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J oseph wins 

more cash for 
universities 


By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 
. Secrelar > The Cabinet’s decision will annus 


of Stale for Education and 
Science, has won Cabinet 
approval for more spending 
on ihe universities and there- 
by avoided another political 
controversy over education 
policies. 

It is understood that minis- 
ters agreed in principle last 
Thursday that university 
tunding should be maintained 
at roughly its current level to 
prevent three or four, or 
possibly six, universities being 
closed by 1990. 

The news comes in the week 
that the University Grants 
Committee announces how 
much money individual uni- 
versities will receive in the 
next academic year. 1986-87. 
The overall cut in funds is 
about 2 per cent because the 
universities are not being 
given enough cash to cover 
inflation. 

But some universities will 
suffer worse than others from 
the committee's rigorous re- 
view of the quality of research. 
In letters which go out tomor- 
row some institutions may do 
relatively- well and others bad- 
lv. 


not affect those cuts because it 
comes too late for that. But it 
should mean that the universi- 
ty system will not continue to 
suffer the 1.5 to 2 per cent a 
year cut which it would other- 
wise experience in successive 
years until the end of the 
decade. 

Although no figures have 
been agreed and no detailed 
announcement is expected 
this week, the government 
commitment to find more 
cash is likely to mean an extra 
£180 million for the universi- 
ties between 1987 and 1990. 

That is the sum which the 
committee says it needs to 
keep funding at current levels 
and to prevent closure of a 
number of universities. It 
wants at least an extra 
£30 million in 1 987-88. an 
extra £60 million in 1 988-89 
and an extra £90 million in 
1989-90. 

It is a measure of the 
Government's concern about 
education policies that minis- 
ters have agreed in principle to 
the extra funding before the 


annual public expenditure 
round gels under way. 

Sir Keith is understood to 
have told his Cabinet col- 
leagues that the committee's 
warning about university clo- 
sures was political dynamite 
and had to be heeded. 

Next month the committee 
will be formally writing to Sir 
Keith with its spending plans 
for the next five years in which 
it is expected to issue a 
warning that future cuts will 
mean closures. Sir Keith will 
now be able to tell the 
university system that it need 
not fear. 

• An opinion poll published 
yesterday by the Committee of 
Vice-Chancellors and Princi- 
pals shows that 55 per cent of 
people want more spending on 
universities, 36 per cent want 
spending maintained and only 
3 per cent want cuts. 

The poll, conducted by the 
British Market Research Bu- 
reau, also shows that universi- 
ties and polytechnics ranked 
fifth in public esteem, above 
the legal profession. Civil 
Servants, the House of Com- 
mons and trade unions. 



Police searching a car at Dover yesterday, one officer using a mirror to examine the underside. (Photograph: Chris Harris). 

Alliance Police to continue Sri Lanka 

clash fprrfoc a fort chief vows 


Doubts on nurses 9 10% rise 


By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 

Opposition sources were cent — although many news- niorji 
sceptical last night about re- papers concentrated attention Servai 


ports that nurses were to get 
pay rises of up to 10 per cent 
when the Cabinet makes its 
decisions on Thursday on a 
hatch of pay review body 
reports. 

It was recalled that a similar 
briefing exercise was carried 
out last year, with •‘planted” 
reports that the nurses were to 
x -j awarded 7 per cent. 

fn the event, the pay review 
body recommendations were 
y.aged to give an affective 
annual increase of 5.6 per- 


on the eventual increase pay- 
able only from last February. 

The latest Whitehall brief- 
ing is that while nurses will 
receive their “full award,” 
there might be some staging. 

It was also being said that 
senior Civil Servants, judges 
and senior officers in the 
Armed Forces would receive 
far less than the widely report- 
ed £100 a week thought to have 
been suggested by the Top 
Salaries Review Board. 

Last year’s increase for se- 


nior judges, officers and Civil 
Servants provoked one of the 
biggest Conservative 
backbench revolts of the par- 
liaraentary session and it is 
unlikely that the Government 
will want to reopen that 
wound. 

It is also expected that Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher will put 
particular emphasis on wage 
costs when she addresses a 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry dinner tomorrow 
night 

Leading article, page 13 
Advice for Thatcher, page 16 


Tomorrow Envoys turn down 
A nuclear ~]| Kiev visit offer 


deadline 



From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

The British Ambassador, technical questions about the 
Sir Bryan Cartlcdge, and other disaster and its implications in 
leading Western envoys in the first week after it was first 


Moscow have turned down an 
invitation from the Kremlin 
to travel this week to Kiev and 


reported, but that by last night 
it had still received no reply 
from the Soviet Ministry of 


other areas dose to the site of Foreign Affairs. 


Britain is running 
out of time in the 
search for waste 
dumping sites. The 
solution may lie 
beneath the Baltic 

Wide boy 
summer 

Men’s fashion plays 
all the angles 


ihe Chernobyl nuclear disaster 
which remain barred to other 
Western diplomats and 
journalists. 

According to senior West- 


The joint invitation to the 
Western envoy's was issued 
last Friday, apparently as part 
of the Kremlin’s policy of 
trying to convince the outside 


umtfciw 

—*8ic/d — 

• Three readers 
shared The Times Port- 
folio Gold weekly 
competition prize of 
£8.000, while the dai- 
ly prize of £4,000 on 
Saturday was won 
outright — details on 
page 2. 

• Prize money this 
week will total £32,000 

- E4, 000 every day 

plus the weekly £8,000. 

• Portfolio list, page 
22; rules and how to 
play, information ser- 
vice, page 16. 

On the way 

England's footballers had an 
encouraging 3-0 over NtCXtCO 
■r, a thend!} in Lon An£C^> 
!hc> continue*. heir bmid-up to 
she World L ’ J P 
li.iaK Spectrum, pas* 
Match report, 


cm sources, representatives of world that the situation at the 
the United States, Sweden, reactor is now under control. 
Sw iizerland. Austria and most The diplomats were on their 
of the 12 member nations of guard from the outset because 
the EEC were among those ’of attempts by the Soviet 
vi ho ha\ e also declined to take authorities to make propagan- 
pan in the trip, which many da out of an earlier trip to the 
feared would quickly degener- affected region by a small 
ate into a pro-Soviet propa- group of Western reporters 
eanda exercise. who were closely shepherded 

In addition, a group of throughout by Soviet 
senior British and Irish “minders”, 
churchmen who arrived in Yesterday. Prenda claimed 
Moscow at the weekend have that largely as a result of that 
cancelled that pan of their trip “the foreign news media 
fect-findina lour which would are backing down, virtually 
have taken them to the admitting the failure of the 
Ukraine. anti-Soviet campiagn.” 

A British Embassy spokes- In fact. Moscow-based 
man told The Times yoster- Western correspondents flatly 
dav: “The ambassador has deny the existence of any such 


da out of an earlier trip to the 
affected region by a small 
group of Western reporters 
who were closely shepherded 
throughout by Soviet 


in Yesterday. Prenda claimed 
ave that largely as a result of that 
leir trip “the foreign news media 
uld are backing down, virtually 
the admitting the failure of the 
anti-Soviet campiagn.” 

:es- In fact. Moscow-based 
ler- Western correspondents flatly 
has deny the existence of any such 


informed the Soviet authori- campaign and attribute any 


ties that he will not be going to misreporung of the early 
Kiev or the Chernobyl region stages of the crisis to the 
as he does not have the obsessive secrecy of the 
technical knowledge to make authorities, 
the trip worthwhile. For the first time, the paper 

“However, if the offer was acknowledged that the Soviet 
to be extended to British public grew worried about the 
I nuclear experts, that would be scale of the disaster partly as a 
i a different matter." result of information about it 

The spokesman added that being given to them too late, 
the British Government had Leading article and letters, 
submitted a detailed list of page *3 


clash 
looms on 
Polaris 

By George Hill 

A direct policy clash be- 
tween the Alliance parties 
over defence is likely next 
month after a strong reaffir- 
mation by Dr David Owen at 
a Social Democratic meeting 
in Southport of the need for a 
new generation of strategic 
nuclear weapons to replace 
Polaris. 

The long-delayed Alliance 
defence policy document, to 
be published in three weeks, is 
reported to reflect the influ- 
ence of Liberal uniiaterists 
and to reject any nuclear 
replacement for Polaris. 

The parties are at one in 
their decision to cancel the 
costly Trident missile but 
differ on whether to seek an 
alternative for the day when 
Polaris becomes obsolete. 

“1 have not seen the joint 
document yet. but the SDPs 
policy on this is perfectly 
clear," Dr Owen said yester- 
day. in response to reports 
that Liberal MPs were jubilant 
at the way the policy docu- 
ment had been drafted to 
exclude a Polaris replacement. 

The issue is the most irrec- 
oncilable point of contention 
between the parties, and in a 
combative speech at the week- 
end Dr Owen rejected any 
thought that this was an issue 
that could tactfully be put off 
until after the general election. 

“No leader of any political ' 
party can stand before the 
British electorate and refuse to 
answer the question.” he said. 
“1 must tell you bluntly that 1 
believe we should remain a 
nuclear weapon state. 

“If we are to carry convic- 
tion in our decision to cancel 
Tridem after an election, we 
ought to be prepared to say 
that we will find 3 replacement 
for Polaris, unless there has 
been such a massive reduction 
in nuclear warheads on the 
part of the Soviet Union and 
the United States that we 
would feel it right in negotia- 
tions to give up our nuclear 
weapons.” 

His insistence on his party’s 
willingness to replace Polaris 
reflects its policy document on 
defence passed by the confer- 
ence in September. 

In a strong attack on the 
parliamentary lobby system, 
which he called “a sordid 
business”. Dr Owen claimed 
that Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
had “surrounded herself with 
a praetorian guard, whose 
chief function is to rubbish 
Cabinet colleagues in the 
name of Mrs Thatcher but 
without words being ascribed. 
We should open up govern- 
ment. with Civil Servants 
speaking on the record from 
No 10 and elsewhere.” 

He accused the Prime Min- 
ister of systematically mis- 
leading the Commons on 
Westland and other issues, 
and of boosting Conservative 
Party finances “by showering 
patronage around with an 
ever-increasing number of 
peerages and knighthoods” 
Conference report, page 4 


Police to continue 
ferries alert 
through summer 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Armed police in Britain, 
France, the Low Countries and 
Scandinavia were on doty at 
main ferry ports yesterday to 
prevent a possible Middle 
East terrorist attack on one of 
the dozens of sailings across 
the Channel and North Sea. 

The alert was called after an 
exchange of intelligence be- 
tween British police and the 
Continent Senior officers 
have no details of specific 
targets, places or times but 
intelligence sounding suggests 
that ferries could be targets, 
rather than airports and 
aircraft 

Over the past few weeks, 
since the attempted bombing 
of an El AJ aircraft at 
Heathrow airport, the interna- 
tional situation has been under 
constant review by British 
intelligence officers and Spe- 
cial Branch. Middle Eastern 
groups might try to seek 
revenge for the British involve- 
ment in the American air 
strike on Libya and ferries 
could be favoured as targets 
because of the increased secu- 
rity at airports. . 

Over the weekend extra 
officers were drafted in by the 
eight forces involved in gnard- 



A police officer on the 
lookout at Dover 
ing the British ferry ports. 
Dogs and equipment to detect 
explosives were on hand at 
some of the ports.’ 

Levels of security at the 
ports will fluctuate during the 
summer as police assess the 
state of the alert and the fruits 
of intelligence gathering. 

Police in plain clothes may 
travel on board some ferries 
and senior officers are not 
commenting on tbe possible 
use of military personnel. 

Police are uncertain wheth- 
er the threat would come from 


a car bomb left on a ferry or a 
device which might be placed 
on a vessel by a passenger. 
Hovercraft will also be 
checked. 

The security operation be- 
gan on Friday with a confer- 
ence of chief constables at the 
headquarters of Kent police in 
Maidstone. Briefings were 
held for customs officers, port 
officials and ferry companies 
in the British ports involved. 

These are Dover, Folke- 
stone. Harwich, Newhaven, 
Weymouth. Hull, Felixstowe, 
Sheer ness, Ramsgate, Ports- 
mouth, Plymouth, Ipswich and 
Great Yarmouth. 

On the Continent, security 
has been stepped np for 
sailings to Britain from 
Zeebrugge, Ostend, Hook of 
Holland, Dieppe. Calais. Bou- 
logne, Dunkirk, Flushing. St 
Malo, Le Havre, Cherbourg, 
Olso, Gofeborg and Ejsberg. 

A police information centre 
has been opened at Maidstone 
under the control of Mr Paul 
Condon, assistant chief con- 
stable of Kent. Yesterday he 
said: “Tfeere is no specific . 
threat to a specific port W hat 
we do have is a heightened 
awareness of the possibility of 
vessels as potential targets.” 

Levels of security will rise 
and fall as they do at airports, 
he said. “W'e decided on a high 
profile this weekend and it will 
be reviewed and will alter from 
day to day.” 

Mr Condon said: “The pub- 
lic can be reassured. The 
police are working very closely 
with the full co-operation of 
everyone concerned.” At Do- 
ver yesterday he fonnd no 
delays or any public unhappi- 
ness at the measures which he 
said were “sensible precau- 
tions against the background 
of international terrorism". 

Dover is the largest single 
port affected and handles 17 
million passengers a year 
compared with more than 30 
million passengers at 
Heathrow airport. Police have 
appealed for passengers to 
report anything suspicious. 

• The operation had no no- 
ticeable effect on traffic at 
Dover yesterday. Police offi- 
cers made selective checks on 
vehicles entering the Eastern 
Docks, using mirrors to exam- 
ine their undersides (Gavin 
Bell writes). 


Colombo (Reuter) — Presi- 
dent Jayewardene vowed yes- 
terday to wipe out terrorism as 
troops tried to restore govern- 
ment control over northern 
Sri Lanka, heart or the Tamil 
separatist insurgency, for the 
first time in a year. 

A Defence Ministry state- 
ment said 19 guerrillas, a 
soldier and a civilian had been 
killed in a push to open roads 
into the Jaffna Peninsula and 
the country's fourth largest 
city, Jaffna, a no-go area for 
non-Tamils since last June. 

State-run radio quoted Mr 
Jayewardene os telling a Bud- 
dhist religious gathering that 
Sri Lanka s problems were no 
longer an ethnic battle be- 
tween majority Sinhalese, 
mainly Buddhists, and minor- 
ity Tamils. 

“Terrorism is no longer 
ethnic but an attempt to insial 
a communist dictatorship by 
force and destroy Sri Lanka's 
democratic form of 
government.” he said. 

Fighting flares, page 8 
Riding the Tiger, page 12 

£5 m Chinese 


eases 


British Rail Engineering, 
which is expected to announce 
nearly 4.000 redundancies to- 
morrow, has won a foothold 
in the massive Chinese market 
for rail coaches. 

After 15 months of talks, a 
£5 million deal has been 
signed for the company to 
build three prototype vehicles 
based on its own design for a 
“high tech" coach. 

It will also cooperate close- 
ly in reorganizing China's 
Huge passenger coach factory 
at Changchun. 

The placing of the order will 
have no effect on tomorrow's 
announcement 


iS 



By Robin Young 

The executive committee of 
the Test and County Cricket 
Board meets in emergency ses- 
sion this morning to decide the 
future nf Ian Botham, the 
England all-rounder who yes- 
terday confessed to smoking 
marijuana. 

Botham tins named yester- 
day for the England team to 
play India in two one-day in- 
ternationals. The selections 
were made on Friday, before 
the revelations which Botham 
made about his drug-taking 
past in yesterday's The Mail 
on Sunday. 

Botham's retraction of pre- 
vious denials that he had been 
involved in drug-taking was 
published just 24 hours after 
he was questioned by detec- 
tives about allegations that he 
took drugs during a charity 
walk 2 cross Britain last year. 

The Mail on Sunday in 
March 1984 alleged that 
Botham had smoked “pot” 
during England's cricketing 
tour of New Zealand. Botham 
dismissed the story as lies, and 

John Woodcock 12 

Leading article 13 


instigated a libel action 
against the newspaper. Yester- 
day in a signed story' which 
occupied the first three pages 
of the newspaper Botham said 
he had regretted that decision 
ever since. 

Under the headline “I DID 
take pot”, Botham wrote that 
he had been a casual user of 
marijuana since being given a 
joint when he was 18. 
Botham's article does not say 
specifically that he did smoke 
marijuana as alleged during 
the New Zealand tour, but his 
libel article against The Mai! 
on Suudav has been with- 
drawn and the cricketer has 
made a substantial contribu- 
tion to the newspaper's tegal 
costs. 

Executives of The Mali on 
Sunday said yesterday that 
they were restrained by legal 
agreement from discussing the 
terms on which Botham's con- 
fession was obtained, but Mr 
Stewart Steven, the paper's 
editor, said: “The i iew on both 
sides was that it would be 
disastrous if this case ever 
came to court, not only for Ian 
Botham and English cricket 
but also because the British 
public would not like to see a 
newspaper apparently trying 
to bring down a man of Both- 
am's calibre and popularity.” 

Botham's lawyer. Mr Alan 
Herd, said yesterday that 
allegations in yesterday's 
Achm of the World — that 
Botham was regularly sup- 
plied with cocaine and mari- 
juana during tbe 1984 New 
Zealand tour, and that Both- 
am had snorted cocaine on the 
pitch during play — were 
“incorrect”. 

He said: "The Mail on 

Continued on page 2, col 5 




Credit Card Account 


Millionaire races to rescue 

Brands Hatch circuit 
saved for motor sport 



and have just one 
easy monthly repayment 

Settle your Credit Cards, H P. Bai 
outstanding bills in one go 





By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 

The new millionaire owner champion, to join Sir Geoffrey 
of Brands Hatch, amateur Johnson Smith. Conservative 
racing driver Mr John MP for Wealden, as non- 




Foul sion. calmed the fears of executive directors of a new 


Turmoil over woman bishop 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


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lora*. 16-12 i Wrathif 


The election of a suffragan 
bishop of Washington in two 
weeks time may cause consid- 
erable turmoil in the Anglican 
community if one particular 
candidate wins, even threateu- 
to split tbe Chorea of 


counterpart, the Episcopal 

Church. r , , ,, 

For one of the four canon 
rlntes is a woman. And the 
Ss of a woman bishop, 
who would be Ihe first in any of 
the Church's 28 provinces, has 
been taken by many in Britain, 
particularly the Mop « 


she worked for several years 
as an analyst with the Nation- 
al Security Agency, the top- 
secret US equivalent of 
GCHQ at Cheltenham. 

She then soagbt ordination 
and graduated from Virginia 


_ _ t ? k C* 1 n 


The question of women cler- 
gy was the main item at the 
meeting of primates of the 
Anglican Communion in To- 
ronto in March. 

They asked the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, Dr Robert 


ing a deacon intern in Dayton, 
Ohio. In 1980 she was ap- 
pointed Rector. 

The Washington Cathedral, 
which when completed wfli be 
the sixth hugest in the world, 
is an important diocese in the 
American Episcopal Chnrcb. 

The suffragan bishop's 
functions are to assist the 


16 I rr ndo „ (O be the Rubicon in functions are to assist the 
\* j Jr haltle for the ordination of diocesan bishop, advising him 


h-affte tor tne OTUUIilUVM ui vnaavp, uuu 

l i beyond which the of the needs of tbe clergy and 

; Jr b 0 ( England will not go. congregation, sharing ecu- 
32 The candidate is the Rev menical and regional ceremo- 
rhnrard Doll aged 47, at aies, preaching on special 
li nr«eat Rector of Calvary occasions in the cathedral and 
- rjmrch. CinannatL overseeing existing diocesan 

4ficr graduation in 1969 missions. 


party to gather reactions to the 
appointment of women bish- 
ops. Its report is to be complet- 
ed by September next year. 

After hot debate, the thrust 
of the Toronto meeting was 
that the ordination of women 
to the Episcopate was inevita- 
ble, but that for the good of the 
total Comm un km, it would be 
prudent to wait until the 
Lambeth Conference in 1988 

If Rev Doll is elected on 
May 31, the US Church wifi 
be seen to be moving foster 
than the Toronto agreement. 

Battle lines set. page 14 


the nation’s motor racing 
community yesterday with a 
promise that the sport would 
continue and the circuit would 
not become a housing estate. 

Revelling in the enthusiast's 
drcam-come-true, Mr Foul- 
ston said: “It is like the 
television advertisement of 
the guy who liked tbe razor so 
much he bought the com- 
pany”. 

Mr Foulston. who has made 
his fortune running Atlantic 
Computers. Britain's leading 
supplier of IBM mainframe 
computers, has paid £5.25m 
in cash for the Kent Grand 
Prix circuit, plus Oulton Park 
in Cheshire and Snenenon in 
Norfolk. Together, (he circuits 
cover about 1.000 acres. 

They were regarded as su- 
perfluous to requirements by 
British .American Tobacco, 
which inherited them when it 
bought Eagle Star Holdings in 
1983. Months of speculation 
about the future of Brands 
Hatch, including the possibili- 
ty of sale to a supermarket 
chain, have now' ended. 

Mr Foulston. aged 38. has 
persuaded Sir Jack Brabham, 
the former world racing cham- 
pion. and Mr Derek Bell, the 
reigning sports car world 


company set up to run the 
three circuits. 

Mr Foulston will hold 80 
per cent, with the remainder 
held by Mr John Webb, the 
managing director of Brands 
Hatch, and his wife Angela, 
also a director. The Webbs 
will continue in these roles, 
with Mr Foulston as non- 
executive chairman. 

At a press conference yester- 
day. he said: “A racing circuit 
with a driver in charge has got 
to be good news for all racing 
people. I look forward 10 
racing on what are now my 
circuits in my cars”. 

He had been pleased to fight 
off bids for the circuit which 
would have seen develop- 
ments outside motor sport, 
some of them representing 
■‘astronomical sums”. Mr 
Foulston. describe! by a col- 
league as “a vintage car racing 
nut’", owns and drives 15 
historic cars, including 
Ferraris. McLarens and a 
Lola-Chevrolet. 

The new company, likely to 
be named Brands Hatch Lei- 
sure Group, has plans for 
developments for the three 
sites to provide facilities for 
racegoers and those accompa- 
nying them who might be less 
enthusiastic. 




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THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Controversial changes 
to jury system 
likely to be dropped 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
The Government is expect- report on fraud trials, was 
Mtorejectcontro versiaJ plans mooted as one of three ways of 


•; for abolishing the right of jury 
. trial in cases of minor then 
.. ■ and curbing the defendant's 
right of jury challenge. 

Ministers have yet to make 
the final decision, but there is 
a growing view that both 
proposals would lay the Crim- 

- inal Justice Bill open to unnec- 
. essary attack when it comes 

^ . before Parliament in the next 
session. 

In a criminal justice White 
Paper in February, the Gov- 
. eminent proposed that jury 
trial be abolished for common 

- assault, driving while disquali- 
.. fied and taking a motor vehi- 

cle without consent. 

It also put forward for 
.comment the proposal that 
' ‘..minor cases of theft be tried in 
'■ Che magistrates' court unless 
‘ the offence seemed unusually 
.. -serious. The idea has the 
backing of some senior judges, 
such as Lord Lane. Lord Chief 

- justice, who has argued that it 
-would ease the workload of 

- overburdened Crown Courts. 

The abolition of the 
defendant's right of jury chal- 
lenge. proposed in the Roskill 


tackling what critics allege has 
become an abuse of the system 
and a means of jury-rigging. 

The Government also invit- 
ed views on the options of 
cutting the number of chal- 
lenges from three to one. or 
limiting the number of chal- 
lenges where several defen- 
dants are being tried together. 

Despite a parliamentary 
campaign against the chal- 
lenge, lea by Mr Toby Jessed. 
Conservative MP for Twick- 
enham, criminal court lawyers 
favour its retention, and min- 
isters are inclining 10 the view 
that to abolish or curb the 
challenge will create contro- 
versy in what will anyway be a 
heavy piece of legislation. 

Ministers are already re- 
ported as favouring keeping 
jury trial in complex fraud 
cases, despite the Roskill pro- 
posal for a new Fraud Trials 
Tribunal. 

The Government will none 
the less include procedural 
reforms on fraud trials, in- 
cluding the rules of evidence 
and preliminary hearings, and 
is likely to propose the setting 


up of a fraud commission. 

The Government is also 
expected to opt for the least 
controversial of three options 
canvassed to strengthen the 
role of the Court of Appeal in 
giving public guidelines on 
sentencing policy. 

As hinted in its White 
Paper, it will go for 
statutorily-constituted Judi- 
cial Studes Board which will 
publish the Court of Appears 
sentencing guidelines. Despite 
pressure from some Tory 
backbenchers, it is now un- 
likely to favour a Court of 
Appeal right to review or 
increase allegedly over-lenient 
sentences. 

Final decisions on the con- 
tents of the Bill will have to be 
made by July. Other likely 
measures include an increase 
in the upper age limit for 
jurors from 65 to 70, which 
would make people between 
65 and 70 eligible, but not 
obliged, (o serve on juries. 

Reform of the prison disci- 
plinary system is also likely, 
but there is still no ' final 
decision on the shape that will 
take. 


Winning 
run for 
UK chess 


By Raymond Keene 

In round three of the 
Klein wort Grieveson UK- 
USA chess challenge British 
'players again scored a re- 
-sounding success, taking two 
- * 'and a half points from three 
: games. 

The British junior players 
. Cathy Haslinger and Demis 
Hassapis won their games 

S i the US juniors Angela 
and Alex Chang. The 
champion, Jon Sped- 
man drew his game against the 
-American champion Lev 
Alburt. 

In the fourth round, played 
on Saturday at the Great 
Eastern Hotel American for- 
1 tunes brightened somewhat 
' when Aiburt claimed his first 
win of the match against 
Sped man, and it was a rest 
' day for die junior matches. 

• The UK now leads by 7.5 
points to 2.5. 

Meanwhile, in Basel Tony 
j Miles, the British Olympic 
.. number one, is faring less well 
in his match against the world 
champion, Gary Kasparov. 
Kasparov won the adjourned 
V second game yesterday, to 
lead by the astounding score 
of 3-0. On Saturday be won 
. .die third game in very dynam- 
ic style in a mere 31 moves. 

. White: Kasparov Black: Mites 
Third match game 


t MM 

H-NEQ 

2 N-KB3 

P-B4 

3 P-Q5 

P-ON4 

4 Me 

MB 

5 EMM 

a-H** 

S OM32 

MB 

7 P-QM 

AMP 

a iv 

OB2 

9 R-4M 

ON2 

10 P-B4 

NxN 

11 pm 

NsB 

12 Q-Q3 

MO 

13 WC4 

fHJ2 

14 QM 

MOB 

15 042 

MM 

16 B-N3 

B-N2 

17NC5 

M 

18 MOM 

QxQP 

19 RPxP 

fixKP 

20 B MM 

Pxfi 

21 MP 

M 

22 tuots 

Kttl 

23 NxKP 

O-MB 

8* R-OR3 

OPBcft 

25 K-B1 
27 0*Q 

OH-Q1 

8X0 

28 M-B8 
28 RxflP 

ssr 

29 IWCP 

MS 

38 K-K2 

P88 

31 K-oa 

Mm » 



GCHQ rebel staff | 
face action today 

By Colin Hughes, Whitehall Correspondent 


Up to 15 staff at the GCHQ 
spy centre in Cheltenham face 
financial penalties, loss of 
privilege or official reprimand 
today for rejoining trade 
unions in defiance of a gov- 
ernment ban. 

The 15 are all staff who 
signed the Government's new 
conditions of service accept- 
ing the ban on union member- 
ship. but subsequently defied 
the terras and signed up again 
as union members. 

They do not include the 30 
staff who were members 
duringthe industrial and legal 
battle over the ban two years 
ago and have remained mem- 
bers. They have been denied 
pay rises, promotion and for- 
eign service, but are not 
subject to discipline because 
they have never signed the 
new conditions. 

Sir Peter Marychurch, di- 
rector of 1GCHQ, has advised 
Sir Robert Armstrong, Secre- 


tary to the Cabinet, that he 
does not believe dismissals are 
appropriate, although they are 
possible under the Civil Ser- 
vice disciplinary code. 

The cases will be heard by a 
panel of three, headed by an 
assistant secretary at GCHQ. 
It will make recommenda- 
tions on action to Mr John 
Ayde, the principal establish- j 
meat officer, with a right of 
appeal to the director. 

Most of the 15 have, howev- 
er, admitted rqoining unions. 
None will turn up to argue his 
case, but a demonstration will 
be held outside the gates when 
the hearings start. 

The issue of union represen- 
tation at Cheltenham contin- 
ues to affect relations between 
the Government and Civil 
Servants. Three motions to 
the annual conference of the 
Institution of Professional 
Civil Servants pledge support 
to staff and members there. 



The Saga Siglar, a replica of a 1,000-year-old Viking ship, sailing ap the Thames in London 
in t hed osing^ stogesofber voy m ONao w take her back to Norway. 

Ministers to back Times 


Bristol champion set 
for crossword finals 


By John Grant 
Crossword Editor 

Mr Terence GirdJestone, 
the 1984 champion of the 
Collins Dictionaries Times 
Crossword Championship, 
won the Bristol regional final 
of this year's championship 
yesterday at the city's Grand 
HoieL 

Mr Girdlestone, aged 56. a 
technical section leader at 
British Cellophane, from 
Bridgwater, Somerset, com- 
pleted the four puzzles in an 


average of nine minutes each. 

Mrs Valerie Law, aged 40. a j 
political agent, from 
Win cant on, came second, tak- 
ing three minutes longer for 
each problem. 

Miss de Rhe-Philipe, aged, 
39, a local government worker 
from Warminster, was third, ' 
only two minutes overall be- 1 
hind Mrs Law. 

All three go forward to the j 
national finals in London in 
September. Fourth was Mr I 
J.S. Roberts of Blackpool 


Several senior ministers are 
expected to oppose the expul- 
sion of Mr Richard Evans, 
The Times lobby reporter, 
from the Commons in a late 
night debate on parliamentary 
privilege tomorrow. 

Although the Prime Minis- 
ter may not vote if the 
division takes place as sched- 
uled at lam on Wednesday, it 
was made clear yesterday that 
she believes that journalists 
have a job to do and Mr Evans 
was doing it when he reported 
the contents of a draft select 
committee report on the dis- 
posal of nuclear waste last 
December. 

The Commons privileges 
committee ruled that The 
Times report was a contempt 
of Parliament and has recom- 
mended that Mr Evans should 
be barred from Westminster 
for six months and that The 
Times should forfeit one of its 
accredited places in Parlia- 
ment for the same period. 


By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 


It is widely expected that the 
proposed disciplinary action 
will not be carried by the 
House, but Mr Evans said 
yesterday that he was “no 
more than cautiously opt- 
imistic" that it would be 
thrown out. 

Certainly, if the recommen- 
dation is rejected, select com- 
mittees will lose a protective 
privilege which is largely de- 
nied to the Cabinet 

But many MPs are more 
concerned that although Mr 
Evans may be disciplined, the 
“real culprit", the person who 
leaked the document has not 
been discovered and will es- 
cape censure. 

Mr Evans was asked by the 
privileges committee to give 
an assurance that he did not 
obtain the document from any 
of the committee clerks, but 
he refused to do so on the 
ground that that would have 
narrowed the area of suspicion 


to 


and might have helped 
identify his source. 

Mr Chris Moncrieffi chief 
political correspondent of the 
Press Association and chair- 
man of the Parliamentary 
Lobby journalists, said yester- 
day: “ft would be outrageous 
if the House of Commons 
voted to impose this ludicrous 
punishment. 

“The glaring fact is that the 
Committee of Privileges has 
failed to identify the real 
culprit the MP if it was an 
MP, who leaked the docu- 
ment 

“A reporter’s natural in- 
stinct is to use — and with 
great relish - a story like that 
and a journalist who kept it to 
him seif because of some anti- 
quated rules would deserve 
the sack. 

“If MPs choose to blurt out 
their own cosy secrets then 
they should take the rap 
themselves. " 



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The lack of flutter in our famous feather says a 
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Objection 
to land 
access law 

By Our Agriculture 
Correspondent 

Plans to give the public legal 
right of access to the 1 ,500,000 
acres of common land in 
England and Wales may be 
delayed by an objection from 
the Farmers' Union of Wales. 

The union is not satisfied 
that the proposal drawn up by 
ihe Common Land Forum, 
established by the Country- 
side Commission, gives suffi- 
cient assurance that farmers' 
work will not be disrupted. 

It had been hoped that a 
compromise put forward by 
the Ramblers' Association 
and the Commons, Footpaths 
and Open Spaces Society, after 
the forum had failed 10 reach 
agreement, would bring to an 
end the long dispute. 

Most common land is not 
publicly owned, but amenity 
groups say it was illegally 
enclosed in the first place and 
should be made accessible for 
recreational pursuits. 


Botham denies New 
Zealand admissions 


Continued from page 1 

Sunday story is correct when it 
says that Ian is not going to 
bother suing everybody to 
sight. But that does not mean 
Out he is now going to stop 
suing die Nem of the World 
over allegations that the news- 
paper has made. 

“They are saying Ian admit- 
ted lying when he denied 
smoking pot during the contro- 
versial tour of New Zealand 
two years ago. The troth is he 
has not made any such admis- 
sion at all" Mr Herd said. 

“What he has admitted is 
that be has smoked pot at 
various times to the past, as 
accurately reported in The 
Mail on Sunday. 

“It is amazing that any 
newspaper could read that 
inference into what Ian has 
said in The Mail on Sunday.™ 

Mr Herd said the Nem oj 
the World was also wrong to 
say that Botham was no longer 
pursuing libel actions agast 
newspapers who have naked 
him to drng-taJriiig. 

Botham's former manager, 
Mr Tim Hudson, who was 


sacked last month after being 
quoted as saying that the cri- 
cketer was a pot smoker, was 
unavailable for comment yes- 
terday. 

Botham was convicted of 
possessfag a small amount of 
cannabis at Scunthorpe last 

February. He claimed to have 
been given the drug two or 
three years before ana to have 
put it in a drawer and forgotten 
it. He was fined £100, and crit- 
icized by the magistrate who 
said he set a bad example to 
youngsters. Botham .then com- 
mented: “I would prefer to 
think I have set a good examp- 
le by telling the froth when it 
would have been the easy way 
out to lie". 

In The Mail on Sunday Bo- 
tham claimed that at a garden 
party at a famous country 
house which he attended to bis 
early 20s be saw barristers, 
journalists and senior police 
officers “openly smoking and 
sharing joints". Cto' another 
occasion, he says, be shared a 
joint with a vicar In the vestry 
of his church. 


Ulster 
stays hand 
on pact 
changes 

By Richard Ford 

The Anglo-Irish Agreement 
is unlikely to produce visible 
changes in Northern Ireland 
until the autumn in spite of 
misgivings about its operation 
among, nationalist politicians. 

■ The consensus among se- 
nior ministers and officials, 
according to one government 
source,- is that in spite of some 
reservations nothing will be 
done to further inflame what 
promises to be- a tense and 
probably violent summer in 
the north. 

Even so, there is still debate 
within the Government on 
whether the first changes 
should be high profile out 
“symbolic" reform, such as 
abolishing the flags and em- 
blems Act, or more bureau- 
cratic reform such as the 
introduction of a new system 
of dealing -with complaints 
against the police. 

The Government has decid- 
ed io let the Northern Ireland- 
Assembly, which has not been 
carrying out its statutory du- 
ties since the signing of the 
Agreement, continue until it 
has run its full four-year term. 

Meanwhile, government of- 
ficials are expected to try again 
to set up talks with the leaders 
of the province's two Unionist 
parties. There is however little 
optimism about their 
prospects. 

There is a growing cam- 
paign within the Official 
Unionist Party for full integra- 
tion with the United King- 
dom. While the Democratic 
Unionist Party broadly fa- 
vours devolution. 

• The Government will 
highlight the success of small 
businesses in Northern Ire- 
land today in an effort to 
relieve the recent serious 
blows to hit the province's 
economy. 

While unemployment is at a 
record 126.189 with tittle 
prospect of improvement, 
small businessess are doing 
better than their counterparts 
in the rest of the United 
Kingdom. 

IRA murder, page 3 





Mr Trevor Phillips, of 
Hedgeriey Green. Bodcmg- 
harasbire. got a birthday sur- 
prise when he became one of 
three weekly winners of Port- 
folio Gold. Mr Phillips, who 
will be 73 tomniorrow .shared 
£8,000. He said:“ft makes a 
marvellous birthday present 1 
am going to spend some of it 
on a world cruise and forest 
the rest" 

The other two winners are 
Mr Kevin Thames, of 
Camberley, Surrey, and" Mis 
Pauline Regan, of Aldershot 
Hampshir e, who has been 
reading The Tunes for 40 
years. Mr Thames, a clerk 
with the gas board, who has 
been- a reader since leaving 
school 14 years ago, said be 
would be taking bis wife on 
holiday with the prize. “I 
couldn't bellere it 1 had the 
wife check ft four times." 

-Mr John Van Dongtin, a 
computer services consultant 
of Potter’s Bar, is taking his 
time to decide what to do with 
the £4,000 be won in the daily 
competition. He has been en- 
tering Portfolio from the day it 
was introduced. He said: “I 
never bettered I would win. I 
was on tenterhooks until It was 
confirmed.” 

Yon will need the new 
Portfolio Gold card to play the 
game. If you bare any difficul- 
ty obtaining one from your 
newsagent, send an s Jte. to: 
Portfolio Gold, - - 
The Hines, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Man killed 
at party 

A birthday celebration con- 
tinual for several hours after 
the murder of a man aged 20 
who was stabbed. 

The dead man was named 
as Richard Griffith of 
Slockwell south London. A 
man from Reading was 
injured. 


Spitfire show 

A Spitfire gallery, built in 
the courtyard of a museum in 
Stoke on Trent to house one of 
the wartime aircraft, was 
opened yesterday . 


AEU in talks on 
Wapping dispute 


Senior executives 
Amalgamated Engineering 
Union are holding talks with 
News International manage- 
ment to investigate ways of 
resolving the 16-week 
Wapping dispute, the compa- 
ny disclosed yesterday. 

In their first meeting on 
Friday night, held at the 
request of ihe AEU, engineers’ 
representatives were told that 
talks could not include the 
placement at the new 
Wanting plant of News Inter- 
national workers who had 
gone on strike and had been 
dismissed by the company. 

Against that background, 
the two sides agreed to meet 
again, the company said. 

Twenty-one people were ar- 


By Patricia Clough 

of the rested ^?and .two policemen 
slightly butt ip a demonstra- 
tion involving about .1,000 
people outside the Wapping 
plant on Saturday night 
Nine were charged with 
threatening behaviour, eight 
with obstructing the highway 
or police and four with being 
drunk and disorderly. The 
Sunday Times and News of ihe 
World were distributed nor- 
mally yesterday. 

• Miss Brenda Dean, secre- 
tary of Ibe prim union. Sogat 
'82, is suing Private Eye 
m agazi ne for libel damages 
over an article in the May 2 
issue alleging that she had 
hired a detective agency to 
watch journalists crossing 
picket lines at Wapping. 


Science report 


Power hot spot tests start 


Geologists win today start a 
seismic survey of the hot 
granite rocks which lie be- 
neath the surface of Cornwall. 
Their aim is to find the best 
location to drill 6.000 metres 
down into the granite, using the 
bore boles to bofl water into 
superheated steam. 

For years, the team led by 
Dr Tony Batchelor, of tire 
Camborne School of Mines In 
West Cornwall has been 
pumping water down one bore 
hole and up through two 
others, 2,000 metres deep in 
the disused granite quarry at 
Rosemanowas. 

The water is warmed up to 
70 degrees Centigrade as it 
passes through a network of 
man-made cracks to warm 
rocks acting as a gigantic 
radiator. 

These tests, supported by 
tite Department of Energy and 
the EEC have given encourag- 
ing results and support for 
geothermal power research 
has continued when other 


By John Newell 

alternative energy projects 
have been cot 

But Dr Batchelor needs to 
drill down 6,000 metres to 
prove that he can superheat 
steam to 200 degrees Centi- 
grade and above, the tempera- 
tures needed to drive turbo- 
generators. The new seismic 
surrey is designed to locate a 
spot where the hottest rocks 
come nearest to the surface. 
That would be an ideal site for 
a prototype Cornish geother- 
mal power station. 

For the next two and a half 
weeks. Camborne geologists 
led by Dr Roy Bara wifi be 


shallow bore holes at 150- 
metre intervals along two lines 
drawn across Cornwall from 
coast to coast Sensitive micro- 
phones will record the return 
of soundwaves which hare 
travelled down into the Earth 
and been reflected back froai 
layers of granite below the 
surface. 

Data from that survey win 
be combined with measure- 
ments made earlier, of minute 


variations in the Earth's gravi- 
tational field which are caused 
fay huge masses of rock near 
the surface of tire Earth. The 
end product will be a detailed 
map of the distribution of 
granite masses warmed natu- 
rally by the uranium they 
contain, which lie below the 
Cornish fields, sometimes 
breaking out into rocky out- 
crops on the moors. 

There is no guarantee of the 
fending which wfil be needed 
to driU down 6,000 metres. But ] 
the threatened closure of Cor- 
nish tin-urines could be a 
powerful argument for in vest- 
tog to the development of 
cheap locally available energy 
resources which could also 
stimulate new local industrieg- 

Authoritks may see the 
Chernobyl disaster as an extra 
argument for a full-scale as- 
sessment of the real potential 
of hot rocks as a source of 
energy which could offer an 
alternative to forth fossil fuels 
and nuclear power over quite 
large areas of the United 
Kingdom. 


Japanese 
get pick 
of prints 

By Hnoa Maflaliea 

Sotheby’s two-day print sale 
in New York ended on Friday 
afternoon with a total of 
S4. 163.005 (£2,610,034) and 
remarkably, only 4 per cent 
bought in. 

In the modem and contem- 
porary sections, American col- 
lectors, who often have the 
field much to themselves, 
faced a strong challenge from 
Japaneseprivate buyers and 
dealers. Toe highest prices on 
Friday were almost all paid by 
Japanese bidders. 

A fine impression of 
Picasso's ever-popufer 1904 
etching Le Repos Frugal sold 
for $68,750 (£43,103) agah 
an estimate of $32,01 _ 
$36,000, and from the other 
end of the artist’s career, a 
linoleum cut of 1962, Nature 
Morte Sous La Lampe. made 
$60,500 (£37,931) against an 
estimate of $36,000^40,000. 

A portfolio of eight spikey 
prints made during the First 
World War by Egon Schiele 
and published in an edition of 
SO in 1922, went to a Japanese 
collector at $57,200 (£35,862). 
The estimate was $30,000- 
$35,000. 

The most expensive of Tou- 
louse-Lautrec’s lithographs on 
offer was a rare fourth state of 
Mcm/in Rouge - La Gouloue 
of 1891, with which the buyer 
took a gamble as to condition, 
since it had not been inspected 
out of its frame. It sold for 
$34,100 (£21,379). against an 
estimate of $18,000^24,000. 

One of the most modern 
works in the sale was a 1982 
etching Circuits: Talladega 
Three II by Frank Stella, 

™ soW for "545,100 
(*28,276) against an estimate 
of $26.000S28.000. 

A specialist sale of railway 
collectors’ items held on Sat- 
£*ai Western 
Royal Hotel Paddington, by 

Onstaw's, tbs WmdKstGT- 

S^Pr C / 1 au ^i oneere * fondled 
C0JM,wuh only s percent 


Gale beats 
2,000 on 
moor trek 

Gale-force winds and driv- 
ing rain forced more than 
2,000 young people to aban- 
don the gruelling Ten Tors 
trek across Dartmoor early 
yesterday. 

Four youths suffering from 
exhaustion were lifted by heli- 
copter to hospital in 
Plymouth. 

Other casualties suffered 
hypothermia, and one boy had 
a fractured wrist 

Only about 200 of the 2,400 
starters completed the chal- 
lenging two-day walking 
event, designed for those aged 
14 to 19. 

One expert criticized the 
Army organizers for allowing 
the trek to go ahead in 
appalling weather. 

Mr John Earle, warden of 
the Dartmoor Outdoor Pur- 
suit Centre, said: "It is ex- 
tremely dangerous out on the 
moor. I would not have 
allowed the younger ones to 
setoff.” 

But Mr John Turner, Army 
public relations officer, said: 
“You cannot just deprive 
2,500 youngsters of something 
for which they have been 
training for weeks. They 
would be bitterly 
disappointed.” 

« TS fire* group over the 
gushing line was the Torbay 

The first girts to complete a 
were Operation 
first 55-mile 
team was Portsmouth Gram- 

mj£ S 2.°° L .. and Ihe first 45- 
m lie team home was from 
Sherborne School Dorset. 

The finishers receive indi- 
Srtfcfi? m edais and team 


IS 




THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


HOME NEWS 



• ByDer^Ham^lBdHStri»lEdi6ff 

faoiidavs power against the US dollar counts on -a wide 

aeemtobelcey.fectors. holidays but only 

Iasi k!? rhZ,^*** tm % Lu “ n PoVs 0WI1 bookings insurance is taken 01 

^ S® t0 ^ Uirited .Stated them. A femilyofl 
I S tJ lS“ a^aaMe. Gmada are up by ahalfwith save up to £80. 

t °,. be those to Thailand rad Hong- - Tha t 4hv, k™ 

cojfflted, but any discounts kom? alsn ™hV ^ The Libya bora 

wiD not be on the rate wen fn " .t 1 worries over terra 

ms ™*merateseenm In the past six months there then: the rhemnht 


compared with the same time 
tost yem; but there are still 
about 2.5 million available 
Many are likely , to be dis- 
counted, but any discounts 
vdQ not be cm the scale seen in 


Thai m u — „ r— . ' S*® been an 18 per. cent 

vsisoftSh^* 0 ™^ 30 ?" incr ease in demand for visas 
h °kdaysjraarket by at the US Embassyin London, 
the US TrawHrad 
Administration reported . In 
a sirbadraiy o f December; the iSmonth for 
. which, figures are available, 
~ isooiangs Tor holidays m the number jrf IJK'visitni* 


Britain have been affected 
only to some extent by the 
expected consumer b acklash 
after last year’s bad weather. 
Bookings for holiday homes, 
nver cruises and -coach tones 
in Britain me down but, 
according to Lonn Poly, book- 
ings at centres with all-weath- 
er attractions Jike Butlins and 
Pon tins are “well up.". 

In foreign holidays a key 
trend is a big growth in long- 
haul holidays, with trade re- 
ports of - -a doubling- in 
bookings to North America. 
Competitive transatlantic air 
fores and sterling's buying 


Ad mini s tr a t ion reported . In 
December; the last month for 
which, figures me available, 
the number of UK visitors 
arri ving in the US was up 13 
per cent in whaiis seen as the 
beginning of a growing trend 
for this year. 

Knoni, a specialist in long- 
haul travel, reported bookings 
to the United States up 300 
percent. 

An estimated : 72. million 


holidays but only if holiday 
insurance is taken out through, 
them. A family of four could 
save up ( .to SO-' . 

The Libya' bombing and 
worries over terrorism, and 
then- the Chernobyl nuclear: 
radiation alert pushed up the 
rale of package holiday cancel- 
lations in the last week .in 
April to 12 per cent 
' It/Teft April sales up IS per- 
cent May hoMdays have sold, 
■well: but from June there is 
availability, LunnPoty said. 

• The tourist ihdukry' in 
Wales must be taken more 
seriously, Mr Ifan Prys Ed- 
wards, the Wales Tourist 
Board chairman, said at 
Welshpool on Saturday when 
hie opened a £1 04,000 24-ho ur 
computerized tourist infomra- 



foreign package holidays are ' £ on feur Welshpool 

likely to be sold this summ er ’ Correspondent writes). 


compared with 6 mini on fast 
year, according to Lnnn Pbty. 
That increase of a fifth has 
been influenced by lower 
prices, which have also stimu- 
lated earlier bookings. 


Limn Poly is 


Mr Alexander Gariile, La- 
bour MP for Montgomery,, 
issued a warning against sug- 
gestions that the Welsh Tour- 
ist Board might be absorbed 
by the British Tourist 


IRA kills MPs to check on 
wrong man poppy-growing 


again 


dis- -Authority. 


Cash curbs ‘threat to coast 


For the second, time in three 
days foe Provisional ERA mur- 
dered a man in Ulster in the 
mistaken belief that be was a 
member of the Ulster Defence 


. By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

The National Trust fears 
that many fine stretches of 
coastal land win be broken up 
because of inadequate govern- 
ment rescue funding. 

The trust is especially wor- 
ried about 800 acres of the 
Sheringham estate in north 
Norfolk which indudes park- 
land laid out by Humphrey 
Repton and woods of excep- 
tionally high wildlife value. 

Mr Angus Stirling, director- 
general of the trust, called it 


Motorists 


lights trial 

EEjrOugSetea 

Traffic tights are to be used for 
the first time is Bri tain to 
control the number of vehicles 
e n te ri ng a motorway in a 
£200,000 experiment which 
sans in the West M&flands 
this week. 

The lights are bring erected 
at junction lO of the M6 to 
control motorists during the 
morning peak period as they 
commute from Wolverhamp- 
ton and Walsall into. 
Birmingham. 

The Mb, built 14 years ago, 
was ' scheduled to cany abodt 
60,000 vehicles a day, but 
during peaks it can be twice 
that. 

The traffic lights wifl be 
monitored during foe six- 
month experiment 
Mr Peter Boltoratey, Parf»- 
roenlary Under Secretary of 
State for Transport, said this 
was one of the busiest stretch- 
es of road in foe countiy.Tbe 
new scheme "should prove to 
be gpod news for motorists 
and journeys certainly should 
be quicker, easier and safer.'* 
Tire Automobile Associa- 
tion has some reservations 
about foe prospect of lights 


Water patrols 

Anglian Water is to mount 
patrols in plain white vans 
.th rough o u t foe eastern coun- 
ties this summer to try to 
catch householders watering 
their gardens without an an- 
nual £18 sprinkler licence. 


“one of the most outstanding- 
ly important pieces of land 
that has been offered to the 
trust" 

He would ^not talk about 
prices because the trustees of 
the estate had only just started 
negotiations. But the National 
Homage Memorial Fund had 
already indicated that it could 
not make a contribution to- 
wards the purchase. . 

Mr Stirling said foal the 
extra £10.5 million that the 
Government bad given to the 
fond for heritage rescue early 
in foe year had not been . 


Computer 
for animal 
ailments 

Veterinary surgeons at foe 

ulntnl hospital of I/wnfa n 

Zoo, a Regent’s Park, have 
engaged comparer technology 
Co assist in preventive medical 
care for 692 rare andendan- 


A computer data base of 
-animal diseases will enable 
staff at foe zoo to cany oat 
detailed analyses that have 
often been impossible to com- 
plete in tfane for an effective 
diagnosis and trea t ment 

The computer system is 
befog extended to cover afl 
i 19,000 varieties of mammals, 
birds and reptiles at foe zoo 
and there are plans to make 
the service avaflaMe to vets in 
general practice. 

Dr Georgina Mace, the 
zoo’s conservation co-oraraa- 
tazv is responsible for the 

£20,066 project which fe fund- 
ed by foe Institute ofZoology, 
the scientific arm of dteJtoyal 
Zoological Society. 

“The aim of the system s to 
prevent disease and mortality. 
We have had a card index iq> 
to now and simply r etr i evi ng 
stored information has become 
more of a problem because of 
the vast amount of data," Dr 
James Kirkwood, London 
Zoo^s senior veterinary officer, 
said. 

“If; for example, we needed 
to find out what the last 18 
rhinos died o f, we would have 
to spend abont two days on it," 
he “The computer sys- 
tem enables ns to search foe 
files rapidly to pinpoint foe 
most Important problems and 
draw oat foe background data. 

Once yoa can do this, you can 
practice p reve n tive medicine ." 


Egg smuggler fined 

n &i * - - <v. <MnnM anil mmn 


fog foe import and export of 
an endangered species. . 

He was detained by Cus- 
toms men who- searched him 
after a tip-off on Friday and 
renamed to custody on Satur- 
day. . 

His detention came after an 
undercover operation in the 
Yorkshire Dates by officers of 
the Royal Society for the 
Protection of Birds. 


enough. Without bdp from 
the fond the trust would not 
have been aide to n pire some 
of its most important acquisi- 
tions of the 1980s. Falling 
farmland prices meant that 
some Welsh formers who 
owned high-quality land on 
the coast were hurrying to sell 
before prices fell further. 

“We know of properties of 
the highest importance which 
are threatened and which are 
going to come up," Mr Stirling 
said. "The National Heritage 
Memorial Fund say they can- 
not handle them.” . 


Drug trial 
changes 
urged 

gy Nicholas Timmins 
• Social Services - 
Correspondent • 

A -radical change ra the 
organization of clinical trials 
to te st new drugs ami treat- 
ments is called for today to 
prevent tire waste of scarce 
resources on unimportant 
research. 

More than £100 million a 
year is estimated to be spent 
on trials in Britain by pharma- 
ceutical companies, the Medi- 
cal Research CdunriL the 
health service and charities. 

. But a large amount of 
money is wasted on trials too 
small to produce valid results, 
according to a discussion pa- 
per issued by the Drug and 
Therapeutics Bulletin. It adds 
that the translation of impor- 
tant results into daily practice 
by doctors is “haphazard and 
sow". 

Most trials are funded by 
the drug industry but many 
are .designed to answer -com- 
mercially rather than medical- 
ly important questions — for 
example, to gain a share of the 
market for a new drug. 

“More , money is probably 
waited oh hopeless small trials 
than is spent on potentially 
powerful multi-centre trials" 
tire discussion document, the 
result of a seminar attended by 
!eadmg : medical specialists 
and foe Department of 
Health, toys. 

“Many published clinical 
trials are either irrelevant to 
clinical needs, or unhelpful 
because of poor design and 
execution" and they waste 
r ese ar c h ers’ time and obscure 
important advances. 

To improve foe situation, 
expert groups should be set up 
to draw up a public “shopping 
list” of trials. Those funding 
research could then see where 
money would be best spenL 

Public funds for clinical 
research might best be allocat- 
ed by a central commissioning 
body, and a register of trials 
should be set up to' prevent 
duplication. The NHS should 
set up trams to visit doctors 
and spread the results of good 
trials. 


l Wg top beajnfor one of tire children who attended a festival yesterday at the Ace Cinema in Rayners Lane, Harrow, north- 
•est London, where hundreds of downs gathered to raise money for foe rebuilding appeal fond for the clowns’ church, Holy 

. Trinity, in Daiston, east London. 


Computer 
expertise 
for hire 

By Bill Johnstone 
Technology Correspondent 

High street purchasers of 
microcomputers who lack 
confidence in themselves and 
their ability to cope with the 
technology can now hire, rela- 
tively cheaply, a computer 
expert at the end of a tele- 
phone lineto answer their 
queries. 

The service is being offered 
by Lasky’s, which has become 
aware that some customers 
have shied away from buying 
computers because of their 
inhibitions. 

The service, provided by 
Interlex, will also allow < 
Lasky’s to sell more advanced 
microcomputers which need 
technical support. Other re- 
tailers are likely to follow. 


Claiming responsibility yes- 
terday for the Jailing on 
Satmd&y evening of Mr David 
Wilson, 39, near Donaghmore 
in County Tyrone, the Provi- 
sional IRA said he was a 
senior officer in the part-time 


This was strenonsly denied 
by his family, friends the 
authorities who all empha- 
sized that Mr Wilson, the 
father of two young daughters, 
had qo connection with the 
security forces. 

Mr Wilson was am bashed 
by two gunmen as he drove a 
pick-up track home. 


By SbeOaGmm 
P olitical Staff 

Fears about the growing of 
opium poppies in Britain have 
led to an investigation that 
will be mounted this week by 
the Commons’ home affairs 
select committee. 

The committee recently 
completed its inquiry into 
hard drugs. But Sir Edward 
Gardner, its chairman, has 
called Mr David Meflor, Par- 
liamentary Under Secretary at 
the Home Office, before the 
committee on Wednesday be- 
cause of fears that the seeds 
could foil into the wrong 
hands. 

British formers have been 
conducting trials to see if it is 
feasible to grow the poppies 
commercially as part of their 
search for promising new 
crops. 


A Home Office spokesman 
confirmed that it was not 
illegal to grow foe opium 
poppies, but it was against the 
law to attempt to refine them 
into heroin. He said that 
because of the climate the 
British-grown seeds were 
much weaker than those har- 
vested in the vast poppy fields ! 
of Pakistan and Afghanistan. 

Britain imports 500 tons of 
the seeds, winch are sprinkled 
on cakes and sweets, mostly 
from Germany and The Neth- 
erlands. 

Mr John Gummer, Minister 
of Slate for Agriculture, has 
announced that, because of 
foe Government’s commit- 
ment to combating drugs 
abuse, it will bring in rules 
requiring formers to keep 
strict records of the growth, 
harvesting and sale of foe 
seeds. 


Dartmoor 
farmer 
takes to 
the trees 

By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 

Mr NeO Smerdoa, aged 36, 
seems a typical West Coop try 
hill former. Having given np 
dairying seven years ago vghen 
his wife was 111 and be needed 
time to look after her, be bow 
keeps 45 beef breeding caws 
and then calves on 70 aergs of 
the Dartmoor National Park. 

Bat where be differs from 
many farmers is that he ;has 
adopted a second occupation 
as a forester. He has undertak- 
en to dear and replant 14 
acres of hillside overlooking 
the River Webbnrn which is 
too steep for agricnltnre and 
which has become overgrown 
Mr Smerdoa is one of a 
number of formers who .have 
responded to an offer by 
Fountain Forestry, one, of 
Britain’s largest private Tor- 
estry firms, to provide advice 
on planting and regenerating 
woodlands. " 

Fountain sees this as a Urst 
step towards foresting 
1,200,660 acres which it is 
estimated will need to be foken 
out of grass and arable produc- 
tion in the next few years in 
order to reduce surpluses* 

So far Mr Smerdop -bas 
cleared and planted twojtfres. 
For this he receives anTmtial 
grant from the Forestry Com- 
mission of £350 an acre. 

He has had to do all the 
clearing work himself by hand 
because be cannot afford con- 
tract labour or machinery. He 
accepts that, because hard- | 
woods take generations to ; 
reach maturity, he wiD see no 
fi nancial return in his own 
lifetime. , 

“But I like to see trees 
around, and I don’t like to see 
foe countryside being ’de- 
stroyed by modern fuming 
methods,” he said. “1 hope 
that my children may - ' get 
something ont of it, and in the 
short-term I may get some 
cheap firewood." 



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4 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


Paying for crime: 1 


Clash of opinions over 
reparation scheme to 
aid victim and offender 


The Government is consid- 
'ering whether to introduce 
statutory powers for courts to 
be able to order reparation by 
■offenders to victims. 

Its decision win depend on 
. the results of four experimen- 
tal schemes in Cumbria, Cov- 
entry, Leeds and 

■ Wolverhampton, along with 
reactions to a Home Office 
policy report on reparation. 

' By the end of the month, 
• comments have to be in on the 
discussion document which 
suggests that a reparation 
order could be combined with 
other disposals such as sus- 
pended sentences of imprison- 
ment, fines or discharges. 

The results are expected to 
give a new deal to victims of 
crime. But even if a court had 
power to make a reparation 
order, the agreement of the 
offender and victim would 
still be needed. 

The idea of reparation has 

■ wide appeal, carrying with it 
ancient ideas of atonement 
Mediation at a meeting be- 
tween the offender and victim 
is a means to it or function in 
its own right 

Reparation can take the 
' form of compensation, restitu- 
tion of stolen property, atone- 
ment or the performance of a 


With the spread of repara- 
tion by offenders to thefr 
victims, the Government is to 
assess bow best the law, police 
and probation officers should 
handle it Peas' Evans, Home 
Affairs Correspondent finds a 
dash of opinion about a 
revolution in penal practice. 

service for .the victim. In one 
classic early case in Exeter, a 
small boy was kept out of 
trouble by working in a glass 
house to teach him not to 
throw stones, after breaking 
two panes. He developed an 
interest in gardening. 

There are three powers un- 
der which reparation can tak e 
place at present 
Courts can defer passing 
sentence for up to six months 
to enable them to take into 
account an offender’s conduct 
after conviction, including his 
making reparation An adult 
offender can be made subject 
to a probation order, with 
requirements to take part in 
specified activities. And the 
same applies to a supervision 
order for a juvenile. 

So for the idea of a repara- 
tion order has stirred up more 
rilion than support One 
the most informed com- 


ments comes from the Forum 
for Initiatives on Reparation 
and Mediation (FIRM), which 
has about 100 members in- 
volved in existing or proposed 
schemes. 

Mr Martin Wright, a mem- 
ber of the forum’s council, 
said: “FIRM doesn't see the 
sense of separate reparation 
orders because mediation and 
reparation can be carried on 
already." 

According to an article in 
Naspo News, the journal of 
probation middle manage- 
ment, the National Associa- 
tion of Probation Officers has 
expressed reservations. 

The Magistrates Associa- 
tion has no great enthusiasm 
for reparation but feels that it 
could be used when a sentence 
was deferred up to six months. 

Mr John Freeman, director 
of criminological studies at 
King's College, London, says 
that most in Die field welcome 
the enhancement by the 
Government's White Paper in 
March of the importance of 
reparation. “But everybody, 
so for as I can ascertain 
opinion, is opposed to the 
courts being given power to 
make reparation orders.” 

Tomorrow: How reparation. 

works 


Chelsea 
blossoms 
despite the 
weather 

By Alan Toogood 
Horticulture Correspondent 

Even though countless 
plants In narseries ami g*r- 
deas were devastated fin the 
Arctic spell earlier this year, 
the sixty-fifth Chelsea Flower 
Show which opens tomorrow 
in the grounds of the Royal 
Hospital, Chelsea, promises to 
be up to its nsnal high 
standard. 

As usual the 3tt-acre mar- 
quee is filled with flowers —d 
p lants of every season, many 
having been coaxed along 
aider glass, inriuding dm 
1986 Rose of the Year~Gent]e 
Tooth, shown by R Harkness 
of Hitehin; and a p rom ising 
new golden-leaved shrub 
Cboisya Teruata Sundance, 
from Blooms of Bress- 
ingham. There is a mangrove' 
swamp and a hang in g basket 
competition. 

The outside gardens include 
a garden designed for the 
British Trust for Conservation 
volunteers which demon- 
strates that even a small town 
plot can be a haven for 
wildlife. 

Times of opening and ad- 
mission charges: t omor row, pri- 
vate view only for holders of 
members' tickets from Sam to 
8pm; Wednesday Sam to 4pm, 
£12'entry fee, and from 4pm to 
8pm £8; Thursday Sam to 4pm 
£10, and from 4 to 8pm £6; 
Friday Sam to 5pm, £8. For their 
own safety there is no admission 
for children under five. 



Gareth Dncker, 
gnomes in the 


six, with an unusual line in garden 
x show pounds (Photograph: Rbs 
Drmkwater). 


SDP conference 

Delegates vote to 

abandon nuclear 
for ‘clean’ energy 

. . Reports by. John Winder 
Democratic. -Party 


With a Telex, 

first class is just Up. 



Social 

members voted overwheim- 
| iugly for an emergency motion 
in the wake of the Chernobyl 
disaster, at the Council for 
Social Democracy: in South- 
port yesterday.lt confirmed 
the party’s opposition to 
budding pressurized water 
reactors. .... - * - 

-The vote came after a 
wanting from Dr David Owen, 
the party leader, against mere- 
ly trying to' find a form of 
words -which would- keep the 
Various strands of the party 
happy and keep the liberals 
with them. 

' The motion demanded that 
die EEC and the United States 
take a lead in developing 
international standards for 
nuclear safety and disclosure 
of information and called fora 
transfer of resources into re- 
search for “clean" energy. 

It also called for policies on 
alternative employment in ar- 
eas where there were nuclear 
power stations. 

Dr Owen said that a work- 
under thechairman- 
was 

preparing an energy document 
which would be -presented to 
the Harrogate conference of 
the party in September. 

- Dr Owen said: “I have been 
appalled at Mrs Thatcher’s 
attitude which has appeared to 
be that she is not prep a re d to 
conduct a fundamental reas- 
sessment of the Government's 
civil nudear power policies. 

. “I have been equally ap- 
palled at how many politicians 
have been ready, over the past 
few weeks, to shift the whole 
energy policy of the United 
Kingdom in the immediate 
aftermath of such a disaster. 
No one, in the light of 
Chernobyl, can ignore the 
need for an authoritative 
rethink. 

“I do not prejudge the issue 
and 1 hope as many as possible 
in the party will remain open- 
minded. But if we are not 
satisfied about the risk of any 
remotely cdmparable disaster 
occurring in tins country, then 
we should be prepared to take 
the fundamental decision to 
pull out of civil nudearpower. 
The worst policy would be to 
make no decision. We cannot 
have an uneasy judge.” 

Mrs PaUfone Wall, of 


accretive regulatory boards 
and, above all; fed up to the 
' teeth with being tender tothe 
insensitive and monolithic 
CEGB ^Central ' Hectricity 
Generating Board) arid its 
nuclear-obsessed chairman 
■. Lord” Marshall.” 

Mr Mat Murray, ■ a 
Sellafield worker, said it was 
sensible -and desirable to have 
a thorough safety review of 
Sellafield- A safety audit by 
the nuclear installations in- 
spectorate had already ban 
going on for some months. 
.Sejlafield was not a laissez- 
faire operation and people 
there were called to account if 
standards lapsed.; Some 
55,000 Jobs depended on re- 
processing plant and it could 
be built to the proper 
standards. ' . . 

- Mr Anthony Goodman, of 
Harrow, said' that there were 
so many leaks at Sellafield one 
felt it must have been de- 
signed by the Cabinet Office. 

Trust plan 
approval 

The Iiraebouse Group, 
which regards itself as the 
guardian of the SDFs con- 
science, is claiming a signifi- 
cant victory daring the 
conference with a 2-1 majority 
vote calling for a citizens' trust 
in Spite of the opposition of the 
party’s policy committee. 

- In proposing the trust the 
group seeks to keep the party 
ou the radical lines which they 
say it was founded on five 
years ago. 

The matter is likely to be 
^raised a gy fin , however, at the 
party next conference at Har- 
rogate in September. The par- 
ty leadership regards the 
proposal for a citizens’ trust, 
which would distribute units 
and dividends to the public 
and employees, as a means of 
back-door nationalization and 
not effective in redistributing 
resources. . 

Mr Richard GravzL chair- 
man of the Iimehouse Group, 
said afterwards that the party 
had accepted the principle that 
there must be a social dividend 
so that the burden of welfare 
was gradually transferred 
from taxes oh income to 
dividends oa capital. 


Southport, moved a motion 
on behalf of the Sefton area, 
calling for an mgent reviewrof (Laugh tet). The, country was 
SeUafieldanda detailed analy- woefully unprepared, -for . .a 
of the financial conse- nudear . disaster. They, must 


of abandoning the 
oxide' reprocessing 


sis 

quences 
thermal 
plant 

‘Safety must be the 
priority,” she said. “We must 
not count the. pennies on 
safety, and must concentrate 
on research and development 
not on extension of nuclear 
power.” 

Mrs Hflary Long, of Bristol, 
said that a nudear cloud of 
emotion hung over them. It 
mod be dispelled by giving 
people honest information. 

Mr John Stevens, ofNonh- 
east Essex, moved a motion 
calling for waste sites, that 
avoided areas of seismic dis- 
turbance, below sea level and . 
near population centres and 
said the motion should not be 
taken as being part of the “not 
in myback yard” syndrome. 

Mr Tony Clayton, of West 
Kent, moving the emergency 
motion, said that when^jl 
came to nudear safety. Lord 
Marshall’s assertion that it 
could not happen here was not 
enough. “It bias to be proved 
that it cannot happen 
anywhere.” .... 

Mr Tom Burke, of Kings-' 
ton, said that they needed no 
more research into alterna- 
tives but to buy the best 
available methods now. “I am 
fed up with being tender to the 
feather-bedded nudear indus- 
try and to the dose and 


say “no" to more .nudear 
power and say “no" now. 

Mr David Thewlis of Wat- 
ford said that coal-produced 
electricity was killing trees. 
This was one world, and we. 
could not unilaterally dis- 
pense. with nuclear power. 
Britain' owed it to the rest . of 
the world to play its part .in 
•nuclear power jand reprocess- 
ing. 

Mr Harold Outer, candi- 
date for St Ives, said they were 
' calling not for immediate 
withdrawal but for withdrawal 
as soon as decently possibly, 
from nudear power and mov- 
ing into other forms of nuclear 
production and conservation. 

Mr WQliam Rodgers, vice- 
president of the party, winding 
up the debate for .the. national 
committee, said the vast ma- 
jority of party members did 
not want to dose the options. 
They were not saying “no" to 
the nudear option now but it 
would be foolish and irrespon- 
sible to say that Chernobyl 
had changed nothing 

They should take a. long 
bard look at whether and if so 
how they should pursue a 
nudear energy- policy. If a 
consequence of Chernobyl 
was to put more resources into 
alternatives it was a step in the 
right direction. 

All the motions were 
passed. 


Murdoch accused on 
‘BBC campaign’ claim 


The reason for The Tunes 
conducting such a vitriolic 
campaign against the BBC was 
that Mr Rupert Murdoch 
wanted to destroy the present 
structure of British broadcast- 
ing, Lord Harris said. He was 
replying to the debate on a 
motion calling for the BBC 
licence to be abolished and 
replaced by advertising on 
some services and a five- 
yearly grant for others. 

The motion was remitted to 
the policy committee for con- 
sideration after a debate in 
which almost every speaker 
except the mover spoke in 
opposition. ■ ■ 


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British fishing vessels minded' 
were floating rusting backets. 

Ear inferior to the vessels of 
their Earopeu competitors. 

Mr Iain Murdoch, of Fleet- 
wood, said in a discussion on a 
ay policy consultative 
document. Some fishing areas 
had « British presence and 
were in danger of being lost by 
default ..." 


• An emergency motion con- 
demning the government pro- - 
posal to cut the allowance to 
unemployed people in respect 
of mortgage interest was car- 
ried without dissent. 

Mrs Freda Mason; of Sun- 
derland, said that the Govern- 
ment shonkl instead, have 
reduced mortgage help to 
those whose Incomes attracted ■ 
the rates of tax. 

Mr Brian Mark said the 
Government’s policy was to 
take from those who had 
nothing and give it to those 
who had more. 

Miss Sae Slipman, for the 
national committee, called the 

seses *«-« «“• 


Mfr John Gordon, chairman 
of the group which produced 

the document, said that its 

proposals for liceosittg vessels 
to spend a given amount of 
time at sea rather titan by 
catch quota would give greater 


• An emergency motion co ri- 
ff™* 111 ^ the Government’s 
{©rament to the use of British 
tea* for the US attack on 
PaS “ d 

MrKevin Carey, of .North 

KtE? M 1 * Thatcher had 
forfeited national support her 

Thomas, replying 
rational committee, 
said that die clear thing- about 

rdSSSSSS 


lh S* h ? it wrong. 

freedom of fishing cuf waste 1 simplest ^ 

and roabteTE^fenting of weapons VffLSSr Sf 
__ preference to local fishermen, targets to be 2LS2! Sf* JS? 


t.- 


* 


6 


C * 


* 


r J 


rmmL_ tar^te to be attacked, 


N 


4v 


lo 








>V 


'7*1 } 

~ i 



li ! 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


* 


22 Wiesenibal, the Nall y 

tuner. has accused the World ^ ** P*e and the old Nazis 

Jewsh Congress of fimn.y .destroyed," he added 

^u-SemiUsminAnstiS^ J^ A £^9^‘* on AniS — 

attacks on the oresifientM 8 > that he did not trust 

^ Wiesenthal said it was 


-- — — presidential 

gndxdate and former United 
Nasons Secrctary-GeneraL 
Dr Kurt Waldheim. 
rt ,Pj Wfeemhal, a 77-year- 
old Jew who survived a Nazi 
death camp and has . been 


aot revelations by congress 
officials that had promoted 
anti-Semitism in Austria but 

threats to the Austrian pecmk. 

banting N^~for 40* vSr? to an interview 

fid congress staier^wTS 

destroyed- the trust built ,m Pro fi* m March by the 
between the 10,000-strone £P^*VL 8fiD«al secretary, 

Jewish comm 111% andSS 

Austrians since to StS«5 ^Vhe Austrian people must be 
WoridWar - nd ^ ** if Waldheim is 

“I think we will have to start 
again as in 1945. It’s that 


- - - . ■■ ■ " wwimiu i io 

ejected the next years wUl be 
no picnic for Austrians." , 
DrWies enthal commentnb 


Austria was: annexed by 
I?lller m I938» bnt the Ger- 
man. dictator was given an 
enthusiastic welcome and 
many Austrians took key 

posts, m the brutal mili tary 

machine that developed. 

-J>T Wiesenthal said .he 
wared a new anti-Semitic 
wave . could' follow a Wald- 
herm defeat. “If he loses, the 
WJC (congress) will hiai» it a 
victory-day. Then you may see. 
something,” he. said. 

He said Yugoslavia ap- 
peared tq be the only country 


which might tera documents 

% S?S5£3EF& a 


Djibouti 

plane 

crash 


kills 19 


He said documents so for 
produced by the congress and 
other sources did not show 
that Dr Waldheim was in- 
volved in war crimes while 
serving as a lieutenant with 
Hitler’s Army in the Halfam* 
between 1942 and 1944. 

“I don’t say be is guilty or 
innocent - only that what I 
have seen up to now is not 
enough to call him a war 
criminal,” said Dr Wfes- 
e nthal . But be dismiewd Dr 
Waldheim’s claimQ to have 


sense of collective' guilt or 
threat. This is against Jewish 
ethics. Singer, who studied to 
be a rabbi, should know this.” 
He called on the president 
of the congress, Mr Edgar 
Bronfman, to issue a state- 
ment distancing himself from 
eny attempt to interfere in 
Austrian affairs. 

"Dr Wiesenthal said fetters 
be received from young peo- 
ple indicated that the congress 
statements had a undying 
effect on Austrians. “The dis- 


any Waldheim role in war: 
crimes. He called oh Belgrade 
to release them if they existed 

Apart from a flow of bate 
mail to prominent Jews, he 
said, there were already con- 
crete . signs, of anti-Semitic 
feeling in Austria. 

“Wh# can you say when an 
elderly Jew calls you and says 
a taxi driver kicked him out of 
his cab after asking him if be 
was a JewiT asked ■ Dr 
WiesenthaL “I just got a-call 
like that.” • 


A, contingent of armed police and troops on the outskirts of Johan 
honouring eight people killed last week. 


ANC 


an eye on Saturday’s funeral procession 
inty policemen. 


Paris (Reuter) — Nineteen 
people died when a Frehch 
Navy aircraft crashed in heavy 
tain in Djibouti, in north-east 
Africa, the Defence Ministry 
announced here. 

Fourteen crew and five 
passengers were on board, the 
Breguet Atlantic maritime re- 
connaissance aircraft wheat it 
came down over the 5,5$0ft 
Montagne dn Day, about £5 
miles north ofDjibouti Glynn 
the- tiny desert country. An 
inquiry has begun. . V 

France has only one Breguet 
stationed in Djibouti, a for- 
mer French colony sand- 
wiched between Ethiopia and 
Somalia. The aircraft was -the 
only one of its kind used for 
maritime surveillance by -the- 
French forces based in £>p- 
bouli, France's main naval 
base in the In dian Ocean. 


mmJ 


The Commonwealth Emi- 
nent Persons Group (EPG) 
was expected back m South 
Africa last night . after talks in 
Lusaka with exited leaders of 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Stroessner 
hardline 
puts future 
in doubt 


From John Endears 
Asundbn 

A deteriorating economy, 
growing dissent and an in- 
creasing level of international 
isolation and criticism add np 
to trouble ahead for the. 32- 
year-old hardline regime of 
General Alfredo Stroessner. 

There is tremendous differ- 
ence of opinion here over how 
long the general can bang on, 
but there are no doubts as to 
his desire to do so. 

By violently repressing all 
opposition. General Stroess- 
ner, aged 73, is creating by his 
own actions the radkaffzation 
and polarization of public and 
political sentiment necessary 
for widescale unrest 


snss'&t 

s^-predudug Caribbean 


“You wifi have oaeditioos 
that will make chrfl war or 
insurgency passible.” unless 
General Stroessner bends to 
demands for some opening of 
the system, one American 
observer noted recently. 

Two months of civil unrest 
and anti-Stroessner demon- 
strations seem to have subsid- 
ed in recent-jdays, but the 
underlying causes bringing 
about the unrest remain. 

The near and medium-term 
future lodes bleak for the 
Paraguayan ruler, now 
along with President Pinochet 
of Chile — one of only two 
military rulers left in the 
southern part of South 
America. 

Like General Pinochet, 
General Strocssncrt pro b le ms 
will not go away Just because 
he sends bullies with dubs and 
braided electrical cords to beat 
his opponents. Once air- 
rounded by friendly dictator- 
ships who were very happy to 
have him as their neighbour. 
General Stroessner » now 
virtually surrounded by coun- 
tries which have recently re- 
turned to democratic rule. 

His relations with those 
countries are therefore mostly 
cool with the exception of 
BraziL Brazes economy is so 
closely tied to Paraguay's that 
neither country would benefit 


Blind poet heads 



fed by Mr Malcolm Fraser, a 
former Australian Prime Min- 
ister, and General Olusegun 
Obasanjo. a former Nigerian 

— r „« head of state, also metPresi- 

the African National Congress* dent Kenneth Kaunda. ANC 
( AN C). officials in T-nsaim were 

The EPG, which is trying to quoted by Agence France 
promote talks between Pre- Presse as saying that some 
tona and resistance leaders, 
flew to Lusaka last Friday a I 

Arms cache uncovered 

Johannesburg — The securi- 


EPG members were expected 
to return to Zambia later this 
week for further consultations 
after another round of talk* 
with the South African Gov- 
ernment. ANC leaders are un- 
derstood to be highly suspici- 
ous of the EPG peace plan, 
and the apparent interest in it 


of Mr P.W. Botha, the South 
African President. 


Airliners in 
near miss 


.a 


Santo Domingo (Reuter, 
AP) — Senor Joaquin 
Bafeguer, a neariy-Wind poet, 
headed _ for victory in the 
Dominican Republic presi- 
dential elections yesterday, 
ahead of the government can- 
didate, SefiorJacobo Majluta. 

Seftor Bajaguer, aged 78, of 
the Reformist Social Christian 
Party fed Sefior Majluta, aged 
SI, of the ruling D ominican 
Revolutionary Party by 
35,000 votes with more than 
90 per cent of the ballots 
counted. 

The Christian Socialists and 
their allies had a total of 
799,968 votes a gainst the rul- 
ing party’s total of 764,509 
votes. The leftist Dominican 
Liberation Party, led by the 
Marxist leader, Sefior Juan 
Bosch, aged 76, trailed in third 
place with 351,000 votes. 

Electoral ofidals said It was 
virtually impossible for Senor 
gluta to overtake Senor 
_ .Jagner, The latter bas not 
yet claimed victory nor has his 
rival conceded. 

Sefior Bategner, an ascetic 
bachelor, is heading for his 
fburtii term in office. He rated 
for three successive terms 
from 1966 to 1978 during a 


nation. 


I dressed in jungle battle 
ftgues, patrolled tire capital, 
but ferns of violent distur- 
bances did not materialize 
yesterday morning. 


No violence was reported 
on Saturday, but three people 
were lolled at polling stations 
during the balloting on Friday. 

The three main candid at es 
have all served as President 
before. There were, three mil- 
lion eligible voters on the 
island. 

The. turnout appeared to be 
heavy; but election officials 
did not release- figures. In the 
past two national elections 
dose to 80 per cent of tire 
voters participated. At stake; 
along with the presidency and 
vice-presidency, are an 30 
Senate seats, 120 seats in tire 
lower house of Congress, 120 
mayoral jobs and 612 city 
council seals. 

Balloting was monitored by 
a committee of prominent 
Dominicans led by Archbish- 
op Nicolas Jesus de Lopez 
Rodriguez, and by an interna- 
tional commission. Senor 
Galo Plaza, a commission 
member, former President of 
Ecuador and a former seae- 
tarygpneral of the Organiza- 
tion of American States, said 
the election was honest. 

“We’ve seen some irregular- 
ities, but I think the dection 
was fair” said Senor Migud 
Guerrero, a spokesman for 
Senor Baiagner, who lost his 
eyesight in the late 1970s. 

. No single issue dominated 
the campaign, although tire 
three leading candidates 
pledged to lower prices for 
goods such as 


sions in Cape Town with 
South African ministers mid 
Made and while opponents of 
the Government. 

If is understood that the 
EPG is seeking the release- of 
the ANC leader, Mr Nelson 
Mandela, from jail and the le- 
galization of his organization 
m return for an undertaking to 
suspend tire ANCs guerrilla 
campaign. 

The Commonwealth group, 


ty police announced last night 
in Pretoria that they had 
uncovered the biggest carfip of 
arms ever found in South 
Africa (Michael Hornsby 
writes). 

The commanding 
officersaid the aims, of Soviet 
origin, had been found near 
Krugersdorp. 

According to the police, the 


cache contained one rocket* 
propelled grenade launcher 
with projectiles, 11 demolition 
charges, a radio receiver and 
transmitter that could have 
been used to Hutnnat* a car 
bomb, six landmines, 24 lim- 
pet mines, four kflogrammes 
of plastic explosives, 28 Mocks 
of TNT, 30 hand-grenades, 
and 12 AK47 rifles with 48 

nra gariro-c 


They fear it could divest 
them of their main weapon, 
and lose them the support of 
young radicals in the town- 
ships. Mr Botha last week set 
out a number of principles 
which he said were non-nego- 
tiabte. One was that any 
political settlement must have 
entrenched protection for the 
white minority. 

About 8,000 people defied 
restrictions when they attend- 
ed a funeral on Saturday in 
Alexandra, a black ghetto on 
the north-eastern outskirts of 
Johannesburg, for eight anti- 
apartheid activists allegedly 
killed by off-duty policemen. 
The coffins were draped in the 
gold, green and black colours 
of the ANC. 


US suffers 
‘dinoflop’ 
disaster 


petrol and rice. 



by distancing itself from the 
other. 

The US is also quite critical 
of the Stroessner Govern- 
ment The US Ambassador, 
Mr Clyde Taylor, is in Wash- 
ington for consultations with 
the Administration over wbai 
course to chart in relation to 
the dictator, and has main- 
tained regular and even for- 
mal meetings with opposition 
leaders in Asuncion. 

Despite tire General's Colo- 
rado Party's bold on power, 
cracks are appearing. The 
party is developing a dissident 

wing whose . . 

ently believe lhal tire country 
and the party would be better 
off if General Srroessnfer 
woutd step down. That senti- 
ment is shared by many. 

The country's economy 
also -taken a sharp turn for the 
worse in recent rtaaohs. 
Sources in Asuncion say toe 
1986 GNP will be 10 per cent 
lower than last year. A drought 
has damaged soya and cotton 




Setter Baiagner (left), who is poised to defeat Seftor Majlnta. 



From Michael Binyon 
- Washington 

Tire US suffered yet another 
space branch disaster at the 
weekend when a nwyhanimi 
repfica of a giant prehistoric 
pterodactyl went into a beak 
dive soon after hiring wing 
and hurtled to the ground in 
front of a crowd of disappoint- 
ed engineers and cameramen. 

There were no injuries ex- 
cept to the~$7§9,000 mo 
which was decapitated. 

As one of tire scientists said,' 
scooping .up the remains at 
Andrews Air Force Base near 
Washington: “Now you know 
why itY extinct.” 

The trouble started soon 
after lift-off when the tall 
boom, used to provide stabil- 
ity, dropped off several sec- 
I onds too soon, befine ground 
control . had activated the 
monster^ automatic pilot It 
made a brief recovery after 
being switched on, bat by then 
the force of the wind df sing its 
dive had cracked the plate 
holding its neck to its head. 

It phnsmeted to earth, much 
as foe flying lizards are 
thought to rave done 65 
ntiDiaii years ago. Its creators 
Insisted It had flown 
“perfectly during 21 previous 
test flights, and suggested 
radio interference may have 
been responsible for what 
onlookers quickly called foe 
“dlnoflop”. 

Still, the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution, which sponsored the 
project, was aUe to get a few 
brief shots of foe gawky 
creature screeching down; long 
neck outstretched, as the origi- 
nal may have done before 
turning into a fossiL 


Contras kidnap German workers 


Managua (Reuter) — Nica- 
raguan rebels have kidnapped 
ei&hi West Germans who were 
working on tire construction 
of housing for peasa n ts dis- 
placed by war, the Defence 
Ministry said yesterday. 

It said the eight were kid- 
napped on Saturday in Jacinto 
Baca, some ISO miles north- 
east of here, after rebels am- 
bushed a vehide in which they 
were travelling. Four others 
escaped and one was wound- 
ed, the ministry said. 

The rebels ware said to be 
members of tire US-backed 


Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force, the largest rebel -army 
fighting to overthrow the San- 
dinista Government 

A Miskito Indian rebel 
group last year captured a 
West German woman, who 
had been working for the 
Sandinista Government She 
was later released. 

The Germans who were 
ambushed yesterday were par- 
ticipating in a Government- 
sponsored programme in 
which volunteers work, for 
three months building bous- 
ing for peasants. It was not 


known how long they had 
been in Nicaragua. 

• BONN: Won Germany bas 
had talks with representatives 
of Nicaraguan rebel forces to 
try to secure the release of-the 
Germans, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said yesterday 
(Reuter reports). 

• Pastora. retires: Command- 
er Eden Pastora, the most 
charismatic oftheanti-Sandi- 
nista guerrillas, has laid down 
his guns because, he said, 
there was no chance of win- 
ning against the Sandimctac . 
(John Carlin writes). 


Court ruling throws Illinois 
Democrats into turmoil 


From Michael Binyon, Washington - 

The minors Democratic the political extremist, Mr challenger 

Lyndon LaRouche, 


Party was thrown into further 
turmoil over the weekend, 
after a judge ruled that Mr 
Adiai Stevenson, the Demo- 
cratic candidate for governor, 
could not run as an indepen- 
dent in order to distance 
himself from two right-wing 


extremistseJectedtotheDem- 
ocratic ticket by default. 

He now feces the difficult 
task of having to form a third 
party with a full slate of 
candidates before August 4 if 
he wants to continue his fight 
to oust the Republican incum- 
bent, Governor James 
Thompson, in November. 

Mr Stevenson resigned last 
month from the Democratic 
ticket after two followers of 


. won 

nominations in the stale pri- 
mary as his lieutenant-gover- 
nor and secretary of state. He 
immediately declared at the 
time that he would not ran 
together with “neo-Nazis” 

The court ruling on Friday, 
which Mr Stevenson may 
appeal against cited what is 
called tire “sore loser” law. 
This insists that independents, 
who do not need to field tire 
full slate of candidates, must 
file earlier than third party 
candidates. The deadline 
passed last December. 

The court was dearly sym- 
pathetic to Mr Stevenson, a 
distinguished politician whose 
father was twice a Democratic 


to President 

Eisenhower. 

The judge noted he was not 


a “sore loser”, but a candidate 
running with people whose 


views he found intolerable but 
the court would not make an 
exception. 

Mr LaRouche’s supporters 
appear to have won nomina- 
tions simply because they 
have straightforward English 
names, compared to the 
EastEuropean-sounding 
names of the official Demo- 
cratic candidates. 

Many voters clearly associ- 
ated them with the powerful 
remnants of the old Chicago 
city machine, which has 
fought a bitter battle against 
Mayor Harold Washington, a 
black. 


Chicago (AFP) — Two 
jetliners narrowly avoided? a 
take-off collision at O’Hare 
Airport here after an air traffic 
control error sent them hur- 
tling towards one another. 

At the last instant, a US-Air 
DC9 became airborne, dam- 
ming the top of an American 
Airlines Boeing 727, officials 
said. The Boeing was carrying 
107 people and the DC9 1 15. 


Iran’s former 
leader beaten 


Tehran (Reuter) — Armed 
men roughed up Mr Mehdi 
Bazargan, Iran's dissident for- 
mer Prime Minister, and beat 
a group of his supporters, a 
spokesman for Mr Bazargan 
said. Z~- 

The incident apparently'^ 
curred on Thursday when ce 
group, Iran’s only legal oppo- 
sition party, trio! to visit '.a 
cemeteiy south of Tehran fifra 
ceremony to marie the 25th 
anniversary of their move- 


ment 


Skydivers die 


Angry Reagan snipes 
defence budget cuts 

From Our Correspondent, Washington 


An angry President Ronald 
Reagan told elite armed forces 
Honour Guards at tire week- 
end that the defence budget 
approved by tire House of 
Representatives was “wholly 
inadequate” and would send 
tire wrong signal to the 
Russians. 

Delivering his weekly radio 
address in a mess hall at Fort 
Myer in Arlington, to mark 
Armed Forces Day, be said the 
$265 billion budget — $35 
billion less than he requested 
- was a “throwback to the 
70s” and a “breach of faith 
with our armed forces and our 
allies”. 

Much of what had been 
achieved in building up US 
strength was now in jeopardy, 
he said. 

The House budget bas 
placed the White House in a 
difficult position. With the 
threat of automatic cuts under 
the Gramm-Rudman-Hol- 
lings balanced budget law. 
Congress is increasingly reluc- 
tant to allocate further funds 
for a continued defence build- 


may compel him to change his 
mind. The Senate has already 


Ajnti-Nato 
vote by 
Greens 


a defence budget of 
if tire House 


up. 


The House has manoeuvred 
itself into a position where foe 
Administration will have to 
decide whether to agree to tax 
increases to reduce foe deficit. 
Mr Reagan has lo: 
any increase, but 


1301 billion. And if tire 

is to compromise on a higher 
figure, as its leaders suggest it 
will, the Senate Republicans 
will be forced to chose be- 
tween more taxes or less 
defence. 

It will be increasingly hard 
for Mr Reagan then to blame 
only the Democrats in Con- 
gress for upsetting his plans, as 
he has done until now. 

With strong political pres- 
sure against more severe cuts 
in domestic spending, espe- 
cially in an election year, the 
feeling is growing in Congress 
that defence must accept ns 
share of the cuts. The threat of 
across-the-board cuts, as man - 
dated by Gramm-Rudman- 
Hollings if Congress and foe 
Administration cannot agree 
on reductions, may speed up 
the protracted annual wran- 
gling about the budget But the 
new law itself is now being 
challenged. 

The Supreme Court recent- 
ly heard an appeal maintain- 
ing that the measure unlaw- 
fully made an Administration 
official, the Comptroller Gen- 
eral, responsible for triggering 
the cuts, instead of leaving 
finan cial decisions to Con- 


From Our Correspondent 
Bonn 

West Germany’s Greens 
party yesterday demanded a 
“drastic” shortening of na- 
tional service and renewed its 
call for Bonn's withdrawal 
from Nato. 

Delegates at a party con 
gress in Hanover voted that 
foe slogan “We must get out of 
Nato, because with Nato there 
can be no peace” should be 
included in their manifesto for 
the coming federal election 


Jakarta (Reuter) - A light 
aircraft crashed on take-off, 
killing 11 members of an 
Indonesian skydiving club, 
including two Britons named 
as Mark Johnson and Mike 


Milton. 

Finns go back 

Helsinki (Reuter) - Thou- 
sands of Finnish public em- 
ployees began returning to 
work after a 45-day strike 
ended with a two-year com- 
promise pay deal. Local trains 
are expected to return to 
normal today. 


Sack for 48 


Accra (AFP) — The Ghana- 
ian authorities have dismissed 
48 officials of foe internal 
revenue service for corrup- 
tion. Another 16 have been 
retired on grounds of deterio- 
rating mental health, as well as 
alcoholism, incompetence and 
absenteeism. 


Five shot dead 


campaign. 

Reduction of national ser- 
from foe present 1 S 


vice from foe present __ 
months (to be extended later 
to 18 months), caused confu- 
sion during a five-hour debate 
on the Greens* peace pro- 
gramme. 

A party leadership proposal 
of 12 months found no sup- 
porters, and delegates voted at 
first for abolition of conscrip- 
tion. This decision was later 
cancelled, and the congress 
agreed on a compromise that 
left the term open, although it 
was also agreed that it should 
be “drastically shortened”. 

A representative of the Afri- 
can National Congress (ANC), 
Mr Tony Sedat, called on foe 
Greens to make South Africa's 
apartheid policy a plank in 
their election platform. 


Minister 


From John Best 
Ottawa 


one 


crops, and Paraguay depends ^ Mahoney, the 

on these two mam exports. ^ Prime Min&ez; 


Canadian voters as a 
international statesman. 

However, foe favourable ex- 
posore Mr Mnlnuey received 
in Tokyo, Peking and Seoul 


— and after two 
incessant opposition question- 
ing of the Government in the 
Commons — Mr Stevens sub- 
mitted his resignation, while 


Heino. «Hch «e sad » 


licki ng. whK* are . » 
involve high-level official^ 
most of them dose to foe 
general, arc proceeding no- 

no programmes to other. 

Meanwhile, in anaHeffipW 
head off tim posstbto of 

farther btoodsfted.. foeR^M 

Catholic Chwcfo m 
has called for a national 


dialogue. • • 

White the Government nas 
so far refused to take pm*. 
opponents believe sudina®- 

focvchidetotrirctiK funeral 

out of foe presWeiitlal pa». 


