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5 






1JS-OI 


sj:. . ~ 





No 6Z453 




SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



• Senior ministers and MPs are urging 
a review of Conservative strategy to 
counter die Liberal-SDP Affiance 
threat. 


• Mrs Thatcher moved s w i ft ly to rally 
her disappointed party workers. She 
told them to “keep cheerful and 
cracking.” 


get 


• Tories now control only one big city 
district and lost all the regions in 
Scotland. They only control 11 
boroughs. 

• Labour easily won the first direct 
elections to the bum- London Education 
Authority, with the Alliance group 
leader. Mis Anne Sofer, losing her seat. 

By MhBp Webster and Bichard Evans 
A thorough review of the majority, at Ryedale and re- 
placing it with a majority of its 
own of nearly 5,000, and 
coming within a whisker of 
erasing the 15,325 lead at 
Derbyshire West, left MPS 
pondering the implications of 


tci- 




£ Conservative Party's electoral 
> strategy to counter the threat 
1 of the Liberal - Social Demo- 
cratic Party is being urged by 
. senior ministers and MPs 
after the Alliance's success in 
capturing the previously safe 
seat of Ryedale, and feflrng by 
only 1 00 votes to do the same 
• at West Derbyshire. 

After the Government's 
most dismal night at the polls 
since 1 979, with heavy losses 
to both Labour and the Alli- 
ance in the London borough 
and district council elections 
adding to the gloom, the 
Prime Minister moved swiftly 
to rally Conservative workers 
by paying a surprise visit to 
party headquarters. 

During a private 20-minute 
pep talk with Central Office 
staff she told them to “keep 
cheerful and get cracking” 
She emerged to gave her first 
reaction to the by-election 
results: “We won one, we lost 
one. And the one we lost we 
will get back next time.” 

But, although Mrs Thatcher 
was said yesterday to regard 
the election results as disap- 
pointing rather than disas- 
trous, an inquest was already 
under way, with some of hear 
senior colleagues pressing for 
urgent action to relieve the 
mood of despondency among 
the majority of Conservative 
MPs whD had an Alliance MP 
in second place in the 1983 
general election. 

Only 93 Conservative seats - 
were safer in 1983 than 
Ryedale and Derbyshire West. 
The Alliance’s remarkable tri- 
umph in wiping out the 16,142 


By election profiles 2 
Local election results 2 
David Boiler 6 

Leading article 7 

a substantial Alliance advance 
at the general election in the 
265 Tory-held seats where it is 
second. The most likely out- 
come would be to leave La- 
bour holding the 
number of seats. 

Senior ministers admitted 
that while the militant wing of 
the Labour Party would al- 
ways give them a target, there 
was uncertainty over how to 
direct their fire against the 
Alliance. That will be the 
subject of urgent strategy dis- 
cussions involving the Prime 
Minister. 

There is uncertainty over 
whether the present tactics of 
casting doubts on the ability of urittee, 
the two Affianc e parties to 
hoW together in government,' 

Or of dismissing them merely 
as the recipients of tactical 
votes, is sufficient 

Mr Norman Tebbit, the 
Conservative Party chairman, 
yle of campaign- 


si ve style which deters middle- 
of-the-road voters. 

In the Alliance yesterday 
there was jubilation over the 
by-election results, tinged with 
regret that it had just failed to 
pull off a staggering doable. 

Although tire Labour Party 
had a good night in the local 
elections, producing further 
evidence of its recovery under 
Mr Neil Kinnock, its leaders 
were profoundly disappointed 
that its votes in the by- 
elections were again heavily 
squeezed by the Alliance. 

In Derbyshire West particu- 
larly, where Mr Bill Moore, 
bad been hopeful at one stage 
of finishing in second place, 
late tactical voting rapidly 
depressed its position. Mr 
Kinnock said that the local 
results pot Labour directly on 
course for a general election 
victory. 

But ft was among Conserva- 
tive MPs that the reaction was 
sharpest. In an implicit criti- 
cism of Mr Tebbit, Sir Edward 
dp Cann, former chairman of 
the Conservative 1922 com- 
said it was “tragic 


folly” that the success of 
government policies had not 
been projected. 

Mr David Crouch, Conser- 
vative MP for Canterbury, 
said that the Government was 
not explaining its approach 
dearly enough. There was a 
feeling in the country that it 
did not appear to care. 


Monday 


whose own style 
ing is bring criticized sharply 
by Cabinet colleagues and 
MPs, admitted yesterday that Education was a key issue in 

there were lessons to be karat both by-elections and Conser- 
fixnn the by-elections. vative MPs were renewing 

He has been criticized both calls for the immediate re- 
fbrpayingtoo tittle heed to the placement of Sir Keith Joseph 
Affiance and for a too-abra- . Continued on page 2 col 8 

labour galas local control 


Hospitals 
in crisis 



Has the cash flow 
from London to the 
regions changed the 
health service for 
the better? Start of 
a three-part series 

Life at 
the top 

British women at the 
pinnacle of their 
careers 



£32,000 to 
be won 

There is £32400 to be won 
today in The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition, £16,000 
ip the drily competition be- 
cause no one has won since 
Tuesday and £36,000 in the 
weekly because no one woo 
last week. Portfolio fist, page 
20. rules and bow to play, 
page 28, weekly list, informa- 
tion service, page 16. 


Medicine plea 

The lives of about 7,000 
thrombosis victims in Britain 
could be saved every year if 
preventive treatment vwss 
made more widely avsulririe, 
medical experts said Page 3 

Polling halted 

The Bangladesh regime of 
President Ershad, embar- 
rassed by the violence used by 
its supporters in the general 
election, halted polimgm 109 
constituencies to see iilreso 
voting is needed Page 4 


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marriages J* 

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Bo»»ess 17-24 

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Crosswords 1UJ 
Diary • 

Etta* *6 


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Letters 
Otawry 
Parhamntt 
Sate Room 
Science 


28 

7 

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TV & Radio 31 
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on 

rates and finance 


By David Walker 

Thursday’s elections re- 
moved Conservatives’ from 
power in a great tract of town 
and city government in En- 
gland and Wales - and the 
entirety of the Scottish •re- 
gions. They set the scene for 
renewed friction between 
councils and the central gov- 
ernment over rates and spend- 
ing levels. 

Conservatives, now control 
only a single big city district; 

Solihull in the Bir min g h a m 
conurbation. A gnat Swath of 
urban administration is now 
in Labour hands, from Slough 
and Stevenage in the South- 
east to Blackburn and Buirnley 
in the North-west Embarrass- 
ing Conservative .losses in- 
cluded such heartland towns 
as Great Yarmouth, Chester, 

Heme! Hempstead and 
Woking. 

Of 35 London boroughs, the 
Conservatives now control 
only 1 1. Labour, despite losing 
Tower Hamlets to the SDP- 
liberai Alliance, were the 
clear winners in 1 5. with some 
votes still to be counted this 
morning in-Haringey, where 
the controversial Labour lead- 
er Mr Beroie Grant saw his 
ward electors increase his 
majority. 

Strengthened^!! Richmond, 
the Allian ce (mainly Liberals) 
took control in neighbouring 
Sutton and eroded the Conser- 
vative majority in Kingston. 

But a provocative result for 
the Conservatives was their 
victory in Wandsworth, where 
an aggressive policy of privati- 
zation and asset sales seemed 
to have convinced a majority 
of electors to add four more 
years to the party’s eight-year 

run. 

likely results of the council 


elections are upward pressure 
on municipal spending and 
reopening of ideological bat- 
tles within the Labour Patty. 

Within a month, many 
councils will start preparation 
of their budgets for 1987-88, 
and the signs are that newly- 
elected councillors. Alliance 
and Labour, will try to in- 


PARTY GAINS 
AND LOSSES 



Gains 

Losses 

c 

59 

764 

Lab 

571 

87 

L 

262 

87 

SDP 

124 

27 

hid 

- 18 

75 

SNP 

13 

3 

PC 

1 

0 

Oth 

8 

13 


Results from 201 compara- 
ble councils in England, Wales 
and Scotland. 


crease spending, even at the 
expense of rate rises. The 
Government will lave to con- 
sider extending its rate-cap- 
ping mechanism to such 
metropolitan districts as Brad- 
ford. 

Many Labour councillors 
will agree with yesterday's 
remark by Mr John Edmonds, 
general secretary of .the Gener- 
al, Municipal, Boilermakers’ 
and Allied Trade Union prais- 
ing a "ballot backlash against 
policies of closing schools, 
cutting soda! services and 
slashing council' house- 
building”. 

As a result of the London 
elections. Labour will become .| 
the predominant party on the 

Continued on page 2, col 3 


Press 

Council 

backs 

Times 

The Press ComicO yester- 
day expressed serious concern 
at the House of Comments 
move fo punish The Times and 
its Lobby Reporter, Mr Rich- 
ard Evans, for publishing a 
leaked select committee draft 
report. 

The council's director, Mr 
Kenneth Morgan, said: “Last 
year the Press Grand! protest 
ed at the Committee o 
Privileges' suggestion to sus- 
pend journalists* gallery and 
lobby passes if their newspa- 
pers pabfisbed serious leaks 
from Commons select comm- 
ittees. 

“We said it wonJd impose 
the wrong penalty o a the 
wrong people. The Comm- 
ittee’s proposal to suspend Mr 
Evans and cut The Times 
facilities to cover Parliament 
is just such a case. 

“The job of the Press is to 
disclose, not conceal Restrict- 
ing the right to report Parlia- 
ment should not be used as a 

weapon against a newspaper in 

a society that believes in press 
freedom and a politically in- 
formed public.” 

• Mr Tony Benn, a member of 
the Privileges Committee, 
which has called on MPs to 
bar Mr Evans from the Com- 
mons for six months, predicted 
yesterday MPs would reject 
the recommendation and no 
farther action would be taken 
to punish the newspaper 
(Sheila Gunn writes). 

The conunittee found that 
Mr Evans had committed a 
ions contempt of Parlia- 
ment by leaking a draft report 
of the Environment Select 
Committee on nuclear waste. 
Its recommendation, for Mr 
Evans’s suspension and the 
withdrawal of one lobby pass 
from The Times, is fikely to be 
voted on in the Commons 
before the Whitson recess on 
May 23. 

Six Conservative and five 
Labours MPs on the commit- 
tee voted in favour of that 
sanction. Mr Benn, Labour 
MP for Chesterfield and the 
only conunittee member to 
vote against it, said yesterday 
be was rallying opposition. 

“I do not think the recom- 
mendation vrUl go through, 1 
do not believe MPs will want 
to be oo record fo the dfrfofoc 
lobby an this. There are other 
MPs who fee! ft is a fail ere of 
natural justice that the Envi- 
ronment Select Committee 
members were not interrogat- 
ed but the Editor and Mr 
Evans were. There is also 
uneasiness of a general char- 
acter a boat the nrisrae of 
privilege.” 

There had been a dash, be 
said, between two obsolete 
systems: parliamentary privi- 
lege and the lobby system. 

“Select committees have got 
into a cosy relationship with 
Government, with Civil Ser- 
vants, with each other and 
with the Press. And the vic- 
tims of this multiple cosiness 
are the electors”. 

He urged journalists at 
Westminster to make it dear 
to MPs wbal retaliatory action 
they would consider taking if 
Mr Evans was suspended. 

Lobby journalists are writ- 
ing to MPs asking them to 
reject the recommendation. 




Mr Kenneth Me 
of the Press is to 


The Princess of Wales swathed in a kimono presented to her 
yesterday ata garden party at Nfto Castle in Kyoto. (Kimono 
fit for a princess, page 4) 


25,000 will 
not see 
the Final 

By Peter Davenport 

Around 75.000 football fans 
from Merseyside will be head- 
ing io Wembley Stadium to- 
day for the first ever FA Cup 
Final between Liverpool and 
Everion. 

Although only 50,000 of 
them will be guaranteed entry, 
thousands will be travelling in 
the hope of buying a black 
market ticket, or just to sam- 
ple the atmosphere. 

Gate receipts for the match 
are £1.2 million but on the 
black market £25 tickets have 
been changing hands in Liver- 
pool for up to £250. Police 
said two examples of forged 
tickets bid turned up. 

The match is being billed as 
"a friendly final" with the two 
teams scheduled to travel 
home on the same chartered 
aircraft and, unless the result 
is a draw, to stage a joint tour 
of the city tomorrow. 

FA officials say that fans’ 
behaviour, a year after the 
disaster at the Heysel stadium 
in Brussels, will have an 
important influence on when 
European authorities allow 
English teams back into their 
competitions. 

Mr Ted Croker, the FA 
secretary, said: “The game 
could be one of the most 
critical in our football 
history.” 

Betting, page 21 
Match preview, page 32 


£5bn wiped off shares 


Share 'prices took another 
hammering on the stock mar- 
ket yesterday largely because 
of the Government's setback 
in the elections. The Financial 
Times index of 30 leading 
shares has (alien by more than 
50 points this week, wiping £5 
billion off share values. 

There were further wide- 
spread losses yesterday before 


a late rally saw the index close 
at 1330.3, down 6.6 on the 
day. 

Dealers also questioned 
whether the long share boom 
was drawing to a close and 
prospects that further interest 
rale cuts may not happen for 
some time also upset 
sentiment 

Market report, page 19 


Solicitor 
robes up 
for court 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent | 

A solicitor will make history 
on Tuesday when he stands up 
in place of a barrister in the 
High Court, attired in robe 
and wing collar, to read out an 
apology in a libel action. 

The appearance of Mr 
Alastair Brett, on behalf of Mr 
Cyril Smith , Liberal MP for 
Rochdale, comes after the 
High Court judges announced 
yesterday a small extension of 
solicitors* rights. 

Their statement comes in 
the wake of the test case in 
which Mr Smith is being sued 
by Mr Leo Abse, Labour MP 
for Torfaen, and 24 other MPs 
over remarks made during the 
Falkiands war. 

Bat the ruling, which allows 
solicitors to appear in certain 
strictly formal and unopposed 
proceedings, was criticized as 
restrictive by the Law Society, 
which said it would enable 
solicitor to appear in only a 
very limited number of cases. 

Mr Brett criticized the di- 
rection as “ welcome news for 
all specialist libel lawyers as it 
will save unnecessary costs - 
barristers' fees, in announcing 
terms of settlement at the end 
of a libel action.” To that 
extent it was a vindication of 
the test case brought with the 
backing of the Law Society 
and Times Newspapers, where 
Mr Brett is a employed in the 
legal department. 

But in other respects it was a 
“timid and pathetic attempt at 
a reform recommended over 
six years ago by the Royal 
Commission on Legal Services 
to streamline a cumbersome 
and expensive legal system.' 

Mr Robert Johnson. QC 
chair man of the Bar’s fees and 
legal aid committee, said he 
hoped the direction would 
mark an end to what “has been 
a source of aggravation” 

Law Report, page 28 


Paying the price for a humble badge of office 


ByAiau Hamilton 

The Government has spent 
no less than £537,000 since 
1981 in supplying that essen- 
tial badge of office without 
which the setf-respecting aril 
servant feels truly naked - the 
briefcase. 

Mr Peter Brooke, Minister 
of State at the Treasury, 
disclosed the figure yesterday 
a Commons reply to Mr 
Robert Hayward, Gwmerra- 
tive MP for Kmgswi^wtio 
as a Member of Rarba- 
k not eotWcd to a 
briefcase by right. 


Mr Brooke, on the other 
hand, is ratified io a superior 
black leather briefcase with a 
brass Chubb lock on it, and the 
loan of a smart red despatch 
box to take work home at 
weekends. 

Asked. if be had reviewed 
the. Government's briefcase 
poficy, Mr Brooke replied that 
be saw no reason to review it 
Individual departments, he' 
said, were responsible for 
controlling what they spent on 
briefcases. 

- Apart from the superior 
leather hem, with the brass 
lockjsswtoniy toa few senior 


officials, the standard Civil 
Service briefcase comes in two 
grades: a PVC model costing 
£736 and a slightly better 
leatbercioth one costing 
£25.19. Both are in Mack, with 
the royal cipher stamped in 
gold. 

A Treasury spokesman was 
at pains to point OHf yesterday 
that the Ciril Servant is not 
entitled automatically to a 
briefcase handout; be has to 
prove that he needs one. 

Additionally, whether he 
gets the cheap plastic Item or 
the marginally swankier 
teatberrloih depends not on 


the grade of the individual but 
the grade of what-h-is intended 
to cany; plastic for documents 
so d&U that no unauthorised 
person would dream of want- 
ing to find them scattered on 
fop of a bos, teatherrioth for 
those deemed slightly more 
sensitive. 

“An officer can apply for a 
briefcase, but he has to prove a 
need, like requiring to take 
papers home. Leather ones 
with brass locks are rare, and 
sre for classified papers,” the 
Treasury spokesman said. 

All Government briefcases 
are supplied by the Stationery 


Office. In theory, they mist be 
returned when the user retires 
or leaves the service. Mr 
Hayward omitted to ask how 
many were purloined into in- 
dex-linked retirement as fish- 
ing tackle bags. 

All other components of the 
Civil Servant’s raifonn, in- 
cluding the dark suit umbrella 
and — Increasingly rarely 
these days — the howler hat, 
are most definitely paid for out 
of the officer's own pocket, the 
Treasury said. Indeed toe 
spokesman, who is entitled to 
a briefcase, coaid not think ofj 
a single other perk iff the job. 



calm 
ears 
nobyl 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Warnings of ao immediate 
and catastrophic melt-down at 
the stricken Chernobyl nucle- 
ar reactor were discounted 
yesterday by leading members 
of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency, the first inde- 
pendent experts permitted 
into the disaster zone since the 
explosion there on April 26. 

The three-strong team from 
the respected Vienna-based 
organization said that the 
situation at Chernobyl was 
now stabilizing, with radiation 
levels felling. 

They announced that from 
yesterday, the Soviet Union 
had agreed to provide reports 
from seven radiation monitor- 
ing stations to the agency. 

Speaking to a crowded Mos- 
cow news conference, the 
experts said temperatures in- 
side the damaged No 4 reactor 
at Chernobyl were now signifi- 
cantly below meltdown point 
and still decreasing 

Their answers left a number 
of important questions about 
the nature of the Soviet rescue 
operation unanswered. 

Questioned by reporters 
about whether a melt-down at 
Chernobyl was stilt posible, 
Mr Morris Rosen, director of 
the agency's Di vision of Nu- 
clear Safety, replied: “As a 
matter of physics, it cannot be 
completely excluded. Howev- 
er. the chain reaction stopped 
immediately after the accident 
and never restarted.” 

The American scientist add- 
ed that according to the 
information provided to him 
by the Soviet authorities from 
measurements taken by infra- 
red techniques, fuel tempera- 
tures at the crippled reactor 
were “significantly below 
melting point and still 
decreasing”. 

Mr Rosen explained that 
the Soviet emergency team — 
which is working in condi- 
tions of considerable persona) 
risk — is now striving to 
contain the disaster by 
“entombing” the crippled re- 
actor in concrete. If this is 
achieved, it will then be left to 
cool over an unspecified peri- 
od inside its covering. 

Speculation about the 
meltdown had been encour- 
aged by the feet that the 
reactor is now buried under ’ 
nearly 5,000 tonnes of sand, 
lead and other materials 
dropped from the sky and 
increasing downward pressure 
on its foundation. 

An official statement issued 


by the IAEA said: “The dam- 
aged reactor suffered some fire 
in parts of the graphite. These 
fires have been extinguished 
but temperatures remain high. 
Re-critacaliiy is not consid- 
ered a problem. The aim is to 
encase the whole fourth unit 
in concrete and work has 
begun to place a concrete 
foundation under the 
reactor.” 

Despite the assurances from 
the three-strong IAEA team 

Technicians tunnel 5 

Children evacuated 5 

which arrived here on May 5, 
Western scientific experts not- 
ed later that there were secret 
elements of the Soviet rescue 
operation 

There was no evidence of 
what kind of techniques were 
being referred to or whether 
they posed any special risks. 

At one point, the team said 
that at the height of the 
disaster, the outside radiation 
level at the site and its vicinity 
had reached 36 millirems per 
hour. 

The international experts 
also denied a claim by the 
Ukrainian Prime Minister 
made to a small group of 
Western newsmen that the 
reactor temperature had 
dropped to 300C. They said 
after a helicopter tour to 
within 800 yards, parts were 
much hotter than that. 

There were angry scenes in 
the large Foreign Ministry 
press room when Western 
correspondents suspected that 
their attempts to seek basic 
details about the seriousness 
of the disaster and its implica- 
tions were being blocked by a 
Soviet technique of using 
written questions from Rus- 
sian reporters to make propa- 
ganda points. 

As it turned out. Mr Hans 
Blix, the agency’s director 
general saw to it that all 
questions were taken, if not 
answered. 

For the Gist time, he gave 
exact details of the delay by 
the Kremlin in announcing 
the disaster to the world. 
Despite earlier Soviet claims 
to the contrary, be said that 
the Soviet repesentative ip. 
Vienna had only confirmed 
that an accident had taken 
place after Mr Blix had ques- 
tioned him following reports 
from anxious Scandanavian 
governments about increased 
radiation levels. 


Hunt tribute to Tenzing 


Sherpa Tenzing, who died 
yesterday, aged 72, had an 
exceptional desire to get to the 
summit of Mount Everest, 
according to Lord Hum, who 
led the fust expedition to 
reach the top of the highest 
mountain in the world. 

“He was so single-minded 
that he was my obvious choice 


as Sherpa leader and as one of 
the climbers. In those days it 
was almost unheard of for a 
Sherpa to be one of the actual 
team. I shall never 
forget . . . when they came 
down from the summit,” Lord 
Hunt said yesterday. 

Man of the mountains, page 3 
Obituary, page 15 


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Tories win the 


V r . 3, 1-^i^^yZs- T 7 


close count 
in West 


Derbyshire 


By Craig Seton 


Eight and a half hours alter 
the polls closed and three 
tense, nerve-wracking re- 
counts bier, the Conserva- 
tives snatched victory in West 
Derbyshire early yesterday but 
saw a huge majority cut to 
only 100 by the Alliance. 

Contrary to fervent Alliance 
hopes, the Labour vote did not 
collapse and the potential 
impact of tactical voting on 
which it depended for victory 
failed to materialize. 

The final declaration of the 
result was announced one 
hour after sunrise at the 
Sherwood Hall in Matlock 
where a dejected Christopher 
YValmsley. the Liberal-Alli- 
ance candidate, accepted the 
fourth verdict of the weary 
counters that he bad failed by 
a fraction to overturn the 
Conservative majority of 
more than 15.000. 

Mr Patrick McLoi in- 
aged 28. the former . tier 
Tor\ candidate, his pregam 
utile". Lynn, at his side, ap- 
peared 'more relieved than 
jubilant at the outcome. 

Just after 2 am the candi- 
dates were told that the Con- 
servatives had a majority of 
ISO. Mr Waimsley. a radio 
producer called for a hill 
recount. That produced a 
Conservative majority of 94. 


A second recount, again 
called for by the Alliance, was 


under way by 4 am and pro- 
Cc 


duced a Conservative major- 
ity of 100. Mr Waimsley 
called for a third recount. 

This time only bundles of 
ballot forms and not individ- 
ual papers were checked. 

The Conservative majority 
of IOO was confirmed ana 
declared at 6.26. 

Given the tiny majority, 
more than usual attention was 
paid to the number of spoilt or 
otherwise discounted ballot 
papers - 91 — and more than 
600 votes shared by two 
fringe candidates. 

Mr McLoughlin. now MP. 
told the crowd: ~1 have been 
given certain messages during 
this campaign and 1 intend to 
relay those messages to the 
Government duriog the next 
few months." 

Mr Waimsley said West 
Derbyshire had become the 
fifth most marginal seat in the 
country and the result demon- 
strated' that an Alliance gov- 
ernment was a real possibility. 

Mr William Moore. Labour, 
well behind in third place, hit 
out at some doorstep tactics 
that had been used during the 
campaign and the intrusion of 
“badly conducted" polls. 



win 250 

>9 t 


- Mr phvkf . Steel and rv" 
David Oaeu,{ookB&tii^K^ 
ebted after *, tuctie hSIiArf 
efeqion fever, predated***. 

on. apt terras- with Labour 

»i^CSDWeaywli^jHad^^^ 


Mrs Shields collecting the winnings from a £50 bet and, right, Mr McLoughlin and his Wife, Lynne, (Photographs: Hsny Kerr and Dad MOSerh 


Victors of the by-elections 


Mouse with a confident roar Ex-miner used to 


By George H3J 


Labour hails Ilea vote 
as call for more cash 


By David Walker 


Labour leaders said last 
night that a loud popular voice 
had sounded in favour of 
“proper" levels of public 
spending ou schools and col- 
leges, after a convincing La- 
bour win in the first direct 
elections to the Inner London 
Education Authority. 

Mrs Frances Morrell, who 
Is likely to continue as leader 
of the authority, announced: 
“The people of inner London 
have made it dear where they 
stand on education: with ns, 
and not with Sir Keith Joseph, 
Mrs Thatcher or Norman 
TebbiL " 

Thanks to a Labour sweep 
in the inner boroughs of 
Southwark, Camden, Isling- 
ton, Hackney and Tower 


Hamlets the party is not only 
guaranteed control of the 58- 
member authority but also a 
(airly weak Conservative op- 
position elected from Chelsea. 
Westminster, Streatham and 
Putney. 

Mrs Anne Sofer, the sole 
Alliance representative on the 
old lira, was defeated in St 
Pancras North. 

As the only directly-elected 
London- wide body [eft after 
the abolition of the Greater 
London Council, flea is a 
prized symbol for Labour. Mrs 
Morrell interpreted the result 
as an endorsement of the 
authority's sometimes contro- 
versial policies for enlighten- 
ing Loudon schoolchildren 
about sex and race. 


After the polls have closed, 
in the interval between the 
courtship and the post- 
mortems, the characters of 
election candidates often re- 
veal themselves more clearly 
than before or after. 

At Ryedalc in the early 
hours of yesterday morning. 
Mrs Shirley Haines, the La- 
bour candidate, pranced in a 
blaze of socialist scari el 
among the jostling press and 
exhausted party workera at the 
count She had never had a 
chance, but she meant 10 put 
on a show 10 the last 

Mr Neil Balfour, the 
Conversative. usually a most 
assured public man. was con- 
stantly drawn back to the 
crackling television and sal 
tumbling his wedding ring 
round and round in his hands. 

As for Mrs Elizabeth 
Shields, the Liberal candidate, 
she was nowhere to be seen. 
She awaited her late modestly 
somewhere in private, and did 
not appear until the an- 


nouncement was due. with the 
sky already growing bright 
with dawn. 

When the result was an- 
nounced. she seemed to have 
tears in her eyes, but she 
firmly insists that the televi- 
sion lights dazzled her and 
that her main feeling at that 
moment was that she could 
not quite comprehend the 
event. 

For all the national fanfares 
to celebrate her success which 
the Alliance is raising, in its 
relief that its electoral mo- 
mentum has not been lost. 
Mrs Shields is an archetypal 
example of the Liberal MP 
who's strength lies in local and 
not national concerns. 

An active member of 
Ryedale District Council, she 
was able to draw on valuable 
reserves of public goodwill in 
the campaign. Venturing on to 
matters of grand strategy, she 
(ends to become wooden and 
trite, and she is too straightfor- 
ward a person to affect the 


artificial charm and easy pat- 
ter with which many MPs 
conceal a lack of ideas. 



By Philip Webster, Political Reporter - 


Outwardly she is something 
of a mouse, but a mouse with 
tenacity and a clear private 
sense of her own worth — and 
a mouse whose roar has been 
heard all over Britain once in 
her life at least She was 
confident enough of herself 
and of her team to lay a bet for 
the first time in her life early in 
the campaign. She put £10 on 
herself 10 win at 5-2 odds, and 
later staked another £50 at 6-4. 
Mrs Shields is a Latin and 
history teacher in her early 50s 


(allegedly 52 but she is shy on 
(his point). . 


Although she has lived in 
the urea for 20 


years, she was 
born in Bushe’y Hill Park. 
Middlesex, married in Surrey 
in 1961 and only moved to 
Yorkshire later with her Scot- 
tish husband. David, a univer- 
sity lecturer in education. 
They have no children. 


Mr Patrick McLoughlin, 
the Conservative trim held 
West Derbyshire with IOO 
rotes, was a good choice to face 
the crisfe thar hit the last days 
of the campaign when the 
Alliance squeezed the Labour 
vote ami ail but toppled-the 
15.325 Tory majority. 

Mr McLongfafin, a former 
miner, and member of the 
National Union of Mme- 
workers, learnt a lot about 
adversity when he attracted 
the wrath of his workmates by 
being only one of a handful to 
work at Littleton colliery , near 
Cannock, during the strike. 

The son and grandson of 
miners, he decided in bis teens 
that the Conservative Party 
was for him. He believed then, 
and has kept on repe ati n g . 
right op to the last press 
conference of his election cam- 
paign, that it was the only 
party that offered opportunity 


to all no matter what t he ir 
background. 

During. hfc five years work- 
ing andergrooad, he not aaex- 
peaedly found few cotteagpts. 
who would admit, to agreriog 
with him, atrhongh he has 
always argued that miners 
generally are wen to the right 
of Labour. 

Down to the pits he was not 
averse to preaching the Cos- 
servative creed* andtiuiag die 
by-election be did ft: waft- * 
fervour that sometimes wor- 
ried his handlers. 

.Mr McLoagfaKto, aged 28. 
one of tire youngest MPs, was 
a highly effective doorstep 
campaigner, although given to j 
spending too much time sign- 
ing with opponents whose vote 
he has! no hope of wto^og. - 

Having derided on a politi- 
cal career, Mr McLeaghfin 
rose quickly through .the 
Young Conservatives 


WAtiretowcrfFutSa 

dissmr SEMtoocy. Or 0*tn 

sui tiarfire ADimwe.had 
do mofahe t f ihe CbnaerireSe * 
vor^Rwdale. an& Wes 
Derbyshire. “And ht haw 
dooc io Labour what they did 
to us in Fulham, with knobs 
"on." ' 

' Wfcfle the two party ksiden 
wore lea euphoric about the 
outcome of the local Munch 
elections they jtiH - toasted 
that very solid success had 

beat achieved, the fafehfethis 
fflchidfag tire Affiance gaining 
control of the 
ough of Tower Hamlets, a 
hitherto rodt-soHd bastion of 
Labour support, and winning 
Sutton .from the 
Conservatives.. 

Mr Sled rejected Labour ■-* 
Party riahans that the local ' 
election results .meant Mr 
Kinoocfc-wasoD crane to win 
an overall majority ** the next 
de c lWHi n - 

“Quite ckarfy they are not 
ou target, even though this 
was ibe best testing ^pund for 
them in toed daturas to win 


' On ffiebasa of Ryedale and 
West Derbyshire the Affiance 
was oa tegs for about 250 
seats at the next election, 
white ajattfeoiem of the local 
.elections, held mainly in 
strong Labour territory, still 
gave the Affiance 80 seats: 


Tory strategy 
underfire 
after defeats 


Continued fieto page 1 


Renewed conflict likely on rates and 


Continued from page 1 
new joint board for fire and 
civil defence and will try to 
resist Home Office directives 
on civil defence planning. Mrs 
Margaret Hodge, Labour lead- 
er of the Association of Lon- 
don Authorities said she 


expected Liberal support in 
pushing for extra expenditure. 

With the election in Brent of 
Miss Merle Amory as Labour 
leader, MrsHoagein Islington 
may come 10 appear a moder- 
ate. Miss Amory, darling of 
Labour's hand left in London. 


is likely to argue for controver- 
sial policies on schooling and 
ethnic initiatives. 

The maintenance of 
Labour's strength in Liver- 
pool, despite both Mr Neil 
Kinnock's effort to rid his 
party of Militant and the 


District Auditor's successful 
court action against Liverpool 
councillors, led Labour left- 
wingers yesterday to demand 
that the party now buckles 
down to support Mr Derek 
Hatton. 

Labour gains in the 



neighbouring boroughs, of 
Sefion and Winal will aho be 
used as ammunition against 
Mr Kinnock's argument that 
hard-line policies deter voters. 

Outside London, the Alli- 
ance — predominantly ' the 
Liberals — made advances 


How the main parties fared in Britain’s local elections 


as Secretary of State. There is 
pressure for the Prime Minis- 
ter to conduct a more exten- 
sive reshuffle to freshen the 
Cabinet's image. 

Bin senior mi rasters said 
that tbnufbonld be no sudden 
changes in government pdi- 
ties, whkft urey said would be 
reen as a panic reaction, and 
cause distrust among the elec- 
torate. Ministers believe that 
die Governments still offer- 
ing from tire impression of 
disiHMgyniated by the West- 

After her visit to Central 
Office. MtS Thatcher said that 


Results in the local 

f ovemment elections in 
.ngland. Scotland and 
Wales held on Thursday: 


SOUTH TOTIEMPE (Labi; Lab IB. C 1. 
Progressive I. Lab gain 1 from L and 


jHr qm P rogressive New owned; Lab 


Metropolitan 

districts 


SO. Progressive 7. 

No change - 
STOCKPORT (Nonet: C 7. Lab 6. L 8. 
bid t L gain 3 from C- Lab gain 1 
from C. New council: C 24. lab 16. L 
la tad 3. Ind Lab 3. 

No change. 

SUNDERLAND (Labi: Lab 21. C3.L2. 
lab gain 2 from C. 2 from hid. 1 from 


WALTHAM FOREST (None* Lab 31. C 
16. L 5. SOP 5. Lab gained 2 (tom L 
and « (com C. SDP gain e d 


HYND8URN (None): Lab 12. SDP 2. L 


^ 3™! 1 Horn SOP- New council'. Lab 
■ C 11. L S. 


Barnsley iLabr Lab 22- Lab gain l 
front C a MI from to New council: 
lab 62, C 2. R l. hid 1. 
iwi rtidiwr. 

BIRMINGHAM (Labi; Lab 26. C 11. L 


1. SOP 1 Lab gain 7 from C arid 2 
from l. L gain l from C. SDP gain l 


from C. New council: Lab TO. C 43. L 
2. SUP S. 

No cnaruie. 

BOLTON iLabh Lab 12. CS.L3. SOP 
1 Lao win i from C and 2 Pom L. L 


1 Lao gain i from C and 2 from L. L 
gain 2 from C. SDP gain 1 from Lab. 
New council: Lab 37. C 16.LS. SDP 


. _ - - _ SDP 

1. One vacancy 
Nn cnangn. 

BRADFORD I None): C 16. Lab 11. L 3. 
11 vacant). Lao gained 9 from C. and I 
from L: C gained 2 from L. New 
council: Lab 61. C 36. L 3. 

Lab cam control. 
BURY iCJ. Lab 13. G 4. Lab gain 8 


No change. 

TAMEMDE iLabfc Lab 17. C 2. L 1. 
Lab gam 2^ from C. New council Lab 

No" change: 

TRAFFORD iCL Lab 14. C 6. L 3. Lab 
gained 9 from C_ L gained 1 from C. 
New council: Lab 30. C 24. L 9. 

C tO«a cotUilL 

WAKEFIELD iLabr. Lab 21. C 1. L 1. 
Lab gained 1 from Ind. and 1 from 
SDP. New council: Lab 56. C 4. L 3. 
No change. 

WALSALL (None): Lab 11. C 5. ind 1. 
L 3. Lab gain 2 from ind. ? from c. i 
from L New council: Lab 30. C 17. L 
7, Ind 6 
No change. 


KEY TO PARTIES 

C: Conservative 
Lab: Labour 
L: Liberal 

SDP: Social Democrat 
All: Libera)/ SDP Alliance 
incfc Independent 

Non-metropolitan ISZBESBS" 
districts 


I. Lab gamed 6framC. SDPgatoMl 1 
from Lab- New council: Lab 25. c lb. 


WANDSWORTH iC* C 31. Lab 30 C 
gained 1 from L. Lab gained 3 from C 
and 1 from L. 

No cha n ge. 

WESTMINSTER (Cfc C 32. Lab 27. Ind 
1. Lab gained lO frame. 1 
and 1 from F 
No change. 


SDP. 


from Ind 


SDP b. LI. 

Lab gain control. 

IPSWICH (Labe Lab 14. C 4. Lab 
gamed 2 Rom C. New council; Lab 32. 

qi6. 

No change. 

KINGSTON UPON HULL (Lab): Lab 19. 


PETERBOROUGH iNoner Lab 8. C 4. 
L 4. L gained 1 from C Lab gauwdi 
from C. L giinHl 1 Irani Lab. Lab 22. 
C 16. L 10 
No change. 

PORTSMOUTH 1CT C 7. SOP 4. Lab 2. 


THREE BIVERfi (Ct C 3 SDP7.L 5. 
Lab LA gamed 3 Rom C. SOP 


SET 


SDP gamed 2 Iran C and 1 fr om bid. 
New Council: C 22. Lab IQ. SOP 6, 


L 1. Lab gained 3 from C. L gained 1 
from C- New! round!: Lab SKC 6. L 


SNP: Scottish National 
PC: Plaid Cymru 
Comm: Communist 


2 . 

No change. 

LEICESTER (Labr Lab 13. C6. L X C 


gained 2 from LOl L gained 1 from 
Lab. Lab 39. C 16. L 1. 


AOUR (Cl L 1 1. C 4. Ind 1. L gamed 3 
Rom C and I Rom Ind. New council: 
L 22. C 15. bid 2. 

L Rb BMnL 
AMBER VALLEY (Lab): Lab 8. C 4. L 
2. Lab gamed 4 Rom L and 1 Rom 
Ind. Cjjamed 2 from Lab and 1 Rom 


L. L < 


„ --.,1 from Lab and 1 from 

New council: Lab 24. C 13. L 4. Ind 2. 


WWAN i Lab): Lab 22. L 1. C 1. Lab 
gain 3 Irom L New Council: Lab 66. L 


67 C 2 
No change 
WIRRAL (C): Lab 10. C 9. L S. SDP 2. 


from C. New counoJ: Lab 30 . C IS . 

control* 


Lab gain 2 Rom C. SDP gain 2 from 
C_New council: C 3a Lab 26. L B. 


LU gain 

CALDEROME (None): C 4. Lab 10. L 
5 L gain 1 Rom C and 1 from tod. 
Lao gam 1 from L. New council: C 16. 
1.10 22. I- 16. Vacurn i. 

No ch ange 

MVBeTfi Y ^iLab): New council: Lob 
No change. 

DONCASTER iLabe Lab 20. C 3. Lab 
gain 1 from C- New council: Lab SI. C 
lO. L 1. Vacant 1 
no change 


SDP 2 

C Mm 

WOLVERHAMPTON (Labi: C 5. 
1*1. L 2. Lab gained 4 Rom C. L< 

1 from Lab. New council: Lab 
19. L 3. 

No change. 


Lab 


London 

boroughs 


No change. 

BARROW-IN-FURNESS (Labi. Lab 9. C 
4 C gained 1 from Lab. Lab gamed I 
from C. New council: Lob 26. C 11. 
Ind 1. 

No change 

BASILDON (Lab): Lab 7. C 5. L 3. SDP 
1 Lab gained 1 from C. L gained l 
from Lao. SDP gained 1 from C. Lab 
22. C 13. L 6. SDP 1. vacant 1. 

No change 

BASINGSTOKE AND DEANE (HOMY. C 
10. LA 7. L 2. SDP 1. G gained 1 
Rom Lab. 1 from L and 2 from bid. 
SDP gained 1 from C. New council: C 
32. Lab 17. ind S. L 2. SDP 3. 

C (Mn COMM. 
BA8SETLAW iLabh Lab lO. C 0. bid 1. 
H® 2 fro™ C- New council: 

Lab 27. C 2a Ind 3. 

No change. 

BATH iCL-.C?. SDP 4. Lab 9. L 2. 


DAVEMTRY (CL C 5. Lab 2. L X. Hid 3. 
C gamed 1 from tod. Lab gained 1 
Rom C and 1 front SDP. New council: 
C 19. Lab lO. L 1. bid 6. 

No change. 

DERBY (Lobh C 6. Lab 9. New 
council: Lab 2S. C IT. L 1. 

No change. 


EASTOJURNE (AH): C 4. L 6. L gained 

1 from C and l from Lab. New 
council: L 16. C 13, SDP 1. 

No change. 

EAST DJEV W( fC r. C 18. L !. SDP X. C 
named 2 from L. New council: C 45. 
Cab 1. L 9. SDP 2. Ind 3. 

No change 

EASTLEJeh iNoneM L 7. SDP 3. Lab 
3. C 2. L gained 2 from c. SDP gamed 

2 Rom C. and l from Lob. Lab gained 
1 from L. C 16. L 15. Lab 9. SUP 4. 
No change. 

ELLESMERE PORT and NESTON iLabfc 


No change. 

LEOMINSTER Ondh C4.L1.M&C 
gained l from Ind. l from L and l 
from Lob. New coundL C 6. INd C 2. 
L 6. ind 22. 

No change. 

UNCOLN i Labi: Lab 10, C 1. Lab 
gained one from C. New oounai: Lab 
26. C 7. 

No change. 

MACCLESFIELD iCl: C lO. L4. SDP 2. 
Lab 2. tod X. R 1. L gained two Rom 
C. SDP Wined 1 Rom Lao. llgaiiied l 
from C. C 34. Lab & L 7. SDP 4. ind 
6. R 4. 

No change. 

MAIDSTONE (None): L 7. C 6. Lab 4. 
SOP 3. ind i. SDP gamed 3 Rom G: L 
C gatnei 


Ind 1. 

NO change. 

PRESTON (Labi: Lab 9.C8.L 2-Lab 
gained 1 from L and 2 Iran C. L 
gained l from C New coundL Lab 34, 
C IS. L 6. 

No change. 

PURBECK iNouei: Ind 6. L S.C1.L 

P ined I Rom tad. New coundL tad 9. 

7. C 6. 

NO change 

READING tC* Lab 9; C 4. L.2. Lab 
gain 4 Rom C and l Rom l~ New 
coundL Lab 22. C 18- L 5. 

C MM mmM 


4 from C. New council: C 17. 

L 16, SDP 6- . _ 

• c Mw aeobob 
THURROCK (Labt tab 11. C 2. Rid X. 
Lab gam 2 from C and X Rom huE 
New coundL Lab 29. C 7, tad 3. 
No-nuingr 

-TOWWpOE and MALUMS fCt C 1L 
Lab 2. L 6. L gamed 1 iron C. Lab 
gained l Iron; C-. New couocC C 33. L 
Jl. LOb 6. SDP 1. bid L 
No change 


tire Government would keep 
right oa with its policies and 
redouble its efforts. Sugges- 
tions that it had been humili- 
ated were nonsense. 



I * i L t 5- ' 

,r\ ' 




i'j" 1 

>.:r- V* 


ORKNEY Oodt ind 23. Orkney Mow- 


TORBA YfCL C XO. L 2. SDP_1 
l Rum SDP i 


No dtanae 


. 1 and l man L. SDP 

iromC. L gain i from c ana i f) 

New council: C 28. LO. SDP 2. .tad X. 
No change. 

IXHWWGE waul tCY C_ll. L 3, 


i from R- from sMund Mowernon. 


Lab «. 


SUP 2. L gained 3 from c. SDP (oaoM 
2 ftonLCJNew council; C 36. LabrLL 


gained 1 from C; C gained 1 from L 
and I from bid: Lab gained 1 from 
SDP and 1 from L. New coundL C 20. 
L 17. Lab 9 SOP 6 Ind 3. 

No change. 


No change. 

ROGATE AND BAHSTEAD <CL C 1 X. 
Lab 2. L2. SDP1 . Lab ertned 1 Rom 
C. L Mined 2 from C. SDP gained l 
tram Lab- New CounrS: C3S. Lab ia 
L4..SDP i. tad i. 

No change- 

»3LBIB«t.L 
I C. 


5. SOP 5. tad 1. 

No cnanoe. ■ 

WATFORD (Lab); La b ft C l. SDP f. 
Lab gain i from C. SDP jnan l from 
C. New coundL- Lab 23. CT3. SDP 1. 
No change- . 

WAVENEV (Cte C 8. Lab T. SDP X. 


Rom St woan rt Mowmdok. 

No aunge. ... 

nKAlHCLVDE (Utt lab 87. C 6. L 
S. Ind 3. SNP 2 Lab gamed B from a 
2 from SNP. 1 Ram ^L^mf^l frqw 


SDP. Ctwal X Rom i 


.gained 1 


Irom C. i Rtwi- lad, gamed } 


gained 1 Rom WAVENEY (CL C 8. Lab 7. SDP 1. Lab ' 
SDP gamed 1 gained 3 Rome. SDP gained 1 DroC. 

: G35. Lab ia New oounelL C 22. Ub 21. L 2- SDP 


, . - 1 Rom C. tad gamed 1 

Rom C. 

No ediange- 

T ATTIDE (O: Lab Sa C 14. SNP-9, 
tad 2. U b 1. Lab gained 7 from C, C 
dm 2 Rom mg - snp gained 5 Ron 
bMLgataed X (ram G L gained X 


1. lad X. vacant l. 


ROCHFORO (CL C 6 Lab 3 L 6 tod 1. 
Mined 3 from C. hid gained l from i 
C23. Lab S. L II. tad x. 


WEL WYN HATFIELD (Lab)- Lab/8. CS. 
L I. SDP 1 . C gamed t Iran Lab. Lab 


MID-SUSSEX (CL CT.L 
4. L gained 4 from C. 


No change. 

ROSSENOALE JCfc Ub 8. C 4 Ub 
gain 5 from C and X from L. New 
council: Lab 21. C RM l.. 


anted 1 Rom C. L gained 1 Irom C. 
SDP gained i irom C. New coundL 
Lab 237 c X7. L L.- SDP l. 


. C Iwe mM 
WESTERN ISLES (but): tad 9a FuS 
council 30. . 

No cdiange- 


No change. 
WEST DORSET , l 


: bid a C5. IJbS. 


Lab ii. c 2. Jan Mined 1 irom C. 
f>iew council: Lab 27. c 12. ind i. 


Varans l. 
No change. 


DUDLEY (Nonet- Lab 18. C 6. Lab gain 
1. New 


11 from C and 1 from tad. 
council: LAD 47. C 24. bid 1. 

Lab gaH control. 
GATESHEAD (Lab) Lao 20. C 1. L 1 
«mbJ from C and 1 from 
R-LSOP Min l from i CJ New council: 
Lab y). G 6. L 1. SDP 1. 

No change 


SDP gained 2 Rtm C. L mined 1 /ram 
C. Lab gained 1 from c. New coundL 


ELMBMDCE <C1. .. 

H inch lev Wood Res Assn 1. 

Res Assn 3. Wahon Society _ 
oatoed l from c. L gained l Rom C. 


9. Lab 3. L 2. 
MoJesev 
2. Lab 


BARKING 


DAGENHAM l Lab): Lab 

35. C 3. L S. Ind HaMNben 3. tod 2 


L gained 2 from Lab. 
No change 


c 26. Lab 12. SOP 6. L 4. 

No change. 

BLACKBURN (None): Lab 14. C 4. L 1. 
!pd l. Lab gained 3 Rom C_ and 1 


Moiesmr Res Awi rained l Rom C. 
New coundL C 29. Others 19. Lab 6. 


from c. N«w coundL C i 
lO. Ind 4. 

No change. 

MILTON KEYNES (None* Lab 6. C 3. 
SDP 5. L I. SDP gained 1 from Lab 
and 2 from C. Lab gained 1 from SDP 
and 2 Rom.C. L gained 1 fromC. IMw 
rounclL C-12. Labl9. LB. SDP & bid 

No change. 

MOLE VALLEY (None): C 6. L 5. tad 4. 


RUGBY (None): C B. Lab 7. R 2. Lab 
gained. 1 irom tad and I Rom L. New 
council: C 23. Lab 17. L 1. Ind 1. R 6. 
No change. 


RUNNYMEDE (CL C 7. Lab 5. L 2. SDP 
I. Others 2. Labgatned ? from C. SDP 


gamed 1 Rom C. L_ gained l from C. 


r.Ondfc In . _ v 

Ind CJ.ta lTS&P V L rained 2 
from C: SDP gained 1 from tad: Lab 
Mf rfromC Ind gained' 1 Rom C. 
council: tad 29. C 1 1 : L 8. Lab 2. 
2. tad C 5. 

No change. 

WEST LANCASHIRE (C* C 10. Lab 8. 
SOP 2. Lab gained 3 from C: SDP 


Welsh 

districts 


AFAN (Labe Lab 9. R 1. tad 1- Lab 
oataed 1 from R- Ind osdnTO I Rom 
Ub. New council: Lao STr f fcWl. 


New coundL C 26. Lab a L 2. SDP i. 
5TV 6. 


pain ed 2 from c. New 


i 21. SDP 3. L 1 


Others- L 
No change. 


C torn ■antral. 


BARMT (Cl: C 39. Lab 18. L 2. SDP 
l. Lab g ained S froin.C. L gained 2 


Rom tad. C gained 1 from L. L gained 
I from Lab. New council: Lab 33. ~ 


MRKLEES ILabfc Lab 11.L8. C6. Lab 
gained 2 Rom Ind and 1 Rom C. Lib 
gained 2 from Lab. C gained I Rom 
Lon New council: Lab 36. C 18. L 17. 
Ind 1 

No change. 

. KN OWSLEY (Lab): Lab 22, C I. Lab 
against Militant 1 Lob gain 2 Rom C. 
and 2 from U Lab agatnsl Militant 

. - — „ Lab. New council. C 6. 

i against Militant 1. Vacant 


irom C. SDP gained 1 fiom C. 
SexleyS): C 36. Lab 15, L 10. SIM* 

Rom L. 

No change. 


20. L 5. tad 2. 


, _ , ___ BRENTWOOD (C): C6.L6. Lab 1 L 

JCSa^? fl,aC25L,2 * L ^ a - 

C. C gained 1 rtocmtom lUmi im. a r- ^ ■ . 


Lab pto* eemraL 


change. 
BRICHTON iNonel. 


tab 9. C 6. L I. 


BRENT (Nonet: U 43. C 20. L 3. Lab 

m C- 


gotoed n Rom . 

Lab ptn emboL 
CAMDEN fLatot. Lab. 44, CIJ.L2. Lab 


L4b rained 2 Rom a New council: 

srF Sb L -iS£ tJU 


F n 1 Rom 
>57. Lab a 


gi^U Rotn C. L gained 2 from C 


No ch ange- 
LEEDS iLab): Lab 20. C 8. L 6. Lab 
.gained 4 from C and 1 from L. L 


'rahied 1 from C New council: Lab 58. 
C2B. L lO. SDP 1. tod 2. 


No change- 
LIVERPOOL (Labi: C 1. Lab 15. L. 17. 
Lao gam 1 Rom L. L gain 6 from C. 
New Council: C 7 Lab 64. L 37. 
vacant 1 
No change 

MANCHESTER (Labr Lab 31. C 1. L 2. 


No change. 


NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE (LNw: Lab 
20. C J. L 4. Lab.gain 5 Irom C ai 


from L. L data 1 from c. New council: 
Lab 51. C16. L 10. SDP 1. 


NO change 
NORTH TYNESIDE INoner C 5. Lab 
10. L 3. SDP 1 . Ind Lab I. Lab gained 
3 fro m Lob Against MlUtanL 1 from 
SDP and 1 from a L gained 1 from 
Lab Agatasl Militant, and 1 from C. 
New council: C IB. Lab 27. L 3. SOP 
2. Lab Against MiUtanl 6. ind Lab 1. 
vacant 1 
No Change 


change 

CROYDON i Cl: C 44. Lab 26. Lab 
gained 18 from C and 3 from ind 
No change. 

EAUNO i None KLab 47 C_20. L3. Lab 
gained 14 from C and 3 from tod. 

Lab gain oomnL 
ENFIELD (Ct C 38. Lab 28. Lab gamed 
9 irom O 
NO change. 

GREENWICH ILabfc Lab 44. C 12, SOP 
±. L2- Lob raJnTO 4 Rom C. SDP 
gained 3 Rom Lab. 

No change. 

HACtatEYjLabfcLab S3. LB. C 2. Lab 
glned^B^Rom L and I Rom C. 

HAfSeSsmi I FULHAM (None): 

^■ 2 c ,U l t_ L ^ 9 ^ 1S4 ' ron ' 

Lab rata control 
HA RINGEY : Counting conoirues today. 
HARIWW (C): Full mull no) known 
unbl Monday because of recount In 


BRISTOL (Nonet C a Lab 13. L 3. L 
rained I fra n C. Lab gamed 2 frotn C 
New council: Lab Z6. c 25. L 7. 

Lab rata eontraL 
PMAQLAND iCb C lO. u SOP l. 


L 6. 

C hr it comvnt 
EPPIMG FOREST K% C II. Lab 3. 
Lo.u gh lon B« Assn 3. SDP 2. SDP 
SOUned 2 from c. New council: C 34. 
jjb iz. SDP 4. Lough] on Res Assn 6. 
too j. 

^E^ionefc Lab 6. C S. SDP l. 

rained i Rom C. SDP gained l 
Rome. New council: Lab 15. C 14 , l 
6. SDP l. tod 1. 

No change. 

FAREHAM ICY. C S. L 3. SDP 5. R 1. 
SDP gained 2 from a L oataed i from 
Cantfl from Lab New cooncfl: C 21; 
SOP 9. L 7. tad 2. R4 . , 

C Msa etndroL 
OtLLltVfiHAM (0:C8. L S. Lab 2. C 


L rained i from C. tad rataed, I Rom 
C. New council:. C- 15. Lab I. L 8. Ind 


RUSHMOOR (Gfc C 11. L 3. Lab fl- C 
gamed 1 from L arid 1 from Lab. L 


Rom Lab: L gained l from Lab. New 
Council: Lab 37. C ia L -7. ind 2. 

NOfWH'SaifOnpSHlHEJ^^C 6. Lab 


gamed 1 Rom C.and 1 Rom Lab. New 
council: C 30. L 9. Lab 6. 

No change. 

ST ALBANS (None): C 6, Ldb 3. : 

~ ' ' lfr 


WgT LINDSEY (Nones L II. tod 2. 
SDP 1. C 1. L rained X from Lab and 
one from tad. L 18. C 9. tod 9. LaD 2. 
SDP 2. 

No change. 

WEST OXFORDSHIRE fCfc C 6. EA> 1. 


No change. 

COLWYN (nond fc Lab j. L8.BJ1 C 

‘nJs, rsL? sscS-^^i 

Lab a. C 4. 

No change. 


CYNON VALLEY (Lab): Lab 12. PC 2; 
ied 2 from presscstoafess- P* 


3. L a. Lab gained | Tram SDP. C 
rame d I from L. L gained 2 Rom C. 
Spp.ramed l from .c Newcoonciuc 


Ind 5. L «. SDP 1. L data) 2 from c. 
- in 1 from C. NewrouncH: C.2S. 


tad i 
tad 


12- Lab 4. l a. 


I ah gained j_ 

gained i from Lab. New coundb Lab 

55T PC 7. Comm 1. 

No change. 


6. L6.SDP1 Labi 


•Rom CS L 


rained A Rom C: SDP gained 1 from 
CL New council: C 73. Lab 14.- L 13. 


23. Lab 8. L 18. SDP 7. tod 1. 
No change. 

SCUNTHORPE iLabfc Lab 9, C 3. 


2 MERTHYR TVPra. CLabl: Lab 8. tad 3. 


s-sjFmffi.' 'nsas 


SDP 2. tod 1. 


C Iom mM 


gained l _from_ 


too 1. L gained 4 from c. SDP gained oatoed 2 from C. New council: C 23. L 
l from <T New council? £MT7, iaTLab 6. tad 1. 


. and l Rom SOP- L 
New ro 


SSDP2. Ind 5. vacant l. 

No c hange. 

BROXBOURNE ICC C 11. Lab 2. Lib 1. 

33* Fi*")? IF*? &, New C 

4* - tata 6. Lib 3. SDP 1. 

No change- 


BlfflHLEY i Lab): Lab 14. C g, SDP 1. L 
2. Lab rained 3 from C, SDP < 
from C. l gained _l Rom 


NO change. 

GLOUCESTER l 

Lob gained 1 from 1 
C. C gained 2 from 
16. Lab 12. L 5. 

No change 
GOSPORT ia C s. L 3. Lab 2. L 


New 

L 2. 


f?f EWTSTtW T* “ k ' c 


No change. 


OLDHAM (Lata: Lab 16. L 3. CJ. SOP 
1 Lon rata 3 Rome. L gain 1 from C. 


SOP gain 1 irom C. New roiiniil: Lab 
42- P 11. L 6. SDP 1. Vacant 1. 


HAVERING (Ck C 2a Lab 2a bid lO. 


cpunpi: Lab 41. C a SDP 
No change. 

CAMBRIDGE (Labfc Lab 8.JC 3. L 2. 
SOP i. Lab gained 1 Rom C. C gamed 

laT’g^bpT counear lj6ffie 

No change 

CANNOCK CHASE (Nonet: UbS.LS 
C 1 . Lab gamed 1 from C. L rained i 
from ind. New council- Lab 2 oTL 17. 
C 4. tad 1. 

No change. 

CARLISLE (Lab): Lab 9. C 7. L X. Lab 
gained 1 Rom C. L gained j Rom Lab. 
New council: Lab 26TC 21. L 3. tod l. 
No change. 

CHELTENHAM iNon *Y. L 8. C 3. Lab 1. 
ind Resldpnia 1. L gained 1 from tod 
and 1 Rain Lab: Lab rained 1 Rom C. 

- - - - - 


12 fran C. New counclLC ; 

Lab *. 

No change. 

GREAT GRIMSBY (noney C 3. Lab 
SDP 1- L ab gained 4 from C 
(TORI SDP. New council. C 14. 

SDP MlUl. _ 

Lab sata vuuuul 
CHEAT YARMOUTH iGh Lab 9. C 6- L 


a. Lab 24. 


1. Lata gained 4 from C. C gained 2 
Jrom L. New councu.- C 24. Lab 22, L 


c ton aeoboL 
HALTON ILabfc Lab 44. C 3. SDP 3. 
Ind 1. Boundary changes. 

No change. 

HARLOW (Labi: Lab 13. Lib 1. Lab 


New council: L ML 


Lab 2- ind 


NO change 


HfKJfJWDW fLabr Lab 40. C 17, SDP 
3- tabWord 10 from C. SDP gained 


and ^SSm C.L gained > Rom C New 

ui k£'&rthU%m 

ROTHERHAM iLabb Lab 

1 Irom C. 1 from ind. 

Lab 62. C 2- SOP 1 


2 from Lab. 
No change. 

No dianra. 


No change 

C»«RWELL iCh C 9. Lab 0. SDP 4. 
Lab gained 2 Rom C and l from SDP. 
gained l f rom Lab and I from C. 
Lab 13. SDP 6, tad 1. 


c - Lab 36 C 2 L 4. 

No change. 

HARROGATE tCfc C7.L7.SDP 3. Lab 
2. tad I. l rained 4 from C. SDP 


.3 Rom C. Lab gained 1 from t- 

gatned l Iran C C31. L X7. SDP 



SCO NTMORPE J Lato): Lab OC 3. SDP 
2 Lab gamed 2 from SDP. Now 
counett: Lib 33. C 5. SDP 2. 

uige. . 

.1 from C- C gained 1 from tod 


Lahs.CT2.L2. tad 3 Lab rain 1 ITOoi 
C and 1 from R. L gam 1 from C. .tad 


No change. 

SHREWSBURY and i 

7. Lab 

sained l 

and i from Lab. Lab gained l from C, 
New councu: C 22. Lab 16. L 6. SDP 
2. tad 2. 

No change- 


SLOUGH (Labfc: Lab IO, C Z. L X. Lab 
rain 2 from C and 1 from l. New 
Council: Lab 23. C 12. L3. Ind I. 


No change- 


98ln 1 from R. New CQundBb C 13. Lab 
14. L O- QMS 4, R -1. 

No dtt ftqt. 

WHJCWSTCR (CJ: C 3. Lab Z -L 7. 
SDP 4. tod z L gain -4 J from C. SDP 
gain 2 front C and 1 Rom L. New 
rouneik C 32. Lab 5. L 9. SDP G. tad 

No change. 

WOKING (Cb L B. C 4. Lab 2. SDP 1. L 
gain 3 (ran c. SDP goto 1 from c. Lab 
tt?un0,: c ia > 
c 


NEWPORT (U*fc ,Lab 
l Rom CXNew ( 


13. C 4. L*& 


counett Lab 36. 


SWANSEA ILabfc Lab 9. C8, LI. SDP 
X. bid 1. Lab rained lftfinGSW 
oatoed rTnofti G L gamed .1 ran Lab. 


._ 1 wnn 

C 14. tad 4. L Z SDP l- 




37. Lab IO. L, 6. tod 1. 
No aiam. 


SOUTO GAMBIBDGESH1HE Itadfc Ind 
IZ- C 7. -c gained 2 from sdp. _ 


gdfWd p irap L. New cdinicU: ma'sB. 


SDP 3 
No change 

WDODSPtaNG (CD C 14. Lab V. L 2. 
SDP 1. Green Party 1. Green Pony 
rained i (ran In md. L gamed i (ran 
Ind. CjnM l fro m, SD P. ~ New 
JfflCH: c 4H. Ldb 4. L 4L SDP Z Ind 3. 
Green party 1. . - • ■ 

No change. 


— - Lab 3. L 3. SDP 2. 

No change- 

SOUTH ENO-OH-SEA ICC L T. Uh 2. C 
4 L gato4 from CjLob rata l from C 
New councu. C 20. L 15. Lab 4. 
No change. 

SOUTH HEREPOftDSMlznE ttadJ: ind 8. 
L 3. SOP 1. L gained 1 froiiTc and i 
fmrntad New council: tod 26. G 4. L 
S. SDP 2. 

No change. 

3UTH LAKELAIffi lOrC & L6. tad 


WORC ESTER O-MJfc Lab 8. G A. lab 
ram 2 from c. New council: Lab 20. C 


L 

gained 


CHESTER 1C): C IO Lab 8 L 3. Lto 


3. Lab 4. tod 6. 

No change. 

HART t Nonet L 4. SOP S C 3. ind Z 
1 2 from C: L gained l 


C C. gained J^m^.^Jw^cobbch: 


‘gained : 


from 


Mr John Maijoram, wbo 
won a seat for the Green- 
Party at StrowL 


4. Lab- 3. l gained 2 irom C and i 
from tad. Lab gained 2 from tod. New 
council; -C 26. L ia Lgb a tad 12. 

Iom eontraL 


No' change. 

WORTHING iCJ: LTD £ L gained 2 
from C New council: C 22. L i«. 
No change.- - ■ 

WYRE FOREST toonefrC-S. LC-Lab i 
tod 1.. Lab gained 1 from Ind. New 
council, c 16. L 14. Lbb 8, tad 5. 
Vacmd 1. 

No change. 

YORK monel: Lab ILLSSCPI.CI. 
Lab gained B from C and 2 from to 

^ counclL 



IF YOl WANT 
TO GET AHEAD. 


STEVENAGE iLabl- Lab 9. SDP 3. L I. 


KBKSINCTON sad CHELSEA ICE C 39. 
Lob gained 1 from tad. 


No change. 


St HOBBI [Lib); UbILC 3. Lab 
rain 3 Rom C. 1 Rom SDP and 2 
from L. New council; Lab 45, c 9. 


No change 
SALFORD Utt \LM» 20. C 2. Lab 
2 from C. C rata l from l 
council: Lab 56. C 4. L 1 
No change 

SAHDWELL ILab). C 2. 


Lab IS. 

No change. 

LEWMH AM JLab): Lab 30. C IT. Lab 
gatoeo II from C. 

No change. 

MERTON iCfc C 29. Lob 2S. Res Atsdr 
3. Lab rained 12 from c. r 
gamed 2 from c. 

' change. 


Br?9. 1 L^.%ST oauncl,: c »■ 

C Ion cmcvdL 
CHO RLEY fNanerj Lab B. C 8. SDP 1. 


1?. SDP 3. C IO. tod 6. bid C 1. 
Hook Environmental Croup 1. 

No change. 

HARTLEPOOL (Lab): Lab 14. C 3. Lab 


L 1. SDP gains 1 Ron Lob. Ltraned'. 
» Hew council: C 22. Lab 21. L 


from C. 

1, SDP 2. tod 
No change. 


Res Assoc 


8AHDWELL ILab). C 2. Lab 20. L 2. 
Lab ^wi 3 Igrni C. New eounfit C 11. 


NEWHAM (Labfc Lab 60 Lab gained 2 
7 from SDP and 1 from Ind 


from to 2 . 
No change. 


No ch ange. 

SEFTON «Cfc. C 7. Lab a, L 7. SOP 1, L 
5from C. S3P rained l from 
P- Lap gamed 1 from Land 1 from 
tad. New council: C 30. Lab 24. L 12- 
SOP 2. 1 vacancy 

C MM eontraL 

SHEFFIELD (Labi: Lab 22.C8.L3. 

& A*T5. & ^ “* incMi 

No change 

SOLIHULL (Cl. CJ. Lab 5. L 2. IM 2. 
ind ratn 2 from a Lab rata 1 ran C. 

Ldbiomc.r - — 

_Ltol4 L 2. tod 
No change 


REDBRIDGE iC): C 45. Lab 17, LI.C 
franc. 


—- Jg.trpq? L. Lab gamed 5 
- oatoed i Rom C. 
no change 






and 1 from Lab. Lab rained i from CL 
New council: C 2B. SOP g. L B. Lab 
11. Ttpiree Res Assn 3. tod 1. 

C lot <1 control 
CONCjJErOH i Cl: L B. SDP 2. C 3. Lab 
J- SDP gained 2 from C. L gained 4 
ran C. Lab gained l from L. New 
council. C 21. L 17. Lab 5. SDP 2. 
_ C Mm eontrrt. 

CRAVEN (O: C 4. Lab 1. L 5. Ind 1. L 
- -I S from C. lag rained. 1 from 
New coundL C ISTLll. tod 5. 


_ ... Ind 3. 

No change. 

HASTINGS i None): L 6 C 5 Lab 2. L 
gained 2 from C and 1 from Lab. New 
council: L 13. C U. Lab 8. 

No change 

HAVANT id C 8. Lab 4. SDP 1. L 1. 


NORTH 
LM B. S 

from C. C rained 1 from tod. L gamed 
c - c “■ 

No change. 


NORWICH Oabfc LM 14. L 5. SDP 1. 
lined 1 from c and 2 from Lab. 


rained 1 from C. 

O New coundL Lab 


LLS.C 


R 1. Lab i rained i from to SDP gained 
from C. R gained 1 from C. C 22. 


change. 
SUTTON IC): C ia 
a Vacant 3. Lf 
gained 4 from 


Lab 3 


,7. L 22. SDP 


CRAWLEY- (Labfc Lab 9. C 1. Lab 
16 from C. SDP giirwd x Rome. New council; Lab 2a 

_ _ C taw mm) No change. 

iLttV. L 98. Lab CREWE and NMlYVneH fNonek Lab 
iini?ii-h S? 11 . Lab. SOP 10 . C el L l. SDPi. Lab gained 1 from 

t La * > 9^ 3 from L £■ SDP graned l fromtorti. New 

1 from tod. __ . SS'chLse*’ - ^ ®»- *- S- SOP 3. 


Lab IO. L s.'SDP I. R'a llid - 2T 
No chan ge 

HEREFORPjLfc Lab I. L 90. gained 
two from C and i from Lab. New 
rounrtfc L 17. c 6, Lab 3. bid 9. 
No chan ge. 

HEH TSME RE (Cl. C 9. L 2. Lab 2. SDP 

22. L SSTa 1 lT^pT eouncU: c 
Nn change. 

HIWCKLEY AND BOSWORTH ICgC 9. 


c Mm eemraL Lab 3. sdp a. l IrEab 


C. SDP gamed l from 
from to New roimcH. C 


24, SDP X. 
9am ’ 
and 


SDP 2. 

No change. 

HUNTINGDONSHIRE iG): C 17. Lab I- 
i. gam 2 from lad and I from nn . 
New council: C 41. Lab 6. Lib i. sop 

1 . ind 4 

No change. 


front 

4. SDP 1. 

No change. 

NUNEATON and BEDWORTH iLabfc 
Lab 12. C 3. Lab gain 1 irom u Lab 
33. C 11. SDP 1 

NO change- 

OAOBY AND WTGSTON IO. C6. L*. L 
rata 3 from a New council: C 19. L 7. 
No change. 

OXFORD iLabfc Lab 1I.C2.L1. SDP ’ 
l Laft> gained 2 frame, and 1 from to 
sdp gained i from C: l gained i from 
C. New council: Lab 30C 11. L 2. 

SDP 2. 

No change- 

PENDLE (None): Lab 7. L 9- C 1 . Lab 
gained 2 from C. L gamed Z Rrom C 
and l from L ab. N ew council: Lab 19. 
l aa c io. sdp i, vacant i. 

No change- 

PENWITH ilnd):C 4. Lab S. SOP 1. tod . 

5. Mfchyun Kernow 1. Lao gained 3 
from ind. SDP gamed 1 from ind. 


iv. iTounear Lab 29. L &. SDP 4. C 1. 
No change. 

STOKE-ON-THENT 'Labfc Lab 19. C 1. 
New council: Lab 57. C 3. 

No change- ■ 

STMTFOn>-aa-AVOH (Cfc C 12. L 4. 
Ind 1. Lab 1. C /gained l from L. L 
gained 3 from Ind and * from C. New 
rounclL- C ST. ind 7. L 6. SOP 3. Lab 
2. 

No change: 

STWOUDtCT: CfS. Lab 4. L 3. SDP 3. 
tad 3. Oreo- Party f Lab-gatnea i 
from L and 1 from tod: sdp grated 2 
rrom c and 1 from Lab. L gamed 3 
from i C and l front bML Green 


Scottish 

regions 


i III ' '-A-: 1 1 


BORDERS andfc ind 14. C OSNP t. 
SDP 1. L l. a«P -gained 1 front tad. 
tod gatacdi Rom Land 1 from C. L 
^uxmhj l from Uvl 

COITRACTLabr. Lab S^fiNPG, C4. L. 
l. tod i. Lab gained ira^tod 


No ch a nge. ' ' 


EDUCATION 




i*}*\ [ • :• 


f 


V 


i^ ?; . 


TY-. 




K. 

1 v ; 


5:>> 

■?" ■ f. 


T. Lib. 3. 


Lab 


Party i. 


n^yFl ‘Sff&StSi 


gained i" from bid. 1 rrom snp and l 
from C: L gatped 1. from tod: SDP 


gdned 


1 front 


C Mag eontraL No change 


L4b 14. l a. 


TAMWORTH tCt Lab S-'C 1. Lab 


SS'Sge. 


IW'JEBSITYAPPOOfrMBNTSBf'BffidMBiC^^ 

SUWOLAPPOBYFMQfTSBHJUCATlONAIJCOtlHSE. 

sxoMsm&mwffsm 


TARDfODGE (Cl: C 8. 


tab fdt 

- L n 


gfA»*AH (C>: Lab' 17.' C 16, L 13. 
lita, , J^ Boundary changes. 


Lab 1. L 


gained Sjrom C. New council: C 31, L 


. Lab 4. 
No change. 


New council. C XX. Ind IB. Lab s. 
SOP l. L X- M ebyon Kernow 1. 

»d Mm WML 


THA MESPOWH (Labfc. Lab 'IT. C 3. 
SDP X L S New coundir Lab 38* C 
IS. L 3. Ind X. Boundary changes. 


NO change. 


HUOHUU^ftodt Ind 37, Lab 7. SNP 
No change. 

LOTH XAH fNonn! IBB 32. C 13. L 2 
l^JP 7. Lab C. 1 

5S5 sdp. i from tod and x Rom 
SNP. L ggraed 1 franc. 6NP gained X 

LPWl C- 

Lab 0Hn eontraL 


MONDAY 

MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 





ii' 


~ • 




£ 




''m 

:-3S 


- 


! = *** 










THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Increased use 
could prevent 7,000 




The Jives of about 7,000 
tnrombosis victims in Britain 
could be saved every year if 
preventive treatment was 
made more widely available, 
medical experts said 
yesterday. 

About 15,000 people die 
each year from pulmonary 
embobsm, a consequence of 
thrombosis, and np 
to 500.000 others suffer years 
of pain and discomfort from 
tne circulatory condition. 

The latest medical evi- 
dence, presented to a meeting 
at the Royal Society of Man- 
erne in London yesterday, has 
emphasized that an inexpen- 
sive drug treatment could 
prevent much of the illness 
and almost half of the 

However, many doctors are 
unwilling to resort to the use 
of low-dose heparin as a 
preventive measure because 
they are over-concerned about 
the bleeding that it can cause 
in some patients, the meeting 
was told. 

“They are reluctant to ac- 
cept the evidence, even 
though it is now 
overwhelming,’* Dr Duncan 
Thomas, a leading- specialist 
in thrombosis research, said. 

Deep-vein thrombosis is a 


condition in which Wood dots 
fonn in the legs, usbaDy of the 
middle-aged and elderly. It 
can lead 1 to pulmonary embo- 
lism, in which a Wood clot 
travels to the heart and then 
lodges in the lung. 

It can occur. suddenly and 
unexpectedly- in hospital pa- 
tients recovering from modi- ’ 
cal or surgical illness, and is an 
immediate threat to life. Itcan 
lead also to other problems 
such as leg ulcers and varicose 
veins. 

In Britain, only 45 per cent 
of general surgery patients 
with die condition are receiv- 
ing heparin, compared with 84 
per cent in The Netherlands, 
and' 78 peir cent in Sweden, 
according to Professor Vijay 
Kakkar, director of the 
Thrombosis Research Unit at 
King's College School of 
Medicine, London Universi- 
ty. “We want to persuade 
clinicians to adopt a, more 
progressive approach,” he 
said. 

Evidence from the United 
States showed that heparin 
treatment produced a 68 per 
cent reduction, of deep- vein 
thrombosis in 12,000 patients, 
and a 49 per cent reduction in 
deaths from pulmonary 
embolism. - 


“Widespread use of this 
form, of prophylaxis would 
provides meaningful survival 
benefit and would have an 
acceptable risk 
haemorrhage,*’ Professor 
: Kakkar said. “This would 
mean saving some 7,000 lives 
a year in our country.” 

- One specialist at the meet- 
ing estimated that the cost to 
the National Health Service of 
using heparin, an anti-coagu- 
lant produced by the body, 
would amount to about 
£4 minion a year if all appro- 
priate patients were treated. 

Professor Harold Roberts, 
of the University of North 
Carolina, presented the sum- 
mary of a consensus statement 
from a recent conference orga- 
nized by the National Institute 
ofHeatih in the United States. 
Deep-vein, or venous throm- 
bosis, and pulmonary embo- 
lism were associated with 

50.000 deaths, and up to 

600.000 hospitalizations 
year m America, he said. 

“Prevention is far superior 
to treatment, and the evidence 
for benefit from preventive 
treatment is compelling,” he 
said. “It should be used more 
extensively.” 


Cigarette 

blackmail 

charges 

Two brothers were charged 
last night with demanding 
£500,000 with menaces from 
Gallaher, the cigarette and 
tobacco company, between 
April 14 and May 1 last 

The charges arise from a 
police investigation into an 
alleged blackmail plot against 
Gallaher, of Kragsway, Hol- 
bora, central London, in 
which it is alleged there was a 
threat to put cyanide into 
some of the company’s 
cigarettes. 

David Prewitt, aged 33, a 
builder, of Nottingham Road, 
HucknaO, and Phillip Prewitt, 
aged 30, also a builder, of 
Monkton Drive, Bilborough, 
both Nottinghamshire, are 
due to appear before 
Horseferry Road Magistrates’ 
Court today. • 

They were charged at Roch- 
ester Row police station in 
central London by Det Chief 
Supt Basil Haddrell, of Scot- 
land Yard’s Serious. Crime 
Squad, Cl. The two men were. 
arrested on Wednesday night 
on board an Inter-City 125 
train en route from St Pancras 
to Leeds via Nottingham. 



‘found 
in hotel lavatory’ 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 
A detective yesterday told a defence of Patrick 


jury at the Central Criminal 
Court how he found part of a 
timer used in bomb-making 
three floors down from the 
alleged seat of the bomb in the 
Grand Hotel, Brighton, tiro 
years ago. 

On the fourth, day of the 
trial of a Belfast man accused 
of the bombing, Det Con lan 
Macleod, of Scotland Yard's 
anti-terrorist branch, told the 
court he found a plate from a 
Memo Park timer 15 days 
alter the explosion in the hotel 
on October 12, 1984. 

Mr Madeod said the plate 
was lodged in foe U-bendof a 
lavatory in room 329. Earlier 
the court had been told that 
room 629 was considered by 
police experts to be the seat of 
the blast 

Mr Macleod said he recog- 
nized the (date immediately, 
although it had been altered 
into tne shape of an ice-cream 
cone. Dust and mortar had 
gathered in the lavatory creat- 
ing mud but Mr Macleod sard 
he spread the mud out on the 
floor and found the plate: 

Cross-examined, by Mr 
Richard Ferguson, QC for the 


Joseph 

Magee who has pleaded not 
guilty to seven charges con- 
nected with the bombing. Mr 
Madeod agreed the timers 
had been used by motorists to 
remind them of the expiration 
of their time on parting 
meters. 

Det Con Madeod said be 
had seen the timers wired up 
in conjunction with time and 
power units in bombs. They 
allowed anyone planting a 
bomb up to an hour to escape. 

They might also be used as 
“a safety mechanism” when a 
bomb was being armed. 

■The detective said he had 
also helped with the removal 
of the mutilated body of Mrs 
Jeanne Shanock who was 
found in room 638 alter the 
blast The court has been told 
she and her husband, chair- 
man of the Conservative 
Party’s western area, had been 
staying in room 628. 

Mr David Horne, a police 
explosives officer at Scotland 
Yard, said he estimated the 
bomb atthe Grand Hotel to be 
between 20 and 30 lbs. 

.. The trial was - adjourned 
aiatil Monday. 



Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary after their successful climb to the summit of Mount Everest in 1953. 

Man of the mountains Tenzing dies 


By Paul Vallely 

Probably the world will now 
never know who was really the 
first climber to reach the 
summit of Mount Everest. 

Tenzing Norgay has died in 
the higher reaches of Darjee- 
ling and Sir Edmund Hillary, 
who was recently appointed to 
be New Zealand's Ambassa- 
dor to India, will doubtless 
remain bound by their unspo- 
ken pact that the honour 
should not be divided 
It was five mouths ago that 
the ratified atmosphere in 
which he worked made its 
final claim upon the sberpa, 
aged 71 

He was sent from the Hima- 
layan Mountaineering Insti- 
tute, which he founded the 
year after the conquest of the 
world’s highest mountain, to a 


hospital idf New Delhi suffer- 
ing from lung infections. A 
month later he was discharged 
and returned to the mountains 
of north-eastern India. 

It was the opposite side of 
the mountain to the one on 
which he was born. But the 
“tiger of the snows” dial in 
the same dear air in which he 
spent most of his life. 

Sberpa Tenzing's role m the 
first ascent of Mount Everest 
was tinged with controversy 
from the start After the 
successful conclusion of the 
expedition its leader Colonel 
John Hum was at pains to 
point out that “Tenzing, 
though a full, gallant and 
much-liked member of the 
expedition, was in no sense a 
guide to foe sura mm it”. 

In foe words of The Times 
correspondent with foe party. 


James later Jan Morris, “he 
and Hillary took it in turns to 
cut a route, but it was foe latter 
who led foe rope to foe 
summit". 

But from foe start there 
were implicit allegations of a 
racist attitude by foe climbing 
establishment. Certain news- 
papers in India and Pakistan 
maintained at foe time that 
Tenzing blazed foe trail and 
finally hauled Hillary to the 
summit on a rope. 

Undoubtedly that was an 
exaggeration. But concern was 
voiced at foe uneven-handed 
treatment of the wo men. 

Hillary was knighted where 
Tenzing received foe George 
Medal and left in a position 
which foe Manchester Guard- 
ian, at the time described as 
“embarrassingly obscure”. 


Bui none of this seemed to 
bother Tenzing. “I desire an 
end to this controversy," he 
told a press conference which 
was consumed by the urge to 
find out whose had been foe 
first foot on the summit. 

His humility in foe situa- 
tion engaged all those who met 
him. Where Hillary went on to 
become a public figure 
Tenzing seemed content to 
remain what he had always 
been, a man of foe mountains. 

Until shortly before his 
death he was fit and active and 
still led the occasional trek- 
king expedition into foe foe 
higher foothills. 

There high on foe roof of 
foe world, devout Buddhist 
that he was. he continued to 
offer up prayers of thanks to a 
sky which he said was “the 
deepest blue I have ever seen". 


Banks to be protected 
in drugs cash inquiries 


The Government is acting 
to give banks legal protection 
if they volunteer suspicions to 
police ot customs that 
customers' finances are con- 
nected with drug trafficking 
(Peter Evans, Home Affairs 
Correspondent, writes). An 
amendment is to be tabled to 
foe Drug Trafficking Offences 
Bill, now before the House of 
Lords. It is expected to come 
into force in the autumn. 

The Government’s move 
will also cover investment 
advisers and others who may 
have suspicions that foe 
source of money is drugs. 

The Home Office says that 
foe Committee of London and 
Scottish Banks, which was 
consulted, had no objections 
to ibis proposal But in March 
Mr Robert Sale, a director of 
Barclays, sakt “We don’t 
want, in any way, to infringe 
the long-established 


customer/banker confidential 
relationship-” If someone has 
suspicions, yet goes on with 
foe transaction, he would be 
liable, under another part of 
foe Bill, to receive np to 14 
years imprisonment for assist- 
ing foe trafficker to handle the 
proceeds of his dreg traffick- 
ing, Mr David MeUor, Parlia- 
mentary Under-Secretary of 
State at the Home Office, said 
yesterday. 

If the banker alerts the 
police he will not be guilty of a 
handling offence. 

Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
Secretary, has said that foe 
Government had included in 
foe Bill, from foe start, impor- 
tant new provisions, enabling 
foe police and customs to 
obtain access at an early stage 
of a drug trafficking investiga- 
tion to information held by 
banks and others about a 
suspect's financial affairs. 


BR launches 
service to 
skirt London 

London will cease to be a 
barrier for through rail travel- 
lers in the north and foe south 
of England when British Rail 
launches its cross-London In- 
ter-City services on Monday 
(Our Transport Editor writes). 

Express trains will nm 
round the west side of London 
via Kensington Olympia be- 
tween Dover and Brighton in 
the South, and Liverpool and 
Manchester in foe North, 
relieving passengers of foe 
need to change trains and 
stations in the capital 
Fourteen services will oper- 
ate on foe route each day with 
cuts of up to 100 minutes in 
journey time: 

Typical tunings are Man- 
chester to Gatwick in 3hr 
43 min; Croydon to Stoke in 
2hr 38min; and Liverpool to 
Dover in 4hr 46min. 


Man loses 
court fight 
for house 

Mr David Banter, a stock- 
broker whose former wife 
killed herself and their chil- 
dren after he left her, has lost 
his battle in foe Court of 
Appeal for foe return of foe 
family’s £ 120,000 home. 

Mr Banter, a member ot 
Lloyd’s, had given foe five- 
bedroom home to his former 
wife, Christina, as part of foe 
financial settlement of their 
1984 divorce. 

But after Mrs Barrier killed 
foe couple's son, aged nine, 
and daughter, aged six, and 
committed suicide in March 
1985, he tried to get foe house 
back from Mrs Jacqueline 
Calouri, his mother-in-law. 

But he was too late. By a two 
to one majority the three 
appeal judges ruled that foe 
legal time limit to appeal 
against the transfer of foe 
house had expired. 

Mr and Mrs Bander married 
in November 1973. But she 
divorced him on foe grounds 
of adultery after be left her for 
another woman. Mrs Barrier 
stayed on at foe family home 
at Hartley Winluey, Hamp- 
shire. 

Lord Justice Dillon, sitting 
with Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Lord - Justice 
Woolf in foe Court of Appeal 
said he would have dismissed 
the mother-in-law’s appeal 
against a judge’s ruling last 
November that Mr Barrier 
could appeal “out of time” 
against foe house transfer. 

But be was overrated by the 
other two judges, who said he 
had no power to grant leave. 

Law report, page 28 


Science report 

Insect-eater fakes to oats 


By Andrew Wiseman 

• A German research team 
has a priority programme 
called “behavioural ontogeny” 
in which they have completed 
a study of the kowari, a small 
marsupial 

■ The zoologists, from Er- 
langen - N urn berg University, 
say their findings give an 
insight into similarities and 
dissimilarities between marsn-. 
pials and placental mammals. 

Kangaroos, koala bears and 
opossums are the best known 
marsupials. But the species 
include other animals living in 
Australia, such as the kowari, 
a squirrel-size mouse. In the 
desert its normal diet is in- 
sects, other invertebrates and 
small vertebrates. In the uni- 
versity breeding colony it 


thrived on dog food, porridge 
and eggs. 

The inter-relationship be- 
tween male and female adult 
kowari was one of foe ques- 
tions on which foe Germans 
concentrated. They divided 
them into groups of one male 
to two females. During foe 
mating season foe male would 
grab his partner by foe neck, 
drag her around foe cage 
before finally disappearing 
into a protected corner. 

About 35 days later foe 
female began to build her own 
nest, giving birth to np to six 
young, each a few millimetres 
long. They immediately 
crawled into foe mother’s 
pooch and attached them- 
selves to a teat 

As foe offspring’s month 
encompassed a nipple, foe 


latter swelled, mouth and nip- 
ple forming a press-stud. 
Mother and young became 
inseparable for 50 days or so. 

When they parted, foe 
young began to move about 
independently, although still 
blind for a further three weeks 
or so. As they explored their 
surroundings they often did 
not bother to find their own 
way back, waiting for mother 
to appear and enjoying a 
piggy-back ride home. 

Another feature of kowari 
behaviour was foe extreme 
tolerance of adults to offspring 
other than their own. Mothers 
groomed childless kowari. 
played with young and de- 
fended them. Offspring from 
different litters happily mixed 
and even partially hand-reared 
young were accepted. 


Riding school 
cleared over 
woman's fall 

Evidence given in foe High 
Court by foe Olympic rider, 
Richard Meade, yesterday 
helped to dear a riding school 
of blame for head injuries 
suffered by a pregnant woman 
when she fell from a horse. 

The court dismissed a dam- 
ages claim by Mrs Patricia 
Crabb, aged 33. of Dane End, 
near Ware, Hertfordshire, 
against Birch Farm Riding 
School of Broxbourne. Hert- 
fordshire, and an instructor, 
Mrs Pip Bennett. 

Deputy judge Sir Douglas 
Frank, QC, said; The most 
likely explanation for Mrs 
Crabb falling was that, as a 
result of her pregnancy, she 
feinted." 


Woman to paint the 
Commons in session 


By Sheila Gunn, Political 
Staff 

June Mendoza, an inieroa- 
itionally renowned portrait 
.painter, has been commis- 
sioned to capture on canvas 
foe atmosphere and characters 
of foe House of Commons. 

Many MPs have been press- 
ing Mr Bernard Weafoerill, 
the Speaker, and Mr John 
Bitten. Leader of foe House, 
for a portrait of foe Commons 
in session as there has not 
been one for 26 years. 

Miss Mendoza, a member 
of foe Royal Society of Por- 
trait Painters, has painted 
portraits of foe Queen, foe 
Prince and Princess of Wales, 
and Mrs Margaret Thatcher. 


The Australian-born daugh- 
ter of professional musicians. 
Miss Mendoza has also com- 
pleted many group portraits 

After foe Speaker’s an- 
nouncement of the commis- 
sion yesterday Miss Mendoza 
said she expected foe work to 
take a year. “I want to catch a 
likeness of foe people in the 
Commons but I also want to 
catch the intimacy. In foe past, 
paintings of foe chamber have 
opened up the benches so that 
foe faces are seen, but that 
gives the impression of a vast 
space." 

She has already sketched the 
chamber and watched the 
well-attended debate on foe 
Chernobyl disaster 


Electrical . 
fault shuts ” 
reactor 1 


By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 

For foe second lime in foe 
past few months, foe Hinckley 
Point B nuclear power station, 
near Bridgwater. Somerset, 
has dosed because of an 
accident. 

The shutdown was caused 
by a fire in electrical generat- 
ing equipment. The Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
said no release of radioactivity 
was involved. 

Only one of the two AGR 
reactors at the station had to 
be closed. The board said foe 
other was already undergoing 
routine maintenance. 

Last November the station 
was shut down after an escape 
of carbon dioxide cooling gas 
containing some 

radioactivity. 

A meeting to discuss that 
incident between Mr Paddy 
Ashdown, Liberal MP for 
Yeovil, and Somerset County 
Council representatives wifi 
take place with the generating 
board next week. 

Failure of electrical generat- 
ing equipment is not regarded 
as a primary problem for 
nuclear reactor safety. 

.As a general rule, the steam 
produced by the heat which 
continues to come from a 
reactor for several hours after 
shutdown, is discarded via 
condensors and cooling 
ponds, or cooling lowers, de- 
pending on the station. 

Explosives 

remand 

Michael McKenny. aged 59. 
farm stockman, of Castle 
Wcllan Road, Dromore, Co 
Down. Northern Ireland was 
remanded in custody yester- 
day by Lambeth magistrates 
in south London charged with 
conspiring to cause explosions 
in the United Kingdom last 
year. 

He is charged with conspir- 
ing with Patrick Magee, aged 
34, Gerald McDonnel. aged 
34, Peter Sherry, aged 30, 
Martina Anderson, aged 23. 
and Ella O’ Dwyer, aged 26. 
and persons unknown, to 
cause explosions between Jan- 
uary 1 and June 23 last year. 

Marines hurt 
in charity run 


hite’s 
Kter- 
f the 
and 
oitia- 
anti- 

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said 
•egan 
ntity 
tadi- 
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The 
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and 
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jv- 
ice 

Marine Maurice Christie, on 
aged 22, from Dudley. West ^ 
Midlands, was critically ill S 3 
and Lance Corporal Colin ^ 
Howe, aged 27, from Peverell, 0 f 
Plymouth, “very seriously ill” 
after an accident early yester- l£ j_ 
day during a sponsored 2 . 000 - 
mile triathlon which has 
raised £25.000 for the Save the 
Children Fund. 

A lorry crashed into the rear ** r 
of the Royal Marines' support n . e 
minibus, overturning it and 
injuring eight of foe team, part ^ 
of 3 Commando Brigade at 
Plymouth. 

at 

Rape charge * 
doctor on bail 

A hospital doctor aged 49 st 
accused of raping a girl aged ii] 
eight was yesterday released y- 
on bail after an application to id 
judge in chambers at :h 
Chelmsford Crown Court, 
Essex. 

The doctor had been held 
since Tuesday night when he 
appeared before a court at 3 " 
Braintree. Essex, in a private 
prosecution brought by foe d 
girl's mother. He is due to ^ 
appear in court again on May ? 

15. >■ 

Society head 
appointed - 

Mr Christopher Dicks, aged £ 

55. managing director of Jo- ’ 
seph Wood head and Sons. r 
publishers of the Huddersfield 
Daily Examiner, is the new 
president of the Newspaper 
Society. , 


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Saleroom _ 

Parrot masterpiece by 
Lear fetches £48,000 

By Geraldine Norman Sate Room Correspondent 

_ > . > « .« . . A niw c 


A copy of Edward Lear’s 
Illustrations of ike family of 
parrots, sent for sale by the 
Duke of Northumberland, 
was sold by Sotheby’s yester- 
day for £48,400 (estimate 

£ 15 . 000 -£ 20 , 000 ) to a private 

collector. The magnificent 
book was begun by Edward 
Lear at foe age of 18 and took 
many years to complete; it 
contains 42 hand coloured 
olaies and was published be- 
tween 1830 and 1832. TCis 
copy was bound with Gould’s 
Family qf toucans and the 

price, no doubt, reflects us 
ducal origins. 

The duke had also sent for 
sale a three- volume book of 
illustrations^ of East IndiM 
plants, which sold for £li 100 
(estimate £5.000-£7.00 0)- T he 
->95 hand colowed lithographs 
were based on illustrations 
commissioned from foe Indi- 
an Army by Nathaniel 
Wallich, who ran foe cast 

India ComWp ***** 
Gardens ai Calcutta about 

* S The two-day sale of natural 
history and travel booksra 11 
mainly in line with expecta- 
tions, but had a sigmWmg of 
exceptional P n ‘^ r ^<wi 
Among them was £44,wu 


(estimate £l0,Q00-£ 15,000) for 
a group of four charts of foe 
Indian Ocean. 

At Christie's first modern 
art sale in Milaivfoe daughter 
of Alberto Magnefli (1888- 
1971), foe Italian artist, set a 
new auction price record for 
her father's work when she 
paid 138 mill ion tire (estimate 
60raiflion-70minion lire) or 
£55,200 for a triptych of 1956. 
She also paid 62.1 million tire 
(estimate 40 million to 50 
million lire) or £24,840 for a 
1937 abstract The sale to- 
talled £690,000 with 36 per 
cent unsold. 

Decorative arts at Christie's 
South Kensington included 
very high prices for Lalique 
glass. A “Sophora” vase 
moulded with foliate 
branches, made £1,050 (esti- 
mate £500-£800) and there 
was a top price of £3,400 
(estimate t2,00CWE3,000) for a 
“Touibillons’' vase. Clarice 
Cliff, in contrast, was hard to 
seH, and a couple of high- 
priced items rated to find 
buyers. The sale made £53,266 
with 20 per cent unsold. . 

• Yesterday’s sale, report 
stated that Berkeley Castle 
was run by Madame Tussaud: 
It is still owned by foe femily. 


Bradford fire disaster 


Learning to live with a nightmare one year on 


By Peter Davenport 

Bradford may have learnt to 
live with foe legacy of its 
foofoaH groamd'ifre catastro- 
phe but it remains a shared 
grief that cannot be forgotten. 

The nightmares ®f -those 
involved linger on, a telephone 
help line receives calls and the 
hospitals are still treating foe 
badly injured. 

■ This weekend marks the 
first anniversary of the fire on 
May 11, which claimed 56 
lives, irajnred 56 and reduced 
the naft* stand at the Valley 
Parade Groend to a mass of 
charred timber. 

Tomorrow a bronze memori- 
al bearing foe names of those 
who died win be ravened, 

followed by a memorial service 
in the city's cathedral. 

Relatives of those who 
killed and those who survived 
injured will be . in foe 
congregation. Mrs Wendy 
Harrison,. Bradford's newly 
appointed fire co-onfinator, 
sa*d:“We are still helping 
people and they are recovering 
slowly. The weekend will be 
difficult for ffie survivors and 
little things win trigger off 
their memories. It hasWn a 
difficult year for most people.” 

Mbs Irene Senior, foe prin- 
cipal social worker based at 
Bradford’s Royal Infirmary, 



Scene of tire Bradford football ground inferno a year ago 


disaster,, foe National Health 
Service is still evaluating foe 
lessons learnt in coping with 
to many serious bonis victims. 

Although all the in-patients 
had been discharged by An- 
gnst last year six of foe victims 
still attend St Luke's Hospital 
in Bradford two or three times 
a week for physiotherapy 
treatment to hands. 

Other patients are muter psy- 
chiatric care to help them 
come to terms with the diffi- 
culties created by the fire. 

A spokesman for the Brad- 
font District Health Authority 
said: “Some lost dose friends 
or relatives, others were affect- 
ed by foe experiences they 
suffered escaping from the 
ground and others are de- 
pressed or have feelings of 
guilt at not being able to do 
more to help those trapped to 


who has been closely involved 
with foe after-care of victims, 
said: “People have not recov- 
ered and we need to make it 
dear that there are stfol these 
in the city who may need our 
help- Atot of people who were 
at the fire have not crane 
forward, and it is possible that 
they may need our help in a 
number of ways. 

“People who were not burnt 
or bereaved were still injured 
by foe whole experience. The 
problem is by no means over 
and a lot of people need a lot of 
support” 

Experts believe that even 
now it is too early to measure 
the degree of psychological 
Impact resulting from an event 
that was witnessed live by 
thousands of people and seen 
by mfliioos more on television. 

Twelve months after foe 


escape from the blaring 
stand.” 

Pioneering medical tech- 
niques were used by Mr David 
Sharpe, foe consultant plastic 
surgeon at Si Luke’s, who led 
the team dealing with the 
casualties. They included the 
ase of new aids and dressings. 

One consequence of the 
disaster has been the estab- 
lishment of a bores research 
unit, combining the skills of 
foe local hospitals and Brad- 
ford University. It was partly 
financed by proceeds from the 
top 10 record “You'll Never 
Walk Atone”. 

The unit's first research 
fellow is to be appointed 
shortly to study technology- 
based aids for burns victims, 
ami a fellowship scheme will 
enable a registrar who treated 
foe victims to travel to Ameri- 
ca to study latest techniques. 

A review of the methods 
used to treat the largest num- 
ber of bunts victims ever 
handled from one incident, 
including the success of skin- 
grafting operations, on more 
fonn 70 patients, is being 
undertaken. 

Mr Sharpe said: “The group 
of patients were quite unique. 
They had all experienced foe 
same trauma within foe same 
four wails*. They had a Only 
remarkable spirit and were 


very supportive of each other. 
It did become something of a 
club-like feeling.” 

Many of foe victims formed 
permaneot friendships with 
others who bad been injured 
while under treatment. They 
started their own newsletter 
which still circulates. 

Emergency procedures, par- 
ticularly in Yorkshire, have 
been reviewed and is part re- 
written. A recent conference 
organized by foe Royal Society 
of Medicine to draw together 
foe experiences of all the 
medical disciplines involved 
has published a report which 
has been circulated through- 
out the country. 

Immediately after foe disas- 
ter, an appeal fond was 
launched and more than 
tA million has since been paid 
oot to 360 people. 

Next November, the High 
Coart in Leeds is to bear a test 
case brought by two victims 
seeking to prove liability 
which will then enable com- 
pensation to be paid. The 
action will be against the 
former West Yorkshire Coun- 
ty Council, foe Health and 
Safety Executive and Bradford 
Gty Football Club. 

But for those who lost 
relatives no amount of money 
will ease the pain. 


1 

Lloyds' chess j 
tournament 
finishes in tie . 

By Harry Golombek 
Chess Correspondent 

The Lloyds Bank interna- 
tional chess tournament at St 
Hclier in Jersey ended in a lie 
between Robert Beilin, the 
Norwich international master, 
and Gary Quillan, aged 1 5. 

They entered the last round 
yesterday leading the field 
with 6^2 points each. 

Quillan forced a win in 36 
moves against Konings; Beilin 
took longer to beat Sheila 
Jackson. 

Results in round 8 : Thomson 
*-!; Beilin 'a, Quillan *•: Milncs '•?. 
Konings I van Putten 0. Redd in 
Jackson *6. Burgisser 0 Fution 
\. Gourei 0 Moetirii \ . Benson l 
Detanoy 0. Home 0 Blow 1. Le 
Blaneq ! Soesan 0. Scott 1 
WojciechowsKi 0. Whitley 0 
Cullip I. Poulton 1 Money 0. 
Waterfield I Neve 0. Querec Vs 
Flewiu V.% Walker I Kevin of the 
Teachers 0. Plaat w? Godfrey w*. 
Murray te Capsey ^ Baccoi bad 
the bye. 

Results in round 9: Jackson 0 
Beilin 1. Konings 0 Quillan I. 
Milncs V: Thomson '6. Moetteli 
1 Rezzin 0. van Putten 1 Benson 

0. Fulton 0 Lx Bancq l. Blow l 
Burgisser 0. Detanoy 0 Gouret I. 
Scott '.'2 Home Culhp 
Poulton ‘o. Soesan Waterfield 

Neve 0 Walker 1. Godfrey 1 
Baccot 0. Fleuin 0 
Wojciechowski 1. Capscy 
Plaat Vi. Morrey 1 Murray 0. 
Kevin of the Teachers 0 Whitley 

1, Querce had the bye. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1980 



COMMENTARY 



‘Hijacked’ Bangladesh 
polls closed as Ershad 
ponders his next move 


Geoffrey Smith 


How severely has the Gov- 
• eminent been damaged by 

- Ryedale, West Derbyshire and 
the local elections? Are these 
just extreme examples of mid- 
terra depression? Or are we 
seeing the first signs of termi- 
nal illness, in mnch the same 
way that Labour’s electoral 

- humiliations in 1967 and 1968 
presaged the defeat of the 
Wilson Government in 1970? 

Two developments struck 
me dnring my visits to Ryedale 
and West Derbyshire: the 
widespread criticism of the 
.Government on the doorstep, 
and how instinctive it has 
become for many people to 
..vote tactically. These trends 
are linked. 

The criticism of the Govern- 
ment is all the more damaging 
for often being assumed rather 
than argned. It frequently 
seems to be taken for granted 
that “she has gone too Car" 
and that it is imperative to “get 
this lot oat'*. 

It was this general disaffec- 
tion, this feeling that the 
Government has become re- 
mote and insensitive to public 
opinion, rather than any tacti- 
cal failing s in the conduct of 
the campaigns that was re- 
sponsible for the setbacks. 

- It is when the defeat of a 
particular candidate is accept- 
ed as die overriding priority 
that people are ready to vote 
tactically. The Liberals were 
openly playing for the tactical 
vote in both campaigns, but 
what was significant was that 
so many people needed no 
prompting. 

Consequences of 
tactical voting 


The natural effect is that the 
main enemy for the Conserva- 
tives differs from one contest 
to another. This is sometimes 
presented as a Conservative 
advantage. Hie party has the 
Inxnry of a divided opposition, 
so it is said. 

1 do not see it like that The 
more the opposition to the 
Conservatives is split the 
harder it will be for any other 
party to win an overall major- 
ity of seats. Bnt the more 
tactical voting there is. the 
more the electorate is concen- 
trating on defeating the Con- 
servatives, the more seats they 
are likely to lose. 

According to the conven- 
tional wisdom, there will be 
.much less tactical voting in a 
- general election. Up to a point 
that is trne. 

There will be many constitu- 
encies in a general election, 
when there are fewer individ- 
nal constituency opinion polls, 
in which it will be difficult for 
the prospective tactical voter 
to know in which direction to 
move. It was critical that he 
knew in Ryedale and less 
certainly hi West Derbyshire. 

There will still be a good 
many constituencies, however, 
in which people will be able to 
work oat for themselves how to 
vote tactically, if they are 
sufficiently determined to get 
. die Conservatives out Bnt will 
-that still be the prime consid- 
eration when the electorate is 
choosing a government? 


.. Importance of 
schools crisis 

Much of the indignation in 
' the by-elections was focused 
on issues that are either purely 
load or ephemeral. The com- 
position of the next govera- 
-ment wfll not be determined by 
the future of the Filey coast- 
guard station. Pensioners will 
surely have forgotten by then 
! their resentment at the modes- ' 
ty of their 40p rise. I 

. Whether rural bos services 
'Will be mutilated by the new 

- arrangements should be dear 
by the general election. If they 

• are, the Conservatives will be 
crodfled in country areas. Bnt 1 
if the Conservative’ claim that , 
they will not suffer is justified, 
then the issue should 1 

- disappear. 

There are other grievances 1 
that will not so easily fade 
away. The political impor- 
tance of the schools crisis is 
now, I believe, appreciated by 

• the Government. I am not so ; 
sure about the hospitals. 

It is not enough for minis- 1 
; ters to point out that more is 
; being spent nationally on tire ' 
. ; health service in real terms. I 
Many people are convinced , 
; either that the money is going 

• to another part of the country, < 
or that it is not being used to i 

'improve tire care of patients. 1 

I am not suggesting that tire 5 
■Conservative cause is now lost. * 
"If tbe economy continues to j 
expand as ministers are pre- j 
; dieting, especially if this . 
brings even a small downward j 
! trend in unemployment, the t 
political mood could be trans- * 
; formed. Other issues may \ 
-come along to dominate atten- t 
two. r 

But the lesson for the Gov- J 
;enunent this week is that it ! 
■will be doomed if it cannot j 
; convey the impression that r 
■this is an administration that 5 
lean listen as well as preach. ti 


Compelled finally to face 
the reality oF the “election 
hijack” committed by its sup- 
porters the Bangladesh Gov- 
ernment has suspended the 
election in 109 constituencies 
while it considers what to do 
next. 

Counting has been stopped 
in those constituencies where 
presiding officers dosed their 
polling stations because of 
violence, intimidation or bal- 
lot seizure. 

The 109 constituencies rep- 
resent more than a third of the 
300 which were open to 
election for the national Par- 
liament. Returning officers, 
who are the deputy commis- 
sioners in each district, were 
last night besieging the Elec- 
tion Commission in the capi- 
tal with anxious inquiries as to 
what they should do next. 

They were told that they 
must make a report in writing 
10 the chief election commis- 
sioner and have it sem by 
hand, a process that, with land 
communications being as they 
are in the riverine country- 
side. could take some lime. 

The commissioner will then 
decide whether the votes in 
the booths that were suspend- 
ed would materially have 
affected the total result If that 


From Michael Hamiyn, Dhaka 

is the case, a further poll will 
have to be held in those 
constituencies. 

The decision to stop the 
polls came as 184 results bad 
ben announced. 

One of the astonishing as- 
pects of the whole election was 
that despite the wholesale 
ballot rigging and violence 
that was well-attested by jour- 
nalists and other observers, 
the opposition Awami League 
was running neck-and-neck 
with the government Jatiyo 
party. 

In fact for much of the day 
the eight-party alliance 
around the League had a 
majority of seats. 

Cynics in tbe League sug- 
gested yesterday that the polk- 
ing was stopped because the 
Government did not like the 
number of seats the opposi- 
tion was getting. 

Dr Kama! Hossain, a senior 
figure in the Awami League 
and its presidential candidate 
in the last elections, declared 
squarely: “The Jatiyo party 
was not leading in those 
constituencies." 

Dr Hossain was unofficially 
declared to have lost in both 
the Dhaka constituencies he 
was contesting despite the fact 
that this reporter, among sev- 


eral others, saw blatant vio- 
lence and intimidation 

A senior official of the 
Election Commission, Mr 
Burhanuddin Ahmed, said 
yesterday that seven other 
constituencies in which the 
result bad not been an- 
nounced would soon be 
completed. 

He said that two seats which 
bad been announced as going 
to the Awami League had been 
wrongly awarded. In one the 
Jatiyo party had won and in 
the other the seat was won by a 
National Awami party candi- 
date. 

Asked why the total number 
of seats announced had 
dropped from 186 to 184 Mr 
Ahmed said, shrugging: 
“There may be some mistake 
in the calculation because 
people have been working day 
and night." 

The People's Commission 
for Free Elections, which was 
established under the aegis of 
the Awami League to provide 
an “impartial" oversight, re- 
ported yesterdagr that Election 
Commission officials were un- 
der the instructions of the 
Army in certain areas and that 
the Army helped candidates in 
Chittagong, Farid pur, Khulna 
and other places. 


SI 

m 

tz 

EE 

m 

its 

Marcos 

m 

E! 

Tm 



mw 

|ij) 



Gadaffi threatens Damascus 
Egypt and Italy 


Colonel Gadaffi. saying Lib- 
ya would attack any country 
displaying hostility or encour- 
aging “terrorism" against it, 
has singled out Italy and Egypt 
as possible targets (Reuter 
reports). 

In a speech in Benghazi 
monitored by the BBC in 
London, he said Libya would 
answer violence with vio- 
lence. 

He said, referring to last 
month's US air raids on 
Tripoli and BenghazL“From 
now on, vis-a-vis Egypt, Italy 
and any country which we 
consider in a hostile position 
to us ... we will treat them as 
.America treats the world 
now.” 

Nor would Libya “turn a 
blind eye to any new US 
campaigns from Italy”, he 
said, adding that the Sixth 
Fleet, which uses Italian ports, 
could be destroyed by Libyan 
suicide operations. 

“If the Americans land on 
the Libyan coast they' will 


deploying cruise missiles 
against Libya. 

“To hell with cruise mis- 
siles. We do not fear cruise 
missiles. We do not fear 
bombers ... We have a right 
to our land. Our determina- 
tion is stronger than their iron, 
which we have weakened and 
destroyed.” 

• CAIRO: Colonel Gadaffi 
lost 300 troops in last month's 
raids and made up the story 
that a girl who was killed was 
his adopted daughter, a for- 
mer Libyan prime minister 
said (AP reports). 

Mr AbdekHamid Bakoush, 
who was Prime Minister when 
tbe colonel seized power in 
1969. said: “Gadaffi made this 


warned 
by Peres 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Israel had no intention of 
attacking Syria and there were 
no indications that Syria 
planned to attack Israel in the 
near future, Mr Shimon Peres, 
the Israeli Prime Minister, 
said yesterday. 

