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The first details emer ge d 
yesterday of a remarkably 
secret package deal between 
America and Iran to secure the 
release of US hostages and 
restore rotations between the 
two countries — indnding a 
series of secret negotiations 
between the Americans and 
Iranian offikaals in Tdnan and 
discussions bet w ee n the US 
and Kuwait about die possible 
reduction of sentences for 17 
men imprisoned for bombing 
the French and American 
embassies in the country. 

The Americans are reported 
by Azab diplomats to have 
sent planeloads of weapons 
and mi litary sgare parts to 
Iran in return for a promise 
that Iran would suspend any 
involvement in international 
b ombing s and »«p<« n^i nn !ti 
an agreement concluded afier 
a secret visit to inn by a US 
delegation said to include Mr 
Robert McFariane, President 
Reag^*s loaner National Sec- 
urity Adviser. 

And last night, in a sensa- 
tional speech on the seventh 
anniversary of the setznre of 
the American Embassy in 
Tehran, the Speaker of the 
Iranian Parliament claimed 
that Mr McFariane had trav- 
elled to Iran , as an airline 
employee on a false Irish 


Tomorrow 


Notfs 

landings 



Sir John Nott ' 
argues that we 
should remember 
the Suez Mure, 
nottheFaUdands 
success, when \ 
planning the . 
future defence of 


wmum 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mr 
J.D. RothweHof - 
south-west London. 


TIMES PROPERTY 


2 , 65 $ houses 


There are ten pages of prop- 
erty advertisements today 
with 2,658 houses' iq> for 
sale Pages27-36 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Maxwell stake 


Mr Robert Maxwell has in- 
creased hts stake in 
McCorqnodafe, the pnnter 
and publisher, to 17 . 2 percent 


TIMES SPORT 


Ught finish 

niL^. ttw Until 


White Crusader, the Bnadi 
chaflengg in fie - America * 
Cup yacht races, beat Canada 
H by less than, a third of a 


aweNrn-M 
Overseas 7-12 


Astnet 14-16 1 Weather 


























Ftam Robert Fisk, Nicosia 
Iranian nSgime, carrying with 
him a Bible signed by Presi- 
dent Reagan, a boat of cakes 
fin Iranian officials and a 1st 
of conditions to improve rela- 
tions between the two 
countries. 

Hc^atofistam Afi AkbarHa- 
shemi RafiamanL one of the 
urostjMwerful figures in ban. 




Mr McFu-bne: Undercover 
trip io Tehran. , ■ 


said tint Mr Mc F a riane and 
four odier. Americ a ns, who 
traveled with him, had ar- 
rived on board a plane loaded 
frith American weapons and 
had been imprisoned for five 


But Mr Rafianjanfs state- 
ment also appears to be an 
attempt to embarrass Syria, 
and The Tima has kamiffiai 
. an American delegation which 
travelled to ban last July — 


and at feast once since then — 
was trying to negotiate the 
release of three US hostages 
hridin Lebanon. 

The Tima has been fold 
than 

• A seats of secret negotia- 
tions has teen-underway be- 
tween the. US and Ran for 
scant months over the Lefaar 
non hostages in which a senior 
Syrian diplomat has acted as 
inteimedmjy between Wash- 
ington and Tehran. 

• Aircraft carrying military 
spare parts ana amm un ition 
for the Iranian Army hi its war 
with Iraq have flown to baa 
with US permission, report- 
edly in return for Iranian 
co oces ri oos over fie 

and an .end to Banian invedye* 

merit in in tern at io nal bomb* 

ings and assassinations. 

• One of the ship- 

ments of American arms to 
Iran — which travelled with 
fidl American cognizance — 
came from land as part 
payment fin- exit visas to be 
granted to Iranian lews wish- 
ing to travel to IsraeL The 
plane flew via Spain to an air 
base near the city of Tabriz in 
September, 1985. 

• The Americans have been 
talking to Kuwaiti pfffcjak 
about a possible launnm l iug 
of the sentences on 17 men 
convicted fir tfaear part in the 
bombing of the US and 
French embassies there in 
1983 and whose release is the 
main demand of the "Mamie 


Orated an page 2* erf 3 



Fn— Nfidtari Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Minister* of 
was cahoved . 
_ in. Cabinet to- 
shuffle announced by Presi- 
dent Botha. Mrlraw Net, tire 
-Peptrty Minister of Informa- 
tion, who is in cfcaige of 
government propaganda, was 
also dismissed. . 

- Mr Le Grange; who a 
respoasfilefirtire pofice, is to 
move to tire less on ero us post 
of Speaker of tire Boose of 
Assembly, tire white chamber 
ofPariramenLFormostofthe 
past year he - has beenunder- 
Scring che mo t hera py treat- 
ment for cancer. 

Although he is now said to 
be free or the disease, be had 

expressed a wish to move to a 
leas high profile jbta He is to 
be replaced by tire Deputy 
Minister of Defence and Law 
and Order, Mr Adriaazt Vide. 


The . Malawi Embassy 
Maputo, the Mozart 


njiflil, was sacked by a ngry 
yate yesterday, ad stones 
ad rotten tomatoes were 
tkmn at the offices of the 
South African Trade Mission 
three. Page 7 


Three is snHMy to be any 
rhanee in tire. Governments 


policy on security. 

Mr Le Grange aged 58, was 
fiercely loyal to the police 
force, and widely accused of 
fifing to control abase of 
police power. Recently, how- 
ever, he caused Surprise by 


•MPx cf the nfiag National 
Party known as tire “New 
Ifei?* who arc said to favour a 
much fester pace of political 
reform. 

. For die rest, the reshuffle is 
largely a cafe of music a l 
charts, occasioned in part by 
tire retirem ent of some older, 
minister. 


Key ministers, such as Gen- 
eral Magnus Maian, the De- 


fiving conditions in mack 
townships instead of espous- 
ing Iheusual government line 
about communist agitators. 

Mr Nd has been under 
heavy fire lately for fie expen- 
diture of Ranas 43 nuQkm 
(£1.4 million) of taxp a y er s] 
money on commissiomng and 


fence Minister; Mr Ptk Botha, 
tire Foreign Minister; Mr 
Chris Hearns, tire Minister of 
Constitutional Development 
ami Planning and Mr F W De 
Klerk, the Minister of Na- 
tional Education; stay where 
they are. 

Speculation that the South 
African Ambassador in Lon- 
don, Mr Dennis WorraD, 
might be brought back home, 
possibly to be given MrNeTs 
m formatkm portfotiq, proved 
unfounded. 


Reserves down £474m 


ByDavMSfefth,EcoDomfcsC«respeodent 
Britain's gold and foreign This fill does not reflect the 

currency reserves stomped by fiO extent of official support 
$668 tmTHon (£474 mfflfoii) The Bank of England asked 


last month- the biggest fell in the West German Bun- 
four years- as the Bank of desbank to help and win repay 

n j »La onrei ui f i in tkw 


England propped up tire the cost of that support in the 


pound next few mo 

The fefl in the reserves Ttetyymc 
oocmred as the pound drop- to$L4145 
ped the mark and dipped to W 

other currencies. - ... "3 


next few months. 

, The pound gained 35 points 
to $1.4145 yesterday, but 


Biggest fiO, page 21 



-> ‘-5 vl 

A- .... ,V 


Baker in 

e. 


direct 

it tack 
states 

appeal 

ag and 
offer 

to heads 

ity de- 
i state 
gas or 




.wy- 


Ri^al head in the !»• The Dudress af York on her first solo flight yesterday. (Photograph: Julian Herbert) 


BBC reply 
today on 
bias claim 


r Rol*l 


Editor 


Russians agree 
to terrorism 
talks with UK 


The BBC wfll today issue a 
sharpiy^woffded reply to com- 
plaints by Mr Nonnas Tebbil, 
drafapan of tire C w ' n f nati w 


Eram Andrew McEwen, Dipkanauk Correspondent, VSenna 


Party, about its coverage cS 
the United Slates bombing 
zaid on Libya hat April 

Yesterday relations between 
die corporation and the BBC 
hkraicfay continued to deteri- 
orate over tire affirir Mr 
Imwk CtHttian tire former 
Labour Prime Minister, 
untied Mr Neal Kinnock, the 
Labour leader; in atiadting tire 
Prime Minister and her party 
dagnmn . 

Tory chrefe are angiy that 
fire BBC, in their view, is 
attempting to “move tire 


Letters 


... a brighter 

Ufi designed to promote 
xaoal harmony. : 

His reptocemeiit is an in-. 
tem y i i p g Mr Stoifle] 

Vaa Der Movie, a member of 
a group of about 30 baifebench 


goalposts” fn its response to - 
Mr Tebfaifs dossier ^criti- 
cism. They see tire crucial 
questibos as those of pro- 
fessional c om petence and 
manag e rial reaction to pro- 
gramme makers who &D be- 
low the required standards. 
Thatis why they were particu- 


larly annoyed that Mr 
Absdair MSne, tire BBC 


Director-General, responded 
almost instantly, to their com- 
phisfs saying tiiat he saw no 
need fo r any internal 
investigation. 

Senior Conservatives be- 
lieve. that the BBC has, in its 
broadcast since, attempted to 
imply that Mr Tebbifs com- 
phmts were of political bias, 
against, the Conservative 
Party, highlighting an o pinion 

Confined ou page 20, caK5 


The Soviet Union yesterday 
accepted a British initiative 
for talks on joint efforts to 
, combat terrorism. British nod 
Soviet experts are expected to 
have their first meeting before 
fie end of tire year, probably 
in London. 

Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, 
tire Soviet Foreign Minister, 
welcomed fie British sugges- 
tion yesterday when he met 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, in Vienna. 

Tire joint effort is seen by 
ftitiriw as offering a valuable 
opportunity to distance the 
Soviet Umon from countries 
m pf ftpri of involvement in 
state-financed terrorism, snch 
as Syria. 

Bnc Sfr Gqofirey. warned 
that fill confidence between 
East and Wcst will not be 
achieved nntfl .tire Soviet 
Union im p ro ves its human 
rights record. His speech on 
tire opening day of tire Euro- 
pean Conference on Security 
and Co-operation linked 
peace to individual freedom. 

“We salute those, like 
Andrei Sakharov, who keep 
alight fie flame of tire human 
spirit”, he said. 

“We remember too those 
whose names are not well 
known but whose lot is one of 
daily harassment, labour 
camp, exile or prison. White 
these things are so it wdl 
remain impossible to establish 
i full confidence between our 
states.** 

The conference is fie third 
follow-up to the Helsinki pro- 
cess begun in 1975, in which 


Shevardnadze meeting 


Yard faces inquiry 
after TV claims 


By Stewart Trader, Crime Reporter 


A provincial police tea m 
was called into Scotland Yard 
yesterday to investigate: seri- 
ous allegations involving a 
London wnwdw and his 
^trensfa^w^Yardddedh 
ives. 

Tbe inquiry, headed by the 
chiefanirtabte of South York- 
shire. follows claims in a 
World at Action television 
p ro gramm e that investiga- 
tions into the criminal, who 
was aim atop informant, were 
fiiiytnffff ii 

Mr Gerald tyfitshire, a for- 
mer Yard detective super- 
intendent, said another officer 
talked ofapton to kffl him and 
junior officers were threatened 
with losing their careen. 

As tire investigation was 
announced two Labour MPs* 
yesterday followed up the 
programme by naming and 
accusing aseznp r Yard detec- 
tive of corru p tion using Par- * 


tiamentzny privilege to quote 
from an internal Yard inquiry. 

The motion was tabled by 
Mr Clive Sotey, MP for 
Hammersmith rad a spokes- 
man cm Home Affairs, and Mr 
Christopher Smith, MP for 
bdmgton South, foflowing the 
programme on Monday which 
the rdatienshin be- 
tween Roy Gamer and Scot-, 
land Yard. 

The p r og r a mme looked at 
tire feimre of an investigation 
called Operation Albany aim- 
ed at convicting Gamer, led 
by officers who were not told 
fie criminal was an infor- 
mant. White they were in- 
vestigatinghim he received up 
to £250,000 m rewards. 

The Yard said yesterday 
that Mr Peter Wngbt, the 
South Yorkshire chief officer, 
had been asked to era mine 
riaimg marie in the pro- 
gramme. 


Networks 
in deal on 
US poll 


End of Russian line nowhere in sight 


Ftont Christopher Walker 
Moscow . 


As fie Soviet Union pre- 
pares for Fridas 69th amo- 
versary of the Bolshevik. Re- 
volution, there is mo unting 
frustration that Mr Gorfa- 
chov*s economic rcfonns have 
fafWi to make any impression 

on one of the greatest bugbears 

ofSoviet life -queuing. . 

By rationing the amount of 
vodka available, queues otrt- 
. side tire drtmaHookfog state 
liquor stores have recently 
grown lamer, wifi pensioners 
offering (for a price) to keep 


op to four or five hours. 

• “Things have got- so bad 
fiat jpeopte arenow prepared 
to join a queue and stand time 
for boms without knowing for 
-certaurwbst is on sate at tire 


other end,” a Moscow houses 
wife said. “Unfortunate^ it 
has become a way of life.** 

Statistics strew that the 
nation wastes bflUons of 
manhours every year standing 
in Queues. The femes aim 
revealed fiat a remarkable 18 
per .cent of all stress-induced 
strokes originated in^ queues. 

He latest edition cn Litera- 
turnayd Gazeta, the official 
paper of the Writera* Union 
and one of Moscow’s most 
respected publications, which 
eight years ago canted n 
sensational article on tbe evfls 
of queuing, carries a bitter 
.series of signed letters be- 
moaning the problem. 

“Years have passed,” wrote 
one Muscovite is reference to 
the 1978 article, "and what 
has happened? The queues 
have got longer and meaner. 


and nowadays 10 people fe not 
considered a queue . .. people 
used to queue for something 
good, now they queue for any- 
thing." Mr A Atiasov, a war 
veteran, complained that in 
recent years queues hsd been 
legalised” by dint of tire 
notices which are now himg in 
“shops, cinemas, bannyas 
(bathhouses), dry cleaners - 
everywhere - stating who has 
the right to be served at the 
beadoffiequene.'* 

■Many readers complained 
fiat sales assistants created 
queues by waiting mxtil five or 
10 people had paltered before 
“deigning" to serve them or 

L.. ** • -nil.. (La LniriaW 


by “correcting tire ‘mistakes* 
of the architect and opening 
only one door of the shop”. 

Among tire suggestions put 
forward for improving mat- 
ters were the introduction of a 


two-shift day. the start of & 
system of sdf-service “as they 
have everywhere else in the 
world” and the creation of 
western-type supermarkets 
sritmg all types of goods so 
that customers would not 
have to trek from shop to shop 
to boy bread, milk, vegetables 

and so on. 

' In the run-up to Friday s 
Red Square parade, special 
yarmaki (fairs) have been 
established in many parts of 
Moscow to try and improve 
the country’s notoriously in- 
efficient distribution system. 

Mr KG Tereshenko de- 
scribed how he had gone to a 
fiir at 830am, only to already 
find a mflitery band playing 

and “enormous queues” at 

every counter. This sort of 
tojpc was “incomprehens- 
ible” he said. 


The flying 
Duchess 


every European state except 
Albania commitments 
on numm&m human rights 
standards and other issues. 

Tbe speech stopped short of 
naming the Soviet Union as 
fie pnndpal violator of the 
human rights provisions in 
the Helsinki Final Act 


As Britain currently holds 
fie presidency of tbe EEC, fie 


speech, which amounted to an 


EEC effort to enconray signs 
of greater Soviet readiness fix' 
change, required approval 
.from all 11 other nations, 
some ofwhora were much less 
willing to name names. 

. Soviet officials have contin- 
ued to show signs of sensitiv- 
ity while attempting to take 
the offensive on some human 
rights aspects. Mr Vladimir 
LozneibOL a senior Soviet For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, said 
all provisions of the Helsinki 
Final Act had been made part 
of the Soviet constitution. 

Another Soviet spokesman 
said processing of applications 
to leave the country had been 
speeded op. 

Mr Shevardnadze was not 
in the conference chamber 
during Sr Geoffrey’s speech. 
Western diplomats said this 
should not be interpreted as a 
boycott, because fie Soviet 
Foreign Minister had spent 
the day meeting Warsaw Pact 
colleagues in prep a r a tion for 
his bilateral meeting today 
with Mr George Shultz, tbe 
US Secretary of State. 


By Dam Cross 

The Duchess of York yes- 
terday took to the air for the 
first time on her own, just four 
weeks after starting to team to 
fly. 

Watched by her instructor, 
Mr Cohn Beckwith, and a 
battery of press and camera- 
men, the 27-year-okl Duchess, 
wearing a bright green jumper, 
camoaflage-ayle trousers and 
with her hair in a pony-tail, 
flew solo in a 15-minote 
circuit over the Oxford 
countryside, at the controls of 
a Piper Warrior four-seater 
aircraft. The weather was per- 
fect with ideal visibility and 
not a doud in the sky. 

The Duchess, who had 
flown to RAF Benson, fie 
headquarters of the Queen's 
Flight, in a helicopter, wanned 
up with three circuits of the 
airfield, accompanied by Mr 
Beckwith, who is prinripal 
instructor at Oxford Air 
Training SchooL 

Then she sat alone in the 
cockpit revving up the single- 
engine plane and waiting for 
a ir traffi c controfleis to tefl her 
fiat she was clear for take-off 
Within seconds fie was air- 
borne and up to about 2,000 
feet She completed just one 
circuit before landing per- 
fectly. 

Mr Beckwith shook ter 
warmly by the hand and said: 
“Well done, I told you could 
doit” 

Later she telephoned the 
news of her first solo flight to 
the Duke of York, who is a 
Navy helicopter pilot, cur- 
rently on a naval officer’s 
course at fie Royal Navy Air 
Station at Yeovilton in 
Somerset. 


By Howard Foster 

The dispute between fie 
second largest teachers* union 
and the Government es- 
calated yesterday when Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education, took fie 
^rn iwwi step of writing 
personally to every head 
teacher in Britain to explain 
his pay offer. 

Mr Baker himself received a 
letter yesterday, from Mr Fired 
Smithies, general secretary of 
the National Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
women Teachers, who re- 
stated the reasons for his 
union's demand for a SO per- 
cent pay rise, as opposed to 
fie 16.4 per cent proposed by 
Mr Baker. 

Mr Smithies said that the 
NAS/UWT would be wOfing 
to ballot its members on any 
settlement agreed at this 
weekend's meeting in Notting- 
ham between unions and 
employers. 

His letter was coupled with 
a warning fiat widespread 
disruption could follow if Mr 
Baker follows his staled aim of 
imposing the settlement on 
fie teachers by law if no 
agreement is reached. 

He said: “We shall obvi- 
ously comply wifi fie law. We 
are not a group of anarchists 
but government should make 
carefully considered de- 
risions. If Mr Baker's solution 
is pursued, the prospects of a 
peaceful and constructive at- 
mosphere are low.** 

Yesterday the union 
claimed that more than 40,000 
of its 127,000 membership 
hud ralcgn part in half-day 


rTTTTi W.\ III A»1 


pupils. 

Yesterday brought more 
injunctions from counties 
including Devon, Cornwall 
and West Sussex, stopping 
teachers from striking without 
a ballot. Tbe union did cot 
oppose the injunctions, mi the 
ground of cost 

The union's disruptive ac- 
tion yesterday was described 
as “utterly disgraceful” by the 
Prune Minister. 

She said in Parliament that 
ft showed no regard whatso- 
ever for the dukiren in the 
care of teachers 




<1 
/ s 








From Michael Binyoo 
Washington 

Polling in the US mid-term 
elections got off to a slow start 
yesterday, as poor weather 
and voter apathy threatened 
to produce one of the lowest 
turnouts in years. But fie 
Senate race looked so dose 
that for the first time in years 
most Americans wear to bed 
without knowing which party 
had won overall controL 

This neck-and-neck situa- 
tion was also exaggerated by 
the lack of early computer 
projections. For fie first time 
m years, fie television net- 
works agreed not to broadcast 
“exit polls”, the sampling of 
voter reaction as people come 
out of the polling booths. 
There has been a considerable 
criticism of exit polls as they 
tend to distort the results. 

Wftb a three-hour time 
difference between tbe East 
and West coasts, the polls in 
California are still open long , 
after they dose in the East. If a 
party hears it is doing poorly 
in the East, it can mobilize 
special resources to bring out 
the test-minute vote is 
California and thus redress the 
balance. 

President Reagan awaited 
fie result anxiously, as he 
concluded his hectic two-week 
campaign covering 13 states 
and 25,000 mites to boost fie 
Republicans* chancre. He has 
warned fiat a Dsmocratic- 
eontrolled Senate would 
weaken his negotiating hand I 
in arms control talks ami pul a 
brake on fie economic 
recovery. 

Mr Reagan, who is 75, 
appeared to relish his last! 
major political campaign, j 
throwing himself energetically 
into the fray, but the strain 
was be ginning to tell by the 
end. 


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WFT>NFSOAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Man’s artificial 
heart replaced 

Surgeons at tbs Papworth Hospital, near Cambridge, 
replaced the artificial heart in a male patient with a donor's 
heart In a fenr-ond-a-half hoar operation yesterday. 

The mam aged 40, who has yet to be named , was green a 
Jamk 7 plastic and metal device by surgeons on Sunday 
when he was abost to die of heart hihre. 

A spokesman for the UK Transplant Centre, Bristol, 
said that the Papworth patient was one of 400 people ur- 
gently in need of a new heart. 

Bishop 40Butlin 
off course staff go 


Tunnel job worth ‘100,000 man-years’ 


By Rodney Cowton 

Transport Correspondent 

The construction of die 
Channel tunnel and associated 
activities will create about 
100,000 man-years of employ- 
ment in Britain, Mr John 
Moore, Secretary of State for 
Transport, said yesterday in a 
vigorous defence of the 
project. . 

Addressing a conference in 
London organized by the 
European League for Eco- 
nomic Co-operation, Mr 
Moore said he had been 
dismayed by the extent of the 
suspicion and inertia shown 
towards the scheme. He felt 
that the adverse factors in the 


project would be vastly offset 

by the advantages. 

As a result of the proceed- 
ing of the House of Com- 
mons select committee, which 
has been hearing objections to 
the project, a number of 
important safeguards had 
been put in place. The stipula- 
tion that the fixed link would 
be constructed and operated 
without recourse to govern- 
ment funds or government 
guarantees would now be writ- 
ten into the Bin which is 
before ParfiamenL 

Some jobs in the ports and 
on the ferries would inevitably 
go, but most would not The 
ferries would continue not just 
on the longer routes but also 


on the short sea crossings. 

Cross Channel traffic had 
quadrupled in the past 20 
years. The additional choice 
represented by the tunnel and 
the spur of competition to 
existing inodes of air and sea 
travel to improve efficiency 
and reduce feres would result 
in more people and goods 
crossing the ChaimeL 

“The Channel tunnel will be 
the biggest civil engineering 
project of its land ever under- 
taken m Europe. Half of it will 
be British, and that wSD be a 
tremendous demonstration 
that we still have the skill and 
imagination for great 
ventures. ' 

“The project will be under- 


taken entirely fay the private 
sector, thus demonstrating 
that the free enterpiro econ- 
omy can stiH respond to great 
opportunities without the 
prop of government 
underwriting,** he said. 

The construction of the 
tunnel system and the asso- 
ciated railway works and roB- 
ing stock would create in 
Britain some 100,000 man- 
years of employment, if ac- 
count was taken of the knock- 
on effect. There would be a 
-Smilar boost for the construc- 
tion industry in France, he 
said. 

• The Council for the 
Protection of Rural England 
yesterday accused the Govern- 


New push 
to check 



mezKoFbzeakn^ its undertak- 
ing to allow objectors to the 
; Channel tunnel to present 
Thwr • case . to the select . 

ranminee considering the 
BlIL 

The oom plaint came in a Gibb 

letter to Mr Alex Fletcher, LegrtAflEnre Correspondent 
MP,thecoimnittee<foairmm, ^be Government is ex- 
bran_MrRofen 9 rov ^,7"5 p ecte d to re s u rrec t its con- 
the CPRE director. Hesud proposal giving the 

thmasaresnUofanimreasra- Attorney General a right to 
ably tight timetable for the refer apparently aver-lement 
committee's h earin g s it had to the Court of 

effectively ruled against. -a Appeal, as* way of resolving a 

number of individuals potting between mhv. 


nnmber of lnmvmuais pnmng saioas ^ between 
then- case in p erron to tne and judges, 
committee _ m spite of m ^ ^ now ahnost ccn 


certain to 


assurance given in the House ^ ori g i n a l propo sa l for 

last December foal day would 


be able to do so. 


A hot air balloon flight 
by foe Bishop of Hereford, 
foe Bight Rev John 

Kaghmgh, marking the' 

start of a diocese tour, 
ended embarrassingly yes- 
terday when he was blown 
into the neighbouring di- 
ocese of Worcester. 

After taking off from 
Ludlow School, the balloon 
eventually came down on a 
farm near Abberley. 


BmHhw Is to W aning 40 
of foe 112 permanent staff 
at Soraerwest world, its 
holiday camp in Min eh cad, 
Somerset 

The announcement 
comes a week after foe torn 
said it was g oin g to fort 
down its holiday camp in 
Barry, South Wales, as 
part of a countrywide cost- 
cutting operation. 


Jury clemency plea 

A jury’s appeal to a judge yesterday saved the son of 
Mike Reid, foe comedian, from going to jafl for shooting 
dead his best friend. The jam's, sitting at Chehnsford 
Crown Court, found Mark Reid, aged 20, guilty of foe raan- 
sianghter of Ian Rogers, aged 17, bet made a special plea 
for clemency which was accepted by Mr Justice Drake. 

iiwtPMl, Reid was put on two years’ probation. The court 
had been told Ian Rogers was blasted by a shotgun from a 
range of 10 feet as the pair skylarked. 


Poll rules 


The Crvfl and Pabfac 
Services Association has 
tightened its rales to pre- 
vent irregularities in the re- 
run of the election for a 
general secretary. 

The election, which be- 
gins on Monday week, was 
ordered after foe disclosure 
that union members were 
denied voting rights m the 
contest won by Mr John 
Macreadie (right), a sup- 
porter of Militant 
Tendency. 


MPs divided 
on issue of 
privately-run 
British jails 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

A Commons select commit- The committee visited three 

tee is divided on the politically “correctional institutions” 
explosive question of whether run by the Corrections 
privately -run prisons should Corporation of America 
be introduced in Britain. (CCA). 

Pont*™*™, memherc of Sir Edward Gardner, the 


Conservative members of 


UUlWVaUTW UIMUVMJ VI . m » 

the home affairs committee comnutire chairman, de- 
returoed fiom a fort-finding sc^thetnpas om offoe 
trin to America last month m °st revealing I have ever 



trip to America last month 
convinced that such institu- 
tions provided an answer to 
the chronic overcrowding and 


undertaken,** while another 
Tory, Mr John Wheder, said 
he was “profoundly 


considerable financial drain of impressed . 

British prisons. According to Sir George, the 


At the last count there was a 


CCA had cut roo 
dollars off the 25 do 


y five 
saday 


. i fl . c UVUOIJ Ull U1V w UUUOig 0 VftT 

total prison population of j t cost state prisons to keep a 


l .jfZf*;? 


buflt for just UBder 41,000, ^biie improving standards, 
with each uunate costing an * , 

average of £36 a day to keep. 

However Labour mem bers which took less than nine 
who went on the trip are months to construct and 
saying privately that the con- which reverted to state owner- 
cept of making profit from ship after 20 years. 

Prisoners is “obscene” and ¥&xA ^ ^ „ l rinilrtp 

Sill sanction of losing the contract, 

a report calling for privately- ^ ob- 

nrn prisons. served stringent conditions 

They acknowledge that the laid down by the state and its 


Newspaper ‘blunder’ 

More than 3,000 readers of The Deify Telegraph 
yesterday each thought they had won a Seychelles holiday 
in foe newspaper’s Passport Control competition. 

But became of a misprint, all they will get is a few peace. 
The management admitted what it . said was a “huge 


run prisons. served stringent conditions 

They acknowledge foal the laid down by the state and its 
American prisons had their prisons were subject to fee- 


lgood points, but insist that 
these should merely be taken 
on board by stale-run prisons 
here. 

The Tories insist that the 


qnent and annannounced 
inspections. It provided re- 
habilitation opportunities for 
prisoners and an “after-care” 
service once they were re- 




ti.- 
i 

• ~ Pi 

vfer 

•**v 




yss x "" 


sentencing ggxfrfors to be 
codified and published on a 


- -■ 


Thai proposal has been 


of St Maryfthone, the Lord. 
Chancellor, although it was 
favou re d by Home Office 
ministers. 

But foe Government is 
determined to be seen to be 
the. problem of sen- 
tences OBt appear too lenient. 

The proposal for a right of 
referral to the Court of Appeal 
for an opinion — which would 
have no power to change the 
sentence —was contained in 
foe Prosecution of Offences 
BOl last year and thrown out 
after opposition in foe Lords. 

It is now c a e ig ng as the 
option fikdy to counter least ; 
Opposition mm tiie ministers 
involved, although it may still 

nm min nj ymntuin in foe 

Lords. 

Ministers hope there is stiS 
time far the proposal to be 
contained in foe foe Criminal 
Justice Bffi ejected late not 
week. 

The option was one ofthc 
three canvassed by foe Gov- 
ernmeut mits crinunat justice 

White Paper earikr this year. 

The second and st rong er op- 
tion was for arigjrt of referral 
by the Attorney General, with 
foe Cost of Appeal having 
power to increase sentences. 

However, the Government 
fears that this would lay the 
p rosecution open to a charge 
ofinvoivaneot in sentencing. 


favoured fry foe Lord 


Police 


blunder”. As a gestured 
£10,000 to foe Save foe 


Suicide of 
fraud case 
bank chief 

A bank manager shot him- 
self after inquiries began into 
an alleged £3 million fraud 
involving one of his cus- 
tomers and a government 
department, Lincoln Crown 
Court was told yesterday. 

Mr John Taylor, manager of 
foe Lincoln branch of Lloyds 
Bank, committed suicide in 
October 1982 when investiga- 
tions began into foe Lincoln 
firm of Lumiere Leisure. 

Mr David Farrar, QC, for 
the prosecution, has claimed 
that directors of foe firm 
invented bogus sales of fold- 
away squash courts and sports 
centres' to France, Belgium 
and Australia, which were 
used to secure massive loans 
from Couttsand Lloyds Bank. 

The loans were insured 
under an agreement with the 
Export Credit Guarantee De- 
partment which had to pay 
out £3.3 million when the 
Lumiere group of companies 
finally collapsed in the sum- 
mer of 1982. He said that the 
firm repaid bogus loans by 
taking out even huger loans 
for contracts which never 
existed. 

Two former directors of 
Lumiere are accused of 
operating the fraud under the 
supervision of the film’s 
managin g director. Mr Robert 
Stapleton, now in Spain. 

Mr Stapleton's wife Julia 
Stapleton, aged 40, of The 
Spindles, Booth by Grafibe, 
near Lincoln, is accused of 10 
counts of false accounting and 
1 0 alternative charges of 
obtaining overdrafts by decep- 
tion. Robert Coles, aged 39, 
foe company’s former finan- 
cial director, of Hayton, near 
East Retford, Nottingham- 
shire. faces four charges of 
false accounting. 

The trial continues today. 


the newspaper is to donate 
n Fund. 


American system is one of leased. 

“managment contract”, not The commitfey null con- 
“privatization”Dut both Tory tinue its inqtriryin this coun- 
and Labour MPs admit that try by taking evidence from 
there-* is little scope for the Home Office and prison 
compromise. authorities. 

Arts funding 


ce n tte rtp tbra to dislodge a proteste r fro m a ennae missile lamchcr after the convoy was 
halted yesterday on its way back to Greenham Common. 

Missile convoy ambushed 


Theatres facing cash crisis 


By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 

A envoy, of. erase missile tochers had severed foe brake other fnckterts wifoconveys, 
hamebers returning to foe hoses on tiro equipment trail- raifo u ft is another example of 
Green ham Common airfield ersonly. how unarmed and untrained 

from an exercise was am- The ambush. Involving cmfians can interrupt a Nato 
bashed yesterday by pro- abort 100 members of foe exercise. I hate tothmk what 
testers who cat brake pipes Guise Watch update osnld happen if determined 
ana urttoed wfafte pamton the and local peace protesters terrorists decided to attach 
‘vehicles. happened at lam yesterday as this convey 


of appeal over ap p aren tly 
lenient sentences. 

‘New rules 

will reduce 
oouMieu detections’ 

indent ■ _ 

. The faD-m detection , rates 
other facMeuls with conveys, forjuvemte crime isdoe to the 
said: u Itb another example of xok requiring adults, to be 


By Garin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


The Royal Shakespeare 
Company (RSC) has no finan- 
cial reserves to meet a crisis 
and its future will remain 
uncertain unless foe Govern- 


ready trying to absorb a 
significant reduction in the 
real value of a carefully estab- 
lished level of subsidy.” 

Mr Cass said foe effect of 


ment restores the real vahw of restricted increases in the past 
J* S 1 **;? ne ? t two years had been to reduce 


Geoffrey Cass, its chairman, 
said yesterday. 

At foe same time, the 
Oxford Playhouse has given a 
warning that it coidd dose 
next Juy because the univer- 
sity can no longer afford to 
bail out foe theatre in its latest 
cash crisis. 

Presenting the RSC 1985-86 


foe real value of the subsidy to 

JriledleS. ^foe mUalw ^?j? c witbout substantial 

SS-iaf-ys 


readied its decision about the . 
Playhouse on Monday. 

Mr DW Roberts, deputy 1 
registrar, said yesterday that 
staff were aware of the 
university’s long-standing 
concern about the theatre’s 
considerable finandal diffi- 
culties and its inability to 
operate without substantial 


. They darned their actions toe convoy moved slowly op a 
had im m obili z ed the leading steep hiD on the A303 between 
launcher bringing foe entire Amesbmy, Wiltshire, and An- 
convoy to a halt for more than dorar, Hampshire, 
an hoar and forcing US Wiltshire police said foor 
personnel to remove a red box p eo p le were char g e d with 
which, they said, ro m t a i a ed obstruction and two with 
c on fiden ti al i nstr u ctions about breach ef the peace, 
foe missiles. Mr Rob Wading, a member 


However, the Ministry of ef Crnse Watch, which has 
Defence said later die at- been responsible for several 


how mnrmed mad mtnuwd 
civiliaBs can interrupt a Nato 
exercise. I hale to thmk what 
could happen if determined 
terrorists decided to attack 
tins convoy.’* 

The convoy, which iadoded 
fog jaanchecs, returned tofoe 
Greenham Common hose 
abort tone and a half boras 
after the incident and Ministry 
off Defence pofice made three 
more arrests later. 

The mhtistry said foe con- 
voy was taking part m a 
roatine training exercise and 
was not carrying five missiles. 


Oftel criticizes Telecom seirice 


emors that the prospecte for 
foe future will once again be 
distressingly difficult” 

The company staged a 


annual report yesterday, Mr reowd number of 36 inoduc- 
Cass said the transfer of four turns, md uding 14 new plays 
'successful productions to the ^ adaptations, during the 
West End had resulted in a net yew “» Stratford-upon-Avon, 
surplus of little more than London and on tour. 

£5,000. The Oxford University 

That margin was perilously Hebdomadal Council, which 


smalL “Contingency plant 
is difficult when we are 


is facing a cash crisis of its own 
because of government cuts, 


had bought time to explore 
new arran gements, on the 
basis that the university could 
not commit itself to keeping 
the Playhouse in business 
beyond next July. 

“The need for substantial 
economies in all its activities 
make it more than ever nec- 
essary for the university to 
dose its open-ended commit- 
ment to make up the Play- 
house's deficit year after 
year,” Mr Roberts said. 


By Jonathan MiHer itoring exercise fora the first 
_ ^ • official measurement of BTs 

The Govraumenfs Office of technical perf or man ce as it 
^c ommunic ations is pie- does not disclose details of the 
ring to release a report on quality of service it provides 
e quality of telephone ser- to its 20 fnaKrm customers, 
ce 'that is strongly critical of According to Oftel, the 

ilish Telecom. main problem with the BT 

The report is based on network lies with its local 
orutoring of the telephone excha n ges, few of which have 
twork by 2,000 volunteers foe latest digital technology, 
muted by Oftd’s 164 Tele- Almost 60 per cent of 
tone Advisory C o m m i tt ees. Britain’s telepho ne cus t omers 
The statistics fiom the mon- are served fry Strowger electro- 


Telecommunications is pre- 
paring to release a report on 
the quality of telephone ser- 
vice that is strongly critical of 
British Telecom. 

The report is based on 
monitoring of the telephone 
network by 2,000 volunteers 
recruited by Oftd’s 164 Tele- 
phone Advisory Committees. 

The statistics fiom themon- 


mechanical exchanges, based 
on technology invented by a 
Kansas City undertaker in 
1889. 

Another 15 percent of BTs 
lines are served fry cross-bar 
e x changes, based on technol- 
ogy invented in 1919. Some 
exchanges are more than 50 
years old. 

A BT spokesman said yes- 
terday it would not be posable 
to comment on OfteTs report 
until it had been studied. 


m w . pres e nt during police inter- 
a Nato I .views, a police superintendent 
* wfc * t l chums in this month's Crim- 
inal Law Review (Our Legal 
Affairs Correspondent writes). 

Det Supt Donald Taylor, 
co-ordinator of die south-west 
regional crime squad, also 
predicts there wffl be a similar 
drop in adult detections as a 
result of netf codes of practice 
on police questioning and the 

right of suspects to have a 
solicitor with them when 
interrogated. 

Mr Taylor says that many 
more offences were admitted 
by juveniles when questioned 
by police before 1978, when 
the new rules were intraducedL 

Reported crime rose by 47 
per cent between 1978 and 
1985, bat total detections rose 
by only 34 per cent That was 
in spite of adult detections 
increasing by 49 per cent. 


Anglo-Irish agreement 

Concern over tactics widens Unionist split 


By Richard Ford 

The divisions between Nor- 
thern Ireland's two Unionist 
parties deepened yesterday as 
they organized protests to 


divisions, while Mr Ian Pais- 
ley, the DUP leader, says a 
citizens’ army is needed to 
oppose foe deal with Dublin. 

The Official Unionists are 
increasingly alarmed at pro- 


be denies that people are being 
“mobilized for anything ill- 


foe idea of any citizens’ army 
as being worrying to all right- 


mark foe first anniversary of parations apparently being 


| the Anglo-Irish agreement. 

Both the Official and 
Democratic Unionists are 
deeply suspicious of each 
others tactics and it is becom- 
ing increasingly difficult for 
the hostilities between the two 
parties to be kept to private 
meetings. 

Mr James Molyneaux, lead- 
er of the Official Unionists, 
yesterday indicated that his 
MPs may soon be back at 
Westminster voting in vital 


made by Mr Paisley to 
“mobilize” tens of thousands 
of “loyalists” into a citizens* 
army ready to take to the 
streets. He has suggested a 
“disciplined force” and it is 
believed that an embryo struc- 
ture is already in existe n ce, in 
readiness for a formal an- 
nouncement. 

Mr Paisley’s office has 
booked the Ulster Hall in 
Belfast for a “dedication 
service" on Monday night, but 


The Official Unionist 
leadership has not been in- 
volved in any of the prepara- 
tions for sndh a mobmzatian,' 
and yesterday Mr Molyneaux 
said he bad no reason to 
believe that his colleagues in 
foe Unionist family woe in- 
volved as a party in organizing 
such an army. 

There are others within the 
OUP who believe that their 
allies in foe fight a gaingt the 
agreement are operating be- 
hind their backs with other 
loyalist groups to organize 
resistance to the deaL 

Mr Molyneaux denounced 


He said it would be difficult 
for him to explain to his party 
that one of the partners had 
engaged in somefoing without 
consultation, and said: “We 
have been through all this 
before in the 70s”. 

He added that he had served 
in an army during the Second 
World War — a comment not 
lost on those within Unionism 
who know that Mr Paisley was 
not a member of the Armed 
Forces during that conflict 

If the OUP are concerned at 
the ideas of their colleagues, 
the DUP will be equally 
worried as Mr Mofyneaux’s 


indication that Unionist MPs 
may be bade at Westminster 
voting cm certain issues within 
the near future. 

The DUP see this a weaken- 
ing of Unionist resolve, but 
Mr Molyneaux raid it did not 
mean they would be reverting 
to normal Parliamentary prac- 
tice. 

“We have not been totally 
boycotting Parliament. We in 
all probability will be engaged 
in voting, perhaps in die near 
future. It would have to be 
something vitally important 
We have no intention of going 
there as lobby fodder, prop- 


ity to a government ’ 
betrayed us.” 



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rm? TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 


51986 


Trade union 


By Martin Ffoteher, Political Reporter 

Restrictive trade union within five months of winning 
actices in hospiials are cost- government contracts andfr&£ 
millions of pounds and are achieved savings of £6,000 a 
leafing to the deaths of kidney patient through flexible work- 
patients, a Omservative MP ii^ practices, 
said yesterday. , 

Mr Tony Favell, secretary Dialysis treatment takes 
of the Conservative health five mid a half hours pa r 
and sodal services committee* session. NHS employees work 
Mamed the health service eight-hour shifts, and there- 
unions both for preventing fore accommodate just ore 
contracting out and for in- patient per shift, whereas pri- 
rfficiency within the NHS. vate renal unit employees I 

, *1. *„ l. 11.Kn»r Have 



Ml! 






Bckmcy within the NHS. vate renal unit employees 
“If s quite dear that there’s work three 11-hour days, 
rigidity of working practices accommodating two patients 
nd demarcation within the per shift. 


2 ngiany Ol wonanj& auwiuuiwaum — 

and demarcation within foe per shift. taet mmmnisK:Tj^ -iu^s l ui» *** t 

33 S 2 * Si j? 

ister for Health, which he said perform technical work. — — — T 1 Private Eye Case 1 QlHOItCr I 

. ' J .L.« ttu> wine fiiriiw — .. T\ — 1 HMAIi I * I _ 



Wife will 
have say 


a v "v* 

Blackburn, 

BB16AJ. 


worst,'’ he said. 
The MP has 


in Mr Antony Newton, Mur- units muses axe tram 
ister for Health, which he said perform technical work, 
showed that the crisis feeing Mr Favell sent Mr Newton a | 

NHS renal units .could be w^- from Dr Derek T1 


- - — : ... ui mr mvui *ui wu twwu » 

NHS renal umts rould t* letter from Dr Derek Thorny ] 
solved overnight if dialysis ^ consultant nephrologist 
treatment was contracted*^ ^ ^ $t Peter’s hospitals. 


“ ■ ..... MJU, UUI3ULUUH 

treatment was contiactedc^ at the St Peter’s hospitals, 1 
to the private sector. Three describing contracting out to 
times as many patients .could relieve pressure as “Very 


tones as many patients .could r%fW pressure as **Very 
be treated, and at a.savmg of tractive”. 

£6,000 per patient per year. a 
So acute is the crisis that Another letter from Mr 


Dead man 
had record 
drug dose 

a «tkA di*d m nrvKcc 


Private Eye case 

Foot denies Maxwell ‘gift* 

...... i™. M-mraEzatioB*' to say cootri- ««* 


Smoker 
died after 


Doctor faces 
drug charges 

a « - nacturahV 




21Ld»-ios.y c«fr and no m was. handed giving UP 
party were a 

awtMi. - 

nttST had tanrefced to pay her last cigarette, but just _24 


estimated 1,200 kidney par firing Hospital ot St Joon ot cocaine — 

toBwe waiting for treat- a Bkabeth, London, inquest m London was tow 

viding dM^#«_235 ,™ number -of 


cents, although funded lor vice patient 

°Mr' ftvendenied thm was ■“» 

|E^| sfl-^SSfS | 

ftgSmS £jaSM d 

he said. _ . have not been fuUy ... Maxwell, sari it was a -wire ngj 


said: "we nave me . T<w _, atul - He said foe allegation mi 

S K1£K1££V »w««»gg£ gS-SST-S 

_ rasswas Ssel- ^seas.'s 


^^ tomrm,aoiw SSkSTc-S^w 


A doctor was yesterday sc^ 

for trial accused of usmg tne 
name of a dead p*ticnt to 
obtain drugs dishonestly from 

^DrGfrrdou Moxnn, aged 54, 
of Castle Cottages, BSckletgh, 

near Tfwrtoo, Dewm, ap- 
peared before magistrates at 
Newton Abbot on three 


^SSTSTrS- aWTgJT*!^ JS>S5MSS.S 
S=*- B -SS-ss*: SM-SSg SranStL. 1 ' 


Dm me msu : — . 