A prominent member of Mr 
Mnfrfflaey’s OmservativeCab- 
inet resigned; a h adrb «i rfi 
Conservative MP from Qae-. 
bee province left the Tory 
f ftwww to sit as an Indepen- 
dent and another Tory h#dc- 
beacber from Quebec was 
charged by the police with 58 

counts of corruption- 

• The Prime Minister’s rotmn 
frma a l£day Asian tour was 
gberedbre not the.trnnBph.foat. 

itmuhieided tDbtr - 

Fart of the- purpose Of foe 
tsar was * uofiticd l^ne: 
show Mr 


oHnterest 
Mr Sinclair 
of Regional 
shin.- - - 

.. MrStevens, «neof foe more 
effective members of the 
Mniroaey Cahsiet was under 
lire JbeeaHse of a S2J6 
loan: arranged- by wife to 
help & sftttggfing femifyTrasi- 



The money- came from an 
official of a company .that has 
hati^rfeaHngs with Mr Ster- 




Three days ’ before ; Mr 
MufatMwy*s-jretina'tD 'Ottawa 


The Prone Minister snbse- 
qnentfy named William Par- 
ka 1 , Chief Justice of the High 
Court of Ontario trial dirisimi, 
to investigate the allegations. 

But far from calming the 
waters, this appointment 
whipped them up even more, 
with the liberal and New 
Democratic Party Opposition 
saying that Mr Mahoney had 
“politicized” the judiciary by 

bringing a judge into the case. 

’ Mr Justice Parker was once 
president of . a Conservative 

constituency association in 

Ontario and the 


parties argned that the matter 
should have been referred to a 

As if the Stevens affair was 
not enough of a problem lor 
the returning Prime Minister, 
a day before Mr Mnlroeey’s 
return, Mr Robert Tonpfn left 
the Tory parliamentary tanks 
to sit as an independent. 

Mr Tonpin, one of 57 first- 
time Tory MPs from Quebec, 
gave no reason for Ms sodden 
move, except to cite a “pro- 
found disagreement” with 
Tory philosophy and the be- 
haviour of some unwa rned 
Tory MPs. 

And on the day Mr 
Mahoney returned, another 


on government 


Quebec member, Mr Michel 
GraveL 1 


ivd, was charged with sp- 
ot seeking to obtain 
more than $100,000 worth of 


kickbacks 
contracts. 

Ironically, the allegations 
were laid after Mr Mahoney, 
then still in Sooth Korea, tofal 
reporters that the Stevens 
resignation demonstrated “a 
new standard of morality” in 
political fife in f-anaila Minify 
the Tories. 

Nrathersu^ly nor in combi- 
nation can the Stevens, Toopin 

and Gravel cases possibly 
threaten the survival of foe 
Tory Government The Tories 
won 211 of file 282 Commons 
seats in ousting the Liberals 
from office m 1964, 

Nevertheless, foe three 
cases are a serious cause for 
caocera among Conservatives, 
who have already seen their 
once-hngolead in the opinion 
dwindle to the point 


where they are now running 
neck-and-neck with the 
Liberals. 

The Tonpin and Gravel 
cases are especially revealing, 
since they seem to underline 
the fragility of the Tory-held 
French-speaking Quebec, 
which tradftkmally has voted 
heavily Liberal. The polls for 
some time have shown a 
reversion to overwhelming 
support for the liberals in 
Quebec; 

Mr Stevens is the fifth 
minister to resign under a 
dood since foe Mulroney Cab- 
inet took office. 

One of the five, Mr MarceJ 
Masse, returned to foe com- 
mnmeations portfolio after be- 
ing cleared of allegations that 
he exceeded election spemling j 


Colorado Springs, Colorado 
(Reuter) — A gunman on a 
shooting spree killed five peo- 
ple and wounded a sixth 
before dousing a bar with 
petrol and setting it on fire. 
Police were hunting foe killer. 


Danish riot 


Copenhagen — The annua] 
Brazilian-style carnival over 
foe Whit weekend here was 
marred by extensive street 
rioting, wind ow-sm ashi ng and 
plundering of offices- Forty- 
five arrests were made when 
drunken youths threw cobble- 
stones as well as beer bottles at 
police in the Old City. 


Cugat better 


Barcelona (Reuter) - The 
Spanish bandleader, Xavier 
Cugat, who is 86, left hospital 
after being admitted on April 
28 suffering from a lung 
ailment He will continue to 
receive treatment 


Peace venue 


.Assisi (Reuter) - The Ro- 
man Catholic Franciscan Or- 
der has invited President 
Reagan and Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachev to meet in .Assisi, 
the city of St Francis, for talks 
on world peace. 

New mayor 

Marseilles (Reuter) — M 
Robert Vigouroux. aged 63, a 
neurosurgeon, was elected by 
62 votes to three to succeed 
his close friend Gaston 
Defferre as the mayor of 
Marseilles. Defferre, aged 75. 
died on May 7 after 33 years as 
mayor. 


Britons leave 


Damascus (Reuter)— Three . 
British diplomats have left- 
Damascus after being ortierai.. 
out in retaliation for Britain^ 
expulsion of three Syrian 
dies, a British Embassy 
spokesman said. - ’ ; 


Palme row 


in foe 1984 campaign. 


Stockholm (Renter) - The 
prosecutor assigned to tfie 
hum for foe killer of the 
Swedish Prime Minister. Otof 
Palme, has resigned after ac- 
cusing foe chief investigator of 
perverting justice by refusing 
to dear a former suspect 




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We’ve yet to find an investment opportunity 

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agrees to 

compromise on 
racism Bill 


®Vwn Ian Mnrray, Jerusalem 

^befeetfaeSabtethoffi- 

. Nereis considerable agha- 
inside ltefcLeli SiSfS **2? “ ****** after a conn 

yS^day maeu Cabmet - ndingihai five cinemas in the 
The agreement mm^c °P» <» Friday 


• — -.w.vuv uGiuuuMnuwas uy me 

reftpous Orthodox despite a coun or- 



ofany legislation so that it will 
ran to stop the anti-Arab 
behaviour it is supposed to 
outlaw. 

The Bill comes at a time 
when the Orthodox Jewish 
community is feeling increas- 
ingly .-miDitant in the face of 
whatJt sees as an erosion of 
religious standards. According 
to Erev Shabbat, an Ultra- 
Orthodox weekly, a Tiutmimi 
task force of rabbis is now 
being set up to fight secular- 
ism, particularly on the 
Sabbath. 

Already Orthodox families 
monitor the market in Jerusa- 
lem to make sure stalls are 
dosed by the start of the 
Sabbath on Friday afternoon. 
With the start of summertime 
in Israel this weekend, these 
watchdogs arc expected to be 
ont more and more frequently 
on Saturday evenings to stop 
theatres and cafes trying to 


Mr Shimon' Pares, the 
Prime Minister, said in an 
interview last week that be 
was under attack by both 
religious and secular groups 
for trying to do no more than 
maintain the status quo. 

■ T “J view this with concern." 
□e said. “I advocate that each 
person worships God in his 
own way, or conducts his life 
. as he sees fit The state should 
-not interfere." 

• Shamir attack: Mr Peres is 
under strong attack from his 
Foreign Minister, Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir, for meddling in for- 
eign policy without keeping 
the ministry informed. 

Mr Shamir’s anger arises 
from a visit to Washington 
last week by Mr Ezra 
Weizman, Minister without 
Portfolio and one of Mr Peres’ 
most trusted advisers in deal- 
ing with Arab, and particular- 
ly Egyptian, affairs. 


General a 1 US blacks 

fall further 


casua 

It 

SSnl 

" • • V 


Libya row behind 


.From John Earle 
Rome 

Brigadier-General Ambro- 
gjo viviani, former bead of 
military counter-intelligence, 
will resign from the Italian 
Army today in protest at his 
treatment after reflations he 
made in a magazine into view 
last week. 

The general is under disci- 
plinary investigation 'after 
jeging that Italian a u t hor i ti es 
helped ' build up Colonel 
Gadaffi’s Army and security 
forces, and that the Italian 
Secret Service masterminded' 
the escape to Germany in 
1977 of General .Herbert 
Kappfer, a Nazi war criminal 
serving a life sentence. 

His statements have caused 
intense embarrassment. Gen- 
eral Viviani says he was 
ordered to prep are reports for 
Colonel Qadam in the early 
19>0s on setting up a secret 
service and - on forming a 
parachute battalion. ' \ 


• From Mohsin Ali 
Was hin gton . 

. The income gap between 
white and black Americans 
widened' between 1980 and 
1984, despite increasing edu- 
cational gains among blacks. ' 

. The Census Bureau, in a 
repent released last week, said 
ftiiit Ibe median income of 
whim families edged up to 
$27,690 (£17,750) in 1984 
from $27,610 in 198a But 
Hack families showed a $550 
4*rinn» to 515,43a 

The income disparity in- 
creased, even though a greater 
number of Hadis were attend- 
ing colleger and moving into 
professions such as medicine 
and the law. 

The number ofHack college 
students totalled 1.1 million in 
1983, iO per cent of all college 
students and more than dou- 
ble the number of 1970. This 
was only sKghtly less than the 
12 percent blacks comprise of 
the American population. 



JKI 


mt 'Jfi 


From Peter Nichols, Rome 


Tht <xil e<i ft) yal family may 
be allowed to return freely to 
Italy. The approaching 48th 

anniversary of the founding of 
the republic is giving members 
of the former rafing House rf 
Savoy CMsefoffcopethaf their 
efforts to return, mm being 
made hi public, may be 
rewarded. . 

It fe knows Out former 
President Partial had gbui 

.1 L.^ d.. l - r U 


the republic was so 


other matte 1 . The handsome 
German woman recalls on 
every possible occasion that 
her brother, Dirk, was shot 
and mortally wounded on the 
night of- August 17, 1978, 
while he was asleep on board a 
friend's yacht anchored off die 
C orsi c an island of Isola del 
CavaQo. 

The young man died after 
111 days of acute suffering 
which involved a Its ampufca- 


Win 


1155355 


Opinion poll blues for ruling coalition 

Sunny outlook for Lubbers suddenly 
clouded by poison of Chernobyl 


ymt' 

. * ... ; , . 




k *: . 


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K- 


Angie Nostaja, aged 11, one of the pupils at an American 
school held hostage in a $300 million ransom scheme which 
went terribly wrong, being comforted by her sister after re- 
ceiving emergency treatment for brans suff e r e d when a 
homemade bomb went off. Authorities in three American 
states are trying to discover why a man and his wife em- 
barked bn the hold-up operation in which both of them died. 
David Young shot himself two hours after the Friday 
takeover of Cokeville Elementary School began, when a 




Saturday 13 people remained in hospital, one of them in a 
critical -condition. Explanations for the Youngs' behaviour 
were being sought in Arizona, in Idaho where Young had 
been a marshal, and in Wyoming. The picture emerging of 
Young is of a man who “still thought he lived in the mid 


The Dutch will elect a new 
150-seat Lower House of 
Parliament on Wednes- 
day as they must at least 
every four years. In the 
first of a two-part series, 
Robert Sekail, our Am- 
sterdam Correspondent, 
focuses on the complex- 
ities of the Dutch political 
landscape. 

Political phnifhrmity is per- 
haps not surprising in a coun- 
try that for many centimes has 
been noted for its tolerance, 
but it certainly complicates the 
j aMa^g pipfcr of The 

No fewer than a dozen 
parties have one or more 
re p rese n tatives in the Lower 
Hoase in The Hague, and 
about 20 parties are taking 
part in Wednesday’s election. 

There are three main con- 
tenders: the Christian Demo- 
crats, led by Mr Ruud 
Lubbers, the Prime Minister; 
the conservative Liberals, ju- 
nior partners in the centre- 
right coalition; and Labour, 
the main opposition party, led 
by Mr Joop den Uyi, a former 
Prime Minister. 

Because none of these par- 
ties can ever hope to win an 
absolute majority, the Chris- 
tian Democrats are in the 
comfortable position of being 
indispensable to a viable coali- 
tion, since an alliance between 
Labour and the liberals is 
about as likely as an alliance 
between Mr Neil Kmnock and 
Mrs Margaret Thatcher. 

There is but one dond on 
this sunny outlook for Mr 
Lubbers: he wants to “finish 
tbe job", as bis party's election 
slogan puts it, but not with the 
socialists, who more or less 


ipUTCHWW 

ELECTIONS 


want to nndo everything he has 
accomplished m the past four 
years. Bra opinion polls have 
consistently predicted fairly 
heavy losses for Mr Lebbers’s 
preferred coalition partner, 
the liberals. 

Until the Chernobyl disas- 
ter, Mr Lubbers, die liberals 
and the opinion pods seemed 
confident that die present 
coalition would [just manage to 




'■ *1' ' a »* ,-J£ i 

. 

» >. •> > - 
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stay intact, even with a major- 
ity of only one seat 

Bra Chernobyl brought life 
into what bad been a rather 
tame election campaign. For 
the socialists, who oppose 
endear power, it confirmed 
their worst fears, and they lost 
no tone in exploiting die 
Government’s recent approval 
of two new nuclear power 
plants. At present The Neth- 
erlands gets only abort 4 per 
cent of Hi energy from nuclear 
power. 

Although Mr Lubbers and 
other coalition spokesmen 
were quick to say that con- 
struction of the plants would at 
least be delayed until foil 
details of Chernobyl woe 




• •:* v 

* " 

> v 

4? ' * 

wf- V-^ v ' ' 



Mr Lnbbers, the Prime hHnister, and Labour's Mr den UyL 


known, opinion polk have not 
given dm rating coalithm even 
a deader majority. At mostit 
could muster 73 of the ISO 
seats. 

. . As Labour is certain lb 
obtain the most seals — proba- 
bly abort 55 — Queen Beatrix 
will have no option bat to give 
Mr da Uyl the first go at 
forming a coalition, which 
would almost certainly lead to 
protracted negotiations with 
the Christian Democrats. -■ 

Oddly enough, the deploy- 
ment of anise missiles on 
Dutch soO by the end of 1988, 
to which die pres e nt Govern- 
ment is committed and which 
the socialists w lm wm d y op- 
pose, is not an election issue, 
bat it coidd be the stumbling 
block in coalition talks be- 
tween Christian Democrats 
and Labour. 

If these talks do break 
down, the Queen could ask Mr 
Lubbers to try to form -a 
coalition. 

He would have two alterna- 
tives. He could seek parlia- 
mentary support from three 

email ri^bf- win g fanHampnhiT - 

ist Camnist parties, who can 
expect to muster abort six 
seats — an unattractive propo- 
sition to die Liberals, who 
favour legalizing euthanasia, 
for instance, which is anathe- 
ma to the fundamentalists. 

Or he could include in Irik 
coalition the left-libera] Dem- 
ocrats 66, who are expected ft 
increase then seats from six to 
10. Although the Democrat? 
are closer to Labour than to 
the Liberals, they say they 
wodd consider snch a proposi- 
tion if Labour, by malting 
impossible demands, thwarts 
the forma ti on of a ooafithm 
with the Christian Democrats. 
Tomorrow; Economic options 


Putting forward 

thefacts. 


4 


At UK Nirex Ltd, we have the task of irrplementing . 
the Government's strategy for the safe and efficient disposal 
of low-level radioactive waste. 

’’ It is ourwish to provide anyone who asks with the 
fects on our scientific research and devebpment- and our 
proposals. 

Then we can explain that the type of material well 
be dealing with at any of the four sites indudes only 
lightly contaminated everyday items like syringes and 
doctors' gloves, paper towels and tools from the nuclear 
industry, and worn-out industrial instruments. Yet we will 
be putting it in concrete trenches under several metres . 

ofday. 

Parliament is shortly to deade whether it should |p| 


authorise a Spedal Development Order allowing in vestigi- 
al ions of four possible disposal sites for low-level waste. 

If the order is granted, we‘ intend to carry out 
exploratory engineering field work at each site. And then, 
when we have analysed all the information, we may-make 
a planning application for the devebpment of one site. 

Any’ ^application would be heard at a Public Inquiry. 

In the meantime, if you'd Bice more details of our plans 
for the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste— or if you 
want to know about the separate subjects of intermediate and 
high-level radioactive waste— why not ask for our Fact Fife. 
^^W^Simpjy by writing to Refer Curd at UK Nirex Ltd, 

Information Office, Curie Arenue, Harwell, Didcot, 
Oxon 0X11 ORH. 


United Kingdom Nirex 
Limited 

Nudear Industry Radbactiue Whste Executive. 




6 L T'WfcT.r/B*^!5=v 











8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 




m0$im 


Pakistan 

F16s bag 
Afghan 
fighter 

From Hasan Akhtar 

Islamabad 

Pakistani FI 6 fighters, sup- 
plied by the US. have shot 
down an Afghan Air Force 
MiG fighter about nine miles 
inside Pakistan. 

It is believed to be the first 
time an Afghan fighter has 
been brought down in Paki- 
stan territory' si nce Soviet 
forces arrived in .Afghanistan 
more than six years ago. 

The Foreign Ministry said a 
second fighter was hit in the 
incident on Saturday when 
four Afghan aircraft violated 
Pakistan airspace. Witnesses 
said it veered into Afghan 
airspace with its tail on fire. 
The other MiGs got away. 

The air battle followed re- 
peated border violations by 
Afghan aircraft and artillery 
over the years, bringing death 
and injury to hundreds of 
people, mainly refugees from 
Afghanistan. 

The ministry said Kabul 
had ignored many warnings to 
stop these violations, its 
charge d'affaires was sum- 
moned yesterday to receive a 
strong protest. 

The wreckage of the shot- 
down plane fell near 
Parachinar. A party of foreign 
correspondents was flown to 
the site for a briefing by a 
Pakistan Air Force com- 


Talks over diverted plane 

Taiwan insists on 
return of defector 

From David Bona via, Hong Kong 


Taiwan aviation officials 
have refused to send a pilot to 
Canton to pick up the Boeing 
747 cargo plane which was 
diverted two weeks ago on a 
flight from Bangkok to Hong 
Kong. 

Taiwan is insisting that Mr 
Wang Xijue. the pilot who de- 
fected to China, be returned 
with the plane and two crew 
members who do not wish to 
remain in China. Mr Wang 
said he was tired of life in 
Taiwan and wanted to live 
with his father in China. 

The deadlock was disclosed 
after two negotiating sessions 
foiled to produce agreement 
However, the feet that such 
talks are occurring is of impor- 
tance in view of the Taiwan 
authorities' normal position 
that they will have no contact 
with Communist officials. 

China has repeatedly said it 
wants talks with Taiwan on a 
whole range of issues, leading 
to discussions on reunifica- 
tion. Taiwan officials want a 
pilot from a third country to 
go to Canton to get the plane. 
Talks will be resumed today. 

Small things often prove to 
be important indicators of 
fresh departures in Chinese 
politics, and it is of particular 


interest that both parties were 
content to use Hong Kong as 
the site for negotiations over 
the aircraft. 

China hopes the apparen Un- 
generous settlement it has 
made with Britain over Hong 
Kong will help to convince the 
Nationalists, led by President 
Chiang Ching-Kuo, that the 
Communists can be fair and 
reasonable, especially since 
the repudiation of the ex- 
treme-left politics pursued by- 
Mao Tse-Tung unul his deaLh 
in 1976. 

Mr Deng Xiaoping, the 
Chinese elder statesman, is 
anxious to follow up the Hong 
Kong settlement with more 
overtures to Taiwan. Howev- 
er, he does not wish to seem 
weak, which explains the diffi- 
culties over the aircraft. For 
Hong Kong, the holding of 
negotiations there is a hopeful 
sign that China is serious 
about exploiting the advan- 
tages of its social system. 
• TAIPEI: Taiwan has tested 
an air-to-air missile developed 
on the island, a Defence Min- 
istry spokesman said yester- 
day. The successful test of a 
ground-io-air Sky Bow missile 
with a warhead was announc- 
ed in March (Reuter reports). 


Junejo aiming 
to get rid 
of Speaker 

Islamabad — Pakistan's 
Prime Minister. Mr Muham- 
mad Khan Junejo, is reported 
to have said that the ruling 
party has decided to remove 
the Speaker of the National 
Assembly, Mr Fakhr Imam, 
because of his attempts to 
drive a wedge between Parlia- 
ment, the elected Government 
and President Zia (Hasan 
Akhtar writes). 

The Speaker had earlier this 
month referred to the Chief 
Election Commissioner a 
question raised by indepen- 
dent members about Mr 
Junejo keeping hi$ seat in the 
assembly after assuming presi- 
dency of the Muslim League. 

The League was not then a 
registered political party, and 
it was said the action thus 
broke the law. 

Parties are obliged to regis- 
ter formally with the Election 
Commission to qualify as a 
parliamentary party. 


Shoe-cleaning 
penance by 
Punjab leader 

Delhi — The Chief Minister 
of Punjab, Mr Suijit Singh 
Barnala, yesterday cleaned the 
shoes of devotees to atone for 
the police action in the Gold- 
en Temple at Amritsar on 
April 30 (Kuldip Nayar 
writes). 

Although Mr Barnala has 
not been declared lankhaiya 
(guilty of religious miscon- 
duct), the five Sikh high 
priests have ordered him to 
repeat the shoe-cleaning for 
six days to soothe Sikhs. 

The high priests had asked 
Mr Barnala to select any Sikh 
temple in which to dean the 
shoes and be picked an histor- 
ic temple - in Anandpur. 

< Sikhs shouted pro-Klulistan 
slogans while the high priests 
considered their veraicL And 
dissidents within the Akali 
Dal party who have asked for 
Mr Banfola's resignation said 
that the penance was “only a 
drama". 


CHRISTIE'S 

ST. JAMES'S 

8 King Street. London SWL 1 fck 01-839 9060 
Tuesday 20 May at 11 a.m_ 
IMPORTANT MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Wednesday 2i May at 10.30 ajn. 
ENGLISH AND FOREIGN SILVER, 
OBJECTS OF VERTU, 
INCLUDING CHESS SETS, MINIATURES 
Thursday 22 May at 11 a.m. 

PINE ENGLISH FURNITURE 

ar 11 aju. and 2.30 p.m. 

FINE WINES AND VINTAGE PORT 

Friday 23 May at 10-30 ajn. 

QLD master pic tures 

Tuesday 20 May at 6.45 pan. 

BRIGITTE FASSBAENDER AT CHRISTIE'S 
LISZT SONGS 

Hdrets & 8 . Further details ol the concert aeries 
from Jonathan Pm* or Patricia Knights 
on 01-839 9Q60 

w wouId 


(Britain's biggest insurance company now arranges mortgages for all properties and pockets. And will happily come to you to discuss diem.) 


More than half the hold-ups in completing house purchases 
are due to delays in completing mortgage arrangements. 

These delays can not only make you lose your temper 
they can also make you lose your house. And they are 
unnecessary. 

Prudential offer a wide choice of mortgages, and give a fast 
moving mortgage service. We cut through the red tape to give 
you a quick answer: on an}- size mortgage or npe of house. 


We can let you have a written quotation, or to make things 
move even quicker we will happily come to you to discuss it. 

Send the coupon today for our free booklet on 
mongages, and details of other financial services. Or call us, 
at our expense. 

That way. when you find your dream house you wont have 
a nightmare trying to arrange a mortgage. 


Fighting flares 
as troops move 
to end Tamil 
hold on Jaffna 


Colombo (Reuter) — Troops 
moved from three directions 
yesterday towards Jaffna. Sri 
Lanka's fourth largest city, to 
end a year-long siege. 

A Defence Ministry state- 
ment said at least 17 Tamil 
separatists and government 
troops had died since the 
operation began on Saturday. 
Fighting, involving rockets, 
mortars, machine-guns and 
hand grenades was in pro- 
gress. “Terrorists used 
schools, houses, churches and 
other buildings ... to take 
cover in their attacks," the 
statement said. 

Jaffna peninsula is the heart 
of the separatist movement. 
Tamil militants want a sepa- 
rate nation stretching south 
from Jaffna along the eastern 
coast. 

The operation was launched 
two weeks after separatists 
staged their worst attacks on 
Colombo, killing 31 people 
and wounding 200 in bomb- 
ings of an .Air Lanka plane and 
the telegraph office. 

For the past year Jaffna, a 
city of 850.000 people, has 
been a no-go area for troops 


and non-Tamils. Troops at 
Jaffna Fort in the city centre 
are fired at whenever they try 
to leave the base, the regional 
nerve centre for anti-guerrilla 
operations. 

The statement said that in a 
co-ordinated operation troops 
moved out of the fort, set off 
from Elephant Pass about 30 
miles south of Jaffna, and 
headed towards the city from 
beaches and islands up to 20 
miles away. 

The Government claims the 
islands and beaches are used 
as landing points by guerrillas 
coming from bases in south- 
ern India's Tamil Nadu state.. 
India denies this. 

“Terrorists used large num- 
bers of surface mines to 
prevent the movement of 
troops," the statement said. 

The operation coincided 
with a decision by the Govern- 
ment to send on leave nearly 
200 state-employed Tamils in 
Colombo. 

An Information Ministry 
official said ibis was part of a 
security plan at “sensitive 
institutions" to guard against 
more bombings. 


Morale of Seoul opposition undermined by US 


From David Watts 
Tokyo 

The Sooth Korean Opposi- 
tion marked the sixth anniver- 
sary of the Kwangju uprising 
at the weekend, dearly on the 
defensive against die Govern- 
ment of President Chun Doo 
Hwan. 

Police forestalled at least 
one attempt at a big demon- 
stration by students in Seoul, 
but there were several dashes 
between police and students on 
campuses. 

The anniversary the up- 
rising. in which die southern 
city of Kwangjn became a 
battlefield for several days, 
has always been a rallying 
point, particularly for the stu- 
dents, but — partly becanse of 
recent setbacks — the Opposi- 
tion failed to make capital of it 
this weekend. 

Several factors account for 
the legitimate Opposition's 
low morale at the moment; the 
realization that their rallies 
are risky ventures becanse of 
their appropriation by radical 
students. President Chon's 
new flexibility, and the fact 
that the US has made it dear 
that it is still firmly with 
President Chon, at least for 
the present. 

The opposition New Korea 
Democratic Party has called 
off demonstrations and rallies, 
ostensibly while hs leader, Mr 
Lee Min Woo, is in the US. 
But it is also dearly unwilling 
to take the risk of any more 
violent incidents at rallies. 

President Chan's latest 
statement that he is prepared 
to discuss modific ation of the 
Constitution before his term of 


trt- tm i saga— a—— — 

.An elderly South Korean woman weeping at the grave of her son, killed during the Kwangju uprising six years ago. 


office ends in 1988, has taken 
the wind out of the 
Opposition's sails by granting 
their principal demand. 

Perhaps a more telling Mow 
in the long run was the recent 
visit to South Korea by Mr 
George Shultz, the US Secre- 
tary of State. Following the 
Reagan Administration's new- 


ly-pronounced policy of dis- 
taste for authoritarian 
governments of both the left 
and right after the overthrow 
of ^President Manxes of the 
Philippines, the Opposition 
had assumed that South Korea 
was the next most suitable 
case for treatment. 

Not so, according to Mr 


Shultz, who not only praised 
President Chnn for “movin g 
fast" in the country’s political 
evolution, but also for refnsing 
to meet the two key opposition 
figures, Mr Khn Young Sun 
and Mr Kim Dae Jang. 

In the event, no one in Mr 
Shultz's party saw either of 


the two Kims, which caused 
Mr Kim Young Sam to com- 
ment: “I'm afraid Shultz has 
the wrong impression of Ko- 
rea. Mis remarks have con- 
firmed US support for a 
dictatorial Government We're 
not asking him to support ns, 
only that the US refrain from 



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THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 








Pfetrol hasn’t c 



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I 


in fifteen years 



Uk WVIi J -pur vyt*! ,«*. -r 


S333 E3Tu p 


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Until now. 



Although there have been great advances in new ingredient, exclusive to Shell, which 
car technology, we’re still using a petrol provides faster, purer combustion making 
that gives a similar performance to one your car more responsive. Secondly, it 
we were using fifteen years ago. But now /T 7\ contains a cleaning agent which reduces 
Shell have developed Formula Shell, a new ^ din in the important parts of your engine so 
petrol that has been proved to increase m aking it smoother running. Together, 

the performance of your car, no matter fW HMUL A these make your car more efficient, 
what you drive. Firstly, it contains a ! ^ !iS From today all petrol is not the same. 

New Formula Shell. It will improve the performance of your car. 


61 . 1 °. n J? ..SVsPtf'l r*i« 








NDAY MAY 19 1986 


SPECTRUM 



Twenty years after 
England last won 
the World Cup, they 
go to the finals 
with more to prove 
than their skill, 
says Clive White 

Twenty years ago, things were not 
so very different. Merseyside clobs 
had just dominated the league 
championship and the FA Cup. 
Britain and Spain were talking 
about Gibraltar — and English 
football attendances, which bad 
been falling steadily since the 
1930s. had hit a new low of 32 
million for the season. 

England's victory over West 
Germany in the World Cup final 
at Wembley in July captured the 
imagination of the entire country. 
Bobby Moore, Geoff Hurst, Bob- 
by Charlton and the rest of the 
team became household names; 
the manager, Alf Ramsey, was 
knighted. Attendances climbed by 
more than two million in the 
following season and the interest 
was sustained over the next five 
years as an extra IS million passed 
through the turnstiles, thanks also 
to Manchester United's glorious 
European Cup success of 1 968, the 
first by an English team. 

Sadly, such individuals as 
United's Best, Law and Charlton 
are no longer to be found among 
today’s performers in the British 
game, and without them the idea 
of conquering the world in the thin 
atmosphere and sweltering heat of 
Mexico is far more unlikely than it 
was even for the homely English 
boys of "66. 

It is the need for them to do well 
that has changed With the game 
seemingly at rock bottom after a 
series of crushing blows to its 
image 12 months ago, total atten- 
dances for the season just ended 
were a record low of 1S.4 million, 
eight per cent down on the 
previous year. During the early 
months of the season it seemed 
that the outraged memory of the 
91 spectators who died in the 
catastrophies at Brussels. Brad- 
ford and Birmingham was exact- 
ing revenge upon a sport which 
bad carelessly failed to protect 
those lives. 

The English game, only too 
aware of its deep complicity in the 
tragedies, seemed almost to have 
lost the will to live. Thousands 
deserted it, and attendances all 
around the country tumbled, in 
some cases by as much as 40 per 
cent on the previous season. 
Bobby Robson. England’s team 
manager, admitted recently: “I felt 
at the time the game was crum- 
bling because of the threat of 
violence”. 

Belatedly, the wheels of reform 
began to turn. The Popplewell 
inquiry, ordered as a result of the 
Bradford fire, delivered its expect- 
ed verdict: this country's football 
■grounds were, by and large, archa- 
ic and unsafe. Government legis- 
lation, assisted by closed-circuit 
television and tighter policing, 
began to take effect on the 
hooligans. The introduction of an 
identity-card system was aban- 





remember, crimes to lorget olll 


top 



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Grasp of ’6 6: Bobby Moore and trophy, aloft at Wembley 


Class of *86: coach Don Howe, left, trainer Fred Street and manager Bobby Robson watch points daring a warm-up match ia'ColonHlo 


doned as being impractical, but 
Luton Town began to plan their 
strategy of banning away support- 
ers from next season's home 
matches. 

Gradually, football began to 
show signs of recovery, both 
financially and morally; a mood of 
optimism was filtering through the 
debris and carnage, The television 
cameras returned after a contrac- 
tual dispute, though whether their 







I have the 
impression 
everyone 
wants the 
game to get 
well again 


MARTIN O'NEILL 




absence affected attendances will 
never be determined. Liverpool 
FC. unwitting culprits in Brussels, 
were reporting full houses again 
and arrests at Anfieid — outside 
and inside the ground — averaged 
only 3.2 per game in the season 
just ended, compared with 7.2 in 
the previous season. The pattern 
was the same at London's II 
League grounds, with the number 
of arrests down by 35 per cent on 
the previous year. Supporters who 
had given up their season tickets 
after Brussels were returning with 
a new feeling of security, given 
expression by Jack Dunnett, presi- 
dent of the Football League, who 
claims that the chief reason for the 
return of the disaffected supporter 
was that "he suddenly realized 
that, contrary to media reports, he 
would not necessarily get mugged 
at a football match”. 


On the other hand, there is a 
strong belief elsewhere that his 
return was due in no small way to 
favourable publicity for unproved 
levels of entertainment, aided by a 
dramatic climax to the season. 
Even experienced players became 
excited about their sport again. 
Martin O’Neill, the former cap- 
tain of Northern Ireland, said that 
it had restored his faith in the 
game. “I watched the game be- 
tween West Ham and Ipswich 
recently on television with my 
wife, and she remarked how 
pleasant it was to see crowds 
invading the pitch at the final 
whistle not to knock the heads oft 
other people but to applaud their 
team. They were nice scenes. 
Earlier that evening I'd been at 
Filbert Street (Leicester City’s 
ground), where there was another 
big crowd. A woman sitting next 
to me was listening to the results 
of other matches on her radio. I 
was begining to think that all that 
sort of interest had disappeared I 
have the overwhelming impres- 
sion that everyone wants to see the 
game get well again”. 

As the English season drew to a 
close, scenes of camaraderie 
around Wembley in the all- 
Merseyside FA Cup final restored 
the hope that rival supporters will 
one day again be able to stand 
together, each vociferously cheer- 
ing their respective teams without 
feeling the urge to assault the other 
person. 

Now comes the World Cup, 
with British players taking their 
place in the game's global shop 
window. Opinion is divided 
among the leading figures in the 
game over what effect a poor 
showing by England in Mexico 
would have on the domestic game, 
ranging from “catastrophic" (Bert 
Miliichip, chairman of the Foot- 



ball Association) and 
“unthinkable” (Ted Croker, the 
FA secretary) to “minimal” (Peter 
Robinson, the respected chief 
executive of Liverpool FC). But 
they are aQ agreed that a successful 
World Cup — even something on 
the scale of England's last appear- 
ance in Mexico in 1970, when they 
were unfortunate not to progress 
beyond the quarter final s — would 
create a tremendous upsurge of 


We have 
got to 
attract 
families 
back to 
football 


GORDON TAYLOR 


interest at home. 

NO One, though, COuld imag ing, 
even in the unlikely event of 
victory, an increase comparable to 
that after 1 966, which was 6.25 per 
cent in the following season. “It's 
much harder to attract crowds 
nowadays”, Robinson says. “In 
this country we think rather more 
domestically. If we have a season 
like the one just ended, it’s just as 
likely to bring the people in as a 
successful World Cup. We would, 
of course, have to have good 
behaviour on the terraces to 
encourage people to our sport”. 

Better-behaved crowds might 
even attract the women’s vote. “It 
brought the ladies in, our 1966 
victory", Miliichip remembers. 
Gordon Taylor, the secretary of 
the Professional Footballers’ As- 
sociation, says: “Women have a 
bigger say in bow the family 


spends its leisure time. We've got 
to try to attract families, because 
that's the way entertainment is 
going”. 

Catching the interest of the 
young is, of course, vitally impor- 
tant to the future of any sport. 
Contrary to popular belief the 
introduction of newer and more 
fashionable sports does not appear 
to have affected football's popu- 
larity. Just as the number of FA- 
affi listed clubs has almost 
doubled in the last 25 years to 
more than 41,000, so the interest 
in schools has risen. 

“In terms of actual numbers of 
boys participating, and of compe- 
titions, there has been a vast 
increase”, Steve Allatt, the secre- 
tary of the English Schools FA, 
says. “There is an involvement in 
schools now outside the physical 
education staff. The team manag- 
er and assistant manager of the 
English Schools under- 1 8 team are 
both craft and design teachers. 
The recent teachers’ action has 
caused a setback, but that will only 
be temporary". 

Some of the country’s young 
people have been trying to repair 
the damage done by theur elders in 
Brussels. The English Schools FA 
recently played against Belgium, 
who initially imposed a ban on 
English teams at all levels from 
competing in their country, 
though this was later relaxed to 
receive school teams. And on May 
31 the English schoolboys play 
Italy at Wembley, for which 
30,000 tickets had been sold some 
weeks ago. Irving Scholar, chair- 
man of Tottenham Hotspur, ad- 
vocates putting junior supporters 
of rival teams in the same family 
enclosure, and making such areas 
mandatory at all grounds. “What 
better way", be asks, “of fostering 
friendly relations?" 


Style and behaviour in Mexico 
are as important to the reputation 
of the English game as ultimate 
victory. This World Cup will 
impose new standards of disci- 
pline on the field, and those who 
fail to meet them will receive little 
compassion- “Misbehaviour on 
the field could indue a misbe- 
haved public who need no encour- 
agement to misbehave” says 
Miliichip. “Unfortunately we 


&& - J : ■ , 


I believe 
that . 
the game 
hasfouiM 
its heart 
again 


IRVING SCHOLAR 


have a number of people who 
insist oh following us around who 
need no excuse”. 

The Football Association is 
particularly careful not to offer the 
rain test excuse for their unruly 
supporters, and Ted. Croker is 
quick to affirm complete confi- 
dence in the behaviour of the 
England team. “It never ceases to 
amaze me what good ambassadors 
they are”, he says. “In Mexico last 
season, after the Brussels disaster, 
they had a very difficult task, 
particularly in a game against 
Italy, but tbey earned h through 
incredibly well” Croker goes back 
to 1978 for the example of 
Argentina, that year’s World Cup 
hosts and the eventual winners; 
“Their manager’s first task was to 
isolate from the team anyone 
whose behaviour was suspect and 
transform what we hid seen 


before in Argentina. He proved 
conclusively that you could be- 9 . 
have respectaMy-muf succeed”.-- 

Bobby Robson could do with- 
out the added handicap of having 
his team's followers labelled los 
animates. He knows only too well 
the responsibility that rests on 
him. “I am under pressure", he 
says. “Everyone warns to get back 
10 the old days. The public are 
ready for it". Aware of the nation's 
desire to see them perform with 
style, he knows too the limitations 
of his squad. 

“The only way you can galva- 
nize them at home is when you 
have incredible players like 
Maradona and Pete, people who 
can take you to the edge of your 
seat”, he says enthusiastically — 
and not a little enviously. In Spain id 
four years ago, England did not 
lose a game and conceded only 
one goal, but won few friends. In 
the following domestic season, the 
crowds continued to dwindle. 

Bobby Charlton agrees that the 
Pdes pf this world cannot, be 
mahiif&ctured to order by coach? 
ing schools, but says he would like 
to see British players taking more 
responsibility for having a go, in 
the style of the ’66 team. Bobby 
Robson, encouragingly, agrees; “I 
would also like to see a World Cup 
played with great sportsmanship" 
he says; “At the end of the day; 1 
what happens on the field can 
educate the public”. 

Irving Scholar notes that while 
the English are.naturally resistant 
.to change, they usually manage to s 
adapt when it is forced upon them.. v ' 
“It took us 20 years to decide that 
the World Cup was a worthwhile 
co mn petition^, he says. “Out of 
all the bad will come good. I 
believe that football has found its 
heart again.” ... 

England preparations, page 32 


Caushi 


Flying the export flag 


When we take off from 
Gatwick with our daily 
service iTs just like going back 
home. Because Miami is our 
town. 

Though that doesn't 
make us a local airiine. Quite 
the reverse. We fly to more 
cities, in more countries in 
the Americas than any other 
airline. 

ATTI-15 EVERY 
MORNING WE 
TAKE OFF AND 
GO HOME. 

But we do know Florida 
better than anyone else. 

In fact we have more 
flights in and out of Miami 
than the next eight airlines 
put together. 

So next time you're fly- 
ing to Miami, why not come 
home with us? 



EASTERN 

The wings of the Americas 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT 
YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT 
OR CALL EASTERN A1RUNE5 ON 0293 517622. 


As aircraft designers compete 
to produce hi-tech aircraft that 
will propel travellers fester, 
higher or in greater numbers. 
British Aerospace at Prestwick 
in Scotland is quietlv enjoying 
a success that confounds fu- 
turistic trends. 

Jetstream, a sturdy, twin- 
engined passenger plane that 
was designed 24 years ago and 
bankrupted one famous name 
in British aviation before fell- 
ing as a military transport, has 
lately emerged as a best seller; 
a commercial ugly duckling 
that has turned into a very fine 
swan. 

The reason why this appar- 
ent failure has achieved 1 17 
rales, nearly half of them in 
one year and in the highly 
competitive American mar- 
ket, is a mixture of keen 
salesmanship and luck. 
Jetstream 31. the latest incar- 
nation with Garrett turbo- 
prop engines is demonstrably 
robust, reliable and economi- 
cal to operate. 

The good luck lay in 
changes to the pattern of 
American internal air travel. 
Basic airline economics have 
led away from airliners that 
could serve large and small 
communities, towards planes 
carrying large numbers be- 
tween major hub airports. 
This left a marten for smaller 
planes to provide the missing ; 
local service link-up. 

More than SO Jetstream 3!s 
have been sold to America 
with repeat orders early this 
year from Republic Express 
and C.C.AIR — formerly Sun- 
bird and American Eagle. 
Others have gone to Eastern 
Metro Express and Eastern 
Atlantis Express. 

Jetstream 31 costs around 
£2.5 million. British Aero- 
space offers three standard 
interiors and with a few flicks 
of a spanner the aircraft can be 
convened from 19 seat com- 
muter to an executive shuttle 
with 12 armchairs or luxury 
corporate aircraft for nine or 
10 VIPs. 




f . •» * 

•- 'V. > 







High flyer: Jetstream, capturing tire small aircraft market 


The Prestwick workforce 
has risen to more than 2,000 
on the Jetstream success and 
production could approach 
one aircraft a week in the near 
future, endorsing the Queen's 
Award for Export which the 
factory won last year. 

Mr Ron Juniper, general 
sales manager, described 
Jetstream as the right product 
at the right time. The compa- 
ny expects that demand for 
Jetstream will remain healthy 
because of lack of competition 
and the fact that more compa- 
nies were appreciating the 
convenience and economy of 
having their own air transport. 

Test pilot Ian Conradi dem- 
onstrated Jetstream's qualities 


as the aircraft climbed in a 
well-insulated whisper above 
the clouds over Prestwick. 
The pressurized cabin allowed 
the plane to cruise at 300 mph 
in the still air high above any 
normal turbulence. He said: 
“It is a simple, unsophisticat- 
ed and very stable aircraft 
The systems are largely auto- 
matic or easy to use. The 
average commercial pilot does 
not lake long to convert to it.” 
The demand for Jetstream 
is such at the moment that 
immediately an aircraft comes 
off the production tine it is 
tested and fitted out for deliv- 
ery. 

Ronald Faux 


TheBritis^HonieatSfeifeal^ 
cares for ow-sr 100 incurable 
people of all ages £ 

We nurse them with gentleness, kwe and ■ t?1 

dedication for many years. ,£■ 

Our costs- over a million ' 

pounds a year- seriously 
outstrip our income. 

Please help, by sending a 
donation or arranging a covenant 
or legacy to transform the lives Z}Z'W' 

of those less fortunate people. 
our residents handicapped feWl I I 
fay progressive diseases. 


■ JMIffilTIEHHCBfflAHDHOSFr^ I 

| Crown Lane, Streatham, London SWlfi 3JB. g 

I Please find enclosed my donation for £ * 

Atoosend me idbnnatkn about the British Home'* HMria'for I 

- Incurables Q * 

i Name: i block lettersi I, 

I Address _ "Z i"'”' £ 



T 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 954 


ACROSS 
I Push aside (5 J 
4 Six-rooted insect (7) 

8 Freewheel (5) 

9 Despised (7) 

10 Kingship (8) 

11 Windmill sail (4) 

13 Scrooge clerk (3 J.) 

17 Speak wildly (4) 

18 Norm (8) 

21 Pul on lead (7) 

21 Whole choir music 
(S) 

23 Obviously (7l 

24 Sudden rush(S) 

DOWN 

1 Suy in teat (6) 

2 Mind (5) 

3 Sorbet f5J) 

4 UnemhosiastkaJly 
(13) 

5 Dec 25(4) 



12 Wolfsbane, monks- 
hood (8) 


6 Iran Shah dynasty (7) 14 Counter (7) 


7 Bumper car (6) 


IS Escapade (6) 


16 Counsel (6) 

19 Change (5) 

20 Cod of thunder (4) 


• ? 

Put pain out 

InfheeoiS 

■V^h ~~ s'i .i 

• 1 >■ pulled muscle or the effect of lumbaao 
m can all be unpleasantly -*v 

PiSpravfethe really quick and 
IaIuIH effective way to relieve that pain, 

pr . mQSt , ofrarpairi relief sprays, 

PR Spray is cold. It ts the spray used by 

Pra Sfc° nal attending injuries, v 
SfgwjinarsJ ™ ^'C* 1 is odourless, rapidly ’ ' 

painful area, and sq freezes pain 
out ^quickly and effectively ' 

Tt If- ^ - -w 









THE TIMES MONDAY MAY-19 1986 


11 


MONDAY PAGE 



Sumii Karadta 

S 


■ course for 
’ top girls 

^ Rugby, a bastion of all-male public schooling, 
/ may soon admit girl pupils. But is the 
• increasing move to co-education in the private 
: sector good for girls? Maggie Dnunmond 
considers the pros and cons of change 


* “Many parents must have joked that 
incorrigible tomboy daughter 
' Would be well suited to life in a top 
► boys’ public school. Now they may 
the chance to put the theory to 
<-4fie test During the next few weeks 
'CRugby School -will decide if it is 
-•going to -eke the plunge into co- 
-education and admit girl pupils 
‘*frpm : the age of 13. Clifton College, 
'which unlike Rugby and many 
‘ Others has so for eschewed girt 
‘ pupils even in the sixth form, plans 
; to go co-ed in September next year. 
•’ Minor co-ed public schools are 
. hot hard to find, but among the top 
names the ethos remains decidedly 
‘ masculine. At a recent conference 
Christopher Everett, headmaster of 
.Tonbridge and this year’s chairman 
tVof the Headmasters' Conference, 
described the movement towards 
co-education as “glacial". But if a 
major public school such as Rugby 
lakes the plunge, the movement 
-could turn into something more like 
’an avalanche. 

•- . “A few years ago the idea of a 
'school like this going coeducational 
-would have been unthinkable**, says 
'Richard Bull, who has been head- 
-xxiaster of Rugby for a year. “Now 
the idea is at the forefront of many 
-people’s minds. This country is 
virtually alone among western na- 
tions in sticking to single-sex educa- 
tion. Now I think there is a feeling 
That boys and girls benefit from 
being taught together and that it is 
.very important they should get used 
. -to each other. Going co-educational 
' .would obviously alter the character 
of a school like Rugby, but I think 
it's important that boys should get 
4ised to the idea that women are 
-equals and even bosses. We can’t go 
on forever with the notion that men 
yule the roost”. •• - - 

7- But there are two schools of 
thought on this. Margaret Spry, 
president of the Girts’ School 
Association, speaks for most girts’ 
public schools when she says: “Co- 
education has infinitely more bene- 
fits for boys than for . girls. Girts 


have a civilizing effect on boys 
schools, which is why so many like 
to have girls in the sixth form. But 
what is in it for the girts? I can 
understand why they wish to go to a 
boys' sixth form for a change if 
they've been at the same school 
since the age of 11. But at the 
sensitive ages of 13, 14 and 15, we 
believe that girls will flourish more 
comfortably m an all-girl environ- 
ment which boosts their confidence 
and where they can concentrate on 
their education away from the 
pressures of having to cope with 
boys as well". 

Lady Warnock, Mistress of 
Girton College and a former bead of 
an Oxford girls’ school, says the 
main virtue of single sex education 
for girls is that it is not like real life, 
where women too easily take on an 
inferior role. “All the evidence 
shows that mixed education actual- 




Co-education in action at Sevenoaks: the question is whether mixed schools encourage sexual stereotyping 

School must prepare children for adult life — and A 
{0 nowadays that means educating girls to lead men y 


that have girls in the sixth form. 
They all sit together and rarely ask 
any questions. Girts in girls' schools 
are more likely to take science 
subjects than girts in mixed schools, 
and academic results are better." 

It is not surprising that women 
educationists are fighting the corner 
for single-sex education. The top 
girts’ public schools produce excel- 
lent academic results. They still 
resent the brain drain caused a few 
years ago when boys’ schools 
opened their sixth forms to girls. 

A 1983 report from the Equal 
Opportunities Commission con- 
cluded: “The studies show that even 
in maths and physics the single sex 
environment of itself does not have 
a significant effect on the academic 
performance of girts”. But this year 
a - report by the - Inner London 
Education Authority said that even 
after adjusting for a higher ability- 
intake, girts in single sex schools still 
-did markedly better in examina- 
tions than girts in mixed schools. 

Richard Barker, headmaster of 


Richard Barker, headmaster of 
Sevenoaks, a public school that 
went fiiUy coeducational some 18 
months ago, says: “I just don't 
believe there is any evidence for the 
claim that mixed education is bad. 
for girls academically." Barker, who 
taught at Bedales, probably the best 
known co-educational public 
school, says that while girls may 
thrive academically in a single-sex 
environment, in his experience they 
do not underperform in a mixed 
one. And girls who have been 
educated entirely in a girls school 
can face difficulties later on — at 
university; for instance, where they 
find they may not be comfortable 
with the opposite sex. “We’ve got to 
think about what we are educating 
pupils for. School is a staging post 
that should prepare them for adult 
life and nowadays that mean* 
educating girts to lead men. How on 
earth can you do that in a single sex 
environment? 

In the state sector, where only a 
sixth of secondary schools are single 


sex, co-education has come about as 
a side effect of the shift to a 
comprehensive system, followed by 
amalgamation in the face of falling 
- numbers of pupils. The' public 
school experience, it is .argued, will 
"be quite different Barker contends 
that most of the factors claimed lo 
inhibit girls in. mixed schools — a 
minority in a science class, a 
tendency to sit at the back of the 
classroom, unwillingness to play a 
forceful role - can be countered by 
careful organization: 

But co-education is not just a 
question of educational philosophy. 
Ultimately, the test in the private 
sector is what feepaying parents 
-want.- And market forces/accoitimg , 
to Stuart Andrews,, headmaster of 
Qifton, College, are. pushing foe 
’ public schools in that direction. 
Recently there has beenli great 
deal of publicity about ' bow well 
private education is doing. Accord^ 
ing to recent figures from the 
Independent Schools Information. 
Service, the number of pupils being 


educated privately is up by 1.2 per 
cent this year. But foe number of 
boy boarders showsa drop of 13 per 
cent, Mowing a long-term down- 
ward trend, while foe figure for girl 
boarders is up. Increasingly, co- 
education looks as much like com- 
mercial as common sense. 

/; Stuart Andrews says: “The mo- 
mentum for private coeducation is 
coming from parents, who nowa- 
days want to give their daughters 
the same standard of education as 
their sons — and it's often more 
convenient for them to go to the 
same school. I have noticed that 
many prep schools, particularly in 
the south-west, . have gone co- 
educational simply to stay in busi- 
ness. And these are foe feeder 
schools for places tike Clifton. 

“By sticking to boysrohiy educa- 
tion we art ^increasingly cutting 
ourselves off from half foe potential 
market" 

How long, then, before the battle 
of the sexes is fought on foe playing 
fields of Eton? 


Abroad — a place 
where things work 


As I wandered around the 
terminal at Gatwick airport 
Hying to find the desk of the 
airline company which was 
supposed to be taking me to 
Italy, but which no f -3dy at the 
information desk had beard 
of, I felt reassured that do 
terrorist was likely to have 
heard of it either. 

When I finally found it, at a 
tiny check-in masquerading 

under a set of initials com- 
pletely different from the ones 

oa my ticket, I began to worry . 
font this deliberate obscurity 
might he because the plane 
was a reconditioned Spitfire 
and the pilot a qualified tram 
driver. 

But all was welL I judge an 
airline's efficiency according 
to the chat displayed by its 
cabin crew and the apbot- 
mery ; one had stewards 
who looked like Rossano 
Brazzi on a good day. 

1 once flew on a plane 
whose seats were covered 
with remnants of patterned 
cretonne and whose 
Stewardesses wore a sort of 
wrap-over pinny; it was the 
only time that I registered 
where foe emergency exits 
.were. 

Once in Florence, every- 
thing went like, clockwork, . 
proving my theory that 
Abroad is a place where 
thing s work. That doesn’t 
mean that England isn't a 
tourist attraction. It is heaven 
Itself for holiday makers as 
long as they are intrepid, 
which, fortunately for oar 
tourist industry, many of 
them are. They rave about 
ghastly country house hotels 
where foe Laura Ashley wall- 
paper is spongy with damp, 
foe bath water is a rusty 
trickle and sub-Sloane Rang- 
er waitresses get m a muddle 
with the vegetables. 

This sort of thing never 
happens Abroad, or at least in 
the sort of Abroad that I 
patronize, where foe switches 
for the bedside lamp are in 
exactly the right place. 

I am so enchanted by foe 
Florentine practicality that 
my -mind tends to wander 
away from the Bandinelli 
PfetA in foe church of 
Santissima Anmroziata and 
back to foe perfect Qttle rack 
for wooden spoons that I 
noticed in a shop in the via de 
PnccL 

The current Peed sensibly 
lives above the shop and the 
ground floor of his palace 
sells extraordinary Latex 
bodysuits in Hashing prints 
as well as his own brand of 
wine and mustard. The En- 
glish equivalent of Pncd 
would live in Virginia Water 
and always arrive late on 



( 


PENNY 

PERRICK 


) 


account of the tailback on the 

motorway. , .. 

Abroad, while I rhapsodize 
over it, is throbbing with 
Anglo philia. The most expen- 
sive boutiques are fall of an 
Italian fantasy of English 
style: beautifully cut tweed 
jackets, silk ties in regimental 
stripes and linen dresses 
whose upkeep would cost a 
fortune in laundry bills. This 
contrasts oddly with the 
wardrobe favoured by the 
average .British tourist — 
Crimplene trousers and a 
short-sleeved shirt through 
which a complicated system 
of underwear can be 
glimpsed. 

Young Florentines discuss 
Brideskeod Revisited as if the 
Flytes were their own distant 
relations, eat Weetabix for 
breakfast and long to be pot 
right on the psychological 
implications of the Tout of 
Beatrix Potter. For fall and 
frank discussions on Petrarch 
I may have to return to Earls 
Court 

One of the reasons the English 
arc so loved Abroad is that we 
spend money like drunken 
sailors. This* an Irish hotelier 
once told me. is in marked 
contrast to other nations, who 
do not feel that they have had 
a good lime unless they go 
home with at least half their 
holiday money intact. 

But there comes a time 
when even the most extrava- 
gant Englishwoman feels 
guiltv at the rate at which 
50.000 lire notes are falling 
through her fingers. Then, it is 
sensible to think of what it 
actually costs to stay in your 
home: the newspapers, the 
trips to Mark* ana Spencer. 
■ the cost . of naming the wash- 
ing machine: This dispels 
guilt so thoroughly that in no 
time at all you can contem- 
plate buying a third pair qf 
gloves, a cotton sweater ana 
several boxes of matron glace. 


Caught on the rehound 


f The exercise craze 

? ; failed to convert 

JLibby Pnrves — until 

_ she discovered the 

delights of bouncing 

back to fitness 

I have seen the future, and 
it bounces. Up and down, 
rebounding from floor to 
ceiling,' arms flailing, a silly 
grin on its face. I see it in foe 
hall mirror, three times a day; 
me, indulging myself in foe 
“exercise regime of the 
^ future”. After years of resisi- 
C ing jogging, despising squash. 

groaning at the idea of 
aerobics classes and turning 
up ax the swimming-baths just 
as they shut a new and 
cnchantingly dafiy way of 
getting exhausted has come 
my way. 

' I have bought a rebounder. 

* . A rebounder is a small 

round trampoline designed for 
domestic use; 40 inches in 
diameter, with a black poly- 
propylene mat and a padded 
red skirt to cover the springs. 
What you do is stand on it 
and bounce. Or you can tun 
on the spot your legs spring- 
ing up at every step, each bare 
foot striking the mat to 
*0? bounce aloft in its turn. Faster 
and faster you go, whoops, 
boing,- boing; you puff with 
effort but cannot bear to break 
the rhythm, happy as a baby 
on a big bouncy bed. 

Eventually you totter off, 
exhausted and giggling, your 
heart going like a trip-ham- 
mer, and realize that without 
pain or boredom, without 
getting into a pretentious track 
suit. or ringing iqj to book a 
squash court, you have done 
foe correct 1980s thing and 
aerated your heart and lungs. 
That is, you are well -aud-truly 
puffed. 

•fa’ Americans have had re- 
bounders since foe early Sev- 
enties; Ronald Reagan 
bounces daily. Yuppies have 
them in their “conversation 
pit" or patio, and Dr Henry 
Savage, MD, rebounds while 
watching foe news on “Good 
Morning America". I am in- 
debted for that last informa- 
tion to a. hilarious book called 
The Miracles of Rebound Ex- 
ercise by one Albert E Carter, 
of the National Institute of 
Reboundoiogy and Health, 
Inc* Mr Carter, together with 


□lira Gold 


Bakina 

'fht doj for J a 

bounce.-. 



G*t&. 


his horribly fit family of 
Darren (champion Kid Wres- 
tler), Melynda, Bonnie and 
Wen die. used to be a trampo- 
line act called the Gymnastics 
Fantastics, but now promotes 
rebounding. 

His book promises relief 
from all the usual things - 
backache, stress, fat. arthritis 
- and goes on at length about 
the lymphatic system, visual 
perception, and cell oxygen- 
ation. all of which he promises 
will improve beyond recogni- 
tion with a good daily bounce. 


s 


upervised therapuetic 
bouncing, he claims, has 
also helped literacy in 
backward students by harness- 
ing the G-foree impression on 
the brain cells: "The bottom of 
foe bounce is the point of 
learning". And, of course, it 
keeps you young. Albert him- 
self can do "100 one-arm 
push-ups at the age of forty”. 
It says a lot for foe innate 
qualities of the round thing in 
the hall that, even after trad- 
ing Mr Carter’s fearful book, I 
still loved it. 

Each morning, I leap on it in 
my dressing-gown and gently 
bounce myself awake. 1 stop 
typing and consider knotty 
problems at a measured jog, 
with no preparation other 
than kicking off my shoes. I 
supervise the children on the 


climbing-frame while at- 
tempting Albert’s “high-kick 
step", and when I get back 
from a night out I leap wildly 
up and down to re-oxygenate 
my alcohol-sodden cells. 

And foe stretchy mat re- 
sponds, gently or vigorously, 
flinging me up aloft in defi- 
ance of boring old gravity. It 
cheers me up. Bouncing has an 
utterly frivolous appeal which 
I have never found in any of 
the dour and self-conscious 
forms of exercise offered by 
foe puritan Eighties. Babies 
bounce in their cots, and 
children on tree-branches; it 
was time adults had some fun 
for a change. 

Exactly why these jolly re- 
bounders are not a major 
craze had been a bit of a 
mystery, until I rang an affable 
chap railed John Turville al 
PT Leisure, who supplied 
mine. The story of the bounc- 
er in Britain is of an exception- 
ally canny family business 
with a disiate fo the cure-all 
hype of the American market- 
ing men. Turville set out to 
make an equivalent of the best 
American unit for the British 
market, and went into produc- 
tion three years ago. 

“We thought there was no 
point jumping on a craze 
bandwagon, then burning out 
like skateboards or hula- 
hoops; so we derided to try 


making an exceptioanlly 
sirong, safe unit with triangu- 
lated gold Swedish springs, 
special grommets to stop them 
sawing through foe frame, and 
a mat with extra stitching — 
one that you couldn’t possibly 
“bottom out" on, hit the 
ground and injure yourself." 
Then they identified the least 
gimmicky market possible: 
the medical profession. After 
“making fools of themselves” 
by spending their whole ad- 
vertising budget of £10,000 in 
fitness magazines and going 
round shops, they began to 
attend physiotherapy confer- 
ences and turn up in the coffe- 
breaks with a couple of 
rebounders, asking foe thera- 
pists what uses they could 
make of them. . 

I he queues formed. Or- 
ders rolled in. A learned 
article on the uses of foe 
rebound er in “enhancing 
proprioception'* and “post- 
meniscectomy routines" ap- 
peared in a professional 
journal; and 100 health au- 
thorities in Britain have 
bought PT units. Even wheel- 
chair patients can have their 
feet placed on the mat while a 
therapist bounces. 

Turville has one in his 
office and uses it to dispel 
headaches. "Jockeys are very 
keen on them — Lester Piggot, 
and Bob Champion’s bought 
two - Terence Stamp has got 
one of ours; and David Owen. 
He apparently went into a 
shop for a tennis-racket and 
came out with a PT bouncer”, 
he says. 

The one sour note is that 
John Turville failed to find a 
British manufacturer to pro- 
duce rebounders. He tried five 
fabrication companies, and 
the best Britstii estimate 
would have doubled foe cost 
price and taken five limes as 
long to produce. So he turned, 
with regret, to Taiwan, and 
now flies there regularly to 
supervise quality control. 

“It could have been made 
Just in the next county, but 
Taiwan delivers our orders in 
six weeks, and the British 
firms all said four months. I 
have to say it: sheer laziness". 

Perhaps they should all get 
bouncing. It would put a 
spring in their step. 

PT Leisure. 57 Courthouse 
Road. Maidenhead. Berks 
10628 2884J). Cost is £59 or 
£69 including vat depending 
on size. 





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VrV.° 



THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 






THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Reserve 

option 

I have mixed feelings about 
Christie's role in saving for the 
nation Thomas Chippendale’s fur- 
niture at Nostell Priory near 
Wakefield in Yorkshire, the seat of 
Lord St Oswald. An article in the 
auctioneers' latest publicity bro- 
chure by Christopher Gilbert of 
Leeds Art Gallery argues that they 
played a key part m the rescue 
operation, the success of which 
was finally assured by a substan- 
tial government grant. It should be 
added that Christie's were also 
standing by eagerfy in the hope of 
auctioning the stuff. This could 
well have realized £15 million, of 
which they would have made a 
handsome £1.2 million in comm- 
ission. The brochure also says the 
rescue owed much to the advocacy 
of the then Arts Minister. Lord 
Gowrie, and the chairman of the 
National Heritage Memorial 
Fund, Lord Charteris. Yes, but 
again this is not the whole story. 
What about the efforts of the 
indefatigable lobbyist Hugh 
Leggatt, secretary of Heritage in 
Danger? j 

Doing a bunker 

David Owen has an obsession 
about Mrs Thatcher. It first took 
hold last autumn and surfaced 
again at the SDP conference in 
Southport this weekend. About 
nine months ago he con vi need 
himself that the lady was planning 
to do a Harold Wilson and resign 
while she was ahead of the game — 
“cut and run”, as he put it - 
leaving her successors to grapple 
with the party's mounting prob- 
lems. So toxic with the notion did 
the doctor become that it was only 
with difficulty that his aides dis- 
suaded him from stunning the 
party with it in his Christmas 
address. The Southport version 
represents a radical revision, and 
runs as follows; her scheme was 
ruined by the Westland affair 
after that' any resignation would 
have looked like a scuttle; now (a 
vivid clash of metaphors) she is 
compelled to stay on and will fight 
like an alley cat in a bunker. In my 
view Owen’s obsession clearly 
implies a fear that his great 
adversary may slip from his grasp 
before he has defeated her. 

Time tabled 

A groan of derision went up at the 
SDP conference when an or- 
ganizer announced that the pro- 
gramme was being shortened by 
30 minutes to give delegates a 
dear run for the 4 o'clock train to 
London. This evidence of the 
influence of the south of Watford 
contingent was not welcome. So 
Shirley Williams, in the chair, put 
it to the vote. Faced with the 
choice between an extra half- 
hour’s debating and a late return 
to NW 5, delegates overwhelm- 
ingly approved the early closure. 

BARRY FANTONI 


TUP TIMES, 

JOBLESS 

MORTGAGE 

CUT? 


Tm alright. My job is to dispossess 
the unemployed of their homes’ 


Holed up 


Rats in Moscow's Kutosovsky 
Prospekt, which houses the 
commercial and cultural sections 
of the British embassy, do nothing 
for Anglo-Soviet relations, accord- 
ing to a report by the Commons 
foreign affairs commit tee. The 
dilapidation, it says, is a “poor 
advertisement for British goods 
and services.” Elsewhere in the 
report, the all-party committee 
uiges the government to begin 
wide-ranging talks with the Krem- 
lin to break down mutual 
distrust — an idea unlikely to find 
favour with Mrs Thatcher, whose 
“Iron Lady” sobriquet was coined 
by Moscow because of her anti- 
Soviet views. It also urges a 
relaxation of the rule restricting 
British and Soviet diplomats to a 
25-mile radius of Moscow and 
London respectively. Given the 
Soviet desire to keep foreigners as 
far from Chernobyl as possible, 
that stands little chance of getting 
off the ground either. 

Low pressure 

More from the great May Day 
non-debate at the House. The 
story so far is that a group of Tory 
dries want it scrapped, with an 
extra day off grafted on to the 
spring bank holiday. In an amend- 
ment, three fellow Tories say it 
should be retained on the grounds 
that its unfailingly foul weather is 
a poignant warning of socialism's 
grim austerities. Now Labour's 
David Winnick has tabled an 
amendment to the amendment 
advancing the claim that the wet, 
miserable and cold weather is “a 
true reflection of the miseries 
suffered by so many as a result of 
the policies of this Tory a dmi n, 
istration.” No, Mr Winnick, the 
weather is a dubious metaphor for 
politics. Miserable and cold, per- 
haps. Wet, never. PHS 


Victim of his own success 


Anne Sofer 


X— >1 

ffrTZx* 


lan Botham's Test future, follow- 
ing his admission that he has 
regularly smoked marijuana, will 
be considered at Lord's today by 
the executive committee of the 
Test and County Cricket Board, 
under the chairmanship of Raman 
Subha Row. Botham's long record 
of being carpeted by the board will 
be of no help to him. 

In yesterday's Mail on Sunday 
article Botham referred to himself 
as being at times an “outrageous 
cricketer” who had lived hisa 
private life “with the same son of 
attitude.” There you have the 
man. On and off the field there are 
no half-measures. He can be both 
grotesque and charming, irresist- 
ibly dashing and utterly boorish. 

If the TCCB did not know until 
yesterday that he smoked mari- 
juana, it was in the minority 
among those closely connected 
with the game. But members of 
the board are great sweepers under 
the carpet. If they possibly can 
they warn a cricketer “as to his 
future conduct”. Now. after so 
often wishing “to state in the 
strongest possible terras their 
condemnation of any illegal use of 
drugs”, they may feel that threats 
are no longer enough. 

Botham must be wondering this 
morning whether his Test career is 
over. If it is. it will be a sad day. He 
has performed such deeds as have 
lifted the heart of a nation, and it 
can have been possible to say that 
of very few cricketers. 

He has been regularly in trouble 


John Woodcock traces the brilliant but 
stormy course of Ian Botham’s career which 
could end with today’s drugs hearing 


with the powers that be during the 
1980s. while touring Australia in 
1982/83 he was fined £250 for 
publicly criticizing an umpire. At 
a special meeting of the disci- 
plinary committee of the TCCB in 
April 1984 it was found that he 
“had broken his tour contract in 
making a public statement of a 
derogatory nature”. This was 
about conditions in Pakistan, 
where he had just toured. For that 
be was fined £1,000 and “given a 
severe reprimand and a strong 
warning as to bis future conduct”. 

It was after that same tour that 
the board was obliged to carry out 
“wide-ranging investigations into 
allegations contained in the Mail 
on Sunday of March 1 1. 1984, and 
other newspapers, relating to the 
behaviour of the England team 
involving allegations concerning 
the illegal use of drugs”. It is of 
some significance now that the 
board. while saying, 
equivocatingly, that it found “no 
evidence of any off-the-field 
behaviour which adversely af- 
fected performance on the field", 
ended its statement with a re- 
minder that it would renew in- 
quiries “should any significant 
new evidence be forthcoming”. 
Because of yesterday's article this 


could now be said to have 
happened. 

Again, on March 14 1985. the 
executive committee recom- 
mended that “no action should be 
taken against I.T. Botham follow- 
ing bis conviction for possessing 
2.19 grammes of cannabis”. It 
warned that in future any players 
involved in drug offences “would 
be subject to harsh penalties”. 
Then, in August 1985, the disci- 
plinary committee met to consider 
an incident during the Trent 
Bridge Test match against Austra- 
lia in which, to quote the TCXTB's 
statement. Botham was “guilty of 
misconduct on the field which the 
committee felt would bring the 
game into disrepute”. Botham was 
“reprimanded and warned that 
any repetition of this conduct 
would be likely to have serious 
repercussions for him”. Once, 
again he was able to leave Lord's, 
this time for the Oval, where be 
was playing for England next day, 
laughing behind his hand. 

If the board is to retain its 
credibility it is hard to see how it 
can let him off today with just 
another warning. It can terminate 
his registration as a first-class 
cricketer. What I imagine it will 
do, though, is suspend him from 


playing for England, making sure 
that it is fair in its severity and 
taking every account of the Saw as 
it relates to restraint of trade. The 
board may leave his county future 
to be decided by Somerset, to 
which he indirectly admits in 
yesterday's article to have lied tike 
a trooper concerning his drug- 
taking habits. 

It is wiser not to speculate on 
how many of Botham's well- 
known first-class colleagues will 
be thinking this morning “There, 
but for the grace of God, go I”. 
They will have had a nasty shock 
and a dose shave — and that can 
only be for the good. 

As a cricketer Botham has been 
tremendous. Every Test match he 
misses, while he is still young and 
fit enough to be in the England 
team. I shall feel deprived. He is a 
victim not only of the times but of 
his success and fame as weU. 

Life is hard on its heroes, not 
least in the way it thrusts i 
responsibilities upon them. Ian | 
Botham, still only 30, is within j 
two tantalizing wickets of passing 
Dennis Lillee's world record of 
355 Test wickets; he has scored 
4,577 runs for England and taken 
99 catches, many of them breath- 
taking. It will be little short of a 
tragedy if we have seen the last of 
him, a fact of which the executive 
committee will be conscious to- 
day — while remembering that no 
one is bigger than the game. 

The author is cricket correspon- 
dent of The Times. 


Michael Binyon assesses the effect of cuts on US military strategy 

Pincers on the Pentagon 


Washington 

Since President Reagan came to 
power the United States has 
gorged itself on a defence build-np 
unprecedented in peacetime. For 
five years it was applauded by 
Congress and the public. But this 
year, with the administration 
presenting a defence budget of 
$320 billion, the mood is very 
different The federal deficit is 
soaring to $200 billion and the 
Gramm-Rudman-Holling5 axe 
hangs over all government spend- 
ing. No target is more tempting to 
an anguished Congress than de- 
fence. 

As the battle begins, hard 
questions, brushed aside since 
1981, are being pressed: has the 
build-up been too fast? Has the 
Soviet threat been exaggerated? 
Has the Pentagon failed to set 
priorities? 

Congress is trying to slash 
programmes, draw in the reins. 
The euphoria over defence has 
given way to talk about cost and 
waste. The press has ridiculed the 
$600 lavatory seats, coffee-pots 
and ashtrays. Congressmen have 
angrily denounced the cost-goug- 
ing and over-charging by Penta- 
gon suppliers. Even the Rep- 
ublicans have distanced them- 
selves from Caspar Weinberger, 
the combative defence secretary, 
whose warnings that not a cent can 
be spared have lost their force on 
Capitol Hill with a periodic Penta- 
gon discovery of over-estimates 
! and money tucked away here and 
there. 

Reagan is fighting to protea 
what he sees as his great achieve- 
ment in sharpening the American 
eagle's talons. In February he went 
on television to denounce congres- 
sional moves to cut defence 
spending as “reckless, dangerous 
and wrong”. Last week he wrote to 
the Republican leader in the 
House of Representatives saying 
that its $285 billion limit would 
cripple the combat readiness of 
the US armed forces and put 
national security at risk. It would 
“tear down much of what we have 
built, together, these past five 
years . . 

Reagan insisted there was “no 
possibility” that significant im- 
provements in personnel and 
readiness could be sustained in the 
face of a $35 billion reduction. But 
influential voices disagreed. The 
Brookings Institution, the re- 
spected Washington think-tank, 
has just published a plan that 
would reduce the defence budget 
by $171.2 billion over four years. 
Moreover, claims Joshua Epstein, 
the plan's author, far from harm- 



ing America's defence, it would 
lead to leaner, fitter armed ser- 
vices more able to focus their 
resources on actual defence needs. 

Epstein finds six features of the 
Reagan budget that need scrutiny 
and which, he says, could lead to 
cuts in spending. 

• An exaggerated assessment of 
Soviet military power. 

• An under-assessment of US and 
allied military efforts which, when 
combined, have outstripped those 
of the Russians and their allies for 
the past two decades. 

• The adoption of strategies — 
maritime, for example— that, 
even if feasible, are inefficient in 
accomplishing basic military tasks 
and raise the ever-present risk of 
escalation. 

• Excessive growth rates in pro- 
grammes of doubtful urgency, 
such as “Star Wars”. 

• Wasteful redundancies, as 
exemplified by the bomber/cruise 
missile leg of the strategic triad. 

• Payment of uncompetitive 
prices to Pentagon contractors. 

The thrust of his argument — 


which is similar to those produced 
each year by the Brookings analo- 
gies — is that by pouring money 
into so many programmes all at 
once, the Pentagon has left itself 
ill-prepared for the inevitable lean 
times to come. A rising tide may 
lift all the boats at once, but an ebb 
tide leaves programmes essential 
to national security, such as 
combat-readiness, beached on the 
shore along with less urgent 
projects. 

This danger is all the worse this 
year because of the Grann- 
Rudman-Hol lings balanced bud- 
get law. Its across-the-board cuts 
mechanism will fall as heavily on 
defence as on domestic spending. 
But even in defence it will make 
no distinction between top-prior- 
ity programmes and others, slicing 
huge amounts off each. Even if, as 
seems likely, this law is eventually 
declared unconstitutional. Con- 
gress is still under great pressure to 
control and lower defence spend- 
ing. 

Epstein's alternative budget is 
based on what he defines as the 


Pentagon’s core missions — nu- 
clear deterrence and the con- 
ventional defence of Western 
Europe, the Gulf and South 
Korea, and of the sea and air lanes 
to these potential theatres of war. 

The defence of Western Europe 
is still the centre of US security 
policy, and further improvements 
should be made there. But he 
insists that the conventional mili- 
tary balance is really much more 
favourable to Nato than is gen- 
erally assumed. The number of 
divisions is less significant than 
their quality. Nato outspends the 
Warsaw Pact and enjoys tech- 
nological and defensive ad- 
vantages. America's allies are 
politically more reliable than the 
Russians'. Western troops are also 
better trained. Because of this 
Epstein emphasizes the im- 
portance of Nato’s frontline de- 
fence, rather than the admin- 
istration's push to apply high 
technology programmes for deep 
attacks into Eastern Europe. - 

On naval strategy, he opposes 
the expansion to a 15-carrier fleet, 
saying this is inadequate for the 
offensive strategy envisioned by 
the navy. A 12-carrier flea would 
be enough to secure the sea lanes if 
other effective tactics were used. 
“Killer” submarines — another 
component of the maritime strat- 
egy — are, he says, very expensive 
and potentially escalatory. 

Epstein’s critique would also cut 
back other cherished Reagan pro- 

S mes. The Strategic Defence 
ttive would be slowed down, 
with funding frozen at 1985 levels. 

A maximum 50 MX missiles 
would be deployed. 

Brookings analysis is unlikely to 
sway the Pentagon’s present 
course. Conservative critics have | 
already dismissed it as dangerous ; 
and ill-conceived. The rival right- 
wing Heritage Foundation insists 
that Soviet military spending — 
said by the CIA to have grown 
little since 1975 — has actually 
risen unabated, from about 12 per 
cent of Soviet gnp in 1970 to 21 
per cent last year. 

Nevertheless, the debate on US 
spending is inevitably leading to a 
debate on strategy. And the 
groundswell of opinion is now 
moving against the Pentagon’s 
more expensive programmes. The 
spectre of huge SDI development 
costs has led to a noticeable 
cooling of enthusiasm, even 
within the administration. Reagan 
will fight hard over the next few 
months to protea his build-up. 
But even his Republican allies are 
now bracing themselves for a 
levelling off if not actual cut, in 
the defence budget. 


Now Tamils too must ride the Tiger 


Colombo 

The minority Tamil community 
of Sri Lanka is terrified- In the 
north, the dream of a separate 
Tamil state has become a night- 
mare as armed guerillas have 
taken the place of security forces 
on the streets. The local people 
have been stunned by a shoot-out 
between the Tamil Eelam Libera- 
tion Army (Telo) and the rival 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. 
(LTTE). It was the latest in a series - 
of skirmishes between the two 
groups in which about 175 people 
have been killed. 

In the east the population has 
been restrained by the successes of 
the armed forces, including the 
British-trained Special Task Force 
of police commandos. The forces 
are able to move freely, normal 
government institutions function, 
but the retal iatory excesses of the 
soldiers and STF have created an 
atmosphere of hate. 

In the rest of the country, where 
Tamils live alongside the majority 
Sinhalese community, there is the 
fear of reprisals following recent 
bombings in Colombo. One Tamil 
bomb killed 17 people, including 
three Britons, when it exploded in 
an Air Lanka Tristar on the 
tarmac at Colombo airport. An- 
other killed 14 at Colombo's 
central telegraph office. . 

Tamil peace of mud » not 
enhanced when opposition Sinha- 


lese politicians declare — as the 
leader of the opposition did last 
week - that a third explosion 
would cause retaliation worse than 
that which resulted in the deaths 
of 3,000 Tamils in July 1983. 

Tamils in government offices 
have been sent on leave, or 
removed to positions where they 
may not threaten security. A bus 
carrying Tamils from the northern 
capital, Jaffna, was stoned just 
outside Colombo, and its pas- 
sengers taken to hospital. Tamil 
employees of the central telegraph 
office were beaten when they 
turned up for work after the 
bombing.“Anti-TamiJ hysteria 
has gripped public corporations 
and even some private instit- 
utions”. a Tamil lawyer told me. 

The security minister, Lalith 
Athulathmudali, has appealed to 
the Sinhalese not to allow a 
backlash to play into the terrorists’ 
hands, but President Jayawardene 
has threatened io “unleash the 
army” in the north if anything 
more happens. 

The president’s remarks have 
not been well received by the 
Indian government, which is try- 
ing to bring about a political 
solution to the crisis. Last week, 
the leader of an Indian delegation 
to Sri Lanka was impressed by the 
government's apparent readiness 
for compromise. More recently 


however. P. Shiv Shankar, India’s 
new minister for external affairs, 
spoke of “crucial gaps” in the 
proposals brought back from Co- 
lombo. 

Sri Lankans deny the existence 
of gaps, but add that if there are 
any they are there to provide room 
for negotiation. “Any prudent 
negotiator keeps something back”, 
I was told. “If we lay out our full 
position, the Indians will try to 
push us further”. 

Shiv Shankar identified the 
faults in the package as coming “in 
the formulation of core issues such 
as law and order, and on the 
nature of the relationship between 
the northern and eastern prov- 
inces. issues to which Tamils 
aitacb great importance.” 

The Sri Lankan government is 
ready to offer a police system in 
which provincial chief ministers 
w ould appoint a police chief from 
a cadre of deputy inspector- 
generals. The provincial police 
would operate independently of, 
but in co-operation with, central 
bodies such as a criminal 
investigasiion bureau. The dis- 
appointment arises from the pro- 
posal for a central overseeing of 
standards of recruitment, which 
could mean anything, or nothing. 

There are no proposals at 
present for institutional links be- 
tween the northern and eastern 
provinces, which for the Sinhalese 


would represent a step towards 
Eelam, the independent Tamil 
state they fear. 

Officials are now looking at the 
kind of cultural councils which 
join the Flemish and Walloon 
communities in Belgium. Such 
councils would provide a link 
between the Tamils of the north 
and east and might fulfil some of 
their aspirations. 

It might be possible to provide 
some general institutional struc- 
ture for inter-provincial connec- 
tions, but the central government 
is unlikely ever to allow the 
Tamils, who are in a technical 
minority in the eastern province, 
to dominate it completely. 

The battles in the north raise 
further questions. When Delhi 
finally puts to the Tamils what it 
calls “a package of proposals 
which are evaluated as constitut- 
ing a fair and reasonable basis for 
a negotiated settlement”, who will 
be left to negotiate with? 

“Anyone who will negotiate 
with us”, says Athulathmudali, 
bravely. With the Tigers wiping 
out all opposition they are likely to 
be the only ones left 

But the question is, can the. 
Tigers be forced to the negotiating 
table? And. if so, will they settle 
for anything less than Eelam? 

Michael Hamlyn 


Outflanking the 
tactical vote 


Friday was a bright sunny day in 
Southport and members of the 
SDP travelling up from the south 
' to our thrice-yearly council all felt 
our spirits rise. On the train we 
had been poring over the 
psephological analysis in The 
Economist which told us that we 
were doing better, and Labour 
worse, than the early media 
coverage of the local election 
results had implied. The Gallup 
poll in the Telegraph put the 
Alliance back at 32.5 per cent. 

At the civic reception that 
evening the outgoing Tory mayor 
of Seflon Council in a triumph of 
politeness and public spirit over 
political inclination, graciously 
welcomed us in a final act of civic 
duty before giving way to an 
Alliance successor. As we walked 
back to the hotel under a brilliant 
crescent moon, all things seemed 
possible. 

Even in the rainy realism of 
Saturday things looked pretty 
1 good, “Patchy” has been the word 
widely used about the Alliance 
performance in the local elections. 

■ ft is a grudging one. Those of us 
who were in the bad patches have 
perhaps been slow to realize how 
good and how widespread the 
good patches were. 

Take, for ins ranee, the Econo- 
mist analysis. On the returns for 
50 provincial towns (not necessar- 
ily our best territory), the Alliance 
is up by 4.3 per cent since May 
i 983, Labour is up by 2.7 per cent, 
and the Conservatives are 7.4 per 
cent down. 

What's more, since May 1 985 — 
when we were toasting our suc- 
cesses the length and breadth of 
the English counties — our vote is 
up by 1.2 per cent and Labour’s is 
down by 1.5 per cent. Even after 
Fulham, even against the strong 
Labour showing in the opinion 
polls, and even in areas where we 
are still clearly the third party 
(Preston and Derby are examples) 
our support is growing. 

But against this general back- 
ground of improvement there is 
another phenomenon which rep- 
resents both a boost and a threat to 
Alliance prospects and morale: the 
evident growth of tactical voting. 

This is illustrated well by what 
happened in the area 1 know best 
London. A Harris opinion poll for 
the London area a week before 
polling day, which was given wide 
publicity in press and television, 
gave the Alliance 19 per cent. We 
would be wiped out, it predicted, 
barely able to hold on to our one 
council, Richmond, and losing 
most of our 1982 gains elsewhere. 

In the event, of course, it could 
not have been more wrong. Not 
only did we have -a landslide 
victory in Richmond but we 
gained control of two other coun- 
cils as well. We had a total net gain 
of 95 seats in London as a whole, 
almost doubling our representa- 
tion. Seventy of these seats were 
captured from the Conservatives, 


but — perhaps even more signifi- 
cant. given the poll findings — 25 
were from Labour. 

Yet in many parts of London 
Alliance party workers felt deeply 
despondent the day after the 
elections. All those years of hard 
work, knocking on doors night 
after night, distributing leaflets* 
following up housing cases . . . all 
for nothing. No seats on the 
counciL an apparently unshiftahle 
third position in the share of the 
votes while up the road, in the 
next-door council with a different 
political composition, the same 
efforts had produced spectacular 
success. 

' The truth is that in London we 
seem to have developed three 
separate two-party systems: Alli- 
ance versus Conservative in the 
outer south-west suburbs; Labour 
versus Alliance in the old East 
End; and Labour versus Conser- 
vative in the rest. 

It is not all that cut and dried, of 
course. In some boroughs theru. 
has been the interesting spectacle 
. of Labour winning seals from the 
Conservatives on the suburban 
fringe and losing them to the 
Alliance in the decaying centre. In 
others the battle to be the main 
opposition remains unresolved. 
But none the less, a definite 
pattern is emerging. 

Even though tactical voting is 
overall bad news for both the 
Conservative and the- Labour 
parties, there will be no way to 
prevent individual candidates of 
both using the arguments for all 
they are worth in particular 
constituencies where it suits them 
as the general election 
approaches. In the Alliance, with^ 
most to gain, it will certainly be* 
the same. 

This growth of tactical voting 
will have one unexpected con- 
sequence: it will almost certainly 
strengthen the case for propor- 
tional representation. Even while 
the electorate goes along with the 
practice oof tactical voting it must 
surely develop a certain distaste 
for it. Why should people have to 
vote for a second best or even a 
second worst, rather than what 
they really want? 

A naive observer might even 
hope that a new understanding of 
the virtues of proportional 
representation would develop 
among the growing number of 
Labour and Conservative acti visls 
caught in the squeeze themselves.* 
Why should Tories in Islington, or 
socialists in Richmond, be forever 
unrepresented? 

Alas, mass conversions are un- 
likely: they would rather endure 
an infinity of local relegations 
than risk disturbing the national 
hegemony. But we must enfran- 
chise them, despite themselves. 
The new slogan for the campaign 
for PR should be “Abolish the 
tactical vote.” 

The author is a member of the SDP 
national counciL 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Our legal eagle 
goes hawking 


Legal Comer a lawyer answers 
some of your questions. 

Do yon think that being able to 
advertise will in any way cheapen 
the legal profession as far as 
solicitors are concerned? A. M, of 
Ealing. 

A laywer writes: Do you mean, 
by cheapen, make less expensive 
or make more vulgar? 

Well less expensive. 

A lawyer writer. It has always 
been our position that legal fees 
are as reasonable as they can be 
already. 

Perhaps, bat that doesn't an- 
swer my question. 

A lawyer writer. It will not 
exactly make solicitors' services 
cheaper, bat it win certainly make 
them more competitive. By the 
way, my name is Sam Kite, of 
Kite, Buzzard and Vulture, solici- 
tors. of 1 234 City Lane and we are 
here every day to help you! No 
case is too large or too small, too 
boring or loo disgusting! Just drop 
in and talk it over with one of our 
luscious lovelies at the front desk, 
and they’ll be glad to show yon 
their expertise! 

So it will make things more 
vulgar, then? 

.4 lawyer writes: T think I've 
answered that question already. 
Could we have another question 
from someone else, please. 

I notice that dog licences have now 
been removed from the statute 
book. Does this mean that my dog 
will now have to stop savaging 
sheep? N. S. of Leeds. 

A lawyer writes: That rather 
depends on whether you paid your 
dog licence in the first place. 

No, I didn't. 

A lawyer writes: Well, you are 
probably alright, then. But you 
have to remember that there are 
basically two kinds of law in 
Britain. There are those that are so 
difficult to administer that the 
police normally do not bother to 
bring prosecutions. And there are 
those for which it is so hand to get 
convictions that the police nor- 
mally do not bother to bring 
prosecutions. Dog licence offences 
come under both headings. Don't 
forget, by the way — Kite, Buzzard 
and Vulture! Always here to help 
you.’ Coffee, tea and biscuits for all 
callers! 

What's the position now about 
Sunday trading? f have a shop in 
London which is theoretically 
breaking the present regulations. I 
also have 129 branches throughout 
the country which are doing the 
same. Lord M of SW 3. 


A lawyer writer. Tricky one, 
this, your Lordship. What you 
have to remember is that there are 
basically two kinds of law in this 
country. There is the kind that was 
passed so long ago that nobody 
can now remember why it was 
passed. And there is the kind that 
was passed after half an hour’s 
debate in order to provide a 
panicky answer to some crisis. 
Under the second heading comes 
the Official Secrets Act the De- 
fence of the Realm Act, etc. If I 
were you, I would be on the safe- 
side and only sell secrets to the** 
Russians during pub opening 
hours. That should see you safe. 

What’s that got fo do with 
Sunday trading? 

A lawyer writes: Nothing Why 
not come along and see Kite, 
Buzzard and Vulture for a free 
lunch and get to know us better? 

I am being prosecuted for allowing 
my dog to savage sheep, although I 
have dearly instructed it on many 
occasions not to do so. What I 

7®*“° w hy are sheep not 

forcea to have a licence? What if 
my dog was savaged by a sheep? 

ST* 1 then? 

B. C. of Welshpool. 

A lawyer writes: It is always 
open io you as a private citizen to* 
takeout a private action against a 
fJ‘ ee P;. H °w e yer. I must remind 
you that British laws basically 
come in two kinds: those that 
someone to do something, 
and those that do no not. A pub is 
hcensed to sell beer, the BBC is 
‘■“"S? 1 “ import Americipr^ 
elc- * were you, i 
til? BBC 1 yOUr dOS OQ t0 a °r 

rZnJnJfl* recea Oy arrived in 
London I have no friends here. In 

meet People, I have taken 
iVS car slowly along 

kerte so that I cai talk to 

passerby. For same reason they 
fnr™ !iT Isb ** Wendly and serW* 

getting arrested. What can von 
suggest? B.V. of NW 3 ,0D 

problem 5 °f JW<r 
Absolutely no obiigaUonj. ° wmr ' 


< \ > \ h 

i • * 


cl 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Death threat to shipbuilding 


.The Top Salaries Review Body 
is a pure example of a style of 
solving political problems 
that, so we were once prora- 
ted, was.to be left behind with 
▼the ofljer bag and baggage of 
:1970s.’ corporatism. Eminent 
and gentlemanly am ateur s 
hear pleading and they gravely 
opine about the distribution of 
public money. The illusion is 
.that the: business is non- 
political when it is merely 
.non-partisan. 

■ Lord Plowden's committee 
survived the culling of the 
quangos. He survived the 
break-up of Professor Clegg’s 
apparatus. And now he returns 
each year to speak to ministers 
' in the old language of fairness, 
■^morale, chaps’ desserts. Last 
year his visit cost the job of 
one minister, the unlamented 
Mr Rees. It provoked Par- 
liamentary revolt 

■ Lord Plowden has visited 
.again. But this time, surely, the 
Prime \ Minister’s colleagues 
.have contributed to dis- 
cussion. This year, surely, the 
minister who will cany the 
-report to the floor of the 
-Commons has been briefed 
more soundly, than Mr Rees. 
This year, surely, the Govern- 
ment has a stronger argument 
*, io put before the people than 
^Sir Robert Armstrong's 
wistfulness or the penury of 
-‘ Lord Hailsbam in his old age. 

’ One of the tingsring myths 
of the last decade is that public 
rector pay can be decided by 
science, or at feast some 
-rigorous methodology of 
-comparison and assessment 
The myth is embedded in the 
Civil Service where (the Trea- 
sury encourages it) the general 


belief is that one day a system 
<>f “pay review” will again, be 
instituted to move - money 
immanently ftom taxpayer to 
official without the grubby 
intermediation of tickle poli- 
ticians. 

. This view has Its adherents 
in the other services, too. In 
teaching the cry is Bcrurbon — 
restoration of levels of pay 
once determined by Lord 
Houghton in Good King 
Harold’s golden day. In health , 
the pseudo-science of 
comparability is condoned by 
the Prime Minister who has 
retained committees paraiH 
to Lord Plowden’ s. ’ 

The feet is that comparison 
.between classes of employees 
in the public and private 
sectors is intellectually un- 
sound and probably impos- 
sible. Moreover it cuts light 
across the basic political lesson 
this government has tried to 
teach about the absolute 
dependence of public rector 
payments on the health of the 
. private economy. That does 
not mean civil servants* pay 
levels cannot be determined 
on the basis of principles (such 
as the need to recruit and 
retain staff of calibre) but that 
these principles may easily 
turn into short-run political 
considerations (prying nurses 
over the odds because it is an 
easy way of demonstrating 
that a government '‘cares” for 
the National Health Service). 

Public sector salaries are 
politically determined. The. 
very choice of comparison is 
value-laden. For example last 
year Lord Plowden proposed 
that Sir Robert Armstrong 
deserved £70,000, he may be 


held to deserve still more this 
yes*. Judging that is pre- 
eminently politician’s work. 
To . foist the onus on an 
amateur committee (as hap- 
pened last year) is cowardly. 

Assessmgthe value of public 
service is political because it 
raises profound questions 
about the way society is or- 
ganized and rewards distrib- 
uted. Because of that, it might 
be an activity.' that was wel- 
come or even enjoyable for a 
government sure of its market 
convictions and unafraid of 
anachronistic ideas of income 
distribution. There would be 
no shame in accepting that 
categories of civil servants,: 
among them tax inspectors 
and specialists, need substan- 
tial increases to keep them in 
post; likewise the judiciary. 

The easy way out this week 
when Lord Plowden will have 
to be publicly confronted is to 
take his figures: and massage 
them so that, the fractions do 
not- look ^unfair”. The easy 
justification .is that public 
service pay. is a political mat- 
ter, hence the -expedients -of 
politics always rule. 