But Syria faced “real and 
dear risks" if it was found to 
be behind future terror 
incidents. 

During a radio interview he 
discounted as “mere rhetoric” 
reports that an attack of any 
sort was imminent 

The Prime Minister was 
reacting to a report in the US 
by the CBS network quoting 
Israeli military experts as 



dearly natch font of any 

geisha. 

no longer wanted Prince aunt Princess bad a 
n exile in Hawaii day of marteBoos swahii* in 
vheredse toga - Kyoto, the dtp that was 
*t want people in Japan's capital for 1,000 
who don't want to years. Prince Charles dis- 
lr Shultz said. “So erased Baddhaw with * 1^. 
some {dace else hag priest fat *0 exquisite 
ago, that would be raotmtains&e temple, n hife 
the Princess of Wales took t 
country was pre- tow grisha-Kke steps hi a 


Manila . 

The US Secretary of State, 
Mr George Shultz, said yester- 
day that former President 
Marcos of the Philippines ' 
become a problem for tbe 
because he no longer wanted 
to remain in exile in Hawaii 
but bad nowhere dse to go. . 

“We don't want people in 
our country who don't want to 
be there, " Mr Shultz said. “So 
if there’s some place else 
where he can go, that would be 
better.” 

No third country was pre- 
pared to lake Mr Marcos and 
risk souring relations with the 
new Philippines Government, 
“so I guess under the circum- 
stances, be probably will be 
staying in Honolulu”, Mr 
Shultz told the departure press 
conference in -Manila alter a 
25-hour stop-over for -talks 
with President Aquino. - 

Mr Shultz and President 
Reagan asked the Aquino 
Government last week to 
reissue Mr Marcos with a 
passport 10 allow him to.iiaicl 
to a third country. 

The former leader's pass* 
port was cancelled soon after 
he arrived in Hawaii on 
February 26 after fleeing the 
revolt in Manila. 

Although Mrs Aquino has 




Professors strike 


claim just to make tbe Libyan y/ “r 
people believe that he was Isnreh military experts as 
sharing in the consequences of saSfJhfi l \ was oecessarv to 
the American attack. A girl smk 5, 9 mcU .y because of the 
indeed was killed, but her rapidly growing strength of the 
father is a soldier and he is Syrian Army. 


indeed was killed, but her 
father is a soldier and he is 
alive.” 

• MADRID: Spain expelled 
Mr Saed Mohamed Alsalam 


bum; they will die. I ask for Esmaiel, the Libyan consul- 
one million Libyans to be general, accusing hint of help- 
ready to fight in cities and ing a Spanish army colonel, 
what is requested is that each named as Carlos Meer de 
one of you pays the price of a Ribera, military governor of 
rifle ...” Avila, to seek support for 

After what he called the extreme right-wing activities 
failure of last month's attacks, from Colonel Gadaffi (Reuter 
he said the US was thinking of reports). 


Mr Yitzhak Rabin, the De- 
fence Minister, was also said 
to have told American offi- 
cials during his trip to Wash- 
ington this week that Israel 
was going to retaliate against 
Syria because it was behind 
last month's attempt to blow 
up an H A1 jet flying from 
London to Tel Aviv. 


In his interview Mr Peres 
avoided saying what Israel 

Achille Lauro Temple attack exploded in mid-air. Tire Syr - 

, |» . ■ -a ans now had a very clear 

sentences splits Punjab choice, he said. They would 


sentences 
cut on appeal 

Rome —.A Genoa appeal 
court has reduced sentences 


Sikh leaders 

Amritsar (AP) - Moderate 
Sikh leaders in Punjab are 


for the illegal possession of faring a political crisis trig- 
arms imposed on the Palestin- gered by a split over tbe recent 


have to run the risk of being a 
land from which terror was 
carried out, or they would 
have to exclude themselves 
from “this very dangerous 
dub”. 


About 300 professors, 
students and staff mem- 
bers of the American 
University of Beirut have 
refused to work until the 
release of Beirut's latest 
kidnap victim. Professor 
Nabil Matar (above). 

Dr Natar, aged 36, 


Deadlock 
at Addis 
conference 

Addis Ababa (AFP) — Two 
days of reoondliation talks 
between Horn of Africa neigh- 
bours Ethiopia and Somalia 
ended here yesterday without 
the two sides apparently hav- 
ing come to grips with the 
substantive issues ai stake. 

In a joint press statement, 
the two merely said they had 
decided to meet again in 
Mogadishu, the Somali capi- 
tal, to try to reach final 
agreement on the agenda. 

That clearly suggested that 
the first formal conference 
between the rival East African 
states in 10 years had not gone 
beyond considering, much less 
agreeing, on a mutual) y-ac- 
cep table agenda. 

The meeting was the first 
session of the Ethiopia-Soma- 
lia ad hoc committee pro- 
posed by the two countries’ 
leaders early this year. 


professor of cultural stud- 
ies, was kidnapped three 
days ago as he was walk- 
ing to the campus, 

Tbe university's 100- 
member foreign faculty 
and staff have shrunk to 
fewer than a dozen in the 
past three years. 


request, her Cabinet is op- 
posed to the idea and instead 
wants Mr Marcos to remain in 
the US where be is facing 
criminal proceedings in con- 
nection with huge property 
holdings allegedly illegally 
obtained. 

Mr Shultz said the issue of a 
passport for Mr Marcos was 
not raised in any ofhis talks. 
“1 didn't bring it up and other 
people didn't bring it up." 

During her 4 5-rainute meet- 
ing with Mr Shultz, Mrs 
Aquino told him that 
Washington's offer of an addi- 
tional S 1 50 million (about £95 
million) aid to the Philippines’ 
debt-ridden economy fell “far 
short" of the country's needs. 


Washington view 


Undertones to new harmony 


ian hijackers of the ‘Achille 
Lauro cruise liner in October 
(John Earle writes). 

Magid Molqi, described as 
the gang leader, bad his sen- 
tence cut from eight to 6 < h 
years, and Ibrahim Abdeialif 
from 7% years to 5% years. 

The court confirmed the 
lower sentence of four years 
given to Ahmed el Assadi,, 
who had turned state evi- 
dence. The 6^-year sentence 
on Bassam Ashker was 
quashed because he was found j 
to be only 17 

The others will be defen- 
dants in the main trial next ; 
month for seizing the ship and j 
murdering an American. | 


raid on tbe Golden Temple. 

In foe latest development 
yesterday, Sikh terrorists 
lulled three Hindis, raising 
foe death toll from terrorist 
shootings to 44 this week. 

Tbe seven-month-old state 
Government of the Chief Min- 
ister, Mr Snrjit Singh 
Barnala, was reduced to a 
minority when 27 of the 
moderate A kali Dal party’s 73 
legislators defected in protest 
at last week’s commando as- 
sault on the temple. 

To halt further erosion of 
his political base, Mr Barnala 
appointed nine of his legisla- 
tors to foe chairmanships of 
public-sector corporations. 


Junejo under threat 

From Hasan Akhtar, Isla maba d 
The Speaker of the National unregistered parties from 


Assembly, Pakistan’s Lower 
House of Pari Lament, has 
asked the Chief Election Com- 
missioner to decide whether 
Mr Mohammad Khan Junejo, 
the Prime Minister, and about 
50 other MPs should be 
disqualified. 

Several independent mem- 
bers of the assembly said Mr 
Junejo and the MPs. had 
joined a political party con- 
trary to a constitutional provi- 
sion which barred members of 


seeking parliamentary seats. 

After the revival of political 
activity in January 1986, it 
was specified, under the con- 
stitution, that new parties had 
to be registered by the Election 
Commission to be eligible to 
function in the House. 

Independent MPs said the 
declaration of Mr Junejo as 
president of the Pakistan Mus- 
lim League before its formal 
registration by tbe Election 


Anti-Enrapeanfam, jest like 
anti-Americanism, goes in 
waves, and the outbursts often 
coincide. At a time when latent 
anti-Americanism in Britain 
erupted over the US air strike 
against Libya, so anger and 
disillusionment with the Euro- 
peans (though not necessarily 
the British) reached a high 
point here. 

“Let’s boycott French 
airspace,” listeners told the 
talk shows; foe press angrily 
denounced foe “Euro-wimps"; 
and political analysts spoke of 
a new crisis in transatlantic 
relations brought on by Euro- 
pean cowardice and hypocrisy. 

Bnt then came Chernobyl 
and the Tokyo summit. And 
suddenly, aD seems to be 
harmony again. Mrs Thatcher 

— who gained as much here for 
her support for the Libyan raid 
as she lost politically at home 

— was on television arguing for 
a tougher European response 
to terrorism; President 
Mitterrand was all civility and 
co-operation; and President 
Reagan declared that he coaid 
not remember a tone when the 
Wasbington-Paris “marriage" 
was eves happier. 

The spat appears to have 
been forgotten, at least in 
public. But it has left a 
wariness and suspicion that 
will take longer to dissipate. 

The US is pressing for 
economic sanctions against 
Libya with real bite, bnt is 
fearful of sparking a new row 
on attempts to regulate US 
subsidiaries in Europe. 

The worried Europeans are 
left wondering whether 


further anilateral strikes US actions where events oat- 
against nations defying the side foe Nato alliance produce 
new Shidtz doctrine as hitting - worid crises, 
back against terrorists. Dr Kissfaget also teaches 

Officials m and Out of m _ something that has long 
government agree that tire hired Americans, especially 
sharp divergence goes deeper this .. Administration: the 
than mere differences on how “foyfo” that Europe, more 
to deal with terrorists. sopMstidrted . and worldly 

Mr Richard Burt, the feisty wise, can restrain the “imma- 
US A mb assad or to' Bonn, tee, bellicose Americans", 
argsed recently that (he- real He denosnees European 
reason fay in differing views governments who pander to 
■ ■■■— ■■■■ . ■ this perception (0 cuny favour 

From Michael Bin yon . . 

Washington Dr Kissinger echoes some of 

wasnipgton ^ autfi _ Earopeajl | Snl ^ ^ 

a . , .. -. , New Right here today. It is a 

on me use ami tentatums of feeing ** mttC h directed 

P®* 8 '' , ■ g pains* foie old liberal US 

to, n worid ersBOTe'tte SSfehmot, pefcowd » 
5* 51 - “If incorrigibly and snobbishly 

dominant : US to transatlantkist, as it is against 

^^ne^aby sUnatioiM European liberals who are soft 
Washington mU: nto ^ccepL ^ comm*,*, but quick to 

exploit US markets. 

to insulate itself from foe But such views, currently 
cons^ neaces of create it felt fe^mri.te.xretfainottlio* 
iw^tss touriha m. of tfae AmedoiH faeartbmd. As 

Mr Bart behoved fee asw „„ ,ide Md me. 

toy m trying to booa tbe stffl uk e 

Europeans setf-confideoce, prM( m ^ Enrop(an ori- 
maltmg them more able to lib, to eg oa holiday 

stead up for themselv es. That t^,stam lin !.e" Emope- 
onl 1 L aa tStaie and react to aafr 

By contrast, Dr Henry Kis- 
singer thinks only the shock of 
the US insisting Europe do 
more to defend itself will 
restore foe concept of “recip- 
rocal obligations", now being 
drained from foe affiance. 

Improved consultation, the 
traditional medicine for. alli- 
ance ills, will not suffice. 

Europe most no longer feel 
free to dissociate itself from 


Commission disqualified him. [ “Ram bo mania” will lead to 


Many may, in ignorance of 
foe relative statistics of road 
actideate and plane hijack- 
ings. be cancelling their holi- 
days to Europe this year. Bat 
few want foe US to torn its 
back on its old allies — 
although these allies must 
understand the US today is 
sharper ami more belligerent 
in defending its own, Ameri- 
can, interests. 


Dangers at sea 

Bill to reduce death toll of fishermen 


COMMONS 


Labour MPs from 
constituencies having strong 
links with the fishing industry 
warmly congratulated Mr 
Albert McQnafrie (Banff and 
I Buchan, C) on the pa«a» 
through the Commons of his 
Safety at Sea Bill, designed to 
improve safety requirements 
for fishing vessels. 

It contains provisions 
dealing with emergency 
position indicating radio 
beacons, automatic mease lift: 
rafts and life jackets. 

As sponsor. Mr McQoarrle 
said, when successfully moving 
the third reading of the Bill, 
that he hoped it would make a 
significant contribution to 
safety. The sea was a dangerous 
place and fishing a dangerous 
occupation and it would always 
be so- 

Mr Donald Stewart ("Western 
Isles, SNP) said he regretted 
that the requirement about 
wearing a life jacket on deck 
had not been achieved but was 
pleased that earlier during tbe 
report stage a clause on safety 
training had been inserted. 

Mr Ian Mlkarde (Bow and 
Popiar. Lab), reminding the 
House that he had a large fish 
market in his constituency, 
said its prosperity and 
therefore the employment of 


same of his constituents indua 
depended on the work of length 
fishermen. about 

I never put a piece of fish “ ver * 
into my mouth (he said) Mr Mi 
without silent thoughts of the are 1 
fishermen who have gone out qualifi 
in the kind of weather we have fightin, 
had this past winter. first ai 

The Bill was read the third Dr No 
time. It now goes to the House and P< 
of Lords. if th 

. . __ satisfie 

•During tbe report stage, a prov isi 
Government new clause on pj n 
safety training for fishermen fish era 
was successfully moved by Mr sM^nec 
Da rid Mitchell. Minister 0 / 

Slate for Transport. It allows Mr 
the Secretary of Slate for Oppo_s 
Transport to make regulations fishetn 
for safety training and provides it was 
for fines to be imposed on fishen 
owners, skippers and other iraimr 
seamen who contravene them. volunii 

by th 

Mr Mitchell said his own q UCS iJ 
general preference was that minisn 
such matters be put on a 0 f disc 
voluntary basis but the clause, 
industry was prepared to see 
this power on tbe statute book. The 
Fishing still had four times mid nd 
more danger than coal mining, 
a powerful argument for . ae 

compulsion. imrner 


indication about the quality or 
length of training courses or 
about the subjects to be 
covered. 

Mr McQuairle: The instructors 
are men of the highest 
qualifications and cover fire 
fighting, survival at sea and 
first aid. 

Dr Norman Godman (Greenock 
and Port Glasgow, Lab) asked 
if the Government was 
satisfied with the level of 
provision, quantity and quality 
of fire fighting training for 
fishermen. Their only training 
seemed to be a one day course. 

Mr Staart Randall, 
Opposition spokesman on 
fisheries (Hull West Lab) said 
it was crucially important that 
fishermen should undergo 
training, whether provided 
voluntarily by the industry or 
by the stale, and it was 
questionable whether the 
minister should have the level 
of discretion provided by the 


The new da use was agreed to 
and added to the Bill. 


Whether such things as fire 
fighting and first aid might be 
covered by the regulations later 
would need to be discussed 
with the industry. 

Mr Mikardo there was no 


•A new clause providing (hat 
immersion suits should be 
made available for each fishing 
crew member was withdrawn 
after Mr David Mitohefl. 
Minister of State for Transport, 
explained that consultations 
were to take place with the 
industry on the issue. 


There. might be a case for' 
carrying immersion suits on 
certain fishing vessels (he said). 

I do not wish to pre-empt the 
outcome of consultations, but 
if it was decided there was need 
for a compulsory requirement 
that they be carried, the 
statutory powers to make 
regulations already exist in the 
Fishing Vessels Safety 
Provision Rules 1970. 

The new clause was 
unnecessary. If the 
consultations were positive, 
there was power to secure 
implementation. 

•The Gvi| Protection in 
Peacetime Bill to enable local 
authorities to use civil defence 
resources In peacetime 
emergencies and disasters, and 
the Consumer Safety 
(Amendment) Bill, to protect 
consumers from a wide range 
of dangerous and unsafe 
products, also passed their 
remaining stages. 

On the tatter, the Bill's 
sponsor, Mr Corn) Gregory 
(York, O said about 7.000 
people died each year in home 
accidents, more than were 
killed on the roads. 

The Bill embraced all areas 
for which consumer regulations 
already existed — electrical, 
pushchairs. children’s 
nightwear and cosmetics. It 
was aimed at catching the 
unscrupulous. 


G ?“ era J s ^ ke Strike-hit supermarket 

threatened • ,, , , 

in Gibraltar may sack black staff 

From Dominiaae Searle P”® 1 Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


From Dominique Searle 
Gibraltar 

Gibraltar's commercial 
shipyard is in jeopardy and 
the colony threatened by a 
general strike after relations 
between workers and manage- 
ment collapsed this week. 

Without consulting their 
union, the 600-member work- 
force ejected foe management 
of Gibrepair from the yard on , 
Wednesday and demonstrated 
in Main Street They queued 
for unemployment benefit to 
try to force the Gibraltar 
Government which owns the 
yard, to take action. 

On Thursday police had to 
intervene when demonstra- 
tors tried to burn an effigy of 
Gibrepair's managing direc- 
tor, Mr Brian Abbot, in foe 
town centre. 

All branches of foe union 
are meeting today to decide 
whether to cap a general 
strike. The union is deter- 
mined that the management 
negotiates without precondi- 
tions and co-operates with foe 
union, or leaves Gibraltar. 

The action follows months 
of tension and failed attempts 
at negotiation. The last time a 
general strike was held in 
Gibraltar was in 1974. 


South Africa's biggest su- 
permarket chain, PidT’n Pay, 
said yesterday it was consider- 
ing whether to issue an ultima- 
tum to striking black staff to 


operators, packers, cleaners 
and canteen and warehouse 
staff. Pick 'n Pay has managed 
to keep mostofits stores open 
by hiring white housewives 


return to work by early next and schoolchildren on holiday 


week or face dismissal. 

The company also said it 
had been forced to dose three 


to supplement skeleton man- 
agement staffs. 

Ah explosion on a fire 


hypermarkets and seven su- escape staircase near a Pick *n 
permarkeis because of “un- Pay supermarket in a northern 


ruJy behaviour" by strikers 
who had invaded the stores, 
threatening customers and 
other staff mil working. 

Pick 'n Pay, which has an 
annual turnover of 2^50 mil- 
lion rand (£700 million), oper- 
ates about 90 retail outlets 
throughout the country and 


Johannesburg suburb last 
Tuesday is now thought to 
have bom caused by a limpet 
mine. It has not yet been 
linked to the strike. 

What makes foe strike of 
particular interest is that the 
Pick 'n Ray chairman. Mr 


tnrougnout tne country and ~ « 

employs 21.000 people, . of Raymond Adman. . has a 
whom 14.000 are bfacKCol- «eP.«gten as one of foe most 


1 a 


'i c 


WW g fiww- uw; . wsfs n a 

£4S s «aprk« kimono rihiefa 
took 1W days to make and ws$ 
the gift of tbe city's kimono 
ntaiters* association. 

Since foe Icfrnoao makers 
did sot know foe Princess's 
exact foot size; they made 10 
pure of tbe iwpired socks. 

. To foe delight of her hosts, 
foe briefly donned foe kimono 
when it was presestedtoker at 
a garden party at Nijo Castle. 

After »alk«iR past a fine of 
tiny schoolchildren fairly 
bursting irifo exritemeni aed 
chanting “Diana San, thank 
yon for your letter", she am) 
foe Prince were served sweet 
rice cakes by foe tea master of 
tbe world’s largest tea ceremo- 
ny, foe UrasmikfcscbooL 

Whaldngfoe seen liquid to 
a froth. Grand Teamaster 
Soshicsa Sen XI - intoned: “In 
my hands I boM a bowl of tea. 
I see foe whole of nature.” 

Tbe tefofigfrtoffoedt; ^far 
Prince Charles appeared to be 
a visit to TofaknjihZen temple, 
founded at U3S. -The jo«y 
chief priest. Tenant Yasuda, 
when asked if die Prince 
woald make a good Buddhist 
monk, replied; “Of coarse, 
because he has a very honest 
character." - . 

Last right, after a reception 
foe royal conple attended a 
formal- Japanese dinner given 
by Mr Shiataro Abe, foe 
ForeigB Minister. The 12- 
conrse meal tocinded a West- 
ern safari at foe request of (he 
royal party. 


oureti (mixed-race) or Indian. 

According to the company, 
6,200 employees at 45 stores 
are involved in foe strike. 

It began on Tuesday after 
two months of negotiations 
broke down. The union is 
asking for an across-the-board 
wage increase of 90 rand a 
month. Management has of- 
fered 80 rand backdated to 
March, or 60. rand backdated 
to March, with a further 30 
rand from July 1; 

Thestrikeaffects mainly till 


enlightened employers 10 
South Africa and has been one 
' of the most outspoken busi- 
ness opponents of apartheid. 

“This is a tragedy”, he told 
The Times on foe telephone 
from Cape Town. “We have 
built, our company on human 
relations- They are striking 
against a company that has 
been fighting apartheid for 1 5 
years," ' 

The average monthly wage 
of Pick 'n Pay's black employ- 
ees is about 430 rand a month. 


» ’ 




l. 










\ 



mi 


‘i. 


, > 


Orrr- 

4 ijj 


5 . * 






Chilean 


under reactor to 


inject concrete 


Soviet technicians are des- 
perately tunnelling under the 
L nemobyl atomic reactor in 


By Robin Young 


an attempt to inject more 
gwcrete beneath the existing 


trite scenario to this disaster. 
But rivers,- reservoirs and 
waterways will be contaminat- 
ed. Contaminated water could 
reach as tar as the Black Sea, 


..Soro® experts believe that 
the Utcrnobyl pressure vessel 
which could lead to a 
meltdown — may already ha ve 
been destroyed. 

Mr John Large, a consulting 
engineer who did research 
work for the UK. Atomic 
Energy Authority on reactor, 
installations, said yesterday: 
It is probable that the reactor 


but by then it will be greatly 
diluted.* 1 


Dr Richard Downing, man- 
ager of the hydrogeology unit 
at the British Geological Sur- 
vey, said: “If there is a 


was supported by a steel 
dragnd of structural 


over three or three and a hal. 
metres of concrete which 
would break up at any tem- 
perature over I200C. 

“By burying the fire the 
Russians have simply pre- 
vented it from cooling down. 
If the reaction is entirely 
uncontrolled it would be 
equivalent to 4.000 megawatts 
of energy, sufficient to vapor- 
ize its way through the 
concrete." 

Mr Peter Potter, a nuclear 
reactor physicist and former 
overseas manager of the Na- 
tional Nuclear Corporation, 
said a meltdown is a real 
possibility at Chernobyl. 

“But the idea of a nuclear 
molten pool melting its way 
through the centre of the earth 
is a science fiction myth. 

“It will slop itself. But if the 
mass bums its way through 
the reactor's concrete founda- 
tion, and if the water table is 
close to the surface, the reac- 
tion will create a chain of 
volcanic explosions. The size 
of these explosions is 
unpredictable. 

“We just don't know the 


meltdown there is a heal 
factor and a radioactive con- 
tamination factor. 

“Contaminated ground wa- 
ter will move towards the 
nearest river system, but the 
movement of ground water is 
very slow." There will also be 
a chemical reaction between 
the radioactive material and 
the rocks. 

He said the Russians could 
control the movement of 
ground water by drilling wells 
m the immediate area to 
attract the contaminated 
water. 

“They will then have a 
problem of how to get rid of 
the contaminated wells." He 
added they could also build a 
concrete wall right round the 
disaster zone to control the 
ground water flow. 

Mr Stewart Boyle, national 
energy campaign officer for 
Friends of the Earth, said 
yesterday:“Nobody seriously 
thought that this could happen. 

“If the nuclear meltdown 
meets the water table it will 
pollute the whole water sys- 
tem throughout the Ukraine 
and beyond.” 

Estimates of how wide- 
spread and long-lived pollu- 
tion in the Ukraine might be 
are entirely guesswork, but 
Friends of the Earth point out 
that hundreds of square miles 
in the southern Urals had to 


be abandoned completely af- 
ter a comparatively small 
Steam explosion at a nuclear 
waste dump at Kvshtyn in the 
1970s. 

Mr Large said that if the 
■ pollution . reaches the water 
courses h will be likely to 
pollute the whole of the water 
system of the Ukraine within a 
year. 

“If the subsoil is day it 
would absorb and retain some 
of the isotopes such as caesi- 
um, but there are hundreds of 
others such as curium, pluto- 
nium and rulhunium, which 
would disperse and could 
persist for thousands of 
years." 

Professor Ian Fells, profes- 
sor of energy conversion at 
Newcastle University, was 
move optimistic. “1 would be 
very surprised if the meltdown 
has penetrated more than a 
few tenths of centimetres into 
the massive concrete 
foundation," he said, “though 
I must admit that I am 
concerned to hear that the 
Russians are talking of sealing 
the reactor both above and 
below. 

“The UK Atomic Energy 
Authority has done all the 
calculations about the effect of 
meltdown on the concrete 
foundation and it is a pity that 
they cannot make them 
public. 

“I can only speak from my 
understanding of the calcula- 
tions and those which have 
been made by the Germans 
and others, and point out that 
in the similar accident at 
Three Mile Island a serious, if 
partial, meltdown was con- 
tained by the concrete founda- 
tion in precisely the way that 
the calculations suggested." 



church 


on raids 



Contaminated 
for up to 1 year 


How (he meltdown might break through into the water table and the possible area nf con tamination that could follow 



s .. 



Basques claim 
Madrid blast 


The military wing of ETA, 
the Basque separatist organi- 
zation, yesterday took respon- 
sibility for Thursday's failed 
grenade attack on the Presi- 
dent of Spain's Supreme 
Court in Madrid (Richard 
Wigg writes). 

Meanwhile the Interior 
Ministry said Costa Rica bad 
greed to extradite to Spain 
rregorio Jimenez, an alleged 
ETA member, for questioning 
about a series of terrorist 
crimes in Spain before 1982. 


US Catholics 


in contempt 


Kohl will Kiev sends children away 


Katya Litvinova, in her mother's arms, taki ng the official radiometric check in Kiev with some degree of suspicion. 


write to 
Gorbachov 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 


The West German Cabinet, 
at a meeting yesterday on the 1 
Chernobyl disaster; called for 


an emergency session of gov- 
ernors of the International 


Atomic Energy Organization 
in Vienna next week. 

It also decided that Chan- 
cellor Kohl should write to Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov express- 
ing dissatisfaction with the 
dearth of information from 
the Soviet Union, and asking 
for more. 

It was Herr Kohl's first 
Cabinet meeting rince his 
return from the Tokyo sum- 
mit and he seemed anxious to 
appear in command of the 
situation and to avoid any 
charge of complacency. " 

Ministers are infuriated by 
some regional governments 
which they believe have exag- 
gerated the radiation levels, 
and suspect political motives. 


New evidence of concern at 
die radiation risks being faced 
in Kiev, the third largest 
Soviet city, came with an 
official announcement that all 
children aged between six and 
13 and breast-feeding mothers 
are being sent away from the 
region for the whole summer. 

hr an efrort to defuse further 
suggestions of mass panic, the 
Sonet authorities said simply 
that as a precautionary mea- 
sure, the derision had been 
takes to bring .forward the 
summer holidays of some 
250,000 schoolchildren, who 
would normally have gone 
away for the summer even had 
there bee* no disaster. 

The announcement, which 
also said that because of the 
disaster at Chernobyl, holiday 
centres in the region crald not 
be used, followed increasing 
signs of a mass voluntary 
exodus of mothers and chil- 
dren from the city, about 60 
mQes south of the stricken 
reactor. 

Yesterday Mr Valestm 
Sgnrsky, the Mayor of Kiev, 


told a small group of Western 
correspondents who have been 
allowed to visit the city that 
children of kindergarten age 
would remain behind because 
their parents would be 


He denied that the sudden 
derision to move 250,000 chil- 
dren out early was an emer- 
gency measure, but his 
arguments were ridiculed by 
Western observers who have 
noted that the anxiety in Kiev 
about radiation — especially 
among parents — has consis- 
tently been higher titan Soviet 
officials have admitted. 

AO week, trains arriving in 
Moscow from Kiev have been 
packed with children sent 
away by worried parents. The 
mood of panic has been in- 
creased by instructions for all 
children to be washed regular- 
ly, and not to be permitted into 
foe fresh air for more than one 
hour a day. 

The authorities have been 
making strenuous efforts to 
play down reports of panic and 
anxiety among die city ’s in- 


habitants, with Soviet (deri- 
sion regularity shewing 
pictures of normal life there, 
with scarcely any mention of 
the anxiety being (dt by many. 

Weston correspondents in 
Moscow have often been phys- 
ically prevented from inter- 
viewing new arrivals here who 
have fled the high radiation 
levels. 

The mood of panic has been 
increased by a rash of health 
measures first introduced at 
the beginning of the week and 
intensified after a rhang e in 
wind direction increased the 
possibility of fallout 

Publicly, the authorities in- 
sist that these pose no danger 
to public health. 

All Kiev residents have been 
warned not to eat leaf vegeta- 
bles and the sale of ice cream 
and other foodstuffs from out- 
side stalls has been banned. 

Roads are washed down 
regularly and all residents 
have been told to wash their 
apartments to nrinhwize the 
risk of radioactive dost set- 
tling there. 


Italy upset 
by Bonn 
and Paris 


iometric check in Kiev with some degree of suspicion. 

Twelve again fail 
to agree on ban 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 


New York (NYT) - The 
two principal US organiza- 
tions of the Roman Catholic 
Church have been held ’ in 
contempt of court by a federal 
judge in Manhattan. 

Judge Roben Carter or- 
dered foe National Confer- 
ence of Catholic Bishops and 
the United States Catholic 
Conference to begin paying 
daily fines of $50,000 (about 
£32,000} each from Monday 
for refusing to turn over 
documents subpoenaed in a 
lawsuit over the tax-exempt 
status of the church. 


Tories suffer 


From John Earle 
Rome 


Italy is angry with France 
and West Germany for alleg- 
edly making difficulties in foe 
EEC for Italian exports of 
vegetables while playing down 
the radioactivity in their own 
agricultural produce. 

Signor Giuseppe 

Zamberietti. the Minister for 
Civfl Defence, said he saw “a 
manoeuvre against Italy”. 

Italy was further away from 
Chernofryl than other coun- 
tries, yet had given fuller 
information and taken stricter 
measures, Signor Zamberietti 


said. But why were people 
> wards Ital- 


abroad so severe to* 
ian vegetables, he asked, and 
not towards milk exported by 
Germany? 

“I would like to know foe 
situation in France, which 
does not give figures of radio- 
activity because they are a 
state seem,” the minister said. 


From Richard 

Two weeks after the 
Chernobyl disaster and five 
days after the EEC Commis- 
sion first put forward propos- 
als for protecting foe health of 
European consumers, the 
member governments of foe 
Twelve again foiled yesterday 
to agree to a ban on food 
imports from areas of Eastern 
Europe affected by foil out. 

The Commission set a new 
deadline for today bat officials 
gave a warning that ithe deci- 
sion might have to be made by 
foreign ministers when they 
meet on Monday, by which 
time it could be too late to 
prevent foe importation of 
contaminated foodstuffs. On 
Thursday the Commission 
banned the import of fresh 
meat and live cattle and pigs In 
the absence of agreement 
among foe Twelve. 

Bat officials said foe Com- 
mission did not have sufficient 
powers to ban other foodstuffs 
without foe approval of the 


Council of Ministers. 

Officials said that in the 
absence of a common ban, 
EEC member states were tend- 
ing to take national measures 
to prohibit imports, not only 
from foe Soviet bloc, hot also 
from each other. This reflected 
fears that fellow members 
might have already bought 
contaminated products from 
within the cordon son fan re, an 
area within a 625-mile radios 
of Kiev. 

One of the main obstacles to 
agreement is the 
Commission's proposal for (he 
measurement of “maxim am 
radiation tolerance levels". 
The scale Is based on the 
maximum permissible intake 
of radiation in milk, fruit and 
vegetables for babies. It sets a 
limit of 500 becqnerels per kfio 
of milk products and 350 
becqnerels per kilo of fruit and 
vegetables. 

EEC scientific experts met 
yesterday to revise the scale. 


Ottawa — The Conservative 
Government of Alberta, 
Canada's fourth largest prov- 
ince, was returned to office 
under its new leader, Mr Don 
Getty, with a greatly reduced 
majority, winning 61 of 83 
seats in Thursday's general 
election compared with 75 of 
79 seats in 1982. The socialist 
New Democratic Party ad- 
vanced from two seats to 16. 


Back to jail 


Harare — Five weeks after 
being freed by the Supreme 
Court from detention for al- 
leged spying, two senior cus- 
toms officials — Mr John 
Austin and Mr Kenneth 
Harper — were re-arrested at 
their homes by Zimbabwe's 
Intelligence Service. 


Dynasty dies 


Bonn (Reuter) — The last 
descendant of foe powerful 
German Krupp industrial dy- 
nasty. Arndt von Bohlen and 
Halbach, died in a Munich 
clinic aged 48. 


Athens backed over Turkey 


Greece was assured yester- 1 
day of the European 
Community's full sympathy 
over its problems with Tur- 
key. which have prompted 
Athens to resist the resump- 
tion of normal relations be- 
' tween foe EEC and Ankara. 

The assurances were given 
by M Claude Cheysson, the 
European Commissioner for 
Mediterranean policy, to Mr 
Andreas Papandreou, the 
Greek Prime Minister. They 
were plainly reflected in an- 
swers the European official 
gave later at a news 
conference. 

A Greek government 
spokesman said Mr 
Papandreou had laid down 
two conditions to M Cheysson 
for ending foe freeze imposed 
on EEC-Turkish relations af- 
ter the 1 980 military coup. 

First, Turkey had to rescind 
legislation discriminating 
against Greek citizens in Tur- 
kev and. secondly. Greece 
should be exempted, for secu- 


From Mario Modrano, Athens 


rity reasons, from the Com- 
munity obligation to open its 
doors to Turkish workers after 
December 1 this year. ■ 

The spokesman said that 
unless these conditions were 
met, Greece would refuse to 
ratify Turkey's association 
treaty with the Community. 
This could create obstacles to 
the reactivation of Turkey’s 
associate membership and the 
release of financing to Ankara. 
M Cheysson said be saw 
jc ro the Greek arguments. 
Turkish decree of 1964 
which barred all transactions 
of property owned by Greek 
citizens in Turkey was . a 
measure of discrimuiation in- 
compatible with the provi- 
sions of the EEC-Tuikey 
treaty of association of 1963. 

The Commissioner, whoj 
came to discuss with Greek 
leaders regional problems af- 
fecting the Community, said 
he would visit Ankara next, 
month — the first Community 
visit to Turkey at that level 


since the 1980 freeze — and 
would urge Turkey to end 
discrimination against 
Greeks. 

He said the Commission's 
proposals on the free move- 
ment of Turkish workers 
made adequate provision for 
national security susceptibil- 
ities of member countries. The 
Greek Government would be 
able to exercise its sovereign 
rights to control the flow of 
Turkish labour, he said. 

Greece has opposed recent 
Turkish efforts to improve its 
relations with Europe, but its 
EEC partners, and especially 
Britain, fed a revival of links 
would encourage Ankara to 
improve its human rights 
record. 

M Cheysson said the 
present effort was to restore 
relations with Turkey only at 
foe level that existed before 
foe 1980 freeze. Further 
progress, he insisted, would be 
conditional on an improve- 
ment of democracy there. 


Ariane takes 
satellite 
from shuttle 


Los Angeles (Reuter) - A 
Japanese communications 
satellite due to be launched 
next year by a US space 
shuttle wiH instead be cameo 
into space on board aEurope- 
an Ariane rocket in 1 988. 

H ughes Communications or 

\ nnniH caid vesierdav foe 


Los Angeles said yesterday foe 
■ Japanese Com- 


launch of the Japanese 
m urtica lions Satellite 
Company's first domestic, 
commercial communications 
satellite was switched because 

of the groundw|of the shuttte 
fleet after the Challenger di- 
Sf and foe sfosequeni 
projected year's totey ® 

bunching a new shuttle. 

“While Hughes strongly 
supports Nasa's spareshuide 

customer sdShte “s” 53 " ^ 
statement said. 


Samey sees Portugal 


as window to Europe 


FromMarthAde la Cal, Lisbon 


The dominant theme dur- 
tbe five-day visit to Poitu- 
by President Samey of 

al has been the mutual 

benefits to be gained from co- 
operation between the two 
countries to take advantage of 
Portugal’s recent entry into 
the EEC. . 

Both countries want to fona 
part of a Jforfoguese-speaJdng 
community that would in- 
clude the African countries of 
Angola, Mozambique, Guinea 
Bissau. Cape Verde and the 
islands of S&o Tome and 
Principe. 

At a state dinner in Lisbon $ 
Ajuda Palace, both President 
Samey and Resident Soares 
of Portugal emphasized the 
importance of Portugal's pres- 
ence in foe EEC in developing 
bilateral relations. 

president Soares said ;. 


EEC membership is not in- 
compatible with Portugal's de- 
sire to strengthen its ties with 
Brazil and other Portuguese^ 
speaking countries with whom 
we have old ties." Conditions 
were ideal for beginning a new 
phase in relations. 

President Samey said Brazil 
wanted to establish a relation- 
ship that would open a win- 
dow of understanding and co; 
operation in Europe. 

Portugal and Brazil have 
: been bound by each other's 
language and history since foe 
1500s when the Portuguese 
explorer, Pedro Aivares Ca- 
bral, discovered Brazil- 


Over the centuries hun- 
dreds of thousands of Portu- 
guese have emigrated to 
Brazil, and many have re- 
turned rich. ’ 


Top men 
sacked 


by Unesco 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 


The first session of foe 
executive board of the United 
Nations Educational, Scientif- 
ic and Cnftaral Organization 
to be held since Britain's 
withdrawal in December, got 
off to a stormy start here this 
week with the dismissal of two 
senior officials, renewed pres- 
sure for the replacement of Mr 
Amadou Mahtar IVTBow, foe 
Director-General, and persis- 
tent rumours that Japan was 
also considering leaving. 

In a speech at the opening 
session of the executive board 
on Wednesday, Mr M’Bow 
said the withdrawal of the US 
in 1984, followed by that of 
Britain and Singapore at the 
end of last year, had meant a 
30 per cent redaction in 
Unesco’s budget 

As a contribution to savings 
which had to be made, 558 
staff posts were to be abol- 
ished in addition to the 97 
abolished last year. 

Only 205 of the posts were 
filled at the time of the 
decision, but 19 employees 
would have to be made com- 
pulsorily redundant, Mr 
IVTBow said. 

Among those dismissed are 
Mr Dragoljub Najman, a for- 
mer Assistant Dfrector-Gener- 
aL 

Mr Erwin Solomon, an 
American, and Unesco diretv 
tor of socio-economic analysis, 
has also been asked to leave. 

The post of Director-Gener- 
al. which Mr M'Bow has 
occupied since 1974, conies up 
for election next year. Nomi- 
nations are not due until 
adman, but a movement has 
begun to block Mr M’Bow's 
election for a third tens. 

Several conn fries, with Ja- 
pan at their head, have indi- 
cated that they would have to 
consider following the US and 
Britain in kaving tite organi- 
zation if Mr M'Bow were re- 
elected. . 


Lange attacks Nato and Britain 

From Richard Long, Wellington 


Jet victim 


Nato nations were criticized 
by foe New Zealand Prime 
Minister, Mr David Lange, 
last night for their reliance on 
the nuclear response. 


In a vigorous sprech which 
n his support- 


drew cheers from 
ers for the Labour 
Government's anti-nuclear 
stance, Mr Lange said: “We 
believe that the late of the 
world should not be the 
exclusive property of the nu- 
clear powers. 

“it is. for instance, outra- 
geous to us that the defence of 
Western Europe is based on 
Nato's promise to blow up the 
world if the Russians attack 
them with overwhelming con- 


ventional force. They have no 
right to decide foe late of all 
foe rest of us." 

Referring to foe visit to New 
Zealand in February of the 
British defence chief. Admiral 
of foe Fleet Sir John 
Fieldhouse, Mr Lange said: 
“The British sent an admiral 
out to lecture us this year. 
Some of the press here seemed 
to think that they had a right 
to do that — We are not a 
colony." 

Mr Lange said there was no 
point in New Zealand remain- 
ing in the Anzus alliance if foe 
Americans viewed the alliance 
as the global projection of its 
nuclear policies. 


In an apparent reference to 
a leading article in The Times 
eight days ago criticizing New, 
Zealand's anti-nuclear stance. 
Mr Lange said: “I am going to , 

Europe to explain to 

readers of The Times that 
there is in foe South Pacific an 
intelligent alternative to a 
nuclear defence which does 
not involve a surrender to the 
Cossacks. 

“1 shall put as forcibly as I 
can the case of a country: 
which is interested in develop-, 
ment through trade, in the 1 
right of small nations to 
determine their own future 
and in co-operation and mu- 
tual aid." 


Colombo (Reuter) — Han- 
nah Mahmoud, the pregnant 
wife of a PLQ official, died 
from injuries received in the 
Colombo airport bombing on 
Saturday, raising foe toll to 16. 


Aids appeal 


Washington (Reuter) — The 
actress Elizabeth Taylor, sur- 
rounded by scores of photog- 
raphers, appeared at a US 
Senate hearing to appeal For 
more funds to fight Aids. 


Cell suicide 


Avignon (AFP) — Maurizio 
Cirelli, aged 31. a suspected 
Italian Red Brigades terrorist, 
was found hanged in his cell 
here shortly before he was to 
be extradited to face trial in 
Italy, informed sources said. 


Seven women named 
in new Oslo Cabinet 


From Tony Samstag. Oslo 


Mrs Gro Harlem Brundt- 
land, foe new Norwegian 
Prime Minister, took office 
yesterday and set what was 
thought to be a world record 
by announcing that seven of 
her 17 Cabinet appointments 
are to be women. 

Her fulfilment of a pledge of 
sexual equality made last 
week, after she agreed to form 
Norway's first minority coali- 
tion government in 25 years, 
caps an extraordinary period 
in a country not normally 
noted for foe liveliness of its 
domestic politics. 

Mrs Brundliand, foe La- 
bour Party leader, has taken 
office after the first collapse of 
a Norwegian government out- 
side a general election since 
foe 1920s. Mr Kare WiUoch. 
her Conservative predecessor, 
resigned last month after Par- 
liament (ailed to approve an 
emergency austerity package. 

Norway's constitution does 
not allow for a national elec- 
tion before J9&9. and some 
analysts are convinced that 
Mrs Brundliand, despite 
pledges of Conservative sup- 
port, will be unable to form a 


workable consensus for long. 

But if Mrs Brundtland is 
deterred by foe prospect of 
political chaos, with foe Con- 
servatives biding their time 
until 1989 in foe role of 
blameless opposition, she is 
not about to show iL 

She is clearly determined to 
come out fighting, not only on 
budget measures, which are 
likely to include tax increases 
on higher incomes, but also on 
foreign policy. It is likely that 
Norway will now join such 
nations as Denmark and 
Greece in vigorous opposition 
to some Nato policies. 

The new Cabinet is: Prime Min- 
ister, Gro Harlem Brunttoand; For- 
eign Affaire, Knut Frydenlund; 
Finance, Gumar Berg* Defence, 
Johan Joergen Holst Consumer 
Affaire, Anno-Lso Bakken; In- 
dustry. Finn Kristsnsen: Justice. 


Helen Boestenri; Retigjoug Affaire 
n, Kirsti 


and Education, Kirsti Kolia 
Groendahl; Culture. Hallvard 
BaKKe: Agriculture, Gunhild 
Oeyangert; Environment Sissei 
Roenbecfc; 08 and Energy, Ame 
Oeten; Transport Kiefl Borgen; 
Social Affairs, Tove Strand 
Genardsen: Development Aid. 
Vesta Vettesen: fisheries. Bjame 
Moerk Eidem; Trade, Kurt 
Mosbaklr. Labour and MunictpaJ- 
rtea, Leif HaraWseth. 


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_ 3 


Santiago (Reuter) - Chile's 
military Government yester- 
day defied foe leader of foe 
Roman Catholic Church and 
ordered more raids on Santia- 
go slums as part of its anti- 
guerrilla drive. 

Residents of La Bandera in 
the south of the capital said 
troops and police began 
rounding up men for identity 
checks in a local soccer stadi- 
um, tbe sixth such operation 
in less than a fortnight. The 
Archbishop of Santiago, Car- 
dinal Juan Francisco Fresno, 
said foe raids spread fear and 
offended the dignity of foe 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


Cloud 
kiwi land 

’the New Zealand rugby" team 
$day. play the first unofficial 
kitemaiional match of their South 
African tour. The likelihood of 
this rebel tour has been talked 
qbout ever since the official lour 
wqs cancelled last summer, and it 
'fis being spoken of as definite in 
nifrby circles since' last November. 
Indeed, for some considerable 
tii§c. money for the New Zealand 
players has been stashed in a Hong 
Kcjng bank: .if they arc banned 
from playing Rugby Union again 
each will receive £40.000. on top 
d£- the substantial “daily 
allowance" they are now receiv- 
ing. Yet only last month the New 
Zealand Rugby Council was say- 
ing it knew nothing about any 
rebel tour. At the same lime, the 
conncil was employing a company 
nm by Andy Hayden, the rebels' 
trouble-shooter and a second row 
player, to promote its own new 
image and logo. Since rugby 
avfthorilies cannot possibly lie, the 
Kiwi bunch can only be naive to 
the point of incompetence. 

-Rugby does not have a proper 
wafrld body, the International 
Board laving a different function 
and being largely toothless any- 
way. This makes the problem of 
ciigning the World Cup. scheduled 
for. next year, particularly vexed. 
Wnat does rugby do about New 
Zealand? If all the players on the 
$&ilh African tour were banned 
the- effect on the World Cup and 
the’ way it is supported would be 
disastrous. For nine, of the 1 1 
Wgrld Cup venues are in New 
Zealand. 

IJobbit habit 

£ learn from The 1986 Cricketer's 
Who's Who that Mike Gatting is 
an expert on the works of Tolkien. 
Having recovered from the initial 
shock, 1 can sec why. Gatting is a 
dead ringer for Gimli. the heroic 
dwarf who slew 42 Ores with bis 
axe in the battle for Helm’s Deep. 
Gatting is seen as a contender for 
the England captaincy, a post 
currently held by David Gower. 
Qni Gower loo is something of a 
Tdlkien character he reminds me 
qf.Gimli’s great friend and rival. 
Legolas the elf — dainty but lethal. 

Years ahead 

Britain’s first senior sports festival 
is jieing- held at Harrogate this 
uteekend - a competition for all 
sports people who fall into what 
each sport considcrsihe “veteran" 
class. Six hundred competitors are 
taking pan in Iff sports. Male 
tennis players start at 45, there is a 
rpad-ninning category for the 60- 
plus and a swimming event for 
those over 70/Most intimidating 
off ill is a mini- triathlon for those 
6£40 and more which comprises 
Iff miles cycling, a five-mile run 
an£ a half-mile swim. 


Flip 


Joggers pound the streets while 
music pounds their ears from their 
Walkman personal steroes. One’s 
hritrz has always bled for the poor 
swimmers: their sport is even 
piiCTre boring but they have nothing 
with which to alleviate the tedium. 
Afilast relief has been found for 
this legion of sad people. A water- 
pcqof personal hi-fi for swimmers 
has been developed in the United 
Stifles: it costs $40. and is called 
A Qua Tunes. 

Return volley 

Martina Navratilova has been 
cabight trying to sneak a gun on 
board a plane in the States. She 
hod a Smith and Wesson .3$ and 
iO'rounds of ammunition in her 
bag* as she passed through airport 
security in San Francisco. She was 
firftd 51.000 for the offence (the 
maximum) and the gun was 
confiscated. She said the gun had 
b€jen mistakenly put into her bag 
friend who had helped her 
pack. It could happen to anyone. 

A'ngled shots 

Tift BBCs coverage of the world 
adbokcr championship, which 
ended this week, was rather pe- 
culiar. The Beeb decided to do all 
&y£ould to make sure that the 
name of the sponsor. Embassy, 
duf not dominate every back- 
ground — which made for some 
suber convoluted camera angles. 
Furthermore, it decided that the 
dps thing we must never see is 
snpoker players smoking. 1 would 
gave thought that if you wanted to 
Communicate the full nastiness of 
cigarettes, then filling the screen 
with the tortured inhalations of 
Jimmy While and Alex Higgins 
nob Id put everyone off for life. 
Junkies injecting themselves look 
scarcely less attractive. 

T BARRY FANTON1 

5??!'3e 

R -V" "1 




V-v' 


. r 

VL- 



David Butler puts Thursday’s votes in a general election perspective 


> *<:. 


© <r* 






•J . * '*?ferring 

in 'down' 


Thursday's votes proclaimed two 
conflicting messages. If the whole 
country voted like West Derby- 
shire there would be only 92 
Conservative MPs in the next 
parliament: if. indeed, it voted like 
Ryedale there would be no more 
than a dozen Tories left. The 
Alliance would win a dear major- 
ity in the Commons. 

On the other hand, if the whole 
country voted as it did in the local- 
elections Labour would be on the 
brink of a nationwide triumph, 
with 320 or so seals to the 
Alliance's 30. 

Either message is disastrous for 
the Conservatives. However, if 
they seek comfort, the most they 
can boast is that they did not 
actually lose in West Derbyshire 
or in Wandsworth. They can 
reflect that they still control It of 
the 32 London boroughs (in 1964 
they bad only nine) and that they 
still have about 670 London 
councillors (in 1971 they had only 
601). Their loss of scats nation- 
wide must be set against the fact- 
that 1982 was the Conservatives' 
best year since they took office: to 
hold even the bulk of the seats 
won in the midst of the Falklands 
war would have been a notable 
triumph for Mrs Thatcher. In . feet 
she lost only as many as Conser- 
vative Central Office "expected. 

Moreover she has the perverse 
comfort that Labour is the main 
beneficiary. The unspoken Tory- 
Labour compact against ttiird 
party intruders seems to hold good 
and. in terms of votes, the .Alliance 
made little net improvement on 
1982 or 1983. 

- But -what must be ominous for 
the Conservatives is the uneven 
nature of the results. In terms of 
scats the Alliance did make a net 
gain; this was because its advances 
came, in large measure, where it 
was strong.- It made- little dent 
where Labour was the. Tories’, 
principal challenger. 

The Alliance sweep forward in 
the south-west London suburbs of 


Washington 

What dp you say about a former 
senior member of the US govern- 
ment who admits that he con- 
sciously plotted to mislead the 
president- and that his reputation 
as an expert is based on his ability 
to bamboozle politicians and the 
media? The question is posed by 
David ‘ A. Stockman, President 
Reagan’s former budget director, 
in his recently published The 
Triumph of Politics. 

The Detroit News answered with 
an editorial comparing Stockman 
unfavourably with Judas Iscariot. 
Even Stockman's supporters, the 
newspaper said, “are appalled at 
the sheer meanness of what he has 
done." 

The Washington Post, which 
has led the ideological campaign 
against Reaganomics from the left, 
was so horrified that it let the 
opportunity pass to use Stockman 
against Reagan and the supply- 
side infidels. The Post's principal 
columnist David Broder. said 
that Stockman “advanced to the 
heights without grasping anything 
but manipulative skills" and the 
paper's economics columnist, 
Hobart Rowcn. said Stockman 
had lastingly damaged his reputa- 
tion and made himself useless to 
his new. Wall Street employer. 
There has been much more in 
similar vein. Such universal 
denunciation is rare in American 
political life. Even Richard Nixon 
had his defenders. 

What does it all mean? For one 
thing that, in the increasingly 
competitive atmosphere of Ameri- 
can politics, by the time a person 
reaches the presidency he does not 
have enough friends left to ap- 
point a government. He is forced 
to rely on people he does not 
know, with unknown con- 
sequences to himself and his goals. 

It means also that when young 
men who have not yet made good 
in life are appointed to powerful 
government positions they are 
dangerously exposed to a compet- 
itive. ruthlessly destructive en- 
vironment To protect themselves 
from ihe wolves, they have to 
create scapegoats along the way. 
Stockman's bagful includes the 
whole of Washington. 

On another level. Stockman's 
book is equally discouraging. He 
argues that conservative revolu- 
tions intended to reduce the size of 
government cannot succeed. Rev- 
olutionary changes are the pre- 
serve of the left, which can enlist 
the greed and envy of the voters to 
expand the scope of government. 
The only function of conservative 
governments is to maintain the 
status quo and slow the growth of 
government. The Reagan revolu- 
tion. he says, "can't be done. It 
shouldn't have been tried" — a 
conclusion fitting with the neo- 
Marxism of his student days. 

Stockman comes to this conclu- 
sion anew as a - result of his 
frustrating experiences in trying to 
balance the budget, which to him 
was the essence of Reaganomics. 
In hib view, ihc 1981 tax cut for 
the better off made the task harder 
because Reagan could not then get 
the Democrats to agree to cut back 
their spending programmes for the 
poor and middle class. Politicians 
being politicians, they preferred 


Change is the 
cry— and any 



Richmond, Kingston and Sutton 
was matched in some prosperous 
areas of Sussex, Hertfordshire and 
the West Country. Tactical voting 
was further demonstrated by the 
way tho rump of Conservative 
voters in Liverpool Tower Ham- 
lets and elsewhere switched to the 
Alliance. 

The by-elections provide the 
same message. Of course it may 
seem odd to speak of tactical 
voting when the Labour percent- 
age held more or less steady. But it 
is plain from the opinion polls that 
in the multiple paths of switching 
between the parties (Conservative 
to Labour. Conservative to Alli- 
ance, Alliance to Labour, Labour 
to Alliance), the natural gain that 
Labour could expect from the 
government's unpopularity was 
fully offset by a tactical move to 
the Alliance from some Labour 
supporters. 

Contrast the last three by- 
eleclions. 

Labour vote 1983 Con Lab Alin 

% “-O % ®'o 

34.9 Fulham -10.4+11.3+0.3 

17.1 Derbyshire 

W -15.4 +2.7+12.4 

103 Ryedale -T7.9 -1.9+19 8 

Despite the distraction of the 

local elections, the voters in West 
Derbyshire and even more in. 
-Ryedale showed that they knew-as 
well as the voters of Fulham how 
to cast an effective anti-Conser- 
valive vote. The mood expressed 
on Thursday was perhaps a de- 


mand for change — any change. 

But il was significant that while 
many voters showed they could 
discriminate between local situa- 
tions in order to cast the most 
effective ami-Conservative vote, 
they showed little propensity to. 
differentiate between the hard left, 
the cuddly left and the moderates. 
Labour fared as well in Liverpool 
and. Lambeth as in Birmingham 
and Hammersmith. The swing 
swung equally to the rate capped 
and the prudential to the friends 
of Militant and its enemies. 

The Conservatives now control 
a bare quarter of the district 
councils in Britain — fewer than 
those that lack a dear majority 
and offer mini-versions of a hung 
parliament - They - do not now 
govern any major city except 
Cardiff. Portsmouth and Plym- 
outh. In Scotland they have 
dismally fallen to third place in 
terms of votes (the outcome of the 
regional council elections was 
projected as 45 per cent Labour, 
18 per cent Scottish National 
Party, 15 per cent Conservative 
and 14 percent Alliance.) 

One lesson of the by-eiections is 
important The Alliance advance 
is affecting Conservative, not 
Labour, strength. If the Alliance 
wins seats like Ryedale it does 
noibing to change the number of 
Labour MPs; however it reduces, 
not onlv the Conservatives’ pros- 
pects of a clear majority but also 
their chances, of being the largest 


Paul Craig Roberts assesses the damage 
caused by the Reagan budget aide .... 
revelations— to Washington and himself 


who ended 


m 



Stockman: an unfavourable comparison with Judas 


the budget defidt to higher taxes 
and lower spending. Disgusted 
with the triumph of politics, 
Stockman exited and told his tale. 
Only a few months out of govern- 
ment. the former poor boy lives in 
a 52 million house ana is driven 
to work on Wall Street in a 
chauffeured limousine — proof 
that the rewards for disloyalty can 
be very high. Anyone else who gets 
the chance can be forgiven if he 
behaves in the same way. 

Stockman's story is neat but 
disingenuous. In fact he bears a 
major responsibility for the failure 
to cut spending. His approach to 
the ask was incompetent and 
doomed to defeat. In weekly secret 
meetings with William Greider of 
the Washington Post he revealed 
all his budget strategies m advance 
to his ideological enemy. Stock- 
man has noer given a convincing 
explanation for this unusual tac- 
tic. About the only explanation 
that mokes sense is that he was 
trying to insure himselfagainst the 
failure of the policy by using the 
Post to build a record of his 
personal doubts. 

The atmosphere of continual 
crisis which 5tockman created 
also worked against hint. Despite 
spending cuts and tax increases, 
the deficit always got bigger. For 
example, the 19S2 tax increase 
was supposed to reduce the dcficii 
by one-third, but by September 


Stockman's projections showed 
that it had doubled. 

Stockman's aides have publicly 
admitted that the crisis strategy 
backfired and Stockman him sell 
reports that friends in Congress 
warned him about an adverse 
reaction to the political trauma be 
was creating. Bui in his book he 
makes it clear that he doesn't 
think anyone's advice is worth 
hearing. 

Stockman's worst mistake was 
in helping to overturn ibe initial 
supply-sidc/monetarist forecast 
early in 1981. The forecast was 
overturned because the con- 
ventional economists in the gov- 
ernment believed that they would 
be "the laughing stock of the 
world" if the administration pre- 
dicted low inflation. Stockman 
was pleased to support a higher 
inflation forecast because it added 
nearly S200 billion to revenues 
and let him please Reagan by 
forecastinga balanced budget The 
Treasury strenuously opposed this 
decision, it wanted ihe deficits on 
the table where everyone could see 
them so that they’ could not 
become a danger to Reagan's 
policy. But it was overruled. 

Having jacked up the inflation 
forecast Stockman then undercut 
his balanced budget by heloing to 
convince Ihe Federal Reserve 
Board that the administration's 
fiscal policy was inflationary. The 
tax cut was too big, Stockman 


party in a hung parliament with 
the attendant claim to be asked to . 
provide a minority government 

Certainly Thursday's results 
add to tiie chances of . a hung 1 
parliament. Labour may present 
statistics that show ft with .more 
than the magic 326 seats. But a 
general election will be very 
different. Choosing a government, . 
or even a hung parliament, con- 
centrates the elector’s mind 
wonderfully. 

The government counts on a 
political recovery comparable -to 
that of 1981 to 1983. But it knows 
that will be. much harder ip 
achieve this lime. Over the next 
year Norman Tebbit and Conser- 
vative Central Office will have to 
steady the party’s shaken morale 
and trust that Nigel Lawson's 
economic management and the 
image-makers' presentation of a 
caring party will restore the situa- 
tion in time. - 

Labour believes it is- on course. 
The council elections will foster its 
renewed selficonfidence. .But it; 
will have to leap over the Alliance 
as the challenging party in a fair 
number of seats, and it must also 
prevent further damage from the 
Militant row. Indeed il might have 
preferred a worse result in Liver-; 
pool — it may even look forward 
to one later this year if the Appeal 
Court ousts their surcharged coun- 
cillors. 

The Alliance, the party with the 
most volatile support, must be 
immensely grateful to the electors 
of Ryedale for obliterating the | 
conclusions that people were 
drawing from Fulham. But it will [ 
not find it easy to keep in. the. j 
forefront of the news. ... . I 

In our three-party politics only a j 
few per cent stand between riding [ 
a landslide and being obliterated 
by one. The variations of 
Thursday's vole show that either 
fete could befall any party.' ' ' 

The author is a Fellow of Nuffield 
College. Oxford 


maintained. The fiscal stimulus 
would be excessive. The deficit 
would get out of hand and result in 
higher inflation, -Coming from the 
budget director, this terrified the 
■ central bank which was certain 
that nt would be blamed. - 

The central bank overreacted 
and Slammed on the monetary 
brakes in . a way . that caused a 
sudden collapse in the- inflation 
rate between 1 980 and. J 982. This 
meant that the spending cuts 
Stockman thought he had ach- 
ieved were turned overnight into 
increases in real government 
spending. Spending actually rose 
as a share of GNP, and gaping 
holes appeared in revenues. Stock- 
man reports that as a result of the 
central bank's monetary policy 
GNP this year is " $660 billion 
below the forecast. The gov- 
ernment's share of that is 25 per 
cent — $165 billion, about the size 
of this year's budget deficiL After 
proving that . monetary policy 
caused the large budget deficits, 
Stockman then disingenuously 
blames the 1981 tax cuL 

In the end he is settling scores 
with the Treasury suppty-siders 
who predicted in advance the 
failure of his tactics. But it all rings 
hollow, because. in the end Stock- 
man has been proved wrong on all 
substantive points. Both inflation 
and interest rates collapsed de- 
spite the large deficits. Since 1982 
the economy has. created 10 
million jobs while inflation fell — 
another “impossible" result The 
budget deficit did opt force up 
inflation or interest rates, because 
the same disinflation' that pro- 
duced the deficit produced the 
means of financing iL- People 
simply stopped investing in “infla- 
tion hedges" such as gold, 
commodities, farmland and an- 
tiques, and began buying financial 
assets such as slocks and govern- 
ment bonds. 

Unfortunately for Stockman, 
his book predicting budgetary 
doom appeared just at the time 
when mounting evidence points in 
the other direction. The latest . 
deficit projections by both the 
administration and Congress 
show deficits half the size of 
Stockman's former predictions. 

Other economists are finding 
that the Reagan tax cut produced a 
substantial increase in private 
saving. Allen Sinai has published 
his results showing that over the 
1 98 1 -85 period private saving rose 
by nearly $600 billion above tiie 
previous trend. This increase in 
private saving .covered 60 percent 
of the cumulative budget deficit 
for the period. 

With the actual results so 
dramatically at odds with Stock- 
man's predictions, he would seem 
to have little prospect of a career 
as an economic seer. And having 
burnt all his bridges by attacking 
everyone in Washington, he is 
unlikely to reappear on the politi- 
cal scene in the foreseeable future 
The Triumph of Politics may turn 
out to be an obituary not of 
Reagan's economic policy but of a 
young man still in his thirties who 
was too ambitious by half. . . 

0 Tfann NflwapmMfs, 1966. . 

The author was US Assistant 
Secretary . of the Treasury, for 
Economic Policy 1981-82. 


to 


Last summer a combination of 
enlightened Tory and Alliance 
peers did noble work on improv- 
ing the Trade Union Bill It was 
largely due to them that the final 
Att-enshrined secret postal ballots 
as the norm, strengthened the 
procedures for the secrecy and 
good governance of workplace 
ballots and made it easier for 
union members, through the 
certification officer, to force-union 
executives to conduct elections 
properly or to re-run them if they 
had not been. 

. The. government's resistance to. 
the changes it now welcomes was' 
inspired by civil servants. They 
maintained that tbs evidence of 
malpractice in union elections was 
not sufficiently strong to warrant 
reform. They ignored the vast 
amount ofi solid evidence to the 
contrary. 

The persuasive power of civil 
servants . over their ministers 
should never be under-estimated. : 
Now they are at it. again. Civil 
servants in the Department of 
Education are saying if is neither 
necessary nor wise to do anything 
in the Education Bill, now going 
through the Lords about political 
indoctrination in schools or insist- 
ing that the police are allowed to. 
continue talking to pupils about 
crime prevention. Again a number 
of Conservative and Alliance 
peers will move amendments 
during the report stage on May 20 
to compel the government to 
change its mind. It is remarkable 
how much common sense comes 
out of the haphazardly composed 
second chamber. . 

These peers -are ■ particularly 
concerned about the promotion of 
partisan political teaching in state, 
schools mid want it stopped. The 
government^ advised by senior 
civil servants, argues that a bill 
about education implicitly ex- 
cludes the promotion of partisan; 
politics: if that is so what point is' 
there in making the exclusion 
explicit? It also says there is 
“insufficient evidence" of abuse. 

How, then, would it explain 
away Auschwitz, an ILEA guide' 
instructing teachers to impress on 
their pupils the similarity between 
the Nazi exterminators and the 
government's so-called anti-trade 
union legislation; the brutality o£ 
Britain's police: the denial of 
human rights allegedly basic iu the 
Prevention of Terrorism Act; the 
“anti-immigration laws'* and so 
forth: 

* Lord Harris of High cross sent a 
copy to Sir Keith Joseph on 
February 18. It is not a long 
document; all its salient points 
cquld be absorbed in half an hour. 
But to date Lord Harris has been 


told only that he- will have a reply 
when inquiries are complete. 

■ The ‘ government seems un- 
concerned about that dishonestly, 
named subject, peace studies. 
Teachers arc urged by. iheir 
organizations and . some public 
bodies to seek information . 
overwhelmingly from such groups, 
as CND. the National. Peace 
Council, Teachers for Peace and 
others which campaign for one- 
sided nuclear disarmament.- 
Sources such as the Ministry of 
Defence and the British Atlantic 
Committee hardly get a mention: 
no pro-Nato campaigning- organ- 
ization is mentioned at alL . 

In Peace Studies for Schools; 
John Marks presents massive 
evidence of the heavily biased 
nature of the political propaganda 
in schools- in favour of tiie CND 
position. DES officials officials 
have doubtless put the document 
under the carpet- 

Another amendment in the 
Lords, backed by Lady Cox and 
Lord Harris, will concern a 
requirement 1 on every school to 
provide courses by police officers 
on crime prevention and road 
safety. At present 23 ILEA schools 
will not allow the police ip. Those 
who rule the ILEA, and. who used 
to rule the GLC are more 
interested in attacking the police, 
than co-operating - with them.. 
Other local authorities are follow- . 
ing the ILEA lead. • . 

The police also talk to children 
about the dangers of drug abase. It . 
is sad that this government, ' 
supposedly engaged in an anti- 
drug campaign, is indifferent to 
the refusal of schools to permit the 
police to advise . pupils . how to 
resist drug pedlais. 

Proportional representation for 
elections to the ILEA and local 
authorities generally would prob- . 
ably prevent extreme left-wingers-' 
within Labour groups, which - 
themselves are elected on a m inor- - 
ity vote, carrying on political 
indoctrination and attacks on the., 
police .in schools. But this is not to 
be, at least for a long time. ■ 

Meanwhile political indoctrina- 
tion by Marxist and CND teachers 
is flourishing because ministers 
are not willing to stop it. No one is- 
suggesting -there should be no. 
discussion of politics for those oid- 
enough to understand it: only that 
children should not be filled with . 
one political view to the exclusion 
of all others. 

! hope that on May’ 20 every- 
peer concerned about the children - 
now at school and abbut-foture. 
generations will rally round* those 
Conservative and Alliance peers 
who are insisting that the govern-* 
mem takes ail necessary action. 





The Common Market was started 
by those countries' which had lost 
the Second World War, so that 
iheir formers had somewhere to 
sell their butter and long-life milk. 
Britain did not join because it had 
won the-war, like .the Americans, 
and anyway did not care for the 
French, the Germans and the 
Italians Or for that matter the 
Belgians, the Dutch and the people 
from that other place. 

--Thanks to-a martial plan- which 
was imposed by the United States 
to keep- .them in. order, the 
coumries- which had lost the war 
soon began to do better than those 
which had won it. This was 
obviously unfair, so the prime 
minister, Harold Macmillan, 
went to see General de Gaulle, and 
told him that Britain had decided 
to let bygones be bygones and join 
the Common Market after alL But 
General de Gaulle, who did not 
like the British because they had 
won the war and because they 
could not speak French, said 
"Non" several times very rudely, 
This proved that he was a nasty 
man. a bad loser and thus typically 
French. 

The Labour party was against 
joining the Common Market any- 
way because it was full of people 
who were making a lot of money 
and didn't like going on strike. But 
when . Harold W ilson, who wore a_ 
raincoat” and had a photographic' 
memory, became prime minister 
he forgot this and went to Paris 
himself saying he wouldn’t take 
No for an answer. So General de 
Gaulle said “Non" again instead, 
which made Wilson’s colleague, 
George Brown, very tired and 
emotional: Then Wilson remem- 
bered that he hadn't ready wanted 
to join the Common Market 
anyway, and everyone decided 
that Britain would wait for Gen- 
eral de Gaulle to die. 

General de Gaulle was suc- 
ceeded by Monsieur de Pom- 
padour,, a retired bank manager 
who kept appearing on television 
smoking Gauloises. Because he 
bad worked in a bank he didn't 
tare who joined the Common 
Market so long as they had the 
money, so when the next British 
prime minister, Edward Heath, 
whb played the piano and had a 
funny laugh, went to ask him. he 
clapped him on the ' shoulders, 
sending clouds of garlic and 
Chateauneuf du Pape over him. 
and wheezed: "Mais oui, cer- 
tainement mon vieux”, or words 
to that effecL All agreed it was one 
in the eye for the late General; 
then they sat back and waited for 
Britain to grow rich like everyone 
else.! 

Before very long they realized 
that Britain couldn't, because it 
bad really been tricked by. Mon- 
sieur de Pompadour into paying a 


bigger annual subscription than 
anyone else, to make up for the 
fact that its -farmers were more 
efficient than those in 
France. Moreover, under Com- 
mon Market rules, the British 
were required to ■ .eat French 
Golden Delicious apples instead 
of Cox’s Grange Pippins: 

When Margaret Thatcher be- 
came prime minister she said she 
had had enough of this. So they 
called her . the Iron Lady and bad a 
big row outside Paris, before the 
French gave her some-money back 
and promised that they would ail 
start eating English lamb -Tie- 
cause they had. to under Common 
Market roles. This proved that 
Mrs Thatcher was even nastier 
than General de Gaulle, a- still 
worse , loser and thus typically 
British. 

The French, the Germans and 
the Italians, not to mention the 
Dutch, the Belgians and the people 
from that other -place, how 
thought they had shot Mrs 
Thatcher up and could thus start 
dealing with the Danes, the Irish, 
the Spanish and the Portuguese, 
not to mention the Greeks whom 
they disliked even more than the 
British. But when Mrs' Thatcher 
heard of this she said “tiie lady’s 
not- for turning" and- anyway, she 
-wanted to start talking about 
CAP — which had something to 
<io with rates. . _ . 

The trouble with CAP- was that 
the French farmers, to show they 
were. not really as inefficient as 
everyone said, .had been produc- 
ing more food than everyone else 
could possibly eat. 

They couldn't give ii all away to 
people who were starving in Africa 
because it would make them fat 
and be very bad for them — so 
they had to store all the surplus 
butter inside a mountain in .Brus- 
sels called the Bcurre-le-MonL 
The mountain had a lake at the 
foot of ii.' into which' they poured 
all the wine that was left over 
because people couldn't afford to 
drink il and a tower block-tailed 
the Charlemagne in which they 
were storing grain. . 

; But the rales on ail these were so 
enormous that Mrs Thatcher said 
they would have to start CAPpmg 
them,' dr she would have another 
row when she was president, She 
also wanted British -Airways to 
take-over all- the routes in Europe, 
which would mean that everyone 
would have to take out British life 
insurance, and said .^ihflt the 
trouble with the Common Market 
was that it wasn’t nearly common 
enough. . . ' ' ' 

This- was' exactly ' what the 
Labour' party had -objected- te-ia 
the first place — which explains 
why everyone agreed ifi."W86 that 
it was no longer art issue in British 
politics. 




Sj-fli K a'fi 5 ft d V n ? r .» • ou»*«&tO as a a 


? 0 *-*• 






THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ELECTORAL WARNING 


The looming after the etec- 
“Oa-night before is rarely a 
unje when much , heat is gen- 
among ; political 
wmoatants - or much light 
sned on the political scenery. 
Despite . the very best 
endeavours of _ the broad- 
caste the nation's leaders and 
wou3d~be leaders -find it hard 
to raise their tired ' mh tfa 
aoove the responses they have 
all used so often. Mr Steel 
mows what Mr Tebbh is going 
tossy about the Government's 
oasty ■ defeat at Ryedale. Mr 
Tebbrt knows exactly what Mr 
Steel is going to say. 

■ IT Labour*® ■ Mr ~ John 
Gunnsn^iani were to fain t, 
under the studio Hgfats the 
Conservatives* Mr Kenneth 
Baker could deliver his lin«f 
with , no less aplomb — and; 
gtyen :the common courtesies 
among fellow parliamentari- 
ans, ■ he - might easily be 
tempted to do so. - 
Thus the response by Mr 
Tebbit that the Conservatives' 
had so often regained at gen- 
eral elections die seats that it 
had spectacularly lost in mid- 
term will have surprised no 

one. Hie viewer i$ enjoined to 
remember poor Mrs Shirley 
Williams from Crosby, the 
tragic Mr Tope from Sutton. • 
Where are they now, the Mrs, 
Shields’s of yesteryears?. Not 
that the argument is any less 
sound for being familiar. Nor 
is there anything wrong: with - 
Mr Tebbh*s long list of govern- 
ment achievements in control- 
ling inflation, the trade unions 
and in rotting bade the fron- 
tiers of stete power. 

Today, however,, is tile 
morning after the morning 
after the election night before. 
The complex pattern of local 
election results, the campaign 
reports, the. market research on 
the party political broadcasts; 
they are all piling up on party 
bureanctats’desks. For the 
sake ofMrs Thatcher's govern- 
ment — and - of future such 
governments — it is of critical 
importance that the dosed 
minds of the broadcasting 
studios open up to allow in 
some tight.. 

Taken together, the loss of 
Ryedale, the near loss of West 
Derbyshire and the scale of 
election reverses throughout 
the country are a grave . politi- 
cal challenge to the Govern- 
ment A very large number of 
anti-Tory verdicts have been 
cast The common denomi- 
nator of virtually all the voting - 
has been a wfltingness to vote 
for the oppositionparty with 
the best chance. The Coeser- _ 
valives now face two enemies 
each of which is capable :of 
damagi ng them - in different 
sorts of seat The Affiance, it 
seems, cannot win inner cities 
and industrial areas to any 
significant, extent, but Labour 
(refurbished and smartened by 
Mr Kinnock’s agreeable man- 
ner) now once again can. 
Labour on the other hand 
could never, come near threat- 
ening the Conservatives in the 
better-off suburbs or the rtnal 
and county areas of South/ or 
even Nortb. 

The danger of the Tories 
losing their overall majority at 
the next general election may 
Still, of course, not be. very 
great Another truism of the 
broadcasting studios is that, 
durmg a general election cam- 
paign in which the Govern- 
ment can probe and expose its < 
opponents’ policies thi n gs are < 
likely to look significantly j 

different from the way they do i 
now. Moreover, Labour is not i 


Labour cure for 
.poor schools 


Finding home for the observatory 

From the Chairman eftke Science Cambridge and Manchester 


likely to achieve an overall 
majority even on its current 
showing. 

But that is hot the be-all- 
and-end-aiL What the Labour 
advance ' and the -Alliance 
squeeze together indicate is 
that Labour could wfell become 
die largest single party,, be- 
come, indeed, the party of 
government and then (as in. 
1966- after 1964) go on to 
establish itself securely in 
power. 

What then, are the possible 
explanations for the anti-Tory 
reaction at the polls and can it 
be reversed? One answer to the 
first question fc that the voting 
public, which gave Mrs 
Thatcher and her colleagues 
frill credit in 1983 for their 
success in dealing with the 
crucial problems of the time, is 
not persuaded that they are 
adapting themselves to deal 
with the different questions 
that now dominate the politi- 
cal concerns of the nation. Mr 
Tebbit 9 list of successes is 
admired/ But it is also taken 
for granted. And it does not. 
necessarily prove to voters 
that a new list can be com- 
piled 

What then should the Gov- 
ernment do? The answer is 
certainty not to reverse its anti- 
inflation policies and to go 
into competition with the 
Opposition parties's spending 
promises. When governments 
steal their opponents* clothes, 
the public concludes that ifit is 
going to have opposition poli- 
cies reluctantly imposed, it 
might as well have them put 
-into practice- by those who 
genuinely believe in them. 

The true answer is much 
more complex. Any look at the 
local government elections 
shows inevitable, reflections of 
local, priorities, as well as 
attitudes to the national politi- 
cal .parties. To talk therefore 
about a single message from 
Tam worth or Tayside (both 
areas where tire Conservatives 
lost heavily) is wrong. But the 
local concerns do have a 
pattern. They point, for exam- 
ple, to the centrality of educa- 
tion as a concern of voters. 
The pattern has to do with 
dvic expenditure and, perhaps 
behind that, with voters’ con- 
fidence. in tire management 
and maintenance of basic pub- 
l£c services. There is a sense in 
which local Conservatives 
have been , found untrust- 
worthy in their management of 
those services. TMs shows 
through particularly in the 
most affluent areas of the 
nation. ' In the south west 
London suburbs the great issue 
determining, votes was school- 
ing. The Affiance won votes on 
a promise not just to spend 
more but to “care”. This 
connection between the 
Conservatives* alleged 
“parsimony” and shabby, in- 
adequate services was ev- 
idently a factor elsewhere. 

Meanwhile in the cities. 
Labour gained It was per- 
ceived as the party that would 
maintain high levels of public 
provision. That sentiment se- 
cured the return of Labour 
administrations in- Haringey 
and ' - Lambeth, outweighing 
what were genuine misgivings 
among traditional Labour 
supporters about such Labour 
leaders as Ted Knight , and 
Bemie Grant 

And yet in Wandsworth a 
Conservative council, 
committed four-square to 
rates reductions ami privatiza- 
tion of public service, was 
returned to power. A plausible 


explanation is that voters m 
the main do not care much for 
the municipal unions or coun- 
cil jobs as such; they do care 
for the efficient emptying of 
bins. Perhaps Wandsworth’s 
politicians were able to make 
convincing distinctions be- 
tween public services where 
there was - room for economy 
and those, such as education, 
where levels of expenditure 
deserved to be maintained 
Is there a message here? 
There might be. The Govern- 
ment has been attempting 
since last Autumn to put 
across the fact that for many 
years its. rhetoric has been 
tougher than its real-life 
behaviour. It has piled statistic 
upon statistic, speed] upon 
speech to prove its high and 
“caring’' levels of public 
expenditure; but it has not 
succeeded Such success as it 
was beginning to achieve was 
swept away in the welter of 
administrative and political 
failures surrounding the West- 
land affair, the BL debacle, the 
Sunday shopping fiasco and 
too many others. 

That does not mean that the 
tactic was a mistake. It simply 
shows that it was difficult. And 
the more embattled the Gov- 
ernment became, the greater 
the risk that changes towards a 
more truthful presentation of 
its public spending record 
would embolden the Cabinet's 
big spenders to demand still 
bigger slices of tax-payers* 
cash. That risk still looks very 
grave; 

The job needs to be begun 
again. Mrs Thatcher is not 
going to change the nature of 
her appeal She is tough in a 
crisis, unbending, the tamer of 
price rises and trade union 
rioters. Others must take the 
strain of presenting the poli- 
cies where Mrs Thatcher’s 
personality is ill-suited to the 
message. Neither in health nor 
in education las this been 
achieved - 

The task of exploiting the 
Prime Minister’s strengths and 
supporting her weaknesses can 
be given only to someone in 
whom she has complete con- 
fidence. Mr Tebbit was meant 
to be that man. The removal 
from the chairman's office of 
the loyal but ligfrftyormed Mr 
John Gummer was the signal 
for the new beginning. But that 
beginning is still awaited Mr 
Tebbit has proved himself the 
first rate street tactician and 
the rattier less than first rate 
political philosopher that his 
friends always knew he was. 
But the difficult strategic work 
shows no signs of being done. 
Moreover, the party 
organisation — particularly at 
Ryedale — was not such as to 
inspire great confidence. The 
Labour party's organisation, 
shown not tot this week by 
its party political broadcast — 
has improved mightily. 

AU criticism of Mr Tebbit 
tends to come from sources 
that are well known for being 
hostile to Mr Tebbit, Mrs 
Thatcher and the entire thrust 
of past government policy. 
That is why so little notice is 
taken of it To criticise the 
party chairman, to call for a 
better deal for education, to 
ask that some of the doubts in 
the suburbs be listened to, is to 
brand oneself as an unfriendly 
critic. That is not a charge to 
which The Times . ,' a friendly 
critic of the Government, feels 
vulnerable. Thursday's elec- 
tions should give pause for 
great thought from the Prime 
Minister and her party. 


From Mr Peter Heath 
Sr, It is typical of the Labour 
forty that hs remedy for poor 
schools should be to dose the good 
ones. (See Mr Giles Radice’s 
remarks in Ryedale yesterday). Mr 
Kinnocfc has long been associated 
with this policy of bitter envy and 
distorted prejudice and those who 
vote for this party should rec- 
ognize that they are voting for a 
national dosed shop in education 
where we would all be at the mercy 
of political “advisers” (such as 
there were is Humberside not 
many years ago) and the reckless 
arrogance and greed of the NUT. 

At the moment many parents, 
like myself who would happily 
send their children to Sate 
schools reluctantly spend money, 
which they cannot easily afford, to 
send them instead to schools 
where mental and social discipline 
are acknowledged as fundamental 
to personal development and 
where the example of teachers 
assists and does not impede this 
process. 

Whether one opts for Stale 
education or private depends of 
ten upon where one lives and may 
even vary with the particular child 
— there are not a few parents who 
have children at both State and 
private schools. And white we may 
benefit from the charitable status 
of private schools, it should be 
remembered that we continue to 
finance, through our rates and 
taxes, the State schools upon 
which we make reduced or no 
demands. The problem is not 
quite so simple as politicians. 
Yours faithfully, 

PETER HEATH, 

10 Carrington Avenue, 
Cottingham, North Humberside. 
May 2. 


Paper chase 

From MrR. F. Jones 
Sir, When I moved from my last 
house the new occupant was 
plagued with the usual readdress- 
ing of my mafl. 

I telephoned one particularly 
persistent mailing company, after 
digging through the waste toper 
basket to retrieve their envelope, 
m order w quote the mailing code. 
I was informed that, as it was a 
house code, my name would be 
deleted instantly from their list. 

Today 1 received the following, 
forwarded from my old address: 
As we have numerous lists, it would 
help us a great deal if you could 
forward to us the label on the 
envelope you have recently received. 
If, in fact, you have now discarded 
this, perhaps you would forward the 
next mie you receive. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. F. JONES,. 

58 West Kensington Mansions, 
Beaumont Crescent, W14. 

April 23. 

From Miss T. S. Bohane 
Sir, Earlier this week I was 
somewhat surprised to receive a 
co mmuni c at ion from the Inland 
Revenue at my business address. 
(Incidentally, it was incorrectly 
addressed to me as Mr . . .) A 
handwritten note on foe small 
form containing the address ad- 


emd Engineering Research Coun- 
cil 

Sir, The Royal Greenwich Obser- 
vatory has had a distin g ^jkhfd 
history and for the last 38 years of 
its 31 1-year life has been situated 
at Herstmonceux Castle, in Sus- 
sex. At the present time, however, 
unlike the earlier days of RGO, it 
cannot perform fropt-hne optical 
astronomical observing directly 
from the United Kingdom. The 
telescopes now are on remote 
mountain sites. 

There are. or shortly wfl] be, 
four optical telescopes, including 
the new world-class 4.2 metre 
William Herschel telescope, on La 
Palma in the Canary islands. 
probably the best site in the 
northern hemisphere. 

The prospects for UK optical 
astronomers have never been 
better. Furthermore, infra-red and 
millimetre radio-wave telescopes 
are sited on Hawaii giving, with 
the radio-telescopes in the UK, a 
range of ground-based facilities 
second to none. 

In all these circumstances the 
council has concluded that astron- 
omy in UK universities will best 
be served by relocating the obser- 
vatory on, or adjacent to, a 
university campus, from which 
the RGO could derive com- 
plementary benefits for its future 
role. 

Hie RGO has to operate, main- 
tain and develop the optical 
telescopes and their instruments. 
This requires not only, participa- 
tion in the observational pro- 
grammes but also continuing R & 
D (research and development), at 
the forefront of what is possible in 
a wide range of applied physics 
and engineering techniques to 
ensure that the instruments con- 
tinue to lead the world. 

The chosen campus, therefore, 
should have strengths in astron- 
omy, physics, control and elec- 
tronic engineering, computing and 
micro-electronics to provide a 
reservoir of activity covering as 
many of the RGO’s tasks as 
possible. 

The council has discussed 
extensively eight possible sites 
(including Sussex, of whose 
astronomy centre Sir William 
McCrea was a founding ami 
distinguished member) and three 
have been selected for further 
study. These are the universities of 


Old and forgotten 

From Mr J. W. K. Tarling 
Sir, The suggestion by Age Con- 
cern that the Church ofEngland is 
losing touch with the interests of 
older people (report, April 29) is 
well founded and this is probably 
due to the existence of the welfare 
state; 

Happily, the staff of the four 
churches with which 1 am asso- 
ciated have good records in caring 
concern for elderly folk; but this 
concern is seldom manifest in the 
laity. AU too often the reaction to 
information concerning the prob- 
lems and difficulties of elderly folk 
is, “tell the welfare people” rather 
than offering personal help. 


vised me that they did not appear 
to have, a record of my private 


to nave, a record at my private 
address and politely asked me to 
supply this in the space provided. 

In the same envelope was my 
income tax return form co rr ect ly 
addressed to me at my private 
address! 

Yours faithfully, 

T. S. BOHANE, 

16 Shmfield Street, W12. 

May 1. 


I have frequently encountered 
this attitude in many different 


DIY conveyance 

From Mr Richard H. Tyler 
Sir. I perceive from your property 
article on DIY conveyancing 
(April 23) that h is once again 
open season for solicitors. I would 
like to correct some wrong im- 
pressions to which the article may 
have given rise. 


Happy days 

From Mr H. B. Sullen 
Sir, Your leader of today (“Is 
everybody happy?**. May 5)c Mau- 
ritius could brat the Egyptians in 
public holidays. When 1 was 
Rector of the Royal College there 
we used to “enjoy" more than 30 
public holidays annually, as the 
minimum had to be multiplied by 
five in' order to satisfy Hindus, 
Muslims, Chinese, Creoles and 
Europeans. 

Yours faithfiilly, 

BRIAN BULLEN, 

Chape l Cottage, 

Bronydd, 

Qyro, Hereford. 


Firstly, the two per cent of 
purchase price quoted by the 
Consumers Association as the fee 
charged by solicitors for a pur- 
chase seems to be confused with 
estate agents' charges on a sate 
which range from 1% to 2 Vi per 
cent Solicitors* conveyancing 
charges in this area have for some 
time ranged from half to one per 
cent These charges are controlled 
ultimately by the Law Society. 

Secondly, I would challenge the 
association's statement that “DIY 
conveyancing is straightforward 
where the house is occupied by an 
owner-occupier and the title to it 
registered with title absolute”. 


FOURTH LEADER 


Sommer has come to China — 
and that is official. Or rather, it 
has come to some of China, 
some of the time — and that is 
official too. ■ 

Last weekend, China added 
daylight saving to the many- 
questionable benefits it has 
borrowed from the outside 
world. Summertime. Chinrae- 
style, began at 0200 Peking 
time last Sunday, anti the 
Chinese who — it should be 
remembered -have no expert- 

ence of danging then- chjdt^ 
were advised that they could, if 
they liked, alter their time- 


you are many, hours* flight 
away from the capital. (Almost 
the whole country runs on 
Peking time, tiiough it spans 
the- equivalent of three US 
tune zones.) 

Should you mistakenly tune 
into Peking radio's service for 
Taiwan, however, you will be 
behind the times again. The 
published schedule now ap- 
plies one hour in arrears. 
Mainland listeners will, as the 


Not that the inhabitants of 
the land of Greenwich Mean 
Time have much to boast 
about This year the time - 1 
honoured (that is more than 70 
year old, with periodic breaks) 
institution of British Summer 
Time was scheduled to begin, 
variously, on March 16, 23 or 
30 according to which, diary 
you chose to believe — and all 
because of a late decision that 
summer British-style should 


lice of changing their clocks, add one . hour to the pn> 
were advised that they could, if gimme listings to itceivs ithe 
thev liked, alter their time- scheduled programme. This 
rriSes the previous evening. ambiguity is likely to persist 
v a great many Chinese did Peking’s adoption of daylight 
Ska. Thev included the saving makes it that much less 

JIOl .4_.v, KVaL, thtt* „hI 1 C,ll An , 


radio helpfully says, have to be synchronized with the usu~ 
add one -, hour to the pn> ally superior summer enjoyed 
gramme listings -to receive the by our European neighbours, 
scheduled programme. This It bad the added benefit, for 
ambiguity is tikriy to persist the French, of leaving Paris 


directors of the country’s rail, 
tnis and river transport who 
rejected the whole idea. Long- 
distance trains are now ran- 
nine one hour late (vto they 
Scon time). So arc the buses. - 

Flights, on the other hand, are 

^ccmfiisei»25 r ? s, ? i ? 

to the radio to check the time. 
You wifl hear the timegrven ra 
Peking summer time even ..if 


likely that Taiwan will follow 
suit 

There was something of the 
same tardiness about the de- 
cision, to start saving daylight 
in . the - first place. Peking 
announced in mid-April that 
summertime was being post- 
poned until the first weekend 
in May, because otherwise 
there would, be no time to 
make the change public. Next 
year, summer in : China win 
start s month earlier (unless it 
fr decided to turn the calendars 

oh instead). : " 


with its 60-minute start on 
London. 

Not that we need have 
noticed until a good 48 hours 
afierthe change. Easter and the 
ensuing bank ..holiday inter- 
vened |o postpone the reality 
of.a lost hour’s sleep. Some 
clocks, as usual, remained 
unadvanced for days. 

In this, as in much else, 
Britain has much in common 
with China where — and this is 
official — the business of 
advancing the clocks in public 
places is the responsibility of 
“someone authorized by the 
departments concerned”; 


How long, O Lord? 

From Mr Bernard Cobb 
Sir, We are indebted to Mr John 
Stoneslreei(May 5) for his invalu- 
able advice regarding the mileage 
be can get from the final “Amen” 
of the Messiah. Indeed, it is only 
in The Times that one is likely to 
find such essential information so 
well expressed. 

lam ihus encouraged to raise a 
reverse problem of tempo. For 
some time I have enjoyed listening 
to Brahms’s second piano con- 
certo on my return to Bookham 
from visiting a client in 
Basingstoke. However, due to 
improved roads in general and the 
M25 in particular, 1 am how 
obliged to fasten to the final seven 
minutes of the last movement in 
my driveway. This invites occa- 
sional criticism from others quite 
dose tome and I wonder if anyone 
can recommend a 43 minute 
recording of this piece. 

Yours faithfully, 

BERNARD COBB, 

89 Eastwick Park Avenue, 

Great Bookham, Surrey. - 
May 6. * 

From Mr Malcolm M. Gull is 
Sir, David Sefman (April 29) 
appears to forget like so many 
people that organ voluntaries are 
not an optional extra, but form an 
integral part of divine service. 
While the Psalnrisf implored us to 
praise the Lord upon the pipe, be 
did not specify a time Bmiti 
Yours faithfully, 

MALCOLM M.GULUS, . 

24 Si Nicholas Close, 

North Bradley, Wiltshire. 


Heritage fire risk 

From Professor Derek Smith 
Sir, The director of the World Fire 
Statistics Centre (April 30) makes 
a powerful case for better statistics 
whereby to assess the relative cost- 
effectiveness of technical devices 
such as automatic sprinkler sys- 
tems. 

I fully agree, but I go further in 
asserting that the time is ripe for 
reassessing the efficacy of all new 
technologies which can contribute 
to fire prevention. These include 
sprinklers, smoke detectors, im- 
proved materials and methods of 
building construction, and build- 
ing design, including application 
of computerised fire-modelling 
techniques at the design stage. 

With the collaboration and 
support of the European Commis- 
sion, this centre is bolding a 
European conference entitled 
“New technology to reduce fire 
kwsses and costs”; this wifi take 
place in the Commission’s Jean 
Monnet building in Luxembourg 
on October 2/3. 

The conference papers will deal 
more with the principles of the 

new technologies rather than with 

technical details, and they are 
intended for architects and de- 
signers, materials users and 
suppliers, fire brigades and insur- 
ancfrcompniiies, as well as the fire- 
research community. 

The conference wifi also 
summarise progress betngmade in 
assembling national data-bases 
relevant to fire prevention and fire 
ngbting so that lessons from past 


places, an attitude so very dif- 
ferent from that experienced be- 
fore the creation of the welfare 
state. Before the 1939-45 war good 
neighbourliness was dearly appar- 
ent in areas where there was more 
poverty than comfortable living 
and mutual aid among neighbours 
was the order of the (fay. 

Much good is done by the 
welfare state, at an enormous cost; 
but a great deal of its workload 
could be reduced if good 
neighbourliness was a reality in 
every street in every town and 
village. That it is not so highlights 
a cardinal failure of the Church. 


Yours faithfully, 

J. W. K. TARLING, 

86 Kensington Park Road, Wll. 
April 30. 


This may be the case where there 
are no rights, easements, quasi- 
easements, exceptions, reserva- 
tions, restrictive covenants, 
notices, cautions or other matters 
which may be referred to in the 
various registers which make up 
the title. 

Investiration of title is only a 
portion or the work involved. Co- 
ordination of the transaction with 
others is a major part of what the 
solicitor does. 

The book to which the article 
refers. The Legal Side to Buying a 
House ; costs £6.95. High Court 
costs for litigation over 
conveyancing which has gone 
wrong through lade of expertise on 
the part of a DIY conveyancer 
could cost thousands of pounds. 
Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD H. TYLER, 

Attersoll Smith & Tyler 
(Solicitors), 

20 West Street, 

Reigate, Surrey. 

April 24. 


incidents can be teamed quickly 
by new entrants to these fields. 

It is therefore particularly rele- 
vant to the work of local authori- 
ties and national bodies 
responsible for protection of our 
heritage who need rapid access to 
cost-effective, anti-fire technol- 
ogy. 

Yours faithfully, 

DEREK SMITH, Director, 

Fire and Materials Centre, 

Queen Mary College, 

University of London. 

101 Marsngate Lane, E1S. 


Nation shall speak . . . 

From Mr G. W. M. Kremer 
Sir, I suppose one should be 
grateful is a way to Secretary of 
State Shultz for confirming that 
the worlds of American foreign 


policy and of the “B” movie have 
finally coalesced. His comment to 


finally coalesced. His comment to 
Colonel Gadaffi, reported in The 
Times of May 6, “You’ve had it. 


ON THIS DAY 


MAY 10 1919 


Cambridge and Manchester and 
the Royal Observatory 
Edinburgh /Uuivendty of Edin- 
burgh. 

The views of a wide range of 
individuals and institutions are 
being sought about these options. 
The pros and cons are delicately 
balanced but there is no reason to 
delay a decision about the 
desirability of a move, on which 
council was unanimous. 

The council will require that the 
move should not interfere with the 
commissioning of the new tele- 
scope on La Palma and that the 
move should be self-financing. 
The council wishes to ensure the 
effective exploitation of its invest- 
ment of nearly £50 million over 
recent years hi telescopes and is 
confident that this object can be 
achieved in each of the options 
under further study. 

Your readers will see. therefore, 
that the RGO is neither to be 
dosed (as your Science Editor 
wrote, March 21) nor dis- 
membered (as Sir William 
McCrea wrote in your edition of 
April 23. 

In addition to the primary 
astronomy support there are a 
number of smaller activities at 
Heretmoaceux which have their 
own importance and which coun- 
cil will provide for, as far as is 
possible on the new ate. These 
include the collection of rare 
books, general and scientific ar- 
chives, HM Nautical Almanac 
Office, the satellite laser ranger, 
astronometric work and a number 
of other items. 

The RGO will provide for 
astronomical exhibitions for 
schools and the general public 
wherever it moves. In addition 
there is a small exhibition centre 
at Herstmonceux, not in the 
castle, but at the site of a group of 
small telescopes at the edge of the 
estate. In order that this exhibition 
should continue council is .pre- 
pared to create a “bubble” fence 
around this small plot, if any local 
or national organization were 
interested in taking charge of it. 
Yours etc, 

R W.J. MITCHELL, 

Science and Engineering Research 
Council, 

Polaris House, 

North Star Avenue, 

Swindon, Wiltshire. 

May 6. 


The TbnileBa had been cantered 
by the German raider WdSanda' 
prize crew put on board. The Aden 
Patrol vessel was HMSOdin, 
commanded by Lt-Cdr PatMer. ' . 

Our Correspondent toas 
Paymaster U-Cdr CyrtlFax. r. 


ON A RAIDER’S 
TRAIL 


(From a Nani ' 

Correspondent.) 

At the beginning of Much, 1917^ 

I was in HALS on the Aden 

Patrol— a doll job. as atiptzboZliag 
jobs are. But we did not pretend 
be pining for the more 
OCCUpatkm Of HMrrhjng 'for the 
German raider WolL Her guar 
could outrange thegunsof our little 
&hip so effectually that, had we met' 
her, we should probably have been) 
blown out of the sea before w 
could put a shot anywhere near her,' 
and, frankly, we had no great desire 

to meet her. ' “ 

About 10 o’clock one evening a 
wgnahnwn appeared at the wan)-' 
roam door with a message from the, 
bridge— “From the officer pfthe 
watch, bit. Ship on the starboard 
bow showing do tights.” 

“Probably an on tramp scared 
out of his wife by three yarns about 
the Wolf;” suggested someone - . .. 

We had been ambling along 
comfortably at eight knots; the 
order was given to increase to KL 
The shutter erf our signal lamp 
began to rattle. 

“What ship is that?” 

The signalman had to repeat the 
question twice before he evoked an. 
answer ... 

“What is your name?” asked the 

pafiynj ni pialmaii This tinw> tltt 

mysterious stranger expanded 
volubly. 

“TurriteHa, London. Runs for 
British Admiralty. Port Said for 
orders ..." 

The signal lamp of the tmknown 
vessel began to sontiDate again..' _ 
“Who are you?" ran the simple 


pal", continues the style set by the 
former President Nixon. “1 am 


There was certainty a directness 
about the question suggesting a 
bluff old English skipper. “A 
British man-of-war,” was our an- 
swer. A little later we followed H up 
by a peremptory order- to the 
stranger to stop. When the signal 
lamp began to -flicker again, 'ft 
seemed to show just a trifle at 
hesitation. 

“Why did you not stop me whetf 
I was passing Aden? Meadows, 
Master.” 

His meaning was plain enough. 
We could have ordered him to stop 
when we first sighted him, when vie 
were within range , of the shore, 
batteries, and when there were 
British men-of-war fyhfe ' fast 
round the corner inside the Wr 
hour. He evidently suspected ua of 
being the German ranter ... 

The officer just relieved frbm the 
bridge became meditative. 

“There was something, funny,” 
he said. ‘‘Even about the last signal 
asking os Why we did hot stop him 
at Aden. The signalman teUs me 
that he fiat spelt Aden with « V 
and that corrected it" . 

“Number One, tefrthem-tp stand 
fiy the searchlight," saod the cap- 
tain to the first .Beutenant. “Sig- 
nalman, tell him to place tar 
navigation lights.” 

Very promptly in response tb tbe 
signal the lights appeared upon the 
strange shrp- 

“Now make, -remain 'where you 
are, I will board you at daylight.” 
When the distance between- the 
ships had been reduced to about a 
mile the' order was given to- switch 
on the searchlight. The great white 
streak shot across the sea until it 
settled on the mysterious craft. In 
large letters across her stern ran 
the legend “Tumtefla, London . ...” 
Dimly we could discern , two 
boats, one on the port anctyme on 
the starboard side of-' us; boffi 
crowdedwitfa occupants, who weic 
jabbering in some -strange: tongue 
like a lot of excited monkeys. J- . 

Just as we came abeam; of tk£ 
strange ship we saw. a doori of ' 
smoke shoot up from her, which 
was followed by the heavy, fhad of 
an fflqjkjsion- Next moment thete 
came another heavy thud, and wje 
saw that the Turritella was begin- 
ning to sink fay the head . ; . And 
then we saw a third boat rowfag' 
away from the wreck in the 
direction ■ of the other. twa ; We 
swung round to return and. padi 

tltfm lip ... 

As we approached the first tiro - 
boats we realized whywe had foiled 
to nnAwi a nH the language.. They 

ware fnfl of H hinamwi »1) tfllbing wfr 
once, in a state of hysterical ' 
agitation. We waited eagerly for 
the third boat As it drew qp! 
alongside our gangway two officers 
stepped briskly up the ladder, apd 
were followed by 26 men, each 
wearing a round blue cap with. £w$ 
black ribbons falling down behind 
Across the front of the cap ribboU 
was printed in gold letters . 
“Kaiseriiche Marine.” Wehad'not 
been fooled after all .. . 

Her second officer spoke English 
as fluently as his own languag e , ami 
without any trace of an accent. He 
bad spent eight years in- our ; 
merchant service, and had the . 
manners and bearing of an English' 
officer. But the weak spot fa the 
company was evidently the signal- 
man. That signal. “Why did 
not stop me when I was passing 
Aden,” was brilliant. It showed real 
genius. But the signalman com- 
pletely ruined it by spelling Aden 
with a “t". 


not a crook", and opens specula- 
tion about likely contexts for other 
Hollywood obiter dicta. 

“Come up and see me some 
time”, “Play it again, Sam", and 
"Time wounds all heels” may 
seem fairly innocuous in an 
international context However, 
when “You dirty rat” and “Make 
my day” enter the register of 
diplomatic exchanges we should 
do well to be alarmed. 

Yours faithfully, 

G. W. M. KREMER. 

26 Prideam Road. 

Eastbourne, East Sussex. 


Half a lifetime 

From Mr J. P. S. Darned ■ 

Sir, Mr John Denton (May 5) 
should take comfort from die 
example of the late- Sir Winston 
Churchill, who became -Prime 
Minster at 6S&. 

This was an appointment he 
had not previously heKL but he 
reached near enough to Perfection 
for our needs at tire time; 

Yours faithfully, 

PAUL DANIELL, . 

Saddlers. 

Iweme Mmstav 
Blandford, Dorset 






THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 




THE ARTS 



Television 

A Few years ago a bland pop 
song by Boggles called "Video 
Killed the Radio Star" was 
hoisted into the charts oq the 
back of a showy, state-of-the- 
art pronto video. Like many 
media obituaries, the title and 
the memorably vacuo as lyric 
“We can’t rewind, we’ve gone 
too far" encapsulated a wish 
rather than a (act. Pop videos 
actually stimulate record 
sales, which in turn boost the 
appeal of pop radio: the new 
medium has not supplanted 
the old, but supplements it. 

Any lethal teodaudes video 
may have lie in another direc- 
tion. As J alien Temple and 
others observed, in the course’ 
of the encyclopaedic telethon 
Video Jukebox (BBCl). suc- 
cessful examples of the form 
work by hammering home a 
definitive set of which 

are designed to colonize the 
viewer's imagination, and in 
some ways to nullify it When 
squeezed through the 
Magfanht of computer en- 
hancement, the traditional 
film techniques of special ef- 
fects and rapid cutting produce 
the nearest equivalent to the 
dream that any medium bps : 
achieved. And, whether or not 
video makes pop less interest- 
ing, it is We to stay. 

Introduced by the veteran 
radio DJ John Peel and his 
producer John Waiters, this 
programme's historically or- 
ganized format was elastic 
enough to include some rare 
pre-video gents and some des- 
perately untrenchant inter- 
views with luminary artistes 
(tnany foiling over themselves 
to be blase) as well obvious 
“classics'* such as "Vienna” 
and “Bohemian Rhapsody”. 

, But however technically so- 
phisticated and densely con- 
structed, most pop videos are 
simply too boring to encourage' 
a third or fourth viewing — 
although one suspects that last 
night's extravaganza may well 
have found its way Into a few 
million VCRs. 

It is to be hoped that the 
video boys never get their 
hands on Mr Cutler, the 
sometime primary school 
teacher and lifelong eccentric 
profiled in South of Watford 
(LWT). On radio and record, 
free of the national health 
specs and tea cosy hat of his 
public persona, Mr Cutler's 
deadpan minimalism spreads 
the tiny, iridescent wings of 
ephemera. But now that he has 
tamd a new, young audience, 
even his might be at risk. 

Martin Cropper 


Tim Rice's new musical Chess opens next week 
in a blaze of publicity. Nicholas Shakespeare 
meets the man behind many stage successes 

Knight of the 
matey fable 



Everything is peppermint-green in 
Tim Rice's office off Shaftesbury 
Avenue. The piano, the radiator, the 
walls. When he puts on a green jersey, 
he suddenly becomes invisible. Only 
by seeking the source of a creamy, 
after-dinner voice does one locale the 
smiling face once likened to that of a 
relaxed Anthony Burgess — the face 
that could go down in history as 
responsible for the break-up of Abba. 

Against one green wall lean posters 
for the Molesworth books now re- 
printed by Rice's company. Pavilion 
Books. “Are you an Eric or a Nigel?” 
asks one. “How to be topp in all 
subjeckts” promises another. “How 
to be a gpody-goody”. 

Rice admits that the sagas of 
Molesworth, the dishevelled but 
worldly urchin, had more influence 
on him than most books. “His 
philosophy is way ahead of Kant or 
RusselL 'Keep a straight bat in cricket 
as in life' ”, be quotes, referring to his 
favourite pastime. On the opposite 
wall bang what he might like to regard 
as the fruits of this philosophy, gold 
and platinum discs of songs written 
: by him and sung mostly by Elaine 
Paige, songs with titles like “Love 
Hurts”. 

Vet it is less Molesworth than his 
weedy enemy Fotheringtoa Thomas 
whom one associates with the smiting 
face and the thinning fair hair, fluffed 
up at the back in curls. "I was really 
quite unrebeNious at Lancing — 
which in itself is quite original” he 
adds hopefully. A contemporary 
there of Christopher Hampton, Da- 
vid Hare and Nigel Andrews, Rice 
remembers with most affection a 
•clarinettist who went to Belgium and 
was never heard of again. 

Music is more important to Rice 
even than cricket, though he has three 
cricket books out this week. He also 
■publishes — and writes — books like 
[British Hit Singles 3 and Hits of the 
Sixties which makes him a mine of 
arcane information. “Did you know 
jihat one of the guys who wrote 'Rock 
Around the Clock' was bom in 1893? 
Extraordinary how the composer of 
that song should be a man of the 19th 
century." These books, full of similar- 
ly useless but succulent scraps, tend 
to be best-sellers, just like his son&. 

It was in listening to his parents’ 
records of shows he had never seen 
that Rice became interested in words 


and music. “All my excitement at 
shows like My Fair Lady came off 
their records. I remember then seeing 
some of the shows and feeling how 
strange they were, not at all like I 
imagined. Even today I never fed a 
sense of theatre.” This could explain 
why be has not seen Andrew Lloyd 
Webber’s Starlight Express, nor his 
former partner's musical Cats. "At 
least not the whole thing from start to 
finish”, he says, tapping his feet. 

“There was a traffic snari-up." 

The 10-year partnership, which had 
begun with an unperformed musical 
on Dr Bamado, ended in 1976 with 
Evita. For a time Rice without Lloyd 
Webber was like Bill Haley without 
his kjss-curl. His medieval musical. 
Blonde!, soon slipped from sight, 
leaving its author to disc-jockey for 
attention on television. 

But now with his latest musical. 
Chess, which opens on Wednesday at 
the Prince Edward Theatre, Rice is 
riding high again. The album has 
already sold 1.3 million copies. As 
with Jesus Christ Superstar and Evita, 
its release, a long time in advance of 
the stage production, is regarded as a 
run out of town. (He could also 
persuade very good people, tike 
Barbara Dixon, to sing minor parts.) 
“I'm very pleased”, purrs Rice. “In 
record terras it's done better than 
Evita." It cannot have escaped his 
attention that one of the songs, “1 
Know Him So Well”, reached num- 
ber one on the very same day as 
“Don’t Cry For Me" some years 
before. 

Chess is the first Rice musical 
which does not involve a famous 
person, though the idea had its origins 
in the Fischer/Spassky and, more 
recently, the Karpov/Korchnoi tour- 
naments. “Andrew and I nearly did 
something on the East-West relation- ■ 
ship featuring the Cuban missile 
crisis. Chess is basically a simple love- 
story showing how anyone who gets 
to the top of any profession finds 
politics intrude.” 

For his research Rice attended 
tournaments in England and Ameri- 
ca. “A lot of the time it's just two guys 
in a room over a board with an 
audience that's quiet and hushed. It's 
just like theatre.” Fittingly for a man 
who does not much like theatre, he 
then admits he is not particularly 




TnfiMs 

8 -d e-id-'. » ■ / V 

.£> ? v-i r s.. • 


Dance 


Revival misses 


its 



star 




imm 

§lgp^ 




sttT • ■ 


l~/A: 







Silver and goldsmith: Tim Rice among his recording trophies 


interested in the game. “I am 
fascinated by the people in it”, tie 
says, picking up a pair of sun-glasses. 

