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No 62.467 


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offer of £50m 
to end dispute 


A new £50 million offer 
which could end ihe 1 7-week- 
old dispute over the News 
International move to 
Wapping. cast London, was 
made by the company yester- 
day. Mr Rupert Murdoch, the 
chairman, made it clear that it 
was the final offer afler a 
weekend or secret talks with 
the leaders or the five unions 
concerned. 

The revised five-point offer 
would give four weeks’ pay for 
every completed year of ser- 
vice. with a ceiling of £155 a 
week and a minimum pay- 
ment of £2,000. 

The unions would also be 
given the entire premises in 
Gray’s Inn Road where The 
Sunday Times was formerly 
primed. Previously only part 
of the building was on’ offer. 
Discussions over union recog- 
nition would be postponed for 
12 months and the company 
also made it clear . that no 
dismissed worker would be 
barred from future employ- 
ment possibilities with News 
Internationa], 

Speaking on behalf of the 
five unions concerned, Mr 
Norman Willis, general secre- 
tary of the TUC, said they 
were not prepared to endorse 
the offer but accepted it was 
final and would pul it to their 
members for a decision, 

Mr Murdoch told a press 
conference after two days of 
secret negotiations with the 
leaders of the five unions 
concerned. Sosa t *32, the 
NGA. EETPU.the AEU, and 
the NUJ, at a hotel near 
Heathrow Airport that obvi- 
ously he hoped they would 
accept the improved offer. 

The deadline set for the 
initial offer was not extended 
and expires on Friday, or until 
June 6 for a ballot of union 
members to be completed, 
provided balloting started by 
Friday. 

Mr Willis, said later they 
accepted that if was Mr 
Murdoch's final offer and 
would be submitting it to their 
members immediately. They 
made it dear it fell far short of 
some of their key demands. 

Tomorrow 


Heads they 
lose? 


By a Staff Reporter 

notably the re-employment of 
dismissed workers at 
Wapping. and said they would 
not be recommending it as 
such to the members — it was 
up to them to make a decision 
Mr Murdoch said the offer 
would lapse on May 30 or on 
completion of any union bal- 
lot taking place a't that time. 
He said the compensation 

MAIN POINTS OF OFFER 

• Four weeks' pay (with a 
ceiling of £155 per week) for 
each completed year of contin- 
uous service with a minimum 

or £2,000 

• No dismisssed worker 
would be excluded from future 
employment opportunities 
with News International by 
reason of his or her dismissal 

• The question of onion recog- 
nition at Wapping and Glas- 
gow would be reviewed after 12 
months from today 

• The onions would be given 
both the front and rear build- 
ings at 200 Gray's Inn Road 
for the purpose iff producing a 
newspaper 

• News International would 
withdraw the various legal 
actions against the print 
unions begun earlier this year 

payments had been thereby 
increased from an initial offer 
of £1 5 million to £50 million. 

.Asked about future employ- 
ment prospects of dismissed 
workers he said: “We are now 
fully staffed with a new labour 
force but we expect in the 
future either to expand 
Wapping or. to open a new 
plant in the north of the 

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Mr Murdoch (left) and Mr Willis at Heathrow yesterday. 

Sport Aid runners 
raise £100 million 



mmmmm 


Beset by the 
problems of the 
teachers' dispute, by 
local politicians and 
by understaffing in 
schools, Britain's 
head teachers are 
finding the pressures 
too stressful 


© The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
resumes today after 
the Bank holiday with 
£4,000 to be won. 
Details of how to apply 

for a card are on 

page 3. Portfolio list 
page 20; rules and 
how to play, information 
service, page 16 

On This Day 

On May 27 1941 ihe German 
battleship Bismarck was 
afier a chase of 1.750 miles 
from Bergen harbour. Nor- 
way. following ihe sinking or 
HMS Hood from which onJv 
three men survived Page 13 


Home News 2-4 Events 14 

Overseas 5-8 Features 10-12 
Appts 21 Law Report 21 

Arts 15 Leaders 13 

BirthsjJeaths. Letters I.' 

marriages 14 Obirnan 14 
Bridge 14 Science 14 
Business 17-21 Spurt 27-32 
Court 14 Tbearie&eic 31 

Crosswords 18,l6 TV & Radio 31 
Diary 12 Weather 16 


The symbolic torch that 
inspired 20 million charity 
runners in the Race Against 
Time was now the responsibil- 
ity of the world's political 
leaders. Sport Aid organizers 
said yesterday. 

Mr Nick Cater, Sport Aid's 
British organizer, said in Lon- 
don that £5 million had al- 
ready been raised in Britain. 
Sponsorship would “more 
than double that figure” be- 
fore money raised in 300 cities 
around the world took the 
total to an estimated 
£100 million. 

He urged athletes and spon- 
sors to hand in money without 
delay. “The 14.000 children 
dying in Africa every day from 
preventable diseases and mal- 
nutrition need the money 
now. The longer people wait 
the longer Africa starves.” 

In the London Sport Aid 
headquarters, young volun- 
teers were busy taking tele- 
phone pledges. Credit card 
donations, “as good as cash”, 
were expected to top £1 mil- 
lion when special telephone 
lines closed last night. 

Mr Cater said Sport Aid 
would be monitoring and 
commenting on the United 
Nations' special session on 
.Africa which sians today. 

Mr Cater said that Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Secretary, had a unique role to 
play. “When he speaks on 
Wednesday it will be his reply 
to Sport Aid. to our petition of 
blistered fecL and wc are very 
worried we will be disappoini- 


TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


ed by his response. But we 
hope he will announce a big 
initiative to help Africa.” 

The one sour note to spoil 
the jubilation of the world's 
biggest sporting event was the 
poor response in the United 
States, where Sport Aid 
clashed with the Hands Across 
America appeal to benefit the 
nation’s poor. 

While the cabinet of 
Ougadougou led thousands in 

Photograph 4 

Le ading article 13 

120 degree heat. Australians 
ran in the dark and camels 
raced in Timbuktu, only 4.000 
people ran in New York where 
Sudanese athlete Omar 
Khalifa, who had carried a 
torch from a refugee camp 
through 12 European capitals, 
lit a flame outside the United 
Nations building 

“I think America has dem- 
onstrated it the largest island 
in the world.” Mr Cater said. 
Two new fund-raising 
schemes were announced by 
Sport Aid Mail order medals 
for those who took pan in 
yesterday's run will be avail- 
able from a Bath. Avon, j 
company for £5. and a first- ; 
day cover of four stamps, 
franked in the Isle of Man at 
the lime of the run. will be 
sold for £3. 

Follow-up events wjJJ in- 
clude a football match with 
Britain playing the Rest of the 
World in August 


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country. We will consider 
applicants for any vacancies 
strictly on the basis of merit, 
there will be no preference 
given or special lists or any- 
thing like thaL” 

Mr Murdoch said he con- 
sidered the offer an extremely 
high price to pay for bringing 
the dispute to an end but 
added: “We want to get on 
with the job. hopefully we can 
put all of this behind us. I 
think the unions accept that 
this is the limit in terms of 
both time and money.” 
Pressed to comment on the 
question of union recognition 
at News International plants 
in a year's time he said: “We 
are going to review that with 
an open mind.” Again he was 
asked to confirm that he 
would make no further offer if 
this one was rejected, he said: 
“That's iL I am catching the 
next plane home.” 

At a separate press confer- 
ence a few minutes later. Mr 
Willis said the negotiations 
had begun on Sunday and that 
he and Mr Murdoch had 
joined them yesterday. 

“We are aU absolutely dear 
it is the final offer of the 
company and now it is up to 
the unions to decide their 
response," Mr Willis said. He 
said the unions leaders would 
not be recommending it but 
their members would be told 
it was the final offer. 

“We have sought to get 
additional amounts of money 
and indeed the amount was 
increased twice during the 
negotiations. A major ingredi- 
Con turned on page 2, col 8 




mm- 

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Mrs Thatcher with Mr Shimon Peres, the Israeli Prime Minister, after talks in Jerusalem. 


Sun causes 
holiday 
trips chaos 

Returning Bank holiday mo - 1 
torists and daytrippers com- 
bined to cause long traffic tail- 
backs on many roads across 
Britain yesterday, the busiest 
day for holiday traffic this 
year. 

Police and motoring organi- 
zations called on drivers to be 
patient to avoid accidents as 
roads leading to coastal re- 
sorts were jammed in the 
morning by oatgoing traffic 
and blocked in the evening by 
people returning home. 

The worst affected areas 
were in the South-east, where 
the Automobile Association 
reported tail-backs np to 10 
miles long in Kent and Sussex, 
as people headed for the 
-beaches at Brighton, Hastings 
and Margate. 

“The son has drawn -people 
out like a magnet,” a spokes- 
man for the RAC said. “Many 
though have had to spend 
longer than they expected 
sitting in traffic jams." I 

There were also heavy traf- I 
fic in Yorkshire as motorists 
headed for Scarborough, and 
in South Wales at Barry 
Island. The Yorkshire Dales, 1 
the Lake District and other 
beauty spots around the coun- 
try also had many visitors. 

The Surrey County Show 
caused further problems for 
motorists at Gnildford. The 
AA said there were snarl-ups 
at Southend because of the 
Essex Air Show. 

The London Weather Cen- 
tre said that Britain's east 
coast bad the sunniest day 
with temperatures reaching 
the high 60s(F). Colder, windi- 
er weather with showers kept 
many people indoors on the 
west coast. Northern Ireland 
and Scotland. 

England won the one day 
Texaco Trophy cricket match 
against India at Old Trafford 
yesterday by five wickets. 

The Whyte and Mackay 
PGA Championship was won 
by Rodger Davis of Australia 
who beat Des Smyth of Ire- 
land at the third extra hole of a 
sudden-death play-off on the 

Continued on page 2, col 7 


British clash over 
Kremlin offer on 
nuclear arms talk 

From Christopher Walker. Moscow 


The future of Britain’s inde- 
pendent nuclear deterrent 
loomed as a central issue at 
the next general election afier 
more than three hours of talks 
in the Kremlin yesterday be- 
tween a parliamentary 'delega- 
tion and Mr Mikhail Gor- 
bachov 

The meeting, which in- 
volved Lord Whiielaw, the 
Deputy Prime Minister and 
Mr Dennis Healey, shadow 
foreign secretary’- was the most 
high-ranking between British 
representatives and Mr Gor- 
bachov since he took power in 
1 9$5. During it. Mr Gor- 
bachov pressed his request for 
bi-lateral negotiations be- 
tween Moscow and London 
on nuclear arms. 

He said that this would be 
outlined in a personal letter he 
is sending lo Mrs Thatcher. 

While Lord Whiielaw hint- 
ed at a subsequent press 
conference that the Conserva- 
tive Government would have 
no part in talks which envis- 
aged the elimination of 
Britain’s deterrenL Mr Healey 
seized on the offer as the key 
point of the meeting and 
clashed openly with Lord 
Whitelaw’s view-s. 

Mr Healey also made clear 
in remarks after the Kremlin 
session - noted both for its 
affability and length — that he 
was seeking private talks in 
Moscow with senior officials 
to discuss Labour’s stand. 

Mr Healey is widely expect- 
ed to make another visit here 
with Mr Neil KinnocLthe 
Labour leader, before the next 
election. 

“Mr Gorbachov said he 
would make an agreement 
with the British Government. 
We hope very much he is 
successful, if not. we will make 
it” Mr Healey said. He had 
areued that the Kremlin’s 
offer of “equivalent” reduc- 
tions in the British and Soviet 
arsenals coincided with La- 
bour’s own defence policy. 

The Labour approach is 
dismissed as naive by many 


Chernobyl death toll rises to 19 


Moscow (Reuter) — The 
death toll from Chernobyl 
now stands at 19. a senior 
Soviet scientist said yesterday, 
a month after the nuclear 
accident. 

Academician Yevgeny 
Velikhov, vice-president of 
the Academy of Sciences, said 
the figure comprised the two 
people who died in the acci- 
dent itself and 17 who died 
later. About 300 others were 
injured. 

Prnvda primed what it 
caJJed “fragments" written in 
hospital by victims, some of 
whom were “no longer with 
us”. 


It acknowledged that tt was 
the w'orld’s worst nuclear 
plant accident, an assessment 
made by Western experts soon 
afier it happened. 

It gave an unnamed 
worker's description of the 
accidenL He was near the 
reactor control centre when he 
heard a strong jet of steam, but 
he thought nothing of it and 
went for a break. 

“At that moment - explo- 
sion. I rushed to the window 
and there immediately fol- 
lowed the nexL I saw a fireball 
rising above the roof of the 
machinery department of the 
fourth unit. 


“We stayed to the end until 
we had put out the fire. Then 
we came downstairs and were 
taken away by ambulance. We 
were in a bad condition.” 
Pravda said: “The rebel- 
lious nuclear giant has not yet 
surrendered. It is still 
dangerous.” The means to 
defeat it were at hand and 
victory was sure. 

It quoted Mr Lev Voronin, 
a Deputy Prime Minister, as 
saving that radiation levels 
were falling by 5 percent every 
day but remained abnormally 
high near the reactor. 

Leading article, page !3 


Garda informer on arms dumps shot, IRA says 


By Richard Ford 

A man who is believed to 
have informed police about an 
arms haul hidden in the Irish 
Repnblic has been shot dead 
by the Provisional IRA. 

The body of Mr Frank 
“Franko” Hegarty. his hands 
tied behind his back and tape 
covering his eyes, was found 
with a bullet shot wound to the 
head on an isolated road 50 
yards from the Co Donegal - 
Co Tvrone border near 
Castlederg on Sunday night. 

Since disappearing from his 
borne in the Shantallow area 
of Londonderry six days ago 


Mr Hegarty, aged 45, a repub- 
lican activist, bad been ques- 
tioned by the Provisional IRA 
about his alleged activities. 

He had only recently re- 
turned to the city after tearing 
the house he shared with the 
woman he lived with and five 
children. He was Itown to 
England in January, only 
hoars after (be Garda discov- 
ered 120 German and Rus- 
sian-made rifles, hand guns 
and 18.000 rounds of ammuni- 
tion in three arms dumps in 
counties Sligo and 
Roscommon. _ 

At the time of the arms find 
it was believed that Mr 


Hegarty was a driver for a 
former quartermaster of the 
Provisional IRA in London- 
derry and had told police 
about the arms which were 
intended to re-equip units 
throughout the north. 

The Provisional IRA said 
yesterday that Mr Hegarty’ 
had been taken from London- 
derry for his own safety after 
the arms find. He lived lu a 
bouse at Sittingbonrne, Kent, 
with his “minders" next door. 

The IRA said that under 
questioning he admitted being 
recruited as an informer seven 
years ago for an initial pay- 


ment of £400 and £25 a week, 
which was paid when he met 
his contacts in Limavady and 
the Protestant Waterside area 
of Londonderry. 

The statement added that 
Mr Hegarty had returned to 
Londonderry recently, believ- 
ing he could convince the 
Promional IRA that he was 
not responsible for the discov- 
ery of the weapons in the 
republic bur under interroga- 
tion had admitted his 
involvement. 

Yesterday neither the dead 
man's parents nor Mrs Doro- 
thy Robb, with whom he lived. 


would discuss the matter and 
the Royal Ulster Constabulary 
maintained its policy on in- 
former cases of refusing to 
comment. 

Mr Hegarty is the third 
alleged informer to have been 
killed by the Provisional IRA 
in Londonderry during the 
past 15 months as the terror- 
ists attempt to bait the flow of 
information to the police, 
which is affecting their ability 
to mount attacks. 

A week ago the terrorists 
shot dead a man in Co Down, 
also claiming he was an 
informer. 





Election Call for 
proposal computer 
reierteri record 


by Israel crime 

Rv Tendler 


senior British Government 
officials in their private brief- 
ings on the complex issue of 
nuclear arms control. 

They point out that Bri- 
tain’s position was adversely 
affected by a similar scheme to i 
negotiate away Britain's inde- 1 
pendent deterrent made by Mr 
Healey and Mr Kjnnock dur- 
ing talks here in 1984. 

Differences on arms control 1 
between the two political 
heavyweights in the !4-sirong 
British delegation emetged as 
the central theme after the 
talks. 

As the session came to a 
close. Mr Gorbachov said 
according to one MP present 
that “he fully understood the 
British parliamentary system 
and had no wish to get rid of 
it”. 

Lord Whiielaw. who stress- 
ed the good humour of the 
talks and the fact that they 
indicated the opening ofa new 
dialogue bwiween London 
and Moscow, said: “Mr 

Gorbachov said that British 
nuclear forces should be elimi- 
nated. Thai is not the position . 
of our Government and not a 
goal we can support.*’ 

Senior US officials had 
stressed apprehension in ad- 
vance of the British trip that 
Mr Gorbachov might use it to 
further exploit differences be- 
tween Washington and its 
Nato allies, seen by the Ameri- 
cans as the main thrust of the 
Kremlin leader’s so-called 
“charm offensive’’ in Europe. 

Lord Whiielaw Iasi night 
stressed positive aspects of Mr 
Gorbachov's approach, which 
included a new approach lo 
the chemical weapons talks in 
Geneva and a strong desire to 
hold a second summit with 
President Reagan. 

Although the meeting was 
taken to indicate a further 
boost to Anglo-Soviet rela- 
tions. the Soviet side was able 
lo offer no firm dale for ihe 
planned visit to London of Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the 
Foreign Minister. 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Mr Yitzhak Rabin, the Is- 
raeli Defence Minister who is 
responsible fur the military 
rule in the occupied temio- 
ries. yesterday virtually ruled 
out Mrs Thatcher’s idea for 
mayoral elections among the 
Arab population there. 

Mrs Thatcher had put for- 
ward her suggestion in a 
speech at the Knesset on 
Sunday evening, in which she 
urged the Israeli Government 
to' recognize the legitimate 
rights of the Palestinians. ! 

But Mr Rabin, who saw Mrs 
Thairher here early yesterday 
morning, said afterwards that 
“elections arc unheard of in 
the Arab world”. He said it 
w ould be a strange thing if the 
first elected major m the 
whole .Arab world was in an 
2 rea under Israeli control. 

Mr Rabin, according to 
British sources, did not say 
this to the Prime Minister 
during their meeting. He had 
concentrated on explaining 
how the battle against terror- 
ism helped the Arab popula- 
tion and what Israel was try ing 
to do to improve the quality of 
life in ihe territories. 

The Israeli Government 
claims that moderate leaders 
are afraid to come forward for 
fear of being assassinated by 
terrorists. 

Mr Rabin had tried to 
convince Mrs Thatcher, who , 
lakes over the overall presi- 
dency of the EEC from July. 1 
that Europe should do more to 
provide the money and help 
needed to improve living sian- i 
dards in the territories. 1 

The meeting was described 
as “friendly and thorough", 
with the Israeli minister doing 
most of the talking. Israeli 
officials said they had been 
surprised that Mrs Thatcher 
had come forward with an 
idea which she must have , 
been advised was not going to : 
win the support of the Israeli 
Government. 

Undeterred by this, howev- 
er. Mrs Thatcher told • the ■ 
influential Foreign A flairs an J 
Defence Committee of the 
Knesset yesterday afternoon 
that she wanted to everything 
possible to try to help bring 
about negotiations for peace. 

It was wrong, she said, to do 
nothing to help produce mod- 
erate leaders simply because 
terrorism existed 

One person who publicly- 
welcomed her idea was Mr 
Rashad Shawa. the deposed 
Palestinian Mayor of Gaza. 
He was one of eight moderate 
Palestinian leaders who had 
dinner with Mrs Thatcher last 
night at the British Consulate 
in East Jerusalem. 

Between them they had 
drawn up a memorandum 
setting out the steps they want 
to see taken to reach a peaceful 
solution and to improve the 
living standards of the people 
in the territories. 


By Slewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

A radical expansion of the 
controversial Police National 
Computer which could im- 
prove police efficiency by cre- 
ating a central computer 
record of major and minor 
criminal activity plus the po- 
tential for automatic finger- 
print recognition is being 
debated by chief constables 
and the Home Office. 

Bui the proposal, in a Home 
Office strategy paper now 
before members of the Associ- 
ation of Chief Police Officers, 
will cause anxiety within the 
civil liberties lobby and among 
Opposition MPs. 

For the first time minor 
offences and cautions would be 
computerized and the paper 
opens the dour to the use of the 
PNC as (he base fora national 
police intelligence system. 

Such systems have been 
investigated by a number of 
police forces where informa- 
tion. sometimes about individ- 
uals without records, has been 
gathered and computerized 
from manual records kept by 
officers known as collainrs.- 
The systems have been criti- 
cized because records have 
been found to be nothing more 
than unsubstantiated gossip. 

Whether or not (be expand- 
ed PNC includes an intelli- 
gence input it would be 
connected to a number of other 
computer systems outside 
straightforward police use. At 
present the PNC is only used 
by the police and the system is 
exempted from data protection 
legislation. 

One of police officers* 
association committees on 
crime policy is reported to 
have accepted the plan for the 
centralizing of records. Even- 
tually the strategy paper will 
go to Home Office ministers 
once all police views are 
canvassed. 

The PNC paper was devel- 
oped by a Home Office study- 
team looking at criminal infor- 
mation systems strategy in the 
areas of criminal records, 
ciime reporting and -cti flU f * 
ihtellfgcr.ee afa rtriteVffiMRs. 
PNC is shortly to receive - 
replacement equipment . 

The PNC, based at Hendon 
in north London, has been 
steadily expanding since it was 
founded in 1972. At the mo- 
ment it includes details of 32 
miff ion vefaiefe owners; over 

300.000 stolen vehicles and 

450.000 chassis or engine 
numbers; 4.7 million names of 
convicted criminals: basic de- 
tails of 3 J million fingerprints 
and an index of disqualified 
drivers. 

The PNC is run by a board 
of management which includes 
the police and Home Office 
representatives .Terminals 
have been set up in main police 
stations and an officer can 
make contact with a terminal 
operator by radio or telephone 
with a query. The operator 

Continued on page 16. col 8 



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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


Ronan Point blast Vas 
triggered by burning 
gramophone records’ 

By Charles Knevitt, Architectnre Correspt^ eai 


The initial cause of the 
Ronan Point disaster in 1968, 
when a comer of the 22-storey 
tower block collapsed, killing 
five people, was probably an 
electrical fault which ignited 
old gramophone records. Mr 
Sam Webb, an architect, 
claimed vesterday. 

The official reason given in 
the public inquiry report was 
that a faulty gas main connec- 
tion to a cooker in the kitchen 
of flat 90. on the eighteenth 
floor, led to a release of gas 
and an explosion when the 
tenant Miss Ivy Hodge, made 
acupoftea. 

Mr Webb, whose report on 
the structural condition of the 
lower block in Newham, east 
London, led to its evacuation 
for the second time in 1984. 
has given official documents 
to The Times which suggest 
that the inquiry report did not 
contain all the relevant facts. 
He wants the inquiry re- 
opened 

Demolition of Ronan Point 
began last week. Some wall 
and floor panels of the prefab- 
ricated concrete structure are 
being removed for examina- 
tion by government scientists. 

Mr Webb said that 22 
tenants and a policeman re- 
ported hearing two explosions 
at about 5.45am on May 16, 
1968. and there were two fires 
in the flat - one in a store 


cupboard off the hall and the 
other in the kitchen. 

Photographs taken immedj: 
aiely after the disaster sho^ 
debris below, as well as a 
the gas cooker, suggestins 
damage had already x c ^ Te ” 
as a result of the fi^ b,asL 
outside the kitchen. 

Minutes of s meeting 
chaired by Sir AJfr** 1 Pug ? !ey ' 
leader of the inquiry- 
1Z 1968, delude evidena 

from Dr N.P.W. Moore, of 
Imperial College. London, 
that old gramophone records 
might have been the cawe of 
an initial explosion .and fire. 

Dr Moore said: No doubt 

the gas board would wish to 
argue that town gas was not 
the sole possibility. Other 
possibilities were aerosols - 
some had been found -or 
local heating acting on, e.g. old 
gramophone records, thus 
causing a small explosion 
sufficient to move the gas 
cooker, and allow an escape of 
gas leading to a gas 
explosion.” 

Between 25 and 30 old 
gramophone records were 
stored in the cupboard next to 
the electricity meter in the flat. 
They can become volatile 
when heated and can explode 
like nitro-glycerine. 

A letter to Dr Moore from 
Mr Charles Mackechnie Jar- 
vis. a consulting engineer. 


JPs to resist local 
courthouse cuts 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Justices of the Peace are 
expected to resist proposals to 
make magistrates' courts 
more efficient by merging 
smalt underworked benches 
and possibly dosing some 
courthouses. 

Similar "mergers in the past 
have not been achieved with- 
out local opposition. However 
a discussion paper by the 
Home Office and the Lord 
Chancellor's Department 
makes clear that, if such 
mergers are not undertaken 
voluntarily, the Government 
has the power to force them by 
statutory orders. 

One bench that could be 
under scrutiny is Dunmow, 
Essex, which, with seven mag- 
istrates, is below its comple- 
ment although it will have 
nine by October. 

Mis Patricia Hargrove, the 
chairman, said yesterday: 
“My first reaction is that 

E robablv courtrooms should 
e shared. But we already 
share the courtroom in Saf- 
fron Walden and have amal- 
gamated our domestic and 
juvenile panels, and we feel we 
do not want to go any 
further”. 

She said the bench bad a 
sense of identity and covered a 
laige number of villages across 
a wide, thinly populated area, 
with “virtually no public 
transport*’. 

“Magistrates are supposed 
to belong to the district in 
which they live and have a 


local interest and knowledge 
of the area. If they are spread 
widely that meaning would be 
lost.” she said. 

Mr Stanley Drapkitu anoth- 
er chairman, whose bench at 
Heding-ham, Essex, merged 
with Halstead six years ago, 
said opposition could prove 
unfounded. 

“Naturally benches have 
their own history and pride 
and we do not want to see that 
disappear. We feared the loss 
of our bench, but the merger 
has worked well in practice 
and produced money to im- 
prove the surviving 
courtroom,” he said. 

The proposals are also likely 
to cause friction between die 
benches and the justices* 
clerks, who administer die 
courts and who, for the most 
pan, favour reorganization. 

Under the proposals, up to 
90 of 630 petty sessional 
divisions in England and 
Wales could be under scruti- 
ny. Those with fewer than 30 
sittings a year, and less than 
134 planned sittings, are to be 
regarded as candidates for 
amalagamation. The same ap- 
plies where benches sit on 
average for less than two 
hours at a time and cannot 
alter sitting arrangements. 

The Government is also 
proposing to cut delays in 38 
big magistrates' courts by 
appointing more stipendiary 
magistrates where benches 
have more than 150 JPs. 


Judge calls Hailsham 
‘a quixotic dictator 9 


Judge Pickles. Britain's 
most outspoken judge, yester- 
day called the Lord Chancel- 
lor. Lord Hailsham of St 
Marylebone. a “brooding, 
quixotic dictator**. 

In an interview with The 
Guardian the judge, who has 
campaigned for the right of ihe 
judiciary to take pan in public 
debate, says j udges are “scared 
to death” of the Lord 
Chancellor. 


A judge on the northern 
circuit, he claims that Lord 
Hailsham is surrounded by a 
“praetorian guard” of Civil 
Servants who wield enormous 
power and treat judges “like 
children". 

Judge Pickles also criticized 
Lord Lane, claiming that he 
has “no idea how to be a Lord 
Chief Justice on the adminis- 
trative side”. He called for a 
Minister of J ustice. 


THURSDAY 
COULD CHANGE 
YOUR LIFE 


PAGES AND PAGES OF JOBS FOR: 

Financial and Accounting 
Chief Executives 
Managing Directors 
Directors 

Sales and Marketing Executives, 
Public, Finance and 
Overseas Appointments. 


SEE GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


& TIMES THURSDAY 



dated July 1. 1968. states that 
there is evidence of the elec- 
tricity meter in flat 90 showing 
a reading “amounting to thou- 
sands of units against hun- 
dreds elsewhere” in the same 
block. 

According to drafts of the 
inquiry report, the cupboard 
door was at first blown in. 
then blown completely out of 
the building. 

Mr Webb said references to 
the possibility of two explo- 
sions were contained in drafts 
of the public inquiry report, 
but were played down in the 
final report. 

Mr Webb said yesterday: 
“In view of the evidence 
which was submitted to the 
inquiry, why was Mr 
Mackechnie Jarvis not cross: 
examined? Was his evidence' 
made available to tbe North 
Thames Gas Board? And why 
was the London Electricity 
Board not called upon to give 
evidence? 

“Evidence that should have 
been investigated further does 
not appear to have been, for 
reasons best known to the 
inquiry or to the then Govern- 
ment. It seems to me beyond 
the bounds of probability that 
only one flat out of 110 in 
Ronan Point whould have had 
both a faulty electricity meter 
and a faulty gas connection 
nuL” 

Law chief 
to address 
the Bar 

By oar Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

Tbe Lord Chancellor is to 
give the opening address at the 
Bar's conference in London 
today, a few weeks after his 
humiliating Hi gh Court defeat 
at the profession's hands over 
legal aid fees. 

Whatever he may choose to 
say, the presence of Lord 
Hailsham of St Marylebone, 
is a sign that the Bar is keen to 
mend any damage in relations 
that its unprecedented legal 
action may have caused. 

The conference, the first 
sack social event in the Bar's 
history, is also a welcome 
chance for barristers to escape 
the debate over fees and the 
pressures of the courtroom. 

The conference is the latest 
move by an increasingly public 
profession anxious to 
“demystify” and explain its 
work to tine public. It comes 
after the appointment of public 
relations consultants and the 
launching of a Bar magazine. 
Counsel. 

For £180 plus value-added 
tax (the more impoverished, 
with less than 10 years experi- 
ence, get a cut-price rate of 
£135) barristers are offered a 
mixed programme far removed 
from present concerns of the 
profession. 

After last night's cocktail 
party, the main part of the 
conference gets under way 
today at tbe Connanght Rooms 
in Bloomsbury, central Lon- 
don, with about 15 papers 
from the luminaries of the 
profession on a range of topics. 

Hard on the Lord 
Chancellor’s heeds comes Mr 
Ludovic Kennedy, campaigner 
over miscarriages of justice, 
who will speak in a session on 
the criminal trial on: “English 
criminal justice — the worst in 
the world?” 

There are also sessions on 
public law and professional 
negligence. 

A full report of the two-day 
Bar conference will appear in 
The Times tomorrow and 
Thursday. 


' f f- ‘iV % . ■ 

> ' V: ,■ - . * .*>* ■« 

1 U.JC v „ M V #U \ r-W ' \ j 






Young attacked for ‘insult’ 


By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 

Lord Young of Graffham, increase, to children whose Government’s ^attitude to- 
icretary of State for Employ- education is being damaged by wards pay and prosperity, 
ent, was attacked yesterday Tory cuts, to the victims of the While all ministers have been 


Secretary of State for Employ- 
ment, was attacked yesterday 
for his “insulting” remark that 
Britain had never had as good 
a time as it was having now. 

The minister said in an 
interview on the TV-am pro- 


lUiy LUU, WUK ,IUUU1U1 UIU ... — — “ i 

record number of crimes being criticizing what the Chancel- 
committed, and to- the record lor of the Exchequer has 


called, “the Achilles heel of 
the British economy”, pay 
increases outpacing produc- 
tivity gains, they are also 
willing to claim credit for the 


us such concern are the unem- ^rov otad Bank h oU- 

»sr5£s riETcSS, 

where there has been no ranKS - 


The Bank holiday and a hint of summer drew crowds to seaside resorts including Southend, Essex, yesterday. But while the 
w ere crowded, few .bred to brae the stfll chilly waters (Photograph : John Voos)- 

Anger over jobless Sun Causes 

Young attacked for ‘insult’ 

By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent U<U-llV 

Lord Young of Graffham, increase, to children whose Government’s ^attimdeto- oTlOfhC . 

Secretary of State for Employ- education is being damaged by wards pay and prosperity. VUmU>j 

meat, was attacked yesterday Tory cuts, to the victims of the While all ministers have been Continued from page 1 
for his “insulting” remark that record number of crimes being criticizing what the Chancel- 

Britain had never had as good committed, and to the record lor of the Exchequer has w^ewrse at wentworm 
a time as it was having now. number of jobless for whom called, “the Achilles heel of ye 5r~5r y ' m 

The minister said in an Lord Young’s department has the British economy , pay i^^aged 35, WOK 

interview on the TV-am pro- direct responsibility-” increases outpacing produc- g^p^ 

gramme, Jonathan Dimbleby Mr Kaufman added: “His tiyity gams,, they are also 

on Sunday, that given the rate statement is typical of the willing to ejaim t credit for Ahe Meofth ^toy-off aner 

of inflation and tax cuts, arrogance and complacency of outcome. On May 13, Mrs Kn _,_ 

people could have maintained Mrs Thatcher’s government.” Thatcher told the Commons The fort sto mc^cnng s 

their standard of living with The criticism also extended “The standard of living of a | 28 ^nle imi 

pay rises of only 1.25 per cent to the Conservative those in work and those on fro® Birmingham to Btack- 

wbereas they had received 7.5 backbenches. Mr Francis social services is higher than P°°l .. W J® ’J” 1 - LfSE* 

per cent “We’ve never had it Pym, the former Foreign Sec- ever” J °ughm^^lsle ofM^ 

so good for the 87 per cent of relary, said: “For some people R ^ of 

us rework,” he said. this is a true remark. But the L ~ho 

In response to a question people who are causing all of it so 

about opinion polls and the us such concern are tbe unem- ^Md^^nrnvoS Bank holi- 

“price for this Thatcherite ployed and those people living 

eipwimenf being too high, S. ihe regions of*the counoy ta Coax ™ nvs l ^rfy o^rmablo™ 

he said: “The country has where there has been no fr*® 8Whn »i JUSOOm races 

never had as good a time as it increase in prosperity” Mr Robert Hicks, Conser- respectirely * 

has today; it’s growing Government sources said vativeMP for Cornwall South In the French Open tennis 

strongly.” that Lord Young had been East, said: “It amazes me that championships, Ivan Lendl 

Mr Gerald Kaufman, referring to the general stan- a senior Cabinet minister who and Chris Ltoyd, the top seeds 
Labour’s home affairs spokes- dard of living, productivity is purported to be a very close in tfae two singles events, both 

man, said yesterday: “These and output It was pointed out adviser to the Prime Mm/ster recorded straight-sets vic- 

sleek Tory ministers are cer- that he bad also said in his should these comments taies ™ fast round in 
tainly havinga good time but interview: “I feel concern for . ai-thistime- Paris. John Lloyd, for many 

at the expense ofthe rest of the people who have been out of ' . . years Britain’s leading player, 

people, .of Britain. It is an work for a long time, and Mr Anthony. Beaumont- also announced his retirement 
insult ‘to. millions of people more than anything else I am . Dark, Conservative MP for yesterday, 
suffering under the Govern- motivated by a desire to See- Birmingham. Selly Oak, said: In Kratayrmng boy.wasair- 

ment in which he complacent- people back in employment, - “It would be a mistake for the lifted to safety in a two hour 
ly serves. and see the economy grow. Conservative Party to think rescue operation after plnng-. 

“It is an insult to sick people and above all to have a caring that because 87 per cent are in ingoyer a 350ft diff yesterday: 
in long waiting lists for hospi- society ” jobs, ail is well What we have Steven Water, aged 13, was 

tal treatment, to pensioners. Nevertheless, his comments to concentrate on is the 13 per caught in bracken on an 

rightly offended by their 40p underline an ambiguity in the cent who have no jobs. outcrop half way down the 

s cliffs at Capd, near his home 

Campaign to highlight Union caUs „ . „„ 

Channel tunnel jobs west’ wise 

1U TVJl T tt » of a train during a daredevil 
Employers yesterday urged that main road sjrtems were Britain's third biggest game of “chicken”, 
the Government to launch a fully operational before much union, tbe General. Munici- David Mclone, aged 16, fell 

campaign highlighting the job of the tunnel construction pal. Boilermakers, and Allied from the electric sliding doors 
prospects arising from con- took place. Trades Union, today calls for as the train was travelling at 

struction of the Channel The consultative committee a legally-set minimum wage- abont 50 mph between 

tunnel. includes representatives of the More than eight million Datchet, Berkshire, and Wa- 

The Confederation of Brit- Government, local councils workers currently earn less terloo station, 

ish Industry said the drive and British Rail. The Com- than the EEC average of £11 6 i n Devon Richard 

should also be aimed ai allay- mons debate on the legislative a week, according to a policy Rr5inKn „v i at ~I nttpmn t tn 

ing fears of unemployment as timetable for the Channel document, New Rights For Rln^ RnwnHflJr the 

Tunnel Bill will tegin next IM> Ao/rfe. 

Mr Dennis Cooper, chair- Tuesday. The document says the frrad Hn nrtu»iUwkTOrter- 

man of the CBI in Kent, said • Perkins, the world's biggest Government has stripped !^ w h™ 

in written evidence to the joint manufacturer of diesden- away legal protection from the 1 ^ 

consultative committee chtu- giues. isio cut another 100 of low-paid by weakening Wage aSSSc 

red by Mr David Mitchell its 3.200 staff through voluu- Counrils and scrapping part of 
Under Secretary of State at the tary redundancy at its head- ihe Employment Protection nSv* 

Department of Transport, that quarters in Peterborough, Act. 

the tunnel could be a Cambridgeshire. It calls for a minimum wage ooraet, wwchft* 

“magnet” for new jobs and • A new industrial estate in set at two thirds of a figure Weymorth lifeboat in the 

business. Ipswich, Suffolk, based on the balftvay up the national earn- storeh for two divers who 

He said it was an opponuni- former six-acre site of ings league, which at present disappeared off Lai worth 

iy fora much-needed boost to Cocksedge Engineering, which would be £1 15 a week. It also Uove. They were later found 

the Kent economy. dosed last September with the demands at least four weeks' by one of the lifeboats. 

But Mr Cooper called on the loss of almost 200 jobs, will annual holiday and protection Sport, pages 27-32 

Government to make sure create more than 500 jobs. for part-time workers. Weather, page 16 


a time as it was having now. number of jobless for whom called, “the Achilles heel of 
The minister said in an Lord Young's department has the British economy”, pay 
interview on the TV-am pro- direct responsibility." increases outpacing produc- 

gramme, Jonathan Dimbleby Mr Kaufman added: “His tiyity gains, they are also 
on Sunday, that given the rate statement is typical of the willing to claim credit for the 
of inflation and tax cuts, arrogance and complacency of outcome. On May 13, Mrs 
people could have maintained Mrs Thatcher’s government.” Thatcher told the Commons 
their standard of living with The criticism also extended “The standard of living of 
pay rises of only 1.25 percent to the Conservative those in work and those on 
whereas they had received 7.5 backbenches. Mr Francis social services is higher than 
per cent “We’ve never had it pym, the former Foreign Sec- ever.” 
so good forthe 87per cent of ' relary, said: “For somepeople R ^ f M 

us in work, he said. this is a true remark. But the v __ 

In response to a question people who are causing all of of ^You’^never’had it so 
about opinion polls and foe us such concern are tbe unem- S^wJLvbK Bank holi- 
“price for this Thatcherite ployed and those people living 

experiment” being too high, in the regions ofthe country “Jl _ unease Lonsemmc 
he said: “The country has where there has been no ranKS * 
never had as good a time as it increase in prosperity.” Mr Robert Hicks, Conser- 

has today; it's growing Government sources said vative MP for Cornwall South 
strongly.” that Lord Young • had been raq J said: “It amazes me that 

Mr Gerald Kaufman, referring to the general stan- a senior Cabinet minister who 
Labour’s home affairs spokes- dard of living, productivity is purported to be a very close 
man, said yesterday: “These and output. It was pointed out adviser to foe Prime Minister 
sleek Tory ministers are cer- that he had also said in his should make these comments 
tainly havinga good time but interview: “I feel concern for . ax -thisti me- 
at the expense of the rest of the people who have been out of 

people, .of Britain. It is an work for a long time, and Mr Anthony. Beaumont- 
msult ‘ 10 . millions of people more than anything else I am . Dark, Conservative MP for 
suffering under foe Govern- motivated by a desire to See- Birmingham, Selly Oak, said: 
mem in which he complacent- people back in employment, “It would be a mistake for the 
ly serves. and see foe economy grow. Conservative Party to think 

“It is an insult to sick people and above afl to have a caring that because 87 per cent are in 
i n long waiting lists for hospi- society ” jobs, all is well What we have 

tal treatment, to pensioners. Nevertheless, his comments to concentrate on is the 13 per 

rightly offended by their 40p underline an ambiguity in the cent who have no jobs. 


increase in prosperity” 

Government sources said 
that Lord Young had been 
referring to the general stan- 
dard of living, productivity 
and output It was pointed out 
that he bad also said in his 
interview: “I feel concern for 
people who have been out of 
work for a long time, and 
more than anything else I am 
motivated by a desire to See- 
people back in employment, 
and see the economy grow, 
and above aQ to have a caring 
society.” 

Nevertheless, his comments 
underline an ambiguity in the 


Campaign to highlight 
Channel tunnel jobs 


Employers yesterday urged 
the Government to launch a 
campaign highlighting foe job 
prospects arising from con- 
struction of foe Channel 
tunnel. 

The Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry said foe drive 
should also be aimed at allay- 
ing fears of unemployment as 
a result of foe project. 

Mr Dennis Cooper, chair- 
man of the CBI in Kent, said 
in written evidence to foe joint 
consultative committee chai- 
red by Mr David Mitchell 
Under Secretary of State at the 
Department of Transport, that 
the tunnel could be a 
“magnet” for new jobs and 
business. 

He said it was an opportuni- 
ty fora much-needed boost to 
the Kent economy. 

But Mr Cooper called on foe 
Govern mem to make sure 

Kasparov 
checks on 
title venue 

Gary Kasparov, aged 22, the 
world chess champion, ar- 
. rived in London yesterday to 
inspect the venue for his 
rematch with fellow Russian 
Anatoly Karpov. 

The five-week first half of 
the championships starts on 
July 28 at the Park Lane 
Hotel. Mayfair. The second 
half will be in Leningrad in 
September. 

Mr Kasparov, tbe youngest 
man to win foe world title, 
said yesterday: Tin very 
pleased to be playing for foe 
world championship in Lon- 
don. Britain is a very impor- 
tant country in foe chess world 
and it is an honour 10 be able 
to play our match here.” 

News of foe West End's 
latest musical Chess had 
spread behind foe Iron Cur- 
, tain. He said: "Of course I 
would very much like to go to 
foe show but unfortunately 
my visit this time is very' brief. 
Perhaps later.” 

Mr Kasparov, a keen foot- 
baller, also said he was looking 
forward to watching the 
| World Cup on television. 

He said; “Yes it’s true I am a 
! keen football fan. I think 
English club teams are the 
strongest in Europe, so I think 
your national side will do well 
in the World Cup. I hope the 
Soviet Union also plays well.” 


that main road systems were 
folly operational before much 
of foe tunnel construction 
took place. 

The consultative committee 
includes representatives of foe 
Government, local councils 
and British Rail. The Com- 
mons debate an foe legislative 
timetable for foe Channel 
Tunnel Bill will begin next 
Tuesday. 

• Perkins, foe world’s biggest 
manufacturer of diesel en- 
gines. is to cut another 100 of 
its 3.200 staff through volun- 
tary redundancy at its head- 
quarters in Peterborough, 
Cambridgeshire. 

• A new industrial estate in 
Ipswich, Suffolk, based on the 
former six-acre site of 
Cocksedge Engineering, which 
dosed last September with the 
loss of almost 200 jobs, will 
create more than 500 jobs. 


Mr Robert Hicks, Conser- 
vative MP for Cornwall South 
East, said: “It amazes me that 
a senior Cabinet minister who 
is purported to be a very close 
adviser to foe Prime Minister 
should make these comments 
axfoistime. 

Mr Anthony. Beaumont- 
Dark, Conservative MP for 
Birminghain, Selly Oak, said: 
"It would be a mistake for foe 
Conservative Party to think 
that because 87 per cent are in . 
jobs, ail is well What we have 
to concentrate on is the 13 per 
cent who have no jobs. 

Union calls 
for legal 
‘lowest’ wage 

Britain's third biggest ! 
union, tbe General. Munid- 
pal. Boilermakers, and Allied 
Trades Union, today calls for 
a legally-set minimum wage. 

More than eight million 
workers currently earn less 
than foe EEC average of £1 16 
a week, according to a policy 
document. New Rights For 
Working People. 

The document says foe 
Government has stripped 
away legal protection from the 
low-paid by weakening Wage 
Counrils and scrapping part of 
the Employment Protection 
Act. 

It calls for a minimum wage 
set at two thirds of a figure 
halfway up foe national earn- 
ings league, which at present 
would be £1 15 a week. It also 
demands at least four weeks' 
annual holiday and protection 
for part-time workers. 


Lloyd’s rings in a new HQ 


By Charles Knevitt 
Architecture Correspondent 

Tbe new Lloyd's of London 
bonding in foe City, ce nt re of 
the world's top insurers and. 
Britain’s most visually star- 
tling, technologically innova- 
tive and expensive work of 
architectnre, opens for busi- 
ness today just over fire years 
since construction began. 

To mark foe event, the 
femora I^tinebeU win be rung 
in its new location in the 
muterwriting roan, at foe foot 
of a glared atrium which rises' 
more than 200 feetthrongh the 
£163 million building. 

Underwriters moved in dur- 
ing foe Bank holiday weekend 
and foe Queen, possibly with 
the Queen Mother, is expected 
to perform an opening ceremo- 
ny in foeanttnhn. 

The insurance market, 
which earns more than £6 bib- 
lion in premiums cadi year, 
will operate on foe ground 
floor and three galleries. Stalls 
used by foe underwriting syn- 
dicates, and known as bones, 
are equipped with tbe latest 
information and communica- 
tions technology, which raised 
foe cost of the building to more 
than £300 per square foot 

The building, designed by 
Mr Richard Rogers, who re- 
ceived foe Royal Gold Medal 
for architecture last year, is 
the fourth Lloyd's headquar- 
ters in less than 60 years. It 
should have a useful life of ut 
least 50 years. 

Unlike Mr Rogers's Pompj- 



i&\< 35i : f- 

Mf-li -I 
m M 




The new Lloyd’s of London 
building in the City 
don Centre in Paris, which is a 
riot of colour, foe Uoyd’s 
building is silver and grey, 
with an exposed concrete 
structure and a profusion of 
service towers with heating 
and ventilating pipes ou its 
exterior. Six permanent' Mae , 
crane top foe ‘satellite’ ser- , 
vice towers. 

Four glass-walled observa- 
tion lifts run up the outside of 
each of three of the towers, 
giving passengers views out 
over the city. Inside,, glass- 
sided escalators 1 criss-cross 
foe market floors. 


A public viewing area and 
exhibition are horaed on the 
fourth floor gallery, and it is 
expected that at least 
250,000visitor$ will see the 
market aarh year. 

At the eleventh gallery level 
the 200-year-old Adam Room, 
originally part of Bowood 
House in Wiltshire, has been 
re-erected. For foe past 25 
years it has been used by the 
committee and latterly the 
council of Lloyd's. 

Part of the lower ground 
floor contains the Captain’s 
Room, a restaurant, coffee 
room and dub. The Nelson 
collection, co ntaining many 
treasures from the period is 
also o n this level. Outside is a 
piazza with a coffee house and 
Lloyd's shop. 

As a reminder of tbe listed 
1928 headquarters, demol- 
ished to make way for foe 1986 
building, Its main entr ance 
arch has been kept as a 
gateway to Green . Yard, a 
public thoroughfare to 
Leadeahafl Market, where the 
Lutyens war memorial from 
foe same bnilding Is afeo to be ' 
located. 


Murdoch 
in final 
offer 
of £50m 

Continued from page 1 
ent in any discussions of this 





Pt-ITQj Malta 


Tm*nSTo& iff®*** 


kind is whether there is more 
on offer. The answer now is 
that there is no more.” 

Miss Brenda Dean, genera! 
secretary of Sogau said it was 
certainly an improvement on 
foe initial offer but that it fell a ,y 
long way short of a key "* 
demand of her union's mem- 
bers for the restoration of their 
jobs at Wapping. 

-We are not recommending 
it, that is up to foe members to 
deride. I personally doubt that 
he would make another offer.” 

Mr Tony Dubbins of the 
NGA also said he was ex- 
tremely disappointed that em- 
ployment at Wapping had not 
been part of the offer. He 
would be reporting to his 
members on Wednesday. 

The dispute began on Janu- 
ary 24 after the print unions , . 
baHotted their members on ■- 
The Times and The Sunday 
Times at Gray's Inn Road, and 
at The Sun and News of the 'j 
World at Bouverie Street - 
strike action over demands for 
lifetime employment. The 
print workers who then went 
on strike were sacked and foe 
company transferred its print- 
ing to its new plant at 
Wapping 

Mr Bruce Matthews, man- 
aging director of News Inter- 
national said foe previous 
offer of £15 miilion was 
somewhere near foe statutory 
redundancy requirements and 
that foe latest proposals being *. 

three times as much were 
clearly way in advance of 
those requirements. It also 
meant that people who would 
have missed out by having less 
than two years* service would 
quali^ for the minimum 
£1000 pay-off 

Mr Ron Leighton. Labour 
MP for Newham North East 
and a former printer wiih The 
Sun. said that Mr Murdoch 
“has made a concession and it 
is something of a climb- 
down". 

Miss Dean indicated that 
Sogat would be balloting only 
its striking members rather ^ 
than the entire membership ^ 
saying “We must now consult 
all our members involved in 
this tragic dispute.” 

. She said it was certainly an 
improvement on foe previous 
offer. “Wbax was on foe table 
when we arrived yesterday 
was £15 million in statutory 
redundancy terms only for 
those people who didn't get 
work in Gray's Inn Road if foe 
unions accepted Gray's Inn 
Road. We’re here this evening 
with an increase in the £15 
million to £50 million and 
with one building in Gray's 
Inn Road becoming two 
which considerably increases 
the value of the site, and not ~~ 
only its value but its potential • „ 
too. 

“We now have to go bade to 
our members. As for as I am 
concerned it will be a factual 
report to our members. It isn't " 
one that quite frankly we are 
ovenoyed about. It’s far short 
of what we wanted to negoti- 
ate. which was to be in 
Wapping for jobs for our 
members and to have fall 
traditional (union) recogni- 
tion in Wapping. It fell far 
short of that 

Mr Dubbins was clearly . ' 
pessimistic about foe likely , t : 
iWponse of NGA members. 
“The offer in financial terms is 
an improvement but Gray's 
Inn Road doesn't provide any ■£'' 
employment ’ opportunities. 

I'm also extremely disappoint- 
ed about foe fact that recogni- ; 
lion and employment at 
Wapping is not part of this 
offer. And of course the . : 
dispute was very much about r 
recognition and about em- 
ployment ax Wapping. And it 
isn’t arty good us in those 
circumstances therefore pre- 
tending that a lot of our 
members will be anything 
j other than extremely disap- 1 

poinred with- foe proposals ■*- 
that have been put forward.” w 

Mr Murdoch said: “We’ve 
put this forward in an effort to 1 
close down the picketing, to jlj 
close down the disturbances to r, ’ 
the people at Wapping, 10 be 
able to lake our own barbed if] 
wire down and if they contin- 
ue in their efforts as unions 
then it’s all off” 

He added: “We’ve made 
this offer with the view hope- 
fully of putting tbe whole 
thing behind us. 

“We are very hopeful actu- 
ally that foe offer will be 
accepted. We think this is a 
very reasonable settlement. 

We are not going to dismiss or 
get rid of any of our new 
employees. We have a very 
fine workforce. They are doing ^ 
a magnificent job and our- ■ 
loyalty is to foe people who are 
working for us. not 10 the 
people who wem on strike and 
we've made that very dear." 

On foe crucial question of . 
eventual recognition of trade • 
unions at Wapping. Mr Mur- 
doch said “What we've said is g • • 
look, let’s have a cooling off -t . 
'period and we'll see who's 
working there in 12 months 
time and what their wishes 
are. If they wish to' have 8 _ . * 
union and rf so what union.” ' 


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By Lucy Hodges, Edocation Correspondent 
Civil Servants have been 
accused of preventing the 
inuoduciion of education 
vouchers, an idea abandoned 
when Sir. Keith Joseph was 
Secretary or State for Educa- 
tion and Science. 


The use of education vouch- 
ers would reduce the power 
and prestige of Civil Servants 
because they would transfer 
spending control from offi- 
cials to parents, according to 
an article in today's issue of 
the magazine. Economic 
Affairs. 

The magazine of the Insti- 
tute of Economic Affairs con- 
tains five articles on. the 
voucher system, m which 
Civil Servants at the Depart- 
ment of Education and Sci- 
ence are accused of 
obstructing reform. 

The proposal, which entails 
giving parents a voucher for 
the cost of their child's educa- 
tion. to spend at toe School of 
their choice, is gaining support 


from the radical right of the 
. Conservati ve Party. M r . 
Rhodes Boyson, MPfor Brent 
North and a former minister, 
is a strong advocate and 
backbench MPs are joining 
him in support ; 

Dr Keith Hartley, director 
of the Institute of Social and 
Economic Affairs, at York 
University, said the vouchers 
restrict the role of bureaucrats 
and change their traditional 
property rights over budgets 
and discretionary behaviour. 

He saidrTeachers will also 
oppose vouchers since they 
redirect spending from bu- 
reaucrats and professional 
groups to parents, with impli- 
cations for changes in estab- 
lished working ’ practices, 
standards and attitudes to the 
curriculum. 

“Consumers are the poten- 
tial gainers; bureaucrats and 
interest groups with an in- 
come involvement in the cur- 
rent arrangements are the 
potential losers.” 


Civil Servants at Ac DES 
objected to a plan for a 
voucher experiment submit- 
ted by the Friends of the 
Education Voucher Experi- 
ment in Representative Re- 
gions (Fever). 

In refusing to evaluate the 
idea formally officials said 
there were difficulties that 
must be resolved by advocates 
of the vouchers before the idea 
could be assessed further. 

Sir Keith was persuaded 
that vouchers would be im- 
practical. costly to introduce 
and would cause administra- 
tive difficulties. 

Sir John Barnes, a lecturer 
in government at the London 
School of Economics and 
vice-chairman of Kent Cbumy 
Council, said that these objec- 
tions could have been dealt 
with if outride people bad 
known about the DES debate. 

He said a minister more 
decisive and less thoughtful 
than Sir Joseph might have 
given the issue more support. 


Last pupils at a lost school 


Mrs Pamela Spearing’s 
anxieties are the symptoms of 
a trauma which will become 
increasingly common during 
the next few years; statistics 
translated into a mother’s 
abiding bitterness. 

“My daughter loved school. 
She was always doing sports, 
out with friends. Now she's 
had to move to a larger school 
it's changed her whole person- 
ality. She doesn't want to go 
in, she's quiet some days she 
won't go unless I walk her to 
the gate: Even a year after 
Nightingale closed she is only 
just beginning to settle.” 

The economic imperatives 
of a slump in children num- 
bers forced Redbridge council 
to begin shutting down her 13- 
year-old child's school only 
eight months after she started 
there as a first-form pupil. 

Nightingale comprehensive 
was unlucky. When Redbridge 
education committee decided 
in October 1983 that the 
secondary schools system had 
to shrink, they launched a 
huge public consultation on 
four options for cutting back 
pupil places across the 
borough. 

They conducted a Harris 
opinion poll, which returned a . 
strbngf verdict against - aban- 
doning comprehend ve$ and 
returning to.- a selective 
system. . 

but, in May 1984, the 
council agreed that _ two 
com prehensi ves. Nightingale 
and Fairiop. would have to 
dose and entries to eight ofibe 
remaining 14 schools reduced. 
The plans received govern- 
ment approval eight months 
later, and the borough's 
schools are now in the throes 


After the Audit Commission 
report, which said that up to 
1,000 secondary schools must 
dose across thecountrv to cope 
with pupil numbers falling in 
into the 1990s. Colin Hughes 
looks at the effect on parents, 
pupils and teachers of closures 
in the outer London Conserva- 
tivecontrolled borough of 
Redbridge. 

of disruptive change. Even 
with these cuts,' the council 
will find itself with 1 ,500 more 
pupil places than it needs early 
in the next decade. 

Unfortunate geography de- 
rided Nightingale's fete. Its 
catchment area, bordered on 
one side by the MI 1 motor- 
way and the borough bound- 
ary on the other, could not 
expand. Most pupils, the 
council decided, would not 
have to go loo far to attend 
one of the two neighbouring 
schools, Wanstead and 
Woodbridge. 

■That did not prevent par- 
ents mounting a strong cam- 
paign to -fight the closure. Mrs . 
Gillian Saunders, .one of 
Nightingale’s parent gover- 
nors. said: **I really thought we 
would win, we had such a 
good case. I still believe that, 
when pupil numbers pick up 
again in right or 10 years, 
Redbridge wifi have to re? 
open 'Nightingale.” 

Children in the lower three 
years left Nightingale last year, 
leaving only those who had 
already begun examination 
courses. Mrs Saunders’s 
daughter will leave the upper 
sixth form next month, and 
-her son will be among the last 
group to leave the school next 


summer after sitting O levels. 

Mr Michael Wootion. 
Nightingale's head teacher for 
II years, said: “Of course 
there's no concealing the fed 
that, everyone was bitterly 
disappointed, 'and dearly 
there is a quite serious prob- 
lem of staff morale. 

“Even though we expect 
that everyone who wants to 
transfer will be redeployed, it 
won't be the same as going to a 
school which you chose, and it 
chose you. And obviously 
there is a formidable tempta- 
tion for some of them to leave 
before Nightingale shuts next 
July, which could naturally 
affect teaching for the pupils 
who slay on to the end.” 

He admits similar feelings 
on his awn part. Nightingale, 
built in the 1950s period of 
rapid expansion, had only 
completed its final phase of 
building extensions the year 
before the closure threat 
loomed. 

In the end, Mr Wootion 
said, “it is a straight clash 
between those who have to 
provide the best education at 
the minimum cost, and those 
who have to believe in build- 
ing up the quality of. an 
individual school. Everything 
that a head wants to do. along 
with teachers and parents, is 
positive. It is depressing to try 
to make progress against the 
tide of recession.” 

So. while many hundreds 
more heads around the coun- 
try wifl be going through his 
experience. Mr Wootion says 
he will probably be seeking 
early retirement rather than 
another school in which to end 
his career. . 


Americans without a towering fear of travelling 


Servants to get £2.5m 
as sisters drop claim 


The three sisters of* mil- 
lionaire red use have decided 
not to contest a will which left 
the bulk of his estate, indud- 
ing one of the world's best 
collections of English ceram- 
ics, to two faithful servants. 

In a wiO published on 
Saturday, Mr Thomas Bum, 
who died a bachelor In Jama- 
ary 1985, aged 77, left nearly 
S2JS mill ion to be shared 
between his head gardener, 
Mr Janies Newman, aged 66, 
and his assistant Mrs Monica 
Houghton, aged 60. 

Mr Newman, who served 
Mr Burn from I960, and his 
assistant became their late 
! employer's main companions 
• after the death of Mr Burn’s 
mother in 1971. They have 
inherited the Tudor manor 
house at Rons Lench Court, 
near Evesham, Worcester- 
shire, 55 acres of parkland and 
a collection of ceramics worth 
; more than £1 million. 

Mr Bora's three married 
sisters, who threatened to 


contest the wiO, have decided 
to drop their objections be- 
cause die costs of fighting a 
legal battle were too great. 

According to the former 
servants, none of the sisters 
visited Mr Bara after their 
mother’s death 15 years ago. 

Mr Burn did not leave his 
sisters anything from the fam- 
ily fortune, amassed by their 
father dining the First World 
War. 

“Mrs Houghton and I are 
both delighted it has ended 
this way,” Mr Newman said. 
“My wife and I intend to go on 
living in the manor.” - 

The two former servants 
have decided to auction the 
ceramics collection and some 
antique furniture at Sotheby's 

in July to help raise money to 
pay tax costs. 

Mrs Houghton, a widow, 
fires in the village of 
Inkberrow, near by, where she 
rims the . estate's nursery 
gardens. 


Spain jails 
hunted 
jeweller 

• A British jeweller wanted by 
Scotland Yard concerning an 
alleged diamond theft has 
been convicted in Spam of 
smuggling jewels into the 
country, court officials in 
Santander, said yesterday. 

Robert Chatwih, aged 44. 
was sentenced to six months 
and one day in prison and 
fined 5.5 million pesetas 
(£21.000) for the offence m 
January 1983. 

Chatwin. who has already 
spent seven months in deten- 
tion on a related charge, will 
appeal, his lawyers said. 

If the appeal succeeds, po- 
lice sources said Chatwih was 
likely to be expelled under 
Spain's tough new. aliens law: 
Chatwin is wanied in Bnv 
ain on a warrant allegmg theft 
after jewels worth £3 nnlhOd 
went missing from his busi- 
ness iii 1982, .. .• 

He was arrested nr *n e 
Mediterranean resort of Dema 
last December and charged 
with smuggling stole* 1 . f® 3 
. from France and sdbnfc t&em 
-on Spain’s Costa dd SoL 


BBC buys 
‘Killing 
Fields’ 

The Cannes Rim Festival 
prize-winner. The Mission, 
and the Oscar-winning pic- 
ture. The Killing Fields, have 
been bought by the BBC as 
part of a deal with the 
Gofdcrest film company. 

Mr Alan Howden, general 
manager of BBC programme 
acquisition, raid yesterday 
that he was delighted to have 
obtained the two British-made 
films for the coiporation. 

"The Mission is a magnifi- 
cent achievement - a spectac- 
ular. intelligent and deeply 
emotional film which de- 
serves to win many more 
awards.” be said. 

'it is a worthy successor to 
The Rilling fields and is 
another triumph for producer 
David Potuiam and director 
Roland Jofie." " 

The Mission won the Palme 
d'Or. the top award at Cannes, 
although it was in unfinished 

f °The BBC deal includes four 
other productions: Enigma. 
Revolution, Smooth Talk, and 
Dream Orte.i. ; 


Shop manager 
accused of 
fourth murder 

A fashion shop manager 
accused of murdering three 
homosexuals and trying to kill 
two other men laced another 
murder charge when he ap- 
peared yesterday at Camber- 
well Magistrates' Court, south 
London. 

Michael Lupo. aged 33, of 
Sydney Mews,- Chelsea, west 
London, was accused of kill- 
ing an unidentified man aged 
about 62' who was found 
strangled near ■ Hungerford 
Bridge in London on April IS. 

Mr Lupo, who has been 
held at Brixton police station 
since May 16, has already 
been charged with murdering 
Mr Anthony Connolly, aged 
26. an unemployed waiter 
who was found strangled on 
April 4, and Mr James Burns, 
aged 37, a railway worker 
found strangled on March 15. 

Mr Lupo is also accused of 
killing Mr Damien McClusky, 
aged 22, a hospital worker 
who was found strangled on 
May 16, and attempting to 
murder two other men on 
March 10 and May 8. The 
alleged offences were commit- 
ted in London. 

Mr Lupo made no applica- 
tion for bail and was further 
remanded in custody until 
June 9. 


Public views 
palace damage 

Pans of Hampton Court 
Palace, dosed since die Easter 
Monday fire eight weeks ago, 
re-opened to the public yester- 
day. 

The outside area of the 
south front of the palace was 
re-opened as clearing up work, 
expected to last four months, 
continued. Full restoration of 
the fire damaged wing is likely 
to take four years. 



—% old — 


If you experience difficulty 
obtaining a gold card, send a 
stamped adressed envelope to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB16AJ 



American tourists relishing the Yeoman Warder's commentary at the Tower of London yesterday (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 
By Alan Hamilton 


Several citizens of Greenville, 
North Carolina, took the view that 
their neighbours Lyman and Carolyn 
Daughtrey were quite mad to take 
their summer vacation in Britain this 
year. Were not anti-terrorist troops 
surrounding London's Heathrow Air- 
port with a ring of steel, and was tome 
not an armed policeman on every 
street corner? Of coarse there was; 
they had seen it on the television 
news. 

On toe second day of their toree- 
and-a-half week holiday, Mr and Mrs 
Daughtrey and their niece Lisa 
Hylton, from Virginia, were staking 
op the history of the Tower of London 
yesterday, relishing the over-re- 
hearsed commentary of the Yeoman 
Warders and still looking for a loaded 
weapon other than the ceremonial 
popguns of the Guards. The threat of 
terrorism had never entered their 
heads. 


“Those people back home who said 
we should not go were generally 
people who had never travelled. We 
have been to Britain once before; we 
have been planning this trip since 
Christmas, and we never tod any 
thought of cancelling it,” Mr 
Daughtrey, an industrial engineer, 
said. “We never saw anything on 
television to put ns o£L” 

His wife concurred. “We took a 
World Airways scheduled flight from 
Baltimore, ami it was so full that 
everytime yon went to the bathroom 
the other passengers tried to take 
your seat” 

Miss Hylton had a less happy 
experience; her British Airways flight 
was so mderbooked that it was 
cancelled, and she had to wait for an 
alternative flight to London. 

The Danghtreys, proudly display- 
ing their S2S-a-head “Open To View” 
ticket, that admits them to a huge 
variety of historic monuments and 


National Trust properties, said that in 
their west London bed-and-breakfast 
accommodation, all bat one of die 
eight other guests was American; the 
odd man ont was a Mexican. During 
their holiday they planned to hire a 
car to visit Dover. Winchester, Strat- 
ford, and the Scottish Highlands. 
They said they loved Britain for its 
history. West End theatres, and 
exceptionally friendly natives. 

They were far from the only 
Americans shuffling their way 
through the Jewel House yesterday 
and gasping at the winking facets of 
the Star of Africa diamond and 
marvelling at gold plate nearly four 
hundred years old. But they were 
greatly outnumbered by impenetrable 
Swedes, earnest Dutch, and ill- 
behaved French schoo (children. No 
firm figures are available, but a straw 
poll of Yeoman Warders of THe 
Tower indicated that overall numbers 
were well down on last year. 


The Daugh treys were not the only 
Americans to arrive in London at the 
weekend. One hundred US travel 
agents were flown in by the British 
Tourist Authority and subjected to an 
impassioned seminar by a Deputy 
Assistant Commissioner of Scotland 
Yard on how the number of London's 
armed police had actually been 
reduced in recent months. 

Their host, Mr Dick Batchelor, . 
BTA marketing manager, said yester- 
day: “We told them that the British 
were alert to terrorism but not 
paranoiac about it We said the 
British were puzzled by Americans' 
fears about coming here, because we 
bad always regarded Americans as 
being particularly open-minded. 

“Their friends were surprised that 
they bad come to Britain when they 
were not forced to, but they were 
delighted to find that everything was 
normal.” 


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Directors criticize the 


law lords for meddling 
with tax legislation 


By Gavin Bell 


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Industry chiefs have criti- 
cized judges in the House of 
Lords for encroaching on the 
functions of Parliament by 
making or amending tax law, 
and called for legislation to 
reassert the -supremacy of 
Parliament as the sole law- 
making body. 

■ ' The Institute: of Directors, 
in a report published today, 
said that ah apparent trend by 
the law lords to make tax law 
in the guise of interpreting 
Acts of Parliament had creat- 
ed widespread uncertainty 
and was contrary to essential 
freedoms enshrined in the Bill 
of Rights. 

“Of late, there has arisen a 
trend jn the House of Lords to 
.usurp the function, of Parlia- 
ment and to remould legisla- 
tion by a disregard of rights 
conferred by legislation, which 


have been utilized by taxpay- 
ers to reduce their liabilities to 
taxes imposed by other 
legislation." 

Citing recent rulings by the 
law lords, the report said: 
“The intention to assume 
Parliament's function of mak- 
ing or amending tax legisla- 
tion is clearly stated.” 

That process did not rely, as 
did Parliament, on electoral 
approval or accountability, 
but upon the power of the 
courts “in a manner which 
overrides legal rights con- 
ferred by Parliament upon its 
citizens". 

That new approach was the 
underlying reason for uncer- 
taintv which was felt to per- 
vade' the UK tax system. 
“Thus many practices or situ- 
ations. which have been 
agreed by both the (Inland) 


Revenue and taxpayers to 
have known results, could 
now. it seems, be held by the 
courts not to have those 
results.” 


The report called for legisla- 
tion to restore parliamentary 
supremacy in law-making. It 
slopped short of suggesting 
that the judicial function of 
the House of Lords be abol- 
ished. 

It also proposed that a joint 
working party of experts from 
the Inland Revenue and the 
representative bodies be set up 
to consideran acceptable form 
of fiscal legislation. 


The institute praised the 
Inland Revenue for being 
much more open and willing 
to consult than it used to be, 
but said there was room for 
improvement. 


History suffers in air show crash 


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inxq. 


Aircraft enthusiasts were 
yesterday counting the cost to 
British aviation history of the 
crash of a Meteor and Vam- 
pire jet at the Mildenhall Air 
Show- on Sundav. 


«2m • 


The Meteor, which crashed 
in a ball of llamc. was under- 
stood to be the last example 
■flymg of the world’s first jet 
fighter. -which saw service in 


the Second World War. 

The Vampire, which 
plunged into a field after the 
two planes had apparently 
touched wings during a low- 
level manoeuvre, was in ser- 
vice in the 1950s. 

A spokesman for the United 
States Air Force, which orga- 
nized the show, said: “So far 
I know these two planes 


as 


were the only flying examples 
of the Meteor and Vampire 
left. They are irreplaceable 
and it is very sad that they 
have gone." 

An inquiry was under way 
yesterday to establish the 
cause of the air collision, in 
which two Royal Air Force 
fivers in the Meteor were 
killed. 


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Volunteers counting the cheques and credit-card pledges for Sport Aid in London yesterday have been working in shifts since last Friday, 
and are expected to take three weeks to complete the task (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 


Canned milk takes on fizzy drinks 

By John Young, Agriculture Correspondent 


UHT milk in ring-top cans 
may not be everyone's idea of 
templing refreshment, but the 
Milk Marketing Board has 
high hopes that it will prove a 
popular alternative to cola 
and other fizzy drinks 

A trial marketing scheme 
has been launched through 


Giffords, an Oxford-based 
dairy and. if successful, the 
new product will be launched 
nationally later this year. A 
number of other dairies are 
said to have expressed an 
interest. ' - 
At present about four pints 
out of every five are sold in 


bottles and the rest in canons. 
But the difficulty with bottles 
and canons is that they are not 
easily carried around and 
therefore do not quite match 
the image the industry has 
been trying to foster for sever- 
al years, of a- quick, conve- 
nient drink for athletes 


Alternative energy: 2 


Cash flow halts 
cheap power from 
waves and tides 


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In the search for inexhaustible 
supplies of energy, successive 
British governments have 
looked at the largest single 
source and then shied away for 
financial reasons. In the sec- 
ond of a three-part series 
Pearce Wright, Science Editor ; 
looks at the possibility of 
harnessing those sources: the 
tides and waves. 


Group (consisting of Robert 
McAlpuie, Wimpey. Taylor 
Woodrow. Balfour Beany. 
GEC and NEn.Tbe work was 
done by Binnie and Partners. 
They made cost analyses for 
the different sites. 


During his spell as chief 
scientist to the Department of 
Energy six years ago. Sir 
Hermann Bondi fostered an 
approach to the future of 
Britain's energy supplies that 
he called the. “insurance 
philosophy". 

- He regarded support for the 
“renewable energy sources" as 
insurance against, and in his 
view the unlikely event of the 
nuclear programme foiling to 
deliver a safe and inexhaust- 
ible supply of energy. 


Two designs were consid- 
ered for a barrage across the 
Severn. One would have the 
prodigious-capacity of 13.500 
megawatts (equivalent to six 
modem coal-fired or 12 
Sizewell-type PWR stations), 
and the other was also im- 
mense but with a smaller 
-capacity of 7,200 megawatts. 

The cost of electicity deliv- 
ered from these tidal power 
stations was 4Jp per unit for 
the first and 3.7p per unit (a 
kilowatt hour) for the second. 


A rational argument under- 
lay the policy which flowed 
from that philosophy. It was 
assumed that the research and 
development for each of the 
renewable energy sources 
would- be fully 'explored be- 
fore. and indeed if, it was 
necessary to call in the insur- 
ance. 

If Sir Hermann's foresight 
had been followed through. 
Britain would be better placed 
now for exploiting the renew- 
able forms of power. 


Comparable prices were 
possible, according to the 
study, from schemes spanning 
the Mersey estuary. More- 
. cambe Bay or asite at Padstow 
in ComwalL But they were 
only a fraction of foe capacity 
Of the schemes for the Severn. 


Compared with the sizes for 
titles coming up the Bristol 
Channel foe only existing 
commercial tidal power sta- 
tion. at fiance, in Brittany. 


The premiums at foe begin- 
ning of this decade were small. 
Less than 1 per cent of the 
money spent on research into 
energy .went i.nto the renew- 
able types. 

But that was long before the 
“Chernobyl facto?' entered 
foe equation. 

Moreover, foe Department 
of Energy welshed on part of 
the premium last July when 
Mr David Hunt. Under Secre- 
tary at the Department of 
Energy, announced the deci- 
sion to halt foe small grant on 
pioneering work on wave 
energy. He said it had been 
derided to "back winners". 



Four months later, on No- 
vember 13,. 1985. foe world’s 
first wave energy power sta- 
tion came into operation. 
Energy of foe waves was 
captured, converted into elec- 
tricity and delivered as light 
and heat into foe homes of 
people living miles from foe 
sea. 

But foal wave power sta- 
tion. which incorporated de- 
velopments perfected in 
Britain, was opened near Ber- 
gen. in Norway. 

In principle, wave energy 
could provide Britain with 
more electricity than that at 
present available from all 
existing power sialions. 

The other source from foe 
oceans would be tidal power. 
Tidal power differs signify 
cantly from other renewable 
energy sources, because it 
cannot be buiU up in small 
increments - as. for example, 
a “wind farm" — might be 
developed. 

Earlier this month a list of 
17 possible tidal power 
schemes for the UK was 
submitted to an expert meet- 
ing at foe Water for Energy 
Conference, in Brighton. 

The details came from stud- 
ies for foe Government and 
for foe Severn Tidal Power 


looks modest, giving 
megawatts of electricity. 

But it produces foe cheapest 
electricity in the world. Yet 
when it came into operation 
20 years ago. foe scheme was 
considered as something of a 
white' elephant That was a 
view when oil cost a handful 
of dollars a barrel. 


In spite of foe current 
plunge from S30 to 512 a 
barrel, tidal power schemes on 
either foe Severn, the Mersey 
or. one of the other sites must 
be foe best known way of 
securing future economic en- 
ergy .supplies in the UK. 

Because of recent neglect, 
wave power needs more devel- 
opment. It is therefore a 
m ed i um -i o-l ong- term source 
of renewable energy. 

Hesitation over.tidal power 
rests mainly on the large sum 
of money for its development. 
Studies of schemes across the 
Severn have been made for 
more than 50 "years. 

The most ambitious plan, to 
construct a barrage- between 
Brean Down to Lavemock 
Point, was cos Led at £7.000 
million, and recommended in 
a report in 1981 by a learn led 
by Sir Hermann. 

Recent technical and finan- 
cial studies of both sites have 
been made for the Govern- 
ment and a decision is 
awaited. 

Tomorrow; Fusion 


'K 


Isr 


aei tu 


5,000 pigs killed 


More than 5,000 pigs at 
seven farms have been slaugh- 
tered in Britain's worst out- 
break of swine fever for 15 
years, the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture said yesterday. 

The highly contagions dis- 
ease has been confirmed at 
four farms in the Tewkesbury' 
area of Gloucestershire, one in 
Shrewsbury, Shropshire, one 
in Hereford and one near 
Wakefield. South Yorkshire, 
means a 15-day ban on the 
movement of pigs and a com- 


plete ban on exports. 

A further IOIod ban has also 
been imposed, with licences 


* ’ V- 


of pigs.. 

The source of the disease 
has been traced to a Glouces- 
tershire market earlier this 
year. Ministry officials said 
they were containing the 'out- 
break, but it could have a 
serious effect on exports. 

Breeders' yesterday called 
for tougher contrbls iHi import- 
ed meat to prevent disease. 


i. ■ » 


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THE .TIMES TUESDAY MAY -27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 





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SfT 




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iiOW ])jj 

Power fti 
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police to check on 
activities of spy chief 


Israeli police have been 
instructed to investigate the 
activities of Mr Avraham 
Shalom, head of Shin Bek the 
Israeli counter-intelligence 

agency. 

The order to cany oat the 
investigation was reluctantly 
issued by the inner Cabinet at 
the request of Mr Yitzhak 
Zamir, the Attorney-GeneraL 

Details of the inquiry are 
not being released for security 
reasons. But according to an 
uncontesled report broadcast 
by the ABC network, which 
named Mr Shalom, it involves 
suppressing evidence and in- 
fluencing witnesses at an in- 
quiry into the death <jf two 
Palestinians. 

The two men died hours 
after being taken prisoner by 
the Army on a bus they bad 
helped to hijack to the Gaza 
Strip in Aprfl 1984. 

Two of the hijackers and an 
Israeli girl soldier died when 
the bus was stormed by troops 
led by Brigadier-General 
Yitzhak Mordechai. 

The other two members of 


From Ian Mnrray, Jerusalem 

the gang died hours later after 
being handed over to the Shin 
Bek . 

■ A disciplinary hearing into 
the deads ended with only 
minor censures being given 
ouk but three Shin Bet mem- 
bers were subsequently dis- 
missed. 

One of these three went to 
the High Court where his 
secret evidence would have 
been passed on to the Attor- 
ney-General . 

Last Friday the Attorney- 
General informed the Cabinet 
that he intended opening pro- 
ceedings against a senior 
official. 

Permission was granted, bat 
Mr Haim Bar-Lev, the Police 
Minister, made it plain in a 
radio interview yesterday that 
the' Cabinet had urged the 
Attorney-General to drop the 
case. 

"This is not a'simpie crimi- 
nal affair but a matter affect- 
ing state security," be said. 

Mr Zamir, in another inter- 
view, said that leaked reports 
about the case so far “in no 


way describe the gravity of the 
facts or the great danger to the 
foundations of law and de- 
mocracy in Israel". 

He said that ministers 
should nor consider it just a 
matter of security but of basic 
democratic values. 

Some of the strongest oppo- 
sition to an investigation 
came from Mr Ariel Sharon, 
the Trade and Industry Minis- 
ter and former Defence 
Minister. 

He said yesterday that the 
Government of Israel was 
responsible, for waging war 
against terror and had to be 
allowed to decide the policy to 
use. 

The Government should 
not be dictated to by officials, 
but should in fact dictate 
policy to the officials. 

“I regret to say that self- 
destnicbon has become the 
accepted norm here in recent 
years," he said. "In this in- 
stance it is not a matter of the 
survival of law and democracy 
but one of danger to the very 
survival of Israel." 


Passport 
crackdown 
in Berlin 

From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

West Germany and three 
Western powers with occupa- 
tion rights in Berlin yesterday 
met in Bonn to discuss an 
incident on Sunday in which 
diplomats from several West- 
ern countries, including West 
Germany and Italy, were 
stopped from crossing to the 
Western half of the divided 
city after refusing to show 
their passports. 

It is expected the Western 
powers — the United States, 
Britain and France — will raise 
the issue with the Soviet 
Union as the co-occupying 
power of Berlin, because to 
raise it with East Germany 
would be to recognize its claim 
on the city. 

Last Thursday the Govern- 
ment of East Germany sent a 
letter to embassies and diplo- 
matic missions in East Berlin 
saying that from Sunday they 
. would have to produce pass- 
ports to cross the . border. 
Previously, they .had only .to 
show the border" guards -.an 
identity card issued' by die. 
East German Foreign Min- 
istry. 

It was understood yesterday 
that the change did not apply 
to American, British or 
French diplomats because 
their countries still had 
"occupation" rights m the 
: city, which has remained un- 
changed since the end of the 
■ Second World War. 

But despite the tendency of 
the “occupiers" to minimize 
the importance of the change 
and privately point out that 
the East Germans are likely to 
soon abandon the require- 
ment to show passports, the 
East German ruling was caus- 
ing them concern. They fear it 
may be used as aprecedent to 
limit their access in the future. 

Diplomats in East Berlin 
from Naio countries were also 
understood to be assessing the 
situation yesterday. 

The development arises out 
of East Germany’s periodic 
attempts, which have been 
going on for decades, to get 
East Berlin recognized as the 
capita] of the East German 
communist state. 

The United States, Britain 
and. France argue it is an 
occupied city pending the 
peace treaty — still not final- 
ized — which would senle all 
outstanding territorial ques- 
tions arising from the Second 
World War. 

They recognize it as an area 
occupied by the Soviet mili- 
tary government and not as 
the capital of East Germany. 

Because of similar disputed 
points of international law. 
West Germany has a “stand- 
ing representation" in East 
Berlin rather than an embassy. 
East Germany has a mission 
of similar status in Bonn. 

Yesterday a busload of chil- 
dren of West German diplo- 
mats were allowed across the 
border to goto school m West 
Berlin. 


Peace pact eludes 
Guatemala five 

From John Carlin, Esquipulas, Guatemala 


The five Central American 
Presidents returned home yes- 
terday from their weekend 
summit in Esquipulas, having 
signed a declaration commit- 
ting themselves . to further 
peace negotiations and having 
agreed to the creation of a 
Central American Parliament 

But they had foiled to 
resolve any of the basic diffi- 
culties that existed before they 
met. . . 

In a document named "The 
Declaration of Esquipulas", 
the Presidents of Guatemala, 
Nicaragua, El Salvador, Hon- . 
duras and Costa Rica ex- 
pressed .their common desire 
to sign the long-awaited 
Contadora peace treaty, a 
move which officials at the 
summit said was a statement 
of Central America's desire for 
a degree of independence -from 
Washington's military ap- 
proach to the problems. 


"Problems still exist; 10 
days are not sufficient to 
resolve them." President 
Cerezo of Guatemala told 
journalists after the summit. 
“To stand by the June 6 date 
would be, in effect, to liqui- 
date the Contadora process." 

The declaration said the 
summiteers had differed over 
what constitutes “a pluralist 
democracy". 

As an indication of how far 
they were from agreement on 
a common peace project, in- 
siders disclosed that by far the 
greater part of the discussions 
had centred not on Contadora 
but on President Ortega’s 
defence of the dwnocratic 
credentials of the Sandinista 
revolutionary Government 
against the sceptical, at times 
bitter, verbal assaults of the 
others. 

In an informal conversation 
after the summit. President 


But the.-Presidents also ac- ■ -Arias of Costa Rica — re- 
knowledged that differences nowned for his hardline anti- 
still existed, above all on the communist credentials . — 
vexed - question -of arms undermined'^ somewhat the 
coniroL • . conciliatory contents , of the 

According to Nicaraguan declaration when hie' said 


officials at the summit, Presi- 
dent Ortega made it clear that 
he could not commit himself 
to a reduction in his Army, the 
biggest in Central America, 
while Washington continued 
to finance the Contra rebels 
and while the threat existed of 
an American invasion. 

Gjcarty. no progress was 
made on this poink which 
explains why a June 6 dead- 
line set for the signing of the 
Contadora treaty is unlikely to 
be met. 


gruffly that there had been 
“few points of agreement and 
many very serious discrep- 
ancies. - - ■ ~ - «' - . 

The agreement to create a 
Central American Pariiamenk 
the most substantial achieve- 
ment, was described in the 
declaration as a mechanism to 
fortify the process of dialogue, 
but also to. try to reach 
consensus on the definition of 
“democracy", this being a 
"fundamental element" for 
peace. 





The Labour Party leader, Mr Neil Kinnock, who is in India 
on a nine-day roar, visiting yesterday the 17th-century Red 
Fort in Delhi with his wife, Glenys. 


Colombia 
goes to 
Barco by a 
landslide 

From Geoffrey Matthews 

Bogoti 

-Senor Vlrgilio Barco Var- 
gas. the Liberal Party’s trium- 
phant candidate in Col- 
ombia's presidential elections, 
has scored a sweeping victory 
of landslide proportions. 

By the time all the results 
from Sunday's voting in a 
country twice the size of 
France are collated later this 
week, projections suggest that 
Setter Barco will finish with 
about two million votes more 
than his Conservative oppo- 
nent Senor Alvaro Gomez 
Hurtado. 

Certainly, it appears that 
Senor Barco has achieved the 
biggest victory in Colombian 
electoral history. 

A surprisingly high figure of 
eight million voters turned out 
to exercise their democratic 
it That is about 60 percent 


the estimated electorate of 
14 million which, in turn, is 
about half the population. 

Yesterday the respected Bo- 
gota newspaper El Tiempo 
projected the final result as 
4.7 10,687 for Senor Barco and 
2.797.193 for Senor Gomez: 

In mid-evening on Sunday 
the Conservative candidate 
saw the writing on the wall, 
with the Liberals then already 
more than one million votes 
ahead, and made a brief but 
dignified TV speech conced- 
ing defeat 

Senor Barco, a technocrat 
who will take office on August 
7. pledged that his govern- 
ment would work to create “a 
more equal and just society". 

Voting took place in a 
carnival atmosphere without 
violence. 

The incumbent President 
Belisario Betancur Cuartas. a 
Conservative, said the elec- 
tion confirmed Colombia’s 
place as “one of the oldest and 
most mature democracies on 
the Latin American con- 
i’ linem.” 

The. election, he said, was “a 
victory for all Colombians and 
a victory for peace". 

His Defence Minister, Gen- 
eral Miguel Vega Uribe, made 
the same poink hailing the 
election as “a triumph of 
democracy over subversion". 

There was more than a 
modicum of irony there, since 
President Betancur’s bold bid 
to forge- peace with the 
nation’s various guerrilla 
groups during his four-year 
term often 'brought him into 
conflict with the armed forces. 



Sefior Virgilio Barco Vargas and his wife acknowledge the cheers of supporters in Bogota 
after his victory in the Colombian presidential election. 

Man in the News 

Technocrat approved by US 


From Onr Correspondent, Bogota 


The bard part for Sefior 
VirgHio Barco Vargas, land- 
slide winner of Colombia's 
presidential election, wQl start 
in August when be takes 
office. After that judgment 
may be possible on the defen- 
sive billing of him by the 
Liberal Party's campaign 
headquarters as "a bad candi- 
date who will make a good 
President" 

Senor Barco, aged 65, is a 
technocrat and considered 
rather dull and nniiispiriqg. A 
politician he is not But 
according to his supporters, 
his proved ability as a cool, 
aim administrator with an 
obsession for efficiency is just 
what this potentially extreme- 
ly rich nation needs at a time 
when the economy is dramati- 
cally on the upturn. 

But doubts persist The 
Liberals' highly respected el- 
der statesman, ex- President 
Carlos Lleras Restrepo, ques- 
tions whether he has “the 
necessary qualities of 
leadership". 

Other critics claim he is a 
weak figure who, once in 
office, wQl be manipulated by 
his dose ally, ex-President 
Julio Cfisar Torbay Ayala. 
Although Sedor Barco’s own 


integrity has not been ques- 
tioned. there is disquiet over 
the political debts be may have 
accumulated in his quest for 
the presidency’. 

Such judgements are ex- 
tremely premature. Four years 
ago the then President-elect, 
Senor Belisario Betancur 
Cuartas, a Conservative, was 
supposedly ripe for manipula- 
tion by his party's right wing. 

However, once in office he 
proved to be his own man, 
steering a distinctly leftward 
course at home and abroad, 
taking Colombia into the non- 
aligned group of nations, 
spearheading the Contadora 
Group's peace initiative in 
Central America, and boldly 
bidding for peace with the 
nation’s various guerrilla 
groups in an effort to end the 
vicious cycle of political vio- 
lence that has plagued Colom- 
bia for decades. 

Under Senor Barco, Colom- 
bia will assuredly veer to the 
right and relations can be 
expected to improve substan- 
tially with Washington, where 
President Betancnr's persis- 
tent criticism of the Reagan 
Administration's support for 
the Contras in Nkaragna of- 
ten rankled. 


SeAor Barco has strong and 
long-standing ties with the 
United States. He was educat- 
ed in the United States, has a 
US-born wife, and according 
to unconfirmed reports at least 
some of his four children have 
US citizenship. 

He has also served in the 
two key diplomatic posts tradi- 
tionally considered to be step- 
ping stones to the presidency; 
as Ambassador in London and 
in Washington (twice). He has 
also served as a director of the 
World Bank. 

As President, Senor Barco 
will have two considerable 
advantages which Sefior 
Betancur never enjoyed; a 
buift-ui majority from his own 
party in Congress and a 
buoyant economy. 

But he owes his electoral 
victory to negative factors 
rather than his own virtues. 

The Liberals have always 
been Colombia’s majority par- 
ty and this time, unlike 1982, 
they went into the elections 
united. But unity was achieved 
not by SeAor Barco’s political 
skills but by deepnrooted fears 
of the Conservatives’ contro- 
versial right-wing candidate, 
Senor Alvaro Gomez Hurtado. 


University 
riot toll in 
Nigeria 
rises to 15 

Lagos (AP) — Eleven stu- 
dents shot by police during 
disturbances at the leaching 
hospital of the Ahmadu Bello 
University in Zaria died of 
their wounds over the week- 
end, bringing the death toD to 
15. 

The university has been 
closed indefinitely while 
Nigeria's military chiefs of 
staff investigate the causes of 
the unrest. 

Reports say the trouble 
centred on the objections of 
university authorities to male 
students entering female 
dormitories. 

Rebels give up 

Quito (Reuter) - A group of 
left-wing Ecuadorean guerril- 
las have released unharmed 
Senor Enrique Echeverria, the 
senior official they had held 
for five days, and surrendered 
to government troops. 

Long haul 

Honiara (AP) — The Solo- 
mon Islands' Prime Minister, 
Sir Peter Kenilorea, said it win 
rake the Solomons 10 years to 
recover from destruction 
caused by Typhoon Namu, 
which left at least 101 people 
dead and 90,000 homeless. 

Death by fire 

Seoul (AFP) — A university 
student who set himself alight 
in an ami-government protest 
last month has died in hospi- 
tal. the third victim of self- 
immolation in a month. 

Van tragedy 

Jakarta (AFP) — The driver 
and all eight passengers of a 
mini-van died instantly in a 
head-on crash with a bus. 

Drug fight 

Bangkok (AFP) — Burma is 
to receive $10.2 million (£6.8 
million) from the United Na- 
tions for a substitution crop 
programme to reduce opium 
production. 

Red letter day 

Berkeley, California (UPI) 
— The American Communist 
Party will publish a nation- 
wide daily newspaper on June 
3 for the first time in its 67- 
year history, using new tech- 
nology pioneered by papers 
like the Wall Street Journal. 


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left 
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Uneseo rejects 
, observer 
ban on Britain 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

The United Nations Educa- 
tional. Scientific and Cultural 
Organization (Uneseo) has de- 
feated a move to deny 
Britain's request for observer 
facilities following its with- 
drawal from the organization 
in December. 

The decision by the 49- 
member executive came after 
a long and heated debate 
behind closed doors. 

The continuing resentment 
caused by Britain’s decision 
was clear in the board’s pro- 
posal that the independent 
British auditors, who have 
been used for auditing Un- 
esco's accounts for the past 36 
years, be replaced. 

The present auditor. Sir 
John Downey, who is the 
British Comptroller General, 
had his mandate renewed in 
1983 for another six years. 

But the board has decided 
that the UN external audit 
service should take over the 
auditing of (Jnesco’s accounts 
until the Uneseo general con- 
ference has had a chance to 
review the matter at its next 
meeting in 1987. 


Patchy end to East-West meeting 


Geneva — The 35-nation 
Bern conference on improving 
East-West human contacts 
closed yesterday without ful- 
filling the high hopes engen- 
dered by Mr Mikhail Gor- 
bachov’s “spirit of co- 
operation" remarks at_ the 
Geneva summit last Novem- 
ber (Alan McGregor writes). 

“We got a lot of bits which 
have to be sewn together into a 
patchwork quilk" Sir Anthony 
Williams, leader of the British 


eiegauc 

After Western and Soviet 
bloc delegates had criticized 
each other’s final drafts — 
incorporating some compro- 
mises — representatives of 
neutral and non-aligned coun- 
tries moved to break the 
impasse with a lake-rt-or- 
leave-it draft of their own, 
some provisions being com- 
patible with points in the 
other two. 

They advocated simplified 


regulations for travel for fam- 
ily reasons, including family 
reunions; an end to interfer- 
ence in mail and phone calls; 
speedy travel formalities in 
cases of serious illness or 

dfalh; 

The conference, which 
opened on April 15, was pan 
of the process initiated by the 
1975 Helsinki Final Ack The 
second conference to review 
compliance with the Act be- 
gins in Vienna in November. 


Israel turns out for Mrs Thatcher 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Mis Thatcher yesterday 
picked flowers in the desert, 

toured an area that was once a 

slum, and was politely interro- 


mauve ami yellow carnations 
oo the “Old Man’s" tomb 
before visiting the boiling 
greenhouses at the desert: uni- 
versity ttfSetfe Boqer. 

. While there, she picked a 
small bouquet iff geraniums 


of its British residents, told 
Mrs Thatcher that some 5,000 
British volunteers helped 
transform the town and teach 
its' people how to care for it 
“We were just a slum town,"* 
she said, “but we have 


England and clapped and 
cheered when she told them: 
“Ashkekm doesn’t get a very 
good press in the OM Testa- 
ment I seem to remember it 
saying ’Don't publish the news 
in the Streets of Ashkefon'. 


be doneJo make the desert have made it quite the most ami we are pibhshi^ ft in the 


whistle-stop tour of Israel- 

Mrs Thatcher, whose tour k 
the first by a British Prune 
Minister to the modern state 
of Israel, was taken by heli- 
copter to the Negev to pay 
tribute to David Bat-Canon, 
the father of Israel, who a 
affectionately remembered as 
-The Old Man". 

The trip to the desert that 
Ben-Gurioo loved and believed 
should become the heart of 
Israel was made in the early 
morning, but stiH the_sun was 
scorching Iff the Jane tte 
helicopter landed. Mrs 
Thatcher bud a ^wreath of 


flower. 

She then flew to Ashkefon, 
where she was greeted by 
hundreds of children waring 
Unfoa Jacks. 

Up to seven years ago* 
Ashkeloa was a shim with a 
big unemployed population, 
largely nude up of , N®r4 
African Jews, and one of the 
highest crime rates in toe 
country. , ... . 

It was adopted by British 
Jewry as part of a “project 
renewal" scheme and now Its 
flats are freshly painted and 
its gardens Mown. ; 

Doreen Cainsford, one 


important town m the world by 
coming here." 

Mrs Thatcher, who was 
driven through the crowded 
streets of Ashkefon in a bus, 
moved from one side of toe 
vehicle to the other to be seen 
by as many people as possible. 
When she (eft the coach, 
children swarmed everywhere 
and their mothers raised the 
triumphant tUuiatibii of toe 
desert peoples. Mrs Thatcher 
seemed overwhelmed. 

• Ail toe guests at a ceremo- 
ny, in which toe laid a 
foundation stone at a new 
school, wore toe red rose of 


streets. 

Mrs Thatcher then moved 
on to lunch at the Weizmann 


Institute, which last year set 
ap the Margaret Thatcher 
Chair of Chemistry. 

The luncheon speeches went 
on so long there was scarcely 
time for toe drive back up toe 
hill to Jerusalem where the 
Knesset's powerful foreign af- 
fairs and defence committee 
was waiting to interview her. 

Mr Shimon Peres, toe Is- 
raeli Prime Minister, who- 
accompanied Mrs Thatcher 
throughout the day, once again 
introduced her with pride. 


FARMING and the COUNTRYSIDE 




COME AND SEE THEM THRIVE - TOGETHER. 

1st to 7th June, 1986 


Farmers are quietly doing a lor for the 
countryside. They're planting hedgerows and 
trees. They’re creating ponds, improving 
woodland, and conserving moors, meadows 
and wetlands. 

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and 
Food has been giving them a hand. It helps 
fanners with die costs of things like new 
hedges or footbridges and stiles. Through die 
Agricultural Development and Advisory 
Service, ir gives them advice on how commercial 
farming can wotk with countryside conservation. 

As well as agricultural advice, ADAS offers 
guidance on wildlife habitats; the effects of 
sprays and fertilisers; and on how things like 



woodlands, ponds, hedges and field borders 
can be looked after to benefit die countryside. 
It also works closely wirh ocher organisations 
such as the Farming and Wildlife Advisory 
Groups. 

You can see the results of some of this work 
during Farming and the Countryside week, 

1st to 7th June. 

During the week, 33 events will be held few 
farmers to see conservation in practice. Many 
of these events will be open days on farms. 

The public are invited to seven of these open 
days. There you'll be able to see how a concern 
for the countryside has been made part of 
everyday farm management 


s: 

MO 


;e 


i 

I 

■ 

I 


rised 

year 

1986. 

iind 


a 

UM* 





Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food 


These seven open days will be on farms in 
Devon, North Yorkshire, Wiltshire, North 
Humberside, Gloucestershire, Warwickshire 


and Kent. To obtain your invitation to these 
public events, please contact your local office of 
the Ministry of Agriculture, fisheries and Food. 



FARMING AND 

THE COUNTRYSIDE 


a week of farm events 1st to 7th]une 


v 


s 










THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


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massive, Tims' iv, adj. the scale of change the London security markets now face, e.gi new 
market members and structures, new products and competitors, ' increased volume of 
trading. ; . r . .v-”*.- • 

manage, man'ij, ut. until now trading risks in the separate financial markets Have : been 
understood. — manage markets, bankers, m^ket-makers, jobbers and brokers each 
manage the different markets and risks within th’e^v<fe^etfe : meas 'of 'operatiph- -ij-y • 
menace, merits, n. as organisations diversify and enter new financial markets where they 
have little experience, they are faced with new, iil-defmed areas of risk. ^ 

motion, mo's/un, n. as many financial institutions move from commission- based tb more 
competitive margin-based sources of corporate income. -fy angular motion, tfie- degree 
of risk increases for inexperienced market members* ; . . -J: : \ ;ryi ■ ■, >. . •• ■ 'a ■ 

misunderstood, mis-und-sr-stoQcLp.p. the new and greater risks are not fully understood. . 
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- w i 



THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 7 



Paris (Reuter, AP) — A 
gangster serving an 18-year 
jail sentence made a dramatic 
escape by helicopter from the 
Same prison in the heart of 
Paris yesterday and police said 
a mystery woman was at the 
controls. 

Michel Vaujour. aged 35, 

' was waiting on the rooftop ina 
warm-up suit when the white 
Aloueite helicopter flew in zo 
the prison,- hovered above the 
rooftop and whisked him 
away at about 20.45 am. - 

A second prisoner had 
climbed up a rope with 
Vaujour to the roof, but foiled 
to get on board the aircraft and 
was left behind. . 

A witness said that, as the 
helicopter hovered, one of the 
men grabbed a helicopter skid 
while the other remained bn 
the roof 

‘'The scene lasted four to 
five minutes," the witness 
said. “The guards did not 
immediately react because the 
prisoners were blocked by a 
chimney, and they did not 
shoot.” 

Police said the helicopter 
was hired in the south-western 
suburb of Saint Cyr this 
morning by a woman accom- 
panied by a man, both aged 
about 30. 

It was the fourth — and most 



Michel Vaujour: fourth and 

most spectacular escape 

spectacular — jaObreak m 
Vaujour’s career. He was con- 
victed last year of armed 
robbery. 

People living near the Sante 
prison said they heard the 
helicopter hovering for four or 
five minutes. Warders saw the 
action, but did not have time 
to react before the helicopter 
flew away. 

The helicopter landed soon 
after on a football field. 

“Two men and a woman got 
out of the helicopter, walked 
several times round it and ran 
off towards the ring road," 


Penance ends for Punjab leader : 

Priests forgive raid 
on Golden Temple 

From Michael Handyn, Delhi 


The chief priests of the 
Golden Temple of Amritsar 
yesterday officially forgave Mr 
Suijit Singh Barnala, the Chief 
Minister of Punjab state, who 
ordered police into the temple 
to remove extremists. ' 

The Chief Minister present- 
ed himself as the Sikh of 
temporal and spiritual power, 
having completed a week of 
penance cleaning the shoes of 
the faithful at various Sikh 
temples around the state and 
in Delhi. 

The five chief priests called 
the police action “painful and 
deplorable". 

Mr Suijit Singh Barnala 
pointed out to them that he 
had given the orders only in 
consonance with a directive of - 
the General Council of Sikhs 
held in February, but nonethe- 
less accepted the penance “as 
a true Sikh”. 

Yesterday he said theatone- 
ment had given him “great 
inner strength” and had 
proved “a boon to my person- 
al purificaiion”. 

It has also strengthened him 
against bis opponents within' 
the ruling Akali Dal party. 

