • ■ 
were $7.4 million, a substantial increase over the same quarter a year ago. 

Wfe should point out however that the first quarter of each year; and this year in 
particular, tends to be one of our stronger quarters because of individuals' 
contributions to their retirement accounts”. 

From the Chairman s letter 

PRO FORMA FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 

Years ended 3Ist December 


Turnover 
Operating profit 
Profit before tax 

Profit for the year (see note below) 

Earnings per ordinary share 
(see note below) 


NOTE: On the basis used for the profits estimate fn the 
oflferfor sale document da\ed 12th February. . 
1986, Lhe profit for lire year would have been: 


1985 

$'000 

80,928 

29,936 

36*365 

29,810 


1984 

$'000 

62,384 

21,076 

22,424 

1S,001 


24,079 


and earnings per ordinaiy share: 


Fora mpyofihpChairman^Rnirw April W86.pieas*apply to The Secretary Templeton. Galbraith & Hansberger Ltd^. 
P-O, BoxN-7776. Nassau, Bahamas ono Cozeners & Co., IJToketthousr Yard, London ECJR TAN. 








FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


# a * a a -a 


WALL STREET 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street stocks moved higher 
eariyyesterday, continuing the 
upward trend begun late on 
Wednesday when losses were 
trimmed substantially, accord- 
ing to traders. 

Initial expectations that the 
auction of 30-year US bonds 
would be a success lifted the 

market, they said. 

further mild gams in oD, 
however, kept a lid on 
enthusiasm. 


May May| 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


The Dow Jones indnstrial 
average which at one stage 
early in the morning gained six 
points to 1.782 soon slipped to 
1,777.16, op 1 M. 

The transport average was 
np 0.61 at 783.98, with the 
utilities average np 0.83 at 
182.60 

The New York Stock Ex- 
change composite index was 
np 0.19 at 136J0 and Stan- 
dard and Poor's index was np 
032 at 236.40 in early trading. 




May May 
7 6 


May May 
7 6 



a 

Am' 

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Am. 

fc 

Am 

Are 


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Any 

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Ami 

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Blow 

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m-i 



weak dollar yesterday, dosing 
at 13445 after a high for the 




value against the continental 
currencies slipped, retreating 
to 33618 against the mark 




LONDON METAL EXCHANOB 
UmfltcM pric** 

OMcMlfcuiwre flpims 
Me* In * par roots* lw» 
sawrfa p w wii l isoynn w c* 
Rudoirwwa Co.Ud.namt 


teBW Mg* 


SO 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


SBZZSI^ 




ESS 

35iB3ai 


1 



INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


tm»uw Gommnf 


Wc* Choe pane* % WE 




mmm 

LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


TTve* Month Staffing 

Jur 86 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sflp 87 

Previous day's total op 
Three Montn Eumtow 
Jan 88 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

MnrB7 

USTrresaary Bond 

Jun8S 

Sep 86 

Dec 66 

ShortGitt 

Jan 86 — 

Sep 86 

Dec 88 

LwmGHR 

JunBfi 

Sep 86 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 _ 

FT-SE 100 

Jun 88 

Sep 86 


SS IS 

9096 
91-23 
91.17 
N JT 
N/T 

rest 19554 


High low Chan EslVot 

9017 90-05 90.13 3154 

90.99 90-90 90.97 742 

91 JO 91.20 9129 244 

91-29 81.17 91.32 75 

91.19 0 

9099 0 

„ Previous day's total ooen interest 20928 
93.42 93J3 3339 2054 

3345 9336 9343 1508 

9339 9323 3328 1fi6 

9304 93.02 9304 52 

Previous day ’s total open ntsresi 5881 
101-00 100-05 100-15 6166 


Previous day’s total open interest 1475 

102- 47 103-06 102-45 103-00 1S5 

103- 22 103-22 10322 103-20 5 

N/T 0 

Previous day's total open interest 13587 
12328 126-20 125-21 126-19 7098 

126-02 126-22 125-29 126-27 412 

N/T 126-26 0 

N/T 126-22 0 

Previous day's total open merest 1999 
162.30 16230 158.70 16130 769 

16430 16430 16315 183.45 13 


4^* 


MtfiUJW CMpMr 


OB 1J 

23b U 
14 QJ 

u as 
as- as 
630 48 
71 it 
111 41 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


14 U 283 

ifl 4 >m| 

S3 tfS 

84 33377 
40 3718.1 
JO 21 ISO 
10 12 MS 
S3 16 279 
88 


THE TIMES’ UNIT TRUST: INFORMATION SERVICE 


bm cam Om yu 


BU oiler Ctng 


BM osar Qng YU 


bu oa* cwg n 


, ' j i ' ,i, ;r tJ 'h t t t t 


HO. Hottamm BO. Boxnemuidn BH8 SAL 
03*5 717373 (bnkinai 


OA 1 Fan 
Men me Eauty 
WmtawTOB Band 
Amman Orawu 
Atm Riotc 
Asms 1 E«m 
Carnal Hasarva 
Coran a Enotgj 
Euodmh Capital 
Gml 
Jassan 

UK Growtfl Me 
1 Do Amu 
US Emm Co's 
Freatea ffioflre aa 


1225 1287 -04 82S 

S3.® »9* >1.4 4 «J 

1785 1911* +04 5.07 
1589 185.8 -07 2-58 

41.7 4*8 -02 in 

905 1032* -09 190 
BS 1 859 . . 1 54 

650 695 -04 271 

BS3 949* —04 144 
1959 1*52 -2M 293 

703 702 -06 .. 

929 99.7* -09 1 54 
1311 143.1* -13 106 
673 613 -05 0*3 

1903 2029* -27 123 


ALUED DUNBAR UNIT TRUSTS 
AOad Dunbar Cantre Cmmoon sttl IB. 
0793 610386 A 0793 29391 


M TniU 
Gnwm a income 

gC?-? 1 * 

A ct mi Trust 
Amman income 
mglt Incama TH 
BMjr tnoonw 
KtflYIWfl 
Com Sms Trim 


223.3 237.9 -15 372 

1363 145.1* -1.8 113 
229.0 3449* -*J 397 

3603 3839 -63 106 

5447 5601 -103 103 

300 329 -02 432 

3<06 2659 466 470 

1309 1489 -1 6 475 


GW Grand] 
SPs&Mr Go'* 

2nd Snder Ga s 
Hewn Trot 
Met Mn a o«ny 
O'HU EwrtDG* 
IMMOg* TU 


CwM Growth Me 
_[» Acctm 


KtfiYUU 1414 1537* -17 543 

GmSnTUI 305 319* .. 908 

mwmrtonal 771 82 1 -Oi 1.08 

Jmn Fund 96.1 1023 +07 091 

Pw*c Trust 1559 18S9 +0.1 1.08 

Amur Spd 9* 639 679* -04 131 

Sacs of Am* T« 2D43 3176c -24 072 

MdAaetVWw 22913440 -04 111 

GW a»Ab 37.9 399W -OI 296 

Smt«or GO'* 1166 1243 -14 294 

2nd Mai Co'* 1543 16*3 -15 244 

Dre a my Trust 81.7 67.0* -13 2.15 
JUIAn* OaJty 795 649* -05 234 
O hm EwnMps 1649 I9S9 -14 391 
Tncnnoocy Tat 907 96 1* -1.1 094 
Mow* Eramj* 130.8 1306 -09 5.13 

EunuSnUerGO'a 2 2*2 237.7* -14 299 

USA Inmpt Thai 9219 341.1 -33 140 

AR8UTMOT SECURITIES 
Oi. FMabuy PMewA London EC3A 1AY 
01-638 9676 0V2B0 65*0/1/2/3 
CUM Growth Inc 573 612 -13 1.72 

'DoAccum 641 689 -13 1.72 

Bwrtm A M 121 5 BJ +19 09B 
.Do&hVftmtraw* 66.1 099 +09 098 

Finance A Property 802 643 -19 334 

OS a Ftaad income *09 si. 4* -04 &«7 

Do Aeon 919 86 1* -®.7 647 

E*4ty Moome 74 4 799* - 1.0491 

Do Accwi 174.7 1669* -23 491 

Hnn YMU Mcoroa 739 79.0 -06 7.73 

bo Accum 1913 2045 -1.7 7.73 

MU Accum 714 765 . . 235 

Do Wbhdnd 69 6 749 .. 235 

MmgM Rmd 564 828 .... 

PMerence Means 303 323* .. 900 

Do Accum 963 102.8* . . 990 

BONUr GO’S Aocum 1393 1489* -14 138 

Work! Pwuiy 9m 99 105 -OI 1.15 
Pomona Tet UK 765 793 -14 1.63 

Portafco Tat Japan 699 03.1 + 1.1 Q .10 

Porttt*] Tet US 603 709 -06 1.10 

PortMo T« Eiaopn iO*fl 1007 +05 Oil) 

PMfcOO Tel HK 385 399 -03 010 

BAHlieOFFORD 

3J QM*| St EdHJUDti 913 BYY 
$1325 2561 (beWsflS -226 6068) 

M Ea 03) 4235 4421 +69 1 15 

Jeon Ex (43} 305 387.1 .. 028 

UK Ex pi 227 4 3*20* +73 1*5 


gw A Rued M 
Grown Equty 
OuardM 
N Anew 
Pacdlc 

Property Bars 


1246 1397 
211 J 2249c 
2955 308.1 
1329 1419* 
2004 2TU* 
2533 2695 


Smaier GOnfjinMs 207 1 2204* 
European Trust 2274 2*29 



UAMOEHS 
PO Ban 442. 32 SI 
3AJ. 

01-623 9333 
rag* toesme 
N Amir Trust 
Recownr 
GW Trust 
Si Vtoarr Inc 
Si VMant US GOi 
Tnmpl* Bar Sen Go'* 
Tmvie Bar USU 


Mery*i4*L 1 


5*3 S03* 
1075 114.4 
mo IDS 4* 
413 429* 
83.7 969 
753 785 
1666 1759 
3487 3765 


PC 


tr *■ . *; 


4219 4421 +99 1 15 

3*23 957.1 . . 028 

. . _ ... 2274 2*20* +73 I.4S 

PWlAnU 4460 4716 .. .. 

FU P*ra UK 199.0 2006 . . 

BG Amend 1563 1662 -21 057 

BO Enemy 1189 1273 . . 136 

BG Inc o me Greet 1969 211.7 -1.7 596 

BG Japan 1576 167.7 +14 090 

BG Tsemotogv 1502 1662* -2l 203 

dALne TMSr MANAOaS 
25/26 Aamranta SneL London WTX 4AD 
01-461 6295 

490 514 -03 0 

201 213 +02 a 

989 101 7 +12 0 

463 407 -03 7 

SMmeaon* Husi 749 7B9 -0.4 1 

bcome Oft TSt 46* 497 -08 4 


rt*r 


HAMBNOSBANX UWT TRUST NUWAOHIS 
Premier ut aom, 5. Reyregn Ro, B ren twood 

ElMX 

0277 317918 

Haemoe So* CD's 1265 1349 -14 192 

Hafarns N Amur 67 9 72.1c -04 092 

H*i*ree Jap A F E 1069 1111* +04 040 
If H r m Scandwt 773 821 +22 09* 

Hemtrat Europren fii.7 973* .. 094 

Hambros Canadian 470 500 -03 190 

Hembree Equay Me 853 903c -18 435 

Ha* ™ S5nnc 56* 62 1* -04 66* 

Hwrtra HaAun 569 604 -13 284 

porter UT AWnmeoreon 6 ReyWoh M. Hunan 


KMum 

46k GreaMOl SL BC3P t 
01-623 43KI £n 269 
KPI UK . 7069 

DO AMR 3213 

NPI (Marts 5*09 . 

Do Aeaen 6867 

Far Eaat Acc 729 

Doom 722 

Anwrlcan Ace 553 

DOOM 5*3 


<40 280 
-47 290 
-69 1.10 

-a a i.n 
+04 030 
+04 030 
-09 17D 
-14 770 




HORmCHUHKM 

PO B m 4. M oreleb WO WO 

0603 B222D0 

Group Timt El 190 1221 -025 336 

MO Trial OU 1274* >05 UO 


O PPE M PWW THUriiAHAqeKEIIT 
66k Canon Sbaat London GC4W6AE 
dartoga 01-236 30a5/1V7/6W 
fc l rtu abO M l CtoMb 1373 U69 -I 

ICOHLOrmB 823 068 - 


tr.r 


Spaa* Art 
Amadou dsam 
Japan Grertb 
Euroaan Growth 
UK Grew* 
Padlk: Growth 
Mgh IncM 
Baottcai means 
Do tarn 


1379 U08 -0J 086 

623 068 -14 194 

024 9812 +03 99S 

325 3*9 -04 029 

512 509* +08 US 

614 657 +04 212 

6*7 509 -13 031 

457 484 +14 131 

313 337 +03 7.16 

514 5*7 -05 221 

BU) 968 -S3 221 


+0J 151 

+03 are 
+04 are 
.. 924 
-06 136 
-VO 056 
-02 010 
-04 356 
•4.7 18 


252^H^Hataai wdv 7S 

Grew* And Me 6D7 -91 

Do Attun 1313 1*1 

Meorne FUnd TIB3 12E 

MO EqUtY Me 1229 130 

Do Aceun 1229 130 

urn Treat Me 1256 133 

Do Aceun 2148 22S 


«7 ~944* -13 186 
1318 7413* -18 186 
1185 126.1* -29 157 
1229 1309 -1.1 138 

1229 1306 -LI 156 
1256-1399 -22 110 

2148 289 -AS 116 


***** Ttmm 

0491 575006 ' 

W Growth 2816 28281 -29 082 

Meow* ■ 1922 2053* -72 44S 

WMOMrt Rac 1513 ME4 -L4 146 

Amer Grown 679 729 -08 0L77 

M BMtCIfl 702 65JM -03 062 

Per EaatXtarti 669 737 - -02 191 

Eunprtn Gdi 577 829 . . 148 

PROuncuMrntusre -• 

hre me ti on el - KBS 1174* -13 l.M 

Incoma T797 W14* -29 4.16 

CDn* A GW 969 1049c -03 072 

Far Eaaam 15*5 1959 +05 . . 

North Amarteen 1364 1* 63* -a* 292 

Spactal SB 2DB5 2232 . --B A 1.18 

TadmoMoy 1204 129.1 -29 035 

Enra Memaa . 844 898 .-09-596 


NLA Toawr. AddHcomM Hoad. Crop**, 
0W»» 43U OWHB 8011 


B130. MoTO irt. Mort Gaeaa. ni 20 L 

01-478 3377 

Hotaun EqBqr 3912 416.1* -72 3.10 

Eunpaan 873 933* +03 078 

Hoftom Comm* 500 503 -09 1.72 I *%' 

Hotoom HWtJne ; €72 714 -OS 6 - 1 * I 00 

Hansom M 8 98.1 -12 07* 1 

Japenen - «M 572 +09 096 

N American 602 72S* -09 032 

Haftom SMcSh 634 674 -1.1 338 

Hataom UK OawM 607 ' 188 -LA 328 
HeSwm BU Thai 1814 1869* . . 599 


3t Gaarosa way. SMnag* Harts 
0*38 3S6I01 

Growth Unis 78.1 809 284 

on a Ftod bit 1159 1199 . . 7.77 

mgn rncoma Unas 115 1 1223* . . 549 

won YMo GW um 564 584 . 1177 

WdGrortl IMB 117.7 12S.1* .. 03* 

N Amedewi Urts 69.1 734 . . 052 

Far Eat a urea 859 912 .. an 

SmaMr Cos Fim 664 737* . 131 

H8NC4PUMT TRUST 

rk ™* M Rd - E7 

IWMKWP 1349 1439* -28 4.18 




at# -02 atj 


039 -14 321 

1684 -1685 ' —13-877 


'V- : : t. • 

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\££> 



S3 


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% 


C TEMPUS ) 



>0 up 

add muscle to 
Allied defence 


Affied-Lyons* 1985-86 results 

aemonarated why the con,. 
j»ny is not giving a 

XXXX aboiu 

the bid from Elders IXL or 
anyone else. 


recovers, an event which may 
not lake place for years. 

• Pretax profit last year, of 
£48.4 million, up # per cent 
on I984 ; was more or less in 
Tow . - _ une with market expecta- 

r i n **^5- profits were nearly from. Shipping profits im- 
P fore ’ by 8 per cent, but 

rasraai t-69.5 million, a gain margins were squeezed due to 
cent on turnover competition in freight and 
only 4 per cent higher. Mar- coach business. . 

& n> Sr B ‘L£ 311 di - vi_ c » m P*ition • from the 
TlsHL-k® 6 * n J?5®* ns French govenunent-owoed 
£2ming 1.5 percent to 9.4oer SNCF continues to' be a 

JL’STS prt>Wem ’ does Sealink 
ftS? 6 *? wh€re low acquisilion 
SSL *** amounts effectively to a 

ch»ge and advanced 31 per subsidy and allows Sealink to 

undercut other operators. 


cent 

Earnings per share after 
extraordinary items rose 75 
per cent. The £67 million 
bonus from the sate of 
Allied's interest in 
Gastiemaine . Toobeys was 
party offset by £28 million 
restnrctunng costs, a £15 
million writeoff on the dis- 
I posal of-the Horn burg meat 
business, and a £7 million 
charge for bid defence costs. 

This year should bring 
further margin improvement 
as the cost-cutting pro- 
gramme continues. The 
growing popularity of more 
profitable lager also helps. 


Clive Anderson of the 
siockbrokmg firm Kilcat & 
Aitken is forecasting pretax 
profit of £59 million for the 
year . to December 1986. 
Much of the improvement is 
likely , to come from the four 
enlarged vessels and two new 
ships, one of which will come 
into service this year. 

The 50 percent expansion 
of container, capacity at 
Felixstowe will also be ready 
this year but it wifl .be 1987 
before it builds up to foil 
capacity. 

Forecast earnings of I6.7p 


Lager accounted for 46 per per share puts European. Fer- 
cem ofbeer production at the ties on a prospective multiple 


end of last year compared 
with 43 per cent the previous 
year. 

Profits are on course for 
£310 million, giving an unde- 
manding prospective p/e ra- 
tio of 10 on the shares 7p 
higher at 315pi However, the 
shares are taking a wait 
see attitude pending the ac- 
quisition of Hiram Walker’s 
spirits and wines division. 

Allied is Confident it will 
secure the necessary monop- 
olies clearances . in Britain, 
the United States and Cana- 
da, and that the Canadian' 
courts will throw out Gulf 
Canada’s appeal against the 
deal Gulf Canada has raVen 
over Hiram Walker since the 
sale was agreed with Allied. 

With expected annual cash 
generation of £75 million 
from Hiram, Allied is relaxed 
about allowing Its gearing to 
go temporarily above SO per 
cent to fund the purchase. 
Gearing at the year end was 
barely 1 7 per cent. The final 
mix between debt and equity 
that Allied chooses to fimd 
the acquisition will have an 
important .effect on earnings 
in the short-term. 

Until that mix is known 
and the deal is secure; the 
shares will probably remain 
hesitant. 

Enropean 

Ferries 


of 8.7. Such a low rating may 
look justified on the basis 
that the next interim an- 
nouncement is likely to be 
dull. However, the potential 
for corporate activity could 
keep the shares on the move. 

P & O still has a 20.8 
cent interest and Geof 
Sterling, P&O chairman, has 
a seat on the board. The US 
properties must look very 
attractive to him, as wfl! 
European Ferries’ 34.7 pa 
cent interest in Stockley. - 

P-E International 

P-E International is. a man- 
agement 'consultancy compa- 
ny with a strong bias towmds 
computer services. Now in 
the 52nd year of its existence, 
it is seeking a foil listing on 
the Stock Exchange by way of 
an offer for sale by tender. 

At the minimum tender 
price of 165p pa share, the 
sale will raise £72 million, 
£1.7 million for the company. 
Most of the rest of the shares 
are being sold by the 
company's pension fond. The 
market value will be £$.8 
million, of which 36 percent 
wifl be publicly held. .. 

: In the highly fragmented 
world of management consul- 
tancy, P-E reckons it is one of 
the biggest, yet it has only 1 
per cent of a market estimat- 
ed to be worth £1.9 billion 
Iasi year. The -sector as . a 
whole is growing at approxi- 
mately 20 per cent a year. 
Competitors include the big 


European Ferries has an 
interesting collection of busi- accountancy firms. PA, 
nesses in its shipping, bar- Saalchi & Saatchi (through 
bour operations and property Hay-MSLJ [ and CAP. 
divisions. Unfortunately, it 
still looks tike a case of ram 
tomorrow, or rather 1987, 
and shareholders must be 
wondering whether it will be 
worth waiting that long. 

Yesterday, the company 
announced its results for the 
year to December 31, 1985, 
and revealed that the proper- 
ty division took a £1 5 million 
write-down' on its Houston, 

Texas, development This 
amounts effectively to a par- 
tially finished suburb in the 
once-booming oil city. This 
development has now been 
put on ice. . 

This leaves European Fa- 
with £60 million of 
its 


nes 


unusually for a ^people’s” , 
company, each share, is 
backed with 74J 
property assets, ihe nearest 
comparison is CAP Group 
which is on a 23.6 multiple on 
prospective. April 1986 earn- 
ings. P-E is on an historic 
(December 1985) multiple of 
25. 

In the year to December 
31, 1986, P-E should manage 
a 20 per cent increase m 
pretax profits with ease. 
There will be a contribution 
of £250,000 due to over- 
funding of the pension fund, 
and with a J8 per cent tax 
charge, the company could 
earn 9.5p pa share, putting it 
on a prospective multiple of 


Houston property on its on a prospective muiupie or 
books withliitie prospect of a just over 1 7 at the mi n imu m 
until the ofl price lender price. 


return 



jama 0/ 25 Apri the ftonl of Directas tortte parwWdi 

toss d f&Sttm lot the Group art afFis. 173ra lor Mouhna bA. teel 

atidta take account d flte to arrears brought knari ri Fix. 32.6m. 

xftdateti cash Bow arnourts 

p and to Fa 150.8m as against Rs. 181.4m o me previous finanoaf year lor 
:SA 

jts gi uouiMS SA and ol fte Group can t» suramarisad as Wows 
fin Frs.mJ 


prate 
dors tax 


vote 

trial 

xaaBL 

Flow 


Investments (net) 


K2ME2B 

■■■■ 

Coal 


3327,0 

211.6 

71.7 

543 

mo 

165.1 

2292 

23170 

81.7 

1.D 
-170 
' 236,5 

178.8 

150.8 

1807.4 

% 

46.7 

206.9 

168.5 

181.4 


been recast aeranww- 

ed a loss to Mfi SA and the Ba® to ***** n ! aa ® s: 
row f that was matted* lo«r ftw hadtetft apecat 

ss, «™*te 

arial casts earned otf in »« Iasi *bw years vras 

BOKuehn nwOTte gB sw j tos ™ aS j C | S provisions ol Rs,11m 

SSSSnaatt- - 



Extel 6 set 
to make 
purchase 9 

By Clare Dobie 

Extd, the financial and raring 
information group, plans 10 
make a large acquisition in the 
near future. It would like to 
expand its financial informa- 
tion, publishing and printing 
businesses. 

Mr Alan Brocket - , chairman 
and chief executive, denied 
that the plan was part of a 
defensive strategy. Demerger 
Corporation, whose bid for 
Extel recently collapsed, and 
Mr Robert Maxwell, the pub- 
lisher, are barred from bidding 
for Extd for the next 12 
months. 

Mr Brooker announced yes- 
terday that Mr John 
Barkshire. chairman of Mer- 
cantile House Holdings, is to 
become non-executive deputy 
chairman of Extel, in place of 
Mr George Mann, who will 
remain on the board for 
another year. 

Enters profits rose from 
£10.9 million to £14.7 million 
before tax in the year to March 
31 and the dividend has been 
increased from 6.7 5p to I Op. 

Following last year's rights 
issue there was a swing from 
interest charged of £882,000 to 
interest received of £41,000. 

Of the £19 million rights 
issue proceeds, £U million 
has been spent on introducing 
television to betting shops. 
Profits in the sporting and 
financial services division foil 
from £6.75 million to £6.20 
million as a result of the costs 
of this investment. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Recovery likely to continue 
after Wall St fuels rally 


Another dull day yesterday 
had share prices slipping from 
the outset on persistent small 
selling due to political consid- 
erations ahead of the election 
results, fears of further rights 
issues and receding hopes of 
another cut in interest rates. 

But shares staged a techni- 
cal rally as Wall Street opened 
firmer. Most dealers expect 
the recovery lo continue today 
as investors buy stock for the 
three-week account, which be- 
gins next Monday. 

The FT 30-share index, 
which had tumbled by more 
than 22 points at one stage, 
ended 8.8 points lower at 
1.336.9. while the FT-SE 100 
closed 7.5 points down at 
1,602.6. 

Leaders finished between 
4p and 8p down, but Allied- 
Lyons again resisted the trend 
at 31 5p, up 7p. relieved at the 
absence of a rights issue and 
pleased with profits that 
matched best expectations. 

Gilts came through un- 
scathed. helped by the 
strength of sterling. Index- 
linked stocks rose by £1. 

It was a different story m 
stores, still numbed by the £72 
million cash call from Harris 
jeensway. Harris dropped to 
8p, before later rallying to 
242p — a net Call of 6p. Marks 
and Spencer did not help 
sentiment by producing prof- 


its at the lower end of expecta- 
tions, but still np 20 per cent 

The shares fell initially to 
199p, but rallied to 204p. 
down 4p. Other stores lan- 
guished in sympathy, but end- 
ed wen above the worst. Sears, 
reporting next week, lost 3p to 
H7 J Ap after adverse com- 
ment. Empire at 198p gave 
back Sp on its recent specula- 
tive rise. 

Electronics remained vul- 
nerable after Wednesday's set- 
back at Diploma, which was 
280p, down 26p — and a loss 
of 80p since the figures were 
announced. Good profits 
failed to help UEI at 276p, 
down 6p. but Amstrad re- 


bounded 27p to 509p on 
growth prospects. 

Profit-taking cut 17p from 
TT Group at 561p, but Wil- 
liams Holdings was hoisted 
30p to 685p after the 
chairman's comraeats at the 
annual meeting. Rank 
Organisation attracted strong 
speculative support on vague 
reports that Bond Corporation 
had acquired an interest. The 
company refused to comment 
on the reports. 

Recently two big stockbro- 
kers have upgraded their prof- 
it forecasts. Aitken Hume was 
a late feature at I74p, up !6p 
following a bid from 
Tran wood. 

Banks remained overshad- 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

aw* 

Brookmount («“ 
Chancwy Sacs 
Cranswicfc M “ 
Davies 0Y H 
Debtor (130p) 
Ferguson y) (lOpj 
Gofej Qm Trot (1 
Granyta Surface 
Green {El (120pl 

BSCS nm 

Jurys Hotel (115 p> 
Lee inti (leap) 
Lexicon pis 
Loam care 
Macro 4 (1Q5p) 
Muettrfin (if 
Realty Useful (3 
Splash Proas { 
Template* t2l: 




196 -3 
220 45 
288 
81 -2 
103 
205 41 
141 -3 
28-2 
218+2 
83 
125 
119 -2 
133-5 
106-2 
159 

suspended 
92 
133-3 
122 +2 
366-2 
72 
208 


. (13001 
Tech Prefect (I40p) 
underwoods (i80p> 
Usner (Frank) (lOOp) 
Weflcome (I20pi 
Wickes (I40p) 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
BS Nip 
FAC Eure N IP 
Greycoat N/p 
Hestair N/P 
Inti Leisure F/P 
Low & Boner N/P 
Ratnera N/P 
Saatctu & S n/p 
S ate Tiiney n/p 
S hare Drug F/P 
(issue pnea in brackets). 


72-2 
99 +2 
219-5 
140 
181 
101 
187+2 
161 


13-2 

10 

256-2 

a -2 

105 

43-10 

44-1 

36-4 

2-7 

350 


owed bv the disappointing 
profits from Royal Bank 
Scotland, 4p lower at 332p. 
Nat West lost ISp to 870p. 

European Ferries eased 3p 
to I44p after profits much as 
expected. Rotaflex, up 7p to 
350p, continued to reflect 
satisfaction with the 
company's strong resistance to 
the Emess Lighting terras. 

Wedgwood eased 8p to 
355p, awaiting takeover devel- 
opments. Disappointing prof- 
its knocked 7p from AE at 
I46 jj. Be tier- than -ex pec ted 
earnings and a sharp rise in 
the dividend foiled to support 
Extd at 375p, down 5p. WSL 
Holdings was marked up 10p 
to 163p. 

There is a presentation of 
the company next week and 
Messel, the broker, is believed 
to have a favourable circular 
in the wings. Tate & Lyle 
remained on offer at 573p, 
down !2p, because of the 
Berisford bid situation. Re- 
cent speculative favourites 
Rowntree, at 496p and Park- 
land Textile, 142p, fell by I2p 
and 8p respectively. 

Oils were supported by the 
latest flare-up in the Gulf war, 
with BP 8p higher at 553p 
ahead of next week's first- 
quarter figures. Ultramar im- 
proved by 5p to I85p as IEP 
Securities increased its 
holding. 


Bankers 
split on 
rule poll 

By' Richard Thomson • _ 
Banking Correspondent • 

Disagreement surfaced yes- 
terday in the British Bankers 
Association over how to con- 
duct a poll among banks on 
the question of abolishing the 
O'Brien rule which prohibits 
banks from owning more than 
1 0 per cent ofa money broker. 
The role was responsible for 
hailing a proposed merger 
between Morgan Grenfell and 
Ex co, the money broking and 
foreign exchange group. 

The executive committee of 
the BBA is believed to havd 
decided to conduct a secret 
poll among a handful of key 
banks. ! 

But Mr Alan Osrich, chair- 
man of the BBA's foreign 
exchange committee which 
first proposed a polk believes 
all banks must be asked. ■ 
“You cannot keep this sori 
of thing secret for long and.it- 
makes more sense to canvas 
all the banks", be said yester- 
day. A broader poll would 
carry more weight with the 
Bank of England which has 
the final decision on whether 
io repeal the rule, he added. 

The BBA's foreign exchange 
co mm i tee has recommended 
that a poll be taken. 

Mr Osrich said; “I do not 
know exactly how a poll 
would come out. but there is a 
strong feeling among the 
banks in favour of keeping the. 
status quo because ii has 
worked." 



JLYi -fi-J 




m 





An All-Out Capital Growth Investment for Y)u 


F ramiington European Fund aims for 
maximum capital growth through invest- 
ment in shares quoted on the principal 
European stock markets. 

Europe is now one of the most popular areas 
for investment. But it is a diverse and complex 
market; for investment success strong links with 
the continent are highly desirable. Framlington’s 
are with Credit Commercial de France, enabling 
us to combine CCFs expertise and knowledge 
of the European market with our own eminently 
.effective approach to long term capital growth. 

THE FRAMIINGTON APPROACH 
Our special style is to concentrate on smaller 
companies and try to identify those with really 
good growth prospects before the rest of the 
. market recognises their promise, aiming for 
exceptional capital growth performance. 

The results of this have been good, especially 
over the long term. 

. OUR RECORD 

The two.previous Framiington funds which have 
most closely followed this approach have been 
Capital Trust, investing 1 in UK. shares; and 
American and General Fund, investing in the 
USA. Both have done well. 

Over the ten years to 1st April Framiington 
Capital Trust was the very best performing of 
all the 275 unit trusts monitored by Money 
Management over the period. It turned an 
original investment of £1,000 into £11,150. 

And over seven years, our American & 
General Fund (started 1978) was one of the 
two best performing unit trusts out of the 27 
investing in North American shares. It turned 
£1,000 mto £3,639. 

OUR EUROPEAN LINK 
The manager of the fund is Philippe Herault, who 
has been seconded from Credit Commercial de 
ftance. He is our link into CCFs research, while 
working in London with the other Framiington 
fund managers. 

The fund will have a bias towards smaller 
companies: it is, for example, authorised to 
invest in the French Second March f. 

• In geographical terms the current emphasis of 
investment is on France (36 per cent), Germany 


( 14 per cent) and Switzerland ( 14 per cent) with 
smaller holdings in Sweden, Italy, Holland, 
Spain and Belgium. There is currently a sub- 
stantial flow of new money into the fund. As 
this is invested, the proportions will change. In 
particular; the proportion invested in Germany 
is likely to be increased. The fund has powers 
to invest in Britain but will not do so for 
the present. 

LUMP SUM INVESTMENT 
You can make a lump sum investment simply 
by completing the form below and sending it 
to us with your cheque. Units are allocated at 
the price ruling when we receive your order. 
The minimum investment for a lump sum is 
£500. There is a discount of 1 per cent for 
investments of £10,000 or more. 

MONTHLY 
SAVINGS PLAN 

S tarting a monthly savings plan is 
equally easy. The minimum is £20 
per month, with a discount of 1 per 
cent for contributions of £100 or 
more. Accumulation units are used and are 
allocated at the price ruling on the 5th of 
each month. To start your plan, complete the 
application and send it with your cheque for 
the first contribution. Subsequent contribu- 
tions are by the direct debit mandate which 
we shall send to you for your signature. 


Investors should regard all unit trust invest- 
ment as long term. They are reminded that the 
price of units and the income from them can go 
down as well as up. 

By 2nd May the price of units had risen ' 
16 per cent to 58. Op, compared with 50.0p : 
when the fund was launched on February 14. ; 
The estimated gross yield was 0.89 per cent 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Applications will be acknowledged; certificates for ' 
lump-sum investments will be sent by the registrars, : 
Lloyds Bank Pic, normally within 42 days. 

The minimum initial investment is £500. Units may ' 
be bought and sold daily Prices and yields will be 
published daily in leading newspapers. When units are" 
sold back to the managers payment is normally made 
within 7 days of receipt of the renounced certificate. 
Savings plans can be cashed in at any time. 

Income net of basic rate tax is distributed to holders of . 
income units annually on 15 July. The first distribution ' 
■will be on 1 5 July, 19S7. 

The annual charge is 1% (+VAX) of the value of the 
fund. The initial charge, which is included in the offer 
price, is 5%. 

Commission is paid to qualified intermediaries at the 
rate of 1*4% (plus VAT). Commission is not paid on. 
savings plans. 

The trust is an authorised unit trust constituted by ' 
Trust Deed. It ranks as a wider range security under the 
Trustee Investments Act, 1961. The Trustee is Lloyds 
Bank Pic. The managers are Framiington Unit-.- 
Management Limited, 3 London Wall Buildings, 1 
London EC2M 5NQ. Telephone 01-628 5181. " 
Telex 8812599. Registered in England No 895241. 
Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

This offer is not open to residents of the Republic of 
Ireland. 


TO: FRAMLINGTON UNIT MANAGEMENT LIMITED, 3 LONDON WALL BUILDINGS, 

LONDON EC2M5NQ 


i 


I wish to invest 

£ 


LUMPSUM 


in Framiington European Fund 
(minimum £500) 

I enclose my cheque payable to Framiington Unit 
Management Limited. I am over 18. For accumulation 
units in which income is reinvested, tick here Q 


MONTHLY SAVINGS 
I wish to start a Monthly Savings Plan for 


£ 


in Framiington European Fund 
(minimum £201 


I enclose my cheque for £ for my first 

contribution (this can be for a larger amount than 
your monthly payment). I am ewer 18. 


Surname ( Mr/Mrs/Miss/Title ). 

Full first name(s) 

Address - 


Signature. 


(Joint applicants should all sign and ifneccessory ghv details separately ) 


Date. 


E • 


r<*Js 


te, 

nd 

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nd 
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(May 5) 
Tom the 
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■tti <C 


24 



THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


?( 


K 

tf 


V± 

T« 


« 

w 

t£ 


lr 

JT 

Y< 

in 

Y. 

Y< 


T» 

•et 

rti 


l 


Even the prophets will be pleased with this profit. 


1985/86 

£269.5m 


1984/85 
£21 9.0m 


1983/84 
£1 94.9m 


1982/83 
£1 59.6m 


1981/82 
£141. 2m 









PRE-TAX PROFIT 


yons 


iirtt 


[P , 

wbi' 


! 

[i 9 



Not many would have predicted that our pre-tax profit 
would rise from £2 19m to j£269.5m. Even a forecast based on last 
year’s excellent growth would have been well below this year’s 
increase of 23%. And would our shareholders have foretold their 
fortunes? The record dividend per share will be 9.5p. That’s 
an increase of nearly 27% on last year. This shows our confidence 
in the future. 


1985/86 

9-5p 


1984/85 


1983/84 7-5p 


1982/83 6.H]p ■ 

1981/82 6.05p n 1 

aIU-L 


ri 


A 



DIVIDENDS PER SHARE 


Our spirits were raised even higher this year, not to mention 
our wines. The more we invest in our pubs, restaurants and off- 
licences, the more customers went into them. Our beer went down 
so well that our profit went up. 

People have also been enjoying more of our food in the U.K. 
and abroad, (especially in North America). In fact our food division 
has been savouring a remarkable increase in profit for six years 
running. 


1985/86 

26.4p 


1982/83 


1984/85 
1983/84 20.1p 
lR.Sp 


u 



i * EK1I 

1981/82 1 Tj 

aILJ-L 


.yons 


EARNINGS PER SI LA RE 


With our continued investment throughout the world, in our 
household names in all divisions, it’s no wonder our performance 
has improved at such a rate. Our earnings per share have grown by 
3 1 % , going from 20- 1 p to 26*4p. 

As our profits say we’re going on growing. 






N ' » 


c — — 









f^>! 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


25 


Tfe 


One in five catches DIY 
habit in £2.5bn market 


•'N- 





I 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

J2C in five 

iack |e s do-it-yourself jobs 
around the house, averaging 
five projects in the past year 
or some ii is a continuous 
process, almost compulsive bv 
nature, reflecting both base 
and cosmetic needs." a survey 
oTconsumer attitudes towards 
DIY found. 

The compulsion means 
good business for the DIY 
manufacturers and hrtajlere, 
whose sales year is now at its 
peak. 

The survey by the market 
analyst NOW Research sug- 
gests that more than 16 mil- 
lion households in Britain are 
hkeiy to spend £3 a week on 
DIY products this year, which 
puts a value of about £2.5 
billion On the market. 

The average household m- 
yolved in DIY spent about 
£150 last year and is likely to 
spend more- than £160 this 
year, suggesting an increase of 
l about 7 per cent. The increase 
last year over 1984 was about 
1 5 per cent. 

This easing of growth un- 
derlines the widespread view 
that DIY is now a mature 
market. 

It has long expanded out of 
its original province of the 
small number of households 
relying on traditional male 
skills and technical 
knowledge. 

The market now embraces 
all socio-economic groups, 
women and men, young and 
old, according to the survey. 

In the past year at least S2 
per cent of women surveyed 
had handled at least one DIY 
task. Among men 74 per cent 
had done the same. At least 


Growth in the £295 mSUon- 
a-year tools and equipment 
market is likely to be limited 
after the end of this decade, 
according to. a survey by 
Market Assessment; the mar- 
ket analysts. 

Potential demand is largely 
met. leaving mainly replace- 
ment sales, the survey says. 

Hand tools sales are likely 
to he hit further because of 
increasing competition from 
power tools and the sales of 
simple self-assembly 
furniture. 

The hand tools market 
dropped in value, in real terms 
,by a third between 1978 and 
1984, although the tradrriftnpl 
manual toots are still the 
biggest single sector, worth 
about £150 million at retail 
values. The market has recov- 
ered slightly since bottoming 
ontin 1982. 


Voinme sales of paintbrush- 
es and rollers, which are 
replaced frequently, bare 
moved ahead, reaching about 
44.4 mflfioa units by the end of 
1984. But falling prices and 
margins have squeezed real 
market value to about £28 
nulfion at retail values. 

Sales of power tools were 
valued at £68 million in 1984, 
a rise in real terms of 14 per 
cent since 1980. Black & 
Decker is market leader in this 
sector with an estimated 85 
per cent of sales. 

Workbenches were selling 
at the rate of about £9 million a 
year in retail terms by 1984. 
The sector was worth only £4 
million retail in 1979 . 

DIY Toots and Equipment: 
Report 552, Market Assess- 
ment Publications, 2 Duncan 
Terrace, London Nl. £250. 


half of those aged 55 or older 
had tackled a DIY job. 

Even young children are 
likely to have some influence 
on tbe decor of their own 
bedrooms, while children aged 
II or more can have an 
impact on decisions on style 
and colour in family rooms. 

Women, the survey found, 
were more likely to be the 
instigators of DIY projects, 
having been influenced by the 
media and advertising. Men 
were primarily the doers, 
while holding sway on techni- 
cal issues— choice of tools and 
working methods — and often 
on brand selection. 

But DIY products are in- 
creasingly likely to be bought 
by women as gifts for men, 
with presentation and packag- 
ing playing key roles, the 
survey found. 


. Group discussions with 
DIY enthusiasts of varying 
levels of competence were part 
of the survey. Most had in 
common their urge to im- 
prove the home. They looked 
on DIY as part of their leisure 
activities, although the key 
motivation was cost 

Secondary motivations 
were concern over “cowboy" 
builders and personal satisfac- 
tion and pride in a DIY 
achievement 

DIY householders were es- 
pecially sensitive about prices, 
the survey found. But in some 
areas, especially tools and 
electrical products, product 
quality and reliability played 
an important part 

Edge-of-town DIY 
superstores were liked for 
their longer trading hours and 


Sunday opening, but they 
were criticized for poor quali- 
ty of sales staff Customers see 
them ail as similar, said the 
survey. 

Only the experienced 
among DIY adherents like the 
builders’ merchants. Small lo- 
cal DIY and hardware shops 
are seen as old fashioned, 
uncompetitive on price and 
likely to decrease in numbers 
even though they often pro- 
vide expert advice. 

Tbe most frequently tackled 
• DIY task, is the painting of| 
interior woodwork, with $1 
per cent undertaking the task 
last year. 

Wallpapering was the sec- 
ond most frequent job (38 per 
cent of adults), followed by 
laying of carpets or tiles (24 
per cent) and fixing shelves 
and cupboards to walls (23 per i 
cent). • 

Twelve per cent of adults 
tackled some plumbing, 10 per 
cent electrical re-wiring and as 
many again some plastering of 
internal walls. About 7 per 
cent made or renovated , 
furniture. 

Installation of double glaz- j 
ing attracted 3 per cent, the ! 
same proportion that built 
internal partitions. Only 2 per | 
cent tried installing central 
heating. 

There are more DIY house- 
holds in the North-east and 
the Midlands than anywhere 
else, although DIY is popular 
in the South of England and 
Scotland. But there are fewer 
DIY adherents in London, 
eastern England and York- 
shire, the survey found. 

DIY NOW '- the Consumer 
View , NOW Research, 80 St 
Martin's Lane, London 
WC2N 4AA. £850. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• VAIIX GROUPS Interim 
dividend 4.18p (3.74p) for tbe 
24 weeks to March 15, 1986. 
Turnover £73.55 million (£62.9 
million). Pretax profit £6.22 
million (£5. 1 1 million). The 
board reports .that, given a 
reasonable summer, the com- 
pany is on target to achieve at 
least a similar increase in profit 
in the second half-year. 

• USHER-WALKER: Total 
dividend for 1985 7Jp (6.6p). 
Turnover £10.99 million 
<£10-15 million). Pretax profit 
£845.000 (£784.0001 Earnings 
per share 20.68p (I8.46p> 

• FAIRLINE BOATS: Half- 
year to March 31. 1986- Interim 
dividend 2p (I.Sp). Turnover 
£5.78 million (£4.26 


Pretax profit 


million). 

£403,000 


(£252,000). Earnings per share 
7.lp(4.7p). 

• C R (HOLDINGS* Half-year 
to Dec. 31, 1986. Interim divi- 
dend 1.6p (same), payable on 
July 3. Turnover £12. 17 million 
(£16.46 million). Pretax profit 
£743. 000 (£ U8 million I. 

• FUJITSU— GTE: Tbe two 
companies intend to form a 
joint venture for developing and 
marketing private branch ex- 
changes and related business 
communications systems for 
North America- A definitive 
agreement is expected to be 
signed by the end of this year. ' 

• UNITED BISCUITS: The. 
annual meeting was (old that the 
first-quarter pretax show a 
substantial increase compared 
with the same period last year. 


t nse 


This will mean a 
in profit for the hall-year. 

• WILLIAMS HOLDINGS: 
The board forecasts a net divi- 
dend of I2p a share for 1986 — 
an increase of 50 per cent over 
last year— which will be paid 4p 
as an interim and 8p as the final, 
the annual meeting was told. 
Williams’ acquisition of Fairey 
Engineering is expected to 
contribute substantially to the 
group’s success and its order 
intake has improved consid- 
erably over tbe last few months. 

• WOODHOUSE AND 
RIXSON: For the first four 
months of tbe current year, sales 
and order intake are well ahead 
of the corresponding period last 
year, the annual meeting was 


told. The company looks for- 
ward to 1986 with confidence. 

• BBA GROUP: Tbe results for 1 
first quarter of the current year 
are ahead of the previous year ! 
and the board expects a year of | 
excellent progress, the annual 
meeting heard. Steps have re- 
cently been taken to establish a 
new management structure 
which recognizes the group's 
rapid growth. 

• HUNTING ASSOCIATED 
INDUSTRIES: Mr CKve Hunt- 
ing. the chairman, says in his 
annual statement that he be- 
lieves prospects for continuing 
growth in 1986 are good. Tbe 
group's defence business has a 
strong order book, which should 
result in a further increase in 
profits from this sector. 



HOTELS 


GROWTH IN THE 

1980’s 

“We cater predominantly for 
the business community 
and the encouraging out 
look for 1986 in con- 
junction with an ex- 
pansion of some 40% 
in hotel rooms to 
6,400, arising both 
from acquisition 
and new 
buildings, will 
lead 

shareholders into 

expecting 1986 to be another growth year. 
Such expectations are more than justified. 

John Bairstow, Chairman 

With 70 hotels and three new ones tinder 
construction Queens Moat Houses is one of the 
largest hotel groups in Britain.The Group has 
expanded rapidly throughout the 1980’s, as 

reflected in its profit before tax. 






For a copy of the 1985 Report & Accounts write to:— \ 

C mpany Secretary, Queens Moat Houses P-LC, FREEPOST, Romford, Essex RM1 2BR, 



Gtvnwed 

International 


^11 « 

r 

uyn 

pre-t 

rise! 

iwea 
ax pi 

»Y34 

s 

ofits 

•3°» 


Highlights from the 
Company’s 1985 
Report and Accounts 


■ Pre-tax profit rises 34 -35; 
tc a record £35-6 million. 


■ Total dividend for year is 
10 - 50p per share (9- 25p in 
1984). Bonus issue on aone- 
for-four basis proposed. 


■ 23-33* rise in earnings 
per share reflects Group's 
excellent progress. 


■ Group's debt/equity 
ratio reduced to 13 : 5 %. 
(34 2a: in 1984). 


■ 1986 seen as a year of 
further progress. 


1985 1984 

£m£Uiosx fi millioo 


Turnover 

464-1 

514-1 

Operating profit 

39-6 

35-6 

Interest payable (net) 

4-0 . 

9-1 

Profit before taxation 

35-6 

26-5 

Earnings for the period 

23-2 

18-8 

Ordinary dividends 

8-8 

B 

Profit retained 

12-1 


Net operating assets 

138-6 

162-1 

Capital enpnidlfaire nn tanjihlnfiimil acsn fn 

11*3 

14-6 

Depreciation 

10-5 

10-9 

Earnings per mdingiy -npthagjf; 

2Z-69p 

22-45p 

Dividends per ordinary share 

10-50p 

9-25p 


If you would like a copy of tbe 1985 Report & Accounts please write to 
The Secretary, Glynwed International pic. 

Headland House, New Coventry Road, 

Sheldon, Birmingham B26 3AZ. 


What3s the difference between 

day and night? 

At Bache Securities, our Supervised Options Program 
provides international investors with the facility to trade 
listed options on US markets, day or night So even though 
local exchanges may be dosed, investors can still trade 
options in the US - half a world away. 

How? Because accounts are managed, on a 
discretionary basis, by the Options Division of Prudential- 
. Bache Securities in New York. 

Our Supervised Options Program was designed 
specifically for small institutional and substantial private 
investors, and can offer the opportunity to seek attractive 
rates of return through the use of established options 
strategies. Minimum investment for our Program is 
US$250,000. 

To find out more about the risks and potential rewards 
of traded options, and whether our Supervised Options 
Program is suitable for you, simply send in the coupon 
below or call your nearest Bache Securities office. We'll also 
send you a copy of “The Characteristics and Risks of 
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OurNewlfotk 
Supervised Options Program. 


Tk Bache Securities 
'London: 5 Burfingron Gardens 
London NMJC ILETet ftM39 41VL 
Zorich: W&sewerksnasse ID, 
Zurich 8035. Tet 1361 4422. 

A then*: 5 Koumbari Street 
UV> 74, Athens. 

Tel; 36 40 Ml 8. 


Hong Song; Central Building 
lbih Fk« fodder Street 

Hocg Kong Tel: 852 S22%51 
Singapore: 150 Cedi Street OfwWJ, 


Singapore 0106. 
Te£ 224 6122- 


Name^ 


Address. 


Please call me on: 


Home Tel No. 


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lofcyo ZihxSi apd w&ttsraaB major Canadian cities. AfiKau* m Melbourne and Sydney 
















YOUR OWN BUSINESS 




Women who 
make up 
a lifeline 

By Sally Watts 

Women “returners” can be the lifeline of 
small businesses that badly need help, 
says Rennie Fritchie. a visiting lecturer 
in business management at Aston Uni- 
versity. who launched her own consul- 
tancy at Gloucester this year. 

She also started Bade Up. a venture to 
provide professional and office services 
such as typing, accountancy, editing and 
research to local businesses in the early 
stages, and at the same time give 
returners, with relevant skills, opportu- 
nities for interesting full and part time 
work. 

Returners are in three groups: personal 
assistants who are closely involved with 
helping three or four small businesses to 
succeed; liaison workers who take on 
short jobs but do not seek responsibility 
or close involvement, and former spe- 
cialists in. for example, personnel, 
research and information, editing, mar- 
keting. interviewing. 

Retired people are also eligible, such as 
one man formerly in editing and 
printing, who can help owners prepare 
their publicity material. Where neces- 
sary. returners have equipment in their 
own home, such as word processors and 
portable typewriters. 

Back Up has eight enterprises, from 
catering to computers, whose owners 
include former business people and 
further education staff. Though one is in 
Birmingham, the scheme is operating 
initially in the West Country. Charges 
range from £3 an hour for copy-typing to 
£100 a year for a telephone-answering 
.service. 

Mrs Fritchie, an executive member of 
the Association of Teachers of Manage- 
ment said; “I want to help small 
businesses get going before they need 
full-time stafT. Often they are run by just 
one person, or the owner may not want 
to grow and take on staff, yet one person 
cannot do everything. 

“I am also trying to practise what I 
teach about developing women through 



BRIEFING 


Practising what she teaches: Rennie 
Fritchie, standing left; assistant Ginny 
Ellis; partner Jan Langley; dient John 
Howse, and, at the keyboard, assistant 
Pam Blanchett 

training and career-life planning. We 
identify their skills and what they need to 
learn in order to balance their -work and 
non-work life and achieve self-develop- 
ment. Then we either work out a training 
programme at Gloucester College of Art 
and Technology or I give them informal 
training in management and negotiating 
skills. 

“Their confidence and expertise are 
built up because, instead of saying ‘I used 
to do this or that 10 years ago', they can 
say *1 did it last week. They are self- 
employed and this is their only workJBut 
they could be poached by a small 
business and progress with iL It's a win- 
all-round situation.” 

Rennie Fritchie, who runs the consul- 
tancy in partnership with Jan .Langley, 
her former secretary and herself a 
returner, has adopted a logo showing the 
Leaning Tower of Pisa — representing a 
small business — being propped up by a 
woman. 

• Contact: Rennie Fritchie Consultancy. 
28 Innsworth Technology Park. 
Innsworth Lane. Gloucester GL3 ID; tel: 
Gloucester (0452) 731499. 


■ Most Promising Young 
Businesswoman of the Year is Ruth 
Wilson, who is in her final year as a 
biochemistry student at Birmingham 
University and is due in October to 
start a career in personnel and production 
management training at Pilkington 
Brothers, the glass-makers.Today she 
was due at the institute of Directors in 
London to get the award, worth £250 in 
cash, with work experience in sales, 
finance and production, from Christine 
Harvey, the award’s founder and 
sponsor, who runs a management 
consultancy. Intrinsic Marketing. 


First to try 
to quench the 
thir st for 
information? 

Gateshead's Business Information Of- 
fice, which, when it opened its doors in 
October 1982, churned to be the. first of 
its kind in tbe country, is pro ring that 
local bwinesses are thirsty for the help it 
can give. In its first three years, the two- 
nun staff answered more than 3,100 calls 
to solve most problems within hoars. 
From 656 inquiries in tbe first year, the 
figure rose to 1506 in tbe third — and is 
still increasing. 

Tbe office was set up, with funding 
from the Inner City Partnership, because 
it was thought that a positive back-up to 
local industry in expa n d ing mar ket s 
would be the provision of specialist help 
in the field of information. 

There were no set guidelines so 
business officers Gordon Kell and Fraser 
Mackay visited 350 businesses in the 
Gateshead area to find out exactly what 
was wanted. Now new problems roll in 
daily from questions on the wind speeds 
and temperatures in Manchuria to where 
one can obtain a supply of tobacco stalks. 

. Kell and Mackay did some fine tuning 
along the way. Now tbe office will often 
discover business leads and pass them to 
local businesses to follow up. 

Gordon Kell, aged 52, was in the 
pharmaceutical business for 14 years, 
then was Scottish manager of the 
Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products 
Training Board until its closure. Fraser 
Mackay, 36, a graduate in mechanical 
engineering, transferred to his present 
post from Gateshead reference library. 

They also get help from a link which 
has grown up with Maastricht University 
in the Netherlands. Three years ago they 
were asked to accept on attachment a 
Dutch student in lanjpnge and business. 
The experiment was so successful that 
they are about to receive their fourth 
Maastricht student. 

'• Contact: Gateshead Business Informa- 
tion Office, 1 Walker Terrace, Gateshead, 
Tyne and Wear. NE8 1EB ; phone (091) 
4776679. 



BOAT BUILDING 
COMPANIES 
WATERCRAFT LIMITED 
IN RECEIVERSHIP 


Designers aod builders of palrol boats, pilot boats, 
harbour launches etc. having Ministry of Defence 
SunOard OS-21 approval op erati ng from premises 
m Shoretam-by-Sca. Sussex. 

Annual turnover appnrumaEefy £Stn. 

Destenen and boil den of lifeboats, totally enclosed 
sun ival craft and davits fbr the iruemauooat men- 
chant marine and of&bore oil rndusmes oper a t ing 
from premises ai Gosport. Hampshire. 

Annual turnover ap pr o* una t ri y ftjffl. 

Designers and boiMerc of rigid mflaoMe rescue, 
boats operating from p r e mise s at unsworn. 
Hampshire. Annual turnover Bppnwmmdy 
£MXL00a 

For farther detsfis please contact: 

WJJt Elies. Joist Receiver and Manager 
ERNST A WHINNEY 

Becket Boose, 1 Lambeth Palace Rd, London SO 7EL 
Teh 01-92* 2000 - Telex: 88S234 


COMPANIES 
s FOR SALE 

Corporate Finance Assoc. 
Founded 1956 h»‘6S of- 
fices . across USA and 
represents fit confidence 
approx 200 co*s for sate ; 

ing or reaiL 

Call 404-399 5633 «r 
write R as s etl Hadea, 
CFA 6600 Feadmee- 
Doowoody M, BMg. 300. 
Safe 670, Attanta. .. 
Georgia 3032 & 1 


sill Ernst &Whinney 

Accountants, Advisees Consultants. 


FISHING BOAT AND 
STEELSHIP BUILDERS 

CYGONUS MARINE LIMITED 

IN RECEIVERSHIP 


Designers and builders of GRP fishing boats, 
special ships and floating structures operating 
from premises at Truro, Penryn, Cornwall. 

Annual turnover approximately £3m 

For further details please contact: 

W. J. H. Elies. Joint Receiver and Manager. 
Ernst & Whitney. Becket House, 1 Lambeth 
Palace Read, London SE1 7EL. 

Tel: 01-928 2000 


Sill! Ernst &Whinney 

Accountants, Advisor, Oinsultants. 


The four previous award-winners are 
doing well, one in banking, another in the 
law, two in consultancy. Mrs Harvey 
said: "The work experience offered under 


Rnth Wilson, left, about to go on stage the award prepares the winner to 
tok receive her business award from compete favourably with male 
Christine Harvey, tbe award's sponsor counterparts." 



“Relaxing? Good grief, no! This is 
company training for battering op 


ENGINEERING 

Small company in Essex has 
capacity available for turning 
and milling, manual and " 
CNC. Quality and delivery 
guaranteed. 

Telephone (0279) 35867 


FOR THE ATTENTION OF 
MAJOR RETAIL FINANCIAL DIRECTORS 

Dor to (hr Murt at a auMM mau gram a co re ptete atoc- 
trofitr point of Hie (EPOS! torsion fsaiaitaMe. 7SdiBiBMid 
systems sal term nuts pw w mt u t. tamal cost £30Ok. wo 
coonoer attar. lac annotate system oute r wnn msaBaaon 
Mchape. 

Contact D. Soother* 

0295 86301. 


ARE YOU OVER 18 AND UNDER 80? 

Fast moving fun photography business, new to En- 
gland that can be operated full or part time. No 
previous photographic experience necessary, con- 
cept has been featured on TV and national press 
ana can be operated anywhere there are people te. 
exhibitions/markets/in stores/forecourts, ideal for 
holiday camps and seaside resorts etc. Our unique 
equipment will ensure you click your way to instant 
-cash and high profits. Our expertise will launch you 
in this booming, fun/leisure industry for as little as 
£1,075 phis VAT. 

Contact Mr. Johnson for frill details 01-208 1 
3462/3453/3162/3103 or write Bronze Class 
House, Depot Approach, Off Cricklewood 
Broadway, London NW2 3DX. 


LAZY ACRES CARAVAN PARK 
GRANTHAM 

Set in 2 acres with planning permission lor a bangatow. Situated 
in Vale of Belvoyr. Licenced all year round. Capacity (or 50 
caravans & tents. Developed to the highest standards. StaMng & 
dog kennels on site. Caravan storage. Enterammenl teal roes 
include a country club adjacent to site. 

PncE £75.000 SAV negotiable 
For .further details write to: 

Lazy Acres Caravan Park, 

Corse Lane, Grantham, Lines. 

(0476) 66851 


EASTBOURNE HOTEL 

70 bedrooms, dining room. 3 puMtc rooms, owners private 
flat. 8 passenger UfL licenced bar. full fire certificate, fully 
equipped, a going concern, excefleni bookings 86. 

Price: £730,000. 

For further details please write to BOX G36. The Sunday 
Times. PO Box 484. Virginia Street. London El 9DO. 


FABRICATION /SHEET METAL 


Nik ; i , 


Freehold premises 14.000 sq feet with office Mock, 
cranage, extensive range of plant and equipment. 
Sheffield area established 20 years. Price 
£140.000 sav. 

Telephone 0742 365072 6pm to 9pm. 


SCOTLAND AYRSHIRE 

Caravan park with adfotntng SO acres and farm buildings. 
Suitable PUB boldine, good living accommodation. Sale 
due lo Ul health. 

Price: £ 130.000 

Further particulars write to BOX G20. 


SOUTH FLORIDA 

FOR SALE SERVICE BUSINESS 

Complete turnkey operation. English owners last 6 
yrs. T/0 3120,000. High pram margin. Asking 
price £65.000. Owner wiD finance if required. 

Phone: 0101 3057982495 or write PO Box 
6542. West Palm Beach, Florida 33405 USA. 


URGENTLY REQUIRED 
SPORTS GROUND 
(MINIMUM 8 ACRES) IN 
S.E. LONDON 

Bordering with Kent. 
Leased - or purchase. Please 
reply with full details to 
BOX B97 


+ FACSIMILE 


Opld UK the major new marketing force in telecom- 
munications are now looking for dealers nationwide. 

We oflier- 

*■ Brand leader products tSTC/rrn. 

9. National nMHnaan 4 Madman service. 


4. Sales 4. product tnuranp. 

5. Cxciune new lines (or 1987. 

For run estate pm cm 

(0992) 700459/700489 


COTSWOLDS HOTEL 

Centre of town. 8 bedrooms (5 en suite) all 
TV & tea malting. 3 roomed private owners 
suite. 50 seater restaurant Bar. Conference 
room. All year trade £189.000. 

Reply to BOX 6*7 . 


SQUASH CLUB 

In expanding town established 14 years. 
Same owner. Forecourts, snooker, 
bar etc. Self contained flat 
Mortgage can be arranged. 

Reply to BOX G03 


ISLE OF MAN 

Building and Plant Hire business for sale. 
Also Farmhouse with many out buildings 
and 12 l h acres. Offers must be in excess of 
£175.000. 

For details write to; 4 Athol Street, Douglas , 
Isle of Man. Quote ref TPW. 


In today’s modern age of adv a nc e d cou u n uta caMuiw can 
your company afford to tow business by not having facsim- 
ile and tetof? Silhouette In dustries supply. instaB. Service 
and train operators in telex a Facsimile machines, on out- 
right purchase. lease, or rental nationwide. 

For farther tof rwt ton: — — olio Ind uri— LU , 01 - 



it* first jwnfi l Mjt ftwobm opened coty a wr 
If you ura nta-fr teicfate that offer* security. contact tht 

Hi# Night Wafcft Limited 
132 SHMSMA iaadm SE1 flSW 
TN-tifii: 1-828 7577 v . 


caps wmmi at- testes 

ROAD CUfOri. ProfttaM* wm 
good ou t ciuu S. JCV-OOO one. oi 
360393* ... 




AiJK)Pi£TS - export 


JAPANESE MOTOR SPARE PARTS 

8WDWLL AUTOPARTS are wdueh* Export 
Oealera fora wkfe rnge of OEquaflfy Japanese 
Replacement Spare Part*. 

We offer compet iti ve export prfoas and am csM 
on con si derable stock, depth and range. * ; 

As Exporters we are prepared to aHarour expert- 
eneft to any aoquiries and can Suppty on an Ex- 
warehouse, F.OA CXF. and/or c. A F.baals. 