Thinking what a good idea it 
seemed for “a play, a book or 
something". Rice wrote a four-page 
synopsis and began looking for a 
partner. Lloyd Webber? “He was 
probably doing Cats at the time”, he 
replies, tapping his feet. Hearing that 
the two bearded members of the 
Swedish pop-group Abba wanted to 
write a musical. Rice weni to Stock- 
holm. They so loved the idea they 
disbanded the group for iL 

The lead female in Chess will be 
Elat dc Paige of the platinum discs, 
Ei it a. Starlight Express and 
Abbacadabra (with Abba's very own 
Bjorn and Benny). Did Rice write the 
part with her in mind? “Yes, I did. 
probably”, he says, but he never took 
it for granted Bjorn and Benny would 
2 gree. “The same people crop tip 
because they're good, and you only* 
want to work with the best”, be 
explains valiantly. One of these was 
the director, Michael Bennett, who 
quite unexpectedly withdrew on ac- 
count of ill-health. Flying back to 
America. Bennett surfaced m the 


Press with garish accounts, not of his 
own health but that of the musical. 

“{ have been assured by our 
American producers that he is ill”, 
says Rice patiently, his feet now in 
unison with his sun-glasses. “Bui I 
was really quite surprised when 1 read 
he didn't tike the script and had 
problems with Elaine.” Fortunately 
Starlight Express was delayed on 
Broadway, which meant the avail- 
ability of Rice's original choice, 

Trevor Nunn. 

Rice goes on about how good his 
Abba colleagues are. Can he conceive 
of them responding to another of his 
ideas? "They're very good” he 
answers, without irony. “If i have a 
wonderful idea I'll take it to Bjorn 
and Benny and if they' think it’s 
rubbish I might try it on Andrew, but 
I have no plans for another musical 
I’m keen to write something solo, a 
book ora play. I’ve no idea if I can do 

iL” 

Currently on his short-list is a 
project called “Evita Two”. “It’s the 
story of what happens to Evita ’s 
body, even though she's a corpse, and 
how Peron tries to make Isabeiita into 
another Evita — someone who 
doesn't have any character at afl." 


Le Baiser de la fee 
Covent Garden 

Kenneth MacMillan dedicat- 
ed tost night's gala at Covent 
Garden to the memoir of 
Barry Kay, who designed one 
of the three works given and 
seven other ballets for Mac- 
Millan. Concurring in the 
sense of loss as his premature 
death, some of us mentally 
added a tribute to another 
artist whose memory' hovered 
almost palpably oyer the 
programme. 

Lynn Seymour was Mac- 
Millan's muse, the inspiration 
of aH three ballets given, and 
to tread in her footsteps is not 
easy. . 

Lesley Collier had that un- 
grateful task in Concerto and 
Anastasia. In the plotless bal- 
let to Shostakovich music, her 
tine and muacalny enable her 
to create her own effect, less 
rounded, less resonant' than 
Seymour's, but still vibrant 
and dear. 

Would that I could say as 
ranch for an otherwise sub- 
standard cast in a work that, 
except in the cook serene sldw 
movement, needs all (he help 
it can get from its dancers. 

Playing Anna Anderson, the 
I woman who thought herself 
Anastasia, is another matter. 
The present revival is of the 
original one act version creat- 
ed at the West Berlin Opera 
House in 1967, or as near as 
you can get to it on a stage 
with no revolve: It gains a tot 
from being shorn of the two- 
act prologue, both trivia! and ' 
misleading, which MacMillan : 
added for the 1971 Co vent 
Garden production. 

Collier acts the central role 
(none of tire others amount to 
much, although David Drew 
lends effectively burley sup- 
port as her husband) with 
serious care, cfanty and em- 
phasis. What she does not 
have, what nobody in the 
Royal Ballet has today, is 
Seymour's ability to make a 
role look larger than life, and 
without that I am not sore the 
ballet is worth reviving. 

In the new production of It. 
Baiser de la Fee, you can 
glimpse something of Sey- . 
mour's quality in the dances 



THE SUNDAY TIMES 


ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 


Theatre 

The baptismal 
night’s dream 


for foe fiancee, just as the ® fts 

of another exceptional balleri- 
na. Svetlana Beriosova. foe 
half bidden in foe rote of foe 
• foiry. : v r - 

Although fob is billed as a 
completely new version, Mao 
Milton has senribty buift on 
his earlier attempt of the 
baflet. and most of foe best 
pans look familiar. . 

I cannot understand why 
the earlier version was unsuc- 
cessful. ft had only 24 perfor- 
mances between I960 and 
W65. .yet h was blessed with 
superb performances and one 
of foe most beautiful decors 
ever created for foe Royal 
BatieL a set of marvellous 
abstract la n d sc apes fay Ken. 
nefo Rawed 

The prosaic new settings by 
Martin Sutherland do not 
even begin to compare, al- 
though they do fit better with 
MacMillan's curious decision 
to change his conception from 
that of a pure classic baltet (so 
right for foe music) by adding 
musical comedy scenes of 
kno c k a b out village . revelry, 
played with embarrassingly 
crude gusto by several of foe 
older dancers. 

Suprismgly. MacMillan has 
not taken the opportunity to 
remedy the earlier version's 
biggest weakness^ that ofbav. 
rag the 'gypsy and the-fekjr 
play ed by different dancers. - 
- Among foe new cast, fra; 
those who did not see 1 
Beriosova’s icy majesty and 
Seymour's melting warmth, 
Fiona Chadwick and Maria. 
Almeida present the roles ably 
and sincerely, although f could 
not rid myself of a thought 
that they could do better still if 
they swapped pans. 

Jonathan Cope as foe young 
man for whose love they 
struggle comes off best; hand- 
some, romantic and dashing, 
strong in dancing, pannering 
and personality. - 

■ Ashley Lawrence cond u cts 
Stravinsky’s most luscious 
ballet score whh affectionate 
care and lavishes equal atten- 
tion on Shostakovich's bright 
melodies and foe impassioned 
Fantaisies Symphoniqves of 
Martina for foe other baUels. 

John Perrival 


Donald Cooper 




MY LIFE 





... ' — > 

■ISMS » 


BY HIS 
WIFE 





FASHION 
AT MSS 




i m 


CUP WINNERS: Full match report 

CHERNOBYL: the cloud over Kiev 

The best guide to new records 

What the elections really mean 

ji © Saatchi & Saatchi become 
I the world’s number one 


The Two Noble 
Kinsmen 

Swan, Stratford on 
Avon 

Since Stratford became im- 
prisoned on foe Bardic tread- 
mill one has frequently felt 
like cursing the name of 
Shakespeare for monopolizing 
the company's classical reper- 
tory to the exclusion of all his 
contemporaries. 

This deadlock has now been 
resolved by foe unknown 
benefactor who' famously 
waved a wand over the scene 
and conjured up a dream 
house for everything except 
the latest recycling of Twelfth 
Night. 

In its physical properties, 

! too, Michael Reardon's the- 
, atre is the answer to a dream. 
You arrive through the en- 
trance to the old RSC gallery, 
still exuberantly Victorian, 
and then pass into foe audito- 
rium where a Jacobean prom- 
ontory stage combines with 
the building’s original non- 
conformist chapel character. 
Stage and lofty surrounding 
galleries are of unpointed tim- 
ber, at once austere, sympa- 
thetic, and accoustically dear 
as a bell. 

The tost factor is crucial. In 
a 400-sea i house ihere may be 
no temptation for casts to 


parade about: but what kind or 
stylistic compromise can be 
made on a fore stage that 
comes within inches of the 
from stalls while looking like a 
landing-strip from the top 
gallery? In practice, this prob- 
lem simply vanishes as speech 
can safely drop to the level of 
studio paformance. All gal- 
lery spectators may miss is eye 
contact 

For a baptismal production 
opening the door on the 
Jacobean treasure bouse. The 
Two Nobel Kinsmen is an 
eccentric choice. Listed in the 
Shakespeare. Apocrypha and 
hopefully ascribed to a long 
string of alternative pretend- 
ers, all you can safely say is 
that it was written by someone 
who, if not Shakespeare him- 
self. had certainly done his 
Shakespearean homework. 
The verse is as syntactically 
knotty as that of the last plays: 
and the piece offers a kaleido- 
scope of Bardic memories — 
so that Holofernes seems to be 
coming on with the 
Mechanicals, and Macbeth’s 
doctor wandering into . 
Ophelia's mad scene. 

The plot ‘ is taken from 
Chaucer’s tale of Pafamon and 
Arcite, the devoted Theban 
cousins who rani to deadly 
rivals for love of Theseus' 
sister Emilia. In Chaucer’s 
hands it is a heart-felt expres- 
sion of chivalnc romance. Ely 
foe time our Jacobean author 




f Pp;:', 

• i 


The noble touch: Peter Guinness (front) and Robert Morgan 


tackled it, something peculiar 
had happened to foe notion of 
chivalry, and perfect gentle 
knights are no longer to be - 
. found. 

Barry Kyle, in a stroke that 
simultaneously fits the play 
and foe space, presents it as a 
modified piece of Kabuki: 
bringing on Theseus and Hip- 
polyta as a pair of scarf ei- 
costumed war lords, and 
playing foe battle and duel 
scenes in Samuri armour. 

The Japanese convention is 
treated flexibly, but it recurs at 
every level from the Bunraku 
manipulation of foe altars to 
foe morris dance where a giant 
phallus emits an avalanche of 
white silk 

Performances are in foe 
same key. Peter Guinness's 
top-knotted Theseus ' asserts 
ducal authority with the gri- 
macing aggressiveness of a - 
shogun, accompanied by an 
Amazonian consort (Anna 
Nygh) in . the likeness of 
TurandoL The boldest deci- 
sion, however, is to abandon - 


the traditional moral equality 
of the two lovers and follow 
foe text in presenting Palamon 
and Arcite as violently con- 
trasting figures. 

Hugh Quarshie's Arcite is a 
magnanimous strong-nerved 
realist. Gererard Murphy’s 
Palamon begins as his follow- 
er, and then errupts into 
feverish ranting jealousy once 
they have both observed Emi- 
lia (Amanda Harris) from the 
prison window. 

The main dramatic sur- 
prise, though, comes from 
Imogen Stubbs as foe gaoler’s 
daughter who runs mad with 
love for Palamon. As written, 
foe part is soaked in . the 
cliches of Ophelia which Miss 
Stubbs neutralizes by mischie- 
vous, spectacularly athletic 
playing. It is a real pleasure - 
after so many impending 
drownings, and' snatches of 
crazed nursery rhyme — to 
witness her recovery thanks to 
a timely piece of sexual 
therapy. 

Irving War die 


Radio 


Real-life dramas behind the scenes 


PLUS FIVE PAGES OF WEEKEND SPORT 


88 pages plus the largest colour magazine 
AND STILL ONLY 50p 



A few short and factual para- 
graphs tucked away on page 3 
of this paper Friday, May 2, 
may not have made it dear 
i that foe mqjor radio drama of 
the Iasi couple of weeks has 
had bnle to do with plays. 
With a suddeness, not to say 
brutality, apparently unchar- 
acteristic of dear old Auntie, 
(chough maybe a change of 
character is in foe making), 
the Board of Governors sum- 
marily ejected not only Rich- 
ard Francis from his post as 
Managing Director, Radio, 
but Charles McLeUand from 
his chair as deputy. 

Inquiries as to why this 
happened, why now and why. 
so abruptly have been met 
with very guarded answers, 
though no doubt the 

fragements will gradually 
work their way to foe surface 
from which a true history can 
be written. In foe meantime, 
at least as far as Mr Francis is 
concerned, it appears to be 
common knowledge that be, 
foe only representative of 


radio on foe Board of Manage- 
ment, had become a more and 
more isolated figure in a group 
of television colleagues aO 
equally assured of a natural 
inferiority of radio. 

In this unpromising envi- 
ronment my guess is that the 
Francis view of foe expanding 
future of sound broadcasting, 
which had included a commu- 
ted advocacy of Langham as a 
new broadcasting centre and 
technological wonder, increas- 
ingly toiled to find sympathy. 

Why should a successor tore 
any better? WeU, that succes- 
sor is to be Brian We n ham, 
presently Director of Pro- 
grammes for BBC Television 
and therefore well aware of foe 
attitudes he wfl] have to cope 
with: indeed until now be has 
very hkeiy shared some of 
them himself But he is said id 
be an ambitious and able man 
who will be on his mettle to do 
well. But there is another 
reason to anticipate that radio 
will come out of ns isolation: 
Mr Wenham will no longer be 


its only senior spokesman, for 
David Hatch (currently Con- 
troller of Radio 4) has been 
appointed Director of Pnv 
grammes. Radio — a job 
previously concealed some- 
where in Mr McLelland's brief 
— and for foe first time that 
position brings with it a seat 
on the Board of Management. 
Since it also brings with it Mr 
Hatch in person, my expecta- 
tion is that between them one 
ex-TV mogul and the most 
resourceful, energetic, innova- 
tive and plain-spoken chief 
that Radio 4 has ever had will 
make it hard for even foe most 
dedicated high priest of Wood 


Lane to insist on the natural 
inferiority of sound. 

But who will take over 
Radio 4? No one I have 
spoken to was willing to name 
a runner, let alone back one. 
The outgoing incumbent has 
given us a very hard act to 
follow, so one criterion for his 
successor is that be be able to 
follow iL Certainly if foe 
governors can do as well with 
this appointment as I believe ' 
them io have done with that of 
John Tusa to External Ser- 
vices, we shall all be able to 
sleep easy by our bedside 
tranoies. 

David Wade 


ITALIAN IN VENICE 


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Ha 


THE 





TIMES 


May 10 - 16, 1986 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 



master of stately miracles . 


Britain’s finest 
houses are often 
a financial 
nightmare for 
their owners. 
William Greaves 
meets a man who 
eases the pain 




S tately homes and 
large historic houses 
are not just star turns 
on Britain's rural 
stage, they also have 
leaking roofs, capricious out- 
breaks of dry rot, gardens that 
need manicuring into the mid- 
dle distance and the sort of 
domestic bills which would 
send the average mortgagee 
running for the shelter of a 
council flat. However, when 
their owners need somewhere 
to run, the man they run to. 
Like as not, is the urbane and 
immensely resourceful Mr 
Norman Hudson. 

Spend a few hours in his 
company and the conversa- 
tion seems to have encom- 
passed half the pages of 
Debrett. The main difference 
between 4 1 -year-old Mr Hud- 
son and any casual name- 
dropper, however, is that the 
names have just as much 
reason to be grateful to him as 
he has to them. 

The visitor who crosses the 
moat of Broughton Castle, 
near Banbury in Oxfordshire, 
and tips his £1,70 entrance fee 
on to the counter might well 
believe that he is in the 
presence of one of Mr Arthur 
Daley's nice little earners. 
What he has actually tumbled 
upon is Lord and Lady Saye 
and Sele's perennial 
nightmare. 

About four years ago they 
were forced to embark on a 
programme of restoration, es- 
timated to cost £1 million 
over 20 years. Even allowing 
for a 40 per cent government 
subsidy from the Historic 
Buildings and Monuments 
Commission, it has already 
swallowed up more than 

£250,000. 

From 'admission to the 
house and grounds, and guide 
book, shop and tearoom sales 
they achieve a turnover of 
between £20,000 and £25,000 
a year and a profit over wages . 
and overheads of only £2,000 
to £3,000. 

“And the estimate for new 
drawing room curtains is 
£10.000". said Lord Saye and 
Sele with a wry smile. If the 
sound of those figures could 
scarcely be descrited as music 
to the bank manager’s ears, 
they struck a far more discor- 
dant note before Norman 
Hudson came on the scene 
about 1 1 years ago. 

**We used to serve cups oi. 
tea out of the kitchen window 


1\V: 






%. aft* S?;.. -4 





The saviour of an expensive heritage: Norman Hudson in the grounds of Brooghton Castle and, right, with Broughton's grateful owner. Lord Saye and Sele 


but, under Norman’s guid- 
ance. we first put tables and 
chairs out in 'the garage and 
now have a proper tea room*’, 
said Lady Saye and Sele. The 
statistics of advance are firmly 
rooted in her husband’s head. 

‘The tea room takes about 
70p per visitor now and the 
Shop takings average out at 
about 50p per head", he says. . 
“And.we; sefl 2,25(1 guide ! 
books a year at 60p each. They 
show a nice profit — Norman 
would rather we charged £1 
for them but I like to reel we 
givegood value.” ' 

The Broughton Castle expe- 
rience underlines Hudson's 
First Law. “No matter how 
great the profit from opening a 
house ami gardens to the 
public" he says, “it can never 
offset the overall cost of 
running the {dace. All I can do 
is to advise on a whole range 
of things like grants, how best 
to reorganize tax commit- 
ments and bow to maximise 
profits from open days and 
other activities". 

Professionally trained as a 
land agent and occupationally 


engaged as the confidante of 
landed gentry, it is scarcely 
surprising that the balding, 
easy mannered Hudson seems 
as much at home in chy suit as 

Wellington boots.. 


A nd in size, jf not 
age, his rambling 
farmhouse and out- 
buildings — almost 
a village within the- 
village of Upper Waixfington 
in Oxfordshire — are a suitable 
headquarters from which to 
operate as a financial agony 
aunt to historic house owners 
throughout Britain. 

In Scotland, Hudson has 
worked his influence on 
RossJyn Castle, near Edin- 
burgh, Mandersione in Ber- 
wickshire and, also in 
Berwickshire, the magnificent 
Thiriestane Castle, which now 
houses the Border Country 
Life museum. 

“Every case is different", 
says Hudson. “Some bouses 
have lakes and parklands 
which can be utilized. Some 
are well placed for tourists, 
while others - although too 


far off the beaten track for 
tourism - are ideally suited to 
banquets and conferences. 
Some bouses can absorb quite 
huge numbers of visitors and 
others lose their essential 
identity as a family home if 
too many people are 
admitted". 

When Lord Somerieyton 
first approached Hudson 12 
years ago. 30,000 people a year 
visited his two-mile-long lake 
near Great Yarmouth. Now 
Fritton Lake is a private 
country parte, including a wild 
fowl reserve, children's adven- 
ture playground,' pony riding 
and boating centre which at- 
tracts 150,000 visitors a year. 
The magnificent early 1 8th 
century Cbichetey Hall near 
Milton Keynes, on the other 
hand, was less well located for 
day trippers and Hudson's 
advice to Mr and Mrs John 
Nutting was to use it for- 
functions, business confer- 
ences and gourmet dinners. 
Similarly Lord Bradford has 
turned his experience as a 
London restaurateur to good 
effect and is now in the 


process of convening Weston 
Park in Shropshire to include 
19 bedrooms to accommodate 
32 resident guests — with clay 
pigeon shooting a speciality of 
the house. 

Not every aristocratic pa- 
tient leaves Hudson's surgery 
with a cure. “I was recently 
asked to look at one house and 
it upset me terribly to have to 
tell the owners that I could see 
no way out of their problem", 
he said. “There is no point 
raising hopes if you know that, 
whatever they do, it will be 
more trouble thin it is worth." 

Around 1950 there was an 
18-month period in Britain 
when one major house was 
being torn down every four 
days. In many cases the elder 
son had been killed and, in 
others, the houses bad been 
damaged beyond repair by 
wartime occupation. It was 
against this grim backcloth 
that the Duke of Bedford and 
the Marquis of Bath, at Wo- 
burn and Long) eat respective- 
ly, embarked on a new age of 
stately home showmanship. 
And by 1953, the Govern- 


ment, recognizing the plight of 
the nation's heritage, set up 
the Historic Buildings Council 
to make repair grants avail- 
able. There was, however, a 
quid pro quo. If the Govern- 
ment was to pay part of the 
repair costs then the house 
and gardens must be opened 
to the public. Bedford and 
Bath were no longer out on 
their own. 

The next bad news came in 
the early 1970s. The bullish 
tourist market was hit by the 
oil crisis and, to cap it all, the 
Government was talking of 
introducing a wealth tax. The 
Historic Houses Association, 
a son of trade union of 
aristocrats, came into being 
and such was public sympathy 
that it gathered a million and a 
half signatures against the 
proposal tax - toe biggest 
petition ever presented to 
Parliament. At that time the 
young Norman Hudson was 
running Savills' reacreational 
land management department 
and, nine years ago, he became 
a technical adviser to the 
HHA and set up on his own as 


a heritage property consultant 
He has since been called in to 
rescue the finances of more 
than 100 great British houses 
- at least 35 times wearing his 
private company hat. 

"Although allowing public 
access is pan of tbe owner’s 
deal when he gets a repair 
grant. I’ve never heard anyone 
complain about having to do 
so", says Hudson. "But open- 
ing for the first time can be 
traumatic. Where do the cars 
go? Where do you put the 
ticket office? Do you have 
guided tours? What about a 
shop, and what do you sell in 
it? A guide book or not? House 
security? Even the threat of 
your children being kid- 
napped can be a big worry. 


“In the early days there wa* 
a tendency for people to think, 
of historic house owners in a> 
'them and us’ way. Nowadays 
l think everyone appreciates 
what a headache they have 
and are grateful for their 
efforts to maintain their prop^ 
erty as a private home, rather 
than let it become a public 
institution." 

"The stately homes of 
England", sang Noel Coward, 
“though rather in the lurch; 
provide a lot of chances for- 
physical research...” He would 
no doubt be delighted to know 
that many of them are no 
longer haunted by the prosi- 
pect of encroaching doom: 
Norman Hudson, entrepre- 
neur extraordinary, has seen 
to that. i«- 




SATURDAY 


American actor 
Tom Hulce on his 
return to more 
than a normal 
part, page 14 




and a stately masterwork 


Arts Diary 

£**** 

Chest 

Concerts 

Crossword 

Dunce 

Drink 

Films 

Galleries 

Gardening 


On and About I-Zl 
Opera 1*5. 

Photography iff- 
Radio 13’ 

Review Id* 

Rock & Jazz 14,’ 
Shopping 10. 
Television ljt- 
Trnvd IF* 

TV fitaw 1ST 


Victoria Wine 
Of 

the Month 


Tony Spencor 


II v ^aTSOFST 







fif Omn tiu kP pam; .j, • -v*® 

. f*n 






COtes du Roussillon 

TO CELEBRATE FRENCH W.NE MOTTH WE Offl* TWO OBJOOU6 
WINES FROM THF SouTH-ThE » 

WINE THATS A GOOD ACCOMPANIMENT TO BOTH RED MEAT AND 

cheese. Selector Code: 

Medium bodied and soft /A M 

The White is fresh. cfflSP and |*| l/|| I 
DRY. WTH A GOOD FUU. FLAVOUR. M 

Chiu, to enjov as an 1 w 

aperitif and wto - — - 

meat. SELECTOR CODE: l. UTh 'm W Barone 
Discount on 6 bottles or more. 

rif Make friends with the wines of France^ 

ES WINE COMMNY J3L- 

P . — ^ - 


House proud: Hal and Susan Bigot at Levens Hall — making them pay where it counts 


L evens Halt near Kendal 
in the Lake District, has 
graced countless calen- 
dars over the years. Its topiary 
garden, carved rather than 

S o by landscape gardener 
aume Beaumont almost 
300 years ago, is a magical 
tapestry of shapes and shad- 
ows. That, and the grandeur of 
the house itself, is more than 
enough to attract 37,000 visi- 
tors a year. 

That statistic has not 
changed significantly since the 
summer of 1982. What has 
changed is that each person 
who then spent an average of 
£1 60 On hxS visit now gladly 
pans »iih £3 20. The summer 
of 1982 was. needless to say. 

■ the Lime Mr Hal Bugui and his 
wife Susan sough! ibe hHp of 
Norman Ard 

il is fine tti Mr Hy.JiOUi 
smaller ad'ustTa-K 5 - which 


obviously affords the present 
occupiers the greatest 
amusement. 

"We used to have the ticket 
office at the entrance to the car 
parking area" recalls Mr 
Bagot, “and if anyone didn't 
like what we charged they 
would turn round and drive 
off again. Now you park first 
and walk to where you pay. By 
the time granny has been 
disembarked and one of the 
children probably wants tbe 
lavatory, it is too late for 
second thoughts". 

Other transformations are 
less esoteric. Once cramped 
and uninviting, the tea room 
is now a slick serve-y ourself 
dispensary of ploughman's 
lunches and freshly-made sal- 
ads for which people willingly 
pay out £1.80 and £2.20 

respectively. 

a succession of discreet 


signs ensure that no one 
misses the plant sale area — 
but only after they have 
admired, in the gardens, the 
speciality blooms on sale. And 
for the children there is now 
an adventure play area, rides 
on Big Bertha - an 18-ton, 
showman's traction engine 
which is pan of a spectacular 
steam collection — and Beatrix 
Potter books and models in 
the shop. 

“Another thing Mr Hudson 
taught us was to keep precise 
records of everything that 
people pay at various stages of 
their tour on a week by week 
basis so we can make compari- 
sons with other years", said 
Mr Bagoi, who moved into the 
house with bis wife, Susie, in 
1975 and whose immediate 
family have owned it for more 
than 100 years. 


Six years ago the Bagots - 
be is a chartered surveyor in 
Kendal — were confronted 
with a £75.000 re-roofing pro- 
gramme which has since 
grown to £90.000 with the 
discovery of widespread dry 
rou Receipts from visitors - 
about £90,000 including VaT ; 
last year — make no contribu- ! 
lion to house repairs and have I 
to be offset against staff wages 1 
of £41,000 and an annual 
5“jjnp Md lighting hill of 

Not much return For being 
open to the public from 1 lam 
5 P m every dav except 
Friday and Saturday from 
gster Sunday umii the end ol 
bepiember. But a great deal 
beaJiiner than the days before 
h T™? 0 Hudson came to the 
neip of yet another beleagured 
stately home owner. 


If flie prices don't put some auctions out of your 
leach, die Mewing and sale limes certainly will. 
Sotheln's Conduit Street Sales are* devisee! to fit 
in with your lilvstyle. So there are ei filing and 
Sunday \iewings. with rite sale on die following 
Monda\ evening. 

V»u1l find many complete room sellings of 
furniture, mgs, ceramics, sifter anti works ol an. 
As lew pieces, if ;m\, need restoration. Uiev are 
ready to lake home -and enjoy fk-lften isinexjien- 
si\e and easilv arranged on die s|mi. 

Vist or Access ( .mis are accejiied. Anti us lists 
.sun bom as link- as lUtH). time won’t he die only 
thing y« m can ;iH« »rd. 

VIEWING TIMES 

Tlunsdin riih May I'J in Kin-Mid pm 

Kiiday ‘.ith M.ty *.MH> am- 7.i Hi pm 

Sunday 1 hh Mat 10.00 ani-4.00 pm 

Monday lUih Mac IMHJani-lDMI pm 

NEXT SALE 

Mond.n IL’ili Mav fi,*i 0 pm-O.00 pm 


ESTO1986 


* i. 








THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


10 


SHOPPING 


It’s time the chain stores sold furniture the way they sell fashion, says Beryl Downing 

Breaking a high street habit 

v 




Left chintzy chair in peach and saga on cream, £299. Sketched rightftoral border on Left long and lean white 

moire cotton curtains, beige or green, from £25. Tulip printed curtains from £1 9.99 both Marks £69.50, also in pine at £59.50. 

& Spencer. Peony wallpaper border £2,99 per roll available in two weeks from Next interior. black and yeflow £24.99, small 


, £35. Centre: mahogany bookshelves ' 

9 d vase designed by Janice Tchalenko, larg 
and pink £28.99. in editions of LMO. Available end May. 


V 




V 


Left Thirties style table £249, chair £79, from the Strasse range in black lacquered ash. 
Sketched right satin-weave cotton, Albert, £7,95 per metre with matching wallpaper £5.! 
roil. Oak Leaves cotton £6.45 per metre. All in dark green and burgundy from Laura Ashl 




Above: elegantly simply dinmg table in dark grey ash with 

Ladder back chairs upholstered in tweed £75 each, in leather £85. Time are three occasional 
tables to match - small side table £49.99, coffee table £69.99 and console £89.99. 

'vr • V* r - 1 :• 

.*>yv<n 

-,y ; 



& 

k 






Left glass-fronted pine cupboard £89.50; open shelf units £65 each at the sides. Sketched 

Mow, red. grey or white. £8.95. Black and white cherry wallpaper 
sring £7.99 per rod, Marks & Spencer. 


Left glass-fronted pine cupboard £89.50; open s 
right Habitat clock in green, yellow, red. grey or 1 
£4.95 per roll, Laura Ashley. Tulip tile walfcoverir 


Above: space-saving waft-mounted < 
are £25 each. Also in the St Michael < 
rectangular or round £135 each — chairs at I 


. - r. 

stable in golden pine £45. Matching high stools 
i kitchen range are three tables - gateleg £189, 
i each and wall units with sofid doors at £89.50. 


it is about time the chain-store gang 
got its act together and began to sell 
furniture as efficiently as it sells 
fashion. Until this week not one of 
the* chains had made any serious 
attempt to challenge Habitat’s hold 
on the High Street, but now 
Marks & Spencer have had an idea 
'that might change the way we buy 
our’fumishings. 

Chi Thursday, opposite their 
main Marble Arch flagstore. M & S 
ope bed their first separate store 
devoted entirely to furniture and 
furnishings. Next week they will go 
a scepffurfoer in Croydon - a single 
subject satellite store laid out like a 
bungalow. Each department will be 
set out in a room of its own, so ihat 
customers will move from kitchen 
to dining, living, bed and bath- 
rooms. selecting their co-ordinated 
furnishings as they go. M & Shave 
tried a satellite store before - the 
specialist children's shop in York — 
but they arc not too sure that 
separating a section of clothing from 
the nfain store is a good idea. 
Furniture, they feel, is quite a 


different matter, and their approach 
is has certainly been original. 

Because they had difficulty in 
finding a British furniture manufac- 
turer “with the attitude we wanted". 
M & S put the project in the hands 
of one of their major footwear 
suppliers. Peter Black, who at their 
instigation bought Jcntique of Nor- 
folk: a well-known, but dying 
company. 


The need for 
imagination 


With the guidance of the M & 5 
buyers a range of wood furniture 
was developed which includes din- 
ing and occasional tables, shelves 
and bedroom furniture. There were 
fewer problems with the uphol- 
stered furniture, which is being 
made by Christie Tyler, already well 
known in the field. 

“We were not exactly swept off 
our feet by the response from the 
furniture trade", says Don 


Trangmar. homeware director of 
M & S. “Homeware is dearly very 
underdeveloped, but when you look 
at the furniture industry most 
retailers and manufacturers do 
nothing for their customers* 
imaginations. 

“We see this as an opportunity to 
offer goods of the quality people 
expea from us. presented in a 
stimulating way. If it is successful 
we will take the concept even 
further." 

It needs to be taken further. At the 
moment, the furniture range is 
small, and as traditional as you 
would expect from a company 
known for reliability rather than 
avant-garde design. 

It is particularly suitable for those 
who like a country look — pine for 
the kitchen, bathroom and bed- 
room: chintz and mahogany for the 
living room. It is a rather “me too” 
collection, but made mainly in solid 
woods rather than veneer and 
therefore representing good value. 


doubledly Next has the most stylish 
designs — their ash dining-table and 
chairs and console table are particu- 
larly elegant in dark-grey ash. But 
this hardly represents a furniture 
collection. Next’s Tricia Guild fab- 
rics arc in a charming range of 

What of the opposition? Un- 
colours and their Janice Tchelenko 
ceramics are the collector's pieces of 
the mass markeL 

Great variety 
of pattern 

British Home Stores are quietly 
relying on its reputation for lighting 
— their clocks and towels are good, 
too — until the effect of the Conran 
take-over is feiL Habitat itself has 
some interesting new Thirties styles 
to add to the mixture as before. 

For the greatest variety of pattern 
in furnishing fabrics and accessories 
Laura Ashley is the best High Street 
bet. The ranges are by no means all 
sprigged and flouncy: there are 


richly coloured paisleys, textured 
tapestry effects, glowing dark satins 
as well as fresh country chintzes. 
But you have to look at the 
catalogue to get the lull picture - 
you would never guess the possible 
permutations from looking at the. 
store displays. 

So the M&S “bungalow" ap- 
proach is an imaginative improve- 
ment on the present state of mass- 
market furnishings. Perhaps the 
step further they speak of will one 
day give us what we really need — a 
layout that really does looks like a 
show house. 

But that will remain a piped ream 
while British retailers are obsessed 
by sales per square foot. It is not 
unknown for customers to buy an 
entire room set from a specialist 
furnishing shop when they can 
actually relate it to their own home, 
so cluttering the place with sales 
fixtures does not always pay off. 
Hasn't one of the big retailers the 
courage to see if showing less would 
mean selling more? 


DRINK 


Right label, 
wrong wine 


Look along the white wine 
shelves of any English wine 
shop and you will find the 
word Riesling on a multitude 
of bottles. Many of the white 
wine labels sans Riesling will 
have, in any case, been styled 
on this appealingly grapey- 
flowery variety. Liebfrau- 
mikfa, Britain's biggest selling 
white wine, is the indubitable 
example. Some Uc bfi a umil ch 
brands could wed still have a 
smidgen of Riesling in the 
blend. In practice most are 
likely to be Muller-thurgau or 
Silvaner based. 

Unfortunately many of 
those bottles, even labelled 
Riesling, contain wines that 
have been made from the 
bogus Riesling, better and 
more politely known as the 
Italian Riesling or false Ries- 
ling. What these Rieslings 
offer is mostly just a bland, 
sweet, vaguely grapey glassful. 
And if you expea your bar- 
gain bottle to be reminiscent 
of the true Riesling grape, as 
found in the Mosel or Saar 
say, with its pale greeny-white 
colour, appley-flowery scent 
and viiaL racy, steely charao * 
ter you will, alas, be sorely 
disappointed. 

Telling one from t'other is 
for once in the wine world, 
easy. The false Riesling's most 
familiar guise, in this country, 
is that of Yugoslavia's Laski 
Riesling. Hungary's 
Olaszrieuing is another widely 
distributed false Riesling. 
Austria has its Welschriesling, 
Rumania its Laski Riesling, 
and Italy sells bogus Riesling 
under the Italico Riesling and 
Welschriesling labels. Bulgaria 
it seems is the only joker in the 
pock for although this country 
sells Welschriesling, many of 
its wines sold simply as Ries- 
ling. have a hefty dollop of 
Welschriesling mixed into the 
blend too. 

Germany is the chief home 
of the true Riesling, often 
known as Rhine Riesling. 
Apart from the slatey, green 
elegance of a magnificent Mo- 
sel, a Riesling from a fine 
Rhine stale will have a pale 
straw-gold colour and a glori- 
ous rich, peachy character. 
With age both will turn into a 
luscious honeyed, multi-lay- 
ered, lime-juice like mouthfuL 
Finding these Teutonic taste- 
trips, outside tiie most cele- 
brated estates, is getting 
increasingly more difficult as 
German growers turn away 
from their labour-intensive, 
steep, sun trap, pocket hand- 
kerchief slopes in favour of the 
lesser quality low-lying 
vineyards. 

Still if great German Ries- 
lings are becoming more elu- 
sive, fine New World Rhine 
Rieslings are definitely on the 
increase. South Africa still has 
some way to go with its 
Weisser Riesling but in Cali- 
fornia late harvest genuine 
Riesling . known as 
Johannisberg Reisling or 
sometimes as White Riesling, 
has produced some wonderful 
wines. Australia, despite its 
hot climate, is beginning to 
make both some fine, floral, 
aperitif style Rieslings, albeit 
with that tell-tale Muscat char- 
acter that ripe Riesling devel- 


late 


ops, plus some fine 
harvest Rieslings too. 

pethaps the purest form of 
Rhine Riesling are the wines 
produced in Alsace. Most of 
these flowery elegant Rieslings 
are bone dry like other AJsace 
wines. Finer still are the late- 
barvest style Rieslings, whose 
grapes have been attacked 
with noble rot, and have been 
turned into rich, complex 
wines. The Huge! family make 
some especially good exam- 
ples of this style. Their 79 
Riesling Reserve Personnelle 
with its rich, positive, flowery 
flavour has a touch of that 
petrol-like nose - that great 
German Rieslings develop. 
Sainsbury's stock this wine for 
£5.95. Not cheap, I know, but 
considering the quality of the 
wine a bargain nonetheless. 

Sainsbury's also stock a 
wide range of German nobley- 
rotted wines in those late 
harvest, ascendingly-sweet 
styles of Spfillese, Auslese and 
Beerenauslese. The quality of 
these Sainsbury’s sweet’uns 
does vary but ihe 1983 
Serriger Vogelsang Riesling 
Auslese from the Verwaltung 
der Staatlichen 

Weinbaudomanen at Trier is a 
textbook example of a great 
Saar wine. Its fresh, green. 


v»'"- 



flowery-appley nose is backed 
up by a lovely fresh green 
luscious taste complete with 
that steely backbone so typical 
of the Saar. (Sainsbmy's 
£5.75) 

An excellent German Ries- 
ling this time from the Rhine 
is Dein hard's delicious '82 
Winkeler Hasensprung Ries- 
ling KabinelL Unlike the Re- 
serve Personnelle and the 
Auslese, which are really pud- 
ding tipples, this wine makes a 
useful spring aperitif and first 
course wine. With its flowery, 
waxy bouquet and similarly 
full-flavoured palate it is ex- 
cellent value for money priced 
at just £3.99 from Wahrose. 

Finally if you like the 
thought of finishing off a meal 
with a sweet wine but are 
worried about opening (and 
finishing!) a whole bottle, then 
the half bottle of a luscious 
dessert wine is the cheaper and 
more suitable answer. Few 
firms, alas, stock this post 
prandial convenience. Les 
Amis du Vin, 51 Chiltem 
Street, London W|, and The 
Wine Studio, 9 Ecdeston 
Street London SW1, howev- 
er, carry the powerful, rich, 
peachy honeyed ’82 Firestone 
Selected Late Harvest Ries- 
ling. Expensive at £10.75 a 
half bottle but worth it 

Jane MacQuitty 


NATURAL TIMBER GARDEN BENCH 



T he appeal of real uvudcn furniture puts u 
in a class of its e«n especially when 
combined u ith sty lish design. 

T his garden bench displays both qualitic\ 
to perfection being made from Iroko 
hardwood which is extremely hard wearing 
throughalitypei of weather. The wood need* 
little attention but may betreaied withteakoil 
as required . The slatson foe seat and back are 
angled to provide comfon and the overall 
design of foe bench makes it an elegant item 
of furniture for any garden, patio or 
conservatory. The bench is supplied with 
easy home assembly instructions and 
measures four loot in length. 


Tiirith this Iroko hardwood bench you can 
W be assured that through summer and 
winter it will retain its attractive appearance 
with foe minimum of maintenance. 

Price — £79.95 

AUprm-.un imiusi r«- rfpnsi and packing. Please 
tiiU ’ii up to 21 1 lays for delivery fimn receipt t fonder. If 
yvnatv unsatisfied The Tunes will rejund your money 
wilkivi! ijiteslh 'ii. 

Orders and enquiries r.fn hl’J he sen; to: 

The Times Garden Bench df ffer. Bourne Road, Bexley. 
KentDA5 IBL Tel: Cnisjnrd 53316 fur enquiries only. 


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A cut above for the closest of shaves 


Gardening should be a plea- 
sure and foe more one can 
take the hard, repetitive work 
out of every-day maintenance 
foe more pleasant it becomes. 

Although grass is the easiest 
form of gardening, it is a 
repetitive job but one where 
machinery can be used to full 
advantage. 

There are two ways of 
cutting grass - by a cylinder 
orroiary machine. Both work 
well but each has a place and 
time for its use. You should 
buy foe best machine you can 
afford for the task. For a lawn 
less than 100 square yards, for 
example, an electric 12 or 15- 
inch machine would be suffi- 
cient. The other factor to 
consider is if you want to catch 
the clippings or allow them to 
fly. You may want a different 
machine according to your 
needs. 

Here arc some examples of 


IN THE GARDEN 


AT THE CHELSEA 
PHYSIC GARDEN 

SPECIAL LECTURES FOR 
CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW WEEK 
Tuesday 20th May 

Colour m the Garden - 
Anthony du Gard Paste y 
WildHowers eve wonderful - 
Francesa Greenoak 
Wednesday 21st May 
Gardens ol Vito Sockwdte-West - 
Jane Brown 

The Landscape Garden - 
Christopher Thacker 
Thursday 22nd May 
Development of the Rose * 
Hotel le Rougetel 
Scented Foliage Plants - 
James Compton 

Friday 23rd May 
Plant rntraducUom - 
Professor W.T.Srearn 

Lectures wdl last 1 hour 

far tickers and further defats 
apply. 

66 ROYAL HOSPITAL ROAD, 
LONDON SW3 4HS. 

Tel: 01-352 4347 


good mowers and their uses: 

• Hand machines are still 
popular if foe lawn is not too 
big and the Qualcast Panther 
30 at £30 is good value. 

• Powered machines are 
much more popular and the 
Qualcast RE25X (around £65) 
with a 10-inch cut is recom- 
mended It is a cylinder ma- 
chine with the ability to box 
cuttings as well as letting them 
fly. 

• Black and Decker have the 
R4 (£65), a 12-inch rotary 
again with no box. 

• Flymo's 10-inch Sprinter 
E25 (around £50) is a rotary 
with no box. 

• Bigger gardens call for big- 
ger machines and the electric 
RE35X (about £85) from 
Qualcast is another cylinder 
machine with a grass box and 
a 14-inch cutting width. Its 
long lead makes it suitable for 


QUESTION TIME 


I have a big garden and 
would like to plant one Or two 
large trees, an oak, a lime 
or an ash for instance. Do / 
need to prepare well ? 

Trees which take up to 200 
years to mature should be 
given the best possible start 
Prepare a site three feet 
square and three feet deep, 
remove the topsoil and put it to 
one side. Remove the next 
layer of soil and put it to one 
side, but separate from the top 
soil. The next layer should be 
dug over ami when broken up 
you should add at least six 
inches of good quality farm- 
yard mannre and fork it in. 
Replace the next layer and add 
bonemeal at four ounces per 
square yard and fork in. 
Replace topsoiL 


quite big gardens. Available as 
an attachment is a lawn raker 
kit, costing £20. 

• Flymo's Sprmtmaster XE38 
rotary has a grass box and its 
15-inch cut picks up most of 
the mowings, leaving stripes. 

• The RM40 rotary from 
Black and Decker (around 
£1 38) is fitted with a grass box 
and has a 16-inch cul 

• Where there is a large grass 
area and where electric ma- 
chines are difficult to operate, 
the best machine is the Suffolk 
Punch. It comes in three sizes 
with cutting edges ranging 
from 12 to 1 6 inches and range 
in price from £180 to £220. 
The solid, well-constructed 
machines should have a life of 
at least 15 years under rejpilar 
use. 

• For big gardens there is the 
FTymo Lawn-chief range. The 


RI40 is a 16-inch machine 
with grass collection and a 
good engine which enables the 
blades to rotate quickly, cut- 
ting the grass finely. 

• Cutting areas through 
which bulbs have grown needs 
a powerful rotary machine. 
The Flymo Pilot Range is 
more than adequate. The 
47CM will stand up to the 
roughest use and will reduce 
18 to 24-inch grass to 3 or 4 
inches quickly, allowing a 
lighter machine to finish off 
the job. 

• A machine which can cut 
long grass and leave a lawn in 
■good condition is the Vicia 
Vortex (around £350). Well 
constructed with its own pow- 
er unit it has a large capacity 
grass box and easy height 
adjustment for the blades. It is 
expensive compared with 
some of the machines men- 
tioned previously but where 
there is a large garden with a 
variety of tasks this may be the 
machine you require. 

• Scarifying good quality 


lawn areas is a task which is 
often neglected and apart from 
Qualcast RE 3SX attachment 
mentioned earlier, there are 
the Black and Decker 
Lawn rakers. The LR400, 
LRI500 and LR200Q range 
from £71 to £130. the largest 
with a 20-inch width. 

• In gardens where it is 
difficult to fit in a compost 
heap, or in areas where burn- 
ing garden refuse is impossi- 
ble, the task of disposing 
garden refuse calls for a great 
deal of lime. Garden Shred- 
ders seem to be one of the best 
answerewhere the garden rub- 
bish can be reduced to a 
product which is easily 
begged. Some have their own 
power unit while others are 
operated by electricity. The 
Alko Compost Star 1100 
(£100) can be recommended 
as can the Black and Decker 
D38 Shredder (£129). They 
will take prunings up to one- 
inch thick and leave it suitable 
for the compost heap. 

Ashley Stephenson 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



11 


TRAVEL 


i 



Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


s°nry for Mexico. There she 

'• EPS!* Wing , to £££■ 
the best- possible irnage^of 

- 88 any country 
S* the ntn-np to * the World 

• ** : her ^5 

s .Jgj" . months after the 
^gedy-whreft tore the heart 

2SfJr ca PT Ia ^ many of the 

* H ^jtawwpere still lie 
siumpedtm iheirfoimdations, 
while others stand gaunt and 
empty along 'the broad ave- 

- aues* earns dead on their feet 

= K hardiy the stuff of 
which foreign .allure is made, 
but there are two important 

.• ractors to- be borne in mind 
rirsuy, thereis fer more to the 
.country . than its main and 
massive metropolis, and sec- 
ondly. Mexico City was never 
Ttiuch to write borne about 

- evenbefotCtfie eartoquake.- 

1 revisted Mexico two 
months ago, having been there 
10 days prior to the catastro- 
phe. By the time fcstruck l was 

» Jar away fa Athens, reading 
.the news in -are English lan- 
guage papef-. The iaark head- 
line,. “Mexico destroyed’’, 
presumably reproduced ' all 
over the world, carried the 
simple implication which 
■has made - the-- situation so 
wisely perceived.- for the 
■word Mexico is frequently us- 
ed as shorthand for the capital; 
but to those not In the know, 
such headlines meant an en- 
tire country had become a 
writeoff! 

Three hundred miles away 
in the new coastal resort of 
Ixtapa, next to the fishing 
yillage ef Zihuatanejo. book- 
ings are drastically down 
‘merely, because there was a 
single -slight -tremor. No one 
was killed;’-. ... 

Mexico City’s troubles have 
'been marching inexorably to- 
wards their present state for . 
^ears.--Witi^20-niiUion-jnhab- 
jiqnts, it is the biggest city m ' 
.the .world. Every day 1,000 
more arrive from the country- ■ 
;sidc fn-'the usually vain; hope - 
^t'finding-.wbiftc. 


Amid towering mountains, Spanish 
architecture and clattering music, 

_ Franks finds there is more to 
— frfexico than its over-populated, 

— : Polluted capital city and a land 
i; preparing for a football showdown 


of rich legacies 


. . s ««h is the pollution that at 
Bight the day’s fumes regroup 
in the. atmosphere above the 
city and lower themselves in 
u»e cooling air to permeate the 
dawn and give'the illusion of a 
mellow English autumn. 

Mexico City- is best treated 
as a place* through which to • 
pass en' route to a suitably far 
destination, of which there is 
no shortage. The last time I 
was here i-made the two stan- 
dard journeys, southwards 
across the Sierra ' Madre to 
Acapulco, and eastwards - to 
the fantastic Mayan nibble of 
the Yucatan peninsula. 

- This -time it seemed appro- 
priate to go nofthonwhat they 
can the revolution route, via 
Querttaro to San Miguel de 
Allende to Guanajuato. Que- 

. retaro bad the added attrac- 
tion ofbeing the home of Scot- 
land’s group in the World Cup 

- regroup Which Jias been 
dubbed, unfortunately per- 
haps, etgruppo del muerte (the 
group of death), which m eans 
.nothing more, .sinister than 
that its outcome will be crucial 
to the tournament 

These towns all have cores 
of splendid colonial architec- 
ture, and squares lined with 
squat Indian Laurel trees 
which seem to moisten the air 
ofa summer's evening. 

With p modicum of luck 
you will catch a mariacha 
bandin full flight Mexico is a 
country rich in cultural accre- 
tions, in its art no less than in 
its.bufldinESi mid through this 
peculiar hybrid of noises you 
can hear the voices of success- 
ive incomers — from the trum- 
pets oTthe. Spanish to the mel- 


odies of the French. At first 
hearing, the bands — even the 
good ones — can sound like a 
group of men who have 
suddenly taken it into their 
heads to beat up a kitchen. 
Besides which, it seems to be a 
semi-tone out and just the 
fraction ofa bar away from the 
time. Still, it contains Noel 
Coward’s pre -requisite for 
popular music. — potency — 
and I for one could gladly 
listen to the stuff all evening. 

Guanajuato is the jewel in 
this little crown of towns. The 
railway has given all it's got in 
the way of burrowjtg dud 
blasting to reach it from the 
south, but at this point it gives 
up in the face of a new range of 
barrier hills. 

For reasons best known to 
Mexico, no foreigner seems to 
have heard of Guanajuato, 
which is extraordinary. It is a 
totally implausible thing, part 
man and part mountain, not 
just growing out of the rock, 
but also delving deeply into it 
to run a- system of roads along 
the course of the subterranean 
river beds. This fools the dri v- 




Seaching for the sky: die ruins of the Mayan observatory at Chichgn Itza on the Yucatan penlnnsla 


er into thinking himself far 
below ihe surface of the earth, 
only to emerge into the day- 
light above a dizzying vista of 
hills. I cannot think of the 
proper European comparison. 
Ronda in Southern Spain and 
Rocamadour in the Dordogne 
'come ro mind, but even they 
lack the absurdly prolix sys- 
tem of lanes and levels. 

It was here that I had my. 
first- tequilla of the journey, 
complete with the full ritual 
that Mexican custom de- 
mands^ a sprinkling of salt 
on the back of the hand, licked 


TRAVEL NOTES 


'seeFareOeais be tow). 

Cars with foreign number 
plates can travel freely if they 
carry the entry permit 
Issued by customs on arrriva/. 
One advantage of road - 
travel is the Angeles Verdes 
(Green Angels) service, the 
first organ izatra 


. — organization of its kind to 
offer free breakdown 
assistance along the main 


highways. Continental 
AjrHnes has introduced a 
series of packages at 
between £600-700 for a week 
at various destinations 
including Mexico City, 
Acapulco, and the Yucatan 
Peninsula. 

Details of travel offers from 
the Mexican Tourist Office at 7 
Cork Street, London W1 
(01-7341058). 


off with a stroke of the longue, 
the clear fluid in the glass 
downed in one, followed by a 
bite into a segment of lemon. 
The procedure smacks of a 
terrible machismo, more con- 
ducive to suffering than to 
hedonism, but that is the way 
they do things. It tasted horri- 
ble. and 1 had another. 

In the evening on my way to 
the theatre 1 ran into the 
town's sole Irishman, a Dub- 
lin expatriate called James 
Patrick O'Shaughnessy Doyle. 
He fell in love with a Guana- 
juato girl and her town — in 
that order I believe — and 
settled here several years ago, 
teaching English at the univer- 
sity from text books devised in 
Switzerland. He struck me as a 
rather Joycean figure — wry, 
mournful, and at once both 
bridling and contented with 
the perspective of bis exile. 

The Juarez Theatre is as 
unexpected as the Opera 
House in Manaus, an extrava- 
gance of Victorian fussiness, 
with seats rearing almost sheer 
tiers to the Gods. 

My original plan had been 


to go from hem to Chihuahua 
in the north west, and then 
ride the famous Copper Can- 
yon railway for two days to its 
terminus at Los Mochis in the 
Gulf of California. But there 
was snow on the line and the 
trains were off So it was with 
the English summer in mind 
that I flew to Monterrey, 
where our boys will be doing 
battle in the early stages of the 
Cup. I am cot referring to the 
fans, although God knows 
their reputation has come in 
advance of them to Mexico. 

Outwardly at least, the po- 
lice chiefs are making concilia- 
tory noises about the conse- 
quences of bad behaviour, and 
refuting all those fearful ru- 
mours about the quality of life 
in the nick. 

Like so many other Latin 
American towns. Monterrey 
suffers from the image of a 
popular song, and in this case 
quite erroneously, since that 
Monterey has only one r, and 
is situated in California. This 
Monterrey is a considerable 
town of one and a half million 


inhabitants, cupped in a broad 
basin of the Sierra Madre Ori- 
ental. with its serrated peaks 
looking down on the valley. 

This' in many ways is the 
acceptable lace of Mexico, the 
one you seldom come to read 
about Here is a city that 
works: unemployment is low, 
ihe people go to bed early, 
corruption is on the run. the 
lavatory doors lock and the 
flushes flush, and the whole 
place is driven along by a 
sense of regional pride border- 
ing on the secessionist 

There are three ways back 
down to Mexico City — the 
plane, the road, and the train, 
the last of which looks like a 
dirty but romantic legacy of 
Woody Guthrie's America, 
clanking out of town on its 
two-day bauL while the moun- 
tain wails return baleful ech- 
oes to the horn. 

It sounds like the blues for a 
country bound hand and foot 
to its own internal past, at the 
very moment of planning a fu- 
ture of international 
acceptability. 


Breton retreat that makes 



Pont-Aven attracts 


lots of artists, * 
but itstranquif 
almospberejias; 
. other beoefits- 


r As a hard luck story Ihe sagi of 
.the ' Pobt-Aved V School f of 
vPainiing -1 u Brittany takes ... 
some '. beaUHg.' -Xfter,- ; one 
would guess, years of dream- 
ing and planning^ the vtsfan . t 
finally became reality on May v 
■T, 1939. Six months Taiei the -T*” 

: '-schoib! was’ dead, : 6U6 -of the 

-early victims of ihe Second J : . 

-World Wjftv - ■■■ - - v .* . ... 

- “Ever since pamtere- first tactangr of such • rauneot 

-discovered Brittany a century - wafter 

- a|o, Tolit-Aven has "been a c 

favoured centre”, said the that the wonder is 

• founders in the introductory 
brochure, “©urfatention is to- 

provide a; school combining ^ on t Ave11 15 ^ 

the advantages of a-sketching • - 

- class abroad and those ofa city I Gauguin who pul tire 

school . . - 
The scheme, which had the 




atyour 


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place on the artistic map and it 
is not hard to see why scores of 
artists from all over, the world 
were inspire to' make their 
way there in the late ;l9th and 
early 20th centuries, 

“It is the light", I was told 
by Catherine Atget, curator of 
the Mustede Pont-Aven: And 
ceitaanfiT on 'a'^unny'StptetfF 
ber. morning the light was 
heavenly.. So, too. were the 
colours and indeed the whole 
ambience. Even those whose 
skill with a brush is limited to 
painting by numbers could 
not foil to be impressed; for 
the true artist tire spot must be 
well ni^t irresistible. 

We spent as long admiring 
the paintings in the mus£e as 
the impatience of small child- 
ren would allow. Then, with 
the threat of juvenile vandal- 
ism looming, we moved on, 
making our way through the 
delightful Bo is d’ Am our up to 
La chapelle deTremalo, where 
hangs the I6lh-cemury wood- 
en crucifix which- inspired 
Gauguin's “Yellow Christ”. 

Set in a shady spot on the 
top of a hill, the chapel if said 
to be typical of the type found 
all over rural Brittany. -Out- 
ride' the birds twittered in die 
branches; inside, the' light 
played gently on the tough 
stone pillars — roft blues and 
yellows and oranges on simple 
grey stone; 

Two leathery old locals eyed 
us suspiciously as we emerged 
into the sunlight. They had 
clearly seen our sort before 
and had not liked what they 
had seen. The Bretons have 
.something of 4 reputation for 
disliking foreigners - which 


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-apparently includes anyone 
from beyond the. boundaries 
-of Brittany- Their befaayiour, 
however, belies their image. 

■■ There was the garage me- 
chanic, .for example, who 
turned, out. to repair our car. 
“The Bretons are very insu-. 
lar’Vhe $akL “We have many . 
qualities but we are not good 
at dealing with outsider!". 
Whereupon bfr proceeded to 
. chatter away as if toa lifelong 
toulroate. He also had' .the 
grace not to pass comment on 
the feet that the the only thing 
-wrong with .the. wretched car 
.was one faulty apariting plug. 
He couldn’t, in short, have 
been friendlier or more tactiuL 
Nor could Mme Dieulang- 



Finding the right routes 
to Mexico’s branches 



aid, who owned the 17th- 
century farmhouse near Pend- 
ruc where we stayed for a 
week, living in one of the 
outhouses that has been con- 
verted to - holiday cottages. 
" Whfle ourcarwas off the road, 
.she lent us hers, on one strict 
. condition. “I am learning to 
speak your language so you 
. must speak -English to me", 
she said firmly. “No English, 
no car.” And she meant it 
Even her black Scotty dog — 
foe latest addition to her 
canine collection — reflected 
ber Anglophilia:- Agatha, it 
was cafied, after Agatha Chris- 
tie, “because she is always 
■ -sniffing the ground", r 

The ferm. at Pendruc, about 
.two miles outside Tregunc, 
was idyllic. The silence was 
-broken only by birdsong and 
the bleating of a couple of 
goats; down a lane bordered 
by a profusion of blackberry 
bushes lay the beach, with a 
broad stretch of sand and a 


Gauguin: thousands follow Ms 
- lead" "" ’ • 

mass of rocks to damber on. i 
We ate the blackberries and 
swam in the sea. We drank 
Breton rider and dreamed 
impossible dreams. That was 
alL But it was enough. 

Habitues of the region told 
us to explore Concarneau, a 
mere seven miles away, and so 
we did — briefly. The ancient 
fortifications are striking it is 
true, but beyond the intriguing 
if somewhat incongrous sound 
of a bagpiper playing a High- 
land lament on the waterfront, 
we found little to keep us 
'there;--' • - 

The guide books waxed 
equally lyrical about places 
like Quimper, Ben ode: and 
Fouesnam; all were within 
easy driving distance, but they 
might as well have been at the 
North Pole. In competition 
with Gauguin, blackberries 
and a dog called Agatha, they 
didn’t stand.a chance. 

John Carey 


TRAVEL NOTES 


. John Carey went to Brittany 
with Mean Vttta Holidays. Mem 
House, PetersfieW, Hants 
(0730 6841 1). This year a week 
in the same cottage at 
Pendruc costs from £179 to 
£329. This year marks the 
centenary of Gaugin’s arrival at 
Pont Avan and the musde is 
celebrating with a special 
exhibition this summer. 


It is several years since Britons 
last enjoyed direct flights to 
Mexico. British Airways sus- 
pended its Mexico City ser- 
vice in 1983 and Mexican flag- 
carrier Aeromexico has never 
flown here. So toe current best 
routings are either via the 
USA or European points such 
as Paris, Madrid or Amster- 
dam. 

Official feres to Mexico City 
through Europe/USA. start at 
£599 for a low season excur- 
sion (valid for travel until 
June 14) rising to £659 for 
peak season travel (June 15 
until October 14). If you want 
a stopover the feres rise to 
£766 low, £847 peak season. 

Some airlines, like British 
Caledonian and US carriers 
Continental and American, 
offer lower Apex feres if you 
travel via toe USA Book at 
least 21 days ahead. Low 
season Apex is £576 return, 
peak £599. 

. From next month Dallas- 
based American Airlines will 
be operating the most conve- 
nient through flights. Depart- 
ing from Gaiwick at 1 0.35am 
you can read) Mexico City by 
5.20pm (local time) the same 
day following a speedy 90- 
minute connection at Dallas. 

But not everyone is heading 
for Mexico City, the only des- 
tination that is served direct 
from Europe. If bound for 
other cities like Acapulco or 
Monterrey, it can be more 
convenient to fly via the USA 
In such cases you would head 
for a major gateway such as 
Miami /Houston/Dal las and 
transfer there to Mexico desti- 
nations Like Acapulco/Can- 
cun/Cozumel/Guadadajara- 
/Monterrey. The main US 
carriers serving Mexico from 
these points are Am eric- 
an/Continental/Pan Am dIus 
the two Mexican airlines, 
Aeromexico and Mexicana. 


FARE DEALS 


The current crop of US 
promotional fares means it is 
.more economical to travel 
that way provided you buy 
two separate tickets. For ex- 
ample, B. Cal is currently 
offering a £398 return 
“Latesaver" fere (book close 
to departure, depart before the 
end of May and return by the 
end of June) from London to 
Houston/Dallas. Combine 
this fere with a separate 
Continental Airlines' excur- 
sion between Houston and 
Mexico City or Acapulco cost- 
ing S195 (£130) and this will 

give you a tog fere of American (01-629 Ml 7k 
£528 ... up to £60 less than Continental (0293776464); 

the Apex fere. * 

Flying via the USA also 


allows “open jaw” (fly to one 
destination and return from 
another) convenience. 

Mexican airlines do not 
offer domestic Airpasses such 
as those for America. Bui as 
domestic flights are subsidised 
they are relatively cheap. For 
example, the 190-mile Mexico 
City/Acapulco hop cost some 
S26 (£17) or you would pay 
around $43 (£28) for the 443- 
mile Mexico City/Monterrey 
flight. Privately-owned 
Mexicana Airlines has a UK 
office 

Alex McWhirter 


Pan Am (01-409 3377k 
Mexicana (01-440 7830). 


IIAIH FRENCH M FRANS 

.E4..& orgavzes Fa*ich cowses at aB ... 

i CornroerciaO ; 

l woe*** be iwpp l»«* w * tf* 

SJBgrlSSASi! 


QE2/NEW YORK 
LATESAVER 
OFFER 
SAIL ONE-WAY 
FLY BACK FREE 
Fn>mon^£695 

On June 1 or 15 you can set 
saO on-IiKurious QE2. Stay 
tip to 15 exciting days in the 
/.£W4ed 5tates before flyraj 
home British Airways. 
Altema&relyiyou can Ry out 
British Ahvrays up to 15 days 
bdbresailng back QE2 from 
. Hew \brk on June 9 or 20. 
This fantastic price includes 
aifmeals-and entertainment 
on your 5 days aboard QE2. 

Space on boaiti is ftnited. so 
call Cunard now on 
(07)491 3930 or huny to 
. your travel agent 



2/ 


A unique art treasures tour 
of N£. Thailand, 

Laos and Vie tnam. 


This November you can 
(pin Swan Hellenic on a 
fascinating tout; the nuipr 
part of which is through 
Vietnam, one of Asia's most 
beautiful countries. 

Beginning in Thailand, we 
visit Udcm Tnani, the exca- 
vations at Ban Chiang, Kbiat, 
and the Khmer nuns at Pinwi. 
Across the border in Lids we 
will stay in Vientiane and visit 
the Wat Thra Keoand Thar 
Luang. - - 

Oiu-tourofVktnam starts in 
Hanoi.travdsdown to Da Nang 
to see die Marble Mountain, 

[ and crosses the mountains to 
! Hue to visit die Imperial City 
and Royal Tombs. A Eiscinating 
journey along thcioas: takes us 
south to theCham monuments 
near Nhd Trang and then to 
Ho Chi Minh City - Saigon. 
Visits here will include Coco- 

I nrn Palm Island to meet die 
Cap Dai religious sect, and the 
famous Vunji Tiu lighthouse. 
Our22 day tout which costs 


£2197, departs on November 8. 
accompanied by guest lecturer 
A lister Shearer and a pro- 
fessional tour manager. 

Aheraarively, we can offer: 
Korea & Taiwan. 19 days 
£Z 25 Q.Dep.Oct. 19 . Burma ft 
Thaiiand .22 days £ 2290 . 
Dep.Nov. 16 .' 

For foil detailson these tours, 
please ring us on 01-2-17 0401, 
ortick the relevant box jnd 
send us the coupon. 



Art Tn-jMjrey Tours 
47 Middlesex Su London H7AL 

Thailand, Laos & Vietnam □ 
Korea JtTai w and 
Burma & Thailand □ 


Name 

Address. 


. Ret: T ATQL 95ij 




5 


£ 


ESCORTED 
URNEYSf 

Experience the mystique of India, witb its ever- J 
changing cultures, magnificent art and beautiful 

scenery. Marvel at the exotic temples of *§; 

theFarEast,gazeactheaixriemnjinsof ♦ 
Mexico and Peru, 'jTfrfTTit? 

, or perhaps journey 7 ^, Til 



coast to coast 



across Canada. For our range of ^ 
fully escorted holidays phone “ 
01-629 0999, or visit any 
Thomas Cook or Frames Travel 
branch for a copy of our 
Escorted journeys brochure. # , 

■ I *—— -T* ABTA/ATOt A* * I 

t 


VISIT A LEGEND - NOW 



Historical! 
and the art of 1 
travel 

JUNE 30 LONDON- 
j DUBROVNIK. A morning. 

( flight from Gatwidc and a 
panoramic coastal drive 
marks the start of our 
ioumey through the Ionian, 
and Aegean seas. As you set 
our to explore each landfall 
from the Orpheus, you'll be 
well informed, lot; as you i, 
relax on board. you can listen!/ 
to our enthusiastic experts, ? 
whose talks will enliven the / 
f. Jpproach to - and enrich 
r your experience of - every 
: : part of our itinerary. 

JULY 2 DELPHI. Across the^ 
Sacred Plain and up Mount 
} Parnassus to reach this 
magical spot. 

3 ATHENS, the Acropolis 
and other classical sights. 
Later, perhaps on to 
Sounion ana the difftop 
temple of Poseidon. 

4 MELOS, home of the 
Venus de Milo, then ancient j 
Thera - Santorini. 

5 EPHESUS in Turkey 
a most marvellous site, 
or Priene. a Hellenistic 
survivoc 

6 DELOS - desened island 
of Apollo, then Mykonos. 

7 MYCENAE, Agamem- 
non's capita], and the superb 
theatre at Epidauros. 

8 MISTRA - an evocative 
Byzantine town of superb , 
beauty and peace. 

10 SYRACUSE, with its rich 
variety ofGreek and Roman 
remains. 

U POMPEII AND 
HERCULANEUM - vivid 
reminders of Roman urban i 
life. 

12 ELBA, island of exile for 
Napoleon, beautifully 
scenic. 

13 NICE. Journey's end tn 
this colourf ul town, with 
time toexplore before flying 
to London. 

There are many other 
itineraries to choose from . 
between nowand December. 1 
AH equally rewarding, and 
offering far more than an- 
understanding of the past 
Indeed, the essence or a 
Swan Hellenic cruise is. a 
sharing and developing of 
ideas and experiences. 
Travelling with like-minded 
company, dining with new 
people each day, you will 
find a stimulating atmos- 
phere both on board and 
ashore. Enabling you -to 
enjoy tothe full every aspect 3 
our cruises have to offec 
Fares from about £900 are 
fully inclusive, with return 
flights, most excursions and \ 


7, 


gratuities. 



at REID’S MADEIRA 


Cruise 
through the 
sands ortime 

Our Nile Crufees are 
almost as legendary as the 
river itself. Traveling in air- 
! conditioned comfort aboard 
the Nile Stai; you can fully 
appreciate the timeless 
beauty of the rive along 
your 600-mile journey and ! 
visit some of the greatest 
monuments in the world- 
As with all Swan Cruises; ’: 
3 guest lecturer - whose 
informal talks give a 
fascinating insist to all you 
will see - accomjpanies every 
cruise. Nile Cruises run all 
year; except July and August. 

0 

Ask your trjuei agent, 
or for full information and 
■ immediate availability on 
Swan Hellenic Orpheus or 
Nile Cruises, plwse ring us 
on (01) 247 7532. or send 
i the coupon. 


Madera is Elite** s iioptcai aland and 
tar many wmots the legendary R«d s 
H»iS ly flfcJoid 

Why na enjoy tab; gland's warm and gvnrle 
summer denote and see MMeaaand 
Sfetd S We gardens in fuU Mc«m. But be 

iwmerl visa us one« and it may wdl 

twcpmeah** 

W*fwia leaving the hotel you con m 2. 
uimiaiif. shin dwe. p4a\ tenrus. base o 
aouna. su.im m our healed sea waiei 
pxlsroryoucan »alh m tad magnffleert 
men-r> &htos enenaraefi eland. 

W«i some 350 Naff for a rnivmum of 
300 guetts you wffl enpenenct b swndanl 

sefwce matched by («, holds You 
n step between qBp ktKn she«6 m 
swnteflaWe tS candWoned rooms, and 

^epenAngon i.«.rmrodvoucaidnem 

raJ-Uonaloj miCHmal sgnOundstgs 
telan. ftsduran and 
ftwuguese euftaie. 

Yes petals you should make Ihe. 
fe^ndarealsy-nc* 


TOR IMMEDIATE RESRV AltoMS 
• Georges Hongarmer. (General 
M**aqer>. Reid's Hoiel F.O. Bo* 401. 
P90Q0. Funchal Coda. Madera. 
Ponuqal Tel funthd Z3001 TeteX 
72 1 39 Reid s P or • H Jt I. - The Leading 
toefe Ot Itie World - TeL 0 1 -583 3050 or 
0 Von Trane! Age« 

It YOU would l*e our brochure and further 
rtarmouon please send ihe coupon ift 



'/j '. 


„ .. „ . MADEIRA 

Rr>d a Hnl^l. 

PO Evu ?~i~ London fell- 1 VJOL 



ADDRESS 


; MBT0rmEGB0WincwOBU)OFr»O 
Swan Hellenic Cruises # 

1 47Middlesex St. London El 7AL ) 


Please send me details of: 
Swan Hellenic CmisesC } 
Swan Nile Crtwesn 


Name- 


Address. 


T10/5 








THE IIMES SAl URDAY MAY 10 19S6 


CHESS 

Rough 

and 

tumble 


Kleinwort Grieveson, spon- 
sors of the British Champion- 
'■ ship, are branching out with a 
novel contribution to Lon- 
don Chess Year. The UK- 
USA Match of Champions, 
pits Jon Speelman, the Brit- 
ish champion . against Lev 
Albun. his American coun- 
terpart, for a total purse of 
£8.000. At an average of 
' £1.000 per game this is a 
; British matchplay record for 
a non-World Championship 
cycle event 

Spectators are welcome 
and entry will be free. The 
venue is the Great Eastern 
Hotel. Liverpool Street now , 
the traditional home of Lon- j 
don chess events. Play will 
run from May 14-23 with rest 
days on May IS and 22. The 
games start at noon and go 
on to 6.00pm. 

At hurt is not a great stylist. I 
more of a rough and tumble I 
. specialist He has won the US 
Championship for the past 
two years and will prove a 
■ most’ wonhy opponent for 
. our champion. Here is a 
- typical sample of his play-: 

White: Albun; Black: 

Gurevich. 

Modern Benoni. US 
Championship 1985. 




• f. *■'- ; •* ’/• ' 



THE TIMES COOK 

Shona Crawford Poole has some wild designs op lasagne 

Luscious layers 


OUT AND ABOUT 


1 

P-04 

N-KB3 

2 P-OB4 

P-B4 

3 

P-Qfi 

P-K3 

« N-CS3 

PxP 

5 

P«P 

P-Q3 

6 IMS 

P-KNS 

T 

P-KN3 

B-N3 

B B4C 

0-0 

9 

0-0 

R4t1 

10 B-64 

N-M 

11 

B-N-5 

04(3 

13 041 

N-R3? 


There is nothing for it but a 
full-frontal admission, an eat- 
ing of formerly printed words: 
wholemeal pasta can be very 
good. Not any old wholemeal 
spaghetti mind you. No 
amount of skill will make 
anything worth the trouble out 
of some dried varieties. 

Fresh wholemeal pasta is an 
altogether more agreeable 
commodity. A single batch of 
dough made with finely 
ground 100 per cent whole- 
meal Dour and free range eggs 
was the only persuasion need- 
ed. but like brown bread, 
brown pasta works better with 
some flavours than with 
others. 

Wholemeal noodles need 
no more than a pat of butter 
and plenty of pungent Parme- 
san cheese. But in baked 
dishes like lasagne, it is the 
more robust fillings such as of 
ragu botognese or wild mush- 
rooms which work best. Mix 
and match the elements which 
follow here, using plain or 
green pasta, fresh or dried, if 
wholemeal does not appeaL 
Wholemeal pasta 
Makes 570g (1 "lbs) 

340g (12oz) finely ground 
wholemeal flour 

1 teaspoon salt 

4 large eggs 


Finely ground wholemeal 
flower is sold for cake and 


To serve with noodles, or as water over them. Leave them 
a building block for lasagne, a to soak for an hour, then 
gccc ragu botognese is called drain. Keep the liquid, which 
f or - 1 hayc been using Eliza- can be used in place of half the 
beih David s recipefrom hoi- milk in the bechamel. Chop 
ijn Food (Penguin, £3.95) the rehydrated mushrooms 
since spaghetti was in fashion finely, 
in the Sixties, and see no rea$- Melt the butter in a saute 
on to try another. pan and add the onion. Cook 

Another essentia] compo- i* gently until soft without 
nent of any lasagne recipe is a allowing it to colour. Add the 
bechamel sauce for which fresh mushrooms and cook 
there are many more compli- uncovered on a medium heat 




"•-e- : T' f ' -V*t ... ......... ... 

■ ■-*-**?; 

'•"V j ■' * 1 'H ' ; r ’ v , - S Vr >:■' 

\-5iyr. ^ 

: J ^ | - *■ ^ ^ 

IrV * - U' . : r*' ' 

f : v" ' : ", ' .• v 

r ' n i i iiiiiimt ’ ' ; 


cated formulas than this. 
Bechamel sauce 
Makes 1 litre (1% pints) 

85g (3oz) butter 

85g (3 o 2) plain flour 

1 litre (1 ¥• pints) milk 

Salt and freshly ground 
pepper 

Freshly grated nutmeg 


until they have softened and 
released their moisture. Add 
the rehydrated mushrooms 
and continue cooking the | 
mixture until the liquid has 
been reabsorbed. Take it of? 
the beat and season it to taste 
with salt and pepper. 

Lasagne 
Serves eight 


3g (11b) fresh, or 225g 
z) dried, pasta 


I ?.r . /■ 


. ..'f •' 1^4 

^-}V S 

-j ;?£ • **f- X* : 


*+\ r \ a 



Mil iMali mmntTfi m ai m i i am y i ■ m i i m 



Melt the butter in a heavy 

saucepan and add the flour, i litre (1% pints) bechamel 
Stir the roux for a minute or sauce 

two on a moderate heat with- 

out allowing it to colour. Then 1 recipe mushroom filling or 
gradually add the milk, stir- ragu botognese 

ring constantly, until the sauce . . ~ . I 

is smooth and thick. Season it 

with salt, pepper and freshly Parmesancheesa 

grated nutmeg. Cook the pasta a few sheets 


King cotton: Quarry Bank Mill, founded in 1784 by Samuel Greg. His workers' quarters were above the usual standard 

Our industrious heritage 


In autumn and winter fresh at a time in plenty of boiling 
porcini mushrooms can be us- salted water. It is ready when 


Droylsden is not an inspiring place- 
name. Nor is it an inspiring place. But. it 
has a surprise in store — buried in the 
middle of dull late Victorian and 
Edwardian surroundings is an oasis — 
Fairfield, founded and built 200 years 
ago as a working example of self 


pastry-making 
available, a 
mixture of 


If none 


porcini musnrooms can be us- salted water, it is ready when ago as a working example of self 
ed to make a luxurious filling it still has a little bite and is sufficiency within a tight religious 
for lasagne. When none are not mushy. Lay the lasagne on regime. ' 

available, bolster the flavour clean tea cloths to dry.Butler a Although the architecture is pleasant, 
of fresh cultivated mush- large rectangular earthenware Fairfield's real interest lies in its history 
rooms with a few dried dish about 25cm by 35cm and the principles behind iu U is one of 
porcini. 


regime. 

Although the architecture is pleasant, 
Fairfield's real interest lies in its history 
and the principles behind iu II is one of 


(JOin by 14inL or something a handful of Moravian villages; the last 


A poor move which should mixture 
have been rejected in favour coarser 
of 12 .. . QN-Q2. wholem 

13 B4t8 B-W 14 H422 and StTO : 

White now enjoys a great plain ' 
advantage since Black's " our a 
pieces can be driven back. use *J — u 
i« ... N-aa is M3 N-es to one 

IS f*-B4 Q-B3 17 0-64 B-R6 u/hifo 1 

IB IW-OI QH-Ot 19 IM2R4 B-B4 w , 

2D P-KN47 Make 

More accurate is 20 N-N5! dough 
20 ... B-B7 31 imis nxn hand or 

22 PiN Ox*> 23 R-G2 B-KS nrfw-^cm 

24 NxP RiN 25 Q*H B*fi pTOCWSOl 

26 pxb ninpi the flour 


Black launches a figbtback. If 
now 27 PxN B-K4 amusingly 
treqps the White Queen in 
mid- board. 

27 O-M N-M 28 P-Q8 002? 

The losing error. He had to 
try 28 ... P-R3! 

29 RxP O-ftG 30 R62I R-Q1 
31 P-07 KxQP 32 0-87 B-63 

And Black at once resigned in 
view of 33 QxRch and R-K8 
mate. 

At the same time as the 
UK.-US match of champions, 
Tony Miles, British Olympic 
number one, will challenge 
the World champion. Gary 
Kasparov. This will be over 
six games and in Basel. The 
Times will be carrying daily 
reports of both these impor- 


wholemeal 
and strong or »V' 

plain white ft* 

flour can be wj Pv . <v :~ 

used — up 

to one third ^ IsSBS 

white flour. • 

dough by "A 

hand or in a 
processor. Put 

the flour and 'IJjtfS 
salt on a sheet 
of paper. Put 
the eggs in the 
processor ~ 
and. with the ^ 

machine run- 
ning. add the flour all at once 
by using the paper as a funnel. 
Process the dough until it 
forms a balL To make the 
dough by hand, mix the eggs, 
flour and salL Knead the 
dough for two or three min- 
utes. then rest it. wrapped to 
prevent drying, for about 30 
minutes. Knead it again be- 
fore rolling it out thinly by 
hand or with a pasta roller and 

cut into wide bands of lasagne, 
or into ribbon noodles. Cook 
the wholemeal pasta in plenty 




tant events involving two of of boiling salted water. Cook- 
the top British Grandmasters, ing times will depend on the 


Raymond Keene 


dryness and thickness of the 
pasta. 


Mushroom filling 

Serves eight 

30g (loz) dried porcini, 
boletus eduks 

600ml (1 pint) boiling water 

55g(2oz) butter 

1 large onion, finely 
chopped 

500g (1 lb 2oz) mushrooms, 
sliced 

Salt and freshly ground 
black pepper 

Put the dried mushrooms in a 
bow] and pour the boiling 


,• bechamel. 

W Cbnlinue the 

layers until 
the dish is full, ending with a 
generous layer of bee ham eL 
Sprinkle the top with grated 
Parmesan. If the ingredients 
are to be baked without cool- 
ing. cook the lasagne in a 
preheated hot oven 
(230C/450f\ gas mark 8) for 
about 15 minutes. 

If the assembled lasagne is 
cold when it goes into the 
oven, cover it loosely with foil 
and bake it for 30 minutes in a 
preheated moderately hot 
oven (200C/400F. gas mark 
6), then remove the foil, raise 
the heat (230C/450f, gas 
mark 8) and bake it for an- 
other 15 minutes. 


similar. Fill and largest of five built in Britain 
the dish, be- between 1742 and 1785. The Moravians 
ginning with a were the first post- Reformation sect in 
skimpy mush- Europe and had re-surfaced in Germany 
room or ragu in the 1 720s. In Britain they concentrat- 
layer. Coyer ed their missionary activity in industrial 
the filling areas. Fairfield was close enough to 
with sheets of Manchester for convenience, far enough 
pasta, trim- away for peace, 
mi ng them to Moravian aspirations shine from the 
fit with over- place; solid terraced houses, two and 
laps of no three storey, arranged as a square. At 
more than the south end stand sacha pel. the school 
?mm («A an d houses for the brethren and the 
inch). Add an- sisters — the unmarried members of the 
other thin lay- village who lived communally, with 
er of filling their workshops in the same building, 
and a ladle of Nowadays the shared economy is no 
bechamel. more and the school is state run. No 
Continue the trace remains of the farm or the 
layers until flourishing 19th-century businesses. 


One side of the square is called 
Sisters* Street, the other Brethren StreeL 
To this day. coffins are carried down 
whichever applies. Other characteristic 
Moravian village features are the grave- 
yard planted as a garden (they consid- 
ered death should be a cheerful subject) 
and the cupola with a platform, on top 
of the chapel, for music on festive days. 

On the other side of Manchester is 
Styal — a village which grew to 
accommodate the employees of Samuel 
Greg, whose Quarry Bank Mill (for 
conon) was founded in 1784. Although 
this was no Utopian settlement, it was 
much above the usual standard. The 
Gregs built sizeable two-bedroom cot- 
tages with gardens and low rents. The 
earliest workers lived in agricultural 
cottages, and even a bam, in the hamlet 
called Firm Fold. Oak Cottages were 
built in the 1 820s, along with the chapel, 
school and shop. But the building which 
reminds us of how things were, even 
under a benevolent employer, is the 
apprentice house built for the child 
labour force, up to 100 at one time. 

LlnJike Fairfield, where life and work 
oflen went on under the same roof, here 
the village and the mill were set well 
apart. The National Trust owns it all 
and the milt, apprentice house, shop 
and cottages can be visited. 

Both these villages seem rather rural 


today. You couldn't say the same fori 
Pon Sunlight, an industrial village built 
a century later near Birkenhead. The 
philanthropic soap manufacturer Lord 
Leverhulme did his level best, but was 
defeated by the realities of late 19th- 
century Merseyside. Nevertheless it is a 
whole-hearted exercise in repro-arc hi- 
red ure. Tudor mansions contracted 
into terraced cottages. Jacobean extrav- 
agance cut down to size, and here and 
there something harking back to the 
Kentish village. In the middle is the one 
contribution that only an Edwardian 
millionaire could have thought of 
adding to an industrial village — a fine 
art gallery brimming with lSlh-cemury 
English painting at its peak. ISth- 
ceniury French furniture, and some of 
the best Victorian work to be found on 
wails anywhere. 

Gillian Barley 

The Lady Lever Art Galleiy. Port Sunlight 
Village. Merseyside (051 227 5234 1 Open 
daily, Mon-Sat' lOam-Spm, Sun 2-5pm. 
Free. 

Quarry Bank Mill, Styal. Cheshire '0625 
527468). Open Tues-Sun. 1 lam-Som 
until June 1 . Then daily, same times. 

Adult £2. child El .30. family ticket £5.30 
until June 1 . Then adult £2.20, child 
£1 .50, family £6. National Trust members 
free. 


Routings 


LIVING CRAFTS 86: 

Bodging, coppicing and icon 
painting are just three of the 
many crafts being 
demonstrated in the 
grounds and old palace stables 
at HetfieJd this weekend. 
Others include farriery, lace- 
making, thatching, 
bookbinding, dollmaking, 
stained glass painting. 
Teach-ins should be available 
and fringe entertainment 
indudes maypole dandngand 
Punch & Judy shows. 

Hatfield House, 

Hertfordshire (30 62823). 




EGG WHISK EXTRAORDINAIRE 


BRIDGE 

Suspicious of science 




'*j'**>% 
; *. 


iSR : - 







i > ; * 


Here’s a wonderful opportunity to buy the 
new Magimix 2000 (or any new Magimix 
model) and receive this beautifully 
engineered egg whisk attachment 
absolutely free! It's superb for meringues, 
cream and souffles-yetanother great 
Magimix feature, alongside the powerful 
‘professional’ heavy duty motor (fully 
guaranteed for 5 years). Sabatier blades, 
dishwasherproof bowl, unique range of 
specialised accessories, recipe books to 
guide and inspire you and Gold Seal 
Service Guarantee. All the advantages 
that make the Magimix food processor 
the one recommended by the world’s 
best cooks. Choose them from 3 sizes, 
including the new family sized Magimix 
2000 at aroundf 79.95 / \ 


Kenneih Konsiam used to 
say: “Give me wincing Rub- 
ber bridge players as team 
males’*. Of course. Konnie 
was an implacable opponent 
of scientific systems, con- 
stantly questioning their mer- 
it and scornfully suggesting 
that “codes'* were a poor 
substitute for judgemenL 
Times may have changed, 
but when I watch some of 
our leading Rubber bridge 
players in action, I see that 
Konnie* s aphorism still holds 
true. 

Freddie North, the declarer 
on the first hand, became 
disenchanted with the domes- 
tic tournament scene some 
years ago. which was surely 
Britain's loss. 

Rubber Bridge 
Love All 
Dealer East 

♦ 016 
: 9 

- AJ9764 
* K103 

• A107S3 1 - ~ I + K82 
; KQ754 " _ I :■ 1062 


On the last diamond South 
discarded the ^8. West in 
agony elected to part with a 
spade, so Freddie established 
a ninth trick by playing a 
small club from dummy. 

The next hand features a 
good pan-score battle be- 
tween Claude Rodrigue and 
Zia Mahmood. 

Love All 
Dealer East 

♦ 073 
V 105 
v J6 

♦ AB6543 


Today, tomorrow. 1 1 am- 
6pm. Adult £2.75, child £1 .50. 

BLUEBELL ON PARADE: 
Annual event at one of the 
prettiest steam railway 
centres. Today engines over 
100 years old will be 
working head-to-head, 
tomorrow coaches will be 
pulled by some of the more 
modem engines. 

The Bluebell Railway, 

Sheffield Park Station, near 
Uckfield East Sussex 
(082572 2370). Today, first 
tram 1 1 .40am. last 5pm; 
tomorrow first 10.30am, last 
6pm. Adult £2-50 return 
ticket child £1 -20 return. 

SUPREME CAT SHOW: 

Feline version of Crufts with 
over 1 ,000 cats entered for 
various classes. 

National Exhibition Centre, 
Birmingham (021 7802024). 
Today, 10.30am-5pm. Adult 
£1 .50. child £1. 

LONDON DOLLS HOUSE 
FESTIVAL: For all addicts of 
the world of miniature 
interiors, 70 stalls showing and 
-selling a wide range of dolls 
houses, and miniature fixtures. 
Kensington Town Hall, 

London W8. Further 
information. Mrs Hamilton 
(01-948 1893). Tomorrow, 
I0am-4.30pm. 

Tickets £2: after 1 pm, 
children 50p. 

Judy Froshaug 


clwyd 

Llangollen 

Distance: 

George Borrow 
fW spent more time based 

in LLangotlen than any- 
where else on his H iirf 
W ales walk. This circular 
walk may be started at any 
suitable place along the 
route, bat here is the most 
satisfying circuit: 

From the Panorama road, 
built for ladies less active 
than Mrs Borrow to view the 
splendours of the Dee Val- 
iev, climb to the reined 13th- 
century Caslell Dinas Bran 
— on a Celtic fort site — 2nd 
after marvelling at the vista, 
descend to the edge of the 
town and follow the canal 
westwards to Pentrefeiin. 

The bulk of Llangollen lies 
on the other side of the fine 
bridge over the Dee, but need 
not detain ns now. 

The access to the Chain 
Bridge Hotel is the call to. 
leave the towpath: about 80 . 
yards back along the road, a ; 
faint path teases its way I 
through bosh and bracken, 
keeping to the fence above 
the cultivated land until the 
majestic remains of Abaty 
Glyn y Groes (Valle Chios 


Abbey), a 13th-century Cis- 
tercian foundation which re- 
ceived Henry Mil's usual 
attentions. A steep bank 
across the footbridge leads ta 
a rising path above conifers 
which in turn gives access to 
a small road. The mighty 
cliffs of Eglwyseg slop their 
scree-strewn slopes form an 
impressive backdrop. Turn 
right on to the road, right at 
the squat little church dedi- 
cated to St Mary and follow 
the Panorama road back 
past Dinbren to return final- 
ly to Dinas Bran. 

lai" Liddell 




aJS f{ 

| Ud flak'll (I 


Valle 

Crscis V-. 

Li"*’ . % 

^ Dinbren V 
41 Pentrefeiin " 

Castd Dinas 
Bran h** 


' Shropshire 
Union. <sS 

r 1 River 


• J 10542 
T A2 

: K2 

* QJ107 


♦ K98 
/ J76 
: 010875 
4 92 


4 A6 
K 09643 
■1 A943 

4 K 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 947 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
cunvci solutions opened on Thursday. May 15. 19&6. Entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. 1 Pennington Street. London, E1X9. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, May 17. 1986. 




*:■ s!.& 


4 94 

• AJ83 

• KO103 
4 872 


Z a Ctaude 

uahmood Rodngue 
No 1 ' 

2- 2' 

34 J 

No — 

Opsneig lead 40 
q mtorence mat 


k-y; 

■ 

„ «■ Vtov 

V-’W 7»‘ : 




& 


w 

N 

E 

s 



_ 

No 

F North 
No 


2 

No 

3v 

3" 

34(1) 

NO 

3NT 

No 

No 

No 

— 


'V .' . 

■ 

MOREIVAYERTO ! 
BEA SUPERCmK! 


vS 

: * ’ *»' ■ 





vJIIl 


.•r.’ -i • 


Opening lead 43 

^ (1) Showmq a g^rd. ratiwr man asking 

MB Ujr one. when tna opponents have tad 

V .J two suits 

J / East took the first trick 
with the ♦K and excusably 
returned the suiL although as 
I the cards lie a switch lo the 
" ^10 would have been lethal. 

West won the ♦A and cleared 
the suiL Declarer has eight 
tricks, but the prospects for 
the ninth are poor, because if 
West is allowed to obtain the 
lead with the «frA he can cash 
his spades to defeat the 
Magimix contract at once. 

-,-1 ° ’ For a squeeze to succeed 

I ne power declarer must normally have 

that thinL-c Josl 2,1 lhe lric ^ can 
LI IdL U III IKb aflord. Nevertheless by run- 

for itself. n,n ? Ihe diamonds Freddie 
was able to exert some 
irresistible pressure. This was 
., N ihe five card ending, with lhe 
” lead in dumniv; 


01 There is s ! 
has only rhree 


Claude won in hand with 
the +K and led a diamond to 
dummy's CJ and Zia’s 
Queen. Zia played a heart lo 
his partner's Ace. After two 
more rounds of hearts. 
Claude played a low dia- 
mond. which West captured 
with the vK. But when West 
switched to the #J. Claude 
had built up an accurate 
picture of ihe unseen hands. 
He won the spade in hand 
and ran the trumps, leading 
to this three card ending, 
with East to discard. 


ACROSS 
I Rivrrbrdtll) 

9 Cross country runner 
(7) 

10 ki: house (5) 

It Decphotetil 

13 SjxAen f4] 

16 Sharp stones (4) 

17 4nificu[(6) 

18 Atur (4) 

20 Sham (4) 

21 Conakry stale ifil 

22 Bacon skin (4) 

23 Ballet skin {4) 

25 Thread (3) 

28 Fragment tS> 

29 Pragmatisi(7) 

30 Great fire seal (7.4} 

DOWN 

2 Mam artery <5} 

3 Hemk' (4} 

4 Moan (41 

5 Standard amount (4) 

6 Sun rooms 17) 

7 Special timepiece 

(ill 

8 \i once (4.2. S) 

12 Aim (6) 

14 Fifth zudiac sign (3) 

15 Take for granted (6) 

19 Car rear cover (7) 

20 Greasy (3) 

24 Trade group (5) 

25 Tournament 
management (4) 


m 

4? w*m 


Emu 


i aaw 
a b^i 


Solution to No 94] 

(last Saturday's prize concise) 

ACROSS: I Seismograph 9 Plumage 10 
Forgo 1 1 Rut 13 Raps 16 Hoop 17 Lean- 
10 18 X-ray 20 Iris 21 Wisdom 22 
Meek 23 Poor ZSSaS 28 Those 29 Pen- 
nies 30 Dermatology' 

DOWN: 2 Equip 1 Siam 40ver 5 Rift 6 
Parlour 7 Approximate 8 Compass Rose 1 1 
Untidy !4Sly 15 Patina 19 Awesome 20 
Imp 24 Owing 25 Seem 26 Spit 27Ani! 

The winners of prize concise Mo 941 are: 
Roy Linnet!, Tvc Rock Hotel. Porthlevtn. 




•i 'f/'l , ,Yp 


'•'•’Oi T-i-r-Ttyr. 


Zia had lo keep his 
diamonds, so he was forced 
to release a spade. When 
Claude played a spade he did 
not mind uho had the 4K. If 
it was WesL dummy would 
make lhe last two tricks. But 
if, as Claude expected, it was 
Zia. he would be forced to i 
into the diamond tenace. 

Jeremy Flint: 


26 St Paul's architect (4) Cttrnwalk and C. R. Illingworth. Stanley 

27 Mournful cry (4) Road. Stockport. 

SOLUTION TO NO 946 

J| . ROSS: 1 Iguana 5 Social 8 Sri 9 Tousle 10 Drudge 11 
Sto.i 12 SkcfttuJd 14 Things 17 Stench 19 Laialava 22 Oil} 24 
RipotT 25 Evince 26 Ml 27 Syntax 28 Yearly 

OOW'N: 2 Gnxtt 3 Abstain 4 Asepsis S Sidle 6Cnimh 7 An- 
ftflic 13 Wit 15 Heavily 16 Gal 17 Shapely 18 Evulica 20 
Adopt 21 Affix 23 L-xal 


Address 


Daily winners of the | 
competition, and the j 
booksellers who supplied 
their entry forms for the 
1st to 7th May are as 
follows: 

Karen Singlelon. 
Manchester 
(W.H. Willshaw Ltd, 
Manchester) 

H.C. Niordaunt, Isle of Man 
(Bridge Bookshop Ltd. 

Isle of Man) 

Joan Ramsey, Belfast 
(Crane's Bookshop, 
Belfast) 

Mrs D. Day, Aberystwyth 
(Midland Educational 
Bookshop, Worcester) 

J.D. Lowe, Warwick 
(John Gould. Warwick) 
Mrs Susan Terry. 
Pelersfield 

(The Fleet Bookshop. 
Hampshire) 


S 






5&N 


» 


fc*4. 


IJ5*> 


TUC TTX1CC C A "T*T fn 'Tv a tr if i tr < n « aa> 



Classical records 


REVIEW 



A clearer ring for classic Wagner 




Wagnen Tristan und Isolde, 

Suttiaus, Flagstad, 
PhHharmonia/Furtw^ngter. HMV ■ 

EX 290684-3 {four LPsTalso on CD 
and cassette) 

Wagner Der Ring des Nrbolunqen. 
Soloists, RA1 Rome SO/Furtw^ngfer 
HMV EX 290670-3 (14 LPs) 

Mozart Don Giovanni. Soloists, 
yfenna PO/Furtwfingler. HMV EX 
290667-3 (three LPs, also on 
cassette) 

There is something presumptuous 
about recommending recordings, that 
have the classic status of 
Furtwangler's Wagnen his Tristan 
has held its place as a landmark of the 
gramophone since 1 953, and bis Ring 
cycle of the same period immediately 
established its authority when it was 
at last published in 1972. 

After rehearing them in newly 
clarified “digital remasterings”, one 
can only advise anyone with the spare 
cash to do the same. The Tristan fives 
up to its reputation for cogent and 
deeply important symphonic drama; 


the Ring interpretation gains much 
from FurtwSngjer’s willingness to be 
at once serious and naive, unfolding 
lhe_ great work in massive breaths 
while at the same time rushing in to 
colour episodes with a ehiidHlcp 
intensity and immediacy of vision. 

But renewed acquaintance can also 
bring doubts. For instance, Ludwig 
Suthaos does cut a stiff figure as 
Tristan, and though Kirsten Flagstad 
was incomparable as Isolde, she was 
perhaps less incomparable by 1 952. It 
may be the new sound, or ft may be 
the intervening recorded Isoldes of 
Margaret Price and Hildegard 
Behrens, but the matroEQiness of 
Flagstad's performance seems to 
matter more. What is still thoroughly 
enjoyable is the young Fischer- 
Dieskau's feeling KunvenaL 
With the Ring recording, the 
outstanding problem is the Italian 
orchestra, which can on occasion 
draw from Fmtwanghrr’s slow fire, 
but which can also sound scrappy or. 
incoherent (I cannot explain the 


erratic account of Siegfried's funeral 
music, for instance, except as moti- 
vated by the conductor's despair, and 
the chorus in this act are pretty 
terrible too). 

On the credit side, there are a great 
many excellent solo performances: 
Martha Modi bending her voice with 
physical urgency into BrOnnhilde’s 
line. Ferdinand Frantz imposing 
authority as Woian, Josef Creindl 
sounding out of a spiritual blackness 
as Hagen, Sena Jurinac glorious as 
Gutrune. Nevertheless, it is now clear 
that this could not be anyone's first 
choice for a Ring: that has to be, as J 
decided here some while back, 
B ohm's Bayreuth recording. 

In many ways the Don Giovanni 
set, recorded at Salzburg in 1954, 
raises fewer problems. The Vienna 
Philharmonic in Mozart is something 
very different from the RAI Rome 
Symphony in Wagner, and Furtwang- 
ler is able to speak through them 
much more directly: the scale of his 
intentions is evident right from the 


i 


Best 

side 

story 


first wild, crushing chord, which sets 
out to make the opera a profound 
event in one's life. 

This is not, it need hardly be said, a 
view of Mozart that accords with 
current fashion. The tempos are 
generally slow, to accommodate a bi, 
sound and generous phrasing: 
anyone tried to reproduce such a 
performing style today, it could not 
possibly work, so different is the 
temper of the times. But this is the 
great value of this recording, that it 
can challenge one to respond to the 
work in a quite other, and surely no 
less rewarding, way. 

What the set also offers is a 
remarkable cast led by Cesare Siepi's 
darkly-alluring Don. neatly balanced 
by Otto Edelmann’s swifter, lighter 
Leporello. Elisabeth Schwarzkopf is 
the wonderful Elvira, but Elisabeth 
G rummer (also Furtwangler’s Freia) 
is by no means outshone as Donna 
Anna. One catches Walter Berry in 
fresh youth as Masetto. 

Paul Griffiths 


Bernstein: Symphonies 
1,2. Ludwig/Foss/Israel PO/ 
Bernstein. DG 415 964-2(1 
CD, also LP and cassette). 
Bernstein: Songfest, 
Chichester Psalms. National 
SO/ Israel PO/Bemstein. 

DG 415 965-2 (ICO. also LP 
and cassette). 

Bernstein: Divert imen to, 

HatU, Meditations, On the • 
Town. 

Rampal/Rostropovteh/ Israel 
PO /Bernstein, DG 415 966- 
2 (1 CD, also LP and cassette). 
Bernstein: Mass. Original 
Cast/Bemstein. CBS M2P 
42236 (2 LPs, also 
cassettes). 

Bemstetat/Stravfnsky/ 

Brubecte Jazz works. 
Goodman/ Columbia Jazz 
Ensemble/ New York PO. CBS 
MP 39768(1 LP, also 
cassette). 

Leonard Bernstein’s current 
high profile in Britain has 
prompted much reissuing of 
earlier recordings, generally 
concentrating on this poly- 
math musician’s more “ser- 
ious" compositions. He once 
defined bis entire output as 
being about “the crisis of our 
century, a crisis of faith". 

The First Symphony ( 1 942). 
for example, is an obvious 
early manifestation of this 
search for God. Entitled 
“Jeremiah", it is steeped m 
Hebrew chant from its brood- 
ing. neo-Mahlerian opening to 
its soothing finale, setting the 
Lamentations (sung with a 
potent mixture of sensuality 
and conviction by Christa 
Ludwig). The work is very 
much a symphonic child of its 
time; indeed, its consolatory 
ending in some ways resem- 
bles Tippett's oratorio of the 
same period. 

The “loss of faith” problem 
is more subtly approached in 
the Second Symphony 
through reference to the Au- 
den poem which gives the 
work its title: The Age of 
Anxiety. Unfortunately the 
pans I find most attractive - 
like the slick, jazzy Masque 
movement — are the very bits 

supposed to represent point- 
less and frenetic social activi- 
ty. Conversely the passages 
evoking rebirth and spiritual 
hope sound disconcertingly 
similar to film-scores like The 



Team with a 
touch of class 


Leonard Bernstein: from God to Broadway and rock gospel 
Ten Commandments. Anoth- spite its Sousa-ish name, ent- 


er American composer, Lukas 
Foss, plays the important 
concertante piano partsuperb- 
ly, and in boto works the Israel 
Philharmonic performs cred- 
itably. . 

The Chichester Psalms re- 
cording is disappointing, 
chiefly because the balance 
between instruments and 
voices is frequently awry. The 
Vienna Youth Choir rarely 
administers an antidotal cut- 
ting-edge to the rather sugary 
melodies, and the boy entrust- 
ed with the big Psalm 23 solo 
wavers a little in pitch. . • • 

Yet the disc is worth buying 
for the 1977 work Songfest, 
commissioned from Bernstein 
for the American Bicentenary 
(he was late finishing it). 
Setting 12 American poems 
for six singers and orchestra, 
the Songfest is atour-de-force 
of vocal eclecticism. Its paro- 
dies ofbymns, barbershop and 
scat-singing are even more 
impressive than its “sincere” 
numbers, though the deliber- 
ately naive setting of Whit- 
man’s To what you said . . . (a 
homosexual lyric, suppressed 
in his day) is stunning, espe- 
cially when graced by Donald 
Gramm's warm tone. - 

Divertimento is a similarly 
virtuosic compilation of allu- 
sions, mimicry and puns, 
written to celebrate the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra’s cente- 
nary (hence its somewhat 
wearving use of the melodic 
formula B-C). On tins five 
recording the Israel Philhar- 
monic is not ideally idiomatic 
in the dance numbers, but it 
gives full-blooded treatment 
to the finale: a march galled 
The BSO Forever which, de- 


elly and brilliantly parodies 
Radetzky. 

Elsewhere, too, there is 
much entertainment. Halil is 
an expressive, miniature flute 
concerto; extracts from Mass 
have been transcribed to show 
off Rostropovich's most soul- 
ful qualities; and the suite 
from On the Town (including 
brassy treatment of "New 
Yoric, New York”) is the 
quintessence of Broadway 
Bernstein. 

If you loved Godspell and 
Jesus Christ Superstar yon wflj 
undoubtedly thrill to Bern- 
stein's Mass. It is easily the 
most sophisticated and excit- 
ing of the rock-gospel school 

The smoothness 
of Goodman 

of musicals. Interpolating the 
traditional Latin liturgy with 
modern glosses like “If I could 
Fd confess, get this load off 
my chest” the work at least 
allows Bernstein to demon- 
strate how resourcefully a 
huge chorus, orchestra, rock 
band and soloists can be 
manipulated. 

The compilation album of 
“symphonic jazz” pieces by 
Bernstein, Stravinsky and 
Brubeck is entirely recoin- 
mendable. since it brings to- 
gether classic performances 
supervised by the composers 
themselves. For my money, 
no one has ever played 
Stravinsky’s Ebony Concerto 
or Bernstein's Prelude, Fugue 
and Rife with a more stylish 
swing than Benny Goodman. 

* 

Richard Morrison 


BOOKINGS 


Bizet La Jolle Rle da 
Perth. 

Anderson/Kraus/OuSco; 

New Philharmonic 
Orch./Pretre. EMI EX 
2702853 (3 records). Cas. EX 
2702859 (2 TCs). 

Weber: Euryanthe. 

Norman/H u nte r/Gedda / 
Krause; Dresden 
StaatskapeHe/Janowski. EMI 
EX 2606983 (3 records). 

A good q Barter of a century 
separates the birth dates of the 
young American soprano, 
June Anderson, and the tenor 
Alfredo Krans. But at the 
moment they are making Paris 
fight for tickets to hear them 
In Donizetti's La Fide da 
regiment. 

And together they are 
teamed again in this month’s 
release on record of another 
FU Ur. Bizet's La Mia FUk da 
Forth in which, if there is any 
jastioe, they should have an 
equal success. 

Bizet's opera, first beard at 
Christmas 1867, has been kept 
from more than the occasional 
airing In the theatre by its 
sprawling and inconsequential 
libretto. 

Just as Hollywood in the' 
Forties was in the habit of 
baying pp novel rights and 
then using nothing bat the 
title, so it was with Bizet's 
librettists who took Sir Walter 
Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth 
and then junked the plot. 

They served up instead a 
tale of a smith (called, of 
course. Smith) who fashions a 
leu rose for his beloved, 
Catherine. (Smith is a 
Rosenkavafier long before 
Strauss and Hofmannsthal 
came together). Catherine 
tosses it away in a fit of pique; 
accusations of infidelity sorely 
follow until ail is resolved 
happily to the notes of the 
Serenade, which the late Hed- 
dle Nash made one of his party 
pieces on the old Home 
Service. 

Those who hear Alfredo 
Krans sing it with his custom- 
ary style and meUiflnonsness, 
in this new recording may well 
be in for a surprise. TSae score 
has been considerably cleaned 
up. The Serenade, ‘A la voix\ 
is one of despair rather than 
wooing. And there is quite a bit 
of melanc h oly in the score: the 
drinking song of the appren- 
tice Ralph (excellently taken 



Alfredo Kraus: hitting high note 

The hero Adolar has killed 
the fearful serpent which 
threatened them both, but then 
abandons bis Enryantbe. 
Nicolai Gedda is somewhat 
stretched as Adolar graceful 
passages are followed by notes 
which could - and should - 
have been re-recorded. But 
there are powerful contribu- 
tions from the villains, 
Lysiart, Count of Beaqjolais, 
and Eglantine, sung by Tom 
Krause and Rita H outer. Mar- 
ek Janowski shows a skilled 
hand with the orchestra, bnt 
even in this digital remaster- 
ing there is a lack of richness. 


THE WEEK AHEAD By Peter Waymark 

Clarke’s ear for the art 
of dangerous laughter 1 


Roy Garke's comedy lives 
dangerously, eschewing the 
traditional props of plot and 
incident and depending al- 
most entirely on the inconse- 
quential mouthings of his 
more or less dotty characters. 
The formula can work bril- 
liantly. as it does in The Last 
of the Summer Wine, or it can 
totter to disaster. 

The latest Clarke series. The 
Clairvoyant (BBC2, Thurs, 9- 
9.30pm), could on the evi- 
dence of the first episode go 
either way. The Clarke signa- 
ture is immediately evident, 
in the leisurely pace and 
idiosyncratic dialogue and the 
refusal to let the storyline 
dominate. 

The central character 
(played by Roy Kinnear) is a 
used car salesman who thinks 
he can foretell the future. 
Sandro Dickinson, of the shrill 
American voice you either 
love or hate, is his girt friend 
and Hugh Lloyd, once a 
marvellous stooge for Tony 
Hancock, the petrol pump 
attendant. 

The producer. Alan J. W. 
Bell, places the Kinnear-Dick- 
inson exchanges in the tradi- 
tion of Bunts and Allen. The 
comparison is not immediate- 
ly apparent. But if The Clair- 
voyant is not an obvious 
ratings topper, nor. when it 
started and indeed for many 
years afterwards, was The Last 
of the Summer Wine. 

The trouble with alternative 
comedy, whether practised by 
The Young Ones or Spitting 



TELEVISION 

Image, is that too often the 
desire to shock overrides the 
more difficult and basic func- 
tion of comedy, which is to be 
funny. To utter rude words on 
Wogan is not enough. 

These thoughts are prompt- 
ed by Naked Video (BBC2, 
Mon. 9.30- 10pm). which has 
the same production team as 
A Kick Vp the Eighties and 
performers who cut their teeth 
on an award-winning series 
for Radio Scotland, reinforced 
by John Sparkes and Helen 
Lederer from the London 
cabaret circuit. 

Targets include the BBCs 
Nine O'Clock News. Glia 
Black and the Sinclair C5 
tricycle. Among the show’s 


running characters are a rau- 
cous Glasgow spiv and the 
owner of a nearly bald pate 
trying to make the most of his 
few remaining strands. Vul- 
garity is much to lhe fore, 
sometimes to hilarious effect 
as in a sketch about Mr 
Kipling’s contraceptive spong- 
es. and at other times not. 

Though the alternative co- 
medians would be reluctant to 
admit it. the most successful 
comedy is often the least 
ambitious. There a lot to be 
said for taking a simple, even 
cliche idea, and sticking with 

it. Thus Sorry'!, back fora new 
series tonight (BBC I, 7- 
7.30pm), with Ronnie Corbett 
as the middle-aged librarian 
still firmly tied to his mother's 
apron strings. 

In The Best Years of Your 
Life (BBC2. Wed. 9.25- 
l6.15pm) a 17-year-old boy 
who wanted to be a footballer 
is coming to terms with the 
lact that he is dying of cancer. 
So. in their different ways, are 
his brother and his father. 
Written by 20-year-old Give 
Jermain. himself suffering 
from cancer, the play manages 
the considerable feat of being 
neither depressing nor mawk- 
ish. The boy is played by Lee 
Whitlock. David Warner’s son 
in Hold the Back Page. 