Meanwhile, the Chief Min- 
ister said the security situation 
in Punjab was not as bad as it 
had been painted. He said the 
arrests of more than 120 
extremists during the past 
fortnight had put the rest 
“virtually on the run”. 

Just how dangerous they 


can be. however, is illustrated 
by the two or three deaths a 
day which continue to be 
reported from various parts of 
the state. Sunday's death toll 
offive included two terrorists 
shot during a battle with 
police in the Amritsar district. 

Mr Suqit Singh Barnala 
yesterday virtually ruled out 
the chance of calling in the 
Army to help control the 
fighting in the worst hit dis- 
tricts. “The Array is no answer 
to the problem,” he said. 

• VANCOUVER: A Cabinet 
minister from India's Punjab 
stale has been shot and seri- 
ously wounded while visiting 
here, but is expected to live 
(Reuter reports). 

PoKce said 'Hfr Malldat 
Singh Sidhu was shot four 
rimes in the chest after his car 
was forced-off the road near 
Gold River, on Vancouver 
Island's west ’ coast, on 
Subday. 

Mr Jagdish Shanna, the 
local Indian consul, su’d Mr 
Sidhu was returning from 
visiting relatives when his car, 
Much- was travelling with 
ibreeothm, was forced offtbe 
road. He was then shot by an 
assailant with a pistoL.No one 
else in the car was injured. 

Mr Sidhu was named a 
Cabinet minister in the Pun- 
jab-Governraent of Mr Surjit 
Singh. Barnala, which mili- 
tants have vowed to destroy, a 
month ago. • 


400 die as 
ferry sinks 
in storm 

From Ahmed Fazl 
Dhaka 

At least 400 people drowned 
when a double-decker ferry 
brat sank in the River Megb- 
na after it was battered by a 
storm in southern Bangladesh 
on Sunday night, officials said 
yesterday. 

President Ershad’s top 
aides flew to the area. 85 utiles 
from Dhaka, to inquire info 
the disaster. Officials say it 
could be the worst river trage- 
dy in the country's 15-year 
history. 

The state radio said tbe 
ferry boat Sarnia, with 50ft 
passengers on board, sank 
when H was caught in a storm 
on tbe way to Dhaka from the 
southern coastal island of 
Bbola. 

Saleh Hasan, a. local magis- 
trate. said that divers fead 
recovered at least 85 bodies so 

far . 

But more than 200 people 
could be trapped inside tbe 
sunken boat and scores had 
been carried away by the. 
current ... 

Weather men say that winds 
reaching 7fl.mph sank several 
smaller boats in the area. ©ss 
April 21 more than 200 people 
died in another ferry* 
disaster about 25 miles frois 
Dhaka. 


Firms get 
Tamil 
warning 

From VfiithB Yapa 
Colombo 

The threat by a- Tamil 
guerrilla group that, it will 
attack the plants of multina- 
tional companies Which con-: 
. tinue to operate in Sri Lanka, 
is being taken seriously by the 
Government. . 

In a statement issued from 
its Madras office on Sunday, 
the Eelam Revolutionary Or- 
ganization of Students (Eros) 
told multinationals to pull out 
of Sri Lanka or face attacks on 
their pJams. 

.The statement referred to 
the destruction of a cement 
plant in Trincomalee. in east- 
ern Sri Lanka, on May 20, and 
asked multinationals to stop 
swindling the people and 
leave. 

• Tamil separatist guerrillas 
claimed responsibilty for the 
destruction of the cement 
plant — the second largest on 
-the island and. a joint Japa- 
nese-Sri Lankan venture — 
which is expected to be out of 
operation for al least a year. 

Mrjilak Samaiasekera, the 
-director general of Sri Lanka’s 
free trade zones, said security 
had been stepped up at indus- 
tries within the -zones during 
tiie past few weeks .and new 
surveillance equipment had 
been imported. ' 


Picture upsets Aquino 

^ -n.. . whinh a 


Manila (AFP) — The Gov- 
nment yesterday banned a 
rteran Filipino pbotojour- 
ilisi from covering President 
quitto after a picture of her 
juing food in her mouia 
jpeared in a leading newspa- 

There. ■ . .. 

Mr Teodoro Locsm, .the 
formation Minister, with- 
w tbe palace accreditation 
’ Albert Garcia for having 
iliberaiely disregarded rav- 
age, rides which he had 
reed Jo follow. Mrs Aqui- 
j's spokesman ~sm'd v - 


The picture, which ap- 
peared on the front page of the 
Manila Bulletin on Sunday, 
showed Mrs Aquino putting 
food in her mouth as she 
breakfestedata military camp 
during a visit to the southern 
a'ty of Davao. . 

’A chtef of state should-be 
accorded the respect due her 
office. Miss Alice Villadofid, a 

spokeswoman, said. , 

She said the suspension was 
temporary; ,, 

. Mr Garcia wasTK« avauable_ 
for.corament \ ; 


said a waitress at a nearby 
restaurant. 

“I thought they were tour- 
ists — they weren’t panicking 
at aU," she added. “The 
gendarmes arrived in a red 
helicopter about 20 io 25 
minutes later.” 

Police launched a vast man- 
hunt and searched the helicop- 
ter with dogs for dues. 

The escape comes as a blow 
to ihe new Government of the 
Prime Minister, M Jacques 
Chirac, which has pledged a 
merciless crackdown on vio- 
lent crime. 

The Sante prison, a gloomy 
building in southern Paris, 
was the setting for a dramatic 
1978 escape by the gangster 
Jacques Mesrine. known as 
France's “Public Enemy 
Number One.” 

Mesrine and a follow pris- 
oner held up three warders, 
pui on their uniforms, scaled 
the prison wall, stole a car and 
vanished into the Paris traffic. 
Mesrine was ambushed and 
kilted by police in November 
1979. 

Two prisoners used a heli- 
copter to escape from tbe 
Fteuiy-Merqgis prison in sub- 
urban Paris m February 1982, 
but were quickly recaptured. 

The Same prison has cables 
stretched above the courtyard 
to stop helicopters landing 
there. 



A yard at tbe Sante prison m Paris, where a helicopter yesterday dropped a line to two prisoners, one of whom was lifted out 


Corsican separatists admit terror attack 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

The Corsican National Lib- 
eration Front has claimed 
responsibility for the terrorist 
attack on a holiday camp in 
Corsica, in which two people 
died and four were injured. But 
tbe front says that it had never 
intended to kill. 

In a statement sent to 
newspapers on the island, the 
separatist movement said: “As 
everyone knows, this type of 


action is In tended simply to 
destroy buildings after the 
neutralization of tbe occupants 
who are placed in a safe place, 
out of (he range m an 
explosion.” 

The 30 people in the camp 
on May 15 had been tied up 
and warned about the danger 
of explosions, the statement 
said. 

But they had not paid 
attention to that wanting. M 
Jacques Rosselet, aged 66, and 
a policeman were killed as 


they were trying to defhse one 
of tbe bombs left by tbe 
terrorists. 

“We did not want that to 
happen, and it should be 
remembered that we have 
always made it a point of 
honour to avoid such acci- 
dents, often to tbe peril of the 
lives and security of our own 
members”, the front claimed. 

The statement said that M 
Rosselet had been singled out 
for attack because of his 
“deep-seated hatred against 


Corsica . . . We knew about 
bis suspicious friendships: in- 
deed, our commando found 
weapons and explosives ready 
for nse on the site (of tbe 
camp).” 

After the attack, police ar- 
rested 65 people in raids on 
homes of suspected separatist 
militants and sympathizers, 
but all were released without 
being charged. It is understood 
that six people are still being 
sought 


Canberra 

ponders 

Maralinga 

options 

From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

A report by British and 
Australian scientists outlining 
proposals to clear waste from 
British nuclear lest sites in the 
outback is being studied by the 
Federal Government. 

The report is by the techni- 
cal advisory group formed by 
agreement between Westmin- 
ster and Canberra after the 
findings last year by the royal 
commission into British nu- 
clear tests in Australia. It was 
handed at the weekend to 
Senator Gareth Evans, the 
Minister for Energy and 
Resources. 

It does not make recom- 
mendations but outlines the 
options, with estimated costs, 
for clearing highly toxic pluto- 
nium waste left at the 
Maralinga site by Britain at 
the end of the lest programme 
in 1961 

The Thatcher Government 
rejected a recommendation by 
the commission that Britain 
should bear the cost of restor- 
ing Maralinga to a state suit- 
able for unrestricted habi- 
tation by Aborigines, but 
agreed to the advisory group 
after Senator Evans met Mr 
Norman Lament, the former 
Minister of State for Defence 
Procurement. 


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AU being well, the Hands Across 
America razzmatazz will have raised well 
over $50 million <£333 million) for the 
hungry and homeless in tbe US. an 
amount so piffling by tbe standards of 
this wealthy nation that it will make 
hardly any difference at all. 

This sad irony was totally lost in the 
national enthusiasm for the exercise on 
Sunday, which even for a time interrupt- 
ed afternoon sport on television (Christo- 


pher Thomas writes from Washington). 

President Reagan seized the pboto- 
opportnnity and swayed to the tone of the 
catchy “Hands Across America" song 
outside the north portico of the White 
House. He and Mrs Reagan held hands 
with children and their daughter Mau- 
reen (above right). 

Four days earlier, still insisting that he 
would not take pari, he told schoolchil- 
dren in an unrehearsed remark: “I don't 


Future of Star Wars 
threatened by 
Capitol Hill austerity 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


Enthusiasm for President 
Reagan's once-gJ amorous Star 
Wars initiative is fading rapid- 
ly on Capitol Hill in the 
sombre mood of budget re- 
straint. threatening the entire 
concept of futuristic space- 
based defences for the foresee- 
able future. 

There is obviously no long- 
er any chance that President 
Reagan will realize his dream 
that a non-nuclear shield 
against enemy missiles would 
be positioned above .America 
by the end of the century. The 
timetable, as far as one exists 
any more, now stretches well 
info the 21st century. 


years. Congress has shaqply 
trimmed the Administration's 
requested funding for Star 
Ware, formally known as the 


Strategic ueienix iniuauvc 

(SDI). 

Next month, the axe is 
likely to fall with even greater 
force when the Senate armed 
forces committee looks at 
funding for the year beginning 
October 1. 


To the dismay of the White 
House, a bipartisan coalition 
of 46 senators has been 
formed to demand a huge 
cutback in the Star Wars 
programme, representing the 
most serious challenge to SDI 
since President Reagan an- 
nounced it with such fanfare 
on March 23 1983. He pro- 
claimed at the lime that Star 
Wars could make nuclear 
weapons obsolete, a belief that 
most experts today dismiss as 
futuristic fantasy. 

The senators are demanding 
no more than a 3 per cent 
after-inflation increase for the 
SDI next year rather than the 

r . ft M— 


Reagan has requested. They 
wrote to the armed forces 
committee: “Our concern is 
that the Strategic Defence 


liimawvi. iwv,%.i*vu tAvw 

sive and inappropriate em- 
phasis on the Department of 
Defence's budget. 

“Not only are the goals of 
the research effort unclear, the 
need for accelerated funding 
for a long-range programme 


such as SDI has not been 
demonstrated." 

**We are concerned that the 
SDI programme is being 
rushed to a premature devel- 
opment decision in the early 
1990s in order to meet an 
unrealistic schedule." 

The senators’ move has 
sparked efforts in the House of 
Representatives to set up a 
similar coalition to fight for 
cuts in Star Wars funding. 

Representative Charles 
Bennett, a Democrat from 
Florida and a senior member 
of the House armed services 
committee, said he was estab- 
lishing a bipartisan coalition 

• . i • c /■ ■ _ r«r\f 


i t ■ ■ i k . * j l • 


funding next year without 
allowances for inflation. 

The dwindling support for 
the programme means that 


less money win oe avauaoie 
for research by overseas firms 
and institutions. Britain is by 
for the most enthusiastic allied 
supporter of Star Wars, and 
was the first to sign an 
agreement to participate in 
research. 


believe there is anyone going h angry in 
America simply by reason of denial and 
lack of ability to feed them; it is by people 
not knowing where or how to get help." 

Over a long family meal later on, with 
roars of protest reverberating from 
charity groups around the country, he 
decided he woold, after all, bold hands 
with the rest of the milli ons of people who 
formed a chain — broken in many places, 
admittedly — which meandered more 


Oslo row 
over UN 
priority 

From Tony Sams tag 
Oslo 

Mrs Gro Harlem Brundi- 
land. the new Norwegian 
Prime Minister, has attracted 
sharp criticism for her deci- 
sion to attend the fifth session 
of the United Nations World 
Commission on Environment 
and Development, of which 
she is chairman, which opened 
in Ottawa yesterday. 

Opposition leaders were as- 
tonished that she insisted on 
attending when Norway is 
grappling with public-sector 
strikes and facing a crucial 
budget debate. 

Mrs Brundtland said she 
was hard put to understand 
how, in the wake of the 
Chernobyl disaster anyone 
could question the supreme 
importance of. the 
commission. 

She said: “Norway has been 
appointed to lead the commis- 
sion, and I cannot just leave it 
now." 

• Whale steak: Whale steaks 
topped the lunch menu yester- 
day in the Norwegian Parlia- 
ment as the country’s whaling 
fleet, defying international 
protests, set out on the first 
day of the 1986 whaling 
season (Reuter reports). 


than 4,000 miles from New York to Los 
Angeles. 

The chain included Dave Parker, the 
baseball player, joining hands with 150 
Little Leaguers in the Three Rivers 
Stadium in Pittsburgh (above left) and 
Sean Lennon with his mother, Yoko Ono, 
and Liza Minnelli at Battery Park, New 
York (centre). 

Hands more accustomed to grasping 
Gucci bags and Rolls-Royce steering 


wheels formed a chain along the priciest 
pari of the cross-country route. Gregory 
Peck, Joan Collins, Louis Jordan, Barbi 
Benton, Little Richard, Lionel Richie, 
Sidney Poitier and Miss Universe, Debra 
Carthay-deu. were among those in the 
chain on Wilshire Boulevard In Beverly 
Hills. 

There is poverty in the United States, 
of course, but it is five-star luxury 
compared with the sights yon see in 


India, in neighbouring Mexico, and the 
little war-torn countries of Central 
America. Those and many other hungry- 
countries, especially in Africa, will ” 
receive far less humanitarian aid from 
the US next year because of stringent 
budget-catting in Washington. 

In 1981, when Mr Reagan took office, 
the Census Bureau said 293 million 
Americans lived in poverty. Last year the 
figure was 34 million. 


US-Mexico drugs crisis: 2 


Boom time again for the traffickers 





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In the second of two 
articles from Washington, 
Christopher Thomas ex- 
amines the US response to 
Mexico 's attempts to stem 
the tide of drugs across the 
border. 

Five years ago Mexican 
marijuana cultivation had 
been all bat obliterated. 
Countless fields of opium pop- 
pies, too, lay dead, wiped out 
-by her biddies sprayed from 
government helicopters, and 
drug lords had fled. Until two 
years ago the United States 
was still fulsome I y praising 
Mexico's drug eradication 
programme as a model for the 
world. So, what went wrong? 

Traffickers have shown a 
tenacious determination to re- 
establish themselves. They 
have lavishly bought off gov- 
ernment officials, sections of 
the judiciary and the police. 

The vidousness of their 
trade was brought home to tire 
American public last year with 
the gruesome torture and mnr- 


Nuclear issue 
starts crisis 
in Finland 

From OUI Kirin en 
Helsinki 

Nuclear power threatens to 
bring dowo Finland's four- 
party centre-left coalition to- 
day unless the populist Rural 
Party decides to withdraw its 
motion demanding the dis- 
mantling of the country’s four 
nuclear reactors by the year 
2000 . 

The Social Democrat Prime 
Minister, Mr Kaleri Sorsa. 
reacted angrily on Friday 
when two of his coalition 
partners, the Rural Party’ and 
the Swedish People's Party, 
tabled anti-nuclear motions. 
He said the Government 
would resign if the two mo- 
tions were not withrawn by 
today. 

The Swedish People's Party 
withdrew its motion immedi- 
ately. Tbe Rural Party is 
expected to withdraw its mo- 
tion. too. it is the only 
coalition partner which stands 
to lose if elections are held 
immediately. 


der of special agent Enrique 
Camarena of tbe US Drugs 
Enforcement Agency, who had 
been working under cover. 

Today's drugs crisis be- 
tween the US and Mexico can 
be traced to that single event, 
but there Is a long drugs 
history across the border. 

From the 1930s to the 1960s 
Mexico provided America 
with almost all its marijuana, 
until better organized rivals, 
such as Jamaica and Colom- 
bia, stole the market. An 
official attack on Mexican 
crops with the chemical para- 
quat finally forced Mexico out 
of the picture. 

The producers, however, 
have fought back spectacular- 
ly and now dominate the 
hungry US market in marijua- 
na. A schoolboy can afford a 
little of it and can invariably 
find it The quality is good and 
America is awash with the 
stuff. 

The story of heroin produc- 
tion is also one of a remark- 
able comeback. After the 
demise of tbe French Connec- 


tion in 1972, Mexican criminal 
organizations scrambled to fill 
the gap in heroin supply. Soon 
they provided 87 per cent of 
the American market. But an 
onslaught by the Mexican 
Government reduced that 
drastically by 1979. 

The US estimates, however, 
that 42 per cent of the heroin 
consumed in the US last year 
came from Mexico. Every year 
the figure rises. 

Drug production is an insti- 
tution m large areas of Mexi- 
co, particularly in the states of 
Durango, Chihuahua and Si- 
naloa, where more than 4,000 
soldiers have lately been 
searching for marijuana and 
poppy fields and destroying 
them. Opium poppies have 
been grown in the mountains 
since the war, when poor 
Mexican farmers were encour- 
aged to produce them for 
morphine manufacture. 

Drug trafficking is sanc- 
tioned at high levels of govern- 
ment, oiled by bribery and 
steeped in romance and vio- 


lence. President de la Madrid, 
who came to power on a pledge 
to combat corruption, his 
achieved little. As he enters 
the lam two years of his 
administration. Ire has little 
power to act American au- 
thorities complain bitterly that 
the hard evidence they present 
to Mexican police is blatantly 
and routinely ignored. 

The House Narcotics Com- 
mittee said in a report last 
month that drug smuggling 
from Mexico was “totally out 
of control" adding that Mexi- 
can drugs were now “threaten- 
ing the entire country". Many 
congressmen claim that illegal 
immigrants are being used as 
drug smugglers. 

“We have to look to Mexico ^ 
to halt production and traffick — 
ing of drugs," the State De- 
partment said. Mexican 
officials retort, with some 
justification, that they can 
never hope to halt the supply 
so long as America continues 
to provide the demand. 

Concluded 


rf. " : r 
•_* K - J • . 


i-rv V 


United Nations to tackle problem 
of creating famine-free Africa 


From Zoriana Pysariwsky, New York 


The United Nations Gener- 
al Assembly will convene 
today in an unprecedented 
session to discuss Africa be- 
yond the famine and the 
possibility of a self-sufficient 
food-producing continent in 
the not too distant future. 

The appeals wiU be for long- 
term investment and develop- 
ment that will steer the 
continent away from its obses- 
sion with urbanization to- 
wards an emphasis on agri- 
cultural modernization. 

Eighteen months ago. a 
session promoting a grand 
design for Africa, rather than 
urgent attempts to ensure its 
very survival on a day-to-day 
basis, would have seemed 
impossible. But longed-for 
rains finally fell on the 
parched soils of much of sub- 
Saharan Africa in 1985, bring- 
ing most of Lhe region’s 45 
countries a good harvest. 

Yet experts warn that one 
favourable harvest will not 


end the food shortage. 
Rather Africa has been given a 
fleeting opportunity to cast 
failed but deeply ingrained 
economic policies aside, and 
work quickly and efficiently to 
avoid another big famine. 

After lengthy debate and 
soul-searching, the Organiza- 
tion of African Unity has put 
forward a two-pronged strate- 
gy to save African economies 
from collapse. 

ft calls for SI 28 billion (£86 
billion) of investment in agri- 
cultural development over the 
next five years, with two 
thirds of that sum being put up 
by African countries them- 
selves. With African nations 
staggering under a $200 billion 
foreign debt, the plan also calls 
for the cancellation of billions 
of dollars of interest due on 
outstanding loans. 

However.the United States, 
which is the largest aid donor, 
has exemplified Western re- 
luctance to deal in figures by 


making it dear that it does not : 
regard the session as an oppor- l 
tunity for considering specific^ 1 
proposals for aid or debt relief. 

The week-long discussions 
are likely to lay the basis for 
gradual, piecemeal progress 
on economic problems coun- 
try by country, with a general 
thread of a more market- 
oriented approach. 

The United Nations Devel- 
opment Programme has iden- 
tified 10 main factors con- f 

trib u ting to Africa’s food 
crisis. They include inade- ,= 

quale land use, outmoded w 

agricultural techniques, lack 
of research, emphasis on cash 
crops, pricing policies with 
disastrous effects on incen- a 
fives to farmers, and lack of 
rural investment, which has p .fj ; 
accelerated rather than stead- J ; 
ied urban drift 

Free tbe peasants, page 12 
Leading article, page 13 


Queen Sofia opens 
Madrid art centre 


NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

FOR THE 900TH ANNIVERSARY 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 


Spain's art-loving Queen 
Sofia inaugurated here yester- 
day the first phase of a major 
new art centre, which will bear 
her name. It is envisaged as 
Madrid's answer to the Pom- 
pidou Centre in Paris. 

Senor Javier Solana. the 
Culture Minister, said the 
centre's aim would be to 
stimulate links between Span- 
ish artists and those from 
abroad, as well as to “recover 
for Spain" 20th-century, art 
ignored by die Franco regime. 

Tbe timing of tbe opening, 
however, provoked con- 
troversy. Critics, including Ei 
Pais* the Madrid independent 
daily, yesterday accused the 
Socialists of involving the 
Queen in electioneering dose 
to the Jane 22 general election 
while the project is still only a 
quarter finished. 

Local inhabitants near the 
Prado Museum, where the art 
centre is situated, were upset 
by the killing of more than 150 
cats which had been living on 
the site before the ceremony. 
The Madrid Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals said yesterday it was 
trying ro rescue the survivors. 

Unlike the Pompidou Cen- 
tre, with its ultra-modern ar- 
chitecture. the Sofia Centre 
occupies the massive stone and 
granite General Hospital for 


Men, built in the late 18th 
century, which was finally 
dosed only in the 1960s. 

The Franco regime planned 
to poll it down, but the advent 
of democracy rescued it as an 
historic building. While the 
planners debated Its future, 
tbe cats moved in. 

Artists and government rep- 
resentatives saw Queen Sofia 
go round an exhibition of the 
works of three leading Span- 
ish artists, two Americans and 
one German. The hospital 
wards have been transformed 
into beautiful white exhibition 
spaces. 

As renovation proceeds, 
Madrid's two existing modern 
collections will be rehoused at 
the centre. 

Some art critics have 
praised the Government's 
move, arguing that It offers an 
historic opportunity to rede- 
fine Spain’s official policies 
towards contemporary art But 
others emphasize that the new 
centre has no director or firmly 
established structure. 

The Government's budget to 
cover all the arts this year 
totals £156 million. Existing 
galleries are unable to pay for 
more attendants or to compete 
at foreign art auctions. Madrid 
still has no permanent opera 
or concert hall. 


bo0)EsfrA^ 


BOOK 


Ktffi-IUKii 


with the Manorial Society of Great Britain 
presents 

T HE CO URTS LEET AND BARON 
OF THE MANOR OF BROMSGROVE 

at the Guildhall, London EC2 
by courtesy of the Corporation of London 
on Friday, June 6 1986. 

The ancient Manor afBro m s g ro v e has held Courts mia a 
ytar in the Worcestershire unm since receiving iu Royal 
Charter from King John in 1199. As part if ike 900ik 
mmvenary celebrations of Domesday Book, the 

SSSflZ ’****? manorial traditions 

dang from the Middle A ges amid the medieval splendor 
of the Great Hall, GuidhaU, on Friday June 6. 


TteWV" "? of Fealty to the 

Lord of the Manor, the View of Frankpledge triUbe taken : 

flesh-aethers, and bread-weighers will duck 
the local beer, meat, and bread as ikeyctid centimes ago. 

Mr John Foster, will be assisted 
by the High Bailiff and Officers of The Most Honourable 


of Henley-in-Arden, all 

ySSrvT* ."rfoO** Library and Crypt, ChddhalL 
Lwdm £C2. or 12ASpm taken medieval muricmSlbe 

A limited number of tickets is available on 
ap plication to the National Committee at: 104 
Kennmgton Road, London SEll 6RE. 
(Telephone: 01-735 6633). 
















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in 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 



SHOOTINGS 


miteriesi 


^Boulevard cfes 
^InvaJktes^ 


Champ da Mars 




gscumm 

iSairrt Michel 


SPECTRUM 


Outwitting the boulevard bombers 


Tomorrow the 
French cabinet 
meets to try to 
find a way of 
combating the 
terrorist threat 
on the streets of 
Paris, reports 
Diana Geddes 

The warning was chillingly 
clean “We win continue to 
carry out Our operations on 
the streets of Paris as long as 
the three terrorists {impris- 
oned in France) are not 
released". It came from the 
little-known Committee of 
Solidarity with .Arab and Mid- 
dle-Eastern Political Prisoners 
(CSPPA) after its March bomb 
attack on a shopping arcade m 
the Champs-Elysees had killed 
two people and injured 28. 

It was the group's fifth 
attack on Parisian shopping 
centres this year. Together 
with an attack on the Paris- 
Lyons high-speed train on 
March 1 7. the group has been 
responsible for two deaths and 
injuries to 58 people. 

Other attacks may follow, 
for there is little chance that 
the new right-wing French 
government — which has 
placed the fight against terror- 
ism at the top of its list of 
priorities — would ever dream 
of freeing any of the prisoners 
whose release the group is 
demanding. Ail three stand 
accused of murder. 

France, and Paris in partic- 
ular. has long been one of the 
world's major terrorist targets. 

Most French 
terrorism 
is imported 


Over the past five years, more 
than 40 attacks involving 
death or injury have been 
carried out in the capital 
alone. Many more have 
caused only material damage. 

Strangely, the French Min- 
istry of the Interior does not 
keep a record of specifically 
terrorist attacks. But its figures 
show that since 1982 France 
has been subjected to an 
annual average of more than 
1.000 bomb attacks. Some of 
those were by criminals, oth- 
ers by militant nationalist 
groups such as the Basque 
separatist group. ETA, or the 
Corsican National Liberation 
Front. 

Many, .however, are the 
work of terrorists, who attack 
blindly in their pursuit of 
often vague, idealistic aims. 
The tracts that Action Directe 
left after the May 16 bombing 
of Interpol's headquarters on 
the outskirts of Paris read like 
pure gobbledegook. 

The extreme-left group de- 
scribed its aim as being “to bit 


central installations which 
link their political, economic 
and military strategy, and at 
the heart of which are found 
the strongest antagonisms of 
the international proletar- 
iat/imperialist bourgeoisie: to 
concretize the qualitative leap 
of all antagonisms of the 
masses and develop .them 
toward a global revolutionary 
strategy". 

France has more than its 
fair share of terrorist attacks, 
partly because of its position 
as a major international cross- 
roads. It also has highly 
permeable borders, including 
six frontiers with foreign 
countries, and a large popula- 
tion of Arab immigrants from 
France’s former North Afri- 
can colonies, among whom a 
terrorist can easily get “lost". 
Furthermore, it has a close 
historical involvement with 
the Middle East. Lebanon in 
particular. 

Most terrorism carried out 
on French soil is imported. 
The French people are often 
.simply innocent victims of 
attacks by one foreign group 
on another — Armenian na- 
tionalists carrying on their 
vendetta against the Turkish 
government for example, or 
one group of Palestinians 
attacking a rival faction. 

But some of the attacks are 
also aimed at changing French 
policy in the Middle East The 
CSPPA, for example, has de- 
nounced what it sees as “the 
reactionary and colonialist 
policy of the French govern- 
ment, hostile to the aspira- 
tions of the Arab people. pro- 
Israeli, and subjugated to 
Washington's will". 

The CSPPA is also a good 
example of how terrorism can 
Teed on itself. No sooner is one 
terrorist group pul in prison, 
than another comes along to 
kill more people in order to 
free the first group. 

This apparent “no win" 


Notice 
to investors. 

The rate of interest on investment 
shares and deposits will be reduced by 
0.7 S% p^L except as set out below. 


The rate of interest on Cardcash 
accounts with a balance of £2,000 and 
over and on Premium Xtra accounts will 
be reduced by 0.73% p.a. 


The rate of interest on investments 
of individuals who are not ordinarily 
resident in the United Kingdom ana 
in respect of whom the Society has 
received an appropriate declaration will 
be reduced as follows: 

Premium Xtra and Cardcash (with 
balances of £2,000 and over) 
by 0.97% p.a. 

90 Day Xtra, Instant Xtra (with balances 
of £2.000 and over but less than £5,000 
and with balances of £10.000 and over). 
Monthly Savings and Deposit (other 
than Cardcasn), Deposit Cheque. 

7 Day Xtra and Special Investment 
by 1.00% p-a. 

Other accounts 
by 1.01% p^. 


The rate of interest on Dei 
Cheque accounts subject to the 
rate of tax, will remain unchanged. 

Some classes of investor wifi receive 
separate notices which will then replace 
this notice. 

The new rates will apply on and 
after 1st June 1986. 

HALIFAX 

BUILDING SOCIETY 

TPSMTY ROAUHUJPW TUESDAY 27TH MW PBb 


situation has prompted some, 
including Charles Pasqua. the 
hard-hitting new Minister of 
the Interior, to call for the 
restoration of the death penal- 
ty. But the balance of opinion 
in the new govermenL includ- 
ing that of Jacques Chirac, the 
prone minister, is firmly 
against iL 

A 30-year prison sentence, 
without possibility of remis- 
sion, was proposed instead, 
but even that has now been 
watered down to a minimum 
of 20 years without remission 
after jurists, prison officers 
and others protested that a 30- 
year sentence would turn pris- 
ons into tinder-boxes. 

The government has pre- 
pared a panoply of other 
measures designed, as it says, 
“to terrorize the terrorists" 
which are due to be presented 
at tomorrow's cabinet meet- 
ing. These include random, 
on-the-spot identity checks — 
everyone, including tourists, 
will be expected to carry their 
identity papers at all times; 
permitting the police to detain 
suspects for up to four days 
without charge (instead of the 
present two days): and creat- 
ing a specialized court without 
a jury in Paris for trying 
terrorist crimes. A reduction 
in prison sentence — in some 
cases, total exemption — 
would be offered to tempt 


Some want the 
death penalty 
brought back 


terrorists or their accomplices 
into “grassing" on their col- 
leagues. and increased finan- 
cial rewards would be offered 
to ordinary citizens for infor- 
mation leading to arrests. 

Other measures, such as the 
re-introduction of obligatory 
registration cards in hotels, 
visas being required by all 
foreigners outside the EEC. 
and the introduction of an 
“unfalsifiable” identity card, 
are to be introduced later. 

However, the government 
has dropped its plans to bring 
in a new “crime of terrorism" 
after protests from the legal 
profession that it would be 
unworkable and could actual- 
ly make it more difficult to 
convict terrorists. 

While a poll earlier this 
month showed that 87 per 
cent of French people believed 
that terrorism constituted a 
“serious threat" to France, 
and 50 per cent feared that 
they or a member of their 
family could become a victim 
of a terrorist attack, not 
everyone approves of the 
government's new measures, 
or its strong-arm tactics — 
including the unprovoked ar- 
rest of journalists and raids on 
newspaper offices — which 
they consider a serious threat 
to individual liberties. 

France is thought to have 
lost half of its American 
lourisi trade this year because 
of fears of terrorist attacks. 
The Stars and Stripes has been 
taken down from most US 
buildings. Senior figures in the 
1 5.000-strong American com- 
munity living in Paris have 
taken to carefully varying 
their daily routine, avoiding 
places traditionally frequented 
by other Americans. The US 
embassy has been turned into 
a veritable fortress. 

By and large, however, the 
ordinary Parisian goes about 
his daily business as normal, 
taking the Metro (where a 
bomb was found by an obser- 
vant passenger in March), 
sitting at the pavement cafes 
(a favourite summertime ter- 
rorist target), and shopping in 


the big department stores Tike 
the Galeries Lafayette, near 
the Opera (where a bomb 
exploded last December). 

“Perhaps one is a little more 
wary", a Parisian friend said, 
“but life goes on. U is not as if 
wc are living in a permanent 
slate of fear." 


a tt ack s In Para since 

which have caused death or 


A CHRONOLOGY OF DEATH AND DESTRUCTION 


injury are shown on our 
map, but the total number of 
bombings is far Maker. 

The attacks tab, very roughly. 
Into three categories: bombs de- 
signed to do maximum damage to 
a particular eta b flahm ent, but 
avoiding physical injury if possible 
(often these explosions occur dur- 
ing the night and during the 
weekend); fcSfings of specific peo- 


ple; and bomba planted in crowded 
areas to spread fear and un- 
certainty among the population. 

Not afi bombings fit tWa p a tter n , 
and the same terrorist group may 
commit acts which fall Into more 
than one category. 

1. January 18. 1982; Lfc-CoL 
Charles Ray. Assistant Martary Atta- 
cfteat the US embassy, shot dead 
outside his home, 2 Boulevard 
Eitele-Auglar - 1 Berne, by lone 
gunman who escapes. Besp ona M - 
tty claimed by FARL (Factions 
Armees RdvolutionnaJres 
Ubanaisas). 

2. (March 29 1982: Bomb on board 
Paris-Touioijse express train La 
Capitole kite five and injures 27. 
Considered to be the work of 
terrorist Qfiteh Ramirez Sanchez, 
otherwise known as “Carlos the 
Jackal". 

3. April 3 1982; Yacov Ba rsim antov, 
second secretary responsible for 
political affairs at Israeli Embassy. 
shot dead In front hall of his block of 
Bate. 17 Avenue Ferdmand-Busson 
— IB&ne, by a woman who es- 
caped. Respon sibi lity claimed by 
FARL and by Mouvement des 
Brigades Revowtionnaires Arabes. 

4. April 22 198fc Explosion of 
booby-trapped car in front of Arab 
newspaper At-Watan-Ai-Arabt (The 
Arab Nation). 33 rue Marbauf — 
8eme. leaves one dead and 63 
injured. No responsiMrty claimed, 
but French government tmp&cates 
Syria. 

5. June 19 1982: Iranian student 
kited on street comer, rue Duc/rue 
deTretaigne-1 Seme, when packet 
he has just cotected from 
office explodes. No 
claimed. • 

6. July 20 1982: Bomb on terrace of 
Brasserie Saint Sdverhi, Place 
Saint-Michel, injures 15. 
Responsibility claimed by "Offy” 
Armenan terrorist group. 

7. July 23 1982: Fiadl Dani, assistant 
director of the PLO in Pans, kited by 
an explosion in his car outside his 
house. 82 rue du Oessous-des- 
Beraes - 13eme. Ninth PLO official 
in 10 wars to be assassinated in 
Paris. PLO blames Abu Nidal terror- 
istgroup. 

8. July 24 1982: Bomb at Pub Saint- 
Germain. rue de i'Ancianna 
Comedie — Berne, injures two. 
Responsibly claimed by Orly. 

9. August 9 1982; Four-man gang 
sprays bullets into Jo Gofdenberg's 
f Jewish) restaurant 7 rue des 
Hosiers, leaving six dead and 22 


French government im- 
. Abu Nidal. but neo-nazi 
organization also suspected. 

10. August 11 1982: Bomb outside 
Israeli trading company. 20 rue de la 
Baume - Same, seriously Injures 
passer-by. Responsibility darned 
by Action Directe, French extreme- 
left terrorist grot^L 

11. August 11 1982: Booby-trapped 
car explodes in front of Iraqi 
embassy offices, rue du General 
Appert - IBeme, injuring six. 
Responsibility claimed by Iraqi Shia 
opposition movement Mouvement 
de ('Action Islamlque d'lrak. 

12. August 21 1982 Two paficsRwn 
killed while trying to diffuse a bomb, 
probably intended for a US 
bmat, on Avenue de la I 
-7ime. 

13. Septemb er 17 1982: Three 
Israelis - a diplomat, his wife and 
cousin - seriously injured when 
bomb in their car explodes outside a 
school at 68 rue Cardinal - I76me.' 
Children among the 51 Injured. 
Responsibility calmed by FARI4 but 
not proved. 

14. February 28 1963: Bomb In 
tourist agency specializing in Turk- 
ish hobefcays, 8 rue Boud re au — 
96ma. leaves one deed and four 
injured. Responsibility claimed by' 
Arm£e Secr&e Armenienne pour la 
Liberation de i'Anrtente (ASALA), 
the Armenian terrorist group. 


15. May 31 1983: Shootout on 
Avenue Trudalne - 96me, when 
four policemen are fired on by four 
suspects loading ther car. Two 
policemen killed, one Injured 
Responsibility claimed by Action 
Directe. 

16. July 7 1983: Bombing at Turkish 
Airline counter at Orty airport leaves 
seven dead and 55 irtured- 
Responsibility claimed by ASALA, 
whose leader, Varodjian Gartxdjtan, 
was later arrested aria sentenced to 
bfe imprisonment. 

17. No v e m ber 19 1983: Bond) 
thrown at L'Oreedu Bofs restaurant 
injures 33. No responsibility 
claimed. • . 

18 . December 23 1983: Bomb 
thrown at Grand V6f0ur restaurant 
in gardens of the Pals 
injures 12 people. No i 
claimed. ' 

19. December 31 1983: Bomb 
aboard TGV Express Marseifes- 
Parts train leaves two dead and 20 
injured. Responsibility claimed by 
Organisation de la Lutte Aimee 
Arabs (letter said to have been 
written by Carlos). . 

2ft February 7 1984: General AB 
Ghoiam Ovetssy, ex-MMary Gov- 
ernor of Tehran and Ms bro th er. 
Ghoiam Hossein - Oveissy, shot 
dead on roe da Passy - 1 6eme. by a 
lone gunman from an unknown 
Iranian revolutionary group. 


21. February 8 1864: KhsBfa Ahmed 
Abdel Aziz A-Mubaak, United Arab 
Emirates ambassador in Paris, shot 
dead outside Ns front door, 22 
Avenue Charles Roquet - 7dme. I 
lone gunman who escar 
Rosponsfciety claimed by Brigades 
RdvolutionnairBS Arabes. 

22. April 2 1984: Bomb in entrance 
of buikflng used by Scientology 
Church. 41 rue de la tour 
d'Auverona - 9dme, injures one 
parson. No responsnflty claimed. ^ 

23. August .2 1984: Bomb at 
European Space Agency. 10 roe 
Mano-Ntes - 15eme. injures pass- 
ers-by. Responsibility Maimed by 
Action Directe. 

24. October 20 1884: Bomb at 
Messler-Hispano-Bugatti at 
Montrouge Injures three. 
Responsibility ciakned by Action 
Directe. 

29. January 25 19B& Genera) Rene 
And ran, director of intern a tio na l 
affairs at Ministry of Defence 
(responsible for arms sates) shot 
deadlnfrontof Ms viHaatLaCete- 
Saint-Cioud on outskirts of the city. 
Responsibaity Maimed by Action 
Directe. 

26. February .23 1985: Bomb at 
Marks & Spencer on- Boulevard 
Haussmann bares one dead and 14. 
injured. Carried out by a Tunisian 
hired by a Syrian-based dtestdem 
■.group. - 


27. March 29 1 985: Bomb at Cinema 
ftlvoH-Beaubourg, 80 roe de Rrrolj, 
inures 18 during an International 
Jewish Cinema Festival. No 
respons&ifty Maimed. 

28. Aprs 29 1985: Two bombs 
explode si mu lt an eously m Arron- 
dsssement 130me. One - at SAT 
telecommunications company , 14 
rue' Reims — injures night-watch- 
man. ResponsitoiHy for both bombs 
Mamed by Action Directe. 

29. July 18 1989: Bomb in mayor s 
waiting room at Hotel de Vine. 

injures three. No 


3ft S epte mb e rs 1985: Four explo- 
sions in a ffere n t areas injure two- 
people —one at ATIC company, rue 
de Longchemp — I8ema, and the 
other at SPiE-Battgnolles in 
Wmthertur tower at La Defense. 
-ResponsiHity Maenad by Action 
Directe. 

31. October 8 198& Bomb outside' 
Casino de Parte. 16 roe de Ctefty - 
ir-by. No 


82. November 17 1985: Two men 
krited when a bomb they are 
harx»ng explodes in an under- 
garage on Avenue 
V. Both men. one French 
and trie other Portuguese, known to 
pofice 

3ft De c em b er 7 1985: A bomb in 
-Gaieties -Lafayette an d on e m 
. Printem ps department stores on 
Boulevard Haussmann explode 
~ simultaneously, injuring 35. No 
respons&ility tiaimad. 

34. "February 3 1988: Bomb in 
Gaterte du Claridge (Champs- 
Bysee) injures eight. Responsibility 
claimed by' previously unknown 

. croup CSPPA — Committee of 
ScMartfy with Arab and Middle East 
Prisoners. 

35. FSbroanr4 1986: Bombin Glbert 
Jeans bookshop. Place Saint Mi- 
chel. inures three. Responsibility 
clamed by CSPPA. 

36. February 5 198& Bomb in FN AC 

shop in Forum des Halles injures 
nine. Responsfeifity Manned by 
•CSPPA. • = ij, 

37. Match 17 1986: Bomb aboard ^ 
Pans-Lyon TGV express tram in- 

SsPP/L Re5porisiWlty c * armed 

38. 20 Ma t ch 1986: Bomb in Galerie 
Point show (Champs- Bysee) 
leaves two dead am 
Responsibility Maimed 

39. April 15, 1988: Attempted 
assassination of Guy Brana, vice- 
president of the CNPF, the main 
French employers' association, out- 
side his home in the Yvelines. 
Chauffeur injured. Responsibility 
Maimed by Action Directe. 

40. May 18, 198ft Armed attack wffh 
machine guns and two bombs on 
Interpol headquarters at Saint- 
Cloud. One pokceman mit 
Responsibility Maimed by 
Directe. 


1 injures 28 
by CSPPA. 


Random slaughter: one of the 15 victims of 1985's Marks & Spencer attack is carried away SuSSUI MacDonald 


Action Directe: 

Extreme-left organization 
formed out of the merger of 
two militant organizations in 
1979. Since then it has 
claimed responsibility for 
nearly 50 terrorist attacks, 
principally in the Paris area. 
Targets mostly military build- 
ings. offices of political par- 
ties, and establishments with 
Jewish connections. Once, at- 
tacks were aimed at causing 
materia] damage; rather than 
killing or maiming people. Bui 
in January 1 985. group split in 
two and a new, much more 
violenL international faction 
emerged to join forces with the 
German Red Army Faction 
and the Belgian Cellules 
Communistes Com ba names 
(CCCL Besides its admitted 
attacks, this group may have 
been involved in the assassi- 
nation in Lyons last month of 
Kenneth Marston, British 
head of the American compa- 
ny Black and Decker. Suspect- 
ed links with other inter- 
national terrorist 

organizations, including the 
Italian Red Brigades and the 
Lebanese Armed Revolution- 
ary Factions (FARL). 


Front de la Liberation 
National* Corse (Corsican 
National liberation Front 
-FLNO 

Corsican separatist move- 
ment. founded in 1976. Bomb 
attacks mainly carried out in 
Corsica, usually against 
French “national" targets. But 
some attacks also in Mar- 
seilles. Toulon, and Nice, and 
more rarely in Paris. Carried 
out the recent bomb attack on 
the holiday centre in Corsica, 
in which wo people were 
killed and four injured, but do 
not usually seek to maim or 

km. 


RIGHT AND LEFT OF FRANCE’S TERROR GROUPS 


Commit^ de Solidarity anx 
Prisonniers Pofrtiqnes Arabes 
et do Proche Orient 
(Committee of Solidarity with 
Arab and Middle Eastern 
Political Prisoners — 

CSPPA). 

First appeared in February 
when it claimed responsibility 
for the three bomb attacks in 
shops in Paris. Demands the 
release of three terrorists im- 
prisoned in France: Annis 
Naceache. head of the five- 
man commando team 
lhattried to assassinate 
Chapour Bakhtiar, last Irani- 
an prime minister under the 
Shah: Varadjian Garbidjian. 
Syrian-born Armenian and 
head of the ASALA comman- 
do which attacked Orfy air- 
port in July. 1983: and 
Abdallah Georges Ibrahim. 

Abu Nidal: 

Syrian-based dissident Pales- 
tinian group, named after 
their leader who was con- 
demned to death in 2974 by 
Yassir Arafat, the PLO leader. 
Mainly Jewish targets, includ- 
ing the commando attack on 
Rosenburg's restaurant in Au- 
gust 1981 Reportedly made a 
deal with French government 
at that lime not to carry om 
any further attacks in France 
in return for an undertaking 
that two Abu Nidal terrorists, 
imprisoned since 1978. would 
be freed after serving just half 
their 15-year sentence. The 
two were released in February 
this year. No Abu Nidal 
attacks reported since 1981 

A miee Secrete 
Armenienne pour hi 
Liberation de TArmeBie 
(Secret Armenian Army for 
the Liberation of Armenia 
-ASALA). 


Marxist nationalist organiza- 
tion. suspected of being ma- 
nipulated by Arab powers m 
to get the Turkish government 
to recognize the Armenian 
genocide of 1915 and to win 
independence for Armenia. 
Mainly, but not exclusively. 
Turkish targets, starting with 
the killing of the Turkish 
ambassador and his chauffeur 
in Paris in October 1975. 
Little activity in France since 
the arrest and. imprisonment 
of Garbidjian. 

Annie Rerolutionaire 
Arnteniesne ( AHA): 

Set up by young, more moder- 
ate Armenians, mostly from 
Lebanon. 

Boakotraute-Gdanak- 
Paris-Gaatemala-Salvador: 
Shadowy group, specializing 
in attacks against arms firms 
and buildings with Soviet and 
Polish government connec- 
tions. No deaths or injuries 
involve^. Claimed responsi- 
bility for 16 bomb attacks, 
mainly in the Paris area, 
between December 1981 and 
February’ 1983.. , 

Alliance R£voIutionaire 
Canute (Caribbean ’• ■ 
Revolutionary Alliance — 
ARC* 

Guadeloupe, separatist organi- 
zation which first made its 
appearance in May' 1983 with 
simultaneous bomb attacks in 
three French overseas territo- 
ries - Guadeloupe. French 
Guyana, and Martinique. Fol- 
lowed by four bomb attacks 
on tourist centres in Paris in 
June 1983. 

Charles Martel: 

Little-known extremet-right 
group, which claimed respon- 
sibility in March 1986. for a 


bomb attack on the Paris 
offices of tbe Jcftne Afrique 
weekly newspaper. 

Factions Armies 
Revolotiouaires Libanaises 
(Lebanese Armed 
Revolutionary Factions — 
FARL): 

Beirut-based. Marxist. Maro- 
nite group responsible for at 
least 10 attacks in France since 
1980. mainly on Jewish tar- 
gets. Abdallah Georges Ibra- 
him. suspected European 
leader of the FARL, arrested 
in Paris and imprisoned in 
October 1984. Since then, no 
attacks claimed by group. 


Commandos in France ■ 
Against the Maghrebin 
Invasion: 

New. . extreme-right.- racist- 
group opposed to immigration 
from the former French North 
African colonies of Algeria. 
Morocco, and Tunisia. 
Claimed responsibility for 
bomb attacks against immi-- 
grant targets in Marseilles.' 
Nice, and Toulon- this month.. 

Black War: ... i. 

New. extreme-left group : 
which claimed responsibility- 
foe attacks against the Paris' 
offices of. Legitime Defense, a. 
right-wing self-defence group 
last December: and against the* 
right-wing European Workers : 
Party offices in Paris in April. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 960 


ACROSS . 

1 Pivot (6) 

5- Unadulterated (4) 

8 Be obliged (5) 

9' Gruesome (7) 

11 EEC admin isronor 
( 8 ) 

13 Long for f4) 

15 112pounds03) 

17 Tinsigbily (4) 

IS Ticker tape (8) 

21 Personification (7) 

22 Damp (5) 

23 Publicity stunt (4) 

24 Large soup disfi (6) 

DOWN 

2 Bet (5) 

3 Distilling tub (3) 

4 Banking work! (7.6) 

5 Step (4) 

6 Teasing (7) 

■ 7 Forceful person (10) 
10 Votm(IO) 


12 Central part (4) 
14 Transfer ( 4 ) 

16 Caned out (7) 


19 Watered silk (5) 

20 Only (4) 

22. Spoil (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO 959 

^ WJTW; V 

SRSHrti'gjsV 




















RALPH LAUREN 


Old England inspires 


a New World designer 


In 1973,. Ralph Lauren designed film 
costumes for The Great Gatsby. Today, 
v white flannels, breezy cotton, fine 
^ linens, monogram tried shirts and a 
\ Scott Fitzgerald smell erf oki money 
make up Lauren's fashion image. 

“Old money is a term I really dislike", 
says Ralph Lauren. “I don't know what 
it means. It isa question of good tnste or 
not I was not born to the manor. And I 
am not fantasizing about that just 
because I like old English leather and I 
don't like pink Cadillacs with fins." ' 
Ralph Lauren, at 46, has built up a 
fashion empire in America worth. SL2 
billion. He has also created his ultimate 
1 fantasy — a five-floor mansion in Man- 
: f hatian that echoes Gatsby’s old-world 
3 'grandeur. Lauren's edifice is New 

• York's first designer store. It is hung, 

< furnished and decorated with trophies 

• of old money — or at least Old Engand: 

■ solid mahogany cabinets to display die 

clubbable ties that were Ralph Lauren's 
u introduction to selling fashi on 19 years 
$ ago. 

4' "Tve used my money” he says, “To 
; express my dreams." 
s. Deep chintzy sofas with tapestry 
.. cushions invite men to try on shoes or 
survey a collection of saddle-soaped 
riding boots; portraits of graceful. 1 920s 
.. sophisticates line the sweeping central 
staircases; horses and their inasters are 
, pictured proudly on the back starts. 

Then there are the goods for sale. The 
; } curving ballroom of the original Rhine- 
J * lander mansion (bought by a millionair- . 
ess but never lived in) houses the 


e In every country there b an ; 

international class ... 
it’s about understatement, - 
- • : breeding, restraint and flair’ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


A. S. P. without the sting 


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elegant and formal men's suits. Success. 
■1 says Lauren, is “sort of sexy in men". 

On the top floor, the beds that furnish a 
~ setting for the Ralph Lauren home 
collection are crackly with fresh linen 

- against solid wooden frames. 

Like the life-style ads photographed 

- by Bruce Weber out of Scott Fitzgerald, 

' the image of the store is romantic, 

. . V succulent and idealized. Write Angfo- 
; Saxon Protestant America and the 
aristocracy of Old England were never . 
quite as decent as this.. Lauren shows. 
V- WAS.P. without the sting. Yet he - 

- J insists that he is not trying to recreate 
1 class symbols intbe New Worid. . . 

“I don't believe in phoneyness and 
_ arrogance", he says. “And l don"t 
believe that one person is better than • 
another. In every country there isan 
international class, an elegance and 
universal taste. It is about understate- 
ment a sense of breeding, restraint and 
flair. That is what I believe in." 

The shop that Lauren opened in 
London in 1981 was the seedling for the 
Madison Avenue store. The old Savory 

- and Moore building in Bond Street. 

* ■_ gracefully restored, introduced the idea 

'jof a shop that conveyed atmosphere as 
r weII as purveying clothes. This idea. is 
integral to England and has been 
marketed to a certain extent by Laura 
Ashley, but is unexpected in America 
where the big stores make the running. 

. ‘ Lauren's new shop will be the flagship 
for the 50 freestanding Polo/ Ralph 
Lauren stores nationwide and through- - 
out Europe. 

. The London shop, after an uncertain 
start, is a success and is expanding into 
the next-door building — formerly Lord 

• Nelson's town house. It will open, after 
extensive restoration, in 1987. The idea 

• of selling Old England back to the 
■' English has now been extended to 

France, where Ralph Lauren las taken 

- over the one-time temple of Britishness 
abroad - the Thomas Cook building at 

.yr the Madeleine. The three-floor store 
opened in Paris last month with bowls 
of peonies dripping pale petals on - 
beeswaxed furniture. 

The clothes are the Lauren classics: 
pure wool and striped cotton, quality 
flannels, tweeds, delicate handkerchief . 
- linen. They are inspired — for both 

- sexes — by traditional menswear. 

“Tbeclothes I design are very low key 
anbd unfashionable,” he says." All is in 
tiie details and the fabric.” 

Lauren says that .be is no longer 
reticent about offering back the kind of 
goods that were once symbols of British 
style: “What used to be made is not 
made now”, he says. “People think they 
- ' can still find ft. 1 1 rave pulled it back. 1 
love things that age and age with 
■ quality, but I have never tried to copy 
anything. Of course my dream of 
' . /England is romantic, but I. have pulled 
the essence of the dream out of the real 
thing.” 











Ralph Lauren’s 'fashion achievement 
has been to bring-the feel of customized 
■ suits and shirts, hand-made shoes and 
- • quality doth in updated shapes, ~ to 
clothes that are made on a factory line. 
■Restarted the menswear Polo collection 
in .1968, after working at Brooks 
Brothers, the heartland of American 
' preppie style. 

His first women's collection was m ' 
1971. based on menswear shapes and the 
. premise, as he puts it, that “a woman in 
in a tuxedo is more sexy than a gizl in a 
. gown",/ 

- “There are two kinds of sexine&,"he' 
explains. “I'm not saying that one is 
better than another; I tike a woman not 
looking like she’a primped in front of a 
mirror all night long." 

t Of course my dream of 
England is romantic, bat 
I have palled the essence 
ont of the real thing 9 


His business figures are now awesome 
and the ranges of clothes and accessories 
vast The menswear sold under the Polo 
label .is broken into three separate 
' ranges, from Ivy League suits at the 
upper end to “rough wear” at the other. 
Similarly, the women's collections en- 
compass active wear, swimwear, the: 
main collection and its less expensive 
counterparts, as well as fragrances. 
Girls’ and boys’ clothes were intro- 
duced; so was luggage. leather goods and 
, home furnishings (in 1983) that will, 
'soon be brought into Europe. . 

There is slight chagrin in the British 
fashion worid that Lauren has. succeed- 
ed in marketing British style as high 
fashion at designer prices, white in 
Britain there is a gap between the classic 
and the .creative. 

Ralph Lauren readily admits his debt' 
to England. But he says that bis 
knowledge came . mostly from bodes, 
magazines and. dreams. The American 
West inspired his earlier Pioneer and 
Navajo collections, and his enduring 
love affair with denim. Yet that, top, 
was based on a vision of a Big Country 
America that he had never seen.: 

Ralph Lauren was brought iip ui the 


Bronx in a Jewish* family. But any 
similarity between the -phoney Jay 
Gatsby, ne James Gatz, and Ralph 
Lauren. n6 Ufsbitz, epds with the 
names. Lauren is sincere about his work 
: and consistent in his designs. He 
believes in quality, standards and the 
product itself rather than what other 
people might think it stands for. He is 
not buffeted by fashionwinds: the body- 
conscious European style becomes the 
merest tuck in a Norfolk jacket; his 
perception of Dynasty opulence is a 
pure camelhair coat or buttermilk 
sheepskin.- 

• “Restraint is important", he says. “ 
Other designers do big sleeves or ruffles. 

■ It is a sense of knowing who you are." 

His fashion heroes are unlikely - 
Anthony Eden, Woody Allen (whom be 
dresses on and off screen), John 
Kennedy, Cary Gram, even Margaret 
Thatcher. (“People who have a sense of 
themselves, a personal style, who stand 
for something.”) 

- He himself is wearing a white 
Western shirt, blue jeans and .well-worn 
cowboy boots. His favourite shirt is 
lumberjack check and he is seen in a 
cowboy hat as wed as a business suit 

His three homes — the fruits of 
success — reflect wfiat .he calls his 
.“point of view about taste" — not. 
English country bouse style. His ranch 
in Colorado has exposed beams and big 
stone fireplaces. The apartment on 
Central Rank, where he lives with his 
wife Ricky and three children, is 
modern, white and dean. 

“There is so much noise in New York 
and life is so hectic. You need to come 
back to something spare and white”, he 
says. The billowing white net curtains in 
a store roomset are inspired by his 
Jamaican villa. ' 

We met on his son’s birthday. He is 17 
and Ralph says, not with any great 
conviction, that he hopes he won't come 
into the business. He is proud of all his 
children, of his father's work as a 
painter. HestiD retains, be says, a sense 
of wonder about his success and the 
infinite riches k has brought him. 

■ “When I started out, I did not think of 
making money", he says.“Mooey is the 
report card. Things just grew. It was not 
laid out with a five-year plan. I just kept 
doing what I believed in." 






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Far left Ralph Lauren tn Western-style check cowboy 
shirt and jeans. Above: Great Gatsby dressing: floral silk 
afternoon dress from £285. men s striped and plain Polo 
shirts £35. pleat-front linen trousers £91 . Left: tennis party: 
white cotton shirts £29. cotton Oxford bags £61 , piimsolf 
shoes £40. Navy blazer £310. striped club ne £26. All from the 
Ralph Lauren image-making campaign. Below left London 
shop vignette: cotton gaberdine jacket £105, shirts, sweaters, 
shoes, with old school photograph. All clothes from 
Poio/Ralplv Lauren. 143 New Bond Street London W1 

■ Fashion photographs by BRUCE WEBER - ' ■ 


Design for sales 


TEST- — 
« six 
dim- tj 
!Q.8p_ 


I read last week two differ- 
ent views about British 
fashion design. One was 
presented with a sense of 
drama, in glossy colour and 
with bold pictures in a 
magazine that bills itself as 
a “world-wide manual of 
style". The other is con- 
tained in clerical ted covers 
and set ont in rigidly coded 
paragraphs. 

The revelations and revo- 
lutionary ideas were all in 
the formal report The mar- 
keting of British fashion 
through exhibitions and 
shows is discussed in “The 
L'K Fashion Designer 
Scene" — a report for the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry by John Wilson, 
Director of the British 
Clothing Industry. Associa- 
tion. It should be required 
reading for those designers 
still stitching np wounds 
from the last London Fash- 
ion Week in March. That 
concentrated on the perfor- 
mance of models on the 
catwalk rather than selling 
clothes at the exhibition. 

The idea that continental 
designers grow rich on state 
snbsidies is scotched in the 
government report. The key 
financial factor in France 
and Italy is that fashion 
exhibition organizers are 
obliged by law to plough 
back profits into the mar- 
keting of fashion, in Brit- 
ain, exhibitions are ran by 
organizers who lave mostly 
done a good job at getting 
together a fragmented in- 
dustry. The organizers keep 
the profits, but in mm have 
been helpful (and some- 
times indulgent) towards 
young designers, who stimu- 


late press and buyer interest 
even though they are not 
making money. 

In February, /. A Maga- 
zine ran an interesting piece 
on the difficulties British 
designers face in getting 
their dothes made up. . 

This month's sequel, 
which comes after the un- 
happy March show's, is an 
attack on the fashion press 
for failing to report and 
promote “creative" fashion 
talent. It is the age-old 
theme that if you don't like 
the message yon blame the 
messenger. It is fine that 
the outrageous street-wise 
designs that put London 
fashion on a roll three years 
ago now seem less exdting 
to the world's fashion press. 
Yet h is ooosense to stress, 
in the words of /. that 
“Foreign buyers are unwill- 
ing to commit themselves to 
a designer because of as- 
toundingiy negative press". 
The bitter truth for those 
who make uncompromising- 
ly odd clothes is that such 
garments do not sett at 
retail. This is overwhelm- 
ingly the message from 
retailers who sit in on 
meetings of the Press Com- 
mittee of the British Fash- 
ion Council. 

Tree creativity is the life- 
blood of the industry. But 
fashion cannot be so-called 
until people are wearing the 
dothes. 

*The UK Fashion Designer 
Scene by John R. Wrhon 
costs £3 post-free from the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry HQ, Library Room 
144, Sanctuary Buildings, 
16-20 Great Smith Street. 
London SWIP 3DB. 


■ - m 


Books that are 
alwavs in style 


Fashion books may be said to 
fj have reached an all-time to* 
jUlwiih the publication of those 
E/ slim but tasteless volumes, the 
" j Princess Diana dressing doll 
-«»book5. As if cardboard figures 
JPr b>f the Prince and Princess of 
>fWaIes fa underwear were not 
jj | enough, some even include 
among the accessories the 
y| royal nursery chamber-poL 
111 But all this is not to say that in 
}a hundred years' time fashion 
S. collectors will not be potty 
. about the likes of the crudely 
illustrated The Princess Diana 
Fashion Collection Dressing 
Bank (World International 
Publishing. 99p). 

A better place to begin. 

. however, would be An Intro- 


duction to Fashion Illustration 
by Madeleine G.insbnrg 
(HMSO. £3.75). The author is 
an assistant keeper at .the 
Department of Textiles and 
Dress at the Victoria and 
Albert Museum, Iii an attrac- 
tive and authoritative book 
she traces the hmory of 
fashion publications from the 
16th-century Trachtenbucher 
up to 1939. when the photog- 
rapher took over from the 

fljusiraior. 

Madeleine Ginsbutg gives 
the background to whai might 

be called the top end of the 
market- Much of .this consists' 
of bound copies of ladies’' 
journals. Nfanes like Lq Belle 

,\ssmbleeaxA&t(jazeae_du 


view r 

OF 

FASHION \ 



\US0fi \ADBU3 GHhM 


Bon Ton are seen in historical 
context. In lerins of hard cash, 
Acfcerriuuin's The Repository 
of. -ins (40 volumes of maga- 
zines dated 1809-1828) sold 
for £17280 at Christie's in 
1984 . : 

To be realistic, though, 
many, collections consist of 


reasonably priced books of 
rebent vintage. At £4.95 each, 
the “In Vogue" series can 
draw upon 70 years of stylish 
photographs for illustration. 
Such books as The Language 
of Clothes by Alison Lune are 
a good read for anyone inter- 
ested in dress. ■ 

A typical collector might be 
a student of an or fashion who 
happens to be mad about one 
particular decade. If this were 
the 1960s. then he or she 
might pick up a -paperback like 
Quant by Quant or Twiggy by 
Twiggy for lOp at a charity' 
bookstall. At second-hand 
bookshops a hardback such as 
Balmain. My Years and Sea- 
sons might be acquired for £ 1. 

Museums are another good 
source of. cheap worthwhile 
items. Exhibition catalogues 
should be kept because they 
are often unlisted and hard to 
trace later. The interest value 
of l’art Dwk in Check Trou- 


sers and Parade has already 
outlived the Edinburgh Festi- 
val exhibitions they were de- 
signed to accompany. 

Are glossy coffee table 
books such as Yves Saini 
Laurent (Thames and. Hud- 
son. £20) and Horst {Viking 
Books. £40) just a - bit of 
conceit, or worth the consider- 
able outlay? Madeleine 
Ginsburg thinks they are ex- 
cellent as they add to the 
visual knowledge of the per- 
son with an emotional ap- 
proach lo the subject. 

Theoretical books such as 
Quentin Bell's Of Human 
Finery, the recently translated 
The Fashion System by Ro- 
land Barthes and Peier York's 
Style Wars rely on text rather 
than lavish illustration. And 
look out for anything written 
by the late James Laver of the 
V&A who dtd. more than 
anyone -to popularize the 


study of fashion through his 
writing. 

Before long, any collector of 
fashion books, magazines or 
ephemera is likely to find 
herself with at least one item 
from France. In 1984 an 
amusing book introduced 
readers to such sub-cultures as 
La Punkette and Le New 
Wave Funky. Les 
Mouvcmcnts de Mode 
Expliques aux Parents costs 
about £ 1 0 to order from 
bookshops with a ‘ French 
department 

Older and more expensive 
books at Sotheby's and 
Christie's often have the word 
“Lipperheide" or "Colas" in- 
cluded in their descriptions. 
These are the names of librar- 
ies. For example, any book 
with a Lipperheide number is 
listed in. the catalogue of that 
library in Berlin. This does not 
guarantee any particular qual- 


; pterne 

BALMAIN . 

v " v im* voiirs ^ . 

" l - giTiriii seasons 


ity. but does lend a certain 
importance. Incidentally, the 
Lipperheide and Colas cata- 
logues. reprinted in 1963 in 
limited editions, are highly 
desirable in themselves. 

Meanwhile, back at your 
local bookshop are the fashion 
books, probably sandwiched 


BOOKS: R. D. Franks. 
Market Place, Oxford Circus, 
London W1 specializes in 
fashion books and 


magazines. Foyle’s, IIS- 
125 Charing Cross Road, 
London WC2has a good 


selection of fashion books. 
Slaney & McKay. 263 Kings 
Road, London SW3 has a 
“style arid gender" section. 
MAGAZINES: The Vintage 
Magazine Shop. 39-41 Brewer 
Street. London W1 stocks 
bade numbers of magazines. 
EPHEMERA: Ephemera 
Society, 12 Fitzroy Square. 
London W1 holds bazaars 
regularly 

between art and craft. They 
might be on anything from 
military uniform to theatrical 
costume. New titles are ap- 
pearing all the time: it looks as 
if the lashioo book will never 
be out of style. 


Li- 


Anne Cowan — 
















THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

His grace 
and favour 

The Archbishop of York’s res- 
idence, Bishoplhorpe, will soon be 
home for not one but two leading 
clerics. In best Good Samaritan 
tradition, the Archbishop of York, 
John Habgood, has invited the 
former Archbishop of Canterbury, 
Dr Michael Ramsey, and his wife 
Joan to move into a self-contained 
' flat in a wing of Bishoplhorpe, a 
few miles south of York. Dr 
Ramsey, who retired from Canter- 
bury 12 years ago, is now 81, 
suffers from poor eyesight and 
finds difficulty both with the hills 
of Durham, where he lives, and 
die stairs in his Large town bouse. 
Dr Ramsey left York, where he 
was archbishop. 25 years ago.. and 
is looking forward to his return 
this summer. Having been also 
Bishop of Durham, he confesses: 
“It does rather seem we hanker for 
old haunts." At this rate, he could 
well end his days in Canterbury. 

Signing off 

Britain's hopes of remaining 
Unesco's official auditor, despite 
last year’s bitterly resented with- 
drawal, have been dashed. The 
organization's executive board has 
finally decided to relieve the 
Auditor General, Sir Gordon 
Downie. of the job. With White- 
hall keen to keep a watch on the 
Paris-based organization. Dow- 
nie ’s office had, as I reported a 
fortnight ago, made it dear it was 
more than willing to go on doing 
the books, as it has for nearly 41 
years. Unesco reasons, however, 
that it would be unconstitutional 
for a non-member state, albeit still 
with observer basis, to retain the 
£200,000-a-year contract. France, 
Canada and Mexico are thought to 
be front-runners for the job. 

• Who says that socialists lack a 
sense of humour? A wit with a 
paint brush has daubed a wall in 
Ruislip, Middlesex, with die slo- 
gan: “Vote Labour and fight troth 
decay.” 

Backtrack 

A moral victory for the Welsh 
record company whose five direc- 
tors were threatened with jail for 
refusing for ten years to submit 
accounts in English to Companies 
House fit Cardiff Notice of dis- 
solution against Sain (Recordiau) 
Cys was posted in the London 
Gazette last month. Now Compa- 
nies House has admitted that it 
went too far and has written to 
apologize — in Welsh. Sain man- 
aging director Dafydd Iwan tells 
me that, loosely translated, the 
letter says the company, which 
specializes in Welsh language pop 
and ballad records, was “in- 
advertently included” in the Lon- 
don Gazette list. Iwan is hoping 
now for a change in the law. 

• Meanwhile Sam’s latest record. 
The Gates of Greenhorn, com- 
memorating the peace camp, has 
brought sharp criticism of its 
composer, Tony Biggin. Whatever 
the merits or otherwise of his 100- 
miirate oratorio, the mere fact be is 
a man has brought a mailbag of 
letters from outraged f eminis ts. 


Stumped 


As the cricket season gets into full 
swing, a sad and contentious little 
story about a wartime fixture 
comes my way, on which I require 
your help. It concerns the Surrey 
player Andrew Ducat, who died of 
a heart attack at the wicket during 
a match between the Surrey and 
Sussex units of the Horae Guard 
at Lord’s in 1942. Wisden records 
his feteful innings as 29 not out, 
which is surely a less than ade- 
quate description from such a 
meticulous arbiter. Cricketomane 
friends suggest that a better form 
of words might have been “Re- 
tired dead, 29,” or, rather less 
plausibly, “The Late Andrew 
Ducat, 29." Any thoughts? 

BARRY FANTONI 


i 


"Given the current opinion polls, no 
doubt she visited the Wailing Wall' 

Rough drama 

Rough justice, as the BBC found, 
makes good television. Now 
Rough Justice is about to make 
good drama. The Edinburgh Tele- 
vision Festival is planning a 
dramatization of last Year’s Ap- 
peal Court hearing which freed 
Anthony Myeock. who had been 
wrongly jailed for robbery, but 
which went on to condemn the 
BBC Rough Justice team -for using 
“outrageous" methods in in- 
vestigating his case. After a three- 
month suspension, the journalists 
Martin Young and Peter Hill have 
been banned by the BBC from 
undertaking any investigative 
work for two years. Will the re- 
enactment of the trial demonstrate 
that they were themselves victims 
of rough justice? John Willis, 
Yorkshire TV’s documentary 
chief organizing the reconstruc- 
tion, would give me no inkling of 
the verdict. PHS 


How much BBC do we need? 


Just over a year ago The Times 
helped to generate a public debate 
about broadcast! ug. In purely 
journalistic terms, the effort was a 
spectacular success. Its leaders in 
particular were deplored, exe- 
crated (and even occasionally 
supported) for neatly a year. 

Assorted TV grandees - nota- 
bly Messrs Grade and Milne- 
even stooped, repeatedly, to 
impugning the motive of the 
Times editorial staff: something 
that if applied to themselves, they 
would unhesitatingly have la- 
belled smear tactics. The broad- 
casting establishment plainly was 
rattled. 

But in a wider sense. The Times 
felled. It never succeeded in 
getting on to centre-stage the main 
question, which was also shirked 
in the Peacock Committee's terms 
of reference. How much, if any, 
BBC do we need — and, if any, 
how„shou!d we finance it? Instead 
Peacock was to ask: How should 
the BBC be financed? That quickly 
became; Should the BBC take 
advertisements? 

Professor Peacock and his 
committee members could have 
stretched the terms of reference 
and issued a series of documents 
outlining possible alternative 
structures for broadcasting (nat- 
ionwide cable; BBC as a small 
common carrier with all produc- 
tion by contract producers; 
competitive tendering for the 
radio and TV channel franchises; 
tendering for production depart- 
ments; arid so on). It did not. 

Instead the public debate never 
left the question whether the BBC 


Africa will ask the rest of the world 
tomorrow for $458.7 billion for an 
“economic recovery programme” 
over the next five years. The 
request will formally be made by 
Ibrahiraa Fall, Senegal's foreign 
minister, at a special session of the 
UN General Assembly. 

The sum includes $200 million 
for agricultural and other develop- 
ment, $169 billion for projects 
under the Organization of African 
Unity priority programme and 
between $16.6 billion and $24.5 
billion annually until 1 990 to meet 
obligations arising from foreign 
debts. 

The total represents more than 
two and a half times the foreign 
debt of $162 billion that Africa 
took 20 years to accumulate. 

The sheer magnitude of the 
request is stultifying. Delegates 
will return home empty-handed 
and disappointed- They will tell 
their citizens that the rich or 
imperialist countries are unwilling 
to help suffering Africans. 

Yet it is such misplaced blame 
that keeps Africa in poverty. We 
Africans have made development 
dependent on foreign exchange, of 
which we have less and tes, and 
foreign aid,- whose variables we 
cannot control 

Take agriculture. In the past 
huge sums went into stole farms, 
grandiose schemes and shiny 
modern machinery. Agricultural 
complexes built in Zaire are still 
not working 10 years after comple- 
tion. In Ghana there are more 
than 70 different makes of tractor 
in various stages of disrepair on 
state farms. 

. Africa's agricultural revolution 
foiled because the strategy empha- 
sized prestige, modernism, mech- 
anization. and paid little or no 
attention to the peasant formers 
who produce the bulk of its food. 

More than two million Africans 
perished from the famine in 1985 
and millions more conti oue to be 
at risk The knee-jerk reaction was 
to blame the drought But food 
production per capita bad been 
declining long before the drought 
According to a UN World Food 
Council report in 1982, food 
production per person fell 7 per 
cent in the )96Qs, 15 per cent in 
the 1970s and is expected to foil 
further in this decade. In 1984 it 
wasaiready less than 80 per cent of - 
what it was in 1961. 

The cause of this decline can be 
found in government policies of 
exploitation of peasant formers. 
Ruling elites use their authority to 
extract wealth from the produc- 
tive class, the peasant majority, 
and spend h on show junjectsand 
conspicuous consumption. In East 
Africa, the Swahili-speaking peas- 


by William Bishop 


should lake ads. The committee’s 
only effort at stimulating public 
debate was a traditional public 
meeting — and that was a fiasco. 

As was often and rightly pointed 
out last year, there is good reason 
to suppose, both in theory and in 
the light of experience, that 
competitive advertiser-supported 
TV will not work well. What is not 
established is that- the current 
BBC together with a regulated 
1TV, is either a good cure or a cost- 
effective one. 

The BBC produces many pro- 
grammes that advertiser-sup- 
ported TV would be eager to 

S ide. It is just not necessary to 
these by taxation. Hie same 
is mie of several other BBC 
activities, which could be cut away 
from their dinging parent 
The only real objection to the 
BBC’s having a narrower remit is 
that its position would become 
politically unsustainable: Every- 
one in broadcasting knows that we 
do not need taxation and regula- 
tion to provide the television fere 
that most viewers want most of 
the time. The unspoken fear is 
simple. A more narrowly focused 
BBC would give the game away. 

Once the mass of the public saw 
that a licence fee was there to 
provide only the stuff they never 
watched, they would vote out the 
licence fee. It is the old, old story 
of British public life: mistrust by 
the educated elite of tbe political 
judgement of the mass of tbe 
population. Will those members 


of the elite chosen for the Peacock 
Committee think any differently? 

But there is a larger question, so 
large that the Peacock Committee 
can be less easily criticized for 
ducking it. What is the point of 
most high-quality TV? -The me- 
dium is good at some things and 
nolat others. It is good at pictures, 
images, impressions, and bad at 
sustained analytical arguments or 
at careful sifting of a mass of 
evidence. It is very good itideed at . 
drama, spectacle, sport, chat, fun. 
It turns everything it touches, 
sometimes into fun. sometimes 
into drama — always into some- 
thing simple. 

Every writer on TV says more 
or less this. The implications for 
“quality TV” are profound. TV 
can, indeed, achieve high quality 
— but only in its proper, limited 
sphere. The preference of so many 
of us for entertainment on TV is 
just a sensible choice, given its 
limitations. Complex subjects are 
better approached in print. 

The Peacock Committee may 
not tell us much about these 
fundamental problems, in the 
present structure of bro a dcasti n g. 
It will, however, tell us something 
about advertising, at least within 
the narrow context of the present 
regulatory framework. 

If it is to recommend a sound, 
sophisticated policy, it will have to 
do some hard thinking about 
advertising. It will have to do the 
thinking for itself. The public 
debate has been dominated by a 


As the Sport Aid runners call for vast 
new aid for Africa, George Ayittey argnes 
that the solution lies In Africa itself 

T o end hunger 
set the 

peasants free 



ants have a name for them: the 
wabenzi — the Mercedes-Benz 
men . 

Through a system of price 
controls and marketing boards. 
Africa's peasant fanners pay some 
of tbe world’s highest confiscatory 
taxes. The cocoa formers ol 
Ghana, for example, pay 70 per 
cent -of their- net proceeds: 
Gambia's peanut growers about 
80 per cent Worse, defenceless 
peasant formers are portrayed as 
exploiters or villains, and treated 

accordingly. 

In Senegal, peasants complain 
that the state monopoly peanut- 
buying agency will not distribute 
seeds unless bribed, underweighs 
crops and creams farmers’ profits. 


(Senegal's gross national product 
per capita has fallen by 0.5 per 
cent since 1961, even though it is 
Africa's largest recipient of eco- 
nomic aid — some $500 million a 
year.) 

In Ghana., markets were dyna- 
mited. burned down and de- 
stroyed by air force personnel and 
police when peasant traders re- 
fused to sell at government- 
dictated prices. In February ! 982, 
when the Tamale market was set 
ablaze, large quantities of food- 
stuffs. medicines and spare parts, 
imported with scarce foreign ex- 
change, were lost. 

Those foolish policies drove up 
the price of locally-produced food 
by more than 600 per cent 


single attitude to advertising - 
that it is a trivial and unimportant 
activity, useful only as a milch 
cow for the broadcast media. Thai 
is a bizarre attitude to an industry 
that adds so much zest to life. 

The present broadcasting set-up 
confers a monopoly of TV 
advertising on a cartel of TV 
companies. Their only interest is 
to maximize revenue from it, 
something they do very welL But 
advertising on the BBC, which 
would expose that cartel to com- 
petition, is seen by nearly every- 
one participating in tire public 
debate as a disaster. 

If the political elite of the 
country wants a TV industry as 
big as it is at present, it should 
finance that industry in other 
ways — perhaps by a fund called 
the “fund to make TV pro- 
grammes that no-one wants to 
watch”, administered by Melvyn 
Bras at the Arts Council 

The Peacock Report then is 
unlikely to be the last word on the 
principles of broadcasting. But it 
will almost certainly be the best 
report on broadcasting yet written 
in this country. Past reports have 
never had much analytical stuff- 
ing. They were written by clever 
people but they never applied 
their analytical skills to the basic 
issues of why and how broadcast s 
iug needs to be regulated. 

Peacock, whatever its short- 
comings may turn out to be, will 
be better than that Its publication 
must give the broadcasting 
establishment cause for unease. 
The author is a lecturer in law at 
the London School of Economics. 


between January 1982 and April 
1983. Bread, for example, dis- 
appeared completely from the : 
markets. The wabenzi responded > 
by setting up price control tri- 
bunals to band down even more 
stringent penalties. 

A woman baker was fined 
$8,000 for buying a bag of flow- 
above the controlled price. Hun- 
dreds of traders were jailed — one 
for four years for selling a bottle of 
Sprite for $2^0 instead of $1. 

The absurdity of it all became 
apparent when the government 
could not feed tbe food traders it 
had jailed. Thirty prisoners died at 
the Sunyani prison for lack of 
food; 39 at another. 

Such brutality makes little eco- 
nomic sense. These peasants are 
Africa’s true producers, respond- 
ing to economic incentives just 
like formers anywhere else: 

If a government pays formers 
more than what they can obtain 
from the free market, they will 
overproduce; the American and 
EEC stockpiles provide abundant 
proof But if a government forces 1 
formers to accept prices lower 
than on the free market, the result 
will be under-production: witness, 
the chronic shortages in east-bloc 
countries and much, of Africa. ; . 

In 1981 Malawi, Somalia, and 
Zambia lifted price contr6ls;-fobd 
production rose. Within two years , 
the Malawi maim crop doubled, i 
creating a surplus for export In 
Somalia, production of sorghum 
went up by almost 50 per cent. 

If all tbe black African countries 
were to lift price controls, permit- 
ting their peasant formers to sell 
their produce on free, open mar- 
kets, there would be no food crisis 
on the continent. But Malawi. 
Somalia and Zambia — followed 
by Ghana — lifted price controls 
only as a result of pressure from 
the International Monetary Fund 
and the US Agency for Inter- 
national Development 

Most African leaders run their 
countries as if they were their own 
personal property. If current 
oppressive, kleptocratic and mis- 
guided policies continue, no 
amount of aid or UN conferences 
will rescue Africa. 

The most effective assistance 
the UN can give is to help 
reinstitute native African tra- 
ditions of free speech and trade. 
There are millions of Africans who 
have ideas about solving Africa's 
problems but they cannot speak 
out If they had been allowed to, 
Africans would not now be starv- 
ing. 

The author, a Ghanaian, is assis- 
tant professor of economics at 
Bloomsburg University, Penn- 
sylvania. 


The Sudetenland’s sorry lesson 


Munich 

Over a recent weekend Munich 
was the scene of the annual 
gathering of the Sudeten Germans. 
Vast numbers of them thronged 
the park and buildings where trade 
fairs are held. Outside Germany 
hardly anyone paid them any 
attention apart from Tass, which 
still believes the Sudetenlanders to 
be a threat to European peace. 

Yet for a few months in 1938 
their homeland was the world’s 
most newsworthy place. Most of 
us have been brought up with the 
same few facts about their story: 
the Germans were the majority in 
the Sudeienland, but not in the 
republic of Czechoslovakia, of 
which the Sudeten land was a part. 
In 1938, Hitler, demanded that 
they be incorporated into his 
Reich. Chamberlain and Daladier 
met Hitler in Munich and agreed. 
Czech protests were in vain. This 
triumph emboldened Hitler to 
further adventures, until finally 
resisted After the war. the 
Sudetenland was returned to 
Czechoslovakia and obscurity. 

Here then was a chance tospend 
a weekend with about 50,000 old 
couples, as well as a few thousand 
widows and widowers, who when 
they were young caused the Sec- 
ond World War. Furthermore, 
they were meeting this year in the 
city bearing the name of the 
allegedly infamous -Agreement of 
which they were the subject- 

in conversation with this for- 
eigner, they pointed but time and 
again that it was not their fault 
that the world took no notice of 


their plight before Hitler became 
the ruler of Germany. They had 
exactly the same aspiration under 
the Weimar Republic: to want to 
be part of Germany. 

They bad been happiest as part 
of the Habsburg empire, ruled -or 
at least reigned over — from Vi- 
enna. In the brief period between 
the collapse of the Habsbuigs and 
the setting up of the Weimar 
Republic, many of them had 
proclaimed themselves part of a 
new state of “German-Austria." 

In 1918-19 they had merely 
invoked the principle of “self- 
determination." they added, as so 
many others did at tbe time, 
inducting the Czechs. But at 
Versailles, the Czech nationalist 
leaders had persuaded the Allies to 
include the Sudeienland in the 
new state of Czechoslovakia. The 
Czechs were not a majority in that 
state. The Slovaks. Hungarians, 
Poles. Ruthenians and Sudeten 
Germans, combined, out- 
numbered them greatly. The 
Czechs had promised that the new 
state would be a kind of Switzer- 
land. with the main groups ruling 
themselves in cantons. In reality. 
“Czechization” was imposed. For 
example. German schools with 
fewer than 40 pupils were closed, 
but Czech schools were set up in 
German areas for a few pupils and 
were called minority schools. Hit- 
ler was able to seize on the 
grievances because no one had 
done anything about them before. 

.Two tilings are striking about 
this tale. First, it is true. Secondly, 
the Sudeten Germans will have 
very little luck in convincing 


many people of the fact Like the 
Ulster Protestants and the Afri- 
kaners, they are among the world’s 
most unfashionable ethnic groups. 
No wild Sudeten ballads are sung 
in sympathetic New York bars. A 
list of famous Sudetenlanders, 
handed out at the gathering, 
included no romantic terrorists, 
but Rilke, Freud, and Ferdinand 
Porsche, the car pioneer. 

By tbe century's standards, the 
injustices suffered by the Sudeten 
Germans in inter- war Czecho- 
slovakia did not amount to much. 
But their later fete did. In 1945 the 
Allies agreed with the Czechs that 
the 3.5 million Sudeten Germans 
should be expelled into Germany. 
During this process, it seems a 
reasonable estimate that about 
250.000 of them died, either from 
illness en route or at the hands 
either of Czech partisans, and 
mobs, or Russian soldiers. Tbe 
documentation for some of the 
methods of killing that were used 
is convincing, although painful 
reading. Doubtless some of these 
victims were themselves the 
oppressors of Czechs. Jews and 
others. Bui a quarter of a million, 
including children? 

In Munich's early summer sun 
the survivors were content to 
queue for big red sausages and 
Karlsbader Oblaten-a sort of 
wafer cake, though Karlsbad is 
now officially called by the more 
Slavic-sounding Karlovy Vary. 
Some wore national dress, which 
looks the same as national dress 
all over Europe — white bonnets 
far the women, those feathers 


" 


coming out of the men’s hunts- 
man hats. Hie rest gave that 
overpowering impression of mass 
dry-cleaning and ironing given by 
all West Goman crowds. 

Helmut Kohl became the first 
chancellor in office to address the 
annual rally. He talked of 
reconciliation between East and 
West, and was commendabiy dulL 
Tass later said his very decision to 
address them was an encourage- 
ment to revanchism. Actually, it 
was solely an encouragement to 
vote for hint, nothing more. Tbe 
Sudeten Germans long ago aban- 
doned any serious claim, except in 
the most utopian terms, on what is 
now Czechoslovak territory. 

If the event should remind the 
world of anything, it is of tbe folly 
of dismantling serviceable forms 
of government, such as the Habs- 
burg empire, in favour of national 
states which do not work. liberal 
politicians and officials, in- 
fluenced by a lifetime of reading ' 
high-minded editorials, and easily 
deceived by wily nationalist poli- 
ticians, had arrived in Paris in 
I919and devised constitutions for 
complicated parts of Europe that 
they knew very little about. 

From present-day Munich, Eu- 
rope looks stable again after those 
salesmen’s efforts of long ago — 
although only after decades of 
horrens. There seems no doubt, 
however, that the errors will be 
repeated for some other part of tbe 
world, and perhaps again for 
Europe at some mercifully un- 
known point in the future. 

Frank Johnson 


Dieby Anderson 

Cane the bad. 
Mr Baker 


-v? -- 


■ it •*“ 

0* r, 

vsTu * 


7 > > 


Kenneth Baker has taken over as 
Education Secretary at a time 
when schools are increasingly 
reco gnize d as an electoral issue. 
He las already announced his 
desire to seek more “resources 
for the system. Before he suc- 
cumbs to tbe temptation to treat 
the problem solely as one to be 
cured by more spending or by 

publicity-seeking government 

“initiatives”, he should kick the 
professional educati onis ts, teacher 
unions and electoral strategists out 
of his room, shut the door and 
quietly remind himself of the 
problem's origins. 

It arose before the pay dispute, 
before either of the Thatcher 
administrations. It was high- 
lighted by James Call ag h a n ’s can 
to “a great debate” and in the 
Blade Papers. The gap between 
high-achieving and low-achieving 
schools -let us dispense with 
educatianese,between good and 
bad schools — was too wide: 

The best were, and still are, 
achieving academic results 400 
per cent better than the worse five 
Q-!evels or equivalent per pupil, 
compared with less than one. In 
the bad schools, more than h a l f 
the pupils were leaving after 
15,000 hours of enforced state 
education with no reasonable 
batch of qualifications. They still 
are and it does not help their 
chances of employment in a 
changing technological economy. 

After all , that time and 
taxpayers’ money, there were, and 
are, over two million adults 
functionally illiterate; not just 
having problems with Dickens but 
with street names and danger signs 
at work. 

Worse, the bad schools knew 
little of the world of work. Their 
teachers had never been in it and 
some displayed ignorance of even . 
hostility to, industry and enter- 
prise. Pupils left after their pro- 
longed state-enforced .“care” 
under such teachers not only 
lacking basic skills but unready fen* 
the culture of work. Small firms in 
particular report inability to file, 
answer the telephone or keep a 
simple ledger, and poor timekeep- 
ing, untidiness and dishonesty. 

The bad schools were, and are, 
ready with tbe excuse that schools 
are about more than passing 
exams: they are about helping 
young people develop. And indeed 
they have helped their pupils 
develop: juvenile crime rates have 
soared. So have juvenile preg- 
nancies outside marriage and drug 
addiction rates. 

Bad schools must share the 
blame for these trends. They have 
more daylight-hours contact with 
• young people between five and 16 
than -any other agency. Their 
egalitarian hostility to excellence 
and the espousal of permissive- 
ness does not help the 
“development” of positive values. 
Nor do curricula inoeasmgly 
manipulated to inflict on pupils 
the political views of teachers. 

The problem is not just that 
there are very bad schools but that 
parents are compelled to send 
their children to them. That is a 


tragedy for the children and a 
heartache for the parents. It also 
means that the schools can go on 
being bad. 

Only when parents nave the; 
right to shun bad schools, when 
such schools are closed and their 
teachers sacked because they have 
foiled to attract enough pupils, wffl 
the gap between good ami had- p 
schools be reduced. As it is, the-^* 
bad schools continue, their right to . 
inflict bad schooling on children 
for 1 ! years endorsed by the state. 
Those children and their parents 
have no rights to compensation 
for 15,000 wasted hours. lifelong 
and £12.000 paid in taxes 

per child- . 

Teacher quality is widely rec- 
ognized as the key to improving - 
education. But just as parents 
have minimal rights to choose, for 
head teachers do not have the 
right to sack dud teachers, or offer 
prospective good teachers really' - 
competitive salaries, or use pay- 
ments, like any other man a g er, to 
reward effort and punish idleness 
or incompetence. £ 

Salaries are fixed by national 
negotiation. Head teachers (out- 
side London) control a mere 10 
percent of their budget- Why send 
head teachers on management 
courses unless they are sub- 
sequently empowered, or rather 
required, to manage? 

The original problem, the exist- 
ence of bad schools and bad 
teachers alongside good schools 
and good teachers, the good 
inadequately rewarded, tbe bad 
undisciplined, has not changed. 
Recent studies by the National 
Council for Education Standards 
and tbe Audit Commission sug- 
gest it has got worse. 

Sir Keith Joseph started with t 
radical plan* to reform it and 
ended by tinkering with iL His 
most notable achievement was to 
compel schools to publish their 
exam results. Since then, there has ~ 
been no hiding the bad schools 
from concerned parents. 

Yet the National Union of 
Teachers, fresh from its “action” 
against children’s education, will 
surely try. It will tell the new 
Education Secretory to throw the 
taxpayers’ money at all schools, 
good, bad and halfempty, and at 
all teachers, competent, hard- 
working, dud and idle: 

These last, euphemized by Fred 
Jarvis, the NUT leader, as the 
“less able” must, he says, on no 
account be appraised and weeded 
out: that, would “set teacher 
a gainst teacher”. Good schools 
and teachers should be rewarded. 

Bad schools — in NUT-speak, 
those that “achieve less” — need 
“additional help”. 

At least Sir Keith resisted this 
nonsense. His successor should go 
further. If he cannot discipline the 
bad schools himself, and one 
doubts any politician's ability to 
control so many classrooms, then 
he should give, parents the finan- 
cial wherewithal to do so. For 
once, perhaps, they can be given . 
some “resources”. 

The author is director of the Social 
Affairs UniL 


Paul Jennings 

Holey, holey, 
holey 


The impression has somehow got 
around that the Thatcher-Mitter- 
rirnd “agreement” (until the next 
election) on the Channel Tunnel 
carried the full support of the 
cradle of English Christianity at 
Canterbury, complete with the 
cathedral's two sets of transepts, 
Great Harry bed tower, tbe associ- 
ations with St Thomas h Becket, 
Chaucer, the divine composer 
Orlando Gibbons and. in our own 
day, his almost equally divine 
interpreter, Alfred DeUer. 

The fact is, of course, that 
although Kent is nowhere near so 
over-churched as some areas, it 
too is beginning to feel the pinch; 
and when the Channel Tunnel 
people applied for permission to 
hold a comraemmorative service, 
permission was given as long as 
the Christian God was at no point 
mentioned, and the Chapter 
House was regarded as a purely 
secular building. 

Even the sauciest proponents of 
the scheme did not object. But 
some residual English hankering 
after religious' ceremo nial re- 
mained, and some advertising 
agency or other was therefore 
commissioned to produce an Or- 
der of Service in honour of 
Mammon (God of Money) and 
Dis (God of the Underworld and 
Tunnelling). The copies arrived 
ten days alter everything had been 
signed and sealed. But here are 
some extracts 

1. Entry Procession of Chief 
Architects and High 
Shareholders. All shall rise 
for the Hymn (Time A & M 391) 
Onward, listed holders. 
Shareholders galore. 

You'll be rich as Croesus 
When we start to bore: 

The Tunnel will be faster. 

And boats wiff be too slow. 

So soon we'll own for ever 
The only way to go. 

2. Commutation Litany of Oppo- 
nents. That They may.not Prevafl. 
Chief Shareholder From all who 
place amenity above money 
Alt Mammon deliver us 
CS: From alt conservationists 
Alt Mammon deliver us 
CS : Fro m all opponents of 
progress 

Alt Mammon deliver us 
C& From fears of underground 
terrorism ' - 


Alt Dis deliver us 
CS: From breakdowns in ventila- 
tion 

Alt Dis deliver us 

CS: From accidents on the wrong 

side of the road 

All: Dis deliver us 

CS: From all marine, ferry and 

nautical interests 

AH: Good Dis deliver us. • 

3. The foBowmg Hymn, Very 
relevant we thought. Shall now be 
Snog, No need to stand up. 
(Tone A & M 370) 

Eternal Pluto, strong to save 
The men who tunnel 'neath the 
wave. 

And even more the men who 
keep 

Their eyes on shares sold dear, 
bought cheap. 

O hear us when we cry to thee 
To make it tough for those at 
sea. 

Let those who made our island 
race 

blow ply their craft some other 
place. 

They've messed about in boats 
enough. 

It's our turn now. For them — < 
well, tough. 

4. The Investing of The Golden 
Safety Helmet. Now. shall 
the Golden Safety Helmet, Having 
been Kissed by all Members of 
The Successful Consortium, 

Be Reverently Placed on the 
Head of the Chief Tannefler- 
5, Closing Hymn (Tone 


Now the day is over, ? 

Now we’re home and drv. 

With money from the toll booths 


In millions ' 'til we die. 
Without a referendum 
we did it at a blow 
Objectors couldn 'l stop it. 
They didn't even know. 

For Mitterrand and Thatcher 
It may mean lots of votes 
From more new jobs created 
Than old ones lost on boats. 

So Dis be thanked by workers 
In tunnelling, roads and rail, 
And most of all by lenders 
For whom it cannot fail ■ 
Napoleon and Hitler 
Strove vainly to invade: 

But now we’re going id doit . 
. An< l what is more, get paid. 



j,-. 











THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1 986 


13 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


THE RACE AND THE REASONS 


' di < 


■■>V After natural enthusiasm 
Sunday’s Sport Aid exer- 
Hons there comes inevitably 
' ^ *** lowing cynicism. How 
* many of those runners, the 
t r . v sedentary sceptics say, could 
rr '^&pyen place Upper Volta on a 
map? How many care that 
! • -r^!" Ethiopian .politics explains 
conditions in the north of that 
country far better than in- 
”‘V t j debtedness or western greed? 

How many understand how 
, . v -£, an influx of foreign grain, 
*?. donated for the best of reasons, 
-•■■/‘fe can depress local prices to a 
point where production of 
-W- staples ceases to be wonh- 
: v>.. while? How many have asked 
' “■ vj about the capacity of nations 

- . ;'*4 to buy weaponry in the midst 
' of their impoverishment? ’ 
,. K \ The questioning comes easy, 
^t? 2 Look, today, at those African 

diplomats in session in New 
-lifC York, tailored, chauffeiired, 
■ metropolitan. They are as 
• much Africa as the images of 
’ misery and death diffused 
;- y ’ across the western world. Were 

- ;’T'*i the runners running for them, 

t; their life-styles and their 
..I J : ‘h‘ Fanonist pretensions? 

A peculiar kind of 
‘-taj condescension is often di&- 
: x-f played towards Africa, to both 
right and left. On the right 
there is a brand of theorizing 
which blames Africans for 
: l * ie,r liberation from European 

^ ;y colonialism. The African 
. ; Irf elites, it is said, have brought 
: : \' v nemesis upon themselves by 
- -’v-' acting without regard to either 
•: ~ economic or political reality 

On the left there is a belief 
. : that was much in evidence in 

;Jf Sunday on the banners and in 
. the beating hearts. It is in aid 
: as a panacea, as if Africans 
.. were sub-human, not 


responsing to the same battery 
of incentives and penalties on 
which life works in the West It 
is coupled with a belief that 
somehow governments (which 
are derided in the West for 
their selfishness and incom- 
petence) are m .Africa altruis- 
tically planning for their 
nations’ wealth. 

» 

Now the Race Against Time 
has ended, the hard questions 
remain. Some are posed on the 
opposite page. However 
tempting the ideal of a multi- 
lateral forum, a meeting 
ground of the advanced and 
the developing countries, the 
United Nations is not it. Whai 
is left, instead, are painstaking 
and undramatic bilateral nego- 
tiations, project work and the 
Procrustean bed of IMF lend- 
ing. 

Development depends on 
local political stability: There 
can be no economic progress 
without the apparatus to main- 
tain order. There can be no 
development until the con- 
ditions of trade are guar- 
anteed. 

The relief of famine must 
immediately give way to 
establishing commercial agri- 
culture that will produce sur- 
pluses available for trade both 
between the nations of Africa 
and within national bound- 
aries. Problems of terrain and 
the terminal conditions in the 
savannah regions cannot be 
wished away. But equally aid 
and debt relief are valueless; 
counterproductive, unless 
there are in place governments 
with a minimum of economic 
literacy. 

And yet however predict- 
able the answers to African 


hunger being offered by Sport 
Aid. and its critics. Sunday's 
runs were a magnificent event 
in themselves. Here was a 
movement galvanized by no 
Slate, no church, no institu- 
tion. The races were autono- 
mous, generated within a 
culture that is supposedly in- 
ward-looking and selfish. 

An activity, distance run- 
ning. which is inherently 
narcissistic, has in recent years 
been made into an expression 
of fellowship and a celebration 
of social bonds. Sunday was an 
aggregation of individual mo- 
tives. some louche, some ele- 
vated, but all touched m some 
measure by a common desire 
to give. The runs were a 
reiteration of cooperative 
membership in a society in 
which competition and self- 
regard are, necessarily, strong. 

And there at the centre was 
the iconic figure of Geidof. 
“Bob for PM” said the banner 
in Hyde Park and that is 
precisely what could never be. 
He is untainted by the com- 
promises, the ambiguities of 
power, and the more potent for 
the simplicity and certitude of 
his prophecy. His stooping, ill- 
shaven figure has, by courtesy 
of the mass media, just the 
qualities of symbolic leader- 
ship that appeal to clever and 
suspicious youth. 

- Add to those his zeal, en- 
ergy, and no small measure of 
bloody-minded stubbomess 
and it is recipe for action. For 
his efforts Geidof deserves 
establishment recognition. But 
today his success has a single 
calibration. Money. The 
phone lines remain open... 


i . 


MORE SHOCKS FROM CHERNOBYL 


, • 




TOicv. 


j 


•vt’ 


One month after the Soviet 
.. nuclear disaster, a second 
wave of fallout has started to 
make itself felt ‘across Europe. 
■ Chernobyl has undermined 
established confidences; it has 
brought to the surface old, 
. half-forgotten questions, arid 
posed some new ones. The 
result is a sense of possible 
. change - not only in. the 
environmental map of Europe, 
: but — more distantly, perhaps 
- in political alignments as 
well. 

Throughout Europe the 
safety of nuclear power is 
being questioned in countries 
and by people who have not 
questioned it before. France; 
which has a well developed 
1 nuclear industry and a public 
that has by and large accepted 
it, has seen 5.000 people march 
through Paris demanding a 
halt to the nuclear power 
programme. In Eastern Europe 
there have been anti-nuclear 
demonstrations in Poland and 
Hungary, even it is said in 
Moscow. 

After Chernobyl, opponents 
of nuclear power can no longer 
be dismissed as green ex- 
tremists or irrational non- 
scientists. Nor can they be 
dismissed, as they have often 
been in Eastern Europe, as 
non-existent. The result could 
be and should be not an end to 
the development of nuclear 
power but a more sophis- 
ticated debate on its merits, 
leading to a safer, better under- 
stood and so ultimately more 
acceptable nuclear industry in 
both halves of Europe. 

Already, proponents of 
nuclear power are presenting 
their case more carefully, and 
not only in Western Europe. A 
senior oficial of the Hungarian 
-Communist Party has spoken 
of the need to keep people well 
• informed and allay their fears. 
In four weeks, the people of 
' Eastern Europe have been 
given more information about 
the risks of nuclear power than 
at any time in the past. Even if 
this degree of openness is not 
continued. East European gov- 
ernments will now find it more 


difficult to site nuclear power 
plants near centres of popula- 
tion and in environmentally 
valuable areas. 