H you bare a Japanese Spare Parts enqirtr 
please contact us for further (nfoni atia t 


BWDHKL AUTOPAHTS 


T*(MttQW7 


tkfacSM 


EXECUTIVES! 
GULFSTREAM II 

WE ULTIMATE PBtSOtttl JET 
tS MW JUJUUBLE 70 YOU 


ftomoor Fimofwn 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 

An exdfmg huntress opportan it y fabfs for 
onfhasiastk a oftwfe people m. i fas mpidfy- 


it A capital oetiay of £10,000 he required for 
this comprobonshre padcoge. . . 
hdtxfed in the package are:- 
■fr AH essential equipment. 

☆ FoD training. 
it Acco mm o d a t ion. 
it Stationery, etc. • 

• For larAer detail rieg "om ore- 
0525 714039 or 0582 579153 


AMERICAN INVESTMENT 
OPPORTUNITY 

Laadmg eucstnmt ofots befievt dm Ammon sconorny s dost to 
son mewng mo i strong grows pared and non s tte hqM wne Bj 
watt mast into coranerml real asata An msurt oowrtuwl y to 
[wetast a taata a te Duaocss b bang uttared by its onmre in ifesa. 
Anmca. i sofitffb located 20 mies from Phcenot A rapp-snrags facitSy 
of 56000 su It « tocaed on 4 area ot tand and saonatf on a moor 
sow Tb« South Western Unted States and partcfely the Phoanbi am 
# me d Tte tesast guMing n me canny. 

bthsrt »i tbe Oty at Men « dean terinokqy such b nojor afectrotecs 
amt nomitaaBmn The nia»4Dragebnsness has estabMted (tsalf 
*s one « ma test oerfonmng busnessas n tern today the id its 
*>*y to be ofeected by econofiac anktms. He tjoibf a now 
beamdtehmarBiciiedaiBasonaMievelwtubnBkesHreiMri- 
»mt imteg Meat Finn sales pnee s S&50CLOOO USA doSus Pimseta 
WW reply W Mo Vote MM-Stoape. Ci irt te rt a d M awM imniSu- 
feteet*. » Iff. a Wert tat Aaat, fen. Marten USA. 


PROFIT SHARE 
OPPORTUNITY 

PubtetMT* or « uteonr ad 
vrnismg cnxm vmm to 
aoDOoii Satan nine . to 
apr a nwd aie tonli of te n 
Mtet . A — tte t teg pro-. . 
teaouite mraunemur the 

cnay.sauteCoaene 

euwrtteewimawt w e 
lal ul« backanxmtf 'wW be 


; AGENTS REQUIRED 

In afi parts of the UK. mate and female to 
sell practical products that offer high .. 
earnings. Wed established companies, 
providing fUfiest support. Exclusive areas, 
long form projects. 

. 078548121 


. COMPUTEBS * 
COMPUTING SERVICES 



H die stow appeals to you and you are fte typo of parson abto to 
n«i y aaCTuye and n* your own buaneas men trtepbono now 
Kjt lunfiHi intonnauon. 

Ring Carder hrte ma t fona l on (09781 881368 


IT WORKS FOR ME! 

o 

A bwtitwifa I eon run eas&y front bone, with uiSwiltl 


high profit margins, poinrrg cash flew, minimal 
orabioh, no stock leqummwnr and over £100 per 
day profit, ft eon work for yon tee. For details send i 
9x4 SAE to The AAarketing D i rec t or/ Scorpion H ou eo . 
High St. Tarvey, Bedford MK43 8DB. 


NEW 

MEASURING DEVICE DJVf.C. - 100 

Distnbrtors and sales agents an warad 
Sales women |M/F) m conimusnn bass to sefl uteasowcBoe irieaswe to 
Esc® AgemsL Aretnecs. Local Audnnaas. Manor Oecofatoa/Furnrtafs 
etc. Hrtt reeans and Art bacA-uo lor (be ngm people. 

DJVLC. EQUIPMENT LTD 
01- 629 1100 


ROIXS-ROYCE (Heritage) 
AGENTS required 

to set the first RoCs-floyce Heritsga Two Veer Calendar. Ap- 
oy Raee-Royce Ltd and Rree-Royce Motors LrcL 
iy tor tow sock only - hign proto return. Exclusive sates 
areas avsflabte. 

DAM Marketing. PO Box 93 
c/0 [National Westminster Bank pic 
Midland Road. DERBY DEI 2BS 
or phone Derby (0332) 46428 


LIMITED COMPANIES 

from £99.50 inclusive 

_ Same-Day Company Services Lid 
Bridge St 181 Queen Victoria St London. EC4 

TEL: 01-248 5616 

Also Company Searches 



COMPUTER 

Recruitment Consults, 
place your contractors 
ttrouQh my agy - pay 
to you £1000 per ana- 
lyst programmer tax 


Confidentially call 
Colin Roberts - 
0224 696109 today. 


COMMERCIAL 


BRIDGWATER 

INDUSTRIAL SALE 
AND LEASEBACK 
INVESTMENT FOR SALE 
WITH PART POSSESSION 
41,200 sq ft on 32 acres 
Leaseback of 2S.OOO sq tt at 
£50.000 pa 

i6j0oo iq Svp 



BUSINESS FOR SALE 


cmuivam iiaa w iu sme setr 
Lines boraw town. F/H 
r nanw r n aurnne Ttmm as 
tradeto Consany; rmtats onty. 
LKence opoao for 32 iwm- 
lal imlss. oaK net 2D0K 
. ono - rosss, 2X93. 


nsip earns* (mibk# m pay. 
mrnto a imki tog mony. New 
conco pt a malDOon lor res,, 
owjtel commercial hntng. 
Bottar a tntbrecily mated tank. 
KUniuacturr take over momei. 
Oesgned (or bU coaiurtes. Muoe 
■to towMi aii pram norm 
USS.OOOJCXX). RJL o> Cai 
bSA TWX 6106004306. 

TAX LOSS reommr deoUns 
Company. Our cfaM lx lootons 
to acquire a Prooeny Daattnfi 
Company uittn tnM tax ww 
baw een £6 0X100 - <200.000. 
Tb* company rnnsr oe mung 
acid meteraBly xttuaico to o>» 
or EnguM. Resiy to 

WOWKINC Him toOBM for 
oolong boxmew now expand- 
ing into prune West Em 
toconoB. £35.000 reoiareo. Mr 
Freeman.. Ba n a ma n. State C. a 
Bouroo p Street. Loodon W1X 

mvcstuw wm cas.ooo - 
£40000 reoiareo for C ot ap an y 
opening letstne rwnptex ui East 
Anon* ah re pli es n«M m 
■nttm confidence lo box 


SPAM JAVKA f AUCAWTI) New 
-moo tor sate. Funy «fcn» 
fronted AB srrvtcci £801000. 
Tet ,031 H«T 1988. 


rokffffiiiBnr 


A AGENTS 



pany needs £30.000 to pul 
WtecMUteo velncie Uooutti Oef- 
man reuutatrons. View to 
nwtmiw ideas? box cs* 




W2 

(OFF EDGWARE RD) 

No premium. 24 hour, 
access. Presdge t umi t m e 
carpeted offices wfttitete- 
phone & telex. From £70 
per week an tndustve. 
Shortiiooe lem. Partonp 
racaUies. . 

01-839 4808 


PALL MALJ. - 
No PramhHn 

Prastlg* turn, carpeted 
showroom offices ad In- 
clusive with phone + TpL 
fanmed avail. Shon/tong 
term. Parking faefees. 
From £75 pw 
01-838 4808 



"Window Dressing far 
afl types of businesses" 
seeks master 
dismbutor. d istribu tors, 
commerc ia l agents, tor 
afl sectors of me United 

- Kingdom, very large 

- - commissions. 

SJLV. 

60Roe WaJdodc Roereau 
G900GLyON(FHANG£) 
08L3X 7SJ5J8J1 


LOANS & 


Drsmtefc now a deert el ng 
medtofn dfstobubon point* 
open throughout B* 
Country. • - . 

Reply In stfictht c onMencd 
with ojrpvtence to BOX Old 


Bmnonn unone. telex add tor- 
ward ma srrvKee- OI «Sa 2660 



DIARYOFTHE.TI.MES 



Over 1-4 mfflioa of tbe j 
most afflaent people fa the 
coanfry read tire classified 
cobmiiB of The Times. Tbe 
foQowbig categories appear 

regniarty every week, and 
se gofenfly accooqttnied 
byrdevaatefitorMatides. 

lise the coupon (ri^ti), 
and find oot bow easy; fost 
and ecoaomica] it Is to adver- 
tise in Tbe Tines Classi&ed. 


MONDAY Ednpdao: Univer- 
sity A p po in tme nt* . Prep. A Pubtk 
School Appointments, Educational 


WEDNESDAY UCtfehii 
C rif Sncirrarifl l/Rk appomlment* 
over £7300. General secretarial. 


• rara nrei re* W'VI US4KJ4I KUCUffRU. 

Cow^^cJwlarshjpsAFeUowshjps. Pimm ty : Resutemial. Commercial, 
llaCtatefeh Ohae Town ACountiy, Overseas, Rentals. 

TUESDAY Cifofe EbriuK 


a comprehensive guide to (he 

computer market 

Legal A ppufeirenh: SoUckPB. 


THURSDAY Gewod Appohrt- 
menfr Chief Executives. Managing 
DiroJors, Directors. SaJa and 
Marketing Executives And Overseas 


Cbmmercial Lav^ers, Legal Marketing Executives and Overseas 

Olitcere. Private A Public practice. Appointments, Including a-oew 

La Creme a new dassrfica- classification entitled Fiswiai red 
non for top legal secretaries. 


'Acc s ife a n c yA m iii lst iii i a tk 


FRIDAY Matos: A complete car 
buyer? guide featuring established 
dealers and private sales. 
ltni fc n.ai is gasteeiK 
Selling property, franchises, 
equipment etc. to- small and huge 
companies or businesses. 

Saturday omtu Thrvet 

Holidays abroad. Low cost lllchts. 
Cruises. Car hire. lULlfavd: 
Hotels. Cottages. Holiday las. 


Fill in the coupon and attach it to your advertisement Prior to il appearing, 
we wjH contact you with a quotation and confirm the date orinserriorT 
Rates are Lineage £6 per fine Unfit. 3 lines). Boxed Display £23 per single, 
column centimetre. Court and Social £6 per line. Ail rates + IS* VAT. 

NAME — • .. 

ADDRESS 1 “ • • 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN APPEARS EVERT DAY. 
announcements can appear within u hours. 


Pea Rteodsa rkwdaaflicafionfar 
young readeis to conactpeoplewith ; 
Hmaartr\tere*8«hotoeand overteas. 


DATE OF iNSERTION ' ' r • i 

lt*fcncattteungfarpom«» t««l anitcte *n tt 
















































t 




THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 




FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


BUSINESS 


docklands' 

PROPERTY CENTRE 



BUSINESS 



WVES ^ttWBI MJELPWG OTHERS 

RrrURN ^VJt«*uSwMEKT 

W A WEST COUNTRY ESTATE. 

interest on a high 004x1 ratas * 

( 0935 ) 74752 


e JS™ BUSHED CIVIL 
ENGINEERING COMPANY 

any. Modem office Mock and 4 orbs of land. 


RUBBER 

STAMPS 


ftade exactly to 
your own 
requirement Td 
K.RJS. (0789) 
764657 for 
im mediate 
quotation. 


PO Box 484, Virgfna St, London Ell 



SUBSTANTIAL FUNDS AVAILABLE 

for the acquisition of private compani es, wm 
consider joint ventures with established annua' 
nles currently under financed. Retirement sales 
and management buy-outs especially welcomed. 
Private share pucltaseis arranged. 

Telephone 01 935 5795 or 486 6139. 


or autfio-visuaf? Par- 
adigm can help. 

01-789 0746 


WHOLESALERS 


DIY PR KIT 


A do it yourseff press release Wt designed by ex- 
perts to enable small businesses to present 
publicity information more effectively to the me- 
dia. Consisting of an instruction manual plus a 
range of specialist stationery, tne complete press- 
id! costs only £29.95 including vat. 

Press-Kits Limited. 

640 Finchley Road. 

London. NWU 7RR. 
telephone 01-209 0965 
Callers welcome (credit cards accepted) 




A SILVER-LINED PROSPECT 

New UK nmrtoi* installed and anting on star nxovwy for 
amntetce and lodnftry. requires tunned number of gjanerty coilccttw 


ATTENTION MR. CHAIRMAN 

product, wrong sales figures? Frustrated by lack 
of effort by your sales force? wm no one agree your 
Product das a bright future? Maybe l can help. ] am a 
sales and marketing professional who can point your 
sales team in the right direction. My approach can be 
ashanl or as son as you wish. I get paid on raw at*. 
SOl^OfiT 09 ^ Waltofl - 162 “^S* 1 **- Soatnaawtau 


PROBLEMS? 

Don't worry any mane, is your company having 
cash flow problems? Do you face liquidation or 
bankruptcy? We win take all pressures off you. AD 
enquiries treated in the strictest of confidence. Ross i 
Walker & Associates. Statecraft House. Stratford 
Rd„ Loxiey. Warwick CV35 9JW. 

Telephone (0789) 841292. 

Telex 8814198 ADPHON 


WANTED- TO BUY 

LEASING COMPANY - SMALL AND MEDIUM TICKET 

M*or Scmtatawi Fnaoce &m> wtstes to tun estabtataf UK (suing 
nance twnrany. PtUcty quctBd or pnvde company ail be amnderef ' 
pe group e prepared tv nmaMe dratted Asoesione wtt pnac*xtL 
Prrtwred iocann: Samara England. i 

Pteosaconoct Hr Onkf Hants or 


GE4M ratine DEL 


GEM DISCOUNTS 

U-R-*a largest mafl order 
company Offer cintumcr 
returns. pool and mooter 
tables, targe or small 
qaauatfes available at 
huge d isco un ts . Returned 
goods sea. Surplus and 
rotated do not eeO. Also 
thousands of cues of 
various qualities at 20 % 
off retail. 

Phone 0244 549444 


THIS IS A CHANCE 
OF A LIFETIME. 

Ex mall order stocks of 
returned goods including 
clothing. furniture, 
hard-ware, household, 
(ays etc. Offered at huge 
discounts. 

Tel: Q244 549444. 


JOB STOCK HEMJER wfctfKS to 
dear foBowtnqqm. 3 JS 0 OcoM> 
com beef £* 79 /w Golxxi. 
HU on 23.000 auto vjkKji 
20p fa. 13JOOO mol ftildr T- 
Murt 40p ea_ 12.000 mm 
Ranad check. 2-000 turtosfc 
men* cun srorfe. 600 2nd Mans. 
Also more lots ovtMe. P lea — 
contact otMtoenv tMftwren 
10 30 - Corn (Man-FTt) 01-377 
8477 Or 01-577 8602. TtX 
88419*. (BUYERS ONLY NO 
TIME WASTERS PLEASE). 

MU or TOP QUALITY brand 



PilSSll 



KBi 




START YOUR OWN BUSINESS GLAZING 
PHOTOGRAPHS ON TO PLATES 
Invest in a compact portable glazing machine. 

■ High profit margin 

* Endless potential. 

* Can be worked front home. 

BE IN TUBE FOR SUMMER SEASON 
For further details telephone:' 
iWira or wrtB enduing bryfl SAE to POTTERY 
PORTRAITS LTtL, ftp Heufa*. The MbwMb. HtSjkni, Aagfecer- 




CITY SHOP 


Lease for sale. Goodwill. Prime 
position. 



ling M3 has already occurred. 
Most economists have taken 
on board the Treasury's mes- 
sage that other indicators (and 
< this is usually taken 10 mean 
exchange rates) have taken on 
much greater importance. 

But that, in some ways, adds 
to the puzzle. It is possible to 
argue with some confidence 
that growth in broad .money 
wiD slow later this year, 
particularly if the new short- 
term commercial paper mar- 
ket takes off. 

But it is a brave person who 


removed. 

Confidence over the course 
of base rales for the rest of the 
year appears to lie more with 
the outlook for inflation than 
with the money supply or the 
exchange rate. The Chancel- 
lor, Mr Nigel Lawson, has said 
that inflation should be the 
judge and jury of policy, and 
the markets are inclined to 
believe him. 

For a variety of reasons, 
most importantly the sharp 
drop in oil prices and 12- 
monlb comparisons with the 


slash yixib mnns bulls. 

6000 feoftaU from £ 28 . Low 
con booklet mctaHas. Nation- 
wide delivery 01 701 3858 - 


SiMl APPOINTMENTS' 1[ 


implied in the public spending 
projections of the Autumn 
Statement last November was 
an inflation rate of 3 per cent 
this summer. 

Now City economists think 
that the Treasury may be, if 
anything, a little cautious on 
the inflation outlook. The 
Budget included a forecast 
inflation rate of 3 J5 percent by 
the end of the year. 

Hoare Govett, at ihe bot- 
tom of the range of outside 
forecasts, expects the rate — 
4.2 per cent in March — to 


COMPANY NEWS 


A AGENTS 


WMMIK sales wul rq. for 
Sovereign cm Stop Query. Sur- 
rey area. 01-739 1367 off 28 . 

Muon w uminM. oodo 
■eeKLAgeni OiKAeMOMI Tefc 
109091 56696 . 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


IMPORT/EXPORTS 




ft *** 4 j 


pr bought in quanuiy- Abo null 
Order return goons oo eflv ta~ 
chafing flat pat* iwunrs 
•Metrical, hardware ft lan me. 
st ug rt ta c ow n i pnoee. Rmg 
<07421 433916. 


seU meKpomv* FarEasMrn ori- 
gin delirium' goods. Rqiy to 
BeDbrto BOX-ObOiTfc* Times. 
PO Boot 484. Vtruuua Street 


T-shuis. A0 sues 4 coious. 
600 avaDa We. Samples, nt 
TW: 031 '867.2066. 

SUNT «CKCEM TIP* VHW WIV* 
ya w. A a toadtog makes. 021 
36*2398 <24 ur» 




TO ACQUIRE (HE OF THE 
LARGEST PREMSES M THE 
CITY 

Licensed for Liquor, Music 
and Enfertamment 
11.600 SQ FT APPROX 
fully equipped wBh Bare. 
KMctwn and Sawd Syaem 

Long lease on very 


RENTALS 


CHESTERTONS 1 


mrauDCE mxws. wii 
S unny new conversion fial 
in Kxtwfcd mewL tiwdy 
1 W*R a o kb. double bed. 
dressing room, bub, 
CHfehw- 6/24 mootte 

Office 
•1-231 35M 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

W» ham « auwb selactkxi 
o I pa n wnaBy rispedsd lur- 
ntehed and untumiatied 
properties »i many fino RbsI- 
dential dta&icis, rangmg 
(ram eiSO pw to tZDOO pw. 

Teh 01-486 8926 


HENRY B 1 MKS Contact n» rww 
on 01 236 8861 for ow tort se- 
Mctton of flimMied Oats and 
houses to rent In KiugMsorUee. 
Kcflpngiaa and OuUti 


Quraishi 
Constantine- 



01-244 7353 


CMELHCA KmgMsfirtog*. Bdgm- 
na. phiuhoo. weatnumiar. 
Lurary nausea and flats avail. 
aUe for tang or Short lets. 
Please rtae tor current Usl. 
Comes. 69 Buckingham palace 
rd. SWI OI«B 8261 


CORNWALL BARDENS. SW 7 1 st 

floor flat with touac a to much 
uiahi afier Weapon. 2 dUr 
bed*, raw, fr MS - m ku. both. 
£260 pw rug. ree aae couiact’ 
Soraone Conway at Saunders 
of knotoflKM on 681 3623 . 


Mitsubishi Trust Interna- 
tional: Mr Motaiuko Fuji! has 
been named managing direc- 
tor. Land Securities 
( Managern en I ):Mr Neville W i 
Johnson is the new director 
responsible for the valuation 
department Motorola: Mr 
John A Lockitt has become 
prerident and chief executive 
officer of the Codex Corpora- 
tion, a wholly-owned 
subsidiary. 

Charles Barker City: Mr 
Oyde Walton and Mir Antho- 
ny Bates have been named as 
directors. 


More appointments 
on page 28 


Shepherd Airconditioning: 
Mr Jim Oakes has become a 
director. 

Eq uipu: Mr H Wilson, 
managing director of Purdie & 
Kirkpatrick, is joining the 
Board. 

Laytons: Mr Richard Brown 
and Mr Anthony Dewharst 
have been made partners. 

Jaidine Thompson Gra- 
ham: Mr John House has : 
been appointed a director and 
also made deputy chairman. 

Tonka: Mr John Cbalier 
has been named vice-presi- 
dent and managing director, 
Europe. 

Wolseley: Mr Fred Pickles 
has joined the board. 

Rank Xerox: Mr Graham 
Brown has been appointed 
director of treasury 
operations. 

The Berry Trust Mr D G H 
Nicholson has been made 
chairman and Mr J A J Berry 
has become a director. 


• AE: Six months to March 31, 
1986. Sales £196.9 million 
(£196.9 million). Pretax profit 
£H-6 million (£11.2 million). 
Interim dividend 2-2p (2p). 
Earnings per share 7.2p (8J!pl. 
The board reports that the 
disposals of unsatisfactory dis- 
tribution businesses have now 
either been completed or re- 
served for and it is confident 
that its strategy is sound and 
promising. It sees substantial 
opportunities for sales growth, 
predominantly outside Britain. 

• UEL- Total dividend 5.5p 
(5.25p) for the year to Jan. 31, 
1986. Turnover £95.53 million 
(£83.51 million). Pretax profit 
£13.06 million (£10.41 million). 
Earnings per share J4.5p 
<H.2p). 

• HOLT LLOYD INTER- 
NATIONAL: Year to Match I, 
1 986. Total dividend 4p (3. 75pL 
Sales £83.06 million (£76 J l 
million). Pretax profit £6.51 
million (£6.24 million). Earn- 
ings per share 7. Ip (7. Ip). 

• STAKES: Half-year to March 
30. 1986. Turnover £73.62 mil- 
lion (£69.88 million). Pretax 
profit £6.01 million (£5.4 mil- 
lion). Extraordinary item 
(credit) £1 13 million (all), being 
the gain, after estimated tax, on 
the sale of the wines and spirits 
division. Earnings per share 
I.86p(1.8lp). Interim dividend 
0.45p (Q.4p), payable on Sept- i. 

• FRANCIS SUMNER 
(HOLDINGS): No dividend 
(nil) for 1985. Turnover £1.49 
million (£3.88 million). Pretax 


profit on ordinary activities 
£20,000 (loss £286,000). Earn- 
ings per share, before extraor- 
dinary items. 0.08p floss 0.97p). 

• BARTON TRANSPORT: 
Turnover for the 24 weeks to 
March 15, 1986, £3.76 million 
(£3.62 million). Pretax profit 
£128.085 (£41353). Earnings 
per share 16.48p (5-49p). 

• JUST RUBBER: Total pay- 

ment for the year to Jan. 31. 
1986, L74p. Turnover £1.84 
million (£1.56 million). Pretax 
profit £595.642 (£503.663). 

Earnings per share 6.22p 
(5.15PJL ^ 

• GUE ST. KEEN & 
NETTLEFOLDS: The com- 
pany has bought Colcrete of 
Thorp Arch Trading Estate. 
Wetheiby. West Yorkshire, for 
£3.2 million from Colcrete 
Oldings. a subsidiary of 
Losinger of Berne, Switzerland. 
Colcrete is in the geotechnical 
engineering contracting market. 

• SENIOR ENGINEERING: 
Henry Hargreaves and Sons, a 
subsidiary, has acquired the 
tooling, goodwill, know-how. 
drawings, trade marks, etc. with 
stocks and work-in-progress for 
the manufacture of “Welfold” 
and “Wellifit" industrial doors, 
from Garador. Senior Process 
Heating has purchased the DKL 
General and Electrical En- 
gineers operation in Leicester. 
Senior Heat Treatment has 
bought the Aldridge heat treat- 
men i operation at Walsall, West 
Midlands, from SKF and Dor- 
mer Tools (Sheffield). Senior 


pound’s sharp recovery qnd 
comparisons with last year 
drop out, the core inflation 
rate may return to around 5 
per cent. 

This, taken in combination 
with the tendency for interest 
rates to be panicked up in 
January by runs on the pound, 
could mean that after driving 
down base rates this year, the 
Government will be forced to 
push them up again in 1987. 
In what could be an election 
year, that is not politically 
attractive. 


Engineering (LE) has purchased 
Northern Heat Treatments and 
its offshoot Northern Induc- 
tion, both operating at Black- 
burn, Lancashire. These 
takeovers cost about £2.2 mil- 
lion cash. 

• ASTRA INDUSTRIAL 
GROUP: The company has 
disposed of its freehold 'invest- 
ment property at Cheston Road, 
Aston, Birmingham, for 
£422,000 cash (book value: 
£350.000). The proceeds will be 
used to fund working capital 
and expenditure incurred in the 
reorganization of the leisure 
division. 

• HUGH MACKAY: Mr J 
Mackay, the chairman, told the 
annual meeting that the current 
year had started well. The 
company's activities are almost 
20 per cent up compared with a 
year ago. Exports have been 
nearer 45 per cent higher. 

• RENAISSANCE ENERGY: 
First quarter of 1986. Gross' 
revenues Can59.68 million 
(£4.6 million), against Can$5.88 
million. Net income, before 
extraordinary item, CanS1.09 
million (CanS392.000). 

• SOUTHERN VENTURES: 
In his annual report. Mr Bob 
Hewitt, the chairman, predicts 
“one or two** gold mining 
operations next year from the 
company's advanced projects in 
Western Australia. Southern 
will be raising additional financ- 
ing by a rights issue, with details 
later this month. 



tfUE OF SKYE. Attractive mod- 
ern 4 Bpp housr wttii bedroom 
+ ntnff kUrtMM A boxroem *tu~ 
HM cm num.ind overlooking 
sea loch. Suom in fa acre 
ground w«h is acres, rwred 
ground avail able. Offers of 
EJS-OOO Pft 0698 823862 


MUSTOL coma, waterfnwi 
tats iron £ 89500 . cus imfit 
Balcony. 2 

rrene M«mn on 03272) ZTJ28Z 
Thunms lo Mondbcv iOJOun 
K> 630m or Jean Ottep on 
*0C72I 425001 


OVUKM 1 Ml rm M BMC* 
87 ftegmt SawlXonflon Wl. 
Tel 439 6 S 34 .UK /Overseas. 
Aka mJtrtps/dMns tenv/oenu 


SITUATIONS WANTS) 


■RLTS/AVaN/LOMDOM. E*wrv 
mert Sea wary /PA. rtxrutres 
owUMnolno pool Repbr to BOX 
044 



MMPSYCML SDMtous flat to 
M. Lge recent o/iooKtog ur 
Mn. 2 too at* beds. Ubb. £189 
p.w T94 1 849, 


MAYMJ*. Wl Lux S/C fora 
Oats. 1/2 beams. La rectos, 
tony eatanotd from £i75pu> 
Short/long lets. 01-629 2S46. 

VBCTAWC POKT offers invUed for I M ,, L . 

cases or Cron /Dow swffl I ■j™** i Mm ftaL tecoL 
duto/tax potd- Renfar n> BOX ( g 



London and Manchester 
Group pic 

SAUENT POINTS- YEAR TO 31 DECEMBER 1985 



CHARITY COMMISSION 

The lor *hr- 

mnfial Cdoramn. 

LONDON SW 17 4 QX 
OUeCtWW ant aw9 ‘* 00nS 
Irani 

K HEREBY tffVEN » 


r.KAsrr (Mouagmaii ScrvmtO 
Lid require prouertMS In cnMral 
south And wen Landau areas 
tor umwiob auuucaaiBjOI 221 - 


r— LI C O SHL bwwiui may 
mod 1 bed fIM with secluded PA- 
SS- 1146 »■ Ten 236 2182 m 
X U tey 1 821 9104 (tvesl. 

ST IftMEt'l, Owners mo d ern 
(onraeci 2 bM 2 buh eta n*i 
Bo« wrr. un. £275 pw. i<2 
yn. Co let 386 9849. m. 

SWT Carden Square. S/C single 
im muom. O astmenL Own Ml 

* bam, £30 mv COIN pm 01- 
370 3876 

9379401 The number to ronrm- 
ber when seeking besl rental 


A new venture has been 
formed by two leading compa- 
nies in the North Sea oil 
construction industry to de- 
velop high-technology low- 
cost systems to help to combat 
the effects of felling oil prices. 

The company, to be called 
British Offshore Engineering 
Technology, will bid for ad- 
vanced technological studies 
during the next stage of North 
Sea ou development. 

The company brings togeth- 
er the technological design 
experience of Humphreys & 
Glasgow and the project man- 
agement record of the John 
Howard Group. 

The new company will be 
51 per cent owned by John 
Howard and 49 per cent by 
Humphreys & Glasgow, who 
will provide the day-to-day 
management. 


To ZSZrv* u* ttuwcm 

f^t^Srcrrtory 
1* Ann' nay attend d«j 


pgOPERTV WANTED 


atyNocBOWwe wmcmto 
lor meat w«B tyOBJOe d iv 

jvw i Jifiv con - 

(OZ 73 J 8 L 2321 


general 


pool Bk««i«n * 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PERSONAL 
COLUMN 
ADVERTISEMENT 
IN THE TIMES . 

TRADE 
ADVERTISERS 
TEL* 01-481 1920 

ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. ' 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 925088 

. PRIVATE 
ADVERTISERS 
TEL-.0Jt481 4000 

USE YOUR 
.ACCESSOR. 
BARGUTCARD 






LENDING 



Afem & Company 10.50% 

BCC1 10^0% 

GSbank SawKpt 10.75% 

CoRsoidated Ms 10.50% 

Coitaeatial Tina lpjfl% 

Coflperafiw Bank 

C. Hoare & Co 11150% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 1050 % 

ILw Bm 1fL50% 

Mat Westminster. 1050% 

Royal Baikot ScoUaod^10iD% 

1SB 10.50% 

Gfflank HA 1050% 

Bare Rate. 




1985 

1984 

Life Premium Income 

£1 32.5 m 

£1 17.5m 

Profit attributable to 
shareholders 

£6.59m 

£5.79m 

Earnings per share 

28.74p 

25.25p 

Dividends per share 

23.81 p 

19.81p 



* Home Service Division - a leader in quality and 

product range 

^ Pensions Division — Transplan Plus policy 

added to range 

^ Ufe Broker Division - achieves excellent 

growth in drfficuftyear 

^ Range of services developed: 

Mortgage funds increased to £300m 
Further two unit trusts launched 
Investment management contracts gained 


Copies of the Annual Report maybe obtained from 
the Company Secretary at Winslade Park, Exeter EX5 IDS 



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ds cm c?> <t^ & 4 n* rm I I 5 dfi'En 15 m* 


FINANCE AND 


Fight red 
tape with 
phone call 

By Onr Industrial 
Editor 

The Institute or Directors' 
anti-red tape hotline, which 
promises to provide answers 
to problems for the price of a 
telephone call, begins opera- 
tion next Monday. 

The new service, part of the 
IOD's campaign against bur- 
. eaucracy and red tape, follows 
a pilot experiment at Man- 
chester. during which the 
greatest demand was for help 
with tax problems and diffi- 
culties arising from local au- 
thority planning controls. 

The hotline — to be run by 
the IOD's policy and research 
executive — has access to ex- 
perts on taxation, insurance, 
local government and compa- 
ny affairs. Mr Simon Bums, 
head of the new service, said: 
“Despite the Government's 
claims that it has reduced 
bureaucracy, directors are still 
being hit by petty ted tape 
which impedes efficient run- 
ning of businesses." 

The 10D service will be 
prepared to raise problems 
with Government depart- 
ments. including the inland 
Revenue, and local authori- 
ties. The pattern of problems 
thrown up by the new service 
will be added to the IOD's 
dossier on which regulations 
and red tape it wants the 
Government to abolish. 

Hotline advice is available 
to an\ member of the IOD bv 
calling 01-339 1233. 


MPs seek compromise 
on Sunday trading law 


By Derek Hanris ' 
Industrial Editor 

It seems increasingly likely 
that there will be some dispen- 
sation on Sunday opening for 
smaller shops, garden centres 
and possibly DIY outlets. 

There is no sign yet of a 
flood of prosecutions by local 
authorities against stores 
opening on Sundays, which 
remains illegal under the 
anomaly-riddled 1950 Shops 
Acl 

Two parliamentary moves 
are in prospect, both aimed at 
achieving compromise im- 
provements on the Shops Act 
The Institute of Directors has 
also brought out the results of 
an April survey showing that 
91 per cent of business leaders 
want to see Sunday trading 
laws reformed, with a major- 
ity in favour of complete Lib- 
eralization. 

Mr Ivor Stanbrook, Tory 
MP for Orpington, who has 
led Conservative backbench 
opposition to complete dereg- 
ulation of shop hours, is due 
next Tuesday to introduce a 
Bill under the 10-minute rule, 
Mr Raymond PowelL Labour 
MP for Ogmore, who has been 
associated with the anti-dereg- 
ulation stance of the Union of 
Shop Distributive and Allied 
Workers (USDAWj. expects 
the following day to introduce 
his own Bill under the 10- 
minuie rule. 

Mr Stanbrook is still dis- 
cussing with the Tory back- 





Ivor Stanbrook: opposes 
complete deregulation 

bench group details of his BilL 
He said: “We were not happy 
with total deregulation but it 
was not that we did not want 
to see a revision of the Shops 
BilL" 

The Stanbrook Bill will aim 
to include the ideas acceptable 
to the backbench group so that 
the Government might even 
feel able to take it up itself or 
make it the basis of a .Private 
Member's Bill which hopeful- 
ly might get government sup- 
port if the backbenchers could 
this time deliver a clear pros- 
pect of the Bill getting a 
substantial majority vote. 

There is already dear sup- 
port for allowing opening of 
garden centres. A key option 
being discussed. Mr Stan- 
brook said, is to clear the way 
for Sunday opening of smaller 
retail outlets, typically comer 


shops, employing no more 
than three people. 

Additionally, four-hour 
openings could be allowed of 
DrY -only ontlets and shops m 
tourism areas. But Mr Stan- 
brook is anxious to find a 
formula which would not 
destroy the special character 
of the English Sunday. 

Mr Powell's Bill will aim to 
set up a standing conference, 
covering all shades of opinion, 
of about 50 representatives of 
the organizations involved in 
the Sunday trading issue. Mr 
Powell said: “When the con- 
ference reported, the House 
could look at the majority 
view. It is the only way we are 
going to get a Stops Act which 
is acceptable to everybody." 

The Federation of Multiple 
DIY Retailers, now campaign- 
ing strongly for special dispen- 
sation for DIY and garden 
centre outlets, sees both par- 
liamentary moves as encour- 
aging. So far, federation 
members have reported no 
new rash of prosecutions by 
local authorities for illegal 
Sunday opening. 

In the Institute of Directors 
survey. 36 per cent of the 
business leaders supported 
complete liberalization .. of 
Sunday trading, with 26 per 
cent in favour of revised limits 
on trading hours such as a 
four-hour maximum. Another 
9 per cent thought local au- 
thorities should have power to 
determine trading laws in 
their areas. 


Royal Bank of Scotland UK mining machinery 
disappoints with £ 92 m sales drop to continue 


APPOINTMENTS 


Midland 
Bank chief 
named 

Midland Bank: Mr Brian 
GokUhorpe, chief executive, 
group ride management, is to 
be chief executive, corporate 
banking. 

Ribbfe '.Valley Enterprise 
Agency Dr G Stafford is to be 
director. 

Hydron Europe: Mr Kerin 
H P MacGiffia becomes man- 
aging director. 

International Hydron Cor- 
poration: Mr Gordon E Jones 
becomes vice-president with 
responsibility for strategic ■ 

planning. 

Sheridan Group: Mr N L 
Oxley and Mr John A 
Soillenx have been named as 
directors. Mr Douglas Harri- 
soo-MUte will be director of 
marketing. Mr Soflleux is to 
be managing director of the 
subsidiary* ■ Sheridan 
Securities. 

Delta Group: Mr Pieter 
Sylvester becomes chairman 
of Investment Engineering 
and Mr David Stringfettow 
managing director. 

Malcolm McIntyre & Part- 
ners: Mr John Albert has 
joined the board. 


Law Report May 9 1 986 House of Lords 


Bottle cannot be registerei 
as a trademark 


hi re CooCoh Oi 
Before Lord Keith of Kinkel, 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook. 
Lord Tern pieman. Lord Grif- 
fiths .and Lord Oliver of 
Aylmenon - 

[Speeches soidMay 8] 

The Coca-Cola Company was 
not entitled to register the Coca- 
Cola bottle as a trade nark. 

The House of Lords dis- 
missed an appeal by Coca-Cola 
from the Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Lawton, Lord Justice 

Browne- Wilkinson and Sr De- 
nys Buckley) (The T imes Janu- 
ary 29. 1985: [1985] FSR 315), 
who lad affirmed Mr Justice 
Falconer (The Times December 
2a 1983). 

Mr T. Al Blanco White, QC 
and Mr Christopher Marconi 
for Coca-Cola; Mr Hugh Laddie, 
QC for the Registrar of Trade 
Marks. 


Coca-Cola had io sttcceed in 
the startling proposition that a. 
bottle was a trade mark. If 90. 
then any other container -or any 
’ article of a distmciive.shape was 
capable ofbeing & trade mark. 

That raised die spectre af-a 
total and perpetual monopoly in 
containers and articles achieved 
by means of the Trade Marks 
Act. . 1 

Once foe container or snide' 
. had become associated with Ae 
Tnatu ife p f u iw distinctive- 
ness had been, established, with 
or without the bdp of foe 
monopolies created by the Par- 
ents Act' 1977. foe Regisrered 
Designs Act 1949 or the Copy- 
right Act 1956,. foe ucip ct ual 
trade mark monopoly in foe 
container or article could be 
achieved. 

In his Lordship’s opinion foe 
1 938 Act had not been intended 
to confer on foe manufacturer of 




bonus] meattflg and in ns 
satmoxy definition was apt only 
to describe something that 
d iain p w hed goods rather than 
the gpofo'foemsefvex A bottle 
«si container, not a mark. 

The . distinction between a 
mark and foe tiring that was 
. wai ted . was supported by 
authority. ?;■ 

in In rr James's Trade Mark 
«f«86) LR 33'ChD’S92) foe 
plai n t i ffs bad sold bbcfc lead in 
foe form of a dome mid in other 
shapes. Their products bad been 
i ap wad with foe represents- X 
tion of a dome, and their labels 
bad carried a picture of a blade 
dome. They had been allowed to 
register foe representation or 

. picture of a black dome as their 
trademark. 

Similariy. Coca-Cola, bad 
been allowed to regiaxtr a line 

drawing of foe Co ca-Cola bottle 
as its trade mark. 

But. in James’s case, deah 





WMSSS ? y.yi ; is 6 m < Yi 


ESiSki 


^ Hi 




By Our City Staff 

Royal Bank of Scotland's a victim 

pretax profit for the six There 

months to March 31 amount- ed Z9 j 
ed to £92 7 million, somewhat costs, 
below market expectations of Staff i 

around £100 million. £17 mil] 

The net dividend has been premises 
increased from 3.6p to 4p. rose £5 
Two chief factors pulled million, 
down the first results since the rose by 
merger with Williams & million. 
Glvn's. TTre fij 

One was a worse- than-ex- element 
peeled charge for bad and compute: 
doubtful debt where specific' Royal 

provisions rose by £7 million managed 
from £223 million to £293 pressive 
million. Net int 

Shipping was. like last year, creased l 
one of the black spots but this fee incon 
year the oil services sector was percent. 


a victim of low oil prices. 

There was also an unexpect- 
ed 19 per cent increase in 
costs. 

Staff expenses jumped by 
£17 million to £110 million, 
premises and equipment costs 
rose £5 million to £36.6 
million, while other expenses 
rose by £7 million to £38.8 
million. 

The figures indude a large 
dement of depreciation on 
computer equipment 

Royal Bank of Scotland 
managed to produce an im- 
pressive increase in income. 
Net interest earnings in- 
creased by 15 per cent while 
fee income jumped by a 221 
percent. 


By Our Industrial Editor 

Britain's mining machinery er the decline in business was 


manufacturers face a conti- 
nued decline in home market 
sales, according to a new study 
of the mining machinery sec- 
tor’s problems by the National 
Economic Development Coun- 
dTs mining machinery eco- 
nomic development committee, 
or “Little Neddy". 

Sales by British makers in 
1984 dropped 16 per cent or 
£145 million, to £558 million, 
although there was foe impact 
that year of the miners’ strike. 
Bat foe volume of home con- 
sumption of mining machinery 
almost halved between 1980 
and 1984, the report said. 

With British Coal the domi- 
nant United Kingdom enstom- 


largely due to falling demand 
for coal and to pit closures. 
The study said: “The recent 
sharp fall in oil prices poses a 
potentially serious threat to 
power station demand for coal 
which represents some 70 per 
cent of NCB sales.** 

The Little Neddy report, 
which was prepared before the 
Russian nuclear disaster, 
takes no account of the possi- 
ble effects hi switching back to 
the non-nuclear field. 

In the medium term foe 
home mining equipment mar- 
ket seemed likely to continue 
to decline from foe peak in 
1980- 


Sir Gerald Vaughan MP, the 
former Minister of Health, 
above, has joined the man- 
agement team of Health 
Fist, Britain's newest pri- 
vate medical insurance orga- 
nization. He becomes a non- 
executive director of Mutual 
of Omaha International, the 
company behind Health 
First. 

Southwest Resources: Mr 
Ken Keep has become a 
director. 

Interleasing: Mr Neil 
Pykett is to be joint managing 
director. . 

Bejam Freezer Food Cen- 
tres: Mr John Kelly has joined 
the board. 

Venture Founders: Mr Jo- 
seph M Frye has been named 
as managing director. 



















•foe Coca-Cola beverage pur- with or without any judication 
veyed by the Coca-Cola Co. it of the identity of that 
was not sufficient for foe bottle person ...” 
to be distinctive. The word “mark” both, in its 


Lord Griffiths and Lord Oliver 
agreed. - 

SoEdtns McKenna & Or, 
Treasury Solicitor. 


Nature of crime not consequences 
vital to compensation right 


Regan v Criminal Injuries 
Compensation Beard, Ex par- 
te Webb and Others 


34 of foe 1861 AcL The deceased 
in Mr Clack's case might not 
have been because of his mental 


Before Lord Justice Lawton, «*£»*“>* 

Lord Justice Stephen Brown and Section 34 pro vided ‘-Who- 


Sir John Mfcgaw 
[Judgment given May 8] 


soever, by any unlawful act, or 
by any wilful omission or nc- 


etecL shall endanger or cane to 
It wuibenatsreofthecrime, ]** endangered the safety of any 

pet^SSed or befog i faor 


assist therein, shall be gpiliy of a 
misdemeanour, and bring am-. 
, Sc* 1 *™ 1964 vioed thereof shall be habfc, ar 
:* * the discretion of the court to be 
The Court of Appeal, in a imprisoned fo- ^ mm. ^ 
served judgment, dismissed -xaLdme two vesm ” . 
MPSKiSSSSM:! 1 about 250 other 


reserved judgment dismissed 
the appeals of four British Rail 
engine drivers, Mr Cyril Man- 


Mast crimes of violence 
would involve the infliction or 
forest of force but some might 
not lx was no t prudent to 
attempt a definition of words of 
ordinary usage in English which 
the board, as a fact-finding, 
body, bad to apply to . foe case 
before them. 

".-There remained the particular 
problem which arose in Mr 
Clack's case. The coroner's jury 
returned a verdict of accidental 
death, , no doubt because they' 
wen: not satisfied that the 
deceased knew what he was 
doing. 

If hie did sot, he lacked an 


1985;. fI985T. 3 .WLR.618) vfota^^ixa'tSSof^ 


-- I - -I L. ' w — i- I j VIVIWUM. wvis. 4IW a iu uiuicuk. 

S* i^^^titie^ The scheme was not a statutory 


judkfod review of a derision ^ fi^s^S^Afor p!^ 35 * 

ment compensation without - ^ ^ . . 

Compensaaon Board made that unde a statutory duty to .M^i^ toMjta court that 

a psychiatric injury attributable do so.^^ ' tire board were of the opinion 

to an offence under section 34of ,. a-, ±he that when a person charged with 

^Offences agate* thej^On “*££55,53 foTscbS a *ime * ***”« S* 
Act 1861 was not a “personal if it -werea smme^Ma caused personal injury put for- 

irpury ^b^ to a aime of ^ jucc esrf^ a defence 

violence wtfou the scheme "** «* 

Mr Leslie Joseph. QC and Mr do. Thar entailed -th&coun offender and there was no 
Guy Sankey for the appellants: deciding wJml would he a cnme **** apaa 

Mr Mfchad Wright, QC and TWr MoftSS mA Tbx opinion 

John Laws for the board. • . -understanding of foe cncmn- . thecw^tnreuonof 
LORD JUSTICE LAWTON sten^ in which he could under ; imiTranit y ai 

5 sewgaws s**js 

se-ss SSSas: ssmwssvs 


Outstanding year 


trey- to sectroo 34. If he 
qoinhiitted uo otienc^ there was 
no crime. . . 

Without a crime there was no 
basis for the application of the 
scheme to anyone who had been 
injured as a result of his 
conduct. 

Mr Wright told foe court that 
tire board were of tire opinion 
that when a person charged with 
a crime of violence which had 
caused personal injury , put for- 


Year to 31sJ March 


1985 

£000 


Increase 


Turnover 

194,060 

182,506 

6.3 

Profit before taxation 

14,667 

10,896 

34.6 ; 

Earnings p6r share 

23.8p 

17.0p 

mm 

DWWemfe per share 

lO.Op 

6.75p 

48.1 | 


™ am •» Q»w»vsopwrts wuen raw 


6 6 Pre-tax profit up 34. 6% , 
substantial opportunities in 
sporting and financial services, 
specialist printing and 
publishing . . . farther investment 
in the latest technology. . . more 
growth both organically and by 
acquisition...?? 


Mr M jehad Wright, QC a 
John Laws for the board. 


LORD JUSTICE LAWTON stances in wtucb be could under 
said that all the appeals, heard *!* sdienre be paid compensa- 
KJgefoer, raised the same qnes- fo . r pewnrel injury caused 


tion, namely whether a psychi- W ® crime of viotemx. . . a m|y th^'hadlo be an 

sdric injury directly attributable Mr Joseph submitted tto the - _.l -tj • t ^ 

Offence under section 34 of the ^ ouI ^ vmaA unfirnS 

Offences against the Person Act ■' m * *£S2± ^ ” asBtoess 

1861 was a “nttsonal iniurv P robiblted by section 34 was „ 


1861 was a “personal injury Prooiouea uy section m was 
attributable to a crime of bkely to endanger or cause to be 
violence” within the Criminal “daggered tire safety of any 


Injuries Compensation Scheme aj^oaefaing engme dnver. 
as amended m 1969. If ft was, . If a cnffle wa® likely .to cause 
compensation was payable. “Ju nfr -yhcfog. physical or 
otherwise not. psychiatric, then as a matter of 

The board decided that such the orthnary usage of English it 


an injury was not attributable ■ 10 co . u ^ propcriy.be. described as a 
a crime of violence. The Di- cr V5 e ^f y’? le ™?' 


3RA V 'V»1 r*»s. 


* ./ * v. V ■''SC 


visional Court agreed, hence the . Mr. Wright submitted that foe 
tppeals. araftsman of the scheme m- 

In tire case of Mr Clack, a ““tied to limit the me a n i n g of 
further question arose, as to “*e word “crime" by the me of 
whether the words in. the ^e, qaaUfying words “of 
schemg- ** irnmimfty at bw nf An violence”. Those .words were 
offender, attributable ' .to his ad t ectivaI a“d. indicated the 
youth or insanity or other natore °f fo® crime to which the 
condition” r efer red to inunu- ■ s ^ Mme ®PPhcd- The nature of a 


youth or 
condition” 


nity from prosecution or innnu- crime was different from its 


nity from conviction. 

The Divisional Court ad- 
judged that they referred to 


consequences. 

His. 'Lordship said that Mr 
Wright's -submission that -whar 


immunity from conviction. Mr mattered was the nature of the 
Wright submitted . that that cn? 1 ?! .flot its likely con- 


construction was wrong. — 
Each of the drivers had had 
tire misfortune when driving his 
train to run- over and kill 


sequences, was well founded, b 
was for- the boaref" to 'decide 
whether unlawful conduct be- 
cause of its ' nature: not its 


to plead. 

. That was too narrow a 
construction. The intention of 
the scheme, read as a whole, was 
to pay compensation to persons 
injured by acts of criminal 
violence. There did not have to 
be a conviction before 
compensation became payable. 
- The key to construction lay in 
the . words “insanity or other 
condition”. A person who was 
unfit to plead was immune from 
prosecution. Save in that lim- 
ited sense, insanity-, was a de- 
fence as was abnormality of 
mind as defined in the Homi- 
cide Act‘1957. 

„ TJre. Divisional- Omrt. ad- 
judged that the words “immu- 
nity at law” meant immunity 
from conviction and that the 
words “youth or insanity or 
other condition" were apt to 
includes tack of mental capacity 
due to old age. His Lordship 


someone who was on the rail- consequences, a m ou n ted to a 
way line as he approached. crime of violence. 

In three cases the coroners’ ; - 

courts returned verdicts of sui- . y ""1 — ' *- • 1 

ode. In Mr Clack's case the t nKt^fKI 
de c eased was a senile man of 84 X XijI 

who might not Jiave known , - • - 

what he was doing. • 'flf'h'f" "lTl 

All four drivers suffered UUl UJ 

psychiatric itnury* directly - ' _ 

ttributable to the conduct of Rugnwv Secretary of State far. 
the deceased. The three who had . the Home Department, Fy 
committed suicide, had been parte Meyer-WnHf - - 
guilty of offences under section AtmlfeatiTm* iKr mmi ^ 


Lord Justice Stephen Brown 
and Sir John Megaw agreed. 

Solicitors: Robin Thompson 
& Partners; Treasury Solicitor. 


not In order 

Regina v Secretary of State tot . judicial re v ie w of a dec i s io n by 
foe . Home . Department,. .Ex the Home Secretary to nmi» a 
parte Meyer-Widff d i mdnation order. 


AkmBno&r, Chotmm. 


Extel Group PLC, Extel House, East Harding Street 
London EC4P 4HB. 


Civil liability 
for dime 
is possible 

CBS Songs Ltd aid Otibevs v 
Amstmd Constuuer Electron- 
ics pic and Another . 

. The criminal offence of incite- 
ment to commit a criminal 
offence under section 21(3)“ of , 
the Copyright Act 1956 might ; 
give rise to civil liability and i 
entitle copyright holders to an 
injunction to restrain' such 
inchemeaz, Mr Justice Wftftford 
said in the Chancery Division 
on May 8, allowing certain 
amendments . to foe plaintiffs’ 
statement of dajm; but striking, 
out certaih allegauons. . 


parte Meyer- Widff de portation order. 

. AppTications for judicial re- . • LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
v^were lfabte 10 be dismissed said that ft needed to be plainly 
with costs if docamems fUed in' understood by all applicants for 
rourt were pot drawn m_ m judicial review that , unless they 
TOmpTiance with Practice Dlrec- folkwed faithfully the terms of 
tion (Evutenf**- . JWrmiArfal fh* rv? ■ 


DirectX tter 

U t«a 1 t ^ appheanons were likely to be 

— . ir ■ Ju ? uc *U 1 Wafl ans ■ so . struck out because of the fact 
wared m- the Queen's Bench that the bunSes of documents 
Divisional Conn on May 6 in. were almost irn i«iirfiimw» 

* judgment oteiqn-- SoUcitors or foeirfaydients 
nng wtth Mr Justice Mans i» or both would be Dable to pay 
^dismissing an application for foecosis of tireappSms. 


the Practice Direction, their 
applications were likely to be 
struck out because of the fact 
'that the bundles of documents 


LEGAL 


EVERY TUESDAY 
















THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY Q ioqf 


29 


-*n right 


1 : 'i 


.r 


i*. * 



f/li 

V‘ 


; ~ ‘ ‘ 



i 



Eln 


:ernational pic 


(Registered in England No. 287211) 


Offer for Sale by Tender 

by 

Hoare Govett Limited 


Summary of Information 

Business - 

P- E is a leading independent consulnnq services mMnMU.' 

consultmg. m tenm>a lec taak W . coq^.w^cmSSSC mma9emnt 

fading Record . 

(Note (0) jqjm . iqcm inm 

1981 1982 -1983 1984 1985 


.' 12.000,000 

£19. 8 million 


taxation 

QBerft» Sale Statistics at tbelffijumiim Tenter Fxioe'afl 65 p 

Ordinary shares in issue after the Offer for S&je ' " " .: : 

Market canalisation 

Earnings pa share for the year ended 31- December 1985 

after the actual tax charge of 47% 
altar a notional tax charge of 35% 

Histone prk» earnings multiple 
after the actual tax charge of 47% 
after a notional tax charge of 35% 

Grose dividend yield (based on the net dividend of 1 8p per share 
paid for the year aided 33 December 1985) 

Dividend cover 

Adjusted net tangible assets per share at 31 December 1985 (Note fa)j 
Net cash proceeds available to the Company from the Offer for Sale 
Notes: . _ 

frt As shown m the Accountants' Report ..t. .... 

(ii) Based on tfae^o forma oonsohdated balance tiieetoItteGiDqp at 3J December 1965 as 

set out under Pro'Foima Balance Sheet below. - wewnioeriaHuas 

Introduction 

sertws m which P-E ig engaged are manufoourina;-^ cheimS. 
d^nbu' ioti .^"na! semc^. and govBrareSwfc &E 

irom major multinational groups to small pnvBtefy-owoed business and deftiredamf^^^ 
revenue from overseas diems _ ' . &ome a?* a its 

more xban half of the Group's revenue carne-ftotn cbemK few uuhnm b.r ;■ . . 

I' The Directors attach great importance to Hue meaaK^SSLJ 


Share Gapital 

Authorised Issued and to 

£1 finnnm be issued fully paid 

li.ouu.uuu ordinary shares of lQp each ri ?nn nm 


Indebtedness 

£32 - 'partes had an overdraft 

chaige; obUganons under a hire purcfeS agreemeStti^ 0 ^ 0 ^ md a floalm 9 
and g uarantees of £290.158 yreement of £51.901. and contingent Labilities 

E «*■<*■« bnnma^ on 2 

unfeaasd. no term Joans or oih^toiro™^ ° r ,^ ted bul 

including bank overdrafts nn hahiiitue u “ e “ 8aness m nature of borrowing. 

“ -* <® 5 

contingent Labilities or guarantees nmmments. mortgages, charges, material 


3.7x 
74:3p 
£1.7 million 


P-E International pic 

the Company and its subsidiaries and. where the context 
requires, their predecessors in business 

. the Company and its subsidiaries 
the Directors of the Company 
P-E Computer Services Limited 
P-E Consulting Group Limited 
P-E Consulting Services Limited 
Hoare Govett Limited 

The P-E 1974 Pension Scheme and TheBaimeUNo 2) Trust 
computer dimension”^" 10 underta,te rnanaaement cnnaihmo mm, -■ - . . 


"P-E" . 

71 the Croup" 

“the Directors" 

"P-E Computer Services" 
“P-E Consulting Group" 
“P-E Consulting Services" 
“Hoare Govett" 

“the Pension Funds" 


Directors and Advisers 

Itates Hugh Montgomerie Lang CBE (Executive Chairman) 

Marcus Taylor Samuels (Group Managing Director) 

James Gilford Donaldson (Group Development Director) 
Victor John Tuffield (Finance Director) 

Robert Campbell Murray (Non -executive) 

Montague Lawrence White (Non-executive) 
all of. 

Park House. Wick Road. Eg ham. Surrey TW20 0HW 

Kenh Charles BeU ACTS 

Rark House. Wick Road. Egham. 

Surrey TW200HW 

Hoare Govett Limited 

Heron House. 319/325 High Holbom. London WC1V 7PB 

Pnce Waterhouse. Chartered Accountants 
Southwark Towers. 32 London Bridge Street. London SEI 9SY 
Simmons & Simmons 
M Dominion Street. London EC2M 2RJ 

LmkJaters ft Paines 

Bamngton House. 59-67 Gresham Street. London EC2V 7JA 


Secretary 
Registered Office 

Einamdal Advisers 
and Stockbrokers 

Auditors and Reporting 
Accountants 

Solicitors to the 
Company 

Solicitors to tbe 
Offer for Sale 

Bankers 


Registrars and 
Receiving Agents 


ClydesdaJeBankPLC 

Victoda Branch. 52 Buckingham Palace Road 
London SW1W0RW 

Ravensboume Registration Services Limned 

SESSXm 34 BeCke " ham Hoad ' Bectenham ' 

and at 

145 Leaden hall Srreet. London EC3V 4QT 


Consulting in Context 

Thnf-a M fc-n — - 



History and Development 

The Company was incorporated as Producbori-Engn 
tost in the United Kingdom- to provide management 
t nMw-b unri thn other fevimter rfenv* 


otTSmSoIS which it IS 

QfganimtioBe^ LUfpiiMtn ryp fniJrfflmm iw^p^rnyf .fPf* 713 * 161 required Instead, many 
facing them end mate mom thro ^ b mare or aftemS 

AI loonsmang work meets one or more of the toltowinodiemnf*ri«! 






die 
. _. was 

-— — - ytw “ui* having a 

pnndpajgeetonsm which itcpeoates. “oars or amuixi ] %. P-E is among the leading firms in the 


“iKMre. Who are * 

The Divisional Mahacnna Dirermns mwi ^ r>_ u 


• . iiKjjt-iv nan cs r-t, s 
—> balance uuhe future. 

Care Business Areas 

“* toC8tTOns ^ ***** 

uximotcqy. computef services and "^nagement oonsufimg. in/onnaaon 

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l ^fe rtakmg boanesses usually invokes P-E in 

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THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 : 


y 


P-E International pic 


continued 


Computer Services 

This business ss mate up el tnree divisions - Compute! Systems Division. Technical Computing 
Division and Northern Division 

The Computer Systems Division provides systems analysis and piogrammtna services in the com- 
mercial systems area imaenakinost-stems development protects and providing skilled stall at all levels to 
lemfctcvriieru prion teams It also provides* lanoeoi training rout ses in vanbusaspecrsot computing 

• The largest current protect is in connecnon with the prevision of a romprehenfiv* management 
inlomiauon svster.i hi the V.Vrt African affiliated a multinational 01 ! company The system rovers the 
functions of mver.rorv management, product costing, sales order processing, [ecetvabtes and 
piohubiliiv reporting 

• The division heS also assisted a maior muu computer manulacturer in ihe .tevelcr mem of tailor-made 
solutions to various retail systems problems including enhancement or a merchandise management 
svstem lor a high street chain and design of an order processing svsiem lot a cash -and -cany operator 

• P-E rerontlv provided ronsimams to a teadinq airline to assist in improving its inventory management 
system lor maior antrame and engine HJVtemhlres 

The Technical Computing Division was at up in late 1984 ro provide a local point far P-E's 
involvement in scientific and techri ical systems The services provided in this area are similar to those of 
the Computer Systems Division although virtually all the work is on a contract basis 

• An assignment in 1 985 involved the provision of son ware engineers to design . develop and implement 
emergency gas and lire shutdown systems tar offshore platforms 

■ The division provided programming staff w reinforce the project team of another software house 
working on an automated warenousing application 

The Northern Division which operates in the North of Ena land and Scotland from P-E’s Manchester 
and Glasgow ofnees provides the same range of services as the other two ojmpurer services divisions 

• In a recent assignment P-E assisted a building society to cam 1 our a maior update of its computer 
software providing consultants to handle the technical aspects of the conversion 

• A current assignment for a maior public transport organisation involves providing project leaders far a 
team converting a mainframe system to distributed processing using mini computers 

Recent Computet Services dienes include BF Oil. BL*PA. SniCti Cheshire Pudding Society. Dowry 
Electronics. Ferranti. Henz Hoechst UK. /Cl. IWoM Nixdori. Scaash Transpoa Croup. Shell Chemicals. 7SB 
Technical Services 

This business coi isisis oi a single division which was established in 1983 io provide technical personnel 
on a rontract basis The demand is particularly horn oil. gas and chemicals clients who use large 
numbers ol contract stall in their engineering and protect management teams 
Recent assignments uid ude the pro vision of 

• Project engineers, planning engineers and cost engineers to work on offshore proiects lot a major oil 
company 

• A maintenance engineer to specify user requirements far computerised maintenance systems in a 
non-ferrous smelter in Dubai 


die^wih&a niSSJOr,m ^ engirweT toaco? P t rotanriij mechanical equipment on an offshore platform in 


• A quality assurance engineer to prepare procedures in the Brussels offare of a major international 
onshore designer 

Recent cfjwiis of _ the Technical Serving, business include Atiannc Rrctihekl. Brrnsh Gas. Esso UK Glaxo. 
Howard Dons. Shell UK Exploraooa & Production 

Overseas Business 

nSJfH??? phriBfcra markets and sells the whole range of the Group’s services outside the 
unnro kingdom The business thus secured is then handled by the appropriate specialist division and a 
number of recent assignments have been inferred to above 

f01 te* 0[ »«« M 5 million (23% of revenue) This was earned 
mainly in the Middle East (Cl 35 million or 7%). Africa (tl 27 million or 7% I and Europe (El 10 million oc 6%) 

Mjl 1 * °* P 'F 5 '^’ erseas business is in developing countries where it is often funded by one or other of 
tne international agencies International Division staff keep closely in touch with these bodies including 
Bank m Manila. the European Develop mem Fund m Brussels, the IndustnS 
uevaopmeni urgamsauon in Vienna, the International Labour Ofhce in Geneva and the World Bank m 
Washington 


In a reoem praieci m Ghana. P-E provided a team of economists and industrial specialists to carry out a 
P? hcv stu ^* Theseforined the basis for consideranon of a line of credn from the 
nj a . f nri^r G SS SS M 01 9, hana project covered export incentives, import controls, reform 
euXauoo investmenc guidelines. industrial rehabditation requirements and project 


Clients 

Ity Sacloi^ P-E earned revenue from approximately 1.000 different clients, in the fallowing proportions 

Manufacturing ogv, 

ChL gas and chermcafe 

Tiansport, iraail and distribution 9 % 

Financial services S? 