Three burning social issues - 
test-tube babies, surrogacy 
and aids - are aired in Society, 
Science and Sex (ITV, Mon to 
Wed. 10.30-1 L30pm). The 
programmes bring together 
experts in the various fields. 


Quality on a shoestring 


by Jose Van Dam) is full of 
dark thoughts. It is only when 
the wicked Duke of Rothsay (a 
high baritone role, which 
draws a performance of great 
distinction from Gino Quill co) 
raises his glass that spirits 
rise, as well as (all down the 
gullet 

Catherine, who finally 
conies to her senses like Elvira 
in I puritan i when she hears 
her favourite air, is a pallid 
role which needs all June 
Anderson's bravura singing to 
bring it to life. This Joue FiUe 
has through and through a 
cast of the highest quality, 
which make one feope an opera 
boose will try and give it a 
revival of equal distinction. 

The orchestral sound is less 
satisfactory, at least on the 
cassette version, with a distant 
and occasionally hooray acous- 
tic. Georges Pretre gets the 
players going in the 
Boheraieiine - all the best 
songs are in Act II - bat 
elsewhere he is too remote. 

The sound is not of the best 
either in Euryanthe^ but that 
was recorded back in 1975. 



The other side of the 

Claudia Weill's first feature. 
Girlfriends (BBC2, tomorrow, 
11.05pm-] 2.35am) is another 
reminder that good films do 
not necessarily depend on 
large budgets and glamourous 
stars. Indeed much of the 
quality of Girlfriends derives 
precisely from lhe absence of 
such supposed advantages. 

Weill made Girlfriends in 
1 978 when she was in her early 
thirties after a promising ca- 
reer in television and docu- 
mentary, and thus added her 
name to the still small list of 
woman directors. Appropri- 
ately, Girlfriends is about fe- 
male relationships, explored 
with a woman's insight. 

The setting is Manhattan, 
where Susan Weinblatt. just 
out of college, scrapes a living 
photographing weddings and 
bar miizvahs and has a rela- 
tionship with a middle-aged 
married rabbi. But Susan's 
emotional prop is her 
flatmate, Anne, and when 
Anne moves out to get mar- 
ried. Susan feels betrayed and 
insecure. 


it Melanie Mayron in Girlfriends 


FILMS ON TV 

Her career is gening no- 
where and her private life goes 
from one emotional crisis 
after another. She picks up 
and drops a young university 
teacher and then does the 
same to a lesbian dancer. 
Anne, for her pan, finds 
marriage stifling, accuses Su- 
san of being selfish and insen- 
sitive and resents her apparent 
independence. 

Such a bald summary can- 
not do justice to the intelli- 
gence and freshness of the 
film. To start with, Weill uses 
New York as much more than 
a backdrop. The city, with its 
size and anonymity, com- 
pounds Susan's insecurity, 
trapping her in an unfriendly 
world of flats and offices. 
Girlfriends adroitly blends the 
emotional landscape with the 
physical one. 

But the emotional territory 
remains at the heart of the film 


and here a key point , is the 
character of Susan. The cast- 
ing is important Were she 
played by an established Hol- 
lywood star, the audience’s 
reading of the performance 
would inevitably be coloured 
by its previous knowledge of 
that actress and her roles. That 
Susan is played by an un- 
known, Melanie Mayron, 
means that actress and role are 
to all intents indivisible. 

The further point is that 
Susan/Mayron is not the con- 
ventional Hollywood glamour 
queen. On the contrary she is 
on the plump side, has bad 
teeth and wears glasses. A film 
which has been compared 
with Girlfriends is An Unmar- 
ried Woman, another study of 
a woman alone in the Big 
Apple. But here the credibility 
of the central character was 
compromised by Jill 
Clay burgh's assertive star per- 
formance. You never felt for a 
minute that she would be 
unable to cope. Mayron, on 
the other hand, comes across 
as vulnerable as she looks. 


John Higgins 


FIRST CHANCE 


Cmr OF LONDON 
FESTIVAL; Booking opens 
Mon for programme 

including rare stagir^of _ 

Shakespeare/Mend^s^m 

A Midsummer Ncftf s Dream; 
recitals to mark tne . 

centenary of Liszt s dea^, and 
Masters of the Kings Musjc _ 
and London Early Music Group 
□laving music from 
Elizabeth I to George B. Also 

Medici and Lindsay 
Quartets, Chns Barber s Jazz 

Band, Acker Bilk and 

Jacques Lousswr, plus full 
festival fringe. Personal 
booking May 19- 

HALU PROMS; Season 
includes Mozart snfl . 

evenings, wtjsgfofite 

1712). 


OPERA NORTH: Season 
opens May 27 with major 

r&stsoinG of Mozsrts Don 
Giovanni and Gounod's Faust* 
and new production of 
Stravinsky's 77w> Rake's 
Progress. Performances at 
Leeds, Nottingham, 
Manchester and York. May- 

Lseds Grand Theatre, 46 
New Brigcflte, Leeds 
(0532440971). 

ROYAL OPERA: Personal 
and phone booking open for 
June/Jufy. New productions 
include A Midsummer Nights 
Dream, and FtdeOo. plus 
Cost Fan Tutta and Eugene 
Onegin. 

Royal Opera House, Covent- 
Garden, 48 Floral Street 
London WG2 (01-240 1066). 

W1LMSLOW SPRING 
FESTIVAL: Phone booking 
from this week for first 
Wilmslow festival, which 
celebrates the Best of 
British and features George - • 
Melly and John Chilton's 
Feetwarmers; the Madid String 
Quartet and John ET 
GaOrid Woolf r and I 


Brass Band in open-air 
concert May 29-June 1. 

Box Office, Leisure Centre, 
Rectory Fields, Wilmslow, 
Cheshire (0625-533789). 

SOMMER CATHEDRALS 
FESTIVAL: Booking open for 
new festival of concerts at 
24 cathedrals, featuring 
London Festival Orchestra 
with cathedral choirs, and 
Janet Baker in gala 
snceatRippn 
ledral. Venues include 
Rochester, Bristol, Paisley, 

• Portsmouth. May 81-Oct 4. 
Centra) Box Office and 
Information: PO Boxl, St 
Albans. AL1 4ED 
(072737799). 

SHAKESPEARE OPEN AIR 
THEATRE: Booking open for 
1986 season with 
productions of Romeo and 
JuHsi, A Midsummer 
Night s Dream and Shaw's 
Amis and the Man; 25 
sonnets will be spoken each 
day by company members. 

. May30-Sep6.. 

: Open Air Theatre. Regent’s 

.Park, London NWt (01-935 
5756). 


WARWICK ARTS 
FESTIVAL: General public 
booking from this week for 
festival marking anniversaries 
of Weber's birtn, Liszt’s 
death and 50tti birthday of 
Richard Rodney Bennett 
New features include opera (by 
Cameo) and Saturday 
morning coffee concerts. 
Artists include Richard 
Rodney Bennett, Sam Houston 
Chorale from America, 

Anthony Goktetone, Kathryn 
Stott and Caroline Dale. 

There will be performances of 
Twelfth Night at Warwick 
Caste. July 2-13. 

Festival Office, Northgate, 
Warwick. (092&492468). 


LAST CHANCE 

BERNSTEIN FESTIVAL- 
Ends this weekend with 

g erformance of his Mass at 
iUfldbaH School of Music 
(tonight, 7.30). and charity 
concert tomorrow. 

Barbican Centre, Silk 
Street, London EC2 (01-638 
6891). 

information 01-638 4141. 


AMERICAN DANCE 
SEASON: Ends tonight (7.30) 
with programme of new 
works from Bill Jones and 
Amie Zanes company. 
Sadler's Wells, Rosebery 
Avenue, London EG1 (01-278 
8916). 

MRS WARREN’S 
PROFESSION: Anthony Page’s 
production, with Jessica 
Turner, finishes today (2.15 
and 7.45 pm). 

Lyitleton Theatre, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
2252). 

TORCH SONG TRILOGY: 

Last performances today (2 
and 7 pm) of Harvey 
Fierstehn splay, in production 
by Robert Allan Ackerman. 
Atoery Theatre, St Martin’s 
Lane. London WC1 (01-836 
3878). 

DAVID HOCKNEY 
LITHOGRAPHS: Vhrid colour 
and photo-collages based 
on Kenneth Tyler's new 
lithography techniques. 

Ends tomorrow. 

Tate Gallery, Mfflbank. 

London SW1 (01-821 1313). 


RECOMMENDED 


The Pink Panther (1963): 
Peter Sellers as the bumbling 
Inspector Clouseau in the 
first and best of the long- 
running series (BBC1 , 
today, 10. 05am -noon). 

Rose of Washington 
Square (1939): Al Jolson and 
some o( his finest songs 
steal fictionalized biopic of 
Broadway star Fanny Brice 
(Channel 4, today, 2-3.35pm). 

Freud: the Secret Passion 
(1 962): The early cases of the 
great psychoanalyst, 
broodingly played by 
Montgomery Clift (Channel 
4, today, 11pm-l ,15am). 

Roman Holiday (1953): 
Romance in Rome for 
newspaperman Gregory 
Peck and princess Audrey 
Hepburn (SBC1 , tomorrow, 
3.55-5.50, 


A passion for trains 
that earned millions 


.50pm). 

Albert RN (1953): Anthony 
Steel and Jack Warner fooling 
the Germans with a dummy 
in POW escape story (Channel 
4. tomorrow, 10.30pm- 
12.10am). 

The Angelk: Conversation 
(1985 Y. images by Derek 
Jarman for 14 Shakespeare 
sonnets, read by Judi Dench 
(Channel 4, Mon, 1 1pm- 
i2^5am). 

Picnic at Hanging Rock 
(1975): Peter Weir’s fine 
Australian film about the 

mysterious fate of Victorian 
schoolchildren (BBC2, 

Tues. 9-1 0.50pm). 

The THfiald Thuideitolt 

(1 952): Cosy Ealing comedy 
with Stanley Holloway 
leading the fight to save a rural 
railway (BBCi.-Wed.6- 
7.20pm). 

'denotes first British 
television showing 


There can be few British 
children who have grown up 
over lhe past 40 years un- 
touched by the adventures of 
Thomas the Tank Engine. But 
they are probably fairly igno- 
rant about the stories’ creator. 

He is the splendidly-named 
Wilbert Vere Awdry, an En- 
glish clergyman with a passion 
for steam trains. So, when his 
small son caught measles, it 
was not surprising that daddy 
should decide to cheer him up 
by telling him railway stories. 

Scribbled on the backs of 
old circulars, the exploits of 
Thomas and his friends were 
intended for family consump- 
tion only. It was Mrs Awdry 
who persuaded her husband to 
get them published and, since 
the first story appeared in 
1 945, the series has sold nearly 
eight million copies. 

Now 74 and retired, the 
Revd Awdry reflects on his 
elevation to best-sellerdom in 
The Thomas the Tank Engine 
Man (Radio 4, Tues. 8.30- 
9 pm). He is plainly delighted 
by the stories' success, and 
amazed that today's children 
should want to read about the 
long-vanished age of steam. 

Another age long gone, that 
of the British Empire, is 
evoked in Two Superior Per- 
sons f Radio 4. tomorrow, 
I0.JM1 pm). The title refers 
to Lord Kitchener and Lord 
George Curzon. and the pro- 
gramme chans their power 
struggle between 1903 and 
1905. 

Curzon. one of the most 
gifted men of his generation, 
became Viceroy ofindia at the 
age of 39. He Invited KJiche- 


RADIO 


per lo become £ommander- 
in-Chief of the Army, unaware 
that Kitchener would try to 
ruin him and put India under 
military control. 

The battle between these 
formidable men is told largely 
in their own words, taken 
from contemporary docu- 
ments. Alec McCowen plays 
Curzon and Jeremy Kemp is 
Kitchener. 

The 600th anniversary of 
the signing of a friendship 
treaty between England and 
Portugal is marked by Radio 4 
tomorrow with It’s Your 
World (12.10-1 pm) - in 
which the guest is Portugal's 
prime minister Anibal Cavaco 
Silva — and The Oldest Ally 
(9-9.30 pm), the first of three 
Robert Graham programmes 
looking at Portugal's past, 
present and future. 

Nevil Shute’s No Highway 
is the new Radio 4 Classic 
Serial (tomorrow, 7-8 pm) in a 
three-part dramatization by- 
Brian Gear. Norman Bowler 
plays the RAF boffin who 
discovers metal fatigue in the 
tailpiece of a new airliner. 

Juliet Ace. v a playwright 
always worth listening to, is 
the author of Jonathon George 
Can Walk on Water (Radio 4. 
Tues. >4 pm)' Jonathon (Pe- 
ter Jeffrey) returns to his 
birthplace, a West Country 
fishing port lo discover that 
its former shabby charm has 
been transformed into a 
gleaming film set. 




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CONCERTS 


ON SONG: Valerie Masterson, 
ex-D'Oyly Carte and now one of die 
Coliseum s favourite sopranos, 
forsakes the theatre for the concert 
hall for a recital of songs and 
arias, mainly British and French. 
Wigmore Hall (01-935 2141), 
today. 7.30pm. 


BOOKS 


STAGE SECRETS: Laurence 
Olivier gives an inside view of his 
profession, ruminating on his 
successes and failures and revealing 
how he created some of his great 
roles, from Richard 111 to Othello 
and Archie Rice, in On Acting 
(Weidenfeld and Nlcoison, £12.95). 


TIMES CHOICE 


ROCK 

RISING SON: Julian Lennon may 
have his father's voice, nose and 
leather jacket, but the jury is still 
out on the dimension of his 
songwriting talent Further 
evidence can be heard at the Albert 
Hall, London SW7 (01-589 8212) 
on Monday and Tuesday. 


THEATRE 


DOUBLE TROUBLE: Roger Rees 
is the star and co-author with Eric 
Bice of Double Double, a thriller 
about a woman encountering a tramp 
who resembles her former idver. 

His leading lady is Jane Lapotaire. 
Palace Watford (0923 25671) from 
Thursday. 


TELE ViSIOli 


PURPLE PROSE Afice Walker, 
whose novel 7fte Colour Purple has 
been filmed by Steven Spielberg, 
discusses in a rare television 
. interview the central theme of her 
work, tiie creative spirit of the black 
woman. Omnibus, BBCt . Friday, 
10.20-1 1.20pm. 


m THE STYLE: Cecfl Beaton** 
unique contribution to 20th-century 
styte is refected in a first major 
retrospective. There are more than 
700 items on show, including . 
paintings, costumes, photographs 
ancf drawings. Barbican Centre 
(01-638 41 41), from Friday. 


THEATRE 


. IN PREVIEW 

DALLIANCE: Tom Stoppard s 
version of Arthur Schnrtzler's 
: Uebeiei. directed by Peter 
Wood. Tragic love in tum-of- 
the-century Vienna. Brenda 
Blethyn, Michael Bryant. 
Lyttelton (01-928 2252). 
Previews Thurs, Fri May 17. 
.19-24, 26. Opens May 27. In 
repertory. 

;THE NORMAL HEART: Tom 
Hulce, creator of the role of 
Ned Weeks in the US, takes 
over from Martin Sheen as the 
Royal Court production of 
Larry Kramer s Aids drama 
.transfers to the West End. 
Alberv (Cl-836 3878). Previews 
from tues. Opens May 20. 
SONS OF CAIN: David 
. Williamson's satirical comedy 
about investigative journalism 
comes to London from 
success in Australia and with 
an all-Australian cast, headed 
by Ray Barrett. Directed by 
.John Noble. 

Wyndham’s (01-S36 3028). 
Previews from Wed. Opens 
May 19. 

CHESS: Murray Head and 
Elaine Paige in the Tim 
Rice /Bjorn Ulvaeus/Benny 
Andersson musical developed 
from the successful album 
about international chess 
champions. Directed by Trevor 
Nunn. 

Prince Edward (01-734 8951). 
Now previewing. Opens Wed. 


OPENINGS 


CREDITORS: August 
Strindberg's "masterpiece" in 
. an updated version of the 
Michael Meyer translation. 
Produced and performed by 
. , Suzanne Bertish. Jonathan 

- Kent, Ian McDiarmid. in 
collaboration with Casper 

• Wrede. 

Almeida Theatre. Almeida 
Street, London N1 (01-359 
4404). Tues-June 7. 

DOUBLE CROSS: Stephen Rea 
plays both Brendan Bracken, a 
confidant of Churchill, and 
' . William Joyce. Hitler's Lord 
' Haw-Haw, in Thomas Kilroy's 
play, with Richard Howard. 

■. . Kate O'Toole. 

Royal Court (01 -730 1 745). 

; Opens today. 

. - DOUBLE DOUBLE: World 
- . premiere of Eric Dice and 
. Roger Rees play in which a 
. woman takes home a tramp 
who resembles a former (over. 
Leon Rubin directs Jane 

- Lapotaire and Rees. 

. Palace, Watford (0923 25671). 
From Thurs. Press preview 
' .May 20. 

REAL DREAMS: British 
•premiere of a Trevor Griffiths 

- play about educated young 
white American liberals in 

.. Cleveland. Ohio. 1969. who are 
. committed to Third World 
„ revolution. 

.The Pit, Barbican (01-628 

- 6795/638 8891). Performances 
■ Tues, Wed. Press night Thurs. 

OUT OF TOWN 

EXETER: One Flew Over the 

- Cuckoo's Nest Dale 

• Wasserman's play of the 

1 KenKesey novel set in a mental 
institution. Pip Miller. Michael 

- Gunn and Zoe Hicks. 

; Northcott (0392 54853). Until 

• 7 May 24. 

GLASGOW: Thomas Muir’s 
r Voyage to Australia: First part 
. of a commissioned trilogy by 
\ * Peter A matt on the fife of "tne 
V. first major martyr of the 
- Scottish Republican 

• ■’Movement'. 

- - Tron (041 552 4267). Until May 
l 18. 

. - GUILDFORD: Cuckoo: 

’ Rosemary Leach stars in the 
’. premiere production of Emlyn 
Williams's play about an 

- eccentric family living on a 
Thames island in the 1930s. 



Wi ffiams (above) also directs. 
Yvonne Amaud (0483 601 91). 
-Opens Tues. Until May 31 . 
LIVERPOOL: Something 
W*cked TWs Way Comes: Liz 
Brellsforti and Andrew 



Dickson's adaptation of Ray 
Bradbury's thriller about a 
sinister carnival. Han 
Duijvendak directs. 

Everyman (051 709 4776). 
Opens Thurs. 

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON: 
Every Man in his Humour Ben 
Johnson comedy directed by 
John Caird, with Tony Church. 
Philip Franks. Paul Greenwood 
and Joely Richardson in 
leadina roles. 

Swan (0789 295623). Peris 
Thurs, Fri. May 17. 19, 20. 
Opens May 2f. 

FILMS 

OPENINGS 

HE DIED WITH HIS EYES 
OPEN (18): Entertaining 
French thriller with a fine 
performance by Michel 
Serrault as the police inspector 
whose murder investigation 
leads to a passionate affair 
with Charlotte Rampling. 
Directed by Jacques Deray. 
Cannon Premiere (01-439 
4470). From Fri. 

9% WEEKS (18): The empty 
story of a bizarre, tumultuous 
love affair between 
stockbroker Mickey Rourke 
and art gallery employee Kim 
Basinger; directed in pop video 
style by Adrian Lyne. 

ABC Shaftesbury Avenue (01- 
836 6279). From Fri. 

THE HITCHER (18): Everyone’s 
fears about hitch-hiking are 
boringly realized in this 
handsomely-shot thriller with 
Rutger Hauer as a lift- 
thumbing psychopath. 

Directed by Robert Harmon. 
Prince Charles (01-437 8181). 
From Fri. 

THE SLUMBER PARTY 
MASSACRE (18) and 
STREETWALKIN' (18): Two 
low-budget exploitation 
movies. The former, directed 
by Amy Jones, at least mixes 
gore with black humour; the 
latter, directed by Joan 
Freeman, is an elephantine tale 
of prostitute and pimp warfare. 
ICA Cinema (01 -930 3647). 

From Fri. 


SELECTED 


VAGABONDE (15): Agnes 
Varda's Weak but compelling 
account of a teenage 
wanderer's last weeks, with a 
powerful performance by 
Sandrine Bonnaire. . 

Renoir Russell Square (01-837 
8402). Minema (01-235 4225). 
LOVE LETTERS (18): 
Thoughtful drama with Jamie 
Lee Curtis as the other woman 
in an extra-martial affair. 
Directed by Amy Jones. 
Cannon Tottenham Court 
Road (01-636 6148). 

ZINA (15): Zina is Trotsky's 
daughter, hauntingly played by 
Domiziana Giordano. An 
austere, striking British 
independent feature, directed 
by Ken McMullen. 

Gate Netting Hill (01-221 0220). 
Metro (01-437 0757). 
CARAVAGGIO (15): Derek 
Jarman's film about the work 
and scandals of the 16th 
century painter, with minimal 
sets and maximum ingenuity. 
Lumiere (01-836 0691). 

CONCERTS 

MUSIC MAKERS: Richard 
Hickox conducts the LSO and 
choir in Weber's Oberon 
Overture. Mendelssohn’s 
Violin Concerto (soloist Ida 
Haendel) and Elgar's The 
Music Makers. 

Barbican Centre, Silk St 
London EC2 (01 -628 8795, 
credit cards 01-638 8891). 
Today. 7.45 pm. 
.POST-AFTERNOON: The 
Simon Rattie/Philharmonia 
Orchestra "Aptes I’Apres- 
midi" series continues with 
Satie's Parade, Koechlin’s 
Les Bandar-Log , Debussy's 
Martyrs de Saint SdOasOen, 
some Duparc songs (Ann 
Murray, mezzo). 

Royal Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
31 91 , credit cards 01 -928 
8800). Tomorrow, 7.30 pm. 

ALL RUSSIAN: Under Mark 
Ermler. the City of London 
Sinfonia plays Arensky’s 
Variations on a Theme by 
Tchaikovsky, 

Tchaikovsky's Serenade for 
Strings. Shostakovich's 
Concerto for Piano and 


Trumpet (Joseph 
Kalicnstern and C 


Crispin Steele- 
Perkins respectively ). 

Barbican Centre. Mon, 

7.45 pm. 

ALL BEETHOVEN: LPO. 
under Klaus Tennstedt plays 
the Leonora No 3 Overture. 
Violin Concerto (Shtomo Mintx. 
soloist), Symphony No 5. 
Festival Hail. Mon, 7.30 pm. 
PIANO PLUS: Eden and 
Tamir play Stravinsky's Five 


Easy Pieces, Milhaud's 
Scaramouche, Poulenc's 
Sonata and, with 
percussionists, Bartok's 
Sonata for Two Pianos and 
Percussion. 

Wigmore Hall. 36 Wigmore 
St. London W1 (01-935 2141). 
Tues. 7.30 pm. 
TAMASVASARY plays 
Beethoven's Sonatas Op 27 
Nos 1 and 57, Liszt's Danta 
Sonata, and a Chopin group. 
St John's. Smith Sq, 

London SW1 (01-222 1061). 
Tues, 7.30 pm. 

ALL FRENCH: The 
Bournemouth Symphony 
Orchestra, under Louis 
Fremaux. plays Satie's 
Gymnopddies, d'lndy's 
Symphonic sur un Chant 
Montagnard and Samt- 
Saens a Symphony No 3. 
Festival Hall. Wed, 7.30 pm. 
KORNGOLD CONCERTO: 
Komgold's worthy Violin 
Concerto is played by 
Stephen Bryant with the 
Salomon Orchestra 
conducted by Malcolm Binney. 
St John's. Wed, 8 pm. 
RATTLE/PHILHARMONIA: 
More “Aptes I'Aptes-Midi", 


with Simon Rattle (above) 
conducting Poulenc's 
Concerto for Two Pianos 
(soloists, Kaba and Marielle 
Labeque), Debussy's Jeux, 
and Ravel's enchanting 
L 'Enfant et les Sorttitiges. 
Festival Hall. Thurs, 

7.30 pm. 

CROW/BOTSTE1N: Todd 
Crow solos In Brahms's Piano 
Concerto No 2 and Leon 
Bot$tein conducts the LPO in 
Dvorak’s Symphony No 8. 
Barbican Centre. Fri, 

7.45 pm. 

GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 

INDIAN MINIATURES: Tiny, 
fine, 18th and 19th century 
paintings. 

Htzwilllam Museum, 
Trumpington St Cambridge 
(0223 332900) from Tues. 

AMERICAN POTTERS: 
Selection of contemporary 
American studio pottery. 
Victoria and Albert Museum, 
South Kensington, London 
SW7 (01 -589 6371) from Wed. 

KEN K1FF: Fantasy subjects in 
Arts Council touring show. 
Amoifini Gallery, Narrow Quay, 
Bristol BS1 (0272 2991 91) from 
today. 

TERRY WINTERS: Large 
figurative paintings of plant 
and crystalline forms. 

Tate Gallery, Mfllbank, London 
SW1 (01-821 1313) from Wed. 

ART OF ILLUMINATION: 
Medieval manuscripts and 
contemporary calligraphy. 
Ruskin Gallery, 101 Norfolk St 
Sheffield (0742 734781) from 
today. 

SELECTED 

IN TANDEM: Sculptures by 
20th century painters such as 
Picasso and Matisse. 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, 
Whitechapel High St London 
El (01-377 010 7). 

MANET: Attempt to explain the 
artist's methods through X- 
rays and research. 

Courtauld Institute Galleries. 
Woburn Square, London W1 
(information 01-278 2345). 


OPERA 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: 
Last performance (7 pm 
tonight) of Les Contes 
d'Hoffman. Then Tosca on 
Tues and Fri (7.30 pm), with 
Mara Zampieri, Giuseppe 
Giacomini, Ingvar Wixeil, 
Richard van Alien. 

Covent Garden, London 
WC2 (01-240 1066). 
ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: New production of 
Busoni’s Doctor Faust 
(Thurs at 7 pm): a stalwart 
revival of Die Fledermaus 
(tonight and Wed. 7.30 pm); 
and Smetana's The 
Bartered Bride ( Fri. 7.30 pm). 


Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-8363161). 
BRIGHTON FESTIVAL: 

New Sussex Opera's Aida 
isset in the times of the 
Franco-Prussian war. Tonight 
Moo, Wed and Fri 
(7.45 pm). 

The Dome, Brighton (0273 
674357). 

SCOTTISH OPERA: 
Performances today, Tues and 
Thurs (7.15 pm), of John 
Cox's new production of The 
Marriage of Figaro. Gyorgy 
Fischer conducts. Anthony 
Besch’s production of 
Tosca returns on Wed 
(7.15 pm) and May 17 
(2.15 pm). 

Theatre Royal, Glasgow 
(041 331 1234) 

NIELSEN FIRST: Moriey 
College presents the first UK 
staging of Carl Nielsen’s 
Maskarade (Mon, Tues 
7,30 pm). 

Moriey College. 61 
Westminster Br. 

London SEIfOM 


An actor at the 
heart of his art 


Tim Behan 


Road, 

8.501) 



ROCK AMD JAZZ 

WATERBOYS: A 
developing rock band who 
bring a sense of 
spontaneity to the sort of 
romantic sensibility for 
which U2 are famous. 

Tonight Leeds Univarsity 
(0532439071); Tues, 
Hammersmith Palais (01- 
7484081) 

NEWCASTLE JAZZ 
FESTIVAL: Beginning tonight 
with Loose Tubes, tins 
aesthetically free-ranging 
event also features the US 
guitarist Tai Fariow (Tues) and 
the duo of multi- 
'mstrumentalist John Surman 
and singer Karin Krog (Fri), 
From tonight New 
Playhouse, Newcastle upon 
Tyne (0632 323421} 
IMAGINATION: Billed as 
the fifth anniversary 
celebration of the creators 
of "Body Talk", perhaps the 
first really convincing 
British soul group. 

Thurs, Albert Hall, London 
SW7 (01-589 8212) 

TED HEATH BAND: Singers 
Dennis Lotts and Lite Roza 
come under Don Lusher's 
baton in this reunion. 

Thurs, Barbican Hall, 

London EC2 (01-628 8795) 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

DAVID RED FERN: One of 
the masters of jazz 
photography whose career 
spans 25 years from the early 
days of television’s Ready 
Steaoy Go through to Ronnie 
Scott's dub. Pictures 
include early Beatles and EHa 
Fitzgerald. Redfem's 
collection is today regarded as 
one of the best in Europe. 

The West End Gallery. 186 
Drury Lane, London, WC2 (01 
831 0196) 

CECIL BEATON: A major 
retrospective for this well 
known photographer. . 
Portraits, fashion and war - 
Beaton covered it all. The 
whole exhibition amounts to a 
fascinating trawl through 
the 20th century. This one 
must not be missed. 

Barbican Art Gallery, 

Barbican, London, EC2 (01 638 
4141) 



ARTS DIARY 


Unholy 


Tom Hulce, complete with the stubble he hopes will age ham 


DANCE 


ROYAL BALLET: MacMMan 
triple bill Concerto, Le Baiser 
de fa fee, and Anastasia. 

Mon, Thurs. 

Covent Garden (01-240 
1066) 

SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: Two performances at 
Plymouth today of Les 
Syphkfes. Prodigal Son and 
Bite Syncopations, then 
a season (WedJune 3) In the 
Big Top in Sheffield. First 
week, The Sleeping Beauty. 
Theatre Royal. Plymouth 
(0752-669595). Big Top, 

Norfolk Park. Sheffield 
(advance booking at Crucible 
- “ 17302' 


Theatre, 0742" 


244) 


For ticket availability, 
performance and opening 
times, telephone the 
numbers listed. Theatre: 
Tony Patrick and Martin 
Cropper; Concerts: Max 
Harrison; Films: Geo IT 
Brown; Photography: 
Michael Young; 
Galleries: Sarah Jane 
Checkiand; Opera: 
Hilary Finch; Rock & 
Jazz: Richard Williams; 
Dance: John Percival: 
Bookings: Anne 
Whitehorse 


Tom Hulce has discarded the 
powder and patch of Amadeus 
tor a contemporary brat pack 
uniform of black leather jack- 
et, tennis shirt and clean white 
sneakers. 

He sat a shade uneasily in 
his rented Knights bridge flat 
struggling for a line to Austria 
and commenting in between 
on the {genteel d6cor of his 
surroundings. “This reminds 
me of something from a 
Penelope Keith comedy 
series”, he said, quite sure of 
his references. “ You didn't 
think this was my taste, did 
you? Oh no, I would wish for 
something a little more 
-..funky” 

Since he will be working 
away from his native America 
-for most of this summer, next 
stage on the agenda is a visit to 
the estate agents. Hulce has 
arrived in London to replace 
Martin Sheen in Larry 
Kramer’s notorious play The 
Normal Heart which tackles 
the subject of Aids through a 
love story between two homo- 
sexual men. 

It bas received a prodigious 
amount of attention and equal 
parts of praise and criticism 
not feast from the homosexual 
community who object to 
Kramer’s advocacy of 
monogamy. 

A couple of months ago 
Hulce was at the Lyric. Ham- 
mersmith, watching a perfor- 
mance of Doug Lucie's 
Progress. He decided that the 
place where he would most 
like to work next was the 
London stage, but because of 
Equity restrictions he imag- 
ined that the only possible role 
he could be offered would be 
in some kind of transferred 
Broadway extravaganza. Sc 
when he was given the oppor- 
tunity to play Ned Weeks in 
the Normal Heart ft came 
close to serendipity. 

He had already tackled the 
role with the Longwharf The- 
atre Company (the team that 
brought A1 Pacino lo London 
in American Buffalo) and 
because of this feels less 
reservation that he might have 
done about succeeding Sheen 
who has received immense 
acclaim in the part 
“It is a quite different 
production to the one I was in. 

It is an exceptional company”, 
he emphasizes, after having 


Tom Hulce, back in 
London to take over 
the lead in The 
Normal Heart , talks 
about his life to 
Alexandra Shqlman 

seen the current production 
the previous night “Had I not 
played the role already it 
would have been very danger- 
ous to watch Martin Sheen 
perform. There must be dose 
on 20 years between us. The 
anger of a young* man is very 
different, I think, from the 
anger of someone who has 
seen more.” 

Although the play is by no 
means tilled with gratuitous 
and titillating displays of ho- 
mosexuality. he admitted that 
he found it strange to play 
intimate scenes opposite a 
leading man. “It's like the 
scene in Annie Hall where 
Diane Keaton and Woody 
dlen are walking down the 
itreet at the start of their first 
date and he asks if he can kiss 
her so that they can get that bit 
out of the way and concentrate 
on having fun for the rest of 
the evening”. 

Huice began his career in 
his teens. At 15 be derided 
that he would go to acting 
school instead of following the 
route he had previously 
charted for himself as a singer. 
Back home in Michigan, his 
parents’ marriage was break- 
ing up and acting school in 
North Carolina was a legiti- 
mate escape route. . 

Within six months of leav- 
ing he was offered the role of 
Peter Firth's understudy in the 
New York stage production of 
Equus. It was there that he met 
Anthony Hopkins who now 
heads his list of heroes and . 
whose performance in Pravda 
brought him to the brink of 
tears with admiration. 

That was the beginning of a • 
career which juggles stage, 
film and television work. 

Amadeus is both his crown 
and. his ball and chain. When 
he speaks of the film it is with 
a mixture of awe and stilled 
boredom. As a relative un- 
known in America, and a total 
unknown in international 


box-office terms, he was sub- 
jected to an arduous audition- 
ing process for the title role by 
director Milos Forman.. ' 

Over a period of six months 
he beat down the competition, 
including Simon Callow, who 
bad played the role bn stage in 
England. In appearance. Cal- 
low bears similarities to Hulce 
with their youthful feces and 
stocky stature. They share, . 
too, an actorish exuberance. 

At one stage in the proceed- 
ings. Hulce was pleased to 
recall, be went home and 
packed up a suitcase full of his 
dirty laundry which he then 
deposited on the stage. There 
it served a dual purpose as a 
reassuring and familiar object 
and a prop for the chaos that 
was young Mozart’s room. 

“ Amadeus -was' extreme. 
There were days that were 
devastating and days that were 
thrilling”, he; remembers. 
“Since we were shooting for 
over five months it becomes 
dear that, in - the circum- 
stances, what h is ail about .is 
discipline.” 

A more immediate process 
has been his move into the 
world of pop. With a taste for 
music that recognizes not only 
Mozart but Ridrie Lee Jones, 
Keith Jarre tt, U2 and Bruce 
Springsteen, he is currently 
embarking on a subsidiary 
career as a pop singer. 

Last year, while shooting his 
most recent film Echo Park, 
Hulce encountered 

Oceanfleight, a German band 
based in a small town , outside 
Zurich. .One long night, after 
several long drinks, he joined 
them on vocals and was such a 
success that they composed a 
song specifically for him. The 
resulting single, polished up m 
the studio by Bill Wyman of 
the Rolling Stones, is shortly - 
to be released in Europe by 
Ariola. “It is a bit poppy”, said 
Hulce dismiss! vely.. “If s like; 
a tune you could dance to.” 

His ancestors wouldn't ap- 
prove. T&irieen years ago, on 
his first trip - to England, he 
spent two weeks on a bicycle 
eagerly tracking the femily 
roots. He found them in a 
miail Devon town where he 
discovered a great, great 
grandfather who had been a 
solid pillar of the establish- 
ment the local choirmaster. 


With a month to.-jgcr before it 
has to respond, the BBC has 
yet to make a reply to the 
staggering £57.16 minion writ 
it has received, as a result of 
ducking ' out of satellite 
broadcasting. 

Programme-makers is the 
Corporation are appalled that 
British Aerospace and- Gener- 
al Electric Corporation, to- 
gether with ovner companies 
making cp the Unisat direct- 
broadcasting- by ^satellite 
group, are suing ihe BBC for 
design, manufacture and fi- 
nancing cost since agreement 
was reached in 1982. 

Though (be writ was issued 
at the beginning of the year, 
little more has been heard of 
the action, which may lake 
two years K> reach the courts. 
But British Aerospace .points 
out that time is running out 
for the Corporation to enter a 
defence. The BBC initially 
agreed to . fipance satellite 
broadc astin g experiments to a 
tolal of f 168 million, but 
pulled om when itrealized the 
enormity of the experiment 

Bombing out 

The . roll-call of Americans 
avoiding these shores because 
of possible terrorist attack 
grows daily. -The latest, sur- 
prisingly, is the classical and 
jazz 7 trumpeter Wynton 
Marsalis. 24. He was due to 
appear at the Ctpital Jazz 
ftstiva) m London in July, 
and Festival director John 
Burrows is now trawling the 
US trying to find a replace- 
ment “It’s a shame there is 
such fear being generated that 
people - won’t travel to 
Europe”, says Burrows. “ If 
only they were here they'd see 
how life is going on as 
normal”. Fop star Lionel 
Richie and Hues singer Albert 
King are among those who 
have also found reasons to 
avoid a visit. 

Bennett on 

Jin Bennett's idea of bringing 
off-Broadway to London's 
West End will give a much- 
needed shot in the arm to 
fringe theatre. Her Off The 
Avenue production company 
will 'open up at the' little- 
known Boulevard Theatre 
next month. Miss Bennett 
conceived the idea with direc- 
tor Sean Mathias and their 




* 


Bennett and Mathias 

first offering win be his play 
Infidelities m. which Jill takes 
the lead. But is iheatreland's 
endearing sofa-blonde the 
stuff of which producers are 
made? “I've been out raising 
the money. Tm so .dizzy, I 
didn’t believe it could be 
done. But we need more. Have 
you got any to spare?" she 
•breathed app ealin g ly 

Off the Boil 

In three month's time the 
Victoria and Albert Museum 
will remove a thorn from its 
tide: the Boilerhouse Project. 
After four years of uncon vinc- 
. mg exhibitions under the play- 
fid directorship of Stephen 
Bayi ey. the V & A can now 
return to middle-of-the-road 
middlebrow projects which 
will upset nobody.. The 
lavatorial white-tiled exhibi- 
tion area will now be used for 
an exhibition of the photo- „ 
graphs of Irving -Penn, fol- 
lowed by fashion designs of 
. ‘50s and '60s, Finnish 
furniture and Ferragamo 
shoes through three decades, 
instead of a baseball cap 
designed for two, and high- 
heeled roller-skates — exam- 
ples from a recent Bayley 
exhibition. 

Qiristopher 
Wilson 









Str.: 

' * »•-; 




fc*2s 


\£J>\ 




COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 
CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
May 9: The Princess Anne, Mrs 
Mark Phillips. Chancellorof foe 
University of London, this eve- 


Trinity Hospice in the FyMe at 
Bispham and visited St 
Wincfride's House, Blackpool 
Later Her Royal Highness, Pa- 
tron, British Limbless Ex-Ser- 
vice Men's Association, opened 
the Constance Green Wing and 
the Forces Help Society and 
Lord Roberts workshops bun- 
liakws at the Association’s 


Colleges Thanksgiving Service Sr 0 ? 5 a V *** Assoriauoi 
at SI Michael’s Church ^S^P 00 * Home, Lancashire. 
Corahjll, EC3 and afterwards -P™ 06 ® Alice. Duchess of 


attended a Reception at the 


Draper's Hall. 
Her 1 


Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Vice-Chancellor of 
the University (the Lord Flow- 
the Rector of St Michael's 
(the Reverend David Burton- 
Principal of the 
College (Sir James Meoier). 

Mrs Malcolm Imves was in 
attendance. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Long (Lord in 
Wailing) was present at 
Heathrow Airport. London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
the Governor-General of Fiji 
and bade farewell «> His Ex- 
cellency on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 


Gloucester travelled in an air- 
craft of The Queen's Flight. 

Mrs Michael Harvey was in 
attendance. 

YORK. HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
May 9: The Duchess of Kcm 
this evening attended the Welsh 
Spons Bad at - the National 
sports Centre for Wales. 
Cardiff. 

Mrs David Napier was 
attendance. 


Birthdays 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
May 9: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother this afternoon 
opened Bible House, the Head- 
quarters or the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, in 
Swindon. 

Lady Angela Oswald. Sir Mar- 
lin Giiliat and Captain Niall 
Hall were in attendance. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 

May 9: The Princess 

Countess of Snowdon, as 
ncl-in-cbief I5th/I9fo 
King’s Royal Hussars, 


Io- 

The 

was 


present this evening at a Cock- 
tail Party given by Past and 
ing Officers of 


Serving Officers of the Regi- 
ment and of The Northumber- 
land Hussars, at Meld on Park, 
Morpeth. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived on arrival at Newcastle 
Airport by Her Majesty's Lord 
Lieutenant for Northumberland 
(The Viscount Ridley). 

The Princess Margaret, 
Countess of Snowdon, who 
travelled in an aircraft, of The 


TODAY: Mr Richard Adams. 
66; Sir John Aintey, 80; Sir 
David Brown, 82: Mr Trevor 
Clay. 50; Lord Coffison, 77; 
Miss Monica Dickens, 71; Mr i. 
R. S. DuadaJe, 63; Major- 
General Edward Fursdon. 61; 
Sir Edward Gardner, MP, 74; 
Professor Aian Gemmell, 73; Sir 
Roger Jackling, 73; Lord Justice 
Kelly. 66; Sir Ewart Levy, 89; 
Mr Richard Lewis, 72; Miss 
Maureen Uproan. 40; Sir Wil- 
liam Lithgow, 52; Lord Justice 
MtutiN. 55; Sir David Orr, 64; 
Sir Angus Patou. 81; Mr Bruce 
Raymond, 43; Mr Manuel 
Santana, 48; Lord Smith, 72; the 
Duke of Sutherland, 71; Mr 
Denis Thatcher, 71; Vice-Ad- 
miral Sir Geoffrey Thistleton- 
Smith, 81; Brigadier n^ ni» 
Margot Turner, 16, 
TOMORROW:- Vice-Admiral 
Sir Edward Anson, 57; Sir E( 
Beck, 75; Mr Irving Berlin, 


Dr Rhodes BoysonT MP, 61; Sir 
pton Miller. S6; Mr 


Queen's Flight, was attended by 
ly Glenconner. 


The Lady < 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
May 9: Princess Alice, Duchess 
of Gloucester today opened the 


John Compton 

Salvador Dali. 82: Sir Percy 
Faulkner, 79; Miss Martha Gra- 
ham, 90; Sir Ernest Harrison. 
60; Professor Antony Hewish, 
62; Mr Justice Hollis, 59; Sir 
Robert Hunt, 68; Sir Albert 
Kennedy, 80; Professor W. M. 
Medlicott, 86; Brigadier Joan 
Moriariy, 63; Sr Ian PercivaL 
QC MP, 65; Mr Mike Sterna n, 
35; Sir Ronald Swayne, 68; the 
Hon Montague Woodhouse, 69. 


Making amends to a genius | 0BmjARY 

SHERPA TENZING 


Kart Barth (1886-1968). au- 
thor of some of the greatest 
theological works of the twenti- 
eth century, has been unfortu- 
nate in the manner of his 
reception in England. The work 


which flifl deep^affecis the 


_ view or his theology 
the translation by Sir Edwyn 
Hoskyns from the original Ger- 
man of his Commentary on 
Romans, the "bombshell on the 
playground of the theologians'' 
that so altered the course of 
Protestant theology after the 
First World War. 


The powerful and rhetorical 
paradoxes of this book are 
bewildering outside the context 
of its first production. Due 
appreciation of his genius has 
also not been helped by the 
essentially tin theological nature 
of the English race (who must be 
distinguished in this respect 
from other parts of the British 
nation). The English are im- 
patient of theory, and are there- 
fore disinclined to labour 
through volumes of dogmatics. 

There is. too. the problem of 
the assessment of a genius to 
whom we are still dose. Yet. 
nearly 70 years after the Com- 
mentary on Romans, the mists 
may be beginning to dear. 

Karl Barth, bora 100 years 
ago today, was a man of his 
time. Yet be was also a genius, 
able to see a little further than 
many and to offer new insights 
into the ways of God with 
mankind. But what was his 
time, and what did he give to it? 

It was, first of alt a century in 
which Europe, emerging from 
the sdfcooudeoce of its recent 
past, experienced fragmentation 
and upheaval Barth was one of 
the first to be aware of the sea- 
change, and his early writings 
revealed him as a new voice 
amidst the increasing tiredness 
of his teachers. But be was more 
than simply a reaction against 
the past, as is sometimes 
suggested. 

Readers of Eberbard Busche’s 
biography will be struck by the 
feet that all of Barth's writing 
was a creative response to the 
turmoil of modern Europe, no- 
where more than In his eariy and 


prophetic opposition to the 
growth of Nazism in Germany. 

Second, it is a century in 
which the churches have sought 
to demolish the historical pris- 
ons in which they have encased 
. themselves. Because of the sheer 
catholicity of his interests, draw- 
ing from Eastern and Western 
Fathers, from the Reformers 
and their opponents. Barth is 
able to speak to many streams of 
churchmauship: Eastern Ortho- 
dox. Roman Catholic, Anglican, 
Lutheran as well as his own 
Reformed: in that sense be is, as 
Professor T. F. Torrance has 
claimed, a universal Church 
Father of our times. 

Third, it isa time when we arc 
experiencing what is perhaps the 
final breakdown of Christen- 
dom. at the end of the era in 


Christian theologian when 
Christendom is no more? That 
is the question underlying so 
many of the hugely various 
programmes that have been on 
offer in re cent decades. 

Christendom based itself on a 
kind of consensus, m which it 
was generally accepted that its 

view of the world roughly 
cohered with that of the culture 
in which the church was set 
Barth realized, and this was his 


genius, that theology coukl no 
longer base itself on the oki 


consensus, for there no longer 
was one. It could not, however, 
escape the question of its 
intellectual basis, but must re- 
shape it in the new conditions. 

To begin again. Barth en- 
gaged, in his forties, in a study of 
the eleventh-century Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. Anselm. 
From Anselm, he took two 
things. First was a conception of 
theological method based on 
Anselm's own expression, "faith 
seeking understanding”. 
According to that, there is no 
need to look outside the faith for 
a rational basis for theology, in 
some now lost consensus. 

The Anselmian approach 
rather finds in faith the begin- 
ning and basis of a rationality 
that can be deepened by ever 
more faithful penetration into 
the mysteries of God as he 


makes himself known in Christ 

The second debt to Anselm is 
an understanding of theology as 
a quest for perfection in which 
all human faculties, especially 
imagination and reason, are 
deployed on the basis of prayer 
to buJd a theology that will 
most nearly reflect the perfec- 
tion of God. 

Barth's theology was a relent- 
less quest to allow foe rational- 
ity. goodness and beauty of God 
— his perfection — to come to 
human speech. 

In that quest the resources of a 
fertile imagination and what has 
been described as demonic en- 
ergy combined to pile concept 
upon concept in the creation of 
immense structures of dogmatic 
theology. It is in the volume of 
foe writing and the originality of 
foe concepts that he the real 
difficulty of assessing and 
understanding this creative 
mind. 

But there lies Barth's weak- 
ness, too. That his creative drive 
led sometimes to an over- 
rationalistic and over-structured 

theology should not surprise; 
nor should the feet that his 
singfe-minded centring on Jesus 
Christ led to the neglect of other 
theological themes. 

He was, after all a man of his 
time: But then so was his 
beloved Mozart, who still domi- 
nates foe musical scene long 
after his death. It is a reasonable 
supposition that Barth will still 
speak to those who have ears to 
bear when his third centenary is 
celebrated. 


Heroic conquest of Everest 


In the meantime, the English 
amends. In 


are seeking to make 
the week leading up to the 
centenary of his birth, foe 
universities of Cambridge, Lon- 
don, Durham and Leeds staged 
lectures on Barth by Professor 
Ingolf Dalferih of the University 
of Tubingen. And, eventually, 
Karl Barth will take his due 
place, even with us. as one of the 
nourish ers of our theological 
life. 


Colin Gunton 

Professor of Christian Doctrine, 
King's College London; 
Associate Minister, Brentwood 
United Reformed Church. 


/uncheoii 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr C.T. Forster 
and Miss M.C Rum ball 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs w. S. Forster, of 
Wembley Park. Middlesex, and 
MajeUa, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs S. F. Rumball, of 
Shepperton. Middlesex. 


Mr ILA. Graham . 
and Miss EM. Odrington 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert Andrew, son of 
Mr and Mrs A. Graham, of 
Headington, Oxford, and Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
John Codrington, of Barnes, 
London. 


Me A. Huutton 
and Miss G. Fremi 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Alexander Hamfl- 
ton, of Thurso, Caithness, and 
Grazyna. only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Wladyslaw Fremi, of 
Warsaw. Poland. 


Mr M.W. Hollis 
and Miss AJ. de Sefinconrt 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew, son of foe 
late Mr Peter HoUis, and Mrs 
Hilary Hollis, ofStowting. Kent, 
and Anna, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Antony de Sefinconrt, of 
Chobharn, Surrey. 


Mr DJ8. Howard 
and Miss JJX Rhys Evans 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Major A. 
& Howard and foe late Mrs S. 
Howard, and Jane, daughter of 
the late Roger Rhys Evans and 
of Mrs J. Rhys Evans, both of 
Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 
Mr J8.A. Lyne-Pirlds 
and Miss GJI. Duval 
The engagement is announced 
between John, youngest son of' 
Dr and Mis R. H. G. Lyne- 
Phitis, of Famham, Surrey, and 
Claire, only daughter of the late 
Mr Bruce Duval and Mrs Diana 
Thomas, of Plymouth, Devon. 
Mr GG. Morris 
and Miss J.C Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, elder son 
ofMr and Mrs D. R. Morris, of 
Holbrook, Suffolk, and Jane, 
younger daughter ofMr and Mrs 
A- P. Martin, of Reading. 

Mr AJ. Ryder 

and Mbs JA Middleton . 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, younger son 
ofMr and Mrs R. A_ Ryder, of 
Bristol, and Judith, youngest 
daughter of Mr R.D. Middleton 
and the fate Mrs A. E. Middle- 
ton. of Harrogate, North 
Yorkshire. 

Mr M.V. Zahni 
and Miss FA. Smyth 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, son ofMr and 
Mrs Lino Zahni, of Siema. 
Malta, and Flora Adair, only 
daughter of Major and Mrs D. 
A. C. Smyth, of Bellas t. North- 
ern Ireland. 


HM Government 
Mr Paul Channon. Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry, 
was host at a luncheon held at 
Lancaster House yesterday in 
honour of Federal Counsellor 
Dr Kurt Furgler. Head of foe 
Swiss Department of Public 
Economy. 


London and Kent Artillery 
Colonel D. J. McLelland pre- 
sided at a ladies' night held at 
the Royal Artillery Mess, Wool- 
wich, by the London and Kent 
Artillery yesterday. Brigadier P. 
D. Orchard-Lisle and Sir Wil- 
liam Clark, MP, also spoke. 


superin deni 
presided. 


of the corps. 


Service luncheon 

4th British Drdsieo 
0939-1945) Club 
General Sir Dudley Ward was in 
the chair at foe annual reunion 
of : foe 4fo British Division 
M 939-1945) Club held at foe 
Connaught Rooms yesterday. 
Among those present were Gen- 
eral Sir Geoffrey Musson, 
Lieutenant-General Sr William 
Pike and Major-Generals A_ E. 
Brocklehurst, P. F. Palmer and 
G. A. White. 


Middlesex Regiment 
The annua) dinner of the 
Middlesex Regiment Officers’ 
Club was held last night at the 
Cavalry and Guards Gub. 
Lieutenant-Colonel T. W. 
Chaney presided. 


Institution of Structural 
Engineers 

Mr David Lee, Presid en t of the 
Institution of Structural En- 
gineers, and Mrs Lee were hosts 
at the insitutions’s annual din- 
ner at Guildhall last night Mr 
Graham Day was the principal 
guest and the other speakers 
were Professor Edmund 
Happold and Mr Finbar 
Cauanan. 


First Garkha Rrtles Begfa wt 
Brigadier JJL Heeiis presided at 
the First Gurkha Regimental 
Association's animal reunion 
dinner held at St Ermin’s Hotel 
last night. 


Service dinners 


Royal Naral College. Greenwich 
Commander T- Jones. Com- 
mander of the Royal Naval 
College, Greenwich, pretided az 
a ladies’ _guest. night dinner held 
yesterday in the Painted HalL 
Commandant Vcmla McBride; 
was the principal guest- 


Paracfante 

The annual dinner of the Para- 
chute Regiment Officers' Din- 
ner Club was held last night at 
the Royal Military Academy, 
Sandhurst. General Sir Geoffrey 
Hewlett, colonel commandant, 
presided and Air Vice Marshal 
M. G- Simmons, AOC Number 
1 Group RAF, was a guest. 


Laanderers* Company 
The Lord Mayor and the Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by foe 
Sheriffs and their ladies, were 
present at the ladies’ dinner 
given by the Laundcrers’ Com- 
pany last night at Laundcrers’ 
HalL Mr Roy Le Pokfevin, 
Master, presided, assisted by the 
Deputy Master, the Senior War- 
den and the Renter Warden. 
Other speakers were the Lord 
Mayor, Colonel Michael H. 
Seys- Phillips, Mr Brian W. 
Goodliffe and Mr Michael F. J. 
Watson. 


Sherpa Tenzing, GM, who, 
with Sir Edmund Hillary, 
stood as the first men on the 
summit of Mount Everest on 
May 29, 1953, died in Dagee- 
ling yesterday. He was 72. 

A porter by calling, a moun- 
taineer by choice, fits invinci- 
ble spirit took him to Everest’s 
29,028 ft. summit and the 
winning of one of the great 

prizes of adventure. 

Tenzing Norgay was boro at 
Tami, on the Tibetan side of 
Everest, in the summer of 
1914 and. lacking a precise 
recorded dare, adopted as his 
birthday the day of his tri- 
umph. May 29. 

His boyhood was spent as a 
herdsman pasturing his 
father's yaks on the high 
slopes, long nursing an ambi- 
tion to climb what Be knew as 
Chomolungma. ’’The moun- 
tain so high no bird can fly 
over jl” 

At the age of 1 8, he made his 
way to Daijeeling. There, be 
was employed as a coolie until 
the Himalayan Club noticed 
him and engaged him as a 
porter. 

He had hopes ofbeing taken 
on as a porter for the 1933 
Everest expedition. But he had 
no certificate of previous ex- 
perience, and even though be 
cut off his pigtail, he was 
turned down as too young. 

At last, in 1935, Eric 
Shipton gave him his chance 
and be was added him to a 
band of veterans assembled 
for a reconnaissance. He went 
to 22,000 ft. on the North Col, 
fwhich was as far as the 
expedition went, and it gave 
him the chance of seeing 
mountaineering techniques. 

He earned himself a place 
on Hugh Rurti edge's full-scale 
Everest attempt of 1936; and, 
with H. W. Tiiman in 1938. 
the last expedition before the 
war, be carried loads up to the 
then record height of 27.200 
ft, earning himself the Tiger 
MedaL But 14 years were to 
pass before his next real 
chance. 

During the war. be served as 
a guide with the Chitral Scouts 
and as an In dian Army ski 
instructor. But be returned to 
the mountains in 1 945 with an 
expedition to the Hiodukush. 

Tenzing was on Everest 
seven tiroes in all: four times 
on the north face, including a 
freakish adventure with the 
solo climber Earl Denman in 
1948, and three times on the 







the impending monsoon 
would postpone any further 
attempt until the autumn. 

Tenzing, with Edmund Hil- 
lary, a New Zealander, formed 
the second assault party. Bad 
weather and sickness among 
foe members created prob- 
lems, but withdrawal at that 
stage was not contemplated. 

Using foe new portable 
oxygen apparatus, foe two 
reached foe summit on May 
29. Several days elapsed 
bewteen the writing of des- 
patches and the arrival of the 
news in London. Bui the 
suspense was rewarded with 
news of the achievement ar- 
riving on the eve of foe 
Coronation. 

Describing his experience 
on foe summit, Tenzing said: 
“There was brilliant sun. I 
could view the immense vistas 
of Tibet and Nepal. The flags 
of Nepal, Great Britain. India 
and the United Nations were 
held by me on an ice-axe. and 
were phoiographed by Hillary. 

1 did not feel very elated. Once 
on the lower camp. I was 
overwhelmed with joy." 

The achievement was, how- 
ever, tainted with controversy 
over which of the two men 
had arrived at the summit 
first The humble Tenzing 
insisted that he and Hillary 
had reached the top 
“simultaneously". 

Colonel Hunt was later 
strongly to deprecate foe con- 
troversy. "When two men are 
roped, foey work together," he 
said, “and the question of who 


work as Field Director of 
Training at foe Himalayan 
Mountaineering Institute, 
founded in 1954 by foe Indian 
GovemmenL 

By foe time he retired in 
1976. Indian teams had 
reached foe summits of many 
Himalayan giants, including 
Everest in 1965. largely thanks 
to the Institute's courses. 

In foe intervals of work. 
Tenzing travelled overseas, 
visiting America. Russia, Ja- 
pan and New Zealand as well 
as renewing old friendships in 
Britain and Switzerland. 

He concerned himself too 
with foe welfare of foe Sherpa 
people, deploring, as he grew 
older, foe exploitation of foeir 
(and his) homeland by the 
tourist industry. 

He retained to the last his 
“attractive grin", more polite- 
ly described when he became 
famous as a “dazzling smile". 

He possessed that 
indespensible quality of the 
mountaineer - humility in the 
face of nature and with it the 
unconquerable spirit with 
which ai the last, man climbs 
mountains. 

A devout Buddhist, he was 
full of initiative and always 
ready to serve to foe limit of 
his strength. 

For the assault on Everest. 
Tenzing received foe George 
Medal, presented by the 


Queen on his visit to England 
afte 


south after Nepal opened her actually set foot first on the 


The Prince of Wafers Own 
Regiment of Yorkshire 
The regimental dinner of The 
Prince of Wales's Own Regi- 
ment of Yorkshire was held last 
night at the Army and Navy 
Cub. Major-General H. M. 
Tfliotson. Colonel of the Regi- 
ment, presided. 


HQ RAF Support 0—4 
Air Vice-Marshal J. D. 
Spottiswood, Air Officer Train- 
ing. and Mrs Spottiswood. at- 
tended a ladies' guest night held 
by Headquarters RAF Support 
Command yesterday at RAF 
Brampton. Group Captain 
M.G. Coggins presided and Air 
Commodore and Mrs F. R. 
Hu] me were among the guests. 


Kent Comfy i 
The Lord Lieutenant of Kent 
and Mrs Leigh- Pem ben on were 
the principal guests at the Kent 
County Constabulary Senior 
Officers* Mess annual ladies’ 
night held at Brompton Bar- 
racks, Chatham, yesterday. Mr 
F. L Jordan, Chief Constable of j 
Kent, and Mis Jordan wel- 
comed the guests. 


frontiers in 1949. 

Dr Wyss-Dunant leader of 
two Swiss expeditions in 1952, 
enrolled him as a climber as 
well as employing him as 
sirdar, or expedition head- 
man, and in the spring at- 
tempt Tenzing and Raymond 
Lambert came within a few 
hundred feet of the summit. 

The ultimate success came 
the following year with the 
British expedition under its 
leader. Colonel H. C. J. HunL 

The first attempt on the 
summit, planned for May 23, 
failed and there were fears that 


summit does not matter' 
Tenzing, he added, was “the 
greatest sherpa of all lime". 

The Times correspondent 
on Everest at foe time de- 
scribed Tenzing as a “simple, 
uncluttered man" before “foe 
jackals of fame dosed in on 
him." 

Certainly, he was bewil- 
dered by the clamour which 
greeted his descent from the 
mountain, and by the adula- 
tion and attentions of the 
press. 

The years after Everest were 
spent in steady and successful 


er the climb. 

His other awards included 
the Star of Nepal from foe 
land of his birth, and. from the 
United Slates, the Hubbard 
Medal of the National Geo- 
ic Society, and foe 
II um Medal of foe Ameri- 
can Geographical Society. 

He was happy in his three 
marriages, mid devoted to his 
six children. 

Though he never learnt to 
read or write, his retentive 
memory and lively gift of 
narrative enabled him to pub- 
lish his life story in two books: 
Man of Everest, told to James 
Ramsay UUman (1955) and 
After Everest . told to Malcolm 
Barnes, and published in 
1977. 


Fnsflier Officers' Qnb 
The Lord Mayra of Bir- 
mingham was foe guest of 
honour at a dinner held last 
night at the Council House, 
Birmingham, by the Fusilier 
Officers* Gub, Royal Warwick- 
shire. Major-General J. G Reilly 
was in the chair. 


Dinners 


Corps of Queen's Messengers 
Mr Brian Austin, Foreign and 
Commonwealth Office, and Mis 
Austin, were the guests of foe 
Corps of Queen's Messengers at 
a dinner held at the Bromley 
Court Hotel last night- Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Terry Crump, 


British Assedatioa of 
Otolaryngologists 
The President of the British 
Association of Oldaryngolo- 
Smith and M 


GROUP CAPTAIN W. T. H. NICHOLS 


S Mr Charles Smith 

it were foe hosts at foe 


Mrs 


annual dinner held at foe Royal 
College of Surgeons on May 2. 
Dr lan Munro, Editor of The 
Lancet, and Professor Jean 


MarqueL of Antwerp, were the 
guests of honour. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BBTHS, HMHM6ES, 
DEATHS mi H REHOfUUI 
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sender, my be sent to; 


THE TIMES 
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BIRTHS 



nttstow - On May 7th In Sm Fran- 
cisco. lo Anna dtf* Haflj »d 
Mirim*, a son. James 
wr com. a brewer and sister tor 

Beniamin. 


bull - On art May to Mary41«* 
Daniels and lan ftiU. a daughter- 
Antonia 


merGUSOM-MVC On Aprfl 28ti» in 
Barcelona to Loutw fnfe 
Julian, a son. Wilton Edward a 
brother tor Charles & John. 


H»e nf - On May 7th w Wendy tnie 
Martin) and David, a daughter. Veri- 


ty Rathei 

BARLOW - On May 7th 80 Judith toer 


inmsi and Garth, a son. 
kwom on A 1 st March to SuK-ha and 
a sonJWho. A broiher 

HUn-sdO 

M/utCHAinr . To Gay m* ***«« 

jnd Ray. a son 

Ouccfl Mounts HosjwWf 

AbradwrlorDtanna. 

cllfM Howto 

and Sebastian, a dMiflmer lusre 
reboa). _ 

omue - On May 8 ih 
apd Rob*ri. a son Nicholas. 


WOOD - On 60i Macy to Ettaabeth and 
NtgeL a son Adam Charles, a brother 
for Victoria. 

ZIEGLER CD 2nd May to Sue Fowle. 
and Michael, a daughter Helen 
Alexandra. 


MARRIAGES 


The marriage too* place ooSahaday 
May 3rd between Huw Cooper and 
Gwynah O’Connor at Woolwich 
Registry Office. 


DEATHS 


MOVrON - Constance Evelyn (Ann) 
vnfe of Alan BstocoaCAC. suddenly 
on 7th May. Funeral service at South 
Bristol crematorium. ' 1140am. 
Tuesday 13th May. Family Dowers 
only - Donations may be sent lo 
N-&P.C.C. 


BOftlASE • on 70i May 1986. peace- 
futty at Newton House Nuraino 
Home. Marjorie Bryant: widow of 
the Reverend Granville Boriase. Fu- 
neral smrtce at WDlon Parish 
Churrh on Tuesday 13th May at 
2.30 pm followed by burial at 
Btsboostone. .AD ewndries lo H A 
Harrold & Son. 77 Etocoort Road. 
Salisbury, let 0722 21 177. 


BRADFORD on May 8th 1986 in the 
wrutOngton Hospto Mtphgate. Ernie 
beloved tustyend ol Beany and father 
to t Hugh Funeral private. 


_ • Susan, oo 9Qi May 1986. 

beloved wife of me into John vts» 
mm* De Vod and much loved 
mother of Emma. Kate and Ton. 
Peacefully lo London, there wHI be a 
service at ABbor Letac. tetot next 
week. 


ENEVEX-On Wi May 1986. Mary, of 
kidmore End. Reading, the wry 
dearly beloved wife of Ate* and 
momer of Robert and James. 

CALMSftl «• Lotos. On 8th May - a 
dearly loved husband, tether, grand- 
tether. brother, and fond mute of Ms 
many nieces and nephews. 


raenY-On Audi add 1986 Alexander 
K-N Gray aged 85 peacefully at 
home, in EsuaL Portugal. Moved 
husband tor 50 years of Nteves and 
wen loved fattier of NKhoias and 
Hotrtna. Greauy mourned. 


HARVEY - On May 7lh peaceftlDyln 
Behnont Hospital. Tiverton, Bse 
Mariam of lOGramUDds. Uffctttme. 
dearly loved sister of Ruth. Fungal 
sendee at the Exeter and Devon Or- 
■naiorium on Wednesday May nth 
at 12 Jioon- 


KSTER PEARL of Pennetnorne 
(3ose. Hackney, beloved dauphter 
nassed away Mur 7th at Tier parents 
name after an fflness faced with proa* 
courage. Mooito. 

May 12th at ihe SafvaUqn Ante CM; 
aM, Waterhouse 8L Hertd 
Hempstead. 12-00 nym. by 

amnltel ri West Herts Oeraaton- 
SrT&rrten. Mht 
donations in Utulf the Hospto of.St 
Francis. ShreMands -■ mad. 
Bertuamstean- Hens. 


HOU - Oo May 8th suddenly ai home 
at uckSekL Beny Doreen, formerly 
of toe Mental Welfare Department of 
Croydon Health Authority will be 
greatly missed by her daughter 
Stephanie and famfiy. Funeral at 
UL30Ptn on Friday May i«h at 
Hoty eras Church. UricOeld. En- 
quires to Fuller' A Scott. The 
Wakefyss. ifckflefd. TM; 3241. 
HOWELL, H. Eralyn on 7 May 1986. 
fattier to FRon and Richard. Grand 
father to Edward and Henry, much 
loved. 

HOWES • On May 7th. after a tong 
Alness, serenely and bravely borne. 
Gina Howes. 27 years old. beloved 
wtfe of Andrew, darting daughter of 
- Aiastate and Paula, sister of Bruce. 
Funeral at Baricway Church. 
Barkway. Hertfordshire, ilom Tues- 
day May 13 Dl FaraOy Rowers only. 
Donations u desired w Canon- Re- 
search Campaign, c/o Andrew 
Howes. Greycoat Croup Ptc. 
Lcontett Home. Cureon Street, 
London Wl. 

LVCL.fr - Dadd John on May 1st 
1986. of Bryn Setar. Ctan Conway, 
killed at sen. Dwty loved husband of 
Sylvia and dear tether of Rachel and 
Dated; Funeral service at St Fftteds. 
Ctan ennway. on Monday. May 12th 
at 1.45 pra. Family Oxrwm only, do- 
nations In Meu U desired, to Royal 
Merchant Navy School Foundation. 
Bear wood. Wtednpoam. RGil SBC. 
MAUKN on 8tti May 1 986 Greta Ruth 
. aged 90 years veaesftety at Lutgdon 
House. Cambridge, funeral Service 
on Friday 16th May at Cambridge 
Oty Crematorium at 4 pm. Floral 
tributes may be sent to the Coopera- 
tive Funeral Service. 34 James SL 
Cambridge. 

MOHnSON on 7lh May 1986 Howard 
Edward Son. Ldr. Aged 66 Ye 
Beloved husband of Roma, devoted 
lather Of GaS and Howard and 
grandfather of Lydia. FdbL Sarah 
and Edward. Private cremation. Me- 
morial service at SL Marys Church. 

. BraneasW 2.00pm Thursday 15th 
May. DonatMM if m desired to impe- 
rial Cancer Research care of Flemlno 
and Fayas Funeral Directors. 16 
Park Road. Hunstanton, Norfolk. 
MUNRO - AI home fat Edinburgh, on 
7th May 1986 In her 76th year. 
Katherine (Kathleen Hilda Canton) 
widow of Thomas. Arthir Mimro. 
C-BE.. M.O. FJtCP.. ■ EA. 
F.RS£. one Um physician to Gays 
Hospital, mother of Anna Morae- 
Service in the & John's Chinch. 
Princes Street. Edinburgh an Mon- 
day 12th May aff&30pfn to widen all 
frtente are invited. Cremation there* 
alter private. 

NASH - On May fitti. suddenly. Peter 
Reginald Hamiyn Nash, beloved son 
of Vera and Harold Nash, dearest 
husband of Angela, and beloved fa- 
ttier of Tanya and Julian. 

MCtfOLU - On May ten peacefuiy tn 
hospital. Henry Fraud* of 
Woodmancote. Newton MaO Chare. 
Dunmow. Moved husband ef Mar- 
jorie and tether of Aten. Private 
cremation for family only. Memorial 
service at Great Dunmow CtHscb. 
on Wednesday May 2ist at EJOpm. 
No letters or llowers jKeoae. Dona- 
httiS may be sent to St Mary's 
Church. Dutunow. c/o Mr C.C. Jaoo. 
Hatc&lands. Hfeb Site. Dunmow. 

Essex. CMS tea. 


PARKER - W. Cfbson Parker. April 
27th 1986 (suddenly) at hts apart- 
ment to Monte Carlo. Deeply missed 
by brother Tom. famfiy and friends. 
Ententnwot look place In Monte Car- 
te 2nd May- 


Marriages 


PAYNE - On 9th May 1986. Charles 
Frank to Cedar Drive. Hayes. 
Wire Dome. Dorse*. The much be- 
loved husband of Joanna Kate and 
much loved lather of Ntchobs and 
Patricia and gramfiMher of Lysette 
and Rtuemaa. Passed aeaceta&y 
away at tu» home aged 78 years. 
Never forgotten. Always remem- 
bered. Funeral service at 
Bournemouth Crematorium on 
Thursday 15th May ai 12.15pm. 
Family flowers only, but donattons If 
desired tn aid of the Poote Hospto. 
Leegueof-fneads may be sent to 
Nicholas Oriiara (Funeral Directors! 
38 Rowlands Htlls. Wfmbome. Dor- 
se*. BH21 1 AW. Tel (0202) 882134. 


POWELL on May 7tti 1986 to the Pil- 
grims .Hospice Canterbury. Linda 
Marion, aged 38 yeare. Dearly loved 
wife of Brian and mother of David. 
Funeral Service the Church of St 
Margaret of Antioch, si MargareCa- 
at-CUff on Tuesday May 13th at 
1030 am followed by buermeni In 
toe Churchyard. Flowere to 
Hambrook and Johns LuL 1 Bea- 
cornfield Avenue. Dover by &30 
ajn. 


ROBERTSON - on 8th May. aged 75. 
David Fischer, of Pans, beloved 
brouter and mde. Funeral service ai 
Haycosnue Cremator! wn. Whrteway 
Road. Betti on Monday May 12 m at 
3 pra. 


WKKEMDCH MkSKte Harry peacefte- 
ly at hn beloved home in steosbury 
on 8m of May. Brave unto the end 
and sorely missed by all who love 
him. Cremation on Tuesday 13th 
May at Crave* HUB Crematoriam. 
Poole. An e no m re s and Dowers to 
Cherrette. 10 Marker Place. 
Btemdford. Dorse*. Telephone; 
( 0258 ) 632%. 


WOKMU - Peacefully at TreUske 
Hospital. Truro. CornwalL an 7th 
May 1986. Veronica Hope (life 
McNair SOadden) aped 6& years. 
much Mved mother of OouHas 
Marwood and Lutar and grandmoth- 
er of Lanrama and Verity. Funeral 
service to Mawnao Parish Quirctt. 
Mftwnaa. near Falmouth. ComwaD. 
on Tuesday 13m May 1966 at 
2.30bm to which ail friends arc invit- 
ed. Flowers may be sen* lo me 
O wth. 


WHEN - On 8m May ve*y suddenly tn 
hossto, Wftfnri John, nearest hus- 
band of Erica, loved father of Saraft- 
Jane. Jonathan and Piers and dear 
SOti Of Douglas and the late Nerah. a 
manorial service is bring arranged. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


PHTHPCC H.ft. - (tom May 1981) 
M e m o ries bue rorevtr. our love al- 
ways. Rath. Aon and Jane 


Mr G.DJV Fitz-Gfeboa 
and Miss SJ\ Saxe 
The mamagr took place on 
Friday, May 9. at St James's 
Church. Gerrards Cross, 
Buckinghamshire, of Mr Gerald. 
David Patrick Ft tz-Gibbon, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
Patrick James Fhz-Gibboa of 
WemHey, Middlesex, and Miss 
Susan Pamela Smee, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs John 
Smee, of Gerrards Cross, 
Buckinghamshire. The Rev N. 
Russell officiated, assisted by 
Father C. Sianislous 
Tito bride who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Jane Birch and 
Miss Charlotte West. Mr Patrick 
FiE-Gibbon, foe bridegroom's 
brother, was best man. 

Mr SX. GreesweU 
and Miss CJL Posner 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, May 3, in London, of 
Mr Simon Lloyd Green well, 
elder son of Mr and Mrs Basil 
Green well, of Rjver, Fetworth. 
West Sussex, and Miss Caroline 
Rosaline Posner, only daughter 
of Mt and Mrs Henry Posner, of 
41 Rue Sebastien Merrier, Paris 
15. The honeymoon is being 
spent abroad and a reception 
will be held is Paris on May 25. 


Sir Laurens van der Post 
writes: 

Group Captain W. T. H. 
Nichols, who died on May 5, 
was one of the outstanding 
commanders of British pris- 
oners-of-war held by the Japa- 
nese in South-East Asia. 

Bom on April 6. 1910, 
privately educated and a 
classics scholar, he was al- 
ready so drawn to flying and 
foe RAF that he forsook 
schooling and made precipi- 
tously for Hallon where he did 
,so well that he was sent to 
•Cntnwell in 1928. 

He was posted to the North- 
West Frontier oflndia in 1 936 
and there he commanded, 
among others, the First 
Squadron of foe Indian Skies 
until the Japanese invasion of 
South-East Asia, and he was 
ordered to Indonesia. 

In February, 1942, when the 


Dutch and fragmented British 
Forces, without aircraft or 
proper equipment, were sur- 
rendered to the Japanese. 
Nichols led a small signals 
unit to break out of the enemy 
circle, but was captured after a 
determined 220-mile run. 

Asa result, he found himself 
incarcerated at Soekaboemi as 
senior British officer in charge 
of 200 British, Australian and 
American servicemen. 

Despite their imprisonment 
in appalling conditions.there 
was an atmosphere of unity, 
purpose and order wh ich 
stood out in bold relief to the 
much bigger Dutch prisoner- 
of-war camp which surround- 
ed iL This was due to Nichols 
and the unit he had brought 
with him. and foe example 
they set 

Under his inspiration as 
prison commander, the camp 
became not a place of negation 


but a school in the best sense 
of foe word: practical, self- 
educating and. above all, an 
emancipation of spiriL 

For some three and a half 
years, from Soekaboemi to 
Tjimahj Bandung. Batavia, 
and Bandung again for the 
last, most critical, dangerous 
and testing of all our phases of 
imprisonment. Nichols's 
command never flagged. 

In the cast-iron grip of a 
ruthless enemy, so unpredict- 
able that every minute was a 
moment almost of life and 
death in balance, Nichols 
possessed a quality of sus- 
tained and unwavering physi- 
cal and moral courage. 

Wh3t these fellow prisoners 
say and how they speak of him 
will be as a memorial of him 
and a lasting comfort to his 
wife, three daughters and 
three grand-children. 


Services tomorrow: Sunday after Ascension Day 


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ST PETER'S. Eaton Square. SWl: 
B.I5 HC: 10 Family Mass: 1 1 Solemn 
Mass, ueu Simple* ILOJUJ. God 
IJveUi *IU U 8 Bactu. 
§7,f n S9^ ZEL0 . 1TS - MUjtef Street. 
SVv’3; B HC: 1 1 Morning Prayer, Te 


Deum i Stanford In C*. I will no) leave 
you romloruess (Byrd): fijo 


Soiree 


Friends of HaOe Appeal 
A soirtse in aid of the Halle 
Orchestra's Endowment Appeal 
was held last night at Adlingion 
Hal], Cheshire, by permission of 

foe host, Mr Charles F. Legb. A 
musical recital was given by Mr 
Pan Hon Lee, Mr Richard 
Simpson and Mrs Janet 
Simpson. 


WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8. 11.40 
HC: 10.30 M. O dap your hands 
rCUtoOftei.- Rev Tremor Beeson: 3 E. O 
clap your hands (Vaughan wwiamsi. 
Rn R P suae: 6 JOES, ftev Michael 
Thompson. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 HC: 
11. Euch. soattenmesse i Mozart;. I 
wilt not leave you ronfortiess (Byrd;. 
Ye men of GslUee(Plaln9ong). Rev 
Robert W h Nina: 3 EL O dap your 


_ A W Marks. 

{jg-J? K 6 30 ES. Rev j A K 

HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort 
ftoad. SW7: 8-30. 12.05 HC: II 

ft** Martin Israel. 


MagrufKaL 
jByrti 
ST S7 


Alietuu Ascenan 


EP 

Deus 


ra STEPHEbrs. Ciourestrr Road. 
SWT7. 8. 9 LM: Jl HM. CoUegium 


Regale fHoweltei. Rev Perry Butler. 6 
Sptemn E and ' * — 


B. Rev oraham 


Morgan 

ST V ED AST- Foster Lane. EC2: 


HOLY TRINITY. Soaw Sleet SWl; 
!»»*•»» HC. 10.30 


gate*. 


_ — 7, 8. 

Sum euctv 

Mtea 'Afcendens Christue in altum- 
tvkiorb), AscendU Deua (PhtUm). 
3.30 V and B. MagnUkat octavi lonl 

QUECN]S CHAPEL. SI 
ace. 8.30 HC: n.lSMc 
Coefaa _ascemdU male 




canon D r vicaiy. 

OLCEN'S CHAPEL , 

WC2: 1 1.15 M- Te Deum i Sanford Iri 


Latest wills 


CL O tor the wings of a ’nbve 
(Mendelssohn). The (Saptain: ipaq 


HC. 


Lord David Cedi, of Red Lion 
House, Salisbury Street, Cran- 
bome, Dorset, the biographer 
and literary scholar, and 
Goldsmith's Professor of En- 
glish Literature at Oxford 1948- 
69, left estate valued ai£2&4, 132 
net. 

Mr Peter Sidney Sumner, of 
Tunbridge Wells, a retired 
schoolmaster, left £1,980,396 
net. 


- . __ WeOinqtQn Bar. 

M. Itev J A H 

UNOOLftTO INN CHAPEL: 11 30 

rag® 

1»S 


ST ALBAN'S. HORmm. ECl: 9 . 3 c 
SM: 1 1 HM. Mteta tesuva iPcvtiprsL O 
raur hands 1 Vaughan Wintamst 

ite Reel or. 

STC* 

SWJ; 

Oortoe (Marenzloj, Rev W J Klrk- 
wtnrt: 6, E and B. 

Hanover Bouare. Wl: 
91 . januev djl " “HC II Sung Euch. I ascend unto 

H& 10-» Sung Euch. Mbsa brrts 
«5*»erh 6 E. Faux Bourdon (TAUis). 
£gx «W deus 1 Philips] 

ST LUKE^S. Chelsea. SW3. a 1120 


Sung cum. Mew Basse (Faurei. thou 
a« .gone up on hmh (Handel). 

THE annunciation. Bryanston 
Street W L II H M- Mlssa Aaccndo ml 
Partem iPUegniui. Ascendii Oeus 


rtpullpM: 6 LM and B 
ST CpLUMBAJ CHURCH OF SCOT- 


LAND. Pont Street. SWl: II. 6^0 
Rev j Fraser MCLuskey. 

«own court church. Covent 
Garden. WC& 11.16. 6 30 Rev 


Kenneth _C Hughes 

MPTION. Warwick Street. 


12. 4. 6. LM. 1 1 SM. Mnsa 


St Joannte de Deo 1 Haydn 1 . Ascendn 
hie Domino 


ra.ta. 4.15. 6 IS LM: 11 HM. 

^S?Cr'| WS5,M<M1 *’ ASCef1011 Dn& 


OF THB! SAVOY. 


HC: Vmgalfleij iBarrdi: i6.3b Monum 
r. 6750 E. RtMn in me Lonl 




^ ReWce in me 
ortL Rev n weui 


THE ORATORY. Brooiwm Road. 
SW7; 7. 8. 9. 10. 12.30. 4 30. 7 LM: 
» I HM. white Ascendent Chnstus 
•'■CtorMl Ascendll Delia (Phillips;; 
3.50 Ve spers. Avc Mena «LWtl. 

ST EthelDREDA'S. Ely Place: 11 
SM. Liu (" 

Worcester 
ten. 


rt onw ipiainaong massL 
■ Anhphoner 1 Chnstus vin- 


•». 0.13, lb HCi It M dim 

: MA^M N-T ^^gLPS WC2.-8 
S; 9 46 Ftomy a The VtCflr. 11.30 


we 

ST C _ 

EC4: e.30. 

R«Mm( CM 

SSiSP-a^fe ITT* SS5 

gFCdlL 0 dn vour hwHte icS 

ALL H/ 


|T M ARETES. Westminster. 
SWl: 8.15. 13 IS HC. 11 mm 
sermon. Rev 

ST I 

H& 

MS. Rev Michael Taylor. 2. AS Chi- 

KX-STK!? 4 J B 6 -W ES. Rev 
Edward Holland 

ST MARY ABBOT’S. Kensington. 
WB. 8. 12.30 HC: 9 30 Sung Euch. 
The vicar: ||.1S M. The Vicar 6.30 
E. Rev S H H Acianfl. 

|^! maRy-s, Bourne Scrert. SWl: 9. 
9 45. 720 LM. 11 HM. Mnsa -Simile 
ea regnum coeiorum' ivicionai o 


OCR .LADY OF VICTORIES. Kenang. 
Ion Hwh Street. WB- 8. 9. 10. 12-so 
6.30 LM. It HM. Mas. Jam ChrtMy® 
Mia ascenderat tPalestrtnai. Non tot 


retowuam orpnanos iByrdJ 
AMERICAN CHURCH IN LONDON. 


nap vote lungs 'CibbonM. Ascendfi 


W l . H Rev Ron F Allison. 

CTTY TEMPLE- Hoi bom. ECl’ 11. 
6.30 Re* Erie wautei. 

CHELSEA METHODIST CHURCH. 
KUMTS Road. SW3. 11 Rev John 
RKfiarOMjn : 6 Mr Comwi FYankIJn 
STREET METHODIST 
CHLRCH WI 11 Rt-s Tne Loro 
Sotw 630 Rev K«lfv Workman. 
KENSINGTON URC. Allen Street, 
wa n 6 50 n- krawih slack. 


JARE PRESBYTERIAN 


Mr Thomas BetmettLaognm, of tower: n 

Ventura-, former deputy chair- 

of XS30.4S0 ffiK, 


asoendU 


^tonfora. Regina caHi (Sonanol My 
tetoved teuke iHaoieyi. canon Brian 

Bring lev. 

K ?5. R ' , ^-^ ONE - Maryleoone 
8pad- Wl. B it HC. Mtato Aetema 
U MumraiPaleArinai. A&ceudilu 
(PTubmi). Rev R McLaren: 6 30 
J K Hima Cooke. 

ST PAUL^. Robert Adam StraeL wi. 


Tax wcgi PWe. WUl: 11 Rei J 
W Miller: 6.30 E_ Rev G j BaKkn 


— — . BaKKer 

ST ANNE AND ST ACM&Tcnrtham 


EC2: II. 
JOHN 


ST . 


Rm John Milter 
VESIXY'SCH 


*S WOOD URC. NWS; 9.30 


- - - _ 1APEL City Road. EC2: 
11 R« R onald C CiMrnn. 
WTSTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL 
iMeihodHi. SWl; ll. 6.30 Rev 
Dilwyn Banner. 


19 


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THE TTMF.S SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



7 guilty 
in Sun 
writer 
protest 

Seven students at Bristol 
University could face expul- 
sion after being found guilty 
yesterday of disrupting lec- 
tures during mass pickets 
against a member of the 
teaching staff. 

Nine others were acquitted 
by a special disciplinary com- 
mittee. and two more students 
had charges against them 
dropped before their cases 
were heard. 

The University Disciplin- 
ary Committee of six senior 
academics and three students 
had been convened for the 
first time in a decade by Sir 
John Kingman, the vice-chan- 
cellor, after three mass dem- 
onstrations in March and 
April against Professor John 
Vincent. 

The pickets claimed that he 
is racist, sexist and anti- 
working class in the weekly 
column he writes for The Sun, 
owned by Mr Rupert Mur- 
doch. The students could face 
measures ranging from a sim- 
ple reprimand to full-scale 
expulsion. They will have an 
opportunity to make speeches 
of mitigation before the com- 
mittee passes sentence next j 
week. 

• Mr Justice Mann, sitting in 
the High Court, gave permis- 
sion yesterday for an east 
London coach business to 
challenge a decision of New- 
ham council not to employ the 
firm, which ferries police to 
and from the Wapping print 
w orks of Mr Murdoch. 

Lacey's, of East Ham. which 
claims that it has been denied 
council contracts since the 
decision last February, wants 
a court order preventing the 
council from refusing to con- 
sider employing the firm. 

• Police officers had spent an 
estimated 350.000 man hours 
at the Wapping print works 1 
since the start of the dispute. 
Mr Giles Shaw, a Home Office 
minister, disclosed in a Com- 
mons written answer last night 
(Richard Evans writes). 

The number of police offi- 
cers held available for duty at 
the plant varied from a mini- 
mum of 25 to a maximum of 
about 1.800. “depending on 
the current or likely public 
order situation", he said. 


Swiss break round the world record 


Letter from Warsaw 



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Skipper Pierre Fehlmann holding aloft a plaque presented to the first yacht home, and (right) being thrown into the sea by Ms jafrfla nt crew. 

■’"tv*- 






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waaaa»: 




The UBS Switzerland crossing the finishing line off Soothsea after her eight-month voyage (Photographs: John Voos and Jonathan Eastland). 


The first yacht home in the 
Whitbread round the world 
race arrived yesterday to a 
champagne welcome and a 
soaking for the skipper. 

After berthing at Gosport, 
Hampshire, the triumphant 
crew of UBS Switzerland 
threw their skipper. Pierre 
Fehlmann, aged 43, into the 
water. 

When the Swiss yacht 


crossed the finishing line off 
Southsea after 27,000 miles 
and nearly eight months away, 
she broke the pterions record 
for the race by more than two 
days. 

The 16-man crew hugged 
one another and boats hooted 
a welcome as the yacht 
berthed. Champagne sprayed 
and wives, girl friends and 
children of the crew members 


them. 

Later, Mr Fehlmann said 
that during the last leg of the 
race he had given a false 
position, saying he was further 
east than he actually was.That 
would appear to explain why 
another of the yachts in the 
race, Atlantic Privateer, fol- 
lowed a more easterly course 
than the others. 


During the last kg the 
yachts are encouraged to have 
daily radio chats. 

A spokesman for the race 
organizers said if a protest was 
received an independent com- 
mittee would hold an inquiry. 

‘ The Swiss skipper said the 
crew had listened to the music 
of Simon Le Bod's group 
Duran Duran on tape during 
the voyage. Mr Le Bon's yacht 


Drum, now lying a dose third 
behind Cote d'Or, is expected ; 
to arrive at Portsmouth on 
Sunday afternoon. 

UBS Switzerland has taken 

the prize for being first heme 
ha tire four-leg race, faking 117 
days. 14 boms, 31 minutes and 
42 seconds, bat the handicap 
winner is likely to be the 
French yacht L'Esprit 
(TEqnipe. 


It was the finish Sunday 
after Easter, the Polish 
churches w ere M. And a 
doud of nuclear falt-mri, as 
yet onanxKitmced, was drift- 
ing - towards the . country; 
hardly the trine, one might 
-have thought, to take one's 
clothes off m public. 

Ian, March and Briggjtte, 
the Czechs and the .Swedes, 
the Belgians and tire Britons 
bad absolutely .no inhibi- 
tions. Sticky with an oil that 
smelled of co conu ts and 
shone like frmituze varnish, . 
they paraded their near-na- 
kedness or rather — because 
since' the Second Vatican 
Council latin is the 
exclusively of bodybuilders — 
their deltoides, their 
pectorals, biceps and ouadri- - 
ceps. It was a pamcniarfy 
good day for pectorals. 

The European 

Bodybuilding Champion- 
ships, yet another milestone 
in Poland's international re- 
habilitation. were held m the 
Torwar stadium in Warsaw 
which c ont r iv ed to besunul- 
taaeously hot and draughty. 
A Sc andin avian sneezes and 
afi the deltoides and biceps 
quiver in sympathy. He is m 
tire heaviest category (won 
incidentally by Mr Ian Dewe 
from Britain) which means 
that a cannibal, sticking to 
the Polish monthly meat 
ration, could survive almost 
a year solely on the man's 
ballooned muscles. 

Bodybuilders cat well, talk 
a lot about food. Ewa Bondar, 
one of the Polish team, hoed 
into tire sport by her muscled 
boyfriend, swigs her granulat- 
ed milk at strict intervals. 
Other Polish bodybuilders 
make friends with vegetari- 
ans and use their! meat cou- 
pons to double their protein 
intake. 

If is all a bit odd. a tut 
pagan. Pumping iron behind 
the Iron Curtain is a relative, 
ly new development. Tn the 
Stalinist years it was regartted 
as decadent, capitalist narcis- 
sism. Lifting weights was 
acceptable, as was putting the 
shot Muscles were a good 
tiring ideologically, but only 
as long as they actually (fid 
something. Attitudes are 
changing but the Soviet 


: Union, Bulgaria, East Ger- 
many and Hungary are still 
only observers in the httsma- 
twnal Federation of Bodv 
BuHden (IFBBL 

Even in Poiand it has been 
difficult to establish a special 
status for the iron-pumpers. 

The dubs often put up with 
abysmal conditions and tire 
Hercules Gob in Warsaw has 
to function out or a cellar 
Even so there , are 30,000 
body-builders in Polish dubs 
and the same number work- I 
ing out at home. 

Some spectators at tire 
congress were remarkably 
professional. A retired 
muscleman complained: 
“What my colleagues and 1 
.used to achieve in five years, 
some of there people want to 
do in a single year." He 
thinksL that some might be 
using “chemistry*’ to help. 

In the main, though, the 
audience is more prurient 
th an pro fessional. Binoculars 
change hands during the fe- 
. male line-up. though in tire 
heavier categories it is some- 
times difficult to assess gen- v 
dec afi muscles have been ' 
developed to their maximum 
potential and sex distinctions 
.Mur. 

On top of the bodies, barely 
relevant to the competition, 
are heads. These display 
clenched, worried features, 
insurance clerks perhaps, 
concentrating on a DaiUcnlar- 


Their feces may be anxious 
but their bodies are a confi- 
dent brown or rather a glow- 
ing radioactive orange, an 
effect of the carotin in seff- 
lanning lotions. Asthe judge 
bravely kissed one of the 
woman winners, a. pleasant 
enough stevedore . with a 
Farran Fawcett hair style, he 
seemed to recoiL afraid that 
las shin would be indelibly 
stained. 

Sadly, it is difficult to spot 
pale mtBcfcs.“U's a question 
of definition,” said a contes- 
tant deploying the phrase like 
an Oxford don. “Everything's 
got to stand out, hasn't itr It 
was difficnltlo disagree. Two 
hundred and fifty-two biceps 
can’t be wrong, 

Roger Boyes 


>r S;^ 




THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 



Today's events 

Royal engagements 

Princess Margaret Colond in 
Chief. 15/19 King's Royal Hus- 
sars. is present when the Regi- 
ment and the Northumberland 


Hussars exercise the Freedom of - 
the Gty, Grey's Monument 
Newcastle upon Tyne. 11.20; 

and then lunches with the Lord 
Mayor of Newcastle. Mansion 
House. 11.45: later she attends 
the AH Rank Dinner. Civic 


p • m ® . is . 

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Solution to Fnzzle No 17.036 Solution to Pusrie No 17,041 


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The Times Crossword Pnzzle No 17,042 


A prize o/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
j® correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries should 
be addressed to : The Times. Saturday Crossword Competition, 
Box 486, llirgmia Street. London El 9XN. The winners and 
solution wiu be published next Saturday. 

IS e J'i nn f rs °/ lasr . ^Mday s competition are: Mrs M. C. Brown, 
W KiUyglen Road, Lame. Co Antrim. Northern Ireland: Miss R. ' 
E. Platt. Ivy Cottage. The Sands. Famham. Surrey: The Rev 
James Hawes. The Presbytery, Champion Road, Upm inner 
Essex. 

Name 

Address „„„ 


la the garden 


Our daffodils have never been 
so good as in this late cold 
spring The bulbs have in- 
creased in numbers. 1 put this 
down to the ample rains we had 
in May and June last year, and 
to generous leaf feeding and root 
feeding two or three tunes with 
soluble fertilizer. AD spring 
bulbs enjoy this treatment but 
not tulips. 

It is time to lift and divide 
clumps of snowdrops, crocuses 
and winter aconites. Old dahlia 
tubers may be planted out now. 
Have some peat or straw bandy 
to cover shoots if there should 
be a tale froSL 

Treat wooden fences, poles, or 
pergolas, if necessary, with one 
of the new water-soluble wood 
preservatives. 

Check all greenhouse and 
house plants now for infesta- 
tions of green and white fly. 
These pests are particularly fond 
of fuchsias and calceolarias. 
Greenfly, black spot, and mil- 
dew will be appearing on roses 
any time now. Be prepared to 
spray them, preferably with a 
system icmsecii ride and a fun- 
gicide, or a spray containing 
both types of chemical. 




ACROSS 

1 Steward — shifts deter him a 
lot 16,1,5). 

S Princess participating in re- 
ligious festival Cl). 

9 It stops the ball making a 
profit (7). 

11 Searching for an advanced 
Liberal (7). 

12 Gascon acquired one in the 
East of Gascony (7). 

13 Some in custody for part of 
the hearing (5). 

14 I replaced Byron's love in 
timber maze (9). 

16 Lamenting stormy row (9). 

19 Dog's memorial (5). 

21 Unusual terrain for a coach 
(71. 

23 For instance, former par- 
liamentarian takes drink 
outside (7). 

24 Clothing that's light, in- 
tended tor auditors (7). 

25 Talk preceding return of 
rented property (7). 

26 Not one meal eaten by very 
large bankrupt (2.4.6) 


Concise Crossword page 12 


DOWN 

1 “Most fruit", said Richard, 
“is sweet" (7). 

2 Exponents of batting taking 
risks (7). 

3 Older your bail-point in col- 
our (5.4), 

4 Stupid, but studies English 
(5). 

5 Best gold is found in the 
open air (7). 

6 No one has time for raising 
an issue (7). 

7 Later in the same document 
or form, 1 enter the RAF 
(12). 

10 Felt sore so had an injection 
<3.3.6). 

15 Fat prize for one of the boat 
people (9). 

17 I raced a man from Persia 
17). 

IS Cloth makes girl enthusias- 
tic (7). 

19 Coach of foreign game (7). 

20 Drive up the motorway with 
favourite American t7). 

22 C riticizes tax (5). 


Centre, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 

7.15. 

The Duchess of Kent attends 
the final of the Football 
Association's Challenge Cup 
competition. Wembley Sta-' 
divurv. 12.3Q. 

Music 

Concert by the Hague Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra: Town 

Hall. Leeds. 7.30. 

Handers Messiah by the Bir- 
mingham Bach Society Choir 
and Orchestra: Town Hall. Bir- 
mingham. 7.30. 

Concert by the Aranjuez Gui- 
tar Trio: Assembly House. Nor- 
wich. 7.30. 

Concert by the Canonbury 
Wind Players: St Mary's Centre, 

: Lichfield, 7.30. 

' Concert-by the Lindsay String 
Quartet; Crucible Studio The- 
atre, Sheffield, 7.45. unBOt an gn 

Concert by the Chester Bach house plants no 
‘Singers; Chester Cathedral tions of green a 
7-40- These pests are pa 

Concert by the Irwin Singeis 0 f fuchsias and 
with Graham Shaw (tenor) and Greenfly. Mack s 
Nigel Purscy (organ); Holy Tnn- dew will be appe 
«y Church. BradTord-on-Avon. any time now. B 
7 » ^ „ . i spray them, pref 

Recital by Lynne Rowland 1 sysiemicinsecticic 
(flute) and Dennis Domra (gui- made, or a sor 
tar); St Peter vBexhiU, 7.30. with types of chei 
_ Concert by Barclays House . 

Choir and soloists and St John’s 
ChambCT Orchestra; St John's, Gardens Open 

wscoiiidc, 7-30 

Concert by the Holburne 
Group; Rochester Cathedral: 

7.30. 1 

Concert by the DeJicato Suing. 

'Orchestra; St Anne's, Bagsbot, 

8. 

Concert by the New Lydian 
Singers; St Mary's, Dorchester, 

Do reel, 7.30. 

General 

Buxton Antiques Fain Pavil- 
ion Gardens, Buxton; 12 to 9 
daily. Sun 1 2 to 6 (ends May 1 7). 

Breamore Museum Special: 
rare working steam exhibits; 

Breamore Countryside Mu- 
seum, Breamore, Hants, today 

and tomorrow 1 1 to 6. rn • 

British Craft Fhir, Great HaD. 1 06 pOUIlU 
Birmingham University, 10 to 5 
today and tomorrow. 

Book Fair, St David's Hall, 

Cardift 10.30 to 5. 

Book Fair Si Peter's Church 
Hail, Hatfield Rd. St Albans, 10 
to 4. i 

A Sense of Style: Fashion . 

>920-1940; Royal Bath Hotel, i 
Bournemouth. 7.30. 


Tomorrow 


New exhibitions 
Regional paintings by Robin 
Bownass and Tom Sisson; 
Towneley Hall Art Gallery. 
Burnley; Mon to Fri 10 to 5.30, 
Sun 12 to S (ends June 22). 
Music 

Concert by the Oxford Har- 
monic Society: Sl Barnabas 
Church. Oxford. 8. 

Concert by the Oldham Cho- 
ral Society, St Anne's, Roytoo, 
2.15. 

Conceit by the Halle Or- 
chestra; Free Trade Hall, Man- 
chester. 3. 

Lecture 

On the Crags, by John White; 
Lake District National Visitor 
Centre. Brockhole, Win- 
dermere. Cumbria. 1.30. 

General 

Vintage and Classic vehicle 
Road run: leaves pier approach. 
Bournemouth 9.45. 

Woodland Open Day: flow- 
ers, nature trails, talks and craft 
displays; Trddeslev Wood. 
Penbore, Wore*. 10.30 to 5.30. 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Jean Laones, Due de 
Montebello, marshall of France. 
Letoure, France. 1769. 

Deaths; George Vancouver, 
navigator of the Pacific coast of 
North America, Richmond. 1 
Surrey, 1798: Paul Revere, folk 
hero of the American War ofi 
Independence, ' Boston, . 
Massachmets, 1818; Sir Henry 
Stanley, explorer, London, 
1904; John Wesley Hyatt, pio- 
neer of the plastics industry, 
Shou Hill, New Jersey, 1920; 
Joan OnwfonL New York, 
1977, 

The Indian Mutiny began in 
Meerut. 1857. 

TOMORROW 

Deaths: Matteo Ricci, Jesuit 
missionary in China. China 
1610; William Pit, 1st Earf of 
Chatham. Prime Minister 1756- 
61. 1766-68, Hayes. Kent, 1778; 
Spencer Pmrival. Prime Min- 
ister 1809-12, assassinated in 
the House of Commons by John 
Bellingham. 1812; 


Weather 


A depression centred to the 
NW of Scotland *31 move 
slowly NE. A trough of low 
pressure wifi move SE over 
England and Wales. 

I ' — 


6 am to midnight 


iq 



(MM Prfca Max: 381* 

London; Tlw fT (ndax dosed down IL6 K 


Roads 



l iigyipitYini i 
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Nuclear advice 


The Foreign Office las issued 
a new telephone number for 
people planning to travel to 
Eastern Europe who are con- 
cerned about the effect of the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster on 
their journey. The number is 01- 
2 i 3-6660 and replaces numbers 
previously used for such advice.' 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge mil be raised 
tomorrow at 530am 
approximately. 


Abroad 


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SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 

THE TIMES 

17 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 

i 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1330.3 (-6.6) - 

FT-SE 100 
1601.6 (-1.9) 

USM (Datastream) 
120.64 (+0.27) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.5385 (-0.007) 

W German mark 
3.3501 (-0.0152) 
Trade-weighted 

75.6 (-0.6) 




Cookson’s 
£14m buy 


Cookson Group, the chemi- 
cals to engineering combine, is. 
paying £14 million for Ley- 
land Metal, which operates 
companies engaged in the 
recycling of scrap aluminium. 

Leyland Metal, which 
earned £2 million -profits last 
year, will be absorbed into the 
Cookson Fry division, which 
has sales of £94 million. The 
deal is being funded by the 
issue of Cookson shams. 


Boot slumps 

Henry Boot, the construc- 
tion company, lost £7.13 mil- 
lion before tax in the year to 
December 31, against a profit 
of £4.05 million in 1984. 
Turnover rose from £153 
million to £183 million and 
the final dividend has been cat 
from ii.5plo 5p. 

Tempos, page 19 


Going public 

Arlington Securities, the 
business park developer, is to 
obtain a Stock Exchange list- 
ing. Hill Samuel will offer for 
sale 8.7 million ordinary lOp 
shares — or. 182 per cent — at 
H5p each, capitalizing the 
company at £55.1 million. 

Tempos, page 19 


Burnett 4 no ! 


Burnett &. Hallamshire, the 
coal mining group, is still 
refusing to band over infor- 
mation about its affairs to 
Anglo United Development — 
which wants to bid £42 mil- 
lion — claiming foe informa- 
tion is commercially sensitive. 



By David Smith 

'Economics Correspondent 

The dollar slumped. to a 
post-war low of 161.90 against 
foe yen yesterday. There are 
market expectations that it 
will soon drop below 160, and 
could be headed for 150. 

The Bank of Japan again 
intervened to attempt to stem 
foe dollar’s slide, and prevent 
foe yen from rising further. 
But, according to one currency 
deafen “The Japanese may be 
making things worse by letting 
everybody know that not even 
intervention can stop foe yen 
rising.". 


drops to post-war 
against yen 


YEN/DOLLAR 


Group of Five 
Plaza meeting 



Group of Five 

London meeting 


160 



IMF Interim 
Committee 
Washington 


MAYJUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NO V DEC JAN FEB MAR APR 


the yen's move. There were 
indications of heavy pur- 
chases of the 10 and '30-year 
bond issues, with one report 
Uiat four Japanese securities 
firms bought S6 billion of 
bonds on Thursday alone. 

Overall, Japanese purchases 
during the week are likely to 


have been well in excess of$l0 


The yen has risen by nearly 
60 per cent against the dollar 
over foe past 13 months. The 
failure of foe Japanese prime 
minister, Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone, to convince foe 
other six countries attending 
foe Tokyo economic summit 
of foe problems created by the 
yen's surge, has done him 
considerable political dam a ge 
at home. 

Foreign exchange dealers 
believe that intervention to 
slop foe dollar foiling will be 
infective as long as it is 


ine 


conducted by the Bank of 
Japan alone. 

A London dealer said; 
"When foe Bundesbank starts 
intervening in foe European 
markets, people might decide 
that the dollar’s foil has run its 
course." 

There is a widely held view 
in foe market that this could 
occur if the raarfc/doDar rate 
moves to DM215. Yesterday, 
it closed unchanged in Lon- 
don at DM21775. 

However, Ihe Bundesbank 
is playing down foe possibili- 


ties of intervention to support 
the dollar and, in particular, 
that Germany has reached an 
accord with Japan on stopping 
their currencies rising against 
foe dollar. 


billion. 

The dollar's overall weak- 
ness — with economic data 
due next week expected to 
show a sluggish economy — 
disguised some selling of ster- 
ling after the Government's 
poor showing in the local 
elections and foe two by- 
elections. 


The dollar closed at 16210, 
compared with 163.50 on 
Thursday. The yen has been 
rising against au currencies, 
including foe mark, this year. 

Japanese buyers were 
strongly in evidence during 
foe week's S27 billion US 
Treasury refunding operation, 
apparently little affected by 


The pound fell by just 60 
points to Si. 5385 but foe 
sterling index fell 0.6 to 75.6. 
reflecting weakness against 
other currencies. 

Dealers believe that politics 
will pkty an increasingly im- 
portant part in foe pound's 
performance in the coming 
months. 

The prospect of a General 
Election with no clear major- 
ity government is considered 
particularly bad for sterling 


Compensation ceiling for 
investors to be raised 


The level of compensation 
available to investors under 
foe new self-regulatory frame- 
work for investment business- 
es is to be substantially 
increased in foe light of the 
Government's decision, an- 
nounced on Thursday, to 
grant immunity to foe self- 
regulaiory organizations. 

Mr Michael Howard, the 
Minister for Consumer and 
Coipbraur Affairs, has written 
to all the SR Os, asking them 
to look again at foe issue of 
compensation as foe proposed 
£30,000 ceiling per investor is 
regarded by foe Government 
as patently inadequate. A 
spokesman for foe Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry 
confirmed yesterday that the 
Government is looking for 
compensation levels to be 
increased to around £325,000. 

“We would be happier to 
see figures' for compensation 


By Lawrence Lever 
similar to those in the United 
States," the spokesman said. 
“We would look at the Securi- 
ties Industries Protection Cor- 
poration which pays up to 
$500,000 for loss of securities, 
as an indication," be added. 

The effect of the Financial 
Services Bill will make the 
Securities and Investments 
Board (SIB), foe new City 
watchdog responsible for pro- 
ducing* a compensation 
scheme which foe Govern- 
ment is satisfied makes foe 
best provision possible for 
investors. 

A spokesman for the SIB 
said yesterday that in foe light 
of Thursday’s decision on 
immunity, "it was quite obvi- 
ous that some form of quid 
pro quo is required. We can 
see the argument fix- raising 
the limit 

The SIB is understood to 
have been wry surprised qt 


the extent of the immunity 
which the Government has 
granted foe SROs. This ex- 
tends to protect foe SROs 
from actions for damages 
brought by members of the 
public for negligence. 

Significantly, Sir Kenneth 
Berml, the chairman of foe 
SIB, in his speech to foe 
National Association of Pen- 
sion Funds conference yester- 
day, made no reference to this 
aspect of the SROs' immunity 
in welcoming the 
Government's derision. 

The SIB's proposals on 
compensation, released last 
December, do not apply to 
professionals. Moreover, the 
SIB has suggested that the 
scheme should be compulsory 
only for those seeking authori- 
zation directly from the SIB. 

The Government Is under- 
stood to oppose both these 
proposals. 


Selling Britain 


Mr James Mellon (above), 
former British ambassador in 
Copenhagen, left London yes- 
terday to become British trade 
commisskmer in New York, a 
post of ambassadorial rank. 


Bell holding 


The Australian entrepre- 
neur Mr Robert Holmes a 
Court, working through Bell 
Group and Bell Resources, 
has increased his stake in foe 
Morgan Crucible materials 
technology group from 10.75 
per cent to 1 1 per cent 


Shares rush 


The application list for foe 
share offer by Dalepak Foods 
closed yesterday, heavily 
oversubscribed, while foe one 
by Monotype Corporation 
was twice covered. 


Rate cut 


The Australia and New 
Zealand Banking Group is to 
cut its prime lending rate from 
18.60 per cent to 18.35 per 
cent on Monday. 


Woolworth 
claims 
rejected 


IS 


By Alison Eadie 

Dixons Group, which 
bidding £1-5 billion for W( 
worth Holdings, has detailed 
its accounting policies in re- 
sponse to Woohvonh’s attack 
on its quality of earnings. , 

Dixons said that uotasmgle 
penny of the pre-acquisition 
profits of Currys’ credit busi- 
ness had been released into the 
1985-86 profits. Currys’ old 
accounting policy had been 
changed on acquisition, and 
foe outstanding deferred gross 
profit on the credit business 
had been released as pre- 
acquisition profit. 

Dixons also denied that 
there had been any significant 
gain from Currys' property 
portfolio. A full value had 
been put on the portfolio at 
the time of acquisition and 
had been incoiporaied into 
Currys’ net assets. 

There bad been no benefit 
to profits from foe release of 
slock provisions or from rer 
duced depreciation charges 
created by other asset write- 
downs. The improvement in 
Currys results was based on 
trading, Dixons said. 

The electrical goods retailer 
has yet to announce its profits 
for foe year ended on April 27, 
but City analysts are expecting 
an increase of more than 80 
per cent to £72 million. 


^ V. /MARKET SUMMARY' 


STOCK MARKETS 


1761 .99 (-4-22) 


New York 
Dow Jones ... 