In West Germany, where the 
anti-nuclear lobby was already 
influential; political fallout 
from Chernobyl has now been 
added to tfte cbaflenges'fadng 
the government coalition. The 
voie by the minority party in 
the coalition, the Free Demo- 
crats (FDP), fora review of the 
country’s nuclear reprocessing 
industry could place the Chris- 
tian Democratic Party of 
Chancellor Kohl in a minority 
position nationally on the 
nuclear question. Both the 
main opposition party, .the 
Socialists, and the minority 
Greens advocate a non- 
nuclear policy. If the FDP now 
moves to join them, the co- 
alition will look even more 
shaky than it already does. 

But it is in Eastern Europe, 
where the political fallout from 
' Chernobyl has the potential to 
be greatest. The Soviet disaster 
has pointed up to the.oountries 
of Eastern Europe — albeit not 
for the first time - the nature 
and extent of their dependence 
on Moscow. Even as the 
radioactive cloud passed out 
of Soviet territory, over Po- 
land and Romania, the gov- 
ernments of those countries 
had ;o. formulate .emct^ency 
measures on the basis of 
information that was not 
merely inadequate but at times 
misleading. 

- Moscow was either not able 
or not prepared to take' the 
East Europeans into its con- 
fidence during a crisis which 
directly affected them. So 
much for the pledge made by 
Mr Gorbachov when he came 
to power to consult his allies 
on all that affected them. 

The .more westward-looking 
of the East European coun- 
tries. in particular, also resent 
the extent to which they found 
themselves identified with the 
Soviet Union. The EEC ban on 
food exports — which will 
severely reduce the hard-cur- 
rency earnings of Yugoslavia, 
Bulgaria and Poland over the 


next few months — is seen as 
an unnecessarily distrustful 
gesture, as though the East 
Europeans could not be 
trusted to deal responsibly 
with the effects of Chernobyl. 
The East. Europeans’ wariness 
towards Moscow, which, is 
elevated to popular contempt 
in Poland, van only increase as 
a result. ■ % 

Even within the Soviet 
Union, in the Republic of the 
Ukraine where the accident 
happened, the political fallout 
could be equally, great. The 
Ukrainian population has, per 
force, been given more 
information and suffered more 
— in human terms and 
economically — from the ac- 
cident than any other pan of 
the Soviet Union. It has now, 
in common with Poland and 
the Baltic states, with which it 
has such close historical ties, a 
sense of being in some sense 
separate from the Soviet 
Union as a whole, of being its 
victim. 

Sentiments like these fuelled 
the Ukrainian nationalist 
movement in the Ukraine in 
the civil war which followed 
the 1917 revolution. They 
resurfaced during the collec- 
tivization of agriculture in the 
late 1920s and the famine that 
followed, and again after the 
German invasion in 1941. 
Since the war. latent or -not so 
latent nationalist tendencies 
have accounted for the fall of 
at feast one Ukrainian Com- 
munist Party leader, and many 
others, have come under sus- 
picion. 

In two years’s time, in 1938, 
the Ukrainian capital Kiev 
will be the focus for celebra- 
tions marking a thousand 
.years' of Christianity in Russia. 
The anniversary will be re- 
garded by Ukrainians the 
w orid over as a national 
festival, and the authorities in 
Moscow are already taking 
steps to stifle the nationalist 
and religious revival that will 
be fostered. Chernobyl will not 
make their task any easier. 




">• 


if 


■? 


Congested M25 

From ihe Director of Transporta- 

lion for Cambridgeshire 

Sir. In the early 1970s I was 
responsible as superintendent en- 
gineer of the South Eastern Road 
-Construction Unit in Surrey, for 
the design and construction of the 
M25 motorway from Heathrow to 
Wesierham. in Kent. At that time 
traffic forecasts were being pre- 
pared in my office predicting flows 
for 15 vears hence, namely the mid 
1980s.' 

The traffic forecasts which 1 
recommended to the Ministry or 
Transport at that time, for the. 
section of motorway from the 
interchange at Thorpe to 
Heathrow, were of the order oi 
100.000 vehicles per day m tne 
mid 1980s. This forecast of traffic 
required dual four-lane motorway 
and over the section in queston i. 
recommended construction to 


dual four-lane standards with two 
hard shoulders tone conventional 
one and one adjacent to the fast 
lane) to cope with the traffic 
requirements across the river 
Thames. 

Unfortunately the minister of 
the day did not accept the recoin- . 
mendation and the motorway was 
built to standard three-lane capac- 
jjv. It is fortunate indeed that land 
requirements were purchased for 
the ultimate width and hence the 
widening of this stretch, which is 
clearly required , as a matter of 
urgency, can be constructed at a 
minimum additional cost 0 
understand approximately £9 mil- 
lion). ... 

It was always en visaged that the 

river crossings east and west of 
London would be under the most 
severe strain. It can be .seen 
therefore that the forecast 15 years 
ago for - 100,000 vehicles per. day 


was correct and has been achieved 
as predicted. 

Yours faithfully. 

BRIAN OLD RIDGE 

Director . of Transportation. 

Cambridgeshire. 

Gloucester Court. Shire HaJL 
Castle Hill Cambridge. 

Fat of the land 

From Professor £>. F. IV. Harrison 
Sir. lii an attempt at improving 
the health of our resident popula- 
tion of five; age assorted, hedge- 
hogs. I have replaced the silver top 
milk in their nightly wholemeal 
bread and milk with skimmed 
milk. All steadfastly refused this 
wholesome fet-free diet showing 
either a lack of concern for future 
arteriosclerosis or sound common 
sense in preparing for the summer 
freeze. 

Y-ours etc. 

D. F. N. HARRISON, 

6 Fishers Farm. Horiey. Surrey- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Fears for leading psychiatric centre Burden of rise 


From Professor J. Griffith Ed- 
vards and others 

Sir. Psychiatry' has a vital 
contribution 10 make to the 
medical services of this country', 
and has been designated a priority 
area by the present Government 
Drag abuse and sexual assault on 
children have recently caught the 
headlines, together with the prob- 
lems of schizophrenics and their 
families, as so cogently described 
in a series of Times articles by 
Maijorie Wallace. 

But beyond those disorders lies 
a mass of human misery con- 
sequent on disorders ranging from 
agoraphobia to autism, from de- 
pression to dementia. Modem 
treatments are frequently able to 
ameloriaie or cure such disorders 
and science is making rapid strides 
in their understanding. 

An erosion in the funding of the 
leading British psychiatric centre 
is therefore cause for extreme 
concern. We refer to what is being 
inflicted by government policies 
on the Institute of Psychiatry (a 
postgraduate medical school of the 
University of London) and its 
associated NHS teaching hospitals 
(The Beihlem Royal Hospital and 
The Maudsley Hospital). 

The institute and the 
Bethlem/Maudsley have a world- 
wide reputation for research, 
training and clinical practice and 
attract over 200 overseas students 
each year, as well as £4 million in 
research grants from non-univer- 
sity sources. Each year over &500 
new patients are treated and our 
emergency clinic is caring for 
twice as many patients now as in 
1979. 

The current under-funding of 
both the universities and the NHS 
constitutes an immensely threat- 
ening pincer movement on Lon- 


don teaching hospitals and. in our 
case, represents a devastating 
attack on the core of British 
psychiatry and on the future care 
of a vulnerable sector of the 
community. The financial crisis at 
the institute has meant that of the 
last eight academic posts to foil 
vacant, only one could be filled, 
and three university chairs have 
been lost. 

The Bethlem/Maudsley are at 
the same time faced with a 
£400.000 per year deficit which 
will require drastic cuts in patient 
services. The Government's 
underfunding of last year's pay 
awards alone puts the Bethlem 
and Maudsley some £200.000 in 
the red. 

In the course of a debate in the 
House of Lords on May 13, 
Baroness Trumpingion. the junior 
Health Minister, stated that the 
Maudsley “is a centre of ex- 
cellence and we are anxious to see 
the further development of its role 
both as a provider of services and 
in support of the excellent teach- 
ing and research functions of the 
Institute of Psychiatry ". 

We are grateful for this state- 
menu but ministerial statements 
alone will not repair the wrecking 
of a national asset which mirrors a 
humane and shared commitment 
both to scientific medicine and 
compassionate care. 

We are. Sir, yours faithfully, 
GRIFFITH EDWARDS. JOHN 
GUNN. JEFFREY GRAY. PETER 
LANTOS. ALWYN LiSHMAN. 
RAYMOND LEVY. MICHAEL 
RUTTER. RICHARD 

RODNIGHT. MICHAEL SHEP- 
HERD. ROBIN M. MURRAY. 
CHRISTIE BROWN. GERALD 
RUSSELL 

Institute of Psychiatry, 

De Crespigny Park. 

Denmark Hill, SE5. 

May 20. 


Tourist boycott 

Front Mr Nicholas O’Shaughnessy 
Sir, The de faao US tourist 
boycott of Europe proceeds, in my 
view, less from rational appraisal 
of any likely terrorist threat as 
from a deep-seated sense of alien- 
ation from Europe as a con- 
sequence of its reaction to the 
Libyan raid. 

If ibis is so. the implications are 
serious. The United States has in 
its history experienced long peri- 
ods of hostility to Europe. In the 
nineteenth century this hardly 
mattered; in the earlier part of the 
twentieth its consequences were 
tragic. 

The reasons for this ambiva- 
lence are not mysterious, since 
America is. peopled by . those 
whose ancestors rejected Europe: 
the American decided to 
strip off his European institutional 
and cultural past and become a new 
American man ._ They created a 
myth of American novelty and 


Chernobyl disaster 

From Dr P. A. Trott 
Sir. In these times, when predict- 
ing the number of cancer deaths as 
a result of nuclear fell-out is a 
national pastime, it is salutary to 
consider that pathologists, who 
have the ultimate responsibility 
for diagnosing cancer, are not 
agreed about its definition. This 
applies particularly to thyroid 
cancer, which seems to be most 
implicated. 

Besr wishes. 

Yours foiihfhlly. 

P. A. TROTT. 

The Royal Marsden Hospital 
Department of Surgical Pathol- 
ogy. 

Fulham Road. SW3. 

May 22. 


simplicity, virtue and harmony 
which is constantly threatened with 
corruption and confusion from the 
forces of high culture and history 
(Stephen Tonsor). 

The Libyan episode may legiti- 
mate sentiments of animosity to 
Europe that were always latenL 
One day these could translate into 
political action; protectionism, 
boredom with Nato and even — as 
America scrutinizes its defence 
budget — troop withdrawals. This 
would be a sad result, from which 
both continents would emerge 
insecure and impoverished. 

Yours sincerely. 

NICHOLAS O'SHAUGHNESSY, 

The University of Wales Institute 
of Science and Technology. 
Department of Business and 
Economics. 

Aberconway Building. 

Cohim Drive, 

Cardiff 
May 20. 


Ordination of women 

Front Pro fessor it J. Berry 
Sir. On May 19 you had a front- 
page headline. “Turmoil over 
woman bishop”. On the Court 
page, your Religious Affairs 
Correspondent described a “Sub- 
tle shin on women priests”. The 
Bible verse on the same page was. 
“And the Spirit of the Lord will 
come upon thee, and thou shalt ... 
be turned into another man”. 

Thank you for pointing the way 
forward. 

Yours faithfully, 

SAM BERRY. 

Qua rise ter. 

Sackvflle Close; 

Seven oaks, 

Kent 
May 21. 


in house prices 

From Mr R. .4. Maidmcm 
Sir. How baffling. 1 When prices in 
general rise by 4 per cent it is a 
deplorable ■ example of inflation, 
but when house prices rise by 10 
per cent to 20 per cent it is a 
welcome sign of “buoyancy in the 
market’'. 

Why is it that constant huge 
rises in the price of a home — for 
most people the largest and most 
essential purchase of their lives — 
are not seen as inflationary? What 
is democratic about property- 
owning democracy if increasing 
numbers of people are not able to 
afford even the cheapest property? 

Our system of funding house 
purchase has developed certain 
features akin to pyramid selling. 
Those already in the game make 
large untaxed profits rased on the 
cumulative effects of inflation and 
tax- relief. Politicians count the 
votes and smile bountifully. 

The losers are not just those 
outside the system: the poor, the 
homeless, the unemployed and the 
young — as well as tenants, public 
and private. The general economy 
also suffers as job mobility be- 
comes impossible and wage de- 
mands chase after house prices. 

It is nonsense to talk about “a 
buoyant market" when the long- 
term effects of this process are 
inflationary and socially un- 
desirable. We are creating a 
money-guzzling monster. 

Yours sincerely. 

RICHARD MAIDMENT, 

81 Richmond Road. 

Montpelier. 

Bristol. Avon. 

May 17. 

Alternative medicine 

From Mr Peter Benson 
Sir. In the rather tired controver- 
sies rekindled by the BMA's report 
on alternative medicine (report. 
May 13) there are two simple 
points that always seem over- 
looked 

So-called orthodox medicine is 
simply an attempt to apply scien- 
tific principles to the problems of 
human disease. Virtually every 
aspect of modem life is controlled 
and made easier by the application 
of scientific principles. A feet that 
we all find perfectly obvious and 
natural. 

The apparent shortcomings of 
this approach in medicine are due 
to the almost unfathomable 
complexity of the human body 
and mind. Time and research 
continue to slowly yield many 
more secrets and often shows us 
where orthodoxy has been wrong, 
sometimes dangerously. One has 
to say that adherents of alternative 
methods sometimes lose their 
credibility by failure to tolerate the 
need for rational scientific assess- 
ment 

The other point so often forgot- 
ten is that although the so-called 
"placebo" effect of treatment can- 
not be influencing small children 
and animals, it is so easy to lose 
sight of the feci that perhaps the 
majority of the ills that we all are 
heir to are in faci self-limiting. 
Apparent cure of conditions that 
are liable to improve or remit 
themselves is the boon of alter- 
native and othodox therapeutics 
alike. 

What a pity we cannot just 
calmly and carefully assess every- 
thing and keep the best of both 
worlds. 

Yours faithfully. 

PETER BENSON. 

270 Wendover Road, 

Aylesbury. Buckinghamshire. 

May 19. 


Answering back 

From Mrs W. M: Craven 
Sir. I think Mrs Hewitt (May 21) is 
right to wish to know whether her 
gifts have been received, and I 
regret that it is now so rare to 
receive a thank-you letter. 

I accept a phone call as the next 
best thing, bin my most successful 
solution to the problem, when 
sending gifts to the younger people 
of family and friends -student age 
or thereabouts — is to enclose a 
postcard, stamped and addressed 
to me. with “received with 
thanks” written on the back. It 
invariably comes back covered 
with news and more thanks- and 
gives me a lot of amusement. 

A stamp alone does not have the 
same effect. 

Yours sincerely. 

FREDA CRAVEN. 

2 Spa Court, 

Ripon. North Yorkshire. 

May 21. 


Profits and pay 

From Professor Gerald H. Lawson 
Sir. In his article (May 16), “Sham 
gains in a profit share”. Sushil 
Wadhwani states that all dis- 
cussion of employee profit-sharing 
schemes is theoretical because 
there is little real experience to 
analyse. This is not so. 

Worker profit-participation in 
Germany goes back to the middle 
of the last century. Since the 
Second World War the number of 
firms in the Federal Republic of 
Germany. Switzerland and Aus- 
tria in which there are employee 
profit-participation schemes has 
increased substantially. 

The forms of profit-sharing that 
are adopted in practice reveal clear 
differences. Moreover, business 
administration theory in these 
countries has long been 
characterised by increasing efforts 
to differentiate the forms of 
worker participation, to analyse 
the problems of systems design 


and to explore feasible solutions. 

In the Federal Republic of 
Germany voluntary profit-sharing 
in particular forms, and for 
particular purposes, is promoted 
by the State by means of the 
Fourth Wealth Formation Act of 
1984. The profit-sharing models 
adopted in practice are based on 
unilateral decisions of employers, 
on internal agreements between 
employer and works council or on 
individual contractual agreements 
between employerand employee. 

The Government may ul- 
timately be wise to follow Sushil 
Wadhwani's advice and to drop its 
proposed incentives to profit- 
sharing. It would be equally wise 
not to base any such decision on 
Sushil Wadhwani’s rather paro- 
chial viewpoint and casual empiri- 
cism. 

Yours faithfully. 

GERALD H. LAWSON. 
Manchester Business School. 

Booth Street West, Manchester. 
May 19. 


Support for ERA 

From the Reverend John P. 
Richardson 

Sir. The support given by Mr Ken 
Livingstone to convicted IRA 
terrorists at present held in 
Amsterdam (report May 17) re- 
veals a fundamental misunder- 
standing of morality, law and 
politics in the thinking of the for 
left. 

To describe Brendan McFarlane 
and Gerard Kelly as political 
refugees, and to call their crimes 
political actions is to confuse, 
deliberately or accidentally, things 
which must if the problem of 
terrorism is to be overcome, be 
kepi separate. 

Messrs McFarlane and Kelly 
were not, convicted for their 
political views, and therefore can- 
not be described as political 
refugees. Membership of Sinn 
Fein and the propagation of its 
views on Irish unity are legal 
activities in this country on a par 
with those of any other political 
party. Thus Mr Gerry Adams. 


who accompanied Mr Living- 
stone. is free to come and go as he 
wishes, no matter how close his 
political views might be to those of 
Messrs McFarlane and Kelly. 

On the other hand, what these 
two men were actually convicted 
of were actions (causing explo- 
sions and murdering) which are 
equally considered crimes for ail 
individuals in this country. 
regardless of political allegiance. 
To kill someone is generally, and 
rightly, regarded as immoral The 
adducing of a political motive to 
such a lulling cannot be regarded 
as changing its moral quality 
unless it can be shown that a 
political opinion excuses aU ac- 
tions. 

If this wens the case, then any 
action, no matter how disgusting 
(arid blowing someone apart is 
ferny disgusting) becomes morally 
acceptable so long as it springs 
from (he political viewpoint of the 
perpetrator. At its most.absuni I 
should then be regarded by Mr 
Livirgstone as acting entirely 


within my rights iff were to punch 
him on the nose on the basis that 
my politics disagree with his. 

It seems to me that both Mr 
Livingstone and the Dutch legal 
authorities have made a basic 
mistake in this case. The question 
addressed should not be. "Were 
these actions politically 
motivated?” (to which the answer 
must be “Yes”) but “Were these 
actions such that, in any other 
situation than the political, they 
would be regarded within a moral 
and civilized society as criminal?” 

Again, the answer to the ques- 
tion is ”Yes” buu on the grounds 
that law must updiold morality 
rather than a particular political 
opinion, the result should be 
automatic extradition and sub- 
sequent punishment 
Yours faithfully. 

JOHN RICHARDSON 
(Chaplain. North East- London 
Polytechnic). 

4 Mathews Park Avenue. 
Stratford. El 5. 

May 17. 



MAY 27 1941 

Bismarck. Germany's newest and 
must powerful warship (35,000 
tons with eight loin guns) left 
Bergen harbour and um sighted 
by British warships on May 23. In 
an enduing engagement the Hoad 
was hit. bleu up and sank with 
only three survivors from its ere m 
of 1,341. After a chase of over 
1.750 mile*, during which the 
Bismarrk u as damaged try both air 
and sea attacks, she teas finally 
sunk on the morning of May 27. 
About 100 of her crew of 2 ,000 
were saved. 


THE BISMARCK 
TORPEDOED 

From Oar Naval 

Correspondent 

The latest news of the progress 
of ihe hunt for the Bismarck was 
given in the Admiralty statement 
quoted above. She has now been hit 
by two torpedoes from naval 
aircraft, and though these may well 
not have inflicted very serious 
damage on a ship so well protected 
as the German battleships are 
known to be, they are exceedingly 
likely to have reduced her speed. 
The hope of her being brought to 
action is therefore enhanced. 

The battleship is evidently mak- 
ing for port, but as the position of 
the last attack has not been 
disclosed, il is not yet known 
whether it is a German, Norwegian 
or French port for which she is 
heading- The Admiralty obviously 
cannot at this stage disclose their 
knowledge, since to do so might 
possibly give the enemy some hint 
of the measures in train to inter- 
cept her. 

The full story of her cruise is yet 
to be told. But it is known that she 
left a Norwegian port on Thursday, 
and as she was intercepted by the 
force of which the Hood was the 
flagship early on Saturday, evi- 
dently that was the result of a 
skilfUI and well -designed strategi- 
cal movement by Admiral Holland 
— one of the most brilliant of 
serving admirals. 

What was the operation on 
which she was bent is also uncer- 
tain. but the enemy would hardly 
send out bis newest and most 
powerful battleship thus except for 
an object to which be attached the 
highest importance. Her purpose 
was frustrated when she was 
brought to action by the Hood and, 
though the price of that success has 
been high, none can say that it was 
not well spent. 

FOGS AND GALES 

Since tbe Bismarck got away 
from her pursuers after the Hood 
blew up, it is known that cruisers, 
aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm. and 
long-range flying-boatsof the RAF 
have all taken part in the search 
and contributed to its success. But 
the hunt is still on, and hopes of a 
still greater success are high. When 
the vastness of tbe area to be 
searched is taken into consider- 
ation. the fogs, gales, and low 
visibility of the northern seas, and 
the number of different objects for 
whicb the enemy might be making, 
that the British forces seeking her 
should have succeeded in keeping 
touch justify high hopes of eventu- 
al success. 

The German Press is naturally 
making the most of the result of 
the Greenland action, the 
Volkischer Beobachler going so far 
as to trumpet that "the destruction 
of Britain's largest 42.000-ton 
battleship has prostrated the Brit- 
ish with alarm."* Nothing could be 
farther from the truth. The British 
public, like the Royal Navy, 
realises full well that victory 
cannot be earned without fighting, 
that fighting at sea involves receiv- 
ing blows as well as dealing them, 
and that in sea battles ships have 
often been sunk in the past and are 
liable to he sunk in the future . . . 

LESSONS OF JUTLAND 

The Hood, which was laid down 
in the year of -Jutland but not 
completed until four years later, 
did. it is to be presumed, embody 
the lessons learnt from the losses in 
that battle so far as they could be 
embodied in the then state of 
engineering knowledge. When she 
underwent virtual reconstruction 
in 1929-31 she was, no doubt, 
modified in view of the advance in 
sea and air weapons that had taken 
place in the interval: but it is never 
possible to make an old ship the 
equal of a new one, and her 
opponent in the recent action was 
begun five years after her recon- 
struction was finished. Neverthe- 
less. the fact that a post-Jutland 
ship rouid be lost by a magazine 
explosion in ihe same way as the 
three ships at Jutland were, while 
no German ship has been so lost 
either in the last War or this, does 
raise the question in the minds of 
the public whether every lesson 
which Jutland should have taught 
was. in fart, learned. 


Made abroad 

From Mrs J. Black 
Sir. Sir Anthony Gray {May 22) 
asks “what does go on in Britain?" 
after he has bought various items 
all of which were imported into 
this country. 

He has answered himself. 
Shoes, lavatory seats, scissors and 
shoe polish are all readily avail- 
able British made, but he. like 
thousands of others, chooses not 
lo buy them. 

Yours faithfully. 

MAGGIE BLACK. 

20 Summerhiil Road. 

Bath. Avon. 

from Mr R, S. Greaves 
Sir. What has happened lo the 
ladies who started the "We're 
backing Britain” campaign so 
many years ago? Have they emi- 
grated? 

Yours sincerely. 

R. S. GREAVES. 

Broad well Hill. 

Moreion-in-Marsh. 

Gloucestershire. 


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14 




COURT AND SOCIAL 


SOCIAL 

NEWS 


The Duke of Edinburgh, 

honorary life member, will 

present the Royal Association of 
British Dairy Farmers 1985 
Prince Philip Award and certifi- 
cates of mem at Buckingham 
Palace on June i 1. 

Prince Andrew will open the 
Imperial War Museum's new 
“superhaogar” at Duxfond, 
Cambridgeshire, on June 1 1. 
The Princess of Wales will open 
the Princess of Wales Hospital, 
Bridgend. Mid Glamorgan, on 
June 11. 


The Prince of Wales. President 
of Business in the Community, 
will visit the Pelenna Mountain 
Centre. Tonmawr, Neath, West 
Glamorgan. "Shopco”. 
Millands Road. Neath, and the 
Community Programme, BP 
Oil. Uandarcy. Neath, on June 
II. 


The Prince of Wales, accompa- 
nied by the Princess of Wales, 
will open the modernized strip 
mill at the British Steel 
Corporation's works at Port 
Talbot on June II. 

Princess Anne will open the new 
European headquarters of 
Amdahl Corporation at 
Dogmcrsfield Park, Hartley 
Wintncy. Hampshire, on June 
1 1 . and later, as President of the 
Riding for the Disabled Associ- 
ation. she will visit the Andover 
Group in Hampshire. 

The Queen will open the new 
medical precinct of the Royal 
College of Physicians at St 
Andrew's Place, Regent's Paris, 
on June 1 1. 

The Prince of Wales. President 
of the Royal College , of Music 
Development Fund, accompa- 
nied by the Princess of Wales, 
will attend a concert at the 
Barbican Centre on June 1 1, in 
aid of the fund and the 
Musicians' Benevolent Fund. 


The Duke of Edinburgh, Chan- 
cellor of Cambridge University, 
will visit the university on June 
1 1 and 12 to confer honorary 
degrees. 

The Princess of Wales will 
present the prizes for the 
Whitbread Round the World 
Yacht Race at the Whitbread 

Porter Tun Room. Chi swell 
Street. EC1. on June 12. 
Princess Anne. President of the 
Save the Children Fund, will 
attend the American Junior 
League of London luncheon at 
Grosvenor House on June 12. 
The Queen will attend a beating 
the retreat by the massed bands 
of the Royal Artillery on Horse 
Guards Parade on June 12 and a 

reception afterwards in the Ban- 
queting Halt Whitehall. 

The Prince of Wales, President 
of the International Council of 
the United World Colleges, will 
attend a reception and dinner 
given by the Chairman of the 
United World Colleges Inter- 
national Board at the Athe- 
naeum on June 12. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Presi- 
dent of the City and Guilds of 
London Institute, will present 
the 1986 Prince Philip Medal to 
Mr Robin Robertson at 
Buckingham Palace on June 13. 
Later, as patron and trustee of 
the Duke of Edinburgh's Award 
Scheme, be will attend recep- 
tions at St James's Palace for 
young people who have reached 
the gold standard. 

Princess Anne will open the 
Princess Anne Wing of the 
Stroud General Hospital. 
Gloucestershire, on June 13. 

The Prince of Wales will present 
the 1986 Times/RIBA Commu- 
nity Enterprise Scheme awards 
at the Royal Institute of British 
Architects. 66 Portland Place, 
Wl. on June 13. 

The Queen will take the salute at 
the Queen's birthday parade on 
Horse Guards Parade oa June 
14. in the afternoon she will lake 
the salute at a fly-past of RAF 


of 


aircraft from the balcony 
Buckingham Palace. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Presi- 
dent of the Guards Polo Cub, 
will attend a dub luncheon and 
fund-raising polo match at 
Smith's Lawn. Windsor Great 
Park, on June 15. 

The Queen and the Duke . 
Edinburgh will attend a service 
for the Order of the Garter in 
George's Chapel, Windsor. 
June 16. 


St 


on 


The Prince of Wales. President 
of the Wells Cathedral Preserva- 
tion Trust, will attend an oj 
air eucharist on Wells Cathed 
Green on June 19 to celebrate 
the completion of the preserva- 
wont on the west from. 


tion 


A service of thanksgiving for the 

life of His Honour Geraint Rees 
will be held in the Chapel at St 
David's School. Church Road. 
Ashford, near Staines. Middle- 
sex. on Saturday. May 31, 1986. 
at 3 pm. 

A memorial service for the Ear! 
of Haddington will be held in Si 


Giles CaihedraL Edinbur gh , at 


noon, on Monday. June 


Birthdays today 


Dr Eric Anderson. 50. Canon 
Simon Bamngton-Waid. 56; Mr 
Jeffrey Bernard. 54: Miss Cilia 


Black, 43: Mr Andrew Boyle, 67; 


82; 

John 


Brigadier Sir Edward Ca 

Lieutenant-General Sir 

Chappie. 55; Mr John Conteh. 
35; Mr Bryan Cowgdl. 59; Sir 
William Crawshay. 66: Lord 
Errol of Hale. 72; Mr Duncan 
Goodhew, 29: Sir Derek 
Greenaway. 76; Mr Norman 
Griggs. 70: Miss Elizabeth 
Harwood. 48: Dr Henry Kissin- 
ger. 63; Mr Christopher Lee. 64; 
Sir John Moberiy. 61: Mr Vin- 
cent Price, 75; Mr AJ win 
Schockemohle. 51; Sir Robert 
Shone. 80. Sir Ross Stainton, 72; 
the Right Rev Mervyn 
Stockwood. 73; Mr Philip 
waidron. 36- 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Dr N.E. Cheese 
and Miss H. Probert 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, eldest son of 
Dr and Mis J-A- Cheese, of 60 
London Road. Canterbury. 
Kent, and Helen, only daughter 
of Mr and Mrs J. E. Probert. of 
23 Rosemont Road, Richmond. 
Surrey. 


Mr RSJ). Costain 
and Miss N-F. Peters 
The engagement is announced 
between Reece Stuart Daniel, 
only son of Mr and Mis AA 
Costain, of Highway Cottage. 
MickJeham. Surrey, and Nicola 
Frances, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs AS. Peters, of 
Ashworth. Geffers Ride. Ascot, 
Berkshire. 


Mr GJCH . Preston 

and Miss AJJL Thomas 

The engagement is announced 


The engagement is announced 
between Giles, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Simon Preston, of 
Lowfleld Farm. Teibury, 
Gloucestershire, and Amanda, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Alan Thomas, of Northumber- 
land Place. London. 


Mr AH. Warby 
and Miss J.C La' 


avers 

The engagement is announced 
between Adam, son of Mr and 
Mrs David Warby, of 
Almondsbury. Bristol, and Jane, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Brian 
Lavers, of Clemsford, Sussex, 
and Knightsbridge. London. 


Smolski leads 
bridge field 


The English international bridge 
player. Roman Smolski. playing 
: United 


with Henry Bethe. of the Unii 
Slates, who has been sent here 
by his company on a tour of 
duty, ted the field in the 
championship pairs at the En- 
glish Bridge Union’s bank holi- 
day congress held at the Queen's 
Hotel. Eastbourne. The leading 
three pairs qualified for Euro- 
pean Pairs Championship. The 
results were: 


cnamptomrup pan* i. h Bethe. R 
Smolski. 587: 2. N Solway. R 

Sampson. 683: 3. Mrs S Landy. C J 
□ Iran. 579: a. P J Crouch. R Hacked. 
578: 6. Mrs A ElUotL J Albuquerque. 
57T 


Swiss nairs-. 1. Mis M ftxtaqe-aM 
?r son. J Y Pottage. 190. 2. D Parry, 
rs c Fehpooi. 188: 3. M Heaney. A 


Iter 

Mrs C Frshpool. 

Sun. 182; a. C 
TrnUnnKk. 181 


Trcdlnmck. S 


Marriages 


Mr B. E. S. Cadbury 
and Miss K. M. Harrison-Hall 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. May 1 7. at St Peter's 
Church. Barford. of Mr Bene- 
dict Cadbury and Miss Kath- 
erine Harrison-Hall. The Rev 
Michael Griffith officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Caroline 
Cadbury. Miss Jessica Harrison- 
Hall. Alexander Kilgour. Eliza- 
beth Chidlcy. and Chloe BeaJL 
Mr Christopher Twigg was best 
man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride. 

Mr PJ. Matthams 
and Miss A*E- Bimungton 
The marriage took place on 
Monday, May 26. ] 986. in 
Jersey, of Mr Paul James 
Matthams. only son of Mr and 
Mrs D. P. Matthams. and Miss 
Anne Elizabeth Binnington. 
only daughter of Senator and 
Mrs B. T- Binnington. 

Mr P.C Seiner 

and Mrs AJM. Steel 

The marriage took place on 

Saturday, May 24, of Mr Peter 

Christian Reiner and Mrs Anne 

Steel, widow of Mr Anthony N. 

Steel. 


Coopers 9 Company 
Cobom Educational 
Foundation 


As part of its 450th anniversary 
celebrations the Coopers’ Com- 
pany and Cobom Educational 
Foundation are holding a dinner 


at the Connaught Rooms on 
October 22. 1986. ( 


Old boys and 
girls and their escorts and 
friends of the school are wel- 
come. Tickets, at £33 each 
(single), are obtainable from the 
Clerk to rhe Governors of the 
Coopers’ Company and Cobom 
Educational • Foundation. St 
Mary’s Lane. Upminster. Essex. 


City of London 
Solicitors 9 Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the City of London 
Solicitors' Company for the 
ensuing year 

Masier. Sir Max WtUlams: Senior 
waiden. Mr M.H, Sheldon: Junior 
Warden. Mr K.S.G. Hinde. 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 
will open the Antiquarian Book 
Fair at the Park Lane Hotel on 
June 24. 


are 


Bloxbam School 

The following awards 
announced: 

For boys v ua It 

Raymond Scholarship: POP MI Her (St 
HiKih-s. woodhaU Spai. _ 

Banoury Scholarship: * RJ Hodsm 
iOv ertnoroe). - M Will lama 
lOvprtborpej (for mathematics and 

John *Schusl*r ExtitbWon: JM TaykH 

• JC Oetford 
tBkutfiam and Stan bridge HalL Ban- 
iSihTkRJE MuBey < Arnold Lodge*, 
including Chapel Gen 
MUSK- 


for 


ntenary Bursary 


John Schuster Exhibition: RO CoJ« 


i Durham Cathedra^ Chorister Schooli. 


Chapel Centenary Bursary 


Jtoq 

English and hWoryfc ■ DOH Tear* 
'Bloxham and Overt ho rpe). U 
Ken ward (Hobo wood House). 

• These are awards made to day- 

boarders 

Art n o te 

Scholarship: MN Drew (Swan bourne 
House’ 

Exhibition: RAJ Cheshire (Arnold 
Lodge). 


Exhibitions: CH B ertr am (Winchester 
House). JM Boxfonl (Cottesmore 
School i. 




ory (The I 


1(1 IK 

Exhibitions: SR Ward (Queen Anne's 
School. CavershamL AJ watloss 
(Kingsley School)- including credit (or 
oboe 


Chapel Centenary Bursaries: PS Bayes 
(Kingsley School). MS 


Honan (Con- 
vent of Jesus and Mary. Thomtotu. 
tor English. 

Art exhOdbons: AS Jerroro (School of 
St Helen and a Katherine. Abmgdonk 
JR Mayes (Convent of Jesus and 
Mary. ThomioiO- 


Exeter School 


Exeter School has made the 
following entrance awards: 

Public . Schools Scholarships^ Toby 


Kendall cwoiboroogt* HID School i. 
Peter Bellingham (Exeter 
School). 


Cathedral 


Acland and Stephens E x hibitions : 


AdanTperitiris lExejer^Srii^j^DanieJ 


Austin iWotboraugh 

12+ Scholarship: Jonathan Oregon) 
(Exeter Cathedral School). 

11+ Scholarship: Rfdiard Hadden and 
Matthew Steele (Exeter preparatory 
School*. 

Music Scholarship: Joachim Stanley 
•EJteur Central Middle School). 


Rugby School 

The following entrance scholar- 


ips nave i 

ML Dyckhocr (St Anselm’s- BateweO). 
sj pnipps i Lawrence Sheriff and 


Rugby School). AVR warren 
icaldicott. Famham Royal*. ECW Day 


• Baton Grange. Dunchurch. Rugby*. A 
Berg idaretnpnt. Baldslow, St 


(Aidwicxaury. HarpendenL CJ A 


Mustc scholarships: AC Humphries 
(Tavern am Hall. Norfolk). DW 
Barred (HaUflcM. Edgbaston*. 

Talbot Kelly Art Exiv&am: CJ Allen 
(BlUon Grange. Duncburchi. 


Westminster School 


MR Fara (The Hall) has been 
awarded an honorary scholar- 
ship to Westminster School. 


Births, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS. MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS ad A MEMOUAM 
£4 i In + 15* VAT 

(min i mum 3 lines) 


A nn ounce me nts, authenticated by the 
‘ ' ' ■ JJ “ of the 


name and p erma nent address 
sender, may be sent lev 


THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virtpaia Street 
London El 


or telephoned [by (denhonc mbs- 
cibcrs only) Ur 01-411 3024 


Announcements can be receivers by 
idcpbonc bet w een 9.00a ra and 


Friday, on Salur- 

i.OOom and 12 nooa. 

(HI -411 4000 04(1- For publication the 
following day phone by l -30pm. 


SJOpm Monday to I 
day between 4.0 


WnBBHO H M MW 8E 5, WHHHWSS 
etc on Court and Social Face £0 ■ Dna 
+ 16% VAT. 


Coun and Socal Page announce* 
nuns can not be accep t ed by 
telephone. Enquiries to: 01-022 9853 
(after (030am). or said tar 
1. flwjeiwn Strew, tendon Et. 


Known nmo God nr « ih 
wartu, (ram (|m> iwgtantng of Ihr 


Acts IS: 18 


BIRTHS 


BLOOMER On 23 May Al ITw Portland 
Kowiiaf. lo Freya tnee Donald) and 
Franklin, a daughter. Kale. 

HOBART On May i«h. to Tim and 
Monwr uwe Hashemtan) a daughter, 
a sister for Tom. 

KEENE On 17th May. to Jane (nde 
Heggte) and Euan, a son. Jonathan 
Philip Euan, a brother for Jake 
Charlie. Harry and Jemima)*. 

LAND - on 16lfi May. to Moira (tide 
Cnxom and Raymond, a son. Chris- 
topher John Leonard, a brother for 
Eleanor 

LANDYMORE On May 21st’ to 
Caroline nice freeman i and Peter, a 
daughter. Stephanie Alexandra. 

MAYNARD on May 5th lo Sails 
(Godtey) and Piers, a dautfiter 
defy 

MOLONY On 2Stti May to Nicola and 
Win. a beautiful d au ghte r. Meredith 
Kale 



STRANG On May 24th at Jersey Ma-, 
temtry Hospital, to Julie and Ian. a 
daughter. Lara Rosemary Sarah, a 
sister for Charlotte. 


WROTE On May 241b to Louise litee 
Parry) and David, a son. Richard 
Sunon. 


WRUGHT On 26th May. 1986 at 
Cdntaiie do MontchoisL Lausanne to 
Marianne (nee v«ui) and William, a 
daughter. Emily Victoria. 


DEATHS 


ABRAHAMS Cedi on May 2dth. Cre- 
mation Golden Green. Thursday at 
noon Donations to the RJK.HJ- 
West Hill. Putney. 


CAKCW-COX On May 2 isl 1986. in 
hospital Anthony John Montgomery 
Carew-Gox MBE aged 69 years, of 
50 Crassnore Road. Kings Norton. 
Birmingham B3S 8BU (Managing Di- 
rector of Cox Exhibition Consultants 
Ud.. Beloved husband of Helen, 
wonderful father of Jennifer. Alteon 
and Alaslalr. Dearest grandad of Si- 
mon and Kale. Will be greatly missed 
by ail who knew him. HeartTeU 
thanks lo the doctors and stoff of E39 
Birmingham Hospital (Wards 26 and 
2) for that care and kindness Ser- 
vice at SI Nicholas Parish Church. 
Kings Norton. Birmingham at 11.45 
am on Thursday. May 29th. fol- 
lowed by private aananon. Family 
flowers only pi rase Donations if de 
Sired to Cancer Research Trus 
Fund. East Buimngnam HaspttaL 
Boroesley Green East. Birmingham. 


CLOWES On 25th May. Rosemary, 
wile of William, mother of Simon. 
Nicholas and Beniamin, peacefully at 
home. High Street House. 
Wappenham. after a long mnest 
Cremation private, service of 
Thanksgiving at St Mary's Church. 
Wappenham on Friday 30Ci May at 
12.15pm. No flowers please. 
Donations, if desired, to St Mary's 
Church, c o The Treasurer. 26 
Helmdon Road. Wappenham. 


DRAKE Jack Thomas, suddenly on 
23rd May. in Sand (ego. US*. Funer- 
al service in England to be arranged. 


G1RLUUI - On 22nd May 1886. at SL 
Mary's HospitaL Eastbourne. Neds 
Lunua. loved wife of llw late LI. Cal. 
Charles Cull Ian. TO . FJ.M. Requi- 
em mass and funeral service at SL 
Saviour's Church. South Sired. 
East bourne, on Thursday 29th May 
at 9.30 am. followed by cremation al 
Eastbourne Crematorium. Flowers 
uprays please) may be sent to Haine 
and Son LM.. 19 Sooth Street East 
bourne. Sussex. 


HARDWICK - On May 23fd peace! idly 
at Kirk Ham melon, formerly of 
MkJdey and Red House. Dorothy 
Joan. Widow of Thomas, mother of 
John and Simon, and grandmother. 
Private . crematMm. No mourning, 
tetters or flowers by request- but do- 
nations If desired lo MicfcJey Church. 
C O Brocksmoor. Mjcktey. Ripon. 


OWE* Peter Granville. CMC. 
QF.Ui.. O-P.M.. C.P.M.. formerly 
Commissioner of Police. Gibratta. Br. 
Guyana and Aden. U N O. Police 
Adviser lo Somalia, latterly Deputy 
Director Fund Raising. Save The 
Children Fund, died suddenly in 
Norwich. 25th May. Much loved 
husband of Mercia (Pirn) and devoted 
father and father ln-iaw to Nigel and 
Helen. Rebecca and Paul. He gave ns 
great toy. Qmet family funeral. 
Requested no flowm. bul donations 
lo Save The Children Fund. 
Norwich, m hte name. 


STEDHAM on 22nd May at 
Isabella Daphne aged 88 years. Wid- 
ow of H£. Stedbam. Funeral service 
at SI James’s Church. Norland. Lon- 
don Wit on Thursday 290) May at 
11.30 am. Enquiries to John Nodes 
Funeral Service. 181 Ladbroke 
Crate. London Wto fTeh 01969 
18191. Family flowers only please. 


STOPPLES On May 19th suddenly. 
John Edward, aged TO yean, d 
Sardersi ead. Private funeral by 
deceased's request. Memorial Ser- 
vice at me Church of SI Mary's the 
Virgin. Sandaratead on Sunday June 
isth at BJSCtom. 


SHAFT On 23rd May at her home in Si 
Ives iCamtn) Mrs Angela -Tabby" 
Swin. widow of the late Major Claud 
Burton Swift. The Royal Norfolk 
Regiment. As Him and erect as ever 
at age 87. she b r em em b ered with 
wide by tier daughter and son-in- 
law. grandchildren and great 
grandchildren. Cremation private on 
50th May but flowers, tf ad w«wd, 
to Denb Easton Funeral Service. St 
Ives. 


TOMBCWtOnMay 23rd pea c ef ully 
» BurcoL Oxon. Mary Georgian* 
OBE JP aged 96. Wktow of Sir John 
Townsend FRS and mother of Ed- 
ward and John. Funeral at Oxford 
Crematorium on Friday. May 30Ui at 
12.15 pm- Family flowers only 
please 


IN MEMOMAM - PRIVATE 


McCarthy Kamieon FRS. May 
27ih 1985. I see in gradual vision 
through ray tears, toe dear sweet 
wished for years, when first thine 
earnest eyes with mmc were crossed 
and love ratted love. Joseph Leo. 



A wave from the Qoeeo at Versailles, Kentucky, where she 
has been visiting thoroughbred stud farms. 


Royal Navy entrants 


The following, candidates en- 
tered Britannia Royal Nayal 
Cege. Dartmouth, on April 30: 

DIRECT GRADUATE ENTRY 
Lieutenant (Short Career Co mmiss ion) 
Instructor Officer M R Barnes . unlv 
of Lancaster. Middlesex Poty: T M 
Day . Brunet Untv. Middx: M E 
Farraoe . N Staffs Poly. . Durham S: R 
V S Hut Dunstable C. Poly S Bank 


Day 


London: I C Macoonaid. Bishop of 
Hereford and Btuecoat S. Herrtord. 
Glasgow Unlv: J R Naden. N Tyneside 
Adult Education Centre. Durham 
Unlv. 

Acting Sub Lieutenant (Full Career 
Conunisston) Seaman Officer: C L 
Dyke. LKervool Unlv. Gravesend S. 
Kent: M J EWOO. Ooeen Elizabeth C. 
London Unlv. SurhUon Co Grammar. 
Surrey: T D S McGregor. Sbathdytte 
Unlv. Dalriel H S. Motherwell: BA 


P Sharp. SI Lawrence C. London SE1: 
M R Tipper. RN upper Yardman. 
MtdsMprean (Fun Career Commission) 
Supply and Secretarial Officer: N J 
McNally, c of commerce. Dublin. 
Midshipman (Medium Career 
Commission) Engineer Officer: P 

Brooks. Herriof Watt Unlv. Ediiv- 
ourgb: D Stephenson. Portsmouto 
Poly: M R Smith. RN Upoer Yardman. 
Midshipman (Snort Career Commis- 
sion! Seaman Officer B Badrock. K 
George V Sixth Form C. Merseyside: C 
j Barren. RN Upper Yardman: s 
— droan: P 


Barrett. RN Upper Yardman: . _ 

Barren- Colchester Inst K M Bowen. 


Abingdon C of FE. J P CocKcron. 
Cambridge Tutorial C: R B Cey.Lady 
Manor S. Sheffield: P J Cross. 

Panobourne C. Berks: S_P Embu 
S carborough VT Form: P R -Bib. 
” ' S. Derbyshire: T J Francis. 


5tS?°C of FET C- J M Ciimour. 


MacDonald. Glasgow unite R P May. 
Exeter Unlv. _ R Edward VI S. 


Soulharaplon: C R Seymour. Durham 
Unlv. Radley C. Oxon: D Thompson. 
Cheltenham: I C Whiteman. Unlv C or 
N waies. Bangor. Tonbridge & 
Acting Sub Lieutenant (Full Career 
Comrmssoni Engineer Officer: L C 
CUbm. poty of Central Londtgj: P 
Lipscomb. Newcastle Uhfv: B Bark. 
Liverpool untv. Edward VII S. Lancs: 


Stevenson C. Edtrtouregi: A J D 
Hacked. Ptymouto C: CT G Hudson. 
Unlv of Sydney, s Australia: A G 


Hutchinson. RN Upoer Yardmanr A R 
KrtohL RN Upper Yardman: G Latrm. 
QKNke MgbT Lanarkshire: D L 


S P Quarmby. Unlv of Manchester 
institute of Science and TtOi: M J 


McKelvte. Dunfermline High S.M a H 
Merewether. Slone S. Buries SDL 
MUdenhall. Fosters CS. Dorset: R 
MUes. Trowbridge Tech C: D J 
Murden. Caldaygrange . CS. 
Merseyside: K w Newbm. Poly 
W Yorks: D J Newton. 


Whliehouse. Sheffield. Noointfiam 
Unlv. King's S. Chester. 

Acting Sub Lieutenant mil Career 

— and Secretariat 

. Leeds Unlv: N 

.... Milton Keynes.. 

Si Brendan'S SFC. BrtstoL . 

Acting Sub Lieutenant (Snort Career 
CofTOTitssioa) seaman Officer: -O D 


Coopers S. Kent N R Noyce. RN 
Upper Yardman: J M C M Pemm. 


Cyen VI Form. Horsham. Sussex:. A R 


Barnetson. Glasgow umv. Duncamg 
Dbrtde. ScoUand: 


Secondary S. East KD bride. . 

A U Bridged. Ptvmouth Poly: A J 
Bvdger. Bath Unlv. Keele Unlv. Yale 
Sixth Form C. Owyd: P Robertson. 
Portsmouth Poly: J R Sproute. State 
Linlv of New York: T K Vickery. 
Exeter Unlv. Queen Elizabeth S ana 
Community C. Devon. 

Acting Sub Lieutenant {Short Career 
Commisstoci) Engineer officer: R W 
Bonsail. Nottingham muv. Northamp- 
ton S. Northampton: J E Clns. Bristol 
Poly. Plymouth Poly. Bnnte Park S. 
Gosport: C S Edgar. King's C London. 
Ledbury Gram S (John MaaefieM High 
Si Ledbury. HerMord: T H CUnon 
Reading Un lv. C of HE. Bucks. 
Edgrbarrow Cornp. Berks: R C Guy. 
Umv of Wales i Cardiff). Ryde S. IOW. 
Midshipman (FuB Career Commission | 
Engineer Officer: T E Mansoni 

caenamrand C. Perthshire. Scotland. 


_ fen wick. RN Upper Yardman: J L E 
Rogers. London Nautical & N J. 
Samuels. London NauUcat S: R- 
scfvier. RN Upper "Yardman: a J 
Shortiand. High Pavfl 

ham. S I, Ward. 

Edinburgh: . J Wood. Rhl 

Yardman. • ;» ■ - 

Midshipman (Short Career Commh- 
stonj Supply ana Secretariat Officer: 

: - cons.- fidgate VI - Form: M 
raviFonn'C. 




brilL Cyer* ' 


M Lnstmao. -Sunderland Poly; j 
RN. UpBCr Yartlman: J J L 


NAVAL COLLEGE ENTRY 
Midshipman (Full Career Commission) 
Seaman Officer: R a JjBted. .Adams 
Gram S. Newp ort: C L Brooiqi 
Princess Margaret Royal Oonrn. Wind- 
son M K Broth wood Bet CoaiS. 
Liverpool: P J Clarke. Gateway sixth 
Form. Letcesier R G N Cook. King's 
Coll S. Wimbledon: R S Curt*. Rossai 
S. Lam; P E Davies. Harlech Coma; 
R J Edwards. Sixth Form HalL 
Wantage. Oxon: D S*C Golden. Sj 
John's C. Hants: A P Hancock. 
Wetlsway O wnp- Bristol: S A. Hager. 
Springfield Comp^ Portsnoutfr D J. 


Renwtcfc. ,, 

Young. Siowmarkei High S. Saffotk. 

FLY1NG DUTIES 

Acting Sub Lieutenant (MedfUm Ca- 
reer Otxnm m ool. Pitot J D Tribe. 
Untv of Kent. Highbury C of Tech. 
Hants. 

Acting Sub Lieut enam (Medl urn Ca- 
reer Commission) Observer: T j 
Webber. Queensland tmatute ofTech. 
Australia, tndooroopiuy High S. 
Australia. 

Acting Sub Lieutenant (Short Career- 
commission) Pilot- D A Cooper. 
Manchester Poty . North Kestoven 
Comp. Lincoln: D J Lambourne. 
Portsmouth Poly . Kenpet Comp S. 
Berks N R -Waters. Urdv C Cardiff. 
Dacorum C. Herts. 

Midshipman (Medium , Career 
CommtaslOQ) Pilot s I Massey. Dait- 
mouth High S. Birmingham. 
-Midshipman^ (Medium _ Career 
Com mission * Observer J M Logan. 
Dorset ‘ institute of HE. Weymouth 

Gram S- - - • — • -- - 

Midshipman (Short Career Oomnds- 
suwu Pitot: A R Balille. Caukten C of 
FE. Graham Balfour High S. Stafford. 

S M Barr. Hatfield Poty . Daunteey-s 
Wilts: BSChw. Trent Poly. Arnold 
and Carl ion Cof FE: D Jtid better. 
NvwdotI C of FE. Mormofflli.Comp S. 


Gwent: D C R Mutter. S( Andrew's 


S Hort. Penes C. Edinburgh: 

M D Manfleid._ THefto*i_ConJPc f* P 


May. BexmU HWi S: p 5..Mwbn, 

Plymouth C: P J L 


Tutorial C. cambridgg. Netuertfi & 
Cambridge: B O O-SulUvan. Dacorum 
C of FE- Hemd Hempstead S: W G 


L Myra. KM'S S, 
t R M Ovoom. 


Bruton. Somwtet __ . . 

Lancing C: M P Paterson. SI Andrew % 
Acad. Ayrshire: P a Beidy. RN Upper 
Yardman: K J »ntth. R N Up per 
Yardman: □ J Snow. Merchison 


CasUe S. Edinburgh: S P L. Staley. 
- ■ ■ i C. Fife: c w Tomlin. Howard 


Madrasi 
GS. Kent. 

Midshipman (FuB Career Ooimtosstoni 
Engineer Officer j w Band. RN 
upper Yardman: G Blackman. 


Spellhome LSJ Brown. RN Upper 
Yardman: . D K _ Butter-worth. RN 


Dacot . 

, ______ fTw G 

Powell. Gufldtort i Co c of Teri*. K 
Edward VI RCS. GuUdfonl: S J Dow. 
Lerth Nautical c. Edinburgh. Madras 
C. Edinburgh. 

Midshipman (Short Career commto> 
ston) Observer: R J Dew. Upwey High 
S. Australia: K W OUchrisu Berwiai- 
upon- Tweed Oounxy High S: O J 
Han by. Peter Symoods C. Hants. 
Mountbaften S. Hants: R J Lindsey. 
Haywards Heath C. Warden parks, 
cuckfleid: P N Robertsoa Duncan Of 
Jordanstone C of Art. Dundee. 
Nicholson insL Isle of Lewis. 


upper Yardman: S A HaUier. Wood- 
lands S. Derby: P Hoe-Rktiardsoo. Wg 


Upper Yardman: j j KMroi^^gN 


Upper Yardman: P Mackay. . 
ion Acad. Kilmarnock; - I 
MacGrtUv ray -Haberdashers AskeN S. 
Herts: R J Mnw. De rby, C . T f 
Richardson. RN Upper Yardman: J 


BURSARY AWARDS . 

Seaman Officer: £ W Flaxmto. Wye 
C. KenL J 

Engtorer Officer: S J Coffey. Reading. 
unlv: P c Zahary. Bath umv. 
Supply and Secretarial Officer: p A 
Davies. Sefwyn c. Cambridge. 


Milan’s 
art dealers 
display 
their best 


From Geraldine Norman 
Milan 


For e?ery legitimate art dealer 
in Italy there are four 
dandestini. part-time dealers 
working ootside the lav, ac- 
cording to Signor Alessandro 
Orsi, one of the most respected 
old timers of MBaa's antique 
trade. 

Italian driers are required 
to work within a stifling 
straigh (jacket of heritage 
laws, which for many years 
have forced the trade in great 
works of art to operate nader- 
groand. In that contest, the 
eighth Milan Antiques Fair 
which closed yesterday was a 
milestone. 

The 124 participating deal- 
ers bad dared to present a 
spectacular range of works of 
art and got away with it. The 
Milanese authorities bad con- 
ceded in advance that it was 
more important to see the dty 
compete as a European art 
centre than to pounce on 
individual treasures for 
masemns. 

The organizers of the fair 
achieved a new deal with the 
Milanese Fine Arts Adminis- 
tration by changing the fair's 
name from ^Nazio/urfe” to 

Internationale 
delTAatiquariato n . 

Many dealers had been 
frigh tened of exhibiting after 
last aatwna's Florentine Fair 

attracted a blitz of 
‘‘notifications”. The notified is 
the most dreaded brnreanoratic 
tool preventing the free circu- 
lation of a work of art 

Once an object is notified as 
of national interest its every 
movement mast be reported to 
the fine arts auth o ri ties; if it is 
moved from one boase to 
another, if it is- taken to the 
restorer and most especially if 
it is offered far sale. The state 
most be given first option to 
buy and its export is automati- 
cally banned. With the ground 
well prepared, there was not a 
igle notification at the 'Mi-- 

Inn fair . 

The buyers among the 
30,000 visitors to the fair were 
looking for top-quality items. 
The middle range was less 
easy to sell. 

Among the Italian treasures 
on offer were two fonrteenth- 
centitry sculpted panels of 
courtly love, a magnificently 
inlaid jewel casket by 
Giuseppe Maggiofini, the 
greatest Italian cabinet maker - 
of . the eighteenth century, a 
pair of - vases- from’ the rare' 
Venf factory' hi Venice -and 
Renaissance bronzes of out- 
standhigTinafity. “ 

The political independence 
of fiie different regionsof .Italy 
before its .unification in the 
late nineteenth century led to 
striking independence of 
styles. Magnificent silver from 
Genoa was on show, and fine 
furniture from Turin, 
Lombardi, Venice, Naples and 
Rome. 

The unrestricted availabil- 
ity of Italian art of this qualify 
was something of a one-off 
event, however. That is under 1 • 
lined, by the month’s big 
auction at Fuiarite m Milan on 
Thursday. One of the most 
important Italian post-impres- 
sionist paintings seen on the 
market for many years wiD be 
offered for sale despite the fact 
that it is notified as of national 
interest. 

Pellizza da Volpedo*s 
‘‘Fimnana”, a great social 
document showing starving 
workers pouring from a fac- 
tory, is estimated to at about 
£500,000. Only a few private 
collectors and financial histi- 
tntions, such as regional 
banks, have in fiie past had the 
courage to pay over £100,000 
for a notified work. 


OBITUARY 

MR CHESTER BOWLES, 

Ambassador for America 
in the developing nations 



'M 




Mr Chester Bowles, twice 
United Stales Ambassador to 
India daring a long and re- 
markably .versatile career in 
public service, died on May 
25. aged $5. 

Bowles had made a fortune 
in advertising before the age of 
40 and, a zealous advocate of 
foreign aid, there was much of 
the publicist about his efforts 
to “sell democracy*’ to the 
developing nations. 

As one of die foremost 
pioneers of President 
Kennedy’s “New Frontier” he 
had looked a candidate for 
foreign office during the I960 
election. . 

During the campaign he and 
his friend, Adiai Stevenson, 
acted as Kennedy’s foreign 
policy advisers in direct liai- 
son with the State 


In 1943 he was made Price j 
A dministrator by President ' 
Roosevelt-Few were prepared ' : 
for the fervour of his crusad* ; 
against inflation or his opcq r 
denunciations of war profi. f. 

teers and their pressure groups ■ 
in Congress. 

Extremes of opinion saw •• 
him as an enemy ofhis class or 
as a defender of the 
people for his insistence ttec, * 
fair mad reasonable profit i . 
the best means of maintaining 
full employment and fan •*. 
production. 

But be resigned in theend as 
director of Economic Slabs* \«* 
zaiion, a post to which Pres*. , 
dent Truman appointed him 
in 1946 to bold the dam ; ;l 
during die post-war period of 
reconversion. ..; 

A few months later Coo- ; 


Department. 
His rews 


reward was the post of 
Under-Sccretary of State, a 
post to whose administrative 
functions he was not, howev- 
er. best suited. 

Towards the end of 1961 
Kennedy made him special 
adviser with ambassadorial 
status for the developing 
countries of Asia, Africa and 
L'atin-America, in which 
Bowles had travelled widely. 

He went about his new 
mission with characteristic 
real, but did not hold it long 
enough to make any detect- 
able impact on American aid 
policy. 

An old friend of India, he 
agreed eariy in 1963 to return 
to New Delhi for a second tour 
as ambassador in succession 
lo Professor J. K. Galbraith. 

Chester Bliss Bowies, of old 
New England stock, was born 
in 1901 at Springfield, 
Massachussets, where his 
great-grandfather had founded 
at influential newspaper, the 
Springfield Republican. 

He had an upper-class edu- 
cation at Choate School and 
Yale Universify, from which 
he graduated in 1924 with a 
science degree. 

■ His “liberal streak” caused 
a- break with the family news- 
paper, and after a year as a 
reporter be turned to Madison 
Avenue for a career. 

Rapid promotion encour- 
aged him in 1929 to form an 
advertising and market re- 
search agency (Benton and 
Bowles Inc) with William 
Benton, a college friend who 
was also to go into public life 
and later acquired the Ency- 
clopaedia Britannica. 

New ideas flowed . from 
Bowles^ bui ft was evident 


gress pasted a Bill rescinding 


some of the wartime control 
and Bowles, to whom even , ' 
moderate inflation was repug- 
nant, refused to stay on. - .. ; “ 

The United Nations, espe-. - 
dally the setting up ofUnesro- - *. 
occupied him for a time, a Stf" . : 
he visited London and other ' 


European capitals as a special 
of the 


secretary. 


assistant 
general. 

Returning to state politics, 
he was defied Governor of 
Connecticut in 1948; too left- 
ist! for a Republican slate 
assembly, be was defeated two 
years later. 

Then came a period of 
assiduous travelling, especial- 
ly in Asia and Africa, and his 
grasp of world affairs was 
perceptively reflected in a 
succession of challenging 
books on the American roJe in 
the new nations. // 

Relations with India," 
strained by the Korean war. . 
could hardly have been worse 
when Truman appointed him 
Ambassador m New Delhi in 
1951 - also the first American 
envoy to Nepal On the per- 
sonal level al least. Bowles 
changed relations for the 
better. 

His book. Ambassador* ^Re- 
port. was witness to the re- 
markable understanding be 
acquired from frequent tours 
outside the capital to meet and 
talk with all sorts of India's 
teeming millions. His con- 
stant plea was for more finan- 
cial and technical aid. 

Resigning in 1953 on the 
accession of a Republics^. 
Administration, with time -for 
his travels and books, he 
returned to the Washington 
fray five years later on being 
elected from Connecticut to a 


then that be left the finn'sjv^wq-year term in the House of 
business side -to his ; partner. * Representatives. 


Life wascomfoitahk; be could 
join the right dubs and sail his 
60ft schooner, his favourite 
pastime. Within 10 years be 
was a millionaire. 

His war services opened a 
second, far longer career. Re- 
jected by the Navy, he was put 
in charge of rationing in 
Connecticut, his home state, 
and was soon transferred to 
fiie Office of Price Adminis- 
tration in Washington. 


If he did not fit into 
President Kennedy’s Wash- 
ington the Indians were de- 
lighted to see him resume as 
American Ambassador, a spe- 
cial realtionship that helped to 
smooth the frictions of the 
Vietnam war. 

Bowles was married to 
Dorothy Stebbins and they 
had ihree children. There were 
two children of a previous 
marriage. 


Science report 


Biological clue to family murders 


Recent studies by two Canadi- 
an psychologists, Martin Daly 
and Margo Wilson, question 
the notion that the murder of 
relatives is a particularly com- 
mon phenomenon; 

The scientists, from 
McM aster University. Ontar- 
io, took as their starting point 
biologists' observations of ani- 
mals which reveal that, by and 
large, animals are more kindly 
disposed towards their blood 
or genetic kin than towards 
unrelated animals. Might not 
similar selectivity apply in 
human society? 

Statistics were drawn from 
many sources and one over- 
whelming trend emerged. 

Most murderers were males 

who killed unrelated men. 

Deaths of relatives were nn- 
osoaL For example, in only 2 
per cent of 496 solved murders 
in Miami in 1980 were killer 
and victim related by blood. In 
another 10 per cent of cases 
the pair* were related by 

marriage. 

Where killer and victim 
actually lived In the same 
household, in a study in 
Detroit, the risk of being lulled 
by a spouse or unrelated room- 
mate was 11 times that of 
being killed by a relative. 
Althongh commonly 
precipated by actual or sus- 
pected female infidelity and 
consequent domestic tnrmoil 
the murder of an American 
spouse was as likely to involve 
wife killing her husband or 
vice versa. In this particular 
category of murder, males and. 


From a Special Correspondent 
equally' often 


are 


females 
culprits. 

The general pattern of dan- 
ger to non-relatives also holds 
true far children. In Canada, 
from 1974 to 1983, - infant - 
stepchildren were - 30 tunes 
more likely to end their short 
lives as die victim of step- 
parents than were a couple's 
own ctafldren. 

By the teenage years step- 
children were 10 times more at 
risk. Because the relative haz- 
ards of bang a step-child 
actually decline towards the 
end of childhood, Daly and 
Wilson think that adolescent 
friction may not be a prime 
cause of the murder of step- 
children. 

Rather, they believe, step- 
parents may be inclined to 
resent investing time and ef- 
fort in emulated scep-ciufaren. 
a resentment which declines as 
adulthood approaches and the 
day when the step-child be- 
comes independent nears. 

Within the rare category of 
murders of relatives, infanti- 
cide by the mother is the most 
common. Data from Canada 
between 1974 and 1983 show 
the likelihood of this terrible 
occurrence decreases with the 
age of the mother. That bolds 
tree whether the mother is 
married or unwed. 

Consequently, the explana- 
tion for the drop in infanticide 
as the mother ages cannot be 
that older mothers are more 
likely to be married and (ess 
likely to be coping single- 
banded with a troublesome - 


infant Instead, the psycholo- 
gists entertain the idea that 
young mothers who commit 
infanticide are likely to. hare 
the opportunity to bear farther 
children under more propi- 
tious circumstances. . • 

_• By contrast, older mothers 
nearmg the end of their chfld- 
. bearing years are restrained 
from infanticide by the possi- 
bflfty that fiie present infant 
wfll be their last. Better, 
therefore, to hang on to what 
they have got 
In proposing that explana- 
tion the researchers are not 
suggesting that mothers are 
making conscious calculations 
about their future reprodactive 
prospects. Rather, they are 
drawing attention to the fact 
that predictions biologists can 
accurately make about animal 
behaviour can be made with 
equal success about unusual 
facets of human behaviour, ■ 
While older mothers are 
less likely to kill Infante, the 
psychologists find that Cana- 
dian children are more likely 
to kill mothers, file older they 
(the mothers) were at the 
birtit. Again, they say, there is 
a biological explanation. 

Older mothers are less like- 
ly to bear further children, 
brothers and sisters of the 
murdering child. By fritting an 
older mother a child does not 
deprive itself of as-yet-anborn 
siblings. It is not killing off 
potential genetic relatives, as 
it would- if it slew, a young 
mother still able to hare 
chfldreB. . 


JVWJOR^ENERALR. W. MAJDOC 


Csiii Bfi’ 


Major-General Rex Madoc, 
CB, DSO, whose outstanding 


leadership of Third Comman- 
do Brigade Royal Marines at 
the Suez landings in Novem- 


ber, 1956, gained him a highly 
lisbed Ser- 


ai the age 


deserved Distini 
vice Order, has 
of 78. 

He was for many the per- 
sonification of what the best 
type of general should be. He 
certainly looked the part 

At over six foot tall with a 
bristling, fierce moustache, 
Madoc had a commanding, 
even imperious bearing and 
presence. He was always im- 
maculately turned out metic- 
ulous in planning, clear in 
decision, forceful in action, 
and personally courageous. 

Reginald William Madoc 
was bom oo August 15, 1907, 
the son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
R W. Madoc, MVO. 

Educated at King William's 
College, Isle of Man, be was 
commissioned into the Royal 
Marines as a '2nd Lieutenant 
in 1926 at the age of 19. 

He served on HMSRodnev 
(1929-31) and HMS ROval 
Oak (1932-34) before being 
appointed ADC to the Gover- 
nor of Madras from 1934 to 
1938. 

From 1938-39 be served 
aboard HMS Furious and was 
then attached to the Royal 
Marines Mobile Naval Base 
Defence Organisation. 

Madoc was captured at the 


fall of Crete in June. 194], and 
spent the next five years as a 
prisoner of war. His activities 
while a PoW earned him a 
mention in despatches. 

Immediately after the war 
.he was an instructor, first at 
the Officers' School and then 
at the Staff College. 
Camberiey. He was CO. 42 




Commando. RM, in Malaya 


from 1950-51 returning as < 
Commando School. RM. 
from 1952-53. 

He was then appointed 
Chief Instructor at the School 
of Amphibious Warfare, at 
Fremington. before taking 
command of 3rd Comraandjtf 
Battalion, RM. at Malta. Cy- 
prus and Port Said from 1 955- 
57. 

He was ADC to the Queen 
from 1955-57 and successively 


FAI.I.; 

THU 

S1IAIM 


Local Major-General at Plym- 
outh (1957-59) and Ports- 


mouth ‘ (1959-61) when be 
retired. 

Madoc will be affectionately 
remembered as a man of 
warm humanity. He had a way 
with people which spoke of 
immediate understanding and 
friendliness, born of the recog- 
nition of the importance of the 
individual, regardless of 
station.. 

. It was these human qualu 
ties, allied to his professional' 
ism. which endeared him to 
all. not least to foe men he led 
so faithfully. 



V- 


MAJOR ARTHUR HARDY 


Major Arthur Hardy, VMH, 
who bred prize-winning rho- 
dodendrons and developed 
foe gardens of the family 
home at Sandling Park. Hyfo, 
died on May 1 6, age d 92. 

mPf rdy j° ined fo e Army in 
1912. served in Ranee and 


gave up soldiering in 1920 to 
help run Sandling Park. 

He took over the estate 
from his father in 1933 and 
continued to develop it to the 
of foe Second 
World War when he went 
rack to soldiering at the 
Guards Depot. Caterham. 

The Army took over Sand- 
hng Park during the war, a 
penod of decline for foe estate. 
Hardy’s post war years were 

devoted to improving Sand- 
IiRg. which is famed for wood- 
land and rhododendrons as 
well as many other 


the de Rothschild Estate at 
Exbury. 

He bred rhododendrons, for 
which he was awarded the 
i-oder Cup, and among his 
well known hybrids are Sand- 
ling. Salt wood and Postling- 
For 40 years he served on the 
Royal Horticultural Society’s 
rhododendron committee. 

Hardy was a beep exhibitor 
atjRHS shows and won mas* . 
prizes, not only for rhododen- 
drons but other plants aiso- 
such as the snowdrop tn* 
which ^ined a first class 
certificate. 

He was awarded foe Vic- 
toria Medal of Honour in 
1984 for his services to 
horticulture. 

, A fitting tribute is a 
rhododendron hybrid named 
Arthur Hardy, raised by his 






son ' Atot s* ^ 


:r 








gggjfeA 



^y>jl»i*e,U. 





• 4 '. R % 

•«sfis 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27-1986 


15 


THE ARTS 


Television 


I Realism 

. -■%; Putting people on television is 
.1.,' ^. a process of persuading them 
{ to fake- their own natural 
- behaviour. 

Open the Box (Ghkaitet 4) 

. revealed that on the riotous 
. ■ 'Q / game show The Price is Right 

• l^i **“* was accomplished by 
h .|./ playing the audience “Land 

. ; -'.-Xof Hope and dory” followed. 
.. v , ^iy old-hshioiKd disco music. 
For the elderly, victims of 

* ' - multiple burglary, however, 

all that was involved was 
< ££•' wholesale moving of furniture 
. . - y~.y. and sympathetic questioning. 

. > This was the second in a 
v i: valuable and inteltigent new 
series which explores the 
/ ‘ dynamics of television. It 

- demonstrated convincingly 

- /?. the varions techniques which 

- ;. c - television professionals can 
. . use to extract the desired 

semblance of normality. 
Professor Laurie Taylor de- 

- scribed how. as an academic, 

, Ir, -- be was seldom interviewed 
- 1 i? without a background of “two 

•; . . J '' ?or three yards of books”, even 
. if the library bad to be 
-• bought in for the occasion. 
John PerrivaL a forma- 
Man .Alive reporter, recalled 
the notorious days when the 
, programme's slogan was 
. ' /- • “make 'em cry” and the 
producers deliberately en- 
■ _ ; couraged their interviewees to 
weep for the camera, lnterest- 
i. ingly, most of the other 
professionals taking part in 
; :> ‘v this programme confessed to 
a similar phase of emotional 
exploitation, which they had 
' since renounced. 

. " ; 'r It would have been fas- 
“ citiating to contrast the re- 
v constructed realism of 
"v western television with die 
t-:. genuine responses to cameras 
r which can still be recorded at 
" n outposts of the global village. 

- "-v Recent documentaries made 

m rural areas of China and 
^ Pern have shown passers-by 
... . - turning In the streets to look 
at cameras, and interviewees 
’■ - ■- --r; glancing edgily , from the 

• machine to foeb-qnestioner; 
these people had not yet 

-•] learned the techniqne of 
•. - / acting naturally in an annate- 
. nil situation, although it now 

- ■ seems to be an inherent trait 
: ' in civilized cultures. 

• Acting naturally as far as 
- : . Britain's designated as- 

: v tronants are concerned means 
I- remaining | * a l m and un* 
emotional at all times. In- 
„ evitably. After the Dream 
r r (Channel 4), a documentary 
• - - about the British, space pro-'; 

gramme after tie . Jj[ASA . 

. disaster, was thus short on - 
histrionics. 

As Tom Wolfe observed m ' 
his study of astronauts. The 
" Right Stuff monosyllabic cool 
. is the approved style, jand it 
. ~ makes for very dull television. 
The documentary was most 
successful where it aban- 
. doned people and con-, 
centrated on p olicies, 

' touching on the. history, 

‘ " significance and ’ cost of 

• ' Britain's plans for space. 


S.\vt '■ 


Celia Brayfield 


Galleries 



Florentine ; 
Drawings of the 
Sixteenth Centnry 
British Museum 


Wilhelm Hensel: 
19th Century 
SodetyPortraits 
Goethe Institute 

Softs and Hards 

Gallery Lingard 

Obedient, no doubt, to the old 
injunction, “If you've got.it, 
flaunt it!'*, the British 
Museum's Department - of 
Prints and Drawings kicks off 
its major new exhibition Flor- 
entine Drawings of the Six- 
teenth Centnry (until August 
17) with a section devoted 
entirely to Leonardo, Michel- 
angelo and Raphael This is a 
spectacular start to a dazzling 
show, designed to reconfirm 
our awareness that the British 
Museum's collections of Old 
Master drawings are 
unparaDelled, and to provide 
the occasion for an authorita- 
tive new publication by Nich- 
olas Turner which illustrates, 
catalogues and documents ev- 
erything in tight (£10 at the 
exhibition, £12.50 elsewhere). 

At least, we take it for 
granted that- this is a dazzling 
show. But it is worth remem- 
bering that up to the 18th 
centnry at least ft would 


mostly have seemed a sorry 
thing of shreds and patches, 
consisting of material hardly 
worth anyone's trouble to 
gather up from the studio 
waste-paper baskets. The taste 
formaster drawings, especial- 
ly of the sketchy variety 
chiefly represented here, is a 
relatively modern fancy, espe- 
cially if they are regarded as 
art-works m themselves rather 
than just adornments to a 
cabinet of curiosities. There is 
an undeniable fascination in 
taking off the back of the dock 
and watching the works go 
round, and anything which 
helps us to understand how 
that mysterious creature, the 
artist, actually comes by and 
shapes his inspiration is of 
interest to many less special- 
ized than the an historian. But 
there is also, perhaps, some- 
thing of a residue from the 
Romantic preoccupation with 
the unfinished rather than the 
coldly complete, the great 
faded attempt rather titan the 
immaculate achievement, in 
our attitude to a show of chips 
from the artist's work-bench. 

Not all drawings in the show 
are of that sort. Michelangelo 
himself, for instance, though 
he is always doodling ideas for 
sculptures or paintings or 
buildings, was also ready, 
when the mood took bun, to 
produce highly finished 
drawings for presentation to 
friends and diems, which be 
certainly regarded as an end in 
themselves — the elaborate 
profile Ideal Head of a Wom- 
an is a good case in point A 
number of other drawings are 
highly finished because they 


were designed for translation 
(with a minimum amount of 
change) into prints. There is 
evidence that Fra Bartolom- 
meo made drawings of pure 
landscape — he was one of the 
first to do so — just for his own 
pleasure rather than as prepa- 
ration for anything; else. And 
then there are those drawings 
which, though apparently 
meant to explore an idea for 
some work in another medi- 
um, dearly have taken on, 
perhaps involuntarily, a life of 
their own under the artist's 
hand, so that often, as with the 
astonishingly complex group 
of elders, women and children 
attributed to Bronzino, we can 
no longer feel sure we know 
even whai the eventual medi- 
um might be. 

And then, hardly less fasci- 
nating, there are drawings for 
other, more immediately prac- 
tical purposes. Technical 
drawings like CigolTs of Two 
Men Operating an Optical 
Device ; or detailed blueprints 
like Bronzino's Design for a 
Tapestry Border and CeDinFs 
Study for the Seal of the 
Accademia del Disegno. And 
as the century moves on, and 
we with it into Late Manner- 
ism and Early Baroque, all the 
distinctions get even further 
blurred: apparently Zuccaro's 
gruesome pink-washed 
drawings of scenes in Hell 
(why does the choice of pink 
for foe washes make them that 
much more gruesome?) have a 
connection with foe decora- 
tions in foe Cupola of Flor- 
ence Cathedral. but 
somewhere along the way he 
seems to have gone off on 





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HenseFs elegant portrait of Giulia Grisi (left) and Michelangelo's elaborate profile “Ideal Head of a Woman* 


some cheery private fantasy of 
bis own. more suitable no 
doubt fora small drawing than 
a major mural decoration, 

even though the Last Judg- 
ment was a subject well sanc- 
tioned by tradition. Bui the 
show is full of surprises like 
this, as well as images that will 
from constant reproduction be 
femiliar to any visitor. So our 
reasons for appreciating them 
are as mixed as foe drawings 
themselves: it hardly matters 
much as long as we do go, and 
do enjoy. 

There is no doubt that the 
drawings of Wilhelm Hensel 
were meant to stand on their 
own: his greatest and most 
lasting fame was as an enor- 


mously productive purveyor 
of portraits in pencil to foe 
famous, foe rich and the grand 
between 1820 and 1860. The 
Nationalgalerie in Berlin 
alone has more than a thou- 
sand of them. Five years ago it 
pm on a large show of Berlin 
portraits to coincide with the 
Prussia festival: now it has 
devised a completely different 
Show for Britain, concerned 
with Hensei's British patrons, 

or anyway with famous people 
such as’ Mendelssohn and 
Grisi who were familiar fig- 
ures in London at the time. 

The show is at foe Goethe 
Institute until June 21, after 
which it will go to Oxford and 
Oldham, and it reveals, by no 


means a towering genius, but 
certainly a highly competent 
draughtsman with a nice (if 
presumably flattering) sense of 
character and radiating an 
almost palpable feeling of his 
period. 

Most of the works on show 
are quite sensible and discreet, 
but exception must be made 
for the portrait of the infant 
Prince of Wales (later Edward 
Vll) wrestling with what ap- 
pears to be a peculiarly aggres- 
sive rooster. 

Gallery Lingard's show, foe 
first in its new premises at 50 
Pall Mall, is called Softs and 
Hards because it represents 
both sides in the great 
Victori an/Ed wardian battle of 
styles and approaches, and 


though one might suppose 
that everything would be 
strictly practical in intent, an 
inherent tendency in archi- 
tects or their draughtsmen to 
take an optimistic and highly 
coloured view of their brain- 
children seems to be present 
whether they belong to the 
hard or foe soft persuasion. 
Still, many of foe drawings 
included -have ample charms 
in their own right — enough 
certainly, to make us overlook 
their wilder flights of fancy 
and the fret that all too many 
of them, for all their blandish- 
ments. failed to get built. 

John Russell 
Taylor 


Lontano 
Bath G uildhall 


opening 
Bath Festival brought right 
away a 'parade of this year’s 
French theme, with 'music 
ranging all the way from Peter 
Abelard to Pierre Boulez. 
Sunday’s recital by Lontano 
filled in some notable corners, 
even if the Guildhall Banquet- 
ing Room tins not acoustically 
ideal for so expressively inti- 
mate and textural ly exquisite 
a .work as Debussy's Trio 
Sonata. This is music to be. 
overheard, as Debussy over- 
heard it from the I8theentury, 
but the playets from Lontano 
were unable to%rcatt a pianis- 
simo or wrap their- lines into - 
one another. ■ 

- Betsy Jobs's Seared Quar- 
tet. though hardly less fragile 
and evanescent bred much 
better in what was la first 
British performance.' This 
quartet stands out for the 
subtlety and success with 
which it executes the basic 
idea of replacing the leader by 
a high soprano in wordless 
vocalese. Here the singer was 
joined by three women string 
players. which gave the perfor- 
mance a useful visual confor- 
mity. Sarah Leonard sang with 


agile virtuosity while remain- 
ing, throughout a member of 
the team, fitting herself in 
volume and colour into what 
is still essentially chamber 
music for strings. 

Hie only non-French item ■ 
on the programme was And 
stilt a softer morning for flute, 
vibraphone, harp and cello by 
Mark-Anthony Tumage. He is 
the featured composer this 
year— featured to the extent of 
having nearly all his non- 
orchestral output performed — 
and there will be more ambi- 
tious pieces to be noted later. 
The present work would have 
made a more incisive impres- 
sion if some of its jolting 
rhythms bad not been ironed 
out into innocuousness. 

Paul Griffiths 
Murray Perahia 
Festival Hall 

Chopin was not originally 
scheduled for this recital, but I 
heard no complaints when 
Murray Perahia devoted the 
entire second half to the 
composer. Nor should there 
have been, for his perfor- 
mance of the Impromptus and 
the Ballade No 3 was spell- 
binding. 


Concerts 

Everything this pianist .does 
is graceful, but there was 
particular elegance about his 
tailoring of the Ballade's pre- 
paratory phrases and his in- 
nocuous introduction of the 
lilting main theme over the 
gentlest of accompaniments. 

Such delicacy had been 
evident earlier in the exquisite 
interplay of inner themes in 
the F sharp Impromptu, a 
clear indication of Perahia’s 
classy, ability to give each 
finger an independent life, and 
m the shimmering cascade of 
the C sharp minor Fantaiarie- 
Impromptu. 

That be is fully aware of this 
special gift was apparent, too, 
from his choice of encores: 
Mendelssohn’s . Rondo 
Capriccioso and Schubert's 
celebrated A flat Impromptu, 
both of which were projected 
with extraordinary clarity and 
a very low dynamic level 

If Perahia has a problem it 
is t h«t his subtle shadings of 
light-fingered filigree are best 
appreciated at close quarters, 
whereas his growing legion of 
fens makes necessary foe hir- 
ing of a “salon” the size of foe 
Festival Hall He refuses to be 
bombastic amply in order to 
fill a big venue with sound: in 
Schumann's G minor Sonata, 


for instance, be noticeably 
took weight away from the left 
hand in foe big chords so that 
they acquired a glittering 
sheen in keeping with the 
surrounding oscillation. 

He had perliaps used 
Beethoven’s Sonata Op 31 No 
3 to warm up: the passage 
work was not quite exemplary. 
But Berg’s Sonata, Op 1, was 
delivered in a veiled timbre 
that will long haunt the 
memory. 

Richard Morrison 

RPO/Temirkanov 

Festival Hall 


Usually foe first bars of a 
performance give an accurate 
pointer towards what follows; 
if foe opening gestures are off- 
beam, the rest are likely to be 
as well. But Yuri 
Tcmirkanov's accompani- 
ment to Brahms’s First Piano 
Concerto was one of those 
intriguing exceptions. In retro- 
spect I still feel that his 
treatment of the strings' tre- 
mendous first scene was in 
itself too sluggish but it made 
sense within his spacious ap- 
proach to foe rest of the 


exposition. Here, as through- 
out the whole work, every 
phrase was attentively shaped 
in the expansive manner that 
Temirkanov and soloist Gar- 
rick Ohlsson had obviously 
evolved between them. 

Ohlsson gave a wonderful 
account of foe piano pan — 
technically immense yet never 
crude, while also capable of 
moments of magical stillness 
in the adagio, and at all points, 
aware of Brahms's way of 
thinking contrapuntally even 
in the most warmly lyrical 
pas s a g e s - The Royal Philhar- 
monic Orchestra found some 
superb form for what is. after 
all much more than just 
another concerto 

accompaniment. 

The other side of the 
Temirkanov coin was all too 
much in evidence in foe outer 
movements of Dvorak’s 
Eighth Symphony (relentlessly 
turbo-charged) and in its Ada- 
gio (mannered and melodra- 
matic). Still, if the overall 
terms of this performance 
took a bit of accepting. 
Temirkanov paid consistent 
attention to the inner detail in 
which this brilliantly written 
work abounds. 

Malcolm Hayes 


Rock 

Laurie Anderson 
Hammersmith 
Odeon 


Halfway through her show, 
Laurie Anderson related a 
conversation with a Dutch 
astronaut, who believed foal 
technology is a new parasitical 
life-form, with its own instinc- 
tive intelligence, that is gradu- 
ally taking over its host body, 
mankind. This apocryphal 
theory, laced with its gentle 
whimsy, illuminated many of 
the themes which ran through 
the multi-media patchwork of 
Anderson’s latest staged work. 
Natural History, a two-part 
performance incorporating 
materia] from her forthcom- 
ing film. Home of /he Brave. 

For Anderson, the asani- 
garde performance artist from . 
New York, has long held an 
ambiguous view of foe good 
technology. Although for this 
show she was joined by a 
keyboard player and two back- 
ing vocalists, who brought a 
welcome touch of soul to the 
pulsing computerized 
soundtrack, foe fabric of her 
music was, as ever, the prod- 
uct of advances in synthesizer 
technology- 

A parade of provocative 


and often beautifully executed 
images and slogans flickered 
on a screen at the back of foe 
stage and a wired up “drum 
suit” enabled Anderson to 
turn into a sort of human 
firecracker for one sequence. 

But ironically these futuris- 
tic sounds and visions were 
frequently harnessed in order 
to raise a question mark over 
the value of modern technol- 
ogy on a broader scale, as in 
“Big Science” and a disap- 
pointingly drab reading of her 
biggest hit. foe 1981 single “O 
Superman”. 

Despite their mysterious 
charm, many of her ideas were 
vague and open-ended, spacey 
dreams that tended to leave 
foe viewer more baffled than 
enlightened. A few more nines 
like the jaunty electro-funk 
“Language is a Virus”, to 
balance foe conceptual con- 
tent, would not have gone 
amiss. 

But although an imagina- 
tively constructed and precise- 
ly realized piece of “art”, the 
show itself fell victim to its 
own sense of microchip im- 
personality. leaving an im- 
pression of a poor return 
gained for foe effort of concen- 
tration demanded. 

David Sinclair 


HAYWARD GALLERY 

SOUTH BANK LONDON SE1 INFORMATION 01-261 0127 

FALLS 

THE 

SHADOW 


RECENT BRITISH AND EUROPEAN ART 


9 APRIL TO 15 JUNE 




yf - 


: ' j , * * 

\ ■ v 


■ t, 
.'i 


The Edward James 
Collection 

at West Dean Baxk, Chichester .Sussex 

Sale 

Monday 2 June to M-day 6 June 

Viewing 

26 May (Bank Holiday) to 30 May at 10 ajn. 
to 6 p jn. and Saturday 31 May ■ 
at 10 a.m. to 5 pan- 

The sale includes English, French, German 
and I talian funriture, European and Oriental 
porcelain and works of art^ fine Japanese 
J hcqaeii Eabexg^ r Silver and finely bound 
books, as well as a select group 
of modem pictures. 

Catalogues available from (01) 582. 1282 and 

fepm Wfest Dean on view and sale days or 

from the addresses below, 
price on request 





Divisions 


Theatre 


The third week of Glasgow’s 
Mayfest brought a welcome 
surprise in the shape of Old- 
ham Coliseum Theatre Com- 
pany (Mitchell Theatre, 
probably transferring to the 
Tron. Glasgow, from June 10). 
A late addition to the pro- 
gramme, their Kiss of the 
Spiderwoman was mounted 
late at night and it says much 
for the compelling quality of 
Paul Elkins’ production that 
they held their audience until 
long after midnight. 

Manuel Puig’s tale is of two 
prisoners: Valentin, a revolu- 
tionary activist and Molina, 
an eflerainate homosexual 
Molina is a gentle, hedonistic 
escapist. Valentin an intellec- 
tual, trying to stifle feelings 
and battle with reality through 
rationality and tough self- 
discipline. As they gradually 
move together, the play ex- 
plores assumptions about 
“masculinity” - and 
“femininity", about treachery 
and trust, domination and 
weakness — both on a political 
and personal leveL The act of 
story-telling becomes central 
to foe play, as Mofina spins 
out his account of a movie, 
reliving it until the two plots, 
real and fantastical converge. 

Most immediately, though, 
it is a moving exploration of 
the developing bond between 
two human beings who, 
though they won't admit it. 
know they are condemned — 
the humane growing out of 
and inspire of foe inhumane. 
Having not seen Hector 
Babenco's recent film I can 
make no comparisons; Paul 
Elkins's production is low- 
key. bare and beautifully con- 
trolled. Barry McGinn a$ 
Molina is camp, but never 
mockingly so. an engaging 
story-teller for whom, like 
Scheherazade, his imaginative 
escapism becomes of real 
mortal concern, a life-spin- 
ning thread that he continual- 
ly lengthens, so buying time to 
struggle with his conscience 
and to prolong Valentin's life. 
He is complemented by Chris 
Barnes's taut self-denying 
Valentin, and they shade their 
characters so that a sudden 
revelation in the riot allows 
the same pattern of behaviour 


to acquire completely differ- 
ent sets of interpretations.' 

The pain of living in a 
conflict-worn country was foe 
subject of more than one . 
production. The Eye and the 
Tooth (Mitchell Theatre) from 
foe Palestinian company El 
Hakawati creates a tableau 
about war in the Middle East 
El Hakawati means story- 
teller and the company call on 
a range of theatrical styles and 
music to tell their stoiy, 
making it timeless, as ancient 
and modem as the conflicts 
they portray. A Romeo and 
Juliet story is told against foe 
background of war, constantly 
waged across a tellingly mute 
but ever-present barrier of 
dead ancestors. 

Charabanc Theatre Compa- 
ny (Mitchell Theatre) from 
Brifest are similarly con- 
cerned with foe deep-rooted 
conflict in lhrir jand and its 
effect oo people on both sides 
of foe division: this time on 
foe people driven to emigra- 
tion. In Gold in the Streets. 
three mini dramas written by 
Marie Jones, they focus on 
three women and foe pres- 
sures that force them to leave. 
Each time foe conflict is in a 
different area and more 
intense. 

Agnes Mullen, a Catholic 
moving to Belfast in 1912 to 
stay with her sister and Protes- 
tant brother-in-law runs np 
against “neighbourly feeling”; 
Mary Connor, returning to 
Belfast in 1950. having lost 
her English husband in the 
war. finds an unbreachable rift 
between her views and those 
of her fervently Catholic 
mother, while in 1 985. Sharon 
McAllister’s unemployed hus- 
band finally finds a job - with 
foe RUC. The cast of four 
women shuffle foe roles crisp- 
ly -and each has her forte, 
though the inevitable weak- 
ness. comes in occasional 
skimpy characterization, and 
the dialogue rings least true in 
foe earliest scenes, fuitherest 
perhaps from the writer's ex- 
perience. However, the con- 
trast between the resilient- 
gritty humour running 
through foe performance and 
foe irreparable damage it por- 
trays. is beautifully managed. 



Voice of Belfast from the Charabanc Theatre Company 


Finally, Pocket Opera from 
Neurnburg returned to 
Mayfest this year (Tron The- 
atre). Two years ago they 
presented a marvellously ab- 
surd spoof mini-version of 

Lucrezia Borgia, this year’s La 
Gioconda didn't strike quite 
foe same gold. 

This time their satire focus- 
es on voyerism and foe vicari- 
ous living of lurid stories, 
passion and power encour- 
aged by tabloid newspapers 
and. sometimes, television, 

. Members of a corpulent bour- 
geois femily, vociferously con- 


suming TV snacks before a 
screening of foe opera, are 
gradual}} 1 sucked into per- 
forming its high points, while 
those not involved ignore foe 
drama going on in their own 
living room. The imagination 
works overtime in all senses 
from foe transformation of foe 
household furniture to the 
fantasies of foe family trans- 
vestite. who steals foe show 
with a solo dance number in 
black tutu, gold lame G-string 
and poinie shoes. 

Sarah Hemming 


BOOKING NOW OPEN FOR TWO NEW PLAYS 


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Art Fair 

182 Galleries at 
ICAF/London Olympia 

29 May-1 June 

All works for sale 11am-8pm 


A TERRIFIC SHOW . 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY.27 1986 


Pretoria Bill to 
strengthen 
hold on unrest 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The South African Govern- 
ment is preparing to railroad 
through Parliament in Cape 
Town draconian legislation 
which would give the Minister 
of Law and Order, Mr Louis 
Le Grange, the equivalent of 
martial law powers in any part 
of the country he deems to be 
an "unrest area”. 

The proposed law, an 
amendment to the Public 
Safety Act of 1 953 and entitled 
the Public Safety Amendment 
Bill, has already had its first 
reading and been approved by 
a joint standing committee of 
the separate white. Indian and 
Coloured (mixed-race) houses 
of the iri camera! Parliament. 

“We suspect the Govern- 
ment wants to have this Bill 
on the statute book by June 16 
and we shall fight it tooth and 
nail.” Mrs Helen Suzman, 
spokesman on law and order 
of the liberal Progressive Fed- 
eral Party (PFP). the official 
opposition in the white House 
of Assembly, told The Times 
yesterday. 

Radical black political 
groups have promised a surge 
of unrest, including work, 
consumer and school boy- 
cotts. on and around June 16, 
an emotion-charged date 
-which will mark the iOih 
anniversary of the uprising by 
black schoolchildren in 
Soweto. 

. The memorandum pub- 
lished with the draft Biff when 
it was tabled in Parliament on 
April 22 is remarkably frank 
about its purpose, which is to 
give the police "necessary 
additional powers” without 
"the concomitant conse- 
quences” of a presidential 
declaration of a stale of emer- 
gency. (A 229-day state of 
emergency was lifted by Presi- 
dent Botha on March 7). 

Mr Le Grange would be 
empowered to proclaim any 
pan of the country an unrest 
area and to enforce in it "such 
regulations as appear to him 
necessary and expedient”. No 
court of law would be "compe- 
tent to inquire into or give 
judgement on the validity” of 
any such proclamations or 
regulations. 

The draft Bill does not 
specify the kind of regulation 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

The Prince of Wales, Duke of 
Cornwall. opens “Mr 
Thorburn's Edwardian 
Countryside”. Dobwalls, Corn- 
wall. 4. 

The Princess of Wales visits 
Broadway Lodge, Oldmixon 
Rd. Weston-super-Mare. 10.35. 

Princess Anne. Commandant 
in Chief, St John Ambulance 
and Nursing Cadets, attends a 
regional cadet rally. British 
Aerospace, Salmesbury Airfield, 
Preston. 2: and later attends the 
Four Stars' Gold Tournament 
ball. Guildhall. EC3. 7.30. 

Princess Margaret. Patron, 
attends a reception at the Royal 
College of Nursing of the United 
Kingdom. 20 Cavendish Sq. 
Wl. 6.30. 


that could be imposed in 
unrest areas but this is not 
necessary since Mr Le Grange 
and the police wouid have 
carte blanche va take whatever 
action they considered neces- 
sary and* to prohibit any 
activity they deemed a threat 
to security. 

Powers of preventive deten- 
tion would be stiffened under 
the Bill so that any person 
could be held indefinitely at 
the whim of the police. Only if 
a detainee was held for longer 
than 30 days would the polire 
be required even to release his 
or her name to Parliament. 

The proclamation of. an 
unrest area would last for 
three months and could be 
extended with - the approval of 
the President. Parliament 
could annul any regulations 
taken in an unrest area, but 
this power would be purely 
theoretical, as all three houses 
would have to agree, and the 
Government controls the 
white house. 

The only serious resistance 
to the Bill is coming from the 
PFP. Right-wing white parties 
are in favour. So, too, secretly, 
are many Coloured and Indi- 
an MP&! who fear for their 
safety as black anger rises. 
Instead of voting against the 
Bill in the joint standing 
committee, they avoided the 
issue by walking out. 

Even if the. Coloured and 
Indian chambers vote against 
the Bill when it comes to the 
final reading, the Government 
can bypass their opposition by 
raking the Bill to the deadlock- 
breaking President’s Council, 
where the ruling National 
Party enjoys a rigged majority. 
• Landmin e blast: Two blacks 
were killed and eight others 
injured in a landmine blast on 
a farm in the Eastern Trans- 
vaal. A second mine was 
discovered about four miles 
away before it could do any 
damage. 

There were two landmine 
explosions in the same area 
last month. The mines are 
presumed to have been plant- 
ed by the African National 
Congress, applying tactics 
adopted at the end of last year 
when mines were placed in 
remote farming areas. 


Prince Michael of Kent, Presi- 
dent the Royal Automobile 
Club, opens the Federation 
Internationale de 1' Automobile 
Round Tabic Conference, 
Bournemouth International 
Centre. 10.15. 

New exhibitions 

So What’s New: new ae- 

S ui si lions: Robson Gallery, 

lalliweli's House Museum. Sel- 
kirk: Mon to Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2 
to 5 (ends June 22). 

Paintings by Timothy Dickin- 
son and prints by Anthony 
Gross: Oxford Gallery. 23 High 
St, Oxford: Mon to Sat 10 to 5 
(ends July 2). 

Exhibitions in progress 
Original paintings: Chichester 
House Gallery. High St, 
Ditchling, Sussex; Tues, Thurs, 
Fri and Sat 1 1 to 1 and 2J3Q to 5 
(ends June 14). 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,056 



ACROSS 

1 Alcohol as the animating 
principle? (6). 

5 Shopkeeper badly taken in 
by Clementine's old man 
(8). 

9 With which a bird man 

could be heralding end of 
spring (4-6). 

10 Son of person to do office 

work (4). 

11 One loses nothing in fuel 
with this old fire-arm (S). 

12 Fate causes mistake without 
a lot of trouble (6). 

13 Point to a porch (4). 

15 This became thy stone of 
final, foundation.. new Jeru- 
salem, it appears (8). 

18 Qualified after action that’s 
appropriate (8). 

19 Counterfeit non;? Thai’s 
dandy! (4). 

21 Get duck, mishandling bat 
at the wicket (6). 

23 Standard cavalry weapon in 
a manner of speaking (8). 

25 With very good living it 
could make one light- 
headed (4). 

26 Member of high court about 
to enter a ring with atten- 
dant holding it ( 10 |. 

27 Squadron leader came down 
to earth when snubbed (8). 

28 Witch-doctor — a far from 
genuine article (6). 


DOWN 

2 Tree used in carpentry (5). 

3 Looking back to Solomon’s 

- Concise crossword page ID 


advice to the sluggard (V). 

4 Gift of a big banger, includ- 
ing drink (6). 

5 Medieval banquet a feature 
of the fifties perhaps? (6- 
3.6). 

6 Bird of gold iu similar and 
in exotic form (8). 

7 Is cut in pieces by stress (5). 

8 Delivered orally or by spe- 
cial messenger? (9). 

14 An extremely handy sort of 
sketch (9). 

16 Conceal senior Guide, sav. 
in the flower shrub (9). 

17 Daniel goes into a disease of 
wheat that’s all over the 

—place (8). 

20 Stone-fruit is sagging, it's 
said (6). 

22 "Having pray'd together, we . 
Will go with you — " (Her- 
rick) (5). 

24 Sounds the son of pin for a 
surplice (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,055 


ssaisa 

B!'BJEI3I!E3(3J0 

aiaraiiHBHHH seishs 
e n h e b s n s 

£SIEll0ESHn 

p is s m □ 

i^SailSnSBGfe 

s ii sin 

fl ■ .-IS E S3 • 0 
iSiSSGl&BllSS!!; &EKE53 
ESBrnseEacE! 

isOEEraESMlEK 

erra gs m m is b m 

sstmsnfsBf* ■■esbe 


Battling saviour of a bl 


An RAF helicopter crew- 
man, who risked his life to 
rescue 32 sailors from a 
blazing tanker during a gale, 
was awarded the Air Force 
Cross yesterday. 

The citation for his medal, 
the highest peacetime award 
given hy the RAF for bravery, 
reads: “His brave and selfless 
conduct was in the highest 
traditions of the Royal Air 
Force.” 

Master Air Loadmaster 
Melwyn Ward, aged 45, of 
Smailbnrgh, near Nonrich, 
volunteered to be winched onto 
the deck of the stricken Greek 
tanker Orleans during an 
hour-long rescue on Janaary 
24, 65 miles north east of 
Great Yarmouth. 

In spite of the danger of the 
tanker exploding ami the diffi- 
culty of communicating with 
the foreign crew, Mr Ward, 
nsing sign language, got four 
sailors winched on board the 
hovering Sea King helicopter. 

- But tMdcening smoke' from 
the blaze and worsening 
weather forced the helicopter 
to move away. The only hope 
was to get the crew on a life 
boat, but the flames had cut 
the men off. 

Mr Ward inflated a life raft 
and lowered it into tire water, 
bat it landed upside down. 
"The wind was blowing at 70- 
knots. there was a snowstorm 
and 30-foot waves. I dived 80 
feet into the water to right the 
raft and told the crew to follow 
in twos.” 

But heavy seas swept the 
helicopter crewman against 
the side of tire ship and he was 
i dragged underneath the stern 
of the tanker, towards the 
propellers by the current 

Mr Ward, who has served in 
the RAF for 19 years, swam 
clear and was rescued by the 
Sea Xing. He then volunteered 
to return to the ship to save the 
survivors. 

But when he attempted to 
winch two men to the helicop- 
ter the cable caught in the 
rigging and snapped. The Sea 
King had to abandon the 
rescue and head for an oil rig. 
Fortunately for the men left on 
deck, the flames subsided and 
they managed to reach one of 
the life boats and escape. 