Government S? 

n 


ino% 


In 1985 the Group undenook assign men is in the UK and overseas fax a number of separate dnnaons and 

ou l7IQU P wfu ch together accounted far some 17% of P-E's 
revenue No other client accounted for more than 5% of P-E's revenue 

/J^^ban 50% of the Group's 1985 revenue came bom clients for whom P-E had also worked previously 
■Hie Directors attach great importanos to this measure ol repeat business, ca nattering thm it provides an 
objective confumaaoD of the value of the services that P-E provides 


Directors, Senior Management anri staff 

Direct or s 

CBE ( 531 J^ExecuDveCfralrnianof theOjunpany A science graduate of Glasgow University 
and a charteied engineer, he joined P-E in 1961 after industrial experience in the stedand engmeertng 
industries He progressed thr oug h a number of management postnonE. leaning the Boara in 1972 
B ^m.^ -Hing Ttn i w Chairman in 138C He is a member of die Design Council and the 

Marie Samuels (44) is Group Managing Director He joined P-E m 1972 after several years of data 
processing experience in tbe UK and overseas. By 1978 he was running P-E's newly-established 
conger senucesbusmess Appointed to the Board m 19S1. he became Group Managing Director in 

^ 15 0rou P Development Director A Camhndge mathemancs graduate, be lotaed 
P-E in 1970 after tndusmaJ and consulting experience in systems and computing, fife has beki several 
senior management positions withm the Group, both in management consulting and tn computer 
services, and be KJmad the Board in 1977 He is a member of the comical of tte Management 


Consultants' Assocteaon and a former President of the Computing Sen/loes 1 Assodadim. 
VfoTbffieMMDisFtnanoeDtieaof A c har tered accountant, he has been with P-E afnee 19@ except 
te a p«MXf of 15 months uo to Jantwy 1979 He has teld senica accountmc oppotonnenci wtthfe fc: 
Group, first m management consulting and then m computer services. He hecamfl Group Financial 
Controller in 1983 ana joined the Board as Finance Director to April 1985 

Hobrat Murray (60) Is a non -executive DbectDr A chartered a c cou nt a nt , be joined the Board a 1980 
having spam mare than 25 years m management consulting, at first with PA Management Ocaaottams 


ahHHHhnlrfflm to reattsB part of then brings. 

sssss sssaas-stsiww;-, 

expected growth of d» bustoass 


ft 


In New York. 


Mnnn g mp yut Cmnu Wriq 

This ousness is sub-divided into two specialist divisions — B»si nets Consulting Dotshm and 
Manufacturing Divcaoa. 

The Business cnnuiting Division provides a range of services to genoal manag ement i ncluding 
strategy business appraisals, organisation and cost structure reviews, personnel work, 

executive selection and marketing consultancy 

A substantial proportion of the division's 1385 revenue came from cost structure reviews wtneb involve 
working cfasaiv wnn the client's management to examine systematically all tbe wock done by 
managerial, technical and support staff This in turn leads to the identification ol potential savings and 
the development of improvements to the diene's management process 

• Recent cost structure review clients indudea large engmeenng group, a defence eiearomcs company, 
a multinational oil company and a national airline 

• in 1985 a study was carried out far a leading retail and distribution group to review its objectives and 
strategy ami to ad vise on the management structure that would be required to ban die expected growth. 

• Last year P-E's executive selection consultants filled more than eighty managerial vacancies fax clients 
in many different sectors of industry and commerce 

• Also m 19S5 P-E's marketing consultants operated overseas m the EEC. Scandinavia and tbe United 
Slates Their work included assisting a major US corporation to investigate the demand lor 
sophisticated control devices for use in Flexible Manufacturing Systems in Europe 

The Manufacturing Division has evolved from the Group's early production engineering work in the 
1930s Its prune current tele is to assist its ctrenis to harness new technology in aider to make char 
man ufacturing operations more efficient. Typical assignments involve planning far die introduction of 
Advanced ManuTacrunng Technology, advising on unproved computerised production and inventory 
control systems, design for manufacture and productivity studies. In recent years P-E has earned out a 
large number of pmiects in the field ol Computer Aided Design (CAD) and in late 19% u was selected by 
the Department cl Trade and Industry to undertake a study of international standards far CAD 

• Last year P-E assisted a leading manufacturer of high- performance luxury tars loexaraine bow best to 
produce a range ol engine ami suspension components using a Group Technology approach 

• Another 1935 assignment was for a major British carpet manufacturer where F-E established a quality 
assurance system 

Since 1977 the Government has subsidised the provtston of consultancy services to smaller busmesses 
through a number of schemes now known as Business and Technical Advisory Services (BTASl Over 
the vems more ihM Cc.OOfl firms have been assisted in this way. P-E has been involved smee the outsat 

• One 1935 BTAS assignment was (or a company with about 50 employees manufacturing leather goods 
p-E assisted with the leorgamsauon of the factory to enable the company to meet the map: expansion 
in output requited on becoming a supplier to Marks & Spencer 

At the beginninc of 1986 the Manufactunno Division, which had hitherto been based in P-E's Midlands' 
office at SoLihulL was split ictc two parallel divisions The Solihull -based division now services clients in 
the Midlands, the North. Scotland and overseas, while a new Eg nam -based division services 
manufacturing diems m London and the South 

Recent Ma/iawment Consulting clients include Access AtgvS Foods. FTP. Brmsh Airways Carpets 
IntemaDcna/. Creed: Stasse. Deoarmen: ol Trade and Indusav Jaguar. John Uenzies. MEL. Mrcrogen. 
Almisnytf Defence, /tency Fisher. Ralls- Boyce. Vickers Wodd Sank 

Information Technology 

This business comprises two divisions - Information Sterns Dunsm and Computer Consulting 
Division 

The inf ormati on Systems Divisioa provides services in Information Technology (IT) strategy, office 
automation. lelecommumrouons and in the applicauon of a range of software tools to the sdtanoa of 
management problems 

Much of the dinKcn'a work involves helping diems to manage then information requirements With the 
very wide ranee of eqi^pmenc available and the rapid rate cl technological change it is ddficult far diems 
tokeepup-t»ddte Th us IT strategy is a particularly appropriate field lui the use oi specialist consultants 

• In 1985 a maici office automanon review was carried out for a focal authority P-E developed a 
ftiUv-iniegraied strategy based on a nerwork Unking all the council's oUices to each other and to the 

mainframe computer 

• In a curter.t st udy . F-E is advising British Rail on the informauon requirements ol rail passengers on its 
next generation oi mainline bams In addition to conventional iniormanon on timing and schedules, the 
study will also encompass provision loi a range of oibe: services including telephones and daialmks 
enabling passengers to keep m touch with their offices during a j-jurr.ev 

• P-E'ssotuvaretooisevcIvedfronitheGrioup'sexpeTienceinoperauonalreseardi With the development 
■oi compact and powerful mmi and person^ compuiers. it became possible io provide packages lor use 
both ny ronsnl rants and by diems' start These packages indude. HOCUS a powerful modelling and 
sunulau>^n system which enables management speedily to evaluate aliemauve courses of action in 
complex situations 

lire Computer Consulting Division provides a range of services similar to that of the Information 
Systems Division but wuh qi eater emphasis on protect management, hartfware and software selection 
and the lechmcai aspects of compuung 

• A maior cfiem m 1985 was the Post Otfice which the division assisted m a number of aspects of IT 
including the National Postal Address File System. Counter Automation and Datapost Automation 

• In 1985 an educational body was assisted to define, select arid install a new database management 
system far student records 

• Last year the division also provided help to a larae composite insurance company in developing its 
financial reporting systems 

Recent clients of the Iniotmanon Technology business include A.*3a. B TEC. BAT. Bnosh Rail. County 
Bank. Coventry Cuv Council. CKN. Tt-e Home On ice. The Law Si.-oerv. Legal & General. London 
Hospital. The Fatem Office. The Post Office. Qatar General f'eyoleum Corporation Koval Insurance. 
Wellcome 


whete he was managing dfioctor, and thereafter as a vice-president of the DiebaJd ( 

He fa chairman of Goww Hokfinga. 

Monty White (57) re a notrexecimve Director who joined the Board In 1884. He fa a chartered 
accountant and is financial director of Atdctm International 


Prospects 

Tbs aOTlropmag tn which management 


Keith Beil (36) is a graduate of Loodoa Umveratry and a ctoteredsecraary He joined P-E in 1984 after 
hefamg a stmllar pcwtion in tbe Rediffuacm Group 

Divisional Bkaxiagiiig Directors 

David Hbjre (44) is DivrsionaJ Mauagmg Director of tire Manufacturing Division, based m SofitraH. He 
comrolB P-FT” manjifaminrg consulting ntnfl nBR w in tire the fforth ami Ovas^s. A chartered 

er^roeer. he Joined P-E In 1967 alter engineering industry experience. 

CoHd B a msirin (39) Is Diviascal Managtug Dliectcg of the Computer Systems Dlvistan. An economics 
graduated Southampton UnJvetsry. he joBredP-E fit 1972 after dataprocesai^ expedenoe in dsaniuH 
and electronics industries. 

Bryan catuteber (39) is DtvtsbHiB! Managing Director of the International Qtvisnsi. A member of the 
Brnfah Oomputar Society, he joined P-fi m 1975 after sales experience tn the comjauier industry 
Brian Conn (45) is Divtsiana] Managmg Dtrecmr of tbe Techtncai Sbnrloes Dnnaon. whicb be famed P-E 
to establish m 1983 Previously he baa a variety of experience tn contracting and coosuinng in tbe 
energy and coDStructtoo industries. 

John Hotman (43) is Divisfaoa! Managing Dtractor of the Gnnputw Cbnsulttog Drvfattm. Ite jomed P-E 
in 1980 after more than 15years of computer expenance m sreeL oil and software 
Alan Marshall (54) fa Dtvtfaooal Mana^ig Director of the Business Consulting DnnsKBt. A chartered 
engineer, he joined the Group m 1960 after industrial experience in consumer electronics. Hrs 
experience has toduded 14 years' mvohrement with diffeieni aspects of P-E's overseas busness 
Peter Moore (44) is Divisional Managing Director of the Northern Division, based fa Manchester He 
joined P-E in 1901 alter experience in bom general management and data jxocessing. 

Jan Sxymanklewicz (38) fa Divisional Managmg Director of the Information Systems Division. A 
graduate ui operational research from Imperial College, he joined P-E in 1970 after operational research 
experience in industry 

David Thomas (39) is Dtvisiona] Managing Director of tfceTecfaracal C om p utin g Dnnslon. A member of 
the Brush Computet Society, be joined P-E m 1970 after systems analysis andptogjamining exper i ence 
tn the software industry 

An Todd (57) is Divisional Managing Director of the Manufacturing Division, based fa Egham He 
connote P-E's manufacturing consulting business fa London and die South A chartered engines, he 
Jranari P-E in 1969 after managemmieiqiengTicBin the pmcRBranri-fin gineBm igm 

Staff 

The functions of the 342 staff employed by P-E ai 31 December 1985 were as foUcwa 
Professional staff 

Consultants 205 

Sales -. 22 

AaxumingaiidadrnuiistratiQn 20 

Group management 


increasing speoaiisatton. combined with die fogfi 
less likely to have within tbar organfafflansalltne 

to useoutmttaconadtingservic^H 


fipwMHB fa beoomfaq moegsngiy 

fflssssajssasasasas 


P-E'acmjabiin y and trac k record give lx a 
be mfanly organic. Aitbough there are no 
Tnanfpn>Ara uH | r w»b k »bi|fffnff ffieii 


TO<an*nfltfas. coccennaorg cm those 


cU«it baee add wide range o( semces wilt 
foreseaaUe fanire. Hie current year has Siam 
erf tf»se far the corresponding period fa 19®. 


under axsute&von. F-E^ wiil be prepared 
fields 

_ confideni that P-E's strong 

the Group”® maintain ggrafaafa gcwji 




Accountants' Report 

Tl lp J^Jni«iTT1j||yiftftB»1ftflfffM»pqfi l .fcnmdii»AutlCt»saild B>^I I U11lKT A>^5lhU ll «lltiS.Pm^W aE1 fi a ^ e 




TJlft P Uprttwff 
P E iiminsjraial pic, 

F^rtc House. 

Wk* Road. 

Efilani. Surrey TW20 0HW 

TboDwaooiB. • • • 
HoareQiywKtUnHred, 
Heron House. 

3J9/325 Hiqfl HcfiXKL 
London UClV7fB 


SofahwaaTtjmm. 

3ZLcflOor3»toeSBeeK. 

IUOCCSE13SY 


* 


3 May 1986 


Grafanw. 

P^Urtemarionalidc ' 

Wehawaud^BKacooaire(XP-EIramasx^t^rd»Cfaiipa>v~)a«iRSEuhHmiiieEfa)aettia ifeaGmy.'lto 
each of the fwe yeaseotel 31 Deceomer 1985 The fmanctamlfflinatioDsa but pooweas beer, prep ared fica t hese 

a caWTBg arrpr matmg orrh jQn -Jif awyafte a p ^g t ^i na t p Out wxkbasbesccamgclcititio»Ka>ju i«i ^ewiCa 

ihff Al l J lll I>u OP ,f1tl * I7M TfK > r , ? inmn g ag r y wtTtt;ln t ~ 




Support stafi 





Some 75% of P-ETs professional staff are graduates or professionally qualified 
It is P-E policy to recruit stall with several years cf relevant experience in industry and commerce 
Considerable resources are invested in recroinrig sunabie start, who are then named tn P-E's standards 
and metboddoqies, mainly withui the divisions for wiudi the individuals are recruited. P-E attaches 
greet importance to ongoing professional development sod, u ns annual budgets, ax days pa 
consultant are allocated tar training and renaming P-E staff attend computer manufacturers* courses fa 
both hardware and software In addition there e an exienave programme of ttuemal commomcaamv. 
wuh regular start meetings, professorial workshops and a monthly house magazine 
The Directors believe strongly tn relating remuneration to results achieved Most members of 
management earn bonuses based on performance against budgeted profit of then dnnstons, such 
bonuses typically range from 20‘S up to EfK of basic salaries Some managers earn bonuses based on 
sales and most other full-time employees participate m profit sbaimg schemes 

S taff ^ l nwihftliliwq 

Since the founders of P-E sold then shares to the staff m the early 1960s. shareholding by staff at all levels 
has been actively encouraged Immediately prior to the Off® for Safe, the Directors held approxlnratdy 
15% of the Company's issued share capital, the Divisional Managing Directors a further 10% and mote 
than 120 other employees just over 26% a cojjihjired siaff shareholding of 51% Following the Offer tot 
Sale, this figure will fail to approximately 4 1 ^ of the enlarged equity 

The Directors attach great importance io a continuing high level of staff shareholding since a commits 
both management and employees more tally to the tong-rerm success of P-E Tb assist in this respect, a 
Savings -Related Share Option Scheme and an Executive State Option Scheme have been introduced 
Furihet details of these schemes ate given imdet Employee Share Schemes in paragraph 4 of Statutory 
and General [□formation below 


any period subsequent ro 31 December 1985 

B nm n|y y 

The to»o%inng are the prmtqjal a v ajuno agpobciegwtuchtiavE been used m prepare d»toanna):n fc roaa ar . set taa 
tnttusiepqrt 


Associates 


TJip m-Ka-fWiMyi {yffharfl} sfa yy j ttvrppr La t p ihp^rframs d aH a i teytsm a; for tts> five 

yams ended 31 nnwwi*w jgeb Related ate en mpafin^ < , «*** man s etete w weese me Grout nas a 

euixsasms &s;>s:3DhJjngaPtJ is ai a position uxkhosp ssjfisiicfflii mfluroce The conscLGaied acccums mdu'*: mo 
Group's an d tne Dost aoquqnoa reronn af such compaues 
7tirnMer and fae fflcogoBUD 

Tunxwer represoas teas racercabfe and recowtafae expenses doe m respect c! an efiafasabie wok earned cut m the 
year, excluding duntiaafi le value added rax 
HxBtf assets and d?preaarm. 

Fixed assets, ozbei teas freehold property wtacta ts stated a a valoauon. are sated at cos less accumulated 
depraosiHi wfnea b provided over ttts usefij hsesot die raevam assets a rnenfiowoigures 
Leas»boldbji*teiq PenodollP*^ 

FunimreandeQuspmeat 15«i reduemg balance 

Mctoivehicfcs 30% reducing balance • 

OonpBMlMnd jcmLu-Myinmiwii 20 % straight line 

f lu tH T IK f IMOim 

Deferred taxation an die surplus aasng an tevAtaaoir of the Group's Tropeit7 b racogrused enty where there s a 
hkelilHKrimai tax be partite mtifatOreseeaiielnrare 

Ko deferred taxanoo is prontod on other (mnng dflerencesas there b bztla faebbood that such taxamo wdi beams 
payable nr the tareseeriaefanne 

Foreign emetates . _ , 

Assets and tatabaesm foreign c tu renctBs have been gg veac diHsngflrngatrfag raws of«artacgeaa»u at the year 
end TberegulramBiBfaanoepMliBiarilOBaiisagdefawittmitepKritairifaBaccagu 


»■ 


division Tbsse registers aie of varying sue 
out tne two oiggesi provraers or consuranq stan on a contract baas aw the Computer Systems Division 
and the Technical Services Division, whose combined tegtHers contain more than 6.000 names In total 
P-E has access to a iKtwork of more than 7.000 experienced consultants 
At 31 December 1985, some 280 associates were engaged on P-E assignments 


Pension Funding 

P-E operates a new -contributory pension scheme which ts valued by independent actuaries every three 
years The most recent valuation was tirade by R Watson & Sons. Consulting Actuaries, at 31 December 
1985 and showed tile scheme lobe in a strong firanesaj position - 

The actuaries have made recommendations in connection with then valuation, taking into account the 
expected impact of the Offer tor Sale cm the value of die scheme' sholdmg of shares in the Company The 
Directors have been advised that it should be possible, on the basis of current assumptions, to provide 
improved benefits under the scheme and yet to reduce the resulting normal coumbution rated about 
16 % to lOSfor a period of 10 « more years 

The Directors intend to implement the unproved benefits and to reduce the contribution rate Mowing 
the Offer lor Sale with effect Horn 1 January 1986 On this baas, m 1986 the reduction in the Company s 
contribution from the existing level will be some £241000 


Properties 

P-E's headquarters are located on on 18 acre estate near Egham. Surrey A Victorian country house Park 
House, which has been convened into offices, and a modem office building, Lubbock House, provide 
total gross accommodation of approximately 31 .000 square feet 

P-E has obtained planning pemusaon far a flutter office buddma. to be constructed on a 4 acre sue on 
the esratapiovidmg grass accommodation of 18. 300 square tael The Dneciore believe that this building 
will ptovrde sufficient additional spacp for the Group's requirements over the next three years P-E has 
entered into a sale and leaseback agreement m respect of the site and the proposed new buUdmg Brief 
pamculara of this agreement are set out under Material Contracts m paragraph 9(b) of Statutory and 
General Information below Eight acres of the estate, currently grazing land, have recently been 
designated as potentially available tar housing development post 1991 
The estate (^du^g^^gi e^ whidi i6 tbe a^a o ffte sale and leaseback agreement has been 

P-E leases ns regional offices m London, SoHhuB. Manchester and Glasgow 

The Park House estate and the Group's other principal premises are described uMer Properties m 

paragraph 7 of Statutory and General Information below 






.. . . 



uzuup itxdxh una i^oss accouuxs 

The pxBOl&ted profit and fag aeoams of the Group for each of the fwe yews ceded 31 December 1985 are set out 
below - 

1381 1382 I* 3 mt 1-TR5 

Notes LOUD QXU QXB. W» BU0 

Tumcver 

O) 

5 371 ’ 

' 9.282- ’ 

W 128- ' 

I3W 

' FH53 

Urea casts 


(5.936) 

(5.760) 

. .-7.3611 

(9.0431 

(13.0241 

Grass profit 


2.435 

2,522 

2767 

-4*5 

. 6.429 

seana and admsusaaditeCQsre 


OJ9M) 

cma 

•247W 

[35601 

<tei» 

Trading profit 


451 

482 

297 

1.015 

■ LS4) 

Excepoaaafuenfa 

<a 

(132) 

(K35I 

169) - 

(2061 


Resuksof idafaif ctaraantes 

(3)- 

(131 . 

(121 

-T8 

• Z-".’ 


NeuMerea 

141.-. 

wn 

(61) 

1101) 

1120) 

(217J 

Prate MMdmayactivRMi 







before taxation " 

(9 

265 

. 283 

MS 

. m 

1324 

TwtahOR 

(61 

Hsu 

ma 

no?) 

azii 

(623) 

Profit on oidEBiv acmcesatrer taxauon 


105 •• 

171 

38 

• 360 • 

- 701 

Dmdesds 

(71 

(8® 

m 


• XB&. 

(193 

Retained profibUGSU far me year 

(15) 

21 ' 

8T 

. 1461 

241 

509 

Eariangsperdiaie 

r* 

lOp 

16p 

04p • 

35p 

- 66p 


Group Balance Sheets 

The cwBotafated balance sheas ct *e Group at the end of each of the fwe yeas ended 31 Decanter I98Sara set out 
butow ' 

££ J£8? WS. ww 1985 

1 nam edoq moo eolo lood - eooo 


Rued assets. 


Financial Information 


Five Year Seminary 
Revenue 

1981 

EOOO 

1982 

EOOO 

1983 
£000 . 

1984 

£000 

1985 

£000 

Management Consulting 

4.700 

4.057 

4.385 

6.222 

6,921 

Information Technology 

409 

939 

1.938 

2.407 

3.831 

Computer Services 

3-262 

4.286 

3.797 

4.397 

7.387 

Technical Services 

— 

— 

8 

582 

1.314 

Total 

8.371 

9.282 

10.128 

13,608 

19.453 

Trading Profit 

451 

482 

297 

1.015 

1.541 

Exceptional items* 

(132) 

(126) 

m 

(206) 

— 

Results of [elated companies 

(13) 

(12) 

18 

2 

— 

Net interest 

(41) 

(61) 

(101) 

(1201 

(217) 

Profit before taxation 

265 

283 

145 

691 

1.324 


"The exceptional items m 1981. 1982 and 1883 comprised redundancy and re-orgamseuan costs and ta 
1984 related to the settlement erf a daun from a chan m respect trf problems wtth a buUdfag designed by 


Trading Record 

The five year summary set out m tbe table above covets two distinct phases the first was a penod of 
relatively slow revenue growth from 1981 to 1983. the second was a period of rapid growth with muni 
unproved profitability m 1984 and 1985 

In 1981 and 1982 the rran^ranara ««su»u^ busmess wasadvereeiyaffocitedbyiheUKreceSBmln 
consequence a management reorganisation was undertaken which led to unproved pertannancgfa 
1983. However, tbe computer services business, which had remained buoyant fa me early lSBQs. 
suffered a setback m 1983 with the cancefiatm of a maw contract in Kuwait Also fa 1983 costs Meome 
£120,000 were incurred m setting up a computer services operation m Houston. Texas, wtuen was 
suhaarmaDy discontinued in ihe touching year 

White the progress made m 1984 and 1965 was in part due w a more bucyunt market for the servtceG 
provided by P-E. the mc«t ngpprtant factor was the high priority gram to profliable growth as a result o f 
tbe dBamoo taken fa mfa- 1983 ro work towardB a putmc flotantm. This ted fa a change in massosraent 
style and a more commercial approach to the development erf P-E's busmees. M anag emen t row ans 
were finked much more strongly to profitability and management and steft shareholdings rose ram 15% 
to 51% of the equity Turnover grew by 34% betwem 1983 ami 1964 andby 43% between 19 84 and 1985. 
with much improved profitability The DtrectoroconsKte that these rasuftEomiflrmtlJesffecxJsaaess of 
the current operating formula 


Ihngrfrfe assets 

'<a 

• 2358 

1356 

7 r S?_t 

5706 

6508 

Investments 


— 

"s’- 

. 18 

21 

- - — 



2.358 

2361 

254! 

5,726 

6603 

Currant resets 




, 



Detects 

(IQ) 

. 2XB6 

2. W0 

' 2.7K 

1274 

5.430 

Cash W bank an] m band 


127 . 

117 

a 

- 106 

212 



2223 

. 225? 

ZJH 5 

2380 

5642 

CrednrHS (dire vmtan one year) 

Bank overdraft 

(in 

342 

35 8 

876 

1.166 

1.735 

Bank loan 


25 

35 

25 ■ 

156 

— 

Other credHQts 

(12) 

. U87 

1^71 

1.588 

1B93 

. 1018 



1.654 

IBM 

2.489 

3.215 

4.744 

Net current assets 


660 

603 

356 

165 

898 

CredKOts Cduaafua one year) ... 

Deferred taxation 

(6) • 

- . 

— 

— 

285 

540 

Bank k»n 


231 

. iai 

156 


— 



— 

■ — 

— 

45 

32 



231 - 

- 181 

- 156 

330 

572 

Nat tangible ®«fls 


2.696 

Z783 

2.741 

5.561 

. 6834 

. . - 

Capita) and reserves 

Called-up share capual 

03 

525 

525 

526 

530 

530 

Share premnnn account 


— 

— 

3 

13 

13 

Bevahjaumresenn 

(14) 

L412 

1.412 

1.412 

3577 

4.841 

Profit and toss account 

05) 

758 

' 846 

am 

1D41 

1550 



-2^6 

£783 

2.741 

6561 

BB34 




Statements of Source and Application of Funds 


1981 

eooo 


1982 

£000 


1983 

so to 


1994 

QUO 


Source at fan* 


1985 

£000 


Net Tangible Assets 

The net tangible assets of the Group, as shown under Pro Forma Balance Sheet below, amount to 
£8.913.000 which represses 74.3pper ordinary share based on the 12.000.000 ordinary shares fa issue 
tallowing the Offer for Sale 


Dividends 

For the year raided 31 December 1985. the Company pad a drvutend of 1 8p net per oriinaiy share 
which, with me associated tax credit, represent s a gross dwidend of 2.5p covered 3.7tims6 At me 
minimum lendra price this dividend would have represented a grass dividend yield of 1.9% 

Following tbe Oflra for Sate it ts planned to pay interim dtvtdeods m October and final dtvfdends m May. 
with the first mtamn dividend brang paid tn October 1986 . . 

The Directors mrend ro pursue a progressive dividend policy, subject to mamtaunug a satisfactory level 
of cover 


The Offer for Sale 

The Directors believe that the admisacm of the ordinary shares to the Official List win 

• Entrance P-E'g status asa leading tadratendent consulting sarvroeG group 

• Increase cheat aw are ness of the services that tttrftecs 

• Provide a witter market in the Company's shares. 

• Enable the Group’s Pension Foods to reduce then suiwannai sharehoWlngE 

m Allow mote ready access to additional capital and feeditate future expansion by aeg mston 

The opportunity ss being t^oan by the BeneJon Funds to reduce tfifar hoidmgsandbyifanatamdrvtdnal 


Profit brfare taxation 

265 . 

. 283 

Mb 

681 

U24 

iha rnownwnt of ftnxfe 






PsproefaBan _• ■ 

237 _ 

.. 266 

. 250 

381 

465 

(Runriflaassnin sales of . . 

fixed rasBts 

(1*9 

— 38 . 

... us» 

(fa 

<B$ 

Befared comDones 

.13 _ 

.. .13. . 

. (171 

(3». 


Tuidl ti\)m 

500 

588 

363 

1.060 

1.7B7 


Sales of fixed assets 

129 

203 

149 

206 

1.068 

Proceeda ol share issae 

— 

. — 

4 

M 


Bn? purchase bnanoa 

— 

— 

— 

57 . 

- - na 

leans w rotated wmpaiiMS 

(13) 

(17) - 

4 

* 

20 


116 

186 

157 

377 


Total funds genaiated 

616 

774- 

520- 

1.337 



omamapan 

79 

64 

64 

84 

137 

Pi nrffnnKflf hunt »«»« 

‘ 136 ' 

- ISO 

120 

90 

70 




V 


Repayment of bmktoana 


551 


$ 


25 

639 


911 


L256 


25 


25 


25 


784 


780 


1.110 


156 

1BDS 









THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


31 





continued 


International pic 


2.096 






j.2' 


Otter debum include C88.000 m. 31 Dwwrtw ISfi oJtowtt in reqplovetsi l* to pmcnasf ■ at ohaio. a to C: cpa-v 

11 Banfcovenijttft 

to 31 Deceottw la® to Co rrpwy and *5 OK wbstfianKt Had given guarantees, 10 OvifcsAate Sari rcr to 

of ati atfjgwons of Group romperues to the brak. in iKfehum the ha-tot: property ww stiecn u tr* noni 

ovetdraL 


^WMaeawwMuBCgTO t 

li»E88efla^C7fldi3e)indefau»r 


t2 CHrBmwrQfaewatai one wear) 

Cuba oKtaoc tailing out wrttan one yew compose 


141 


(395 


(14) 


* 


(389 


39 


2.166 


(SO?) Trade crednofs 


W1 

£000 


1982 

£ 0 « 


15(* 

£000 


t£-X. 


i«*. 

two 


453 


■tt? 




Tbtalftmfeappted 

fleaaase a brad funds 


127 


16 


283 


495 


1.649 AcctuatandotorcrediUtt 


426 


406 


6W 


TW 


800 


1 (W 


3.257 Dividends 


&J 


84 


*4 


150 


26 


583 


Moteg to the Financial In formation 

wpaws a eat* of the five yeas were treat dents located as faBows. 

lj» 1982 1883 1964 16 

WOO COOO GDQ0 CQ0Q £0 


<&j Corporate raxes 


6b 


99 


2i:- 


0*tJ«H8EftHOSOQol»OirttV 


2*9 


<3i 


1287 


1.271 


l.re* 


5ft-i 

~vr. 

w 

jXC 

3 018 


13 Ebmmpttal 


1981 

£000 


1982 

£090 


1513 

£003 


"j>9 


Unaed Knyfc ci 
Oihac Europe 


1935 

£K» 


6639 


5i66 


7438 


10.718 


14.947 


182 


Middle fast 

Africa 


710 


320 


371 


1.104 


Auttartsed 

oidmaiY shares of E leach 


7SO 


760 


750 


7>3 


1267 


1.033 


1.162 


1.346 


ADoned ami bitte paid onfinary stores o( 
£)ndi 


525 


5CS 


bSL 


Other 


960 


87b 


648 


782 


1.273 


V£> 

’3C 


756 


864 


5® 


784 


&371 


9.283 


10.128 


13 600 


19.453 


2 Bxcgp Uu uaHttans 


19B1 

£000 


1982 

£000 


1983 

£000 


F^owussoot and redundancy costs 


1964 

COOO 


19® 

COOO 


subsequent to 31 December 1*6 the woiu) mb rwiga&iMd cy to sub-ciwocn of uA asca-/ 

10 oidmaff abates <H lOp each and a one tot one rapnuteauon ksjc 

14 Brnhudonnum 

Mowmenu on to revatuaon resene to each ol the hire years compose. 

to! 1 382 mi 

COOO £ 0 tf) OK/i C.v.l 


AilJanumv 


1062 


1.412 


1412 


N - .: 


132 


>26 


Seotememof cJann from diem m respect 
ot work partonoed in earlier yeas 


Rnuahanm suiplua mite war 


350 


206 


Lees: Uttered taanan ihaeon 


i2ft. 


, V.9 
L*» 


132 


126 


206 


At 31 December 




m: 


1412 


se ' ate ? ,ew <* a <*aBi tram a client in respect o( problems with a tmfahng 
assigned by asubatnaiy m 1978 Tte Group tsr» long® engap^ in aii^inecuiial design 


3 Related 

Results of 


rarapamw are in respect a( an investment (n lodestar Computing Lowed wte*wassc*Jin198& 


15 P» wS«. yvi 

Mwenwnis on roe piotn and toss account m each c< to live- years cwnprec 

1 &= I 1*2 

£000 DUO 


1943 

£HQ 


1-1*4 

tjiil 


At 1 January 


73c 


756 


?46 




4 Wtt IbmmI 

Imeiaspayatte and nxefeabte by the Group & the hue years ended 31 December 1985 sax out below 

1981 - 1982 1983 1984 

WOO £000 £800 £000 


Retained prett/floss) tor the year 


37 


rffj 


19® 

COOO 


At 31 December 


759 


S46 


300 




Interest payable on bank borrowmgs 
repayable within hve years 

57 

68 

100 

96 

218 

Otor loans 


— 

10 

27 

12 


87 

89 

110 

125 

230 

Interest receivabte 

1161 

rai 

(91 

(5) 

(13) 


41 

61 

101 

120 

217 

5 Profit on onliintryactMdesbatoe taxation 

The ptow. beioie laxaom isbwwJ ana daigngf(BniMaB> 

1981 

£000 

1982 

£000 

1983 

£000 

1964 

£000 

1986 

£000 

Staff iscos 

3.441 

3.280 

3.710 

4041 

6.077 

De precuuon 

237 

266 

2 S 0 

381 

465 

( Prof uykes on sale of farad assets 

CIS) 

28 

(15) 

(91 

(831 

Dnectas - emohunems 

184 

227 

185 

247 

321 

Audnors' ramuneratKin 

17 

19 

20 

26 

30 

Hue charges 

3 

10 

30 

67 

112 

Exchange dmerences 

( 20 ) 

(34) 

31 

(98) 

50 


Number 

Nwnbre 

Number 

Number 

Number 

Average numbw of employees 

328 

281 

247 

370 

325 


U Oa dlm MlIliMUtta 

At 31 December 19B5 the Group Had entered mroa performance bond with a maxunum taddnv rf l'.¥; ‘>>2 


17 C«sdtnl«zsl(MiecaaiadtsieBt* 

CfepaaTpoainmnienis contraned but not provided at 51 Decnnt>:i jg®* amcjrued :o £6T 000 
Op&aung lease commurnemsKs i986consmK 


€000 


Leasee expiring watwi one vesr 

it 

Leases expiring between one and 
|we yearn 


UweeB expiring thereafter 

46 




Rfrtiwmetu btrrfchis tot emntow« of tie Group are provided through The P-E 1974 Pension Scheme, a trustee- 
admirusiteted fund winch hero 2S*t of the Bsuad share capKal o( the Gcunpanv at 3! December 1965 The last acniana) 
Ktluauca c4 the scheme, at 31 December 1B85. showed tteschane to be m a strong tmancaal jwsrtion 


IB SnbwqMBl event 

On 2 May 1985a sale and (easebacK agreement was entered imp whereby die Group soki part >jf ns freehold ciocem 
A develrver has undenaken to construn an office building which will be leased to tt# Group fi..<m laie I<&7 ar an 
uuual anrni&l rental & £2(10.000 Pi weeds 01 the sain. a*wi dHtueung cose, esumaira at tlOfUUil wnU arriwm 10 
apptoxunawiv C1.675.0ufJ of which some £1.300.000 was leo-wedoncompleiinnoi thragieemeni arxi £??£. i) 0 ii willt^ 
rwjfived when the buiirimg is ermpbred The nohl ansmg from the s* in me ptepeny amnunr^ to approumatelv 
Li75J3QG Bom which mil be deducted taxation 4 £1 1 3.000 Tiio Group intends to ttwoi ciprlol M>-nduuK : n a new 
tar park, atan esumatad cost or £200.000. which ishheiy 10 be ennstrurneo during 19® Also. ih= Group has a rapiwl 
Qomiraoneni. not vet oonunaed. to install parpuonuig m ibt new building at an estimated cos* at Utfj.000 wnen us 
cotmucaron ts completed in 1987 
youmiauhfuhv 

Price Water houso 
Chanwed Accountants 


6 Ta m tton 

Taxadon . which ts baeed upon the results tat each year, oomptuefi 


Pro Forma Balance Sheet 


. 

1981 

£000 

1982 

£000 

1983 

£000 

1984 

£000 

1965 

£000 

UKcrepreauoniax 

72 

145 

35 

310 

610 

Relief lor over®** tax 

(651 

1 (123) 

(35) 

131) 

(441 


7 

22 

— 

279 

566 

Overseas tax 

126 

123 

3b 

31 

<*.« 

AdvoncKcaparaurwiax 



36 

- 

— 


133 

146 

71 

310 

610 

Adiunmeniz m respect M estor years 

Advance Drepnranon tax 

— 

— 

36 

(72 ) 

— 

UKcorpreaucint<w 

- 

27 

— 

30 

13 

OvrsFtasiax 

27 

(60) 

— 

154 

1 

L«s Rebi-f for overseas tax 

- 

- 

- 

(89) 

ft) 


180 

m 

107 

3 23 

623 

Ccxvotaurei rax rates 

52% 

K<* 

505% 

4625% 

4125% 


The pro forma consohdated balancs sheet spi cui bekw has be»*n ptswred re leflea the offca pi the following 

transscoonsas though they bad been earned out a 3) Decemigr 19® 

1 The cypuMsahon r .4 £12.846 nandms re tfic cteda oi the state sarnnium account and £517 y» ■swpoot) to the 
credit Ql tta reserves of the Company bv the issue of shares, on the pass of one new ordinary c >nar>- !<u each 
e»stjpg ahaie, which was approved at theuMraw dinarw gervaal mowing ol the Comptnv hWd on 24 April l^At 

2 The receipt of the noceedsol the Otter lor Sato at the minimum tender pmreol 16bp. alwr deduct irg estimated 
expenses ol £586,000 

3 TtasaJe of pan of the freehold land m accordance with an aoreciwit daied 2 May 1986 fas more hiUv describe 
m Note 18 to ihe Accountanis' Report and under Main wl Connect; in paragraph Rib) of Staunorv and Genets 
hnaitauah betow) and the capdai expcnditureon the new cm p&ik 


In l983adran«- roporauon lax paid on the 1982 divyte^ and pavatoto cc the proposed 13B3 mvxtend wereexpwwwl 
but lemoaied in 1964 as recoverable Ttaadh»lfflneniolC154^)00in 1384 tooversaas wx for earlier years amiespeciaf 
(PCS reoeivafjfc- which pnwusfy Had not Uwi expeaed 10 be taxable m the countries concerned 
The- UK conptwnon ux charoe (w wch JW * aUecwd bv operating expenses which are not allowable tor tax and by 
tax allowances and tuning chBereooes on wtuch deterred fax is 001 recognised The amounts bv which the UK 
curporaiion tax chaipp is ahecred wee as toOows 

1981 I9R2 1983 1984 1985 

£D0C COOO 0)00 COOO COOO 



Actual 

ProFrema 


IU )0 


Fixed assets 

Tangible assets 

6 rrt? 

s.we 

Cqnew assets 

Debtors 

5.430 

5.B05 

Cash at bank and ut hand 

212 

1.503 


h.642 


Creditors (due within one rear! 

Bank overdraft 

1.726 

- 

Other creditors 

3018 

3.n 


4.T44 

3?21 

Mat aarom assets 

ft* 

3587 

Credtum (due ah® one year) 


Deterred taxaim 


W0 


i« 


lipreaunqerpiwi^rwa allowable Ire rax 21 

16 

1 b 

61 

4b 

Hxe purebaee comiratment 

32 

.12 

Timuiq dtorenrasand otoi tax aDowanras (61) 

16) 

153) 

(72) 

19 


<F2 

182 

(40) 

10 

(38) 

( 11 ) 

64 

N« tangible assess 

6934 

89)3 


sup's propen 

y is tecourased 

bv reduction of to 




jjiipIus included in to revaluauwi reserve where item a aUkehhoodi D ime wa tw payable m to foreseeable rntwe 

Capua) raid reserves 







£000 

Caned up share carnal 

530 

1 JW 





Share premium account 

13 

1677 

Oitpotararei tax era revaluation surplus 




1.486 

Revaluation raaarve 

4.W1 

^414 

Capital atkiwancRsat 35% 




75 

Piuftt aid loss account 

1.560 

-> 

Fu»pn».ratieA amount * 




1.561 

(540) 


6934 

t » 1 ? 


Amoum 1 « recognised 


1.021 


7 DtvfcSsoda 


1901 


1982 


1983 


1984 


PividHrts ivr share 


oap 


D8p 


J&L 


T2P 


1985 

J 8 P 


Divrdwids per share fiaw hewn adjusted to the edea a U» 
reporr 


espna) rengamsaoan iptored re id Note 13 ctf this 


8 Eantmga per stare 

s ^ ,eS * «ue m ^ each ym 

nijrgarus^fi relenedtc-m Nwe 13 QlthiE report 


adjusted tea the etea ol the tapiial 


a T anBiMB M—tl ^ 

The Group fatwtbto taoKi assets ccuipnpe 



_ HfUB*. route rt ajreKafflwre^ W acres wtnch B mteuded « a vatoauanof 

MM worerry Chartered Sunrevoes. ol Kw Hoqm ™Mraph Street. 

rh 7 ^PWa( 31 twvn&s ™ mfflkweidstrggiisataaslftt^paneqtheprcrpeTty 

a^g^aMSfawsaaBaar-*-- 


10 debtan 

Gr.up'i’swrsaentnsc 


1W1 

£000 


1982 

£000 


1983 

£000 


1984 

COOO 


1385 

COOO 


'»v..'»i »di4KC'<3 — 

Otsw a»-K-:iften t >( n c ^ trtannil 

uuc recoverable m 

j7-ir>;- than fflta 7Ptf_ 


1.737 

333 


1.908 


2457 


2540 


5t017 


396 


305 


280 


331 


X 


36 


54 


82 


Statutory and General Information 

1. Ii »»p<w nt ^nrrefltan8Capit3d 

(a) Tlw Company was inogrpurared m EngteuJ undfi d*f Oxnpames Aa 1929 on 21 Apul r<*4 as a pnvaie Umn« 
company wjtn the name Production ■ Engine ■ennn Limited On 26 June 1995 the Company was re iraLiemf as a 
public company under the Companies Aoa 1348 to 1981 Tht* Company is requawee m England arvo Wok* with 
registered Dumber 28721 1 

ft) On 9 May 1983. the Company's authorised stare capita] was £750.000 drvtcted rare 760.000 ordinary shares of £ I 
each, o) which Ktfufi? woe in issue eredned as fully paid Saree men ihe snaie capital cl tfit Company nas noen 
changed asMlows 

0) on 29 Man* 1984 itaCWnpany altoRed 3.973 orduw/y stares nf£l each fuDy pare im cash at £3 50 peishaie. 
(b) by an ordre»y resolution passed oh 24 ApnJ 1986- 

(1) each Pt the ensung ordinary shaiee of Cl each in the capital of the Company was sub- divided into 10 
mthnan stales of I 0 p each and the uutonsed stare capital wm maeaswt re U .600 £Oj divided tare 
16JXXLOOO ardipaiy stales of lOpeach by the creation pi S.50£|.U0U or dinarv stares of I Op each, and 

(2) the Directors were authorised re cajuuta* the sum M £530 240 standing 10 UK- credit of its stare 
reaaBum account and tawvee by the aUemem creanefl as luBv paxl at 5.302 -SU dthnary stei oiifip 
each rmaabfy among the tioktofsol ihe ordinary stales on ihe register ai I Match J-J®. 

fuil an 8 May 1988. ibectextahroimn Htnie retoredrom8ub-coiamatafbtoiX2i above was effect wind pur-raam 
to the Otter to Side agreement deambed m paragraph 8 below, 1.3%.:2(i ordirurv stau* 01 lOp each wwe 
allotted ml paid and are proposed toba issued fully paid tor cash puiRuam re the Ghei 101 Sale 
By an ordinary resolution passed on 24 ArrB 1985 the Duectas were g*ntg«IIv and uncOTidfUrnaliv jvih.irii-d 
pursuant to mcooo B0 of the Companies Art 1 98E. for a period of5 vtais re alto rwwrant secunties us deir,&i in 
Uw said swoon] u p to an aggregate nominal aroount at £639*20 

By a special resolution passed on 34 ApnJ 1986 the Directors were empowered pursuant to section 35 ol the- 
CtonpamesAcr 1985 re aUot equity snwiops pursuant to the authonrv ret«ied rerasub-rvuagraiw ref above «il 
section 89(1) of that Aa <&d not apply This powes wll expo* on die contusion of the nwa Annual Geneial 
Meeting and re tunned to certain aootmentsln conneoion with ngfna issues pro rata re ordinur . 1 shaietioJdeis at 
otherwise to the allotment at equity secunttes up too maximum ag^^gate norrnrvil value which, aftti tajatc into 
amiittitasecura^allottfidtetenedumsub-paraeraphlbiiiuldhcr/e i^C40-iKi 
brnnedtatefy foftowtng the Offer to Sale, the authorised share capita! of the Company will a* £1 6)0.000 divided 
mto 16.iXU,00D otebnarv shares ol lOp each of which 4 jBo.OUjcrcwidiv state:- will rettaui umssueij 
Fcaowiup the Oder to Sate, no roaienal bkk ol shares m the Ootnpanv tother tlwn ro ataiehcjlders pro rata 10 
exstlng Roktagsl will be made wnhm 00 a year of the date of this document wmiDut the prior approval or tfre 
CcoTpany in general meeting 

FbUcwnng the Oiler to SMe the whale of the issued ordinary stale capital -af the Compery will oe in itgtsered 
farm. . 

TtaprowsrooBOleectioftStKIJof the Companies Aa IB® lw4uch. w the extern rwt disapphed p oraiam tc section 
Bfjof 1 that Are. cento 00 shareholders ngms of pi^-efnpDan in reepea ol allomierits ol eguuv sscunuc*: wfuch are 
ar ani to be. pad up m cash atioa than atoments re empn-yees under emptorree stare setatew,) apply re th* 
balance ol the autlunsed but unissued state espial ol ®e Company wind) is not (he subject of ifce difapphcauon 
raowdwrasub-(wagrai*(d)aboiiB. 

The commumg obhgaoopa ol the Company impound bv The Stock Exchange requite Una. m tire atowici' 01 
exceptional nrcumstances, the Company must alto any udinarv snanw re be ibwiQ tor cash 10 existing 
starebaldason a pro rata beets untessareinival re shareholders in general mpetjng is OOlainea for an is&reona 
ddtoEEQtbaaa. 

Save as disposed ra this pamgssphl^sto® to irffra- group ssiifes wuhin tta c*rvid 01 ■.hret veure imnvriaiv n 

pfecedngjtte data at dlls doeunireu no share ex ban capital ol any company m the Gw has been issued 01 
agreed tdneBsued to cash or otherwise 

© On 7 May 1966 mom* 10 soheenbe to 2E&.DOO new otdinafv shares of 10p edCh n the espied ol Die Contpanv 
were retoed unoa ihe P-E Intemauottel Exomnue Share Opuon Scfteme *OXi aiaios in aggregate v> av> 
execubveDiiBCUW(lteaiterewllifa)aiiesarniiinparagiaph5iAiiielpw)arid 16b0ft:stai*^ wreherec^iiovwj In 
each case die options will be awfflMbte between '.hreeaind wn vaas nom diedaip of Chant and ihe suOMipiion 
woe pet state payable on exetoae wtB be me stnlonq paw under ihe Com to Sate, fto a-risauatan is 10 he 
received to the grant of the options 

Save as ebsetased above, po wmcary rathe Oioup has granted any ocai on enw any ol ns xtaiecr loan csnul or 
has catered t» agreed <Mndu»MSy or incondtucnally logiam any Sudl epuon 

X SoteUiuM 

H» Oorapany is dw hoJdrag corapany^ of the Group 

The Gonpany s itolfW^opeidimasiJbsiilianec. afire wlhdi ore whoUy-wwwd. sneasljJIows 

Issued Field ot 

sharacBpcai acnvify 


PE , ’<cftraar«S 6 n l lttif'Lnniird SODQ Consulung service: 

T E O raising Sstacks fQy»:sea5> Lirutea 6.(ftU Cr.insuluivj scraccg 

IVi it i^uri^-) fYjpertitx; Lmiree j j0 TiopetP/ biding 

7tat<igutoedolba-reo»'h re tite£iiDSKid!t£SsF&!lc House. lVKt>.Road. Egtam. Surrey TW200HW 

3. Memorandum and Anfdex £rf Asnodation 

if -1 Tta mfztfnViOw) si asnooatan rf ihe Cr-aparv pf'/mdes that the Compuiy s psainpal chreta is 10 canv wi 
buflitasr at a hutono compan v of if Ire itai purpow re sicquiiB and to noirT either in dv nasar ot LtoGrenpetry ff m that 
cf oiiy nootrirt anaiec stoats. cP.bcrauns duSoniure- artos bands, toons obligations re scounues ol wfLitswuer 
taiutfc issued w any ojiupdnv gi body empreatf.-. ana re cofiUd and co-recinaa* ihe aSmi.uni'sucTi ana optia'.iMi oj 
an-/ compdh.’js to ita uupt being lu->=h- re acu vrty CbniRilltM bv Lta Cr>mpanv Tne gtuccre ol me Company are set 
wil hi teif ut Clans* 4 of she memorandum ol rissooaijon. which ic a-.ailahio lor inspect : mi at the address ^»7ttied in 
poiycet^ 14 below 

ibt Tta oiuctes ot ossoaaUMi re itw Comtvrev r dw aiwsto' j egrtafft isovQjns. rate? alia, re the following effect 

CA1 Bights attaching uj the abrim to be listed 

i») I'osno 

o-ir-t^r; rr. a.-r,- sr^nal treire ea re voang upon weicn an v snares may w issued re tmv to ihetimt tetng be hr.w. wav' 
tr-eir {** pior^m at par». n at off/ gtfwi rj nswiiisc scan upen a dwr* - ol irands tew one -.tas mw swc : y motnbre psc»m 
in tier son re ny raoxv stall upon a ix.tf na*- oik- wore tor twii uruue nefa DV rum Unteu die 5c-did 01 UueCas of the 
Comp-my • ine taotd'i ijuirevnss- >to^mir«: voting nghts may no; <=xei cat-d b/o membe-r »>«:■ ntssnre paid re the 
Cr&punv ai! chile iitd -jtta; m irAi- tevante ?v hm - , m lesjwa at aiaies in ir* CmrpaRV. 01 bv a member who has 
t^- r, a: run witti a cut<Kiir anchiarenmi nctiot after Uiluie to povide the Company v.rJi uilramatioc required to be 

p:o.iih£ jr.dre any hf(riL»*jw. 

ii> V'csratavn vi rarfjip and chary-w to cgn^if 

Sutwc to LV- pcr.-Kjonr 01 an-/ it&vani leqvJatrsn, all nr anv of the righu lor uw.' time being attached 10 any class of 
star- 1 » to the urn. peing issued ma-/ horn onv re ume iwterber or noi tne Coctpenv v being wound upi be var.ed or 
iOtufrvA *mh die consent m -wntino Ol Uk rifWflt. O! nc4 less uua Uufj® guanas m ireiratxil valtx- Ol Utt issued 
sna'et ol rear eUs re wire sarmar. ot op nOfareditary rocoluuon passed re a separate atiieraJ meeting of the 
rc&Ueie of Ux chains cd that riws> 

Th% CamMsy in gi.wialmt-nung tmy 

'ai iTT'ttit-U'iiio And divide ns ctaro capital inti stales of a large; amount , 
ib. sub-ot-nce us stare capital rare sTui« re a sir-aiicr amount. 

tc • car.ct-i anv £tai/s which fume not twi nken or a'need to be taxer bv anv porKra and dumn.-iri its authonsed 
sTick pajiiol sv tlie-amouM of trie inaii 1 a*., oancalted. 

nil mrte*bf-ite reiUidnsei shaii cipital by such suit 1 ., rebcdiyidelraic* -Aarcco!-AKhan*-uivis.»the reyiliiiren stall 
pf-sentv and 

ie> v.-n:- in-- s>nciren t«l a ipeaaJ rosjnuon and sutnect w any crnUrmao-jn or consent [equvod by law. reduce its 
uuihoiis*^: and issued share capiiaire anv capure iedc-rttpuon loser: ■ « any sTwie premium account 
f.'. or. 7 jea. 1 -. 

Dubir-n -.:tr [ir.'-i-wMi--. 1 j any i. tewnr teijisldLon. the Companv in qKVKal mecom may from nme 10 ume lecJaie 
ivilr-nc.-. :c tv ivard 1 r, lv n jeTiitear accoidUia re then nghis ana muf mu in tn*- raDhte av-aflahte lor djsribuuon mn 
r-o qroue-ti snail r* dpetuen in -~v o-ss ol me amreim f-^omrie-ro. 7 i-.- t k ic tc<vd IrscM as in the .vpinion re ihe Board 
•Jr-, t ;-’.is cl Ihe C.ippu-tv [urti'y su?ti MVmmis ihe Board may yiav to luryj diuidends on any cUrs ot states 
■sar/uus - o.-.d swidwa tq:a-^sswi «. tv pavabte on roi--a aams ’Mi in* wall veailv re ouiti da vs pieuntod ra the 
pa-, b-.ii' uk r-fif or»d may also !u>m urr^ re ume pay interim diuide-n-is on shaift. ol any class of men amourte and cn 
sum dale;, anc m ie'w-ct oi.-iicftisrioaaae ft ihmkfm Ur^i«.ina re the extern that to - 1 1 qu s at uchotl re anv ^har-as 
o* v.y. vrtRtfotissite. U^KMl-aher-wsie pro-rwv-. all divicteM*? sl-aU teqais. \t>v sr,art ?. noi lullv ted VMijaqti'Snt Uw 
p«: tod ii. i-:iT».*c. ol wniigi tf« di vuJcnd 10 pa id* tv* apP'irtioneil arc paid pio a-'emd ran re the a.-pounre paid cn tne- 

atar-s djiaigarv pcn.cn 01 pomona - c tne penoa in icopun oi wfuen ret in AVad it piud 

(■»' l seoxuacn vf on a irji.ir>-; up 

if to Comi»anv snail pe v/t'una up iv/heihei to- Imumatra is voltmtarv. under rapi rw.ion « by the muni the 
ugmaaif! .tuv ».-j. to autrioiu-, «:c an extraoidinarv inoliitiun and vjhi<-n k- airy piiwuxin sanraoJK-a m aomtdanoe 
vrtMi -.tic pi ovtucvK. 01 anv i«4wfo»n »rea«'.on 'livai*- amung to tsw-tnnws ir> j>>. v. re mrid ttie vA-vre c* any i-an ol to- 
ic ■ ■' r lie C-jiiip.it:',' lirul itav In sum curpeSe set such /aluea at n> txr n.-. .'ar upon env assett- tc. w d ,.v3rd as 
•u'T->ac and mav .irinirite rie>w -aicp, or-iMon shall tx. coined 0111 .u. DOi/.f'i. to m^-mt-rts u diflorem c1ojS-I£ ot 
ir.-rtii-"c Tlte bqucoitfl mav wnr. to tec aureuny ven -rae vrtak- re anv yad o: vne asseu m uuaces uye-n such 
■j’stj lor the brneiit cl ntr-iriL-nt at in - 1 luimdaret with re- W’-: a-nnoniv ctajj tota in The- liquid arei may make any 
pr>. inun it; 1 eM uj re in ana sann itw-i ir> accoidoacy.- wan tne pcoutsurte of «nv ick /art te&slauc u 
if-> 2 Luh.ua .-rtriMnd 

.-.-■v qiwl-nd unclaimed .after a period ol 1C vearc from me date such dr/aery l is payable be Ire lei ted and shall 
v/ert H- im: Company 

if: Tianifer ahtVrv 

7;n mivii', -j-ka-s. mav t» hansieneqbvinsjmmerftm v.-nung in usual cwnntmfcnn. 01 many ottierlsrm which the 
fcteic .Tki y approve No u anare < -I any state.- shall be mric ic n rmnot ban -jupi • v p-eison whu is meniaUy aisoi-JeTed or 
a pndeni Ire anv puiposi ol -are, statuu.’ rehi ing to mofiial health 

T>e Boaid rr.av. m iir, absolute oisci'Hon arrt withfui -cshTmng anv icasor toielor. decline to icdiurei any irander ot 
any snare ton b net a lulfv paut up snai-: The Boaid may -to. d-<±ne to le^isw anv uansfer jrJess 
la) the instrumwK rt uansfea. duly aamped is lodged with irv C-wipanv aaxun|MhMrf W to certificate for the 
siirties rp wnicti u rebuts, arid such other evulence as the Board may leasonorH 1 .’ requue to show to now. of the 
uansievM re miTj.e to uanstre. 

ibl to inaruitMi; of nansirT t. in ir‘spr-3 a onte one class of sfi-iie. and 

ic) in to cto/- or a u.insia unoint holder s. the n umbei of joint lioihert; re whom to state is to be tiansfcnod does nm 
:ore 

(B> Directors 

tW hvir.uneiMnr. 

No iMnuitetaurin .stall br> payaNc under to aanies toanv Cm-vtnr white he n “TUUted re be letnuitetnied in icspea of 
his apprenunHU as an treruuve Dnectni The remurvcriuofl 01 ttv Dii»ctors nor sc entitled lor tou services as 
E'lrenres stall pe CtewnuiHd Cv to Belaid Knji alull nm excr-.q in agrircflau: to-: sum ol fbfi «K> per annum or sum 
■Jieais-r < mm a:, to Compaiu in oeretal mw-ung may itom ante to ut>- di-i-anun'.- In addiuc-t*. to Dnccwts are 
■wiuUcii I... ty mreirmr.-^d ire all itosoriapfe .apen «s mcuired in creima.-uor, with ton •1un fc s as Direotors. including 
auendance at btm-l mt^nngs and genera) meetings 0 ! ilte Company Any L'ire.vr who or resides abroad 01 
MKhwnis ■ spe- ial ser/icw ireihe Cbrnpany nay b* paid raich enta 1 -sn'jreiaucii.is to Baud mav detemune 
A Director nay br- apr-.iinted by to Board 10 anv emnolovraeni ar executive office with to Company (or such perwd 
isuH'teci 10 me novBjtms of any relevant legislation), on such rerme and at such remuneration as to Board may 
drtvHUiw 

fJI Ag-.'.U Dnectois 

Tto orudrt do nor vary cx exclude to application re the Company of section 293 ol to Companies Act 1385 
Acconlmqtv. except wjlh to sannirei of the Company m aener.u meetina. a per -yip wire has actair^d the ane of 70 
stall ?« 4 1«? awoiiite-l a DitecUM . and 3 Dusmw stall vacate (utoOiceai to conduRon ol to annual ynaai meeting 
cnminennixj ik-ki jw; he .jitainsineayeofVO Special nouue a: u-quned of anv rwuluut® appointing or ro- appointing 
such a Diionni 

UJ Aen-aocs and otor l-emtns 

TVBoaiaori betallcrl toCotnfianvmtw AibiWt lotfwpriwistonsrif any retevwt tegtsiation. emnssall topowersof 
to Companv to grant pensions, annuities, gratuities and superannuatnon « oiher ahowanoer- ana tienefits in favour of 
anv peis-n inriuding anv Dueaor or v>mwi Dnectnr 01 to letouons connections re der>'pdams ol any Director or 
trama riiieare A Duectot at lormei Entpctoi stall nc-i b-‘ accciunuMo ic tta tjjmpanv 01 us mwibovr ta aw bonetit ol 
any kind ewuened undei or puisuam to this pjovisionand to receipt or any such Uraem epall nor disqualify anv peison 
liom being 01 hecommga Duecrer ol to Company 

(4* f.arecires'imeteStv 

ral A l.'ite. vu may crew aav other otficp or place at pretu. with to Company (except that ol auditott m cemunenon 
wim nre a4lice 01 Dueciot h n such poi n -1 and u)»yi suen retms as to- Swan mav . 1 etwmme ana mav' i» paid such 
i-xto rrenurH^.nion iheictor twhi-toi »« way of salary, ixmirmsswu. puruapguon in prolm, cr otonwisei as the 
Boaidmavctetriniuie 

«:•» A Dir-.-crm mav aa tv lum<ell • * his Itrmma reofe*n-.nal capacity ire to Company retri.'tw.te than os audita 1 
and Ik- re his mm stall be emitted to [anunesauon tot rrpfwvumaf srevnret. w it he were not a Director 
10 A Iniertre m toCooapanv may t>: or beromea Diream re rener otnrw re or other w>somi wrsaed in. anv company 
M< -ntuiHd bv ths- Companv re m ivrjch th.- Crenpany mav b. imer^a.*j. and snail nor be liaoi-: to account to to 
Crenpai v 01 nu ntemt* ts> ire anv rc ruunerauun piom oi ottier rwm .111 ivo iv-> l tv him ar- a Dnre-wn or otficw « or 
Hum his rareiru in suct. cnnei regnpair/ The Breud mav also tauste Uie voutia i«vtd comeied by tl.e arat-* in 
anv other cr-mpinv te4d or owned bv to Gnmpinv to be exeirat) m such manner in all respects as it thinks ttu 
irviuding ita i^erew -Jt-sicof in lovren 01 inv resyluiwn aptcinnng tfic Doecrers re anv cu toren tob-r duectorsor 
iCliceir w sutiitufiM company, or •-otiiw re pi coding ire to payment M iemui5f.;auor.ir'ihcdiiectoisoi oBiccisoi 
suchoifM company 

id* Dnbten to ihe provisions re anv relevani temslauon no Duenru sfsnll bt-thsqualtod by lusotote- from entennq into 
anyciirtuaa airanqefnem transaaj..in re prep^a) with to Comuinv nre snail anv -rachoonu.icL arranaemem. 
tiaii vctiuni'i pi'Jp'JS&l emeird uuo fw re on ty-talf of to Company m whicti ariv Dnectoi is mioteaed. whether 
diirenlv re mdiieniv. be lump 10 be avoided, nor snail anv Duenre who enters into anv such contract, 
ai lanucmi.-m ttansacuon « proposal re whc> ir. so inieiesud be habte ic> accremi to to Company or its members 
f« anv temun«auon. pram re otoi bewm realtseo ttu tetiv tv leasan re such Duecv.n hredtria that office re at to 
fiducial v iHaiionshtp Uieirtiv establitod A Duinor mun deciaie the nature re his raieresi in any contract, 
anang-inem. Uorcacuon re propuoal wnh to Company 10 to Boaid 
iel A Dnecior stall r»n vote re W? coutael m to quonur. on any lesoUiunn « to B*?aid cc-nremmg his own 
appointment as ihe hefore of any oDice re phee ol ptolrt with ihe Company re any other company m which 
to Company s inieiested (indmlmg the arrangement or variation ol to ire mo toreol. 01 to terminanon 
tlteteoCl 

If) Save .as provided in sub -paragraph fg) bek-w. a tweeter shall not vote inre be counied m the quorum l on anv 
njwJtoiKin ut the Briard m respea re any contract .smiMement. traiwmion re other piop-:>sal ui wtuch he is 
niMeuallv inieresirel Fre this prepiw*. a Dnectoi staU te deemed to be maienalfv interested in anv transaction 
wrreie a (xvnpinv m wnicti he ittigetot with anv connacted peianiBl holds or is benehnallv mterened in 1 per 
o?nr 01 moieotariy i.-iies ol to equnv -tare cap.iui or 0 ! ihe voUivj nghrs availacte 10 membeis of auc/i company 
f« leh.-vam cnmpaov '} is maieuaUv mteresied in to transaaioo 
igl Suhirct iotopi r 'vif : > , ' | nsoianv , reJevanriegisfattcin oridirito.-iteeno-oimfTierehrerrviterialintfiesi.aDiiectre' 
snail nw br-proiubiied from voting 10 / being cpunted in toquorumiananviesuluureioi me Board iconcerrung any 
01 tr>*.- TOUowmg maiters 

Ol to uivina of anv seonitv or indemnity w him in respect m nionev tern or ofaln^Ur-ns undertaken by tan (re 
to taiwtit ol to Company re any a ils suTtutia/ies. 

f?i die owing bv to Company re anv of its subsxliamwof anv serum v re rarfemrotv to.v tfurd party m respect re 
a dubi 01 npltoiiuon ot to- Ompany re anv re us subwdiiurss. m iess«. , a «M whirn sudi three wi has him»U 
given an utdeninny re itrai hr has guaranteed re s^cuiwi m wnrie re in pxm. 