SC1«- SSWUHt SSS Nature line 

felSfeiSS ¥EKbK AB^-sgi 

g-SSSr-s .sssaMSs s£S&au: BftgfiS 

2 ssss.‘£s. £ SSj a-« wa|a-“— 

tggS gr^ldftSS tal •nwbwnogowftwft. 


rn the maKazme in hours cner, ™ 

-*” 1 th f‘. he ^. S,SS^Ssh.dkd. 


ironers court: it s me rngu- -”~r when the tod was sun 

Stof&s.ato tri^ 

£«" um * rf artossSSB w? 

as arum. a.*. ■ ■ m-n rnnodc fn an attempt to slate cwm. 


[i 


^tohhsernc.nsftos, ’ "M Vw« 

In Wales, foe priv«ese^ proggstove not been y hfi ^ unableto ^ 

had built two new renal units ■ ™*efoer Mr Lemard had used 


Staffordsnire, in uku 
have a disused railway fine, 
once destined to bees* * 
read, adopted as a nature 
walk. 


He said he was unaomw 

Whether Mr Lemard had ured 

Stalin’ of Attacks 
Tyracase baby ’not 

" 1 wA/*ollAfl^ found dead at 

WfirkPT -• recaueu police station on pctbbCT 8, 

aw^.SS*e?® ® S3N-K 


Where do the m^or retailer 


ill rds 


JSJ 9 JSS' £& Sy^couwoo,^^ S^jaftjlg 

KUnd total to toft ^ ^^ iWkofBMtdey tadHoo»,NotmgHai,wa 

cSmS smd that ft. 


shopping for 


SUft-WiEJss SSSftSffiMS 

ssstf&sffSE ;S5 s®^bis 

^ ‘ r - ^ ^^d^saft^e^^ I Se and cause halhici- 

"W 38 separate braises 1 natiaty,. vtv ft « ^uUAlnmd 


^N^llack Smith, Lambeth’s 
• -..i n (C/w fhr - sncuu 


plete retail systems? 


tijorpe, foe fieldworker fo- 0 fESma^d sSd he nism of death was from the 

S* responsible for .foe inhalation of vcjml 

child, was mp<»rh^foand ac ^ , was a bastaid for doing Dr West added that bis 
was under strain because oi „ he told Preston Crown post-mortem examination 
‘ her husband's death. {?«» Sowed no apis of Mr 

The tribunal has been fold ^^oreseention alleys that Lemard either bang vwlentiy 

thatareBefworkerbadtoiate Gcoree had beendrinking restrained or involved in a 

over the childs care whm ^ ^ taken drags violent struggle. . 1 

Palcthorpe had foree moD'fe vfoenhe went to foe child's professor Bernard Knight, 
compassionate leave bea room inarageafte® an independent path(^ogisi 


“IS- M ftMeft on* £ SSSy picked, the K^SSTOSS 

turned she deeded ^ ^ ^ the eais, head- <3 rcas h ai n who did a thud 

superior, , butted her sewal tones imd po^^rtbm examination for 

Rp^dl 

her mother, «** ssiisara Kf-s* 




to stop visrong UK “““rr 

STfo- 1 Bsrs-fo 1 _ 

“ShSSft^tSjSS 'lotted saoldng. tan- £SSSm«SS bS 

the mother was b^j®^ nalns, taking a police officers managed to get 

conditions and drinking cider, bat said be the ground and 

was not followed up by foe ^ Mtnx ^^a^entor 

tV Mr Smith aho’.jjJ 3**- toto PC Worsley bad alerttri 

EfS^thSWS '^ffl^SASS S3S"-tt 

^TyroE shocld tav. volved cmdd viotot»3on” tat on ttor 

told to stay away to® “jjjjjjmtoy. dqttns to™ mval Mr Uftmd ted «1>“^ 
thefemily. . .. fimetion and cause violent ened down. When he was 

“But 1 don't know rf it aggressive behaviour. The taken to foe charge room and 

would have made any dif- akn caused amnesia [aid on the floor it _ was 

ference. I don’tfojifort to ^ would expect to be obvious he was ^ otb reafom^ 

posrible to predictjhat jht hearing continues 

S^wNeO was a murder^. _ TLa trial f-nntmues- I today. - 


He ttddfoejury thajas a ^ m caned to ! 

child he bad been a ymtim of said: “The 

violence. . .. ____ man went, beserk and was 

He ata^smokuM era- 5 





tettiay that NeO,^™ ^ John Rees, a 

expert, told the count 
son, Tyrone, fo°“® -JJ]® tranauillraer mvoNed 
Untold to stayaway from dtsws 

thefemily. _ , „ w H function and cause 

“But 1 dooJttaoWv rfrt J^^rossivebAavio 
would have nia^ any ___ drug also caused a 
ference. I IS v& he would expet 

tWEggS ^ 


■■til*'’' 


Accidents at home 

Peril of summery 






SSSSSSU — nMJATAL HOME ACCIDENTS IN 1985 


Acoflenu. m -zy__ 

ai^jssw’s 

rr- c j 


home rnostfre*|uw8Jf irwohiBd. 


=e- jsay 1 J 6 ^ 


Cataaon itembar of Acddanls 

Pto^ rta0f “ 0d V,S 

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HOME NEWS 


November 4 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


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star wars research 


Britain's participation in Star 
Wars research and the Gov- 
ernment's nuclear policy came 
under attack during question 
time. 

Mr Robert Clay (Sunderland 
North, Lab) said that the Reyk- 
javik summit had destroyed the 
illusion that the Strategic De- 
fence Initiative, far from 
enhancing the possibilities of 
nuclear disarmament, was the 
main stumbling block. 

He suggested that President 
Reagan would be toid that the 
only mason the Americans 
wanted British involvement in 
SDI was to “rip-off” commer- 
cial research by British firms. 

He also said that Mr George 
Younger, Secretary of Stale for 
Defence .should come clean 
about the Naio tactical ballistic 
minilc initiative and make an 
honest statement about it. 

Mr Younger said nothing at 
Reykjavik altered the fact that 
the Soviet Union bad been 
wigagpH in research into strate- 
gic defence matters for a long 
time and that their offer there 
was to try to prevent the United 
States carrying on their efforts in 
these matters while the Russians 
carried on doing it themselves. 
This seemed unreasonable. 

Sir Anthony Buck (Colchester 
North, O said that if they coukl 
get away from the doctrine of 
“mad”, mutually assured de- 
struction, it would be a great 
advantage to the whole world. 
That was an awful doctrine and 
he wanted to see something 
effective substituted for it. 

Mr Younger agreed. He said 
that was why the Government 
had pm such a high priority on 
encouraging the US to negotiate 
as strongly as it could for 
armaments reductions provided 
they were balanced reductions, 
including all types of ar- 
maments, so that the security of 
the West could be maintained. 
Mr Abut Beith (Berwick-upon- 
Tweed, Lj asked if the Govern- 
ment believed that SDI could 
create an impenetrable nuclear 
shield, making nuclear weapons 
unnecessary. How would that 
aid Europe? 

Mr Younger told him that the 
purpose of SDI was to establish 
whether such techniques could 
produce such an effect and. if so. 
whether it could be deployed as 
an extra protection for the WesL 
Mr John Wilkinson (Ruislip- 
Northwood, Q said President' 
Reagan was, in feet, set up by 
the Soviet Union at Reykjavik. , 
“For General Secretary Gor- 
bachev to make the abandon- 
ment of SDI a precondition for 
arms control progress was a 
dangerous step on his part with 
the whole world looking forward 
to an early summit with the 
United States, with the agenda 
settled ax Reykjavik, agreed by 
both sides." 

Mr Younger: He is correct in 
suggesting that had President 
Reagan agreed to the one con- 
dition which the Soviet Union 
and Mr Gorbachev tried to lay 
down at Reykjavik, he would 
have given away the right of the 
West to research into these 
matters while leaving the Rus- 
sians free to continue 
That would have been a 
dangerous step and we should 
be grateful to the President that 
he did not agree to il 
M r Cyril Townsend (Bcx- 
kyheaih, Q said it was sensible 
for Britain to be involved in 
anti-missile defence which 
would give her a chance to play 
a part in a decision on whether 
the project should be im- 
ptememed- 

Mr Younger said that about 
£17 million worth of business 
was coming to British firms as 
pan of the programme. 

Such research with British 
firms taking part was only trying 
to help to establish if such 
techniques would be important 
for the defensive shield of the 
West 

Mr DenzO Davies, chief Opposi- 
•tion spokesman on defence and 
disarmament, asked whether, as 
President Reagan in Iceland had 


DEFENCE 


offered to get rid of all strategic 
and nuclear weaponry within 10 
years, the British Government 
bad been consulted on that offer 
and whether it agreed with it. 
Mr Younger: The British Gov- 
ernment was very closely, very 
effectively and constantly con- 
sulted in the preparations for the 
Reykavik summit, and 1 could . 
not possibly have expected any 
closer consultation than there 
was (Opposition laughter). 

Of course, during the summit, 
the discussions hid to be be- 
tween those present. 

The British Government had 
always tried to get arms reduc- 
tions. “And if, in due course, 
taking into account all factors, 
including conventional and 
chemical weapons, we can ap- 
proach a period of big reduc- 
tions. or even zero, of course we 



r> 




Mr Beith: Worried about the 
SDI “shield* 

would be able to have a part in 
that process, but not taking only 
one part of it on its own.” 

Mr Roy Hughes (Newport East, 
Lab) asked whether SDI bad. in 
fact, “scuppered” the Iceland 
disarmament talks (Conser- 
vative cries of “No!”). On 
further Star Wars Tests, further 
nuclear tests to determine the 
feasibility of the X-Ray system, 
he said that if the Government 
wanted disarmament and a 
comprehensive test ban treaty, 
the sooner it got off the Reagan 
bandwagon, the better. 

Mr Younger said that was not 
correct There had been no 
suggestion that this particular 
nuclear test was related to SDI, 
and indeed the .Americans had 



Mr Davies: Has Britain beat 
consulted? 

made clear that they abided 
within the ABM treaty and. 
therefore, no nudear activities 
in space would be permitted as 
part of the research into the SDI 
programme. 

On the ending of the Iceland 
summit, the pretext upon which 
the agreement nearly reached 
was not reached was the insis- 
tence of the Soviet Union that 
the US should abandon SDI 
research, leaving the Russians 
free to do their own work. 

That was "an extremely bad 
bargain, which the President 
was quite right to refuse". 

Mr Antony Marlow (Northamp- 


ton North. C) commented: If we 
were to adopt the defence policy 
or lack of policy sold to the 
Labour Party by Mis Ruddock 
(Joan Ruddock, of CND) and 
Mrs Kinnock, would not we find 
that without any Americans, 
without nuclear weapons, we 
could defend ourselves only 
with our own SDI? 

Mr Younger: Mr Marlow may 
well be right on that. But if tlx: 
British Government had fol- 
lowed the policies as advocated 
by the Campaign for Nuclear 
Disarmament and the Labour 
Party and others, we would be 
left with the Soviet Union not 
prepared to n e g o tiate on any 
aspect of cruise missiles and we 
would have the SS20s pointed 
towards us from western Europe 
with nothing to replace them. 

This whole episode is a com- 
plete demolition of the theory 
on which CND is based. 

Mr Younger later tokl Mr 
Richard Douglas (Dunfermline 
West. Lab) that he did not think 
he had ever suggested that the 
Russians had breached the 
ABM treaty and that he made 
no such suggestion now. As he 
understood il both sides were 
prepared to keep within the 
treaty but there was some 
dispute on the precise definition 
of what that involved. 

Mr YHUiam Hamilton (Central 
Fife. Lab): In what conceivable 
circumstances would our so- 
called independent nudear de- 
terrent be used? 

Mr Younger The position of 
our independent nudear deter- 
rent is that it should be available 
as a last resort in case of any 
circumstances in future in 
which a last resort response was 
needed from this country. 

If it was abandoned this 
country would be at the mercy 
of a vastly superior force in 
conventional terms. Mr Hamil- 
ton and his party are backing a 
dangerous defence policy. 

Mr Jonathan Sayeed (Bristol 
East, Cj: One of the difficulties 
of the zero option was that it did 
not include those third world 
powers that have or are develop- 
ing atomic weapons. To defend 
ourselves against that potential 
danger we need to maintain an 
independent nuclear deterrent. 
Mr Younger: We have made it 
clear that none of our weapons, 
nuclear or non-nuclear, will ever 
be used as a first strike. 

The possession by this coun- 
try of an independent nuclear 
deterrent is a safeguard against 
any future threat which is 
always available for a British 
government to choose. The 
necessity to have that response 
has been agreed between all 
governments since the war. 
Labour or Conservative, and I 
would hope that would also be 
the case in future. 

Mr James Wallace (Orkney and 
Shetland, Lk If in the next five 
or six years the Soviet Union 
and the United Stales were able 
to agree on a 50 per cent 
reduction in strategic nudear 
missiles, would it be the policy 
of a Conservative government 
to deploy a missile system 
representing an eightfold in- 
crease in the present Polaris 
system? 

Are there circumstances in 
which the Government would 
be prepared to negotiate away 
Trident, and if so what are they? 
Mr Younger: If the US and the 
Soviet Union were to agree on 
such a thing h would be more 
than the Liberal Party has been 
able to do with its own defence 
policy. If there were to be large 
reductions of SO per cent or so 
in strategic weapons, this Gov- 
ernment would be perfectly 
prepared to go along with the 
search for such reductions. If 
there was anything further, we 
would require the taking into 
account of conventional and 
other weapons systems which 
are a threat to us. 

Mr Kevin McNamara (Hull 
North. Lab), an Opposition 
spokesman on defence and 
disarm amenc On the basis of 
his argument must we assume 



Women 

deacons 

measure 

passes 

Deaconesses bad a substantial 
share both in the conduct of 
public worship and in the 
general life of the Church of 
England, the Bishop of Roch- 
ester, the Right Rev Darid Say, 
said in the House of Lords when 
he successfully moved that the 
Deacons (Ordination of 
Women) Measure, should be 
presented for Royal Assent on 
Friday. . . . , , 

The Measure, which would 
for the first time allow women 
deacons to conduct marriage 
services, would create no senoos 
problems in the relationship of 
the Anglican Communion with 
either the Orthodox _ Church or 
the Roman Catholic Church, 
whose members bad been 
watching the progress of the 
Measure with considerable 
interest. 

He emphasized that (he Mea- 
sure would not allow women to 
become priests. That would be 
something for future consid- 
eration and debate if and when 
the time came. 

Lady Seear (L) welcomed the 
Measure which she said gave 
recognition to the work, 
q ualifi cations and value of 
women in the church. As such, it 
would encourage more women 
to become deaconsand so help 
to relieve the burden of existing 
workers. 


Thatcher 

defends 

Tebbit 

letter 

PRIME MINISTER 


Mr George Yi 

that it is government policy that 
under no circumstances is it 
prepared to see the United 
Kingdom give up its deterrent 
and therefore we win maintain 
it, no matter what the US does, 
while there are strong con- 
ventional forces in the USSR? 

In feci it is not a deterrent 
against nuclear blackmail but 
against conventional forces. 

Mr Younger: We have always 
made dear that we consider the 
possession of an independent 
deterrent tty this country is 
essential to our security. That 
has been the view of Labour as 
well as Conservative govern- 
ments. 

If there were to be very large 
reductions in strategic systems 
and no development of any new 
weapon which was a threat to us 
we would be prepared to con- 
sider whether we could contrib- 
ute to further 'reductions 

Later, Mr McNamara ques- 
tioned tire Prime Minister about 
tire role of cruise and Pershing 
missiles. He said that when the 
decision was token to have those 
weapons in Britain, it was on the 
grounds that it would force the 
Russians to the table and make 
them take out the SS20s. 

“Now that the Russians and 
Americans have agreed that the 
SS20 and cruise and Pershing 
should go. why does she run to 
the United Stales to see Reagan 
and say she did not really mean 
it and can she keep these 
weapons here?" 

Mrs Thatcher: The matter of 
tire intermediate nudear forces 
has to be negotiated in Geneva. 

Thai is the only place where 
agreement can be reached. The 
British Government welcomes 
the progress made on the INF at 
Reykjavik. That is consistent 
with tire long-standing (Naio) 
alliance position that INF most 
be dealt with on a global basis. 

The zero-zero solution was 
long-term, but some SS20s in 
Asia were acceptable, provided 
that the disparity was not too 
great. 

“It is the well known alliance 
position that the problem of 
staon-range nuclear forces must 
also be addressed because they 
were put into satellite countries 
in response to cruise and Per- 
shing. which were deployed in 
response to 5S20. It must afi be 
worked out” 


: Keeping British researchers involved in nudear defence planning 


‘Absurd’ report by 
union man denied 


EMPLOYMENT 


No targets far reductions in tire 
number of benefit recipients 
were befog laid down for chum- 
ant advisers in employment 
offices, Mr Kenneth Clarke, 
Paymaster General and Min- 
ister for Employment; said when 
replying to a private notice 
qnestioa from Mr John Prescott, 
chief Opposition spokesman on 
employment. 

Mr Choke said the latest absurd 
allegation bad arisen out of 
press reports ia which a trade 
anion official had quoted from 
the urinates of a meeting where a 
middle-rank officer had ex- 
pressed himself in a way which 
did not have nriaesterial ap- 
provaL 

He had never suggested that 
most of the unemployed were not 
genuinely jobless. But if, in the 
course of carrying oat positive 
work to help the unemployed 
back into work or training, 
officers encountered cases where 
it was obvious that people were 
not entitled to the unempioy- 
■uest bene fit they were drawing, 
of comae that ben e fit would be 
stopped. 

It was abs ol utely absurd to 
say that amounted to fiddling 
the nnemployoMBt figures. Were 
Labour MPs really s ugge stin g 
that sack cases should be ig- 
nored? 

Mr Prescott said that Mr Clarke 
bad informed the House last 
week that the cost of 1^00 new 
officers to a dminis ter the new 
work availability test could be 
paid for by a reduction in 
rlcinwmtq of 2 per ce nt. 

Would he confirm that the 
additional 850 new claimant 
advisers would be interviewing 
to check up on HEeasployed 
people who would be subjected 
to the new work availability test? 

Why was the minister in- 
troducin g new g casni un directed 
against the unemployed when 
the country knew the proWeax 
was not the availability of the 


unemployed for work but rather 
tire availability of work for the 
unemployed? 

Mr Clarice said the new form- 
had been tried oat for months 
without complaint 

He had said, in reply to a 
question last week, that if they 
saved less thaw 2 per cent by 
finding people who were not 
entitled to nnemploymeat bene- 
fit it would cover the cost. He 

was in ho way implying that any 
target was being set down. 

Mr Andrew Rowe (Mid Kent. Q 
said one of the consequences of 
the new “Restart” programme 
was that very large numbers of 
long-tea ^employed people 
had been amazed to find ss many 
opportunities open to them. 

Mr Clarice said he had been hi 
Manchester that morning where 
be had visited an employment 
office and seen tbe effects of the 
“Restart” initiative. 

He had seen a young man, 
who had come along to the job 
dub for the first time in a very 
long tune, studying the details of 
a Job be themght he mjriit be 
able to do. AO the staff there 
won p lease d with the work 
being carried oat imder “Re- 
start” and the job dnbs and the 
unemployed felt some thing was 
beam done to help them. 

Mr Prescott ran the risk of 
mideniiiaing those new sche- 


Mr Richard Wainwright (Colne 
Valley, L) raid if the new 
daimant advisers turned up 
cases of people entitled to 
benefit who were net getting St, 
woaM that be regarded as jraf as 
effective as getting people off the 
unemployment [register? 

Mr Clarke said it would be. 
though that was noBkdy. The 
whole point of Instructions givea 
to the officers was to help people 
wherever they could. 

If o ffi cers discovered some 
people were <4« Hiring unemploy- 
ment benefit who were not 
entitled to it, the average mem- 
ber of the public would think 
ministers were mad if they Md 
them to ignore that. 


Missiles 
protest 
attacked 

An ambush by anti-nuclear 
protesters on a cruise missile 
convoy returning to Greenham 
Common from exercises on 
Salisbury Plain was condemned 
by a Tory MP during Commons 
questions. 

Mr Patrick McNair- Wilson 
(New Forest. O said the am- 
bush of a military convoy in the 
early hours of the morning 
would cause great concern 
among people ofthis country. 

He asked Mr John Stanley, 
Minister of State for the Armed 
Forces, if be was satisfied thai it 
could be prevented in the future 
and whether the p er p e tr ators 
had been apprehended. 

.Mr Stanley: I have received a 
report. I understand some ar- 
rests were made. Members of 
:the police and other services 
involved showed immense pa- 
tience and restraint 
In very different international 
circumstances from those we 
have had today, we would have 
:to take a very different attitude 
towards protection of nuclear 
weapons.- 
Sir Anthony Grant (Cambridge- 
'shire South West, Q: Many of 
us would like the Government 
to have rather more control over 
security ofNato bases than half- 
baked local authorities like 
Cambridgeshire, whose failure 
to enforce the law agaiui CND 
and other oddballs is as infuriat- 
ing to the residents as it is 
dangerous to the nation. 

Mr Stanley said the security 
position both at Greenham 
Common and Mofeswonh was 
very much better today than it 
was some time ago. 

• The* total value of contracts 
placed by the Ministry of De- 
fence with Rolls- Royce in the 
first six months of financial 
year amounted to £100 million, 
Mr Archibald Hamilton, 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Defence Procurement, said dur- 
ing Commons questions. 

Much of the department’s 
business with the company, 
such as the RB199 engines for 
Tornado, was contracted for 
internationally. 

He was replying to Mr Mi- 
chael Stern (Bristol North West, 
Q who asked for an estimate of 
the total value of all contracts 
■recently placed by his depart- 
ment with the company. 

Mr Hamilton said that it was 
not possible to provide a reliable 
estimate of the man-hours in- 
volved. 


Poll blow 
for the 
Alliance 

By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

The Alliance's hopes of 
using the Knowsley North by- 
election as a platform for an 
electoral revival suffered a 
severe setback last night with 
the publication of an opinion 
pod carried ont in the Labour 
Merseyside stronghold. 

It predicts that the centre 
party will trail home a poor 
second to Labour with the 
Conservatives in third place. 

According to the survey. 
Labour will get 67 per cent of 
the vote next Thursday , the 
Affiance 22 per cent and the 
Conservatives 10 per cent. 

The prediction will come as 
a bitter Mow to Mr David 
Steel and Dr David Owen, the 
Affiance leaders. 

After the d£bade of the 
Liberal conference at East- 
bourne over defence, which 
has seen the coalition slump to 
17 _ per cent In the national 
ratings, they are aware that 
Knowsley North amounts to 
an eleventh-boor chance of 
staging a recoveiy. 

For Labour, struggling to 
overcome the twin handicaps 
of a fractured local part)- ami a 
candidate flat on his back in 
hospital with a slipped disc, 
the figures will be a source of 
great comfort. 

They suggest that the side- 
fined Mr George Howarth, 
who was befog seen yesterday 
by a specialist in Walton 



Mr David Trippier, an Employmnent junior minister 
didate at Knowsley North, Mr Roger 1 


Hospital, Liverpool, will in- 
herit something approaching 
the 17,000 majority achieved 
by his predecessor Mr Robert 
Kttroy-Silk. 

The projected Tory vote, 
although pitifblly small, win 
not cause great dismay at 
Conservative Central Office 
because it is nevertheless 4 per 
cent above the trend estab- 
lished in the 12 by-elections 
since the 1983 general ej- 
ection. 

Yesterday, Mr Steel, the 
Liberal leader, underlined the 
make or break nature of the 
contest for the Alliance's 
fortunes. 

On his fourth visit to the 


constituency since Mr KHroy- 
Silk announced his resigna- 
tion, be said that the Affiance 
has had “too many near 
misses” and be was deter- 
mined to strike them off the 


Of the poll carried oat for 
BBC televisions Nevsmgkt on 
November 1 and 2 among a 
weighted sample of 736 elec- 
tors in the poverty-stricken 
seat, Mr Steel sank “I think 
these figures are not as up to 
date as oar canvass returns, 
and, while I do not challenge 
their accuracy, at the same 
stage in the Bermondsey elec- 
tion (where the Liberals even- 
tually won with 57 per cent of 


with the Tory can- 
ay. 

the vote) we had a poll 
showing 26 per cent” 

Mr Jack Straw, Labour MP 
for Blackburn and Mr How- 
arth's chief adviser in the 
campaign said: “Electors are 
now harkfag fohnr m great 
numbers because George 
Howarth represents the main- 
stream Labour Party of Nefl 
Kinnock.'* 

Mr Roger Brown, the Tory 
candidate, said the polls 
showed that the Liberals were 
doing for worse than they 
claimed. 

General election: R Kflroy-Silk 
(Lab), 24J49 ; A Birch (CL 
7,758; B McCotean (SDP), 
5.715; J Simons (WRP), 246. 
Labour maj: 17491. 


Building 
office 
is closed 

By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 

A council direct labour 
organization which made a 
.loss of £3.3 million inside 
three years was closed yes- 
terday on government orders. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley, Sec- 
retary of Stale for the Environ- 
ment, took the derision after a 
report disclosed the foil extent 
of losses incurred on new 
builduig works by the London 
Borough ofNewham's directly 
employed labour force. 

More than £2 million was 
lost in 1984-85 alone. 

The council has stopped 
awarding new building pro- 
jects to its direct labour 
organization, but it expects 
further losses of about £2 mil- 
lion for 1985-86. 

Mr Rhodes Boyson, the 
Minister for Local Govern- 
ment, said yesterday that the 
direct labour organization 
would be able to complete 
existing work. 


A peer from 
Tasmania 

A retired postmaster from 
Gravelly Beach. Tasmania. 
Mr Kenneth Murray, aged 
73, took his seat in the House 
of Lords for the first time on 
Monday since becoming the 
eleventh Earl of Dunmore on 
the death of his brother. 


Tebbit attack ‘is 
having its effect’ 

By Our Political Reporter 

Mr Norman Tebbit’s attack Tebbit and he believed there 

was a “case to answer’'. 

“I am led to believe that it 
might be improving, perhaps 
as a result of the letter the 
party chairman sent to the 
BBC”, be said yesterday while 
campaigning in the Knowsley 
North by-election. 

As evidence of the changed 
approach, the minister cited 
his own experience in a trie- 
vision interview on the Youth 
Training Scheme for the Nine 
O'clock News test week. 

Before going on air he was 
concerned that the report 
might not be fair and bal- 
anced. But after checking the 
finished article on video-tape 
he was “entirely satisfied” 
with it. 


on the BBC for alleged bias in 
its coverage on the Libyan 
bombing raid is already pay- 
ing dividends, a government 
minister raid yesterday . 

The corporation has begem 
to take additional care to 
ensure that its reporting of 
political issues is fair and 
balanced, according to Mr 
David Trippier, an under- 
secretary at the Department of 
Employment 

Mr Trippier dismissed re- 
ports that many of his fellow 
ministers believe the Tory 
chairman had over-reacted 
with his highly publicized 
assault on the BBC's integrity. 

He said they stood “shoul- 
der to shoulder” with Mr 


10-minute speech plan 


An experiment e nabling the 
Speaker to limi t backbench 
speeches to 10 minutes during 
the middle hours of over- 
subscribed debates was de- 
clared a success yesterday. 

As predicted in The Times 
last week, the procedure select 
committee produced a report 
saying that the use of time 
limits had engendered “a 
greater sense of feimess in 
those major debates in which 
many members wish to take 
part” and had guaranteed the 
Speaker’s ability to call a 


By Our Political Reporter 

respectable number of MPs. 


The committee recom- 
mended that the experiment 
should become permanent 
practice. 

MPs should not read pre- 
pared speeches that ignored 
previous contributions, and 
they should be prepared to 
“give way” io other MPs, 
Ministers and opposition 
spokesmen should attempt to 
Kmit their own opening and 
dosing speeches to 30 min- 
utes. 


The Prime Minister said daring 
question tunc that the com- 
plaint by Mr Norman Tebbit, 
chairman of the Conservative 
Pany and Chancellor of the 
Duchy of Lancaster, against the 
BBC was the straightforward 
one of wh ether the corpora tio n 
was honouring its charter and 
licence agreement. 

Mr NdlKhHMck, Leader of the 
Opposition, had asked her to 
“condemn the manic efforts of 
Mr Tebbit to subordinate the 
BBC by his smears”, adding: 
“Or is lie acting under her 
orders?” 

Mrs Thatcher raid that the 
oompbialwu not for the Hone 
to discuss, but for the BBC to 
reply to. 

Mr Kbmodc She is increcfibie. 
Is she saying that her creature — 
be is definitely that — is acting 
in any straightforward fashion 

at all? This is a tortnous attempt 
to intimidate the BBC bec ause it 
is not mawipnfatiug the news in 
the way she and Mr Tebbit wish. 
Mrs Thatcher: It may be that 
Mr Kinnock has read the sub* 
missi on, but from what he has 
said, it does sot seem to me that 
be has. 

If he had, be would have seea 
that it was in reference to the 
terms and conditions under 
which they broadcast that the 
complaint was made. It is a 
matter of feet for the governors 
of the BBC to consider. It is only 
the governors who can decide 
on and reply to that com plain L 
It was a ferny measured com- 
plaint and if he reads it he will 
seetbaL 

Mr Khmodc I have read it It is 
not a complaint — which is 
right — but coercion, which is 
entirely wrong. 

Mrs Thatcher: It is a matter for 
die g o vernors, and only the 
governors, to see whether the 
charter or licence agreement 
have been honoured. It u not for 
us to have an argument aboot iL 
It is for the governors to reply. 
Dr Darid Owen, Leader of the 
SDP: Was it not the Chancellor 
of the Duchy of Lancaster who 
was complaining to the BBC, 
but Mr Tebbit soldy in his role 
as chairman of the Conservative 
Party? 

If so. how are the two roles 
distinguished? Surely the Board 
of Governors is responsible for 
the BBC and it is they who 
should reply to the Conservative 
Party. The Government should 
distance itself from Mr Tebbit in 
'his other role. 

Mrs Thatcher: Dr Owen is righ t. 
Mr Tebbit made the complaint 
as chairman of the Conservative 
Party. On that basis I should 
refuse to answer questions. 

• Later, during prints of order 
after Prime Minister's question 
time, there was laughter in the 
chamber when Mr James Calla- 
ghan (Cardiff South and 
Penarth, Lab), the former Prime 
Minister, asked the Speaker 
Can you advise us how to 
distinguish between the Chan- 
cellor of the Duchy of Lancaster 
uesting the BBC to be impar- 
tial and fair, and the chairman 
•of the Conservative Party send- 
ing them a bullying letter? 

The Speaker (Mr Bernard 
WeatheriD) replied: I am not in 
any way responsible for the 
chairmen of political parties, 
but I am responsible for min- 
isters in this House when they 
come to the despatch box. 


Move on 
work time 
rejected 


An attempt to reverse a decision 
the Commons to abandon a 
use on working hours, added 
by the House of Lords to the Sex 
Discrimination Bill, was de- 
feated during peers' consid- 
eration of the Commons 
amendments on Monday. The 
clause allowed fin- extensive 
consultations before the in- 
troduction of equal working 
boors for men and women. 

An amendment moved by 
Lord Wedderimn of Chariton 
(Lab), that the House should 
tgree with the Commons 
proposal to omit the danse, was 
rejected by 56 votes to 30 — 
Government majority, 26. 

He argued that the House had 
been correct when it originally 
defeated the Government and 
inserted the clause intn the Bill 
because there was a danger that 
women would be exploited. 
Lnd Young of fi raffham, Sec- 
retary of State for Employment, 
said the clause would achieve 
nothing positive. No advantage 
would acme from introducing 
such a complex, unwieldy and 
time-consuming consultation 
procedure. 


Anti-crime 
cash grant 

The Department of Transport is 
to make a grant of £15 million 
in London Regional Transport 
over the next three years to 
invest in anti-crime measures 
on the London Underground, 
Mr David MttcfaeU, Minister of 
State for Transport, said in a 
written reply. 

This is a sequel to a study 
bunched as a result of the Prime 
Minister's Seminar OQ crime 
prevention in January this year. 
The study identified measures 
that are now bong financed and 
LR T is to p rep ar e a detailed 
programme of implementation, 
which Mr Mitchell will 
with the a u t h ority. 


Parliament today 

Commons (2.30k National Hea- 
lth Service (Amendment) Bill, 
Lords amendments. Rate Sup- 
port Grant (Scotland) Order. 
kj*rts (230): Motion to dis- 
approve statement on change is 
immigration rules. 


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THE TDVTFK WEDNESDAY NOVEMBERS 1986 


HOME NEWS 


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It is 8.42pm in the casualty 
Tmni of Guy’s Hospital and 
pr David Walsh has just 
completed the first hour of a 
shift which mil not end until . 
830 next morning. 

Behind a curtain a boy aged 
IS is having his hand dressed 
after a firework aorident and a 
queue of 12 people wait 
patiently in the conridor for 
their: turn. 

A nurse is looking lor a.saw 
to cut a wanting sti& down to 
size. “I'D never make a 
carpenter" foe said with a wry 


The BBCs drama series, Cesmdty, wHJ 
ended, attracted a Saturday night audience m mac Bn*' 
lion viewers. _ : _ ..■ a ' , ■ 

It angered dodoes end nurses at the IwsiaMw*^.. 
it was researched and prwqded sBf g atios s of swt. 
Government bias fromminfetCTg. • . 

William Greaves spent a night m onetf JjMwwrs 
busie st casaalty wards to oomparciact wft nenim. 

“If s a stressful job and we casually iT™ JSSkS^ 
all have our. social problems cadent - a 
Him any one dse, bat we don’t be met with practised 


Senior Staff Nurse Judy 
Morgan, aged 26, managed to 
grab a moment or two' s 
respite to ponder the truths 
and fictions of the television 
series. Casualty ; which looks 
like being the latest battle- 
ground in- the current war 
between the Government and 
the BBC 

Nurses and doctors around 
the country fcme- over the 
programme's emphasis on 
constant love affairs, drinking 
and drug taking by hospital 
staff on duty, while 
Westminster’s fury is directed 
at what ministers see as the 
script's left-wing condemna- 
tion of 'the- NHS and die 


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economies being imposed 
upon h. • . 

“We don't spend our .tune 
nooning pills or swigging gulps 
S^UhSfe,” Nurse Morgan 
said. ' - _ ' 


“Ifs a stressful job and we 
all have our. social problems 
like any one dse, but we don't 
bring them to work with us 
and we don’t shout them out 
to all and sundry in the coffee 
room. 

“Nurses are . human beings 
first and we . behave Eke 
human bemgs. We're not an- 
«ls - we eat, drink and sleep 
Eke anyone else. 

“Nurses do go out with 

doctors, of course they do, but 

they go out with policemen 
and • fotrmen and bank man- 
agers, too. Whoops-!” 
Suddenly, the doors of the 
ward oash open and a man 

carryings young woman in his 
arms shouts: “Emergency, 
emergency!'’- at . the top of ms 
. 170106. A second woman runs 
behind with her face in her 
'hand« l screaming: “She can’t 
• breathe, someone hdp her, 
please!” 

For the sufferer and those 
that worried for her it was an 
incomprehensible mo ment' of 
undiluted fear. For the staff m 


receptionist Gr- 

Rowe took the wk 

*■ * — - — 


age <rf dm woman and qrtefM: 

“DMBcnlty in brcathfflgT »t° 
the register. 

The other entaes made it a 

typical enough fist— -acute 
Atflima* a 31-year-oJd ma n 
who had in jured his right arm 

in a fell; a woman in Iwxmr 
another with an mfi xied fin- 
gjBr. someone from Ken t wnn 
abdominal pains; an ear infec- 
tion; lacerated finger and in- 
jured right ankle. . 

“The waiting turns is about 

two to three hours at the 
moment," Carmel raid. 
“Everybody who co mes here 
gets seen, but the surprising 



come with injuries and m- 

nesses which are really routine 

and would be mucxi bette r 
taken to their doctor's smgery- 
“They have to wait hours 
ba ?n ise every urgent case 


“-tjjss 

ssaags slfelll* 

wmm m§0 mm- 

SrStoded in by «» andgon, ^ 

one of them returns to the thecomdor. ^ — 


Axt to give name and ad- 
dress. “CVA," besayssoc- 

dnctly, and the entry is made. 

“Cardiac Vascular 
Accident,” Caimd explains. 
“It means stroke really, but we 
use the initials because if the 

patient or relative overhear 

they tend to grt frightenaL 
The time ticks by and the 
oueoe gradually shortens m 


alty wards is the speed with 
which, things happen and Urn 
constant evidence of blood 
and gore. 

Serious road accidents, 
imifaigs and other manifesta- 


duu lol -* . 

But one of the messages 
the latest television sen^ ~ 
and, ironically, the one which 
has created the most angiy 
response in government cir- 
cles - was readily confirmed 
by Sister Diana Smith, rve 
been in nursing for 10 years, 

she says, “and there isno 

doubt that the cuts in NH2» 


spending are really beginning -- 
to bite. . *-• 

“Hospital stocks have been v 

reduced so much that we have ^ 
gone weeks without any slings 
and we’ve been withoutw- 
bular dresangs ftw four or five 
weeks now. _ 

“Jua imagine it — a «su- 
alty department .without 
^lingR. It isn’t the hospitals 
feSC but it all adds to the 

“We’re also terribly short of -j; 
beds. We’ve got 12 bays here 
and half the time tlmy are ’ 
filled with people who have to ^ 
he Emitted, but are waiting i : 
for a bed in award- jj 

“Our record is a 
stock behind ft curtain for 7w ^ 
hours, just because there was , 
nowhere else to put him. it v 
isn’t just their incon vemena, < : 
it could mean that if a really .1 
serious multiple road crash a; 
comes in an our accommoda- \ 
Xion for treating the casualties ^ 
is taken up by peopte who „ 
shouldn't be here at alL” . 

By 3.30am Dr Walsh is just .. 
beginning to relax. He has t 
been working single-handed 
without a break for six hours 1 £ 
and the queue has almost* 

disappeared. . . , 

“We’re down to the alcohol- ; 
ics anonymous cases now,” he . 
jokes, ruefully listening to the 
v obscene language cowag* 
from a drunken man, who has 
if brought his equally drunk girl « 
- friend in with a cut head. . 
h “We’re too busy for politics 
y and by and large we get by, he 
r- says. “But it’s the nursing staff 
d who are really feeling the 
e strain and particularly tne , 
student nurses — they get all 
io the lousy jobs because there S; 
[S no one else to do them. 


*back 

states 

ligand 


ity de- 
i state 


House price rises 

m • ’ x IS 


House prices increased in 
Britain by 13.6 per cent during 
the year to the «od of October, 
a o i m B im to the latest bouse 
price index published by the 
Halibx BuMing Society yes- 
terday. 

This is the same as the 


July and August. The figures 
show that in the past three 
months, bouse prices have 
increased byZ9.pcx cent com- 
pared, with 23 per cent in the 
three months .to the erf 
September, but iwuain wdl 
below the peak of SA per fat 
ip yfMwi h» the three mou ths m 

June. . 

New house pricesJnoeasei 
by JMpir«rtl^W. 
October -coM garea. i VW : 

1# As7mdt of de iu im»&r 
bouse price Mhft ie 
at four times 
inflation and ae«p «*■*■ 

that of arera ae earnings. ^ 


The EUffut states that the 
average price of all houses 
studs at £41^50, while the 
average for new houses _ is 
£46,780. The avenge price 
•said by first-time buyers m 
October was £31,420, 13A per 
cent higher than a year ago. 

For London the rale of 
increase remains at an anneal 
25 per cent, similar to that for 



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•rf- .' . — . •’ ; 

foe put five muofogi 
Srf|^^annfoKntre«« 

bu been 20 percent - . 

. The Halifax forecasts that 
.bouse: pice Inflation in 1907 
wfflremafe tedonMefig™- | 


Search for 
Barton 
girl’s body 

Detectives are hojang that 
Ronald Barton, the comnctea 
murderer, wiBshowtto foe 
exact place where he md tne 
body of his r stepdai^ner, 
Keighley. . - 

Barton, whowas jaUrf for 
fife last week for kiUing foe 
girl aged 14, told ppronstefi 
that he dumped her body ju 

overgrown 

NewSgton, north Lon dmi-^ 

Police with dog 
their seardi of foe 32-acre 

yestenJ^atcmn of 6° pota* 
cadets arrived to hop. 

De t Supt Charies Far- 

ggisa 

rambling graveyard would 
take three days. 

“The day after be was 
sentenced Barton 
ber of the pnson 
had hidden her -body here, 

Mr Farquabar said. 

“We had hoped to 
to show us exactly where ne 
had hidden her. - ' ■' 


Chemical 
threat to 
barn owls 

Conservationists fear that 
barn owls are' feeing, yet w - 
other threat to tbdr dmimsh- 
iog population m foe ot 
ahew and poteni agricuftmal 
poison. 

More than a doien of foe 
increaangly rare bods tave 
been found dead m foe Ips- 
wich and Woodbtidge suea of 

Suffolk in the past few days. 

Mr Reg Snook, a Depart- 
ment of foe Envnonn^nt 
wildlife inspector/ yesterday 
said: “AD the signs point to 
poison”.- ' 

Laboratory tests are being 
earned out to determine why 
they (tied, but it looks. as 


mvuyi mi — 

a new, much more powermi 
pestidde which owls are tak- 
ing in. 

■ Barn ovri numbers m East 
Anglia have been drastically 
reduced because^ of increased 
traffic, traps, and foe dis- 
appearance of foear natural 
halritaL ; 


MP 


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The future of .sonie of 
Britain’s best spwting mwra 
may rest on 

the House of Onnmons tfos 
week to stop nMpW 
amateurs ic^gfoar 
security benefttritflea»DP«r 


because foe could not attend 

■ i °Mlfv®Ss J® 

Mr Nicholas LyeD, 
Secretary at foe Dcputmrat 


Mr Alan Wfifiams, taboor 
^Srfjwebh 

swsgf-s 

benefit rule,' wtadi 

allow athletes » ctamsw^, 

meiBMy 

peting m overseas un" ,r 
pionships. ^ 




fhrAWHS. She MSI f7/ 
two weeks while 

ss^ll 

She was MkFby^ J^r 

benefit 

count as -hohdays 
SuW not receive anv monev 


butwasroio m»«w«- — 

rules could pot ^ 

Karen said: I was W 

upsetwhen^retom^fotaj 
that my money bad been sto- 
pped and l Jffld.tP aj“ “ 
E biit this is rft ifo- 
common among -young aih- 

.^Fortunarfy Iw^aWeto 

turn to my parents 

dal sawort, to 

time aroaieurs.find it difficult 

to cope and are unable to 
^leniF international evoite. 
Yet-it is teejqwfencc wtuen 
fc needed to hdp us become 
meddvfomere” . . 

Mr Tony Wad, oMte 
British Amateur Afotefics 
Board, 'said: “The current law 
^St foe. athletes, of foe 
future, . who a* present, are 
: strolling to : ,^®d ., eD 9°fJ 1 
. SoStoRVfe on- whde. d*hr 
- caring foemsdvesto tmprow- 
“ in* foefr drills.-- 


iuned b, Morgan Grant. .. « Co. UorHod on behalf of Virgin Group pic. 



From a one-io^(R!chard Branson, to be precise) 
business l^p>, Virgio has grown to employ 
some MoJpU. Today, Virgin is a multi-million 
pound tJBror group operating in 17 countries, 


Our ri 


companies back ov^ 100 artistes: 


big nws like Phil Collins, Culturj 


iPeter 


aabrj 


meslSy Hui 




t Simple. 


sr; 


thaw no 




iudiSp the®bxf or 


restii 


in ‘su 



itellite TV anj 


|o public, 

roseryjg;® 


piegastore. Virgin’s 
businesses such as 
id now, Virgin plans to 
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it prospecti^call 


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FROITTHr ROCK MARKET® TO THE STOCK MARKET 





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HOME NEWS 


15 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


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STA. 