The difficult path will be to 
accept controversial increases 
for top people because (for 
example) Plowden has found 
convincing evidence about 
productivity or dangerous 
signs of a haemorrhage of 
talent or even because it is 
time to give a sign of apprecia- 
tion to the State’s senior 
functionaries: the judgements 
are equally political The worst 
case this week would be for the 
Government to attempt some 
hole-and-corner decision, like 
last year, sneaked out in an 
unargued written answer. 


A CONFESSION ANOITS CONSEQUENCE 


On Friday the England cricket 
selectors included lan Botham 
amongst the team for the first 
, match of this summer’s series 
against India. On Saturday 
their selections were made 
known, under the usual em- 
bargo agreements, to sews 
agencies. Yesterday tire Mali 
Sunday printed £ long 
article by Botham in which the 
.Somerset and England afl- 
rounder confessed to the habit- 
ual use of marijuana. 

A few hours later the team - 
including Botham — was of- 
ficially announced. The selec- 
tors must have felt they had 
neither the time, the opportu- 
nity nor the responsibility to 
change their team selection in 
t the tight of the newspaper 
article. So today it fells to the 
executive committee of the 
Test and County Cricket 
Board to decide the matter. It 
will be better for English 
cricket and for England’s hero 
i if he is not in the side that 
: walks out at the Oval on 
'Saturday. 

The banishing of Botham 
•will . inevitably bring cries of 
" TouT* and worse. Some of the 
.complaints will have an ete- 


massive talent who has given a 
massive boost to cricket — a 
hero in every sporting sense of 
that word. And some people 
will forgive heroes anything. 

There is also the feefing that 
he Is being made a scapegoat 
for society’s failure to stop its 
young-people taking dnigs^In 
1967 a judge tried to make an 
example of. Botham’s friend 
Mick Jagger and was elo- 
quently criticised in The 
Times for doing so. 

These are the sorts of argu- 
ments that might comfort Ian 
Botham this morning and 
reinforce the determination of 
those who want England sim- 
ply to choose the best team to 
restore the country’s battered 
cricketing pride. They are not 
without force but they must be 
ngected. 

Botham’s article' yesterday 
gave an unexceptional account 
of how a young boy became 
drawn into the use of drugs by 
a high . society that smoked 
marijuana as lightly as it drank 
champagoe. Now, however, 
that he himself is becoming an. 
elder (if not a better), what is 
bis altitude? From yesterday’s 
apologia one does not know. 


degree of individual 
responsibility, for his private 
actions which he takes for his 
actions on the field of play. 
The term “hero” is modi 
abused in the sporting world. 
But that is one mark of a hero 

to accept responsibility and 
not always So expect total 
fairness m return. 

/- Botham is no unwillingidol 
for the nation's youth. He may 
complain about the press 
attention mi his private life but 
he encourages it— and accepts 
money for it — when it suits 
him. He is no more a victim of 
feme than was Mick Jagger. 
But there are important dif- 
ferences between the two 
cases. Jagger was on a criminal 
charge. Botham is being se- 
lected to play for England at 
cricket He has no right to play 
cricket for his country. The 
TCCB, on the other hand, has 
a duty to ensure that the 
reputation of the game is 
upheld. 

It may be that the board will 
have to cany out its duty. Its 
options include a temporary 
suspension, a permanent ban 
from test cricket or the re- 
moval of his registration as a 
first class player altogether. It 
would be be better for every- 


, cumpinis win nave H ■ fhat " 

merit of justification. Few He would be be better for every- 

-abseryers of the game (and few one*however, if^boaid did 

jams have closer observers) -“E*? 1 not have to make this choice 

: tot BoUiam is the *&-. ^ , eveD ^ ” today. Ian Botham has so far 

a‘:m!5var.euBi the most serious, on, y ?? incomplete 

- ■dna taker on the score-card, widespread as is auegeo, jome statemenl Q f jus case, under 

have . *0. * ho ™ more legal pressures that hairily 

teve a private life and responsibility than others. form the best conditions for 

' tRe Mail on Sunday article He should make it dear that calm and candid thinking. He 
-comes at the end of an be regrets the disrepute that he should give himself time to 
7 investigation which some will has brought upon ffimsejf and eqskin himself as 

feeTfflrare appropriate to cor- upon the game. He should the jaigonhas it, make himself 
nipt politicians than to high- disavow the use of illegal unavailable for England ser- 
soStS sSfliien. He is a drugs. He should take the vice until he has done so. 


spirited sportsmen. He is a drugs. He snorna me vi 

PARTY FALL-OUT 


made only an incomplete 
statement of his case, under 
legal pressures that hardly 
form the best conditions for 
ralm and candid thinking. He 
should give himse lf time to 
explain himself further and, as 
the jargon has it, make himself 
unavailable for England ser- 
vice until he Iras done so. 


: Moscow's official voice has 
. gained a new, more confident 
• tetie since Mr Gorbachov 
: spoke to the world last 
Wednesday about Chemobyl. 
. /The task of restoring con- 
V J f»ierice in nuclear energy. !S 
now well under way. Matching 

~ il in difficulty is another 
problem: how to persuade the 
/.Soviet population of me 
- benevolence of their Party 
' leadership when local Com- 
: inurims are being sacked for 
, rfteir incompetence * n 
tiling the accident and ns 
. TOtitrii 

^ There are some 20 reactors 
■*.of the Chernobyl RBMK type 
r. ia the Soviet Union - athCT 
" already operating or plannee 

i and under .construction. Most 

are dose to population centres, 
■four of them for example m 
Leningrad with five million 
^Staple nearby, ft is aii.veo’ 
vwd{ for Sbtietskaya Rossiya to 
^»Huik readers that storks will 
build their nest on 

- ’ Chernobyl rooftops* But 
l^sSSnlv before the disa^er.^ 
had rcportcd 'v'iofetio^ 
t of regulations at- several P 0 **" 
stations in IS 

Ofcraobyl iAi the 
for example, 

Torrid ; »36 “seftous 


deviations” in just one year. 
When they refused to pass the 
work, the chief construction 
engineers simply signed the 
document themselves, since 
they and the local Party were 
prepared to put plan targets 
before safety. 

Matters could improve. 
With Mr Gorbachov’s back- 
ing, the State Committee for 
Supervising Safe Working 
Practices in the Nuclear Power 
Industry may be given more 
teeth to ensure that slipshod 
practices are halted and . poor 
quality work made good what- 
ever the consequences for 
plans. However, this would 
run counter to present prac- 
tices, whereby local Party lead- 
ers are held responsible by the 
centre for their districts eco- 
nomic success: the temptation 

is to make things look good at 

least long enough to wm 
promotion to the next nmg of 
the ladder. .. 

Since the career of virtually 
every official, in ■ the 
neighbourhood including ecor 
nomic managers, trade union 
Kgggcg and- even journalists 
depends on the local. Party, 
dangerous practices frequently 
continue without any . public 


outcry until the Party suzerain 
either moves elsewhere or is 
disgraced for some political 
. indiscretion. 

It is therefore , the rule of a 
single party rather -than the 
shortcomings of Soviet science 
and technology which presents 

the greatest future danger. Mr 
Gorbachov does not intend to 
relinquish the Communist 
monopoly of power but he is 
prepared to allow more criti- 
cism of individual officials, 
especially those appointed un- 
der hispredecessor. 

Meanwhile, to improve the 
Communist image, the brave 
Russans and Ukrainians who 
.are .sacrificing themselves 
fighting the- consequences of 
the radiation leak are being 
.linked as closely as possible 
with tire Party. lt may be too 
late for those who have already 
suffered fetal radiation doses, 
such as the nuclear technolo- 
gist Alexander Lefecbenko and 
chief : fire man Leonid 
Telyatmkov, but last Friday 
Pravda gave front-page cover- 
age to two of lelechenko’s 
colleagues who found time 
(while fuHfflmg their vital 
duties) to apply for the honour 
of Party membership/ , 


From Sir Robert Atkinson , FEng 
Sir, The elimination and ultimate 
extinction of British ^upbuilding 
and marine engineering is HOW 
accelerating. The reasons are 
many and varied and would 
amply form the kernel of an 
inquiry. It is now too late to 
restore them, but it is not too fete 
to preserve and sustain them. 

This will not be done by present 
Government policies where politi- 
cal dogma prevails. It is agreed 
that- capacity reductions had to 
teke. place, due largely to the 
irresponsible capacity increases in 
the Far East followed by 
“dumping”. These reductions 
have been taking place steadily 
since "nationalisation but have 
gone beyond safety levels. 

It is plain feet that HM Govern- 
ment wanted rid of shipbuilding, 
exemplified by the sale of the 
warship yards and Swan Hunter. 
The elimina tion of a new me- 
dium-speed diesel engine (suitable 
for marine and non-manne use) 
ready for prototype building three 
years ago has laigely taken the UK 
out of marine engineering, with 
consequent terminal effect on 
Wall send and Greenock. 

The favourable treatment of 
Tlarland& Wolff at the expense of 
the north-east coast, is dearly for 
political reasons. HM Govern- 
ment continues to react to the 
developing sitiration because there 
is no dear policy for British 
shipbuilding (other than reduc- 
tion) and .a total absence of 
positive thinking . So when die 
Prime Minister states that the 
latest tranche of 3,500 redun- 
dances could not be avoided she 
is right; but she might have added 
that 'they could nave been pre- 
vented a HM Government had 
heeded earlier informed advice 
about the Hkdy effect on cus- 
tomers, employers and the unions 
of wholesale privatisation and 
sell-off 

However, as the Times leader of 
May IS states, it is fetile to look 
for scapegoats. But that does not 
mean that we shouldn't look for 
solutions — and solutions there 
are. 

. The first requirement is for a 
Government commitment to treat 


Chernobyl disaster 

From DrP. R. Rowland 
Sir, It is now overwhelmingly 
obvious that you do not, if you are 
sensible, make a reactor core or 
fuel cans of materials that can melt 
down. In this respect the British 
advanced ■ gas-cooled reactor 
(AGR) is better than the American 
pressurised water reactor (PWR) 
m that a high-temperature ac- 
cident might melt metal cans and 
uranium oxide fuel but these 
would not form a single, still 
critical molten mass. This is 
because the graphite moderator 
would not melt and would keep 
the elements (strings) separated in 
their individual channels. 

The situation in the PWR is 
much worse because the core 
contains only metals and uranium 
oxide feel, both meltable. Some 
melting is known to have occurred 
at Three Mile Island and it almost 
certainly took place at Chernobyl. 

The only reactor design in 
which the core is virtually 
unm el table is the high-tem- 
perature gas-cooled reactor 
(HTGR) exemplified by the late 


Single European Act 

From Professor AlA. Dashwood 
Sir. May 1 make three short points 
in response to correspondents who 
have expressed concern about the 
constitutional implications for the 
United Kingdom of the Single 
European Act? 

Hist, it is important to distin- 
guish between formal, sovereignty 
and practical power. The world is 
full of states which are sovereign 
in the most complete juridical 
sense but which have almost no 
control over their destinies. It is 
precisely to increase their chances 
of achieving vital economic and 
social goals that the members of 
the European Community accept 
curbs on their theoretical freedom 
of action. In the area of policy 
affected there is a pooling, rather 
than a loss, of individual sov- 
ereignties. 

Secondly, European Union 
must not be equated with a 
European super-state. Federal 


Privilege issue 

From MrKenneth G. Braidwood 
Sir, Viscount Rochdale, in his 
letter (May 14), seems to base his 
pejorative view of The Times's 
publication of the article by Mr 
Richard Evans and your leader 
(May 9) supporting that publica- 
tion on a spurious premiss. 

The assumption that “leaked 
information can only be regarded 
as tbe equivalent of stolen goods” 
is not well founded. Members of 
Parliament receive and discuss 
such information on our behalf, 
they do not have, title to it. There 
needs to be substantial justifica- 
tion 'Mien they wish to withhold 
that information from us. 

Our public and political ser- 
vants too often assume rights of 
privilege and secrecy which are 
unnecessary in practice and which 
undermine good government. I 
trust that The Times and other 
newspapers and reporters will 
continue to discount this un- 
wonted arrogance by their “leaks”. 
Yours sincerely, 

K. G. BRAIDWOOD, 

15 Pembroke Court, 

Edwardes Square, 

Kensington, w8. 

.May 14. 


the industry as a nationally strate- 
gic one and not as an old and 
dying one. Shipbuilding and ship- 
ping, although' very different in- 
dustries, are facing similar 
problems. The . Prime Minister 
knows wefi why the ready 
availability of both is vital. They 
both -need specialised attention 
and should be taken out of the 
“leviathan” Department of Trade 
and Industry, the combination of 
which is too complex. 

HM Government should, «»« , 
mo*.. Jfrmfy. declare a. state of 
emeigeuqy in these industries 
through the EEC and. OECD and 
their intention to sustain both. 
.There teno.real.hasis of compari- 
son with Sweden or Germany or 
with Fiance either. Is it too much 
to ask Mr Pym, Mr Heseltine or 
Sir Edward du Gann to assume 
this national responsibility since 
these, particular men are not 
totally motivated by political am- 
bition and do feel ter industry and 
-their country. 

By her personal and authori- 
tative intervention (and against 
the advice of certain ministers) the 
Prime Minister “bulldozed” 
through to British Shipbuilders 
important offshore oil and mer- 
chant ship orders. -Shehad a fed- 
for the situation on those occa- 
sions, as did Mr Tebbit when he so 
-successfully- intervened to-save a - 
deserving Smith's Dock at 
Middlesbrough. 

I beg ofhdr to do so again in the 
interest of our national security 
and the preservation of our na- 
tional skills, which took genera- 
tions to braid. I ask her to help 
again these industries which have 
served our nation so well and can 
do so again. 

Otherwise her next invitation to 
Sunderland will not be to perform 
the naming ceremony at a launch; 
it will be to attend the funeral of 
British ship building and marine 
engineering. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT ATKINSON, 

Southwood House, 

Itchen Abbas, 

Winchester, 

Hampshire, 

May 16. 

lamented OECD Dragon reactor 
experiment at Winfhth. This is 
because the fuel is embedded in 
myriads of tiny (1mm) silicon 
carbide (“carborundum”) parti- 
cles that will withstand accident 
temperatures, including a graph- 
ite-core fire should an unlikely 
series of events leadto loss ofboth 
inner and outer containment 

Unlike other reactors, all the 
materials that enter the core are 
not only high-temperature materi- 
als but are either chemically inert 
or chemically compatible with 
each other. It stands at the 
-opposite end of the safety spec- 
trum from Chernobyl with its 
water-reactor-in -a-graphite-core 
construction. The AGR and PWR 
are somewhere between. 

In a matter of this magnitude no 
second best can be morally accept- 
able. With the HTGR to be had, 
the Government must not be 
allowed to railroad us into the 
PWR. 

Yours etc, 

P. R. ROWLAND, 

76 Ruskin Walk, 

Dulwich, SE24. 

May 12. 


' models are ill adapted to the 
multifarious, polyglot reality that 
is Europe. The genius of the 
European Community is that it 
provides a framework for com- 
mon action without threatening 
the identity of our historic na- 
tions. The closer union to which 
both the EEC Treaty and the 
Single European Act look forward 
would be a development of that 
modeL 

Thirdly, the British reaction to 
the modest increase in the power 
of the Council of Ministers to 
adopt legislation by a qualified 
majority should not be defensive 
— quite the reverse. Our national 
interest in ensuring the rapid 
completion of the internal market 
far outweighs any conceivable 
harm from the occasional vote 
that may go against us. 

Yours faithfully, 

AJV. DASHWOOD, 

Faculty of Law, 

The University, 

Leicester. 

May 9. 

England’s hour 

From Mr Robert Kee 
Sirffhe truth about Leo Amery’s 
famous call to Arthur Greenwood 
is a little more complicated than 
you relate (Parliament, May 16) 
and illustrates the difficulty for the 
Speaker in giving a ruling about 
comments delivered from a sed- 
entary position. 

Fully to understand why Amery 
said what be did, it is necessary to 
know that it was in response to a 
number of other sedentary cries, 
all of which, if any, needed to go 
into Hansard. 

“What about Britain?”' and 
“Speak for the working classes!” 
came' from the Labour benches as 
Greenwood rose. ' 

"Speak for England!”, cried Leo 
Amoy. Which Greenwood did, 
pointing out that- “the very 
foundations -of our national 
honour” were imperilled by the 
Government’s failure to im- 
plement the Anglo-Potish Treaty 
38 hours after the German attack 
on Poland had automatically 
brought it into operation. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT KEE, 

82 Camberwell Grove, SE5. 

May 16.. 


Patient’s tribute 
to the NHS 

From Lord . Trend 
Sir, I have just emerged from St 
Thomas' Hospital where I had 
several weeks* opportunity to 
observe the National Health Ser- 
vice at work I cannot easily say 
how much, in the light of the 
experience, I support the letter of 
May 13 from 12 distinguished 
London consultants, headed by Dr 
Richard Thompson, whose pa- 
tient I had the good fortune to be. 

As a young officer in the 
Treasury tn 1945 I had a certain 
amount to do with the great 
programme of social reform in the 
years -immediately after the war, 
an# I realised, at The time, that of 
all the changes and innovations of 
those years the NHS was the most 
imaginative, the most enlightened 
and the most genuinely demo- * 
cratic. I have believed in it ever 
since; and it is appalling if it has 
now deteriorated to the condition 
described in the consultants* let- 
ter. 

It is no answer to them to say 
that the resources devoted to the 
NHS have already been increased 
very substantially. If so, they have 
simply not been increased enough. 
Nor is it acceptable to argue that 
the country cannot afford the 
'additional expenditure required to 
remedy or to anticipate the de- 
~ fidendes which the consultants 
-identify.— — - 

Given the current rate of eco- 
nomic growth and the margin of 
elasticity necessarily inherent in a 
total national budget at the 
present, level, this argument is 
patent nonsense. And, if we are 
told that extra resources for the 
NHS can only be found at the 
expense of corresponding reduc- 
tions in the provision for other 
services, we are entitled to reply 
that this is a matter of establishing 
priorities — the very essence of the 
politicians' proper function, pre- 
risely the thing which we pay them 
to do. 

In an earlier incarnation I have 
watched many Cabinets battling 
with this problem; and, difficult 
though it always is, it is never 
insoluble, given a sufficiency of 
political will But the British 

S mblic will not lightly foiget or 
orgive if that will is manifestly 
lacking and they are offered, 
instead, no more than the gross 
insult to both their intelligence 
and their humanity which is 
foreshadowed by the spokesmen 
of so many great London hos- 
pitals. 

Perhaps I have got it all wrong; 
.but 1 have written this letter in 
thanksgiving for all the help and 
comfort which I myself have 
' recently received from the NHS 
and in tribute to all those who will 
continue to look to it for relief 
from far greater suffering and 
distress. 

Yours truly, 

TREND. 

House of Lords. 

May 14. 

Irish agreement 

From Sir John Biggs-Davison MP 
for Epping Forest (Conservative) 

Sir, From your balance sheet of 
the Anglo-Irish Agreement (lead- 
ing article, May 12): “The Repub- 
lic has signed the European 
Convention on the Suppression of 
Terrorism” (not yet effective); 
“And the United States has 
pledged modest funds” (not re- 
ceived but a provocation to 
Unionists resentful of US interfer- 
ence). 

On the debit side: allowing the 
Republic “to represent the Roman 
Catholic minority in the north”. 
Apart from the erosion of sov- 
ereignty, what an insult to Catho- 
lic Unionists! 

In echoing official hostility to 
“integration” you are in effect 
saying, “Stay in your ghettos". It 
was not by fancy constitutional 
devices, institutionalising sectar- 
ian difference -but through equal 
citizenship under one parliament 
that old Irish quarrels were ended 
in great British cities. So could it 
be in Ulster. 

I remain, Sir, your most obedient 
servant, 

JOHN BIGGS-DAVISON, 

House of Commons. 

May 13. 

Helicopter link 

From Sir Peter Masefield 
Sir, For the first time in peace a 
much respected but obviously 
pressurised Secretary of State is, 
apparently, “minded to revoke" a 
formally granted licence for an 
established commercial air ser- 
vice: the Gaiwick/Heathrow heli- 
copter link. 

At a time when theGovemment 
powerfully advocates the de- 
regulation of transport, such an 
unprecedented regulatory action 
would halt a service which, during 
seven years of successful opera- 
tion, has generated more than 
£100 million of inter-line revenue 
for British airlines (75.3 per cent 
of it in foreign currency) while 
carrying more than 600,000 pas- 
sengers, contributing strongly to 
tiie competitive attractions of the 
chief British airports against those 
of their Continental rivals and 
upholding employment in an in- 
dustry of high technology. 

■ I trust that the Secretary of State 
for Transport will consider again 
the precedent which he would set 
and the damage which he would 
do to -industry before be decides to 
overturn the CAA licence and to 
regulate out of existence a shining 
example of national enterprise - 
and to do so in Industry Year. 

Yours faithfully. 
peter Masefield, 

Rosehill, 

Doods Way, 

Reigate, Surrey. 

May 9. 


ON THIS DAY 


MAY 19 1944 

Cassino and its monastery had 
held up the Allied northward ■ 
advance in Italy as earfy os 
February when troops of the US 
Fifth Army had reached its 
outskirts. The cutting of the Via 
CasiUna by British troops and the 
assaults cf the Poles to the north- 
| west wrenched from the Germans 
the fortress that had frustrated 
Allied efforts for so long. Our v 
i Special Correspondent was Philip 
Ure (1896-1975). 


DESOLATION OF 
CASSINO : r 

From Our Special ; _ 


INSIDE CASSINO, .May 18 

Hero “ a scene of utter desola- 
tion such as only this war can 
prodace. It is nearing noon, and the 
last Germans left this relic of a 
tortured town some few hours ago; 
they were prisoners. Their last 
stronghold — Hotel Continental — 
had gone up with a bang a little 
while before that; it was the final 
retreating blow that the Germans 
in Cassino struck. There were 
fewer than 30 prisoners taken in 
Cassino itself. Our man felt bitter 
about that “This ib the first time I 
have ever been able to- stand 
outside in the open air”, said one of 
them, “and now I have only seen 
ten Germans". . 7 

He had come into the open air to 
stand boh upright for the first time 
t.Hin morning; be had from a 
dug-out that was in the rubble of s 
battered house where the day was 
dark as night, and where only in 
the hours of darkness you dared . to 
crawl out so that the next section 
to bold the post might crawl in. 

A Kttie behind us is “the Crypt”. 
Its rightful ecclesiastical name — 
for it is below the chapel of a 
convent — remained relevant in the 
cruel circumstances of war. It had 
99 direct hits on it up to the arrival 
of British troops who took over 
about ten days ago; since then it 
has received 15 direct hits. 

They say that: nothing Wa than 

a direct hit from a 1,000 Ib bomb 
would penetrate the crypt That is 
some measure of the protection 
which the Germans enjoyed last 
March when the allied air forces 
bombed this town in the greatest 
strength ever , put on a target, of 
comparable size. The crypt inside 
and out might paw for any front- 
line soldier’s picture of a dug-ont. 
Its dangers were supremely the 
dangers of the front line itself one 
British sergeant whose head was 
visible in daylight above its en- 
trance for less than a second was 
killed. Eneiny snipers never left the 
spot uncovered. 

Today, in its remnants Of shat- 
tered walls, Cassino looks just as if 
it were mainly a series of caves in 
the hillside. Castle Hill, rising 
sheer within tbe town on its north 
side, stands like a steep crag, its 
pinnacle a jagged rock now unrec- 
ognizable as buildings. The castle 
itself had remained in our hands 
since the last part of March; below 
it the ruins of the houses were in 
the hands of the Germans. This, 
our own troops on the »op of Castle 
Hill were just above the Ge rman s, 
who in turn were only about 50 
yards from -another • line of our 
troops in the opposite direction 
towards the centre of the town and 
the River Rapido. 

One writes about “the centre of 
the town". Today it.is but a guess 
which or what was the centre of the 
town. Across there, there is a 
stinking quagmire with disabled 
trunks half buried in its mud, 
craters, dirty yellowish-green with 
the slime of stagnant water, blasted 
trees, gaunt remains of stone walls, 
a medley of twisted metal — all the 
mess and disarray of horror that 
comes in the chaos of ceaseless 
bombardment. That, we were told, 
was the centre of the town. 

Just outside the crypt was 
another crater; its muddy water 
had served as washing water — 
when purified by the medical 
officer — for a first-aid post within 
the crypt. The convent beside the 
crypt stood like a crazy house of 
cards about to collapse. 

In one of its walls was embedded 
a tank a reminder of the days when 
the New Zealanders had fought 
along this way. Soldiers who had 
known this scene only though the 
meagre slits of defensive sentry 
posts, were looking round freely 
this morning. They still moved 
warily, cautious of mines and traps. 
Ahead of us was a small sangar or 
pile of stones. Two men had been 
sitting there a few days ago when a 
German mortar shell buret exactly 
between them. 

High above the town the abbey 
stood like jagged spikes of rock on a 
hilltop; it was no more like any 
building than is a natural rugged 
peak of mountain, and yesterday it 
had been like a sullen smoking 
crater of some volcano. Today, ho 
longer in German hands, it seemed 
to nave regained almost something 
of peacefulness; at least it Was 

quiet. 

British troops looked down on us 
from the lesser height of Castle Hill 
and waved cheerfully. They are 
irrepressibly cheerful, these men 
who have endured so much with 
stolid, simple courage. (One of 
them is exploring a tank in the 

quagmire that may be the centre of 
the town, and shouts across that he 
has found an old wireless set. “See 
if you can get us any news” call out 
hie comrades like one man.) 


Going for gold 

From DrJ. Af. Longmore 

Sir. As Roy Hay poinis out (May 
10) 19S6 is proving a long and 
golden year for daffodils. One.' at 
the bottom of our garden, a King 
Alfred, measures 3ft and '.-'sin long 
(with its trumpet gently extended). 
Yours faithfully. 

J. M. LONGMORE, 

44 Ferring Street, 

Ferring. West Sussex. 

May 14. 


v -o ■ -*• 

5 =el 

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14 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


% 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
. May 1 7: The Queen this evening 
honoured the Newbury Spring 
Festival with her presence at the 
final concert for 1986 in St 
Nicolas Church. Newbuiv given 
by the Bournemouth Sinfonietta 
(Leader. Mr Ronald Thomas). 

The Queen was received by 
Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant 
for the Roval County of Berk- 
shire (Colonel the Hon Gordon 
Palmer), the Rector of St Nico- 
las Church (the Reverend Rich- 
ard Capslick) and the Artistic 
Director of the Festival (Mr 
John Wright). 

Lord and Lady Porchester 
(Chairman of the Festival) and 


Mr Robert Fellowes were in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
May 1 7: The Prince of Wales, 
President H MS Kelly Reunion 
.Association, this evening at- 
tended the Reunion Dinner held 
on board HMS President 
King's Reach. 

Lieutenant-Commander 
Richard Aylard. RN. was in 
attendance. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work ofMr Jon Harvey. 
QC- will be held in Gray's Inn 
Chapel today at 5. 1 5 pm. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Ian Howie. 
Chairman and co-founder of 
Merry down Wine will be held at 
the Parish Church of AJI Saints, 
Waldren, Healhfield. East Sus- 
sex. on Tuesday, May 27, 1986. 
at noon. 


Marriages 


Mr G.E. Atkinson-dark 
iiwri the Hon Sarah Elliott 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday in Hexham Abbey. 
Northumberland, of Mr George 
Atkinson-CIark. son of the late 
Mr Cecil Atkinson-CIark and 
Mrs Atkin son -Cl ark. of Poplar 
Cottage. WhixJev, North York- 
shire, and the ton Sarah Elliott, 
twin daughter of Lord and Lady 
Elliott of Morpeth, of Lipwood 
HalL Haydon Bridge, Northum- 
berland. The Rev Michael 
Middleton officiated, assisted 
bv the Rev Keith Fletcher. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Rupert Hodges, 
Edward Sowcrby. Victoria 
Britton and .Annabel Baker. Mr 
Antony Steel was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon will be spent 
abroad. 


Mr J.H.R. Dairymple Hamilton 
and Miss P.M.D. Metcalfe 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday at Holy Trinity 
Church, M inchi nharnpton, of 
Mr James Dairymple Hamilton, 
younger son of Captain North 
Dairymple Hamilton of 
Bargany. RN. and the late Hon 
Mrs Dairymple Hamilton, and 
Miss Pippa Metcalfe, only 
daughter of Major and Mrs 
David Metcalfe, of 
Minchinhampton. Gloucester- 
shire. The Rev David Yerbuigh 
and the Rev Edmund Haviland 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Hew Dairymple 
Hamilton. Alastair Dairymple. 
Georgina Callingham. Elizabeth 
and Victoria Shearman. Katie 
Dairymple Hamilton and Sarah 
Metcalfe. Sir Thomas Ingilby 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon will be spent 
abroad. 


Mr WJ. Wood 
and Miss T.M. Present 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday at St Mary's. 
Charlbury. of Mr William 
James Wood, younger son of the 
late Sir Frank Wood and of 
Lady Wood, of Hammersmith. 
London, and Miss Tonya Mary 
PinsenL younger daughter of Mr 
Michael PinsenL of Edgbaston, 
Birmingham, and Mrs Stella 
Pinsenu ofTrotton. Sussex. The 
Rev M. D. Chadwick officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her brother. Mr 
William PinsenL was attended 
by Katie Fish. Johanna Wood 
and Miss Jessica Legg. Mr Nigel 
Parker was best man. 


Mr T.G. Harding 
and Miss CSA. Harris 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday in the Chapel of St 
Cross. Winchester, of Mr Timo- 
thy Guy Harding, second son of 
Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter and 
Lady Harding, of ‘•Merlins". 
Okeford. Fiizpatne. DorseL and 


Miss Caroline Sarah Alexandra 
Harris, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs David Harris, of Denham 
Close. Winchester. Hampshire. 
Canon A. C- B. Deedes 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Michael and Philip 
Harding and Miss Kate Har- 
ding. Mr Stephen Harding was 
best man. 

A reception was held at Keats 
Restaurant. Amptlekf. and the 
honeymoon will be spent in the 
Greek Islands. 


Mr RJF. Francis 
and Miss A.E. Ashmore 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday at St Mary's, 
Sundridge. of Mr Richard Fran- 
cis. only son of the late Dr G. H. 
Francis and of Mrs G. M. 
Francis, of Sundridge, KenL and 
Miss Alison Ashmore, second 
daughter of Vice-Admiral Sir 
Peter and Lady Ashmore. 
Canon James Mansell offici- 
ated. assisted by the Rev 
Hamish Bozon. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
-.uended by Caroli ne 
McCracken. Mr Nigel Gavin 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon will be spent 
abroad. 


Mr A.W. Bird 

and Miss EC. Kehray-Bunber 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. May 17, at St John 
The EvangelisL Northington, of 
Mr Anthony Bird, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Anthony Bird, and 
Miss Emma Kelwav-Bamber, 
only daughter of the late 

Lieutenant-Colonel C.G. 
Kelwav-Bamber. and of Mrs 
Kelway-Bamber. The Rev C. R. 
Smiih officiated, assisted by 
Father Thomas Jordan. 

Mr C.E, Crichton 
and Miss Y.M. Proctor 
The marriage took place on May 
17. 1986. between Mr Charles 
Eric Crichton, eldest son of 
Wing Commander C. Crichton 
and Mrs Francoise B.de B. 
Crichton, and Miss Yvonne 
Margaret Proctor, youngest 
daughter of Mr Frank Proctor. 


Mr R.M. Kelly 
and Miss A. Achw-Stow 
The marriage 109k place on 
Saturday. May 10, in London, of 
Mr R. Martin Kelly, younger 
son of Mr and Mrs N. K. Kelly, 
of Bishop Burton. Yorkshire, 
and Miss Anna Acton-Slow, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
D. Acton-Stow, of Hever. Kent 


Mr E.N. Shrubsok 
and Mrs RS. Smith 
The marriage took place at St 
Peter's Church, Millbrook, New 
York State, on Saturday, May 
17. 1986. between Mr Eric 
Norman Shrubsole and Mrs 
Karin Susan Smith. 


Gifford Longley 


Subtle shift on women priests 


The Bishop of London. Dr Graham 
Leonard, has again warned the Church 
of England that it may soon be laced 
with a serious split this time indicating 
that he may accept a leading role hi it. 
He said on television on Saturday night 
that he hoped it would be an amicable 
separation rather than "storming oul" 

The key question on which the church 
might divide was the ordination of 
women. Dr Leonard said on Channel 4's 
Credo programme, though he was also 
concerned about liberalism in doctrine 
and the issues raised by the Bishop of 
Durham, the Right Rev David Jenkins. 

It was the fullest public account he 
has given so far of how he sees the 
situation developing and particularly 
his role in iL something he has 
previously avoided. He described three 
ways in which the issue of female 
ordination would divide the church: the 
consecration of a woman bishop 
abroad, the recognition of women 
priests from abroad in England, and the 
ordination of women priests in England. 

The first has already been proposed in 
America, the second will be before the 
General Synod of the Church of 
England in July, and the third is now in 
preparation but unlikely to happen 
before 1990. There will be a debate on 
certain details also in July. 

He also predicted a major realign- 
ment in all the churches, “perhaps on 
the scale of the Reformation" between 
traditionalists and liberals. But this may 
not happen m his lifetime. Pressed by 
the interviewer, Mr John Stapleton, to 
say whether the Bishop of Durham's 
views were “unchristian" he said tech- 
nically that was true “but not in the 
popular sense." A purely spiritual 
concept of the Resurrection, which did 
not assert that Jesus rose bodily, did not 
reflect what the church proclaimed in 
the Creeds. 

Dr Leonard was very guarded about 


Birthdays today 

Mr Mark Boxer. 55: Brigadier 
Sir Frederick Coates. 70; Mr 
Lionel Hardwick, 82: Sir Harold 
Himsworth. 81; Baroness 
Hylton-Foster. 78; Mr David 
Jacobs. 60: Air Chief Marshal 
Sir Thomas Kennedy, 58; Mr 
Noel Mander. 74: Sir Edward 
Parkes, 60; Sir Kenneth Preston, 
85; Sir Michael Scott, 63; Lady 
Sempill, 66; Sir James Steel 77; 
Mr Pete Townshend. 41; Mr 
Sandy Wilson, 62; Miss Victoria 
Wood. 33. 


his role in any formal split in the Church 
of England over female ordination. He 
would not take an initiative because he 
was "not prepared 10 leave the Church 
of England wholly in ihe hands of the 
liberals." and he saw his dupr as calling 
the church to “come 10 mind what it 
actually stands for, what it believes, 
what its own formulae are." 

He was trying to offer positive 
guidance, and 'not prepared to give a 
lead which would be tantamount to 
walking out and saying “to hell with the 
lot of you." He did not want to go off 
and try to run a little show of his own. 

"1 mean 1 still hope that there will be 
good common sense on both sides, that 
it would be some form of amicable 
separation, rather than one side actually 
storming oul on its own in a unilateral 
sort of way." Dr Leonard added: “That 
may be too much to hope for_". What 
he wanted to avoid at all cost was 
walking out with a holier-than-thou 
attitude. 

"I don't want to give the impression 
that I am now going to lead a breakaway 
movement. 1 don't believe that's the 
way you resolve this issue.” Bui if it 
existed. Mr Stapleton asked, “Would 
you like them to come to you?” Dr 
Leonard replied; “If it's there, yes, 
naturally, yes." 

The Bishop of London is now 
compiling a register of all those clergy 
and Anglican laity who want to asso- 
ciate themselves with his position over 
female ordination and advertisements 
have been placed in the press. A mailing 
list of this kind could well become a 
movement and even in due course a 
movement which went its separate way. 

The bishop’s reluctance to lead h that 
way is explained by the belief that to 
cause schism in the church is always 
wrong - schismatic is a word almost as 
loaded as heretic. 

So he would have to be able to show 


that it was actually the rest of the 
Church of England which broke away, 
went into schism, leaving him and 
others still where they were. That is why 
American Anglicans who have separat- 
ed from the Episcopal Church of the 
United States over female ordination 
call themselves a “continuing^ church, 
meaning the rest have discontinued. 

The evidence from other sources is 
that opponents of women priests are 
already preparing the ground for this 
situation- Legislation is being drafted to 
allow female ordination in the Church 
- of England, and a crucial detail will be 
the so-called “conscience clause” to 
allow opponents to opt oul It is 
expected to allow that whole parishes, 
even whole dioceses, will become “no- 
go" areas for women priests. 

A great deal of controversy will be 
generated by the desire of some clergy 
for financial compensation, for those 
who feel they may have to resign from 
their livings rather than co-exist with 
women priests. If they have their 
parishes behind them, the entire parish 
may want to resign from the church too 
(or as they would put ii continue as the 
true church while the rest departs.) 

In that event the general synod will 
have to decide what property if any they 
may take with them, in particular 
whether they may take church buildings 
and endowments. There is an active 
lobby at work to see the legislation 
allows for this. 

These efforts are undoubtedly partly 
tactical, as are the warnings of the 
Bishop of London: they are meant to 
frighten the general synod into thinking 


the game is not worth the candle. But 
there is a gradual subtle shift taking 
place in such quarters from “if* to 
“when”, a shift which was apparent in 
the Bishop of London's interview in 
comparison with his earlier thoughts. 


Christening 

The infant son of Mr Rodney 
and Lady Jane Led ward was 
christened Bertie Arthur 
Ruthven at St Paul’s Church, 
Sandgate. by the Very Rev 
Robert Holtby, Dean of Chich- 
ester. assisted by the Rev E. 
Bath. The godparents are the 
Hon Philip Howard. Professor 
James Jones. Dr Jeremy Oats. 
Mr John Johnson (for whom Mr 
Alexander Hicks stood proxy). 
Miss Gemma Seth -Smith and 
Mrs David Martin. 


St Paul's Girls’ 
School 

The following Foundation 
Awards are announced to take 
effect from September 1986: 

Senior scholarship Emma Obion. 
Senior Exhibitions Fiona Arnold. 
Camilla Buckley. Philippa Hamilton. 
Philippa westbury. 

Junior Foundation. Awards: Jessica 
Eastwood. Amelia Gentleman. 
Melanie Klein. 

Highly commended: Catherine 
Brunner. 

Senior music scholarship: Elisabeth Si 
Clair (Putney High School). 

An Award: Katharine Morris. 
PEOXime: Claire Bennie. 


Luncheon 

Shrievalty of Humberside 
Former High Sheriffs living in 
the County of Humberside 
entertained the High Sheriff of 
Humberside and Mrs Letten at 
luncheon at Burton Constable 
yesterday. Mr Norman Jackson 
presided and those present 
included: 

Mr Anthony and Lady Jane Bethcli. 
Captain and the Hon Mis Annus 
Kikiyard. Mrs Norman Jackson. Mr 
Godfrey FBtiet: Mr and Mrs John 
Chichester Constable. Mr and Mrs 
Richard Bellamy. Mr and Mrs Stephen 
Hail. Mrs Robert Ho liny. Mr and Mrs 
David Add«on. Mr and Mrs James 
Gordon. Mr and Mrs Joseph 
Goodhan. Captain Jeremy Owes and 


Major and 


Roland Bellamy 



. «■•* * ‘A. 

• *7 A 


The Rev Albert Humphrey celebrated his fumdredtfa birthday yesterday at St John die Bap- 
tist church is Pawlett Somerset, by preaching the sermon. Mr Humphrey, who was or- 
dained in St Paul's Cathedral 73 years ago, retired to Pawlett in 1974. 


Parliament 
this week 

Commons: Today t2.30i; Social Se- 
curity Bill, progress on remaining 
stages. 

Tomorrow 12-X3K Social Security Bin. 
completion of remaining stage*. De- 
bate on motion from Privileges 
Committee to exclude reporter tram 
Tkr T 1 niff from Ihe House of Com- 
mons. 

Wednesday <2.301: Legal Aid (Scot- 
land i Bill, second reading- Debate on 
the shipbuilding Industry. 

Thursday <2.30i. Sex Discrimination 
Bill, second reading. 

Friday <9.30>: Spring adjournment 
debates. 

Lords: Today 12.30]: Gas BtiL commit- 
tee. fourth day 

Tomorrow <2 30r. Education BIIL 
report stage. 

Wednesday (2.30 1: Debate on the 
water industry 

Thursday • 1 1 1: Afrpons BUI. com mil- 
ler. second day 


University news 

Oxford 

ST EDMUND'S HALL _ 

Dec Uon. George Michael Reed. BSC. 
MS. PHD lAuttum'. Professor Of 
Computer Science Ohio. Ip Oie 
General Electric Company Tutorial 
Fellowship in Compulation. 

Stirliag 

Mr Hanoson Msuka. tecuturrr In 
Engitsh. Chancellor GoUege. Univer- 
sity of Malawi, has been awarded a 
Common wealth Academic Staff 
scholarship lo study at the university 
from September 1986. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Births, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS and IN MEMORIAM 
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remUDHUIlB HUBUGES. WHUMKS 

etc on Court and Social Page £8 a Baa 
+ 15% VAT. 

Couri and Social Page announce- 
ments can noi be ac c epted bv 
telephone Enquiries to: SI-622 9953 
latter I0..30aim. or send UK 
1. P a wMgniu Sinai Lsadoa El. 


Aiuf It*" SPtril «l I hi- LORD will ram. 
upon ihfr. diid inou *rviii m* iurnc«j 
lliln anuJhrr m.m 

I Samurt I O 


BIRTHS 


COR3ALLY on May ism at St 
George's Hospital lo Louise inw 
Johnston) and John, * daughter. 
Emma, a sister for Robert and 
Margaret. 

DAHNREUTHCR on tothMay 1986. at 
Gleneagtes Hospital Singapore to 
Heather inee Oaruejand David a son 
Rupert John 

GINGELL - On 1st May at the John 
Radcliffc. Oxford, lo NKtwias and 
Anne mw Simpson) a son. George 
Frederick, a brother lo Augustus and 
William. 

UUHBRfCK on May «ui lo CaiafUa 
mec Huxley i and George a daughter 
Frances Hope, a sister for Gabrfetie 

MACLEOD on May 16th at Ihe Queen 
Mother's Hospital- Glasgow, to 
Hilary inee Burford) and lain, a son. 
Robert, a brother /or Alexander. 

MOW On 25lh April, at Sevenoaks 
Hospital to Pamela and Hugh, a 
daughter Victoria Anne, a ssier to 
Sluarl Cameron. 

NORTH - On May 13th at St Thomas'. 
Hospital, lo Fiona *nee Smyth* and 
Christopher, a son Oliver Jach- 

P HELPS on X4th May to Paula tnee 
Keep) and Simon a beautiful da ugh 
ter Laura Catherine 


SHOW On May 1 6th to Unda titee 
Grout) and Paul, a daughter. Char- 
lotte Margaret, a sister for Alec. 

W ALFORD On 8Ut May 1986 lo John 
and Lynn tnee Pumeili a daughter. 
Imogen Amy Olive. 


DEATHS 


ATKINS on May lSlh very suddenly 
Freda Akins (nee Bamfordi. beloved 
wife of the tale Ian AiUlns and dearly 
loved mother of Rooert and Sally, 
and grandmother of Ben. Elizabeth 
and tan. Funeral Service at St. 
Peter's Church. Chertsey 11 am 
Thursday 22nd May. fallowed by 
private cremation. Family flowers 
only please 


’ on 16th May al SI Thomas's 
Hospital Moira Barry of 30 Cardigan 
Street. SEl 1. Requiem Mass 2.00 pm 
Thursday 22nd May al SL Anne's. 
Kenmngian Lane. Ail family and 
friends welcome. 

BATSTONE On 16th May. 1966. 
peacefully after a long Illness borne 
with great fortitude. John Harold 
Franh Batsione f.BC.S. aged 61 
years. Much loved husband of Hilary 
and dear father of William. Tim and 
Rose. FUneral Service. St Lukes 
Church. Svdney Street. Chelsea 
swj. on Wednesday 2ist May at 
2 IS p.m. Followed by cremation. 
Flowers and enquiries to J H Kenyon 
Ud. 49 Marloes Rd. W8 or Donations 
lo Parkinsons Disease Association. 

CALLAGHAN • ErKk Kenneth Frances 
Callaghan. Church warden of St 
Margaret's. Westminster. Funeral 
private Memorial service at St 
Margaret 12th June 1986 at 6pm. 
Cut Flowers only Mease lo church. 

CA5PAMUS - May 16Ui In Barnet 
Hospital. Hans Gustav, aged 86 after 
a short illness, peaceful ty wttn 
humour and courage. 

MNGJSrd May. Margaret (Nte Mads 
of Shanghai! gifted ballerina, arust. 
after a long illness. The funeral took 
Place al tne British cemetery in La- 
ban on 5tn May. 

DUTTON on May 16(h 1986 Reginald 
James Dution OB E. aged 83. For- 
merly of Winchester, peacefully at 
home at Tolland. Isle of Wight alter a 
long illness Beloved husband of Bar- 
bara. rather of Elizabeth Le BrechL 
Michael. John and Trtoa Palmer 
Service at Isle of Wight Crematori- 
um. 1 1 am Thursday Mav 22nd No 
flowers, donations If wished to Ten- 
nyson Memorial Ambulance. C o 
Lloyds Bank. Freshwater 

HARDY - On May 16th 1086. peaceful- 
ly al Sandlmg Park. Hyihr. KenL 
Major Arthur Evelyn Kanly V.M H 
aged 92 years. Funeral service at 
Sainvood Parish Church, on Thurs- 
day May 22nd 1966. al 2-00 pm. 


HOARS on t6Ui May. 1986 suddenly 
at Cow drays. East H end red. Susan 
Honor Nixon Koare aged 73. The be- 
loved wife of the iaie Michael W 
Hoar* of South India. Dearly loved 
mother of Juliet. Penny. Margie and 
Tony and sister of John. A beloved 
grandmother 

KING on 1 5th May 1986. peacefully at 
Chichester. Kathleen in her SOth 
year. Dearly loved by her husband 
Ronald, her children and their fam 
ilies Formerly of Bryansloo and 
Stourpatnc. Dorset 

MATTHEW on May 14th 1986 peace- 
fully al Chesterton House. 
Cirencester. Edith, aged 97 years. 
Widow of Owen Matthew, greadv 
toved mother of Winna. David and 
Nancy, beloved grandmother and 
great grandmother. Funeral service 
at Cirencester Parish Church. Friday 
May 23rd at 2 p.m. followed by cre- 
mation Flowers and e natures lo 
Packer and Slade. Funeral Directors. 
1 City Bank Rd. Cirencester. Tel: 
Cirencester 3525 

MCHAEXJSon May Ulh 1986 peace- 
fully In Kaywanxs Heath Hospital 
aged 85 yean. Waller (Micky >. Be- 
loved by his wife Maione and all tits 
family. Service at Surrey and Sussex 
Crematorium. Worth al 3 45 pm on 
Wednesday May 21st. Family now- 
ers only please but donations if 
desired lo Cancer Research, c. o J & 
R Matthews 8 Church SL CuOjjeJd. 
Sussex 


SAMUEL 

Samuel. 
Israel In 


- Hada&sah Viscountess 
' on ir 
year. 


SCNOLES on May I6lh al Bedford. 
Edwin Reginald, beloved former hus- 
band of Genevieve am) beloved 
lather of William and Anne and Fa- 
iher-in-Law of Yvonne and John 
Enquires lo Ctaraout and Plumoe. 
fffngsway. Bedford. Tel <02341 
54547 

SB. VET on May 1 6th suddenly al 1. 
Honeycomb* Cottage. Weare 
Glffarri. Baleford Vera Helen aged 
87 Funeral service at Holy Trimly 
Church. Wear* GUTard on Thursday 
May 22nd at 2 0Opm followed by 
cremation. Family flowers only Do- 
ra nons If wished to Weare Gifford 
Church. C O Reuor. 

STRONG - on May I6ih. at Memcn. 
LI Col Charles Strong O.B.E.. late of 
Ihe York and Lancaster Regimen i. 
beloved husband of Joan, and 
dearest father of Juliet. Adele and 
Soma Funeral, with Holy Commu- 
nion. al All Saints Church. Memos. 
Somerset, al 1 2-00 on Saturday 241h 
May Family flowers only. 

WARWICK - On May 15th peacefully 
in Harrogate. Duloe Joan, aged 96. 
widow of Colonel Philip H. Warwick 
DS.O. Mother of Barbara and 
Derick . grandmother and great 
grandmother. Funeral private Dona- 
tions. ii desired, to S.S.AJ. 
Association. T.A Centre. Triumph 
Road. Nottingham. 


WATSON on 15th May 1986. peaceful- 
ly alter a short illness. Phyllis teette. 
devoted wife of Roy. much loved 
mother of Louise and David, loved 
bv all who knew her Funeral Ser- 
vice al Ihe Cambridge city 
Crematorium. Huntington Road. 
MaoinglV on Friday 23rd May al 
4.00 pm 

WILLIAMS On May HK sleeping 
tranquilly alter a long Illness, borne 
with characteristic fortitude. Monica, 
aged 72. very much loved wtfe of 
Johnny Williams. 51 Campden 
Street. W8. Funeral private, no flow- 
ers please, but donations if dnired to 
Chepstow L'mL Paddington Commu- 
nity Hospital. 7A woodfteM Road. 
London W9. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


LONGMRE A Sen ice of Thanksgiving 
for the life of John Longimre (1902 - 
1 966- w«U beheld at the Church of St 
Sepulchre Without Newgate. Hrt- 
born viaduci ECl. on Saturday May 
31st at it IS am. 

MACPMERSON. A service of thanks- 
giving for ihe Irves of Tim. Mouse 
and Iona Macpherson will be held al 
Si Mary Magdetene Parish Church. 
Newark on-Tremon 1 2th June al 12 
noon All friends and colleagues will 
be welcome. 

VAF1AD1S - The Memorial Service for 
Manus Vafiadts will be held at The 
Russian Church. Enmsmore Gar- 
dens. London SW7. on Tuesday 20th 
May at 6 15pm. 

WILKES A Memorial Service for Ihe 
Reverend John Vaughan Wilkes will 
be held in Radley College Chapel at 
12 noon on Saturday, t-ih June. 

WREN - The Funeral of the late Wilfrid 
John Wren miii be on ?isi May. 
Pennant Melangell. LLangynog 
Powys al 2.30. Family flowers. If de 
■stred donations lo the New Lowestoft 
Lifeboat Fund, c o R Rived Ltd. 15 
Canton Road. Lowest oft. KR33 
ORL A service of thanksgiving for 
his life will be held in St Margaret's 
Church. Lowestoft, on Sunday 15Ui 
June al 3pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


GAIN Murdoch. 19th May I9SS. aged 
31. The children and l mist you. for- 
ever u> our thoughts Laura. Emits' 
and Eleanor. 

NICHOLSON William Lothian - May 
1 9th 1972. Remembered with love. 
Nora and family. 

THOMPSON Janet Marian St. 
dement Danes 18th May 1936 and 
forever. 


Mr O.M. Sells 
and Miss U. Mackwortb- 
Yoirag 

The engagement is announced 
between Oliver, son of Sir 
David and Lady Sells, of 
Tadlow House. Royston, 
Hertfordshire, and Lucinda, 
daughter of the Iaie Mr G- W. 
Mackworth-Young and of Mrs 
Eve Mackworth-Young, of 
Fisherton de ia Mere, Wylye, 
Wiltshire. 

MrEJ.H. Archer 
and Miss KJ. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs R. W. Archer, of 
Ware, Hertfordshire, and Katy, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
D. C. Jones, of Frarapton 
Mansell Gloucestershire. 

Mr J J). Barclay 
and Miss N. Babikrishnan 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr and 
Mrs David M. Barclay, of 
Souihsea. Hampshire, and 
Nina, daughter of the Iaie 
Commander C. K. Balakrishnan 
and Mrs Balakrishnan, of Win- 
chester, Hampshire. 

Mr R.V. Bootb-Jones 
and Miss S. PI am 
The engagement is announced 
between Roderick Vernon, son 
of Major Charles Boolh-Jones, 
of Monkton DeveriU. Wiltshire, 
and of Mrs Louise Boolh-Jones. 
of Holland Park. London, and 
Sarah, elder daughter of Mr 
Stephen H. Plum, of San Anto- 
nio. Texas, and of Mrs Elizabeth 
Co* Plum, of Kensington. 
London. 

Mr J.D.G. Carey 
and Miss L.M.L. Guy 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeffrey, only son of 
Major David Carey and the late 
Mrs E. M. Care>, of Chobhara. 
and Lavinia. elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Robin Guy, of 
Jesus Pobre. Alicante. Spain. 


Mr AJ- Charming 
and Miss JJVL Barrass 

The engagement is announced 
between Antony John, only son 
of Mr and Mrs H. J. T. 
Chancing, of Guernsey, and Jill 
Margaret, only daughter of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs E 
B. Barrass, of Tunbridge Wells. 


Mr R.G. Short 
and Miss AJV. Khan 

The engagement is announced 
between Guy. son of Mr M. J. E 
Short, of Sharjah, United Arab 
Emirates, and Mrs J. G Short, of 
Winchester, and Amanda, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs H. N. 
Khan, of Ham Manor, Cob ham. 
Surrey. 

Dr C J. Watldns 
and Miss H. Bishop 

The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, only son 
of the late Rev Arthur and Mrs 
Watkins, and Helen, twin 
daughter of Canon and Mrs 
David Bishop, of Norwich. 

Mr C.M. Williams 
aid Miss D.L Rivers 

The engagement is announced 
between Chris, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Owen Williams, of 
Burchetts Green, Berkshire, and 
Debbie, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Jeremy Rivers, of 
Waterloo, Belgium, formed y of 
Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire. 

Mr P. Wlnchcorabe 
and Miss N.R.H. Leech 

The engagement is announced 
between Patrick, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs F. J. Wmchcombe. of 
Swindon, Wiltshire, and Nicky, 
younger daughter of Judge Rob- 
ert Leech and Mrs Leech, of 
Carlisle. Cumbria. 


Service dinners 

Royal Military Police 
Association 

The annual dinner of the Royal 
Military Police Association was 
held oh Saturday al Roussillon 
Barracks. Chichester. Among 
those present were General Sir 
James Glover, president the 
Mayor of Chichester. Colonel P. 
W. Herring, chairman. Brigadier 
B. Thomas, Provost Marshal 
t Army!. Brigadier D. B. Rend ell 
and Brigadier A. R- Forbes. 

154 (Lowland) Transport 
Regimen t 

Mr 1. S. Irwin was the principal 
guest at a dinner given by 
officers of 1 54 (Lowland) Trans- 
port Regiment RCT (V) at the 
Regimental Officers Mess. Glas- 
gow. on Saturday, to mark his 
appointment as Honorary Colo- 
nel of the Regimen L Major A. 
G. MacDonald presided and the 
guests, who were received by 
Lieutenant-Colonel C. J. Con- 
stable. included Colonel W. H. 
Wellman, US Army. Com- 
mander AFCENT Support 
Group, and Colonel D. G. B. 
Saunders, secretary. Lowland 
TA&VRA. 

814/1851 Naval Air Squadrons 
Naval Air Squadrons 814 god 
1851, which served in HMS 
Venerable 1945/46.' held a 
ladies' night dinner at Brewers’ 


Hall, London, on Saturday. May 
17. 1986. Mr R. J. Coles was in 
the chair. 


Dinners 


Lord High Cormnissioner 
Thc Lord High Commissioner 
to the General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland and the 
Viscountess of Arbulhnotl 
entertained at dinner last night 
at the Palace of Holyroodhouse. 
The guests included: 

Ttte Earl and Cotmtess of Dundte. Uie 
Han AIKk BucMnan-SnMlli. MP. and 
Mrs BucTtanan-SmlUi- (he Hen wil- 
liam Waktegrava. MP. and Mrs 
Waldegrave. Sir Peter and Lady 
Hutchison. .Sir Henry and Lady 
Plumb . Str Vvimaro and Lady Fraser. 
Ilw dean or me Tlusiie and Mrs 
McIntyre, the Rev COK-ashutg and Mrs 
Macmillan. Mr and Mrs Roger Carr 
and me Solicitor General. 

Anglp-Ven ez a cla n Society 
On Thursday, May is. the 
Anglo- Venezuelan Society held 
its biennial Simon Bolrvar lec- 
ture. sponsored by John Walker 
& Sons Limited, at the Institute 
of Directors. The lecture was 
given by the Venezuelan lawyer 
and academic Dr A flan Brewer 
Carias. Afterwards, the presi- 
dent. The Venezuelan Ambas- 
sador. Dr Jose Luis Salcedo 
Bastard o. and the chairman. Mr 
Anthony S. Westnedge. enter- 
tained at dinner, the Ambas- 
sadors of Ecuador. Nicaragua. 
Mexico and Pent and the H^h 
Commissioner for Trinidad and 
Tobago and other members of 
the society and the Latin .Ameri- 
can community in the U.K. 


OBITUARY 

PEADAR O’DONNELL 

Campaigner for an Irish 

socialist republic 


Peadar O'Donnell, who 
died, aged 93. in Dublin on 
May 13, was in the great Irish 
tradition of the writer revolu- 
tionary. but his steely vision 
could see only one goal, a 
socialist republic. 

He would never describe 
himself as a writer -"I use my 
pen as a weapon”- yet he 
produced novels of true liter- 
ary merit. 

His first. Storm, was pub- 
lished in 1926. followed the 
next year by Islanders, then 
Ardrigoole in 1929, The Knife 
(1930). On the Edge of the 
Stream (1934), The Big Win- 
dows (1954) - probably his 
most accomplished book - and 
finally Proud Island in 1975. 

There were three autobio- 
graphical works. The Gates 
flew Open (1932), Salud! 
(1936). about the Spanish 
Civil War, and There Will Be 
Another Day (1963). 

With Sean O'Faoiain he 
founded The Bell, an out- 
standing magazine of litera- 
ture and life which flourished 
during the Second World War. 
Here was published the cre- 
ations of the best of modern 
Irish writers. 

His life was full of 
compaigning on behalf of 
small farmers and workers. 
Born on February 22, 1893, 
near Dungioe in Co Donegal, 
he trained as a teacher and 
became inspired by the revo- 
lutionary words of Pearse 
Connolly and Larkin. 

In 1918 he left teaching lo 
become a trade union organiz- 
er. The following year he 
joined the Irish Volunteers 
and in 1922 he was in the 
Dublin Four Courts on the 


Republican side when the civil 
war erupted. 

O’Donnell was arrested but 
later escaped from the Cur- 
ragh Camp to become active 
in the IRA and a powerful 
propagandist as editor of An 
Phoblacht (The Republic). 

The Gates Flew Open is an 
astonishing account of prison 
scenes and throws light on th^ 
mentality of that period/ 
O'Donnell wrote as a fighter 
and was unsparing . in his 
denunciation of political 
opponents. 

The book deals with the 
attitude of the Roman Catho- 
lic Church at the time of the 
civil war, when chaplains were 
insulted and services disrupt- 
ed violently, and it argues that 
the fierce disputes between 
church and people were not 
due to atheism or anti-clerical- 
ism. but actually sprang from 
a fervent sense of religion. 

During the 1 930s he tried to 
turn the IRA away from a 
predominantly militarist posi- A . 
lion towards being a vehicled 
for socialist ideals. Following 
the rise of European fascism 
he helped lo organize the 
small Irish group who joined 
the International Brigade to 
figju in the Spanish Civil War. 

In more recent years he 
became a rallying point for 
radical protests, in particular 
against the Vietnam war and 
the anti-nuclear movement. 

At the age of 90, he set off 
for England on his own and 
toured Salvation Army hostels 
in order to assess the living 
conditions of the poor. His 
sharp, biting intellect re- 
mained intact almost to the a 
end. ^ 


MR PETER WADE 


Mr Peter Wade, a trustee of 
the Leonard Cheshire Foun- 
dation, who worked unceas- 
ingly to improve public 
understanding of the aspira- 
tions and feelings of handi- 
capped people, died on May 
10, aged 54. 

He himself suffered from an 
incurable bone disease and 
spent his life in a fixO-length 
wheelchair, virtually unable to 
move and without the use of 
his hands. Despite this, he was 

unfailingly cheerful. 

After his marriage in 1967, 
he expanded his work for the 
Cheshire Foundation and un- 
dertook a gruelling tour of 


Cheshire homes in the United 
Kingdom, speaking at scores 
of meetings and seeking the 
views of other disabled people 
as a basis for the foundation's 
future policies. 

He also served on the 
executive and housing com- 
mittees of the Royal Associa- 
tion for Disability and 
Rehabilitation and was a 
trustee of PHAB (Physically 
Handicapped and Able-bod- 
ied), where he did much to 
further the rights of disabled 
people. 

He leaves a widow and a 
son and daughter. 


ELISABETH BERGNER 


Sir John Gielgud writes: 

Elisabeth Bergnefs first ap- 
pearance in England in the 
early 1930s in a play called 
Escape Me Never by the 
novelist Margaret Kennedy, 
brought her an immediate and 
overwhelming persona] suc- 
cess. 

However, on the first night 
in Manchester she was so 
nervous that the director, 
Komisaijevsky, had to stand 
in the wings and push her on 
to the stage for her first 
entrance. 

! can see her now. sprawling 
in a Venetian palazzo, dressed 
in gym tunic and sandals, 
gazing mournfully over the 
rim of an enormous coffee 
cup, and later in the play, in a 
beret and mackintosh, hud- 
dled in a comer mourning a 
dead baby - an eager, mischie- 
vous, elfin figure with pathos 
beneath her childish charm. 

No wonder Barrie fell in 
love with her in his last days. 
Bay David, which he wrote for 
her, was not a great success but 
she rose valiantly above her 
disappointment and would 
amuse herself, while seated at 
the feet of Godfrey Tearle, 
who played Saul, for pulling 
the hairs out of his legs to 
make him laugh as she gazed 
adoringly up at his face. 

I do not know whether she 
ever played Shaw's Cleopatra, 
which would have suited her 
perfectly, but she did essay 
Saint Joan in one of the 
Malvern Festivals. 

I fancy she found the pan 
somewhat long and intimidat- 
ing. for she told me that during 
a long matinee she ventured to 
cut the famous “Bells” speech, 
only to discover afterwards 
that GBS was himself among 
the audience. 

She described his coming 
round and throwing the book 
al her. “ What did you do. 
Elisabeth ?" I inquired “Ob, I 
just threw it back !” 

She was an avid reader, 
immensely interested in ev- 


erything that was going on. 
seeing all the new plays and 
attending concerts and art 
galleries. She disdained gossip 
and was a shrewd and gener- 
ous critic. 

Though sometimes devi- 
ous. wilfol and autocratic, she 
was a consummately skilled 
executanL 

On the only occasion on 
which 1 had the privilege of 
working with her. she acted 
with delightful subtlety as 
Catherine of Braganza in the 
epilogue lo Shaw's Good King 
Charles ' Golden Days, (hough 
she ignored the director, in- 
sisted on rehearsing with me 
in private, and. on the actual 
day of filming, left the studio 
in team after what she fell to 
have been an irrevocable 
disaster. 

She had known Einstein 
and Auden. Huxley, Schweit- 
zer and BrechL Her autobiog- 
raphy, written in German, has 
unfortunately never been 
iranslated, though I _ 
her to undertake the work. 

An amazingly original and 
enigmatic personality of enor- 
mous fascination, I am very 
proud to have known her and 
to have counted myself among 
her friends. 

Mr O W Kier, CBE, Direc- 
tor of J. L. Kicr and 
Company.the civil engineer- 
ing contractors, from 1934 to 
1976, died on May 3, aged 86. 

A Dane by birth, Kier came 
to England in 1922, founding 
his company ten years later. 
He became a naturalized Brit- 
ish subject in 1947, and his 
company went public in 1963. 

He was made a Fellow of 
the Institution of Civil Enai- 
neors in 1 955 and awarded the 
Order of Dannebrog in 1 966. 

Mr Alan Risseff-Cowan, a 
pioneer in the field of solar 
energy, and a founder member 
of the Solar Trade Associa- 
non. died in London on May 
14, aged 70. 3 


Appointments in the Forces 


Royal Navy 

CAPTAINS. R M Brantey to MOO 
iBathl. Mav 12: D A H Kerr to MOO 
(London*. November 1 1: D Pentreath 
lo MOD OLondoo; June 9: J F 6 
Trtndcr <o MOD (London*. October 
"O. 


COMMANDERS. G S Beard lo MOD 
- mdODl. September 2fc R P P Buruit 
.. MOD tBMbi. June 17: J E Burton lo 
DR V AD. November 11: M D Coooer 




to MOD (London i. June IftJJM 
Curas to CMUngwood. Dece m ber 2: j 
M Dobson to MOD iLondon). Jute 22: 
J E Dynes to NA Moscow. June 6 ito 
continue to serve in Ok a hr of Cart). 
R w Hutetongs lo ROOKS. November 
11: SA Locke to FOF5. Smteumer 12: 
R M Prynn lo FOF3. October lO. □ W 
Stguao to OOMNAVSOliTH. Feb. 
^MUQ. H87: B H wood to 


_ na 

AIR MARSH/ 

Chtel of stair and r&SSS 1 S3 °* 
nwnder ItvOuef S?lk.. t £5!£ v Con *- 

OPtosucceswon to 


J-S R cntTey In 


DA 


ruary I to. 198 
FONAC. July 4. 

CHAPLAINS: E D 
C7CRM. July 8. 

The Army 

MAJOR GENERALS C G Oornock In 
COS Live Oak SHAPE. May 19: P R F 
BOrusei to DBA. May 19. 
BRIGADIERS: N M PUgbe to 
Awn. May 19 
COLONEL: PMHiUtc MOD. August 
27. 

LIEUTENANT COLONELS: J R CUT- 
ton-BHtel. X«.‘20H IO RARDE. May 
19: R D Hanacombc R Hamoo to LSP 
OMAN. May 3L BA Hull Hash to CO 
KOSB. May 19: K D H KeaUnge R 
to Sch of Inf. May 23: M E 

R Anglian to DSDC, May 19; 

. J Sullvan RHO. D to MOD. May 20. 
A D Deudiar RA to MOD. May 19; j 

SiOTlKMtiBR RSS 

May 20 

”™ WNTS JS? T5 


BgESSsfiSB 

Commodore, in - 

Commodore I wrt 
Group Captain - 

f&?*gg£™S' 


RontSbH 



nmm. June — MM 

^«^y Cf MOD AN R ?ER S 

Nktious fo OAftn 0*23* . 2? 


Sgn Ur TB ItaL M 


late R Signals, 


Stap 


A E 
in 

■■ “J 
.19: I 


p. ; -, 




■wl Mav ‘ax- 
dythvraod. May 
SA Prague. May 












-L 


ih 


VS 


•irct- 




' M*v ' , 



*«. 


i 

f 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


15 


THE ARTS 



Television 


l*r 

ft <- 

r._ 

r 

Ln ' 




l-VK 


i: ■ 



its 


gnp 


Unmistakable symptoms of 
Mexican Fever role out on 

**»~ . m C— I— . I ^ • . 


World Cap OTV) showed the 
-coadhkn in hs infectious 
stone, with the chirpy double 
irt Embering up' their “spon- 
taneous” wit ( Jimmf Greaves, 
[ da -seeing the Endand- ceam 
aosdng* picket-fine outside 
Ifoeir Los Angeles- hotel; “Nice 
[ ta see some strikers in good 
y foraTVwhHe Football Focus 
K (BBO) struck bock with a 
j. thesaurus of 86 goals from 
{ptevioBs competitions. 

A brief remission was af- 


!), in which Nick 
Ross introduced a bizarrely 
dreamy documentary an 
America's first fatal nuclear 
accident chaired a limp stwfio 
Vfiscusstoft and ended by in- 
forming ns that we had jnst 
absorbed mare radiation from 
the tek vision set than from the 
Chernobyl faU-oat. 

- This did little to dispel the 
JbosxHS itemized here, and it 
became in cre as in gl y dtffigiih 
to follow tire testimony of 
sarvivmg rescue workers when 
one’s attention was devoted to 
sentinfeangfiieir feces for the 



American director of 
. the lire actios in International 
[ Football (ITV) earned several 
r minus points for allowing the 
l? camera to loiter dozily along 
l the halfway line while Hately 
t' - .wajs opening the score, and 
t Martin Tyler, commenting on 
r England's soaring morale, 
^contributed the uafbrtnmte 
; -fine “I’m not one what’s 
r higher than sky-high”. Clear- 
jb hi someone mold fiB him in 
f on snperimmry sit ua t io ns. 

- Bade to earth yesterday 
i w ith A Walk Under Ladders 
[ fITV) the first of six new plays 
{ • wider the Lore and Marriage 
banner. Peter Gibbs’s dotnes- 
•; v tic comedy begpui with the 
-. framing device of an 11 -year- 
I- oM gWs sacred diary and Ami 
•• abandoned it to follow the 
, agitations of tfce two honse- 
! bold’s adults. The piece trod a 
: tot of water and never ipsife 
- lived up to Its eariy promise. 


Roland Joffe’s The Mission, after 
a dramatic and controversial 


Xr i nytj jl mil 

Festival, seems ai sure candidate 
for a major prize and the sort of 
commercial success that could 
revive Goldcrest’s struggling 
fortunes: David Robinson reports 



Jeremy firms as the Jesuit In TkeMissum amid dm grandeur of 
Chris Meagts’s photography of the Colombian settings 





In all the 39 years of Cannes, Britain 
has never shown a more assertive 
presence at the festival. A newfy- 
formed “Cannes Action Com- - 
mittee” has raised £130,000, and 
somehow overcome the resistance 
of the . city authorities, to erect a 
colourful two-storey pavilion on the 
Plage Publique. Looking Kke a fairy 
palace and proudly flying its dual 
flags. Union Jack and . J. and 
B. Scotch Whisky, the pavilion has 
not merely served usefully as infor- 
mation point and social centre but 
has also loyally screened videos of 
the Queen's birthday. 

Unprecedently Britain has had 
two films in competition (Roland 
Joffe’s The Mission and Neil 
Jordan’s Mona Lisa \ two fihnsin 
the director’s fortnight (David 
Drury’s Defence cf the Realm and 
Alex Cox’s Sid and Haney — Love 
Kills) and one in the section “Un 
Certain Regard” (Stephen Bayly’s 
Coming Up Roses^sn endearing tale 
of the last cinema in town, from 
Wales). A tribute, to Britain’s- 
favourite veterans; Powell and 
Pressbmgpv included a gab dinner, 
a screening of A Matter cf Life and 
Death and an authentic Twenties 
yacht in fine harbour where the 
ageless Michael Powell holds court, 
no doubt remembering his ’prentice 
days in Rex Ingram’s studio in Nice. 

Though Jofie's The Mission ar- 
rived in an admitteefiy unfinished 
Sam, with the cutting, incomplete 
and grave anxiety about whether the 
splices would get through the pro- 
jectors. without breaking, it seems a 
certain candidate for a major prize; 
indeed, given de composition of 
foe jury headedby Sidney Pollack, it 


. could easily snatch foe. Palme (TOr 
from Tarkowsky’s incomparable 
The Sacrifice. 

Jofle has grown m assurance since 
The Killing Fields, This is cinema 
spectacle on a Hollywood scale; the 
grandeur of Chris Menges’s photog- 
raphy of the Colombian settings is 
complemented by a rich Morricone 
score and a lucid script by Robert 
Bolt The 'script was written more 
than ten years ago whenfoe Italian 
producer- Fernando Ghia first tried 
to set up the project In the late 
Seventies he joined forces with 
David Puttnam, who took foe film 
to GoldcresL Thestory is a byway of 
European colonial history. In foe 
mid-eighteenth century Spain and 
Portugal saw the Jesuit missions set 
up in South America threatening 
their commerce — in particular foe 
. cruel but profitable slave trade. . 
Political pressure was. successfully 
brought to bear on the Vatican; and 
... foe missions were dosed, leaving 
foefr native adherents unprotected. 

Bolt’s screenplay imagines an 
idealistic young priest (Jeremy 
. Irons) and a penitent former slave- 
trader (Robert de Niro) defying the 
church and battling — one passive, 
the other militan t — to save their 
mission.- The massacre of the mis*: 
sion at the Battle of Gaibale Is an 
historic reality, as is the character of 
the papal envoy. Cardinal Alta- 
ntirano. In an oustandmg perfor- 
mance by die Irish actor Ray 
McAnally (most recently seen in No 
Surrender ), Altanrirano becomes 
foe focus of the moral drama, a 
battle between fefth,conscience and 
political necessity which has evi- 
dent references for today. - . • . 


Clearly awaiting further editing, 
for the moment the weakest section 
of the film is, paradoxically, the 
climactic battle, where the film loses 
its rhythm and lucidity and the 
contrivances of Joflfe’s set-pieces, 
which handicapped The Kitting 
Fields are exposed. The reception 
of foe film in Cannes was dramati- 
cally mixed, .wild enthusiasm com- 
with ‘ equally vociferous 


nents, buying or eating anything in 
their path, whether it is talent or 


y. Certainly the response 
promises foe Jana of commercial 


success that could retrieve Gold- 
crest’s Injured fortunes. 


Neil Jordan’s Mona Lisa has also 
enjoyed a good critical and popular 
reception. The marvellous Bob 
Hoskins plays a small-time crook 
who conies out of gaol after a 10 - 
year stretch to find that society and 
the ethical standards of the under- 
world have passed him by. He takes 
a job as driver-minder to a classy 
young blade prostitute (an elegant 
newnctress; Cathy Tyson), and the 
film traces foe growing dependence 
of this strangely assorted duo. 
Jordan shows the same visionary 
gift as in Angel and Company of 
■ Wolves ; his London locations some- 
times have foe look of a Fellini 
. nightmare. Strangely for a former 
novelist, scripts seem his downfall: 
Mona Lisa collapses at foe end into 
-melodrama and disbelief! 

Cannes 1986 has really belonged 
to Cannon, the overnight empire 
created by the Israeli cousins Mena- 
hem Golan and Yoram Globus and 
eclipsing anything that -has -gone 
before^ even .at the height of 
Hollywood's magnificence; Golan 
and G Johns inarch across conti- 


terriiories. last week it was British 
rinemas, this week German. Every 
day there is a new Press announce- 
ment. They wfll make a dozen filmy 
for children. Norman Mailer will 
play King Lear in foe version he is 
writing for Jean-Luc Godard (“He 
has five daughters”, explains the 
genial Golan, “so be understands”). 

While one hand produces tough 
martial-arts and cold-war pictures, 
foe other creates films that are, 
rather, cultural events like Lear or 
Zefirelli’s Otello. People who 
worked for Cannon in the eariy days 
recall the cousins' interference in 
production, but today they have far 
too many projects to meddle with 
detail, and foe major artists who 
work for them appear to do so with 
comparative freedom. 


Cannon have had three films in 
competition. Otello is predictably a 
highly polished performance, with 
Placido Domingo and Katia 
Ricdarelli under Lorin Maazel, and 
with Justino Diaz skilfully used as 

an lago of insinuating bonhomie, 

with eyes wide open in affected 
innocence but ice-cold. Gianni 
Quaranta’s production design 
makes imag inative use of ancient 
locations in Crete and Barietta, 
though the settings do not seem as 
integral to foe drama here as did foe 
studio decors of Zefirellfs Traviata. 

Another Cannon alumnus is Rob- 
ert Altman, with his interpretation 
of Sam Shepard’s stage play Ford for 
Love, an intense, angry confronta- 
tion between a sister and toother 
tormented by unendurable incestu- 


ous attraction. Altman has recently 
concentrated on films from plays 
{Come Back to the 5 and Dime, 
Jimmie Dean, Jimmie Dean and 
Streamers), and again he demon- 
strates that a film is not necessarily 
restricted by stage origins, but can 
on the contrary greatly enrich a 
play. Here the best things all happen 
between the lines. 

Instead of the single-set motel 
room there is the whole motel itself, 
but the sense of claustrophobia in 
this isolated desert caravanserai is 
even greater. When Shepard's char- 
acters reminisce, Altman shows 
flashbacks which are always slightly 
out of true with the words, enforcing 
the sense of equivocation which is 
central to the drama. Shepard 
himself plays foe main character, a 
stunt-man: “It made my job easier”, 
recalls Altman. “Who am I to 
question the author's reading of his 
own lines?” 


Andrei Konchalovsky (another 
Russian abroad, like Tarkowsky) is 
a second-time Cannon director, 
laving already made Maria's Lov- 
ers for foe cousins. Runaway Train 
is an effective suspense showpiece, 
based on an old scenario by Akira 
Kurosawa, a master of story-makr 
ing. A violent criminal (Jon Voight) 
and a hero-worshipping young punk 
(Eric Roberts) break out of a 
maximum-security gaol, only to 
find themselves on a driverless 
runaway train. The performances 
are matched to foe melodramatic 
scale of-foe action: and, like a lot of 
pictures, it is very fine until the 
action stops and the characters are 
permitted to think.. 


Theatre 


Donald Coopar 


Entertaining 

Strangers 

Lyric Studio, 
Hammersmith 


For shows taking shelter un- 
der foe performance-art um- 
brella, it is ofleh hard to tcH 
whether bad plotting is a 
matter of aesthetic principle 
Or simple incompetence. The 


question crops up in an acute 
form in this collective piece 


* l 


* 


from Lnxriifcre Son, a sequel to 
Madam Rutted showing foe 
dying Suzuki dispatching a 
pair of hit-men to avenge her 
wronged mistress by rubbing 
out the dastardly Pinkerton, 

no matter where he may be. As 

the recruits are a pair of 
distant cousins, one Japanese; 
one . half- Australian, and both 
equally bewildered by -their 
mission arid clueless on how 
to carry it out, theejffcct is as if 
foe rider Hamlet had got his 
lines crossed and entrusted die 
job to Rosencranz and Guild- 
enstem. 

It is, in short, a most 
pfonrisiog idea which Hilary 
Westlake (deviser and direc- 
tor) . and David Gale, (dia- 
logue) proceed to squander on 
a; perversely bungled nan% 
tiye. Tosbio and Dennis (Bji 
Kamhaa *md Trevor Stuart) 
head from Tokyo- to rural 
Bedfordshire and drift aim- 
lessly from one defeat to tire 
next Some of the dialogue is 
rgther good: as where their 
trad leads into bog-land. “So 
this is where foe food comes 
from**. _■ Dennis, says. "Tm 
surprised the animals don’t 
just walk into the sho ps and 
surrender.” But, as for nana- 
tujtirfoey merely collide with a 
succession of hostile citizens 
woo insult their pigmentation, 
steal Their overcoats, and pry 
intp their sexual habits. As all 

fee-, ghouls are 7 

Neale Goodrum, wifo.no al- 
teration of character or change 
of place, a certain monotony is 
soop fdt 

^ The events hardly add up t« 



Well worth waiting for Turin Heafley (centre) with 
Trevor Starart (left) and Egl Knsuhara 


a picaresque adventure, much 
less to a purposeful pursuit. 
When, by pure chance, the 
partners do ran foeir prey to 
earth, it is only to siee fahn pass 
out of his own accord: ah end 
evidently hastened by the 
tedium of entertaining two 
such unrewarding house- 
guests. 

Given the show’s other 
elements, however, h is possi- 
ble that this broken-backed 
structure is intended to malm 
fun of revenge plots along with 
its two gonnless avengers: 
Musically and visually the 
. production presentsa drat and 
witty game with national ste- 
reotypes. In the openiifo scene 
a Nob-masked Suzuki ddlvers 
her orders in foe style of a 
Chandler vifiainess. An elegy 
for Butterfly mingles, oriental 
pentaumics with - night-chib 
erfi mfllT. On arrival in Britain 
the visitors are made, to kow- 
tow by an official who would 
have been at tome on foe 
Burma railroad. ’■ 

Best of all is the unveiling of 
Pinkerton’s mansion as a Jap- 
anese - sanctuary, . festooned 
with erotic paintings 


(“Tbeyhe very well hung”, 
remarks the. polite Toshio), 
where the kimono-dad betray- 
er is assuaging a lifetime’s 
guilt in company with an 
English wife who has -learnt all 
the delicate arts', of Go-Oo^ 
Ran " 

In this role Tamsin Heatley 
has even perfected-the tech- 
mque of xunningat high speed 
in a sitting position. It is well 
worth enduring the first half of 
the show for the sight of the 
two westernized Japanese 
knocking back thimblefuls of 


sake Eke halves of bitter and 
launching into a few rounds of 
pingdXmg over a model of 
MountFnjL 

In my article on theatre 


stated teat foe Almeida The- 
atre had foiled to -secure an 
increased grant from Islington 
Borough Council. The bor- 
ough basin feet- increased its 
grant, to £15,000, thus rrieas- 

ingamaxchingfigurefrom the 

Arts Council. My apologies 
and congratulations to Is- 
lington. 


Irving War die 


Concerts 


Sophistications amid the toy-boxes 


Pfailhannonia/ 
Rattle.. 
Elizabeth Hall/ 
Radio 3 


ex- 


On Saturday, for the penulti- 
mate concert in foe “Aprts 
rAprts-MidT series, Simon 
Rattle and foe Phflharmonia 
moved into the Queen Elizas 
beth Hah and into the nursery, 
the programme being framed 
by the toy-box and fairy-tale 
ballets of Debussy and RaveL 
Within that frame, though, we 
wiere in’ for very different 
kinds of babyhood. 


Messiaen’s Oiseaux 
otiques perhaps looks back to 
foe infancy of the world before 
human evolution, when music 
was what was shrieked, ululat- 
ed and melodiously warbled 
by birds. And maybe one 
could see Boulez’s £dat as 
. another soztg of innocence, foe . 
bird-songs replaced by foe 

nals oF^^^-civilized. Cer- 
tainly foe connections bet- 
ween the works, connections 
of form as well as flurried 
gesture, were nicely brought 
out by this juxtaposition, 
though so were foeir quite un- 
ehiMiike sophistications. 


Peter Donohoe, with his 
strong bass and rhythmic in- 
tensiveness, made the solos of 
tire Messiaen sound as much 
exasperated as exuburant, and 
in -the Boulez he offered a 
striking display of power in 
danger of being numbed. The 
o rch e s t r al support showed 
both the problems and the 
benefits that come from using 
a non-specialist orchestra in 
this music. The end of Eclat 
may have been a bit shaky (it 
is featsomely difficult to bring 
off), but foe almost Schoen- 
bergian contortions of the 
clarinets in Oiseaux exotiques 
suggested a plausible crazi- 


ness. 1 would just doubt foe 
wisdom. of immediately re- 
peating Eclat, like lightning, it 
should not strike in foe same 
place twice for fear of seeming 
regular. 

The bigger works were bril- 
liant in foe way one expects 
from this team. La Boite & 
joujoux still sounded like foe 
accomp&niament for some- 
thing we were not seeing, but 
its plainness was accepted and 
its parodies (not least of 
Debussy himself) were neatly 
judged. Ma Mire I’oye was 
just as excessively gorgeous as 
it ought to be. 

Paul Griffiths 


The Spanish Lady 

St John’s 


George Bernard Shaw thought 
that he could. George Moore 
thought that he should. Barry 
Jackson thought that 1 be 
would. But one wonders how 
confident of creating an opera 
Elgar was when he embarked 
on The Spanisk Lady in 1929. 
like Richard Strauss at al- 
most foe same time, he turned 
to Ben Johnson: the main plot 
conies from The Devil is an 
Ass, though there is a lot of 
extraneous material, some of 
it brought in by foe conditions 
of Elgar’s composing. He had 
the idea Belloc’s “Tarantella” 


might be fitted in somewhere 
and the sketches include quite 
unrelated songs, and instru- 
mental pieces, of which some 
go right lack to the beginnings 
of his life as a composer. 


The whole thing is a ragbag, 
and one’s admiration goes out 


to Dr Percy Young for draw- 
coherent 40- 


The Kingdom, three or four 
strains of a grand sarabande 
going back to 1879, a song to 
words by John Milton Hay, 
“Memento mori”, which had- 
been composed in 1886 and 
which has something of foe 
stirring quality of foe last of 
the Sea Pictures. 


ing from it a 
minute selection of items; 
though, as he himself admit- 
ted in his introduction, there 
is more than a little Young in 
what we beard, along with a 
fair amount of distinctly un- 
distinguished Elgar. The best 
things had all been lying long 
in the composer's bottom 
drawer a dialogue associated 
originally with sketches for 


This was vigorously sung by 
Bryn Jones, who was joined 
on foe platform by other 
soloists from the Guildhall 
School: Simon Tunkin gave 
some suggestion of what an 
admirable part Meercraft 
might have been, Roisin 
McGibbon was delicious as 
Lady Tailbnsh, and Joseph 
Cornwell and Gaynor Morgan 
sang freshly in the bland love 


duet The City University 
Symphony Orchestra, under 
Cem Mansur, gave a decent 
approximation 10 the Elga ri an 
noises of Dr -Young’s orch- 
estration. 

I doubt though, that much 
more can be made of foe 
music. There is a feint hint in 
the surprising harmony of the 
central section ofa march and 
in the choral serenade suggest- 
ing Vaughan Williams, ofhow 
Elgar might have developed 
had he continued as a compos- 
er into foe 1930s. But nothing 
is sustained, and the whole 
project has the poignancy of 
something that was happening 
too late. 


P.G. 


RPO/Hughes 
Festival Hall 


This concert- has to be seen.as 
one of the season's strangest 
bits of programming. Intend- 
ed to celebrate (he ISOtb 
anniversary of foe Hudders- 
field Choral Society, its sec- 
ond half consisted of Carl 
Orff’s Carmina Bur ana. 


whose idiom is melodically 
and harmonically a joke (not a 
funny one), which contains no 
counterpoint whatever and 
which exhibits about as much 
rhythmic variety as a pile- 
driver. 


opportunities for this choir to 
demonstrate its reputedly for- 
midable range of skills. So 
why choose this atrocity? 


Almost any of the great 
masterpieces of foe choral 
tradition are as much fun to 
sing, make as much noise and 
would have provided a feast of 


I hope that we shall soon 
-hdu- foe Huddersfield Choral 
Society again in music which 
gives them a chance to show 
what they can really do. 
Meanwhile foeir execution of 
this farrago of endless repeti- 
tion and banal word-setting 



Ml Wiison is incurable. He exercises with determination, loves to 


• BiflWilsoii wiotedtobe a fanner’ora che£ 
His uncleowned a farm in Kflimamoch where 
.Bill wasbom As it happened, BID became 
■ a the BMA. Hels softly spoken, and 

hasa yramreense offaimoui: Some years ago, 
he suffered astroke which left him severely 
paralysed: He' came to us’at Putney - a long 
wayfrom his uride^farin. 

.. -But Bill doesn't let things get him down. 



j patients' kitchen. 

For BiH the RHHI is home, as it is for some 
270 other patients whom we strive, through 
skilled nuiang, therapy and medical treat- 
ment; to help achieve as much independence 
as possible. 

We.are a registered charity (No. _ . . . 
205907) and rely upon donations, RBH 
covenants and legacies. Please help. 


Pdnpns: HitThe (Jieen and HM The Queen Mother 


To: Captain A D. Hutton. OBE, RN I 
Director of Appeals, The Royal 
Hospital ana Horae for Incurables, 

Dept L, West HiO, Putney, 

London SWI53SW 


Yes, I would like to help. (Plejse tick) 
D 1 endow a donation totheRHHL 


_ Pleasesend me UmRHHTS leaflet on 
U malting covenants Mbequeas. . ' . 


n Please send me iraire infnrmatioQ 
Li about the RHHI. 


Name. 


(BLOCK LETTERS. PliASsf 


Address. 


was lively enough, with the 
Southend Boys’ Choir provid- 
ing game support. 

The force soloists constant- 
ly .find themselves having to 
repeat phrase after trite phrase 
while trying to make foe 
procedure sound interesting; 
they managed it commend- 
ably well, foe soprano Helen 
Field especially finding some 
ravishing tone and phrasing in 
her aria-like set-piece in Part 
3. Owaio Arwel Hughes co- 
ordinated proceedings ener- 
getically and kepi a watchful 
ear on the overall decibel- 
leveL 


He also drew some clean 
and vivid playing from foe 
, Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra in Mussorgsky's Pictures 
from an Exhibition, which 
alone occupied foe first half. 
Hie brass delivered their per- 
oration in “The Great Gate of 
Kiev” with controlled splen- 
dour, while at the end Hughes 
singled out foe tenor tuba 
soloist in "Bydlo** and his 
saxophone counterpart in 
“The Old Castle” for individ- 
ual applause — a nice touch, 
and fully deserved. 

Malcolm Hayes 


x. •- 












Opera 


Carmen 
Covent Garden 


The Bolshoi's principal con- 
ductor, Mark Ermler, making 
his Royal Opera debut, is the 
main new ingredient in this 
revived Carmen. His is a 
fresh, appealing interpreta- 
tion, too. But there is no doubt 
about who dominates the 
show. Agnes Baltsa, in the title 
role, is as moody and magnifi- 
cent as ever. 


Her wild, taunting Carmen 
ifoi 


creates some unforgettable 
images. One thinks of her 
picking up foe cast-aside flow- 
er from foe dust with her 
teeth, and spitting it at Don 
.Jose: a .submissive act per- 
formed sadistically. When he 
unties her hands she cracks 
foe rope on the floor in front 
of him: a circus trick, except 
that the lioness wields the 
whip. In foe tavern she smash- 
es a plate, then uses the broken 
pieces as castanets. 

It is, in a way, admirable 
that this immense physicality 
also spills over into Baltsa's 
singing. Just as her dialogue 
moves from gutteral snarl to 
sweet-talk, so every sung 
phrase reflects volatile mood- 
changes. The Habanera incor- 
porated pariando, glissando 
and some pitch-bending in an 
extraordinary demonstration 
that could be deemed indul- 
gent did it not establish this 
Carmen's personality so well. 
In foe big confrontations of 
Acts 111 and IV Baltsa used her 
strong, vibrant tone superbly; 
even her unyielding timbre 
after seeing death in foe cards 
seemed appropriate in con- 
text But one did wonder 
about foe constant use of chest 
register at a relatively high 
pitch: ft was ugly and fre- 
quently untunefuL 

Jose Carreras (Don Jose) 
could not be anything but 
overwhelmed eariy on. but 
this worked well. The ease 
with which Carmen literally 
pushed him around made his 
nasty turn at the end - beating 
as well as knifing her — all fot: 
more dramatic. Appropriately 
his vocal performance fol- 
lowed the same curve: unas- 
suming initially, striking a 
more ardent vein in foe 
Flower Song, but reserving full 
voltage for foe argument with 
Escamillo and the final scene, 
which he sang gloriously. 

Unfortunately his early reti- 
cence meant foe pre-Carmen 
relationship between Don 
Jose and Micaela was barely- 
established; a pity, since Marie 
McLaughlin's Micaela was 
creditable. Her clear-toned, 
unfrilly singing and natural 
manner offered the perfect foil 
to Baltsa. 

Despite foe dash of bravado 
in his phrasing of foe 
Toreador's Song, Gino Quil- 
ico seemed rather amiable for 
EscamiUo. One feared he 
would be too kind to animals 
for bis own good. Lillian 
Watson and Claire Powell, 
respectively Frasquita and 
Mercedes, were solid in eni- 
semble, if a little anonymous; 
and Gordon Sandison's Mo- 
rales brought an unusually 
witty touch to the opening 
exchanges. 

The beauty of Enrilefs con- 
ducting lay in bis care over 
phrasing, his concern to keep 
matters light (in every sense) 
until well into the drama and 
his sympathetic accompani- 
ment If speeds sometimes 
erred on the stolid side, foe 
gain in orchestral elegance 
usually made it worthwhile. 

Michael Geliot's 1973 pro- 
duction was revived here by 
Mike Ashman in good-looking 
and unfussyLstyle; it should 
impress the South Koreans on 
foe Royal Opera's forthcom- 
ing tour. 


Richard Morrison 


1 HE THEATRE OF COXECY COMPANY PREJF1TS 
THE AUSTP-AtlAI ELIZABETHAN THEATRE TB'JST 
' PRODUCTION 


DAVID WILLIAMSON’S 

BITINGLY 

FUNNY 


sons 

OF 


HP 


s> 

pfl lQ0P m 



OWYNDHAM’S 

THEATRE 


"^os,.H';cgrv,-!>2rr2C 


Charing Cross Road London WC2 
Box Office 01 .836 3028 
Credit Cards 

379 6565/379 6433 or 741 S999 


9 


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to 


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rised 

year 

1986. 


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[Eke. I 


>AZ/ 


... — 














16 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 




US sales 
drive by 
iritish 



By Graham Sear jean t 
Financial Editor 

British Airways, in a last- 
ditch attempt to keep it on 
course for privatization, is to 
launch an emergency market- 
ing promotion in New York 
tomorrow to recapture busi- 
ness from the United States. 

Lord King, chairman of BA. 
still hopes that the oft-delayed 
Government sale can be 
achieved in January. The 
airline accepts, however, that, 
unless it can recoup much of 
the near 20 per cent fall in its 
transatlatic traffic, profits will 
fall sharply, and the sale may 
havc to be shelved until alter 
the next general election. 

British Airways normaliy 
eams nearly all its profits in 
I he six months from March to 
September. As the promotion 
is being unveiled in New York 
Lord King will announce in 
the City disappointing results 
for the year to March . 

Profit before lax rose from 
f 189 million to £201 million 
in the more profitable first 
half of the financial >ear. but it, 
is likely io have fallen to 
around the 1983-84 figure of 
£185 million for the full 12 
months. This is well below the 
£202 million made in 1984-85 
before allowing for the cost of 
settling lawsuits arising from 
the collapse of Laker .Airways. 