13) ar.v uanrscuon hv hun to sut-erto ire Stales literatures re re her securities ci the Company or any of its 
subsjdiariK issui.fl or u:> be issued pui-aiam 10 anv otter or invnauori u.iri^mreis re detenime notdar. i?l the 
Compinv w anv clast toieoi re to to public re any Jemon Urfieoi re 10 unaerwntc 01 sub un-teiwriu anv 
sucTi snares debemuius re other se-mmns. 

i4l anv u anshcliMi in winch he is interested bv virtue iif his imprest in -taies w aeton turcs or other secunucs 0 ! 

to-ijCntipanvot bv leascxireanvothei inwresi in re tiuouqf, to Company. 

<5> anv uansacuira concerning anv oiher aunr-anv leafier ihan a lefcvarn oumpan-., in wtuch he is ratensied 
aieotlvvr indirectly whether asanonicer. Shar eh older, aeanre or otherwise hoivsoev-v 
161 anv Ftefosi) ccraosming die adoption m> 3 ailicaiu 3 n re re^tjtKra ol a superannuaticn ninrt ot retnemem. 
death or disabihr v ben-aid. scheme or other a/ranorme m dial lelates both to Dnectres and emplovees ol to 
Cc>mprittv or ot anv oi its suh^Jianos ami that drees noi acooid to anv Du.ctoi as such anv privilege or 
aovanurje not qenijallv accented to die empwvoes to whom such srtiraTtp. fund re anangrrnam relates 
(hi The Company may bv re*Jmarv tesohiugn suspend re relax to piovuh.iis lefrered 10 to ibis sut- paragraph i4i to 
anv extent or ratify auv uansactwn not duly auinoraod by loaeon of a oonuavenuun re sucfi ptennstons 

f?l b7.af«ho*inc quafifraaon 

There is nuttaiehoMing quatacauori tor Cireaors 

(O Baaomng powers 

Suttee: to itetiDKicns era tranowina- ixraiamed m this sut'-parareaph <C1 and to the pKwsKffiS of anv Klevani 
legtaau&n. the Boatd mav evernreali to powers ut ihe Company robmrow money and to nmpgaijr ,y cbugeall oianv 
pait ol the undeuakra-g property arid assets ipiesem and ruiuiei and unealkd .iapiial of to Company ami 10 issue 
tetantuK* jvl ouwi secutnies. witidiwi reitrvght of os .oailawiai secunw Ire am debt. IwPilitv 01 obligation ol to 
Company ur ol anv thud part V 

The Eofl-d shaiJ rectnet to borrcwniis re to Company ( os denned in to .inirtefiain e/reare all voting ami other 
noma 01 puw**is ot irrmnre e>»-Ki£at*> bv to Company in it-saimn to it- vsbodianes so as to secure il-u; as 1^.11 bs 
siii isHtam-' oiih mswai os bv to eiera-ool such ngmsor feiwusol cunuoi to Boani Can Eeciiieithat to aggregate 
pr.ri'irml amouni tiom iuik ro nmr ouLaamiiriij 01 all boflcv/mas hv to Group i b define.) in ihe aitutes' exclusive ot 
bonowrwd* owing hv one rwnpar.; m to Gicup to snoto? .'jrapanv m Uie Gir-up stall ivre. wnhout th-v ptf-v-aus 
Edn-.n.'i) .’.I an oidmary itsoluuon of to Ccanpanv. ai anv ume excwq an amount equal to ihiee tunre: ihe adjusted 
Cipitei and reserve*; 1 js deuned in the an ides) 

4. Employe* Share Schama* 

The Cioup ihie»- mpk *i-» stale retomes ahtwirah 11 is inwnded that one. 01 tooe. u<e pinm Shsnng Srheroe win 

ceare 1 ip operate The two tenuriumq schemes ccratam lestrictionii TO die- erten tnai the numt-'i re orgraarv srioirs 
ucued or ssjar-lc ur,.i« ot pursuanr to rights acquired under anvemjilovte share -v'^cm-- shall not at anv ame. wnen 
adael to to number ol oidinorv shares to iss>iei re csua&te Bv die Con .pony m the immediaifHv pieceding t?n veais. 
<«rt*d 10 % and stall rare, wnen added to the number of re dinar/ shaies w issued or issuaWr bv th- Company m to 
ur.mcdiatelv precobng tfuee veois. exceed 3% of to number 01 ordinary shares 01 the Company srerrr ume 10 ume in 
issue aJLViuah ihis restriction lelaxed in to (list yeai ol ocMawn re to seneme The mV»-jfto:£ hemes -renpiwcr 
to rnrecrors to omenii cvrurn; Of ton provisions, but the tosic suucuue of to schemes rand in particular Lhe 
limitaaoiison to munbt; cl oidmaiy sharos that mav be issued tneii-under and on indrnduai rMracipiticns.' cannot be 
ancreii wiboui to pnOf approval ol to iJompanv in general maeung except 10 the extent alteration mav be te^uiiac in 
CHoer to obtain or to maintain Inland Revenue approval 
rai The P-E IMexnaticnul Executive SbaroOpdoo Scheme 
rttw Executive Scheme-) 

The F-->Tiuve Scheme was 1 adopted by to Company by an omitarv lesoJuaon passed on 2^ ApnJ 19ft? and tas teon 
appwffl bv to Boaaol Inlaral Revenue pursuam 10 Schedule 10 to the Finance Act 1964 The principal provrsons of 
the Eimiuve Scheme ac as tallows, 

tii PamcipatibD m to Exeoitrve i/heme wifi be limited ro persons nominated bv the Be-ud i in dud mg executive 
Duwtmsi who aiein full-time ren[4ovmeru wnn iheGfOuprwtucfi. for this purpose, toon? :tat to ernp levs* 
k, t«juu«J fii «rek tanotfex ton 20 houis p« week. re. il a Dueare. tireless itan 2 t > nwits) 
ful < /puons will be personal to to pasttcipani to whrett toy am {named and 1 tun rare &■: ass>orie>-j or tianstcraed 
faiihoiwh where a pamcipaiiidits his pers^ial napres«wuiras have certain lights to t-*-*:!,:-*- fus orCffS' 

(mi No amount wiO be favaBte on to gran! of anv option The price at which shaiwt mav ta acqiurrc wra?n an 
tp>.in is exfccKed will u> iiPiemarijd tv to bond tut will be nc* less ihoi 1 to «wraq? 01 the middle itaAei 
gucCatKMs for on oidouiy share On to five dealing days beiwe to opnon e otwred tand veil no; u. anv case 
be tea? than the nominal value 01 an ordinary 1 state* 

in*) An t-poon cannot nonnallv op eveinseij within uuoe vsois and will cease ;c t* ewrersabie after ten vea - 
liom me date 01 bs gram The persona! representatives ol a deceased opnon hotel itav exiiaa;- to 
itewased s options wuiun twSvo memto oi his death Option Wias wno leave me anplvATUfttl « *-5» 

1 tei m pan v re anv pannnpaiinQf?jb: 5 dian'Owuw ro iniui v duBpibr/. reoundaHCv, leuisfliririldi todtlPsalol 
to emptowrai wmpahv Of ilh»iTak-mgniayftii%as.?toii. 3 f<iofb.dt anv urae dimno to w;iod engines 
ifteeallwrreiaitweluerBgritoeneimL •cessauoncilUiei^vantoTriplWi’incmiW.illalPt -* 2 months after to 
dom of gram oi to qMionsi and (bi to wjd oi to ter. vr.it perwd mefiuoned above E-wpi as prwrdwi 
oD-yje. i 3 puon nwdef s who cew to he orapJoved bv thm^renpanv w anv parucipairno Mibridwrv wiu nremoll -■ 
Men men cpnons The Boaid na. h-.wewj . a msoetion to preirci aitt -jpuon hbldt-.s to rpuwvi which uw; 
hove fwM ire throe year sdunng the reraod c.nsmg on to eoibi? of 1 1 * six months anci ton loan tig and . u 1 me 
end oi to ten year penixf 

Three- ore alro provisions 10 f to car Ivreraace ol options tomiam of a wfcr-owf of Ui? Comiianv e srhrette 
of anotgcmcttl unaa seoion 426 &l uk- Compame. Aa 1 3tfc ot to vownwr: winding up 01 to Oxswanv 



.had 

te>n 0 

m l. 
ciicli 
nson 

t*w 1 

rev 1 . 

P 

rfeid 
rev I 
' 0 
V 1b 2 

s> 0. 

If.tC, 


(May 5) 
ram tine 
Winsum 
e Prime 

jncni be 
U but he 
^erfectioo 


1 


?< 


ie 

P 

«y 

ur 

iti 

■is 

T1 
•ac 
Is 1 
th 
irt 




r /o: 

t i 


I 


Aft 

T« 


& 


■i 


In 

J T 

Y< 

in 

Yi 




m 

rri 







32 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1 986 


P-E International pic 


continued 


(bl 


(») 


The emploveem us spertyai the oust i whether the amount Thar he *vftestc be available tar thesubscrpaor 
cr. snares under his option ts tr be the inpayment inclusive olire sian-im; bonus or the repavmen*. UKiii.uve 
of the maxman bonus The number rt shares over which an option wiD be granted to any emplovee will be 
sura ant me repayment under ins Sai¥4s-Y':*j-&am conrw” in.-iusnne oi the specified tonus 1 wiD ias 
nearly as nav bet enattte rhaf emptow to subscribe (Or the shares over whrcft the option ercss 


in) The emptow mav use all or seme onhr oi the repayment undudntg bonus! under his Save- As You -Earn 
comract ar the end of the relevant live or seven tear perk'd to subscribe I'^r shares -mipt which me option 
exisis irewmi any amount not applied in exercise oi the option in ckiv .■yterraircelv toeemptawemaytei 
thecSWr. laa-e ennjel-.- :r. whrh case hernavreottv*. rerwvment dhisSove-Aj Ywj-Eam contran in ajUar 
once « a it has then run only m ira? ware continue the comae* tor a runner two years so as to receive the 
maximum bonus 


ivul An cpticn mus ncrmaL'v be exercised wirftm sex months from the rer^^'menr date of the related 
Save- As You -Earn cwract except in certain circumstances such as (team or leiusment cn a participant, 
where a deferent dale may apply 


(vunThe number ol wdisarv shares over which options mav be tram*^ under the Savinas Belated Scheme will be 
limited so that no options may be- jr a rjed U the number oi shares in respect or win.* options have men been 
granted under the Scheme would exceed S\> 01 me number of issued ordinary shares of me Company 
im mediately prior in the aaieol gran, or u less 12UC'.0W shares 


led The rurni ber of maiesove which esmens mavbe graite-ion anv- da to under the SavmasRtiaied Scheme will 
be lurther tanned so mat wnen added to the number oi shares issued or issuacl* under options granted 
withm the previous ten vears under the Scheme or anv other share option or pran snaimc scheme operated 
bv the L ompanv u. wiD not exceed ICHb of the number of issued ordinary stales or the Company iir.mediareh' 
tin to such date 


ixl 


The number of shares in reseed of which options nrav be granted under rheSjvinas-Refated Scheme * any 
nme (together with shares comprised in grants ot anv rate stare eptwns or issues under any prow staring 
setwire in the preoKftng three years! is tamrea to JY of me number of i ned oidiiw stales However . ir. the 
fust year rt operaoon a the Scheme, the 3> knit will not appiv pr wded that on anv gran: ol options the 
percentageoJ capita) appropriated tothoseapomsanduitbepieoedmgfrjeveaisundei Ml other Gtoupshare 
option or profit sharing scbemesdoefi not exceed 5% 


(x>) Options mav not be grantwf mote than ten years after the date on which the Savings -F»tai*t Scheme is 
approved by toe Intano Revenue 


(xb) Options may be ottered ro all those ebcnWe to ran renot? in me Sa/inge-Related Scheme within 42 lays after 
the date on which me scheme is approved by the Inland Revenue and thereafter durmg pen-ids of 43 days 
after the announcement of the Group s annual or interim results 


fxulShares issued as a result of the exercise of anv opr ions wfl rank pan passu wnn ifto other issued ordinary 
shares or me Company save that they will not tank for dividends with a record m announcement oarepnCHr U> 
me exercise of toe optrun 

lavilf at anv nme prior to the exercise rt an option the issued artaary share capital o! tty? Company ® waned bv 
wav of capitalisation lights issue sub-dmaum consolidation or reduction the exarnse price m resoec* of 
pidi options the number ot shares subiea to the options, and me Limits reiened rc- m sub -paragraphs iviul. 
lixi and ix i arewe wdl be waned m such manner as the Board may determine, provided that the a>tdnaa 
contum that surh adjustment b it then opinion fan and reasonable 


(cl The P-E Croup Profit-Sharing Scheme 
("the Prafit-Sbaxmg Scheme) 

The fhotadSjanija Scheme was constituted bv a mist deed and rates dated 14 December 1979. and from 22 
January isBOto H Decotmr 1 &3 was an approwsdsefrw? under rheprcwioinsof Scnecuie£> to Ae Finance Act 
1378 Duran such period the Directors allocated E6S.47S to the tnuiees ci the Scheme nom me proms of the 
Group, wtuch monies were applied in tne putrhase and suosaiption of 24.717 ordmarv shares oi £1 each rn il» 
Gompany . sich abates bana held bv me trustees an behalf ot. and aft'jcared ro. empkivees ol tne Gwup The 
Drrectois do not intend to alkvaie anv ruitha monies for the purposes ot the Prom Sharing Scheme and the 
Scheme win ir. due courae be tennmatwl 


5. Dtracwn 1 and Other Interests 

te) The b wieflcaf mt crests or t/H Drreaoia in the anJnvnv shares of the Company as they wiif be shown m the 
tra«er ot Dnecrors' interests maintained unoer the nowsions of die Companies Act 198a. nnmedHtelv toUowm-r 
the Otter for Sale, will be as follows 


Cfcrecror 
J G Donaftfcon 
H M Lana 
B C Murray 
MT Samuels 
V J Tuftietd 
M L White 


Number of sharer 


151 6*1 

13 

666.ro 1 ' 

L 7 

2Ci0o;i 

n: 

r?«w 

31 

9?|>X1 

0^ 

200D9 

02 


Number of shares 
under ocoon 
20.000 


50000 
20 000 


The options listed above will be granted under the Executive Scheme 


,h l 0tfet to: Sale J G Dond-dson R C Murray and M T Samuels will be mwpwed in 20 
Ji and 4b& tw] wdm.u\' sbaies respeenvefy as trastees « cenaui trusts eaabtahed lor the benefit ot employees 
H l- Munay is also a Trustee ol we P?ns»o Funds 'see sub- pura'jrup/KtHWfc'wi 


Save«^iosed above, nom of the Directors has any interest in the share capital ol ttw Company or any rtf its 
jbl P ^ Cros ? ajvl - « J ^vbnd J £ Murray J M F awn and K Tndren 

™ P e,K ' n wh0 awrtv or indirectly is or will be fbtowmo ihe 

raore s otdurarv shares or who directfy or mdirealv. 

pmrlv ex seueraUv. with another, exercises o» could ewrase oomrol -»er the Ccmipanv 

w v m 0» 0»“P Winy of the Dneorore nor any guarantees 

provned bv any oompanv m the Group lor ihe benefit of such Dueaors 

W SSSiiJSSSi£“*!2-ffS25?5? 8 m DllW0[ ^ Company has or ha- had anv interest in any 

1 n v^ t " : ’ ns,x s“jn meant tothe business oi the Group and 

SS>’Z^ 5 ’SSS 5 , ' 5m ' 3 ' ^ 


(bi 


Dtrectora' GtupkTymcuit Anungmnems 

W1,h aiw m the Group ftwr sTvydue roerpue ot determinant-? bv ttw 

te^ateS uSd^uiTOnr 0111 pavmem 01 0Mn P« l3 " £K,n l «her than statutory ranpensatymi wimmixwv^ 


tel 


dre ^ TOtlts m tend uncfjigvfr ot pension conmbtrannci provided to 

y ?” Osewrilw r «•« and tne Drreaurc ato reoeiwd 

Iwnlh^ 7 in iS2f£S al " a ^, MUSft5 11 15 «titnated that the agepenare l3l ^ baa.? teimmerauor to be pari and 
l^o^Tnn 1 inwusw e ot pension owiuibutionsi uj be pr.*vyfl ro ihe Dneoois in uw cunem tmanoal year 
ac^irart “* “■ ° l 5“ document w«U be aDPtonmateiv C22D4MI. before toknig 

aocouraotpiohi-retatEdbonu6es ihe amount oiwnicji cannot vet bt-ascreirained 


Thwy noanatiyrmeiit under wfiv+i any Duecior has *jre*d to waive funne -amdumems. not fiasany Director 
waived anv etnolumaiK for ine year aided 31 Deoemner 19@f) uw™«unieiiiB.iM ndsdnyvnera* 


7. Propertius 

The tottowing b a sunnnaHV of the Gr ou p s pnncipM prowitRa 




Tenure and 


Prorvmand 

aesenpoon 

Appro joitm re 
area 
net Boor space 

appioxonato 
unexpt tea 
term wrRfs 
tedteroro 

Annual 
tent and 
rarow dates 

Park House Esate 
WickRoad 

Marre s 
4aaes" 

FteehoM 

- 

Egham. Surrey 



Offices 

25 630 eg It 



1 st Floor 

692 Warwick Road 
Solihull 


Lftastoold 
-l 1 -; veare 

£19200 

Nohniher 

Cnocve 

SMOsgtt 


reviews 

2nd Row 

212 Wdanway Road 
Sate 

Greater Manchester 
Ofl/ces 


Leasrtiolii 
22 1 '; veais 

E 19 600 

25 12 38 

3.400 sq ft 


and eiw hire 
years thereafter 

la Flom 
Sworate Hoube 
40PrecariiUv 
brtlOklftWi 


Leasehold 
3 tiro runs 

£42 000 
No lurther 
reviews 

Offices 

lWOsqft 




m^aS^S*b^Mow ben,:lrt °* an 3 0 ,eflmenl r,s teaw in respect of land anda ptopoeed office budduigs as retened to 


OBar for Bala Ananoamrata 

6 fAa < ta S** agiwnwm made between (lithe Company 12) certain 
B^cSm e0dt ^ tK * >J& 1 i 31 theDiiwwreriii»CtemxMny.andi 4 it 4 oareGciw»i. 

^mrer^a. on uw admiS3«Ti io me OfliaaJ List of to* *rr+i jl tne oramarr 
iS.HS^2y™ v . TX)1 teter man a May 19661 to act as the aaent ot the Company and the s*flmg 
eharefiufaer.. t« in? purpue of rnalangtheUfter tot Sale of 4.369 620 ordinary snares Hoaie Govett wiB receive a 


fpeof £17.500 fa BSGenncteandffli undaw ritft i u conm i isaonofawtn eqcal tc the ramnum tgnderpa»a( 

me ndmay shares cHaedirasale. ft) he turn By the Oanpanvfflid the 6eflsi^di.gsfatildeg mite a a poma ts 
speabed m me Litter lor Sate agreement Out ol this coramisaan HoareGcwstt wiopay msafruajerwitetsa ' 
cxHTurufjSjon ol I^V^^the^iM anium 

costs incbKhng the lees ctf its legal advisers and Hoae Gown ek^aladmxs the lees cdtharepprzmgacoooiKaiiK 
and the reserving agents and the costs of p tmotg *3uen<snxj and circulating me Offer to- Safe ttaa a aaa 
(together with value added rax where appbraMei aid the capital dura on theonfmary draws bemg owed bv the 
Company m omnectKu with the Otter kx Safe Wagaupes and indannnjas have been gwBO » Hoare Gcoett ty 
the Company and tre Dnemors xxntty and severally and wauanttus as in trie have bear gnen by thesofling 
shaiehalctenion a ssverai basis. 


lb) The selling diaetrOdere and ttonurnber of exiscngcidiTiary shares bang sold m Ebe Offer to Sale am asloUows 


iv) The exercise of an option mav be made whotty w partly rondmona] upon the peTtermance ol ihe Company 
and or sir* svbsuSaiv irewsuredagainci suen cmenaas me Board may determine, aifci «t to u» approval of 
the Inland Revenue 

ivr) No opoon wdl be ottered or granred in any person under the Executive Scheme if at the date of granr this 
would tesjr. mCv? aggregate of the sums pavabfe '-m ewrerse of me options hew by such peis^t unde: the 
Scheme land certain other speoned optwts. if applwatile! exceeding tour raws hit lelevart emoluineoui lac 
detmed'm ttreontem ortxecedinfiQxveaJOi d greaipr lour tmresfus annual basic lecrumetaocn. sjbi»ct ro 
a tnaxmutcm the latter rasecl£)0Q.O0i) 2 ubitm to tne tann. ttwsoaid will determine the nuinrya of stxaes 
to be comprised in anv opuen 

77w options to be rafcen into account lot the purpose ol this tour ate broadly all rpr.-ons craved to the 
pafticipaiR unde; the Executive Scheme or anv ottret Group shaie .?ption setemve imduding the P E 
IraerTBUonaJ Sdraws Related Shaw Option Scheme- whether the same have been exposed . remain available 
lor acercse. or have Lapsed 

(vu) The number of ordinary shares cw which options nnv be uranred on anv dare under the Exeaur.e Scheme 
will be Lmited se ttvft when »Wed to me number o! rtwres iss-ifi or ssuatoe under .rptions granted wrJnn 
the prevKus ren wears unoer tne Exeainve Sctveme and am,- cOWt Grsur executive shaie optren scheme it 
ui 3 not exceed 5=e of the mmcex ol issued acinar, sbaies of the Company inuneoaielv prw: to the oaw of 
fnr: a. i/fcss 1 2C<J -.Vuixiinan- shares 

ivun The number of shares over wtu.?h Tpnons mav tv •yar.re.i on anv JaiP untte: the tcrecjnve Scheme will be 
funher limited so ttrar when added to the number o! snaies lisusj or iss-iatae under options ramed wuran 
the previous ten wars under tire E icciiuk i-Tierne or anv :rher share apuon sefremeor r-rew shan n s-Sieme 
operated bv the Company it will not exceed lOV of tne number ot usued cedmarv snares ol me Company 
nruneciatel v pi nano such >lau» 

ik) The numbai of shares ons which opows mav be qranied ueder ttie Execjtjve Scheme at anv toneuo gerher 
with shaw ccmpnaed in orents of anv ctfrer share cptaans or issues und-r airy ptorp slurry; scheme in me 
proredinq three veais 1 is Imuied to J“- of die numtwr rt issued : idr ara stares riowem re. tne first v«ai rt 
operation oi the Executive Scheme the Rv limn wdi mar apple piovided that on any grant ol opdors the 
perceniace of capital appicpyraied to those options an : in die preceding live '.e ars jn s?r Mlcthet Group share 
optfeii cm 'piofci sharing schemes dies no: exceed 5*^ 

ix) Options unde; the Executive Scheme mav not be gi anted irote than ten veais aftei ur date or. which the 
Scheirre was apprcued bv the Inland Revenue 

bo] Options may be oifeied witiun 26 dave after the date on which the Executive Scheme was arpicved by the 
Inland Revenue, and ttiaeatter wnhm 2S days ate me announcfmen: ot die Group s annua 1 or inism 

lESUftS 

(ml Shares issued asa result of rtre exercise of an option will tank pan passu with 'heertrer issued ordmarv shares 
oi the Company save mat ttiev will not rank tordiwacrds with a record or annoubiremeni dare prior to the 
exeraseclanopiton 

ixmt U a: anv new prior re the exercise rt anv options me issufd ordinary shae capnal o: the Conpinv is varied bv 
wav rt capaalisairon nghts L<me pib-dnoaon consoLdancm or leaucoon the exercise pro? in i5*prot rt 
pucb opwms. me numoer rt mares suftect to me cprun? and the taruts rrtericd to in sea paragraphs • iraj. 
ivm 1 and uat ■ atew wdl be vatvd in such nraimer as me E^mto mav w'ennzn? provided mat the auditors have 
coflfnnwd that judi adrusment c in iter opinion 1 u ar.d reasTiafca? 

The P-E Inuraaaoaal Savtugs-RefeUd Share Option Scheme 
(**tbB sa wnw-j Mm d SctMuw") 

The Savm-js- Rrtaie . Scheme was adopted bv the Company bv an rtdmajv resolunon passed on 14 Aprl l**» and 
apphcaacii is to be made to the Surd rt Inland Revenue lot its aprirtrai sera; it ro f ^hi.jje !0 to u<£ Fin sno? 
fyrt 19SP ias amendedi The pmopal provisions t?l me Savir.gs Fetaied Scheme which mav k amended bv me 
Directors to toe. extent necessary to obtain toe said appr oval, are as t :^Joms 

ft) The Savinas Refated Scheme will be open lo all ernplov^es nr.du.fmg sxiearave DveciorM rt Group 
participating companies woo are conttanuallv required to wkx r,y re* uim 1 c nows rer week acd erher aie 
reade sis with at leas: one yea ? continuous .-rer-iaeorare cftiver. tv me Scar-3 re famcipate 
(u) Options win be personal to th? pamcipant to whom they aie granted and mav r.ot be assigned or Tranderred. 

(although where a parnaparu -jies his personal teprasenianves have certain iiglus to exercise his cpdoiBl 
(id) No amount wiR be payable on the grant ot an opoon but the paranpars will oe iwmrt to enret mm a 
Sam Ae-You-Em oonuact in? ivxyvds ot wtscti unit tv awa ineir to rued toe ewr-rse rt toe rpuon The 
price pet share payable or. exercise rt toe option wifi 1>: -irterminsd tn. toe soaid but will not be less tran VS 
oUhenMjBrt value or a shaie shrtttv before the otter rt the option >and will not a any case be less than the 
nominal ^ue rt toe shai *i 

(iu) Under the Sate - As -You- Earn contract the employee wifi be bound io make regular savings lor a period rt five 
years rt an amount u be determined bv him bur temg noi tests man anv m/nnwm jet bv me reievam 
lecpsiarc-n .a- piesenr £10 tet n>jr.to i and not a eater man arv naxunum uepoaed r. toe c-rard •?; tne retevon: 
teoiFunor lat present C1G0 pei momtn At meertoaiuietivev^iip trreempiL’ite w-ii fiai-e toe naht to>«5ain 
lepa-.Tnem: ol tus conmbucons with a ' standard bonus equal to 14 months' ooRrnbuuciu or to leave rhe 
oBtnbuocns mvesed ioi a iurJiet two veam -dunm wmen no runner ccacibunon? vefi be payable bv tbe 
etrpioi-eei and tnen leceive lepayment with a 'maximitoi 'bonus equal to 28 months roctnbuuons 


Setting share/irttes 


H M Lang 
M T Samuels 
V J TuttK+1 

Th^ Trustees rt The F E rFlPanswn Scheme 
The Traaees rt The Eannel iNo 2j Trust 
Other shareholdas 


Orduarv shares 
tengsrtd 
60.000 
.93900 
10000 

880.000 

330.520 


2374420 


(c) 


Id) 


(a) 


lb) 


Id 


4 **+ 


l 



IQ. TaxaUon 

la) The Dnecrors have been advised that the Company has mi bra a ctose ampmy a detoed m the Income and 
Corpor axion Taxes Aa 1970 since.- ns accauntog pened ended on 31 December 1964 

lb) CteujarKehuFbeenobwined&arritheBoardrti-tedR^w^uritePerncn-fSJrttoelnCTmeandQi^nrattm 

. TaxesAa 1 970tn connectirti with the Oflerfn Sale and tMiaaanns related tteeto •• 


<c) 


Cdl 


Under current UK laxatnn legislation no toxaoor. a wnhfeeJd frara dnndeod payraenc rt toe Cwnpany buttba 
Company b liable roatxount to the Inland Revenue ta an amount a! advance cotpatannn tax f ACT umtespeart 
anv .iwKterwls paid rexwpi to the extern thar : ne Compaav raw oflset that lHtoty agamst aqytsc credit aaadUDg 
to cUstnbutKms iecewd tiom other UK recztxr.i ccrnpaitKsi The anrent ratE rt ACT is STlscol the dnudaid 
pud The ACT ibrttfrte represents 2PA>d toe- sun: o! toe dwi fend plus toe ACT 

For United Kingdom resident shareboltes ACT pad is avarJabfe as a tax ctedtt. Dotted KagdO P reoe tem 
individual sfiarehoWets must mdude the sum rt toe dmtdend and the tax credit ID wtuch they are etssied m 
amvimat ibfir roral inrome tor UK income iax purposes The tax aedn mav bn set agama thee rjvts,;?J income 
tax liability and to too extent that the tax cedn creeds that IraMnv. the nrirndual may be cepaid the cross m 
cash A UK lesidem corporal? shareholder is no; cr^geabte to UK taxauon on any dividend recewed 
SharefroWefs who are nrtiesdemm toe United Kingdom may be modedroa payment tram the IrtonaRetremiert 
a prnparaon of the tax credit in respect d any dnidends part Entitfcment to such credit will depend on the 
pravtooris rt any dcubte tax convention cn agreement existing between tbe country rt residence rt such 
itoaretomuand toe Umwd Knwfom However oataacategonesrtintiivitfcirtsfiaffihQftiKswticaieijareadent 
in the UK. lor example British subfecs and ciczens of the R^ubfic rt Ireland may id cettam egeumaanoesbe 
matted to a tax credit to the same extent as d they were resident m Ihe UK Sat a iehddes potreadein. a the 
United Kingdom rtmld consult thro own tax advisers as to thee poemon on these matters 
The Band rt Inland Revenue has- ccntoped that the shortfall prorcroracamaiiied in BChedute 16 to the Finance 
Act ] 972 wdl nm be applied against any company m toe Gioup (or accogntn^penodsiaBoig between IJanuanr 
1980 and 31 Pecembet 1984. 


(bl 


ic> 


U) 


11. Working Capital 

The DneewracotKriai thar. having regard ro tbe Group s easting bank facilities and the proceeds rt the Offer (or Sale, 
the Group will have ailficiaii wa long capital for us peseta tequusmems. 

12. General 

U] frta company m the Group is engaged m any leaaL or adwianon proceedings and ik tegrtot^nnawopr<Meetongs 
aie known to the Do wrens to.- be pending or threatened agamst any companv m tbe Group which may haw a tune 
had during the 12 months pnw to the dare hereof aagmftcarudfecton the Group's fmanaafposmon 
Save as tfisetoseri ui Note 16 to toe Account a nts Repon there has been no snmbcam change m the trading cr 
financial pcenwn rt the Group smee 3) December 1985. being the date to which the latest pubUshed autteed 
accounts were made up 

Price Waterhouse have given and not withdrawn rber written consent » the rssne of this docatnem mth the 
mrtusion harem rt tbeu report and toe references thereto and to toar name in ibefann and context m which they 
artvar 

Jones Lana Wowron have gwan and have not withdrawn thar written consent to the issue rt dm document with 
the mduaon haem ot toe leteremes to then valuations and to then name in toe farm and context m wtncfi they 
appear 

R Watson 6 Sene have gwen and hare no* wnSdrawn thar written consent to the rssae rt tbs document with 
Ureouiusirti haem c4 die tetaences to theu report and valuation and to then name cube farm and ccntaef 
whiduhev appear 

The costs to be borne by toe Company m connemoa with the Otter (or Sale are estimated at E5B5JD0O 
The Offer for Sale is made bv H>»re Gourn. sutckbictef. wtnch is regHSEdm England (No 1212101) and bain 
registered office at 27 Throgmorton Street Lonacn EC2N 2AN 

Tlie pnnnpal place rt business rt the Cranpeny is a» Park House. Wick Road. Egham. Surrey TVU200HVir 
The financial information set out in dm doenment does not comprise tufi accounts wnton toe meani n g rtaecnon 
254 ol me Companies Act 1965 Full accounts fo; each accounting rrtetence pond to winch toe fmanoa) 
mpxmauon lelates haw been delivered to the Rmsnar ot Companies The aadms have iHuxmd m respea rt 
each set of accounts and ench such report was an unquaithea repan war tun me meaning of section Sort the 
Gunpames Aa 1965. Apart from toe mtormamm caraamea m tbe Accountants' Repon none rt tbe mtonwoonm 
toB document has been andned . 

In arcotaanoe with Ui? normal pnnaptes cri EngJeh law tbe remedies available to pecans a cq umng s h ares which 
are bemo issued by the Crtnpanv may dmei linn tne remedres available to those acgumng shares winch are bang 
disposed ol bv the setting cnarehatios under the Ote lor Sale a^eemem. detailsrt which are Baonm paragraph 
8 above 


(e) 


(0 

igi 


(I) 


12 Preferential AppUcattoD Rights 


maximum rt 435 000 ordmarv shares lapprowmairtv ten per can rt the shares now' being ottered for safe) : 
empteveesol tne Group otoa than itaexHrauve Dnecrors. Eattoanptoveeretaytrwesttepectty^ttnertrtrewBhes. 
a maximum purchase puce paordmarvshareja mmirDum sum rt C100 lor orcwiary shares cobeaSocatedat the staking . 
pnee under the Oltei rh Sale 


14 l Docmnanu tar Inspection 

The (ohowinq nocumaits or copies thereof may be inspected at the offices rt Snnmons & Salmons 14 Danunon 
Stteer . London EC2M 2PJ durmo normal business houre on any weekday (Stamdays and pobbe bobdavsemrepffidj far 
a penwJrt 14 days following toe oate of ttusdocustem 


(a) the memorandum and arodesrt a ssooa oo not the Company. 

(bi ttteairiiiedimcBrtidatedaixounisrttbeCompanyand ns subsdarres for tbe two years ended3l December 1985. 
(c) the repwt rt F^ceWaurhoiise set out beremtogerte with a statement seraog out tbe adjustmans made by them 
m amymg at the Ogures shown m then report and giving the reasons thereto. 

(to toe valuations rt Jones Lang Wotxton refaang to the Park House estate referred to under Properties and m ttw 
Aocnmianm Report abew. 

<e) the leport arte valuation d R Watson & So ns re fe r re d to unda Pension Funding above 
(fl toe wrawn consents leJeired ro in paragraph 12 above. 


IgJ toe rules of toe Executive Scheme referred tom paragraph 4(a) above: 


(hi 

(i) 

U) 


toe draft rates rt the Savmgs-Betated Scheme retened to mparagtapbiltti) above. 

the oust deed and rates consmudng the Profit Stating Schama referred to to paragraph 4fc) above, and 

toe material contra ctereleneri to mpaia^ih 9 above 


8 Mav 1986 


Terms and Conditions of Application 


(a) Acceptance of applications wfif be conditional upon the ordmarv share capata) rt P-E XntaiTBQon^ pic (the 
T-ompeny'i. issued and new being esued. being adrraned to the Ofhmat List rt The Stock Exchaags not later thmi 
22i>1 May. 1986 Cheques a bankas' drafts lor amounts tenjged may be p raw n e d fix payment brtcre ton - 
dare and. if so toe application moneys wifi be kept bvRat&KbounreRe&straam Services Limited me separate bank, 
account and. if admission is not granted wifi be returned i without onarasd by crossed cheque m favour rt the 
applicantra through Ur poaai toe nsk rt toe applicants) his expected toatthermliiiarysbarBG^b&adiiKtod to 
the Official list on or befwe 22 May 1986 

(bi HoaeGovea Limned f'HoareGcwrti l reserves the nghuoreteamwholBtKinpartrtscaledown my appfleabon 
and inpamcular. mutopfeors'ispeaedrnulQpieapptftariOiis U any taipbaatKXi is dot accepted mwticio or m part oris 
seated aown. w m accepted at a tower price than mat tendered, toe appUcaum mcnevs ot.es tbe case may be the 
baiance ttweef. wifi be returned tentoout iraaestl by crossed cheque m favour of the apjtocarats) toiourtiw post at 
tbe rsk rt toe applicants) 

Irt By completing and dedrenng oi Aprtfuation Fbnn. you (as r 


(if 


ota to acquire the number of admaiy sbaies spotted tn your AppUcapon Form ( 
number for wtuch the appbeatun k. accepted) on and subject to msm reams and 


stolen to the hsrmgpamcuJare lefeang to the Company dared 8 May 1386 ftbe Duong Bamcutanf) 
Assoaaucnrt toe Company. 


Hi] 


and to toe Meimaraiuffl and Aracies of Arsocwicn rt toeCofmpany. 
authorise Raranstoouine t^gorramn SemcesLumted to send a Letter rt Acceptance tar toeaumber rt 
ordinary shoes tor which your appbcaoon u accepted, and/or a crossed cheque (or anv moneys 
mnmabte bv post at tbe risk rt toe peraonfs) emitted thereto, to your address tar that rt toe 
hia- named applicant) as set out m the Appbcauoa Fbm and to proenre that yoor nane frogoher wnh 
toe named rt anv other team awbcarotsB \&ae placed oo toe Register rt Members rt toe Qjmpany m 
respect rt such ordinary tomes toe euntement ro which has not beat dill? ranouncect 


fui) 


agree that, m comdaanon rt rh? Cconpmv sagraemB to 
n tteLretrog feroadare 


by by 


fa 


fin 


ivy 


tvui 


subwa to toe coaftoans set out m I 
after 21 May l» and that ttns paragraph shall i 
Company which wifi become btodii-c upon des. 

Ravaitocitime Regwratwn Services LrantBdrt your i 
agree that compfeoat and delivery at the Appteattan Form staff oanasture * warranty (hat Vocr 
remmance wfif be honoured on tm-presemarwa and furtoet agree that any Letter of Aoceptanod and 
anvmraRysreruraJjtetovoumayberaiameal^RawnstMunraRiBgistiatKnServioBsLlBntiedpaadwg 
dearannert your remittance. . _ . 

agree that aU ajmticaittons. acceptances rt apptocancns and crxttraas lesufttng tt 
Ctoer tar Sate stufl begovanea by and oansinied in acocniance waft Eri^rtiLaw. 
warrant that, if you sign the Apptacananftxmanbehatf rtBomabody ete.youbsvedueauttuffty mdo 
sol . 

agree tha you sbafl not be muded at any tane after accepancc of your apt tfteattcp m etaaaeany 
iflnvdv ctf raeciraann lorinnocpm rmsrepresaiUDnn. and - 


tvra] 


rwttirm that m makmg such apphcattoi you are not relying on any mtonnaoon or m 
than those contained sa the LMmg Pattteutasaod you accotdiinty agree. that ftoi 
sotefv a Bmttv for toe Ltsong FaracuLare ot any pan toer^rt shrtTbave anyhabliityJor aarysactrc 


intacmatui or tanesenranais 
id) Acceptance rt applications will be effected by a n no u ocanaatrtttwbaraBrtaflocetlqo tt)^ The Stodr Exchange 
M NopaCTreogwiagaeopyo/tteLlsnngfarocuac aanApptaBtlonFcmltigi y w tl Mcycitoatf a ntoatjnHBd 
Kjngdwi may ueat toe same as constituting an snntatm or rtter to him. nor should ba m any_S9ent use sochFano 
unless mtheretewantrerniore.sucmaimvttancmaotecourilawtuUybemadetiDfaimoreiicfaraDnoouldiawtufiYbe 
used without cumravBnOcm rt anv registrar* m or other tega] requ u emen t s Anv person o u t s u te the Umted Ki ng do m 
wishing in mak? an appteatim nareunda m ust smsrv hBiweH as to tuD obsereanaa of ihe lawi rt anyteevanc reonoty 
m connection rhoewnh. mdudmg ob atn mg any requmae gouemmeatal ot other cooeone. obtewng- arty Otha 
requisite iramalmes. and pavmg any issue. oansterocotoBrraxesdueinsucbterTnom . . 


Coplea ctf tbe UatfmjPaxticiiIaxs and AppfteckitiFtoaii iran he obtafiMdfkom: 

P-Blnteraetlnnwl pic HoBeOavatt Undted * Ima fe o m ne B oBietr et io oS eniff LIadtail. 

Park H.juse-. Heron House-. '145Leadem»ffla3fteet. . i 

Wri Road. Eatam. 3)9-325 High Hofbcm. London EC3V4QT 

Surrey TW200HW London wciv 7PB 


The full Leung Particulars will be fxjbtaiwd m The Fmancval Tanas and Tbe Turns on Friday. 9 Msv)98EL 


PROCEDURE FOR APPLICATION 


Offer Its Sale by Tender 

hi an otter (or sale bv rente, an appbeant mav ott® to buv shares other at toe mimtmim tender once or® a higher, 
pnen Thetxicear which all tteehaiBsaeaauaBvsrtdisKnownasihe "SmkmgPnM' . which wiflbenottastoan toe 
minmwm larierpocn B appliranoiis ate rerwvnd ta mrae rfian rbe total mrntoer rt stweeon otter. Pnce te 

ganerallv sedai. or sftghUvtRtow the highest pnce at which satoaemappacatlanBaeieoewed for the war number 
al ubar<s on otter H apibcanons are recavedla teas than toe number rt snares offered, ihe Stoking Ppce wifl be toa 
muumumtentepnee " ... 




— frttwo»rarhanlJX)frshaiBs.odrartaptert2OO*aP0i - • • ' 

—tataoratoantaBahaies. bur not rooretoanlOJNO shares mat ajuptert *.7r«raJW 

_eyi ft ^.than Tnnnn«i fpr-.H5 pot more than ftM. OMihu ia.ina mutoffert Id 
. — frasiora that WOAOO Mares, m a mutoiffcrtSO.Ortlrtaras 


FKtaBw2(taflgw«»iheirfoeyw*»3effliaB»PWtatt«*fcrt» 

- Mimrre»T ~— **» *«m«rtthe ialMia»w it» »*ie» i»lne o fM Bpper 
afeeznnltiptecdSp. ' ^ 




PnttaBaxSftnOgwwtttheemoo^T^fWT- .. .' . . . 

• nraiMmtf price TOBhmrefpeetteaJBBMta nwW pItadiT the 

tneartedtaSarL 


Stgneod detetbe AppOcstioa Ftanim Bow-*. 
*nreApptaui»'Fopnttaybesqtedby«>me aMalw traf rob ea8 tfi apto'reoctgM|ff 

ifd^^rtfKfr i rPdwttaspbrtitepow^rteirtaMttiwyotedrtycgtifiwcow.ntu^fe^ti^iraa^irapetTOa 


wcapftstvraaab* 


Bv adeed rt indermurv dawd 8 May 1986 made between fl) toe DnecKXs. (2) HoareGoweo; art f3)the Company 
arid certain subsidiaries, the Drecrore have gwee nrienuaries in teqrea of capital aatslB tax. mhwit a nofl tax. 
and income tax and certain oto« tax hatahoes m lavoor rt toe Group 


Put your Jofli 


tendaddriw* lu BUXX CAPITALS io Box B. 


Pursuant to the Offer lot Safe agreement the Daectora and carumrt Oat 
takings to Hoare Goiren restnamg the sale of shares id the Company before the dare of tire preksmuiy. 
announoonetiL rt the dual rasuks « toe Group tar es hnawrt year eodmg 31 December 1986 


6 


iFcritaltePtatpl 


Then fufinsnK and addr*wec.er»vJdUp<^; 


a Material Gcmtxacta 

The Wtiwingomiuas.tabemgamtraasmtfie/mliraryajutsgrt business have be en e ure t u d mta by tbeCcrnpariy 
and iu* subsidianes within the we wars nnmeebartiv preHtSng the date rt tots dacumera and are a may be roarenal 
agreements rt various dares hem 24 October 19S>ic 12 March 1966 made berown (I) Dra) Corhaas Unwed 
Cftai i. and 12) the Companv - ■laehvtoeCr’Tapanv sold ram mDiaJ lor an aggregate conacteationrtn.TOS 4TS 
an) aareed to hire toe same nom Dial fix periods uc* exqeedmg J years tar a ram wtndi m currently £38.761 
per month in lespectrt those vehKlas remaining oa tare . . . 

anreemem dated 2 Mav 1986 made between n) Wtdk tsurewi Fropenres Limited CWdn. (2) Tbe Gteaa 
ManctRswr Residuary Body f the Body"! I3i the Company andMILrtxfcinSi Menopotaan Estates Lnntedrtoe 
Devekmer' ).whereWWhcKg4drot)R5oavtoeireeflrtdmterestinffproxiinarety4acresrtiaodcaiip n s3ngpait 
rt toe Park House estate, the Decetopet agreed ro prooae toe construction rt an otttce butfamg upon the (and 
iwnhoutcofttq Wick a ihe Gompatyi. and toa Conpanv agreed ro tease toe (and and budding on fu ff tena nt's 
repairmq covenants tar a term rt 25 years tofcwng cccnptetracofthe bmHroaai in initial amuaTremrt £20aQ0a 
leutiea ro Due vearfy upward only rent reviews to open market rent), the cturadHanai tar toe sale was 
£1 ,?7fi 000. rtwhicti Cl. 400 IMD was pad to Wmtoc exchange ctttie a greeaicnt and the balance of £375.600 ts to 
be paid to Wick by tbe Body todowing c u u^i tet icn a 1 toe btarimg. aid ■ - 

toe Offer (or Sale agreement and toe deed of indemnity referred to mpsagrapb Sahara 




i foist wciBant (pom than lira Dzati 
st.tae p owiBftt 1 rt auix u eg imw heweteawi fee wprwn 





draft tot 


kicw wid HW lNBBfkthr . 

afsbBSoMvtai tfu^gfeenon 


or bankers thaftmus be drawn m starting on an atxnmi at a branefi tench nrapt >' m'She 

Unced KnsgrtKi. toe a: v.: v ,>J at toe feta of M*b rt a tank wracn k adwt a nemow rt rt» ^ 't 

■ ScocBh Cfeanag Houses ot wtacb has. arranged tar n» cfRcyysaod t n n kfes «asat an be p rep wm M tar 
paynMwtfton^tbedeanigfacihxiesppwttedWtfreinanbasrtttnob n toj nt igli fwra i fMirtmirttLhwt tbe 
iwapnate sc r an g coaenuffibginae tap oefet band corea; 

AppfroaDrtismay(»a(xainiBniBdfwac&et^ck3wnl^»praeoDrattigibaitteapriirarafi».l^^m«)eya 

nfrerwanedin&besemwcraaeddRgaemlauiffrttfwpeuoaBfDBiiedKBaM&Statdw 

Tod noit Mod tha oomolMDil- AiiHn l f nB ~ Run bv MR. v dilfn ft be Irai. to * —!»■ ■ ■ ■» 
Ita g li UitJ onSMvieoa^^i^S^dnaag StraM. LaodoaKC3V 4QTsDU tpb« racsriMdaotfsxarttiu 
- lOim.aBTlnradcy. X&Mvf 3386. _ 

Hvaapaayoui ApptouonFdcai. vtxtshouldusefBsLda»paKaadafiawhriMKn«crfiiysft7dei.’my 


BASIS OF ACCEPTAN CE AND DEALING 
ARRANGEMENTS 


The APPhcaucrLErwiD open ano am ttaTtansttsy. l&Mtav 1996tod«didkttfeMsocritoetMiMMHowGouen 
Limited nay deieroare^ TbeStokai; Pace and toe baas an WtoitJ apuficaaore em ttec aarepcea wribeaBrannort 
as soon as passage aba the Apptcsst® 1st noses ft & ‘sgwrrfld tear >nas rt AcnHHafii:® he owed ro 
g/^^f^rtoaisa«i^tt^21M^ 1966 and t h at ilwifmgfi irito^^dingv?a^gi»grttc omn ii u^ » on Thursday 

Anangottents have bees made tar ragEtianian by toe Company rt all sdmsv stuxesnow rtfared far sate, fieertaono 
duty and regsaascc lees m toe names O! app&acis ot paeons m srhose BMXir Lerw^vif Acr^punoe are dutv 
< enounced piended to*, in cakes rt taiunaatMtL'LMes ol Acogffance-htjiy c or xirol v accn & nx wdn me 
mstruenoes eantaeced toereml are iodged far regspaaon by 3pm m 48 Joo? nB6 Share wr Cxarot wd) be 
despatched oner abort t6Jefrl936 

Up » a trtaf ctf -CS.OOO tmtaavsiaHs wfii m the test mstece be made «vadabie ar the swung Phct to mae* 
appbcaooncbaneinpioyeesrtiteCftaip ; 


Application Fonn 
To Hoare Govett Iimitfid: 


Offer for Sde by Tender by HoareGovert Loaned c4 4.369. &20ordrMxysfiaJ% 
of lOp each at a mmrnn rm Knctr pr»ce of !65p per siiane. the price wndetf^J 
bang payable mfuB on appbcaacn 


P-E 



(Registered m En^ami l^o.2872Hi 


l 


| I/We offer to acquire 


I 



M driw yrtMttnvinP-ElntcTi at io nrt pIcfCtf 
such lessa number oi shares in raspect of 
vuhich rhE appheauon mav accepiedi at 



per sbare or rftawerat the Sadang Pnoe 
on tire terms and subject to The conditions 
attaching lo ttos application 


and I/wb attach a ctejoe or 
bankas' draft far the areount 
payable, namely 

£ 


Dated . 

Signature 

2986 

• 

PLEASE UfSHLOCX CAPITALS 

Mr. Mm. Mibb cr Qiltt 

RotenamcfslfsitaB) 

Surname 

■ r " 

AdtfreEBlmtalD 



..... 

' ' : .. . 

• '• _ • . . 

ftiaoode 

.. . ' ^ 

... 

] PlfalMwpiMcliwimi/iwiito 


WnonWnLtBE 

(Kit 


) AccoNh»No 



4 'Anxu*pnatf? 

f 


5 fta*!»«riwi:r^l 


6 Cbiquen'tfBW 


I 


I 


FUI . In tUt Hctkn oiriy ratoon ttora it non tba one applicant. Xha g» or sol« 
appflcaw atxnki eotfaptaw Box 5 aralsign in Box 4, Icaaxt bvtow only tb« names «nd 
addnasev of th* saooad and mtoeqaemt qipllcants. ««rti at whom rtgnntnto is 
raqufiadliiBax7. 


I 


FLEiSSDSEBLOCX CAPITALS 


edpenhng i 
i anda tote 


Mr. Mis. Unset tan FonuBraw 

’StxmuM 

j Auess _. 




■ 


ftracnfe 



Sanawn 

- - . 



Mr . Mis . Ms sm ntte Rvaarnetsl 


• . - - 


sonuBw 

1 Addon .... 

- - 


~ 

• . 

- . a.- - V ■ .. . ■ . ■ - - . 

.Pooooda 



Stnaan 


-- 



I 




i' rl> . 




sj : 


| & • 


l 

\* 


RKtcade 


t — -L J 


i* 













* irlt ' 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY Q 1 9fi6 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


33 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


-<8M- 


^%5waaa--a H 

pibiS^, ss ^ ir 


Late rally 


ACCOUNT DAYS: 


Dealings began April 28. Dealings end May 9. §Contango day Mav 12 Sealemem day May 1 9 
§Forward bargains are permuted on wo previous business days. 


riof 


12? 


»« 


1 s\ 




IT 


m 


*! 


r»i 


r» 


I 33 




m 


r«i 


41 


m 


«s 




. Gatai 


FR 


LEfcanotb 


Obwpd>. 


"sr™ 

W» CH’gbbra % 


F* 


bteOiw 


I MoiowAiinSr 




-i 


CSSE Sa 


I Snare fttna 
Fas4 Moaor 


Ttpboofc 
SNlA BPD 


MS- lm 


* South 

Ra Bna 
Ifecfl Etanaivr 


Aflied-Lwi 
Effii A Ewenrt 


ClyaatMe 
Part Place 


FoW 
Casta IS) 


Nichoh <JNXVjnHo) 

tan - 


Aberdeen Conttr 

Noictd* 


Wood fAnlutr) 


IBcridcv Tech 
Morgan Cnuabte 


Mowfcm (John) 


Harriya &-Hmnoos 


Stocktake 


Turriff 




Benobefl 


CbmcahjPtas 


.Mwor^Aircraa- 


jndimriafc S-Z 


□micakj’lM 


Breweries 


faduwriab L4t 


BantaJfaranijn 


taJmriafe L-R 


Breweries 


CheawcalUhs 


Efeemcak 


ladiwriata E-X 


Industrials E-K 


towa e-k 


Pnpery^mres 


Forxfr 


Industrials L-R 


BtriMing. Bonds 


Industrials L-R 


Industrials S-Z 


Finance. Lend 


htduuiah L-R 




Brewgies 


Indastmb S-Z 


BuBdinoJlaads 


M’s iTVSctrodm _ cm 

3 -S-gSg^ A _ 

.MB «T8 (MOD - w* 

«B ST- IP * 


MX 20WJB 
10 10 40 

4U S4 M 

er uiu 


7.1 LB IT.) 


Kg : 25«^ • 

W- « Mmi 

1*2 M7 Bitaiar |H q 

g g Sgssr- 
&ss;skk‘* , a ' 


197 

473 


204 



JU 275 

ag tsrer"- 

114 77 - 

2St 217 


47 

K« 


46 

Jib 


-1 

. 1.1 

-£8 ai 

-ft 

*6 

84 178 

-5 

000 

40 174 

-3 

70 

40 1£j 

- 

« 

4ft 1 29 
£1208 

Lfi • 

TOO 

20ZL8 

. -«1 

214 

80 180 

-1 

78 

40130 

- -1 

• 70 

at isa 


ms 

30 110 

■ +5 

24 7 

40120 


80 

80 100 


U 

42 HU 



BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


565 3® jhwsan Corn- 

&7 2M Ane 

in 


377 384 

in im 


w ii 


ferau 1 


EM 

270 

se 

TM 

471 


Qeonads 


Holton 


IndunmH A-D 


TO 

22 

174. 

BO 

n 


Nat Attst Bk 




Cardiff Prop 


Standard Fireworks 


Soldi Ife Speak [run 


LongWi tad 


Suer 


Br Benzol 


[ ‘mTrhp 

P Tima Nrwftupcrs U4. 


BanltyDirooum 




twhmriata S-Z 


Hiff nu.lt 


fasdostrials L-R 


fndusirtals S-Z 


OtamcaKPIas 


Industrials L-R 

f S8,T.«J l 


'^uquent- 

»n riyfct 


Weekly Dividend 


P 


DCZT^aWMMM 

H 

n 

PI 

n 

n 

n 


» 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 



BRITISH FUNDS 


07S 875 

SS Si SfCMt 705 

OT -3BB BraMmiOoud m am 

152 73 BrichhouH Diday M2 -2 

#1 81 Br frnrckn » *41 

» iB Brown X Jackson 2iV -V 

71 56 BnmH - •• -BB 

« Brew iao n-i 

M IS 3K" 11 ” * >ta— " 1BV -V 

117 85 Ceratra-RnfiSssona 117 41 

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149 M Brenf Waocar TO 
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225 1BD Ctaysafe 160 

386 32B Firei Lareun 3*0 
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227 150 Lon M 
198 IM Longtan M 
488 319 Low* Boaac 
380 306 ML Hdga 
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131 89 239 

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100 52 99 
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14 27 684 
12-6 69 187 
12.1 40 mi 

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13V rv Ang Amtr Coal 
10 * 743 Ang Am 
57V 38 Am Gold 
58 33 AATT 

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198 130 Avar Hum.. 

425 310 BWxa 
ISO 05 Oreckan 
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634 439 Core GrtaMda 
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350 223 Harbaa 
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69 18 Ranotamart 

236 233 RanHOn 
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DAILY DIVIDEND 

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Qaims required for 
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Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


1988 

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y'n 















































THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


Motoring by Clifford Webb 


Keeping a check on the 6 write-offs’ 


Not before time the insur- 
ance companies are preparing 
to take action to control the 
. unscrupulous use of “written 
off" cars to provide new 
: identities for stolen vehicles. 

- It is still far too easy to acquire 
wrecks complete with their 
registration books and no 
questions asked. 

The police computer pro- 
vides an instant check on 
' stolen car numbers but has 
; nothing comparable on 
1 “write-offs”. The proposals 
now under consideration by ' 
the Association of British 
Insurers and Lloyd's Syndi- 
cates call for such a register to 
be set up. But my understand- 
, ing is that there are no 
proposals for the destruction 
of the documents, the vital 
ingredient of any plan to 
“rmg” a stolen car. 

Toe problem for the insur- 

■ ance industry is the huge 
I amount of money tied up in 

■ “write-offs”. It is reported that 
1 50,000 cars involved annual- 

- ly in accidents are found by 
insurance companies to be 
uneconomical to repair or 
unacceptable when repaired 
by the policy holder. That 
does not mean they have no 
value. They can still be 
stripped for spare parts or sold 






.V i 

! 


OWN A NEW NISSAN 
FROM 


£28.00 per week 


0 ■- 


Nissan Bluebird: Clean practical lines 

present vicious circle where better driver as a result of that the high gearing which makes 
insurance companies pay out experience." it frugal on petrol but sends 


with a 100,000 miles 3 year warranty 
Tel: CALLUM MILNE 01-539 8282 


OUT OF THE ORDINARY 


insurance companies pay out 
every year for thousands of 
cars stolen to match the 
description of wrecks already 
bought from the same insurers 
and awaiting an identity swap. 


I hope that does not mean I 
need an accident to sharpen 
up my own reflexes and make 
me a better driver. . 

Road Test 


Better drivers xksan 

Driving at least one differ- ^ iaa«u 
ut car each week and cover- glnphirH 

-JO nrV) >rru) TO t ft™- OlUvUIl U. 


Driving at least one differ- 
ent car each week and cover- 
ing up to 20.000 accident free 
miles a year on British and 
Continental roads would seem 
to suggest that 1 am a reason- 
able competent driver. But it 
is always reassuring to get a 


for rebuilding by professional- second opinion from someone 
body shops or even DIY whose ability behind the 


motorists. 

“Frod-A-Part", the Nor- 
. wich based clearing house 

• used by firms recycling parts, 

. says the main bone of conten- 
■ tion within the dismantling' 

• industry is the high prices 
; being asked for cars which 

have no chance of being 
repaired legitimately. It claims 
they are sold to the highest 

- bidder along with registration 
; documents instead of to a 
. bone fide dismantler who 
' would ensure that they did not 

- get into the hands of the 
“ringers". 

It would like to see the 
documents of cars sold for 
. breaking down sent directly to 

- the Driving and Vehicle Li- 
. censing Centre at Swansea for 

• destruction. 

• Two insurance companies 
have come up with their own 


Nissan insist that there will be 
nothing to choose between the 
quality of the cars assembled 
at their new £60 million 
British plant and those im- 
ported from Japan. But when 
the Washington factory gets 
wheel commands respect into its stride this autumn the 
With that in mind I went to opportunity to put that claim 
Nottinghamshire Police Driv- to the test will disappear, 
ing School recently to lei one The only notch back (boot- 
of heir senior instructors run ed) Nissan Bluebirds on sale 
the rule over my technique. in Britain will come from 
Within SO yards I was in Washington. As a temporary 
trouble for doing 40mph in a measure, however, some are 
30mph zone. I had not passed being imported, so 1 have just 
a 30m ph sign but I had taken the opportunity of driv- 
overiooked streetlights which ing one fora week to establish 
should have told me that the a yardstick by which to judge 
country lane through the quiet Washington's quality, 
village of Epperstone was The new front wheel drive 
speed restricted. Bluebird is unashamedly 

I was also criticized for Nissan's Cortina. It is intend- 
changing down too soon when ed to repeal the Ford's phe- 


answers. Last April General .granted. 

Accident opened its own dis- ‘ “You must get into the 


slowing. “That is what the nomenal success as a fleet and 
brakes are for not the gears” company car by offering prov- 
Sergeant John Davis chided en mechanical reliability in a 
He then proceeded to give me roomy five-seat body shorn- of 
a running commentary on the frilly excesses of some of 
road and traffic conditions its more recent rivals, 
which suggested that I have The 1.6 LX model will be 
been taking far too much for the biggest fleet seller in the 
granted 1 5-strong Bluebird line up and 


mantling plant in a converted 
bus depot “Right-offs” are 
stripped and suitable parts 
salvaged Guardian Royal Ex- 
change followed suit last 
December. 

Unless the insurance com- 
panies put their own house in 
order quicklv they could find 
themselves faring preemptive 
action by the Home Office. 
Talks are well advanced with 
Scotland Yard's CIO stolen 
vehicles bureau. It must be in 
everyone's interests to end the 


habit of thinking as far ahead 
as possible. Make your mind 


if the one which appeared in 
my drive recently is typical it 
is a well finished, competent 


concentrate on everything contender, 
happening around you. It The styling is rather blunter 
soon becomes a habit Sloppy than the latest offerings from 
driving comes from sloppy European manufacturers but 


thinking. 


its clean, practical lines are 


“I was done for driving business-like. I wish I could 
without due care and atten- say the same for its engine, 
tion last year in the middle of First seen in the now demnct 
the miner' s strike. I had a lot Stanza it was never a very 
on my mind and let it wander powerful uniL 
for a second but that was In the bigger Bluebird its 
enough. I knew I had done performance is mediocre. One. 
wrong' but I believe I am a of the problems auoeare to be- 


it frugal ou petrol but sends 
you grabbing for the gear lever 
much too frequently. 