IS DOW 16194.981+116.74) 

SsSw 1852.21 (--12.00) 

Sydney: AO . — ■■■-' 1232.1 (-105) 

Cwwnerzbar* 2049-3 (-49.0) 

669.00 (same) 

ntecK 

USesnatel 509.40 (same) 


interest rates 


London; 

Bank Base: 10v%> 

S-month Interbank 10 7 i*-1EWk 
3 -month ehQtWC WtelOte-10''** 
buying rat® 

Knefla ta&S» 

Federal Funds 6' i- * 


ederai Funds v 

-month TT ?f 
O^ear bonds 9 oflr&F 3 ? 


CURRENCIES 


nfloR 

SI 4385 

DM33501 

Sv«Fr2 T670 

FFr10.6695 

Yen249-39 

triflex:75.6 


New Volte 
t: $1 5420 
£,• DM2,1775 

$. index: U2.8 


ECU £0.986197 
SDR E1.W01 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 


Rank Organisation — 584p (+11 
Shett ........... — — 74§p (+13Pf 



Hampton 


AspmaS Hofcfings 


ywHo^r__«Mp^ig 


D J Security Alarms --WIP,* 
Country Garts JJ32|gJ+1 


ASed-Lyons 


Royal insurance .- 
Desou^Br 


wysa-*— 


HeficaiBar, 


FALLS: 

Lucas — 

Natwest — - 

Thom EMI — 

British Aerospace 
Amstrad 


* 563p(-30p) 
... 8S5pf-15p 
- 46Sp \-15p) 
... 538 p f- 17 p) 


HiHsdown — 

S WSensiord 


Woolworth 

Coats Wyena 

Gamar 
Good Heteoons _ 


283p(-i: 

. 214p (-3 . . 
790p(-25p> 
492p t-tr - 


Union Discount 



GOLD 


London Fixing: 
AM S344.5C - 
ao*?S34o.D 
224.50.) 


36 

(£224.00- 


Aitken snubs £91m 
Oppenheim offer 


By Richard Lander 

Aitken Hume International, 
the financial group, has come 
out with a strong rebuttal of 
the £91 million all-paper take- 
over offer from Mr Nick 
Oppenheim, foe financier. 

.- Aitken rejected the form of 
foe bid, made on Thursday 
through Mr Oppenheun’s 
Tran wood hosiery group, and 
said it had the support- of the 
Saudi Investment and Fi- 
nance Corporation, which 
owns 152 per cent of its 
shares. 

Aitken also said that inves- 
tors owning a further 10 per 
cent of the group had indicat- 
ed their support for the 
present management On 
Thursday, Mr Oppenheim 
said his offer had beat accept- 
ed by the 1928 Investment 


Trust which owns 6.8 per cent 
of Aitken. 

Mr Tony Constance. 
Aitken's-chief executive, who 
took up his job in March after 
a drasuc fall in interim profits 
and a series of boardroom and 
management departures, de- 
scribed the bid approach yes- 
terday as "unwelcome and 
prejudicial” and said the new 
management and company 
strategy were in place to chart 
the group's recovery. 

He responded to Mr 
Oppcnbeim’s remarks that 
Aitken was too diversified by, 
saying foe group had decided 
to withdraw from property 
while its stake in foe loss- 
making HQ Holdings Cana- 
dian investment trust would 
be reduced 


GEC sells subsidiary 


By Our City Staff 
CH Industrials, an industri- CHI estimated its own pre- 


al bolding company with in- 
terests ranging from car 
sunroofs to polymer products, 
has paid £4.5 million to GEC 
for ParnaU and Sons, foe office 
furniture and shopfitting 
group. CHI is issuing 6.63 
million shares to GEC, enlarg- 
ing its issued share capital by 
about a third, but these have 
already been placed at 69p 
each. CHI says foe purchase 
price is equivalent to 82 times 
Papuan's estimated 1985-86 
earnings. 


tax profits for the year ended 
March 29 at not less than £2 
million, compared with the 
previous £1.4 million. 

The company also made £1 
million on foe sale of shares 
purchased in Banro. another 
sunroof manufacturer, during 
last year’s abortive takeover 
bid, although this is before 
taking into account bid costs.' 
which were put at £293,000 in 
the interim report. 

Annual dividends will also 
be increased to 24p from 2 H. 


New legal 
challenge 
toTSB 
flotation 


By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Scottish depositors of the 
Trustee Savings Bank have 
again thrown plans for foe £1 
billion flotation into confu- 
sion by deciding to appeal to 
the House of Lords over foe 
question of who owns foe 
bank. 

Mr James Ross, the Scottish 
depositor who has already 
fought foe TSB and the Trea- 
sury through the Scottish 
courts, said yesterday: "In my 
view there is still a case and I 
am prepared to go to the 
House of Lords and meet the 
considerable costs of doing 
so.” 

He may be joined by Mr 
John Vincent a depositor 
with TSB England and Wales, 
who. brought foe case in 
England. 

The appeal follows the fail- 
ure of depositors in both foe 
Scottish and English courts to 
gain a ruling saying that foe 
TSB is owned by its 
depositors. 

A ruling along these lines 
would make toe flotation 
plans, which are based on the 
assumption that no one owns 
the bank, illegaL 
Mr Ross said that although 
the depositors had not yet 
received the ruling they had 
hoped for, the basic question 
of ownership was still unre- 
solved by foe couns's judge- 
ments. He said that the recent 
English court ruling was dear- 
ly made on the expectation 
that foe case would go to foe 
House of Lords. 

Mr Ross told the TSB that 
he had lodged his petition to 
the Lords yesterday. He said 
there was room for the case to 
be heard between June 1 6 and 
19. “This is a little soon for 
our liking but it is a timetable 
lo suit foe bank, which wants 
to get on* with things." 


Merlin seeks 
full listing 


Merlin International Prop- 
erties, an Isle of Man compa- 
ny, is to seek a full listing on 
foe Stock Exchange. 

Merlin has an issued share 
capital of 12 million ordinary 
shares of 25p. and net assets 
for the year ended December 
3 1 were £4. 1 8 million, equal lo 
34.84p per share. Pretax prof- 
its were £230.274. 

The company has develop- 
ments in the Isle of Man. 
Canada and Australia 
Merlin says its shares have 
been traded outside foe mar- 
ket at 45p. 


Thom receives 
£128m cash 
from Bond 


Thom EMI said last night 
that it had received £128 
million in cash from Mr Alan 
Bond for Thorn EMI Screen 
Entertainment and that a fur- 
ther amount would follow. 
Hie final payment depends on 
completion of an auditors' 
report 

As a result of the sate Thom 
EMI has been relieved of 
commitments on financing 
and distributing films estimat- 
ed to be worth more titan £100 
million. 

The company said the cash' 
and releases should be seen 
against Screen 

Entertainment's profits of 
£4.8 million 

The proceeds from this sale 
and . the disposal of foe 
company's cable television 
and programming interests 
will enable it to concentrate 
resources on its core 
businesses. 


Cater Allen issue 
to raise £18.3m 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Cater Alien Holdings, foe 
City discount bouse, yesterday 
announced that it was raising 
about £1835 million, through 
a rights issue. 

The company also revealed 
profits of £4.5 million for the 
year lo April 30 compared 
with £3.71 million the year 
before. 

The new Cater Allen shares 
are being issued at a deep 
discount to market value to 
avoid the need for underwrit- 
ing. This will save the compa* 
ny about £400,000 in 
underwriting and issuing 
costs. 

The directors said that the 
money would be used primari- 
ly to strengthen foe company's 
existing areas of business. 
These include gills trading and 
traditional short-term money 


market trading as well as 
financial futures broking, 
long-term fixed interest mar- 
kets and insurance manage- 
ment at Lloyd’s of London. 

Cater Alien's disclosed re- 
serves rose by more than £2 
million from £32.07 million to 
£34.22 million, but the -com- 
pany emphasized that inner 
reserves had reached a record 
level. 

A final dividend of 22p was 
announced, giving total divi- 
dends for the year of 30p 
compared wjfo 28.8p the pre- 
vious year. 

• King & Shaxson. which is 
^bidding for Smith St Aubyn, 
another discount house, yes- 
terday announced profits for 
foe year to April 30 of £1.1 
million, against £788,000 the 
year before. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Junior market faces 
a mid-life crisis 


The Unlisted Securities Market, 
popularly known as the “million- 
aire’s club.** wishes it lo be known 
that its membership lists are now 
open. 

The USM has found no shortage of 
recruits since its inception but there 
are signs that at the ripe old ape of 5% 
years, middle age is creeping in and it 
may need a youth serum. 

A report just published by Peat 
Marwick, the accountant, notes that 
fewer companies joined the USM in 
the first three months of this year 
than in any quarter since the market 
opened. 

The facts are that only seven 
companies were floated compared 
with 1 8 in the same quarter a year ago 
and 99 for the whole of 1 985. 

The USM is a major success for the 
Slock Exchange. It was created, 
nobly, to make it easier for young 
companies to gain access to venture 
capital by relaxing the entry qualifica- 
tions of the main market; and 
commercially, with an eye to the 
competing attractions of other mar- 
kets, by cutting the costs and reducing 
the rigmarole involved in a full Stock 
Exchange listing. 

The market has had its ups and 
downs; the shakeout in electrical 
stocks might have proved fatal but it 
has survived such shocks and there 
has not been any shortage of compa- 
nies willing to join up. Until now. 

Peat Marwick suggests that the 
sudden drop might be explained in 
part by the acquisition of private 
firms, which would make good USM 
prospects, by larger companies before 
they have chance to get to the markeL 


Other companies may be bypassing 

prestige of 


the USM and going for the prestige 
a full listing. Another possible 
explanation is that the City is 
becoming more fussy about the 
companies it sponsors. 

These reasons have the ring of 
truth, but one theory overlooked is 
that the USM has distanced itself 
from its roots. Far from providing 
basic risk capital it is appealing 
increasingly to more mature compa- 
nies. 

There is nothing remiss in impos- 
ing higher standards on entrants but 
there is a risk that the USM, as it 
looks over its shoulder at the 
proposed third tier market and the 
mushrooming Over-the-Counter 
area, will be sandwiched uncomfort- 
ably between start-up situations and 
the established main market It 
would be sad if it were to become a 
dinosaur at such an early age. 

Lunches discounted 

The discount houses, whose direc- 
tors were for years regarded as the 
core of the City's long-lunch brigade, 
have seen the future and concluded 
that it won’t work without a lot of ef- 
fort The lunches have become 
shorter and surprising things are 
happening in the sector 

Yesterday’s announcement by Ca- 
ter Allen, one of the larger of the 


breed, of a deeply discounted rights 
issue to raise £18 million of new 
capital emphasises the perception 
that size is cruciaL 

In a few short years the number of 
quoted discount houses has shrunk 
from nine to a mere four as the 
houses first merged and were then 
taken out of the stock market 
altogether as they were absorbed by 
ihe digestive systems of Citicorp and 
Banque Beige. The process continues 
as Prudential Bache takes in Clive 
Discount and King & Shaxson looks 
sel lo take over Smith St Aubyn. 

Size is essenatiai because it reduces 
overheads as a proportion of total 
business. The smaller houses have 
increasingly had to lake huge and 
dangerously exposed postions in the 
gilts and short-term money market to 
keep up with the earnings of their 
bigger brothers. Size also enables the 
houses to keep up with the steadily 
increasing volumes of the markets 

All very well, but confronted with 
the resources of a Citicorp can even 
the largest of the discount houses 
hope to maintain their position after 
the big bang? 

The houses insist that in the last 
few years their expertise in even their 
most traditional markets of short- 
term bill trading has leapt forward. 
The larger houses now tend to take 
smaller positions, selecting their mo- 
ment carefully and trading rapidly in 
and out of the market They have also 
been sharpening their expertise in 
hedging risks through, for example, 
financial futures. 

In theory, this reduces their risk 
and improves the quality of their 
earnings. What they lack in resources, 
in other words, they make up for in 
skill. 

But the houses remain highly 
vulnerable as figures recently pub- 
lished by Smith St Aubyn as part of 
its position as a takeover victim 
reveal At the end of February Smith 
disclosed that its net asset value was 
37p a share; three weeks later it was 
46p, two weeks after that it was 42p 
and then 47p again two weeks later. 

To reduce this vulnerability the 
discount houses have started ener- 
getically to diversify- Cater Allen is 
going selectively into the new gilts 
market and already has interest in 
financial ftiture and insurance 

Gerrard & National is aiming for a 
broader sweep across the money 
markets and could start to look like a 
small version of a US securities 
house. King & Shaxson is interested 
in money broking, while Clive has 
ambitions in stock lending. 

Size will probably again count for 
much. In the current trend towards 
offering a complete securities market 
service, discount houses are likely to 
find themselves pushed increasingly 
in this direction, having to give up 
their ambitions of being "niche” 
players. It may as yet be premature to 
say that the discount house sector has 
ceased to exist, but the time cannot be 
far off. 



No.l International 
Unitltust over 
1,3,5 and 7 years. 


7 YEARS 



■Source Planned Savings. Offer la BkL Income Reinvested 1/5/8& 



Above you see the results of £1000 invested 
in the Oppenheimer International Growth 
Trust placing it top out of all international 
unit trusts over all the periods shown* 

Our style of international fund manage- 
ment is different 

We buy the shares that we want wherever 
they may be, regardless of the established 
international capital weighting. 

Our performance has benefited from some 
aggressive positions, at times over 40% in one 
geographical area, 

The risks of such active management can 
be great but, as you can see, so can 
the rewards. jKpfctM 

To see how the Oppenheimer rei tiS 
International Growth Trust is pres - 
ently invested call 01-489 1078. 

A member company of Che MeicarWe House Group. 


19 


3 


11 


t 


tl Id- 
922? 
third 


also 

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spec- 

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atj« 







FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


tng 


TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


WALL STREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


mmS 


iSSSESSESI^ 


$33 


m 


May May 
B T 


May May 
B 7 



Am'rdai 

i { 

AmBrar 

- ! 

Am Brat 


Am Can 

4 

Am Cyra 

< 

Am El Pi 


Am Expt 


Am Horn 

- 

1 Am Hos? 

■ 

. Am Mon 


ArtiSTra 

* " 

* AmTt*n 







COMMODITIES 

ti? 

SZ 


RoMfWoaaco.tM.npwt 


- Amagt WMbA Rriora at 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 






t£ 


SOYABEAN 

Juno . —— 

AJ5 

Oct __ 

Dec 

Fob 

AprU 

Juno _ 

V* 

GASOIL 
May 

Juno— — _ 

July 

Aug 

Sapt 

Oci 

Nov 

Doc 

Jan 

Vat 


25A3B . 8 
. ZL2-ZLS 
2A.(L2A2 
2SJ-26-Q 


275-29.5 

zr.o^ao 
16* 


LT-14&00 

. 143JQ042J5 
142M41J5 
1*250-6200 
143JXM275 
14300-42-25 
14330-42-75 
145JXM2-00 
14000-20.00 
4311 



3 H£f was 

* i»s--isa> 

« 1020 10£® 

ft ' W15 IOTA 

reft ■ ffifl i®| 

rt 102-0 UQa 

VbtO 

u5WC SSiI3 TW » 

BM Contact 

pparkDo 


Canto not. up* 0%. m. 







Apr 87 BT5.M15.0 8373 

MBT 750.0-735,0 TMA 


Vot49M» 

Op ai «il w 33 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


m 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


r— -rm-rr-mn 


• Uawicmc ata-swr o Sou w i I'M t untuned 


Thrae Month Staring 

Jun86 

sap 88 

DSC 88 

Mar 07 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

Pravnus day's total <4i 
Three Month EuraMb 

JuP 86 — 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

US Trenuy Bond 

Jun 88 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Start' Q» 

Ji*iB8 - . — . 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Long Get 

Jun 66 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

FT-SE 100 

Jun 86 

Sep 88 


Interest 19554 


High Low OoM EatVoi 
9017 90.05 90.13 3154 

90.99 9030 90-97 742 

9130 9120 91.29 244 

91.29 91.17 9132 75 

91.19 0 

90.99 0 

98. « BWtoUS go^ ““ °^ n ^ ,ton, 2(^ Z3 
93.45 93.36 93.43 1508 

9329 0323 3328 186 

93.04 93.02 93.04 52 

Previous day s total open interest 5881 
101-00 100-05 100-15 6188 

9023 0 

8000 0 


Previous day's total open interest 1475 

102- 47 103-05 102-45 1B3-00 155 

103- 22 10322 10322 103-20 5 

NfT 0 

Previous day's total open interest 1 3587 
125-28 126-20 125-21 126-19 7098 

12342 12622 125-29 12527 412 

N/T 126-26 0 

N/T 12622 0 

_ Previous day's total open vtartMt 1999 
16230 16230 159 70 16120 789 

16420 16420 163.15 T8345 13 


18 08 
14 02 

77 

.-IS ' 

09 

as 

47 

13 

&6t! 

l 12: 

50 

14. 

28 

221 

06 

29 i 

00 

141 

26 

£41 

01 

1.1 1 

112 

u: 

142 

431 

07 

82 

62 

151 

73 

4.i ; 

109b 19 r 

1.4 

12 

22 

£7 i 

57 

00 

21 

34! 

39 

23 ‘ 

33 

£11 

80 

£2 < 

£1 

25! 


223 *-2 

W -V 

i 3 

zn -4 

659 

>7 -I 

229 -1 

SB 

63 -2 

119 *-2 

rto -a 
15S -3 

184 +1 

293 *7 

S I -a' 

iSS 

XX 4 

*3 *3 
\A ■?. 

77 

S :: 

S T. 

S • 3 

2M 

320 -1 

wi 

344 -1 

296 -2 

sos -a 

S -s' 

S -a 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BM Otter Chng YW 


Bd Otfar Cmg YU 


Bu Otfar Chng Yld 




Ctng YU 


□mo vh 


V M i it. 



Smnunr Co* 

139 7 1490 

-88 131 


UK Growm 

37 T 3964! 

-07 004 


Extra ore 

67 G B&r 

-10 BE 


G41 

276 293 

.. 727 


Me A Growth 

1509 2100* 

-44 424 

WJ7 

JEt'SE*!? 

1908 2097* 
19£ 20.Se 

-06 465 
-02 056 

179 

Commocny 
F+uncui Sacs 

1165 1241* 
44 7 477 

-0* 079 
-08 022 


Goto 6 Gan 

18J 175 

-04 366 


im Laoura 

IS 7 187 

-03 05+ 


Prop Smim 

sa o 64.a 

-1.7 1.15 


Uoiv Enaray 
woreo ter* 

382 <07 

+01 182 


*31 4ED 

-06 082 


ATOfF G'PWUl 

913 974 



A nm Income 

555 592* 

-07 556 
-03 ass 


Amur Smaxw Co'i 

214 250 



703 77l* 



Euro Smaffw 




Far Exer 

434 463 

+05 087 


Bona Kona tM 
rmr Growm 

236 254 

. 061 
-06 155 


Jxowr Rwr 

61.4 655 

♦07 .. 


Jaoan Smourr 

144 IS* 

+0.1 .. 


Exmnpr 

618 975* 

-10 160 

E7 

06 

Exampl MafluM 
BROWN SfWLET 

64.7 677 

.. 4.14 


B*1r. Perrytnourt R0 MaywardS HoBth 

7D 

Fnancito 

1203 1315 

-04 015 


Gramn Accum 

2014 2165* 

-04 


Do Income 

1290 135.7* 

-15 179 


Hgn (neentu 

603 712 

-18 028 


too™ 

758 612* 

-1.1 526 


Man Paraoaa me 

606 676 

-08 429 


Do ACC 

IQS + 1114 



Ncnh Atuancan 

MS 638 

-08 125 


Of "Bit 




Rocowry 

4T.7 44 8c 

-03 132 


Tachnology 

142 7 1535* 

-1J 060 

44 

Oeraun 

30 6 309* 

-06 186 


BUCXMA0TER MANAOEMBir 



Thu Stock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 

94 

12 

General toe (41 

2135 234.1 

-22 317 

8 

Do Amm (4) 

3362 3530 

-14 117 

40 

tnconw Fund (3) 

1017 106 1* 

.. 523 


Do Aoobi (3) 

1818 168.7* 

.. 523 


WI Inc iZ) 

1196 1251 

.. 167 


Do Accun 12] 

151* 1651 



SmaSac he (51 

£1 1.39 1004 

.. 077 


DO Accum (51 

£1189 1071 

.. 077 


csFimoauNAosu 


B8 

125. Man HODom. London VYC1V SPY 
01-242 1146 

*7 

CS Japan Fuw 

703 ffU 

*08 025 

01 

CMWDN FUND MAHAGB1S 


73 

L a^i^Why, wembtay. HA9 CUB 


M 

Grown 

261.0 2989 

-3 7 072 


fncomo 

326.7 3*65 

-11 4.11 


Fat East 

179.8 1905* 

+1 7 068 


North Anmaai 

1385 1472* 

-15 073 


CAPO. (JAMES) MANAQBdENT 



TO Box 5S1 Bevtt Marks London EC3 7JQ 

33 

01-621 0011 
Capau 

3607 3856* 

-05 189 


tocom* 

28*.4 3042* 

+14 469 

0 

D 

North Amancan 
CATBI ALLEN 

2575 *756* 

-0.7 140 


l. Ktog WBam SL EC4N 7AU 
01-623 6314 



GRB Truar 

1068 113.7* 

.. 1053 

5 

CENTRAL BOARD OF RHANCE OF 



CHURCH OF HtG 




77 London WW EC2 IDS 



01-668 1615 
tov Fund 

41075 

.. 412 


Fixao n 




Du DOM 

10OLO 

.. 1125 

0 

CHARITIES OFFICIAL MVESTMEHT FUND 1 

2 

77. Londui Wx*. London EC2N iob 



01-668 ISIS 




EQUITY 1 LAW 

Sl OaorgB Hh CorporaBon St Coventry 071 
190 

0203 5S3231 

UK Drown Accam 144.1 1S32S -27 3/7 

Do hoonw 125.1 1338* ~2« 347 
HMWT fee Accum 2338 2518* -34 473 
Dc toeoma 192.1 20*6* -37 4.73 

Gus/Faad Accvn -103-5 1039 -32 265 

Do Ineomn B3fl 93-2 -01 265 

NtnAnwTM Accum n *2 M07* -22 022 
Far East T* Accun 134 .O 1435* *02 032 
Euro Tsi Aceum . 1438 1561 +0.1 1.15 

Gwrt Trent 2230 3418* -48 298 

F A C UCT MANAGEMENT 

1. uuanee Poutrwy HO. London EC4R OBA 

01-623 4880 

Amancan Fund 738 77J9 -1.0 326 

CwMHl Fund 107-3 115.0 -0.9 069 

moons FukJ 665 86.1 -1.4 455 

Far Eanam Fund 6BJ 746 +<L1 02 s 

Ovwmbs toetxns 64.9 605 -U* 389 

Find Mans 608 Mfl -02 9.00 

Nttum Bn Fund 37.5 398 -08 475 

European heura 735 778 +05 321 

FSMVESTUQ4T MANAGERS 

190, Went George St Gtaagow G2 2PA 

041-332 3>32 


hr* 


li— ju- 


[+— V i 1V -+ 


BManced Cm Me 
Co Accun 
McareQai Me 
Do Accum 
Eerwee Co s Me 
Do Mum 


433 46.10 
440 4680 
*03 430 
43-2 46J0 
♦5.1 48.0c 
455 435* 


3a 


FIDELITY NTtaNATKHUU. 

RlM* Wta. T ortyiCo4 TW9 107 
0732 3S22Z2 


Anwr Bam tacoma 
toner SpocaU Shs 
Far East Mo 
GM 8 fixed Ml 
Omroi 6 Income 
Japan Spaed Sc 
Japan Trust 


972 1040 -18 056 

913 325* -0.4 604 
51.0 54.6* -0.7 0.4® 
315 338c +02 402 
31.4 328 -0.1 6.73 

89.7 1067 -18 422 

360 362 +0.9 .. 

Ill 1 1188 


Managed Mt T* 1367 136.1 
Max toeoma Equity 731 782 
Proteaaioiwi Wn 3+8 362 
South Ea» Aan Tar 26* 261 
SpoesU SKs 1658 1678 

FLEMNG (ROBERT) 

oi-sas&H 4 M ”" on EC3A 

touneen Exempt E2S1 6 366.7* 
Japan Exen*t *346.1 3572 
Am Propany Dal 9107958 

Property Trust £3X00 • 


lUmdon wa« Brogt. London «u London 
tw* aau 
01-626 5161 

Amar 6 Gan toe 2194 2334 -22 DEO 

Do ifflai 224.0 2382 -25 056 

Amar Tunosnd 1* 206.4 2194 




Cue T*t toe 
Do ACcun 
Corn a Gto toe 
Do Accum 
Extra Inc TM Me 
□o Aceum 
hcoma Trei* 

Do Acaan 
tot Growth Fd toe 
Do accuk 
J aoan 6 Can Me 
Do Aceum 


192.3 2058* -2.3 280 

2320 2468* -26 266 
892 948 -08 5.15 

1166 1248 -06 5.IS 

1572 1072 -2d 440 

1672 1778 -21 440 

1178 1244e -18 404 

121 4 1298c -1 8 484 

1592 1662* -1.7 080 
1788 188.0a -t2 080 

768 B02 +04 026 

766 81 8 +08 0JS8 


Uhemli 
do- A ceum 


Monthly Incon* Fd 748 794* -1.1 476 



Raeovery 
Do Aceum 
European kic 
Do Aceum 


137.4 1468 
1466 J588 
648 562 
548 562 


mens PROnoen- iMfupBtt 

Phmam End. Doming. Sumy 


% 


er 


tor - to ‘*4 ' 

P-4U 


pp Enuty Dm 
D o Accun 
FP Rxnd HU DM 
Do Acaan 
toewareuMp Dtet 
Do Aceum 

FUNDS IN COURT 
PubhC Trust**. Kto 
Or -405 4300 
Coenai 
Grots tor 
i+gn raid 


1638 2058* -68 273 
3232 3430a -112 273 
1168 1240a -0.7 6.79 

1328 1412* -08 5l79 

161 7 1718* -48 215 
1878 1772* -40 215 


851 8 363A* 
1537 1568 
220.7 2298 


WTBtoMI6BBMireO»toMltY 
3i-«a Gntanam SC London EC2V 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Ouadram Ganaml 4295 4S7.M . . 287 

Qumton iwaoma 24+8 2662 523 

OadmffltoflFd 3746 3848* .. 1.14 

Quadrant Hacovay 2S9A 2788 . . 366 

Ml ROTKSCiOlD ASSET MANAGEMENT 
St Gv j Mi to i Lan*. Lpnqon EC4P 4DU 
OHM 6456 

NC Amanea toe 286.1 2SG2 -07 182 

Do Acona 2B6.4 3068 -28 102 

NC Ervgy Ftaa 1342 MZB -02 288 




BY UMT RHNAiQBta 

Ftoq r. B - Dtoponamra 8a. London EC2M 4TJ 
61-263 2575 DagNog 01 9431 

UK Cap Fna toe 062 IBS 1 -22 220 

Do Accum 1774 147.0 -SB 220 

tooome Fund 607 66.4 -as 680 

Pension Emu 1602 1676 -14 200 

Imivnooonal TS31 1668 +03 1.00 

U5 6 Gamm 868 827a -03 140 

Tacit 4 Growth 712 7&2a -02 180 

JTOM 6 Dsnaral 205.7 2201* +0.1 020 
Far East & Gao 068 91 3 +04 180 

Eumcean Fund 2207 2448 -07 070 

Germany Fund 647 062 -04 180 

QAimacaiE n» tSwaoBa 

a St M a r y Aw moon EC3A 8BP 

MU 1212 Oeafeig 01023 5700 Owtoig t7MB3 

American Itat 907 972 -05 086 

Aiaraton Trust 1B2 205* -02 a +2 
BntMi T« Accum 536 578 -13 2M 

_00 DM _ 473 30M -1.1 242 

Ceamaw snare 631 568 -0 A i so 

EurooMBTfuM 608 64A +02 0*3 

Ewa Income Trial 417 490* -08 647 
ft* Eastern Trust 1165 134 7 -04 0.1 D 

Bxodi imaroat Fond 8B.$ aa^* _oi 9.62 
Gar TUM 205 29.7a *02 620 

GUM Fund Aceum 1608 1709 +0.1 022 

Oojta _ _ 1500 wa +oi 022 

GQU Sharv Ttual |1.| 1 |.B . ymn 

HMMd IMnn 288 312 . . Old 

*0h toeoma That 1358 1458 -18 529 

Hang K ong Trial 288 Z78 -01 182 

h^ranaPimd 742 794 -10 327 

msrmnoa Agaroea E4S.51 4920 -083 185 

J* * 1 T? g « 125 4 1334 *08 000 

Manaqad Exam au 290 Sa -24 283 

W A Energy Thai 2S.4 31.4 -04 140 

Kttevi su ks a 

^crL^r ^Sdon ECail 
01-588 5820 

tod Ckowth 773 626 . . 1 87 

♦mereean Grow* 642 688 ..182 

665 M l .. 540 

Batman Grown 2016 2158 .. n w 

Goal i toww <02 411 . . 127 

Japan Qrpwdi 1433 1S32 .. Qii 

Fax* meema 662 71 1 am 

UK Specw Opps K7 Si iff 

GW UMT MANAGERS 
Howl Erorarua, EC3P 3DN 


Amar Qrowdi toe 62.4 0E2 

Do Accom 038 674 

Fuad to* Tai toe 106 are 

Da Acorn 248 268 

non vteid he i30J 13&1 

DO Accum 2108 2234* 

tot Recovery he 992 1057c 
DC ACCUX 1039 1107 

Japan Grown Me 675 927 

Do Acoan 67 a 133. r* 

Smaear Co s Me 1562 160.1* 

DO ACCUM 20Z6 2168* 

UK Eq OKMI toe ZB4 304 

DO Accum 46.7 500 

VMaldMaa Tach Inc 422 444 
Do ACCUn 425 45.1 

LG cuwn 1 TRUST MAM 6MBHT 

oSS 8 b aST" Copfl,1, ***■ ' 

Income Fund 4391 4481 

totamohorm & Gan 2405 8455 


B 356101 

Grown Units 
Gto A Ffted tot 


way, Stowage Hn 

1 731 80 a 

tot 1168 1195 


fc 


-0.1 288 
- 0.1 .. 
-14 5.17 
-22 .. 
+05 227 
+06 .. 
♦ 1.1 .. 
♦12 .. 

3 Z z « 

-02 124 
-04 .. 
-0.4 014 


tocome UnKt 1131 1228* 
I Yltod G* Unt 504 534 


T71L7 1814 
CDs _ 1388 1452 

3 Ctf* 1712 162.1 
£1338 1368* 
«p S1 147 12.16* 
1738 1628* 


-22 182 
~®5 182 
-03 268 
-1-7 688 
+08 081 
-12 228 
+06 044 
-- 347 


DR me 

Mt PROWElfr OTMANAGERS 
UKHoojj Cwe Sc Gwtoay 8P1 3SH 
0722 336342 

«« jq*r ■ 1172 13+2 -17 .. 

tmaaeaewt idsws +00 .. 

N Amor 1098 1162 -22 .. 

VANGUARD TRUST 

5 ■i2f2S2. v, *" ,c * “W *u 

01-238 3068. 

Grown toe 1022 SOLS -07 l.7B 

Od Accum 2795 397.4 -48 1.71 

HMI YtaW 208.® 2234 -2.1 427 

BoAqrom 2099 2234 -01 07 

Sweei &B 433 44.0 -os 289 

Ot ACorn 412 448 -04 208 

Ihtotse 1332 I41J -1.7 347 

DO Accun 2006 213.4 -05 147 

Amar a Gan 565 602* -06 1.19 

DdAonm 565 602 -06 1.18 

Jtafta* £5862 6135* -047 ITT 
Atmg Rdto Act! P) 1052 1128 -36 071 

WAHOLE Y UNIT TRUST atAWAOEBS 
W*tay | ^>*. 7. OwBHMto 80 UMm EC2 

S JS5S Jy , 718 -06 120 

FhrEaarlGan a+o B 03 +02120 


tod Growth Unis 
K Amartean Unas 
Far East Unas 
Sa to r Cm Fund 


117.7 125.1* 
OBJ 734 
818 912 
664 72.7m 


, London EC4R 9AS 


MStCAPUNir TRUST 

llncom Mae. 262. nomtoM M. E 7 

01-234 55+4 




EMy OwrMon 2672 28S.7 -5.1 214 

DO Accun 4175 4468 -6.1 014 

Do tocomo 61 T (53 -08 489 

Euopean 666 732 +1.0 148 

Fhr tasum M.I 042 +05 CL57 

pto. Treat 612 855* +01 546 

tori Managed 70S 788 -04 l 17 

totow . 556 95* -07 073 

w A mancan Treat 705 775 -00 255 

UK 8pooai Sus 612 658 -15 014 

LL OVP 6 B ANK UMT TRUST MANGQBto 
goffsirani Dot Gonvay-Goa. Woravng. W 


Enugy tod 
Do Aceum 
Extra tocomo 
_Do Accun 
Guman Olt toe 
Do A ccum 
Kama 
Do Aceum 
M Tout 
Do Accun 
Japan Growto 
Do Accun 
N Amar 6 Gan 
Do Acoan 
(Me Bom 
_ t>j Aceum 
SmaAar Cos ( Rae 


1762 ISO 5* 
3173 3392 
468 462 
51.4 545 
15jLB 1685a 
2803 299.7 
615 fl&7* 
•15 65.7 
2638 2618* 
6180 566.0 
1E04 13090 
1882 2012 
677 706* 
67 B 705* 
971 1038 
1045 111.7 
1131 1209 
1161 1263 
1852 1S&0* 


-38 012 
•08 812 
.. 325 
.. 325 
-10 406 
-32 408 
-05 081 
-05 001 
-15 444 
-74 4.44 
-12 034 
-\2 034 
♦10 082 
♦10 0 02 


rood immosi 
-05 4.18 I Hp\tourwi 
™ ™* W 


2116 2172 
7070 7200 
1600 1655c 
3778 3855 
1718 1700 
131.0 1300 
1872 1905 


-02 013 
- 036 
B81 
.. 1.77 
+42 048 
.. 1124 
.. 026 


S* 1 ? Urmpooi U» 3MB 

051-227^4422 

GOMy TTUM 614 903* +12 248 

to* 1>U« 082 725 -02 142 

«JW 203 292 -.726 

US Tool 307 320 ' -04 180 

Pacific Baato Tat . 347 369 +03 059 

ROVAL LONDON uwrnwir 




Aroweari Tluat 607 718 -06 180 

F>* tot A Gw US 683 +02 130 

M Gro wn 007 742 .. 1.10 

IWMa TTOrt 700 838* -03 590 

Jxpy Grown io+.7 H08 +08 020 

smax Cmn peniaa 1228 i3i 2 -as zoo 

T aanoto gy 3&9 38.6» -04 020 

,to>W *70 50.5 -05 140 

jj* Tram . 131 S 1404c -14*90 

fanopeon Ctawr 510 564 +03 120 

Hong Kong 228 234 -02 LTD 

wA VBtuEYA ^gTjwJutAaaterr 

^^‘S wSafBr 1*9 isl* oio 

C wad toB Bil Oto 562 « 1* -03 300 

Btota Maa Fad S1IE3 1063 . . 780 

^-^twnuiSTUMaaffl* 

SMDtdORFuid 6S8 667* .. 029 


fMANAOnSLTD 
83. Kaigsway. Lo 




«5 500 
523 557 















































But then if it 
be Flora 

Are you eatin 
right reasons? 


it wouldn’t 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1 0fi* 


TEMPUS 


and hope to Boot 

? Sons has lost Fvmprfv -mw < . 


?he market, valuing the com- 

nnni* n t- i 




I fin temoararSf- ,■ f v 5 I F‘ , s accounts, . pub- 

{'• 1984 the Riyadh 7 ^!^ . last week alongside the 

I °£l d ^ umenL 5 P eI] 001 *e '^VfferVor'Se under- 

^wa* Chin container term; 6 !? &c L? f ” s mei?er accounting written by Hill Samuel ihe 

r-^ ^andde zoe, 

Sftsa^s awrat'wt 

acimc. end, its profits wens included 
months ih* r. lhe 13381 few u Hie nil! year. The accounts 
has IefL 2J"SP Erector show dearly that this had the 

oPvS'oJf ih , ^ mana 8 ers of “ lcrasi "f; profits 
anous subsidiaries. before tax by £ 1 .2 million and 

win i!/L® pe 15 11131 °ew blood ea JP ,n 8 s . per share by 0.5p. 
nvm^.r re ! urn the compa- Questions remain about the 
wL ^ *». 'here IpQttt^bon amounting of 

fsni s ’n- 8 from Profits of ° rock house, acquired by 

£7lw. , r ,0n J? iosses of I ve EE d in 1984 - T he 
fk; J k-’fore tax, but B rockhouse assets had been 


tax, out " ,wv ~««oc eoxts naa 

_ hl |^ r “ Boors centenary S® 1 ® 1 * al £21 million, but 
* here should be a good Ev , ered ascribed a value of 
n^‘^y ery ’i assumin 8 are °2 ,y £, °- 6 million to them 
no more large provisions. after Anting down its proper- 

The Kwai Chin confront t, -^ S ^ d Providing for reoiga- 
was responsible for masTS “^JL 011 5 osls - 11 is Pitted 
the £ 6.2 million oSmkS S ?££"¥> Industries, a 
»n 1985, but hte firBntkhoBK; 

WTte "nosh was planning a larger write- 
down. 

In the eight months of 1984 
alter acquisition Brockhouse 
contributed £Z25 million. 
The latest accounts do not, 
however, show how much it 
made in 1985. Jt is, therefore, 
impossible to say. how much 
of the improvement in group 
profits from £3.44 million to 


in 

contracts were ah» fo foss. 
The joinery and railway engi- 
neertng businesses swtmg- 
Jrom combined profits of 
il.4 million in 1984 to uu- 
quantified losses last year and 
there was a provision against 
me^ property development 

The company has large 
contracts on the Singapore 
mass rapid transit railway 
and the Kowloon-Canton 


« 1 . **■ ana oe /.oerc 

& Bevan, the broker, is for 8.7 
million ordinary shares of 10 p 
•each at I15p per share. The 
forecast eammgs per share of 
7 -2Sp puts the shares on a 
Protective p/e of 1 5.8 times. 

. Arlington is a property trad- 
>ng company, involved with 
partners in five existing bitti- 
ness parks in the south of 
England with another two 
such schemes in the offing, 
one m Birmingham. It has a 
total land bank of 500 acres. It 
also has a large office project 
m band in London's Reel 
Street as weB as the transfor- 
matfon of the former 
Whiteley s department store 
in West London. 

Arlington is joining the 
growing hand of quoted prop- 
er trading companies which 
specialize in a sector of the 
raaikrt such as London & 
Edinburgh Trust, Speyhawk 
and Rosehaugh, now the 
glamour” slocks 

. Arlington's p/e ratio has 
been nicely judged compared 
wuh the likes of LET, which 
has a p/e of about 25 times 
Pretax profits for the year 
ended December 31 1986 are 
forecast to be not less than 


State sale 
delayed 

By Teresa Poole 

Privatization of the Crown 
Agents is unlikely to take place 
within the lifetime of the 
present Government 
Mr Peter Graham, senior 
crown agent confirmed yes- 
terday that he has been told 
there will be no time for 
legislation in the run-up to the 
general election. 

Meanwhile, the agents’ 
1985 report showed further 
recovery from the 1983 crisis 
when the Sultan of Brunei 
removed his portfolio of funds 
from its management Opera i- 
’ n S Profits moved ahead from 
£1.08 million to £1.94 million 
on income increased by 1 5 per 
cent to £26.9 million, in line 
with government targets. 

But Mr Graham said the 
decision this year to remove 
certain overseas pensions 
work had jeopardised future 
levels of profitability. Last 
vear this business accounted 
for almost half the pretax 
profits. 

During the year the agents 
placed orders worth £125 
million and managed projects 
worth nearly £900 million, 
principal’s finds worth £1.2 
billion, and aid grants and 
loans worth £2J> billion. 


-FINANCE AND INDT TSTR v 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


» Will 

Election losses prompt fall 
?C“®?rIy7 points in index 

Wig in the elections ° Iscenm ,eH ^ 1 5p to Building and DronmiM Immm .i ~ . _ 


.... - — ■ ■ “MIIWU IU 

- million before tax cany ? 

radwa^in ,, Kow [?° n - CanI on ^ss^ and how^^ch fhSi foTOsTiT'be'not 1 le^fian 
Sf. 1 ; ”9 n s Ivoog Which, Brockhouse; or. how much of £5-15 nriihon compared wi3?£ 
SS* Ovtmall any improvement at mere £85,000 in 1981 But 
I« e ®. °f business. however. Brockhouse reflected lower Axiinetnn rib*- «»«,. 
to fall back this ^Precialion policies resulting 
from the -write-down ‘ 


are likely 
year. 

Even after last year's after- 
tax loss of £8.3 million, net 
assets stand at about 400p a 
share. The premium to the 
market price of 235p reflects 
a cautious view of Boot's 
I prospects. The new managers 
1 need time to establish 
themselves. 


— of its 

assets. 

There is also a suggestion 
that property profits woe 
material to last year’s result 
Evered points out that it 
wouM have had to disclose 
them if this were true. 

. The problem with acquisi- 
tion accounting is partly one 
of disclosure as it tends * 


Arlington, like many other 
developers, knows that it must 
raise moneyto retain a bigger 
ware of development profits 
than is possible when schemes 
nave to be forward funded. 
The flotation is a way of 
achieving this. 

Two private placings have 
already raised £8.3 million, 
and no shareholders nor direc- 
tor-shareholders are to sell 
shares. It is expected that 


Barclays to 
sack 165 

Barclays, one of the fastest- 
growing foreign banking 
groups in Italy, is to riigmip; 
165 of the 400 staff at its main 
Milan branch because of a 
“difficult and complex market 
situation,” John Earle writes 
from Rome. 

It intends, however, to con- 
solidate its presence in the 
Italian market, a statement 
said. Last year, Barclays' Ital- 
ian subsidiary reported a loss 
°f5j- 67 0 million lire (about 
±22.4 million) despite a 52 per 
cent rise in the volume of 
business. 


The Government’s poor 
showing in the elections 
dampened hopes of any fur- 
ther recovery yesterday. 

Share prices moved lower 
after an early, modest im- 
provement, which largely 
stemmed from a firmer Wall 
Street Falls were quite large 
among some leaders. 

. ^The FT 30-share index 
slipped by 6.6 points to 
1.330.3. while the FT-SE 100 
radex was 1.9 points lower at 
i.oui.o. 

Lucas illustrated the trend 
by tumbling 30p to 563p. on 
reports of an adverse article in 
we weekend press. British 
Aerospace; a firm market of 
jale on American support 
dipped )7p to 538p in sympa- 

toy. 

Thora EMI was another 
predorninaUy weak spot at 
469p — down J5p - after a 
suggestion that the troubled 
Inraos subsidiary was up for 
sate- Declines elsewhere 
ranged between 5p and Mp, 
but oils and insurances man- 
aged to attract some buying 
interest ahead of quarterly 
statements next week. 

Stores had another dull 
session, still upset by the 
Hams Queensway rights issue 
and uninspiring figures from 
Maries and Spencer. An £J8 
million cash tall from Cater 
Allen knocked 30p from the 
shares at 563 p, upsetting other 
discount houses in sympathy. 


Building and properties 
lacked support. There were 


Best of the day's three « £ WttS 

Tip T op Drat talLSe/ Ian? ^^ThurSay’s third 

which recorded a 20 p prem? ° T? 3ni fl^rterly report. 

um at 180n. hm 11 J 11 »-»^a- isaDon, firm on Thurs- ~ .... 


which recorded a 20 d rm?iS rwT 

». loXrr “ -up.pnmn- Organisation, firm on Thurs- * . . 

— «- Speculative demand also 


on-unTui^nria^ n> 

othcr newcomers had mixed h?ri S J ha -^P nd C P f Tf )orat, ' on 
fortunes. CombinedUase ^ .m d i ? a,u,rerf a moved 
nance managed afeh^nrerrri P p^ S mo - re P 584p. 

unj over the J25 d offerine E ecxrDm f issues remained 

Price. Clo si n7« 1 fi 0ffenng SS ±'er th f h D, ' plon l a 
But Airier unc inu .. 7 T? X ~ CK earlier this week. 
A ™ er »I<1 al a High-technology stocks were 

alert HmII a .. 


lifted Richardsons. 
•Vest garth, ahead by 5p to 
57p. Desoutler was the subject 
of favourable comment, eoine 
ahead 7p to 280p. 


,. — - was soi a at a 

discount, ending at 12Sp after 
being offered at I30p. 

Motor distributors were 
stimulated by the record car 
sales m April. 

Gilts had a quiet day, easing 
by a quarter iu the 
conventionals, but improving 
by an eighth in the index- 
Itnked stocks. 


also dull, not helped by 

suspension of CPS Computers 


r. v'” w vuxu|iaicr$ 

at 9p following Thursday's 
sharp decline. 

Comment on Thursday's 
im^fV year figures boosted 
AUied-Lyons, up 6p to 32lp. 

‘"a dull hanking sector 
NatWest lost 15p to 855p. 


EQUITIES 
AnHar (130p) 

ssw 3 *’ 

Comiwwci Lease (IZSpl 
Cransvwclc M (95pJ 
2 «v»s DY(1 kST 
DeWor 


RECENT ISSUES 


Spice 
Tecft 
Tech . . 

E&WegP 

Wictes (140p) 

RIGHTS issues 

as wo 

F&c fcro N, 

Greycoat N/ 

Hestair n/p 
J ntl Leisure F/P 
tor A Bonar HIP 
Ratnsrs N IP 
Sealchi & S N/P 
Sate TBney bl/P 
Share Drug F/P 

(Issue price in brackets]. 


atwiwung is paniy one iui-anarenoiaers are to sell 

Evered Holdings Extension bv 

- nrance of acquired businesses, a premium once dealings be- , tuaiul1 U J 

ine t_jty is waking up to This objection cannot he a J?m. DOssibl v ahnm I C-OXOroll 


-•«. City is waking up to This objection cannot be a 
acquisition accounting. Ac- criticism of Evered. in particu- 
countams have long been far, as it has simply followed 
aware of its uses and abuses, the relevant , accounting stan- 
but analysis are only now dard, along with a mass of 
coming to appreciate its other companies, 
importance. 

Questions have alreadv. Aflinpfnn 
been raised in respect of ___5^ZIl5L 

g^wil^b? de_ 

McKechnie 8*,^ ^ ..BJSSSiS « 


. ‘ — — uvomip uc- 

pn, possibly about 10 percent 
above net asset value, which is 
44.9p per share. 

An external valuation of the 
portfolio has been undertaken 
by Richard Ellis, the surveyor. 
It has been a complicated task 
to assess the value of partner- 
ship . ventures, and those 
where Arlington is involved in 
profits but does not own the 
land But earnings will be 
more important than assets 
initially, although the compa- 
ny has long-term ambitions to 
retain some developments to 
build an asset base. 


CoIorolL the wallcoverings 
mid textiles group, has extend- 
ns ofTer for Staffordshire 
Potteries until 3pm on 
Monday^y the Thursday 
dosing date Colorofl had re- 
ceived acceptances for 24 J 

M^ flhe ordinar y shares 
and 38.8 per cent of the non- 
voting preference capitaL 

With shares already owned 
by Colondl and its financial 
advisers, the company has 
acceptances or owns the 
equivalent of almost 46 per 
cent on a fiiDy-diJuted tesis. 


• GARNAR BOOTH: Year to 
■fan. 31, 1986. Total dividend 
tOp (8.75pL Turnover £89.63 
milUon (£80.91 million). Pretax 
profit £2.52 million (£4.77 mil- 
lion). Basic earnings per share 
18.47p(39^7p). 

• KINGSLEY & FORESTER 
GROUP: Results for 1 985. com- 
pared with the previous niw 
months. Total dividend 3.03p 
(0.5p). Turnover £45.27 million 
<£3M million). Pretax profit 
£2.01 million (£1.84 million), 
“rnings per share 5.84p (6p). 
The board repons that turnover 
for the first quarter of 1986 is 30 
per cent ahead of the same 
period last year. 

• UNITED SPRING A 
STEEL: Haif-year to March 31, 
1986. Interim dividend 0-5p 
(0-3p), payable Juiy 4. Turn- 
over steel stockholding and 
processings 0.27 miilion (£9.34 
million) and spring manufac- 
turing £5.66 million (£4.75 mil- 
j 1 oa )- Pretax profit £451,000 
(*231,000). Earnings per share 
2:08p (0.98pk 

• MJNTY: Total payment Ip 
(2p) for the year to Jan. 25. 1986. 


Turnover £2.87 miHion (£ 2.83 
Pretax loss £156.000 
(^46,000). Loss per share 
25.25p (3676p). 

• NEW AUSTRALIA 
INVESTMENT TRUST* 
Mosskirk (a subsidiary of 
Keywesl Investments of Austra- 
lia) is making an offer for the 
ordinary shares, other than the 
2.08 million (41.79 per cent) 
already owned, of lOOp cash a 
share. The offer values the 
ordinary capital at £5 miBion. 

• jfEEDEX; Total dividend for 
iffl, *-5p (0.5p). Turnover 
£38.06 million (£36.2 million). 
Pferax profit £904.000 
(£205,000). Earnings per share 
^ 4 ^P (0-83p). The board reports 
that 1 986 has begun welL 

•SUNJJE3GH ELECTRON- 
ICS: The company has bought 
Blackburn Wound Products, an 
electrical and electronic en- 
gineering company, for 2 mil- 
lion ordinary shares. It has also 
purchased Cyfas Systems, a 
subsidiary of FK1 Electricals, for 
4.5 million ordinary shares. 

• CAMBRIDGE ELEC- 
TRONIC INDUSTRIES: Mr 


COMPANY NEWS 


Profi t-taking clipped 
Amstrad by 20p to 489p. 
Leisuretime was another spec- 
ulative favourite. 6p to the 
good at 103p. Profits up 152 
per cent at Norfolk Capital 
prompted a 1 !6p rise to 29'Ap. 

WSL Holdings came in for 

favourable comment ahead of "• 1 

next week's brokers' seminar, / 

nsing 8p to 173p. The three- ) ' 
cornered bid situation at Tale 
_ and Lyle continued to be beset I | 
99 by Monopolies and Mergers ! 

ziB Commission reference wor- I I 

“m Ber ? sford 7p , 

tB1 i?*iili 4p ’ ** nval bidder, ! 

HiUsdow-n Holdings, I3p to ‘ j 

283p and Tate itself 5p to : { 

56 op. } 

Bn wn tree Mackintosh, a pe- 1 j 

rennial bid favourite' came in j * 
for more speculative gains. { 
ahead by 7p to 503p. Redteara I ! 
National Glass, on bid hopes 1 ; 
advanced by 5p to 2l6p. In a | ) 
weak stores sector. GUS “A” ; 

shares lost 25p to £10.00. I 
Wool worth, conducting a ) 

stern defence against the Dix- 1 * 
ons bid, fell by 25p to 790p. 


13 
8 -1 
256 
23+15 
104 -1 
38-5 
42-2 
38 +2 
2 
350 


Jones - the chairman, 
tola the annual meeting that the 
first-half results would reflea 
faff i« orders at the end 
® ul older* have now 
stabilized at a relatively low 

• DUALVEST: Total dividend 

/°o n no m P? mC , ShareS of 12.1 Ip 

SJlPJJbrtheyearto March 31, 
K? 1 revenue before tax 
£1.6 million (£132 million) 
•FUNpiNVEST: ,^ r im 
dividend 2.67p (2J!6p) for the 
six months to March 31, 1986 

(£41 Toooj* ““ «^00d 

SECURITIES 
S OL K°ff C S : Half-year to 
March 31, 1986. Intenm divi- 

EStfr ssssussss 

per share 0.73p(Q.79p). 

• BROWN AND TAWSE: The 
comtany has conditionally 
agreed to purchase Willcox En- 
gnemng Supplies, a division of 

Xnniiv* WUJcox - for about 
£600.000 cash. Willcox En- 
ginecnng made a pretax loss of 


£34,000 in the year to Sept. 30, 

1 70J. 

• JAYPLANT: Agreement has 
been reached with Mr D H B 
Holland and Mr J A Nichols for 
the acquisition by Rands worth. 


" XT' ixqiiujwuiUl, 

^propjnrty offehoot of Jayplant, 


-- The price wiij be 

the lower of £350.000 or the 
market value of the develop- 
ment properties owned ' 
Hohvale. Mr Holland and rar 
Nichols are Jayplant directors, 
so the acquisition is subject to 
shareholders' approvaL 

• ROCK: Agreement has been 
reached with Gmmry and 
Sutcliffe, a Huddersfield, West 
Yorkshire, distributor of 
engineers' consumable supplies, 
for lhe purchase of its subsid- 
iary, Fixmodel. for £250.000. 
Fixmodel has acquired the busi- 
ness. goodwill and trading assets 
of Gregory and Sutcliffe. 

• GLEN ABBEY: The com- 
pany is to sell its subsidiary, 
Glen Abbey Brigand, and the 
buildings it occupies, to that 
company’s management This is 

£6*0000 W fEa ^ IZe raore ‘ban 


Mr - 


You enjoy Flora for its light and 
delicate taste. 

But you also have a much better, 
reason for choosing it 

That reason is you. 

You know why you need to lead a 

healthier life. 

And you know about Flora too. 
Flora is made with pure sunflower 
ofl, so its high in essential polyim- 

SSt" storatee ““ i ^ » 






FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 



. -'Sold- 

Rom soor portfolio card check tout 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall lotaL Check 
this Minst the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If h matches you 
have won outright or a stare of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of vour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Recovery collapses 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began April 28. Dealings ended yesterday. §Contango day Monday. Settlement day.May 19. 

§Fonvard bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


— '<§ old — - 


DAILY 
DIVIDEND 
£16000 ■ 
Claims required 

for 

+36 points 

Claimants should 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£16000 

Ganns required 

for 

+177 points 
ring 0254-53272 




Gainer 

pa. Company 

6«* 

in 





W* «A 30.7 4 5 8.1 


S5 33 Smrtn S» Wm SI . . U 20 

89* 419 Cttnd CMt 809 -3 *34 14 




Cun rMcttnm) sis 
DawMC (J A) 80S 


BIB B13 IHon 
8Z% 43 1 . VMM Fargo 
320 220 Manat 


33S 2*8 
840 620 
50 38 

1*4 as 
900 37S 
1B2 147 
560 40S 
SIS 410 
830 940 
723 488 
204 195 
2*3 1S3 
355 275 
483 405 
88 59 

178 158 
288 173 
114 77 
231 217 
W8 153 
234 183 
39% 30% 
540 353 
313 223 
315 228 
251 188 
505 410 
315 ns 


Kardya 8 Hm 
HgMand DM 
tavaraordon DM 
MthlSsa 


809 ^ <U 14 OS 

7S3 -tt Ol 797*8 

158% +1 

270 7.1 24 17.1 


416 119 

-a 219 

.. i.i 

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-2 70 

.. 149 

.. 10-7 

.. 1U 

48 214 

-i ia 
72 

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Untn Thcmproo 110 

Moita* M 

SA Srawsrtea 188 

scot 6 KfW 194 

Sat aria £37% 

Su 430 

WrtsawJ * 273 

Do IT Z78 

NMDread V** 233 

Wolwlwtal 6 0 480 


WOU U mpBl c 

Young 'A" 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



18 

1213*0 


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23 70 



2.1 214 


HJ £ 

17 17.1 

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-8 

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07 


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17 129 

-10 

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12 275 


07 

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U3 U U 
ran as 9i4 

a 38 735 
U1U 
62 57 115 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £16.000 in 
today's newspaper. 


975 875 
729 531 
270 235 

152 n 
91 81 

29 18 

71 59 

127 84 

zr is 

117 85 

. 83 80 

568 482 
416 296 
158 124 
104 8* 

95 72 

99 63 

91 75 

70 SO 
98 54 

94 50 

131 108 

37B 254 
113 85 

192 99 

78 42 

224 i«g 

620 425 
199 130 


Mdm CBme 254 
Arnac 256 

Amenta SO 

AtMOd* 184 

BPSMWIH 453 

IKS®.** IS 

Mr 000 *,?! 

BwtorJ Concrsta 80 
Baa Brea 71 





BRITISH FUNDS 


Bncktam Dud«7 M 2 

wn». s, 

> Brawntaa 87 

Bnao* 118 

Btmaea iWiin 17% 
Owiil nuiMmia 117 
CondarOrp 82 

COntwi 504 

CwrarpW 41$ 

Qoucn (Darak) 134 

Fat) 75 

Da 56 

tomOfi 60 

CaWam 85 

GUM 6 Dandy Or) 131 
amen fUJ) 370 
MAT TOT 

Hafcal Bar T70 

HawdnBan in 
Haywood WMama 212 
Mgp6M 550 
DRXh JglHM • M0 
Java in 1 Sana 315 
lang (J) 441 

Do -W 431 

UwrtncaJVMta) » 

WS 2 

M+ST44 8 800W MB 

MAtal 229 

Unaali (raffia) 178 

Mlt&HMMl 129 

,s 

MoatanpoftnJ 318 
Ntwamn 880 


-2 114 43 as 

•1 15.7 53 143 

.. 41 02 U 

51 57 153 

-a 113 Z5 154 
-a 63 23123 
46 103 73 .. 

.. m .. 44 

-2 103 53184 

.. 54 63 233 

.. 44 52 203 

.. 37.1 43 124 

-7 300 43 114 

.. Itf S41L7 
.. 510 53 203 

-2 43 6412.7 



897 727 
*20 281 
74 % SS . 
295 238 


Gan ActnW 

HM C g 

E£?sr 

UMOItlW 

lOlIMkr 

&W4MUB 


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51 51423 
2M24IU 
7.1 35 13 

7.1 23 713 

13 17*15 

as. u hs 

57 aiaisa 

1U 4102 

SSnSSf 

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44 23153 

14 04 .. 

11 59 M« 

13 US .. 
31 £3250 

57 aotat 

4.1 U 13 
18 13251 

43 51 24J 
73 63 03 

15 73157 
73 33 77 

13 48 125 
84 54 17 

14 US3 

58 73743 

sm arm a 

1ft 43117 
144 43 HO 
53 44123 

I? sm 

47 11 154 


+1 SL9 &0 .. 
A WO 42 ' 

nan .14 . 

-s 73 23 ns 

-6 423 32 .. 

.. 109 83 .. 

-4 MU.. 

4 

.. 314 16 214 
4« *1.1 *3333 

-6 114 50 33 

-2 134 (SHI 

-8 350 43303 

.. 340 42613 

.. 214 53 103 

+1% 220 11 .. 

-3 114 43 29 

..' 123tl <3 323 
.. 623 42 .. 

-2 37 Hi 43 543 

*1 1*3 54 ... . 

*12 358 40 793 

-7 17 41*1 

*2 152 19113 
-15 63 11 5*2 

.. 250 34662 

-2 353. 51 ... 

.. 119 15 251 

■48 12* 23703 


M.2S9 (feWBRN 
56 li. Com pm 
tzi 38 grwunni » 


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36 - *2 

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-54 96 Mom 38 

a U RCA G8i| W - 43 

M 110 LA6IJO - ■ m *t 174 

300 MU CttUtM __ 180 ..142 

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OVBtSEAS TRADERS 



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.. S3 72 OB 
*5 » 75114 

*15 Bi 43 212 
13 44 134 
+1 183 82 VU 

-1 u uu 

18 41 4J 
83 41 89 

+? T9 43 14 


223 40 no 

wo ah”* 


PAPER. PRINTING, A OVERT G 


FINANCE AND LAND 




110 


65 


85 


117 


129 


102 


16 

-% 

104 


65 

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99 

, , 

11 

-% 

115 


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63 13133 
2508 73 103 
103 22 12 3 
too 22 120 
53 54 *9 
69 70 102 
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57 40 174 
113 51 117 
7.10 40 132 
54* 43 ... 
179 42 117 
77 12 111 

14 S3 .. 

15 62 151 
2230 53 128 
157 13 173 

19 44157 
73 34122 
43 43 33 
184 50 62 
mo 11 142 
153 13153 
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104 19 15.1 

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54 HISS 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


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195 160 
393 291 
2*1 160 
156 106 
111 7S% 

128 102 
*99 112 
87 S7'i 
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142 112 
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288 215 
100 113 
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101'. 78 
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118 102 
225 179 
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FOODS 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


YOTotaa Cham 


CINEMAS AND IV 


381 812 Udbroba 318 >2 

i545 447 lot pm Hama sa 

100 78 MM*Oia<10«a 79% 

105 67 ntca Of W Hotats 75 

79 MS OU— MOM 88% -1 

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81 56 Soa5 64 ^ 

S» 146 Truadwua* For* 156 -4 


225 178 MOM TV *A 
43 27 Qrtnnlm 
W 17S KTVWV 
350 253 LVTT Httat 
337 188 Scot TV ’ A ' 
229 153 TVS N/V 
43 31 rew 


123 53111 

*9 64 58 
114 63 *5 
213 51 143 
150 43104 
114 51 103 

28 57 157 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



21 

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28 
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ELECTRICALS 


Aertcul CatW J B n 83 .-4 

Altai 70 ^ 

AMKConp 27B 

Auao fidaktj S3 

Aicp 9m 200 

BRW 385 -1 

B5H 130 a* 

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375 189 Hb9 Awoar ^ S79 
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356 2« Bootcar McCavn* 323 

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S <a m D aii ata he £17% 

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383 323 a «cm ar 348 

88 82 Bnawsy SB 

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4*3 97 Br %pne»1 120 

323 196 Br W 316 

3S3 296 BrahOT HB 3S1 

105 1* U ranwro* kata in) 

26 IB BriwEng 20% 

49 2S Bnx*4 Toe* 45 

190 186 »tw«i 5 Tua* IK 
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« 58 Bnawm (Musj 52 


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105 56 
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113 86 

840 516 
856 880 
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148 96 
600 380 
223 14S 
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Caw* 9 Star 5% 
Ottaw a * M 19 

CM tad 73 

Oaitawi ph 94% 

Owamrtn aw 106 

Cnanar Con* 233 

0*1 FDUM LMXb 110 
Otanrkio 880 

Gmotem mo 

Chrwv HIM 46 

Ctata (Ctaaara) IBP 

Caynai Son 136 

SSS 4% no 

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Ccncmta 94 


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43 7.1 14 159 

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39 

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274 

214 

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90 

48 

528 

373 

1 73 

103 

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120 

130 

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HM 

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134 

164 

109 9 

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100 s 

1 820 

703 S 

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303 

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225 

163 

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346 

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354 

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24 59 146 
39 31 99 

129 121 89 
175 29 219 
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79 *7 123 
224 46202 

69 17819 
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69 21209 
85 45 169 

75 45141 
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2 


Edited by Loma Bourke 



Take care when you cover 


:V ^ insurance T) 

* ho J v im f»nant it is io 

: ana understand the small 

- P 111 ” on your household in- 
J»*icy has been high- 
"f™ far some householders 
who look out contents insur- 
ance with the AA. 

Two policyholders who in- 
sured their home contents 
with the AA discovered too 
fate in the day that they were 
not rally covered, The problem 
lies to some extent in the 
promotional literature pro- 
duced to sell the household 
contents policy. If you do not 
read or understand the small 
print you could easily be 
confused and think you hgA 
fiill contents cover — when, in 
fact, you may not 
The promotional literature 
says on the from “full 
protection” and “no need to 
calculate the value of all your 
contents”. Vet when two AA 
Homesure policyholders were 
burgled and put in a claim,, 
they were surprised to find 
their claim had bees scaled 
down to take account of 
underinsurance. 

Now General Accident 
winch administers the AA 
Homesure policy is to “take a 
fresh look at the wording”. A 
General Accident spokesman 
said: "There was no intention 
on our pan to mislead or 
deceive policyholders.” 

But some policyholders 
have clearly been confused by 
the claims that the Homesure 
policy “cuts the risk of being 
underinsurecT* and removes 
fbe need to value all contents. 

The problem is that the 
policy is designed only for 
those with contents up to 
£25,000. Anyone whose 
household possessions come 
to more than this is told to ask 
for an individual quotation. 
But some have this 

unobtrusive proviso Art if 
you do not workout the value 
of the contents, how do you ; 
know if they come to more ; 
than £25.000? i 


The AA concedes that the 
disgruntled policyholders may 
have a point and is also 
considering changing the 
wording: “fn tire light of 
recent comments we have re- 
- examined the material Whilst 
the brochure does refer to a 
limit of £25,000 it could be 
stressed more clearly that 
values in excess of this require 
an Individual quotation. 
Thus, when we reprint the 
brochure 'this will be dealt 
with.” . s 

The AA also pointed out 
that research done before the 
policy was launched shows 
that 90 per cent of the popula- 
tion came within the £25,000. 

The cases of the policyhold- 
ers who fonnd they were 
underinsured are being taken 
up by the loss assessor Roger 
Freeman. They both had con- 
tents worth around £40,000. 
Both suffered burglaries, and 
their claims of £15,000 and 
£9,000 are being contested. 

What tire insurers are claim- 
ing is that only a proportion of 
their claims should be paid, to 
take account of the 
unde rin su r anc e . This is com- 
mon practice with most 

‘literature should 
be much dearer 9 








How the bookies 
will make a few 
cool millions 


IP 



•> acESar rrsssi. 


How the AA sells its Homesnre poScy 


household policies and is 
known as “averaging”. If your 
underinsurance is 50 per cent, 
say, then only 50 per cent of 
the claim is paid. . 

“They fell for the 
advertising,” said Mr Free- 
man. “They probably realized 
they had more than £25,000 
worth of goods, but they did 
hot think about h. They 
thought h did not matter as 
they didnot have to decide the 
sum insured. They probably, 
imagined it was a first loss 
policy where they were cov- 
ered up to £25,000 and did not 
realize that any claim would 
be scaled down in proportion 
to the amount they were 
underinsured. - 


“The policy literature 
should be much clearer. I'm 
amaced this should happen 
with the AA which is such a 
consumer-orientated 
organization.” 

AA Insurance Services was 
set up in 1967 and now brings 
in £120 million a year in 
premiums on the 1.25 million 
policies sol<LThe AA 
Homesure policy is adminis- 
tered by General Accident but 
jointly underwritten by GA 
and Royal Insurance. 

People living in the highest 
of the five rate bands, which 
includes central London and 
pans of Birmingham, would 
pay £1 16 for basic cover if 
they lived in a three-bedroom 
house and £143 tor a tour- 
bedroom house. Insurance for 
accidental loss or damage to 
jewellery anywhere up to £750 
per item costs an extra £15 
and accidental damage insur- 
ance an extra £33 for the three- 
bedroom bouse and £36 for 
the four-bedroom house. 

in the lowest rated areas, 
including Dorset, the base 
rates come down to £38 for a 
three-bedroom house and £47 
for a tour-bedroom house. 

These premiums cover con- 
tents up to £25,000 — no 
matter if you have just 
£10,000 worth of goods or 
£24,999. But anyone topping 


the £25.000 must ask for an 
individual quotation. 

But for roughly the same 
premiums a householder 
could go to the TSB, which 
also has a simplified policy 
relieving the householder of 
calculating the value of his 
contents tor complete cover 
with no scaling-down for 
about the same premiums. 

The TSB policy, which is 
underwritten by Provincial 
Insurance, sets a minimum 
sum assured for each bouse 
type. Someone in a three- 
bedroom terror bouse in cen- 
tral Loudon would pay £117 
and£153 fora flat, town house 
or semi. 

In a rural area such as 
Dorset the basic premiums 
would be £36.40 for a three- 
bedroom terrace house and 
£47.60 for one with four 
bedrooms, and £47.60 and 
£58.80 for a town bouse, fiat 
or semi. 

These sums assured cover 
up to a total loss of£l 3,000 for 
a three-bedroom property and 
£17,000 for a four-bedroom 
one. But even if the contents 
are worth more, when there is 
a claim tor a smaller sum then 
there is no seating-down. 

And if you take out a TSB 
mortgage you get a year's free 
contents insurance. 

Vivien Goldsmith 



ACADEMY 

INSURANCE BROKERS 


Private Managed Funds 

PCmOLD 
TO SUCCESS! 


Has your investment 
doubled in under 2 years? 


Clients whu invested tn tbe first Academy Rind bonefted \ t June 1904 in 
conjunct km 4 kadinj; Seortisb Ufc company have now seen ibrir . 

capital double la 22 months. Whits it must be remembered that unit 
pner* on M as '"■■ell as rise Hoc Academy Fund Managers are confident 
that nrw opportunities for growth will continue to present, themselves. 
Example-. Invest merit; £5000.4- Bonus £50 
+ Growth £5580 ** £HMi30 ( offer io offer price*! 
h*r (Waits t >J tins utter funds aanptae.tbe coupon 
& send fur free btrodmm 


ACADEMY Chester. ^ 

INSURANCE BROKERS ■ ches. Oil 2 LE 


INALS rULM DIVISION LID Tel; 02-f-f-fl 122'.* 


| NAME 
| AODF 


Send your child 
to public 
school for only 
30 % of the fees. 


You could hardly give your child a better stair 
thanbykwkingtoTlieEquitaWeUfe. 

Because our new School Fee Trust Plans make 
providing for your child's education realistic. 

For example, eight annual contributions total- 
ling £14,959 could, at die end of that period, pro- 
vide £50,301 worth of school fees* over die following 
ten years. 

Tharfc a saving to you of 70 /o. 

You'fl find that a plan with us is as flexible asyou 
want it to be, with 3 different methods of payment to 

< *°° S SoJf you'd like further details aboutthe scheme 

that makes a private education 

phone 01-606 661 1 or send this coupon FREEPOST 

. i. — mJ un hums feet, svfudmf hflWiui bime. jit rram- 

w ojon.cvi WxuUSfi ; 


OUR NEW 
INTERNATIONAL 
TRUST HAS ONE AIM 

MORE INCOME. A 


Introducing Barclays Unicorn 
International Income Trust — \. 

The objective? To achieve a high and \ 
greeting income ewer the longer term together 
with prospects of capital growth through invest- 
ment in the major stock markets worldwide, 
i . Barclays is better placed than most to take 
advantage of these markets because we are physkaily 
present and active in so many of them. 

Diversify Abroad. If you already hold building 
society deposits or UK equities this is a perfect 
opportunity. 

Especially as until 23rd May 1986 we are 
; ing a 2% discount for sums of .£ 3,000 and over, with 
1% from foe minimum of £500 to £2,999. 


To: David Chapman at Barclays Unkornjuxon House, 

M Sc Paufc Owrenyard, London EGtM 8EH or phone 01 -248 62M. 
Send me details of Barclays Unicom International Income Trust. 


BARCLAYS 
TTi 



Unit trust selection? 

Here's how to get a 
wealth of experience 
working for you! 

Saracen Is an entirely Independent company whose 
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the vast range of unit trusts. Launched by Peter Potts and 
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to meet your specific requirements and financial needs. 

If you have £20.000 io Invest, send lor the brochure now 
by post or phone 01 -831 2882 ^ — 1 

i 

-i— ■ - — — i 


15, Thr Euuiut’Jr L ilc FREEPOST, 4 Gjlcawn Snwr.Lon&m ECB2JT 
VJ r rhrr deU.K on «ur ^ by= 

S jon. • Mi Mr* Ms- — — — 


| PIAMS 


" (nasdimj 


SARACEN 


ASSET MANAGEMENT LIMITED 


Sardinia House. Lincoln^ Ion Fields. Loudon WC2A 3LZ 
Telephone: 01-631 2882 


C GAMBLING ) 

Armchair sportsmen have 
been in training for some time. 
The sommer season is npon 
them, and a new intensive 
spate of watching is heralded 
by today's two big football 
matches. It is Cap Final day in 
England and Scotland, and 
soon we can expect 21 consec- 
utive nights of the World Cap 
from Mexico. 

For Britain's bookmakers 
this means big business. The 
FA Cop Final is football's 
equivalent of the Grand Na- 
tional. Tens of thousands «UJ 
be visiting the bookmakers. 
William HR] expects to take at 
least £1 million, while 
Ladbrokes «oold not even 
make a gness. “Lots of the 
betting will be done on the day 
of the match, despite the risk 
of flte odds changing slightly,” 
says a Ladbrokes spokesman, 
“so we can't really say.” Bat 

Some pouters bet 
on who will score 

the company should take in a 
similar amo unt. 

The money is coming from 
all over Britain. The battle 
between Liverpool and 
Evert on has attracted interest 
from football followers 
throughout England and 
Wales, not just 
Merseyside.The Cap Final is 
easily the biggest footballing 
draw for gamblers' money, and 
the feet that both teams are 
from the same city this year 
will, strangely enough, proba- 
bly increase the money 


Graham Sharp, of William 
HiH, says: “It's going to be a 
dose match, and it's locaL 
There isn't even a North 
versos South element, so many 
people will have a bet to add a 
tittle interest” 

FootbaD, as we are constant- 
ly reminded by the experts, is 
a fanny game. The bets, 
however, are straightforward 
compared with some of the 
arithmetical wizardry con- 
tained in racing wagers. Yon 
can pot money on the result at 
90 nun ntes — win, lose, or 
draw — or yon can try to 
predict the score. Extra time 
does not coant Predicting the 
score inevitably attracts far 


longer odds than bets on the 
outcome. 

Another bet for the specula- 
tive punter is guessing who 
will score. The first footballer 
able to declare that he “just hit 
it, Brian, and it went in” will 
make some gamblers very 
happy this afternoon. Natural- 
ly enough, the odds are shorter 
for forwards and longer for 
defenders. But the bet is on the 
first scorer only; second and 
subsequent goals do not count 

Predicting who will be win- 
ning at both faD-time and half- 
time Is the nearest yon get to 
the racing doable. To win yon 
have to predict correctly which 
side, if either, will be winning 
at the end of both periods of 
play. 

Football, however, is rela- 
tively staid compared with 
some of tbe more exotic bets 
on offer. Yon will be relieved to 
know that according to 
Ladbrokes the odds against 
extra-terrestrial beings land- 
ing on Earth in the next 12 
months are 250-1. If yon 
believe in the Loch Ness 
monster, tbe bookies win wa- 
ger that neither yon nor any- 
one else can prove hs existence 
within the next year. Their 
confidence is more brittle this 
time; the odds are jost 100-1. 
And, of coarse, who could 
forget tbe Papal enclave of 
1978? British bookmakers 
took ns to the world forefront 
of irreverence by offering odds 
on who would succeed Pope 
Pud. 

You can bet on whether die 
FT 30-Share or American 
Dow Jones Indices will go ap 
or down. Both IG Index and 
Ladbrokes offer that bet, 
which some serious investors 
use as a hedge to protect their 
portfolios. IG Index will also 
bet on tbe date of the next 
general election (October 22 to 
November J9, 1987. are the 
favourite days) and the Dum- 
ber of seats the major parties 
will have. 

One practical tip If yoo do 
decide to risk your money at 
the bookmakers: pay tbe bet- 
ting tax beforehand, especially 
on longer-odds bets. Tax is 
paid on the stake, or the 
winnings, if there any. So if 
yon do win yon should save 
yourself money. 

Martin Baker 


l Right now, where is 
| the best place to invest 

I £2,000 or more? A pertinent 

; question since city brokers can’t agree whether 
! the stock market is going to continue going up or 
j about to decline. Some find shares 'overpriced 7 
j and others ‘under? Meanwhile, interest rates at 
j banks and building societies tumble. 

| So where should you most sensibly invest 
l your money? We offer an answer: the Scottish 
[ Equitable Performance Bond. 

It’s better than a buiJdingsodety because the 
\ rate of return can be so much more. And better 
than the usual unit trust because you benefit from 
dual management, from Scottish Equitable's own 
fund managers who successfully control assets of 
> over £1.8 billion and from Towry Law who 
i review performance regularly, 
i They choose < ~] 

I between 12 funds | Thlk to , 

S and switch between 1 rjry t 

) them at no cost. j lOWVy LAIW j | 

This partnership j f Qr impartial ii 
: has achieved a verv ‘ uj . 1 T , . , • 

i commendable 23”u : J^TlOTlCiCli ClClVlCC. I ( 


| commendable 23”u 
< growth since launch 
( six months ago. 
j* And you set 
i you r own level of 
! income. Indeed 
f higher rate tax 
i payers can take 5 n « 
5 out annually with- 
out personal tax. 

There is a 
special bonus of2% 
\ ifyouactnow. 

Send the 
coupon today for 
details or call us 


'lincry Turn'd: Co. Ltd.. 

(■RCliPi is K Windsor SU WT 
TtTrphonc: 0753 S6S2-t-f. 
Outside office hours 
01-936 9057. Or 031-2262244 
(Edinburgh) or 05.32 445911 

(Leeds). 

PLwsc send me full 
details without charge or 
obligation. 1 am/am not an 
existing Tbu n • Lau ■ client . 

Same 

Address 


Postcode ' 


UNIT TRUSTS 


Adley Drew Limited 


.Contact us NOW tor details of 


Speaat otters stn avattabte on 
major Scottish launch until May 15th. 
highly competitive dealng arrangements 
on ML U.K. authorised Unit Trusts. 
FREE Advisory Service. 

Current Recommendations + Newsletter. 


■ Uj?.-:ir.q Rocrin: 49 Doughty Street 
, licracn ’,VC1N 2 lF. 

Tel: 01-331 3344 
LICENSED DEALERS !N SECURITIES 


In 




Pension Fund 

One "fear 

Two Years 

Three Years 

International 

1st 

UP 100.8% 

1st 

UP 126.6% 

1st 

UP 184.4% 

Equity 

4th 

UP 56.3% 

3rd 

UP 110.2% 

3rd 

UP 207.0% 

Managed 

2nd 

UP 57.4% 

4th 

UP 82.6% 

3rd 

UP 128.0% 

Fixed Interest 

13th 

UP 26.2% 

5th 

UP 44-8% 

5th 

UP 68.5% 

figures from Monev Manaeernenr "Stars pack", percentages are the otter ro offer unit price growth over the 
three years up to April 1st 1466 and the position each British National Lite Fund attained compared 
to the performance of other sector funds Rtmumber unu prices om Jail os well us nse 


Deciding on a pension plan means that you have 
to select a fund which will perform well in future 
years- Consider British National Life Assurance, one of 
the pacesetters in the field, whose performance Money 
Management magazine recently described as 
“ remarkably ccmsis tent." Check for yourself; over a three 
year period our four main pension funds have never 
been out of the top five in a field of 216 competitors. 

Just one reason why Citicorp, one of the largest 
financial institutions in the world, brought British 
National Life into the Citicorp group just three months 
ago. Its a potent combination for your pension plan; 
proven investment performance backed by Citicorp, an 
innovative leader in financial services, with assets of 
over £120 billion. 

A pension plan is exceptionally attractive since 
pension funds are free of all income, capital gains and 
corporation taxes. There is probably no better way to 
increase the value of your capital than investing in your 
own future pension. British National Life has a range of 
plans to suit your particular needs. 

SELF-EMPLOYED? 

YOU NEED PLAN'FOR'RETIREMENT 


A self-employed person (or an individual in non- 
pensionable employment) can make payments up to 
17.5%of netrclevan teamings into a Plan-for-Rerirement 
and receive tax relief at the highest rax rare paid. 

The Plan is folly portable and payments can be 
varied to suit your needs in future years. On reriremen t, 
part of the individual s entitlement can be taken asa tax- 
free lump sum. 


u 



British National 


COMPANY DIRECTOR? 

YOU NEED FLAN -FOR- EXECUTIVES 

As a company director you can set up a Plan for 
yourself (and your key executives) which attracts foil 
Corporation Tax relief on company contributions and 
relief at the highest level of tax paid for individual 
contributions. The Plan offers portability for the 
individual and flexibility for the company; contributions 
can be increased when profit is available in a tax 
efficient manner. 

PAST PENSION BENEFITS? YOU 
NEED PLAN -FOR -PENSION PRESER VATION 

Do you have benefits from past jobs which have 
simply been left frozen 7 Perhaps relatively small sums 
which were based on your salary at that time but no 
longer match your future needs. Chances are that your 
fonner employer has not even allowed for the effects of 
inflation. British National Life’s Plan gives the 
opportunity for real growth. 

Don’t delay your pension planning; every year 
that goes by without action decreases your pension 


| am parocularfv imere&wd in: """] 

* S3S2? pm 2S!^ n Ck'ropanv diiwrer {vnswns □ 

I bendia □ irWx .id, 

( * wttd me lurcher ir>torchaui>n I 

| Name: i 

J Qa-u n-iupn. j 

f AJJrnfa- ; 


| — ■ — — — P"*» Ct-Jr * 

&wncy,TeleBh t .nrS:». ;| 

l C.mjfwn Lunnrj. FREEPOST I 

JZA HwiAHs* kMHi 4hSi! | 

A SUBSIDIARY OF CmCORPa 












ia agiaSs: z: J^LtLJi.1 



THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 







resofcfor "sereritf 


^mtM«ftrde4his 


Darts, wtoc jrteraptiowfo 


a 


sltb k jinkUy Iqkw &*i 
JtewKi9 a^Rs^jLTeiortkss 


The Times 6th May 1986: 


recomme 


Performances in sport _ _ 

and investment are not one w 

entirely dissimilar. 

Take the case of Joe Johnson, the man 
who dramatically lifted the World Snooker 
crown, a hitherto 150-1 outsider. 

On the face of it, he would seem to have 
been an astute investment. 

Indeed, paralleling the world of sport, a 
fund can often come from nowhere to top 
the investment league 

Ironically, many of the funds that top the 
league fail to maintain their momentum. In 
fact, in the last five years, the highest placed 
unit trust has failed to reach even the top 200 
in its subsequent year. 

It’s easy to be seduced by the success of 
one dazzling fund A phenomenon used by 
some companies to suggest their shrewd ^ 
investment s kills . 4 


T _ _L ^ j ^ -X. somewhat misleading 

W 1 lO lU ijL. Especially for prospec- 

tive clients who may 
not have a broad view of the market place 


success in investment, as in sport, is all about 
one thing, consistency Not just this year, but 
the next, and the next and so on 

Over the last ten years, it’s a philosophy 
which has kept over 70%* of our long term 
unit trust and life funds in the top half of their 
investment leagues and given our pension 
planholders a net return of 20 . 8 % p.a 

Of course, as one of the founding com- 
panies in unit trusts, and now one of the three 
biggest we have over 50 years of experience 
to call upon 

In the real world of investment there are 

L no short cuts or easy answers. 

5 Because for every Joe Johnson theres 


The picture they paint we feel, is ALUED a score of Joe Soaps. 

DUNBAR ~ 

Aflied Dunbar Assurance pic, Allied Dunbar Centre, Swindon SN1 lELTdephone 0793 2829L 


"Source Money Management. 














THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


23 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Loan war hots up, 
rates coo! down 

SifSZ? ^ rates took set to fen 
still further during the summer 

months, according to the latest 
research carried art 

Guide. ‘‘Competition (s 
intense, with some of the large 
banks such “ Citibank 

dtr^s d « nlt8d ^ of Kuwait 

charging 10.75 par cent," says 
SK banks and insurance 
companies have introduced a 

^ed rate for eyear -tor instance. 

Cannon Assurance tt.5 per cent. 
Eagle Star KJ.7S per cent and 
Chemical Bank 10 .5 per cent 
others have Introduced flexible 
payment schemes." 

However, borrowers should be 
cautious about some of the schemes 
as they are in some Instances 
endowment-linked only, and the life 
policies to which the kwn is 
finked are not necessarily the best 
on the market Probably tha best 
£??L now 18 *** Midland Bank's after 
of loan money for house 
purchase or remortgage at 10.5 per 


cent for the first year. Those 
transferring a loan will get the 
exf 
Mi 

Details of rates from: Blay’s 
Guides Ltd, ChurchfiefcJ Road, 
Chalfont St Peter, 

Buckinghamshire SLfl 9EW 
(Gerrards Cross 884417). 

Town hall haggle 

■ There are not many taxes 
which you can haggle about but 
rates come into that category. If 
you think your rates are too high you 
can contest them and reductions 
are by no means uncommon. The 
Consumers' Association has just 
issued its Rates Money Saving Kit 
giving step-by-step instructions 
on how to apply for a reduction on 
your rates bid. On average, home 
owners pay around £300 a year and 
as much as £520 in London. A 
reduction, if you are successful, runs 
on year after year. The kit also 
covers rebates. Copies of the kit at 
£4.95 can be obtained from the 
Consumers' Association, >4 
Buckingham Street. London 
WCBNi 


HEu-jiam m 
mm E A 
RATE REBATE. 



RBS goes gold 


■ It's only a matter of time 
before one of the high street banks 
starts to offer interest on your 
ordinary current account Hi me 
meantime, the next best thing is 
the high interest account, the latest 
version of which has just bean 
launched by Royal Bank of Scotland 
RBS's instant access Gold 
Deposit Account pays 8.2S per cent 
net of basic rate tax tor 
investments of £2,000 or more. 
These high interest accounts 
have largely superseded the old 
seven-day deposit account 
except where me investor cannot 
meet the minimum deposit 


requirements. Seven-day deposit 
accounts are paying only 4.75 per 
cent 

no notice is required to withdraw 
funds from the Gold Deposit Accoun 
but if you let the balance fad 
below £2,000 you are heavrfy 
penalized on the interest rate - it 
drops to 2 per cent below the RBS 
seven-day deposit rate, which 
currently works out at a miserable 
2.75 per cent. Full details are 
available from branches of Royal 
Bank of Scotland or you can write 
to RBS, 36 St Andrew Square, 
Edinburgh EH2 2YB. 

Two wind-ups 

■ Readers who put money with 
two companies called New 
Hampshire Investment Ltd and 
Global Guaranty Life Assurance 
Company SA will be interested to 
know that steps have been taken to 
have them both compulsorily 
wound up. The Department of Trade 
and Industry says this action is 
"expedient in the public interest'’, 
using powers under the 
Companies Act 1985- Both 
companies were registered 


overseas and used mailing lists to 
send brochures to UK citizens 
inviting investments. 

According to the department 
New Hampshire invited investments 

into a range of investment bonds, 
white Global Guaranty offered 
investment in a range of 
insurance and buikfing society-linked 
products. About £154.000 was 
received by the companies from 
investors by foe beginning of last 
month through an agent in 
Southampton. The department 
says cannot give the name of the 
agent at the moment and that no 
action is currently being taken 
against him individually. The 
department says it cannnot even 
reveal why it is taking such 
drastic action against bom 
companies. 

It wants inquiries from creditors 
to go to the Official Receiver, DTI, 
Atlantic House, Holbom Viaduct 
London EC1N 2HD (01-583 8931). 

We should also be interested in 
heanng from readers with 
experience of either of foe above 
two companies. 


How you buy discounts 


C SHARES ) 

Tony Doyle, an actor, and bis 
wife Sally are renovating a 
ramshackle old house in 
Britanny. They like spending 
Easter and most of the sum- 
mer in France. But carting 
their three small children, 
Lucy. Joe and Sam, across the 
Channel in a car large enough 
to take buggies, bikes, beds 
and high chairs, was becoming 
a major expense. 

About IS months ago Tony 
bought shares in European 
Ferries, the company that runs 
the Townsend Thoresen cross- 
Channel ferries. He bought 
just 300 preference shares, the 
minimum needed to qualify 
for the discount on the ferries. 
The shares cost I lOp each, a 
total of £330. Already they 
have paid for themselves. 

Sally and Tony go on the 
long crossing from Ports- 
mouth to Cherbourg where 
they get 40 per cent off their 
fare. (The more normal Do- 
ver-Calais route is half price). 
So far they have used the 
concession four times and 
saved around £400. 

This year with another two • 
trips planned they will save 
another £200. In the mean- 
time, if they want to sell their 
European Ferries shares, they 
are now worth !60p each. 

In 1988, European Ferries 
are increasing the number of 
preference shares needed to 
qualify for the full cross- 
Channel concession from 300 


to 600. Unless the shares have 
risen to really beady heights, 
the Doyles say they are in- 
clined to increase their 
shareholding. If they don't 
buy those extra shares, they 
wifi still be entitled to cut- 
price cross-Channel fares, but 
the concession will be reduced 
to half the current level 

Shares in British Telecom 
and European Ferries are 
probably the two best-known 
perks for shareholders. In fact 
the British Telecom telephone 
voucher was only an incentive 
to get small investors to buy 
British Telecom shares when 
they went public in November 

In the end, such was the 
scramble for the shares that 
they would have sold without 
the vouchers and there is no 
sign that British Telecom is 
going to repeat the perk. 

There are about 1 1 0 compa- 
nies offering discounts or 
special offers to their share- 
holders. With just a few rare 

Pick the companies 
that will succeed . 

exceptions, like European Fer- 
ries, shareholder perks should 
never be the sole reason for 
buying a share. No one ever 
got rich by choosing shares by 
the cut of their perks. 

It is a much better policy to 
go for companies which you 
think are going to do well and 
if they then shower you with 


its, that is an added 
nus. 

There are other exceptions 
to this general rule. For exam- 
ple. anyone about to instal a 
child's car seat could buy just 
one share in BSG Internation- 
al. and get SO per cent off all 
Britax safety seats. The 
stockbroker's commission 
would be £15, much more 
expensive than the cost of one 
share at around 40p. but in 
total still less than half the cost 
of a child's safety seat. 

Other concessions range 
from Allied Lyons' wallet of 
special money-off vouchers 
for their restaurants and off- 
licences, and a discount on a 
new Barrett home, to 20 per 
cent off Christmas hampers 
from Paric Food. 

The qualifications can be 
just one share, and cheap — 
and in the case of BSG 
International and Peters 
Stores where all shareholders 
get a 15 per cent discount in 
their 75 stores. Or it could 
prove expensive, as in the case 
of the Southampton IOW and 
South of England Packet 
where you need 2,400 shares 
at around 300p each to get a 
free passenger pass on the 
Southampton to Cowes cross- 
ing. At Asprey you would need 
1.124 shares at 53Sp to get the 
15 per cent discount 

And then there are the 
oddities and the most highly- 
sought perks, such as the 
almost impossible to buy de- 
bentures in the All England 



The Doyles are off to France: Now their shares ease the harden 


Tennis Club which entitles 
you to Centre Court seats at 
Wimbledon. A £500 deben- 
ture costs around £16.500. 

Brewers, hotel groups, and 
chain stores are the most 
generous towards their share- 
holders. A company like 
Marks & Spencer has always 
held out against offering 
shareholders any special 
perks. Tthere is the view that 
once a company starts wooing 
its shareholders with free 
handouts, it is the time to sell 
the shares. 

So why do some companies 
offer perks? Burton has oper- 
ated a shareholders' discount 
scheme for some time. Philip 
Smith. Burton's assistant sec- 
retary says: “We introduced 
the scheme in 1979 to cele- 
brate Burton's 50th anniversa- 


ry' as a public company. We 
wanted to do something to 
reward our shareholders for 
their loyalty and faith in us. 
And once introduced, you 
can't then withdraw il We 
don't actually know how 
much it costs us, because it has 
never been worth our while to 

Lists are revised 
once, a year 

account for it separately, but 
we have the impression that it 
isn't much, and that only 
about one in 10 shareholders 
takes advantage of iu" 
Seymour. Pierce & Co and 
Klernwort Grieveson are two 
brokers which compile lists of 
shareholder concessions. The 
Seymour, Pierce list costs 
£1.50 and is available from 10 


Old Jewry. London EC2R 
SEA. The Kfcinwort 
Grieveson list is free to any- 
one who sends in a large 
stamped addressed envelope 
to PO Box 191, 10 Fenchurch 
StreeL London EC3M 3LB. 

The lists are revised once a 
year. Sometimes they miss 
one or two of the small USM 
and Over-the-Counter shares. 
For example. Airship Indus- 
tries wil take shareholders up 
in their new scheduled airship 
trip round London for £50 
rather than £100. The wine 
merchant. Jacques Maihiot 
Wine which trades on Afcor's 
OTC market, gives a 10 per 
cent discount off wholesale 
prices to anyone with more 
than 3,000 shares, now chang- 
ing hands at around 63p. 

Axithea Masey 


t 7fc 0 u\a 

CLal 

IW^TTOn4Vf«<% 

But whoever tells 


you when to sell? 


Any prudent investor knows that selling at the 
right time is as important as buying. 

But when did you last see an advertisement 
advising you to take a profit and move on? 

If you think that there has to be a better way to 
invest, you're right - because there's now the 
County Managed Investment Service. 

It offers you a Unit Trust portfolio carefully 
selected to meet your capital growth or income 
requirements. 

It offers you personal service to keep you fully 
informed on the progress of your investment. 

Best of all, it offers you active management that 
will rearrange your holding to fit changing 
conditions in the UK and overseas markets. 

If you have £5.000 or more to invest, find out 
more. Pick up full details from your local NatWest 
branch or ring the free Linldine number now. 

LDfKUKE 0800 400 474 


COUNTY MANAGED 


INVESTMENT SERVICE 


To: County Bank Unit Trusts Ltd.. 

161 Cheapside, London EC2V 6EU. 
i Please send me my free brochure giving full details 
j on the County Managed Investment Service. 

I Name 


Address. 


r 

i 

i 

I A service of the 

I National Westminster Bank Group a 
I 


T 10-5 


Now is the right time to move 
nto this exerting market with 
high potential profits. 
However, it is vital to hove well 
researched information, so 
write for a free copy and 
details of the special offer of 
The City Tipsters to: 

Musai ltd, sum 213 , 

QUEENS BUHJHNG, BtSBOK 
COUNT. LONDON EC4M 7EI 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN- 10.50% 

Adam & Company 10.50% 

BCC1 10 50% 

Citibank Savings!- _ 10.75% 

Consolidated Crds 10.50% 

Contmenlal Trust..- 10.50% 

Co-operatee Bank.... 10.50% 

C. Hoare 8 Co 10.50% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 10.50% 

Lloyds Bank 10.50% 

Nat Westminster — 10.50% 

Roval Bank ot Scotland 10.50% 

TSB ...1050% 

Citibank NA 10.50% 






eel in our highest rate 
of interest. ^ 

. new 90 DAYS Account pays | Stf ~t~ 

jr top rate of9.0% net And all j f* 

sed is £500 to open an account , 1 

e us 90 days' notice of with- 
ils and you lose no Interest, 
istant access, ail you lose is 
iys* interest on the amount 



No. 


* FIRST OUT OF89 FIXED INTEREST 
FUNDS' 

* BEATS ALL FIXED INTEREST UNIT 
TRUSTS BY 5? o’ , - V -/ . 

* ALMOST 3 TIMES FT-SEIOO INDEX 

* MORE THAN DOUBLE THE FT ALL 
. STOCKS FIXED INTEREST INDEX 

from 1 3.36- I 5 86 * ’ . ' 


interest rates worldwide are faffing fast and building society rates are 
forecast to fell further. But Gilts (or Government Securities) 
keep the same return once you’ve bought them. 

What’s more, when interest rates fall, the CAPITAL VALUE 
OF GILTS INCREASES. 

Gilts still offer a return of about 9% a year- 6% higher than the 
Government’s inflation forecast for this year! 

/Etna’s new GILT-EDGED BOND offers one of the MOST 
COST-EFFECTIVE WAYS TO INVEST IN GILTS. 

5k 5% SAVING OVER MOST GILT FUNDS. 

Huge cost savings over Direct Investment 

sk Up to 10%a year income facility. 

* NO CAPITAL GAINS TAX on profits from Gifts. 

*k Management by Phillips & Drew- voted top for gilt research by 

'Institutional Investor 1 poll. 

*k Fund up 18% in first two months 1/5/86. 

/Etna is the UK arm of the world's largest publicly quoted insurance group, with assets 
equivalent to £ 38.000.000 000 

/Etna Life Insurance Company Ltd, 401 St John Street. London EC IV 4QE Reg No. 1766220. 

DON’T DELAY - INVEST NOW! 

'S’ur.y Phiimui SkIiihm Stiti.'tiiS I 3 66- 15 86 


Please compleleand send the coupon in an envelope addressed to 
/Etna Life Insurance Company Ltd, FREEPOST London EC I B I NA 

Or phone our Customer Care Centre - dial IDO and ^1. the operator lor Freefone Ttna The Cent re b open tb k 
S aturday and Sunday from# am to } pm and from b am to 8 pm each weekdav ' rn 

Please send me my FREE 'Guide to Gilts and details of the /Etna GILT-EDGED BOND lo 


t Provincial BuiMtag Sodctjc 


Artrtran 




l/Womlo«CACtaatMfor£ . 

A* De Imrurt (fi i TO Dap Account 


pteiM c*nd fwtlUr urioftnuion I J 


a vc a balance of £10,000 and . 

be no penalty for immediate 

i I ScndtrcPotarl 

• ____ „„-04r BRADFORD. «ST TOttSMME BOI 1ML AU INTEREST UTES QUOTED M DNlCItU non J1XR* AND ARE CORRECT RT 

I0VINOAL BU«.0«K5 1 LyulriOlWS. CUMCNT W DATS ACCOUNT INTEREST RATI IS W HO. TURN GROSS EQUIVALENT WffiH 1U JS MUD AT THE BASE RATE. 

T0 PRESS. ■V T : - . - _ 


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Address. 


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■ Postcode 


Name of usual Professional adviser. 



P ? 11 you * w self-employed or have no comcwn r*»n ^ ic.fi 
please no. the bo* so wi-cau also- v;ud iou Jeia'.f- 
.ttrid s neu- Ci I [-Edged Pension Bond □ 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


1 r 

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900 good reasons 

for openings Hoare Govett 

VT MR j With more than 900 unit trusts available, it is 

I |mf Jl becoming increasingly difficult, if not impossible, 

I 1 1 1 1 1 || I |\l % for the pnvate investor to find his way through the 

Villi U Uvlw unit trust maze. 

■ if you share our view that independent advice 

M _ ^ is likely to be the best advice and would like your 

fl |Pfp/l| 1 nT portfolio to have full access to all the 900 trusts 

imLLU 111 I L available, a Hoare Govett Unit Trusts Account 

* wr VHIv mon ha ii ict uuhsrt uni i aio Innlcinn for 


HOARE 

GOVETT 

The International Stockbroker 

Members oTnw London Slock Exchange 


hU'l' I V I ■> 'T I. I'll! I*. | 

rh -v^f 'I-J j." 1 - Hi,ji|i-i.||-. l 'l. 

li'HomAC Iv 'ey 

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With more than 900 unit trusts available, it is 
becoming increasingly difficult, if not impossible, 
tor the pnvate investor to find his way through the 
unit trust maze. 

if you share our view that independent advice 
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Hohn Savage ”"1 

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| Heian House. 319 325 High Holbom. , 

I London WC1V7PB ' • 

i I 

| Please se nd me deisi Is ol now lo open a Hoare j 

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LONDON - NEW YORK - TOKYO • HONG KONG ■ SINGAPORE ■ AUSTRALIA • CHANNEL ISLANDS 


This advertisement is issued in compliance with the Regulations of The Stock Exchange. 

Nationwide 

a Building society 

(Incorporated in England under the Building Societies Act 1874) 

Placing of £2<MKHM)00 9 7 /»per cent Bonds 
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Listing for the bonds has been granted by the Council of The Stock Exchange. Listing 
— Particulars in relation to The Nationwide Building Society are available in the Excel 
Statistical Services. Copies may be collected from Companies Announcements Office, 

P.Q. Box No. 119. The Stock Exchange, London EC2P 2BT until 13th May 1986 and 
until 26th May 1986 fram:- 


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Sterling Ltd., 
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Chase Manhattan Rowe & Pitman, 

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Y Vanguard 

A DoubleFirst! ^ 

Not only did we win the Observer “Small Unit Thist Group of the 
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Shortterm performance is often a Itnke — brag term performance is not. 


ln vestment Objectives 
The investment policy of this Trust is to 
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JJbV*. and send it to the Managers. 
MS)'!' For your guidance only, the 
p Wjt, J J; offer price of unitson 8th May 
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■Jr* The Estimated Current Gross 
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1'ir-i Nam^iui t>1 ** 1 

Surname 'Mr Mis Missi 

l:u« KT.I TTI HMI> »'l 

\.|.|y..x PiihIiiwIm 


The big day that brings 



C_- WEDDINGS ) 

Prince Andrew and Sarah 
Ferguson are not the only 
couple grappling with the 
logistics of their wedding, the 
details of which were an- 
nounced on Thursday. This is 
the park season for marriages, 
and the fathers of countless 
brides must be wondering 
what on earth it is all going to 
cost. 

You can, of course, get 
married at your local register 
office for a mere £18. But not 
many people do. According to 
a survey carried out by the 
magazine Brides and Setting 
up Home earlier this year, 
most happy couples opt for a 
church wedding with all the 
trimmings — and all the 
expense. So where does the 
money go? 

If you get married by certifi- 
cate in a register office you 
have to pay £8 for notice given 
in each districL If you both 
live in the same district, only 
one of you need apply. In 
addition it costs £10 for the 
registrar to officiate at the 
ceremony and a copy of the 
marriage certificate costs £2. 
Marriage by licence costs £26. 

The price you pay for a 
religious marriage varies ac- 
cording to your faith. The 
Church of England has set fees 
for the reading of the banns. 
They are: £4 for each of you if 
you live in separate parishes, 
£2 for a certificate of banns, 
and £33 for the marriage 
service. You also need a 
registrar's certificate costing 
£Z 

Every individual church 
will charge its own rates for 
organ music, choirs, carpets 
and bellringers. At St Maryle- 
bone Parish Church, for exam- 
ple, you would have to budget 

^Diamond rings still 
the most popular 

for a minimum of £10 for 
bells. £25 for the director of 
music. £20 for the organist, 
£15 a head each for a 1 0-strong 
choir and £20 for a soloist 

If you announce your wed- 
ding in The Times (in six lines 
on the court page) that will 
add £41.40 to your costs. The 
minimum you could spend on 
100 invitations would be 
about £24 but a classic en- 
graved copperplate formal in- 
vitation on folded card would 
be around £200. 


Getting to the church on 
time and in style is another 
expense. Prices from Vintage 
Rolls-Royce Hire start from 
£185. If you set your heart on a 
glass coach pulled by a pair of 
matched greys, plus coachman 
and two footman in full livery, 
then the Wellington Carriage 
Company can oblige, provid- 
ed you live within 75 miles of 
Telford, Shropshire, at prices 
from £258 to £330. 

Then there are the rings. 
Diamond engagement rings 
and gold wedding rings are 
still foe most popular. More 
than a quarter of those who 
took part in foe Brides survey 
spent between £100 and £200 
on an engagement ring and 
third spent £50 to £100 on a 
wedding ring. However, 10 
per cent spenL more than £500 
On an engagement ring and 8 
per cent more than £250 on a 
wedding ring. 

Prices for wedding dresses 
start at around £800 for foe 
cheapest of those produced by 
bridal chains such as Berketex 
or Pronuptia. Laura Ashley 
wedding dresses start at £1 25. 
The most popular price is 
about £200 but if you want 

£350 for a really 
spectacular dress 

something made to order, 
exclusi ve or really spectacular, 
you are going to have to think 
in terms of about £350 
upwards. 

The price of a veil varies 
according to foe fabric used — 
a long nylon veil would be 
around £60. a tulle one around 
£80, a silk one more than 
£100. Satin court shoes cost 
from £27. After all that, 
spending £5 on a pair of satin 
gloves, £7.95 on a bridal garter 
and £7.95 for “Wedding Bells” 
tights from Cham os seems a 
mere slip. 

Bridegrooms get off rather 
more lightly. To have a three- 
piece morning suit made to 
your measurements at Austin 
Reed in Regent Street costs 
from £1 30 to 050. although if 
you had a suit handmade by a 
tailor it would be considerably 
more expensive than that A 
grey topper might cost a 
further £75. Then, of course, 
you would need to buy shoes, 
shirt, tie and gloves. Not 
surprisingly, most opt to hire 


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S K Had Office 176 London BoMLNorib End. PoctHnmdbFOZBDL 
1 Telephone <070S) 693311. 

ortsmouth BpMfn g Society 

tow, fiwflBYrl f7*liH»iwu 

CHELTENHAM 

Goldloan 


Compare our 
rate for mortgages 

of £30,000 
or more. 

The Cheltenham Goldloan rate for 
endowment or pension linked mortgages is 
currently 10.75%, typical APR 11.4%. Compare 
that with the rates offered by other leading 
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how competitive Cheltenham Goldloan is. 

We can also give you instant tax relief, at 
source, on the qualifying amount of your loan, 
unlike most other lenders. 

Loans are available for mortgages of £30,000 
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Naturally security will be required for the loan 
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For full written details simply complete and 
return the FREEPOST coupon or, if it’s more 
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To: Cheltenham & Gloucester Building Society. 

FREEPOST. Cheltenham. Gloucestershire GL50 1BR. 

Please send me full written details on CheltenhamGoIdloan. 

Name CUT3 

Address 

Postcode 

Cheltenham &Gkxicester 
Bidding Society 

Over 160 branches throughout the UK. See Yellow Pages. 


their outfits. At Austin Reed 
the whole package (shoes ex- 
cepted) costs £33.95. 

There are still the pageboys' 
and bridesmaids’ clothes to 
consider. Laura Ashley, for 
example, has moire taffeta 
bridesmaids dresses for chil- 
dren from £60 to £68. Their 
sailor suits for little boys cost 
£26.95. 

Flowers for the church, the 
reception and foe bouquets 
are likely to add at least £100 
to foe final bill, and if you 
have a professionally made 
triple-tier wedding cake from, 
for example, Boris in London, 


it will cost between £105 and 
£149. 

Professional photographers 
often offer package deals in- 
cluding a wedding album and 
prices range from around £ 1 00 
to £250. Video recordings are 

becoming increasingly popu- 
lar and a typical starting price 
is around £120 for a two hour 
tape. 

Obviously, the cost of the 
reception will depend on the 
venue you choose, foe number 
of guests and the type of food 
and drink. At The Ritz, for 
example, it costs £100 to hire 
the Marie Antoinette Suite. 


Finger buffet menus start from 
£9.75 up to £18 a head, sit- 
down menus from £21.50 to 
£41 a head. The Ritz cham- 
pagne costs £22.50 a bottle, 
the house wine £8.75 a bottle. 
Prices for other wines start at 
around £15 a bottle. So if you 
had 100 guests and kept to the 
bottom end of the price range, 
you would still face a bill of 
around £2.000. 

.And finally, if you decide to 
press and frame your wedding 
bouquet as a lasting memento, 
don't forget to set aside be- 
tween £30 and £30. 

Lee Rodwell 



Working oot the cost of married bliss: David and Dinah 

Stylish marriage for Dinah 


Dinah HalL 28, a claims 
administrator for an insurance 
company, and actor David 
Lloyd, 31, are getting married 
at Shere Cbarch, near 
Guildford, Surrey, on May 24. 

Apart from the usual church 
fees, they will be paying the 
bellringers £25 and the organ- 
ist £21 and they have decided 
not to have a choir. “I’ve 
chosen well-known hymns so 
that everyone can join in," 
says Dinah. 

She is prepared to spend 
£200 on a white suit. She says: 
“I decided to be practkaL 
rather than go for a do-or-die. 
one-da y-only dress. But I'm 
having a wonderful hat made 
for £50, covered in net with a 
long trail. My best friend is 
going to be the bridesmaid. I 
don't know yet what she will 
wear, bat I’ll contribute if 
necessary. 

“I haven't got an engage- 
ment ring bat I saw a weeding 
ring I liked, a twist of gold and 
platinam, and one of David's 
friends is making it for ns for 
£125. I'm being taken to foe j 
charch in a horse and carriage 
and my sister and brother-in- 
law are paying for that as our 
wedding present One of my 
father's friends is doing foe 
flowers. 

“We've invited about 150 
people and it looks as If they 
are nearly all coming. The 
marquee for foe reception at 
my father's farm cost about 

FRAMLINGTON 
rUNIT TRUST-, 
GUIDE | 

For a free copy of our 
1986 Guide? with full 1 
details of our top- I 
performing fiuuls and I 
both lump-sum and ) 
monthly investment, \ 
simply send this | 
coupon. [ 

To: FRAMLINGTON. j 
FREEPOST LONDON EC2B 2DL 


■ Name . 
Address 


OFFER EXTENDED 
FINAL CLOSING DATE 
MAY30TH 


£1,000 to hire and the catering 
will be another £2.000 or so for 
food and drink. The wedding 
photographs will cost £240.“ 

David and Dinah are not 
planning a party in foe eve- 
ning, bat they will be meeting 
some of their friends for a 
drink and are then going to foe 
South of France for their 
honeymoon. 