Like other airlines. BA had 
suffered a drop in American 
jourisl travel after the fall in 
fhe dollar even before fears of 
terrorism. 

The airline is anxious to 
avoid cuts such as those 
announced last week by Brit- 
ish Caledonian. BA has decid- 
ed not to take on the extra 
1.300 to 1,500 staff it normally 
requires in the summer, but it 
will avoid taking any more 
drastic measures until it has 
reviewed the impact of its 
New York promotion. 

Even if there were to be a 
flotation in January, ambi- 
tious plans to sell BA to small 
investors on the pattern of 
British Telecom and to sell 25 
per cent in North America are 
likely to be abandoned in 
favour of a more conventional 
City flotation. 

SB 

38 


Bundled out from Stonehenge 


k "• 

r 



Hippies on the move after 200 
of them were evicted from a camp 
in a field near Stonehenge on 
Saturday night after apparently 
trying to prepare a summer 
solstice {>op Festival. 

The hippies, who had arrived 
earlier in the day in about 50 


vehicles, were removed in a 
peaceful police operation after a 
High Court judge granted a writ of 
repossession of the land. 

Officers with riot shields stood 
by as the hippies drove from the 
site in their coaches and vans. 
“We'll be back,” called one. 


The hippies had arrived at the 
site of the monument which the 
National Trust and English Her- 
itage claim has been badly dam- 
aged in previous festivals; in two 
separate convoys from camps in 
the West Country. 

(Photograph: Suresh Karadia) 


Tories deluge Thatcher with advice 


By Anthony Bevins 
Political Correspondent 

The Conservative Party 
continued in turmoil yester- 
day. with ministers and MPs 
snatching at the opportunity 
offered by Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher's new image as the 
listening Prime Minister. 

The key area of debate is 
whether the Government goes 
all out for tax cuts, or whether 
it gives greater emphasis to 
the “dragon** of unemploy- 
ment, and the public expendi- 
ture challenges of education 
and the National Health 
Service. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Secre- 
tary or State for the Environ- 
ment, is thought to have 
expressed a majority Cabinet 
view when he said on 
Saturday:“Whst people want 
to see are more positive re- 
wards coming through. Per- 
sonal rewards certainly, but 


also rewards for the communi- 
ties in which they live. 

“Our target must be to make 
available to more people, 
whether they live in the North 
or the South, the town or the 
country, the high standards of 
service in the public sector 
that have been achieved in 
some hospitals and some 
schools and on some bousing 
estates.** 

But Mr Michael Heseltine, 
the former Secretary of State 
for Defence, took the chal- 
lenge a step further yesterday 
when be urged the Prime 
Minister to allow the Cabinet 
to produce a “balanced policy** 
— a dear reminder of Mr John 
Biffen's plea for a “balanced 
ticket" of leadership for the 
next general election. 

Mr Heseltine said on Radio 
4*s World this Weekend: “1 
think it is damaging if the 
Prime Minister doesn't grip a 
potential division within the 
Cabinet, and 1 think this is 


really what the Conservative 
Party is calling out for today. 

“For goodness sake let the 
Cabinet now produce a docu- 
ment which sets out our policy 
priorities; a balanced docu- 
ment not reflecting an over- 
stressed policy of just tax cuts, 
but a balanced policy recogniz- 
ing the legitimate claims of the 
more under-privileged parts of 
our society, and then the whole 
party can unite behind that." 

Mr Francis Pym, the former 
Foreign Secretary, said on 
BBC l's This Week , Next 
Week that people had to wait 
and see whether Mrs 
Thatcher's speech at Perth on 
Friday was the start of a 
change of direction. 

He said that if more atten- 
tion had been paid to the 
problems of unemployment, 
the welfare state, rates, hous- 
ing, and the inner cities, the 
Government would not be 
facing its current electoral 
problems. 


Mr Julian CritcMey. Con- 
servative MP for Aldershot, 
was less generous in an inter- 
view on TV-am’s Jonathan 
Dintbieby on Sunday. He 
agreed that the Prime Minis- 
ter was too strident, domineer- 
ing and to some extent 
tiresome. But he said there 
was no question of a change of 
leadership — a point of consen- 
sus among a majority of 
Conservative critics. 

Bnt the backlash was not 
confined to the Conservatives. 
Mr Roy Hattersley, Labour's 
deputy leader, said: “Nobody 
really believes that Margaret 
Thatcher has been converted 
overnight from a hard-hearted 
harridan into the caring moth- 
er of her people. 

“She can lower her voice an 
octave and nse the language of 
compassion recommended to 
her by Saatchi and SaatchL 
Bat she cannot erase the 
memory of seven callous 
years.” 


Village Voice 

The potato grower living 
just on the bread line 

This week Victor Zorza, In his Monday column from a 
remote Himalayan Tillage, tells of a potato-grower’s 
efforts to scratch a living from the arid soil. 


The village has its own way of helping the 
poor. My neighbour Bidyadat has never been 
able to buy a pair of bullocks to plough his 
field. He doesn't even have the money to hire 
bullocks for a few days at a time. Yet his fields 
have never remained un plough ed. 

He has his own plough which he has 
fashioned out of wood he cut in the forest. At 
ploughing time he carries it on his back up the 
mountain to his terraced fields. The bullocks 
be borrows, from one of the richer villagers. 

The seed potatoes Bidyadat needs are more 
difficult to obtain. Few families, even those 
regarded as well-off, have enough of these left 
over from the previous harvest- They have to 
sell them earlier in the year to buy the rice and. 
lentils which won't grow at higher altitudes. 
At planting time they purchase seed potatoes 
back from merchants in the valley. By then 
the price is often higher. Even the “rich” in 
this village — those who have bullocks — live 
from hand to mouth. 


Weather signs point 
to a good crop 


Bidyadat has usually managed to scrape 
together enough money for two sacks of seed 
potatoes. This time, up to his neck in debt, he 
was able to borrow enough for just one, and 
that of the cheaper variety. One sack of better 
quality seed would normally yield between 
ten and 20 sacks of potatoes, the poorer sort 
between five and ten. 

The signs which sometimes enable formers 
to predict the weather for the growing season 
pointed to a good crop. The first danger 
period, when monkeys descend on the fields 
to dig up the needy planted potatoes, passed 
off without much mischief. Bidyadat often 
trudged up the mountain, even when he had 
no work on the terraces, to inspect the 
promising green tops. He didn't lose hope 
when the drought belied the early signs; the 
monsoon rains would revive the wilting 
plants. 

Bidyadat was better off than some of his 
neighbours, whose fields had been invaded by 
wild pigs. The boar had trampled the green 
tops and had rooted the tubers. But the rains 
he had been praying for were late. When the 
time came to pick his potatoes, they were still 
wretchedly small. Some were diseased. All 
were of a quality even poorer than the seeds 
be had planted. 

The meagre harvest filled only seven sacks. 
He kept two - with the poorest potatoes— for 
his family, hired a couple of mules, and took 
his crop down to the market village in the 
valley. 


High-lying villages are always at a disad- 
vantage. Villages whose fields are in the valley 
can get their potatoes to the market more 
promptly and obtain a better price. They 
don't always need mules; if they do. the 
shorter distances and tbe easier mule tracks 
make the cost of hire less. Milder winters help 
their crops. Their irrigated fields are rarely 
afflicted by drougbL 

In the upper village the fields are often 
parched: there is no irrigation. The rains, 
even when the monsoon comes on time, can 
be so heavy that the crops become sodden and 
may roL Freezing winters lake their toll. By 
the time the villagers get their potatoes to tbe 
market, the purchase price has usually gone 
down and they have to hire mules for the 
long, difficult trek at a cost they can ill afford. 

Tbe potato merchant to whom Bidyadat 
offered his harvest refused to pay more than 
35 rupees a sack (about £1 .80p) for less than 
his high hopes had led him to expect “Take it 
or leave it” the merchant said. Badyadat was 
crestfallen. He had already paid 30 rupees for 
the mules. The potato dealer knew that he 
couldn't pay another 30 to take his produce 
back to the village. He was in no position to 
bargain. 

When the villager placed the first sack on 
the scales, the dealer furtively manipulated 
them to show less than the true weight 
Bidyadat protested, but the trader brazenly 
insisted that tbe weight the scales were 
showing was correct 

“Take your rotten potatoes back to the 
village then." be shouted. Bidyadat panicked. 
If he didn't submit he might have to hire 
mules again. He meekly accepted the pay- 
ment and began the long climb home. 

Officials do what 
they can to help 

The money wouldn’t last him long, but he 
was not the only villager in that position. He 
would have to borrow, as all did. 

Tbe Government is not unaware of the 
village's plight Officials do what they can to 
help, with the limited ftinds available. When 
they promised to finance a public works 
project to provide temporary employment for 
the villagers. Bidyadat breathed with relief 
He would no longer have to keep his children 
on short commons. 

He might even be able to earn enough to 
buy two sacks of seed potatoes for the next 
planting season, not just one — if the officials 
kept their promise. 

© Victor Zorza.1986 

Next Monday: Bidyadat comes into money, 
but gets no cash. 




mmimmmmm. w as ^thetime^information service 


Today's events 

Royal engagements 

The Queen visits Reading; 
and opens the new premises of 
ihe Reading Newspaper Com- 
pany. Portman Rd. 10.20; then 
visits Reading Sch to mark the 
Quincentenary of its re-founda- 
lion by King Henry VII in 1486. 
11.20; later, accompanied by 
Princess Anne, she visits the 
Chelsea Rower Show. Royal 
Hospital. SW3. 5.30. 

Princess Anne presents the 
annual Pye Television Awards. 
Hilton Hotel. W|. 12.30; later, 
attends a performance of Run 
l or Your W lie. in aid of the 
London Region of the Victim 
Support Scheme. Criterion The- 
atre. Piccadilly. Wl. 8. 


Princess Margaret visits the 
Chelsea Rower Show. S.20. 

Princess Alice, accompanied 
by the Duchess of Kent, visits 
the Chelsea Rowr Show. 5.10. 

The Duke of Kent visits 
Australia, departs Heathrow, 
7.15. 

New exhibitons 
Elisabeth Frink: Sculpture 
and Drawings: David Roberts: 
Raku- Fired Vessels: Beaux Arts, 
York St. Bath: Mon to Sat 10 to 
5 (ends June 30) 

Work in progress 
Landscape into sculpture: re- 
cent works by Anrcw Fyvie. Jim 
Harrold. Chris Lane and Enc 
Stanford: Reading Museum and 
An Gall. Blagrave St; Mon to 
Fri 10 to 5.30. Sat 10 to 5 (ends 
June 7). 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,049 



ACROSS 

1 He has a right to enter mar- 
ried women's quarters (5). 

4 Mean valet engaged in trade 
r 9). 

9 A river, but more diversified 
— it has many branches (9). 

10 Certain to advance rapidly 
f5». 

1 1 Monev a G reek character re- 
ccived at home (S). 

12 Dentist, perhaps, supplies- 
gold after quotation |9). 

13 They may carry letters to 

_ ships' rescuers (7j. 

IS It’s newsworthy io a royatly- 
waichcr. being a slavish imi- 
tator (7). 

18 Sleazy son serving as cover 
(7). 

20 Examine businessman's 
gamble in working tin <7i_ 

21 Act like these cranks, to 
Petrie's dismay (9;. 

23 Poet's domestic rook or pi- 
geon (5j. 

25 One like Horatius. detailed 
to be sent, say (5). 

26 Deserted village craftsman? 
<9>. 

27 Meet principal settler f 9). 

28 Bar from Wagner's longest 
opera (5). 

DOWN 

1 Supporters for Descartes, 
perhaps — hot. not cold (4- 

2 No end of a pel. ih e chier 
minuter I5t. 

3 Rock-like, but increasingly 
in a curious state of alarm 
(9). 


4 Female relations produced 
winy sayings about her (7>_ 

5 Vulgar protest — it upset 
many (7). 

6 The sign of a progressive 
artist? 15). 

7 Breaking a custom, he pro- 
vided identification for the 
Walrus 19>. 

8 It's rock bottom. Winnie 
darling, according to some 
(5). 

14 Praising the old prelate — no 
Whig he (9). 

16 Appointment has one of the 
Lawrences moving fast (4- 
5l. 

J7 Guardians with joint teach- 
ing assignment (9). 

19 Meteorological condition a 
GP should understand (7). 

20 Man is so narrow-minded 
17). 

21 Confine king in temporary 
quarters (5). 

22 .All right to climb in the 
manner of this creature (5). 

24 Damp — a cause of limited 
vision around Ohio (5). 


The Solution 
of Saturday’s 
Prize Puzzle 
No 17,048 
will appear 
next Saturday 


Concise crossword page 10 


Janet Bolton: Applique: God- 
■frey & Twatt, 7 Westminster 
Arcade. Parliament Su Harro- 
gate; Mon to Sat 10 to 5.30 (ends 
June 7). 

The Day of the Dinosaur, City 
Museum and Art Gall. Foregale 
SL Worcester; Mon to Fri 9.30 
to 6. closed Thur. Sat 9.30 to 5 
(ends June 21) 

Last chance to see 
Spring is Sprung': Aberdeen 
Art Gallery and Museum. 
School hill; 10 IO 5 

Matisse: Illustrations io the 
“Amours" of Pierre De Ron- 
sard; Arts Centre, Vane Terrace, 
Darlington; 10 to 10. 

Music 

Concert by Lindsay String 
Quartet; Crucible Studio. Shef- 
field. 12.45 and 7.45. 

Folk music with Tony Rose: 
Crown Hotel, Biandford, 7.30. 

Victorian Music by Ian Par- 
tridge. Stephen Roberts and 
Richard Burncu: The Great 
HalL Univ of Reading. London 
Rd, 7.30. 

Organ recital; Coventry 
Cathedral. 1. 

Piano recital by Frank Lane; 
Norfolk Hotel, Richmond Hill, 

Bournemouth. 8. 

Organ recital by Simon Lind- 
ley; Albert Hall. Town Hall. 

Bolton. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Arnold Ma- 
hon: St Bartholomew's Church, 
Arm Icy. Leeds. 8. 

Concert by the Pennsylvania 
Chorale and Liverpool Phil- 
harmonic Choir. Philharmonic 
Hall. Liverpool. 7.30. 

Talks and lectures 

. Editing the Geographical 
Magazine by Mr Ian Bain; 
Department of Geography. 
Univ of Durham. South Rd. 
5.15. 

General 

Book Fain Memorial Hail. 
Beverley. 10 to 5. 

Book Fain Town Hall, 
Bakewell. 10 to 5. 


Nature Notes 


Many bird migrants have 
been exceptionally late arriving 
this year. Chiff-chaffs are nor- 
mally in their breeding terri- 
tories by mid-April but passage 
birds have still been turning up 
in unusual places in the last 
week. 

Newly-arrived yellow wag- 
tails have been feeding together 
round the legs of sheep and their 
growing lambs: at a distance 
they look like swaying butter- 
cups. Ruddy duck, a naturalized 
American species that has now 
been officially added to the 
Bnush list, are breeding on 
some southern waters: they are 
chestnut-coloured birds with a 
pointed tail, a black cap and a 
startling sky-blue beak. 

In a few meadows in the south 
of England snake's-head frit- 
i I lanes are in flower their 
nodding heads are like small 
lanterns, chequered with pink, 
purple and white, and there is 
also a pure creamy-white vari- 
ety. Wood anemones and blue- 
bells are abundant; cow parsley 
has grown tall and come into 
flower. 

On crab-apples, the dense 
clusters of flowers are red. pink 
and while, but the red will fade. 
Most trees are in full leaf, except 
for ashes and planes: that mo- 
ment in the year when the 
woods are at their fullest and 
freshest green is just coming 
up — a week or so later than 
usual. DJM 


Bond winners 


The winner of this week's 
£100.000 Premium Bond prize 
with number 4MP 537669 lives 
in Hampshire. £50.000: 4KS 
907717 (Motherwell). £25.000: 
1SWW 372939 (Chelmsford). 


Roads 


London and South-east Ml Edgeware 
Way between At Barrel Way and 
BroadfieWs Ann, contraflow on west- 
bound lanes. 

Mldandg: M5: only one lane open 
between junctions 4 and 5 
(Bromsgrove/Droitwicti). MS: contraflow 
at junction 16 (Stoke). A5: Shropshire, 
ligms ai Ensdon and Moumford Bridge on 
Shrewsbury io wtwtmgton Road. 

Nortic A1(M): bridge repairs, contraflow 
ai Barton Bridge interchange. N Yorks. 
MSI: lane closures at Biacow Bridge. 
Lancs, at | unction M61/M6. A4& Work on 
Tarporiey bypass, delays to north and 
south ol Tarporiey. 

Wales end Wait Kfc lanes dosed « 


Exeter, diversions at Bonn ay Road. 
Scotland: 1474: works to north ol Black- 
wood access, northonjnd carriageway 
closed. A8Z delays between Speak 
Bridge and Letterfmiay. delays. A9£ 
■^Surfacing, delays, igtits on Montrose 
Rci, Arbroath. 

Infor ma tion m pplsd by AA 


Anniversaries 


Births: Johann Gottliev Fich- 
te. philosopher. Rammenau, 
Germany. 1762; Dame Nellie 
Melba (Helen Armstrong), 
Richmond. near Melbourne, 
Australia. 1861. 

Deaths: Ann Boteyn. second 
wife of Henry VIIL executed. 
London 1536: James Boswell. 
London. 1795: Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne. novelist. Plymouth, 
New Hampshire. 1864; Jose 
Marti. Cuban poet and patriot, 
Dos Rios. Cuba. 1895: William 
Ewart Gladstone; prime min- 
ister. 1868-94. Hawarden, 
Clwyd. 1898: TE Lawrence, 
(Lawrence of Arabia). 
Bovingion. Dorset. 1935; 
Charles Ives:, composer. New 
York, 1954. 


Parliament today 


Com mo os (2.30): Social Se- 
curity Bill, progress on remain- 
ing stages. 

Lords (2.30k Gas BiU. 
committee, fourth day. 


Weather 


A ridge of high pressure 
will extend W across the 
UK- 


6am to midnight 


London, Mdtands, N Wales, NW. 
Cm N England: Dry, surety periods: 
wind SE ftght-, max 21C (70F) 

SE, Cm S, SW. E, E Anglia, 
Channel (stands, S Wales, Me of 
Man, N Ireland: Dry sunny periods, 
misty on some coasts; wind SE fight 
or moderate; max 20C (68F). 

Lake District, NE, Borders, Edin- 
burgh, Dundee, Aberdeen, SW 
Scotland, Glasgow, Cm Mgh- 
tands, Moray firth: “ 


NOON TODAY Prawn h tiwwn io mitfibati PSONTS Warn CM Ocduchd 

BjfrfMh am an etfnndiag edps) 

TTInF 



Dry, sunny 
ite becoming 


;; winds moderate) 
light maxi 9C( 

NE. NW Scotland, Aigyt Rather 
cloudy isolated light showers; 
becoming surety; wind S; max 15C 
(59F) 

Orkney, Shetland: Rather doudy; 
a fittte Isghtrain or drizzle at times, 
dying out wind SW fresh decreas- 
ing moderate, max 13C (55F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and 
Wednesday: Changeable with 
showers or longer of rata. Also 
some sunny Intervals. Warm at first 
but temperatures faffing to near 
normal 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c. 
dawk f, far: r, ram s. sun. 

C F 

Belfast e 1355 Goremsy 

f 1559 Inverne ss 

c 1355 Jereey 

c 1457 London 

Canfifl s 14 57 M'nchstsr 

Edinburgh c 1355 Newcastle 

Glasgow c 11 52 Rfildrerey 



High Tides 


1 akK k£*kg taw 
r. o-overcast i-fog: m 

MM-mtsl: r-rain: a 

mundsimonn: p-showers. 
Arrows snow wind " 

Sr **•" 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 1028 

52 1052 

58 

Aberdeen 

1007 

35 11 02 

3.5 

AvonmoUBi 

3.15 

103 

42« 

10.4 


7.45 

3.0 

830 

25 

Credit 

300 

95 

3.49 

9.7 

Demnport 

122 

4.5 

225 

44 

Dow 

7.56 

5.4 

820 

5.7 

FiUmuth 

1.02 

4.3 

1.55 

4.2 

Glasgow 

8.43 

42 1028 

4.0 

Harwich 

828 

3.7 

856 

25 

Hoytead 

7.12 

302 

44 

52 

755 

3.15 

45 

60 

nbaooatee 

227 

7.1 

3.11 

72 

LaMb 

1128 

4.6 



Liverpool 

7.55 

7.7 

837 

79 

Lowestoft 

6.40 

22 

618 

21 

Ky aaio 

8.51 

4.0 

9.06 

41 

HHort Haven 

2A2 

5.5 

326 

55 

tewftuey 

1.42 

5.6 

225 

55 

Oban 

251 

32 

340 

3.1 

Penzance 

1250 

45 

138 

4.4 

Portland 

249 

IS 

4.03 

15 

Portsmouth 

8.00 

3.8 

842 

4.1 

Shorettmn 

7.53 

49 

833 

5.4 

Southampton 

7.46 

3.7 

830 

40 

Swansea 

2.44 

7.5 

3.28 

7.6 

Tees 

1227 

42 1234 

45 

WHon-on-Nza 

030 

35 

8.48 

24 

Tide measured ki metres: 1m=32808ft, 


Around Britain 


D 


Sun Maes: 

SunSetK 


Sun Ram 

Max 

5.04 am 

851 pm 

EAST COAST 

hra 

m 

c 

F 

Moon sets 

Mom rises 

Sanborn 

23 

.01 

8 

46 

322 am 

204 pm 

Brid-igton 

33 

31 

9 

48 


The Week's Walks 


Today. The Jewish East End. meet Si 
PauTi Unoar ground. 11, Fawi's Fronds, 
meet Museum of London. 2.30: Beal ol 
British Pubs Night, meet Bond Street 
Urdergnxmd. 7 30. 

Tomorrow: A London VBage: Chelsea, 
meet Soane Square Underground. IV 
Tudor 4 Ekzatwthan London, meei Mu- 
seum ol London. 230: A Ghost Walk- The 
Haunted West End. mem Embankment 
Underground. 7.30. 

Wednesday: Inns Of Court England's 
Legal Heritage, meet Chancery Lane 
Underground. 11: EvJ London: Crime 
through me ages, mew SI Pouf a Under- 
ground. 2: An Historic Pub Walk: Belgra- 
via. meet Soane square underground. 
7 jo. 

Thursday: In me Fo o t s teps of Shertocfe 
Holmes, meet Embankment Under- 
l. 11: Pews. The Plague ano ttw 
_ Fire, meet Museum of London. 
SL30: Death m London, meat Covert 
Garden Underground. 7. 

Friday: Teasures and Trivtas of Royal 
Westminster, meet Green Park Under- 
ground. 11: The Cnartes Ockens Story, 
meet HoKwrn Underground. 2.30: An 
Histone Puo Walk: Fleet StreaL meal Si 
Raufs Underground. 7 30. 

Saturday: Hddan London at the Old 
Gate, meet AJogote Underground. It; 
Picturesque Hampstead Visage. mee» 
Hampstead Underground. 230. An His- 
tone Pub Walk: Thamesiaa. meet 
Blackfrtara Underground. 7.30. 

Sumter Aristocratic London, meet 
Green Park Underground. 1 UCt Solent 
Garden and the West End Theatre, meet 
Covert Garden Underground, 11.15. m 
the Footsteps Of StwricStt Holmes, meel 
Baker Street Underground. 2. An Hestonc 
Pub WaUv Cnresea. meal Skane Square 
Underground. 7 30. 


ground. 
Groat F 


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(6. Printed bv London Post 'Point- 
ers! Limned of 1 Vlrama Street. 
London Cl 0XN Monday 19 Mas. 
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matches TIM Times Pw Outer DMdemL 
No ditau us be accepted euubM these 
harm. 

>r>u must nave your card with you 
wnen you telephone. 

ir vou are unable to Idrohone 
sonvnn,' ctv can claim on vour behalf 
but ihcv must nave your card and call 
The rimes Portfolio claims line 
between uv stipulated limes 
No responsibility can be accepted 
for failure Io contact the claims oflice 
tor any reason wiuun the staled 
hours. 

.The above Instructions are *P- 
rtrcabte to both daily and weekly 
dividend ctemn*. 


Lighting-up time 

'London 9.21 pm to 4.32 am 
Bristol 9.31 pm to 4.42 am 
E dtoUHtf i 9.56pm to 4.22 am 
W a nchoster 9 39 pm to 4.31 am 
9.37 pm to 5.00 am 


Ctectm 


45 .02 
23 .02 




The pound 



Bank 

Bank 

AustrafiaS 

IS 

259 

fevitriaScb 

2459 

2350 

IMghiczi Fr 

7150 


fbmarfa 1 

2165 

2 

■ i 

1258 

1228 


820 

7.70 

France Fr 

11.12 

1057 

Germans Dm 
Greece Or 

250 

21750 

352 

Hong Kong S 

1220 

11.70 

tasted Pi 

1.155 

1595 

itfUre 

MWiM 

227550 

iaprtn Yen 

284.00 

250.00 

Netherlands Old 

353 

274 

Norway Kr 

1152 

1122 

Portugal Esc 

23250 

22050 

Sooth Africa Rd 

4.60 

350 

Spain Pm 

221.50 

20850 

Sv*»iienKr 

1129 


Switzeriend Fr 

251 

2.76 

USAS 

1585 

1515 

Yugostaria Dor 

64050 

50050 


25 .02 
COAST 

2.4 .01 

2 3 02 
25 .05 
2-9 .10 
2.6 .13 

25 .15 

2.6 .13 

26 .13 
12 .17 
2 1 .24 

24 23 
21 .30 
15 .28 

25 43 

27 .61 

2.7 57 


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ShankUn 

DiwiiimMiL 
□ouiNnuui 

Poole 
Swanage 
WeymauBi 
Exmouth 
Totgranoutb 
Torquay 24 68 

Falmouth 22 57 

Psnzance 3.7 .65 

ferae* 1.4 57 

Guernsey — — 

WEST COAST 
GciHy teiee 22 .42 

Newquay 4.1 .43 


14 57 doudy 
12 54 tarn 

14 57 doudy 

15 59 ran 


15 59 
14 57 
14 57 
13 55 

13 55 

14 57 

12 54 

13 55 

12 54 

13 55 

12 54 

13 55 

13 55 

14 57 
12 54 
14 57 
14 57 

14 57 

15 59 
15 59 


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Horocambg 13 .17 14 57 

Dougtas 22 .07 10 50 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
kjndon 21 .13 15 59 

jfkton Abpt 1.8 .15 15 59 

BriWaJICtril 22 .12 16 61 

Cw#fl(CW) 2a .45 15 59 

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northebn maAND 

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Abroad 


Rates tax small denomination bank notes 
Bare plc. 
travellers' 
currency 


omy as supplied by Barclays I 
“lie - 


Different rates apply ro 
Cheques and other 
business. 


Rated Price Index: 3863 

London: The FT Index dosed down 
13 1 at 1289 3 On Friday. 

New Yertu The Dow Jones industrial 
aiirage dosed down 15.01 at 
I.7S9.67 an Friday. 


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Geneva 
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23 73 HeWrtd 


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sirnt lo The Editor. TTts. The Time*. 
PO BoW. | Virginia Street. London. 


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THE TIMES 


17 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


Time for 
the Fed to 
halt bonds 
‘carnage’ 

From Maxwell Newton 
New York 

It has been a week of 

Canute in the bond markets of 

America. 

completion of the 
527 ounoa Treasury anptwuf 
on May 8, the rot began to set 
in. 

Weakness was evident the 
following day in the Treasury- 
bond fnloie in Chicago, al - 
though the cash bonds in New 
York were trading at or above 
die issae prices of 98 l4 A> for 
the “new” 30-year bond and 
99'%2 for the 10-year notes. 

By last Monday, however, it 
was obvious something nasty 
was iiagpesring. The Jtrne 
Treasury bond in Chicago 
dosed down the Gmit of two to 
97 Wi and the cash 30-year 
bond closed down to 98. 

There was no adverse eco- 
nomic news to justify this 
trend. 

The following (able traces 
the coarse of die disaster in 
the bends daring the rest of 
the week: 


June T-Bond New 
Tuesday +a*« 

Wednesday -%a J %2 

Thursday ->%- 

Friday -2%a jjfo 


The canse of this devasta- 
tion was not a flood of good 
news about an economic recov- 
ery in the United States. On 
the contrary, capacity utiliza- 
tion in April remained stuck at 
the 793 per cent March level. 
Industrial production in April 
was np a tiny 03 per cent to a 
level tint was still behm the 
Angnst 1985 level. 

The producer price index 
fell 0.6 per cent in April to give 
a 12 per cent annul rate of 
decline in this index in the fiist 
four months of the year — the 
biggest drop in four months in 
20 years. 

Nor was the canse of the 
devastation a puntimuyi weak- 
ness of the dollar as in April. 
The US unit shewed «nme 
strength while the debacle in 
the bond market was 
occurring. ' 

The reason for the destruc- 
tion of bond prices, wind left 
the yield on the 30-year bond 
about IS per ceaLCagahtst 
7.13 per cent at the lew about 
three weeks ago) was * hose 
short squeeze in the bends 
market 

Major companies lost huge 
amaants, running no to ffenres 
like $60 mlllimi to &0 mUfioa. 
On Friday, the Fed, concerned 
abut the collapse of bond 
prices seat a circular to the 
government dealers asking for 
information abut the extort 
of short positions. 

By the end of the week, 
there was stffl no indication 
that the mtretvefliag of short 
positions was oven. The losses 
began to threaten the viability 
of some companies and some 
form of Fed interven tio n was 
dearly called for. 

The bond market will soon 
be positioned for a renewed 
rally, based on weak econo mi c 
statistics, the discrediting of 
the “surge of growth” theory 
and the greater confidence the 
Japanese will enjoy now that 
the yen has fallen sfightiy 
from its recent peak 


BOARD MEETINGS 


TODAY -Interims: Australia 
and New Zealand Banking 
Group, Brooke Tool Engineer- 
ing, Matthew Brown, Groton 
Lodge and Knight Group, 
Crystalatc Holdings. Dubilier, 
United Scientific Holdings, 
John WilKarns-Fmak: Associ- 
ated British Foods, Godwin 
Warren Control Systems, Ivo- 
ry & Si me, Readicul Interna- 
tional, Tomkmsons. 
TOMORROW - Interims: A 
& P Apptedore Group, Etabby 
& Sons, Cramphom. Guinn- 
ess Peat Group. Majedie In- 
vestments, Ranks fiovis 
McDougalL Finals Bnnsh & 
American Film Holdings, 
Business Mortgages Trust. 
Country and New Town Prop- 
erties, Fine Art Develop- 
ments, Gartmore American 
Securities, Mersey Docks and 
Harbour Company. Mil es -33 . 
J. Sainsbury. Sapphire Petro- 
leum. Spectra Automotive 
and Engineering Products. 
WEDNESDAY - Internals: 
Associated Paper Industries, 
Avon Rubber. Bass. Cromte 
Group. Irish Distillers Group, 
National ' Australia Bank, 
Scottish American Invert- 
ment Company. Finals Au red 
Irish Banks, Hartwells Group, 
London and Northgn Group, 
Monks & Crane, Whitbread 
and Company. . . 

THURSDAY 

Won, Greenall Whitley. RIW 
Group. Finals: British Borneo 
Petroleum Syndicate, Cast- 
ings, Derilend Sm*,™: 
guson Industrial Homings, 
Hambros Invwimeirt TnK, 

Micro Focus Group, Plessey, 
Witan investment Company, 
Young and Co*s Breww. ' 
FRIDAY haenrom Kefcej 
Industries. Spectrum Group. 
Tafbex Group. Ms 
Caod & Leonard. J»“E5 
Leisure Shops. New Engajd 
Properties. H. Samuet^; 
an Enterprise invest** 
Company* Toshiba Col- 
oration. 



hits US rulebook snag 


The obstacles in the path of 
Uowfc bank’s bid for Stan- 
dard Chartered Bank began to 
look as if they could prove 
insuperable over the weekend 
as uncertainty grew over the 
states of an application to the 
United States Federal Reserve 
Board. 

The application is for per- 
mission from the Fed for 
Uoyds to own Union Rank of 
California, Standard’s valu- 
able US subsidiary.' 

Last week Goldman Sachs, 
advisers to Standard, gafrf that 
the Fed normally takes around 
90 days to grant permission, 
which would overshoot the 
60-day time limit allowed for 
takeovers in the Britain. With- 
out US permission fust 
Lloyd’s takeover of Standard 
would probably be impossible. 

Lloyds claimed it had filed 
an application last' Tuesday 
but on Friday the San Francis- 
co Federal Reserve denied 
that it had yet received it 


A spokesman, Mr Ron 
Sirpinsfci, said: “Uoyds started 
enquiries about bow to file a 
week ago, but we still have do! 
received anything from them. 
The permission-granting pro- 
cess can only start when the 
application is received”. 

It appears that Lloyds filed a 
draft application, the first step 
is the complicated process, 
last week. But the main pro- 
cess cannot begin until a 
formal application is filed. 
“From that point it normal- 
takes 30 (toys at the San 
rancisco Fed and then 60 
days at the central Fed Board 
in Washington”, said Mr 
SupinskL “The process is 
normally only speeded up 
when the bank being taken 
over is in trouble — but that is 
not the case with Union.” 

Mr Brian Pitman, chief 
executive of Lloyds, said: “It 
is possible we may not get 
permission in time to satisfy 
UK takeover rules — but that 


£ 



Brian Pitman: clearance 
likely to be in time 

is not likely”. Lloyds officials 
have already had talks with 
the Fed in both Washington 
and San Francisco. 

Mr Mike Thompson, a 
Uoyds director involved in 
the negotiations, called itatest 
case for getting US banking 
rules and British takeover 
rules to work together. A 


British bank has never had to 
face both time limits before. 

He said that since Lloyds 
had been given Fed permis- 
sion once— for owning Lloyds 
Bank California, which it is 
now selling — getting permis- 
sion a second time should 
pose no problem. 

“There is no reason to 
assume that City and US 
timetables cannot work 
together”, he added. The ap- 
plication could, however, 
have been filed a month ago. 
a The permission process has 
rigidly defined maximum 
time limits which, from the 
filing of a draft application to 
the final judgement, allow 
more than 1 00 days. The most 
recent application involving a 
British bank — by Wells Faigo, 
which is buying Crocker Na- 
tional from Midland — will 
have taken 85 days by the time 
h goes through. 

Standard’s formal reply to 
last week's offer document 
from Lloyds is expected this 
Thursday or Friday. 


Directors 
reject 
rate plan 

By Onr Financial Editor - 

The Institute of Directors, 
which has strongly criticized 
the effects of local rates on 
business, has rejected the 
Government's proposal for a 
uniform business rate to be 
fixed by central government. 

In a response today, the 
restitute says that such a rale 
would be harmful to business 
because: 

lit would reduce protec- 
tion for business ratepayers 
under an unsympathetic cen- 
tral government 

lit would be politically 
easier to increase a central 
business lax than other na- 
tional taxes directly paid by 
voters. 

I It would make the task of 
local business ratepayers' con- 
sultative committees virtually 
impossible. 

• Business would be forced 
to revert to national lobbying 
to protect its local interests. 

. The ' Insti tute saws that a 
uniform rate would be a policy 
of despair of achieving respon- 
sible and accountable l ocal 
government or of establishing 
effective co-operation be- 
tween local government and 
local business communities. 


BR wins £5m 
Chinese order 
for coaches 

British RaQ Engineering, 
which is expected to announce 
nearly 4,000 redundancies in 
its maintenance division to- 
morrow, has signed a £5 
million deal with China to 
build three prototype vehicles 
based on the company’s de- 
sign fora “high-tech” interna- 
tional railway coach. 

BREL wfil also co-operate 
dosdy in reorganizing China’s 
passenger coach factory 


at Changchun. 

Experts from Britain mil 
travel to Changchun to rede- 
stgn the plant and install the 
production lines for the 
coaches. 

Tbe-Gnnese plan to build 
1,500 coaches by the eariy 
1 990s based on the prototypes 
to be built at BREL’s Derby 
plant. 


Scrutiny likely on 
Japan car quota 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Whitehall sur- 
the Japanese mo- 
tor industry's voluntary 
British car import quota is 
expected after reports that the 
sales targets of some of the 
biggest British Nissan dealers 
have been almost doubled 
before the opening of the 
Japanese car factory at Wash- 
ington. Tyne and Wear. 

Nissan UK, the privately- 
owned distribution company, 
has said that neither it nor the 
Japanese producer intends to 
breach an agreement But 
dealers have been told that 
135,000 cars would be avail- 
able for sale this year com- 
pared with sales last year of 
about 105 ,OOOl 

Under the terms of the 
longstanding agreement be- 
tween the British and Japa- 
nese motor industries, 
imports are restricted to about 
II per.. cent of the British 
market. 

The deal was renewed at 
talks last month at which the 
Japanese agreed to continue . 
their “prudent marketing” 
policy. 

Nissan’s Washington plant, 
due to begin production in 
July, wiD be limited initially to 


24.000 cars a year. They wifl 
be built largely from imported 
components and, under the 
strictly-worded deal with the 
Government, will count as 
imports. 

A spokesman for the De- 
partment of Trade and Indus- 
try said yesterday that, if 
evidence was produced that 
Nissan was breaching the 
agreement, it would sera: an- 
swers from the company. “But 
until that happens we nave no 
reason to respond.” 

Nissan UK, which its own- 
er, Mr Octav Botnar, has 
agreed should eventually be 
bought by the Japanese com- 
pany, said recently that it had 
spent £50.million on appoint- 
ing dealers and refurbishing 
existing ones to cope with 

2.000 cars a month from the 
Washington plant 

The deal with the Govern- 
ment means that these must 
count against Nissan's im- 
ports, winch account for more 
than half of the - 11 per cent. 
The second phase of the 
Washington development en- 
visages building 1 00,000 cars a 
year, with an EEC content of 
80 per cent These would be 
counted as British. 


CBI to seek review 
of merger policy 

By Our, Industrial Correspondent 


Growing unrest among in- 
dustrialists over the present 
outbreak of “merger mania” 
will lead this week to a 
concerted call from members 
of the Confederation of British 
Industry for an in-depth re- 
view of the Government’s 
competition policy and the 
creation within two years of a 
Europe-wide system of rules. 

CBI leaders were unim- 
pressed by last week’s pledge 
by Mr Paul Channon, Secre- 
tary of State -for Trade and 
Industry, to “give serious 
thought” to a review of the 
competition Acts, and the 
issue s to be raised at the fiiU 
monthly meeting of the CBI 
ruling council on Thursday. 

Sir James deminson, the 
CBI jxreadeat, who is to 
relinquish the post also on 


Thursday, said today: “Mem- 
bers are concerned about the 
interpretation of merger poli- 
cy. Uncertainty about the 
application of restrictive prac- 
tices policy, particularly in 
relation to collaborative ven- 
tures 1ms also increased the 
need fora review.” 

One of the main tests any 
competition policy should 
meet, he said, was to encour- 
age British companies to be 
more internationally competi- 
tive. 

He added: “To achieve this 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry, the Office of Fair- 
Trading and the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission 
need to look at international 
and EEC sources of* 
competition.” 


US attack 
on insider 
trading by 
foreigners 

From Onr US Economics 
Correspondent 

The US Securities and Ex- 
change Co mmissio n, which 
last week announced the hug- 
est insider trading case in Wall 
Street's history, has launched 
a new campaign against for- 
eign investors who earn huge 
profits by circumventing the 
US law. 

Mr Gary Lynch, director of 
enforcement for the SEC said 
in an interview that due to 
recent gains in unlocking bank 
secrecy laws, his agency ex- 
pects to announce a number of 
new cases against foreign in- 
vestors in the weeks ahead. 

Speculation was widespread 
that the new cases will involve 
arbitrageurs, the professional 
specialists who bet on the 
outcome of mergers. “There 
are cases under investigation.” 
The SEC campaign has 
already resulted in two spec- 
tacular cases over the last 
three months which have 
shaken Wall Street and sent a 
strong wanting to foreign in- 
vestors trading in US markets. 

Both cases depend on the 
SECs ability to unlock bank 
secrecy laws in the Bahamas 
and Switzerland. 

The first was announced 
three months ago when the 
SEC recovered $7.8 million 
(£5.16 million) from foreign 
investors accused of earning 
illegal profits by trading on 
insider information in the 
shares of Santa Fe Interna- 
tional Corporation. 

The second was announced 
last week. The SEC is accusing 
Mr Dennis Levine, a manag- 
ing director of Drexel, 
Burnham Lambert, of illegally 
earning $12.6 million in the 
largest inrider trading case in 
US history. 

The key to the Levine case 
was the SECs ability to identi- 
fy him as the client of Bank 
Leu, a Nassau subsidiary of a 
large Swiss bank, officials said. 

SEC officials said that in 
1984, the latest year for which 
figures are available, foreign 
investors traded shares on US 
markets valued at $123.7 bil- 
lion, up sharply from $75.4 
billion in 1981. 


Trade peace a 



US 


From Bafley Morris, Washington 
The United States and Eu- dnded payments oflarge-scate 
are locked in a dispute compensation and a coordi- 
‘ “ ’ ’ naied worldwide effort to roll 

back subsidies over a specific 
agreed time. 

Mr Baldrige said that action 
on the trade front was essen- 
tial to contain mounting, elec- 
tion-year protectionist 
pressures in Congress. These 
were now hs strong against 
Europe as they were earlier 


which dwarfs all other world 
trade problems, and it can be 
resolved only through high- 
level action by beads of stale, 
according to Mr Malcolm 
Baldrige, the United States 
Secretary of Cbnunerce. 

In an interview with The 
Times Mr Baldrige painted a 
grim picture ^^S-European 
relations. The conflicts 
which arise amongst nations 
over trade issues are now 
more serious than the prob- 
lems of military defence or 
other international 

relationships”, he said. 

The longstanding dispute 
over agricultural made was 


The US would resist 
Europe's latest efforts to ex- 
tract emergency short-term 
trade concessions from Japan 
which pushed the Nakasone 
government towards an im- 
port quota system. 

Meanwhile, Mr “Tip’ 



ovti ayi. —— — mcauwiuib, nu ny 

spilling over into other arm, o , N e jii i Speaker of the House 
creating a baddash against Q e Renresentatives. predicted 


creating — — , 

Europe which had to be 
resolved to prevent further 
deterioration in the 
relationship. , 

Mr Baldrige said tha t the 
US was continuing to press 
Europe to take coordinated 
economic sanctions ""•* 
Libya which would 


of Representatives, predicted 
the passage ofa Bffl, opposed 
by the Administration and 
which requires the President 
to retaliate against the unfair 
trade: practices of Europe and 
Japan. . 

At the same time, the 
Administxafibn faces heavy 
criticism is the RepuWican- 


*to*rute controlled Senate for its feil- 

rould impose* additional trade negotiations .with other 
SSrions aTTieviewral.flte ; 

evidence of possible serious - Senator John Danforth, 
involvement in the latest ter- chairman of the International 
rorist activities. . Trade- subcommittee, de- 

The US dispute with Eu- . .scribed the Administration’s 
rope required short and long- trade policies as 

term solutions on which the “Inadequate”, Senator Lloyd 
Reagan AdmiraStratom was Bwnsen, tberankuig minority, 
w ^g jan g . he said. These in* - .member, -criticized the Ad- 


Malcolm 
creating a 

ministration for “having no 
policy a! all”. 

The pressing problem, 
which has brought US-EEC 
relations to the boil, is the $1 
billion trade which wifi be 
affected by the accession of 
Spain and Portugal to the 
Community. , 

The US, using unusually 
strong language, claims that 
the EEC acted illegally is 
drawing up Portugal's trade 
Idans and must pay large 
compensation, under General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade rules in the case of 
Spain. 

But tins compensation is 
only a symptom of the much 
larger agricultural trade dis- 
pute, which has gained rather 
than lost importance over the 
span of President Reagan's 
term, of office, Mr Baldrige 
said. 

The US was now as bad a 


sinner as Europe in violating 
the free trade commandments. 

“Both the United Stales and 
the European Community 
have dreadful agricultural pol- 
icies, which are destabilizjng 
world trade and are costing 
each side more and more 
money. We both spend about 
the same amount on subsi- 
dies, about $20 billion a year.” 

The growing resources con- 
sumed by agricultural subsi- 
dies was unsustainable at a 
time when governments faced 
other pressing problems such 
as high unemployment. 

But despite the importance 
of the issues and the high 
stakes involved, agricultural, 
trade and finance ministers 
had beat unable to resolve the 
problem after more than five 
years of talks. “It has to be a 
summit decision. Only the 
heads of states can do it” 

Mr Baldrige said that for the 
past six months be had been 
working on a plan, a phased 
drawdown over a ax to ten- 
year period of worldwide agri- 
cultural subsidies, which 
would require the endorse- 
ment of the heads of the US, 
European and Japanese 
governments. 

He hoped that this would be 
a priority issue at the next 
economic summit of Western 
leaders. The realization was 
growing In the Reagan Admin- 
istration that, much like ex- 
change rates before it trade 
was sow the issue which had 
the most profound impact on 
geopolitical relationships. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Why the British dole 
queue does not work 


It is worth recalling that most 
economic forecasts, not just those of 
officialdom, depicted a static and 
even foiling unemployment total this 
year. Instead, our jobless total has 
started to go up again. Between May 
and November last year, the under- 
lying total of unemployment actually 
foil a modest 7,000. Since then, it has 
risen 88,000. 

This rise reflects a check to the 
growth of industrial output last year, 
and a more recent decline in manufac- 
turing, that has plainly taken the 
Treasury by surprise. Its Budget-time 
forecast suggested 1986 would be a 
stronger year of growth than 1987. 
That expectation has certainly 
changed. The surge in unemployment 
has yet to meet the structural breakers 
on which a little statistical optimism 
was based. The number of school- 
leavers is foiling, the number of work 
schemes increasing. But the latest 
jobless figures have at last scorched 
the Prime Minister with their dragon's 
breath. 

Right on cue, in one of the best 
collective academic analyses of the 
British economy in years, there comes 
today a detailed portrait of our 
unemployment problem. Professor 
Richard Layard, of the Centre for 
Labour Economics at the London 
School of Economics, has (together 
with Steve Nickell) done more than 
anyone to tease out the facts behind 
the myths about Mrs Thatcher's new 
“dragon”. 

The most telling feet about un- 
employment is that if you lose your 
job today, your chances of finding a 
new one in three months are probably 
still over 40 per cent; better than they 
were in 1981, even though unemploy- 
ment has continued to rise, and not 
that much worse than in the late 1970s 
— even though unemployment has 
trebled since then. 

Indeed, short-term unemployment 
has been foiling gently since 1981. But 
the number of long-term unemployed 
has gone on rising. And their pros- 
pects are quite different Of those 
unemployed for three years, the 
proportion finding jobs in the next 
three months is as low as 6 per cent 

The famous metaphor for this is the 
flower shop. Today’s blooms which 
do not find a buyer will have a worse 
chance tomorrow than new, fresh 
flowers; after a time, drooping in a 
bucket at the back of the shop, they 
have precious little chance at afl- Thus 
it is that while the number of people 
leaving the unemployment register 
each month has risen sharply since 
1981, the number of long-term un- 
employed has gone on rising. 

This, the Government has to face, is 
the inescapable consequence of the 
severe slump of its early years in 
office. The steep foil in output suffered 
in 1979-80 can be gradually corrected. 
But unemployment cannot be cor- 
rected in the same smooth fashion, 
because in the meantime the stock of 


unemployed human capital seems to 
depreciate fast. 

The different quality of long-term 
unemployment goes a long way to 
explain the vicious spiral in which 
rising real wages squeeze employ- 
ment, but the resulting unemploy- 
ment does not seem to damp down 
wages. Professor Layard teases out 
other contributions to this spiral. He 
does find evidence that over 15 years . 
or so union militan cy has bolstered ; 
wage pressure. His analysis of the 1 
vexed impact of social security bene- V 
fits is also instructive. 

It has not (contrary to knee-jerk 
public opinion) become more profit- . 
able to live on the dole. But the 
increase in long-term unemployment 
has naturally altered the preferences 
of the unemployed For the long-term 
jobless, it is for harder to find work. So 
they are naturally more likely to rest 
on a low level of income than scour 
the country for a job. (Professor 
Layard notes that America’s jobless 
do make many more job applications 
than the British.) 

He is also an acute analyst of the 
catchphrase “ mism atch” — the belief 
that all the unemployed are in the 
wrong place and the wrong occupa- 
tion. Entriguingly, regional imbalances 
have not got proportionately larger; 
but since all die jobless totals have 
grown, the excess numbers of un- 
employed in the worst-hit regions 
have risen enormously. Wages have 
not adjusted to reflect the differences. 

By contrast, they have adjusted 
much more in relation to skill 
shortages. Unemployment, it is worth 
remembering, largely affects the un- 
skilled, among whom it is about five 
times as high as among the skilled 
There has been a widening of wage 
differentials, but seemingly without 
helping the unskilled back to work. 

The obvious conclusion is that 
differentials will have to widen still 
further; and here we must begin to 
reap lessons from the Layard crop of 
facts. Three stand out: 

• The need to do more — much more 
— to bring the long-term unemployed 
back into work, and to realize that 
they are not a temporary problem; 

• The need to widen wage differen- 
tials, but also to recognize that in a 
small and homogenous society such as 
Britain they may not gape wide 
enough without employment sub- 
sidies; 

• And the need to recognize the 
double bonus provided by more real 
training, both in shunting the un- 
employable unskilled into the em- 
ployable skilled category, and thereby 
in reducing overall wage pressure. 

All these changes are for more 
important than marginal differences 
in a slow rate of overall economic 
growth; but they have small chance in 
an economy that stands stilL 

Sarah Hogg 

Economics Editor 


Merrett 
revival 

Merrett Holdings, one of 
the largest underwriting 
groups at Lloyd's insurance 
market, should make taxable 
profits of more than £4.5 
million this year, the chair- 
man, Mr Stephen MeTrett, 
said. 

In 1985 the group's profits 
slumped to £1.8 million from 
£3.3 million in 1984 after a 
sharp decline in [unfit com- 
mission following large losses 
on some syndicates in the 
1982 year of account 

Sale plea 

Bankers Trust has written to 
Boosey & Hawkes sharehold- 
ers, urging them to ask their 
board to open negotiations for 
the company to be bought by 
Music Sales, a company 
owned by the American music 
publisher, Mr Bob Wise. Un- 
der this plan Boosey’s musical 
instrument company, which is 
responsible for Boosey &. 
Hawkes’ losses, would be sold 
to a management buyout 
team. 

Fraser change 

Professor Roland Smith, 
who helped House of Fraser 
fight off Lonrfao and wel- 
comed the At Fayed takeover, 
is to step down as chairman of 
Fraser board following the 
appointment of a new chief 
executive from July 1. Mr 
Ernest Sharp, his deputy, is 
also likely to leave. 

New lira plan 

Italy is planning to launch a 
new kra worth 1,000 present 
lire following Cabinet approv- 
al for currency reform. New 
one lira notes and coins worth 
1,000 present lire would be 
issued 7 months after parlia- 
mentary approval for the 
move and the two currencies 
would ran parallel for a far- 
ther six months. 

BM delay 

BM Group’s offer docu- 
ment for Benftwti Concrete 
Machinery has been delayed 
“for administrative reasons,” 
and it is now likely to appear 
tomorrow. BM is offering £19 
million for Benford. 


Swire Pacific Limited 

Final dividends for the year ended 
31st December 1985 

Scrip Dividends 

The average last deal prices of the Company's shares 
on the Hong Kong stock exchange for the five trading 
days up to and including 16th may 1985 were: 

HKS 

‘A' shares 13.20 

'B' shares 2.19 

In a letter to shareholders from the Chairman dated 5th 
May 1986, it was announced that the recommended 
final dividends for 1985 of 97.0E per 'A' share and 19.4£ 
per ‘B‘ share will take the form of scrip dividends to be 
satisfied by the additional 'A' shares and the additional 
‘B’ shares respectively, but that shareholders will be 
able to elect to receive dividends in cash in respect of afl 
or, part of their shareholdings. It was further announced 
that entitlements to fractional shares will be disregarded 
and tiie benefit thereof will accrue to the Company. - 

Applying the average last deal prices noted above, the 
number of new shares which shareholders wilt receive 
in respect of their existing shares on the record date of 
25th April 1986, for, which elections to receive cash are 
not deposited by 26th May 1986 either with the 
Registrars in Hong Kong ex’ with fee Registrars Agents 
in the United Kingdom, will be calculated as follows: 
For ‘A’ shares: 


Number of new 

Number of 


0.970 

‘A‘ shares to 
be received 

= existing 
‘A’ shares 

X 

1320 

For *B' shares 
number of new 

number of 


0.194 

'B'shares to 
be received 

= existing 
'B' shares 

X 

2.19 


and will be rounded down to the nearest whole number 
of new shares, fractional entitlements being disre- 
garded. the new shares will rank pari passu wife fee 
existing shares of the Company except feat they will not 
rank for the final diddends in respect of fee year ended 
31st December 1985 or for the capitalisation issue 
which wfll be considered at fee annual general meeting 
of the Company to be held on 29th May 1986. 

Subject to the approval of the recommended final 
dividends by the shareholders at the annual general 
meeting of the Company, certificates for the new ‘A 1 
shares and 'B' shares in respect of the scrip dividends 
and warrants for dividends, where cash elections have 
been made, will be despatched {shareholders on 2nd 
June 1986. 

By order of the Board 
JOHN SWIRE & SONS (H.K.) LIMITED 
Secretaries 


Hong Kon 
9th May 1 


I 


Swire Pacific Limited 

The Swire Group 

Swire Haase, Hong Kong. 




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MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


-•/* • ; • "J- : •-afvt-l - 


^ ABC Medical Services Member Claim Form 


INSTRUCTIONS 

1. Complete one Member Gaim Form forc**ii pxaenL 

2. Attach aa Itemised hill containing patient's name, 
provider of savices type date sod annum charged. 


Mail CnpIcM Farm To: 
ABC MEDICAL SERVICES 
f>. O l BOX 300 
LONDON. W1 


PATIENTS Name 

Dawof Rif|h 

SEX 

□ □ 

RELATKWaUP TO EMPLOYEE 
□ □ □ □ 

LAST FIRST MIDDLE Bay 1 -<■ 1 

Mile fonfc 

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EMPLOYER 




COVERED BY BUT A7 

CD YES □ 

IF YES, 

HO EFFECTIVE 

[Hasp! Part A 

. LI. 

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GROUPNO. I COVERAGE I PHONE NUMBER 

I core 


EMPLOYEE NAT. 
INSURANCE NO. 


EMPLOYEE NAME 


NAME OF EMPLb YEH 


DATE OF 1ST SHI VICE 


ILLNESS ACCIDENT WORK RELATED PREGNANCY RELATED 

I I YES f I fO I j YES I 1 NO QJyB [ J NO 1 I YES 1 |n3 



DATE OF ACCIDENT 

Big I M« I Pi- 


IIOW ACCIDENT OCCURRED 


WHAT INJURIES WERE SUSTAINED 



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Aiduteouol Design 


Arch News 


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Master Architect . 

The man featured m this month's 
iffioe may well be one of Oxford's 
best-kept secrets. Yoo may not 
-know his face, but if yoo live itr 
Oxfotd you know his work — that 
is. if yoo’ve ever vished civic ami 
residential buildings. The moo is 
Arthur Erickson, Architect, and be 
has called Oxford home for most 
of his life. 

While the layperson may not 
recognise his face or name, during 
a remarkable and prolific career 
spanning more than 30 years. 
Arthur Erickson has received 
dozens of hoooraiy degrees and 
virtually every major professional 
and personal award. To list them 
all would take pages, bet they 
indude the Man of the Year 
sward 1972 and die Tau Sigma 
Gold Medal for excellence ui 
design. 





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Financial Report 

The Watermill Restaurants Ltd 
( 1985 Year m Review 1 



TOTAL RESTAURANT SALES 
Less Cost of Sales 
Gross Profit 

Leas Operating Expenses 

Less Interest 
Net Profll before Tax 

(£ in thousands) 

Net Income 

(fax mi fflon s of Cs) 


£115^00 £125,790 £130.723 XlSLSaO 

£81.460 £85,035 X7L9M I £70.140 

£54.140 £80.775 £87.720 £77.520 

£32.722 £3X722 I34J23 £31.790 

£21.418 SMJB77 533.006 £45,730 . 

£251 £228 £185 £06 

£21.107 £24.7$! £3X821 C4&634 


Total Sales 

(in mllWons of £4 


■ 13.1 

- 12.1 

10.8 PzJl 


NOTE: Six restau r a n ts owned by others. As consideration far mm 
In cludin g certain directors and offices of Company receives 35% of 
the Company, are managed by the Com pany operating income as deQn 
under contracts entered into in fiscal year Company rompeiismrb tbt 

1972. out of Us manage ment fee 


operating income as defined in the agreemen ts . 
Company rompcnw i r* the rest auran t mmagn a 
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PHILIPS GRAY AND JONES INT ERNATI ONAL MARKETING CONSULTANTS. 

OSSA 

30hApd, 1986 

Mr. N Smith. 

73 Hatton Gardena, 

London. 

NW1 

DearMr.Smrth, 

Inrosoonse to your recent enquiry concerning ABCs recent move into 
rterrrsiionoi moifcets l rotor you to ihe iotsfa shown below. 


Unted Kingdom 

United States 

Canada 

AustrcAa 

France 

Germany 


KB5 NB4 

2000 * £000 % 

2050 <2 1983 55 

1045 21 577 16 

647 13 361 10 

«8 IO 3» 8 

398 B 216 6 

2Sfi t> ISO ■ 5 

4976 KP 3406 ICO 


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THE TIMES MONDAY MAY TQ IQKrt 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


19 


t USM REVIEW") 



the retail 



One of the more pronrinent 
reatures of the slock market in 
lecent yean; has been the 
restructuring of the retail sec- 
tor, with a spate of mergers 
and takeovers accompanying 
launches of new chains and 
the repoatioxung of existing 
names in the marketplace. 

A co mmon theme has been 
apparent in this retail revolu- 
tion; the.need for good design 
tor shop interiors is now seen 
to be as vital a component of 
retail management policy as 
mere hanrticing ■ 

PoUBcity 

that has been focused on the 
high-flying design consultan- 
cies . that give tired retail 
unages a new fece, very little 
attention has been paid to the 
companies that actually im- 
plement the new look — the 
shopfitters. 

There are only a couple of 
quoted shopfitting companies 
in existence, but one of the 
most exciting is Havelock 
Entraps. 

Havelock was founded in 
1972 as the internal 
shopfitting subsidiary of 
Mackays Stores, a Scottish 
menawear c hain. 

Havelock woiks with estab- 
lished design co nsultancies 
such as AID and Fitch, yet 
also has a strong design capa- 
bility of its own and about 30 
per cent of its work is actually 
designed in-house. 

It started work for third 
parlies in 1974 and came to 
the USM in 1984 by way of a 
placing. Since then the compa- 
ny has achieved impressive 
growth in profits and earnings, 
reflecting both the boom m 
the shopfitting industries and 
tire strong position that Have- 
lock enjoys within it. 


Most work is bespoke 
completely tailored- to the 
user's requirements. 

Once approved, . the 
shopfitting products are built 
at one of the' company’s 
factories and. then transported 
to the client’s premises where 
they are fitted by- a team of 
local specialists. - 

The company is capable of 
undertaking a wide range of 
work, including all types of 
architectural joinery, suspend- 
ed ceilings and electrical 
contracting. 

There is also a special 
service, Mirrorspot, a means 
of ultrasonic glass welding 
enabling Havelock to offer 
very attractive glass cabinets 
and showcases!. Mirrorspot is 
operated under an exclusive 
licence agreement from Ashai 
of Japan. 

On the corporate front the 
company bad a quiet first year 
marked by a couple of very 
small acquisitions funded by 
cash. 

But early this year it made a ' 
major aquisition of a highly 
complementary business, - 
Store Design, by the i s s u e of 
shares which effectively dou- 
bled Havelock's market 
capitalization. 

Store Design, also based in 
Scotland, specializes in the 
design and manufacture of 
modular display systems on 
an off-tbe-peg basis — selling a 
basic product which is only 
partly customized to the user’s 
specific requirements. - 

The two companies will 
retain their own identities in 
the shopfitting market but 
there tnD be some cross- 
savings resulting from the 
merger. There should alsobe 
scope for cross-marketing the 


two companies’ specialist 
skills to each other’s clients. 

Havelock has made a profit 
forecast for the year to April 
this year of £900,000, equiva- 
lent to about 9p of earnings. 

For the year to April 1987, 
assuming a full contribution 
from Store Design, profits of. 
about £2. 7 million seem possi- 
ble, which results in earnings 
of about 14p. 

At the current market price 
of 21Sp this gives a p/e of only 
15. which seems very conser- 
vative given the strong growth 
still bang generated in the 
retail shopfitting industry and 
the scarcity of investment 
opportunities within it. 

The sales promotion indus- 
try is providing the USM with 
its newest entrant, with duke 
Hooper being placed by CCM. 

Clarke Hooper is placing 2. 1 
million shares at 130p, imply- 
ing a p/e of 18 in the year to 
April this year. 

The company is one of die 
more conservatively run busi- 
nesses in its sector and does 
not look likely to embark 
upon an ambitions acquisition 
programme' although there 
may be some activity given its 
links with international sales 
promotion agencies. 

Nevertheless, it is soundly 
managed and fully enjoying 
the benefits of the rapid 
growth in sales promotion. 

Although the rating is not so 
attractive as KLP which 
stands on a prospective p/e of 
only 13, the issue should be a 
success. 

Mark Sheppen} 

The author is an analyst 
at Phillips & Drew, ihe 
stockbrokers. 


APPOINTMENTS 


C H Bearer (Holdings): In a 
restructuring of the boaid, Mr 
Dick Aden and Mr Terry 
UpsaB have been made group 
managing directors. responsi- 
ble for contracting, and homes 
and property activities respec- 
tively. Mr Alan Chappie has 
been, appointed financ e di- 
rector- 

. ; Royal Dbufton: Mr Stanley 
Edwards has joined the board 
as peraonnd director. 

' Walter Lawrence & Sore Mir 
Brian Scull becomes division- 
al managing director. 

- Brookes & Vernons Public 
Relations: Mr Pud Mande- 
▼flle. becomes chief executive. 
Mr Graham Lucas is made 
managing director. Mr Paul 
Shrimytoa joins as senior 
account executive. 



Stanley Edwards 

Berger Industrial Coatings: 
The new board is - Mr Bill 
Coffins, chairman; Dr Ed, 
Hoojgh, managing director. Dr 
David Montgomery, opera- 
tions director; Mr Bruno 
Giordan, technical director; 
Mr Peter Tape, finance 
direcior/seaetaiy; Mr Geoff 
Weightman, "Mr Hans 
Kaeppers, and Mr Rolf 
Jansson, - non-executive 
directors. 


Ashley and Rode Mr Fred 
Pickles, chair man of Ashley 
and Rock, has been made a 
main board director ofWolse- 
ley, as chief executive of the 
electrical and consumer prod- 
ucts division, which includes 
Ashley Accessories and Rock 
Electrical Accessories. Mr 
Randell Soley becomes man- 
aging. director - sales and 
marketing . of Ashley and 
Rock. Mr Ken Barton be- 
comes managing director of 
Ashley Accessories. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Company 


Pnoa Orta Ones Dw 
H a * w 


P/E 


57.9m Mm. 

UMNm 
1074m Aimt TMt 
198.7m Am Am* S*c 
59 Jm AMtown 
1248m MtsHtc Aamts 
HBJhi Batiks* 

7S6m Bany 
218&B Br Aram 
4£4 oi Br Empn Sac 
Brh^ 

73-dm Cmcim Japan 

l&M DMBy me 
20 dm DoCap 
1148m Omyton Cow 
31 3m Dayton F«r Em 
177A« Dayton JWM . 
33toi Domna Lon 
IB 1m Eton Mmr Amt 
■U&On Ettrewon 
642» EMcOM 


114 
133 
131 
330 
182 
■m 

115 
237 

57 

431. 


217 

M0 

-184 

3*0 


-a 

+B 

-3 

+10 


3.1D 27442 
SOS AS 35.1 
4 A 34385 
8S 23 55.1 
44 74 57 JJ 
08 OS ... 
390 34 <32 

130 as .. 

27 47S1J 
8.7 U 4n a 
217 5.1 230 
21 U«42 
3000 2S 385 

as as ' 

120 85187 


733n Enghsn Scat 02 

978m Era*® NY 122 

211 8m Entian 148 

483m F 8C A MI 10* 

UGmFOCPlBiC 188 

114M Fanny 2BD 

106.7m Fnt Sax Amor 33* 

frtt ito Gan 100 

880m Ftommg AxmocKi S33 

345m FW -io Qm t* I72'i 

annH^Mnw 333 

1723m F to mn p Ft t EM 114 
18Jm Ftomng FMM 133 


2138m FhmjMimWi V8 
1815m ^oanm W 
389m fwmng Tacn 192 
84 M Hanwg ummm h I 3n 
440 Alt For c3 85 

714m CBC CmW 101 
4BM or Japan 17* 

Am dmm FtmdB is* 
Usm Gtnami Com aw 
*82m QMgm Sax* ras 






132 

•-6 

46 



184 

•-8 

83 

13 783 


219 

S 

51 

23 016 


317 

-3 

24 

06-.. 


215 

-15 

83 

26 285 


192 

-1 

6.1 

34 424 

1 M lHKOift 

275 

-1 

138 

56 262 

| 3Bl5r> towt m SDOOttt 

B47 

+2. 

82 

KM 1 M 1 

1 1082*1 bnr Ck> 

27? 

to-7 

890 24 77-3 1 


S7b 

-1 

61 

02 .. 1 


91 

-3 

33b 33362 1 


wnm 

-1 

96 

40 273 1 

IB 

61 

+1 

32 

52153 I 

3 5 SMm Ujb Trout 

«1 

-2 

61*10.0 207 1 

T133M Itortrti 

113 

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1191000 Basam c*jw 
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( GILT-EDGED ) 

Expect austerity until Gas sale 


Bor much of the past 12 
months a debate about the 
propriety of monetary policy 
m Britain has been quietly 
raging among government 
officials. On one side, the 
combined forces of the Trea- 
sury and the political hierar- 
chy maintained that con- 
ditions were satisfactory. 
They dismissed the evidence 
of the traditional data re- 
leases, which were daimed to 
be heavily distorted and, 
therefore, inisleading. 

Tire genuine picture was 
revealed by interest rates, 
which had stayed consistently 
high in real terms during the 
preceding J2 months. 


tion was seen as the ultimate 
arbiter of oedit conditions. 
Accordingly, the feet that the 
pace of price rises was slow- 
ing dramatically amounted to 
persuasive evidence of mon- 
ey policies being sensible. On 
the basis of tins analysis, it 
was concluded that there was 
no justification for any 
moves towards restraint. 

The other side of the 
argument was supplied by the 
Bank of England (and to a 
very minor degree by the 
City). It acknowledged that 
there were wrinkles in the 
money supply statistics, bat 
said that the releases could 
not be ignored entirely. It 
in ted out that secondary 
sources (which had an 
unblemished track recced in 
monitoring monetary devel- 
opments) also showed very 


e fect, for instance, that 
stock market prices had surg- 
ed and that the volume of 
turnover had been buoyant 
convinced many people that 
money was too loose. Others 
saw evidence of too expan- 
sive a credit environment in 
the behaviour of the housing 
market 

Admittedly, there was no 
near-term prospect of higher 
inflation, felt that was simply 
became of softness in com- 
modity prices in general, and 


of the collapse of oil prices in 
particular. 

When these influences had 
worked their way through to 
the retail level, however, we 
would be left with a repealed 
pace of inflation, whim was 
very much higher. Unit la- 
bour costs were rising at 
about 4 per cent a year, and 
the indications were that the 
trend was accelerating. If 
credit policies should remain 
expansive, the likelihood was 
that inflation at the end of 
1987 would be uncomfort- 
ably high. 

To guard against that even- 
tuality, a modest credit 
squeeze in the immediate 
future was essential. 

In the fate spring the Bank 
began to get the upper hand. 
The April money supply 
numbers were particularly 
significant in this respect 
Everyone had anticipated a 
fairly heavy increase, but the 
3 per cent advance in £M3 
came as a bombshell. 

The Treasury tried to stand 
its ground, bat it found its 

in^tbe* C^inet evaporating. 
When the March overseas 
trade returns were seen to 
have been in substantial defi- 
cit, the case for restraint was 
strengthened. When finally, it 
began to emerge that unit 
labour costs were showing no 
signs of subsiding, the pres- 
sure for change became 
irresistible. 

It was probably the fears 
about the longer-term out- 
look for inflat ion which final- 
ly swung the Cabinet behind 
the hawks. 

The result was the go- 
ahead for the Bank to take a 
somewhat more aggressive 
fine on funding. Aimed at 
reducing 
the 
policy 

The extra availability of stock 
sapped their enthusiasm and 
pnees began to retreat 

For a while; this pattern 
has to be expected to persist. 



The authorities are likely to 
want to produce at least a 
couple of monthly money 
supply figures which imply 
that control has been re- 
established, and they may be 
particularly anxious to re- 
impose an dement of disd- 
pline in pay settlements in the 
run-up to the new wage 
round. 

The consequence of their 
posture is fikdy to be a 
stronger pound and a worsen- 
ing trend within unemploy- 
ment, but they are going to 
ha ve lo accept this as the cost 
of longer-term salvation. The 

ab^ to reactivate liquidity 
again before the end of the 
year so as to return the 
economy to a rapid growth 
mode, but without any dis- 
quieting inflationary ten- 
dencies. 

Precisely what the timing 

of their change in lack will be 

is difficult to estimate, but an 
important landmark in this 
respect is the flotation of 
British Gas. As their experi- 
ence with British Telecom 
taught them, fairly relaxed 
money conditions are an 
essential ingredient in getting 
the stock away in the first 
place, and in producing a 
politically valuable price ap- 
preciation thereafter. Our 
guess is that in the autumn, 
therefore, any austerity will 
evaporate. From then until 
the election, credit will once 
again be quite expansive. 

What this means in terms 
of price action in the gjlt 
market is a rather subdued 
performance in the near 
term, but a new and possibly 
quite substantial rally later 
on. For the next several 
months, the urgency to sell 
_ is going to be the 

min an t factor. 

Good inflation reports, a 
strong pound, and cuts in 
interest rates at home and 
abroad may revive investor 
enthusiasm from time to 
time, but the demand will not 


be allowed to come through 
prices to any substantial de- 
gree. It will instead be used by 
the Bank to dispose of extra 
stock. Only when the po- 
lished money numbers begin 
to respond, or when pay 
settlements seem to moder- 
ate, will the selling pressure 
be removed. 

Later on, and certainly by 
October, the market will be 
well placed to advance. With 
inflation at negligible levels, 
and with base rates having 
been cut by as much as three 
points, the lift-off could be 
dramatic. 

The key issue among inves- 
tors will then be the longer- 
term outlook for inflation. If 
as we suspect, pay increases 
are down to 6 per cent, foe 
actual analysis will be bullish. 
The trend for unit labour 
costs will be upwards at only 
about 3 per cent a year aha 
that, coupled with a fairly 
stable picture on the com- 
modities front, wil] inspire 
new optimism. 

The long-dated issues will 
almost certainly be the best 
performers in this environ- 
. menu Their extra gearing will 
be the crucial factor in any 
general drift to lower yields, 
and investors will be keen 
buyers in their attempts to 
lock into ‘'unrepeatable” real 
returns. 

The index-linked variants, 
on the other hand, will fere 
much less welL Strong recent- 
ly on the back of distant fears 
for inflation, they will come 
in for a major reassessment 
Ironically, they foiled to rim 
in the early pan of the year 
when money was particularly 
easy and when anxieties 
about inflation were justified. 
Their strength in the last few 
weeks, when credit has been 
squeezed somewhat could be 
equally ill-conceived. 

Roger Nightingale 

The author is director oJ 
economics and strategy 
at Hoare Govett. 


& 


COMPANY NEWS 


• AURORA: Investors in In- 
dustry has disposed of a million 
ordinary shares (1.08 per cemX 
reducing its holding lo ten 
million shares (10.77 per oentt 

• NOVO INDUSTRY The 
company is to establish four 
divisions comprising the bio- 
industrial group with the aim of 
strengthening ac ti v it ies in thin 
area. 

• CLIFFORD’S DAIRIES: 
The chairman told the 4in»»i 
meeting that, despite the poor 
weather, the company’s overall 
performance in the first four 
months of 1986’had been above 
expectations, mid prospects for 
the remainder of me year were 
encouraging. Liquid infllr vol- 
umes were slightly below those 
of 1985 

• AGA: A total of 250,000 B 
shares have been placed with 
Swiss investors through a bank 
syndicate. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN.. 


Adam & Company. 

BCCt... 

Citibank 


Consolidated 
Continents Trust.. 


Cooperative Bank 

C. rove & Co 


Hong Kong & Shanghai. 

LLoyds Bank , 

Nat Westnutster 


Bank of Scotland. 


Citibank NA. 


. 10 . 50 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

- 10 . 75 % 

. 1050 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 1050 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 1050 % 

. 1030 % 

. 10 . 50 % 

. 1050 % 


t Mortgage Bmc Bate. 


NOTICE TO HOLDERS 

of - 

IPF (ILLINOIS POWER FINANCE) COMPANY N.V ' 

Mfcff GUARANTEED DEBENTURES DUE 1989 
12Vtft GUARANTEED DEBENTURES DUE 1992 

Unconditionally guaranteed as to payment at 
pri ncipa l and interest by 

ILLINOIS POWER COMPANY 

Copies of the audited financial statements of IPF (Iltinois. 
Power Finance) Company N.V for 1985 and copies of the- 
annual report for 1985 of Illinois Power Company are avail- 
able upon request to the holders of the W Jl Guaranteed 
Debentures Due 1989 and 12W Guaranteed Debentures Due 
1992, and to other interested parties. Please direct requests to 
the Secretary of Illinois ftwer Company. 

Illinois Rmer Company 
500 South 27th Street 
Decatur, Illinois 62525. 
United States 


HOW INDEPENDENTLY IS YOUR 
GILT PORTFOLIO BEING MANAGED? 



How confident are you that the company 
managing your gilt portfolio is acting purely 
in your interest? If the company is also 
involved (directly or indirectly) in the trading 
of gilts, then the objectivity of their advice 
could easily be in question. 

With Reserve Asset Managers this 
potential problem simply does not exist We 
are a substantial and leading independent 
adviser, providing a highly professional 
approach based on years of research and 
experience. 

Our role is to provide strictly objective 
advice and management We specialise 
exclusively in the field of fixed-interest 
investments. We do not participate in the 


selling or in market-making of gilts. We are 
remunerated by fee only. 

Only in this way, we believe, can all 
conflicts of interest be eliminated. 

Our clients include pension funds, merchant 
banks, insurance companies, charities, 
stockbrokers, investment management 
organisations and individual investors. 

Every portfolio is under constant review. 
This positive approach to gilt investment is 
essential, we believe, if you are to receive the 
best return from your portfolio. We always 
match the risk profile to individual needs. 

For a brochure explaining our services in 
more detail, please contact George McNeill 
on 01-283 4985. 


Reserve Asset Managers Limited 

lioensed Dealers in Securities 

The specialises in Gilt and Fixed interest Investment 

3 Gracechuhch Street 
LONDON EC3V0AB 
Telephone oi-283 49«5 
Telex 929091 pnllsn 


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_ 20 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rates 
day's range 
May 16 

N York 13200-1.5285 
Montreal 2 0881-2.0992 
Ama'daml 7883-3 0044 
Brussels 6852-68 S8 
C'phgan 12.4483-124677 
OtSm 1.1069-1.1115 
Frankfurt3 3568-33749 
Lisbon 221.67-225.10 
Madrid 21333-214.41 

MdanM 2302.70-2316.46 
Oslo 11.4661-115007 
Pads 10.7010-10.7600 
StkWm 10.6224-108716 
Tokyo 251 .07-25239 
Vienna 2358-23.73 
Zurich 2.7965-2.6118 


don 
Mn 16 

10235-10245 
30933-20977 
3.7996-3.8044 
68.76-68.95 
12.4643- 12.4077 

I. 1080-1.1090 
3.3885-33730 
22101-22S.O1 
214.12-214.41 
2308.68-231405 

II. 4780-11.5007 
10.7407-10.7564 
100224-106448 
25133-25232 
23 £9-23 73 
28064-20106 


1 month 
0.460.4 
0A1^ 
Hv-lVprem 
18-13pram 
4-3ptem 


3 months 

151-1.l8prem 

0.91-0.76prem 

5V5%prem 

41-32pram 

9»-7Hpram 

3prem-l0tfis 

4%-44prem 


30-7MK 

MA 

2%-3'Atfs 

3V3crem 

V1%<fls 

iK-i%prem 

1 214-1014 pram 

1 %- 11 ^jram 


65-180(93 

7-13*8 

BU-SXdn 

8h-7bpreni 

1X-2%dS 

3%-3Hprem 

31V28%pram 

4K-3Sprem 


Sterling Index compared nffii 1975 was doom at 760 {day's rage 750-78.1). 

OTHER STERLING RATES 

Argemma austral' 13945-12970 

Australia dotar 21132-2.1167 

Bahrain dinar _ 05725-00765 

Brazil cruzado* 2038-21.11 

Cyprus pound 0.75600.7660 

Finland marfca 7.7575-7 6175 

Greece drachma 209.70-211.70 

Hong Kong ctoflar 11094-11.906 

India rupee — . 1800-19.00 

Iraq dinar ._ 


Kuwait dnarKO 
Malaysia doftar — 
Mexico peso. 


. N/A 
0.43^0.4435 
30506-30564 
780-830 


New Zeeland dollar 27540-27710 

Saudi Arabs rival 5043500635 

. 3066803727 
3096030131 


Singapore 
South Africa rand . 
U A E dirham 


. 50775-50175 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 

Ireland 

1.3735-10745 

SESS 8 — 

. 2.5940-20960 




.. 1 3750-10760 


7.1150-7.1200 

Norway 

_ 7032S-70375 

Denmark 

. 22090-22105 


1 8395-10410 

Netherlands 

24915-20925 


1fiS.20-1fi5.3a 


Be&umtComrn) . 

45.10-45.15 

Hong Kong 

14800-14900 


14005-14000 

Austria 

. 1504-1506 


Ratos stapled by Barclays Bank HOFEX and EXteL uoydt Bcmfc h u er wa t ta ml 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


BaaeRatea% 

Clearing Banks TDK 
Finance House 1 1 VS 

Discount Market Loans % 
Overrtghl High: 1014 Low 10 
Week fixed: 10» 

Treasury BSs (Discount %J 


EURO PHONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dollar 

7 days 6' J w7 
3 moth 7'.*-6 , ‘i» 


2 ninth 10 
3mnth 9 »j.- 


2 mum 954 
3mnth 9^ 


Prime Bank EBDs (Discount %) 

1 mmh 10 ! m- 1054 2mnth 10-9»* 
3mnth 9”r-9-'’j.' 0mnth e'A-9 ,s « 

Trade Bats (Discount %) 

1 mmh Wj: 2mntti 10S 

3 mmh 10 ''ji 6mnth 1054 

Interbank (%) 

Overmght open 1054 dose 10% 

1 week 10 ,l »»-1D»i« 6mnth 9 ,4 i#-9V, 

1 mmh 1054-10% 9 moth 8 ,1 i«-B ,, « 

3mnth lOU-KPu 12mth &H-9% 
Local Authority Deposits (hi 

2 days 1054 7 days 1051 

1 mnth 104* 3mnth 10 

Smntti 9H IZmth 9M 


7 days 4>4-4% 

3 mmh 4%-45 4 
French Franc 
7 days 7’ie-7 B n 
3 mmh 7W-7% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 254-2 
3rmm 4X-454 
Yen 

7 days 4 , 4«-4'i la 
3 rrmth 4V4X 


call 7 

I mnth 7'i«-fi re i« 
6 mnth 7'i«0*ia 
cafl 5-4 

1 mrilh 4V4W 
6rmh 4%-45i 
cal 7*-6* 

1 mnth 7%-75* 

6 mnth 7H-754 
call 2 VI 55 

1 mmh 4*-4Vj 
6 mnth 4’w4 s i# 
a» 5-4 

1 mnth S'le-t 1 *)* 
6 mnth 4%-4* 


GOLD 


Gok£$343.OO-3430O 
Krugerrand* {per cant 
S 3&75-34S.& (E2250O-2260O) 


S81 
'Excludes VA' 


Local Authority Bonds (%) 

1 mmh 11 V10% 2 mnth T0V10S 

3 mmh 10V-10K 6 mnth ID’4-10 
9 mnth 9 V9% 12 mth 9 V8% 

Sterling CDs 

1 rnnth lO’it-KPig 3mnth 10V10 
6mnDi 9 u m4 ,i i« 12mth 955-9K 


TREASURY BILLS 


s: £5 12 m stated: £ 100 m 

: £97555% reeeneff84% 

Last week: £97510% received: £89% 

Avge rate: £90001 Iasi wk £9.9779 

Next week: £100m replace El 00m 


THS NOTICE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER FOR SALE AND THE STOCKS LISTED 
BELOW ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOB PURCHASE DIRECT FROM THE BANK OF ENGLAND 
OFFICIAL DEALINGS IN THE STOCKS ON THE STOCK EXCHANGE ARE EXPECTED TO 
COMMENCE ON MONDAY. 19TH MAY 1986 


ISSUES OF GOVERNMENT STOCK 


The Bank of England announces that Her Majesty's Treasury' has 
created on loth May 1986. and has issued to the Bank, additional 
amounts as indicated of each of the Stocks listed below: 

£im million 21 per cent INDEX-LINKED TREASURY STOCK. 2003 

£100 million ll per cent INDEX-LINKED TREASURY STOCK. 2009 

£100 nuUitm 2{ per cent INDEX-LINKED TREASURY STOCK, 2013 

The price paid by the Bank on issue was in each case the middle market 

closing price of the relevant Slack on ibth May 1986 as certified by 
ihe Government Broker. 

In each case, the amount issued on 16th May 1 986 represents a further 
tranche of the relevant Stock, ranking in all respects pari passu with 
that Stock and subject to the terms and conditions applicable to that 
Slock, and subject also to the provision contained in the final paragraph 
of this notice: the current provisions for Capital Gains Tax are 
described below. 

Copies of the prospectuses for the Slocks listed above, dated 22nd 
October 1982. 19th October 1982 and ISih February' 1985 respectively, 
may be obtained at the Bank of England. New Issues. Wading Street, - 
London. EC4M 9AA. 

.Application has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange for 
each funher tranche of stock to be admitted to the Official List. 

The Stocks are repayable, and interest is payable half-yearly, on the 
dates shown below (provision is made in the prospectuses for 
stockholders to be offered the right of early redemption under certain 
circumstances): 


Interest payment 
dales 
20th May 
20th November 

20th May 
20th November 

I6lh February 
iblh August 


Stock Redemption date 

2* percent Index-Linked 20lh May 2003 
Treasury Stock. 2003 

2$ per cent Index-Linked 20th May 2009 
Treasury Stock. 2009 

21 percent Index-Linked 16th August 2013 
Treasury Slock. 2013 

Both the principal or and the imercsl on the Slocks are indexed to the 
General Index of Retail Prices. The Index figure relevant to any month 
is that published seven months previously and relating to the month 
before publication. The Index figure relevant to the month of issue 
of 21 per cent Index-Linked Treasury Stock. 2003 and 21 per cent 
Index-Linked Treasury Stock. 2009 is Ui3l relating to February 1982 
(310.7): the equivalent index figure for 21 per cent Index-Linked 
Treasury Stock. 201 3 is that relaungtoJune 1984 (351.9*. These Index 
figures will be used for the purposes of calculating payments of 
principal and interest due in respect of the relevant funner tranches of 
stock. 

The relevant Index figures for the half-yearly interest payments on the 
Slocks are as follows: 

Relevant Index figure 

Interest payable Published in Relating to 

May October of the previous year September 

November April of the same year March 

February July of the previous year June 

August January of the same year Ctecember 

The further tranches of 21 percent Index-Linked Treasury Slock. 2003 
and 21 per cent Index-Linked Treasury Stock. 2009 have been issued 
on an cx-drvidend basis and will not rank for the interest payments 
due on 20th May 1986 on the existing Stocks. The further tranche of 
21 per cent Index-Linked Treasury Stock. 2013 will rank for a full six 
months' interest on 16th August 1986. 


disposals made on or after 2nd July 1 986. irrespective of the period 
lor which the Stock is heldt. 

Government statement 

Attention is drawn to the statement issued by Her Majestv’s Treasury 
on 29ih May 1985 which explained lhaL in the interest of the orderly- 
conduct of fiscal policy, neither Her Majesty's Government nor the 
Bank of England or their respective servants or agents undertake to 
disclose tax changes decided on but not yet announced, even where 
they may specifically affect the terms on which, or the conditions under 
which, these lunher tranches of stock are issued or sold by or on behalf 
of the Government or the Bank; that no responsibility can therefore 
be accepted for any omission to make such disclosure: and that such 
omission shall neither render any transaction liable to be set aside nor 
give rise to any claim for compensation. 

BANK OF ENGLAND. 

LONDON 

16th Mav I486 


( ANALYSIS ) 


Auditors walk tightrope 
over ‘hidden’ figures 


Off-balance sheet finance and 
window dressing, artificial 
transactions whose sole pur- 
pose is to improve the ap- 
pearance of the accounts, is 
like incest; it is far more 
prevalent than commonly 
supposed and most will get 
away with it 

Unless revealed by a com- 
pany failure, it is usually only 
a detailed investigation of the 
accounts by die Department 
of Trade and Industry which 
will expose the sort of artifi- 
cial transaction which, at 
best, is designed to impress 
by improving year-end bal- 
ance sheet ratios, and at worst 
is a dishonest attempt to 
mislead or conceal. 

What these transactions 
have in common is that they 
are aimed at not showing 
something. The principal 
purpose of financial state- 
ments is to inform, and so 
although the transactions are 
usually legal if the accounts 
are whholding information, 
then something is wrong. 

DTI inspectors are charac- 
teristically restrained in their 
conclusions as to the effects 
of such transactions on the 
accounts. 

In the reports of their 
investigations, they are vari- 
ously described as “mis- 
leading”, in the case of 
Vehicle and General Insur- 
ance; not showing “a true and 
fair view” (London Capital 
Group): “materially 

misleading” (London and 
County); and “unusually 
deceptive” (Comhill). 

Significantly, the first three 
of these companies either 
collapsed or were compulso- 
rily wound up by the DTI. 

A classic example of off- 
balance sheet financing will 
involve the creation of a non- 
subsidiary dependent compa- 
ny into which its creator will 
off-load both debt and assets. 

It is not a difficult matter to 
create a £100 company, hold 
none of the equity, yet still get 
the benefit of all the income 
from the assets put into it via, 
say. preference shares. 

The banks are great pro- 
moters of off-balance sheet 
financing for two reasons. 
One is that that the merchant 
banks see it as a source of 
income. They will cold-call 
potential customers and will 
offer to “clean up their 
balance sheets”. 

The merchant bank will 
take a fee. while the lender to 
the “non-subsidiary” will 
earn a slightly higher rate of 
interest, although most com- 
panies will usually deny this. 

The second reason, just as 
disturbing, is that the clearing 
banks like to use such vehi- 
cles themselves to improve 
their financial ratios, espe- 
cially when they are coming 
up against the restraints im- 


posed by the Bank of 
England- 

Reuim on capital can 
readily be improved by pack- 
aging house mongage loans 
and “selling” them into a 
specially created “non- 
subsidiary” dependent com- 
pany, while retaining control 
over the interest rate charged 
to borrowers. 

The “non-subsidiary” will 
borrow funds in the Euro- 
bond market to “buy” the 
mortgages at a lower rale of 
interest The difference be- 
tween the two rates of interest 
will accrue to the bank. The 
bank’s income is unchanged, 
but the^ asset base is dimin- 
ished giving a higher return 
on capital. 

The banks are known to be 
looking closely at the possi- 
bility of getting their mort- 
gage assets off their balance 
sheets in this way. 

House mortgage loans are 
among the lowest risk assets 
in a bank’s loan book. There 
is therefore very little risk of 
default in the “non- 
subsidiary”. What risk there 
is can be covered by 
insurance. 

If the Bank of England is 
assured that there is no 
undisclosed residual risk to 
the bank in question’s report- 
ed balance sheet, it would not 
necessarily see any objection 
to such an arrangement. 

In the case of the banks, 
this may not seem very 
alarming. If implemented, 
the accounts will be neither 
true nor fair, and the balance 
sheet ratios will no longer 
reflect the economic reality. 

Worse, this arrangement, 
might appear to have the seal 
of approval of the Bank of 
England, which is concerned 
with risk, rather than ac- 
counting practice. 

Move away from the banks 
and the practice becomes 
much more sinister. Only one 
type of transaction has been 
illustrated, but sharp practi- 
tioners have devised count- 
less ways of borrowing 
money without showing it in 
the accounts. 

Indeed, you need look no 
further than the recently res- 
cued Burnett & Hallamshire 
to appreciate what sharehold- 
ers and creditors are up 
against 

Their first line of defence 
should normally be the audi- 
tor. but the Companies Act is 
ambiguous as to how far the 
auditor can go. 

The requirement to present 
a true and fair view overrides 
all other requirements gov- 
erning the form and content 
of the accounts. And if the 
accounts do not provide suf- 
ficient information to give a 
true and fair view, then any 
necessary additional .infor- 
mation must be provided in 


the accounts or in the notes . 

But the DTI statement in 
the much -ail uded-to Argyll 
Foods case, that “it is axiom 
atic that any emphasis of 
substance over form must not 
be at the expense of compli- 
ance with the law”, has been 
widely interpreted to mean 
that restating accounts to 
show the underlying econom- 
ic reality eg consolidating 
“non -subsidiaries”, could re- 
sult in prosecution if it con- 
travenes other requirements 
of company law. 

The accountancy profes- 
sion is itself divided on this 
subject as it brings the audi- 
tor into direct conflict with 
his client and sometimes with 
his colleagues. When faced 
with lawyers who tell him 
what the law is, it is easier for 
the auditin' to cave in and 
comply with the letter of the 
Companies Acts. 

But sometimes, no amount 
of additional information can 
take the place of proper 
accounting. By their nature, 
off-balance sheet financing 
and window dressing are used 
to mislead or conceal. 

More often than not, the 
notes to the accounts refer- 
ring to these dubious prac- 
tices barely hint at their real 
significance, as readers of 
note 24 to the Burnett & 
Hallamshire 1984 accounts 
will know only too well This 
resulted in a set of accounts 
which concealed the fact that 
the company was in real 
difficulty. 

When asked during a 
shareholders' meeting wheth- 
er the banks might consider 
legal action against B & ffs 
auditors Grant Thornton, the 
chairman Mr Tom Carlile 
said that if they elected to do 
so that would be their 
derision. 

Hie legal position seemed 
so uncertain to the auditors 
that in 1985 they produced 
two sets of accounts, one 
reflecting the legal form and 
the other reflecting the under- 
lying substance in an effort to 
comply with the law. 

As far as showing the 
economic substance in the 
accounts is concerned, h 
seems to be a case of 
“damned if you do and 
damned if you don't”. If they 
are sued, they will be the fell 
guys in what has become a 
very contentious issue. 

The accountancy profes- 
sion has barely started to 
come to grips with this 
problem, but it is hamstrung 
without clarification of the 
law. A set of accounts which 
does not reflect the substance 
of a company's financial 
situation is like Sam 
Goldwyn's verbal contract — 
not worth the paper it's 
written on. 

Carol Ferguson 


King&Shaxson Holdings PLC 

EXTRACTS FROM THE STATEMENT OF THE CHAIRMAN, Mr. W.E.C. D’ABBANS 
to be presented at the Annual General Meeting of the Company 
on 12th June 1986 

It has has been an eventful year. In my last statement I referred to the proposed changes in The 
Stock Exchange and in particular to the gilt-edged market. Your Board had decided that 
primary dealership was an inappropriate venture for your Company but were actively seeking 
other avenues of profit less vulnerable to the whims of the interest rate cycle. To this end, your 
Company applied to the Bank of England for permission to form a Stock Exchange Money 
Broking subsidiary and this was granted in August. We are fortunate in having obtained the 
services of Mr. J. A. Beard to set up and manage the new venture and he was appointed to the 
Board on 18th Novemeber, 1985. 

On 1 Sth April, your Company made an offer for the whole of the issued Ordinary Share Capital 
of Smith St Aubyn (Holdings) PLC, a move intended to strengthen our capital base and achieve 
economies of scale in an increasingly competitive market. At the time of writing, the offer has 
been accepted bv holders of 38.5% of that company’s Ordinary Shares and remains open until 
2 1st May, 1986. 