Nissan have a 1.8 litre 
version on the way. It should 
be here later this month and 
for an extra £200 will make a 
more lively car. I suspect that 
the 1.6 mil be the fleet car 
while the private buyer will 
choose the 1.8. 

A bonus for business users 
is the double trip meter. 
Mileage allowances can be 
calculated on a single journey 
and also over the week or 
month as a whole. 

The 1.6 makes up for some 
of its shortcomings by its 
remarkable smoothness. The 
absence of vibration and 
coarseness makes the car seem 
slower than it is. 119 seconds 
for 0-60rnph was par for the 
class only a few years ago. 
Today it is over two seconds 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Model: Nissan Bluebird 1.6 LX 
Price: £6,995 
Engine: 1598cc 
Performance: (WOmph IIS 
seconds, maximum speeds 
103mph 

Official consumption: Urban 
28.5mpg. 56mph 44Bmpg and 
75m ph 33.2mpg. 

Length: 14.4 feet 
Insurance: Group 4. 

down on the 1.6 Montego. 

At motorway speeds Blue- 
bird is quiet and stable. I was 
never able to get my seat into a 
comfortable position however 
despite an apparently excel- 
lent combination of steering 
column and seat adjustment. 

The boot — a prime require- 
ment on a fleet car — is a little 
disappointing compared with 
the competition, but still ade- 
quate. The power steering and 
brakes are light in operation. 
While I can imagine some 
drivers taking ti™ to adjust 
their driving styles to cope 
with this I personally found 
them very acceptable. 






THE ISOZU PIAZZA TURBO 

FOR DEDULS CONTACT THE LONDON DBli m W 

JACK ALPE, 54 MARYLEBONE HIGH STREET, LONDON W1H 3AD. 01-935 1124 


For farther deads contact 
• PaulMarcbam [040383-289 fSmEvsI «- -.- 
kGrocp Marketing on 0705^64411 (TO&bysh 


any watt confidence from a Font Deader with over SO yeara 


REST* 950 P op — — 

FIESTA 110Q Pop Pfcg . 

FIESTA 950L 

fiESTA 1100 

RESTA 14001 ■ ■ ... 

FIESTA 950 RneSM II 

FIESTA 1100 Finesse R ; 

. Dweei 5 Door.- . 

600 Ghto 

2000GL. Ivory : 

2000 QL, ChMinut 

2000 GL, Srao, Airtp/PAS — : 

2000 caw. CtwsowtPAS 1 

2800 case. Quartz. Rear Belts 1 

- ALL TAXED AND AWAY NO MORE TO PAY. 


26130 Road. Worcester MS 3EN 
TOepnone (05051 3S2123 Tatac 3385® 
e BSG Imtrmaimtl Cqmpaxy 


Reading Coro 

Christchurch Road 

o, (0734) I 

* 875242 " 





/Ssnwdnowq8j » vpb 


BMW 

AUTHORISED DEALERS 


L.H. Tranter A Son 

Swansea 0792-51474 
Authorised BMW 
Dealers 

Offer ihc Following BMW 
Approved Used Cm 
1185 BMW 635 CSW fin- 
ished Zumober Red whli 
■Amtnache Leather. Elea 
Sliding Root Usual Refine- 
ments. FSR. 1 Owner. 
£21.195 

1985 BMW 72 & Arts Fin- 
ished m Cosmos Blue Mel 
U sual Refinements. FSH. I 
Owner. £13.950 
1984 BMW 3ZS fimshed in 
Polaris Silver. High Spec 
FSH. 1 6.000 Mites. I Owner. : 
£10395 


BJVLW. 


rose AUTO 1984 8 Reg. I 
owner. U 9 M Champamc 
CoM. Air eon. 1931 3 mum. 
The rtttawta in HR, Cow 

new £26.495 £17399 

KO 1985 C Reg 1 owner. 
LKHII Qiamnwir Gold. 
Bad Cw Graphic. Sunroof 

13.000 miles £9399 

CONTAC T 9WAN J WBrtON 
mSTOL STR UT M OTORS 
BRISTOL ST. ■MMIIARS 

021-622 2777 


BMW *35 CM Y Reg Black 
paintwork. Mack velour lr ten- 
or. Adankmai extras maud* 
Harare seats. etectnc unroof, 
orvooard computer. air coom- 
OOMno. Panasonic stereo 
Regularly serviced. 3*300 
i*4 lee. £14.000 ono Tel: Ol 
486-7067 d 01-940-6062 C/W. 


BS IH8 C Very M«h wee. to 
eluding lux uadi. Dolphin grey 
twramc- colour coded m in o ra 
* Oumoers. Black took, green 
UnL Mack te aflm A sport* 
seats. M. lectuac sports suspen- 
sion etc etc. BMW warranty. 
i e T y '27 «woat. £12.980. 
Tef (04895) 5739 or 2291. 


BBS CS) AUTO New 28-11/85, 
Di amond Mack, ana men. auto 
speed. Haora Made leather 
seats, etn.il k sunroof, on board 

. computer, air ran m outun u . Pio- 
neer Stereo. 6.900 miles. Srte 
due to rrarganMaiion £24.750 
an.o. TecOl 703 2700 


I NON BMW’S AH models to order. 
52SI party dethery Luv <&*- 
counts. Tel 0227-793010 rTt 


0227-793010 fT» 928 S Auto 1982 


BJVLW. WANTED 


WANTED BMW-S 1978-1986 for 
the best once. Teh Ol 502 42«6 
or settle tar lew. 


PORSCHE OFFICIAL 
CENTRES 


Official 

Poodle Centra 
For Kent 


Waldron 


Hart Stoat 
Mil l rt i tnnn ME1S BRA 

Tot (0622) 683836 



Ugffi Blue metaflic with Ml 
Blue leathar. Afi usual refre- 
ments. 2 owners. FSH. 
Outstanding example 
OMy asfias 

TeL-Office Byfleet 
(06323) 51929 
Sun (04862) 69083 


PORSCHE 944 AUTOMATIC 

Coupe- StKer.-Mack FSH. 
16/600 mues Lrt* B3. tnrnacu- 
llb randUMM) £14.500 lor 
outek sale. Tel: 649 2626 sun- 
day and e ve mngi a fter 9pm or 
228 0289 daytime. 


924 LUX C reg- 85. Guards red. 
etectnc sunroof. Pioneer rterec. 
Extras tool £3.000 Immacu- 
late COndUlon. £14.950. 01 -302 
1142 (Office), 01-309 0909 
(Home). 


PORSCHE 92* S 1984 A Reg I 
Auto finished in Guard's Red 
Coactiwork. Leather uphat- 1 
stery. 1 owner. Fun hwory. 
taxed £24-595 FUB details ■ 
Mann Egenon Ol 446 7982 


944 1984. Sap hire MefpM C wfth I 
special red leather ml ESR. Al- 
loy*. A C Foss Other extras, 
low mi le a ge. POM. 1 Yr wnly 
tramacidate 6 totally untoue. 
£15.750000. 01-673 4270 


•II CARRERA March 85- Red. 
New spec immaculate coodr 
ban. FSH 1 owner. Only 9.300 


FIAT FABPNE HO OOY CAN*. 

Perfect concmioo. £2.950. Tel: 
06436 73934. 


V.w. AND AUDI 


Riona M «t Lock or 
Steve Cm NOW! 

* NO CASH DEPOSIT 

* S e lf amployi f and 
business users we taka 

any vehicle in any 
condition as ■ deposit. 
Frea delivery anywhere 
in the UK. 


RB&OE ROflQ BSOM-SURREY 

. 0737360111 > 


Qnattre Centre 

86 C QUATTRO TURBO Tor- 
n affix an nmf WJSt 

BB C QUATTRO COUPS 
TORNADO SW roof, Bms. hta 
£14350. 

La# low irdeqE models 
taught Mr cash. 

0203 56325 T. 


JAMJAR U U HE (BIBS 
AMML Whtte.'Blaeh leather to 
terior. ceUnet handset, trio 
compact dtac. radio- cassette . 
speakers. FSJ*. Company di- 
rector* car. 14^)00 maes - 
£18.000 ono, Ring 01-240 
7838 tom 01-868 0121 <HJ 
XJB 42 AUTO 83 ou Sage Gfreeiv 
Me*. E/Roor. surra- Mint 
Cpnd. 1 Own. 14.000 m Only. 
FSH. £10.995 01-546-1888 UU 
or 01-397-3832 (eves) Ol 
CABWOLCr M gonmetal pry 
ntetadK. May 1984. FSH. 
HWW. cuoQMrr. immaculate. 
£14.995- Tel 0636 790350. ' 


JAGUAR & DAIMLER 
WANTED 


Take the 
profit... 

on your new car 
investment 

— PAMLESS WPORT— 
you take the profit, 
we do the work 

.Buy via . 

Mycar 

Tei- 0895 39990/71831/ \ 
72103 ' 


‘ PERSONAL 
IMPORTS 

Snt On da atH cars 
Yoo aaid not buy a new ira- 
ponta car io a more retafato & 
safe way. Gtafatfee d knr 
prices. Based on the bwst 
c a aoenoi fast price + extra 
(hscoura For fin Petals ft fiw 
taafkB ptese cdl Of wills BE 
SHEEN ENTERPRISES 
IB/ll Rbhags^Ct, liaina 

01-248 2025/4890817 . 


aa MBe as XRs d epo RC. Raven 
Mack. Unpe rt N rsd. dlasnond 
white etc. 1986 B Reg 28 EFL 
c spd aula. E^eato fnw * 
rear. AB8. dtac hrat u ng system. 
A iBnBMd e R tert is i column. 
Heated screens from a fear. 
Many other features. From j 
£11.996 or £73 pw. Open 7 
days- MJA 0932-221396 


model s for ammedorte asifesry. 
ling Sanaa rent Honcu. Tel 
MaMRpne (06223 50442 for 
avalaoatty. HP/PX wicosoed. 


WALCHRY 

MOTORS 

FOR THE BEST DEALS 
ON WHEELS 
FLEET CUSTOMERS OR 
PRIVATE INDIVDUALS 


HMerxra m 
Tsc (Bxqzznci 


PROTECTED 

SALOON 

CARS 

ExSfaxfc 

(sobfecr to pnr *aej 
2 x Aucfi Quattro ! 
1 x Opel Senate CD 

Hgtast BdfaSK FMcHd at 
Steal Annour . 
pace Oa Miimii 
Td: 01-669 4681 . 


. FORD ESCORT 
XR 3 I 

Mark a Hag. ExceBeM 
-condition. Low mBtugt. 
Surra esc. - 


. . £ 5,500 ■ 
01-236 6280 


Msamora Dtscowts on UX. 
Mac Dealer Suppled Cvs. 
toy mrfee , ary naM . 

we Dana 

NATIONWIDE 
Tet 8Z79-53622 I 
NOWT 


f" BROAD RRDS - 

■ummm MMi mva cama 
* No - 1 
I U.K. 

I BWnOTS tMKST CROCE 
OF NBf MT UTE B3ED 
Egad Orntontm Odra Bn 


TVR TASMN U Ora 1986 
excMantcopshtton. 6-000 mHes . 
£14.750 ono tei <0799126761 
day>f07998S)557 evens 



BEEP 07 Renegade «WD A Can- Sy;S«gK^. 

mder. Manual Nov 82 Y teg. avras 

£500 stereo, Haiti & soft lop. — •■■■■ 

AO turn . Very erononura). sroarnr 205 C71 CABRDOUT 

8211 day. 01 456 3531 Evas. oms. 0236 27638 T. 

VAUXMALL Carttoo 2000 OL LAN9/RANBK MRVBR Parsaaal 
auto 1983 28000 mots. All ex- . export lax free safe* raeo U st 
, Iras simerb raadltton £3900. DA A matn dealer- 061 22* 
Hornchurch 04024 71909 2206. 


sm fiCCfislin 

TOP BfSCOM ilt 
9IMEDUTE DQJVBQT 
-OB HOST U( MODELS 
BEST HP RATES. ALSO LEASWG 
CONTRACT HffE, 
COHMBCULS 

8587451275 
PAHXVffW VBUCLE 
COfftBACTS 


89W8 V8B. V rae. Gold, 
aaoooe. Mfuatt i . atr coodF 
aonlaa. son raaf. 4KOOOeaiaak' 
.D ut T BO pi car. coo* 

dona. Superb ear. £1800 for 
asdefc owe. Tec OX-etKS 8924: 
466 3400 cm 


Volvo 240 sl Earam bom. -se 
OL Met Brawn, may- extras. 
19000 mues. ET3SO OBQ. Tet 
Watford OSB5 32718- 

NSMAULT 5 OIL New setfes. 
1988- 6.600 miles oidf- ran 
roof, css radio, excat rand, tatty 

owner. £4.100. Ol 589 
2002/943 9988. 


dukuiu^nlD 

KSCOUHT NEW CMS 

stock MCtupeas/ 

SmSikaiisc. 

HUH 5 GTIWm EubclS 


wuhbmi m as. Me *> 

Sri MI 

MUD 74G. 240. 3« . . 

PORSCHE 7D QRSa. 

WBT UIHtH 
MKB 7 Q OHBHL 

TEL: 91-20&-2999 


Y AUCHAN MOTORS 

DEM. NtOHBQ AM 
MOumS UMZ5T OXMUBCD 
KDBOT TNMf AMIS 

cm me. jap MEmon nn 

- SMESISStMCE/PNOS 


nuanmri 


carsave 


THEtatCAXSup&muaxT 

5— tafhHh rai — prawmael 


-MCSunBKt 

ont mmorn * 

.YQ0RGMRM OEf 
01-858 8220 


Fleet Garage 
FStfleiroitb Jjtd 


dfiniR arftRTMMiiHlr 1 

FfTTLEWORTH . 
PULBOmOGH. 
.WEST. SUSSEX- 
Tet (07988&307/244 i 


SC COWS 

tMc Mnyandh. C Bra. 


£ 32,900 ' 
01-504 9017 


t ? * f- 

■ 


nnrfiNnsiBBWshWirratlBi 
ds nli gnsgsed Aye 
araaf gatenadALa) 
• dotsc utlai p. 

(1582)455999 


WAT UNO TURBO 
BARGAIN r 
1985 C tap. UsrifacJistaaraM 
Mdt two H0G8 WIM. -1 
9H9K. B IWt Stvor mat ft 
.Ssn Itat two o # nconK 05 
miih. 35 npo. taanM 



«?®5i 


AVTOM MWfe 




sftt ASM 563BBB-MJMB9 


19M. 1 owner. M a p extra*, 
am Tet. 01-686 91 IB, . 


2002/543 3H& 4 tte lat hs t tra w. Low tain. 

, • 4S.996.Trt 8M7» 57463S 

1983 LAND MU A KS pe*- . _ . _ 

roL 11.000 Mies only Short OOLTOX Mctr dwr Oct 1985. 
whed bnse .1 owner. aU extras Urntted edtUo n . Sot mat spurt 
mchMUng oeer drtee. A hargeut eeett. fog lamps etc. 22£X»tals. i 

at £4.600 Otto 06333 74488. £4600. TM 0028 406807 <BWW 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER AUTHORISED DEALERS 


OFFICIAL CENTRE 

>Vssk\I 

; 040381-3341 


‘ BUD* QUA7TOO Maztaafng Dlrar 

* Z7 - BO °- ton Car. rrassfered Marat 
Tek 01 476 1522 iqm wtm hurt mis 


924 LUX 1980 V Reg. Stiver. 
S. roof. Stereo- ExCSWnt condt- 
Uon demte 96000 mile*. FSH. 
POM £4.400 ono. Tet Ol 741 
9965 iw> 876 6S79 (home) 


mscMBl 944. LUX May 1984. Derk »ue. 


BBS ZamaM Om, 

*c m fam^s w fa^ToanS! 
XT hrttorjr, 17JJ00 nrfes. 
£15.750 


PORSCHE 811 SC SPONT 80-85. Must be «TI Jim* 1^85. 39.000 

— Orautne. Prnd* cash buyer. ito Blach. Sun roof. Pioneer 

wore 0827 67474. Home 0837 rod • 

BUCXtMTuiin UiniM— 69896. (Midlands). Trt: 01-3806081 UMyt 01-656 

911 WANTED 1985-4. Low mile- **»«««. 

fer secures. 0932 4S6M. ape. FSH. Tet 0653-604915 — 

oftice in 

AUD* COUPE OTt. B Reg Wrote. 


Low profile. ExceuerH con* 
0 on. £i*JfiO«r near offer. Tel: 
02217 2167 (after 6 pnu. 


tors car. manral March 
1986. Who* with buck true, 
cruur control burglar alone, re- 
tractable e tactnc aenal. 30.000 
miles. £16.995 or nearest offer. 
Phone daytooe 061-708 0780. 
after fern. 061-733 0397 Mrs 
worraa. 


AUDI COUPE CT. 1984. SOver 
Grey / Black and Red tm. Ortg- 
Inal. Owner. Good Tires. Only 
19000 miles, standard extras, 
v.g c_ ST3O0 o m contact 
■Harry TetOI-622 9336 any- 
time after 1200 hr* Friday 


P% UNLEASH 

lipSsA IAGUAR 

YOU'RE BUYING MORE 
pr THAN A CAR YOU'RE BUYING 

THE EXPERIENCE 

A setertion of our prevfousty owned Jaguar* 

1885 CO -Jaguar XJS V12 Coibm. Cobalt blua/DossWn. 

6JX» mHss. 88 MottaL K22AGQ 

1985 n Jaguar XJS Vt2 Coqpa. Sage green/DoeaWn, 

17,500 mass. ; C19AS0 


US 42 Aa*» 1 


«Mi Jaguar XJB HE, Coba* 
fakirtdrartav 2500 MB- t osw. 
pw ...taojM 

«■* fiat XJS NLOM aOB 

doartto i7tao iNaTreK nares 

naBtaadsMILMHa 
■to bsna I n— o r . SfjOO mta. 
PSH. ar can. A86 star ssat, Ahw 


911 9C CAMtKHET. June *83. ^ 

16.000 Pita. White, tromacu- BOtF on C K4 -86 spec. Black, 
late. £19.750- Tet 037384 6 600 rata. -System 4‘ earphone 

3438 eves/wkend B "“- “Itay-s. sunroof. Remase 

alarm. Pwra P6t Pioneer Mfl. 
— ■ £8.460. Tet Of .7 36 9669 

PORSCHE WANTED 01550 0092 <WortJ ' 


628C9I Jane ‘86. Auto nM — - 
Mack -pearl. 14.000 mta three 

Si^lnSS?: ™c New May 86 UK 

fnl/raarspoilen. Eleri^r. com- SrS«L , m!3?‘ nSiSSuP' 

ouier. green glass. Mi. £19.996 rome*- Oiler*. 06285-26346 

- Tel 01-223 7636 day (08835) — 

8300 eve/wkend 944 LUX 5 speed 83. White. - 

g 1 ** pinstripe inienor 

Sutroof. S tereo Alloy wneeta 

B MN 198 4 A Reg. 36000 miles. ttaOOO^ST^Sj^isM 

Sen de e history. Opal Oreen.- 0883 8^20 STold3»i^ 

Charcoal mlenor Stereo 107 

Radio Cassette Brat over 9,1 Tjr W - 

£6.600. Tet 0586 47123 _ . Cherished 

“JrtrBUfeniiltnfS mack . 

220 I 2 DR C Reg. 6.000 m. Sle- £13^50. 

- tra ndM/CB9MRe. A1MK. Sunday Oldoa-aaTT StaS w 

MSB. C/1- SMIMTS. Other Ex- PORSCHE ns B Hp- 

, tra*. £10250 Ter. 0344- rf9 30.000 mta 

4801 IO Ml 0734661413 
incf/Wkendd 

M SSH Ltd adUton. Prtv Reg iwt. 


1966 (C) Jaguar Sonrefgn 4i Antetope/DoesUn. 
11^00 nfias. 86 ModeL 617^460 

1965 (B) Jaguar S ovaraigw 42. Regent grey/Doaskin. 

7^50 inMs. £16/450 

1964 (B) Jaguar SovareigB 4-2. S Uv onra n d/D mi csI dn. 
19,500 irtles. ! — £14^60 

1984 (B) Jaguar XJS 3^ 5 SpMd nanuk Radng 

Green/Biscuft. FHS. — — - eXMJSO 

1993 (A) Mated Jaa 500 8EL. Auaomatic, TTtisOe 
green/Green cloth, 1 owner, FSH, 44J000 mfies. £22 , 6 60 


au N nd t an*, auto, apw 

bhai re— c wab dart Hua 
manor, otsaata sun mat. FSH 
20000 nta ... . ■ ilUB 

MANN B 
EGERTON 


MB SWIM StnSET 

B.«MOMamuuns 


Sdsv But Mhttoc m> Dan Btaa 
Mar. FM a uftRa UK np- 
pi«L 1 osnar. 18600 

wfia Q3JB 

OCT M HERCaiES 283 SE fat 
Start Bn MaaCc mt> Btoe moor 
uXtotaary. auns atmoL do> 
. MfaniL faaataa «»Hrea S rear 

JwtofBsnwsa. Only -2ZU00 

nin mae 

as? mss me m nt m i surt 

TRMTY STREET 
PORCHESTHI, DOmCT 

ST\ Ttfc (0305) 84^4 to 





auuraimw; 

^jL^dari 


MERCEDES 


500 SL 

Pr ivate Sesens pna rt car 
stnee brand new ' m ■ 
1981-ChainpoBne - with Ian 
leather-- tmsrtor. Ahoy 
wheels, new seats, heated 
rear windows, c ent ra l lock- 
ing etc. 46-000 ndles. 


CONTACT BttW JOHTBOa 
WSTO L SlUffT M0T0B3 
BWSTHIST. 8BHM0UM 

021422 2777 


280SL 

M64 BL la Red. 30000 miles: 
I owner. Stereo. ABoy 
wheeli. FuD tervue trisut^. 

. £ 19,995 

0422 884464 


LAN CI A UPC Z88R JKWWSnra 

1183. 39000 NOW townawi - 
taas CmaM w ui Many Extras- 
RtaF m -7303660 


GENERALMOTORS 
WANTED 1 


CATCNKAJN7 tsvtu to m wonted. 
«!*0 CSDCR Z2 A/C TH fen 01 
20B 2713.' (Office) T. 


290 SL 

Dee v m^lWh 
Breen. 13.100 mis. 
Bnponkt radio caa- 
seda. Fan spec. 

£17,950 

051 342 5590 . 


280 SL . 
PRIVATE PLATE 

1961 (799 JO) Manual. 
Metafile UpB 6tue with my 
tether interior. Left-hand 
drive, A35^ asti-tbeft 
device. 26JX0 mb. 1 ow n er 

Offers £13,000 
Teh 041 639 3106 


-7“ | • *' 

t r .. ‘ 

a 

'■ •. .. w 

* : « 

i-tr . - 






range of demonstration 
vehicles avaflable. 


DM SAHIB) DKHLPte £16,495 I 

sd« CBtOL 174DD wautlfiJM. 01- 438-7 228 uvea/wkadN I 

DM jaaau u junaaoie oBBa-taaeoo tuay*) I 

tortoof. mi rod. 1 

DMT DWMLB) D8MLEB 

>*»■ •■ "*« afm. 988 aec w wa ntra body 

aamaWaaBMI UCF I WU BB) Fhd. mac* A gout/b a g e 
Hi- tot aM. to sMsga CtajM. tone.- Fltel t toto 1 owner 
3IJXWmll«s. £27^00. TrtOI- 
in Mia MHi a m ni 6«-asa« or 0344-430361 eva 


duo. Tat 0623 29331/794881 




hwgunsy m Has of extras. 

■gw«W- POfusanK 8S 
ro u.-c. Dw «■ roof windows 
5*7*2, txoMoiu candlban. 


JAGUAR E-TYK 2*2 V12 M4n- 
uaL Dec 1972. Regency 
ira/btecx leather. 51.000 
miles. Maintained by wwaahai. 
Superb anginal cor. One own- 
er. IlOSOO Tet Bristol i0373| 
45450. 


1992. Sad sate due tn removal. 
exceUen! cond. body 3c dun 
wise, new eng before storage In 
car dMwrwm, tares of gam. 
n eeds new carpets. £960 ono. 
Tel Mr Hagpuae. Leeds 820812 . 



Spee-Rec 68.000 mis Hew BvteL CARRERA CABRIOLET 1 QM 
bnmac AhnUartoOiitabable from sports eauu> emu sunier 

new ca9 BQ 106 473) 3691. Alarm biSi. A9M jSrw' 

Barer 33 a scales 2 1984 Blue. 17.000 mib. teet oner !otui 
5 Spd. S/Roof. Tbits. Stereo 813689 nome (O 6661 S2171 oft 
Cals. Low Mileage. FSH. SIM SC SPORT COUPE ign, w 
£6.000 ana Tec 01-39»7G6Z mm Black 470O0iites F9H 
Barer SISI auto. pwr. - steering. PDac. Factory air ran. Full hKte 
s-rort. Ztnnober Red/ Anihra- uphotsle r y. £16.995 ono. 

CHe. NOV-85. TOOOm. £9750. Carphone OB3e»69acuo 
- ■ Tel: 0334 214179 SMI SC TARQA SPORTS. Direr- 

CABRIOLET 329 82 (YX Henna Mrs ran. Choice « 2. Aug -82 
red. PA& 24.000 mites. and Dec *81. £18.500 and 

. BteUPtmM. mof & tax. Ext. £16.960 Bath tine examples. 

£7.500. 01-736 4298 Home. FSH Tef Ol 809 2149. 

•39 CW 1983 V Reg Lapis blue PORSCHE 92SS 1st regt deiwi 


1*M4 E-TYK JAOUAR COUPE. 1903. 
MWter. punmeul raey -tipni grey. 

JJHt ujKnpnimw murage. In per- 

>04621 feet condition- £12.000. 


nMltoHm isn genuine one 
of only 18 made lor UK. M 
Hire V8 engine. 15-000 rattes. 
petrol rod oraphre o re £14 780. ! 
Fuu details Bet 0728 4284 


met.-Mue vesour. ABS. tat. 
36.000 miles. 1 owner. FSH. 
£15-960 01481-4178 oftice it) 
**■ 4 dr B reg. br onz e met 
- ■ 'roof. aOayi, central locking. 1 
M owner. 2 nd nr mini cotta. 
■ £9850 T»i (02021 827859 


82 Quanta red. manual 
46.000 rmfes. many extras 
(I6MO ono. Tel 026864 218. 
BBS 1982 X Reg. Oak green 
mcLbogr leather. 37.000 notes, 
air coo. stereo, elec sorts. FSH. 
£16895- Ol 681 4178 Office Hi 


V.W. GOLF an convertible, bn- 
maculate. All Mach. 10 months 
OM. 9.500 mites. Dealer 
serviced.' warranty. extras. 
£8.500 Offers. TM: 0706 

699729 

AUDI BO SPORT RESi UVL 1 

1985 alter. 54100 mites Only. 
Atntfuwty as new. Baraga 
£8.760 Tet Off tte le rh oro u gh 
63316 OT Mm 02924 «U 

■rkmati osuvorr cm 

OMtsover 203 • 6 door models 
In stock, limned del. Tel 0882 
872182. Open Sun lAuincmed 
VW. dealer!. 

AUDI 90 blue met. 1986 Manto. 
under SOOOvn- Company car 
I or cos sale. Save BWf £2000 
only £8600 TO 0526 59410 
CONVOriBU GOLFS aH mod- 
els (nr auto's tram such for 
tanraad del. 0882 0721 82. Open 
Sun. lAulhofvwd VW daateri. 
HEW VW * AUDI available at dls- 
counl onces for i m m ronw 
detnery ICC Ol 202 8696- 
UMW ANTED ORDER GT1 8 door 
1 x 1 tehite. £9-000. Wk 08966 
33030. H 06385 20015 T 


BOTLEY ROAD, OKRNOLTEL: OXFORD (0B85J 244833 


Cambridge 


MMC£1MS. ned/btocito. ESR. 
. afloys. ele ct ric windows. 2 tathe 
. warrenty. FSH. Imm a cu la te. 
£9.250. Tet 0480 301676 
(home) Cambridge:. - 



BZ42 52M41 fey 
•242 H3S13 kotaa. 


MERCEDES 

ATJIBORISED DEALERS 


S2K A Outstanding car In Henna i 924 5 Speed. Quanta Red. 44.000 


gS-."” 1 - toM Ura. alleys, atenen. 
FSH. Enthuaaa owned. Y rcg. 
£6-300 Tet: 0602 607838 


mues. Cherished NO. 39 JOR 
£6.495. Five star of Fortney 
Tel: <07048) 73083/78561- 


CTVMam TURBO 33 1980. I 944 TUBBQ May -86- Quanta 


grtdwun brawn half leather. 
SLOW mues. FSH. £17.980 
COMder PX. 0604 842788. T 
*■«! Metallic blue. 1983. ex- 
oeuani eunaaon. every extra, t 
■ owner. £12.95a 0526 S7D6I7. 


Red ■ Black mnuitpe sport srata. 
C-Con. 200 mis Onraiml. 0636 
71432 tSum/7D4CBO (WU T 
PORSCHE TYRO AS makes, ail 
sun. unbe at able prim. 100*9 
m suck. Oi Boo 6S1S 


Low mileage. FSH. VQC. 8B BESS 2 Auto Mat Blue. Bine 


grar tto fi a500.Trt:oi 


irtan. I onr FSH. 29.000 mb. 
£27^60 TM: Ol 738 8138 T. 


HAARMAN toBA Vflltewgwi ex- URWAn ■ ear OJU» 
rellenl condidon tnrougnout 

Abort untterseoled red. tun- *3030. H 0 6 285 . 
ran* Immacuteie tooking 

ESJS rTSTSSSS JAGUAR & DAIMLER 

Robert. 01-364 4400 dayfame. ■ 

E r^Ser*Mo^tes a ^S “"""ST 

anhm. £ 17.000 ono Toun-aos Trt - 0858 680,6 

5775-6628 or <08601 333883 ■ ■■ 

atCBEDWLT SIVUSH Ramos 
20 MTS fasBMck coupe. Body XJB S A AUTO Mar. 
ay Bertane. 1967. silver, mid- vw 45,000 ml 
ful condition, fuu imnry from H a ai a- stereo, cm 
new. 2 owners. £4.993. Tel mo. Trt- 0828 22C 
0984 402 83. 

ASTON MARTIN Utg DBSV8 ra rai aie ■iiamn an 
8.000 ndl« ante* rramid. pnr. chmce of -3 v, 

•mat Id- «SS*i£SS S' »oi £*.998-£! 9.000 E 

£9.750- 0483/ 72802 3 PX. Tel Ol 5M 98 


J A G UA R SOVEREMH 4.2 Alda. 
May U4. in Cwd. 22X00 antes. 
Fail service tewy. £13.9oa 
Tel: 0606 65098. 


XJB 24 AUTO March 1983 Sti- 
ver 46,000 mues. v CC 

Radio .stereo, carterte. £7.900 
mo. Trt' 0829 220983 (HoraeJ. 


JJUMMR MJMBRBH1M 4to— 1985e Iteoag Graan \-P 

teetaac. BaaatBSOOation. MOO ateea ' - EtfLOM 

JAOUAR 9Q W BRBU H 4to- 1988i Saji Green. D oa rtta . 
9S0Ctarara&0DagsteB. CIS^SO 

JAGUAR UU W M H MJU M « JI i g W 4 . Cc«XrtBUtaD«B*ta. c l a anG 
auntool, 38X00 (TW«3. . CT^9B9 

JAOUAR T A JKrtO—AllC— 1985: Hsgant Gray. BtegscWh. 
Aa-GondBoiwiB. tSXmntM. «2^95 

JAGUAR T JAVW HE- 1983= BtaA.atotoRABBrtlagrMtocy 
27 000 intas HIJM 

JAOUAR *J» V18 «-1SS4i Cranoarr* Doertdn. OumbonboL 
FSJV. 32A00 rates dSJMI 

JWUWARTBI V8 19 0 4 fB^tVtanhQteai Etato Magnolia. 
suopwaatxiBaraoeQbyoiMT i 9 4B .8jQ00itrtto. 143,900 

LOTUS EXCEL SBRKS B-1984 (B)t SbS hrtl RMIoaBiec ' 

8 rttei.nsAta3.FSH. 2000018*84 MIAH 

MMITUBEBPfTT U R BO ISLU.rntamn BetlMAOoldlorthet 

SurdcL Ar-Cpnagonry mamGart ai e. iifloo m*aa czi^BS 

U7TU8 EXCEL IRNI91 g-lOMfCfrRaOnftCraeraE^ta 
PysciCasaone. KLOOOmfes feS^BS 

- exmerpotHenmsrir 


MGUAR/DABNLER 1981/86. 
ChcK* of 43 whole range. 
£4.99S-£I 9.000 Esl. 19 years. 
PX. Tei 01 804 9838 Essex m. 


JAGUAR HOUSE, 

CHERRY HM1QN ROAD CAMBRIDGE 
TELEPHONE (D223) 2492 n . 




84 (B) 300 OiasaL Signal 1 
Rad. .-.Brawn doth. 5 spd. 
S/raof._ RtoVCeaa. 27,000 

life i £11,750 

-W (A} 2S0SE. Astral SOver. 
Grey doth. ESR. Cnfea. 
Else 1/seoL Rad/Csfe. 

22JJOO nfe £16,960 

84 m 2SOSE. Chsn^egne 
met Brazf doth. ESR. Rad / 
Care. 38300 nfe,„£15^6 
S3 (Y> 380SEL. Bkw Green 
meL Grey dom. ABS. ESH. 
Cnfee non. Hfedtan^ w/w. 

30000 rife £18,450 

B3(jq 280SE. -RfeSB Green. 
-Otoe doth. Afiov whaeito 
ABS. ESR; RH rests. 13,750 
nfe «S£SQ 


WOBTHOATE STREET 

xb ce sta 

Tifc(0533>530*a 
7rt*C 342885 CASTLE <3 


lerther interior, atoe. A/C. 
etectnc sunroof. FSH. superb 
condWon. £7toOO. 01-228 
2818- 


490 SLC 197*. Etectnc s/r. Al- 
loys. Vetoar 8ierto. 1 pmtous 
owner, bnmandate. £6.300 
Tel: 091 48808CH 


288 SC 1982: Mat fahw. 22000 
mte. one- owner. Ml Mstaro. 

£12.760. Tat Oxrtabt 2171. 

380 MjC Utl. 4L800 mfkta 
w ar ra nt y to me and of the year. 
ABS. ESR. HIT condlUonmo. 
crutae controL ewtne wtadows 
and ortat. MB mamtrtned- 
buraa iar atarm. dan grown, 
bene Interior. £19£00. Trt 
aerte tam paed 6050 ' 

MS 1986. petrol blue. 
AB£- rear , headrest, etectnc 
sunroof. A winoowe. central 
armresL stereo radar mo- 
front headlqh* wm. new 
tyres. 29.oao miles. £31.000 
ono Tel 0268 23368 office. 

Ml* OCTOBER 82. (Vl-Auta i 
GUVS' neube. Oacirlc roof ; 

. and windows. 1 

radjo/touena. A Hay wberts: 


WVadBMSOC 2 J. 16 valve. 
SSE" 1 ."2? rtlvar me- 

te«c. Leauio- Inferior. AtoS. 
Numaroua extras. Baa offer 
OW £25300. T0U06W. 

720017 


grt^Mgm^. EiajOd. Tet 


280*1 MM3 KMo ofetaOm 

prevtou* owner. MD*s car. SIS- 
' art red /b tad: cm trim, rated 
won Lorenz bmps Sport 
wherta. ABS. C/cmcnd. 
W/Wtoe. rear tort. Mnwrri 
•terra. VeMde tn axcencm eon- 
dIUon. ntw Be ocen £18.995. 
P/ex conoidared. Finance 9% 

. over 3 yearn. Rmg .0934 
73250307 


nufctoofy. 1982. ramtxeMy as 
new. Made wm tan hnte.uphol- 
Rery. even extra cnchuuag 
refrtg air eon. aHoys etc.- tkxed. 
£10600. Trt.lOOfiBI 6«2fi9* 
(hone) cr 021-238 9847 (bu*L 


ESTATE. 

Red- 84. Prison*. Alto Brand 


-ect. 2 Hoe. 130 mph. dtoOOO 
muca. 1 year factory warranty. 
New ear arrived. Mud sen 
£9-SOOono. Trt C0SD8U2852 


290 c. Jbetoutatof irtiawr- 

Ptflt Service Htatonr. i towacr. 
£3300 one. Chematord (02481 


aae a. aioop m'fetlt. d 

cettent mod. fBH. MR Al 

' Hi Ri — Pferfe 

£18.750. 01-3*6 ISjjtata 


°».1* (Al auto . Only ilooq 

P^ r *yror n 4Wroa. awm^ RTOAUTTL 43 fpt.- 19fe 

T * h Wlnkhetd MOT ' and Tmed. vge. £1850 

ROW 885208. boo Teh 01-436 7486 


a y .%. 1 * w - Mrad/aon ions, 

urn 5K2?t. ow ¥ ,a eonto 

SSS^toTSi e rtSa° , te 

uroa 907123 (Eva. wv/emu 


'example of Ou» iiainic Car. 

^•orsiis^i^sg. 

jwSKSL 198SL only 


HEW SOO BL MrtCh 1986. ARDC 
ymaa. cream/bena terther. fuB 
UK opoon. 2.000 miea- 
£36.960. 0868 881569 oMBcs. 
20 0 SC 88 lun 1 Owner. 
lAOOO MHes. F6FL . A8W*- 
S/Root. .. A* New. 
£18.450 Trt: 02816-2877 
*00 5EL New. Metafile Hu*. 
JtoOier Hswr. many extra*. 
jun nedlate dtatvry. £ 32000 - 
Trt 07373" 61479. 


~f nro0 f * erayrt j^wUeo^rtSicSS! *381^ Petra* Bme. 27«0 

Sjo- sumat *”^23; ™hl fjsjl Superb. 00** 

now . radm/rracMin n mn". - . fliar ClA&Yi r#l- «n**r 91 

On«fc 29OT0 miles. £31.000 Hl^OOOoSi mSL!™***' 810783^°°^ 

OHO- Trt 0268 23568 gfltae. 2ao*r\> ^ 8 15® ,B88 - row? . - xniwyt — -- 

£2^ eu ‘S^- ro ^- £li-%OtarmSS 12 mono* wanarttr 

oara-Arti 

47 mT r «- Atob. PAS, raw aanL hTT c-'rautreL Mg nude. £11.998. 

H ft f T TtT ' MO CL mi SflS. jy^ourtki Rad/ G ul, ,7^* 09904*036 2* hn 
44 Offft miles. SUvar met. ^ ^nSrolS *-12. 750. 2 30 T E Feb 83a AM Petra* 

ira£s. abb. » c^SSS! «t*5S^ D 2S* 3S ”=«6. 

crlto OMM. HL wUMpc. **■««■ I Owner. £9.280. 01-440 8926. 

fBH. C17.HK Oltoiain d. CS? “"OO ntoa* werv mo. 

fltohnfU * 

. . •-‘..(OumOB 8 i<nM 0 7 Ml COBtiBBeJ an md tm. 


07894. 

MWBfl MO SL 1981. 
4ojOOO mites, sum mat. Black 
■cooier. AB8. air Otartcn. 
crUM eonlM. HL -WMnvIpe. 

FSH. C17.MK 01-581-4178 of- 
Mths lU 


ajVw'W.T 


I 












2S0SL 

j%*\, PW Ptm aOm 

ss-sss-^ 

CRM* mb. 


<rcn stMotTnhe w« 

**» «HS7 Aa*tae. 


MERCEDES WANTED 


LONDON ROAD 
GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) 
LTD 

Maudes Benz main deal- 
era. UndervriUR for be 
ud km mOtt* Mercedes. 

comer 

mumii mcsown on 

nut 23511 





RR Canidn CmnrtUo 

MaateTnimrflBdwabMjB- 
non H«e. Qnpnai omer Iron) 
ne*. Fjn fejtttoed M» 

ms. 5U00 mte only. tuB 
Mwcftoswy ratable Chef- 
«ws number paw acbiiHt 
' WFBSJB3W 
To War T«tfOM5) 73235 


PATRICK CARROLL 
SILVB SHADOW H 

1900 fAogustj. dam. Mag- 
nttatwa {aped Ftofl, tfAOnC 
sum*. Thu maenheenr 1 
owner ey hw only £900 
tele of Man fnHss-XaXOOO 

(0G2 482) 3607 


W*I BENTLEY IMimWMC. 
erean tour, nark Hue n». 
soooomt*. rr Worraiuro. fufl 
nwrav. nngwNi condition. 
fmftntlMW 0MW if Featured 
jVJH a stf. £23 T50 Tri: 1 07271 

Saons mi / (0SB/7J mz35 qu 


ROLLS ROVCE & 
BENTLEY WANTED 


sum u»w hu**k. 
•W Krm racr. Buyer waning 
a® «*■ oi-osMssa or oi- 

ww«0 nnwi» 


MOTORS LEA51NC 


AM cfeHcrGed Bdre nag ncnB 
can be accepted by telephone 
feuepi Annow>ce n» cfim. The 
deadline is 5.00pm 2 (Java poor 
10 puMieauan (re 5.00pm Mon- 
day for Wednoda*!. Should 
yno «iih io *nd h advertise- 
metu m *ntn| please meted? 
yodr da>innc phone number. 

CUSTOMER services oe- 
PMWBfr. If you hate any, 
queries or proMemi rebuilt io 
your adienormeu oner n bu 
appeared. please contact oor 
Crooner Semen Department 
by telephone on 01-491 4100. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


■4 MMV tofllmnOH M 
aauoiver Ruu. witn w Uw» 
/norms. unafipom ana m 
kmiik ad MiUnml 

Wrtanunttr Bank, for Oorai 

IMMMrk. Mkn oi rtmiloWxa 

and MoMm» Io Uir Duioruc 
Association. on iftn death of a 
near naam am tauter. m 
lamCnMirty whowin or sadly 


GO 

ANNIVERSARIES 


SWIMMING POOLS 


riLltlH CVS NB frw o a ay 
wiim and produmi cumco- 

tTmSZSF""* D ~** ; 

BctiwnoriacnTui 

AmtMerxw |q The Roiimo 
Sionrv David Bowie. BoO 
P v l». Bruce SonnosJiwn g, . 
Lnr AM. oilers you UK“ araoir 
oaoanuniiii ro have the bdw 
T on Dr» AmtMmcn Kwcuoy 
Onqnra for your (unction. br d 
partv. wedding. sreduet 
launrn. conference or nrem- 
non. phone Jim RuJuravin 
now on 003*003990 


W OP ivoMrn gun main 
arrttm inn atm win bo~ ww* 

m J1Z" £550 TM 980 SOM 
PIANO Magnifm-nt German Baftv 
Grand rwummhm Hamxfv. 
Valltod £1.650 Of 455 0148 
WlfHSLEtxm TICKETS. 

Broom and *eM Tn 01-881 
s»t t» m »t as»t> 


rtevru f OT igbf Tel Oi ao? 
78*1 




WANTED 


mtiqih: m modern silver 

Tdir anianuor of w«H»rul 
auction pno-i m our tonnraulv 
v-lev Con Mcl Daiwl Ponrr. 
BofHUim Montpriier SI ■ 
KmghKWidge. London SWT. 01 
saa 9ioi 

Rut OTumwiTV IO «um 
£g-anf \nl Pillar Bov I lj Ti- 
re owned kinqi Oilers imitrd 
Proll la BOX CIS. Thr Tmi« 
ROYAL BOULTON Toby aw*,. 
Fiqtirmn. aunuiv etc . want 
M 01 885 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 



M.iinti-naixc Jr« 


pool EndoMM 

aoA 

Consmatorle* 


l If I Jt 4 Sav.UiriUi.iiUm: 

-U-Li IJJLLLJ JJL £i A 


C 'dpff/i/r /&&&*» 


.SianRrnund. iVlcrhnniuiili 
Iclcnhonc: 07X\ 41850 


Vc . J /{frfx '('< )> (tar/., 


ft NATIONAL CONTRACT HIRE 

C 


Examples of aw compet ito r rates include; 

Escort DCS tow «S pi Cartba I ILtai £B p 

' 3* 4 * — bn £63 pr VMn 7408- bn 02 P> 

ro S-M8 **• «M«* Cff — torn £47 J* 

} We onfl buy yoor egasong cars. 




Colindale 


CONTRACT HIRE OR SUPPLY ONLY 

Credit terms available 

FULL CONTRACT HIRE 

„ Per Mk ■ FW wk 

ford Rata— — — — .£27 I Vauxiial Cm 1.6 £3g 

How Fort Encon 09 I Aufi an no 

vw Gotf — S bS« " b~ZZZ^ZZZz% 

FbrdSwnra E37 I Renftut 25TS CS6 

3 year contracts for business users, includes aft 
Mincing. aB repair, all replacement parts, breakdown 
recovery membership, replacement vends. 3 yr. RF 
licence. 

Top discounts 

Afl makes & models sunofied 




iwm.^^a? 11 Vao 




or chauffeur, other ueMctas 
mauabto. 01 -540 9280/ 7902 r 




SOLIHUa 

021-745 5566 

Sun. 09073-76768 


DUDLEY 

0384-53201 

Sun. 0299-402215 


01 20013939 ‘ 


WHOARE 

CARFLCW? 

Ufa l»ue b«en established since I960 and me a very 
experienced company, with a turnover In excess oi £4 
million, numbering amoogu our dientt we have 
- mayor companies and local authorites 

RELEASE THE CAPITAL TIED CP 
IN MOTOR VEHICLES 
with one of the following schemes 
*Lmshg * Contract Hire 

* Lease -Purchase sir Asset. Realisation 

Ideal /br any hurines *— large or ttnaJL 
Any mak*—ani/ model 


FOR SALE 


**■ Prof foiium lux flat doubt* 
mum, to S. o»n M L*5 pw 
Tri 720 1373. 

SWI9 prof fn t r r m modwrn 
ILii nr uabon no b<- rui &79 
72oS KStHwl 543 TOM <*v«4l 
MfB N S w* 3Qr% own vmall nil 
in nirr lui cl m t nil nopw 
*k£J. 01-329 8191 nUT4 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SCACH HOTEL VAUNCO in Cor 
«J • PmM uute 

wairaaons uonn loon, un 
lunuru wine. Fuhmk umm 
anc*y lor MOV ana June dtps. 
BJUero Unn Travel 
OI TBS 2300 


COSTCUTTEKS OH fUsMt hoa 
IQ Enron-. c&A a moll anliiwr 
IMHO. DllMnll Tnirl 01-7^0 

_ „ . 3201. ABTA IATA ATOL. 

nAMQ. Small C*noan Grand. I 
Fuay wmdwomi aoa rape. | “ 

HUM. dark rourwuM. Braunfu I . — 

- ana w. r> iwn » m t. I -*« muniTt rUOin and 
77eaT 04 1 HoUdayy - Oicrk sunn. Ca- 

nary Mandk and Turkey 
109351 771206. ABTA 


p«*>e contact Anne at 44 hn» 
Road. Sealorth. 

CASMUOMA Pteme phm 
01-563 6600. 



.. v-v; ,T - , ” - — i 



We cant 
care for the 
victims of 
cancer unless 


Evans Hafshaw 

For Rolls-Royce and Be ntley 

'WaK; Wifi) 


Contract Hire also 
Available 


?H0N£ NOW 
FOR CUCTATiCN 
'C;G2'! ~ = E25 


Mr E & T MOTORS LTD 

mSSwi 

Hri*ca«»: wa imm mao. ifYTQMsn>«(.UNU)aM nine Wqiip w mwn 
an* maw noAD-omim. coot un tTL wsM Stoin 

ut oiumh wi. unmauN. utK nu uh wwmsb . 

4*i irr xraExr. mnn pajk. urana aux ua rsz m«iM)i-Man 


Ittfa April 1986 


- r — i — usajaranE 

Hiss Julie Hay 
Tines daasoned 
Lewi 4A 
Kl Bax *3* 

Virginia Street 
London 
El Wti 


T bust than* you fbr your assistance and judgeaem; over the past three ueeks 
as 1 as sure iT it had not been Tor you* persistance 1 prooaoty uould never 
nave advertised in tne Uses. 

I an totally assert at the response X have received (Y» such a sasll adnert 
in the Car Buyers Guide on a Friday. I thought it wculd take at least 5 or 
V w-ets to get a response froo the advert, however on its first appearance 
I received ? oalls and wi its natt appearance I .received no lees than T7 calls 
ani as a direct result of those calls sold 5 ** Cars. 

Naturally I shall continue to advertise in the Friday Car Buyers Guide *Ue 
the response is ae good * it is. 


performance cars 


||Th[ ( M'KI SS ||I\ II; ,Tf ’HIM!' 


liit.l'i-'iiii-i-riCjp: 

Ont i,l :l.i- w.irJiS'v '.l-iicM .- jn. 

! Tick ford 




‘Officially ' 

A^ in r^L W 

fiama Deakr vv 

toTtoeNAqnteeE&s 


Cancer Relief 


BLTNKBOUMOE TfCHCTE 

swoo mjmrra from 6 rrem suii 
U rkrto opemne iwm (28 M»yi 

Simon Bonannua io nu M . 

tour on rithn- M May. a June . 6 
June, li Junp Riud OI 3au 
2424 ran 2284 


■HMHTB OF MTfUKD. Th* 

umiuai* HI Period iiytc nowd- 
room and ofnra lumiurre. 
Ha n dma d e wand ntanooanv 
nmrik and boardroom utdes 
from our own wonnnao. 
Nrir iroed. Oun oriii 
6*11 IS. Bournemouth iQ202» 
293680. ToHium <039287) 
7443. BrfUtoy. CkK lOOM) 
810952. 

• MONTHS OLD W'nlwocd II 
HP wwo (ran or £975 me 12 
montm wtmuiiy. also Toro 
58" noe-on inpi* mower nooks 
newt £950 Phone Tun Tantoir 
or Cute HoOoway at Taylors 
Toots iCarairitoi Ud on Higb 
V'ycamt (0494) 41842/- 

443214. 

F1NFIT quality wool carnets. At 
trad* prices and under, aba 
ataUabie lOtr* extra LAW 
roam nr nsnnana under half 
norma) once. Qiaoeary Carpets 
OI 406 0465 

CANCELLATION 2 tutor Wats for 
Monto Cano Grand Prtv mrtud- 
- too aUracrivo villa aparbocM 
for 1 wq«k ■ neqonim*. Cab 
0105395 569281. 

DERBY DAYI Box la M Ttokris 
and box Mr B peup to plus car 
partdag Mr 2 cars. For funfier 
ttotani Mfephoae; ro572) 
577161. 

EXQMnra FtRMAN Ktmran 
Carpet. 20T - x HIT. Ivory 
bariMiroiuHL mm shades of 
Dowers Hi Jad* Own amt Rose 
Puik. £8000 oho. OI 629 1216. 
THE TIMES 1786.1666. Other 
bocs avaa. Had oowad rraiy 


"Sundays" £12 GO Bemember 
When. 01-688 6523 
nOKCTS FOR ANY EVENT, CBto. 
emrtlqM Exp. Chem. Las Mb. 
AD thtacr* and sperm. 

Tap 821 -461 6/ 8280496. 

(Ul / VW V Ouxra. 
BramiAY ME T Ove eotnrone 
an original Timex Newspaptr 
dated me new day may wav* 
boro- £12 AO. 0492-315037 
SCATVDIOtX* Any event lnr L01 
Mis. Owes* Gan. SurtugM Exp. 
WHOHMoo. Ctyndebotna. Ol- 
828 1678. Motor aerttt cams. 
HftoMtl EDOH. CATS, sarapm 
Exp. Chess. Las Mb. Air them™ 
and! sport. Trt 631 5719. 657 
1715. AB motor credo cards. 
KA Ctito A WMBLIDOM Tlcbatx 
Bdusbl and Sold. Triep Hou c 
Ot 930 0277/01-950 0698. 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SPECIAL OFFERS 

memm Compost TBas. de- 
sn rabrt only £855 dn sq yd 
+ VAT. Wool nsx Bate arpas 
4n aril Hasson tacked £435 
gn «fl yd + VAT. WUe socks 

"ESHER.* 

TetOl-731 3388/9 
Hm s n—bi [ spi l l toB 


MUIIU1W MUMS stutn. 
1 955 with stool. exreUrm ron- 
cSlKjn. munacuW* case £4 . 500 
or ueu Offer. Tri: 01 686 49B1 



Sancn Lands breed KC rav rraav 
now 06 0 128 671 or 928 4069 


FLATSHARE 


■MHYLOOHE DrofHstonpl per- 
son reguu-rd 10 snare with 1 
other, own doubt* mom. near 
Watson. CTOOQ pw ncw&vr. 
Tel 01-724 0069 Oder b JCWn 


CHILD WITH 
KIDNEY ILLNESS? 

Read this important se& hefobooktet. 
prepared by the country* leading 
kidney spedafetL Suggested minimum 
donation just El. AB rantributions to the 
NKRF tearing work. 

MTIOML IODIIEY RESEARCH FUND 

TTlaJ, Freepost, London SE1 7BP 



LOWEST ART ARCS Florida. 
Jamaica N. York. Toronto. 
Alnca. India. Far East OI 737 
2)62.0659 ABTA. 


CHEAPEST rUCHT*W -WIOC. 

Bmi Train. Tri 01 585 641 A 


CHEAP FUGHT5 Worldwide. 
May market 01 930 1506. 


CHEAP FUGHTS WortdwMM. 
Ring HTT 01-950 246S. 


DHCOUKT FARES Woridwlde: 
Juuuer Travel 01-754 IB 12 


HEW YORK £260 rln Rome 
£11 Gnu Eumu 01 457 BIOS 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled nights 
OI 724 2588 ABTA ATOL 


USA fiats £99. Motor travel. 01 
485 9257. IATA 


Swimming Pool 

The SPATA logo is your assurance of 
quality and reliability. Only SPATA 
members can offer SPATASURE - 
exclusive guarantee. 

Membership list and handbook from 
MrT. Lingham, 

SPATA, 01-291 3455 <24hre) 


WHY WAIT FOR SUMMER ? 

I'iPT SWMMINC ANYTIME INStOE A COVAJR DOME 
INSTALLED OVER TOUR POOL 

• Unmocs beano, dspana re ehenevs. 

■ taSVy irnuri whoi good ueanar irmes. (i 07 B 

* StoMU) pneed BSarfl 

Send lot ferns from me ttanrixuvs:- 
COVAffl STBUCTtmeS LTD 
Maki SL 8afM li 9m Bora. te weri M. Wandtkttoiu 
Tb£ 0455 G 18181 (24to*) 


BUY A SWIMMING POOL 

Manufacturers of high quality xvground tow pools 

SeH-bnM or instsUird. 


VMaaTdHknti 
■UVERMU, UBTOU C8» 7AA 


(0440) 61006 




NORDIC* 

Genuine Finaiah Saunas 


OAKLET OF HASSOCKS X>4 
Swimming Poof 
Cantractors ^ 

Yok o> oama n canmam 
M inMwarw of M types to 
owns. Damott A meutres 
4Bo earn *. 

E J OAKLEY A SONS LTD 
BrtdM Hn. Kaymar Rd. 

lfoimn h g SusaM 
TEL: (07818) 4700/4999 



UP UP A AWAY 

NainHii, Jo'Buig. Calm. 
Du On. Istanbul. Singapore. 
K-L Delhi. Bn^koL. Hong 
Kong. Sydney. Europe. Sc The 
Americas. Ranungp TrawcL 3 
New Quebec St Marble Arch 
London WIH TDIX 

01-402 9217/15/19 

Open Snontay laOO-IlOO 


cams ABROAD? Airey & 

Wheeler Mtoaame in mtov lo 
wear iiqhiweigni 4 iinwca 
ajllk. luxedas. hawery A acres- 
M>n*s. 129 R«9ent SI.. 

LONDON W1 

L CALL For xcmve el theberi deals 
on flci. vinax. and. MU and car 
lure. Tri London OI 6S6 6000. 

Manchcrier 061 832 2000. Air 
Tmel Advisory Bureau. 

LATIN AMERICA. Low rad 
nights e.a Rio £485. Uma 
£486 rUi aim Snub Croup 
Holiday Journeys JLA 01-747- 
3108 

LOW FARES WOHUNnre - 

USA. S America. Mm and Far 

JSwi^sbwi. wl'oT'bSo I CRUISE A SAIL ABROAD 

2«*2B iVaa Accepted) 

N'YORK Miami LA QxaDH 
farm on mamr y£. scheduled 
earners Aim tranMiiannr 
cnanenA fhgtiH to Canada. Ol 

584 7571 ABTA. 

ROUND WORLB C795 (COIL Oub 
Ir £1699. Flret ir £2036. S»d- 
ne»- fr £659 ran Column*. 

Cutlers Cantons lODnonHiire 
Souare. EC2 Ol 929 42*1 
CAMARK9 DJEROA Greece Sun 
Hot 82F. sannv Peanuts 3.10 
17 May -on fr £!Jo bo 
Lunarsraoe 01-441 0122 24nr. 

Dt&COUMTS lxf/Ecunomy ucl- 
« Th a Id FLKJMT- 
BOOKERS Ol 387 9100. 


CRUKE Turkey 12 berth Crewed 
moior yaeni 2 wks June 3. 1 r 
Hi 6 "S CNiodd “ snorts. 01 
526 1005 AIM 2091. 


GENERAL 


ptnop to ear hatin' ns*. O/R. 
*78 PW Inc. 794 6066 tevexv 
RRW 06-36) Mere large how* 
with Z> 3 others. Nr rube A ad 
ameothex Cab Jo 876 6579 
WMM MRRW SOT. O R in 
stard flat. £50 pw rtrt 609 
7017 may). 681 4875 levesL 
H16 Nr Tune. F 10 snare Gdn rial 
with F unraed. O. r. CM. £56 
pw Ol -629 9996 0/ 802 5761 E 
HR HAYNES PARK. 2nd Prof F. 
o r share CH Iwe nr BR. £36 
pw mu. n. s Eve* 942 0229 
PARSONS GREEN, pnof F. O R 
m lux house with garden Nr 
tub* £160 Bern 736 5931. 
SHEPHERDS RUSH Prof F. o/R 
tn Sunny flai. Nr. Tube/ Buses. 
C46pw Met. Ol 602 9216 eves. 
SWli. UnmuwactaMe Prof m 
24-e n v a r. he*. £160 pan 
Ina. Avon binned. Ol -223 2327 


HOT 

TURKEY 

How hoi? Well already 
it’s 84°F! Holidays from 

£159 

See yoor local 
travel agent NOW! 



iomfen Lotus Centre .1 


Once assin Julie, Lhank you ftr evemhlag. 


Tours aineerely 



CflLLW MIKE 
fl«T jiLfiS. hAKA5Hri. 


LET US GET 

RESULTS FOR YOUR CAR 
THE^I® TIMES 


VITESSE 3 JS C rag 

Mint condition. Extras 
air conditioning, cruise 
control. Sonic alarm 

with Sunroof and 
wananlies. Original 
owner, 8000 miles, 
FSH, valued over 
£19,000. 

Unfortunately Eat sale 
needed. 

Offers 03^5©. 

Tel: 01-567 9915 



MAWAGEKT 

01-6439106 

HILLSIDE MOTORS 

CtoStattoLSurray 


74 JENSEN 


mm 


fan. Pdmt Hood. 1 Onq«. 24.471 
MISS 0 tov. VsBwt MB Back Tmt 
Mti Gar inserts. Sbpxb Catfksa. 

£19.500 ono 
01-908^)622 or 
01-908-4672 (t) 


BEAT THIS! 
Ferrari 400 

1978. 41.000 ndles only 
from new. Fun gervtre tuc- 
lurv. Romo Red with Black 
& Gray leather interior. 
ISO molt- tmmarulate to- 
stde St out. PX pass. 
R eriUBLaE y prfead £*.860 
DM9 7E03/4K137 aw 


RANGE ROVER 
VOGUE 
LHD 

Grey. Automatic. 
1985. Air cond. 
12.500 km. immacu- 
late Cond. 


■ nMWIV: ,-i r -ra^| l i 1 1 r-MtoMrtiwhrtW J — >P~lEld*V n I ii 


adverosemeni in 
and send io: ShHw 


Advernsement: 


separareiyl 


ISUZU 

PIAZZA 

TURBO 

. FROM . 

Bates of Danbury 
The Essex Dealer 
(024541) 3511 


01-789 3 


£ 11,000 

19 3524 



TELOV7«OB21. 
laa 835433 IfiCttS G 


MOB'S, MGCs, VT» 
WhMhir buyeia or sotoio. 
Rostomon or Spares. 
Consult tne Soeoatots. 
MGOC appwed womshop 
mo Dans suppker 

® FUUnuStAHTV \J& 

tarn StttMWSM 

1fl7Z3) 3S1227 


OPEL MONZA CSC. B sp man. 
Not 8«. imhbk prawn. Man- 
aging Dtrectore Pmanmi Car. 
Ml 26.000 mies. standard ca- 
ns. rear vest brtto. Immaculate 
CMMUn. JC7.996 Contact Mr 
Lrorm.* Tri. >09081 76442 lor 
rm noure 


1082 LOTUS 
ESPRIT 3 

6*00 KM**. BBS Wherta.au- 
camuooning. Mack toother 
trim /Hushed in bright rm. 
R e g a nucMi no 34 LOT. 

£12,500 ono 

•'Conua 

Stewart Morton 
0207-503561 (i) 


•4 A ASTON MAHTM VOLANTE 

«s»fb. as new condition, fac- 
tory nuunuinril a Newport 
PagnrtL FSH. £49.500 or wiu 
part exchange wiui cash aduw- 
■nem for Rolls Buyer or Berutoy 
Com enl Me. or Mcrceoee soo 
SEC. Tri Home 0908 602943. 
Other 08447 8874. T 


CAR ACCESSORIES & 
SERVICES 


ABTA ATOL J82 

London- 01-201 5000 

Manchester tttl-83« 7011 

Gtugow; 041-204 2S52 


★ALL FLIGHTS BONDED* 

* ★FUGHTS. FLIGHTS** 

★ ★SAVE EEC's** 

★ ★1ST CLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS** 

★ ★TOURIST CLASS** 

* SEHT * * “JfflFw * 

* PERTH * 4- M56NC « 

* WWfll * + WfUWE * 

* XWS * * S ABC* * 

* MOOMO « ♦ WEUNGTQH a 

* hj _ * * ? UORfSPi a 

* BUG W* * * IKUYtt * 

* U&POK * a- iMI ra » 

* Ciew * * gpmn « 

* «* East « * wmh« 

* l »MJlFS * to MAW to 


TUNHU For that perfect holiday 
wuh sunny dam A rare! rap ms 
Weal Spring. Swiuner.TIJiiMMn 
Travel. 01-573 4411. 