David says: “We'll be stay- 
ing in a gite, and foe cost, 
apart from spending money, 
will be around £370.“ 

David had already bought 
himself a suit for £120 (which 
he needed to go to a friend's 
wedding. “I don't usually wear 
suits," he explained. So far he 
has not made np his mind 
whether to buy a new shirt and 
tie for the occasion. 


The couple were given 
£2.000 by Dinah's father as a 
wedding present and decided 
tn put this towards the cost of 
the wedding. David’s own 
parents contributed £500 and 
his mother is making foe 
wedding cake. Dinah's father 
is also spending about £ 1 .500 
on the cost of foe reception. 

Do David and Dinah have 
any reservations about the 
total costs? They say:“We 
want ourselves and our friends 
to have a memorable day. The 
memories will stay with as for 
a long time. If we art going to 
get married then we want to do 
it in style. It's going to be an 
occasion, foe best day possi- 
ble. And if we have to spend 
money doing that, we have no 
regrets at all." 


+ GROWTH TOMORROW^ 

= PLANNED INCOM^ACCOUNT; 


If you have £10,000 or more to invest and would like to find 
out more about Planned Income Account from Quitter Unit 
Trust Advisory Service (QLT1AS), please complete the 
coupon below or ring Chris Busby or Angus Agnew 
on 01600 4177. 

Or come and see us at our QGC Money Centres: 

Debenhams Oxford Street 
De ben ha ms Bristol (Broadmead Centre) 

3 Calenick Street Truro. 


Please complete and send to: QUTAS-'Ptenned Income Account 
QuHtar Goodtson Company Limited Garrard House, 

3145 Gresham Street London ECJV 7LH. 


j Name 


lira 


A safer route 




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FREEPOST, Bristol, BSl 5BR. 
NAME 

ADDRESS 


T NASP1M fc. J jj 




The Prolific Convertible and Gilt 
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£119 


H 


SPEEEjfPlNG 


01 486 9356 

' - • ATCL lS2a 


FINLAND 


£175 


Kr.ri’KN 

on i innair 
ScJitiliilfd .“K-rvices 
For detail- ,uu] conditions 
of Super Apex Fares ” ' 
ronucl:- 


HOT 

TURKEY 


How hot? Well already 
il's 84°F! Holidays from 

£159 


See your local 
travel agent NOW! 


AST A ATOL 3B2 

London: 01-291 5000 
Manctieswn 06 I- 8 J 1 7011 
041-204 2552 


S/7ywvwy/7 


01-jOH 1 222 

or your local Travel Agent 



return from 

SYD/MO/BfiJS * £555 
AUCKLAND * £MS 
See what the MDgaCEW 
SPB3ALST can offcrl 
01*2425555 

, ®f0 TRAVEL (IATA) 

l 1S ff7 Want Wo nt Uwdon W et 


_ LODEST FUSES 

£*« cea h Tan 
Frankfurt £65 LA/Sf 
tops £320 btant 
****» 025 Smqapore 

Jpourg U£o Ba^S. 
Cord £205 ruancrau 
0 «vao« C 255 FWot 
Hong Kong £ 51 Q Cdtioa 
ntam trrib tt lebpan 

SSS 4 sSP" 

« >*■ Si. 'rfm VI 


S2, 

£335 

cist 

£n2fi 

£335 

E*40 

EJ 50 

DCS 


01-08 tmuti 0537 ■ 

■■C/CAROS 4 CCHTH 3 


MAJOR 


BCACU flora. VAUMCQ in Cor 
**a PrrfKI ettmatp. lAkuknn 
yw Rrsnoft». auptn food, on- 

WWW mn». Fa nlA^y bMOln 
p ricn lor Mn> «id June doigL 
SHUoii Lmn Travel. 

01 765 2200 




Eartr **» Spectatt 


PALMA 

«ZA 

SEROUA 

.AJJCAWTE 

1 AJ-*£RS 

HEtUUOJOU 


K» 1 ISO 
KW »t?l 
1 W fct 7 i 
a 191 
lOrt * £71 
13 / 5(1 l via 


Bba an 37-723 MS 4 

UTA.ABTA.A 10 i TWO ACCESS. VTSA 


SALES m £48 

TanonM 11 . IB. 25 J 5 
urnam 15 . 22 . 29 o 
Cm 10 . 17 . 2*IS 
Fare S. ia it. 15 2215 
- 1 10 15 18 2 X 31/3 


M am 10 15 18 2 X : 

«ca n. 18 25/5 
Manon 9 12 . 18 T 9/5 

tabua 12 . w. 2 Brt 

AMro IX 17 . 24 . ivs 
Ccrfcj IX 18 26 A 
__ Ma 10 . 17 . 2*fS 
fnoota 14 21 . ibfi. tfi 

TrLtttf * * « «»« <» 

Acaviraucaos 119 roe ai imma n 



UJW HSL 1 i ».3 Ff.-W 1 e; nL'i'Jl 
- 3 US^itSS SfiP PtLASPi>£ 


The Algarve Alternative 


s 

n 

)f 


Villa Holidays of distinction 
*. for the very few. 

v-JSi James Street, London, SWI. A\ 

Tel: 01-491 0802 


Cmitm-i 
As»M 
SlCnqr 
l>/a 
JTfcdg 

Sen; irv .T=e 


<3 


0*3 
7233 1=2 
7^7 :?_2 
:=5 ;c< 
?:E 3 ST 5 

:a» 

!«3 


1 : 0.1 

?i3 

£=3 

Si 3 

iJ 

W 


SKA avi ri^ ria 


OLUMBUS 


arnttSuAfcyc 

^TWSKSKRtS^lAEX 

S 1 S 2 S 4751 


NEW 10 W FARES WOUOWBK 


Kenotw 

bgos 

Mbotmu 

Amman 


F 40 D T>rv* 

T 4 tn teomon 

ag *<**• 

£400 unm 
£260 KylSm 
FSO *~— 

Bam.Da 1335 iirS! 

Caro E 2 M Smt 
Cufcmco £430 S/O/AMI 

“Mis,, 

2 OaoUH STfffTT. L 0 K 00 S MM 

^sSsffsser 


l£ 37 D 

£1*1 

£440 

£770 

£4451 

£350 

£ 260 


£570 




S|lSg3§l| 




•n»*E Y aom pi moku -rravn 
g c ** ur * || q* | 4»v»- 

Sett (Wit cua inn. Vjcni 
dunert. mdixMuai Mertnartm. 
Som* avMaMMy deon June 7 . 

*■ 1 Free bfisctnire 01 434 
196 ? or 01-788 8050 CM 
A 8 TA ACCESS VISA 

» trmcts itrrriAi » n 

Njw Vortj Q 49 . 

* jyurg £ 419 . 
Nairobi £ 309 . Sydney £ 659 . 
Auwuuul £749 OwiMr 130 
Jermyo Street. 01 839 7144 


TURKEY 

3827 AUr 

Esranc 10 me Mflimni & mnl 
beau uf ul cam on me vwih 
(erranran Uk» Hose). 
Fettuye avail Muon u«h 
H B direct fbgflts oMMnal 
Tourv i. Boat trtoi Ana 
Iboni on/y to Caiman 

NtSSAK! VILLAS 

01-948 9191 (24 hrs) 

ATOL 1596 


1 week luxury hotel- 
barge in France. Luxury 
mini-bus transport B & 
B in private chateau en 
route. July and August 


Only £280. 

(0272) 738213 


HVDt SAMSUNB on Die Cn 

•Loire Valley/, indryniaance. 
Canadian canoes, eedlty Oaw- 
ina mcr. unspoilt countryside. 

novel comforts, superb food. 

rneHodiure. Meadwaier Hoa- 
^ ^ IABTAJ Tel. 0006 


(Arm Minjakm 
Pver t qoitmq h h. qmei posdion 
near beanies, sleeps 49 Mrs 
HID 0336 29 Q 3 S 9 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


B 8 MMMS. I men A represent 
9 Mne of die pretnesuiutasa c<M- 

t»M» Jiauabie 10 rent on me 
WestOo aw. Sleeping rrom 714 
person*. Ogmpmne atr (ares 
WcUioed. For brochures 3 pm 
MOM attention catt hjkH 
Sapcote (otboei 021 253 I TW 
thome. w/el 021 454 0912 . 
■*“*“» Small Hotels. 7 
nuns Inc or Tbphl and 
woomftom £ 384 . Acmm oeiy 
£61 SudoMe for mdivaiuait or 
W 25 »- for brochure. 

Budiel Travel 01-741 8491 
tMSPOB-T CAffmCAN IdUIMD 
deserted beach mini £ 1 74 00 
ppwstos. 2 S. 0304 823173 


CMIK VAUCR vm» wooded 
aamen. ueep 4 .- 6 . b»p tetrare. 
imoM. Tree m 13 / 7 (nxn 24 .8 
«o_T and alter 21 /9. From 
« 2 t» PW TebOl -252 1963 . 

LOME VALLEY. Axifcw. Rtver- 
Aldr bmioakhv. sleeps 9 . 
Ayauabte May *Jm, July a 
2301 Aug onwards, rr £118 
PW Rlone 03 «l 422336 . 

NEAR » TKOFCZ ClObc-Vahner 
tax « 1 Ua cm fee tab views 2 Oats 
sleep 8-7 pule bench v. out* la 
Jane 14 and sem £200 £328 
pw 01-930 6519 . 


L CALL Tar some pi me MM d«Mi 

00 m» 1 ittas apts tills and car 
hire Tel London 01 65 o 5000 . 
Manchester 061 832 2000 Air 
TraieJ Adi dory Bureau. 
LATM AMERICA. Low cost 
»KSds e p. Rio L 485 Lima 
£485 rtn. Also Small Group 
Hobday Journeys. JLA 01 - 747 - 
3106 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 

LfiA. S America. MM and Far 
East. S Africa. Train-ale. 48 
Mar g ar ei street. Wi 01 50 a 
2928 IVIU Accepted) 

N/YORX Miami LA. Gheapes) 
fares on ma/or L’.S scheduled 
carrterv Atso (racjniatuk 
charters A (bibb to Canada. 01 
584 7371 ABTA. 


FRANCE AND FLEXIBILITY 

MOTORING HOLIDAYS 


' r0U 1nm 200 n«i hoods. 2 or 3 stw 

vni . Ty* »/«»* wverai terry creasm*. 

TOU choose a fixed itinerary. * one or two cenlre holiday 

or a -no as you Please" lour 

w?i cwoo a? B *° * Menkias* or real French cwstne. ruU board 
T 1 JU cnoow the day and lime you Irate and length m your stay 

!,wrwW83:SP' 

ABTA 


LOWEST AIRFARES Florida 

Jamaica N tors. Toronto. 
Alnca. India. Far East 01-737 
2162 0659 ABTA 


OKAFESr RJCttTS W/UHDC . 

Brm Travel. Tel Ol 386 64|4 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


GENERAL 


SELFCATERING 
CANARY A MADEIRA 


. : coOaore 

«n farmhouses some wtm 
poob. June, party July redac- 
tion*. 0225 337477 
COTE D'AZUR, or 8 oMl Flat 
A medieval mountain viSaae. 
beach ■« mite, skren 35 . From 
£320 pw 076727 60 S. 

nninorNL oo mi b roM y 

equipped Souse Shw 6 - 2 oaths 
wage uarCwn Availanie 6-19 
July £160 P-W 0 * 44 - 454063 . 

ores • villas m urn-Ainr. 

J une Bar gain*, spfl some (ugh 
aY*aab*t«y Jim France. ( 0973 ) 
82 D 285 . 


I 


inltafy I 

The Secret South. A I 
Taste ofTuscany or b 
S plendours of rfie | 

Veneio. A select trio I 
of value for money ■ 

coach court. Abo v«s I 
& hotels with ■ 

;and I 


LRXB8T MTWL 

UfiiUVE I COSTA VEBBE 

to*a» »*a* uilb prism* poeb, 
sOri A Manor Hmhol w 2 
(to fair Baarfed SpeaofaiL 
. / Rfeta h £79 

* Se canty - Aid Bndod 

* Snow JotrlAng And 

PORTUVHJLAS 

08926 64245 ATOL 17*0 


I I swimming poobar 
city weekends. 
m FREc brochure fro 


A. anna beach and 


Lately vo- 


SKIATHOS. tsrfita. Alderney b- 

lancta 01 836 - 4383 . ABTA. 




**■•■ vfJt*.>s 




SELFCATERWG iu. sleep* 4 - 6 . 
lame Inrace A G off 
Cdruuminium ennenna. near 
Alamo, to let on seasons. Good 
renlratneaima m the winter 
Fully eouipped. Information: 
Von GMcnen Travel. Anne con 
GWchen. Goetnestrasm 23 Dei 
Alfred. 6000 Frankfurt, Mam. 
Gmnv Phone- 069 28 42 53 . 

UAAtAIISr. RETURN FUOKY* 
from- Canada £ 166 . Canooran 
£ 329 . nondaCI 98 .L.A A Son 
rranmeo £ 309 , New York 
£ 2 * 9 . Dallas £ 330 . Houston 
£ 299 . Auwdis £ 569 . Fly 
Dtne HMMa on request. 
Inter Alias Travel Tet 01-493 
0071 Visa welcome. 

TANK TOME OFF to Pan*. Am- 
slcrdom. Brunei*. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Uuunnt. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dieppe Time Off. 2 a. 
Chester Close. London- 6 W 1 X 
7 BO 01 255 8070 . 

CYPRUS May. June I or 2 wk* 
Motet-. Apts Scheduled flights 
Pan World Holidays 01 734 
2862 


tBAMD CANARIA Pfclnrosqi* 
ftstanq VUlape of Mogan. Apt 
a v-adaue from May to October. 
£96 P W Tei 01035321 43 B 22 - 
fMOVE iaittMe 0 S Tenerife. 
2 bed. hoc spl sins 6 . From £40 
P-P-P w Tel 0204 594711 and 
52372 . a m* banded. 
£»WJB> ^ Wmnr fc aa from gOJrni 
to 4 Jul luxury 2 bednn apt 2 
balcony overtook pool * see 
dee«B 5 £lB 0 pw 09325 47459 . 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


HOTELS ABROAD 


NEAR. 
ST. TROPEZ 


vata on Sea. Magntf- 
oenl views. Steen 6 - 0 . 
Healed pool. AvaUAMe 
l- 19 lh July and 1 1 th 
August onward*. 

44.000173 pjn. Septem- 
ber minus iSAo. 


Reply BOX G47 


— Innuawogi. 

Sle ep* 4/6. Tel *04248274 1 7 
POT AMA D OR BeouhruUy re- 
g”N Cl4 (ormer school Use. 
Spectacular — *U«to Slee ps T 
Frnm DSPO pw. 01-622 SBB7 
««mi 09 FRANCE, 4 star We 
tojety caravan to M. Mere* a 
All omum. Mem lamly nok- 
_aay £7 0-120. 0609 881069 
Bn *P5* detiahHiil cottage 
ovadobto S ept to On. Deems 
TefcOl-AAB ff 79Q or 688 8063 
•NCE CENTRE Mod sunny studio 
”*■ « W«R beach, sleep* 2 . 
FlWB £140 pw 01-9X7 9*70 
UtOVENt* splendid vniaoe Use. 
nr sea. lake*. Not Auo. Sip* 7. 
£150 pw 0223 321286 
8.FNANC E hou ae to medieval vll- 
tam^lS ntoee Ir ml Shu 5. Fr 
LlOCtow T el 01-722 8644 
ST H OP I I Mobs* Dome on rw- 
ovda use. Spa 6. All swteef- 
Poot Avau now 0562883038- 
SMI FRANCE, isolated nnhouse. 
S2¥ a re a* 7 £75 

£200 pw T*L 01 622 5887 


( mcc proch lire from 

Magic of Italy, 

■ 4 7Sh^ K5*B«Mh 
I Crroi,WnSK 
I Tdb 0U749 7449 


vttLABWgA. Ataureaw. 

CARVUAJfrO. Belt VRIM With 
P<toi to (he Alporve. Inc 
hols. v«na renal only, ai <av 
bghtoie pricra. ctly Travel Ol- 
580 81 91 (Atoll 


CYCLING 
FOR SOFTIES 


Hides BntorprfmtJ 

pcB«blfid-ib«aeaJ 

rfoodtafo*5vw^ 
iretoCokxuBrocimrephmcl 
koeu 224 7T77/634 6801 1 



NEW YORK 'MM 8 R 'Toronto fr 
£190 rtn LA Vancouver tr 
£299 rtn. Fourway* Travel. Ol 
907 0 QQ 5 ABTA 
»**. MSTOCAL. GREECE. 
Flights irom mist UK airaort*. 
totolaie ipgnu offers. FMdor 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
tWRSIA For lhai perfect hob day 
with sunny day* £ carefree nls. 
Weal Spring Sianmer TunMan 
Travel. 01-373 4411 

N J- . South Altera. 


U-B.A. Hong MmBM Fares. 


01-49 3 

AUSTRALIA. Companion wanted 
SJ***; Vto *WRO<W early 

81300?*°* OC * ab ‘ C - ™ »« 


tMScomrr fares woratwwe; 

Jinxler Travel Ol 734 1812 


NEW YORK £250 rtn 

£1 1 5 rtn Europa Ol 437 8106 . 


*!?? Scheduled Righu 

Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


ECUADOR TRAVEL) 

Uutn America A Emnyr air 
to n Tel: 01-437 7534 ABTA. 
STD Ma. £618 Perth £640 All 
"^orcareiere to AUb N 2 ot 
584 7371 ABTA 

•MR. JAM AICA, R.YORK. 
Wonawta, ^ c«enpe*i T 2 reC 
TTavNrt. l Dune St 
•nmmond ABTA Qi- 940 « 073 . 
“jj** 1 * **« ''Economy Uck- 

Soi^S-^piS^ 

^orss-T^SrA'™™ 


THE GREAT 
AMERICAS 

Offer USA/C^pada/HairaB/ 
Merko/Caribbeas 
APWL/MA1 FARES 
8 Vots £229 Data £379 

Bade* £229 Hoesue E 32 Si 

'CfncRQo £239 cwoma £ 3 ffi 

Flonto SOT Us Vegas S 333 

Demw 5369 Tonota £i®| 

*wnta . ta vanawve £299 

?vwcepKt U« RtnqjBn £299 

FLY DRIVE USA 
fVmtft . £249 atom £379 

ac 7 da>V car mal 
FilLUt fOLWlS AIR PaSSS 
ret ' M m WiTEL VOL'IHERS 
ex PER MIGHT 
SradiBcr bo* avaitaMc 

PEREGOR TRAVEL 

JYttl 


up up & away 


Nairobv Jo'Burg. Cura, 
Dubai. IsanbuL Sratapore, 
K-L Drihu Bangkok. Hong 
Kong. Sydne>. Europe. A The 
Amcncas. Flamingo Travel. 3 
New Quebec St- Mart* Arch 
London W 1 H TOD 


01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10 . 00 - 13.00 


CAJMEMG. FOR £251 

Spend a week canoemg m 
Ireland with Adventure 
Holidays. Includes return 
terry travel tor car and 2 
passengers. Call: (0763) 
42867 (24 hours). 

Ybu*S OHy Know 
By Beiag There. 


TENERIFE. CREEK 4 n«|)| 
ALGARVE, MSSmbCIL^S!: 
apa. penuons. overrun 
HtoMtuv nights. brochures. 
inMaui boonm* Ventura Holt 
day-v TH oi 250 1355 
AHi ftQUA - choice of luxury 
“TmwWton nvoltobtf- nrsi 2 
wrefc* November TW 091 281 
7073 icuii-i ooi 2ST 2039 
vntohu 


244 Dd 8 B 80 rt 8 . (S 3 ) 
rU34Ba | 


^ (Mhnarvk*) j 


CBITRAL FLORENCE, sleep* 4 . 
2 battiraoma. Z stiang room. 
MIL Panoramic. For July am 
Aubui. (tent L 666 rb monUs. 
Tel: VivanU. 14 V|a 27 Apclle. 
Ftoresice tOlO 59 SB) 484461 


KLBABVE ALTERNATIVE. Vila 
Hoiktoy* of dshnCOon tor the 
veTy lew TeL 01-391 0802. 73 
SI. Ann'i Street. SWI 
KLBARWL Suoecb Vtuas Veffh 

SS&JHE* oi- 

BARBARA READ VILLA RERT- 

AL*e PrtvsiF villa*, many wttb 
POOR. TR. 0535-85021 
LACP B lux 6 bedroom vtan. 
bwve pool, maM cook Arad 
Aug- Sept IQSBGJ 870298 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


TIMCANY BARBA Lucaitaaday 


US. gg*fr L to—** town. 

Ruip after 6. «* aMm 38280. 


nOBA/CAMLAB grade* of ho- 
RR * dioracwr pension*. 
Hohday titan a* 01-8354383 


SELFCATERING 

GREECE 


PERSONAL BOOWNBS 41 twteR 
in France en route (O your desti- 
nation Tel: Ol 462 4907 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARIC'S 


. . KAU 1 VU. 

ADOAYA. 2 bed. 2 en fu> I* 
bum luxury foe four Lounge, 
kitchen, own pool. New m an 
dale*. Archer. 027573194 dr 
027520749 anytime 


SOUTH OF FRANCE 


Book now fc* boron) pnog 
tys. z wn ‘ 


suivnar itoRJays. 

2 weeks ton £44 (xp. 


For me best vetoo luxury 
mob# homes on ths Hhn- 
sra. Hmg: 


BRAYBROOK HOLIDAYS 
two 53437 
(24 boms) 


SOLLER. MALLORCA Oonvert- 
rd 1 arm ho uve approx G nunt 
Irom Puerto Seller Sip* 4 - 6 . 
TOf IQ 2721 41774 or 424713 




:2t 


CALA DDR VLUS. Mallorca. 
Villa* wtth urn. ale coot*, sip 
z ib. nt beam. MB. June sp 5 
r UlS OI 6 SB 7072 . 

FOHMEXTERA. Braul gone bvtot 
roe. mag sea view, beach >6 
mins, steeps 4 . £l 65 -£! 8 Spw 
Ol 229 1642 

MAJORCA Puerto Potiensa 2 bed 
.hm. pool vac July Aug SepI 
Reasonable Tel. 0277 3627690 . 

MINORCA Private Villa* m «■- 
pert tucation nr coast - Budget 
prices car Avail. 02403-7193 


BRUTAIY/VENDEE 

LtUQify Mob* Home* on super 
sestqrsM- 

Son«e Jufy/Auoist sraRbtity 

UMJLHJWE HATES 

Colouf bracfiwe by return 

caw SPARROW 

2 RaynoUs ftoad 
LtnduVM 
SI 747 a >5 pas) 


ISLAND OF KOS 

aur/TUNE S’HWLS 
HUH £T09 

DbIiWoi ftsamg wfiage ot 
(tatonem. ohB and baachas. 
chap & gootl Tawnas. Good 
QuUdy ttacnade raomt. stud- 
ns. tovnaos S Hob l 
HOLY MGLUSNE 
NO EXTRAS 


«M H 142 UB CBS 

ELI 


PM FACtHC 
WOSLWRNB SWOCS. 
Gotdcau ausai 
EZS Wfe aid 
RMf PACJFTC TRA«. 
IGa SOW SO 
UMBOK WIVSS 8 
ST - 734 3894 [ 24 ta va] 
AM Cl 08 


VILLAS WITH A MMB TOUCH. 

A vata. a gem awl ■ beauttfid 
view Whai more couW you 
want? Choae nom Toscany. 
Sardinia or Ravelin the lovels- 

er pam ol luiy where the mocs 
market operator* don't go. Or 
combine a villa ttoUnay whb a 
sUv m Vejuc*. Florence or 
Rome. Free brochure from 
M 4 «c <jf tuny. Dent T. *7 Sheo- 
bred* Bush Green. W 12 BPS 
Tel Ol 749 7449 i 24 hto 
wrvicei 

TUSCANY VB-LAS MALF 1 ANO. 
A pool Peace 3 wine. oB free. 
Dtscoonis April July TrL 062 

081 600 evefunos/w/ends. 


mazarron 


Snafl resort in imspofe ms 
Soumem Span. 

VBUs aid apaonorts torn 
yft.PWfe- SMKlay Hfebt 


TKE WATERSPOBTS A Iretruc- 
non. Windsurf mg. sathog. 

watteski-mg. snoncehno 6 
muni more. R VA quauned 
kMucton. exciting mgni We. 
vunrdled days. Two unspoded 
Mcalran* £20 o*f fly In noii- 
col brae ran Top 
SSS. I!?*?- «1 155 . EarR 
Utoton. SW 6 . Ol 

y** PRPICW m * frteodty 
French family Good food, m- 
to ™ 1 homes. Ftontoe* A 
ao n. Al so Study & 
Hotaetariy Centre*. Seaside 
croup* 3 Cookery 
w reks S-*e. £n Famllte Agerv 
^ Ch ^., Un ' Aronoel. 
109031 883682 .- 


SAUK BOUBAYS 

Efm a tantasbc brae sMng ■ , 
rtnghy » Poo« Haoow mO) a? I 
many creeks and Cays. R.YJL 
causes. AtntB AWn courees. 
Accomm (or tamBes mj unc- 
contparaed dnidrea 
FUmUA R 0 UUYS 
Sad and enoy tbp beady of 
Porte and Rw SotefS m new 
VW*. Very msanaofe pneas. 
TBEASWE BUM WMBATS 
Ao«Ba» tokoay tar wunpiBs 


Put^)orou^i 

Sand^ Hold 


1 3 Vac Hold close to beautiful beach, indoor 
part. npRvh. tnnu etc. FuB ficilmci lor 
twrtics. ^mc p hone 

PUTSBOROUCH SANDS HOTEL 
BRA LINTON, DEVON 
TEL: (0271) 890SS5 


Eanwng. sabng. anoamg and 
WPS. 9-15 years 


UX HOLIDAYS 


npionos . 1 

P*WK BZ *2 877272 
B 8 CUET PW 
SAUK SCHOOL 
HAKWRTH, POOLE, BttSET 


VALENCIA Secluded farranouae 
wiunn in own ICO acres of 
vine, need* 11 SwaanUnq 
pool, so km inland irom 
Ctoioto. caoo pw AuRwnie 
Jun*. July A August pnoto- 
mooh* on apoJirauon. Tee oi 
876 6865 or Reply to BOX 056 . 


CABTEUJHMTC VOa 


irom £165 pw Near sea. pan- 
1.0932 


PUERTO BAMIS. Maroella Lux 
ury apartment. 2 double 
bedtootns. Sleet* 5 . Ah 
amnwiittira- £150 B.w THe- 
phonr 01-936 1891 


_ TA, Tus- 

cany tnoma and on the coatL 
VUW 0 + poeds. Retort VtBas tm. 
061 833 9096 Or Ol 904 2207 
ADRIATIC. Home deep* 9 . 4 
mite* sea from £190 pw May 
(® September Tel 0682 8321 96 


COTTA 8 LAMCA Caipe- Lux 5 
bid. 2 Ml villa, tge »,-poo.. 
bog. Mag views. Avan Apr -Oct. 
tterrartB CTOa* I 0896 J 832040 . 


4 . avau Jui. Aug. £150 pw 
Tel -381 9222 


d^a^ vUto. Bvrinwunp pool 
Tel: 0896 832040 . 


cottage in oto port. From £180 
pw tad. Tel: 01-720 2026 


ST BRIDES HOTEL 
Sauodersfoot Dyfed 
AA*** RAC— 


One of Wates' iovatiest re- 
sort hotels. 48 bedrooms 
fmciutfing soma suites), al 
wuh bathroom, colour and 
satellite TV. radio, tele- 
phone. haY tbyers. Relax 
in our heated pooL Activity 
holidays - Golf, fishing, 
sa*ng. eyefing. riding. 

For colour brochure and 
shod break leaflet, please 
write or telephone: 

0834 812304 


Sometime eninrtv different - * 

GLIDING HOLIDAY 

To glB toh M o id team ■ am <m 
■ to—M ra y PRdraw*. cob 
a ucimat ny m* ■»— *i , 


careaflnjws m®r tmeMm 
tampol oiD (Hr ai tour rum Loam 
* MUM Dmute OonnMH cavra 
Goto t wo, to ndtonwatotontop 
Bpng. tobn hm 
S {«" GtoroUA.KTj owsate 
Dftons. Bros 63419 a 85744 


wtmBurftog. 

swim. team*, gov etc or relax 


MALTA & GOZO 


u visa among vineyard*, i 
6 . Abcanie Valencia ah 


GREEK ISLANDS 

Avgdabifrtv aK temons 
Ur acGom. Bum II 7 Q 


. Return mwiy g^Oyhis tom.. 




SELF-CATERING 


.o-. \ 




-V* J - 

*»-- 


TW BEST VSLLAS arc to 0 * 
Palmer & Par*« ?“* 

AvaiWMc to A Wane. MarbMta. 
South ol France. U.S A & We*l 
iMiri Mou have staff, all have 
pm ale port* A none 4 re cheap, 
uromum » 04 *» 4 «ij mu 


EUB BU WPT. SMppered pare* 
cruising mkHiiI and (ranawl 
waterway Offer* •»« comamed 
srV c a ter i ng accom. 4 -6 per- 
sons For dteai t» 0726 72348 


CORFU AND OEPHxlONIA 
Td (09321 247 b 17 
Atol MM 


PROVENCE WBTTOL Outot Imtu- 
nou* villa, heated pod. view* 
Medue ii a n c a w. nwiwinim. Ot- 
fnred On. May tocrunva 


pan 

lHOULVOS 



.V '.v 


SLACK FORR 5 T. Sflf comw l 
i fan. gnps 4 . Swiuertam) iv> 
nrs France I hr Pvnvesque 
jn..i Tet. 0752 872356 
PAINS HOCK COTSWOLD 5 V II 
W centre, rottage. HfU 
■lew-. Btoeav 2 3 . T«. 0452 
012885 


peppercera rent £150 M.nL to 
ensure occupation. Mm 3 mu*. 
Impeccable raerence* eaennal. 
058081 301 

MURMOVSICE, FnmRMd 
apartment, open view; resi- 
dence with swimming pool 2 
lenni* court*, stem 5 4 . Mm l 
month, avotUMr front June. 


NC CORFU. No tourism. Re Wo eed 
trad tee. breath unto? views, 
huge terrace*, sea lO ran* 
drive SJp* 4 / 5 . T«fc 07977-202 


£ 500 . 01-079 
wends. 


RIGHT VILLA 


rte no anm ata 'asto M lUtran. 

U OK E 7 S per F 750 (to. 2 10 guest*. 


rami of fUKE: Kne. teas. St Traget La 6 w W m Cwal a re 

ekusve ram ckti mr* a bm. AnBAaum raws 


mnocni BOM «> peoLttV 
Many «»as monmL Good aa gnmortton sffl 

' July. AtiBust «f Sofunov. 


ACT VOLAS (02041 394397 


CORFU Superb vffla A howl 
aerdm. in uaspout Oshiog vd- 
tose. Special aOar.- May £ 2 Spp 
pw June £ 4 opp pw Peak sea- 
son wo avad. For details A 
Ehuen. TW ( 8 am«pmi Nandas 
Corf a Hots 09904 3035 . 
CORFU SPECIAL OFFER Sunday 
18. 26 May & t. a. lEm Jane i 
wtr £ 169 . 8 veto £ 189 . Beaut 
villa* fr Gatwtck pan WorM 

HoMays open Sat 73 » 2 SCCIN- 

»w 4 Pt n « 9 m 756 24641 
SREECE. UawnBl totamto. chow 
tbqMs.i-ffla rentals etc. Zeu* Wd 
May s- 01-434 1647 Alol AIIO. 
MYKONOS. Agartmm for 4 . *S ri 
town. Dtred OfiMs. Sanoty Sl 
aoo Hobdays. 01 573 1933 . 
PAKOS. CAWS vr house 3 {toss 
sea Wtth Veens 2 - 5 . andj L 5 , 
X May on. TN 0606 30621 
■**»«*Uixury ant /notei irom 
£ 129 apjik TeL- Stoaona 0 TO 6 
962614 


£165 

0t-9488»0 ! 

MJBDtHUKBtMMtaE y 

abuses aso t 

1 6 KMBSL KflNKt TW BO 

M-W 998 flu mb 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


to nan pots ranceutKn lux vtt- 
B far 8-10 with awn port, avail 
29 Mu or 12 June for 2 wta at 
fe nonMt prtee. £i 60 per adidL 
£140 per rttod umo 16 yes me* 
day nt. Pat Stupo. Survstlas 
tOSS 3 ) 19900 . ATOL 517 t> 
ALCARVe ALTERNATTVC Vina 
HoRdayx of mebneiton for (he 
very lew Tet 01-491 0800. 73 
a James's Street. SWI 
ALSAKVE, CMVOEDtD List 
pnvaie vtOa sleep* 6/8 own 
pool maul nr beach A village. 
AM avau sips 2 * Ol -660 3874 


Airport. 

LLwynybraR, Liasdoven- 
20305 . Dyted 

COSTA BRAVA - 17 May. 7 
mgati. Top gnauty act*, rtou- 
live resort* £ 10 S p.p. ilpo 
nw>ls from Gaiwxki. Tel Al- 
lan Townsend. ACT VUm 
0804 394397 ABTA 
NMMWRtA COSTA BLANCA 5 
bed. 5 bed vina and I bed apart 
meal maQatur May onw a mg*. 
Pnvaie pm. Large garden and 
am terrace*. 0274 677990 
COSTA BLANCA Mortora vdla. 3 
D-brd. 2 bau>. balcony and sun- 

rrot nea ww*. From ciSOdw 

078887 635 . 

JAVEA. Lovely VQta. 3 bed. 2 
both- garden, own pool sweet 
water Beautiful view*, nm 
B« w Tel: 01660 1845 
MENORCA Beauttfuity ramred 
farmnouto. pool garden, maid. 
Sleeps 14 . avauaue Jane 23 
July 7 . £ 600 . 0*38 820153 . 
FLAP ID RAN US Sth ttcl accom 
rea oasts anting, pool tacuzzL 
bar No children. £126 pw 031 
226 7676 / 606 3406 rvn. 
■CAL SFABt, m BERM. Own 
to to. aa m. Ctwtow 
vltw*. walk*, gen. pool Fr 
£150 pw Ol -737 4829 
a ra n t-A U PN 5 mm sea. oew 
hanry house. 3 pod. s loon, m- 
j^teal QMage. shared pool 
harow Tel Bna ng ore 73719 
W A Wn iABarertrc New house. 

own pool from LISO. Brochure 
Tel: 01602 4563 «eve». 

MOUA. Apt an beach, yp* 4 . sun- 
UTBaweny ExceUeoi slruauoa. 
Poo l. Tennis. Tel! 01-880 381 1 
MRU. Lux. apt. 8 -pool. Ctose 
»«*. shops. Most dales From 
£66 P.w 0 * 25 - 872053 . 


RELAX 

la Wgh QuaRy 
Caantry Homes. 


3 day break* in the Engltsh 
Store* Oxford. The Cots- 
wotos. Warwick and 
Stratford efinr by Coif. 
Trool. Fishing. Riding avail 
aMe. Ttvoughout year £66 
p person. For deiaiK and 
brochure 
Tel 0327 40625 


IMMVRMIAL EXCKAMKS tor 

English children 12 18 years 
with French German Spanish 
(amities. Ages, interests and 
formne* maimed. Contact CON- 
TI MINT AL CONNECTIONS. 
Cranford. Church End. AJbiory. 
Ware. Hertfordshire Tele: i «7 
9741 641 

NORSE AND PONY HOUBAYS 

for a lun packed Junior Holiday 
m Hampshire Berkshire CaB 
Her Wield <0736831 308 tor tree 
colour brochure 


MEUDON 


HOTEL 

fiUMOUTILSNfmGOMWMi. 

1CUO33&2S0S4L TOBL4547S 


summer breaks 

fefTOcptoMMifrtoGpmwBi. 


*ow gtfna toadtog to pnmto 
eoeo- Ba ar nyem aartna and 
Bgawt- 

ntanitotf by ms bast nukias. 

ww* bj R im to tnSSZ 

You trow a 



COTSWOLDS 


EBB C BARN Spectacular view*, 
nr drencesler »ery core tort 
■Pte. fuuy eouipped. gallery 
oak beams, indoor gdb Bath 
unq 028 S 77 274 
WOT COTSWOLDS DeDghUul 
drt. cottage in beaudhil and in 
(•vesting area needy let ctps 5 
£851 25 TH 0463 2837 
COSY COTTASC sleeps 2 4 

small lake. fTv fishing available 
TH. 10453831 2053 

un mynsH cottas »ip* 

4 . Peaceful village Views -Linen. 
CTVx ti TH 103861 750570 


CPtswcdd stone 
cottage Sterns 4 Recently ten 
OVatett. egutpoed 0386681929 


DORSET, HANTS* & 
L0.W. 


WEEK-END BREAKS 


COUNTRY WAYS. AA three 
merit award hotel, halfway be- 
tween Bath a Weds Weekend 
(peaks. £29 per person per day 
Phone <07617 52449 


SPRING BREAKS 


A WEEKEND IN 
THE COUNTBY 


loxuas Cuvy Nnsa tote oo ne 

edge Of Exmoor 

Pftons taw tarettAy ptmaj m 
teMte w pmwiBE 
SbOOPw. FrsneyL (kapg 

.. phto urnKtir 

ttn* IM Cntoy Hook How 


i Devoo (B 76 S 5 ) 266 * 


SHANKLM DMECLVFE HOTEL 

Uc CH Cnauite rooms Choice 
ot menu TV m room car terry 
booked Terms from £15 par 
day 0983 806)99 
FRESHWATER RAY Superb 
bung In N T country with sea 
views. 3 bedrms. 2 bath) ne . CH 
Vac AuoSepi Oct 0732 822379 
NEAR SHERBORNE. OW Rectory 
•eil conLuinrd annex double 
bedsit TH 096321 465 


IRELAND 


LUXURY COTTASC -style home 
oiert Poking lakes in Wicklow 

Mis i Dublin 25 miles. June 
Sept mrl £160 pw Sips 4 5 
Bristol <02721 731347 lesetu 


INDULGE 

YOURSELF 


kio Oofl.Scpxnk wSJo brert i«rfae| 

dekgWul Con— okk. Hcbi (Q 4 S? 


25051 fat a colour tx Define 

Umtstir itatti 
uW'CowtnrcuA 

W t •oswswocxiHni-oiouusite 


RELAX M THE 
LAP OF LUXURY 
to h* Cotsoote Cantrv touso tote 
non Menem rfracresndeo rescc 
art uoefRnce wari pact tarh. 

)3 podes a 


teWTO JffHf for Cotroous S 
tetnSfyire • Sunmv bteaa pod- 


CALCOT MANOR 


Tat IWHW 355 / 2 Z 7 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


TICATRE WEEXEM JUaefilh 

™tOd Vto to Feydeau's Lil 
UF Hotel. Strindbergs Mm 

how Drum 0272-715098 


HRNCAWAY 5 BS. SHf-calermq 
hohdays in lyplcally Engbsh 
settings. Specialists m aU parts 
ol H'idsntre A in Hampshire. 
Oorsrt. Somerset. Exmoor A 
South Devon Dtscoier your 
Htdrenray rn our superb free 
brochure Hideaways. 4 Bridge 

Street. Satobury. Win*. SP 1 
_ 2 LX. TH. 107221 24868 iJ 4 tmu 
niMUIUI superior. ccnfraBy- 
tec- flat, ideal (or festival and 

C wealth Games. Mid-June If 
Sept Sleeps & 6 . TH.iOJI > 229 
6900 

LOVELY garden flat. Ganonbary. 
« amenities. 20 ram Oxford 
Circus, and CUy. wonderful 
hohday pase sleeps 4 oi 226 
6295 

tleoi tllal Eden valley adtacenl to 
Lakeland Luvury bungalow 

own armic grounds. Sips B- 9 
all to ns. T ( 1:0980 24465 . 
kT l WIIItm i 3 -a bedroom Oat 
m central arc® avau. July OcT 
tori. Festival a CCunrOanweallh 
Games Rum 1 031 > 228 1200 

"EAKPARK, uraooiH ifUaqe. list. 
M stone cottage, slretn five, 
real lire, dramatic views south 
facing garden Ql -794 45 io. 


MLLYSHANNON Co Donegal 
Georgian house centrally teat 
edronv bches goH fnluni- ShH 
8 -XO AD supplied 06623631 


CHANNEL BUNDS 


JCNSEY, LUXURY HOUSE CWm- 
tryside NW coast- swimming 
pom. steeps 6 car needed tool 
suitable lor vocmg ctulareti a 
PH*. Availa ble 26 July h> 9 Au- 
gua £700 au me 0634 8 * 100 . 


1STH CENTURY 

1 WWBHED DEVON L 0 M 6 H 0 USE 
BraiBM Grasse R fasso tammase 
n tat#y senuded trad Devon cet- 
«fe Lug fees, nk beams. A smaH 
fanri mm rwtbb of ad sons <ri- 
ckafs^i notsesj Almost BsetyOutfl 
iVCTeorawn or bomamiite (inciutf 
ffi on dotted mam*] Fuiy 
toaed AA fetal Heated pool 
hemmi landed m EUzabeto 

Simrtey-L "Slayng Off Tf* Beaten 
OB 8 B from £21 Ensuse 
mteblL Sony no sraoheis! 

tS 1 imtomtowSSp 

( 03837 ) 3 S 0 


HEART OF ENGLAND 


OCOfteiAN muiOUH Beauu 
tut irmr in Norm GotswoMk 
with original (natures and 
vtrnam 10 miles to SlrWOrd- 
On-Avon. supert pgstuon for 
focal amenities 4 bedroona. 2 
baths, an model n ameninm. Un 
ct> included Car needed Avail 
• toty A AuousI 0608 61658 

S. SMIOPMHU. larratTouieB&a 
4 Att»ted Also holiday cottage 


•fHvs 6 a <068821 2383 


. _ country caravan 

fonp toraiton al) lari hues 
WenM> 939 > 32786 


LAKE DISTRICT 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


ACnVTTY HOLIDAYS 


1 XARN TO IRRVT Hobday in 
►forth Waves C 250 
Lawns. £ 200 . 0248 6808 S 7 
TORUY FLY nsMNfl reurens. 
D«on Aisp ror train In hoh- 
d*vt. Ctalloion zfil 


-J 



Over Mn^Esa of the 
most affluent people to the 
conB&y read the dassffied 
CfltaBssrf The Taies. The 
fofiowing catefioiles appear 
regnfarfy every week, and 
a« SeBasBy accon^ R a ne d 
by refer** afiloral artktes. 

Use the oomiob (riebD. 
aid 6ad out how easy, fasi 
andecoBDBKd&Istoadver- 
fee ia The Hales Classified 


MONDAY Edootfim: Univer- 
sity Appomimenis. Prep. A Public 
Scfioot Appouilments, Educuional 


*■_ 5 *yO* P Ptn/ l —AY 
? c Sl«1»5 2 8 person*. 
L* revUursnt. O4ome rooMnol 
C»om 3 miles Cniorm. pet, 
WHcotte £J3 to £30 wrokS^ 
Brochwe >06261 8«6276 

YNUNLS 8 TONE. S. DEVON. 6 n- 
Phtot arram Magrai sduatron 

"S S’’*'' •* to" w surf- 

'jyj Tffgy* "* «wy roenfort 
5 s 3 £ 5 ^ oowanto. TH: 

T **J-*K* : Ashburton. 
P* * to* Slhl fc 6 BtouWlU 
tornwraatn* Serhided. not iso- 
lator Td 0564 52520 

“SSJje B»»*»ow 

"toWtoU^ near sea. beadies 

«SfS^ 4tcw Td: 

thatched arm- 
"Me. bcauniuK), lumtstea. 4 
Wr« A« boroe nrar town H 
IbdniOutB. Pho ne 08847 327 

Cottars man May 
£754146 pw Tet098064ZS6 


I Collages of Unusual 
& ExQtdAe Character 

Ptecrtrt bamirt n the tot ol 
tounrysafe. Superbly amped, 
tony contained mm oW mhV 
ebartt. Abo one button ctaoM. 
Lovnrtr tond S cared (or by 
John Hid Nancy Jotfl. 

Tremwn 6 reca 

Low. Cttimen. 


Tet (0503) 20333 


200 yr old 


ronierted gcanary dps 46 of 
W_ 091 281 7073 


brochure 

. *2« «2L 867 2 ° K ' «ta«i 

SHI Catortng cw 
woes. Farmhouse* etc Grey 
<094615773 

"IT ■UnWCM On WhuMrm. 


WmBl on Wbiwrisere 
f 11 * "bub try rotiaoe- *« 57 d 
Iv. an sraniun 04488 Jtn^ 


EAST ANGLIA 


RR BANTHAM Sdf-CONdnM 
J*******' fif* with polio Sips 
V ar May 117 , June 
ffi-July 5 . JWy 12-19 JidyS 

eSv* faifUU 0 " 1 0(1 front 

£120 pw Tel: 0648-560443 


**YOLK 3 trad bungalow no 

3 + Dld-u-nD. Olbel 

^UTnwua large cup I0QRI QK 
“to _ ' v Cutstarts Hauey 




OWN BEACH. Boats nun 
JjKe comfort, now sqm a i 
ton«S H 7^ ^ a, 

SToSj'wroS ° wn 


Tn - 

touofimv con 


°»* 860239 


W.rtU/«i l vSS?® tf 4 < 'SS 

Mat- June aST 

CootiBBed M 27 


SSKsass sssssasa 


S- DEVON COAST. Stekjao Nr 

anoBREs-* 


SSS™ saa&' 

TUESDAy Canwcer Hflrt 2 aat C^nWf.Overseas.Remak. Selling propeny.fenchisB, 

Lic^MM CtopaerilrtHBS: egapnieni etc. 10 small art fen* 

iWURSDAy General Appffie- conipanrasorbusinessfs. 

ante OneiE kwiBj vea, Managing 

ftirotots. Directors. Sales and SATURDAV On™ tw^ 

MdiietmgExeciinvesand Overseas Holic&ys abroad 


a comine>KiGHve guide to the 

computer market 

Ugwl A DUhtonte ScMctoS. 
Lonunercial Lawyers, Legal 
OfTicers, Pirvalt & Public practice 
Let* Lb Crbae; 


^ COLUMN APPEARS EVERYDAY: ^ ^ new classification for 

AWNOUNtaiENTSCAN APPEAR WITHIN 24 HfMIgg ■ J^ungreadeistocofilact people with 

snrahrinteiBstsathonicandovenEss. 


^wll Prior lo flappcanng. 

Raics an Lineage £i per line fmfn 1 ^"“^^daiaofinscnion 

«nd Ba ^Ctaa4 S0 c WB ^«J^ i ^M smglc 

oow MwroGs. c™, 
^ AlhOTisaB «« Dw- 


NaME 
ADDRESS 



TELEPHONE (Dfljtimr) 

ACCESSOR VKA 



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ENTERTAINMENTS 




I t— jfjr iH B M Wmat W m— Smeau k,j»- i 1 s: so* ■ 
CZ Cl M} .41'. CVHtBS SOLO) Ja"« Oir 

Royal Festival Hall Fridav 16 Mav ai 7.3i»pm 

BEETHOVEN 

PIANO CONCERTO CYCLE 

Directed from the Kiev board 
FINAL CONCERT 
Concertos No's 3 and 5 (‘Emperor') 

MARTINO TEREV10 

Director Soloist 

DRESDEN PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

breathtaking rapport bet wen Soloist and Orchestra " 
(Dresden Union! 

U.ps.ts.XIfl Hjnm-o. ■i'»l 


VICTOR ROCHHALSER mtcmi at the ROVAL FE5TU.X L HALL 

SUNDAY ISth MAY at 7.30 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

Rrf'i :r«n ’Slcepne Stior> Sui:c fn*oi 'Sa an Lite'. 

Paai'Cvixerto No I. NaKm.-lcer iuiic 

OVERTURE 1812 WITH CANNON AND 
MORTAR EFFECTS 

SEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA VJLEMTACSKY.nnJuc-or 
Sofaw: INTO.-O PEEBLES HAND W THE COLDSTREA M UVARDS 

UAP.14 t7 L«.»4 Vi £1,1 «,» :'ipdi KjII’O MU w> -mv 


VICTOR H OCHH-XUSER prctcuta at ffie ROYAL FESTIVAL HAI I 

IB MMlHarlMI llhh ilk# VCO 


__ muiuuu UK.VI uimeii.ijnc 

RLM5RT-KORSAKOV Cipniuo Ea^utol WALDTEUFEL Esnxu 
FAUA Lt Vida Breve KHACHATURIAN ParceetfihcGa.tanw 
&QP 1 S parta cu* | u mII » Flamenco and other daircci from Spain. 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CwiJuvlor DAVID COLEMAN 
Flacstno) Solom: TERESA MORENO Smjw VALERlVNOROCCV 
Gnim; PEDRO ROMERO DANZA ESPANOL(1N FULL COSTUME) 
fS.ifi.W. i~ <tf. L* 59. (t Hi iiom Hall 3111 'IJSSSiW 


V ICWB HOTHH At .NER present- at THE ROVAL FESTIV AL HALL 
MONDAY" ZULU MAY at 7.30 

GRAND OPERA 
NIGHT 

Procnuniur mriu** ROSSINI Orrrtmv William Tell. VERDI Chnni-rf 
tltt Hebr™ Male- Irom N jbiICCu brand Clioni.- from Alda Anvil Clinnj* 
froro II TitAuli-rv. BIZET ■xjii< irnm i. jrmvn: MASCAGNI InternurKo frr.rn 
CavallrnaRiL-Hijra MEYERBEER I'nroiution Maivh IromL Prophete; 

ARIAS A CHURI SES from La Bufarme. Gianni .S;hifrhi. Magic Hun*. 

L'Eli ir d imnit . Mudam Buiivrfli and Lu Travuta 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conductor GRAHAM NASH 
Soprano. MARILYN HILL SMITH Tenor \ ERNON M1DGLEY 
Fan Tar r Trumpeter*. Iri>h Gnards John Bale Choir 
to 911 . J.4 50 10 oil. 1 7 nil. i- .Ml. i» 50. l In .it) from Hall 

M.* 1 tipi 3j->Hiiii 


L^jaac«aiFAi:^>:»:TT 


TOMORROW ai 7.15 pan. 

ENGUSH STRING ORCHESTRA 

Conductor WILLIAM HOUGHTON 
Ham SUSAN DRAKE 

JOHN Ja™«* Suite for strings ( 1 877) 

luGH/W Rodney Bennett Music for Strings 
Mgjwtww Debussy Danse Sacree et Danse Profane 
Strauss Aleramorphosen 

£2.30. £3.30. £4.M. £550. £ft 30 Bor uflkc ill Afi 510] CC 01-928 SUO 
John Hlghnm buomdonal Aniu Limited 


TUESDAY NEXT U MAY m 7M pm 

KINUKO SHIRANE 

.. . Koto recital -In aid of Sadler's Wells 

«•“ JhP««e Emta-> ™d Jtan Fwodufon 

Nobuko Ixnai viola Yoshifcazu Iwamoto shakuhachi 

T m d Wmw al fr iMorfr ™ koto mime from the HiM&JIth Centime* 
Progtamine mdiaic. Tim performances <n 
Hirose Duo lor Kmo A Viofa. NagmawaBrtsfrua oo Krofca for Kino 
_ for fall details plenr ux J**nd 

ZipoiBorTd by ljmaichi hmiu flodal ifcoropc) Lxd 


Uidccil Concerts Co. prsems 

THURSDAY NEXT 15 MAY at 7.45 pm 

CRAIG SHEPPARD piano 

Chopin: Allegro de concert. Op. 46 
_ ^ Scriabin: Twenty- four Preludes, On. II 
Beethoven: Sonata in B flat, Op. 106 (‘Hammerklavier’) 

£2, £3. £4, £$,£(, inan Hall Pl-vat J|V| CL. 01-99 $800 


FRIDAY NEXT 1. MAY n 7AS p.m. 

LONDON BACH ORCHESTRA 

Directon NICHOLAS KRAEMER 

CORELLI: Cooceno Gnmo m F. Op ft No. IJ 
HACtt Braihlenhurg Lonamci Xu Mn Bilat. B3TV. |0X| 
'•VjanCttnsio in B llu. Op. 7 No. 6 
Ijoiwio lor l»o hum. in t till 
HAYDN: Symphony No 49 m F mmor. La Ibumne’ 
Spotoorcd by Guhmu Peal Group pic. 



fit] St John's 

Smith Square 




oof no ; 

a JwwCrav 

toOti ZTN^.^oiilua STa «,F 


fifttWlrlil 





ROYAL ALBERT HALL SUNDAY 18 MAY at 7 JO 

A HISTORIC CONCERT 

75 YEARS TO THE DAY THAT GUSTAV MAHLER DIED 

Mahlers Symphony No. 2 

‘Resurrection* 

OvOuoor. 

GILBERT KAPLAN 

London Symphony Orchestra 

London Vmphonv tboru* A Pro Mnaica ChonH of London 

Soprano: JILL GOMEZ Mezz»->oprano: SARAH WALKER 

£! I. i«.£7. Li. l> Be* OiGrr 01 -Wv (UI2 C£L 01 NN -Mo5 
andatoa 

QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 145 - 530 pm 

.AiJcmu nc 6or rondel haUentaic«m( pMsimu. RJCHJ 
Pie-Canueit Sympouum. 

MAHLER: The Man, The Music 
and The Message 

See QEH pad far (unhtrdraiB"^ 


KK.UOREHALL THURSDAY E MAV m UW 

An(rfo- Austrian Music Society FINAL AUDITION 

1986 RICHARD TAUBER 
||P RIZE for singers 

Twd Bumn. Gim and PuMk Rtdal In L— daq 

Vt mr ri n Bnbnw. Judcc Chue. CUn Dadd*. 
Andrr* tirmaa. Rrtm l.r— w. Slawa Kna.Iyi.V „ Oa|av 
Map* Sb* Prior, imrd Olio. Arm. Rxm|. Mat TinkWr. 
Taien £1 non W*m*r Hdl.UMn 2141 .ad 
Ao£o-. i WMran ,«oa»: 5cucr)i4o>Ja«3i Am>U*K.5WI 


WIG MORE HAUL 
Thursday 5 June at 7.93 pm 
Firsi London appearance lor 2$ rears of the great pianist 

MIECZYSLAW 

HORSZOWSKI 

Eighbeth Anniversary Concert 
"One of the wortdN wonders" Ses It** Irma 

'A nmMcr of MrcBiiy. wisdmn and gracr of ptanbdc 
colour and loanl nd n m ip hosudleM *| l "l lt rT > 
tBLir+ut rim 

JS Bade Two Preludes and Fumes: Mua rn FonusB m D minor 
K 3*7; Bmbtuaui Sonaa Up. 2> Toiori', DdHKy: Op Idler's 
Coma; Chopin; Fntomnc Op. 40 No. i lmpraatpta Up. 36; 
BidrraOp. 1° 

£1. £5. i,L £3fn«> Bn* sJlfici 6 Uwfe i^atai-aVS !I4( 



ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


^pii i w The Angle* Ausman Mode Society ptrscdD 

■ SgJ TONIGHT at 7.30 

A NIGHT IN VIENNA 

JOHANN STRAUSS JOSEF STRAUSS 
FRITZ KRE1SLER 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Cosduaor/Solo Violin: ERICH BINDER 

Leader — Vienna Philharmonic, Conductor — 
Vienna Stale Opera. F ir st London Appearance 

tVLtVfctssaie.su. £7 so tisa.fvsatui.Gi-oTs -,iui c.c M-ehimmi 


PPHILHARMONIA 
Q ORCHESTRA 

Principal Conductor Giuseppe Sinopoli 
APRES L’APRES-MEDI 

conducted by 

SIMON RATTLE 

Royal Fetaval HaS 

TOMORROW at 730 

ANN MURRAY 

Ravti L*E«etnaiI de Jeanne 
Satie Parade 

Du pare: Songs with Orchestra 
Debussy: Le Martyre de Saint- Scbastkn 
Kocchllxs Les Bandar-Log 
Ravel: La Valse . 

Thursday 15 May at 730 

A few seats sdB aiadabie 
For decnb see Sowfa Bank pmd 

Queen Elizabeth Hall 
Saturday Next 17 May at 745 

PETER DONOHOE 

Debussy: La Bcfite a joujoux 
Messiaen: Oiseaux Esxiques 
Boulez Edat 
Ravel: Ma Mere l’Oye 
TKkrts. £l.£S.£a.V).£« 

Royal Fcsdvad Hall 

Monday 19 May at 730 

ELISABETH SODERSTROM 
PHELHARMONIA CHORUS 

Poulenc La Vqix Humaine 
Messiaen: Hi E x s p e o o Resurrectionem Morruorum 
Ravel: Daphnis a Chloe (compleie) 

SPONSORED BY CHANEL 


Thursday 22 May an 730 

GIUSEPPE SINOPOLI 
BARRY TUCKWELL 

Haydn: Symphony No. 102 
Strauss Horn Cooceno No. I 
Strauss: Also Spracfa Zarathisna 

SPONSORED BY THE CONDE N AST 
PUBLICATIONS LIMITED 

Tfcta* £S.£175. £47S.£6.£73. £HVl (Q W./II 
AvnUbic bun HmI tin jjjs MU ; CC M AKU . & qnrn 


ROYAL PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY 

PUm Her Majeuy the Qocen A 

Les Grand Maitres Francois 

Fhnl Concert of Seaton (jjw) 

Wcdwxiay Next 14 May at 7J0pm 

SAINT-SAENS ORGAN SYMPHONY 

Centenary Performance 

CommMisoed t* the ROYAL PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY n 1SIM> 
See RFH Prod for fall dtsuh 


WEDNESDAY 21 MAY ai 7 JO pan. 

LONDON MOZART PLAYERS 
Conduaor: JANE GLOVER 

# MENDELSSOHN Ottrnnr, The H A'nto 

SCHUMANNi nMaCaucawnAiunar 

PROKOFIEV: S yuu4mm " 1 The QawaT 

MOZART: Symphony No. 38 n D Tbc Pr*gj*V KJ04 

JOHN KJLL piano f^r\ 


A Britub PttruUun ! 

13.50. £4.50. £«, £7.£B,£9 Hd 01 -l 


HAROLD HOLT LIMITED presents 
FRIDAY 23 MAY at 730 pm 

MURRAY PERAHIA 

BEETHOVEN: Suihu m E flw. Op. 31 No. 3 
BERG: Sonata On. I 

gMSfwtj SCHUMANN: Sonata m G moor, Op. 3 

flpigJHjKfc. CHOPIN: 3 I mp rony u a; Ranaaic-In^roinpt u 
CtfP* mC*hatp oanof , Op. t/R Balbde No.3iaALUt 

£3. £4- W, £6 50. £850, £10 HM lOI-OT 3191; CCiOI-WB WOO) 



TUESDAY 27 MAY at 730 pm 
Harrison/Parrott Ltd presents 

The Academy of Ancient Music 

The Academy of Ancient Music Choir 

MOZART 

Clarinet Concerto K622 Requiem K626 

Antony Pay basset clarinet 
. Anne Dawson soprano 
Carolyn Wadrinson mezzo-soprano 
Laurence Dak: tenor David Thomas bass 

CHRISTOPHER HOGWOOD conductor 

Trdw s £3J0 1J C450,£5J0 1J C7.50, 1 C950 i niJO Pl'l'll Vi 
B« Office 0 1 -9S JI9l.crediitanfa01.928 8B0a i ■ I»l l l 

Sponsored try B & W Loudspeakers Limited 


THURSDAY 29 .MAY « 7 JO pan. 

@ THE BACH CHOIR 

PSALMUS HUNGARICUS Kodaly 
PIANO CONCERTO 

in D minor, K466 Mozart 
SPRING SYMPHONY Britten 

PATREZIA KWELLA wfiumo PENELOPE WALKER canalia 
IAN PARTRIDGE tenor Cbortaen of Sc PauTa Csdi^al 

RAFAEL OROZCO piano @1 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Wt H 

SIR DAVID WILLCOCKS conducto?*^ 

£270.£l.£5-50,£7.J J lfc£a FU0IA3 ]|9| CC. OI-9C8SWB 
SpaoMred by Udlncr 




VKHJN CONCERTO 

SY.VtPHONY NOJ(EROtCA) 

.. LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
imImot URS SCHNEIDER LELAND CHEN nota 
fcl <9. It 50. £5 W. £7.f JS 50. £9 *0. £10 W Hdl 014» 3191 C . C 01-42(1 tfWfl 


RAYMOND GUBBAY prevents SUNDAY I JUNE m 7 JO pm 

TCHAIKOVSKY-RACHMANINOV- 
MUSSORGSKY -RAVEL 

TdtatovH FANTASY-OV, ROMEO AND ILUHT 


VhHMrpAy'Rml . . PH7TURES FROM AN EXHTBriTON 

K * vt * - BOLERO 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

i^mhuor JAMES JUDD OdSTTNA ORTEj*** 

LK £S Oh £1 36, £8.50, £930, £10-50 HaD 01-928 3191 C.C. 01-923 SMN 


HSS BARBICAN HALL 

rnmUn Barbican Centre, Silk St . EC2V SDS 
01-638 &831 / 625 8795 
Telephone Bookings: 10am-8pm 7 days a 


rC .tag: r7n#n vjf C O/ I^r CtVpc.* c 








¥ ~ . Ai '' Vi A.' 




■ 41 i ‘;»m l A f ■ 




p,.4 


pip s 


ISO 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA Barbican 


Tonight 10 May 7.45 pm 

H3A HAENDEL viol in 

WEBER Overture *Qbejcfi' 

MENDELSSOHN VwHn Concerto 

ELGAR The Music Makers 

FELICITY PALMER me//o-v.<prano 
LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS 

RICHA RD HICKOX c onductor 

Thursday 22 May 145 jhu 
the return of the Leeds Imcmaifonai 
PianoCorapetilion prizewinner 

JUHEESUH 

BORODIN Overttnr'PrincelpM'' 

TCHAIKOVSKY Piaiio Concerto No I 

RACHMANINOV Symphony No 2 

YOEL LEVI conductor 
Sponsored by Rank Xerox 

Sunday 25 May 130pm 

BARRYTUCKWELL 

conductor bom 

DVORA K Overture “Carnival' 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No4 

BARBER. Adagio for Strings 

MOZART Horn Concerto No 3 

FALLA.... Suite No 2 from the “Three Cornered Hat' 
OLIVIER GARDON piano 


Seat Prices £1050. £8.50. £7.50, £6. £430.13.50 
Box Office TeL 10-8 every day inc. Sun W-6 38 8891 «S 8^5 


Thursday 29 May 7.15 pm Barbican Hall 

SIMON R ATTLE 

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 
JOHN LILL piano 

HAYDN S\ m phony No 70 mJ3 

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No I 

BARTOK - Conceno for OreheMra 

Seal Prices £9.50. £8.50. £7.50. £6. £4 50. £3 
Box Office Tel. 10-8 everyday inc. SunOI-bW 8891. '628 W<« 


BARBICAN HALL TUESDAY 20 MAY AT 7.45 

COLINCARR FRANCES^KELLY 

WAGNER Siegfried idyll 
SCHUMANN CeBe concerto in A mmor 
COWIE Harp concer to flat London performance) 
PROKOFIEV Classical symphony 

RICHARD HICKOX 

conductor 

NORTHERN SINFONIA 

Tickets C50. £330. £4.50 £530 £050 £730 from Barbicn tox office 
Ptwoe booLima IQwn - gptn (wc. Sma-fc 01-638 8891 or 01-628 8795 



FesHvalOpera 

wfafaihe 

London Philharmonic Orchestra 
27 May-15 August J986 
So me s eat s availab le for 

ALBERT HERRING 

27, 29 May 

and some June performances 

Simon Boconcpa, LTocoronazione efi Ppppea, 
Pngy aid Bess. Don Giovanoi 

li! Performances Sold Out 
Box Office 

Open 10BB-5piii Monday to ftiday rail] 23 Moy^ho 34 A y> Mav 
riwievwyrfuy from 27 May 

^^ C |^^^ 1 ^^ SlSOS5 “ BN8 ^ 


WESTMINSTER 
CENTRAL HALL 

Tickets ' fronr -HCKT f MA^TLK O t - 3 7 9 . ^, 3 , . , 


Alvo BehrarMri Boom*. lUhlbmong. CootogfirL^ 


MONDAY 9 JUNE 730 pm 

HANOVER BAND 

Artati: Dnector. CAROLINE BROWN 
. Director from the nabffi MONICA BU GGETT 
• poena 

BEETHOVEN 

on period ntwmueutb 
Or.-Th* Cmatuc^ at Fraaethcu, . 

ftanoConoeno No. 3 
Symphow No. a ('Ihstonl') 

TICKETS £S,£7, £830 ' 


RwytehoaeaBij 1SW 

f«nj47 'A Wa» 73) ynSlManf- 
C8Sor*e Parish Cisi rcfi 
BKQM7 vioim coacenro « 
6 ayw: Percr Shewad 
HUTISf (RUKM HASS solcas; 
Saab Vfcneo Mjy SteWs. Ao- 
ensii MuMjanwtf . hvctiapl 
Pence 

Cwsrof S!Mav , rt»re- Roy* 
Academy tfi Mine CwmSer 
Omunna 

ranrlrmr iOHH UJ880CK 

Twists 15 from 74 1 0404 or at 

Has tftMW • 


OPERA A BALLET 



JUinr or 836 3878 CC 17*> 
&M CC Sfti 603 Crou» !Xj*m 

830 39 wa Nr 11 «Mi 

TOM HULCE 
THE NORMAL ^ EART 

*• eteem Wxmli iH KvmH* Lstn 
"MMWKWTmiinri. 
wnwc nwar OF 

HMMTKWHL‘ S.C«P 
Pmi rmw 1 cr-v f,wi Writ. 
Tl-crv 4 % K nun 4 50 lOprm 
20 Mav Tumi 







WIFE BEGINS AT FORTY 

a nrngmim mm*** (tookuia 

aireonn Jupc ivia 


A FOUO TMCATRC. Shaunmirv 
At. W tons 3398. ri txi 
CM Ol 7*0 7300 Orp SJln 01 
930 0133. tiri Hpm. Vil Xtns 

alberVfinney 







BOOMNCS TO IWIIlT* 


MTCMI U THCATRK Bax Oft mfa 
CC A Grown 01 734 4287. 01 
437 8773. 

BEST MUSICAL w*s 

The Timm 

LENNON 

A twnmon of ihn uir> and mouc 
a i Jann L mi non 

"i was ue took cmnmc 

WITH CVERTOHC OK AT THE 
END" 

Arunumul MM Sun ol 4 0 Etw 
Tun to S * I 8 a IWals bai 8 3un 



ACROSS FROM THE 
GARDEN OF .ALLAH 

by aumu wood 
ntmwd by ROM Daniels 
Exqx Man-Fn 8.0 bat 5 30 A 4 30 


CUTTKSLOe *S' sea 3TS2 CC 
■ Nauonal Theatre 1 * small Audi 
bnumi. Today 2 30 A '7 SO. 
Mon 3 Tu» 7.30. IIhu Map 20 
A 21 FUTURISTS ay Dusty 
Huqttn 


DOMINION THCA7IK Box OKim 
Ol 980 HHA5 Ol Uo 8938 ■ 9 or 
Ol 580 89*2 ' 3 FIRST CAU. 
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DAVE CLARK'* 


CLIFF RICHARD 

__ *b THE ROCK STAR- 
THE PORTA AVAL OF 'AKASH' 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon-Fn 7 SO Thu Ma 2 30 yji 5 

SOjy SKATS tAL AVAILABLE 

ran todays kafomhancc. 


5"“T LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

2*5* .'.rilOR- 01-240 9060 7 
BS 1 _r_ aU hour 7tUv cc 
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. «A2ND s tre et 

* *»» FOR ALL THE FAMILY 
Wtauw rfantc M 
BMul Awanb tme ISM 

t«ee 

BE5T MUSICAL 

STAMDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

lOHtl 

„ best musical _ 

WWKt OUVKR AWARD 

«w 

BKT MUSICAL 

. . PLAT S * PLAT ERS _ 
WWW THEATRE acmes 

r _ award 

Eiqs a O Mats Kid 4 o 4M 5 0 A 
R.3CI 

Graun sain 950 

NOW BOOKING UNTTL 
' 'JAN 1987 

Part* Rata AvaftaMa 


































« 


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* 

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1 

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enttertainments 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


MAKAGKMSKTt^^. 

WlfcKNATIONAL LUNCHTIME 
CONCERTS 

a «* BARB^can . w« laeafajs 

— S * 1 ?. mmn beeiSS ST gS” 

barbican ' ~ ... ' ■ — — 

METOELsaomTdSS’a- 

•aSSSr 

iJSSS^L 


RAYMOND GUBBAY ^^ 

ar the BARBICAN 

SUNDAY IS MAY vt 7 J 4 pm 

METOaSSOHN-HANDEL- 

RACHMANINOV-DVORAK 

Mrn| f [| i'*l"' THE HEBRIDES 



HauM . 


CHNG AL-S CAVQ 


&•&.£?. &3Q.&Sb£lttM 


SATURDAY M A BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY 26 MAY _ 

PESERVATTON HALL 
JAZZ BAND 



**! 


Tt " ?*^- l,yp y far y ft R«n 

^ Percy ITnnmtm y iiiiiulu 

^cSKStedSEstt. 

£A£bNl, J £aS 0 li £ 1 Ojo 

Sponsore d by American Exprew Ltd. 

SUNDAY 25 MAY at 1 pun. 

teddy bears* concert 

dEs.tsJ'Ss 

UWDONCONCERTdS^r^ 
Conductor; FRASER GOUiXHNG 
«TUi spctui fcuca fsooacr IAN LAVENDER 

SATURDAY M JUNE at 8 pm 

OPERA GALA NIGHT 

Pwrnc. RoritacTbe Barter of Scvfflc O*. md Lam. Ai 
FaO CTtim Gou nntl: Faun Sakhtn 1 Qn» uxi An ttZprCL 


< MK «st istz. cc sn eua. 

rtnt Can 24 Or 7 Day CC 240 
7200 . can SAX* WQ 6125 . Eves 
a. Mtt WM A Sal 4 

■ * n ^ t ^y%2gLf tae ** 

OtNS LAWSON 
JAM FRANCO 
HMMA HOLOATC 
WWMMM 

"HOARKXJSLY OVER 
_ THE TOp-t 3 tt> 

tr ntZ AWHE HCE COfWCAlMEP 
DP THROAT PAWS FROM 
nu ta PH B TOO amicir* Ttaby 

^Bp-atorhri w y»te , Vlhln 

IDw lwv» MMi « ft wap t* 

•*T fta-F*\S.Tifn«. 

A cmway by Ken Li 4 nta 
Directed by Dm at GUmm. 


■Hfnw 722 «X» Etff 
awn-Sai Hvs 4 . 30 . HU SMS 
jtnr. -hv_ w fl witt nTW 

f*«WW- BOA COOPT D MR 

-«CS 

s&rcr,; ^*32 

p^^on^asRDTOMAT$r 


HAYMAAKXT THEATRE ROYAL 

84 * Office Arc Of -950 983 ? FMf 
GUI an Hr 7 aay <x tnuMap 
Ol 240 7200 

PETER 0T00L£ ■ 

• WHl 


DAVtO KBfO 

m oat* urnat 

PAUL MMEH 


DAVID WALLER 

and 


WJ22£$£& T 

£vga 7-30 Mac SM 2 30 
_ MUST OB HAY 17 
Obmm b|m &+ 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 
& TIMOTHY DALTON 

to a Shakespeare season of 

SHREW 

fa* Re p ertoire. 


ftiUJUJAI MAY JU iy»0 27 

PERSONAL RENTALS 







Ne»}« Oone»v Hum Vb, D-AmTSuSfcnS^Uee 
Don, La Botanic Ah t 2 . 

UWDON CONCERT ORCSESnu 
miunetb^^SJ 

DONALD MAXWELL hmt . .» LONDON CBOSAY snmn 
THE SCOTS GUARDS 
G.£«,c.qisa,psa,£Ki.9 
MOm« 16 JUNE ai 7 A 5 pm 
A Piano Recital by 

IVO POGORELICH 

FUR ELBE 

... >^OSONAn NOL 27 W E MINOR 
ENGLISH SUITE IN G MINOR 

Cb "» ,ta SONATA IN BME^ORSF 

D&. £10, £12Je.0S 

m raralkw irt ib Aggie sraaArttaa ini C teaghtaArr H i- 

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY 

Piano/Direcmr 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA - 
WEDNESDAY M JUNE at 7 A$ pa 

.. mVBRTMlBm INn tw 

PIANO CONCERTO fSJUA 

. SYMPHONY NO 41 (jUPfTERj 

SATURDAYS JUNE h 8 pm 

.. numI • • MEttMORPHOSEN 

JNn - PIANO CONCERTDXA 53 — 

D * mk - ..SERENADE 

£ 750 ,^ 0 X 0 . £HSo.^|S 

fa«aiiwihwlU >an>kwiCax«adteH MYftpHHaJ. 

Box Office 101-628 8795 ) OedeCenY C 01 - 638 8891 ) 

k> URKolHm Court Raid, London W 1 oc pfaaae 02-3872082 


© 


BARBICAN WEDNESDAY 21 MAY ac 7 .« pm. 

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

GALA CONCERT 

fepMcwlwiyrfMiafc ftcIwM " 

Sir Regnsdd GfwdalT , Mamriee Hsadlanl coodaaors 
SUptoei W^UfiK* ertto. A&enri Stria* Q**rtrT^ 

Royal Academy of Muiic Cbonn. Inuodaedby CUn Btcnm 

■ . ... Ac ndwnfc Ferial Owrpta 


ReNMAJCSTYS. HaymarhM 
500 4026/0606 2 oS 25 iSS. 
CC TKMtnuoter 379 6131 
rv« cam cc 240 7200 

''H^SE UETmlSS " 
THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Open* 9 oa. 

Lowpow Par.umwitt 437 7373, 
437 2065. CC 734 8961. 379 
64»,?41 9999. First CaB M W 

7 °* y 00 222 IBS. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 

oamrrol^mumAY 

(XOROC HEARN & DCME 
QLiaLEY 

U CAGE AUX FOUES 

A LOVE STORY YOU'LL LAUtM 
ABOUT FOR A LIFE TIME 

BREATHTAKINGLY 
LAVISH The Tmt» 

A GLORIOUS CELEBRATION... 

_ A . PUL L- THROTTLE 
ENTERTAINMENT, d MaR 
Mon-Sal 7 -SCt Mata Wed 3 Sat 


vqom or your in 

■Tom itittt June w«d Mat uo 
SKWfi 8 D 0 

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Sat Mats 4 . 0 . 

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ANGRY HOUSEWIVES 

From 13 May I wfi t.Hi The- 


Lmc THEATRE Shadobory 
Ave W| 01-437 5686/7 01-434 
1680 -, 01-454 106 a 01-734 

Si M/ 7 . Red Pncr Piws. from 
•Rate A OPem Tone II at T.CL 
_ COUN HAMEL V IB 
The National T 7 Matra-s ardaltncd 
• pradoctlon M 
ALAN AYCSUOURirs 
Award Whoiq Comedy 

A CHORUS OF 

IB) pad Sals 5 U Advance Book- 
iB^t Period Now Open Jmr A - 
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612 3 .I 8 MT C ALL 24 HM 7 DAY 

ccma Z£?!5Z£!i? l J2? n09 

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LmiLTM y 92 a 22 fiC oc 
- -{National Theatre's prosten im i 
MaBp-.Tndar 2.18 (tow glee 

wS^brV “rfiaas&H-g 

- Shaw. Previews May 16 to 26 . 
gensjgtg^heoMayaa* 

JRAYT AIR 8 CC 629 3056/741 
9999 24 Hr 7 dy CC 240 7200 , 
MBB-Tha 8 Fri/Saf Eaa 8 ,ia 

_ RICHARD TODD 

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THE BUSINESS OF 
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Thewt Oriw to ttdwrd Hams 
"TW kata ttrOtar hr pori 

S Mir. -a» unanstted wmner*S 
Do- “A ttnOer mi achieves II 
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PALACE THEATRE 437 6654 
CC -*37 8577 or 379 6455 
„ 06 Un UO 6125 
THE MUTUAL M 9 MAHOH 

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£tn. 7 .» Mats TM A Sal 230 
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PHOONX 036 2284 rc 240 9661 
Ml 9999241 c 7 Day rr 240 7200 
Era 8 MM Thu 3 Sat B A 820 

BEST MUSICAL OF IMS 

Sudani Drama Awards 

MARTIN SHAW 

As EMS Presley 

“JUST AMAZMD THE PCRPOR.- 
MAMCE IS A LAMMHARK- D EX 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT? 

. Etr ALAN ■ ULAMALE 

Chmpatty hoMay May 12 - 26 . 

HTfiSMIY THEATRE 437 

4606 . 734 9636 OnM Card 
Hemres 579 6668. 741 9999 Cm 

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Eves SO Mata Wed 3 A Sal 5 
New booKiae period now open to 
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734 8961 First C 4 H 24 Hr 7 Days 
cc BoohOB 836 3464 cm Sales 
950 6125 

Mon-Sat 8 - Mai Thun A Sal 300 

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Open* 14 May si 7 pm 

RZ 9 PHfCC PREVEW TOMtQKT. 

PRINCE OF WALES 01-930 8681 
2 CC Houme 930 0644 /S /6 Grp 
Sales 930 6123 Kvim Prewse 
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All classified advenoonenu 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MMOLE HOUSE USHOOI, an Sal 
24 in Mm-andan 8 «vi 35 m May 
Ihere will ae a reunmn Stdtri 

LiDKh at the SehMl in ertebra- 

oon a! I he ootn anniversary. 
Tri, 1 0 500 l A 2 I 04 
WHd m iPinS InMrnuiin an 
Stater Cownrr or Mary Franm 
Cbwper Hyde tow. 
»* 6 856 « Repty w BOX F 9 B. 
DUNES. To ear doom cltoCMate 
bars. Darth Latter. pa\ and 
Tonga <71 HEDGEHOG. 
CERVDdA Week 6 86 . Mirtiart. 
Ptew romari n> Ui Cmenha- 
oen Recti m BOX' CSJ 
8 CARBWAV 1 AM PAINTER HKMB 
ronlacl are na tarn An Drsler. 
Moiling, m London. BOX C 69 . 
THE ALEXANDER INS T ITUT E |fr 
Baideriou St . Loo aoa Ml. Tel 
Ol 629 6183 . 


co; 


ANTIQUES £ 
LLECT/ 


fABLES 



fVdude D Ueheamd from 'TVteB* mad 

Sponsored by the Tranoea Savingi Bank Grom 

L. 5 . tr- 50 , J £fi 50 . J £IO.W. £li» Bn Office 01-«28 8795 GCOl 




1-4088891 

SPITALFIELDS FESTIVAL 

3 mmc Doctar MCUARD HKJGOX 
WEDNESDAY 28 MAY IAS pm . 

DAVID MUNROW 
Tenth Anniversary 

PWccll, miliiBn Wo, G*£a Crotac. PHer Dictawon. 
PhrodLJalm Bfaw 

Anuo acbde JAMES J8DWMAN. CHARLES BRETT 
THURSDAY 29 MAY 7*5 pen 

CARL MIKAEL BELLMANN 

Rtti -Stapcr btaa the Apr of Fnedev 
SbkLMbl Sacdcn IXWW 
PincflW) S pafotnxd by MARTIN BEST 
THURSDAY 5 JUNE Mlpia 
BRAHMS Aha Btapwdy 
LISZT Ataea 

MOZART MASS IN' CAUNOR R .427 
Dame Jenri Baker. Mardo HOI, YntaOrReniy. Stephen liercee, 
Rrcbard BkhaS epn Cky of Latadota SWUM 
Conductor RICHARD HIGKOX 
Tidun iron* Btn Office tM 85 - 57 SS 4 
andudote Arbpw 


CC ino booklnp fee} 

01 -236 0868 cr 74 1 9999 CC <Bkg 
Feet 24 hr /7 day 240 7200 . Grp 
Me* 01-930 6123 . Moo-Thu 8 . 
Fn 6 * R 30 .SJB 6*8 

LAST 2 HOW 
NT* AWAIto-NMW NB 
PROOUCnOR 
David Mamet's 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS 

. dtreawl oy WO Bryden 

7SJSS. JUS™ 

SUuWITia M LOtaDO**~Sprri 3 tcr 
PnKThmwe Food & Onnk 
CAR PARK im door 9 Sp 
Otter NT straws see National Th. 

RATIONAL T 1 KATRE Stt Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
. COMPANY 

See separate ENTRIES under 
OU VP/ LYTTELTON/ 
cOTIESLoc Exceoeni cheap 
•eats days or peri s an ttbatrm 
from 10 am. RESTAURANT I 92 B 
2035 ). CHEAP. EASY CAR PAR, 
Ihfo 633 <3880 

NT ALSO AT THE MERMAID 


MEW LONDON Drary Lane Wc? 
408 0072 CC 579 6433 Eves 7 AS 
Tue * sal 3.00 * 7 . 46 . 

THE MMXW LLOYD WE 8 R ER 
/T 5 . ELIOT MUSICAL 

_ CATS 

APPLY MAY TO BO X OSfKC 

Group __ 

01-930 6123 
now twins ac c ept e d «MD end of 
November 


ouor ir-r.Tttta- 
Eves 7 SO. Mai Thur * Sat 3 . 

QUDBN*S 01-754 1166 . 734 

1167 . 754 0261 . 73 d 01 30 459 
5849 459 4031 . First GaD CC 24 
hr 2407200 Grp Sales 930 61 2 S. 
Eves 80 m. wed * Sat Mat* 3 om 

MAGGIE EDWARD 

SMITH FOX 

TIXOANT. BUB HART 
PZR FORFM NCO“S Tnta. 

INTERPRETERS 

A New Ptaj- by Ranald Ham-ad. 

" Ct£Vra ia5En i d* *«"■ 

Directed by Pater Yateta 
NtatanMMaallJata 2 L 

ROYAL COURT S OC 730 1857 
Eve* 8 pm. Sal Mata don* BOO. 
BLE CROSS by Thomas KQroy 
"A hrittant A t a aslei pUy- 
S Times. 

ROYAL COUNT UPSTAIRS 730 
2864 . SMHCLEY by Andrea 
Dunbar. Eves 730 . Sal Mats 

330 . 

SAVOY Box Orilce 01836 8888 
CC 01-379 6219 . 836 0479 Era. 
7 . 46 . Matinees Wednesday 3JJ 
Sduruv 60 & 8 JO 
■•MICHAEL FRAYN'S AWARD 
WINNING FARCE NOW IN CTS 
STH YEAR IS S TTLL ONE OF 
THE FUNNIEST THINGS DM 
TOWN " s Tones 16 / 2 /S 6 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADOtCK 

MICHAEL COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

GLEESON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Db- Bar MICHAEL BLAXEMORE 

SSrSSumf 379 5399 cc 

379 6433/741 9999 . Ftnt CaU 
24 HT 7 Day CC 240 720 a Grp 
Sales 930 6123 . 

ROWAN ATKINSON 

- YHC IER REVUE 

Mon-Frt 8 . S 4 I 630 A 830 . 
“EASILY THE FIRMEST . 
SHOW M LOMXHPO T 6 

Laa i 2 weeha. 

SHAFTESBURY 579 6599 or 579 
6456 CC 741 9999 Ftnt CM 
24 hr 7 day CC 240 7200 . Clp 
Sates 930 6128 . Mon-Fli 6 
WM Mat 6 sat 4 * 8 . 


Prevs from 28 May. - 

STIRAimPSOI 836 1443 . Spe- 
dH CG No. 579 6455 . E«Bi 80 . 
Tun 2 46 Sal 60 tard ao 
M p at AOATRA IW I C 1 

THE MOUSETRAP 

STRAND 836 2660 CC 8368190 
240 7200 Mop-FTI & Wed mal 

2 . 30 , Fh ate Mantt. L 3 L 
•A STAR IS BURNT Cdn 
- Lesley hule - - 
4 a Aady Oaataad h 

JUDY - = - - ' 

A NEW MIMICAL 

‘AN AST OP 4 SHING TOUR OC 
"FORCE? SEap. 'A BLA 2 IMO 
THEATRICAL PERSONALITY 
P Tel -ERILUANT- M 4 U on S 
STRATFORD WON .AVON 
107891 29 MZ 3 CCTMMWMr 
01 379 6433 . ROYAL SHAJtE- 


Tate Ttaught 730 . Rama and 
«te». Today t JO. Mon. Turn 
7.30 %mam H ia N ia. hten in 

TontiFrt 7 . 30 . Italy Mm opens 
May 16 . Fir special 
meal /throne u rns a nd hotel 
atop over ring <07891 67262 . 


THEATRE ROYAL Stratford Cate 
Ol 634 0510 . BALLROOM by 
Robert Push 'Vary Ferny— 
Madacte deOWdNr Cdn. 
Eves 6 X 0 . ^ 

VAUMVILIX. WC 2 . Bar OfUce 
and CC 01-836 9907 / 6646 . Find 
Can ICC 24 hni 01 - 240 7200 iSVB 
feel Eves 7 JO. WM MaB 2 . 30 . 
Sals 8.0 * 8 - 15 . 


RARE OPFORTVMmr to annnre 
Edwara vin pulv box am- 
tfowned king* Often wvlted. 
Reply to BOX Cl I. The Tunes. 
ROYAL BOULTON Toby Jo®. 
FiBunnev anuiwta. etc- warn- 
ed- Ol 885 0024 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


1955. ttionv. with Hon*, wn 
Mil roMiltm. £4 joO or best 
otter TeL S66 4961 

TK PIANO WORKSHOP 
London'a teadtnp meriatad m 
new ana restored pianos (or me 
largest genuine setocuen avail- 
able 304 Hrohpale Rd. NWS. 
01-267 7671 fne catalogue. 

FtAMOSe H-LAMC A BOMB. New 
and reccutm boned. Quality at 
mamnabte price*. 326 BnonMo 
Rd ■ S Crovdon. 01-688 3513 

ANIMALS & BIRDS 


STANDARD POODLES Lively 
home reared Marx pupotr*. 
pood pedigree. Tel 01-979 6466 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY d-OFVAY. 9 * 23 
Pe n ny P L WL LAWBCM 
WPMER. 499 4100 . 

ORB BEETLES LTD 5 . Ryder 
Street. St James-* Swi Tetot. 
930 BM 6 THE &LUSTRA- 
TOM (The Brutal* Hli*tranon 
1800 - 1986 * unbl 24 tt May. 
Daily WSW 8 SOT*. 

flimrO FI IE B WOOD OAL- 
- Lpn TOWN ARP COUNTRY 

LL. Until 17 th May. IB 
MoKomb St S.W.I. Tel 01-236 
9141 . 

5u u5 B 14 OM Bond SL WL 
12i W »*«*■* Dra^^ 
And W e irr e U aii unta 23 
May. Mon-Frt 106 : Sats 10 - 1 . 


umo is Jibie Mon-Bat 106 sun 
2 J Adm £1 JO Con 60 p. natal 
Bank Hobdays. 

FRANK AVttAY WBJOM r«W 

SX^ 9 ^riAr^ 

Warwick Square. SL Georra 
Drive. London 8 W 1 th ioi) 

- 834 7836 . Open Wtta - Sibil. 
1 Q 8 . Anwrainn im. 

•ALLEmr IB. ID croavenor SL 
WITH 01-491 8103 FBUdmga 
by PETIR CORER RIL^ 
Hava ru 30 Daws Sl wi. 
495 2488 ALBERT BIVP I New 

LEMS MR FINE ART. 5 CBBOrO 
StreeL 4 U* Floor. Condon WI. 

■ gLf?Z— *&*■ . *j* «P 

WDUCM NtMdwMNr - 
The rm d BMaMad. work on 
paper and smaa SrUptur*. 
Moo Tn 106 . SN 11 - 1 . 

ROYAL- ACADEMY 0 P ART 

PlcradtUy 01 734 9062 
Open dully 106 

mc^Sun. (Reduced rale Stro. until 


%%%7%3f nua:boo, ‘- 

Ing today,. lOQQ - t oo. 

tatE uuinrr Sunk 
swi BAVID HOCKNEY: Utto- 
Bratpna UMd ii May- Adm. 
tree- wkaayi 10 ■ 6 S 0 . Sura 2 - 
7i» RtemM •Wo- 01-821 

HM MALL DAI I FBIEI tNr ^ 

Rurally ArctU TH 01 930 6844 . 

1 Oam - 6 pm Adm ftee. Ho rnby 

UI I 0 tt May. ArtAwm * mJC 


SERVICES 


FOR HIM 


ROUS ROTCS Wilfi teNdy 
rerdmmrftard CJtaurieur for 
gmate hire AU m ravtuns. Aho 
rieeiaiKeCtuuKenruni London 
. Berkshire Tel. Oua 34906 

PARTYUNE - PARTY KITS 

Evenming 1 ou need toe nerftri 
childrens Porijea. aim personal 
9 m. kr * adults 06827 - 66855 . 

great tuSmSS dm 

sours know Ms? Let Bnom< 
trading mp erp trace >OLB 
INCEbtB* tome lo 
ACWIFI CMFNTS U 961 1 Ua 
Noniroatp. Canterbur*- k’em. 
CTI I BAT. TH 0227 462 t> 1 8 
SELECT FRIENDS Exri-juse m- 
I tod ix (ms tar Hw unaiiaaitd. 
£8 Maddux Street London ws 
THedMhe 4959937 
C O M P ANY C 4 NJ Daw orgaataeu 
for sair or riMoiem Any to 
Caban. Tel 073 a 677722 

WMN m LONDON rem a TV or 

vioeci to day. wk or moaih. 
TOPS TV OI 720 44 ®* 

FRIENDSHIP, Lose or Mamaoe 
4 U egm. areas. Dalrior. Orpt 
(Qlb! 23 Atfington Hoad Lon- 
*»| W 0 . Tet OI 938 ion. 


MAKE MONEY 
FROM 
WRITING 

Causes <n «mcie Km*;. Sheet 

^fodes. SUN Joumaurun Wnjrfig 
tat Chnyen Tv ana Page 
ftarta ntmg and gthets Freaao- 
(Pnae bcrri Thy uynoc r - School 
of jownaiem iOTi :s ne-ncra 
Suaei. Pan Lane Linaon Wir 
tBR Tel 01-439 62 M 


WANTED 


NOME EMMAMOC W Germany, 
rri lo Detmurx. Wauled home 
in GB ui brat. D Krause. 

Bmeruedl 2266 l-toriund wc 
LARUE WARDROBES A MJrrorv 
Desks. Bookcase He A Pre 1940 
rumilure TH Oi ses Oi 48 or 
01-228 2716 day or ntgtu 
FA CUP and Wimbledon nckets 
wanted pka dnrnurn Best 
Prices OWL Ol 223 0837 . 

FA CUP FINAL. Wimbledon tick- 
ets wanted Top oners pm on 
Ol 701 8283 m 
F A CUP TICKETS * Wimbledon 
tickets bousni and bold. 01-486 
1596 

WIMBLEDON TKXE 7 S reward 

Ol 928 1776 . 


FOR Km- • A new general idler- 
rsl nuwtanr tor men Includes 
68 PU new lashwn. groonung A 
stl tr tor Summer 86 sennSOp 
lb nun pLp la M A B. 5 . SC. 
Jpnn Si. London EC I Vt oaa 


SHORT LETS 


WIMBLEBUfl amacme double 
bedfooin gxrtteb tLsH (or tennn 
fan mum VLnC service. 5 nun* 
bus m tennis. C 20 O per week. 
TH OI 540 9068 
LUXURIOUSLY lumuned s bed- 
room Hal Lancaster Gale, (ram 
£250 pw. TH. 01-794 866 a 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
central London from £325 pw. 
Ring Town Hsr APto 373 3433 


FLATSHARE 


*" reawred to share with 
other own double room, near 
station. £7000 pw exHimse. 
TH Ol 724 0069 alter b -SOpm 


FttTNEY M if, dble bedrni In 
house, rloie an invmtvr £45 
pwescl TM. Ol 870 0407 after 

0 - 30 2 RI m 01 362 0239 idl 

BATTERSEA. 6 month IcL own 
tKW room, vngte oempanry. 
Sharing bain kitchen. a» ma- 
chines. £40 Pw. TH: Ot -228 
6766 'atlrr 7 pm or w tndu. 
BATTERSEA prat female? 20 
Ah/ rromring own room In a 
nor oeous 2 bed Rat. Sham wtth 
owner. £160 oo pern. e*«. th 

01 - 622 0785 after Spin 
FLATMATES Setecthe Sharing. 

Well eslab introductory irrvKr. 
Ptae let tor apte. 01-689 5491 . 
513 Brampton Road. SW 3 
WANTED Prof I. tarty 2 tr* re- 
ouirno r. nr lube. N 6 or 5 W]. 
TH. 01 354 5460 *24 or Ol- 
360 4987 me w-onds). 

CMS WICK. o. r chare hnrory lot 

with garden. CK d washer. 
£«5 pw no. Ol 994 8066 
HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE prof 
m I. 20 Y. own tge rm. lux Hat 
£60 PW TM. 794 9385 
KEW < 26 - 33 * share large house 
with 2 3 Otters. Nr time A aU 
ameiuues. Call Jo 876 6579 


CHOSE* Knigitsbndgr Betgra- 
*ld. PimilKO. Weylimmtef- 
Luxury noiiics And nau aia»l- 
abte far long or tton lets. 
Wm» rmg lor rurrem bn. 
Gbolea. 69 Bucbndm Nine 
rd SWI Ol -828 8251 . 


COMPANY LET Wll Centra. 
Beaut Uxh 2 bed dupteiL Spec- 
tacular view parking 1276 
PW 957 8 E 26 . an* 937 1 124 . 
PIT FO SWL 8 *auh|UI tuny 
mm 1 bed flat wuh secluded m 
Ub. £146 pw. TH. 2362182 e*l 
30 i day i 821 910 * «n) 

SWT GARDEN SQUARE. Gunny 
top ite| owe norm, rerep. k * 
b Fully fumithed. LioO p.w 
3 . 4 rnonlM. TH 01 937 0234 
•87 MSI The numoer la remem- 
ber when Melting beta rental 
properties Id centra mo prone 
London areas ueo/sa. ooosw. 
CLS. COMPANY well tun, prop, 
ertie* lo bast London areas. 
CABBAN A GA&CLCE (Earn 
Agentai 01-689 5481 . 

WM BARONS COURT F/r 
charming lux 4 bed townteu* 

2 hath. gdn. vie. Only £ 290 pw 
me. 01 -675 1896 m 

BRUPARM (tedecbedui. TV. nr 
low.Ol. Phone. £ 3 Spw. OUv 
m 627 2610 Homctocaiors. 
CHEAPS I INr be dim , recpl. GH. 
redrr. nr rube. £66 pw. Others 
tab 627 2610 Hemetenun 
C N K 6 C A LTOM hn balcony flat 
Ooubic bedroom, rerep. nils. 

Porter* Long to 622 6825 
CHEYHE PLACE SW 3 Lux Fum. 

3 room flat Non sharing 
£180 pw T H.Ol 946 4896 

UniaOCB 1 dble bedim. 

recpL phone, gdn. £62 pw Ott- 
e rs 627 2610 HomHocalcn. 
RAMasRSMBm A seiertion at 2 
3 bed apanmenls from 
SIOOpw. th 01676 1896 fTl 
HANDY TUBES 3 be di m. Ui ok. 
washer. Phone, gdn £130 pw. 
others 627 2610 Homriocaloes. 
Willin' 2 bedroi dal. phone. 
TV. nr lube. pdn. Cft EW pw. 
Otters 627 26 1 0 HpmHocatore 
NW Exec 1 bedrtn TV, pneoe. nr 
lube recpl £90 pw. Otters too 
627 2610 Homttocmn mi 9 . 
RnCC l brdrm recoi- phone. 
OCH. nr tube. Uds ok. £80 pw. 
Ottrev 627 2610 HomeHCMOrs. 
R 008 TY 2 bets rec phone p-fetdg. 
JIT tune £100 pw.Otters 627 
2610 HomHocators. 

SE SC. Ptnl sharehtaury modern 
owm house. 15 minutes City. 

£160 DOT*. OI 231 2815 . 


Luxury luntqhed 
apartments. mtly pnvwL 
r near eat Mayfw or Miacnu lo 
Krmiugum Palace From £300 
• £650 pw. 3 months ? years. 
MouranirzDfi Management Ud. 
Ol 49 | 2626 .(Trie* 2991851 . 


6 UP UU CR FLATS 

mall, a rend, ter tuptonra. 
rwtultvro. Long tr short lets in 
all area*. Unfriend A Co. 48 . 
Albctnant-SWl Ql -499 5334 . 


AMERICAN CttCUTKO berk 
lu* (tats /newes.' £200 - £1000 
p.w. Lsuuf lee* rm. Phi H(pB 
kiyi Lrwn. South ot u»e Park. 
Chelsea oMce. OI 353 81 1 1 pr 
North of Ihc park Regent'S 

Part* office. Ol 722 61 36 
HOLIDAY APARTMENT*. Wc 
hove the pest selection of luxu- 
ry furnished Am m 
Knot noton. Chelsea. 

KnMpitabnape. Mayfair. Sl 
Johns Wood and Htanosam. 
From 1200 pw 01 244 7353 - 
HAMFSTEAO SupCTO. aidH Oat. 
taut Heattl. i beds, hd 
meo dining w FF kh. allapata- 
jnro. open In Co. IH pref 
£215 to w TH Ol 794 8574 . 

IRLL 4 MTE PLACE WB. Slunnuid 
house. 2 beds, large recap, mod 
kK dm. roof letr with new 
Ond. light, ejee transport C 400 
pw nn 243 1 166 229 6940 . 
KEMHNOTOH HEWHTS ML Lux 
1 dU bedroom flat Lgt Receg 
K&B Fully furnished £170 

pw Asad now. Oo lh only. 
TH 01 629 7777 Ext 3254 
NW* C OL f N P A L E Luxury 1 bed 
Ota Fully furmshed Self ran- 
lamed, in auto resideniul area 
C l o s e lo shoos add lube £75 
D w Tel-Ol 206 9482 
BEAUTIFUL CAPE TOWN font, 
house lo to or swap for N Lon- 
don home iron* Aug- Phone: 
788 3249 . 

BM BANO. CUy Hideaway Fieri 
si emrbiu rm nr ytutMo flak in 
HMortc Court. £io 5 pw. Cam* 
party Let 3406966/353 5190 . 

SWL 4 . qrd Itr turn I bed rial. £78 
pw. cnerseasor co fefprri. Ten 
Ol 876 tab la 

BW Exec i bedrm ftol recat. 
phone, gdn. nr lube. £75 pw. 

Others 677 2610 Home locators. 
UP MARKET] DMe bedsit tuba 
pad TV Phone £56 pw Otters 
627 261 0 HomHocators 7 days. 


ts 

in 

of 


1 


FOR SALE 


CARTIER SANTO* WATCH, Sol- 
id gold AS New Witt souare 
lace. Drtaste a* £ 5.500 For sale 
41 £ 4.000 TH. BrtakH 0272 
421078 day. 736257 home 


CINEMAS 


ANDRE PREVIN MUSIC FESTIVAL II 


15-29 JUNE 

ROYAL FESTIVAL HAU- 
QUEEN ELIZABETH MAU. 



exo 

Sooraotedby 

B Baokerslhist 
Company 


ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Artists inefudo: 

KIRI TE KANAWA RAY CHARLES CECILE OUSSET 
ISAAC STERN ANDREWflOTS JOHN WILLIAMS 
JOSHUA RIFKIN KYUNCMVHA CHUNQ PONGS SINGERS 
MURRAY PERAHU AMADEUS QUUIET MJQ 

Ti&Xaaxt&ablBNCMIi For trtonnaaonftog 01-926 3002 


THEATRES 


DUCHESS WM/ 3 JOW 9 . 

ril «4 Call CC 240 7300 
1 24 firs r awgCCW 9999 66 
379 6433 ^ 

Bob UrtW» ctmedV- 

A MON™ OFglNDAYS 

tyONOCRFIlL PLACE** DXaB 
Sumn 

GEORGE COLi: 

fl Wed 14^0 

C ‘ P Th^Ma? 3 ! S^S ^aQfir, 

kWOotnedv by 

T aSnS 


FORTUNE S CC 836 2238/9 T 41 
9999. FlTB OU 24fUj day CC 
2407200 Eie 0 Fri/SH a *040 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

f ant Tire OttvMr Award 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

By Jhhh Co dbcr 

- A WOHCMTAWNttr* s 

“oi&Tche fumuesi 2 nd lead pn- 
OM “ A JOY" S EXP 

2nd HILARIOUS YEAR 


MftRKBf* S 01436 460 J. CC 

379 64338 <LC » nr 'Tday WO 
7200. GrySatea WP6ia- Eraf 
pm. WM Ml SA. Su 60 and &O 

NO SEX, PLEASE- 
WERE BRITISH 


GREENWICH TNEATREOl JS 8 
WSlteCd Mritr *88 1 

Srouwo^ 

uejDUM 'A JOY... Ofr 

«nuav funny- sm 
t>SroLchlv enjoyable- 
F.Ttmc 


OLD VIC 99 B 7616 CC 261 1821 
Cm# Sale* 930 6125 . June a 
to tab >2 


as Imtmm -« f MR fat 

ROSS 

by Tentpce BafllptaL 

«n WC 9 Z 87616 CC 261 4 B 21 
Qng Sal* 930 6123 . UKU 
May Si. Ever 7 - 30 .- Wed Mm 

2 30 . Sals 4.0 R 7 , 46 . 


HM S PINA FORE 

f*CQD 0 EOUR,Y 
MVXNTIVE— FMBfY" ObL 
"TstMUb i ..lahMaOnL 

D.Tete. 


MME 


ffl a »S^82iiS& 

ENJOY ABLEST. Over 10 O Peris 

VWTOW 6 MUM 01 -834 1317 
OPENS JUNE 19 REDUCED 
PRICE PREVS FROM JUNE 11 

PAUL CYD 

NICHOLAS CHARISSE 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS MARK 
PARSONS WYNTER 
CHARLIE GIRL 

Box Office open Daily 9 am - 9 pm 
Sun TM CC Bkgs only 1 lam • 7 pm 

WWTUMUL SWI Ol 930 


33? 

■^bSSXS^* 

SC 6 L 88 
EUZUCTH SPKSOC 8 
TWbnjrwm 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

*y J.B. Prte«£y^ 

- OR THE 

WORUP'S. Exprxat 

* 22 ^*^ 8 S 6 3028 CC 379 

O 115 

, , prm a nfu 

Wrect Bra Ttt t Ri UY 

JKSSL 

AU Ibis mb; £ 7.30 Mr £8 00 . 
MUST WD TODAY 1 

*^®HWM 6 3 CC 8 CC 379 
6666 . 379 6403/741 9999 . 

I 836 3962. 

OF COMGOY CO 

PTM0IIS 

— — — JMtan EUaMteB 
T^g awg-T ruM produaron or 
wwd muMMsosrs 
SONS OF CAIN 

Direct from a sed-out 
_ . AuHraian taHn 
Recuwa nn<y prwiewy i*-i 7 . 
Mw . Era 8 m. S® 330 6 

FOR 8 UBHQ SEASON 

TOOJ« WC 928 6363 « 379 
rSm me enow 92 a uu. 

bjte fO Jto. DRAM A 

! ^i7air^ r * 


B ^g^ -AN t. Ol (OB 8793 . Sta- 

guss^ssu^-is & 

NER 3 ( 10>6 15 * 8 . 2 a Today 
EftiSHJLiSSSS 1 f -tenm ar m lp) 
FLAM OOBDON IPG) 114 X 1 * 

2 - 5 Q. 

fNjWMNAaiMiwiiQpt. 
Camden Town tube) A 8 SO- 
UJ« BCSMNCRS ( 1 ^. mm M 
126 . 3 . 46 . 6 . 10 . 840 . TH 
Bootora artepted- 

ONEMA 361 3742 
K*m «oad nueare« tube 
Stow* Sol RAM 116 ) Film ai 
IJO. 4 . 40 . 7456 . Seats 

for er 


/Vtt 


Access 


■ 4993737 First Call 24 Hr 7 Day 
CT 24 D 720 0 (Bkg Feet MWPe 
Smith. DeiUKWm EUMII. JIM 
tejch 8.4 ROOM WITH A 
WEWJPRI Mm at 130 (Not 
Soni 3 . 45.610 6 840 Scats 
bkhto at KA£0 Ui advance far 
3-40 pen daily 6 6.10 on Sat A 
Son. 

CURZON WEST END ShaflesM^ 
Aieaue Wi 439 4806 . Firs 
OM 1 24 Hr 7 Day cc 240 7200 
‘Bkgfe*) Kurosawa's RAN H 51 
Sep Paris daily at 2 . 1 5 . 5 . IS. A 

• W 15 . 

D ATE CWlIk NoamBtim Cate 
TW 4043 . Deny stereo. ZMA 
06 ] 3 . 40 . & 2 S. 7 ia 9 JXL Ad- 


930 5252 <£hq |/950 761 S (24 
Hput Arttete/ Visa/ A mEx Book- 
25 * Jtwn - OP THE 
MLC (PO> In Dotty stereo Sep 
prow Dally 12 46 . 5 - 2 S. 605 
8 A 5 Late NHMRow Frt&Sal 
11 . 46 pm An progs bookable bi 
Jdvanee 

LUMNMC CWEMA 579 3014 / 
836 0691 a Martm-s Lane. 
WC 2 f Leicester Sg luorl Derek 

'£r n «>" «*■*- 

VA 66 MI ( 1 RV. VHm M 1 OO. 
^. 5 f^. be L^§ 6 - 9 OO. Lie. Bar. 
SEATS BOOKABLE for «ue 


236 0226 . Brthah premiere of a 
fWtt- . - -by . Agn*» Varda 

WBRNWhR UdbULL oat- 
ty 1 3 -0. SO. 70. 9.0 rsnoog. 
rimsto. etogueat. A fHm you 
wonT IbrgH^CuardianL 

RtWI NATMARMET - (930 
37381 THE UOftW ( 151 . 
Sep pkm Daily 2 . 00 . 680 . 
8 - 50 . AH Mate bookable in ad- 
lancw. Arrecs and vim 
tetePhone bpokara wHco m e 


NUTS M MAY Cdl T.vr, ft- tso 
\ 7 deot fr £99 Topi TV. 91 
Lower Skutoc Sheer, swt. 01 - 
730 0933 

SPUCNMD SOLID MAHOGANY 
dinuro table Regency deugnrd 
Handbuh in Eogtand 1 2 ft X 
an Seats 16- 18 Unused 
Stared. Suitable Stalely Home 
or Oeganl Board Room. Inde- 
nenoenl valuauon wriroroe. 
£ 1960 . Abo matching vh ot 
handcarved Prince of Wales 
Mahogany Chairs. All unused. 
Accept £125 each. 01-203 
6027 . 

' BRRm or NKTT1EB8B. I7U* 
and 18 th Cenlury furniture tii 
Ihentlcaity reproduced in our 
own workshops for the home, 
office and board ro om. £2 mil- 
lion stacks. Nentebed. near 
Henev ( 04911641116 . Bmirne- 
ttOUOl 102021 293680 . 

Topsham ( 039287 ) 7443 . 

Berkeley. Gtav (04631 B 10962 . 
B MONTHS OLD Westwood 11 
HP garden tractor £976 me 12 
months warranty, also Torn 
58 - ratoon tuple mower (looks 
newi £960 phone Tim TXWor 
or carve Holloway ai Taylors 
Tools (Caraveuel Ud on Hkte 
Wycombe (04941 41842 / 

44321 4 . 

PRUT quahiy wool carpets. AT 
Uadr prices and under, ateo 
available tovs extra Large 
room see remnants under hrif 
normal oriev Chancery CarpHs 
01 4 O 6 D 053 " 

EXQUSnC PERSIAN Rinnan 
Carnet 207” x UR-. Ivory 
background. pasM shades of 
flowers in Jade Ct-ren and Rosa 
Pink. £ 6000 o no. 01 629 1215 . 

seats tar D G. AupTST wnh*to 
swap for simitar aeats arty DC. 
peri^up lb Aug 6 . T*L 05723 

THE TIMES I 7 BS-IBBG. otter 
tdtes avail. Hand bound ready 
lor presentation ateo 

"Sunday*-. £ 12 - 50 . Rem em b er 
When. 01-688 6323 . 

TICKET* FOR ANY EVENT. CM*, 
swrtgta Exp. aiem. Le* mis. 
All theatre and sports. 