Tour Directors reporta profit for the year ended 30th April, 1986 of £ 1, 1 00, OHO after 
providing for rebate, taxation, and a transfer to inner reserves. This represents an increase of 
nearly 4U% over the profitof £788,000 reported for the year ended 30th April, 1985. A final 
dividend of 6.25 pence per Ordinary Share is proposed making a tote! for the year of 8.75 
pence, an increase of 0.5 pence per Ordinary Share. 

Relatively narrow fluctuations in Clearing Bank Base Rates have at times disguised greater 
movements in term rates, notably in January when a sharp rise was threatened. Ironically this 
proved to be a most profitable period. A net fall of 2 % in Clearing Bank Base Rates might in the 
past have been expected to yield a higher level of profit than has been achieved in the past 
twelve months. However, u hen the markets’ exuberance clashes with the Authorities' caution, 
the resulting inverted rate struoure makes for very difficult trading conditions in our traditional 
areas. It re mains a source of great concern that a pan of our business as important as that of 
investment in and dealing in eligble bank bills should yield so little profit. 

To turn to the current year, expectations of further cuts in interest rates must be viewed with a 
degree of scepticism. Bank lending, largely for the purpose of financing consumer expenditure, 
continues to grow at an alarming rate. Sterling M3 is outside its target range and, although a 
much devalued indicator in some quarters, it is closely watched by bond and other markets. Low 
price inflation has not so far been reflected in low pay settlements and there has recently been a 
marked deterioration in the U.K. trade figures. Sterling, though currently at a satisfactory level 
will remain vulnerable ra any adverse change in sentiment and it seems unlikely that the 
Authorities will sanction a rapid fail in interest rates, however desirable that might appear to be 
politically. 

Copies of the I9S6 Annual Report and Accounts may be obtained from the Secretary, King id Shantou 
Holdings PLC, 52 Comhill, London ECS l" 3 PD. 


Law Report May 19 1986 House of Lords 


limited partner’s tax rein 
can exceed capital share 


Reed (Inspector of Taxes) ▼ 
Young 

Before Lord Bridge of Harwich, 
Lord Brightman. Lord Mackay 
of Clash fern. Lord Ackner and 
Lord Oliver of Aylmerton 
[Speeches sold May 15J 
A limited partner was entitled to 
relief against income tax under 
section 168 of tiw Income and 
Corporation Taxes Act 1970 in 
respect of her share of the 
trading losses sustained by the 
partnership even though the 
amount of that share greatly 
exceeded the amount of her 
capital contribution to the 
partnership. 

The House of Lords dis- 
missed an appeal fay the Inland 
Revenue from the Court of 
Appeal-(Lord Justice Waller, 
Lord Justice Griffiths and Lord 
Justice Dillon) {The Times 
November 9, 1984; [198H STC 
25) who had affirmed Mr Justice 
Nourse {The Times November 
18, 1983; [I984J STC 38). 

The judge, upholding a de- 
cision of the special commis- 
sioners in favour of the limited 
partner, Mrs Marjorie Young, 
had held that she was entitled to 
loss relief for 1977-78 of 
£41,423. being her agreed share 
of the losses of the partnership 
for the relevant period, to be set 
off against her general income. 

In March 1978 Mrs Young 
entered into a partnership agree- 
ment The partnership, Monday 
Films (3), was a limited partner- 
ship' for the purposes 'of the 
Limited Partnership Act 1907, 
trading on a commercial basis 
producing motion pictures. Mis 
Young contributed £10,000 of 
initial capitaL ' 

For its accounting period 
ended March 31. 1978. Monday 
Films (3) incurred a trading loss 
computed in accordance with 
Case I of Schedule D of 
£650,073. 

Mrs Young claimed relief in 
respect of her share of that loss, 
allocated to her in accordance 
with the terms of the partner- 
ship deed, together with a wnall 
apportioned stun for the period 
ended April 1 to 6, 1978. Her 
daim was refused by the inspec- 
tor of taxes. 

Section 168 of the 1970 Act 
provides: 

“(1) Where any person sus- 
tains a loss in any trade, 
profession, employment or 
vocation carried on by him 
either solely or in partnership, 
he may . . . make a claim. for 
relief from income tax on an 
amount of his income equal to 
the amount of the loss . . . 

“(7) For the purposes of this 
section, the amount of a loss 
sustained in a trade shall be 
computed in like manner as the 
proms or gains arising or accru- 
ing from the trade are computed 
under the provisions of the 
Income Tax Acts applicable to 
Case I of Schedule D.” 


Mr Robert Camwalh. QC and 
Mr Philip Vallance for the 
Crown; Mr Michael Flesch. QC 
and Mr David Goldberg for Mis 
Young. 

LORD OLIVER said that the 
short question raised by the 
appeal was whether, within the 
terms of section 168 ( 1 ) of the 
1970 Act. a limited partner 
could be said to “sustain a loss 
in an amount exceeding that for 
which he or she could be made 
liable for the debts and obliga- 
tions of the partnership. 

Section 4 of the 1907 Act 
provided: 

**{2) A limited partnership 
shall not consist ... of more 
than 20 persons, an d m ust 
consist of one or more persons 
called general partners, who 
shall be liable for all debts and 
obligations of the firm, and one 
or more persons to be called 
limited partners, who shall at 
the time of entering into such 
partnership contribute thereto a 
sum or sums as capital or 
property valued at a stated 
amount, and who shall not be 
liable for the debts or obliga- 
tions of the firm beyond the 
amount so contributed.” 

The Crown argued that it was 
a misuse of language to speak of 
Mrs Young as having 
“sustained” a loss of £41,423 
when her legal liability for the 
debts of the partnership, if 
called in during the relevant 
period, could not exceed the 
£10,000 that she had contrib- 
uted in March 1978 and an 
additional £5.000 that she bad 
contributed in October 1978. 

If the creditors had, at the last 
moment of the year ended on 
April 5, 1978, demanded and 
sued for their debts, she could 
not have been made liable for a 
single penny. 

Suppose, it was urged, the 
partnership had then been dis- 
solved or wound up or that she 
had ceased to be a partner, how 
could it properly be said that she 
had “lost” anything or “sus- 
tained a loss” beyond the 
amount of her contributed cap- 
ital? 

A partner sustained a loss, it 
was argued, only if and so long 
as he or his property was at risk 
of having to pay the amount of 
the loss. 

like the judge and the Court 
of Appeal, his Lordship was 
unable to subscribe to that 
reasoning. The profits and losses 
with which they were concerned 
were the profits and losses of the 
partnership from the carrying 
on of the trade as shown by its 
annual profit and loss account 
and computed in accordance 
with the provisions of the 1970 
AcL 

The assessment of tax on the 
individual partners was by ref- 
erence to their respective shares 
as set out in the partnership 
deed and had no necessary 


relation to what nughi ul- 
timately turn out to be the 
proportions in fort in which a 
partner was called on IO contrib- 
ute to pavment of the firm's 
debts — for instance, if one or 
more of his partners was insol- 
vent- . 

Thus the partnership s trading 
losses were conceptually quite 
distinct from the debts and 
liabilities of the firm and from 
the assets that were available to 
meet them. 

The point was a short one not 
susceptible of any great elabora- 
tion. His Lordship agreed with 
the judge, at pp57-38. and with 
Lord Justice DiUoa. at p29. 

It might be that in fort at the 
end ofthe financial year in 
question there were no assets of 
the partnership out of which its 
liabilities could be discharged 
and that if those liabilities had 
then to be immediately met they 
would foil on the general part- 
ner. 

But one could not test the 
question of whether a partner 
had sustained a loss by. as it 
were. notionaRy taking a dis- 
solution account at the end of 
each financial year of the 
partnership. 

What the 1970 Art was con- 
cerned with was the profit or 
loss computed on the statutory 
basis as shown by the profit and 
loss account for the year, not 
with the relationship between 
the individual partners and the 
creditors. 

The feet that the 1907 Act 
afforded a limited partner a 
protection against further liabil- 
ity beyind his capilal contribu- 
tion for the debts of the firm was 
entirelv immaterial to the ques- 
tion of' whether that partner had 
“sustained a loss” for lax pur- 
poses within section 168 of the 
1970 Act 

His Lordship also rejected an 
alternative argument advanced 
by the Crown based on clause 8 
of the partnership deed. Again, 
he agreed with the judge, at 
pp58-59. 

His Lordship added that in 
his opinion nothing could be 
made to turn on the amending 
provisions of section 48 of and 
Schedule 12 to the Finance Act 
1985. which effectively pre- 
vented, for the future, the lateral 
set-off of a tax loss acquired in 
this way and thus, by implica- 
tion, recognized that, apart from 
those provisions, such a loss 
was, in fort, “sustained”. 

That seemed to his Lordship 
to be merely a recognition by 
Parliament of the law as it had 
stood at tire time when the 
amendment had been in- 
troduced as set out in the 
decision ofthe Court of Appeal. 

Lord Bridge. Lord Brightman, 
Lord Mackay and Lord Ackner 
agreed. 

Solicitors: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue: Joel son. Wilson &. Co. 


Tax commissioners 9 findings were 
inconsistent with the facts 


Torbell Investments Ltd v 
W illiams (Inspector of Taxes) 
Whiteaway Laidlaw & Co Ltd 
vSame 

GUS Merchandise Corpora- 
tion Ltd v Same 
Before Mr Justice Harman • 
[Judgment given May J2] 

A company that in 1974 
acquired two loans secured on 
real property and then carried 
on activities relating to the 
securities to realize their assets, 
were thereby carrying on a trade 
for corporation tax purposes. 

A bare, unreasoned finding by 
the Central Manchester General 
Commissioners that Torbetl 
Investments Ltd was not en- 
gaged in trade so that substantia] 
losses that it incurred were not 
available for surrender by way 
of group relief was inconsistent 
with their findings of feet and 
was wrong. 

Mr Justice Harman, allowing 
the appeals by three subsidiaries 
of the Great Universal Stores 
pic, held in the Chancery Di- 
vision that Torbell had trading 
losses in respect of the trans- 
actions that were available for 
the relief. 

At the time of the 1975 
collapse in the property market. 
Whiteaway Laidlaw, a bank, 
transferred certain loans secured 
on real property to Torbell at 
face value, Torbell having been 
put in funds by GUS Mer- 
chandise. 

The object it was said, was to 
safeguard Whitea way's credibil- 
ity as a bank. Some loans were 
repaid but two — to the Stern 
Group and to the Fortress Trust 
Group — were not. 

Following much activity and 
work done by the properly 
director of the parent company. 
Torbell sold the underlying 
securities thereby incurring 
substantial losses. The tax 
inspector refused to allow relief 
in respect of those losses, stating 
that Torbell had not traded. 

Alternatively, be said that if 
he was wrong on the trading 
point, then the loans had not 


been acquired as trading stock 
and the losses were thus dis- 
allowed under section 130(a) of 
the Income and Corporation 
Taxes Act 1970. 

Mr Andrew Park. QC, for the 
three companies; Mr Alan Mo- 
ses for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE HARMAN 
said that the case was a bizarre 
one: the evidence contained in it 
caused considerable difficulty of 
belief. But one matter was plain: 
in 1974 thoughts of fiscal advan- 
tage did not occur to the 
companies and neither did the 
serious possible . disadvantages 
that might later follow. 

The activities that had been 
done in connection with the sale 
transactions were to be regarded 
as work done by Torbell. Many 
negotiations with purchasers 
ana security and p lanning mat- 
ters, all occupying a great deal of 
time, had taken place between 
1974 and 1976. 

Such activity was difficult to 
describe: in the directors' report 
it was referred to as “trade in the 
recovery of loans and the 
exploitation of underlying 
securities”. 

The commissioners had not 
doubted Torbell’s bona fides 
and they had accepted evidence 
that the transactions were 
reasonable commercial trans- 
actions. With a brevity that was 
wholly unhelpful the commis- 


sioners’ concluded that Torbell 
had not been engaged in trade. 

That conclusion was not 
embellished with any reasoning 
and was a finding that was an 
inference of fort. 

Mr Park attacked it as being a 
derision in line with Edwards v 
Bairstow (P956J AC 14) and he 
relied on Lord Raddiffe's dic- 
tum at p36: “it may be that the 
facts found are such that no 
person acting judicially and 
properly instructed as to the 
relevant law could have come to 
the conclusion under appear. 

Had the commissioners 
thought that there was a trade 
carried on formerly by 
Whiteaway, about which there 
was no dispute, and that the 
loans were transferred to 
Torbell ai a proper price and 
with reasonable expectation of 
making profit, then the only 
conclusion open to them was 
that Torbell, on having the loans 
transferred commenced carry- 
ing on a trade. 

Moreover, the Crown’s argu- 
ment that in any event the cost 
to Torbell of acquiring the loans 
should be disallowed under 
section 130(a) was unacceptable. 
The circumstances showed that 
they had been acquired as 
trading stock. 

The case was remitted to the 
commissioners. 

Solicitors: Paisner & Co; 
Solicitor of Inland Revenue. 


Printouts identical 


Clarke v Hegarty 

Where the two specimens of 
breath provided by a defendant 
produced two identical print- 
outs either printout was admis- 
sible. 

The purpose of section 8(6) of 
the Road Traffic Act 1972. as 
substituted in Schedule 8 of the. 
Transport Acf198L was to give 
the accused the benefit of ihe 
lower reading. Where both were 
identical there was no benefit to 
be gained. Both were equally 


beneficial or prejudicial to the 
defendant 

.The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court (Lord Justice 
Stocker and Mr Justice Hirst) so 
held on May 13 dismissing an 
appeal by case staled by the 
defendant Robert Anthony 
Clarke, against his conviction by 
the Brentford Justices of driving 
a motor vehicle having a breath 
alcohol level in excess of the 
prescribed limit contrary to 
section 6 of the 1972 Art as 
substituted. 


LONDON 


FRANKFURT 



NOW OUR SMILE SPREADS 

TO FRANKFURT 


EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY AT 1 DAM. 

ENJOY GULF AIR'S GOLDEN FALCON SERVICE TO FRANKFURT. 
WHETHER YOU CHOOSE FIRST CLASS. FALCON BUSINESS CLASS 
OR GOLDEN ECONOMY YOU'LL FIND OUR STANDARD 0FSERVICE SUPERB. 
FLY WITH GULF AIR TO FRANKFURT 
DISCOVER THE GULF AIR SMILE FOR YOURSELF. 

(FROM JUNE 1ST EVERY WEDNESDAY. FRIDAY AND SUNDAY) 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 
OR GU-LF AIR, 73 PICCADILLY. LONDON WTV SHF. 

TELEPHONE: 01-409 1951. BIRMINGHAM: 021-632 5931. 
MANCHESTER: OS 1 -832 9677/8. GLASGOW: 041-248 6381. 

OR KEY PRESTEL 2239)3. 







H55&©2«3 




ONCE FLOWN 


EVER FORGO T T .E N 


ABU DHABI 


AMMAN 


ATHENS • BAHRAIN • BANGKOK BOMBAY • CAIRO ■ COLOMBO • DELHI 
STANBUL ■ JEDDAH • KARACHI • KHARTOUM • KUWAIT LARNACA • LONDON • MANILA ■ MUSCAT - PARIS 



DHAHRAN • DHAKA • DOHA • DUBAI 
RAS Al KHAIMAH '-'RIYADH' - SAL A L AH 




FRANKFURT . h 0 NG KONG 
SANAA . • SHARJAH ■ TUNIS 


a 









a y* 

Jr-' 


* 


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22 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 



-%>u- 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share pncc movements. Add them 
up io si 'c >ou your overall loial. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a share or the total 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of vour card. Vou must always have 
vaur cord available when claiming. 




|.No. Cea parry Group loss | 

B1 

Micro BS 

Elect ncals 


8 2 

Luc Rcmucrauor 

Electricals 


' 

Sa Bre»«rw«. 

Breweries 


-X 

Bunotreoixl Bnr» 

Breweries 


5 

Hickson 

Chemicals 


P 

Scot TV A" 

Cinema 'TV 


7 

Fine An Dei 

Drapery. Slones 


¥ 

uhnbread ’V 

Bre«enes 


Q 

A levin 

Drapery. Stores 


10 

Irish Dull 

Breweries 


ii 

Combined English 

Drapery. Stores 


i: 

Grampian 

Cinema/TV 


i) 

Douglas iRMi 

Bui (ding. Roads 


13 

Apncni Compuicre 

Bectncab 


1? 

Lmcroh Kilgour 

Drapery. Stores 


lb 

Enlh 

Building. Roads 


IT 

Rea Bnu 

Banks 


Ik 

RoDlTca 

Electricals 


IX 

BTP 

Chemicals 



TumfT 

Building. Roads 


Zl 

Electronic Rentals 

Electricals 


22 

Aulo See 

Electricals 


| y 

STT 

Electricals 


:j 

Beaufort) 

Industrials A-D 


1 2? 

Davies £ Newman 

Industrials A-D 


| 2b 

Park Place 

Industrials L-R 


T 2T 

DeahuiM ’A" 

Electricals 


fl 28 

Plessev 

Electncah 


29 

Cape Ind 

Indusi rials A-D 


W 

CopVson 

Industrials A-D 


31 

Reed Ewcuiive 

Industrials DR 


1 32 

Robertwn Rev 

Industrials L-R 


53 

DSC 

Industrials A-D 


54 

Foihcntill &■ Harvey 

Industrials E-K 


55 

Parker Knoll - A‘ 

Industrials DR 


5b 

Kjlemaeoo 

Industrials E-K 


37 

Brvam 

Building. Roads 


3* 

Jones A Shipman 

Industrials E-K. 


.10 

Barker £ Dobson 

Foods 


40 

Wood lArthuri 

Industrials S-Z 


1 41 

Park Foods 

Foods 


3 42 

V icken 

Industrials S-Z 


a 45 

Nurd In & Peacock 

Foods 


J 44 

Victor Products 

Industrials S-Z 



Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
Saturdays newspaper. 


1^ 

TUI 

WED 

THU 

FBI 

sa 

| 







BRITISH FUNDS 


Stock CUT 

Manama 

E Stock 


Pm* Ctipe M. Gross 
last on o£ Rad. 


Friday 


fdN 


SHORTS (Under Rve Years) 

as 
26 

31 

*8 

104 

at. 

111 
74 

IOZ 

94 

as 

94 

104 

V 

lo 

104 

ft 

8 
114 

112 

34 

63 
94 


Treas 

8':N 196+86 

99N 


E«d> 

2W 1986 

98 > 


Erch 

14b, 1988 

10»’r 

-Si 

E*eh 

13‘i% 1967 

102V 


Treas CIO A 1987 

I0OV 


E«te 

2'ik, 1987 
10V*. 1967 

96. 

♦*« 

EKh 

w 


Fund 

6'Ak 198M7 


Treas 

Treas 

10k 1987 
3S. 1967 

w 

4> l * 

Treas 

12% 1967 



Treas 

7 VS* 1985X8 

4J* 

Evte 

10';% 1968 

102V 

♦ r fl 

Truss 

CS-'r^ 1968 

101Vt»+'. 

Trans 

3% 197688 

92b 


Troas 

9'.-% 1968 

101 


Trees 

1 1 1989 

106 


Trees 

I0’.-N >989 

104>« .. 

E«ch 

ION 1969 

102 1 . 

+». 

Ektte 

10'rN 1989 

107V 

Etch 

2':N 1990 

64 i 


Eute 

1 1N 1989 

105'. 


Treas 

9N 1986-69 

92>. 

♦N 

ErCh 

11N 1990 

106b 

p'| 

Treas 

C9'.N 1989 

102 

*'f 

Treas 

3N 1966 

90N 


Treas 

UN 1990 

112k 


Each 

1Z':N 1890 
3*, 1990 

III*. 


Treas 

87N 


Treas 

8A 1967X0 

99V i 


Traas 

ION 1990 

10*V 



FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

2377m Tims J1'«N 1991 MOV 

*7im Fund S'-N 1987-91 S3'. +’. 

1520m E.cti 11W 1991 108N -V 

966m Trail 1ZVN IW 116 

1153m Treas 10% 1992 1D»V 

lOMm Treas CIO',-% 1992 107 -•? 

I5*5m Etch 12 <N 1992 114V -Ni 

3121m E*ch 13’:% 1M2 120': -N 

1257m Treat 10% 1993 IM'* -V 

1295m Trail I2':N 1933 117V -1 

537m Fund 6% 1993 M'r 

1559m Treat I3’-N 1993 124VM-V 

77Sm Trass H’.-N 1994 129’. -'« 

1364m Excn »2':% 1994 124 

1844m Eroh 13’TN 1994 119 - i 


106 

61 

101 

110 

94 

94 

10.7 

112 

95 

10.8 

6.7 

110 

112 

104 

105 



9N 1994 

irev 

B-'o 

8J9 


1ZN 1995 

11b’. 

— 1 '« 

104 


3 1990X5 

77'. 


36 


I0'«N 1995 

1U6’. 

-r* 

66 


12 VN 1995 

122 


105 


14N 1996 

129b 

-IV 

JOB 


9N 1992-96 

11X1V 

—1 

SX 


5.N 1996 

US'. 

-IV 

11 0 


3’.N 1996 


-IV 



3N 1996 

53'. 

w>| 

38 


ION 1996 

105V 


90 


I3’.N 1997 

126 . 

-IV 

104 


10' ;N 1997 

108V 


97 


8V- 1997 

W. 

•IV 

a.» 

1393m Escn 

I5N 1997 

13W 

-V 

10X 


8Sim Treas 6’*N 1996-88 
ZfiOOm Exen 9'.*. 1999 
1586m Trass 15’.*. 1996 
2993m E*tfi 12% 7996 
1080m Trass 9 % 1999 
3534m Each l2v r * 1999 
1H 3m Trass 10 iN 1999 
1508m Com «0'-% 1999 
2280m Tr»as 13V 2000 


104 
144-. 
119V l 
102 ’, 
121'. 
I09>.| 
107'il 
128’a 


-1 

1-1 V 
-IV 
-IV 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 



10"i 2001 

106'. 

-IV 


5-V, 2001 

104* 

-TV 




-IV 


l*N >99601 

1X1* 

1-1 ’■ 


ION 2002 

106V 

-IV 


IZN 199902 

120 

-IV 

<U5m Trees 

9VN 2002 

105 

-iv 


ION 2003 

107" r 

-IV 


13'.N 20004X3 

134- 

-l'l 


ll'.N 2001-04 

1IBV 

-IV 


ION 2004 

ion. a-iv 


3.N 199904 

5 n. 





-lb 


9 ' N 2005 

103'; 

-I 1 ; 


10’:N 2005 

112': 



IZ’:N 2003-05 

128'. 

MV 


9% 200-4)6 

90V 

-l'l 


9f. 2006 

106 




121'r 

-1 V R 



137’.- 

-1 J 4 


r- 2009 

91 b 

-I'l 


5‘s 2306-12 

6T« 

-IV 


T'.N 2012-tS 


-IN 

1302m Exch 


in'. *-r. 


UNDATED 

194m Consols. 4'- 
770m war in 3 V 
84m Con. o r, 
"9m Treat 3*. 
79m Contois 2' V 
135m Treas Z\N 


INDEX-UNKED 

. f L r% 

i Treas H. 2^ 
j Treas rL 2*. 
i Treas *£•.-. 
i Traas 02 
i Trass H. 3*. 
i Treas 02 . '= 
i Treas nS 

i Treas il2'-v 

i Tims IL3 v 
i Treas >12' % 


>ZZ5m 

53C™ 

mom ' 

POTm 

633m 

r’Mn 

794m 

1U5a 

565m 

I2ZS« 

1095m 


1986 

1W0 

19W 

2001 

2003 

2006 

2009 

2911 

3013 

me 

Z9» 


45V 

4DV«-'.- 

62 


122'.- 
106’. • 
120 
107 
105V 1 
110 
105‘al 
■ ll'r 
94V 
10B'« 
100 '. 


74 

94 

107 

100 

92 

10.1 

96 

94 

10.1 


94 

9J 

91 
105 

94 
10 0 
93 
93 
103 
97 
63 
6.1 
93 
93 
93 
9.7 
BO 

92 
9.7 

96 

97 
61 
84 

93 


68 

17 

67 

H8 

67 

0.7 


21 

21 

2.4 

04 

24 

25 
24 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


360 ten 
iiOOm 
M2 >m 
I 67? 9m 
iK. 3m 
«5ten 
■2 in 
*7?0m 
3.429 7ai 
89 3m 
MJra 
Cl 6 <b 
1 941 sm 

5 1853m 

ii ?m 
15 1m 
i 5602m 

6 B3C lm 
2K.Jm 
104 8m 
239 8m 
254 2m 

59 Cm 
236 4m 

1 824 0m 

11 2m 

T5 im 
45 6 9* 
2062 4m 
■•0 7* 
4562m 
SiJm 
I 252 8m 
BSC Dm 
25?: 3m 
59 Om 
1*6' 2m 
138m 
4773m 
1516 3m 
fiEO 7m 


+M insn 
4r.suf.-iar (Homy) 
*ic N*-» 2 
Bireiamenca 
San* O’ Ireland 
Bon* wm Israel 

Bank LOim Uk 
8+nk W Sconana 
Barclays 
Brown 5tki*ey 
Corn Allan 
Camas 

Ouse Marruttan 
Cirw? 

C'n* 

Com Bam. who 
C ommarttan*! 

Ons^cna Bam. 

F«u fur France 

Canard Nai 
Cum uts Fuji 
H vntrm 
03 1 6031 

KJ1 Sjtnuei 

Hk EruMUk 
JCSkon (Cettotl) 
•*5 4 S"*w 
wo*i«0rt Benson 
LI6,« 

Uan-reti 

Mtecunr uu 
On i”. 'A' 
Mdiand 
N* Au«! Bk 
fra’ nan 
Oiw+w> 

Prevalent 
Rea Bros 
Remserao ijj me 
Hoyt Bn* Ot Can 
Hryt Bnk Or Scot 


220 

76 

274 

E10V 

450 

E7 

2*0 

382 

*97 

600 

579 

47V 

C2fi\- 

£37’. 

49 

63 

ES2‘. 

££3+'r 

200 

344 

94 

229 

£23 

370 

54 

429 

168 

715 

577 

37 

758 

142 

5«? 

Z73 

7*0 

t«8 

3S6 

70 

117 

ri3’« 

3iq 


-23 HO 4.1 
-> . 
-is iso a« 


-45 17 0 36 .. 


-2S 

-SO 

-*5 

-13 

-2 

-IT. 


1-10 

-to 

-so 

-15 

-30 

-33 

-120 

-7 

*2 


150 07 113 

200 52 63' 

268 54 73 

132 23 250 

421 7 4 123 

28 55 133 

139 53 . . 
206 SS .. 
36 73 HO 

.34 54 103 

60 01 .. 
1200 5.1 . . 

*0 20 12.1 
16 9 5 5 200 

27 29 150 

96n 43 127 
95.7 00 243 
17.0 43 9.7 

17.4 4.1 223 

123 74 202 

337 3.6 104 
30 0 5 2 63 

23 83 14.1 


36.4 6 7 203 

4438 EX 43 
800 M 93 
155 * A 125 
13 26 2 02 

U 53 140 

1*0 4.Q SO 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Capitalization and week’s change 

(Current market price multiplied by the number of shares in issue for the stock quoted) 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began May 12. Dealings end May 30. §Contango day June 2. Settlement day June 9. 


§ Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 




Pnce Choe Grass Dm 


Caonakiabon 

lan on 

t»* 



£ Company 

Friday week pence N R/E 


1018m Servodtrs 

£fl’ 

... 



110m Sown Sr Autryn 

5i 


IX £0 4 6 


14352m Stand Oran 

794 

• -IS 430 SS 90 


S3 4m unon 



920 71 750 


1434 2m warn F*rao 





21 ten Wtotruti 

280 

-10 7. 

£7 185 


BREWERIES | 



320 


138 

40 14 4 


£451 *a Bass 

748 

-Ii 

211 



100m Bawawtr' 

43 

-1 


26 232 



133 

-4 

*x ax tax 


1075m BrowniMnmow! 



- 201 

*2 175 


d| flnft Chi hoi ■* IU PI 






208m RlXTrVtomWHl fWaa UG 


i*; 

£8 130 


id Ira rMi pilllHaj 



10J 



570a. DerewgB g A) 

795 

-1( 

18J 

20 233 



1B0 

-s 

7/ 

44 125 





7J 

3.1 16.4 


£744Ba Gumneie 


-7z 

uu 

35 110 


IB 5o Horn 6 Hansons 488 


2*. 



SHttr* Hghtond Otst) 


-3 

3D 

3X 182 



£ 

+4 

+2 

-H 

41 107 
£3 .. 


95 40 Marstnn ThonoOten 110 


2D 

2X19X 



2*9 


9-1 

37 138 


4984m Sa Brawenas 

190 

+2 

ibit 



54?3m Scot A Now 

186 

•8 



302£6m Seagram 

£37" 


44.1 

1.1 . . 


I69.im Vain 

445 

• -15 

1&1 



1X30 2m wtutmrt 'A' 

275 

-2 

10J 



*6 lm Da «■ 

278 


1IU 



1469m Wlatbread tor 

233 


9J 

*2 344 


15SXm WWwrwnnei A D 
8.573X00 Young A 



143 



235 


94 

32 236 


BUILDING AND ROADS 



252 

•-12 

11.4 

*5 7X 



269 


167 

58 146 


2X00X00 Amckfte 

59 


0.1 

02 ax 



161 

-3 

61 

38 1*8 



483 


11.fi 

£5 16* 


i44m Baggenaga Bnck 
266.6m Barren Dm 

355 

ISO 

-A 

102 

109 

£9 128 
70 .. 


1.150X00 BtetoylBaru Constr 22 


. 




168 

• -8 

100 

ex 137 


170m Banfora ConeraH 

79 

-7 

ft* 

8X235 



69 

-3 





935 


37.1 

4012L4 


64780. Bkj* Crete 

651 

• -37 

MIX 

45 94 


iSXm BreedonSCkiul HD 263 


143 

54 2+9 


20Bm BneMtousa DixSey 134 

-8 

6.1 

ax 19* 

136m Br Dropping 
J.tWOJXIO Brown S Jackson 

70 

30 

-IV 

40 

5.4 145 
.. 138 



88 

+1 






-4 

4.9 

41 131 


32 7m Bumen 5 Hakmn 

16’r 

ml 

5.7 

345 IX 


27DXm Cemam-Roansiona 11! 

-5 

40 

38 .. 

6.757.000 Coremr Grp 

02 


7J> 

30 11X 


360.0m Costaai 

518 

• +I4 

240 




416 

-2 

82 

£0 112 


164m Crouch (Dwato 

130 

-4 

05 

65 98 

7X00000 Dew iGflorae) 
138 m Dougtes tF®h 

95 

90 

+ 1 
+4 

56 91 13.4 
2Sb 2X ISO 



9* 

+4 



1316X00 Fab 

76 

+1 

42 

55 100 

2.757.000 DO *A* 

54 

-2 

42 

78 73 

5X23000 Ftoian Gp 

58 

-2 

5* 

90 237 


250m Gawp*] 

92 

-3 

S3 

08 1*9 

2X79X00 Gm 8 Dandy On 131 


?.« 

2X383 


38 6m Gtoason IHJ] 

366 

• -2 

70 

£1 137 


790a HAT 

103 

-8 

6* 

52 107 

5X40.000 Hatcai Bar 

186 

+18 


.. 537 


64 5m HemaarvSajan 

73 

• -0 

?A 

30139 


57 0m Haywood W**re 

212 


9X 

45 139 


6600 Hggs A MB 

565 

-S 

19A 




174 

-18 

ex 

40 127 

3440X00 Jams LB A Sons 

330 

+15 

250* 7X 110 


12£4m Larng U) 

442 

+1 

10X 

33 133 


■ 144m Do A' 

432 

+1 

too 



18 ten Lawrence (WeHerl 

96 


52 



5&*m Utoy (FJQ 

73 

• -6 

55 

75 98 


114.0m Loral (YJ) 

413 

-a 

100 



3014m ua^iat & Soutn 

166 

-a 

8.7 

40 T7X 


35 7m UaiKMre 

243 

+17 

T1X 

48 14.7 


67 ten Marshall (HsHU 

175 

-3 

7.1b 4.1 IteO 


ll Bm May A Itaama 

124 

-2 

& 

44 .. 


1*6.7m McAlpmn (Attrad) 

415 

-11 



2303m Meyer tor 

239 

*1 

77 

32 132 

1.440 000 Umv (Sunteyl 

24 


14 

55 .. 


123m Monk (A) 

114 

-2 

03 

82 114 


1070m Mowtom (John) 

376 

-12 

22Xb 6.1 110 


80.7m horentre 

670 

• -10 

1S.7 

IX 174 


220m Noongnam arete 

210 


» 



27 «m FVf3*im«n 

218 


34 132 

30*8X00 Poctwis 





370 


To 

6X 82 
32 14X 


6030a RMC 

63* 

-8 


6963m Remand 

417 

+0 

1S5 

37 150 


11.7m Roberts Aremd 

245 

•-a 

100 

4.1 290 


«Ua HuMnan 

295 

-6 

120 

42 105 


2409m Rutty Camam 
151. im 5GB 

IIB 

350 

-3 

91 5j4 I1X 

140b 4.1 12X 


21 Om ShaiiM A Fntar 

IDS 



31 180 

7.86* 000 Smart (J) 

78 

•3 

79 165 

1.41 70™ Tarmac 

458 

ISA 

EX 162 


4404m Taytor Woodrow 
21 0m Tsjuiy Group 

613 

-12 

74b 

4.0 125 


144 

• -4 

76 

50 rax 
31 139 


EO0n Tram A Arnold 


-5 

122 

577SX00 Tram 


IX 


&386J10Q TudftT 

US 

-tX 

100 

ex 159 


T76cn Wxoptar* 

29* 


13 A 

4X 129 


33l9» •mm 

K6 

-10 

10A 

4X Vl£ 

2.154X00 Wamngton (T) 
37.0m Waite Mi 

iS 

• .. 

-4 

*4 

88 

19 82 
35120 

1.310X00 w*ttam Ertu 

78 

♦12 

-23 

•-1 

1A« 

IX 15X 

&210JJOO Wmq«5 

82 

3 

. . a 

t 7 



50*Xm Wtogiay' (Garage) 

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27 9m Eastern Prod 
164m EdOTO 
559m E<S 
4.017.000 Ertrtl 
IB Ora aoco 


266 

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1583 8m E»Ctr«n (AEJ ’B - £2T. 
13 *m E10R ifll 78 

741 3d Endian E24’« 

6635m E/KjSjn CM3 Cloy 337 
647 im Enc'.scn OM) 0‘ C25V 
239m Erskme K o &a 146 
3303m Europoan Farms 146 
63 5m DC 5% PH 1S6 
TIB lm Evaded 294 

20.1m Erode 114 

46 7m EipOIDOt tot 200 

1565m End 366 

10 6m Faicm 


-10 143 5l4 65 

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• -6 96 4.0 133 

-3 25 65 155 

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372m Fanrwr . . 

3 B2*.000 FBe Inomar 
15704m FrtctoB 566 

11 5m Rcwflon 52 

3.705 000 HartU C»W 1 12 

9427.000 Fount 57 

19 7m Fogarty 106 

B440 000 Foies Group N/V 32 

24 3m Power 9* & HOrvey 19* 

6X75X00 French (Tliq mast 54 

406m GEi im 113 

7995m GKN 319 

94*9.000 Gft 300 

4X17X00 QMW E09 108 

67 im Gesietnor 137 

135m Otores 145 

7.127801 G*a*o 963 

3122m Giyn-ad 374 

255m Song Kara 430 

31 9m Orampun Hugs 153 

6469m Granada 256 

5.695 000 QroYSPea 
7.716X00 Him 
£9 2m mi Eng 
1064m lU) 

6.576.000 HSMS 
929m HStoiS 

8350000 Hampson md 
7 878.000 Hanoi's* 

4576 0m Hanson 
010 On DO 8% Cnv 
15* 6m Od 5W 
S66m Narasavts 
7.136X00 Hams (PnOpi 
1.105 *m Hawker SuMSy 
241 (ko Hawley 
3X00.000 Hay INnrmara 
3099m HepwORh Ceramic 
490m Hastalr 

2901.000 Hewtn U1 

1376.000 HMigam S Job 

455m Hon* &tn 66 

38 Bm HM Ltoyd 86 

Si Om Hopkntsona 250 

659n howden 109 

3565m Hunon Bay £13V 

356m Hunrng Assoc 290 

2* Pm Humng Group 106 

13712m Hutcnoi wrwrpaa 245 


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61 55 135 

20 63 7.B 

125 S* 135 

4.1 75 
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17.1 54 T07 

100 33 63 

SO 45 02 
2.1 15 123 


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-38 167 1 8 KB 

• -30 150 4.0 135 

ISO 15 165 
S7 17 155 
10 1 35 11.7 

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TO 7 43 160 

45 4.4 105 


-IV 59.0 43 

114 39 69 

65 60 235 


577.7m IIM 

301m ttoetJn 

5550 000 Jacksons Bowie 
3*66m Jarpme Math 
660m Johnson Cieamn 
£26*m Johnson Maitrey 
36 7 ci Johnson 6 FB 
260m Johnston 
136m Jones 6 Sanjxnssn 
136m Jouofem (Thomas] 
*238000 Kaiamuoo 
35 6m Ufon 
9370X00 KWser hid 
7303X00 Mnrwrty Smote 
IfllXm Korwaw (A) 
4516000 Ween-E-Za 


181 

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280 

104 

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116 

114 

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S3 4.6 262 
290125 7.7 
1.7 S5 156 
+48 11.4 17 145 
-3 200 1.7 21.1 

+4 21-4 73 245 

7.1 45 325 


L-R 


2657.000 UJH 34 s'r 05 15 205 

1037m U» 295 -2 65 23 273 

3B13m Lart 255 -5 06 14 102 

33 Sm XlflUKt 172 -6 64b 17 90 

2600.000 uwte* 65 +3 16b 55 65 

195m LM lArmui) 63 -I 10 45 69 

5333.000 Utecare 26 -1 .. .. 165 

1517X00 UMGha 89 -3 32 45 10.B 

1060.000 unraid 72 -1 35 5X 17 

15 lm LkMl |FH) 63 ..16 17 163 

9.150X00 Locker fT] 30Hr -2 19 62 10.1 

526m Lon MWWnd 211 H2 BJliO 

2959.000 Do OM la -3 

80 Om Lon t Wn 72 -1 74 103 64 

2622m Lor tod 205 -7 55 29 215 

13 *m Longwn bid 215 +17 43 20 26.1 

1207m Low 5 Bonar *13 -25 115 13114 

21 3m ML Hdgs 383 +7 11.1b 29 215 

23 6m MS K 99 +8 17 07 142 

6916000 MY Dart 46’.- -2 14 30 145 

46«a Maearfliys «wm 37r +3 126 17 182 

458m Uacterwne 146 IS 24 196 

4.733X00 Mocteton (P6W) 53 -10 27 61 95 

144.7m McKschnio 2*0 «-8 129 54 115 

5.719000 Magnofc* IDO . 45 *5 92 

27 «m MancMSM swo 665 +15 65 1X212 

1 1 9m Manganasa Bronze 75 43 67 85 

250 *m Money 119’r ~‘i 64 45 229 

126m Martng 84 +7 23 27 10J2 

6211.000 Uaranofl (LOUey) 92 *+1 62 67 7.1 

14BH UarshOs Urm 79 • .. 16 45 195 

820m Mortons' 63 .. 115 18 223 

551.1m M«al BO* 715 -25 2<5 34 117 

36*m Motet Ckwaos 112 -7 96 53272 

288m Metairax 69 -3 IS 19 117 

71 9m M«h*R Cans 74V +6V 61 62 75 

1B3m MdOdSi Sowis 11* +1 60 4 4 213 

515m Mokns 183 -8 113 62 95 

W9m Morgan CnrCdda 300 -13 121 4.0 211 

25 6m Mess (RstoarQ 132 -2 44 13 147 

4.4*4.000 Neeosend 33 -2 0.1a 03 17.1 

*9 5m Men Ul 17B -12 105 66 8 6 

*79m Newman mas 36 1.1 25 575 

SB im Newman Tomu 131 -6 1(L3n 79 109 

10 lm Notron SO -1 1 * 25 562 

298 7m Normas 240 -10 126 63 121 

14 6m Office Befl Msch 2*0 -3 121 SO 99 

29 Dm Parker Knofl A’ 416 +3 15X 15 162 

*9 6m Park Plata 338 «+3 9.6 25 265 

6308.000 Pnntoh JT 915 

8715a Peeraan 445 -10 143 12 145 

2078.000 Fes* 23 +3’.- . . .545 

l6Zm PteW 1Z5 9Xn 72 159 

1822m PegurJHsSirsley 594 
31<5ni FWart I no 670 

58 6mPhoto4le £10 

aae 5m Pismown *ie 

*368.000 Ptamc Corsir 78 

155 im Portats 900 

1 32m Pnmr Cnaesum 38o 

1761m Powe* DuHryn 275 

7S3*i Prosnwcn HKgs 1Z8 

1353m Prnchord Son 117 

£7 9m WD 205 

140 4m RHP 183 

T 700000 Hacrant Meal 12s 

1.094 3m Rank Og 5*2 

50 4m Raraom* Sm* 1BZ 

5.756000 Ratditt* KS Bodge) 123 
12030m Reckid A Cotoien 81? 

117m Redeem Gtess 228 

28*m Reed Eacunve 271 

96’ Om ROM *n 622 

I9£m Aehcn 156 

46 4m Ranate 75 

9.C79XOO RenmOr 66 

1.3832m Peulera 443 

20*3.000 Rerowr* 2»'r 

30 4m Ricardo Eng 142 

1 WO 000 ftenard (Lwes) 75 

5230 000 Rrcrwraaon Wesl 41 

2? 3m Robertson Res 105 

30 7m (Thomas) 349 -26 . . . . 460 

1£ Im Pocmiare 50 -1 . . - . . 115 

9.066000 Roonor 139 • -11 93 67 63 

190m Do A - 12S «-S 93 7,4 6.4 

2025000 Rowenm 9‘r .. .. .. 45 

*1 5m Rotor* 156 7.7 43 113 

213m Russel (A) 104 -2 20 19 562 


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4559 000 
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190m 
30 3m 
106 4m 
£3 0m 
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5 383X00 
91 Sm 
99 0m 
47 5m 
1*72000 
:i3ei 
330 3m 
229m 
ISC 6m 
6t 2m 
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309 8m 
9523m 
I 640X00 
553 5m 
7.672000 
132 7m 

7 148X00 

8 414 BOO 
8033 000 
3270 000 

8? 5m 
29C.lm 

216m 
9933 000 
4 754 000 
*085.000 

467m 

1564m 
8519m 
3099000 
5051 000 
330 Sm 
482Aa 
196m 
354m 
7.1SC000 
J^WXCO 
1 1 8m 
3.CS6.000 
2.640000 
3.437.000 
39 im 
1iB0m 
1X17 4m 
6F 7m 
254 lm 
B. 193X03 


SI 25' 

San Tm*y 225 

Sanonurii 32 

Sawee Gordon IX 84 

Scaaa^ 456 

Scon <3re*nnam 11s 

San HenMbie 173 

Scon 5 Rotmnson 132 

Secuwc* 1*2 

Da 'A 132 

Sacumv Serv 101 

Senior Eng 

SWon 

Sedaw 

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S*emn<gw 
Smxxi Emj 
So Hundred 
9keMH»y 
SHF B 

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gimth rv na woiTli 
Srami tod 
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Stag Fnmnura 
Standard Fireworks 14 j 

Srar comp 
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Steettey 
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Stonan* 

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TramccwmeraA 
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67 112 
49 177 
22 117 
30 35. * 
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34 194 
29163 
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SI 229 
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6992X00 lUetes 
9228X00 There* 

2317m Timor k Haws* 
33.7k* UKO 


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236S Sm 1 

15601 

630m Vaur 
*27 .3* vcksre 
610SXOO VWor PrttokicB 
29.7m Unttfl 
1917 

326m WSL 
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379m Wagon Bid 
2610m Wafirtord Gkna 


157.1m 


1.61S1S1 1 
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9017.000 MteKS 

500*1 Whatman Reeve 
151* 

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5139m Wbtestey 
1x20x00 wood Unreal 
1026000 Wbod (SW1 
6269000 WoorStousa S f 
1.709X00 Wyajnun Eng 
252m Yarrow 
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56QXm Abbey Us 
6337m Ala* 1 Ain 
20550m Am Gen 
333m Bredslock 
1565 m Brtsnmc 
739E0m Com Ur*n 
2672 m Eqmty & Lew. 

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1.5003m Gen Accident 
14509m GBE 
1920m Hash C E 
135 Im Haag Robatson 
1.(21 7m LegS & Gen 
1316m London 6 Man 
567n Lon UK> to* 
10064m Marti 6 Melon 
1750m MnM 
176m PWS 
463Xn Pearl 
2j*5£Xm PIUdonSM 

138.5m Rehga 
2.1645a Hov 3 
1X17 2m Sedgwick Cp 
1 69.3a SMwan Wf«jn 
1075m Surge HWg* 
14745 m Sun AMancs 
4711 m Sim LA 
3SBm Trade Menmty 
734.1m VWte Faber 


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LEISURE 


5.771X00 
7X46000 
3S3m 
3053X001 
466m 
108.0a 
21 Sm 
886.000 
5&3» 

02 4m 

7020X00 
2600X00 
2154a 
39 Sm 
7X19.000 
31 An 
504m 
5325X00 
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Barr 8 WA -A 
Baasoy I Nn 
BfSM wafcer 
Csrapan 
CtHjsMs 
Fru Lmn 
ORA 

Hmtuw are 
Horajn Travei 
lm Lames 
Jumub-s tfdgs 
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Rsaiy UsaW 
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Sags Hoaaaya 
Samuetson Cto 
Tonsmam Hoes 
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2016m Ang Amor Coal 
1077.0m Ang Am 
9659m Am Gdfe) 

510 ten AAIT 
58.8m AlMkMUl 
57 Bm Do -A' 
6535X00 Ayer Horn 
76.7m Hwvtajrs 

13 ten Bracken 
1500a BuHMs 
1.4234m CRA 
209m Carr Boyd 
8909M Cora GaidflNds 
1063 Bn Da Beers 
1373a Deehaaai 
567m DoomroctoVn 
BM.lm Dnetemm 
9X81X00 Durban 
293a E Daggai 
3362m EterSrand 
88+2. 000 0 Ofd 
461m Bilug 
I2*Xm E Pond Gdd 
174m E Rare) Prep 

FS Cons 

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1431X00 Qaavor Tki 
167 9m Osfloei 
6652m Gan MMng 
6060m GFSA 
36 4m GM Kaigoort 
7,178.000 Gopang 

214m GreamMch Res 
7B3*i GroonW 
376m Hampton Areas 
1614m H armony 
257.8a Harden 

471 xm jorewes 
1485a Kinross 
1265a moot 
154 b Lasie 
669m U«non 


5025a HM 
999a MMaysttn MMng 
3.625X00 MHW-ate 
7.471000 Metals Exp 
2X00.000 Mianjpea 
725a MOOte Wits 

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(CO 


issr**— 

6-* 15.000 Ceflro* 

239m Cowie m 


1785m FR Graup 
, 2169m Ford Motor 
6.72aoao Gates [Fra* G) 
96S ten Gonarar Motor 
4.49BX00 OBntteto UwreTBS 
2* 9m Qroiyj LOUS 


1*5 

129 

119 

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168 

117 

198 

49 

395 

250 

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Krs 1 


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9001000 Pterions (G® 
1724X00 Qock (HJJ 
9.75a,OO0 supre 
7472X00 Woodhsad Umet) 


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DAILY DIVIDEND 

£4jO0O 

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+33 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


SISra todrtsndem 
1. JS3.7m lm Thomson 
S27J* 

2561 

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46Xm Tm 
4874a IM 


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126m Egerton 
208m Estates Gen 
30Xm Estates Prop 
35,7m Evens Of Leads 
4.486.000 Five Oaks 
84 5 m Frogmore 
2718m Gr Pordand 
187.1m Greycoat 

HaSnood Gp 

1563m Kanrraraan 
5*01401 DO A' 

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195a H are angsr 
41.7 m Imry 
1X00 000 Jemiyn 
1729 m Lang Prep 
721m land toi awan. 
10700m Land Seoarkes 
1329m Lon 6 Edn TM 
310m Do SW 
408m Lon 6 Prov Snog 
74 Am Lon Shop Prop 
42Sm Lymon 
81 96m MEPC 
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25 8a McXav Sics 
14 ten MarhMUi 
IB 4m Marreata Maura 
254m Mvborautfi 
17.1 m Marter Est 
99.7m MoutdBigh 
28 ten Motathw o w 
522m Muddow (A&J) 
9X60.000 Mureapd 
5J0BX0D NawCavencfcih 
5X79.000 Paikdda 
00.7m Peachey 
534m Prop A Re* 
101.5m Prop Hdga 
78.9m mm Security 
9J74X0O Ragtan 
6ZXm Regalan 
299 Jm Rosetuu 
319m Rush • 

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SHIPPING 


2250m 
6256m 
267. tm 
161m 
6160 000 
164m 
901X00 
750X00 
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1079.1m 
6.421.000 
1X66X00 


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Aareey Docks 37b 
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PA 0 Did 529 

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share 


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23 





It is always hoped that 
a company^ ambition for growth 
will be shared by its empFoyees, 

But by its typewriters? Arerft 
we'gertting a bit carried away? 

We doritthink so. When you 
look at the way wevedesigned 
our range/ you'll see afar cry 
from the buy-now-pay-dearly- . 
later variety. 

so carefully thought put 
that you never buy a.typewriter 
more elaborate than you need 
now; but whateveryou start with, ; 
jt can adapt as your circumstances: 
change. 

Take the ETH6, pictured • 


• above. It can underline, embolden 
and centre, all automatically 

It even has a 2,000 character 
:■ storage memory for frequently 
used phrases or addresses. 

it could be all you ever need 
But what happens if in six 
months time, youVe grown, 
correspondence to existing clients 
has increased and your secretary's 
having something, of a torrid time? 

• . . ■ Dq you curse the day you 
got sweettalked into an Olivetti 
;,t)pewriterand wish you’d bought 
a word processor instead? 

Not a hit of it/tbu need 
change nothingiyou should simply 


add the ETV350.This is a separate r 
screen and disk drive unit with a 
working memory of over 20,000 ; 
characters and external storage of ■ 
320,000 characters on each disk. 

'four basic typewriter has 
suddenly grown up to cope with 
your new demands. 

All the machines in our 
current ET range*are designed to - 
adapt in this way: you can use s . 
them as high quality printers for a ' 
computet? for instance,;or con nect 
them to a telephone li ne. : ; 

■ But, whatever problems-you 
need to solve now, please call us 
or fill in the coupon arid we’H- 


be happy to give you some help 
You may even decide to 
plump for a sophisticated Video- 
typewriter straightaway But think 
about it carefully 

You might be removing the 
Big Opportunity for your basic 
typewriter to work its way to 
the top 


"Pleas? send me a brochure showing me how jo grow m/ own 
TypewmeriTo. Sandra Wight. Bnrish Olivetti Lid 86-88 Upper 
Richmond Road London SW15 2UR.Tel; 01-785 6S6& 

Name 

Fbsitori ; : _ 

Company . 

-Addles ; 


Tel no 


Olivetti 


Sdsd 


‘Plus ihe ET 121. ET 111. ET 115 & ET 225. 



companies, 


! 

I 




rised 

year 

1986. 

imd 
















Temporary work Beads to 
permanent employment. 

A first class opportunity has arisen for an 
experienced SH/WP secretary. 

You will be working for a major company, at partner 
level, in superb offices overlooking the Thames. This could 
well result in a permanent position. 

If this sounds like your assignment, take a closer look. 
Cali Victoria Martin now. 



Madfcrn 

a; 

6S 

01 ■ 439 0601 


MAMETHS 

E 11 .BM 

rony art) vkxV lor Ore ItortUino 
o) ow M"* 1 ™ 
romom r> wreflf 
i scr canal poMbo. m i<*> 
and SH T»(W>9 osKfflMl VffV 
omes ConMtnl art UuobM Kiw> 
«rtv i mel 


CITY: 01-4812343 
WEST END : 01-93S 21So 


An «««« «»>?>«& 
lor a ftnaitc SH S-s CP* 

SH.1»P Win PH 

and iu off** praWJiy wt 
Cn Dumbs rnctMte »' 

ijnqmo iroennp 

mkw ana IUBW 5 •«> * *” 
cucmde Coofl piescraum 


CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 



CHEER UP YOUR RANK MANAGER! 

£5.60p.h. (S/band) X6.20p.li. (WP) 

Our senior level team is constantly in demand in central London. We are 
extremely busy and are looking (or first class secretaries to join the team 
which has established an excellent reputation over the years. 

You should have speeds of 100 R0, 2 years' Director level secretarial 
experience in London and proficient WP. skills, particularly on Wang and 
Multi mate. 

Our skilled temps are ail paid Lhe same hourly rates and there are always 
permanent opportunities to explore. 

Make temping a rewarding experience by working at the level you deserve 
where you will be positively' appreciated. 

Please telephone us now for an immediate appointment: 

01-3883535 (City) 


01-4344512 (West End) 



RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 



ROYAL COLLEGE OF 
OBSTETRICIANS & 
GYNAECOLOGISTS 

BIRTHRIGHT 

ASSISTANT TO THE NATIONAL 
ORGANISE* 

A demanding post In an hectic office helping 
to organise events and a wide variety of 
other projects for a mother and baby re- 
search charity. A pleasant, warm 
personality with outstanding secretarial and 
organisational skills is needed to complete 
our small team. Word processing and com- 
puter skills preferred. Non-smoker. Salary 
from £9.000 per annum. 

Application forms and lab description avail- 
able on request from: 

Birthright. 27 Sussex Place. Regents Park. 
London. NW1 4SP. «H 723 9296) 

Handwritten appllcauons only by 23rd May 
1986. 



CITY: 01-481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 

aMiatt 

'nnRVornn/ton 

{SecretaridGum . $r 1 


WE HAVE NEVER BEEN SO BUSY— 

You only iwb one* so make me most ot n a«J wort tw one of nie bwwsj AganoMm Tcwn. 

jam me moneymakers [top rates) ana have me benefits w enjoyment ana «ene». 

We are currently seeking temporary secretarial staff at afl levels and are paying up to me 
faOowwg rwas;- 


j fflepenwee on Wang. Phftps. IBM Depiaywnter and £530. Waropexl 
! Saenr * 


Audio Sbm 


Copy Swratarin (min SOwpm) 
Switchboard Ope 


(Minimum speeds 90/60) 

(min eOwiptn)_ ■ 


.CSJtO 


.E&OO 


.MOD 



(AH systems and must have good speaking voce) 


For tartar Wwmathw 
or at 
tar 


Lynda Colt on 
01-491 7090. 


Pamela SSiekens 

recruitment consultants 

4th Floor, 46 ABjotitwUo Street, 
London W1X 3FE 
Evening ansaphone 01-493 6139 



COLLEGE LEAVERS c£7,000 
Cheap mortgage, private health scheme, 75p LVs 
daily. S.T.L ana other benefits tor flexible career 
iranaed Bring. Sec with French. Surater posts without 
French In merchant bank and a variety of companies. 

BITING BANK PJL SEC G. £10000 BASIC 
Ptmpte oriematad for custonwr laieon u&tng French tv 
Flemtsh m commercial loans dept Mainly admin. Eng 
shorthand and/or Audio. Bounttftf benefits met cheap 
mortgage, ideally aged in md to late 20 yts but sorter 
post in investment House tor 40 yr old Sac. 

MANY LEGAL c£1(L500 

Legal Secs are m demand by our efients wtrt opoortu- 
rates galore at Snr Ptnr. levef In mast aspects of the 
law. P.A. duties. Excellent benefits. 

WANG OtS. £10,000 BASIC 
Great American boss and multimAon deter deals In 
smalt insncKy oty co. Terrific variety. Rusty Sh and no 
audio! Excellent benefits. 

Send C.V. or phone 01-588 9851 for appointment. 

Wardgate Has. 59A Loudon Wa*. ECS 


COULD YOU 
KEEP COOL 
IN THE POP 
MUSIC SCENE? 

If your shorthand flutters to a 
standstill when your favounte 
lead anger walks in. this is 
rot for you. Although small, 
this company manages soma 
vary famous stars and groups. 
Everyone mucks in (so no 
prima donnas please) with 
booking studios, making travel 
arrangements and general 
secretarial backup- Skills 
90/60. Age 21 +. Salary 
£ 8 . 000 . 


^ TAKE THE “ 
TEMPO FROM 
CO VENT 
GARDEN 

Smce we moved to our Covent 
Garden office our range of 
t e mporary assignments has 
dramatically increased. Now, 
as well as ffie Mayfan/Wl 
yea, we have very interesting 
temporary positrons in tres 
thriving nMn-the-minute 
community and other parts of 
London. All at excellent rates. 
If your secretarial and WP 
stalls are up to standard, 
change (he tempo of your Me 
by ringing us. 


FANTASTIC ^ 
OPPORTUNITY 
(N WEST END 
c£9,000 

Making the most ot glamorous 
TV personalities by promoting 

K inds with that names is 
this successful com pan y 
has made ifs mark. Looking 
after the Managing Director by 
sorting out fcs priorities, 
organising artwork and harsnra 
on the telephone are all part of 
tire ioh. Fabulous working 
environment incMinc an n- 
house cerema. 1 00/03 skills. 
age 23*. 


^ 


BBtaMQl-X79 3S15«wredi 



*01-379335 


*nSS2S£&. 

01-379 3515 teMBl 


*********** »»*»★**»*» WWW 




Not part-time peers, but Manpower temporaries. Forget "On no! 

It's the temp." Listen for "Oh great! trs the Manpower temporary'." 
Our clients now expect that standard - so now we need more 
people to live up to it. 

6) Secretaries GW.'P Operators 
• Management Secretaries 

We help through training . and correct assigning . . . and recognise 
upper class performance. 

‘Manpower Temporary’ - tfs a title well worth having. 

Call us now. 


Temporary Siafl Specialist* 


Tel: 225 0505 

24 hour answering service^ 


Audio Scretary £9,750.00 p.a. 

Property Company - City Site Office 

This is an excellent opportunity to Join a small but 
busy property company and work on site dose to 
Liverpool Street Station. 

The company are leaders m their field and operate 
on a friendly, informal management style. 

We are looking for someone 21+ with at least one 
year's previous experience to work lor two project 
managers. Duties will include audio typing with an 
emphasis on accurancy. general secretarial work 
and possibly some shorthand. A pleasant manner 
and appearance are essential along with a flexible 
attitude. 

Hours are 9.00 to 530 but the right person wifl be 
expected to work later if necessary. 

Please telephone Amanda Hux table on 01-629 
2020 for further details. No Agencies. 


* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

5f ****** 


MentBTKwrn 

ntesurTMenctwsuuuns 


£ 10 , 000+1 


PA + ADMIN 

A fun. young Director of this 
small firm of co mm erce! 
and residential designers r 
Wll is looking tor a PA with 
good shorthand to organise 
nun. help rrai a busy office 
and toise with clients, sup- 
pkers. decorators etc. For i 
further debris please call 
Hamer MdrSeditcii on 01- 1 
581 2977/2947. 


a rji 

cacn-v/l* « 0-J 1 MW LTJ 

tfOTISHJlW I 


DESIGN GROUP 

Great opportunity for a secretary to work 
with one of Londons leading product design 
groups. Friendly and lively studio near Lan- 
caster Gate. 

First rale secretarial skills are needed includ- 
ing shorthand and WP. 

Salary negotiable. £10.000 
Free lunches 
4 weeks holiday. 

Please write to Annette Eggett enclosing 
your CV. 

24 Brook Mews North, 

London W’2 3BVV 
or call 01-724 3701 


SHANGRI-LA INTERNATIONAL 

Secretary 
Sales Co-Ordinator 

Immediate vacancy for young energetic secretary - 
sales co-ordinator working for leading Far East 
hotel company. Language ability German and 
French. This busy sales office in Knightsbridge 
handles individual and group reservations. 
Excellent salary. Full CV to: 

Tim Reid, 

(Private & Confidential) 

Shangri-La International 
47 Chevai Place 
London SW7 1EW 


AD AGENCY RECEPTIONIST 

£8,000+ 

Are you wen presented with personality 
charrn and initiative? Would you enjoy play- 
ing a vital role in a "buzzy" creative 
atmosphere and have the communication 
skiUs to deal tactfully with everyone from the 
Chairman to the messenger? If so, you are 
just the person this young fast-growing 
agency is looking for. The pace is test the 
atmosphere is fun. Like to joai them? 
Then ring us now on 01-499 €566 

~VU 

GROSVJENOR 


£10K+ IN HI-TECH 

We need 2 enthusiastic adaptable people to join 
our growing team: 

- PA to Vice Chairman. A good organiser who 
can work indepemantly and speak 
French/German. 

- Financial Admin/Secretary to MD. Account- 
ing experience essential. 

Phone R W Beilis on 078481 3115 or write to 
Beale International Technology Lid, Whitehall. 
Wrasbury. Near Staines. Middlesex. TWI9 5NJ 


NEW OFFICES - NEW CAREER 

cl 0,000 - PA 

Our dient - a well established property company 
- are opening another branch. Exciting opportu- 
nity for high calibre PA to bead up new offices, 
acting as lynch pin. 

£9.000 RECEPTIONIST 

Can you project the right image - are you attrac- 
tive. well eduacaled & keen to get this show on 
the road ?. some typing. 


TEMPS URGENTLY 



WE TEMPT YOU? 

As one of our young enthusiastic temps, you wBI 
be greatly appreciated by our interesting and 
varied clients all over London. Using yourlnitia- 
hve and skills of 80/100 sh or audio, 50+ typ and 
good W.P. you will be paid excellent rates and 
have action-packed days. Age 19-25. Please 
call: 

437 6032 



'PROPERTY SALARY £££££ NE6 


Rare opportunity to learn all about property 
development. The director of this thriving W1 
company needs someone to whom he can 
delegate everything he can t do himself! If you 
are well organised with skills of 100/60 this 
may just be the challenge you are looking for. 




01-4998070 

CAROLINE KING SECRETARIAL APPOINTMENTS 


J 



WINE TRADE 

Established Wine Company just otT Old StneeL ECI 
requires a young. competent shorthand 
Secrciarv/Administraior to wort, in their bury Saks 
Office. A basic familiarity with French a definite ad- 
vantage and interest in or knowledge of wine 
preferable. Salary negotiable dependent cm experience. 
Please send your C.»'. to: 

Miss Marion J. See, 

Comey & Barrow Limited. 

No 12 Helmet Row. London ECIV 3QJ. 


GRADUATE FLYER 

to wort *n Mpmat City co. 
EC4. Conlideniia] wort in- 
vert we admm relating in 
training, councellng + sal 
rev rew. to name a few. 
□etwimutnn to Uewion 
nUe + gei on a must Skills 
90/50 Age 2d+. To 
£10.003 


01-408 0424 


PRODUCTION CO 

m publishing world needs a 
confident, ambenus ill- 
rounder Susy position. 
Oufire mdude lestmg pnjd- 
utfS. attending aril i 0 rt ions, 
typesetting/ camera* art 
lira rang gnreni. Pass 
travel Gd fst/2nd jobber. 
Tvww 55 worn +.£6.500- 
£3.500 aae. A career 
positionl 

01-408 0424. 


RESPONSIBILITY AND INITIATIVE 
CITY £12,000 to £15,000 

As Office Manager/PA in the new London office of 
American attorneys you will draw on every aspect 
of your experience and continue to leam. As well as 
your excellent typing and admin skills (shorthand 
not necessary/ your organisational flair will be in 
demand - creating new systems, acquiring equip- 
ment and hiring staff. All in all a challenging role. 

Telephone Fttma Sanderson 

oi-283 0iii 


INTERVIEWERS 
£13,000 - £16,000 Plus 
HIGH BASIC AND VERY 
GENEROUS COMMISSION 

Due to current expansion, well known small 
group urgently require experienced Employ- 
ment Consultant for their Permanent and 
temporary departments. West End and City 
opportunities for ambitious people. 

Also Managerial opportunities 
CaD 01-499 9378 


SECRETARY/DATA 

ASSISTANT 

OU Company in modem west End office has a vacancy for 
a bright enmusiasuc numerate Secretary . Data Assistant 
with smart appearance. Although excellent secretarial 
skills unc tudmg wp. but not necessarily shorthand) are 
desirable, the candidate will also be required to work with 
computer terminals and to assist In data entry. Database 
maintenance and lhe preparation of staitstical reports. An 
aptilude for and interest In this type of work Is therefore 
necessary. 

Excellent English and good knowledge of German Is essen- 
tial Some Spanish would also be an adsanta^e. Salary up 
to £3. BOO depending on experience and ability. 

Please reply wun C.V. lo BOX DOS. 


PA/SECRETARY 

Required for busy but friendly Fulham property de- 
weloperj office. Varied, interesting work fix- two 
Directors and the Sales & Marketing Manager. Fast, 
accurate typing & shorthand. Good telephone man- 
ner also desirable, wp experience an advant 


20's. £8.500 + 5 weeks holiday & free lunch 

Contact Howard Day on: 01-738 7133 


VERSATILE SECRETARY/ 
ADMINISTRATOR 

£9,000-£9 r 500 

We are a small but fast expanding management 
consultancy. We now need a capable Secretary 
Administrator to keep the office running 
smoothly. W'e see vou as probably 30+. wefl 
spoken and organised, with good secretarial 
skills and ability to use your own initiative. 
Duties include some shorthand, typing of re- 
ports and correspondence (training on word 
processor provided if necessary). Client liaison 
and a variety of organisational tasks. Enthusias- 
tic team. Please call 01-40] 4337 

I Strict!, bo agnefca) 


- required for 

Legal Dept, of Newspaper. Age 21 -26 yrs. Must have 
pleasant personality and be helpful and tactful when 
dealing with people. Accurate shorthand and typing and 
a good standard of English essential Interesting position 
- not all typing! Legal experience not essential. 

Good salary. 6 weeks holiday. Hours 10-6 pm. Mon-Fri. 
Offices dose to Blackfriars Station. For further details 
please telephone 01 -353 6000, extn. 525. 



^^UPEH 



non pa 
E12-E14k 


there must be mrnawbere. > 
svpanor PA wm newer 
presentation, suwror sums 
( 100 / 60 ) and xupwjr tore) e»- 
panuica Who s coaxcratfa 
; Den mMaduafy and sooafy 
[ *fl*3Ut»rtoctents.Mtftrisi>- 
penor amw*dngs you wfl 
' «t.pt a ftgn mnx » aamausn- 
aor and Be agw 25-35 To 
near more about Du superey 
post ma suoonor (weft p*X- 
age carazcc 

Kbn Russefl 
, 629 4 3*3 

i itnxucvnsnBtiiMiMireiw. 

■ IBIMK UUaoUBIta 




‘'graduate pa 

£10,500 

An axmrn «wnra/ 
tor a yafl/A-wvsf pa a as- 
ven» an Jd r matraw e ea-wr 
oi Bts In g f i uliona l Mana je- 
ment Ccxtmtexr. Vour 
acaamc xnnmm s tocoe 
•m akM route atan saw re- 
new. coorsnaa wmmg 
maws and unUGe aa Ht-T ecn 
ms a*slatn n you. ss*s 
90/60 for nxutwn use. £«*(- 
tarn OTOoming cws* 1 
Contact Swan Payne 
629 4343 

itchmkh SiMai.UJWOeana** 
■ta , naiH>Ht 9 «s<i«i mem 


LABRADOR 

LOVER? 

To £13,000 neg 

MD + dog of West End 
company require a 
PA/Secretary with 
shorthand/iypmg and 
positive personality to 
handle own corres- 
pondence. get very 
involved in hts work and 
go (or wal kies. 
Pressurised jpjj - age 
35-40+. 


Cdv 377 8600 

'AmE-k! 439 TOOl 


mJ 


Secretaries Plus 


FRANGLAIS? 
£10,000 + M/G 

Wortng oi a hec&c dsafing 
rum In an I nt o na tio na l Bank 
in the Cay. your day Mill be 
j busy and varied. 

You wifl be involved in report 
ptepaiabon and record-keep- 
hw: organong tundies. 
making travel arrangements 
and losing wttn rtw Bank's 
Pans office. 

It you sa numerate, ideally 
educated to 'A level standard 
and have good French 
language tiulls. this Q an 
ideal opportunity to use your 
secretanl and organisational 
aditities m a tast-movmg 

BnerotBoa Bnwonmwn. 


Age 20-25 
»ite-, 


760 

CD nr OFFICE 
726 8491 


CAREER PA 

Are yea ambitions, bard working and 
looking for a real cbaDenge m your next 
Job? 

We are two extremely busy female directors 
who need a highly organised PA/secretary 
able to think and act on own initiative. The 
position would suit someone used to work- 
ing in a small company environment 
handling a wide range of administrative, li- 
aison and secretarial duties. Aged 25+ with 
WP experience (preferably Amsirad) and ex- 
cellent secretarial skills (audio - no 
shorthand). Salary £8,500 - £10,500 depend- 
ing on age and experience. Regular salary 
reviews based on merit. 4 weeks holiday per 
annum. Contact Lorna Galbraith-Ryan or 
by telephone. 01-482 5229, 
lith Ryan Associates Ltd, 146 Camden 
High Street, London NW 1 ONE 




OSBORNE n RICHARDSON 

PRIVATE FUNCTIONS £12,000 

Variety is the key as you organise promotional 
(unctions and run your boss's diverse activi- 
ties. Your own secretary wiU ease the 
pressure. 100/60 skills. 

PROPERTY + PERKS £11,500 

Enjoy banking in property. Use your sympa- 
thetic approach and excellent organisations] 
ski Is as sec. to the MD of this smallsubsidiary. 
90/55 skiBs. 

Please telephone Debbie Berkovitch, Anna 
Friend, Jucfi Osborne or Eileen Richardson 8 am 
- 6.30 pm. 




Eaumm comrm 

nouwBoiasLumitwi 


PRESS AND 

We era looting for a Secre- 
tary to wok in the Prase 
Department of a mfl known 
posted body and an Admin 
Sac to work In a Re- 
cruitment Consultancy. 
Ample opportunities m 
both positions. Must 
haw mod sHs. 

Age 17+. Salary 
£5,500- E7.00Q. - 

Please contact 
Maria or Astaada at 
fl- X Crawfords 
(Roc Corn) oe- 



935 9692. 


FWI Ffoer 69 Wlgrawg Street leratoa WW BIG 01-93S 9892 


Secretary to an Associate 

We are a leading firm of international chartered 
surveyors looking for an audio secretary or 
shorthand secretary to work for a young asso- 
ciate and bis team in Hoiborn. 

Word processing training given. 

Electronic typewriter, meetings, travel arrange- 
ments and diary to organise. 

’4 weeks holiday per annum, free BUPA after I 
year, interest free season ticket loan after 3 
months, twice yearly bonus, 75p per day LV^s. 
salary c£8,000pa. For more details please ring 
Jennie Evelegh on 405 6944. 


THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF OBSTETRICIANS 
AND GYNAECOLOGISTS 
SENIOR SECRETARY 

Qualified and experienced secretary. Age 25+ with 
good shorthand ability required In the administration 
department Must be able to act on own initiative and 
except responsibility for the work of a number of 
c om mittees and their chairmen. Excellent working 
conditions including flexbfe hours, pleasant offices 
and free lunches. Salary £8.500 to £8,800 for 35 Hour 
week according to age and experience. Please tel or 
write for an application form and job descriprtion to: 
RCOG 87 Sussex Place. Regents Park, London 
NW14RG. Tel Ot 262 5425 x223. 


INTERNATIONAL 
PUBLISHING 
Covent Garden 

Managing Director of this 
small and trientfiy company 
needs a Secretary wftfi ex- 
skflls, 1C0/S5. to 


handte his busy aid varied 
wwfdoad. Benefits include 
private health insurance. 
LVs and 4 weeks holiday. 
£9.000 pa oas. 

Please contact Tin Creksr 
938 5733 


<€OTflCOm 


Recruitment 

Consultants 


(■■■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL || 

EXECUTIVE PA 
£12,000 HARROW 
- ON THE MET UNE 

61 you own fuuy ottw. 
tewiM tar «w dynarac Chair- 
nw 0 # tins cwKtng 
OfQawation whose interests 
wdudeSwee DmtaomcnL It 
las a tea mamahonai teas 
and your German would be an 
asset Me a an wtraonJ«srtv 
dynamic man. demanduig but 
■ttornng. 

Cafl m tee fina instance Mh 
yocr rap sec sUta and protes- 
swai Style to MOMHtt 
WUESCtSMBI bb 01-031 0BBS. 

nrcDmwsiNTu»MnoNM.CRoun 


research 

G. £10,000 


■*^ propq rataBng to 


A 

teiteimals. sfirnnstraMn'm 
ate nr dab WP manema 
b 8 *™, 20 +. wefl spoten 

»™w« pwsonaSty. 

. 3 cm 

4ooa flratan Hoc Coos 
637 2952 


CLAPHAM 

COMMON 

Dyrame Property Finn need 
Bucflo secretary wfth axesf- 
lem stalls, imtilgana^o 
ertiy work ing aa pan of a 
■mas team. Smart offices, 
salary around £9.000. 

Ring CoutffMti 242 0081. 




EXECUTIVE 
SECRETARIES 
£ 10,000 - £ 12,000 

Our client who is an international bank in 
the heart of the city has 3 interesting posi- 
tions for Senior Secretaries. 25 - 40 with 
1st class skills. 100 sh/70 wpm. Knowl- 
edge of word processing would be a 
distinct advantage, and presentation and 
communication must be excellent Variety 
and involvement are offered along with 
caring company benefits, such as mort- 
jsidy, STL, 


gage subsidy, 


BUPA. 


WANG WP 

OPERATOR/ABMfNISTRATOf? 
£3,5G0- £9,500 

Excellent opportunity for a competant op- 
erator to join this major bank. Wang WP 
experience and skills 55/60 essential 
along with a hard working, flexible nature. 
Sound career progression for a good 
worker and other benefits. 

If you are interested in the above posi- 
tions contact Paula Howe, Zara Siddiqui, 
or Karen Roche for an immediate 
interview. 

Office Systems Recruitment Services 
IIS Shaftsbury Ave 
London WC2H BAD 
01-439 4001 


WINE TASTING 

is part of your job as PA (100/50) to a young 
dynamic Chairman of a Wine Company in 
Fulham who is involved in property and travels a 
lot. French useful but not essential. £8,500 plus 
perks. 

FUN INTERIOR DESIGN 

Charming bunch ot young Designers in Kensing- 
ton want a bubbly ReceptkmisVSecretary (45 
wpm min) with a flair for organising! Age 19-25. 
Salary to £8,500. 


Susan Beck 


RECRUITMENT 
01-584 6242 


P.A./ SECRETARY 

To Chairman 

Well educated and experienced P.A./secrctary 
required for 47 year old Chairman of successful 
private company in E.C.I. First class shorthand 
and typing essential: Initiative and ability to 
communicate most important: City experience 
an advantage. 

Excellent salary 

commensurate with the experience required 
Please apply in writing and send C.V. to: 
Valerie Byford 
10 Snow Hill 
London, ECI A 2EB 


SECRETARY/PA 

£9,500 

A firm of Accountants in modern offices near 
Regents Park require a Secreiary/PA fora Senior 
Partner. Applicants should be mature, well-edu- 
cated. intelligent and adaptable with 
considerable secretarial experience, excellent 
r £ nt ? typing and preferably knowledge 

of Wp. Written and spoken German an 
advantage. 

Write with CV and details of 3 referees to Mr 
Milne, Blick Rothenberg & Noble, 12 York 
Gate, London. N1 4QS 


SVC TELEVISION 

requires 

RECEPTIONIST 

,cam al our Wanlonr Sm 
-,„ U h ^ should have a pleasant manner, are 

appearance and self motivation. Afle 19+. Salary oegot 

An * rtHn n e by UUer wrfy t* 

«r? eo ®s Isaacs ’ svc Television 
Him HO use. 142 Wardour Street 
London W1V 3AU 


“HOME OFFICE” 

Executive requires an 
experienced secre- 
tary to run an office 
based at his home in 
W 8 . Top level secre- 
tarial skills essential. 
Hours by arrange- 
ment ( 8-10 hours 
per week). Excellent 
pay and conditions. 
For further informa- 
tion telephone 603 
9010. 


EXECUTIVE 
SECRETARY 
c£9,500 

Bright secretary requin 
for small friendly bo 
office of PLC based i 
Hoiborn- Good - shoe 
band and typing sJdl 
essential as wjtfl as goo 
telephone manner an 
initiative to tackle all o 
ficc routines. Write wil 
CV to: J R TreveUtidfc 
John Street Londo 
WC1N 2ES, 

Contained ob nest psP 1 





















a 

- ."t •V-- : ‘/f-,'*V r ’''- -! 

, ■>”.<■. ^-. - 'r*nv.r^— . .• , . ... •i.-.*'- 1 

- 1 ’~ ■ioWai , ai.U,>V •••>-»-< ? » riB .-;.-f„ ;£•; 


* f '< 

b«Lf> 






THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 



CRANLEIGH school 

deputy bursar 

Cranleigh School seeks to appoint a 'Deputy Bursar 
m Autumn 1986 

The °J Post are available from 

he Bursar and Secretory to the Governing Body 

Crapleigh S<*ooU Cranleigh, Surrey. -GU6 8QQ 


ROCKWOOD 

SCHOOL 

WeyMB Road, Aodover. 
SP10 3AL ■: 


Required for Septem- 
ber 1986. Resident 
Housemkstrese for 40 
Otrts aged 7-l6s also 
Asbtani. Some teach- 
ing could be available. 

Applications with C.V. 
and two referees to the 
headmistress. 


ALDENHAM SCHOOL 

bursar 

Applications are invited for this appoint- 

SSJT^Jora* 1 * ^ ecorae vacant ifrom 
October 1986 on the retirement of the 

g 11 ^ 1 ®. ursa f- Th e School is an indepen- 
dent public school with approximately 330 
pupils including some 250 boarders. The 
post is non-resident and will cany a basic 
salary of not less than £17,000 pjl A wide 
expenence of finance and administration is 
required and candidates should preferably 
be between the ages of 35 and 50 and pres 
pared to undertake a commitment of at 
least 10 years. 

Further particulars and detailed job speci- 
fication may be obtained from The Cleric 
to the Governors. Aldenham School, 
Hlstree Herts WD6 3AT (Telephone 
Radlelt 6131), 


QUEEN ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL 
BRISTOL 

APPOINTMENT OF SCHOOL BURSAR 

ADDHcations are invited far fan rvjct rtf Bursar 


plications are invited for the post of Bursar 
the above HMC School tor 460 boys aoed 


of the Governors to make the appointment tor 
the September term as soon as possible 
thereafter. 


Further ^formation 
application to the 
Queen Elizabeth's I 
Orchard Street 8r 


be obtained by written 
c to the Governors of 
itai. Governors' Office, 
BS1 5EQ. 


EDUCATIONAL 
ADMINISTRATION . 

_ AND ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT 

We are looking far a verson with good educational 
qualifications who can work accurately and 
quickly with figures and has a Hgh standard of 
written and spoken fitglistL Previous experience Is 
desirable but not essential and we are open- 
minded as to age. 

Salary an appcdntawD* lx, within the range £6090- 
£7200 and wtU be reviewed after nine months. 

Details Cram: MCS. 25 Mandebane Road. 
NWI6JP 

Telephone: 01-935 3723 


IA C3l^ ra IA ORfilV^ 



SALARY 0*508 WC1 

plusncy m Mao and Span- 
«*h or French mWi imof 
two yam aomm wp. fnf 



Mohrs mstai nun g co 
tetfcanr sates aOrin to tW 
wttti at aspects of aria*, 
np/iag. dappog. chert h»- 
son. TMs would compu aa 
00 V of ms*. ramMdar bo- 
tog secmsmi Du a n e* in 
both ns and good «t in Eng. 


£9,500 

A flair fbr art and design. 

admmretrattva ability and 

total commitmient are es- 
sential working as PA to 
the Managing Director of 
tins theatre design com- 
pany in Oapnam^ast 
accurate typing Is eleo 
needed and s ho rthand 
would be useful You wifi 
be Batting with their PR 
oocnpany end deafing with 
people at afl levels so tact, 
diplomacy and a confident 
outgoing manner are im- 
portant Age 22+. 

Bernadette 
ofBondSt. 

RouvanMoiccmeitaKiK « 


C>0 Paragon Language 
Consultants m-5S0 7*tS£ 


CONFIDEHTIAL PA 

£10,998 ieg. 

Ex xriU sub art ptsetmon 
nomd tor Sennc Emm* 
Mtoto gra mglpas tenn—ad 
axnpwy. FnamSy mhvaen. 

toury Wl effect ate hast 



SI-599 4377 

Me St Bee Cms 


PA SECRETARY Wl 

Age w ivm ettU but good 
shorthand assent*) and aM* 
ay to dad «Mh tewa 
tetemcn P******* 
Good sritfy and 
honour ad tor ng« apt***- 
B29 7622 d» taO «■ 46* 


CHELSEA 

ESTATE 

AGENTS 

Secretary/ 

Negotiator 

Raoundfcr busy flat faffing 
dapsrimant. Expawca in 
preptoir o usoW but not as- 
samaL Tba successful 
appScart writ probably be 
bemen 25 i 35. a car 
dm* w» knowledge <* toS 
Chaisea area- Heese apply 

M H Thomas. 

ueam oi-3Si sisi 


PR/ADVERTtSING 

fl&OO - £10,000 

Gd imoNed in Journal Pub- 
tejwa Cted uanon. PR 
Msrtort Research. The M.0. 

Fast Sh o rt h an d and lyj#ng 
men sec *«® 

Mound 25. AqitdiMdam 

otrtgewng neture we bestauR 
SwnpSmfagpost _ 




CTjKHMM-r-rtStei 



SH SEC 

$ 11,000 

Tn ww* m 

tnr ml ***» °S4 kS 
oemnwoe Off-. JLL. : 
W37 mmwa wnnw 1 



'n-~ J-'Cvt 


HEAD OF THE SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL LEGAL STUDIES 

The School forms pat of one of the largest 
Polytechnic Law Faculties In the United King- 
dom and offers courses at both undeigraduate 
and postgraduate level. The person appointed 
win be expected to foster professional legal 
education and to strengthen the finks between 
academic legal studies and the legal profes- 
sions. While all appficants should be 
professionally qualified, applications are par- 
ticularly welcome from those with extensive 
professtonal experience. 

Further particulars are available from the Per- 
sonnel Officer, PCL, 309 Regem Street, 
London W1R 8AL, to whom applications should 
be made in writing with a fid cunicukim vttae. 
Closing date: 9 June U986L. " • 

Salary scale: CT8J264 - £20,166 Inclusive, 
this is a re-advertisement, previous applicants 
need not re-apply. . 

PCL 



STOCKPORT GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

hnfependent HMC Founded 1487 
1010 boys aod girls 11 to 18 

Required for September 1986 Honours Graduate 
to teach 

MATHEMATICS 

throughout the school to Advanced Level 
and beyond in 

an exceptionally strong department 

Salary according to age and experience on 
Bum ham plus scale 

Please apply by letter to the Headmaster, The Stockport 
Grammar School. Buxton Road, Stockport, Cheshire 
SK2 7AF enclosing a full curricuhni vitae giving details 
of extra auricular interests aid the nanes or two 
referees, information on Stockport Grammar School aid 
the vacancy will be forwarded. 


■ MN \--V 


IAPS Preparatory SriroOL 342 boys 
Head of French required for September 1986 or 
January 1987 ' . 

To organise and teach French to PSS and CEE . 
levels. 

The department comprises 3 French teachers. Is 
strong lit oral and audio-visual approaches, and 
organises an annual stay In France. 

Salary: Burnham Scale 2 rising to 3. 

Apply by 1st June, wfthCV and details of 2 referees, 
to: 

The Headmaster. RoKeby. G eorge Road. Kingston. 
Surrey KT2 7PB. 


Fellowships 


GRANVILLE AND CAMS COLLEGE, 
CAMBRIDGE 

TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN 
PORE MATHEMATICS 

Applications are invited for a Fellowship and 
College Lectureship in Pure Mathematics (in- 
cluding Probability and Statistics). The 


The appointment will be for three years in the 
first instance with the possibility of eventual 
reappointment to the retiring agfi. lt is hoped 
that the person appointed can (alee up the Fel- 
towship on 1 October 1966 or as soon as 
possible therafter. 

Further particulars may be obtained from the 
Master, to whom - completed applications should 
be sent by 16 June 1986. 


GONVILLE AND CAIUS 

COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE 

TEACHING FELLOWSHIP 
IN ECONOMICS 

Applications are invited for . a Fellowship 
and College Lectureship in Economics for 
up to 10 hours per week in Full Term. The 
appointment will be for three years in the 
first instance with the possibility of reap- 
pointment to the retiring age. It is hoped! 
that the person appointed can take up the! 
fellowship on 1 October 1986 or as soon as 
possible thereafter. 

Further particulars may be obtained from the 
Master, to whom completed applications 
should be sent by 16 June 1986 


Exeter College, Oxford 
Fellowship in Law 

The college proposes to elect a Tutorial Fel- 
low in Law to take up duties bn 1st October 
1986. or assoon thereafter as possible. The 
Fellowship is open to men and women, and 
wiH be held in conjunction with a non-sti- 
pendiary' pntverslty Lecturership (CUF) 
which nay. at a later date, be converted into 
a stipendiary university post Further par- 
ticulars of the appointment including 
emoluments. can be obtained from the Rec- 
tor. to . .whom application should be 
submmed.as soon as possible, and not later 
titan 20th June 1986. Applications should 
be. accompanied^ a short statement of the 
candidate's quaBflcatioos and experience, 
and by the name&.of three referees. 
Candidates should ask their referees lo send 
references direct to the. Rector. 



RUTHIN SCHOOL 
CLWYD 

APPOINTMENT OF 
BURSAR AND CLERK 
TO THE GOVERNORS 

The appointment will be made during the Summer 
Term 1986 with expectation that the person ap- 
pointed will assume office. Ideally from 1st 
September. 1986 or 1st January. 1987 at Die 
latest 

Salary wQl depend upon experience. Hours of 
work can only be noted as bring In accordance, 
with the demands of the )ob. Holidays will be Ove 
weeks per year plus public holidays at Eas te r and 
Christmas. The Initial appointment win be for a 
probationary period of 12 months. Full appoint- 
ment win be to the age of 60. but may be extended, 
at the discretion of the Governors, ou-a year-by- 
year basis, to age 66. The appointment will be 
subject to a satisfactory medical examination. 

Appdcatkms should be tn writing xmhwwi lo: 

Clerk to the Governors, 

Ruthin School, 

Ctwyd LL15 1EE TeL Ruthin (08242) 2543 

Applications should contain a full curriculum vitae 
together with the names of two refe ree s , and 
should rearii the School by 15Ui June. 1986. 


University of Bristol 
Department of Physics 
Postdoctoral Research Assistant 

We invite experimental physicists to apply 
for a Postdoctoral Research Assistantship to 
study a fundamental problem in under- 
standing the physical behaviour of glaciers. 
The work is primarily experimental, but 
would involve some theoretical aspects and 
possibly some computer modelling. 

The appointment will be fbr three years, 
with salary In Range 1A according to age 
and experience. 

Applications, with curriculum vitae, details 
of research experience and names and ad- 
dresses of two referees, should be sent by 6 
June 1986 to Professor J.F. Nye. F.R.S.. 
H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory. Tyndall Av- 
enue. Bristol BS8 ITL. who can supply 
further particulars. 


BRAMBLETYE SCHOOL 

BURSAR 

Reqmrte for Augusl/Septcmber 1986. nsMoil Bursar for 
Su*8«£ boardlnfl preparatory school. Expertise in financial 
matters «wnH*l, AMtfly » nvervfM maintenance and 
cars of brikttngt also reoutred. 

Salary negotiable. Attractive house available in grounds. 
Witte, with c.v„ by Wednesday. 28th May to The Head- 
master. BraaiHetys. Eas* Grfnstead. Sussex. RHL9 3PD. 


Studentships 


UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER 

Department of Economic and Social History 

ESRC LINKED 
STUDENTSHIP 

Applications are invited fbr the above studentship which 
is funded by the ESRC fix three years. The successful 
candidate will undertake work for a Ph.D. under the 
supervision of Mr Peter Clark on some anted of the , 
devriopmem of Small Towns in Britain 1600-1850. The 
studentship is linked with current research projects at 
the Centre fbr Urban History, Leicester University, prin- 
cipally the ESRC-CNRS supported project on Small | 
Towns in Britain and Fiance- under the direction of Mr 
Clark and Professor IF. Poossou (Sorbonne). Candi- 
dates should, have obtained, or expect to obtain, a good 
upper second class or first dais degree. 

Application forms and . further details may be obtained 
from Mr Pieter Clark, Economic and Soria! History 
Department. Leicester University, Leicester LEI 7RH. 
The dosing date fbr applications is 12th June 1986. 


SAINT DAVID’S UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE. LAMPETER 

Centre for the Study of Britain 
and the World 

. Economy/Departrnent of Geography 

ESRC RESEARCH STUDENTSHIP 
THE NATIONAL EFFECTS OF INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR MARKETS 

Appflcattans an Mtsd tor an ESRC Unjcaj Award* Ph.D. 
Studentship on the above topic bom students with a back- 
ground in human geography, econo mi cs, planning, and oflw 
relevant (SsdpBnM. The award has bean made by the SRC 
Environment and Planning Commlttra. Research wffl be super- 
vised tiy Dr. N. J. TMh amt wffl locus on the impacts ot toe 
international demand for labour on certain British urban and 
regional labour markets. wRh special re leranca » toe demand 
tor toe services oi professional and maragenal workers. 

Further (Mails can be obtrinerf from Dr. N. J. ■OirUt Centre tor 
toe Study of Britain and toe World Economy /Department of 
Geography. Saint David's University CoBega. Lampeter. Dyfed, 
SA487ED. Wales, to whom totters of appftcsbon, including a 
wnVaftim vhm. should ba sant as toon es passtoto, and no 
Mer than Monday 96i June 1988. 


Courses 


Lookingfora 
boarding school? 

Our personal advisory service will 
help you choose foe school most suited 
to the needs of your child, 

Wfe are a Charitable Trust and our 
assistance is free. 

GabbHas-Thring 

fi,7& 8 SadNilk Strtfit, ffcadfflji London W1X 2BR 
Telephone 01-7J40I6L 01439 2071 


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON 
GOLDSMITHS’ COLLEGE 

Registrar 

Applications are invited for this post The 
vacancy arises as a consequence of the re- 
tirement of Mr. S.D. Leedam. The College 
hopes to make the appointment by 1st Oc- 
tober. 1986 or thereafter on a date to be 
agreed. 

The Registrar is the senior administrative 
officer of the College responsible to the 
Warden for the administration of the 
College. 

Salary £2£L065 per annum (under review) plus 
£1,038 London Allowance. 

Write for further details of the appointment to 
the Senior Assistant Registrar (Personnel), 
University of London Goldsmiths' College, 
New Cross, Loudon SEI4 6NW. 

Applications should be returned not later than 
7th June, 1986 to the Warden, University of 
London Goldsmiths' College. 

Tie College is m 
Equal Opportunities Employer, 


UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM 

Applications are invited from graduates for 
the post Of ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
in the office of the Registrar, tenable from l 
September 1986. Initial duties will Involve 
work In the Faculty of Science and with 
some central committees. Preference will be 
given to younger candidates with relevant 
University experience. 

Salary on Grade 1A £7.005 - £12.780 with 
superannuation. 

Applications (3 copies) naming three refer- 
ees should be sent by 9 June 1986 to the 
Registrar. Science Laboratories. South 
Road. Durham. DH1 3LE, from whom fur- 
ther particulars may be obtained. 


Rita Hiller 
Language Services 

Applications are Invited from specialists in all fields 
capable of teaching foreign business executives effec- 
tive communication in the English language for 
business purposes. 

The appointments win be on a freelance basis and 
within a short distance from London. 

Applications with CV and full detnQs of two referees 
to: 

Rita Hiller 
Language Services 
PO Box 3X07 
D5901 Wilnsdorf 3 
West Germany. 


Courses 


Want to Move Up? 

Sloan 

Fellowship 

Programme 

• A unique 9 month full-time General Management 
Programme, it is exclusive to London Business 
School in Europe 

• Fbr ambitious, already successful men and 
women in the 30-40 age range, who want to 
climb higher 

• With 40% of participants from abroad it is a truly 
international management programme 

• Places are limited to just 40 participants and 
they will mainly be sponsored by the organisation 
for which they work 

m The next programme runs from 29th Sept 1986 
to 3rd July 1987 

Sloan Information Evening 

We invite you to attend our next Information evening 

on Wednesday, 28th May from 630 pm until 

8.30 pm. Please phone NOW to reserve a place. Ring 

Hazel Cooper, Registrar, on 01-262 5050 ext. 306 


Please send mea Sloan Information Pack 

Name_ 

Company 

Address 


Sloan Fellowship Programme, I 

London Business School. Sussex Place, i 

Regent’s Park, London NW1 4SA. 