Earfr Mar Specials 


PALMA 

B&ZA 

GEJHONA 

AUCAN1E 

TAHWE8S 


17/S Ir nw 
IIV5 h C71 
16/5 b C7l 
Tfe If E90 
10ft * E71 


HEflAKUON 13/S ir £112 


Brig HR 81-723 8964 

IATA. ABTA. ATOL I960 ACCESS WSA 



PANTHER KAJLUSTIR 2* W 

fAi. 9.500 man. 1 ownt. m- 
ver body, dark Mue wap. 
» Reel buntnv radtorCaW. 
■SBAOO one. Tel: 0900 B23254. 


ASTON MARTIN VOLANTE 
18 80 Storm red 'magnolia. 
! 7.000 tftifca Iron new. factory 
IttMnrv. ataununkt Berlin, tnv- 
maniiate. £36*00. WkMCQbd 
8103(77. Office 01 681 0141 
Home Ol 362 6967 


CAR HI-FI | 


For real car hi-fi 
talk to us. We help! 

AKAMOfl - ALPINE - 
TRIO - JBL- 
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH • 

i/cf . R a in . 

HARMAN HARD ON. 
hot noHEra on Bumrwn 
TEL: 

(0782) 332178 


to CMCKAN w toS HWfiSCO 1 
• to SOUTH M&C* *-a 
to USA to U5A to USA tollSA to 
5UHWIMD TBAMEL STD IMS) 
SB SNA SL 


•th- #1! (.'M. li. 


“BOOK SECURITY" 


IT S ALT AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


Wntdride hnv enst umc 
Tfabrt - nd toe CM prew 0 
HSJNIO ctaals ska 197B 
MOWD THE WOflUJ HtOU C79S 



COACH TOURS IN ITALY. Thr 

Secret South. A Tame of TutM'a 
ny or SptMMUjun Ol the VeneM 
A vriecl vno of value lor money 
rum lour* Also * lUas A imnt 
wilh swimming nooh and city 
weevendv. Free brochure Iram 
Magurol Italy. Dew T 47snep 
MO Built Green. WI2 BPS 
Tri. Ol 749 7449 .24 hrs 
xervieei 

TAKE TDK OFF ID Pam. Am- 
» praam. Bnurb. Bnigp*. 
OnevA Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Duaan. Rouen. Boia 
kxjne & Drepoe. Time Of t 2a. 
Chester Close. London. 5W1X 
7bq 01-235 aarro. 

CYPRUS May June 1 or 2 wics 
Hotel*, AHA- Scnedutod flMtUf. 
Pan Worm Hobdays Ol TM 
2562 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


du'toOW dehotirrm old mi- 
lage. Hrworrr uUarae. avail 4tn 
lo 30 Aug- sips 4. £.1 75 pw Bi- 
cycling. nding. swimntinn- 
canoeing. leruus. Gasfronomlr 
oartriwe let OL 274 9581 
eves W ends. 

BITES <6 VILLAS M BRITTANY. 

June Bargains, still some nigh 
avaUamiiiy- Just France. i0573i 
826283 


t 

iratB' 
raft Ini 
ini ran 
km..." 
n tm 


SELF-CATERING 

C to# 

GREECE 

3DWQC 


Davtime Tifkfphon^- 


earMe to Times NewsnapWS Ltd- Should TOU.wish to , 


RBNKYMEAD MOTOR CO Of- 
FERIBSBtAlAvun Martin DBS 
V8 Btack/rad hide. 5 meed. 
A/& 25X00 ms. l owner. 
FSH £54.960. Moo-$af 9-7. 
Gun 10-4. <04861 29444 or 
6356. Wotrtng. Nr Omldfond 
L A M B O R Cl RIM MLM |98* (CL 
- hi racing Rea with CrratntKHh- 
er imennr. p Mr wing toot tor 
fitted Very lew imtoage. Coct- 
IK1 Bob Shew. Dkuhd of 
PfTUi, (0738) 98911. 

JEH5EH nmatCEPTOR MK w 
76 Chrome VriMw/BUCk HHM 
A Vinyl Mayiuhctein sp eamen. 
Hfnorv. £5.480 Pf X Trii 0757- 
244601 iSutrey) (u 
RENAU LT 6 ttfltSO X i486 IO. 
Mid ewpn* Rally car. Ffcntaooc 
BPffornuare Low nnteaM. 

. £9,996- Con tact Bob Shaw. 

. Ockeru of Perth 0738 282)1. 
XRS CARMHUT 86 <8> 11004 
Miles. RAWS. Stereo. Careful 
Owner. Pngriive OondMiwi 
£7.750 Tri 0636-790585 01 
LOTUS CARS. For the Bert ns- 
ftonwtde cash buyere. Phone 
Lotos- Norton. 0603 J07766 07. 



CAR RADIOS & CELLULAR CAR PHONES 



SVDNfY 

PtRTH 

AUCKLAND 

fWffiHIJb 

SHGAPORE 

BOSTON 

WWG KONG 

OELigiBOUBAV 

C0L0W0 

TEL AriV 

NAJROBI 

JOfflJBG 

LUM 

LOS ANGELES 
NEW TOW 
IS NEVA 


o/* itn 
E374 rsti 
£380 ESST 
SAOT £748 
£198 £363 
B31 £«8? 
ten; *259 

P46 £«96 

£250- UTA 
04? ?*3i 
£T19 £169 

£74? S391 
£286 £457 

P ^ 

EI49 £2G9 
£7S EM 


EmAfiA fUHsDi-9]/ MO 
tgfLHto » 80 
l9flAAea(Sii0i K8 «*l 
G a to xm w Lcmeo.rBoHM 
•Fk UTA ATOL mu 


BARGAIN AIR FARES 

O/w Rm 

SYDNEY £389 £645 

JO BURS. — _ £2*6 f«J0 

TEL Aviv I1T9 

NEW YORK ... £139 £275 

LOS ANGELES. £19? £385 

EMHC-OK. fTTfi £360 

TORONTO.. £162 

£210 

MANY OTHER BARGAINS 
DECKERS TRAVEL 
01-370 6237 


LOWEST FAAES 

Pans £69 N vox tl9B 

Frank tart £65 LAfSF £33S 
Lagos 020 Moth Eifia 

Na**» £325 Snoaooia C470 

JObutQ £4« Bara** £335 
Cam £205 Katmandu £440 
Dw/Soni £335 Ranqwn £350 
Honojung £510 Ctoom U25 
7f«*f Hrt8 *r Weptoxe 

sun & $wn 

21 SuafkM St laafloa W! 

„ IHW 2W437 B537 

HUM G/CARPS ACCEPTH) 


KM UJW FJWK WGLR0WW6 

AftfSian £400 Dub* I3TT 

Fieenmn (400 tsumnul fist 

Lagos pi jaoojD read 

Uatohia WOO Karachi f?70 

Nnman C?j« KN an f«4J 

taiOMlt Kumc ax 

Ban-Del D3S NYtrt cffl 

Uni £240 Send £750 

CnfcmAo E43D Srt.HM £655 

Darrjscut E270 Tokyo a/n 

SKYIBSO TRUa LTD 
2 OBfHM STRST. UHOM Ml 
Tat 8 W3S 3521/007 

NBUNEMnb 


The Paxos 
Beach . . . 

An idyllic, family owned hotel 
on a small, unspoiled Ore** 
Island in a magical selling of 
olwe groves sloping down io 
turquoise sea. n mu have not 
bad lime to etpiote tne woiid - 
for The perfect place irv Pdxos , 
- b > a umgue experience. 
Making I9B6 the year you oof 
thr holiday right, and ask lor 
our brochure, mcludmg villas, 
also on Corfu and Crete 
ABTA VIOL CV Travel (T) 
v- -f Paxos Departmai 
43 Cadogan Street 
ffv-'ij Ldndon SW3 2 PR 
I 01-581 0651 
Tf^ <589 01 32 - 24 hi 
-.-i- 1 - .-.v,'--! bibchuie service) 


CORFU SFCCIAL OFFCRS Sun- 
day 18 May 1 wk C>69 6 25 

May 2 wks £189. Beautiful villa 
m Carwich Pan World Holi- 
days Ol 754 2562 
CRFYITr Lnwaili blanas. cheap 
fnghikiHia rentals etc. 2ew Hoi 
Mays Ol 454 1647 AkU Ado 
RHODCSLuvurV am hotel Iram 
L 1 29 P p me. Tri: Sarama 0706 
862814. 

5KMTHOS. Lux. beach vina. 6 S 
pers. 2w k.s tram CSBOnifT 1114 
free “ . surfing >09321 246342. 


SELF-CATERING ITALV 


ISCHIA CAPHLAll grades nf ho- 
iris 4 cnararter pensiom. 
Holiday Majids 01 836-4583 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


SFRM6 BANK HOL-Prhale VII- 
Les in Aioan e with staff A own 
PCOfa. Hmrw fils 22 May 2 wks 
Palm* A Parker Ol 493-5725. 


!» CM tv 

E at — — -^.£16000 


*SR 330. £12935 CC 3460 £15995 

kSR 7ft DM00 CCM... fMMS 


raw — _.D740S 

W 7» £27106 


FT 960.. E 0US 
FT Ml — £ BL85 


fK WI-. £14495 
RX 795.. C1MJS 


*£ El 6995 

WB noSJB 


FOR SALE 



son mil) r.xn oiiY 


UNTIL MAY 15th 1986 


mm 


i ' ja gg | 



m Million 

worth of stock 
to clear now. 


y upw40«i v 
/ asftnmi cm \ 
setosro Sda Baft 


FIRST COME-FIRST SERVED 






SPEO.AL INTEREST 


HEALTH WEEKCWf aboard cius. 
stc tlrtorun Vaehl. Hurh 
Coast, in 0836 221656 


ACTIVITY HOLIDAYS 


LEARN TO IKfVC Hohdm in 
Nunn into. OsO Late cJiKei- 
Iriiunv C20O 02^8 980867 


sey l >2 
■ray 0. 
thitley 















































































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36 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


STRATFORD 


Going: good to firm 


6.0 TYSOE NOVICE HURDLE (4-Y-O: £798: 2m) {17 
runners) 


7.30 COLLIERS, BIGWOOD & BEWLAY NOVICE 
CHASE (22,856: 3m 2f) (12) 

3 vra CAIRO HHodare 9-11-4- — D 

S3R1P GAlESB« Qfl^NGtoBtoa7-11-4 0 

8 I 2 n Junes mewntaad 6 - 11 -a 

11 P124 KKIG JO Mrs H RnaB 6-1 

12 2100 RASTER OF RMU McCain 8116 K 

IS 0011 VALLEY JUSTICE CTneflhe 61 16 AStepe 


1 1400 BEL COURSE 101 Ws M Rtnwfl 11-10, 
5 4002 MNATTASH (DIM P*e 11-5.- 


PgaAwwi 


CTrte9n8l1-3 A Step* 

. Mrs JWmai 11-3 MPftmre 

j jantans li-3. jr 


SJOTMR 
Cl 


HrNBmokn 
- Jl 


11 3100 QRAIUAH 

12 3321 STURM 

13 3130 TESTIMONIAL.-. 

17 0000 BA01NGHAMBbr(B)WG Mm 10-10 

‘ 21 000 CLERMONT LAME M Tan 10-10 

28 00 KA8EEH N ffrookre 10-10 

30 RUSTY RAILS M W Owns 10-10— 

31 0400 SMFMATEDAnefl 10-10 

- 32 OP TRUST THE GYPSYRHodges 10-10 

33 0 WRBON BOUND A Snooouma 10-10 MBnbsm 

"34 P BUNGEBEUECFLm 165 — 

35 FP CANDY BOU H Data 10-5 : Hamate 

37 P GEM MART (USA) C Hotrm 106 CAUnn 

.38 0020 NAIUOWH3 P PmcftJrt 10-5 DCMm(7) 

41 F0 ROYS DILEMMA K Brtdgwaw 10-5 


16 <2F0 WOODLAND GENERATOR P ffrttcttard 

7-11-0 D 

1 6-10-10- Mr B DnaOafl 


18 POOP BOBAFETT A 6-10-10. 

19 -W COmMONTY (USA) CA Bel 610-10. 

2SFPBP TKSEB TED PBstey 61610 

2ERPRP TO ALL BOY W Oa» 7-10-10 

31 00U BLA2EM88I R Shephart 9-lM 


8 


SJI 


MCI 


8 


5-2 vtfey Jua»ca. 3-1 Aidrean. 4-1 GaMwg. 9-2 King 
Ja B-1 Canto. 12-1 Woodland Generator. 16-1 oftera. 


8J) JIM SLATER CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE 0E844: 2m 8f) (19) 

1 3030 CUEARLYBUSTCHaPnos 6-11-10 D Hood 


- 7-4 Steam House. 11-4 Mnettesft. 4-1 Bel Course, 7-1 

TosamnaL 10-1 Oranon. 12-1 Haaowad. 16-1 others. 


4 0124 BLACKWELL BOY (USA) A JBOSS 6-1 1-2.. 

5 ««1 MBS NglOG Jackson 5-1 


h-10-10. 


10 0000 TAROOGAirs BEST R Peacock B-1 


Stratford selections 

By Mandarin 


11 201F SUNNY SLAVE H H ondonc w 5-10-8 — 

12 4JF0 S&BK£ PLEASE M P Cundol 7-10-8. 

13 0000 HKUOAIM CARDINAL J Dawes 7-10-7. 

14 4QP0 SMJNG BY J Janus 8-107 

15 30FR TOO OFTEN (8) KBndgwter 7-166- 
IB 0«13 SHJlQAYLE C J BaO 4.1 


6.0 Bel Course. 630 Pommardy. 7.0 Indamelody. 
7.30 Ardesee. 8.0 Miss Nero. 830 Mi Dad. 


20 4000 BEMYWHGSMBaOor 
22 0031 DEW R Hotter 5-1 


24 0000 SPBBEMVAMHt 
MENEFQHT CASTLE ( 


630 WINDERTON NOVICE HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1,024: 2m) (3) 

7 3020 OLIVER ANTHONY N Gesetofl 6-1 1-7 — PScsdanoce 

B 4F30 POMMAIHJY F Winter 7-7 1-6 B da Han 

- 8 1POO KAYBER (B) D GshJoOd 7-11-3 R EamaNaw 

12 0FU0 HEALTHY Mrs V McKe 10-10-5 «WM 

13 0203 ORYX MAJOR OBocM 610-Z D JBvcbal (7) 


27 0002 CATANZARO 

29 00 SQUMAIK J I 

30 3040 GAM THE DAY | 
33 400 LEVANTME1 



97 24F- VULCAN'S HONOR A J 

11-4 Sunny Slave. 7-2 Daw. 9-2 Mtes Nero. 11-2 
Catsnzaro. 6-I Shagayte. 10-1 BiaetamU Boy. 12-1 CJearty 
Bast. 14-1 often. 


15 U040 GOLDEN NSXNA P Badey 6-10-2. 


17 3400 FUSHT SHEET (USA) P J Jones 10-10-2 C 

18 04P3 CRISP AND KEEN K WTMB 8-10-2 


18 40PO JULIA THYME TM Jones 9-10-2 GCSertes Joees 


2-1 Pommardy. 3-1. Oliver Anotfry. 4-1 Oryx Mnor. 6-1 
Crop And Keen, 81 Now Kayter. 12-1 Golden Marina. 14-1 


830 WKCHFORD HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,242: 
2m) (20) 

2 0000 NOBLE MOUNT M Pipe 5-11-12 P 


TUI PRAGWELL TROPHY (£1.932: 2m 6f) (14) 

1 0323 THE COUNTY STONE (BF) J Thome S-11-12- HOatdee 
2F38U SUTTON PRMCEFWMar 8-11-6 


3 0234 CMPPED METAL OTRFtanos 7-11-11 ^CCoaday J7J 
5 22P2 IBDAO |DXBF) MreJ P*nan 8-11-8 
9 U004 MAUSTRANO (D) T Cagey 5-11-2 — 

ID 0423 DEVIL TO PLAY (D) J Smtti 10-11-1 — PCorrtwefT) 

12 1103 SU>ER REGAL ra Mrs M Renal 4-10-13 H 

13 -000 AMECE Mrs G ivies 6-10-12 J 

20 POOO PITLOCHR Y (D) A AytoB 8-18-4 G 

22 ION BOLD RODOTCK W GrsrwSe Retards 


4 2J1F INDAMBLOOYN Henderson 8-1 1-2 — SSteftEectea 

6UFP0 ROUSPETER D Wcftotson 9-11-1 P Scudamore 

7 UUP WALNUT WOrffiER R ftcfcman 11-11-1 J Bryan 

10 3PPI Bfl(ASONja»»ing 11-10-11 — 

13 POP LQUJPQPMAH p) J OM 10-104— MCUea tep(7| 



THE GO-BOY Mrs W Sykes 12-10-3. 


15 3210 MERCY LESS M Brian 7-10-3. 


Q Moor* 


1(D) Mrs G Jones 

8106RI 

27 0004 SANT DUBAS0FF(0)J Sparing 7-1<ML 

,28 MO STRING fC-ClR Juefces MOO G> 

29FtyO- TOURNAMENT LEADER OMarfcs 6-100. 


17 0003 SPANISH GOD C Pnpnara 11-1M~__.- 
IS POPO MANSTON MARAU0B1 P Hedger 10-100 — S Moore 

19 -FPU ROYAL POTION (8)0 Peatman 11- UHJ M Perform 

21 -0P0 CLONEEN KING P Ransom 11-100 PDeaar 

24 43-P TRUSTY GATQCR (USA) M Tate 8-10-0 CSrattfc 


X ORF (USING SOVERBGN P) P Butler 8-100. 
31 4000 CANAffMEWhaaer 5-10-0. 


32 BOM CMARRON PI J Norton 8-HM 

35 14(0 ROYAL TYCOON (0) A BnsOaume 8-1 MM 


9-4 mdanetady. 3-1 Ena naso n. 9-2 Sutton Prince. 11-2 The 
County Stone, 8-1 Mercy Less. lO-l Spaman God. 12-1 others. 


36 0004 MAKDRULNO P) K Wngrow 7-10-0 
3-1 Mi DatL 9-2 Super Regal 11-2 Dev« To Ray. 6-1 
Meal B-1 The End. tO-i Awstrano & Noble Mount 12-1 
DutMsaff. 16-1 others. 


HUNTINGDON 


5 4013 THE NUB W 

6 226- NAOB? SChrstan 


11-3. 


7-11-6. 


7 3000 MONZA P D CundeB 6-114). 


_ MrOOuggen 
. AMrMiBHenifg) 
MrS Cawley ft 


Going; good to firm 

63 GODMAN CHESTER NOVICE HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£735: 2m 220yd) (22 runners) 

1 POP GLASSERTON GRL G Apiey 

5-12-7HN* P n ae M ley ee 

4 2104 LITHE SLOOP 0 WeMson 4-11-7 R (hsrwoody 

1-7 SMcNeM 


8 3204 YULRORTS CLOWN 0 Brennan 5-10-12 
10 P4M MASTBt VUICE M Tompkns 8-10-9 

12 0202 BATON MATCH M C Chapman SHkMQ 

13 0(30 SO BRAVE C T WOrtt 8-10-7 MseSBMMarft 

14 -MO DOUBLE DtSCOUNTH Fteninn 8-104 M 

15 OMf D0LLYMX1URE BOY A tide 8-104 

17 0430 TM BOY D S Roger 7-104 S 

Waunr 


M Pepper 
. MWtaco 


18 0004 KEYCORNJWnjndaU 8-100- 


5 0120 CRUOBI BAY PS FMgaW 6-11-7 
a 0341 BOW WITH THE VEiJM Jefferson 7-1 1-4 — . PTUck 


9 2P20 CRISP CP Read 5-1 1-3. 


. Gl 

CCo*(4) 


11 1230 ALDMOTON MU CCTriedine 8-1M. 

12 XP RHYMBTSTOWSIG A Hubbard 7-11-1_ R May IT) 
15 P-20 HR CARACTACUSGGG-acey 5-10-12 ... ERtopOy (4) 

18 3<3P ASncOTJRJankm 4-10-10 N. ' 

20 4210 JACK BtLLMBR P 0 Cundal 6-10-8 Al 


21 2000 DRAW THE UNEBRchmond 7-1 
24 24M UBBITY WAUGGGrwy 7-1M- 

26 -PM JOSHMGIQRC Spicer 5-i (HI 

27 P-OF 

28 Q-M 


ROumoady 


USD1II WMUL U U WHV l-IITW.,.— ■■ 

JOSHBiGtORC Spicer 5-1CM 

WYAXOOEGftpieyB-IM KnP 

HAIB0E-8KSG GAHubtard 6-1(M) 


POracey(7) 

.. s 


29 01-0 EASTER BRANDY R J Snaffi 8-10-0 . 


PTacfc 


21 3241 AMLANKA (C-O) J R Jettons 4-10-8_ 


S Sherwood 


24 -030 MILLS ALLEGUNCE (FRJ J W BkftM 6-1U6 D (Men 

25 P-00 PF6CE OF PEACE C J Befl 6-10-5 . 


27 -2PP lONBOSIfl P T Bowtjy 6-10-3. 

Anger 7-193— 
L Glow 5-183. 


28 F/PQ (OKA MADS 

29 OM CAUPH(gJA 


30 MM TOWBIBIG G Thomor 7-10-3. 


31 POM FOREVER SDK8NG D IttSntamn 

5-10-2W 

33 00-0 ASCENBARSRBownng 8-10-1 


PI 

Ktagloa 


30 0400 HAYWRECB) MW Keegan 12-HM1 J 

7-2 Rochy’s Gal 4-1 Cewarra Lad. 9-2 Tin Boy. 11-2 
Ascamnoor. Monza. 13-2 Steeple Befl, 8-1 VUmry's down. 

ZJO MARCH HANDICAP CHASE (£1.932: 3m 
100 yc 9 (l 0 ) 

1 4FP4 MASTBt TERCEL D T Thom 10-12-2 — 

3 0121 PRMCS CARLTON Mrs J Boom 

11-t 1-OMee C Saeaden (7) 


P) 


38 0400 EVE FLASHBUBRCmr 4-104. 


40 POPP WESTBM KELLY (B) R Perfrar 9-104 


41 -PM RBIBKERAID MW Keegan 11-100 J 1 

52 Gone With (he Vet 3-1 LMta Stoop. 5-1 Airtanke. 6-1 
Cruder) Bay. 7-1 Crisp. 8-1 Jack Btffenw. 10-1 AsMot 14-1 
others 


6 240F SHIFT ROY ALE 0 Sherwood 8-11-0 S 

8 FFX SMARK (BF) R Chempm 

7-10-1 1 »T Tfcoraon Joooo 

9 3P23 SONNY MAY G A Hubbard 10-1010 PTeefc 


12 4302 BRONWYN Mrs S Davenport 9-103 

13 1244 HUBUJ TQHard 6-101 

15 20M POLAR EXPRESS (QWKtog 11-100 
18 0340 JQAT R W Honop lOlOO 

9-4 Swtit Royate. 7-2 Pnnce Carlton. 9-2 Meyamcor. 5-1 


R 

EMrephy 

! c 


Huntingdon selections 

By Mandarin 

6.0 Cnidcn Bay. 630 Pukka Major. 7.0 Weight 
Problem. 730 Rocky's GaL 8.0 Sonny May. 830 
Centaur Song. 


Master Tercel 8-1 Bronwyn. 10-1 HuM. 14-1 others 

830 ROYSTON NOVICE WRDLE (£630: 2m 41) 

(17) 

421M1 CENTAUR SONG J J Brldgar 6-11-5 RStrange 

7 PM AUNNBTtM MANOR P RTtadger 6-1012. MHenMee 

S F3P0 ANOT1CR NORFOLK B A Mmnbon 5-10-12 TWM 

9 ARCTIC BARD D L WMeme 5-l0-l2._ D 


630 RAMSEY NOVICE CHASE (£1,600: 2m 100yd) 
(14) 

1 2041 HUMYAK HOUSE I VMMhews 8-11-12 THeaney 

3 4212 PUKKA MAJOR (USA) 0 Sherwood 

5-1 1-1 OM-T Thomson Jonea 



4 POP DANCE THE BUIE8(U8AIJ WMbar 6-1 1-7_ RRmnB 

5 -000 GET COMO FRB1 Mrs NMacauley 7-11-7. 


§ ™ GOLDEN DESTINY K A Mogai 7-11-7 KRyee |7j 


11 0M0 BARS8R2X3E LAD R C Speer 6-10-12 8 

12 MM BR* OF A DANDY J T ©ftort'5-1812 EM 

17 J B U TT S WISH GGGacey 5-10-12. wC 

20 NBSOFTS FOLLY N A Ren ee 5-10-12 — V 

23 SPP RAPBAFFARO) SR Bowdng B-10-12. SShew 

24 0PUO ROY THE READY R Chawpion 0-10-12 SMcNeM 

27 BRSZE AWAY BEN P D umbel 4-107 — AGoneee 

28 Ca.TlC(»maJOEPDCl«dBt6-l07MSOow4oy(7) 

29 PO FFTHATTB4PT PS Falgate 4-107 S Jo hn so n 

31 PPM LE MARSH J J Seaton 9-107 JMCLen^Ae 

32 0 LLOYDS DARK LADY DMGritSOfl 7-107 CWmn (7) 


7F00P GMPPWG LAD MraJ Bloom 7-11-7__ M-N Bloom . _ 

8 -flPO HOPWAS B A McMahon 7-11-7 PBeny 

9 0303 (NOUN (B)J A Gtow 6-11-7 DMcXoowm(7) 

10 OPOF MSS TAlil R W Hartop 7-11-7 CGrM 

12 WM WORUNGWOHTH G A Hjttord 7-11-7 — R Fahey 

14 0004 BABIES RIGHT CTWHeB 6-11-2. “ 

15 MM DOVBKDBESN Cole 5-1 1-0. 

16 3«03 SAMmA(B)DT Thom 5-1 1-0. 


-OOP RED BARONESS P J Sevan 6-107- 


35 POPO TWaJGNT A* Mra A Hctmon 4-HM — MaANokma 


SMcHew 


4-5_Corttur_Song. %2 Anolhm Norfpfc. IH AMnjMn 


Manor. Ba of A Dandy. 10-1 Ltayde Dark Lady, 12-1 Roy 
Ready, 20-1 Others 


RACING 



The grey Branco (right), 
pulled off a 33-1 shock when 
beating the hot favourite, 
Shardari, by one and a half 
lengths in yesterday's feature 
race at Chester^be Ormonde 
Stakes. 

Walter Swinbnrn took ap 
the ronnina on the 6-5 
favourite buf a mile from 
borne, where Gold And Ivory, 
who had gone dear from the 
start, began to tire. 

He brought Shardari up the 
centre of the coarse, looking 


for the better ground, but 
Bnmko, who had been making 
steady beadway in the last five 
furlongs, oMared the fa vor i te 
150 yards out — 

Shardari, although finish- 
ing tired, was stiD seven 
lengths ahead of the third, 
Lemhll 1. Swinbnrn said, 
“Shardari felt great and bell 
be back - but the ground was 
almost mmceabfe.” 

Bnmfco, bringing off a 339- 
1 double for absent owner 
Terry Ramsden, who had ear- 


lier scored with Pagan Seat, 
gave the Landmnm trafocr 
Rod Simpson his first success 
in a Group race. 1 have been 
framing seven years and 
can't teByra how XfeeL” ■ 
Simpson added Simon 
Whitworth told me after he 
had ridden him In the City and 
Suburban that be thought the 
grey needed a longer trip, and 
I was jnst expecting hha tonm 
well on tbe greond. He was' fit 
from hnrd^to, and I ntehhna 
Champiea inodle horsed. 


Primary can make amends 


By Mandarin 


Guy Harwood looks to have a 
vintage crop of three-year-olds 
this season and the Pulborocgh 
trainer must have high expecta- 
tions of a treble from this age 
group at Lingfieid Park today 
when he runs Primary (2.15). 
Sunny Liz (4.15) and Viuora 
(5.15). 

Primary, a colt with plenty of 
potential, is napped to nuke 
amends for his Sandown lapse 
by outstaying one of Hemy 
Cecil's classic candidates Vero- 
Aniique in the Hawthorn 
E-B.F3 takes, ran over the foil 
Derby trip. 

Heavily su pp o rted in the pre- 
race betting and looking a 
picture in the paddock. Primary 
was virtually polled up after 
foiling to negotiate the final 
bend in the Guardian Classic 
Trial at Sandown, leaving the 
iresent Derby favonrite, 
hahrastani, to gain a rather, 
hollow victory over another of 
Gcril's hopefuls. Bonhomie. 


GreviUe Starkey, Primary’s 
jockey, who bad jarred his elbow 
leaving the stalls in the 
Sandown trial reported that 
Primary had cocked his jaw and 
he had been unable to steer him 
properly into the straight As it 
was Primary completed the 
course to finish a distant fourth, 
and hopefully today the Ca- 
nadian-bred son of Green 
Dancer will be on his best 
behaviour and show his true 
ability. 

Verd-Antique makes a speedy 
reappearance after 

hisimpresstve debut last Thurs- 
day when he showed a nice turn 
of foot to outpace Paul Cole's 
Danski in the Coral Newmarket 
Stakes. 

Cole reopposes this time with 
Nisnas, who was well beaten by 
Cecil's Masbkour in Ascot's 
White Rose Stakes. So in what 
looksa virtual match Primary is 
taken to re-establish his consid- 
erable home reputation at the 


expense of VerdnAstique. 
Robert Sangster’s Sunn; 


Songster's Sunny Liz, 
second to Queen 
Helen in tbe Hyperion St 
Ascot last October, should open 
her account in the first division 
of the Ginevra Stakes. The other 
division may go to her 
stable companion Vianora. who 
scored at Kempton on 2 J 100 
Guineas Day. 

Ron Sbeatber’s Menton Mel- 
ody got up m tbe last stride to 
short bead Luna Bid in a 
competitve Newmarket sprint 
last week and, despite having to 
carry a good deal more pound- 
age this time; can complete a 
flying double: 

Biu O’Gorman's Bcstpbn 
shaped nicely behind Zaibaq ax 
the Guineas Anjilj 

be prominem in today’s Roberts 
Maiden Stakes, but preference is 
for Peter Wafwyn's wefl-bred 
newcomer. Muhldr. who has 
been shaping well on the home 
gallops. . 


HAMILTON PARK 


ChMiawnK. 6-1 Taytora Tsytonnada, KM Miytw Jana. Mac 
TMCbar. 14-1 otfiws. 


Going; heavy 

Draw: 5f-6f, nwkfie to high numbers best 

2.15 ~ LEVY BOARD MADEN APPRENTIC E 
STAKES (3-y-o: £1386: 1m 40yd) (10 runners) 


2 -OM — — mniriinirdT rninBMiiMpif 

4 CRICXET HOUSE GAcMs 87 JCtokwS 

8 MO ORIENTAL EXPRESS F Carr 8-7 JCwr2 

IT OOO POKBtEE R Wctato 07 S Gregory (5)8 

12 430 SEATYRM S Norton 87 JHmffti 

15 0 BAVAHWI P RSI CB B M H Entarty 


145 BLENHEIM HANDICAP (£1,440: 6f) (14) . 

1 -ON MARY MAQWRE D ChaWBO 9-KM) DMcMM 12 

3 -122 ROSCDlCXMS(mRHcMMd4«-T RUn>0» 
5 -0B3 TKM1E HIGH (D) ( vickors 7-8-12 R Victim (7)7 

7 0U3Q KESPONOER R StoKH 4-8-11 SMMWt 

8 -M4 FB4TOffnWC-mO Cham 4+9 JlM« 

10 009 Z»PB4to»(D)TCnBgW. 

13 MO- IBFKHOWES Mt I BtfVo5- 


10 - 0 sal’s DAUBHTBt € Retards 84 J—^SwOT 

00- BREBUET E toeba 8-4 


18-009 BOLDB t BOY AW Jonas 4-7-10 

20 009- PET ERS KTO E R Wtafinw 5-7-9- 

21 OM MAM OOLPHW J Beny 67-9 

23 000 - LAURA’S CMKZT Crab 574. 

ojjSi 


, J<Wm(5)T1 

A Roods' 

.MRyM 


24 306 TRADESMAN 

25 660 R9MMER uPJ RorWjnds 4-7-9 . 


.xtuorsi 

■jtteMrZ 


17 to BHEQUET E Inch* 8-4 jrMMgAil 

T9 00 PARKES SPECML J PKtan 8-4 RVtcfcanfSM 

2D OM- SEVBI MLLSPQ^nm)ifitzGmki64_ RBnmlfl 
' M Saatwn, 3-1 Cool Oporatof, 6-1 OriantaJ Express. 
Sevan Hto, JO-TBSi Daugfttor. Oidcac Hama, Pokarea, 16-1 
ott ai iL 


IMMctMaOU 

WO M B UNH Ot W 

27 9ft- TTS HEAVB4 C Parlor 67-7. A R a im a PHI 

64 TYadaanian. 3-1 Trade Tfl(^. 4-1 ftoato Dctdns, 6-1 
Mam Dotpnin. 6-1 Pantatt. 10-1 n a i po m la r . T2-1 rehws. 


17 OOOP SUVADERA Mrs N Macaulay 5-10-9. 


64 Hunyak Housa. 11-4 Putda Major, 5-1 Sandyia. 13-2 
Miss TaU. 8-1 bx' 


' Indtan. 10-1 Gat Gong Fred, 12-1 mnera 

7 JO HUNTINGDON NOVICE HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1,024: 2m 4fl(10) 


4 F2D4 FtONNADOM (C-D) FT Winter 8-1 1-7 
.YEOMANJ' 


I TGMort 8-11-3 


6 004P STEEL 

7 OP02 

10 3P12 CAMP DUNPHY G A Hubbard 

11 -PIP CELTIC WAY m G Wsfanam 10-106. 
16 0043 FLBOiGTONWM Panto 7-106 


EMxptiy (4) 
9-1013 M Dwyar 
1010 PTodc 


.AtofliO) 


17 4312 MOLES CHAMBBt Mre V MdOe 12-106. S 
19 2044 CELTIC HAMET (C-t^ P D CundM 7-100— A 

24 -004 PREOPICE ROAD K A Moraan 7-106 K 

toa 7-10-6 


28 -POP RAJ. OF LOVE Mre A Laa 7-106- 


£ s va 


4-1 Game Way, 5-1 Motes Chamber. 11-2 WaWit Pnobtem. 
61 Fkxmadoir. 13-2 Steal Yeoman, 15-2 Camp Dunphy. 61 


Ftemington. 161 Cattle Hamlet 14-1 often 


730 CHATTERIS HANDICAP HURDLE (£1342: 2 m 
200 yd) ( 22 ) 


X Iff CAW^^ ay^BF) c James 7 - 11 -KL C Cox | 
2 -411 ROCtnrs GAL wHoUan 5-11-6 KToMwndi 


l OTgP tJOBLM Stou»l0il-8_ Mr J 


ASCENHOOR S R Bowtng 7-11-7 (78x] 


Today’s course specialists 


UNOHELD PARK 

TKADERSe H Cacp, 14 ateaien from 31 nimare. 45JM: P Cato. 
27 from 108. 25.7%; G Harwood. 34 from 135.262%. 
JOCKEYSKTOuam18rennersfrom84 rides. 202%; P« Eddery, 
19 from 101: 184%; W Carson. 30 from 165. 182%. 

HAMILTON PARK 

TRABBISi MrsG Ro*otey. 8 wfrman from 37 runnen. 21^%;N 
TlnWar, 7 from 35,208%: C Thornton. 12 from 63. 19.0%. 
JOCKEY86 M Hmcflay. 6 winners from 22 rides. 273%; G 
Didfiaid. 45 from 244. 184%; J Lowe. 39 from 264, 14*%. 

NEWTON ABBOT 

TRABCRS: D Bsworth, 17 wlnnara from 64 rumors. 26.7%; D 
GandoBo. 13 from 65. 200%; M Pipe. 36 from 205. 17.1%. 
JOCKEYS: R Dennis. 11 wtmen from 67 ridaa. 16^4% forty one 
qualifier). 

HUNTINGDON 

TRABCRSc F Winter. 12 winners from 64 runners. 188%: J 
Gittard 32 Iram 174, 184%; D Nchoison, 6 from 55, 148%. 
JOCKEYS: No quafrfiere. 

STRATFORD: 

TTU8CRS: Mrs G Jones, 6 wfrmers from 24 turners. 25.0%; F 
Winter. 10 from 51. 19.8%; N Hendsraon. 8 from 48. IB.7%. 
JOCKEY* K Mooney. 10 winners from 52 rides, 1912%; S Srrtth 
Ecdes 13 tram 79. l&Se P Scudamore 14 tnxn 109, 12E%. 


Hamilton selections 

By Mandarin 
2.15 Seatym.-2.45 Meath Princess. 3.15 Wow 
Wow Wow. 3-45 Trade High. 4.15 Caronsd 
RockeL 4.45 Prince Satire. 5.1 5 Jack's Luck. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Cool Operator. 3.15 Taylors Taylonnade. 

4.15 Brave And BokL 4.45 Prince Satire. 5.15 
Jack's Luck. 

By Michael Scdy 

3.15 Wow Wow Wow. 3.45 TRADE HIGH 
(nap). 5.15 Wildrush. • 


4.15 SCOTTISH RIFLES HANDICAP Bw £1^36: 
1m40yd)(13) 

-310 CAROUSE. ROCKET JSYYteoa 67 DaridBfrtery g) 6 


4 0110 MAROU PLATA 


9 660 VBUUBBRA 


10 0161 ELEGANT 

11 -202 BRAVE AND 

12 460 TAKE THE BtSCWr 
15 -OM KOBLAM JBairy 


(C-mocnapman 
| W Rreroa 6ll_ 


9-3 — . 


(Patna 611 MHMarf 

TFartant611 MBa> cw ft7 


16 -602 CEZY OLO t Pi A Robsoo 8-6 M 
18 066 MOTOR MASTER W Psw a» ¥5] 

I 19 066 N0RC00LRffrchafe8&Ha 
21 -4M VAJfPetWIP (S)Mw aZ6re«n 
WAY R 



22 044 WATERFORD WAY R HoUoahead 62 WR*W»4 

24 6 M C0CJ0M3. HALL Mrs J Ransdao 66 MftytT 

7-4 Marina Plata. 5-2 Breve And Bold. 4-1 Bean 
tay Sunnar. 6-1 Carousel RockeL 10-1 Tate) The 
WMBtfonl Wfry, 14-1 oftara. 


LINGFiELD PARK 


J Q£BAIirflUErf|P»WeAS»w»*»Oeorwt61* 

I 4 M A WCAA I A W ama*} C -^ -77 

10 0Z046Z MRAOEIrt H C CTp ^HC«ya«lB tov»6» 

S-* Van»A«mqufc 64 Pr»«K».»a 
25-1 Maricwna- 


Z45 


SLEEPING PABTNER SELUNG H«*RCAPflW 


1MB06 MA JOR* RE WBB WOteCft Aff' 
mSoS 6PABKPOHO LHC (A BRi s— gj PgN 


1 (K Sown R HM 


T 

2Mj 

5 ^S j SS Smhm m^^coanfeii L~^^d 844 L 

a 03-00*0 PA«w»SfWJojH 

12 aoooto 

13 0000-0 KHAHSarRBl (J Kangri W d 

5 800630 MAWBOMAIt^* CquMf M 

75 400-1M AMOIHBI B0«q 

ia M-m PoeOLOeoiMrsCl frw iflA 0 a w 0P*66-~-| 


17 




» 300660 LEAN STREAK! 
18 300260 CHAWSMAMM 


21 m FMIDAt£(M>«rtHmYlLCainB 8 «-L^=. 


BMF*RDAL£flU>toCfc*toi 

22 604460 SMBOALVOSBH»POWP 


. Red. Pooo Loca 1IM Fon Ouoww. 


Stumy 


Mubkir. 4.15 
Reignbeau. 

By Our Newmagiei Co rreig wd a ft- 
2.15 Verd-Antique. 2.45 Alnssbme. 3.15. Menfoa 
Lama Breeze. 4.15 Mostango. 4.45 EasyD*y. 5.15 M&»Wi 
5.45 Love At Last. 


13 00*040- WCfiKfY MAJOR 

14 023316 

16 00610 IMJMAHBA1 
18 -004- LAOAVMAri 

21 



6 CMabonai*Riteao *66 

I HllllHIIT 




ByMawhni 


2.15 PRIMARY (nap). Z45 Fairacen. 3J5 Merdoa Mefody. 3 M 
Liz. 4.45 Torrey. 


3.15 CHARLES KEIDSIECX CKAflPAGNE HANDICAP (3^01771: 

6oa4) 

2 10824F- DREAM CHA9ER M {T JobreavlP Cote 67^. ^.LMmm(7)4 

3 10- SPAHKY LAD (0 Kmfi A Jwb 9-7 L-i tUbI 

4 032130- MIDISHASm HanmdlGrfrlBwM 

s 01034-1 MBaxwiffixcrfflrtjaaMiRSbeaBw»8.^-.^.. oadnw » 

7 Dto« LOFT BOY P»|U*B A»^e M Wgore 61 SDWMiSU , 

9 201- KHARRAwTSanaS^UaKawSyW SWtWMdfrf 

16 2044-0 PORINREORFasSCMOMBoaovB-fB ,. tCMH»«8 

It 020-000 MEADOW MOOR SWDlfCnoftncO M« CHareae I 


, .. 1 ABMilnf LRgg°R66 
■ BroandR temH : 



- 7-2 MardonMalody, 44 Barite WOB— r. 62i loR Boy. 6-HQlMOa.MMuMML 
tfl-1 fforihnaor. Oamjra Gfrt 18-1 SiiwOMHwl 141 cb bl 


345 ROBERTS MAIDEN STAKES S2JRQ: B) (17) 


1 

2 

3 

4 

. 5 

7 

- 8 

9 

12 

17 

19 

20 
21 
22 
23. 
25 
28 

3-1! 


0 BBTHANfUraP 



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— — — Lf gSw 

■ m^oajGHT 0 MSMU 8 kIBbi 

fUfiSEARBt flrevcrttIM McCmW 
GREY ROOpOKoMW Item »6Hto| 
ITS VARADAN adartw 98| 

2 JAHULESSMts MAndirWrtP«B 
_ LASTDATCEUNoaBamiraiaM 
^M^MAIMteioarilPlMdwyiiWl 


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Ml till iniiijLiii sMGowatiifaC itetea yao 

YtXMGlC3RET0NPdA(ain»LrW»6 MM 

0 EBONY PjjgejRCoowbri Pit WtteWW 
3 LOAM MgEn ffioANtea LKj P K— wa y 611—1 
giHOHE FLCRALI SMka4«DM«6t1-lJ 


Part 

PtefddlqrTT 


I SaooBten. 7-2 BeabMn. 61 Bom dree 7-1 Mt Bteas. B-lteatfria-. iM 

Bxmy Pnda,Loma Braere.16-1 MpttVUM c 



. 2 *-- 

. - 


■ 

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ir* v* 


4.15 GINEVRA STAKES fpNk&f-o:£2&8i 71} (tfi) 


W 51 *'. 


.7 

11 

14 

22 

27 

29 

34 

37 

38 


64 JOHN TUIXY (Mas 


6 BMttfr) 1 «. 




MMteMenf* 
HACte fc4 


J0BabM»96-^ ^~.60rtMqr' 

tCmlS-11 ■RCwfrrenalS 

, lm A — Tvruin n 

Gdawaod64T ^GOtedceyl 

P Cote 611; U— -.TOtetell 


46 Sunny lit 4-1 Uphona. 54 Nonx 8-1 John TUQL KM‘ (SMsOeL IM 
-■ *■ ir. 25-1 aftare. - -- • 


AJfS MAY'HAJfiJkSAP (E2^98t7f 14flyd| (2fl| 


2 1Qf«aoO- SHAR P SHQT| 

3 moovo REurad 

4 001K-0 oomoi l 

5 t ootyio - Tamer] 

8 020612- TAR'S >9 
11 400466 Q0LDGM| 

T2 0306- 10 KMGOFl 

14 40006-2 TAMBlW 

15 008064 EASYOAYpfl 
IS 00046 TOP FEATHER 

20 306602 

21 840049 LMGHELP LADY 

23 



24 ton 
28 44MB0 WA 


Ft&BM BR (B H agar) C BawMal 468 - 
YDWBBORBlfcKaMoactatNCMagl 
0010 LOFT (E BrelteKS P MMda04«7 


fsssss 

— .RgteWT* 

34 003068 BBTiUtoML0dMARdfrTAgnaw|GBlMM6SSiZjii^]!?NTte(3 
33 OMqMTURCYBWtJHuaOR hare 56*1. — — ^.RPEOteBl 


BRSmpoaa«64. 
tAWbdted»OAft Bmoi763to 
H W Mosaon 464L^^HM 


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4-1 Hewys Raca. 9-2 Tamartom Lad. 5-1 Tmrw. 6-1 Gotten Stada. B-1 Rear 
Actkm. 10-1 GofdLoO;VteSWMtea,12-16tekpShaLlWs WTf-1 oftem. 


5.15 GMEVRA STAKES (Dl» It 3-y-« tZ28& 7i) (15) 


Z45 EBP MAN DORA MAIDEN STAKES (2-y-o: 
£1,216:59(9) 

ARBHAN P MortaM 96 CDwyarO 

DORMESTONE LAD R Stubbs 96 JH“ 

3 HARRY HUHTJ Bany 96 


4.45 LORD LYISTOCH MMSEH STAKES (£1,139: 
1 m 30 ( 8 ) 

0 SNAMJON OBXS S Norton 4-9-7. 


0 WGUST0NJJa(terson96. 


■ SSO IT DOWN J S Haidano 9-0 _ 
U U-8tX COPY BR J S Wteon 96_ 
ra YOUNG WAwflOR frtea I Bafl 96. 




00 BANTH. BOUQUET MBS IBM 611. 
02 MEATH PfflNCESS S Norton 611 — 


_ Ml 

_ KDartay 5 
D NcboOaA 
. NCartrit7 
JOuteB(5)3 
— JLowal 


06 FROCESSBEUA AW Jonas 464- 
222 BANTB. BUSHY Mire IBM 368-1 
mm BLQYCA7HRA BOY C Parker 368J 
I MAB8TWOM M H EaMartg 38-8 J 

m ^rvis m 


JLowe4 


0 PROICE SATME (USA) M Jarvis 3-66 _WWMM-B91 
IWBny686 GDidMUZ 


006 SCARBOROUGH WBtay 368. 


66 MQMCAN QR0V) C Thomtob 3-66 Jl 


7-4 Bantte Bushy, 52 Prtnca.Saflra. 3-1 Maatotmm. 5-1 
Shandon Bab, 16-1 often. ’ 


UK I 



Congratulations to Cannons Sports Club, London on he mmin g 
American Express Premier League Champions of 1985/86, having 
P x PP£d Ardleigh Hall SC, Colchester, at the post in an exciting finish 
The Premier League is the pinnacle of the National Squash League 
which is based on 41 county and district leagues involving over 4,000 
teams and more than 30,000 players. The champions of each league 
qualify to play in the National Challenge, the winners and runners-up of 
wiuch ran apply for promotion to the Premier League. The finals of the 
1985/86 National Challenge will be played at the Manor Club, Ilkeston 
on 10th and 1 1 th May and American Express congratulate these eight 

clubs who have reached this stage. 

AVON; West Country Squash. Weston-S-M 
DUNDEE & DISTRICT Fonhill S.C 


Forthill S.C 

HAMPSHIRE; Portsmouth S.G 
MIDDLESEX: Stripes Club 


N.VK COUNTIES: Manchester Northern LTC 
OXFORDSHIRE: Thame S.G 
SURREY Richmond Town S.C 
YORKSHIRE: Victoria S.C 


Co ngratulations also to these other county and district league 
champions and our thanks to everybody involved in tbe National I fa g u p 
for making it so successful 


BEDFORDSHIRE: Coral S.C 
BERKSHIRE: Beechdown S.C 
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE Wycombe Hills S.C 
CAMBRIDGESHIRE Cambridge S.C. 
CENTRAL (Scotland): West Lothian S.G 
CORNWALL: Falmouth S.C 
CUMBRIA: Carlisle S.C. 

DERBYSHIRE Manor Squash & Leisure Club 
DEV ON: W est Country Squash Plymouth 
DORSET: Wsst Hants LTC. 

DURHAM & CLEVELAND: Durham S.C 

ESSEX: Wanstead S.C 
FIFE: Fife Metal Structures 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE: De La Bere C.G 
HEREFORDSHIRE: RAF Hereford 
HERTFORDSHIRE: Potters Bar S.C 
ISLE OF WIGHT Wsstridge S.G 


KENT Bro mley Town S.C. 

LEICESTERSHIRE: Squash Leicester 
LINCOLNSHIRE: Scunthorpe S.C. 

MIDLANDS: Edgboston Priory dub 
NORFOLK: Hunter S.C. 
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: VfeJlingborough S.G 


NORTHUMBRIA: Squash Newcastle 
iHIRE: 


NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: Trent Bridge S.G 
SHROP SHIR E: Brookside Country Gub 
SOMERSET West Country Squash, Wsston ; S-M 
STAFFORDSHIRE: Northwood S.G 
SUFKXJG Bury St Edmunds GC 
SUSSEX: Horsham S.G 
WARWICKSHIRE: Edgbaston Rriory Qub 
WILTSHIRE: Wessex S.G 
WORCESTERSHIRE: Stourbridge S.G 



KEEP PLAWNG ON THE CARD 


Evens Mesft Princess. 5-2 Hairy Hurt, 6-1 U-Bbc Copy. 8-1 
IngSswn. 10-1 Oormssrensted. 16-1 oftore. 

3.15 EARL OF ANGUS SELLING STAKES (£764: 
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posiUon to nominate his 


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Pradier . completed a trebie 
with a narrow success over 
Aftayan in the Prix deSuresnes, 

ai.Longchamp yesterday, but h 
wa s not a particularly convinn. 
performance and he remains 


chance for the Derby. 

• Mi chad Stoute gave warn- 
ing that his 4-1 Derby fovourile 
Shahr astani may not rim in next 
week’s York trial, tbe Mecca 
Dante Stakes. Watching the rain 
come down at 'Chester yes- 
terday. he said. “I wO] not risk 
Shahrastani if foe conditions at 
York are' testing. If be misses 
York, tbe colt win have to go 
straight to Epsom.” 


Results page 38 


Blinkered first time 


mSKK* " ^ Mr 

HAMILTON: 


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SLACKS & 

LEISUREMEAR 


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sp ORTS 

COMMENTARY 









^ — - v.-v^I.^r • • .• -— ■ "- . — -THE TIM ES FRIDAY MAY 9 1 QKfi 


wv pvuaiij 

for setting out 

-A . Jh 


David Miller 

J" Steana of thm s**h uuur aner 

SSL! the Sd^EST^ Q,p SS, 1- 

Europe SS JSlu* ™ s* 00 * 1 on 

area in 


From Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent, Seville 
At midnight, an hour after- ' 


European 


-- important 
2*® frephy. but 

fandard fiuaL The Last one 
^dhy of the mb 
«*»* ago, when UveipoolS 

J*? *?* hscmatfag only fo 
professiopals tatnti mou S. 
tee tactics or for sepj>: cte« 

2J^ proansed « «» much 
_J*y5** a bitter coadnsmo It 

Bera© a I56i when Barcelo- 
na, reaching the final after fire 

Sysw-sa 

«ws« 

cawr^S 

Kocsfc hitting the bar and 
Po^s five times but losing 3-2 

yea» of hope and failure, of 

countless managers and great 

players imported at phenome- 
J^^Ptawe, here they were 

For two days the old city of 
Seville throbbed with expecta- 
™ n * A cavalcade of coaches, 
nose to tail and streamfogJS 
Mue bunting, rolled 
™ro«8h the terracotta-col. 
owed Andalusian countryside 
"■osomenmilinnal army and 
'^0 Catalans took corn- 


stood oo 

Penalty area in 

an othenvae empty stadium, 
35 *{ te wwn about to 
P^jy- For a minute 

hrirJ2°°2 i? 0 ® moti onless 

o^re shaJdng his head in 
disbelief and shuffling away. 

He could not understand 
Jjow. after the rad of enra 
ume and a goalless draw, his 
Catalonian heroes had foiled 
tocwven any of their four 

J?S ^Si Barce,ona > ® from 

i nrv? r° ^matms. all but 
i,uoo of whom were there to 
support them, thus lost the 

Su phy «^. Cwo Peaalties to 
ml _ that they had seemed 
destined to win. 


to sock to our principles” of 
playing in ah open, adventur- 
ous fashionJFor the opening 
half hour they were for from 
unsuccessfiiL' 

Schuster, potentially the 
most talented individual on 
view despite looking over- . 
w^ght and unfit, began to- 
fade, as did Baroeionafc chal- 
Sleaua, methodical 
rather than inspired, raised 
tnor challenge but it was not 
until the 75th minute that they 
firet troubled the Spanish 
goalkeeper. Over the two 
hours only two dear chances 
were created, both of them by 
Barcelona. - 
In the dosing dr ama 
Baredona’s nerve was broken 
mid the glory went to the unit 
that proved itself the more 


stLssat&jsi 


. —wpuHsunuijy 

their opponents, had nothing 

hLiiiS? 6 ' ^ ***** been 

«»jen, even by a significant 
mai^m, no one would have 
been surprised. After alL no 
East European side had -won 
the European Cup in three 
decades. 

In marking the end of one 
Kmgthy sequence, the Roma- 
nians continued another. Only 
once m the last nine years has 
more than one goal been 
scored within the limits of 
™ral time in the final in 
1 984 Liverpool defeated 


the crowds m the first half of 
the season, and West Ham 
Utdm the second, but Liver- 
pool watched with admira- 
tion, ended up with the title. 

It has become increasingly 
evident m the modem aj* that 
the entertainers are paying a '3£K9ES^3 
costiy penalty for tfie^perror- 
mances. Those who follow a 
more straightforward, if less 
anracti ve, course generally go 
Jhrough. to collect the gam^s 
honours, ft is not a trend that 
should be welcomed. 

S tea ua's triumph, as unex- 
Hambuig’ 


stfwsSS- t^SiaaiK SAasaiS IHHHflHHKI 

ssr^arw plort * ■" 0,1 


■ — wi mem were 

I an ill omen. That old demon of 
sport was stallring the prema- 
ture celeb rations. 

A tarnished prize 
for Bucharest 

In their downtown hotel 
Steana’s players were hardly 
noticed among the American 
tourists fretting about 
tomorrow's schedule. 

The difficulty for most oat. 
standing Eastern teams from 
l/jpest, Ferencvaros, JDikh 
and Red Star of Belgrade has 
bees that the near season after 
their winter break coincides 
Jttth the quarter-filial stages. 
Partizan of Belpade alone 
had reached the final . Now 
Steana, with some technically 
accomplished players, have 
made history. Yet to do so 
thanks to the lottery of a 
penalty shoot-oat after having 
four men booked tarnishes the 
prize. 

Barcelona's tears, on the 
other hand, ought to be dried 
by the recollection of befog 
fortunate three times over to 
have reached the final, for 
their passage against Sparta 
of Prague, Juventus and Gdte- 
borg had been littered with 
luck. Having sm-vived, they 
rave the appearance h the 
final of men too wound-up by 
tension or the fi—nriwi bonus 
that was at stake. Or both. 

They played below capacity 
against cleverly negative oppo- 
sition who, time-wasting after 
only 20 lin-tes, were dearly 
contest to wait for extra thug 
or even penalties if necessary. 
Worried about the pace of 
Carrasco and Marcos and left- 
back Alberto, Steana would 
only counter-attack from mod- 
field: which at timw they-did 
superbly. 



Confidence and balance of 

Everton impresses Pleat 




n 

I 


\ou would have thought by 
bow Erertotrians would be nt ab 
to the sight of Liverpool 
cekbratmg another success. Not 
jo- Every recret word of praise 

for Kenny Dalglish and his 
meny men has been tike a 
PfwoMl insult to Everton. 
®“ 8w ? n 8 that Liverpool are 
sapenar has been gair;*.. 
enough over the years but faarioi 
to baud over the title to them 
when you firmfy believe you are 
agU tl y best, h as iaemtf a new 
*™d of depression for the Blues. 

Conseq uently, Everton see 
to morrow's FA Cup final as the 
Qppw taalty to put the record 
Hraighf before uuUmus of wit- 
n f ssc s - Of course there win 
"ways be sceptics, even among 
Evenon fanatics. rifr» the one 
who told Howard K»»fan 
Evertoo’g manager, before the 
agamst SbeflSeM 
Wednesday that he hoped 
E verto n would lose because 
OMdd not face them being beaten 
by Leverp ool at Wembley. 

Everton remain convinced 
J**y foa their title by 
«“mt. They were caught baO- 
watching tnstoatd of waichine the 
opposition. Like Coe when slow 
to counter Ovetts burst in the 
Moscow Olympics 880m. so 
bveitqa woe taken by surprise 
by tbe famous Liverpool Uck 

^^T md * P0b * i 

_ Evatoa feeJ they could have 
nod should have polled out that 
ume extra which would have 

r aevea Liverpool too much to 
They led Liverpool by J 1 
poms « near to the finish as 
Man* L Lineker's goal supply 
dried up at the worst possible 
moment due to a variety of injury 
probtesas. As a Liverpool col- 
league said: “Whea he's fit he 
scores goals.” 

tf it was lack of experience 
™h cost Everton victory in 
football’s equivalent to the 
marathon, over the short dis- 


By Clive W hite 

Monntfleld doubt 

tterek Mountfidd's swollen 
knee could force Everton into a 
dramatic defensive reshuffle for 
lomoirow’s FA Cup final. The 
- 3_ y“ r -°*d cenire half has been 

unable to train this week and is 
still undergoing intensive 
ireatmeni. 

< ? rmer Tranmere 
Rovers defender was out of 
action earlier in the season, 
fcverton tried various permuta- 
tions before introducing their 
£““S £50-000 signing 8 firori 
Scunthorpe, Poimon, at full 
back, and switching Van den 
Hauwe into the centre. Bui 
Pointon. his ankle in plaster is a 
“on^artor, and Kendall would 
totoe d to give the former 
Liverpool reserve, Alan Hamer 
an unexpected recall. 


defence; they don't 
breathe.” 


let you 

Heat secs Stereo as the 


_ ___ — AT wviiiu yc 

7977. W^esd^TSSbft^ £^i2“ c rCpraenlati ^- 

sarsaSS kS?-' 

last year's dark events in ***. unaoce P | laWy violent 15 

swiais 

■a.M ul j . . , French referee soon put a stop 

But Jje admitted that “ev- to thaL Next season's sho^ 
preached piece needs to be enchantingly 
sajdt a high level of efficiency adventurous; but that foai- 
that ^ =. most certainly too much to 


awe imu to ex- 
left side, says David Pleat 


” — — • v*« uj cuitrency 

foal to be entert aining is yery 

difficult” He wanted his team 



<«!» 

Jhrown a bfetinc yesterday after 
foerf councillors had eaiiier' 
^* akc oo *Xiod on the 
« b req ^? L for jEl5Q -0 00 «<► 


inert season. - 

A special meeting of 
pmckpool s full- council, called 
raratedktoly? afterwards, over- 
turned the decision and agreed 
to make an interest-free loan of 


repayable over 
Rascfaid GibraiLn club 
Stoteanaii;; said later that Tie ' 

was absotatdy delighted" and 
said the -club could start h^tt 
season as planned.' • > - 

J ^ a ? K!d ' eleven th 
. p the third division this year, 
ra^Ung le®w on the season of 
z 130,000 and accumulated i 

rff785;00a comiciitot 

made it dear the loan was 
simply ip allow the dub time to 
plan their long-term survivaL 

given the 


Non-League Football, By PtranVewman 

"* ^ J — — among the feertere in order to i 
preserve, their respective 
strengths. 1 

Barrow, who return to the 
Muinpart League, and DartfoixL 
who rejom tbcSouthern League, 
had both looked doomed for 
several weeks, but the relegation 
of Wycombe Wanderers, whose j 
?iL*?V ca,ed by Dagenham's 
araw at Runcorn on Sunday, is a I 
surprise. 1 


EVERTON 



3 

& 

SEC 


NEC 
SPONSORS 
EVERTON. 
EA. Cup Final 

Sat May 10 

1986 


fence of cap football they' have 
not been found wanting. This 
*dl be their third snoccssive FA 
Cup final and their sixth appear- 
fece at Wembley in three sea- 
No one has ever trodden 
such familiarity on the 
saved turf as this Everton side, 
“dbeen beatea on it only once. 

They have developed 7 what 
their manager likes to dem-ib^ 


after another famous Tnrf per- 
*^7 ner i I as ■ never-say-die atti- 
tude. No one has tested this 
quality more to their cost in the 
two seasons than Loton 
town. Last season they led 
Everton until the latter stages of 
ther semi-final before losing in 
extra time. This season, at the 
qMiBter-Ssssai stage, they led the 
champions by two goals before 
Everton polled level ang then 

Dand Pleat, Latou's manager, 
remains a big admirer, 

““A succession of victories has 
hredan almost arrogant con- 
fidence m them,” Pleat said. The 
start of this success is nmtanti- 
“hy toaccd back to a Milk Cup 
tie at Oxford on January 18 . 
1984. when Heath stSTfoL u 
errant back pass fry Brock to 
force a replay. But Pleat cites 
the appointment of Colin Har- 
*ey as coach as the turning 
point 

He added: “Today Everton 
comprise all the features of the 
traditional English game. They 
*“ P**y h short or long. They're 
very well Inhurwl, particularly 
now they've got their back fonr 


. . the key 

u> tomorrow's 0naL”(f 
tere is a chink anywhere in 
LbwpooTs armour it is on the 
left side of defence. Steven has 
foe ability if be stays wide and 
does not (Hi midfield too ranch to 
wts«tle Beglln. On the other 
tew, Johnston against Van den 
Hauwe could be inaesdns. bat 
I think foe Everton player can 

handle bis pace.** 

For all Luton's disappoint- 
ments at the hands of Everton it 
8 former champions who 
now have more cause to curse the 
small Bedfordshire dab. Km. 
daUbelieves foe title mg tat 

“Everton can afford to leave 
oat valuable players Eke Heath, 
Wilkinson, Pomtoa and antil 
recently Minims," Pleat ob- 
served. “UvergMuol Will be leav- 
tog ont Walsh. Waric and 
McMahon or MacDonald. And 
“ Lawrenson doesn't play then, 
my word, we are improving our 
stan dards . I'm not against it, 
because we are jndged by the 
nest. Bat certain other dubs 
won't be able to get near them 
because they can main tain stan- 
fords through a group of 
players.” 