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Civil Servants 
responding to 
demands for 
more efficiency 

By Rfchanl Evans, Political Conrespondent 


* The Civil Service, so often 
^criticized fin- being bureau- 
cratic and unwieldy, is well on 
She way to becoming a much 
jnore efficient government 
ananhitie, a report disclosed 
^yesterday. 

* The optimistic assessment 

comes after a detailed inquiry 
py Sir Gordon Downey, the 
Comptroller and Auditor 
[General, into bow Whitehall 
fats responded to ministerial 
attempts to improve the Civil 
Service’s effectiveness and 
achieve better value for 
Rooney from government 
spending winch totals more 
jfaan £100 million. 

His investigation con- 
centrates on how individual 
'departments reacted to a 
■financial management initia- 
tive (FMD launched in May 
■1982 by the Prime Minister, 
ifjriwse underlying aim was to 
'encourage a more managerial 
approach to government 
business. 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher’s 
efficiency drive was intended 
1b improve the allocation, 
manageme nt and control of 
Resources throughout central 
government. 

.■ Thirty-one government de- 
partments were required to 


review their systems of 
management responsibility, 
financial accountability and 
control. 

They all ended up changing 
their practices or introducing 
new systems. 

Sir Gordon looked specifi- 
cally to see if the Whitehall 
shake-up would help Civil 
Service managers to secure 
better value for money. 

“My broad conclusions are 
that real progress is being 
made in the development of 
suitable systems and there are 
not serious shortcomings in 
the departments examined,” 
Sir Gordon said. 

Individual government de- 
partments believe the ef- 
ficiency initiative had results 
in greater cost-consciousness, 

But Sir Gordon concluded 
that tire new management 
systems had not been in place 
long enough fi* their full 
effect on gaining value for 
money to become apparent 

He added: “It is important 
to continue the work aimed at 
demonstrating not only that 
the FM1 improves the qualify 
of management but also that 
this improvement in turn 
results m better value for 
money." 



I Whitbread Book of the Year .award are i 
Jim Once, Peter Beading, Andrew Taylor, Richard . 


Solicitor questioned on £20m funds 


A solicitor was questioned 
at a bankruptcy court yes- 
aboat what had hap- 
to £20 million of 
clients’ money which went 
through an. account he held 
Mr Anthony McGrath, aged 
48, of Corcoran Road, Sur- 


biton, Surrey, whose 
meat of affair s showed 
liabilities of more than £3 mil- 


lion, said that he found it 
incredible that be should be 
asked about the money. 

Mr Jaffiuy Mogg, assistant 
official receiver, told him at 
Kingston Bankruptcy court: 
“From August 1984 to Janu- 
ary 1985, sums totalling 
£20,489,804 went into your 
clients’ account and it ended 


up with a zero balance”. 

Mr McGrath, who had prac- 
tised. at Tolworth, Surrey, 
under the name of Whelton, 
replied: “I find this question 
astounding. The money be- 
longed to clients. It came in 
ana wen t out. If you- are 
suggesting that clients’ money 
has been misapplied I find Jt 
incredibleL” - 


Mr McGrath claimed his 
shareholding - m a manage- 
ment consultancy was worth 
more than £1 millipn but. 


the public trustee, be 
agreed that this depended on a 
forthcoming contract. 

The public examination was 
adjourned until February 24. 



When cotton yam processorsjames Sutdiffe & Sons Ltd 
were told of the massive savings they could make by switching 
from oil to electricity they were, frankly, scepticaL 

Ian Flint, Industrial Sales Engineer at Yorkshire Electricity 
Board, had taken a hard look at the oil boiler -used to provide 
heat for steaming cotton yam and for space and water heating in . 
the works canteen - and predicted substantial benefits by . 
switching to electricity. 

YEB carried out detailed tests before recommending 
the installation of a highly efficient electrode boiler for 
yam steaming, with separate electric space and 
water heating equipment in the canteen. 


And iris no yam tharjames Sutdiffe realised their investment 
after just 19 weeks. 

This was just one of several thousand projects tackled by 
Electricity Board Industrial Sales Engineers during the last year 

They could help your company in many ways: cutting energy 
and operating costs; improving product quality, boosting 
production; creating barer working conditions. And they’re 
backed by the R&D facilities of the Hectridty Supply Industry. 

There are very few companies indeed that can’t benefit from 
the many dectrical techniques available. And even at current oil 
price levels electricity brings substantial cost savings in many 
situations 

Fill in the coupon for more information or contact your 
Industrial Sales Engineer direct at your local Hecmdty Board. 

“They thought I was spinning 
them a yarn 

90 % energy cost savings 

1 To: Electricity Publications, PO Box 2, Fdtham, Middlesex TW14 OTG. 

I | 1 Please send me more information on BE Service }~| Please arrange for an KEroconoa me 

I Name Position 

Company 


Th* Elecmcit>- Council England and Wales 



Telephone 


The eneigy-dFficient switch. 






Whitbread Awards 

■» - - 

Tales of mystery 




By Pttifip Howard 

A novel about those mys- mined to write* new kmdbf 


tones wrapped in- pri&w 
enigmas, old and new Japan; a 
moral alkgory-fimfasy about* 
seventh ” ont-o^this-vwld 
continent;' th e bio graphy of 
the country curate who. be- 
cmie EngbnfTsmost famous 
naturalist; a -mystery adven- 
ture connected - with the 
miners’ strike;' and some 
sharp, sardonic ^ poem s about 

cont e m p o ra ry Britain are the- 
ftfive category winners in the 
* Whitbread literary Award* 
Tbe authors receive £1,000 
fpeh hn 1 3 January one of the 
five will be voted tire 
Whitbread Book of the Year, 
and' its author given a further 
£17,500; which makes tire 
Whitbread Britain’s most 
valuable Eterary prize. 

The five c ategor y winners 
announced yesterday are: 


book. He gave ap the chance 
of a prosperous frying and 
marriage,' i«d devoted 18 


Novel 

An Artist af the Floating 
World, by Kazoo Ishiguro 
(Faber, £8.95). 

The time is 1948, tire place 


painter, 
world 
over his 
and guilt, 
his 



famous before tire 
looks back 
in puzzlement 
awl - uamfiiDv 
career that co- 
incided with tire rise of Japa- 
nese militarism. ■ 

Whatever mistakes it may 
have made in tire past, Japan 
now has a dunce to make a 
better go of things. He can 

only wish there new and alien 

yotmg Japanese well As deli- 
cate as a Japanese water- 
colour, this novel, exposing 
the roots of a complex culture, 
was on the short fist for the 
Booker Prize. Ishiguro was 
bom in Nagasaki in 1954, 
came to England when Ire was 
six, was ed u cated at the 
universities afOatterbmyand 
East Anglia, and writes beauti- 
fully and iffiosyncxaticalty in 
Bn g firii ; his Japanese is just 
about good enough to manage 
comics. Sure Ins first novel, A_ 
Pate View of Hills, was given 
awards and mtenigritmal ac- 
claim, Ishignro has been onie 
of oar brightest young nov- 
elists writing m English. 


First Novel 

by Jim Qace 
l £4.95). 


Cwt h ft, 

(Hrinemann, 

In tire mythical scrence- 
fiction world of The seventh 
continent, paslfftd present are 
discontinuous, and custom 
and p ro g ressformadangefous 
flux. Se^stonesflitmodc to 
explore tire ' irreconcilable 
fonxs implicit in aDcuitnres: a 
tribe on heat like dogs; * 
calligrapher loses his sktU; a 
runner pitched gainst a 
horseman; a love story be- 
tween a young giri mid a 
soldier; a geologist searches 
for rare min er als. The tech- 
niques -are betid and modem. 
The seven narratives combine 
to form a new world that : 
seems strangely familiar. Jim 
Grace was bom in J 946, and 
brought up in notthUmdon. 

r w»H Fn gfish I Hm ilii r p m 

an external student at London 
University, wotted in Suda- 
nese . educational tdeviskm, 
and became . a freelance 
and script-writer, 
was awarded a writing 
bursary by the Arts Council, 
and was writer in residence at 
the Midhuxls Arts' Centre. 

Biography 

Gilbert White, A Biography of - 
tire Author of The Natural 


History ofSeibome , by Rich- 
aid Mabey (Century, £14.95). 
The language of birds is 


very ancient, and, like other 
ancient modes of speech, very 
elliptical: tittfe’ts said,, but 
much is meant and under- 
stood. Gilbert White’s ac- 
count of the intimate life of 
tire birds and other wildlife 
around his parish 200 years 
ago is one of the best loved 
nature books ever written. 

Both scientist and poet, and 
an inteflectual in touch noth 
the philosophical and cultural 
issues ofhis age. White deter- 


piece, wfcoch became a tnrn- 
fng-poinf in oar view of 
: nature. 

This first com p re he nsive 
biography for 8Q ye ars deploy s 
pmrfi unpublished correspon- 
dence and archiv e m at e ri a l to 
describe tire natural history of 

flu WUg.TUltlC J1MH1. . 

Richard Mabey read PPEat 
Oxford, taught abend strafies 
at a coflege of frnther educa- 
tion, waited as an editor in 
jwh prfiinfl , and is now a full- 
time writer a nd b roadcaster 
on country matters. 

Children’s novel 

Tbe Coal House, by Andrew 
Taylor (Collins, £5.95). 

Alison is IX Her mother 
has just died. Her dad has 
bought a house in foe North, 
300 miles away from the 
world tire knows. She is fiiH of 
i wj a rtnw wit, and determined 
to hale the rambling aid Coal 
Honso, home of the Victoria n 
pit owner. In the overgrown 
ga rden ti re meets Tommy, 

about 

-foe past owners of tire bouse, 
and the tragedy m.their fives. 

Through her new friend. 
Tommy, sire comes to identify 
with tire local minors on 
strike, and becomes mvotad 
in their struggle. But there is 
another interloper lurking 
around the Coal House. 

Alison and her father dis- 
cover in their separate 
the secret of tire stalker in 
woods. Andrew Taylor was 
bom in Scotland, but now 
fives in tire Durham country- 
side. He is a marketing consul- 
tant, and has written several 
stage and television plays. 
This is his fest novel for 
children. 

Poetry 

Stet, by Peter Reading 
(Setter & Warburg £195). 

Harsh, violent verses come 
to teems with fife m contem- 
porary Britain in the front 
fine. They are dever, witty, 
mveotive, slangy, flamy, and 
serious. 

• As tbe poet says in one of 
them: **Muse!aing tire Grotty 
(scant atternativej”. He says 
ofhis poetry: “Art has always 
string me mdst when it was to 
do with cdping with things, 
hard things, things tint are 
.difficult to take. 

If yoa want art to be like 
Ovafrine, then deariy some 
artists are not for you.” 
Ovaltme he is not, but vodka, 
meths, .and occasionally 
stiydutine: 

Peter Reading was bom in 
1946, and trained as a painter 
at Liverpool College of Art. 
After a spell as a teacher, he 
returned to Liverpool to lec- 
ture in the Department of Art 
History. He was given tire 
Chcdmondeley Award in 
1978, and the Dylan Thomas 
Award in 1983. 

. He fives m Shropshire, and 
has had various jobs there 
including working in an ani- 

mal- feen m»T1- 

Priodme aceessenmt in the 
short lists, in alphabetical 
order by. author wens 
Novels: Gabriel’s Lament, by 
Paul Bafley; Contre-Jour, by 
Gabriel Josipovici; The 
ferny, by Fay 


Shrapnel 
Wekkm. 
first novels: The Song ef the 
Forest, by Colin Madory; See- 
ing Things, by Frances 



Chesteron,by 
Ffinch; Road to Vic- 
tory: Winston S Churchill 
1941-1945, by Martin Gilbert; 
■the Lamberts, by Andrew 
Motion. 

Children’s novel: Isaac Cam- 
pion, by Jazrni Howker, Re- 
turn af the Indian, by Lynne 
Reid Banks; Howl's Moving 
Castle, .by Diana Wynne 
Jones. 

PoetryrTma, by Ken Smith. 


V 


Woman says her 
sons are not racist 

A woman who could lose 
her Loudon council flat be- 
cause her two sons allegedly 
abused foes- Bengali neigh- 
bours denied yestoday that 
her family were racists. 

Mrs Maria ' Hawkins told 
Qerioenwefl- County Count 
thrtbofo her sons had gone to 
schools that had mixed racial 
roups and had “many ethnic 
i«adS”. 

Camden council is 
to- repossess Mis Hawkins’s 
three-bedroom flat in tire 
Btepreodsbmy tower block, 

DombeyStreet, ontheTybald 
Close estate in Holborn, cen- 
tral London , under tbe Hous- 
' r Act 1980. 

it is allied that Frank 
Hawkins, a^d 17; and his - 
brotirer, Charles, aged 26, 
carried out a five-year cam- 
prifn of racial harassment 
a^anist Mr Abdul Afi and his 
wife and six children. 

Frank Hawkins is also ac- 
cused of punching rare of Mr 
AH’s sons and' smashing win- 
dows at their flat with ahmeh. 

Although Mrs Hawkins is 
not accused ^ rari^ baras- 
ment herseif Camden wants 


to evict her because it claims 
that as tire taiancy holder she 
is responsible for tire behav- 
iour of people Irving in tire 
flat. • - 

The brothers have been 
summoned for causing “nui- 
sance and annoyance” to the 
All family . by. ’ racial 
harassment. 

Mrs Hawkins feces two 
summonses fire £138 rent and 
heating anears and defying an 
earlier court order banning her 
mongrel dog from the estate. 

" Tire case continues. . 


All. BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED 
- TO: 


BOX NO....™..;..;...., 
' C/o Ttmejs 
- News pa pers. 

■ P.O. Box 484 

Virginia Street- 
- LONDON 
: Ef9Dt> / 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


COMMENTARY 

liPS! 


Howe call unheeded 




Shevardnadze 
ends hope of 
separate accord 
on missiles 

Geoffrey Smith I from Andrew McEweo, Diplomatic Corespondent, Vienna 


What has struck me im- 
mediately on this visit to the 
Uuted States is the remark- 
able spirit of American op- 
tiMisnj about disarmament 
that has followed Reykjavik. \ 
"ear international catastrophe 
has been transformed into 
something dose to a domestic 
political triumph, 

This has been achieved 
partly by a calculated propa- 
ganda exercise on the part of 
the Administration and also 
by President Reagan's extra- 
ordinary capacity to his 
countrymen share his own 
sonny view of the world. 

This sense of optimism will 
now be pot to an initial test 
with the first high-level meet- 
ing between Soviet and Ameri- 
can leaders since the s ummi t 
when Mr George Shultz and 
Mr Eduard Shevardnadze 
come together today in 
Vienna. 

The American intention is 
that this should bean occasion 
not so much for fresh negotia- 
tion as for clarifying and 
refining the disagreements 
that emerged in Reykjavik. 
This is certainly necessary. 

The summit was charac- 
terized both by a failure to 
refine the issues before the two 
sides got there and by the 
confusion after they left as to 
what had or had not been 
tentatively agreed before the 
breakdown. 

There appear now to be four j 
principle differences between 
them. The United States is [ 
speaking of eliminating all 
offensive ballistic missiles at 
the end of 10 years, while the 
Soviets want to get rid of all 
strategic aims. 


No agreement 
on limitations 


Then they do not agree as to 
hat limitations there should 
: within that period on 
search, development and 
sting of the Strategic De- 
uce Initiative. Soviet dip- 
mats appear to have been 
tggesting that their definition 
laboratory testing might not 
! too restrictive. But that 
doM not get round the 
mertean objection that they 
nst be allowed to test a 
ifeodve space system in 
wee. 

The third disagreement is 
at the United States wants 
e right to deploy SDI after 
1 years, while the Soviet 
Bum maintains that there 
onld then be further Begotia- 
ob on any possible 
ployment 

Finally, there an conflicting 
ms as to what should be 
me about the smaller inter- 
ediate range missiles tint 
e Soviet Union has in east- 
a Europe. 

The United States argues 
at if the larger intermediate 
i&siles - the Cruise, Par- 
ings and SS20s — were all 
moved from Europe then 
ere should be a freeze on 
iviet deployment of the 
uUer missiles, with the 
nericaas having the right to 
itch them. The Soviet Union 
raid like to have simply a 
seze at current levels, which 
wild confirm their preseat 
vantage. 

Even if agreement cannot be 
ached on any of these points, 
would be sensible for both 
les to be absolutely dear os 
tere they differ. That is a 
)re methodical procedure for ! 
gotiations and more likely to 
M a lasting settlement in i 
e long ran. 

But there are in but two 
asou for hoping that the 
icussions in Vienna do not 
t beyond the task of 
irificaiion. Mr Shultz has 
ierged as the pmdpal 
thosiast within the Admin- 
ration for pressing oa from 
e Reykjavik base camp to a 
mprehensive settlement. If 
were given his head in 
enna he might rush to fll- 
nsidered positions which 
raid not be in the best 
terest of the Western 
lifloce. 

The other reason for paus- 
* at this stage is that a 
nod of reflection is needed 
Washington on the unplica- I 
ns of Reykjavik. There are 
me signs of second thoughts 
ginning tn emerge on the 

sdom of talking about a non- 
dear world or of negotiating 

ay all ballistic missiles and 
Euro missiles, 
rhe Administration is not 
of one mind on these 
estions and a process of 
issessmest may become eas- 
now that the mid-term 
ctions are-over. 

(t is very modi in the 


that this shoald take place 
because there is a real risk of 
the United States undermining 
confidence in its commitment 
to Europe almost unawares as 
it pursues such objectives as 
the elimination of ballistic 
missiles which are beyond its 
grasp anyway. 


Any hope of an agreement 
to remove Soviet SS 20 and 
American cruise and Pershing 
2 missiles from Europe with- 
out waiting tor a comprehen- 
sive Easi-West disar mam ent 
accord was dispelled yes- 
terday. 

Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, 
the Soviet Foreign Minister, 
told Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, that the 
Soviet Union was prepared to 
accept nothing less than an 
overall agreement on nuclear 
weapons. 

A meeting before the open- 
ing of the third foQow-up to 
the European Conference on 
Security and Co-operation re- 
vealed no softening of the 
stand made by the Russians at 
last month's Reykjavik sum- 
mit. 

The Soviet demand that the 
US should agree not to test 
laser weapons in space as pan 
of an overall nuclear agree- 
ment remained firm. Sir 
Geoffrey's calls for early 
progress to eliminate inter- 
mediate-range nuclear weap- 
ons (INF) and short-range 
missiles went unheeded. 

'T told Mr Sbevardnaze that 
it was illogical and a retro- 
grade step to make such an 
agreement conditional on an 
understanding on SDI (the 
American Strategic Defence 
Initiative)," said Sir Geoffrey. 

Mr Shevardnadze indicated 
that the Soviet Union now 
required that any package 
should cover progress on 
strategic weapons, intermedi- 
ate missiles and a longer 
period of non-withdrawal 
from the 1972 ABM (Ami- 
Ballistic Missile) Treaty. 

Sir Geoffrey responded with 
two British Government link- 
ages. Any agreement to elimi- 
nate INF missiles from 
Europe should also cover 
short-range nuclear missiles, 
and any overall nuclear agree- 
ments shoald be accompanied 
fry comparable progress era 
troop reductions. 


' "The Russians say they are 
ready to scrap all nuclear 
weapons within 10 years," the 
Foreign Secretary said at a 
press conference later. 

"If they are sincere - and 
there are many who remain to 
be convinced — no one in 
Western Europe can view that 
prospect as satisfactory while 
the continent lies under the 
shadow of the Soviet Union’s 
superiority in conventional 
and chemical weapons." 

He told Mr Shevardnadze 
that the Soviets would have to 
be more forthcoming with 
information on troop levels if 
progress were to be made on 
the ambitious troop cuts pro- 
posed by the Warsaw Pact in 
June. 

Sir Geoffrey took Mr 
Shevardnadze to task for hav- 
ing effectively sided with the 
Syrians when Britain broke 
relations over the involve- 
ment of their ambassador and 
secret service in a plot to 
destroy an El-AJ airliner. He 
said he would be looking for a 
"more constructive Soviet 
approach" on this issue. 

However, Mr Shevardnadze 
welcomed a British initiative 
for Anglo-Soviet talks on ter- 
rorism. Experts from the two 
countries are expected to meet 
by the end of the year. 

"Our aim was to find out | 
whether there is scope for co- | 
operation between the two 
countries on this." said Sir 
Geoffiey. 

A Soviet expen yesterday 
called on the West to respond 
to the "Budapest appeal" in 
which the Warsaw Pact called 
for each side to withdraw 
500,000 troops by the 1990s. 

Mr Oleg Grinewslri, head of 
the Soviet delegation at the 
Stockholm talks on advanced 
notice of military exercises 
which ended in September, 
said; "It is time they presented 
a programme for disarm- 
ament in Vienna. Further 
foot-dragging would not be in 
the interests of the world." 


Mozambique unrest 

Frelimo youth sack 
Malawi Embassy 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Angry youths sacked the 
Malawi Embassy and threw 
sumes and rotten tomatoes at 
the offices of the South Af- 
rican Trade Mission in Mapu- 
to yesterday. 

News of the demonstrations 
came as President Botha sent 
a message to President Joa- 
quim Cnissano of Mozam- 
bique, congratulating him on 
his election on Monday. 

Pretoria claims that Mo- 
zambique is allowing guerril- 
las of the outlawed African 
National Congress (ANC) to 
I use iis territory as a sanctuary, 
and Maputo maintains that 
I South Africa is continuing to 
support Renamo insurgents 
inside Mozambique. 

Yesterday’s trouble started 
with a march fry members of 
the youth organisation of 
Frelimo, Mozambique's sole 
political party. The intention 
had been to deliver a protest 
note to the South African and 
Malawi representatives, but 
part of the crowd turned 
violent and some stoned the 
South African Trade Mission, 
breaking several windows. 

A larger group of dem- 
onstrators ransacked the Ma- 
lawi Embassy, dragging furnit- 
ure and piles of documents 
into the street and setting 
them alight. The Malawi flag 
was also torn down and 
thrown on the bonfire. 

Slogans reading "Samora 
fives" and "Banda is a 
murderer" were daubed on the 
walls of the Embassy. The 
demonstrators also carried 
placards calling for an ex- 
planation of the October 19 air 
crash, which Mozambique 
newspapers have accused 


South Africa of being respons- 
ible for. 

President Banda of Malawi, 
the southern tip of which 
thrusts deeply into central 
Mozambique, has been ac- 
cused by Maputo of allowing 
Renamo insurgents to operate 
from his territory. Shortly 
before be died. President 
Macbel threatened to instal 
missiles along the border with 
Malawi. 

On October 21, young dem- 
onstrators in Harare, the Zim- 
babwe capital, stoned the Ma- 
lawi High Commission and 
set fire to the offices of Air 
Malawi. They also attacked 
the South African Trade Mis- 
sion, set fire to the South 
African Airways offices and 
threw stones at the American 
Embassy. 

Mr Carlos Cardoso, the 
director of AIM, the semi-offi- 
cial Mozambique news agen- 
cy, told The Times yesterday 
that Mr Sergio Vieira, the 
Minister of Security, went to 
the Malawi Embassy and per- 
suaded the youths to disperse, 
telling them that this was not 
how President Macbel would 
have wanted them to express 
their anger. 

The South African Foreign 
Minister, Mr R_ F. "Pik” Bo-, 
tfia, announced yesterday that 
Pretoria had decided to call 
for the inclusion of interna- 
tional experts in the panel in- 
vestigating the air crash in 
which Mr Macbel died. 

• HARARE: The Zimbabwe 
House of Assembly is to be 
asked to pass a resolution 
today pledging full support for 
President Chissano of Mo- 
zambique in his civil war with 
right-wing Mozambique Re- 
sistance Movement. 


Oslo sends minister 
on pollution mission 

From Tony Samstag, Oslo 


Mrs Sissel Roenbeck, the 
Norwegian Minister for the 
I Environment, today begins a 
two-day visit to Britain armed 
with a list of issues long 
enough to strain the eyesight, 
if not ihe patience, of her 
hosts. 

Sbe wifi, of course, be 
reiterating Oslo's demands 
that Britain join the 30 Per 
Cent Club of nations commit- 
ted to reducing sulphur emis- 
sions from power stations — 
emissions that are thought to 
have poisoned thousands of 
Scandinavian lakes and rivers. 

Hopes that Mrs Thatcher 
would commit Britain to such 
an endeavour when she vis- 
ited Oslo in September were 
dashed amid fierce anti-Brit- 
ish rioting there. 

Mrs Roenbeck - who 
shortly after taking office in 


May fired two of ihe mosi 
strongly worded messages 
Britain has ever received from 
Oslo on Ihe issue of arid rain 
and proposals for a nuclear 
waste reprocessing plant at 
Dounreay — is expected to tell 
Mr William Waldegrave, her 
British counterpart, and Lord 
Marshall, head of the Central 
Electricity Generating Boanl 
that concern over both issues 
has grown. 

Recent studies show a 
strong link between levels of 
aluminium in drinking water 
and rales of pre-senility and 
senility (including Alzhei- 
mer's disease) in populations 
living within the "acid rain 
bell" of southern Norway. 

“Pm only 35 and Tm 
worried," Mrs Roenbeck told 
The Times. “It really makes us 
anxious." 




US setback on 
abortion curbs 

Washington — The Supreme Corat has severely set back 
nationwide efforts to restrict abortion by ruling that states 
cannot cut off public funds to private family planning and 
pregnancy counselling organisations that also offer 
abortions (Christopher Thomas writes). 

The coon, voting five to three, said in the majority' de- 
cision that Arizona acted improperly when it barred state 
fami ly planning funds for groups providing abortions ot 
abortion cotmselling. 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the 
Soviet Foreign Minister, 
meeting in Vienna yesterday. 

Israel PM 
silent 
on Vanunu 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

The Prime Minister of Is- 
rael, Mr Yitzhak Shamir, 
made his first public comment 
yesterday about the disappear- 
ance of Mr Mordechai Va- 
nunu, the nuclear technician 
who told The Sunday Times 
Israel had developed a nuclear 
arsenal. 

Mr Shamir tersely told a 
radio reporter that Israel was 
not under any pressure to say 
anything on the subject. The 
Government, he said, would 
do so only when it deemed it 
appropriate and it would con- 
tinue to do its duty by its 
citizens. He would say nothing 
else. 


Rome orders Aids 


Mugabe 

insult 

Harare — A woman from 
Zimbabwe's Ndebele min- 
ority tribe has been jailed 
for six months without the 
option of a fine for saying 
that sbe wished the Prime 
Minister, Mr Robert Mu- 
gabe, had been killed with 
Mozambique's President 
Machel in fbe October 19 
air crash in northern South 
Alirica (Michael Hartnack 
writes). 


a j • • writes). All writes). 

teSt ,Ll“£5,™ 0I1S Alfonsln appeal 


Attack 
on Aids 

Washington — The If 
Food and Drug Admin 
istration (FDA) has mad 
new recommendations fa 
further reducing the risk 0 
Aids transmission throng! 
the blood supply, and ha 
expanded the lik of thos- 
who should not donat- 
hlood to include prostitute 
and their recent betero 
sexual customers (Mofasii 
All writes). 


The Italian Government has 
ordered that all consenting 
prisoners be tested to see if 
(bey are carrying the Aids 
rims. This is one of the steps 
being taken to deal with the 
release of an estimated 12.000 
convicts before the year is oat. 

The exodus is due to more 
liberal prison regulations now 
coming into effect and to a 
projected amnesty dim to be 
approved by Christmas. The 
first releases trader the new 
regulations took place at the 
weekend and have now 
reached 250. It is estimated 
that as many as 5,000 pris- 
oners may benefit 

The object of the prison 
reform is to concentrate on re- 
education. In principle, the 
prisoner who proves by his 
conduct that he is intent on 
seif- improvement will be able 
to ask for remission of his 
sentence of up to 45 days for 


every six months served. He 
amid also ask for an annual 
"holiday" of up to 45 days a 
year, to be taken in fortnightly 
periods 

A prisoner sentenced to life 
imprisonment wfll now be able 
to take some holiday after the 
first 10 years so long as he 
behaves well, has good reta- : 
tions with other prisoners and ; 
co-operates in the work of re- 
education. After another 10 
years he will need only to sleep 
inside the prison. Ami finally 
he could expect to be granted 
an early release. 

The problem involving the 
threat of a farther spread of 
Aids is raised by the fact that 
legislation cannot be passed in 
time before the exodus take? 
place to make medical tests 
obligatory. At the moment the 
only one which can be imposed 
by law is the Wassennan test 
for syphilis. 


Buenos Aires (Renter) - President Alfossiu r 
Argentina has asked President Reagan to support bi 
protest against Britain's establishment of a fishing zon 
around the disputed Falkland Islands, a govemmeu 
statement said. 

Sehor Allans in made a 10-minute telephone call to M 
Reagan in California and asked for his “understanding an 
support". 

Buses Scheme 

boycott for Suez 

Johannesburg - Buses Cairo (AFP) — The Sue; 
running between here and Canal Authority may adap 
Soweto were boycotted for the waterway for two-wa; 
die second successive day working, the authority*' 
in protest against a 17.5 per president, Mr Ezzat Adel 

cent fares increase (Mi- told a conference marking 
dine! Hornsby writes). the 30th anniversary of it* 

One bus driver suffered nationalization, 
eye injuries and concussion Egyptian labour am 
when his vehicle was at- equipment would be used, 
tacked by a stone-throwing he said, but be gave nt- 
mob in Soweto. starting date. 




• ■ * ' ■. ' s < ♦ . 1 ■ . \\ | • 


3 






& 


1 


I 


How Peat Marwick 
helped us grow 

fourfold in Mf\ a 


one year. 















m 


hi. 


g . 

K. : 




Carl Gozzett and NevHl Colgate’s 
metal pressing works was doing 
nicely turning over about £300,000 a 
year when the big break came. 

A company owned by a consor- 
tium of electronics manufacturers 
gave them an order for 8,000 video- 
tape recorder covers a week. 

Carl and NeviJJ were sure they 
could deliver if they could borrow 
£50,000 to set up an additional 
production line. 

They knew where they could buy 
six second-hand presses that would 
meet the need perfectly. 

Only one problem: their bank 
couldn't see its way clear to lending 
them the money. 




They tried another bank. And 
another. 

Finally, they went to a bank in 
Brighton who suggested that they 
talk to Peat Marwick. 

We weren't immediately sure they 
could achieve what they thought they 
could with the investment they had 
in mind. So we called in one of our 
production engineers to work with 
our accountants on- a feasibility study. 

We examined their plans, checked 
iheir figures and looked at the tax 
implications. 

We concluded they'd got it right. 

We passed our view to the bank 
and they decided to make the loan. 
The outcome was a fourfold increase 


in C&N (Precision Metalwork) Ltd's 
business. Currently they're pressing 
parts for eight to ten thousand videos 
per week. 

We have 43 offices in Britain and 
our Private Business Advisory Group 
is helping hundreds of growing 
businesses wilh tax, accounting and 
the many diverse problems that can 
arise with rapid expansion. 

At the same time we audit 166 of 
Britain's lop 1000 companies and are 
one of the largest firms of chartered 
accountants and business advisers. 

if you would like to know more 
about the services that we offer 
please give us rjT) PEAT 
a call. lei MARWICK 


You have a partner at tot Marwick. 


^ • *■ ■v* , vS"a* 






L . . , r-«- . i - , - _ . . T - ' - VVf-‘ ' "■ >.-■ 

• . v •. *.• ^ >-fc‘ - r ■- -r - 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 



.ufthansa today: 


Doing business in 

Europe has again 
become a little more 
pleasant. 


i -DiBii 

— 7 V J_ 2 3 4 


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’ion-smoking 


Smoking 


)ur of the most comfortable 
ays of getting to your destination 
l time: Lufthansa’s B 737 City 
it, Lufthansa’s 727 Europa Jet, 
jfthansa’s A 310 Airbus and 
jfthansa’s A 300 Airbus, 
id one of the most pleasant 
ings: since November 1, 1986 
jsiness Class passengers have 
sen able to reserve their seat at 
e same time they book their 
ght 

dvance Seat Reservation is 


available on all international 
routes at normal fares. There’s no 
more hassle when boarding. Your 
seat will be waiting for you. 

And when you get on board, 
you’ll see there are new, comfort- 
able seats, too. Ideal to sit back 
and relax in. With more legroom - 
a spacious seat-pitch of 34 inches 
(86 cm). 

Lufthansa’s hospitality on board 
will add to the pleasure of flying, 
too. Whatever time you fly, we’ll 


serve you a complete menu on 
each and every international 
flight A hot meal if the flight is 
longer than 2 hours. 

That’s Lufthansa’s new way to fly 
in Europe. 

You can still choose First Class, of 
course. And you’ll still be flying 
with one of the most modern fleets 
in the world - as punctually, 
reliably and safely as ever. Nothing 
has changed in that. Welcome on 
board. 


Lufthansa 


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THETT^nwi WEDNESDAY NOVEMB ER 5 1986 - 

on plane shot down in Nicaragua 


Defence says surviving 

had minor 


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itfu«iiiWniu 



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if*. 


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?-*.» > . 
■ ;•* - U.. 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


UN tells Reagan 
to end rebel aid 

From Zoriana Pyaariwsky, New York 

jjisassrgs 

adopted a measnrenrgn ^ am** ™S : JSS£ ’ ' 


in , — 

fee ine tension in the region- 



*22*' 


















v 






-V'v: 





Centra aid padnse, Certral 
America’s five pro-Westera 
coantries are braced far a 
sharp boM-ap in Jte Nict- 
rasaan conflict which canid, 
many here say, culmin a te in a 
direct US invasion. 

Over the part months, Je**" 
ers of Costa Bka, Honduras, 
El Salvador, Gnrtamda ud 
panama have, to varying de- 
grees, made fcnown ^heir m^ 
harness abort the inqmct rt 
the Contra aid package and 
the official rertwatton ofjy/“ 


five-year-old war agamst rtf 

. i ■ I d~ ■fin ■■■■■MIT 


forces m 
coming months. 

In addition, US and Bon- 
dman military somtxs say 
tot several Headman islands 
wffl be used for storing and 
shipping the Contra supplies 
sad as staging areas for 

anhorne attacks against Nk»- 
ragnan Pacific coast targets. 

'•• |n fem t ra rt with. Honduras, 

- the Onta Bican Government 
has arrested and expelled 
armed Centres, seized caches: 
rfarms,triedraprt^li^ 
narks, and dosed dandesfin e 

. nbd airstrips andhospiials. 

flat Contra olficiak say 


liTiiit 


coavunaB . 

istiatSon to tram siwerrtjan- 

dred Contra a®® “5J- 
“the continental United 
States” and not h Central 
America as had been planned. 

Several weeks ago, a furore 
erupted when a Pa n a m a — 



fneni! s 
k * r nation! 

4 •* 

fliaht is 

} n/ 

..vaytoft 

St C 53S ' 

• qq fiyir*: 

,.~ P rn ^ 

-L 

«5sl* 

r-.jnct^- 

.-■*»** .VU*' 1 

.-:-oni ew 


^rtoranectly^da^ , 

tine training of Contra trenps j 
was already ■q denray a t rte , 
US Sorthern Command ®*~ , 
side Panam a Giy* - 

The US allies in Central 
America all fa**™*^" 

fears that the widening Contra 

war will embroil file entire 
region. • 

In El Sal vadg, wto e^ 
Government contends fi 

s^Mg.s-3 

5LB* a5gi » 

aiiman Eagene Baseews. 

Hesaidbewas^*«3 
the Salvador 
was part of an etaborate 

srss%3X* 

Salvadorean mffitory awfittd. 

In Tegucigalpa, wwj 
hnndred coffee grow**® 
ing “Yankee 

Honduras”, demo»irt«^«J; 

side the Nation al Aree mMy 
Srt week to demand to 
Spriston of Contra and US 
military forces. 

Thev presented a petition 

ZTTE, Nicaraguan Demo- 

est Contra army which 



wfcdi oportes along! I 

to^Corta Wcan^Rcamg^aalj 

border- 11 

Afl tosepro-Wertern conn- 1 1 
tries nlk rHiJWR *gl 

wanfina to antagonize theu^ 1 1 

which & their greatest s ource 1 1 
rfecoaomkandmi^wy"^ 1 1 

tmBCe .“Wecanstand Bptothe 1 1 
liPtm n Adn dn i rt ratka ®w|| 

sHmc « they dautt rtw til 
St^era aH patoge,”arid 1 1 
^^ankiag Costo Bican 1 1 

offidaL II 

Lerin of these five coan-ll 

gated setflemeat tea wider II 

war in II 

amabu Foreign Mkhter, Se- II 
fim Marw Qmnonez, receafiy II 
visited to other confines in II 

an effort to revive the rtn£ I 
mated Cortadora peace talks 11 
by which Irtin American II 

cmmtries h ave son glfi ^ee- || 

..meat on a written acco rd to | 

end fiie Nkaragnan war. I 

But bis torn was ov»-|! 

shat*— 1 ^y 1 

vhdbi of to US S«rota7«[ I 

St** 6 ’ I 

I AssfatantSeaertnesnSIrte, I 

. MTEDktt Abram* and Mr I 
Midmd'-AimaMt - I 
They are said to »«l 

r nremked. their worried afiies I 

—mbw in aid to fin Central I 
B American “denwartf#^ , C *L I 
K • craeacy assistonce to hel p H| 
K Suvadu' recover *«■ 

5" «rthqnake, and to sdfc .*« 
h Se^rst time, of F5E jet 
fighters to Hoodarro. 


gmnewC^rtraaidljjPro^ 

erist«aS' 

MoAips, An 30 recommit 
mmertrcraft, more ton a 
Mi 17 troop transport 
hrikopten, and new cargo 


Firsttady’s maid is 
cleared in arms case 


Mr,N ^ K X‘ s ^£ 

House maid. Mis 
Castdo, has 

involvement id an ■ ahn g e o 
^me to^t^smaD-atms 
anununrtionto^aragu^^ 

flisas 

Reagan was said to be 
wormy that Mrs Castdo, agpfl 
Jf^fouhd innocent and 

Sr old job as Ptf — \ . tD9jd . 

assistant. • 


An attorney, Mr^ 
Hudson, told the radge to 
new infonnadon finin r™ 
Parawcm na t io nals .radiGtea 
with Mis Cwtdc ibdfj; 
vujced him the White House 
employee had been an_“unwii- 

.ting partiapai^’ m 

am munition • 

The two men who were to 
stand, trial with Mis 
fteighier captain, Juno Cesar 
Bao-Acosta, ama a Richmond 
resident, ^Eogenio jriv^ 
pleaded grnlty on Monday to 
mm donut of rttmnjrtmg to 
"esmort aannanition without a 
licence. They face sentenang 
in early Deraobfif. •. 


m 




k !rT335l 


— n ^Tt | 

- .. T -.TMMi . 


[2 1 






Soon, 28000000 shares 

inM&Gwdbe 

made awalable to the pirac 


■Wiihin the next week, Kleinwort Benson ^ds to ofe for sale 
leadirjgtarestment management companies inBntanL 

25SSSS funds and charities, and overseas funds. 

to its customers and intermediaries. _ onff(ir an( » tn 

ro^Stion form, complete and return the coupon. 

Or telephone 01-388 1966 today. 


reostwwuw 

INTEREST TODAY 

I 

r~ M&G STTARE INFOR MATION SERVICE 

I Please send me, without obligation, the MAG 

Group offer for sale document when available. 

* (PLEASE COMPLETE IN BLOCK LETTERS) 

' (S5f) Mr □ Mrs n Miss □ or (write) title — 

I Forename(s) — 

I Surname — 

| Address— — 

1- 

i — - — 


. Postcode , 


I FREEPOST; Mdksham, Wiltshire SN12 7BR. 


































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


LA CREME DE 


SENIOR SECR ETARY 

£9,500 p.a. 

Logjra Energy and Industry Systems Limited, 
part of Logics pic, is one of the leadi n g c ompanies 
providing computer services to B t i t ai n’ s energy 
industries — Oil, Electricity: Water and Gas 

We are constantly seeking good people to join 
our dosely-knrt team and beep the company running 
at its present success rate Currently we axe looking for 
a Senior Secretary to be based in our modem, friendly 

offices based at Henrietta House, nght in the heart of 

London's West End. 

The successful applicant will be required to 
provide full secretarial support to our Chairm an, 
Managing Director and M aitetiag a nd S ales 
Manager Good organisational skills axe required to 
arrange meetings, keep diaries and p ri o ri t is e 
workload. 

Aged 23+, you will ideally be educated to Alevel 
standard, with 80/50 shorthand/typing skills, together 
wife fee ability to communicate effectively both 
internally and externally Woxd Processing and audio 
giriria are essential, as is a sound general secretarial 
background and a friendly outgoi ng p ersonali ty 

The position carries an excellent salary of 
c. £9^00 pa. and a generous range of fringe benefits. 

Applications should be made in writing (cv 
preferred) quoting ref: SS/1 to: Lynda Ban, 
Personnel Officer, Logica Energy and Industry 
Systems tiiwHirf, 64 Newman Street, London 
W1A4SE. 






SUMMER SCHOOL NOTHING BUT THE 
REGISTRAR BEST 

If you are a wizard on computes and SSSwtfL 

pm ths tem nnmmg language worses. fa 2 amesBre lhta cS 

reasuatom and involvement extends to j,- l™ 

, i ■ « . • . AffjjiwwiwnuL m-n miimiP (iuin pft. 

travel and accommodation arrangements - .TTT . J “~rr 

at well as iov^ Yo. O-d b. 

highly organised, with an ezceBeut ^ Education at least to W 

t^ phone m anner European hognagw afinSSLml dawful 

a dfctmct . adrarteg. Compute 
proficiency vital good typing and A’ 

levels. Age late 20’s. Wl, £11,000. «wteaL Age 23-25 c£lW00 + bouu». 

ttYNxmrm START TOGETHER 

Lf x JrAMl lh. Could you reorganise this wmll 

Are you lookhigfor that amazing oae-off cooBultaacy in WC2? The recently 
job that demands versatility, efficiency appointed Managing Director requite a 
and a sense of fan? The dynamic top flight PA to becora totally involved 
founder of this famous business needs a in miming the office and Knitting with 
brilliant and bright organiser to join his the Canadian head-quarters as well as 
team providing a multi faceted support taking on a Pobfa Retatiom role and 
rote from a wonderful Wl base. Joggle a dealing with chests. If yon have skills of 
100 things at once urim your excellent 90/60/np, are outgoing and fawhta then 
skSk (100/60). Impeccable educational this MD would life to wock with yoo to 
background, age 22-26. £1LQ00+ engineer the company's success. Age 

25-45. £11000. 

434 4512 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


CITY OPPORTUNITY 

c.£12,000 neg 

Our client, the Chief Executive of a recently formed investment company is 
seeking a professional and committed PA. to provide full back-up in all 
aspects of his business. A financial or insurance related badqpxKuid is 
essential as, in order to deputise for him his PA needs to become folty 
conversant with all projects and develop contacts with clients and associated 
companies. The ideal candidate wiU have an excellent memory, an eye for 
detail and the maturity and diplomacy to handle work of a highly 
confidential nature. Age range 28-45? Secretarial skills 90/60/WP. Please 
telephone 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SPREAD YOUR WINGS WITH KINGSWAY 

WE N EH) YOU - 


PolyGram Video 

MORE THAN JUST A SECRETARY 

FEATURE FILM & MUSIC VIDEO 

PolyGram Video seek a tip-top secre tary who, in 
addition to provkSng secretarial support, can un- 
dertake contract administration (Ucencee 
agreements, production and artists' agreements), 
using a computerised system. Working for the 
head of Legal & Business Affairs, you can be 
promised a busy futfffing day, using your experi- 
ence, first class skffls (s/h, aucflo and lots of WP), 
as part of this small, busy team. 

In return we offer an excellent salary and bene- 
fits, which include LVs, 5 weeks hoKday, xmas 
bonus, STL. free product and pension. 

Please write with fufl cv and day-fane telephone 
number to; 


ROOMATTHETOP 

Excellent opportunity for a young graduate with one/two 
years working experience, coupledwitb good secretarial 
skills, to work closely with the leading lights of British 
Industry in this national advisory body. Primarily an 
administrative position, there is excellent scope for an 
articulate and confident person to become really involved 
in fee running of this independent organisation. 