TH: 821 - 6616 . B 28 D 495 . 

Aix • Visa • Otters. 
BIRTHDAY DUE T Give som eo ne 
an onpmal Tunes Nrwspapcr 
daled U*e very day they were 
bora. £ 1260 . 0492 - 31303 . 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONE*, coh 
Me seta etc. NsUonwMr 
dHivertes- Tel: ( 03 BDI 850039 
( WIHsi 

WATFBRM 9 B Any exeffl ttc Les 
Md. Coveni Con. Sianighi exp. 
WUBMeaoc. Gfynoeboume. 01 - 
828 1678 . Mwr credll cards 
F-A CUB 8 WIMBLEDON TkSurte 
Bottom and Sold Tetephone: 
01-930 0277 01-930 0698 . 
FfANO Magmnreoi German Baby 
Grand. Reconmuoaed Hartts 
Valued £ 1 . 660 . 01453 0148 . 
WW H rP ON TICKET*. 

Bouohi and swd th ot ssi 
3347 or 01-791 2286 . 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SPECIAL OFFERS 

Mtafltfw Corfoptwi Tltes. (fc- 
ggn iBBim oofy E &95 per sq yd 
♦ VAT. Wool nw Barter capete 
«n me Nessoi badiad £435 
jn sq yd + WAT. WMg stocks 

MWaBtomR Bridge Bd. 
fMOBs Greea. SffiL 

Tit0 1-731 3368/9 

Free eshrotekCteen fen 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


RESOENT COUPLE 1 N 0 chfl- 
diem as cook /housekeeper 
and chauffeur Butler required 
in Central London Sian July. 
Salary negoUaMe. Please nhone 
Wertrwortt (099041 2548 Of 
lice Hours. 

CHEERFUL STUOOfT over 20 
required » help for summer 01 
home wtrh three cMIdreo 13 . 
II. 10 ui altrariive out buw 
fprnhouv- In South West Scot 
tand Must be driver, tennis 
Mayer and non-smoker. Lady 
Hope- Dunbar. Banks. 

Kpkruobngni 

OVERSEAS AU MR AGENCY 
87 Regent SfreH-LotMon WI. 
TH 430 6534 uk- otereeas. 
Aha m hetav dotab temp perm 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Christian mar- 
ned Cbirolr willing lo live lh and 
cue for resNtehrr in 
central. NW London dunno 
owner* absence Phone Scoff 
Mortimer 01-486 7611 or Ol- 
722 B 4 ST 7 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


Doctor's family in Zurich 
seeks English student or 
youg- teacher to come to 

(with 
the 


FOOD & WINE 


Champagne 

GIFT SERVICE 


Pfeaar editor cor BrodMaht 
fete a axe of o«rm 
bfaterw. 

PHONE 0233 99202 ' 

I pa Box SB -ASHFORD -KBri 


HOME & GARDEN 


jams laniucapmg 

enmun 

Eswbfabefl 1795 

kagMiveM RMmdoi wntenE 
MON and Mi a imp m 
rninund UK PINK contact . 
Atone Maran. Sew Des«iv. 

xmouMom 
eoHPAwr. 

Bar. 

j GU WB. 

TeL # 285 ) 2 ZK 


PORSCHE 


i lor 1 to 2 months 


sta SmeraWa). 

Duties: Tuition aid social 
conversation n Enghsh tor 
learning pteposesjittte 
ssistance with houseworfc 
(housahoW hetg at hand). 
Bed and board with the 
bmly. 

peicrtra gffinRN ^ ip bra 

tdbsaddmssdJK 

Dr MnL OeoL HA Fuchs, 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


BLACK D 44 TUrtm. Many ehtro*. 
Dlvry mileage only hxFkm of- 
fer tenires 0932 466 B 4 . 


COLLECTORS CARS 


T HlD MF H T BA 1982 rate one 
of only IB made for UK. 3 w 
hire vs engine. 13.000 miles. 
Petrol red ttuphead. £ 14 . 750 . 
Full details let 0726 4284 

ASTON BUMTM 1970 DKV 8 
8.000 nllw liner rebuild, per- 
sonal no plate. Muu be seen. 
£ 9 . 760 . 0488 .- 72802/5 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


MBCRN/QOWKR NN Pk 216 

acres + c 500 lux. Mod 1852 4 
bed hsr. sheep came pomes 
trout S bU N d tes /Man au eme uf 
eczaamo. ooas isoaae/em. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Burhnglan phone, telex and tar. 
warding services. Ol «34 2560 


BOURNEMOUTH 

A VACANCY EXISTS 
FOR A PERSON WITH 
SALES OR 
MANAGEMENT 
EXPERIENCE. 
TELEPHONE 
0202 295199. 


COURSES 


WOL 1 EY HALLs home study tor 
GCE. Draws fUmuon BA. HSe. 
LLB. Warwick MBA*. Protore 
HI 4 The PnoctaaL Dew AL 9 . 
Wohey Hall. FfeepoH Oxford 
0 X 2 6 B 8 . Tet 0866 622000 

(24 hrSJ- 


PUBUC NOTICES 


CHARITY COMMTSISON 

Lady Hamri BentttckY Endow 
mem lor the tmernabonal 
HoMNtaL Natates- 

The Charily CammbumnMv* 
made a Scheme for iw charily. 
Copies can be obtained from them 
at SI Alban's House. 57-60 
Haymarkrt. Lorxtan SWI Y 4 QX 
( ref: 2 S 6932 -AI -LSI. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH OOllRT OF 
JLfSTICE NO- 002819 


CHANCERY DIVISION 


IN THE MATTER of HEBRON 
INVESTMENTS PLC 


IN THE MATTER of 
COMA PAULS ACT 1986 


THE 


NOTICE » HEREBY OVEN that 
a Pel MI 00 was an the 9 ih April 
1986 prevented to Her MateKjr** 
High Court of Justice for I he cotv 
tarnation of the reduction of (he 
Share prefix um Acroum of the 
above-named Company from 
£ 7 . 206 . 120-31 lb Ml. 


AND NOTICE 18 FURTHER GIV. 
EN dial tte said PHIUrra a 
directed to be hearo before tte 
HononraMe Mr. Justx* Hoff- 
mann ai tte Royal Courts of 
Justice. Strand. London, on Mon- 
day tte iw day of May 1986 . 

ANY Creditor or Shareholder of 
tte sakt Company desiring 10 op- 
pose Die making of an Order lor 
. the conurmation of me said re- 
duction of Share Cranium 
Account should appear at me 
time of hearing in person dr by 
Counsel for that purpose. 


A copy of ow said Petition whi be 
lumuttHLfo any such person re- 
quiring tte same tv (he 
undemenuoimi Sol tenon on 
payment or the retaliated ctiatpe 
for tte same. 

dated the 7 ih day or Mar 1 986 . 

SLAUGHTER AND MAY 
36 . Bastnotuu Strert 
London EC 2 V 608 

Ref: RRSB-UT PJR.JCWO 

Sottdtors tar the said. Company. 


RCR. LANSOOWN A SONS LIM- 
ITED BY ORDER OF THE HIGH 
COURT DATED TOE 24 TH 
JANUARY 1986 . NEVILLE 
ECKLEV F C.A. OF 332 ". BRIGH- 
TON ROAD. SOUTH CROYDON 
HAS BEEN APPOINTED UQL 3 - 
DATOU of THE ABOVE- 
NAMED COM PANY W ITHOUT 
A COMMITTEE OF 

INSPECTION. 

DATED TTH MAY 1986 . 


Holidays & Villas 

CoadBBtd (ram page 25 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


BATTERSEA PARK Pretty 2 bed 
Spill level lop floor flat. Design- 
er dec. Modem M •bTasKra*. 
Bath + sep Wc. Lux fitted car- 
pets throughouL 95 vr he. 
GCH. £ 64-000 627 2500 eve 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BRISTOL CENTRE. Waterfront 
Rats from £ 69 . 950 . City remre. 
Balcony, a beds gas ch Call 
Irene Martm on ( 02721 277285 
ThuRtays to Monday ia 30 am 
t o SS Oppi or Jean Oben oo 
10272 ) 426001 . 


THE CITY 
COBBLER 

Handmade nadetomeaswe 
Shoes 

Mett front £70 

2X5 CITY ROAD. 
LONDON EC1 

TEL 01 - 2 S 1 8658 

No brochure available 


SUSSEX 


V 928 22 S 2 OC 
(National tmbiry epn teagri 
Today 2.00 flow pm mat) A 
7 . IS. Bien May 30 to Ju ne 2 
THE THREKFnfWY OFCRA by 
Brum, wnh i nrac by Kurt 
WWL Mon 736 . Own May 13 A 
1 A CHORUS OF 


May 20 6 21 A 

DISAPPROVAL. 


OFBM AM KOPTTS PARK s 

406 2431 CC 379 CC 

HriUne 486 -. 2933 . ROMEO 
AND JULIET previews from SO 
May- A BOMBWOI MSHT* 
OREAW .am rep ertor y lb 
June. ASMS AMD TOE MAN 
fron* 4 AvguaL DOOM HOW. 


^XHismcws 


BMCIUI UBRAKT otck Russell 
Street- wci. NrowteM d» 
Ptay of famous reanusrtus, 
beokajiupMtanipe. Minx. 

Mon-Sal IDS Sundaw. 5.30 . « 
Affln Jree 

WCTORU A ALBERT MUSEUM. 

The Npuonai Museum of Art A 
Design. 6 . Kensoigiim. WMK. 
10 ■ 660 Sana. 2-30 • 680 
Owed maun Recorded inlb 
«* racial exMMue & nFM 
01 - 381-4894 


<990 6 ! 1 It Info 930 4260 / 
JZWRglO UUIBD AMO 
DUfflEHUUS ttSL San scops 
Doom ooen Daffy 1 . 45 . 4 . 46 . 
BOO LMeNfgfu Show rrl* Sal 
DoorsBoei* ll.iSon*. AU Drugs 
tefrittWe tt advance. Credit 
cart Hoi Line rArress/ vbaJ 
AmQO 839 1929 . 84 hour ser- 
vice. £260 seals lYUlarw 
Mrixtay aj peris. 

• ra 1 i* .2? i?** 1 - W 

JPQ Sep progs Doors 
open Daily 1 ts. 3 . 36 . ass. 
gy-fL ^ WHf Show Fli 4 
SM- Doors open u .oopm. Re- 
du red P rices fee Under 16 V 
ftudeoi card iwMh*. l ®40 
tenders. OjV.P-s. 

Bnootfijar yug ppp 
wi- Tobc (formerly Cue 

Kornnabidyf 

ffENS FBI 9 M AY with NEW 
IWW SCREENS COMPLETE - 
LV REFURBISHED. 

p&ootrssfto?" - 

3 »i / «!ra K£gr * ?°edy Ml 
MO SwRCNBGl Film ma 

£- 00 . 4 . 0 B. 6 IB. 8 30 
•S EATS B OOKABLE EVE 
PERFS Atxra/Vtea. 

SCTCT M , 6 N BAKER SnSt 

• M&tSSSUil"* BKAUnFli 
w wm iii: iisi 306 . 5 . 00 . 

7 ^* 0 ®) Ha* op 
fRBDI WOMAN fi 8 i SuS O. 
6 IQA 840 Serai hStaSte 
«nunii«HU 4 »UM' 

a* wwoey (161 ' 

2 3 0 - 4 3 5 . 7 0 a 065 . Scute 
Bwuabte Aerete/Vtea. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


UKMTBUUPTED SEMREW 

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Oloobro Promenade. Sunny. 

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FRANCE 


COTE D’AZUR. VIOa/Bimg 5 
D BY. Unique tele 40 nans 
Nice doing Walkers writers' 
peradar £ 78.000 MMtefrra 
0730 64227 i Until 6 Ul MUy> 
am Ol O 9342 6024 . 

% LWXROM. 30 mna aix en Pro- 
vence. Restored farm roe. 
umpMledvdlge Lrpeoirynm. 
Shte 4 . End gon. Sunmnunq, 
Tennis, ndmg itrby. Fm mat 
June. 6-000 rranc* ranfb 
42 61 13 77 . W oodworms. 
Fontcuberte. 15770 VCStolles. 


SWITZERLAND 

AETS. 2 room not steeps 
4 6 . At AHUM* DMI date* Free 

fwwia.xirtMmteg. Rem cioo- 

£160 pw. Tel >02251 276531 


EAST ANGLIA 

SUFFOLK pmod roftogr- sire ns o. 
Commir-rx boulhwoM A CooSl. 
Weekly Ms July * August Tel 
Ctefltetbury lD 227 J 70649 

SCOTLAND 


ESMBtllNN central mrws flat 
wuh garage. Anallabie md 
dates mctudiDB Common wrath 
Games and Edlnburc** FesuvaL 
Steeds 4 . For details phone: 031 
441 1231 . 

BiXfWMIlZ&um^cJincelta 
lions. Cuukusic &C & 
bedim. 3 txh house. Idynic 
lochHdr surroundlneB en route 
to Iona. From £200 pw Brocb 
9 Srtwood Place SW 7 300 Ol 
228 0420 or Ol 570 5224 
COTTAGE KURLAND* Scotland 
Nr Inverness. StiBinmg view, 
open fireplace, steeps 6 . £ 1 IO- 
£120 pw. TM 01-602 6068 
FAMH.Y MOUSC lovely grounds, 
sips to. overlooks own Peach. 
boots. Ateo cottage- alp* 4. Kin- 
l yre Coea l 06833 265 . 
BfVMJM** Fanny heme CH 
CTV 5 bedrm* sim 68 £ 1 70 pw 
Auto WM T Dry D Waste IPJul 
lb 9 Auq 0463 259*60 evennq 
LUXUStV 4 DAYS. Country 
monwone. rio hotels witt *ch 
dnve car iron* £83 inri. Bro- 
chure 051 226 2938 124 h«» 


SOMERSET & AVON 


CLA TTOfUH e AREA. Cottage 
quiet sfns 2 / 3 . No prls-miaD 
children. TM: 04686 0288 . 

^JSSEX 

CMMMNB OAST RYE Battle 
nearby swimming pool tennis 
E 22 iSf* 9 - WyUt c sleep O. 
Most dates TM 0424 761 107 



wales 


»«»«« 

4 lOpeopie. Fm£ 220 p.w. Tel 
Tenia- 499 ot 4 ) .'81 1109 tele)! 

mere. 

SS?££l 

WWrii. TeteraS **2S3 

(0272 ) 621392 . 

"TtV 0782 28875 . ” 


COMURVATKRI ESTUARY adta- 
renf tatehefl Anglesey beaches 
fbcmg trvrl. comfortable house 
lor 12 tafler Tt 01281 . 0209 . 

NORTH WALCB> Conway VaBey. 
Conave. well equipped, rime to 
sea. Snowdonia. Steeps 6 . From 
£ 60 . Phone * 0492 ) 81042 . 

FCMBS. Country guest house 
overioofuog too. 5 imies Sl Do- 
vkte. Children A dogs welcome. 
Credit cards. 103483 ) 434 . 


DEA A Mountain cot- 
tages. Snowdonia Touna 
Service*. Porthmadog Tet 
0766 3829 . 

LSTH C total j Ihimwim wing. 
Unspoilt Write* hi Os Heated 
P 0 U. souatt. wiarluin. sauna. 
Steeps 6 . tel 106603*479 


HOTELS A Buesmouus m 
bcaubful Woles. Free 40 page 
Uluuroted bench 065 473 283 . 

FOATMADOC harbour Mde flat 
superb news, teps 2 6 . vacant 
BOW Tel . 10244 ; 570577 


YORKSHIRE 


DALES NATIONAL. PARK 
piarmng. tamhi iun Geotgqe Minor 
Hme. tte m imii sackaiM gnuwL 

atom ws win en smt ft al naa. 

SgjSBAtSSiS 

war - **-— 


MR A PETBl TAYLOR 

d^toaooow 

AUSTMCS 
U 2 6 BT 

mtPttOBttmn 22 L 


HO W 1* 1 yOMi MOnim memTiA 

Spacious cottut 

Fram £ 60 . jasopwaJratar' 
^WBone. lricraer tSoSo 


NORTH 

ITthC 


DALES 

ran***. FuUv 


from 


X180B.W Tefc 0545-5^423, 


OlJR RLAlAka AKb MORE INTO 


W °^ DY0U R^S? ERYWrrH0UT 

SSE&SSSa 

JHESURGICai 

kesharchfund 



- At 
lost of 
rations 
police, 
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latest 
when 
j and 
ads of 
Death 
want 
aviets. 
lamic 

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when 
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Mr 
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said- 
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build- 
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pw. wants r 

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LAW/SPOKT 


__Law Report May 10 1986 

Death before order 
executed is no 
ground of appeal 


Harder v Harder 

Before Lord Justice Dillon. 
Lord Justice Stephen Brown and 
Lord Justice Woolf 
{Judgment given May 9] 

Where there was a "dean 
break" order by consent for 
financial provision in matri- 
monial proceedings, the death 
of one party before the order was 
executed but after the expiry of 
the time limit for appeal, did not 
of itself justify granting leave to 
appeal out of time. 

The Court of Appeal so held. 
Lord Justice Dillon dissenting, 
allowing an appeal by the inter- 
vener. Jacqueline Florence 
Calouri. from Judge Smithies at 
Basingstoke County Court on 
November IS. 1985 who al- 
lowed the application by the 
husband. David Donald Peter 
Barder, for leave to appeal and 
allowed bis appeal against a 
consent order dated February 
20, 198S of Mr Registrar Fuller, 
for the transfer to the wife. 
Christina Sandra Barder. of the 
husband's interest in the former 
matrimonial home. 

Mr Joseph Jackson, QC and 
Mr Jeremy Taiham for the 
appellant: Mr Alan Ward. QC 
ana Mr H. J. Shaw for the 
husband. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON, 
dissenting, said that the hus- 
band and wife were married in 
1 973 and had two children bom 
in 1976 and 1978. The five- 
bedroom matrimonial home 
was owned by the parties jointly, 
subject to mortgages. 

The marriage broke down and 
the wife presented a petition for 
divorce in February 1984. 
claiming also ancillary relief. It 
was founded on adultery by the 
husband with another woman 
whom he had since married. 

The decree absolute was pro- 
nounced in September 1984. 
The husband left the matri- 
monial home where the wife 
remained with the children. 
Care and control of the children 
was awarded to the wife with 
reasonable access to the hus- 
band. 

The case was appropriate for 
dean-break financial pro- 
visions. and after negotiations a 
consent order was made on 
February 20. 1985. It was ex- 
pressed to be in full and final 
settlement of all claims made or 
capable of being made by the 
parties against each other. 

It provided that the husband 
should within 28 days transfer 
and release to the wife all his 
legal and equitable interest in 
the house and the proceeds of 
sale thereof and in the contents. 

The wife undertook that on 
transfer she would redeem the 
mortgages. There were also 
undertakings as to certain life 
policies held by tbe mortgagees 
and the husband was ordered to 
pay periodic payments to the 
children. 

The husband had five days to 
appeal against that order but did 
not. 

On March 25, 1985 the wife 
killed both the children and 
committed suicide. Although 
the time limit of 28 days had 
expired, the registrar's order was 
still not executed. 

On April 23, 1985 the hus- 
band issued a notice in the 
county coun for leave to appeal 
out of time against the order and 
the wife's mother was given, 
leave to intervene to oppose the 
application. 

The judge gave leave to 
appeal, allowed the appeal and 


Solicitors gain rights 
in Supreme Court 


Practice Direction (Solicitors: 
Rights of Audience) 

Lord Lane. Lord Chief Jus- 
tice, sitting with Mr Justice 
Leggatt and Mr Justice Kennedy 
in the Queen's Bench Divisional 
Coun on May 9 read the 
following practice direction 
signed by Lord Hailsham of St 
Marylebone. Lord Chancellor. 
Lord Lane. Sir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls, and Sir 
John Arnold. President of the 
Family Division. 

“In addition to the cases in 
which solicitors already have 
rights of audience in the Su- 
preme Court, and without prej- 
udice to the discretion of a judge 


to allow a solicitor to represent 
his diem in open court in an 
emergency, a solicitor may ap- 
pear m the Supreme Court in 
formal or unopposed proceed- 
ings. that is to say. those 
proceedings where — (a) by 
reason of agreement between 
the parties there is unlikely to be 
any argument: and (b) the court 
will not be called upon to 
exercise a discretion. 

“A solicitor may also repre- 
sent his client in the Supreme 
Court when judgment is deliv- 
ered in open court following a 
hearing in chambers at which 
that solicitor conducted the case 
for his client," 


Times Portfolio Gold rules are 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


MOTOR RACING 


TENNIS 


held that the order ought to be 
set aside because its basis had 
been vitiated by a fundamental 
mistake, common to both par- 
ties. namely that for an appre- 
ciable period the wife and 
children would continue to live 
and benefit from the terms of 
the order. 

However, the judge mis- 
directed himself in that line of 
reasoning. Tbe common mis- 
take which avoided a contract 
had to be a mistake as to existing 
facts at the date of the contract, 
and of that there was none. 

It was not enough to bring the 
the doctrine of common mis- 
take into play that there was a 
common failure to predict cor- 
rectly future events. 

However, his Lordship did 
agree with the judge that the 
husband Ought in those rare and 
exceptional circumstances to 
have leave to appeal out of time 
against the order. 

In the light of the unforeseen 
events which happened so soon 
afterwards, the judge was right 
to reconsider the order and was 
emitted to take into account 
events which had occurred since 
the order. 

Since no course had been 
suggested between leaving the 
order effective and setting it 
aside the order must be affirmed 
and the appeal dismissed. 

LORD JUSTICE STEPHEN 
BROWN said that the real issue 
was one of jurisdiction. The 
facts were extreme in character 
but that could not justify the 
judge's decision that the order 
had been vitiated by a fun- 
damental common mistake. 

The supervening tragedy was 
wholly unrelated to the malting 
of the order. If in feet the 
transfer had ben executed 
within the 28 days there could 
not have been any justifiable 
basis for leave to appeal. 

The executory nature of the 
order was comparable with the 
right to execute a judgment. The 
death of the wife did not in itself 
afford any ground for appealing 
against the consent order and in 
the circumstances there was no 
ground upon which the judge 
could have granted leave to 
appeal. 

There was no “respondent" 
upon whom to serve the notice. 
The matrimonial cause had 
terminated 

His Lordship could not agree 
with Lord Justice Dillon and 
would allow the appeal on the 
basis that the judge did not have 
jurisdiction to gram leave to 
appeal out of time. 

LORD JUSTICE WOOLF 
said that there was no require- 
ment that the wife and children 
should occupy the house and if 
before her death the wife had 
given the house away, the 
husband would not have had 
any right to complain. 

The position was not altered 
because of the unexpected 
circumstances which brought 
the occupation to an end. 

Once leave to appeal was 
given the court could look at the 
circumstances as they then ex- 
isted, namely with the knowl- 
edge of the deaths. The order 
would then obviously have to be 
set aside. 

Tbe mistake was treating the 
issue ofleave to appeal and the 
result of the appeal as raising the 
same question and therefore the 
appeal should be allowed. 

Solicitors: Wood, Nash & 
Winter’s; Thomson Snell & 
Passmore. Tunbridge Wells. 


High-tech explosion 
leads to four engine 
blow-ups in a row 


From John Bltmsdeo, Monte Carlo 


Computer technology has 
transformed grand prix racing., 
enabling calculations which 
previously took hours or even 
days to accomplish to be 
completed in seconds, some- 
times in microseconds. Every- 
thing from suspension 
movement to ignition timing, 
from turbo-charger boost pres- 
sure to fuel consumption can 
be monitored 

simultaneously and the ap- 
propriate checks and adjust- 
ments made instantly. 

it has been described as a 
computer buffs paradise; but 
occasionally it can turn into a 
nightmare, as the Canon Wil- 
liams team discovered on 
Thursday. 

On the first day of practice 
and qualifying for tomorrow's 
Monaco Grand Prix they ex- 
perienced four engine blow- 
ups in quick succession, which 
left Nelson Piquet lanquisbing 
in thirteenth place on the 
provisional starting grid and 
Nigel Mansell only 22nd in 
the list of times, which means 
that he has yet to qualify for 
the 20-car race. 

The cause of it has been 
traced to a chip - the wrong 
chip — which resulted in the 
engines running too leanly, 
overheating and breaking 
pistons. 


Having diagnosed the prob- 
lem. the team can be expected 
to bounce back strongly in 
today's final qualifying and to 
secure their customary places 
near the front of the grid. If the 
weather remains dry, that is. 

Williams are not the first 
team to suffer from computer- 
induced hiccups. Marlboro 
McLaren lost both their cars 
from this year's opening race 
in Brazil with an identical 
engine failure provoked by a 
fault in the engine manage- 
ment system. At least Wil- 
liams and Honda can be 
consoled that they discovered 
their problems before rather 
than during the race. 

Given dry conditions, ev- 
eryone can be expected to 
improve on their Thursday 
times today if only because the 
Monaco circuit invariably be- 
comes faster as the weekend 
develops and more rubber is 
laid on the track surface. 

Understeer has proved to be 
the Achilles' heel for most 
teams and overcoming it usu- 
ally means adopting what one 
senior engineer described to 
me as “a set of fairly unhappy 
compromises”. It is all a 
matter of balance. “Around 
here", he added. M if you get 
the from working right, sure as 
hell you're going to be giving 

YACHTING 


something away at the back.” 

And that usually means 
sacrificing traction - a vital 
ingredient in a fast lap time on 
a slow circuit. This is where 
Ferrari, in particular, have 
been suffering during qualify- 
ing 

Olivetti Brabham are begin- 
ning to climb back into con- 
tention, radical new cars, a 
new exhaust system and some 
repackaging of turbo equip- 
ment down the left side of the 
car having taken them about 
50 per cent towards where 
they should be, according to 
the chief designer, Gordon 
Murray. 

Meanwhile. Ayrton Senna 
will be difficult to displace this 
afternoon from his fourth 
consecutive pole position of 
the season with his JPS Lotus. 
His two qualifying runs on 
Thursday were far from per- 
fect (his own words), which 
suggests that a lap in under I 
minute 24 seconds is within 
his capability. 

At the other end of the field 
a place anywhere on the 
starting grid must be tbe main 
target and this could well 
require a lap time of no more 
than 1 minute 27.5 seconds — 
a standard which so far only 
12 drivers have managed to 
attain. 



Hair-raising service: Martina Navratilova clenches her’ 
teeth as she dutches victory over Susan Mascarin in Tokyo 

Public ignore the 
computer fodder 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Swiss scales sailor’s Everest 


Pierre Fehlmann. the lake 
sailor from Morges in Switzer- 
land, yesterday achieved the 
goal he had set himseir 1 1 years 
ago — to win the Whitbread. 
Round the World race, a 27.000- 
mile classic long regarded as 
being the sailor's Everest- 

Sailing the 80-fool Bruce Farr- 
designed maxi UBS Switzer- 
land. Fehlmann and his crew of 
18 crossed the finish line off 
Portsmouth under spinnaker in 
flying style to rousing cheers, 
horn blasts and (he clattering of 
cow bells shortly after 9.40 
yesterday morning to set a 
record lor the voyage of 117 
days 14 hours 31 minutes, 
dipping 2 days 16 hours off tbe 
previous best time set by the 
Dutch yacht Flyer four years 
ago. 

The countdown has begun to 
see if the smaller French yacht 
L'Esprit <f Equipe. skippered by 
Lionel Peon, which is almost 
certain to win tbe Whitbread 
Trophy for the best handicap 
time, can also finish on a high 


By Barry Pickthall 

note by winning the 6.000-mile 
final stage from Punta del Este, 
Uruguay on corrected time. 

yesterday's computer predic- 
tions placed the Swiss maxi 
ahead of the 14-strong fleet on 
handicap but L'Esprit d'Equipe 
has until shortly after midnight 
on Tuesday to complete the 
final 850 miles, an average of7.7 
knots — by no means an 
impossible (ask. 

For Fehlmann this was his 
third attempt at winning the 
race. In 1976 he sailed the Swan 
65 DisquedDr into fourth (dace 
on handicap, a feat repeated in 
the following event four years 
later with the 58-foot Farr- 
dcsigned Disque d'Or III, which 
had been built to win handicap 
honours. 

“After that race I realized tbe 
boat was too small and went 
home determined to build a 
maxi to win line honours in this 
race." he said. 

On the first leg to Cape Town 
the crew lost three days wallow- 


ATHLETICS 

A big test for Coe and 
Ovett in the long run 

By Pat Botcher 

Sebastian Cor and Steve national Athletes' Club eight- 
Ovelt, the middle-distance kilometre road race, sponsored 
mainstays of British and inter- by Gaymer's Cyder, through the 
national athletics during the last streets of Oxford tomorrow 
decade, are making moves up to afternoon. 

5.000 metres this summer. And After a road mite victory in 
in races this weekend they will Gijon, Northern Spain, over 
get a dose look at Steve Harris Pierre Deleze and Jose Abascal 
and Paul Davies-Hale, the last Saturday, proving that be 
young but stern British oppo- still has the measure on most 
siuon for them at that longer middle-distance men. Oven 
distance. _ said he was hoping for a better 

Coe, whose switch to 5.000 result tomorrow than in his last 
metres is more tentative than British appearance, eleventh in 
Ovens, will study Harris from the AAA I Okm championship, 
the safety of the stands at won by Harris in Battersea a 
Alexander Stadium in Bir- month ago. 
mingham, where the G RE Brit- The hairpin course at Oxford 
ish League division one match should hold Tewer fears for 
tak« place. For Coe runs his Oven than his peers, consid- 
double Olympic gold medal ering that the course at Gijon 
distance of 1.500 metres as a was similar and not forgetting 
season's track opener while Oven’s propensity for weil- 
Hams makes an attempt on the positioned elbows, 
league 5.000 metres record of Carlos Lopes, the Olympic 
1 3min 49.6sec which John Da- marathon champion, will prob- 


ing in the Doldrums but went on 
to take line honours after the 
American-registered leader. 
Porta tan (now Atlantic Priva- 
teer) was dismasted, and the 
second-placed Belgian maxi, 
Cote d'Or, sustained hull 
damage. 

During the second stage 
through the Southern 1 Ocean to 
Auckland the UBS crew stayed 
loo far north and as a result 
finished third, two hours behind 
Atlantic Privateer and NZI 
Enterprise. The Swiss crew 
made no such mistakes on (he 
third leg round Cape Horn, 
leading, as they did on this final 
stage, from start to finish and 
breaking all records as they 
went 

As UBS arrived in Ports- 
mouth Simon Le Bon’s crew on 
Drum were fighting it out for 
second place between Cote d’Or, 
Lion New Zealand and Atlantic 
Privateer 500 miles astern, 
promising a close finish 
tomorrow. 

RUGBY LEAGUE" 

Leeds are 
in mood 


Kumiko Okamoto, of Osaka, 
aged 21. will play Natalie 
Zvereva, of Minsk, aged 15. in 
the women's singles final of the 
Lawn Tennis Association tour- 
nament at Bournemouth today. 
Matches like that have been 
happening all the time during a 
five-week circuit that has served 
as an interim examination for 
aspiring professionals but has 
been a non-event for the public. 

The circuit will end at Lee-on- 
Solent next week, when the 16 
leading men will contest a 
“Masters" tournament and 32 
women will take pan in an up- 
graded event carry i ng £ 1 7,857 in 
prize money. Both the sexes will 
also be striving for results that, 
once digested by the relevant 
computers, could improve the 
players's world rankings. 

The 16 men at Lee will 
include a respectable contingent 
of six British players: Stuart 
Bale, Jonathan Smith. Mike 
Walker. Andrew Castle. Stephen 
Botfield . and Jonathan 
Southcorabc. The British 
women engaged will be Sally 
Reeves. Joanne Louis. Julie 
Salmon, two wild card (invited) 
competitors, Jane Wood and 
Belinda Borneo, and possibly 
one or two qualifiers. 

Miss Zvereva has contested a 
semi-final and two finals in 
consecutive weeks. Even at this 
modest level, that is good going 
for a slim lass of 15. Yesterday 
she had a 6-2. 6-2 win over 
Pascaie Etcbemendy, of Biarritz. 


who won the Queen's Club 
segment of the circuit. Miss 
Zvereva was warned for tossing 
her racket towards the umpire's 
chair. 

Elsewhere. Nicole Jagerman. 
aged I S, who lives near Amster- 
dam. was warned for whacking a 
ball into the empty terraces. 
Both incidents were trivial, 
except as reminders that players 
are never too young to pick up 
petulant habits. Miss Jagerman 
was beaten 6-4. 6-2 by Miss 
Okamoto, whose Oriental seren- 
ity does not permit emotional 
self-indulgence. 

The men’s semi-finals fea- 
tured Patrick Flynn, of Bris- 
bane. aged 17, and the winners 
of the three previous tour- 
naments: Thierry Pham 

(France). Denys Maasdorp 
(South Africa) and Gilad Bloom 
(Israel). Pham is not only a 
better player than Flynn. He is 
almost seven years wiser. Pham 
won 6-I.6-1. 

Maasdorp had a nasty cold 
when Bloom beat him io a semi- 
final last week. Yesterday 
Maasdorp’s I2st 7lb was in 
belter condition and he beat 
Bloom 7-6. 6-3 in a match that 
would have done justice to the 
early rounds of those more 
distinguished Bournemouth 
tournaments of 20 years ago. 
RESULTS: Woman: singles, quarter- 
finals: P Eicnemendy (Fr) bt M 
Dosedetova (Cz). 7-6. 7-5: N Zvereva 
(USSR) w a need (Aig>, 6-1, 6-3. Son- 
flnais: K Okamoto (Jap) M N Jagerman 
jNeth) 6-4. 6-3: Zvereva M Etehemendy 6- 


RUGBY UNION 

Hall moves 
to No 8 
for Egerton 

From David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 
Rome 

John Hall, the Bath blind-side 
flanker whose potential as a No. 
8 has been discussed frequently 
in the past, will get the chance to 
play there when England B meet 
Italy in the Olympic stadium 
here this evening. He will do so 
at the expense or Egerton. his 
dub colleague who tore ankle 
ligaments in training on Thurs- 
day evening and had to with- 
draw from the selected side. 

It is bad luck on the lanky 
Egerton and it seemed, at the 
time, that worse might follow, 
since Hail himself fell heavily on 
his shoulder three minutes later. 
He has recovered from the 
severe jar, however, and wilt 
oppose Russo, the only new- 
comer to die Italian side, with 
Peter Cook, of Nottingham, 
coming in to complete the back 
row. 

In New Zealand last year with 
the senior side there was some 
possibility that Hall might play 
No. 8 with Cooke (Harlequins) 
and Rees (Nottingham) as his 
flankers, la the event the experi- 
ment was not tried; indeed Hall 
has not played there for three 
years, though he sometimes 
occupies the No. 8 position at 
the tineouL With next year's 
world tournament in mind it 
will be instructive to see how he 
plays in the new position and 
also to see Cook's worth at this 
level. Twice the Nottingham 
man has been close to a foil cap. 
during this last season and four 
years ago; be. too. has distinct 
possibilities. 

Those training mishaps apart. 
England have been fortunate 
with injuries. They will want 
Bai abridge to win more lineout 
ball than Redman and Morrison 
contrived on Wednesday 
against Italy B and they will look 
for greater concentration from 
ihe backs. It is Salmon's mis- 
fortune that he is the man to 
step down from mid-field. By all 
accounts he played well in 
Catania but Carleton has to be 
given a game and Palmer, of 
course, captains the side. It was. 
incidentally. Palmer who set up 
Bailey for the fifth and final try 
on Wednesday rather than scor- 
ing it himself. 

Russo, from Treviso, was 
brought into the Italian side 
yesterday when it was learned 
that Anuso. the Padua back row 
man. was unable to tour Austra- 
lia for business reasons. 

England B. chivvied by Hill, 
and with a strong thread of 
international experience 
throughout the side, will hope to 
contain them, though already 
the tour management have 
developed enough respect for 
Italian rugby to wish for more 
frequent meetings. 

(TALY: S Barba (Rome Urweraity): M 
MnadotetH (L'Aqufe). F GamanMta 
(Palma). O Coflodo (L'Aquiia). S Ghusni 
(L'Aquia): S Bettareio (Treviso). F 
Longtola (Padua). D-C CuccMeHa 
(L'Aquiia). G MoreM (L'Aquiia). G Ross) 
(Treviso), M Pawn (Trewsoi A Cotefla 
(L'Aquiai F Bern) (kbtan), M Innocent) 
(Padua, capo. A Rnaao (Treviso). 
ENGLAND Be M Rom (Harlequins): J 
Goodwm (Moseley). J Camion (Orrein. J 
Palmar (Both, capt), M BaSey (Wasps); S 
Smith (Richmond), R Hifl (Bath); P 
Rendon (Wasps). A Simpson (Sale), R 
Lee (Bath). P Cook (Noranqham). N 
Redman (Bath), S BalnMdge (Fykto). P 
Buck ton (Onw). J Hal (Bath). 

Referee: R Hourquet (Franca) 


to reneat US out of champions torse trials 

New York (UP!) — Ivan 'I he iticmiccol of V I ® ^ 


vies, the steeplechaser, has held ably give as good an account of 


since 1974. 


himself as usual, but it would 


Oven should get a much need another superlative effort, 
closer look at Davies-Hale, since commensurate with his world 
they will both be among the cross-country victories to win 
front-runners in the Inter- tomorrow. 


By Keith Macklin 

Had Halifex been given a 
choice of opponents in this 
weekend's semi-finals of the 
Slalom Lager premiership, they 
would surely not have chosen 
Leeds. In February the teams 
met in the challenge cup, and on 
a treacherous frozen surface 
Halifex were thoroughly beaten. 

Similarly, Leeds are quite 
happy to be going to Halifax 
rather than to Wigan or 
Warrington, although the 
Headingtey side have a habit, 
well developed in trophy com- 
petitions over tbe years, of 
coming from behind to snatch 
victory, and they may well 
prevent Halifex, the champions, 
from tilting at the double. 

In tbe other semi-final at 
Central Park, Warrington will 
be hoping to end a run of eight 
matches against Wigan without 
a win. In Les Boyd, the Austra- 
lian, and Kevin Taman, the ! 
New Zealander, Warrington 
have two of the most un- 
compromising and tough for- 
wards in the game, 


i N 5T k 01 ^. — i The dismissal of Krickstcin 

Lendl who has lost only two and Tim wilkison left the 

**Jf*5?**? . in United Slates without a repre- 

ernshed Aaron Knckstem. fr-i sanative among the final ei&L 
b4, on Thursday night to (n each of the six previous 

fhe loun, amems at least one Ameri- 

the quarter-finals of ‘he Tour- ^ reached me final. 


nameni of Champions. Becker 
had difficulty in a swirling wind 
disposing of the Argentine. 
Horacio de la Pena. 7-5. 7-5. 
The unseated Guillermo Vilas 


J««fC*MA Knckstem 
(US) (W, 6-4: Y Noah (Fri bt P McNamee 
JAifi). M. M: P Arran (Peru) M D Perez 
(Ur). 5-7, 6-2. 6- 1 ; G Vfas ( Arg) bt L LavaAe 


. ■ vw.a-/. D-^o-<;uvHS|Mrg)reLLavafl4 

moved into the quarter-finals (muo. 6-2. 6-Z; j Nystrom (Swe) tx t 
with a 6-2, 6-2 victory o ver th e ^ - ? Becfciy (WG) 

Mexican teenager, Leonardo" 

Lavalle. 


teenager. 


Pena (Aren. 7-5, 7-5: T TuUsne 
Pd fn M srejner (&) 6-3. 6-4; M Jane 
(Arg) M B Ores* (Vug) 60.6-3. 


JUDO 


Vexation for Gordon 

From Philip Nicksao, Belgrade 

The unpredictable latent of Vcritchev, should have been a 


ROWING 

Crews in battle for selection 


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The British men's team is 
competing this weekend at an 
international regatta in Mann- 
heim. West Germany, where 
they will race on a dock course, 
just short of the international 
distance of 2.000 metres (Jim 
Railton writes). 

Over the next two days the 
fastest English crew will have 
laid claim to a place in the 
Commonwealth Games in 


Edinburgh (25-31 July), where a 
medal looks assured. 

A problem for English oars- 
men is that in the Common- 
wealth Games there is only one 
pairs event — the coxless — and 
there is almost an embarrass- 
ment of riches in today's event, 
in which Great Britain have no 
less than three Olympic gold 
medal winners, in two separate 
crews, racing against each other. 


Elvis Gordon, the British heavy- 
weight, was shown at the Euro- 
pean championships here 
Thursday as he levelled two 
opponents, one of them Grigory 
Veriichev. the Soviet champion, 
threw the mighty East German. 
Henry Stohr. and still failed to 
get a medal It was quite a feat 
by the Wolverhampton man. 

In bis first match he was 
giving a typically low-key 
performance against Sianko 
Anderle. of Yugoslavia, until, 
with a sudden turn of speed that 
belied his 127kg. Goidon spun 
him over on to his back with a 
huge rear throw. 

His next contest against 


foregone conclusion, for 
Veriichev is a former world 
silver-medal winner. The Rus- 
sian made the mistake of under- 
estimating Gordon, who flashed 
past all his defences and swept 
him down with a peach of a 
valley drop throw to end the 
contest after two minutes. 

He nearly did the same to 
Stohr but the valley drop throw 
produced only three points. 
Gordon went on to lose in the 
bronze-medal contest against 
Oemens Jehle. of Switzerland. I 


bnxiza. LNhMMwy (under 95 vil R van 
de Welle (Bel), gold: R Vachon (ft). sArac 
J Kotanowski (Pol). J Sosna (Cz). bronze. 


Princess is 
pleased 
with deal 

By Jenny Mac Arthur 

The TI Group announced 
yesterday it is to sponsor the 
Windsor three-day event for a 
further three years, with 
"substantially more than 
£25.000" being put into it each 
year. 

Princess Anne, the president 
of the trials, said tile news was 
particularly welcome as it gave 
the organizers the opportunity 
to plan ahead. 

This year's event, from May 
23-25. has several new fences on 
the cross-country course. Spe- 
cial surfaces have been laid 
down on the take-off and land- 
ing sides of each fence so that 
even if the weather is wet the 
event will go ahead. This year all 
the horses will be stabled in the 
Great Park. 

The three-day event includes 
the British Junior Champion- 
ship. sponsored by TI Credo, 
which announced yesterday that 
it has entered a three-year 
sponsorship contract with 
Mandy Orchard, one of 
Britain's most talented young 
event riders, who is currently in 
Australia to compete in this 
month s world three-day event 
championships. 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND CRICKET FIXTURES 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


RACKETS 



FOOTBALL 

3.0 irtess stated 

FA Cup 
Final 

Everton v Liverpool (at Wembley) 

Scottish Cup 
Final 

Aberdeen v Hearts (at Hampden 
Park) 

HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAGUE: 
, Preraw ** ate Mxngdon Town v 
Mormon Town: Sharpness v Bees tar 
I .Town; Yste Town v Abingdon utd. 

ESSEX SENIOR L£AGuEBowers Utd v 
C oggestraJL East Tlwrock v Font Uni: 
Haisaad « wittum; Wryanhcw v 


CRICKET 
TOUR MATCH 

CHELTENHAM (Town Ground): 
□ktucosrarsrwe v Indians (11 JO n 6 (JL 

BENSON AND HEDGES CUP 

SWANSEA: ^JnSi^^isseK. 
SOUTHAMPTON: Hampshire v 

MxJdlesex. 

CANTBWOT: Kant v Surrey. 
LEICESTER: Leicestershire v 

W&rwicksnre. 


NOk i rtAMP 1 0*1: Nontiamotonsnire v 
uerbysTure. 

Sra" 00 ®-' Ntronaramshre * 
TAUNTON: Somerset V Essex. 
PEHT^PtaTth tec** Scotland v 

RUGBY league 

SECOND DtYGSHM; Fuffiam v MansheM 


TOMORROW 


FOOTBALL 

SECOND 0WIS(0»t BracPora City l. Wenote- 
don t. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTES LEAGUE: Second 
Mm op HnaL second leg: Crystal Palace 
□ Somnanipton 6 tSoutnampran wai 9-2 on 

P^TBALL CQMBHU TON; Charlton J.Bi’V 

loi Rovers 4, Futiam t. Chwon's Park 
Ranger so. Fulham 1. M*nnm t. Tonannam 1. 
UiJtiwIS. Ponsmtwth 2. Chetseo 1 
TOUR MATCH; Uruguay 1. MNoranos 0 (in 
BogKI. CWWKMI. 

ICE HOCKEY 


NORTH AMERICA: NaMflOl UMUfr (WAk 
Ptay -off game-. Sr Lous Bums b. Calgary 
Raniri 2 jbeswMewn senes mil 2-3- 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

SECOND OMSKM: BHWMQi M, B«fe* Z 
Mans»*j t6 FiAhamal 

TENNIS ~ 

DAVB CUP: Eastern bom (pener-Awta: 
Japan lead Taiwen 2-0 kn Matsunaya. 
Japan): South Kama lead Pakistan 2-0 (in 
Seoul); ctwu lead Hong Kong 2-0 
Hongkong) 

MUmCKnawerian Hen's Open: Ouarts- 
fineb: R Qstennui (WG) tn t Muster (Ausmai 
6-3. 6-3; E ToGcner (US) Bt E Jeton (WG| 6-1 . 

HOUSTON: Wotetm's cfcwnpionsriip: Second 
round (US unless srama W Dime m N 
Sodupe 7-5. 6-t. L OkJamaow (Penu « 0 
Spence 7-6, 6-2; K RnM£QiK Sends 6- 1.6-2, 
W luma* (Aus) Oi C Bantami M. 7-8; C 
Uoyom « Nennemson 6-2 6-t. 

TOfCYOi Gma* *nrw rawnement (U£ uncss 
SOW*, woman** m g u im imnfc M 
Navranow ra S Mascram 6-2. 7-5: P Slwiuw 


1 ®f«AT MILS WESTERN LEAGUE: PW- 
«i£r Drvaiore Keynsham Town v Portway 
tentot fiatJJc Radstock Town « Walton 
RwsiEaq. 

BULpMG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 


fSZEStiSi ISO* w aa « on Town P- 30 * 

CatWWED COUNTIES: PrarmaMsfan 
(1S L0): ftsh Utd » Malawi Town; ChoWiarn 
y Eqa yrrUng Town: Famtan v Chonsey; 
Hartley wirney y CoWtam. Malden Vata v 
Cow: vagina Water v Marathon. 

OTHER SPOUT 

EQUESTR1AMSM: Royal Windsor show. 
GOLF: Branham and Barrow Saber. GoM 
illustrated Gold Vase (at Walton Heath). 
LACROSSE: Bmw Northern league FW 
dhriemn; MeUorv Sheffield (at Ashton LCk 

Sate » snetheu umveratty. 

Rackets: Queen's Club centenary 


SPEEDWAY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Mnoesnougn ai! 
PaowJ? 


hr a Crotf lOei 6- 1 . M. B tsedusek a E mow) 


T M*vaa» 6-3. 64; s Edoem (Swe) n p 
Luntwnen (Swe) W. 7-6, J Wie* hr P 
Ann d cane 74 . 0-3. 


SQUASH: American Express national 
cnaiange tmais rat Boston). 
SWIMMING: SCaSA inter -county 
cnamgonsnitra (at Crysral Paoce NSC). 
TENNIS: LTA International sonrg oradt 
(at West Hamah Second bar tournament 
(at PewBorough). 


CRICKET 
TOUH MATCH 

CH ELTEN HAM (Town Ground): 
CioUMSWratwe v hndarts (11.30 ro 8.1)). 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL LEAGUE 
(2-0 unless stated, 40 overa) 

DERBY; Derbyshire v Sussex. 

SWANSEA: Qomorgan v UHcesterettina 
(••30). 

SOUTHAMPTON: Hampshire v 

Ntfth&mpttmsfwe. 

TRENT BRIDGE: Nottinghamshire « 
Warwickshire. 

TAU*r^Styrierara» Middlesex 
THEOVAL: Su rrey v Yonrsiferg. 
WOflCtillEJfc Worcestershire v Kent 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

3.0 unless stated 

SLALOM LAGER PREMiERSHV: Sent- 
•mat* HohlBA v Lunas: wiaan v 
Mamnqton. 

SECOND OMSKM: Better * Futiam; 
Blackpool v Hvda^fJeKt Bramtry v 

wruehaiwi (330): Cansw v Hunstet; 
lexjn v Doncaster (130); VKxKmgmn v 
Kergntoy. 


OTHER SPORT 

BASEWLL: Southern EnMand Aasod- 
rtwtsion: Basildon Raiders v 
££22 nL anke8S: « Enft « Spawns v 
Barnet Gt ? kr4 Greensox * 

cS>G a** Breves v 

amn «y 

ISJSJS^S^SA inter- county 
tm Crystal Patace NSCL 

Bar* Ot soottenf 
Junior 

Mai: Bqdtord MytnbreaHers v 
Porter^ ^*4 1 1 ' Jwnor men’s Anal: 

sSSliaS WoS^\iito?3SfcaJ3l 
Wpra city Bruton » spoeawea flueanor 


'■)*<»«( 3‘‘ ii- ri I I 





.1 


RACING: HARWOOD COLT SHOULD JUSTIFY POSITION IN DERBY MARKET 



gain trial verdict 


Run over a mile and a half 
on Lmgfiekfs undulating 

Deity Trial has been a good 
Sj* 1 ® L t0 the eventual result of 
the Derby in remit years, 
thanks to Teenoso and Slip 
Anchor, who both trod today's 
path or route to Epsom and 
grater fame and fortune. 

*** afte moon, all eyes 
win be on the current second 
favourite, Bakharoff to see 
whether he can justify his 
prominent position in the 
ante-post market. After super- 
vising Dancing Brave’s bril- 
liant performance in last 
Saturday’s 2,000 Guineas, 
Guy Harwood, the trainer, 
was optimistic that Bakharoff 
would also win today. 

Sired by The Minstrel, who 
won the Derby, Bakharoff 
certainly looked the epitome 
of a middle-distance horse in 
the making last autumn when 


ByMandarin (Michael Phillips) 


he won the William' Hill 
Futurity over a mile at Don- 
caster. Recently die form of 
that race has had quite a boost, 
thanks to Nomrood winning 
the Chester Vase cm Tuesday 
and Bold Arrangement run- 
ning so well to finish second m 
Uie Kentucky Derby a week 
ago. 

So Bakharoff is napped to 
begin this season where he left 
off last, on a winning note, az 
the expense of the recent easy 
Ascot winner Mashkour and 
Tisn’L Of some significance is 
the fact that New Trojan, one 
of the other runners in today's 
field, beat Mashkour at 
Goodwood last summer, only 
to be beaten subsequently by 
Bold Arrangement at 
San down. And Bold Arrange- 
ment was behind Bakharoff at 
Doncaster. 

My Ton Ton was amor 
those who finished 


Tisn’l at Newmarket where 
they were both beaten by 
Flying Trio, who has since 
.flopped at Chester. As a two* 
year-old, though. My Ton Ton 
could boast having beaten the 
present Derby favourite, 
Shahrastani. hr- the Haynes. 
Hanson. and. park Stakes at 
Newbury, so be is dearly 
capable of better. 

White Salchow's view 
Wednesday’s Cheshire 
can be taken as a sign of better 
things to come from Dick 
Hern's stable. 1 still think that 
the Queen's filly, Laughter, 
lheir runner in die Mar Icy 
Roof Tile Oaks Trial, will 
have to give best on this 
occasion to both Smgieua and 
Mill On The Floss. Interest- 
ingly, those two ran against 
one another at Newmarket 
last autumn. On that occasion 
Singletta finished seven 
lengths ahead of Mill On The 


Floss. With the benefit of that 
run in the Pretty Polly 
Ices at Newmarket 10 days 
ago. Mill On The Floss should 
certainly do better this time 
especially as die was probably 
past her best ’last autumn. 
Nevertheless, I still prefer 
Singletta. 

Unless Mailman hits form 
first time out, which he is 

Other raring^ page 30 

quite capable of doing, the 
Williams de Broe Stakes 
seems likely to be won by/f 
Nebris. who recently became 
the first horse for 19 years to 
land the Rosebery Handicap- 
City and Suburban double. At : 
Epsom. Nebris beat Esquire, 
who then drew further atten- 
tion to the reliability of that 
form by winning at Chester on 
Tuesday. ’ 



-.«■ 


r.i-i Ai'.* . . . iiV*. • 

■ >♦•'' -v* frit.'. . 


Bakharoff, the William Hill Futurity winner, who will be try ing to farther his Epsom claims 
in today's Highland Spring Derby Trial at Lingfield Park 


RACING ABROAD 

Bering can 
earn tilt 
at Epsom 

Bering, the mount of Gary 
Moore, may jet join ihe Derby 
field if, as expected, he adds the 
12-furlong Pm Hocquan at 
Longchamp tomorrow to his 
resounding eight-length success 
over Point d’Artois in Iasi 
month's Prix Noailles <Our 
French Correspondent wriics). 

Baiave and Last Tycoon 
should dominate the Prix de 
Sain! Georges, with Storm 
Warning (Brent Thomson J earn- 
ing third place, which is also the 
best that the British challenger. 
Land Of ivory (Cash 
Asmussen). can hope for in the 
Prix Cleopatre at Saint-Cloud 
today . 

Shibii (Walter Swinbumi. a 
close fourth to Verd-Amique at 
Newmarket last week, is pre- 
ferred to his fellow British 
challengers. Tommy Way. Local 
Herbert and North 


the Derby 
Capannelle. 


Verdict in 
Tialiano, at the 
Rome, tomorrow. 


Oranfffiood to Soft 
Drawi High numbers best up to 1m, but low favoured on soft 


11.M KAYNC HANDICAP (£2.897: 6ft (20 mnmre) 

*" SStSS SSg B^gjMjO MO E BBh 7-9-Ttl 

3JW4 CORN STREETBJ) [U Slone) J BooriyS0-1tt_ 
MM00O VORVADOS ®) (Uam F 

“22S: ®gg jw c Austin 

I take time (d-dj (Mi 8 Stamm) 0 Bmartb 


THIRSK 


Going: soft 

Draw: High best over 5-6f 


SUNDAY 1 HANDiCAP{3-Y -O: 


IDS 

103 

1M 

105 

108 

JOB 

111 

Itfi 

117 

118 

119 


HAS MARKET PUCE AUCTION STAKES (2-Y-O: 
21,363: 5f) (18 runners) 


SC«Am»| 


OOdO SHADES OF BUiE (D)(C«nwdonCoii3urtM^MBin(>ard^ 60BNMa 13 


120 


ta «HBt BELLE TOWER 
122 JH320-? BOSH COOKIE 
1» 1000-02 BECSTIIEE 
1» NM04 DOAWARE 

127 0202*0- DORNEY (D) (Mbs L. 

128 WOW EXERT 

129 000200 CATS I 

132 (DOM WUMLAHlOuS (Mrs S CnMj 



W Draws) S Dow 4-7-8- 
■ATMMMBcttn 4-7-7 


I P Stamp) 10 
MLTboamlS 


Bfl ^, T« gy. j-lE acm Tree, 1M Com Street. 7-1 Ml George. 10-1 
Comcnarm. 10-1 Tranaftash. Al Amend. 12-1 Vorvados, Lorie Lormrev 16-1 offerv 


Iingfield selections 

By Mandarin 

Ewee Tree. 1230 SiMletta. 1.0 BAKHAROFF (nap). 130 
Nebns- 2.0 Highest Peak. 230 Stay Low. 3.0 Ivory GuU. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1 1.55 Transflasb. 1230 Singletta. L0 Mashkour. 130 Kaytn. Z0 
Highest Peak. 230 Stay Low. 3.0 Below Zero. 


1230 MARLEY ROOF TILE OAKS TRIAL (&Y*0 
4I)(8) 


£15^08: 1m 


201 

202 

204 

206 

206 

207 

208 
208 


1- LAUGHTER (Tha Queen) W Ham 49, 
KM MRX OH TIC FLOSS (LFrMdmMI- 


H Cad 80. 


■ 12- SMUTO (SheMi 
140 SPUN Q0U) (C«« 

3 BENAnOSA 

AMU DAVEMUA Mrs J S*nM)P KflMww &-«■ 
42 FLA—NO OANCSt (P MeMtyiSjw W BA 

■ 0 INTRINSIC (K ADOdHi) G Henwod 46 


Sffu»40_ 

P Cots 48. 

P l i Wwy M 


- W Genoa 4 

1MMI 

WRSMMmS 

T Qatar 1 

P Cook 8 

.Qm Kata'S* * 

B Rouse 7 

QAafteyS 


1 1-8 MW on the Hobs. 9-4 Sfcuhma. 5-l Spun Gold, 8-1 Laughter, lO-l Honing 
(tenesr. 14-1 Intrinsic. Bonawsa, 24-1 orient. 

FORM; LAUGHTER (8-0) Newmarket winner fromPICaal 
firm. Oct 19, 7 ten). MLL ON THE FLOSS I 


. . . .. .. __ . . loM2toGesooati 

Newmorkat (im2t listed. £9864. pood, Msyl, t2 ran). BB4AHOSA (8^ ran on 
Another 3L back DAVEmA &S) was 9Bi and MTOMSlC «-7) not n fiat 9. 
StNOLETTAJM) 1L2fM OlStoTnnhm at NtwmwMt(7f Itetod. £12271. good to 

tamj. MU ON THE FLOSS (84) was 7L1Urtwri»Ck kiSth. SPUN GOU) (Mfbtn 12 
3(4L <n lom tMtSnd Mttwy Lady WOJ IniOOQ Gunwa Ot. £101,244, good. May 1, 15 
ran). FLAaHNGOANCS1{6r11}294L£!ndo/8tDM]f08naBCtMrry(B-11)fKCnop3low(1ni 
21 imkt. £884. noW. Apr 1 
SwiMhoa: SMOLETTA 


5 21 CLOWN STHEAXmi 

8 M3 KUMRKmHI 

to ioa wesTuNQi 


11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
18 
19 
22 
23 

30 

31 
33 
3S 
38 
40 


0 GLENCROfTDWQanwwn 
■ JAMES OWL W PnrcsMH 

1 MOBLEKju^ ABaMwMl 


1 8-11 — MBfctbA 
. . SPMfcs7 

Q|U8ntl*B88 — KOtKtayS 
D Metals 1 


B RABEMUMTBanoni 

KKER ROAR MHEasMibv 8-8 JUstatfi 

1 GOODBinrBJULEVsmsBkRi&a AMacnyS 

TNEDEWL-SimOClJ^ooBM LCBsmadrM 

8 SAWDUST JACK M W Eastnrby 45 TLucssM 

BBt LEM MKEasMrty 44_1 NCMWW1I 

0 A® OF SPRMG T Bstnn 42 St HMtatartt 

0 OWYN BttOOK M W EaBWmy B-2 KHOtfgwnll 

8ALLrraOROrCThomwi42 JBmdSs5 

D GET BET USA C TmMer 8-1 M Wood 3 

CHAYOFA K Ssxw 8-0 PBwtof7)12 

NAH0WS 80MQ R StetOs 6-0 JHBnmafiMT 


11-4 CMm StroaMr. 3-1 KMvwnaL 4-1 mitafing UAmdsr. 
8*1 Good Bey's Boday’s. 8-1 Stay foxtrot, 10-1 GWoaoR. 12-1 
Rotor Roar. 14-1 osnkk. 


Thirsk selections 

By Mandarin 

11.45 Rabenham. 1Z15 Glikiaa Moo. IZ45 
Wine FestivaL 1.15 Caribbean Sound. 1.45 Safe 
River. Z]S Pmenim. 2.45 Well Rigged. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
11.45 Good Buy Bailey's. IZ15 Glikiaa Moil 
1Z45 Wine FestivaL 1.15 PeQinko. M5 Safe 
River. ZI5 Pinctum. Z45 Cascabel. 

By Michael Seely 

MS FELUNKO (nap). Z45 Well Rigged. 


1.15 *MAIL ON 
£2355:70(12) 

1 232- MANOflAKEMAOAM Denys Smta 9-7 MFry 4 

5 441 PBUHKO phW J aws 413 AMatUrS 

« 941 VEMJREDI nfCZE DM W Poarcs 8*10 MHSMtayt3)7 

7 304 TRICK OR TREAT J W Watts 8-10 NCi«orw>2 

8 m- SHXVIS DAUGHTER A 8-10 —9 

10 36*0 SBCtmmrPAOEICGCMmt14ia DMcfcoSs ID 

11 V mm PASSAGE T Barron 83 S Mtavi 

18 042 CARIBBEAN SOUND C Braun 42 JLm»S 

14 42B IMPROVISE (D) Ron Ttaraman 41 RPBwait 

19 24)4 CUMBRIAN DAMSER (B9 MH EosWlMr 

7-11 NCwM»12 

23 -430 UPTOWN RAWWS G Moore 7-7 6 Wood (7) 3 

24 040 POLLY WORIti H Whaaku 7-7 S P GnTWha (S> S 

11-4 PeEnfco, 7-2 Vsndrwfi Trmra. 4-1 CambQJn Sound. 4 

1 Irish Passage. 15-2 Gutman Qsncar, 10-1 improvse, I4~i 
oflws. 

1A5 COFFEE TIME CUP (Amsteurs) (£1,404: 1m 
4f)(20) 

1 049 ALWURTAJAZ (USA) R Smbbs 

&-11-5UKtaSttM»a)13 

2 42-0 CANE MLL C ThomiDn 4-11-5 R Swim (3)1 

3 431- CASTLE POOL (DJDGandotfo 

4-1 14 QhttWti GHadoMo (3) 7 

4 M2- DUAL VBfnJTC JmnwRtzgMaM 

4-114 T FMgenU |3) 12 
7 040 ITOROSn Dews fimOi 4-114 Janw Qootong 20 

9 81-0 ORYX MMM|D)SMBdor6-f 1-5_ Dona Hrttorrf 15 

10 PAJMUQ J fcgetoU 7-11-5 EFm«nn(3t& 

12 2M- PMCTAQA W Storey 4-11-5 Hooa SMrey 0) 4 

13 400 RHBMRMD I Ow 1411-5 WNom|3)14 

14 1-44 SAFE MVHI (USAXIA L Cuman 4-1 1-6 SmCwnaal2 
16 224 WALTER THE (MEAT MH 


12.15 90BA MAIDEN STAKES (3-V-O: £2,008: 5f) 

( 17 ) 


Km CMSP METCALFE M WEutBifiyM-. SKaUdtay-17 

04 EASTBWIE>3ifTSJa«MonM 1 if Wood 9 

048 HARRY HULL M W Etatartiy 94-. SPMuS 

204 MQMJUO GLBI F Wuaon 40 D Metals 16 

0 KHLESTAKOVRSmtWBO HBkcOM 

WHQ3JTAJ 


4 MURPHTS 


- - 1.00 HIGHLAND SPRING DERBY TRIAL Ofoup 3 (3-Y-O: E48373rtm 

; 40 ( 6 ) 

301 811321- BAKHAROFF 0C AfidUte) G Kanmod SO 
» -• 302 2211-31 MASMtOUR "* 


303 

304 

305 
307 


804140 UY TON TON (Mrs P 
■ ISO- NEW TRO JAN gSirl 


lAtawd S*hoan)H Gad 80 . 

PLamo^CBtw »9Q 


OStadcayO 

•CaattaaO 


0431-3 NORFOLK 30HATA IK BwnaS) H Boss 40 
12 naNT(F3w«qpct«9o 


.PRaWnonA 
. WCmmb* 

__ UtatarS 

— TOWnel 


Evans BaMwraH, 7-4 Mashkour. 11-8 Hart. 1<M Haw Titian. 141 My TonTon, 
• --r 25-1 Norton Soma. 


FORM; BAKHAROFF l 
_ 1/2L ai Doncaster (1m. 1 


. .BLAsiMtwiBner 
good to soft, Apr 30, 8 nm). NORFOLK 80- 
hstsnasrmffl^lLGooohwxid 


i. yood. 



9 104 RO PER WOW MH 

10 804 SAmTTONPAIA 

11 U0 SELORCELEi . 

12 4 *UPHKW«BEPC0fc9O> 

13 40 fii'PSt RESCO B Hanoury 90 h _ 

14 8 TP TOP BOY MW Ewart* SML 

19 42- FAUVEJW Watts 8-11 

21 424 GLMAAMOUfflFTR Boea8-1t — _ 

24 LATCH BTRMGLPigoatt 411 

26 KARCRBJEADJ I4amth411 

30 W84SOM3MELOOYPCUMM411. 


J Lowe 11 



5-n-S Cola Btaatby (3) 10 
18 303- EJKMVATDR LADY RWUlaksr 7-1 1-2_ Fltaes(3)3 

20 121- GENTLE FAVOR M PiBSCMJ 5-11-2. ttadw Justar 11 

21 042 OEtfTLE STREAM <D) J Tolar 

4-1 1-2 Lodade Stoptord-SadorfBe (3) 9 
23 906 EASY BMRPaacocfc 4-1 1-0_ drawn Paacock (3) S 

26 24-3 P0HTYATES J S wason 4-110 Q McLaren pj B 

30 440 50LAR CLOUD m D NKtabon 

4-110 Princess Anoe (3} 16 
34 034 TROIAN WAY RHCBnMad 

4-ltO A HcHMAad 131 19 

42 141 OMBKYmP Goto 41411 -^T EMttrty 11 

44 -KM MHBLE NATIVE 0ISA1S Norton 

30-12 Sandy Bmok (3) 17 
5-20ntoky.7-2 Qemla Ftoor. 42 Safa Rwar. 41 Cane MO. 
41 Dual Venture. 12-1 Fontyatu. 141 othare- 

2.15 WILLIAM HILL ‘FIRST FOR PRICES' 
HANDICAP {£2,754: Bf) (12) 

1 004 VALLEY M8JJ8TCKD1 T Binon 4100. B«cCiff(7)7 

4 404 8HArBJE*S MWY (D) W Paarce 70-5 M Hmley (3) 6 

5 0000 INUMPTDNiaUCEnmWWlwton 

40-IEQneat 




Going: good 

Draw: low numbers best 

2.15 FRANCASAL SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £823: 
5f) (8 runners) 

1 0 CLEARWAY C HA 411 ACtertS 

2 ROMANY LAO W CM Turner B- 11 RCwa«t3 

3 04 TELEGRAPH FOLLY R Hoad 8-1 1 Th*sB 

4 0 SEEP TAW C Hdi 3-8 NQay2 

5 FLORET P HqesJ 5-8 _ M Robots 4 

6 JUST ENCHANTING F Cwrfe* 8-3 G Baxter 6 

9 30 SUPS REFTUMDH Jones 46 J Rod 7 

11 002 VALDOSTA CWcurnan 4b RHBsl 

150 Sam's Refrain. 11-4 Teiegrapn Foay. 4-1 Vakjosta. 14 
2 Ctaarihay. 12-1 Just Enchamrng, 14-1 others. 


Bath selections 

By Mandarin 

2. 1 5 Just Enchanting. 2.45 Alkzdi. 5.15 Waierlow 
Park. 3.45 Sccrei Wedding. 4.15 Snow Wizard. 

4.45 Hale ,\nd Heany. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.45 Atkadi. 4.15 Snow Wizard. 

Michael Seely’s select ion: 3. 15 Water low Park. 


21 2-13 GOING BROKE (BF) D U-Sntn 47-9.. SDmwon(3j5 

24 040 SMITTLECOCX STAR J BrnSger 4-7-7 —3 

7-2 v/stenow Parti. 4-1 BaSei Champ. 5-1 Gomg BroXa. 41 
Flying Olticar. 4l Gneka. '2-1 Morgans Choice, stvny Copper, 

3.45 MiOSOMER NORTON RLL1ES HANDICAP (3- 
Y-O: £2,473: lm 2f 50yd) (7) 

1 MJ-2 SECRET WEDDING w Here 47 W Carson 4 

3 444 ZStDQJHA R Hamm 4S - AMcSons2 

6 004 APPRECIATIVE P Watwyn 8-0 NHowe 1 

8 -240 FAIR ATLANTA M Usher 7-7 RSmot7 

9 040 SIRDAR FLYER Mr« C Ream 7-7 L RaggH (7)5 

10 004 SLAP BANG N Vigors 7-7 — SDawn(3l6 

12 M4 STUJLOU P lAtctwl 7-7 —3 

44 Secret Wedding. 4-1 Fan Attanta. 11-2 Sfrlou, 142 

Zndebna. 141 AppreoaFve, 14-1 others. 

4.15 WEST LITTLETON MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£1B9S: 1m 31 150yd) (19) 

3 434 BETTER BEWARE (USA) I Bating 94-.- J Marttma 19 
5 CORNISH PIXIE (USA) F Durr 8-0 G Bauer 3 

7 0 CROWN HONE B Stevens 40 — 16 

9 M Wn*STONflJ6A>FO»m40 G French 12 

13 tm HELLO GEORtBE M McCormack 40 — RWeraltanS 


■HIST DAVID A Stewart 48 

16 48 LAW COURT (USA) H Candy 9-0 . 

18 004 MISTS OF TIlMlBakltM 40 

19 40 MUSIC MPtSTRa-CNefcon 40.. 

20 400 NEVER BEE (WjBndger 40 — 

21 DF40 ROYAL EFFIGY 0 LasSe 9-0 

22 SNOW WIZARD OOdtMb 40. 


04 SUREG«MIW)PWarwwi40 

24 004 TEARS OF LAUGHTBt C Bel 40 


URtacmS 
— R Curant ID 
__ S Pam 13 

J Reid 7 

R Guest 11 

PRflbanon 14 

R HMsI 

N Howe 2 

— 18 


« 140 OXIEY BAY K>)K Whin 4^41: 
7 -813 SULtrS CHOKE mUSAXD) 


VSnHtH 


M Lynch (5) 6 
A tern « 
HMnAarffiT 
NCoMortaaZ 
.EMni 

T Lucas B 

RCcctaaw4 
J Remedy 13 


9 -104 GODS SOLUTION 
12 400 PAWLEY'S GRL( 


wbwi ^5TK35«* 3 

$ WntaMrS 


T Barren 446 
IHoMishtad 

4-S-3ACribaM(7)B 

17 484 TNATCHVHJLE (DJ I MRtttiens 4-40 G Dickie 2 


19 81-0 PBCIUMJTdMr 4-7-12. 


KOariey 12 


11-8 FaumL 7-2 Murphy's Wlwata. 5-1 QNdaa Mou. 41 
Suparcomtu, 141 Latch String, 141 Roper Row, 14-1 others. 

12jI 5 MAY SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O; £1,031: 1m 

( 12 ) 

Mfty8 — 


. . _ front Mams Doncar 18-81 (1m 2f. CS402. good IP soft, Aj 
. - - NATA.1X3m^)toTorwacla»1i)tJnre8PDi»irance,ta 

■ _ wa nn er from Palaesire&61(7L &!7iB2 pood io firm. Oct 1.5 rant. TISnTKM) ran on W 

fimsh 1 113. 2nd » FJytng^ Wo (9-4) ar Newnwrtv* n m 41 Wed, E978& wtt, V - 17 - 11 
renj. MY TON TON (9-1) was 7th. In 198S MY TON TON (4T1)«st orar 7L48i 0l 7to 

, ■ Bonhond8WAscot{1nvC!Sj927.Bnn,Sept28i.t®N , niOJMi(411)v«‘ 

■ ; : PievKX^NEWTRaiAN(W)n3/5.4thof5To0oidAiTanflaBianC(WB 

• ‘ ■ ks«. maw^o^finiL Aug30|. 


wasuMdoffML 

atStadown(7f 


1.30 WILLIAM DE BROE STAKES (L MM handfeNp£S,108: 1m 2f) 

.2 

11-8 NaWs. 7-2 LM of Rro, 7-1 Prito. Kayta 141 MaOman, Toda Fores Avow. 
14-1 Gay Captain 

ZOO TKD0DE STAKES (3-Y-G: £3,132: lm 21) (13) 

502 8 FORWARD MOVE (R Lawson) D A Wtoon 411. 

5M 004 QOCrS PATH WCwaDDBavwrtb 411 
505 08023 MOMEST PEAK (W Du 



EAKJW Du Ptmt tfi) 0 fWcftantGortonOll 
tT^QurtcJ E eon 411 



(Mm O Watts} 8 Gmcav 411- 

rETUty) M Hums 41 1 

BnKSaJ D A l/fan 41T 



04 SWISS NEPHEW WrePSottamirWJ I 
0 AM0TH6R PAGEANT «t 
004 LAST POLONAISE (T Swt. . 

3634 HLFBt (Lord Ta««tocfc} W 


BCadhaa 12 

^WBfiStSo 

I — BRowa4 

POaekS 

. sawhceyr 


10-1 


42 Highest f*rt. 41 Qua»L 9-B PAftr. 11-2 Anottar Pagaatt, 41 LkpftWigByto, 
l Sr Brett. 141 other*. 

2.30 TULYAB AUCTION STAKES (2-Y-O: £2^05: 5f) (10) 

<“ 'SB 

QAMtSHOW |p Foa p MaWJ B-11 

MAROUS CAFE |W GaflJ OLMW Ml--— 

" BBSgmgag ggSnS 

awn fiata Ta Wit If I I.MiiiHll PlMnrt O flnrtwn ft n 


603 

604 
606 
60B 
609 
611 
6T5 
620 
621 


412 SAMLEONf 
08 WISE TINES (C B-<_ 



4-5 Swy Low. 11-4 Samteon, 7-1 Rwte GuesL 141 UDWiwig UBflend, 14-1 WNa 
Tones. 141 otnera. 


3B PLOUGH HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2^25: 7t 140yd) <12) 

2 124336 WCTtMIW^PO ^A Inq WM>8 


G Starkey 4 
MMaSt 


5 641- IVORY GULL 

7 841238 BELOWaBJI 

8 430410 BOWL OVER 

9 0004 WARWAGT 

II 064304 LUMTIMU 

2 MM 

6 0400 ARROW 



9 00040 flUk—rnini i spruce 

20 MATaJ3TBgYAUE~ 

21 000-0 GRANDWiGUS (K “ 



7-10MLTMew»3 
OCarwr(3)11 
N Adam 1 
RFaaS 


3-1 ttm Greek 7-2 iwxy tyAr rigny. 4 1 Weat Cemick. 41 Bow* 

ow. 10 O&W zSS!l2-1 MaJomt ftayaie. 14-1 offers. ' . 


Today’s course specialists 


LINGFIELD 

TRAINERS: H OodL U wfcypre froro 31 

25 7^. G Harejod 34 from iM. 

jockeyS: G Starkey. K winners from 

BATH 

J Meff^ ISfrom 113, 
R HAS, 6 Wm 48. 126%. 

THIRSK 

TRAINERS: T Barron, 15 winrgrg frpm77 

17 E Bdrta 6 froni 37a 165%. 

JOCVEV& a fctackay 

14 0%, N COnnortOtt, B horn 72. 

gg,M Fry. 8 


HEXHAM 

TRAMBtS: K O Mm. 6 WfmWS from 31 
Tuffws Ifl.4 yw r A Sttp heaspB, 31 from 
181. 16L£%; J Charnen. 13 from 85, 
15J^fc. 

JOCKEYS; C Grant, 19 tannere from se 
rides. 207%. 

HEREFORD 

TRARSR& F Wtntar. 10 wffnars from 36 
rumen. 

2AJS+: Mrs w Gytos, 10 from 47, 21^%, 
jogiEYS: S Sirioi Bates, 6 winners from 
SO ndes. 20.0%; ft DuriwoOOy, 8 from 43. 
18P»: P Leach. B from Si. 

MARKET RASEN 

TRAINERS: Mrs M DWdnaoa 33 wfrffers 

tram ga 292%-. JRt^JBfakl. 25 from 113, 

21.7%. • - - 

JOCKEYS: No CuaUfiere. 


-a??SBaas«®l 

I shock in dicUv) .^CamcronS^HaDdicap. Or returned lest 
Ihe 12-1 winner of the as tannners. 


vear 


kS. 



-1 048 -DESAREMT Baron M : 

2 -004 FASTAWFIW«)Lr RHo«to9rwd94l_ SPwkaO 

3 064 HRE LORD G Moore M D Casey (7) 3 

4 044 FOREVER YOUNG GCKfrDjfd 9-0 LOWMCk4 

5 040 TOURNO TRUMPS P Rohan 9-0 JBMaadiHl 

6 042 UCXY HUMBUG W Anna 80 HCcwwrm/ 

7 004 MIAMI MSPR^SR SUtaa 80 DMcholelO 

8 W0 PEWYN BOV TO Ron Thompson 90 RPB6W5 

9 104 R088K GRAKfr W WartonMl- — E (test » 11 

12 844 fUDAHQEBMD«B)WVmH1on411 M Cartels 9 

13 800 0URANMEECvNr811 Waa4yCMv(7)1 

16 8 WBC FESTIVAL M Prescott 811 GDafbUf 

42 Ludkjr Humbug, 7-2 Frist and Friendly, 4-1 Dasararn.4 
1 Mrant h arma. SrVWna FesavM, 141 Foreeer Young, 141 
Hr* Lord. 141 omara. 


20 -400 COOL EN0U8Ht&S) Mrs J Randan 

47-ttTWafieresl 

23 434 PAWAMCH WELLS M W Easterly 3-7-8 LChanwtit4 

28 080 BOLD ROWLEY JSWMon 47-7 J Lowe 11 

11-8 ThatchvHe. 7-2 Stay's Chocs, 4-1 Oxhey Bay. 42 
Pamiaiich Waas, 41 Gods Sottan. 10-1 Pinetira, 12 

2.45 THIRSK HUNT CUP (£8,337: 1m) (12) 

1 064 RBI RUSSSJ.G carat 5410 aMchoBaS 

3 -204 ALL FAR IMP Hastes 541 TWa*awt2 

4 1-21 WELL IfrQGB) (C-m M H Easterly 5-40 MBttch 1 

5 MOO PAASmtCN(^LijonD>Dwn449 —7 

7 180 SHORT SLEEVES Mm SIM 4-84. SPGrinWu(5)8 

B 812- CASCABELIWR JWO*m»S44 RC«Mm2 

9 280 WORKADAY C Bay 44-4 N Cennorton 6 

T Loess Tl 


I Gray 4-44. 

BURAAGM WGtaBrtnf S44. 


Tl w .. 

12 418 OVER CANNON (B)(USA| PWR R Wooffowsa 

443 KOariey 4 

14 U10 TUTBURY (C-D) W Wharton 4-8-0 RCartMeS 

15 802 PALMON fC-O) R Hoamhead 4-7-11 ACottiaM(7) 10 

16 -an RAPS ACTION (DIG Moots 5-7-7 J Lowe 9 

41 CascalM. 7-21t«iiiry, 4-1 Wefl Rigpod. 41 PaSnion. 7- 

1 Saw Cannon. 41 Rapid Action, iWBureag. 12-1 Paris 
Match, 141 others. 


MARKET RASEN 


14 42PP CW NA CULLE J Gritord 4180 EMorahyM 

17 0-P9 HAPPY WORKERJC1M W Eastahy 11-104 — . Ftw 
19 4FP MB1WAY GAUNTtET fOOQ 0 Bmrai 


Going: good 

2.0 AVELMG-BARFORD MV1CTA 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£614: 2m 41) (9) 

1 1000 TASHONYA fflS (D) J Janttn 4-11-10 

2 prop miMMsnmramPBidiar 411 - 10 — 

4 6236 ffiQIKSCOmGNagMi 411-0 D 

5 000 CHAM»PSimWASl80hanEOT 


1 1-100 If Bremen 

22 BW AffTMARVAL (GO) JBkmdsB 14104 DOfften 

23 POM ALABAMA F S Jackson 4100 Mr H Korns 

SELLING BwnaGelnaay. 7-2 Spring Chancetar, 41 CnocNaCuNe, 
41 Kumon Sunahiie. 141 Happy Worker. 12-1 offers. 


P) 


411-80 coadrem 

8 0PM PRNCERAPDJ Norton 411-8 HrS WoocN (7) 

9 P333 BfIBf GUMS1H Ftaning 411-3 MPappre 

14 8PM MCnaUE T Kareey 4ii4L_— ! Caean Kareay m 

' 17 OP40 WHAT A POPS OMKMoroan 411-0 KRyaatit 

18 PPM CHATTY CHEZ JKMUtMM411-0 SKatBewta 

11-8 Tastanya, 41 Bren Gunner. 41 Negreaco, Changed 
Parson, 41 W* A PopsL 241 offera. 


Market Rased selections 

ByMandarin 

2D Bran Gunner. 230 Just ABcfc. 3D Yahoo. 330 Staarpfte. 4J) 
Gainsay. 4D0 Rape! Gumar.-SD JaranypKh. 630 The Cherry 


Man. 


430 LINCOLNSHIRE MAIDEN HURDLE 

(Amateurs: E1.48& 2m) (20) 

2 P4M DUST CONOUERHt (USA) O Sherwood 

4l82AMcKecw(7) 

3 M HELL RAISBI J Thorpe 7-12-2 — 

4 OOPP HOUNSTtXJT (B) G Prusl S-12-2 T Edwards 0 

5 LATE Twent W A SwjWBQn 5-12-2— P Joiitwwi (i) 

7 8 MA8IER-BL0W T Kersey 7-122. Hn J Mthfem p) 

11 OOOS RAPB GUNNER (^pF) J EPwards 

4l2-2HMdrerds(7) 

13 ROCABAY BUIE M Camacho 412-2 — 

13 F0F9 ROUNDGREY T Caeev 4182 TCtateta 

14 SEBir SHADOW A Btadcraore 4124 M BWefcmMB (7) 

15 -80 STEADY DUDLEY J Scaflan 412-2 — 

19 840 CORAL HA8B0UR G PrttchanlGlMon 

4-1V11H0H4WWHER 

22 0 JAMEB4A J Long 411-1 PCIartte 

23 POM LOW MOOR M 

25 4 OU1WOOD LASS (0} B 


27 0034 B ta GM O B C J Faricee 4-11-1., 


4-11-1 K Cotter 


411-1 (fiaa 8 Yartlay ( 


ZOO LINCOLNSHIRE STANDARD 
CHASE (E2v316: 2m) (12) 

2U430 BEBCTUHEJFWSwNd 12-182. 


HANDICAP 


29 PJPU ROYAL FEATURE Mrs E Andrews 411-1 S Andrews K} 

33 F0F TRUGOD Lee 5-11-11 HBrowa(7) 

34 M WtSlWOP LADY RSchotey 411-1 1 — 

35 8 KELLYAMSAT C Hoyle 4-1 1-0 — 

36 0822 ROYAL SHOE U Pipe 4-11-6- 


5 FOOD SQegJdOSpIFJaOBon 141 1-6 MMWctardSl 

6 11U2 CAPTAIN DAWN J Giflord 10-11-MteMMM6 



11-4 Royal Shoe. 41 Coral Hartxxjr. 9-2 Rapid Gunner. 41 
Oust Conqueror, 41 Rocabey Blue. 141 Low Moor, 12-1 Late 
There. 14-1 others 


14 OBg HAHWASTAR 
18 Fm PALATWATE G 
20 0004 SLEVE BRACKEN 

23 0430 MK3CS RI TUAL . . 

24 run NUTAOTCnoYMPQ Mrs J Carr Bore 

418® ( 

26 0388 BRAMB AMI USZTP Butter 14180 


5J> BEAUMONTECOTE 
(Amateurs: £1,870: 2m) (16) 

1 F421 J MM YWCK <Q J Lai» 412-12 


NOVICE CHASE 


7-12-5. 


TCwttao 


41 Lochrua, 4-1 Juet Aft*, 41 area Line. 11-2 Captain 
Dawn. 41 Bold Deaiar. 141 Straw Bracken, Marina Star. 141 
others. 

3-0 BET WITH THE TOTE HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£2^88: 3m) (14) 

1 0144 WYANT Dwaame 7-11-13 I DWMerea 

2 3P1T TAB0MA LORD D Moorhead 

411-it {tOexlD OwM m 

4 U330 SXEWSBV M W Esoterfry 1411-8 PTis* 

5 8M0 ABANDONED WAHRIOR (C-O) Mrs C fteife^WJBSs 

4l1-8MDwyer 

17 3P0F SNJetSMOW Mrs E Scott 4W-5 Ettaptgr j4J 

IB MM ABRAMACFH Lae 4144 ! S lilted 

20 8418 WIL-TOrmflUJ Norton 4142 (C Ryata (7) 

21 P030 CHUCXBUCfcjCl S G Smith 8180 M Bremen 

23 fW PHOTON 4140 DDsttea 

24 MM ChfHAIJff DfedsO 4148, 

P) 


3 FF30 SHARK 

6 P-PP BRONZEH 

7 hobo mm FUZ Z W A 

IM BVBtORMB 


> Roe 411-12 C 

. 1 41 1-12— P 

. _ ... i j Rate 411-12™. A Forte (7) 

IT 600P RtEMBH UBJTBMKT {B| N Steens 

411-12SAariraMpg 

19 /PPP JUST WHARTON W Hardy 411-12 T Natan 

15 OFF MONAS BAtNT A KlteSes 1411-12 — . SWWaker0 

IB /P4 SANDY WOOD J Townson 411-12 J Tomsmi 0 

19IWf SEAL MOON J Redtom 411-12 CWteocv(7) 


24 0234 TURTLETON K Bote 9-11-12. 

25 WAGS Of SH J Thorpe 7-11-12 . 


S Andrews (7) 


27 030 WDMS1 MLL MCasM 14-11-12 Btea J Rwowan m 

28 OF/0 MSS PRAGUE DLMbaras 12-11-7 GWraggfri 

23 9426 PB4HY FALLS S Bowring 7*Tl-7 — 

30 SHAAPVUE (B) Mbs J Addnson 41 1-6 ... H Brown (7) 

7-4 Jcnmyprck, 100-30 Sknark, 42 Turttoton, 41 Busk 
Fuzz. 41 Penny Falls, 141 others. 

&30 MARKET RASEN NATIONAL HUNT FLAT 
RACE (£893: 2m) (26) 

1 1 THE CHERRY HAN (Dl O Sherwood 4-11-7.. C Cat (41 

MITWMY MLL NBwrofr 411-6 — M Mchanfsan (7) 
BE PATENT MT SON MuGCWOB 411-8 


26QFPP CYPRUS SKY F Jackson 9-140 - 
27 0002 GAMYULELADORoy RoOlnsai 

4ia«rC 

26 MM JMPAN2E R Brsnnpon 7-140 


44 Tatremo Lord. 41 Yahoo. 4-1 Stowsfay, 41 GetawNe 
Lhd. VoysriL 241 ottwre. 

3-30 LINCOLNSHIRE MAIDEN HURDLE 

(Amateurs £1^15: 2m) (20) 

1 «M> MB71CR fisher 7-122 K Cottar (71 

2 000 CAREEN M Ptae 5-12-2 — MnHHaeddl 

"" ISUNMreB Brunt 6-144 CRH 

J Edwards 412-2 MMriwnMP) 



7P0FP DANTES TB S 
9 8/82 OtOPEBEAftM 
14 4P0 MAJESTIC STM J 
16 B HERE JHUBC tea J 
4PF SEYL FGfesM 4124. 

lSft»4ia-2 



U Chapman 4124 S Woods | 
7-124 S C~ 

122 — HrSl 

8124. 



■ BAY 0 Marks 

9 . Juauu 

mpS! S^SSeSi 




4-11-11 cwtrenm 

iriam 7-U-li Cfitaydim 
4-11-11 Des Wtaotafn 
jftMl-11. P Johns® (7) 

4-11-11 BDosdea(7) 

Dfek If Saar, 11-42 Aorte. 7-1 
! Steorpflce, 12-1 Ctose Ram*. 24 


WEST HANDICAP CHASE 



2 

. 4 

5 

7 

8 
13 
15 
22 
26 
2B 

35 

38 

43 

44 
47 
51 

S 

K 

77 

79 

80 
83 
85 


JET SM 


L BOV D Moltat 411-0 Mr* J Moffat (7) 

I NNG D Nrthdtson 411-6 »A»r®fT) 

J RULER T Carey 5-1 1-8 MrTCoettfa 

LSssJWritat 411-6 Mss JWtnM 

taoson 411-8 DCondeapI 



5-tVGI 

LADY 0 F8ALWH N R Ffaher 411-1. 

SKKJOY LADY S G SMff 411-1 . 
TMANNAROSA 0 ftwwm 411-1 . 


lATorapidnst^ 


.JGonaan 


KRysel 


PLYMO DANCER Mrs Mi 

— - 4-1KMr*$rei&( 

(WARS MEADOW FH Lee 4-11-0 CNetof 

JACK DASH Dlha 4-11-0 — Mr K Drown ( 

SEAL COURT J Scflten J-1W5. 


8 THE FRO^I NORTH Mrs JPWaai 

4-1 1-0M (PCaBaMB ( 

J(gr«WMa«by 4-148 HGrerity 

OneiORENCnrao 4-149 Mr JOrenw 

MSHT8 STAR j Forte 4-148— 

WWBPEAHL h FtendnoA-lM . 

STtetton oob. b Preeoe 4-140 


Mr A Forts | 
Dl 


44 The Cherry Men. 4-1 . 
Baktaai. 13-2 The Frotan North. 
RodqpiB. 14-1 omefB. 


Dm, 5-1 Lady a 
1 Copper King, 12-1 


44 THEODORE 

(£2,733: 3m) (8) 

7 1222 GAMBAY 

TO 2004 SPftH*OCHA*caiDR(C-DJ W ASreptumson 

1 1-1400 CorMI (7) 

If 1PP0.HUNCM BUM3HNE(B) (Q D Yeoman 

9-1MPftnai(4) 


MraJP%not4l4a. 


• T*» Jockey Dub have suspended Mark Pitman 
from a ding for the remaining three weeks of the 
National Hun! season on medical grounds. A 
.statement by Dr Michael Alien, Senior Medical 
Omt*r, said: “ Mark Pieman, following a series of 
lauS during the past 10 days 'which resulted in a 
cervical whiplash injury, has been medically 
appended uora riding for tbe rest of foe season 
by tiie Jockey aubmedioti consultants.” 


2.45 EBP MONUMENT MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
C1.611:5f)(7) 

1 ABSOLUTION K Brassoy 80 RHBsfi 

22 3 ALAADt W 0 Gtanar. S-Q Tlws4 

23 ALLEATS BAY C H9 80 GBnterB 

24 M BRUStffORD (Bt L ConraB 9-0 IJohMmS 

27 CAfLHL©r M McCcifrnBdt 9-0 RWanhn2 

10 SAY YOU WIX P Mskin 80 JRekl 7 

15 3 THE DOUNCAN B Kfls 90 BOmpsoBl 

2-1 ABtatfr. 5-2 Tha Domncan. 41 Afisolurioa 41 Say You 

WB, io -1 Careen. i 2 -i asm. 

3.15 BOX HANDICAP (£2.792: 2m It 27yd) (13) 

2 0000 KORGAITS CHOICE (C-DjCHdf 447 T Ires 6 

5 22-2 WATERLCW PARK (BF>1 Bakina 4-84 - 4 Matfrras 12 

6 0*0 SALORS REWARD J Kru 4-43 —9 

12 483 BALLET CHAMP (USAJ FHMder 8410 A Proud 2 

13 0-84 FLYING OFFICER (BKC-n) M Pipe 849- H Robertas 

14 /40 AMBUCKJRoMrts446 LRrggto(7)1 

15 21-0 KM STAR R Hodoeo 4-86 —4 

10 140 SYLVAN JOKER (B) P MktttaB 4-45 __ AMcGbmU 

17 0024 SHMY COPPER Mrs N Smff 443 Bltaral 

IB 0/00 FA1DROS (FR) J Old 5-41 J Raid U 

18 420 CHEKA (USAXCU) I Baktag 147-10 R MPa 11 


25 430 VANTASTIC B Stevens 80 Tlwa4 

26 BAQ J CcEgrsva 811 JScafty (T)fi 

27 404 CanC0MEGPnre411 JMB6m5 

28 EXCELBELLE (USA] J Durtop 411 BThencMn 15 

! LOVE J Dun! ‘ 


31 34 SAVAGE! 


I Dunlop 41 1 . 


W Canon 17 


11-4 Sure Ground. 7-2 Savage Love. 42 Mists of Tone, 11- 
2 Law Court. 7-1 Snow Wfcaro. 10-1 Better Beware. 

445 CHAPEL FARM HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,624. 5( 
167yd) (14) 

1 440 THE WLCOIE CLUB (BF1 M McConnatL 9-7 .. J Retd 2 

2 (CO- USEFUL (C-D) B Hat 45. BThonsonll 

3 904 WEBSTStS FEAST M MoCORWck. 44 R Watnham 3 

7 420 FOUNTAIN BELLS R Hamta 48 A MeGWna9 

8 024 ffiRMNOA N Vioars 88 SDreraonCDU 

8 224 GYPSY'S PROPHECY (USAJ G Harwood 88. ACterh S 

10 -BBS OLE FLO (OK Brassey47. Threa4 

11 402 HASL AND HEARTY RSmftti&-5 PRotwreWlS 


12 040 MUHTAIII8CBfl|lsiB8d84.. 

13 M GALAXY PATH LCottM 84. 


14 448 CHORISTERS DREAM (B) J Penatt 43 

15 004 SUNNY MATCH LCottraf 82 

16 040 SHARASAR R HOMter 81 

18 424 TZU-WONOM ftpe 9-4 M 

7-42 Gypsy's Prophecy, 42 Halt and Hearty. 5-1 OteFto. 41 
Memnnaa. 41 The HUcote Qub. Useful, 141 Founttun Beds. 
12-1 Tm-Wong. 141 offers. 


W Carson 5 
.R HNS 10 
N Howe 14 
0 Baxter 7 
APraodB 
1 


12 QUO JUVEMLEPRMCEM Offer 81 l-Q. 

13 20FF RAY PROSSER F Welwyn 141413 , 

14 PPP0 HAVAKAZE G L Wteanw 7-1413— 


Gomg^ood 

2.30 KNK5HT, FRANK A RUTLEY HANDICAP 
CHASE (£1 .380: 3m If) (13 runners) 

4 4220 DUMPER SIFT Wrinr 411-2 BdeNun 

5 2130 JO COLOMBO IQ MrsW Sykes 11-1413 — P Warner 
7 0OPO C38LEY EXP«Ss (D) B B Isaac 14147.-. R UNmn 
9 283 STAUNTON AF) R 

10 0302 BASHFUL LAD (1 


17 -OOP FARMER <DIR Hawker H-141D 
PHNCESS HECATE gMR P Daws 


IS 04M 


RD w oody 


. C Mam 
EWwte 


19 0130 PARTY MISS W E fisher 11-188 

21 00M CATHY’S PAL J ’ ~ 

22 3023 BRKMMA (BF) ST Hams 4147 

23 0320 CARAD0(B)(HF)MCPrie 5-147 

24 iBP3 STRAIGHT UP tO 


11-149 IHnTDret>{7> 


H Danes 
..A Sharpe 
3 Starwood 
P Leach 


, . 11-108- S Sherwood 

__ . tO p-O) M Offer 11-188 — R 

11 FW LATE NfGKT EXTRA (B) X C Bate 14140-.. B 

12 0P31 KE1EGARKMJ WeOhar 7-180Sex1 AWehfa 

14 4442 NOTRE CMEVAL (C| S Meter 7-180 — 

15 OOO BRIDGE ASK J t Johnson 18-109 — 

T7 30M» LAST ARGUMENT N A Gesatoe 12-140— A Adim(7) 

19 P0P0 WORTH LANE (Dj K asnop 4108 JFrott 

20 -OOP UNDER-RATED ffi) Mra A Appiey3ni4180 PWcfrrerie 
23PP00 CONN THE CCNM-ERM Stapnans 4140..— ACanui 

11-4 KMsgar Kim. 7-2 Dumper, 42 Bashful Lad, 5-1 Notre 
CheeaL 142 JO Coiomho. i0-i Smunfrxv 12-1 Cobtey Express. 


- AR Aytett 14146 — . CWanan(7) 

26 OO0P BORDER GadCFLux*w* 13-143 RMMman 

27 0401 UPHAM KELLY (D)Q RGandotta 7-108 AWeab 


Hereford selections 


7 -2 Wye Lea. 4-1 Upturn Kelly. 118 Golden Debdous. 7-1 
" B «nT7 ji Bngona. 41 Party Miss. 141 Caredo. 12-1 Princess Hecare. 

4J0 HEREFORD TIMES & RBB HUNTER CHASE 
(Amateurs: £880; 3m If) (12) 

1 118 PflttJE OTIFE (B) J A Edwards 
412-10MteaVWWBiire(7| 

2 «4 BALLYWELLP Paris 11-128. Mas T Darts (7) 

3 LW- KE TTHSON R F Knge 13-128 TTfronreta Jones 

4 0l4 WWTERRBSE Miss S Brawn 8128 CBemettf/J 

5 UW ASBYRAMARC Pnca 11-1 18 PTTmbk(7) 

7 440 BACHELOR LADD R Pnce 11-118 MrM Price (7) 

9 4 CORVEDALE CORFTON K C Edwards 


By Mandarin 

2 30 Dimmer. 30 Northern Halo. 330 Mi 
Kefy. 430 Kailheon. 5.0 Amhaa. 5 30 Yes 


Mai. 4.0 Upham 


11 0P4 KARANNSUA 

12 WOP LONESOME PARK 


811-9GGodnl(7} 
MLow(4) 


3.0 BONUSPRINT CONDfrtONAL JOCKEYS 
SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£340: 2m) ( 

6 0100 THEOQRJOG (D) R B Eranea 6-11-3 CCoetey 

8 014- DRVUfS SONG A F Lecpaon 5-118 — 

11 OPO0 CONORS ROCK D R Tocher 41411 SDoody 


12 040 NORTHERN HALO (C-D) A J Chamhertui 


13 0000 HfTTY WREN (B) BIKcks 4188- 

14 000 RODOT DOTH A P James 4147.. 


5-148R Quasi 
CWanert 


C Evans 
R Byrne 


15 -POO HADDAK (USA) BPMrw 5-147 

15 -000 THE RUSK F Jordan 5- 147 

18WP3 WEAVB1S WAY B R Camtedas 4147 RHatfuki 

19 0033 WATER EATON GAL (C-OJMC Pipe 4147_ JLrMer 

23 000 KALMPONGPButar 4-147 Latan Bumfrsm (7) 

2C BRPO CALYPSO QUEEN pQ W Clay 5-10-7 DoMCtey 

25 0000 UBKK0T0US LADY JE Long 5-147.- LeenLong(7) 

9-4 Water Eaton Gal, 3-1 Weaver* Way, 4-1 Treoeffog. 41 
N annum halo, 41 CMvme's Song. 12- 1 offers. 

3J0 SUN VALLEY POULTRY NOVICE CHASE 
(El ,920: 2m 21) (16) 

8 0F34 BOWEN (BF) I M Dudgeon 411-4 MRkhreds 

9 1F04 BROAD BEAM Mrs M fSnel 6-1 1-4 Jl 

11 BFOO BRYMA B Rafftg 6-1 1-4 _ 

12 34P0 CASTLE TALBOT J E 
14 011F DANCING KWStBGK 

16 23-1 DERBY DULY (C-D) K C 


14118 

(Mrs A Price 

_ 1411-9 KsaLWMtocem 

13 43F2 ROYAL VIEW VRBtthqp 14118 C Croats 

15 COUNTRY KAY A BCowap 411-4 SHdun(71 

16 LC MONRO MnsJShann frll-4 GSoe>(7) 

2-1 Prate O' Fite. 4-1 Keifteon. 41 BaUywafl, 41 Covatdale 

Cortton. 141 Royal View. 12-1 others. 

5.0 PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE NOVICE HURDLE 

(£1/482: 2m) (17) 

1 3220 PREORDINATION MC Pm 4-1 VII P Leach 

3 0314 FREEMASOtyDXBFIO Shwwixxl 41 1-1 5 Sherwood 

6 23U4 PRINCE RAMBORO pQ Mrs M Rural 

4ll'9PScutemm 

7 0003 SBAB|D)JCoHon8118 CSoath 

12 0321 ARNHALL (B> (D) N J Handarson 

4-1 1 -A Mr T Thomson Jonas 

14 10FF SHADY LEGACY (C-D| R Morris 411-4 4 Bryan 

28 4000 HEAOttT ON W Ecktoy 411-2.. AOHagen 

33 040 MARSTON MOOR (USA) BPaffn 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1986 


CRICKET: EXCITEMENT AS ESSEX JUST FAIL TO ANSWER THE CHALLENGE OF A GENEROUS DECLARATION 


Alderman’s five-wicket 
spree shows 




CHELMSFORD: Kern (32pis) 
beat Essex (4) by 25 runs. 

An absorbing match was 
brought to the most exciting of 
conclusions yesterday. Kent 
gaining their first champion- 
ship victory of the season. 

A nicely judged declaration 
left Essex 269 to win in a 
minimum of 74 overs which, 
thanks to two partnerships, 
they almost achieved. More 
than anything they were un- 
done by Terry Alderman, 
who. moving the ball both 
ways, took the first five 
wickets. 

At tea. Essex, if not in pole 
position, were handily placed 
on 143 for three. Hardie. 
Gooch and Prichard had all 
gone relatively cheaply, the 
last named to a lovely piece of 
bowling by .Alderman, who 
cut the ball back after running 
several away from the bal-Yct 
Border had the measure of the 
pitch and Fletcher, having 
survived a searching spell 
from Dilley, had played him- 
self in against Underwood. 
His first three balls went for 
boundaries. 

The pitch had changed 
when Alderman returned di- 
rectly after tea. Border, hither- 
to circumspect for almost two 
hours — he and Fletcher added 
80 for the fourth wicket — 
drove recklessly at his compa- 
triot and edged to first slip. 

Two balls later Pringle went 


By I vo Tennant 

much the same way. caught at 
the wicket. And with the score 
little further advanced. Fletch- 
er aimed to slash Underwood 
with the spin and was well 
taken by Marsh. The former 
England captain had made a 
half century in 83 minutes 
with nine boundaries. 

Lilley and East made a 
gallant effort to hit Essex back 
into the match. Lilley almost 
put Llndcrwood in the river, 
and scampered runs hither 
and thither. They had pul on 
50 when East chanced his arm 
at Christopher Cowdrey and 
was held at long leg. In the 
same over Cowdrey had UHey 
and Lever leg before off 
successive balls. 

It was a difficult declaration 
for Cowdrey to judge, not 
because the pilch was playing 
any belter than on the first two 
days but because Gooch and 
Border were among the oppo- 
sition. Not many captains will 
err on the generous side 
towards Essex this season. 

Cowdrey was able to pace 
Kent's second innings himself, 
taking his overnight score to 
70. an innings that included 
eight fours. He led from the 
front, too. in the field. When 
Lilley and East were going 
well, he look Underwood off 
and. perhaps to the scepticism 
of some, put himself on. Three 
wickets in one over was his 
answer. 


It could just be that Kent 
have pul their problems of the 
last two years behind them. 
One senses the spirit in their 
camp has improved. They 
have 3 youngish side, a new 
chairman and Alderman's en- 
thusiasm should renew 
Dilley's zesL It did so in this 
match. 

KENT: Firs IrtmftflS 272 for 9 dec (S G 
talks 67. M R Benson 64: J K Lever tour 
tar 57). 

Second Innings 

M fl Benson c Border b Lever 30 

S G Wnks b Laver 9 

C J Tavari c East b Lever __ 4 

N R Taylor tow b Lever 14 

■C S Cowdrey not out 70 

G R Cowdrey b Pnogle 10 

R M Bttson tow b Foster 15 

tS A Marsh tow b Foster 0 

G R DtSay c Border b Foster 0 

D L Underwood b Pmgta 16 

Extras (to 1. w 1) 2 

Total (9 wkts dec) 170 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-37. 2-44. 3-57, 4- 

60. 5- 92. 6-139. 7-145. B-1S1, 9-170. 
BOWLING: Lever 26-6-69-4; Foster 27-7- 
8 T-3; P rmgle 143-7-1 9-2. 

ESSEX: First Innings: 174 (G A Gooch BO: 
G R Ddley 5-67, T M Alderman 4-69L 
Essex 174 (G A Gooch 60. G R Dffley thro 
for 69, T M Aldermen four tar 59). 

Second Innings 

*G A Gooch tow b Alderman 21 

B R Hardie c Underwood b Alderman . 5 

PJ Prichard tow b Alderman 25 

A R Border c Tavard b Alderman 38 

K W R Fletcher c Marsh b Underwood 51 

D R Pmgle c Marsh b Alderman 0 

AW Utley BmbCSCowdrey 29 

to E East c Mley b C S Cowdrey 21 

N A Foster c G R Cowdrey b Dfley 25 

J K Lever tow D C S Cowdrey 0 

O C AcSeM not out - 1 

Extras (b 1. to 17. w 3. nb 6) -27 

Total 243 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14. 2-43. 3-77, 4- 

157. 5- 157. 6-167, 7-217. B-217, 9-217, IQ- 
243 

BOWLING: Ddey 153-1-81-1. AMennan 
17-3-46-5: BUson 14-3-30-0: CSCowOey 
8-2-31-3: Underwood 10-2-37-1. 

Umpires: A A Jones and K E Palmer. 



Pride of pace: Alderman, Kent's five-wicket destroyer (Photograph: Chris Cole) 


Glamorgan’s brave Last pair snatch 
battle in vain dramatic victory 


Northants v Gloucs Surrey y Warwicks 


By Alan Gibson 


TAl'sXTON: Somerset [4 pts ) 
drew with Glamorgan (I). 

ft was noi a pleasant day for 
watching cricket, chilly, with 
min always threatening.' (hough 
falling only in light quantities in 
the morning and afternoon. The 
captains did their best to make a 
game ofii. 

Overnight Glamorgan had 
been 2b for two in reply to 
Somerset's 300. They declared, 
four points to one behind on the 
first innings. Somerset batted 
briefly and also declared, selling 
Glamorgan to score 291 atabout 
three an over. This was reason- 
able enough, but 291 was a lot of 
runs to score in the last innings, 
for though the pitch was slow, so 
was the outfield. 

Glamorgan never looked like 
making it. though they balled 
bravely, especially Holmes. 
Gamer took two early wickets, 
Hopkins leg-before and Jones 
caught in the slips. Morris was 
third out. at 67, in the 23nd over, 
caught in the slips off Taylor, 
who had a promising-looking 
spell. 

Younis, probably the one 
man who might have played the 
innings to turn the match, was 
fourth oul at 80. attempting a 
wild hook at Richards. Since it 
was the 32nd over. Glamorgan 
had to get a move on. so it was a 
forgivable mistake. At 107. in 
the 4 1 si over. Ontong was also 
caught at slip, off Turner. At 
138 Steele was caught, close in 
on the off side, and at 164 the 
resolute effort of Holmes ended, 
by an excellent catch at silly 
mid-off. the bowler Marks. That 
seemed the end of hope for 
Glamorgan. Thomas had a 
courageous biff or two. but was 
caught at slip, off Gamer, who 
was recalled to action. Moseley 
was vorked by Marks. 

Then the Somerset weather 
reneged on its county. Off for 
ram. on again, off again, on 


again, and so on. The showers 
seemed to disturb the fieldsmen 
more than the batsmen. Davies 
and Base played calmly. Roe- 
buck made a double change. 
Taylor for Gamer and Richards 
for Marks. Then it rained so 
heavily that wc thought there 
could be no more. 

Yet at a quarter to six they 
came back again, with six overs 
left. The Stragglers' Bar was 
husky with voices explaining the 
right tactics to ihc Somerset 
captain. Myself. I thought he 
might have tried himself with 
his leg breaks. 

One over to go. It was given to 
Gamer. It was not a bad over, 
though he did look a little weary. 
It was a splendid effort by the 
last wicket pair of Glamorgan to 
have avoided defeat dragons 
showing they can defend them- 
selves even when the flames are 
coming out of enemy mouths. 

SOMERSET: First tnrtnm 300 tar 4 dec 
(IV A Richards 102. P M Roebuck 76 not 
out N A Fetor 55) 

GLAMORGAN: First timings 

J A Hopk ns c Felton b Gamer 0 

A L Jones not out 12 

H Moms c Richards b Gamer 8 

G C Holmes not out 3 

Extras (nb 3) - ,.3 

Total (2 wkts dec. 14.5 overs) 26 

Yoms Ahmed. *R C Ontong. J F Steele. 
fT Daws. E A Moseley. J G Thomas and 
S Base <6d not bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-13. 

Bonus points: Glamorgan 1, Somerset 4. 