Certainly, (hey are in a po- 
sition to be able to make big 
profits on big signings. Lineker 
cost Everton £800,000 less than 
12 months ago, yet Kendall was 
unimpressed with an alleged £2 
million offer from Barcelona for 
the player. 

But for the moment Kendall 


l hite’s 
;sier- 
1 f foe 
and 
1 niia- 
1 ami- 


ra in 
< said 
o «gan 
c nrity 
g tadi- 
uion 
n The 
ie Chr- 
is 500 . 
>e and 
foe 
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ly __ 

or HI 

iy h 

in r 

rTA, 

stni- 

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together again and Sheedy re- 
stored to foe left I liken him to 
Leadbeater, who used to play for 
Ipswkii in the late 50s. A canny 
p^er. TncticaBy it is verj 
djOicnlt for foothalling sides like 
Lreerpool and ourselves to get 
thm game going against them. 

They push out so quickly from 


will tell yon that money is of 
secondary importance as they 
and Liverpool head for a share 
in record receipts of £l V, motion 
at Wembley. He needs to beat 
Dalglish before be starts having 
fefhtinares about his neighbour. 

many he agrees that 
Dalglish s return to the Liver- 
poof team was the most inftaen- 
nal factor in foe League trophy' 
moving home the short dtoan^ 
across Stanley Park. 

He now shares with Liverpool 
supporters the dream of 
Dalglish leading ont his imw at 
Wembley in his first season as 

., Exc *l“ lb »* to 
Kendall s dream Dalglish is 
wearing a lounge suit, not his 

Klla 


59 ' T-U 

<stle Hie 
Co «?- 
was olic 
iter- in 
ates ?ral 
«vith . • 
ions or* 
last fer- 
ind 
spir- ^ic 
aged ing 


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fKtV-n 






For t he first tune under the 
current system, of entiy into the 
Gola. League, the champions of 
aP th ree “feeder" leagues look 
certain to be admitted this 
summer. 


Schuster’s fitness 
a crucial factor 

The key to Barcelona's per- 
formance, or lack of it, was 
Schuster's evident shortage of 
fitness. This marveloas jsfe yes- 
who had dominated the win- 
ning of the Spanish champion- 
ship best year, had made only a 
partial recovery from the inju- 
ry which has dogged him and 
Barcelona's whole season. 

While the fouls were flying 
in the first half hour, be hit 
several peerless long balls 
which had Steana scurr yin g 
back like rabbits, and in the 
quarter of an hour before half- 
time be headed narrowly over 
bat within minutes of the 
start of the second half it was 
apparent that Schuster * * 


and Welling Uni 

League) have both been _ 
oepwd after passing ground 
inspections. Sutton United 
{Vauxhall-Opet League) will be 
visited by Gola League officials 
next week and their ground is 
believed to meet comfortably 
tbe required standards. In pre- 
vious seasons at least one of the 
three champion dubs brave not 
been promoted other iw«n ig 
they did cot want to move or 
because tbeir facilities were 
unacceptable. 

Ga t eshead, .who share their 
town’s international athletics 
stadium, did not expect any 
problems with their application 
as they were members of the 
Gola League until being rele- 
gated a year ago. Welling, 
however, have had to improve 
. their ground substantially this 
season and have been admitted 
only on the unders tanding thpt 
they make a number of further 
minor alterations. 

The promotion of three dubs 
and the relegation of one dub to 
each of the three feeder leagues 
(relegated clubs are always given 
the option of returning to their 
former leagues) means that 
there wiD be.no problems this 
summer in redistributing chibs 


aed 49 st 
ri aged ul 
.Teased y- 
lion to id 
;rs at rfa 
Court, 

■n held 
hen he 
3urt at 
private “ 
by foe ° 
due to ‘ e 
Dn May ? 


Promoted to the Gola League 
only 12 months ago, the i 
Buckinghamsh ire dub thrived 
in the first half of the season but 
never -recovered from the shock 
of Paul Bence's -resignation as 
m a nage r in Januaiy. Their I 
punishing third round FA Tro- , 
phy tie against Leek Town, 
which went loforeeTtpays, was 

nmhahtv also an important 


id 


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nmy, 

sjgQf 

p bfe 
Ds JD 
ha^i 

i stain 
e cap 

-TL. 

ifo! 

re yc 
jghL" 
enti 
ibout 
swift: 
twbil 
imtill 
raft. I 
mi ra 
too ... 
m tw 
one , 

i, 

XlrVe 


Less than two months ago i 
Wycombe were still 10 points 
ahead of Nuneaton Borough 1 
with three games in hand. 
However, they then took only , 
five points from their last 14 
games and were relegated be- 
crose they bad tbe worst goal ' 
difference of the four dubs to 
finish on 36 points. 

■At the other end of the table. 
Etifield, the Cola League cham? 
pions, will have then- ground 

ssij;jzai-jsc 
ssuEiftssr *? for 


One team has 
greatness written 

all over it. 


ks, aged > 
r of Jo- 5 
i Sons. r 
icrxilc/d 
.he new 
wspaper 


Of 

kwd 


m 


aim reuraza, m-tok g 

better than aa average perfor- 
mance, could not compensate. 
In file next 20 minutes Steana 
could have won tbe match, ami 
Venables took a calculated 

risk in leaving Schuster Ofl tbe 

field antil six minntes before 
foe end of normal time. 

Fears about inadequate han- 
dling of foe World Cop next 
month were increased- Michel 
Vautrot, of France, one of foe 
game's more alert referees, 
rightly warned foe ca ptains 
after half aa hour of mutual 
indiscipline. Yet when 
Bnmbescu mockingly ap- 
plauded M. Vautrot when 
booked in extra time be should 
have been seat offi While we 
tolerate moral bootigans on 
foe field, we can hardly com- 
plain about violence on foe 
terraces. 


ATHLETICS 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 

a ruptured Achilles tendon. 


Geoff Parsons added another 
centimetre to his Uuilcd Krag- 
dom hjgb jump record, with 
2-27 metres in a match at 
Crystal Palace on Wednesday. 
Parsons was successful on bis 
second attempt and. considering 
the coid and blustery conditions 
and the fact be felled maigmally 
at 2.31 metres, looks certain to 
repeat his winter’s indoor best of 
230 metres. This is his; third 
British record. 

Another excellent perfor- 
mance in the Southern Counties 
v RAF v West London Institute 
match' was the limn 47.6Sscc 
victory for John Gladwin in the 
800 metres. There was a fixe 
comeback for Steve Crabb in 
second place, with . 1:48^7. 
Crabb had two victories over 
Steve Cram during the 1984 
seasonl but missed last year with 


Cram, the ante and 2,000 
metres world record holder, is 
fko ra excellent eariy-season 
fonn. A few days after returning 
from, “four good weeks 
framing" at altitude in the 
United States. Cram broke die 
course record by 24 seconds 
when he won the Cheaer-Le- 
Sureet 6.6 miles road race j 
31min-2Qsec earfier this week. 

.Third ia the same race was 
David. Sharpe, Cram's young 
trainn« partner and one of the 
British medal favourites for foe 
inaugural -world . junior, 
aampionshfps in Athens in 


On Saturday, Everton - one of the greatest 

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SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 


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CRICKET 


Richards runs riot as 
Somerset go 
in search of points 


TAUNTON: Glamorgan with 
eight first innings wickets 
standing are 274 runs behind 
Somerset. 

Somerset began at 126 for 
one and a marvellous century 
by Richards enabled them to 
declare just after lunch at 300 
for four, having achieved their 
fourth baiting point Hardy 
was caught at the wicket off 
Thomas for 34. Richards then 
came in, and scored 100 in 48 
balls. 

Strange though it may seem 
it was not an especially excit- 
ing innings for those accus- 
tomed to Richards. There 
were few unusual strokes. He 
just hit the ball for four or six 
whenever and wherever he felt 
like iL He was particularly 
severe upon Ontong, but this 
was not because Ontong 
bowled worse than the others, 
just that he caught Richards in 
the mood more often. 

In 1921 MacCarthy. the 
Australian, scored 345 in a 
day at Trent Bridge against 
Nottinghamshire and a local 
supporter summed it up as 
“bloody monotonous." I can 
see what he meant. Flawless- 
ness can be boring. 


By Alan Gibson 

Roebuck at the other end 
was flawed and. therefore, not 
boring, though he wisely gave 
the rampaging Richards as 
much of the bowling as he 
could. He had a tactical 
problem to consider, especial- 
ly when Richards was 
stumped just after reaching his 
century from a dash down the 
pitch - feeling no doubt his 
contribution was sufficient for 
the day. 

Richards's dismissal made 
it 245 for three, of which 
Roebuck, the captain, had 
scored a faithful 49. There was 
a case for him declaring 
straight away, or at least at 
lunch, in the hope of a suitable 
response from Glamorgan; 
there was also a case for him 
baiting on for 400 and hoping 
to bowl out the opposition 
twice (this, I think, is what 
Close would have done). At 
lunch the score was 294 for 
four and Roebuck decided to 
bat on until the fourth point 
was secured, then declared 
immediately. 

This was probably a sensi- 
ble compromise since the sky 
was grey and there bad already 
been several splutters of rain. 


Every point was worthwhile. 
Glamorgan lost two quick 
wickets to Gamer, Hopkins 
and Morris both caught in the 
slips, and were 26 for two 
when the rain really settled in. 

Gamer bowled sharply, even 
for him, as though someone 
bad suggested be was not as 
quick as Thomas - or had 
reminded him it was his 
benefit year. 


S0H9SST; First Innings 
■PM Roebuck not out 


.76 

N a Faroe Jones b Base 55 

JJEHartyeSteeJeb Thomas 24 

I V A Richards st Duties b Ontong - 102 

Rj Harden eSwetab Base B 

RJ Barnett not Out 18 

.17 


Extras (lb 4. w 3.1*10). 


Total (4 wkts dec, 725 avers) 300 

V J Marks. J Gamer, N S Taylor. fT Sard 

and M S Turner did not baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-72 2.130, 3-245, 4- 

256. 

BOWUNG: Thomas 17.2-1-100-1; 
Moseley lfrO-61-O: Base 244-71-% 
Ontong 13-2-64-1. 

GLAMORGAN: Ftaw Innings 

J A Hopldns c Felton b Gamer O 

A L Jones nor our — 12 

H Morris c Richards b Gamer B 

G C Hotmes not out 3 

Extras (nb 3) 3 


Total (2 who, 145 overs) . 


-TSS 


Younts Ahmed. *H C Ontong. J F Steele. 
tT Davies. EA Moseley. J G mares and 
S Base to baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-13. 

Bonus points: Glamorgan 1. Somerset 4. 
Umpires: C Cook and □ Lloyd. 


Athey at his best Yorkshire 


Gloucestershire were among 
those counties fortunate enough 
to sidestep the thunderstorms 
and rain which disrupted the 
Britannic Assurance champion- 
ship programme yesterday. Set- 
ting out in the morning against 
Northamptonshire at North- 
ampton. they were strongly 
placed at 2 48 for four from 97 
overs with Athey 144 not out 
and Curran an undefeated 13. 
These two pushed on by 53 runs, 
pocketing a third bonus point, 
before Gravency declared at 301 
for four. 

Along the way. Athey's fifth 
wicket partnership with Curran 
had yeilded 1 10 runs from 30 
overs and taken him past 170. 
his score against Derbyshire last 
season, to his best champion- 
ship performance, in a stay of 
six hours and nine minutes. 

Gloucestershire's left arm fast 
medium bowler. Sainsbury. who 
had taken seven wickets for 38 
in the first innings of the 
corresponding match last sea- 
son. threatened to give an 
encore as he prised out Stone 
and Boyd-Moss with 16 runs on 
the board. Cook and Lamb 
helped Northamptonshire turn 
an awkward corner. 

In the afternoon the mood of 
the batsmen altered dramati- 
cally, which seemed to indicate 
either that they had lunched 
well, or that they had become 
aware of Alan Smith’s presence 


By Peter Marson 


in his capacity as a Test selector. 
Either way, Lawrence was given 
a warm reception, with Lamb 
opening his shoulders to hit a 
massive six among 24 runs off 
Lawrence's two opening overs 
of the afternoon. 

Surrey began the day in good 
heart. Gray having cut down 
Warwickshire's batting on the 
previous day. but in a poor light 
at the Oval, where Clinton and 
Stewart took guard with Surrey 
164 runs behind with nine first 
innings wickets in hand. After 
only four overs, the light wors- 
ened. but when the players 
returned Clinton batted well 
to make 60 before falling leg 
before to Parsons as Surrey 
came in to lunch at i 10 for two. 

Stewart then moved to bis 
own 50, his third in five 
championship innings, and in 
company with his new partner. 
Lynch .joined in his second half 
century stand as Surrey closed 
in on Warwickshire's total be- 
fore moving in to a lead in mid 
afternoon. When a thunder- 
storm sent the players scuttling 
for cover shortly before tea, 
Surrey's third wicket pair had 
put on 94. 

At Lord's, where Leicester- 
shire began again at 234 for six. 
Boon and Whitticase had time 
only to advance by another 
dozen runs against Middlesex 
before frustration set in for the 
day with the first fall of rain. 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCORES 

Middlesex ? Leics Surrey ? Warwicks 

AT THE OVAL 

WARWICKSHIRE: Fhtt te r rinig 174 [B M 
McMriten 58: A H Gray 6 tar S3). 

SURREY: Frol Innings 

AR Butcher c MeMAan bSmal 0 

G S Cfcnton tow b Parsons — 60 


AT LORD'S 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First tmngs 

R A Cobb c Getting b Cowan® — 34 

I P Butcher c Downton D Daniel 4 

l Potter run out - 1 

*D I Gower b Wrtbams ... 83 

T J Boon tow b Wilbams 22 

J J WtuaKer b Cowans 60 

P B Clift c Butcher b Darnel 17 

IP wtwacas® not out — ..... 5 

P A J De Freitas c Stack o Wtttems 9 

W K R Beniamin not out - — 11 

Extras (b 2. to 4. nb 7) — . 13 

Total (8 wkts. 80 ovaral 259 

L B Tavtor to bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-9. 2-11. 3-115. 4- 
169. 5-191. 6-221. 7-236. 6-246 
MIDDLESEX: G D Bartow, w N Slack. ~M 
W Gatonq. R O Butcher. C T Radley. -fPR 
Downton. J E Embmey. P H Edmonds, N F 
Wi Items. N G Cowans. W W Darnel. 

Bonus pomts. Middlesex 3. Leicestershire 
3. 

Umpires: J A Jameson and R Power 

Oxford Univ v Notts 

AT THE PARKS 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: First Irnings 228 
tor no wkt dec lM Newell 1 12 noi ouL D W 
RanaaD 101 not oul BOWUNG. Quinlan 
10-2-21 -ft Thome 13-6-30-0. Rydon 21 -4- 
62-0. Dawson 20-5-51-0 Lawrence 17-4- 
51-0). 

Second tanmgs 

P Johnson c Rydon b Lawrence 91 

D J R Marandale rax out ... - 74 

J D Birch not out 22 

Extras (b 1. to 2. w i» 

Total (1 wkt) 191 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-129 

OXFORD UtaVEWWTY: First Irwngs 
O A Hagan c Birch b Such ........... 39 

A AG Mw rim out . - 0 

M J Kitown tow b Pick ..... 0 

•O A Thome c Newell b Such 27 

T Pawl c and o Such 

S Weato DSuch — 

R A Rydon tow Afford ..... — 7 

t J Cooe c Pwk b Atiort 0 

J D Quintan b Afford - — J 

T A J Dawson no) out . . — - « 

M P Lawrence 0 Such •••••-— “ 

E«tras (b2.b2.w3l - ? 

Total 88 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15. 2; 18. 3-69 4- 
74. 5-77. 6-90. 7-95. 8-96. 9-97. 10-98 
BOWUNG. Sametoy 8-3-15-0: Pwk 8-3-13- 
1. Evans 4-0-12-ft Such 195-1D-36-5: 
Afford 16-9-18-3 

Umpires: H D Bird and D S ThompsetL 


A J Stewart c Humpage b M unton — 76 

M A Lynch not out — — 113 

T E Jesty c Humpage b Munton 9 

A Needham tow o Parsons ......... 2 

tC J Richards not out — 12 

Extras (b 4. to 21, nb 3) 28 

Total (5 wkts, 7B ovws) 300 

G Monkhouse. R J Doughty. A H Gray and 
•P I Pocock to baL 

FALL OF WICKETS. 1-6. 2-1 10. 3-224. 4- 
254.5-259. 

Bonus pomts Surrey 8. Warwickshire 3. 
Umpires: K J Lyons and P B Wight 

Northants v Gloucs 

AT NORTHAMPTON 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE: First Innings 

A W StovoW b Griffiths 2 

P W Romanes tow b Mafcwder 17 

C W J Athey not out — - — 171 

P Bambndge c Griffiths b Harper — 55 

J W Uoyds c and b Harper 6 

K M Curran not out 39 

Extras (to 10. nb I) 

Total (4 wfcts dec) — — 301 

Score after 100 overs: 265 tor 4 
l R Payne. *D A Graveney. fN C Russefl. D 
V Lawrence and G E Samsfxxy did not 
bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-7. 2-47. 3-173. 4- 
191 

BOWUNG: Maaender 25-9-61-1; Griffiths 
223-3-72-1 : Capet 23-7-61 -O.NOB Cook 
15-3-48* Harper 24-7-43-2 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: First Irnngs 

A C Stone c Curran b SamsOmy 0 

*G Cook no) out — 81 

R J Boyd-Moss c Lloyds b Sainsbury -.4 
A J Lamb c Lawrence b Sainsbury 50 
R J Badey c Russel b Grawney 25 

D J Capet c Atney b Payne 22 

R A Harper not out 23 

Extras lb 4. to 5. nb 5) U 

Total (5 w ins. 59 overs) 219 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 2-16. 3-95. 4. 
123.5-177 

tD Riptey. N G B Cook. N A Malender and 
B J Griffiths to bat 

Bonus pomts. Northampwnshre 3. 
Gloucestershire 5. 

Umpres- R Julian and R A wnoa 



Stewart hooks a ball from Parsons during Surrey's match 
against Warwickshire at the Oval yesterday 

Cancellation 


foiled 
by Lenham 

By Richard Streeton 

HEADING LEY: Sussex have, 
scored 190 for 9 wickets against 
Yorkshire. 

An uneven batting display by 
Sussex yesterday was held 
together by Neil Lenham, who 
played with a maturity which 
belied his 20 years. Reeve also 
thwarted Yorkshire near the end 
of a shortened day, which 
finished with the unusual occur- 
rence of a hailstorm in bright 
sunshine. 

Lenham’s promise was appar- 
ent in the 1 1 games he played 
last summer. Sussex, however,, 
could not have anticipated that 
their experiment of asking him 
to take Mendis’s place as an 
opening batsman, would have 
succeeded so soon. Lenham's 
composure was seldom ruffled, 
though the ball regularly swung 
under the heavy clouds and the 
pilch yielded uneven bounce. 

Sideboftom looked the most 
penetrative of the bowlers; Jar-, 
vis was usually tidy. At times, 
though, the Yorkshire seam 
bowleis erred in direction and 
Lenham scored many runs with 
forceful and correct strokes off 
his legs. 

Lenham hit nine fours and 
was seventh out in the 51st over 
when he tried to on-drive 
Hartley and gave the bowler a 
low, return catch. This was the 
third of four wickets Sussex lost 
in consecutive overs after tea. 

The only support Lenham 
received came from Alan Wells, 
who shared a third wicket stand 
of 85 in 27 overs. Rain delayed 
the start for 75 minutes and 
Sussex soon lost Green and 
Parker. Green edged a low catch 
to first slip; Parker played a ball, 
which kept low, on to his boot 
and it rolled into his stumps. 

Wells never looked at ease 
and was finally caught at third 
slip by Love, who dung to a 
rebound off second slip's chest 
Barclay was beaten by 
Sidebottom’s movement; 
Standing pushed forward and 
was held at third slip and the 
Sussex collapse had started. 

SUSSEX: First Innings 

N J Lenham c and b Hartley 75 

A M Groan C Cam* b Janrts 3 

P W G Partiar b Stoebonom 0 

A P Wefts c Low b Jarvis 38 

MR T Boratey tow b Stosboaom 4 

D K Standing c Jarvis b Hartley 2 

-H J Gould tow b Stevenson 0 

G S to Roux c Harttty b Stevenson — 0 

D A Reeve not out 31 

AC SPigottb Janrta 10 

A N Jones not out 10 

Extras {b 10. Ib7. nb2) 19 

Total (9 wkts. 122 overs) 190 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14, 2-21. 3-106. 4- 
117, 5-130.8-131. 7-132, 8-132,9-162. 
YORKSHIRE: Q Boycott M 0 Moxan, K 
Sharp. J D Love. A A Metcatte. *TO L 
Banstow. P Camck. A Stoebottom, G B 
Stevenson. P W Jarvis. P J Hartley. 
Bonus pomts: Yorkshire 4. Sussex 1. 
Umpires: N T Flaws and B Dudtaatan. 

No play yesterday 

WORCESTER: Worcastar W re 230 for 9 
dec (G A Hick TO) and 56 tor no wkt 
(BOWLING: Prabhakar 5-2-19-0: Sharma 
4-2-13-0: Kapi Dev 4-1-15-0: Mamndar 5- 
3-5-0: Shastrt 1-1-Wft tertians 297 (M 
Azharaddm 76, Kapil Dav 51). Match 
abandoned. 

OLD TRAFFORD: Hampshire 251 for 3 (C 
G Greamdge 127 not out C L Smith 70 not 
out) v Lancastwe. 

Second XI championship 
HMCKLEY: Glamorgan 17 for no aria v 
Leicestershire. 


Dilley’s hat-trick 
alerts selectors 


By Ivo Tennant 


CHELMSFORD: Kent, with five 
second innings wickets in hand, 
are 207 runs ahead of Essex. 

A hat-trick by Graham Dilley, 
the second of his career, arid 
coming at an opportune lime as 
he strove with pace and hostility 
to catch the selectors’ eye, 
helped Kent, who declared at 
their overnight total, to a 98-run 
lead. This they extended after 
tea in spite of John Lever 
quickly capturing their first four 
wickets. 

On a pitch such as this, when 
the tali is doing a bit and there is 
some lift, Dilley, Alderman and 
Ellison comprise a pretty useful 
attack. In his first over for Kent 
since the 1984 season, when be 
took 76 wickets, Alderman had 
Hardie caught at third slip and 
Prichard dropped at second slip. 

Dilley's pace worried Gooch 
intermittently, but there were 
runs to be had with Kent not 
keeping a third man. Both 
Gooch and Prichard collected 
assiduously in that direction. It 
was thus something of a surprise 
when Prichard foiled to do the 
same to Alderman and got a 
touch. Marsh taking a neat low 
catch in front of first slip. 

Kent's over rate was dreadful 
in the morning. Only 13 overs 
were bowled in the first hour, in 
part the result of a plethora of 
no-balls. Kent bowled 21 in all, 
most of them through striving 
for a little extra when Gooch 
was wresting control. 

The new Essex captain 
reached his half-century off 84 
balls with nine fours. Those that 
were not steered to third man 
were keenly driven or whipped 
through mid- wicket This was 
the meridian of the day's play; 
three Test bowlers putting 
everything in against Gooch and 
Border. 

Dilley returned for his second 
spell and Bottler cut him sav- 
agely to third man. Soon, 
though, he beat Border with one 
that nipped back at him and in 
his following over Gooch foiled 
to go through with a hook and 
was caught at second slip, the 
ball lobbing up off his glance. 


With his last ball before lunch 
Dilley removed Fletcher, also 
caught in the slips as if offering 
catching practice. There comes a 
time for every batsman when 
reflexes foil them against pace 
on account of advancing years. 
Sad to say. Fletcher has reached 
that time. 

Essex were now 156 for five. 
Forty minutes immediately af- 
ter lunch were lost for rain. 
When Dilley resumed, be had 
Lilley caught at first slip off his 
first ball and East in the gulley 
off his second, both batsmen 
hanging their bats ouL In 23 
deliveries the former England 
fast bowler had taken five for 1 8. 

Pringle was run out chancing 
a quick single and Alde rman 
wrapped up the innings, finish- 
ing with four for 59. Kent got 
away to a useful start before 
Lever struck. Hinks shouldered 
arms and was bowled, Benson 
sliced to gulley, TavarC was 
taken one-handed by East and 
Taylor was leg befbre. 

KENT: First tontefn'272 for 9 doc (S G 
BOWUNG: 


Hinks 67, M R Benson 64. 
Lever 29-10-57-4; Foster 
Prmgta 24-6-76-1 ; Gooch 
Acwk) 14-5-23-0). 

Second tarings 
M R Benson c Border b' Lever 
SG Hinks b 


C J Tavate c East b Lever . 

NR Taylor tow b Lever 

X S Cowdrey not out 


27-6-68-3; 

21-941-ft 


G R Cowdrey b Ppngte . 
R M BSsonnotoot . 
Extras (w 1) 


Total (5 wfcts) 


.10 
_ 2 
— 1 
.109 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-37. 244, 367, 4- 
60.542. 

mxm- pngt innings 

X A Goocti c Aidonnan b Dwey 60 

B R Hards c Hnks b Alderman 2 

P J Prichard c Marsh b AWormar 31 

A R Border tow b DiSey 14 

K W R Ftoichor c C S Cowdrey b OOtoy 16 

D R Pringle run out 15 

A W Lfltoy c Tavare b Pi ley 3 

to E East c Benson b DUtoy 0 

N A Foster cCS Cowdrey OAktennon 3 


JK Lever bAtosmtan 
□ L AcfiekJ not out 


Extras (b 4. to 2. w 1. nb 21) . 
Total {38 5 overs) 


2 

_ 0 
- 28 
.174 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6. 2-96. 3-123. 4- 
129. 5-157. 6-16S, 7-165, 8-1 72, 9-174. 10- 
174, 

BOWUNG: DBtoy 13.5-086-5; Aidennsn 
13-1-69-4; Edison 5-0-19-0; C S Cowdrey 
7-1-21 -a 

Bonus points: Essex 4. Kent 6. 

Umpires: A A Jones and K E Pafcner. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 

(7.30 unless stated) 

Third division 

Derby County v Rotherham 
Freight Rover Trophy 
Southern Final, second leg 
(First leg scores in brackets) 

Bristol City (0) v Hereford (2) (7.4$) 
Northern Final, second leg 
Bolton (1) v Wigan Athletic (0) 
CENTRAL LEAGUE: Hat iMston Barns- 
ley v Wigan. Second division: Coventry v 
Port Vato (7.01; Gnmsfty » Notts Co (6.30). 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Chariton v 
Fulham (at Brqmtef FC, 3.0); Mftwal v 
Heading (2J). 

5HRM&FF TOSH LEAGUE: Ards v 
Unfieid (7.15); Badyina na v Coleraine 

g '.ISfc Camck v Portadown (7.15), 
lenuran v Bamgr. 

BUUMNG SCERE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
HevertHl v Nawmarket Mareti Town utd v 
Lowestoft; Thetkxd v Fesxstowe. 

NENE GROW UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Pra mlra dhr la tora Northam p ton 
Spencer v Wootton; Bourne v Patton : 
Raunas v Long Buckby. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Senior 
dMston: BROB Bamei v Cartord Wander- 
ers (7.45). 


SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: first «- 
vtakm: Arundel v Steynbig. 

CRICKET 

BRITANNIC ASSURANCE 
COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
(11.0. 102 owars mtntmum) 
CHELMSFORO: Essex v Kent 
OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire v 


Hampshire 

LORt?S:l 


Not- 


i Mddtosex v Lstoeetershire 

NORTHAMPTON: Northamptonshire 
Gloucestershire 

TAUNTON Somerset v Glamorgan 
THE OVAL: Surrey v Werwicksnva 
HEADtNGLEY: Ywtartre v Sussex 

OTHER MATCH 

THE PARKS: Oxford Umvsrsr 
Bnghamshtre (1 1.0 to S.30 or 61 
SECOND XI CHAMWNSHBP: 
DerDyshrre v Nort nampto nsttirB; Brisk* 
Gloucestershire v Somerset Leic este r . 
Lwooatw store v Glamor gan ; Edgbaston: 
Warwickshire v Lancashire. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

SECOND DTVTSK3N Cwtate v Huddars- 
heto (7.00): KemMey v Lrtgn; Doncaster « 
Runcorn H (7.15). 

RACKETS 

QUEEN 'S CLUB: Centenary 

championships 


WEDNESDAYS 

RESULTS 

Football 

EUROPEAN CUP FINAL M SesN* 
Barcelona 0. Steaua Bucharest 0 (Steaua 
won 2-0 on penalties). 

INTER NATIONALS: Brazil 1. Ole 1. 
USSR 0. Finland 

AUSTRIAN CUP FINAL Austria Vienna 6. 
Rapd Vienna 4 laet). 

FOURTH DIVISION: PeWOOrovgft 1. 
Rochdale 1 

COLA LEAGUE: Siaftord 0. Kettsm 0. 
CENTRAL LEAGUE: Feat tivtofeto&ack- 
tum 0. Sheffield Wednesday i. Second 
dMatoft Doncaster 3. Scunthorpe O. 
Middlesbrough 2. Port Vale 2 
FOOTBALL GONBNATION! Arsenal 5. 
Reading 3. Cnartwn a MrtlwaH 1: MUmail 
0. Norwcn 1. Swansea 1. Bristol Rovers 
3, Tottenham 5. Bristol Rovers 1 

Rugby Union 

CLUB MATCH: EDOw Vale 16. Bridgend 

10 . 

Rugby League 

SECOND DIVISION: Workman 28. 
Runcom 0. Bramley fl. LMh 21: Carisls 
14. Wakefield Trinity 44; KmflMy D. 
Whitehaven 15: Rochdale Hornets 32. 
Hjddsrsfieu 16: Snettieid Eagles 1. 
Barrow 2l 


1, 000-mile record 

New York (Reuter) — Siu 
Miitleman. United States, set a 
world record for the 1.000-mile 

run yesterday of 1 1 days 20 hr 
36 mm. Miitleman. 34. a New 
York City health and fitness 
instructor, broke the record set 
by Siegfried Bauer. New Zea- 
land, in 1984 ofl 2 days 12 hr 36 
min. 


FOOTBALL 


ITALIAN CUft OuafNHlnsIs. tm togc Roma 

2. inMrfiajwnais 0: Wwa 2. Como 1; Empou 

3, Forenwa 2. Sampdcina 2, Tom* 0. 

YUGOSLAV FIRST WVWOW 4. Vojvo- 

dau P. Prisma 2. PHM 1; Buoucnoa 
Tnngiaa a Ctfttemcai l. Vaidar Z. Suooaa 
Tuda Z Sarajevo 1. Dnamo Vnkova ft 
Hiidbii Z Partesm 1. vatez 4. CMk 1: Rad 
Star Belgrade 2. OFX Belgrade I Lea di ng 
poeftwTCj. Red Star. 38oa. 2. Fanoan. 3ft 
3. Vem.33 

FOOTBALL C0M8MATKM: Fulham 1. QPR 
0. Portsmouth 2. Chetaea 3, Tottenham 1. 
Mttwaiifi. 


FOR THE RECORD 


CYCLING 

KIEV; Peace Race: Rnt stage: 1. I Regac 

. H z3w. (EkA 37 t 
same ana as Regec 

Jft5,2VWOrM(Po5rB; 
A Novosad [Cxi al sane tune. Oim itot. 1. 
Regec. 13057: Z ZM». 3^2-14; 3. 
Genonold. 331.43. 4. AmpMr. 3:32*2 5. V 
Klenov (USSR). S 32A2. Team: 1. Czechosio- 
vaKia: Z Bmoano; 3, East Germaiy; 4. Sonet 
Unon. 5, Pound- Sacend stage (team race, 
over dSun): i. SovM Unon. Sinn 58sat 1 


TENNIS 


East Gaimany. 55 19: 3. Poland. 55.47: 4. 
CzechostorakO. 5651; 5. Bu jgna. 57.aQ: 6. 

uu n o uns : 1. 


NEW YORK: To ur nament of C haa ip fc m a : 
Second round (US unknB staae# T Tmasne 
(Frl M R ACtoto iOA 6-2. fr4; T WWwOfl Dt H 
Solomon 62. W; J teprem mm a G 
Leiwndecker 6-1. 6-4. B Oraser (Vug) « A 
Gomez (Ed 7-5. 6-4: M Jam (Aral to S 
aarmnelva 64. 64: H Oe la Pm |Ara) U J 
Masak (Swig 6-3. 64; B Backer (IAK3 bt E 
Edrada (Sfl 64. 6-1; P Mcftomoe (AuS) M F 
Maaai (Mes)M, 62; M Srqber (Cz)H J Arms 
4-8. 8-4. 8-2: P Anaya iPenrtbtM Daws 3-6.7- 
5 6-3; D Pamz (Urug) Ot K Curran 62. 6-2. G 


France. 1.00.50. La 


l.Sowat 


CRICKET 


SCHOOLS MATCHES: COcfiemr HOS 224- 
4. St Joseph's. Ipswich, 82. Forest 160. 
Bremwood 90, Hampton 13CM, Ei*6tol27-& 
Hgngate un. ueranars Tawon . Norarwood. 
iR-4. Larmier Kl Si BenedWe 866. 
Oratory 56 PannBwjue 80-4; Catorham 159. 


Urson. Ilhr 32mn 24sec 2. East . . 
113136: 3. CwenoekMfcto. 1 1-33.38; 
Bulgaria. 1134.37. ft Poland. 11-34J9. 


WEIGHTLIFTING 


EAST SCRUM Em epean 


Theme. ,1254. Lo id Wands- (Poll. 2425 rtlOnteSL^. B P 
irg.i.snpiaM iM-i — *. - • 


(Aral blAMainr(Wl3] 6-2. 84;LLBvale 
(Max) fit B Gtoert 1 6. 64. 6-3: Y Noeh (Fri tit 
H Agenor (Hail 6-7, 8-3. 6-2; I Lsraf (04 IX J 
UmtoiG^M.84!: A KnekStetnbtM heritors 
(Sw« 64. 4-6. M. 

TOKYO: Qmm world to u ronew f Mstfa 
etogtos. Ural rosnd (US unton Stated): J Knek 
U P Armecone 7-6. 6 3 Wemae'e sMes. 
first found: M Navrantova HSM 6-2. 7%: P 
Snnw bt A Croft |OBj8-L 8-3. 


RUGBY UNION 


TAR8E& French S elacnon IB. Scotland 
XV 16. 

BASEBALL 

UNITED STATES: Aie swc a n League: Texas 
Rangers 1 Derot T^era l. MewaiAwa 
Brewers 7. Oakland Atwetst 6. Boston Red 
$o, tl. Seattle Msnnere 5: MmnesotaTwsis 
5. BaitMiora Onoies 2. Ctowtana naans 7. 
Kansas City Royals t. Catmna Angeto 6. 
Totorao Bue jaya 2. * *ew v o^ Wtw S. 
Chcsgo Wtvts Sox t Nsawnsl Ust y. New 
YorsMats 3. Houston Astros £TAontrael 
Expos a. Piuaoetpnto Pn*» ® 
Canjnals 4. San &P9®J?£5L?k 
Franpflco Qants 7, piraaurflh Pwaiea 5 a los 
A ngeles tXiOgeis a. Dws*go Cum 4 Poet- 
poned: CncHmati Reds « raente Braves. 


(Poll. 242Jt110n32.5L 3. B Ptofcora fPot)- 
230 (105/125) Bs nt e m r Ul fl M (56k4|. 1. N 
Tereski (BU). 285kg nzzs vm&ififus 
(Hto. 2. 0 MasomnnKSHL 280 (1 20/1601 3. 
M QratSew (Burt 275 (1 175/15751. Foatoer- 
wAg 1 <up to Wkflf: 1. N ShNamanm (BuQ. 
33 25 kg I world reel |145 svnch/IBM nrk. 
JWW •get 2-. y Zarfpww (USSR). 295 
(130/165). 1 A Lett (EGL 2S25 (1275/156). 

YACHTING ~ 

OPTNttST SELECTION TRIALS (tv Bntnh 




(AuSIrtS] M T 
*ntMi(WG)« 


(Bewf Vafcsy SCt 2, F BtomAe (fiewi v«nm 
SCK 3. J Ramahaw (Bawl Veley SCI. 4. r py. 
(Draycaa Want .Set 5. J Read (Drayodu 
water SCI Ewopean team: 1. A Cuv 
praycoto Water SO. 2, R Gorrad (Woatem 
SCI: 3. J Hanson (Roama* Biqm SCI; 4, J 
Goman (Western SCI. 5. K MCer (Pspsretxirt 
SCi. 6. S Maddock (Bew< Vflfey sS. 7. j 
Baker (Framoton-an-Sevem SC). 


Scots choose 

Scotland have named a 
badminton team of five men 
and five women for the Com- 
monwealth Games in Edin- 
burgh in July. 

TEAM: W GOitand (Bpping). D 
Travers (Glasgow). A White (KHmar- 
noefc). K Mtdolerrnss (EtSnburghL I 

a (Glasgow), J Aten (Etfin- 
E Aten (EdtnburgtiL C 
Heattey (Edinburgh), A Fulton (Glas- 
gow). A Naim (Perth). 


CYCLING 

Bondue races 
home past 
tired Russian 

Jaen (Reuter) — Alain 
Bondue. of France sprinted 
dear of a little-known Russian, 
who was his. lone companion 
ahead or the pack, to win the 
sixteenth stage of the Tour of 
Spain race yesterday. At the 
Close of the 264-kilometre 
stretch, the longest of the tour. 
Sergei Skhoiuchnekov watched 
helplessly as Bondue raced 
ahead to take a six-second lead 
Skhoruchnekov managed to 
retain second place by 12 sec- 
onds over Lucien Van Impe, of 
Belgium, who was followed 
closely by the pack. 

"We broke away _ 35 
kilometres from the finish," 
Bondue said.Then I saw the 
Russian was exhausted and 100 
metres from the finishing line 1 
knew I was winning." 

SxtMMft Stm (2641011): 1. A Bondue 
(Frt. 6hr 39mtn56sec: £ S SWtorachmtew 
IUSS% (toec batand: 3. L Van top# (8«n, 
12s«x UKftN. 16see. _Bntrit 
placing: 12. R MNtor. seme «km. OwMfe 
1. A Wto (SoL 74hr 6mm 48s«s 2. 


33S4C btednd. Oteer ptoeten: 6, M0y. 
3n*n33sec 





The Libyan crisis and the 
threat of terrorist activity in 
the Mediterranean have 
prompted the Class A Yacht 
Association to .cancel the 
Maxi world championship, 
which was scheduled to be 
held in Greece during August. 
American owners were reluc- 
tant to send their boats across 
the Atlantic. 

It has also been suggested in 
America that the United 
States should not send a team 
to Libya's Sardinia Cap in 
Septmkn-, bat John Wrigbt, 
chief measurer t rf the US 
Yacht Baring Unions, said 
yesterday that the selection 
trials for the three-boat team, 
to be held off Newport, Rhode 
Island, from May 10, vodd 
proceed. 


GOLF 


Faldo sure he will 
get back in swing 


Nick Faldo is well aware that 
a head-to-head confrontation 
over 18 holes is not the easiest 
route back into the European 
circuit following an indifferent 
four months in the United 
States this season. 

Even so. Faldo will approach 
his first round encounter with 
Ove Sellberg, of Sweden, in the 
Epson Grand Prix of Europe at 
SL Pierre. Chepstow, today 
confident that he is on the 
threshold of finding the light at 
the end of a long dark tunnel. 

Faldo has not won a tour- 
nament for two years. It is a 
statistic which hurts his pride. 
However, he considers that 
there will be a reward for 
spending the last 12 months 
changing his swing under the 
instruction of the American- 
based teacher David Ledbetter. 

"It should not be forgotten 
that I won my 1 1 tournaments 
in Europe using the swing I had 
for 13 yeare." Faklo said- “I 
have been working on my new 
swing for one year. I believe that 


By Mitchell Platts 

the time has been well spent and 
that the results will be 
forthcoming.** 

Faklo is now back on the 
European tour for an extended 
spell. He is only in this tour- 
nament courtesy of an invita- 
tion from the sponsors. So it will 
be a bonus if he has an extended 
run this week, especially as he 
could face Sam Torrance in the 
second round even if he over- 
comes the much-improved 
Selbeig 

Faldo, too, knows the ca- 
pricious nature of match play. 
Remember he was six up against 
Sandy Lyle with 17 boles to play 
in the World Match Play 
championship in 1982 and be 
still lost. 

Lyle, who faces Christy 
O'Connor Junior in the first 

round today, is the tournament 
favourite. Lyle, of course, has 
overtaken Faldo as the No . 1 
player in Britain today. But 
Lyle, too. knows that nothing is 
certain in match play. 


* 


Gamer keeps in contact 
in spite of her lenses 


-From John Hennessy, Chantilly 
Maureen Gamer, playing in yards into the 
only her second tournament as a 
professional after a distin- 
guished amateur career, and 


amateur career. 

Diane Barnard, a member of the 
IBM learn, were the unexpected 
leaders on the first day of the 
Hennessy Cognac Cup. the most 
richly endowed event of the 
Women's Professional Goli 
Association tour with a prize 
fund of £60.000. 

With rounds of 72, one under 
par for the gruelling 6,267-yard 
course, they stood one shot 
ahead of Julie Brown, another 
IBM player; and Kelly 
Leadbeater, or the United 
States. 

The signs were not propitious 
for Mrs Garner, a former British 
stroke-play champion as Mau- 
reen Madill. The course was 
universally thought to favour 
the long hitters and she was, 
besides, suffering from an un- 
usual case of double vision. She 
was wearing an unmatched pair 
o? contact lenses, having yet to 
replace one she lost in, of all 
places, a Marks and Spencer fish 

Thus she was unable to 
appreciate the splendour of her 
birdie at the closing hole. Play- 
ing even longer than its 514 


wind, it de- 
manded a three-iron from Mrs 
Garner with 1 65 yards still to go. 
She struck it beautifully and had 
to rely on her paternal caddie to 
discover where it finished, no 
more than 12 inches- from the 
hole. 

Miss Barnard, like Miss 
Brown, has dearly profited from 
six weeks in the Florida sun. She 
played a thoroughly convindng 
round, her best as either an 
amateur or a professional. 

Miss Brown overcame daunt- 
ing odds, for a night interrupted 
by stomach cramps had led her 1 
to consider withdrawing with- 
out striking a ball. A few hits on 
the practice ground gave her 
sufficient assurance to go out 
and add substance to the old 
adage advising you to beware 
the sick golfer. 

LEADMG SCORES: 72: M Gamer. D 
Barnard. 73: J Brown. K Laadbaaiet (USL 
74: S Young. V Pamard (Fr. amateuri. B 
Hufca. PGonlev(USVL Neumann (Swel. D 
Dowling. M Certw (US). 75: E Glass f?«m. 

F Daana m. C WatoTM Marshal (US). D 
Retd. J Connacnam. A NtcnoUs. 76: C 
Lehmann (USL B Lews. C Dtonaft (Ausj. 
M Thomson. K Lurtn (AusL J ForrasL M 
Wennersten (Swe). D Hekucke (US). K 
Douglas. S Stmowick, G Stewart. C 
Pamon.77: K Hurley. L Multord (Ausl. P 
Whittaker. R Comstock (US). M Burton. C 
Mourgue d’Algue (Fr. amateur), L Dawes. 


JUDO 


East German outgenerals Gordon 


Elvis Gordon, the British 
heavyweight, came within a 
whisker of reaching the final of 
the European championships 
here in Belgrade yesterday in his 
attempt to improve on the 
bronze medal be won last year 
(Philip Nicksan writes). 

Although he managed a 
spectacular win over the over- 
confident Grigory Veritchev, of 
the Soviet ' Union, a former 
world silver medal winner, — 
Gordon threw him on his back 
for a full point - he had to 
overcome the stern challenge of 
Henry Stohr, from East Ger- 
many. And he nearly made h. 

With his slightly crouching 
stance. Gordon looked defen- 
sive and somewhat nervous 


against the 6ft 3in East 
(rerman.lt was an illusion. After 
one minute of small attacks be 
launched his whole body into 
the valley drop throw with 
which be caught Veritchev and 
the powerful German was 
knocked backwards. Unlike the 
Russian, he managed to twist 
out of most of the throw and 
conceded only a three-point 
knockdown score. 

Having scored first, Gordon 
could settle down to a tactical 
match, putting in the occasional 
small attacks in order to prevent 
a passivity warning Unfortu- 
nately, he sailed too close to the 
wind. 

Stohr used all his strength and 


skill to put the Wolverhampton 
fighter under pressure and in 
defending Gordon stepped out 
of the fighting area and incurred 
a chui. This five-point penalty 
effectively tTumpoS (Jordon’s 
three-point score. 

The incident was repeated 30 
seconds later and the Briton was 
left perusing a lost opportunity 
and the prospect of lighting fora 
bronze medal when a place in 
the European final had been 
within his grasp. 

In the light-heavyweight cate- 
gory Gordon's club colleague. 
Dennis Stewart, lost to the 
experienced Roger Vachon. of 
France. 




Chester 


Going: soft 

2.15 154) 1 . MBS 8«GAS(W Carson. S- 

13-8 lav Veryan Bay (5th), 14 CHy RraJ 
[4th). 25 Sautaor (0ttil 6 rar. Srt fto. VI, ti. 
71. 151. J Barry « CochartMm. TotecEJ.IO; 
£2.10. £200. OF: £11.70. CSF: E2281. 
Imtn 09JK6QC. 

245 (im 41 65yd) 1. PAGAN BlIN (Pate 


RACING RESULTS 

0.30. £200. £690. £0.60. DF: E13J0. 
CSF: C272X. TVKSHC £309.10. 1m 
33.0758C. Folkwring a stewards- inquiry 
Dolly, who finished fourth was 
AquaMed. 

an (50 I.MYtSABa. (A McG tana. 14- 
1): 2, Jam Cmtesn (M ; 3, 


surney. sawn 
Record WtTO. 8 Cotorwl 
Hri &e®ti 


5 Wav! 

Palace (5th), 3 Reo . 

James (4th). 10 Standard fteaktaat 13 
Vouchsafe. 16 Peinzzo (6fh). SkyhooL 11 
ran NR: HWi Tension. Nk. sh hd. 2NI. 
INI. a A Badey at Nawmarket Tote: 
£9.80; £290. £2-70, £2^0. DR £32-00. 
CSF: £57.17. Tricast: £6854)9. 2n*i 
54.7Bsec- 

3.15 (1m 51 88yd) 1. BRUN1CO (B 
Thomson. 33-1): 2. Shorted ON R 
Swmtxim, 6-5 lav); 3. LenM (R 
Cochrane. 8-1). ALSO RAN: 6 EagRng. 
Goto And Iwry KMi). Rising (4wri. & 
Cftaumtere (5th). 50 MBon Bum. 8 ran. 
NR: Range Rower. 1141, 71. nk. 6L 6L R 
Simpson at Lamboum. Tote: £ 31 50: 
ES-BoTEI-IO. £220. DF: £3650. CSF: 
£67.61. 3nte 1558SOC. 

345 (1m 2f B5yd) T. FARAWAY 


(A Murray. 2-11 ALSO HAN: 
Evens tav Blue Tango i4Mii B Josel Smati 
(«ti). 10 Yavsrro J5thL 20 Dmravtow 
Lady. 33 Phoebe. 50 Etoftantrae (6 ii O 
Brown). 9 ran. NR: Ma Petite Lassie. W. 
hd. 41. sh IWL H Hannon at 

Martioroiigh. Tote: £1350: £220. £250, 
£150. DF. £84.00. 

350 (51) 1. SPARSHOLT (K PowdreU, 


DANCER (S_ Cauthart '^3^2..^ 
6 Eve's Error 


Guest (Pat Edden/. 11-2 k 
r. 6-1). ALSO RAN: 


Eudary. 6-1) . 

(40)1, 10 Oriental Soldier. 5 ran. NFL 
Junto. 51, a ah hd. 15L H Cecfl n 
Nawmaricet Tote: £1.70; £150. £150. DF: 
£350. CSF: £5.12. 2rrun 2650sec. 

4.15CH) 1 . PSBON <P Wtodron. 2^-1 fiM: 
2. Bridge Street Lady (Pat E*tery Mk 1 
PMHp(L Chomock. 8-1). ALSO RAN9-2 
Musto Machne (4th). 5 Duck FBgM (6th), 
12 Deny River (5ffi). 16 LWta Starchy. 40 
Little Bon. 8 ran. IL 1 W. 4L «. KL G Law« 
at Epsom. Tote: £350; £1-40. £1-60. 
£140. DF: £550. CSF: £1059. Inin 
07.72aec. 

455 (70 1 . DOGMATIC (5 Cauthen. 9-2 
it-favk 2 Romsnhc W^jJHawrt^ 
b 3. Hymn Of Kariach (G Duflield. 6-1L 
ALSO RAN: 9^ R-tava Aucoon Man (Jth). 
Examination, 11-2 My Kind ot Town (5tn|, 
8 Toppeshamme. 14 Hftrtabatl. Danww 
Tom (fidi). 9 ran. Hd. >L hd. 3L W- ft 
Johnson Houtfitan at Blowpury. Tote: 
E3M; Cl .90250. £280. DF: £1240. 
CSF: £3453. limn 3755360. 

Ptocepot E545S. 

Salisbury 

Qete^SofL 

150 (lm 2f) 1. PLEETMG AFFAIR (G 
Starkey. 6-1): 2 Mtata (M Roberts. 4-5 
tavt 3. Stongi Vah (R Guram. 12-1). ALSO 
RAN: 15-2 rabecos (4th). 8 Krtowkk (5th), 
14 Damon Fate. Eaton Smote. 16 
Peranarirn (881). to Assentty, 33 Alnta, 
Asftord Lass.fluseW. 12ran. W. W.5L2L 
4LNR: Nftle VHung. Roubayd. G Harwood 
at Putoorough. Tote: £4.4ft £1.70, £1-40, 
E5.40. DF; £450. CSF: £1552 2mm 
16.S09OC- 

25 (lm) 1. GEORGES QUAY (A 
McGione. 4-lfc 2 Stertort Vtoe(J RekL 8 - 
il 2. Cosmic FWA(M Wigham. 8-1): 4, 
Fvepnot (A Ctarice. IfelL ALSO RAIL- 
10050 (av Problem Chfld (6th). 8 
Avertino. 12 Merrymotes. 14 On To Glory, 
to Balnacrmg. No Jazz. 33 Eastern never 
(5M Hadwmtau. Brent Riverside, No 
Stoppng, Whrtnfl Worts, Cracon 9ft, 
CsSm. 17 ran. Nft Markeha. 31. 1LB.2L 
M. R Hannon at Martborough. Tola: 
£5 4ft £2.00. £450, £1.10, CX20. D F: 
£4650. CSF: £3218- TRICAST: £21856. 
1mm 4956sac. 

230(71) t. StNQLE ffl McKay. 3-1 tayk 


Sutters Mfl. 

Sarasota ( 

shot Baby. 10 

41. 41, W. P Cote at Whataombe. Tote: 
£210; £150. £150. £150. DF: £1250. 
CSF: £11.30. Iinm 05.04 aac. 

45 pm 2Q 1. MOON MADNESS ® 
Rouse. 6-1); 2 Cnteage jJ Rwd, 9-2): 3, 
Make Peace (J Mattntos. 8-1 ). ALSO RAN: 
11-4 tav Benisa Ryder (4th). 11-2 FntHof. 
8 tong's Crusade («h). 10 Autumn Fkitter 
rattix B«eL 16 GraMy. to Home O Away. 
X) FuB Speed Ahead, Mr Sewas. 
Tonqusi. 13 ran. NR: Ganoon. W.Z.IKl 
21. a. J Dunlop at Anmciet Tots: £5.00; 
H 70. £2». £200. DF: £1660. CSF: 
£34.78. 2jnhi 1648S8C. 

450 (lm 61) 1. MY CHARADE (R Fox, 
20-11:2 WUGfc»oar(BCrossley. 14-lfc3, 
(ML Thomas. 12-1). ALSO 
7-4 tav Fak Dance (4th). 6 Sugar 
Patoi (8thv. 7 Intuition. B Brigadier Jac- 
ques. 10 Cawarra Bade. 12 Cotesto (5W4. 
Nostar Puer, 20 Master Franco. 11 ran. 51. 
G. 3L 7L 41. Mrs B Wanna 8t Malmesbury. 
Tote: £1220: £210. 080. £220. DF: 
£102.20. CSF: £240.15. Trlcast: 
£3.13856. 3nrin 14.11 sec. 

55 (lm 2f) 1. BROKEN WAVE (Ft 
Curant, 14-1): 2 ButoKdo (G Sttekm. 5-& 
2 Zatoer (B Rouse. 4-1). ALSO RANt 11-8 
lav Floral Cnarga (6th). 12 Dhraon. to Ma 
Fstehers, HcRuwti). 33 Coleman Hawkins 
CStn). Bemlgre Boy. Danribo, Gay Caruso. 


Thereafter, vary. 13 ran. NR: Mouradatea. 
sh hd, f2t.uk. til. a H Candy at Wantage 
Tote: £11.10; £250. £1 1ft £1 70. DF 
El 7.90. CSF: £4953. 2mtn 17.64sec 
FoMowmg a stewards' Inquiry itw result 
stood. 

Ptecepofc 85 86 

Sedgefield 

Go/nq: good to sort 
5^6 Cm 41 hdiei 1 . QaMm tC Price, 1 4- 
1); 2. FebuKHm Lad (5-1): 3. Son Of 
Monedo (9-1). BevaL Star Even) 4- d4a» 
14 ran. 21. 5L T BriL Tote: £8.60: £210. 
£3.50. £250. DF: winner or second wrrti 
any Other horse £270. CSF: £8223. 
TrtaBst: £626 76. 

6.15 (3m 600 yd hde) 1 . Fair Beirart (S 
Yotrioen. 6-4 tavt 2 Btakeratatf (9-2); 3. 
Taora Gold (16-1). 6 ran. NR: Brtaarona. 
25L 9h hd. H Wharton. Tote: E27ft £1.«0. 
£150. £3.40. DF: £350. CSF: £9.19. 
TrtcMt £73.59. 

• Single, the 3-1 fovouriie. de- 
layed the start of the 
Stockbridge Handicap at Salis- 
bury yesterday by more than ten 
minutes, when he had to be 
reshoed. but he wasted no time 
once the race was under way, 
winning by ihreequartere of a 
length from Formatune. 

TTie coll is keeping the flag 
flying for long-serving local 
trainer Bill Wjghtman. Bought 
for just 300 guineas by 
Wightman as a yearling. Single 
has now won three times this 
season, and six times in all. 
Wightman said “He would have 
won at Kempion on Saturday 
but for hanging badly. 

Georges Quay recovered 
losses from Newmarket Iasi 
week when pulling off a gamble 
from 13-2 to 4-1 in the Dorset 
Handicap. 


7 

3 

9 

1 

B 

a 

a 

.1 

.9 

12 
.2 
:3 
'.3 
:s 

■ 23 

'.45 

f.6 

U 

iS 

13 
».1 
i2 
L0 
t 


sra 


2 FomwumeiJ Reto.8-1t 3. Peemtay (A 
Mom. 16-11; 4. Hapetal Katie (N Adams. 
16-1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 Every Effort 11 


Dolly. 13 Fair Country, 14 Herts Sunshine, 
Kampgiow. 16 Hate Lid, Kavalta (Stfi), to 
Hun Pitted. 25 Crimbowne. 33 
Sandboume (6thi MckyMck. Jabaraba. 
SuoertrosL »ent Gain. Apr* Fool. 19 ran. 
NR: Pamela Heanety. *UH. to. IL * M. 
W Wightman at Upham. Tale £3-20; 


ENTERTAINMENTS 

Cuotinto from page 39 


jder 

--ws 


are 

3r 


CINEMAS 


QATE CWENUL NatUnqhlH Cate 
727 0043. Derby SICfiro ZMA 
1151 340. 5^5 7 to. 9.00. Ad- 
vance teriunt. 

umm squuK ihcatoe 

930 6230 IEM|l/«3a 7615 CM 
now Arerfl/ vea/fl niBi Book- 

UMM THJK JEWEL or T 1 K 

MIX rPGi m Dotay swreo. Sep 
prop Daily 12.48, 326. 6.06, 
0.46 Lai# Nmhl Show Frt 6 Sat 
11 46pm All procs boohatrtr In 
advance 


379 3014/ 
836 0691 a Martin's Lam. 
WCE iLomter Sa tn6e>. Dcrck 

Janiun'i pert* winning CM*- 

vA«ao cm. rum ar i oo. 
i 65 4 50. 6.66. 9.O0. Uc Bar 
SCATS BOOKABLE far eve 
pert* 

MmEMA 45 KNtBHreBMDOE 

2354225 Bn ran mnnwolr 
film by Agnes Varda 
VACJU MM OE tlBl WuMfc-i Dm 
ly : 3 0. 5.0. 7 JO. 9-0 ’Strung, 
wgu. riMiMM. A nirri you 
wcarl FawryouBniiBni 


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201H 1W JEWEL OP TMC 
MUE (PCI sea ome. Owl 

OMfl DtUty I IS. 3.38. 5.56. 
8 15 Law N«tii snow Frt a 
S al Doors iUX)pm. Be- 
aund prim Mr unaer la's. 
Student card hoMera- UB4C 
ladders. OAPt 


HAYlUUHrT 
27381 THE LKWT5W .161 ~ 
Sen Progs Daily 2.00. S3Q. 
8.30. All scan bookable in ad 
Access and v»a 
WWnhcme bookings wetewne 


_ i ( ^yuqy 
1930 ami . MO 9 SO 42S0 / 
48 59 waw p IINAR—P AND 
DAMGZMMIt . 181 . Ses progs 
Doan darn Daily i 46. 4 46. 
B OO Lai. NMM snow m A Sal 

Doors open n lSpm. AH progi 
bookable In advance. Crron 
Cam hm Line iAtnm/ visa/ 
AmExr 839 1929. 24 hour ser- 
vice. Q 50 seats «arlaMe' 
Monday aU perh 


*•;; i ■ 


817 8402 OPP. RusseU 
Sq. Tube iformerry Gate 
Bloomsbury' 

OPENS n»l 9 MAY wim NEW 
TWW SCREENS COMPLETE- 
LY REFURBISHEO. 

1 Agnes Vnrda's praewumlng 
ntm VjrCAbonoe ,is>. stamng 
Sandnne Sonnaire Film al 
210. 4.20, 6.30 SOLD OUT. 
8.48. 

2. Ala n BJea sdale-s comedy Ml 
*to StTO®«fR net mm ar 

2 00. 4 OS. fc 16. e 30 
SEATS BOOKABLE EVE 

PEnrs Arw*i/vba. . 

WOMAN iifli a 30 
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SOTOM ON THE 1HM, 435 3366. 
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2-30. 4.3e, 7 00. a.ss. srera 
Bankable Acnsa/Vha 


(• . . 



5 


>> 


bx. 




\ 




, ^ * a*** * * ^ x. ^vv 

’s television and radio programmes 


BBC 1 


U» Ceefax AAf. 
fc- 30 ®p«WW Time wim Frank 
522* *** NWt.Rosa. A 

special borough and fy. 
Bwctonreaute edition . 
"jau^corninentfTom 

SffiSBF 

regtor^newsmgj/ 

727, 7^7 and & 2 T; 
national and international 

at 8.1% and a review of the 
«wrn^newsp»er»at 

■J7- Pwu deaing-up 

Britain's footbeB image; 

shopping advice; . 
gening hints; and the 
___ rajoapop music news. 

9-20 The Panim Programme. 
Cwwig wrfth cryfrigfatfte 
subject of thte programme 
tattre series on fivtng with 
die under-fives, presented 


TV- AM 


8.16 Good 


Britain 


J and Nk* Owen. 
Exercises at fcK; news 

fftTefiSnsia 

9-00; sport at 640 and 
74% cartoon at 72% pop 
vWeoat7J%JImny 
Giesves'B television 

wnembwedatWftand 
health and fitness for fifty 
yearoWsmflLia. 


ITV' LONDON 


*5 headlines. 

9 -20 For Schools: the natural 



i OTteWy. (r) 9 l 3S 
1020 Pfoy SchooL 


„ ' historical 
dues along part of ihe 
Leeds nndUveraodl Canal 
1049 Junior maths: brae 
numbers 1026 Family 
prebtems associated with 
leisure 1048 EnoHsh: the 


►The passing-out parade 
becomes one of the 
i of Friday night. 

the return of YOUft 
LIFE iff THEM HANDS 
(BBC2, 9.00pm], the 
documentary series that 
takas us into our insides via the 
operating theatreJSo much 
blood. So many organs. So much 
sliced tissue and sfitcftfiig- 
upJhe oriy way the more 
squeamish among ue can 

“'1 is by trying to 
nearrovt 

1 people on the 

surgeon's table but anlmsl 
carcases on the butcher's stab. 
The curse^f it an is that such 
. self-deception does not reafly 
woricFBms Oka tonight's, 
about the operations to separate 
~ Siamese twins at London's 
X-ray af the Reich Siamese twins: Great Ormond Street ho6pnal,wn 
onBBCA 940pm keep on remlmflngus that 


CHOICE 


these are human bongs, and that 
what we are watching are 
battles to save a life, end that If 
■the operation goes wrong 
there wffl be grief to equal the fey 
if it doesn't go wrong.The 
dramatic elements are very 
powerful indeed in the story 
of HoBy and Carty Reich. One 
twin may have to Sa so that 
the other can Kve. Can the 

surgeons sort out which bits 
of viscera belong to which twin ? 
Are the hearts separata? 