“It was the hardest and 
most dangerous rescue opera- 
tion I have ever carried out, 
hot 1 am delighted with the 
medal” Mr Ward, who has 
been based at RAF Cottishall 
for the past nine years, is 
married with two teenage 
daughters. 



Call for 
computer * 
record 
of crime 

Continued from page I 

then calls the PNC through 
his VDU by a network of 
private tele phone K nee to an* 
swer the questions. 

At the moment po&ce offi- 
cers using tire PNC can ooh 
•- «- * 





v- . fit 

fyio 

;T - 


Man with a mission: Master Air Loadmaster Melvyn Ward with a Sea King yesterda; 

Below, the blazing Greek tanker Orleans, photographed by MeJvyn Ward i 


sh: John Manning). 







got a conviction for a serious or 
recorded offence. The PMf . 
will also record ihdividaab 
who are not convicted taf aze 
awaiting triaL 

The actual record is Mde* 
microfiche by the National ' 
Identification Bureau at Scat, 
land Yard and a copy haste be 
sent off by post. 

Non-recordable offences 
and cautions are kept by tool 
forces- Recordable offence* 
are those which were indict- 
able offences before the Crimt- 
nal Law Act in 1977 and 
excludes offences such 
asdnmkenness. 

There are regional and local 
force collections iff records 
which wanld inctade both ni>- . 
nor and major offences and tic 
strategy paper points out 
“there is a very strong casefor 
the replacing the present unco- 
ordinated mix of central, and 
local fadSties by a unified 
national, computerized 
records bureau 

Later this year tire Hfoe 
Office is to evaluate a report . 
looking at the possibility of s& 
automatic fingerprint recogni- 
tion system. 

Looking at the collection «T 
criminal mlefligentt the strat- 
egy paper notes because there 
Is duplication between criuif- 
nsl records and inteHfeace,/. 
“tire integr ation of tire haa-'r 
tiling of intelligence with, 
records infonnAtioa and the 
utilization of the same infor- 
mation technology hdnstrao- 
tare would dearly represent 
the most cost-effective use of 
public resources.” .. 

The police officer* assedt- 
tion is looking at police intelli- 
gence work and the paper 
makes no recommendation 
but urges ^Tbose charged 
with preparing the specifica- 
tion for the central records 
facility to keep in dose Coach 
with the ACPO study so Oat 
they can ensure that, where 
appropriate, the new records 
facility can also meet at least 
some of the intelligent* 
qearauents 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Signs of the Times: art and 
, industry in Scotland; Collins 
I Gallery, Richmond St, Glasgow, 
Mon to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 12 to 4 
(ends May 31). 

Britain at Bay: The Home 
Front 1939-45; Falmouth Art 
Gallery, Municipal Offices; 
Mon to Fri 10 to 4.30. (ends 
June 2). 

New Work by Charles Oakley; 
Arts Council Gallery, Bedford 
St. Belfast; Tues to Sat 10 to 6 
(ends May 30). 

Paintings by Robert Jenkins: 
The Ginnel Gallery. Lloyds 
House, 16 Lloyd St, Manches- 
ter Mon to Fri 9 to 5.30 (ends 
May 30). 

Landscape into sculpture; 
Reading Museum and Art Gal- 
lery, Blagrave St Mon to Fri 10 
to 5.30. Sal 10 to 5 (ends June 7). 

Works by Liu Hai Ming; 
Aberdeen Art Gallery, 
School hill; Mon to Sat 10 to 5, 
Thurs 10 to 7, Sun 2 to 5 (ends 
May 31). 

Piciures by Neill Young; 
Derby City Museum and An 
Gallery, Derby; Tues to Sat 10 to 
5 (ends May 31). 

Riding to the Border early 
printed maps of North-east 
England; York City Art Gallery, 
Exhibition Square; Mon to Sal 
10 to 5. Sun 230 to 5 (ends June 
8). 

Janet Bolton: Appliqu*: God- 
frey & Twatu 7 Westminster 
.Arcade. Parliament St. Harro- 
gate: Mon to Sat 10 to 530 (ends ‘ 
June 7V 

The Eye of the Storm: Scot- 
tish artists and the nuclear arms 
debate: The Smith Art Gallery 
and Museum, Dumbarton RcL 
Stirling: Wed to Sun 2 to 5. Sal 
10.30 to 5 (ends June 15). 

Lancashire South of the Sand; 
Blackburn Museum and Art 
Gallery. Museum Su Mon to Sat 
930' to 5 (ends June 21). 

Music 

Organ recital by Andrea , 
Chorosinski: St Martin’s, Scar- , 
borough. 730. | 

Organ recital by John Marsh; 
Bristol Cathedral, 1.15. 


TV top ten 


MatfaraitoptwWiwMou ^ 
me week ending May Iffc: 

B8C 1 

1 EastEndars (Thura/Sun), 20.15m 

2 EastEndara (Tues/Sun), 1830m . 

3 Three Up, Two Down. 12J0m 

4 Daflas. ft .50m 

5 Antiques Roadshow. 1030m 

6 Every Second Counts, 1035m 

7 Thm% Lite. 10.15m 

8 News. Sport and Weather (Sat 
22:10), 9.95m 

9 Sony,B-85m 

10 KBng at Hers Gate. 9X5m 

nv 



80m 

BBC2 

Picnic at Hanpng Rock, 5X0m 

Naked Video. 4.60m 

Ode to Bitty Joe. 4.10m 

The Best Years at Yew Life, 3.75m 

Speedway, 3.70m 

The Titfiefa Thunderbolt. 3.70m 

Your Ufe ii Thee Hands. 3.70m 

Top Gear, 3.65m 

Gardeners' World, 336m 

The Natural World, 330m 


Anniversaries — - 

-Births; Sir Henry Rarkes, 
Australian statesman. 
Stoneleigh, Warwickshire, 1815; 
Amelia Bloomer, campaigner 
for women’s rights. Homer, 
New York. 1818: Arnold Ben- 
nett; Hanley, Staffordshire. ! 
1 867; Georges Rouault, painter, 
Paris. 1871; Isadora Duncan, 
San Francisco. 1877; Sr John 
Cockcroft physicist, Nobel 
laureate. 1951, Todmonden, 
Yorkshire, 1897. 

Deaths; John Calvin, Geneva, 
1564; Niccoio Paganini, Nice, 
1840: Robert Koch, bacteriolo- . 
gist Nobel laureate 1905, Baden- 
Baden, Germany, 1940; Sir 
Thomas Blarney, Field- mar- 
shall, Melbourne, 1951; 
Jawaharlal Nehru, first prime 
minister of India, 1947-64, New 
Delhi, 1964. 

Habeas Corpus Act passed 
1679. 


The pound 



Bmkfast m to v M on: The average 
weekly figures for audiences at peak 
tomes (with figures In parentheses 
showing the reach - the number of people 
who viewed for at least tnree 
BUCIs BroOkt/nt Pma: Mon to Fri 
1-5tn (7.2m) 

TV-anr Good Mooting Brian Mon to Fri 
22m (10.1m) Sat 2Sm (6Xm) 

Sun 1.3m 

Broadcasters' Audience Research Board. 


Our address 

Information for InchaOkMi in The 
Times information sconc e should be 
sent to: The Editor. TTgL The Times 
po Box 7. l vinjtaU Street. London. 


Bank Bank. 

Buys Sefls 

Australia S 2,19 2 j05 

Austria Sch 24.7 23.5 

Belgium Fr 725 6 ZJ 

CanadaS 2.1 200 

Denmark Kr 1348 -12X8- 

FMandMkk . 8X5 7.75 

France Fr 11.2 - ■ KL65 

Germany Dm 3X3 335 

Greece Or 22240 ‘ 207X0 

Hong Kong S- -11.9 -11.4 

Ireland Ft 1.165 1.105 

Italy Lira 2410.00 2290.00 

Japan Yen 2G5.0Q 251.00 

Netherlands Old 195 3.76 

Norway Kr 11.89 11.29 

Portugal Esc 232X0 220X0 

Sooth Africa Rd 4X5 3.05 

Spain Pta 223X0 211.® 

Sweden Kr 11X4 10X9 

Switzerland Fr 2X3 2.76 

USAS 1.55 4.4B- 

Yugoslairia Onr 55U.00 510X0 

Rates tty small de no mination bank notes 
only as suppflad by Barclays Bank PIC. 
Ratal Price Index 385X 

London: The FT Index dosed up 13X at 
1330.1 on Friday. 

New York: The Dow Jones Indu s tri a l 
average closed up 16X9. at 1823X9 on 
Friday. 


Weather 

forecast" 

Pressure will remain low 
to the North and high to 
the Sooth of the British 
-Isles and a frontal trough 
lying through N England, 
Wales and SW England 
will move E into the 
continent- 

6 am to nudnight 

London, SE, central S, E. central 
N, NE England, East Anglia, MU- 
fands, Channel (stands: Cloudy 
with outbreaks of rain area hfll fog 
spreading from W, becoming rnaWy 
diy with sunny intervals: wmd SW 
moderate or fresh, veering W; max 
temp 17C (63f). 

SW, NW England, Wales, Lake 
District: Cloudy at first with rain, hfll 
and coastal fog then sunny intervals 
and isolated showers; wind SW 
moderate or fresh, increasing 
strong for a time, veering W; max 
temp 16C (61 F), but cooler on 
exposed coasts. 

Borders, Edinburgh, Dundee, 
Aberdeen, Moray Frith, NE Scot- 
land, Orkney: Sunny periods and 
scattered showers', some heavy; 
wind W or SW moderate dr fresh; 
max temp 15C(59F). - 

tale of Mat, SW, NW Scotland, 
Glasgow, Central Highlands, Ar- 
gyll, Northern Ireland: Sunny inter- 
vals and showers, some heavy and 
prolonged; wind W or SW moderate 
or fresh; max temp 14C (S7F). but 
cooler on coasts. 

Shetland: Sunny periods and 
scattered showers, ■ some heavy; 
wind W or SW moderate or fresh; 
max temp 12C (54F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Thurs- 
day: Sunny or dear intervals and 
showers, some heavy in the N at 
first hut mostly dying out. Tem- 
peratures mostfy near normal but 
with a touch of mound frost 
overnight in some shenered spots. 


NOON TODAY Procure fa liwwn in oOBicbs ROWsfiSm* 

ByMfatfc 




High Tides 


b~Wu<? sky: be -blue sky -and cloud: c- 


Ihunderalorm; p^howm. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

wr 

London Bridge 

4i7 

7X 

5X1 

89 

Abenfeen 

4.22 

4.1 

5X9 

4*1 

AvonmOolli 

10X8 

12^ 

11.00 

123 

BHIpst 

1.56 

35 

2X5 

33 

Centiff 

10X3 

11X 

1045 

113 

Devonport 

9X8 

5.1 

9.43 

5X 

Dower 

2X4 

6.4 

2X3 

83 

Falmouth 

8X8 

4X 

9.13 

53 

223T 

narwncQ 

3X9 

2X5 

4.9 

A0 

4.10 

3.16 

4 J 
33 

Hojjfhead 

1.12 

9X7 

5X 

7X 

149 

10X4 

53 

7J0 

Ilfracombe 

9.19 

8.8 

942 

83 


5X9 

5.4 

6X0 

SA 

Liverpool 

2-12 

9.4 

2.41 

90 

Lowestoft 

12X7 

2X 

12X4 

24 

.Pfiafgata 

3X6 

49 

3X9 

4X 

RBltonf Haven 

9X4 

67 

9X7 

B.7 

Newquay 

8X6 

8.7 

849 

63 

Oban 

axs 

3X 

9.19* 3J 

Penzance 

8X3 

5X 

649 


Portland 

10X4 

19 

1040 

zH 

Portsmouth 

2X1 

46 

302 

4.6 ™ 

ShosaSsten 

2X8 

ex 

247 

81 

Southampton 

1.45 

4.4 

2X5 

44 

Swansea 

9.40 

9.1 

10X3 

9.0 

Tans 

6.49 

5X 

7.29 

52 

vntooHiiUtae 

2.48 

4.3 

3X8 

4X 

Tide measured In metres: 1f**2£®». 


Around Britain 


EAST COAST 


Sun Rafri 
hrs In 


Organ recital by Peter Goon; 
ily Hall, Hull, 7.30. 

Organ recital by Kenneth 


Ryder and Roger Rayner. St 
Peier Mancroft. Norwidt, 7 JO. 


□ 


SwRtawc 
-4X4 am 


Sun Sets: 
9X2 pm 


BUmn rfwjK Moon sets: 
12X3 am ' 7X4 am 
Last quarter: May 30 


Roads 


Timm Portfolio Cold rnl« are as 

l Times Portfolio is tree Purchase 
of The Tunes la not a condition of 
taking pari. 


11 If for any reason The Times 


normal way Times Port 
s usp ended for that day. 


London and Santa-east A307: Major 
roadworks on Paarsham Rd. Richmond, 
tncwean Compass Hfl and Star and 
Gartar HHfc dtwrewns for northbound 
traffic: delays. A207: Al traffic shares one 
lane on Shooters HB Rd at the luncnon of 
ZangwW Rtfc temporary fights. Ml: 
Contraflow between Junctions 8 (Hemet 
Hempstead) and 9 (Hatpenden); north- 
bound entry slip road at pjnebon 8 a 



Lighting-up time 

London 9.32 pm to 4X3 am 
Bristol 9.42 pm to 4X3 am 
Ettobu rgfa 10X9 pm to 4.10 am 
Manchester 9X1 pm to 4X1 am 
Punzanco 9.47 pm to 4X1 am 


Yesterday 


Thaiildtanda: Mi: contraflow between I 
junction -15 (Northampton) and 16| 
(Daventry); the B othwath iOpO service I 
area a dosed. Mfc Contraflow between I 

junctions 4 (B roms grov a) and 5| 
southbound entry sS 



After twang the price changes of 
your fight shares lor that day. odd up 
an «tgtu snare changes to give you 
sfour overall coral plus or minus <+ or - 
r. 

Check your overall total against The 
Times Portfolio dlv-ldnwl MbMMd on 
the Slock Exchange Prices page 


COlstonworth, Lines. 

Wales and West: MS: Contraflow 
southbound betwoon Junct ion s 8 (MfiO 
arterchange) and 9 (Tewkesbury), two 
lanes avalabto n each dtaectaon. IH: Lane 
restrictions on both caniageways be- 
tween junctions 21 aid 22 (Sevan 
Bodge >. A31: Lane closures between 
Yeowl and ShaftsOury at Qradfatri Abbas, 
temoorarv Sdits. 

The Norac MBS: Mqor widenBig 
schema at Barton Bridge. Greater Man- 
chester; venous lane closures on both 
canageways between Juneww 2 and a 
A19: Contraflow BaVjersby near Rtpon. 
MS; Contraflow between tunewns 31 
(Prasmn) and 32 (fiCS Bieoipool): traffic 
Ittreng ttw stxxhbouid camageway ham 
M55/A8 Is restricted to a singiB tine. 

ScoCaixt Giaagaw: Broomfield Rd. 
SprmgOum is dosed between Royston Hd 
and Rye Rd tor the next two weeks: 
dweretons and delays likely. A72Q: Width 
re s tnction at Oumbrae, south of Craigs, 
Lothian. AQ21: Gas matfi renewal on 
Kkheahfy ffitir Street *t Coal Wind; 
delays at pew periods, evtid if poss«e. 
inforamtlon suppfled by AA 


4 The daily dMdend will be 
announced MCA day and the weekly 
dMdend w« fajnnounnd each 
Saturday In The Tiroes. 

5 Times Portfolio Itai and details of 
the daily or weekly dJvtdma will also 
be available for mssecaon at the 
offices of The TKnes- 

6 If 
more 
equals 
•Ouan 
hoMfui 


8 Employees of News totematibnai 
pic and us suKidranes ano of 
Euragnnl Croup Limited (producer* 
and ewrtfewars of the card) or 
members ot their immediate rambles 
are not allowed to play Tunes 
portfolio. 

9- AH participants wui be sobfcct to 
these Rules a ci mbruetions oo -how 
to oLri." and "how io claim wbettter 
m The Tones or -in Tunes 
Portfolio cards wlU be de e med to be 
part d these Roles: The Editor 
resenes U» riant to amend the Rules. 

to ■ m •am' dispute. The Editors 
decision ts final and no correspon- 
dence win be entered into- 



Cardiff 

r -r— l ... i 
fau^vuiyji 

Glasgow 


ratores at midday yesterday: c, 
f. lam r, rain: a, sun. 

C F C F 

1 r1050 Qoemsey -c 1254 

mm 9 1763 I nv ern ess sub? 

iod s 1457 Jnsoy c 1457 

f 15 ■>? London c iBfil 


f1355 fiTnchster s 1559 


soS(mcoAsr 3 ^ 


Brighton 

Worthing 

Utdehmptn 


Shanfcfin 
Boumcwntta 


Weymouth 

Esnnmth 

TtH^imouth 


jtomey 14.1 

GtatfiHy 12.7 
WEST COAST 
Scflly totes 
Newquay 02 


- 17 63 Bunny 

- 18 64 cloudy 

- 2D 68 cloudy 

- 20 68 bright 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 18 64 Bunny 


13 55 cloudy 
15 56 cloudy 


StsiRata Max 

„ . hre tn C F 

Bfratumbe OX .01 15 59 
^ - - 12 54 

CotograBay 7X1 X2 17 63 
Morewnwie 52 X3 14 57 
a**** 7.7 XS 14 57 

AND WALES 
6X - 17 93 

BTuun Akpt 2.7 - 17 63 

3.1 - 17 « 

CerdW(Q6^ 0X - 16 81 
An^eey Q A .03 13 55 
ffpool Alr pt 4.7 .31 15 59 
SW -10 16 GJ 

No^nghwn 35 - 17 63 

N’rt-n-Tyn. 10 ^ X7 17 63 : 
Cm** 8.7 X5 15 59 : 

SCOTLAND 

7.6 158 14 57 : 

02 .13 14 57 I 

8X .12 15 59 

7X X7 13 55 i 

Stonww wy 72 £0 13 55 : 
Jjjnjk* 3.7 .02 18 55 i 
JS* 9.7 X2 15 69: 

*££*■ 11X - 15 59 I 

"wntofln 8X - 18 64 ! 
3L Andrew* 108 - 15 59 I 

Ba » b »Sh 102 M2 15 59 1 

ywnfl BRNBBEUum 
BHfHa * 7A .18 18 61 I 



r 948~ RlnMtiway s 1254 


... H« w j ojm - Wotitly DMtUnd 

recw your ““r 

Add these together to dei ermine 
vocr weekly PorUouo total. 



You must hm-e your card wtm you ] 
when you telephone. 

If you are unaote to Meohone j 
someone ehw can claim on your behalf 
nur they must have your card and call 
The Tunes Portfolio claim s line 
Between the stipulated times. 

for any reason within uw staled 
hour*. 

The- above instructions *ire ep- 
ptKaw- io both dally, and weekly 
dividend claims. 


Anglers’ weights 

The Government is seeking 

comments on draft, regulations 
which would ban the sale and 
import of 'Anglers’ lead weights 
from January 1. 1987. 

Angling bodies,- water 
authoritiesand local authorities, 
environmental groups, sports 
associations, trades unions and 
other interested bodies have 
been asked for comments by- 
Friday. J une 1 3. They should be 
addressed iq Mr. M Sains bury. 
Room 904. Tollgate House. 
Houlion Street. Bristol; BS2 
9SJ: tel: (0272) 218231.' 


Thneaitt Sunday's figures 

Abroad 


»^Y:acloottd. drizzle; 

Akratiri s 27 «? 8 S 77 Moores 

^ilSST sSlE 

i sr issss 1 ;ilS- 


Barctin* 

Beirut 



Baitoi 
D en nu d u* 

Btonftc 

is?* » ^ Sssss* 

8sr ifiS® 

^ :is& :ilBS 

•denowa Sunday, 


3 25 77 Gw va f pc to — rwi tjw 
® 21 70 GSxaMar a 23 73 j 
8 75 hdsinhi c W S 

iisiS 


sssss 

! 21 70 Ptate 


; b, stm; sn, snow; t thuMWr. 

C F iJj 

' 8 29 84 Rome s 25 77i 

8 24 75 Stiztmg. s 28 W 
f 25 77 SFrbco* d 18 |f 
, c 13 55 Santiago* 3 19 g 

' izi matZSF f a w 

8 29 84 S<wti r 17 g 
8 26 78 Statipor l 30 « 

8 22 72 Sfknoini *17® 

C 18 64 SMsbfg 1 25 77 
f 25 77 Sydpay t.W SJ 
121 70 Tlngtor - V 29 £ 

6 30 88 TetSta *2BJ? 
c 37 99 Tanortto 
I 24 re Tokyo f « « 

* 25 TTTtawre* *gg 
r 10 50 Ttads t ® % 
s 24 75 VUtotia .1 25 77 
a 27 6i V anc ’ W cgS 
C 17 63 Venice 

* a 73 Vtemu - 

f 9 48 Waraati- a-g-S 

* 24 75 WtaMotf.f »S 
f 2» 75 WrfatoO -C -*54 
a 43109 Zurich 

■st available 






TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


THE TIMES 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


J Deflation 
poses new 
?; threat to 

v- stability 

1 From Maxwell Newton j 
& New York 

' - After tbe panic caused by the 

jjjl short squeeze on tbe bond 
, : . ■"‘■Kjt'iJi- market in tbe week to May 16 , 

■ r* , * ri tfie latest week has witnessed 
, _ a degree of maturity and calm 

:m' : “T’.riu, retnrn to the financial 

r-. . _ There was some early confo- 

sfon-cansed by the publication 
of the revised first-quarter 
/-n GNP fignres, which contrary 

s r /, 5 S. to expectations appeared to 
' \ show that there had been a 

" i-, r \ sodden acceleration of eco- 
/ -..: =TT 5^t| nornic growth in- the first 

. <P»ner- 

■ The Department of- Com- { 
- merce annonnced about &15 

. *m last Tuesday that tbe GNP 

^ ^ ^ risen in me first quarter 

'■ “'•■■'C «»!, jV by 3.7 per cent on a revised 
" - basis. The trigger-happy deai- 

* 'iT', f, ore who have so much to do 

: >3'. with bond trading these days 
i\.. immediately hit the “selT 
' . . ' % ^ button sending the June Trea- 
• . sury-bood contract down to an 

;“^.. early low of 93iafc, from the 
Un &t 5 h previous night’s close of 94 

- - - r *, u ' " IJf <t By morning, at which time 

. some more experienced people 

:i’ • had had a chance to look at the 

- - ^ ■ figures, it was seen that all the 

4 3 ^ increase in the revised GNP 
wasdue to a build-up. of stocks, 
t., : most of whicb was an invohm- 

-• tary accumulation of unsold 

- ri motor shares. Excluding the 

revised stocks increase, the 
* ^ u&l ' real GNP would have declined 
* r,v 0.5 per cent 


Dixons ‘will not pay £10 
a share for Woolworth’ 


' By Cliff Feftbam 

Mr Stanley Halms, chair- discrej 
man of Dixons, last night went prices, 
on the offensive to dampen launch 
down City speculation that be p 
is prepared to increase his £1.5 J* U ‘J 
MKon takeover bid for Wool- was .V 1 


discrepancy between the 
prices, it has been expected to 
launch a new offer any day. 

But tbe message last night 
was that it is no burry to 


worth, the high street stores SP n ?,^? r raisin 8 the Terras as 
group, to £10 a share. “* fvalras «n»P continued to 

discharge fiirther broadsides 
Mr (Calms, who also took at the Woolworth man- 
an other swipe at Woolworth’s agement. 


IJ Wk 


trading ability, is perturbed 
that the City believes he is 
willing to pay alm ost any price 
to get his bands on the 
Woolworth chain. 

A- Dixons spokesman said: 
“Some suggestions that we are 
prepared to pay £10 a share 
are just pie in the sky. ft is not 
op. We all know what some- 
thing is worth, and Wpotwonh 
is not worth that.” 

Dixons pointed out that the 
value of the present offer is 
673p a share, against a stock 


The latest consists of a 
further attack on Woolwwth’s 
trading expertise. 

. data supplied by 

AGB Research, Dixons 
that Woolwonh’s share of the 
cosmetics and toiletries mar, 
kel has fallen dramatically.. 

While the whole market has 
grown by 14 per cent over the 
last year, Woolworth’s share 
has follen by 10 per cenL 
Marks and Spencer, for in- 



market price for Woolworth of ?* ance ' shows a 36 per cent 
860p — double the price at the im provemenL 


Stanley Kalms: no hurry 
to raise the terms 

maintain its market share- of 
important businesses. 

This is a vitally important 
area for Woolworth in its new 
so- called marketing strategy 


policy, which it says has 1 
switched erratically between 
press and television. 

Woolworth, which is step- 
ping up its store refurbish- 
ment programme, last night 
claimed that the cosmetics 
survey referred to product 
lines no longer being stocked. 

It said: "We have stopped 
selling the unprofitable low- 
priced toiletries and high- 
priced fragrances and our new 
lines are substantially more 
profitable. 

“ We cannot think why 
Dixons is bothering to bring 
this up at all.” 

Meanwhile, Woolworth’s 
chief executive, Mr Geoff 
Mulcahy, said tbe group 
would be refurbishing or 
opening about 360,000 sq ft of 
retail space next month — the 
equivalent of almost 200 Dix- 
ons stores or about two thirds 
of the Dixons chain. 

He said: "This emphasizes 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 

A deadline for the 
election calculus 


time the bid rumours started. 

Dixons has until June 13, at 
the latest, to launch a revised 
bid, but in view of the 


Dixons said: “This supports 
what we have been saying for 
some time and that is Wool- 
worth has simply failed to 


and yet it appeals incapable of “ bATSSTlS 

growth strategies and that we 


alone raising its share.** 

In meetings with City insti- 
tutions, .Dixons is also derid- 
ing the Woolworth advertising 


Thom EMI screen division 
was near ruin, says Cannon 

By Jeremy Warner, Business Correspondent 

Britain’s largest film compa- been allowed to carry on hs mer chief executive, Mr Gar 
ny, Thom EMI Screen Enter- previous course,** be said. Dartnali, and burnt. . 


tamment, came near to 
financial ruin before being 
sold by Thorn EMI, its new 

'•% to 1 ^d e ^ HI S™ ,n rf e ^ “oKST’lhe Hollywood 
•’ IJJS? ilL films poor said fiat since 

■^. ttarpog b tbe bond market, aounffig the ABC cinema 

- S - curcuit and Elstree film studio 

, Ijp; company three weeks ago; it 

; V -points to 96 i36z and the new had “a h£™- 


Mr Golan said he was 
particularly concerned by the 


mer chief executive, Mr Gary 
Dartnali, and burnt. 

Mr Dartnali, who was on a 
three-year contract, resigned 


(j; >30-year bond up liife to 

" -• :95»6i. ' 

. '.‘'j).' 1 -' Thursday brought more 
„ grim news of economic stagna- 

“ • tioa, with tbe revelation that 

--- durable goods orders by Amer- 

" 1: ican manufacturers in April 

• had dropped to a level of. 

I $1043 billion, Iowa* than 
June 1985 and well below the 
level of $108.2 billfon In 
December 1985. „ 

As a resolt, tbougbtfnl Wall 

Stre^ analysts - been 
bus% seating backTteir esti- 
~ r ~ _ ■ mates of- ■ 1986 economic 

A growth. • : 

Even after the correction 
: that has taken place since 
1 f April 18, June T-bond futures 
• f are still up 15 since the first 
1 J ■ week of January, counting a 
jr' yieW of about 2 l h per cent over 

: f. the period. This represents a 
\ total return on bonds of 17Vfe 

‘•.• since early January, a gain 
'that would have been lost had 
hood fund managers listened 
i to the “consensus” who have 
been shouting “inflation and 

- - accelerating economic growth” 

- since early 1985, thus further 
— debasing the already abysmal 
T i .J: IS . " reputation of economists. 

- ^7 By now, deflation poses a 
. more significant threat to the 
1 stability of the American econ- 
omy than does inflation. In the 
' first four months of the year, 
producer prices have fallen at - 
* an annual rate of 12! per cent 
. and consumer prices have 
.. . fallen at an annual rate of 23 
'.‘•"percent. 


had discovered “a .horror Thorn EMI has already 
story" of squandmed money, been severely embarrassed 
poorly negotiated contracts over Dae way it sold Screen 
and “gross incompetence.** Entertainment to the Austra- 
Mr Menahem Golan, the financier Mr Alan Bond 
Israeli-born film magnate who f" OT £125 million only to see 
controls Cannon with his Mr Bond sefl the company a 
cousin, Mr Ynnim Globus, week later to Cannon for £175 
said be had been “shocked million, 
and amazed” by some of the Mr Golan said that shortly 
film contracts negotiated Jby- after Cannon bought Screen 


contracts for a number of ' four weeks ago after agreeing a 
high-budget US films signed substantial severance feewith 
with MrDavid Begelman. the Mr Bond. 

Hollywood producer, and he Cannon tried to buy Screen 
was currently attempting to Entertainment from Thom 
renegotiate the deals. EMI six months ago but at 

Thorn EMI has already that stage Thorn was set on 
been severely embarrassed selling to a management con- 
over the way it sold Screen sortium being organized by 
Entertainment to the Austin- Mr Dartnali. Cannon's bid 
tian financier Mr Alan Bond was also criticized by other 
for £125 million only to see leaders in the British film 
Mr Bond sefl the company a industry, 
week later to Cannon for £ 1 75 ^ firet 

million. ... 


i Screen Eniertaimnenfs previ- 
ous management. . 

• “The company would have 
been bust within a year had ft 


for £125 million only to see leaders in the British film 

Mr Bond sefl the company a industry. 

week later to Cannon for £ 1 75 ^ firet 

mimoa. volved by offering to put up 

Mr Golan-said that shortly £10 million towards tbe man- 
after Cannon bought Screen agement bid. He then exer- 
Entertainment, a number of cised an option to buy the 


manag e ment files had been whole company after Mr 
secretly removed from the- Dartnali foiled to raise the 
offic^;Of thOrcompBny's.fbrr-.jjalaDceoftbe money:- - * - 


(ir groups Industry alarmed 

time in US HoTiwki PadIo 


By David Yi 


Europe’s prestige car mak- 
ers — Jaguar, Mercedes and 
BMW — are warned in a report 
published today that the lower 
dollar has made the important 
United States market less at- 
tractive for them despite the 
fact that cheap oil is once 
again making large cars more 
attractive to the average Am- 
erican driver. 

The report, by DRI Europe, 
says that Japanese car makers 
will suffer most from the foil 
of the doHar against the yen, 
but adds that the 
“supernormal” profits made 
by some importers in the 
United States market will end. 

Tbe new Rover model will 


By Teresa Poole 

An a l a rmin g pictare of third of the companies comp- 
Britain’s skills shortage lained. In Yorkshire and 

emerges in a business sar- Humberside it was 26 per cent, 
vey published today which and in the North-east and East 
concludes that the prospects Anglia it was 23 per cent The 
for employment remain situation was better tn Wales 


dismal. 

The regional survey, con- 


ducted by the Association of respectively- 


and Merseyride where the 
figures were 10 and 8 per amt 


Given the mountain of US be targeted at the growing US 
debt - corporate individual prestige market which is al- 
and government debt now ready Jaguars main sales area, 
represents 18 times national The DRI report says that 

- 4 A Al — manrnir in tKa nrKtino 


. income against 24) times in 
l 1980 — deflation of prices 
. - acutely increases the burden of 
such debt. 

these facts painstakingly 

• ■ overcame the torrent of infla- 
' don warnings during the week 

as the 30-year bond inched its 
—way back towards its issue 
«* price of 98 u6j- 

The present favourable 
prices of US Treasury bonds 
: may not be repeated for a tong 
" ..time to come. 

' Shrewd investors are now 
•: -starting to talk about the 

• nearby T-bond rising back to 
120, at which point the yield 
won Id be 7 per cent. Such 

. though ts have been given add- 
1 ed support by tbe publication 
of the latest market survey of 
bond buyers* sentiment, which 
;! shows only 28 bullish, m a kin g 
[ * price rises a virtual certainty. 


TODAY- Interims: Midsum- 
-■ : mer Inns. Northern American 
Trusu Pericom (amended), 
" , • _ Radio City (Sound of Mersey- 
• Isi3e).' Scottish National TriisL 
.a Finals: Biskrhi Tin. Coloroll 
/ *~Group, * ' Dunhill Holdings. 
- ' 'Globe Investment Trust. A 
.. Goldberg and Sons. Hay & 
. ■■ Robertson, Hunter Saphir, 

“ ^ jLondon & Associated Invest- 
m mem Trust Monks Invest- 
r^v ' ment Trust NEC Coip. 

\Z TOMORROW - Interi^ 

• v ; Associated Fisheries. ME PC, 
*'■> ' Svenska Cellulosa. Finals: 
t<, . . Aircall. Coalite Group. Electra 
Investment TnusL Frank G. 
" • Gates. Gerrard & National 

Kt (expeaed May 29). Harrisons 
Crosfield. Murray Technol- 
c®y Investment Trust. Ports- 
•A . mouth and Sunderland News-. 
V ? japeri Richanisons • West- 
r- ganh. Tosco. TR Property- 

- lnvesaxncm TrusL 


profit margins in the prestige 
sector will shrink, but only 
small cars have lost their 
competitive pricing edge 
The report says: “The re- 
alignment of exchange rates 
has allowed US-based manu- 
facturers to think once again 
of selling in the European 
market — something quite 
; improbable during the years of 
dollar strength.” 


. British Chambers of Com- 
merce, asked companies in- 
volved in manufacturing, 
service, retail and wholesale 
distribution whether they had 
difficulty obtaining skille d 
workers. 

In the mid-Thames Valley 
79 per cent of firms reported 
problems in finding skilled 
manual workers, 57 per cent 
had difficulty in finding office 
staf£ and half had problems 
finding other manual workers. 

In tbe West Midlands, 
where unemployment levels 
are high, half the firms re- 
cruiting recently had difficulty 
finding skilled manual work- 
ers. In London and the South- 
east the proportion was 38 per 
cent, in the Sootb-westand the 
Bristol and West regions a 


The survey comes a week 
after Mr Bryan Nicholson, 
chairman of the Manpower 
Services Commission, said 
tint Britain was bring a skills 
crisis. 

Trading performance was 
also disappointing, with an 
average downturn of 7 per cent 
in domestic orders during the 
first quarter of 1986. Export 
orders were more promising 
with a 7 per cent improvement 
ami only the North-east, Scot- 
land, and Wales reported a 
weakening. 

The association says that 
manufacturing industry 
should by now be showing 
more encouraging results. In 
fine with other recent surveys, 
the level of interest rates 
remains the top complaint 


are doing a great (teal in all 
three of our retail businesses — 
Woolworth. B&Q and 
Comet.” 

CBI fears 
effects of 
US tax Bill 

By Lawrence Lever 

British companies may be 
forced to reduce their invest- 
ments in America because of 
provisions in a tax reform Bill 
now going through tbe US 
Senate, according to the Con- 
federation of British Industry. 

The provisions would effec- 
tively end the practice of es- 
tablishing “link” or dual resid- 
ent companies in order to ob- 
tain relief for interest charges 
and losses under tbe tax sys- 
tems of both countries. 

At present, aBritish compa- 
ny acquiring a US company, 
or vice versa, is able to set up a 
link company and ensure that 
it is that company which 
borrows money for the 
acquisition. 

A spokesman for the CBI 
said the Senate Bfll “would 
put a restraint on the ability of 
British companies to invest in 
the United States”. 

Objections to the Bill focus 
on its alleged discriminatory 
treatment of UK companies, 
because although the Bill pre- 
vents UK companies benefit- 
ting from link companies for 
investment in the US, there is 
□o corresponding provision 
for US companies seeking to 
finance their UK investments 
m this manner. 

The Inland Revenue threat- 
ened to end link company 
arrangements in a series of 
consultative documents on in- 
ternational taxation issued in 
the early 1980s, although the 
resultant provisions of the Fi- 
nance Att 1 984 left the system 
intact. 

•The CBI will today call on 
the Government to launch a 
j massive public relations exer- 
cise to emphasize the pros- 
pects for job creation arising 
from the Channel Tunnel 
project (Teresa Poole writes). 

The CBI is also concerned 
about the effects of the 
tunnel’s construction on the 
environment 

It believes that a major road 
system should be in place 
before construction starts in 
earnest, with a motorway link 
from the M25 to the terminal. 

Roads should also be im- 
proved to the north and 
northwest to the M2 link, and 
proper sign-posting should be 
introduced to protect villages r 


Nevi purchase 

Nevi Baltic is adding more 
than £14 million to its funds 
under management with the 
acquisition of Fraser Hender- 
son for a maximum of 
£300,000 in cash. Mr Alan 
Henderson, founder and 
chairman of Fraser Hender- 
son, will now head a restruc- 
tured investment mangement 
team within Nevi Baltic. 


Holmes a Court and Elliott 
in final showdown for BHP 


THURSDAY — latemnsr 
M&G Group. Owen & Robin- 
son. J Smart (Contractors). 
Wolverhampton & Dudley 
Breweries. Finals! Boots, 
Buckley's Brewery. Chancery 
Securities, Courtaulds, Edbro 
Holdings: Freshbake Foods 
(amended), Philip Hill Invest- 
ment Trust. Lep Group, 
Pavton International, 
Redland. Sandhurst Market- 
ing. Wettem Bros, 
Woodchester Group. 

FRIDAY - Interims: Arbutb- 
not Government Securities 
Trust. Dobson Park Indus- 
tries. Fulcrum Investment 
Trust. Nolion, ' Scottish In- 
vestment . Trust. . Finals: 
Bulmer & Lumb. Chamberlin 
& Hill . William Cook ■ & 
Sons (Sheffield), Hunting 
Group. Pacific - Investment 
Trust, TR Industrial & Gener- 
alTrusL 


adding more ^%Stej Taytor 

a toils funds Sydney 

tent with the The latest bid for control of 
raser Hen tier- Broken Hill Proprietary Com- 
laximum of pany (BHP) closes today with 
sh. Mr Alan no clear indication as to who 
sunder and will win Australia's biggest 
aser Header- company. Amid the confusing 
sad a resmzc- flurry of bids, manoeuvres 
t mangement and insider jargon that have 
ri Baltic. become part of the battle For 
“Tbe Big Australian”, one 
thing is reasonably certain — 
Mr John Elliott or Mr Robert 
— Interims? . Holmes k Court will emerge as 
wen & Robin- the king of corporate 
(Contractors). Australia. 






Today is vital for Mr Robert Holmes & Court 
Holmes d Court; chairman of 

the Bell Group, who on May. advising their clients to accept 
13 announced he had secured the offer - at the last moment 
an additional AusSi.S billion - or sell oh the open market. 
(£697 mflion) credit taking One broker said: “There is 
Bell's available resources for very little justification for 
tbe bid to Aus$4.1 billion. anyone doing nothing. The 
The increase in Mr Holmes fundamentals suggest this is a 
a Court’s May 13 offer, from good price.” 

Aus$7.7Q per share to When Mr Holmes a Court 
Aus$9.20 for half of each first made his intentions 


the offer - at the last moment 
- or sell oh the open markeL 
One broker said: “There is 
very little justification for 
anyone doing nothing. The 
fundamentals suggest this is a 
good price.” 

When Mr Holmes a Court 
first made his intentions 


It is a nice question whether econom- 
ics determines election dates, or 
election dates determine economics. 
The British system allows govern- 
ments to look for a window of 
opportunity. The Iasi two general 
elections took place just before a rise 
in the inflation rate. But this does not 
preclude British governments from 
behaving much like those facing a 
fixed-term nemesis: using economic 
policy to make the best of things at the 
most likely election moment. 

Economic policy is imprecise and 
slow. So there is for these purposes 
precious little difference between the 
British movable election feast and a 
fixed term. Take the present election 
calculus. Mrs Thatcher is, she says, 
minded to play it long. Even if she is 
not. her choice of dates is quite 
restricted. 

It would be odd to call an election 
within one year, barely possible to 
wait a full two. This is the normal 
span of short-term economic forecast- 
ing and policy-making. So we can now 
make an educated guess at the 
economic wares Mrs Thatcher will 
have on display; and it is almost her 
last chance to rearrange them. 

One set of wares is already the 
subject of public dispute between Mrs 
Thatcher's new Cabinet. Education, 
hitherto the easiest programme to 
trim, is in the hands of a man who 
considers that changing gear is easier 
with a little financial oil. Local 
government in contrast is in the 
hands of a man determined to 
demonstrate financial muscle; a tri- 
umph of hope over experience. Local 
authorities still have the capacity to 
inflict electoral revenge through cuts 
or rate increases. 

The departmental budgets over 
which debate is joined cover a year — 
1987-88 — - which straddles Mrs 
Thatcher’s election options. .The bat- 
tle will also affect the two critical 
Budgets. Nigel Lawson will probably 
have the opportunity to present a fifth 
Budget in March 1988. If he does 
manage to introduce 25p income tax, 
it will be a campaign headline, even if 
voting takes place before the taxman 
has delivered the bunce into pay- 
packets. 

But the Budget of fundamental 
electoral importance is next year's — 
March 1987. Research (well, folklore) 
suggests nine months are needed for a 
boost to purchasing power to translate 
into voting kindliness; thus the tra- 
ditional “giveaway Budget” should 
take place a year before an election. 

In the early 1980s, it came to be 
thought that the giveaway Budget had 
lost its electoral punch. Voters were 
inclined to question the bill. Labour’s 
exotically expensive plans were a 
liability in the 1983 election. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, as Chancellor, 
ran the Tories into the 1983 election 
with a politically skilful combination 
of apparent thrift and slight excess. Mr 
Lawson, you may remember, had to 
cut back almost immediately he got a 
look at the books. The intriguing 
question is whether voters, as polls 


suggest, arc losing their appetite for 
lax cuts. Even if not, there is an 
electoral risk of overkill, when wages 
are also rising. 

People in work have done all too 
well. Real earnings have risen roughly 
3 per cent a year since 1981. But the 
most telling statistic is provided by 
the Government's long-forgotten Tax 
and Price Index. This shows the wage 
increase needed to preserve the real 
value of your after-tax income. 

The most recent 12-monthly in- 
crease in the TPI was only 1.2 per 
cent. That, in other words, was all the 
average wage-earner needed to pre- 
serve a constant purchasing power. 
The actual rise in average earnings 
over that year was 7.5 per cent This 
must suggest that tiying to win the 
1988 election purely by boosting 
personal incomes would be to over- 
stuff the goose. Inflation and output 
will weigh heavily in the election 
score. 

For all that opinion polls also 
suggest that voters are bored with 
counter-inflation, it is still strate- 
gically important. Mrs Thatcher can- 
not, this time, take advantage of a dip 
in the figures (perhaps below 2 per 
cent); this will come inconveniently 
early. The true aim is not zero 
inflation, but a low plateau from 
which that Garden of Eden is visible. 
Mrs Thatcher, after all, has been 
running for most of this Parliament 
with an election target of 3 per cent. 

Which leaves, of course, the most 
critical economic arena of all. The 
pattern of output may, thanks to oil, 
actually fit the electoral cycle rather 
better than the inflation figures will. 
We are plainly going to have a very 
flat year, a mid-term recession. In 
1 987 and 1 988, Britain may be pulled 
up again by stronger world growth. 

Growth helps the Chancellor's Bud- 
get calculations. But its vital link is 
with unemployment The Govern- 
ment has now gone through a com- 
plete economic cycle without halting 
the rise in joblessness. In the next 
cycle, this task will be eased by 
changing demography and new 
employment programmes. It is signifi- 
cant that the National Institute for 
Economic and Social Research, whose 
latest forecast does not suggest a rapid 
revival in growth, still implies that 
unemployment will drop by more 
than 200,000 by the likely date ofihe 
next election. If that happens, the 
Government would sigh with relief 
But at the moment, the pessimists still 
have the best of the jobless argument 
— as I was reminded only last week by 
their patriach. Professor Wynne 
Godley of the Cambridge Economic 
Policy Group. Although the CEPG 
was too gloomy about output it alone 
forecast the full drama of rising 
unemployment. It is worth npting its 
present suggestion that average output 
growth of 3 per cent a year is needed to 
bring unemployment down a mere 
quarter of a million by the 1990s. 

Sarah Hogg 

Economics Editor 


Italy gears up for new oil projects 


Italian shipyards serving ihe 
oif industry are looking for- 
ward to an assured future with 
orders for about 40 offshore 
platforms between now and 
1990. 

Signor Franco Reviglio, 
chairman of ENI, the state oil 
company, told an energy semi- 
nar that ENI would also drill 
about 500 development wells 
on land and offshore. This 
would create several thousand 
jobs in Italian industry, espe- 


From John Earle, Rome 
daily in the impoverished 
south. 

In contrast to the tendency 
of oil companies cutting ex- 
penditure on exploration and 
development. Signor Reviglio 
told the seminar at Stresa. in 
northern Italy that ENI would 
maintain its effort in Italian 
territory with a sizeable 
spending 

Taking oil and gas together. 
ENI's domestic output would 
go up from the equivalent of 
240.000 barrels a day to 


390.000 barrels a day. 

Signor Reviglio argued that 
the present “laisser faire” oil 
market could play into the 
hands of the producer 
countries. 

Unless consumer countries 
took corrective action, the 
producers would be able to 
establish a near monopoly and 
deliver a new oil shock. “In 
other words, with crude oil 
under $15 per barrel, depen- 
dence on Opec is just around 
the corner," he said. 


shareholding up to a maxi- known earlier this year there 
muni acceptance of 400 mil- was a tendency to suggest that 


Hon ■ shares. had 
commentators saying he was 
within sight of his objective. 
But few shareholders seem .10 
have responded, because they 
believe - the- price may go 
higher. 

That might all change to- 
day. 'Most stockbrokers are 


he was not really interested in 
taking over BHP. 

. That is no longer in doubL 
He disclosed at a public 
bearing this month that be and 
Mr Efliott. have held three 
secret meetings at which the 
Elders chief offered a price for 
BHP shares which would have 


left him with a Aus$400 
million profit. He declined. 

Elders entered the fray in 
April with a Aus$1.7 billion 
market raid which gave Mr 
Blliou an 18 per cent holding. 
Mr Holmes a Court has a 
similar holding. It has been 
suggested that one can only 
gain control by buying out the 
other. The Bell chairman said 
he bad made an offer which 
would have left bis rival 
Aus$400 million or so richer. 

Behind the two main con- 
tenders. other heavyweights 
have been manoeuvring in a 
way which could sway the 
outcome. One of these is Mr 
John Spalding's Adelaide 
Steamship Group, which has 
been cast in the role of the 
white knight sought by BHFs 
directors to ward off Mr 
Holmes A Court 

Adsteam owns about 60 
million BHP shares — about 5 
per cent of capital — but has 
the.caparity to increase that to 
about 20 per cent It has been ■ 
lurking in the background for { 
more than a week and could 
Still emerge to play a pivotal 
role. 

. Meanwhile a new player has 
emerged out of nowhere. ! 
Equiticorp Tasman, an invest- j 
merit company with its roots j 
in New Zealand, snapped up 3 j 
per cent of- BHP on Friday. I 


Notice to Account Holders 


Gross 
interest 
% p.a. 

Midland Savings Accounts 

Net 

interest 

%p.a. 

Gross 
Equivalent 
to a Basic 
Rate 

Taxpayer 

Pfcp.a 

With effect from 27th May 1986 

5.82 

Deposit Account 

4.35 

6.13 

8.83 

Monthly Income Account 

6.60 

9.30 

8.49 

Griffin Savers 

6.35 

8.94 


Saver Plus 



6.69 

£100+ 

5.00 

7.04 

7.63 

£500+ 

5.70 

8.03 

8.56 

£1000+ 

6.40 

9.01 


(ffelW wia nd Bank 

Midland Bank pic, 27 Poultry, London EC2P 2BX 


p to 
ai tbe 
ctiles. 
andS 
ed 8p 
New- 
quiet 
» of it 


doa 

Coast 
7 per .n 

other 


46+2 nd 
60-10 
18 

3-3 - 
15-4 
68-12 
55 
500 
2 »■.,* 


rating — : 
iterest __ 
fit was “ 
is 781 


ZEST--: I 
te six I- - 
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and .1 

5,908 









FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


Onshore oil production 
starts to boom 
after a quiet revolution 


ANALYSIS 


Beecham seeks sense of direction 


Energy Correspondent 

Mr Alick Buchanan-Smith. 
the Energy Minister, who has 
several times pressed the cere- 
monial button to start produc- 
tion from some of the larger 
North Sea oilfields, has inau- 
gurated a new stage in 
Britain's onshore oil industry. 

Although oil was first pro- 
duced from oil shale deposits 
near Edinburgh more than 100 
years ago and Britain's first 
well was drilled in Derbyshire 
in 1918, the development of 
the North Sea has overshad- 
owed the quiet revolution 
going on behind the hedge- 
rows of Hampshire, Sussex, 
Surrey and the East Midlands. 

Now, according to Helbert 
Wagg. the stockbroker, the 
British onshore oil industry is 
set for a boom period which 
could bring increased reve- 
nues for the Government and 
possibly rescue some of die 
smaller independent oil com- 
panies badly hit by the fall in 
oil prices. 

Although oil is still below 
$15a barrel. Britain's onshore 
oilfields can be massively 
profitable, even at output 
rates measured in hundreds of 
barrels a day as opposed to the 
thousands in the North Sea. 




Alick Buchanan-Smith 

Mr Buchanan-Smith last 
week opened BFs newest 
onshore oilfield at Welton, 
five miles north-east of Lin- 
coln, which will shortly reach 
peak production of 3,000 bar- 
rels a day. On June 4, he will 
officially open the Humbly 
Grove oilfield in Hampshire 
where Carless has developed a 
field which is nearing produc- 
tion of 2.500 barrels a day. 

The need to meet strict 
environmental controls has 
been cited as the most impor- 
tant factor controlling the pace 
of development of the onshore 
industry. Mr Buchanan-Smith 
recently announced new on- 



HARVARD 
SECURITIES 
GROUP PLC 

INTERIM STATEMENT 


Unaudited Group Results for 
half-year to 31st March, 1986 


HaH year » 
31st March 


HaH-ysartO 
31st March 
1385 

£000 


Veo-tD 
30th Sspc 
1385 

£O00 


Turnover 32,376 36.546 59,426 

Profit on Ordinary Activities 

before Taxation 926 768 1,545 

Taxation (estimated) (286 ) (227 ) (66 ) 

Profit after Taxation 640 541 1,479 

Dividend (150 ) — (150 ) 

Retained Profit 490 54 T 1,329 

Dividend (net) 0-50p — 0-50p 

Earnings per share 2-13p 1-80p 4-93p 

The shares will become Ex-Dnndend on 2nd Juno. 1968 
The results irxayporate dealings up to 1 1th Apra, 19B6 

"Our interim figures show a very sat i sfactory improvement over 
last year. During the last six months we have further extended 
our client base and the number of stocks in which we make 
a market Excluding the exceptional trading last year in British 
Telecom our turnover shows an increase of more than 60%. 
We are confident Shat our full year figures will meet with 
our shareholders approval and, therefore, I have pleasure in 
announcing our first interim dividend of 0.5p net per sham." 
Tom Wflmot (Chairman) 20th May, 1986 

For copies of this Interim Statement please ring 01-928 2661 
Member of the British institute of Dealers in Securities (BIDS) 
HARVARD HOUSE ■ 42-44 DOLBEN STREET - LONDON SEI 0UQ 


(286) 

(227) 

(66) 

640 

541 

1,479 

(150) 

— 

(150) 

490 

54! 

1,329 


shore regulations which tight- 
en up the rules. 

The Welton oilfield, which 
the minister first saw 15 
months ago when work started 
and is now screened to fit into 
the flat Lincolnshire land- 
scape. was discovered in 1981 
by BP and its partner in the 
venture, British Gas. 

Initial production was 544 
barrels a day. but now there 
are IS wells on three sites, 
sending a 1. 000-ton trainload 
of oil to the Humberside 
refinery every second day. 

Welion is typical of the type 
of development which the 
Government hopes will keep 
Britain in the upper league of 
oil producers well into the 
next century. 

Lincolnshire County Coun- 
cil gave outline planning per- 
mission in raid- 1 984 and a full 
planning application was sub- 
mitted by BP shortly after- 
wards — but not until the 
company had undertaken a 
detailed environmental im- 
pact assessment Such an as- 
sessment involves discussions 
with all local councils, conser- 
vation groups and archeologi- 
cal societies. 

BP also had to deal with the 
discovery of the remains of a 
plesiosaurus, a 15-foot prehis- 
toric marine carnivore, which 
is now being prepared for 
display by Scunthorpe Natural 
History Museum working on 
behalf of the British Museum. 

Ultimately, the Welton oil 
gathering facilities will also be 
able to handle oil produced 
from the Nettleham field 
which is under development 
three miles away, and which, 
although lacking the reserves 
of Welton — 13 million barrels 
— could produce 250 barrels a 
day from a single well for 20 
years. BP is also planning to 
develop a well at Stainton 
which will produce 250 barrels 
a day and send its production 
to the Welton treatment cen- 
tre by road tanker. 

However, the environmen- 
tal pressure on the onshore oil 
explorers is continuing and 
BP. as the largest and most 
experienced onshore 'oil pro- 
ducer is now experimenting 
with slim-hole drilling on an 
oilfield in the Vale or Belvoir 
which dried up in the early 
1970s. 

The micro-drill system, de- 
veloped in Sweden, has been 
used to driU more than 250 
wells in Europe, Turkey and 


If you have lost your way, one 
well tried method of finding it 
is to go back to where your 
difficulties started and begin 
again. 

That may not be soeasy for 
Beecham. Not that there has 
been anything disastrously 
wrong. "Hie company is not 
even overburdened with 
debL . . - 

But somewhere along the 
line, .virtually unnoticed by 
the City until the abrupt 
departure of Sir Ronald 
Halstead as chairman nine 
months ago, it has started to 
drift. 

It is impossible to say 
exactly where Beecham start- 
ed to lose direction. But 
certainly the emphasis of the 
group's trading profit has 
altered significantly. In 1979 
pharmaceuticals accounted 
for over 60 per cent of profit. 
Now they are only 45 per 
cent. 

The other 55 per cent 
comes from consumer prod- 
ucts, where much of the 
growth has been on the back 
of acquisitions. Since 1979, 
Beecham has spent more 
than £800 million (£537 mil- 
lion) on acquisitions, most of 
them consumer products 
companies. 

In the process the consum- 
er products division has 
moved further and further 
from its original base in 
proprietary medicines and 
toiletries and extended its 
exposure to food and drinks, 
cosmetics, fragrances and 
home improvement 
products. 

Evidence suggests that Bee- 
cham may have paid too 
much for its acquisitions. A 
recent study shows that a 
return of 35 per cent or more 
was required to maintain the 
group's historic margins. 
While it is difficult to quanti- 
fy accurately, returns have 
probably been Iks than half 
thaL Asa result, Beecham has 
been accused of trying to 


HOW BEECHAM’S 
SHARE PRICE 
UNDERPERFORMED 

SoiraOATASTHEAM __ _ ___ 

FTA HEALTH & 
HOUSEHOLD g 
PRODUCTS Wf 


earnings 
PER SHARE 

Year to March 31 

223p2tap^S 


IBEECHAM GROUPff pP 

J 1984 1 985 


spend its way out of trouble, 
increasing its debts, culmi- 
nating in a rights issue in 
1984. 

So how can it retrace its 
steps and begin again? 

The company is not expect- 
ed to unwind completely the 
long string of acquisitions it 
has made since 1979, but it is 
likely that many will be sold. 
Some have been distinctly 
poor performers, especially in 
the United States. Jo van, 
bought for S85 million (£57 
million) in 1979, took Bee- 
cham into the lower end of 
the fragrances market when 
fashion was moving up-mar- 
ket. Germaine Monteti. part 
of the cosmetics business 
acquired in 1985 from British 
American Tobacco, is mak- 
ing losses. And the home 
improvement group DAP, 
acquired in 1983 for $70 
million, has proved a disap- 
pointing performer. 

In the meantime, the per- 
formance of the pharmaceuti- 
cals division has been 
variable and recently disap- 
pointing. Traditionally, it has 
relied heavily on antibiotics. 
About 65 per cent of 
Beecham’s pharmaceutical 
sales are in that category and 
some 50 per cent of turnover 
comes from the mature, peni- 
cillin-based drug amoxycillin 
(Amoxyl), where margins are 
being progressively eroded. 


This is only partly due to 
generic competition. Phar- 
maceuticals have recently 
been vulnerable to govern- 
ment fiat. The Japanese Gov- 
ernment has progressively 
reduced drug prices for four 
years, while in Britain, the 
Department of Health and 
Social Security has -cracked 
down on drug profits. 

• Beecham’s new broad- 
spectrum antibiotic. 
Augment! n, is also penicillin- 
based. But initial hopes that it 
would take over from 
Amoxyl as the latter came 
off-patent have not been 
realized. 

It is succeeding notably 
only in the United States. In 
Europe and Japan it. has 
made veiy little impact. 

The boardroom putsch 
which resulted in the depar- 
ture of Sir Ronald Halstead 
also led to the appointment as 
temporary chairman of Lord 
Keith of Castleacre, and as 
chief executive, Mr John 
Robb, who has a background 
in consumer products but 
who has a clear idea of where 
he wants the company to go. 

That still leaves the compa- 
ny with a gaping deficiency. 
What is needed is a strong 
arm at the helm 

The search, presumably for 
an executive chairman to 
replace Lord Keith, is being 
conducted with urgency. 


82 83 84 85 w.j 

mainly in the United States 
where there is a greater pool , 
of candidates than in Britain. 

Lord Keith has just over a 
year to go as chairman, as 
company rules stipulate that 
he must resign at the annual 
meeting after his seventieth 
birthday in August. 

The long-suffering share- 
holder, who has seen his 
shares underperform other 
pharmaceutical companies, is 
not without hope. When 
Beecham announces its pre- 
liminary results for the year 
on June 12, it is likely to be 
more forthcoming than usual 
about its plans. 

It is expected to comment 
on its new drug develop- 
ments which will it is hoped, 
take it away from over- 
dependence on antibiotics. 
Of particular interest is a new 
cardiovascular drug which 

could be launched early next 
year, initially in West 
Germany. . 

This will not have the 
money-spinning potential of 
drugs which have to be taken 
several times a day for long 
periods, . but the market is 
estimated to be worth over $1 
billion in the United States* 
alone, where a similar drug 
manufactured by Genentec 
has caused a sensation. 

The group is also trying to 
break into the lucrative anti- 
inflammatory market with 


COMPANY NEWS V FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


• WAVERLEY CAMERON: 
Dividend for 1985 cut from 
3.75p to 1.25p. Turnover £3.56 
million (£3.01 million). Trading 
loss £91,125 (profit £840}. Loss 
per share 8.13p (earnings lJSp). 

• NORSK HYDRO: Applica- 
tion is being made for a listing 
on the New York Slock Ex- 
change. The board says that 
1986's result will probably be 
somewhat weaker than 1985. 
since it is unlikely that the foil in 
oil prices can be fully offset by 
improved earnings in other 
sect ors. 

• SHEFFIELD BRICK: The 
company is reported for the 12 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Tunisia. The rigs are only 1 1 company is reported for the 12 
metres -high compared- with- months to P^.3L-1985, 


can be moved quickly, are 
quieter, and drilling costs are 
30-40 per cent lower. 

The disadvantages, are that 
the small hole means conven- 
tional down-hole testing 
equipment cannot be used 


months to May 31, 1986. Turn- 
over £2.42 million (£2.73 mil- 
lion for 1984). Pretax loss 
£13,000 (profit £8.000). 


More company news 
on page 19 



TOURS MUST BE LODGED AT THE BANK OF ENGLAND. NEW BSUES (I). VWTUNG 
STREET. LONDON. EC4M BAA NOT LATER THAN 10.00 A.M. ON THURSD/W. 2STH MW 
196a OR AT ANY OF THE BRANCHES OF THE BANK OF ENGLAND OH AT THE GLASGOW 
AGENCY OF THE BANK OF ENGLAND NOT LATHI THAN 3J0 RM. ON WEDNESDAY 2BTH 
MAT 19Mb 

ISSUE BY TENDER OF £400,000,000 

3 per cent TREASURY 
STOCK, 1991 

MINIMUM TENDER PRICE £86.00 PER CENT 

PAYABLE IN FULL WITH TENDER 

INTEREST PAYABLE HALF-YEARLY ON 13TH MAY AND 13TH NOVEMBER 

Thii Stock in an innrtBnmt failing mithin Pari I! of the First Schetiuir to the Trvttee 
Irwetbtvnu Act 1961. Appkauum hex been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange 
for the Stack to bt admitted to the Official LuL 

THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OP THE BANK OF ENGLAND bm authorised 
to receive Woden he the abort Stock. 

The principal of and interest on the Stock wrfU be a chaw on the National Loom Fluid, 
with recount to lb Cooaofadaud Find of the United Kingdom. 

The Stock win be repaid at par on 13th May 1991. 

The Stock will t» rqpgurtd at the Bank of England or ox the Bank of Mud. Belfast, 
and will be oansferahie. in mnlijplaa of one penny, by instrument in writing in accordance 
with the Stock Transfer Act 1963. Stock regstend u the Bank of England held for the 
account of rnrm h wi of the Central Gdu Office Service will aha be transferable, in 
multiples of one penny, by exempt transfer in sccordaoce with the Stock Transfer Act 
1962 and the rekresnt subordinate tegistanon. Transfers will be free of stamp doty. 

Interest w&l be parable half-yearly on 13th May and 13ih November. Income tax wfll 
be deducted from payments of more than £5 per annum. Interest warrants will ba 
t ran smitt ed by post. The first interest payment will be nude an 13th November 1086 
u the rate of £1-3809 per £100 of the Stock. 

Trader* moat be lodged at Hu Bank at England. New braea 01. Waiting 
Street, London, EC4M9AA not Inter than 10.00 AJflL ON THURSDAY. SflTH 
MAY 1986, or at any of the Branches of the Bank of England nr at the 
Glasg ow Agency of the Bank of England not later than 3.40 P-M- ON 
WEDNESDAY, 28TB MAY 1988. Tenders win not be revocable between 
10JM) ajn. on Thursday. 28th May 1986 and 10.00 men. on Tuesday. 3rd 
Jane 1988. 

Each tender meat ba far caw amount and at one price. The prim, 

below which tenders wffl net be accepted, » £88.00 per eent. Tenders ant 
be made attbe mhunna price or el higher prleee whiefa are am!d|ilee of 2 Ap. 
Te n de r s lodged wUhonf price being jUod will be deemed to have been made 

•t *lid> HlfR llWlf B PlHCTI. 

Tenders must be accompanied by payment hi tall, Le. the price tendered 
t rain I ran n i of £ 88.001 for every £100 of the ™i«i ■»m l nl iff ffiwft tendered 
for. A separate cheque east accompany each tender! cheques most be drawn 
on a bonk in, and be payable In, Uw United Kingdom, the Channel or 

Ihn hde at Mmo. 

Tenders unri be Tor a minimum of £100 Stock and for multiplee of Stock as 
ftaDowm— 


Tender forms and cnfriCT of this p ro sp ect us may b« obtained at the Bank of England. 
New Issnsa. Witbag Street, Loodoe. ECcM BAA, or at any of tba BranehM nf the Bank 
of England, or at the Glasgow Agency of the Bank of England; at the Bank of Ireland. 
Moyne BuiUma, 1st Floor, 20 CaJlender Street, Belfast, BT1 5BN; erst any office of 
The Stock Bacnangl in die United Kin gdo m 

GosemmefU statement 

Att en tio n b drawn In the state m ent bened by Her Majesty's Treasury cm 29th May 
1985 which explained that, in the interest of the orderly conduct of fiscal policy, neither 
Her Mqe^yk Gora m ment nor the Bank of Bogbnd or their rapsethv amwaote or 
agent* undertake to tfiedoee tu changee decided cn but not yet announced. own where 
they may qrarifkaQy effect the terms an which, or the coodMone under which, this 
Suck b bened or add by or on behalf of the Government or the Beak; that no 
le sp o w a ih il ii y can therefore be acceptad far any nmjwsion to make ech disclosure; and 
that such o mtts ioii shell center render any trsraactam Uahle to be set amdc nor give 
rise to any Haim far ■ 

BANK OP ENGLAND 

LONDON 

23rd May 1986 


THIS FORM MAT BE USED 
TENDER FORM 

This form mast ba lodged at tbs Book of England, Now Issues {Q, Wafflng Shm*. 
London. EC4M 9AA not later flan 1IU0 AJL ON TMUR8MK 29TH M4tf 1M, or at 
any of tbs Brancbosol the Bonk of England oral the Ghngow Agency of Bm Bade 
Of England not bur Own 130 RM. OH WEDfESOffi WTH IUGM9B&. 

ISSUE BY TENDER OF £400,000,000 

3 per cent Treasury 
Stock, 1991 

MINIMUM TENDER PRICE E8&00 PER CENT 

TO TOE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OY THE SANK OF ENGLAND 

BWe twnbrfaiacrard e n c c wi th the teme of the p rsqpee iiB deled 23rd May 1986 saMlows— 
Amount of shovmcntloaed Such tendered for, bring a mfaimam of £100 and In 
a iuulti|iie as ftBowm— 


Amount af Stock tendered for Multifile 

£100— £1,000 £ioo 

£1.000— £3.000 £500 

£3.000— £10,000 II ,(H)0 

£10,000— UKUMO £8 000 

£60.000 or grantor £26,000 

Her Maiestyli Treasury reserve the right to reject any lender or mt of any tender and 
may therefore flUat to tenderers ten then the full amount of the Stack. Tenders will ba 
onrimd in deseenifiag order of price snd allotments Brill be made to tenderers whose 
undma are at or above the lowest price et which Her Majasnrb Tremury tfauda limt 
any tender should be accepted (the alternant price i. which wdl be not less than the 

mhdtmms trader price. Ail aDotmenis will be made el the eUunnent price: tendon which 
ait accepted and wnleh are made ai prices above the allotment price will be altered m 
tenda made si lbs allotmsnt pnea may be slteied in. fall or m nan onlr. Anv 
habeocs of Stock not allotted to tenderers will be sfiocted at dm alterant price to (he 
Governor and Compagy of the Bank of England, iasue DepmtmuL 

Letters of sHotmenl in respect of Slock oJktled, taring the only farm In wtudi the Stock 
may ba transfarrad prim to i cgbo a tt a n . sriD be despatched by post at the risk trf the 
tenderer, but the despatch of any letter of allot mem. end the refund of any «— 
amount paid, may at the dhu at iOM of the Bank of England he wtthheU rami the 
tenderer's cheque has been paid. In the event of each withholding, the tenderer wfll be 
notified by tetter by the Bank of England of the acceptance of hb imxfar and of tire 
amount of Stock alkmad to him. subject in each case to payment of bn cheque, but 
■och nudficaann wfll confer no right on the imderer to tnunrfw iIm. SrnfV m nn n^.^4 

No aOatwsqi win be made for a let* amoral than £1C0 Suck. In the event of partial 

■Tint ll l Mil J - -■ - L - n.n— — fhtt awe . m 


Ament of Stock tendered for 
neo-cijwo 

£3.000-210^100 
£ 10 . 000 — £ 00,000 
JBOjOOO or gnaier 


Bam enc losed, being the n mara t 

sssisu^Sb'ads.e 

every £100 of the nominal amount of 
Stock tendered far (shown In Bom 1 

obmtb— 


Tbs price te n dered per £100 Stuck, 
betas a multiple of S&p and ■ratteesthan 
the minimum tender pries of £88.00:— 


1. NOMINAL AMOUNT OF STOCK 



2L AMOUNT OF PAYMENT faj 



3. TENDER PBJCB fW 



I/We reqnut tint any letter of eOotmtm in n*ped of Stack dotted 

cat. st nty/Dor nek lomnfmal the address show bttow. 


tn mefai he mat by 


SIGNATURE 

.May IBM *„„, ***□£, 


PLEASE USE BLOCS CAPITALS 


FORENAMES) Di POLL SURNAME 



DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


1.3335-1 -3365' 

22Z51KL23S0 

23175-23225 

0.7165-0.7172 

13860-13670 

73725-73775 

7.7125-7.7175 

8.4500-6.4550 

23866-23880 

1.8345-13960 

25700-25715 

73750-73800 

17025-17035 

15643-15653 

46.624637 

73133-7.8165 

_ — 150.75-151.75 

144.70-145.00 

1630-1635 


OTHER STERLING RATES 



nabunwtonc. one of a new 
class of non-st (bugs 

with very few side effects. 
Since the Oprea controversy, 
it has been difficult to obtain 
approval for anti- 
inflammatories. but there are 
hopes that its firet major 
launch will be jn West Ger- 
many where it has been 
awaiting approval since Janu- 
ary 19S5. • 

The company will be un- 
able to name a new chairman 
on June 12. Buz it is expected 
to outline a more positive 
strategy and possibly a list of 
disposals in cosmetics and 
home improvements, where 
Mr EH. Bond, formerly the 
group's finance director, has 
been appointed chairman. It 
is likely that he will return 
Beecham’s focus to propri- 
etary medicines, health care 
products, toiletries and possi- 
bly some cosmetics. 

A division whose products 
range from Horiicks and 
Marmite to UHU glue and 
from Brylcreem and Yard ley 
cosmetics to Copydex and 
carpet laying accessories is a 
likely ' candidate for 
rationalization. 

While it may be embarrass- 
ing to have to abandon them 
so soon after acquisition, 
possibly taking some book 
losses, it appears that Bee- 
cham will sell several recent 
purchases. It may even an- 
nounce a disposal or two 
before its results. 

Javan (especially the un- 
profitable US portion). DAP 
and Germaine Monteuii look 
certain to be under consider- 
ation for sale. Other candi- 
dates for disposal . could be 
Unibond and Copydex, both 
in the adhesives market, and 
Roberts Consolidated, a US 
home improvements compa- 
ny. All of these companies 
except Jovan have been 
bought since 1983. 

Carol Ferguson 


BRISTOL 



The attraction is magnetic 

ExjHntfing or retooling your business? 
Forsotnc fntdiii imam 
anna Mike Wes, BrtaDTs Director cf 
Econoaric Dcvdbpnem.Brand House, 

& Georges told, Bristol SSI 5UY. 




Australia 

Canaria 

Sweden 

Norway . 
Dermatic _____ 
Wrist Germany 
Swttzeriand — 
Netherlands — 

Franca ; 

Japan 


Argentina BUStraT 
AustrabadoUar — _ 

Bahrasi tknar 

Brazil cruzado ' 

Cyprus pound- 

Finland marks 

Graacadractima 

Hong Kongdolv 

India rupee 

Iraq Omar 

Kuwait dmar KD 

Malaysia dolor ___ 

Mawco peso 

New Zealand dofar - 


. 13618-13642 
23713-2.0755 
05580-03620 

— 20X42036 
0.7540-0.7640 
7.8090-7.8490 
2103021230 
11.60011.614 

— 18. 75-16.85 


0.4385-O.tUflS 

3386033971 

780620 

26680-23775 


Hong Kong 
Portugal _ 

Spain 

Austria 


Saudi AraOw rtyal 5^0306.4438 

Singapore dofar 330333 

South Afnca rand 3367333860 

U AEtkrtiam 5438034760 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Base Ratal % 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House IIYj 
D taeourt Marint Loans % 
Overnight F8glr 10 Low 8 
Week Sect 9% 

Ttemny Bfflta (Discount' 
Buying Selling 

2 ninth 2 mnS 

3mntfi9’u 3tsntfr 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dollar 

7 days 6"i»6% 
3mnm 7'iB-6'*ia 


3 ontft 9 7 « 
Bffla (Discount TU 
t-Stt 2 traith 9*i» 


1 ninth 8 «m- 8H 2 until 9’9is3»,s 

3mntfi9K-01t Btmtti 9%-ga* 

Trade BUs(Dtsco(nt%) 

1 mnth IQ'S? 2mntn ItPw 


Interim* (%) 

OvesTtSghe open 9K dose 1014 
1 week 1054-10 8 mnth S ,3 w-95£ 

1 until lOK-IO'w 9 mnth 9V-9% 

3 mnth 10-9 15 w 12mth 

Local Authority Deposits f%) 

2 days 10!4 7 days 10 % 

1 mnth 9% 3 moth 914 

6nroh 94 12 mth 9X 

Local Authority Bonds (%) 

1 mnth 11-ion 2 mnth 10V-10K 

3 mnth 10%-IOH 6 mnth 1QVS% 

9 mnth 054-9% 12rmti 9%-9% 

Starting CDs (%) 

1 mnth 1054-ID 3mrth 9'*ia-9'»is 

6 mnth 9 ,l n-9 , >« 12ratti S’*-** 

DofiarCDsfiq 

1 mnth 6.90-6-85 3nMTi 635890 

0 mnth 7.00895 12 mth 7.15*7.10 


7 days 4>V-4% 

3 mnth 4S-V-4'* 
French Franc 
7 days 7K-7X 
SmrUh 7X-75i 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 12&-12X 
3 mnth 
Yen 

7 days 5 'w5*ib 


can 7%8Ki 

1 mnth 78% 

B ninth 7't«8' & w 
caS 5-4 

1 imth 4 *>M'm 
6 mnth 4%-4Vi 
can 7*8* 

1 mnth 7®is-7^is 
6 mnth 7X-7* 
can ■ 254-114 

1 mnth 414-454 
6 mnth 4’i*4 T u 
can 5-4 

1 iwittl 5-444 


3mnth4 ,% isr4 IJ is 8 mnth 454-441 


Go4d3342 00-34230 
Krugenancr (per com] 
S 75-34435 (£230 


Hill Samuel 

Base Rate 


With effect from the close of business on 
27th May, 1986, Hilt Samuel's Base Bate 
for lending wilt be decreased 
from 10.5% to 10% per annum. 
DEMAND DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS 
. Depositors not liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
5.82% per annum gross. 
Depositors liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
4.35% per annum net 
6.13% per annum gross equivalent 
Interest to be paid quarterly and 
rates are subject to variation. 


S 80.7581.75 1 
’ExdudssVAl 


4358530) 


TREASURY BILLS 


Applets: £515.3m 
b 53 sT£ 37 . 636 % 

. Last week; £97555% 
Avgo rata: £94660% 
Next woeic£t 00m 


aftMad: 2100m 
received: 84% 
received: EiQO 
last wk £9.8001 % 
replace El 00m 



Grindlays Bank p.I.c. 
Interest Rates 


Grindlays B ank p.I.c. 

announces 
that its base rate for 
lending will change 
from 10V4%' to 10% 
with effect from 
27th May 1986 

: » ’Grindlays 
! "i Bank p.I.c. 

A moudwr of the JUH Gnwp ot Componlaa 
Head Office: Griodldyj Bank pic. 

Minerva House. Montague Close, London SEI 9DH. 


Hill Samuel & Ca Limited 

100 Wfood Street London EC2P 2Ai. 
Telephone: 01-628 8011. . i 


Bank of Scotland 
Base Rate 

Bank of Scotland 
announces that, 
with effect from 
27th May, 1986 
its Base Ra te will be 
decreased from 
10.50% per annum 
to 10.00% per annum 




B ANK OF SCOTT. aw n 


FE 





















THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


1 : J-’sJS 


Mil 

Hu 

ate 


USM REVIEW 


Qoud over market 
as more firms 


The future of the USM is in 
disarray. The popularity of the 
secondary market over the 
past two or three years has 
depended on small companies 
opting for a USM flotation 
rather than the main market 
because it was cheaper and 
less equity bad to be sold. A 
transfer to the main market 
when appropriate was a cbeap 
and informal process. 

These factors ensured that 
companies- coming to the 
USM were, although small, of 
sufficiently high quality to 
attract substantial investor in- 
terest from institutions and 
private individuals. 

The balance between the 
attractions of the USM and 
the main market began to shift 
at the beginning of 1985 when 
changes in the listing rules 
made transfers from the USM 
to the Big Board much more 
expensive so that any compa- 
ny contemplating only a short 
stay on the USM now prefer- 
red to opt immediately for the 
main market. 

Brokers have been increas- 
ingly less prepared to finance 
USM flotations as a loss lead- 
er. and costs for companies 
have risen to such an extent 
that the differential between 
the two markets has been 
substantially eroded. 

Some brokers have taken 
the view that all their small 
companies should opt for a 
full listing unless special cir- 
cumstances such as the 
amount of equity available 
prevent ft. 

At the lower end of the 
scale, very young and venture 
capita] companies have avoid- 
ed the USM because the 
smaller level of funds they re* 


quire has been available 
through the BES route from 
which USM companies are ex- 
cluded. 

The most recent blow to the 
USM has been the Treasury 
decision to exclude USM 
companies from the tax relief 
available under the Personal 
Equity Plan. The Treasury's 
stated reason is that the USM 
-companies are too high-risk 
for private investors. 

Leaving aside the argument 
that it is a dubious precedent 
for the Government to deter- 
mine the risks a private indi- 
vidual should take inr equity 
investment, the record, of the 
USM suggests that the risks 
attached for the investor are 
not noticeably different .from 
the general risks involved in 
investing in equities. This 
move looks once again like the 
band of the Inland Revenue 
attempting to frustrate wher- 
ever possible the progressive 
intentions of the Chancellor 
by maximum restriction and 
limitation. 

The implications for the 
USM are serious. USM fund 
managers now see the second- 
ary market caught between 
two tax breaks of the BES 
relief available on the Third 
Maikel and.. PEP relief avail- 
able on the main market. The 
effect will be to kill the USM 
new issue market and as the 
quality of companies on the 
market declines so will inter- 
est in this area. 

It could be argued that this 
does not matter overmuch if 
small companies are still able 
to raise finance in some way or 
other through the equity mar- 
ket But this ignores the fact 
that the USM bas been a very 
successful marketing concept 


— giving smaller companies a 
dear focus and definition. 

- USM companies on the 
whole receive more attention 
than smaller companies on the 
main market through special- 
ist USM analysts and the ex- 
istence of press columns such 
as this which have helped to 
stimulate the substantial inter- 
est in smaller companies. It is 
to be hoped that the Stock Ex- 
change's lobbying for a change 
of heart in Whitehall will 
succeed. 

Flop of the week bas been 
Mrs Field, the US cookie 
company. Apart from the ex- 
travagant rating on which the 
shares were offered, this fail- 
ure indicates the problems 
which free US companies in 
trying to raise money in 
London. 

Investors are reluctant to 
subscribe to US stocks be- 
cause they feel they are too far 
away to follow their progress 
satisfactorily. A number of 
high-tech New England stocks 
which came to the USM in 
1985 and are in fact perform- 
ing well are attempting to 
meet this criticism. 

Next week a party of job- 
bers, analysts and institutions 
are flying to New York on a 
visit which has been chris- 
tened 'The London 
connection" where a pro- 
gramme has been arranged to 
visit CVD lac. Pacer Systems, 
Infrared, Colorgeu and 
Optometries. Full marks to 
the companies for this initia- 
tive. but the summer liming 
has unfortunately restricted 
the number of people going. 

Isabel Unsworth 

The author is a member of the 
smaller companies unit at 
Phillips & Drew . 


COMPANY NEWS 


• LYDENBURG PLAT- 
INUM: Half-year to April 30. 
1986. Interim dividend 40 cents 
(27.5 cents). Pretax net income 
R5.96 million (£1.74 million), 
against R4.29 million. Earnings 
per share 41.2 cents (28.9 cents). 

• TOSHIBA: Net profit for the 
year ended March 31, 1986. 
54.06 billion yen (£214 million), 
against 65.53 billion yen. Divi- 
dend 8 yen (same). 

• GREAT WESTERN RE- 
SOURCES: Half-year to March 
31. J986. Pretax income SI -66 
million (£ 1.11 million), against 
SI .54 million. Earnings per 
share 3.3 cents (6.S cents) based 
on 20 million shares in issue 
(25.33 million shares Iasi time}. 

• OPTOMETR1CS (USA): 
For the year ended March 31. 
the directors wDI write down 
about $500,000 (£334.000) of 
the inventories of the US 
subsidiary. PTR Optics 
Corporation. They feel that in 
addition to the considerable tax 
benefits, estimated at about 
S KJO.OOQ. it is in shareholders' 
long-term interest to strengthen 
the balance sheet and improve 
cash-flow. 

• TAL: IBL Computer, the Wes; 
German subsidiary, has entered 
into an option agreement to 
purchase the lease portfolio of 
Intenalionale Computer and 

, Consulting from the German 
receiver, lor DM 1.35 million 
I (£400.000) cash. ICC. which is 
one of the largest computer 
leasing companies m Germany, 
has 215 computer lease agree- 
ments outstanding, with 65 end- 
users. 

• WM MORRISON SUPER- 
MARKETS: The annual meet- 
ing was told that sales for the 
first quarter of the current year 
were showing an increase of 
above IS per cent which, allow- 
ing for inflation, continues to 
reflect reasonable volume gains. 
The board is confident that the , 
company can maintain this 

! strong trading position through- 
out the rest of the year and 
| produce a growth in trading 
! profits in line with the compar- 
! atrve increase in sales. 

• PREMIER GROUP HOLD- 
INGS: Year to March 31. 1986. 
Total payment 86 cents (86 
cents). Turnover R2.444.6 mil- 
lion (£715 million), against 
R2.309.2 million. Pretax profit 
RS 8.8 million (R84.2 million). 
Earnings per share 162-2 cents , 
( 146-2 cents). 

• CAMBRIAN A GENERAL 
SECURITIES: Half-year to 
March 31, 1986. Interim divi- 
dend 0-25p (same), payable July 
5. Gross revenue £4.33 million 
(£4.4 million). Pretax profit 
£116,067 (£161.198). .... 


London to sample first 
taste of Japanese grill 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

The first of what U claimed 
to be Britain's first chain of 
Japanese theme restaurants, 
i based on Tcppanyaki. or steel 
1 grill cooking, is due to open 
this summer in London. It is 
an offshoot of an 80-outlet 
chain in north America and 
Japan. 

Mr Rocky AokL a 48-year- 
old Japanese former Olympic 
wrestler who moved to the 
United Slates in 1960 but still 
bolds a Japanese passport, 
says he is a dollar multi- 
millionaire since building his 
chain of Benihana family res- 
taurants. 

He plans to establish at least 
three London outlets. The first 
will open in August at Swiss 
Cottage and will accommo- 
date ) 12 customers distribut- 
ed among 14 chef stations at 
which Japanese chefs will 
prepare and cook food in a 
culmary’ entertainment de- 
scribed as "theatre at the 
table". Some more traditional 
entertainment, possibly a pi- 
ano bar, may be added. 

Mr Aoki is exploring site 
.possibilities outside London 
and also wants to open outlets 
in West Germany and France. 
His London outlets are ex- 
pected to expand to between 
three and five within five 
years, he said 

"The concept is not a sushi 



alPT'. 

Rocky Aokn Japanese wrestler turned restaurateur 
bar nor a traditional Japanese safisfv the customer's eye. 


restaurant. In price terms it 
falls between the two. It is for 
people who enjoy a fun even- 
ing." he said Prices for lunch 
will be from £5 to £12 for ad- 
ults. with lower prices for 
children. Dinner will cost 
between £1 1 and £21 per head 
for adults. 

Menus are based on those 
adapted for American tastes 
with ingredients like steak, 
chicken, prawn, scallops and 
lobster tails. Mr Aoki will 
feature more meat dishes in 
Britain because he believes 
Britons are less keen on fish. 

Mr Aoki said: “These are 
not last food restaurants. We 
tried that once in America and 
it did not work. On average 
people spend about an hour 
and a half over their meal. We 


nose and ear. with the target 
audience among the English 
middle class and above. Decor 
will be contemporary style 
rather than purely traditional 
Japanese." 


APPOINTMENTS 


Alsop Stevens: Mr WilHam 
Holt has joined the 
partnership. 

I DC Group: Mr L P 
Whitting will take over as 
chief executive on June 16. 
Mr Jim Brown is made deputy 
chief executive. Mr Richard 
Chamberlayne, Dr Roger 
Downturn and Mr Michael 
Stanton are appointed direc- 
tors. Mr Trevor West will join 
the board from June ir 
British Scrap Federation: 
Mr P A Neenan has been 
elected president with Mr C L 
Bedford as president-elect. ~ 
Rolls-Royce Motors: Mr 
Malcolm Han has been ap- 
pointed director for the sales 
operations in Britain. . 

Allstate Reinsurance: Mr 
Claude Nyssen has joined the 
board. Mr Peter Donovan, Mr 
Bruno Meyenbofer and Mr 
Kart Angst are now assistant 
general managers. 

More appointments 
on page 21 



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Clydesdale Bank PLC 


BASE 

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FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


Base Rate 

BCC ann ounces 
that from 27th May, 1986 
its base rate is changed 
from 10 */ 2 % to 10% 


Bank of Credit and Commerce International 
SOC1ETE ANONYME LICENSED DEPOSIT TAKER 
UNI II . VIII Ml Ml SI Kill IffMMft I < * X «AM 


Clydesdale Bank PLC 
announces that with 
effect from 27th May 
1986 its Base Rate for 
lending is being 
reduced 

from 10Vz% to 10% 
per annum. 


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+S*» 

, _ 

802 

61 

+3 

40 

69 255 

115 

-5 

£< 

385 


-a 


203 

+8 

43 

£1217 

173 

+? 

Sfl 

1.7 7 4 

f 71 

*2 

24 

20220 

88 

+3 

58 

7.7 129 

126 

• - 16 1 ? 

7.7b 81 125 

P35 


43 

10 297 

IBS 

•-? 

£1 

1.1 177 

13b 

-a 

29 

21 183 

106 

*3 

14 

15 .. 

466 

+13 

57b 

15 375 

73 

+7 

£9n 40 12.7 

50 

-B 

4,1B 82 77 

135 

-3 

47 

1(250 

45 


15 

18 362 
35 192 

1SS 

+4 

8b 

380 

-10 

74 

15 182 




15 187 

246 

+18 

188 

7.7 63 

t& 


54 

83 103 

4W 


240 

40 

95 

*2 

49 

55 40 

TOO 


64 

64 11.9 

01 


T.B 

22 11 

85 


21 

25 95 


+a 

35 

14 120 

i6-< 

-■i 

04 

24 135 

78 


67 

73 IQS 

*fi 

+2 

20 

6 A 19 

158 


20 

10 180 

e 



M3 

?i 

-1 

15 

62169 

113 

• 

25 

25 155 


+» 


15 71.7 

140 


70 

65 MS 

183 

+8 

35 

10 205 

93 

-4 

14 

17 119 

2004.. 

-2 

25b 

10 21.7 

48 

-3 



61 

+1 

20 

49 216 

39 








20 



V 


Plessey achieves 

£170 million 

pre -tax profits 

• Operating profit increased by 13.4% 

• Cash balances up by £80 million 

• 225 System X exchanges completed 


1985-86 Prdiminaiy results 

An extract from The Plessey Company's unaudited consolidated results 


Turnover 

Operating profit 

Profit before taxation 

Profit before extraordinary items 

Earnings per share 


52 weeks ended 
28 March 1986 
£000 

1,461,055 

162,467 

170,174 

99,491 

13.49p 


52 weeks ended 
29 March 1985 
£000 

1,415,741 

143,265 

163,655 

93,544 

12.70p 







Ftjifl 

ShWiiwI 













20 


finance and industry 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 



— Qold — 

rrom \qut portfolio cam check your 
ugh! share price movements. Add them 
up to give you >our overall' loiaE. Check 
tins against the daily dividend figure 

E ublished on (his page. If it matches you 
avc won outnghi or a share of die loial 
daily prize monev staled- If vou are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


No. Company 


Group 


Grin or 
less 


C»nng» 



Barium 

Indusirub A-D 


Aricn 

Breiriculs 


KuiK-Saiu- 

Foods 


Dubilicr 

Ekcrneals 


Brad lord 

Propcnr 


Counin 5 New 

Ptctpcnv 


Ltm-rofi Kilgour 

Draperv.Siofcs 


Nunlio 8 tVaivck 

Frwds 


AE 

Motors. Anvraft 


CYowihcr 

Tektiles 


Int Signal A 0.1111 ml 

Eledneals 


U'Kon H.'onnoHvi 

BuiWmfi-Rwd4 


iogicj 

EkrTrieab 


Heiii-al Kar 

BiitUmg-Roads 


Om SR 

Draperv.SujTT^ 



Induslruts E-K 


nraniThall 

'>1 


OldM-.+iirW 

Properly 


Ratal EJeil 

Ehnneals 


Ferranti 

Efccineals 


Lamg til 

Bui Ming. Roads 


Tate 5 L;-k 

FL«.Kh ‘ 


BET DM 

Industrials A-D 


OR 

Industrials E-K 


Fn%\'it-Minyep 

Chemicals. Pla* 


Ft.mj Motor 

MoiorvArrxraf) 


CH Ind 

Indunnals A-D 


Triton tun roe 

Oil 


lAi'Wrhmptn 5 D 

Breweries 



Build mg. Roads 


Meal Trade Supp 

Foods 


Cromlt ( Derek 1 

BuiMing. Roads 


BurysHi 

Ind usi rials .A-D 


.Aik l rtk Bros 

Tcuiles 


Casket *S1 

Drapery -Stores 


Rainers iJewxllers) 

Drapery .Si ores 


Cirihurv -Se bwepprt 

Foods 


Y'.'urie < H 1 

Industrials S-Z 


Prop H Uigs 

Property 


Did Biscuits 

Foods 


Haj 1 Norman 1 

Industrials E-K 


Bridgend Gp 

Industrials A-D 


Mel nemo 

Property 



r 

— - 

Weekly Di> 

idend 

— 

"1 

I Pkosc make a note of your daily totals 1 
1 tor the weekly dividend of £14.000 in 1 
| Saturday's newspaper. | 


n.'t 

MO 

IMl 

FW 

5*T 

Wfr+lr 

Tow 

L 








BRITISH FUNDS 


&TOC+ out- 
mnOng 

£ jtoc* 


nice Cnqe Ini Cron 
fjsl on 0"V Red 
Friday mtA ykf% yta% 


SHORTS (Under Five Years) 


&98m Treas 

B.% 19*4-06 

9S-. 


B5 

gate Each 

2.% I90S 

OS'. 


25 

IDUkn Eicn 

1*". 1986 

101'. 


136 

I3 r 9m Eren 

W i*. 1W7 

m?'. 



lOQSm Treas CIO ft <OT 

V- 


>0? 

873m Excn 

2 .% 1907 


26 

Wm 6rch 




104 

555m Fimrt 


90' 

*•'§ 

6S 


icr. 1357 



99 

916* Treas 
2026m Trees 

3% 1987 

96'.- 

+1 

£1 

12% 1387 
r.% 1985-38 

KU'a 

W. 

+ *. 

114 

70 



KB 


H 

H66m Trans CVS*. 19* 

107V 


1217* Trans 

3% 1078-08 

93': 

+ 1 

30 

2075m Tien 

3 % I98H 

101'. 

+ 'l 

94 


tf.% 1989 

106’. 


too 

1*60* Treas 

10'.% 1989 


10 1 


10% 1989 

103 


97 

1l9*m Ejrcn 

10 .% 1989 

108>. 

+t% 

94 

*30* E>cn 

2.-- 1390 

BS 

+2 

as 


11% 1989 



10* 

SftSm Treas 

5*- '966-89 

Kfa 

+ ■ 

5ft 


11% 1930 

Ilk.. 

+ 'ft 

1U4 

1 12*m Tram C9'.% i«9 

UK'. 

♦ ’ft 

90 


3% '968 

91 . 

+r. 

3ft 

1072m Treas 
1398m Exert 

13% 1990 

Il2 - a 

■♦.’ft 

IIS 

I2'.% '900 

111% 


113 


3% 1390 

89 v 

+ i ■. 

3* 

59te Trees 

5 ■*- 1987-90 

99-'. •+ '■ 

lift 

iS09m Treas 

10% 1990 

I0*'- 

+■> 

94 



FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

2383m Tress ll’r*. 1991 
3-6m Pgnd 5***« 1987 91 
IMS* Even 11*. 1991 
995m Tims 1Z'.% 1992 
l'6*m Tim* 10% 1995 
UEOm Tijas ClO'.% 1992 
1 562m E«h 12 <»• 1992 
2141m Erah I3'.*> 1392 
1772m Trite 10% 1993 
1309m Imn 12 ". 1183 
SO* Fund 6~, »M3 
ISnkn Tneas Ift 1993 
795m Tiiu 14'.% 1914 
1375m Etch 13'.’. 1994 
1850m Eiyi 13 .*■ *99* 

1570m Tre« IT. 1994 
KMm Trees 1?. 1995 
1HM Gil 3% 1990-95 
5308m Cut- ro .% 199S 
1230m Trots 12'.% 1995 
1 T7te Traaa 14% 1996 
7S8m Tree* 9% 199Z-96 IGl’i 
1079m Tins 15 .% 19S9 1J9‘ 

1017m E<cn 13 v. ’996 
34m Ro'-Df 3". 1996 
- — Com 10*. 1996 
1919m Tims 13 % 1997 
579om East ID .*• 1997 
1138m Treas S'% 1997 
1393m EU31 15% 1997 
ttOm Trws, 6- % 1995-98 
251001 Em 9 <% IM 
1596m Tim* I5‘ % IP98 
3012m Etcn '2% 1998 
1009m Trws 9 .*• 1999 
3553m Each 12 % 1999 
i386m Treas 10 .% I9i9 
1522m Com. 10'.% i?99 
ZC9Sm Trees 1J% 7000 

OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

P55m Tnsss iff". 2001 IDS'. 

Wm C an 9 2W' IDS'* 

IGOioi Gem 9% 200*1 100 « 

1575m Tims 14*. 19964)1 134 
T7«n Cam 10% 3WH 10B% 
IB75HI E*c" 12% WWB 121 
Ski* Tims 9-% 205? 106 "■ 

1038m Tress IP. 5003 lOB't 
7443m Tress 13 ■% 2000-03 135*. 
5275m Tims 11'.% 5001-04 119*. 
981m Tims 10% 2004 IOS 
256m Fima 3 .% 1999-0* 57 ■ 
9Si» Corev 9'.% 2004 10C. 

701m Con* 0'.% 3KH W. 
1194* Eton 10.% 2005 1I3‘. 

2854m Tims 12 % 2003-05 129'. 
«£. Trees P.2CC2-OS 91. 

Con* 91% 5036 107'. 

3805m Tims 11'% 2003417 122*. 
1734m Tims 13'.% B»*-08 IH'< 
7«m 1W 8% 5!W9 92'- 

633m liens 6 .% 2008-12 60% 
5»4m Tims T.% 2012-15 B9'. 

13:3m E«cti U% 2013-17 131% I 



UNDATED 

164m CotsOIS 4-. 
7-301 War Lr 3 .% 

Co"* 3'.% 
19m Trrus 3% 
79m Cwwa 2 % 
136m Irens Z'.% 

INDEX- LINKED 


ia?te 

535m 

1550m 

BD7m 

543m 

1105* 

T8m 

1115m 

«Jm 

i252ra 

IOCbi 


Trow fl. 5% 1988 
Tims S- 2% 1990 
T.eii B. 2% 1996 
TfCBS W.*t 2001 
Tims U-.v 2TO3 
Trews IL 2% 5006 
Trans IL2'.% 2003 
Trem 152-1% 2011 
Tims BJ-.N 2013 
Trees IL2 .%> 2018 
7 yens iLT .% 2020 


404 Dm »«f*d mm 
n55m Anauw iHdwy) 
SSI 9m *is New / 
i 754 6m Banweroa 
1 :80m Bar* Of I'Uand 
4966m Sam. Leum Israel 
12 im Bank Lew" U*< 
-•’5 te B**r Of Swoons 
5431 8m Barrows 
89-3 m Brav* EWey 
630m Caw Men 
Ziam Ceuta 


40 : 
K> 
34-, 
28'e 
20" 


W7» 

107. 
122 
ior B 
lor . 
110 '. 
itev 
111-. 
93 m 
IQI 1 
MW'. 


241 

82 

263 

E»1-m 

430 

£7 

240 

384 

499 

600 

666 

51': 


V 

;s5 

84 

.SI 

II t 
9.4 
10 5 
66 

109 
11.1 
106 
104 

84 

’SI 

94 

107 

89 

110 
104 

36 

94 
104 

56 

as 

104 

78 

93 

10 7 
■00 
92 
100 

95 

94 
tag 


9 3 
9 2 

90 
104 

02 

99 

92 

95 

10 1 

94 

92 

60 

91 
9 1 

92 

96 

97 
9 1 
06 
97 
B& 
BO 
87 
91 


BB 

06 

67 

88 

67 

or 


33 

£9 

28 

55 

14 

29 

29 

19 

2.9 


+21 90 3 7 

*4 425 

-»5 ISO 37 

-20 17Q 44 

>60 97 H 2 
+2 200 12 84 
+2 260 53 72 

W2 22 254 
-10 429 7.6 120 

+4 26 50 14.? 

+2 138 44 


b.ElQ5ffl OiKtirp 

E*0') 

•3 

206 

5 1 

11 7* One 

49 


3.6 

73 89 


63 


34 

54 m3 


{38 

•S': 

50 

01 

6 991 im DeuBch? Ban* 

£238 

• '3'j 

<200 

50 


196 

4 

40 

29 119 


33* 

-10 

159 

57 19* 

Z2*?m Goamess Peat 

« 


£9 

33 <47 

254 2m Hprramjs 

223 


San i2 95 

sate Do Iran 

£29 


95 7n 3 3 

3*8 9* H4 Samuel 

38i 

+11 

17,0 

*5100 

1 866 te hk Slung iai 

59 

4-1 



>i te josapn (Uwocaai 

433 

+5 

17.* 

*0 224 

'5 HU hmq ft Eharscn 

»W 

• 

125 


<SaS<>> Kww Benum 

700 

-15 

257 

3 7 102 


sn 

-a 

300 

S3 61 


35 

-2 

23 

66 134 

4? 7 im Ufmrv Inti 

723 

-35 



56 *m Dn 6 . A 

135 

-7 



! 35 7m MtoBfld 

5*4 

-ft 

36* 

6 7 20 2 

8??*m rear Atm 0k 

275 

-a 




760 

+10 


59 50 


£118 


Am 

51 93 

138 te Prowem 

338 

-IB 

155 

4.6 <19 


69 

-2 

1 8 

3 8 203 

*30°* Bosfiscfwa fX Htj 

118 

+i 

65 

54 U I 

1f4I im Ron Bns Ot Can 

CIS . 

* ■„ 



B2i Sra Rov Gm Of sow 

3K 

• +I4 

(43 

44 94 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Capitalization and week’s change 

(Current market price multiplied by the number of shares in issue for die stock quoted; . 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began May 12. Dealings end May 30. ^Contango day June Z Settlement day June * 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



-WUr 

(ffl TtatasN^W"* 1 ™ 1 * 4 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Gaims required for 
+62 points 
Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


CapMwaw" 

£ Company 


An CtineQnJK CW 
last on pH YU 
Fnd*T wwk pence % P/E 


107 7m SOirooera 
lOBm Smen Si Aubyn 
12430m Sum Owl 

016m Own 

12713m Weto l=nrga 

22.4m W Hindi 


Da 

♦V 

192 

26 132 

SO 

-1 

29 

SB *6 

7W 

+5 

*30 

U 94 

733 

£59'. 

>15 

+I J . 

520 

72 730 

26S 

+6 

71 

2 7 <80 


BREWERIES 


2201 9m 
26219m 
11 im 
123 im 
197 Sm 
05 Dm 
289m 

44 4m 

576m 
201 Im 
971m 
54890m 
195m 
103 5m 
382m 
S3 ft* 
346m 
189m 
4794m 
576 7m 
3483.5m 
1691m 
1487 7m 


Almd-Lyone 

Bass 

0a*ie«n 

Bootenon. 

Brown iMstmoHl 
Burner IH PI 
B un onwood Snm 
Ckrk rMannowj 
DevenUi U *) 

Gwml WlMMv 
Gmane King 
Grnm 

Hordyt 8 Hansom 

Hquand Dot 
mmrwrton D»a 
wi D*m 


bBT 11 ". 

DO B' 

143 te vvtmmMd m* 
isaan ' 

8^27400 1 


i W u niwnptn a D *90 
I Young -A 290 


32i 

• + 1 

136 

*2 1*4 

800 

+52 

21.7 

£7 170 

*ft 

+1 

1.1 

20 23.8 

138 

+3 

40 

34 172 

*75 


2000 *2 170 

16* 

+2 

70 

43 113 



14 3 

20 130 

fsi 


<0.7 

£1 208 

trm 


78.S 

23 233 

ira 

-1 

7Xb ** 120 

233 

+2 

72 

31 TO0 

tvl 


103 

30 113 

rl 


2*T 

40 12-8 

8* 

+4 

20 

35 170 

167 


68 

4.1 107 

235 

-28 

as 

2.6 

109 

-1 

29 

27 <88 

m 

-1 

31 

3 7 <37 

rr-1 

-7 



L * 

+10 

<00 

51 11* 

rri 

+4. 