Salary at 22 £8,500, review in 6 months. 

SpmxaM s fisrtfui 18-25 year oida 


YTS CO-ORDINATOR 

Salary circa £10,000 
(including London Weighting) 

As one of the UK's largest travel agency multiples, Lunn 
Pdy Limited has a thriving Youth Training Scheme pro- 
gramme. Young people on the scheme are now our main 
recr ui tment source and we are constantly seeking to 
upgrade the quafty of tramhig offered to them. 
Re-organisation within the Personnel Department has 
created a need to appoint a new YTS Co-ordinator to 
continue the development of our growing schemes 

Naturally this is a role which wii appeal to someone 
committed to the development of young people and who 
understands the alms of YTS. 

The job brief majors on Bason and admmisfration, so the 
successful candidate is Ekdy to have excellent inter- 
personal skffls, be well organised and numerate. 

Written applications with afuB CV. 
should be sent to: 

Mrs L Chan, 

YTS Co-ordinator, m — — ■ WKmM mm 
Lunn Poly Limited, mJUmmmm rtiMw 
4/7 Chisweit Street, V 

London I 

EC1Y4TH I 



T "« M I T K » 

trouble shooter ny»o+ 
major benefits 

Head of Admin al atiugyU S Bp * 


Bi-Lingual Secretary 

ENGLISH/GERMAN Mitcham, Surrey 

This is an opportunity to make good use of your linguistic 
ability, as well es your secretarial skills, in an expanding and 
successful company. 

Working within our Service Department you will be 
involved in the lull range of secretarial duties. In addition, 
you will need to liaise extensively wife the German man- 
ufacturers of fee print and print origination equipment 
which we sell and service. 

Good shorthand and typing skills are essential. 

Salary is negotiable and conditions of employment are 
excellent 

Please write with full details or telephone for an application 
form to fee Personnel Manager, Pershke Price Service 
Organisation Ltd., Dover House, 141 Morden Road, 
Mitcham, Surrey. CR44XB. Tel: 01-6487090. - 


rni 


PERSHKE 
PRICE SERVICE 


PERSONNEL SUPERVISOR 

C London Sokny Negotiable 

Our Client, a mafor retailer within the Leisure industry. Is seeking an 
exceptional all-rounder to act as Fasonad Supervisor at their Head Office 
based in the heart of the West End 

Repotting diiecttyte the Personnel Manager, yoor background wfa be 
one of OBBre Ad mini str a tion wife the sensitivity to eo mm i mtate at afi 
levels nationwide, plus you will need the ability to maintain multiple 
manual aid co mp uterised information systems. 

Just as important is dedication, caring attitude, flexible personality 
good education (emphasis on Maths and English), and the abffity to thrive 
fn a continuously pressurised environment 
Not that we ask for much, but experience in any of the foHowfng would 
be helpful: supervisory skills; typing; WP; payroll systems; or basic 
knowledge of employment law. Preferred age range 25-30. 

You wffl be rewaded with exoefient working coadHfoas, pension, STL 
staff discounts and a saloy negotiable from £9,500. 

ff you feel you can meet these criteria, write with fan Of. current salay 
and contact phone mnrfeers to: 

Maggie Tottoa, BAM, 100 VUtedupel Road, London EL UB 



DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


Director’s Secretaries - Draft Advertisements 
TAKEOVERS 

Frequent takeover and merger action meana that this UK based multi national is often 
m the news. It abo means that the Finance Director is dose U> the «ftinn *aj weds a 
posooal assistant who can give trim the support that he needs. Dealing with >»*»■« 
and brokers wiU be as mnefa a part of the job as monitoring exchange rates -■*) charting 
the movemcamte of interest inch. Una exdUnf myoet n nity far emm deveto pmah t 


ftrumwnl AaHnj 


a stepping atone to the world of 


PERSONNEL 


The human factor in high-tech is vital and yon would be too wkinr with the Roman 
Resources and Pensions Managers for this leading oot npute r company. They need a 
secretary who will share their sense of hnmoar and CDmmfcmeiii to ensuring the smooth 
r unnin g of the oryuisatoon. Liaison with European wrisiidieries will h» sithw p nr tjmt — . 
local ad munstmtion. A computer familiarisation course will be p mu iiirf as weU free 


01-629 9323 


ML Personnel Officer, P 
ey Road, LONDON W14 


Video, 1 


^INTERESTED IN PERSONNEL?^ 

f £11,000 

' client u targe international trading company 

"seeks a PA/Secretaiy to their Group Pemound 
Director. This is a very responsible position as you 
deal wRh perso nn el at all levels and will be privy to 
very c onfi de n tial information, so a discreet manner 
and good interpersonal skills ess ent ial. 100/60 akiHa- 
and WP experience n ee ded. 

ADVERTISING & PR 

to £10,000 

N o shorthand needed when you join this top adver- 
tising and PR consultancy as P A/Secretary to 
their Corporate Development Director. This is a new 
position with excellent prospects for you to get very 
involved. Handle your own support 60 wpm typing 
ud WP ability needed- Ple ase t elephone 01-240 3551- 

v • Elizabeth Hunt • 

\ Reai^rnentCoosiAwts A 

23 College HI London EC A y// 



ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


Woneja a b right, youn g parson toprovfde secretarial 
suppent to our Hnanctal Director's Office. Trio pereon wi 

aJaonesd to help out in other areas of the AdmMstnHian 
Department as and when necaasary. 

Appuamts should be presentable. weV-spoken, have 
good emronuau ea Bon skMs and bo able to roaweisa tact 
and t flscrotion as trio doportroont handles worit Of a 
eonMomlal nature. Also essential la a ftedbla 
approach and wiBngness to undertake various dudes. 

Candidates mug be educated to O /CSE level and poo- 


DO aged 19-21 and ideally have at least one year's work 
OKperiyie e hnr an office env l r oni nent . Non am ofos re or W 
ptaasef 

We can offer a salary of £8000 pe plus good terms and 
conditions of employment. 

Please apply in whang, together with a full CV. toe 
MS D WBCOX 
Psrsonnel Officer 

Independent Television Publications Limited 
247 Tottenham Court Road 
London 
W1P OAU 


SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS — 

International 

Publishing 

The Finance Director of this lead- 
ing international pubSshing group 
requires an experienced short- 
hand PA to assist him with afl 
aspects of this key position. In 
addition to wide ranging secre- 
tarial responsibilities .you wffl be 
given the opportunity to oversee 
.special projects to completion. It 
is a young, vibrant environment 
and you are likely to be aged early 
to mid-twenties having gained 
good 'A' Levels or a degree. The 
envisaged salary is to £10,000 
with excellent benefits. Please 
contact Joanna Bad. 


01-491 1868 


Provide an imp ort ant contr&x&n as right band to tin 
Matating Director of this world famous Company. 
Sefrtfsdpfcte/fflotivted with top um teafl onal and 
U BC wa i ia l skffls. (60+ typing, rusty shorthand), minimal 
secretarial content, constant meetings presentations and 
m arketing events. 


Liaise with top aWmes. or g an i se new product launches 
vraridwide and provide exceflmt 90/60 socratarW sWfe as 
PA to the Msmrtionai Director of this Mayfair based 
cosmetic house. 

FASHION APPEAL £1 


tMs young and exciting fashion label Mtasnai 
,U. seoafarial (aBwagli 90/60 skffls feqoestMQ, 


, Using and co-orrfioating activffies in ar 
franstic enwonmenL 








BANKING £17,000 pltge 

dierti, a large American inve s tment Bank are 
| looking for a young, dynamic secretary/P A to 
join titer team. Your day wffl be hectic aranging 
" and seminars in London and abroad. 



RECEPTIONIST PLUS 
TO £10,000 aae 

A lead in g firm of reinsurance brokets requires an 
exceptional receptionist for their newly refurb- 
ished offices in EC3 who can also undertake 
secretarial duties -rang a word processor. Tire 
ideal candidate will be wed presented, pbtsed and 
confident as initial contact wife clients and other 
visitors is of paramount importance in maintain- 
ing fee firm's professional standing If you are 
keen to join a lively and successful company 
committed to the full involvement of all their 
staff please ring 588 3535. 

Crone Crkill 




PA to Chairman 

£13,500 

Excellent opening for a cop Executive PA 
within this high profile, high-growth ELC 
Wwiungdosclywith their young, dynamic 
C h a irman yon will enjoy total invofremafl; 
- h a ndling financiers, advisers, VIP 
clients etc and co-ordinating all aspects of 
his international business gffttgq Style, 
superb presentation and board-level 
experience essential. Steffis 90/50. Age 
27-35. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 

GORDONYATES 


Strife iS «r hi — 

Excellent skills together wife a «tau fiexibfc 
attitude are essential. ; 


■ ABCRtnnfBtrCOIfSDIMIH 


r,A TIBER 

r>P, S I G N 

limit ITS 

DECISION MAKERS £10,50©+ 
BANKING BENEFITS 

Leading City Bank offas a demandmgMd stmnz- 


tent secretarial skills whilst m a kin g a positive 
contribution to this high flying deputnett. 

Contact Dtee Ha- m M «9 «W/M 7* 250 


RECBUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

.canvEUND Cou^ ^^jg^row-g 




design. 



Assoriaie DirecKBS you wiU ntibse your sbonhAm 
and typing sldte ifetta etuoymg * busy and waned 
day with masses of cheat conta ct. . 

Contact Karit Hamby oa 01 489 0889/BI 235. .2522 


KECBUmOSNT CONSULTANTS . 

1 GBOVELAND COURT. BOW LANE. LONDON BC4H BBS 
TELEPHONE: 0J-4W 0688 


Personnel 

Secretary 

London Wl 

CBS Records are one of the LHC's lead- 
ing record companies with many o l our 
artistes regularly featuring in the charts. 
Our Personnel Department which is 
located at CBS Head Office in London’s 
West End currently has a vacancy for a 
first class Senior Secretary. 

Probably aged In your mkf to lafe 20's 
you will need excellent shorthand and 
typing skffis phis significant ex peri e nce 
or working at senior mana gement 
level. Your org anisa tional and inteiper- 
sonal abffity will be corTOlementecf by 
■die confidential^ and efij^omacy this 
role-- naturally demands. A. working 
knowledge of WP's and PC's wffl prove 
. a distinct .advantage as would experi- 
ence of working within a personnel 
d^iartmenit. 

In return we are offering a highly 
attractive salary plus a generous range 
of benefits which include a substantial 
discount on company products. 

This is a high profile secretarial role in 
a busy, sometimes hectic office. If you 
feel you match up to our demanding 
standards, piese write enclosing' a- 
detaiied C.V. to Phytlis Morgan, Person- 
nel Manager, CBS Records, 17/1 9 Soho 
Square, London Wl. 


Two Top 
Secretaries 


Two Senior Directors of a major engi- 
neering services group each require an 
experienced and versatile secretary to 
organise and plan his day to day 
activities. 

With previous experience at director 
level, you must possess fee fuD range 
of technical skiUs together wife fee ma- 
turity and stremfe of personality to 
meet either challenging position. 

Telephone or send your C.V. wife fufl 
salary history to: 

Mr C P Ousefoy - 
Company Personnel Manager - 
Drake & Scull Engineering Ltd . 
Hamlyn House, Highgate H». 
London N19 5PS 
Telephone: 01-272 0233 


™nwds soomobb fa bade upaS 



LA CHEME 
APPEAR ON 
PAGES 36, 37 & 38. 






















































, . ■ . . . . .‘■Vi .. .. . . . r . , - • . 


uakLi* • ’■ "■ -T "■' 


NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986. 


Weapons shipments to Iran 


Secret deals hold the key to 
release- of Beirut captives 


From Robert Fisk, Nicosia 


A power struggle within hie 
I ranian leadership, a series of 
secret meetings between Am- 
erican and Iranian officialis m 
Tehran and negotiations with 
Kuwait to commute the sen- 
tences of 17 men convicted of 
' bombing the French and US 
embassies there lie behind a 
package deal for the release of 
the American hostages in 
Lebanon. 

The Americans have used 
Mr Terry Waite, the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury’s special 
envoy, to capture public atten- 
tion in the hostage deal by 
flying between Lebanon, Cy- 
prus and Germany — but the 
real concessions made by the 
US have little to do with Mr 
Waite. 

They are said by reliable 
sources in Beirut and Nicosia 
to have involved not only US 
talks in Tehran but the trans- 
port of arms and military 
spare parts to Iran from air 
bases in Israel and Spain. 

One of the main shipments 
sent with US knowledge - 
which was part payment by 
the Israelis for exit permits for 
Iranian Jews — was taken to 
Iran on a Boeing jet that flew 
from Spain to a base near 
Tabriz in northern Iran in 
September 1985 . . . then re- 
turned over Turkey to land in 
Israel. 

The aircraft was registered 
under the name of a Belgian 
company which proved to 
have a false address. 

Now, according to the pro- 
Syrian Lebanese magazine o£ 


Shiraa, Anther supplies of 
weapons, according to the 
same sources, have been sent 
to Iran by the Americans on 
C 130 aircraft, some of them 
ferrying equipment from as far 
away as the Philippines. 

Toe Iranians are principally 
equipped with American-built 
aircraft and tanks, bought 
from the US before the revolu- 
tion that overthrew the Shah, 
but the Iranians* dire need of 
maintenance facilities amjl 
spare parts has already 
grounded much of their Air 
Force. 

The Americans, however, 
have astutely exploited a 
power struggle within the 
I ranian le a d er shi p, apparently 
rewarding pragmatic clerics 
with promises of arms sup- 
plies in return for progress on 
the release of the three hos- 
tages held in Lebanon by the 
pro- Iranian Islamic Jihad 
movement 

One of the three. Dr David 
Jacobsen, the director of the 
American University Hospital 
in Beirut was released in 
Lebanon on Sunday. 

The Iranians have de- 
manded that the US cease its 
military support to Iraq in the 
Gulf War and suspend the 
shipment of all helicopters to 

Ra ghrlarl 

But during the latest US- 
I ranian contacts — which were 
underway by the early sum- 
mer of this year — the Ameri- 
cans reportedly demanded a 
total cessation of all Iranian 
involvement in international 


Syrian airline disowns 
Hindawi and terror 

From Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent, Montreux 


Syrian Arab Airlines has 
hunched a propaganda cam- 
paign to improve its image — 
famkKpii in the wake of the 
Hmdawi terrorism triaL 

Two of its senior officials 
have used the International 
Air Transport Association 
(lata) conference in Mantrenx 
to persuade other airlines — 
especially British Airways — 
to maintain the commercial 
finks that enable it to operate 
effectively. 

The airline dearly fears 
Britain conld take further 
attiw against it, including 
severing the existing ties be- 
tween them. 

British Airways looks after 
Syrian Arab Airlines’ aircraft 
in many parts rf the world, and 
since die Syrian Government 
banned Syrian planes from 
landing at Heathrow it has 
regularly carried 19 to LOW 
passengers a week from 
Europe to Britain for the 
Syrian carrier. 

Mr Muhammad Harfoush, 
the airline's commercial direc- 
tor, yesterday said tint his 
company hoped its regular 
service to Heathrow would be 
restored. He said his airline 
was ‘totally and genuinely 
against terrorism, hijacking, 
bombing or any other kmd ®ff 
attack on aircraft. 


“We never have in the past 
and never will in the future 
become involved in any form of 
terrorism. We were the victim 
of a plot to try to blacken the 
name of Syria.** 

When Britain broke off 
diplomatic relations with Syr- 
ia following the Hindawi trial, 
Syria retaliated by banning all 
British aircraft from over- 
flying the country. 

Mr Harfoush said his com- 
pany regretted that ban, **. . . 
but we had to do it otherwise a 
British aircraft could have 
been shot down by the same, 
people who stage-managed the 
London bomb plot and we 
would have been Mamed. Now 
if anything happens we can 
prove that we are not 
Involved." 

Mr Harfoush yesterday 
voted in favour of a strongly- 
wanted resolution by rata 
which urged governments to 
take tougher action against 
terrorism. 

“We have adopted this | 
resolution against terrorism ! 
because we are the nation | 
which has suffered most from j 
it," he said. “We have been 
foremost in opposing tom- 
ism and could new have been 
behind anything which woald 
have led to an axt of terror at 
Heathrow or anywhere else in 
the world." 


bombings and assassinations 
as well as security guarantees 
for the Arab Gulf states which 
fear an enlargement of the 
Gulf War. 

Arab diplomats say the 
Americans have meanwhile 
been talking to officials of the 
Kuwaiti Government about a 
possible reduction in the sen- 
tences of the 17 convicts 
whose release from prison was 
one of the original demands of 

Islamic Ji had. 

Despite repeated US assur- 
ances that it would be wrong 
to attempt to persuade the 
Kuwaitis to release these men, 
the Kuwaiti authorities are 
said by diplomats in the area 
to be prepared to reduce their 
sentences and even to release 
the prisoners if they are re- 
quested to do so. 

But according to Arab dip- 
lomatic sources, Dr Jacob- 
sen's release came as a result 
not of such initiatives — nor of 
Mr Waite’s perambulations - 
but because of Syrian pressure 
on Iran following the kidnap- 
ping of a Syrian diplomat in 
Tehran. 

Syria, they say, had been 
demanding the release of the 
US hostages after repeated 
appeals by the US Admin- 
istration to President Assad. 
Syria's subsequent approaches 
to Iran, however, had been 
angrily received by radicals in 
the I ranian Government, not 
least by Mr Mehdi Hashemi, 
the Iranian Revolutionary 
Guards official in charge of 
"Islamic liberation move- 
ments overseas**, especially 
the Hezbollah (Party of God) 
in Lebanon. 

Mr Hashemi is the Mother 
of the brother-in-law of 
Ayatollah Hussein-aH Mon- 
tazeri, the designated succes- 
sor to Ayatollah Khomeini 
And it was he, it is said, who 
arranged the abduction of the 
Syrian diplomat, Mr Iyad 
Mahmoud, earlier this month 
as a warning to Syria to keep 
its hands off the movement of 
Hezbollah members. 

But Mr Mahmoud, who was 
released a few hours after his 
kidnapping, performs two vi- 
tal functions. First, he is the 
liaison between Iran and the 
Hezbollah in Lebanon, en- 
abling Iranian* to travel in 
and out of Lebanon and 
providing visas for their tran- 
sit through Syria. 


Second, and for more im- 
portantly, Mr Hashemi is the 
mam intermediary between 
the US and Iran. 

Faced with Mr Mahmoud’s 
kidnapping and repeated ob- 
jections from the Hezbollah in 
Lebanon to Syrian control, the 
authorities in Damascus de- 
manded Mr HashemTs arrest 
And indeed, Mr Hashemi has 
just been detained by security 
police in Tehran and charged 
with illegal possession of 
weapons and of forged docu- 
ments. 

JMr Mahmoud’s role is, of 
course^- weHJcnown to the 
Americans who 'sent a-smafl 
but technically unofficial del- 
egation to Iran in July, tasked 
to discuss the hostages with 
the Iranians. But their trip was 
“disdaimaWe” — in other 
words, there were no US 
officials among the visitors 
and the American authorities 
could deny any involvement 
in their mission if It became 
public. 

According to an Arab dip- 
lomat who has served in Iran, 
Dr Jacobsen was released as a 
direct result of the Mahmoud 
abduction — when Iran’s hand 
in the kidnapping of foreigners 
in Lebanon became so dear 
that it was fenced to free at 
least one of the Americans to 
avoid embarrassment 

Further releases of Ameri- 
cans are likely to follow the 
fulfilment of US promises 
made during recent 
negotiations. 

Sources in both Beirut and 
the Gulf say the Syrians win 
shortly ask Tehran to arrange 
the release of two French 
hostages — M Mated Carton 
and M Marcel Fontaine, both 
diplomats. 

This may occur within the 
next five days, before the 
European Community meets 
to consider whether British 
evidence of Syrian involve- 
ment in bombings justifies 
European action against Syria. 
A colonel from French intelli- 
gence has already arrived in 
Damascus to discuss these 
releases. 

A further two French intelli- 
gence officials have also ar- 
rived in Nicosia to join in 
negotiations. One of them has 
just left Cyprus for an un- 
known destination. 



Builders 
blamed for 
Italian > 
dam burst 

Trento (Rene*).— Experts 
appointed by a court in- 


r.*:. \ 

■1 

■v ^ t 


burst m northern. Italy In 
which 268 people died, yes- 


fealty construction and bad 

nwinlMiHW 

They said the dam’s build- 
ers and those who owned it 
when ii collapsed in Juhr 1985, 
had foiled to realize that foe 
materfrds used were unstable 
and could not withstand the 


£lm claim 
on jet blast 

New York (Reuter) — A 


than £1 mflKoB from TWA, 
claiming n eg li g ence when a 
bomb exploded in April on a 
jaennmtetoAtfaens. sucking 
out four p as senger s who were 
sitting in front of him. 

Mr A utha ratio s Polyzos is 
seeking damages for nervous 
shock and continuing emo- 
tional discress is a test case pa 
behalf of himself and other 


:f..r / / 


Dr David Jacobsen, foe American hostage freed on Monday, embracing ; his daughter, Mrs 
Diana Duggan, on foe balcony of the US Air Force hospital in Wiesbaden yesterday. 

Freed hostage greets family 


Dr Jacobses, the American 
hostage in Lebanon who was 
freed on Monday after 17 
mouths in Muslim captivity, 
was reunited with Ins fluty In 
West Germany yesterday. 

His two sons and daagfater, 
and thesr spouses, all from 
Cafifenia, flew into Frankfort 
airport to be met by Mr Terry 
Waite, the man who won Dr 
Jacobsen's release. 

The family group was then 
driven to the US Air Force 
hospital in nearby Wiesbaden 
where be is still having medi- 
cal and psychological tests. 

The rerauon was strictly 
private, but Dr Jacobsen, aged 
55, his famil y later ap- 
peared on a hospital balcony 
to face a battery of cameras 


From John England, Wiesbaden 

1 and questions from jams- ; 
1 atists. 

r The farmer captive bagged 
, or kissed each member oThis 
1 family as loudspeakers played 
a tape of a baHad tiffed “When 
, foe Word Comes* 1 , composed 
1 and snug by his two sons, Eric 
t and Paul. 

r He said that when he had 
• last seen Mr Terry Anderson 
• and Mr Tom Sutherland, his 
two American fellow hostages, 

| they were welL “I hope to God 
: they will be here very soon and 
1 standing where X am now," he 
added. 

Dr Jacobsen, whom hospital 
r specialists on Monday de- < 
1 dared had dealt with foe 
- stresses of Ms captivity 
’ remarkably wdi, then gave a 1 
rambling and often emotional 1 


address. He said he was going 
to ran for foe US Congress. 

He spoke of his frith in God 
that had sustained him when 
he was “rifting on the floor 
like a rabbit** and be spoke at 
length, but disjoiittedly, about 
his favourite baseball, basket- 
ball and football teams hi 
America, referred to friends at 
foe Umrority of California in 
Los Angeles and joked that he 
was unemployed, broke and 
homeless. 

The former director of the 
American Uni ve rsit y Hospital 
in Beirut then tmaed to the 
commander of foe medical 
centre and said: “Bat I. am 
honsebrnken, don't: ask for 
much pay ami can live in a six- j 
by-six space." 


The worid-wide plight of consrientioiis objectors 

War on conscription spreads as the penalties grow harsher 


“I am a Christian, brought 
up in foe beliefs of the 
Catholic Church. I am 
committed to peace... I believe 
that all armies legitimize the 
use of violence^.” 

These are the words of 
Phillip Wilkinson, a 22-year- 
old South African conscien- 
tious objector repeatedly in 
conflict with foe authorities 
and detained for his failure to 
report to camp. 

In the Soviet Union, Dmitri 
Argunov, aged 18 and also an 


objector to compulsory mili- 
tary service, has been in 
difficulties for distributing 
leaflets justifying his opposi- 
tion to war. 

Both men have come up 
against their governments be- 
cause of 'their anti-war and 
pacifist beliefs. They are two 
of hundreds of young cons- 
cientious objectors in trouble 
or jailed all over foe world; 
and they are part of a move- 
ment that is spreading as 
measures to control them, 
often apparently more liberal. 


are in feet growing more 
severe. 

Today at least 80 countries 
continue to have conscription, 
of which only 20 have any 
form of legislation, however 
discriminatory, which ac- 
knowledges foe right to a 
conscientious objection to 
war. Countries are split be- 
tween those who regard cer- 
tain grounds as acceptable, 
and those who send aO who 
object, whatever then reasons, 
to prison. Some objectors 
currently in detention: 


Bulgaria: Kostadm Angrier 
Kahnakov, 57, a former 
imprisoned consrientioiis ob- 
jector, serving a four-year 
sentence forprotesting against 
the jailing of his consaeatious 
objector son, EmiL 

West Germany: Kai Kunz, a 
“total resister” to all military 
service, including the civilian 
alternative available in West 
Germany, serving a 14-month 
sentence for “desertion” and 
“refusal of obedience”. 

South Africa: Janet Cherry, 


24, detained in Port Elizabeth 
for her involvement with the 
End Conscription Campaign. 

Poland: Ryszard Bonowslo, 
feeing further sentences for 
refusing to pay a fine imposed 
on him for returning his 
military papers, and he has 
already staved several months 
for refusing military service. 

Greece: Aristides Sim this, 
a Jehovah’s Witness and thus 
opposed to all military ser- 
vice, sentenced to save 10 
years ’ in Diviata Military 
PnsomTbessalonika. 


Murder charge 

Lagos (AFP) - The lawyer 
for Newswatch magazine^ 
whose chief executive and 
effiior-in-chie£ Mr Dete Giwa, 
was kitted by a pared bomb 
two weeks ago, has Bed 
private mnrder charges 
the heads of Nigeria’s 
military and riviliari-intdfi- 
geace services. 

Tahiti protest 

Papeete (AFP) — Hundreds 
of demonstrators protesting at 
Fiance’s nuclear testing pro- 
gramme took to the streets of 
Talari is a torchlight protest 
after the 26th conference of 
the South Pacific Commission 
opened here. 

Family killed 

Deventer -(AP)- A Dutch 
couple mid their baby died 
when an express train hit their 
cm at a crossing in this eastern 
Dutch city. ' 

Wall arrest 

West Besim (Renter) — East 
Ge rman border guards seized- 
a mas technically inside East 
German territory who was 
painting a long white line on 
foe Western ride of the Berlin 
Wafl. 

Dog-think 

• Viborg (Renta) — Postmen 
in this west Danish town are 
to attend a. course on dog. 
psychology because about 65 ‘ 
have been bitten by dogs so fer 
this year. 

Plea rejected 

Be lg rade (Reuter) — The 
Yugoslav Federal Court has 
turned down an appeal on 
behalf of a convicted Second 
World War criminal, Andrija 
Artukovic, who was sentenced 
to death in May. 

Record crop 

Delhi (AFP) — The Punjab 
expects a bumper food crop 
this year, and to retain its 
place as India’s grain bowl 


ifS ‘ 

;5j;- ; -r 

’ i 

$V.; 1 


Is •• • 

fcUx- .. 



























_12_ 








:.-3 


drisr in Medkfea- 


url Virginia, there Gres a 

rr «Kn kre lriiUwi 


U, who las killed four 
Upfc hi as many years. His 
jgiri .&ermB never yarns. 
Eiriog had then* heads w ri 
&t teg* shared, his victims 
ce strapped to a wooden chair 
U afi« two SS-secood 
Jrsts of electric current 
pfhe Jailer’s name is Scr* 


"JaiseS&dp), and he resets- 
Res a rather lugabrioas pork 
Ltcfcer of ample girth (he 
KiMy,coold &** this bit). 
pK fort that he has now killed 
■ere people than have the 
^ridoal condemned marrfer- 
ks, whom he periodically 
ispatches, might lead the 
Hroioos m ftimgme judicial 
ucntkm in terms of cookers. 


Mention interns of conken 

fctnariative eye-f or-an-eye. 

f In (tniiMilv imfnnJoa 


{ la the studiedly nnfrmtloas 
Erst Tuesday (YTV), the feB 
Sergeant displayed the grisly 
torfware of his occasional 
tette foe foam-fined restrafa- 
I* straps foe PickeHvaabe 
Wnreq the velcro-tied execs- 
foe shirt, devoid of buttons for 
hr die attendant doctor 
hsaU ham his fingers. We 
Mte farther informed that the 
■ere corpulent of his clients 
end to “sm oker more, and 
fat those who are watdring 
xff ^fheir nostrils with 
(asetine. ‘ 


TELEVISION 


r#y for . 

five in a torture chamber so 
ganiy id that every act in- 
cts p»in on somebody else. 
k piece unfolds with the 
motions of dream logic, but 
■playing style is unspecified, 
r the two past productions, 
grrrar Bapiaa's opted for a 
oVnatoalistic collage; Mike 
Trent’s pushed the piece 
to expressionist nightmare, 
ic lesson is-foat nobody can 


THE ARTS 




4p., : 'P'* • V 

&: t/ >y > > 

&''4$k . - f*' * 

v 




#*. ' " '**■ 









Cinderella (Sjyivic Gaflfess) makes her way to file studio hy open-topped car 


John Perdval reports on Nureyev’s new Cinderella in Paris 


T he intention of Rudolf Nuro- 
yev- and his designer, Petrika 
Ionesco, to set their production 
of the Prokofiev Cinderella in 
the Hollywood of the Thirties 
sounded, before the event, capricious 
and even silly. But when you section the 
stage of the Paris Opta their point 
becomes dear. Where else but in that 
dreamland does a girl whose beauty and 
talent have been neglected stand a 
chance of finding fortune m*d 
happiness overnight? 

Toe transposition proves to inflict no 
mayhem on the music. Nureyev uses the 
complete score (including dm scene 
omitted from Ashton's Co vent Garden, 
production) with just one small change 
m running-order at the begriming, of Act 
IL The music is some of me best 
Prokofiev ever wrote for baBet, : and 
Marius Constant, conducting, firings its 
romantic and bizarre dements to good 
balance. . ■- ‘ 

The production goes for spectacle m a 
big way. The film studio where Act n 
takes place is a vast Bdbytonian sky- 
scraper, and when first seen from a 
distance there is a whoie row of outsize 
BenyGraWe cut-outs to point the way. 
Cinderella makes the journey in a lag red 
open-topped car and at her arrival is 
5urrounded by photographers whose 
fiash-bulbs iflugunate her pr og res s . In- 
side; there is room for three film sets to 
be seen at once; allowing jokes about 
Buster Keaton, King Kong and costume 
drama s, and when those are efeared, in 
the twinkling ofah eye; the space left for 
danrfog (hadeertby a splendid staircase) 
would allow even Busby Berkeley to let 
himself go. / 

- Instead ofa ball, CSnderdlagoes to an 
audition and rehearsal where she gets the 
starring rote her. pretty but spiteful 
stepsisters have been trying for. She also 
gets the devastxtinriy handsome young 
fe eding man of the film, a character 


The electric chair is a 
agolarly barbaric mode of 
lecntion, but it might be 
knight no more cruel and 
Msaal a punishment than 
toping -a prisoner. on Death 
ow, often for years on end, 
hfle die "due process” of 
ypeals lumbers on outside, 
be condemned of MecUen- ' 
ng evinced the expected 
mbiimtion of stoicism and 
upended dibelief: they com- 
filed their crimes in seme 
Isty past and now, under* 
andably, cultivate an in- 
tcagF6 fifth in the hereafter. 
Ve made Death one df my 
ese advisers”, announced 
•e of their number, as though 
s whole life had ted up to 
at lapidary insight 
The programme might have 
ven more biographical infor- 
ataon about foe extraor- 
nary “paralegal” who has 
kea it on herself to cajole 
tomeys into representing foe 
ndenmed in foe ahsewe of 
(Wic foods — as it migW also 
ive detailed the atrocity of 
eir crimes. The only expficit . 

tstiness was supplied by foe, 
ckening racist whoopee that, 
romnarafiy, salutes ' each 
[ecutian. 


Martin Cropper 


treated with the deference doe. to a 
Valentino (is this Nureyev’s reply to the 
iniiquities of Ken Rnssdfs film?)- The 
other big chang e in foe story .is that the 


place of the — „ „ _ 

.film producer whom Cinderella helps 
when, travelling incognito in search of 
talent, he has a cycling accident. Michael 


Denard plays him with debonair charm, 
brings about some instant befare-your- 


eyes transformations of Cinderella's 
apparel and is discreetly but constantly 
at hand to ensure her success. 

. -w-nreyev also introduces a 


I \| hdously widoed drag perfitf- 

I mance by Georges FSetta, 

•A, . • v pointe shoes and all) to 
couqdement the antics of Cinderella's 
stepsisters, played with rdish by two of 
the company's most gifted ballerinas, 
Isabelle Guinn and Monique Loudirtes. 
Although they lose no chance of bur- 
lesque fim, they never go too fer over tite 
top. Ctfiriequeotly there is tittle likeli- 
bood of the comic aspects eclipsing the 
main story, as has sometimes'happened 
elsewhere. 

•Nureyev has in ’ fort followed 
Prokofiev’s wish to concentrate above all 
on the love-story, and to foat end he 
devotes the whole of the last scene (once 
Cinderella has signed her contract) to 
giving her and her heart-throb l e a d ing 
man another duet Whether or not they 
live happy ever after, they are last seen 
with her in his arms while a wind- 
machine sends an enormous length of 
tulle fluttering across the stage. ' 

. When it comes to the big set pieces, 
nobody would expect Nureyev to out- 
shine Ashton in! foe composition of the 
duets — although as indicated he scores 
by allowing famssetf more scope. His 
solos fra - the men are for more exerting 
than Ashton’s, partly from his tempera- 
ment, partly because he has stronger 


male dancers at his disposal, and more of 
them, than Ashton ever enjoyed. Also, 
like Ashton, Nureyev knows how to use a 
big corps de balkt, and the ensembles 
again benefit from foe exce p ti o nal 
quality of the Paris company all through 
its ranks. The choreography throughout 
shows Nureyev having the confidence to 
write more simply ami directly than in 
the past; which brings benefits both in 
expressiveness and in the brilliance with 
which his cast can perform his steps. 

There wifi be two or three casts in all 
the snam roles. Sylvie Guiltexn, me of 
the youngest ballerinas, was the choice 
for Cinderella on the opening night. Her 
ability to fill the stage with glamour was 
never in doubt; what was a surprise was 
to find her so adept a comedienne, with a 
wry, sly timing especially in her Chaplin- 
styie mime and the dances she performs, 
emulating Astaire, with a hat-stand and a 
broom. 

. Charles Jude, happily right back on 
form after recent iqjuries, was the film- 
star, gambolling smoothly through solos 
with steps quite as Wocd-curdlingly 
difficult as anythin the Bolshoi showed, 
bat done here with a throwaway grace. 
He looks stunning, too, in the elaborately 
informal waistcoat and tights decorated 
to simulate jodhpurs which are among 
the best of many handsome costumes by 
the Japanese couturier Hairie Mori. 

. The great virtue of this Cinderella, in 
addition to its wit and its spectacle, is 
that it rescues the ballet from the limbo 
of Christmas pantomime and turns it 
into a modem fairy-tale for afl seasons. I 
imag ing incidentally, flat it could easily 
<areipin a straight run in a West End ora 
Broadway tfiemrer being for more enter- 
taining than most musicals but who 
could afford to present a show with so 
splendid a cart? 


The production is in repertory until 
November 12, with a further run 
scheduled for next June and July. 


itaizyfras seen two superb 
'rivals of Strindberg’s mas- 
rpiece in the past IS years, 
jth revealed a dramatist 
arlds removed from the 
anonic chronicler of sexual . 

irfore, and confirmed him as 

tragic poet of the first 
agnitude. But, for all the 
tention Ehgfish manage- 
ects have paid, these 
oduciions might never have 
ipeared at all; and we are stffl 
ode with the Strindberg of 
"iss Julie and The Father. 

A Dream Play tetts the story 
an immortal who t ak es on 
unan form to gain experi- 
ce of the world, moves 
rough a cycle of suffering, 
ri then departs expressing 


THEATRE 


A Dream Play 

King’sHead 


just “do" A Dream Play, it 
demands a creative director. 

At foe King’s Head, it is 
directed by the Swedisb-bam 
Karma MicaDef as foe fox of 
a series of European produc- 
tions by the Tell-Tale Theatre 
Company. There is room for 
such a company, but their 
future work win have to be 
better than this Show, Much 
wafts innocently into a loaded 
trap. . . . 

The first rule m dream 
narrative is that every event 
and every location must be 
presented with unambiguous 
clarity. Scenes may dissolve, 
characters double or multiply, 
but the process must be prop- 
erly articulated. Miss NCcal- 
Ie£ s company, however, go 
simply for the fluidity of 
dream: rushing on with a 
hasty - costume-change and 
launching into the next scenic 



fragment without fist defin- 
ing the nature of the trans- 
formation. As i result, foe 
ironies, pun and the sense of 
an all-pervading intel ligenc e 
are mining , and foe narrative 
subsides into a jumbted blur. 

Bergman once confessed to 
finding parts of foe play- 
“sentimental and over-aes- 
iheticT. He took good care to 
minimize those qualities in 
his own version. Here, they 
dnrmnattv the evening. The 
style fataBy combines the 
grotesque with imprecision, so 
that characterization aB too 
often consists of generalized 
grimaces and leetSi backed up 
with a menacing-chorus going 
through the hissing routine. 

. Thus, instead of viewing the 
sadness of human, life al long 
range, with passing glimpses 
of wasted affection and mu- 
tiial torment, foe performance 
offers a gallery of fools and 
aggressors inviting you to pass 
judgement on them as indi- 
viduals- .1 

Periodically, the scenes are 
interruptedhy JahnJansson’s 
score; which may indeed be 
based on Swedish folk-times 
but Much prompts the com- 
pany into pre c ari ous and 
unethercal dances redolent of 
a drama school's end-ofterm 
show demonstrating the cast’s 
versatility. Equally inexpres- 
sive are the passages of robot 
pantomime which Wot oat the 
meaning of the fines' and tear 
into the : dramatic texture as 
intrusive numbers sending the 
dream up in smoke; 

1 am sorry to freet an 
adventurous ^ group in" these 
terms. The accompanying 
Swedish dinner is well up to 
the standards of tbe house. 


Dirty Dishes 

Boulevard 


Wedged between the mer- 
etriooos facades of Walker's 
Coart, Soho, and sharing ame- 
nities with foe Raymond 
Reraebar, this brave aewish 
venae offers better vaiae for 
money than many a “legit- 
imate’* West End theatre. 
Nick Whitby** previous play 
attracted a favourable notice 
'from ray pr ed e cess or, foe late 
Anthony Masters; this, his 
first commercial vesture, 
shows that he is pocsesaedof a 
good pah of can as well as 
some good mater ial. As to 
stractare mad de v e lo pm en t, he 
has some way to go yet 

The action devolves entirely 
in foe kitchen of a London 
pizzeria, eponymonsly named, 
where a chkch of illegal 
imm i grants and associated 
misfits are doing what they 
can to ease foe pain of tough 
work and lossy wages. 

Edgar, a . s h a m b ofic aDy 
goofy Argentine (CKfiT Paris), 
is laanched on an heroic, days- 


Moore) is a B razili a n lawyer. 


famine habit and s owading off 
about capitalist exploitation; 
shaziiig a Joest of gram in the 
staff lavatory with Edgar, he 
i mproves the latter's Elfish 
by havhig him repeat foe 


sentence “Desmond Lyuam 
wears a moustache''. Later, he 
wfll bow) *Tm frustrating! - 
my whole body is frus- 
trating", which I think is a 
defidoas fin. These are, in 
addition, a resting American 
actress, another Sooth Ameri- 
can who spits in the diilfi, a 
blank French girl in love with 
Carlos, sad a garrrioas and 
obense Englishwoman. 

The (tilt that is dished to 
these lost seals comes from foe 
smifiiig swtne of a manager 
(Oily Parker), who is, tmforte- 
natriy, foe one huredlUe 
character of the piece. In Us 
manipalative callousness 
there rises the horrible sas- 
pldoa that the author bout to 
m«kp a point rather than 
shhply wind hb creations np 
and let them go — a suspicion 
confirmed to the dosing, ma- 
cabre scene which draws to- 
gether the sarreal threads of 
foe piece without tying a 
satisfying knot. Mr Parker 
also plays the manag er 's move 
wimpish brother, an egregious 
theatrical device which has not 

been thoroughly thought out 

Tim Whitby’s production is 
robustly cast and vigorously 
executed. It makes a pleasant 
change to see a young audience 
responding genatoely to (at foe 
risk ofsomding patronaztog) a 
young play. 

Martin Cropper 


Young Writers 
Theatre Upstairs 


IrvingWardle 


Hopes, for the future of dra- 
matic writing in a video age 

are giveh a boost by tins year’s 

Paim! Auiri ViMftu* 


Craftsmanship across tne 
board keeps Stetoway at 
the peak of perfection^ — . 

gmn oth. CW KftPn 


Gocoaa^asmALS 

t invites you to a 


nan logest is: 
oen climate 




See one, touch on e, 



Royal Court Young Writers' 
Feriival Three authors, rang- 
ing in age between 16 and 20; 
force different concerns, and 
widely differing styles; ach- 
ievements in each 'that focus 
on contemporary 'prqffea- 
ments and crimes, • 

. The Plague Year, a snort 


Hi i I, n , mu I III W: 0M873391. 




T5/*vm 


Thursday 6th at 7.30pni 
- Certralliondon 

■ .TOSSWWKJNS REQURIB3 

, for detmfs please 
01'58T43ft3or 01-245 W35 

merebwsQO irawncnibeisSaS 
IfyOuanysHWetoattenU,. ‘ 
farinafoerahlpdetafe 




in London 300 years ago, but 
humankind's resistance to the 
notion of pestilence as God's 
j punishment is passionately up 
to date. Characters are simply 
indicated and their develop- 
ment is restricted by the snap 
conclusion, but foe revelation 
of private beliefs through spo^ 
ken prayer is effective. 

Two minutes of deft scene- 
changing and we are in the 
cartoon-coloured world of 
Shaun Duggan'S William. The 
gan g lin g 17-year-old hero 
dreams of fame and flight 
from 'Merseyside, where Dad 
(Ian Redford) is barnacled to 
the televstion set. Mum 
(tinda Henry) hurts prayers 




y 4 - 


The people to watch 


Tons of Money, 
which opens at the 
Lyttelton tomorrow, 
surprisingly marks 
the London debut of 
Alan Ayckbourn 
(rigjit) in directing 
work other than his 
own: interview by 
Andrew Hislop 


i Alan Ayckbourn is a great 
audiencfrwatdter during foe 
performances of bis days. 
Hus celebrated master-crafti 
man, ever invemive of in- 
genious theatrical techniques 
to explore the comic muddle 
and su ppres s ed horror of mid- 
dle-class life, is never short of 
people to look at Translated 
mto 24 languages, his plays are 
probably watched by more 
people in foe work) than those 
of any other living dramatist. 
Success, though, does not turn 
his head when it comes to 
focusing on the reactions of a 
paying customer. On foe 
opening nigh t of his first West 
End success. Relatively Speak- 
ing, be became completely 
obse ss edwifothefldhgeofthe 
huge woman eating sweets 
next to him to show any 
response to the play, despite 
the riotous acclaim around 
her. It was only after the final 
curtain had been lowered foat 
he discovered she was Spa- 
nish. 

For well over 20 years, 
however, Ayckbourn’s critical 
gazing at his public — mainly 

adnr in g and gu f fawin g , but 

also occasionally puzzled and 
disturbed — has been pre- 
dominantly in Scarborough, 
first as apprentice, then as 
successor to his theatrical 
mentor, Stephen Joseph. Jo- 
seph was a champion of 
theatre-in-foe-ronnd, which 
makes performers more aware 
of foe andimee. and Ayck- 
bourn often watches them on 
the monitors in the Stephen 
Joseph Theatre-in-the- Round 
while they damber over the 
set during the intervals. 

The good playgoers ofScar- 
borougi, however, now have a 
temporary reprieve from the 
keen Ayckbourn eye, for their 
adopted theatrical son has 
tpirgn a sabbatical from his 
unpaid job as director of 
production to direct three 
plays at the National Theatre: 
a new play ofhis own, Small 
Family Business, next year at 
the Olivier, Arthur Miller’s A 
View from the Bridge at the 
Cottesloeand, opening tomor- 
row at the Lyttelton, a revival 
of foe first of the celebrated 
AJdwych farces, Tons of 
Money. 