Second Innings 

J A Hopkins tow b Gamer ... 14 

A L Jones c Felton b Gamer _ 14 

H Moms c Richards b Taylor 20 

G C Holmes c sub b Marks 68 

Yourks Ahmed c Sob b Richards — 11 

■R C Ontong c Richards b Turner 1 1 

J F Steele c Gamer b Turner 4 

J G Thomas c Refunds b Gamer 31 

IT Davies not out 28 

E A Moseley b Marks — 2 

S Base nor out 15 

Extras (nb 12) 12 

Total 19 wkts) 230 


FALL OF WICKETS' 1-21. 2-36. 3-67. 4- 
BO. 5-1D7. 5-138. 7-164. 9-192. 9-195 
BOWLING- Gamer 23-3-53-3: Taylor 19-4- 
59-1. Turner 15-3-55-2. Richards 15-4-25- 
1. Marks 12-1-38-2 

Bonus points: Somerset 4 Glamorgan 1 
Umpires. C Cook and □ Lloyd 


HEADING LEY: Yorkshire 
(20pts) beat Sussex (IJ by I 
wicket. 

Yorkshire snatched a dra- 
matic victor}’ when their last two 
batsmen. Stevenson and Jarvis, 
added 32 together and won the 
match with five balls to spare. 
Yorkshire's target was 251 for 
what proved to be 58 overs. In 
appalling light their hopes 
seemed dashed when they 
slumped to 75 for five. The 
turning point came when Car- 
rick and Stevenson pot on 55 in 
seven overs for the eighth 
wicket 

Garrick was (hen bowled and 
Hartley stayed briefly before 
Reeve held a fierce return catch. 
Stevenson had been hitting 
aggressively bat when joined by 
Jarvis, with eight overs left, both 
men calmly took regular singles 
against a deeply-spread field. 
Jarvis won the match with a 
snicked four through the empty 
slips. 

The captains did well to 
salvage a positive finish from a 
match harshly treated by rain, 
which made the first day blank 
and disrupted the second. 

Most of the morning it rained. 
Sussex, resuming at 190 for 
nine, failed by five raws to secure 
a second batting point when play 
began at one o'clock. Yorkshire 
forfeited their first innings and 
then Sussex made a brisk 55 
against Sharp and Metcalfe, two 
occasional off-spinners. 

In light drizzle Boycott and 
Moxon began soundly for York- 
shire but Le Ronx dismissed 
Boycott at 26. when the batsman 
stretched forward and edged a 
ball which left him off the pitch. 
Le Roux continued to bowl with 
determination and after bitting 
Sharp in the body, he had the 
left-hander caught at short leg 
off a glove. 

Moxon looked in calm control 
bnt was undone by a ball from 


By Richard Streeton 

Reeve But lifted and had him 
caught behind. In the next over 
Love was similarly deceived aad 
was taken in the golly. Then 
Reeve had Bairstow leg before 
and three wickets had fallen in 
three successive overs. 

Yorkshire were 100 for six 
when Metcalfe drove loosely 
outside the off stump and Pigott 
look a good catch at second slip. 
Sidebottom stayed with Carnet 
for 35 minutes before be was 
caught behind and the stage was 
set for the eighth wicket pair. 
SUSSEX: First hungi 

NJ Lcatamcud b Haider 75 

A MGreeflcGurick b Jams 3 

P W G Pxrtcr b Sktebo Oo w 8 

A P Wells c Lose b Jams 36 

*J R T Barclay lb* bSktcbonrai 4 

D K SuwtiuK c JarTB b Hartley 2 

tl J GeoM lb* b Stereawa — „ 0 

G Sir Rome Hartley bSierenaoii 0 

DA Rent DM not 


AT NORTHAMPTON 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE: Fbst Innings 301 
for 4 wkjs oec (C w J A they 171 no. p 
Banbndge 55). 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: First Innings 

A C Stone c Curran b Samsbury 0 

*G Cook c Payne b Samsbury 82 

R J Boyd-Moss c Lloyds b Samsbury .. 4 
A J Lamb c Lawrence b Samsbury ... 50 

R J Bailey c Russell b Gravaney 25 

O J Co pel c Athey b Payne 22 

R A Harper c ana b Lloyds — 234 

tD Ripley b Lloyds 43 

N G B Cook not oul — 17 

N A Ma Bender c Aftev b Lloyds 2 

B J Griffiths b Lloyds 6 

Extras (b 5. toB, nb 7) — .J8 

Total - 503 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 2-15. 3-95. 4- 
123.5-177.6-231,7-424. 6487. 9-497. ID- 
503. 

BOWLING: Lawrence 19-3-100-0: 
Samsbury 43-9-146-4. Payne 1 8-2-96-1: 
Gravenay 20-7-51-1: Bambndge 12-1-60- 
0; Lloyds 12.4-3-39-4. 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE: Second innings 

A w siovold not out 12 

P W Romanies noi out — 18 

Extras 0 

30 


Total (tar 0 wkts) 


ACS Pijwflb Jarvis. 
A N Jones b Hartley . 


E liras (b 2, lb id, nb 7) 
Total (78.1 overs) . 


10 

.11 

.195 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14. 2-2L 3-186. 4- 
1 17, 5-130, 6-131. 7-02. 8-132, 9-162, 10- 
195. 

BOWUNGSUcbaltaia 19-3-47-2; Jarvis 
20-6-44- J: SttvcnsM 16-6-27-2; Hartley 
17.1-2-46-3: Canicfc 6-1-I94L 
Swum! Innings 

N J Latham b Sharp — 7 

A MGrwmwr-- 34 


PW G Parker not an! . 
Extras (lb I. nb J) . 
Total (I wfci dec) _ 


.If 

-4 

.55 


FALL OF WICKET: l-JI. 

BOWLING: Sharp 5-1-36-1; Metcalfe 4.1- 
0-18-0. 

YORKSHIRE: Fhal lankier forfeited 
Second lasings 

G Brecon c (rfwld be U- Ron 12 

M D Mourn cGeaid bRcc*e — ■ . . 28 
k Sharp c Green b Le Roa\ ________ 7 

J D Low r Standing b PatoQ 12 

A 1 MrtcaHe r Pisan b Reeve 9 

I) L Bavste* Ibw b Reeve . 0 

P Carrie* b PJsWl 51 


A StdebMlom r Gould b Jmcs . 

G B Stevenson aot out 

PJ Hartley eaad b Reeve 

P W JarrK not oat 

Extras lb7abJ8 


Toni (9 wkts J 


18 

-58 

- 15 

- 16 

- 25 
2SI 


BOWLING: Cape! 4- 1-9-0. Griffiths 4-1-5- 
0; Boyd-Moss 5-0-14-0; Bailey 44-2-0. 
Northamptonshire (5 pts) drew wttti 
Gloucestershire (5). 

Umpires: R Jufean and R A White. 

Oxford Univ v Notts 

AT THE PARKS 

Nottinghamshire beat Oxford University 
by 210 runs 

NOTTOTGHAMSHRE. First Innings 228 
tar no wfd dec (M News! 1 12 not oul D W 
Randall 101 not out). 

Second Innings 

P Johnson cRydonb Lawrence 01 

D J R Martmdaie c K*um b Quinlan _ 88 

J D Birch not out 28 

Extras (b 1.to4. w 1) —6 

Total (2 wkts dec) 211 

FALL OF WICKETS: M29. 2-211. 
BOWLING: Quinlan 16.3-2-58-1: Rydon 
14-5-76-0: Dawson frO-37-O; Lawrence 
12-2-36-1. 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY: First Innings 98 (P 
M Such 5 tar 38). 

Second Innings 

DA Hagan tow b Afford 30 

A AG MeabPick 0 

M J Ktoum b Pick ... 17 

’D A Thome c Saxe toy b Pick 23 

T Patel tow b Pick __..0 

S Wheats c Randall D Such 28 

R A Rydon b Such — __ 1 1 

tJ Core not OUT ... 2 

J D Quinlan b Such — _____ 1 

TAJ Dawson b Such -~ — 5 

M P Lawrence c Birch b Evans 2 


Extras (b 1,1b 10, w 1). 
Total. 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-26. 2-53. >71 4- 
74. 5-75. 6-JOT, 7-144. 8-195. 9-219. 

BOW UNC: Le Ron\ 14-1-57-2: Junes II- 
0-66-1: Reeve 24.1-2-82-4: PJpm 12-0-39- 

CmpircE N T Ple»s and B Dndleston. 


.._12 

.131 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-49. 3-89. 4-89. 
5-76.6-113. 7-120.fr 122. 9-128. 10-131. 
BOWLING Saxetoy 13-2-444; Pk* 17-7- 
26-«. Evans 10.2-3-10-1: Alford 10-3-11- 
1: Such 10-10-20-4. 

Umpires- H D Bind and D S Thompson. 


AT THE OVAL 

SURREY: First airings 338 tor 5 wkts dec 
(M A Lynch 128 no. CJ Richards 31 no, A 
J Stewart 76. G S Clinton 60). 
WARWICKSHIRE: First bVWIQS 174 (B M 
McMrilan 58: A H Gray 6 for 83V 

WARWICKSHIRE: Second innings 

T A Lloyd c Stewart b Gray 0 

R I H B Dyer c Stewart b Gray 14 

Asil Dm e Doughty b Gray 0 

D L Amiss c Richards b Doughty 26 

B M McMillan c Lynch b Monkbousa 17 

P A Smith c Doughty b Gray 4 

1G W Humpage tow b Monknouse 10 

G J Parsons c Lynch b Gray 2 

G C Small rtd hurt 1 

T A Munton b Gray 1 

"N Grtfoid not out 6 

Extras (b 2. lb 3. nb 4) 9 

Total 69 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0, 2-12. 3-17, 4-63. 
5-63. 6-76. 7-78. fr80. 9-84. 1 0-89. 
BOWLING: Gray 13.3-4-30-6; Doughty 11- 
5-39-1; Monkhou»fr3-15-2;Pocock 1-1- 
04). 

Umpires: KJ Lyons and PBWighL 
Sunny (24ptsl ben WarwKkshne (3) by an 
mngj and 73 runs. 

County table 

PWLDBtBtPts 
Yorkshire (11) 2 200 3 4 39 

Surrey(6) 3 10 21010 38 

Hampshire (2) 3 102 9 7 32 

Lancashee(14) 3 102 8 7 31 

Kent (9) 3 102 4 8 28 

Leicestershire (16) 3 003 9 8 17 

Somerset (17) 3 012 8 5 13 

Notnnghamshre (B) 2 01 1 6 6 12 

Essex (4) 2 01 1 5 6 11 

Northamptonst*re(lO) 2 0 02 7 4 11 

Glamorgan (12) 3 003 4 6 10 

MxMtasex(i) 2 002 3 7 10 

Warwickshire (15) 2 01 1 4 5 fl 

Derbyshae (12) 2 002 4 4 8 

Gfoucestershen (3) 2 002 3 5 8 

Worcestershire (5) 1 001 2 4 6 

Sussex (7) 2 020 2 1 3 

1965 positions tai brackets 

No play yesterday 

OLD THAFFOHD: Hamp sh ire 251 for3(C 
G Greerndge 127 not out C L Smith 70. 
BOWLING. Patterson 122-2-38-1; Atott 
19-4-65-2: Folley 17-3-72-0; 

O'Shaughnessy 6-2-20-0: Watkmson 14- 
0-46-01 v Lancashire Match drawn. 
Lancshira Ipt. Hampsrire3. 

LORDS: Lwxsterslwe 259 tar 8 [D I 
Gower 83. J J Whitaker 60. BOWLING: 
Cowans 20-8-47-2: Darnel 293-79-2; WiV 
flams 20-1-86-3; Gating 11-5-20-0: 
Emburey 2-0-10-0: Edmonds 7-2-11-0) v 
Middlesex. Match drawn. Nhddtosex 3pts, 
Leicestershire 3. 

Second XI champions hip 
EDGBASTOffc Warwickshire 277 for 6 
(A M Ferreira 1 9 not out G A Tedsum 64) 
and second no mgs forfeited. Lancasters 
0 lor 0 dec and 278 for five (A N Hayhuret 
142 rax ouL D J Mafcinson 49 rw* cut, A M 
Ferrara four far 55). Lancashire wren by 
five wickets. 


Gray puts 
Warwicks 
on rack 
again 

By Peter Marsoa 

Two high performances stood 
oul bcacon-like in the Britannic 
Assurance county champion- 
ship, yesterday, on a day where, 
in general the light had been 
murky and the pressure low, and 
where a combination of the two 
phis rain had forced the 
abandonment of the matches at 
Old Trafford. between Lan- 
cashire and Hampshire and at 
Lord's between Middlesex and 
Leicestershire. 

At the Oval, where Surrey 
pulverized Warwickshire, who 
suffered an innings defeat for 
the second season on a row. 
Tony Gray systematically cut 
down Warwickshire's bailing, in 
a succession of rapier-like 
thrusts, which brought him six 
wickets for 30. and a glowing 

match analysis of 12 for 1 13. At 
the County ground, Northamp- 
ton. the West Indian all 
rounder, Roger Harper, made 
full use of a day which ottered 
little more than match practice, 
to flog Gloucestershire's bowl- 
ing to the boundaries at all 
points on this little ground as be 
made his way to his career best 
score of 234 made off 213 balls 
in a stay of 233 minutes in 
which he hit 12 sixes and 25 
fours. In a partnership for the 
seventh wicket. Harper and 
Northamptonshire's 19 year-okl 
wicketkeeper. Ripley, who made 
43. put on 193 in 147 minutes, 
before Gloucestershire's 
bowlers, who had taken a fearful 
hammering, came again to 
round up the remainder for a 
massive 503. 

Following a delay of 75 
minutes through rain and bad 
light at the Oval, a drab morning 
brightened instantly as Lynch. 
113 not oul and Richards. 12. 
took guard again with Surrey, at 
300 for five from 78 overs, 
leading Warwickshire by 126 
runs. Lynch's quick eye and 
supreme timing synchronized 
perfectly as the first ball bowled 
by McMillan sailed over square 
leg for six. An expansive stroke 
which signalled the start of the 
batsmen's barrage in which 
Richards now joined with a 
square cut and pull to the 
boundary for four. As 
Warwickshire's fielders fell back 
to patrol the more distant 
outposts. Surrey broke off the 
engagement, having added 36 in 
five overs before declaring at 
336 for five, a lead of 162. 

Last season. Lynch, with an 
innings of 1 45. and Gray, whose 
match analysis was six for 67, 
had conspired to hustle 
Warwickshire to an innings 
defeat here and with these two 
having combined effectively yet 
again. Gray had good reasons 
for wishing to embellish and 
underline a polished display in 
the first innings by leading 
Surrey’s charge for victory in the 
day's last action. Chief among 
them, no doubt was Gray's 
failure to find a place in Surrey's 
squad of 12 in front of Sylvester 
Clarke, who reappears after 
injury for today’s Benson and 
Hedges match against Kent, at 
Canterbury. 

At Northampton, gathering 
clouds, drizzle and an un- 
promising forecast prompted 
Northamptonshire to think in 
terms of bonus points as they 
began after a 45-minute delay 82 
runs behind Gloucestershire at 
219 for five, with Cook 81. and 
Harper 23. Cook was soon gone, 
but Harper got away to a racing 
start twice straight driving Law- 
rence to the boundary. 

By lunch, when North- 
amptonshire had got to 297 for 
six from 81 overs. Harper with 
90 had his first hundred in his 
sights. Later, with four bonus 
points safely in the bag. and 
having reached his century by 
way of two sixes and 16 fours in 
128 minutes. Harper moved up 
a gear and with a flourish of 
three sixes raced past his pre- 
vious best score and beyond to a 
memorable double hundred. 


GOLF 



RACING: COLE COULD BE THREE-HANDED AT EPSOftS BUT O’BRIEN HOPE IS UNDER A CLOUD 

Nisnas earns 20-1 Derby quote Toca Madera to atone 


By Mitchell Platts 

Nick Faldo and Sam Torrance 
became the unsuspecting vic- 
tims of typical match-play 
recoveries on an intriguing 
opening day of the Epson Grand 
Pnx at St Pierre. Chepstow, 
yesterday. 

Faldo, struggling to regain his 
confidence following two 
tormenting years without a vic- 
tory, looked poised io complete 
a comfortable win when he 
moved two holes ahead of Ove 
Sellberg. of Sweden, at the turn. 

Sellberg- however, launched 
an outstanding counter-attack 
with the assistance of a birdie at 
the IlLh. although he was 
required to wait until the 1 7th 
before squaring mailers when 
Faldo found a bunker with his 
seven-iron approach. 

Sellberg hit the green at the 
1 8th (237 yards) with a two-iron 
and. after Faldo had pitched on 
when coming up short with his 
tee shoL the Swede ended the 
match in sly le bv holing a putt of 
28 fccL 

Thus Sellberg moved through 
to a second-round match against 
the 100-1 outsider. Stephen * ' 
Bennett, who surprisingly- 
gained a one-hole victory over 
Torrance. 

Torrance, the 1 8th green hero 
of Europe's splendid Ryder Cup 
triumph Iasi autumn, was round 
in 68 which, considering the 
heavy conditions, was an ex- 
cellent performance. But Ben- 
nett refused to submit and he 
turned the probability of defeat 
into a famous win with the 
assistance of two birdies in the 
last four holes. 

Sandy Lyle, the Open cham- 
pion. safety progressed although 
he was taken io the last green by 
Christy O’Connor Junior, who 
lost his chance by leaving his 
recovery from a bunker at the 
18th in the sand. t 

FIRST-ROUND (GS unless stated I . S Lv'e 
bt C O' Connor Junior I frej. 1 hole: ROavc 
lAusi dt t Baker-Fincn (Aus) 5 and 4. P 
Parkin ta JO Leary (iiei 3 and 2. E Dsir.y 
(Jrejtt P Wav 5 and 3: R Chapman OtM Pi- 
nero <Sp) ait toe 20th. D Feherly b> □ 

Smyth lire] 4 and 2: B Gaiacner br M 
McLean 2 and 1; H Clack bt J R;vo:o !Sai 
at the 20th: S Benmn W S Terrance. 1 
hole: O Sellberg iSwei bt N Faldo i hole: 

D J Russell bl G Brand. 2 and V P Paherry 
01 J Canizares (Sp). 1 hole. G Brand Junior 
m R Hartmann (US) 5 and 4. R Lee Dt M 
James, l hole: A Forsbrand <S*ei b; C 
Mason 2 and i: I Woosnam pi h Bupccpi 
(SAj at me 2 : sl 

Leader thinks 
too slowly 
and is fined 

From John Hennessy 

Chantilly •/ 

A tap of the kaleidoscope 
produced a new pattern on ihc 
second day of the Hennessy 
Cognac Cup women's pro- 
fessional tournament here yes- 
terday. Diane Barnard and 
Maureen Gamer, (he joint over- 
night leaders, receded into the 
distance, bolh with a second 
round of 80. seven over par. In 
their stead Kelly Leadbettcr. of 
the United Slates, strode four 
strokes ahead with a second 
round of 71 and a lolal of 144. 

Mrs Leadbeiter is better 
known in Britain perhaps as the 
wife of Nick Faldo's Florida 
mentor (though a Bn ion him- 
self) and as the player who 
introduced herself to the 
women's tour when seven 
months pregnant at Hill Bam. 
Worthing, two years ago. 

She is. she feels, a thinking • j 
golfer, the kind who might be * 
expected to prosper over 
Chantilly's demanding 6.267 
yards o) parkland. Perhaps she 
thought a little too long, for she 
was fined £50 for slow- play. But 
the coup of the day belonged to 
Laura Davies, the pride of 
Surrey, who scored an eagle at 
the eighth and ninth. 

LEADING SCORES: 144: K Leadbefier 
(US). 73. 71 148: L Davies. 77. 71; J 
Brawn. 73. 75; C Lehmann (US). 76. 72; K 
Lunn (Aus). 70. 72. 149: J Cwmachan. 75. 

74. 


Nisnas earned a place in next 
month's Epsom Derby when 
shattering the classic hopes of 
the 9-4 on favourite. Verd- 
Antique. m the Hawthorn 
Stakes at Ltngficld Park 
yesterday. 

Steve Cauihen attempted to 
make ail Ihc running on Verd- 
Antiquc. but had no answer to 
the challenge of Nisnas inside 
Ihc final furlong, going under by 
half a length. Cauihen said: 
“The coll didn't handle the 
track. He ran green, and w-as 
never stretching himself' 

Nisnas. 20-1 from 33-1 with 
Hills for the Derby, is unlikely 


to run again before Epsom. Paul 
Cole, the trainer, said. 

He added: “I think a lot of this 
colt and Epsom is definitely on 
the cards. 1 was very dis- 
appointed when he was beaten 
at Ascot last time, but there were 
excuses. He was sweating in the 
box beforehand, and I think he 
may have had a touch of colic. 
He has worked brilliantly since 
that defeat, and has earned his 
place in the line-up." 

Cole could have three runners 
in the Derby. He runs Tisn’l in 
the trial at Lingficld today and 
may also be represented by this 
week's Chester winner. 


Norn rood. Hills offer Cole's 
stable at S-l. 

After his defeat Vcrd-Antiquc 
has been taken out of most ante- 
post Derby lists. Meanwhile. 
Corals report heavy support for 
Bakharoff. in anticipation of an 
impressive display on the Sur- 
rey track today. Guy Harwood's 
colt is down to 6-1 from 8-1. and 
the favourite Shahrasiani is still 
7-2. 

Pat Eddery gained his first 
winner since returning from his 
suspension when he rode Nioro 
to victory over the odds on 
Sunny Liz in the first division of 
the Gincvra Slakes. 


Vincent O'Brien has been 
obliged to substitute Wise 
Counsellor for Imperial Falcon 
in this afternoon's group two 
Dcrrinstown Stud Derby Trial 
at Leopardstown (Our Irish 
Racing Correspondent writes). 

Imperial Falcon has cased out 
to 12-1 with Hills in the Derby 
betting after going lame with a 
bruised foot earlier this week. 
O'Bncn is hoping that the injury 
will respond to treatment 
quickly and enable him to run in 
next Saturday’s Irish 2.000 
Guineas. 

In the meantime. Toca Ma- 
dera. with a new jockey, Christy 


Roche, will be attempting to 
prove that he failed to show his 
true form in the 2.000 Guineas 
at Newmarket last week. 

Then he was totally unsuited 
to the slow pace and finished 
ninth behind Dancing Brave. 
He had been unbeaten in Ire- 
land and if Liam Browne is 
justified in his belief that he will 
stay 10 furlongs, he could prove 
too strong for the less experi- 
enced Wise Counsellor. 


Blinkered first time 

THIRSK: 2.15 Brampton Graca. 
UNGFELD: 3D Bowl Over. BATH. 2.45 
Brushlord. 4.15 Never Bee. 


Lingfleld results 

9°Od to soft. 

, *61. NISNAS (T Oumn. 12-1J; 

: . v«m-Ant»9ue ($ Cauttwn, 4-9 la*); 3, 
(P «omnson. 20-1). ALSO 
man 3-i Primary 4th. 50-1 Began! Guest 
i£' 6 »lH3. i*. 31. 

€4 10 C n in Tom: £10-50; 

64 “■ £17 - 36 - 


Loco I J RexL 7-1) ALEtoRAN- 7-j 

Namely, frl Khamsin Rea. KM Another 
f?9- I'- 1 Fargreen. ij.i Bhutan 
Mango Man. Sing Gatvo &ng. i4.y 
Durto*siw. Major’s Rower., lfr] Cha- 
rema Mum. Sparkled Lad 6rtv 20-1 
HottCto. 35-1 Russen Flyer. 33-1 Bakws 
Double. Tame Duwms Sth. Lean Sirea* 
2p ran 2’:l. 41. !\L ah hd D Thom at 
Newmarka Ton: E7.10, £2.60 £25 70 
“5 70 £3 30 DF E888.7D CSF.£l02.40' 
Tncast. £2759 30. 1mm 12 195*4. Winner 
bought *1. 5.800gns. 

„ 3-15 ISO J. BERTIE WOOSTER <W R 
S win burn. 7-1). 2. Menton Melody (R 
Cocnrane. 3-1 taw. 3. Loft Boy (S 
Dawson. 9-2) ALSO RAN: 13-2 BerTngra 
Gin 5tn. 7-1 Porthmcor 4th. 12-1 Dream 
Chaser Gin. Meadow Moor. 14-1 Sparky 
Lad. 16-1 La 0>vina. Mudisha. 20-i 
□aisaan Bay. Viceroy Major. 33-1 
Sequostnan 13 ran NR- Kharrana. 2'il. 
■>l 11. 5) '-.-i L Piggon at NewmarKm 
Tote £510. £170. £150. £230. DF: 
£13 10 CSF. £2827. Trios!' £10093 
I mm l22Tsec 

3.45 i5t) l. BESTPLAN (T Wes. 41* 2. 
Jan Bleas IN Howe. l4-i, ; j. Uu0*rf (Paul 
Edd#rv. 15-8 lav) ALSO RAN 4-1 
Segovlan. 10-1 Fmd Deiiqm. 12-1 80m 
Free Agjm Last Dance dm. U-i Lome 
Bream 20-1 Ebony Pride Jth. 33-1 Bold 
Vojacoues. Flag Bear nr. Grey Rod. h s 
Va radon. Taitoer. Tmunascn. Madams 
Flora 5ft. 17 ran fl. Z‘:l. M. ji. £\-l w 
0 Gorman at Newmarket Tote: £7 90. 
P.60. £2.T0. El .20. DF. £3370. CSF: 
£56.46. 69.54 S6C. 


4.15 f7D 1. NIORO (Pat Eddery. 5-1). 2. 
Sunny Lu iG Starkey. 4-6 lav): 3. Rue Si 
Jacques (S Cautnen. 1Z-1). ALSO RAN fr 
2 Uphona 4ft. Ifrl Charcoal. 5-1 Demt- 
5emtquaver. 50-1 Baxieigaie 6th. 
Mostango. Sir Speedy, The Moon And 
Back. Trent End. Valvnora. HoHy Brown 
5ft. Miss Moggie. 14 ran. NFL John TuHy. 
Five Ouartere. -il. 5). sh hd. sn hd. a. R J 
Houghton at DidcoL Tote £6.00: £140. 
£1.20. £1.M. DF. £3£0.CSF; EBJ36. tmr 
24.S6MC. 

4.45(71 140yd) 1 . EASY DAY (A Mackay. 
14-1), 2. Toney (T Spartt. 12-1): 3. 
Golden Beeu (B Rouse. 11-2): 4. Kim Of 
Speed (LR agio. 9-U ALSO RAN. 5-ftav 
TamertramlSd. 8-1 Gold Loft 9-1 Jfa 
SaieBta. 1H Henry's Place 6ft. 12-1 
Gowen Slade. Sharp Shol l4-i Rear 
Action. 16-1 Even Banker 5ttl, Tar s Hill, 
Top Feather. 25-1 Lmgfnld Lady. Pent 
Bot- 33-i. Putsmgh. Young Bans, Rest 
1 Wetaame, Tixcy Boy. 20 ran. !&l. 41. 
3L 1L '/fl e Ekfn at Newmaiket Toft: 
E2830: £2.90. £4.10. EL30. £1.70. DF: 

iSn'wS*' E,7 - S6 - TriCaSL £965 - B4 - 

Imin 32.378C 
law 1 ! Hm 

■PcGSrasrig a 

ALSO RAN: 13.2 Gei ta i 

Cipal F tower. 1&-1 Kass* itj/ 

6ft. 33-1 Golden 

Impulse. Higrtand Taia'. tSCUST 

Usakaty 5ih. Mistral Mantc^W 0 ^' 
(Wine. Rectiprure 15 ran 
U Han^ocd at Putoorougn. Tow ’ ci «v 
£1 30 £2.30. £1.70 dT ON CSP 
£1312 limn 24 04sec. 

WS rn 1HAUMAL (W Carson, frl). 2 
Rngnbeau (P Watoron. ifrB Jau»; 3 Low 
At Uul (R Lmes. 20- tl. ALSO RANTfri 
Basically Betier<m. 15-2 Be 3o Bold, ifri 
Jaaiwl, Sifner Draqon 6ft 25-1 Spanish 
Intent. 33- 1 Hum&£ Beautv. 50-1 Depoiy 
Govenor. Mr Matchmaker. Baby Ravenna 
VcHiiei Poarl Sin 13 ran nr Donnas 
Diearn Kings Rmg r-,|. 31. hd. nk, 11 w 
H«n ai West iblev. Tow £3 10 £T 50. 
£1 10. £3 20 DF £3 20. CSF: £7 97. 1mm 
25 19m* 

Ptacepot C48J2S. Jackpot not won. 


Hamilton Park 

Gome heavy 

2.15 (Im 40yd). 1. Oriental Express U 
Carr 20-1 1. 2. Braguet (20-1 ): 3. Sealym (5- 
2) Cool Operator 7-4 tav.10 ran 31. II F 
Carr Torn £53.40: E9.20. £720. £1.70. 
CSF: £287 04 

2-45 i5lr 1. Harry Hunt (M Frv 7-4 lav|: 2. 
U-& Copy 19-21.3. taohsion lB-11. 9 ran. 
Hd. 41. J Berry. Tow: £3.90. £1.40. El B0. 
EI90DFE5 70 CS.F. £10.28 

3.15 (50 1.LuBa6yBhiOT(M Birch 4-1): 
2. Music Taachft 16-lj: 3. Taykirs 
Taytannade (H-4 Fav). 8 ran.NR.wow 
WOw Wow. 3. m M H Easterby. Tote: 
£4.50. £1 60. £1 40. £1.10. OF: £5.40: 
CSF; £24 j2S. 

145 Ifift 1 . Miami Odphta ( M Fry 1 5-2t 
2. Rests Dickins (3-1 Fav); 3. Zio Pappmo 
M6-1I.13 ran NR:Remainder r,p. 8)6). J 
Berry. Tote £12.10: £360. £1.10, ES.60 
DF C9.10: CSF. £26.98.TnctoL £312.36 

4.15 Urn 40yd) 1. Waterford Way ( W 
Ryan 10-1); 2. fzzy Gunner (6-1V 3. 
Virajendra 120-1). Manna Plata. Brave and 
Bold 7-2 |t-favs. 13 ran. Neck. hd. R 
Holmshead Tote. £17.40: £6 60. £1.10. 
£530. DF E65J0. CSF £67.40 Tncast 
£1.076 77. 

4.4S|1m 30. 1. Pnnea Satin) W Woods 
11-4 it ravL2. Barite! Bush (11-4 jt-lavj: 3. 
Motncan (fi). 8 rafl.SI. 151 M Jarvis Toie: 
£4 30; £3.00. E1.00. £3 70; DF £7 80. CSF 
£933 

6.1 5 (1 m 41): 1. Nk Lion (J Carr 12-1 1.2. 
Cftnstmas Holly (7- 1); 3 Jart's Uidk (7-2r 
Menngr 3-1 lav. 8 Ran. Nk.5l F Garr.Tote 

£3.00, £1.10. £1.70. DF £1330. 
CSF £8321 
Pbcepot £54.00 


Newton Abbot 


£11 92. Grey Cole withdrawn, not under 
orders No rule (our. 

3J0 (2m 150yd) 1. Saffron Lord (B 
Poweu. 3-1): 2. Butters Pel (5-2 lav). 3. 
Grade Of Jazz MO-i). 11 ran. NR. Come 
On Graoe. Firm ConvicWm. 7/. 21. L G 
Kenrurd TOW. £350. £1.50. £1.20. £2.40. 
DF £4.00 CSF: £10 95 Tncast £82.62. 

4.0|3m2f 100yd) 1 Seal Manne (Mrs R 
Vickery. 16-1); 2. Ottefy News (11-2); 3. 
Pnnea Mitoome (10-1). Croaman 3-1 lav. 
14 ran. NR: Tarquin Queen. 1',. 71 H 

Messer- Bennetts. Tote: £22.20; E3.B0. 
£1.60. £3.00- DF. £149.40. CSF: £9700. 

4.30 (2m 150yd) 1, Metro Star (R 
Derm. 10-1): 2. Goose Green (frl); 3. 
High Reef (S-2 lav). 10 ran. NR: Fields, Of 
France 2L 3) P A Bowden. Tore: £1380; 
£250. £2.70. £1 40. OF C350- 

5.0 (2m l50yd) 1. Royal Beue (Mr L 
Harvey. 11-1): 2. Dancer in Pans (33-1): 3. 
Broclte (14-1); 4. Upnom Gamble (7-2L 
Chad ?-i tav 16 ran ft. a J H Baker. 
Tote: £20 00. £4 10. £1 7 60. £1 .60. £2.00. 
DF £148.70. CSF: £305.69. Treast 
£4.58281 

Ptacepot El 485. 

Stratford 

Game good to ten 

6.0 Qm ndte) 1. Clermont Lane |C 
Smith 33-1 f. 2, Bel Course (6-1). 3. Storm 
House (7-4 lavi. 81. 71. 17 ran. M Tale. 


Tote: £3030: £7.30. £1-50. £130. DF. 
£71.10. CSF: £215.55. 

630 (2m ch) 1. P a mmwdy (B da Haan, 
6-1). 2. Cnso And Kean (11-2): 3. Ofcvar 
Anthony 16-1). Oryx Major 2-1 fav. 10L20L 
9 ran F Winter. T&te: £5.30: £2.10. £1.70. 
£1.70. DF: £220. CSF: £3435. 

Huntingdon 

Gang: good to fkm 
60 |&n 200yd hdw) 1. Price Of Peace 
(M Dwyer. 20-1); 2. Jack BtOmar 120-1 r. 3. 
Cnsp (13-2). Gone With The Vet 7-2 fav. 
12), 31. 22 ran. C J Bafl. Tote: £80.60; 
£19 10. £2-90. £2-20, £7.40. DF; Winner or 
second with any other £780. CSF: 
£350.84. Tricast. fcjWI 60. 

630 (2m 100yd cm 1 . Pukka NWar (Mr 
T Thomson Janes. 8-13 tavt 2. Sandyta 
(10-1). 3. Indian (11-lj_4l, 71. 14 m. 0 
Sherwood. Tote d-70; £110. £1,50. 
£1^0. DF: £4.10 CSF: £7.80 

• Colin Tinkler senior received 
a £70 fine for wilhdrawing Wow 
Wow Wow from Ihc seller at 
Hamilton yesierday. then de- 
scribed their action as 
"outrageous“. “I pulled my 
horse out because he does not 
act without sialls. and would 
have lost several lengths. 


Easterby to face inquiry 



£3 ID nc iowi'S*.* 1 
ij IU DF. £9.70 CSF- £13.61. 

, "tomHC Blown. 7-21; 

.. uouWetqn (S-2i. 3. runs 


The victory of Lullaby Blues 
in yesterday's seller at Hamilton 
Park has been referred io ihc 
Jockey Club Stewards. Lullaby 
Blues, backed down to 4- 1 and 
ridden by Mark Birch, ran out a 
two lengths winner from Music 
Teacher. The stewards inter- 
viewed Graham Lockerbie, 
representing the winning 
trainer. Peter Easier by. but were 
unable io accept his explanation 


for the gelding's improvement 
compared with his lost run at 
Carlisle on May - 
At Carlisle. Lullaby Blues 
finished behind Maybe Jane, 
w-ho could only run fourth in 
yesterday's race. Lullaby Blues 
was die first leg of a 54-1 double 
for the Cayman Island business- 
man. Peier Savili. Savill laier 
won wiih Waicrtbrd Way in ihc 
Scottish Rifles Handicap. 


From the facing page 

SATURDAY 

BBC 1 WALES. 5.45- 5J0pm 

1 =^ Sports News Wafcw. SCOT- 
LAND. 12JW-fr.15pm Cup Final 
Sportscana. Hearts and Aberdeen con- 
I tea me 101st Scottish Cup FinaL 
I Plus Racxig frorn Lmgftekl Park. eta. 

I &45-550 Scotbsti news and sporL 
* Cup Final Spwt&sene Hlgh- 

hghts from today's Cup Fmal match- 
es. NORTHERN IRELAND. 5.15-&20pm 
Northern Ireland news. 1255-1 JWam 
Northern Ireland News Haatflnes and 
Weather; Close. ENGLAND 545- 
550pm London: Sport South-West 
Spowght news and sport All other 
Engteft regions : Reftonal News and 
SporL 

CHANNEL 

Bunny ItLSQFIm: Moment by Mo- 
menMZaOem Whan the Musto's Over 
1 JO Closedown. 

semmsgsss;^ 

True Gnt 230-5.15 Scotsport Cup Fi- 
nal Special 520-535 Canoon 1030 FDm: 
Escape from New York 1220m Late 
CaiTcioeedawn. 

BORDER Londcm except: 

, ByflK cn 5u20pm-tL3S Bugs Burery 
ID-30 Film: Escape from New York 
1220am Closedown. 

GSANADA^^,- Cimon 

5-30 Candid Camera &DO-7.O0 Rotxn 
Of Sherwood 1030 We Are me Champt- 
onsl Live from Merseyside tl JO 
F*m: Escape From New York 1 JtOtn 
Ctosettovrn. 

TSW ** London except: 5J9pm 
J-S2. TSW News 53SiS5 Cartoon 
1030 Film: Eacwpe From New York 
1220am Postscript Closedown. 

1030 Ftoir Escape From New York 
1220am At TheincJ Of The Day. 
Close down. 

safffiM.asssssL 

10-30 Flm: Escape From New York 
1220am Closedown, fotewed by Central 
Jobfinder. 

SBAME!AN^£^> m 

Trus On 230-5.15 Cup Final Spe- 
cj* Aberdeen v Hearts &20-5JS Car- 
toon 1030 FHm: Escape from New 
York 1220am Cricket Results. 
Closedown. 

S 4 C Starts: 235pm rtH-ftoed: 

- Cwpan Uoegr Ewktoo v Lerpwi 
6-00 Cartoon Carmal 5J0 
Wortawise Reports 6JM Path of fte Rain 
God 7.00 Hwfewrk 7 JO Newyddton 
7-46 Pwy w'n Porthyn 9 215 Noson 
Lawer 930 Coahy Show 3J50 
Smforfema 103& Joteon Sngs Agam 1 
1225am Closedown. 

TVS As London except: 220pm- 
- ■ 5J& Cartoon 1030 F«m: Escape 

from New York 122Qem When the 
Muse’s Over iJlOCompeny. Ctosedown. 

tgywEST^g^ 

Canoon 1030 Fftm Escape from 
New York 1220am Ctosedown. 


HTV WALES 

tar HTV West Pf ° 9ranWleaaT83S 

ifiamHEsasasu 

Cartoon 1030 Film: Escape from 
New York 1220am Closedown. 

TYNE TE ES 

Cartoon 1030 FBnr Escape from 
Newywk 1220am Epilogue. Closedown. 
ULSTER 

As London except 218pm News 
52fr63S Cartoon 1030 
F3m: Rollover! Jane Fonda) 1235am 
Sports Results 1240 News ai Bedtime. 
Ctosedown. 

ULSTER 

As London except 5.18pm News 
520-535 Carman 1030 
Ften:RoUover(Jape Fonda) 1235am 
Sports Rosuds 1240 News at Bedtime. 
Closedown. 


SUNDAY 


BBC 1 WALES. 6.55-5. 00am In- 
S HH - terval 930-9.15 Sioe Srarad. 
330-335 Golf: Welsh Rugby Union 
pro-am tournament. 10.40-11.09 Cricket 
John Player Speoal Lemue. Oamor- 
gan v Letoesterenve at a Helen's 
wound Swansea. 1139-11.10 
News. SCOTLAND. 1285- 1258pm Land- 
ward 1035-10.40 Voyager. 1135- 
11.10 News. NOimetN IRELAND. 200- 
230pm Eight Roads to Mexico. 23fr 

330 Gaflery. 1135-11.10 Northern 
Ireland News. 


930-1030 Lea Francois Chez Voua 
I.Slpm That's Gardening 130 Video ChJb 

I. 45-200 Dolmen BuKdera 230 Fi tot: 
Bridges at Toho-Rl 43S-430 Puffm'a 
Piafffca 1130 Man m a Subcase 
1230am Oo&ettown. 

HTV WEST AaLonttanfl ’- 

” eapi »3 Sm. Max The 
Mousa 936-moo Rrebtel XL5* 

130pm Gartering Tima 130-200 Fanrv 

kw wales, 230 Farm ftght of fte 
Pltotooc 530 The CantobeOs 530 Now 
K 630-630 Aloion Market 
1130 New Avengers 1230am 
Ctosedown. 

HTV WALES AS HTV wea 
130toL 

Tyg As London exnepr 935am 
“S ActiOrt Late 240-10JSO Canooi 
130pm Agenda 130-200 Enterprise 
South 2J0 R(m. Bridges at Toko-Ri *35- 
*30 News 1 1 30 Marmy (tnfeuto to 
ShmweH). 1210 New SquBdrormglres. 
1225am Company, Ctosedown. 

S4C Stans: 200pm GnaarPtem 

Cotoiftom ^ fleltenr 3J)o Fto ; 
Murder He Says' 435 Arwyddion 
Ffyrtto 5.15 Busfcwss Praqijtmmo 640 
Second Gtance K.1E hnemarwnai 
Road Recau 7. 15 Den Deg 720 
Newyodon 730 Ca« am Gan 030 
Mwvnftau'r Pefte 830 DechrauCanu. 
Deefirau Canmoi 9J» Almanac 935 
PIU lOwnfmg 1005 Witness to Apartheto 

II. 00 Film: Wooden Horae' 12£n 
Ctosedown. 


GRAMPIAN as London e> - 

cept 9.25am Max 
The Mouse 935 Sesame Street 
1030-1 1JM Fireball XL5 1.00pm Farmng 
Outlook 1.30-230 Spice of Lite 230 
Film: The Sundowners (Dehorah Kerr) 
530 The CampbeVs 530 Now You 
See it 6.00-630 Albion Market 1130 
Tales from fte Darkskte 1230 Re- 
ftecoo ns. Clo sedown. 

CENTRAL A * London eACept: 

«B 1 92Sam Wattoo. watioo 

833-1030 Joyce ana the Wheeled 
Wamors 130pm Here and Now 1.30-230 
Gardening Time 230 FHm: A Town 
Uto Alice* 430 Fan Gvy 530 The Camp- 
bells 630-630 Alteon Marvel 11.30 
War 1230am Closedown. foAowed by 
Central Jobflncter. 

8NS!JA^iS5asffi 0 „ 


Home 130pm Beverly HmtxUres* 135 
Weather 130-230 Famvng Diary 230 
Fanr Two for me Road (Audrey Hep- 
bum) OO Smurfs 5.00 CanrpOalte 5.30 
Now You See It 6.00-630 Albion 

NOTfAvengars 123Cam Je- 
sus Shan Reign. Closedown. 

TSW i 2 i 59 don 93 Sam- 

“—1030 Link 11.00 Once a 
TteeL .7 1135 Look and Sea 1130- 

1 -00pm Gsrdarts 

for All 30-230 Farm mg Nows Pan 

Canoor| 4 - 30 

SWALK 530 The CampbeHs 530 

see h S30-630 Albion Marker 
1130 South west Week 1230 Post- 
script Postbag, Closedown. 
BORDER ^.London excapr: 

S35am Gardening Thne 


S^Ottt Border Diary 1.00pm? 
Wtomana Place 130-200 Farmmg Out- 
^oJ'WOLwe Boat 4.30 Survival 

Who's 

B - 0 ^ 6 - 30 Albion Market 
1130 Jazz Special 1200 Closedown. 

GRANADA A* London «- 
- - cept; 935am Max (he 


Mouse 935-10.00 ^tonuo Hnh- 
ways 1130 Once a Tfvet....? lias Aap 
Trie Is Your 

S H ian ¥Vof!tWr 130pm Car- 
toonl.M Love Boat 330 FHm: Bullet 
tar a Badman 430 Pfaflom 5.00 The 
Campbate 530 Now You See K 630- 

. 2?%** 11 - an Suapend- 

«J AIM 1230 Ctosedown. 

SCOTTISH ^ London ex- 
cept: 935am Foo Foo 


j a ggOrog 1030-1130 
s^wstrem 1 00 p» 430 Glen Michael 
330 Dftfram 

Mr? 6 tS! 30 You See It 530 
AKxan Market 

JJ^OMiatcal Special 123ttam Late Cafl. 

YORKSHIRE 

1^*1 1.00 Once a Th«(....7 T 1 30- 
™ F8n ^T9 D«y l.OOpm-200 Man m 
fife's 68240 F,tm - G^en Berats 
llSra. W i v U2 , l^ 0 Gftnpbolri S30 Mr 

11.30 Wren me Musw a Over 1230am 
Five Mmures. Closedown. 

TYNE TgES L °r 0on g»- 

935-10.00 ^ner vpur Mom ” 

SBM!Si'assas5i* 

gSBBMasasBSi 

1130 Epdogue. Ctosedown. 



ij5k* 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MAY 10 1QS6 

Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


TV- AM 


6.55 Good Morning Britain, 

Mika Morris. 
News at 730; regional 

report at 7.08; sport « 

7*30 Tto Wide Awake Club 

_hc/ude8 news at aas. 


Pink Panther 


fera.pawkf Njven and 










ofanewhtatMecft 

1100 

124W The FA Cup Final Live 
coverage of tha match at 
Wembtoy between 
Everton and Liverpool. ■ 
The match begins at 3.00 
Out beforehand: a 
welcome from Saint and 
Graavsie at the Champion 
Bar. 12.15 the' team 
managers are interviewad: 
at various times from 
,<220 Jimmy Tarbuck 




Open University. Until 


2-05 Film: The Buccaneer* 
(1938) starring Fredric 
March. The story of the 
celebrated pirate, Jean 
Lafitte. set at the time in 

1814 when the British are 

planning to attack New 
Orleans. They offer Lafitte 
a handsome reward if he 
bnngshB fire power on to 
the side of the btvaders. 
but Lafitte is tom between 
accepting the huge 
‘^Cucement or assisting 
his beleaguered 

^rringvSTHefl^md 

Srtvana Mangano. Period 
drama about a younq 
sofcfiar, banished to an 
isolated Russian qarrison 


B.4S Open University. Until 

W6 Play School 9.15 Knock 
Knock. Rebgjous stories 
and songs for the young, 
(r) 9.30 Tw* is the Day. a 
® mpie service from a 
viewer s home in 
Leasowe. The Wirnl. 

104XJ Asian Magazine. A film 
report on the Centre tor 
Pakistan Studies in 
London 1030 Switch On 
toEngffeh. 

10.55 France actuate. Life in 
the Mountains of the 
Dauphine(r) 11.20 Micro 
Fue. AcompHatton ot the 
be« Of Micro Live 11 >15 
W0i a Little Help from the 
Chip. How 


TV- am 


835 Good Morning Britain 
begins with A Thought for 


«wBKe retr; TJt 5 cartoon; 
730 the What's News 
quia; 8.10 Jeni Bamen's 
Pick of the Week, 837 
news headlines. 

830 Jonathan Dimbieby on 
Sunday. 


ITV/LONDON 




V’ - ■ :■ -”S V- • *> i "..'f-iv- 


5.15 The Pink Panther Show. 

5-35 Jj**rawlth Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 5>I5 


__ - — Harris Show. 

The first of a new series. 
The guests are singers 
Nana Mouskouri and 
Logan; aerial gymnast 
Kassio Pete; and mind- 
reader Graham PJoltey. 
(Ceefax) ^ 

6-3° Every Second Counts. 

7 * ssasaR,. 

“*n«dy series etanrkw 
Ronnie Corbett as the 
mother-dominated, 


by Catherine the 
who saves tha itt 


towwiiCeetax) 

730 Rfrn: The Battle of 
JfiWway (1976) starring 
Charlton Heston. Henry 
Fonda, James Ctoburn and 
Glenn Ford. The 
dramatized reconstruction 
of one of the celebrated 

f^w^^spS 8 S ) Jan 
Leeming Weather. 

9-55 Cagney and Lacey. A 
Sunk en driving case In | 
which a young baby is a I 
victim brings the heavBy 
pregnant Mary Beth back ■ 
on the scene. (Ceefax) 

HUS Match of the Day. Jimmy 
Hrfl presents highbghts erf 
mis afternoon’s fXcud 
F inal. 

1135 FMr Phase fV (1974) 


A science fiction thrffier 
about a remote Arizona 
community threatened t 
marauding ants. Directs 
by Saul Bass. 

1235 Weather. 


Dickson try to decipher 

„ ° hfi *®n s desertions. 

Na ifthe Cup Final runs to extra 
dme the rw-down wifi be: fL45 
JJ®*®* 530 Cartoon; 6.00 Robin 
of Sherwood. 

730 Cannon and BaiL Tommy 
and Bobby in more 
comicai situations. 

730 The Price fa RSghL Gama 
show 

830 Tarby and Friends. Jimmy 
Tarbuck's guests are 
Mane Osmond, John 
. Schneider. Norman Coffier 
and Stan Boa/dman. 

9.15 CA.T3. Eyes. A British 

I criming, saving a 20 year 
sentence in a South 
African prison, is released 
and sent bade to England 
£j*ause tab terminally ffl. 

10.15 News and sport 

1030 The Late Cflua Janes. 

The guests are Charlotte 
RampfingandAianCoren. 

11-15 LWT News headfines 
followed by FBm: Escape 
from New York (1981)”"” 
starring Kurt Russefl. A 
science fiction thriller, set 
m 1997, when Manhattan 
has been turned into a 
waited prison. One of the 
inma tes has a chance to 
earn his freedom when he 

is given 24 hours In which 
to rescue the kidnapped 
President Directed by 
John Carpenter. 

130 Highway PatroF. in tribute 
to the late Broderick 
Crawford, an episode 
entitled The Prison Break. 


who saves the Ufa of a 
man while on his way to 
his remote posting. The 
rescued man turns out to 
be Pugacev. a ruthless 
pretender to the Czar's 
throne. Directed by 
Alberto Lattuada. 

830 Laramie. Jess Harper is 


ranchers who beHeve he is 
a cattle rustier. Only an dd 
friend, a member of the 
real rustling gang, can 
save him. Starring Robert 
Fuller, John Smith and 
Rod Cameron, (r) 

830 NewsView. Jan Leeming 
with the day's news; Motra 
Stuart reviews the week's 
news in pictures with 
subtitles. Weather. 

730 Around With Afltea. Peter 
Alliss's guest over 
selected holes of the New 
Zealand Golf Club, 
Weybrldge, b former Test 

captain and President’s 
Putter holder, Ted Dexter. 

8.10 Leonard Bernstein at the 
Barbican. An LSO Trust 
Gala Concert in the 
presence of The Queen 
and Prince Philip. 

Bernstein conducts the 
London Symphony 
Orchestra in three of Ms 
own works, Chichester 
Psalms, Age of Anxiety, 
and Serenade. The 
soloists are Aied Jonas, 
treble, Gidon Kramer, 
violin, and Kiystian 
Zimerman, piano. 

835 The Montreux Golden 
Rose IMMC Gaia. 

Highlights Of the pop Video 
awards, introduced by 
Mike Smith from the 
Casino Montreux, 

Switzerland. Ends at 
1235. 


1.10 Eco. A Worfdwise 88 

programme in which Dr 
Alice Stewart, who. 30 
years ago warned that x- 
raying pregnant women 
could cause cancer in their 
unborn children, and is still 
engaged on public safety 
issues, talks about her 
controversial career. 

135 Bmis of Britain. Garden 
birds. (r) 

230 Film; Rose of Washington 
Square* (1939) starring 
Tyrone Power, Al Joteon 
and Alice Faye. Joteon 
stars as an entertainer 
who befriends a struggling 
singer with a gangster 
boyfriend. Directed by 
Gregory Ratoff. 

335 Film: Over She Goes* 


and Laddie cm. 
Romantic musical about 
two friends who sort out 
the love life of two other 
people. Directed by 
Graham Cutts. 

much publicized policy on 
family viewing is being 
consistently flouted say 
two critics. The I BA 
defends. 

630 News summary and 
weather followed by 
Credo. New evidence 
about how religious are 
the British people. 

730 Africa Part three of Basfl 
Davidson's series 
examines the story of the 
camel caravans which 
brought gold from Mali to 
_ _ the European bankers, (r) 
830 Held In Trust. Diana Riga 


of properties run by the 
National Trust for Scotland 
with visits to some of 
those along the River 
Tay. (Oracle) 

9.00 Mapp and Lucia. Mapp 
does nothing to dampen 
the rumour teat she b 
expecting a baby. (Oracle) 
1030 HU Street Biues. A baby is 
abandoned in a squad car 


lose their hearts to the 
fittte mite whib the mother 
» being traced. (Oracle) 
11.00 Rim: Freud - The Secret 
Passion* (1 982) sterrino 


^UUDOttS. I Irt ' I vwanuinuifUHUA, 

1235 Weather. I 125 MghtThou^tts. I ^S ertand ~ Endsat 

1458KHz/206m: VHF 94J; WBrtd fcSaTOwgSSn? 1 * * C * P ®* 15 ««W1 

Radio 4 


' Susannah York and Eric 

Portman. A biography of 
the psychoanalyst 
COOC8 h tr atmgontheffve 
years he was treating an 
hysterica) woman patient 
Swig nse to his theories 
of neuroses and their 
sitoconscious sexual ' 
coonections. Directed by 

John Huston. Ends at 

r . 

12l5 k Hz/247fTt VHF -90- 
/194m: VHF 953; BBC Radio London 


1230 News; Weather 1233 


Oh^jwave. VHF variations at end 

535 Shipping 630 News Briefing 
6.10 Prelude (s) 830 
News; Fanning Today 630 
Prayer tor tha Day (s) 

835 Weather; Travel 

730 News 7.10 Today's 
Papers 

7.15 On Your Farm 

7.45 in Perspective. Religious 
affairs, with Rosemary 
Martin. 

730 Down to Earth. Weekend 
gardening. 735 Weather; 

830 News 8.10 Today's 
Papers 

8.15 Sport on 4 

8.48 Yesterday in Parliament 
837 Weather; TravaL 
9.00 News 

935 Breakaway. Holiday 

guide, with Bernard Falk. 


(■variable in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 535-6JXtam Weather 
Travel. 135-230pni 
Programme News. 430-630 


430 Nurs 


sT&riglnsofJ 


930 News Stand. Linda 
Christmas reviews the 

1035 TnewK jjf 2 ™®' 

Westminster with James 
Naughtie, of The Guardian. 
1030 Loose Ends with Nad 
Sherrin and studio 


1130 From Our Own 

Correspondent. Ufa and 
politics abroad, reported by 
BBC foreign 
correspondents. 

12.00 News; Money Box. Panel 
game about rood and 
drink. 1235 Weather 

1.00 News 

1.10 Any Questions? With 
Peter Bottomtey. MP, 

Tony Chr is t o pher. Richard 
Holme. Jean Denton. 

135 Shipping 

230 News; The Afternoon 
Play. ’Good Morning 
Blues' by John Wain. With 
Jtriie Covington and BB 
Nighy(ri(s) 

330 News: Travel; 

International 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 

430 The Saturday Feature: 

Letter to the World. A 
centenary celebration of the 
life and poetry of Emily 
Dickinson. With Bonny 
Human and Don FeAows. 

4.45 The Fosdyke Saga ii. 

Based on Bill Tidy's 


cartoon strip. 
530 The Living W( 


orid (Peter 


4.30 Spitin - Ten Years On. 

530 So You Want to be a 
Writer. 530 Ground sweU 
(Sweden's method of 
handing waste). 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variatione at 
end of Radio 3. 

835 weather. 730 News 
73S Rossini (Italian Girl In 
Algiers overture), Liszt (II 
Pensereso: Canzonette del 
Salvator Rosa; Boiet, 
piano), Mahler (Songs of a 
wayfarer: Fischer- 
Dbskau.barftone), Barrios 
(Sueno en fa ftoresta: 

John WifflarTO, guitar), 

Debussy (La meri. 

Giovanni Gabrieli (Canzon a 
G, 1815), Brahms (Narte). 

| Schubert (Impromptu in E 
flat D 899, No 2: 

Brandel pane), Wagner 
(Dawn and Siegfried's 
Journey to the Rhine), Delius 
(Two AquareKes, 
arranged Fenby). and 
Smetana (Vltava, Me 
Via st). 930 News 
935 Record Review Includes 
Roger Nichob comparing 
retrortfings of Stravinsky s 
Symphony in three 
movments. With Paiti 
Vaughan 

10.15 Stereo Release: Vivaldi ( 
Beaufus vfr, RV 597. with 
soktists Buchanan, Smith 
and ten Partridge, and 
Choir of King's College, 
Cambridge); Cantetoube 
(T nptyque; Frederica von 
Stade. mezzo and RPO) 

11.10 This Sporting Life: talk 
by Tom McNab, former 
Olympics athletics coach 

11.15 Violin arid Vida: Nora 
Chastain and Paul 
Cobtti. Mozart (Duo in G, K - 
423), and Martinu (Three 
madrigals) 

11.60 Pioneering Haydn, 

Mature Beethoven: 

Bosto SO (under Ozawa). 

Haydn (Symphony No 8), 


7.10 Mozart and Weber Nash 
Ensemble 

membOTs. Mozart (Clarinet 
Tr»mEBaLK498> I and 
Weber (Clarinet Quantet Op 
34, with Michael CoUtos, 
clarinet) 

830 Brighton Fbstivab BBC 
Concert 

Orchestra/Brighton Festival 
Chorus/ Manoug 
ParHdan (vto«n)/David 
WBson-Johnson 
(baritone) Pan one. Holst 
(Perfect Fool ballet 
music), Delius (In a summer 
• garden), Vaughan (Lark 
ascending) 

8-45 A Modem M ahabharata: 
Professor P Lai tofts the 

9.05 &^iton F^Sfaakfwirt' 0 ^ 
two. Constant Lambert 
(Simmer's test will and 


ScotohOyFmaL Aberdeen v 
Hearte. 530 Sports Report 
R^nWon presents 
Two'e Best 730 Pop Score. 


microcomputers help the 
„ *sabted. ft (Ceefax) 

12.10 Sew Heart Magazine 
programme for the 
nearing impaired 1235 
Farming includes an up- 
date on the after-effects of 
the Chernobyl disaster 
„ _ 1238 Weather. 

130 This Week Next Week. 
David Dimbteby reviews 
the political scene after 
this week's local and by- 
elections. The guests 
include Malcolm Rifkind, 
Paddy Ashdown and Ray 
Hattersiey. 230 
fMtBidere. (rXCeefax) 

330 Cartoon. 

3-05 Bonanza. Two young 
brothers run away from an 
orphanage when they ! 
learn they are to be 
separated. 

335 FBm: Roman Holiday 
(1 953) starring Gregory 
Peck and. in an Oscar- 
winning performance, 

Audrey Hepburn. A Rome- 
based American journalist 
befriends a pretty girl he 
finds sprawled in a 
drunken stupor by the 
Train fountain. He takes 
her back to his fiat to sleep 
It off and the next morning 
discovers she is a 


IteljriDirected by William 

530 Antiques Roadshow from 
Swindon. (Ceefax) 

630 News with Jan Learning. 

6.40 Praise Be! Popular hymns 
presented by Thora Hird. 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Hancock’s Half Hour* 

When Tony contracts a 
cold everybody else 
suffers, (r) (Ceefax) 

735 Mfsa Marpie: The Moving 
Rnger. Part one of a two- 
episode Agatha Christie 
mystery surrounding the 
suicide of a recipient of 

S en letters. 

Joan Hickson, (r) 

b-k> Mastermind. The 

specialist subjects are: the 
history and development 
of firearms 1500-1900; 
the life and career of 
Laurence Olivier, the First 
World War, and the history 
of the Yugoslavs 1900- 
1945. 

835 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

9*20 That's Ufa includes an 
investigation into a 
noisome trade In sick and . 

dying puppies. • 

10-05 Heart of the Matter. A new 
series begins with a 
discussion on the question 

What Pries Hostages?' 

With Terry Waite, tiro Rev 
Ben Weir, Sir Anthony 
Parsons, Ambassador 
Michael Novak and 
Timothy Renton. 

1030 Geoffrey Smith's World of 11 
Flowers. Poppies, (r) 

1135 Weather. 12 

11-10 Ends at 


9-25 Wake Up London. The 
Vicious Boys take tennis 
lessons 9.35 Woody and 
Friends. Two cartoons 
935 Roger Ramjet. 

10.00 Morning Worship. A 
service from Clarendon 
Park Congregational 
Church. Leicester, 
celebrating the 155th 
Annual Assembly of the 
Congregational Church 
Federation. 

1130 Link. Kevin Mulhem 

comments on the DHSS's 
new policy on mobility 
allowances 1130 Once a 
Thief-? Marcel Berlins 
investigates what is being 
achieved by imprisoning 
recidivists. 

1230 Weekend World. After 
Thursday 's local and by- 
elections, how do the 
Tories plan to avoid defeat 
at the next General 
Election? 

1.00 Police 5. Shaw Taylor with 
more clues to unsolved 
crime in the London area 
1.15 The Smurfs. Cartoon 
series 130 Small Wonder. 
American domestic 
comeeiy series about a 
household wim a robot. 

230 Platform. An exploration 
of moral and religious 
issues raised tins week by 
the media. 

I 2.30 LWT News headlines 
followed by Fibre Win 
Penny (967) starring 
Chariton Heston. The 
story of a cowboy facing a 
nud-life crisis. Help comes 
in the shape of a frontier 
widow and her young son. 
With Joan Hackett and 
Donald Pieasence. 

Directed by Tom Gries. 

430 The Campbells. Drama 
serial about a Scottish 
doctor and his family who 
emkjrata to Canada in the 

530 Afoton Market 

630 Now You See It General 
knowledge game 
presented by Jack 
McLaughlin. 

630 News with Alastair 
Stewart. 

630 Highway. Sir Harry 
Secombe is in Bradford. 

7.15 Catchphrasa. Game show 


Soutib Pacific panorama: A scene from the World About Li Gtan 
Pitcairn: The Bounty Inheritance (BBC2.7.45pm) 


CHANNEL 4 


1.10 Irish Angle - Patterns. The 
art of Danny Osborne, a 


starring Robert Shaw. 
Jacqueline Bisset and 
Nick Nofte. Thriller about a 
couple of holidaymakers 
who discover a sunken 
Second World War 
freighter and the keys to 
priceless treasures - and 
danger. They are helped in 
their quest by a reclusive 
lighthouse keeper. 

Directed by Peter Yates. 

935 News. 

10.00 The Under s t an ding, by 
Angela Huth. Constance 
Cummings, Isabel Dean, 
Rachel Kempson, Michael 
Aldridge and Samantha 
Bond star in this drama 
about a secret a woman 
has kept all her married 
life. 

1130 LWT News headlines 
followed by Manny. A 
tribute to Mannv Shinwefl. 


5 30 Open University. Until 1.55 

135 Sunday Grandstand, 
introduced by Desmond 
Lynam. At 230 FootbaBb 
the FA Cup winners north 
and south of the border 
arrive home to rapturous 
welcomes - unless, of 
course, the games end in 
a draw: 2.30- 4.00 Motor 
Racing: live coverage of 
the Monaco Grand Prlx; 
4.00 and 430 Cricket: 
highlights of the opening 
of the John Player Special 
League match between 
Somerset ana Middlesex, 
the finish of the game is 
live; during the cricketers' 
tea interval Rallying; the 
Shefi International Welsh 
Rally. 

6.40 The Money Programme 
includes a profile of AEUW 
president Bill Jordan; and 
reports on the British film 
industry and energy 
prices. 

7.15 Nature introduced by Tony 
Soper with lam Quest. A 
Dutch team watch as a 
tawny owl family regulate 

’ its clutch size; and a report 
on the consequences to 
wildlife of the proposed 
new container port in the 
Fal estuary; ana what 
happens to acorns? 

7.45 The World About Us: 

Pitcairn - The 'Bounty* 
Inheritance. The first of a 
new series. Gtynn 
Christian, better known as 
tha Breakfast Time cook, 
is a descendant of 
Fletcher Christian ot 
mutiny on the Bounty 
infamy. A life- tone’s 
obsession with his 
ancestor's story led Mr 
Christian to organise an 
expedition under sail from 
Tahiti to Pitcairn Island 
where Fletcher Christian 
and his followers settled. 
(Ceefax) 

835 To the Lighthouse. A 
repeat of the award- 


Sir Yehudi Menuhin conducts 
(s) In celebration of his 70th 
Birthday. An evening of popular 
operate highlights. At 830, Sir 
Yehudi in convers a tion with 
M?”**? 9 - 30 String Sound 
10.05 Martin Keiner (s) 

05am Living Legends (s) 130 
presents Nightride 
(s) 900-430801 A Little Night 
Musks. 


Radio 4 


Radio 1 


On medium-wave. VHF 
variations at end. 

630am Mark Page a 30 pBter 
Powell 1030 Dave Lee Travis 


SrSK? 1 ** ^ varlaliofls at and 

535 Stepping 630 News 6.10 
Prelude (s) 830 News; 
Morning has broken (hymns) 
835 Weather; Travel 
730 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers 7.15 Apna Hi 
GharSamajhtoe 735 Beils 
730 Turning Over New 
Oiw. b Baw *» 735 Weather; Travel 
830 News 8.10 Sunday 
Papers 8.15 Sunday 


Holmes's verse 
VWH^ay^EU^MdSi^l 

10H5 Beethoven and 

KomgoW; ChifttoBian 
String Quartet Beethoven 
(String Quartet in F, Op 
14), Komgoid (String Quartet , 
No 1) 

11.00 Continental Cabaret 
Chansons: Saflors. the 
Sea. and "the Bistrot in the 
Harbour" 

1130 Piarro duos by Hoist and 
Debussy: Krtfh Williams 
and CiivB Wflbamson. Hotel 
(Elegy in memoriam 
WH&n Morris). Debussy 
(Six epigraphies 


(3)3301 
American Chart Show direct from 
New York, with Gary Byrd (s) 

530 Saturday Live (Mark Page (s) 
630 In Concert (s) 730 Simon 
Mayo 930-1230 The Midnight 
Runner Show with Dixie Peach 
VHF Radios 1 5 2*. 430m As 
Radio Z 1.00pm As Radio 1 . 
730-430am As flaetto Z 


(hmoous news and views) 
830 Dame Anna Neagle 
appeals for the Week's Good 
Cause 835 Weather; 

Travel 

630 News. 9.10 Sunday 


9.16 Letter from America, by 
ABsteir Cooke. 

930 Morning Service from St 
Mary's College, 
Twickenham 

10.15 The Archers. Omn&us 
edition 

11.15 Pick of the Week. 


imiowea Dy Manny, a 
— iT ibute 10 Manny Shinwefl. 

12.15 Trapper John. Medical 
comedy drama series. 

1.05 Night Thoughts. 

Two superior persons. 

Aiec McCowen and Jeremy 
Kemp in the story of Lord 

„ Curzon and Lord Kitchener. 

1130 Seeds of Faith. A 
reflection of the life of 

„ Ma£9aret C«therow(s) 

11.15 In Committee. The work 
of Parliament's Select 
Committees. 

1230 News; Weather. 1233 
Shaping. 

VHF (avauaDle in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 5353.00am Weather; 
Travel 739-830 Open 
University: 7.00 Maths 
Foundation Tutorial 730 
An Enlightened Historian 7.40 
The Autonomy of the 
State. 135-ZOOpm 
Programme News. 430- 
6.00 Options: 4J)0 Mexican 
Journey. 430 Plato to 
Nato. 530 Wbridmakers. 530 
Get by in Spanish. 


winning adaptation of 
Virginia Woolf's novel 
starring Rosemary Harris, 
Michael Gough and 
T.P.McKenna. Set in the 
summer Of 1912. the story 
centres on the Ramsay 
family and their guests at 
their holiday home in 

! Cornwall. Directed by 
Colin Gregg. (Ceefax) 

1030 Grand Prtx. Highlights of 
this afternoon's Monaco 
Grand Prtx. 

1135 FRm: Girlfriends (1978) 
starring Melanie Mayron, 
Anita Skinner and Eft 
Wailach. The story of two 
New York girls who take 
their friendship for granted 
until one of them is 
married. The single girl 
feels betrayed and the 
married one becomes to 
resent what she behoves 
is the freedom of her 
fr iend. Directed by Claudia 
Weill. Ends at 1Z3S. 

da caccta/Vienna Concantus 
Mustcus and 

H uttar tocher (bass). Bach 
(Concerto m A major for 
oboe d'amore ana 
orchestral Vivaldi (Oboe 
Concerto in A minor. RV 
463). and Bach (Cantata 
No 82, and the aria Erfullet, 
ihr himmfischen. 
goftiichen Ffammen 

830 Brighton Festival: BBC 
SO with Peter Donohoe 


painter and sculptor, who 
lives on the Beam 
i Peninsula, West Cork. 

135 The Making of Britain. Dr 
Mark Goldie describes the 
events that led to the rise 
of the political parties 
during the restoration. 

ZOO The Pocket Money 
Programme. Financial 
advice lor children, from 
children. 

I 230 FHrm Jet PBot (1957) 

starring John Wayne and 
Janet Leigh. An American 
Air Force commander, to 
charge ot an airbase to 
Alaska, falls fora 
defecting Russian pitot 
who lands at his base. 
Directed by Joseph Von 
F Sternberg. 

4.35 Barefaced Flatfoot A Mr 
Magoo cartoon. 

4.45 Durretl in Russia. Gerald 
and Lee Dunreii continue 
their exploration of 
Russian wildlife with a visit 
to the Askania Nova 
reserve to the heart of the 
Ukraine. (Oracie) 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Business Programme. 

This week's edition 
includes a report on Swan 
Hunter, the recently 
privatized shipyard that 
has tost a big contract to 
its nationalized 
competitor, Harland and 
Wolff. 

6.00 Second Glance. Filmic 
impressions of Britain's 
lighthouses. 

6.15 Athletics: International 
Road Racing from Oxford. 
An eight kilometre course 
lor the men; three for the 
women. 

7.15 KiHmaniaro. A repeat of 
the programme illustrating 
the mountain's variety of 
landscapes, plants and 
animals. 

8.15 Sinfonietta. The London 
Sinfon'ietta play 
Messiaen's Colours of the 
Celestial City. 

9.00 The Channel 4 Inquiry, 
presented by Peter 
Sissons. Experts summon 
star witnesses to examine 
whether our education and 
training system is failing to 
meet the needs ofindustry. 

1030 Hfrrt Albert, RN* (1953) 
starring Anthony Steel. 
Second World War thriller 
about a ruse to cover the 
disappearance of 
escaping Allied prisoners 
of war. Directed by Lewis 
Gilbert 

12.10 The Twaight Zone: A 
Short Drink From a 
Carotin Fountain. A 
supernatural tale of an 
older man who seeks the 
fountain of youth in order 
to satisfy his forty- years- 
ypunger wife. Starring 
Patrick O'Neal and Ruta 
Lee. Ends at 1235. 


1137 News. 1230 Closedown. 
W onte Open University. 
From B35amto 635. Education 


Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 

SIB itewnteak U9 Martian 730 News 
Hours 7J0 From me 
Wge ttBS TAS N etwork UK 8.00 News 
Hg Wyg* 6J6 * Good Snow 
^ Review of me British 
Press 9.15 The Worn Today 830 Finan- 
gaj Ww w M0 Look Ahead <U5 About 
Bn»i 1000 NWS 1001 Here's HumpW 

2?no ft* 1 11J» News 
11-09 News About Bntam 11.15 Gum r 
Interlude 1U0 Meridian 1200 Remo 
k—wreet .10.15 Anything Goes IMS 
Spona Roundup 1JW News IJB Twemy- 
Four Hours 1J0 Network UK tAG 


1Z,0 SffifflRHW 
4444. Phone-in to Arabs! 
Cavaca Stiva. Prime Minister 
of Portugal fimes open 
from 1030am). 1235 
Weather 

1.00 The World this Weekend: 
News. 135 Shipping 
ZOO News; Gardeners' 

„ Question Tims 
230 The Afternoon Ptay. 

Hoperaft into Europe, a 


France) 

535 Weak Ending. Satirical 
review of the week's 
news. 530 Shipping 535 
weather: Travel 

6.00 News; Sports Round-up 

635 Stop the Week with 

Robert Robinson. With 
Dtffie Keane's musical item 

7.00 Saturday Night Theatre. 
The Death ch Robert De 
CerWey. by Frederick 
Bradnum.Witil Jenny 
Funnel! and Shaun 
Prandergast(s) 

8.30 Baker's Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records (Si 

930 Thriller! CJimax of Flulth 
Renders A Judgement in 
Stone, read by Paul 
Daneman. 938 Weatiier 

10.00 News . 

10.15 Evening Service (s) 

1030 Soundings [new series) 
Satan and aft his works. 
With Ted Harrison. 

11.00 Science Now (Peter 
Evans) 

n.30 Bodgers. Banks and 
Sparkes. Comedy 
Senes. 


No 7). 130 News 
135 Schubert Edith Vogel 
plays Sonata in G major, 


On medfum wave. See Radio 1 
for VHF variations. 

News on the hour until 130pm, 
then 330. 630, 730, and hourly 
from 1030. Headlines 630am, 
730. Sports Desks 1132am, 
1032pm. Cricket Scoreboard 
730pm. 

4.00 am Martel Stanford (si 
630 Steve Truetove (e) 8J06 David 
Jacobs (s) 1030 Sounds Of The 
60s (a) 1130 Afoum Time with 
Peter Clayton (s) 1.00pm The 
News Hudtffines. Roy Hudd with 
June Whitfield. Chris Emmatt 
■and The Hudcffiners. 130 Cup Final 
Sport on 2. FOOtbatt: FACup 
FtoaL Evarton v Liverpool at 
Wembley Stadium. Also 


230 Vautftan Wiitfams in his. 
time: KodaIy(Concerto 
. for orcchestra), Vaughan 
WWiams (Symphony No 
9), Berlioz (Harold in Italy), 
Vaughan Williams 


fr®"* StiflTwBnty-Fbur Hours 
JUJOAttz for the Asking SlOONsws 

o"S2£ 0n 'l££?* l 2 ns About Literature 
9.15CUR RnaJ SpecW 9L30FaooiB ana 
Po*bc8 lOJUNaws 1039Frtxn our own 
Corraaponctav.ia.30Nm* Hess lOAORe- 

l?S«ld nB Roundup 

^•WCommertBry ll.lfijort 
Anars Cricket Anetoiogy 

ttriStotto NewsraeJ 15L308t*»fs Haft 
pozam IJMMflws iJTlPiay oi ttw Weak: 
Hawk. Ena aJONe^ZJSRmteWg 
2*0"^ Pr^a-ISA Srtn VVaBt B1 aw 
Hndu K!a h a^OAjbum TUne XOONews 
MStaews About Britain 3.15From Our 
Own Comsaqondont USHrancol R* 
S'SJi 435Re(ieBtlons S.OBNewa 
SilSTwa n^Fbtg Hours S^SUttar From 
America. Aa ten— In OMT. 

Regional TV: on facing page 


430 Cefio and piano: Steven 
Isserfis and Peter Everts. 
Schumann (Fantasia stuefca, 
Op 73). Debussy (Sonata 
to D rninori, Brahms .(Sonata 

5.00 Ja2Z Record Requests: 
with Peter Clayton 
5.45 Critics' Fcxum: topics' 
mefudo the new ram The 
Lightship, Timothy Mo’s • 
novel An toaular. 
Possession, and the Radio 3 
production of Kroetz’s . 
ptey Through the Leaves 
635 Organs in Norway^ . 

Coin Andrews at 
Haretad Church, .north 
Norway plays works by 

De Grigny. Knut NysfedL Eg3 
HoviareJ, and anon 



With Charies Kay, 

Norman Rodwsy and Cecde 
Chevreau(s) 

330 Enterprise. Marjorie 
Lofthouee meets fossil 
collector Stan Wood. 

430 News; The Food 
Programme. Derek 
Cotfoer hears about the 
. _ rarob bean's revival (r) 

430 The Natural History 
Programme. With Fergus 
.„ I^wnfland Lional KeSeway. 
530 News; Travel 
335 Indian Tales of the Raj. 

What tna Indians thought 
of the British and their 
legacies (3) The 
Unguage of Protest 
535 Joyous Days in the 
Desert Cherte Lung hi 
reads from the letters and 
writings of Janet Ross 
who went to Alexandra in 
1881. 530 Shipping 6.55 
Whather 

630 News 6.15 Weekend 
^ Wbman's Hour 
730 No Highway. Nevfl 
Shuts s novel in three 
parts (1) with Norman Bowler 
and John Cfegg(G) 

830 Bookshelf wim Hunter 
Davies, featuring poet 


aW5^tatamWRnth (P« no). Conductor 

: ZoUman.Pan one. Berio 

versltor 7 00 Mnttm (Quattro versioni onginals 

S^TutoStSo riftran nottuma di 

^^gp nan7 ’ 40 

□rarrar^&e.oo- a40 J >e M S£Ster a S ( BW,arate; 

"wet 

py in aparasn. (Piano Concerto No 2) 

□grfin *3 10,00 P® Quality of Cabinet 

n «UIU w j Govern mantO) Peter 

^ -f „ VHF S»!SSf*' 

. see EHia oi Hacto 3 minister in Mrs Thatcher's 

^- 7-00 News 1030 ichub^aixT Strauss 

■ songs: Bnan Rayner- 

(aimphony n Cook (bass bantone).w?th 

SrtarhSab f Jo 9 Br Vignoles (piano). 

SSSEff Hrt tociudes Schubert's Das 

ue. D Ascofl, P^no). Sangers Habe, and 

idMunrow: with Earty SchSert and Strauss 

^Ooreortof settings of Das 

ii??*®!™ Roserfoand, by Ktopsrock. 

. and Vom kunftrgen Alter, 

w). Hmdemith (Recorder by Ruckerl 

I.PurceJJ i Birthday 11.00 Samuel Wesley: Ulster 

aara&as 

SSC®U 

MurraV.^gan). 1 830). and Boyce 

issy (Petite Piece: (Symphony No 1) 

SSSSM 11 1 157 News - Closedown. 

ett,piano).Chausson VHF only: Open 

™ 5S. ramo “ r 01 Unrversity. From 6.35 to 

6.55am. The Romantic 
ian. soprano). Delius Poets. 


KarrHukne. 

830 Tha Monarchy to Britain. 
Brian Hoey tteks to 

peopte responsible for the 
Royal FamSys travel 
arrangements. 

930 News; The Oldest Ally 
(new series) Robert 
Graham examines the past 
influence of Britain's SOOT 


On medium wave. For VHF 
variations, see end of Radio 3 
fetinos 

635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Franck and he Circle; 

i l SfflS mpton,h 

(Prekide.Chorate and 
Fugue: D’Ascofi, piano). 

830 David M unrow: with Early 
Music Consort of I 

London. Hofboms (Rva I 

Dances, and other I 

works), Hmdemith (Recorder I 
Tno).F*urceJJ (Birthday I 

Ode for Queen Mary, and I 

Come ye sons of art). I 

9.00 News | 

935 Your Concert Choice; I 

Jongen (Sym phony | 

Concerts me, 1926. with I 

Michael Murrey.cmap), f 

Debussy (Petite Piece: I 

Hacker clarinet and I 

Burnett piano).Chdusson I 

(Poeme de ramour et da | 

la mer, with I 

Nortnan.soprano). Detiue I 

(Piano Concerto: Kars with 
the LSO) 

1030 Music Weektytincludes I 

Anthony Beaumont on J 

Busoni s opera Dr Faust I 

and a conversation with I 

the violinist Nigel Kennedy 

11.15 Undsay Stnng Quartet | 

Haydn (the E fiat Op 33 

No 2). and Bartok (Quartet ! 

No 1) I 

1235 BBC SO to Berne (under f 

Pntchard), with Szeryng | " 

(vtolinj. Walton (Partita), and 
Brahms (VioJm 
Concerto). At 1.15, 

Rachmarwwv j 

- — (Symphonic Dances) I 
230 Jerusalem-The Verdi | 
tour-act opera, sung to { ' 
French. BBC Fhaharmonie j 

S£J i, - d ! 2 i ?£P Singers. With I 
a cast ncfudtng | 

Newman, Andwson, Sand. F. 

Corns, King, Roden* S 

tarfe end Tranter. Interval I t. 

roadlrg « 3^0. Utird { < 

and rmrntiacts begto at 3.45 I 

5.15 New Premises: the return I 
of the Stephen Games I » 


Steve True love (s) 730 Roger 
Royle says Good Morning 
Sunday, and visits Tisstogton in 
Derbyshire for the Weft 

Dressing ceremony (s) 9-05 
Metodies for You is) 11.00 

Charts Chester (Sunday Soapbox) 
7.35 Rhyme end Reason. 

Richard Anthony Baker with the 
stories behind some well- 
known songs 630 Just William, 
william Davies introduces, 
conducts and plays some of his 
favounte music 830 Sunday 

((“tores Students from 
the RSCM Choir Course. 

RossaU School, Lancashire 9.00 
Your Hundred Best Tunes (Alan 
Keitii) ia05 Songs from the Shows 
(BBC Radio Orchestra) 10.30 
Jazz Score. Chairman Benny Gran 
with Ronnie Scon, Humphrey 
Lyttelton, John Barnes and George 
Chisholm 11.00 Sounds of Jazz 
with Peter Clayton (stereo from 
midnight) I.OOom Bill Renneils 
(s) 3.00-4.00 A Little Night Music 


C Radio 2 

sff™™c. se6Raa^o, 

News on the hour. Headlines 
730am. Sports Desks 1Z02pm, 
1032. Cric&st Scoreboard 
7.30pm. 

430am Martin Stanford (s) 630 



ISP 830 W(5SSSff: 


F 




N«d Hawtbmite (left) sod Denis UU io (fae mud episode' of 
M*«J and Lada (Chaimd 4, 9.00pm) 


930 Six Man. Brian Rbt tafles 
to Anna Brown. 935 
Weather; Travel 
1030 News 

10.15 The Sunday Feature; 


recital. SchubartjSonata 
^!' T 2 X ?' D6 6«- Brahms 
(ftour Baoades. Op 10), 
Schumann (Sonata in G 
minor, Op 22i 

735 Jurg Schaaftteinioboa, 
oboe d'amore and oboe 




J^raard Spear, Carol Kaye: 
Album Market, ITV 6.00pm 


C Radio 1 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end. 

News on the half how until 

Janice Long with Action Special 
Bulletins at 930am, 1130. 

630am Mark Page 8.00 Peter 
Powell 10.00 Mike Read 1230pm 
Jimmy SavHe's 'Old Record” 

Club (1982. 1976. 1970)Z30. 
American Bandstand [featuring 
The Four Tops) 330 Radio 1 More 
Time. With Adrian Juste 4.00 
Chartbusters (Bruno Brookes) 5L00 
Top 40 (Bruno Brookes) (s) 730 
Ahrie Nightingale Request Show (s) 
930 Robbie Vincent (s) 1 1.00- 
1Z00 The Rankin' Miss P with 
Culture Rock (s) VHF Radios 1 
* 2 - 4.00am As Radio Z ZDOpm 
Benny Greenjs). 330 Alan Dell 
with Sounds Easy (s). 4.00 Jazz 
Classics in stereo (s). 430 Sing 
Something! Simple (s). 5.00 As 
Radio 1. fZ00-4.00am As 
Radio 2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

5n2 jBJa *“ ** Askww 

7.00 News 7 MS Twenty-Feu- Hours 7 JO 

^Sspoodeni 7 jo Wave- 
gurtle 830 News fiJW Reflections 8.15 
The Pleasure's Yours 9J0 News 9.09 
Review of th* Bmisn Press 0.15 Soence 
Action 9.« Living nHtn Oougnt 10.00 
News 1031 Shcn Story lOHSFrom our 
Corrasponflent 1 1.00 News 1 1.09 Its 
H-55 News Abour Bntam 
1230 Nows 1231 Play « the Week: 
Howard s End 1.00 News 1.00 Twemy 
Fbur Hours 1J0 Spons Roundup 1J5 
to Twy Myall Recuea Show 239 News 
130 Pride art Prejudice 3.00 Raqp 
Newareei 0.15 Concen Hal 430 News 
4.16 It's Your world 5.4S Spons Roundup 
B.00 News 839 Twenty-four Hours SJ0 
Sunaey Halt Hour 930 News B31 Snort 
Story 9.15 The Pleasure's Yours 1030 
News 1039 A Snort Waft. In me Hindu 
Kttsn 10.25 Book Choice 1030 Financial 
fjawew 10.40 Reflections 10.45 Scons 
ROunoup 11.00 News 1139 Commentary 
11.15 Letttr From America 1130 Listen to 
Whot the Man Says 1230 News 1239 
News About Britan 12.15 Radio Nswsresi 
1230 Rehgioui Sorwse 130 News 131 
Aspects o> Loire 1.45 Da»id Munrow £30 


A I N»« zt» Review of me British Prase 
jflg { ZlSPeewe s Choice 230Jt's Your World 


3-OONews aoSNews About Bntam 
H5Gooa aocA* AASWavegukie 435 Rb- 
flecnons 5-OONews 5.09Twemy-Four 
Hours 5.45 Rsccfding oi the Week AS 
fanes to GMT. 

Regional 7T-'- on facing page 


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. : -Vi4w~- > ^riJEwrZ.^x--- ‘ - it 


THE TIMES 


»*** ** 






-■-S' 1 iv-'*- 


SPORT 


Merseyside clubs meet in FA Cup Final for first time in competition’s 1 14-ycar history 


have had to live down the the tragedy of last season's European 
Cap final in Brussels while overcoming the loss of Soaness. Their 
list of honours in the domestic and European game is endless: 15 times league champions, 
twice FA Cup winners, four times Milk Cup winners, four times European Cup winners, and 
twice UEFA Cop winners to name but a few. Victory would give them the elusive League and 
FA Cup doable, hitherto achieved only by Tottenham Hotspur and Arsenal. 


Clive White on 
the probable 
Wembley teams 


ClfCBTAII are seriously challenging for supreme? on Merseyside ** and therefor 
EVBK I yn national supremacy — aster 14 years is the shadow m their neighbour 
and natural enemies. Seven times first division chatnpMMS, fenr times FA Cap. winners and 
Cup Winners’ Cup holders. Defeat in last May’s final cost them a nniqoe treble. Thn beat 
Liverpool in the Charity Shield in Angnst hot victory in their third consecnd t* FA Cop final fc 
essential if they are to save face after relinquishing their League fitle to LiverpooL 


ft)) 


■ 







STEVE WICOL 
Right Dacfc 



Routes to 


. % ;;a.* . ■- yv, ■ • .<■ r -■ 

a.! ■ 

& '■ 


the final 


Liverpool: Third round- Norwich 
(h) 5-0. Fourth round: Chelsea (a) 
2-1. Fifth round- York (a) 1-1: 
(replay, h) 3-1 (after extra time). 
Sixth round- Watford (h) 0-0; 


(replay, a) 2-1 (after extra time). 
Semi-fir 


Semi-final (at White Han Lane): 
Southampton, 2-0 (after extra 
time). 


Hero or villain? Exiro- 
< vert successor to 
■ Clemence. Born in Dur- 
' ban and p!a\ed for Zira- 
babwe. Vancouver and 
Crewe. Acrobaiic. coura- 
. gcous and risky. 


On?inal!y understudy to 
NcaJ. but equally impres- 
sive in midfield. Joined 
from Ayr for £300.000 
and will represent Scot- 
land in Mexico. Forceful 
forager. 


Recently preferred to 
Lawrenson at centre 
back One need say no 
more. A patient under- 
study since arriving from 
Coventry three years ago. 
Composed and elegant. 




:.«* Handsome Hansen. Fix- 
r:^ uire in the Liverpool 
t'\ team if not always 
x-’i Scotland's after leaving 
h/i- Pankfc nine years aga 
?’* Captain. Cbasiog his first 


k ’ V 







: ^ v >*C‘ r iV . * t - .V"'. ’ ’• 
■**■:•* 


v.; '--e i: i 
■ >: ... %■ 


MARX LAlVReNSCN 
MiTfteld 


Played for Republic cf 
Ireland before 

Liverpool's tint team. 
Succeeded Kennedy but 
yet to win over thc'Kop. 
Accurate, sometimes 
oventmbitious. left foot. 


Britain's best defender 
but no less a player in 
midfield. Signed from 
Brighton for record 
£*00.000 in 1*81. Tack- 
les with precision rather 
than power. Quick. 



Everton: Third round: Exeter (h) 
1-0. Fourth round: Blackburn (h) 
3-1. Fifth round: Tottenham (a) 2- 
1. Sixth round: Luton (a) 2-2; 
(replay 40 1-0. Semi-final (at Villa 
Park): Sheffield Wednesday, 2-1 
(after extra time). 



I 



Left Rotherham as an 
England nnder-21 to be- . 
come an Evenoa reserve. ; 
Exceeded all expecta- 
tions in replacing the 
injured SouthaQ. As tall .« 
as a basketball pfayet 


Graduated to the ‘ En- 
gland senior team after 
one game at under -21 
leveL Winner of three 
major championship 
medals when 22. Fast, 
powerful tadder. 


Bdgiao-bora Wefah m- 
:: teroattond .enuafiy ax 
: hoar * comp back. 
1 Unbeatable value at 
i; £100.001 Af&oionisdy 
■i known as -PsycboPsi". 
■■ Facey nd strong. 


v)i; Transformed by Wales 
-v •- Evenoa captaincy. 
-A itoised to oveshaul SalTs 
!?' dub reconl of .TO caps at 
the age of 23. Qmeiand 
r ' 1 ; co m pos e d: - Renowned 
for speed. -instinctive. 


An unpredictable player 
who has found his niche 
after five seasons. Born 
m Johannesburg and 
signed from Middles- 
brough for £500.000. 
Speedy, tricky player. 


The great Dane who hke 
a Hans Christian Ander- 
son fairytale has dcvel- 
f.-l| oped into a player of 
V-4 beauty under Dalglish. 
<'?• Signed from Ajax. Deii- 
*"■ cate distribution. 




f ‘ ■*' i ■r -'- ' *&■ •:* 










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j£l 


IAN RUSH 
Forward 


KENNY DALGLISH 
Forward 


Explosive Wembley de- 
but four years 3go against 
Tottenham. Signed from 
Home Farm. Dublin in 
1 979 and again into dou- 
ble figures in goals. Slip- 
pery with a good shoL 


The most prolific 
gnalscorer of modern 
times. Bought from 
Chester for £>>).(?0fl five 
seasons ago. Welsh team- 
mate of 'his marker to- 
day. RatchtTc. 


Man of the momcnL ^ 
Instrumental in their '. 
championship success on • 
the field in his first . 
season as manager. ;] 
Sv-oUsncfs most capped 
player. Shrewd. lethaL 

. ’ ■ % .<? 



Alan Robinson (above), the ref- 
eree for today's match, is a 49-year- 
oW civa servant from Watertoovflte, 
near Portsmouth. He retires after 


An outsider Mexico 
before a knee operation 
and subsequent compli- 
cations. Discovered in a 
bargain basement at 
Ttanmere. A perfect 
complement to Ratcbfle. 


Joined from Burnlev for 
£325,000 in 1983. 
Goaisronng midfield- 
enm-wioger in the 
Coppell mould and Mex- 
ico bound. Could prise 
open LiverpooL • 


■ ■ m 

Has o ve rc o m e mtffiiple ,r. : ' 
•••‘.I mjurie* ax 29 to assume 
rightful place - among .J. - 
, . • Engfond’s creative ben. ' 


; t . KendalTs rooa iasptfed 


purchase at I6QOOO from f! 
" Bohan. ' ■ 


Reid’s ronrimg mate, 
whom he may miss in 
Meuca Another pnt- 
dent purchase at 
-C5G.OOO from Sundcr- 
bod. Made debar at 
Wcmbkj. 


• • 'A.// * « .«v v ,*< 

&***•••• 


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todays game. 


A lifelong Portsmouth supporter, 
he has been the man in the middle 
for 30 years, since he was 19. *T 
played <n local footbaH but I was a 
frustrated player." he said. "J was 
never any good. So I turned to 
refereeing". 

He refereed the MOk Cup final 
between Everton and Liverpool, at 
Wembley in 1984. and also the 


replay at Maine Road. “It was such 
a fine, sporting event" he says. "I 
just hope it wfiTbe the same again/ 


■ : j Inconsistent after a suc- 
' cessful impact upon ar- 

< rival from Leicester. A 
•i broken arm ended a rc- 
: cent good spell. One- 

< paced but capable of 
: inspiring by ha effort. 


i VS 




He admits he will be nervous 
before the match. “1 get pre-match 
nerves before every game, let alone 
a cup final," he admitted. “But 
that's not a bad thing, if you get 
complacent you can make a real 
hash of things. I like to keep the 
game flowing and I try to keep a low 
profile. The crowd come to see the 
players, not the referee." 



:'^U . 


A* 


ADRIAN HEATH 




The most accande ban 
striker in either team. :! 
Bora in Boilih Wefts bm 
represents Republic of !• 
Ireland. Free-kick spe- ■■■ 
ciahsL A rcgreliabk ab- •' 
sentee this season. \ 


Most improved pfover in • ... 
•j the team. Signed from ' 

\ Dumbarton for £150.000 .• 

' ra 1980 and a member of ; - 
; Scotland's World Cop f- 
j squad. Ideal tmgel man " 
t with fine controL 


Player of the year in 
anyone's pill. Cost 
£800.000 from Leicester, 
now *ahied as £3 rl First 
division's feadiqg somer 
with 39 «n aA competf 
tions Sumtung'paor. 


Evcrton's answer to 
Liverpool's original 
igii “woersub". Rtircfough- 
% Soned form Stoke for 
ffeOODO in 1981 Lou 
?4-' ptxce first fonsughinjury- 


-t .,7. j'J^v v .. v < £ .. .. .• 


Leandro refees to go 
to Mexico with Brazil 


Rio De Janeiro (Reuter) - 
The Brazilian right back. Le- 
andro. refused to accompany 
his squad when it flew to 
Mexico for the World Cup 
finals. The plane was delayed 
more than an hour to give 
Leandro time to reconsider 
but it left without him after 
his team colleagues. Zico and 
Junior, had gone to his flat to 
tir to persuade him to change 
his mind. 

"Leandro has been very 
depressed lately. Since he did 
not wish to discuss his deci- 
sion. I decided not io push 
him further." the Flamenco 


presidenL George Helal. said. 
Leandro, a veteran of Brazil's 
I <*82 World Cup team in 
Spain, had also refused play 
aeamsi Paraguay in the Amer- 
icas Cup tourament in I9S3. 

© Lisbon (AP) — Tne top 
Portuguese defender. Antonio 
VeJoso was excluded from his 
country's World Cup squad 
hours before Lhe team was due 
:o leave for Mexico. Tests 
rev ealed that the Benfica play- 
er was suffering from a neuro- 
logical problem that made 
him unfit :o play. He will be 
replaced by Fernando 
Bandeirinha. 


Aberdeen 
should 
rise to the 
occasion 


Dalglish, Freeman of Wembley 


By Stuart Jones 
Football Correspondent 


By Hugh Taylor 


^7— 






these two booklets 
set out your financial options. 


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W«is« viu* niv.lrw jih 3 i' nil. hi ■ 4iti-.ui. « i..yin\t 1 iui it ■jf>'nnawiin! 

»Hir.Muir-' 


Every neutral football fol- 
lower who was enthralled by 
tiie exploits of Heart of Midlo- 
thian in the league is ardently 
hoping they will find consola- 
tion for their ill-fated romance 
by winning the Scottish Cap 
final at Hampden Park today. 

The bookmakers, however 
make their opponents, Aber- 
deen, favourites to take die 
trophy. Although they faded 
to retain their league champi- 
onship because of inconsisten- 
cy Aberdeen stfll appear the 
team more likely to show their 
best form on the big occasion. 
It may be significant that 
victory for Aberdeen today 
would make them the first 
side, other than Rangers and 
Celtic, to win both domestic 
cups in the same season, after 
their 3-0 Skol Cop victory 
against Hibernian. 

Hearts, however, have 
shown they are unlikely to 
freeze because their success 
has come from solid team- 
work and a simple pattern of 
play. Hie most difficult task 
for Alex MacDonald, their 
manager, will be to restore 
morale after their unexpected 
stumble at the last league 
hurdle when they lost to 
Dundee, allowing Celtic to 
take the championship. 

Aberdeen's resolute defen- 
sive partnership of McLeisb 
and Miller will be hard 
pressed to contain the venom- 
ous attacks led by the Hearts 
trio of Clark, Robertson and 
Colquhoon, but on the other 
hand, Aberdeen are more ex- 
perienced and powerful than 
Hearts, even without the 
sprightly Black, who Is joining 
the French dab, Metz, and is 
dropped from the cup final 
team. 


It will be dose, perhaps 
desperately so. It will be 
cramped, perhaps disappoint- 
ingly so. h will be crunchingly 
competitive, too. but as 
Merseyside's finest hour and a 
half looms one name 
suggeststhat Liverpool are 
about to achieve the double by 
winning the FA Cup Final at 
Wembley. That name 
is Kenny Dalglish. 

Entitled to call himself a 
Member of the British Empire 
and a Freeman of Glasgow, he 
has won a pageful of honours 
in the game, including 
yesterday’s accolade as man- 
ager of the year. The holder of 
a hundred Scotland caps and 


England's World Cnp 
squad, ensconced In Colorado 
Springs in then- bnfid-np to 
Mexico, w01 be unable to 
watch five coverage of the FA 
Cap final. Although the Wem- 
bley showpiece between 
Everton and Liverpool is being 
beamed live to around 50 
countries, the United States is 
not among them. 


the only player-manager to 
Englis 


claim the English champion- 
ship, be already boasts a 
record that is unlikely to be 
matched. 

Apart from overtaking De- 
nis Law as Scotland's leading 
goal-scorer, all he needs to 
complete his set is the 
winner's medal that is on offer 
this afternoon. At the age of 
35, one of the oldest players 
and the youngest manager in 
the first division, this may be 
his last chance to accept it 

Although it would be the 
crowning achievement of a 
dazzling career, 

leadingLiverpooi to victory is 
not enveloped in sentiment 
alone. He will not be the 


swiftest player to be seen by an 
estimated audience of 200 
million today, nor the most 
energetic. 

He may not be involved in 
many of the shuddering tack- 
les nor will his presence 
always necessarily be obvious. 
But no one's touch will be 
softer, no one’s vision will be 
wider, no one's imagination 
will be brighter and no one’s 
contribution is likely to be as 
influential No one on either 
side, in other words, is as 
talented. 

Bob Paisley his assistant, 
describes him as "the man 
with magic in his boots" and 
Everton have painful memo- 
ries of how spellbinding he can 
be. . Last September he picked 
an unexpected formation for 
the derby- at Goodison Park 
and, in a stunning game that 
would have graced any arena 
in the world, be led them to a 
3-2 triumph. * • 

Liverpool's almost flawless ' 
performance, opened by 


Dalglish himself with a goal 
after a mere 20 seconds, was to 
prove decisive not only on the 
day but. since they eventually 
finished two points in front of 
their neighbours in the final 
table, in the season rtselt Can 
they close with a display of 
similar quality to enrich the 
occasion at Wembley? 

As eight months ago. 
Dalglish is keeping his line up 
locked inside his tactical 
brain. Then he chose a sweep- 
er, Molby, to tidy op around 
Hansen and Lawrenson and 
treated the fixture asa Europe- 
an tie. With Rush and John- 
ston leading tire breaks, he 
stayed behind them and 
prompted Liverpool to a 3-0 
lead by the interval 

The framework had altered 
slightly by the time Liverpool 
became champions by defeat- 
ing Chelsea last Saturday, 
appropriately through 
Daglisfa’s lone goal Molby has 
since strolled elegantly into 
midfield where MacDonald 
has taken over from McMa- 
hon and Lawrenson has shift- 
ed across to allow Gillespie to 
share the defensive marking 
duties with Hansen. 

Dalglish is expected to re- 
tain his balanced side that is 
captained by Hansen, who has 
astonishingly been left out of 
Scotland's World Cup squad 
With Nico! and Begfin shad- 
owing Sheedy and Steven 
respectively, Liverpool would 
thus have numerical advan- 


Znrich (AP) — The execu- 
tive committee of UEFA said 
yesterday thxt Engfish dabs 
have made "important efforts" 
to improve the coodact of their 
fans fofiowing the Heysd 
stadium tragedy a year ago. 

However, in a brief state- 
ment, the committee said ft 
was still too eariy to consider 
readmitting Stem to European 
cnp matches. - 


"If the unpvmx-zocQt emtin- partnership with Sha 
ues the conmntee reserves the Everton's most improved 

rwihf 4 a eomnoialttr rifi HAcihmv J*. » ».i ft ji 


right to reconsider its position 
in 1987," the statement said. 


Liverpool, finishing as 
strongly and as jrhytiunically 
as ever, maintained a' run of 
tea victories and a draw and, 
more poignantly, they already 
have a trophy to mark 
Dalglish's first season in 
charge. As be himself says, 
“wc can afford to relax and the 
pressure must be on them to 
win something." 

Lineker, with 39 goals to his 
credit, has blossomed in bis 
Sharp, 
in- 



tege in midfield, the crucial 
ana 

Remarkably, Liverpool 
have yet to lose a match in 
which Rush has scored and his 
personal duel with his Welsh 
international colleague, 
Raidiffe. will be one of the 
more significant features. 
Mountfiefd, missing through 
injury in September and trou- 
bled by a swollen knee this 
week, is in danger of being 
excluded again. 

Howard Keodafi, given no 
choice but to delay the publi- 
cation of his team sheet until 
Mountfield's fitness has been 
assessed this morning, has 
been disturbed all season by 
absenteeism. Apart from Sou- 
thall Everton trust that they 
will otherwise be at full 
strength but their recent form 
in the Canon League- has not 
been convincingly fluent 


dividual but neither of them 
should expect to remain unac- 
companied for more than a 
few of the forthcoming 5,400 
seconds. verpooTs most nig- 
gling fear may centre not so 
much on the opposition but 
on their own goalkeeper. 

Grobbelaar, an entertaining 
showman who regards the 
whole penalty area as his 
stage* has mistimed his visits 
to its furthest extremeties with 
embarrassing consequences. 

Minims, Southall's abled 
deputy, will face a wider 
variety of potential danger/ 
men, one of whom is Molby. ’’ 
armed with one of the fiercest 
shots in the game. If Liverpool 
should win -it for the sake of 
Dalglish, somebody should 
win it for the sake of England 
and Scotland. A replay would 
postpone the preparation of 
seven of their World Cup 
representatives. 


■ -it 

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FA Cnp final betting, page 21 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Xmie.lMr Mfs Mi— 1_ 
Adtlux. 


JllliUI 


I'--*.' kJt-_ 


ALLIED 

DUNBAR 


Ht'llb.'!:! rm. 
Yliifr'Ii.l lliir_ 


RrfM.NrtUtJuJK1[. 1 

L -^— — Alln\J I Hinrwr Ay.iiram c pit . 3 

THE FINANCIAL RWf-aco^TCSClJn IklUttii: Wlldun S.M1VZ ^ j 



Whether Aberdeen are as 
menacing as Hearts in attack 
may be questioned bat Joe 
Miller Is one of the country's 
most promising attackers, 
Weir an entrancing winger and 
McDougall and Hewitt noted 
scorers. 

Aberdeen, then, appear the 
more likely winners, even 
more so because the country's 
history shows that misfortnne 
rather than trimnph Is nssafly 
the fate of fleeting flowers of 
Scotland. 


ABERDEEN: J Leighton; S 
McKtmme, T McQueen. J Bett. A 
McLeish, W MHIer, W Stark. J 
McM aster. N Coras’. J Hewitt, J 
Mater. F McOougall, P Weir. 
HEARTS: H Smith; W Kfod, B 
Whittaker, S Jardine, C Levan, K 
Black, N Berry, R McDonald. G 
Macfcay. j Gokjuhoun. S Clark. J 
Robertson, G Cowte. 


Jaguar out 
in front 


Jaguar moved a step nearer 
to recapturing old glories in 
the Le Mans 24-hour race of 
29 years ago by securing the 
first two places around this 
eight-mile French road circuit 
in practice yesterday. A Silk 
Cut Team Jaguar XJ-6, driven 
by the Hampshire Grand Prix 
driver, Derek Warwick, 
lapped at iSlmph. well inside 
the official lap- record for the 
race which, will be staged at 
the end of the month. 

Their second car. driven by 
Jean Louis Scb lesser, of 
France, was second fastest 
They beat a Porsche 962C 
driven by Jochen Mass, of 
West Germany, into third 



Yanez wins 


0* 

Tony Gray (above), of Surrey, 
takes delight in meeting War- 
wickshire at The OvaL Yester- 
day he had match figures of 12 
for 113 as the Mid landers 
were beaten by an innings. 
Last year he netted six for 67 
as Warwickshire suffered a 
similar h umiliati on. 


Sierra Nevada, (Reuter) — 
Felipe Yanez, of Spain, won 
the 191km 17th stage of the 
Tour of Spain cycle race, but 
Robert Millar, of Scotland, 
and Alvaro Pino, of Spain, are 
favourites to win the event 
after a dramatic duel on the 
30km climb to the snow- 
capped peaks of Sierra Neva- 
da. Miliar opened a one- 
second gap over the Spaniard, 
but Pino overtook him to keep 
his 33sec overall lead and the 
yellow jersey. 


Ultra success 


Stand plan 


Wigan Rugby League club 
are to continue their expan- 
sion plans with a £500,000 
stand on the popular side of 
the Central Park ground. The 
new. which will take about 
three years to complete, will 
include new dressing rooms 
and social dub facilities. 


Hiddy Jahan, of England, 
aged 36 and nearly 20 years in 
international squash, has 
forced his way back into the 


top 10 world rankings, issued 
by the^ International Squash 


Players s Association. 

TOP TEN: J Khan (Pak). R Norman 
(NZ), S D a ven p o rt (NZ), R Thome 
(Ausj. P Kwqnn jtngl G Briars 
(EngL H Jahan (Engl G PoHard 
(Aus), P Smith (toST <J Brumby 

(Aus). 


Melbourne (Reuter) — 
Dusan Mravlje, of Yugosla- 
via, won the 1,000-km (625- 
mile) Sydney to Melbourne 
Ultra Marathon on Thursday 
night, completing the world's 
longest road race in just over 
six and a half days. Mravlje, 
aged 33, an engineer from 
Kranj, was more than 50km 
(30 miles) ahead of bis nearest 
rival Patrick Macke, of Brit- 
ain, who hobbled towards the 
finish on a walking stick. 
Geoff Kirkman. of Australia, 
was seriously injured in a road 
accident when he was leading. 


Veteran Sky Fly takes 
pair to new heights 


By Jenny Mac Arthur 


Gillian Greenwood gained 
her most significant victory 
since winning the 1984 junior 
European tide when she won 
the Toshiba national ladies' 
championship at the Royal 
Windsor horse show 
yesterday. 


Riding the 19-year-old 
mare. Sky Fly. who is the same 
age as herself Miss Green- 
wood made a stylish round 
against £he dock in the six- 
horse jump-off that was a dear 
two seconds faster than that of 
last year's winner. Sue 
Fountain, on the magnificent 
Ned Kelly VI. Miche 
was third on Sander. 


successfully jumped by Miss 
Greenwood's father. John. 
Five years ago she broke down 
and was due to be retired and 
put in foaL Miss Greenwood 
however had other ideas: She 
started riding the mare and 
formed an instant partnership, 
winning the junior gold medal 
in their first year together. 

Miss Greenwood, who is 
looking for a sponsor, is 
helped by international rider 
Geoff Glazzanf, but her regu- 
lar trainer is her father. John. 


r*. 

m r _ 


V 


i : 


RESULTS: Toshiba National 
Latfias* C hamp io nship : 1 Sky Fly (Gh- ■ 
Greenwood) no faults In 30.55: 2 
Nad Ke«y VI (S POuntairt 0 in 3257: 

3 Sander (M Lewis) 2 in 34.55. 


•:v. 

' b ■ 


Sky Fly’s continued enthu- 
siasm for showjumping is 
something of a wonder to the 
Greenwood family. Tie Irish 
mare was bred to race .but 
"wasted too much time in the 
air" during her hurdling days. 
She was bought by theGreen- 
woods nine years ago and 


Tosbfoa Paid Pony 
C hamp ion: Mr W G Weston's Night 
Ride; Reserve: Lord Bereaford's 


_ Toshiba Smafi Hat: 1 
Mrs M A Baker's Foxton Flight; 2 M 
P Jody and Miss E Burge's Spring- 
bok SiNer Fox; 3 Mten s Wymaivs 
Kaston Refund. Cob: I K Luxford's jf 
Grandstand; 2 Mrs A Wareham's "~- 
Morning Pride: 3 Mr & Mrs R J 
Gardner's Beffingw. 

Horse trials, page 28 


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