*».< 

1 f . 

**5 

• 

<64 

3 7 172 

233 

+18 

11 < 

38 12 7 

295 

+ 17 

11 < 

30 120 

22B 

-S 

108 

40 293 

+90 

+7 

122 

20 179 

290 

-6 

104 

30 230 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


41 6m ADeraean Omar 
174J5m <*n« 

2-900.000 AmcMfa 
86.3m Amwoas 
S32te BPS MOustnw 
14A» B a nBendge Bnck 
263te Bmrati Dew 
1.150 000 BoewBen) CM 22 
28 3m EMMay 184 

175m Benton] Comma 79 
1 02m Boa Bros 06 

160m Biockleys 935 

876.0m Blue Oc*j 883 

154m BraManBOoud Hffl 283 
20 8m BnomeiM DuOey 134 
14 im Bf DradS«g 82 

4JU0400 Bnwm T Jackson 20 
iaem EkanMiM es 

979m Bnom 122 

3Bte Bunan 8 HaCam 19 1 ; 
2660m Gemem-floadmna 110 


2S2 

■ .. 

114 

40 

90 

271 

• +2 

153 

50 

14 7 

58 

+2 

01 

02 

80 

>56 

-6 

8.1 

19 

143 

*88 

+25 

11.8 

£4 

19.4 

350 


102 

20 

120 

148 

-a 

(09 

74 





4.4 


6-757.000 Conner Orp 
378-0* Ccsnon 
37 7m Country*** 
184m C .4*ai (OtroE) 


• +22 


+3 


10.0 

54 

4.4 

37.1 

30.0 

lO 

51 

O 


15 6m Doug 
18 3m Emn 
1 316.000 Fail 
“ B59.00Q Do A 
5417000 Fknun Gp 
25 5m GaMom 
2479400 Oooj 8 Danay On) 131 
366m Q meson (MJ) 366 
790m HAT 103 

5420400 HatoP Bar 194 

62.7m HevKMn-£mart 71 
570m H amwod WAama 212 
63Jm H^gt 8 HH 
1182m * ' 


1239m Lamg Ul 
1154m Da ‘A 
IB im 


6.1 185 
64 2*2 
85 192 
<4 124 
4 A 9.7 
54 249 
34 19 4 
52 15.0 
.. ..138 

44 85 78 

+2 44 *0 13.4 

+3 5.7 292 2.1 

-2 41 U .. 

25 34 11 8 

• +28 244 45 94 

84 £4113 

85 54 94 

8 6 66 14.1 

250 24 164 
47 40177 


+6 

+5 

+13 

+1 


+2 

+2 


• -2 


*6 
• -2 


33 10.3 
45 7.8 
90 23.4 
84 144 
£0 364 
22 127 
82 107 
356 
24 34 125 

98 45 139 


25 

25 

54 

63 

24 

79 

84 


S an (4Wy iFJGJ 
0m L OH* IVJ1 
3005m Magnet 8 Sown 
40 im 

685m Mannafc IHann] 
11 2m May 8 HaSMfl 
147 im McAIom (Alkali) 
2tS4m Me«er Ira 
1500.000 MUet (Stanley) 
124m Mona (A) 

1027m Moeton iJonn) 

85 7m MMMM 
22 im N o ra ■ / am Bnck 
27 4m Peiaenmon 
2404 000 nrnm Timbar 
34*8500 Pochma 
010 7m RMC 
Bffli)* Rwftma 
120m Bobene AUam 
43 7m Ru»n>« 

238im Hugoy Cement 
>448n 5GB 
21.6m Snare* 8 Ftsher 
750* 000 Smart U) 

14485m Tarmac 
4476m Taylor Woodrow 
22 In T«uy Group 
6G5m Tna*q 8 Arnold 
5775.000 Trem 
0406000 Tumn 
17 6m wfarodam 
339m van 

2164.000 wnmMpn ff) 

37 0m watts Bt»ko 
1 310.000 Wenem Bros 
6518 000 Wiggins 
2094m Wilson iComolyl 
51 54m mumper iGaogai 


585 -20 

16.* 

3* 

12.4 

190 +16 

60 

30 

mo 

3+0 +10 

25 On 

74 

11.7 

*47 +5 

10 0 

2? 

12.S 

437 +5 

100 

23 

120 

9 

-a 

S3 

55 


74 U+1 

55 

7.4 

96 

*13 

ion 

2* 

l+H 

170 +* 

67 

39 

176 

273 «+30 

118 

* 1 

165 

178 +3 

71ft 

*0 

132 

120 — * 

5*11 

45 


*18 +1 

179 

*3 

104 

255 +16 

7.7 

3.0 

M.1 

2S 

+1 

1* 

51 


115 +1 

93 

81 

155 

36 

-16 

??9 

M 

109 

87 

i • . 

1SJ 

11 

17.* 

205 -5 

93 

45 

153 

ZlB 

70 

3* 

120 

91 

+2 

40 

*6 

30 

370 

18* 

SO 

82 

6*0 +14 

no 

31 

14 3 

428 +11 

15 5 

3.6 

15.7 

» 

• +5 

100 

40 

299 

30 

+8 

130 

4.1 

107 

197 -2 

91 

54 

185 

3* 

-10 


*3 

12.1 


+3 


30 

18.7 

71 


63 

70 

165 

*fl 

•+10 

<34 

23 

160 

6X 

•+10 

248 

39 

1£7 

15 

• +« 

70 

51 

110 



123 

16 

31 

19 

130 

10.1 

15 

*6 

100 

67 

200 

29 



40 

170 

25 


IflA 

*tf 

1*6 

72 m 

14 

1.9 

93 

It 


6.6 

35 

133 

71 


1.** 

10 

15.6 

65 +3 




*79 +7 

57 

10 

180 

183 U+4 

5* 

ax 

120 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


1 8386m AKZO N pt tau E46% 
2305m AIM ConoW 183 

1868m Arnersnam 373 

B406.000 Ancnor Owtnau 230 

599m BTP 150 

4488 im Bear DM50 f90% 

44 te BUgOa n 118 

64 Om Bront Chems 153 

195m Br Benzol 87 

212m Carawig (W1 125 

222.7m Coakie 259 

239m Coeus Bra* 140 

3lJ0m Do A 133 

3.-404 000 Cuy (Huacal 18% 
1780 m Croda 154 

135m Do DU 128 

334m Bus 8 Enerard 202 

2344* Foseco M«* ep 288 

194m HaKwad (James) 138 


85 5m Hickson 

4*0 

-1 

4.?19 te HOOCrtM DM50 

E83V 

♦2’j 

S 0*6 0m imp Cnem Ind 

901 

+19 

*61 te La prate 

338 

+5 

170m Lrwjri 

1 !3 

♦3 

53 Im Plysu 

221 

+1 

5350X00 Retoook Htags 

70 

-3 

266 Ora Hrnwri _ 

138 



•231* 

7J6I400 

113m 

ISte 


SNIA BPO 

SuWYfe SMakman 
Wahwmolme Raft 
Vorkstne Own 


309 

62 

183 

11b 


*4% 400 
+10 35 

+3 89 

+5 81 

+2 57 

+3>« TOO 
103 
6.0 
-a 

• 31 

+11 95 

• . 65 

• +1 65 

+1 09 

• +2 1O0 

• +1 

86 

• +6 124 


68 . 
14 19.1 
24 <8.1 
27 135 
38 21.7 

7.6 . 
07 1 75 
34 174 

. 96.7 

41 210 
27 135 

4.7 84 

50 84 
44 64 
65 16.0 
.. 133 
44 T77 
4 5 12 2 
46 108 
44 114 

54101 

35144 

42 179 
15224 

51 84 
Z5 1T4 

.. 594 
61 206 
37 105 


CINEMAS AND TV 


31. te Angle TV A 
&Z21 000 Giampsn 
42te HTV HW 
M8m LWT HPOgs 
M2* Scot TV A 
£6 6m TVS N/V 
8209000 TSW 


235 

+2 

120 

55 160 

48 


£9 

ao 60 

210 

*2 

11 4 

5* 90 

355 

+5 

213 

60 142 

345 

*6 

150b 43 100 

233 


It* 

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38 


20 

68 10* 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


290m Akyror 148 +10 

rate Aaumcnnmi -a- 74 +4 

400m Bum umm A 89 • 

706m Bantus P0 +2 

'jJWaOOC Black: Lws 
925m Body Strop 
3 579000 Bromnai 
706m Brenm (N) 

1.631 5* Burton 
7 954 000 Cantors A 
6330000 CJ>0» lS1 
329m Owen 
1334 0m Coes Viyeaa 
1226m ComDoieo Engfasn 
23 4m Courts iFwn) A 
1B*m tWKS tem-ron A 
67 2* oa*nm ftl) 

12554m D™dns Grp 
195 7* Dunnd 
21 5m Efts. S GtMHM* 

0220 000 Ely* iWr**won| 

T2te tean StCTOT 


35 24 21 4 

36 49102 

30 43124 

33 19344 


no 

342 

468 

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194 


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16 15 T93 
43 14 382 

61 15 235 

35 47 92 
136 20 265 
54 20 189 


1156m Earn 

222 

+2 

61 

2 7 |70 

165m Bmrtriw MeoSum 

51 

+2 

£0*5000 Eieeutei Domes 

96 

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29 

30 70 

1 505 000 Sartor. Tiaraoorr 

305 

+*5 

tor te f«w ait d* 


+10 

87 

30 13* 


30 

+2 

10 9m Ford iManmj 






221 

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100 

2* 177 


198 


10 8m Gerier MJl 

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86 80 

3XS2te Beao-am 

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245m Gent 5 R 
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209m OrtBrnro cp 
1B7 te Gfatun 
67 J* GUS 
258*9* Do 'A 
3912* Hems Qu 
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lite Hcacs 
8-3:5000 House Ot Lerose 
8^00400 Jones lErmsi) 
£46*000 Laafeos Pnoe 
94te LCP 
290* Lee COW 
35 T * Liberty 
9 049000 L«Kn* KJgour 
52900* kites 6 Scene* 
1663m Metuws 1J 0IWI 
9350iWO M«»r» Le^uro 
17 Em 1W! Bros 
577m MSS Newsagents 

3*2 am Men 
7.778 000 Oku* |G) 

37 te PVntH 
a+OB400 Pteeoy ia**» 
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I6te Reyoeck 
045*000 HwC 
385m Do A 
3 520000 5 a U Swros 
229m SemjW iHj 
1134* Da A 
10670* Soars 
442teSnMMWW) A 
737* DO 0 
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12130* Staronouso 
262* Sesnncaia 
’.000400 Serwa Cromes 
I7S2* Superdrug StOrtM 
t. ire 000 Tem-Ccresuwo 
37.8* Tme PiMueti 
47te Undanwxros 
04T2OOO WW Crow) 

278 1« w»d WMa 
0734000 

7.5030* W o onw y gi 


14 21410 


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107 

49 

154 



set 

21 

161 

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288 

22 

202 

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268 

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172 

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68 

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710 

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60 

52 

190 

193 

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31 

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270 

198 

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51 

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200 

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211 

238 

303 

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138 

126 

278 

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175 
343 
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36 44 134 

110 30 180 
355 

7.1 14 269' 

25a 4 6 13.9 
35 33 169 

2 4 1 a 23.7 

113 33105 

93 3 1 163 
36« 33 
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ELECTRICALS 


672m 
607 3* 
4&te 
4330500 
1432* 
1.487.000 
ui m 
5840m 
186 9» 
234 0m 
1 4.4005m 
SUsm 


AB Beet 333 

knjnd 557 

Aot<o: Comptiaa 67 
Aden 70 

ABB"* Cdmp 275 

Ante Faiany 55 

Amo Sec 205 

ffCC 31D 

BSfl 113 

EdMMrpa S28 

B* Teuton 240 

Bream Bow* Kent 96 


■4 

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111 3 4 24 9 
10 03 472 
216 £4 69 

30 13 M 

17 6 

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15.7 5 1 179 
24 2.1 70 
100 < 0 16.1 
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Price Cru79 Gross CVv. 

Gtotakuwn 

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% P/E 

39TO HO <Mgn «AF) A 

15 


IX 

127 3*9 

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12W0» GUM ft wvratass 

6*0 

+ 13 

130 

11 21 J 

1086m Camfinrioe Sac 

278 

-2 

106 

38 167 

459m CAP Go 

Tltt 

+3 

£1 

IX 

62An CNOnda 
35.7* Da 7'% cpf 

*9 

+3 


110 

198 

+S 



897m CorocBa 

333 


21 

08 ififi 


315 

+2 

40 

10 357 

42.7m Crnalm 

Z20 

+17 

&£ 

an m 

9068X00 Da* Beet 

72 

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6* 

BX 238 

*5*m Osasah- 

185 


10 

00 

1073000 Oeteura A 

S3 

+1 

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£9 116 

*5 9m Duna* 

3S0 


25 

07 336 

S* Dmorn 8 MK 

40 


£1 

S3 1£7 

57 Im Dubtor 

174 

+8 

A1 

£4 120 






1038 000 Bactromc Madi 

75 

■ft 

IX 


1680* Buctrone Romn 

M 

+2 

4H 

7 8 232 


332 


7.9 

£4 23J 

aste EureWm 

315 

+ 10 

68 

£2 170 


1B0 

• 

3.1 

18200 

561 te Ferremr 

130 

+8 

£3 




-2 



50250m GEC 

1% 

+12 

58 

a0 134 


1*0 

+4 

&2l 

58 11 7 

8040000 Hgnand Sect 
789m (Bl 

10i 

110 

B . 

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36 
1 7 

30 129 
10 130 

A Q2 Am fid rffiii X rrwtml 74fi 

+7 



190m Jones' Stroud 

715 

-6 

107 

SX 102 

90SZOOO koda 

ire 

+ 10 




275 

U-18 

170 

68 too 

i szS&r™ 

388 

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-7 

(4a 

140 

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Si 5m Memac 

3*1) 

-10 

43 

13 263 

7^1 klumri bR 

66 

r+3 

0-7 


ZOte M«ro Focus 

iro 

-00 

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*8 

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58 

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280 






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23 

-3 

1.1 

40 47 

2303m CrxkTO hMtunMs 501 

+2 

20 

04270 


30 

+ 10 



209m Pnuiuo FM Pj% 

Cl 59 

+8 

675 

as 

35107m Pr+pa Lamps N/V 

£15'.- 

+1% 



30*1X00 P4CO 

167 

+2 

75 

40 91 


+2 

70 

55 75 

1.5683m Ptaarmy 

216 

122% 

-2 

+'■ 

71 

30 172 


118 

-2 

31 

20 172 


27 



123 


213 

*0 

40 

20 iae 

37.9* ROM* 

3*9 



20 180 

382m Senrtei (GH) 

595 


314 

50 134 

2*9* Shorrack 

104 

+1 

£7 

28 184 


38 

-pi 

as 

10 74 

797 3m STC 

1*6 

+2 


. 136 

sea* sn™ m 

170 

-2 

65 

30 100 

1335* System Deagnara 
1.9630m TDK 

116 

EIG'a 

+8 

+■» 

06 

05 280 

203** Tatamne Ramis 

2*8 

• +33 

100 

40 <60 

14 0m TrMmeWe 

70 

-2 

25 

36 <X 

9602* Thom Bra 

454 

-3 


55 <62 


215 


61 

20 107 

*80* Tunsua 

305 

-5 

£5 

08 210 

1480m UB 

776 

0+12 

79 

20 100 

1083* Urancti 

235 

+2 

6S 

30 130 

*(.(* Utd Lflksmg 
room Utd Somfic 

785 


S3 

19 9X 

IX 


61 

82 107 
00 260 


435 

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30 

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290 

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114 

30 12.1 

8 9?1 000 WasMrn Setacoon 

90 

-6 

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40 21.1 

3.188X00 Whavuonti Baa 

B0 


21 

20 122 

35.6* Whataw* Ftong 

256 

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00 

38 13X 

FINANCE AND LAND 

*02u AbngvKKih 

238 


10 

00 .. 

78 7* Akkan Hum 

174 


no 

03 73 

3£7a Antotaqxsa 

510 


270 

54 47 

Berttay Tech . 

507* Cantatas 

C20 


17.1 

00 800 

181* CUKKMV 

zsa 

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57 

20 4OX 

1.409X00 Cantrawov 
5094X00 Etotyft Gan 

X 

2* 

-2 

13 

84 108 

*3 4* Hamcro 

330 

-3 

10* 

32 470 


170 


88 

4X 238 

*80m Meredta 

UB 

+3 

80b 40 286 

193* N* Homa Lon 

29 

-4 



21 On Do 8% 

G42 

+1 

800 

10X 

*90* Newmanet 

140 

-1 



FOODS 

1.636.0* ASDA-UH 

144 

+2 

41 

20104 

339*000 Alpma Dunks 

X 

+1 

Z0 

7.9 .. 

707 5* Aray* 
13150m AS Food 

353 

+0 

11 1 

3.1 17.1 

330 


6.7 

20104 

17 5m ASSOC FrSherMB 

100 

+3 

40 

40 208 

191 0m A>ana 

547 

+3 

168 

3.1 167 

9012X00 Buxtat (Staroy Q 

280 

-10 

146 

52 63 

37 8m Barker I Dodson 

iS'i 

4'ft 


.. 2SX 

ia*m Barr (AG) 

793 

-1 

1£1 

4.1 63 

2&to Bassau Foods 

196 

+23 

97 

49 11 3 

15 (M BeOnys 

106 


30 

20 128 

202te Beiarn 

162 

+1 

57 

as 194 

17*5000 BhratMU Cork 

103 

+10 

7,4 

72 293 

123* Br Vendno (BVI) 

116 

+5 

20 

17215 

B82-9w Cfldt»jiv-SdMrflpp<&l72 

+9 

64 

4.9 20.1 

0X75X00 Cura waro 

158 

+13 

86 

54 a7 

4.113000 CMtorts Otoas 

235 

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103 

4.4 120 

21 6m Do 'A' 

208 

-10 

103 

SX 115 


270 

+10 


37 27.0 

1.699.7m DM 

260 

+10 

97 

90 Bn Ftcner IMbart) 

175 

U+5 

32 

1X230 

2022* Fear Laval 

270 

+15 

140 

5.4 204 

3(1 fo) Glass GUrar 

728 

+25 

60 

20 174 

169. ira Haaorrood Foods 

793 

114 

14 2S7 

1068m Hararels 

221 

+1 

44 

20 190 

s 

1 

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270 

®-5S 

60 


378 ( 000 Horn Farm 

«i 

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40 

57 84 

76 *bs icaiana Frozen 

534 

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0.4 

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3960*1 Kr* Strew 

202 

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£8 190 

£020X00 Lass (Jotai 0 

101 

+3 

£1 

£1 147 

803X00 Loral IGF] 
757* Low (Wmt 

8S 

-5 

40 

5.1 61.6 

580 


179 

ai 160 

1220* Manrtna {Bernard) 770 

-S 

167 

£0 173 

3X16X00 Me* Trade Strop 

115 

+7 

lb 

60 170 

2022m Mormon (W) 

410* Htt«B UN) |VMa 

218 

• +20 

IX 

0X224 

226 

-2 

88 

38148 

2£te Mormarta 

82'r 

£8 

42 138 

5813* Mm Foods 

774 

+12 

10.4 

38 147 

(350t> Hartin 8 PmkocA 

182 

• ♦ft 

68 

31 MJ 

i*. 4* Part Foods 

1*0 

+1 

54 

39 142 

588.7m RUM 

200 

+9 

60 

38 142 

837.1m Rouanrao Mac 

*93 

• +« 

17.4 

30 130 

£722** Samsbury U 
3080* Saimaan {S BM 

388 

1*0 

+18 

7.0 

4.1 

20 210 
20164 

5008X00 SomporBK 

211 




38B.4* To* ft Ly» 

565 

40 

32.1 

57 110 

13562* Tosco 

378 

+23 

IA 

£0 265 

6130* Unoa* 
(XOBJte (AfBtsciMs 

278 

♦X 

12 A 

40 185 

2*8 

• +8 

116b 50 134 

151m Wareqn ft PMg 

158 

+1 

83 

50 190 

HOTELS AND CATERERS 


415 

+» 

13S 

33 139 

358m Kaoneoy Brot+MS 

218 

-7 

£1 

10 113 

6996* La derm* 

339 

+23 

t«r 

4 7 160 


5Z0 


1*0 

28 150 

1650m Mount Chartone 

77 

• . 

£0 

26 i£7 

9.662X00 Pram a W Honb 78 

+3 

21 

£7 14 1 

120 to Queans Mom 

GB'r 

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£3 

£4 150 

1027m £e*c> Haieis A' 

371 

-2 

50 

U 140 

150 im Sate 

65 

-3 

18 

£8 160 

1325.6m Trustheusn For* 

157 

-9 

7.8 

50 156 

INDUSTRIALS 



A- 

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to* (kn AAM 
895m AGB ResearUi 
11 Im AIM 
1813* A°V 
36 4m Aaranson 
695m Adwaw 
33.7* Aieamm Wrro 
21 im Alanamenc 
5 088000 A*S* Wfl 
6.MDOO0 AopkKtOro 
120* Arensim 
S *35 OM Armour 


211 

209 

112 

571 

101 

223 

305 

150 

195 

220 

39 

27 

430 


-IS 

-13 

+12 

+5 

-90 


101 

96 
87 

169 

60 

112 

86 

15 

97 
86 
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289 


4 8 167 
40 224 
73 126 
29 263 
59 112 
50 142 
29 186 
10 285 
50 142 
39 121 

10 79 

1 1 129 
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lO’j 

625 

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• 

21 

03 813 

£914 000 Asmav 
6E01 COO Ass Br Eng 8% 

68 

*30 

-3 

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11 4 

27 W 

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07 

1.6 328 

38 Bm Assoc Ho« 

4X6 

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167 

34 236 

565 

-5 

139 

£5 28 8 

66Jm Auram 

71 

-3 

1 4 

£0 11 1 

298 

+ lfi 

68 

23 204 

425* A«n RuBoer 

320 

+20 

SB 


107 

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32 

£3 352 

3 SCO 0C0 A-rsTne Mrai 

72 

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29 

40 75 

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• +7 

11 

62 96 

380 00 B&A 

255 

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29 

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31! 

• +38 

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1022.2* BET Oto 

398 

+7 

218 

55 162 

M* 

171 

34 152 

7287000 BETEC 

82 

• -3 

26 

32 11 1 

22b 

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96 

43 >99 

1.4267m BDC 

318 

+4 

14 1 

44 1£1 

124 


67 

54 102 

52*5 3m BTR 

315 

+ 14 

80 

ZS 220 

345 

•-10 

86 

£0 103 

21*te Babcock 

ire 

+10 

120 

68 117 


6.795 000 Beaay tOfl 
t03te Bare iVJmi 
1123m Baker Pertes 
13 im Bam me 
393* Sarturn 
621m Bane* Bard 


16 

550 

268 

ITS 

156 

312 


+10 

-2 

+10 

1+6 

-14 


27 7 
102 
83 
29 


170 
50 122 
38 113 
47 iaj 
10 1B7 


5309.000 Bette* 


Bam* Ccteeeea 


36 71 121 
257a 84 94 
22 73 

107 4 8 152 
70 54 94 

80 30 M3 
161 40 168 

15 50240 



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-4 

190 

68 

ll 7 


IDS 



71 


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133 

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61 

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S60M Brmot -rai 

419 


86 

21 


20 Dm Bosnhccd 

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+5 

86 

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£XI 

47 

11.7 


295 

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96 

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15/ 

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143 

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127 

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40 

171 

102* Bamrigrtaffi Man 
102* Back Areow 

163 


80 

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15S 

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84 

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£4 

10 


460* Badmood Hocge 

b*'.- 




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758 


06 

33 

99 

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sn 

• +10 

17.1 

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1*0 


19273* 9»l 
$.700,000 BttHpn IWm) 
aoJn Sa«a*r 
5<1 6* BOwawr hro 
3055000 BhkteraM GrO 
1S40* B ro m m a r 
7*22000 Erase *y 
25 7m Brenaein 
6486X00 Bncggn d Go 
967m Braten 
17 te Brngort-Gnndry 


313 
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385 
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1.634 000 0f BflCi Ens ape '35 


301* Br Steam 
30* Be Sypnon 
87.7* Br Vr» 

39221m Broken H* 
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3000000 Bran* tug 
9J0KJW Bntm Teat 
333m BnMa 8 Tiau 
J7 9m Brown Ochnj 
4X00 000 BrunkSM (UuS) 
1034* BUtoagn 
156* Burgau 
13 <■ Buwuwewwn 
148* Canton Eng 
?t Bm Capua inO 
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8-114.000 CeeMqs 
7 897.000 Cemuon 
a 1B1.000 Caroroi 3 6%w 
I.9UOOO Canaewiy tac 
104m cm kro 
294* O u nmeitaw Pti 
304i ooa O u mouft i & I* 8 
£450* Chert* Cans 


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390 

100 

24 

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158 

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210 

77 

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355 

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17S* Cnemnng 
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2.17mm 0*5 n Hum 
200* curtte tOuram 
1200000 Daytcn Son 
4 500 000 CMnlM 
58te Cetacs Qd 
9398600 Cantoned Tad) 
SOM Cancanm 


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93 35 164 

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12 4.0 <1.5 

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7.4 42 137 
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100 34 123 

18 16 220 
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11.7 4.1 137 
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7032000 HsmaM 
4.7630* Human 

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5800* Ml 
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573m nroo-Ma 
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4088000 Pas*: Conwr 76 

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9,726000 Triper 
233.7* Tlanar 6 Newt* 
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1778m GaTOU 
6702* Gen Wrung 
S7Z2m GF3A 
33 Sm GU Kergoora 
6091.000 Gooeno 
2i3u GroanADb Hm 
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364* Hampnn Ann 
1570* Hannony 
2600* Hands 
4420m Jonraiaa 
1380m Hhraes 
1266* Kkrot 
130* Laexa - 
860* Libvron 
360o Lorstne 
6176* MIM 
Bbte Madyetan Meang 
3A65.000 M« Haute 
8794X00 Metals Ezp 
1.600000 Mhangura 
701* MkWMWs 

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340* New WHS 

Nth Breton Hu 

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23 1 m Nontigte 

8078000 rauSlIb 
1687m Pehn waiswro 

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2870* R s ndtona* 
1237m Ramson 
1.9835* R1Z 
7575* RusMarg 
770* St Helena 
8265000 SA Lund 
490.7m SouBnmU 
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8928000 swig* Best 
982* Tara 
10.1* Tremon 
1196* Unset 
760 X* Veal Raafs 


4000.000 wurforuun 
11X* Vogte 

3027.000 Winkw CoW(ry 
102.0s* WWcora 

737* Western Anas 
4982m Western Deep 
4762* w aw em Mring 
6020X00 Wen Rand cons 
210m wm Creek 
1149m Hkftefs 

MM Iran 

14 4m Zamb* Cdpinr 
8208000 Zandpon 


133 

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> 


THE ilM£S TUESDAY MAY 27 19»6 


FINANCE AND UmQUSTR Y/LA W 


21 


Politics hold threat 
to 



Following its nervous start to 
the year, the gilt-edged mar- 
ket was exceptionally buoy- 
ant between the end of 
January and the middle' of 
April 

Yields fell sharply, from 11 
per cent to a low of 8ft per 
cent the total return- to- 
domestic investors on gilts 
during this period, including 
the capital gain, was no less 
than 25 per cent. That com- 
pares with 20 per cent on 
United Slates Treasuries and 
JO per cent in West German 
and Japanese government 
bonds to their domestic 
investors. 

. After such a meteoric rise, 
a significant setback was not 
surprising Gilt-edged yields 
have risen by half a percent- 
age point since mid-ApriL 
while US. Treasury' yields 
have risen even more. The 
key question is whether this 
development is merely a 
long-overdue technical reac- 
tion or the beginning of a 
sustained bearish period. For 
the UK there certainly are 
some bearish domestic fac- 
tors that have become more 
prominent They are. howev- 
er. political rather than eco- 
nomic in nature. 

UK factors 

The economic upswing in 
Britain began five years ago. 
Lower oil prices and falling 
inflation should ensure that it 
continues for another year, 
albeit at a somewhat slower 
pace. Historically in the UK. 
bull bond markets have come 
to an end within two years of 
the start of an economic 
recovery. But the current 
recovery is highly unusuaL 
Not only has fiscal stimula- 
tion been much less than 
usual but the recovery fol- 
lowed the steepest recession 
since the Second World War. 
The combined demand for 
finance from the public and 
corporate sectors remains ex- 
tremely low. 

The failure of unemploy- 
ment to fall, however, is 
increasing the political pres- 
sures on the Government for 
expansionary action. Even 
so. the slippage in fiscal 
policy is unlikely to be suffi- 
cient to change dramatically 
the balance between the do- 
mestic demand and supply of 
funds. Last week's cut in 
banks* base rates, evidently 
prompted by the authorities, 
is clearly consistent with 
money GDP, particularly real 
growth, undershooting its 
target. X 

Broad monetary growth in 
Britain has accelerated in 
recent months and is. now 
over 1 5 per cent, 12 per cent 
in real terms. This need not 
be adverse for financial mar- 


kets in the short term, assum- 
ing that the authorities do not 
take action to correct it by 
pushing up interest rates. The 
broader measures of money 
include many balances which 
in' different circumstances 
would be held in other sav- 
ings media and would not be 
included in the definitions of 
money. The authorities' lack 
of response is. therefore, the 
correct policy at present, and 
is confirmed by -the sluggish - 
growth of Mo and other very 
narrow measures of money. 

Excessive broad monetary 
growth is only a potential, not 
a current, problem. It ts most 
likely to become an actual 
problem only after further 
falls in short-term interest 
rates, when funds held m 
sterling M3 and other mea- 
sures of liquidity are more 
likely to be spent either m the 
UK or abroad. 

Either pattern would raise 
inflation, but the fall in short- 
term rales would be benefi- 
cial for the gilt-edged market 
while it was occurring,. 

Published annual retail 
price inflation, currently 3 
per cent, is now expected to 
dip below 2ft per cent in the 
middle of this year and to rise 
thereafter. Real interest rates, 
both short-term and on long 
pit-edged stocks, neverthe- 
less remain historically, very 
high. Even if inflation re- 
bounds to an underlying 4 per 
cent in 1987. real yields on 
long-dated gilt-edged stocks 
would still be 5 per cent on 
today's nominal yields, 
which is high by international 
standards. This point is per- 
haps the strongest single bull 
point for the gilt-edged 
market. 

There is, however, one 
black spot on the horizon. 
UK earnings growth and, 
therefore, unit wage costs 
continue to be much higher 
than those abroad. As long as 
this persists, Britain will not 
enjoy to the same extent the 
lower inflationary trends 
from the fall in oil prices. 

One potential positive fac- 
tor for the gilt-edged market 
is the possibility of sterling's 
entry into the European 
Monetary System. If the UK 
enters at an exchange rate 
which appears defensible, the 
relatively high nominal bond 
yields in the UK are likely to 
attract substantial overseas 
investors. However. EMS 
membership is still probably 
some way from becoming 
reality due to the .Prime 
Minister's reported strong 
opposition to entry. 

On balance, there are no 
strong domestic economic 
factors to prevent pit-edged 
yields falling back below their 
lows of mid-April. There is, * 


however, one important neg- 
ative factor — the political 
uncertainty ahead of the 
era) election in 1987 or 11 
which will undoubtedly in- 
crease nervousness. esperiaJ- 
Iy“of overseas investors, as it 
approaches. 

Influences 

In the month since the 
Libyan crisis spot oil prices 
have rebounded by S3 to over 
S15 a bane). This underlines 
the feet that current pub- 
lished inflation figures are 
below the underlying trends 
in many countries. Despite 
the kick-up in oil prices, 
lower inflation win boost 
economic activity and 
strengthen cyclical economic 
recoveries in many countries. 

The buoyant first quarter 
real GNP figures for the US 
are unlikely to be due mainly 
to falling oil prices. These, 
together with the lower dol- 
lar, will have their main 
impact towards the end of 
this year, as will buoyant 
monetary growth. Unless the 
dollar moves into freefaJl, 
however, the US authorities 
willnot want a significant rise 
in interest rates there. Two 
special reasons for this are the 
continuing fragility of many 
financial institutions there 
and the clearly stated prefer- 
ence of the US Treasury for 
further concerted interna- 
tional action to get interest 
rates down. 

The continuing financial 
imbalance in the US. reflect- 
ing the balance of trade 
deficit, the budget deficit and 
demands for business fi- 
nance. make it difficult for 
America to initiate another 
round in this process and set 
off a further leg in the 
worldwide bull market in 
bonds. 

This does not mean that a 
further leg cannot occur. US 
bond market movements 
have been closely tracked by 
the pit-edged and other inter- 
national bond markets in the 
first five months this year. • 
Over the last 2ft. however, 
the yield differential between 
long-dated gilt-edged stocks 
and long US Treasury bonds 
has moved sbarpty- 

ln summary, there is plenty 
of room for gjh-edged yields 
to move modestly below the 
low in yields of mid-ApriL 
This is so even iFUS yields do 
not fell. However, this can 
only be for as long as politics 
do hot begin to dominate 
investors-- perceptions of the: 

UK * Robert Thomas 

The author is director of 
economic research, ster- 
ling bonds, at stockbroker 
GreenweU Montague 


APPOINTMENTS 


Building Employers Con- 
federation: Mr Leslie Salla- 
bank has been elected chair- 
man of the National Contract- 
ors’ Group. 

Johnson Wax: Mr Richard 
E Posey has been appointed 
managing director. He suc- 
ceeds Mr Gianni Montezemo- 
k>. 

Cement-Roadsione Hold- 
ings: Mr Gerard Valkier has 
been made a director. 

Export Guarantees Adviso- 
ry Council: Mr Timothy Sal- 
11 tt a director of the Hawker 
Siddeiey Group, has been 
made a member of the coun- 
cil. He succeeds Mr Norman 
Scon. 

Technical Audit Group: Sir 
Kenneth Corfield and Mr Sol- 
ly Gross have been made non- 
executive directors. 



Mr Solly Gross 

Alliance Capital Manage- 
ment International: Mr Jo- 
seph C Williams has been ap- 
pointed a director. 

Derek Bryant Group: Mr 
Richard Seymour joins the 
board and becomes chairman 
from 1 June. He will also be- 
appointed a director and 
chairman of the board of 
Derek Bryant Insurance Brok- 
ers. 

Imperial Chemical Indus- 
tries: Mr Herman Scopes has 
been appointed chairman of 
the paints division. 

Delome Haskins & Sells: 
Mr Nicholas Monte joins as 
a partner. 







Sir Kenneth Corfield 

Thorn EMI: Mr Gerald 
McLay win become a director 
and general manager, lighting 
systems division, in July. 

Matsushita Electric (UK): 
Mr Itsoo Sukemtrae has suc- 
ceeded Mr Shmji Mats do ka 
as managing director. 

Industrial Development 
Authority of Ireland (IDA): 
Mr John Gorman "has been ap- 
pointed a director. 


Midland 


Banking. 

CLIENTS’ PREMIUM 
DEPOSIT ACCOUNT 
INTEREST 
RATE CHANGE. 

With effect from 27th May 1986, 
the interest rate per annum payable 
on this account is as follows. 

£25,000 - £99,999 
9.25% gross 6.92% net. 

£100,000 and over 
9.75% gross 7.29% net. 



Coutts &. Co. announce that their 
Base Rate is reduced from 
10.50% to 10.00% per annum withenect 
from the 23rd May, 1986 
until further notice. 

An facilities i including regufcned consumer credit agreement*! 
unh j nue Imted w Cnuro Baft: Rue will be varied accmdinRlv 

The Deposit Rates on monies subject 

to seven days’ notice of withdrawal 
are as follows:- 

6.25% per annum Gross* 

4 375% per annum Net (the Gross Equivalent 
of which is 6.16% per annum to 

a basic rate tax payer). 

Rates are subject zo variation and 
interest is paid half-yearly in 

June and December. 

.wdnunlv at .uftHel* «•*' hloah^an UK 

440 Svand, London, WC2R 0QS . 



National 
Westminster 
Bank PLC 


NatWest announces that 
with effect from 
Friday, 23rd May, 1986, 
its Base Rate 
is decreased from 
10.50% to 10.00% per annum. 

All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a rate of interest linked to 
NatWest Base Bate will be varied accordingly. 

41 Lothbury London EC2P 2BP 



. . :\y‘ vy- VrL^-' . 


On and after 27th May, 1986 
Standard Chartered Bank’s Base Rate 
for lending is being decreased from 
10.50% to 10.00% 


7 days 1 notice 

5.85% 

4.373% 

21 days’ notice 

6.85% 

5.12%' 


Interest paid half-yearly 


Standard Chartered Bank 

Head Office 38 Bishopsgate, London EC2N 4DE 
TeL 01-280 7500 Telex 885951 


Queen’s Bench Division 


Law Report May 27 1986 — 


Collision inquiry verdict not final 


The European Gateway 
Before Mr Justice Steyn 
{Judgment given May 21] 

The findings of a conn of 
formal investigation inquiring 
into a collision between two 
vessels did not create an issue 
estoppel in a subsequent Ad- 
miralty action between the own- 
ers of the vessels. Nor was it an 
abuse of the process of the court 
or contrary to public poliev to 
attempt to re-Ji ligate such find- 
ings. 

Mr Justice Steyn in the 
Queen's Bench Division accord- 
ingly gave judgment in favour of 
the plaintiffs, the owners of the 
Speedlink Vanguard, on a 
preliminary issue in their Ad- 
miralty action against the defen- 
dants. the owners of the 
European Gateway. 

Mr John WHlmer. QC and Mr 
Simon Gauft for the plaintiffs; 
Mr Anthony Clarke, QC and Mr 
Nigel Tears for the defendants. 

MR JUSTICE STEYN said 
that both vessels were engaged 
in a cross-Channel ferry service. 
On the night of December 19, 
1982. the European Gateway 
collided with the Speedlink 
Vanguard in shallow water in 
the approaches to Harwich, 
causing a breach in the Euro- 
pean Gateway's starboard side. 

Within 10 minutes, the Euro- 
pean Gateway was lying on her 
starboard side with her port side 
clear of the water. Two pas- 
sengers and four crew members 
lost their lives. 

After a preliminary inquiry, 
the Secretary of State for Trans- 
port gave directions under sec- 
tion 466 of the Merchant 
Shipping Act 1894 that a formal 
investigation be held into the 
collision by a wreck commis- 
sioner. 

The commissioner appointed. 
Mr Nicholas Phillips, QC. was 
assisted by four assessors with 
nautical, engineering and other 
relevant experience. The court, 
to whose investigations the 
Shipping Casualties and Ap- 
peals and Re-hearing Rules (SI 
1923 No 752(L9l) applied, had 
ail the powers of a magistrates’ 
court exercising its ordinary 
jurisdiction. 

Apart from the Secretary of 
Stale for Transport, the owners 
of the vessels, their masters and 
cargo interests became parties to 
the proceedings. 

All parties were repr e sented 
by counsel and solicitors 
throughout the hearing, which 
occupied 35 days between 
November 1983 and March 
1984. 

Although counsel for the sec- 
retary of state had the general 
duty of superintending the 
management of the case, acting 
pro bono publico . separate coun- 
sel was instructed to appear on 
behalf of the secretary of state 
since the owners of the 
Speedlink Vanguard wished to 
raise criticisms of the depart- 
ment 

The first purpose of the 
investigation was to answer the 
questions: "Why did the col- 


lision occur?" and “Why did the 
European Gateway capsize so 
rapidly?" 

The second purpose was “to 
consider what lessons for the 
future can be learnt from the 
casualty . . 

The final, and subsidiary 
purpose was “to consider 
whether the loss of the European 
Gateway and the consequent 
loss of life were caused by the 
wrongful act or default of any 
persons ..." ... - 

The owners of the Speedlink 
Vanguard succeeded in satisfy- 
ing the court of formal in- 
vestigation that the 

preponderant blame for the 

collision was that of Captain 
McGibney. the Master of the 
European Gateway. 

The plaintiffs commenced a 
collision action against the 
defendants. Although the writ 
was served before the investiga- 
tion began, the statement of 
claim was not served until the 
court of formal investigation 
had reported its findings. 

In that pleading the plaintiffs 
squarely based their case on the 

court's findings. 

The defendants denied all 
liability and asked for judgment 
in their favour on their counter- 
claim. The denials and aver- 
ments in the defence and 
counterclaim were at variance 
with the court's findings. 

The plaintiffs replied, inter 
alia, that the defendants were 
precluded by the doctrine of 
issue estoppel from re-opening 
the findings of the investigation. 

The plaintiffs subsequently 
commenced a limitation anion 
against the defendants in which 
issue estoppel was again raised. 

The requirements of issue 
estoppel per rent judicaiam. 
with which the present court 
was concerned, w-ere staled by 
Lord Brandon in The Sennar 
{So 2) ({1985] 1 WLR 490). 

The real issue in the present 
case was whether Lord 
Brandon's first requirement that 
the judgment in the earlier 
action had to be of a court of 
competent jurisdiction had been 
established. 

It was conceded that the court 


of formal investigation was 
competent with regard to the 
question whether the certificate 
of a master or certificated officer 
should be suspended or can- 
celled. 

Was the court of formal 
investigation a court of com- 
petent jurisdiction as between 
contending owners in relation to 
findings of fact sought to be 
relied on? 

Ultimately, the question 
whether there- was. or could be, 
an issue estoppel in (he present 
case depended on the function 
of the court of formal investiga- 
tion. as between contending 
shipowners, seen in the light of 
the applicable legislation, pri- 
mary and subordinate. 

What did the Merchant Ship- 
ping Act 1894 and the 1923 
Rules provide in relation to the 
determination of civil liability 
between contending ship- 
owners? 

Section 466 of the 1894 Act 
prescribed the procedure to be 
adopted at an wreck inquiry 
only in the broadest outline. The 
coun could censure or admon- 
ish a master or certificated 
officer, but no sanctions could 
be imposed on a shipowner who 
was personally or vicariously 
liable, other than by an order for 
costs. Section 466 did not 
provide for the trying of ques- 
tions as to civil liability between 
shipowners. 

Prima facte therefore, apart 
from its disciplinary function, 
the functions of a court of 
formal investigation were en- 
tirely investigatory. 

Under the iy23 Rules, while 
the coun was not confined to 
answering those questions 
stated in the notice of investiga- 
tion. it could only answer, and 
was required to answer, such 
questions as the secretary of 
state deemed it fit to ask. 

What could be inferred from 
the general tenor of section 466 
was made explicit by the 1923 
Rules: there was no /is between 
contending shipowners. Prima 
Jhcie that factor militated co- 
gently against the submission 
that the coun of formal in- 
vestigation was acting as a court 


of competent jurisdiction be- 
tween contending shipowners. 

The right of an affected owner 
to appeal to the High Court 
against the findings of a court of 
investigation under section 66 
of the Merchant Shipping Act 
1906. did not alter h» 
Lordship's view that there was 
no Its between the contending 
shipowners, and that the func- 
tion of the court of formal 
invest igaiion did not extend to 
pronouncing on the civil liabil- 
ity of those parties. 

Sections 483(2) and. more 
importantly. 475 of the 1894 Act 
also lent support to the view that 
the findings were not intended 
to be conclusive. 

Furthermore, there were fea- 
tures of the procedure under the 
1923 Rules which were very 
different from the procedure 
adopted in civil proceedings. 

Regarded cumulatively, those 
differences tended to support 
the conclusion that, apart from 
its limited disciplinary function, 
the court offormal investigation 
fulfilled a purely investigaioiy 
function: see rules 6. 12 and 13. 

To hold that the findings of 
fact were conclusive as between 
contending owners would have 
a detrimental effect on the 
effective functioning of in- 
vestigations. fr would lead to a 
shift from safety at sea to the 
determination of civil liability 
as the major purpose of the 
inquiry. 

For those reasons no issue 
estoppel arose. 

His Lordship repeated and 
endorsed the recommendation 
of Mr Justice Devlin in Waddle 
r Wallsend Shipping Co Ltd 
<[19521 2 Lloyd's Rep 105. 131) 
that the repon of wreck in- 
quiries be made available to any 
court which had io determine 
the cause of the loss. 

A statutory provision was 
needed enabling the judge hear- 
ing the collision or limitation 
action to make such evidential 
use of the repon as a whole as he 
thought fit. 

Solicitors: Ingledew Botterell 
Roche & Pybus. Newcastle 
upon Tyne: Norton Rose 

Botterell & Roche. 


Satisfying requirement of notice 


Sage t Townsend 
Before Lord Justice Watkins 
and Mr Justice Mann 
[Judgment given May 16] 

The requiremeni in serlion 
|79(2Hcl of die Road Traffic 
Act 1972 that a defendant be 
served with a notice of the 
intended prosecution within 14 
davs was satisfied where a 
defendant was charged within 
14 days and was been given a 
copy of the notice of tbe charge. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held when 
allowing the prosecutor' s appeal 
by way of case stated from the 
decision of Wallington Justices 
that the prosecutor had failed to 
show that he had complied with 
section 179. 


Mr David Farrington for the 
prosecutor Mr Geoffrey Mott 
for the defendant 
MR JUSTICE MANN said 
that the defendant wished to 
take the point that section 179 
had not been complied with. He 
had to satisfy the justices that 
that was the case. 

ft was plain that at the lime of 
the offence, there was no warn- 
ing that the question of 
prosecuting the defendant 
would be taken into 
consideration. 

The words “at the time the 
offence was committed" in sec- 
tion !79(2Kal could not mean 
literally what they appeared to 
say. There was a degree of 
elasticity. The period must de- 


pend on the circumstances. 

So far as section I79(2vc)was 
concerned had the defendant 
been given a notice of the 
charge, the giving or the -copy 
satisfied the requirement that a 
notice of intended prosecution 
be served within 14 days. 

The difficulty was that no 
evidence was called one way or 
the other. The onus was on the 
defendant and so the appeal 
must be allowed but the matter 
would not be remitted to the 
justices. 

Lord Justice Watkins deliv- 
ered a concurring judgment. 

Solicitors: Solicitor. Metro- 
politan Police; Eatons. 
Sireatham. 



1982 1983 1984 1985 


Capital and Reserves 
Total Loans and Advances 
Total Deposits 

Total Assets (excluding Contra Accounts) 
Net Profit* 


1985 

1227.6 

18.011.9 

25,179-9 

31.406.9 
20.9 


1984 

1,089-2 

16.779-0 

23.493-2 

29.112.6 

18.6 


* After allowing 60 billion Lire for depreciation and 188 billion Lire 
for provisions. 


Banco di Sicilia 

Head Office: Via Mariano Stabile 182, Palermo. 

International Banking Group -Head Office: Via del Corso 271, Roma 
Branches Abroad: Frankfurt a r M, London, Los Angeles (Foreign Branch). 
New York, Paris 

Representative Offices: Brussels. Budapest, Chicago, Munich, Singapore 

Zurich 


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1985 Annual Report 
Banco di Sicilia 

is growing further. 

HIGHLIGHTS FROM BANCO DI SICILIA ANNUAL REPORT 1985 

(in billion Lire) 




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AZ. 







THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


Edited byMatthewMay 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


The Times/DEC Schneider Competition 

Win a flight to New York in Concorde 





Claire Robertson, the winner 
of the second week's 
- competition 


HOWTO ENTER 


After answering each or the six 
questions, and writing your tie- 
breaking sentence, please follow 
these instructions carefully. 

1. Add together the answers to 
the first three questions. 

2. Do the same with the last 
three questions. 

3. Subtract the sum of answers 
4-6 from the sum of answers 1 -3. 

4. This will produce a four digit 
number, which is this week's 
numerical solution. 

5. On Sunday June I. between 7 
am and. 1 1 pm. call 0 1 400 8464. 
which is the Times- DEC 
Schneider hot line. 

6. You will be asked for the 
following information when you 
make your caJL 

The numerical solution, the 
lie-breaking sentence, your 
name and a day-time phone 
number. Please ;have all this 
information to hand to enable 
the entry lo be processed 
accurately. 

The winner will be the entrant 
with the greatest number of 
correct answers to the questions 
and whose tie-breaking slogan is 
considered the most 
appropriate. 


This is the fourth of a six week 
scries of competitions in con- 
. junction with DEC (Digital 
Equipment Company), linked 
to the DEC Schneider ah* race, 
with a first prize of a weekend 
for two in New York, with 
return Concorde flights. - 

The winner of the second 
week's competition was a Lon- 
don dental surgeon, Claire 
Robertson who works in the 
community dental service. 
Mad it not been for a wet 
weekend. Miss Robertson 
would have been water skiing 
with friends, instead, she re* 
searched the answers to the 
competition in her local li- 
brary and sent her winning tie 
breaker in the last batch of . 
entries, shortly before the 
competition hot-fine closed at 
11pm. 

Since using a DEC Mate . 
word processor at college* she 
became aware of the potential 
of computers m dentistry, and 
is keen to see mere nse of them 
in such tasks as the updating 
of patients' records. 

Her winning tie breaker 
took a rhyming look at the use 
of networks, and in the judge’s 
opinion was the most creatire. 

It was: “By the swift digital 
transfer of data, networking 


makes computer power all the 
greater.*’ 

This year two Spitfires have 
entered the event, and will be 
competing against the Har- 
vard display team, so a vintage 
race is promised. 


■ Miss Robertson w31 join the 
other five winners on the Isle 
of Wight, where they 'will 
spend die weekend of the race 
as guests of DEC. At a gala 
dinner on June 21, the winner 
of the first prize will be 
announced. The next day, the 
winners, with their partners, 
will be part of the VIP party 
that wfll watch the race from a 
cruise ship moored off Ryde 
Pier, the finishing line. 



Prince Andrew, President of 
the Royal Aero Club, the body 


responsible for the race orga- 
nization, wfll start the event 
and wfll later present a replica 
of the original Schneider Tro- 
phy tn the winner. 

In addition to tire New York 
prize, there are cham p a g n e 
Concorde trips for the five 
other weekly winners and their 
partners. 


•Answers for the third week: 

1.1928 

2- 1024 

3.4 
4.1852 

5.5 
6.16 

The numerical solution is 1083 
•The winner was Jennifer 
McParland of Leicester 


decision is final and no 
correspondence will be entered 
into. 


THE QUESTIONS 


The competition hot line will 
be operational only during the 
stated hours. Employees of 
News International pic and 
DEC and members of their 
immediate families are not eli- 


f ible to enter the competition, 
n any dispute the editor's 


1. Between the first and last 
race, engine development was 
startling. The 1913 winner had 
a 160hp engine, but by the 
time the Super-marine S.6B 
won the event in 1931. the 
Rolls-Royce R powerplam de- 
veloped many times this 
horsepower. How many hp 
did it deliver? 

2. In what year did three 
American scientists invent the 
transistor? 

3. Jimmy Doolittle, who went 
on to command the US Sth 
AAF in the Second World 
War, won the event for the 
USA. Held at Baltimore, it 
took place in what year? 

4. Gottfried von Leibnitz, 
working in Dresden, discov- 
ered the concept of Binary 





Gottfried von Leibnitz 
dicovered Binary notation 
over 300 years ago 


The Supermarine SJiB: Final winner of the Schneider 
Trophy, but despite technological advance the method of 
putting the pilot ashore remained much the same 

notation as far back as the other winner. How 


TIE BREAKER 


Seventeenth century. In which 
year was he born? 

5. The Supermarine S.6B had 
a higher wing loading than any 


many 

pounds per square foot was it? 
6. When did Professors Kurtz 
and Kemeny form the BASIC 
computer language? 


For this week's tie breaker 
answer this question in no mote 
than 15 words: 

•In your opinion, could the 
present generation of office 
automation products be im- 
proved: if so. by what additions 
or changes? 


SPECIAL SPRING OFFER 


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IBM sets the brands talking 


■IBM has announced two 
network services designed to 
attract customers in the grow- 
ing market for electronic data 
transmission. The Managed 
Network Service, which is ex- 
actly that is already used by 
Matrix — the system that links 
together the cash machines of 
several building societies — and 
by Unidex an insurance com- 
pany and broker service. It is 
based on IBM's proprietary 
communication system, SNA, 


though as the company puts it 
"in fine with its licensing obliga- 
tions IBM also intends to 
provide support for defined 


Open Systems Connection 


(OS1) standards". OSI Is an 
attempt to force a common 
standard of computer commu- 
nication so that different 
brands of computer can 
communicate easily. The other 
IBM network now available is 
information Exchange — a 
store and forward service for 
business transactions. 


Why Borland 


phones, the 
brainchild of an entrepreneur 
-who suspected telephone op- 
erators passed on germs to 
one another by using the same 
-equipment, may be standard In 
hospital rooms within two 
years. Gary Johnson, president 
of Texas based M Ini-Phones 
said that since October, more 
than 400 hospitals had showed 
interest in the. disposable 
phones, “ft has been estimated 
that up to 10 per cent of the 
patients admitted to hospitals 
each year contract bacterial 
infections as a result of their 
hospital stay.” he said. His 
company sells its phones tor 
about £5 each to hospitals, 
which offer them to patients for 
up to £10. 


International 


is a name 


worth 


remembering 


Because Borland International is one of the biggest micro- 
computer software companies in the world. 


And because we're the company that brought Sidekick 
Redex The Analyst', Turbo fiscal'. Turbo Prolog*, Turbo Ughtoing* 
and 8 other software products from the US to the UK. ( You recently 
gave us your prestigious British Micro Awards for Sidekick and Redex 
The Analyst - and we're grateful for that recognition). 


Vfe're currently offering 13 different microcomputer software 
products in the UK Given our growth rate, new product plans, our 
technical excellence, pricing and marketing strategies, you can expect 
us to become one of the best-known names in the UK software industry 
-and a name well worth remembering. 

For more information, please telephone 01-321 1566: 





INTEBNATIONAL 
A name worth remembering 


Ow UK DistributDss indude: Sotlsei 101} 568 88K,P&PMKroDistrSw»n (07061 21 7744, Ater (041) 
2284211 . and find Software (0256) 483344. 


Bgrigntf Mims pahctiiitr induce sdoda State Tbs Jnatat. Sidekick, linefling Ski dock. S«ste* W« Ufitoaft 
Tote Word Ward. Borland Urtpaqs undoes iactade Mo Pascal fate Tuts Turin Snobs te*at Tbrtn Antes 
fa*®. fabo Edim TooHra. fate SaswWwta and TintJO Prutog. to nsani bnenga oi ARitad to^gaaca. (All (sake 
rapes are remgwBd nadenaris of Bnrtead topnHiraeQ . * i w te rt tetarifcMaawa. 


■ Commanders In charge of 
warfare in the future will foHow 


battles on television sets and 
use robot driven tanks and 
remotely piloted airplanes 


COMPUTER > 
BRIEFING , 


according to nuclear physicist 
Frank Bamaby. He Is the author 
book 


of a new book The Automated 
Battlefield which examines th6 


effects computer technology, 
‘ ‘ lies will 


robotics and electronics 
soon have on war. Published by 
Sidgwick & Jackson The Auto- 
mated BatteKekt costs £1255. 


■The West German computer 
firm Siemens and the Dutch 


firm Philips are to receive a £95 
million dollar West German 
government subsidy for re- 
search into four-megabit com- 
puter chips. The companies 
believe their work will give them 
world leadership, in rivalry with 
IBM, Japanese Toshiba and 
other companies. IBM Is 
producing chips with a capacity 
of just over one megabit able to 
store tile equivalent of 100 
typewritten pages. 





The only bit tint makes 
sense is the phone number to 
pall iii case of difficulty 


■ A patient is rushed into an 
emergency room with a shot- 
gun wound to the abdomen. 
Every minute is critical and the 
doctor on duty works rapidly 
until b-e-e-e-p. The video is re- 
started and tills time the view- 
ing doctor, operating with a 
touch screen, saves the 
patient's fife in the simulated 
emergency played out on an 
interactive video disc. It was 
one of seven interactive video 
discs entered for an Inter- 
national medical film festival in 
California. Called A Shotgun 
Wound to tiie Abdomen. It won 
an award in the in the popular 
emergency medicine category. 


Despite a gnnring air of secrecy, teleconferencing has iwteed 
: : M flanfcflKnng tw ffu> tir, j|wiinKng hanks, insnrance and jaamnaOmtiig companies 


The office chat show 
that will run and run 


t- 


By Graham 

A report from Silicon Valley’s 
Institute forthe Future reveals 
a growing secrecy on the part 
of companies -about the use 
they are -making of 
-teleconferencings - - - 

The author of the report, 
Robert Johansen, interprets 
this as an indication that such 
meetings in which partici- 
pants do not travel, but are 
brought into communication 
through audio, video and 
computer technologies, are 
starting to be regarded by 
many organizations as a stra- 
tegic tooL 

This reticence to discuss the 
details - of their applications 
was particularly strong among 
American companies that use 
teleconferencing for sales and 
marketing applications. Retafl- 
ebairts. for example, nre using 
teleconferencing to speed up 
buying derisions when several 
buying centres are involved. 

After the purchasing deci- 
sions have been made, mar- 
keting and merchandising 
plans can be agreed and 
implemented more quickly 
using teleconferencing. 

Again Johansen rites pub- 
licity-shy members of the US 
pharmaceuticals industry who 
use teleconferences with doc- 
tors to promote new drugs. . / 

The idea . is* that during 1 
discussions between doctors 
who have used the new drugs - 
and other doctors who are’ ' 
candidates to rise the drugs, 
the normal process of accep- - 
tance by word-of-mouth 
among doctors is sped up. 

It appears that often the 
doctors endorsing the new 
drugs enjoy the 
teleconferences so much — 
and find the discussions so 
stimulating — that they do not . 
need to be paid for their, 
participation. 

Despite the growing air of- 
secrecy, the report can detail 
some quite dramatic success 
stories from leading US orga- 
nizations in manufacturing, 


insurance, banking and even 
transportation. 

The development of the 757 
commercial aircraft involved 


pany. American Airlines, 
making extensive use of the 


some dramatically successful 
applications • of telecon- 


ferencing. JBy.. being, able, to 
bring together rooms full of 
engineers at 12. separate loca- 
tions in the Seattle area. 
Boeing was able to keep the 
project well on schedule and, 
it claims, from suggestions 
made, save more than a 
million dollars each time. 

With the development of 
the 757 completed, Boeing is 
converting the telecon- 
ferencing rooms for use in the 
marketing of the aircraft. 

Prospective buyers brought 
to Seattle by the sales people 
are introduced to supporting 
engineers and other staff via 
teleconferencing. • 

- -As you might expect being 
high-tech people themselves, 
computer programmers tend 
to- • cope ’ well with 
teleconferencing. Aetna Life • 
and Casualty moved a group 
of programmers out of the 
main office into the suburbs of 


Attractive alternative 
to executive travel 


Hartford; ConnecticuL ' 

: Using teleconferencing,-' the 
programmers continued 1 
working on a daily basis with - 
the “clients” at the head 
office. At another insurants 
company. Liberty Mutual of. 
Boston. - which moved the 
computer programming team 
60 miles from head office, the 
use of teleconferencing has 
been so successful that staff 
refer, not . to teleconferences, 
but to meetings. They even 
hold retirement panies.at the 
two sites, joining them togeth- ■ 
er electronically. . . 

Given that teleconferencing 
has been bailed as an alterna^ 
live to travel, it is surprising to 
find a leading transport com- 


The company holds a quar- 
ter of an hour audio confer- 
ence for all levels of staff from 
.the chairman of the board to 
the maintenance staff at air- 
ports across the US. Staff 
participate from their offices, 
from conference phones, from 
their cars and even from 
planes. 

The organizer of the Amen- 
can Airlines teleconferencing £ 
system. Stan Srizer. explains 
that the teleconferences are 
meetings that could otherwise 
not be held. 

Teleconferencing has even 
been used for press confer- 
ences in the US. 

In the wake of deaths from 
contaminated supplies of its 
pain killing drug. Tylenol. 
Johnson &' Johnson rapidly 
lost market share. 

The company, quickly came 
up with new packaging for the 
dings which made the: bottles 
more difficult to tamper with. 

To announce this, instead of 
relying on a single venue press 
conference. Johnson & John- 
son used a video ^ 
teleconference which was ' 
transmitted around the coun- 
try with the video feed directly 
available to network rebroad- 
cast 4hat evening. Within 
weeks Tylenol regained its 
market leadership. 

As a -result of canyingiout 
thestudy Robert Johansen has 
identified- some common 
themes that recur in 
teleconferencing success sto- 
ries. Successful tele-conferenc- 
ing applications tend to be 
found in organizations which 
are generally innovative,' not 
in the average or slow-moving 
companies. 

. Also there is in almost every 
case an innovative individual 
.or small group who champi- . 
oned die application. Time * 
pressures are often present 
and if nou the .task involves a 
strong need for co-ordination. 




jp pursu 
the trai 

special 


In search of fast facts 


fe'ChuT- 


LillV.V ■’ . 


By Ian White 
With more than 3,000 on-line 
information services around 
the world, the opportunities 
for electronically searching for 
a piece of knowledge have 
never been greater. 

Plug in a modem, dial tip 
the host computer and within 
seconds a store of literally 
millions of facts and figures 
will available to your terminal 
screen. 

That, at least is the theory. 
The reality can be more 
tiresome and certainly more 
expensive than it first seems. 
This is largely because practi- 
cally every on-line database 
requires a very sperific set of 
commands with a rigid hierar- 
chy of keywords and headings. 

To the uninitiated, search-, 
ing a database can be an 
extremely frustrating exercise 
working through many levels 
of instructions to find a ample 
fact. The limitations of today’s 
computers still preclude the 
possibility of typing in collo- 
quial commands such as 'whai 
countries have suffered the 
worst outbreaks of heart dis- 
ease in the last five years*. 

Instead you might have to 
siarrwilh the category Medi- 
cine and work your way 
through a myriad of descrip- 
tions relating to ‘heart* and 
'disease’ to find the connec- 


befbre logging on to the 
database but if done correctly 
it becomes feasible to dial, log- 
on, search the database, and 
download the required data in 
a few seconds using only one 
or two keystrokes. 

.The computer friendliness 
of proprietory databases var- 
ies enormously. Some compa- 
ny databases — such as World 
Reporter are easy to use as 
they utilise a menu system 
that just requires the user to 
select the relevant option. 
Generally, the level of search 
difficulty progresses with the 
degree of speciality and exclu- 
sivity. 

For example, Derwent’s 
massive database listing all 
the patents ever filed can only 
be used effectively by a skilled 
and trained specialist In these 
cases-it can. make sense to use 
professional experts and re- 


searchers who specialise in 
earning out searches. 

“If you're doing a search 
into a specialised area such as 
research or chemistry, . you 
need the appropriate back- 
ground knowledge about the 
database,” says Geraldine 
Turpie of the Association for 
Information Management, a 
membership organisation to 
assist users of on-line services. 

Some cynics may say; that jp 
databases are more difficult to 
search than necessary so that 
logging, on time is longer so 
generating more income: Ger- 
aldine Turpie doesn' agree. 
“The providers of such ser- 
vices are more interested in 
recruiting more people. They 
are trying to make the lan- 


guage as easy as passible by 
moving to more simplified 


lion you're looking for. 
All the tit 


te time you are logging 
up on-line charges which can 
run to several pounds per 
minute according to the 
database being used. Thom 
EMI's 'World Reporter’ 
database listing the contents 
of major newspapers, charges 
around £1 for every minute 
and so it becomes vital to 
carry out searches as quickly 
as possible, download the 
data, and save it on a disk 
where it can be analysed at 
leisure. ' . 

One way to speed the 
process is by pre-program- 
ming the keyboard, possible 
on some personal computers, 
to automatically execute 
lengthy search sequences. This 
way. one keystroke executes a 
string of commands. This 
method does require some 
meticulous forward planning 


menu structures and by mak- 
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THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


23 







to VDU work 


h:. 



The health of those working in the 
computer field was under scrutiny Iasi 
week and raised more questions than' 
answers. - 

Two academics from Manchester — ‘ 
Professor Cary Cooper, from -th&- Man- . 
agement. Science Department of the 
University, of Manchester Institute of 
Science and Technology (UM 1ST) and 
Howard Kahn, from Manchester Poly- 
technic — have examined, the research •; 
that has been conducted to date on the 
subject. 

Last week they disdoted some of their 
findings. The review highlighted 
blatant gaps ■ .in the research 
conducted to dale and- that certain illness 
is. still, commonplace in the computer 
world. 

One stark omission from the work 
conducted to date was detail pT those 
who work in the manufacturing arm of ’ 
die computer business. It is accepted as 
commonplace, how that computer de- 
signs must be near perfect and quality 
control excellent if a product is to have . 
any chance of survival in tbe market 
place. 

As a consequents tbe designer works 
with some degree of isolation from the 
marketplace, but with the naming fear 
that the product coukl be obsolete before 
launch because of a competitive design. 

. The designers and engineers are not 
the only casualties. The marketeers who 
live by commission and know tbe tight 
profit margins which exist on computer 
products are also casualties. Casualties of 
what? They appear to be potential 
sufferers of stress: . . .. 


. ThetwoManchester academics have 
uneanhed the research done on stress 
related diseases among operators and 
users of computers — largely VDU 
operators at various levels, of manage- 
ment. 

Those stresses have indicated to the 
researchers .that stress may be the 
primary cause of illness' which have been 
thought to derive from the physical 
effects of working with the new 
electronics. 


<3 


THE WEEK 


I 


By Bill Johnstone 

Technology correspondent 

There is no direct evidence which 
emerges " from tbe academics' review 
which isolates certain illnesses as psy- 
chosomatic but raises many doubts 
whether some reported illnesses are 
stress derived. 

The academics review highlighted the 
plight of the ambitions secretary. 

She is now less able to move within a 
career structure than was the case before 
-the arrival of the computer terminaL 
Now she is tied to the electronics 
and at the mercy of bosses who 
invariably have no knowledge of the 
computer, but increase her workload 
each day as they attempt to get more 
from the machine. 

The classic stress symptoms begin to 
show — bad timekeeping, apathy and 


possibly drinking and smoking too 
much. If unnoticed, tbe habits can 
become the foundations of serious 
diseases — alcoholism and bean trouble. 

The Manchester review concludes that 
those in the manufacturing-marketing 
arm of the computer business could be 
equally vulnerable! Tbe personalities of 
these young high-flying professionals 
ensures that they are subject to great 
stress. The nature of the computer 
industry aggravates that situation. 

• The researchers believe that these 
jfessionals could be prone to serious 
conditions and that the Industry 
must find a way of relieving their 
tension, principally as the subjects get 
older.’. .-Thai might be achieved by 
ensuring that die high-fliers who have 
reached their late forties or early fifties be 
taken out of the from line of tbe 
computer industry ana given a job which 
generates less pressure. 

Because these professionals are Typo 
A people — energetic, ambitious, pushy 
and invariably smoke and drink too 
much and eat the wrong food — they are 
prime candidates for diseases. 

There is no evidence to support the 
Manchanians hypothesis, but all . the 
indicators culled from previous research 
suggest them to be right Tbe computer 
industry is young as are the people 
working in iL 

If the academics are right then unless 
these young thrusting professionals take 
more care of themselves iTs probable 
that only a few will be around to 
celebrate a mature computer industry. 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 


The best 
idea 
in sales 
is free 

Bv Chris Naylor 
I have discovered a truly great 
marketing idea for software. 
You know how hard it can be 
to break into the software 
market: how much it costs to 
advertise, distribute and pack- 
age. And then, of course, there 
is the piracy problem. 

‘ No sooner do we sell a few 
copies of Our potential world- 
beater than someone starts to 
pirate it and before you know 
it the whole world is using it 
for free. It is enough to make 
you weep just *o think of tbe 
problems. 

But my marketing plan 
steers us clear of all of those 
problems: we simply give the 
stuff away to anyone who 

waiilsTL' 

And you can bet your life 
that we do. not need to 
advertise that we are doing 
that Word soon gels around 
when something’s free. Who is 
going to waste precious min- 
utes illegally copying software 
that is available for nothing. 
As for packaging, you do not 
expea a pretty box for your 
disc when you're not parting 
with the folding stuff do you? 

Why. within a few years we 
could be shifting thousands of 


Stephan Johnson 



point 

well. 


copies of our software. The 
world simply won't know 
what hit iL 

The pedants of course will 
tint out there is no profit, 
maybe we could ask 
people nicely if they would 
like to pay for it Nothing 
pushy, you understand. Just if 
they’ want to, they can. 

Nobody is' gome to surest 
that I'm mad. After all. if a 
customer really tries to give 
me money I am not going to 
say no. Fanciful nonsense — 
well I am writing this piece 
using a word-processing pack- 
age called PC Write, which a 
nice man called Bob Wallace 
wrote and just gave away. 
What’s more, he’s given away 
30.000 copies of it to date and, 
really, it is very, very good. 

And be isn’t starving — far 


from it — in faa he has nearly 
a dozen staff at his firm 
Quicksoft. all hard at work 
giving his program away. He 
must have collected £500.000 
or so just because, if you like 
his package, he asks if you'll 
send him £45 to- register as a 
user. He reckons that so for 
7.000 people had done just 

ihaL 

The idea's called Shareware 
and what it means is that 
anyone can copy PC Write 
and use if for nothing. It is a 
full-feature world-processing 
package which, to my mind, 
knocks spots off anything else 
I’ve seen at prices up to £500. 
It even comes with a manual 
so thick it makes the tele- 
phone directory look as if 
people are giving ap the 
phone. 


In pursuit of 
the trained 



By David Guest 


• <. 


, _ r 


t facts , 


There has been a shortage of 
skilled computer staff for so 
long in Britain that the prob- 
lem is losing /sharpness in its 
definition. 

Like a household repair that 
never gets done or an unex- 
plained rattle on a motor car, 
people have learned to -Jive 
with, it The extent of the 
shortage has always been a 
matter of conjectureTbut there 
is growing reluctance in tbe 
computer industry to express 
it in numbers. \ 

Tbe figure most frequently 
used, as it has .been for the past 
eight to ten years, is 50,000- 
Bui that has lost its. shock: 
value, and it does not Pieces- . 
sarily help. If the computer, 
industry . is 50,000 trained 
people light, and - if. 50,000 
willing souls could easily be 
found, a home crowd at Old 
Traffond perhaps, there would 
remain the question of which 
. type of job needed them most 
urgently. 

When the overall shortage 
can be expressed only vaguely, 
it stands to reason that partic- 
ular' shortages of program- 
mers. systems analysts, data . 
managers, operators, network 
specialists mid 1,00! others 
can hardly be measured at a!L 

The scheme will have 
far reaching effects 

It is this aspect of the 
problem that- a training 
scheme devised try the British 
Computer Society aims to 
tackle. The society’s Profes- 
sional Development Scheme 
(PDS) is. as tbe name suggests, 
intended for people, who have 
already selected a career in 
computing. But the. structure 
, of- the scheme could have 
important effects beyond the 
primary aim of raising profess 
sional standards. 

. **t wouldn't like to pul a 
.figure on the -shortage,^ ad- 
mits BCS professional 'direc- 
tor Alan Taylor. “PDS won't 


in itself necessarily cure any 
shortages, but it may help to 
define where those shortages 
really are. and it might moti- 
vate employers to take train- 
ing more seriously.** - . • 

It could also help the society 
to shed its image, an . unusual 
amalgam of elitism and 
schoolroom chalk dust. The 
scheme arose, MrTaylor said* 
out of the society’s sense of 
responsibility on being grant- 
ed a Royal Charter two years 
.'ago. . • •; >■-. , 

It dosends on a fiUJ defini- 
tion of job types. For-every 
category of job; standards of 
achievement are applied ip. 
measure the progress of ah 
individual, along his or her 
. career path. Since these stan- 
dards have been devised inde- 
pendently they can form part 
of the indivjduaTs curriculum 


M 


I 


JOB SCENE 


vitae. Employers wiB no 
doubt continue to operate 
their, own .training, schemes, 
but the means of assessment is 
intended to be tbe .common 
denominator. . - 

By defining the jobs and by 
gi ving an organization a dear 
picture of its resources in 
different areas, PDS could 
throw up some useful infor- 
mation on specific and overall 


Different levels of attain- 
ment are represented by the 
cyclical nature of the scheme, 
and tbe cycles (of six months 
or a year) should also allow 
individuals to move from one 
employer to Another or be- 
tween areas of specialization 
without penalty. In operation, 
PDS will be supervised by 
personnel on the staff of the 
individual's employer — line 
managers and trailing super- 
visors, for example. 


PDS is expected 
operational soon 


■ . • " . “In the past there have been 

"■ * £ !.v V s '■ V ;' *' TjprafiS varied groups of job defini- 

" tions m companies; and they 

- v were usually used for salary 
- ~ VaWr : data collection;'’ says Mr Tay- 
lor. “Organizations have their 
; own definitions and they 
sometimes make reference u> 
standards, but those are rarely 
qualitative.” 

PDS has been in. operation 
as a pilot scheme for six 
months, and is expected to 
become fully operational m 
the late summer. 

. Its success would appear to 
depend on universal accep- 
tance — organizations . in- 
volved at -me pilot stage 
indude IBM, British Aero-* 
space, the Prudential and 
several others. Beyond that it 
also depends on the society's 
ability to support it and on the 
acceptance by industry of the 
model it employs. 

Interested parties such as 
the Manpower Services Com- 
mission. die National Com-, 
puting .Centre, and _ the 
: - Engineering IndustryTraming 
Alan Taylor Defining where Board have also made enequr- 
the shortagesue ■ agingnoises, Mr Taylor said. 

Park, London, Septembers^, 
mew Technologies fn Training, 
Kensington Town HaH, London. 

• 30 -October 2, (01- 

1 



Atnstrad Computer Show, 
ffovotel. Haimneramifo ^ 
- don W6, June 13-15. (081-456 
•* 8835) - . 

, Computer G-Mex Bdtofflon 
-Centro. Manchester, June 24- 

jl r jibfcan. London EC2, July_24m~. 

*? 1 - 27 ttl,(Cn -349 4667 ) 

visit ® S 

teteffioptitatel Hatek- : Hyd® 


Overseas Events . 

Comdex International, Nice, 
France, June . 10-12, (01-930 
974D)~ . 

Comdex 'Australia.' RAS 
Showground, Sydney, Septem- 
ber 2-5(01-930 


Of course, the manual is on 
disc so you have to print it off 
yourself. But you can get 
around that by sending him 
your £48 and he’ll send you a 
properly printed one. together 
wiih a newsletter and a couple 
of free updates of PC Write as 
and when they come along. 

Probably, Bob Wallace got 
the idea itself, free, from 
Andrew FTuegelman who in- 
vented Freeware so that he 
could give away PC Talk to 
anyone that wants iL PC Talk 
is a communications package 
that enables you to get your 
PC talking to other PCs. And 
he just asks for donations, too. 

Jim Button is another who 
has been working hard of late. 
He's written PC-File. a filing 
system, and he calls it “user 
supported software”, which 
Continued on page 2 4 



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COMPUTER HORIZONS/3 


Gash looms on 
database front 


By Geof ■Wheelwright 

Big battle plans are afoot in 
the software industry and it 
could well be that the next 
major clash will be on the 
database front. 

Databases, long-considered 
electronic filing cabinets by 
those with a need to explain 
them quickly, have been -an 
integral application for per- 
sonal computers since their 
inception almost 10 years ago. 

But they have probably 
changed in their method of 
operation to a for lesser extent 
than financial spreadsheets or 
word-processing programs. 

Several software programs 
have jockeyed for the number 
one position in the spread- 
sheet market — with Visicak; 

Microsoft. Multiplan and Lo- 
tus 1-2-3 all at one time 
topping the charts. Similarly, 
the word-processing business 
has included tough competi- 
tion among users of Wordstar, 

Microsoft Word. Word Per- 
fect and M ultimate. 

In the database business, 
however. AshtonTate's dBase 
II and later dBase III and 
dBase III Plus commands 
some 60 per cent of the top- 
end relational database mar- 
ket — a position it has held 
continously for five or six 
years. 

While other large software 


houses concentrated mainly 
on the word-processing, 
spreadsheet and integrated 
software markets, the data- 
base business — at least on the 
IBM PC and its look-a-Iikes — 
has been left pretty much to] 
Ashton-Taie. 

But challengers are now on 
the horizon. Microsoft recent- 
ly acquired the European 
is to the American Rbase 
database and are now 
promoting it heavily in- the 
UK- White in the US Ansa 
Software company has appar- 
ently made healthy in-roads 
into traditional Ashton-Tate 
territory with its Paradox 
database. 

Just how the market is 
reacting to these new competi- 
tors will be of crucial interest 
to companies like Lotus which 
must now look at products 
such as databases if it is to 
avoid the charge of being a 
one-product company with 
Lotus 1-2-3. 

The Jazz and Symphony 
integrated software applica- 
tions for the Apple Macintosh 
and IBM PC respectively, 
have not done as well as Lotus 
had hoped and it really needs 
another highly successful ap- 
plication on which to build a 
long-term future. . 


Hi-tec 

pirates 

still woo 
buyers 

From Adam KeHiher 
in Hong Kong 

A cluttered shop in a Hong 
Kong arcade hardly looks like 
a pirate's den. 

The booth is a mix of high 
technology and urban decay: 
benches strewn with innards 
of dismantled home comput- 
ers. comers stacked with in- 
struction manuals and walls 
all plastered with advertise- 
ments for the latest and most 
innovative programs. 

But the computers are 
copies, of the name-brand 
originals, the pamphlets are 
photocopies of official man- 
uals and the software are 
unauthorized duplications of 
programs prepared by big- 
name manufacturers. 

**I can get you software one 
month after it's released! in the 
United States," boasts an 
unabashed software pirate, ap- 
parently unperturbed that ma- 
jor American companies are 
plotting to extinguish shoe- 
string operations like his. 

"It is against the law, in the 
United States but we will label 
the disk so customs cannot 



[ man at work in the Golden Arcade computer centre mHong Kong..Heis electroni- 
ferring data from a master disc onto a blank disc. The act takes 1U &conds but vi- 
olates international copyright laws 


(XJMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


ANAIYST/PKOCRAMMER 

arr 

C fitU + 

As a subsidiary of an international commodity broking company we 
are now recruiting for the above postion. 

The successful candidate should have a minimum of 18 months ex- 
perience of Cobol, preferably gained in a Wang VS100 environment 
within foe financial services sector, although mis is not 


essential. 


The person 


jlnted will undertake a programr 

however, he/she will be expected to deputise for the DP manager in 
providing an efficent computing service for all operations within the 
company. 

We will offer the successful cantfdate an attractive remuneration 
package together with a very pleasant working environment 
Please send full CV in the first instance to Ros Gascoigne 

Gerald Metals Ltd 
Europe House. WerM Trade Centre 
St Katherine by the Tower 
Unden El 9AA 


identify it" he reassures leery 
American customers. 

It is small wonder that shops 
like this have sprung up across 
Asia, for software piracy is as 
easy as photocopying a docu- 
ment ortaping a record. 

Electronically transferring 
data from a master disk onto a 
blank disk using a standard 
computer dual disk drive 
takes only 10 seconds, but the 
act breaches international 


pyright laws and constitutes 
eft of intellectual t 
Hong Kong's sof 


CO'l 

theft 


property. 
>ftware pi- 
rates, many housed in the 
notorious Golden Arcade, a 
50-shop mecca for compute- 
consumers. have established 
libraries of master disks that 
are copied and sold for frac- 
tions of the prices of authentic 
software. Computer buyers 
usually receive free software 
with their purchase. 

"This business program," 
the pirate said of a set of five 
disks, "would cost $500 in the 
US. I can sell it to you for 50 
Hong Kong dollars ($6.50). 

Shops in theGolden Arcade 
are doing brisk trade among 
bargain-hunting tourists but 
legitimate software manufac- 
turers are not pleased. 

The U.S. based Intellectual 
Property Alliance, using fig- 


ANALYST/PROGRAMMERS 
PROGRAMMERS 
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• Cobol 

• IBMDOS/VSE 

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providing opportunities for career developments in an 
international env ir onment in the UK, Europe and 
Overseas. 


CAP5CO Software Europe Ltd is a fast-growing 
company of professionals dedicated to proviefirig 
consultancy arid software services to the life assurance 
irxhistry Part of foe international CAPSCO Group of 
companies with Headquarters in North America, 
CAPSCDScrftvvare Europe Ltd is responsible for _ 
operations in theUK, Europe and overseas. Our 
principal saftvuoreproduct, CAPS-l-L is installed in 
over 70 life assurance companies worldwide. The 
continuing success of CAPS-TL - the only 
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Tel: (0483) 506701-24 horn answering service. 


ures backed by the United 
Nations and the U.S. Trade 
Department, said it believes 
$90 million in Asian business 
was lost to software pirates in 
1985. 

The estimated losses, calcu- 
lated by comparing sales.pene- 
cration with that in piracy-free 
markets, are $34 million in 
Taiwan, $20 million each in 
Singapore and South Korea, 
and $16 million divided 
among Indonesia, Malaysia, 
the Philippines, Thailand and 
Hong Kong. - • 

Seventy customs officers 
recently raided the Golden 
Arcade in the Hong Kong 
Customs and Excise 
Department’s first major ac- 
tion against illicit software 
duplicators. 

The raid, which resulted in 
17 arrests and the seizure of 
$17,000 worth of goods, has 
been hailed by sofrwre manu- 
facturers as foe start of. a war 
on the pirates. 

Lotus Corp*. which esti- 
mates it loses $100,000 in 
Asian sales every month, 
prompted the government ac- 
tion after seeing duplicates of 
its programs blatantly peddled 
in the arcade. 

Lotus said it views piracy as 
theft citing considerable re- 
search and royalty costs be- 
hind its products. Unchecked 
piracy. Lotus said, would have 
detrimental long-term effects 
on support services and in- 
vestment in local software 
industries. ‘ 

“Personally we have no 
hard feelings against the pi- 
rates. But if they keep ripping 
us off, we must show them it is 
unlawful and unbusinesslike," 
said Tony Sena, the general 
manager of Imagineering, 
Lotus's Hong Kong 
distributor. 

“The Golden Arcade busi- 
nessmen are caught in a 
vicious circle of competition, 
of giving away everything that 
is not theirs, we don Y want to 
run them out of business but 


would like them to make then- 
trade legitimate.” he said. - 

But some consumers ques- 
tion the prices for legitimate 
software and note that pirated 
programs often are more var- 
ied and accessible than the 
authentic goods. 

"The prices have been 
steadily dropping in America, 
but they haven’t dropped 
comparatively in Asia,” said 
Christopher Smith, a former 
computer magazine editor. 

"I can buy authentic pro- 
grams from the States through 
the mail for two-thirds to one- 
half the price of what they 
charge in Hong Kong. And the 
follow-up service here is slop- 
py to say foe least. It's no 
wonder they are losing busi- 
ness to the Golden Arcade." 

"Software houses will have 
to look at their delivery sup- 
port claimed and bring their 
prices into foe U.S. price 
range," said Raymond Chang, 
the Hong Kong president of 
the Asiawide Anti-Software 
Piracy Association. 

The pirates are so estab- 
lished in Hong Kong that even 
schools and respectable busi- 
nesses use their goods~ 
Manfacturers said they realize 
that private software duplica- 
tion may be an incurable 
activity. Their main battle- 
ground will be educating busi- 
nesses to be "good corporate 
citizens." 

"We have known for the 
past year who the corporate 
offenders are," said Sue Ann 
.Hall Lotus’ international as- 
sociate marketing manager,, 
"but we want them to dean up. 
Their act. We will use litigation 
as a last resort if they -don't 
cooperate." . 

The campaign against the 
pirates began in Hong Kong 
because its government ad- 
heres to copyright laws. Fur- 
ther raids are planned, with 
the manufacturers pushing for 
suffer sentences. Singapore 
and Malaysia are the next 
Asian targets. . (UP1) 



to each other 


By Chris Lyn* 

Gone are the days when be compounded by financial 
computes could be left to a difficulties. Improvements to 
dato-processing ' department information techno}*® 1 are no 
and gone are the days of the longer concerned wnhi ihcodd 
one-off personal computer few thousand pounds for a 
buy that initialed the era of personal compute, but * 
managemen i computi ng. minimum of m000 to 
Communications are now the £30.000 upwards for a My 
theme in most medium to operational duster system 
large organizations and this that will talk to other pans of 
its the manager with- a the organization. 

In these days of tighter 
financial control m public and 
private sectors, there will be 
tow middle managers who can 
spend that sort of money 
without first arguing a cost 
justification case through then- 
departmental budgets. This is 
as it should be. but it will 
inevitably involve consider- 
able work and delay before the 
system can be installed. 

Perhaps here we come to the 
nub of the problem. In count- 
less offices around the world 
decisions on new information 
systems are being taken on a 


set of problems. 

So compatability becomes 
the key as more organizations 
have clusters of small comput- 
er and word-processing net- 
works that must corn municate 
with each other. . 

In a few large organizations 

such things are -all planned 
from the top down — . budgets 
allocated and. entire systems 
ordered and installed.. But in 
others interest from top man- 
agement in information tech- 
nology is slight and knowledge 
rather less. 

It is often not seen as a 


Come one, come all for no cost at all 


ii n — — r— o — — 

matter of corporate policy and pan-time and necessarily am- 
bence the onus of achieving aieur basis- 


productivity and efficiency 
through improved informa- 
tion handling is often left to 
middle management. ' .’ 

What are the managers 
guidelines? Where are his 
budgets? The probability is 
that he will need to spend 
many bouts closeted with 
sceptical colleagues, colourful 
brochures and stylish sales- 
men before he- can establish 
which system will meet his 
needs. 

Even then his. conclusion 
can only be tentative because 
he won't understand half of 
what he is told. The various 
experts will probably disagree 
about a good deal of it 
anyway. He must then insist 
on a trial demonstration. 


Hie installation of a new 
system, even one with wide 
ranging implications, is only 
rarely viewed as a job in itself. 
Commonly it will be an add- 
on. dealt with once more 
pressing regular duties have 
been cleared. 

We are already entering a 
situation where the capabili- 
ties of sophisticated informa- 
tion systems have outrun 
most people's ability to cope 
with them. - 

To catch up with informa- 
tion technology we need to 
improve the commitment of 
people, their training and 
demystify the systems. Man- 
agers must always make deri- 
sions but they can only make 
sensible decisions about 


This uncertainty is likely to things they understand. 

V V; 

ir ,: 



More than a pretty face 


as perforating well has yef to catch on in any real way. 
Though the era of the designer computer still looks some 


ish office. Designed by Porsche Industrial Design Studios it 
is black and green, has a tinted dust cover and a liquid crys- 
tal display. Priced at £3,730 it is intended for business 
graphics and computer aided design and will work with most 
personal computers. Further information from British 
verf on 0203 364021. 


Continued from page 23 
means be’s also giving it away. 

In feet, it is said to be so 
good that Bob Wallace uses it 
— free — to keep trade of all the 
tens of thousands of people to 
whom he has given away PC 
Write — without charge. Per- 
haps they also Twap experi- 


ences — exchange names of 
their analysts and so or. 

And thousands of freely 
available, freely copyable pro- 
grams are available now. 
Whole organizations have 
been set up to distribute them, 
usually for just the price of the 
disc they come on. Sure, 


THE CHOICE FOR COMPUTER PROFESSIONALS 


SYSTEM 36 RETRAIN TO S/ 
PROGRAMMERS AND ANALY 



LONDON 214 - 218k 

/PROGRAMMERS 

mroi fl aie y taste In Central London and Inwtvod in fog 


LYST/PROGRAMMERS requrad Id ptar w adw pat 
from in tea specification through to unpbmsntaton. 

. ... - d flraroft nature. 

Euw t em. 2 yean plus axpenonco gained on BSD aqapnart. faro GRAOUAD 
onxnturety. where arguable, to RETRAIN onto OH System 38. Programmers i 
18 months of FPGHor H and Anatyst/Pro uiamm as with a (oast ft month s ; 


Company; All 

dcwJQjirwnt of _ . 

PoOOmt: Several PROGRAMMERS and J 
m dndopuig and msmtatreng map protects 1 . 

Apptetems m ot commercial, insuano and ftunoal nature. _ 

' from GRADUATE who wte taw the 
■rat have mawnum 

Anatyst/Pro gu i u nats with a test ft month s safysa pared m a 

demanding envi r onm en t 

e— i t UMQUE OPftMrruWTY of gaining hatter smrionos and marring towards project teadhg 
or eoButtancy rote. Preference wB be gnen to canduan toottig far a cam move and greater 
chahenge. Work «U be n-house and on Clems sites: soma bawl wfl be tarotete. 

REF TM 1583 

Stop Pretax; THREE ANALYST/PROGRAMMERS W7H 6000 MMttCS SJGUS. rsqohaef ugsnty 
wan RPQ B or RPG H eroenenct Also a good GS0 Systems Engkreet. 

SUSSEX C16K REF TM 1640 


AMBITIOUS VAX CITY To 14k 

ANALY8T/PR0GRAMMBIS 

Ibis dynamic company smafisss in the ana of efient portfafio man agement, tfyftr 
aid otebkshed w orldwide. its tanwer tacudad £30 b£u last yea. 

Two a mbteo w fcaJyst/Procraranras are raqured to wok a a ftsuntwfng fina n cia l 

emnomant wrotang esteKWo analysis and programming strife uwng vans tenting and flnanctai 


ratable 


missed! 


newer . Aged in your ndd to fate 20s. yoa wdl tave te Inst U months financial expatfeoco on 
VAX iBtng toBAL CantoaiBS shouM lave had some nposin to sates tedwr. bouett ledger or 
rity systans and. although a dsgreo s not sbgolftte. education to at tees V Level a retjrired. 
A cMtangmg and esnmshr wtora shng poehen ottering you the oppe rtarty to gate 
crpanenco in an innovative ervirwmentBweClshidudt: in annual bows, non conoturoy 
PPP. LVi season hefcn teat aod prospects far test pronoun. An opporfiaaty notfa 0e 

REF TX 13840 


SALES 


MIDDLESEX To 212k Csr 

pwNfi. rapM ftwputog W fateOw 
«m m me saw , sonrn uhot ns 


PROGRAMMERS 

Compm: MuttHnaSon pound IBM i 
sites West" of London, and 
p ro teS Mum i service areas. 

Aafinc PnHpamniOT are required to work in teams, reporting to Project Leaders OR Btemferos. 
w4h a wale variety o( applications 80% (4 the wort wttl be m-house and 20% edent-ste wort. 
ta p er it e m: Upwards of 3 years mcrecornputtr pro m nn i lng experience, preferably with a bawl- 
edge o( dataflex. aithough Pascal. Fortran, Base a API. Programmers wM be retramed. Knowledge cl 
DBase R. Lotus 1-2-3. ant symphony would be ideal. 

Gwent An excellent opportunity to progress ntthm tftis test-moving company, wdh benefits 
metering company ear. 

REF TS 1551 


GONSULTANCr/TURNXEY 
SA LB 


CITY 


ore . . 

BASE TO 218K 
CHOICE OF CAR 

Wtfljf it 

m m 


the forefront of cmwn ac fo tefaey. E B e te ated far mom den 
mamined an wvsabie proeoirta? and expuson record. 

Vofcant of busmws has oeteed two oppanuortKs to join the wtll-ra abl i sh ed 
~ 1 “ iedfina “ 

i etc. t 

j good hart record m mgti value Mtwere earn, or 

pertegs account management wtti a mareiicaarer. They wB be ol good edoeatiood standard, wdfi- 
' and ta w v era am wtfh the C9y aoW OT iKBt 


SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 
RETRAIN TO IBM 


cmr 


. To £16400 
+ BaOCATTON 


THs is araafafy toe learfing software services company in the UK and afters an c cefl eot 
li as wgB a top level rentooaobon and company benefits. Futwe pnweseen 
of (Ufarent areas and facahons. A leeks&e {parartee cat also t* rage 


Commiy: 
far both 


International major IBM usv bisod to the CBy ot London otRbmg the West technology 
J — * 2nd tasmejs sotebons. 


GOVBSMBfT SALES 
NETWOm SYSTSKS 


RQ BASE 


succtssfrty n a busmen enviro nmen t. 
sk Upwards of three 


ma rtram es (any . . 
Hnpfcatuns of producing.. .. 
strafed. For cand ida tes without 
environment esteihng OMS 
Be a ffc Thisoa 
lasting security you 
" etc. 


yen comroeroof meron gained on projects usng mires or 
- bj a gm j a - s not assented but an awarenes of die 
from which progremmara on wort most be demon- 
sbl fifl cross- jranUng wiA bo pnvldad te the IBM 

new Ra bite ym career and owe far yunatf the 
aidude a generous rteocaaon attewooce, bmoses. 

REF TG 1381 


ean mow Into 
dated. 

Rff TX 1560 
£344)00 0TE 

£16 sm ORE 
CAVALIER SRI 

com pa btoe wuh meet 
n u pftte ctem has 



thero’s some rubbish in there, 
but there is some good soft- 
wart too. 

Anyway, I have this other 
great marketing scheme. We 
give computers away. You 
know what kind of a risk 
business selling hardware is. 
But who is going to refuse a 
free machine? Word gets 
around, you know.' • 

AD you have to do is to 
loosen the straps on this 
straitjacket so I can get at my 
fountain pen and we could be 
in for the big time. 
tSofiworefor a fairly nominal 
charge is available from the 
following organisations 
though in addition many user 


dard of some of the soft i 
high but there ar> 


groups operate iheir own free 
software schemes. The ston- 
eware is 
are no 

guarantees. 

IBM PC User Group, PO -Box 
830. London SEJ 2BQ. IBM 
PC and compatible!' 

PD Software Interest Group. 
138 Hoylte Road, East 
Grinstead. Sussex RH19 SEA. 
IBM PC compatibles, Apple. 
BBC and CP/M. 

CP/M Users Group. 72 Mill 
Road. Hawley. Dartford. Kent. 
CP/M. 

Disk Formations. 60 Coventrv 
Cross, St Leonards Street. 
London E3 3JT. IBM PC 
compatibles and CP/M. 


DEC + ICL 
PROGRAMMES/ 
SNR 


C LONDON 


210-1&5K 


fteoowned far its proren and rabble 

■ microOTWJierel aod te own reags of wrtsattms ad PC's, 
an im mrt a a mnoereent to as fflWfienced Sites EWBfan. 

Posteon: The bne) will be to tha above Mtoortteg system into Control Sowrwnont accouds 
teg. MOD, DHSS etc.) Hire utfrool dm UK. 

ftaariwor tatedegfateiowtedpeafltaixnfristegpreadures associated with MsmUtepteoiic 
essantaL In addition a sound background in Ateeoanwwatnn and a coanoad. mltn ^preach fa 
this lype of sale are both tegUy desrabte. 

Bunt A hni) stoJdard of personal sisfc and *teewm®a wfl ensure W technics Report and 
rnrisfle tn tanjrt earaingt The-gmows range ol bonefas ndtedes person scheme. BlffA and ao 
weuge car. 

REF TY 1637 


rauWB 


ft* of OH largest and most succonfai computer senfea compartos daring wft 
" and cum n u M f appiaten areas, sbffad with c a reictent and dynamic 


AREA MANAUS 
DEALER SALS 


LONDON 


23W 


212X + GUARANTEE 
E25K + 0TE 
+ AVH1AGE EARNINGS 


n a smjS team wgifnns from jncqeon to Imptenena ti oi i . 
eoeneneg and On desn to progress. 

Exporfocc Progwnmer - 18 months - 2 ware Cobol eaMrimca. ganmf on ether ICL naMamr 
or f®C VAX from a commotia) or teundU b artg r aa tl Sow Prog i ro n i es 3 years ptes with team 
teadteshp oxoanmee and good comnunicaUng stalls. 

Btmat roraopporturmes must fis carofady considered by candidate wft hanJwat/SJEfcafoi 
ocoenpice tenM to one or svsn two yevs. as in ihe past this type d mreon has berated 
raradteteny. Vfart mcMes nvotsemoo a both dleffl sues axl to-tawo. The vmety of baniwaro 
“I* 1 * scope d a ppic ahoiB . can lead to test promotro . tegher sdanes and a certan 
msperous fuhn. 

HEFTF23D 


CoreBan; TTeswufiortaMsfwdnanotadurerandOWispatden^ntfSonpiwidCoriJoatron. 
S q a nC o n hn t grofafa now an h as crofted the fofemg rwnteeraenti 
PteSac Sefteig poonftcoropcws. oersteds and a rede ranged software to doataraln London. 
Bit accussW candftatos wd hare ten potential to ouicJdy develop end orovess witftBi the r 


Aged 2W0 with a good background In eitber persond computer sales or n a technreft 
Wtot a nwron nw n t . you wd iwsd to be pi dess oua L emtusasdc and a achiever. Defter 
account fteRdtem mil further your dances d gwmg fhs pm psnw conmany. 

C< te n t The range d Donate tectedes Mice d car. gumtet md no tana on earnings - a 
state m ent w tech ean bo Darted igi by oarent sales a sto evemer te wfeh can be bached m by current 

sates achwonwrits whu are roanng ter n oaress d reabs&c brote- 

REF TB ISO 

6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844, (24 hours). 


Evening nmnbers 
until lOpm:- 

01-311-8444 

01-850-1866 


For a confidential 
discussion about these and 
many other vacancies 
please contact one of our 
consultants. We are also 
specialists in assisting . 
British nationals working 
overseas and wishing to 
return to fiie UK. 



EDUCATIONAL 

CONSULTANT 

APPLIED MICROSYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 
is continuing its fine of software 
development for the Middle East and 
is seeking to appoint a full time 
Educational Consultant to join its 
research and development staff. 

The Consultant jmll be working In co- 
operation wtft the R & D engineers to 
design Arabic educational software to 
55-™* p n several microcomputers. 
The required personnel must be fluent 
a™! ha Y® a career that is 
ised. wrth at least 10 years 
experience in the Arab 


SALES/MARKETING 

MANAGER 


0 P«*!ons 
especlally IBM 


ialary: 

xperie 


Sa 

e: 


Negotiable 
ence. 


according to 


Send ftill.CV to: 


A.M.T„ 
Applied 
Technol 
32/34 
Broadway 
LONDON 



NW2 3ET 
Closing Date 14th June.1986. 








L 


Commercial Adviser to 



London c. £20,000 


British ^ Telecom now seeks Comrnerdd Advisers for the six 
London Districts which came into existence in April 1986, 
foDowmg reorganisation of the business in the capftd. 

The role ts to advise District Management on BTs 
commenced and legal position, negotiate contracts and explain 
contract implications. Commercial Advisers wS also be 

expected to become fetfniter with the BT Licence and the other 
licences issued under Section 7 of thelela ocK iMiiuni c c rt ions Act 
1984, and the Act itself and to interpret that regulatory regime 
for District Management on a cfcy-to-daybask. 

The pest will involve ransrierobfelk^n wrih Senior * 
Management in the District and its Headquarters, and with the 
other London District Commercial Advisers. ... 

Candidates should either have a contracts' background 


Hoggett Bowers 

Executive Search and Selection Consultants 

BmnMsun,cAMDar.cusaow.ia^toHoo^HAXiiimi^mKJsm.sHEfmLOtmrwpasaii 

Commercial Legal 
Opportunities 

West London 

Two Senior Solicitors 

a £18,000— £23,000, Car 

A subsidiary of one of die world’s largest computer 
manufacturers, with an excellent track record of 
success and achievement requires two solicitors of 
outstanding ability and potential to strengthen their ■ 
legal department • 

Both positions report to the Company Secretary and 
Legal Advisor, himself a Solicitor. Responsibility will 
be to provide a full legal service to all functions and ' 
levels of management within the company including 
the preparation, review and negotiation of co nt racts 
and the handling of disputes and litigation. Indepth 
knowledge of contract law is requirea and experience 
-relating to the aali» and purchase of goods and 
services, software licensing and distribution 
ag reements will hira- digHnc t advantage. - 
"Candidates "must be solicitors whb _ &re able to ^ 

demonstrate exceptional performances within a' 

rnmTPwr^al Pr^r imn mant thgtliaa demanded the • 

highest levels of legal skills and business sense. The 
more senior position requires at least five'years 
relevant post qualification, experience whilst the Junior 
will best suit appropriately qualified candidates in 
. . their mid-twenties with probably two years commercial 
experience. 

' Excellent r mnmmricaH rm skills, a quick-thinking 
analytical mind and the ability to enjoy the chaJJange 
of working in a demanding highly pressurised, 
environment are essential for both positions. 