He has chosen the pro- 
gramme not only to offer a full 

range of drama from the tragic 
to the lightest comedy, with 
his own piny in the middle, 
but also to fit the theatres. He 
used to think good drama 
could be done anywhere, bat 
now believes “the right space 
is essential for the right play”. 



His own play is the result of 
his obsession with the prob- 
lems of mastering the vast 
Ofivier — “the most infuriat- 
ing theatre and foe most 
interesting”. 

Ayckbourn has, of course, 
directed plays ofhxs own at the 
National, most successfully 
perhaps foe much-acclaimed 


foe theatre, including acting. 

He once was even directed 
by Pinter as Stanley in The 
Birthday Party, fresh from its 
famous mauling by the 
London critics. “I was lifted 


by a director with his brain on 
fire determined to make a 
point.” He admits, however, - 
that he would never have been 
asked to join the National as 
an actor. 

Ayckbourn comes to the 
National at foe summit of his 
career. The security of his 
Scarborough nest has enabled 
him to continue his work 
remarkably unaffected by 
those who have overpraised 
him, comparing him to Shake- 
speare, and those who have 
unjustly reviled him, regard- 
ing him as a vacuous, right- 
wing boulevardier. His recent 
West End success. Woman in 
Mind, shows that his great 
talents as well as his limita- 
tions thrive unabated despite 
attempts by some to see him 
as a writer politically subver- 
sive of middle-class values as 
he is of theatrical convention. 
Only Broadway remains un- 


A Chorus of Disapproval — but 
only after first trying them out 
at Scarborough. Despite all his 
experience. Tons of Money 
brings his London d£bot 
directing other peoples* work. 
At least it is his debut direct- 
ing some of other peoples' 
work — for be has given the 
play, originally written by Will 
Evans and Valentine but also 
tinkered with by a number of 
others, including Yvonne 
Aniaud, “a pretty big fece-lift 


job”. (Gone for instance are 
lines, intended for Arnaud, 
which only make sense in a 
French accent) 

Wisely, Ayckbourn has ap- 
proached the problems of 
working in such a leviathan of 
a theatre as foe National by 
trying to re-create some of foe 
intimacy of Scarborough. He 
has his own company of 20, 
jnrfndhig many sta l w a rts of 
past Ayckbourn productions 
in both Scarborough and 
London and his own small 
stage crew. He has tried to 
keep things simple — “so I can 
do what I think I do best 
which is to make companies” 
Stephen Joseph had once told 
him, in a throwaway manner, 
“just create an atmosphere in 
which foeactoisxan create”. 

Creating that atmosphere, 
according ' to Ayckbourn, is 
“the most difficult' thing in the 
world”, but he is obviously 
good at it. Large, jovially- 
rounded but very quick in 
mind, easygoing yet with foe 
thinly veiled competitive 
spirit of the keen E nglish 
amateur sportsman — appro- 
priately, he keeps wicket — 
Ayckbourn is able both to get 
the best out of a company in 
short, intensive rehearsals and 
to make sure they have great 
fun in the process too. It also 
helps that he is thoroughly 
experienced in every aspect of 


conquered by his refusal to 
confine himself either to foe 
theatrical shallows or depths. 

He don, however, reveal a 
comforting vulnerability 
about his move to the Na- 
tional Though Sir Peter Hall 
was prepared to allow him, as 
is his wont at Scarborough, to 
write A Small Family Business 
at the last moment, he pro- 
duced it a year in advance. 
Since it was the first play for : 
years he had to submit to an 
artistic director other than 
himse!£ he was overcome by 
anxiety when there was no 
immediate response. He sent 
another copy to Michael 
Gambon, who is to star in it 
Still no reaction. In despera- 
tion he sent it to his mother 
for amnovaL Perhaps this 
need for approval explains 
why he is so keen on observing 
audiences. Whether Tons of 
Money is met by rapturous . 
acclaim or Spanish sweet- 
rustling on its opening night. 


its director wfil be keenly 
watching the performances off 


watching the performances i 
as well as on stage. 


■&#****£ 


Thursdays at 730pm 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 
ROYAL FESTIVAL HAll 


Thura.6ttov. 


Hum. 13 Nov. 


Ttturs.27 Nov 


Conductor 

SIR YEHUDI UENUHIN 

Soloist 

JUSTUS FRANTZ 


Conductor 

YURI TEMIRKANOV 

Soloist 

MIRIAM FRIED 


Conductor 

ANTAL DORATI 

Soloist 

JORGE BOLET 


HANDa 

Royal Fereworks Made 
MENDELSSOHN 
Plano Concerto Hal 
VWSHAN WILLIAMS 
A London Symphony 
Sfioosondly 




PROKOFIEV 
ILMje Suite 
BRUCH 

Violin Concerto Hal 
SIBELIUS 
Symphony Nn2 
•ShorsornHy 

0 £ 5 L* 


BRAHMS 

Academic Festival Overture 
BRAHMS 

Plano Concert HaZ 
BRAHMS 
Symphony NaZ 

Sponsav/ty 


n t 


northern .. 
ituourm 


across a Pope-embroidered 
rug, and the fat girt at the 
stores (delightful Cheryl Mar- 
ker) offers only traditional 
joys. RnefiiSy recording foe 
youth's comical misadven- 
tures, Marie Williams treads 
with, skill and . charm, the 
author's path along foe 
boundary between self-criti- 
cism andself-respecL 
These two plays, both di- 
rected by Hettie Macdonald, 
peter out near the end. Eye 
Lewis’s Fuky Stingers, di- 
rerted by Lindsay Posner, is a 
most alertly imagined se- 
quence of events surrounding | 
andcomamingagbi’srapeby ; 
one of. the local boys. Mr 
Wonderful pulls the drapes off 
three still girts who fora 
p rocee d, through tense nar- 
rative, pulses of swift dialogue 
and the splitting of words and 
action between iltem, to give a 
vivid' impression of folly, 
terror and disgust I was 
greatly, moved by Harriet 
Bagnall as the distressed girl 
Cyril Nit’s snappy fella is 
written as boastful rather than 
black. Would London's more 
neurotic boroughs call this 
casting racist? 






Spring 1987 




season: 


Now booking 


flexible schemes 

aed big savings for 

lose** 

bust 

Akfanata 

Simon Boccanegra* 
DonSovaran 
The Stone Guest* 
Orpheus in the 
Undenmrid 
Lady Macbeth of 
Mtsensk* 

Carmen 

*M« production 


Phone 

01-8362699 

for leaflet 


BMkfegiskgrtottrafr 


Jeremy Kingston 


RMMtm Rrtbwas Vmtiy ta 




.*Y>T 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 

SPECTRUM 


Love in a chilling climate 

SM^ncK ... _ ____ 


I, f ,1 

l\ > v‘ 


The Government’s prescription for stopping 
the spread of Aids is a dramatic alteration in 
se xual behaviour. But a tour of London’s 
West End clubs persuaded Jill Sherman and 
Michael Dynes that undoing 20 years of 
s exual permissiveness will not be easy 

The Aids epidemic is now a warnings more emphatic. The 
national crisis. Anthony Newton, evidence that the disease in some 
Minist er for Health, wanted this cases can be passed through 
week that, with the number of Aids normal sexual intercourse has only 
cases doubling every 10 months, just began to cha l lenge popalar 
urgent action is required. The only prejudices. The crisis has still to 
way to stop the spread of the be taken seriously. Most people 
disease, he said, was for people to ding to the belief that Aids can't 
change their sexnal behaviour. and won't happen to them. 

A national television advertising Advice that essentially calls for 

cam pai g n to get that message a new code of chastity may thus be 
across will top the agenda at a ignored or dismissed as a “kmjoy" 
meeting this week of the newly- tactic among a population long 
formed Cabinet committee set up used to carefree sex and unable or 
to deal with the Aids epidemic, nswfllizig to risnalize the future. 
The same message will be re- Meanwhile many experts believe 
pealed by politicians, doctors and that, in toms of the progress of the 
other health experts for the disease, we are already tiring in 
foreseeable future. the past 

But how effective will it be? Our “The truth is that the people 
interviews with young men and who are dying of Aids today 
women reveal an alarming ig- became infected five years ago,” 
iterance abort toe risks of Aids. To says Dr Jonathan Weber, a Iead- 
them the infection is still an ing researcher in London. “Some- 
irrelevance, a “gay” disease or a bow we have to accept the reality 
bawdy joke. Few people seem that since then another 30,000 or 
impressed by the Government's more have become infected, and 
publicity rampai gn so far. that in five years from now, there 

Since March about £2 million will be perhaps 4,000 people in 
has been spent on news papa- Britain with Aids, and that there is 
advertisements that have sought to nothing at aU we can do to stop 
increase awareness of the disease those cases occurring, 
and its risks. They seem to have “All we can hope to do is prevent 

had little impact. Much more will more cases. We can't do that 
soon be spent, the messages will medically. It can only be done by 
become more explicit, the changes in sexual behaviour.” 



X._ 







imtm. 




/ 



m 

!! s*. Jam, 


I suppose if you had a one- 
night stand the girl may 
have slept with a 
haemophiliac, or a drug 
addict. But I don't think you 
would consciously wony about 
catching Aids. You might think 
about it afterwards, but 1 think if it 
crosses your mind at all, you judge 
the risk by the social status of the 
girl you're with." 

Nick, a 25-year-old market- 
maker in the City, was not in the 
least concerned about Aids. Prop- 
ping up the bar at the fashionable 
Soho Brasserie, gin and tonic in 
hand, he said he was not promis- 
cuous and presumed bis girlfriend 
of three months’ standing was not 
either. 

Nick's relaxed if not com- 
placent attitude seems to be 
typical of his age group. With only 
a few exceptions, the young 
heterosexuals we talked to seem 
startlingly unaware of their 
vulnerability. They were reluctant 
to practise safer sex or change their 
promiscuous life-styles. 

While most young people know 
that the Aids virus can be sexually 
transmitted , many are convinced 
it is still a homosexual disease 
which poses no threat to their own 
lifestyle. Aids specialists, however, 
now agree that the disease can be 
passed through body fluids such as 
blood, semen and vaginal secre- 
tions. Women can pass it on as 
easily as men like most other 
sexually transmitted diseases. 

Andrew, 23, an unemployed 
musician imbibing at the oar of 
the Criterion restaurant in Picca- 


dilly, claimed that all be knew 
about Aids bad been learnt from 
friends. He never read newspapers 
or watched television. “As for as I 
know it is transmitted by anal 
intercourse and through blood So 
I wouldn't really be worried about 
having a heterosexual 
relationship." 

Half-way through his 
McDonald's hamburger in Char- 
ing Cross Road Greg, an 18-year- 
old cabinet maker from Scotland 
thought his homeland would help 
him. “Scotland’s not as bad as 
London. We've only got about 40 
people with Aids. It's all blown out 
of proportion. It’s just like 
herpes.” 

Crouched over his vodka and 
orange at Larry's Bar off the New 
King’s Road David aged 19, an 
art student, believed it was 
transmitted through sex, Mood 
and “prolonged” kissing. “There 
was an Aids scare at college, about 
overseas students," he said “and 
everyone was supposed to have a 
chest X-ray which shows it up.” 

Others conveniently excluded 
themselves from the vulnerable 
categories. “I don't consider my- 
self in a high-risk group,” said 
Graham, 21, a labourer on a 
building site. “Drug addicts and 
homosexuals, they’re the only 
ones that get it 1 haven't beard of 
any women passing it on to men.” 

John, 20, a hotel worker, was 
sceptical: “When a bloke and a 
woman are together, nothing 
passes from the woman to the man 
does it? So you can't get it from a 
woman.” 


Many young people have not 
even discussed Aids with their 
friends — or if they have, the 
subject is not taken seriously. At a 
popular bar in Soho, MarieUe, 24. 
working in the travel trade said, 
“We usually joke about it The 
subject does come up but friends 
say *Oh . . . have you got Aids?*, 
nudge, nudge ...” 

People in long-term relation- 
ships felt the problem did not 
concern them a! the moment, and 
were reluctant to think how it 
would affect them once their affair 
had finished. Some, however, 
were very scared, conscious that 
they might easily be victims of the 
disease already, whether or not 
they led a promiscuous life. 


K ay, 26, working for a 
film company, said she 
was so frightened about 
having Aids that she 
and the rest of her office 
were going to donate blood so that 
they could be tested for the virus. 
“I saw the programme on TV. 
We've all been talking about it. It's 
certainly made me more aware 
about how easy it is to catch it.” 
Sonya, 26, producer of a pop 
programme, predicted that Aids 
would destroy civilization. “It wifl 
always be at the back of your 
mind. There could be masses of 
people wandering around with the 
disease now. It's all very well 
telling them what to do but it may 
be too late. A voluntary screening 
system should be set up so that 
anyone could have their blood 
tested. People could then carry 


‘Homosexuals 
and drug 
addicts, they’re 
the only ones 
that get it. I’m 
not worried 
about it at all’ 


cards to say whether they were 
positive or not. I would rather see 
a card before going to bed with 
someone,” she said. 

But most young people wee not 
in favour of compulsory screen- 
ing, which they viewed as a breach 
of civil liberty. 

Not surprisingly, homosexuals 
were more aware of how Aids is 
contracted and how to prevent it 
spreading. Gary, a 27-year-old 
doctor, said many gay people had 
restrained their sexual activity but 
that others were still going out on 
the gay scene, their lives revolving 
around boyfriends and sex. 

The hostility towards condoms, 
despite the protection they offer 
against the disease, was wide- 
spread. Indeed, some people 
would prefer to give up sex 
altogether rather than use them. 

In a bar in Covent Garden, 
Gare, aged 22, a musician, said 
she would be very particular about 


whom she went to bed with but 
said: “I wouldn't ask a bloke to 
wear a condom. I think they’re just 
revolting. It's the smeQ. You just 
can't get rid of iL If they could 
manufacture one that didn't smell 
like rubber so horribly, 1 suppose I 
wouldn't mind so much. But it 
would still be just like having a 
bath with your socks on. I would 
rather have no sex at all than have 
to use condoms. They just put me 
off completely." 

Like many people, Sonya was 
sceptical that two decades of 
permissive propaganda could be 
undone because or the Aids scare. 
“I for one wouldn't be prepared to 
sleep with someone who used a 
condom. It’s not very nice. Maybe 
we’U just have to be re-educated.” 

A ndrew also found the 
idea of using condoms 
completely unaccept- 
able. “I just don’t like 
them, so I wouldn’t 
ever use one. I'd rather not have 
sex. They don't arouse me at alL 1 
think a lot of people feel that way. 
Its just the fact that they're so 
awkward to use, and they smell 
disgusting.” 

Although reconciled to the pru- 
dence of using condoms, John was 
concerned about their immediate 
availability. “Yeah, I'd wear a 
condom, if I had one on me. But I 
can't see many people doing that, 
can you? I mean, when you get 
back to a bird’s house you're not 
going to say, 'hold on a tick. I'm 
just going to nipout to the all night 
chemist and get a condom’, are 


you? Most people would just take 
the risk.” 

For some people., the one-night 
stand is already a thing of the past. 
Ron, a 34-year-o!d London taxi 
driver, married with a son aged 16, 
has radically changed his sexual 
behaviour for fear of passing the 
disease onto his wife, 

“l used to sleep around all the 
time, a different girl almost every 
• night. Jots of money in me pocket 
— you know. But I’ve had VD m 
the past so I know how easily these 
things can be picked up on those 
one-off occassions. A lot of my 
friends still regard Aids as a gay 
plague. They don’t realize that the 
chances of them catching it are 
increasing ail the time. I for one 
have no intention of playing the 
field any more:” 

Despite all the talk about the 
arrival of the new chastity, youn- 
ger people were not prepared to 
accept toe idea. Jackie, aged 25, a 
hairdresser who is married with a 
young daughter, was convinced 
that most people would carry on 
having extra-marital affairs. 
“There’s a lot of peopte who are 
married who can’t stick to one 
partner. They have just got to have 
some one else, otherwise they 
think they’re missing out on 
something." 

Yet most people said that if they 
contracted Aids, the last thing they 
would do is infect anyone else. 
Brid, aged 26, an actress, was 
convinced that men would be 
more irresponsible than women 
when it came to passing on toe 
disease. “If I had Aids, I would try 
to find a partner who had it as 
well But most men probably 
wouldn't. When men get toe urge, 
they’ve just got to go for it. But 
women are normally more in 
control of their emotions.” 

T hough most young peo- 
ple were reluctant to 
change their sexual 
behaviour radically, 
many showed a morbid 
curiosity about Aids. Young peo- 
ple wanted more information 
about the disease, and bow to 
prevent it spreading. What they 
had gleaned came mainly from 
television programmes. The 
Government's recent newspaper 
campaign was dismissed as a 
“joke”. 

“There has been too much 
banding about of statistics and dot 
enough straightforward, lucid 
explanation. The British public 
doesn’t face up to things very 
quickly,” said Nick. 

Others echoed the views of Aids 
specialists that toe Government 
had done too tittle, too late. “The 
Government has been really neg- 
ligent. Attitudes should have 
changed a long time ago. So many 
people are now infected and are 
going to go on and get the disease. 

I don’t think that telling people to 
be monogomous is going to 
work,” said Gary. 

As Richard, aged 19. a com- 
puter programmer observed after 
a few pints at Lucy’s nightclub 
near Leicester Square: “The Gov- 
ernment clearly isn’t that worried 
about Aids. If it was. we would 
have had more public broadcasts 
on television about it by now. I 
really can’t see people changing 
their attitudes until the Govern- 
ment thinks that there is some- 
thing out there we have to wony 
about.” 


Where they 
went wrong 

The young people in 
our survey betrayed an 

alarming degree 

ignorance about Aids. | 
Dr Thomas StuttafonT ! 
puts them right : 

Initially homosexuals, drug ad- 
dicts, haemophiliac patients, and 1 
prostitutes woe the main sufferers 
from Aids, and an impression was 
given that other people should not 
be too concerned. Thai is 
nonsense. 

The virus is spread by hetero- 
sexual as well as homosexual ■ 
int erco u rse, by vaginal as well as > 
anal sex, by toe mouth as well as | 
through other orifices. The virus is 
carried in blood, semen, vaginal 
and cervical secretions; it is also 
present in smaller amounts in 
teats and saliva, though probably 
not in a high enough quantity to be 
infections. 

Aids is not a single disc*fc, but 
a collection of pathologies? con- 
ditions to which the body is prone ; 
after its defences against infec- 
tions and malignant diseases have I 
been destroyed by the; 
HIY(HTLV3) virus. Perhaps in. 
an attempt to alleviate alarm, the- 
hazard posed to the community by 
the HIV virus has been played 
down. I 

Initially it was hoped that only < 
about 10 pm cent of those infected > 
with HIV would develop Aids, but 
that has proved to be an absurdly 
optimistic forecast; five-year stud- 
ies have shewn that as many as 30 
per cent of those infected may have . 
developed Aids, and there exists 
the fear that in time most of the 
rest may succumb. Even without 
developing the fall Aids syndrome 
many patients have signs of jjjpre - 1 
bral involvement and show var/y 
dementia. 

All patients who have been 
infected into HIV, whatever their 
present state of health, are infec- 
tions. Aids can manifest itself in a 
variety of ways. The most common 1 
presenting complaint is pnennto- . 
nia due to Pneumocystis carton. 
The second most likely initial I 
symptom is Kaposi's sarcoma. [ 
Cancer of the lymphatic system. I 
intractable diarrhoea, weight loss, 
mental changes may all be the first 
signs or symptoms that Aids is 1 
developing. 

David, with his cheery optimism 
in Larry's Bar, could not be more 
mistaken. A dear chest X-ray is no 
certainty that he has not been 
infected. Only a blood test will give 
him complete confidence that he 
has not been exposed to tbsjPHIV 
virus, and only by avoiding casual 
sex, or if he is unable to do this, by 
using a condom, will be be safe, or 
relatively safe, from the virus. 

If these precautions are fol- 
lowed, Aids may not be too 
terrifying and he can reassure 
himself that it is less infectious 
than syphilis. A careful sex life in 
Che days when that disease was 
rampant provided complete 
protection. 


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“1 despair of ever being able to 
dispose of toe siderial clock at 
toe price it ought to bring us. It 
is my wish and I do think it 
most advantageous for us to 
present it to toe Empress of 
Russia after it is properly 
finished and regulated for toe 
latitude of St Petersburg. 1 am 
certain from her known noble 
I disposition she will make us 
for greater amends than any 
price we are likely ever to 
obtain from our own gambling 
nobility . . .*’ 

It was thus that James 
Fotoergill wrote to his partner 
Matthew Boulton after toe 
latter's magnificent ormolu 
sidereal clock, so named since 
it measures toe movement of 
toe sun against toe stars, failed 
to sell at Christie's in 1772. 
His despair was justified since 
it is still unsold 224 years later, 
but Christie’s have been given 
a second chance. They are 
currently trying to negotiate 
its sale to the nation. The 
asking price is believed to be 
in toe region of £1 million. 

The partners sent it to St 
Petersburg and tried it out on 
Catherine the Great but her 
disposition was not as noble as 
they hoped. Their agent re- 
ported: “Your clock has been 
shown at Court first to the 
Empress, afterwards to Prince 
Potempkin ... I left it stand- 
ing in the palace for some lime 
but finding no longer toe least 
reason to hope for success I 
brought it home two days ago. 
They all praised it — it was 
very fine, an elegant piece of 
workmanship — but it did not 
Strike the hours, nor play any 
tunes — how could a clock 
without such necesary req- 
uisites cost Rs 2,500? — from 
such remarks you will see toe 
vanity of expecting to find a 
market in this place for any- 
thing but gewgaws and French 
baubles ...” 

After spending 1 1 years in 
St Petersburg, the clock was 
sent back to England with a 
broken glass case. 


In the neglected 
village of Great Tew 
a remarkable clock 
lay unnoticed for 200 
years. Now it’s on 
offer to the nation 




Heavenly: Matthew Bonltoo’s 
great sidereal dock 

Matthew Boulton was one 
of toe greatest English metal- 
workers of the eighteenth 
century. At his factory outside 
Birmingham he produced su- 
perb ormolu, silver and Shef- 
field plate using designs by 
such great contemporaries as 
Robert Adam and James Wy- 
att As toe partner of James 
Watt he was toe first manu- 
facturer of the steam engine. 
In 1774 he boasted to Boswell: 
“I sell here. sir. what all the 
world desires to have — 
Power”. 

His many historians have 
assumed toe clock to be lost or 
destroyed. But together with 
his library and fascinating 
working drawings for various 
of his projects, toe clock has 


been slumbering in a derelict 
Oxfordshire village like a 
beautiful princess in a fairy 
story. 

The Boulton home at Great 
Tew in Oxfordshire has been 
toe epicentre of a sensational 
conservationist battle for toe 
last two decades. Matthew 
Boulton’s son, Matthew 
Robinson Boulton, purchased 
the Tew estate in 1815-16. In 
addition to toe manor house, 
there are some 56 cottages and 
4,500 acres of arable and 
woodland. The last owner. 
Major Eustace Robb, who 
died last year, was descended 
from the Boultons in the 
female line and became, in his 
latter years, a recluse and 
eccentric. 

Robb seems to have set his 
face against modern agri- 
cultural orthodoxy. He 
wanted, it appears, to preserve 
the traditional village commu- 
nity without allowing an in- 
flux of commuters and 
weekenders who would have 
changed toe nature of toe old 
farming estate. As villagers 
and farm bands died or left, 
their cottages fell into ruin. 
Many are empty, with walls 
crumbling and roofs falling in. 
The village has retained its 
traditional character but ap- 
pears neglected compared 
with its smart Cotswold 
neighbours. 

As a barrage of newspaper 
articles and television pro- 
grammes has exposed its 
plight. Major Robb and his 
estate manager James 
Johnstone have come under 
fierce criticism. Johnstone 
had formerly worked in a 
solicitor’s office and has been 
particularly singled out for 
criticism as an unqualified 
and hard-hearted executant of 
Robb’s old-fashioned policies. 
When he drew up his will 
Robb ignored his family 
connections and left the entire 
estate to Johnstone. 

Like any other heir, 
Johnstone's first problem is 


capital transfer tax, formerly 
estate duty, and he has called 
in Christie's to help him solve 
it Breaking through toe cob- 
webs, their representatives 
have entered the house to find 
Matthew Boulton’s effects 
slumbering within. 

As well as offering toe 
famous clock to the nation, 
they are to auction his library 
and a large collection of 
drawings on December 12 and 
16 respectively. The library is 
a utilitarian collection, reflect- 
ing Boulton’s wide interests in 
mathematics, mineralogy, 
chemistry and economy and 
including many books by 
scientists such as Joseph 
Black, Erasmus Darwin, 
Priestley, De Luc and 
Fourcroy. They have simple 
late 18th Century bindings 
and have Boulton's own book- 
plate inside. 


The drawings fall imofbo .'rfea 
groups. The first concern x •»«*§? 
improvements made to - >!'-«•. t 

T> 1* ? 


improvements made to ; 
Boulton’s home, Soho House, 
near Birmingham, in tire 
1780s and 1790s by Samuel 
and James Wyatt as well as a 
local architect, William 
Hollins. They include eleva- * 
dons, plans and working - 
drawings and provide a fas- 
cinaiing insight into the 
architects’ ideas. 

The second group relates to 
Boulton’s last great achieve- 
ment, his revolutionary tech- 
nique for minting f° ir ^ e f 

using Watt's steam engine. The . 

collection includes a forge 
number of mechanical l 

drawings for toe iastaifauon of g. 

machinery in London and M r 
Petersburg, as well as plans f 
and elevations. . ’ Jj .f 

Geraldine Norman g 


V 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1098 

9 Land management ^ 

science (8) I I r° I P 1 I 

13 Israel airport (3) 15bH BB B. 

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19 Young fishes (5.31 17 { gRl9 pH K M I { ^ jj 

24 Unmarried woman — BB^^Bg — HB — 

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27 Trying lime (6) 

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3 Ascended (5) 12 Alpine cal) (5) 21 

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« Cir^L-.! 4 14 Far down (4) 23 HartierJike^** 

* Circular painting (5) j S Comply with ( 4 ) (I.I.U) 

SOLUTION TO NO 1097 

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DOWN: 2 Chimb 3 By 4 Scan dalmonger 5 June 6 Tally-ho 
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13 Morally dissolute (9) n ^ftyiypcri) 

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The popular vision of the life of a diplomat’s 
wife is of tall drinks on sunny verandas while 
t he men geton with the real work- But, as a 
c onference in London tomorrow will make 
clear, many sacrifice a great deal, including 
their own careers. Lindsay Knight reports 




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W hatever complaints 
diplomats* wives may 
have about their lot, 
they, are unfailingly 
loyal to their husbands. “We are the 
most loyal group of wives,” smd 
Gay Murphy, chairman of the ■ 
Diplomatic Service Wives. 
Association. • 

But this loyalty is sorely tested by 
husbands and the Foreign Office, 
especially when couples are posted 
abroad. A move can mean a major 
disruption, if not a total break, m 
the wife’s career, and she can span 
so much time oh embassy workthai 
she may feel like an unpaid. FCO 
employee. . ' 

While her loyalty may be refresh- 
ingly old-fashioned, her ambitions 
are not. Diplomatic wives are keen 
to dismiss the image, at least 20 
years out of date, of the (hptomats 
wife swanning around the world, 
being looked after by armies 
servants and having little to do but 
rvn verandas sxD- 


servamsana nnvius w . 

pose decorative!* on verandas im- 
ping gin and tomes. They have, for 
v ranee of 


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V- *• 


III MIHl LUIUW- * , 

ile,- an impressive range ot 
mtaimc arions and work experience, 

2s a recent DSWA ^ questionnaire 
shows. Many are ; graduates or 
Tratwdteadicts. and their jobs vary 
from nursing to aqcountMcy; toe 
law to word processing, cartograpmr 
to electronic engineering, met- 
allurgy to architecture. 

In *1986, most of thee wives 
(about 2,600 throughout toworid) 
would like to work m tbar own 
right, whatever the fevd ojjmear 
ambitions or career: They anrno 
longer happy with tte assumpbrn 
that their rolls' to support Jam 
spouses (and ■ implicitly the 

week's conferMce °^ SS . 
Community Monde . SP°g*? 
Associations, hosted by the Va* 
DSWA in London. • 

In recent years, co^dHabte^ 

fort and often ingenuity have 

exercised toanange J°“ l 

when two FCO peopfenrany^Tbe 

problems of wives with .cm* 15 
^Sfcdie FCO are less , 

One young woman spokecmlyon 
the understanding that she co^d 
Temain anonymous (even to bff 
husband): “In theory you re ifra to 
W what you tbh* but in pracb« 

win do worry that pressure might be 

dm. you 

“ 1 cL is now back in London after’ 
*** * n 5T«IS nniver- 


husband for everything because I 
couldn’t work there. When l came 
back: Td obviously missed out on 
promotions I -keep very quiet at 
work about my husbarufs jfob 
because they think m be going 
abroad again.” -... . _ 

For this woman, the frostranom 
of not working were aggravated by 
the expectations of her as a dip- 
lomatic wife - not only the vol- 
untary work, but also the conee 
mornings and wives’ meeting. » 
stopped going to these soon srfter we 
amved and then a couple of wives 
came round to see me, to ask why.- 
‘ You'll geta lot of stick if ypudMrt 
. come,’ they warned. Bul l dstert, 

: even though I know my husband 
would have preferred me to, and i 
know I wasn’t the most popular wife 

in the embassy” 

Clare Oliver is a social worker 
who accompanied her hustemd to 
Mexico when he was seconded Ujom 

stresses are hard for many wives, 
she says. “Because they pant do 
paid work, women Ipse tear sense 
of identity and receive thar status 

from thisir husbmdsJR^ wv^ 

prevalent so you become the Second 
Secretary's Wife, for example, and 
there is still a big .divide between 
junior and senior wives. 



Teaching children 
to complain 


Has Esther Rantzen 
spread her safety net 
for sexually abused 
children too wide? 


r, iiMiiPnr *■' - _ . 


- “1 did feel that I wanted to do the 

i-'S^wSS {ESgesSB 

■£S0&fsu SwSsbssi 

*o restated to the didtft wktat rf the at: fund raising’. 

S !^l^an?Ste;“Piii “That was anoti* 

“I was very slow in ammigto 

tenns -tth the.rtMb*- 


[here are considerable dif- 
ferences between going 
. abroad with a companyand 

. 1 .. ' Ci wlmi Offict 


X . mnuou ™ — i — — - 

' with the Foreign Office, 
dare- explains. “With a company, 
ihere ispiore choice about the house 
^ Af-haiwimn lrvr ™ 


-LUU1V ” — • - - . .• ' «« 

lyou live in onhow. yon lrye. The 
PCO allots you a house acconnngto 

your states, and ft’s assumed you 

- J i Lf iwimnino tnr 


aty ana advertisrag/ it 


g ispsgffi 


YOUT Status, auu na aw. 1 ;. ^- 

vriU *db''« lot bf tee 
your huteand. $ome wives I knew, 
in Mexico would cook di nner, serve 
tee drinks and then' disappear .1 
refused toaSow myhometo beused 

as a rest^maiit like that, rat 1 
certainly tfidn’t have any choice 
about who came into my home. 

Of course, many wives enjoy tear 
life abroad but som^ pa^arty 
the y ounger women, doubt u me 
benefits- outweigh the dis- 
advantages. Some Ti^when- 
- choosing to stay m the UK when 
their husbands are posted abroadm 
order to continue their careers, me 
FGO admits teat it is losing good 
• feen" in their 30s boause their 
wives put pressure on them to leave 
the FCO for a more settled 

recognizes both a wife’s 
contribution and her dflermna. a 
spokesman said:^ :‘*Fkiridy, ifa wfc 
chooses to be involved 
embassy work, it’s an unpaid bene- 
fit for us” 


mot always 

fife of loyal wife *^5 

inst learning to live with it a mi 

StS rv? vZ 

sot older." Now in her 

W-mmU read law 

University aaA then Joined tee 

Foreign Office L. 

stream,- not the hig^ mers ). »ne 
met her hosteid-to-he 

first week, (“he had beini to Oxford 

a hfch-ffie*”) tat . “ 

SSsioim were made a^wan^ 
mite five ytera later* by which^e 
both of them tad be« postec 
abroad'separaidy- 
Pamela had saved 18 aanmm m 
Cdbte as Third Secretary, Political, 
Slteta went to Brass^asjm 
tetadte to tee British EEC 
tioa. Robert called onJterM rente 
from Poland (wb«e he had spent 
two years) to London, aid after 
Z* d-JS they decided tonmny. 
Their tnroUem was: where wwud 
. ■ ck. tn Slav 


io^ftKhBibud 


^kjn ^wiresta ^lM»^a 

Td fed » npset ttat I wonlto twmrt 
to listen to Ms stones about worn. 

‘It’s a matter of 
having a 
job rather 
than a career’ 


at tend raising’. . 

-That was another shodk -to the 
system. I’d only been a diplomats 
wife for three weeks." 

After four yews, which she 
emphasizes were often “g reat fa n^ 
she and her husband rrturnedto 
London. She amid 
back into tee Foreign Office* tat 
uked for part-time wwkbwmserf 
her small chfidren. Ttare ^ wbmk 
available, though 

vears fetor, the FCO. is now _ en- 
ateapBg part-time' work and job- 


Ai fim I thought it was a 
reflection .of my own dyspep- 
tic nature. But as the evening 
wore on l became convinced 

that I was not the only person 

feeling profoundly uncom- 
fortable with the BBC’s new 
Childline — die free phone-m 
service for abused chiWren. 
Esther Rantzen was suffused 
with caring, all right, but 
every time she explained her 
new role as the B eeb s 
supermum, I felt uneasy. 
There’sa problem here, I said 

to myself 

It is not teal l have any 
measure of understanding or 
sympathy for child abusers. 
Hanging’s too good for them, 

I have always thought .As 
r*n«i flooded the ChildLine 
phones, I could only wonder 
admiringly at Esther 
Rantzen’s achievemenu 
Singlehandedly, she hp 
thrust child abuse into tee 
popular consciousness. Still, 
the doubts began to nag. 

Child abuse has always 
been a pretty dear cut busi- 
ness to me involving some 
thought of physical or sexual 
attack. Or extreme negli- 
gence. But Esther Rantzen 
had a broader view. Even the 
interviewer on Newsround 
seemed a little taken aback. 

“Esther," he asked, “what 
range of problems are you 
dealing with?" 

“Well, anything that trou- 
bles a child really, Esther 
replied. That turned out to 
include little girls afraid at 

the dark ^UtUe bojs.™* 

school nerves. “I tiunk, 
Esther continued, ^hat child 
abuse is anything that puts a 
child through pain, makre 
them feel uncomfortable and 
unhap py.” 

Under normal arcam- 
stances, of. course, Esther 
Rantzen’s views would con- 
cent only those dose ac- 
quaintances who mightbe tee 
object of her extraordinary 
breadth of compassion. But 
with the power of the 
her finger. Wr, Esth*! 
Rantzen’s views take on a 


ihe “trauma” of feeing the 
accused assailant in court 
Dangerous nonsense.* 
thought the person acroed 
of the crime is presumed woe 
innocent- By separating tee 
child from the aceuwd, you 
frnply that the deftntetted 
something very desperate 
and you reverse the onus of 
mult, psychologi^ly sP^^ 
ing. That may well improve 
the conviction rate — at me 
price of setting our tradition- 
al notion of justice on its 

h TunderstoQd the kind of 
world Esther Rantzen inhab- 
ited when tire programme 
took us to a school, to show 
us, approvingly, the New 
Child. A group of them were 
singing a song with tee chores 
“My body’s nobody’s body 
but mine/You run your own 
body, let me run mine, i 
thought it was curious that we 
needed such a song in this age 
which rhapsodizes over 
people’s rights to do with 
their bodies as they will 
regardless of tee harm they 
cause others. Still, 1 let that 


Then an American woman 
named Michelle Elliot began 
asking tee children what they 
would do about a bully who 
demanded their lunch. A 
sweet-faced girl said she 
would punch one in tee tare, 
but apparently this was the 
wrong answer. Another said, 
she would ran away and teen 
tell A lot of the children 
emphasized tee need to teU 
with a very unchildhke sett- 

satisfied air. “Excellent, said 

Michelle Elliot. 

Well I didn’t think it was 
excellent at all. It reminded 


KanizcD a r — . 

different complexion ^ 

child’s call to tar-CWdknc 



Because of her Caban posting, 
Pamela spoke fluent S w-sh, so sne 

rontmted several Britfahc^P*®^ 


“I thra -M !• "“U 

remember thmkmg that d rd 
SSasasoBdtOT.Bkesoma^of 
my friends, part-time-work would 
have been no problem. 

Pamela resigned and ha* now re* 
trained as an EFL (EngM* ■ 
Foreign Language) teacher, _a nsefel 
qnafification for diptomaticwivra 


Aey » «age*MT7 awe wannm w 

in herpes* in Bross^and beta'? a 
post np in Ch3e as Second 

Secretary. 

The Foreign OTce said ft ^ 
ted tee feet, lmt teerev ro«M »ff ^ 
-two jobs available * 

Santiago wteey 
choose. Acconfing to fttada^tee 
dedrioa was obvions - “He tad a 
much better career ahead of ta® 
than me” - so ^ 

theFCO tavn^i^to^veber 

jmpaid leave during titatinw. 
Punvli remembers teeir tin 


STcImSml “I was termed when ’oridm. abroad. “In my pw™ 00 

rushed along to the embassy to tell matter of having a job ra&er than 

hit hnsbrnd, only to discover that career." _ _ 

r-i.iiM.nc w stonoed giving And the fiitme? The Gordoas, 


■ ramen reioa“»«« — TT , — ,■ 

in Santiago: “Om very kmd prede- 
cessor and his wife showed ns r©and 


d4 Chileans tad ^wedgwrag 
diplomatic spouses wo«k * 

work. It was 

So like most iapfeamta 
Pamela “kept herself tas£*m[taj 
two children in feirly qmck sncc»- 
sion, while taking 

ing and volontary work. « 

ajreek of 


°aS tee .fatere? Jb* Gorfjjj 

MwnambenHgfive^erthebfttb 

a son in 1985, wffl be going abroad 
again next year and P MMla accigte 
titatshe may have toretram 
As for tee general proWem of 

wra ^ w hes,rfwhich^K^are 

through her work on to DSWA 
oom^ttee. “I nap* *»2 
what to sotahm ^^J***± 


has consequences. It can 
result in suae interference m 
the fenrily, whether by drastic 
measures involving the pol- 
ice or by chatty social wote- 
eis passing judgement on 
mother’s sanctions for poor 
homework. None of us would 
deny the need for the state to 
interfere whm it 
real child abuse, but why 
should beleaguered parents 
now be under siege for a 
whole range of private 
parenting concerns. 

Rantzen next turned her 
attention to the courtrooms. 
What seemed to worry her 
here was the difficulty tf 
setting a conviction for fluid 
abuse. She advocated certam 

changes to set tins right such 
as the new Criminal Justice 
Bill That Bfll. proposes 
nutting children *** topnrate 

rooms with a video hnkrothe 
* * ,ka< thw mav 


Esther Rantzen: a broader view 
me of the spirit of the old 
scientific' sooahst society in 
which films were made about 
brave children who stood up 
and told on their parents. 
This, I thought,, is how- you 
train a population to com- 
plain, denounce and be proud 
of their dependency. You 
plant tee idea in people from 

early childhood that if they 

are afraid in the dark, or have 

a problem with a bully, they 
just telephone the stare. Is 
there anything more destruc- 
tive to tee family as a unit or 
in its relationship to tee. 
community as having outsid- 
ers brought m willy rally to 
solve matters where no laws* 
are broken? 

You see, Esther, I want to 
help that bruised child as. 
much as you. It’s your reme- 
dy that I v ~““ 


what to soumuu 

I gjve evidence without having 

therefore wtat I sbooU do. 


Barbara Amiel 

ipnm— m w tf Mp mn IM WW 




’ 


[STACK 

UESSSB 


OV994B016 {alSOSflK& 


r FRIDAY 


Britain’s first 
‘adopt by 
video’ scheme 



BRIEFLY 


A round-up of news, 
views and information 



Chewing 
the fat 


new magazine called Btaf 
Toy (fl-50 at 

Aimed at^J»ra«tfl^^ 

parent who has 
stefisbocked from a tot to * 
toyshop with demandtag cM- 
S^The National TJy la- 
hraries AssodatiOT xo& 

Matters 

sm^oftoysfOTchfldimiW 

Wagon trail 

mend 600 toys in this nseftu 
1 guide. 


determine accurat^tbetme I 
a woman is most fdytofcD , 
pregnant (though dtey re i 

5SBW, 

£2450 tor the first six-day , 

pack, with a three-day refill at 

£12.8a 


TALKBACK 


women areal! too frequently 
taunted 

about their attempts at dW- 
ing, and- made to feel trim 
their days, of belrgshmand 
desirable are beWnd them. 
This compounds the 
contradiction they elre^ 
ted between wantlngroDfl 
seen as a providw of rood 
and maternal comfort wtete 
wishing to ■ remain sexually 
attractive to their husbands. 
Unhappily, the researchers 
Nfchola Startes from Swap- 
sea University and Manor*. 
Kerr from tee 

the -Envir onmOTt - was 
(breed to concede that it is 
surprising that food phobias 
among women are not even 
morewMespread- 


Eqmfity has its downtime - 

Sdtaing a soaring akohrtito 

'm' rate ^ mns *Z womoa. 

Quote nflG— McNcBTs How to Soy N< oto 

WUW — * Alcohol (Sheldon Press, £L50) 

£ m impreadiy 
dftqiiing practical methodsof 
giving ap or iedodag your 

Sc^intake-Asajonrnalirt 

who abandoned alcohol be s 
wdi-versed in toway®^ 

resta witeout ontarrassm^ 

die constant pressore from 
other people to drfew- 



Tdrather bewthdi»OT 

than spend m 

politicians. ” Gienys Kinnock. 


Pigeonholed 


Sound advice 


Premenstrual Syntemme tas 

been knota to drire oteanvisB 
sane women to distrMte®. J 
unhinge ttanu *nd a hi^ 
proportion experience at least 

Tum rumbled 

4371 drighO- 


For the Kttie girl wta t tas 
everything:.- In- America, 
Mattel creators uf to mort 

famonfi doll oftll time. Barbie, 

tae tamched 'The Heart 
Family New Arrival set, 
comprising Daddy -Heart 
(bearing flowers .and toys), 
newborn Baby. Heart (com- 
plete with tiny Menket, Mrth 
certificate and belfle)and Mra 
Heart. All sweetly realistic 
until yon. look; under Mrs 
Heart’s rohnranoiBTnarerraty 
smock, to discover a tammy as 
nanseatingly flat as Barbie’s. . 

It war probably be a; wMe 
before the trio is featured in a 



From If. MasefieM. 
Sunningdole. Serkshl J'*\ 

There may be some hope fix 
at least some young people 
like Michelle (Mad, ad, or 
simply a lw£ 

23). My wife and I have a 
rather similar story vnte ora 
son who is nearly 23. we 
discovered quite ta acctont 
that what was contributing to 
his utterly irrational epi- 
sodes, and tee selMestruc- 
tive behaviour which “ras 
quite at variance with his 
previous loving nature, was 
some of the food he ate. • 
pork, m pamculari causeo 
him to slash his forearms;_iie 
only ever did this after eating 
nork- He has now not eaten it 

& four yean and not 

cut himself once. 

Other reactions, charac- 
terized by psychiatnsis as 
psychotic behaviour, schra- 

Sd withdrawal and £ 

cohoUsm, 

ingestion of specific foods. 
He too became a menace to 
himself and others. ■ 


V^JL^JLN AW-** 

BARKJiK^ Be warnea, our 

occasions, plus details of onr unique custom 


90 hana-iastea, uauu-i»i*»^“ — 

occasions, plus details of onr unique custom . 
repair service. If you can’t find exactly . 
what you want in stock, your stockist can 

it- order via our Direct Order Service. 

^ Details with catalogue. 


FAROES 


FOWEV 


Testing time 


Pinpointing the b™°fovute- 
tton can be crucial tojmy 
woman frying to concenra. 