LONDON BUSINESS SCHOOL 


EURO-SPRACHSCHULE 

Large Private 

Langu ag e School Organisation in Germany, 
requires for a diem in the Frankfurt area: 
Experienced and Qualified Native Speaker 
language Trainer (TEFL) 

FOR IN-COMPANY TRAINING 
PROGRAMME 

With possibility of later assuming Post as Euro-Rep- 
resentative on the programme with the fbUowhre 
tasks: 

- Professional supervision of Euro-Teachers 
. Organisation and administrative duties 

- Teaching English as required 

REQUIREMENT: 

- Exicnsive experience teaching enghsh as a foreign 

- hngu ag; (mcL 5 years teaching students from busi 
ness and industry) 

- TEFL qualification (RSA, PGCE/TEFL, MA, 
APP.LfNG.) 

. Adaptability to training methods currently in use. 

- Good knowledge of German 

The successful applicant can expect both an attractive 


L>: 1 y.'t'M hU'l r-^iSTil 1 


Applications in duplicate with cv. qualifications and 
recent- photograph to: 

Euro-Sprachschulen Organisation. Hauptstr. 26, D- 
8751 Stockstadt/Main. West Germany. 

Ann Mrs. Bastnier, 


The Bhckheath School of Art 

OFFERS FOUNDATION COURSE IN ART AND DESIGN. 
Full time one year. 

SUMMER HOLIDAY COURSES IS drawing painting an 4 
Illustration and book design, 
derails from: 

21 Lw Read 
London SE3 9RQ 
T« 01-352 3960. 


THE TANTE MARIE 
SCHOOL OF COOKERY 

has a vacancy for a foil time 

QUALIFIED COOKERY TEACHER 

Applicants should preferably have experience of Cookery to 
Cordon Bleu standard. 

Please write riving full career derails and sriarv required to 
the Principal. Tame Marie School of Cookery, woodbam 
House. Carlton Road. Woking, Surrey. CU2I 4HF. 


STUDY 
GERMAN IN 
AUSTRIA 

TT and 'A* Level 
for 15-18 year old students 
shared with Ausmans 

LUNZ. nr VIENNA 
13-27 August 
5349 all towswb 

UNIVERSITY SUMMER 


Adults. Beginners to 
Advanced 

VIENNA SALZBURG 
GRAZ 

3,4 wetira Ju^tog/Sept 
rnd scheduled ffegtits 
ANGLO-AUSTRIAN 


46 Queen Ame s Gate 
London SW1H9AU 
Tal 01-222 0366 ATQL065 


THE DOWNS 
SCHOOL 
Part-time 
Bursar 

The Governors wish 
to appoint a part-time 
Bursar from Septem- 
ber 1986. Full 
particulars may be 
obtained from the 
Clerk to the Gover- 
nors, The Downs 
School, Wraxall, Bris- 
tol BS19 1PF. 


SALISBURY ft WELLS 




Tator in Doctrine 

wh spacial mpandOtity in pas- 
tool and practical theology, and 
for post-graduitB states 
Fufl deads tram die PrtnapaTs 
Secretary, ig The Close. 
Stishtiy . WRb SP1 ZEE Tel 
0722 332235 dosng dau lor 
app tamn 10 June T966. 


; LECTURER r 

' r\ -v : • ' 

ACCOUNTING 


Applications are 
invited fbr the above 
post The University 
runs a “recognised” 
degree course in 
Accounting and 
Financial 

Management The 


accountant with a 
good first degree. 


and experience. U 
Closing date for 
applications: 

13th June. 1966. 
Further particulars 
from The Registrar; 
The University of 
Buckingham. 


(0230)81 


A LEVEL 
TUTORS 
WANTED 

For 1966 to 1967. Full/ 
Part-time in Economics, 
Geography. Computer 
Science and other * 
subjects. Graduates 
aged 24 to 2a 

Leading London I 
Tutorial College. 
01-373 5432. 


Tuition 


ST. JAMES' SECRETARIAL 
COLLEGE vanota rourtt* «urr 
Snu J*n a April. Prospectus: 
Mrs Day. A. WcUiertur Cons. 
SWS. at 373 3832 
MATHS and StatMm I ulUon by 
MA iCanUDi lor GCE. Ozbndge 
Entrance and 1 st year L/m 
work. OI WS 4380 
MATHS AND STATISTICS tuHlon 
lor aU setiool let** and 1M year 
L'ntv work by M A iCmunL 
01-946 436a 



Research 
in Management at 
I [Ml Manchester Ipm] v 

' MancrieswBu&riessScroors Doctor^ I 

datongfq TOteCMI wpwterce arc the tteretenere cf sWtem 

ofgarraaionriiaeairaarama n agemartieaeiiing.ChEdocnral 

QraOuaas have gone on to swx*sstui careers m Utvrtsety toaefwig. 

frianca tanaAanqy aM ^neramanaBetient 

Fnancid support is Biair to ba 
bb*Ub to appropnae cantUta. 


The Doctoral Programme at 


^ Manchester Business School / 

Dtonral nty a HM MMaaa w 
Bton tow mo iiacteap uMSfl 
te 06t-r738zaas4 ra 




CHIROPODY AS A PROFESSION 

Hit Ifemand lor trawcl man or wonsn ciwopcxta m the pmoit mhot a 
"craMBQ. Uost al tne wHmg nwMsaiy to qiuUy tor « Optoma n dwepody 
™y bo tsun at noma by »ory veoahsed cHTOpondenca tesaons ttWMad 
by ha practical fr n ra ay. You iifl mad to wme tor tne Ires woUet ban 

Tlw SacMby <* ttw School el CUrapody. 

THE SMAE WSTTTTJTE tot MWto hH 1919) 

TMNwIU (Dopartmoat Tiq 
Bam Rood. Mto MM A BH u tara SLG 4L* 

Tat H M d i nhu d (OtSMU 21100 (2* ha) «nd (pfiRQ 32M9 


SHORT INTENSIVE 
TypewrKuis 

LndKIdua) tuition. Dally 
speed development . Eleo 
me, 1 electronic. A whs. 
FuU-Ume day. BeBtoners 
start June 2/ Jane 30/ 
July 28. Refreshers any 
Monday. Td: Mrs Phipps 
01-629 2904. The 

Langtiam Centre. 18 
Dunraven 8L Park Lane. 
London. Wl. 


CRUCIAL EXAMS 
IN 1986? 

GCEir M Wleni? Rpatotog 

UCCAorPoIrTCradHifOB? 

OuttbcsaamT 

OTW IS THE T1K toesmtt 
■to iw expui >u<ssa»iot ood 
iridutca. Fth bisttoirt: 



| CAREER ANALYSTS 
, 90 GtDHOKIarf’Im.Wl 
>01 93SM»(24hn| 




W"' 


STGCXfilCSarUBoF. 

Secretarial. Business 
and Language Courses 

TtHjid Processor Training 

English for Overseas 

Students 

Resident & Day Students 
The Registrar HT I) 

2 Arkwright Road. 
LONDON NW36AD 
tlcphone:014359831 
































26 


HORIZONS 


K 


A guide to 
career choice 


New skills under the hammer 


When Lord Gowrie left the Government 
for the chairmanship of Sotheby's Inter- 
national (at a falsely rumoured £100,000 
a year) he added to the top salesroom's 
air of privilege. Here international 
clients pay record prices for works of art, 
but salesrooms also deal in basic 
artefacts as well as old masters. And pay 
can be low. 

A woman with an Oxford University 
degree and an MA from the Courtauld, 
working at another auction house in 
South Kensington, complained to me 
that she has been a switchboard operator 
for months, with no foreseeable prospect 
of improving her position or pay, which 
was less than £4.000. 

Such cases of misplaced talent are 
gening rarer, despite graduates' readiness 


A Among colleagues is Tom Lamb. 28, 

A muerent expertise W j^ 0 ^ geography at Durham and now 

• r „ , - , is valuing old maps, having started 

IS nnaiiy reacning toe collecting county maps as a teenager- 
; : ; Time is limited: be may spend a couple 

major auction houses. 

Ann Hills examines how J J5T3U 

certain individuals wiU “ the ***** ** * 

benefit from this ^ 

r r mm ruifhmn country examining maps to practical 

torm Ol compctluon advantages of staff canteen and Bupa_ 

cover) — he finds the excitement of 
has been put in charge of a national non- successful sales has led to a general sense 
technical training scheme. of satisfaction. But without a dear career 

This, he said, is designed to improve structure, after five years. Tom Lamb 
techniques — from dealing with the m ay eventually move on elsewhere — 


to lake menial jobs simply to enter the techniques — from dealing with the ma y eventually move on elsewhere - 
world of auction rooms with hope of public to administration. Branch roanag- and improve his income, which remains 
promotion in reasonable time. Nor are ers are being offered 14 three-hour modest at around £10,000. 
the chances of so-and-so's daughter with sessions, and colleagues are being in- m Sotheby’s, 1 Bond Street (sales- 

a plummy accent likely to prosper in strutted in matters from performing on moms are in Chester and Sussex as well 
future, unless the girt in question has the the rosierum to security. as abroad), Simon Taylor is settled into 

man He »i± “ w e may start looking for running the Victorian paintings depart- 
Professionalism m subjects from man- ple prepared to lake qualifications." ment, having a Cambridge university 

aumSvn 1 hmiwhS H^SL? tradition to These include, for example, exams sei by history of art degree and a Christie's Fine 
au c u on ho usK b ut a o ne tradraon to ^ Incorporated sodety 0 f Valuers and An course unto his bell. 

mrarTof Auctioneer Mr Bordiwc fc mmri He is out ahout days a week, 
be bringing in graduates with aualifica- 35 3 raec h3 n,ca l engineer, added. The yjjjjjpg clients around the country — 

lions in maths ffuSmiOL Sotheby’s J* 1 *" 8 S? SSfS’a " duri ^ f T in 55? 

has taken on Ian Macpherson previously ° - deaIt * 55 calls, all to pnvaiepeopl^toajy, 

responsible for recruitment at Price professional man . ..... however inspiring the subject, aucaon- 

Waterhouse) who was himself bead So who are the young elite who have eers are touting for business, for objects 
hunted to fill the new post of director of Passed the first rungs of the ladder? lo sell at the highest price, 

personnel UK and Europe. Despite tradition, women are making the Mr Taylor, who has about 14 sates a 

Since his appointment a few months grade as department heads and auction- year to organize, said: “The job is 

eens (among the first femais auctioneers 

attract graduates rather than porters, though, Denise Reid auction means OUSmeSS 

was brought in by Christie's as a shipping m ■ 1 

ago. he has begun a salary review (the manager, with previous experience, exciting, but ultimately repetitive. You 


Whatever the subject, the 
auction means business 


ago. he has begun a salary review (the 
catalogue trainee is likely to join at about 
£7.000), and has started to organize in- 
service training. Management topics are 
to be of increasing importance among 
the 740 UK staff He emphasizes that 
how customers are treated — be they a 
grand couple or an old lady with prized 
family possession in a plastic bag — 
begins at the reception desk, or on the 
phone and continues through notifica- 
tion of sale, accurate description and 
prompt money settlemenL 

Sotheby’s expect staff to welcome new 
annual reviews. Department heads are 
responsible for these written statements 
of progress which are signed by each 
subject of a review. Mr Macpherson said: 
"We are developing a matrix to show 
where individuals might benefit from 
ongoing training and development." 

He expects to be doing the rounds to 
recruit graduates, but stresses that num- 
bers will remain small: countable on the 
fingers of one hand a year. 

Other auction houses are also seeking 
staff to gain skills at a time when high- 
quality service rather than expansion is 
favoured. Competition is across the 
road, but the total stock for sale is not in- 
creasing. Phillips, for example, is ex- 
panding in the regions, taking over 
salesrooms from fading companies. To 
improve performance by its staff, David 
Borthwick. the northern region director. 


manager, with previous experience, exciting, but ultimately repetitive. You 
"The function of the shipping depart- could be in medieval manuscripts and 
ment is to be invisible, but the old master have only two a year." The relaxed 
prints are just down there." She is taking image, he insists, is misleading. The 
a keen interest, while finding the work public want service through the lunch 


"fascinating." 


hour, auction rooms are increasingly 


Among the departmental directors is competitive and would-be recruits must 
Frances Gillham. aged 30, in charge of have several skills, including, if possible, 


musical instruments. She got an Oxford 
degree in music and after graduating, 


languages and driving. 

Over in Kinghtsbridge, Nicholas 


MURDOCH UNIVERSITY 

Perth, Western Australia 

School of Environmental 

and Life Sciences 

LECTURBSHIP/SEN IOR 
LECTURESHIP IN 
OCCUPATIONAL 




Tim appointee will contribute to teaching and re- 
search within Environmental Science directed to 
the occupational environment. Applicants should 
have a background in Science or Engineering with 
research skills in environmental monitoring. In- 
strumentation. risk assessment, noise, toxicology 
or control of pollutants applied to the occupational 
environment. A commitment to external teaching 
Is required. Some Industrial experience could be of 
advantage. (REP. 0928 - cost available 1/7/86 car 
as soon as possible thereafter). 

Salary Ranges: Senior Lectureship SA56.54 1 to 
SA42388: Lectureship SA27J235 to SA36.7T7 
per annum. (Appointment wfl] normally be made 
at the lower steps of the grade) 

This is a tenuraWe appointment and conditions 
Include superannuation. long service leave, out- 
side studies programme, payment of fares to Perth 
for appointee and dependent family, removal and 
settling-in allowance and house purchase loan 
arrangement 

PROCEDURE FOR APPLICATIONS: There is 
no prescribed application form, but TWO COM- 
PLETE SETS Of detailed applications, quoting the 
appropriate reference number, including full per- 
sonal particulars, details of tertiary qualifications, 
career history with description of posts held, area 
of special competence and interest, research com- 
pleted or currently being undertaken, personal 
views on teaching, membership of professional in- 
stitutions or societies and position of responsflHity 
In these: list of relevant material published by the 
applicant, when available to take up appointment 
If offered and the names and addresses of three 
professional referees, should reach the Personnel 
Officer. Murdoch University. Murdoch. Western 
Australia 6160. by 13 June 1986. 

Applicants resident In the UK. Europe or Africa, 
should also forward a copy of their applications to 
the Secretary General. Association of Common- 
wealth Universities (Appts). 36 Gordon Square. 
London WC1H OPF. 


"worked for Maxwell and did PR for Bonham (“I'm the sixth generation; we 
musicians." but soon joined Christie’s, were established in 1793”) believes flair 
specifically to concentrate on musical is crucial in new recruits. As managing 
instruments - "still a male-orientated director he wants someone who, if they 
world,” she said, "dealers tend to be men know all about the Life and times of 


and 1 have some novelty value". 
Having started “on the front counter, 


Rembrandt also realizes that a saleroom 
is a market place and that 95 per cent of 


she pushed for promotion. She confesses their items for sale are not of museum 
to being ambitious, liking the corporate quality (the average price is a lot less 
structure, glad that the wind of modern than £500 here; and less than £120 in 
change has arrived - "the company is Chelsea). 

managed by extremely professional peo- Though the glamour might catch the 
pie who have time to see you; who want headlines, work is often at a basic level 
to hear you" — and hopes she might, one Bonhams hopes to open auction rooms 


day, get a seat on the board. 

Debbie Harman, 32, press officer at 
Christie’s in South Kensington, started 


in the regions in the months to come. 

While humping furniture, carrying 
porcelain or manning the reception desk. 


as a fashion buyer with stores, before establish an area of interest and agitate 
deciding to follow her father’s interest in for promotion. In the future the profes- 
antiques and joined, at short notice, on sional managers and heads of depart- 
the front desk before taking up a post as ments should improve their talent 
cataloguer in art nouveau. Her job can spotting. The MA answering the phone 
grow as this branch of Christie’s devel- should not be there much longer. She 
ops. Starting from scratch in 1975. might, one day, be knocking down a 
turnover last year was £26.9 million. Goya. 


UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY 

BARLING CHAIR OF 
SURGERY AND HEADSHIP 
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
SURGERY 

AppBcations are invited (dr the Barfing Chair of Sur- 
gery and Headship of the Department of Surgery 
which wffl become vacant from 1st October 1986. 

Salary in the cSnical professorial range, maximum 
£27,700 with superannuation. 

Further paflkxriars available from the Vice Chancefior, 
University of Bimtingham, P.O. Bax 363, Birmingham 
B15 2TT to whom applications (IS copies: one from 
overseas applicants) should be sent by 19th June 
198& 

An Equal Opportunities Employer. 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON 

Department of Mechanical 
Engineering 

NEW BLOOD APPOINTMENT 

The LECTURER would be expo rted » 
search on Structural Integrity of Offshore Fwtfwrns- 
Work would be directed toward s genera l 
refiabtfty modefling, and semi-automatic 
inspection systems hrc ghfoS - 
microprocessor control of an hydraufic mgxprta tor 
and NOT hardware. Research would complement me 
existing extensive work at UCL on fatigue fr acture 
mechanics studies of offshore structuresr crack seteg 
techniques and computer controlled manqwMJX 
systems. 

Department te a major contrtoutor to the London Cen- 
tre for Marine Technology which is heavily supported 
by SERC and industry. FacMfes relevant tome new 
appointment include large scale test rigs, extensive 
experience m real time computer control, numerical 
modeling of stress distribution, WJ.T. md manlpida- 
tor equipment and finally the new NOT Underwater 
Trials Centre. 

Good first degree In relevant engineering dfcdpfine 

essenifeL A Wgtw degree or eifliNalant experience In 

subject area desirable, hital salary m range- £8020 - 
El 2780 plus £1297 London Allowance. 

Applications with cm. and anmes of two referees to 
Departmental Secretary (T), Dept of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. UCL, Torrlngton Place, London WC1E 7JE 
from whom further particulars may be obtained. Ctos- 
kig date 13 June 1986. 


UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN 

DEPARTMENT OF GENETICS 
PRINCIPAL/TOP GRADE 
CYTOGENETICIST 

Applications are invited for the above post which 
fells vacant on 31 July 1986. The successful ap- 
plicant win be responsible for the cytogenetic 
services for the Grampian Health Board area, and 
must be fully experienced in basic cytogenetic 
techniques. as well as being capable of adminis- 
tering a busy diagnostic laboratory. The appointee 
will be expected to undertake relevant research 
and teaching. - 

Q ualificati ons should preferably include a. higher 
degree in a relevant biological discipline together 
with a proven record In research, and at least lO- 
12 years relevant experience. Applicants should 
also possess at least the Diploma in Clinical Cyto- 
genetics of the Royal College of Pathology. 

Salary on Grade in Scale ftir Research, and Analo- 
gous Staff £14*870 to £18^25 per annum, with 
appropriate placing (scale under review). 

Further particulars and application farms from 
The Secretary. The University. Regent Walk. Ab- 
erdeen AB9 1FX with whom applications (2 
copies) should be lodged by 13 June 1986 (Ref No 
EL/037). 


THE CITY UNIVERSITY 
Department of Social Science & Humanities 

Senior Research Fellow or Lecturer in 
Communications Policy Staidies 


App li cations am mwted fora tan 
dons Potior. n» appointw wfl be 


9st it CofMmnica- 
tooontrtiuietBthe 



LECTURESHIPS IN 

ENGINEERING 


Applicants are invited for TWO lectureships In Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

For one post the person appointed will be expect to 
have had Industrial and/or research experience In 
the field of Applied Mechanics, particularly areas 
associated with manufacturing systems. 

For the other post the person appointed will be 
expected to have had industrial and/or research 
experience in Ihe field of Thermodynamics and be 
- prepared to make a major contribution to our well 
established M.Sc. course la Refrigeration and Air- 
Conditioning. 

Salary will be within the range £8.020-£ 15.700 
per annum plus £1 .297 per annum London Allow- 
ance. Universities Superannuation Scheme 
benefits payable. 

Application forms and further particulars are 
available from Mr. G.A. CuthberL Assistant Per- 
sonnel Officer. King's College London. Strand. 
London WC2R 2LS CTel. 01-836 5454 ext. 2765). 
Applications should be submitted in duplicate with 
names of not fewer than two referees, not later 
than 16th June 1986. 

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor 
S.W.E. Earles. Head of the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Department (01-836 5454 ext. 2294). 


UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW 
CHAIR OF VETERINARY 
SURGERY 

Applications are invited for the Chair of Veteri- 
nary Surgery to succeed Professor D.D. 
Lawson. The post will be vacant from 1st Octo- 
ber, 1986. 

Further particulars may be obtained from the 
Academic Personnel Officer, University of 
Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, where applica- 
tions (3 copies; 1 copy in the case of overseas 
applicants), giving the names and addresses of 
not more than three referees, should be lodged 
not later than 27th June, 1986. 

In reply please quote Ref. No. 5723E. 


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH 

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING 
AND BUSINESS METHOD 
Lecturer in Accountancy 

Applications from suitably qualified Individuals are In- 
vited for this post In a Department offering a wide range 
of leaching and research opportunities m congenial sur- 
roundings. No particular subject spedaUstp will be 
preferred. 

The appointment win be made at a notnt on the Lecturer 
Scale (£8X120 to £16.70(9 appropriate to the age and 
experience of the successful camhdate. 

Further particulars are available from Personnel Office. 
University of Edinburgh. 65 South Bridge. Edinburgh 
EHl US. with whom applications by letter, including 
curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, should 
be lodged not later than 13tb June 2985. 

PLEASE QUOTE REFERENCE NO. 1250. 


The Queen’s 
University ef Belfast 
COMPOSER-M- 


Apptations as invited from com- 
poses for rtw post of Composw- 
m-flasMeno. financed jointly by 
the ArtsCound of Ncrtiwm Ireland 
aidmetintwlty TTwpoO. 
will ba aHacned to the Department 
of Male, is for one year to the frst 
instance but may be renewed an- 
raaBy for a maximum of tfne 
years. The salary is E&5DD per 
amun and tte successful apptt- 
cant w* be expected to tala up 
post m October, Assistance nth 
rotation. 

Further ntraita {plane quote 
Ref- 86/T) may he oOtaned from 
tin ftraomd Officer. The Queen's 
UriwrSy of Befest, BT7 INN. 
Northern Wand. Doting date: 16 
Jura 1966. 


research pi u g iju in w ot the Commu ac atlonB PptCTCBove end I 
to asta n teaching die recentty lunched MA hiComrmmica- 
tions PDticy States. The appointment win bo mads at Sartor 
Research mow or Lecturer level and -the balance batmens 


research and teachtog duties wifl vary a coonteigly. The ap- 
pointment wS be (or ftraa years in the first Instance. 

The Cornmudcadons. Poficy Centre has Interest s in tBteoom- 
munications. mass media and Wonrouiun technology. 
Research and teaching folcw on ntanSscipkiary. socH so- 

anmnrinnlntinn nnd appSrjilifin^ itll frnmthnM- 

with a badcnraim! m any aoetel science: those wffli expertise in 
economics, law or comm un ic a tions research methods any be 
given prefe rence. 

Salary: Lecturer - SL317 - E1RSS7 per annum Inclusive (un- 
der review) 

Senior Research FMow - £16,167 - E19J22 per 
annum indushe {under revtaw) 

Fdr father Petals and an appacatton form, please write to The 
Academic Rartstrar's Office. The City Unfrareity. W o rtf iamplon 
Square, LONDON EC1V 0HB. or tefephona 01-253 4389, ex- 
tension 3037. 

Closing data 6tti June, 1988 


Prep & 

Public 

Schools 


Which School 
for your child? 


Our expert cnmugflnig oraa 
way aspect sf education, fiom“ 
pwpu toqr - .to-.. 
sdbooh, from fauna to 
edacritoad pqdwkgati. 

We coend punts so t. 
perianal bon • wr advice is 
bie sod oljedhe. • 


TW THOWUf-* miNGMlCr 
HTOOnWM. TRUST, 7S (T7l 
WTIWG WL GATE. LOttflN 
■11 3 U THBWWE 81-727 




^University” 
of Reading 

Appointments 


UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM 
DEPARTMENT OF LAW 

Applications are invited for a lectureship in this 
Department. Salary within the range £8.020 - 
£15.700 per annum. 

Further particulars and application forms, return- 
able not later than 2 June 1986 may be obtained 
from the staff Appointments Officer. University of 
Nottingham. University Park. Nottingham NG7 
2RD- Ref No 1039. 


PROFESSORSHIP OF 
AGRICULTURAL ROTARY 

AppBcations are Invited for the Professorship of 
Agricultural Botany in the department of that 
name. The appointment win IbeT? made from a 
date to be agreed with the successful candidate. 

The University is seeking to appoint a Professor 
who has an established reputation In teaching and 
research and whose specialist Interest are In plant 
genetics and plant breeding. 

Further Information may be obtained from the 
Registrar. Room 212. Whlteknights House. P.O. 
Box 217. The University. Whiteknights. Reading. 
RG6 2 AH. The closing date for applications is Fri- 
day 27 June 1986. 


IF YOU WANT 
TO GET AHEAD, 
GET 

v * Tl VI i s 


EDUCATION 

EVEBY MONDAY 


UNI VERSITY APPOINTMENTS ■ PREP. & PUBLIC 
SCHOOl-AFPOINriTSdJEJ'rrS ■ EDUCATIONAL COU RSES. 
SCHOLARSHIPS & FELLOWSHIPS 
A wide range of positions in Education appears every Monday. 

MONDAY 

MAKE SURE YOU GET 
' YOUR COPY OF 

THE^tSy&TTMES 


University 
College Cardiff 
DEPARTMENT OF 
GEOLOGY 
Lectureship in 
Applied 
Sedimentology 

AmrilcJUons are itnIM for 
me above inrfuslr Lilly -funded, 
rue-year contra* I msl n In- 
icHves Broad learning dunes 
in Uw context of Geology de- 
gree tctiemes with special 
mponsabiuty for courses in 
seounenidkigy. tv success- 
lid candidate wm be rxprded 
lo dev efon denartmemal face I- 
Ues and research aahiHn tn 

wcdmenloiagy and contribute 
lo departmental interests m 
sedimentary basin analysts. 
Preference will be given to ap- 
pl teams who have a strong 
research Interns tn elastic 
sedi memo logy. Although 

bated in (he Geology Depart- 
ment Uw appoiniee wMI be 
expected, m raflaboratton 
wuh (tie CardrtrEimersHy In- 
dustry Centre iCUIO. lo seek 
outside funding to support 
aru cites i including consunan- 
cv and researchi in areas or 
apoHrd sedunentotogy. The 
abdamlment will bo made al 
or near the lower end of the 
lecturesnttt scale The scale a 
£8020 • CIS. too per annum. 
Dufies lo commence 1 Octo- 
ber 1986. 

AppUcalMns ‘i copies). <P- 
BMher wiih uie n*ne* and 
addresses of two referees, 
should be lot-wanted lo the 
VKe Principal lAdimmsm- 
iteni and Registrar. 
UnflefSIly College. Pft Box 
TB. Cardiff CF1 jso, <0232 
£17401 II. Instil Whom further 
nsnbcaiant may be obtained. 

Details of me Geology mmt- 
metn man be obcuned from 
I hr head of Det»artmenf. Pro- 
fessor m Brooks, who win bc 
pleased to answer personal 
entwines CJosina date i jui 
J une 1906. Ref. £099. 


UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER 
CHAIR OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 

The University invites applications for a new 
Chair of Molecular Biology in the Faculties of 
Medicine and Science, established by the Univer- 
sity as part of a major new initiative in the 
Biological Sciences. Candidates with Interests in 
any area of molecular biology wm be considered, 
but preference will be given to those with an inter- 
est in the molecular biology of eukaryotes. 
Applications (one copy suitable for photographic 
reproduction) giving full details of qualifications 
and experience together with the names and ad- 
dresses of three persons to whom reference may 
be made, should be sent to the Registrar. The Uni- 
versity. Manchester M13 9PL. from whom further 
particulars may be obtained, and be received by 
him not later than June 30th. 1986. Please quote 
ref. i 09/86 /T. Overseas candidates may apply by 
air mall letter in the first Instance 


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH 
DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING 
AND BUSINESS METHOD 
Lecturer in Ac cou nt an cy 

Applications from suitably qualified Individuals 
are invited for this post in a Department offering a 
wide range of teaching and research opportunities 
in congenial surroundings. No particular subject 
specialism will be preferred. 

The appointment will be made at a point on the 
Lecturer Scale (£8.020 to £15.700) appropriate to 
the age and experience of the successful candidate. 
Further particulars are available from Personnel 
Office. University of Edinburgh, 63 South Bridge. 
Edinburgh EHl ILS. with whom applications by 
letter. Including curriculum vitae and the names of 
two referees, should be lodged not later than 13th 
June 1986. 

Please quote reference no. 1250 


UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL 
Lectureships (Special Appointment) 
fn Public Administration 

Applications are invited for two posts of Lec- 
turer (Special Appointment) in the newly 
established Liverpool Institute of Public Admin- 
istration and Management- One will be in the 
general area of Public Administration and 
Development: the other will be in any area of 
Public Administration but preference may be 
given to candidates who have, or are prep are d to 
develop a specialism in administrative and man- 
agerial techniques. Informal enquiries may be 
made to Mr M.R. Davies, Director of the Insti- 
tute. Tel: 051-709 6022 ort. 2740. 

Initial salary will be within the range £8,020 - 
£15,700 per annum (under review). 

Applications, together with the names of three 
referees, should be received not later than 6th 
June. 1986, by The Registrar. The University, 
PO Box 147. Liverpool L69 3BX. from whom 
further partieulais may be obtained Quote Ref 
RV/753/T. 


UNIVERISTY OF NOTTINGHAM 

LECTURESHIP 
IN GENETICS 

Appficatkms are invited for a Lectureship in Genetics, 
starting m October 1986- The apoolntment wtt coincide wtth 
the move of me Department of Genetics into new 
laboratories. Preference mS be given to those using the 
techniques of molecular biology to solve fundamental 
goW^«lnGen0tiC8.Thesal0ry wffl be in the range £8^)20- 

tnformal enquiries should ba nude to Professor B.C. Clarke. 
FRS. Further particulars and forms of application returnable 
not later than 8 June hum the Staff Appointments Officer. 
Untvwsttjr of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 


UNIVERSITY OF 
NOTTINGHAM 
DEPUTY REGISTRAR AND 
ACADEMIC SECRETARY 

Applications are invited from suitably 
qua] ififed candidates for this appointment, 
which will be effective from 1 October 
1986. Salary wifi be wfthirr The Adminis- 
trative Range IVi j. 

Forms of application and futher particu- 
lars, returnable not later than 2 June 1986 
from the Staff Appointments Officers, 
Unviersity of Nottingham, University Park. 
Nottingham NG7 2RD.- Ref -No 1CS7. '- 




WORKING IN THE ALGARVE 


An unusual earning opportunity floe a qualified person 
or persons to Join a successful sales team at the 
prestigoos Four Seasons Country aub In the Algarve. 
Our current sales staff are earning In excess- of 
£36.000 Per An urn. how would you Uke the opportu- 
nity to do the same. 

Sales experience helpful but character ref trances^ edu- 
cational background, appearance and social skills most 
Important. (Must be aMe to relocate). 

For Appointment. 

Phone 01-251 1046/1062 office lire. 


COLOURIST 


Art Gallery seeks intel- 
ligent practical person 
for hand -colouring an- 
tique prints and 
decorating . mounts. 
Nonsmoker. 

«n* 01-720 4907 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 

A CHANGE & 

A CHALLENGE 

If you are dynamic, self-motivated, with 
initiative & enthusiam, and drive a good 
car-letting high class furnished properties 
m Central London could be for you. 

CALL 

PAMELA BEREND 
NOW 

ANSCOMBE & RINGLAND 
01-722 7101 


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

We require an, energetic, responsible person who 
is looking for job satisfaction being both muner- 
ate a nd a good typist, able to work under 
pressme, handle the management of high- 
class furnished houses and flats. Ability to deal 
with people and car owner essential. Attractive 
salary and allowances. 

Please apply to Pamela Berend 01-722 7101 
Aincombe & Rmgland Residential Lettings, 

8 Wellington Rd. London NW8 



TRAINEE 

BROKERS 

Vacancies turn developed 
fer Trainee Broken wtthtn 
the UK’s moat dynamic 
Brokenqt. Applicants 
a ged a s - 36 was entaw 
wnaxWenshm prafto* 
team training anl an 
unrivaled career path. IT 
you have a positive mental 
aHH i i fl e and vent hum of 
human" call .Jerry Odle on 
OX-629 222* 


SEULVMO Is ji eamv* Ws'n n jii. 

hut r<x*t«r. fip, „ comnmb 
<uU BrMnlna. 

w if you really ware tn 






experienced 

COOK : : : 

' Required- by ,;.~ 
" <3aleriiig -' 'i. 
Company^: * 

0i-870aw2-'/ :: 


I 

* Minimum experience 5 yearn. /SamWSl 

S yeai * • 

J Telephone 061-236 43S3---. J 

* M ********irt*it*ite 
















THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 



RENTALS 


SPRING BREAKS 


EAHKTO SAB. w4h The Km i 
saflnw School. Fi« reduced is 
only £299 lor 14 day cr im e io 
Ownprt blank. Departing 
RamsBUe 31 Mqy. Far details 
of an our RYA approved &4ay 
«r w mfad nuiwtt F(W 
Balaian. Phone <0843)584477 


DORSET, HANTS, & 
I.O.W. 


Denser i7r canape m National 
Trust country. unpom beach 7 
min* walk. Pretty garden. 
tiKH 4. avail 16 a up onward*. 
Tel: 01-743 6996. 




. MAIDA VALE W9. 
RANDOLPH AVE 

. Suosrb liaaatou a ■ mnioowwa, 
1*t pad 2nd floor* plus granny 
8aL * bedrooms, vary Urge, 
kaefton. string room, Wad car- 

oets throughout. Cub 
tomb bad. c o mm ute ! garden*. 

.. T«i 01-459 4356 - 

- AKT TIME 


^01-629 6604^ 

CHESTERTONS 





LETTING? 

See Your 
Specialist 

GEORGE KNIGHT 

Tht I.vStilrJ A^i-nt 

155-157 Kni"ht-iiiHijgi- 
l.ondoaSi'l . 

Tel: 589 2133 


GOUQB GASL WeH tasted' 
soaaous taoafe nsa Very dose 
nfle.4 OBtnss. 3 tea. Ft* ft to. 
Barn. 1 WC Gda HOD. 

MBSOttS 68SH. Mas tend Vfc 
hse. 3 beams. 2 bets. Latiy 
nets lmWaUmadi.pttie.E2K 
MNBA VALE. Hjptt neWy tarn ml 
dtc *a 3 bedims. ctaxmaj itoo. 
Me ntOOlaq qdns. Lia K + 8. 
naaiHienOed. (IBS. 

TEL 499 5334 


HIGHGATE WOODS 
- A SPECTACULAR . 

.. EXECUTIVE HOME. 
Coanpnstno a magnificBm lounge. . 
ntta a cadiwrf caftng (30 ft 
tngtr), am) unnus nvctaangng 
gallery. Star* doom to pane 
garden. -3 beds, [mastenwtfi bal- 
am otferaig views mb London 
skymel 2 l abs + sta res fi 
wfth tngfi pressue staaer 
nunp). pdl 1 doanstars doafcs. 
Haft, draw room, modem 
Wcten/braatfasL All amemes. 
Garage. Seamy system. Many 
extras. Sedated ns* for enter- 
aming. Must to seen to be 

■jlJ MWi jdwil 


B1 BS3 9831 aaftiaa 


HAMPSTEAD. FHODMAL. P/B 

Uni floor 2 b oetroom Oal. New- 
ly decorated. Lounge- I rt idim 
and bathroom. GCH. £ 90.000 
one, Teh 668 3200 

eves/Wt-ntft. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 



CLDANT cbarmlnn . trad 
nwdemsed white wash cot- 
tage- Aga- 3 beds, large studio. 
O/ looking Sugarioaf. £4&ooo 
F/H. 01-386 6463. - - 


hlTwi 


BATH unique oppo rtuaay. Small 
estate 1 mUe city centre.TocaHy 
leduded 4 bed roaage. Heated 
pool Kara court.- Stables.- so- 
perb views. 6 to 17 acres. From 
ci69.goo. Tei: azz fsa&s. 



DipicmcSCTibaonhIJgaDda 

seefafopuctaeirfaW* 

»-i — -—-In 1 rTnr4.li Jit 

oScsomdlwlanialnttB 
NdaenmnUoloaBBcf 
Karpdai Uganda. 


BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


KENSBICTON Soper very large, 
newly fum and decorated s-c 
flat. 4 bedrras. sips 6. 
lounge, dutlng room, 

kitchen break test rnv 

bBhnn wc. gas CH. tel. TV. 
entrance phone. £300 pw Co 
let only Michael Richards A Co 
995 5673. 


BSfCffT. SUPERB Luxury mat 
soneite at the AnoN NX. 2 dbte 
bedrooms, spactout lounge, 
kitchen diner, bathroom, funy 
(unvehed. gdc telephone, col- 
our tv. own entrance, is mins 
from city. Co lei £19000 pw. 
Tel Ol- 837 J322. 


HOLLAND PARK Wil tot attrac 
uve cul-de-sac. fully furnished, 
newly bum mats, lee sit. with 
bale. Ml. diner. 2,3 

beds. dining room. 2 baths. Co 
Lei. ! ■? yr* gref. £326 ow. Tel 
01 -409 2299 day.Ol- 603 5461 
eve 


KENSmcrON Comfortable 2 bed 
flat in oeaubfiu street Uoed with 
while cherry btamont. Careful- 
ly mod e l n lied a furnished by 
American owner. SMdous Hv- 
fng room, kitchen, bathroom A 
Pilio. ad appliances 1 par 
min. £300 pw. 01-603 2946 


WALPOLE ST SW3 Attractive 2 
bed mao. recepL kll/dbung rav 
blh. cloak. £200 gw. Co lev Rid- 
ley: 584 6391. 

WEST KEN Charmtno t/t town- 
home in mod rompte x. 4 Beds. 
2 Baths. Gdn. PVn only 
£260pw talc. 01-676 1896 CD. 

A BIC SELECTION of dab A 
houses. London Estates 457 
7169 or 734 9029 until 7pm. 


University it Brit Museum Het- 
- eo waaon A Co. 680 6Z76. 
BULS PARR Dbte studio carpets 
phone heating. £62 pw. Other* 
627 2610 HOmefocuSors. 

CHfl SEA light lux balcony DaL 
OouMe bedroom, rerep. nils, 
porter*. Long let- 622-6826. 
riWI 171 - Snanmi* 2 nd fir Hal 
suit couple. MtTn 36. £146 pw. 
No agents 352 6870. 
CLAPHAM COMM Oil superb FT 
2 bedroom mod flat £136 p w. 
TetiOl-678 0961 
COSY 1 bed. Oaf in Chelsea avail- 
able 3 months. £176 pw. 730 
3435 in. 

COSY KEDCC Deddl own Hitch, 
nr tube. £40 pw. Others anil 
627 2610 Homefocators. 
FORTtS GREEN KZ unique aplft- 
levci oaLposMA gda*. secoruy 
system. £160 pw. 01-885 41 16 
FULHAM. Ige lux 4 house (Ml 
ament tine ML pan. nr tube. 
~£400pw. Fluff*. 788 4448. 
FULHAM Luxury 2 bedroom Hal 
nr lube and park. £170 pw. 736 
5505 Finches 

FULHAM Large 3 bedim how. 
fully ruled gdn. £225 pw. 736 
6606 Finches • ■ 

GHECHFORD 3 bed turn l«e CH. 
c*v. ClIOpw. Co at Tel: 01- 
907 1351 • - • 

KDUMGTOM WB garden Gal id 
house In Vogue Sunny lounge. 
2 bdnns. £250 pw. 602 6941. 
KNMHTSMUDGC Lux: 1 bed flat 
tor couple Ch. porter. Long let 
only. £160 pw. 01-584 7263 
LOW LET also Holidays bt Lon- 
don. Forested* Properties 242 
9462 «X1 77-. or 631 0367. 
OLD CHELSEA. Spac wed rant 
□aL 1 dMc bed. drveng rut. (Un. 
£163 pw. Co ltd. 362 6174 
REGENTS PARK - CTlootttng lux 
mod rum studio. K&B. £135 
pw. AvaH burned. 01-437 7519 


VICARAGE GATE W8 
Brand new interior designed 
flat In siunrang Regency ter- 
race nvnpTElng 2 double 



QUUMSGATE Very oideL beau- 
tuully Manor designed, newly 
tnooemned 2 bedroom Hal with 
folly lined kitchen, dining 
room, tilling mom. bathroom A 
cloakroom A snail patio gar- 
den. £276pw. PhUOp An dr ew s 
01-486 5991. 


SOUTH KENSINGTON SHCtoS 
flat nr tube and lyree with 2 
dUe beds, dbte glazing, rrept 
with full lengui bay window*, 
ku w dryer, bath. Res porter, 
video entrance phone, co let. 
£250 pw. Goddard & SmiUt 
930 7321. 


JM DON. Luxury (umMied 
apariments. tuHy serviced, 
choke of Mayfair or adjacent to 
Keaangion Palace. From £300 
- £560 pw. 3 months . 2 years. 
Mountcurzun Management Ltd. 
Ol 491 2626 .(Telex 2991861. 




Id fir $ C RaL Rer.-dfnrm. 1 
Dole 1 Sgle Bdrms. K&B CH 
Close lubt Res pkg. £130.00 
PW. Tel 01- 748 608 4 

detached bungalow 78 yrds 
from Medowtsank lor rent dur- 
ing men. 19 Jaty - 2 August 
Tel (031 1 6614609 

BEGEMIS PARK Superb mad out 
2 bed. 2 TTcrp K*B flat. Pan- 
oramic views. £276 Inc] ol 
CM.-CHW. Nr SL CCS 431 
2666. 

SITU. LOOKMGT Hometocalor 
accofn publishers handle over 
2000 rentals weekly an areas, 
son. prices. Cadi 627 2610 
open 7 days mi 9. 

WLEntlN. Penthouse Oat In 
modem development. 2 beds. 2 
baths, fully equipped. Co let. 
£226pw. ApptyfA Jestyn Coke 
0268 64029. 

AMERICAN Bank urgently re- 
suns luxury Rats and he oxi 
Cram £200 • £1.000 pw. runs 
Burgess Enalr Agents 681 5136 

AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats A 
houses. Chelsea. KMahtsbriage. 
Belgravia- £200-£2.000gw. 
Tel: Burges 581 5136. 



Eiiopeintadafionta 
CCO p OB l fl l 
JueAa*taWeI7A. . 
KMOUuam - 
Betfia A 


ita 

A 



82DL 1984 ooaL 26jOOO. Exert 
lent cam. 6apert> Ttto Hf-FL 
Sun Roof. 1 owner. FSH. 
£7.250. TH 0684 72649. 


GENERAL 


MO METRO C. HEu less than 
2JXO mis. with lull manufac- 
turers .warranty. IMS. an 
factory fined extras, as new: 
£4.700. Teh 0582-872096. 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


TRIUMPH STAG 1977 Blue wflh 
bard lop. 33000 mOrs. Innnar- 
male condition wim pmj 6 
registration. £6800. Tel: 0503 
20218 



NON-SECRETARIAL 


STEPPING STONES 


A TRADITIONAL HOTEL 
IN LONDON W1 

Requires a TYPIST lor general 
hotel correspondence. Good 
■canto type's ESSENTIAL 
and th e capetttty o< using 
Wtaattvo. 

Very good caxftai s. Meats 
prowled wide on duty. 
Please tateftftone 01-499 7070. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS £7.000. 
YouneinformoJ PR co. seeks 
college leaver secretary to work 
in a busy tram. Good prospects. 
90. SO skills needed Call Os- 
borne Rkhardson RecruUmenl 
Consultants. 01-409 2393 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


MATURE Part time secretary re- 
a ut ml (or Partner in Mayfair 
surveyors practice. Hours by 


PART-INK SEC. required by 
small new company in W.14. 
Mornings Mon - Frl. txc. terms 
negotiable. 602-9333. 



TEMPING WITH 
A DIFFERENCE 

- Why take fast any 

tempomy secretarial job 

gften you could wot* in 

TELtl/felON. FILMS. 
ADVERTISING. POWJC 
.. J1QATK3NS0fl 
PUBUSKING? Wehavc 

, ' tots ol vacancies and 
offer exeafiatt ratsi and 
whaf » more •m pay you 
in the same week! ' 

Why not caR us today 
. . on 01*499 5565 
or 01 >4338383 


GRADUATES wflh secretarial 
skins Jor te m po rary worn tin 
universities, charities and other 
non c omme rcial grgamMBon*. 
Please rwg Prospect Temps 
tsaif agency). 629 1331 


MOTORS LEASING ' 


( Je tf i f/te 

>: NATIONAL CONTRACT HIRE 



*TENNIS BALlJ 


ALBERT HALL 
2 ]st JDNE 

HELP WANTED 
NOW 

01-834 1002 

tfJfccdeaaa&}.m. 


MlftHVKWER II - S required 
for-fiat ren Ufa, by Esiale Agen- 
cy ., 1 mmiiie victoria saifoa 
Lg Io £150 p w. including corn- 
ttusuon. 828 1457 


NR. HAMPTON COURT elegant 1 
bed Oat forming 6 C wing of 
listed house overlooking Royal 
Pork. Intenor Hagu e wtth HI 
mod coos. 5 mins Trddmgton 
statton-avaii now co let £120 
pw 01 977 3122. 


ELM PARK GARDENS, Otetsca. 
Compact comfortable 6(h floor 
flat In mod Mock. 1 (Me bed. 1 
recep, kit both. Avail tyr*. 
£ 175pw. Go let. Geo Joslln 01 
351 0821. 


RED-A-TERRE. West End /City. 
Attractively fum in ideal cen- 
tral location. Oose to tube. Sep 
noth A fall Perfect for City exec- 
utive. PBB a porter. Co let pref 

£12Spw 244 7353. 


5W1 Superb mansion flat close lo 
all amerillle*. 2 attractive recaps 
wub adkxntng balconies. 3 
Beds. 2 Balm, ige ku bTasI rm. 
uMivtl £ 6 O 0 dw. Cootrs 82 B 
8261. 


REDECORATEDtdMe bedrzu Hat. 
recM. carpels, nr tube. CH. £66 
pw. Others loo 627 2610 
HomeSocaiors open 7 days. 

RICHMOND lux ground floor fur- 
nfahed flat. 2 dbl beds. cons, 
balcony. Tel. parldng spare. 
GasCH.CISOpw 019488538 

SWLS. Superb Vks collage. Dble 
roc. 2 beds. bath. Exc kb. Ggr. 
blunae. £260 pw. Slurg<s& Son 
788 4681. 

SWISS COTTAGE. £350 pw. Mod 
3 bed. 2 bath town hs*. Nr Holi- 
day Inn. Co let only. Others 
available. A.C-R-E. 586 8811. 

SJ7 SCSI The number to remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
proorrtle* in cesilral and prune 

London areas £ 1 50/C2.0000W. 

VISITING LONDON? Alien Bales 
6 CD have a large selection of 
flats 6 houses avail for 1 wk + 
tram £200 pw. 01-499 1665 

S-KEN Magnificent Studio, per- 
fect spot £126 me CH A CMW. 
S C- Boland Lid. 221-2616. 

SC 2 tSile bedim gdn Oat. carpets. 
TV. phone. £90 pw. Others 627 
2610 Hometocalor*. 

ST JAMES'S Charming 2 Bed. 2 
Bath pb. flat. Roof Terr Com- 
pany left. £?75PW 586 9842. 

ST JOHNS WOOD Quiet S -C flat. 
Studio, kit. an rm. shower. 
WC. CH. £80 pw. 821 0417. 

STUDIO NWL Detux ralwd 
(round floor close io tube. 
£90pw PoUtl Si Co 499 9B76. 

SW7. StMmy <m racing 2 bed flat 
o looking private gdns. CH. 
£160 P w. 01-373 6942. 

SWJ7 Near tube. 3 '4Pror*nrv3 
b lire serviced flat- £120 p.w. 
Inc. Tel. 672 3000 d 778 826B e 

SW Dbte bedim flal. recpL CH. 
phone, washer. £76 pw. Others 
627 2610 Homelocatore tfll 9. 

BCL Modern 1 brd'quaHty 
mews flal on immense charm. 
£17Spw. Tel 240 7909. 

WCL. Exc studio flat. F Fum. 
CH. Co let £120 pw Tel: Ol 
883 3491 (After 7Jxnl 

WEST KENBINCTOH Lux 2 bed 
fiat root terrace, short let £1 SO 
pw. 736 6606 Finches. 


IN THE HIGH COLUT 
OF JLSTICE 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
BIRMINGHAM DISTRICT 
REOKTRV 
NO. 30077 of 1986 

IN THE MATTER OF OPTILON 
LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 
a Petition was on 28lh April 1986 
presented lo Her Malesly - * Court 

of Justice for lhe confirmation of 

the reduction of the share carnal 
of lhe above-named Company 
from E639B.OOO to £3.247.000 
and the cancel la Bon ot us share 
premium account of £548.996. 


AND NOTICE IS FURTHER OV- 
EN that the mm Petition ts 
directed to be heard before H» 
Honour Judge MtrUesn sitting as 
a High Court Judge at The Court 
House. 4 Newton Street. Binning 
ham on Monday the I6th day of 
June 1986 at lOJO am. 


ANY Creditor or Shareholder of 
the said Company desiring to op- 
pose the making of an Order for 
the confirmation of the said re- 
duction of capital and 
cancellation of share premium ac- 
count should appear at the lime of 
hearing in person or by Goaraci 
far that purpose. 


A copy of the aatd Petition would 
be fumnbed lo any such person 
requiring the same by the under- 
mentioned Sobcitots on payment 
of lhe regulated charge for the 


DATED this 14th day of May 
1986. 

Ptreent & Co ot Post & Mall 
House. 26 Cotmore Ctrrus. Bir- 
nungtuni 04 ftRH- iw 

the above-named Company. 


FULHAM Charming new 1 bed 
flat in block wtlh poet, gym and 
sauna. Super fall and both. Long 
and snort Iris £190 pw. God- 
dard & Smith 930 7321. 


HAMPSTEAD. Super lux elegant 
flat. 2 beds, wood panrHed spa- 
cious lounge, new l.-r kitchen, 
dote to t r a n sport. £170 pw. 

Tel: 01-431 1263. 


HENRY A JAMES Contort us now 
on CH 236 8861 for the best se- 
lection of furnished Rais and 
houses to rent In k'ntghtshrldoe. 
Kensington and Chetoea. 


LET TOUR P ROPE R TY with 
greater flexibility Obtain your 
furnllure lor short or long term 
lets on our unique hire service. 
Ring Mr Michael Norbury 
John Strand Contracts Ltd Tel 
01 486 8615. 

COMPANY LET. WB lux 2 bed 
flat, root garden £260 pw. Cl 
tax 2 bed flu. entry anon*, qg- 
ra9F. £200 pw. Luxurious 
properties all areas. Tel LAMA 

01 607 9381 

COVENT CARDEN Pud A Terre 
available on limr-snare basis. 
Lmaue 2 bed flat, fully lur- 
nistMd and equipped £350 pw. 
Phone Jean HoOJday. Ol 579 
3366. 

NW11. Wen-appotnled tee. 3 
beds. 2 recess- large HI b'fasL 

2 WC. CH. gdn. gge etc 6 mins 
lube, bines A parti. Co leL £220 
pw. 01-455 1928 OT 0452 
013159 5pm - 7 pm 

QUEENS CATE SW7. Mod 1st 
floor flat in lined bldg. 2 mins 
Hyue Park. L shaped recep. 2 
dbl beds, mod kti A bath. Avail 
now fum unfurn. Long Co leL 
£425pw. Masked* 581 2216. 

AMERICAN SPECIALISTS are 
currently seeking good auaMy 


WESTMINSTER Luxury flaL 5 
beds, recep. din rm. study. 2 
baths, kit all machines, avail 
June (or 3 months. £650pw. 
Gavin Cowper. 351 6732. 


MAYFAIR. Penthouse with Ige 
tool terrace. 5 dble beds. 3 
baths en suite. Ige recep. Avail 
iramed Realty 681 0012. 


FULHAM Luxury house. £300.00 
per week. Long let. no again. 
Tel. 01-381 0417 


: I T 



central London far wading 
company tenants 01-937 9681. 

W24. Lovely tee with palfo Ideal 
S sharers wiUi awn roams. 2 
ball's. £40 pw each l£2DOpwL 
Buchanans. 351 7767. 

Wl. HARLEY S 1 HE5T. FlaL 3 
dble bedims. 2 batnrms. recep. 
fully furnished. £350 pw. 631- 
1369 1 day' 686-3251 irvesl. 

CLAPHAM Exceptionally beaull 
lu' 2 bedroomed tux flat on 
aiitel r*L nr tube. Non smokers. 
£105 pw 01-720 0999. 

DOCKLANDS Houses and rials 
throughout the Docklands area. 
Docklands Property Ccmrr 01 
468 4852. • - 

FLEET ST EC4. City hideaway. 
Elegant gnd fir studio flat, to 
Histone Court- £166 pw Com- 
pany Lei. 340 6958/353 5190. 

HAMPSTEAD Adt to Hrvtih 
Beautiful 2 bed. 2 recep fll + 
gdn & gge. £230 pw. Naihan 
Wilson A Co 01 794 1 161 


LEGAL NOTICES 


TOE LONDON LIFE ASSOCIATION LIMITED AND TOE 
METROPOLITAN LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 

Notice of Meetings 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Oittmary General Men- 
ials of the London Life Association Limited and Hie 
Metropolian Life assurance Society and die Joint General Meet- 
ing ol the Association and lhe Society will be brld at The 
Armourers’ HalL SI Coleman SireeL in lhe City of London, on 
Wednesday. ISth June 195bai 12JD jxin. io transact the following 
business: 

1. To receive and consider ibe report’ of the Directors and ihe 
Acccunna.for lhe year ended 3tsi December 1985 lQ 0 rtherwilb 
ibe trpon of ibe Auditors thereon. 

2. To rocket Dtirctotv 

fa) Mr. 0- N. Dawson and Mr. P. A. Brandt retire by rotation 
and bemg eligible offer themselves for rc-eketion. 

(b) Mr. W. B. McBride bavins been appointed since the last 
Ordinary Joint General M retint, retires and offers bun- 
self for roekcuoa. 

3. Torooppoiot Price Waierhoose as Audiiots and miborise the 
Directors to fix tbetr remuaeraiioo. 

4. To transact any other ordinaiy business. 

Any member en tilled to attend and vote at die Ordinary 
General Meeting of The London Life Association Limned or 
the Joint General Meeting ofTbe Metropolian Life Assurance 
Society and The London Life Assodaitoo Limited may ap- 
point a proxy to auctid and vole on bis behalf. .Any mstnimcnt 
appointing a prosy should be in the form sei out in Ankle 32 
of die Memorandum and Articles of . Association and must be 



be prepared to queue their policy number on request 

By Orde r of Hie Board. 

J. POCKETT 
Secretary 

Dated ibis 2nd day of April 1986. 

Registered Office: 

• 100.- Temple Sm»L — 

BristoL B5I OEA. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FJHD A HEW PARTNER fhraurfi 
Busums Link-Up. Brochure: S3 
St George SRYrt. London WlR 
9FA 01-«99 £714. 

Wl CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS 
address, tel an*., bx. sec & luxu- 
ry service unices. C& S Group. 
01 fi8p BS7X. 


PUBOC NOTICES 


NOTICE OF MEETING OF 
CREDITORS. Name of ftimnnils 
CRIPTRUCK LIMITED 
Notice to hereby given, pursuant 
to section 868 of the Companies 
Act. 1985. that n meeting of (he 
Creditors of the above-named 
Company win be hrtg al 206 Sta- 
tion Road. Harrow. Middlesex 
HA1 2TP on Tuesday, the 27th 
day of Mas- 1986. al 1200 
o'clock, lor lhe purpose or having 
a luDsialemrm of the oosTOon at 
ine Company's affatm. looether 
wim a us. 01 me crraims m me 
Company - .and the es nma ied 
arwrunl of ttwir dattn. laid be- 
fore tom. and tor me purpose. If 
ingugm tu.gr noRtuuitiiga uqul- 
dator and ot apgpuwpg a 
Gom nti flee or tmpeeuan. 

Notice h. also dver mat. for the 
punxw* ot v-bfang. Secured CMdl 
fOK misl f upless they surrender 
Ihdr secnrtlyit lodge al me Regs- 
tered Office of the Company at 
205 S m u o n R oad. H arrow. Mid- 
dfesex HAi 2TP before u» 
Meeting a SUiemait gmiw pgr 
Bciaars of ihatr security, the dale 
when ft was given, and lhe vahw 
at wtitcn It b assessed 
Pjjhfo this twel f th day or May 

By order of the Beard tJ 
Director*. 


*• tfir,- r. 


IN THE HI LSI UATT 

or Jisncc 

CHANCERY DIVISION 

NO. 002417 of 1986 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 
The 28th day of April 1986 
IN THE MATTER OF 
HUMBERSIDE ELECTRONIC 
CONTROLS PLC 
and 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1986 


NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN [hat 
the Order M the High Court of 
Justice i Chancery Divt&ioni dated 
28fh April 1986 confirming the 
reduction of capital try ihe cancel 
latkm of 3p of each lOp share in 
me above named Ctenpanv was 
redstned by me Regairar of 
Companies on 7lh May 1986. 
Doled Ihh |4ih day of May 1986. 

Nabbarro Nathanson 
76 JFrmvtt Street 
London sum CNR 

Ref. IB RED DCW3 
SUUtors kj Die apove named 
Comaaiu 


I N THE M ATTER OF ELROPA 
SYSTEMS GRCH.P LIMITED 

®v «der or lhe High Court ot Jus- 
tice doled Ihe 1 8th das of 
February 1986 Mr Barry David 
Lewis. F.C.A. of High HoUnm 
House. 6264. Hah HOUOM. 
London WCIV 6RL lux ben ap- 
wwtUa Iraiudalor ol the above- 
named Corn turn uiumul a 
Osrantnep of Imprcuon. 


IN THE MATTER OF BOMORE 
MEDICAL SL-PPUES LIMITED 
BY order of Uu> HIGH CXH.RT or 
JUSTICE Haim me 20 th on of 
March. 1986. Mr 1.D.B Burnt of 
12B Omn \«ona Street. Lon- 
don EC* has oren ancomtec! 
It a i H da tor omte aaovenanied 
company wtm a Cammdlre or 

tBOKNII 

Dated this 9th ojy of May. 198c 


TOE LONDON LIFE ASSOCIATION LIMITED AND TOE 
METROPOLITAN LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY AND SPECIAL GENERAL MEETINGS 
NOTICE G KREBY OVEN that at Itie coREtatHtn ol the onknary Gewar 
Meetngs at The London L<te Assotdhsn LmwJ and The uarotutaon LA 
Assataoee SoWv Md He OnJswy Joel GttKfll Meetnos tf the Assooaton 
anC lhe Soo&y x rte AmoMrs HjB, 81 WananSJrt«mtte&y of London, 
wtsoi vdi tamoKe a 1230 pra an Wednuday. 18& Jura 1966. Dee wS 
be bcld n I he same place E d raotBs m r and Spew General Meetings of the 
Asspowm and the Scp«v reqteefnnly for Oe puppse m each case oi 
cgnateng d pmugw w {usgng the Wkwng SPECIAL RESOLUTION:- 

RESOLimON 

THAT the Scheme for the iransfrr of tie business ofTbe Metro- 

C Jitao Life Assurance Soaetv to The London Life Assodanon 
roiled be sanctioned and approved and Ural the direom be 
auilmmed » Dkc ihe Kteixi steps uiih a view to the tame 
being earned mio effi-ci »nh power to agree to any modification 
addition or condition imposed by the Gram. 

Anv member of London Life enfllfed to attend and vote at the 
Extraordinary General Meeting may appoint a proxy to attend 
and vote on his behalf in arconlance with the articles of associa- 
tion of London Lite Any instrument araxtinllng a proxy should 
be in lhe form set out in Article 32 of the Memorandum and 
articles of association of London Life and must be deposited al 
the Registered Office not less than 48 hours before the time 
appointed tor holding lhe meet m g . A form of Proxy may he 
obtained on application to the Company Secretary at the Regis- 
tered (Miter. 

The Constitution and Regulations of the Metropolitan do not 
pemuitneRiDctsiovoicbj proxy at roe Special General Meeting 
and member* must be prevent in person ol Dial Meet m g lu order 
lo idle. Ora Urc»"<- mmttkrs Ol the Mrrroyodtan ha* ing an axxxr 
ancr on their own Hies wtlh a right lo participation ta abatement 
of premiums in Ute sum of £1 .000 Of. more are entitled to vole at 
any meeting. 

By Order of the Boards 
J. POCKETT 
Secrelarj- 

Dated this 14th day of Ma3' 1986 
Registered Office 
100 Temple Street 
Bristol. B$i 6EA. 


























































































1 


28 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


; 

t - 

v- 

».> 

.-'A 


.J. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


JANE CKOSTHWAITiHECRUrraEJfrCO»SULTMTS 


SDHHEB 88 COLLEGE LEAVERS 

E^-7,000 

INTERIOR DESIGN: SPORTS PROMOTION: HEAD- 
HUNTERS: FINE ARTS PUBLISHERS: EXHIBITION 
ORGANISERS: PR: CATERING: MAGAZINE PUB- 
LISHERS: COMMODITIES: MARKETING. 

Wb have vacancies in ALL the above lor young, 
bright college leavers with good secretarial skills 
and lots of Initiative, who are looking for their first 
step in an interesting career. For further detals 
please call Lucy Lutyens on 01-581 2977/2947. 



iVECROSTHWUILRECRUIIMENrLJD 
BEALfCHAIUP PLACE. LONDON SW3 Ifffl 
TEifPHOte 01-581 3977 W7 


LATYNSER UPPER SCHOOL 
King Street, Hammersmith, WS 

Headmaster’s Secretary 

required in be responsible for the administration of the 
School Office. luiuMminns and uni ranee examination 
arran: 
dcun 

Applications together niih full C.V. and the names or 
t»n referees 10: The Headmaster. Lalvmcr Upper 
School. King Sum. Hammersmith. London W6 SLR. 


Tjngemems. Good sccn-Unal skills required. Further 
:uitls may he obtained on request. 


*************** 


PA/ SECRETARY 

To American stock bro- 
ker. hating knou.lt*(lAe 
of French, word pro- 
cessing and icle*. 
School leaver t, acropt- 
able. This is an 
muslandina career 
apporiuniU ior an am 
bilious v ounq pTMin 
miiTi-:.ied in bccominga 
slack broker 

Plca.ie r<-p|y to 
BOX DS7 


5** ************ 


WEST EN35 
ART GALLERY 

REOVIRES INTELLI- 
GENT SECRETARY. NO 
SHORTHAND 
NECESSARY. 

TEL 491 4627 


AOTuriPA£io.ooa ■*■ -xr perks 
FYntramr- Cili Ivis/rf pcopi-rlv 
o’ v-rr. inl-'iii-r nl preen with 
OO SOspcen- inr Iras JO’^see. 
r.-l.niat Vpplu-.mls iTiirJ nr 

onir-4- h,- well n*i.iiiis-d and 

.Mv lo supervise runicr es. 
Could sun s-n v -r l. if.l ing for a 
pieilum vviln mi'Cr jivJ 

revnensiiiiliiv A* 1 .‘- .i Ji Lw 
|k-(l.s in. I to e travel. Call k.lle 
V iv ian *.fX Tire KimisLind 
rs-is faur- 

CPERATTC STAST. CoiIhki 
. ere ninu Iw .1 rot lean* with 
f-0 SO .iniiio and U P ir.iininn 
l 'i • xprricwi- -HI asaeiir. ol the 
ruilliilri 111 a wnfld famous Op- 
era and Balirl CV Ev: Imin 
irrm rruiwis tor someone 
wun a bretfil tonrwk-nl ap- 
prison 'O' Irve] mut. + 
turopean lai ms helpful Sal 
cLb/Kfj * review Please 

call J S7 oo3C Hormone; Ror. 
Cons 


RESPONSIBILITY. VARIETY and 

nfipnrtimih' In make- a sub-Jan 
ii.ii rtmlntaitinn lo an aclivdv 
deipiopiiK) company. PA it 
quill'd M MD In l*-lp wilh aU 
a*.|i--rcs irf ruoniny nn-jnr.-j. and 
maintain tonirM durmu Ire 
-• quera -llrn-nns Mid -Type 
ar n r an.1 have -JihsUnlul c\pe. 
nciice HnuWsuUgraaiUUe CV 
lo lam.-. M'-ti'U. DHphln 
ivrrantr. Ud . a VshwellSirret. 
SI VI ban, Herts AL5 SJZ 

1ST PAST THE POST. At thh 
well knnvtn horse farina 
ririi.inis.il mu m WCI v.m will 
vvo-k lor a thnrmina Senior Ev 
ri‘ni,vi- who wi-| realty 
appreciate your arionned ap 
pr-iiieh Id luv bi»,v bul varn<d 
won.m.i.1 Amir imnK/mml 
and rr-sponsilNlilm will auio- 
mallraUv-iruM at voubnonu-a 
v nal pan m Ihis im-ndiv leam. 
SI ills *0 oO ard 1 yi*. sec r\p. 
•»»' ,\i PS Sal >-CR.OOn* Tfl 
reach Ihr winner' enclesure 
r-l.-.r e rail JJ7 ofiSJ HotrJonc', 
Pw- runs 

COSMETICS c£7.500. Thi- well 
known i 'ilerivalinii.il cituihNin. 
cnmisiny e Iv- kiiw ror a lively 
Vnt.twi’vsn-f.ir'.' I", JVJV two of 
lm-ir iiins-lnrv. Lr.| . ol cnni.vl 
nilem.illv . 'l-i-cusllv wilh the 
m.irki-lin-i ■l/nartim-nt and ra 
I'-m-llv wilh ■li'.lrilmlors and 
•ainuiirr. vi. in- l'.i< el arranoe 
im-nls and n«-efihi»s lo arranqe 
•r- w 'll .is .mu/- i>-r-.onr<Ci an- 
niiliirlral/on So So -.hills 
nissi/il and French useful 
Ple,r-1- lel/ lrfi-.IM- Caroline kind 
\PPIs on Cl l J« H.STO 

MACAZ2NE SLfMkNC SQ. Tfu, is 
■in ill* . il .Tv.-iinn lor a hriuhl. 
well ■■•«.ken /o:irs,, leaver in 
learn an .,l>eiii in..- mnr.inn .in-l 

rimimTu-n el a rumhl. ir-.>u 

.-il" ' n-i will ImvI .i.'iir.ile 

Iv pinn .mil *ir .nn.io In d.-.d 
wnh in-w sur. /rriplinsr. .ind 
rplenes .nid lo I- ur Iv p<-4-| 

hd rj.x.1 '-I all vou n..-1 l-us ol 

liulialive an.1 ■•Khu-ikiu lo m 
mil’ Ihr --ne'-li lir almnsl-bi rr ol 
iso- V'linin ii .iPV -V'J/- 
■7 r.;<7» Please rail S 7” W.i7-r 

Hob .tori' . Bi ■- Cue 

MA9HETING Mf-Tnh /f lO'vCs? 
v-imisinv rr'i .irrn. ni.irlehnq 
.a n: >iraieqic nUinnina-ire msi a 
I'W m lie- prmrtl- veu II lie m 

volved wilh in Ihis well m.-vsn 
Vs : rnmpanv Worlin-imr IWb 
Inveiv fiinpriliillina n.'.<s, 
-null n««l In iv imunMi 

hien le um- vmir imiuviive , un i 

HUH In l.ihe o|. r/ .|s.|i- il/ili!-. m 
i tv-ir .rtjsi-m • No • i :i irn : ji. J hm 
v» p i-vrn loner am .h»»i aiilin 
re-i nli.il r J 7 ” Wh Pl.-a-e l ie 
|*mne Latelinn huiq 
Vri"viilnwnls nri ' I awn -vs-.v 

WCDOIK3 SELLS «rai- v.e inrv 
lor Vaulin PV k.*-. nnd ZOV 

lo war*, vs Oh vm*r.| Lor ■. lor in 
ta lai...'-' Hi- i.- ivsv -.SiieiiJl 
-h-viih-ir.il lsp« n, i vhen net- 1 

h, - iwMi .ma .uii -.ill tis.. Vs. inn 

CIS ’Will li.i-n- hl.ni.lv 

■ •Ml Will inn •■Ki.lls. .iiWfhir.i 
in'- r.nu. nil nn-iil- V -m -sill 

also dial vviln >-i j’r.re-l an-i 

i. -mp' iarv si.iii : i.iii'on-. «.i- 
lie.* C> 5 -vr • b.nkjin 


Ol 


:.io 


■Pic i. an-’ 

EXHIBITIONS Wl. Lii.i'el.r 
I.- in wl X ■ -iie-iiu.ipis n-v-i .m 
on!huv.vJ|i- hri.ua -.v \o ii.u.i 
limn up ur'iain- if'i r shih-lion- 
and F eats. ds V...i will m-,-1 in 
iv nuin.-r.iie a-, will .r. h.iiim 
u mlio i/ivp .ir-il W r» .mu In 
ilr.d will! all lb*- .>--iiiin-.| alien 
and In hwnti'i 'uilv in-, nl-.ivl ni 
IhK V.irwvl .11"! n. I- rr-1- Vir 
».VI I VI * CSV leXfl 

n> .r . rail 417 rO.’.C Hub- 

kic One. 

MARHCTINS ASSISTANT svv. 
rinse- .sur. .il -runup. ,n- 
sa-STeLlfV- H-'ni L*» vrjr. >n Is 
ienr insnlsed ’.iin all .eeviv 
‘in .'ialf'-'nei The «.«.-■ ».ll 
apph' lull Will !»■ lepmml. I nr 

liflllllllin new ll>e|,il«e|s 
hi.iilv|a4s .iiiswvsinii u a rhiim- 
■M , i , l ,|B Tspili-r -Sill- iinrt 
ruifin-r.'ot* all rs-a iiliai i.7 7-tv‘i 
I' a rer lur-te il/lalb cent.iCI 
Ti"’a Crnkf. Oli -t.'-O .- 73J 
Ceiil.itv’i.i aid: ■l-r-ni* 
TRAINEE PRODUCTION JUNIOR 
IT'ish Lpwar.l . ar. iT Irani inn 
will be t-.m b-. CiTv Mr.li.i 
Greur siisvif .-.Itiini .ind rwslia 
pii.iiu.reir >-iP'|.if >ie nrrrt- -O' 

i. wel' in fnnlrn and \l.:!li-- 

Ce.il .ippear.imr and rniui- 
ib-IiC*' In mi-el client-. l.vpvS’li-il 
r.UMT PJIti m Prreliaf' As;| 
Ar' iniiTe n pm-i e- s-iil«il Irem 
r 50CV.1 |i> --l-iri * ir.vinnn 
■cnenie luire Caum-v- OI-DnS 
tuiivT IHJ10 'per Ovnst 

management secretary. 

OII’I C«> 0-is"! /I’fnp.inv re- 

qilires mllTii’ni and ■-■n-fe'iirril 
si<rrkirv ha a p-r.ii.-n 
Icaai eav iiw-'iven»-iii. oiu-iii 
(I’ nl.e I and Ial-1 nl .afiinnr-lra 

IhiH Sell niv-itv.il/uii .-ii.f ■v'slilv 
In m n.11114- uvlirr.il i.llif p br«e. 
rlnri-s i.ywailidJ kre/i.lert-Ti' ol 
V Pap a-lvahlAiS- Silir. nenn 
I id lie C-IlkK I on o: s.»: 

m*i 

PAPERBACK FUBL«Wn«: 

-,117-X’ Till- c-1|!r.r- il InriUI J- 
■a llw niai'-r I -I il ili-.ru rm hen/ 
.ir.ilim ■’*' He- i.'l - Her in.ii 
I el is seeluiq a PA In lei-ani- 
rr'iivi* in ■< .aii'il ah-l ■ -rn- 
in-i iiinriiiw. Iiu-imi win. 
niami uulhnl-. -t-ii -.ill h.ni 

rurs *-re I - null i a e,.ninhu 
lee klilp. w ui i-.p.-n 
i -tv . IP'* rv rriiilmeni » via 
■uiiai"'. "i sj? Z 

eoo*$ >' S--.I 
■yj i ii-nr i-i-r -er n pnn-i- r.eej 
ill. line. w||i si'ini» II- les| 

ii. -.«sl .ral.lf'-is rnii.y. in- 
ni-i.il hi a -ari'il r- 1- ’’hi. ii 
v-dl .inluiff.ini- nr .Iilihra r.ai 

lai ; v mi w/H a ins- ;u -nl vi 
■hi iilifi-ri.il lunr'ioii 'll ill' 
no vj w.vn *nnii-i\. iht re 
iiMilnvnl .uiruiljficv ci;.zr-7T 
ojc.v 

POLITICS. SEC '"I r'"-.ir>"h>irpr 
i.ils ir.vinnn s*i|ne fi wn>l 4C.» 
'»• "dW Fuur K-s run mr nl 

/,i w 


ANTIQUES 

An opportunity lo loam 
about Uw antique world. 
Some typing and book- 
keeping knowledge 
essential. Must be well 
spoken and well pre- 
sented. 

Pis can 01 930 0313 or 
01-930 9648 


available ynlmtar? 
Ymmq Bllinoual secretary with 
rsn-llenl sfmrlliand m Engftsh 
and French, lo mtn tmmjnial 
leam in CJiy hank Experience 
isn't iwcpimiv but vou do hire 
|r. be free to staff work Iha 
fnnnlli. (b5Xi C7.DOO plus bo- 
rne- and mhtr extras 
MulUllnAudi Services irecruH- 
rirenl OinsuUanlsi Ol 836 

J7QJ &. 


tECEFTIOMST - OMS. Busy, 
smart r e ception of a well 
known inlemalKmai company 
in SWI needs a Irtendly. wcU 
presented RrrepUonlsl. Varied 
responsimimes include using a 
Herald switchboard arginung 
travel, hold and theatre boofc- 
imn as well as some relief 
lypma and lefex. Age as-ao. 
Please rmg 43d 4S12 Crane 
CorkiD Rec Cons. 


LEGAL PA £11.000 pa. Assist 
i he Snticllor of mb pmogeow 
group and become involved in 
all aspects of llm very inlerest- 
ing but relaxed legal area No 
legal experience is required bul 
good audio skills .w essenhaL 
ror further details contact 
melanle la no 01-631 IB41. 

Prw Jameson A Partners Re- 
crulimenl Consullanls 


NOT A 9 TO 5 JOB. Thu opening 
wilh Management CansulLanl& 
■> lor a PA 20 33 years wnh 
high asperauons and total oom- 
milmrnl Work will be varied, 
mleresllnq and pressurised. Ex- 
cellent skills and s/h not 
ossenlaL EIO.SOO + 583 1034 
Mcredllh Scull Ftecmnmenl. 


SEC WITH AUDIO required lo as- 
sist in running of expanding 
mortgage dept of Barnard Mar- 
cia Estate Agnils bi 
Hammersmuh. Lots of cUenl 
roman. Pleasant telephone 
manner and accurare- typing es- 
sential. Salary C7.EOO Phone 
*03 1231 

CIRCA £10 AMO Personal Amb- 
lanL daily 20‘s to MD EGA 
Advertising Group. You wm 
need good shorthand typing and 
In WP. Bul you wfU he heavily 
involved in hrt work toad for re 
protects. dealing cHenls. 
ncgamsuig ennferenres. meet- 
ingvelc A really lively number. 
Joyce Cuiness 01-589 
WW7 OHIO. IRec Cons). 
CONFERENCES /PUBUSMNG 
• no shorthandi £7.000. A Col- 
lege Leaver is soughl by Ulls 
Iriendly company lo become In- 
volved In ctMitorence 
organisation and publishing A 
superb -start lo your career, you 
will be gaining exc exp Typing 
til 50 worn req'd. Synergy, uie 
recrvnminif consultancy. Ol- 
637 9533 

MATURE 2»45Tah person re- 
guirnl lo run small office In 
privain Kraghisbridpr nal for 
i wo Financial Advisers Good 
/-duration and retlaMe short- 
hand lypnKi Musi be self retlanl 
and able lo cope and organise. 
Soria! r mummer necessary lor 
honpilnbiy to cllrnls Joyce 
cuiness Ol 589 8807 OOIO. 
i Bee Cons' 

PA M FUBUSMMG £10.500 An 
evreplional prrwgvillty. S5+. n 
urgelillv soughl lo IUI a unique- 
ly ch.iUengvng posdmn within a 
•null bul prestigious publishing 
ennorn Good typing and 
I'mantsaltoivil aMlilv a must. 
Finam ul or pubhslung tuck- 
nrnund preferred Please 
ruiilarf Lind.1 McCleod on Ol- 
i V> .5054 Fonhfold Personnel 
PUBU5HMG-COUEGE LEAV- 
ERS tb S00 This well known 
w.-l End firm are kolliq for 
several vou on serreUirtes wilh 
80 45 speeds lo jmn ihetr sales 
.ind lilurmral books depart, 
menis For lurlher informauon 
ahold Ihr- and other college 
haver Inks plrase lelepnone 
Oarnline hum Appbv on 01 499 

nn?0 

SECRETARY WITH WP needed to 
work -it O I red or level IP mafnr 
uiiemalion.il oroanlsallon Vou 
Will m-rd lo have l he nuiLallvc 
In cope uiMier pressure in 4 lugh 
powered envlromenl and 
spii-rls of 90 50 Pile, sound WP 
i-rpi rierire Parkagr c£l 1 .000. 
lninieiliale start Finesse Ap- 
pomlnienls i Bet Cons ) 01-499 
9175 

FAST GROWING ADVCRT1SMG 

vviicv need Up sec ino short- 
h.mdi for one W I heir busy 
Vrs-viinl Groups Organise Uie 
Dirv-cior jiirt 5 soung Accounl 
tviiilivr. IB'1 DfspViiywnler 
exiwnenre an advanuge. Early 
rv Mh-al £7&30 to start 
(. oveui Garden Bureau. 110 
Tien 51 £1.4 353 7690 
FRENCH MARKETTMC PA 'SEC, 
pai-lagi- lo £10.000 Bilingual 
■js I.. jvJ’I manager tor mi cilv 
run wun maTltg rmeareh and 
PB rlul/es Friqucnl client has- 
vn Previous nurkrling 
raran.-s d>-velopmenl Exp 
prel C-/U Mnrfl--* Emp Any 
•The kaieaugr Speoalislsi 030 
1-187 

MAYFAIR Rapidly evp.vnduvg 
L v/s- Career Consul lano seem 
i-xpenenced PA Ser to manage 
i -i lire .1 4mm Omii presenfa- 
■ i'U ■ .'M lek'phoiie manner and 
up Vi xlio -kills e-.srnlia! Lots 
ni rlienl rrail.H I 9/-IB* of hu- 
mour i nonunion Career 
pnu-nlial. Good 'sil.irs * profit 
st.,r/ M 493 T64H 3b8 2T42. 
ANYONE FOR TENNIS? r £7.000 
presiHIHu/s Uesi End lashien 
giuup uiwnllt requires rniieqe 
le.iii.f rnd y-hhrr verrefarv 
wiih nuvd skills. PC 45. lo 

work in their spisrtswear divi 
•■mn Ptr.iie /unlari Linda 
xiiLTi-wt immrrtuurfv «i 01 
-W TOM F.nfhlold Personnel 
£13.500 * BANK BENEFITS. PA 
aa!h flingil German lor Senior 
Cserulive tin esimi-nl Area in- 
iernaiioTv.il Cilv Bank English 
mother loreiue wilh audio- 
■hi>rtrund skill!-, preferably 
I sink lie) expert er«r a Jo 

1 551 2n53 DuHTie Summon 
^ptHiitii m/iiis. 

EXPERKNGED SECRCTART- 
Admiddiraior required (ot 
Mi -4 End Fashion Group Self 
mntivated. cnihususm and 
obilly lo work under pressure 
ate eswgiuat HXJ CD. Salary 
Nrn rthtt Jr depending rifi expen - 

sure Ph-asr Tef Anne Cannings 
<•!• 0 ! 63 T :g 25 
MEDICAL SECRETARY. Full 
linir with expenenre required 
la work as semnd senefarv in 

Miss SsimprHr Slreef \ Ray 
era* tKe Musi nave minimum 
45 SC' 'spin ivpiffr and be prr. 
rsm-d to undertake audio 
bniiig Salary aac 01-935 
4 "47 

SMALL FRIENDLY PROPERTY 

Invewimenl C/.nmanv na-axl <n 

i‘JkIs*si r r.iuin-s (nitoonoi se.'re 

fare wilh sncrtliand 1 >e.q-s 
expr-nrurr prefem-d bul good 
coll' "tv leavers ronvidcred Sal 
■ii s rrinoe £7 S*>3 ■ Ifl.500 
jri .-iriiiim in T-vricrieiicc. Tel. 
I?t VjI 77 <j 1 

TEL BE CEP 'TYPIST. TELEX 

■•■irtv Ws to run hnsv reception 
sw l Hotel Group- Good tvplng 
fne -ii .-ernad. Telex ana PI may 
-.wiiiit iwiii lixirhi Lively emi' 
r.vnnient super ollires cirrt 
C7 500 tv> etnncrsxHins Jovre 
Gn/n.'s 01-389 a «07 0010 . 
iK'X Ct>nx! 

SECRET ARY £9 000 ♦ 

•■uw 1-HFed mortgage + other 
iMI'lits. Tel 01 C‘4a 5656 
Ctnlreiyrl Emp Agv- 




PUBUSHING 
Central London 

A wefl educated college 
leaver wilh rusty short- 
hand required as 
secretary to the office 
manager of Has well 
known publisher. Knowl- 
edge of, or an Interest in 
learning WP would be an 
advantage. Very friendty 
office- Salary £6.500 with 
a review in July. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

RcennemaiuCmullinii 
WiLlMdHrNFMMU 
01-829 OH 


I PA s 

• SECRETARY j 

1 Age 25+. • 

Z Min exp 5 years. 3 

• Salary £7300 • 

• pa. • 

3 Reply to 3 

• BOX D21 • 


8b. 


EARLS COURT £104100. 

Market resttentfal 
tings and property man- 
agement company requra a 
receptionist / secretary win 
basw skib and aMHy to 
nark on tMor own Initiative. 
Good telephone manner and 
outgoing pensonafty 
esssof&L Tel Mr Queisn 
01-244 7353. 


PVcry much an 

adiuii i titu Uon apc«ne in itw 
market research deal of Urge 
Infrmauonai Co. This would 
Mil a winNUnl college leavcr- 
or young secretary who Is keen 
to tram in this field Good skills. 
£8.500 505 1034 McndiUl 

Scon RbcruUmML 


YOUNG HECEPTHMCT a coOege 
■caver could entoy Die coma 
pod Ian epvtroment of ihls 
company with superb offices 
ovrrtookiTig The Park. You 
need a warm ouigofng personal- 
ity and skills of aowpm typing 
£6600 . 683 1034 Meredith 
Scou Recruitment. 


JUDMIMkl RATOR <C7.HXH bo- 
nus. Arucolair A brtnM person 
23H- to asHN busy sola office 
based ui Uie West End. typing 
50wpm «- good tel e phone man- 
ner. Career opp * train log. 
inlerpued? ran A F B irec cons) 
01-437 4502 


£9000 top Ad- 
verttstng Agency In Wl needs 
well groomed, wen presented 
expenmeed person. Friendly 
personality A antliy m greet cli- 
ents al all levels essential Age 
26-35. Jaygar Careers {Soane 
Sen Ud 01 730 5140. 


EXQUISITE 
£0.000. Exciting challenge for 
young and outgoing secretary. 
Organise exhUuUons and assist 
m pramoUanal advertising. 
Skins 90 66. Capful People 
240 9304- after 7pm 74i 2064. 


Young sec 

190 451. knowledge of horses, 
for busy Belgravia office, some 
travelling. £7.000. Hendersons 
Recniltinenl 370 5066. 


OPEN TBJL BjOO pan. AES Sec 
for WCI Education cu. £9K+. 
Wang op Wl . £8X. TypM for 
Wl Architects £BR. Wont Asso- 
ciates. 01-577 6433 


PUBLIC RELATIONS wonderful 
opening to learn this exciting 
business. Good typing and WP 
exp. £7.500. Capital People 240 
9384. after 7pm 741 2064. 

AUDIO SEC £10000 urgent sun 
now. Trt 01-240 6666 

Centreghl Emp Agy 
GERMAN /ENGLISH spk coBc* 
leaver. BHbigual SH. C 7-600 . 
Language SlaD Any 455 8922. 

man tour woght m 

GOLD! An excefteii oooonunJ- 
n' to uw your 6 imtw+ rc. exp. 
lo become pan of a team in an 
expanding □eslgna' Jewellery 
Co In Wl. Working with the 
charming Marketing Mg. you 
will ansi to organising world- 
wide exMMttons and press 
rece p tion * as well a* providing 
see. support. You *M»id pos- 
sess 100. 60* audio skins, be 
presentable, wen spoken with 
plenty of mutative. "A"*. Age 
early 20‘s Salary £8.000 + hid- 
den benrftu. Please call 437 
6032 Hototonee Bee. Coro 
SEC/ AD I USniA TON £9.500 
This representp an excellml o®- 
port unity for a competent 
individual. 2S+. lo diversify 

from secretarial status to a 
more admin roie The pasuton 
encompasses a broad specirum 
ol responsiBIHues requiring 
quad otgantsal tonal and typing 
skids and a knowledge of short- 
hand and word processing. Ttus 
muUinauonal organisation of- 
fers full benefits and bonus. 
Plrase contact Linda McCleod 
on 01-439 3064 FaHhfoU 

Personnel 

GROUP ASSISTANT I8 wm. 

-VssMlnq the Admin Manager. 
Urge Media Group EC4. Wilt 
train on computer, wp General 
atttfanre in very bay office, 
good typing essential Circa 
£7.500 Joyce Gutness 01-509 
8807 OOIO. i Tire Coro) 

LEGAL £9.700. Lively friendly 
Wl soliaiors seek Conveyanc- 
ing sec. lor busy A Involved 
PMVen. Emphasis an client Bat- 
son A involvement In Ihe 
partner's day to day work. Call 
in rnfuidrncc. Mr. Thompson 
on 623 4226 Kingdom Legal. 
TO £11.000 PA /SCC 26-35. 
too 55 wp Varied highly 
cixifidenrual work, admin, cli- 
ent contact tor senior partner 
win likes delegate Prominent 
cits co. Phone Miller McNuh 
Bee Cons 734 3760 or 437 
8476 133 Oxford SI. 

LEGAL £9.500. Successful ex 
pandmg solicitors need 2 
ixi 1 1 nets' secretaries- 1 in Pro- 
hale. omer In Litigation Both 
are busy. exclUnq posts Call 
Mr Thompson on 633 4226 
k imrland Legal 

RCCEP/TEL i Regen I Board) for 
prnligtous property co Nice of - 
f/ri-v. friendly emironnvem 
Age 254 Prev raus reievanl exp 
esnen E9JJOO f'&OO. Trt 
Adland Ptu* 636 21 16 iRec 
Coroi 

SWEDISH DHKCTOR OP WTL 

Co rraidrw sec PA with stdOs 
of go 65 Meucvdous atlenuon 
■o detail accuracy A ahdiiy to 
draft letter*. Friendly . su mutat- 
ing on (roomcrif . 23-40. 

£8 500 Link APPH 846 9743 
GERMAN AN ASSET as sec to Di- 
rector of presuatous hotel 
group. Friendly personality, 
good presemallon A rtf skllh of 
90 50. 2&40. £10.000+. Link 
Lanqtuge Appt*. Ol 036 9743 
NO SHORTHAND - Jua audio, 
wp and outgoing personality as 
srerelary to Mayfair Estate 
Agent - * Mid 30s: £8.750. Call 
439 7001 Secretaries Plus - The 
Secretarial CorouiUnH. 
£10,000 Secretary to Chahman 
and Managing Cured or in Weil 
End Estate Agency required. A 
sotervdid opportunity for the 
Haul person Apply Mr* TA 
ctuarnnun omq 0676. 
£104100 COVENT O ARDEN. PA 
for MD al nee recruU me ni co 
good skills + seme IBM PC ns 
pref run RecruOnienl 01-938 
2222 

FRENCH IUUMGUAL College 
Leaver 2nd tobber? French 
SH lywnq. Lotsof InriMecoik- 
lact. £7.6004. Link Language 
Appointments 01 846 9743 
PORTUGUESE BO JN CUAL SEC 
lor ml cuy co. SH prof not ns 
good typing. Wp exp. Merrow- 
tmp Any ithe language special 
KB) 636 1407 

Mt GO. IN MCL Rro sec no sn. 
SO°o admin. BrtghL outgoing 
Good IV P £7.500 Age 21* 
Call Elaine 405 5778 Kingsland 
Perv Coro 

PR SEC. JCB4MML Mawr co In 
BUGtfrurs seeks see wp. Ex- 
tretnelv Interesting post ■ lots of 
perks Age 21*. Call EJUme 405 
3770 Kingsiand Prrs. Coro 
sec; NO SH CJOLMO. American 
m.ived n in SEI n* we in 
kite. & Marketing. Lovrty povi 
■ton Age 21*. Call ELnnr 405 
5778 Kingsiand Perv Cons 
SECRETARIES for Arrhilreis A 
Designers Pernunml A lempo* 
too ttoMlicsw. AMSA Sprddbi 
Ree Cmb 01 734 0632 


vpk Mock con trot hr. £7.o0o 
M2 Language staff A«y 455 

8922. 

GERMAN SPRC Audio sec. For 
cuy SPbcitorv C8500 One of 
many unuagr pons from Poiy- 
.glol Agency 01247 5242 
MAGAZINE SECS for popular 
weekly in WoM End A months 
exp. 80 50 Mnlh £7300** 
Flair RecruUmeni 01 938 


RACING: HSHER’S VERSATILE NINE-YEAR-OLD HAS GROUND IN HIS FAVOUR 


Ballydurrow ready to strike gold 


By Mandarin 

BaUydnmwr, equally at 
home over hurdles or on the 
Flat, is napped to belie his 
years in today's most valuable 
race — the £4,000 Edinburgh 
Gold Cup. 

Like many geldings, 
BaUydurrow's form on the 
Hat has improved with age 
and last season, at the age of 
eight, he won five races in- 
cluding a valuable sponsored 
handicap at Newbury in 
October. 

He then finished a credit- 
able fourth to Bold Rex in the 
November Handicap, on 
ground far too soft for him, 
before chasing home Out Of 
The Gloom in tire Fighting 
Fifth Hurdle at Newcastle. 

Ballydurrow must have 
ground no worse than good to 
produce his best and despite 
rain over the weekend, David 
McHarg, Edinburgh's clerk of 
the course, assured me yester- 
day that the ground would not 
be soft and that but for tire 
rain, the going would have 
been on the last side of good. 

The ground was again too 
soft when Ballydurrow made 
his reappearance at Haydock 
Park last month but he ran his 
usual game race to finish a 
dose fifth to Masted Ball, a 
winner again since on the 
same course. 

As that, was his first race of 
any description for more than 
five months he probably need- 
ed the run and he should now 
be fighting fit after a recent 
outing over hurdles, again at 
Haydock. 

The greatest threat to 
Ballydurrow this afternoon is 
likely to come from Min 
Baladi, who has done well 
since joining Steve Norton 
from Guy Harwood's stable 
last summer. However, with 
the ground in his favour, 
Ballydurrow looks well up to 
the task of conceding him 41b. 

Another sound proposition 
at the Scottish track is 
Rotherfleid Greys who 


if* - vs 



Flashback to October as Bal ly d u r ro w (right) masters Cherry Hill at Newbury. Mandarin 
m«it«»a Roger Fisher’s gelding the day's best bet in the Edinburgh Gold Cop 


showed signs of recaptaring 
his excellent juvenile form 
when giving Chris Befl a 
welcome winner at Warwick a 
fortnight ago. He can defy a 
61b penalty for that success in 
the Leith Races Apprentice 
Handicap. 

Pearl Run, touched off in 
the Chester Cup by Western 
Dancer 12 days ago, is another 


top weight with sound pros- 
pects in the Shrewsbury 
Handicap at Wolverhampton. 

Elsewhere at the Midlands 
track it may pay to follow 
Peter Walwyn and Paul 
Eddery who can land a double 
with Golden Heights in the 
Penn Field Stakes and MnUdr 
in the EBF Penkridge Maiden 
States where the presence of 


Today’s course specialists 


WINDSOR 

TRAMB1S: H Coca, 14 winners from 39 
runners, 39.9%; A Stewart. S from 14, 
35.7%: W OGormaa 15 from 55. 373%. 
JOCKEYS: Pat Edtiary. 45 winners from 
232 rides. 19.4%; G Starkey, 26 from 141, 
1&4%; W R Switeum, 1 1 from 65, 1&9%, 
EDINBURGH 

TRAMERS: I Vickers. 6 Miners from 34 
runners. 2&9%; N CaSaghan. 7 from 3a 


233 %; J W tetts, 18 tom 74, 214%. 
JOCKEYS: N Cormorton. 17 winners ftom 
99 rides. 17.2%; M Birch, 18 from 108, 
187%/. 