Male or female candidates should submit in : 
confidence a comprehensive C.V. or telephone tor a 
Personal History Aim to M. Gould, - 
Hoggett Bowers pic, 1/2 Hanover Street, LONDON, 



Speedily Birdiam 



Derrick Morgan, Speecnwcuxmam 

354 Fleet Street, London EC4A 2HX. 


PAISNER & CO 
TWO COMMERCIAL 
CONVEYANCERS 

Paisner & Co ingendy require 2 solicitors to join ibfb Conmeroai 
Conveyancing Department The successful applicants will be qualified for 
udio 5 years and Will have had experience ofimportam and complicated 
Commerrial Property transactions in a medium or large practice or m 
induSvThey will be expected to work wth minimum supervision, show 
ini tiaiive and be. willing io assume increasing responsibility. . . . 

Substantial salary will be offered for the successful applicant. 
Applications with full Curriculum Vitae should be made in writing to: 

Geoffrey Hayhuret 
Messers Paisner & Co 
Bouverie House 
154 Fleet Suwt 
London EC4A 2DQ 


NORTH HAMPSHIRE - 

Expanding practice requires; 

Experienced Legal J^ecu^^pable ^ 
dealtno with Plain Off and Defendant RTA 
wot? S icily County Court with minimum 
supervision. 

Assistant to help Partner in busy 
tenUous department 

to be discussed depending on experience. - 
Salaries negotiable. CV to Mrs J ^uir^unt. 

SfSs & 

Basingstoke. Hants. RG21 1BG. 


COMPETENT 

LOCUMS 

required Countrywide 
for Solicitors with J 
staff emergencies 

01-248 1139 

Short and long term 
assignments for .■ 

. Litigation & 
Conveyancing. 

ASA LAW 

- - tfnm-g u t tM t m snugs 


■ or be legally Qualified with experience m private practice 
(in Gonvnerdca law or rommerda! litigation) or in industry If a 
lawyer, you should hove at least three years' experience since 
admission. The ability to communicate effectively at all levels, a 
sound academic record, versatility and considerable self- 
reliance are essential 

Please send your CV fit is important to indude a day time 
telephone number, which will be used with discretion) quoting 
ref. T/Ql,to Tony Gasper at British Telecom London, Recruitment 
and Selection Centre, Sf Giles House, 1 Drury Lane, London 
WC2B 5RA. Alternatively, call hkn or Graham Milboume on 
01-379 6070. Dosing date for applications is 9th June, 1986. 

British Telecom has an equal opportunities employment 

poky 

British 

TELECOM 


TAX LAWYERS 


We are looking for able and experienced 
lawyers to handle the increased workload in 
our Tax Department. 

Applicants should have a first class academic 
record and a sound knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of corporate taxation. Consideration 
will also be given to applicants who are 
Chartered Accountants and now wish to 
pursue a legal career. 

The department engages in all aspects of 
corporate and individual tax and associated 
planning work, especially in the context of 
international business, and some experience 
of international tax planning would be useful. 
The rewards, professionally and financially, 
are very attractive. 

If you would like to find out more , please 
write sending a complete CV to Michael 
Charteris-Black, 14 Dominion Street, London 
EC2M 2RJ. 


(tiles, 
indS 
ed8p 
New- 
quiet 
x of >t 


Young 

Lawyer 


We have a smaB, NgNy-profesatonal team which provides legal advice 
on aH matters relevant to Stock Exchange activities. The subject 
areas are extremely varied and provide a major challenge as most of 
toe legal aspects areol considerable importance and complexity. 

The increasing amount o( work carried on "m-house has created an 
excellent caraeropporturutyfor a person wtx> has the abifity to respond 
to the demands of a changing environment 

\burmain areas of involvement will include: Research on legal issues; 
Review and drafting of rules and regulatory documentation; 
Proceedings of the Disciplinary Appeals Committee: Dealing with 
company secretarial and legal matters for Stock Exchange companies; 
Data Protection Act responsibilities. 

Ideally. you wfflbeanewVqualified Barrister or Soticitorwith relevant 
commercial experience. However, consideration may also be given tea 
LawGraduate not yet professionally qualified but with appropriate 
experience. 

There will be an excsUent salary and benefits package. Please write 
witha full c.v. to Jennifer Gregson, Person nel Manager, The Stock 
Exchange, Old Broad Street, London EC2N 1HP. 


The Stock Exchange 


We are a medium sized City practice seekingw recruit an 
able young Lawyer of between 2 and 5 years post- 
qualification experience. - 

This opportunity will suit someone who is keen to undertake 
high quality work in the field of acquisitions, flotations, 
venture capital and corporate finance yet is attracted by a 
pleasant working atmosphere. 

Our emphasis is on co-operation rather than competition and 
we genuinely endeavour to create a working environment in 
which individuals, can do full justice to their abilities. 

eal to you, please apply with atoll CV to 

use, 


MERSEYSIDE PASSENGER TRANSPORT 
EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 

UP TO £25,000 PER ANNUM. 

Applications arc invited for soliriton. of a minimum of 7 years post 
admission experience for this senior post in the recently restructured 
Passenger Transport Executive which is adapting itself to the new role 
created for such bodies by the Transport Act 1985. In addition to provid- 
ing a comprehensive legal and administrative service for the Executive, 
the post holder will be responsible for personnel, property and claims 
management and for providing under commercial contracts such profes- 
sional services as the Executives subsidiary companies may require. 

An outline job specification and further details of the post are available on 
requcsL Benefits include a contributory superannuation scheme and assis- 
tance with removal expenses in appropriate cases. 

Applications with a toll curriculum vitae and details of relevent experi- 
ence should be sent- to reach the personnel department, Merseyside 
Passenger Transport Executive, 24 Hatton Garden, Liverpool L3 2AN (on 
051 227 5181 extensions 4369 and 4370) and should be returned no later 
than Friday 20th June 1986. . .. 

- nie executive is an equal opportunity employer 


Tax Planning Adviser 

Leading Life Assurance Company 
c. £14,000 Croydon 

Merchant investors is one of the mosc p ro gressive unit-linked 
life assurance and financial planning companies in the LHC 
As part of our market expansion programme, we now seek a Tax 
Planning (and Mitigation) Specialist to work with our sales force 
and clients? professional advisers. 

The assignment calls for relevant experience ip preparing financial 
reports and in giving well-informed tax planning advice. 

■ Salary will be negotiable in line with experience and we offer a 
range of large-company benefits and excellent prospects within a 
high-growth business. 

Please write with a toll Cy indicating current salary, to Mark 
Molloy, Personnel Officer; Merchant Investors. PO Box 35, Leon 
House, 233 High Street, Croydon, Snrrey CR9 1LR Tel: 01-686 917L 


MERCHANT 



INVESTORS 


NEWLY 

QUALIFIED 

SOLICITORS 

W9 have exciting 
vacancies for 
Solicitors seeking 

CONVEYANCING 

COMPANY/ 

COMMERCIAL 

All these positions 
offer attractive 
salaries' and 
good prospects 

l^vTcrsonnel 


BRAUND & FEDRICK 

CONVEYANCING - 

We are a four office south London and 
Kent practice. Our five partners are all 
aged over 37 and we seek to recruit the 
first of the next generation of potential 
equity partners. 

The immediate need ts for a conveyanc- 
ing solicitor for our busy Woolwich office. 
If you are a newly qualified or admitted 
up to two years apply now for a Job with 
real partnership prospects. An outgoing 
personality is as important to us as tech- 
nical expertise and an aptitude for hard 
work. 

Salary - excellent and above average for 
the right' applicant. 

Apply with full CV to: 

The Partnership Secretary 
Braund and Fedrick 
• 4 Woolwich New Road 
LONDON SE18 6HA 
Tel: 01-854 6232 


SIMMONS & SIMMONS 


Ashurst Morris Crisp 

Ashurst Morris Crisp are looking for able young 
lawyers to join the following expanding departments 

COMPANY AND COMMERCIAL 

T 'he Company and Commercial Department is involved in all aspects of corporate 
and commercial work. The work is wide-ranging and stimulating, and applicants 
should preferably have had at least two years post-qualification experience. 

PLANNING 

Ashurst, Morris. Crisp is a major City practice with a substantial Property and 
lA Planning Department. The planning team acts on behalf of both public and 
private sector clients. An exciting variety* of work is involved particularly in the field 
of urban regeneration. • • 

A vacancy has now arisen for a lawyer with a local government background and 
with 3/5 years post-admission experience to join the firm's planning team. 
Experience in planning, compulsory purchase and general administrative law is 
essential. Knowledge of development and building agreements may also be an . 
.advantage. An exceilenr salary will be paid. . 



Please apply in writing with full curriculum vitae to: 

W. Drummond Ashurst Morris Crisp Broadgale House 7 Eldon Street London EC2M 7HD 


Secretary and Solicitor 



This isan opportunity for an 
experienced Secretary and Solicitor to 
take upa key appointment with-our 
client, "a major public organisation 
based in the West Country. 

The Secretary is responsible to the 
Deputy Chairman for services to the 
Board, legal, estates management and 
general administrative services. 

Candidates, who are unlikely to be 
aged under 58, will already have 
considerable experience and a good 
track record in the management of the 
secretarial and business function in 
a large organisation. 

Relocation expenses will be 
reimbursed. 


If you have toedriveandenthusiasm 
to meet this challenging opportunity 
please contact Austin Knight who - 
have been retained to advise on this 
appointment Please telephone our 
Consultant, Sarah Hornby on (0784) 
39103 (day) or (0344) 775515 
(evenings). Alternatively send her 
your c.v. at Austin Knight Selection, 
Knightway House, Band Lane, Eghara, 
Surrey TW20 9NX, quoting reference 
SH 281. 

Austin 

ffnioht 


Selection 



ROWLEYS & 
BLEWITTS 
BIRMINGHAM 

Require dynamic and personable solicitor to 
control and expand existing conveyancing 
and commercial departments. Early partner- 
ship prospects to the successfol applicant 
Excellent salary according to experience. Car 
provided. Applicants should contact: 

Dominic Regan 
Rowleys & Blewitt 
Kennedev Tower 
Telephone 021-236 1900 


SURREY MAGISTRATES’ 
COURTS COMMITTEE 

Gnat Clerk £9,555 - £104)71 inclusive (under renew) 

Epsom Petty Sessional Division 

Applications arc invited from persons who are 
qualified io be clerks In court Barristers or 
solicitors without court experience will be con- 
sidered for appointment initially on a scale 
commencing at £8.493 inclusive. 

Further details and applications form from . 
Westgate House, 51 High Street* 
Esher, Surrey KT!6 9RQ 
(Telephone Esher 65454V 

Dosing date 20th June .1986 


BOYCE TURNER 
& BURROWS 

An established yet progressive 
and expanding Practice in the 
Thames Valley, we seek appli- 
cants of above average ability for 
the following positions:- 

1. A COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR to 

assist with current expansion 
in the Commercial Depart- 
ment of our Reading Office. 
Excellent initial salary and 
genuine and early Partner- 
ship prospects. Enquiries to 
Adrian Desmond at 162 Friar 
Street, Reading RG1 1HR 
(0734 597711). 

2. A LITIGATION SOLICITOR to 
strengthen the Litigation De- 
partment of our Staines 
Office to include matrimonial 
and criminal work. Excellent 

* terms negotiable. Enquiries 
to Peter Dowling at Market 
Square, Staines, Middlesex 
TW18 4RQ (0784 59955). 












THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


I 


PARK 

NELSON 

Commercial 

Property 

Solicitors 

Continuing and rapid expansion 
of our Property Department re- 
quires us to recruit able young 
Solicitors of not less than 2/3 
years qualification. Applicants 
should be experienced principally 
in commercial conveyancing and 
be prepared to undertake a de- 
manding but stimulating 
workload with iniative and enthu- 
siasm. Salaries negotiated 
according to experience will be 
generous and career prospects are 
excellent. 

If you are interested in joining us. 
please write in confidence with 
your cirriculum vitae to:- 

Eogene O'Keeffe or Simon Stone 

at 

Park Nelson 
1 Bell Yard 
London WC2A 2JP 


AVIATION 

LAWYER 


We are a small firm based in the Gty which spe cialis es in 
avialkm and satellite claims adjustment for insurers We 
have a requirement for a qualified lawyer (Barrister 
preferred) with post-qualification litigatiDn experience and 
an interest m aviation. 

Whilst not essential, a post-graduate qualification m 
insurance or aerospace law would be a derided advantage. 
The successful candidate will be expected to undertake 
occasional travel both overseas and in the U.K. 

Applicatims wttb a fall C.V. and an indkatioB of salary 
requirement should be sent to Box No. E04, c/a Times 
Newspapers. PO Box 484, Virginia Street. Loodoa ECI. 


OWEN WHITE 

Ths busy emndmo frmwn seven offices to tbs west ol London tote 
aBjttCTTK tac tile loBomng poswns:- 

f. Mnmvnoi Sotaw. probably rath 2 years adrotftad experience. 

2. CmwHl Advocate possibly until some na t nmuni a i ax penenco. No 
years adnnttedL 

3. Conveyamvg Sofcnor/Lagal Executive lor bray resktenW 
dapstmenL 

Tdephone N BamanJ 
01-890 2836 
Or wne wtb CV to: 

90-92 Hub Street. 

hum 

TWJ3 4ES 
Hounslow office 

1. Sotator with at least two years abrttstd ewerawce tor dvfl Stiga- 
tums especially P.l. 

Taieplrora Mr Weston 
01-570 5471 
0< ante wait CV to 
19 Betmant Hd 
Twickenham 
TW2 50A 


POLDEN BISHOP & GALE 

111 Baker Street 
Louden W1M 2BP 

We are looking for a conveyancer with a com- 
mercial bias to work alone and lo assist Senior 
Panner. 

At least 2 lo 3 years qualified. Salary circa 
£16.000 p.a. 

Phone 01-486 4935/2091 reEEHE 


EDUCATIONAL 


“I can teach YOU 
to draw and paint 
...successfully!” 

hsb Alan Swann. Director of Studies, The Art School 


know-he'aapenthia whole 


Gabriel Duffy Consultancy 

PARTNERSHIP IMMINENT £ Highly Neg 

A senior Gomoany/Ctxnmsrea ssectaSst is required by fids 
ttuivinfl and progressive Central UndOT law firnETto success- 
ful applicant wfifcteal wSfi dl aspects of Com^iy/Conunercal 
work and will be responsible for the development of this side 
of Hie practice. An ideal opportunity far a lawyer with City 
experience who has found itai prospects fur career progres- 
sion at ffls/fier preseil praflee are Srafted. 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL To £18,000 

Qv dtert. a Hottom based practice. iwprtes a dynamic young 
lawyer, other newty quoted or with up to two yeare ma. to 
assist a young partner in a8 areas of Company/Commero^ 
work. Prospects good. 

LITIGATION £ Excellent 

We are currently recruiting Btigation assistants for our clients 
both in the City and Central London If you haw to to three 
years experience in Slapping, Intellectual Property. Enjoy- 
ment Binding or Computer Uw Legation our dlBfls would be 
interested it meeting with you. 

For totter isformafion, please contact 
Claire Wiseman, 

Gabriel Duffy Consultancy, 

31 Southampton Row, 

London WC1B 5HJ. 

Daytime telephone oomber 01-831 2288. 
Evening telephone number 01-740 0289. 


SUB-EDITOR 
Law and Tax 
Publishers 

Butterworths, the leading law book pub- 
lishers. seek a law graduate to work as a 
sub-editor on a variety of kxweleaf and an- 
nual tax publications. Previous editorial 
experience is not essential, but applicants 
should have the ability to think and write 
clearly and an eye for detail. 

Salary and conditions in accordance with 
NUJ agreement. 

Please reply with full c.v. to: 

The Personnel Department, 
Bntterworth & Go. 
(Publishers) Ltd-, 

88 Kimsway, 

London WG2B 6AB 


□□ Butterworths 


Commercial 

Partner 

Fast-expupding firm inNorth of England with 
quality corporate clients offers partnership to 
experienced commercial solicitor. 

We have been recruiting lawyer, for industry,, 
commerce and finance since 1973 and have placed 
lawyers with most major British and international 
companies. We also recruit for f irms of solicitors in 
London and throughout the country. 

All our consultants are qualified lawyers with 
many years' experience in recruitment. 

74 Long Lane, London ECl TeL* 01-606 9371 


CHAMBERS 

mmmmSt PARTNERS mm 


POTENTIAL 

PARTNER 

Required by west London 
solictors lo deal with litiga- 
tion inc matrimonial. Min 
I years admission. Amal- 
gamation with sole prac- 
tioncr considered. Reply to 
BOX D97. 


FINANCE HOUSE 
SALES TRAINEES 
To £10,323 + Car 

-Suit law or business 
studies graduate. 

0903 30424 

HP Personnel Agy 


cm' SOLICITORS 
Partner’s Secretary 
c. £l(L500 

Experienced legal Secretary 
for busy Coramemai 
Conveyancing Partner. 
Shorthand an advantage. Ap- 
ply in anting ta- 

Carter A Co. (Ret TS] 

78 Fenclmch Stmt 
Loodoa EC3M 4BT. 

(No -Agencies) 


SITES SECRETARIES 


*81*7 m nilwialnTinin fMd 
mural London, requires Mi> 
irali-d v hoot leaver for accounts 
and flwwrai office work, end ol 
June Musi hate knowledge of 
elavacaj music. Ring 01-936 
»lk v 



LEGAL LA CREME 


PARTNER'S SECRETARY/PA 
£10,000 - £10,500 pa 

Litigation Partner requires a motivated and 
legally experienced Secretary/ PA. Excellent 
secretarial speeds and ability to work unsuper- 
vised are essential. 

Bonus, salary reviews twice yearly, 4 weeks 
holiday. 

Please call Lynne Frank-Keyes on 01491 2020 


SeC AMO lor bank * stoj mort- 
9ay * tlW bw day LX'*, 
pnnion. llfr*H * ram sub TH 
Ol 348 5fc6fa Onlreqirl E_mo 
Agv 

SECRET ARKS for An-fitkvfe i 
Dmoim Pumuwni 4 lmp» 
rar> pmiuon, AMSA SptcmiiH 
Rv Com. Ol 734 ossa 
Accowrrsorec CV/X» 4. com 
punv far tor antmonq 
agency. TO 01-340 6666 
Crnirvqui ELtnp AQV 
■M Om p te fr Op CI3 0O0 tor 
tin bank. Stud iMnwv- Aw 
20 SO sun now TH Ol 248 
3656 Cctitrrgm Eituj a® 


LEGAL PA Cl 1.000 nhl Ow M> 
ixvar of IM* Dresuwotn 
restaurant grow and become 
Involved in au aspects of the 
very interesting bui retaxM le- 
gal area. No legal experience is 
required but sound audio skins 
iirrawnual For former decaUt 
contact MHorae Lain? 01-631 
1641 Price Jamieson A Part- 
ners Recruitment Consul Laois 


partners pa cio^oa True 
PA supervtwry role mm tots 
of actinia on offer for np lUWa- 
tion sec. Thriving West End 
practice, lull WP inioinqgnm 
Cali Marxr Cranes 4 Assoc Ol - 
637 6377 Dec Com 


TEMPTING TIMES 


3H /SEC W1 £0.00 pb Immediate 
sun. hidef t*g Pay same wn. 
BHIe Emp Agy 404 4656 


NON-SECRET AKIAL 


ennis ball? 

ALBERT HALL 
21st JUN.E 
HELP WANTED 

NOW > 

01-834 1002 £. 

tfl t-vtHor So. SR l 


PRIVATE CLIENT 
LAWYER 

There is a vacancy at our Reading Office for a 
private client lawyer in his or her late twenties. 
An attractive salary will be offered to the right 
person who win be experienced In conveyanc- 
ing, probate, trusts and financial planning. 
There are partnership prospects. 

LITIGATION 

SOLICITORS 

Continue expansion of the workkjad inaliseo- 

lions of our litigation department has createo 
vacancies for sotievtors at our Northampton and 
Banbury Offices. There are excellent opportu- 
nities for career development and a wide range 
of Inter tasting work. 

Please apply with C.V. tcr.- 
Nlck Bromwich, AdnwnWrattoo Partner. 
Shoosmiffts 8 Harrison, P 0. Box 2, 
Compton House, Abington Street, 
Northampton, NN1 2UL 

SH00SMITUS&BARR1S0N 


HONG KONG 

Outstanding opportunity to join eminent 
Commercial practice in Hong Kong ton- 

Commercial Litigator Minimum three years 
post quaiifi cation experience, possessing sale of 
goods, banking related experience for exciting 
minimally supervised caseload. 

Company Commercial: Minimym three years 
gost. qualification experience. jwsses^g 

draftings^ clients. 

The above attract outstanding salaries, and 
definite propsects exist for the calibre applicant 


Commercial 

Solicitor 

HIGH HOLBORN up to £16,000 

One of our young assistant solid- 
tore will be leaving us shortly to 
read for his Masters degree in Law. 
We shall replace him with a young 
lawyer of ability and promise. 

if you have 2 or 3 years of good 
experience of company / commer- 
cial work and, like us. attach 
importance to providing a quick 
and efficient service to clients 
whilst, at the same time, develop- 
ing your own abilities, then write 
with full cirriculum vitae to: 

Colin Ellis, 

Reynolds Porter Chamberlain 
Chichester House, 

278-282 High Holbora, 
London. WG1V 7HA 


COMMERCIAL LITIGATION CITY 

Well respected medium sized practice seeks 
fitigator, one to three years post qualification 
experience for excellent broad commercial 
workload. Salary up to £20k. 

EMPLOYMENT CITY 

Eminent large firm requires able solicitor, from 
newly qualified upwards, to undertake non- 
contenttous Employment matters. Excellent 
salary, prospects. 

COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCING CITY 

Leading medium sized practice seeks calibre 
Commercial Conveyancer for quality heavy 
weight workload. Highly attractive salary, good 
prospects. . 


Our Glasgow 


we are at 


151 St Vincent Street, Glasgow 
G2 5NJ. Oar telephone, telex 
and fox numbers are 
andtangetfc- tel . 041-248 5011 
telex Tfa74> fox 041 248 5810 
and 041-221 2968. 


remains 


Maclay Murray & Spens 
. Soliritras 
Eftinbwsh d Glasgow 


Fax 01 -631 2901 


SSMbwfi. Londonwcas 4JF.'& ot-242 on MM, 

Roc 01-631 2901 


PETER T. JAMES & CO. - WJ. 

We.tiAve an immediate vacancy for a recently 
qualified Solicitor with post admission conveyanc- 
ing experience to work in the property department 
of our offices in Mayfair. 

Good salary offered - contact by telephone or in 
wrltlng:- 

Peter T. James & Co-, 

2 Carlos Place. 

Mount Street 
London W1Y 5AE. 

Telephone; 01-499 8921. 

Re£ R/MN. 


SQUIRE RAYFIELD 

Coyest Garden solicitors have vacancies for two 
assistant solicitors, one not less than 2 years 
qualified, one recently qualified, both to deal 
with insurance related litigation. Excellent pros- 
pects. 

Telephone David Herbert 01-379 7083. 


NORTH FINCHLEY 

Conveyancing Solicitor required for 
small friendly practice - sense of hu- 
mour essential - good prospects. - 

Tel Mr Donald Galbraith 
(01-446 6717) 


WEST COUNTRY 

We are an oM estaOHshed. expanding, forward looking 
computer based firm and we rewire: 

1 ) An enthusiastic, competent Solicitor an rounder 
for noa contentious work. P art ner ship calibre, 
and excellent prospects. Pr e ferred age late 20 's, 
early 30's 

2) Conveyancing lepal executive for large votume do- 
- - mestlc property work of all types. Competitive 

salary. 

Telephone 0726 7666S. 

Graham & Graham. 

St Anstdl. Cornwall 
rtfAFB 


SUB-EDITOR 

LAWBOOK 

PUBLISHERS 

Batterrortlis* the leading law book pub- 
lishers, are looking for a Barrister or 
Solicitor to become a Sub-Editor on one of 
their long established etK^ckrpedic pubUca- 
tions. Previous editorial experience is un- 
necessary but the abffifcy to think and write 
concisely and informatively is essential. 
Salary and conditions are in accordance 
with the currant NUJ agreement 

Please reply with full c.v. to: . . 

The Personnel Department, 
Bntterworth & Co. 
(PnliliSliers) litcL, 






88 Ktaesway. 
London WC2B 6 


SAB. 


□□ Butterworths 


SAUSBURY 

Sottdtors require Qmvcy- 
ancer lo handle large 
v olume of domestic 
conveyancing. Sidcdde po- 
ll tlon for newb quaUfled 

Apply ^^Nichols, 
Jonas & Parker 
Tel: (0722-) 27786. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


LIMITED 

COMPANIES 

FORMED 

for £79 fnc. No extras. 
Capital Company Services 
Lid. 1 /3 Leonard SL 
EC2A 4AQ Tel: 01-608 
2321 AS FEATURED ON 
BBC. PANORAMA. 


PALL MALL 
+ W2 

Low premium 24hr ac- 
cess + parking. Fum 
carpeted offices Ind 
phone/ tefox/ rax. ft 
£ 75pw. 

01-839 4808 


CONVEYANCER 
SOUTH DEVON 

CMengng oppcnwtfy lor lor- 
wanl loiMig rorno solicitor to 
wort closely with new property 


GENERAL 


DIRECT CAR 
PHONES 

Keenest suwfiets of CAAones 
on tease or purchase. Nahonmdg 
nsauaoon a mnsnanoe. 

Please pbooe tar tree fomfiy 
advea. 

0742 730011. 


CHARTTV COMMISSION 

Btounl o( Ueinvnard Cotonrt T 
C P Oitui 16 Uie Offlrm' Wid- 
owi jnd OatI 0 hl(«« BnnoIMt 
Assorunan, 


sales dept of old en ta bis ha j 
firm. (£12^00. Partnersho pros- 
pects. Interviews London 6th 

<B3M) <2345 (enrtngs) 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1988 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
BA. THOMS ON IH OLDINCSI 
LIMITED 

NOTTOE IS HEREBY GIVEN. 
punuaM to Section EQ8 of itw> 
Conmales Art. 1985. Hut a 
Meeting or the qmiws or tne 
above-named Conwany will be 
hem at l Scrleann inn. umdrni 
EG4Y UD on Wednesday the 
l«l» day or June 1966. ai 1 
o'ctock In Uw afternoon, tar the 
purposes mentioned tot Sections 
588. 089 and 090 or the caM Ad. 

GATED (Ms torn day of May 
1986 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
MJ_ Thomson 

Director 


IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1968 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
ACE MAN LIMITED - 

IN RECEIVERSHIP 

NOTICE IS HEREBY OTVEN. 
pursuant to Section asa of the 
Comuanles Art. 1988. that a 
Meeting of (he OTOftora of the 
above-named Company wtll be 
held rt I Serjeant's Inn. London 
EC4V UTO on Wednnday the 
lain day of June 1986. at ti 
o'clock m ine fore noon, tor the 
purposes mentioned in Secttoos 
B88. 689 and 890 Of the said Art. 


BY ORDER OF THE -BOARD 
M.l_ Thomson 
Director 


IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1988 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 1 
ACUMAN I FINANCE) LIMITED — 
IN RECEIVERSHIP 

NOTICE IS HEREBY OTYEN. 
pursuant to Section 588 of the 
CwdboM Act. I486, that a 
Meeting of the Creditors of the 
abot r-nampd Company wfl be 
held at 1 Sweat*!"* ton. London 
ECav LID on Wednesday the 
18th day ol June 1986. at,3 15 in 
the afternoon, for toe Burttse* 
nmlMord In "sections 588. 989 
and 090 of tne uid ACL 

DATED IMS 15th day of May 


BY ORDER Or THE BOARD 
P-S. Whitehead 
Director 


MERCHANT BANK LAWYER, «Jp 

to 4 years POE u develop caa- 
iwr In lax detnrtmenL No tax 
experience necessary. Salary 
up to El Sk plus excellent fringe 
benefits. Law Personnel Ol 2*3 
1281 . 1 24 nrs an* sysL 

COMtmtCUIL CONVEY AHcnw 
Ctty Practice. Prrt. t - » yaars 
mwnr B tr in or out of London. 
TocSOjOOO. Meredit h SW 1 Re- 
cnUtment 01-583 0065,541 
3897 inel. 

TORQUAY Younp conveyancer 
sought oy Commercial Pmcttce. 
pref. newly to 2 years adtidUM. 
c. Cl 2.000 + prospects. Mer- 
edith Seed Recruitment 01-083 
0065. 341 3897 tevett. 

COW. COMMERGIAI. SWl 
Practice. Pref. 1 - S yeaw ad- 
mined- TO £10-000+ prospects. 
Meredith Scott Recruitment Ol- 
683 0035- 541 9897 tovaS). 

EMPLOYMENT LAW EC2 Plac- 
ate. pref t ■ 4 years admitted 
c. C20JOOO * prospects. Mer- 
edith scon Recruitment at -583 
0055. 541 3897 tevesL 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF . 
HAMMOND 6 BOYLE LIMITED 

NOTICE B HEREBY OVEN. 
Pursuant lo Section 588 or toe 
Companies AcL 1985. dial a 
Meeting of toe OMiton of the 
above-named Company will or 
held at 1 SerteaniH inn. London 
EC4V 1JD on Wednesday the 
ism day of June 1906. at 4 jo m 
the afternoon, for tne purposes i 
: mentioned to Sections 586. 589 
and (foo of toe said Art 

dated um 18th day of May 
1966 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
P-S. Whitehead 
Director 


IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 198S 
AN D 

IN THE MATTER OF 
B A THOMSON LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HERESY GIVEN, 
pursuant to section 388 of the 
Cbcnbaotts Art. . 1985. that a 
Meeting of the Creditors or the 
abovewnrd Company wm be 
held at 1 Sexleanrs Inn. London 
EC4Y UD on Wednesday me 
18 th day of Jtme 1986. at 2.13 to 
I he afternoon, for the purposes 
mentioned In Sen loos 388. 689 
and 690 -of toe saM Art. 


-BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
P.S. Wtittetiead 

Director 


tN THE MATTEROF 
THE COMPANIES ACT. 1983 
AN D 

IN THE MATTER OF 
BAILEY & WEAT HEPBU. 
LIMITED 

NOTICE - IS HEREBY GIVEN, 
ptaruunl -lo Section S88 of the 
Corn damn Art. 19B5, that a 
Meeting of the Cnduom or the 
above-named Company wni be 
new at i Seneant's inn. London 
EC4Y 1JD on Wednesday toe 
l»h day of June 1986. at 2.46 in 
tne afternoon, far toe purposes 
raeoUoned in Sections 388. 589 
and 890.01 toe Nnd Ad. 

DATED tott 15fo day of May 
1986 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
P-S. Whitehead 
tXrertor 


C O — ntrtwt CONVEY A W C» m 

Omtraf. London cCi2k. Mary 
Male Accord Personnel 0935 
815506 

CONVEY AMCtNQ WITH <LP. 

West Midlands vobCHor-LE. 
E9k. Mary Male Accord Per- 
sonnel 0933 816600 
CONVETANCnta ASStSTANT or 
LE. pcestuuows Devon firm u 
£iOk Mary Male Accord Per- 
sonn el<»ao 816606 
FREE LIST of country va cancies 
at salaries from £7.000 to 
£25.000 Chambers & Partners 
01-606 9371. 

ONCRM. ntACTKE SOUCT. 

TOR Ohic ww nhW c£13kl 
Mary Male. Accord Personnel 
0936 816606 . 
imSATMN -v OEMERAL PRAC- 
TICE Dorset cruet cElOK. Mary 
Male. Accord Personnel 0935 
816506 

UTKSA7JON Mucmw Masts- 
[rates Court Coumy Court 
Dorset to £L2k- Mary Male AC- 
cold Personnel 0935 615606 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HX3H COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

No 004972 of 1986 
tN THE MATTER OF 
FAGANS ALE 46 LTD 
AND 

THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 

By Order of the Htoh Court of 
Justice. Chancery Division- dated 
i6Ui January. 1986. II » ordered 
that Patrick Walter John 
Hartman, of 1 Wardrobe Place. 
Carter Lane. SL Pauls. London. 
ECJ V 5AJ. Certified AccountatlL 
be and is hereby appoi nt ed Llanl- 
dalor of toe said Company 
together with a Committee of 
Inspection. 

Dated tots lath day of May. 
1^6 

PWJ H ARTISAN 
LIQUIDATOR 


COMPANY NOTICES 

Pioneer Mutual 
Insurance 
Company Ltd j 


ASHLEY SPECIALIST A R ROW! - - 
■Ml The pnrcntonl 
Agency tar ee p e rt en r ed Legal 
. Secre t arial staff at afl levels. 
Highest salary. For oeatta o i 
our current vacancies M oi- 
683 5535 


AssisrAffr souenwt west 
YoncJure cCion Mary Mato 

Accord Personnel 0935 8 1 6506 

PARTNERSMP P ROT ECTS tar 

young toUrttar conveyancing - 
prohale bias Sussex. Mary Male 
ArcoRI PnaoniMl 0935 815606 


Practice, cstmtoai -ark com- 
- petaive salary. Mary Male 
Accord Personnel 0935 816506 
BOUCrrORMOHCOffTEMTlOUS 
4 General Practice Berkshire to 
£ 15k- Mary Male Accord. PW- 
sonnel 0933 813506 
ABLE ADVOCATE for Avon com- 
pettthe salary. Mary Male 
Accord Personnel 0935815606 


DUE TO OCPAMSHRI a highly re- 
garded S. Bucks practice seek* 
fugb rannre newfy ouaUfied so- 
Urtton n specialise m either 
domcsUc conveyancing or pro- 
twoe Saury above market rate, 
exertew ' prospects- Tefcpnetn 
. Richard Morgan. GJftnel Duffy 
Consultancy. 01-831 2288. 


HEATHROW AREA UtlgatMOSo- 
tkiton. Lundy. crmdnaL civil 
tdeany min 2 years guadfled. 
Leadnrg firm Package to 
£17.000 + prospects. Meredith 
Scon iTrcrmiment 01-583 
□055 541 3897 levesL 


CONVCTAIKRra m CORNWALL 

c£ 12.500 Mary Male Accord 
Personnel 0935 815506 
CCMCRAL ntACTICE OLAMOR- 
«AH salary neg. Mary Male 
Acrord Personnel 0936 815506 
NON CON I IN I NJtfS ASSISTANT 
LX. Kept to £l 3fc. Maly Male. 
Accord Personnel 0935 Biseoa 


Beutra v,| . 



I. Tomdvcibe Samra gf Acctnn 
mi fspon of te rfesrsjfa-tliejear 
ended 3U Dccaotu UC. 

L 


J. Toreappeim Ante Yoooj; v 
■N&m w the Cbogo, sad u 
antharife the themiw to doetec 

U(d2MKviW. 

3f oster of the Bond 
D.BLEAZARD 


Rfftamd nd Hod Office— 

Wasta H gen 18 Odfe, thud Nath, 
tank Lnopcol. L228KY. 

WT Si 

I. A ■enta-nuU to ntead aid tat 
“ite ■ pra, to mead Mdvge 
swad othsa. Apimj mb bei dodn- 
flflkOnpaiT. 


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column cemimetre.Coun and Social I £6 per line. All rates + 1SNVXT. 

, PAY NO P OSTAGE^ Send t«K The Iks. Strafe? Margate. Group 
Cbssffied Adrattseaeat Manage^ Times Newspqpen lid. Adretttemat Depart 
Beut,P-O.B«k484,VirpDa Street. Londira El 9DD. . 

.NAME • 

ADDRESS. 


TELEPHONE (Daytime I - 

ACCESS CTt VISA A/C No 


. DATE OF INSERTION ' 

lPfo«M4llhhHinL-t8f [Wltopj'liJ (Wixcvtolf i 



























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THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


' 27 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


AP chuffed advertisements 
«" « accepted by icfeptone 
Announcements). The 
“OdW is 5.00pm : days prior 
mpubUaiKw (tc 5 00pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you »Hh io send an adiotno 
meni in tenting phase mdude 
j w da ytime phone number. 
CUSTOM® SERVICES DE- 
PABTM EOT. If you have any 
queries or problems retain* to 
y our ad vonsemem once it has 
oppewrd. please contact our 
C ustomer Sen ices Department 
by Wephone on 01-481 4100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


CXTANuntc PVBUSHOtS 

Would UK* TD 

™T* l« »ou have written a 
lhai «n*nes puWmhun. 
»n» IO Den TMl l o THE 
BOOK GUILD LTD. rs High 

L*i*ps. Suivx BN7 2Lli 

OPE** LOVERS Llvrtv RaU 4n 
anas perioimed mqhflv bv ihn 
S"®*™ 1 Opera Company at 
Banos Wbu on the Park. See 
■Food And wine- 
•WSS SUMMER FARM JOBS. 
Also 9rapmu:kma in Franre A 
bMBWand Smd large SAE id 
vwi. o Park End St. Oxford. 


BIRTHDAYS 


CAROL J. MOORE wner* else 
rould II be announced. Happi 
nh btrtniuy Ualrmw to Ihp 
rlun Mucrt Mir nirlufd. Jus- 
tine. NKhola*. Sknoo. Tam mi 
and Daisv. 

**•* L TAYLOR. AO ncoaln e 
nier evnosed. Single Lem 
Reflex. 


SERVICES 


COMRAHY GOLF Dm oroonaed 
lor sun or customers nn> m 
ration Tpi 0734 B7J7 22 

FIHD HW PARTNERS Him- 
He<u FkIw Inlroouaionv 
SAC U Braurlunip PL SVsS. 
01 267 6060 Hnh success rate. 
Men Wto m dmund. 

CALIBRE CVS prareswonallv 
wniien and produced comtu- 
lum i ilae documen t s Drums. 
01 580 2US9 

WMMGTIME THIS YEAR rould 
Up realli beautiful for lour lam- 
ilv esopcutlv it a pfobfcm- 
dnnldng loved one Tclnrs 
effective and n-cogntaed treai 
meni I nr nus nines- al Clouds 
House wtnch n wt in oeauiitui 
and secluded surrounding- Foe 
Mluflrated orosuertie.. coiHarl 
The Life Anew Trusl Frrpimsi. 
Salisbury SPJ 6BR or 074703 
655 

DYSLEXIA For sprclaltM help 
wilh this educational problem 
com art Bnckwali School. 
Northiam. me Sussex. Good 
close ratio learning Northum 
2494 

SELECT FRIENDS Exclusive In- 
iroduclpsns ior Use unattached. 
5R Maddox street London Wl. 
Tclc pnane 403-0*37 

FHUUIDSNIP. Lose or Marriage 
All ages areas Dateline. Deal 
■Qi6> 23 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don WS TM 01-958 toil. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US VISA MATTERS E S Gudeon 
l.S i-iwvpr 17 huMrtxk- SL 
London HI Ol JM 0813 


WANTED 


WIMBLEDON Dehenlurrs and 
oalkils u anted lor pmolr com- 
panies Top prices paid. Ol 228 
0425 


WIMBLEDON TICKETS All day* 
wanted. 01 688 9449 Day. 
Eves 01 387 4S89 and Ol 303 
1979 


URGENT WIMBLEDON TICKETS 

01-778 9373 anylUne 


LARGE WARDROBES A Minors. 
Desks. Bookcase etc A Pro 1940 
lurmture Tel 01 S8SOI48or 
Ol 228 271b day or noM 
WIMBLEDON We guarantee to 
pay loo p ram lor cenire court 
seals. Phone Rolan Richardson 
DO Ol 956 2630 
ALL JEWELLERY wanted. Top 
cash wuiiarns. 45 Lambs 
Cnndun St WCl 408 8838 
ALL WIMBLEDON TICKETS 
wanted Centres. NO Vs. Best 
prices paid 01-839 5233 
WI MBLED ON all rackets wanted, 
not lor resale Best prices paid 
01 950 4536. 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS lor 

sale wanted plus worts, pop 
event s 01 093 9944 iTl 
WIMBLEDON - loo wires lor On 
ire Court seals Ring 01 836 
6571 

WIMBLEDON tickets wanted. 
Wham Queen, all olher events. 
01 58? *264 or Ol 587 1095 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS. BougM 
or sold Top price-. paid Trt Ol 
701 82*3 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS required 

Ol VI 1775. 


FOR SALE 


REStSTA 

CARPETS 

SPECIAL OFFERS 

WtsarCt's Co-kCD'a'-: T-i-s 

fitter -Jtiral -S 55 DM 5C 

vtf * vat wen mu Semec car 
mi: in u-ce mksji* ucmc 
£ 4 3S »r sq rf + WT lYSiie 
Stocks list 

548 FuRiam Road. 
Parsons Greco. SW6. 

Tel: 01-736 7551 

Fm HhnatH-Eiptil QBtag. 


SALE SPECIALS at Tops GCC 4 
prnnram video C319 1J in rM 
LI 59 16 IP LI09 Rem can 
91 lower hhune Si Si* l 
Ol 750 0953 

BRtOHTS OF NCTTLEBED. Hi 

and I8ih Cenlun replica limn- 
lure ualuduiq the BnwJiMn 
Manor Cnnrrtion. made in our 
own wej| Country workshop 
Nrtilebed near Henlrv ir-l9li 
641115 Bourne mourn <DS02> 
295880 Tupsham. Devon 
.nia:«"i tilt Berketes. 
GIO-'iMfiV 810952 

FINEST aikilili wool carpets \l 
uadr ptues and under. af*o 
auil.iMe IPO’s extra L.UUr 
rie-in sice ri-n-n.irl' uM-r nail 
normal utter Cnancerb CJiUDis 
Ol 405 0453 


announcements 


Laps 

MEDICAL RESEARCH 
DO YOU SAT WS OR NO TO 

I ?J- --.-era k'--i»’ 

; 5w«ctf 45 » Tf Srt 7! ’ _ 

j Rn»*( i a(i4.i Zryr -=t“ 

l :«(■.- 

4 K"J F«cng ?YwC4k 
: kins, i L:?i iT • xk 

}rc—; £ r- rr irr 

ievrur.-*- u.-rgi', i. touch; lum 


I 


-N 


» TtilHS'.PCXWtl 

Mtr.i Min u«jc» nwiitci: 

ni*ii 

tnt UiOHttiMr Miexu ; 
WUItcraiWi 100*1 Til A“V 
ri'< iTfunr 5-Srr-arr isrt.c: 
hjpisiwf tit d7*»:r 3P>* 


Cancer 


Together we can beat it 

We fund over one ih:id of 
j!l mcir.-h into ihe f «ics- 
uoit ap J cf cincer in 

the VL 

HripuntA ienciti’? > iv«-4- 
non or nu'kv a v i * 

Cancer 
Reseaidi 
Campaign 

; Cariira'i Hi Hive Tc-r jv e” 

;7rjil ITj;.S.l • ld.inSV.lt i»l- 



THE TMBES 1795-ine. Other 
bun avail Hand hound ready 
for preunumon also 

“Sundai^" £12.50. Remember 
when. 01688 6323 
T1CHETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cat*. 

Siartigftl Exp. Chess. Lra mb 

All lhealre and tpnm. 

TM. 821 6616 -8280499 
A Ex Vhd Dinen 
BIRTH DAY DUE 7 Give somemie 
on nrmnal Tiroes Newspaper 
doled ihe very day l hex were 
born. £12 50. 0492 31503 
CHESS TICKETS AVAILABLE. 
Tnesdav A Salunuy manners 
Reasonable pnm. All re. Rep 
iiunie ageney 01 741 butt 
OU) YORK FLAGSTONES, con 
Mr sefB Me Nationwide 
dehieris. TM i0380> 8S0039 
t Wills! 

SSATFINOCRS Any evenl inc Lrs 
Mis CoienlGdn.SlarliqME.yp. 
Wimwedon. Glyndeboume Ol 
828 1678 Major crrxtll cards. 
WIMBLEDON, CATS. Marinin 
Exp cnexs. Lm Mb an lhealre 
and soon tm 63 i 3719 . ost 
171S AU ritanr oredii cards. 
BOUGHT A SOLO, wirounwn 
Tickets. Chew A Pop Concerts 
Ol 831 1080 81 
FBI D L LS -’FREEZERS. Cookers, 
eit Gan * ou buy cheaper? B A 
S Lid 01 229 1947 H4o8 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS. 

Bn until and SOU Tel 01-881 
JJ47 or 01 791 22fl6. 
WIMBLEDON DEBENTURES 
Best seats l«l len rows Lounne 
hadon eir T« 01 402 7851 
WIMBLEDON and all Pop Events. 
Tickets nought and sou 
Ol 9JO-W77 or 01-9508598 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS Best 
•eats, all (lavs Ideal Incenllve 
package. Ol 602 9766- 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


ROYAL DOULTON Toby Jugs 
Figurine* animats, elt. want 
ed 01 883 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


SPRING INVENTORY PIANO 

SALE High quuUri Grands and 
L pnqtiis. Many unprecedented 
dismunli All in be void Free or 
subudned detherres Part ex 
mange and HP Credit cards 
welcome Free (uniiw For ap 
potnitnem call Ol -Wo 31 11 or 
Ol »35 7578 -Mon IP Sail 
Bovnrtorfer London Plano Cen 
ire. 38 WJfenorr SI.. Wi . 
THE PIANO WORKSHOP 
London’s Itvidmg speoalist hi 
new and resiored punmfor the 
largest amumr seteciion avail 
obte 3oa Htafvwte km. nws 
O l 267 7671 Free ruia Vogue 
RECKS IE INS. 2 beaulilul grands. 
Good price lor giuck sale MUM- 
nans imlruroenlk. Tel. 01-586 

4981 

PIANOS) TLLANE A SONS. New 

and reronaitHmed Quality al 
reasonable prices 526 Brighton 
Rd . *5 Crovdon. 01 -688 3513 
BCMEDMAYER Grand 6’4- 
no I640Q manogonv. ex cond 
£2.300 ono. Tel. as 72 372619 


YACHTS, PLANES & 
SPORTING 


DUTCH BARGE IOO ft tong bv 
apixox 17 ii beam gd mnd 
lltrougboul. spare engine Ripe 
tor com 1 C35 030 ono Far 
moredeialK lei. 0772 i 7 50B4A 


FOOD & WINE 


OPERA LOVERS! Lively IULkui 
arias performed nightly bv me 
spanhelli Ooera Compxuii al 
Parra's FAnta mi the Park An 
exriling new rrsiauranl al 116 
Kniomsbnoge. SWT. Reserve 
Vvjur UMc now on Ol 584 


LECTURES & MEETINGS 


THOMAS CUBTTT lecture on 
-■Cnanoing pallems or Inquiry 
in Work 3 Living” by profsaor 
Donald Sc hon. M.l T Auihur o< 
-The Renertue Praciinoner’’ d 
presimrs Reilh lecturer al Ihe 
Royal Society of Arts. 8 John 
Adam Street al 6pm mi 28th 
Mai Admission by lickei avail- 
able without clurar Teiephone 
930 51 IS Extension 230. 


FOR HIM 


Wedding Morning Suits. 

Dinner Suits. 

Evening Tad Suds. 

Hack Jackets & 

Striped Trousers. 

Surplus to 
him dept 
TOR BALE 
(TORI £30 
UPMANSHKE 
DEPT. 

22 CHARING 
CROSS RD 
LONDON WC2 
(Nr Leic es ter Sq | 

Tube) 

01-240 2310. 



AUCTIONS & 
SALEROOMS 


FULL SIZE SNOOKER TABLE lu 

Ik- wad bv auction on JO May 
|98e> Supplied new by 
Ttiuruom in IW Phillip-, 
fvlari lehr.n,-. Have, place. 
U--X4I Grove. London Mil 
6LA Tel Ol 723 2047 


SHORT LETS 


KENSINGTON Sunny garden rial. 
IP VOi.GF maourinr Lcrainne 2 
bJp. L22CI pw Ol -092 Swat 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS. 

Crnlr.il Uvulran irom LJ75 nw 
Ring Town Hve AWv 173 34 53 


FLATSHARE 


WI4 tU^vik-iTT-en Pr.Tt i(- n 
25- In vh.nr Cl.ii c. V" 
PW nxcl Ring e<72 6354 
apm 


F MW snare 5 bed 
Ini, n twill-a. I, lib 2 Cithers o 
i-ips so'ilmield Sin L2Crtprm. 
Phone 91 *92 4422 exl v:-3 


KENSINGTON WB Bngni Hal in 
quite loc.iimn nit church siia-rt 
Thr-e rr,-rri* k 3 Ball nev, lur 
mini- an>i appliances £229PVs 

? I 1 ?) 

LARGE lutlv fumrxhed luxury 
in j. Mjnei'*- in Baiierxea Inina 

-ec.m i r-n»n aiurv . 2 rthi i vqi 

t,dv LI5-5 PW 418 3144 

■ nai ■ 9.-* V.-. r -eve- 
WIMBLEDON PARK, l ,-i 2 girh 

lm- -I’ju- rm in lamUv heme V vn 
pwi-i 170 pw TV UC Mir kil 
A H-un Cl-we I afar L*e m 
W ,xh Me •» e|. 71 ‘It. HI if. 
ALEXANDRA PARK \22 «m 

i in il.il IO nuns Bnunds 
Green Sl.ilmn !s W 1120 ixm 

■ »rl iW e”6 eves 

CLAPMAM SOUTH iJ.I pers to 
shre CH hse All mod ions 
Li ’•ra t> ni exrlus Ti-1 Ot 673 
r«>-. '■ .l llef 6 30 pjn 
FLATMATES 9r|"rli>e Shsnng 
w eli e-i.iu iittrotluclv-rv service 
PlV- |e| UK -IPW I’ll 5441. 
,’l.' Bn-mpinn R iM SV» N 
KENSINGTON W14. Prrt 2S* la 
xhair larm- Hat .ill mod ennx 
wilh one eihef L68 P-. Tel 
5’J 7466 |lu 60S 7089 Eve 
PUTNEY HEATH VUI5 r»m F 

ii s U-ge ilrai- rman in lux flat 
C55 pw itx 1 -tkiv • •?: 49? in 
cvl 1 71 -F.ves Ol 78S oiW 

BALHAM nr-M M r non smkr 
O P in n-.vl li e Nr lube LlbS 
prm T- 1 6~0 5399 all Jpm 
CLAPHAM STH prof M O 8 in 

lin n v! n-e iirlnhe CITSprin 
Trt PI 671 26;G dll 4 [Hit 
FULHAM Pmtil-1 Invniitrrnm. 
(.■rl.ililr- (’ H Isuise O r L1U0 
firm Tel rtl 751 2M53 rxe 
HAMMERSMITH. Prat f In snare 
fi;[|i IUX nuioe Q R LTAl ex 
pem Tel 731 9567 
HCNOON. Luxgrv dble rm lor 
rpie avail 6 vvks ini 2f.’ ine 
L70 jw it*- Tf I 202 .=-47; 

P ARSONS GREEN Ijx Hal 
w mav’rheir [. a r . £i-io 

orrr exri m ~M 7311 
SOUTH NORWOOD -15 mile 
To xii* Pita Girl lux J B«1 h«e 
U-JO (» ni me fajo 9J’>5 eves 
SWll O ’R m xiurnma lux n-vr 
All mrd ennv Gen \S I uliv 
in.1 145F' 21 22*6510 £• es 
TOOTING DEC 2nd Pm: prison 
r plea^nl il.vl Ct-gx pm > 
Bivun’ t.-l 0! ’Xi'' i.’”mj eirs 
W- KENSINGTON Piol V T mr 
MIPT 0 l( in iui nr tune LJ6 
p-. ni : T<-j o: .L-: 3544 
Wl Own litvipi m large Immjh 
ptiuse in 'I’a'i t vi>: iri- r"-ji tut-, 1 
p-« n« i Ol 5n7 Sc-99 
WANDSWORTH Cr,mira ti p p-r 
•^tr.s n > •> r te u rb sni ig.- re«- 
lit' 1 ' 1WTT1 . vrt 870 VI4|X eve 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London W1H 4DH. 




OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


CORSICA GREECE 
SARDINIA 

June getaway bargains 

from £169 

7 14 night inclusive hotbdayv 
via Gacurack- 

ISLAND SUN 
01-222 7452 

AHTA ATOL 1907 


SWITZERLAND SchrdUM fllohtl 
Ol 724 2388 AETtA ATOL 


AIRFARE SPCCIAJJ5TS Sydney 
o w £395 rtn C64S Auckland 
O w £420 rtn £774. JODUTg 
o w C264 rtn £470. Los Ange- 
les o w ci 92 rtn £380 London 
niohl Cenire Ol 370 6332. 
AIR TICKETS SPECIALIST* 
New York £249. L A £329 To 
ranio £229 JTwrg £419 
NairnM ES09 Sydney £639 
Auckland £749 Dartatr 150 
Jenin n street 01 839 7144 
GREECE. TURKEY, CANARIES 
Las! minute fltghlx & noiiddys 
from Calwick (ltd avail ex 
Man l 109231 771266 104221 
73999 Timsway Hobday's 
ABTA ATOL 1107. 

GREEK ISLANDS Algarve. 
Menorca. Tenerife VHLK AM 
Pemam Tdvmvas. HolKLura 
Fligfab. Brochures inyunl 
bookings. Ventura Holidays. 
Tel 01-250 1355. 


DISCOUNTED FMES 


JatnsgiKv 

Snqfe 

ono 

retorn 

fWi 

lurote 

£2X1 

rrs 

Cam 

Site 

S.T10 

L14K 

£235 

T.tb 

M Bflfl 

£230 

K4U 

Smut 

£1B5 


DnaU 

Mre Astta Tram 

£420 

Ltd 


182/188 BtfMl SL B1 
TO: BM37 8255/8/7/8 
Ln & Gro® Boousp fiWfanss 
UCk vi&e.DKRS 


LOWEST FMES 

Pans C69 N VORK C199 

rrankhm CBS LA/SF £335 
Lagos £320 Man, £198 
Hawn CIS SngasorB £420 
jo bug saflO Sarigu* £335 
Case £205 kamanou £440 
OenBam U3S Rangoon £350 
Hong Kong £510 Catania £425 
Please write or teteptaae 
SUN & SMD 
21 SMn ri. InNm Wl 
fly U9 2Nfl’4xr osj7 
uuon CJMRBS UtXPIB) 


NEW UIWFAISS WQLROWmE 

Abdpd t«Jl Dub» £370 

F rescan £400 ISUfliH S10H 

Lagos C340 je<WUi £440 

Wonrona S-=00 Karachi C?0 

airman f^C Kul.’Sw T445 

Bamuvk 5150 kuM4 £350 

Bern M 5535 NVvyk EMO 

r-tro 5740 Seat £750 

Cokjmbo (4J0 SeO'MH £b55 

OaiuMt, £770 Timvo £570 

SKTLDBD TRAVEL LTD 
2 BEMUN STREET. LONDON Wl 
Td; 01-439 3S21pajS7 
ARURE BOMDED 


BARGAIN AIR FARES 



OH 

RTN 

1 SYDNEY 

£399 

(MS 

JO BURG 

E246 

f4.11 

TIL AVIV. 

£99 

fin 

NEW YORi. 

£139 

f?75 

LOS ANGLES 

£19? 

F3RS 

BANGKOK .. 

t.-m 

MK) 

TORONTO 

£16? 

£26 

MANY OTHffl BARGJUHS 

DECKERS TRAVEL 

01-370 B237 



UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jottorv. Cairo. Du- 
bai. IsutibuL Singapore. K.L 
Delhi. Bangkok. Hmi£ Kong. 
Svdney. Europe. & The Ameri- 
cas. Flamingo TraveL 3 New 
Quebec Sl Marble Arch Lon- 
don WIH 7DD. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 1000-13.00 


UP UP & away 

Nairobi. Jo'Burp. "Cairo. DubaL 
Istanbul Singapore. K.L DetbK 
Banekok. Hong Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & The Americas. 
Flamingo TrawL 
76 Shaftesbwy Arcane 
London W1V 7DG. 
01-439 0102 
Open Saiwday 10.00-1100 


VALEXANDER 

ABcanto 6/6 fr £85 
Gerona 30/5 It £71 
Malaga 6/6 lr E99 
Tensrrte i/B lr £116 
Herald ton 3/6 lr £125 

Most European dosttna- 
tiota ring now 

on 01-723 6964 
I ATAl ABT A/ATOL 


PRS5RCE TO PRRRDISE 


CD S. PftCJBC 

c_ m M L-WD 

fO UWEABD Of 
y LEFKAJ. & OJFRBA 
5 Uttcvo runrtc trjctm n*"s. 
IO uxDW'dr px*i Wi duta mv 

S stowrr, emesuif Icwk. ewooic. 

I nupln & nwio ■*k«i"ied 

“^IR£I5S.JI Hit.aiia Jorr Oa 


SPRING 


* SAVE SSI's 

1,000’s of seats 

must be sold 
* TOURIST CLASS • 

* CLUB CLASS * 

* nnsT class * 

■ HUGE DISCOUNTS * 
’ FREE CHAMPAGNE 1 


AUSTRALIA 
OACIFtC 
FAR EAST 
AFRICA 
CARIBBEAN 
USA * USA 


NEW ZEALAND 
CANADA 
HD EAST 
SJtFRKA 
S AMERICA 
USA ■ USA 


SUN WORLD TRAVEL 
(ESrD 1969) 

59 SOUTH ST. 
EPSOM. SURREY 
27538/25530/27109 
15/24832/26097 
AU FLIGHTS BONDED 


|M7 i& 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


Bukhride Ini c«sl fli(fett 
Um best - aafl n eaa pnm It 
173J80 cum tbu tno 
im TK 10U FROM £7*5 


rroirr 

-nn 

ES*1 

PtRTH 

aJtilotd 

ran 

fJC 

s:.!3 

n«s 

toor* 

ins 

•Sl 

SdWOTf 

t:» 

MU 

>MK HOW 

t?« 

(«9B 

Kin EUjMMr 

site 

!J74 

COLOMBO 

cc 

tm 

ISIAN8UL 

tis; 

£i« 

WURCA 


rm 

jo etna 

M3 

war 

uw 

«:u 

‘■WS 

L3S MJELE5 


fm 

sfw vna 

rite 

ran 

GEHVA 

£ 

£M 

WASWVrfilN.* 

£174 

EOT 


BAiiumt 
42-40 EARLS COOT MAD 
LSX80I WS BEJ 

Lmw U5A Ff^pni 01-537 5H0Q 
Loro Hail FldnK Ol «a 1515 
lyi’SnlMKI Cuss 01-938 3444 
Govwitraefli LkhkiM. Sontoa 
IATA ATOL 1458 


RCMH HOTEL VALMCO In Cor- 
wt Perfect co male laovnoux 
xiJtnwnv Migeru land, un- 
litmlea wine. FanUMUr bargain 
pnres lor May and Jum de«L 
Biadon Line* Travel. 

Ol 7B6 2200 


CD9TCUT lUtt ON nisnts hot) 
to Europe. ISA A imp deitiaa- 
itany Oiptamat Tram Ci-730 
9201- ABTA IATA ATOL. 


CHEAPEST FLIGHTS- MIRK - 

Bene Travel. TM Ol 3B9 6414 


CHEAP FLIGHT! Worldwide. 
HayinarkM Ol B30 1366- 


MALACA. CANARIES 01-041 
1111. Traveler 1ST. AbU AIM 


MALAGA. FARO. LoertW tom. 
Ol 736 8191. AIM 1893 


RENTALS 


CABBAN & 
GASELEE 

SW3 FW.I» Co Lflt Bfld. 
Rscas, US, £150 
SW1( Owners name, fled. 
Recap. Ufi. £150 
SW10 Unftm Mens HU 
wtfi tarpon. 3 Bed, Recap, 
M29. £275 

SH5 UJrtym nranacufitp 
lamilyl>u.5BM.2RflCflp. 
Ainsncsi K, 2 B. Pm 
£300 

SWl DutHax ovsr Gths. 3 
Bad. taap. K&B. £450 
SW1 Balcony ta. 3 Bad. 2 
Recap. KA2B. £500 me 

01-589 5481 


WOULD WOE nighh weciBltatng 
inFini.ClubClau Economy to 
AuGralia. Far EM. s. Ainca. 
LSA. Lisbon. Faro 6 Geneva, 
Phone Travel Centre 01-666 
7025 ABTA 73196 


1 CALL For tome of the 6K> deals 
on flu vtiiax. ante tills and car 
nirr TM London 01 «* 6000. 
Manchester 061 83? 2000. Air 
Travel Advisory Bureau. 

LATIN AMERGA. Low tost 
Ihqnis eg. Rm £48B. Lima 
£4ffi rtn. Also Small Group 
Hnlinay Journeys (eg Peru 
from CMOl JLA 6| 747-3108 
LOW FANES WOBLDWNMC - 
lsa. s America. Mid and Far 
EM. s Atnra. Trayvah 1 . ae 
MargarH Street. Wl. 01 680 
-Visa Accepted) 

N.'YORX Miami LA Cheapest 
larex on manr L S seneduM 
earners Abo transatlantic 
charters A ntgnts io Canada. 41 
684 7371 AHTA 
HOUND WORLD £79S enm. Chib 
lr LI599. First lr £2035. Syd- 
ney lr £659 rtn Columbus. 
Cutlers Gardens. IO Devonshire 
Square. CCS Ol 929 4251. 
LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most Euro 
Pc an desunolnns Valexander 
Ol 402 426? 005? ABTA 
61004 ATOL I960 

MIAMI. JAMA I CA. M.YORK, 

Worldwide cheapen fans. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke Sl 
Richmond ABTA 01 940 4073. 
RELIABLE LICENSED A Bonded 
law vM rughl experts: Europe 
A w wide Freedom Hoi Slavs 
01-74] 4686 ATOL 43? IATA 
SPAIN. PORTUGAL, GREECE. 
Flights Irotn mod UK airports. 
Mam Lale special offers. FaUor 
HI 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUNISIA For that perfect hnHday 
wilh sunny days 4 cam ns- nts- 
Ideal Spring Summer TunMan 
Travel 01-373 4411. 

TURKEY. Lale availability 3.1 D 
June lr £189 Turkish Delight 
Holidays Ol 891 6469. ATOL 
2047. 

USA. CANADA. AMD EUROPE. 

LOWEST ADR FARES. Also 
a no and First BEST FARE 01 
394 104? AIM 1400 
ALICANTE, Faro. Malaga etc. 
Dimond Travel ATOL I7B3. 
01 581 4641. Horsham 68541 
AUSSIE- NJE.. South Africa. 
L’ S A. Hong Kong. Best Fares: 
01-493 7775 ABTA. 


CHEAP 

Europe Worldwide. Tel. 01- 
629 0690 SJeepv.es! ATOL 
DtSCOUNTS 1 sl/ Economy IKK- 
ets Try us Iasi FLIGHT - 
BOOKERS 01 387 9100 
ECUADOR TRAVEL tpectaUjm In 
Latin America A Europe air 
tari-t Tel: 01-437 7534 ABTA 
GREECE, CANARIES towed 
lares. Call Biggies Travel. 01 
735 8191. AIM 1893. 

SINGAPORE AND ISTANBUL ev- 
ery Sunday Boi economical 
air fare. Tel Ol 437 4233. 
SYD MEL £618 Perth £546 All 
maior earners lo ALS NZ. Ol- 
584 7371 ABTA 
SOUTH AFRICA Jotourg rroni 
£465. Ol 5B4 7371 ABTA 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


CRUSE Turkey 12 berth crewed 
motnr vachl 2 wks June 3 17 
£365 no me ms. Whole boat 
available other weeks from 
£1000 Free W. wore, it b. Ol 
326 1005. AIM 2091. 


GENERAL _ 


CYPRUS LEAD MG HOTELS on 

Islands finest beach. Grecian 

Bay 5 slar Grecian Sands a Mar. 

Book through Sovereign. 
Thomas Cook. Cypruna. 
Cvprair. CynJon. Kypnn. Pan 
World Hobdays er Directly. 
Avia Nana P O Bo* 6. TM 
21301 I Hex 2980 
TAKE TIME OFF u> Paris. Am- 
sterdam. Brume!*. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dieppe Time Off 2a. 
Chester Oovr. London. SW’iX 
7BO Ol 235 8070. 

CYPRUS June July August 1 or 
2 wks Hotels Apis. Scheduled 
Bis Pan wortd Holiday* 01734 
2562 


OVERLANDERS 


FANTASY TREKS 


Journey 

To the Steppes of 
Russia 
Up the Nile 
To Katmandu 
On an African Safari 
Down the Amazon 
From £300 for 10 
days 

To £3,560 for 28 wks 
Ring now 


OF FANTASY -r- 


01-636 6963 


SELF-CATERING 


SUPERIOR 

VILLAS 

VfJ on atwav', swapty a lint class 

fite fttn a; ma i*st nriffl we 

nj.-e prcuaa 1 ’, me h,T«s seteaioii 
m ;!i* McflitHianflte (hi Corfu. 
Crate Pams. fiJtiar.e Scud of 
FraiM ifaiy ■ or me Ueacn or r&t 
ami. in nave mu some a cook 
Prices" Ftom me veer pvoensiw to 
me simnsmqiy modess 

StcImt 

CT TRAVEL (!) 

43 CaAmn Stmt 
UmdM SW3 OT 
81-581 0851 / 01-584 8883 
(589 0132 ■ 24 bf brostara 
anted} ABTA ATOL 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MAHON HARBOUR MENORCA. 

Hnuve min pool and u «urter 
J-JII Alin S*iperh pnsinon Jt 
w.ilerx edge Exert harbour 
vii-w-. Sips t- 2nd bouse avail 
m-iifbv iitxra dps 6 Tel Ol 730 
(.Wj 

MENORCA Villas. uMrtnmviy. 
i.m rrn.T- ail dai«i avail 
Slav luni'spenaN nmn se.non 
linm LI25 CrlfK H Hilda vs 01 
S.i9 7070 A Ofa?? 677D71 Or 
IWT 677076 >24 hna Aim 

1772 

MAJORCA Piimn Pnllema. bemi- 
unit mttonrainv I bed nai pnm. 
iraliu gdiHi iir »j niosl dales 
ir tBQ pw me 01 948 5900 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


CHATEAU IN CHER, Grand 
xhauiue counirv Cfwn park 
river nearby \rrv Imsw bul 
he.iumijl Slew 2 5 LI 20 1 50 
per *rc* OB9285 2333 


MAY-JUNE BARGAINS 

■*— FROM 


FLIGHTS ONLY 

GREECE 

SPAIN /CANARIES 

£67 


UPFRIEND 

SWISS COTTAGE. Moo beaut fum 
hse. Sops poomn 40e*nB.<Mi 
ram lux Ullu ka. 2 Ms. gun. 
Vary dose mb £450 m 
KBsfliGTOH. PteOy mem hse. 3 
betters, mao s pa w n s imp. 

K + B.Rbcbil 


BAYSWATEfl. D*fl> ftfl now dtnr 
hse QuM so 2 beflmK. rmp. 
KitdA Kdn/uc. pant. png. £175 

W SO. Fantastic volaa apL 2 
dbtu uednns. recap. K -* 8, nw 

deem. £130 pw. 

<99 5234 


SW3 

Cltamutg masonite recently 
redecorated, fumstiad or un- 
fumched. 3 beds, 2 baths, 
large reception, kit chen and 
big sunny terrace. -£300 per 
weak, company JeL (No 
agents} 

878 3814. 
or 584 0030 


BRITTON POOLE 
& BURNS 

CHELSEA. SW3 PresagtoiE (tat 
ouertoobno/usa ol arm pons. Hecep 
nn. Dnmg ftn. 3 me Beds. 1 Snis 
Bpd'Srudv. SUB. Cktes. New KA 
FURN ot uwum. Co LeL E450PW 
SOUTH XBL SW7 Btom Cottage. 
S®nq ftn. KL'ftner. 1 DHe. 1 5g>e 
“ ’ Co La £225fw. 

01 581 2987 


HYDE PARK W2 Ow amrtitMS 
Excellent i dble bed Hal. rectn. 
Ml and bath. £160 pw. 
F.W.Gapp 221 8838 


KMOSTON. Pretty mod 3 bed 
colLMe style Me Wilh patio & 
gge nr ihopi an A park. £150 
pw william A Sen 947 3130 


SW1 Lovely fUmrahed flat avail- 
able 4 moruhv 2 Beds. 1 Lge 
RKep Room. Kitchen. BaUirm. 
£360pw TeL 01-225 1972. 


CHELSEA. KMGS RD. Luxury 
lunuyhed 1 bedim flat £98 pw. 
Ring Sue on 01-649 8935 day. 


FULHAM SW« Charming 3 bed 
house In quirt road, dble tecpl- 
kil plus washer. 2 baihy and 
gdn. Prof sharers consu>er*d. 
£166 pw. F W Gapp 221 883a 


CM5WICK. Luxury gmd floor 2 
bed flaL Inc 

conserv atory /duilnp room, cm! 
roe of 7011 gdn. F. r io Inc. 
m wave, d washer. C-T.V.. 
video and en suite shower In 
nuritrr bedim. Owner abroad 
for I year £185 p.w pref Co 
Let. Sue 995 9632. No agami 
please 


I via rura/houses: £200 - £1000 
p w. Usual fees req pwihiw 
K ay A Lewis. South of the Park. 
Chelsea office. 01 362 8111 or 
Nortn of Die park. Regent’s 
Park office. 01-686 9882. 

(-FULHAM - CHELSEA — DOflOOt 
flat, living rm. bed. bath ML 
GCH. IM water, serviced. I 
prof or bustnen pm. ihs. £42 
p.w. la advance s- JKMHlUVlew 
between IO am and 2000 pro 
Today. TBI.Ol 736 2209 
LET TOUR P RUPLIf lY with 
greaier flexibility ” Obtain your 
-furniture for short or long term 
lets on our unfcme hire service. 
Ring Mr Mtcliael Norbury. 
John strand Contracts Lid. Tel 
Ol 485 8613. 

EALMB. Pert ref 1 bed flaL new 
conversion overtooktap The 
Green. Ini des. and no expense 
spared. 2 mins train lube, high- 
ly rec. £l 10 pw. Co lei. 244 
7365. fT). 

LUXURY HOLIDAY FLAT, 
KnightSbrMge. 2 dble beds, 
lounge £450 pw West End l 
dble £140 pw. Carts a. 1 bed 
£175 pw and many more. 244 
7353 iTL 

REGENTS PARK. Sunert> SC 2 
bed flat ’ Lower gmd floor’ in . 
mtniunceni Nash hse Exqui- 
sllely furnished and equIppesL 
3/6 months £285 pw. Co. let. 
Dav 278 9597. eves 723 S6?4. 
VICARAGE GATE MW. Spaoous. 
smart 2nd fir fll In drtlghlful 
quadrangle. 1 dole bed. sgl bed. 
diung rm. well- gulp kil. bath 
rm. elks Avail June long Co let. 
£400 pw MaskelK: 581 2216 
AMERICAN SPECIALISTS arc 
currently vekuin qeod quality 
renial a c cwnswodatlon in 
ccnlral London for watting 
company tenants 01-937 9681- 
■ARBHSAN. Ben Johnson Hse 
5lh floor maisonette 2 dble 
beds, lounge. Lu dining haloo- 
nv Weal loe mr City Vvegt End. 
£250 pw Co let 244 7353 m. 
CHELSEA PAULTONS SQUARE. 
Ne-iy dec luuy lum 2 mu bed 

IUI Co W 6 mmtr. rain. 
UMpw Other rxc flats and 
hiivx B Dale Ol 750 594Q 
CHELSEA SW3 Superior rentals. 
Beaulilul 3 bedroom flat wilh 
garden . Owners own homes 
£225 pw Phone Gavin Cowper 
01- 3S1 6732 

FULHAM. Anractlve 1 bra] flat 
avail up lo 9 months. Come- 
meni Parsons Green lube £BO 
pw Excellent rrfs req. TeT 01 
35? 9925 affer 3pm 
FURNISHED FLATS. ImeJl lora- 
mn Lnnsdab- Square NI Meal 
prmrsMonal [Dunks Reason- 
abh- rem Ruin 01 607 8931. 
Tuesday Spin lo 7pm 
FULHAM! Reder flat, rerw 
phone, tso pw Others 6JT 
2610 HoiMoralon. 



THE VERY BEST 
Landkffds & Tenants 
come to us for 

BELGRAVIA. 

HAMPSTEAD. 

KENSINGTON, WIMBLEDON 
and 5*n4ar praas. 
Ptmn now. 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


HOLIDAY FLATS. 

Super Kir contained holiday 
ilais id Knuinaon 5*5. 

.Avail from ISih June 
Studios frm £195pw 

I -bedroom firm £23ftp* 

2 bedroonu frm £375pw. 

Book new. 

■ LONDON ETTES" ‘ 
01-589 4555. 


THE VERY BEST 
Landlords & Tenants 
come to us for 

BELGRAVIA, 

HAMPSTEAD. 

KENSINGTON, WIMBLEDON 
and sknlar areas. 


BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


REGENTS PK Mews r«fl with gge 
■ 10d yds irom lube, communal 
gdm. Tennis eru fully fur- 
mshed- i dble bed. large 
retention, bathroom, kitchen A 
dining room. £180 pw. um. 
Tel 01 936 6052 


CHELSEA NR SUMME SQUARE 

Charming 6Ui floor flat newly 
modernised & decorated. Dble 
bedrm.iKVP. k&b. lifts- port irs. 
restaurant £200pw ind CHW 
minumim Ml 6 rath* 362 0609. 


Wl LARGE LUXURY Furnished 
flat. 3 beds. 2 rereps. kitchen 
and 2 bam* >1 en sullel. gas CH. 
Chw. A1I appHances. L3 month 
let. £4Q0pw. Tel 01-629 6102. 
III. 


EXCLUSIVE NR. HAMPSTEAD. 

Highly luxurious pnKtigluus 
tqr fum rial. 2 bed. 2 rec. UL 
■ solarium sauna, gdns. alarm. 
£180 pw 01 883 4116. 


P.WJBAPP iManagmenl Services) 
Lid reautre properties IA central 
south and west London areas 
for wailing aptU leant* 01221 
.8838. 


BEHR A BUTCHOFF for luxury 
properties in SiJolin* Wood. Re 
ems Park. MaMa vale. SMn 
Colt A Hampstead Ol -586 7561 
CADOGAN STREET SW3. Altrae- 
dir l bed flat with recep/ML 
Mh. dressing rm. £150 pw. Co 
M. Ridleys: Ol 684 6391. 
DOCKLANDS Houses and flats 
throughout ihe Docklands area. 
Docklands Properly Centra Ol 
488 4852. 

KEHSMGTDH. Brand new » bed.' 

- -nem-en- siai* . rec. UL wash 

math. eh. Only £140 pw. 
WTP. 935 9512. " 

KEMSBflGTONl 2 bedim fMrC2H. 

- -TV. -renova te d - nhaht-XlM) . 

pw Others ail areas 627 261 Q 
Honu-tocuto** - ■ 

MAYFAIR HYDE PARICr .The 
most lux long- short term apis. 

1 week 1 year. I a beds - 
■w T P. Ol 936 9512. 

-MEBfc HOUSE Prime W2 loca- 
lion. Cosy 2. 3 bed. 2 bath well 
equipped. Good value « £226 
pw. WTP Ol 936 9512: . 
MEWS HOUSE. Bright modern I 
bed ho. wilh garage In W2, 
Long co let £126 pw. Buchan- 
an: 381 7767. - 
NJLONDON3 bedim flaL sharers 
wrtcome. nr tube. £106 pw. 
Phone the rental experts 627 
2610 Homeiorators. 

PARK LAME (elf) 4 flats Urperlod - 
block. 2 A 3 Bedrooms. 
Long Short le« from £500pw. 

• Allen Bate* A Co 499 1665. 
SWISS COTTAGE lux (own house 

3 bed. 2 bath. Irg beaut reep. 
goe A gdn. short long lei from- 
C32SPW . OI 485 4266 
937 9681 The number lo' remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
properties In retural and prune 
London area* £ 1 50/ £2.000pw . 
Vtsnwe LONDOMT Alien Bate* 

A Co have a large selection of 
flalx A heroes avail lnrlrte 
from £200 pw 01-499 1665 
WJ.ONDON 2 bedrm flaL pets 
welcome redec. phone. £106 
pw- 6 branches lo serve you. 
c>27 26)0 Home locator*. 

A S/C STUDIO use of garden. 
£4fl pw Olhers all areas, sues, 
price* 677 2610 Humeloealor*. 
CAMPDEN DWe bedim flatlet, 
ret pi. phone. £6° pw. Diners 
627 2*10 Hame toca iora. 
CHELSEA Luxury 3 bed Mew* 
house. Newly lumnllfd- £260 
pi* Flncnes 736 6505. 

CHELSEA SW3- The vale I bed. 

1 rec K A B. Free now. 3. 6 
mins’ CITS pw 352 6870. 
CLAPHAM 2 bedrm flat, nr ldbo_ 
reenl.TV. £105 pw. Olhm627 
. 2610 Hemetocaioi* 
FORTn-CREEN H2 unique *ptal- 
levei flat, patio A gon* security 
srslem, £160 pw. 01-883 4116 
FULHAM- Soaaou* furnished 
house. 4 Bed*. 2 recep Co LM. 
£300 pw TeL (0202 1 7*8657. 
FULHAM Large lux house, all 
amniue* ni tube, nice garden. 
£380 pw 788 4448 Finches. 
FULHAM Luxury 1 bed flat. new. 

• !Y lined, co let. £120 pw. 
Finch S 736 9606. 



CANFIELD 
GARDENS, NW6 
Charming newty dac£ 
rated one bedroom ki 
lovely Victorian conw- 
ston. Double bed. rec. ML 
Co let only. CaU Jo or 
Emma ; 

Utile Venice office: 

01-ZW 484Q. 

BROMPTON PARK 
CRESCENT, SWS 
Setedkxi of stuoo. 1 A 2 
bed apartments. Indhnd- 
ual modem & tradWonal 
(umteMng. Award win- 
ning devetopmertt. Tree 
ined gardens with leisure 
centre. A variable now. 
£120-275 p-w. 

Kensington Office: 
01-937 7244. 

WAPP1NG, El 

Two bed maisonette in 
completely refitfOtehed 
devaopment Minutes 
framOty 3 west End. 2 
beds, reception room, kit 
& B a throom. Forking 
space. El 20 pw. 

Docktands Office: 

01 538 4821. 


R PIa2a. Estates 


PALACE G8WT W2 

Nnsfir decanted WiiieM la 
ftw as- 3 Beds. 2 ms, l re- 
eras. waan/nreaiiM mu ige. 
balmy. Long ML £450 pk 
— ■ HAT HU Wl 
SBsnteojM floor flat in the bean 
ol fte West End. FwibM utt 
beautbd aGoues. 4 beds. 3 
bates. 3 racspL. tteten/ftmak- 
laa roam. Long teL CTJOO psl 
01-724 3100 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

We have a superb selection 
-of persornfly tnspectsd fur- 
nished arm iKifumished 
propertiea ir marry fr« Resi- 
dential districts, ranging 
from £150 pw to £2,000 pw. 

Teh 01r486 8926 


MWt. 

Avattebte lor three to sec 
months I* this Cully lurntehed 
(■round floor IteL The accom- 
modauon offers three 
ordroom*. one rMndon room, 
kitchen and bunroom and k 
avaitobte now lo a company 
tenant al £250 a week. Co mart. 
George Knight LU on 01-794 
1125 


EATON SQUARE. SWl. Beautiful 
l bed apartment. SophteUcaied 
home, luqhaec stereo equip- 
ment. superb order, highly 
recommended Recep. bam A 
modern kil. all matin. £300 
pw. AyKdetd A Co. 01-361 
2383. 


KENSINGTON Luxury 7th Boor 
rial In weh maintained mod 
~plfb View* over Hof land Park. 
3 Bed*. 2 Balhs. large Recep- FF 
mod kiL lift. Garage. £3GOpw. 
Co Lei. 6 mowns+. AROUND 
TOWN 229 9966. 


HARM VALE supurb lux fUL 2 
meazandrine beds, bid dressing 
rm and study, very large reoepL 
Pierre Cardin fumllure. lactinl 
and drahwasheijetc. communal 
gdn. £360 pw. min 1 yr. lete- 
phMW 0202 22425 


MAMPSTEAO me. bedrm RM. 

• TV. phone. £90 pw. Othetr-637 
2610 Homeiocaten... 
WBHBLEY BACK Lux. siwdous. 

' ' Tun! 3'EedTy«: _ age. IMBiW- ' 
den- Very xudef-str. £150-pw. 

. Oa let.- Reduction far. ombroox 
. XffcOI 904 1774 ... . _ . 

AMERICAN Bardrt -urgently re- 
. . aul res rmcuiyrtlate and houae* 
from £200 - £1.000 pw. Ring 
Barges* Estate Agcnra 581 6136 
AVAILABLE MOW Luxury Rate A 
house*. Chelsea. Kn&itsbndge. i 
-Belgravia £20O£2D00pw. 

Tel: Burgess 581 613*. J 

BATTERSEA S ’cmye bedrm flaL I 
no WIN. pmaie parMng. phone. 
CH.JT75 pw. Many oOwn too. 
627 2610 HomeJocator*. 

KENSMBTON WS. RecepL bed- k 
A b. CH. TV. video, garden. 
£160 pw. 0722 72639 
KENSINGTON *114. Large newly 
. com X bed lum rial. CH. 

Cl I3pw. Crawford* 689 4555. 
KNKHT5BRSDGE Lux. 1 bed ftal 
tor couple. Ch. porter. Long tef 
only. £150 pw. 01 584 7263 
LAMA 607 9381. Selection of 
luxurious flats, houses rroni 
£150 - £500. 

10 MNS CITYi Beautiful I f 2 
bed rial Ig Inge. OCH. pking i vr 
£l7CVw 985 8107 (after 6pm i. 
NEWLY refurbished modem 2 
room fUl to let irom June 1st. 
Regen is Park. Tet. Ol 936 9066 
NWS. Superb luxury studio fiai 
with large bakuny £110 pw. 
west Trend 930 9512. 

ST. JOHN'S WOOD. Superb mate. 

2 ref. 2 beds. kit. dm. uniliy. 
car port. £190 pw. 821-0417 
SW7. Sunny «h lacing 2 bed rial 
o looking private gdic. CH. 
£150 pw 01-373 6942. 

TAKE YOUR PICK of the best 
rtaix. duplex A nouses in Lon- 
don - 689 5481 TO. 

TWIN BEDSIT! Wit. Own lot. 
phone. C H. £50 Othen all ar- 
ea*. 627 2610 Hometocalorv 
Wl Spactou* 2 bedroom modern 
flat ui immar condition £200 
pw 240 7984 m. 

Wl HARLEY ST.. Raf. 3 date 
beciv 2 bathe recop. fully fur- 
nnned. £350 pw 631-1369. 
WCl Lnigur modem 1 bedroom 
Mew* Hat wun character. £160 
pw 240 7988 IU 
WEST KEN Large 2 bed flat, roof 
lerrare short lei. £160 pw 
Finches 736 550S. 

ST. GEORGES SQ. SWl. Superb 
mnd. conversion chw to Ptmn- 
ta lube 2 due bed*, recep- K A 
B Good value. £100 pw. Co let 
pref 244 7353 TO. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


HOUSE PARTIES IN GREECE 

Ma» Hows’ Can i hntf a com on ■ 
nns villas lor 27 Tins 6 a imuue 
ounce tm ibe ddeerrang cousle 
to soy in some ol the most luxuri- 
ous houses m Gmee-Ouo to 
flmencai gn cg l ta ii on . w haw 
one or nw lanje liwuiv houses on 
Corfu m june/earfy Jut*, win 
MW Hearn mad. cook senra 
facn u tune wdi have Own mm 
Dfma» Bedroom and twtimom 
We must stress mat names ire 
icairy un- orgausal and couples 
can Bf x 3mratt.’H)rat»e as may 
«VH £349 2wfc5- E199 ■ 1 ML 
me Hum Limned places: Rmg or 
can hi lot detaHs. 

Barclay art nr Aceras. 

W TRAVEL (TL 
43 CADOGAN STREET, 
LONDON SW3 ZPR 
01 561 0651 
(01 589 0132 - W Hn|. 


ISLUOS M THE SU 
MAY/JBNE BREAKS 
FROM E1Z9pp 

FLY DIRECT to CORFU. 
CEPHALONIA. ZAKYNTHAS. 
CRETE 3 SKIATHOS Beaulitui 
uJ*4s & an close m anurous 
beacnes. Some FREE ewa ultra 
FREE wmoburlmg m Crete. 
Avaiiabiiily ihroughom me 
summer 

0403 59780 
IU0S ISLAND 
HOUDAYS 

i3IA WTO ATOL tU3 


INCLUSIVE HOLIDAYS 

CRETE /RHODES 
CORFU/ ATHENS 

£109 

FREE WATER SPORTS 


GRYPHON TRAVEL AroL PC'# V 

> Of- 4^9 6841 - 01-434 4598 

‘ ( TO LINES 1 . f 24 HOURS ) 


:ORFU BARGAIN £136 I wl,. 
CI69 2 w»*lnr « bi-juiilul vilto 
nr Utr seu 1.8 A 15 June E.x 
Gin, tv Of 7X4 2562 pan 
world Kouaaw 

RHODCS Special offrr M4V 21 Inc 
lux apt hob. Cl 49 p.p uho 
28 S A 4 6 TH Sirunu 0705 
8021114 

GRHECE. L’mpmn Stench ctmm 

lliqhh.villd rmlihrlt 2eusHo( 
kldV* 01-434 1647 AIN Alto 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


MARIKA 41 PtCTRASAMTA. Tu*- 
c am- Inland and ui in omm - 
\ ilia* * pctol* Resort ViIMj. ini. 
061 833 9093 or 01 904 2307 


INDULGE M A MAGIC WEEK- 
END. indulge yourself . »ou 
deserve Ii. A weekend in Ven- 
ire. norence. or Rome Can 
well drink well, ilwp well and 
fmort .Umiui Cnqtamrx dmra 

inq Mreiher. Or combine a cil> 

weekend wun a week by ihe 
6>a Free broenure Irom Magic 
ol llulv rx-W ST. 47 Sfupberck 
Bush Green. Wl? BPS Tel. 01 
749 7449 i?4 hr* wrvKei 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

HOLIDAY 

BARGAINS 

vuias A Ajurtmoits from 

£195 per week. 

Call Now 

0923 674310 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE, villa 
Holiday* of dKiincixm lor me 
tec* lew Tel: 01 -491 0802. 73 
SI law’s Street. SW 1 
VALE DO LOSO 3 bedim villa 
wiinpoAi AvaU May- OCT. Ring 
Ol 5HO 451? 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


DANTMOUTH. DEVON. Escape 
■hr grci id our uuriunv 
niulpped railage for 7. in 
giouiidvdf Refteurt h«4J*e. Con- 
vemenl. vrt teCtuded. Dart, 
ntoufh 4555 Bteckawton 539 
EXORMWALL S C from June 
OumH Ijrmhouse islp* 81 h 
Lndgr ronaqe ibi Tennt* Com 
Sea Moor* Golf i06054i 261 


WALES 


NEV CRN, PCMB5. 2 ltd* «#J 

moot Superb detslonelixe wilh 
gauh-n «Jp* 67 July A Sep*. 
£150 pu ret- .0239 830865 

YORKSHIRE 


N YORK MOORS In «ghl. winy 
okt larmhouM nr river * wun- 
mmo. fiuung canoeing 16 Aug 
- 16 Srtd Trt D6& 382373. 


BJVLW. 


72B 1-H.D. 1979 BO.OOOnU*. 

green met or crawl, new 
K-rec A. brake*. £1.900 tmo 
Trt Dav 01 358 0068. Eve* 01 
286 8944 


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BOXING 


McGuigan letter 
to Eastwood 
highlights tension 

By George Ace 

between Barry That cannot be denwd _and 


The rift , 

McGuigan and B J Eastwood, 
his manager, which emerged 
after McGuigan won the WBA 
featherweight title io London 
last June, has deepened rapidly. 

McGuigan has in his 
backroom team one of the 
shrewdest legal brains in Ireland 
and a financial adviser who 
never sees less than lflOp in the 
£. It is «i McCtriaan’s insis- 
tence, almost certainly at the 
behest of his advisers, that 
Eastwood will not or any future 
occasion commit him to any 
contract unless he has written 
permission from the boxer. 
Word of month and a handshake 
is no longer acceptable. 

; The unfortunate result of this 
is that an unnecessary strain has 
been pat on a relationship which 
was more like father and son 
than manager and fighter. No- 
body doubts the sincerity of the 
new men advising McGuigan 
bat nobody Is better informed 
than Eastwood of the in-fighting 
that goes on before a world tide 
boot contract is signed. 

In a world where the wheeler- 
dealers call the shots behind the 
scenes, the days are past when a 
manager managed and a pro- 
moter promoted. The m an ag er, 
the promoter and the boxer are 
only cogs in a wheel and are 
virtually subservient to the net- 
works who control the silver 

s (xeetti 

| No world tide boat is a viable 
proposition far a promoter or a 
worthwhile financial venture for 
a boxer and his manager without 
a television tie-up — viable and. 
worthwhile, that is. in this era of 
inflated values when vast sums 
are paid to those with skills 
beyond the norm able to boost 
the television ratings into the 
millions. 

Nevertheless. McGuigan has 
seen fit to heed his advisers and 
la recent exchange of letters 
between manager and fighter, 
initiated by McGmgan, is cer- 
tain to put farther pressure on a 
partnership that has travelled a 
long way in a comparatively 
short time with tremendous 
success. 

One cannot detract from the 
Jadroftness of Eastwood's man- 
lagerial prowess: he is his own 
j man, prepared to' back his 
fljndgeineiit with his considerable 
^resources. Expense was-oC no. 
consequence when Eastwood 
deemed it was ' in the - best 
interests of his performer. 


I 1131 WIIHnit f 

there is more than ™ 

truth in What many bri>^ " 
Ireland that Eastwood had prob- 
ably more to do with wiiming tne 
world title than the educated 
fists of McGuigan. His percep- 
tion of who was ngbt lor 
McGuigaD and when McGuigan 
was ready for another step up 
the ladder all bear testimony to 
fas fight know-how. On both 

sides of Ihe Atlantic Eastwood 
has gained the reputation or 
being a “shrewd cookie . 

What the outcome will be is 
problematical: McGuigan 

signed a new three-year contract 

some months an® hut his June 
23 date in Las Vegas against the 
South American and .Argenun- 
ian c ha mpion, Fernando Sosa, 
almost certainly wilL if he is 

Cowdell protest 
put in focus 

The former British super- 
featherweight champion. Pat 

Cowdell. will support his protest 
against his defeat by Najib Da ho 
in Manchester on Saturday with 
photographic evidence. A pic- 
ture showing Cowdell on the 
canvas with Daho astride him 
throwing a punch will be sent to 
the British Boxing Board of 
Control. Tom Lynch. Cowdell's 
trainer, said: “The referee's 
prime objective is to protect the 
boxers in the ring. To hit an 
opponent once when he is down 
is Dad enough but to hit him 
twice is disgrace ftil.” 

successful, open up new and 
extremely lucrative horizons for 
the world champion; 

It is this that may have 
prompted McGuigan's most re- 
cent letter to Eastwood, obvi- 
ously al the instigation of his 
advisers, which arrived only a 
matter of days before they left 
for Palm Springs and the final 
preparation for the title defence. 

Relations are certainly tense 
between the pair — they haie 
□ever been at a lower ebb — and 
that cannot be good Tor the 
mental attitude of the boxer to 
the job he faces. 

Sosa has the reputation of being 
a most durable customer of no 
mean ability. With only four 
defeats, all on points, in around 
SO contests he can by no stretch 
of the imagination be rated a 
pushover. 


MOTOR RACING 


Vital time ahead 
on and off circuit 

: By John Blunsden .-■ ' 

Demanding circuits of a dif- showrooms and it is now widely 


ferent nature await Nigel 
Mansell, the winner of Sunday's 
Belgian Grand Prix. and the rest 
of the - drivers when they head 
across the Atlantic next month 
for the next two rounds in 
Montreal and Detroit. The Ca- 
nadian race on an island in the 
Sl Lawrence River vies with 
Imola for being the thirstiest of 
4.aJI for fuel and is followed by a 
tortuous street circuit on which 
there will be no such worries, 
but instead a never-ending bat-, 
tie with wheelspfn out of the" 
many tight corners. 

Four days after the Detroit 
Grand Prix comes a piece of 
decision-making which will in- 
fluence the whole picture of 
Grand Prix racing in (he years 
ahead. On June 26 the extraor- 
dinary meeting of the FISA 
executive committee will take 
place to decide the method by 
which the planned reduction of 
Formula i horsepower to a 
maximum of 600 is to be 
achieved. 

If the current breed of turbo- 
charged engines is to be allowed 
io continue, the power reduc- 
tion will probably be achieved 
by the requirement either of a 
pop-ofT valve, which will limit 
the amount of turbo boost to a 
specified figure, or an air 
restrictor of an agreed size 
through which the fuel-air mix- 
ture will have to be passed. A 
third solution mooted is a 
drastic reduction of engine size, 
perhaps to only l.OOOcc. 

The only other solution, 
which would be favoured by 
many despite its political sen- 
sitivity, would be to ban turbos 
altogether and revert to a for- 
mula based on normally as- 
pirated engines. The presence of 


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believed that within a few years 
they will have been eclipsed by 
highly efficient, normally as- 
pirated engines featuring four 
valves per cylinder. 

If so. could there then be 
justification for the retention of 
turbos in a form of motor racing 
which is supposed to represent 
tomorrow's technology rather 
than yesterday’s? 

After his- triumph at Sp3- 
Fran corch amps_ Mansell was 
generous in his praise for mem- 
bers ofhis Canon Williams team 
who had helped him to his third 
Grand Prix success and taken 
him into third place in the 
championship table. 

He singled out Patrick Head 
the designer of his car. the 
strength of which Mansell put 
dramatically to the test w hen he 
made a mistake on the fifth lap. 
Having left his braking too late 
for a light comer. Mansell had 
the option of going up the escape 
road or trying to scramble 
through the comer by leaning 
heavily on the kerbs. He chose 
the latter, but hit one kerb so 
violently that his car literally 
flew through the air. 

“It says much for the strength 
of Patrick's chassis that after 
such a violent shock it was still 
true enough to enable me to do 
38 more hard laps with Ayrton 
Senna on my tail and then win 
the race." Mansell said. His 
victory was also assisted by 
some lightning quick work by 
his pit crew during the mid-race 
stop lor fresh tyres. His car was 
at rest for just 7.2 seconds, 
which is believed to be a record 
even for Formula I. where pit 
lane dexterity is now almost 
taken for granted. “The team- 
work was sensational." Mansell 
said. In rushing out of the pits to 


turbos in Grand Prix racing had .rejoin the race he found lime to 


a certain attraction to the motor 
industry 1 at a time when this type 
of power unit was about to be 
widely promoted for passenger 
cars. Bul the turbos have never 
been high volume sellers in the 


raise a hand in salute- of a 
magnificent performance. Later. 
Mansell. dedicated his victory to 
the memory of Elio de Angclis. 
his former team partner in his 
days with JPS Lotus. 


BASKETBALL 

New coach for 
Sunderland 

Sunderland, now known as 
Reg Vardy Sunderland after 
completion of a partnership 
with a car distributor, have 
become the sixth club in the 
National Basketball League's 
first division to announce a 
change of coach since the end of 
last season (Nicholas Harling 
writes). 

They have appointed Duane 
Grooms, a 34-year-old 6ft 6in 
American from Colinsville. Illi- 
nois. as successor to Dave 
Elderkin. who becomes the 
club's general manager. 

For the past six years. 
Grooms has been playing and 
coaching in France. He has just 
been in charge of Gravclines. 
runners-up in the French second 
division. The team who finished 
top. Cholet. are coached, co- 
incidentally. by Tom Becker, 
the former Sunderland coach. 

Grooms made it a condition 
of his employ. men l lw Sunder- 
land. who finished third from 
bottom last season, that the club 
would give him an assurance 
that he would be able to recruit 
| new players. 


TENNIS 

French Team 
Cup triumph 

Dfeseldorf - France won the 
World Team Cup on Snndav by 
hearing Sweden 2-1 in the first 
all-European final of ' the 
contest's eight-year history. 

Henri Leconte set them on the 
winning road by defeating An- 
dersr Jarryd 6-3. 3-6, -6-1? but 
Mats VVjiander pulled Sweden 
level -by winning the second 
singles 6-1. 6-4 against Thierry 
Tnlasne. Jarryd’s inability to 
hold his serve in the decisive 
doubles match with Wilander 
against Leconte and Guy Forget 
cost Sweden the trophy. The 
French pair won 6-3. 2-6. 6-2. 

The opening singles marked 
the first time Leconte and 
Jarryd had met and the Swede 
found it difficult to adjust his 
predominantly baseline game. 
By the time he was dose to an 
answer the first set was over. 

Janyd's cool, methodical ten- 

filn h ff hl, fl t ?d b r som* beauti- 
fully- timed lobs and fine passing 

shots, came into its own in the 
second set wbed'be achieved a 
» go S-3 up and 
,be notch "ith a fine 
JacUmnd passing shot. Bor 
Leowte would not be denied. 


% 


— J 


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V * -• 


28 


-SPORT 


TTTF TTMER TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


GYMNASTICS 

Restoring 
the old 
aesthetic 
values 

By Peter Aykroyd 

Anyone wishing to find oat 
how far gyniBastics has devel- 
oped world-wide during this 
decade could hare done no better 
than to watch the unique 
NatWest Gala for Sport Aid 
recently held at the National 
Exhibition Centre. Binning bant. 

There. 14 leading nations, 
including six Eastern bloc coun- 
tries, sent a bevy of world, 

Olympic and European cham- 
pions who demonstrated the 
latest advances in all three 
branches of the spore artistic (or 
conventional gymnastics), 
rhythmic and sports acrobatics. 

For some years, men's gym- 
nastics has been moving into the 
realm of the spectacular. One 
recent example of this trend is 
one-armed work shown by the 
Tsnkahara vault carried oat by 
Laurent Barbieri, of France, and 
the one-armed giant circle on the 
horizontal bar executed by Jorge 
Hasse or East Germany. These 
moves na rurally require great 
strength and steadiness. 

The triple somersault, re- 
garded a few years ago as a near 
physical impossibility, is East 
becoming the norm. Hasse 
achieved a nicked version as a 
dismount from one horizontal 
bar and the showy tumblers, 
Evgeny Ivanov of the Soviet 
Union and Sveteslav Slavov of 
Bnigaria, climaxed their 
demonstration with triples at the 
end of a 30-metre ran. 

The global effort to bring 
women's gymnastics back to its 
aesthetic traditions as estab- 
lished by the great stars, 
Latynina and Caslavska. in the 
1950s and 1960s is now having a 
significant effect particularly in 
the floor exercise. Expert dance 
techniques, considered choreog- 
raphy and a dash of show 
business are now paramount for 


MORE SPORT 
PAGE 27 


success, and progress was exem- 
plified last weekend by the 
sinuous routine to oriental -style 
music by the talented Camelia 
Yoinea of Romania. Among 
others, Iveta Polokova of 
Czechoslovakia also matched 
movement and mood to music, 
impressively adopting a theme 
reminiscent or the ballet puppet 
Petrushka. 

In musical contrast the ele- 
gant Lilia Ignatove of Bulgaria, 
the world's No 2 rhythmic 
gymnast, performed her 
balleticully sultry routine with a 
ball to the evocative, unaccom- 
panied voice of a woman folk 
singer. And dance synchroniza- 
tion, variation and timing of 
almost professional standards 
were displayed by the Soviet 
sports acrobats, Natalia Miller 
and Evgeny Marchenko, in their 
tempo routine.' " 

Aesthetics apart women gym- 
nasts are now, of coarse, emulat- 
ing moves once thought 
exclusive to their male col- 
leagues. For example, Sabrina 
Mar, the overall American 
champion, performed op the 
asymmetric bars the difficult 
Tkachev release and grasp move 
first developed as a stunt for men 
on the horizontal bar. 

Perhaps the progress of gym- 
nastics is demonstrated best by- 
today’s lop exponents of the 
pommel horse. _ named the 
scourge of men’s gymnastics, 
requiring as it does a strenuous 
combination of strength, balance 
and momentum. In Bir min g h a m 
Gyorgy Gnczogby of Hungary, 
the world and European pommel 
horse champion, produced a 
smooth, flowing routine, circling 
effortlessly over the entire area 
of the apparatus without a 
grimace of strain. 

If the dreaded pommel horse 
is becoming easier to handle, the 
limits of the human body in 
gymnastics today are bound to 
be extended. 


YACHTING 

Smaller boats 
come off 
second best 

By a Correspondent 

A south-westerly force six. 
which blew up to reach gale- 
force and bright sunshine, were 
the lot of competitors in the 
fourth of the five-race McEwan 
Scottish series being contested 
off Tarbert. Loch Fyne. yes- 
terday. Many crews found con- 
ditions more than testing, 
especially among the smaller 
cruising boats, for many of 
whom this series is the only 
serious racing of the year. Two 
dismast ings. innumerable torn 
sails and a host of minor gear 
breakages were the outcome. 