Until now SSJSJTS 
reHed on 

Tambrands tf 1 ®, SS ke S 
Tampax) uses the latwt 
- diagnostic tedtatiques to 


The Pocket Gukte J? JJ®" 
(Chalk & Cheese. £2.50) i te 

good, not-always-ctean fun 
toil of tee wit and wisdom 
exchanged by women 
“when," according to sts au- 
thors. “there aren’t any men 
around". The result is a 
frivolous, but wen-observed 
nttte volume, stereotypes I fr» 
Liberated Man.-theTV Addtrt. 
the Satoon Bar Bore and so 


on. 


Josephine Fairley 


From Mrs M.E. Bulford. 
Shepperton, Middlesex ' • 

I would be interested to know, 
jf Michelfe has ever been 
considered allergic to other 
food or chemicals. My own 
daughter, who » 9^ “.fj' 

head and ear achre. 

and depression. She beeune 
very withdrawn and some- 

local ho*tol 
bad no idea what ws caug 
all these problems, so I took 
her to an allergy clinic. 
Following an ebminatiWJ 
dieL it was discovered that 
$?£o*£i all lie above 
symptoms whenever she ate 
Sri^ chicken, cheese, pea- 
nutt milk, com (gjucose 

sugar) and beet sugar. . . 

She now has de-sensitizmg 
drops before each meal and is 
a normal happy, health 1 
child again* 


DENVER 


*TLEET 


T,iM FREEPOST, Earls Barton, Nortl^mpion NN60BR. 


[ ADDRESS 


i, postcode : ^ ; 

’ I — T.M | 

Jl^NO STAMP NEEDED j 




■ ' sjyy 'e y iff ‘f " •-? C 












-!&& ld.1fr.i-™ i *aa aniRiKiis 






THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Iron bars to 


race bar 


The shadow of apartheid has been 
cast over a reunion next week of 
Coldiiz prisoners, Mike Moran, a 


former Royal Navy commander 
who run. the Coklitz Associ- 


who hag run the Coklitz Associ- 
ation for 40 years, has invited the 
South African ambassador. Den- 
nis Worrell, to a party next Friday 
■to launch a new book. Tunnelling 
Into Coldiiz. by a South African 
mining engineer, Jim Rogers. 
'Moran, in his circular to associ- 
ation members, says Rogers, 
known to fellow captives as “Old 
Horse", entbusiarically approves 
of his move. But Rogers’ delight is 
not shared by one Coldiiz PoW 
who escaped from German cus- 
tody. He is Indian and has written 
to Moran saying he will not be 
coining because of the invitation 
to WorralL Moran says: “There 
were South Africans in every part 
of our war effort so our loyalties 
are still there — to hell with what's 


happening now/ 


Video Nazi 


Home rule 


Peacemeal 


The government is celebrating 
International Year of Peace in a 
style which I can only describe as 
distinctive. The high point was to 
have been a Foreign Office semi- 
nar at Wilton Park in early 
September — (luring the holiday 
season — but this had to be 
cancelled for lack of interest Now 
the FOC is asking people to a 
lecture by Sir Brian Urquhart at 
Chatham House on November 12. 
My informant, whose name was 
spelt wrongly on the invitation, 
tells me he would cross the 
Atlantic to hear the great UN 
Peacekeeper, buta week’s notice is 
absurd; also, he could have heard 
Urquhart at the Central Hall a few 
weeks ago, along with a much 
larger audience than that accom- 
modated by Chatham House. 


BARRY FANTONI 


AliNT 


r** 


POP 

star* 

TD M/OQ 
VOTERS 


‘We all want to help the Tories, bat 
with yonr sex life, forget it* 


Miles behind 


. I discover an explanation for 
Edinburgh's humiliating defeat by 
Glasgow in the contest to be 
designated European City of Cul- 
ture 1990. On the face of h 
. Edinburgh, with its art galleries, its 
official festival, tattoo and fringe, 
.'would appear streets ahead of 
Glasgow, even given the latter's 
Burrell Collection and costly 
“Miles Better" PR campaign. I 
have it on the best authority, 
however, that Edinburgh council 
threw away its case in a disastrous 
. application paper to Richard 
■ Luce, the Arts Minister. So inept 
was it that Malcolm Rifkind, 

. Scottish Secretary, who represents 


an Edinburgh constituency, 
?.pleaded with Luce to give Edin- 
burgh another chance. Incredibly, 
I understand, when its second 
attempt landed on Luce's desk, 
Rifkind was forced to admit it was 
just as bad. 


• Even pub grab is faffing victim 
to gentrification- A sign outside a 
Shaftesbury Avenue pub reads: 
“Ploughman's Quiche". 


Family fare 


.1 fear the Boots “Baby of the 
■Year" competition being publi- 
cized at the Cannon cinema in 
-Piccadilly is unlikely to attact 
many entries. The poster asks: 
“Are you the proud parent of a 
beautififf bouncing baby?" This 
must surely be answered in the 
negative by most of foe current 
clientele: the two films showing 
are Desert Hearts , the tale of a 
lesbian affair, and Parting 
Glances, about a gay triangle in 
New York. PHS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5-1986 


Can criminals go 


Hie Home Secretary's speech to 
the Conservative lawyers, empha- 
sizing the government's intention 
to strengthen the powers of jjhe 


by D. A. Thomas 


courts to seize the profits of enme 
fa proposal foreshadowed in a 
white paper on criminal justice 
last March) will cause some 
puzzlement to lawyers familiar 
with existing sentencing legisla- 
tion. The courts have bad such 
powers for many years, in the 
shape of the Criminal Bankruptcy 
Order. 

Under existing law an offender 
who inflicts losses totalling more 
than £15,000 on his victim can be 
made criminally bankrupt The 
Director of Public Prosecutions 
may then petition for the appoint- 
ment of a Receiver who will 
become vested with all the 
offender's property, with power to 
reopen past transactions. The 
Criminal Bankruptcy Order was 
recently described in the Court of 
Appeal as “a comprehensive and 
far-reaching means of obtaining 
satisfaction: the defendant can not 
only be stripped of his ill-gotten 


guns, but obliged to make rec- 
ompense for all the loss which the 
injured party has suffered to the 
limit of his means." 


The main limitation of the 
Criminal Bankruptcy Order re- 
sults from its restriction to cases 
where the offender has inflicted a 
loss. It does not apply where the 
offender has made a profit without 
inflicting specific financial loses: 
This means that drag traffickers, 
in particular, are not subject to 
this sanction. Rutly to meat this 
deficiency, Parliament has re- 
cently enacted the Drug Traffick- 
ing Offences Act, designed to 
provide a powerful means of 

profit^Vhls Art, which passed 
through Par liamen t with enthu- 
siastic support from both sides, is 
expected to come into effect some 
time next year. 

Whether it will prove to be the 
scourge of the drag trafficker 


remains to be- seen: one view is 
that it will cause more trouble 
than it is wrath, and that it may 
possibly provide, the dreg traf- 
ficker with, the means of delaying 
the pursuit of justice against him. 
This is because, for m obvious 
reason, Paritament has specified 
that the court most deal with the 
question of confiscation in every 
case of a drag trafficking offence. 
Experience suggests that the 
overwhelming majority of pro- 
secutions which will attract the 
provisions of the Act will involve 
small-time pushers whose assets 
are extremely limited, and there is 
a danger that the Act will simply 
result in an-unnecessary waste of 
time in an already overburdened 
Crown Court system. 

More serious, at least in the 
relatively rare case of the big-time 
trafficker, is the requirement .of 
the Act that the court must 
complete the process or making a 


confiscation order before impos- 
ing the principal sentence for like 
offence: This process involves 

three distinct steps, each of which , 
may. be complicated. The court, 
must first decide whether the 
■ offender has benefited from drug 
trafficking, then assess the total 
value of his proceeds of his profit 
from drug trafficking, and then, 
detornine the total value of his 
realizable property, before it can 
pass sentence. 

It is not difficult to see that a 
successful drag trafficker will be 
abfe to present his financial affairs 
in such a way that the first stage of 
. this process will be long drawn 
out, particularly if he is able to 
secure release on bail in the 
meanwhile. These fears may be 
disproved by experience: but it 
can hardly be sensible policy to 
extend new and untried legisla- 
tion, an which the ink is scarcely 
dry, when die need for new powers 
(as opposed to e ffe c tiv e admin- 
istration) is not demonstrated. 

The author is editor qf C ur ren t 
Sentencing Practice: 


Thirty years after the Hungarian uprising, Gyorgy Agzej, a member of the rolmg Politfenra, 
argues that its aims and tai^^have bera inisrepresei^throiisjioiit the West 


RoUocks restaurant, with its Ba- 
nana Belgian o ice cream, has 
already been toppled from the top 
of my league of bad taste advert- 
isements. A reader sends me a 
local paper ad garnished with a 
portrait of Hitter "If Hiller had 
Sindaire TV . . .he’d be watching 
more than warring. Sindaire, the 
TV with a German accent." 

• Spotted in Mexico City; a menu 
advertising sandwiches "with 
chicken leg or bosom." 


Fianna Fail supporters in 
Castlebar, County Mayo, have 
good reason for objecting to the 
local council's plans for a road by- 
pass. The siggested route slices 
right through the birthplace of 
their leader, Charles Haughey. 
The former prime minis ter and 
present leader of the opposition 
has said he “doesn't wish to stand 
in the way" of the road. But the lo- 
cal party takes the view that to 
demolish the house — which 
; already has a plaque on the wall 
celebrating its significance — 

; would be a political ill omen, given 
that a generalelectionhas to beheld , 
within the next year. j 




. .rr*. - 4 W* 

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• vK-^y 






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Kadar trusting the people 


Hungary today: enjoying the fruits of a new spirit of entraprise 


Hungarians remember the events 
of 1956 in order to understand the 
present, and to stop us from 
straying once again into the error 
of past ways. 

-The Horthy regime, installed by 
joint Anglo-French efforts, ruled a 
country between the two world 
wars where 3.6 million (40 per 
cent of the population) enjoyed a 
weekly income which was the 
same as the price of three and a 
half pints of milk. Hundreds of 
thousands of field bands on large 
estates had no home of their own. 
"Worker" was a pejorative term in 
a country where the proletarian 
misery was much like that de- 
scribed by Dickens a century 
earlier. 

The post-war years were a time 
when the energies of the people 
were set free. Unfortunately, how- 
ever, from 1948 the Rakosi clique 
abused the people’s legitimate 
hopes, their honest and active 
faith, and the ideals of socialism. 
That was the major cause of the 
national tragedy of 1956. 

The break in socialist progress 
would not have happened without 
the counter-revolutionary struggle 
of reactionary forces. Even the 
West recognizes this to be true, 
although it supported, incited, and 
encouraged the counter-revolu- 
tion. The speed with which Hun- 
gary was able to return to the 


1956: only an 
episode on 


socialist system, and not just 
restore law and order, oners 


restore law and order, oners 
positive proof that the people were 
merely disillusioned with the 
distortions of socialism and not 


with socialism! tsel£ 

The new leadership of the party 
based itself on putting its trust in 
people instead of suspecting 
everybody, shutting itself off from 
the outside world. The construc- 
tion of socialism should continue 
on the understanding that in 
society, no man and no generation 
is so unimportant that it can be 
sacrificed for an objective. 

That is why the deliberate self- 
restraint of power and the plural- 
ism of values and interests that 
expresses the diversified nature of 


society must be manifest in a rate- 
party system. We made a new start 
on the organization of agricultural 
cooperatives in 1958, and our 
success was such that it received 
international recognition. Both 
agricultural production and the 
income of the rural population 
were boosted. Food shortages 
became a thing of the past and — 
since various crop yields moved to 
the top of the scale — Hungary 
turned into a major exporter of 
agricultural produce. 

Within a generation the number 
of manual workers in agriculture 
was reduced by four fifihs and the 
number of those with professional 
qualifications of university stan- 
dard grew six-fold. These pro- 
fessional people in' no way 
resemble the professional men of 
old with their gentry manners and 
aspirations; nor do agricultural 
workers resemble the peasants 
their fathers were, or their own 
former selves. For they are now 
the masters of their own fate. 


Between 1950 and 1980 the 
urban population grew from about 
two to four milli on, and the 
number of skilled workers has 
doubled. These 30 years are 
without precedent in the history of 
the Hungarian nation. Thai is true 
in spire of all the difficulties and 
all the anxieties that accompanied 
these changes. 

Dry figures can only indicate the 
extent and rate of change. In I960 
18,000 privately-owned motor 
vechicles were licensed; the 


prcsrat figure is 13 miffioiL Inter- 
na tfonti holiday travd is a growth 
industry. In the 1950s the number 
of tourists, in each direction, 
totalled only tens of thousands. In 
1985. more than 15 million for- 
eigners visited Hungary and 5.5 
rmUion Hungarians travelled 
abroad, about a quarter of them to 
non-Warsaw Pact countries. For 
many years now those who left the 
country in 1956-57, be it' in 
confusion, because they found 
themselves confronted, or simply 
out of a sense of adventure, have 
been coining back to their old 
country on visits.. 

We are living in difficult times. 
For some years now we have been 
up against the consequences of 
restructuring in the world econ- 
omy which have proved unfav- 
ourable to Hungary in the long 
term, as wdl as trying to cope with 
the modernization of our own 
economic structure. We cannot 
stand still but must take stops 
forward in the reform of economic 
management and of the economic 
structure, as wdl as carry on with 
the process of extending socialist 
democracy. 

That is why our answer was not 
less, but more, and more meaning- 
ful, socialist democracy even at a 
time of diplomatic chills, unjusti- 
fied embargo* and discrimination, " 
and a deterioration in the terms or 
trade. This was furthered by it 
being made compulsory to have 
more than one candidate in each 
election and by continuing with 


foe right of veto for trades rations, 
while strengthening other rights 
they enjoyed, as weQ as their right 
to represent interests which de- 
volve on the Chamber of Com- 
merce and other institutions. 

The state administrative appa- 
ratus was reorganized, greater 
autonomy was given to local 
councils, and a new Media Act 
was passed. Preparations aire being 
made .to introduce compulsory 
rotation all foe way to the highest 
posts in the leadership. Socialist 
- democracy cannot be confined to 
participation at elections every 
few years. Tire right to make one’s 
yoke heard on the^job, a sense of 
ownership which is vital where 
property is held in common, and 
foe need to strengthen the spirit of 
enterprise all mean that in as 
many enterprises as possible 
management should be chosen by 
the workforce. 

Although people: work too hand 
in Hungary today, product i vity is 
still; low. We must, therefore, shift 
to a higher gear. Naturally , social- 
ism to us means not only a growth 
in production but also a growth in 
welfare. We became communists 
to make sure that society should 
give men a chance to lead a 
meaningful and joyful life, that 
there should be more smiles on the 
faces of men and ' women and 
.fewer tears in their oyes, that they 
should have a sense of security 
and a sense of dignity, that they 
should have aims that make sense * 
and . are realistic, and that they 
should look on this socialist 
country as their own. Our work for 
foe past 30 years has been devoted 
to this, and this remains our ami 
for foe fixture as weH. " 

Humanity is foe sole beneficiary 
of peaceful competition between 
the different social systems. And it 
is humanity, that would perish 
should this competition degen- 
erate into a fierce and senseless 
war. Let us compete for ways in 
which to offer a mare free, 
complete, and meaningful fife to 
mankind without, oppressing, 
exploiting, or misleading others. 


n«nny Finkelstein 


than 


Nothing but trouble at the diploma mill 


[ Washington 

A highly critical report from one 
i of America's leading research 
foundations has found that most 
of the country's 3300 four-year 
undergraduate colleges and univ- 
ersities have lost their direction. 
The courses are fragmented, foe 
teachers bored and cynical, the 
students neglected, the goals con- 
fused and the g raduates un- 
j pre p ared for the real world. 

The report, the result of a three- 
year study by the Carnegie 
j Foundation for the Advancement 
of Teaching, says foe undergrad- 
uate college is “a troubled 
institution." It cites staring ex- 
penses, students with low aca- 
demic standards and little intell- 
ectual curiosity, too much 
emphasis on “big-time'* sport and 
poor coordination of intellectual 
and social life on campus. 

The main criticism is that most 
university teachers, under career 
pressure to get ahead, spend too 
much time on research and too 
little on teaching. Students said 
they felt foot were treated like a 
number instead of a person, 
especially in the large state univer- 
sities with up to 40,000 students. 

But the students themselves are 
not spared. The report says that in 
an average week one m four never 
goes to foe library and two thirds 
use it for four hours or less: Many 
are excessively vocational, in- 


terested only rc getting a profitable 
job, “so that I can make some 
money and then take it easy," as 
one said. They are “exceedingly 
passive." One professor remarked: 
“My students have no idea what 
scholarship in my department is 
all about” As a result BA degrees 
in business studies have doubted 
from 114,865 in 1971 to 230,031 
in 1984, while degrees in En glish 
have fallen from 57,026 to 26,419. 
Some colleges have dropped BA 
courses in such subjects as geology 
and music to emphasize business 
specialities such as restaurant 
management. 

Many students arrive at univer- 
sity so incompetent in reading, 
writing and mathematics that they 
need remedial work. As one of foe 
5,000 lecturers interviewed in the 
study remarked: “The biggest 
problem I have with my students 
is getting them to read and write." 
One reason is the lack of selection; 
with too many colleges competing 
for too few students, there is tittle 
competition to get a place. 


The Carnegie report is particu- 
larly worrying because it comes 
from one of foe liberal founda- 
tions most identified with support 
for education. Its president. Dr 
Ernest Boyer, was US Commis- 
sioner of Education under Presi- 
dent Caner. He said last week that 
American colleges suffer from 


conflicting priorities and compet- 
ing special interests. . 

He recommends a number -of. 
reforms: applicants for university 
entry should, have to submit ; a 
written essay; students should take 
a one-year English course, and' 
their four-year curriculum should 
include a compulsory core. Of 
language, foe arts, history, sacral 
and government institutions and 
the natural sciences. 

Lack of money and rising fees 
had already led to talk of a crisis in 
American higher education which, 
with 12.3 million students and an 
annual bin of $1022 billion, is a 
very important factor in the 
economy. The report found that 
many parents and taxpayers con- 
sider foe cost — fees rai^e from - 
$1,000 a year at state institutions', 
to $16,000 at private universities 
— to be outrageous. 

The many confusions- and 
disagreements on goals identified 
by foe Carnegie report include a 
separation between academic and 
non-academic life and a mismatch 
between, secondary and higher 
education. Si milar concerns have 
been voiced by W illiam Bennett, 
President Reagan’s Secretary of 
Education, who recently told Har- 


vard University, that, it was wast- 
ing students' fees, had failed to 


The Carnegie report JDustraies , 
how the end of the baby boom and 
growing public reluctance to 
-spend 'tax dollars have taken their 
toll bn American higher : educa- 
tion. Many liberal - arts colleges 
that thrived In foe J960s -are , 
struggling to survive, concentrat- 
ing only on what seems “relevant" 
both lojob-hungrystudentsandto 
wary state legislatures. As Car- 
■negle noted: “Driven by careerism 
and overshadowed, by graduate i 
. and professional education, many 
....are more -successful in 
credenliating than in providing a 
quality education." But foe back- 
lash has begun. Already public 
disquiet over foe low standards of 
secondary schools in the US has 
-fuelled a “back-to-foe-basies? 
movement, led to tougher stan- 
dards for teachers and renewed 
public c o n c ern over what happens 
in foe classroom. Carnegie heralds 
a similar movement now in higher 
education. There is an everlouder 
clamour for academic excellence, 
for standards, rigour and intellec- 
mal responsibility. It is a move-, 
mem liberals once denounced as 
elitism, a “more-means-worse" 
philosophy tha t hampered minor- 
ities arid those from dis- 


“SbdaEsrii- is what Labour gov- 
ernments do". That was the 
sophisticated political philosophy 
of Herbert Morrison. Now, along 
with many of Morrison's other 
beliefs, Labour activists believe 
the reverse: “Socialism is what 
Labour governments didn't do. 

Labour activists have drawn®* 
odd conclusion from -the past 
force d ecades in government and 
opposition-They have blamed the 
failure on the betrayal of demo- 
cratic socialism by Labour poB- 
tirigTw in .. office. They are 
confident about facing foe rigours 
of office only now that they have 
replaced “foe revisionist traitors" 
of the last Labour government, 
evil people Eke Red Mulley, with 
honest- socialists tike Roy Hat- 
tersley and Gerald Ka ufm a n . 
Eventually, of course these bas- 
tions of socialism wQl themselves 
be denounced and replaced by 
even sturdier bastions. 


At its inception, the SDP ad- 
vanced a moire sensible but still 


only partially correct axgument. 
Labour’s, failure was blamed on 
the nature of the party. The formal 
link with the trade unions, foe 
homage paid to Clause IV, the 
antipathy of Labour to inter- . 
national pni^rirpc and increasing 
T rotskyite infiltration . ..all these 
shortcomings had made the mod- 
ernization of British socialism 
impossible. Only a new party, free 
from these debilitating defects, 

. could take proper advantage of the 

rich democratic socialist tradition. 

Gradually, over the last five 
years, foe SDPs analysis , has 


ist ends. 

There is a furfoer. criticism: that 
democratic socialists pursue 
equality to the exclusion of other 
and yet are vague on the 
nature of foe egafitenan society 
they are seeking; that foe tradition 
is antipathetic to foe price xnecb*> 
nfrem while presenting no work- 
. able alternative; that it accepts an 
ovOT-sizDpli&d!^ 

analysis. . ; ‘ 

No podificran, however honest, 
can overcome foe defirienries 
such a tradition. No party, how- 
ever modem its institutions* can 
afford to be restricted to thmfcmg 
only in terms of sneb aptriks- 
qefry. it is this gradual realization 
that ■ has characterized tfie 
development of foe SDP. It has 
not moved to foe right, but has . 
simply grown up- The SDP doc k 
not, of course, doty foe siguife . 
cance of democratic sodafem. ft 
owes to this tradithm its . 
determination to fight eo ouoa tic 
its desire- to. eradicate 
class distinction and Its resolve to 
redistribute wealth. Bat it is now 
prepared » acknowledge* debt to 
other phflosoplricar traditions: 

Perhaps the best example is its 
readiness to accept that the new 
liberal tradition is as important to 
foe party as foe socialist tradition. . 
The SDP has harm from foe new. 
Liberals foe importance of the 
frirfT v wfagf and of liberty, ft has 
teamed a healthy scepticism abotftilri 
foefaeaevoteoce of all central sunt 
activity. It has teamed foe im- 


tradition itself is seen to be at 
fault Most SDP members see 
central flaws in soriatism which 
cannot be removed simply by 
“modernization". They also see 
foe importance of other political 
traditions and acknowledge their 
influence. 

In debates at SDP conferences 
very few members can now be 
found who equate social democ- 
racy with democratic socialism. 
Members are much more likely to 
state that the SDP is a “new 
party". They do not, of course, 
suggest that political history began 
in 1981, but they do suggest that 
foe SDP is a new and creative 
synthesis of many polkical tra- 
ditions rather than the narrow 
product of one. 

The perceived deficiencies in 
democratic socialism are numer- 
ous. The most important is that 
democratic socialism sees democ- 
racy as simply foe. means to 
sooalist ends. As socialist poli- 
ticians become more po w erfu l 
they simply stress more mid more* 
emphatically that socialist ends 
will take a Jong titne to. achieve. , 

For the social democrat, on the 
Other hand, no end is foreseen to 
foe political process; there win 
always be conflicts of interest and 
of value that will have to be 
conciliated. The democratic 
socialist tradition and its adher- 
ents will always undervalue foe 
importance of democracy and 
oppose its reform, if it inconve- 


Jeamed that the reformer’s job is 
to combat injustice as it becomes 
evident rather than to follow 
social blueprints. ' 

Many members of the SDP 
have also bad the confidence to 
admit what to . many Labour 
activists would be anathema: that 
there is much good in the often 
neglected tradition of Tory 
democracy. The Tory democrats 
have bequeathed to the _ SDP a 
belief in national unity, in com- 
promise, and in consensus. The 
SDP has accepted, loo, foe unity, 
of rights and responsibilities and 

foe v ?ht T ^ rathw than 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


our very own 
male model 


The first- of foe glittering new 
Young Entrepreneur of the Month 
awards was made at foe weekend 
by the proprietor of Moreover 
Enterprises himself. Lord More- 
over. Lord Moreover has always 
believed in encouraging, industry 
in others, usually by keeping them 
at the office tilt midnight, and it 
was with a keen sense of anticipa- 
tion that the distinguished guests 
sped up foe Ml on Sunday 
evening. The ceremony itself took, 
place in the Pork Scratchings 
service area conference suite, 
which represents everything that 
is best about Britistebusiness. 

At 9 J5 'precisely, just as foe 
coffee was being cleared away and 


foe-next gala dinner. Lord 


Moreover flew in by helicopter 
and was whisked to foe micro- 
phone to make hisspeech, which 
was handed to him by a'team of 
scriptwriters. 

“Ladies and gentlemen, this is 
the first Young Entrepreneur of 
the Month award ceremony, 
which is designed to help young . 
people to get tbetr first footing on 
foe tedder which leads to foe 
heights of the black economy. As a - 
young man I arrived in London 
without a penny in my pocket, and 
fay 430 pm the same day l had 
already made my first million. 
What was my secret? I'll tell you. I 
didn’t waste time poncing around 
at Young Entrepreneur of foe 
Month ceremonies — I went 
"straight out . and supplied what 
other people demanded. 

“But -enough of myself The 
co mpe tition for this- premier 
award, made possible by the 
Moreover charitable foundation. 
Tax Dodge' Aid, has . been intense. 
And some of the entrants have 
been- quite ingenious. For in- 
stance, I was very struck with foe 
contestant who has set up a small 
catering firm for weddings. Far the 
wedding ceremony itself; that is — 
he mans a well-stacked drinks 
trolley up and down the aisles of 
churches. 

-"I was also quite taken by a lady 

who has invented lighter-than-air 
garments. Her idea is that if 
shoulder-pads are filled with 
ugmer-than-air gases, tiffs "will 
fate foe wekht . off foe feeL 
aimuany, a brassiere with the 
same asset will give m ore, am, . 
upUft Ingenious, but no use to me 


show clear educational .purpose 
and did not provide a sofid “moral 
education.” 


advantaged backgrounds. But now 
even-foe liberals believe it is tune 


to tighten up. 


Michael pinyon 


personally. The same cannot be 
said for another entrant- who has 
devised a way of making a profit 
on the Stock Exchange without 
anyone knoWbg. However, l have 
come to a private arrangement 
with him and he has now with: 

■ drawn to worklbr me. . 

“The winner, thnug fr , isa young 
firm which has devised an inflat- 
able mate companion. Yes, you 
heard me. An inflatable male 
friend. In the shoddier shops, of . 
Soho yon can, I believe, purchase 
inflatable females if you axe going 
to foe South Pole. But this is 
something quite different - it is 
aimed. at the- many lone females 
who dread going into restaurants 
or pubs by themselves because of 
mate reaction. Now, at hot, they 
have someone who w3l . sit opp- 
osite and win be courteous; 
c omp a n i onabl e and quieL ' There 
is another inflatable model wb6 
will walk yon home at night in 
complete safety, and ifyousawhis 
fierce appearance you would 
understand why. In man y ways 
these inflatables are m .ch more 
useful than real men. 

"The inflatable man has many 
other uses. He can be left in a 
dining-car or railway coach seat to 
reserve it. He can be left muter a 
car, with his legs sticking out, so 
that a prying traffi c warden wiD 
think the car is being mended. He 
can be left by the pool at the crack 
of. dawn, to keep the sunbathing 
place at your hotdl which would 
otherwise be taken by Germans. 
He can head government commis- 
sions, answer telephones at the- 
atres or do any other job .which 
requires total immobility. ' 

“In my case; I shall certainly : 
buy one or two to take to public 
dmners, to tit next to me Tbey are 
bound to be better company than 
foe people normally placed at my 
side. In any case, l am delighted to 
present foe award to . Your® - 
In fl atables of Croydon. The prize, 
of course, is a Chanrgi to still til ■ 

rights and assets exdusivdy . tp 
Moreover Enterprises. They nave 
until this tune tomorrow to think 
.it over. The rest of you, no doubt . 
will get very drank 4tL. my . 
expense." 

So saying, his Lordship pock- 
eted several cigars, badenis wife - 
good night and disappeared 'to- 
wards the helicopter prior 10 




From these traditions and in- , 
Alienees and from others — contio > 
nental social democracy, Amer- 
‘ my fiberafism, the feminist 
movement — has come foe syn- 
thesis of ideas that is the philos- 
ophy of the SDP. From the 
formation of this synthesis comes 
nk» the determination «i« foe 
. future of pofitira should Ife in foe 
compet iti on of many different 
ideas rather than a dash between 
two outdated ones. - . j 

Labour, an. foe -other hand, is j 
destined to spend its days in fiat- { 
ricidal conflict over the bones of a 
dead phSosopby. However good 
Neff Kinnock is on teteyition, 
however weH it does at foe next 
election, the tnflh is, to use Tony 
OostencTs comment on public 
spending: “The party’s over”. 

7 he author is Alliance prospective 
partiamentajy candidate for Brad , x 
Bast . ■ / _ . _ 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 



17 



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pew things in the Middle East 
are what they .seem. White the 
work! was still rejoicing with 
Dr David Jacobsen over his 
release from captivity in Leba- 
non . and. congratulating Mr 
Terry Waite for helping to 
briirg ibis about — it became 
apparent last night that both 
w jnen played only small parts in 
a play of much greater political 
consequence. 

Even that hardly describes 
the revelations, which we print 
on page 12 today, of the 
intrigue involving five govern- 
ments and the. freedom of 
innocent men. The mission of 
Mr Robert McFariane ,• a 
former National Security Ad- 
viser in Washington, allegedly 
travelling to Iran cm an Irish 
passport- with' a planeload of 
arms, a signed Bible from his 
President and a parcel of cakes 
for Ayatollah Khomeini, must, 
count among the strangest in 
diplomatic history. Beside 
that, die more familiar New 
Testament presence of Mr 
Waite, dressed in his cassock 
^ahd descending from ah air- 
W craft in a war-ravaged corner 
of the Third World to bargain 
for captured, men’s lives, 
seems comparatively mun- 
dane. What are we to make of 
it? 

. That there was less than met 
the eye to Mr Waite’s criss- 
crossing of the Levant, should 
not be a surprise. He is no 
mirade man and it has looked 
for some time as if the West 
was beginning to expect too 
much of him. As the Arch- 
bishop of Omtesbury’s envoy 
extraordinary, he approaches 


any cri sis as a man of God — 
representing va l ues 

and humanity. The hostages in 
Lebanon are being held by 
men more interested in poli- 
tics than piety — though 
ruling to use both in the 
cynical pursuit of their objec- 
tives. In .short, there was 
cteariy a price to pay beyond 
Mr Waite’s spiritual resources. 

It now seems dear that the 
release of Dr Jacribsen was 
engineered by pcditicians en- 
gaged in the Comdex politics 
of the Middle East and at a far 
higher fevd than anyone could 
have supposed. The govent- 
inents of Syria, Iran and the 
United - Stoles, presumably 
France and apparently Ku- 
wait, would seem to have been 
involved in a secret bar gaining 
round over arms supplies and 
influence, in which the safety 
of innocent men and the 
emotions of their families 
have been once more pan of a 
greater game. 

It all makes for fadings of 
profound unease. To buy the 
release of innocent men by 
freeing convicted muderers 
from jail or to deal in the 
murky underworld of the arms 
trade and political allegiances, 
ra to rfak surrendering the high 
ground to terrorists. Short- 
term relief can be bought by 
such means only at the cost of 
long-term anxiety and grief 
Gradually the response to 
terrorism has been toughening 
as more and more govern- 
ments have come to recognise 
this general principle. : 

It is hard to *n«iri» lasting 
judgements on this strange 


affair. The details are only now 
^emerging and there win doubt- 
less be denials and counter- 
claims in the coming week. 
But at fist right it looks as if 
the United States, which has 
taken the tendin' confronting 
the forces of international 
terrorism has been canyxngthe 
on the kind of negotiations it 
has publicly condemned. 
While it may not nave entered 
into talks directly with the 
teronsts themselves, it has 
bought the. cooperation of the 
Iranian, government at a price 
which is of doubtful 
acceptability. 

Bor die Syrians and the 
Iranians, both of whom have 
clearly been involved, there 
can be little sympathy. The 
course of events would seem to 
justify the long-standing sus- 
picion. that both governments 
have had It in their power to 
secure the release of at least 
some of the hostages in Leba- 
non. If they have chosen to 
exercise that power only when 
they have secured the right 
political price, they deserve 
contempt not gratitude. 

Mr Waite himself would 
seem to have been used as 
A»myi« this affair . Th e re is n o 
reason to suspect bis motives 
atiH he must, by his courage 
and industry, emerge as the 
one imblemished player in foe 
plot Buthe has been in danger 
for some time of becoming an 
-institutionalised figure, whose 
good will could be abused by 
governments. He weight need 
to reassess his interests if 
indeed this is starting to 
happen. 




LOOKING THROUGH THE LEFT 




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Mr Kmnorik has tried his best 
this year to convey the im- 
pression that the only threat to 
democracy comes from the 
Militant, or ganization, and that 
he has dealt with it He ignores 
(though the general public will 
not forget) foe rest of foe hard 
left, winchfrom so many inner 
city town halk and epostit- 
. ueocy parties, uses, its power to 
flout public, wishes, and which 
will lave more MPs » thenext 
Parliament, whatever the re- 
sult of the election. . 

Yet to focus on thehardteft, 
also distorts foe picture of the 
Labour Party. If the rest of foe 
party were soundly committed 
to democratic values, the hard 
left conld be eradicated. But 
f-tbe rest of the party is not so 
committed, which is why Mr 
Kinnock dare not strike at the 
wider hard left as he does at 
\ f KinStd! the Militants. He is inhibited 

- * ‘ v - by the fact that the so-called 

soft left, from which he himself 
sprang, is now foe pivot on 
which the Labour Itarty bal- 
ances, and foe soft left protects 
the hard. 

The soft left is separated 
from foe hard for two reasons. 
It understands that foe quari- 
revolutionary policies of the 
hard left’s “party democracy 9 * 
repel voters. More disinterest- 
edly, when faced with tire 
authoritarian logic of so much 
left-wing thinking , the soft left 
genuinely flinches from it. 

So why does the soft left 
protect the hard? One ieas onis 
fear of afienatmg supporters 
who control so much of 
Labour’s local party marina - 


f erv 


me 


3del 


ery. They do not; want a rivfl 
war in advance of a general 
. election. There is also a resid- 
ual feeling that these are “our 
people” who cannot be dis- 
owned; sodafists with the 
same n ftjmptfr vision who 
could be kept in plaoe once Mr 
Kinaock wssm powrr. 

. • But tire -fostortion m foe 
picture realty arises from foe 
en^brqgd imity b rough t about 
jg the.'sfoft left hetwptti itself 
aM the so-caDed moderates, 
itqjreseBted by Mr Hattersley, 
Mr Kaufman, Mr John Smith 
. and their Hke. Thisonty exists 
because foe toft left fa pivotal 
and controls foe party, forcing 
the moderates to swallow a 
range of leftist pofcdes from 
Mr Healey’s acceptance of a 
wholly non-nuclear policy to 
Mr Hatteisley’s highly con- 
trolled economic poficy, of 
which the latest manifestation 
is his announcement tins week 
of his ideas far subjecting 
pension foods to controls. The 
crucial fact about the Labour 
Party is not the position of the 
hand versus the soft leftbut foe 
extent to which the two to- 
gether have forced the mod- 
erates to toe foeir hue. 

Last week’s Shadow Cabinet 
elections were widely inter- 
preted as showing a spfit 
between foe hard and soft left 
to the benefit of foe moderates. 
The Tribune (soft) and Cam- 
paign (hard) groups had faded 
to agree on a sate over a 
•technical argument about vot- 
ing. As a result, two of the 
Tribune Groups Mr .Robin 


Cooke, Mr Kitmodfs chief 
campaign strategist, and Mr 
Robert Hughes, were voted 
off Their places were taken by 
* Dr David dark, of the Solidar- 
ity (moderate) group and Mr 
Bryan Gould, a politician of 
. clear ability, who is among die 
most moderate of the soft left. 
Mr Gould now has Mr Cook’s 
rid job; DrCSaik has foe job of 
Environment protection 

Butfofafoifttofoecentzeon 
a technical argument' about 
Shadow Cabinet voting sig- 
nifies no mine than foe shift to 
the left last year when both 
groups had a pact. Soft left 
policies now generally prevail 
in the party. They have ranch 
in common with those of the 
hard left. The question sow J5 
bow deariy foe electorate will 

The signs are not encourag- 
ing for Mr Kizmock. A Gallop 
survey of the 16-29 year age- 
. group has found that on 
nudear defence policy opinion 
is almost exactly divided in the 
group where lfe expected most 
support, and where Labour is 
generally in the biggest lead. At 
foe same time, a Marpian poll 
has shown a two to one 
rejection of Labour’s nudear 
policy. Overall, foe Conser- 
vatives seem to have caught up 
Labour in the opinion polls. 
The general public usually has 
. the knack of reg i stering what 
the .real state of a party is. 
Perhaps it has understood the 
■shift that has taken place in the 
. structure of the Labour Party 
and vfoat it portends. 




CHUNNEL BLUES 


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This 
ought 
project 


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The initial enthusiasm 3 Bm* tte 
Channel tunnel project has 
talwn several knorics in recent 
weeks. This was periiaps to be 
expected. The media excite- 
ment with which such im- 
portant national projects are 
launched ineyiteWy gives way 
to a period in which fob foe 
doubters nibble away! To use ^a 
Budget metaphor we are now 
at foe “finance hflT stage 
when foe grand certainties of 
Budget day are subject to foe 
detailed scrutiny and 
organised opposition of the 
sceptics. 

fading of hesitancy 
to pass away as foe 
K * W jvU becomes further ad- 
vanced. It would be a tragedy 
if; having secured a political 
consensus on both aifles of the 
Channel and having finally 
agreed a pref er r e d scheme, foe 
back-biting were so to delay 
the project that it ran out of 
impetus altogether. 

Yesterday the Transport 
Secretary, Mr John Moore, 
of his dismay a at. foe 
and inertia” fo- 
ntu%w . tunnel, and tbe 
“paralysing fear of -change 
which it generated.-' He 
acknowledged — perhaps not 
soon enough — that foe project 
toadied a sensitive nave aim 
that the Government would 
therefore have to work all the 
harder to convince those who 
have reservations about It. 


■ There are various streams of 
dissent The local concerns of 
the people of East Kent are 
perhaps foe most straight- 
forward. Projects on this scale 
are seldom free from environ- 
mental costs and as far as 
possible these doubts must be 


spoke 
“suspicion 
wards the 


Job worries may ihe even 
more pressing but they come 
more dearly into foe category 
of “fear of change*. Certainly 
there will be some impact on 
the ferries but equally, there 
will be new jobs created by foe 
tunnel. itself More important, 
for foe country as a whole, 
easier communications with 
foe continent will create new 
jri» in a whole range of 
industries to whom trade links 
are vital : 

More difficult to address, 
because more nebulous, is the 
de^-seated fading that we are 
more secure as an island and 
foot wfr by-pass maritime 
protection at our periL Only 
time and familiarity are likely 
. to prove an effective antidote 
to instinctive insularity: . . 

Scepticism in the City about 
foe project’s financial appeal is 
not entirely unrelated to these 
other , strands of opposition. 
An: investment -which arouses 
no political sensitivities. -is 
always preferable to one that is 
controversial On so: 'many 
fronts. But the more important 
reason for the difficulties en- 


countered by Eurotunnel and 
its advisers in raising initial 
equity finance have more to do 
with tire likely attractions of 
competing investment 
opportunities, not least the 
fix t ur e privatisations, planned 
by foe Government 
. The difficulties are unfortu- 
nate because the tunnel is foe 
archetype of privately fi- 
nanced infrastructure projects 
which could provide a high 
proportion of foe increased 
capital investment for which 
MPs in all parties have regu- 
Jariy called. On amuch smaller 
scale foe proposed Dartford 
bridge is another interesting 
step along this path. 

If the Treasury can agree 
that foe ride involved in these 
projects is .genuinely in the 
private sector and the financ- 
ing not part of public spending 
then an important constraint 
on the i mp ro v ement of the 
country’s capital assets wiH be 
lifted. Investment will also be 
subject fo the judgement of foe 
market rather "than the more 
erratic discrinzmation of pofi- 
yiriang- 

' Difficulties in financing a 
project the rise of the Channel 
.tunnel do not necessarily im- 
ply difficulties for other more 
modest infrastructure projects 
in the private sector; The 
.Government should press 
ahead with. ibis aspect of 
its programme; ■ . 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Aids screening for high-risk groups 


From Professor M, B. Bracken 
Sh; The tack of either * vaccine or 
cure far Aids (acquir e d hnnunw 
deficiency syndrome) leaves only 
one other n Wuvt of epidemic 
control — pre ve n ting the trans- 
mission of mfectiom rdxaatios^ 
programs will have tittle impact 
and, indeed, cannot be properly 
evaluated unless they axe finked to 
a massive, voluntary and 
confidential Aids screening pro- 


Scrologic tests canbcrw identify 
ftrrma^ iminBttodeficieDcy vims 
with reasonable accuracy and 
sett^oritireindhwhiabfoonldbe 
die focus of education and 
counseling riuoe they are the 
potential tran smi tters of the dis- 
ease. ’ 

Given farmed resources it is less 
efficient (and almost certainly less 
effective) to try and ednrale the 
entire population, although com- 
mon sense demaneb some expen- 
diture tf effort here aba. • 

Moreover, only by measuring 1 
decline in the rate of seropositive 
individuals in the population w£Q 
we know that ow e du c ational and 
preventive measures (soch as the 
provision of sterile needles to drug 
abusers) are working and that die 
epidemic is being br o ug h t under 
control. 

■’ Screening does not need to be 
universally mandatory if huge 
enough segments of me popula- 
tion volunteer — a prospect which 
shook! be easier as Aids is 
increasin gly recognised to be a 
disease Wtacb affects those outside 
the known high-risk groups. Man- 
datory testing is necessary far 
some individuals (blood, organ 
and spens donors) and, possibly, 
ought to be far others (health 
professionals, the Armed Forces, 


The Aids epidemic has foe 
potential for becoming thegreatert 
threat to czvitizaskm since foe 
bubonic plague and only draco- 
nian pobtic health measures are 
likefy to bring about its control. 
Youra sincerely, 

MICHAEL R BRACKEN, 

Yale University, 

School of Medicine, 

New Haven, 

Connecticut 06510, USA. 

From DrJLJ. Donaldson 
Sr, The raised in the 

Thames Television programme 
This Week, and s up port e d by the 
majority of viewers polled, that 
screening of tire general popula- 
tion for the Aids vims should be 
introduced adds to foe already 
complex ethical and moral issues 

ipyrnwiyfirig the - 

The decison as to whether to 

f Iiftwk ■ pw ywime to drtect 

tire p res e nce of a di sease, or 
marker for acdSseaae, in a popula- 
tion the majority of whom are npt 
symptomatic is still governed by 
prinapics promnlgncrt under the 
auspices of the Wodd Health 
Orraifoation in foe fate 1960s. 

The most fundamental of these 
is an ethical one: it hjghfigbts the 
fostinrtion between testing whidx 


takes place is site usual cfinicil 
sitnation when a patient series hefo 
from a deotor because be has 
recognised that he is in need of 
medical care, and population 
screening, where in fact the in- 
dividual probably believes himself 
to be bcalihy. 

In this tatter case, doctors or 
agencies offering the screening are 
doing so with foe dear imputation 
that a health benefit win accrue to 
the indxvidiial: that early treat- 
ment of foe disease (tf present) wfil 
result in a favourable outcome. 

With the present state of know- 
ledge erf the natural history of 
Aids, s c ree n i ng would not be 
acceptable <m this criterion. 

Could screening then be jus- 
tified in foe interests of foe public 
he a lth? With other infectious dis- 
eases* screening far the carrier 
state is seldom done on whole 
populations rather than high-risk 
groups or contacts of cases and, 
when it h, the carrier as^ well as the 
general population win Often 

The person coming forward for 
population screening far Aids 
would be doing so on purely 
altruistic grounds; that by being 
detected, fie may alter his behav- 
iour so as not to infect others. 