WOLVERHAMPTON 

TRAINERS: M Jarvis. 9 winners from 41 
rimers. ZZLO%; P Cota. 14 Iran 72, 
19.4%: M Prescon. 5 from 30. 16.7%. 
JOCKEYS: P Waldron. 6 wtnnara (ram 24 
rates, 25.0%; W Carson. 17 from 85. 
20 . 0 %. 


Timeswitch should ensure a 
good price. 

Walwyn and Eddery should 
also be on the mark with 
another two-year-old at 
Windsor's evening meeting 
where Mimaasib is taken to 
step up on his excellent Salis- 
bury third in the Charing 
Cress States. 

- Stay Low can complete a 
quick treble for Gerry Blum 
by successfully conceding 101b 
to Plum Drop in the other 
two-year-old race, the White- 
hall Stakes, while Northern 
Amethyst need only repro- 
duce the form of his Newmar- 
ket race last November, when 
he divided Dancing Brave and 
Nisnas, to get off the mark in 
the Mayfair Stakes. 


Sunshine 
a must 
for Slip 
Anchor 

CofBKCtkms of Slip Anchor 
are hoping summer will arrive 
before the Coronation Cop at 
Epsom hi 18 days' tone. Last 
year's Derby winner worked 
after racing at Newbury on 
Saturday and did what was 
asked of him without cw 
looking die horse who produced 
ok of tire great Epsom penor- 
ma nee of all time last June- 

Wearing a dropped nose band 
and a rss&ber bit, he covered 
a boat a mile and a quarter wrtn 
parang and Eaton Place and 
strode several lengths clear to- 
wards the end. His tniM r « 
Henry Cedi, said afterwards: 
**SHp Anchor is fine bat be s not 
quite firing yet What he really 
wants k some decent weaiher 
and 1 jnst hope bell come right 
in time far Epsom.’' 

Steve Canthen, who rode Slip 
Anchor, said: “The idea was to 
settle him and he did settle in tk 
end. he was qaiie relaxed but he 
wants firmer ground and some 
son on his back." 

Another trainer looking for 
better weather before Epsom is 
Barry FUls, whose decision not 
to srod Sore Blade, bis Derby ‘ 
contender, for yesterdays Prw 
Lapin yielded a surprising divi- 
dend at Newbury. 

Hills Bid, who was to bare 
been sent lo Fiance as Sore 
Blade's pacemaker, came from 
well off the pare to beat Gor- 
geous Algernon in the filial 
furlong of tie £5,000 Mail On 
Sunday Handicap. Hills thought 
his colt would be all at sea in tbe 
rain-softened ground but he 
overcame both that problem and 
Che slow start to win like a very 
good-horse. 

In contrast. Dawns Delight, 
one of the oldest horses m tbe 
field at tbe age of eight, appre- 
ciated every drop of ram and 
showed his 21 rivals a dean pair 
of heels throughout the last 
fhrioogof the Towry Law Insur- 
ance Handicap. 

Ken Ivory will nerer have a 
better servant. He bought 
Dawns Delight oat of die bar- 
gain basement and tbe gelding 
has won 13 of his 56 races . 


.V’ --V\#OCVEBBAMPTON 


Going: good to soft 
Draw: high numbers 

2.15 EBF PENKRIDGE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: C A G: El, 145: 51) 
(11 runners) 


OOMMONROYALE 
GUNSHS* 

4 HAIET5 . 

0 HARD ACT (G 


RJVWSbitbEM)- 


(R Shawl B McMahon M JHtta(S)2 

RUN (S Meacock) G PrtfchjuJ-Gordon 9-0 GDnflMdS 

r (G Howard- Sfwik) R Hannon 90 R Wanton 4 

3 MUBWR (Br (H AHJaktoum) P Wahw 9-0 PaulEddwy 10 

PAHKHlSJOY(Mre J Parker) EWrlootar 9-0 - 


8 STAGE (MQnndtartK Stem SML 


W Wharton G 
C Dwyer 9 


0 STEUIYIVSesM) 6 Brennan 9-0 — 

3 SUPREKOPTVK5T(GBtaasdato)REFsacock9-0 W Canon 11 

... SFwtaB 

Tlvesl 


EDINBURGH 


ftnl nn- OOOd 

Draw: tnghnumbers beet 


2 000 - 

3 100- 

4 0080 


HANDICAP 


TA UESM [A WTxttliaad) fl Honnsftaad 9-0 — S 

2 TOESW1TcH(USA)(BF)rnmesolWSgai)W O'Gorman 9-0 

10*11 TTmcswteh. 4-1 Supreme OptfcnisL MubMr, 8-1 Haney's Run, 14-1 DamMon 
Royate, to-1 others. 


Wolverhampton selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Mubldr. 2.45 Ardnacross. 3.15 Pearl Run. 3.45 Golden 
Heights. 4.15 Lemelasor. 4.45 Bills Ahead. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Dominion Royale. 3.1S Pelham Line. 3.45 Great Topic. 4.15 
Young AngeL 4.45 Crammiiig. _ 

Michael Seely’s selection: 3.15 Pearl Run. 


2L45 HIMLEY SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £823: 5f) (11) 

001 BROONn ANSWB) 

0 CHAMBER MASTER 


0 PIALUa QAa C Seym 

HBBWORKfGto 


mourtBPri 


(W Brown) K Stone 8-1; 
t) R Howe 8*11 
Prwce8*11 


m«i G M Moore 8-11 


ii 

0 ARDNACROSS (Mra N ShbW J Dougbs-Harofra 
202 BMGO QUEBI (Mrs H Vernon) J Bony 8-6_- — 
B0XB1 S CHOI CE (Mre R Brameyl J watfley 88] 
H PUUANOESE (R WafiBn) 



1 

2 

5 

6 
8 
9 

10 
12 

13 

14 

15 

2-1 Bingo Queen, 9-4 Broon's Answer, 3-1 Sam’s Refrain. 4-1 Ardnacross, 10-1 
Boxers Choice. 18-1 others. 


300 SAITS REFRAM (D H Jonas) D Haydn Jones 
SOLENT GOU) (Mrs M Saunders) WG M Turner 88 
STAR cnY(jBiad)ay)J Bradley 88 



3.15 SHREWSBURY HANDICAP (£2,763: 2m If) (11) 

1 0*11012 PEARL RUN (R Squres) G Mw 88-10 

- 020/30 CWA(R Padrnore)JCM848.. 


4 022/004 ACE OF SPIES ID Horsweffil Kannaid 5^3., 
" 033840 RUSHMOOR (J Eraisl R E Pejcocfc 8-82 


4-8*13. 


040-040 FLYTNGOFnCER 
144040- QUIET COUNTRY! 


5-8-9- 


.PRoUtacn* 

J RaiifS 

RCodm»5 

— R ducat 3 

- W Canon 1 
_ GDollMda 

■s 


00-0000 JACKDAW (USA) 
on/31 PEUiAM LtaC (C WeeSsj W Musson 6-7*10 (4ax). 


. (A ShaMrito) M Rpe 888 — Paul Eddery 11 

ProbW! F YanBoy 5-82 I Jotawai 7 

R HoEnshead 6-8-2 W^aolO 


! Fox 2 


7*2 PWham Lite. 4-1 Ace Of 
Reward. B-l Write nw Music, 10*1 


j. 9-2 Peart Run. 11*2 Rushmoor, 7-1 Saiors 
lytix] Officer, 12-1 Ctma, 14-1 Others. 


FORM: PEARL RUN (7-12] 2nd beaten shitd to Western Dancer (88) wth RUSHMOOR 
(7-10) unplaced 22 ran. Chester 2m 2f h'cap good to soft Mter 7. QMA <! 
over 71 to Milton Bum (3-5) 11 


10) 2nd beaten l*itoAocuraw(8*11) with CtMA 
h eap soil Apr 18. SAfl-ORS REWARD (9-3)4ttl I 
l2m if h'cap good to so rt May 10. WRITE nfe MO 
(8-0) 11 ran. Pontefract ^M 

Seiorttanc PEARL Rim 


iw 2m 21 h'cap good to sort May 7. OKA «■» 7tii beaten 
I ran. Sandown frn Sf h'cap soft Apr 25. ACE OFSWES {8- 
(9-2) 3rd beaten 31 1 7 raa Newtairy an 
beaten 41 to Cheka (7-10) 12 ran. Bath 


2m if h'cap good to sort May 10. WRITE TIE MUSIC (948 2nd beaten 51 a PatiuRi Une 
(8-0) 11 ran. Pontefract 2m 5f h'cap soft May 12. 


3-45 PENN RELDS STAKES (3-Y-O: C & G: £359: 1m 4f) (9) 


00 CROWN MUSE (BPS LmHed) B Siewns 811 


i 43-12 GOLDEN K0GMTS (P Goiiandrts) P Watoyn 9-2. 
3 0033-10 WLTEiXSe (A Mansfiek}) A Jar^s 9-2. 

9 
ID 
11 
12 
14 
19 


0-0 GREAT TOPIC (A Anderson) G P 
00 IDLE SONG (B Rresfixw) R Ho* 
000 RISH D&QMA (B) (T ftemssfen 


000 

0000- MYSTERY . 

084 SHSBJSTARTi. 

TUWA (USA) (Racegoers Cktb) M Jams B-11 


G Pr*ciia>dConkin8'11 . 

nshaadB-ll. 

msden) A Baley 811 

(Miss L Townsend) P Baitey 811 — 

~ (Shebtar Imnatine) J BemeH 811 — W Canon 4 



W Woods R 2 


813 Gortien Hetehts. 81 MStescans. 81 Irish DBemma, 181 Tumba. 181 Idle 
Song. 181 Shtristar Taxsavar. 20-1 others. 

4.15 COMPTON HANDICAP (£2,183: 7f) (17)' 

2 100840 YOUNG ANGa.(L Nanis) PK 


3 284323 LElELASORfH 

8 30/08-9 SANDBOURNElJI 

9 008400 RjQMEGASQAY ( 


1887. 


032084 BOfO DEALER I 
SI4W4 NEW CENTRAL] 
02004-4 GRACIOUS 


I Spearing 4-9-1 — 
n)B McMahon 4-81 


15 0000-04 REMEMBRANCE n»(GWIWakei)R I 

20 004403 MLMAY (B| (Ms P Drnin) W Owries * 

21 201040 HARS00M (A Soever) H Beestay 4-8 


JHffia(5)5 

48-12 ROodmaeZ 

3 8810 J Reid 1 

18810 JMbUMbs 17 


004400 MR ROSE (ft) 1 
200408 SUE CLAff (M McS 
044400 SING GALVOSMG (D 
04000 G0U*NB0Y(7^B 
00000/0 THE MANOR HM 
^^HTtHrSNAPl 


32 000/000- HUTTONS HOPE 


iSBSSgf 

IQPE (K Ltebsch) T 


dtay 87-10. 
wan 87*10- 

nes 4-7-0™ 

87-7. 


WRVW 0ams 87.7. 
Tayf0r87-7. 


. G King (7) 15 


7*2 Htimay. 9-2 Lemelasor. 81 Gracious Homes. 11*2 Naw Central, 81 Romegas 
Day, Young Angel. 181 Remembrance, Mareoom. 181 others. 


FORM: LEMELASOR (7-RJ) 3rd beaten 254 1 to Creeger (84) wtih GRACIOUS HOMESTF- 
15X1, 18 ran. Chester 7> trap good to soft May 6. IEWCB4- 

i De r - - • - - - 

mm 

good to soft May 12. MUIAY 
Wamrtek 51 app’c h’cac finn May 5. 

SetacMon: GRAOOUS HOMES 


7) tart on weL 4th beaten i 
TftAL J82) 7th beau 

to soft beetan 3Vil to Rotf»rfiBldGreys'(8Z)20 ran. 


(83 7th beaten 131 to De Riguer (9-1) 18 rani Bath 1m h'cap soft May 7. 
REMEBRANCE (M^.beatenl U to ArttcKon (812) 17 ran. Wort«1WlTp^7fftD 


445 CANNOCK HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2/404: 1m) (20) 


084324 AUCTION HAN (BF) 
000138 LOWXW CONTACT 
008340 KEEP COOL (FR) (N 


F) Mrs B Gittms) R HoHnshtodM, 
T (Mra P Fasey) M Pipe 87^H 
N Ma Udell P Keteway 8§d 

S (USA) (W Hancock) R* 


S Perks 13 
RCartar(Q9 


0038 TEMPEST TQSSBJ (USA! (W Hancock) H Armstrong 85 

0238 GLANQWIU (D H Jonas) H Candy 9-4— 

0081 CRAMHNG (Mrs C Perkns) W Miason 82»_ 

004480 CEN7WL8RRES BEST (J Upson) T Casey 81 
00408 ALZUHURRUO(H Al-Mtfctown) R/ 

008 FWVOt£JGChMnjry)P Cota 810, 

D20084 BOLS AH&D [• DotK .ui) G M Moore 810 

000800 LADYBONOPB) fMrs GF«mng|R Harmon 810 
000040 WGMAND TALE (Mrs fi Banks) A Jams 810 



.—19 


30 000040 WGMAND TALE (Mrs R Banks) A Janns 810 jMxtMasiQ 

31 008 SAIXJHTraES(Hka»*»ck)PVVa)ww89 MEddarfS 

35 008400 CEKOCIMrs C HwBO J Betha# 87_ JRtedlS 

38 001040 PRINCESS PAMELA (Mrs P McOuten] P FeSjsJe 87 GDuffWdT 

38 004 THQPtCO IMis T Efts) P Haskn B-B TWmiiii 15 

4t 400084 SEEN0EVt(LSirangnMn)GBadng85_.._ 

42 000040 ATtfiJTEff WEEK (B Robnson) J Spearwg 84 . 

44 0Q2D4Q SPHNAKER LADY (H Smpson) M UJiorfZ — 

46 0020-01 TAKE A BREAK (l McGready)D tiling 82 

82 Take A Break. 5-1 Tempest Tossed. 81 Auction Man. 7-1 Keep Cool, 181 
BUb Ahead. London Contact Cramming. 12-1 Tropteo. 1«-1 Oangmk, 181 othera. 

fP^. A^ K ?lPf*l** f *( 7 -5)4lhbwtari1itoDognia»c(94)9ran.Che8tar7th'capsoW 
MayB. LO NDON C ONTACT (87) 3rt beaten 3» Ttektord (88) 6 ran. LateaterW stks 
fimt Nov 5, .KEEP MOL (94) 7th braten owr 81 In Arctic Ken (86) 19 raa Warwick 7T 

h'ap firm May 5. TEMPES T TOS SED (8 ~ ' ~ 

LacMter7fStfc5ftmiOcl21. CRAUMMG 
rwt. Ftoon im if saler sort Apr 28. BUS 
22ran. Doncaster imstks good Mar 21 ~ 

7) 14 ran. Bath im seaar qaod Apr 29. 



: TEMPEST! 


2J3Q LEITH RACES APPRENTICE 
(£1,802: 5f) (14 runners) 

1 018 RAIBUimnVBI(B)(Mq WASiaphenscn 

8180DEddeiy7 

2 081 R0THBmELDGREY8(0)CABflt 

4-1 (M)(E«dJ leech 12 
5 840 PBK0QAra(C4AI Vktan844 — _ R Vickmll 
7 114 UPTOWN aK- fOOMBF) T Banxi 6-88™ B BcQltf 14 
9 040 APWKXMSUC m (D) R tarts S85 A Roper S 

14 401 HAMID0LPHMJ Bony 644 (GaiO J Qumo ID 

15 008 LAST SB3»©DOnpmw 87-13. MRWtartaoaS 

16 400 FRANCE WSSimW Bentley 87-11 RLapptal 

17 224 8L0CH/URNSraLAR(D)NBycrcift 

87-1 0 Jlnndi ByooR BJ 8 

18 340 TRADESMANS (CHD) J S Hattwe 874— P Brake 2 

19 004 T0LLYS BESTO Chapmen 4-74 JCaBa0an13 

20 004 COLWAT RADIAL DnmSmilh 874 HR ■ 

21 oo/o CULMINATE Mrs A BaA 874 KtatTtalder4 

24 008 MARSHALL DHRLSRWfdakar 37-7 A CtM te ^M 6 

5-2 Roilwfleld Greys. 81 Rambtaig RNer. 7-2 Miami 
Dotottin. 81 Uptown GM, 182 Cofway RadU, 81 Pargoda.18 
1 othera. 

3.0 E B F PEOPLES MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
E1J260: 51) (17) 


10 EDINBURGH GOLD CUP (£3,210: Im 4f) (13) 

AUCMMJEA(D) Jmmy Ftaoertd 4-810. AMonayll 

ELrFAYEZ On N Tnlder 444 Km TWdeflT) S 

S8I0 R RAMjS (USA) (B) (PXD) Ron Thompson 

WRPBUI1S 

5 008 COMMANDER ROBERT J Hanson 44-2 —3 

6 134 BALLYDURROW (CXBF) R Ftelter 9-9-1 _ DMdnBea 

9 11-3 ION BALADI (DXBR S Norton 44-11 J Lowe 2 

10 484 FOUR STAB THRUST (C-D) R Wwakcr 

444KBredahaw(5)4 

11 1/33 DeSCARTC3(B)MNnjgMon 44-1 K Darter 9 

12 444 L 0 BROADWAY D Moffett 880 J Quinn (5) 1 

13 800 WORDS*] (C) Denys Smdfr 87-13 M Pry 12 

14 108 MEND IT IB) N Bycroft 87-7 LChareock? 

15 084 PRINCE OBERONP 

16 034 EXCAVATOR 


RON (B) R Aten 87-7 .. S P Griffiths (5) 3 
I LADY (B) R WNtafcor 7-7-7 _. P NH (7)6 


10040 BeBydunw. 94 AucMniaa. 81 B-Favez, 11-2 4 
Commander Robert, 1S4 For Star Thrust 184 Descartes. 81 
L0 Broadway. 181 othera. 

Edinburgh selections 

By Mandarin 

2.30 RotherfiekL-Greys. 3.0 Silvers Era. 3.30 
Philstar. 4.0 BALLYDURROW (nap). 4.30 
Murillo. 5.0 Criccath. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
3.0 Silvers Era. 3 JO Alkaayed: 4.0 Commander 
Robert. 

Michael Seely's selection: 4.0 Ballydurrow. 


i 

3 

4 

5 

6 
8 
10 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 
21 
22 
23 
25 
27 


0 ARISHAN P MonKtih 80 

BRUTUS J SWlson 9-0 

40 DANADN Ron Thompson 9-0 — 

DUNLM (USA) S Norton 80 

00 - HSERGATE M W Easterly 94- 
04 GEOBRfrONY DMofiMt94 




RPQM16 

J Lowe 14 

_ KHodotonfi 
. ja*»s)i7 
E Guest ra 10 


4w30 COMMONWEALTH 
HANDICAP (£1,03: Im) (15) 


GAMES SELLING 


MRUNKTCranBO 

43 WBJSLEYDAlEWAJIRIOR G M Moore 

94N0mdher11 

« YOUNG WAMNR Mss I Be> 94 NCreMelfi 

03 AIR OF SWUNG (MTBanon 811 G Baxter S 

CAUSE KHLYSfterton 811 LCtnmocfc13 

CHOICE MATCH JSVAmn 811 E Trailer m3 

0 MISS WSHJtY J S WBson 811 DMcfnlta2 

MUSK STAR J KetitoMl 811 „ 

PREMB1 VtoBO J Barry 811 


6 403 BUCKS BOLT J Barry 4-8-2 
7-830 SOPHY’S F0LLT J SWfcon 444 


Gay KeBewey (51 14 

M Birch 7 

JCwt( 7)2 


RIVERS SECRET Denys Smhh 811- D 
02 8LVBISBM N Callaghan 81 1 


. MBeccrartB 
IRnrtt 
hrfol 


4 DIN PARADE GML(DIJ KattlSWSl4-B4 M 
00 ACKAS BOY D MoHatt 444 


15 

81 SHsere Era, 4-1 ah of Spring. 81 Warataydatawarrior. 
114 Ftehergaie. 81 Damte. 81 Geobrttany, 181 Young 
Warrior. 181 others. 

330 WAVERLEY MARKET EBF STAKES (£2,194: 
5f)(13) 

2 040 PHILSTAR (H(C4) A Balding 887 EGnest&fi 

3 0310 GOLD DUCHESS (9) 01) M WEasterby ^ 

5 00 AGRA’S BOYD Moffett 444 - JLmhm! 

7 00 SOMA RDGE A Hkte 4-84 —8 

9 WALLER FBJ) F Durr 444 MBhcfaU 

10 008 LADY OF LEISURE (C-D) I VWera54>13 RVIchsia(7)2 

11 M4 ITS SffiAVaCPBitor 8811 DMdtoOsS 

13 064 MBS PRIMULA W Benttoy 3-810 KDariay 7 

14 810 AUCAAYB2 0H Thomson Jonas 344 _ A Murray 12 

15 224 DBBE DO (me Thornton 384 JBteasdsta3 

16 302- IBBUMI 8TAHT ira T Barron 3-85 G Betters 

18 108. SOHLYflPOKnR Wifialiar344l DMcKeonl 

84 toerien Start, 82 Datable Do, 4-1 Akaayed. 81 Miss 
Primula, 182 Parade GW, 181 SoMy Spoken, 181 others. 


fBHDl T Craig 7-82«— H Cartrte 11 
I RHAPSODY GMAocre 87-7- S Woods 
Soy. 4-1 Sophya FOUy. Murifio. 81 
ft. 181 Bartel Banzai. 181 Avraeas, 14- 


5-8SS WatastsrS 

18 400 BAH1EL BANZAI Mlffl IBM 344 J0Htan(S)3 

19 008 RETOHMED HABIT *Y Pearce 4-8-5 KDvky5 

21 038 MARTDN BOYS Win 864 MFtyl 

22 -320 CAERNARVON BOY J Kafitawnl 4-85_ M Beecreft M 

24 004 LAURA'S CHOICE T Craig 885 S P Grifttto (5) 3 

25 00® COPWCEPMonte»4-85 SKelgMeyA 

29 400 MISTRESS CHARLEYS Norton 344 JLmselS 

30 004 H0MESTT0KEN 
32 040 RACEFORM 

11-4 Coemsnron 
Frasass. 81 Bucks Soft. 

1 others- __ . 

5.0 EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 
STAKES (£983: 1m4Q (129 

1 004 DARK CYtoMT Denys Smtft 444 _ D LeadtaMer (5) 2 

3 008 MGHT GUEST PMonWtii 444 SM|May7 

5 -434 THEYMM0N (USA) S Norton 448 J LoweS 

7 083 CWCCEfTH Denys Smft 4-98 LChamockll 

8 2222 BAtfTEL BUSHY (8F) Miss I Bad 3-84— .. N CwSsle 10 

9 44 COMELY DANOT(USA)(BF) J W Watts 
344 N Cnanartsn 12 

384 H Richardson (7) 1 

344 M Bin* 4 


11 040 GUNNER MAC N 

12 808 HIDDEN MOVE W 


13 004 HOAD HU. R Fisher 344. 


15 801 ORIENTAL EXPRESS F Can 344 JCwr(7)S 

16 JESSg T WM8 IS J 5 WBson 3-82 DMcXaimnS 

18 004 STAR OF TARA RFMw 382 KDartayS 


2-1 Comely Dancer. 4-1 CricoaKh, Oriental Express. 9-2 
Bantal Bushy, 81 Treyamon, 181 Pfiglrt Guest. 12-1 others. 


WINDSOR 


Going: 

Draw: tilfpi numbers best 
G J3Q SERPENTINE SELLING HANDICAP (£966: Im 
70yd) (21 runners) 

208 POXY DYKE K CrartnohsnvBrown 4413 — Thw«15 


380 HUNTS KATE CKoknw 444 


1 

2 

3 

4 
9 

10 004 OSTE NTATIO US 

11 004 BLUE STEEL R Simpson 884 

12 224 FOXCRQFT P Hasten 344. 


P Cook 16 


H20 JACK BARCLAY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £3,137:1 
61) (25) 

1 040 G3GEWSE (M J Douglas-Home 87 R Cochrane 3 

2 0000 CRETE CARGO M E rianos 9-4 Paul Edctare 22 

3 024 FRUTTY OTJOOMEY (USA) R Annsirong 

S4SCaoihen15 

4 022- RIVERA SCENE J Dtstiop 94 WCamsaS 

5 401 TOUCH OF ORE?' (D) D Thom 94 (7sx) ._ G Sttrtiey 20 

5 1323 LOFT B OY ( D) N Wp cre 812 SDmnan(99 

7 431 BBfTE WOOS1 “ 


M0 EASTER RAM8LBI (C4) P Butisr 

444WR9Mtetaun18 
-433 SNAKE MVBt D Mchcfcon 444 I Mason 7 


434 H0KUSANK tew 44-1 A Stxadts (5) 20 

XfSC Wtidnan 44-18 PM Eddaty 4 


12(7ex)WRS«riDbm2 
S OM KHBLEBLMEM McCormack 88 -Pat Eddery 19 

10 240 TZU-W0NG M Ftps 88 : ACIanlS 

11 18 MSS KNOW ALL (USA) BtttS 88 

14 081 BATH J ToSer 84 

15 308 HARMONY HBGHTSR Harmon 


13 400 CHARIS M A MUSCR Hoad 444- 

14 008 HARD AS RON P Hasten 3-87 J 

15 008 ON IMPULSE KBrassey 887 -j 


16 OOfl AMIES VIDEO R Holder 44-6- 


. G Reach 17 
. N Adas 19 
APmad2 

17 040 VENTURE TO REPOfBI A JWfcon 4-84 — RlbSHS 
IB 004 ■ NIGHT WALLER J Bridgsr 4-84 S Demon (3) 21 

20 042 THE UTE(W Mbs L Bower 344 ^.HLItanif 

21 0030 NANQRW Komp 342 C McN smaaS 

22 TRACXTHEBEARJ Jenkins 382 Nfimnl 

23 034 flR0VHMTEPMakifiS81 TOtenlO 

24 040 ANSEL 0 B UMM Q1 A Ingham 87-13— G CteterCT 14 

25 042 FWST ORBIT M McCoral 37-12 : _RMta12 

26 040 MBS HARt£Ot»l(BrR Hannon 87-10. A KoGtaM 13 
81 Hokusan. 10040 First Orbit 9-2 Foxeroft. 81 Snake ffivar, 
11-2 Os te ntatious. 181 Vantura To Ftatonm; 281 Blue Steel, 

6JS5 WHITEHALL STAKES (2-Y-O: flfltes: £959: 5!) 

GDoTMdS 

■ WH B etab — 8 

Tires 3 

P Casks 



16 -169 nATBIE tD) R Ssnpson 8-4„„ 

18 3-40 VAIGLMn J Betiielf82_ 

19 28C PRISSY MSS P Wafcnn 80, 

20 40C8 SOMEWAY L HOB 7-12. 

21 283 GYPSY'S PROPHECY (USA) (BF) G Hanvood 


N Adam 25 


23 083 SOLO STYLE G Lewis 7-12. 


14 

25 444 SHEHT MAJOR ITY W CfOorman 74- ML fho^ 24 

26 004 TACHOMETER C Nelson 74 RFm 4 


7-12W Woods 
D 


29 W LADY LA PAZ P Cundefl 7-7... 

30 10 £ASY UNE ID) P Hasten 7-7 . 

31 088 DELTA ROSEC Benstead 7-7. 


32 408 STOCK PHRASE R SmyVl 7-7. , 
35 820 BANDY AMN P ftMchaO 7-7. 


— G Fnendh 10 
-TWUamlf 
R Street 5 

- J Carter 
■ G Carter 


1 211 STAYL0W(MGfitem84. 

P Melon 88 - 


I BERTRADE^H^^^^H 
COUNTESS BflEF K C-Brown 88 - 
WFaNTA MAIBA N Vkiora 88-M 
NQMUD P Cwdfll 

PERCY C Benstead 


.GStatkay7 
■ B Rouse 11 

PWEAPPlfS PM0E M Btanshsrd 88 N Adorns 4 

2 PLUM DROP HAmettom 84 W Carson 9 

RHANPBQ0KI*xy88 GHumml 

RIPECHMSTMA ABdqr84 PatEdttey12 


0 SURELY GREAT D Thom 84 ^ 
WIND AND WAVED Latag 88. 


MLTbaamB 

IW 


4 

5 
9 

11 

13 

14 

15 

16 
18 

19 

20 

Brens Plum Drop. 84 Say Low, 81 Wind A Ware. 181 Surely 
Great, 281 Ripg-Qitstftia 8 Peroy, 25-1 others. 

7^0 CHARING CROSS STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,592: 
5f)(7) 

4 124 MBTERCOLM (D)R Hainan 84 PM Eddery B 

6 0 BKmNP Haynes 811 N Horae 7 

9 HIGHLAND LODGE P€ota811.. uuw » H — TIUnS 

12 WNAASOfUSAJP Walwyn 811 Pad Eddery 2 

13 0002 ORIOLE QmCER DT hom811 WflSamhm3 

IE 43 T»> THE BATON MlbdtfOM 811 RCMhaae4 

16 TECHNOCRAT A Tum08lt P Cock 1 

81 Mister conn. 9-4 Tap The Baton, 81 MtnaaatL9-2 Oriole 
Dancer. 281 Highland Lodge, 33*1 Biotin & Technocrat. 

7J5B WESTMINSTER HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2^78: 
Im 3f 150 yd) (11) 

1 -W WJSHL0NR$B^87___-. -_f y Eddary 3 

3 -13 PEARL RSHER fa*) (BF)J Francome 81 SOtetlraal 

4 088 DWA BIC0RE R Armstrong 94 ■ WCanran 4 

5 482 ZHCELa iA R Hannon 84 ■ A HcGteW 9 

,S dS 

s iss ssxrts 

14 040 G0LDBI CROFT N Vte« 7-7„ SWraremifflll 


Windsor selections 

By Mandarin 

630 Blue Sled. 6.55 Slay Low. 7.20 Tempest 
Tossed. 7.50 Wishlon. 8.20 Riviera Scene. 8,50 
Northern Amethyst 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.30 Foxcnift. 6.55 Stay Low. 7 JO Oriole Dancer. 

7 JO Diva- Encore. 8.20 Bertie Wooster. 8 JO 
Dalgadiyr. 

Michael Seely's selection: 7.50 GOLDEN 
CROFT (oap). 

8-50 MAYFAffl STAKES (3-Y-a C & G: £1 ,136: Im 
2f 22yd) (20) 

~ M Roberts 
WRSwMtamVA/ 
RHUMB 




DAAFBCOM A Stewart 8H- 
3 DALGADIYR M Stoute 811 [ 


6 

7 

8 ‘ 0 FMAL ALMA LCuntani 811 . 

9 24 ILORAL CHARGE (BFJRJohnsonHou^tion 

10 8 FREE HAND H Cedi 811 1 sCmISm! 

It 040 GAYCARUS0(B)KBras3ey811 B tote c 

* R Linas (3) 11 

9 WNGTffKR OSMTo nqiktns8H RCocbraoft 7 


14 

15 _ 

16 008 LOCKWOOD PRWCES'te™ 811 "fTAdSM 9 

17 343 MAKE PEACE I Bakteg 811 -PatEddSs 

19 804 HR SAWAS JDouMs4lome 81 1._^jmmSsiS 
a a NATIVE HAGEMPr^coft 811 _^Tg Sftted 20 


022- NpHTlBm AMETHYST G Huffer811 M Q~CtetariKh ifl 
RISK ANOTHER P MUtf 8-11 . aSSS®?/^ 

- GStarireyi 
W Careen 17 
— T Ires 3 


27 IKJN HIGHU Hararaod81l 

30 84 SHWMASTWHgm8lI.. 

31 03. .TOP RANGE M Jarris 811 


15 884' HRSTO0F D Marks 7-7. 

16 -120 T» WOOOSf HUT R Voorepuy 7-7- 
6-4 Wtahkn, 4-1 Stent Runwig, 82 Pawl Ftabar, 81 


32 888 /niH®MD«»JET(U8A)Mkte5a* 

33 X WILLOW GORGE G UMa 811 JJ! P w3*2 14 

iM j a?a!?(g. , i stomw. 


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THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


SPORT 


a9 


1 . . n 
:... ' •■> 
■ ~ , — Vl 


.'if 

*. 


.f , 

I- 


RACING 




Epsom raid not 
ruled out for 



Hash .Of Steel and Mr Jotm, 
wst and second in the Airiie- 
Coql more Irish 2,000 Guineas 
o^turday, are both possible 
uertiy 'runners after staking die 
English 2,000 Guncssfonn 
virtually without trace in the 
Curragh quagmire. 

Gre=n Desert. Huotmgdale 
and Sharrood, who were Dane- 
ing Brave s closest attendants at 
Newmarket, were expected to 
d ora male the race but all three 
»««J to produce their best and 
Green Desert was the biggest 
disappointment of afl. He had 

coped with an easy sar&ce when 

winning the Free Handicap but 
never got in to the race, bringing 
up the rear almost the whole 
way. Hunting dale showed 
briefly on the far rail 2£ 

funongs out but ceased to «n»h» 
anv further progres s. 

In the meantime, Michael 
Kinane, riding the proven 
mudlark Flash Of Steel, had 
come through in the centre of 
the track to tackle and pass 
Shairood on whom Willie Car- 


Dublin 

Mr John’s* . trainer, liapi 
Browne, was the first to nomi- 
nate his colt a probable runner 

at Epsom. “I believe he wifi do 
®ven better over distances be- 
yond a mile,” Browne sakL 
On the other hand, Dennot 
wekt, the winner’s trainer, is 
“rained to believe that a wik 

Will always be the best distance 
for Flash Of Steel, a son of Kris. 
However, his owner, Bert Fire- 
stone, is keen to have a runner 
in the Derby and the colt will be 
tested over ten furlongs in the 
middle of next week to se^ if it is 
worthwhile sending him 
pie alternative is to reserve him 
for the St James's Palace Stakes 
at Royal Ascot 
This was the first Irish 2,000 
Guineas win for Weld and the 
second for Kinane, who four i 
year* ago scored on Dara Mon- 
arch, ironically trained by 
Browne. 

It was a bad day for the 
Bogush as apart from the guin- 
eas debacle. Nomination was 
beaten into second pfeoe by 



Lord John before beating him 
by three-quarters of a length. A 
stewards' inquiry was inevitably 
announced but the result was 
allowed to stand. 


Damister, a 5-4 favourite, ran 
even worse to be fourth of seven 
to Mr John's stable companion. 
Fair Of The Furze in the 
Tattersalls Rogers Gold Cup. 


Fast Topaze takes Lupin 

5£ Topaze (Cash Asmnssen) 
tbe £60,529 Prix Lupin by a 
incing length from Arofcar 


won 

convincing w 

at Longchamp yesterday. He is 
80 per cent certain to run tn the 
Prix do Jockey-Club, according 
to his trainer, Georges 
Mikbalides. 

The runner-up, however, win 
run in the Derby. Jacques de 
Chevigny, who trams Arokar, 
said: “There is no point taking 
on Fast Topaze and Bering at 
Chantilly so we might as wen go 
to Epsom". 

Mikhal ides' Derby runner 
will be HaO To Roberto, 6% 
lengths behind Dancing Brave 
when sixth in the Guineas; after 
leading for a long way. 

. Yves Saint-Martin, who rode 
Arokar. said he does not know if 


he win be available to partner 
the colt at Epsom as be has may 
be asked to ride the Aga Khan's 
Kadial, a five-length winner at 
York last Wednesday. 

• Ivor’s Image (Walter 
Swmburn) started 5-4 on 
favourite for the Oaks dltalia at 
San Suro, Milan, yesterday and 
justified the support with a two- 
length success-over Danzica. 

• Snow Chief ridden by Alex 
Solis, won the 1 1 1th Preakness 
Stakes on.Satuiday, beating the 
Kentucky Derby winner, Ferdi- 
nand (Bill Shoemaker) by four 
lengths. 

• Barney Curiey had his first 
winner as a trainer when Praxis 
landed a ramble 4 in the Dee 
Novices’ Hurdle at Bangor on 
Saturday. 


Saturday’s results 



Warwick 

(15-6 tMt 2. Carafe S-tS 1. Hu ra v s fc 

i (t£l). 9 ran. Sandyta (10-1):3,G 

. BM 

Algernon (ZMJc .. _ 

Tonrantor 9ft lav. Worn, 
an 

(10- 
NR: 

aaoi, 



i. MedM (tft-1). 9 ran. Sanflvta (10-lv 

Ud 04 -i£ 2. Gorgeous S45l.Ootdl 

3. Gouges any (6-ty (7-11:3. Sefttera (8-1). 

it. 18tm ■ ran. 

lOt.B*mf*D*agtKeS-1);ZT**m 7.15 1. -Mtotor Melody (2D~n 2. SM 
■It 3. Prace Sky (14-1); £An»he» Splash (12-1); 3, Doutteuagaki (33-1). 
-TiUaiKfwMKskyeWRS-lfatf.^ran. Swift Rotate. Emrcason 3-i jtftws. 11 


gat a' 



n(T6-Tk3,anaW> 

2-1 to. m no. NR: HoSaw 


Dust 


FWbOt- 

iS^liSSSnt 

•ow tong. MOT* 




i 1. PHiwdMr>it2. Irani (7-4 
. MgM VfeRlor n5-1fc 4, Briaomfe 

17 ran. NR: Boldere. 


(i- 2 Me a 

jpO-ll.7aD.Nft 

-WlV-rag 

. 425 1. CMtofe Can* (33-1): SL Ctar 
Th* Prudara Praira (S-l^CaN To Honor 

(5-1V 16 rae- HR Honra Oounty- 

hh nua rr-tj: z rot 

- l -“«^OTS4 


Mm. 

oil NR: 6 
7j*5 1. 

Buck (7-1): a Mramac (20-tt 
rt2-lL ShM S-2 to. 20 
IW ri Bov. Noes Popst RaU» lady. 
Stw And Sums. Antes. Sefeome 
RacoRLVUCtabar. 

6.15 1, aracUn Brig (16-1): 2,bty 
FMa flMO to): a Satyrae* (14-1). 14 
an. NR: Our Seamus, fenston's Son. 

645 1. WlfeaNra Ynbm (12-1 k Z 
- Paddy's Dmm (B-4 fawt a tidy R» 
power (5-1 1 t* ran. NR: iCsty Mnge. 

Newcastie 

6.15 1. ftte By ruraia (13-1X2. Tex 
Cods (10-1); a Mortey {5&-lVMriabeto 7- 
2 to. a* ran. Wfc Conduit court 
CAS 1, Mr Spot (3-1 N-tofc 2. Jura's 
Gam (16-1): a Ctonroene Strawi (3-1 ft 
tof. U ran. NRrMaracK Bay. 

7.tS 1. Mra Muck (114 Aft 2. Tbe 
CknmfMk 3 TfeBtek Sack {12-1* 16 
ran. Nit Prvteg Parsons. 

7M 1. SfcaMMw (5-1* 2 Hazy Gten 

atS 1. B ra i i sr OsnMray 01-10 toft 2 

Sand Back. (7-2): a Prlnra sarango (i i- 
11.7 nn. _ _ 

■ SASinaridMtCtl-afc&Thsnfusr- 
H a PnraOf Peace (7-4 toft n ran. 



Flat leaders 

TRAINERS 


I? 

(16-11: a CqtoOb Scpny (1241. 12 ran. 


H Cad 
P Colo 
<3 Harwood 
R Hannon 

MH! 

M Baton 
LCunari 


18 9 8 0 -3.06 

16 10 11 2 +13B9 

14 S 5-3. -2D0 
13 16 8 5 +1324 

12 7 7 1 -40.75 

11 8 15 0 -7526 

10 1 5 2 -0-19 


JOCKEYS 


4.16 1. team Z Jm my 

Thompson 014 toft 3. Santonttl Mi 

g ^1?ft^g4fcaUSdrfi-ll:3. 

Cte^te ffTa fra*ar (5.1). Mtora 

Sr7-2to.T0ran. 


PatEddary 

SCBMban 

GStartoy 
The* 
RCocbane 
W Carson 
P Cook - 


30 T7 13 4 +2088 

25 24 27 4 -2028 

18 9 7 3 -&59 

18 20 17 3 -23JJ2 

IB 19 12 - 2 -2tLra 

17 24 21 2 -7627 

15 10 11 17 -am 


POINT-TO-POINT 


Greenall close to treble 


By Brian Bed 

A broken breast-girth robbed 
Peter Greenall of a treble at the 
Melon Hunt <3«b P ?*p«o- 
point ou Saturday. Na^bty 
Niece, on whom be rode* 
waiting race, provided hra 
winner in the find division of 
the Restricted *n& be 
up rathe Fannos*oa Hightand 
Wwi. who bad a sicapfe a» in 
outpacing his only serious nyaL 
Towtatnc and Caroline 
1 Saunders. . 

Looking all seLto complete a 
■a; treWeonRo^foJ *ei second 

• Ira of the Restricted, Greenall 
was unseated when the breas- 
anh snapped and tus satMIe 
slipped. Jw Newton .then 
25ked assured of comrtotg a- 
double — having previously won 
the Marie Cone nomoM on 

. Pe ri scope — but True Dowiy 

sfippedon la^^aittepa^ 

timaie fence lravmg Roto Tae 
and Comardi » ho*d off 
Sidewinder. . . 

There was^qtality hid few 
runners in both foe Nhrac 
frnsd&i Gentle Appnw* and 
Oliver VaughanJonesjnco to 
make aU in the ram’ final tat 
' erratic jumping his 

chances and three ouj 
jjoonabaroo. Vulgarim and 
AVrttfsM trad rakcnovff 
T and 

: In the I to&es feat, AJnauda 

' CflTtal fo dose foe gap 
■Sr and Jdl Gnoyer on 
• Dana to 

* 'impression 

SL-iSSSs 


for the Grand Marnier 
championship. 

Previously Miss Harwood 
had shown great maturity for a 
16-year-old when winning the 
me mber s'* race on Lawn Meet. 
After going on at the thirteenth, 
she was headed ax the 3rd last 
but got back on terms at the next 
and went on to score by two 
frn gtfts- .. 

Miss Harwood’s win kept her 

three behind Alison Dare m the 

ladies' title race as Miss Dare 
was successful on Mendrp Ex- 
press at- the CNwuW Vate 
Nicky Ledger remains in -third 
place following her win on 
Logan at the East Sussex and 
Romney Marsh, whose new 
course at Buckholt w*s 
favourably received by both 
ndexs and spectators. 

Just Dai gave Mike Felton his 
only winner at ihe Drimtna 
West where atrocious con- 
ditions caused ■ the abandon- 
ment of the «<***?. 
fifth of foe scheduled eagnt 

r3 Tfoi Lewis broke a leg aLthe 
IXamfefio meeting last ye ar on 
Spotting Tack but 
win on the same horse on 
Saturday and went on to com- 
pfete a ocxibfc on Island Joy. 

Saturday’s winners 

coraw«J> vrAtt »» 

WnttMijSSi 


DULU 


me nrau i-w* 


CnfDMt n**e tomortal Man. 

K&oasse 

Hmfora 





WDd waten Traby and Martin negotiate River Tryweryn in the British Open held at Bala. (Pbotograptelan Stewart). 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Warrington’s power pack 
makes light of Halifax 


Halifax ; 10 

Warrington — 38 


The outsiders, Warrington, 
who were within seconds of 
being knocked out in the first 
round by Widnes, triumphed in 
the Premiership Final at EUand 
Road with an awesome display 
of forward power. Warrington 
scored seven tries to one. setting 
up their. attacks with ferocious 
pads play to which Halifax had 
no answer, and then tackling the 
Halifax backs out of the game. 

The sixth try was a spectacu- 
lar long-range effort by the 
substitute back, Johnson, and 
his fellow Australian, Boyd, 
crowned a towering Man of the 
Match performance with a try in 
the last seconds. 

Halifax could count them- 
selves fortunate to be level 10-10 
at half time. Although they 
scored a brilliant try when 
Dixon broke through and Chris 
Anderson touched down, they 
were on the defensive for most 
of the. half . The .Warrington 
front row of Boyd; Tamati and 
Jackson pounded the Halifax 
defence, and the champions 
looked extremely vulnerable 
close to their own line. 


By Keith Maddin 

Before Halifax had settled 
down, the Australian. Boyd, 
crashed over. Although 
Anderson's try and two goals 
from Whhfiekl put Halifax 
ahead 8-4, Warrington ham- 
mered away at the Halifax line, 
and would have gone ahead but 


Bishop, who missed 
comfortable kicks at goal. 

Eventually the Halifax de- 
fence cradled again under pres- 
sure. Bishop slithering under 
several, tackles. Warrington 
might have had a thin) try after 
similar pressure but when Rob- 
erts crashed over, the referee. 
Mr Lindop, ruled that be bad 
made two movements. 

The last two minutes of the 
first half were dramatic. 
Whitfidd kicked a long range 
penahygoal in the swirling wind 
to level the scores, and then, as 
the hooter sounded, Halifax 
were given another penalty luck 
for a late tackle, but Whitfield 
shot wide. . 

Warrington began the second 
half as they bad begun the first. 
Their forwards, prompted by 
the elusive scrum half Gregory, 
shimmed at the Halifax line and 


Tamati forced his way over 
direct from a play for the balL 

Wi thin two minutes Warring- 
ton scored again with the Hali- 
fax defence dearly demoralized. 
Cross! ey failed to gather a 
bouncing ball behind his own 
posts and as the Warrington 
forwards came up like hounds in 
pursuit of a tiring fox. Jackson 
touched down. Bishop landed 
the goals to both tries. 

Halifax attempted to revive 
their fading hopes with some 
desperate attacks, but their han- 
dling let them down at vital 
moments, and it was Warring- 
ton who scored, albeit with a 
dubious try. Several Warrington 
players looked offside from a 
kick through, but Mr Lindop 
waved play on and Forster ran 
unchallenged over the line. 

SC ORERS: Hafltte Try: AndBiaon. 
Orals: WnfieU <3t. Mtort ig l ra: Tom: 
Boyd (2), Bishop, Tamati. Jackson. For- 
ster. Johnson. Orate: Bishop (5). 

HALIFAX: C VffiriMd (rap. S Smith): E 
Rxbfesdeo, A Andoreon. C Anderson, S 
WHsrat; J Cronloy. G Stephens; M Scott 
S McCsBJon. G RoMnson. B Jukfl. N 
James (rap: S Bond), P Damn. 

«f ARRINGTON: P Ford (rap: B Johnson* 
M Forster. P CuOen, R Duane, B Cartert 
P Bisnap, A Greoory:L Boyd. K Tamall. R 
Jackson. G Sanderson psix W McGrty), 
M Roberts. M Gregory. 


ATHLETICS 


Oakes of Kent 
sets new 
native record 

By a Special Correspondent 

Judy Oakes, the Common- 
wealth champion, was in fine 
fens at the Kent championships 
at Crystal Palace yesterday. She 
retained her shot- putt title with 
J&4Q metres to set an English 
native record. * 

Sebastian Coe, Olympic 1500 
metres champion who tomorrow 
ffies off to the United States for 

800 

metres tide m windy and wet 
conditions at Enfield in a 
satisfactory tmia 4X9sec. 

Wendy Sly, the Olympic 
5,000 metres diver medallist, 
meed to two Middlesex titles. 
taking the 800 metres la 2min 
fefisec, sm a shin g the 15-year 
championship record, and 
retaining her 1,500 metres title 
In 4ndn 249sec; ‘ 

WMNStS: Kate teltoiite O 

Pmm (Lfiadon AQ. zAmJlMoa- 

aSSffis 

50JS- MkMeMOc Itee lMnsO KbttR 

drafts 


Records fall and news 
is Heard in Oxford 



2A&.-1JSOte WSJy 

H Oteor J Avlm (B«- 

i48nz; SMray:IA>tBS00M:J tXwW *T 
tora 1v«a.1. Lana Jnp: J-Stoep- 
■liafleM), 7A Haora: K 

?»fS 

iwrtte if c£»b 14J3. 

HW*mK t Mora** (HounstowVajn^ 


By JimRaihm) 

The outstanding performance 
of the 1 12th Universities’ Ath- 
letic Match on Saturday was a 
record long jump from Oxford's 
Dwayne Heard. On his own pit. 
Heard jumped 7.40 metres. 
seven centimetes beyond bis 
record-equalling jump of last 
year. Heard leapt even further in 
his first effort, but spiked the 
plasticine for a no-jump. He was 
a busy man on Saturday: he 
went on to win the 200 metres 
and the sprint relay, and fin- 
ished second in the 100 metres 
and triple jump. 

• The Oxford men were 
convincing winners for the 
fourth successive year, and the 
Cambridge women once again 
extended their winning runs. 
Cambridge's Suzi Caesar set a 
new record in the 400 metre 
hurdles, and Light Blue. Kathy 
OIney, another in the 3,000 
metres. 

It was a thoroughly miserable 
day at Oxford's Iffley Rood 
Stadium, but it was overcome 
by friendly enthusiasm. Daring 
the relays to conclude the 
match, announcer Allan Mal- 
colm had to request that spec- 
tators kindly leave ihe track. It 
was not a case of hooliganism, 
but sheer enthusiasm which, 
during the day, brought out 
many best performances from 
these real amaieurs. 

The spectators were even on 
their feet for the finish of the 
5,000 metres, when Oxford’s 
Jon Brooke out-sprinted 


Cambridge’s Jeremy Barton, 
who earlier had won the 1,500 
metres. 

Cambridge's Paul 

Rowbotham showed class in the 
800 metres, and anchored Cam- 
bridge to victory in the 1.600 
metres relay. Despite the cold, 
Oxford’s Martyn Bowen shaved 
l/10ih of a second off his best 
400 metre time; and his team- 
mate. Mike PowelL not only 
won the high jump, bo: finished 
second in the long jnmp and ran 
leg in the 1,600 metre 



Marc UWnnat j: 100m: J K*|| (Cam- 
bridge). 1156ec.200m:DHswd ~~ ' 
ZZT 400m: M Bowsn ~ 
MferPRowtoottSfl) 

1,500m: J Barton . 

5,000m: J Brooke . 

3noom ataaptoctaarc A 
9285. 110m banflas: J KoB 
15.4. 200m bontea: D. 
bodge), 242. «X>m h u rdl es. 

{Oxford). 53ft 3,000m Mafic 
(Oxtart}. 1 3KM.fi. 4r100m May: (Oxford), 
&.<. 4x40Goi relay: Cambridge, 120. «. 
High Jump: M PoweB (Oxford). 2.00m. 
Feb vault: R stona lOxtord), 3.65m. Long 
jump: D Heard (Oxford). 740m (record). 
DtetrarA VaNlai tOxftxd). 3938m. Shot 
1252m. Hammer: R 
5220m. Jm r eBnr J 
ige). 59 :8m. Match 
raaufc Oxford 124pts. Cambndge 97pts. 
Woman: Wfews: 100m: H Qssendar 
^Snendge), 132sac. 200m: S Caesar 
(Caomndoft 26.4, 400m: J Nad (Cam- 
5ndg8), 602. BOOoe A Gore (Oxford), 
21?I IftOOm: J ' - “ 

4:41.1. ftOOOnc K 


J Lautas (Cambridge.), 

Ohey (CsmbnOge), 

10D1.fi (raeft 400m taitotes: S 


CambnOge. 

a -08. High 


,100m trades f> 
, 17 0. 4x1 00m May: 


51ft 4x400m relay: Oxford, 
hasp: H Lissendan (Cam- 
OM (Cambridge), 1.45m. 



FOOTBALL 

Altrincham 
are on 
the inarch 


Altrincham ... 

... 1 

Runcorn 

0 


By Paul Newman 

This convincing victory in the 
final of the FA Trophy at 
Wembley on Saturday provided 
John King with his first major 
honour as manager of Al- 
trincham. It is unlikely to be his 
last King has assembled a team 
that looks capable of sustaining 
the club's tradition of regular 
success and they most already 
be one of the favourites to take 
advantage of the introduction 
from next season of automatic 
promotion from the Go la 
League into the fourth division. 

Altrincham's well-stocked 
trophy cabinet, professional ap- 
proach and continuity in 
personnel — King for example is 
a former dab captain who 
played in most of their famous 
FA Cup games of the 1970s — 
inevitably invite comparisons 
with UveipooL Allowing for the 
obvious gulf in class, there are 
also similarities in the style of 
play: Altrincham do the simple 
things wdl, rarely give away 
possession and always seem to 
have players in support of the 
man with the ball. 

Runcorn were on the retreat 
for most of the game and when 
they did throw more players 
forward in the second half they 
found Cuddy and Johnson 
firmly in control at the heart of 
the Altrincham defence. Gard- 
ner, who must have covered 
more ground than anyone else 
on the pitch, dominated the 
midfield for Altrincham and 
Anderson frequently stretched 
the Runcorn defence on the 
flanks. 

The decisive goal came three 
minutes from half-time. Roberts 
committed himself to tackling 
Anderson, who successfully 
evaded the challenge and 
crossed the ball from the byline 
into the path of Farrelly. The 
Altrincham defender’s powerful 
drive from 10 yards gave 
McBride no chance and from 
that point the game's outcome 
was rarely in doubL 

ALIMNCMMfc J WaatoxS; P GsnMsr, P 
Dertsmore. J Joftnson. M ferrety. P 
Comma. P Cuddy. J Dawson. P RexL R 
Efts, G Anderson. 

RtWCORN: R McBrids: A LBS. M Roberts. 
G Jones. R Fraser. O Smab. 5 Cron?Kxi 
■ ^ A Crompton). J tome. M Carter. D 
r. FCerrodus. 


{sub: A 
Mather. 


WELSH FA CW RNAL: Wrerham 1. KfcMer- 
1 (ost). Replay at Kteerminster on 


Premier rfvtoorcMte. 

•meed a Abmgoan utd 2: Momo Motors a 
Sharpness 1; Suponwnet. AUngdonTown 
2: Yate Town 6. Bcasmr 2. 

ESSEX SEMOR LEAGUE: Eton Manor 1. 
AWaro 7wn 9; Malden Town 1. Bower* Utd 
0. Senior Cup flnei to HBbsteJ: CoggasnaB 
0. Ford UlnT 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: PM ter *4- 
Mok Parram a Boon* & vttumm Aotrey 1. 


COterrtES LEAGUE: GottoMM 
1, Ctwtoey 5; Hontey Witney i. Maten VNB 

i. Merchant i.Famtiam 4. 

NORTHERN COUNTIES (EAST) LEAGUE: 
Prater tettem Booty Von 2. Fwtey 
Cote 1 ; Bntongton Trmty 0. Eastwood To*m 
2 Density United 1. Boston FC &. Qtetey 5. 
' m o. 

I nl o nito o M fc Denmark 1. 

Poland 0. 

MONO KONG: Ftynflr Soto! CNna Z 
Manchester U rated 2. 

AUSTRIAN LEAGUE Austria Wagentun 0. 
SEW (rotsoruck Z GA< 0. Austria Hfen Z 
Rap'd 2. Seam Qraz 1; Mum Wacker 2. 
LASK z UMKSnoposliiens: 1. Aostna Wien 
56 pb: a Rapm fiK a LASK 3B. 


TENNIS 


Lendl walks tall 
in the city 
of giant statues 

From Ridrard Evans, Rome 


Emilio Sanchez, the surprise 
package of the European day 
court season, made a valiant 
effort to complete a third 
successive victory against reign- 
ing grand slam champions in the 
final of the Italian Open here at 
the Foro Italico yesterday, but 
the task proved beyond him. 

After three unsuccessful at- 
tempts to win this coveted 
crown. Ivan Lendl finally took 
the title with a 7-5, 4-6. M, 6-1 
victory in a dud lasting two 
hours and SO minutes under a 
baking Roman sun. 

Having beaten Boris Becker, 
the Wimbledon champion, on 
Friday and Mats Wilander, foe 
French Open champion, on 
Saturday, both in straight sets, 
Sanchez had reason to feel 
confident of at least making a 
dent in the Czechoslovak's ar- 
mour when be freed the United 
States Open title holder. 

As the Spaniard, aged 2 1 . won 
the first three games it became 
apparent that Sanchez is not one 


to be overawed by the big 
11,000 people 
were cram mix® the famous 


occasion. Nearly 


centre court that has now been 
enlarged by temporary seating 
to such an extent that most of 
the giant marble statues are 
hidden from view. 

It was inevitable, however, 
that Lendl’s gladiatorial qual- 
ities would soon start to glitter 
and, although a superb back- 
hand service retnrn pass off a big 
first service put Sanchez within 
two points of the first set when 
Lendl served at 4-5, the Czecho- 
slovak unleashed a sufficient 
number of hammer blows to 
take it 7-5. 


Despite losing service early in 
the second set, foe ability of 
Sanchez to manoeuvre his man 
wide with heavily angled fore- 
hands soon had Lendl in trouble 
again and. to foe delight of the 
crowd, foe Spaniard broke back 
twice to level the match. The 
tide then turned dramatically 
and. by foe end. Sanchez was 
struggling for points let alone 
games. 

Lendl could feel satisfied with 
his fifth Nabisco Grand Prix 
title of foe year, especially as be 
had been lucky to escape from 
match point down against a 
rampant Yannick Noah in their 
semi-final. 

In one of the great matches of 
the year, these two giants of the 
game turned on a superb, emo- 
tion-charge spectacle that in- 
cluded a bewildering variety of 
strokes and tactics, including 
one lop-spin service return loo 
from Lendl. 

The umpire was probably 
right m denying Noah foe 
chance to replay foe point on 
which Lendl had saved tbe- 
match with an ace that, erro- 
neously, was called out. Bui foe 
laconic Lendl put it all in 
perspective. “In Paris it would 
have been replayed," he said. 
“In Prague he would not even 
have got to argue about ft.” At 
least in Rome, the new, highly 
organized and well supported 
Rome, the decision was fair. 
RESULTS: Smote rc ftMk rite te Y 
Noah (Ft) bt D Perez (Uni). 7-6. 64; M 
wnarttar fSwe) bt L Pimefc (Czt B-1. 6-2. 
SercHtoahRlLsnoi (Cz) bt Noah. 1-6. 6-2. 
7-& B Sanchez (Sp) btMtender. 6-3. 7-5. 
Rnat Lendl bt Sanchez, 7S. 4-6. 6-1. 6-1. 
Dcxtearc Ftaafc G Forget p) and Nrah M 
M Edmonson (Aus) and SStowart (US). 7- 
6 , 6 - 2 . 


Wimbledon block may 
be the price of failure 


British women players will 
probably find H harder to gain 
entry into Wimbledon and other 
leading tournaments following 
poor results in the Lawn Tennis 
Association's £90,000 spring 
circuit which ended at Lee-on- 
Soleut yesterday. 

The titles went overseas for 
the fifth successive week and 
Sue Mappin, Britain's director 
of womens tennis, urns so upset 
at her players' response that she 
said: “I must ask myself bow I 
can justify nominating British 
players for wild cards into 
Wimbledon and the big women's 
tournaments like Eastbourne 
and Edgbaston. 

“There is nobody who de- 
serves such accolades. It has 
been for too easy for players to 
assume they are going to be 


nominated for wild cards year 
after year. I had hopes for the 
yonder players when I per- 
suaded the LTA to put money 
into this series bat they have not 
been getting valne for that 
money." 

By comparison the British 
men had a satisfactory circuit 
with Andrew Castle finishing 
overall fourth and coming into 
the reckoning for a Davis Cup 
sqaad place. Six British men 
were in the 16 sur vivors for last 
week's Masters tournament. 

RESULTS (GB utess state*: Mm'S 
states (teal: GtHoim (Is) MDMaasdore 

[SAL6-2. 44. 6-6. Woaunte siaefes Case 


Essm:ea8»& 

Tmaer bt J GeadaU ate R WhicbeBo. 7-6, 
6-2. Wareca's dteites Gate K Bakim and 
N liman (N«b> bt E Derty (Fr) md 

Ttr-SS ,7-fi.iftfi-l. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Benson and Hedges Cup 
(11.0, 55 overs) 

SWANSEA: Glamorgan v 

Gloucestershire 

CANTERBURY: Kent v Middlesex 
LIVERPOOL: Lancashire v 


Leicestershire v Minor 

Counties 

THE OVAL: Siarey v Combined 
Universities 

HOVE: Sussex v Somerset 
EDGBASTON: Warwickshire v 
Derbyshire 

HEADINGLEY: Yorkshire v 
Worcestershire 

Britannic Assurance County 

Championship 

(11.0-6.30) 

NORTHAMPTON: Northampton- 
shire v Essex 
Tour Match 

SOUTHAMPTON: Hampshire v India 
(11.0-6.0) 

WARWICK UNDER- 25 COMPETITION: 
Bristol: Gloucestershire v Somerset. St 
AlMBK Middesax v Nonhampconshire. 
Purtey: Surrey v Hampshire. Worcester 
Worcestershire v WanwckshWB. 

BAM DAWES TROPHY: Sussex v Kent 
(Hassngs). 

OTHER SPORT 
TENNIS: LTA tournament (Faddngton). 


RIFLE SHOOTING 

Drew on target 
in Barbados 

Paul Drew of High Wycombe 
added another major trophy to 
the Great Britain rifle team's 
haul during the Caribbean tour 
when he won the grand ag- 
gregate at the West Indies 
international meeting in Bar- 
bados (A Special Correspondent 
writesXHe took the lead after 
the second day and looked a 
certain winner until he dropped 
to the low score of 67 in the final 
1,000 yards shoot. 

Graham Jackman of 
Tadworth. Surrey, team captain, 
almost toppled him by winning 
the final shoot for the Governor 
General's Cup with 72 out of 75 
but was still one short in the 
aggregate. 


ATHLETICS 
QlftMMMMidk Marc 116* 

1. G Foster, 132TMC. Mscbk 1. 1 
^ B7.lflm. Junte 1, T PmanoB. 
77j55n. Womorc 109a hates: 1. f 'Page 
13.12MC. 100m: 1. VBrioco-Hugfcs ML9Snc. 
Lraa Jtete 1.Jln«s(Guy).ei70m.- 


BASKETBALL 


FOR THE RECORD 


CYCLING 


ICE HOCKEY 


REAL TENNIS 



SSerjJ £ ynas 

Kornore), 1W SnSnSlsoc: 3, J Dtewal (Cty 
ot Hb 4L ihr SmteaOooc. W ow tefe isasrl. C 
H*rK/y (Baton) 1 hr 17pta_1teoc: Z 3 

iB/jim ihrl&steStsscft 

Ctymptes), ils Wan 


, TlJsec. 


UMTIHI STATES: Matonte X oon c teon P0TEN2A: To urttf ^ .Saturtmfa jamm 
MBAk namfl: Esaom Coteram flte (teten naooa i tea ty 1. R yb ytora. & Stt03: 

2. G Sarenra. tlaoc bteond 3. M WBscn JAuo): 
4. J Van Poppa! (Noth). S. P RQS 0 to 6 .SBMr 
(CanL 7.F Gate! (Fr);8. S Coage: 9. J Worm 
iDenfc 10. E fedassn (Nor): ll. J Van Dor 
12. GLamondJUSL M>te sane 
UMBsSsrannL 

OSAKA Uopaft Hu's liaa uowwrwd 
race l.RMrottQ.2hr2BmtaS&87wc2W 

Swra lira. 22K6J37: 3. U Saw .uapL 
ateiMR^ M ktoaoM new 1. V LstoBUB 


Boston Cotes til. Mfa rcu - 

107 mote" ted sate 3JL „ 

EUROPEAN CHALLENGE BOUND: Qrrcp A 
(in AnMom): Bamarua 85, FnfcM 7& Hofate 
TO, SuIgwioSS; AiateSBstyan ep.Qmop 
B{in Uegol Hungary 87. Turtcw 73; lusol 86. 
tewdanm MW SB. Ptendfm. 


BtLUARDS 


DBA MI IA L L: E nro l l 




K Stol ty (Gres Ityrtey) bt M Pug* 
(Mdtestrougn)3-1. Onoo scans: 163-SOa 
306226. W219. 306-161, 


iFn. thr23rnln4&ias«a 
DOWOWt 


LOflNQSTOM SWAAA ■ 

otei^tOOnrJ Weflsao] 

ssok f Hndroa vs s «■ 

400rc LJracdORM (MeTMai 
■Da: K Hactoson |LnMM Sm7.7mt 
19 B 0 R H Robatcoo « min 61.1 

saoate. 3909a: S McLaren (AMrdsen). 
lOte Z73B SC. tOOxi toite *: C Rte 

— E 

issm. Shot pwt m 
■ 14.15m. Oaam K 
| JtvoAn: S LMyutet 


BOXING 




. : Wanafe w a Bo n ol d atesty 

(RmnonCQ: 10 etes toatriafc 1. M Blower 
(CharTMODO CW5L 24n*i OQwc Z L 
Br a momi (Rswsttorpa CQ. 2424; 3, L 
Jones (Cmomood) anO 0 Burton Bradford 
Wh). S426. ten CHammt (M Srawr. L 
Joo«.Jftelnt8n.1=1 W > >te o r 6Sary(VC 

iSjmsas OS nna* 1. 1 Cammisii 
(Ma tegar WM. 55mm ttseo. Team: M- 

3Swy» Vit WsttaHH mass maa _na 


NORTH AMERICA: toaonor Lraaa (NHL): 
Sanlav Cup finals: Canary Fionas 5. 
Uomreai Canarians 2 (Fimas load ees-cf ■ 
seven uues i-ty 


MOTOR-CYCLING 

aOMZAiWoildiliaiMUiioloia COOtctlaii 

1. E Lawson 0®. Y Amato. 46mm 2936sec 

2. R MgmOta II^l Yamaha. 56nc Wt 1 
M Btewn (ua. Yarnaia. 76MC: e. c Sarron 
(Frl V a maru. lOsec 5, D De RadBuesffleO. 
Honta. Osscr 6. 6 van Dubtan fNeth), 
Hondo, rain 433S8C 7. P CM (RL State. 
1533: 3 F Skotli (ty. Hate I bp bahmL 8. 

P Lews (GB), Sate If ~ 

Honda. 1to.f 


SEACCtmr (Haying Isbn&Oaor&Wlover 

aa>M4a(L 

(mUBM uin teWM I IlflI I MOiin i t y - I 

finals: C Ron eteon (Haniwon tfcurt tx A 
Dawes IMoraoxiMorraB). 66.6-1 . M: F W«s 
(Mancnenen m P Brene (Saacourft 6ft w. 
6-5: C Unity hjnanacfted) taat N Srrath 
(Ouaens). WH.W.I. DeuenarO^npm 
Coal) a M Gooden Unattached- 64L M. 6- 
5. So mUteo b: Rorakteto M Ml*. 14. fft 
6-2. 6-3: Oeuchv « Lumle*. 61. *-i- 65. 
Fhab Ronaldson a DmcW. 6ft 6-1. 4-6. 6- 

6ft Brake tn Smdh. Eft 63. Hate: Way W 
Brake. 65. 6-2. 


Kcx)btRI 


I(bvsr9l fc* 

jm a qnCT(t ^recaTa 

ikxteiE^ Xi-Yong (5 
tflBLWS. 


1. P Rspnr .. 

51 MG Z D Wester 
GowaH Me ntoa st ar 


(Omwamn BCL ! 
wnnr (Mancri w wr 
osar Wt) 


3iv 5Mn 
OT); 3, M 


SWIMMING 


BASEBALL 


GOLF 


U WTHl STATES: II ni nnel Uagw: Los 
Angelas Dodgem & New Vote ate z 
fttMM A8RW5. CMcagBQte l:San Otago 
Puke* 5. Momtte Expos 3; San Fmnraco 
GUMS- 12. Ptoadttphh PStes 7: Atona 
Btseee Z St lute Caiteala Of Pteourfrt 
Pinas 4. CtaMH Rada ft Aai te leij 
Loegte Beaon ReeSoKS. Tern Ruiram 2: 
EMM Ttaas m -Generate Aageb 4; N*w 
York YinSae' tl. Seaalo Mamrs 0; 6ate- 
.mra Orioles A OaMnfi MMn 2 Tomrao 
Sue Jw* K. cawteti MUrnS: Chraao 
was to 7. Kansas Cty J*)g* 6 (7k 
Ml o aonie D wwara 4. MkowseaiWus 1. 


CHATWUl (Hew Jem** LPGA toteYi 
classic teunararati Sac and nara jus 
utese saMp 13*_B Kxig. BT.J2. Mtt D 

asueiHUBtiMAW 

Walton. 73. 71: A Okameto. 71 71; J 
Dtenson. 7X 71: K PosOenal 71. 73. 
PORTUCAWL- Writer vnoafe c fom pio n 
«arcScfl6 4lnteMm VTb w Tte( P W wa i^te 
Urn S Ttamra (Ra iw yr» 3 ate 2 Mas L 
tehotteod (Royal PnWaW)« tot PQ HB9 
sat Tixxnts ot 






eswip 1 - 




VASTStAfllSradon): htemotiiaetie 
Mas 2 tea bsdaaofax 1. H FreOn 
2rrm OOJTsac. Women: SOOen Irww j ty te 1. 
van Der Meer (m) 4:1754. SflOa ao tey. 
1.MMra|Nah).2tft.19 
mpHTE CARLO: M o n a c o I n te rn Hl a ml tow- 
day mao to o- Hare 100a treeiralo: 1, S 
Caron |Frj. 5V3SseC. 200a Drtttrty: 1, M 
Gross pm 2ftt.SL 600n taaayte: I, B 
D w dentfB (FT), 626.08 20fla braeststaeke 
l.SLooezgpL224W. l6 0 m bac fcWH*rc i. 
F HdMBWJwq, 5831. 200a tedMdua 
wte tSoy : 1. J fetor Bamdt. 20539. waae ts 
IQOm toeosuagfcei 1. P Vaatavsran (ttexh). 
1.12S& ante Caaatyte: 1. f ZSriwpe (Wffl. 
£0458. 100m b o aar ty; 1. J Anana (Math), 
16356. 200a to ettit ml a- 1, J Da Ronr 
omt 2:17-36- aotta ft aaute 1. A 
fe na ppi plod4 4.16.44. 


. Ms 10L M Pep* (W. 
staidim afar aoeend nea 1. 
Lavsen.27pts.ZM3mctaandBalBMn.2a:*. 
W Gardner (Aits). 15, 5. Sarron. 14: fi. De 
~ ' es. S. 2S0cc ctesc 1. A Mena MG). 

- SSraln 35.75S0C 2. G Laoedo (Vsi), 
Yamaha. 35J6B9: 3. J Bride (Bel). Honda. 
35A644; 4. M Wbnw (WfoVtenata. 
35:47.13. 5. S fensJSpt Hond».^47JT: G. J 
Cornu (Switz), Hate 355S4& Ovrasfi 
■ ten t toy afar *m tacos: 1 . Mang ana 
Laaoo. 27ptK X Pons end Whwrwr. 16 . 5. 
Bride. 13: 6. Como. 11. tSEcs eteos: 1. F 
GresWfty. GareA.Sftnm 51 .45 see 2 . ANMo 
(SpL Ducedot. 10-5S$ec bsnte 3, A Aircqer 

-.umsoKALCadatora 

E P Bbncta. (fiL Seri- 

09 43eac & G G mam l*L MBA. 1:1215; 9. 
J wewtmem (Ffe 11 x 111111 . 1:1824; 10 . w 
Pw» (Ans). Beei-Ba 1:13.44. Quote tand- 


ROWING 


ESSEN: tumaaenal 
i. P KCtte (WG). 7-2353: IV 

727* 3. V Rebar (BA 72624. 

:l.NChuprinB»xJT5rito«ch 


{USSR). 6M1J». Z P UtzekandJ G»w* 
658.471 3. B Pews aid M Enke (Nath). 
652.70. Cadeao rate 1. T Orenor and OW 
Foerster <EGL 65364: 2. C Toma and C 
Toader (Rom). 7.DL40: 3. H Bauer and K 
granger (Austt. 71 336. Coxed pate 1. 
(tanama. 731 37: 2. West Germany. 737.06. 
Coders hn 1. CzedwsteteB L 61620: 
2. West Germany. 6 154ft 1 C 2 «s»slowk» 
n 635 4a Coxed tana: 1 . Ean Getmaiy. 
&2S.IS. I Son « Item 62&S7: Z PottM 
631 34. 


RUGBY UNION 


etys after tan raeav l Gracmi Slots: 2. 
Cadnom. 16 1 Nntoana D Bnnpa (ta 1£ 
6 E Gate 00 . Aumger and BarSii, 10; 6 
Waksnem, 6, 3. Peret, 6 10. nemntro. 5. 
•dec doom 1. S Oorftoeer fSuAL Krausar. 
28mm 56S8MC 2, G Maruiaz (Spl Derty, 
0J7sec MHnd: 3. M Herrera tSrt, Demy. 
27tees *. G Wribei fffO. Real. 27!fcec; 6 P 
BanchL SeeL 46 S o> ci T. T Towner AtetM. 
Cssaf. 465; 7. M foam (Nate), Caste. <76 8, 
G Kafka (Aust). Ktausar. iron ozi&ac. 
Oxarair staafiac* after tan races: 1. 84ar> 
nez.27pts. 2. Hwreros. 2ft S. Dorteoer. 17. 
4. BtenenL 14: 6 Mara and WafceL tz 


Otaretut Tour motete South Africa 16 New 

Zeasna Cewahors IB. 


S*EE0WAY 




■ELLeVUEff tead ra ritela te Bn fod ri fMD- 

o»d a* huoe En^and *5. Derana tkB. 
ituav CUP: Kmgs Lynn 3B, B iteHutd 38. 

N^Ml SSS Barack 36 Edtntxxgh 

rrawsMssmas 

(Stokai. 13 




MOTOR CYCUNG 

Top three 
places for 
US riders 

Friom Michael Scott, Monza 

la the absence of foe world 
champion, Freddie Spencer, the 
Californian Eddie Lawson 
headed an American Yamaha 1- 
2-3 at yesterday's Italian Grand 
Prix here. But British team 
competitors were variously out 
of luck in an exciting race of 
changing fortunes. 

Rob McElnea, challenging for 
third, crashed unhurt on the last 
lap. Ron H aste m . holding an 
apparently secure seventh on 
the French Elf Honda, ran out of 
petrol almost within sight of the 
finish line; The UK-based 
Australian, Wayne Gardner, 
winner of the opening Spanish 
Grand Prix, lost a lap in the pits 
after a start-line collision and 
hurt his leg and damaged his 
works Honda's gar lever. He 
rejoined the race to finish 
sixteenth. 

Only the Australian, Paul 
Lewis, on the British-designed 
Heron Suzuki, benefited from 
the misfortune ahead of him, 
finishing ninth 10 take his first 
championship points of the 
season. 

Lawson led foe race from the 
start in hot, dry conditions, and 
fended off a challenge from the 
second placed Randy Mamota, 
also from California. In the 
meantime, the Connecticut 
rider. Mike Baldwin, had 
charged through from a poor 
start and (once McElnea had 
crashed out) he emerged the 
victor of a fierce battle with the 
Frenchman. Christian Sarron, 
also on a Yamaha. 

The result put 1984 cham- 
pion, Lawson, into the 
championship lead, with 27 
points. Baldwin and Mamota 
are equal second, on 20 points. 
Gardner, pushed down to 
fourth, was bitterly dis- 
appointed. “My Honda did not 
Fire up on the first push. The 
next thing I knew, somebody 
had almost knocked me flying. I 
rejoined the race on the off- 
chance of collecting a few 
points, but it was impossible.'’ 

RESULTS: 1, E Lawson (US, Yamaha). 
46mm 2935WC (W.IOijtafit 2. R 
Mamota (US. YamstoO. 463S&; 3, M 



MADE IN 
AMERICA 

Peter Ueberroth 


Time magazine’s Man of 
the Year explains the 

political battie behind 
the scenes of the 1984 
Los Angeles Olympics 
which, under his brilliant 
entrepreneurial 
stewardship, has 
changedthefeceof 
international sport 
A compulsive read. 
19th May £14.95 


HE KiNGSWOOD PRESS 


-• •'ts 


A 


Ll 


) 


i 

1 

■ 

I 


a 

( 




SPORT 


THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


ATHLETICS 


GOLF: BRITON TAKES LEAD IN EUROPEAN ORDER 


OF MERIT AFTER SECOND SPANISH VICTORY IN THREE WEEKS 


Why Thompson 
needs close 
competition to 
really excel 

From Fat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent 
Arles, France 

The greatest competitive points re-evaluation on last 


machine in world athletics 
experienced a wobble this 
weekend, and* Daley 
Thompson's hopes for a per- 
sonal best decathlon and new 
world record ended as tattered 
as the Roman r uins in the 
Provencal town of Arles. 

Despite the gorgeous weath- 
er conditions, with tempera- 
tures in the mid-20s 
Centigrade all weekend (al- 
though a freak head wind in 
the 100 metres on Saturday 
cost him a decent time), 
Thompson could only manage 
one decathlon personal best, 
47.62 metres in the discus 
yesterday and ended up 180 
points outside a world record, 
but such is bis superiority at 
the event that he still managed 
to record 8,667 points, the 
third best ever. 

Thompson's immediate re- 
action after a no-more-than- 
reasonable 1,500m in 4min 
30.04sec was; “1 enjoyed the 
weekend thoroughly, and I'm 
not at all disappointed. I am a 
little ring-rusty, but I'm look- 
ing forward to a great 
summer," he added, referring 
to his forthcoming defence of 
his Commonwealth and Euro- 
pean tides. 

His performance this week- 
end is certainly only a tempo- 
rary decline rather than the 
start of die fall of Thompson's 
fortunes, and can be explained 
by the 21 -month gap since his 
last decathlon, his second 


year meant that this would 
still be a lower score than for 
his five metres vault in Los 
Angeles. 

Sitting on the infield after 
two failures. Thompson 
looked like a Sunday tourist 
sunning himself on the banks 
of the nearby Rhdne. Yet the 
scenario recalled similar dra- 
matic moments in the Europe- 
an Championships in Athens 
in 1982, and at the Olympic 
Games two years ago, when a 
third poor throw in the discuss 
would have in Hingsen. On 
both of those occasions, 
Thompson came good and 
consigned Hingsen to the 
silver medal, with the Briton 
going on to the world record in 
the former case and finishing 
one point behind it in the 
latter. 

With the lack of any similar 
competition here, it looked as i 
if Thompson had set himself a '■ 
bard target for he came in at 

4.90 metres, his highest ever 
opener in the pole vault. He 
then passed up five metres, 
and passed under the bar on 
his third attempt at 5.10 
metres. 

In contrast, in the parallel 
women's match, Kim Hagger 
was a success story all the way. 
She had four heptathlon per- 
sonal bests over the two days, 
despite the recurrence of a foot 
injury as soon as she had 
cleared her all-time best of 

1.90 metres in the high jump 


Victory for 
Clark 
with eagle 
at 18th 

Howard Clark bdeda 30 feet 
chip shot for an eagle three at 
the 18th to win the Peugeot 
Spanish Open on the La 
Morealja course in Madrid 
yesterday. 

It gave Clark a final round of 
67 and a winning score of 272 
for a one-stroke victory from the 
Australian, Tan Baker-Finch 
(68). Severiano Ballesteros fin- 
ished third following a 68 fin- 
276, which was two strokes 
ahead of Robert Lee (71). 

Clark, who won the Cepsa 
Madrid Open in the Spanish 
capital three weeks ago, earned 
£25.000 fin- his win. 

LEAONG FINAL SCORES {British unless 
sand): 272; H Clark. SB, 71, 66. 07. 273; I 
Bafcw-Rncft (Alls). SB. 68. 6ft 68. 276t S 
BaOsstsrttS M?4, 66. 68. 68. 27* H 
Lae, 72, 70. 65. 71. 2Stt R Drummond. 68, 
72. 72. 68: M PfnerqJSp). 73, 69. 70. 68. 
281: J Rhrero (EW. 72. 68. 67. 74. 282: 1 
Mosey 74. 7U.68. 70: R Deris (Amt 75. 
71. 72, 64. 283: PPwttn, 72, 70,71.70; M 
McNutty (SA). 73. 71. 6ft 71. 284: J Mudd 
(usaTra. ea. 73, ss. 28& j m otaratai 


■ •• tv 

> O „ 




(US), 73. 68, 7ft 69. 266; J M Olazabal 
(Spf.es. 71. 72, 73; M MW**) (Sal, SB. 
7471, 72; V Fernandez (Arm. 74,lff .76, 
67. 286: A Farsftrand (Swel 74, 68. 76. 68: 
G Turner 
7 7.68. 

Gamdo 

(Aus), 74, 74, 67. 71. Otter acorea (Britt* 
unless stata# 290: M Motfand. 73. 70, 
71. 76; G Brand Jrr. 73. 72 .74. 71 :P Way. 
72. 76. 72, 70; J OlaaryOreL 71. 75, 77, 
67. 291: 1 Yotrn, 71, 72. 68, 78; M James, 
76. 70 ,73. 72; L Jones, 71. 71, 78. 73c R 
Basal. 75. 73. 70. 73. 232: D Smyth (be), 
73. 71. 75, 73; I Woosiwn. 76. 7ft 74. 72. 
283: OFaharly, 71. 75,78.69:0 Llewelyn, 
75. 73. 74. 71; P Hoad. 73, 74, 74. 72; J 
Morgan, 76 .71. 72, 74. 



- M. — — a-ktl— ; 

from the rough to the smooth: Richard Kaplan on his way to winning the Bnbazoa Trophy at Smmingd&le yesterday 


CRICKET: TOURISTS STAGE A RECOVERY AFTER GAVASKAR FALLS TO A DUTCHMAN 

Kapil century lifts Jones is Hardie, Coot 
the gloom for Lidia see Essex hon 

By Richard Streeton iHC P^CK By a Special Correspondent 


Hardie, Gooch 
see Essex home 


By Richard Streeton 


SOUTHAMPTON: Hampshire, 
with nine first innings wickets in 


a high catch to the same place. 
Bakker. who is aged 28, and 


hand, are 168 runs behind the known as "PJ", bowls medium 


Indians. pace, after 14 running strides. 

An attractive 115 not out by with an economical action. 
Kapil Dev, who for two hours Fairhaired and strongly-built. 


pace, after 14 nmnir 


Olympic title, in Los Angeles, on Saturday. Despite swelling 
and the lack of a close of her right ankle, she went on 
competitor of the order of to come within one centimetre 
Jurgen Hingsen, the West of her all-time long jump best. 
German holder of the world and ended yesterday spectacu- 
record, until it was put into lariy with 2min 17.72secin the 
.cold storage by last year's re- 800 metres to give her a final 
scoring of the decathlon score of 6.259 points, by for a 


personal best, and only 88 
points off the British record of 


tables. personal best. 

Little went well for him all points off the Bi 
weekend, and after a series of Judy Simpson. 
sub-Thompson performances, 
his last chance of salvaging THOMPSON’S SCORES: lOOnr 
any possibility of a world i0£&ec (96ipte). Long Jump: 
record came on his third iJraJJtsL* 10 s^ 8, isjaC 1 & (8ra! 
attempt at 5.10 metres in the 2,787?* hka 
pole vault That would have 3,572). 4oonc (47.52sec 1933, 
equalled his best performance 

m the decathlon and be just 10 gg^ 5 '^ “53? JBT fi 
centimetres below his all-time 7,138). JaveSn: 6&28m (787, 7,923). 
best On the distaff ri d ft . the l^OOin: 4mm 30.04sec (744, 8 .6671 


mixed aggression and languid 
grace, was responsible for the 
Indians redeeming a poor start 
yesterday. Both teams provided 
entertaining cricket in bright 
conditions and helped to com- 
pensate for Saturday's play be- 
ing lost to rain. 

The Indians declared at tea- 
time and Hampshire lost 
Gree nidge before the close. 
Greenidge took 24 from one 
over by Binny, with two sixes 
and three fours, all on the leg 
side, before he was out. Robin 
Smith survived a stumping 
chance off Yadav and stayed 
with Terry, who reached a 
polished half-century before the 
end. 


Bakker is on a year’s contract 
after being spotted by David 
Turner in Cape Town dub’ 
cricket. Among county employ- 
ees he is probably unique in that 
he has worked as a professional 
ski instructor and be also holds a 
pilot's licence. He is, I think, 
only the fifth continental to play 
for an English first class side and 
the third batsman. 

After Gavaskar’s exit the 
Indians lost Laraba soon after- 
wards when Robin Smith hit the 
stumps with a direct throw from 
cover. Azharuddin was caught 
behind, forcing on the back foot; 
Amarnath charged Cowley fa- 
tally and Paul was leg before 
sweeping. Binny, at 16, survived 
a hard chance to wide mid on 
but settled down to give Kapil 


Injury forces Cram 
out during 5,000m 


Steve Cram made an unhappy 
stan to his track season yes- 
terday, foiling to finish in the 
5,000 metres in the Dairy Crest 
north eastern counties 
championship at Gateshead. 
The world champion at 1,500 
metres went through that dis- 
tance in 4min lOsec and was 
pulling away from the rest of the 
field on the fifth lapwhen he 
dropped out 

Cram, who suffered an injury 
to his left calf said “It's 
obviously a setback. Any injury 
would be at this stage of the 
season. It’s particularly annoy- 
ing because 1 have bad a trouble- 
free winter. The calf didn't fed 
too good before the race and it 
became worse during the fifth 
lap. I dropped out more as a 
precaution than anything else. 
All I can do now is have rest and 
treatment.” 

The race was won by the 
Gateshead runner, Gareth 
Nagel, in 14min 24.9sec. 


Another British record holder 
to suffer an injury yesterday was 
Derek Redmond, who cracked 
David Jenkins’s len-year-oki 
British 400 metres mark last 
season. The Birchfidd Harrier, 
aged 20, tore a hamstring during 
the Northamptonshire 
championships at Corby. Red- 
mond was running in a 200 
metres race as pan of bis 
preparations for the Common- 
wealth Games and European 
championships this summer. 

Shirley Strong, the Olympic 
silver medal winner and 
Commonwealth champion, won 
the Cheshire 100 metres hurdles 
tide in 14.3sec but confessed to 
being concerned at her time-She 
has only two races left before 
Commonwealth selection takes 
place and admitted: “I am 
obviously a little worried at not 
getting a fast time. I would like 
some more races and hope next 
week's UK championships have 
qualifying rounds and are not 
run as a straight final." 


Kapil's hundred was the first a hard chance to wide mid on 
of the tour for the Indians, who but settled down to give Kapil 
have already lost a third of their good support until he was 
programme to rain. They badly caught behind, 
need sunshine to erase some mdia 

rustiness before the repre- s M Gavaskar c Maru bBakk8r.„___ 6 

sentative fixtures get underway. MSl^fbC^ 46 

The leading lights among MAzharoddmc Parks ft An*aw 22 

their batsmen had already been SMf^Rjwb Cowley 27 

b efore Kapil and ■— <» 

Binny rectified a shaky situation m Praunakar not out 6 

by adding 1 58 in 30 overs for the Extras(b3, to 3. nb 3) _ 9 

sixth wicket. Kapil finished with Total (6 whs dec) 297 

four sixes and 12 fours and 
never looked in trouble, with wwcSrai .7 
delicate cuts and glances, inter- wia 1 7 ‘ M0, ^ 

sperwdwrthdaKJC driving. BOWLIN CL*idrew1 7-3531 ;BaMur 13 

Three of Kapils sixes came 10 MM: Tremtet 15-4-48-1: Mam 17 - 1 - 51 - 
one over by Cowley, the off- 14-357-2. 

spraner. Kapil also took 18 off CG 33 

an over from Paul Jan Bakker, a VPT^ynrtout 54 

Dutchman, who created a stir BASmrni notout 36 

earlier by claiming Gavaskar’s Extraspii, wi, nt»4) s 

wicket with his third ball in first l?® 1 jfffi — 

class cricket Gavaskar hit rJLt t’mtywbiml^ 'r^jmSEJ' +r Q i 
B akker's second ball past cover parts?j w Andrew. P J Bekkw to bat 
uppishly for four and then skied fall of wicket 1 - 57 . 


BOWUNG: Andrew 17-3-50-1; Bakker 16- 
SHJ5-1: Tremlett 15-4-46-1: Mare 17-1-51- 
0; Cowley 14-3-57-2. 

KAMPSHnE 

C G Greertdge tow b Prabhakar 33 

VP Terry not out - — ___ 54 

R A Snath notout 36 

Extras(to 1, w 1, nb4) 6 

Total (IwM) 129 

C L Smith. VC J Nicholas, N G 
Cowley. T M Trtmten. R J Mare, fR J 
Parts. J w Andrew. P J Bakker to bat 
FALL OF WICKET: 1-57. 

Umpires: □ J Constant and K E Palmar. 


By Peter Ball 

TRENT BRIDGE: Sussex (4pts) 
beat Nottinghamshire by one 
wicket. 

Sussex's uncapped seam 
bowler Adrian Jones had a quite 
remarkable day yesterday. 
Brought on almost as an after- 
thought as the sixth bowler, he 
produced one of the John Player 
League's more notable perfor- 
mances - taking seven for 41 in 
seven overs and then bringing 
Sussex their win off the last ball 
with five runs, his scrambled 
single producing four 
overthrows. Jones, an open- 
ing bowler by trade, was held 
back until the 28 tb over. 

After one quiet over to find 
his range, Jones's introduction 
was dramatic as he took seven 
wickets in his next six overs. 
Rice, heaving across the line, hit 
one six before being bowled 
attempting to repeat the stroke. 
In his next over both Robinson 
and Johnson skied to mid-off 
and the rest followed in their 
turn, each trying desperately, 
but foiling, to -prevent the sound 
start being wasted. 

Seven wickets had fallen for 
55 runs* bat the good start had 
seen Notts to 198. Sussex began 
as if conscious of that lesson. 
Green and Parker getting the 
innings under way with equal 
steadiness to put on 57 in 16 
overs before Parker needlessly 
chased a wide one. 

The efforts to build on that 
foundation were quickly un- 
hinged by the Notts change 
bowlers, however. Pick re- 
moved Green and Imran in his 
third over and Afford ended his 
tight spdl by claiming the 
younger of the wells brothers to 
leave Sussex behind the dock 
without the security of a wealth 
of batting to come. 


By a Special Correspondent 

SH7NDON: Essex (4 pts) beat (16 not out 


SWINDON: Essex (4 pis) beat 
Gloucestershire fO) py nine 
wickets. 

Brian Hardie swept Essex, the 
champions, to a John Player 
Special League victory over 
Gloucestershire at Swindon yes- 
terday with a hard-hitting un- 
beaten 71 which included four 
sixes and five fours. 

The match was restricted to 
25 overs-a-side and Essex, chas- 
ing a Gloucestershire total of 
126 for seven, always looked 
comfortable once Hardie and 
Gooch (43) had shared in an 
opening partnership of 80 in 17 
overs. 

Eventually, Essex won by 
nine wickets with eight f«n« to 
spare.' 

Earlier, Gloucestershire strug- 
gled against accurate bowling by 
Acfield, who conceded only 18 
runs in his five overs and 
claimed the important wicket of 
Athey. 

Romanies made 33, but his 
run-out led to a collapse from 61 
for one to 68 for four. Only 
Bai abridge (37) arid Lawrence 


(16 not out) offered much 
resistance after thaL 


. ii» GtoucEaieftartRE iron to eight feet from where he 

m holed artwx Hamer, bow- 

P Bainbndge c Lavor b Fostv 37 ever, lost ms chance when he 

KMCurranc Gooch bTrtner 0 took three putts at each of the 


S African 
leads ail 
the way to 
the title 

By MkcheS Platte-'' 

- Richard Kaplan, o f- So uth 
Africa, completed a. ssrt-to- 
finish win in the - English 
surikepfoy championship for the 
Brabazon Trophy when be pm 
together a final round of 72 on 
the New.Course at Smmingdale 
yesterday. It gave Kapfona 
winning aggregate of 286, which 
is six over par. and a. four-shot 
win from Stephen Hamer. 

Kaplan, who became the first 
overseas winner since his 
compatriot, Neville Sundehon* 
won in 1974. said: Tm here fix- 
five weeks and I*m looking 
forward to playing in the ama- 
teur champions tup. I will see 
how things go this year but of 
course I am . thinking about 
becoming a professionals some 
time. You. have to dream about 
walking down the last bole at & 
Andrews or Augusta.” 

Kaplan, aged 24b who is 
making his second visit to this 
country, began a blustery day 
with a otn>-«rofce lead from the 
Welsh international. Mark 
Macara. But Macara, who has 
been, banned fix 6 k year foam : 
domestic events, ' following 
misdemeanours on a recent 
training week in Spain, feu back 
in the morning with a 76. 

Kaplan advanced his daubs 
with a solid 73. Even so he took 
lunch win pursing only a feme- 
stroke lead as Sieve; Hamer hoi 
moved out of fbe pack with the 
assistance of two birdies in an 
.excellent round of 69. Kaplan 
made a tentative, dart in jhe 
fourth arid final round when he 
took three tot get down from the 
side of the short second, then 
marked a six ori his .card 
following a wayward drive rathe 
fourth. But a solid ice shot to the 
green at the short fifth seemed to 
settle him down. -. 

Hamer maintained his chal- 
lenge in qnte of taking sx at the 
ninth. He recovered well at tbe< 
short 1 0th where be hit a one- 
iron to eight feet from where he 
holed for a two. Hamer, how-. 


i ■ 

: ,: 4 » •.' 