In the first division Geoff 
Howison's One Tonner. Local 
Hero, and Richard Matthews' 
Oyster 40. Nadia Catcher, are 
sharing the honours. 

FOURTH RACE: DMston 1: 1. Local Ham 
(G Hoteson). Division & 1. Spirt (R 
Burrows). Division 1 1. ChO Chta [J 
Anderson) Cruteer A: 1. Gumdroa (T 
Windsor). CnmarC. 1. Sorcerer of Rhu n 
Rarity). Cruiser D: 1. Diamaust (R Frewrt. 
Cruiser E: 1. Renegade (R and D 
McLaman). Cruiser P; 1, Juftra (M Htfl). 
Sonata: 1. Footnote {□ McLaren). 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Britannie County Championship 
(1 1.0 to 5.30 or 6.0. unless stated, 
100 overs minimum) 

CARDIFF: Glamorgan v Somerset. 
ZOUTH: 


Hampshire 


BQURNEML _ 

Gloucestershire. 

LORD’S: Nhddte&ex v Sussex. 
NORTHAMPTON: NarttumptonsMra v 
Leicester shire 

EDGB ASTON: Warwickshire v 

Worce ste rshire. 

HEAfHNGLEY: Yorkshire v Lancashire. 
Warwick Under-25 Competition 
CHlGWELL: Essex v Middlesex. 
LEICESTER: Leicestershire v 

Northamptonshire 

Bain Dawes Trophy 

HASLINGDEN; Lancashire v 
NotliMhamshve. 

MINOR COUNTIES’ CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Newbury. Berkshire v Buckinghamshire. 
Sherborne: Dorset v Wiltshire. 
Netherfiekt Cumoeriand v Hertfordshire. 
Hantepoct Durham r Bedtoroawe. 
Jeomomt Northumberland v Suffolk. 

OTHER SPORT 

CYCLWO; M fr. Ra ce (Second stage: 
Lancaster io Sedgefnid) 

CROQUE T: Souttinon tournament. 
SPEEDWAY: National League: Poole v 
Long Eaton 



PA/-IMI-. iMPnusQiVE DOUBLE SCHWARTZ MAKING STRONG CHALLENGE FOR SPRINTjNGTjTLE 


Risk Me’s pace 
should put 
Sandown rivals 
in their place 

By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


At Sandown Pprk this eve- 
ning the National Two-year- 
old Stakes, run over five 
furlongs, offers an opportunity 
to watch a handful of the 
fastest youngsters seen so far 
this Spring in opposition, 
most notably Risk Me and 
Zaibaq. 

The latter is reputed to be 
the best of those that Harry 
Thomson Jones has run — ana 
he has run a few good ones — 
which helps to explain why be 
cost $1,600,000 when he was 
sold as a yearling in the 
United Suites. 

Zaibaq's reputation certain- 
ly preceded him to the course 
at Newmarket on 2.000 Guin- 
eas Day when he started 
favourite at 1 5-8 first lime out. 
In the race itself he was not 
hard pressed to hold Samcek 
at bay. 

In the meantime, Sameek 
has paid him a compliment by 
winning his next race at York. 
Gulf King and Besiplan are 
others, who finished even 
further behind to have come 
out and won since; Bestplan at 
Lingfield and Newbury, Gulf 
King at Goodwood. So reputa- 
tion apart, Zaibaq's fomi has a 
rock solid look about it. 

In spite of that, I am still 
happy to go nap on Risk Me to 


give his trainer Paul Kelleway 
his second taste of success in 
the race in as many years. Like 
last season's winner. Moon- 
light Lady, Risk Me will be 
ridden by Pat Eddery. 

The former champion jock- 
ey was booked to ride him first 
time out over today's course 
and distance on Whitbread 
Day, but he had to give it a 
miss as he was required to be 
in Ireland, instead, to work for 
Vincent O'Brien. 

Paul Cook was called upon 
to deputise for Eddery and he 
could hardly believe his good 
fortune when Risk Me pro- 
ceeded to turn the race into a 
procession, winning by what 
looked like a conservative 
estimate of eight lengths. 

While it is fair to say that his 
form does not look as good on 
paper as Zaibaq’s he still made 
a huge impression on those 
who were there and I for one 
have no intention of deserting 
him. It was apparent that he 
had inherited much of the 
speed of his young sire 
Sharpo, who is still the only 
horse to have won the William 
Hill Sprint Championship 
three times. 

In the Brigadier Gerard 
Stakes, Eddery will be on 
Nebris. who has gone from 



Game Longboat 
enhances his 
old Cun claim 


£>• 


By Mkhad Seely 


Longboat, a fast finishing 
nuuier-up to GELdman in last 
year’s Ascot Gold Cup, stamped 
himself as the likely winner of 

the highlight of the Royal 


King's Stand Stakes.” said Pat 
Eddery, the winning jockey “I 
/-a n ’t gee anything to beat him 
the way he did that-” 

The most extraordinary 


Risk Me, who is fancied to give Paul KeDeway a National Stakes doable. 


strength to strength this Spring 
as his form record suggests. 
But here I much prefer Su- 
preme Leader, just so long as 
his rider, Philip Robinson, 
does not overdo the waiting 
tactics again the way he did at 
Newbury last time out and at 
Sandown before that. 

Each time Clive Brittain has 
leapt to the defence of his 
jockey, but 1 still share the 
majority view that there was 
no need to lie so far off the 
pace the way Robinson did 
before he and Supreme Leader 
managed to get up and pip 
Iroko on the post in the 
Westbury Stakes over today's 
course and distance in April. 
Now he will be meeting Iroko 
on 2 lb better terms into the 
bargain. 


This will be Bedtime's first 
race since he contested the 
Japan Cup in Tokyo, 18 
months ago. Injury kept him 
off the course all last season. 

Having run in two classic 
trials, Danishgar has now been 
dropped in class into the 
Wheaisheaf Maiden Stakes, 
which he should pick up at the 
expense of Bananas. 

Before going to Sandown 
his rider, Walter Swinburn, 
will be on duty for Michael 
Stoute at Leicester where he is 
expected to win the Tote 
Fillies' EBF Stakes on Skeeb. 

Swinburn will also be on 
Badoglio for Lester Piggott in 
the EBF Woodhouse Eaves 
Maiden Stakes, but here I 
much prefer Sarab’s younger 
half-brother Floose from Paul 


Cole's yard. Floose was taken 
out of a race at Goodwood last 
Thursday because of the dete- 
riorating state of ihe ground. 

At Redcar, where Philip will 
take a lot of catching inthe J & 
B Rare Scotch Whiskey Sprint 
if he is in the mood he was in 
at York, there is a big tip from 
Newmarket that Mubdi will 
make a winning debut in the 
EBF John Cross Maiden 
Stakes. 

Also. Btshah is fancied at 
Headquarters to beat Mount 
Olympus in the Mai co ran 
Winters Maiden Stakes. 

Finally, Telemeter Gem, 
who did this column a good 
turn last Thursday when she 
woo at Perth, can score again 
in the Slramshall Novices 
Hurdle at Uttoxeter. 


Meeting with a dour display of perfbnmuic* m the fire-totoog 
stamina in the Henry O Stakes dash was pni upby Grey Desire, 
at Sandown yesterday. who finished like a rocket In. 

Forcefully ridden by Willie take second place after bring . 
Carson. Dick Hollingsworth's last of all with ooty two fortonaV 
five-year-old beat Seismk Wave left. J 

l- w i«^hc —tth rKtM Charlie Nelson, delighted to * 

have given Robert Saagsrer rat 
another birthday present after 
the celebrations on the Isle of 
Man over the weekend, com- 
mented. “Doable Schwartz has 
really cone to himself this 
season. He's always been a year 
behind himself. . He has 
strengthened and thickened out 
beyond afi belief, so I can give ’ 
him twice as maeix work.” 

The Lambotxni trainer conod- ■ 
ecs Double Schwartz to be at Us 
most e ff e c tive over five furlongs 
and envisages aiming the five- 
year-old at races like the W3- 
Wam Hffl Sprint Championship 
and the Prix de L'Abhaye later 
in the year. 

Carson went on to complete 
54-1 doable when riding Srjaii ■ 
to an astuaishingly 
comfortable victory in a pre- 
viously competitive lotting 
Selfridges Whitsun Cop. 

“Slyah Kafcm will probably 
go for the Royal Hunt Cap at 
Ascot,” said John Dc- top, 
“then I’ve gat a pattern race to 
Germany earmarked for him.” 
Yesterday's principal Derby 
news concerned Aralcar and 
Jareer- Yves Saint-Martin has 
been booked to ride Kais At 
Said's recent runner-up to Fast 
Topaze in the Prise Lapis. 
Michael Stoats has eng 
Brian Rouse for Jareer 


by Vh lengths with Eastern 
Mystic tbreequarters of a length 
away third. 

Carson was impressed by 
Longboat's courage. Watching 
the video recording of the race be 
remarked, “Just look at that, 
they were all going better than 
me. Now there's Seismic Wave 
coming to swallow me up but the 
old horse just keeps going and 
the further he goes, the better he 
likes it.” 

Dick Hem, the winning 
trainer, watched the race on 
television at West Dstey. “I was 
delighted with that,” he said 
afterwards, “Longboat jnst 
sticks his neck out and keeps 

- Discussing his Epson plans, 
the Royal trainer continued, 
‘-Sharood runs in the Derby and 
PCtosJu goes for the Coronation 
Cup. Salchow and Laughter are 
likely to be my only runners in 
the Oaks.” Carson has yet to 
his choice between 
Salchow, Shelagh Hern’s 
Cheshire Oaks winner, and the 
Queen's filly. Laughter, who 
finished runner-up to Mill on 
the Floss at Lingfield. 

Double Schwartz also showed 
hhnwif to be au outst a n di ng 
candidate for Ascot honours 
when storming home dear of his 
rivals in the Temple Stakes, “I'd 
Uealiy like to ride him in the 


A 


SANDOWN PARK 


Going: good 

Draw: 5f, high numbers best 

6J25 RAILWAY HANDICAP (£2£95: 51) (15 runners) 


FORM: SUPREME LEADER (9-1) 3W 3rd to Scottish Real (9-1) at Newbury with 
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2 300900 STONEYDALE 

3 0400-02 BROWN BEAR 

4 003-000 BURACLES TAKE 


N Gahgfran 4-9-8- 
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4-9-7 _ W Carson 6 

_ __ Pat Eddery 2 

5 000-201 FOUNT AW BELLS{R KhanjR Haruxri 3-90 l5ex] AMeOone3 

6 0240-00 DOHNEY (Mas L Ennis) A Damson B-8-9 RF0a13 


UngfiekJ ( 1 m 2f h eap. ! 
since runner-up in 1984 
(1rn3f.Groupm.E18.il 


Oct 5. 30 ran). 

Seterttore SUPREME LEADER 


£8.108, 

JJapanL 

(lm 3f. Group Tl. £18,110. good., 
vnusiy (9-9) 1 Ml 2nd to TramblBin 


i SHIS (9-6) beet I 



000009- SHALBEE 
109022 MUHTfll 


•444. 


C Benstaad 3-B-5 

200000- GtLBANDO ID WMMd) D Bswonh 4tJJj 


R Guest 12 
BRouaaO 
— 4 


7 
9 
10 
11 

13 

14 

15 

17 

18 

19 . . 

5-2 Fountain Beds, 7-2 Muhtaria. Brown Bear Boy. 6-1 Royal Bear, 10-1 Mractes 
Take Tone. 12-1 Stonsydale. 14.1 Sitex. 16-1 others 

FORM: BROWN BEAR BOY (98) dead-heated ter 2nd. bin VI bjr Irish CooMb^B- 3) at 


7J55 NATIONAL STAKES (2-y-at £6,128: 5f) (5) 

M» tL Nona) P Kattewav 90— 
) (A fetalis) C Brittain 90 


003000- PADDINGTON BELLE (Mbs D Jams) B Stevans 98-0 Hj^rttn(5)1S 

0009-00 PFGAMHt (.A 0 * ffl (T ri DnnnBlIl P Bitmoyne 3-7-12..—. C Hatter (5) 7 

0MTO _PgUanr10 

220430 ROYAL BEAR (D) (E Monaghan) J Bradley 4-7-8 TWteamsIO 

Swam 6-7-7 N Adama 1 

—9 

HSUS 


, Pat Eddery 4 

.PfloMnsoaZ 

[Hamdan AJ-Maktown) H Thomson Jones 94 AMwrayl 

14 SAXON dfMl&miJ RatcHfe) J Winter 8-11 W RMjhml 

042 DOUBLE TAIX(H O'NeP) H O'Neil 8-8 — G Barters 


040440- SHARAD (D) (J NKhofeon)B 9 
200090 YANKR Dawes) PBuUer 4-7-7 
222000- SITEX (Mre S Bptack) M Bcfcon 6-7-7 „ 


54 Risk Me. M Zaibaq, 7-8 Wtuppet 1W SaronStar, 16-1 Double Tb* 

15. 8 ran). ZAIBAQ (9-0) *1 Newmarkof vrtn- 
, . 3, 10 ran). SAXON STAR (9-1) 51 4th to For- 

, good to SOIL May 16, 7 ran). 


Qf,£3j049. soft. Apr 2S. 5 ran). 

course and distance (St. SL6lZ^ood. Ma^15. 8 ran]. ZAI 


835 ESHER PLACE HANDICAP (3-y-a £3,189: 1m 3f 100yd) (12) 


today's course and distance (£3, 131 . good. May 1&12 ran). SLBWtoO(9®li5tt£ to 
to Comchann (M| at Fo*as»ro (H appee h'cap. E8&4. good to firm, Oct ISLSHARAD 
(8-12) 21 6«h to P0karfayes<8-6) a Nottiiflnam(ri appee h'cap. £1^65, firm. Oct 29, 10 
ran). 

Selection: SHARAD — 


Sandown selections 

By Mandarin 

6.25 Brown Bear Boy. 6.55 AD Is Revealed. 7.25 Supreme Leader. 
7.55 RISK ME map). 8.25 Owl Castle. 8.55 Danishgar. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

6.25 Brown Bear Boy. 6.55 All Is Revealed. 7_25 Supreme Leader. 
7.55 Risk Me. 8.25 Hurricane Henry. 8.55 Bananas. 

Michael Seely's selection: 7.25 SUPREME LEADER (nap). 


99 HURRICANE HENRY (E St George) M Stoute 97 

0094 DIVA EHCORE (KMsrfiR Corporation) R Armstrong 97. 

0-32410 OWL CASTLE (8 Owl M Usher 92 

102004 BEAU MRAGE(B)(P Lucas) C Booth B-10 

0084 irarTTO (Lady OAwdw-GottsimJ) N Vmor? 84 . 


M04 TtHITTO (Lady D'Awndor-Gottsmd) N Vigors W 
0000 DSCnE@pjnalniwstfnaieUd)GLawls84. 
0410 SWNYNFOTOPHMCE (Quaker Hotels LH) K Sb 


PRMCE (Quattar Hotels Ltd) K Store 96 ._ 

0412 MATELOT ROY ALE (Wss L Enrtsj A Davison 8-4 

9400 WGHTH.Y (Mbs A Hocfle) D A Wiaon B-1 

0040 APPEAUANA (M Chawflar) W Musson 7-11 


104-340 smiOU (Mss DeroatrtouJPWtchBa 7-11 
39-1200 THE WOODB4 HUT (F Bud) R VOOrtpuy 7-7 


WRSwfat«*nt1 

W CaraunS 

MEddaryS 

iMatiUass 

P Cook 7 

_ P Wakfcon 12 
■ OBww^tQ 

J C Ratter (5) 2 

AMackay 9 

_ TWBfawuS 
__D Brown 1 


11-4 Hunricam Horny. 7-2 Bobu Mraga 9-2 Swytrtort Prtnco, 6-T Owl Castle, 8-1 
Tebitto. 10-1 Dnn Encore, 12-1 MatekM floyate, 1«-l others 


FORM: HURHJCANE HENRY (8-5) BHISBlot 17 to 


at Rodcarr MM 



at Leicester (1m 41. 
5(9-11) 12v*l71h at 
26. 27 tan). MaTBjOT ROYALE 
(im 2J, £1/476. good to SOIL Apr 29, 
‘ at Rfeon with SWYIF0RD PRflNCE 


Oct 


6.55 MILLER INSURANCE GROUP HANDICAP flMH: 1m 6f) (14) 


144-12- 


.P Cook 9 


. D McKay 3 


1 100100- KING OF COMEDY (L Lazarus) C Horan 4 

5 000430 BLQOtX FSS COUP £T MBTShal) M Ufoar 4-8-3 . „ 

7 2422-22 WATERLOW PARK fflF) (Greenland PBrk Ltd) I Baking 44-11 PalEddwyl 

0 310441 ALL IS REVEALED (B)((H3) (Mis I Norman) □ TTwin , 

44-11 (4ertG9mfcsy 11 

009-130 OWEtrSPRIOEWn (Vanturo Chsmartti ran RAkahwst 444 w Caison 10 

404110 MILTON BURN (C4) (A Richards] H UNte* 54-9 —GBazJWS 

944002 TRAPEZE ARTIST (Wroqroup Hottr>gs( N Vigars 54-9 — 5DMM»J98 

013094 FORALARKflUnworaDA WS00 4-M C RHdor (5) 13 

030024 DOMMATE (Mrs S Wianns) P Mltchel 544 ThtitiT 

440044 BCXMCAlAD(CHm(EHMCBanstMd545 B BoueoH 

408009- TANA HBTJR Voorapuy) R VOorspuy 444 . M Rotortl 1 2 

940014 MY CHARAK (BXD) (T IteRatOrf) Mrs B VIAumg 5-74 (4sjQ — -■ « 

000/000 SHIPWRIGHT |n Bamsey) H O'Nell 5-7-7 TW8tana6 

0000-30 ALCAZAM (Headmen Stables lid) JSpaarmg 4-7-7 — 4 


(6-11) behmd (1m 4f. £1814. soft. May 21, 18 ran). Earter SWYNFORO PRWCEJ74) 21 
did toA/SaHB(9-7>atHa)dobc(1rr>4f. £2^64. good. May 3 , 11 ran}. S7HLOU (7-71 6tf» 
to Fair Atlanta (7-8) at Badu earlier (9^ 6KI 4th raSarnanpourS-7) at Epoora with OWL 
CASTLE (9-ia 71 away 5th of 18 (1m 2f, E23S9. heavy. Apr 2 3). 

Selection: HURWCANE HE1WY 

&S5 WHEATSHEAF MAIDEN STAKES (3-y-tt fi4JM6i 1m 2f) (23) 


11-4 All is Raveatad. 7-2 Watortow Padc. 9-2 0«wns Pride. 6-T Ttopeza Artist S-1 
My Charade. Dommate. 10-1 Milton Bum. 12-1 Bkxx flo sa Coup. 14-1 odws 

If. £2.792, good to 
nNewmarkm 
7«1 (2m). ALL 
over today's course and dwtance 
LAD 18-4) fOth (£3.184. good. May 
>(7-11) 4th to Battat Champ (7-7) at Ascot (2m, 
ran). MILTON BURN outclassed in group company last ttne;pn»- 


1(8-111 iiH4l away 4di 

IS REVEALS) (8-9) beat TRAPEZE ARTST (B-11)3I 
with MY CHARADE (7-9) 51 away 4th and BOCOOA L 
IS. 15 ran). Last year BOCOOA LAD (7-11) »l4th ® 

£6.004. firm. July 28. 9 ran). MO.TON BURN outdassei _ . 

vwusly (8-ffl beat Hoty Spam (94) »1 over today s course and datum «Wh 
BLOODLESS COUP (9-9) 41 away 3rd and FOR A LAW 
IE4.901. son. Apr 25. 11 ran). DOMINATE bohmddas 


Ascot 2nd to Verdance (12-0) (im 41 amateurs. 
Selection: BOCOOA LAD 


(6-13) 8 further 25SI 
: finished last season (1 
Oa 12. 13 ran). 


6th 

31 


1 

2 

3 

5 

7 

9 

ID 

11 

12 

15 

IS 

19 

22 

23 

24 

25 

29 

30 

31 

34 

35 
38 
38 


2 


BANANAS (USA) (a Schefler) O Douieb 9 
BUSTAMENTE (t MoUey) B HNS 94 


994 CIGAR (A 
2244 DANISHGAR 
DOM STAR 
00 FORWARD 


. Lawson) 

04 FULL SFEB) AHEAD (CaM MSmyMMSoqpiy 94- 

0004 GOO'S PATH (J Carey) D asworth 94 

GUESSING (K Atxhda) G Harwood 94- 


M Stoute 94- 
94. 


D A Wiaon 90- 


00- LUCKY LAD(K Parris) W Brooks 94 

FAMMAU (M«3 U TWterJ J TotorS4- 


03 Moa 

09400 NEVER B£E(ASpeake)J Bndger94 
0 RISK ANOTTctTa Wrighfi PMtttiafl! 
0042 SAROMCOS(H=)[C0PtM 
24 SIX 
0 STEP IN TWE 
0- WOODLANDS 
0 BARLEYBREE 
BARSKAM 


RHKsW 

MHBt2 

— Fat Eddery 22 
WRSnUbumll 
_ Pate Eddery 15 

JWHmtZ 

A Mousy 13 

_ A McGtone17 

G Starkey 5 

G Barter 14 

NOrMJNNBUO 

RGaeatlfl 

TNeete 


LOREEFURowte 
DM NEEDLEWOMAN 



STRIKE HOME (Maktoum A1 
KS’CALM (E Meier) G Wragg 94. 


725 BRIGADIER GERARD STAKES (Group lit £18,405: Im 2!) (7) 

1 039113 SUPREME LEADS) (C-DXBF1 (Capt M LemosJ C Bnttafl 44-1 P 

2 20111-2 IROKO (C-D) (Mrs A PlascmM Stoute 4-8-13 WR 

a 11911 NEBRIS (O) ID Coftnge) R Ahahuret 54-13 B 

5 211940 PIWTECTWN (H J Joel) H C«4 44-13.. 


6 211112/ EEDTME (0) (Lord Habtax) W Hem 64-10. 
KURJMA (B Hamoud) G Hkdter 44-TD. 


11140/2 WYLFA(C4I) (Lard Mostyn)J Shaw 58-10.. 


RobiramnS 
Swinburn 1 
Pst Eddery 4 
S Cauttwn 5 
W Corson 7 
G Starkey 3 
_ B Rouse 2 


2-1 S» Thread. 3-1 Bananas, 4-1 Danishgar. B-1 Saronlcos. 8-1 Gwwteng, 12-1 
Loreef. 14-1 others 

FORM: BANANAS (90) 3 runner-up to Top Guest (3-0) at Bwertw^aW0NK»8(B- 
Q II away 3rd Dm 21. £1.409. sott, Apr 12 , 18 ranL SAAOWODS (94) » 

Tsnberwood (9-0) to Newmarket (8f mdn, good. May £s ran). DAteSHGAH 
to Nomrood (8-12 to Chosw (im 4f. Graip Hi. £21^30. good tosoft. May &. 7 ran). 
GOO'S PATH (8-11) 13141 6tfi to Quazal (0-1D* LlngfwW (Im 21. £3.133. good to roh. 


a 

10 

6-4 Supreme Leader. 5-2 Iroko. 4-1 Protection . 11-2 Bedtime. 10-1 Nebris, 14-1 
Wylfa. 20-1 Kufuma 


May 10. 
good. ■ 


10. 11 ran). STEP M TRUE (94)8 9th to Nno 
, May 1. 19 ran). SILK THREAD (8-7) 9th to 
season (8-11) 3 Newbury 2nd to El Cute (8-11) * 

landfSL - 

Sel e cti o n: 


(8-11) 3 Newbury 2nd to El Cuta (8-11) wdh 
I. £4.515. good. Cfa 28. 27 ran). 

□AMSHGAR 


(94) at Ktowmarkto (8f. £4.786, 
Atiaz Milord (9^ at Newmarket; last 
_ CROWN (8-11) be- 


UTTOXETER 


Going: good to firm 

2.15 STRAMSHALL NOVICES* HURDLE (£1,021: 
2m 4f) (16 runners) 

8 0310 DEW (BF)R Holder 5-11-: 

9 0001 ELECTRIFIED (DJJLagh 
12 0000 Tm&ER TOOL Mrs WSY 
14 P- BISHOP'S JIG J Mahon! 

16 " 


3^5 FEILDEN NOVICES* HUNTERS* CHASE (Div k 
amateurs: £592: 2m 41) (12) 


5 S8f 


BARBATTI E 


Chapman 

BOYMreP 


19124- 


Q 


911-2 — 
tes 4-11-1. 
114.. 


_ Nl 

. PBteckbom 
— H Davies 
RDunwoody 


04 OEVB.-S ARROW G Pntchard-Gordon 
_ S-11-OSSonS) Ecdes 

17 PPO FAIR EXAMINER W Mackenzw-Caies 8-114— P Dover 

18 0 WLLBEAGIEJP Smith 91 1-0 PCvrigan(7) 

19 3 LLANPADRIGN Henderson 9114 7mte 

22 a PONTON'S PROTON E Wheeler 9114 PTucfc 

23 2F RANCHO 8ARNADQ Mrs M Qcfcvtson 5-114 — 

26 0000 TEME SAUCE C F C Jackson 9114 JBryau 

27 2214 ROYAL SHOE (BF)M P?» 4-1910 P Scudamore 

2a PPOD GLB fS SUP PCT Mrs E ttemart 5- tO-S OICuMOW 

3£ 3121 TELEMETER GEM R Hsher 9199 MrAFowter 

38 00 OUR DUDLEY Mrs R Banett 4-198 D Johnson 

40 F00 ROYS DKEMMA K Bndgweter 4-104— W WoriMnglon 

9-4 Ttosmeter Gern, 3-1 Bactnfwd. 5-1 Lteixudng. Gmv- 8- 


BARR1STH180Y - _ 

7 CHAUMONT Mrs DCrtissteydboto 10-190 tiOtorpj 

9 COURT STAR Mrs TWatchom 9124 R Morns (7) 

10 F- HARtWGWORTH J Mfington 11-124 P HHSnflfion Q 

11 044 LANOAS SLAVE F Barton 19124 X Cotter (7) 

21 P-7r WOODLANDS OSNSETPPntehanJ 

9124J Prikhard (7) 

22 GOP/ CLASSIC PAGE Mis EVWson 91 14 S Crank (7) 

24 3000 GRAYROSE ACAD3HC E H Owen tan 

B-1 1-9M WifcJjjg (71 

26 403 PSWOIC J Dation 9114 AOafton m 

27 P4 SPEAKALONE J H Docter 9114 S Andrew* (7) 

28 Op- waSH LOG B Leighton 1911-9 M Price (7) 

5-2 Pemoic. 11-4 Landas Slava. 4-1 Woodlands Genset 9 

1 Barrister Boy. 192 Grayms Academic. 191 Speaktoore, 

4.15 FEILDEN NOVICES' HUNTERS’ CHASE (Div 1: 
amateurs: £5890: 2m 4f) (11) 


1 Royal Show, 12-1 Timber Tool, 14-1 
others. 


& Arrow. 20-1 


Uttoxeter selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Telemeter Gem. 2.45 Lean On. 3.15 
Lollipopman. 3.45 Woodlands JenseL 4.15 Poker 
Classic. 4.45 VoyanL 5.15 Dancer In Paris. 


2.45 MAYFIELD NOVICES' CHASE (£1 ,452: 3m 2f) 
(14) 

3 0440 CELTIC HAMLET PCundel 7-114 AGonnan 

4 2331 FINAL CLEAR J(M 9114 — Mr C Uewnflyn (7) 

5 0211 LEAH ORT OL VWtoms 9l24 UWfana 

8 OfUO BLACK COMBE mGTTnmer 911 -2. R Ktagton 

10 3F4P JON PIPER B Morgan 91 1-2. — C Prince (7] 

11 F40F JUBILEE LIGHTS PPntctwd 9-11-2 R Strange 

12 P042 LANGSTON Mrs J Crolt 911-2 SMoor* 

13 FFPP HNM0RE G Baking 7-11-2 


1 

4 

B 

8 

12 

M 

15 

16 


BARNMG Mrs E Whstoo 19124. 
BE CONTBtT W Manmon 9124- 


SDtddn 




COREEL LORD A Bavfe 7-124. 

LYNNS DELKafT E Chawnai 19124 

CPF POKER CLASSIC W A Stephenson 9124 . 
PRMCE ZEUS J Cuts 7-124. 


ABayfis 


SI 


ua ROLLMGHT LAD Mrs S Green 9124 A Lay I 


17 Off- SCARLET S0J( T H Dawes 19124 

18 HO- THISTLEDOWN PATH R Francis 9124 D 


20 


WHAT FOR Mrs S Newel 9124- 


AUlyefH 


3-1 Rollrtght Lad, 7-2 TMsiIedown Path. 9-2 Bvmng, .11<2 
Armaiygt. 91 Be Content 91 Poker Ctassc, 

4.45 RA1SDORF HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,119: 3m) 
( 12 ) 

. R Crank 


1 4444 VOYANTlCJDLWMams 7-12*1.. 

2U0UR FEARLESS SEAL (D) R Hounsnaod 911-13 P 

3 2300 DEW. TO PLAY ICJJP Sown 1911-1 _ P Corrigan (7) 

6 4000 AM8ERGATE W A Stephenson 9104 — — 

7 0032 WRAMACJB) F H Lee 9197 SHoBand 

9 0000 AMRERWELL(D1 P Bevan 19104 TWd 

12 0002 DBnYCRBMLASSfQOO'NaB 

7-10-4 1 Slwemariifn 

13 0004 TARQOGAIfS BEST R Peacock 9193 K Ryan (7) 

15 -404 TASTY ®JY R Ftsher 7-10-1 

18 4304 ULLE fB) B Forsev 7-104 A 


15 PFP0 OUEENSWAY BOYMss A Khw 7-11-2 P D ever 

15ZP41 STABLE LAD JEdwam 7- 114 Mr H Rtehads (71 

17 PPm STREAMLINER (BF)PCOvte lQ-ll-2- Hss T Dates (7) 

1BPRPP TIXALL BOY W Oay 7-114 SJOVeM 

SOPOPO BALASPHarM0 11-10-11 CSmHh 

22 0PP4 STAR FORMAA (B) P Pritehard 9104 DCMm>(7) 

92 Lean On. n-« Fmj Clear. 4-1 Stable Lad. 9i 
Lang^mo, 13-2 Cetoc Hamlet. 10-1 Star Fornaia. 12-1 others. 

3.15 KEN BOULTON HANDICAP CHASE (£1,861: 

2m 4f) (9) 

5 O3P0 TUDOR POLLY (0) W A Stephenson ID-11-7 — 

12 4002 UICYFAR J HnqJD-114 BFWfl 

15 0P22 LQLUPOPMANftnJOM 191911- Ur C Umrenn (7) 

17 03F3 ICTHERBRJDGt (0) D Gandato 910-7 MWMn 

18 POOF BEACONTWED McCain 12-10-1 — 

20 PPM CITADEL ROC (B)JH BradlBy 11-190 GDariea 

21 «0F THE GO-BOY Mrs W Syiws 12-104 PWaram 

2S 2430 8 M8JNG C AVAUBR (C) A Madwar 10-104._ R Crank 
28P4P4 RiTTERMEAE (CHD) H Peace* 191 M m.. K Ryan (7) 

114 Lokpopman. 7-2 Lucytir. 4*1 Notherbndge. 91 
FKteimere. 91 Smhng Cavattw. 10-1 Tudor Rady. 20-fodMre 


BRetfiy 17 0400 SWEET SOUCtTOR Q) J King 7-104L 
PDew 18 0400 LAST CF THE FOXES N Twteton-Damf 


ITwteartOawas 

1 3-1 04P Scudamore 
92 Voyarn. 10930 Cterrymtota Lass, 92 L*a. 91 Tasty 
Guy. 91 Last otThe Fo*w. 191 AmbargtoB.l4-i others. 

5.15 CHEADLE NOVICES' HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£818: 2m) (14) 

4 #001 WK.TSMRE YEOMAN (D) P Hayward 6-11-13— C Mono 

8 FOCI MSTER FEATHERS (B) (D) J Kir i 5-11-10 — 

7 SOn DANCER JN PARS {Ffl) JC09|#Sve 

91t-10TRnfidd(7) 

10 0010 EMPIRE WAY 0) W Charles 911-7 PDm 

19 1020 JACK BUJER (D) P CundeU 911-10 AGomm 

20 903 HK3HAMQ1EY0W Chapman 191913 — 

S3 0300 CARHEYC0URTP Ransom 91912^- S South Eeete* 
28 000P HEAO0F ON M Echley 9196 — - AOHagan 

30 0000 JAHEYS DEUGHTTHaS 9104 R Crank 

31 0P4 SILVER EMPRESS P Haywyd 5-1 CW — 

32PPF0 PROVINCIALS BEST Ms S0hwr7-192_._. RHytol 

34 0000 SAUCY SKMORW day 9192 0tef»Ctoy(7) 

35 -POO SPACE GEM Mis WSyKes 9191 SJOteeB 

. 91WL_ — 


38 POM GOLDEN BAYARD T 
5-2 watshire Yeoman, 7-2 Dancer in Paris, 4-1 MKtoi 
Featiwre. 13-2 Empire Way, Jack Brtnelr. 191 Others. 


ARAB RACING 

Newcomers in 
command 
at Goodwood 

By Christopher Gonlding 

Newcomers upstaged the sea- 
soned campaigners at 
Goodwood, where the second 
Arab horse race meeting of the 
season took place on Saturday. 
Derby and Oaks contenders had 
entertained the crowds earlier in 
the week on the Sussex turf and 
now it was the turn of the Arab 
horses, the forebears of the 
present-day thoroughbred 
racehorse. 

The most notable upset was 
the defeat of Woodlands Court 
Magician by Hawkwind Sea 
Witch, a four-year-old filly who 
had only been broken in seven 
weeks ago. 

Woodlands Court Magician 
had a troubled journey to the 
races, due to his horcebox 
breaking down, and was pos- 
sibly feeling the effects. But his 
travelling companion Suntal 
Golden Token, made the trip 
from Lancashire worthwhile, 
winning the Midbursx Stakes 
with his head in his chest. 

The biggest gamble of the day 
was executed in fine style when 
Shiama. who was having her 
first-ever race in the 26-runner 
Glenn Beer Stakes (division 
one), galloped her rivals into the 
ground, and in doing so landed a 
substantial gamble, caving been 
backed from 12-1 to 2 - 1 *. 

Carabineer, who took all be- 
fore him last season, had his 
colours lowered in theLaybroqk 
Stakes, run over 2m 3f. finishing 
a disappointing eighth behind 
Typhon. whom he had pre- 
viously beaten at Aimree. 

RESULTS: 2J0 Typton (91). Z.3S 
Hmrimtod Sm when (91). 3.10 MMrie 


(4-1). 3.4S 

Grtim 


. . Token 

2 fav).5J30 Sterna (2-1 hn). 


4 20 Suntal 
lnf).4£5S)iMi«(5- 


REDCAR 


Going: good to firm 
Draw: no advantage 

2.15 PETER HIGGINS SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£892: 1m)(10 runners) 


8 4100 SPACaUKERBOT 

9 239 SHOW HOMEID) G 

10 164 RAMBLMGBV 


RWcMta694 N Horn 7 _ 

44-13 

' 2u ks£\\ 


1 400 TAKE THE BSCWTR Stubbs 97. 

3 004 OCTTGAM BrttnmS-5. 

4 0000 K018LAMDJ 

5 040 larches m Ryan 

E P Mi 


-JH 


B8nv9-r 
Ivan 93- 




6 340 GBOVECOTE P Maton 92 . 

7 B-65 HtU.RYDEJLHama92 

8 404 HARSLEY SUPRISE N TMdar 94 DMctHrts2 


. PRabinoa7 
B Ttmnaan 10 
. MBSrcta 1 


10 090 FOLKSWOODM Camacho 0-12 

11 004 SPRING FLIGHT A Jarvis 911 

12 -200 0URMUMSEN£ycroit84. 


11 0000 THRONE OF GLORY DWCtnmm 9911 
13 400 OfTHESCHI fUSAHO) RNidwtiS 4-8-8 — A Proud 2 
IS sm- CELTIC BfflD (C4n A Battnq 97-11 i. AMackay I 

17 009 CARPEHTBrSBOY p)MraGRMfltey 97-11 JLomS 

18 014- LADY CARA (0) Mrs GRewtey 97-11 M Fry 12 

154 PMb! 4-1 Show Home. 9-2 Iberian Start 11-2 
Spacemaker Boy. 91 Lady Cera, 191 Celtic BM, 191 
Rambling River, U-l others. 

245 REDCAR STAKES (Amateurs: £1.392: Im 4A 

( 12 ) 

240 AYLESFdD (B)A Htie 911-7 Sue Brown (S) 4 

4-11-7 TTtammUaaaa? 

DGeBdoito4-iw —j 




MRictairiaoa(7)fl 


11-4 Take The Btsont 10040 HD Ryde. 11-2 Ocoga. 192 
K O Hand, 7-1 Harsiay Surprise, 9-1 Our Mumne, 191 


2 1-30 CAOaeUM P 

3 314 CASTLE POOL 

4 049 HERRADURA . 
7 142 MNBALMH(B) 


Grovecote. 191 others. 


Redcar selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Harsley Surprise. 2.45 MubdL 3.15 Philip. 
3.45 Cadmium. 4.15 Bishah. 4.45 Snake River. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.1 5 Larches. 2.45 Mubdi. 3. 1 5 Show Home. 3.45 
Herradura. 4. 1 5 Bishah. 4.45 Atoka. 

Michael Seely's s election: 4. 1 5 Mount Olympus. 

Z45 E B F JOHN CROSS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y- 
O: £1,641: 6f)(21) 

BE MY PROSPECT Mtea I BetM B Thomson 14 

CHateTWCTinWerM TLocn2 


M Prescott 911-7 MsdnaJuiter 8 

S Norton 

4-11-7TEasterb«12 
NOBLE JACK D A WOaan 911-7 _ Paine Oronaon p) 1 
144 PWCTADA W Storey 4-11-7 —It 

jswfcoiw 


444 PONTYATES J81 


14 090 TAXIADSCNteson 4-11-7. 

15 204 WALTER THE GREAT MH 


14-117- 


91 


18 090 ANME RAD Nicholson 4-11 -4 

19 P4 GRSNACRESGffiLBMcMabon 911-4. 


LaBa&ntariiy 


.6 


9- 4 Mn Baiadr. 92 Cadmium. 3-1 Homtoura. 192 AyMteatj 

10- 1 Pmetadi. 191 Water The Groat, 14-1 others. 


1 

2 

3 

4 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 
27 


0 PMAL OBJGHT K Braasey 94 — 
0 FORCE MAJEUHEJSWtean 90 
0 KNOWLES BANK J Barry 94. 

toon Jonas 


MUffiH (USM Thomson 1 
MUSEVENI PCahar 94. 


94- 


SWfatonrih 16 
PRotrinon IQ 

KDertayA 

R Mis 12 

M Fry IS 

_ K Hodgson 1 

— 21 

_AMm*sy17 


4.15 MALCOLM WINTERS MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y- 
& £934: Itn 3f) (12) 

2 09 DENALTO Denys SmBh 94 DUadUttermS 

^ 3 840- DEPUTY MONAWW Derya Sm«iS4_ , MRy2 

10 443 MOUNT OCYMPUS J W Wara 94 NCoreiortMl 

-14 -RGDBRSZEA Jenns90 -DMctatoS 

15 094aPlANSY)SMWEuni^94L~ KHoOgmm7 

18 92 SPART AN VALL EY (USA) B Htes 94 — BTboaaaa9 

17 09 STATE JESTBIWBsey 90 JLam3 

20 9 BISHAH (USA) H Gert 911 WRyaefi 

o Bmwi«ara.jRai«»9ii — w 


21 

23 

24 

25 


3-4 BtZOJYA R Johnson Hougreon 911 . 

ONLY FLOWHIC Thornton 911 

0 OUR NOOHA F Durr9l1 


_ KDariretl 
MT«MmHU) 4 
GRanditt 


0 PUBLIC PRAISE MHEmteitiy90. 

00 RABBMAMT Barron 94 

34 SLVBI ANCONA EBtfn 94 — — _ 

0 STAB PLAY K Stone 94 . CDwygr 5 

STB* BY STH>DW Chapman 94 DNfcho*s3 

0 STILLMAN M H Eastarby 94 MRWlf 

STRAIGHT BX3E T Faanust 94 MBeacrrttll 

OB W1GANTHORre(BF)MW Eastartjy94 M WwfiaypJO 

8 OffTLYWBseye-ll Jlwa7 

0 U VHTTE GLEAM G OWrqjrd 911 -— W 

0 LEVEN LASS IVWwrs 911 ^HVSctammag 

MADAME LAfFtTTE J Ethamgton9ll_ M Wood 19 

00 MISS SHERBROOKE MStetoy 911 JQtem(5)6 

WIND OF PEACE JWWtote 911 NCoiwitoolB 


198 &izeflya. 94 Bfahah, 7-2 Mount Otympus. 112 Sparan 
Vatiey, 12-1 Deputy Monarch. H-1 others. 


4.45 FRED ANDERSON HANDICAP (£1^2& Im 
11X17) 


i Snath 54-10. 


2 019 RABRKJS Danya 1 _ . 

4 900 ELARM (CVDJ T Fairtlurat 7-94 . 

7 -000 ATOKA (GBOJohrr FrtzGeraid 4-95 . 


BTboreaoa2 


198 Mubdi, 10930 Wigemhorpe, 132 Stiver Ancona. 91 
StarPtey. 91 Wind Of Peace, 191 Sfflmen, 12-1 Rnal DetighL 
14-1 Raoefllwm, 191 otoers. 

3.15 J&B RARE SCOTCH WHISKY SPRINT 
HANDICAP (£4v103:51) (12) 

1 400 CHAFUNS CUm (USA)(02) D W ^ 

? ®! PHttff ^ 10 


5 090 


•BCff©flWlte*er444 OMcKanml 

6 022 BER1AN START (C4) T Barrai 991 — B Thomson 9 


.0 Coates (5) 3 
... . — PlYArcy 17 

8 0483 KtGHT YifARWOH A M Robson 4-9-3 — J Dliaadtea 19 

9 090 SflXnOE t&O) E Inciaa 4-93 MBcecronX 

10 4331 SHAKE RIVB1 D NchQtoon 442 (7es} WtteyeiV 

13 902 PERSHMG J LenM 9910 .MRHkrll 

14 900 GlSOeRRYJBflDlHbt Jonas 444 WflyaaM 

15 490 NEW BAmETMrsJ Ramadan 443 MRyl 

16 009 RAVENS PEAK Jimmy Rtzgatted 4-96^. —8 

17 400 KAMARESS (O M Bn«ain44-6 . K D«te 7 11 

18 0200 t»4RY^ PLACE DW Chapman 496 D Mctetef 9 

19 944 DOMMKM PRINCESS P Rohan 993- J Orton S 12 

21 344 SWlFraPBOBYP Rohan 97-12 LChnoSlfi 

22 00-4 THMTEENTH R0DAY W Pearce 4-7-11 JLoml 

24 923 STAR'S DELIGHT W Storey 4-7-10 SWMtWWtiM 

27 09 SSI BE HUSDLY M Reddan 974 —4 

2-1 Star's Detigm. 3-1 NWb Wamor. 112 Parahtog, 7-1 
Snake River, 91 SMtoe, 91 Gtandtoiy, 12-1 Domtnlon 
Pnncess. 14-1 others. 


>*■=•• "y 


t.- »- 


LEICESTER 


Draw: 5f-€f, low nunfoers numbers 

2.0 E B F WOODHOUSE EAVES MAIDEN STAKES 
(2-Y-a C & a- £1 ,784: 51) (14 runners) 

BADOGLIO (USA) LPwgott 94 WRSwUxnn4 

40 BUDDY RICH (ten OGormen 94 ThaaB 

44 DUTCH COLfflAGE (W=) M Martty 94„. 

FLOOSE P COte 90. 


. RCartarOQT 
, I JetMMl 


0 GOLD STATE W Wharton 94 
0 GREAT MEMORY LPtemtt 9 
MORNMG FLOWER 


1 

3 

4 

5 

7 

8 
10 
12 
13 
15 
18 

19 

20 
21 

72 Sariftah, 4-1 „ 
Dutch Courage. Buddy 



8 900 DENBOY BStoWna 44-1 — 

7 244 KAD£SH(B)FYard)ay591. _ 

8 004 BLBOERS CHOKE KBasaay 990 NMmO 

9 0000 00N RUM M Moriay 4-90 A Many 13 

10 249 PAUCE YARD J Jenkins 44-11 ~ "" 

11 040 PARALMijmWMuiSOn 4-911 

12 420 CUT A CAPER B Prases 44-10 

13 400 GASTIGUOM: (USA) (B) J Froncoroe 

15 043 INCHQOWER (04) W Hflghtman 

18 004 PRIMROSE WAY M Btenshard 4-910. 

17 400 SHAO RA8UGK (CAIO J Perrau 4-97 
21 009 THERESA GBbsn 4-94, 


'tes- 


4410&Catetea3 
9910 B Rohm 11 


J Raid 4 


BCraaateylO 

RCochnmS 


23 0-48 THE CRYHM GAME B Morgan 442_____ PHN (7) W? k. 
25 040 MRHELEHYBGLLER NltniB8 444_ BCnaalayB ?- 


R Street 10 

ipjfc 




SARHAH (USA) H Thomson Jones 94 AMareyT 

4 SAY YOU WLL P Makki 94 JMd14 

-2 


4-1 

Mandare 


Castigfione. 91 tnchpowm, 6-1 Moon Jester, 132 
9 Trophy, 91 Palace raid. 191 others- 


00 SOHMHS TAYLOR OLesle 94 

SWEET PICCOLO GHuttar 94 G Carter P) 12 

042 TEZSMKAfflLC0WM94 W Carson 11 

00 TOUCH OF SPSD R HoBnsftead 94 S Perks a 

YOUNG CENTURION MUshar 94 D McKay 13 

r -1 Boose. 191 


Leicester selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Floose. 230 Gary And Larry; 3.0 A1 
Zumurrud. 3-30 Inchgower. 4.0 Skeeb. 430 
Native Oak. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Sarihah. 230 Saltcote HopefuL 3.0 A1 
Zumurrud. 3.30 Patralan. 4.0 Skeeb. 430 Native 
Oak. 

Michael Seely's selection: 4.0 Skeeb. 

230 TOTE EACH WAY SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£734: 61) (14) 

4 109 SALTCOTE HOPEFUL 

5 004 GARY AND LARRY N„ 

G 009 GBtSHWM DO'Qonnaf 
7 9 ML UHGOON JtMFC*~ 

9 940 MR JESTER Mrs N 

10 009 MPPERSWmW 

12 0004 TOUCH ME NOT 


4-0 TOTE FILLIES E B F STAKES (3-Y-O: £4^85: 

6f)(flJ) 

1 4M DREAM CHASER IMP Cola 92 TOoinnS 

2 140 H-YAWAY BRDE (LBA) I Balding 92 PtoEdderyG 

3 .144 SK^a (USAHD) M Stoute 91 WR9wWxoa7 

6 2U^a5aADLatog87 MMaHaraS 

6 009 COOL GALES G Prltehar^Gonfcn 8-7 GfMMdS 

7 HRMDRY R.YER A Baiay 97 P Bknrofited M 

10 0 MSS MOTH P Cole 97„ PWataal 

13 009 RAFFLES WHGMIA B McMalan 67 




14 ROOBTYUP Cote 8-7 

17 SPRfNGWm.GHufter97. 

198 Ryawav Bride. 91 Skeeb. 10930 Cool Gales. 92 


G 


_ 4 


Dream Chaser, 12 -I Chart Ctenber, 191 others. 


4.30 TOTE PLACEPOT EBF STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£2,460: 7f) (20) 

3 342 NATIVE OAK (BF)H CacO 94 SCaotertiG 

6 893 MUrarTSSECHET (FR) G P^ooton 94. GOrffiaWI 
10 0 BEAR'S EVENGE WHotoen 911 — 


12 


1911. 

BOLD AONHU. M Stoute 911. 





98RCodmne13 
..FK Eddery 10 

A Clark 6 

.R Carter (5) 12 

/ 84_ Gay K tJ to —y fi) 5 

JtOT (B) R HofinsftMi 

13 040 THACK WE BEAR J JonkuK 96 

JM 84^ I Jotaaan 14 

15 009 DASAK1 GOLD (B) R Jucfces 8-3 : — 8 

16 064 EASY ROUNCEP Cota 93 LJoimfi«y(714 

» SAMMI^TB^M..-. rSlSfcia 2 

21 O SHY MISTRESS B MH tfuh nn H A JHWafflft 

22 09 THELALESG HuHer8-3 WUetafol 

, 94 Samoa Lass. 10930 Touch Me Not 5-1 

HopefuL 11-2 Easy Romance. 7-1 Dasftate Goto. 191 others. 

3.0 TOTE CREDIT HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,687: Im 
21) (10) - 

4 Mf QUBALflflH Gag] 8-11 ___SCmitii«i1 

6 930 HOOB4A RSF (BF) I Bakfog 97. Pat Eddery 6 

7 091 AL ZUMURRUJ R tonstrar^M WC^ll 

- 912 CRAIMWGnnW Musson 92 MWMemS 

8 409 BAYDON QUsN D Hanlev 91 TwXna9 


13 424 BON ACCUE1LL Ltehtbrawn 9112. 

18 90 DMdnBO LCOteteo-lU 

25 04 MOSTANGO A Hide 8-11 . 

S S SUSWBSR^ISSSi 

RfYDAR Johnson Houghton 910 JMd12 


1 .- - 


HOLLY BROWN C WNoman 98- 
TOMUSAJOuntoofra. 


35 1 

sa ei4 
40 

42 8 

43 

44 0 MEGAOVWE W Holdsn 84 

' 46 090 PRINCESS RYMHtT EM 84- 

47 -400 ROBIS Mrs N Macaolnr 84 . 

50 WAIStLEY ROSE J HoB8-8 PWtodmsM 

154N^^ 1 0p4°Rjyeda.4- 1 Mummy's Secret 152 
^ AdmeL 91 Bon Acmes. 191 VHto Fomi 12-t tetmusa. 
191 1 


HMHSW 

— WCaraon 10 
RMo«mB 17 
— .N Caritate 5 


■j. ' 12 




8 912 CRAMMING WW 

9 409 BAYDON QUEEN D Hamey 9 

10 044 LADY OWEN WHoMfiri 912. 

11 040 

13 0B4 

W 4040 

17 400 SPMNAKB) LADY M UShBT 


.. RMan»(5)8 


— Rcod»m7 

N Adam* 2 

CELTIC DOME GPnce 97 JWB0SRIS3 


— DMcKay4 

**** . 

3*30 TOTE DUAL FORECAST HANDICAP (£2,390: 
Im 4f) (17) 

1 <4/0 ACTION TOE P Malefl 5-91 0^- GQattea-Jnm IS 

2 noon JK jramM Usher &97 _Jz!d 17 

3 TOW MONCLARETRmtYinP Bean 7-97. RCmntS 


Today’s course specialists 

SANDOWN 

TRAINEM: H CecO 18.waw»s from 59 rannere. 

Sto ute 36 from 135, 2BJ%; w Hem 16 from 87. 23^ 
JOCKEYS: A Mackay 8 winners from 36 runners, 222** n 
Carson 47 from 222. 21.2%: T Chten 10 from 53. 199%. 

REDCAR 

TRAnffiRftH Thomson Jaws 18-tenners from. TO runners, 
aw* J Wffl» 18 Iran 125 nrs. 14^%; T Featunt 22 from 
106. 13-35- JOCKEYS: J Lowe 32 terners from 273 ride*. 
117%: J BJaasdate 11 from 106. 10A%; N Comorton 15 tote 
145. 103V 

LEICESTER 

TRAlKBtS: H Caci 33 wlnnera from 74 r unne r s. 44.6V U 
%ute 27 from 83. 325%: j Dunfc» 21 from 46. 24 AT 
JOCKEYaj w Cstgen 3S wtoners from 159 ndaa. 22.6%; W - 
Swmtwn 21 from 102. 204%; S Caottmi 20 from 108. 185V' 

UTTOXETER 

TRAINERS: Mrs M Dickinson 8 winners (ram 22 rmrmrs. 36.4*5 
J &toar cb.1l fro m 44. 254%; W A Stephenson 10 fiom^ 
14-5%- JOCKEY& S Smith Ecctes tOwWiefS from. 57 ndjfc 
175%; RCrar*17frorn 103. 1&5%:P Warner Q from 38,154%- 




1 ' 
-^*1 - . 





THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


SPORT 


YESTERDAY'S RACING RESULTS 


Sandown Park 

Gotagtgood 

lJ30(7qi.BURHAAm(P8UtEdd«y.20. 
II. £. Join Saxon (W R Swunbum, 12-lk 3, 
«nnmn)(*a Ptrt ID Brown. 7- it 4. 
Nate^jP jo&Jron. TM1. ALSO 
RAN: 4 fa* SMI Dreemro. M Arctic Kan, 
1M S uper Punk. 10 Dmuty Ttai. Blue 
&«««. U War WegongS). » Viceroy 
“ger (W|l. Zulu Krsght. 33 Lftta Prere. 
fflwa. STOCK Phrase. Miss Venezuela. 18 
ran. NR: Master Music. NK, *1. 1M. II. 3L 
P Wahwn at UfflMum. Tots: £43.90: 
g.50. CS 30. EZ20. £2-70. OF: El 04. 60 
CSF- EJ3022. Tncast: £1,680.91. Inn 
31.78MC 

& seismic ttne (B Thomson, 5-1 V. 3. 
Eastern Mystic (Pat Eddery. 7*2 fav). 
ALSO RAN 4 Mango Express (ini. 11-2 
Bouton Bay. 10 Tale Quaki (4ttiL 14 
EhjftboftM-ht flta). PeSrtzzo. 20 1 Warn To 
Be. 50 Kuttai (ckRit Wit lOraa 2VH, 14L 
Iftl. M. IL W Hem at West Itsiey. Tote. 
£< 40; £1.70. £230. £1 GO DP: £1030. 
C6F: E24.M. 3(IW 3733SBC. 


Leicester 

[ywH 

2.0^0 1.nM8EAU(JReri. 3-1 f®*);Z 
BaHAick M Wood. 4-1t 3, P*«M*e (T 
WHhams. 2S-1). ALSO RAN; MBBe 
DcuMeyou (5th). 12 P*mw Lw w. Stan* 
Brook mh). Turing Yard. 16 Nerrad v*mL 
20 Blow For Home. 33 Musical Chorus. 
Peony ■ Treasure. Broon s Answer. Just 
Entaanttag. 13 ran. 3. 2»l. 1VH. 21. 1 SL C 
Nelson at Upper Umtoutn. Tpte £430; 
£180. £1.50. £3.70. DF: £830. CSF. 
El 123. No offtaai times. 


FvSt Alarm. 10 Amplify CBM. Max Clown 
l&mi. 14 Jtrtown Lad (4th). 20 Rawtaton. 
Astim. Dad's Gunner. 11 ran. 41. 9.1*. Mi 
M.4I. D Haydn Jones at Rwyprldd. Tag: 
£170: £1 TO. £1.70. £570. DF: £4.00. 
CSF: £11.88. Tncast £128.96. The wtaner 
was nought m tor 1300 gns. 

33 (1m) 1, MEET THE GREEK (J Raid. 
5-1 fc 2. Ftam&aaton Court (N Howe. 5-_1t 



3JO(2meffl1.SkytaMtar(KMoonqr.2- 
IfcZ Oryx Major 16-1): 3. Mal*a MMIIp-lt 


43 (3m 4(ctiH.ra»a* Farm (H Davies. 
11*4); 2. St Alezan (11-8 lav): 3. Ctalyno 
jiB-1). 6 ran. NR: Rddb. 2WL 29. T 


Forster. Tote: £120. £130. £130. DR 
£341 CSF: £734. 

430 (3m II ch) 1. BatvwaS (Mr M 
Mfc 1 

Bafiyeamon (B-i). mmopon uoy /£ fa* 
Mran. NR: AsTCww fcWWataw. a nk. 
P Davis. Tow £8.60: £2L40. £130. £220. 
Of: £4530. CSF; E453&. 

S3 Cm 4f Me) 1. Ban date ro (P 
Scudamore. 2-1 to* 2 Baluchi (Mt, 
Lor MOSS (4-1). 14 rajv*. tot. M Ptoe. 
Tow £SA £230. E330. £230. DF: 
£24.10. CSF- £3117. 

Ptocapot £3170 


'#■ hLJV HWI nilTKI UUITMIN, » 

Fayru2 (6m). to Powder Keg (4tn). Sharp 
Ramancs(5th). 20 Prince Reymo. imperial 
Jade. Nasha 10 ran. 21. nk. H. J *.L 1"W. C 
Nelson at Lamooum. Tow £330: El 50. 
£2 00. EL50. DF: £4.50. CSF: £1141 
1mm 02.00$ bc. 

33 tim) 1. SIYAH KALEM (W Carson. 
10-H. 2, Promised tale (B Rouse. 16-1). 1 


Bshar. S GeordW'4 Dehgf 
Palestra (501). 12 Araman 
Mahogany FUm. 33 Topeka E 


Gay Captam (5rnlTi6 Jatetas. Ready Wit 
20 Go Bananas. Hate Lad. Merle. 
Quafetar Flyer. Thais Your Lot. 25 
Mancnesterskytram, Roman Beach. 33 
Come On The Blue9. Fast Served. Talk CM 
Glory (Blh). 21 ran. 1 ■.-,). nk, sh hd. 21. 1’»L 
J Dunlop at Arundel. Tote: £830; £220. 
£4 00. £2.10. £190 DF: £69 60. CSF: 
£154.72. Tncast: £1.373 51. irnm 
4235see. 

3L3G (501 . INDIAN ULY (P Hotenson. 5- 
4 lave 2. Vevfta (Pat Eddery. 7-lk 1 
Marimba (W R SwmDum. 11-2) ALSO 
RAN. 5 Base Bhss (6oi). 10 Surety Great 
l2Benrade. 14 Persian Tapestry (4th). 16 
Fresn Tnougnts (5tm. 33KrsJanmus. 9 ran. 
NR: Atrayu. H. nk. nk. 31. 2L C Bnttam at 
Newmarket. Tola. £2 80. n 60. £2.10. 
£1430 DF. £8 50. CSF: £1031 limn 
03.72s«. 

4.10 (1ml 1. PURCHASEPAPERCHASE 
(C Asmussen. 18-1): 2. Chalk Stream (Pat 
Eddery. 3-1 lav): 3. Sweet Adelaide <B 
Thomson. 8-11 ALSO RAN: 9-4 Cocotte 
(6cm. 8 Charge Aura lSm>. Entrancing. 
Arab Herns 09. 33 Lady For Two (4m). a 
ran. 9. Si. hd. nk. 1-.-I R Arm st ro ng at 
Newmarket Tote £17 50: £2.60. £150. 
1180 DF £27.00. CSF: £46.77. limn 
43 I2sec 

4.40 (1m 20 1. MASTER LINE (C 
Asmussen. 11-21: 2. Free On Board l Paul 
Eaoery. 33-M. 3. CMwood Renown (S 
Dawson. 33-11: 4. Dashm Light (B 
Rouse. 14-1) ALSO RAN. 7-2lav Dman- 
&on. 1 1 -2 Gibbous Moon (5(h). 8 Tip-Tap. 
Marsh Hamer. 9 Heatngrrtf. 12 Duelling 
(Bmi. 14 Any Bus ness 30 Tournament 
Leader. 25 Janaao. 33 Becnoper. Track- 
ers Jewel. Pusngn. Rosanna Of Tedfald. 
Even Banker. Sotsuce Bed. 19 ran. NR: 
We B Meet Agan. Denooy. 9. U hd. ■»!. 
ii. H Candy at Wantage. Tote: £5 90. 
£1 50. £6a0. £9 00. £2.10 DF £164.30 
CSF £172.67 Tncast: £4370 44 2mm 
1025SKS 

Jackpot not won. PlocepoC £6930. 


10 ran. M. sn ltd, 1L *1. 41. D_ Lang as 
Lambourn. Tote £620; £220. £T70. 
£230. DF: £10.40. CSF: £2991 Tncast 
£20670. After a stewards' inquiry me 
result stood. 

330 [lm 2f) 1. KATHY W (S Cauthen. 7- 
2k 2. Enwrare (T wukams. 18-1): 1 
Coinage JflSd, 5-2 lav), also RAN: 4 
Stavordale FWn. 11-2 Com&n Caste, 12 
Sweden Prmcass m 16 Kmg Jack. 33 
Royal Dynasty (5m), Azusa, rmpertel 
Palace. Kooky's Pet. Remar. Jutwee 
Jamboree. Marcee. ned tfOr. Queen o( 
Swords. 16 ran. NR: Montana. lk<L ML 
SiL hd, 9. H Cecil at NewmartaLToa 
£3.30; £130. £230. El A0. DF: £22.71 
CSF: £49.64. 

43 ( 1 m 41) 1 , PRfWIDOIE (J Qumn. 4-1); 
1 Mr bon (J Carr, 5-1 k 3, Master Carl ID 

Leadbnw. 10-1) ALSO RAN: 100-30 fav 
Umngi (4th). 5 Oryx Minor ftm). 7 
Hctyport Waory. 10 Balgowme (am. 25 
Karanoun (pul- Gambart, Aafanka. Spend 
It ■:»«- 11 ran. NR: Mythical Boy. 
Hoboumes. nk. 1L II. 1U. 41. H Rohan at 
Mahon Tom: £3.90; £1.61 £1.60. £220. 
OF: £10.30. CSF: £23.09. Trlcast £164.00. 
Alter a stewards' mquuy the result stood. 

430 (Gfl 1. PEN BAL LADY (Domkkc 
Gtwon. 25-1): Z Rowiwio (T Lucas, 8-lk 
3. Shuttlecock Gkrl (R Cochrane. 7-1). 
ALSO RAN 11-10 lav Bundukeya (4th). 
1 1-2 Our Lady Native. 10 Broad*®)? 
Stomp (GttiL 12 Pmtatoiy, 16 PtWeam. 20 
Systems Go (5th). 25 Corehn Lass. 
Frivolous Fancy. Lwrida Brood. Our Lana. 
Tmeto. 14 ran. NR: Gone For It II. sh hd. 
M 41. 21. G PmctefO-Gomon at New- 
market. Tote: £96.11 £1570. £2.60. 
£1.60. DF: wmner or second With any 
other horse £2.00. CSF- £203 37. 

53 dm 2f) 1 . FIRST KISS (G Baxter. 20- 
1): 2. is Bello (C Rare HMU 1 Eye Sight 
(J Reid. 20-1) ALSO RAN: 4-1 1 fav Brown 
Thatcti. 6 Manessans Dancer (4m), 50 
Paro Bay (5m), Turmeric (6th). Eastern 
Player. Ernie Dale. River Gambler. Aunt 
Etty. Learner s Pearl. Ma Feathers, Stop 


Devon 

Going: good to fkm 
ZISBm It MSeJ 1 . Coortanda GW (G 
cnartes Jones. 10MW. Z Nlnattash (6-13 
fav): 1 Lott) uifty C5-U 8 wi NR: 
Etayme. 101, 30. W Feher. Tote £330: 
£1.10. £131 El 30. DF: £130. CSF: 
£537. 

Z48(2mifch) l.Larncre 
Hobbs, fl-lk Z Flonnadoir (5-2 lav): 1 
Ataiano (7-21 S ran. NR: CulvertWQfi. 3L 
30. P J Hobbs. Totm £8.10: £l.eaEl.l0. 
£2.10. OP £1030. CSF: £2125. 

115 am if hda) 1, Rodnere (Tracey 
Turner. ®-lkZ CeWe Sam (9J): 1G W 
Supormara (33-1); 4, Trtxh AngterJ33-1). 
Father Mac iMfav. 17 ran. Mb HI The 
Jug. 51. 1L W G Tumor. Tote £21.60; 
0.30, £1.10. E&30. £731 DF: £3020. 
CSF: £160 77. 





M Bradley. Tots: £35.90: £3.90, El. 50. 
£1.90. DF: £21100. CSF: £8927. 


Arizona Be*e (50-1). The Pam Barrier 9-4 
tav. ii ran. NR- No Urn* Spsrtei 
Rambler. 41. 20L R Fear. Tore £630: 
£150. £1.70. £8.10. DF: £1030. CSF: 
£28.41. 

4.45 (2m If hcBe) 1. Sudan Pat (P 
Richards. 11-4): Z Rainbow Lady (7-1J 3. 
Marsh King (16-8 lav). 12 ran. NR 
Prmcesa tee. m 17.1. T Ha ML Tore 
£3 80: £200. £2.40. £230. OF: £1450. 
CSF: £23.18. 

Ptocapab not MriUbie. 

Fakenham 

G ZlSSneOyd MSe) 1. Smdter SoW 
(Mr A Kekeway. 2-1B LmgtWd Lady(7-4 


(Mr A Keteway. 2-11: bngiWd Lady (7-4 
mvt 2 Vaaaboto Victor ra-l|. 13 ran. A 
Stt 7T 3. WC50: £1.10. £130. £220. 
DF: £330. CSF: £756. 



V : . 

v-' A.v 


GOLF 

Davis scrambles 

to victory at 
third extra hole 

By Mitchell Platts 

Rodger Davis, of Australia. » 1 

completed his second success on vvithihree bRd es ^ 

The European tour when he holes. . Me ar ,d the 

overcame Des Smyth, of Ire- J?!fL^ l Q f victory had virtually 

Ctompio& °n the West -jj* won a 

first prize of £35.000 when shots at^Sie 17th. He narrowly 
Smyth took seven at the 7Ui - s ™ | 0 ho i c with his eagh: 
the third hole in the play-o^- SanDi fiom 20 feel. Then he 
after driving, out of bounds, aiwmpi birdie al ,hc 

Davis was fortunate that h« out of a green- 

second shot stayed m play and 18 Within four feet. 

LX b fc2- aS1X * ^Ttwrance might have won this 

Davis and Smyth bad re- loumament if only he 
mimed in from of the chasing have putted aswehashe JgJ 
pack throughout a sultry after- from tee to green. He had no 
Son. Sm^who set out two than 109 putts ,m thefnjl torce 
strokes behind his nvaL waited rounds and he m '“«L -VESI 
until late in the day to make his inside of 10 feet "9^? fi 
move. He holed from 15 feet for eight occasions : Jj, e 
a two at the 14th which was the ranee made certa in Of being a me 
first of three birdies in four holes io leave his putter in the bag at 
that enabled him to go one the 399-yard seventh where hj 
ahead. holed his second shot from u 

Davis, however, sank a putt of yards with an eight iron, 
fully 20 feel on the last green for w a U 0 n ,he ini,,a J. ,ar ^f l 

a birdie to complete a round or _ ore than fw 0 hours before the 
70. Smvth. afier foiling to win lasl u i 0pp ied into the hole. 


E23 40. CSF- £172.96. 
Ptacapofc £4535 


17 Tncast: £4370 44 2mm __ 

Chepstow 

« won. Pteeepot: £6931 

23(3m 31 c« 1 Hire* Coimttes (MresG 

Redcar 


Going: good to firm 

2.15 I5D 1. PASHMINA (C Coates. 9-4L 
2 Mona Future (D Nicnoks. 15-8 lav): 1 
Piuicms Smgb (J Bteasoaie. 8-ll^LSO 
RAN 9-2 The Mague i4mi. B IA^)n-My. 
t0 Choce Matcn. Ntlfy Gnff |6tnL 14 
Bootnam Lao (5tr». 20 Fution's Ryar. 9 
ran. 2':l. II. 41. II. 1 ■-••I. T FauHurst at 
rjiptfeham Tate £3.30. El.50. £1.20. 
£3 10. DF- £2 40. CSF ESOZNobKl. 

2.45 (lm 61 160yl) 1. AGATHtST (G 
DubxM. 2-1 tav). 2. Lucky Humbug (L 
Cnamock. 7-1 1. 3. Regency Square (G 
Dickie. 25-1). ALSO RAN. 100-30 Better 
Bewara iSth). 15-2 Mprvcan. 12 Tears Ol 


k«rs M Rimeil Tote: EZ5ft £1 40. £650. 
£2.10. DF: £217.70. CSF: £36.67. 

23S (3m 3t cb) 1. Fixed Price 9*r J 
Lewekyn. 9-D:Z Didto Boo (25-1 1:3. Avp 
Tour (33-13. Lhser 7-2 fav. 18 ran. 4L U. 
Gienwlie Richards. Tow £9.40: g20. 
£5 60. £1630. DF: £193.40 CSF: £188.43. 

Z10 (lm 2f) 1. welsh Medtov (D 
Wilkams. 9-2 fav): Z Tar's HJ 
KatesPnde(7-T). HranJL l^iLp Haydn 
Jones. Tote: E520: £1.90. £1.80. £2.40. 
DF. £1330. CSF: £3257 Tncast £175.43. 

Z40 (50 1. Summer Sky (T Qumn. 2-5 
favkZ My baWH (9-2): 3. BOBabtoyJiS- 


250 (2m 5f 110yd ch) 1. W Ste Proea 
(Mr B Munro Wilson, 4-SteVt Z Phnop 
Carlton (M): 3. Staccato^-I). 6 nml 101 
201. W T Kemp.Tme: £1.70; £1.10. £1-60. 
DF: £Z1Z CSF: £4.09. 

3JS (2m BOyd hdle) 1. NMMm^rmepAr 
S Andrews. Evens Wav): Z FBx WootF 
cock (Evens jt-tay); a Hounstout (14-U 7 
ran. 61. Wl. M H Tompkins. Tow £2.50; 
£1 60. £1.10. DF: £1.40. CSF: E33S. 

43 (3m di) 1 . BanUdkfMr D Tbmer : >6 
favi. 2. Mr Meflbrs (7-2): 3. Golden Casino 
(6-11. 7 ran. NR: Columbu. 10L 41. JTurner. 
Tow £1.80: £130. £230. DP: E230. CSF: 
£432. 


Coming alive: Davis after a birdie at the 18th had taken him into a sodden death play-off 

POLO 

Gracida makes no mistake 

match of the season at Tramontana’s workload was Coi^ray had iIk mworiune to 
Midhuret, Sussex, yesterday for less well spread. Too much or it sec Gracida fi“ d fla^ from a 

the Smith-Rvland Cup. which was left to Carlos Gracida and nice long cut shot under his 

was won b-5 by Anthony Jesus Baez Although Cowdrey pony s neck, right on the lasl 

Embiricos’s Tramontana were more inclined to commit bell, to equalize, 

against Cowdray Park in extra 
mne(John Watson writes). 

Both teams aggregated 22 
goals on handicap. Both were 
exceptionally well mounted 
Pivoted on the Brazilian. Silvio 


ip with an at- 
Feei. was cum- 


Novaes. Cowdray played a well 
practised positional game. 

Tramontana’s workload was 
less well spread. Too much of it 
was left to Carlos Gracida and 
Jesus Baez Although Cowdray 
were more inclined to commit 
infringements, neither Gracida 
nor Martin Brown were able, for 
the most pan, to compete with 
the crosswind and convert the 
penalties. 

When the scoreboard showed 


TRAMONTANA: 1. A Embirfcos (ZhZJ 
Baez <Q: Z C Gracida (1 0): back. MBrown 
(4). 

COWDRAY PARK 1. C Pearson (3); Z M 
Okie (4); 3. S Novaes (8): back. P WHhare 
(7). 


#V. jiiijw " — ' 1351 pull 

the championship with an at- powered his way out of tne 
tempt from 18 feet, was com- pack with a round that con- 
pelted to hole a pun of three feet ^ birdies and an eagle 

for a 68 which tied Davis with a twoat ^ 344-yard 6th where he 
72-hole aggregate of 28 1. seven a nine iron from 1 >+ 

under par. yards. 

extra hole where' all. the luck 

went with me and against Des. w«*« TaJS 7i ■ 74 - 

Nick Faldo compiled a 68 to 7o! 287: S Lyle. 69. TO. 72. 68: 1 wwwnwn- 
lake third place on 284. But 74. 70. 7ZJ 72 . tz 7r 
Philip Walton, of Ireland, pro- 

duced the round of the <foy by ?67 ^r bomJI. to. to. 73. 7i; h&' 
scoring a 65 for a share of fourth «w.7Z 74. 70. tzh Cteffc.7i.7i . 7Z 7Z 
plare with San. Torrance (69) on 

“ Faldo’s decision to con- Wvw 

] centrate on Europe again this (3 p)J Z 1\. TjkT i; AGtowifc 
summer looks Ukely to be 70 ‘ 7,1 J ^ 


UlirQ IMU6 flOTBI- 74 efi D 

74T K G TiSr^m 71. 71. 74. 

TO! BBTsSLylB- 69- »M» 

74. 70. 72. 71: M Md.ten.72. 71. 7Z 71 . 


summer iooiu. uiw=iy ^1^71 7Z71 75 

rewarded. He appeared at ease. (SALTi.tzti. ra 


288: Ff Dnjtwnoncl, 77. 70-^2- ^" 7 2 
Waites. 71. 71.75. 71; R Rafferty 6 9. 7g . 
TStTr BoxaH. TO. TO. 73. 71; H Bajoagi 

khHndmwK. 71 76 72. 7(h J Cafiizaros 
(Sp) 1*72^ 75. 71 ; A Chandler. 73. 7Z 72. 
7V B Gatecher. 74. 70. 71, 74; J Bland 


CRICKET: ROSES MATCH READY TO FOLLOW RECENT TRADITION 


455 (2m 5f 110yd ch) i. M — n ra rt M 
(Mss M Carter. 33-lfc Z Mussel Bad tlB- 
i); 3. Wise Gambol (8-1). Wttctvn 6-4 tav. 
13 ran. 1L 1 V,L A C L-Smrth. Tote E55T0; 


Tote £2 7ft £110. C1.4fl. £1210. DF: 
£530 CSF £15 86. Tncast £248 59. 

3.15 fim 2f) 1. FORWARD RALLY (G 
DutteW. 7-1): 2. Masked Bill M Pry. 12- 
1): 3. MeiNiJ Low. 16-1): 4. Vintage TdJ 
(N Dav. i6-i|. ALSO RAN . 2 fav Bartey Bin, 
11-3 BaVydurrow. 9 Cbdet 10 Acomum. 
16 S«no>e Odone. 20 Qimi HiOL 25 Barry 
Sneene. Try To Slop Me. SheHman. SAy 
Bov i5tn). Commander Robert. Tnnan. 17 
ran. Nk ll. M. 31. 41 m Prescott at 
Nmvmarket. Tore: £860: £1.30. £2-00. 
13 50. £6 30. DF; £26.80. CSF: £85.19. 
Tricasi E1.1BZ19 

3.*5l1m2n 1. ALSHAMOOim Hdtell* 


faVk Z My Isabcri (9-2): 3. Bo BattWy (15- 
21 6 ran. NR: Pmk Pumkmjl. tyt P Cote. 
TOW £130; £1.10. £230. DF: £1.70. CSF: 
£2.78. 

4.10 (5f) l.Keiy Undo (RWemhem. 12- 
1 H Z Boras Shukae (11-2): Z Com- 
mander Mooden (3-1). La Dnm Evens 
fav. 7 ran. NR: Gerstiwm. Someway. 1 W. 
21. B Stevens. Tote £2030: £430. £130. 
DF: £3650. CSF: £80.70. 

4^0 (7f> 1. Pen VelafoiPSIms. 33-1): 2. 
C BM Get p-l lav): 3. Pamela Heaney(il- 


£7.80. £5.50. £1.70. DF: £284.00. CSF: 
£499.70. 

5.10 (2m 80vd hdte) 1. Coral HaAonr 
(Mr S Sudani 5-1): Z Dick E* Bear (3-1): 
3. AmhaV (4-7 fav) 14 ran. a i. G 
Pritchard- Gordon. Tote: £5-20: £1.10, 
£1 30. OF: £17.70. CSF: £2620. 

PlaeapoK not available. 

Uttoxeter 

Going: good to Arm 


Hampshire face 
an uphill task 

By Richard Streeton 

BOURNEMOUTH: Gloucester •- Hampshire back from the brink. 
shire with all their second He only played because 
innings wickets in hand, lead Greenidge has a back injury, but 
Hampshire bv 129 runs. baited with calm control for 1 00 


1). 4. Gauhar (B-1). 21 ran. NR: 
Sandbounre 1W, , 1»1. ' S Dov. ' Tote: 
£82.60; £9.40. £130. £11.50. £1.90. DF: 
P9JBM CSF: £142.09. Tncast £1.15052. 
Ptacepot not won. 


2l. 2 Albert Had |R Fo«. 5-4 fai* 3. Part 
done* tC Dwyer. 16-1) ALSO RAN: 9-2 
Hello Bent 7 Mod Fammau (6th). 14 
Seatry" (*itil. Desenea t5tn). 18 
Peqmanne. 20 Sokmmo Turn. The Canny 
Man 25 Sunmawen. W Laune's Trojan. 
Goklena 13 ran. Nfc 41. W. a. '.-I. B Rais 
ai Lamooum Tote. £7 30: £260. £1 30. 
£2.40 DF. £4 90. CSF £13 96. Albert Hal 
tnvsrod l*5i but after a stewards' inquiry 
was placed second. 

4.15 (7fl I. THE MA2ALL tG Gosney. 
11-21. Z Chicago Bid (V Smith. 4-1); 3. 
Emergency Ptwnber (R Hils. 9-2). ALSO 
ran 7-2 fav Mage BO. 8 Bn Of a Stare 
i5tm. 12 Trade i*gn Try score* (6ta). 14 
Hooe'ui Heianis. 16 Always Native. 20 
Pars Matcn. smqle Hand. CbaWisse (4th) 

12 ran 41 11. 2' .1 3. nk. Miss L SrJdaU at 
Coiron T«e. £6 36. £2 30. £2 60. El 40. 
DF £24 20. CSF. £28 32 Tncast £9867. 

4.45 (Sfll . BOTHV BALLAD (M Fry. 9- 1): 

2 James Owl (M Hartley. 7-1 1: 3. 
Rhabdomancer iR For. 100-30). ALSO 
PAN 10-11 *av Our Honion(5tni. 6 Mtehr 
Runner. t6 Pence Concert i4|h|. 20 Bejant 
ifthi M'SS Emi'v 8 ran II. 3>. 3l. 81. 
PCai.n: a'F'Pon Tore £15 90.£1 60. 
L2 1C. £1 4Q DF £44 40 CSF. £6525 
5.15 1 lm 21' l LLANARMON IR FO* 7- 
2. Abafliero .C Du«*«NJ 7-4 tavi 3. 
Asmngran Grere Rvan. Ii-J) ALSO 
n4N 13-2 sn nv "a* r6mi 6 Dvmra. 12 
Jjt'ssruteew. 20 B<g League. Nei A 
Frccvm i4mi Ta*> Man (5tn) 

Vifct'S 12 :J”. ll. 2i. 2 .1 sh no w 
*■2 B Hi's ai Lamocum Tjre £4 50. 
£2 40 £1 80. £1 SO DF £5 30 CSF 
£11 20 

Ptacepot 0930. 

Doncaster 

QnHiff fin* 

JOi^l GOnSLAWiJui^Brwker 2^ 
i. : Torrey iT Scrafco 4 i lavi 3 Buba 
Boy iD Lea2tmer i2-ii 4 GokJen D«c 
"(Si! 26 1* ALSO RAN 9-2 2C 
-ec-’.'ic 3 O i O.-stcn i-tf' Hmeti4kat>e. 

Q Mmus Man 13 Si '*ev Arm. 12 tea 

v. fje. u Jaws S-J-reEty * 

w. -m, PLUM-U. wnncoj!i 20 Pent bol 
Rj.acer. 25 Sa'Q^a E»e';gn: 18 ran 

1 i ti* ' : nk '.l. M:s ui Rewere* W 
fcytturn-btethc Sea S:sy £4 « 
*1-3 £4 10 £310 C- £23 ?0 C£ p 
£105 51 Tncast £96" 55 1 mm «- 3 - 13 
sec 

2.30 i5h 1. ROSE DUET .N Comynon. 
13 9 it.- 2. e Jar iG 2 

Harry's CwMnfl ! J CaiWpan. 5 ' fl LSQ 
qaN ^FjnnrX(4lnl 12 Arwns LaCl '5fnr. 
s-j-fcon’ itini .T>S*ne:SiKi . 'an il. 
.1 • | ji. t ' J. T Barren a: ;-■*-> Tote: 
c»-C £160 £1 M O f En -J L&h 
£520 1 mmC2 13 iOE*d 

J0 12-n 21* 1 SNEAK PREVIEW iC 
Ru“n r 2-2 tan Z SoiukJ Odtuskm iD 
r.-;M>;*'i 12-1 1 j RAW Tew IP SrrML 
i-1- ALSO PAN 5 With* Ban*. 15-2 
- -«j 3 Lave 'n. 10 JacKdaw 

.•i-i' ii isirni E«''e '4m« i2 Secwmy 
C-e vxr-s Pri-a:- ■- 70 Kn-am s He*. 

2s Sui Sl'«!. 33 -u" 1 W« 13 jn NRj 

7s jo. El 60 DF £113 50 L.5F £4537 
T: -|S» £15883 3 mm 57 58 5« 

:' 30 r»l i CARRI8EAN SOUND (M 
Pc ^ris. 13-21.2 PesticpolW W«W. 4-1 
,t-ia., 1 Top Wing iG SOftey- 11 -3 
ALafiRAN 4 rr-tark ivory Gu.1 8 Hudsons 

ve*s i4thi 6 Daew ftw Cunjnan 

Dvc?r ,5ihi. 25 Njp Ma-WteJ. 6Wl 8 
r ip r I 1 sn tic. 2* 2 ?i. C Bnfgiin as 
r.e*ma»ket Tote KM. 

if 60 CF £16 10 CSF £31.93 1 Itw 
U 22 sec 

4 0 rim 41 1 COX GREER iG 
4-ti'av 2 Up To Me i Gai 

2 Dunston (G F'encr. » »- 3 

isumd Red iN Con-teW". »’» 

SiN 5 2 &4M5. 14 SOnuin'-g bimi'ar. 20 
c-5* W-are. Ji 45VAM Assemcv 

H 3 n,wv0o*nl5ttn 

M: ‘.'2SS i5’*'i Pua-v *.pg wa'er-aw. 


Fontwell Park 


„ 2l 110yd ch) 1. Wlwf*e Ymrra 
(Mr G Maundrel. 14-1); Z Rlton Jim (8-11 
favi; 3. WhawouNM (7-1). Bran Z rTM- 
Mrs G Gktengs. Tote: £1430: £2.10, 
£1.10. £1.70. DF: E9.B0- CSF: £2537. 

230 (2m 61 hda) 1. Blue tort fE 

Murpny. 5-UZ White Roae(EvensfBv);Z 
Housewife(l6-1).20 rarr. 2.2aJGrftord- 
Tote: ESHh £1.90. £1.40. £330. DF; 
£4.30. CSF £10-98. 

33 (3m 2f H 0yd ch) 1. CardbiaP* 
Outtwrat (Mr J Portman. 20-11; 2. Marks 
Methane (9-2). Z Hasty Retreat (2^ rt- 
fnv) 14 ran. NR: WMamson. 31. 15L A 
Portman Tote: £2960: £6.60. £230. 
£1 40 DF: £404.00. CSF: £11490 
330 (2m 21 hate) 1. Flra CMeftate (A 
Meogwick. 14-1). z High Heaven (6-4 tav); 


£19 90. CSF- £41 22. tkgh Heaven fin- 
rsned first hut after a stewaras' mawry 
wasoteced second. 


DF £14 80 CSF: £24 35 


430 i2m 2f hdte) i. Master Bob n 
Shoemark. I3^V 2. Hasty Gamble (5-6 
ta») 1 Marker Run i20-l) 6 ran 31. 121N 


wenaerson Tote £2 90: El-50. £1.10. DF: 
£1 90 CSF E3.4Q. 

Ptacepot: not available 

Huntingdon 

Gomg. firm 

10 i2m 200yd tote) V Welsh Consort IS 
Smith Ecoes. 8-11.2. Timber Merchant |6- 
4 tavi. 3 Eve Flasnet (12-1) 19 f an. 10 5. 
N Henderson Tote £6 30. EZ30. £1 50. 
£1.60 DF £5 50 CSF £2231. 

Z30 (2m 1 00yd ch 1 1 . Vale Cttetenge (K 
P,an 12-11. 2. Parsons Pnde (3-M. 3. 
Brahms And Liszt |2-1 fav). 13 ran. 151. 61 
K Morgan Tote £9 30. £2.50. £1 TO. 
£1 20 OF £35 10 . CSF £54 09 
3 0i2m4iixJie1 1 Broken Wing (5 Smith 
Eccies ii-2r. 2. Caranzaro tii-io tav). 3. 
Sontare DM). 9 ran nr W«s»wd 
' reoman i?t. 41 n Hen«rson Tote- 
£6 20 £1 60. £1 10. £3 4fl. DF £4.40 
CSF £'2.51 

330 (3m 100vd cn) 1. Southern Prince 
iMas J Hodge. 5-4 favi. 2. Aragenn6li 
j Tommy sireasure i30-1) Tl ran ' j. 
151 h Hodge Tow £3 10. Ei.SO. £4 70. 
£4 00 Df£AD 10 CSF £25 58 
4.0 iZm 100yd chi t. DuhaMm Boy (E 
Bu:>*ev 2-5 favi Z Gtommg |5-2I. 3 
Gaaes Flight i20-t| 6 ran 101 dts*. T 
Casey T«e £1 4fr £1 10. £1 60 DF. 
£1 TO CSF £2 00 

430 |2m 200yd hdai I- Aiado iC 
Warren. 12-fi. 2. Naoar i4-l|. 3. Saint 
Pucasso" i3J-ii 12 ran I2i. an ha A 
Neaves Tote £43 06 £6 10. El 70. £6 nO 
DF El 16 10 CSF £6732. 

P tace pot £5.10 


Log Catan (8-ik 4, Le Pearl (2&-1). Dusty 
FaSow 5-1 tt-fav. ifl ran. Nft Pass 
Ashore. Vrt Csrtwr. 41. a. A J Wfcon. 
Tote £6.90: EZIO, EZ50, £130. E1830. 
DF; £2350. CSF: £51.03. 

ZS0 (2m 4fch)l.Ptey Bay (BDe Heart. 
4-5 favV 2. Alice s Bcw (4-1): Z Motes 
Chamber (B-1). 7 ran. F Winter. 71, 2VH. 
Tote: £1.70: £140. £150. DF: £Z10. CSF: 
£4.47. 

Z2S (2m hdte) 1. Red gr a ve Artist (S C 
Knight&Z); Z Miste Bool (7-2): 3. Deadly 
Goteg(14-1 ). Burley HB Lad &-« tav. 8j ran. 
NR: Dreadnought. M Pipe. Tote: £3 60: 
£140. £1.100.60. OfT £9.00. CSF: 
£12.01. 

43 (2m hdte) 1. Le Sob (p Cowtay. 11- 
4L 2. Storm House (9-4); 3. Gentenera 
Choice (2-1 tav). 13 ran. NR: Wonder 
Wittet. Frisky Htme. MuSkCTl Rambter. U 
1 >41. R Frantss. Tote: £3.70: £1.1Z £1-30. 
£1.20- DF: £330. CSR £839. 

435 (3m 2f dll 1. Glen Rover (S C 

S 5-4 tav): 2. Sonny May (7-1); 3, 
Rhythm 2-1). 6 ran. 3. II. A 
Tow: EzS): £1.40. £230. DF: 
£6.00. CSF: £934. 

5.10 (3m ndta) 1. b*pen (P Dever. M 
tav). Z Woodtand Generator (6-1): Z 
Utopian (25-i). 13 ran. NR; Regent 
Leisure. David's Treasure, Uttte Myra; kj. 
21 M H Easterby. Tow: EZIO; £130. 
£1.80. £1 3.9a DF: £5.70. CSF: E1Z44. 
Ptacepot: not a wa laMe 

Wetherby 

Ootec: good to soft 
230 (Em hdte) 1 Had Shaft (R Lamb. 4- 
5 fav); 2. Rpyaf Tycoon (10-1): 3 Wiliam 
The First (9-2). 10 ran. 3L 8L W A 
Stephenson Tote: £2 50: £1 30, £2.90. 
El .40. DF. £30.90. CSF: E1Z51. 

30 (2m 4i lOOydcn) 1. Fergy Foster (R 
Lamb. &4h 2. GoW Bearer IT1-8 favh 3 
Living Fee (3-D. 5 ran. II. Cbst. W A 
Sieohenson. Tote. E2.B0; £180, £1-20- 
DF. £2-80. CSF: £4.45. 

330 (3m 100yd ch) 1. Youghal (Mr J 
GreenaH. 4-7 lav); Z Winning Bnef (9-1). 3. 
Wool Mwcham [33-1L 10 ran. NR. Slaney 
Kmg 01st. 1 ‘?V W A Steohenson. TatK 
£1 TO. £1 20. £1 50. £600. DF; £630. 
CSF £924. 

43 (2m hdte) 1. Lenhydreck (S Sner- 
wood 9-2): 2. Mr Ouck 0-1 favt 3 
Strameam (61). 8 ran NR Retdom. zv.-l, 
21 O Sherwood Tote: £530. E1.70.C1 50. 
£1 90. DF. £1030. CSF £21.91. 

430 (3m 100 yd ch) 1. Why Forget (C 
Gram. 7-il. 2. Nevrtfe Connection (11-8 
tavi. 3. Hazy Gten ffi-l) 6 ran. w A 
Smonernon Tote £840. £230. £1.50. 
DF £B40. CSF. £18 25. 

53 1 2m hdle) 1. Freemason (S Sher- 
wood. 4-5 tav) 2. Record Harvest (6-*). 3. 
Cao That (33-1). 12 ran.a. 121 0 
Shanreood. Tote, n 70 E1.1Z £1.30. 
£4 10 DF. £1 TO. CSF £Z94. 

Ptacepot not available. 


Gloucestershire continued to minutes, 
come off best yesterday in what An uncharacteristic stroke fi- 
has developed into a tight, gritty nally brought Turner’s downfall, 
match. They gained a first He swatted a lifting ball over the 
innings lead of 106 runs and top of the slips and was spteh- 
then Stovold and Romanies djdly caught by Payne at deep 
came safely through the final SO ^ird man. Parks and Mara 
minutes. All day the seam survived a testing examination 
bowlers were helped by a green Lawrence before the follow- 
pitch. which had dried and on was saved, 
become firmer than it was on (gjouccsTEHSHme prat ktengs: »g 

Saturday. Hampshire had seven fof 7dec(AW3tovoW66.KMCwrBn8Z 

wickets down before they pw R<xnameB52). 

averted the follow on. Thor AWao vowSt^!l!??!L 14 

owed much to Parks for a plircky pwRomkamesnotout._-~-.--~-.~iJ 
36, which ensured their nra k 

™ deficil ^ Wthin HAMPSHIRE: FWt innings 

bounds. v p T ■ c Russei b watsfi 17 

Walsh obtained both lift and — ~i 

movement from the start, and c j Nmhotas c RusseHb vvaten — ii 

was a consistent thorn in the D r Turner c Payne b Lawrence 35 

Hampshire flesh. Both he and ^ 

Payne, with medium paced j^/fSb wf^-..-^-IlTM 
swing, were more effective than r j Manic wngwowemh 17S Andrew t 

Lawrence’s sheer speed. An- gambndga « 

other feature of the innin« was p jl 

Russell s neat and efficient ToW(te2owwS ) 19C 

wicket-keeping. FALL OF WICKETS: 1-»0. 2-42. 3G7. 4. 

Hampshire s struggles began 66.5-105.8-125. 7-130.8-185. 9-179, io- 

with the dismissals of the Smith 190. 

brothers, either side of lunch. 

The light at this stage was poor. pByne ^ 

and had already brought an 8S Bonus pomts; Hampsrere ipt Qioucs 4. 

minute stoppage. Chns Smith, 

who batted as confidently as 

anyone, was unfortunate to get a j f nr T« v Inr 
ball (hat kepi low. Robin Smith 1 WO IOr 1 aylOr 
edged a catch behind as he Two Olympic athletes, 
played forward in (he first over Gladys Taylor and Kim Hagger 
after the interval. are included in a strong Essex 

Terry and Nicholas were also (cam to compete in the women's 
caught behind, to leave Hamp- European Champion Clubs 
shire 66 for 4. Marshall briefly Trophy in Amsterdam on Junt 
played some positive strokes l. Taylor, the captain, is to ran 
and Tremlett stayed for 10 in the 400m and 400m relay 
overs. It was the veteren. while Hagger will compete m 
Turner, however, who pulled the long jump and sprint relay. 


top of the slips and was splen- 
didly caught by Payne at deep 
third man. Parks and Mara 
survived a testing examination . 
by Lawrence before the follow-- 
on was saved. 

auOUCESTEKSMRe First tarings »8 
for 7 dec (A W Stovold 66. K M Cuvran BZ 
PW Romanes 52). 

Second tarings 

AW Stovold not out — 14 

p w Romkames not out -■» 

Total 23 

HAMP8MRE: First wrings 

V P Terry c Russe* b Watsfi 17 

C L Smith Ibw b Watah 

R A Sn*h c R umN] 6 
^CJNstaotasc Russell 6 Watati — 11 

D fl Turner c Payne b Lawrence 35 

M O MarehaM b Payne 23 

T M Tremtau c Stovold b Payne 5 

TR J Paris b Wateri « 

RjMarucWrlgntbWat8li 17 S Andrew b 

Baattndge g 

p j Bakker not our - 3 

Exoas(b 1. Ib5. nb9) ._15 

Total ( 853 overs) 190 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-40. 2-42. 3£7. 4- 
86. 5-105. 8-125. 7-130. 8-185, 9-179. 10- 
190. 

BOWUNG: Lawrence 12-1-52-1; Wash 
262-7-68-5: Payne 22-6-48-3; Bemtxidge 
5-0-16-1. 

Bonus (tents: Hampsrire ipt Gtouta 4. 


Two Olympic athletes, 
Gladys Taylor and Kim Hagger, 
are included in a strong Essex 
learn to compete in the women's 
European Champion Cubs' 
Trophy in Amsterdam on June 
l. Taylor, the captain, is to run 
in the 400m and 400m relay 
while Hagger will compete in 
the long jump and sprint relay. 


Stubborn 
Parker 
holds out 

By Ivo Tennant 

LORDS: Middlesex, with 

eight second innings wickets in 
hand, are 60 nuts ahead of 
Sussex. 

An obdurate century by Paul 
Parker led to Sussex dedaring 
42 runs in arrears yesterday 
evening. Something out of the 
ordinary is required today to 
prevent this match drifting to- 
wards a draw. The man most 
capable of anything extraor- 
dinary. Imran Khan, captured 
two Middlesex wickets before 
the close. 

It was altogether a soporific 
day. The weather was heavy and 
after luncheon, as it used to be 
known in The Times, rather a 
lot of members fell asleep. The 
Sussex innings stagnated until 
Imran came in and hit a breezy 
60. 

It was not until the match was 
into its tenth hour that spin was 
introduced. Middlesex, like Sus- 
sex on Saturday, could have 
done with a better balanced 
attack. They are without six first 


Yorkshire recover 
from disarray 

By Peter Ball 

HEADING LEY: Lancashire, the attack to Allott with a fluny 


HEADINGLEY: Lancashire, the attack to Allott with a flurry 
with all second innings wickets of aggressive strokes. Lancashire 
in hand, lead Yorkshire by 42 losing their opportunity to 
runs. lighten their grip as he survived 

ft is a long time since the a straightforward chance at 
Roses match took place with the cover to Alton's visible disgust. 


two teams leading the 
championship, and they re- 
sponded yesterday by producing 
an enthralling day's play for a 
good sized Rank holiday crowd. 

Yorkshire's batsmen played 
with pleasing freedom as they 
recovered from an inauspicious 
start against the keen Lancashire 
attack. Allott bowling with fire 
and Watkinson again suggesting 
his considerable potential as an 
off-spinner, getting both turn 
and bounce. 

Yorkshire’s success, however, 
almost certainly means that the 
declaration will have to be 
nicely judged today if the recent 


After being reprieved again. 
Bairslow saw his team pass 200 
before heaving once too often at 
Watkinson. and as Neil Hanley 
followed quickly. Lancashire 
still had the possibility of a 
useful lead. They dissipated it 
with iheir sloppiest period of the 
day. Carrick and Peter Hartley 
prospering against some loose 
bowling to take their side past 
300. 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 
296 (C Maynard 132 not out. PJ 
W Allott 65: P W Jarvis five for 
86 ). 

Second innings 

G D Mendis not out 39 


.. ij u Menais not out ^ 

tradition of stalemate is to be. M R Chadwick not out 14 

«- nr. _L ci ”7 


team players, owing to England 
calls and injury. Also. Williams 
was off the field for much of the 


afternoon, suffering from a bade 
strain and Butcher, who had a 
swollen finger, was already in 
the pavilion. 

Middlesex declared at their 
Saturday score. 342 for nine, 
and gamed a wicket in the 
second over. Lenham caught in 
the dips pushing fast forward to 
Hughes. Thereafter, on a firm 
pitch, the Middlesex attack 
looked innocuous. Green got 
into his stride with three consec- 
utive boundaries off Hughes 
and he and Parker were not 
parted until they had added 159 
in 49 overs. 


Richards leads the 
way for Somerset 

By Alan Gibson 


Hexham 


Going: good to firm 

6.0 ( 3m chfl . B«ou Lyon (B BtoraY. 9-4t 
2 Ctonrocne Stream (Evens fav>: 3. 
Snmmg Banfl (12-1). 6 ran sh tW. 51 p 
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£2 30 CSF £4 67. 

630 (2m 41 MM 1. Rafera Air U 
Prison 8-n. 2. Starstwt H0CF30 favi. Z 
Bariev Brake 16-u 9 ran. 15. Mrs B 
Wanng Tote E19 50. £3 10. £1 40. £2.00. 


Cartmel 


££ & » s»*o. csf 

ft* 97 2trBi3JQ' tec 
430 151 1. CAROL'S jWMgf g 
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gi-jS. 4-11 3 Joan Sent*** iS 
?-r ALSO RAN 4 Timesvr'icn (5mi 9-3 
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S.0 iin 21 SC .01 1. WESHAAM iG 

JSef J ta« CtotaW J5MJ5 £ 

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FUcepOC £1975. 


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(Miss S 33-lL 2. Pnowfiove i M - 

4i. 3. Cm Mai (9-4 tavl 8 ran NR. 
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£30 70 £4 30 £1 10. £1 40 DF £4520. 
CSF £114 00. 

235 <2m ii ratal V Son Ol Manada (K 
Jon« 94 favu 2. GF-anrane (16-1). 3. 
W«i Va|Cr (9-21. 11 ran a IS J Wage. 
Tola £390. £160. £3 70. £1 60 DF- 
£23 30. CSF £39 95. 

Z1D i2m 5f chi 1. Bashful Lad (R 
□umvoccv. 5-2 favi 2 Kumon Sunsnine 
I3-1T 3. imperial BUS* (5-11 9 ran NR 
Gmian House n 15) m Oi'*er Tore 
£3 IP £1 20. £140. £150 DF £510. 
CSF £71 40 

3.45 13m if noigi i Golden Secret ik 
T eeyr. 311 2 Just a Han i?-i fav) 1 
Crark-A-Jim rTO «j 12 ran ■»! 251 0 
Vortan Tcr> £6 70 f ’ 50. £i 30 £3 10 
DF. £9 30 CSF. £26 17 
430 (2m if sni i viewy Mom (K 
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£2Q»i 

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Hereford 

Gcmg- it-i 

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2. '.'■s'.- Sunset i9-t, ij> ran & 13. M 
Taw £370. £1 50 Si 10 £230 DF 

Sc. iki CSF £1 50 


Bartev Brake (&-U 9 ran. 15. Mrs B 
Wanng Tote £19 50. E3 10. £1 40. £2.00. 
DF £1 10 1510* 2nd vrrtn any other horse 
CSF £33 75. After a stewaras mawrytne 
resuh 51000 

Flat leaders 

TRAINERS 


H Coal 18 

PGote 17 

R Harmon 16 

G Harwood 16 

L Cumam 13 

M H tasrartoy 12 

M Brittain 11 

B Hills 10 


» av m i 
ia io a 
17 10 13 
16 17 9 
16 7 5 
13 1 6 

12 9 8 

11 9 15 
10 19 10 


JOCKEYS 


M ta M aara> awn 
SCautaan 33 26 29 * -2 78 

Pat Eddery 31 18 13 4 -t7.il 

V; Carson 20 26 » 11 «7Z37 

GStart-av 3J 11 7 2 -6 76 

RCoCfirW 19 20 13 B -30® 

TVeS 18 21 20 16 -3602 

P&X* 17 11 11 3 -712 

WRSwrtbum 15 IB 14 B -15.78 

tN M mckamg yesterday s mutts) 

Blinkered first time 

REDCAR: 3 45 AytesheM, Mm BaMI 

• Con Horpao's Derby 
acceptor Hollo« Hand is likely 
to miss Epsom and wait for 
Ruv-il Vtcot. 