At the pragmatic level, if at- 
tempts were made to screen the 
general population, and bearing in 
mind that m a democratic society 
ft is unlikely that a compulsory 
approach could be used, foe 
lessons of other screening pro- 
grammes are that the group at 
greatest risk are the least Iflcdy to 
come forward far screening. 

It seems Kkdy, therefore, that 
the battle against Aids must be 
waged with scree n i ng being de- 
ployed cm a selected basis and that 
action within the general popula- 
tion will be directed at increas ing 
knowledge, changing attitudes and 
particularly behaviour: practical 
problems no less eftatienging but 
safer moral and ethical grtmnd. 
Yours sincerely, 

UAM DONALDSON, 
Broadstose, Front Street, 
Tynemouth, Tyne and wear. 
October 31. 

From Mr JLJ.C HW 
Sr, The last paragraph of your 
editorial on Aids today (October 
30) admirably points a finger at a 
Government which has, to date 
totally failed to grasp the moral 
issues involved. 

There is now, surely, an obliga- 
tion on foe churches of all 
denominations to foe initia- 
tive by preaching foe morality 
which has always been a part erf 
foeir creed. 

- This could be done in an 
informed way, preferably in dose 
collab o ration with the 
profession and also with our 
schools. Many p a rents must feel a 
desperate need for tins kind of 
pastoral help in its widest sense. 
Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD HuX, 

The Old Vicarage, 

Croxion KeniaJ, 

Grantham, Lincolnshire. 


Red Cross troubles 

From the Chairman erf the Council 
of the British Red Cross Society 
Sir, I have just returned from the 
25th international conference of 
the Red Cross in Geneva, where I 
led the British Red Guss delega- 
tion. 

Before foe conference; national 
Red Crms. and Red Crescent 
societies had assembled and, led 
by African Red Gross societies, 
had pledged support for the 
humanitarian work of the South 
African Red Cross. . 

It was foe Government delega- 
tion of Kenya who introduced tins 
motion to suspend the South 
African Government detention 
from the conference. The British 
Red Cross, foe International 
Committee of the Red Cross and 
50 other delegations, mostly Red 
Goss, refused to p ar t icipa te m 
this uncons tituti o nal vote because 


of foe paramount need to uphold 
the principles of neutrality and 
impartiality which unite tire Red 
Cross movement but do not bind 
governments. 

The international conference 
has now ended and with ft the de 
facto suspension of the South 
African Government delegation. I 
hope the South African Govern- 
ment will therefore reconsider the 
ejuMoa from South Africa of 
ICRC re pr ese n tatives. 

The humanitarian work of foe 
British Red Cross and the Inter- 
national Committee of the Red 
Cross wiH continue. These efforts 
need more support than ever from 
those who wish to uphold impar- 
tial standards of humanity. 

Yours faithfully, 

SYLVIA LIMERICK, 

Chairman of the Council, 

The British Red Cross Society, 

9 Grosvenor Crescent, SW1. 


Mortgages and RPI 

Front Mr J.L. Carr 
Sir, It has always s eem ed anoma- 
kms tiurt increases in interest rates 
that are from time to time needed 
to snstus t^r T9t(L emb 

excessive monetary growth, or 
damp down expectations of infla- 
tion should, m the shot ran, 
appear to add to inflation. 

The weight riven to mortgage 
interest in the retail price index 
must at times put political ob- 
stacles m the way of interest rate 
dianges that are desirable on 
economic grounds, and when the 
Government does sanction an 
increase there is as automatic rise 
in public spendmg since pension- 
ers, who do not pay much 
mortgage interest, receive higher 
pensions because foe RFI has 
increased by more than foeir 
frying costs - at foe same time as 
those with sayings invested in 
bidding societies receive higher 
incomes in the farm of interest. 

As foe boosing component of 
tire RFI cannot & representative, 
because of foe enormous dif- 
ferences in foe housing costs of 
council tenants, private tenants, 
owner-occupiers with recent mort- 
gages and owncr-ocenpiers whose 
houses are unencumbered or 
mortgaged for a fraction of foeir 
piesentday value, there seems no 
particular virme in the index as it 
is today. Not; since boosing costs- 
have nsen so much faster than 
other prices is foe last half 
century, would it be right to 
exdude housing from foe RFL . 

Bat study oar statisticians 
could devise a smtabfe index, 
tafcmg in rente construction 
costs, and possibly new house 
prices, to show foe trend in 
boiunigcosteinsteadoffoefooit- 
term fluctuations in the cost of a 
‘‘typicaF mortgage? 

Yonrs faithfully, 

J.L CARR, 

56 Bournemouth Drive, 

Heme Bay, Kent 


Bamber adoption 

From the Director ^ the Church cf 
England Children's Society 
Sir, In your background report cm 
Jeremy Bamber (October 29) yon 
stated that his adoption had been 
arranged by tins society. 1 would 
Hke to make it dear that fois 
statement was not based on 
information from this 
organisation. 

Adoption agencies are entrusted 
with a great deal of confidential 
information which is gives to 
them on tire understanding that ft 
null not be divulged to anyone rise 
and this duty of confidentiality is 
reinforced by statute. It would be 
regrettable if your report seemed 
to give the impression that adop- 
tion af ynra'cs are providing conn- 
A-nfiaT fwfounfltinn tO the PfBSS. 

Yours feifofiifly, 

IAN SPARKS, Director, 

Church of England Children's 
Society, 

Edward Rudolf House, 

Margery Street, TO. 

October31. 

Grand Prix failings 

Front Mr Greg Masters 
Sr, Lord Kmearn (October 31) 
has totally missed the point. The 
.object in aS motor rac ing is to be 
first to the riteqnered flag. The role 
of the team and pit crew is to assist 
the car and driver in meeting this 

objective. . 

• In Grand Prix racing, it is the 
case that cars can normally com- 
plete foe distance in a shorter time 
when equipped with soft (and 
likely less durable) tyres than they 
can with tyres capable of going the 
fall distance. Similar arguments 
are valid regarding mid-distance 
refoefling, but this practice was 
outlawed some time ago on safety 
ground* 

Yonts faith fully, 

GREG MASTERS. 

13 Agate Close, 

Port- Onavc Rrt^rtnn Ptfi 


BBC reporting 
under fire 

From Mr Glyn James 
Sr, Perhaps Mr Tebbh and his 
political unstress are unaware that 
some of us are more interested io 
foe preservation of a free ex- 
pression of views than in thdr 
evidently acute anxieties about tile 
outcome of the next general 
election. 

Is it not foe case that the 
Government's own selective 
repor ting of certain events to 
Parliament over recent months 
has blackened the Tebbit/ 
Thatcher pot so much that they 
desperately seek out a kettle -any 
kettle? 

What after seven years of 
already uninterrupted power do 
they want — a one governing-party 
State and a country which relies 
entirely for its political news and 
comment uoon those nooular 
dailies which support foe Conser- 
vative party? 

No! I will gladly continue to pay 
the BBC licence tee, if only as an 
expression of confidence in one of 
the few sources of objective 
reporting left in the media. 

Yours faithfully, 

GLYN JAMES, 

17 Broadmead Crescent, 
Bishopston, 

West Blamorgan. 

October 31. 

From Mr Eric R. Wilkinson 
Sir, The reaction of the BBC to Mr 
'Tebbrfs letter about Libyan air- 
strike reporting has followed a 
well tried PR principle, exem- 
plified by the anecdote of the 
'visiting preacher finding his 
predecessor's sermon notes dis- 
carded in pulpit and noticing a 

pencil remark scribbled in the 
margin: “Argument weak here — 
shout like blazes!” 

Many of those who have cho- 
sen, on this occasion, to defend the 
BBC are also well grounded in PR. 
“If the target is difficult to 
defend,” they reflect, “change the 
target. So they react as though the 
criticism was of foe facts reported, 
rather of the comment which 
somehow got mixed up with the 
facts. 

When the smokescreens have 
dispersed, it will be interesting to 
•read the BBCs reply to the valid 
prints made in Mr Tebbit* s letter. 
Yours sincerely, 

E R. WILKINSON, 

The Stable, 

Chanel Lane, 

Gtatetey, 

Andover, Hampshire. 

November 3w 

Gorbachov meeting 

From General Sir John Hackett 
Sir; It was made known at the time 
of tile Geneva summit last 
November that the Vice-Chair- 
man of CND in Britain, Monsig- 
nor Brace Kent, had been reoeived 
in audience by the Secretary 
General of the Co mmuni st Party 
of foe Soviet Union. I have 
nowhere seen any account of what 
was said between them. 

It has long been perfectly dear 
to very many of us that Mr 
Gorbachov's laudable intention to 
ease the USSR out of the shackles 
fastened on it by the rid guard was 
impossible to fulfil without a 
sharp movement of industrial 
resource away from military 
procurement toward the satisfac- 
tion of civilian demand. The 
industrial strength of the USA is 
such that it can very easily 
produce huge quantities of mili- 
tary hardware white continuing at 
the same time to satisfy all 
domestic demands for consumer 
durables. 

The USSR cannot, and prob- 
ably no one knows this better than 
Mr Gorbachov. It was therefore 
abundantly dear that if the so- 
called ‘‘peace movements” in the 
West faited to secure a unilateral 
reduction in arms levels, without 
negotiation, the USSR would 
wnhout any question at aO have to 
return to the negotiating table. 

The “peace movements” failed. 
So what, if anything, did the head 
Of an officially atbast State say to 
this Christian priest? There are 
certainly very many people who 
would like to know. 

Yours faithfully , 

J. W. HACKETT, 

Coberiey MflL 

nr Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 
October 29. 

White popples 

From Mr A. J. Attgarde 
Sir, Your correspondents (October 
31) to misunderstand the 
intention of the white poppy. It is 
not intended to replace the red 
poppy but simply to offer an 
alternative for those people to 
whom the red poppy has become 
too closely associated with mili- 
taristic ceremonies of remem- 
brance. 

Rose Simpson, foe General 
Secretary or the Co-operative. 
Women’s Guild which instituted 
the white poppy in 1933, said: 
"The white poppy is not a piea of 
political propaganda. It is a defi- 
nite pledge to peace that war must 
not happen aram.” 

Yours faithMy, 

A. J. AUGARDE, 

IS Carlton Road, Oxford 
October 31. 

From Mrs Marjorie Charlton 
Sir, It seems appropriate at this 
time to report foal I stiS have in 
my possession a real red poppy 
sent to me from foe trenches, at 
Bufly-Gresnay, France, by an old 
friend of mine in the RAMC 
attached at that time, 1916, to the 
317th Royal Field Artillery, 

It still retains its red colour, 
without a bint of white, and bears 
its poignant message all the better 
for ft. 

Yoars faithfully, 

MARJORIE CHARLTON, 
Knowlfield, 

Exton, Exeter, Devon. 

Wh»pi«Kw t 



ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 5 1938 

The Tynesidert who marched 
from Jarrow to Westminster in 
19 & may net have immediately 
improved their lot, btd they have 
linked the name of their town imih 
unemployment ever since. 

Starting on October 5 tape 200 of 
them covered the 300 nules in 27 
days (“On Tbs Day", Nooember 
2,1985). Two yean after the 
march unemployment had 

dropped from 80 per cent to 30 per 
cent 


Jarrow’s Petition 

By the co nstitu t i onal method of 
petition the people of Jarrow and 
the people of Tyneside have ap- 
pealed to Parliament to go to the 
bdp of a town that lost almost all 
its employment when its shipyard 
and its ironworks were dosed. For 
ya prthe tqw" h— *fr»ri«h»ri hopes 
of a resuscitation of its industry 
ff,y| >wm ad ditionall y a ffli c t ed 

by one disappointment after an- 
other. What was at first an 
industrial calamity, acute but not 
necessarily irreparable, baa since 
received hard ratification through 
foe operation of what are described 
as ratkmafaatiQn schemes. Both 
the shipbuilding and foe iron and 
steel industries have taken deci- 
sions winch forbid the revival in 
Jarzow of the industries which 
maA» it and for years kept it 
prosperous. The people of 0 arrow 


are therefore the a oflfera ro from 
decisions that they could not 
influence arid that have been to the 
benefit of other places. They have 
done what they could far them- 
selves, and they have had foe 
disinterested he l p of SIR JOHN 
JARVIS, who has laboured not 
only to reduce foe hardship of the 
town’s unem p lo y ment but also to 
attract employment. The town’s 
latest action has been this appeal 
to PadfamenL Afi T yne side lias 
Special plea for 
foeresouxees of the Government to 
be enspteyed so as to turn iodnstiy 
to the town . . . 

Jarrow will appreciate sympa- 
thy, but its petition to Parliament 
mAh for work. Jarrow’s position is 
not altogether typical of the dis- 
tressed areas because it is a zoodarn 
town advantageously titrated on a 
great waterway, and moreover it is 
closely linked fay excellent trans- 
port faalitifls with foe rest of, 
Tyneside. In its want of employ- 
ment, however, it has a tragic 
equality wifo other distressed areas 
and it is hot a pert of a far greater 
national problem. The reiteration 
of foe idea that foe Government 
should actively assist the settle- 
ment of industries in the distressed 
areas has evoked no response from 
Ministers- Having provided means 
far financing smaQ industries and 


(through the Special Areas Coaa- 

nfaajoner ) far «dMhliiihiTig*ymKiqg 
estates, and having also begun the 
Unlding of two or three factories in 
foe areas and distributed many 
radars for munitions that wfll 
increase foe available employment 
in the country generally and, to 
some extent, in foe scheduled areas 
(although not in foe worat parts of 
them), the Government are wait- 
mg. What is in the manda of those 
who appeal far more direct and 
immediate action to influence foe 
location of industry is that, if foe 
oppor tu n i ty of foe present indus- 
trial activity is lost, it may never 
recur. It is modi too late in the ikty 
to suggest that foe condition of 
TTM^ m d ry and In ffl l WP pf 

try are not direct concerns of the 
Government. In fact national poli- 
cy is to some extort responsible for 
the circumstances of foe fistressed 
areas, and the virtual veto of the 
proposal to construct a new steel 
works at Jarrow was only made 
possible fry foe monopolistic pow- 
ers possessed fay foe British Iron 
and Steel Federation, which ezyoys 
foe protection of a high ttuift 
National poficy can as justifiably 
be directed to foe planting in foe 
distressed areas of new industries 
as to the safeguarding of old 
industries. It does not follow that 
each decayed mining village must 
have a little mdustiy of its own; 
modern transport as well as indus- 
trial r e quirem ents mt ' B| such a 
suggestion ridiculous. But new 
industries are required to save foe 
distressed areas from a lingering 
Awth; and, if private e n t e rpri se 


stands aside, it becomes foe more 
necessary that the Government 
should act. 


A barred game 

From Mr Gerald Leach 
Sir, Regarding the complaint of 
your correspondent Mr Victor 
Hexi (October 31) that he was 
requested to tr ansfer his game of 
piquet from the saloon to the 
public bar, he may be unaware 
that in any case be would be acting 
illegally, as under the gaming laws 
this game is prohibited on licensed 
premises together with all other 
card games with the exception of 
cribbage (for modest stakes). 

Together with some friends, I 
was recently requested by the 
landlord of a pub to discontinue a 
friendly game of poker in the 
public bar, our slakes consisting of 
match-sticks. 

Yours faithfully, 

GERALD LEACH, 

35 Beacbfield Road, 

Bembridge, 

Isle of Wight. 

October 31. 

From Mr George Strang 
Sir, No doubt your readers will 
provide many examples of in- 
verted social discrimination in 
sporLMy own experience is lim- 
ited to being banished from a pub 
with friends for singing. The 
landlord explained that the u wall- 
to-walT music which was eqjoyed 
by his better class customers was 
in danger of not being heard. He 
obligingly moved our glasses to 
the counter in the public bar. 
Yours faithfully, 

GEO STRANG. 

61 Manor Drive. 

Hinchley Wood, 

Esher. Surrey. 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November^ His Excellency Mr 
Sudhee Prasasvinitchai was re- 
ceived in audienc e by The 
Queen and presented the Letters 
OT Recan of his predecessors and 
his own Letters of Credence as 
Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary from Thailand 
to the Court of St James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied. by the following members 
of the Embass y who bad the 
honour of being presented to 
Her Mstjesty: Mr VOaom 

KLoompirochana (Minister 
Counsellor), Captain Prida 
Karasuddhi (Defence and Naval 
Attache), Group Captain 
Amorn Neawmalee (Air Atta- 
ch*), Colonel Kamol 

Dapparungsi (Military Attache), 
Mrs Piswong Anukxahanond 
(Counsellor), Mr Sukasem 
Yothasamutr (First Secretary). 
Mr Akrasid Aroatayakul (Sec- 
ond Secretary) and Mrs Supasiri 
Amatayaknl (Second Secretary). 

Mrs Prasasvinitchai had the 
honour ofbeing received by The 
Queen. 

Sir Patrick Wright (Perma- 
nent Under-Secretary of State 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs), who bad the honour of 
being received by The Queen 
was present, and the Gentlemen 
of the Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. 

Mr D M McBain (Her 
Majesty's Ambassador Extraor- 
dinary and Plenipotentiary at 
Antananarivo) and Mrs McBain 
had the honour of being re- 
ceived by The Queen. 

The Earl of Swinton had the 
honour ofbeing received by The 
Queen upon ndinquishing ins 
appointment as Captain of Her 
Majesty’s Body Guard of the 
Yeomen of the Guatd and 
delivered up his Stick of Office. 

The Viscount Davidson bad 
foe honour ofbeing received by 
The Queen upon bis appoint- 
ment as Captain of Her 
Majesty’s Body Guard of the 
Yeomen of the Guard and 
received bis Slide of Office. 

The Right Hon Margaret 
Thatcher, KG’ (Prime Minis ter 
and First Lord of foe Treasury) 
had an audience of The Queen 
this evening. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, Chancellor of foe 
University of London, this 


in 1 . 

Rooms, 

Her Royal 


morning opened the new exten- 
sion to tli© Department of Child 
and Adolescent Psychiatry at 
the of Psychiatry, De 

Crcspigny Park, London, SE5. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
cel ved by foe Vke-Chaacdlor m 
the University (the Laid 
Flowers). 

The Princess Anne; Mrs Mark 
P hillips, Honorary President of 
tfacChartered Institute ofTrans- 
port, attended the Anniversary 
Luncheon, to celebrate the 
founding offoe Institute in 1919 
and the grant of a Royal Charter 
at foe Connaught 
WC2. 

__jhncg was re- 
ceived by foe President of the 
Institute (Mr G Myers). 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mart 

Phillips, Chancellor of foe 
University of London, this 
afternoon opened the Hunterian 
Institute at the Royal College of 
Surgeons of England, Lincoln's 
Inn Fields, London, WC2. 

During foe afternoon Her 
Royal Hi ghness was admitted 
an Honorary Fellow of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of 
England. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Philli ps was received on arrival 
by foe Vice-Chancellor of foe 
University (foe Lord Flowers) 
and foe President of foe College 
(Mr Ian Todd). 

Mrs Timothy HoUeroess 
Roddam was in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 4: The Princess Mar- 
garet, Countess of Snowdon, 
Patron of foe Heart Disease and 
Diabetes Research Trust, 
opened the Cavendish Clinic, 
Wellington Road, this 
afternoon. 

Lady Cavendish 

was in attend anc e. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, as 
Patron, was present tins evening 
at foe Annual General Meeting 
offoe BLOT (British Library of 
Tape Recordings for Hospital 
Patients) at Drapers* HaO, 
London, EC2. 

Mrs Michael Wigley was in 
at t en dan ce. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
November-*: The Duke of Kent, 
Vice Chair man of foe British 
Overseas Trade Board, today 
visited British Aerospace pic at 
Warton, Preston, Lancashire. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen’s Flight, was attended by 
Sir Richard Bockiey. 


Richmond Tutorial 
College 

Mr Carey Palmer, principal of 
Richmond Tutorial College, has 
appointed Mr RJL Barker, 
Bursar of Richmond Tutorial 
College, for foe academic year 
1986/87 and Mr DU. Martin, 
Registrar and senior tutor. Mr 
G. Read and Miss J. De Leon 
have been appointed visiting 
tutors. 


Queen Elizabeth’s 
Foundation for 
tbe Disabled 

AH rickets for foe Guinu e ss and 
Oyster luncheon to be held on 
November 19, at foe Mansion 
House; in aid of Queen 
Elizabeth’s Foundation for foe 
Disabled have been sold. 


Service Dinners 

The Royal Hussars (PWO) 

The regimental dinner of The 
Royal Hussars (PWO) was held 
lari night at foe Cavalry and 
Guards Club. Colonel Sir Piers 
Bcngough, Colonel of the Regi- 
ment, presided. 

RAF Shrike Cenmand 
Admiral of foe Fleet Sir John 
FMdhouse, Chief of foe De- 
fence Staff, and Lady 
Ffekfoouse were foe guests of 
honour at a ladies' guest night 
dinner held at HQ Strike Com- 
mand yesterday. Air Chief Mar- 
shal Sir Pieter Harding, Air 
Officer Commanding-in-Chief 
RAF Strike Command, and 
Lady Harding received foe 
guests. Group Captain R. E .E 
Hart presided and Wing Com- 
mander PA Holmes, accompa- 
nied by Mrs Holmes, was dined 
out on bis retirement from the 
service. 


A memorial service for Vis- 
count Beaxsted wOl be held at 
the Libera] Jewish Synagogue, St 
John's Wood Road, at 5pm 
today. 


Birthdays today 

Mr R. W. Annanil, VC, 72;- 
Viscount Bangor, 81; Mr John- 
Berger, 60; the Right Rev F. W. 
Coos, 73; General Sir John 
Hacked, 76; Dr Paul Knapman, 
42; the Rev Professor John 
Marsh, 82; Mr Nicholas Maw, 
51; Mr John Morris, QC, MP, 
55; Mr Lester Piggott, 51; Lord 
Stallard, 65; Sir Reginald 
Verdon-Smith, 74. 


Latest appointments * 

Latest appointments indode: 
Mr Timothy King, to be a 
Deputy Judge advocate from 
October 27, 1986. 

Mr Robin Laurie, to be aGrcuit 
Judge on the South-eastern 
GbcuiL 

Mr William Haaritton RayiEsrf 
Crawford, QC, to be a Circuit 
Judge on the North-eastern 
Circuit. 

Mr Keith E. Lacy to be joint 
County Court Registrar for tbe 
districts of the Corby, Hunting- 
don, Kettering; Northampton, 
Peterborough and 

Wellingborough County Courts 
andioint District Registrar in 
the District Registry of tbe High 
Court at Northampton and 
Peterborough, from December 
1.1986. 

Sir John $ Wonfie, Mrs OL 
AOdn, Mr HG De Ville, Mr RA 
Farraace, Mr DC Jenkins, Mr 
JS Monks, Mr RH Price, and 
Mr JG Russell to be members 
offoe Council of the Advisory, 
Conciliation and Arbitration 
Servioe until April 30 1989. 


University news 

Oxford 


Henson lectnrw-Jn tucotosy: 

TM Rev Professor OB Forrester , at 
Uie Department of Ctirtattan EtMcs. 
and Practical Ttaotoo. Edtnburgta 
University- for 19BT- T 
University le c turer. Commonwraun 
StaHe*: M A Vaughan (BA 
LondonX fellow of Numn 
from October 1 W 
1991. 



Buckingham Palace 
Luncheon 

The Queen held a luncheon 
party at Buckingham Mace 
yesterday.. The Duke of 
Gloucester was present and foe 

WSSBsm 

W mar cw Fumn. 

Luncheons 



•T Transport 

Princess Anne, Honorary Presi- 
dent of foe C har t ered Institute 
of Transport, was a speaker at 
the anniversary luncheon, held 
at the Connaught Rooms yes- 
terday, to celebrate tbe diamond 
jubilee of the granting of tbe 
Royal Charter to foe mstrune. 
The president, Mr G. Myers, 
Vice-Chairman of British Rail- 
ways Board, presided and Mr D 
Mitchell, Minister of State for 
Transport, also spoke. 

Media Society 

Miss Baibara Hashing, Vice- 
President of foe Media Society, 
presided at a luncheon held at 
the Cafe Royal yesterday: Mr 
Jeremy Isaacs was the guest 
speaker. 


Professor Sir Graham Smith 
was the guest speaker at a 
luncheon given by tbe Lunch- 
time Comment Club yesterday 
at the Connaught Rooms. Mr S 
John Holt, chairman, presided. 

Building Employers* 
Confederation 

Mr George W. Hammond, 
President of the London region 
of tbe Building Employers’ 
Confederation, was host at a 
luncheon bekl at Plaisterers’ 
Hall yesterday. Mr Michael 
Hesettine, MP, was the chief 
guest 

Receptions 

HM Government 
Mr Michael Howard, QC, Par- 
liamentary Under Secretary of 
State for Corporate and Con- 
sumer Affairs, was host at a 
reception at Banqueting House 
yesterday on the occasion of tbe 
Home Safety Research and Ac- 
cident Prevention Conference. 
Middlesex Hospital 
Medical School 

Mr William Slack, Dean offoe 
Middlesex Hospital Medical 
School, was host at a reception 
held yesterday ax the school to 
mark tbe 150th anniversary of 
London University. 

Dinners 

Pharmaceutical Society 
of Great Britain 
Dr Geoffrey Booth. President of 
the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Great Britain, presided at a 
dinner held at tire society’s 
headquarters yesterday. Lord 
Winstanley, Liberal Party 
Spokesman on Health and So- 
cial Services also spoke. 

London SoHdtors* 

Litigation Association 
Mr Stephen Jakobs presided at 
the annual dinner of the London 
Solicitors litigation Association 
bdd at the Law Society’s Hall 
yesterday. Mr Giles Shepard. 
Sheriff of Greater London, and 
Judge Michael Cook were the 
guest speakers. 

International Maritime 
Industries Foram 

The International Maritime In- 
dustries Forum held its annua l 
dinner last night at the Inn mi 
the Park Hotel, preceding the 
full forum meeting. Mr J.G. 
Davis, Chairman, presided and 
the speakers at the dinner were 
Mr K-H Naqes, Vice President 
of tbe Commission of tbe Euro- 
pean Communities, and Dr G. 
fAnnirfi, Austrian Ambassador 
to tire Organisation for Eco- 
nomic Co-operation and 
Development Among tbe many 
members and guests present 


R T ra£w AG Knuiedy: Sir 
Anthony Buck. Q C- MP: Mr l+J 

KSSte A 


London Business School 
Sr Terence Beckett, chairman 
of the governing body, presided 
at a dinner held at the London 
Business School on October 30, 
to mark the granting of a royal 
charter to the schooL Mr George 
Walden, Parliamentary Under- 
secretary of State for Education, 
proposed a toast to the school to 
which the principal. Professor 
Peter Moore, replied. f 


WEAR YOUR 
POPPY 
WITH PRIDE 



REMEMBER, THE BEST WAY TO HONOUR 
THEDEAD IS TO CARE FOR THE LIVING 

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY NOV. 9th. 





Mrs Helene Alexander with some of the 1,000 antique fans 
she hopes to pat on display in two. converted Georgian 
houses In Crooms HQ1, Greenwich, south London, but which 
may go instead to Geneva, Switzerland, if planning 
permission is refused (Photograph: Arthur Foster). 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr D.Y. Adams 
and Dr AJVL Chalk 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son ofMrs 
Robert Brooks, of Cobbam, 

tero?Mr and^MrsPhilip Chailt 

ofThe Old Rectory, Whepstead, 
Suffolk. 

Mr SJVLJ. Arnold 
and Miss KJ. Bond 
The engagement is announced 
between Sanaa Mark Joseph, 
younger sou of the late Rev EJ. 
Arnold and of Mrs M. Arnold, 
of Tiverton, Devon, and Kath- 
ryn Juba, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs E.R. Bond, of 
Kirby mo or side. North 

Yorkshire. 

MrGD. Bradbury 
aid Mbs NJ. Pope 
The engagement is announced 
between Colin, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs K-A. Bradbury, of 
Stretford, Manchester, and 
Nicola, only daughter of Mr and 
Mbs LA. Pope, of Hayes End, 
Middlesex. 


MrAJMLW.Doa 
nod Miss MX. Berfyn 
The e n g a g e me nt is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mrs 
Janet Don, of Weston Patrick, 
Hampshire, and foe late Major 
D.TJL Don, and Margot, 
of Mr John Berfyn, of 
and Mrs Daphne 
Dennis, of Ramsgate, Kent. 

Mr ELV. MacM. Cameron 
and Miss AJL Zdo-HBsou 
The engagement is announced 
between Euan, only son of Mr 
RJX Cameron, of Blackhouse 
Cottage, Hatfield, Sussex, and 
Mis CP. Cunnyngham-Brown, 
of The North Haa, Yell, and 
Alexandra, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs FJL Hfison, of 
Benehnadena, Spain. 


MrRJL 

ndMbsEJL 

The engagement is announced 
between Robert, younger son of 
foe late Mr EJ. Frayung-Gork 
and of Mrs Frayling-Coik, of 
Harstoo, Cambridgeshire, and 
Elizabeth, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs M. McCntm, of 
Cambridge, . 

Mr GJLTJX Kronsten 
and Mss A. Dntta 
The engagement is announced 
between Gregory, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs J.A. Kronsten, of 
5 Cope Place, London, W 8 ,and 
Ami la. younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs A. Dntta, Calcutta, 
India. . 

Mr CJL Mutton » 

and Miss MJVL Ghnsou 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher James, ri- 
der son of Mr and Mix James 
Mutton, of Hemri Hempstead, 
and Mary Margaret (Polly), 
‘ J of Mr and 
rGimson, of St Albans. 

Mr. J.W. Bess 
and Mira AJ. SftKfomD 
The engagement Is announced 
between Jarir Wilson Ross, of 
Sueyd Park, Bristol, and Angela 
Jane, youngest daughter of Mrs 
Marion StockweD. of Pinner, 
Middlesex, and foe. late Mr 
Leslie: StodcvvdL . . 


Mr J. Walker 
and Miss M. Staler 
The engagement is announced 
between John, younger son of 
the late Mr Peter Walker and 
Mrs M. Carrott,- of Eating, 
Loudon, and Mnanda, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs David 
Stanger, of Elstree, 
Hertfordshire. 


Marriages 


Mr CH. AUbusea 
and Mbs PA. Rae 
The marriage took pboe on 
Friday, October 31, at St Rod's 
Church, Knightsbridgti, of Mr 
Christian Hrory Allhuaen. el- 
dest son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Mrs R.C Allhnsen, of 
Bradenham Hall, Tbetford, 
Norfolk, and Miss Penelope 
Amanda Rae, younger daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Colin Rae, of 
Pullet’s House, Braxton, Chesh- 
ire: The Rev Donald Hants 
officiated, assisted by the Rev. 
Christopher Courtauld. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by hex father, and attended 
by Lacy Proffitt, Emma and 
Susanna Duriacher, Thomas 
Lloyd Owen, Alexander Frere- 
Scott and Thomas Homfray. 
Captain Richard Allhusen was 
best man. 

Tbe honeymoon is being 
spent in Morocco. 


Mr J.D. Fc 
and Mbs GJL Bishop 

Nuptial Mass was concddwated 
on October 25, at the Church of 
foe Most Holy Trinity, Otford, 
by Canon John Bailey; Father 
Derek Grafton and Father 
James Hanvcy, SJ. who also 
gave tire homily, attire marriage 
of Mr Jonathan Fenner, son of 
Mr and Mrs WJL Tenner, of 
Forest HiH, mid Miss Gillian 
Bishop, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
R.D.L. -Bishop, of 
Crowborough. 

The bride, who was givm in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Mbs Elizabeth Os- 
borne and Alexander Wright. 
Mr Paul Hudson was best man. 

A reception was held at 
Giiddingstone Castle and tbe 
honeymoon is being spent in 
Kenya. 


Royal Literary Fund 

The 1 96tb annual meeting of the 
>yal Literary Fund will be held 
at tbe Stationers' Hall, EC4, on 
Wednesday. December 10, 
1986, at 3.30 pm. Nominations 
for candidates for election to 
any of tire positions held by 
officers of tbe fund should reach 
tire Secretary, 144 Temple 
Chambers, Temple Avenue; 
London, EC4Y ODT, in writing 
by November 26, 1986, and be 
qigwarl by foe candirifiu* and the 
proposer, who must be a mem- 
ber of the corporation. 


little Ship Club 

The Diamond Jubilee Ball 
which celebrates the sixtieth 
year of tbe Little Ship Club will 
be bdd at tire Savoy Hold, 
London, on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 8, 1986. 


Gnumakers’ 

Company, 

Mr UP XI Salter has been 
installed as Master of tire 
Gunmakets* Company for tire 
ensuing year. 


Science report 


Sensor swap clue 
to moths 9 mating 

By Pearce Wright, Science Eifitor 


Tbe ability of a male moth to 
find a female at a range of 
several miles, by detecting a few 
m d ecalra she releases of a 
Mechanical sow known as a 
pheromone, has earned foe in- 
sect a reference fa foe Gamaea 
Book of Records. 

It trade nearly 10ft years Car 
MMofeto to isolate foe most 
powe rf ul known sex attendants 
from the the fodr existence 
was suggested by observat i o ns of 
foe aalnralxst, Jean Henri Fa- 
bre, on mate-seeking behaviour 
is (he nritf-aincteeafo century. 

Subsequently, pheromones of 
away species have been identi- 
fied. But their effect is a sex- 
spedfk behaviour. 

The antennae of the female 
lack foe tiny Mocbemicml detec- 
tor that b stimulated by a? 
pheromone. 

However in tire latest experi- 
ments by Dr Anne Schndd- 
enuan of Yak University, and 
colleagues at Arizona Univer- 
sity, foe pheromone sensor of 


tbe male has been transplanted 
to foe female awth- The delicate 
transfer was done at foe land 
stage, when the odh which win 
later develop mm foe antennae 
id the adult are replaced. More 
tiwm 10 ft mdthswere mod i fi e d; 

The observmtioag by the first 
a atnr a fiste were of Europe's 
biggest and most richjy etrioured 

moth, foe Great Peacock, which 

was pdaced.iu a wne-ganze cage. 
As night fen, foe house was 
besieged by many am orous 
“conspecific” males. 

In the latest tests, foe mol- 
ecules now known to attract tire 
. male wore earned oa an artidal 
breeze ia a wind tuaacL How- 
ever, they were not oaoingfrem 
« female. They came from 
objects such as" impregnated 
leaves.' Although females with 
modified autrun a r . Hew to these 
objects, they retained their nor- 
mal reproductive patterns as 
ittD* 

Natan Voi 323. p. SOI - 803. 
1986 


OBITUARY 

PROFESSOR KURT 


HIRSCH 


Mathematician who broke new ground 



Bids 


Professor Kurt Hirech,alge- ^ tune fist 
braist of mtemationai stature, as one of tire oest otoud 
who was Professor of Pure 
Mathematics ax Queen Mary 
CbUegjs, London, from 1957 to 
1973, died yesterday. He wax 

sa 

Kurt August Hirsch was 
bom in Berlin on January 12, 

1906. He was educ a te d at 
Berlin University, wirere be 
betoitged to the iande oTgifeod 
students around Issai Schur, 
an original nnd influential 
mathem atician. . 

After obtaining his doctor- 
ate in 1930 Hirsch worked as a 
journalist for tire Vtxssische 
Zeitung.von Stoats taut 
Getehrten Sachen, at that toe 

oiiie^^cM^d^^ 1 ^ 

He was given a full page to 
fill every week in any way he 
wfehed; he wrote on science 
and philosophy, A friend and 
fellow journalist, who also 
wrote on. science, was Arthur 
Koestler. 

The Nazis dosed tire 
Vossidte Zoning in March 
1934, and tire nest month 
Hirsch was on Ins way to 
England. He now had to make 
a choice between continuing 
with a career in journaiisni or 
devoting himself fully to 
mathematics. 

He chose mathematics and 
went to King’s College, Cam- 
bridge, to undertake research 
m group theory. He took his 
second doctorate in 1937. 

Officially be was a student 
of Philip Hall, who was at that 


theorists in the world, 
always retained, close 
with bis teacher. 

His first , important papas 
stem from his Cambridge 
years. They opened up a new 
area mgrouptheoryrthe study 
of soluble groups with maau- 
mad condition. • 

jt was discovered mneo 
later, in -the 1950s and 1960s, 
that tirese groups were precise* 
]y tire soluble matrix groups 
with coefficients in the ratio- 
Tifli witegers. As stich they were 
of considerable important in 
topology (a math ema tical 
study of geometry) and other 
areas of mathematics well 
away from pure group theory. 

From 1938 to 1947 he 
taught at University Cofiege, 
Leicester (now Leicester Uni- 
versity); and from 1948 to 
1951 at King’s College, New- 
castle (now Newcastle Univer- 
sity), lu the latter year he went 
to Queen Mary Colley . as 
reader in pure mathematics, 
gri d was appointed professor 
six yearn lata. : 

■ His influence bn the teach- 
ing of mathematics at the. 
college was enormous. He was 

a leading force in establishing 
a long overdue modernization 
of the teaching syllabus, and 
he set in motion an organized 
programme of postgraduate 
teaching and activities in 
modem algebra. 

Above ml, he built op the 
mathematics departxrrent into 


one of die — , 

reseim* schools a 
tire country. Hr «i;»a 
achieved tins by 
only atoixauas to now poo- 
ttoris,^ holding ti«tt any . re- 
spec table nratiremattcran, 
whatever bis special uuere^s, 

must be able to teach foe 
entire undergraduate carncs? 
lum (an obvious idea bow, but 
not so in 1951). 

He also opened the d otos to 
sb 5 many vuitara from abroad 

as possible. He navefled wiifey 
W, tiiereby - attracting ma&y ; 

mathematacttBis- 
back to London. He served on 
tire council of tire London 
Mathematical Society for a 
number of years, amT watf 
twkr vkre^HttoidenL 

As tire editor of Russian 
Mathematical Surveys (he ; , 
could read bat not speak tire 
language), be brought to tbe 
English-speaking mathematic 1 
Wane tbe translated worts of 
their Soviet counterparts. 

Hissch's infections entima^ 
asm for matiresnaires madb 
him an effective. Hgacftrr, His . 
v/a*™ and vdcosBog patun^. 







riwfofpojple, esaUed him to 
create at tire college a friendly 
and stimulating atmospheres 
He was a skfited chess player 
and an accomptitiied come, 
and he and bs wife enter- 
tained lavishly. 

His wife, Elsa Rnaht, whom 
he married in 1928, died m 
1980. He is sur viyeoh y foeif 
son and two daughters. 


MR HARRY BROWN 


MrHany Brown, American 
screenwriter and novelist, 
died in Los Angeles on No- 
vember 3. He was 69. 

Both as novelist and scenar- 
ist, his forte was war themes, 
though the screenplay which 
won him an Oscar was for A 
Place in the Sun, the movie 
version qf Theodore Dreiser’s 
An American Tragedy.. 

He was born al Portland, 
Maine, and went to Harvard 
before working as a journalist 
on Time and The New Yorker. 

. During - the Second World 
War he served in the US 
Army, where his creative tal- 
ents found -outlet in a column 
he wrote for Y/znk, the army 
magazine. This featured Artie 
Greengroin, foe archetypal 
American private stddiear in 
En gland. The adventures of 
this latter-day Connecticut 
Yankee al King Arthur’s court 
- at once tactlessly indifferent 
and romantically wide-eyed ~ 
were published in book form 
in 1946. 


But Brown had already 
published the novel that made 
his name, ri Walk in the Su n, 
in 1944. A graphic description 
of the troxuations of an 
-American infantry platoon on 
the Salerno beachhead, this 
made a taut, vivid film of foe 
same title (1946). 

His war poems, which also 
drew their inspiration from 
foe experiences of foe Ameri- 
can army in Italy, conveyed 
the same pungent sense of 
battlefield realities. 

' After tbe war Brown was 
busy as writer or co-writer on 
a number of Hollywood mov- 
ies, notably Arch af Triumph 
(1948), a version of 
Remanpie's novel; Sands of 
IwoJima i 194% and Ocean's 
Eleven (I960): ~ 

He continued to write now- 
els, toa Among these was The 
Stars in their Courses, which 
su cces sf ully translated to foe 
dnema screen as EtDonukh * 
movie not unfairly described 


as “a rumbustious lament for, 
the good old days of the had . 
old West”. , . . li - 

lt was perhaps teev&oie 
that tire American fiba 
industry's attempt to make 
Dreiser’s great masterpiece 
palatable to the general should 
not wear wdL Tne prose ofrbfc 
American Tragedy has air 
obdurate integrity which does 
not lend itself to foe pfeeaatig 
sentiment in which Hail- 
wood trades. Nevertheless if* 
Place in the San reduced 
tragedy to melodrama, it was 
ranch acclaimed, and wan 
Brown and his co-writer, 
Maurice Wilson, an Oscar in 
1952. 

In foe 1960s be and his wife, 
June; moved to Mexico where 
he hoped to find solitude. He 
<fid not, but among foe novels . 
he wrote there was A Quiet 
Place to Work, which was a 
humorous comment on pre- 
cisely that 

He leaves his widow anefa 
son. 


DR E. CUYLER HAMMOND 


AT 'J-- c- - 


Dr E Cuyler Hammond, 
biologist and epidemiologist, 
who spent a lifetime investi- 
gating links between cigarette- 
smofangand lung cancer, (tied 
on November 3. He was 74. 

Edward Cuyler Hammond 
was boro at Baltimore on June 
14, 191Z He was educated at 
Yale, Erst studying physics 
but switching to biology, and 
at Johns Hopkins where he 
earned a doctorate in epidemic 
ology. 

From 1938 to 1942 he 
worked at the National Insti- 
tute of Health as a statistician- 
in the rodu&rial' hygehe divi- 
sot. For the rest of foe war he 
served as health analyst and 
statistician to. both the Army 
and the Navy. 

After foe war he joined the 
American Cancer Society 
(ACS) as. director of epidemi- 
ology and statistical research. 


a post be hdd for foe next 
three decades. From 1957 to 
1958 he was also p rofessor of 
biometry at Yale. 

Hammond’s first mqor 
study was published in 1952. 
Using a sample of 180,000 
men, tire findings showed 
cigarette-smokers running a 

greater risk of lung cancer. 

The scope of the research 
• was widened to include other 
cancers and heart disease, this 
time among women as wdl as 
men. JEfe wnciuded foal giv- 
ing up cigarettes reduced foe 
risks. 

In 1959 Hammond set up a. 
force of 60,000 volunteers to 
gather data on the habits of 
more than one million Ameri- 
cans. During foe 1960s he 
pubhshed finther studies on 
tire health of workers exposed 
to asbestos and vinyl chloride 
who. also smoked. 


Hammond’s chums won 
him few friends in the tobacco 
industry. In heated debates 
with its repre se ntatives be 
spoke . in a measured and 
precise manner, content to let 
iris statistics do the talking for 
him. He himself was once an 
80-a-day man, but he gave up 
cagarcttes and took to tire pipe 
instead. 

Following his retirement 
from the -ACS in 1977 he 
taught ^ epidemiologists at foe 
environmental sciences lab- 
oratory ofMounl Sinai Hospi- 
tal m Manhattan, including 
several from China. 

He married, in 1948, Mar- 
ian .E. Thomas, who died in 
1970. His . second wife, 
Katharine S. Redmond, 
whom he married in 1972, 
survives- him together with 
three ronsofTrisfii^maniagel 


EDDIE “LOCKJAW” DAVIS 


Eddie “Lockjaw" Davis, the 
jazz saxophonist, died in Las 
Vegas on November 3, at the 
ageof65. 

He had a reputation as one 
of tire most aggressive tenor 
sax-players in modem jazz; 
and the big sound of^ which he 
was enable - combined per- 
haps with his bizarre nick- 
name - tended to raise in 
audiences who had not previ- 
ously heard him the expecta- 
tion of a relentless attack on 

bis material. 

Bat this was to do him less 
than justice. Besides a rau- 
cous, honking style he was 
capable of great subtlety. And 
in another mood he was one of 
the great exponents of the 
weO-nigh extinct art of tender 
balladplaying^.. 


Eddie Davis was boro in 
New York . on March 2, 1921. 
Self-taught, he began his play- 
ing career at Clark Monroe’s 
Uptown House in Harlem. He 
worked with names like Coo- 
tie Williams and Louis Ann- 
strong in the early 1 940s until 
he formed his own combo in 
1945.. 