» ' . - t 


J WLtoydsrun out. -—-- — ; — _ 1 ]4tii and 15tfa holes. 

.The prospect^ of Pew 

D V Lawrence not out.- 16 McEvoy, the former a nyrt ei n 

Extrasjb2.ibS.nb2) 9 champion, winning evaporated 

.. Total (7 adds, 26 OVWS) 126 whftn hff Innk fi ght at thi» Jajglrttt 

^CR^CAWateLGESatomwy during a 74 in the moraingfHe 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-32, SMI, WB. 4- fe« cr ihan.blS SCOre of 

68. 5-96, 647. 7-126. - 71 would suggest. m the after- 


Extrasjb2.lbS.nb2) 

Total (TMfcts, 26 oms) 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-32, SMI, MS, 4- oamr man. no score oi 

68. 5-96, 6-87, 7-126. - 71 would suggest. m the aftcr- 

BOWUNG: Um 5-1-ao-i: Foster 54M9- noon but he had Httle fortune on 


2 w the greens. 


Prtngla 5-0-23-1. r 

ESSEX 

•G A Gooch st Ruasafl b Ltoyds 

BRHantenotoiJt 

A n Border nor out . ; 


LEAOMGFUiAL SCORES: 28ft R 
68, 72, 73. 72. 290: S Homer 

72. 74. 6ft 75. i-,. « 
73. 72. 72. 74: 282; P 
L74. 73.74, 71. 283: 

Extras (lb 2. w 2 ) ITS M4taaaa(MaB«Jul7ft7Z7ft75.284cS 

Total (i^^ow^zrriao -X 

PrtMlftP J ftWwd, A W Uloy, S 

.OF WICKETS: 1-80. . ' TO A (SaaoirCwBwL 71. 74. 


I gjg 


sS 

£ vr - ‘ 
■lia* .* 




DR Prlrw^Pj PnchanJ, A W LBoy, S 
Tumar, /D e E ast N A Foaar. J KlSror, 
DLAdUddidnottiBL . 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-80. . 

UmpXHS: D Uoyd and R Palmar. 




Potter’s 63 earns win 

By Peter Marsou 

A fine innings by Laurie Potter, tuning to round up Tavate, 
who made 63 not out, took .Hinks and.- -Christopher 


Leicestershire to a resounding 
victory by nine wickets at Grace 


Cowdrey, Kent’s, batting, save 
fora fine innings by the younger 


Road, yesterday. Set to make Cowdrey, Graham, who made 
142 to win, Leicestershire lost 45. began to fen away, and as 


Kent in quarter-finals 


Kent and their former player 

Paul Downton had something to when he had Butcher caught by 
celebrate as widrapread rain put Ellison. Kent made only 12 be- 
a dampens on Saumday's final fore bad light forced the game 


for Kent was taken by Jarvis 


reries of Benson and Hedges into a resumption today. ” 
Cup zone games. _ Nottinghamshire reached 171 

Canterbury and Liverpool, for five from 44 oven in another 
whne Lancashire played Not- weather-hit game, with Rice (71) 
Dnginimslufe, were the only and Robinson, also putting 
grounds where play was possible West Indies failures behind him 
and for Kent supporters the day with 58. sharing a 1 1 5 stand for 
was worthwhile as their team ihe second wickeL ABott took 
made sure of a quarter-final three of The wickets for 23. 


POLO 


Withers shoulders the 
Cowdray scorer’s role 


The final of the Texaco 
trophy, which was played off 
over five chukkas in sunny, gale- 
force wind conditions on the 
Ambersham No 1 ground at 
Midhurst. Sussex, yesterday, re- 
sulted in a 7lfe-3 victory for the 
home leam, Cowdray Park, 
against Tramontana. 

Cowdray, nicely pivoted on 
Raul Withers, displayed the 
vigilant backing-up, marking 
and positional play which bas 
been their hallmark throughout 
the tournamenL Before half- 
time, Withers pul on three goals 
— two from the open ana one 
from a 60-yard penalty — to 
increase their handicap advan- 
tage and to give them the 
decisive lead which they never 
losL 

In contrast. Tramontana 
failed to find a similar linchpin 
in the talent of their six-goal 
Mexican No 3. Jesus Baez. 


By John Watson 

Texaco Next onto ihc Ambersham 
ycd off ground were the last quaner- 
ny.gale- finalists for the Cicero Cup. 
on the Rotherhill, who are put together 
iund at by the Colombian banker Carlos 
day. re- Mejia, and Richard Guess's 
for the team, the Greyhounds. 
r Park, Rotherhill — with an aggregate 
13 handicap goals against 
«ed on Ground's IS - began the 
duel one and a half up. which 
narking fo^^sed io four and a half 
icb has ^ tr eading-m time, with only 
Miehout lwo on scoreboard for 
e half- Greyhounds. Based on the cen- 
ee coals 031 slren sV 1 ° r tbe brothers 
“/Sk James and William Lucas, 
v _ to Rotherhill s was a belter bal- 
advan- anced quartet than their 
•m the °PP™ en “’- who were playing 
. never together for the first tune tins , 
' season. The final tally was 6V>3 

to Rotherhill. 

ontana RESULTS: Cowdrsy Pwte 1 , T WafterfOt 
inchpin ftCPMrOTiafcftPWJtn^miBack.B 
ui-nnal 0UB W Tinwnlg— : U Embincos {2L 
ux-goal j, M Brown <4); 3. J Baez (6): Back, a 
2- Seavfl (3)- 


was won h while as their team 
made sure of a quarter-final 
place. 

They did so by taking a fifth 
Middlesex wicket to ensure 
their final striking rate, with 
balls bowled divided by wickets 
taken, would be good enough to 
get them through. 


Saturday’s scores 

Comfy championship 
NORTHAMPTON: Northamptonshire v Es- 
sex, no pfay. 

Benson and Hedges Cup 
SWANSEA: Glamoigan « Oaucestw- 


Middlesex, already there Surra^Sr- umaw» kb a 
ihemsejveftMil! mustered 258 S ^®12 
for eighl from their 55 overs, LIVERPOOL^ Nottinghanmiiro 171 for 4 
with Downton, showing the 


with Downton, showing the ^ 

form that deserted him in the v ComWnad Untvw * 

West Indies, making an un- hove- Sussex V SomwsaL no p( 
beaten 53. Earlier Gatling (62) ^ DQB A 3TQN: Wawtckshira v 
led a Middlesex recovery after Vortstm v w< 

two wickets had gone for 29, 

while Radley hit 48. leicestS LafeutersHre v 

The all-important fifth wicket Courtws ’ 00 Pter- 


stm, no play. 

HEADIWiEV: VortsMro v Wrtcsstsr- 
shi re. notfa y. 

LBCESTSt La jc a ateraW re v Minor 
Counties, no play. 


NOTTMGKAMStflRE 

R T Robinson c La Roux b Jones 55 

B C Broad tow b Reeve 46 

CEBRceb Jones 23 

p Johnson c La Roux b donas 10 

D WRandaBc and b Jones 12 

Rj Hadlee b Jonas 2 

J D Btrch c Ptgocb Jonea 4 

BN French 14 

R A Pick b Jones S 

KE Cooper 1 

Extras (to 1ft w ft nb 1) 26 

Total ( 8 wkts, 40 overs) 198 

J A Afford dU not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-88,2-142, 3-151.4- 

165.5-165.6-174.7-181,8-197 

BOWUNG: C M Wells 5-0-21-ft Le Roux 

7-0-20-0; Imran WF24-0; Reeve 00-35-1; 

Jones 7-0-41-7: Plgott 84M1-0 

AM Green bPteX 3G 

p w G Paifeer c French b Cooper — 22 

Imran Khan c French b Pick 15 

CMWtrilscHcebPtck 11 

A P WBOs st French b Afford 2 

I J Gould c Birch bHice 63 

G S le Roux tow b Rice 1 

D A Reeve tow b Rice 8 

J R T Barday not out : — 6 

ACS P^oB run out 0 

A W Jones not out — 17 

Extras ( 10 13, w4. nb 5) 22 

Told ( 9 wkts, 40 Overs) 203 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-57. 2-81, 362, 4- 
6ft 5-113, 6-133. 7-164. 3180. 3181. 
BOWUNte HadMa 84MOO; Cooper 8-3 
25-1: Afford 31-27-1; Pick 33433; Ra» 


Briers, who hit 52 in a stand 
with Potter of 124 for the first 
wicket, before racing home in 
345 overs. 

Gower’s decision to invite 
Lancashire to bat on a good 
pitch instantly paid a handsome 
dividend as four wickets fell for 
39 runs in the opening 16 overs. 
Additional benefits came the 
way ofWfaJtticase. who took two 
catches. Potter and Whitaker, 
who took one each, while 
Leicestershire’s bowling quartet 
of Taylor, Benjamin, Clift and 
pe Freitas took an equal share 
in the wickets. AO of which can 
only have been a shade 
disappointing for Jack Bond, 
Lancashire's cricket manager, 
whose hopes of a good run in the 
competition had centred round 
the ability and experience of 
Lancashire’s captain, Clive 


Fraser took his second wicket, 
that of Baptiste. Daniel arid 
Emburey, with three wickets 
each came to polish off the taD. 1 

Yorkshire had chosen to field 
first at Headingley and here, too, 
the bowlers were on lop with 
Jarvis takrng:fonr for 13, and 
Carrick . two for 36,. as 
Worcestershire lost nine wickets 
in making 163. Hick, who made 
45 was Worcestershire’s most 
successful batsman, while the 
wicketkeeper, Rhodes, contrib- 
uted a valuable 30. 

At Leek, which is sitiiated 
outside the county 's boundaries 
in Staffordshire, the story was 
much the . same, as 
Warwickshire's bowlers, who 
enjoyed the backing of a keen 
field, experienced little trouble 
in bringing down Derbyshire's 
batsmen, who had been bard put 


Lloyd, who bad been one of gpra 38.4 


limpres; H D Bird and G T WdlBheacf 


those involved in this mini- 
collapse. 

Much then depended on the 
old hand, -Abrahams' and , 
relatively speaking, the new boy,. 
Hayhurst. In a solid fifth wicket 
partnership of 82 runs these two 
did their level best, the former 
moving to a half century, and 
the latter skipping past 12 , 
Hay hurst’s previous best perfor- 
mance and thence to 34, before 
both fell to Benjamin, who by 
taking four For .19 was 
Leicestershire's best bowler. - 
Put in to bat at Lord's. Kent 
made a sound start putting 66 
runs on the board from 17 overs, 
for the loss of Benson, to a catch - 
by Slack, off Fraser. Yet, with 
Hughes and Emburey cora- 


overs. Only Hill who hit 43, had 
managed to survive the bowlers 
thrusts in which Manillas, in 
taking three for 22, had been the 
spearhead. 

• . -Runs were scarce at the OvaL 
too. Surrey, who had been put in 
to bat by Gbuaoigan, made a 
good start, and in this Clinton 


71.74, 

77.75. 
73.74,73: 

. 75J58.78.76; 
7& 72. 75. 73. 
(L'AnowcsqL 7ft 73.71, 77. 
zwrw tatnam (srfttoy Add: 7ft 73, 77, 
74. 288c D Jones (Three RWersL 71. 7ft 
75, 76; F.GawgB (Beecoasfietra.74. 74, 
75, 75; W Henry (PwlBmPHrtftTfc. 7S.74. 

A bonny 
12th for 
Panton 

Catherine Panton, of Scot- 
land, established a Women's 
Professional Goff Association 
record by winning her 12th 
tournament, the Portuguese 
Open, at Vtiamoura yesterday 
(John Hennessy writes). 

She prevailed at tbe fifth extra 
bole of a gripping sudden-death 
play-ofT against Kelly 
. Lead better, the American win- 
ner of last -week's Hennessy 
Cognac Cup at Chantilly. 

- They finished tbe four rounds 
on 286. six under par, together 
with Gillian Stewart, another 
Scot. Stewart fell at tbe first 
extra hole, however, with a 
bogey four, a fete that similiarly 
befell Leadbetter after she and 
Panton bad reeled off par figures 
for four boles. 

Beverley New, with the joint 
lowest round of tbe day. 67, 
moved up into fourth place. 

swwteft C Panton, 74. 69. 
-off): K Laadbafttr nisi 


IS'TvV, *•- 




2 :=-^.- 


had given the lead, but the 
middle order failed lamentably 
in i heir efforts to build and 
consolidate. Clinton had played 
a key role in two partnerships, 
firstly with Stewart, in which 56 
runs were added for the second 
wicket, and secondly with Jesty, 
which was of 59 runs for the 
fourth wickeL Clinton went on 
to make 66 before Base, the best 
of Glamorgan's bowlers bowled 
him. : 



StoTTr:- 


ss ... 


£ \ ; n 


Hughes and Emburey com- him. - 

YESTERDAY'S OTHER JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL LEAGUE SCOREBOARDS 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


CHIEF EXECUTIVES! MANAGING DIRECTORS 
1 DIRECTORS IS ALES 4 MARKETING EXECUTIVES 
I OV'ERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 
1 FIN ANCI AL & .ACCOUNTANCY 
A wide ramj; of marviganeTU apfKHnimenlsappear: 

cwiyThuniliiK 

THURSDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 


Middlesex v Kent 

AT LORD'S 

Koftt(4pts) poet Stodhtsex by sown runs. 
KENT 

M R Banson c Slack b Fraser 25 

SG Hnxsb Hughes 46 

C J Tavart c and b Emburey 4 

JS Cowdrey b Daniel 45 

GRCowrteyb Hughes 10 

EA E Baptato c Rafley b Fraser 16 

N H Taylor c Downton b Darnel 9 

C Perm c Carr b Emtxxoy 1 

tS A Marsti b Bnburey 6 

2 L Underwood ODaree! 2 

K B S Jarvis not out n 

Baras(b1.1bftw1.nb3) 13 

Total (38.1 overs) 177 

"SONBlSs 1 |«. 37S.369.4- 
106. 3135. 3157. 7-158. 3173.3177. 13 


Si 2 G Mflwlbw b ©tfort 0 

5 M A Holding b Parsons 0 

"Trzr™ .8 R Sharma b McMBsn 0 

Extras (b 1.1b ft wl.nb 3) .13 R J Rrmey b McMUai 16 

Total (38.1 overs) 177 A E Warner nol out . . ... 3 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-63. 375, 3-89. 4- O H Monansen b Grftord 1 

106. 5-135. 3157. 7-15ft 317ft 3T77T10- Extras ( b 1. Ib7. w4.nb2) 14 

Total (3R4 overs] 132 

7 1 - 3333 ; Cowans 3 FALL OF WICKETS: 1-24, 354. 37ft 4- 


Derbyshfre 
v Warwickshire 

ATLSKCC 

warm&cstm f*pts) beat Detbyshn by 
Iha WieftBtS. 

DERBYSHIRE 

*KJ Barnett cMcMUanb Mutton 23 

I S Anderson run out 11 

AHHbMcMBan 43 

J E Moms run out 13 

IB Roberts tbwb Munton 8 

GMBartowb effort 0 

M A Hoi^b Parsons 0 

R J Finney b MeMWanH" 16 

A E Warner not out 3 

OH Monansen b Gifford 1 


WNJUCkewbjSS^ 2 

iwasBaaasjcs— j 

JD Carr tow bBaptete ... JT 

i SSrtHa*?#! b rtnks 2 

5 P 


92. 310ft 3104. 7-106. 312ft 3129. 
BOWUNG: Sretfl 7-1-20-0. McMHan 8-2- 
233: Parsons 33331; Munton 8334-2; 
Gifford 7.4-1-15-2. 

WARWICKSHIRE 

T A Lloyd runout 1 

D L Amiss c Roberts b Moransen 4 


2 G JLert tow b Finney _ 
r ” 4 DM McMflannorou — 


ARC Fraser ran out ? G W Humpage c MJer b Mcwtansan _ 25 

N G Cowans b Baptiste 0 Asrt Oin bwbWanwr 33 

WW Dame! not out 1 PASnwhnotoul _____ 1 

Exbas(b4. to12.w2.nb1) is Extras ( b 6. to 9. w 9. rto Z) 26 

Total (3ft5 overs) 170 Total(5 wkts, 39 overs) 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-10. 312, 3-51, 4- 1,33 - _ 4% 

77. 3134, 313ft 7-161, 316ft 3168. 13 9. J Parsons. G C Smaft T A Munton. N 
170. Gifford Oxt not bat 

BOWUNG: Jands 30-30-1; Beot«s» 73 MU- OF UflCKETS: 1-1.315.315.4-70. 
325-4; C 5 Cowrtay 8-0-231; Penn 6-3 3131. 


331: Underwood 
1. 


Hurts 3313 KJWUNG: 


UnpUttfl: B Dudhston and M J Mtctien 
kenupte 


KJWLING: HokJtog 33130: Hmwy 7-3 
231. MortenHO 3332-2; Mtor 31-te-ft 
Warner 63131: Sharma 36-11-0. 
Umpires: A A Jonas end P B Wight 


Leicestershire 
v Lancashire 

AT LEICESTER 

Lateoaterahm (4pta) beat U axaaht e by 
rauwictets 


GDMenrtseRoaarDTaiitor 7 

G FtowfareWtiitKaMb Bantams* 2 

J Abrahams c Butcher b Berijsms* — 55 

■CH Lloyd cwntakarb cm io 

NFatfbnttnrcWhuiGreebDeFHetas 0 
A N Haytwsj te tiBoonbl Ban^nw 34 

2 

DJMaMnsan ran out ______ 0 

P J W Alott not ou 10 

Extras ( to 10;w 7. nb 9 19 

Total ( 8 wkts. 40 overs) 141 

j L SXnmons rtd not bet 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1 -ft 2-14, 33ft 368, 
5-121. 3129, 7-129. 3130- 
BOWUNG; BsrtBmln31'134;Tnlor33 
331; CM 32-131; De Fretea 31-24-1; 
Patter 4-3138; Brtvs 4-323-0. 


LEICESTERSHIRE 

N E Brtere e Lloyd b Vtottansan 52 

L Puiwrnot ou* 63 

-D (Gower nor out , — — — 16 

Extras ( b 2. lb 7. rto 2 ) 11 

Total (1 wkL3A5 overs) M2 

J J WrtWrer. T 4 Boon. P B CWt W K R 
Bmm I PSulciier, P A J Defrens. fP 
whttocase. L B iraytor dw not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: M2* 
BOWUNGtWUMnson 7-U-2S-1; Alton 5-0- 
30; Havnuret 8-0-33-U: MaMmonft33 
41-0: Smunans 83230. 

UtnpMs: C cook and K H Lyons. 


Surrey y Glamorgan 

ATTTEOVAL 

Surrey (aptsftnaemergm by IS rm .. 


‘A R Butcher c Morns b Thomas . 



. 7 

G S Canton b Base ___ 

A J Stewart or Oavtss b Ontong 

M A Lynch c Davies b Ontong 

_ 66 
31 
0 

_ 2S 
8 

Beptrar.™ 

56 

SiaSKS’ 


wbDeFdeta! 

ft 

MA Mtoam nrtout 

4 

tanjirw 

34 

2 

Total (7 wkts, «J overt) — 

~isr 


G MonMmse. S T Ctarte (2d not beL 
FALL OF WICNE7S: 1-11, 367. 375. 3 
134,3138.3143.7-153. . 
BOWLINQ;Thoma8 7-1-34-1; Base 33 
31-3; Ontana 33232: Steele 332341: 
Derm* 5323ft Holmes *3223 

GLAMORGAN 

J A HopWracOartab Doughty 12 

H Monts C FsUwrrb Butcher 44 

D B Paukta c Butober b Needhara'__ 4 

G C Hoknes b Needham ,__jt 

"R C Ontong run out . l .. 23 

MPMaynvac Richards bCtorKs 12 

J G Thomas run out 16 

fT Davies c and b Mo n khou s e 3 

jf Sneto bMonkhouss 11 

SJ Base runout - 1 

J Derrick not out — — , — - 6 

Extras to 1. to 7 w 5) — _13 

Total (39.1 overt) 149 

FALL OF WICKET®: 1- 34, 23ft 36ft 4- 
80. 31Q2_B-127, 7-1^, 3132 3146 


Yorkshire v 
Worcestershire 

AT HEADINGLEY 

VVrfcsnrra (-ipts) bt Worcestershire by 5 
MCE9» 

•• -.WORCESIBnHHS 
TS Curbs run out 'tt 

5 SS 0 !!*!® Lo » e b C* 1 ** -— 29 

D c Srtrstpw bSttwaraon ■ 8 

GA Hick b Jarvis 45 

*P A Neale o Low bP Hanley 3 

M J Weston b Camek __________ 4 

tSJ Rhodes not out an 

J □ Inctanore b Jams 3 

aarestoll. to 12. w 2. nbi) 26 

. T«al (8 Wets, 40ows} 183 

RK HUngworthdklnatbBt 

FALL OF ynCKETS: 1-25.- 2-44. 374, 4- 
104. 3119. 3131, 7-441. 3141. 3163 
BOWLM&Sktobottam84MQ-0;'Jems3 

tsw! c£& 3&^ ,: ?19 T son8 - 


WWMMi 

K-Sh djp ft R w fford — — 69 

M D Mcnon c Ritodes b K&ngwcxtti ._ 12 

AAMetaaHebWngwonh 4 

J D Lome Rhodes DRodtonJ 36 

SN Hafftty tow ft Weston 8 

G B Swenson not out ■— 22 

P Camek notout 4 

Extras (to 1ft w3. nb 6) 19 


EQUESTRIANISM 

Harrington’s 
win on her 
father’s horse 

J 5 S ^5 a ? Ti ? gton ’ of Ireland, 
won « s ? he Houtekeo 3-day event 

Ridin 8 her 
“ tber . s - Brigadier Fowler's 
Copprt she was the only rider to 
finish on her dressage score: 

asss 

outset of the competition, were 
PPf*** al *he post when they 
knocked two fences down in ihe 
show-jumping. 

Kesalts: Heineken 3-Day Event. 

teSt t sa£"s^I 

Lucinda Green (GB) 83.2. 

Fiona Lynch Ore) 66.01™ y 


^V- l4 
si ^ *. 

SS- - - 

c - v .v 


0*1311 . , 


8ft 3102^-127, 7-128, 3132 PJKwSyDd'noT^ ^ 

SS»G:e«. 

1 BOWUNG: Radlbrd3.l-30* incliitSxeB- 

CTrtSSPPffff 31^-a Jesty 3(M3 • 343 ^ WestW^WafftilbMw^ 3 
. ■ , -1-132.' Newport 3323ft.Hldt3317-a 

UtBpwscJHanipstiiraandNTPiw*,’-..: tioiptt»:BLB«dliBaito«toff AWftte 1 


Total (5 wtas.35,1 owtra) 164 , 

*tO L Betrstow. ASidabottoni,PW Jems. VnCKClRlg gQal 
P J Hanley tM not bat • ” . 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1*3. 373. 3144 . 3 V^TIZOVIC, the CffV- 


™y City goalkeeper, is hop! 
mg io resume his. minor 

Shropshire this season. 


:v 




ife. 


y 'w. • - 













-i-3.. • ■ 'i.jjt.-:. ■■ ~~-~s:ti : * _<f,»' >'»:..ii,' — •• £ _-■ 





'•'JVW 


BBC 1 


aw CaotexAhL 

re 9“^ n ews.ii»ather 
“Wl traffic at R57, 

and 

sp6ftat7.20 and IL20*and 
®f] BV,8w ^ the morning 
^sgapera at «L37. Pius, 
Lynn Fairids Wood's 
consumer report; pop 
music news; horoscoas* 
and Anne RtfcinSvs 
Wwnsion choice. 

9-20 Csetaz 1030 Play School 
presented by Jane Hardy 
and Mika AmatL 1050 
Ceefax. 

12J0 a^After.Woonwlth 
Richard Whitmore and 
Sub Carpenter, includes 
news headlines with 
subtitles. 1JL55 Regional 
news and waathwT 

1.00 Pebble leant One. The ' 
cooking canon, John Hey, 
talks about how he 
reached peak fitness after 
his series of work-outs 
with Emtyn Hughes. Wffl 
his resolve be threatened 
by Jane Asher’s decorated 
cakes?; there is country 
and western music from 
Billy Jo Spiers and Bobby 
Bean a Jdke or two from 
Michael Barrymore; and 
Sally Burton and John 
Hart present an up-data 
on the Richard Burton 
Drama Awards. 145 The 
Flumps, (r) 2.00 Ceefax. 

3.15 Songs of Praise for 
Whitsun from Canterbury 
Cathedral, presented by 
ne. (shown 
} (Ceefax) 3^2 

1 news. 

3J55 Stfigoe's On. Richard 
Stilgoe presents another 
programme in his series 
on ideas for Indoor 
entertainment 440 The 


Puppy's Further 
Adventures. < 


-v.‘ 


Cartoon 

series 430 The Kids of 
Dearassi Street 
Adventures of a group of 
children living on a 
Toronto thoroughfare. 

4.55 John Craven's 

NemramdSilSBiM 
Peter. Janet Effis tens the 


'w.jj.vS' 


. ' * r 


■ 


i Melba, the opera 
singer who was bom 125 
years ago today. (Ceefax) 

535 Rotf Harris Cartoon Time. 

630 News with Sue Lawtey and 
Andrew Harvey. Weafner. 

635 London Plus; 

730 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
include Bob Gekton 
Michael Hesettine, NeB 
Dickson and. from 

i, David Gower 
ICfiveLloyd. 

735 The Rock V Rofl Years. 
Highlights of I960, the 
year of the Sharpie 
massacre and me election 
of President 
Musk: is from Adam 
Duane Eddy and the 
Rebels, Ctin Richard and 
the Shadows, The Evedy 
Brothers and Roy Orbison. 

835 I?* Your Mow. American 
comette series. 

830 Three Up, Two Down. • 
Angela Thome and 
Michael Bphick star in ttas 
comedy about a 
grandmother constantly 
rebuffing the advances of 
her daughter's father-in- 
faw. (Cwifax)- 

930 News with Julia SomervOe 
and John Humphrys. 
Weather. 

530 Panorama: The 

Comrades, kfike DutfieM 
reports from Krugersdorp, 
a smaU town 20 miles from 
Johannesburg, where 
blacks end whites Sve in 
anything but peaceful 
coexistence. 

10.10 FhKTheCiripeppw' 

. Crtto Company{l972) 
starring Gary Grimes and 
Bo Hopkins. A teenager, 
determined to become a 

drive. Hes romantic 

dreams of the We me 
shattered when rustlers 
attack the drive, leaving 
four of the drovers dead. 
The young man Is then 
entrusted with the job of 
tying to gat help to the 
beleaguered band. 
Directed by Dick Richards. 

11.40 Weather. 



s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 



6.15 Good Morntag Britain 

gfcmond »8 Nick Oiwn. 
News with Gordon 

sport at &40 and 734; 
eranfcesatMS; cartoon 
at735;pop video at735: 
Jimmy Greaves's 

sasaasssr-'- 

presents the rearfts of a 

rra^on love and sex in 


ITV 'LONDON 


Thames news headlines. 

930 FOr Schools: a film about 
thetoysof mountain 
ckmbmg 947 A tour of the 
Herefordshire vfttege of • 
Pembridge in the company 
of focal schoofchHdren 
939 Courtship and 
intercourse 10.16 Care fin 
modem China 1038 How 
American public opirmn is 
moulded at election time . 
1133Atourof - 
Copenhagen In the . 
company of a teenager 
1132 Junior maths 1139 
French -an interview with 
France Rochard, a 
hospital surgeon in ‘ - 
. VIBejuif. • 

112.00 Tickle a 

the urvtnn 1 _„ 

story 

of the Playdough Statue. 
{1230 Baby amfCoiL^ley Judd 
talks to Miriam Stoppard 
about why it is the working 
mothers and not their 
children who mbs out 

130 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news. 

130 Fane rn Get You For This* 
(1951) starring George 
Raft and Coteen Gray. A 
peripatetic gambler is in 
Italy on the trail of a gang 
of forgers who framed him 
for the murder of a United 
States Treai 
Directed by 
Newman. 

330 University Challenge. 335 
Thames news headlines 
330 The Young Doctors. 
Medical drama serial set in 
a large Australian city 
hospital. 

430 Tickle on the Turn. A 
repeat of the programme 
shown at noon 440 The 
Bkmdera. Cartoon. 430 
He-Man and Masters of 
the Universe. Animated 
science fiction series 445 
The Little Vampire. Series 
based on the books 
Sorraner- 
j. (Oracle) 

5.15 DtfPrent Strokes. 

545 News. 

630 Thames news. 

635 Help! VtvTaytor Gee wfth 
news of the National 
Association of Carers. 

635 Crossroads. Barry has a 
date with Anne-Marie; and 
Benny is extensively 
tested at hospital. 

730 Nature Watcn. Jufian 
Pattifer explores the world 
of the furry duck-bill sd 



nai 


Edward 


• The recent death of the 
Duchess of Windsor is the : 
for a repeat of EDWARD < 

MRS SMPSON (ITV. 9pm and 
10.30pm, with remaining 
episodes at the same ttmes 
tomorrow and Wednesday! 

The series rigtafy gathered the 
critical accolades when it was 
first screened back m 1978, as 
weB as picking up three 
British Academy Awards. Written 
by Simon Raven and directed 
by Waris Hussein, it treats what 
-has been dubbed the 
romance of the century with 
more sympathy than tra 
sis perhaps deserve, 
that (a a judgement of - 
hindsight Beyond dispute is the 
crm% of the series as 
drama, the immaculate attention 
to period data B, the lavish 
Mrs *8ii»««* ob production values and above ail 


ITV, at330pm 


a dutch of authentic 


CHOfCi 


performances, with players of 
.the quaflty of Peggy Ashcroft 
(Queen Mary) in supporting 
rotes. But at the heart of the 
enterprise is Edward Fox's 
iPrinceof 
, which is not only 
pnyacaBy true to life but 
brakantiy captures the subject's 
mixture of charm and 
arrogance. Fox spent hours 
listening to recoiwgs of the 
Prince to perfect his voice and 
the abdication broadcast 
which comes as Ihe climax to the 
story could almost be the real 
thing. Cynthia Harris, who plays 
Walus, is another near 
lookafike whose performance is 
so much more than a simple 
impersonation. 


• OPEN THE BOX (Channel 
4, 10pm) has television 
contemplating Bs own navel 
and addressing itself to such 
questions as how programme 
makers try to manipulate 
audiences, both inthe studio 
and at home, and how far we. the 
viewers, let ourselves De 
taken in. The evidence is 
contradictory but perhaps 
reassuring. But a hidden camera 
captures a small chfld coming 
into a room, using the remote 
control to zap his way 
jh the four channels, 
jihereis 

him and walking out ai 
discrimination starts 
young, neither Mr Bern atone 
end of the pofibcal spectrum, 
nor Mrs Whitehouse at the other, 
can have much to tear. 

Peter Waymark. 


730 ^ ron So wStraAVera 
Duckworth takes 
possession of her new 
car. (Oracle) 

830 WhafaMyline? 

Guessing the odd 
occupations this week are 
Ernie Wise, My Cooper, 
Barbara Kefly and George 
Gala In the chair is 
Eamonn Andrews. 

830 World hi Action. 

930 Edward and Mrs 

Simpson. Part one of the 
three part award-winning 
(Kama, tohe shown on 
consecutive nights, 
reconstructing the events 
that led to the Abdication 
of King Edward VIIHn 
193& starring Edward Fox 
as Edward Vltt and 
Cynthia Harris as WaUs 
Simpson, (r) (Continues 
after the news) (see 
Choice) 

1030 News at Ten and weather 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

1030 Edward and Mrs Simpson 
continued. 

1130 Wckey Spfflane’a MSce 
Hammer: Dead Card 
Down. The private 
detective mvestigates the 
murder of an okl friend 

and the onte dues are a 
brief-case full of (fiamonds 
and half a $10300 note. 
1235 Night Thoughts. 


BBC 2 


635 Open University: Maths - 
Curve Sketching. Ends at 
730. 

930 Ceefax. 

938 Daytime on Two: 

economics - Is there such 
a thingas the right price? 
1030 For four- and five- ' 
year olds 10.15 Traditional 
Javanese shadow 
puppets. 1038 History: 
the 1 926 General Strike 
1130 The Greeks and the 
Persian Wars 1132 What 
happens when the water 
- .supply is cut off? 1140 
History: how the Industrial 
R evolution affected . 
Bfonfegham and 
Manchester 1232 
Mind stretcher solution 
1237 Ceefax 230 Words 

and pictures 248 
Jamaica’s; 

Britain 2^ How a 
computer can help a 
transport planner. . 

3.00 Ceefax. 

539 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

530 Momenta. Jermi I 

talks to Anne I 
Racfiol's first female (fisc 
about moments in 
that left a deep 
Impression. (First shown 
on BBC South) 

630 FBm: Uvea Little, Love a 
Litfle (1968) starring Bvis 
Presley and Rudy VaHee. 
Romantic comedy about a 
photographer who meets 
a gsl who gives him a 
tranquiliserthat knocks 
trim out for three days. 
When he wakes up he 
discovers that she has 
taken over his Bfe. Based - 
on the celebrated novel by 
Dan Gteenburg, Kiss My 
Firm But Pfiant Ups. 
Directed by Norman 
Taurog. 

735 Anfinando. A Brazffian- 
made short that takes 
humoro us look at 
animation. 

Wainwright-On 
Lakeland's Far Eastern 
Fells. Wamwright takes 
Eric Robson to see the 
delights above 
Haweswater. (First shown 
on BBC North East) 
(Ceefax). 

&K) Horizon: A Handful of 
Sugar w9h a Pinch of Salt. 
The story of how adrink of 
sugar arid salt is helping to 
save the fives of some naif 

a million children a year, ft 
ts a cure for diarrhoea, the 
world's biggest Idler of 
children. . 

930 The Fan and Rise of - 
Reginald Perrin. Reggie 
invites CJ to dinner and 
uses the occasion to 
indulge in a EtUe 
eccentricity 
Leonard! 

930 Naked Video. Alternative 
comedy series from BBC 
Scotland featuring, among 
others, Ron Bain, Helen 
Lederer. Tony Roper and 
Jonathan Watson. 


740 


935 Amt Another day. John 
Pitman spends a day at 
the Natural History 
Museum and mingles with 
the staff and some of the 
7300 visitors, (r) (Ceefax) 
1035 Newsnight The latest 
national and international 
news. 

11.10 Weather. 

11.15 Music at Night Paul 
waiamson and Phffip 
Astte perform Little 
Musgrave. 

ill 30 Open University: Writing 
Together. Ends at 1230. 


CHANNEL 4 


235 Winston Churchte - the 
Vafimtt Years* The 

ate chapter of the 
of the Second 
War, based on the 
memoirs of Winston 
Churchill. It is now April 
1945, Mussolini is caught 
trying toescape and 
strung up in Milan by 
partisans; Hitler accepts 
the inevitable and commits 
suicide. 

330 The Late, Late Show. 
Dublin's chat and music 
show presented by Gay 
Byrne. 

430 Hands. The work horses 
of Dublin and those who 
rely on them, (r) 

430 Countdown.Today's 

challenger is Peter Scott, a 
retired quantity surveyor 
from Newark. 

530 Alice. Mel becomes 
besotted by a beautiful 
recording star and. to 
everyone's surprise she 
returns the affection even 
to the extent of .proposing - 
to Mel. But then Mel gets 
cold feet 

530 Let’s Paitez Franglate. In 
Le Uvre Dans Un Overdue 
Situation, Mehryn Bragg is 
the borrower and Judy 
Geeson the librarian; Le 
Speeding Offence finds 
James Hunt the motorist 

RanSw^sS^rndki A 
La Florists customer 
Vladek Sheybal receives 
a dvf 
Gay 

545 Aril 

Jill Cochrane visits Wilton 
House, near Salisbury, the 
home of the Earl, of 
Pembroke. (Oracle) 

630 The Marketing Mix. This 
fifth programme in the 
soles on marketing 
examines the different 
ways of using the media to 
communicate with 
customers. (Oracle) 

730 Channel Four news with 
Peter Sissons. 

730 Comment from American 
writer, Laiaie Lewki. 
Weather. 

830 Brookside. Gloom arid 


GorkhiUs - Doreen is 
fretting over the tele phone 
bBI ana Billy Is receiving no 
support from his union 
over tils sacking. 

830 KateandAMe. American 
comedy series about two 
divorcees who decide to 
face the prospect of single 

James and Jane Curtin. 

930 St Elsewhere. Tough 

decisions have to be takan 
after the mayor threatens 
to dose the hospital in 48 
hours if the nurses' 
dispute is not settled. 

935 4 mutes: Sister 

Catherine- The first in a 
new series of dramas by 
new whters/diractors- 
TonighTs story, by Jezz 
Startup, concerns a young 
nun who receives a 
Valentine's card. 

1030 Open toe Bax. Part one of 
a new series about 
popular television, (see 

1130 TheEteventh Hour Super 
Eight Tire story of how 
the Super 8 home movie 
system developed. 

12.15 Ttwir Lordships’ House. 
Highlights of the day's 
proceerfings in the House 
of Lords. Presented by 
Kevin Durai. Ends at 
1230. 


( Radio 4 ) 

On tong wave. VHF variations at end 
Radio 4. 


of 
535 am 


Forecast 630 


am Shipping Foreca 
News Briefing; Weiv 
6.10 Farming Week. An 
Interview wtm a leader of 
the agricultural industry, 
foflowed by a five-day 
weather forecast for 
termers. 635 Prayer far 

630 T0d!^ind63fl,73Q, 

830 News. 645 
Business News. 655, 7. 55 
Weather. 730, 

830NSWS. 735, 835 Sport- 
745 Thought for the Day- 

835 The Weak on 4. 

Pr o gramme previews. 

With Chartotta Green. 

843 Bany Fantoni's Chinese 
as. The Snake 
y. His guests are 

OOd and Miles 
Kington, who writes the 

Moreover. column in 

The Times. 837 weather 

Travel 

930 News. 

935 Start the Week with 


Richard Baker (s) 
EoneyBox. 

Financial advice, with 


10.00 News; Mar 


Louise Botting (r). 

1030 Morning Story: A Proper 
Cup of Tea, by Brenoan 


isr. Denys 


0 'E. . 

Hawthorne. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 


1130 News; 

Tales of toe Raj. Roshan 
Seth cm what the indtans 
thought of the Britsh and 
their legacies (4) Quit India 

1133 from Aztecs to Fbotbafl. 
Michael Young presents 
a personal view of Mexico 
and its people. 

1230 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, with 
PattieCokfwelL 

1237 The Spy who came bt 
from the CoW. by John le 
Carre, with Gobi Btakeiy as 
Leamas. Part 4 of a six- 


ifico(s).1235 
W oatf ior 

130 The World at One: News. 

1.40 The Archers. 135 
Shipping Forecast. 

ZOO News; Woman's Hour. 

With Jenra Murray. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Where are You, 

Wally? By Barry Wassetman. 
With B6I Patterson, (ftfe)- 

430 Kaleidoscope. With 
Robert Hewtson. A 
second chance to hear last 
Friday's edition, wlvch 
included comment on the 
Marriage of Figaro at the 
Theatre Royal. Qasgow.and 
the Radio 4 play Where 


e.5J50 


are you, Wally 7(t 

530 PM News I _ 

Shfeplng.l 
Weatosr. 

6.00 Neavs; Ftnandal Report 

630 Questions erf Taste. 

Panel game on food and 
drink. With Russell Davies, 
Paul Lew. Oz Clark, 

Denise Coffey and AUeen 

735 The Archers. 

730 OnYowFarm. 

745 Science Now. Alun Lewis 
reviews the latest 
discoveries and 
developments. 

845 The Monday Play: 

Widows by Ariel 
Dorfman. With John Abineri, 
Steve Hodson and 
Graham Blockeyfe). 

945 KaJetdOSCOpe. Includes 
comment on Girlfriends 
at the Oldham Coiseum, and 
the Cannes Fftri Festival. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: The 
Girl m His Past by 
Georges SimenorL(1). Read 


Weather. 

1030 The World Tortrtit 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Today in Paritament 
1230 News; Weather. 

1233 Shaping. 

VHF (avaiteblB In England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: 5355L0Dam Weather; 
TravaL 1130-1230 For 
Schools: 1130 Opus (s) 
Arranging and Script 
Writing. 1130 Let's Move (s) 
AH the Fun of lire Fair. 

1140 Word Games. 1130 
Poetry Comer.135-330 
For Schools: 135 Listening 
Comer. 235 Playtime. 

230 introducing Science. 240 
Introducing Science Extra: 
Junior Electronics. 530535 
PM (contkued). 1130- 
12.10am Open University-. 
1130 What the Tortoise 
said to Achiles. 1130 Geneva 
Episode. 1230-1.10 
Schools 


Science: Energy. 1230 ' 
Energy We Use. 1230 
Energy Today. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variatiosns 

at end of Ratio 3. 

635 Weather. 730 News 

735 Morning Concert Dvorak 
(Slavonic Dance No 16, 

Op 72 No 8). Saint-Saens 
(Violin Concerto No 
1: Kyung-wha 
Chung/Montreal SO), 

Kodaly (Dances from 
Marosszak: 

Zempieni,pteno), Liszt 
(Symphonic poem Tasso, 
Jamentoetrionfo).830 
News 

835 Morning Concert 


AWnoni (Oboe Concerto 
Op 9 No 2: HoWger/l Musid), 
Telemann (Don 
Qtdchoae auHo), Mozart 
No 28) 930 


935 This Week's Composer 
Rubbra. DonrtJesu. 

\fioHn Sonata ffo 2 
(Grinke/Rubbra), Three 
Psalms, Op 61 
{Feniar .contralto). 
Improvisations on Virginal 

Pieces by F8maby, Op 

1030 liszt Racorefings 
including Hymne da 
renfant a son revarf. Fantasy 
on themes from 
Beethoven's Ruins of 

Athens. Beta of 
StrasburgCathedral.and 
Polonaise briUante, with 
Rose (piano) 

1045 Barry Tuckwefl and 
i:hom 

Koechtin (Sonata 
Dukas 

i), Schumann 
and ABegro. Op 
' 0 ). Beethoven (Sonata in F 
Op 17). tfindcMteto 

11-55 feflwn Slnfonre (under 
TorteSer, violin). Haydn 

Saena (introauction ana 
Rondo capriccioso), False 
iL Saint-Saens 
iJ.RossW (La 
la overture). 

130 News 

135 Plano re cltaL Boris 
Berman. Shostakovich 
(Sonata No 2). Prokofiev 
(Sonata No 7) 

230 Music Weekly: Includes a 
tribute to Rubbra, and a 
feature about Boidez's 
musical research centre 

245 I5ew Records: 

Beethoven (Leonora No 

3 overture). Bach 
(Contrapunctus 1 to 4: 
Moroney.harpstohord). 
Purcell (Udo's Lament: 
Norman^oprano). Mozart 
(Concerto in F,K 242: 
Brendel.Cooper Academy of 
StMartin-in-Fietds), 
Stravinsky (Duo Concertant 
Cho- Liang Ling/ Schub), 
Nielsen (Symphony No 5L 
455 News 

530 Mainly tor Pleasure: 
recorded music 
selects 
Natalie 

630 Or^ni music: Thomas 
Trotter, Margaret 
Phitos. Soter (Concertos No 

4 in F malor, 5 In A major. 

6 ki Dmajor 

730 Hurtfoodand 

Listen drink: Professor 
Coin Btakamore talks to 
Professors Beatrix and 
Alan Gardner, of the 
University of Reno. They 
are chimp enrerts 

730 Phitarmonia (under 
Rattle). With Elisabeth 
Soderstrom (soprano), and 
PhiharmoniB 
Chone.Part one. Poulenc 

iSiesslaraiT^Jtoacto 

resurractionem 

mortuorum) 

845 Inventive Mothersdak by 
Marilyn Butler. Lecturer 
In Engfish at Oxford 
University 

9.05 Concert part two. Ravel 
(Daphnis et Chkre bdlet 


1040 Jazz Today. Charles Fox 
presents Azimuth 
11.Respighiand his 

ies:Pizzetti (De 


(Lauda par la Nativita del 
Signore: I nstiu mental Ensemble 
under Jotx) Poole) 

1137 News. 12.00 Closedown. 
VHF only: Open 
University. From 635am to 
635. Deputy heads in 

primary schools? 


( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave, vhf 
variations at end of Radio 1. 

News on the hour. Headlines 



430am Charles Nove (s) 530 
Ray Moore (s)730 Derek Jameson 
(s) 930 Ken Bruce (si 11.00 
Michael Aspel (s) 1.05pm 


Carrington and Jacobs. Davkf 
Jacobs and Desmond Carrington 
celebrate thek 80th Birthdays 
(S) 2-05 SaBy Magnusson (a) 3.30 
David Hammoo (s) 535 John 
Dunn (s) 730 Alan Den and. at 730, 


These Days. Panel quiz game 
with June Whitfield, Kenneth 
Williams, Ruth Madoc and Ernie 
Wise. Chairman David Hamilton 
1030 Star Sound 1130 Brian 
Matthew presents Round Midnight 
direct from New York 130am 
Peter Dickson (s) 3.00-430 A Utne 
Night Music (s). 

C Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end. 

News on toe halt hour from 
630am until 930pm and at 1230 
rmdnwht 

530am Adrian John 730 Mice 
Smith's Breakfast Show 930 Andy 
Peebles 1230pm Newsbeat 
(Frank Partridge) 1245 Gary Davies 
3.00 Mike Read 530 Newsbeat 
(Frank Partridge) 545 Bruno 
Brookes 730 Janice Long 
1030-1230 John Peel (s). VHF 
RADIOS 1 5 2:- 430am As 
Radio 2. 10.00pm As Radio 1. 
12.00-430am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


SJM Newsoask 630 Ustm to what the 


Man Says 7.00 Nms 7SB TvmtffOur 
s 7JO Sarah and Company 8JJ0 
News B. 0 S Reflections 8.15 The Rear ot 


tin Day 830 Anything Goes 100 News 
R09 Review ot the Bnftsh Press 8.15 
Good Books 930 Financial News 930 
Look Ahead 935 Feeble's Choice 10J» 
News 1031 Listen to what the mtan Says 
11.00 News 1139 News About Britain 

11 .15 Training for Tomorrow 1 130 ABwin 
Tima 12 JW Rzdra Newsreel 12.15 Bram ot 
Britain 1966 12.45 Sports Roundup 130 
News 139 Twanty-Fotr Htxjrs 130 
Robert Tear s Victorian SongtXX* 230 
Outlook Z45 A Shmt Wah In the Hindu 
Kush 330 Radio Newsreel 3.15 Listen to 
ntnt the Man Says 335 What's New 430 

News 439 Commentary 4. 15 Whvl Am an 
Atheist 430 Guitar Interlude 545 Sports 
RouKtup 735 Peeble s Choice 030 News 
830 Twenty Four Hours 830 Sports 
International 930 News 931 Network UK 

9.15 Guitar Interlude 930 Counterpoint 
1830 News 1039 The Wald Today 1035 
Book Choce 1030 Financial News 10^0 
Reflections 10.45 Sports Roundup 1130 
News 1139 Commentary 11.15 iwnr I Am 
an Atheist 1130 Brain ot Britain 1986 
1230 News 1239 News About Britam 

12.15 Radio Newsreel 1230 Sarah and 
Company 130 News 131 Outlook 130 
Short Story 135 Why I Am an AtheiEi 230 
News 239 Review of the British Press 

2.15 Network UK 230 Sports Mecnational 
830 News 339 News About Britain 3.15 


The World Today 435 Financial News 
ms 530 News 539 Twenty- 
Four Horn 530 News Ideas. AI times m 


GMT. 


435 Reflections! 



Richard Baker, Radio 4, 9.05am 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;1089kHz/275m; Ratio 2 : 693kHz/433m: 909kH/433m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90- 
9 2& Radio 4: 200kHz 1500m; VHF -32-95; LBC; 11 52k Hz /261 m; VHF 973; Capital; 1548kH2/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Racfio London 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94A World Saniica MF 648kHz/463m- 


PRrtl WALES 535pm-030 
55&£l WWes Today. 835-730 Rotf 
Harris Cstocxi Tima. 10.10-11 JCffl 
The 1986 European Brass Band Champi- 
onships. 1130-1230am Ftot The 

LANQ 93D»1330The 1386 General 
Of toe ChunA of GcotisraL 
mso-1230|» The General Assembly of 
the Chuch of Scotland. 835-730 

Sectoral NOfmERN «E- 

Today's tout 

8L408JX) Inside Ulster- 635-730 Rotf 
Harris Cartoon Time. 1140-1145 
News and weether. BIGLAND «35pre- 
730 Regional news magazines. 

TYNE TEES 

130-330 FStc Happy Is the Bnda 
5.15445 SurvhJukr Northern Life 
630730 MrC Mrs 1130 V 1230UB 
Jancta Hanrey 1230am Closedown. 

mvtMraggft - 

Carafld Camera 63D-730 News 1130 V 
1230am Closedown. 

HW WALES 

1230 Sctxmte B30pi»730 ' WWbb at 
She. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


TSW As London exce^ 130pm 
- News 130330 Fflmr Mutiny on 
the Buses 630-730 EmmerdaJe 
FUnn 1130 Oitacy 123Sem Postcrtpt 
Closedown. 

ULSTER 

330 F9m: Beyond the Cratain 330- 
430 Sons and Daughters 5.15 Heirai 
Worn and the 57 Trycydee. &00 
Good Evartro Ulster 630-730 Lifestyle 
1130 V 1225am News. Ctoswtown. 
TVC As London except 130pm 
JJtS News 130 Home Cookery 13S- 
330 Fine The Magnet 545-545 
Sons and Daugtitere 630 Coast to Coast 
630-7.00 Dtffrent Strokes 1130 SF 
moo and Simon 1230am Company, 
Closedown. 

C4p 130pm Countdown 130 
s^s&Hbm to Trust 230 Daaaryddissih 
Brazil 230 Cei Cocos 235 


Late. Cate Show Making of Brit- 


■m 430 < Had a Hippopotamus 500 B 
Wonder BV 730 

■) 730 Arotwg BOOSt 

BsewherB9J0Marged930Y— 


UoerHg530FteincH 
NewytxBon Sattfl 730 / 


AT Bedwer 1030 Cheers 1030 
Blades 1230 Closedown. 


Fim: Naw LariT 5.15-545 DifTrent 
strokes B30 News 645-730 Central 
Post 1130 Central Week 1230 Con- 
tact 1230m dosedown. 

YORKSHIRE ^— 

135 Help Yourself 130-330 Rnt 
Toko My Life 330-430 Cotrury Pracbce 
5.15^45 Heinz Wrtff and ihe 57 Tri- 
i 630 Calenctar 530-730 Sounds 
1130 Priso ne r. Cel Block H 
1230am Closedown. 

GRANADA 

Reports 130 Scramble! 230-330 
Hart to Hart 330-430 Sons and Daugh- 
ters 5.15-545 ScrambtaJ 530 (Cana- 
da Reports 630-730TomorTDw Taflang 
1130 New Avengers 1230am 
Closedown. 

SHANN 

Home Cookery 12KML00 FSm: The 


Magnet 
630 Chi 


Cookery 13 

it 5.15-545 Sons and Daughters 


i Channel Report 5630-730 
Diffrem Strokes aoO-UUn The 
Sweeney 1030 FBm; SUten Cross 
12.15am Ctosettown. 


SCOTTISH 

130 Action Line 135-330 F»tl- Ben- 
ny and Barney: Las Vegas Urwercover 
330 Cuart Mu n Chatdhag - A Jour- 
ney about GaeSc 035-4.00 Mr T 5.15- 
545 Emmerdole Farm 030 News 
and Scotland Today 630-730 What 's 
Your ProUm? 1135 LatBCatlllM 
Portrait of a Legend 12 . 10 am Closedown. 

border isgssvE^ 

FHm: Cuckoo in the Nest 330-430 
Sons and Daughters 5.15-545 Fergle 
630 Lookarouid 530-730 Take the 
High Rood 1130 Sweeney 130am 
Closedown. 

ANGLIA SiSaaSM.- 

FSm; Your Money Or Your Wife 5.15- 
545 Emmetdala Farm 60S Abot Anglia 
630-730 Benson 1130 The 
Seeeney 1230am Telflng the Troth, 
Closedown. 


|4ayiv 


PMMBANSflSr« 

130 Gtamorous Grandmother Con- 
tost 230000 Protectors 5.1S646 
Emmerdale Farm 630-730 North 
Tonight 1130 Fifty Fifty 1230 News, 
Closedown. 


ENTBRISINASOTS 


CONCERTS 


- 


MUCAWCT 87M/U8 8801. 
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TVTFE BEGINS AT FO RTY 

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sc£8£t» £223 

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mats »l A 

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Ol 628 S79S/63e 

8891 CC (MCnrSUB lOarahSwa) 
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RV WIVES OF WIM^ORjFn- 
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7.30. Ttmrs 2.00 * 7 JO PHI- 
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! 0243 781312 

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1 ALK GARDEN Eve* 7.3a 
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Dtrfctfd tar HO* DWIEU 
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COmSLOC 9M 32B2 CC 
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O BIf H O*. S 950 321600 579 
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}taN HURT ^ MELXN OBJ. 

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RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

wnnen and dlrerted nv 


■OVAL CHARfTV 
Sauce wi^l- 
prtfHKi 1 or HUH 2* 


Bar 

7 48 prompt. Doors Oden 645 
nur ant nosed at Tom ooM 
uTiirmw okes. Ltd wto amiable 
J?a5rnwipSe. as i«w 

Tomer 


nodOMN THEATRE BOS Orik» 

TIME 

TK MUSICAL 

nw era womot of tme 

wonjr’-&Exp 

CLIFF RICHARD 

AS 'THE ROCK STAR” 

THE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASM- 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

MravCn 7 Ja.Thu Mat 3JOSai5 
& 83 0. .'■• 
«flME SCAJS ST03. K VAHAEUt 
roBTOQAY T * mWiiWHa. 


■■■■ WAREHOUSE 240 

OBOCC5T9 68tB.t*SSFrmm 
27 Has. Eve* 7 30,. mats Thut 
2JQ. saw a. La a rmti WMw 
. Award THE CHEEK BY JOWL 

hr - e-msi&mmx- wshts ' 

OKML'tttwriiMrfrf 
rad - te — fai iLl 


DRURY LAME THEATRE ROYAL 

01836 BIOS. 01-240 9066/7. 
First can 34- hour 7 -day cc bfem 
240 7200 

■Md Ma ra W a 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALLTHC FAHUT 

Wbmar «f aH tha 


wed . 

BEST MUSICAL. 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

-voted 


’ AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

FLAY* A PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITIC* 


Era* ao Mats Wed 3.0 Sal &0 & 
8JO 

Oroup Sales 930 6123 

NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN 1987 


BLOK 437 1592. OC37964SS. 
Fust cam 24 .hr 7. Day CC 240 
7200. CTO Sales *f 0 6123. Eves 
8 . Mat* Wed 3. Sa j A. 

AnttrPW DaMO LAWSON 
JAM FltANCtS 

LEND ME A TENOR 

•roSMUMELT FURRY- F.TImw 

-HILARIOUSLY OVER 

THE TOP^Sto 


■JUWHDI 8 TOO MUCH- TOdBY 
-A- u raraLa t varrioo al Ra Hn 

nwWnMM-Imkb 

•err fcmaor-^.Tlme*. 

A comedy by ken Ujtfwk 
areoed tv Gdraare. 


C R EEMW1CR THEATRE Q1^S8 
77S6. Preview wed 7.46 Ope» 
Thur 7.00 sue «««> 7-48 um 
Sai 2.30. 

THE e rt WIAN by Tlwnaa Ot- 
way directed and designed by 
Pinup Prewse. 


HAMPSTEAD 733 9301. Eyes 
aura. Sal Mai 4.50. until SM. 
<Na part wed Extra URo hhtajt 
pert Tbnra lipm). TH E QAM- 

■'Sww«aasg 

“Ae tMhr a4 pltlliai 99 a Rayai 
- LAST WIXIU . 


HAYMARKST TMEATHC ROYAL 

Offlct * W Ol -930 9832 FHS 
Can 2 * nr 7 day cc booktum 
Ot 240 7200 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 
£ TIMOTHY DALTON 

.in a Shakespeare ***** « 

ANTONY & CLEOPATRA 

Pms from May zl 
THESHREW 

- • b 

Evgt 7 JO Mat* w«d 
(Trent June 111 and Sal 3.00. 


HER MMflVf. HwnUAd 
930 4029/6606 2046/2806., 
CC TTcketniBeter 371 6131 
Finn CM CC 240 7200. 

Dm Andrew Uayd Mebtow 
. .HareW Fibre MaRol 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
; OPERA - ^ 

Om 9 Oct. 


DUCHEM 836 8243/ 2*0 9648. 
. . Ftna Call CC 240 7200 

124 hr* 7 days! CC 741 9999 CC 
379 6433 

Bah Larew's new comedy. 

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 

MAKES THE WOT EHD A 


WOHKAFUL FLACE- DJUI 

Starring 

GEORGE COLE 

Ore S. Wed matt 3. Sat* S A 030 
NOW BOOKING THROUGH TO 
SEPTEMBER 1986. 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/240 720a 
Eve* 8 Thu 3 SH S A 8 .30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Iliad led Drama Award IBM 

STEPPING OUT 

-TRIUMPH ON TAP” SM 
HU Comedy By Richard Harm 
Dewed to Juli a Mdtogie 
— mum y o ur s e lf g ur t o 
t n we r Dcucarr* d t*i 


TORTURE 5 CC 836 2238/9 Eve 
8 FM A SM 6 A R40 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laurence Ottvter Award 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

“One of tM nmniest and icrei nre- 
Ota. “A JOY" S Ew. 


fiAIOBCK. t Ol -836 4601. CC. 
379 6433 A C.C. 24 hr.Tdw 240 
7200 Cm Sate* 930 61 25. Eves 8 
ran. Wed mat 3.0. Sai 6-0 and 8^) 

NO SEX, PLEASE- 
WE*RE BRITISH 


LYTTELTON *8* 928 2252 CC 
INaoonal Theatre's proscenium 

atane) Preview* Twl Tomer 
8 oo A May 2a lo 26 now T46 
as pnrued M loafleil Lew price 
natMto2dai2.iE .Opoiito. 
27 u 7.00. Then May 28* 29 
A Juno 3 lo 8 PAL L IA R TE by 
Arthur Sdiolcder. version to 
Tom Stoppard. 


MAYFAIR C CC 629 30M. Mon- 
Thu 8 Fri/Sil B.40 A 8-10 

RICHARD TODD 
THE BU9NESS OF ■ 
MURDER 

‘Drab— I Uuta.r far yam"SM. 

“An onabathM winner” S Em 
^Smsauonal" Times 


KATlOtlAL THCATRC Sttl Bank 

NATIONAL. THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARATE MitW B raider 
QUVtER/ LYTTELTON/ 
COYTESLOC Excaitant Cheap 

yats tow OftoK.ffl.SKSS 

from 10 am. RESTAURANT 1928 
2053). CHEAP. EASY CAR PAR, 
Info 653 08 80 

NT ALSO AT THE MCRMATO 


o LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6435 Eves 7.4S 
Tue 6 '5*i 300 & 7 48. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/TA suer MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO HR OFFICE 


Grow BookufiB 01-406 1867 or 
01-920 6123 Postal apouraikms 
new bemg accepted until and of 

Not oncer 


UNBON MLLADHRH 437 7373. 
437 2056. CC 734 8961. 379 
6433/741 9999. First CaH 24 Hr 
7 Day CC 240 7200. Grp Sales 
930 6123. 

- THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

DMECT FROM BROADWAY 

GEORGE HEARN & DEMIS 
OGUXEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

A LOVE STORY YOUXL LAUGH 
ABOUT FUR A LIFE TIME 

“BREATHTAKINGLY 
L AVIS H" Th e Tim es 

“A SLOMOUS CELERRATKML- 
A FU LL- THROTTLE 
EHTEXTABOKKr* D Mai 

Mon-Sol 7.50. Mats Wed A Sal 
2.30 


From 16th June Wed Mat 2.00 
Sal ewe* 800 


LYRR HA— 3111— TM 01-741 
231 1. Prev* May 28 A 29 al 7.45. 
May 30 at 7.00. Sub Eves 



LYRIC THEATRE 9ban«bray 
Ave Wl 01-437 368617 01-434 
1560. 01-434 1050- 01-734 

Si 66/7. Red Price Pren. from 
June 4. Open* June 1 1 « 7.0. 

COL1R KJIKO.Y tn 
The Naueoai Theatre - * acdaOned 
produ ct ion of 
ALAR AYCKBOURtrS 
Award Winning comedy 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

Eips 7-30. Mats Weds Worn June 
< 8 ) and Sms 3.0 Adiance Book- 
tops Penod Now Open June 4 - 
AIM 30. cram Sale* Ol 930 
61 23JWST CALL 24HR 7 DAY 
CC BOOtUNOS ON 01 240 7200 
(NO BOOKING FEEL 


OLD VtC 929 7616 CC 261 1821 
Group Sales 930 6123. June 3 
la July 12 

SIMOH W ARD 
DAVD LAMQTON 

ROSS 

The story nf 


Of Terence Ramgan ' 


OLD VIC 9» 7616 CC 261 1821 
Group Sale* 930 6123 Until 
May 31. Eves 7.30. wed Mai* 
230. Safe 4 . 0 * 7.48. 


wumbt*' 

NtVEMTIVE — FORNT" 008. 
“Y pra4d r e t .... wif i Hw U m; 

O Tale. 


taiVlElt *S* 928 2252 CC 
■National Tneaire's own sugei 
Tom 7 16. men June 6 lo 9 
YOHAilAB to Peter Shaffer. 
Tonuir 7.19. Wed 200 (low 
price null 6 7.16. men May 2 7 
lo 29 A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL. 


OPEN AIR BCC E Kri PARK 

486 2431 CC 379 6433. 

• CC Houtne 486 IStt. 

ROMEO AND JULIET 

Preview* from so May IN 

nkM 2nd Jnxe 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 
CC 437 KS27 DT 379 6433 
_ Grn Sales 930 6123 


LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT* GET A 
TICKET -STEAL ONE" sw. 

Eves 7.30 Mats TM! It sal 2.30 
Latecramms not aanuted until me 
interval 

■EAT THE TOUTS BY BNQUR- 
IHC FOR RETUHMS AT THE BOX 
OFFICE HOW BOOKHtB TO 
OCT 4. SPECIAL CHARITY 


BOX OFFICE PON DETAILS. 


PHOENIX B36 2294 cc 240 9661 
741 9999/240 7200 Evea 8 Mai 
Thu 3 Sal 5 & 8-30 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
. TONIGHTL _ 


PICCADILLY THEATRE 487 
4606. 734 9656 GredU Cant 
Hotlines 379 6 S 6 & 741 9999 GTP 
Sales 836 3962/930 6123. 

"A BrMani BiP 1 RRC 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 


Eses 8.0 Mats Wed 3 It Sal 6 


New boAUfip Derted new open to 
end of September 


PRDKE EDWARD Box Office 
734 8951 First Cali 34 Hr 7 Days 
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32 MONDAY MAY 19 1986 


THE 


SPORT 


England bring back 
Pringle and Dilley 


By John Woodcock 

Cricket Correspondent 

When, od Friday, the En- 
gland selectors chose then 
party for the two one-day 
internationals for the Texaco 
Trophy next weekend, _ they 
were unaware that within 3c 
hours Ian Botham would be 
signing a document which 
could send him into exile. He 
is. therefore, included among 
the 13 players whose names 
were announced yesterday. So 
are Graham Dilley and Derek 
Pringle, the only two not to 
have been cm the ill-fated 
winter tour to the West Indies. 

It was not to be expected 
that wholesale changes would 
be made; but some bad to be. 
if only as an example. So there 
is no' place for Robinson and 
Foster, who both played in the 
last Test match in Antigua. 
Foster, anyway, is not at his 
best in limited-overs cricket. 
Taylor, on the other hand, is 
given a place. If the tour were 
to be repeated, with England 
taking the same side, more use 
would have to be made of 

RUGBY UNION 

Lost pride 
restored 
by England 

By David Hands 

Rugby Correspondent 

%.jB The inter- 
conm^ national sevens 
*rWn\ tournament at 
^ASEP? the Cardiff Na- 

S f j tional Stadium 

i r on Saturday may 

\x not have prov- 
ided an impressive launching 
pad for Sport Aid Week, but it 
did no harm to the morale of 
England's much abused rugby 
players. By playing as they did 
to reach the final, they also 
contributed to the success of the 
event which frankly did not get 
the support it deserved. 

On a rainswept blustery day 
the 5.000 souls who did attend 
took England to their hearts. 
Many of them had watched the 
Bulldogs brazen it out with New 
Zealand, the favourites, in a 
group match on Friday evening 
before going down 16-10. Then 
the team, led by Cusworth. the 
Leicester captain, made the 
most of a popularity which is 
bound to be temporary by 
beating the Australians 18-10 to 
reach the finaL 
That they then lost 32-6 to 
New Zealand Korns, who 
played rugby as sharp as the 
prows of the Maori war canoes 
from which they took their 
sobriqueL was not surprising. 
England's primary effort had 
gone into beating the Austra- 

Durfcan — The “rebel" New 
Zealand team beat the Sooth 
African Sprinboks 19-18 here 
on Saturday. Naas Botha 
could have won the game for 
the Springboks in the dying 
seconds of the match, but he 
narrowly missed a drop kick 
from in front of the posts. The 
New Zealand rugby authori- 
ties have said that if their 
players do not return home 
today they will forfeit the right 
to play in their national trials. 

bans, during which they lost 
Cusworth, their play-anker, 
with concussion derived from 
the flying boot of Skinner, his 
own forward. Early in the final 
they also lost Evans, their pace 
man, following a kick on the 
knee. 

Yet even if England bad been 
at full strength. New Zealand 
would still have won what was 
their third major sevens tour- 
nament in the space of two 
months. Blessed with aggres- 
sion. all-round pace and the goal 
kicking of Botica (who ended 
the tournament as leading try 
scorer, with six, and leading 
points scorer, with 52). they are 
clearly setting new standards in 
the abbreviated game as well as 
the senior game. 

Nevertheless. England, well 
selected and well prepared, went 
a long way to restoring a 
reputation lost at the Sydney 
sevens tournament in Match. 

England, runners-up in group 
B. paced themselves while 
Australia threatened to nin 
a wav with the event by scoring 
SO points in three games. But in 
the semi-final Don Hughes, the i 
Newbridge referee, gave a pen- , 
ally try to England after a 
somewhat cynical body check 
by Ella on Cusworth when three , 
Australian players had the bail 1 
covered. Hughes then refused to 
aive one to Australia after 
Cusworth played the ball in a i 
blatantly offside position ; 

England accepted their gifts j 
gratefully. Knibbs carved , 
through the middle for a try and i 
Older collected another after an ■ 
Australian line-out. Cusworth - 
adding the conversion. Charity 1 
ran short in the finaL Evans < 
seized upon a loose pass for a try i 
convened by Williams before 
being siretchered off whereupon 
Brooke -Cow den, Kirk, Phillips. 
Kirwan and Botica (2) scored 
tries, Botica converting four 
times. 

FINALISTS: NEW ZEALAND KORUS; J 
Kswan, J Scnusw. F Botica. D Kirtc fcapt). 

Z Brooke. M Brooke-Gowden. c PMipa. 
ENGLISH BULLDOGS; B Evans (Leices- 
ter) (rep: D Pooler. Wasps). R Knaos 
iSrotcD. P Vfafems (Orrall), a Moon 
fNoMmgham). M Skinner (Harteouins). J 
OWer (Harlequins, captain). M Rosa 

ifcrfmie D Sevan (Wales). 

RESULTS.- Group A: New Zealand 22. 
France 0: ScoVand 12. Frame lfr, England 
10, New Zealand is: Sampnd o. England 
10. New Zealand 26. Scotland 4; England 
10. Francs B.CnupQi Wales O. Australia 
22. Rest Of WoriHlO, Ireland IS; AustraSa 


England team 

*D I Gower (Leicestershire) 
G A Gooch (Essex) 

W N Slack (Middlesex) 

M W Catting (Middlesex) 

A J f- flmh (Northams) 

I T Botham (Somerset) 
tP R Downlen (Middlesex) 
D R Pringle (Essex) 

J E Emburey (Middlesex) 

P H Edmonds (Middlesex) 

R M Ellison (Kent) 

GR Dilley (Kent) 

L B Taylor (Leicestershire) 

Taylor, who could at least 
have been relied upon to bowl 
a line and length. As it was. 
after being England’s most 
economical bowler in the fust 
of the four one-day interna- 
tionals, he was hardly seen 
again. 

Pringle and Wiley are both 
more mature cricketers than 
when they first played for 
England, Pringle while he was 
still at Cambridge and Dilley 
when he was only 2 1 . An Essex 
match seldom goes by now 
without Pringle doing some- 


thing useful for them either 
with bat or ball, and he is a 
good catcher. He is still 
Botham's likeliest successor, 
when the time comes, as the 
chief all-rounder in the side. 

Dilley, for his pari, seems to 
have benefited greatly from 
being taken in hand by John 
Lever in South Africa during 
the winter. Coming into the 
Natal side to fill a temporary 
gap. he became their most 
successful bowler. After want- 
ing to leave Kent at the dose 
of last season, he has settled 
down with them again, and his 
county captain, for one, says 
he has never seen him bowl 
better. Both he and Pringle 
deserve another chance, just 
as, 1 am sure. Thomas and 
Foster will before long. 

The same goes for Robin- 
son. though for the moment 
Slack, as the more successful 
of the two when the winter 
tour ended, is preferred as 
Gooch's partner. David 
Smith. England's other miss- 
ing batsman from the West 
Indian party (apart from 
Willey, who is still injured). 


SHOWJUMPING 


Whitaker is edged 
out of a double 

From Jenny MacArthar, Jerez de la Frontera 


An unlucky draw for Mi- 
chael Whitaker and Next 
Courtway in yesterday’s big 
speed class, the Cruz del 
Campo, narrowly prevented 
the Yorkshire-born rider a 
second successive win in 
Spain. 

He and the Irish-bred mare, 
the winner of Saturday night's 
speed class, were drawn first 
out of 38 starters but their fast 
clear round over the big 10- 
fence course looked increas- 
ingly good as the next 36 riders 
tried and failed to catch him. 

It was Spain's Pedro San- 
chez Aleman, on the agile 
stallion Lobaio, who finally 
toppled him. The 20-year-old 
rider, who is in his team fin- 
today's Nations Cup. had 
been accidentally left off the 
original start fist and the 
organisers, realising their mis- 
take, added him on at the end 
— a happy positron to be in for 
a speed class. 

“It’s almost impossible to 
win from the front in a 
competition with that many 
; runners," Whitaker said after- 
wards. “I'm surprised I stayed 
there as long as I did." 

Today Whitaker rides his 


top horse. Next Amanda, in 
the Nations Cup in which nine 
teams, including the Swiss and 
West Germans are competing. 
Nick Skelton and the in-form 
Raffles Apollo, who were rele- 
gated to second place by Joris 
Meulemans. a little-known 
Belgian rider in Saturday's 
£1 9,000 Grand Prix, go first in 
the team. Malcolm Pyrah and 
Tower land Diamond Seeker, 
who were fourth in the Grand 
Prix. go third and the reliable 
John Whitaker with Next 
Hopscotch, who has jumped 
consistently well here, go last 
Ronnie Massarella. the 
team's manager, brought these 
four riders to Spain as part of 
the build-up to the world 
championships in West Ger- 
many in July. He wants to 
rekindle team spirit 

RESULTS: The Craz del Campo: 1, 
Lobato (S Atemdn), no (suits In 
61-98S6C; 2, Next Courtway (M 
Whitaker). 0 in 62.63; 3. Fly Away (L 
Bovy, Argentina), 0 in 63.47. The 
Repub&e of Araentoia Prize: 1, 
Next Courtway (M Whitaker). 0 in 
67.85; 2. Iratus Megal (M Da Costa. 
Portugal), 0 in 69.92; 3, Saint Mungo 
(J Whitaker), 0 in 69.94. Jerez 
Grand Prix: i . Acardi (J Meulemans, 
Belgium). 0 In 3653; 2, Raffles 
Apollo (N Skelton), 4 in 35.12: 3, 
Kaoua (M Irujo, Spain}. 4 in 37.63. 


HOCKEY 


British hopes vanish 

From Joyce Whitehead, Utrecht 


Any hopes of a British team 
reaching the final of the Euro- 
pean Cup for women’s club 
champions disappeared here 
over the weekend with the 
defeats suffered by Glasgow 
Western and Ipswich. Glasgow 
lost 4-0 to the Dutch team, 
HCG, on Saturday but despite 
making heavy weather of 
yesterday’s match with Slade 
Franca is, won 3-0 to secure a 
place in today’s match for third 
and fourth place, against 
Leverkusen. The final will be 
between HGC and Borispol 
(USSR). 

Ipswich suffered a great dis- 
appointment when they lost 
yesterday's vital match 2-1 to 
Leverkusen, whose winning goal 
came late m the game. A draw 
would have put the English 
champions through to the semi- 


finaL They struggled gallantly 
but found the dose marking of 
the West Germans too difficult 
to overcome though Mary 
Lipsrambe was behind some 
inspired moves and scored the 
equaliser in die second half 
On Saturday, Ipswich were 
unfortunate not to draw with 
BorispoL who won 5-3. In a 
skilful game, goals from Sandy 
Lister (2) and Tracey Wilce kept 
excitement high and Ipswich in 
contention until the ability and 
ball control of the Russians, in 
particular the famous Natella 
Knasuikova, proved decisive. 
RESULTS: Saturday: Borispol 
(USSR) 5. Ipswich 3; HGC (Neth) 4. 
Glasgow 0; Leverkusen (WG) 6, 
Cwrmawa (Wales) 0; portadown 
(Ire) 4. Stade Francais 0. Sunday: 
Borispol 5, Cwmtawe 0; Leverkusen 
2, Ipswich 1; Glasgow 3, Stade 
FrangafeO. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


will have to overcome bis 
proneness to injury before 
getting himself back into con- 
sideration. Already this season 
he has missed more matches 
for Worcestershire than he has 
played, and one thing or 
another made him unavail- 
able a number of times in the 
West Indies. 

Of those who might well 
have been included in this 
Texaco party, but have not, 
Agnew, Athey. Fowler, 
Radford and Rhodes probably 
came nearest to it. The choice 
of Lamb extends his unbroken 
sequence of selection since be 
Gist came into the side in June 
1982. He has not missed a 
Test match or a one-day 
international since then, a 
record he is justifiably proud 
of. Next Saturday’s will be his 
48ih one-day international 
and be has played 43 
successive Tests, an accurate 
indication of his resilience in 
an age when bowlers are 
inclined to make the batsmen 
tbeir target almost as often as 
the slumps. 

Botham bearing, page 12 

BOXING 

Stevenson 
wins his 
third title 

The super-heavy weight, 
Teofilo Stevenson, and the 
lightweight Adolfo Horta, of 
Cuba, pot their muses into the 
record books on Saturday by 
becoming the first fighters to 
inn three world amateur 
championship titles. 

Veterans Stevenson and 
Horta were joined on the 
winners" stand by their 18- 
year-old compatriot Felix 
Savon, who won file heavy- 
weight title. 

Boxers from the United 
Stales took Saturday's other 
three titles: KeJcie Banks the 
featherweight championship, 
Kenny Gould the welterweight 
and Darin Allen the middle- 
weight. 

Stevenson and Horta scored 
their unprecedented third 
world championship victories 
in contrasting fashion. The 35- 
y ear-old Stevenson, a three- 
time Olympic gold medallist 
nearing the end of a spectacu- 
lar amaiesr career, stopped 
the strong, but inexperienced 
Alex. Garcia, of the United 
States, in the second round, 
while Horta, aged 28, strag- 
gled to take a 3-2 decision over 
Engels Pedrosa, the teenager 
from Venezuela. 

Winners in these competi- 
tions, held every four years, 
are considered early favourites 
for fire next Olympic Games, 
hot Stevenson, the best known 
champion of this to ornament, 
may not travel to Seoul in 
1988. 

After his easy victory over 
Garcia (who was contesting 
only his 19th amateur fight), 
Stevenson, winner of 301 
bouts, said that he was not 
certain of his fotnre (dans. *T 
don’t know about fighting in 
Seoul. It's possible. Well hare 
1 to wait and see," he said. 

Stevenson overwhelmed his 
young opponent who was 
knocked down twice in the 
second round with rights to the 
j bead. Horta, who sum he dees 
plan to compete in the 1988 
; Olympics, has now won world 
championship tides in three 
weight divisions previously 
winning as a bantamweight in 
1 1978 and as a featherweight in 
1982. Results, page 29 


34. Ireland 6: Wales 6. Rest of Woftt 22: 
Wales 18. tratana 10: fiwrafca 2*. Rest ol 
TO 18. Austra- 

ha 10. New Zealand 24. Rssef world 12. 
Smt England 6, New Zeasanc 32- 


Parson’s 

record 

Geoff Parsons provided the 
highlight of the Kent AAA 
county championships at 
Crystal Palace yesterday by 
once again improving his own 
UK national high jump record 
(Cliff Temple writes). He 
cleared 2.28 metres (7ft 5%in) 
to add 1 centimetre to the 
mark he set in the same 
stadium 1 1 days earlier. 

Parsons, a student at the 
Royal School of Mines, 
cleared on his first attempt 
and then had two unsuccessful 
jumps at 231 metres (7ft 7in) 
which would have surpassed 
his national indoor record of 
230 metres.. His next compe- 
tition will be in the LJK 
championships at Cwmbran 
next Sunday. 

O’Reilly wins 

Teresa O’Reilly, aged 32, is 
the new Irish women’s golf 
champion. Mrs O'Reilly sur- 
prised the Curtis Cup player, 
Mary McKenna, by one hole 
in the semi-final at Castierock 
on Saturday before defeating 
Evan Higgins by 4 and 3 in the 
final. Miss Higgins shocked 

reigning champion Claire 
Hourihane. who has won the 
title for the last three years, in 
the other semi-final winning 
by one hole. 

RESULTS: SmHWk T OTteSy 
(Grange) M M McKenna (ConatuM 5 
hole: E Kgrans (Douglas) K C Hounnane 

(WooaxooKt t Me- Ffaefc CPeUy a 

H«girt3 4and 3 



Parsons highlight of event 

Ronaldson title 

Chris Ronaldson, the world 
real tennis champion who is 
the professional at Hampton 
Court, regained the George 
Wimpey professionals singles 
championship front his depu- 
ty professional. Lachlan 
Deucbar. by 6-3, 6-1. 4-6. 6-5 
at the Seacoun Tennis club, 
Hayling Island yesterday (Wil- 
liam Stephens writes). 
Ronaldson had eliminated 
Frank Willis, the former open 

champion who is professional 
at Manchester. 1-b. 6-2. 6-2. 6- 
3 in the semi-finals while 
Deuchar beat Colin Lumley. 
former Holyport professional, 
6-1, 6-1, 6-5. 

ResnIlsJPage29 


Willey back 

Peter Willey is set to return 
to cricket in a second team 
match a week tomorrow. The 
Leicestershire and England 
all-rounder has made a swift 
recovery following an emer- 
gency operation on his right 
knee. Willey was flown home 
from West Indies and missed 
the final Test there after 
breaking down in training. 

Italian pink 

Baia Domizia (AP) - Guido 
Bon tempi, of Italy, edged 
ahead at the finish line yester- 
day to win the 257-kilometer 
( 1 60-mile) seventh stage of the 
Giro d’ Italia cycling race. 
Bontempi beat two fellow 
Italians, Stefano Allocchio 
and Paolo Rosola, and the rest 
of the pack in a final sprint. 
Giuseppe Saronni. of Italy, 
held on to the pink jersey as 
the overall leader. 

ResnltsJPage 29 

Flight delay 

B J Eastwood's insistence at 
being ringside when his recent 
signing Eamonn McAufey. the 
former ABA lightweight 
champion from Belfast, makes 
his professional debut, has 
delayed Barry McGuigan's de- 
parture for his title defence 
against Fernando Sosa, of 
Argentina, in Las Vegas on 
June 23 by 24 hours. 
McGuigan will fly out to his 
training camp in Palm 
Springs. California, on 
Wednesday From Heathrow. 



Heads yon win: Barnes rises to the challenge while Dixon, his England team-mate, hacks 
down in Saturday's match against Mexico in the Los Angeles Coliseum. . 

Robson’s chosen men have 
thrown down the gauntlet 

From Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent, Los Angeles 


The sun shone brilliantly, 
almost too brilliantly, for 
England's squad here on Sat- 
urday afternoon. It burnt 
through the visible haze of 
smog that hangs constantly 
over the city and illuminated a 
3-0 victory over Mexico of 
such bright promise that Bob- 
by Robson's celebrated claim 
that “we can win the World 
Cup" should now be taken 
seriously. 

Mexico, the hosts of the 
forthcoming tournament, bad 
not lost any of the 1 7 previous 
internationals they had staged 
in their second home, the 
Coliseum in Los Angeles. 
They are considered one of the 
favourites in the open field of 
24 finalists and one of their 
recent victims there was Ar- 
gentina, another of the leading 
candidates. 

Yet it took England a mere 
37 minutes to dismantle the 
defence, the record and the 
esteem of the Mexicans. Had 
they been accustomed to the 
temperature, there is little 
doubt the margin would have 
been more substantial As it is, 
the result will have sent a cold 
shudder around the globe. 

“We became tired and rag- 
ged when the heat got to us but 
we can prepare for that later in 
Monterrey.” Robson said. “It 
was a fabulous win." 

The rfflrnagft was inflicted 
initially by Hatdey, who was 
almost rubbing his nose in the 
turf as he glanced in a low 
cross from Waddle. Hatdey 
then rose to head in another 
cross from Beardsley. “It is a 
good job we've been training 
at altitude," Robson said. “He 
climbed as high as Pike's Peak 
(the mountain that overshad- 
ows the team's hotel in Colo- 
rado) to reach that one." 

Bora Milutinovic the Mexi- 
co manager, admitted that 
Hatdey was “a daunting chal- 
lenge for players who are not 
used to that sort of threat". If 
his first touch were not so 
heavy be would be even more 
dangerous on the ground. It 
was there, at a lower level, that 
Beardsley was most 
promioenL 

Left unattended at a free 
kick, be punished the Mexi- 
cans by adding the third. Not 
only was it his opening goal 
for England it also, according 
to Robson, crowned his best 
international performance so 
far. “He was the star of the 
show and especially in the first 
half." 

After the interval, England 
wilted in the oppressive, un- 
forgiving heat, but bdd on 
stubbornly to their advantage. 
Although Anderson was nota- 
bly fallible. Butcher, in partic- 
ular. stood out alongside 
Fenwick, his partner for only 
the fourth time. And Shilton, 
in Robson's words, “showed 
people here what the number 
one in the world means". 

His first “magnificent" save 
from Hermostllo stopped En- 
gland from falling behind. His 
others — from Aguirre, Espafia 
and Javier Cruz — prevented 
the Mexicans from catching 
up. With Shilton in such form, 
the lone concern was that 
somebody would suffer an 


injury. With 20 minutes to go, 
that dark fear seemed to have 
been realised. 

The sight of Bryan Robson 
throwing himself into a chal- 
lenge and emerging clutching 
his right shoulder has become 
sicken ingly familiar. As be 
knelt by the byline, hundred 
in that same dreaded pose, the 
thought that he might sudden- 
ly and cruelly have been ruled 
out of the World Cup occurred 
to every Englishman in the 
stadium. 

Hodge doubt 

Steve Hodge, the Aston 
Villa midfield player, has been 
given mrtfl Wednesday to 
prove his fitness after damag- 
ing ankle ligaments during 
last week’s warm-op match 
against South Korea. If he 
fails to recover by then be frill 
be sent home and probably 
replaced by Stewart Robson of 
ArseoaL Bobby Robson said: 
“I cannot afford to take even 
die slightest chance. Senti- 
ment can play no part in the 
matter. I frill have to be 
ruthless about ft." 

It passed through his own 
mind as welL “I fell a tweak in 
the muscle at the back of the 
shoulder." be commented lat- 
er. “I was a bit worried and I 
.iboughL^Carefiii, get out of 
here immediately'. "He did so 
as a precautionary measure 
and was about to be with- 
drawn anyway. . 

The distress on the faces of 
the rest of the side as they 
stumbled back to their dress- 
ing room confirmed how 
strenuous the test bad been. 
Sansom, weighed moments 
after the end, had shed eight 
pounds. Robson was sur- 
mised. “You wouldn't have 
thought that he had that much 
weight to lose.” 

Wflkins, who lost five 
pounds, took off one of his 
boots to reveal another source 
of pain. Half of the sole of his 
foot was covered with a huge 
blister. Hoddle received 


lengthy attention on his 
bloodied nose and Beardsley 
also took a stray elbow in the 
face. Those blows were noth- 
ing compared to the psycho- 
logical set-back suffered by 
Mexico. The presence of San- 
chez. Real Madrid's leading 
scoter who was unavailable 
through injury, and Boy. an- 
other forward who was absent, 
would have done nothing to 
improve either their defence 
or the unreliable handling of 
Larios, their goalkeeper. 

Mflutinovic said the score 
flattered England and that he 
“would not mind meeting 
them again" if fate should 
bring the two countries togeth- 
er in the World Gup. His 
words lacked conviction. Nei - 1 
tber he nor any other national 
manager will relish the pros- i 
pect of colliding with 
Robson's side next month. 

As well as gaining revenge i 
for their last defeat, in Mexico i 
City last June, England ex- 
tended their unbeaten run to 
10 games. Within the se- 
quence lie some relevant sta- 
tistics. In scoring 26 goals, 
they have conceded only three 
and have conquered other 
finalists such as West Germa- 
ny and the Soviet Union along 
the way. 

A match against Canada, 
who have also qualified, will 
-complete England’s build-up 
next Saturday in Vancouver. 
The belief the confidence and 
the spirit is now so irresistibly 
strong that even if it is raining 
there at the end of the week, as 
it has been recently, the sun 
will continue to shine for 
Robson and his chosen men. 

MEXICO: P Larios. M Trejo, A 
Manzo, M Esparta (sub: A 
OominguezL C HarmosTBo (sub: F 
Javier Cruz), J Aguirre. F Cruz (sub: 

F Quirerta). L Bores, C MuAoz, R 


ENGLAND: PShfiton. K Sansom, V 
Anderson, T Butcher, T Fenwick, G 
Hoddle, B Robson {sub: G Stevens, 
Tottenham Hotspur). R WBkins (sub: 
T Steven), M Hatetey (sub: K Doran), 
P Beardsley, C Waddle (sub: J 
Bernes). 

Referee: V Maura (Urftetf States). 

Life after Mexico, page 40 


Maradona’s message 
boosts Zico’s spirits 


MEXICO CITY (Reuter) - 
The Brazilian midfield play- 
er, Zico, will miss the World 
Cup finals unless his knee 
injuiy heals by Friday's dead- 
line for the naming of squads, 
his manager. Tele Santana 
said yesterday. 

“In a short tournament like 
the World Cup you cannot 
take any risks; everybody will 
have to be 100 per cent fit," 
Santana said. 

Argentina's Diego 


Maradona has seat a message 
to Zico wishing him welL “For 
the benefit of world football 


fans, I hope you will recover in 
time to play in the World Cup 
and delight all of us with your 
anistry," Maradona said. Zico 
said that the message had 
given him “strength to fight 
until the very last minute". 

Santana's comments con- 
tradicted those of the Brazil- 


ian team doctor, Neylor 
Lasmar. who said earlier that 
team officials were consider- 
ing including Zico in the final 
22-man squad in the hope he 
would be fit 

That approach won support 
from the defender, Edinho. “I 
think no-one should push 
Zico at this stage." he said. 
“We should keep him in the 
squad and hope he can play 
after the first round." Santana 
believes Zico will have , 
shrugged off the injury by the 1 
time he names the squad and 
that he will attain match 
fitness after the deadline. 

But Dr Lasmar said: “To be 
cured, perhaps Zico needs an 
operation on his left knee. The 
treatment he is being submit- 
ted to may allow him to play 
normally m all the games. But 
it could stop him after only a 
minute.** 


Graf set 
for her 
ultimate 
test 

From Rex Bellamy 
Tennis Correspondent 
West Berlin 

The dramatic conventions -, 
have been satisfied in the'-' 
German women's champion- 
ships. Steffi Graf, the preco- 
cious heroine of German 
tennis, wifi play Martina 
Navratilova, monarch of the 
world game, fa today's singles 
final — played a day later than 
mast finals so that it can slot 
into a public holiday. 

Tins could he a memorable 
festival for Miss Graf and her 
compatriots. Still a month 
short of her seventeenth birth- 
day, she will be playing on her 
best surface, whereas Mbs 
N avratilova is less at ease on 
shale than on anything 
efse-“I T ve 'pretty much mas- ■ 
tered grass 2 nd indoors," Miss £ 
Nanatofiva suggests, “bid I 
can still improve on cement 
and day 7* 

Boris Beckris reputation as 
Wimbledon champion has 
partly obscured the fact that 
the younger Miss Graf has an 
even higher ranking: third in 
the world- five weeks ago, in 
South Carolina, she won a 
professional tournament for 
the first tune, beating Hans 
Mandlikpva in her semi-final 
and Chris Lloyd m the final — 
on Mrs Lloyd’s favorite sur- 
face, shale. 

Encouraged, Miss Graf won 
her next two tournaments as A . 
wdL Winning consistently is '*• 
fan, hot strenuous. Miss Graf 
is haring treatment for a 
slightly strained stomach mus- 
cle, but has lost only nine 
pmm fa the three matches 
she has played here. Great 
player though Miss 
Navratilova Is, she will start 
the final with no more than an 
even chance. 

Yesterday’s programme 
amid not hare been ranch 
more inviting, in prospect 
anyway. The listed contestants 
were four of the five most 
highly tanked players — Mrs 
Lloyd did not compete — and 
each senti-final included a 
German. But when Miss 
Mandlxkova turned op, eri- t 
deatly iH, the doctor sent her 
back to the faoteL Afflicted by 
a viral infection, she had been 
up for ranch of the sight, and 
ford a temperature of 101 

Kohde-Kilseh’s 
steady rise 


. So Miss Graf had a walk- 
over into the final and Miss 
Navratilova joined her after a 
7-6, 6-2 win over Claudia 
Kohde-Kilsch, otherwise 
known as the leaning tower of 
Saarbrncfcen. Becker and 
Miss Graf have attracted so 
ranch attention that Miss 
Kobde-Kflsch, aged 22 and 
more than six feet teJL has 
advanced almost by stealth to 
fourth place in tbe world 
rankings. 

The first set lasted for 64 
annates, and included eight 
deace games — in a tempera- 
tare of 82 degrees. Thank 
goodness for the soaring beau- 
ty of beech, poplar, lime, 
maple and plane that nsnally 
cast a shadow over one end of 
the court Miss Kohde-Kibcfa 
had a break-point for a 4-1 
lead in that first set, bat saved 
seven doable-faults. She saved 
set points at 4-5 and 5-6 before 
two boldly majestic initiatives 
gave Miss Navratofiva the 
edge in the tie-break. 

In the second set. Miss 
Kohde-Kilsch had two break 
points for a 3-1 lead, but was to 
score only six more pwnts. She 
had played some smart tennis, 
fllnminated by deft variations, 
and she had hit many great 
shots. She had also reminded 
as that, when threatened from 
tbe net. Miss Navratilova is 
not particularly adept at pro- 
ducing the necessary pasting 
shot or lob. 

The first set was joyously 
thrilling, the second mostly 
little more than an appendix. 
One had time to notice a 
butterfly perching on tbe 
heads of one spectator after 
another (except, for some rea- 
son, bald men). Moreover, this 
may have been the first match 
in which play was held np 
while the drinks “fridge" was 
moved — a ball had rolled 
under iL 

Jo Draie’s encouraging ra- 
ttan to - competition was 
checked on Saturday, when 
she twice shared the centra 
court with Miss Navratilova. 
Miss Dime ms beaten 6-2, 6- 
I in a singles quarter-final. 
She made far more unforced 
errors than anyone playing 
Miss Navratilova can afford. 
Eventually, Miss Navratilova 
seemed to settle for some 
.rallying practice. 

Miss Dane and Anne 
Hobbs were beaten 6-2, 6-3 by 
Miss Navratilova ami Andrea 
Temesvari is a doubles semi- 
final. In doubles Miss 
Navratilova is the equivalent 

of a player and a half. 

RESU LT S: S pa tes: Quarter-finals: 
M Navratilova (US) M J Ourie (GB), 
6*2, 6-1; H Mandfflwva (Cz) bt B 
Bunge (WG) 6-2. 6-0; C Kohde- 
Kfedl (WG) titV Huber (Austria). 2- 
6, 4-4. 6-1; S Graf (WG) W A 
Temesvari (HtnL 6-3. 6-3. Semh 
thnlc NavratSova M KoMe-KB&ch. 
7-6, 6-2; Graf w.o. Mand&kova. scr. 
Doubles: Final; Graf and H Sukova 
(C*) bt NavratSova and Temesvari, 
7-6.6- 2. 




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