•George DufTidd landed his 
second Zetland Gold Cop when 
Forward Rally, a 7-1 chance, 
just lasted home by a neck to 
beu( Masked Ball at Redcar 
yesterday. 


TAUNTON: Glamorgan, with 
ail their second innings wickets 
standing, are 22 runs behind 
Stvnenet. 

Glamorgan declared at their 
weekend score. 314 for seven, 
and when Somerset went in 
Marks was out second bolL 
bowled by Thomas. Harden 
came in at No.3. How confusing 
ii is that Somerset have two 
promising young batsmen called 
Hardy and Harden, but I think I 
have got this one right- Harden 
baited welL and the tunings was 
flourishing when Roebuck was 
caught at square leg. an excellent 
catch. He had scored 40. and the 
total was 68. Harden was third 
oul bowled by Ontong. at 121. 

Richards had by now settled 
in. and in a moment, in the 
twinkling of an eve, as it seemed, 
he had his 100. It was not one or 
his more ebullient games. After 
he had reached il he settled 
down, rather ominously, as if he 
intended to score another hun- 
dred. which is not his usual 
custom, at least in matches of 
this standard. It was Somerset’s 
plan to secure a big lead because 
the pilch was playing un- 
certainly and might be difficult 
on the last day. 

But Richards was run out and 
Botham, after another 
marvellously careless display, 
wascaueht in the slips for 49. So 


SOMERSET: Fim Innings 

V J Marks b Thomas . 0 

•PM Roebuck c mots bBasa ... 40 

R J Harden b Omong —. 42 

I V Richards run out '36 

I T Bottom c Jones b Hofmos ...... — 49 

G V Patmer c Yourus o Howies - 17 

T Sard c and b Omong....- 30 

jjE Hardy c Jones DBase — -8 

C H Dteoge b Base « 

NSTaytorb Omong 3 

J Gamer noi ml ................ .5 

Extras ( b l. lb 10. w 1. no 13) ..._2S 
Total — 369 

FALL OF WICKETS. 1-0 2-8Z 3-121. 4- 
21 1 5-280. 6-314. 7-343. *347. 9-351. ID- 
359 

BOWUNG- Thomas 20-4^4-1 Base 16-4- 
56-3: Homes 18-3-66-2: Derrick 15-1-45- 
0: Ontong 21 Z-5-B2-3: Younm 7-0-35-0 
Borita pants Somerset «. Glamorgan 
Umpires J Burkenshaw and J H Hamp- 
shnr 


was caught in the slips for 49. So 
the inni ngs ended at 359. a stout 
effort, but less than Somerset 
had wanted. 

When Glamorgan came in 
again. Somerset crowded the 
bat. but Hopkins and Jones 
taned wlidft. 

GLAMORGAN: FH-w tanmos 314 tor 7 doc 
(H Moms 67, RC Ontong TS-JG Thomas 

50 noi 

Second innings 

J A Hopkms no; out .. t2 

A L Jones not out | 

Extras i no 2) -iJ 

Total — 23 


S Warwicks v Worcs 

Edgbaaton 

ICT WORCESTERSHIRE: First Innings 360 tar 
ed flflsclOMSnwti lOZPANealaS4 no. G 
he A Hick 62) 

Second Innings 

M J Wwton t) Srmta .4 

iat d B D Qte sra not out ... - 24 

of D MSmitnc Dyw b Small 8 

,jV GAHiCk6G4KWf 53 

1 s Extras (b 7. ibl, w 1.nb5) — - -14 

“ Total Owtes) - 103 

in r FALL OF WICKETS; 1-20. 2-33. 3-103. 

ult 

WARWICKSHIRE: First Irmmgs 
nd T a Lloyd 41 c Rhodes b Pndguon .... 70 

, Pr RHIBDyv runout — 0 

' .. p A S«mn a fihodas b Hngworth -.. 119 

■ 0 L Amos b Paial — 4fi 

So tG WHumpag8btttaigwDrth3t 

3U t B M McMJlan not out 9 

1SCI Extras ( tbZ w 3. np7) J8 

Total fSvrits dec. 99 overs) 301 

in 

!he G J Pareons. K J Kerr. G C Small N 
Gilford dto not bet. 

” FALL OF WICKETS' t-11. 2-121.3-2I0. 4- 
28Z 5-285 

Z BOWUNG: Radford 22-2-61 -O. tachmorfl 
13-2*46-0. PnSmfi 15-2-37-1: Rate 21- 
6-64-1. W*st©n¥l-t3-0; Utaigworm 23-6- 
12 52-2 

9 Bonus points: Warwicks Apts WonsZ 
Umpires. K E Palmer and □ Lloyd 


Butcher 50: Bgwhna tmran Khan 21-^57- 
0; le Rou* 19-5-37-1; Pflan 17-1-71-3. 
Reeve 29-688^: C M 

WeUs 6-1-19-0; Lenham B-1-25-0L 
Second inrengs 

Q D Bartow c Gould b Imran — — 3 

a JT Milter not out 3 

S P Hugnes tow b Imran “ 

K R Brown not cut— — “ 

Extras (4 b. t ft. 2 w. 1 nO) 

Total (2 wkts) — -~-’ B 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-9. 2-18. 
SUSSEX: First tamngs 

N J Lenham c Cam b Hughes — - •_! 

a MGraenc Bartow b Hughes 

p w G Patfier c Meaon bRose 107 

Imran Khan run out 

C M wells tow b Can- a 

APWdHsS22 7 

1 J i^“pb6^Tra® — J2 

fall^f wK^reT-Tzlea. z-iB7. *- 

Cowans 24-5-56-C: Hughsa 
24-4-81-2. Rose 19-5-6&-1; VWbarns 11-1- 
41-0. Carr 21 Z-4-46-1. 

Derbyshire v Notts 

AT DERBY 

Derbysrve 15 prs) drew wrtfi 
sfwe(77. 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: Pfst Imngs 279 (C 
E B Rica 120: G Miller 4 for 88) 

Second tarings 

R T Robmson D Wamor 31 

BC Broad tow b Finney 34 

□ W Randan ibw b Monensen 31 

P Jonraon Ibw b Fmnqy 71 

’CEBRwflcMllerD Mommsen i 

M NeweH not out 26 

R JHadWC and b Milter 20 

tCWStxJttnotout — — » 

Extras (0 4. to 7. ra 3) .J£ 

Total(6 vritsdec) -..235 

E E Hammings. K E Cooper and J A Afford 
d>d not bat- 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-48. 2-84. 3-137. 4- 

139. 5- 197. 6-225. 

BOWLING- Mortensen 17-9 35-Z Finney 
14-1-38-Z Mtaer 34-2-1 14-1; Wamar 13-2- 
37-1. 

DERBYSHIRE. Fret tarings 151 (R J 
Finney 54. R J Hadlee 6 tor 31) 

Second innings 

•kj Barnette Johnson oftee t 

ISAnoersonc6co8bHaaee.. 6 

A WHO Cooper 3 

J G Wnrifl c Soon b Attord 7 

J E Moms a Scon b Afford ..... 81 

BRoOertsb Attord ... 0 

G tarttar c Scon b Cooper 2 

R 4 Finney c Randan o Attorn 45 

1C Marpres not ow -50 

A E Warner b Afford — 3-J 

OHMortenswinolout -2 

E*nas(b 1. to 10. w 1» 12 

Total flwktal . . — • 248 

FALL OF WICKETS.- 1-12. 2-11 3-2Z *• 

22.5- 23 626 7- 147. 8-154. 9216 
BOWtlMG. Hades 17-3-43-1: Ri« 

<6-1- Aflon) 38-15-71-6: CoopOf 1IM-I7- 
Z Herron mgs 34-10-90-0. 

Umores. R Palmer and R A WMa- 


avoided. 

Yorkshire began in some 
disarray as Sharp fall to 
Patterson's first ball to leave 
them 1 1 for two. The recovery 
began immediately. Swallow 
driving both Allott and Patter- 
son confidently to bely his status 
as nightwatchman. 

Metcalfe was equally com- 
posed and the stand had yielded 
67 when Simmons ended 
Swallow's stay in his first over. 
After a brief spell in his faster 
sivle Watkinson also found off 
spin more productive, inducing 
Metcalfe's first false stroke as he 
mistimed a drive. 

Nelson had struck agajn and. 
at 111 for four. Lancashire still 
held a slight advantage, the 
pendulum swinging further in 
iheir direction as Allott came 
back after lunch for a fiery speljL 
Love was removed immedi- 
ately. Ibw, the third of four 
Yorkshire batsmen to discover 
that life ended in the forties, and 
Bairstow was given a torrid 
greeting. 

The Yorkshire captain re- 
acted characteristically, taking 


Extras (lb 2. nb 5) — -_7 

Total 60 

YORKSHIRE: First Innings 

M D Moxon — I 

K Sharp c and b Patterson .... I 
I G Swallow c Allot! b Simmons 

41 

A A Metcalfe c and b Watkinson 

42 

J D Love Ibw b Allott 41 

S N Hanley Ibw b Patterson 34 
*tD L Bairstow c Makinson b 

Watkinson 41 

P Carrick b Makinson 50 

A Sideboliom c Abrahams b 

Allott 6 

P J Hanley Ibw b Alton — 3 1 

P W Jarvis not out 5 

Extras (b 6. lb 9. w I. nb 5) 
21 _ 

Total (87.4 overs) 314 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 2-1 1. 
3-73.4-1 1 1. 5-146. 6-208. 7-221. 
8-238. 9-302 

BOWLING: Patterson 20-4-67- 
2: Allott 21.4-4-68-4: Makinson 
13-2-56-1: Watkinson 19-2-69- 
2: Simmons 14-5-39-1. 

Bonus points: Yorkshire 4. Lan- 
cashire 3. 


Obstinate resistance 
helps Derby survive 


By Peter Marson 


John Morris, who made 81. 
and Roger Finney, who made 
45. steered Derbyshire away 
from probable defeat, at Derby 
yesterday. With 364 runs re- 
quired for victory. Morris and 
Finney had come together with 
Derbvshire teetering on the 
brink at 26 for six. Their stand 
of 121 runs in 43 overs was the 
prelude to a sturdy rearguard 
action in which Marples. the 
Chesterfield goalkeeper who 
made a maidenhair century, and 
was there still at (he close, and 
Warner, who made 39. each 
made valuable contributions. 

In the morning. Nottingham- 
shire started out at 209 for five, 
and leading by 337 runs. Hadlee 
was soon gone, caught and 
bowled by Miller, and with 
another 26 added. Rice de- 
clared. Having made so 
wretched a beginning to their 
first innings. Derbyshire some- 
how contrived to offer an encore 
more calamitous still. Jn this, 
the first five wickets feu for 23 
runs, and the sixth for 26. 

So. faced by a mountain of 
338 runs and 70 overs and more, 
and. presumably. 

Nottinghamshire's ultimation. 
inherent in Hadlee’s peeling off 
a sweater and rolling up his 
sleeves, not many would have 
wanted to have been in either 
Moms' or Finney’s shoes. 

At Northampton. Butcher 
and Cobb, with 10 runs each, 
took guard with Leicestershire 
standing 253 _ runs behind 
Northamptonshire. By moving 
on bv 4 1 runs, these two seemed 
to have completed the prelimi- 
naries. when both Butcher and 
Cobb and then, Baldennone fell 
to Harper. Thereafter, batsmen 


did rather better at making runs, 
than bowlers taking wickets 
with Briers the most successful. 

When Lloyd and Smith 
walked out at the day's start at 
Edgbaston. Worcestershire 
stood some distance off. 31 S 
runs away to be exacL Armed 
with the certain knowledge that 
the opposition's Smith, and 
Neale, had found there to be 
runs in this pitch. Lloyd, who 
had been 32 not out. and Smith. 
4. determined to collect a few for 
themselves. 

Going along at between three, 
and four an over, these two had 
put on 1 10 runs for the second 
wicket when Lloyd, now 70. fell 
io a catch behind off Pridgeon. 
Smith now took a fresh guard 
and with Amiss' help put on 
another 89 for the third wicket, 
before moving to a maiden 
hundred on the way to 
Warwickshire's declaration. 55 
runs behind. 

Northants v Leics 

AT NORTHAMPTON 
•JP^THAMPTONSIWe: First Innmqs273 

U' . BaUev sapf j Do 

Fredas 5 tor 54. J P Agnew 4. lor 61) 

, „ IBJCSStBtSHJfiE: First Imm 
• P Outfitter c sub b Harper -w 

R A Goto Cano b Harper 3? 


J.. J - B S on e t> Harper i* 

•N E ©rare bNd B Cot* . S 
PBCWiceubbGnteths " S 

P A J De Frar&s not out " , 

Extras (04. lb 9. nb 2) 

Tett1(8v*ts)._ " ' rrf 

. . A Seofe « 100 owrs- 187 tor' 5 
J P Agnew » bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-fll J.7Q - , 

VIZ 5-129. 6*13 . ***• *- 

SSUSR 5. 

U"9WBS: B ttedbeater and N r Ptew, 


i 


(i i 


tt. 



ki'pJNu* i- 




30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1_986 


FOOTBALL: BINGHAM GETS MAXIMUM EFFORT FROM THE MINIMUM OF RESOURCES 

Simplicity is the key to Irish success 


From David Miller, Albuquerque 

With less than a we ck to go 10 the 
big kick-off. many of the 24 finalists 
in the World Cup have induced 
themselves to believe that every- 
thing is going right for them. 
Optimism is everything. The first 
injuries of the competition are going 
to be to euphoria. . 

Northern Ireland a footballing 
nation with a relatively tiny one 
million population, now about to 
play in their third finals, are as 
realistic as they were all those years 
ago in the halcyon days of Sweden 
in 1938. They may not have 
Blanchflower. Jimmy Mcllroy and 
McFarland and they may not get to 
the quarter-finals, but they will be 
amusing and approachable between 
matches, pleasant to five among and 
engagingly free of neurosis. Those 
nursing an injunr. as is Billy 
Hamilton, one of the heroes of 
] 982, are not intense. There has, of 
course, been almost no pressure 
from the media during training 
here. 

Ireland know as they leave the 
heat and altitude after’ two and a 
half weeks preparation at the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico for the even 
more physically demanding envi- 
ronment of Guadalajara, that they 
will be difficult to beat. Since Billy 
Bingham, the wily little right winger 
of 1958, became their manager for 
the second time in 1980. they have 
lost only one match in four, and 


conceded only one goal during 
1985. Bingham extracts the maxi- 
mum. by their efficiency and his 
strategy, from a relatively modest 
squad “Fitness-wise I have no 
problems," he said yesterday, add- 
ing with a laugh, “but that is not to 
say I may not have football 
problems." 

Industrial, modem Albuquerque 
has been no peace haven and 
although the international hotel 
with its swimming pool has been 
comfortable enough, the past weeks 
have required dedication. Yet be- 
cause the players largely do not 
come from ritzy British clubs, they 
are less inclined to grumble. As 
Sammy Mcllroy and his wife take a 
leisurely breakfast, it could be a Post 
House anywhere in England: with 
added heal. Bingham has taken the 
view that the team will uy to play 
their normal game in spile of the 
conditions, which means a lot of 
running without the balL They have 
run a lot in New Mexico. 

In the first week, they regularly 
jogged 3.000 metres for aerobic 
work. The next week, they under- 
went the “Cooper Test” — 3,000 
metres in 12 minutes at 7,000 feet 
(which is 2.300 feet higher than 
Guadalajara). Only the reserve goal- 
keepers. Plan and Hughes, did not 
manage it- Old man Jennings was 
not asked. Bingham and the rest of 
the squad are coaxing him along like 
a grandad. For one of the most 


experienced, and still most able 
goalkeepers on earth, the placid 
Jennings is unexpectedly sensitive 
and in need of constant reassurance. 
His evergreen brilliance, against 
Romania in Bucharest and England 


Germans sweat it out 

Morelia, (AP) - West Germany 
managed only a 2-1 victory over 
Adetico Morelia, a Mexican club 
side, in a practice match on Sunday. 
Franz Beckenbauer, the West Ger- 
man manager, used 17 players from 
his 22-man squad in a match be 
described as important for his team 
to “work op a sweat and adapt to the 
La tm-American style of play". 

at Wembley, helped bring his 
colleagues here. They happily ac- 
cept his frailties, even Jim Platt who 
has lived os reserve so long in the 
shadow of those two huge bands. 

The third week the pace hotted 
up: 2,000 metres in under seven 
minutes, then 1,000 metres in under 
three minutes. Three of them 
achieved the latter. Seb Coe’s world 
record is only 2:12. “Our football 
work in the second week was done 
at 6.000 feet, and in the third at 
5.000 feet." Bingham said, “pnly 
the humidity in Guadalajara will be 
worse. Two days before we played 
Scotland" — in two makeshift 
practice matches — “I took them to 


the brink: eight against right on a 
full-sized pitch. I know we’re in 
shape." 

Bingham hopes this assessment 
includes Hamilton, who memora- 
bly made the goal for Armstrong 
which beat the hosts in 1982. Last 
year Hamilton had three knee 
operations. Unsympathetic . P 1 ^ 5- 
sure upon him to keep playing by 
Oxford United, threatened with 
relegation, cost him his place in the 
League Cup final, at his own 
request. He needed the rest. Leaning 
on the bar with a beer, he smiles: “If 
not being at Wembley helped me to 
be out here, it was worth it." 

Bingham has eased him through 
the training of alternate days, and 
Hughes has managed the runs. 
More to the point, Hamilton was 
regularly outjumping McLrish,' the 
Scotland centre back, on the far post 
in the practice match,' and will give 
Ireland's limited attack an extra 
dimension. “He has pain after every 
match. That's fact But he’s a 
courageous boy," his grateful man- 
ager says. 

It is a cliche of the World Cup to 
say that, for every team, the opening 
match is vital. Yet certainly this is 
true for Group D. in which Brazil, 
disorganized and depleted, play 
Spain on Sunday. Were the Europe- 
an runners-up to win. Ireland would 
know that the group was wide open 
when they play Algeria two days 
later; for Spain have failed to beat 


the Irish in their last three meetings. 

Bingham recently watched Alge- 
ria. the exciting newcomers of 1982. 
Jose by. two goals to Switzerland, 
their goalkeeper unhappy on cross- 
es. Bingham thought, as he came 
away, that he knew what his team 
would be. From a squad who. 
helpfully in one way, alter very little 
over the year because of restricted 
choice, Bingham makes changes not 


only tactically, but to stop compla- 
cency. He likes to think this, policy 
works on both counts, that it does 
not produce insecurity. 

Versatility is valuable. Of four 
full-backs - Nichofl, Donaghy, 
Worthington and _ Ramsay — 
Donaghy can play either (lank or 
centre back, as be does for Luton, 
and Worthington can play midfield, 
as he does for Sheffield Wednesday. 
At centre back it is two from three, 
with O’Neill and McDonald, the big 
youngster from Queen’s Park Rang- 
ers, having the edge at present over 
McClelland, the stalwart from 1982. 

Bingham's cunning lies in his 
fluctuating use of wingers — Penney, 
Stewart and Armstrong — and 
midfield men like Whiteside, whom 
he can use deep or up front If 
Hamilton plays forward instead of 
Clark alongside Whiteside, there 
could be a place for Campbell, the 
young, inexperienced but immense- 
ly fit midfield player from Notting- 
ham Forest The Irish story will be 
worth following. 


Lack of oxygen 
may put Danes 
out of running 


Zbigniew Boniek. having pub- 
licly disparaged Juventus for 
gelling rid of him last year, 
having spoken sceptically of the 
England team be will be playing 
against in Monterrey, has now 
cast doubt on the potential of 
Denmark. 

The Roma forward, who 
played against the Danes re- 
cently in Copenhagen, does not 
think they will do well in 
Mexico. "Denmark bank on a 
very athletic style, with lots of 
running, with long through balls 
to Elkjaer and Laudrup. and 
well have to see whether they 
can exploit these methods at 
altitude, whether iheyli have 
enough oxygen to run as they 
usually do." 

Michael Laudrup. the young 
Danish attacker who took 
Boniek's place at Juventus and 
will be lining up next week in the 
opening match against Scotland, 
has no doubts. “We and the 
Germans will get through: just 
two of us. because the group is 
so well balanced that the third 
placed team won't get any 
advantage qui of goal 
'difference.". 

Holders net four 

Italy, the World Cup holders, 
beat Guatemala 4-0 in a wann- 
np match in Mexico City on 
Sunday. Altobelii scoring three 
times and Gaiderisi once. Italy's 
first goal, the only one of the 
first half, was apparently a 
mistake by Rodolfo Fregoso, the 
Mexican referee. From a free 
kick by Bruno Conti, Di 
Geonaro sent a bouncing shot 
into the Guatemalan goal area, 
where Altobelii, more titan a 
metre behind all the other 
players in an off-side position, 
beaded the ball into the net amid 
heated protests. 

England might be interested 
to hear that Laudrup was es- 
pecially impressed by the Polish 
left winger. Smoiarek. who has 
been somewhat off colour this 
season, less taken with the 
performance of the much 

E raised young centre forward. 

iziekanowski. who. in 
Laudrup's view, “is good but 
turns back on himself too often, 
and isn’t positive enough". 

Klaus Berggreen, the Danish 
midfield player, admired 
Poland's counter-attacking play. 
“Boniek thinks Hungary are 
going to spring the main sur- 
prise. but that the Brazilians are 
too old." 

But the Soviet Union, now 
that they have boldly dismissed 
Malafeev and made Dynamo 
Kiev's Lobanovski their team 
manager, could surprise people, 
too. Lobanovski. riding the luck 
and fine form of his own club, 
has not hesitated to stack the 22 
Russians with bis own players. 
Among them are four who only 
a few months ago were not even 
pan of the 25-man training 
squad, all four taking pan with 
distinction in the Nehru Cup in 
Trivandrum. 

Andrei Bal and Vasili Rats 
played their large part in Kiev's 
success in the European Cup 
Winners’ Cup. in midfield. 
Vadim Evtushenko was the man 
who came on in the final in 



WORLD 

FOOTBALL 

Brian Gtenvite 


Lyon as substitute to score that 
elegant third goal. Igor Belanov, 
aged 25. has also been showing 
splendid form in attack. 

Evtushenko. 28. is hardly new 
to the international game. He 
was in the Soviet Union's 1980 
European Nations Cup squad, 
and happily remembers the 
victory of Russia's Olympic 
team in Rio that year, over 
Brazil. He. like Belanov, plays 
basketball, jumps correspond- 
ingly well, has two good feet and 
is technically adroit. A useful 
reinforcement. 

The Italians are still trying to 
make friends with the Mexicans 
after their disastrous banning 
at Mexico City airport. Shades 
of 1970 when Sir Alf Ramsey, 
with the best of intentions, fefl 
foul of the Mexican Press, with 
. dire consequences. .. - .. 

The Italians were whisked 
away from the airport on their 
arrival, without a Press con- 
ference, to the fury of the 
Mexican reporters. Huge head- 
lines attacked Italy next day. the 
team bad brought “ 1 5 quintal of 
equipment, and not a gram of 
courtesy". When a Mexican 
woman journalist told Enzo 
Bearzot. Italy's team manager, 
that according to an Italian 
colleague, it was his fault, 
Bearzot exploded. “Where is he, 
that reporter? I’ll kill him with 
my own bare hands." 

Paolo Rossi said philosophi- 
cally that if the Mexicans jeer 
him. he is not worried: “Every- 
body whistles at me in Italy." 
Bul’h seems less and less likely 
Rossi will hold a place in the 
team on present form, whatever 
he ultimately did in Spain four 
years ago. 

Three players are contesting 
Rossi's place beside “Spillone 
(The Big Pin) Altobelii: little 
Galderist. of Verona, nowon his 
way to take Rossi's place at 
Milan beside Mark Hateley. 
Aldo Serena, the tall Juventus 
forward, and Bianluca ViailL 
the Sampdoria winger. 

Franz Beckenbauer, the West 
German manager, and “Toni" 
Schumacher, the controversial 
goalkeeper, have papered over 
the cracks of their row , but 



World Cup participation of 
top players in jeopardy 


Schumacher has taken it very 
badly and is still seething. The 
goalkeeper, who horrified the 
world of football with his dread- 
ful. and potentially lethal foul 
oo France's Bartiston in Seville 
in the 1982 semi-finals, overtly 
accepted Beckenbauer’s public 
rebuke over complaining to the 
Press, but privately he has been 
growling about freedom of 
speech. This may account for 
Schumacher's astonishing as- 
sault. masquerading as a tackle 
on his team-mate. Hergeu in a 
practice match last week. If 
Beckenbauer again prefers 
Hamburg's Stein to him — the 
casus belli when the Germans 
met in Holland — then batten 
down ad batches. 

• Brian Glanvil/e is Football 
Correspondent of the Sunday 
Times. 


Bobby Robson has something to smile aboat as he arrives in Monterrey: Gary Iineker should be fit for England's campaign 


Portugal’s 
walkout 
over pay 

Mexico City ( Renter- AP) — 
Portugal's World Cop team 
refused to play a practice match 
at Monterrey on Sunday be- 
cause of a pay dispute with then- 
own football authorities- It is at 
Monterrey that Portugal open 
their World Cop Group F pro- 
gramme against England oo 
Jane 3. 

The match in question was 
against Leon University's Ti- 
gres team. Scnfaor Dasar Grasio, 
secretary-general of the Portu- 
guese Football Federation, said 
the team declined to face TTgres 
as part of their campaign for 
improved bonuses and appear- 
ance money 

He did not specify the sums 
involved, hot said the players 
felt they were not getting a fair 
deal in view of the current 
economic situation in Portugal. 
Hie federation, be said, was 
negotiating with the players as it 
had no wish to jeopardize 
Portugal's prospects in the 
World Cup finals. 

Another warm-op match in 
Monterrey on Thursday is still 
oo schedule along with regular, 
daily training sessions 

In addition to the money 
dispute, another problem for the 
Portuguese team was an injury 
troubUng their mid field brain, 
Carlos Manuel who has been 
unable to practice recently. The 
coach says be will be training 
soon but there are doubts 
whether he will be risked against 
England. 


Mexico City (Agencies) —The 
World Cup finals are in danger 
of losing many celebrated 
performers for the opening 
group games. Zico. 
Rummenigge. Passarella and 
Rossi are among those who have 
fallen victim to a Mexican 
mixture of injuries, stomach 
complaints and poor form. 

Zico. of BraziL has been a 
doubtful starter with a knee 
iryury for some months and 
only a training session on 
Friday, when competing nations 
had to submit to FIFA their 
final 22 names, guaranteed his 
inclusion. But Tele Santana, the 
Brazil manager, confirmed that 
the 33-year-old is unlikely to 
face Spain oo Sunday in the 
toughest group D game. 

“1 don't think Zico will be fit 
for the first match but 1 am not 
willing to announce the team 
before Saturday." Santana said. 
Zico. who scored an exceptional 
goal in a 2-0 practice match win 
over Universidad Autonoma on 
Thursday, was left out of the 
team for another match on 
Sunday which the Brazilians 
won 3-1. 

What Zjco is to BraziL Kari- 
Heinz Rummenigge is to West 
Germany and the chances are 
that the blond forward will join 
the Brazilian on the sidelines for 
his country's opening game, 
against Uruguay a week tomor- 
row. A knee injury prevented 
Rummenigge from playing in 
Sunday's practice game against 
Atletico Morelia, a local team. 


which the Germans won 2-1. 

Like Rummenigge. Paolo 
Rossi, of Italy, had his league 
season disrupted by injury but it 
is poor form and his slow rate of 
acclimatization to Mexican con- 
ditions that could, keep the 29- 
year-old out of the world 
champions' team. 

Daniel Passarella. the 
Argentinian who claimed a 
World Cup winner’s medal in 
1978. is beset by problems of a 
different ilk which will probably 
keep him out of the game with 
South Korea on Monday. The 
former Argentinian captain has 
fallen foul of a tourist's ailment, 
the stomach comptaint 
nicknamed Montezuma's Re- 
venge. which has caused him to 
lose around three kilogrammes 
in weight and miss five days' 
training. 


While England are concerned 
for the fitness of their inspira- 
tional captain. Bryan Robson, 
and must hope for the best with 
Gary Lineker, their prolific 
goal scorer who injured a wrist, 
playing against Canada in a 
warm-up match on Saturday. 
France also have doubts over 
two key players. One of them. 
Bruno Befione, a winger, is 
expected to miss France's open- 
ing match against Canada 
Uruguay will have to do 
without their first-choice goal- 
keeper. Rodolfo Rodriguez, for 
the opening game against West 
Germany and possibly the en- 
tire first round, because he has 
not recovered from surgery a 
month ago, Omar Bonus, the 
team coach, said. Rodriguez bad 
his appendix removed m Brazil 
in April. 


EUROPEAN LEAGUE RESULTS 


East Germany: fw amok Kart- 

Warx-Stadt 4, Sacftsciutng Zwickau 1; 
Rot-Welss Erfurt 1. Vonwerts Frankfurt 3: 
StaM Srandenbtirg 1, Cart Zeiss Jana 1; 
Dynamo Bertn 4. Stahl fUasa ft Dynamo 
Dresden 2. Union Bortn Is Lck Luipcg 3. 
Wismut Aue is Hansa Rostock 3. Magde- 
burg 1 

AUSTRIA: FrctdMsaon: Rapid Vienna 3, 
Austria Wan 1; SSW Wmsteuck 3, GAK 1; 
Sturm Grez 2. LASK 1; Austria Wagenfurt 
1 . Admire WackarQ. 

SPAIN: Leepua Gap: Quarter teats: First 
log: Barcelona 1, Sporting of Gijon ft 
vSencra 1 . Real Bette 2: Sestao 3 Attotfeo 
Madrid 2: Real Sociadadl, Real Zaragoza 
ft 

SOVIET UWOte first ArWon: Torpedo 
Moscow 4, Dinamo Minsk ft Spans* 
Moscow 1. Chemomorets Odessa 1: 
Nates Baku 2. Oramo Tbter 2; Zhalgtrts 


0. Stiaktityor 1. Zen# Leningrad t, 
MstaKst 1: Aram 3. Torpedo Kutaisi 3. 


THE NETHERLANDS: fin 
Heracles ). Rode X Kerkrade ft 
Rotterdam 3. Aiax AmsTerdan 1; 

Star Rotterdam 3. Fortuna Start ft MW 
Maa stricht 2, PC Don Bosch 1; AZY5 7 
Afcmaar 1. Haarfem 1: PSV Bndhown 1 
Utrecht 1: Gron in gen ft r ey eroord Rotter- 
dam 1; VW Vento t. Go Ahead Ernies 2; 
Twerae Enschede Z, NEC Nijmegen 2. 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA: fire! Aristae Boh©- 


Pregue 5. Tatran Presov 0: TJ 
Vrtkovm 2. DtiMa Prague 1. DAC 
Dunajska Strode & fetter Bratislava ft ZVL 
Zina 2. L oko m oti ve Kosice 1; Spartak 
Tmava 5. Ban* Ostrava 2; Stoma Oto- 
mouc 1. Rh Chafe ft Sparta Prague 2. 
SBvia Prague 1: Dynamo Cesfce eude- 
jovtaa 0, Oukfa Banska Bystrica 0. 


Of sahibs and maidans, and monsoon drains 


The cricket season is here 
again, praise Che Lord. For me. 
the season has been 
characterised by the sound of 
new cricket books crashing onto 
the doormat. On the theory'. that 

yon can never go wrong with a 

cricket book, the publishers 
have brought out yet another 
lorry-load. 

My postman is cursing, bat ! 
am not; not alter reading A 
Maidan View: The Magic of 
Indian Cricket, by Mibir Bose. 
One of the cricket classics is 
Beyond a Boundary by C.L.R. 
James: a book about West 
Indian cricket that manages to 
be personal, historical, social, 
political, analytical and im- 
pressionistic, Bose has managed 
to pull off something of the same 
trick. 

He writes about princelings 
and sahibs and about how be 
went to school with Gavaskar. 
He writes about pick-op games 
on the dnsty. sporadically- 
grassed open spaces in Indian 
cities (the maidan of the title); oF 
o'erleaplng monsoon drains 
while fielding; of the search for 
power and influence through 
cricket, and how he played 



unending Test m atch es in a tittle 
alleyway when he was seven 
years old. He describes the place 
thus: "On one Side there was a 
high wall that enclosed the Parsi 
Agiari -t the Parsec religions 
place, a formidable barrier. The 
other wall opened with the area's 
sewer and ended with Hubert's 
house. The sewer part of it was 
open, while underneath 
Hubert’s bouse was situated a 
press which reeked of gum and 
paste and sticky molten sub- 
stances, a shop of sorts, and then 
a gymnasium where in the 
evenings the local boys — poor 
but enterprising — couW be seen 
developing their pony bodies." 

The book is an education and 
a delight, and like James's book, 
it deserves to become a classic. 

It was also educational, if in a 
somewhat different vein, to read 
the exuberant biography of the 


former Australian cricket cap- 
tain. Greg Chappell by Adrian 
McGregor. At one stage. 
McGregor discusses an incident 
when Chappell was caught 
Sneddon on 52, but didn't walk 
and went on to make 90. 
“Inexplicably, neither umpire 
was watching. To Greg it was 
irrelevant whether Sneddon 
caught it or not. All bis life bis 
policy could not have been 
dearer bad he advertised it in 
newspapers. He did not walk. 
He played the amp ire’s rating. 
They gave him the benefit of 
their ignorance." 

Good stuff, eh? He also quotes 
Chappell — this is an authorized 
biography — over tire infamous 
nnder-arm incident. Had 
Australia lost the match, they 
would have needed to play 
another. They didn’t fancy this. 
“I thought this is nor going to be 
too well received. I expected a lot 
of people to say ‘Tdi tch. not 
cricket', but quite honestly I 
couldn't give a rat's taiL I was 
quite prepared fora rap over the 
knuckles if it saved ns from the 
extra game.” 

Most cricketers leap into print 
with an autobiography as soon 


as they have had a couple of 
matches for Surrey Colts. Alec 
Bedser has shown more restraint 
than most, but he has finally 
come out with an autobiography 
written with Alex Bannister. It 
is called, ho ho. Twin Ambitions. 

There is plenty of staff abont 
his time as a selector, indnding 
a bizarre meeting in the Watford 
Gap service station car park, a 

meeting set up by, inevitably. 
Geoff Boycott, who chose the 
place to inform the selectors that 
he was once more available for 
England selection. 

Meanwhile, tire Grub Street 
Casuals will be awaiting their 
fixtures with my own team with 
fear and trembling this season, 
because I have been reading 
Frank Tyson's The Cricket 
Coaching Manual. It is packed 
with detailed tilnstration, and 
even more detailed advice. It is 
good stnJL The only serious 
disadvantage of the book is that 
my skipper borrowed it and now- 
thinks be can bowl a googly. 
"Can you pick it?" he asked. 
“Yes." I replied. “It’s the one 
that bounces twice." ■ 

A Maidan View: The Magic oj 
Indian Cricket, by Mihir Bose. 


Published by Allen and Unwin, 
price £11-95. 

Greg ChnppeU, by Adrian 
McGregor. Published by Col- 
lins. price £9-95. 

Twin Ambitions, by Alec Bedser 
with Alex Bannister. Published 
by Stanley Paid, price £9,95. 
The Cricket Coaching Manual, 
by Frank Tyson. Published by 
Pelham, price £8.95, 

Cricket nostalgia and cricket 
beBe-Iettres are not rices of 
mine, as if happens. But Lsball 
not be narrow-minded about it: 
here are some of the titles 
currently on offer. And if you 
think Botham is over-rated and 
Gower is not a proper batsman, 
then there must be something 
here for you. 

The Pavilion Library re-print 
books you had thought forever 
condemned to the Valley of Lost 
Things on the moon. They have 
the following new old books on 
offer. 

The Ashes Crown The Year, by 
Jack Fhigleton. about the Ashes 
series of 1953. 

Barter's Castle: A Ramble Round 
the Realm of Cricket, by Ian 
Peebles, first published In 1958. 


Two Summers at the Tests, by 
John Arioct, on the 1947 series 
against South Africa, and on the 
Ashes series of the following 
year. 

Hirst and Rhodes, by A_A. 
Thomson, a double biography 
from 1959. All Che above ate 
published by Pavilion and priced 
at £5.95. 

Other titles received include: 
Afier Stumps Were Drawn: The 
Best of Rgy Robinson's Cricket 
Writing. Published by Collins, 
price £8.95. 

‘Tiger’ O’RdUy : 60 years in 
Cricket , by Bill O'Reilly, pub- 
lished by Collins, price £9.95. 
About the chap who was de- 
scribed by Bradman as “tire 
greatest howler I ever saw". 

The Character of Cricket, by 
Tim Heald, published by Pavil- 
ion. price £122)5. A book about 
-cricket grounds, with lots of oice 
drawings by Paul Cox. 

Beyond the Far Pavilions, com- 
piled by Lee Cooper and Allen 
Synge, published by pavilion, 
price £102)5, Including the tale 
of a man wbo was given oat when 
tbr ball was caught by a shark. 

Simon Barnes 


RUGBY UNION 


Odds too heavily 
stacked against 
New Zealanders 

- From Paul Martin, Johannesburg 

The strain of touring South understands the jationale_ to 



Africa ft sapping the strength 
and even the morale of the New 
Zealanders as their un- 
authorized visit enters its last 
dimaciic week. ■ 

A tour schedule of unprece- 
dented severity, coupled with 
continuing worries over security 
and the at times homeiown- 
slantcd allocation of practice 
facilities, have combined to 
stack the odds against the 
visitors. It must be ooneedoL 
however., that the. Springboks, 
especially in the bade line, have 
been the superior side thus far. ■ 
The dark shadow over the 
tour has been the fear that 
escalating violence m the black 
townships, from which die play- 
ers have been cocooned, and the 
anger of radical black groups 
opposing the tour, may pene- 
trate through to the mam. 


Visitors haunted 
by bomb threat 


So far. thankfully, nothing has 
gone wrong. Security men sleep 
m the hotels and patrol the 
lobbies, but the greatest night- - 
mare is of a bomb exploding at 
the grounds. Andy Dalton, the. 
lour captain, says these concerns 
have haunted the team, though 
be is pleased that “no chances 
are being taken” by the vigilant 
South African police. 

So conscious of security were 
the authorities at Loftus 
Versvdd. Pretoria, last week 
that the ground was sealed off 
on Thursday as the 68,000- 
seater stadium was minutely 
searched by a police anti-terror- 
ist squad using snifter dogs. 

Just before the third big 
match on Saturday, police 
nervousness rose. Tbe car carry- 
ing South Africa’s rugby chair- 
man. Dr Danie Craven, had 
pulled up outside the main 
grandstand entrance, having al- 
ready entered the main gate, 
when policemen surrounded it. 
A sniffer dog jumped on the roof 
and then crawled under the 
vehicle. As an official frantically 
tried to find . proof of his 
identity. Dr Craven was con- 
fined to his car. mystified. 

A Northern. Transvaal official' 
later apologized, but proceeded 
to tell Dr Craven of an even 
iter concern: whether part of 


make as toga profit as posable. 

The Springboks and the New 
Zealanders are each battling 
ferodouslv for what they believe 
io be their own future inter- 
national survival. Tension be- 
tween - them reached near 
breaking point last Friday when 
the New Zealanders armed at ^ 
Loftus Versvrid only to find 
that the ground was occupied by 
men in green and gold. "Some- 
th irig of > confrontation 
ensued. - Dahou recalled, "and 
we nearlv bad the game a day 
early.** The New Zealanders 

withdrew “grudgingly". 

The keenness of all and 
suodrv to offer copious hospital- 
ity added to the tour pressure, 
said -Dalton — as when last 
Thursday's mayoral cocktail 
party turned out to be a full- 
blown barbecue losing the team 
four precious hours of pre- 
match preparation. 

Dalton's less weighty com- 
plaint fa that the physical de- 
mands have been so heavy that 
there has been tittle time for 
levity — to the extent that the K- 
coach, Cofin Meads, advised the ' 
team, to “drink more beer", an 
exhortation that, as Dalton 
dryly notes, mast be a rugby 
first. Certainly no such accusa- 
tion of restraint could have been 
levelled at the 1984 England 
side. 

' Meads has. however, ex- 
pressed regret that the 
camaraderie engendered be- 


tween players from opposing 
teams in hfa day no longer 
exists. He notes that players 
n after- 


prefer to rush away from 

match receptions, arms around 
a girt rather than carouse the 
night away with their 
opponents. 

The tough tour schedule leads 
inevitably to injuries — but two 
of them have been caused by 
foul play. Dalton's broken jaw is 
no longer protected by a cage, 
but his playing days are num- 
bered. And on Saturday a late, 
high tackle concussed the scrum 
half. Dave Lovendge. who had 
hoped to end hfa playing days 
next Saturday but did so a week 
early. 

Rough handling 
v for Craven 


S Cdltl VUllkHU> "lltUIW 

e newly-built grandstand Not surprisingly. Dalton is 
would collapse under the weight arguing that officials and players 

of the bfggesi-ever crowd. ' «»•«* “*>*• «■ 

It fa not. dear if there had 
indeed been a bomb threat. 


though one officer, who forbade 
me entry to the ground because I 
had a teg with tape recorders, 
said they ted received a warning 
that day. 

Dalton, oblivious of these 
goings-on. revealed that as part 
tf the touring deaf, a sizeable 
premium for the security risks 
had been added to the life 
insurance covering each player! 

Of more immediate concern 
to the touring squad has been 
the rigours of tire tour schedule. 
In contrast .. to the generous 
arrangements for the England 
tour here m 1984. the pro- 
gramme has been cram hied with 
rough matches, midweek and 
Saturdays, culminating with 
four main matches on consec- 
utive Saturdays. The New Tear 
landers had been caught 
unawares by ibe strength of tire 
midweek opposition. . Dalton 


augui uuu viiaum omv y rejua 

internationally must “set an 
example" agamn dirty play. The 
perpetrator of Dalton's injury. 
Burger Gektenhufa. has been 
excluded from all four main ^ 
games at Dr Craven's insistence. *- 
This has led lo a bitter feud that 
has also split tire national selec- 
tors: Dr Craven fa now vilified 
in Geklenhuis's province. 
Northern TransvaaL 
Gtidenhufa embarrassed the 
Springboks by turning up to 
watch their practice: then at the 
after-matefa speeches on Sat- 
urday, Northern Transvaal’s 
rugby president. Professor Fritz 
Hoff pointedly urid Geldenhuis 
he would “always be welcome 
here if not elsewhere". As with 
his -efforts to avoid confronta- 
tion with the international 
rugby board over rebel tours. Dr 
Craven appears to be out of 
kilter with the more strident 
“devil-may-care" attitudes of 
South African rugby's 
hardliners. 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


CROQUET 


CWMBRAN: MFC Trust Unfed Kingdom 
rtosp i n riM pi: F^xtdsy. St n dq: tore 1Q0 
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Oara. St M. M» MBA: r. A Asfeurat. 540m; 
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FOOTBALL 


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todies: 1. Y Rw, 57.88; ft S Gandy. 58.18; 3. 
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TOUR MATCH: Sato (Hong Kopg) 1. 8ngh#n 
and How Atom ft 

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■toto* iW. 


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AMERICAN LEAGUE: Betomora Ono%s ft 
Seeds Manners & Minnesota . Twins 4. 
Ifeeaukee Martens 8: Boston Bed Sox 7. 
Texas Rangers 1. New York Yankees ft 
GjMomta Anoets 8: Oeeot Tiger* ft OManO 
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11. Bassoon Raiders 10. Erfleid: 


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art: H anon. 68. 6ft 36. Ml Z7S 0 Pocto. 

69. 67. 70. 09 27t J UBBer. 70. 69. 69. 60: U 
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fmSDr, "l^'CT . 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


31 


- 3 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited b v Peter Dear 
and Christopher Davalle 


BBC 1 


$-00 Ceefax AM. Nows 

headlines, weather, travel 
and sports bulletins. 

6.50 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 
Greenwood. Weather at 
&55. 7.25, 7.55, &25 and 
8^5; regional news, 
weather and traffic at &57, 
7.27,7.57 and 8.27; 
national and International 
news et 7-00, 7.30, 8.00, 
8-30 and 9.00; sport at 
7.20 and 8-20: and review 
of the morning 
newspapers at 8.37. Plus, 
the junior and adult 
. phone-in advice lines; 

Alan Titchmarsh's 
gardening advice; and 
Glynn Christian with a 
recipe. 

9.20 The Goode Kitchen. 

Shirley Goode prepares 
penny pancakes; an 
inexpensive casserole; 
and brews 50p-a-gallon 
'champagne' <r) g.^S 
Ceefax 1G.30 Play School 
presented by Bnan 
Jameson with guest, Jane 
Hardy, (r) 10.50 Ceefax. 

1.00 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Cover dale, 
includes news headlines 
with subtitles 1-25 
Regional news. The 
weather prospects come 
from John Kc 

1.30 Fmgermouse. A! 

proqramme for the very 
young presented by (am 
Lauchian and Jane Hardy, 
fr; 1.45 Ceefax 3.15 Praise 
Bel Thora Hird presents 
another selection of 
popular hymns, (shown on 
Sunday) (Ceefax) 3.52 
Regional news 

3.55 The Amazing Adventures 
of Morph, introduced by 
Tony Hart 4.00 Pigeon 
Street, with the voices of 
George Layton and John 
TeHer. (r) 4.10 Laurel and 
Hardy. Cartoon. 420 
Professor Popper's 
Problems, with Charlie 
Drake (r) 425 Lift Off! 
Comedy and pop music. 

5.00 Newsround presented by 

X Finn 5.05 The Kids 
rassl Street 
adventures of a group of 
children who live on a 
Toronto thoroughfare 635 
Rolf Harris Cartoon Time. 
6.00 News with Frances 
Cover dale and Nicholas 
Wnchell. Weather. 

6.35 London Plus, presented 
by Jeremy Paxman. 

7.00 Terry and June. The 
simple task of measuring 
and choosing a new front 
door poses unexpected 
difficulties when June 
decides to keep up with 
Jones' (r) 

7.30 EastEnders. Is it time for 
Michelle to go to the 
maternity home?; Dan and 
Angie make a worrying 
discovery about Sharon; 
and Den decides he must 
see Jan again. (Ceefax) 
8.00 Juliet Bravo. Inspector 
Kate Lonaton investigates 
a suspected case of 
drunken driving. She 
supects the man is guilty 
but proving it Is a different 
matter. (Ceefax) (r) 

BJ50 Points of View. Barry 
Took dives into the BBC's 
postbag once more. 

9.00 News with Julia SomervlHe 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Weather. 

9.30 After Chernobyl -Our 
Nuclear Future? An 
examination of the nuclear 
future presented by Frank 
Bough, including reports 
from Judith Hann inside 
Sizeweil A Power Station; 
Robert Harris on Three 
Mile island: Bnan 
Hanrahan on the latest 
developments in the 
Ukraine; and bone marrow 
surgeon. Richard Gale, on 
the state of the Chernobyl 
patients he has operated 
on. 

11.00 Film 86. Among the film 
reviewed by Barry Normar 
are To Live and Die in LA. 
a thriller set in the seamy 
back streets of Los 
Angeies: and Lady Jane, 
the story of Henry Vlll's 
nine-day queen. 


11.30 Summer of 66. Highlights 
ot England's semifinal 
match against Portugal in 


the 1966 World Cup. 
12.05 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Hi 


Britain 


I and Henry Kelly. 
News with Gordon 
Honeycombs at 620, 74)0, 
720, i00, 820 and 920; 
sport at EL40 and 724; 
exercises at 6.55; canoon 
at 725; pop video at 725; 
Moya Doherty's reunions 
at 822; Jeni Bamstt's 
postbag at 8.40; Wacaday 
with po 
Rad at! 


UV/LONDON 


9425 Thames news headlines 
followed by Nature and 
Things- The Tears of 

creatures from the reptile 
world 925 Cartoon Time 
with Courageous Cat 
10.05 Mortimer Griffin and 

rairtin^iiumoroi* 4 * 5081 9 
manner 1020 Land of the 
Dragon. The mountains of 
the Himalayas, (rt 1025 
Cartoon Tana. More 
Courageous Cat 
adventures 11.05 Firebafl 
XL5*. Science fiction 
adventures, (r) 

1120 About Britain. The first of 
tour programmes about 
carnival time In the 
Channel islands. This 
morning's programme is 
on the Sark Water 
Carnival. 

12.00 Coddeshefl Bay. Seaside 
adventures of the Cockle 
twins 12.10 Rainbow. 
Learning with puppets, (r) 
1220 Tfie Sullivans. 

120 News at One with Carol 
Barnes 120 Thames 
news presented by Trtela 
Ingrams 1.30 Ftfty /Fifty. 
The two lady private 
detectives agree to help a 
police lieutenant under 
investigation from his own 
polk* department. 

220 Hindsight The Blue 
Streak project is recalled 


by Peter Conchie, 


eoffrey Pardoe and John 
Wilkinson. Presented by 
Christian Dymond 320 
University Challenge. 325 
Thames news headlines. 
320 The Young Doctors. 

420 CockfesheO Bay. (r)4.10 
The Blunders. Cartoon 
series. 4J20 Sooty, 

Matthew 
Woody 
Woodpecker In Shanghai 
Woody 425 Splash. 
Magazine programme in 
which the viewers decide 
the content 

5.15 S.W.AJ-K. Drama serial 
about a young girl whose 
life is ruled by a teenage 
magazine's agony aunt 

5.45 News with Alastalr 
Stewart 620 Thames 
News. 

6.25 Reporting London. 
Lindsay Chariton reports 
- on Amnesty International 
which celebrates its 25th 
anniversary this week; and 
Bill Wig more examines the 
arguments between the 
Royal Homeopathic 
Hospital and the BMA. 

7.00 Eiranerdale Faun. Has 
Joe Sugden made an 
enemy of Jackie Merrick? 

720 Duty Free. Comedy series 

about two couples. on . 

* holiday in Spam. Starring 
Keith Barron, Gwen 
Taylor. Joanna Van 
Gysegham and Neil 
Stacey. (Oracle) 

820 Magnum. Higgins's 
cousin, Sally, arrives in 
Hawafl to marry the heir of 
an old wine family. She 
does not turn but as 
expected, 

920 LarfieainCtiarne. A 


ventriloquist's Eve don 
leaves him to join another 
act Babs steps Into the 
breach. (Oracle) 

10.00 News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Pamela 
Armstrong. Weather, 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

1020 Viewpoint *86: Victims. 
The experiences of 
victims of crime - after the 
event (see Choice) 

11.30 Ftim: Find the Lady* 
(1958) starring Donald 
Houston and Beverly 
Brooks. Comedy thriller 
about a model who goes 
to a village to spend the 
New Year with her 

S ndmothar. Directed by 
tries Saunders. 

12.30 Night Thoughts. 





David Cohere producer/ director 
of Victims (TTV. 1 0 JO pm) 


• VIEWPOINT 56; VICTIMS 
(TTV, 1 0.30pm) is an angry 
documentary by David Cohen 
about indifference and worse to 
tha people on me sharp end 
cf enme. As if the fact of 
burglary mugging Or 
bereavement was not bad 
enough, the attitude ot tne 
police, insurance companies and 
tne courts is ohen needlessly 
heartless. A woman pensioner 
whose son nad been siaboea 
by his wife did not learn tne tuu 
tacts until the inquest and she 
curly knew about the inquest 
when she read about it in the 
local paper. There are brtter 
testimonies about courts 
appearing mors sympathetic to 
tne criminals than victims, 
roffenng legal aid and other 
succour to tne person in tne 
dock and imposing laughably 
light sentences. There are 


tales ot bureaucratic tussles with 
insurance companies and of 
me Criminal injuries 
Compensation Board taking 
20 months to process a claim. 
And meanwhile innocent 
people whose lives have been 
shattered are thrown pack or. 
their own resources and try the 
best they can to pick up the 
pieces. It is notan edifying story. 

• ODE TO ST CECILIA 
(Radio 4. 1 1 am) ts an example of 
something radio does 
exquisitely well: a half hour 
playlet which distills emotion 
ana challenges the imagination 
and would not be enhanced 
one tot by tne addition of 
pictures. Wnttan by Gabnel 
J osipov id and beautifully acted 


bv Frances Baroer ana Tim 
Vvocdward. >t is the simple story 
Cf a ram a nee that fans to 
piossom. Sne is a brilliant 
mus-oart. a supreme 
exponent ot tne baroque oboe, 
he an academic in English 
literature. OkJ friends wno have 

re: seer, each other fa' 
years, ;ney meet after a concert 
on one cf his penodic visits 
from abroad. She is deiignredto 
see him ana they spend a 
weekenc in me West Country but 
n.s anerr.pt :c formalize tne 
relationship bnngs an unwilling 
response. The smengtn of me 
play is mat rt makes me listener 
cc the werk. for much is let; 

unsaid and meanings have to be 
carefully assembled from 
wnatever vert ai clues tne writer 
chooses to offer. 

Peter Wayinark 


BBC 2 


625 Open University: Energy 
and Rockets. Ends at 7120 

9.00 Ceefax. 

220 You and Me. For tour- and 
five-year olds, (r) 

2.15 Ceefax. 

525 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

520 Secret Nature. This fourth 
programme of Andrew 
Cooper s six-part 
exploration of the natural 
history of a Devon farm 
examines the Hazel 
Copse, (r). 

620 Whistle Test. Elvis 

Costello plays tracks from 
his latest album; Ro 
Newton is in Paris to 
watch Depeche Mode in 
concert; in the studio are 
the group from 
Minneapolis, the 
Replacements; and at the 
Town and Country CluP 
are Twelfth Night. Plus the 
_ latest chart news. 
Presented by Andy 
Kershaw and Mark Ellen. 

720 Top Gear. Peter Burgess 
tests the Peugeot 20aGTi 
and the Renault Turbo; 
and William Wooilard 
takes the new GCSE 
examination in motor 
mechanics and road traffic 
studies aimed at teaching 
future road users how to 
drive well. 


720 Ye 


■ Musician of the 


’oungMu 

Year. The final of the 
competition and five 
survivors from Sunday's 
semifinals each play a 
concerto with the Danish 
Radio Symphony 
Orchestra, conducted by 
Hans Graf. Introduced 
from the Concert Half of 
Danish Radio by 
Humphrey Burton with 
commentary by conductor, 
AJun Francis. 

10.00 Page 3 GHs. A Forty 
Minutes documentary 
tracing the fortunes of 15- 
year old Sharon Jay from 
Rotherham who wants to 
become a Page Three girl. 
With contributions from 
past and present models 
including Samantha Fox, 
Linda Lusardi and Vivien 
Neves, (r) 

10.40 NewsnighL The latBSt 
national and international 
news including extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 
With John Tusa, Peter 
Snow. Donald 
MacCormidc and Olivia 
O'Leary. 

1125 Weather. 

1120 Open University: The 
Standards Debate. Ends 
at 1220. 

NB: programme times after the 

Young Musician of the Year are 

approximate. 



EJvis Costello, BBC2, 6.00pm 


CHANNEL 4 


220 Ulster Landscapes. Parr 
five of the senes examines 
how Derry became 
Londonderry, fr) 

3.00 Film: Dreamboat* (1952) 
starring Clifton Webb and 
Ginger Rogers. Comedy 
about a crusty old college 
professor who gams a 
certain amount of 
notoriety when a television 
network's season of silent 
films reveal turn to nave 
been an early hearthrob. 
Directed by Claude 
Binyon. 

420 Countdown. The second 
semi-final of the anagrams 
and mental arithmetic 
competition. The number 
two seed. Geoff Taylor, 
meets Mick Keebte. the 
seventh seed. Richard 
Whiteiey is the 
quesnonmaster. assisted 
in the adjudicator s chair 
by Bill Tidy. 

5.00 Bewitched. Darrin forbids 
his wife to use witchcraft 
attain, but changes hrs 
mind when gets a flat tyre 
on the way to an important 
dinner engagement. 
Samantha refuses to help 
and the dinner ends m- 
disaster. 

5.30 Nature in Focus. Helen, 

Ch ns and Jo investigate 
the world of fungi, (r) 
(Oracle) 

6.00 Marco Polo. The eighth 
and final episode in tne 
dramatized life of the 
celebrated explorer. 

720 Channel Four news with 
Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholas Owen, includes 
an assessment of Mrs 
Thatcher's visit to Israel. 

7.50 Comment Wttn his views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is Enc 
Moonman, director of the 
Centre for Contemporary 
Studies. Weather. 

8.00 Brookside. Heather meets 
her future step-children 
and is upset by their 
hostility: Karen and Guy 
start searching for a flat; 
and Annabelie sees a 
bright career future. 

820 4 What It's Worth. 
Consumer affairs 
programme presented by 
Penny Junor. John 
Stoneborough reports on 
the oeople who have paid, 
unwisely, to have their 
baths spray-pamted; Bill 
Breckon investigates why 
complaints about British 
Telecom hava doubled 
since privatisation: and 
David Stafford finds the 
best buys in dishwashers. 

9.00 Fitnr. Written in the Wind 
(1956) starting Dorothy 
Malone and Rock Hudson. 
Drama about the spoilt 
sister of an oil tycoon's 
son who sets out to break 
up her brother's mamage 
after she has made his 
best fnend her lover. With 
Lauren Bacall and Robert 
Stack. 

1020 The Unrepeatable Who 
Dares Wins.. Highlights 
jhic comedy 


from the anracht 
series. 

11.15 Archie Bunker’s Place. 
Archie s partner, Murray, 
despite Archie's 
protestation s, decides to 
employ a 'working' girl in 
order to give her a chance 
to make good in a more 
honourable profession 
Starring Carroll O'Connor. 
Martin Balsam and 
Shsrree North. Ends at 
11.45. 


C Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF venations st enc 

ot Radio 4 

525 am Snipping. 620 News 
Briefing: Weatner. 6.10 
Farming Today. 625 Prayer 
(or me Day is). 

620 Today mcJ 6.30, 720, 

820 News Summary. 

6.45 Business News. 6.55, 
725 Weather. 7.00. 8.00 
Today s News. 720 Ycyur 
Letters. 725, 825 Sport. 

7.45 T nought for the Day. 
827 Weather Travel. 

823 Penge Papers. The 
con lessens ot an 
unwaged metropolitan 
househusband. Written 

and read by Brian W right (2) 

9.00 News. 

925 Tuesday Call: 01-580 
44 1 1. An opportunity for 
listeners to express their 
views and question 
expans on a subject cf 
current interest. 

10.00 News. From Our Own 
Correspondent. Lite and 
politics abroad reported by 
BBC foreign 
correspondents. 

1020 Morning Story: Rosie's 
Eagle, by Kaie Griffin. 

10.45 Daily Service (si. 

1120 News: Travel: Thirty- 
Mmute Theatre. Ode (or 
St Ceoiia. by Gaonei 
Josipovia is). 

1123 The Living Worid. Alistair 
Sommerville. Mika Scdtt 
and David Long tackle 
wildlife questions from 
an audience at the Royal 
Botanic Garden, 

Edinburgh. 

12.00 News: You and Yours 
presented by Pattie 
CoWwell. 

1227 Brain of Britain 1986 (5) 
Nationwide general 
knowledge contest. 12.55 
Weather. Travel. 

1.00 The World At One : News. 

1.40 The Arcners. 125 

Shipping. 

220 News, Woman's Hour. 

3.00 News: The Afternoon 
Play. Close ot Play, by 
Ellen Oryoen (s). 

4.00 News. 

4.05 The Local Network. Paul 
Hemey. with the nelp of 
BBC Local Radio stations, 
looks at a subject of 
current interest. 

4.30 Kaleidoscope (r). 

5.00 PM. News magazine. 

520 Shipping. 525 
Weatner. 


6.C0 News - Financial Report. 

620 Tne Spy wno Came in 
From The Cold (£1 by 
Jonn le Ca-rfe. 

7.00 News. 

7.05 Tne Archers. 

7.20 Re ar. i. Major issues 
ana .rope rant events at 
name and acrcad. 

8.00 Me&cme Now. Geotf 
V.ans reports on me 
neam ot medical care. 

820 The Tuesday Fearurg: 
Travelling Tnrougn. A 
profile ot Tne Rev Jim Wall's, 
founder cf Scoumere. 
cutsstwen critic ot President 
Reagan ana peace 
prerestor. 

5.00 ir. Touch, tor people wtfft 
a vsuai handicap. 

S.30 A s-aeways lock at . . .by 
Annbny Smitn. 

9.45 Kaieicoscope. Review of 
means. 

13.15 A Bock at Bedtime: The 
Gm in His Pasi (7) by 
Georges Simenon. 1029 
westner. 

10.30 The World Tonight. 

11.15 The Financial World 
Toricnt. 

1120 Tne any Way To Cross. 

He tr.e most luxurious 
passenger liner in the world, 
me Queen Mary, came to 
be conceived and bunt 
cur.ng tne Depression. 

12.00 News: Weatner. 1223 
Snipping. 

VHF lavaiiaoie m England and 
5 waies only] as above 
except 5 25-6. 00am Weather 
Travel. 1.S5-2.00pm 
Listening Corner. 520-525 
PM i continued) 11.30- 
12.10am Open university. 
1120 Open Forum: 

Students Magazine. 11.50 
Science ana Literature. 

( Radio 3 ) 

625 Weather 7.00 News 

7.05 Morning Concert. Suppe 
(Overture: Jolly 
Roooers). Bacn (Sonata in F 
minor. BWV 101 B. with 
Momca Nugget!, violin, and 
Ton Koopman. 
harpsichord), Berwald 
(Sintonie singuliere). 8.00 
News 

B.05 Morning Concert (cont). 
Mameno (Three 
Renaissance Dances), 
Mendelssohn (Overture, 

The Hebrides: LSO/Abbado). 
Haydn, arr Salomon 
(Symphony No 1 00 in G: 
Military). Dvorak 
(Scnerzo Capnccioso, Op 


68) 920 News 

9.05 This Wee* s Composer 
Haydn: Esiemaza 1779- 

SI. Quartet m G. Op 33 no 5. 
Sonata m E tia: (H xvi 
38> with Walter Ahgr fc*3 no), 
Sympnony No 75. in D. 

10.00 The Flowers in Spring. 

EEC Singers. COnp jonn 
Poole. Britten (Five Fiawer 
Songs): E J Moeran 
(Songs ot Springtime: seven 
Elizabethan poems) 

1020 Srer.hammar: Symonony 
No 2 in G minor Op 34. 
Gothenburg SO 

11.15 Beemoven i&onaia in g. 

Op 30 No 3) Enesco 
(Sonata No 2. in F minor. Op 
€). Sara sate iCapr.ce 
Basoue. Op 2*}, win 
Tckssni Shimizu (violin) 
and Gordon Back ipiano). 

12.10 BBC Welsn SO. cond 
Gwsin Arwel Hugnes. 
plays Paul Panenson's 
Concerto lor Crcnesna 
and Alan Hodcunoi s 
Sympnony No i. 1.00 
News 

125 Bath International 

Festival 1986. Live relay 
Augusrm Duman t violin) and 
Jean- Philippe Co Hard 
(wanoL Debussy's Sonata in 
G minor. Franck s 
Sonata m A, Op 13. 

320 Guitar Encores. Vladimir 
Mikuive plays works Dy 
Albeniz, arr Segovia. 
Deoussy, arr Mikuika, 
Barrios and Koshkin. 

220 Kubelik ana Kuseuk. 

Father and son as 
composer and performer. 
With Chicago SO. Jan 
Kuoeiik (Canonzetta). 
Raphael KuDeiik (A 
symphonic Peripeteia for 
organ and orchestra — 
first UK broadcast », 
Beethoven s Sympnony 
No 3. m E flat (trotca). 

429 The Scholars. Vocal 
music by Orlando 
Lassus. Cipnano da Rore. 
Tnomas Bateson, John 
VJiibye. Hans Leo hassier. 
Arcaaeit. Ciaudin oe 
Sermisy. Sancrin and 
janneauin. Uve (rpm 
Broadcasting House. 425 
News 

5.00 Mainly (or Pleasure, with 
Granam Fawcett. 

6.30 Orianao Gibbons. 

Consort music with the 
ooubie-bass viol. 

7.05 Elciar. Chanson ae mann. 

Op 15 No 2: Chanson oe 
nuit. Op 15 No f. Serenade 
tvrique: Saiut d amour. 

Op 12: Dream Cmiaren. Op 
34. 

7.30 Virgin of the Clearways, 
playby Jeremy Sandford. 
with Neil Stacy and SyNesia 
(e Touzet 

825 Anthony Goldsfone 
(pianoi plays 

Beemoven's Variations on 
Rigmni a sir venm 
amore' (WoO 65) and 
Schubert s Klaviersuicke 
ID 946/. 

925 Miracles, by Roger 

BurfoTO-Mason. Reader 
Geoffrey Collins. 

9.40 IRCAM in London. 
Electro-acoustic musk: 
from the research institute 
Pierre Boulez with the 
BBC Singers and London 
Smiomena. 

11.10 Budapest Wind 
Ensemble plays Mozart, 
arr Tnebensee. 
Harmomemusik (Don 
Giovanni). Seiner's 
Serenade; Dvorak, a nr 
Patnck Clements. Slavonic 


Dances Nos 9 and 15; 

Seen jophn. arr Laszlo 
Zempiera. Tne 
Entertamer: Johann Strauss 
ison). anr Uszic. 
f-nnenpolka. 

11.57 News 1220 Closedown. 

VHF only From 6.35- 
625am Open University. 
Modern Art: Mamst 
Aesthetic 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations ai end bl Radio 1. 

News on me hour, headlines 
5.30am. 6.30pm 7.30 art 8.30. 
Spots Desks 1.05pm. 2.02, ' 

322. 4.02. 5.05 8.02. 6.45 (mf 
Only}. 9.55 Cricket Scoreboard 
7.30pm. 

4.00am Charles Nova (sj 520 
Ray Moore (si 7.30 Derek Jameson 
is 1 920 Ken Bruce (S) 11.00 
M.cnaei Aspel plus your medical 
duestions answered by D? Bill 
Dolmen is) 1.05 David Jacobs (£) 
2.05 Gfone Hunmford (5) 3.30 
Davie Ha nitron <51 s.05 John Dunn 
isi 7.00 Bob Halness presents 
is) 925 Song by Song by 
Sonaneim Tne composer and 
lyricisi talks ro Sheridan Money. 
9.55 Spots 10.00 The 
impressionists. 10.30 l m Sorry I 
haven t a Clue 11.00 Joan 
Baheweii presents Round Midnight 
isiereo from m»0night|1.00eiii 
Peter Dickson presents Wightrlde 
IS) 3.00-4.00 A Litue Night 
Musw: <s). 

C Radiol ) 

On medium wave. VHF 

vans nens at end 

News on tr.e nail nour from 

630am until 9.30pm and at 1220 

midnight. 

520am Adrian Jonn 720 Mike 
Smith s Breakfast Enow 9.30 
Simon Bates s Mammoth Mail 
Coach DnvB 12.30pm Newsbeat 
(Frank Partridgei 12-45 Gary 
Davies 3.00 Mike Read 520 
Newsoeat (Frank Peonage) 

5.45 Bruno Brookes mci 620 a 
review of tne new Top 40 
smgies cnan 7.30 Janice Long md 
John Walter s Diary 10.00- 
1 2.00 Jon n Pee 1 1 5}. VHF R adios 1 
& 2 4.00am As Radio 2. 10.00 
as Radio 1. 12.00-4.00am As Radio 
2 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 n ewsdesr 6.30 Counwrpemr 7 M 
Ne*! 7.09 Twenty-Four Hours 720 Wh» 1 
Am An Air^irs: 7.45 Network UK 6.00 


News 809 Retiemons 8.15 k«d ro me 
Pam 6.30 Taking apou: Music 9JM Ne/is 
9.09 Revew of me Bnhsn Press 9.15 Tr.a 
Work) Toaav 9^0 Through My Wmccw 
9.40 Look Atieac 9.45 wnai s New 10.00 
Ne*s 10.01 t>srpvery 11.00 News 11.09 
News AtxMi Britain 11-iS iWavegiuae 
1125 A Letter Iran Scorlana 1120 Spans 
imeir>4tiora< 1220 Radio Newsreel T2.15 
Open Sesame' 1225 Personal Srorv 
12.45 Sports Rounc-JD 120 News 129 
Twenty- Four Hours 1 20 Network UK 1.45 
Pecoding of tne Weak 2.00 Outlook 2.45 
Pieo Piper 3.00 Radio Newsreel 3.15 A 
Jolly Good Snow 4.00 (laws 429 Com- 
memarv 4.15 Omnous 5.45 Spans 
Roundup 7.45 Report on Rel«l»on 8.00 
Hews 5J)5 Twepiy-Fiwr Hours 820 
OmaDuS 9.00 News 921 On IfW 80k 9.10 
Beck Choice 9.1S Concert Hex ia00 
News 10.09 The Woria Today 10.25 A 
u-rer Horn Sc oi tana 1020 Financial 
News 10.40 Retiecuons 10.45 Sports 
Round-up 1120 News 11 29 Canmemary 
ll.TSTne Pop Press 1120 Open Sesame 1 
11.50 Personal Siorv 12.00 News 1225 
Ne-vs About Britain 12.15 Rada Newsreel 
1220 Omnibus 1.00 News 121 Outlook 
120 Report on Religion 1.45 Country 
Stiiie 2.00 News 229 Review ot tne Bnusn 
Press 2.15 Guitar interlude 2.30 Rattles 
320 News 329 News About Britain 3.15 
Tr.e World Today 4.45 Financial News 
425 Rerteceons 5. DO News 523 Twarttv- 
Four Hours 5A5 The World Today. All 
nmes in GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kNz/285ro;t089kHz/275m; Radio 2 : 693kHz/433m; 909kH/433m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90^ 
92.5; Radio 4: 200HHz J50flnu.VHF f92-95; LBC: 11S2kHz/261m; V “ “ * 


14S8kHz/206fn; VHF 94.9; Wortd Service MF 648KHj/463m. 


VHF 97.3; CapKak 1548kHz/194m; VHF 95.8; BBC Redto London 


BBC1 WALES 525pm-6-00 
HHMl vvates Toaav B25-720Ttie 
Fhntslones 12.05am-1225 The Sky 
at Nwltt 1225-12.40 News and weather 
SCOTLAND 1 0.10a m-1020 Dotanan 
E.35pm-7.00 FSD 1 120-1220 Film 86 
12.00-l225wn Summer ol 66 1225- 
1 2.40 Weather NORTHERN IRELAND 
5 25om- 5.40 Today s Span 5-40-6.00 
inside Ulster 625-7.00 Ho« Hams Car- 
loon Time 12.05am-i2.10 News and 
weartier ENGLAND 1220- 1220pm East 
on Two (east only) 825-74)0 Region- 
al news magazines 

TV <5 As London except 928am 

sesame Sneef 1020 Matt and 
Jenny, fo-55 Donald Duck. 11-05- 
1 120 Orpnans oi me Wila. 1.20 pm News. 
1.30-220 Courrv Pracw* 5.15-5.45 
Sons and Daughters BJOCoasito 
Coasi 625 Pofcce Five 625-7.00 
Crossroads. ll20Cnempions. 12J0am 
Company Closedown. 

border 

1020-11.30 Tarzan 120pm News. 
120-220 RxJDde 320-420 Sons and 
Daugmers. 6.00 Lookaround. 625- 
7.00 Crossroads. 8.00-9JM Hotel. 11.30 
Who's The Greatest’’ 124)0 
Closedown. 

6f!SUA,*ys^,^«t 

10.30 Canoon 10.35 Captam Scar- 
iei 11.00-1120 Jackson iZJOpm-l.DO 
Gardens kjr aii 1.20 News 120-220 
The Baron 5.15-5.45 Emmerazle Farm 
84)0 Atxw Anglia. 625 Crossroads 
720-7,30 Mouitirrap. 1120 T J Hooker. 
1220am Tuesday Topic. Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS* 


HTV WEST a* looowo*- 

¥ — cepf. 925am News. 

Sesame Street. 1025 20.000 
Leagues Under me Sea. 1125-1120 Star 
Ways. 120pm News 120- 220 The 
Barer 6.00 News 636-74)0 Crossroads. 
64XF94X) Murder Sne Wrore. 1120 
Man <n a Suflcase. 1220am Closedown. 

HTV WALES SSaL 

102S Sesame Street. 6.00pm-6.35 
wales at Si x. 

TCUf As London except: 925am 

Sesame Street 1025 Max The 
Mouse. 10.40 Calilomia Highways. 
11.05-11.30 Rrebaii XL5. 1220pm-1.00 
Star Cniwe. 120 News 120-220 
Hotel 328-4.00 Sons and Daughters. 
5.15 Gus Honeybun. 520-645 
Cr'Msroao* 5.00 Today South West. 62S 
Televiews 620-730 Carson's Law 
8.00-94)0 T J Hooker 11.30 Postscript 
1125 fliptrae- 1221am Closedown. 

GRAN^A^Sr^ 

Reports 920 Flm: Captain s Tatte 
i Jonn G reason 1. 11 .00-1 1.30 Granada 
Reports Man ana Jenny. 130pm 
Granada Recons 120 Scarecrow and 
Mrs K.nc 2.25-220 Home Cookery 
320-4.00 Sons and Daughters 6.00 Gre- 
nada Reports. 620 This is lour 
Rigor 5.35-7.00 Crossroads 11.30 
Whc s Tne Gresiesi 3 12.30am Ban- 
son Closedown 


S4C Srans 1.00pm Countdown. 

120 Ftaaoaiam 1.45 Eiatefldfd 
Genedlaethol Y r Ur 00 435 Harmer 
Awr Fawr. 520 Car 54. Where Are You? 
6.00 Home oi Your Own. 6.45 S«oe 
Siarad 720 Newvdd>on Saim 730 D- 
sieddfod 830 Mapp and Luctg. 930 


YORKSHIRE 

Baniestar Galacnca. 11.00-11.30 A 
forAgneta 1220pm-1.00 Calendar 
LuncnhmeUve 120 News. 1.30- 
220 Ripnoe. 320-4.00 Country Practice 
600 Calendar 625-720 Cross- 
roads. 1120 Sylvie Vartan Show. 
1220am Closedown. 

TYNE TEES As LcnCpn **- 
i itxc lew M Pf: 9.30am Sesa- 
me Sheet 1630 Nature ofThincs. 
1120-1 1.30 Canoon. 120pm News. 1.25 
Look around. 1.30-220 Scarecrow 
and Mrs King. 6.00 Northern uia 635- 
74» Crossroads. 84XF920 Hotel. 

1120 Ai Last. Ii s Mike amn. 12.00 Med- 
itations. Closedown. 

CENTRAL ** London except: 

luCrtlrtHL 9J5am Runaway Is- 
land 650 He Ain't Scan/. He s Our 
Broiner 1615 Tale ot Two Sphinxes. 
1125-11.30 Cartoon. 12.30pm-1.00 
Gardening Time 120 News. 120-220 
Alter noon Fiaunouse 620 Cross- 
roads. 625-7.00 Mews 11.30 Star Pa- 
rade 1220am Closedown. 


SCOTTiSN As London ex- 

I I ton ^ 9 2Sam Sesame 
Street. 1025 Looks Fans bar 11.10- 
1120 Adventures of Gulliver. 1220pm- 

I. 00 Gardemno Time 120-1.30 
News 3JO-4.0O Sons and Daughters 
5.15-5.45 Emmeroale Farm 5.00 
News and Scotland Today 625 Cross- 
roads 7.00-720 Take The High 

Road. 1120 Late Can. 1125 About Gael- 
ic 12.05am Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 

me Street. 10.25 Malt and Jenny 
10.5G Smurfs. 11.05-1120 Snail Story 
Theaiie 1220pm-l.00 Gardemnc 
Time 120 News. 120-2.30 New Aveng- 
ers 5.15-5.45 Emmerdale Farm. 600 
North Tprtgfn. 625 Crossroads. 74)0- 
7 30 Oul end ADoul 820-9.00 Hotel . 

11 30 Hardcasile and McCormick. 
12.30am News. Closedown. 

ULSTER * s London except: 

UUO I cn i25am sesame Sneei. 
1025 Cartoon. 1025 Prizewinners. 

II. 05-1120 Fabulous Funrnes. 120pm 
Luncnwne. 120-220 Han loHan. 
3.30-4.00 Horses lor Courses. 620 Good 
Evenmo Uisisr. 625 Diary Dates. 
635-7.00 Crossroads 600-600 Falcon 
Crest. 11.30 Sweeney. 1 225am 

News. Closedown. 

CHANNEL ttiSSSST 11 

Street 1020 Man and Jenny. 1025 
OonaldDud' 1105-11 30 Orphans ol me 
Wild 120pm News 120-2.30 Coun- 
uy Practice 5.15-5.45 Sens and Daugh- 
ter 6.G0 Channel Report. 630 
Classic Themes 5.35-7.00 Crossroads. 
11.30 Champions. 1220am 
Closedown 


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13 U\ 











32 


TUESDAY MAY 27 1986 


England rally 


but India 


take the series 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


Set a target of 255 by India, 
England soon lost the wickets 
of Gooch and Fowler in the 
second of the Texaco Trophy 
matches at Old Trafford yes- 
terday. But they made a 
proper challenge after that, led 
by Gower. There was never 
any question, though, of their 
having anything to spare. 

It was a grand day's cricket 
- spirited, friendly, entertain- 
ing and good value for 
anyone's money. Twenty-five 
overs from the end. the match 
was still as wide open as when 
it began. Gower and Lamb 
were going well enough, and 
England still had eight wickets 
left. Against that, it was not an 
easy pilch on which to force 
the pace, and India's bowlers 
have learned to give little 
away in these one-day games. 

Then Lamb was run-out by 
the purest mischance and 


There were many lovely 
strokes, a regular cascade of 
them during a sixth-wicket 
partnership of 104 between 
Shastri and Kapil Dev. I am 
not sure whose innings I 
enjoved most — Srikkanth's. 
Shasiri’s or Kapil Dev's. 
Srikkanth's. played while the 
ball was new. was of the 
highest class. Kapil's 
marvellously uninhibited and 


had a more difficult lime 
behind the wicket: the life he 
gave Srikkanth off Emburey 
made no difference, Srikkanth 
being out in the same over, but 
Kapil was only 23 when he 
should have been stumped, 
also off Emburey. 


Scoreboard 


INDIA 

K Srikkanth c Fowler b Emburey 67 

5 M Gavaskar c Gooch b Steen 4 

M Azharuddin c Gower b Edmonds — 7 

□ B Venqsarkar b Emburey 29 

SM PanbOUey 12 

R J Shastri not out ® 


-Kapil Dev c Downton b Diley 
C Sharma not out 


51 
8 


Gower was bowled, hooking at 
Tefore 


Extras (b 5, lb 4. w 2. r* 3) 14 

Total (Owkts, 55 owra) 2S4 

tC S Pandit. R M H Bmny and Maninder 
Smgh did not bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-49, 3-109. 4- 
117.5-130. 6-234. 


a ball that kept low. Bei_._ 
iong Gatting and Pringle were 
needing to score at seven _an 
over for England to level the 
series. and at some quite 
impossible rate to win the 
Texaco Trophy, derided on 
the overall scoring rate if each 
side has a victory to its credit. 
.Another time it might be more 
satisfactory to stage a three- 
match series. 

India played the same side 
as at the Oval last Saturday. 
For England. Edmonds came 
in for Taylor. This time 
Gower won the toss and chose 
to field. Morning showers had 
given wav to broken cloud as 
Dilley began the match with a 
maiden. Playing as though the 
second over of the match was 
the last Gavaskar drove his 
first ball for four and was 


BOWLING- DUay 11-2-48-2: Bitson 11-0- 
55-1; Pringle 11-0-49-ft Edmonds 11-1- 


49-1; Emburey 11-1-16-2. 

Umpires: H D Bird and D J Constant 
ENGLAND 


G Fbwter c and b Bbmy _ 

G A Gooch Ibw b Kapd Duv . 


*0 1 Gower b Btnny 
AJLambruioui 


M W Gatmg not out 


□ R Pringle not out — 
Extras 


Total (4 wkts, 45 wore) 192 

t P R Downton. P H Edmonds. J E 
Emburey. R M BHson and G R Dilley to 
bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-18. 2-27. 3-142. 4- 
157. 


caught at second slip off his 
sixth. Srikkanth and 


Azharuddin. tatting more ju- 
diciously. then laid the foun- 
dation of a good total and set 
the tenor of the day. 

All the Indians that came 
later also played their part 


Shastri's as well-judged as 
either. 

To add to the enjoyment 
England fielded belter than for 
a Jong time. Gower showed 
the way with a splendid save 
in the covers. Next tall Ed- 
monds followed suit. By lunch 
the whole side had grass stains 
on their flannels from where 
they had been throwing them- 
selves around. There was a 
brilliant catch by Gower, 
right-handed above his head 
at mid-wicket to account for 
Azharuddin, and a nice one by 
Fowler just in from the raid- 
wickel boundary. Downton 


By lunch India were 130 for 
five from 36 overs. When, first 
ball afterwards. Pa til was 
bowled by Dilley, they were in 
danger of making decidedly 
too few. The pitch had already 
lost its tinge of green and the 
sun was shining by now on a 
fine crowd. But Kapil struck a 
balance between daring and 
discretion, and Shastri is as 
good a one-day all-rounder as 
there is. With pretty nearly the 
full ground in use, and the 
outfield not especially fast 
there was a lot of running to be 
done. 

When Gooch was given out 
in the seventh over of 
England's innings, I am not 
sure that even be knew how. 
The scorers entered ft as 
caught at the wicket At tea 
umpire Constant said he had 
adjudged Gooch leg before. 
The tall must just have flicked 
the pad. Three overs later 
Binny, following through, 
stuck out bis right hand and 
look a reflex return catch to 
get rid of Fowler. 

At 27 for two England faced 
another collapse. But Lamb, 
happier not to have to starve 
against die slow bowlers, and 
Gower set about playing 
themselves in. As much as 
anything this meant getting 
used to the low bounce of the 
tall. It took time, but the 
captain and Lamb added US 
together in 24 overs, and when 
Lamb was run out in the 
unluCkiest of ways England 
.had victory in their sights. A 
firm return drive by Gower 
was deflected off Sharma's 
foot into the bowlers slumps 
with Lamb out of his ground. 
India needed that. 


YACHTING 


Vancouver place for Brooks 


By Barry Pickthall 


The Laser sailor, Christine 
Brooks, confirmed her place 
in the IYRU women's world 
championships in Vancouver 
later this year by winning the 
women's UK championships 
held at Hayling Island over 
the weekend with a clean 
sweep of victories. 

Miss Brooks, who hails 
from Maldon Sailing Club, 
dominated this 23-strong sin- 
gle-handed class to such an 
extent she was able to catch an 
early train home leaving 
Nichola Ponsford and Sarah 
Pipes to fight over second 
place in the final heat yester- 
day afternoon. 


Competition for the 
women's two-handed class 
sailed in 470s proved more 
intense with Kay Hedgecock 
and Ruth RushaJl just pipping 
the sisters, Debbie and Tracey 
Jordan, for the title. Both 
crews earned places at the 
forthcoming 470 world cham- 
pionship in Spain, though 
university studies may force 
the second pair to relinquish 
their place in favour of Diana 
Shcllcock and Sarah Robert- 
son from Oban, who finished 
third. 

In the UK Olympic indica- 
tor trials for places at Keil 
Olympic Week and the Euro- 


pean championships also held 
at Hayling Island Sailing Gub 
this weekend, the Laser world 
champion. Lawrence Crispin, 
dominated the Finn single- 
handed dass while Ian Gray 
and Malcolm Bishop took 
theTomado catamaran class. 

The 470 class saw Adrian 
Stead and Andy Hemming 
from Parkstone steal the thun- 
der from David Smith- White 
and his crew, John Brooks, 
while Will Henderson finished 
top among the three-strong 
Soling fleet. Richard 
Westwood took the Flying 
Dutchman honours. 

Results, page 30 



FOOTBALL 


Diplomatic 


success 


for Robson 


THE 


TIMES 




First naMished b 1785 


SPORT 






«&> * • • " '••• ■ i ' 

Wrong-footed: Vengsarkar is bowled by Emburey at Old Trafford yesterday. (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Bobby Robson, the England 
manager, and his World Cup 
plavcrs scored a diplomatic 
victory at Monterrey’s airport 
as they put a troubled 12-hour 
trip from Vancouver behind 
them to win over the local 
reception committee and a 
Press conference dropping 
loaded questions in their path. 

An Aeromexico computer 
error at Los Angeles meant the 
party of 35 arrived to find they 
were not booked on the flight 
to Monterrey. When they 
eventually did get aboard a 
large amount of luggage be- 
longing to the squad and the 
Press failed to catch the same 
plane, and two-thirds of the 
way south the plane had to 
make an unscheduled fuelling 
Slop. 

A semi-official complaint 
by the Football Association's 
travel agent brought only a 
shrug from the Mexican air- 
line operator. 

The Monterrey public, how- 
ever. welcomed the players 
warmly. Several hundred were 
at the aiTport to greet them 
amid heavy security’. 

In front of Mexican televi- 
sion cameras Robson was 
diplomacy personified, parry- 
ing potentially dangerous 
questions about the city, the 
heat and the opposition in fine 
style. The players, each indi- 
vidually spoken to by Robson 
on the flight, also avoided 
controversy. 

Gary Lineker travelled with 
his left wrist heavily strapped, 
but despite a lingering pain, js 
expected to be ready to train hi 
a day or so. An X-ray will be 
taken after the swelling sub- 
sides in about a week to show 
whether there is a crack in a 
wrist bone. Bui he is confident 
that even then he could play 
Photograph, page 30 


BOXING 


Hodkinson 


likely to 
lose Games 


place 


BySrtknmarSen 
Boxing Correspondent 


Paul Hodkinson, the excit- 
ing -young featherweight ABA 
champion, is almost certain to 
be excluded from the Com- 
monwealth Games team when 
the England selectors meet on 
Friday to consider why he was 
absent from the first training 
camp from May 22 to 25. 


Hodkinson, who is reported 
to be joining Barry McGmgan 
at the world champion's train- 
ing headquarters in Palm 
Spring, California, will also 
miss the next two camps at 
Blackpool and Crystal Palace. 
His dub, Kirkby, have in- 
formed the ABA that he is 
going on holiday with his aunt 
to the United States and will 
not be returning until June 24, 
die day after McG organ's 
World Boxing Association 
featherweight tide defence 
against Fernando Sosa, of 
Argentina, in Las Vegas. 


Any training Hodkinson 
might do with McGnigan 
would not be considered of any 
value for the purposes of die 
Games. England's training 
camps are specially geared to 
the ‘’speed event" of the 
amateur, not the endurance of 
the professional. 


England's selectors are un- 
likely to take kindly to 
Hodkinson going off to work 
with McGmgan without their 
permission. If Hodkinson is 
ruled out it is almost certain 
that he will join the profes- 
sional ranks with B.J. 
Eastwood, McGuigan's 
manager. 


ATHLETICS 


Elliott shows a 


sharper edge 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


Peter Elliott's first impor- 
tant British race since he had 
to drop out of the Olympic 
800 metres semi-final with a 
stress fracture proved that he 
has lost little of his dour 
competitive ability when he 
won in lmin 46.66sec yester- 
day. But Elliott had to over- 
come David Sharpe, a young 
man with as much promise as 
Elliott showed three years ago, 
to win the United Kingdom 
championship, sponsored by 
HFC Trust, at Cwmbran. 

Shaxpe surprised everyone, 
including Elliott, who had 
been used to the young man's 
waiting tactics when he 
dashed ahead into the very 
strong wind, and led until 100 
metres to go, when - Elliott 
swept past 

The 1,500 metres was a 
similar story with Rob Harri- 
son, the more experienced 
runner, eventually beating 
John Gladwyn. another young 
man, like Sharpe, who is 
destined to make his mark 
soon on British and interna- 
tional athletics. After Neil 
Horsefield had set a fast early 
pace, Gladwyn took Harrison 
well away from the rest of the 
pursuers, until Harrison too 
swept past in the final straight 
to win in a fast 3min 35.75sec. 

Phil Brown was within 
0.03sec of his personal best 
with a 400 metres victory in 
45.29sec, the fastest in Europe 
so far this year. But the strong 
headwinds in the straight, 
around 2L5 metres per second, 
prevented the race living up to 
the expectations of Saturday's 
heat. 

But the promise is still there 
of improvement in times for 
the seven men last season who 
were under 46sec. Roger 


Black, of Southampton, last 
year's European junior cham- 
pion, led off at what proved to 
be a suicidal pace. He was 
close to 21 sec for the first 200 
metres, with Brown still some 
way -down. * 

- Bm Black lost his impetus at 
about 300 metres when he hit 
the wind, as Brown started his 
surge which took him to 
victory. Also impressive was 
Brian Whittle, of Ayr, who 
knocked over a second off his 
personal best just pipping 
Black with 45.38 to Black's 
45.48 in third place. Kriss 
Akabusi was also well under 
46sec in fourth place 
It was a welcome comeback 
to international form for 
Brown, who ran bis best time 
of 45.26sec in the same cham- 
pionship last "year, and then 
injured a hamstring so badly 
shortly afterwards that he 
missed the rest of the season. 

He put bis successful 
return down to naming longer 
distances, two to three miles 
for a sprinter in the winter, 
and said: “Getting places in 
the relay teams this year is 
going to be very difficult, 
because there is a lot more to 
come from Roger and Kriss.” 
The inaugural women's 
10,000 metres championship 
turned into a farce when the 
organizers insisted, as they 
had done with the men's 
10,000 metres the previous 
day. that the lapped runners 
should drop -out. Since 
women’s 10,000 metres run- 
ning is in infancy, anything 
under 35 minutes at this stage 
is admirable, but women were 
being pulled out of the already 
small field who were clearly 
capable of doing that. 

Results, page 30 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Sutton 17 


under par 


Hal Sutton, of the United 
States, hit a final round of 68 
to score a record-breaking, 
four-stroke victory in the Jack 
Nicklaus Memorial Tourna- 
ment at Dublin. Ohio. His 271 
total was 17 under par, and 
nine shots better than the old 
record jointly held by 
Nicklaus. Andy Bean and 
David Graham. It earned him 
S 100.000 <£64,500) from a 
total purse of approximately 
$577,00. 

Nicklaus. hosting the event 
in his home town, excited the 
gallery with a burst of six 
consecutive birdies from the 
10th to the 1 5th holes, a 
record for the course and 
matching the best of the 
season on the PGA tour. But 
Don Poo ley finished second 
with 275 and Johnny Miller 
and Mark O'Meara third on 
276. John Mahaflfey tied with 
Nicklaus at 277. 

Results, page 30. 



Budd’s hope 


Zola Budd celebrated her 
20th birthday sitting in the 
sunshine watching the UK 
Athletics Championships t at 
Cwmbran and in a television 
interview said she still hopes 
to run the 1,500 metres at the 
Common wraith Games. Con- 
troversy still surrounds her 
eligibility because she has 
it less than six months in 
id in the past year. She 


only returned to Britain from 
a training spell in South Africa 
on Friday. 


Sutton: Nine shots better 
than Nicklaus record 


Roche second 


Club’s fight 

Middlesbrough are to fight 
the courts the Football 


m 


Level best 


The high jumper, Stefka 
Kostadinova. of Bulgaria, 
cleared 2.07 meins in Sofia, 
equalling the world record 
height of her countrywoman. 
Ludmila Andonova. 


League's threat to expel them 
if they go into liquidation and 
form' a new company as 
previous clubs have done. 
They say a survival scheme 
should be accepted by the 
League if it is accepted by the 
court and creditors. “We face 
huge debts but owe less than 
£50.000 to football dubs.” 
said Steve Gibson, a director. 
“There are 20 dubs on the 
brink. The League will be 
decimated if they adopt a new 
tough policy.” 


Erik Pedersen, of Norway, 
pulled away - from Stephen 
Roche, of Ireland, to win the 
1 55-mile fifteenth stage of the 
Giro d’ltalia cycle race ending 
at Erba in the hills of Pied- 
mont after racing from the ski 
resort of Sauze d’Oulx. 
Giuseppe Saronni, of Italy, 
retained ; the pink jersey as 
overall trader in the 22-siage 
event- 


Danish blue 


Derbyshire have awarded a 
county cap to Ole Mortensen. 
their 28-year old Danish seam 
bowler. He was invited by 
Derbyshire for a trial three 
yeanfago. . 


CYCLING 


A furious 
finish 


to opening 


stage 


Bj John WDcockson 

"■ The former British profes- 
sional road race champion. 
Steve Joughin, of the Moducd 
team* proved the. fastest in a 
massve sprint finish to win 
the first stage of the 29th Milk 
Race on Blackpool's South 
Promenade yesterday. And 
the 30-second time bonus for 
winning enabled the Manx 
rider, aged 26, to take over the 
race leadership from Igor 
Sumnikov, the 1 9-year-old So- 
viet who won the Prologue 
time trial at Birmingham on 
Sunday. 

Joughin complimented his 
team for helping him to work 
his way to the front in a fast 
and forious conclusion to the 
128-mile race — the longest 
stage of the Milk Race for 19 
years. Many hopes had been 
placed on Malcolm Elliott of 
the ANC-Halfords team, the 
record-holder of Milk Race 
stage victories. But less than 
three miles from the finish, 
racing through Lylham St 
Aimes at well over the town's 
speed limit, the Sheffield rider 
was forced to stop. 

The experienced Raleigh 
professional, Paul Sherwen, 
said: “It was very hairy with 
the cars parked along the side 
of the road. We were clipping 
their wing-mirrors.” 

The battle between the 
sprinters was fierce, and El- 
liott was warned for dangerous 
riding after be clashed wheels 
with one of Sherwen's team- 
mates, Steve Fleetwood. 

“I must have had almost 28 
spokes ripped out of my 28- 
spoke front wheel,” comment- 
ed Elliott, who was given 
another wheel by a team 
colleague which enabled him 
to re-intregrate the bunch 
entering the final kilometre. 
But too late to contest the 
sprint which Joughin won 
decisively from the Austra- 
lian, Shane Sutton, of the 
Falcon team, and the French- 
man. Philippe Casado. of 
Peugeot. 

While the professional 
teams were happy to amble 
along in the sunshine for most 
of the day, the Danish ama- 
teur, Jan Joergensen, 
ploughed a lone furrow be- 
tween the green fields of 
Shropshire. Cheshire and Lan- 
cashire. He attacked only 12 
miles after leaving Birming- 
ham. and remained at the 
head of the race for the next 88 
miles. 


Of 


time 

Spot 


. He gamed a maximum 
eight minutes at Knutsfoiti, 
which was more than enough 
to earn him a 20-second * 
bonus as the day’s Hot 
sprint. 

REST stage 

Btedqjool. 12&6' mitet 

• '• (Cz). all same Uma. 

I- .Immhhn Ch> a 


Sutton, &23.19; 3 . j 




aBolt 

Newton Aydttfe (log 


- -wow, 

Jowgonsan 


— «« (ANC- 
McLougWin. 
to 


-rrjrzr:- 



Aurelius 
theory 
is put to 
the test 


From Rex Bellamy 
Tennis Conwpwdaxt 

Paris 


are 


The French champ wnsbipsy ; 
■ e tough. One of the fast - -1 


thing s a young man has to 
learn atom them (and the 
young women are not much .• 
better off) is that it is possible - 
to sweat and strain on briefer 
coloured shale in temperatures ' 
exceeding IO0F for more than 
four hours and still have only i - 

50 per cent chance of ttiredug - 
Mentally and physically 
drained, the unlucky 56 per-; 
tfpt have tittle consolation : - 
otber than the terse comment 
made centuries ago by Marcos ■ 

Aurelius: ”One can sm ite 
anything except death.” 

This arduous lesson in phi- 
losophy was driven home yes- 
today in one of the fast safes '■m 
of matches to populate die 16 
courts. Leonardo Lavage if ; 
Mexico, aged 1& was beaten 
6 - 3 , 4-6, 6-4, 6-7, *-7 in four 
boors and a quarter by Simon * 
YonI of Tasmania, aged 28. 
They played os cant eight, 
where the only refief from the 
beat was the shade cast over 
one corner of the rafrhac k fay t 
massive horse-chestnut. Ywd 
served for the match at 5-4, in 
the fourth set, LavaBe served 7 : 
for it at 6-5 in the fifth, and-, 
both seemed to age visibly as 
hope and frustration receded - 
in turn. 



Nystrom has go; 
off the bou 


ne 




j 


All this was 
savoured, with evident refish, 
bv such spectators as Brim 
Gottfried, Tom German, Bob 
Howe and Dick Stockton, who 
used to endnre the same nwbd 
reminders that Rugoot de 
Monton or PW-on-Feu, make 
good eating but fake a bag 
time to cook. There were a lot 
of handshakes and memories 
around the courts yesterday. 

Bob Carmichael, Pierre 
Hannon, Owen Davidson, Bfl- 
ly Knight. Ray Moore, fond. 
Ramirez and Fred StoHeirere 
among the host of oU hems £ J 
remembering thefr youth and - ] 
- in the presence of Laeilfe 
and Youl - perhaps being 
grateful for its passing. 

The draw suggests thaf tEm 
year's singles senri-fina&pffl 
be Ivan Lendl v YaaaSfc . 
Noah, Boris Becker v. Mats. 

W Slander, Martina 

Natratilova v Oaudia Kohde- 
Kilsch, and Steffi GrefvChrfc 
UoytL Lendl and Noah loakto 
have easier draws than Jfecfe 
and Wilander. Of tte.ldW; 
obvious challengers, Jo^na 
Nystrom has temporarflygoae 
off the bofi after playing too 
much and winning too. often, 
whereas Henri Leconte fc 
bursting with elaB after a fear- / 
month break enforced by fi* : # 
ness. Stefan Edberg is o ne (if 
several hazards confrontiBg 
Becker. . 

The interesting feature ef 
the women's draw is that Miss 
Graf has just won four tourna- 
ments in a row and, in the 
process, has beaten all the 
other Handed contenders. She 

estM three weeks short of her 

seventeenth birthday but may 
already be good enough <? 
become the youngest champi- 
on here. 

Yesterday Mrs Lloyd, wear- 
ing a skirt that might be 
described as the colour of the. 
fttschia (pot the pun dowu to 
the heat), had a 6-0, 6-1 win • 
against the French junior 
champion, C&rile Calmette, *) 
who briefly had an fllusiou of r 
glory when tire scoreboard 
gave her the second set at fr2- : 

In the intimate area* of 
Court One, Carling Bassett : 
explored tire attractive posh- J 
bilities of lime-green and, 
more to tire point, played the ! 
important rallies nrore b<ridJy 
and more tidily (fan Catherine. 
Tanvier. On Court 14, which is 
almost outside the premises, 
Frederica Bonsignori of Rome : 
had an astonishing 6-0, 6-0 - 
win over Amanda Tobin Ding- 
wall of New South Wales, who : 
scored only 10 points. 


*-W ^ u- 



* S 




V. k ■ . 


Slav heavyweight - ft 
falls in three ^ ~ 


H..,. 


In 


Annabel Croft lost only si* 
games to Helena Dahlstrom® * 

Sweden, almost two years fatf- . 
junior. Britain's only corogett- 
tors in the men’s singles, John 
Lloyd and Jeremy Bates, were 
beaten by qualifiers: respec- 
tively, Lewiz Matter (Brazil) - 
and Marco Osfoj& (Yogd®*** . 

>1a). Bates made a tenacious - 
recovery from two sets down » 
take Ostoja to fire. 

Ostoja's heavyweight «*•*-. 
patriot, Slobodan ZirojiBOVtC. 
played three strenuous sets 
with Eric Jelen but lost all 
themJkden, aged 21, may **> 
Germany's brat chance of 
adequate second string to . 

Becker. Jelen is deft; smart 
and, in some ways, even mere, 
talented than Becker- He was _ 
too good for tire 

Zivojinovfc, who could douWe ■ 

for Sylvester Stallone in. to*, 
role of "Rocky?. « 

The Germans to watch berfe- 

though, may be Mfcs€haf®*J {v 
Becker, the teenagers > 

Baden: a region forarerft? ^^ V* 
ter known fwfts wluteww*^'- v * 
More tennis. 


; S N r „..