When the Dawesnave been 
parted, can the bodies 
function normally ? And - an 
important consideration tar 
the apprehensive viewer who 
leeta a feinttng fit coming on- 
how many more times ww the 
narrator seyr“ That’s one 
crisis over, but there's stfll lots 


more to be dona"?. 

•I can't imagine a harder- 
hitting or more effective way to 
prevent youngsters from 
taking a chance on drui 
making them watch Watty K 
Daly's play for BBC School 
Television TOO MCE BY 
HALF,repeafed on BBC2 at 
2.00 .Even had it been given a 
happy-ever-efter ending, this 
story of heroin addiction 
would be powerful propaganda. 
But the power is an the 
greater because it ends with a 
question mark. 

•A notable early repeat on 
radio, tottLouts Robinson's 
feature about the former 
leper colony of Spinatonga, 
Island of the Living Deat f 
(Radio 4, 1 l.00am.}From start to 
finish, this is i 

pictures. 


: radio with buitt-in 


Peter DavaUe 


BBC 2 




Ceefax 10201 
lOSOCeefax. 

1220 News After Noon with 
Frances Covers and 
Moka Stuart, includes 
news headlines with 
subtittas 1225 Regional 

news: The weather details 
are provided b 

la MU at One. Peter 
Seabrpok reports on the 

Queen's eye SSe toured 
the Pebble MB Street 
section of the National 
Garden Festival; Keith 
Royd with ideas on how to 


8.55 


the local 
1127 


visit 
station 
their 


9.45 


_ _‘S School 720 

Weekend Outlook. Ends at 
725- 940 Ceefax. 


140 




C David WtOcta 
gives EnHyn Hughes 

advice on how to improve 
his swimming technique; 
and there -la music from 
the Beethoven Trio. 145 
Gran (r) 120 (r) 240 
Ceefax 342 Regional 
news. 

345 The Amazing Adventures 
of Morph, introduced by 
Tony Hart (r) 440 Mike, 
Mop and the Moke. 
Songs, stories and jokes 
from tin seaside. (04.10 
Dogtanian and the Three 
Muskahounds. Cartoon 

440 FBm; A Ghost of a Chance 

(1967) Three children iota 
forces with the ghosts of a 
house in order to thwart 
the bidding's demolition. 
Madefy the Children's 
Film Foundation and 
starring Jimmy Edwards, 
Graham Syksa, Patricia 
Hayes, Bernard CrtoWns. 
Terry Scott and Ronnie 
Barker. Directed by Jen 
Damiey Smith. 525 The 
Bbitstones. Cartoon. 

640 News with Sue Lawiey and 
Nicholas Witched. 

Weather. 

625 London Ptue, presented 
by Jeremy Paxman, 
includes a round-up of 
London’s local election 
results. 


den to 8 vet; and then the 
vet goes to a farm to treat 
a cow 1144 The story of 
Sfktrfsm. 

1240 Teetkm and Ctauctta. 
Adventures of a dog and a 
cat (rl 12.10 Rainbow. 
Learning made fun wtth 

Kenton continues her 
series on delaying the 
ageing process and visits 
■ one of the most luxurious 
hearth farms m the ' 
country. 

1.00 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 120 Thames news. 

120 Ftam River Bear (1954) 
starring PhyjSs Kirk ana 
John Bentley. A ship's 
radio officer comes under 
suspicion of smuggling 
when she agrees to carry 
a package ashore tar a 
steward. Then tire body of 
the steward is found in the 
Thames. Directed by Guy 
Green. 

340 


CHANNEL 4 


220 Tbeir Lordships' House. A 
repeat of fast night’s 
highlights of the da ^ 


growth of a baby in the 
womb and its birth- 
Subtitled 1028 The rota of 
micronutrients In diets 
1140 How a computer can 
help a television producer 
1122 A day In the Ufa of a 
assembly mae worker In a 
Hiroshima car factory 
1144 The impact of new 


controWng240TooMce 
-By Half?, a play by Wafly K 
Daly on the perils of L ___ 

’ ' " .(see Choice} 

___r books about 

survivors. 

240 Ceefax. 

525 News summery with 
subtitles. Weather. 

520 Goto' Places. Harry 


on a 


Introduced! 

Gascoigne.: 

news headlines 320 Sons 
and Daughters. . 

440 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at12.10 
4.15 The Blunders. 
Cartoon series narrated by 
Frankie Howerd 425 
Scootry Doo 440 The Blzz 
presented by Kelly Temple 
and Lisa Maxwell. How 


5.15 


pop videos are made. 
Horses for I 


rCoursee. 

Veronica Chartwodd is at 
the Fortune Centre, 
Dorset; Mike FieWvfsHs 
the British Racing School 
In Newmarket 
545 New* with Carol Barnes. 
640 The 6 O'clock Show: 
740 Me end My GM. Comedy 
series about an 
advertising man I 
> Ms teenage f 


740 


up Ms to 
Under,! 


Sobers, Lord Denn! 
and 'Lord Upminsti 
Ian Dure. Pfos music from 
Jimmy Ruffin and Heaven 
17. 

740 i*ve Got a Secret, 

-introduced fy Torn; . ~ 
O'Connor.. Anneka Rice, 
Derek Jameson. Alan 
Titehmarsh. and The ' 
Times Dtary edttoc, Angata 
Gordon, attempt to learri 
the secrets of five guests. 
(Ceefax) 

8.10 Dynasty. An tavestigative 
reporter drives Krytale to 
the edge of a nervous 
breakdown; Ataxia is 
having delusions of 
grandeur; and Fallon fiees 
toe attentions of her low- 
stricken husband. (Ceefax) 

940 News with Julia SomervBto 
and John Humphry*. 
Weather. 

920 VWeo Jukebox. A special 
Omntaus programme 
tracing the history of rock 
video. The programme, • 
presented by John Peel 
and John Walters, test 
taur-and-a-haif hours and 
as weti as showing 
performances by toe stare, 
the programme Includes 
interviews with the 
Important people behind 
the cameras. 

240 approximately Weather. 


720 Murder, She Wrote: D eed 
Heart. Jessica comes to 
the aid of bar niece, a 
young Jockey who is the 
prime suspect when toe : 
owner of a winning horse 
she rode is found 
'murdered. Starting Arigaia 
Lansbwy. : ■ 

.820 Hone to RooM. Comedy 
' starring John Thaw as a ' 
divorced father whose . 

oeeMbuntf freedom te 

threatened fy the arrival of 
tils son. (i) (Oracle) 

9.00 AufWtedBrseheiwPet., ■ 

. . .-Comedy jfcamajbout a 

. gang' oCbtickfaK (Oracle) 
HUB News at Ten with Sandy 
Gall end Pamela 
Armstrong. 

1020 The London Programme. 
John Taylor reports on 
house price escalation in 
-London and the South 
East Followed bytWT 
News headlines. - 
1140 South of WatfonL A - 
proffle of the 63-year old . 
star of London's fringe 
reviews, Ivor Gutter. . . 
1120 Shoot Pdofl. The second 
semifinal of the John Bull 
Bitter London Port 
- Championship. Joe 
Barbara plays M&e 
Casey. 

1220 Hawaii Five-O. Steve 

McGanett Is Involved in a 
kidnap case, (r) 

120 NkMThouaMa. 


Melbourne, near York, (rt 
640 FBm: Vlstt to a Chiefs Son 
(1 974) starring Richard 
MuHgan and Johnny 
Sekka.Thesonofan 

American 

in Kenya to fflm_ 
tribe, strikes up a 
friendship wtto the chief a 
son. Directed fy Lamont 
Johnson. 

725 Cartoon Twot Ocfc&afl. 

725 House and Home .Nicholas 
Taylor is ta IsSngton, 
admiring the area's 
Georotan terraces. 

840 Orchestra. Jans Glover 
traces the evolution of the 
modem symphony 
o r chestra. Part one. ft) 

820 GantaneEB* WUrkL The 
rockeries, watsrgardens 
and woodlands of Clapton 
Court the Somerset home 
of Captain and Mrs Simon 
Loder. The grounds also 
boast tte biggest prtva* 
collection ofmehstas in 
Britain. 

040 Your LUO In Th e* H an ds . 

- The story of an eight-hour 
operation at Great 
. Ormond Street Hospital to 
. separate Siamese twins, 
-Holly and Carty Raich, who 
were jotaerffrorv 
breastbone to navel (see 
/■' ' ChofceXCeafax) 

940- Did You S*e~?_Ludovic 
Kennedy fejeseted by . 
Stephen Bwkoff, Matthew 
Parris and Anna Massey. 
.They ^ comment on King of 
the Ghetto; FtrstTuesday 
andGalary. 

1025 NtwsNght1l20 
■ weather. 

1125 The Lords TMa Wt 

Christopher Jones reports 
on the week's debates in 
the House of Lords. The 
first of a new series. : 

1 1245 Flm: Riot in Cell Block 
11- (1954) starring Nevflta 
Brand and Emae Meyer. 
Four prison officers are 
taken hostage by a group 
of prisoners who are 
demanding bettor 
coxtitions. The prison 
warden wants to 
negotiate, the state 
autoorities want to use 
force. Directed by Don. 
SJegef and produced fy 
Walter Wanger who had 

nt more thm three 
in prison for 
his wife's (Joar 
_.agert.Endsat 

120 . 


_ i In the 
of Lords.. .. 

David Rose. 

225 FBim Boa k. . 

A celeb ra tion of the 

Basle Band horn its early 
days, featuring soksts 

' y Wells, Stodytate, 

; Clayton, Esne 

Warren and Jo Jones. 
Directed by John Jeremy. 
320 On the Road With Duke 
. A portrait of the 
__j musician and Ms 

made In 1967. 

! 420 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner bchaflenged fy jm 
CarrpbeU from Sofihui 
540 Car 54 Where Are YouT* 
Vintage American comedy 
series starring Joe E Ross 
and Fred Gwynne as two 
hapless New York police 
offleera, today ta ptata 
dotoes patrolling the 
Yankee Stedtam on the 

look-out lor pickpockets. 

520 The Chart Snow. The run- 
down of toe latest charts 
covering all types of 
popular musfc from home 
and abroad. 

6.15 RevkL Gary Crowley and 
Jon Stephen Fink review 
the week's video releases. 
620 Solid Scarf, presented fy 
Juliet Roberts and Chris 
Forbes. The guests are 
BOy Ocean, Joyce Sims, 
Wally Badarou, and Aurra. 
740 Channel Four news with 
Peter Sissons and Atastair 
Stewart Indudes a report 
from Heysham Power 
Station on how sate is 
Britain’s nudear power 
industry. Weather. 

740 Book diotes. Timothy 
Garton Ash reviews me 
Artful Albanian, the 
memoirsof Enver Hoxha, 
who ruled Albania tar tour 
decades. 

840 Whet the Papers Sey. 
Freelance Journalist, Peter 
McKay, casts a critical eye 
over how the Press has 
treated toe week’s news. 


8.15 


Bandung na. This week's 
edition of 


ev tu ■ wwwh 

brtnMigch 
world than 


f the magazine 
programme for Asian and 
Aho-Caribbean viewers 
includes a report on post- 
DuvaJlerHdti. 

940 The Cosby Show. Comedy 
series starring BH Cosby 
as an obstetrician haf 
children Into 
bringing them 

920 The&eatPtant 
Cofleeflona. Roy 
Lancaster vtaftsBodnant - 
Gardens, North Wales, (r) 
(Orade) 

[1040 Cheers. Diane, unhappy at 
seeing fYasier down in toe 
dumps, concocts a plan to 
help him fed needed. 

>1020 SSeelng. This find 
programme of toe series 
follows a group of low or 
no Income Glaswegians 
ttsough a typical day ln 
their fives. (Orede) 

11.15 FfemKOer of Sheep* 

Saj^Sandefl as^e, a 
man tiring In a black Los 
Angeles ghetto trying to 
retain his sense of dignity 
and moral values despite 
his surroundings. Directed 
by Charles Burnett 
1245 FBnc Blues LBte Showers 


Blues 
and archive 


Jeremy. Ends at 1 


bgJotin 


( Radio 4 




emtangware. VHF variations at end 

545 Shaping 640 News Brtsfints 
Weather4.10 


840 


News 045.745 Weather 
740440 News 72S22S 
Sport 745 Thought for the 
Day 62S Yesterday in 
Paritament 840 Letters 

Weather; Travel 

940 News 

945 Six Men. Anne Brown 
meets John Rtdgway. 
transatlantic oarsman and 
compulsive adventurer to 

940 More Hot AX’. Anthony 
Smith and landscape 
architect Jerry Birteck takes 
tnp in a bafloon over 
WwwfcksWra. 


>847 


1040 News; international 
Assignment. BBC 
correspondents report 
1040 Mooting Story; 


1148 


JSS by John Sturt. 

Reader; Peter Tuddenham. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 

1140 

the LMng Dead. Louis 
Robinson describes the grim 
Mst of the (stand of 

Catchpota dtacoms that 
there ts more to a bird's nest 
than a beep of old sticks. 

1240 News: The Food 
Programme. Derek 
Cfooper learns about the 

carobbean. 

1227 ted^, Ban iteand ^ 

140 ^HtaridSonsc News 

140 Tlw Arch ers. 1.55 

2.00 Ne^v^omen’s Hour. 
Flashback to s North 
Wales state quarry strike. 

340 News; Joseph Andrews 
by Henry Fielding. Last 
episode in a tour-part 
dramatization (rVs) 

440 News 

445 The News Huddtee*. 

Roy Hudd. June WhfifieM 
and Chris Emmett tough at 
the news. 

440 Kaleidoscope. Last 
right's edwon, repeated. 

540 PM: News 
Magaztae440 
Shipptag&S5 Weather 

640 News: HramcW Report 

640 Gang Places. CSvs 
Jacobs and his team 
examine the world of travel 
and transport. •* • 


740 News.745 The Arcfters. 

720 Pick Of the Week. Glyn 
Worsnlp's selection of 
extracts from BBC radio 
programmas over toe 
past weak. 

820 On Being e Judge. Judge 
James Hrides. in 
conversation with 
Wilkes, reveals how 
mind of a serving judge 
works. 

845 Any Questions? with 
Peter Bottontiey. MP, 

Tony Christopher, Richard 
Hrima and Jean Denton. 

940 Latter From America by 
Alistair Cooke. 

945 Kaleidoscope. With 
Michael 

Sdkngton.tndbideB comment 
on the BBC2 drama 
serial Kra of the Ghetto, and 
Two Noble Kinsmen, at 
the Swan Theatre, Stratford 
upon Avon 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: The 
Amateur Emigrant, by 
Robert Lows swvenson. 
Read by Paul 
Yoimg.1029 Weather. 

1040 The World Tonight 

1140 Today in Parliament 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

11 40 Week Ending. Satirical 
review erf tne week's 
news (6). 

1240 News; Weather.1243 
Shipping. 


VHF (available in England and 
S woes only) as above 
except 54Sfi40em Weather; 
Travel. 11. 00-1 240 For 
SchoOs:1140 Singing 
Together (sj.11 20 

See tor YourseH.145-5.00pm 
ForSchoots:155 
Listening Comen 245 Let s 
Join InJLS Topic 
Songbook (s)240 Let’s Make 
a Story! (s)240 Listen! 
(6)440-545 PM 
(conttaued).1240am-1.10 
Schools Night-time 
Broadca3ting:1240 
Advanced Studies 


( Radio 3 ) 


On medlwn wava VHF variations at 
and of Ftadto 3. 

645Waather. 740 News 
745 Moming Concert Gounod 
music from Fi 


»r (An den Mond, 

18 and Sis haben heur 
Abend Gesedschaft Ftacher- 
baritone), Haydn 
^rr^thony No 83). E40 . 

945 Concert (contd): WOwr 


J ubel overture. Op 59). 
Busser arrangement of 
Debussy (Petite Suite}, 
Gabnen {Sonata piano 
forte.1597). Walton( 
Facade orchestral suite), 


Lotte Lenya, soprano). 
News 

945 This Week's Composer: 
Ockeghem. Josqum 
Choir perform Mass for the 
Feast of the 

Ann u nc ia tion of Our Lady; 
Mlssa Ecce anofla 
Domini 

945 Wind Quartets: Capricorn 
m Mozart's Flute Quartet 

in C.. K 285b, and Hummers 
darmet Quartet In E Hat 
10.45 Langham Chamber 
'under 

).WlFen (Serenade 

tor Stniigs), T ft sodo ra fcb 
(Oedipus tyrannos), Mozan 

g veremento in D, K 
1) 

11.35 Faure aqnd Saint-Saeng: 
Andrea Hess (cello), 

Kathron Stunock (ptanoL 
Faure (Romance in A. Op 
69: Papifon.Op 
77 iSictitenne, Op 78; 
Samt-Saens (Sonata in C 
minor. Op 32) 

12.15 BBC Wash SO (under 
Owaln Arwei 
Hughes).with BBC Walsh 
Chorus, CardHf 
Pdyphor* Choir, Ardwyn 

and Philip 

Partone. 
Tender 
Land). Rachmani n ov 
(Rhapsody on theme of 
Paganini). 140 News 
145 Concert: part two. Barber 
(Essay No 2, and Adagio 
tor string orchestra). 
Stravinsky (Symphony of 
Psalms) 

140 Janacek and Debussy: 
Manm Roscoe 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


Franz Xaver Kroetz. set 
in a smaU Bavarian town. 
With Maureen Beattie as 
the butcher, and 
Fisher as her 

1025 Araitti String Quartet 
Ligeti's Quartet No 1 
1140 Nocturne: recordings of 
works by Bax (Into ms 
Tua fight), OuflhiU (The Cloths 
tti Heaven, with John 

McCormack.ienor). Field 
(Nocturnes No 1 and No 
2. in EflatandC mho), 

Harty (Nocturne, a John 
Field Suita), and Ofle to a 
Nightingale, with Heather 
Harper, soprano) 

1147 News 1240 Ctosedown. 

Viff only: Open University. 

From 825am to 845. Mans 
F oundation TutCrttf. 

( Radio 2 ) 

440am Charies Nove(s>540 
Ray Moora(5j720 Derek 
Jamewon(s)940 Ken 
Bruce(s)1140 jimmy Young plus 
legal problems answered by BM 
TtKHrias(srt.05pm DeWd 


|pwno)ptays works by 
Debussy (Pour ie pian 


and L isle 


Jove: 

Janacek (hi tne Mists) 

2JS BgarLFO under Sotf. 

Faktaff, Op 68 
340 The Cooiioge 

Commissions: Mithaud 
(String Quartet No 9), 
Honegger (Concerto da 
camera, wtto ShostecAM 
and Vogal.cor 
angiats/Los Angeles CO) 
440 Choral Evensong: from 
Winchester Cathedral. 

445 News 

540 Mainly tor Pleasure: 
recorded music 
selection presented by 
Rodney Siatfonf 
620 Guitar muste toriro 
Suzuki plays works by 
Ohana, Sor and Falla 
(Homenaje a Debussy) 

740 The Art of Margaret 
Price: recordings of 
works I 
Dieihr 
unermessiichen WattaNs 
Schopfo-ahn, Liszt 
(Petrech Sonnet Pace non 
trovo), and Berg 
(Attenberg Uedar, Op 4) 

720 The English Concert, 
under Trevor Pin nock 
(harpsichord). Part 
one .Handel (Concerto 
Grosso in F, Op3 No 4a), 
Vivaldi (Bassoon 
Concerto In E minor. RV 
484). Handel (PassecaSte 
In G). and Bach (Harpsichord 
Concerto in D minor. 
BVW1Q59) 

820 Letter from Tokyo: by 
Anthony Thwaite 
840 Concert put two. Vhiskli 
(Concerto In A minor for 
two viol ns, RV 522)and Bach 
(Suite No 1. BWV 1066) 

920 Through the Leaves: 

Anthony VMS's 
translati on of the work by 


to piano, 
useLand 


HunrVford(S)320 David Hamflton 
from the National Garden 
Festival . Stoke-on-Trent? 9)545 
John Dunn(s)740 Hubert Green 
says Thanks tor toe Mamory(m720 
Friday NkpS Is Music 


Vic 

the vUaga and town bands of 
Sussex and the Souto920 The 
Organist EnurteinsMlgfll 
OgoenMs)946 Sports 
DeskltLOO Just William. WUam 
Davies introduces conducts 
and plays some of Ms favourite 
music. 1020 Kemeto Wfiiams' 
Cabaratl 140 Angela 
FUpponfstareo from 
mnn«ht)l40am Nick Page(8)340- 
4 40 A Little Night Musk^S/ 

( Radio 1 ) 

520 Adrian Jotm740Mfes 
SmitfKtive from Montrsaux Rock 
FestivaJ)920 Simon Batss1220 
NewsbeatfFrsnk Partridge)! 2^45 
Gary Da vies3i40 Steve 
Wright520 Newsbe a tf F rank 
Partriage)546 Singled Out 
Jenfce Long wkh Axils HoHand and 
Jonathan I&ig720 Andy 
PeebtesKUtf 1240 The Friday 
Rock Show with Tommy 
Vancafs) 


WORLD SERVICE 


840 NewSdwk 620 Maridbn 740 News 


Munraw 820 Muvc Now S40 News flLOO 
Review of the Bnun ness 9.15 The 
Worm Today 920 Financial News S20 
Look Ahead 925 A Short waft in the 
Hindu Kush 1040 News 1041 The Poo 
Press 10.15 Merchant Navy Programme 
1140 News 1149 News About Bntam 
11.15 In (ha Maantsne 1125 A Later from 
Northern Iraand 1120 Msrktan 1240 


I Radio Newsreel 12-15 Jazz tor me Aaksil 
1246 Snorts RouKSup 140 News LM I 
TWerty-four Hows 120 John Peel 240 
News 241 ounook 245 John After 
CncMt Anthology 240 Radio Nawareri 
0.15 Aapeea otCove 44BNawa «40Com. 
mentary 415Sdonca In Action 545Sporta 
Rouncbo 745 AD 0 U BiWn B40Nawti 
849Twenty-Four Hows 820Sdenca In 
Action 940 News 941 Network UK 9.15 
Miuc Now 945 The Heat oMhe Oey 1040 
worm News 1040 The World Tooay 1IU5 
A Letter tram N u nn e m Miami 1040 
RnanoBl Newe 1040 ReOecrem 1045 
Soorn Roundup 1140 News 1140 Com- 
mentary 11.16 From the WeeMas 1120 
TaUtng Aoout Munc 1240 News 1249 
News About Brttmn 12.15 RatSo Neweraai 
1220 Aoout Bntam 1245 Recording of 
the Week 140 Newt 141 Ounook 120 
The Pop Frees 1.45 John Anon's Crfcaw 
I Anthology 240 News 249 Review at tne 
Bnttsn >ess 2.15 Network UK 229 
People and POitlce 240 News 249 News 
About Bnten 3.15 Tbs Wond Today 445 
| Financial News 426 Reflections 540 
News S49 Twenty-Four Horn 545 The 
World Today. AS terns la QMT. 


RRC1 - WALE S 528pm-740 

MtereTbdey- 825740 Game. 
Sat and Match. SCOTLAND 125pm- • 
740 Reporting Sastana 740-4.10 . . 
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Bsaengrore Qteten. 1045-1020 Lett 
Right and Catena. 1«20-340e»0m- 
tifi* VUaoJteatiOBL NOmWM Oto- 

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sum IMpaHJ* Ragtete naa» 


Be t w een Two 


Addicts. BKSJUto 
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Day Out NORTH A VMgs 
« Sees. NORTH-CAST^ 


CoumrySpedaL NORTH- WEST A 
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Htoamte Report 825 Cris Weak In 
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Country QP S.15-S4S Connections 
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As HTV West 
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tior I vs 200-340 Mre m A Sterese 
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You tea R440LooKaroundS20 
Tree The won Road 740-720 ASiion 
Market 1020 Fare 10 . RDimion 
Piece t220amCtoeadown. 


ISK&12KSE 


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120pm News 120-340 Ftet CttttiB 
Queen of Montane 328-440 Young Doo- 
toraS. 15-545 Blockbusters 640 To- 
aaySomh west 620 What's Anaed 740- 
720 ABMon Market 1023 (jafosna 
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J. Hoornr 820-940 Granaoa 30: frees 
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6.16 Revd 620 SoM Sod 740 
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Kate and Alta 92D Rare HanaChra- 
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340 FQnc Nurse On Wheels 5.16- 
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tester 620 Soonscast 640 Advice 
Wte Arms Hates 740 AiMMt Market 
720-620 Kngitt fUmr 1020 Witness 


1025 Hotel )120 Barney Utter 1125 
Snow Express 1220am Nows, 
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sconiM^g^ 

120 CorniBv Pracooa 220-340 
Farmnouee Kitcnen MS-545 Connec- 
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Report 740 Ataon Market 720 What** 
My Une? 840420Me And My GW 
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125HetoYoursaHl20F*m:Unaor- 
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545 Now You See It 540 Cawnaar 
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720420 Fa* Guy 1020 Oty Centre 
Cycling 11.15 Film: Your Money Or Yotr 
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120 Lo»e Story 220-340 Harvest 
Jazz S.15-545 Connections 940 North 
Toramt 740 Albion Market 720420 
HartTo Hart 1020 Craastee 1140 Ftac 
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TYNE TEES A#U5n,ton,w ' 

Rvmr225-340HomeCoofcery545- 
5.4S NOW You See n 640 Nonrem 
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:-THCROUOHL.Y. enjoyable* 
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01 940 7200 

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VANESSA REDG&VE 
& TIMOTHY DALTON 

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!T/&^iG(5FTEE 

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WO 4020/6006 2046/2866. 
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THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Oaena 9 Oct. 


LOT 


. . PAUAMUM 437 7373. 

457 3065. CC 734 8961. 379 
6433/741 9999. FM Cad 94 Hr 
7 Day CC 940 7200. ere Sales 
930 6193. 

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ABOUT FOB A IWT TIME 
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Aw* W1 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1350. 01-454 1060 01-734 

8168/7 Red Price Piyvs. from 
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A CHORUS OF . 
DISAPPROVAL 

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Aug 50. C roup sales Ol 930 
612AFRST CALL HfiR 7 'DAY 
CC BOOIUMC* OK Ol 2«a 7200 
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Mon-mu 8 Fn/Sar 8.40. 8.10. 

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THE BUSINESS OF 
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Feel 24 hr/7 day 240 7200. ere 
Wes 01-930 61Z3. Mott-Thn 0. 
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directed ay M Brvden 
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NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

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20351. CHEAP. EASY CAtt PAR, 
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MEW LOSCOOM Drury Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 579 6433 Etee 7M 
Tur A Sat 3^ 0 ft 7.40, 

W ANDREW LLOYD l. . 
rt*. EUOT MUHCAL 

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Craw Saw 930 6123. Irntt 
May 31 Evas 7 JO. wed Matt 
930. jntt. 4 jl ft 7.4a. 

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OLIVIER *8* 998 22ES OC 
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Tom 7 28. Tomor ZOO Oow 
price mao ft 7.1a. Bin May 30 
to Jaw 8 TNE TIIREKPEIIIW 
OPERA tv Brecht, Wflft BAMlG 
by Kurt Won 


OPEN All S EQi ltr a PARK S 

age, 9431 CC 379 6«3 CC 
KotUnr 486 1933. ROT 
AND PUT prev ie w s from 30 
May a moumtaat wcHTt 
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June. ARMS Aittt THE MAM 
tram 4 Amoa. BOOK NOW. 


PALACE 7NEA1RC 437 6034 
CC 437 8327 or 5T9 6433 
Cro Saw 930 61 23 

TNE MUSTCAL SENSATION 

LES MISERaBLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONr sw 

Eves 7.30 MAU Thu ft Sat 230 
I rtri omei nd admoed until Uae 
mlervai 

BEAT T HE TO UTS BY KNQUttt- 
IM8 YOB ■ETtODtS AT THE mOX 
OFFIC E Ho rn tOOKBK TO 
OCT 4 SPECIAL CHARITY PER- 
FORMANCE SUN JUKE 22 CALL 


Hso n NX 836 2994 CC 3*0 9661 
T41 9999 3*J»r 7Doy r* 940 7300 
Eves 8 Mat Tim 3 SM 6 A 8.30 

BEST MUSICAL OF I9g5 

Sannard Drama A war 

MARTIN SHAW 

As Pits Presley 

“JUST AMAZOte THE PD 

MAMCE IS A LANDMARK” D EX 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT? 


“ITS MMMFKDir Ok 
Company trouday May 12 36 


Y THEATRE 457 
4606. 734 9536 CredH Card 
Hour ties 379 6666. 741 9999 Grp 
saws 836 3962 -930 6123. 

A frtiBaa* MuslaaP* BSC 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

M UTINY! 

TREMENDOUS SncrAOPCar 
Eva AO Mars Wed 3 ft Sai S 
New booking prnod now open » 
end of Sematnoer 


ESWAAO Boar Office 

734 8961. Pfftt can 94 Hr 7 Days 
cc Booking 836 3464 Grp Sa*c9 
930 6123 

Mon-Sal A Mat Thury ft Sal 300 

• CHESS. 

THE MUSICAL 

OP*f* 14 May ai 7p m 

ITOWRHT. 


PRRtGC OP WALES 014130 B6B1 
/2 CC Hotlter 930 0844/5 th Cn> 
Sales 930 6123. Ketth Prow 
741 9999. FM Caa 34 nr 7 day 

*raE,TAPMm 7 oooo* d. mnj 

"SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
SEVEN BROTHERS - 

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"1 BOTf ANY Qm. NOT TO 
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MRDO« Ol 734 1166. 734 

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Etta Bom. wh A SM Mats 3pm 

MAGGIE EDWARD 

SMITH FOX 


rSEOwr, BOJJ 

I FER f ORM A ie ce a-sW 

■ interpreters 

A New Piter op NsttMftdte 

'T3XVBR, WlTTYl 


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KL*0- SW. 


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ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
2554. MIUY by Andrea 
Dunbar Eves 7.30. Sm Mate 
330 


SAVOY Bn OWrre Or -836 8088 
CC01 379 6219. 836 0479 Evgs 
7.46. Maimers Wednesday AO 
Saturday AO & a 30 
“MICHAEL FRAYN'S AWARD 
WINNING FARCE NOW IN ITS 
STH YEAR IS STILL ONE OF 
THE FUNNIEST THINGS IN 
TOWN - S Timet 16 -3 86 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PAOXVCK 

MICHAEL COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

GLEXSON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Dnr by MICHAEL 0 LakemORE 


SHAFTESBURY 379 6399 CC 
379 6433/741 9999 rtrrj Call 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. Cre 
Sun 930 6123. 

ROWAN ATKINSON 


Mon FO B. Sat 5.30 ft RSO. 

**EASILV THE P1IWHC5T 
SHOW M LOWPO WD .Tcl. 
Lott 2 weeks. 


SHAFTESBURY 379 6399 or 379 
6*53 OC 741 9969. First Cati 
94 hr 7 d ay CC 240 7900. Ore 
Selfs 930 6123. Mon-Fn & 
toed Mai 3. Lai 4 ft 8 
PETER BOWL ES to 
THE EMTERTAMCR 
ttr JOHN OSBORNE. 
Pre\, trora 28 May 


ST MA8TBTS 01 896 1443. S06 
«al CC teWtaji EvqsBO. 
2.46. 5»1 30 and 80 

M*m yr at A6ATHA CIBBti TtK’B 

THE MOUSETRAP 




LESLEY toAOME 


JUDY 

A Wt MUM CAL 

‘WWOWSHUVC TOUR OC 

foRcra exo -a blazing 

THEATRICAL PERSONALITY 
D Tel. ■BRILLIANT* Mai on S 


L TRAT TOAU upon AVON 

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5PEARE MKVIHT M Itoyal 



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MraUSApORB THSATRE/ 
CRTnfWON THEATRE/ 

theatre.' 

' "WlDtoLL TMEaTRE ' 

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TKATRS ROYAL sr aitore E att 
01 Olio, BALLROOM. A 
new {day win* music try Room 
RligB with Philip Madoc. hu 

raour ana totrtbue ui the Wefan 
alio*. Eves at a 


VAUDEVILLE, WC2. Box Office 
and CC 01-036 9987/5646. FTrtt 
Can ICC 24 hrs) O! -240 7200 !Bkv 
fee I CVH 7 3o. Wed Mate 2.30. 
Sato 6.0 ft BAB. 

JOANNA 
LUMLEY 


MARCIA WARREN 
NOD. COWARD'S 


~PB»*T CLASS, BNIOKT BTTEt, 
LlttCNT AND 1MMOUGM.V 
ENJOY ABLE~F T Over lOO Pens 


VICTORIA PALACE 01-834 1317 
OPENS JUNE 19 REDUCED 
PRICE PREVS FROM JUNE 1 1 

PAUL CYD 

NICHOLAS CHARISSE 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS MARK 
PARSONS WYNTER 
CHARLIE GIRL 

Bo* Office open Dally 9on« 9bnr 
Sun Tel CC Bate only i tun 7pm 


sm 01 930 

7766/ 839 4466 CC 01 579 
6666/6*33. 741 9999 CrjK Ol 
8363962. Mon-Fn 8 00. Wed MM 
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THEATRE OP COMEDY present 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

»JB Presoey 
Q ti fried by Ronaui Eyre 
-nrou wax not find a more 
WW WW EVENWO ANY 
WHERE IN .LOMStON - ON THE 
WORLD-S Emress 


WVNDHAarC 836 3028 CC 379 
6668. 379 6433. 741 9999. 
Grps 836 3962. Toni ft Tomer 
6.00 ft tOOom 

THEATRE OF COMCUY CO 


Direct from lutor d ay ihr 

THE WOW SHOW 

"THE MOST EXCmmi AND 

CNAixotaaaa fveninc to 

K NAD W LONDON** F Timm 
All IMs only: E7 SO A £600. 
TRUST END TOMORROW 1 


WTNONAUr* 836 3028 GC 379 
6666. 379 6432/741 9999. 

OrtS 836 5962. 
THEATRE OF COMEDY CO 
amenta 

The Auttreban EhmtiethM 
Theatre Trun produrtion of 

trriYBt WH | IAM8WP8 

SONS OF CAIN 

Drrrcl from a Mhxl 
Australian rrecn 
Redored pore previews |4-17. 
May Eves Bom. Sal BJO ft 
8 30. Opera 19 Ma y at Tyn. 
FOR A LHBTED SEASON 


VOUKC VIC 928 6363 Cr 379 
W33 Em 730. Mai Today 

“■Sj r* 4 


YOUNG VIC STUNO 928 6M5 
Evn 7 45 Phe mato. fHWMA 
STUDIO : Tnn I ft Timur 

Farrars reowJ/bocK 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY 9 ft 23 

Dennn 81 wi LAI 
WEMER. 499 410b 


CMRISTOPNCR WOOD CAL- 
LERY TOWN AND COUNTRY 

XI unm 17m May IB 
MdcanbS SWi Tel OI-53& 
914| 


178 Etromplon Rd. London 
SW3 Tel: 684 7566 Tina 
to ores try Baa NtcMsaa, Heavy 
Maara. Sir Htoatttttt Smith, 


Lawry, CranaiB 
Vmdred Nmol- 


Sutherland, wmr 
eon. Mary Newco mb and 
otnen. Daily 10 6. Sal 10 4 


NAZUTT, GOODEN A POX 38 
Bury Street, bl. Jaraml. SWI 
930 6422 THE JOHN TTLLOT- 
SON BEQUEST TO THE 


PBuumos and DrawuiBi or me 
Binuzon School 18 ABnl 16 
May Monday Friday 10-5 30 


6. Duke SI.. Sf 

— - S WJ- TH 839 

6223.EXMBmON -VICTORMN 
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Mmoaqs nv I9d< Century artisu 
May 6tn June iom. Mon Fri 
9 JO 8.30. Sal 10.00 I OO 
Fully uhMrafed cttatogue £2 sold 
in aid of the National Trutt 


ROYAL ACADEMY JPKCMtUly Ol 
734 9062 Open data 104 me 
ten [Reduced rale Sun. until 
1 45> ALFRED GUDtT SCULP- 
TOR OF EROS £2.60. Cl 70 rone 
rale a boating Ol 74| 9999 


RUSSELL PUNT Miter event 
IMt annual Exit over 120 biles, 
fine pmua-ftd. e tte- rar e onnts. 
Friday 9 Saturday 34 May 1986 
Daily 1030- 60m rimed Sundays 
GRANBY GALLERY 


Wamrtane. tekeweu. Derby* 
Teteptiooe 062 98! 3060 


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SPINK te'mq street. Si. Jamm'i 

SWt An — I BahMHaa ■ 


drama today. 9.306.3 O: totem 
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usmnrrow.iooo 1 90 


|Nr Ad 

mi rally Arctu'Tel Ol 9306844 
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CINEMAS 


■ARWCAR I. Ol 628 8796. Stu- 
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booLame. THE JCWIL Of TNE 
MLE IPO) 6 IS ft B20. Today 
Kids Club iinsum M enm er tl H W 
TNE LAST UNKOm ru) n 00 
ft 3 03. MHMCAN 2. BERN- 
Tne tv work 1200 


CAMDEN PLAZA d8S 2443 fOpo. 
Camden Town mof] AGSO- 
uiTE BCOtt Ni u i S (1SL rum at 
136. 648. 6.10. 8.40 Tel 
Bometno* aeeeoled. 


CHELSEA CSCOHA 351 3742 
Kmqt Road (Nearest tune 
Soane Sol. RAM 118). FDRi at 
1.30. 4 40 l 7.85. Seas 

BMUblr lor ra Pdf ilrrmr 
'Vu. 


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499 5737 1 ml CHI 24Hr 7 Day 
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VIEW (PGJ Film al 1 30 iNM 
Sun) 9 iu 10 ft 8.40 Seats 
04 tee al £4.60 hi adianc* for 
8 40 pert daily ft 6 10 on Sat ft 
«iun 


CURZOtt WEST END Shaftesbury 
Avenue Wl 439 4806. FM 
Caa 34Hr 7 Day CC 9a0 7900 
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— , •: Tw®'" 


FRIDAY MAY 9 1986 




THE TIMES 


SPORT 


Ferguson goes 
for experience 


By Hugh Taylor 

Apart from a rumbustious 
David Speedie. Scotland's pool 
of 22 players for the World Cup 
announced yesterday is made 
up of tried and trusted players 
who battled so vigorously to 
take the country through a 
formidable qualifying section. 

There may be surprise at the 
omission of the Liverpool cap- 
tain. Hansen, whose degam 
style was thought by many to 
beideal for the sapping heat of 
Mexico, but the manager. .Alex 
Ferguson, obviously believes 
that he has in his own Aberdeen 
players. Miller and McLeish. 
perhaps the best central part- 
nership in the tournament and 
so feels that he cannot tamper 
with his reliable defensive For- 
mation. Hansen remains on 
standby with Speedie. 
Archibald MacLeod Money 
and Nevin. 

Speedie has made it plain 
that he is aggrieved at being 
axed from the pool and he will 
have many sympathisers who 
admired his fierce commitment 
in qualifying matches. .Alt the 
manager would say was: “This 
was one of the most difficult 
decisions of my career." but it is 
believed that the Chelsea 
forward's bustling approach 
would be out of place in 
Mexico, where control will be 


Scotland squad 

J Leighton (Aberdeen) 

A Rough (Hibernian} 

A Gorara (Oldham) 

R Gough (Dundee Utd) 

S Nicoi (Liverpool) 

M Malpas (Dundee Utd) 

A McLeish (Aberden) 

W Miller (Aberdeen) 

D Narey (Dundee Utd) 

A Aftwston (Manchester Utd) 

G Souness (Rangers) 

G Strachan (Manchester Utd) 

P McStay (Celtic) 

J Belt (Aberdeen) 

R Aitken (Celtic) 

£ Bannon (Dundee Uted) 

K Dalglish (Liverpool) 

F McAveonie (West Ham) 

C Nicholas (Arsenal) 

G Sharp (Everton) 

P Sturrock (Dundee Utd) 

D Cooper (Rangers). 

On stand-by: S Archbibald 
(Barcelona). A Hansen (Liverpool), 
M MacLeod (Celtic), K Money (St 
Mirren), P Nevin (Chexsea), D 
Speedie (Chelsea). 

of more importance than pace 
and strength. 

However, to the supporters 
of the new Scottish champions. 
Celtic, the real mvsteiy of 
Ferguson's selection is the ab- 
sence of Johnston, who has 
sprung back to such sparkling 
form thal he played a key role 
in his club's astonishing title 
v ictory and is again accepted as 
the most impressive forward in 
the country. 


Johnston does not even fig- 
ure in the standby list and 
Scotland's front men will come 
from Dalglish, who can 'hardly 
be expected to play a full 90 
minutes in every ^me, the 
dependable Sharp, the goal- 
hungry McAvennie, the much- 
im proved Nicholas and 
Sturrock. who has the ability to 
twist and turn in the Dalglish 
manner in the penalty area 

None of these players, how- 
ever, can equal the sharpness of 
Johnston and so the country is 
left to wonder what has caused 
the Celtic centre forward to fell 
out of favour. 

As. however, there is 
versatilty as well as what could 
prove a happy blend of the 
artist and the artisan in the 
squad, there is a prospect of a 
team being found to do much 
better in a formidable section 
than those disillusioned by the 
frantic display in the interna- 
tional with England at Wem- 
bley are expecting. 

Much will depend on the 
fitness of Strachan. who must 
be the dominating figure in 
midfield, and perhaps on 
whether McStay can regain the 
form which not so long ago 
made him the most promising 
of a rich crop of young Scottish 
players. 




Simon 

Barnes 


jltfv 

.< 


vv* V 

rSt - > 


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■ 


The Queen's Balmoral Madge, first in tbe peeking order and second in the highland pony class (Photograph: Peter Trievoftr) 

A second . OLYMPIC games . i 

title for private sector invests £1 .5m 

IScsbrooK . > i* 


SCOTLAND SQUAD FOR WORLD CUP FINALS 


JIM LEIGHTON: Aged 27. caps: 26. 
I nterna ti o nal debut against E Ger- 
many 1982. Scotland s first choice 
goalkeeper, sofid and reliable. 
ALAN ROUGH: (34. 53) Scotland's 
most capped goalkeeper. His third 
successive World Cup finals. 

ANDY GORAM: (22. 3). Debut 
against E Germany last October. 
SmaH but instinctive goalkeeper. 
RICHARD GOUGH: (24. 23): Can 
play at fuff back, in central defence, 
or mktfie*d. Debut agamst Switzer- 
land. 1983. 

STEVE NICOL: (24. 8) Debut v 
Yugoslavia. 1984. At home m de- 
fence Of midfield. 

DAVE NAREY: (29. 28) Versatile 
defender who performed wefl at lull 
beck in last World Cup finals, 
provides good cover for McLeish 
and Miller. 

MAURICE MALPAS: (23. 10) Can 
play in a number of positions but 
essentially a defender. Debut v 
France. 1984. 

ALEX McLBSH: (27. 43) Forms 
successful partnership with WiUie 
Miner for Aberdeen and Scotland. 
Strong-tackling centre back. 


WILLIE MILLER: (31.48) One of the 
most outstanding ‘sweepers' in 
British football. Dependable wce- 
captam to Souness. 

ARTHUR ALBtSTON: (28. 13) Debut 
against Northern Ireland in 1982. 
Reliable, strong- tackling left back. 
GRAEME SOUNESS: (33. 53) 
Scotland's captain and midfield 
qeneraL Inspirational figure, will be 
first Scot to captain his country m 
two World Cup finals. 

GORDON STRACHAN: (29. 34) 
Small alert, skilful and with bound- 
less energy, is driving force going 
forward. 

PAUL McSTAY: 121. 15) Capped at 
18. he is mature for his age. Gifted 
midfield player with excellent vision. 
JIM BETT: (26.17) international 
debut in 1982 against HoBand. 
intelligent user of the balL 
ROY AITKEN: (27.20) Formidable 
figure in midfield. Strength and 
stamina are greatest assets. Won 
first cap in 1979. 

EAMONN BAN NON: (28. 9) Re- 
called after two and a half years to 
face Israel m January. VersatSe 
midfielder and wing. 


KENNY DALGUat (35. 100) 
Scotland's most capped player. 
Could be a key factor in Mexico - if 
hs legs hold out Shares the 
Scottish scoring record of 30 waft 
Denis Law. 


FRANK McAVBWE: (2£ 
of mtemattonsi class < 
scoring ability. Played in 
games against Australia. 

CHARLIE NICHOLAS: 


CHARLIE NICHOLAS: (24, 15) 
Scored on debut against Switzer- 
land in 1983 but nas p erformed 
disappointing since transfer from 
Celtic to Arsenal. 


Taltest of 
rong and 
settle de- 


GRAEME SHARP: (25, 
Scotland's' attackers, 
eager, with ability to 
fences. 


PAUL STURROCK: (29. 16) ProOfic 
scorer for dub. with an exceptional 
ability to turn' defenders. 

DAVID COOPER: (30, 14) Pos- 
sesses excellent dose control and 
skills which make him a devastating 
wing. 


BOXING 


Marsh bewares the shadow 

By Sriknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 

Even those who wanted first won eight years ago. it is fixed; we are talking about the 


Clinton McKenzie, the 30- 
year-old veteran from Croy- 
don, to win and had thought 
that he had beaten Tony 
Laing. of Nottingham, when 
they met for the vacant British 
light-welterweight title at the 
Albert Hall on Wednesday 
night, could not have been 
disappointed when the former 
British, Commonwealth and 
European champion an- 
nounced after his defeat that 
he was retiring. 

McKenzie was just a shad- 
ow of his old self, unable to 
shape into those combinations 
to the body. Had he scraped 
through and won the title he 


almost certain he would have 
been struggling to get away 
from those chasing him. or to 
keep up with the energetic 
Terry Marsh, the European 
champion, who would have 
been his next target 

Marsh is to have a “warm- 
up" on May 28 at Alexandra 
Pavilion. London, for his 
world title bout against 
Palrizio Oliva, ofltaly. which 
is expected to take place on 
July 10 in Monte Carlo or 
Naples. He will be meeting 
Grant Walters, of the United 
States, a boxer, like Oliva. 
“The date for the world title is 


venue," Warren said. “We 
would rather fight in Monte 
Carla They want Naples. 
Terry will fight him 
anywhere." 

Marsh is even willing to 
meet Rene Arredondo, the 
new World Boxing Council 
champion — even in the 
Mexican’s backyard, the fear- 
some Olympic Auditorium, 
Los Angeles. When a colleague 
warned that that was where 
the customers were relieved of 
their guns and knives at the 
door, the former Marine said: 
Til fight for tbe title any- 
where, even there, anywhere 
but Kiev. 


By Jenny MacArthur 

Via Toalson and Mrs Jane 
Dewar's he avyw eight banter, 
Seabrook, took their second 
major title of tbe season when 
they won yesterday’s Toshiba 
Hooter championship on the 
first day of the Royal Windsor 
Horse Show in the Home 
Park. The reserve title went to 
Peter Hobbs's outstanding 
lightweight, Micky 
Springfield. 

Seabrook, a seven-year-old 
chestnut gelding by 
Stetch worth Lad, was pro- 
duced by Peter Richmond last 
year and by Robert Oliver tbe 
year before. He came to 
Toalson's Leicestershire Yard 
last May. He has had a long 
winter rest from winch be has 
dearly benefited. 

In the wefi-fiDed lightweight 
class, the judges, Michael 
Gibson and Thady Ryan (the 
Master and Huntsman of the 
Black and Tan to Ireland X 
wasted tittle time in parting 
the seven-year-old Micky 
Springfield, ridden by Solly 
Hobbs, at die head of the tine. 
The bay gelding by MQms oat 
of Sbelmore Valley looks twice 
the horse be was last year 
when he was shown only 
lightly. 

In an exact reversal of last 
year’s positions, Gemsignet 
Bloodstock Limited's lively 
hay gelding. Dancin', ’stood 
second in the lightweight 
class, ridden by Nigel Oliver. 
RESULTS: Toshiba Hunter 
championship: Champion: 

Seabrook (V Toalson). Reserve 
Mfcfcv Springfield (S HobbsL Light- 


Private sector invests £1. 5m 
in success for Britain 


By David Mfller 

A Gty insurance group, 
Minet Holdings, is to contrib- 
ute £1.5 million in assisting 
British preparation for the 
1988 Olympic Games. This is 
a second step, coming from 
the private sector, following 
the Sports Council Review 
Group's recommendation. 
Under the chairmanshi p of 
Sebastian Coe, for a substan- 
tial increase in ' hacking for 
Britain's sports men and 
women. 

Tbe Sports Councti had 
previously announced a fund 
of £17 million, to be directed 
through tbe governing bodies 
of individual sports. What the 
Minet sponsorship win do is 
to bring on to the map of 
assistance many of those who 
were previously beyond foe 
fringe and feeling somewhat 
grudging about the substantial 
assistance that was available 
to those at the top. - 

The new sponsorship, 
which is to be administered by 


the Sports Aid Foundation 
(SAF), Win be directed at some 
500 potential Olympic com- 
petitors over the next two 
years, and foe SAP will act in 
conjunction with recommen- 
dations from governing 
bodies. 

On tbe present estimate 
there are around 545<ompeti- 
tots who would be eligible, but 
36 of these — 27 of them from 
athletics *■»- are discounted 
because they already have the 
advantage of personal trust 
fluids. - • 

The remainder have been 
divided into three categories. 
An elite group, estimated at 
27, who have a reasonable 
prospect of gaining a medal in 
Seoul, will receive up to 
£6,000 a year in personal 
assistance to improve their 
training facility and capacity. 
A further 1 14- are said to be in 
an international group likely 
to perform with distinction. 
They will receive np to £2,000. 

The remaining 370 or so 
will receive the smaller grants, 

TENNIS 


with a minimum of £400, 
which win be reassessed each 
year according to their pro- 
gression. As GeoeraT Ian 
’ Graeme - of foe SAF, whose 
speciality is doing but who 
nudes tbe grants commitiee 
for all sports, says, the main 
advantage of foe Minet spon- 
sorship is that it win now be 
possible to give assistance to 
junior categories: those who 
may be medal winners in eight 
or i2yearstime,ratherthanin 
two years. 

This, is the first time in 
Britain that such sums haw 
been earmarked for Olympic 
preparation by a : com m ercial 
o rganisation on such a. basis. 
“The financial . hardships 
feced.by Britain's sports men 
and. women have.-, been 
recognised as a barrier to 
success." Seb Coe said yester- 
day. This money will norm 
itself bring success, but it will 
allow our competitors to com- 
pete without having to wony 
quite so modi about foefr 
bank managers: 



rnip-il 


i PH I 



Joe Johnson wfaaiag the 
snooker was prod. Press men . 
are meant to he impartial to 
the point art cytecfen, toft 1 
dapped my hands raw.WHHe 
Thorne,* dunning horn aada 
fine snooker ptoytev was 
standing a few yards; *w*y, 
and I canflfrt hbn ssrrepti- 
tioasiy tripnig fears from Us 
eyes. He, too, was sharing foe 
defightofoDe ofsportV better 


Decline of Bournemouth 




MOTOR RACING 


Mansell in danger of 
failing to qualify 

From John Blunsden, Monte Carlo 
Pre-race practice and quali- first driver of the day to come 
fication on the streets of a cropper, losing control of his 


By Rex Befimmy, Tennis Correspondent 

It has become increasingly . WeB, jane Wood and An- Sut 
difficult these past few years to drew Castle reached the sin- Wa 
see any way in which British gles . finals of the fist 
tennis has benefited from the tournament on the circuit, at 
rigidly monolithic, doQar-ori- Hampstead, and a British pair ^ a 
emed structure of the modem of each sex have contested Pj J 5 
professional game. It has be- doubles finals.. Other than . Xxs - 
come increasingly easy, on the that, the^ritisfr challenge has : ®®[J 
other hand, to observe foe been engulfed by a tide .of Sr 33 
decline of Britain's interna- meffi’oerity that flowed too 
tional tournaments. Take, as strongly for them. - "P™ 

an example, Bournemouth- The fotif British women in p ~ _ 

There used to be a charming the draw at Bournemouth all “jl 
international festival at tost in the first -round. -Of H> 
Bournemouth, which has a British men, only Stuart Bale r~f 
special place in history as foe and MilreWalker advanced to *7 “ 
scene of tbe first open tourna- foe quarter-finals and both 1001 
ment, in 1968,The walls of foe were . beaten yesterday, by - T 
club dining-room bear photo- younger 'men. The sky was pofr 
graphs of Rod Laver, Ken overcast, the breeze chiQy and ingi 
RosewaH, Margaret Court, the thinly scattered spectators mer 
Ann Jones, Christine Truman ; were mostly, there because nati 


Sutton. Bale won six games, 
Walkerthree. 

How Bournemouth has 
changed. Even foe old mixture 


and Virginia Wade. They all ; they saw that personal afffli - 
played at Bournemouth- and ' ation demanded iL- 


of stole and grass courts has 
of each sex have contested , * T^h~r"i 

Snuriv^foem -■ 100 ' - indoor co u rts that wig shortly 
^TtetefoSr womenin ber^tod by another kind of 

and Mike-Walker advanced to ZSiShh? someth,n£ 

foe quarter-finals and both more practjWflWe. 

were. ■ beaten .-yesterday, by * To. return to one's original 
younger 'men. The sky was point, a prerequisite for arrest- 
overcast, tbe breeze chilly and ing the decline of such tourna- 
the thinly scattered spectators merits is greater freedom for 
were mostly. . there because national associations to rnq 

their own. shows as they think 
fit. The expensive, stiffing, 
bureaucratic uniformity of foe 
international game has to be 
checked. ' 

RESULTSfcSfarfw: QuarteHteMs: 
Man: P f^rm (Aus) bt S Bate, 6-3. 6- 
3; G Bloom {Isrt bt M Walkar 
(Watest 6-2. Mi T PhamfFrtW A 
Gonzalez (Bel), 6-3, 6-4; ' D 
MaaMojpjS AIMD E nj^.(Swl. 6- 
i-o. women: n jagurruun 
(Noth) bt D Ketalaar (Nath). &2.B-2; 
K Okamoto (Japan) bt P Teserova 
(Cz^M.OG. 


Monte Carlo invariably con- 
stitutes one of the most tense 
episodes of the grand prix 
year, and yesterday that repu- 
tation was reinforced as team 
after team ran into problems. 


JPS Lotus on his second lap 
while still warming up his car. 
He, too. must wait until 
tomorrow to secure a place on 
foe grid, as must Jonathan 
Palmer, whose Zakspeed was 


the crowds flocked to watch. 

This week, the - same 
premises . are accommodating 
the fourth tournament in a 
five-week. series, for which the 
Lawn Tennis ' Association . 
have set aside £90,000 in foe 


Bale, ranked fourth in Brit- 
ain, was beaten ; fey Patrick 
Flynn, 'aged j 7, - of Brisbane, 
who fives and works at foe 
Australian Institute of Sport 
in Canberra and is a member 
of- the national, junior' squad. 




As a result, only one of going well in the preliminary 
■i tain's four drivers has so practice, but encountered 
r claimed a place amongst heavy traffic on each of his 
e top 20 permitted to start qualifying laps, 
e race. And the world cham- Martin Bnrndle looked like 
on, Alain Prost, managed to being 20th in the list five 
i so only in tbe dosing minutes from the end of 
inutes of qualifying after qualifying, but then he put in a 
m aging his race car. Even crisp and. dean lap in the Data 
(rton Senna, who was once General Tyrrell to move up 
ain the fastest of all in his six places. 


Informal (in for mat) (IN- (2). FORMAL], a. Not 
in accordance with official, proper, or customary 
forms: without formality, informality (-mal'i fci) n. 
informally, adv. 


n 


Moss Bros 


FOR FULL LIST OF BRANCHES R INC ftl-240 4V>7 


Britain's four drivers has so 
far claimed a place amongst 
the top 20 permitted to start 
foe race. And the world cham- 
pion, Alain Prost, managed to 
do so only in tbe dosing 
minutes of qualifying after 
damaging his race car. Even 
Ayrton Senna, who was once 
again the fastest of all in his 
Renault-powered JPS Lotus, 
was disappointed with his 
time. 

Senna's best lap of lmin 
25-22 2sec was 0.4 seconds 
slower than his best in the 
preliminary practice and near- 
ly four seconds slower than bis 
pole position time last year. 
Only about half of the deficit 
is explained by foe changes 
made to tbe circuit because 
tbe new tight chicane after the 
exit from the tunnel (reducing 
speeds from last year's 
140mph to nearer 40mph) is 
partly offset by a smoother 
and quicker entry to the start- 
finish straight and by some 
extensive resurfacing of the 
upper part of the circuit which 
has substantially improved 
grip. 

The most worried team of 
all last night were Canon 
Williams, who suffered no 

fewer than four engine break- 
ages. two in Nigel Mansell's 
car and one each in Nelson 
Piquet’s race car and in foe 
team's spare, to which Piquet 
had been switched. Piquet's 
time prior to his second blow- 
up should secure him a place 
in the race, but Mansell still 
has it all -to do. 

Johnny Dumfries was foe 


hope that British players Fortbefourth time in as many 
would be eager enough and weeks Walker played the 
good enough to make the most “spare man^ of Israel's Davis 
of modest- cosmopolitan Cup team, Gilad Bloom, who 
competition. won last week’s tournament at 


btP Teserova 


QUALIFYING TOSS: 1, A Seim 
(81% JPS Lotus-Renautt, Info 
25.222 sec. 87.354mph: 2, K 
.Rosbarg (Fin), Marlboro McLareo- 
TAG, UrUn 25-662sec; 3, R Amoux 
(Fr), Ligier-Renault. lmin 
25.900sec; 4, A Prost (Fr), Marlboro 
McLaren-TAG, Irnin -2S-059sec; 5, 
G Berger (Austria), Dane tt on-DMW 
lmin 2<L28Qsec; 6 . a Jones (Aus), 
Beanies Lola-Ford, 1 min 
26.663sec: 7, J Lafflte (Fr), Ugier- 
RenaiA, lmin 26.702foc; 8. M 
Alboreto (It). Ferrari, lmin 
2S.839sec 9. R Patrese Oft, OBvetH 
BraWiam-BMW, info 2&872sec; 
10. S Johansson (Swe), Ferrari, 
Info 27.005sec: 11. P Tamtey (Fi), 
Beatrice Lo ta T or d Info TTSJSG&xz, 

12. Bio da Angels (HL OfivetU 
Brabham-8 MW, Info 27.191 sac; 

13, N Piquet (Br). Canon WBBams- 
Hontte, Info 27J19sec; 14, M 
BruncSe (GB) Data General TyrraB- 
RenauK, Info 28564sec; 15, M 
Surer (SwitzL Barclay Arrows- 
BMW, Info 28.878sac; 16, A de 
Cesaris (It), MnarUFModerr^, info 
28JG2sec; 17. T Bouteen (Bel). 
Barclay Arrows-BMW, irnin 

29244S8C; 18, PGWnzani (IQ. 

Osetla-Alfa Romeo. lmin 
2928&ec; 19, T Fat* (It). Benetton- 
BMW. info 29-397see: 20. A 
Nannirv (Iti, MlnarA-Modemi, Info 
29.447sec; 21. J Palmer (G B). West 
Zakspeed Info G0.152sec 22. N 
Mansell (GB), Canon WBtams- 
Honda, lmin 30.919sec: 23. C 
Danner (WG}. OseBa-Atta Romeo, 
Info 30.986sec 24. P Strettf (Fr), 
Data Gfoeral TyrreB-RenadL Info 
32.646S8C; 25, J Dumfries (GB), JPS 
Lotus-RenatA, tinin 35-027sec; 26, 
H Rothengatter (Neth), West - 
Zakspeed Info 3&8l4aea 


[ SPORT IN BRIEF 


3 




■ 





im 


- Snooker is all right Des^e 
die «maml scandal and tbe 
Odd Sqnahbfc it holds todf 
togethei better dm may 
sports food haw had mere 
practice at betng tnajor sports. 
Eric MWwbiter spd of foe 
gxlite» to Uo iwr Md- mtel&- 
gent book F*irG*me-. “Most 
important ef «fl, t tot is no 

pdfitical nudertone. National 
rttotests ire iftkewam, aad, 
almost alone among a dozen or 
so ni|dr^ spectator sports. 
Snooker has not beta foe 
cause of a diplomatic or inter- 
national incident. This, to 
part; is becaase, whfle watch- 
ecs have frnartos ad ptoy* 
ers hare fbflomngs, these haw 
nerCr become too signBi ra nt . 
The very traits and approach- 
es of highly todMctoafist per- 
formers seem tbJ ' he 
appreefeted widely, almost 
fike those golden days when 
thousands went to Lord's to 
wsteb Oxford phy Cambridge 
with bat ft transput affection 
for one or the other."_ . 

This is a good text for i 
week which contented both 
snooker's world championship 
and the anniversary of Brus- 
sels, that night what football 
really -did become a frfe-and- 
death . matter. Sport n foe 
ultimate trivial pnratol it 
sfaohfd never mwrterasftdid to 
Brussels. 


achievement 


Football commemorated 
this anniversary with the Eu- 
ropean Cop final, a match that 
was fall of foe football of fear, 
the result was- . all that 
mattered to anyone there, end 
it mattered Ear too macta. And 
so k was a complete waste of 
everybody's time. .. ... 

But even football — some- 
tones even especially football 


— can still bring ns lapse 
gorgeously irrelevant joys. 
Perhaps the aUrliverpoof FA 
Cep fraal wffl bring w * . 
further helping- If foe match - i 
can be played to- as jofiy an 
atino^ihere as the Rog^by 
Leagne ChaQengaCap final a 
fortnight back, it wfiT be a 
grand occasaos^ 

Even the old slog-ajoog of 
tin league feu been pretty 
good inn this season, and the 
best bit of ail has been the 
ascent of 1>nml)todon to foe 
first division. Ten seasons ago 
they played. In the Soothers 
League, and a defender -called 
Dave Bassett kept getti ng 

booked. Now Bassett has man- 
aged the dob to this ridicakms 
adueveaent if the. award* 


* »«* ^ 







M d'-i ■' - d 

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