This performed mainly, at 
Minton’s until, in 1952, he 
joined Count Basie, -which 
gave an important fillip to his 
career. He gained.a reputation 
as one ofBasie’s moist memo- 
rable soloists. 

In 1955 he formed a trio 
with tire organist, Shirley 
Scott, but he found Jtime to 
tour Bri tain and France, with 
Basie. His trio alto undertook 
several long engagements in 


St* 


>X; 


PROFESSOR ALBERT 
Ton SZENT-GYORGYI 


Professor T. F. Slater writes: 

Your obituary of Albert von 
Szent-GyftTgyi (October 27)- 
drew attention to many im- 
portant aspects of his very 
productive, long and exciting 
fife. Some features ofhis work 
during foe past 15 years of so 
were somewhat neglected, 
however, and I believe they 
should be noted as additional 
evidence ofhis creativity until 
the end of his life. 

In the mid-1970s he became 
closely associated .with tire 
National Foundation for Can- 
cer Research (NECR) as its 
scientific director and, in this 
capacity, stimulated and at- 
tracted many .scientists from 
different disoplines and coun- 
tries to collaborate: 

In this way he created wbat 
he called a “laboratory with- 
out wafis”: scientists in up to 
70 laboratories in . 1 S countries' 
working together on cancer 
research. The success of these 
collaborations owed’ much to 
iris personal charisma and 
acute scientific intwtiori. 

Indudctt m this huge group 


were a number of scientists 
based in Bri tain, and von 
Szent-Gyoigyi, through the 
NFCR, generously encour- 
aged and supported them. 

Albert von Szent-Gyoigyi 
not only fished with a . large 
hook as mentioned in your 
obituary; he also painted sci- 


entifically whh broad sweeps 
of tire, brush on an extremely 
large canvas, and these pic- 
tures glowed with a very 
special insight and extraordi- 
nary ability. 

Sir (Frederick) Nefl Satires 
fond,- CBE, who held several 
. senior posts with The Marconi 
Company., died oh October 
29. He was 86 . 

-A pilot in the Royal Naval 
Air Service during the HrSt 
W°r» War, he^oined the 
moglifo Electric Company in 
1922; remaining until moving 
to Marconi in 1948.. 

There lie was managing 
director; from 1958 to 1965 
and djairman from then until 
his retinfinentin 1969. 


Base’s dub in New York. 

- Davis was inevitably com- 
pared - to his disadvantage - 
with foe great Coteman Haw- 
kins. Certainly he learqed a 
great deal from his dder, and 
incorporated elements of his 
style- 

But he was not a mere 
imitator, as became dear; 
when he teamed up with, him 
to play and record. The result 
was an iritdligent dialogue, 
between sax players of widely 
different personality, pleas- 
antly free from any attempt, 
by either, to set foe other 
down. - 

A new generation of audi- 
ences was beguiled by him at 
Ronnie Scon's Cub, where he 
played, again on lour, in foe 
1960s and 1970s. 

SIPPIE 

WALLACE 


Sippie Wallace, a bhtes stag-. - 
er, whose bits “Women Be 
Wise (Keep Your Mouth Shifo 
Don't Advertise Your Man)" • 
and “Mighty Tight Woman" 
made her a queen of the blues , , 
circuit in the 1920s and 1936s, : . 

died on November 1, her 88 fo . "* 

birthday. 

Known, as the “Texas - * 

Nightingale”, she both wrote . vvf-c ’ .. 
and sang, and her shouted . .’iY 1 ! ' - 

Uues made her prominent on~ ' . * 

foe circuit in the South and in : ' • . ■ .. 

tire vaudeville houses of foe : . 

North. . - t; • 



■ She recorded hit after b3 
with musicians like. ■ 

Armstrong, Sidney Bedtetju^r 
Joe u King” Oliver, but trnc^; 
to gospel music in fire ' 

. 1930s after the deaths 
gambler husband. Matt ^ 

face, and her brother;:’ - *. 

She sang gospel 

30 years, but in J965she i w a ^; ; 
. coaxed bade to jazz and blue* 
'by music researches : 
found her voice asj-swmi^^.. 

-ever. <!*•.; 


fifs-' - '• 
















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COOKE On 1st November 1986. at 
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WUJt- On » November 1986. at Ox- 
fora. to Mary Am .feiSe Ottm) and 
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DIXON - On November 2nd. « the 
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DONOVAN - On October 50. to Chh>- 
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f MULATTO - On 24m October. 1986. 
to Haste Me Hyde Parker) ana 
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r— CAM - On ant October, water 
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MCMULLEN- On October 27 to SaBy 
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M MMK I D - On November 1st 1986. 
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SKNCCIt-Oa November 2nd 1986 at 
Quee n ; Chmla aeu HwpflM. to Lorna 
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STRATTON - on November 2nd 1986 
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astm. Nklmias Christopher. 
MUM - On 28th- October, to 
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Anna bel Mriam Jane. . 

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DNONNB - On November 1st 1986. 
Edwsrd Harold Lawrence, aged 85 
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Bridget FUnend Service on Monday 
November 30th. at 11.00 ajn. ad 
Cambridge crematortonu Cnt Oow- 
ere only to Brian Warner. Ftmend 
Service. Hantogton Grave 
Gaonbridne. 


TATUM - On October SI 1906. sud- 
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Rooney. Hamosbtee. Dearty loved 
botbawt father and granuftifber. 
Service of Thantoatvtegi Rwnjey 
Abbey. Thursday November 6. at 2 
pm. Donatlonr if desired to toe Brit- 
ish Heart Foundation may be sent to 
. A H Chester. Funeral Director. 


AMP* Mr W.Q. MC K8C. Hava a vtstv 
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to ptntsase «com bans lewe iM y 
and aaMne casnaw oodcs to add to 
oar varied end In m eatnu c oaec Bon. 


Osman cram rauL 

JANE BOWLES wn 2l yesumtoy. 

tunmMw. 


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I 


POUTBTAIHMIMMMk Gn Nw 6 
1941 at Plymouth. FlHJetd Raanb 
Pobteyan. RjLF. in 5id officer. Bar- 
yf Rkbanto. WJUIS Now at 6 
Mfecec ii aL Etawr. Bognor Regis. 
P022 6UC. New* or mewti always 
twfenme. 


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WAKELETiBDITLEV - On November 
9 tb 1936 . At the Abhor. Sanw- 
bury. Aubrey lo Marlon. Nowat 27 
Hazebro ucfe no. Fawrimm. Kant-; 








MM 


sa 


WATSON-CtoYTH - On 1st November, 
by accidental drowntog ta Crete. 
Charles MkhaeL of lime Paddock. 
UadtoM Down. Susan. Beloved son 
of Many and D* ute Rmriand. Fto 
nem . enoubies to W A F 
^roombridge. Funeral Directors. 
Quarry HU Road. Tottbrhtoe. Kent 
(0732 353964). 

W> . On i November 1986. penoe- 
ftffiy St Urn POgrims Hoagfos 
Canbabarv. the nmcb Med Madge 
orWfetetobie.’Wldow of Hie tabs Jack 
WUL Serotoe (aim place at AH 
Stints Church WdMtSDto on Mon- 
day 10 November at 1J0 pm 
fhllDwedbvPrivatocreaMllaB.Paaa- 
fly flovvenoniyMeaaa; bat donottom 
If desired may beseX to B» PDatoas 
HoeMce. laadan HO. Cadfertnay or 
IfaelLNX-L c/o Mr Abram*. 14 Bar 
Hot RiL WUtatetde. 


nsat Kenny OMMsy aeritea. ah my 
love and nea *hm Han m 


SYLVIA Hamer MMu. Love yoa if 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


Councils | The curious come closer to inner circle 


Frank 



told % 
pay what 
you can’ 

By Richard Evans 

Political Correspondent 

Local authorities were last 
night positively encouraged by 
a Cabinet minister to ignore 
nationally agreed wage in* 
creases for council workers 
and pay staff what they can 
afford. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Sec- 
retary of State for the Environ- 
ment, made the radical 
proposal as be hit bac k at 
Conservative party critics at 
Westminster and in the shire 
counties who have bitterly j 
criticized his proposals for 
next year's rate support grant 
settlement. 

With the Government rac- 
ing the prospect of a serious 
backbench revolt against his 
plans, which have particularly 
angered MPs in southern shire 
counties, Mr Ridley defended 
his proposed gram settlement 
and implicitly criticized **1116 
‘flash' political reaction” from 
fellow Conservatives. 

He said Tory councils and 
councillors believed there was 
no alternative to paying na- 
tionally negotiated wage in- 
creases for their staff, and 
feared the resulting wage bills 
would push up spending 
above the rate of inflation. 

It was "intolerable” that the 
Government and councillors 
were at the mercy of artificial 
machinery which dictated 
how much was to be taken 
from taxpayers and ratepayers 
to keep services going. 

' “It is open to local authori- 
ties to opt out of national 
agreements and to pay their 
staff what they can afford. So 
any local authority that wants 
to can take control of hs 
payroll costs — and I strongly 
advise them to do so.” 

Mr Ridley added: "What I 
can't accept is that local 
authorities who neither take a 
grip of their staff numbers, nor 
restrain pay increases, should 
simply take the resultant in- 
crease in their payroll costs as 
God-given. 

"I wish they were as good at 
controlling their own costs as 
they are at lobbying the Gov- 
ernment for more money. It is 
a sort of irresponsibility which 
‘ in tiie end central government 
can't accept." 

In last night's speech to the 
Carlton Gub in London, the 
only hope offered by Mr 
Ridley to his critics was the 
repealed promise of reforming 
the rating system, but not 
during this parliament 

He hoped rales would be 
dose to being abolished by 
1990-91. 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen holds an Investi- 
ture. Buckingham Palace, II; 
and later attends the gala open- 
ing of the Royal College of 
Music Opera Theatre. 7. The 
Prince of Wales. President, the 
Royal College of Music Dev- 
elopment Fund, also attends. 

Princess Anne, Chancellor, 










The Tiroes Crossword Puzzle No 17,195 



ACROSS 

I Meat for each basket (6k 

S Dance student replacing 
master in madrigal, perhaps 
(8k 

9 In yours trnly’s exam it con- 
stituted a drama (8k 

10 Tongue made of gold re- 
turned by a host (6). 

II Can be transported in car- 
riage with the necessary 
power (8). 

12 Support for a small number 
surrounded by a smaller (6k 

13 New dairy cat. a pillar of the 
Establishment? (8k 

IS Liquor for a king confined 
in Kent, perhaps (4k 

17 Quantity of potatoes, say. to 
plunder (4k 

19 Like some who rule? Ab- 
solutely (8). 

20 Old coins for financial back- 
ers (6k 

21 Garment worn by fielder be- 
fore bowling (4-4). 

22 Herdsman in stale univer- 
sity church circle (6k 

23 Serviceman posted to East 
Europe initially, not here 
( 8 ). 

24 Concerning boy worker 
contributing to the boom 
( 8 ). 

25 Leaders of 6 leave 18 in pet 
(6k 


DOWN 

2 The defence in a 
soldier introduced? 


Concise Crossword page 14 


3 Professional business cost 
divided by law (8k 

4 Settle for about one thou- 
sand stickers by beginning 
of Easter (9). 

5 Must a Sunday page mis- 
represent this writer? 
(3.2.10k 

6 No sailor escorted outride 
would wear this (7k 

7 They say a girl studied a 
reptile (8). 

8 Dawn's 24-hour holiday (8k 

14 Having arrived, dropped 
article from train — so natu- 
ral! (9k 

15 Unknown killer, having dis- 
patched many (8k 

16 Two books about prize 
{dams (8k 

17 Glass vessel covered once 
for travellers on tire prairie 

■ (8k 

18 Charge a smaller amount, 
being unconcerned (8). 

19 Swimmer lacking the vital- 
ity of Marlborough’s Lord 
Treasurei? (7k 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,194 


QftisaasiasiEais ra _ 

s e e? 

2 ffl MPHMI-H-HviEb* 
p hi h d n n 
liebr £iran]fir=niiraiPE 

® ■ E H li (5 [3 cn 

D O 131 S3 m ' IS . K 

i-j w e n n uni mjsiVjh 

b r2 is ns ra n 
m n s , 
e cn r? iiinmcjQSErarg 
0 ra h n 

H 5! ;2flHHnE0l!Hn 



By David Sapsted 

Stonehenge yesterday 
echoed to the tramp of 
visitors’ feet as English 
Heritage reopened the 
gates to the inner circle of | 
pagan stones. 

For most of the year 
people — not in die least 
Droids and hippies — are 
banned from actually get- 
ting to the stones, but 
English Heritage has 
once a gain decided to let 
the carious come closer 
this winter. 

“The reason is simply 
that fewer people visit 
Stonehenge at this time of 
the year and, conse- 
quently, the dangers of 
soil erosion from thou- 
sands of pans of feet are 
much less,” a spokesman 
for the organization said. 

Until toe end of Feb- 
ruary, provided the 
ground is not too boggy, 
visitors will be allowed 
inside toe fence on Tues- 
days and Fridays between 
9.30 am and 4 pm. 

Last year, more than 
650,000 people visited 
Stonehenge, making it by 
far the biggest diawcard 
among the hundreds of 
attractions owned by Eng- 
lish Heritage. 

Photograph: Nick Rogers 


London University, opens Wye 
College new student residence 
and attends the launch of the 
college appeal, Ashford. Kent, 
10.30: and later opens tire new 
hostel for students of tire United 
Medical and Dental Schools of 
Guy’s and St Thomas's Hos- 
pitals, the grounds of Lambeth 
Palace. 4.3d 

Princess Margaret, Colond- 
in-Chiet Queen Alexandra's 
Royal Army Nursing Corps. 


Secret deal to free 
American hostages 


BBC reply today 
on bias complaint 


Continued from page 1 

Jihad kidnappers in Lebanon. 
• The Syrian diplomat kid- 
napped in Tehran last month 
was Syria's principle inter- 
mediary not only between 
Iran and the pro-Iranian 
Hezbollah (Party of God) in 
Lebanon but also between 
Iran and the United States. Mr 
lyad Mahmoud, the Syrian 
envoy — who was abducted on 
the orders of an official of the 
I ranian Revolutionary Gua- 
rds — was instrumental in 
securing the release of Mr 
David Dodge, who was kid- 
napped in 1982. 

Hojaiotislam Rafsanjani 
last night himself listed Iran's 
conditions for assisting in the 
release of the American hos- 
tages in Lebanon as "the 
return of Iranian assets, the 
recognition of the denied 
rights of Lebanese Muslim 
people and the freedom of 
political prisoners incarcer- 
ated in Israel and other parts 
of the world”. 

But the statement can be 
most accurately interpreted as 
an attempt to embarrass Syria 
following pressure on Iran 
from Damascus to free three 
American hostages- 


Only 24 hours before Mr 
Rafeaq/atii's extraordinary 
statement, the pro-Syrian 
Lebanese magazine drShiroa 
had claimed that Mr Macfer- 
lane had visited Iran in 
September, a report which Mr 
McFarlane hims elf specifi- 
cally denied. But his presence 
among a small group of 
Americans sent to Tehran' 
during the summer has been 
common gossip. 

According to these dip- 
lomas, America managed to 
exploit a power straggle within 
the Iranian clergy, offering 
weapons for the Iranian 
armed forces to those who 
favoured a settlement of the 
hostage crisis in Lebanon. 

A spokesman for Mr 
McFarlane in the United ; 
States said last night that : 
President Reagan's former . 
aide had no comment to make 
on the statements in Iran. But 
an Arab diplomat who has 
served in Iran told The Times 
that the Iranians h«d been 
instrumental in securing Dr 
Jacobsen's release after the 
Syrians had made it dear they 
were responsible for the 
groups holding the hostages in 
Lebanon. 


Continued from page ! 
poll which said that only 10 
per cent of people thought the 
BBC biased against the Gov- 
ernment and that 88 per cent 
thought it wrong that the 
Conservative Party should 
seek to influence the way the 
BBC covered news items. 

But while Mr Tebbit and 
Conservative Central Office 
remain convinced . that the 
battle will be worth ft in the 
long term, by starting to get 
what they see as the right 
questions asked about the 
BBC and its management, 
some ministers are now anx- 
ious to draw a line under the 
whole episode as soon as the 
specific questions raised have 
been answered. They believe, 
and Mr Tebbit actually agrees 
with them, that ft will not 
serve anybody's interests for a 
long -running battle to con- 
tinue until the next election. 

In the Commons yesterday 
Mr Kinnock accused Mr 
Tebbit of manic efforts, using 
"smears and menaces” to 
coerce the - corporation into 
manipulating news the way he 
and the Prime Minister would 
like. 

Mrs Thatcher replied that ft 


was a straigh tfor ward matter 
of whether the BBC was 
honouring the terms of its 
charter and licence agreement 
Later former Labour Leader 1 


fhstt rather than acting impar- 
tially as a minister Mr Tebbil 
had sent a "bullying letter” in 
his role as party chairman. 

• The BBC is expected 
today to accuse the Cooser- 

tbat were^ottote^to sup- 
port its allegation that the 
BBC broadcast biased reports 
on the American raid cm 
Libya. 

The BBCs detailed refuta- 
tion deals with every’ one of 
the specific complaints raised 
byMrTebbft. 

In almost every case, the 
BBC concludes that the fac- 
tual statements used by Mr 
Tebbit to support his allega- 
tions of bias were false. 

The report states that the 
BBCs only important error in 
its Libyan coverage was to link 
the raid with the attempted 
bombing of an El AL jetliner at 
Heathrow Airport two days 
later. 

"This assumption was not 
correct,” the BBC admits 


Mr Dale Campbell- 

Savours, the Labourmember 

for Workington, and his cam- 
paign m sympathy with Pan- 
orama (see this space 
yesterday- and 'doubtless 
many times in. the future), 
continues to . occupy the 
House's attention. 

Mr Neil Hamilton, one of 
tile two Tory MPs who 
brought si libel action a gai nst 
the programme for sugges- 
tions of right wing ex- 
tremism, yesterday 
complained to the Speaker 
about Mr Campbell-Savours. 

The essence of the. com- 
plaint was that; by points of 
order and . other, par- 
liamentary devices, Mr 

i Campbefl-Savours was using 

parliamentary privilege to 
rarr y nji tiie BBC's defcpccio 
the libel action, even though 
flat defence had been aban- 
doned in court and a settle- 
ment reached with the 

p^mrife. 

If that is true, Mr Camp- 
beH-Savours has only been 
fubaUmg Ids role as the 
flagship ofLabour backbench 
current affairs broadcasting. 
He is toe continuation of 
Panorama by other naans. 

Mr Campbell-Savours goes 
out nearly every day at peak 

viewing time. This is the 
period at the end of question 
time when the House is 
fullest and the Speaker 
considers points of order and 
members’ applications for 
emergency ‘ debates;. After 
that, for viewers on both, 
sides of the Houre, it is 
usually time for the main 
debate of the day and steep. 

• Mr Campbell-Savours has 
long been thought more eff- 
ective than what many view- 
era regari as snto outmoded, 
over-theatrical p ro gr amm es 
as Mr Andrew Faulds (War- 
fey East, Lab). His onfy rival 
on the Labour benches is This 
DaJyeD-iht member for 
Linlithgo w responsible for 
immensely long investigative 
shows about Westland or the 
sinking of the Bei^nuto and 
. the attempted sinking of Mis 
Thatcher. Mr Campbdl- 
Savonrs* only rival on the 
other channel is perhaps the 
downmarket Mr Geoffrey 
Dickens (Littleborough and 
Saddleworth, Q. . 

Nearly every day for over a 
week now the Czmpbefl- 
Savours programme has been 
about the alleged injustice 
done to Panorama in its. 
having to give m to the two 
Tory pfamtifk In q u es ti ons, 
and points of order, he keeps 
hinting that' Conservative : 
Centra! Office frightened 


mg its de fe n c e of the libel 
action. “The BBC are refight- 
ing a betite they lost in 
court,” be said. 

Mr Bernard Weatherifl, toe 
Speaker, replied that what Mr 
Campbell-Savours had done 
was "in House of Commons 
toms, in order”. That may be 
so, but we have not heard the 
last of the matter. Nor had we 
heard, the last of Mr Camp- 
befl-Savoura. i 

He rose yesterday to stand 
by lira story. To substantiate 
Ins earlier show . about 
intimidation of witnesses by 
Central Office, be said he had 
sent the transcri p t of a tape 
recording to the Attorney 
General Then be turned to 
what he regarded as the 
related subject of Mr Tebbit 
and toe Libyan bombmbg. 

"BBC journalists are look- 
ing over their shoulders in 
fear,” Quite so. Bui normally 
ft is at other BBC journalists 
who are after their j obs. "The 
whole nation should rally in 
support of the BBC” he said. 
He was now conjuring up 
virions of “Free Michael 
Cockerell Now", committees 
beingfonned iu our factories, 
and of Camden. Council 
renaming a street as Kate 
Addie Avenue. 

Mr Campbell-Savours will 
go out again at his osual time 
today. ' 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


attends their annual cocktail 
party. Royal Hospital. Chelsea, 
6.5a 

Tbe Dolce of Gloucester 
presents the Masons’ Company 
Awards 1986, Mercers' Hall 
Ironmonger Lane, EC2, 12.15. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
visits the Warwick Row Day 
Centre few the Physically Handi- 
capped on their silver jubilee, 3. 

The Duchess of Kent, as 
Chancellor, visits the depart- 
ment of rheumatology, Leeds 
University, 3; and later, as 
tron, attends the Leeds De- 


Prince Michael of Kent, as 
President, the Institute of the 
Motor Industry, attends their 
annual meeting. Fansfaaws, 
Brickeodon, Herts, 12.45. 

New Exhibitions 
Nine Portuguese painters; 
John Hansard Gaflety, The 
University, Southampton; Moo 
to Sat 10 to 6 (ends Dec 20). 

Crafts for Christmas; Coach 
House Craft Gallery, Gaw- 
iborpe Hall Padtham, Nr Burn- 
ley, Lancs; Mon to Sat 10 to 5. 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Dec 23). 
Exhibitions in progress 
Work by tbe Ulster Society of 
Women Artists; Central Li- 
brary, Belfast; Mon and Tburs 
9.30 to 8, Tues. Wed and Fri 

9 JO to 5 JO, Sat 9.30 to 1 (ends 
Nov 291 

Recent work by Roger Wil- 
son; Mappin Art Gallery, Wes- 
ton Park, Sheffield: Mon to Sat 

10 to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Nov 
30k 

Mnsic 

Concert by the BBC Welsh 
•Symphony Orchestra; St Dav- 


Organ redial by Christopher 
Kent, Reading Town Hall, 
BlagraveSt. 1.10. 

Redial by the Jonathan Wil- 
liams Horn Trier, Royal Institu- 
tion, River St, Truro, 7.30. 

Concert by tbe Scottish Na- 
tional Orc h ester. Caird HaO, 
Dundee. 7 ja 
General 


New books — hardback . 


The Literary EcStor’s sn i o ction of interestin g books pubBshed this week: 
Cemb o di ep Witness, The Autobiography of Someth May, netted and 
introduced by James Fenton (Faber, £355) 

Gustav Kfimt Women. Introductory essay by Angalca- B&htw 
(W esienfeld - Nicoteon. E 30) 


Sussex. 9 to 4. 


The pound 



TtgoMtar 

Bates for amaBd en omi nafa n bank nows 
,oSy ea suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
daoM and aflw wreipn cur re n cy 
business. 

Retafl Pries todea; 3874 
1 London: The FT Index dosed up 02 at 


The Midlan d s; Ml: Road- 
works on the southbound 
carriageway between junctions 
27 (A608 Heanor) and 28 (A38 
, Manfield); delays. M5: Contra- 
flow b e twe e n junctions 4 and 5 
to tbe SW of Birmingham; also 
overnight lane closures. A449: 
Contraflow between Kidder- 
! minster and Worcester at 
Crown Lane. RartJetnuy. 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
1 7 (Swindon and Chippenham). 
M5e Contraflow between junc- 
tions 24 and 26 (A39 and A38), 
Somerset. M& Contraflow at 
junction 14 (Thornbury), Glou- 
cestershire; northbound entry 
slip road dosed. 

The North: M1& Contraflow 
! between junctions 6 and 7; 
southbound exit ami north- 
! bound entry dosed; diversions. 
M63: Major roadworks and lane 
closures at Barton Bridge, 
Greater Manchester. M& Major 
roadworks and lane closures 
between junctions 17 and 18 
near Chester. 

Scotland: M& Lane closures 
between junctions 17 and IS. 
M8: Contraflow between junc- 
tions 29 and 30. M9(k 
Contraflow between junctions 6 
and 4; progressive carriageway 
repairs. 

Information supplied by AA 


Anniversaries. 


Births: Washington AUston. 
painter. Brook Green Domain, 
South Carolina, 1779; Stephen 
Crane, novelist, author of The 
Red Badge of Courage, Newark, 
New Jersey. 1871; James Elroy 
; Flecker, poet, author of ff assort, 

1 London, 2884; John Barden 
H a ld a n e, physiologist and gen- | 
eticist, Bhubaneswar, India, 
1892; Vivien Darjeeling, 

India, 1913. 

Deaths: AngeBca 
painter. Rente, 1807; Junes 
Clerk Maxwell, physicist, Cam- 
bridge, 1879; August We»- 
ffiann, biologist, Freiburg im ■ 
BreUgan, 1914; Christian SJk- : 
man, physician, Nobel laureate 
1929 , Utrecht, 2930; George 
M. Cohan, actor, song-writer. 
New York, 1942; Maurice 
Utrillo, painter. Lie VesmeL 
France, 1955; Mad Sennett, 
creator of the Keystone Kops. 
Hollywood, I960. 


Hobbes, by Tom Sorefl {Routiedoe & Kogan Paul, E1435J 
ran^Artoor, Hero and LagondTby Rrcnard Barber (Soydof 8 Brewer, 

Russian Studies, by Leonard Schapiro (Coffins Harvid,£l5) 

The Best Biddings of England, by Nicolaus Pevsner, an anthology 
compiled by Bridget Chany and John Newman (Viking. £14.95) 

The Christians and the Roman Empire, by Marta Sort*. t ran slated by 
Annabel Badri (Croom Helm. £18.95) 

The Htetory of the Royal Academy 1768-1968, by Sidney C. Hutchinson 
(Robert Royce, £14.95) 

The Market for Gtonr, Fleet Street Ownership In the 20tb Csntuy, by Simon 
Jenkins (Faber, £955) 

TheTTwoiy & Practice of Unch, by Keith Waterhouse (Michael Joseph. 


Firework displays 


Warrington Display: Bonfire 
and fireworks, Victoria Park, 
Warrington. Cheshire, gates 
open 6 pm (£2 per car, 5%) 
pedestrian). 

Ottery St Mary Carnival: 
Ottery St Mary, Devon, from 6 
pm (free). 

Gtitheroe Display: Bonfire 
and fireworks, Castle Ground, 
Clitheroe, Lancs, from 7 pm 
(free)- 

Limpool Displays: F ir ework 
displays only; Newsham Park, 
Wyihroshaw Park, Alexandra 
Park, Manchester, from 7.15 
pm. 

Preston: Grasshoppers’ Dis- 
play: bonfire and .fireworks, 
Preston Grasshoppers’ Rugby 
Club. Preston, Lancs, gates open 


Weather 

forecast 

Frontal troughs win move 
south eastwards across 
the British Isles. 


TOPM Umu i v b 4m to raOtbst 


ROffiS'wS^ 





Parliament today 









hr 








f'.'B 






from gviflg evidence to 
substantiate Panorama’s 
riphns the two MPs. 


In Ins most recoft^mt 
he has taken the opportunity 
ofadding. that Mr Tebbit is 
aito persecuting the BBC in 
the “Libyan bombing” affair. 
Logically, toe Libyan bomb- 
ing affair has nothing to do 
with the libel action. But why 
spoil a good programme? 

Andso Mr Hamilton, as an 
l um ay ri viewer ofMrCamp- 
befl-Savoucs over many days, 
yesterday told toe Speaker 
that toe Labour member had 
amply been repeating “vari- 
ous ifods” which had been' 
“accepted by the BBC in a 
statement in open court as , 
being totally without j 
foundation”. Mr Hamilton i 
added that, because Mr | 
Camifoen-Savours’ remarks 
bad been made unde toe 
protection of pa r lia ment ary 
privifege, the newspapers bad 
been ableto repeat them. . 

Mr Hamilton obviously 
suspected that Mr Campbefl- 
Savoijas was setting his 
information, from BBC 
sources which had been op- 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 






WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 




TIMES 


SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 




Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 
1294.3 (+0.2) 

FT-SE 100 
1637.7 (-1.50) 

32616(36712) 

USM (Datastream) 
126.98 (+0.66) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4145 (+0.0035) 

W German mark 
2.9096 (-0.0013) . 

Trade-weighted 
68-6 (-0.1) 

Montagu 

defection 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd has 
added to its capital markets 
capability by recruiting a 
Eurobond trading team from 
Samuel Montagu, the mer- 
chant bank. It is the first ma ss 
defection of a dealing team to 
a different bank since Big 
Bang a week ago. 

The team is headed by Mr 
Alan Reid, who was a Samuel 
Montagu director and now , 
becomes head of trading in 
BZW's international capital 
markets division. He is bring- 
ing with him three dollar 
Eurobond dealers and two 
sterling Eurobond dealers. 

Until now. BZW has had 
virtually no involvement in 
the secondary Eurobond 
market 

This is the latest in a series 
of moves by Mr Ken Green, 
head of the international cap- 
ital markets division, to 
broaden BZW's involvement 
in capital markets. The 
conglomerate has chosen a 
policy of acquisition to 
achieve this aim which may 
include the purchase of a 
primary dealership in the US. 

Bigger stake 

American Trust has agreed 
to subscribe for up to 2.67 
million new Edinburgh Oil 
and Gas shares at 30p a share 
to raise £730,000 in a move 
that could increase its holding 
from 26.5 per cent to a 
maximum of 40.8 per cenL 
Other Edinburgh shafcboldere 
will have the opportunity to 
maintain their percentage 
holding through a onc-for-four 
rights issue at 30p. 

Profits trebled 

Pretax profits at GT 
Management almost trebled 
in the six months to Septem- 
ber 30. They rose from £12 
million to £6 million on 
turnover up 65 per cent at 
£18.8 million. The interim 
dividend was raised from 
Q.67pto l-25p. 

Tempos, page 24 

IBA approval 

The Independent 
Broadcasting Authority has 
approved plans by Anglia 
Television to give voting 
rights to its A shares, which 
are traded on the Stock Ex- 
change, and to compensate B 
and C shareholders with a 
four-for-ihree bonus issue. 

Ban on coins 

British imports of South 
African gold coins are now 
banned irrespective of their 
country of origin. Previously 
only direct imports from 
South Africa were banned. 

Arlington link 

Arlington Securities plans 
lo partner Teesland Develop- 
ment in a £25 million town- 
centre development for Bar- 
row-in-Furness, Cumbria: 

Wall Street 72 FordgaExeh 24 
Co New Z2 TrededOp* 24 
ComaeM 23 Share Prices 25 
Stock Market 23 UwtTrwcs 2S 
Tempos 24 CmuMt&aes 26 
Money MAls 24 USM Prices 26 


Official reserves 
in biggest 
fall since 1982 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Britain's official reserves 
fell by an underlying $668 
million (£474 million) last 
month, the biggest monthly 
drop fin* four years. The large 
fall in the reserves was doe to 
Bank of England support for 
the pound in the foreign 
exchange markets. 

The recorded fall in the 
reserves last month was bigger 
than the average of City 
expectations. However, it is 
unlikely to reflect the full 
extent of official support for 
sterling last month, because 
much of the intervention will 
have been conducted on a 
forward basis. 

In addition, the Bank of 
England called upon the West 
German Bundesbank to help 
in the support operation for 
the pound about the time of 
the International Monetary 
Firnd meetings in Washington 
at die end of September and 
the beginning of October. 

The cost of this support will 
be paid bade by the British 
authorities over the next few 
months. 


The reserves stood at 
$21,992 million (£15,614 mil- 
lion) at the end of last month, 
compared with $22,426 m3-, 
lion (£15,491 million) at the' 
end of September. 

(The pouad/dollar convex- 
aons were done at the prevail- 
ing rates for each month). The 
actual fid!, of $434 million, 
understated the underlying 
fall because borrowings under 
the exchange cover scheme, of 
$389 million, exceeded repay- 
ments of $60 million. 

The reserves were also af- 
fected by the quarterly valua- 
tion change under the 
European Monetary Co-op- 
eration Fund provisions, 
which reduced them by $92 
million as a result of the 
dollar’s decline against the 
European Currency Unit. 

The underlying tail in the 
reserves, of $668 million, was 
the largest since December 
1982, when the pound was 
weak because of political un- 
certainties ahead of the 1983 
General Election. 

Treasury officials said the 


UK OFFICIAL 
V RESERVES 
X $ b§Uon 


J FMAMJJA SO N D JFMAMJJASO 
1985 I 1986 _____ 


underlying reserves total 
showed a rise of $30 million 
since the start of the year, and 
the fell in the reserves in the 
second half of last year was 
recouped in the early months 
of this year. 

The actual reserves* total 
was boosted in September by a 
$4 billion floating rate note 
issued by the Government 
This was issued to bolster the 
reserves and, as it turned out 
was a timely move. . 

The pressure on the pound, 
and the need for official 
intervention, has eased in the 
past few days. Yesterday, how- 
ever. the pound slipped 
slightly, with the sterling index 
dipping from 68.7 to 68.6. 

The pound gained 35 points 
to $1.4145 against the dollar, 
but slipped fractionally to 
DM2.9096 against the mark. 
In the money markets, rates 
were little changed, three- 
month interbank rate dosing 
lo 1 Pi6-10 ,5 i 6 per cent 

Despite the pound’s im- 
proved performance over the 
past few days, its recovery has 
been insufficiently robust to 
remove underlying doubts 
and lift fears ofa further rise in 
base rates completely. 

Dealers believe the pound 
could be vulnerable if the new 
Saudi Arabian oil minister. 
Sheikh Hishan Nazer, fails in 
bis attempt to drive oil prices 
up. 

The pound may also have 
received some short-term 
benefit because of the US mid- 
term elections yesterday, 
which caused some dealers to 
take up defensive positions on 
the dollar. 



By Lawrence Lever 



Beazer flop highlights Qty’s 
dim view of rights issues 


Mr Brian Beazer, chairman 
ofCH Beazer, Ibe feat-growing 
Bath housebuilding group, 
admitted last night that the 
company's rapid expansion 
may have come to a halt after 
disappointment over bis latest 
City fund-raising exercise. 

The balance of Bearer's 
recent £180 million rights 
issue, used to acquire GiffonJ- 
Hifl. the US construction 
materials group, was placed 
with City clients after only 72 
per cent was taken up by 
shareholders. 

Mr Beazer. who has blazed a 
takeover trail and boosted the 
| value of bis company from £5 
million to more than £550 
million in seven years, said: 
“Since we launched the issue 
we have suffered from great 


By CEff Feltham 
uncertainty in the stock mar- 
ket. a rise in base rates and, of 
course, an increase in mort- 
gage rates. 1 don’t think any- 
thing was wrong with the 
pricing of our issue but our 
advisers have had to contend 
with a fairly turbulent time. 

*1 think that from now on 
we will be concentrating our 
energies on successfully merg- 
ing the Giflbrd-HiU business. 
We will not be looking at any 
further acquisitions at this 
stag e ." 

Bearer’s share price has 
fallen from 230p. before the 
announcement of the two-for- 
three rights issue in Septem- 
ber, bumped along ai I80p, 
the issue price, and has recov- 
ered to I89p. 

Mr Mike .Whittles of 


Messefs corporate finance 
department, which completed 
the placing of 30 million 
shares with City institutions, 
admitted: “We worked very 
hard to get this one away. 
Unfortunately, the market 
took a dive almost from the 
day the issue was announced.” 

■ City observers believe senti- 
ment has turned against rights 
issues. 

Mr Martin Daws, analyst at 
De Zoete & Be van, the stock- 
broker, said: “I think people 
are beginning to become wary 
of the building sector. We 
certainly see a period of 
decline ahead. Despite the 
boom in house prices the 
profits being made by the 
builders are not great” 


The Adelphi is die Strand: bousing all Manufacturers Hanover's activities under one roof. 

Maxwell Albert Fisher in 
Stake £44.7m buy 

surprise By Lawrence Lever 

Rv AifeAnFflrifP .Albert Fisher Group, the 

By Atisofl fcadie fast-growing food distribution 

Mr Robert Maxwell, pub- and service company, went 
Usher of the Doily Mirror, back on the acquisition trail 
yesterday enhanced his repo- yesterday with purchases 
ration for springing surprises, worth £44.7 million, 
when he announced he had The company is paying £38 
bought more McCorqoodaie million for three Distillers 
shares at prices op (o 6p above food subsidiaries owned by 
the management buyout terms. Guinness and a maximum 
Mr Maxwell bought a for- S9.5 million (£6.7 million) for 
tber 1 .275 million shares, or a Florida fruit and vegetable 
IS per cent, in two blocks at distributor. 

302p and 306p. His total The deals increase Albert 
bolding in the company is now Fisher's share capital by 37.5 
17.2 per cent He assented per cent. Since Mr Tony 
10.8 per cent to the body Millar took over as chairman 
contested £151.7 million bid four years ago. Albert Fisher's 
from Norton Opax. stock market value has soared 

Mr John HoUoran, chief from £720.000 to about £165 

executive of McCorqnodale million. 

and the man leading the bay- Two weeks ago. the com- T Millar stock 

out, said he had no idea what pany announced that full-year 3 \ v;i r l}e 

Mr Maxwell's intentions pretax profits had more than T; . . * . 

were. McCorqnodale shares doubled to £8.35 million. . .■^^ eT ^,^ si,er 11 I ? P®? 1 * JJJ 
closed unchanged at 290p Yesterday, it forecast a 30 per mUial $3.5 nufoon for ihe 
yesterday, the highest level cent increase in its total Red s Group in a mixture of 
they have reached. dividend on the enlarged cash and shares with a maxi- 

Mr Maxwell's previous par- share capital for the present ^ um payment of $9.5 million 
chases hare been well beta- year. depending on profils lo lie 

the buyout terms at 300p cash. “These deals contain no end of Augusi lyoy. 
leaving him with a profit of earnings dilutions.” Mr Millar Toe , Reds . 9 roi ?P * s % 

aboot£3 million. promised. “Moreover, profits whokater and distributor of 

Mr John Wood, the will now be more or less fresh frurt and j® 

McCorqoodaie chairman, who evenly split between Britain 1,-00 customers in 

is not involved in the buyout, and the US. Last year about ■ . . . 

yesterday wrote to shareboW- two-thirds came from the 

ers, recommending the US” £38 milhon For the British 

management buyout offer. The Albert Fisher’s shares rose aquisitions via a vendor plac- 
inde pendent directors and 4p on yesterday’s announce- ,n 8 of -5.3 million snares at 
McCorquod ale’s adviser, ment, closing at 166p. I50p. compared to its 161p 

1 Klein wort Benson, said the The three Guinness food share price before the 
terms of the offer from companies — Stratford-upon- announcement 
Datafin, the new company, Avon Canners. MCC Foods ?* 15 raising a turther £/.> 
were fair and reasonable. and Frank Idiens & Sons — million through a 5 milhon 
Shareholders were urged to between them produced pre- shares issue, also at 150p, tor 
take no action until they saw tax profits of £3.3 million in American purchase, to 
• the formal offer document, the year to March 31. The refinance _ two recently un- 
expected early next week, companies have net assets of nounced US aquisitions and 
O pax's bid closes on Friday £22.1 million and together to pay related costs, 
and although the company has employ 600 people. \ c l a T i -S SJKiSIi 

! not ruled out raising its terms The American purchase — ofjhc 
1 to top the £156 million buyout, Red's Group — had net tan- b^iog placed will be offered to 
| an increased offer looks nn- gible assets of $1.9 million as 

■ likely. at October 15. Its pretax Employees of AJbert Fisher 

Opax has acceptances of profits in the nine-and-a-hatf and tte three British food 
27-3 per cent fat addition to its months to that date amounted companies it is buying wui 
14& per cent stake, giving it to S 1.6 million before extraor- have similar rights oyer the 
control of 42 J. per cent of dinary items and non-recur- outstanding 10 per cent- 
McCorqnodale. ring expenditure. Tempos, page Z4 


.Albert Fisher Group, the 
fast-growing food distribution 
and service company, went 
back on the acquisition trail 
yesterday with purchases 
worth £44.7 million. 

The company is paying £38 
million for three Distillers 
food subsidiaries owned by 
Guinness and a maximum 
S9.5 million (£6.7 million) for 
a Florida fruit and vegetable 
distributor. 

The deals increase Albert 
Fisher’s share capital by 37.5 
per cent. Since Mr Tony 
Millar took over as chairman 
four years ago. Albert Fisher’s 
stock market value has soared 
from £720.000 to about £165 
million. 

Two weeks ago. the com- 
pany announced that full-year 
pretax profits had more than 
doubled to £8.35 million. 
Yesterday, it forecast a 30 per 
cent increase in its total 
dividend on the enlarged 
share capital for the present 
year. 

“These deals contain no 
earnings dilutions.” Mr Millar 
promised. “Moreover, profits 
will now be more or less 
evenly split between Britain 
and the US. Last year about 
two-thirds came from the 
US” 

Albert Fisher’s shares rose 
4p on yesterday’s announce- 
ment, closing at I66p. 

The three Guinness food 
companies — Stratford-upon- 
Avon Canners. MCC Foods 
and Frank Idiens & Sons — 
between them produced pre- 
tax profits of £3.3 million in 
the year to March 31. The 
companies have net assets of 
£22.1 million and together 
employ 600 people. 

The American purchase — 
Red's Group — had net tan- 
gible assets of $1,9 million as 
at October 15. Its pretax 
profits in the nine-and-a-half 
months to that date amounted 
to $ 1 .6 million before extraor- 
dinary items and non-recur- 
ring expenditure. 


Tony Millar: soaring stock 
market value. 

Albert Fisher is paying an 
initial $3.5 million for the 
Red's Group in a mixture of 
cash and shares with a maxi- 
mum payment of $9.5 million 
depending on profits to the , 
end of Augusi 1989. 

The Red's Group is a 
wholesaler and distributor of 
fresh fruit and vegetables to 
about 1.200 customers in 
Florida. 

The company is raising die 
£38 million for the British 
aquisitions via a vendor plac- 
ing of 25.3 million shares at 
I50p. compared to its 161p 
share price before the 
announcement 

It is raising a further £7.5 
million through a 5 million 
shares issue, also at 150p, for 
the American purchase, to 
refinance two recently an- 
nounced US aquisitions and 
to pay related costs. 

A clawback on 90 per cent 
of the total 30.3 million shares 
being placed will be offered to 
Albert Fisher shareholders. 
Employees of Albert Fisber 
and the three British food 
companies it is buying will 
have similar rights over the 
outstanding 10 per cent 

Tempos, page 24 


US bank 
leaves 
City after 
50 years 

By Judith Huntley 

Commercial Property 
Correspondent 

Manufacturers Hanover 
Corporation, the. American 
bank housed in Princes Street, 
City of London, for 50 ws. 
is moving into 300,000 sq ft of 
space at the Adelphi in the 
Strand. 

The bank purchased the 
Adelphi lease from the Phil- 
lips Petroleum Company UK 
for £90 million. It has the 
option to buy the freehold 
from the Prudential Assur- 
ance Company. 

The move away from the 
Square Mile allows the bank 
to concentrate all its activities, 
including investment bank- 
ing, under one roof, in addi- 
tion to expanding its inter- 
national activities from Lon- 
don. 

Manufacturers intends to 
open 150 dealing positions in 
the Adelphi and foreign ex- 
change and Eurobond dealers 
will work on a new trading 
floor. The bank may also 
venture into gilts trading. 

But it says it has no inten- 
tion of becoming a market- 
maker yet. So far Manu- 
facturers has not bought a 
broking or jobbing house, 
believing the costs did not 
justify the returns. But the 
bank says it has not ruled out 
the possibility. 

The leases on Manu- 
facturers’ existing offices, ex- 
cept 7 Princes Street- which is 
near the Bank of England, will 
be sold. The bank says it will 
keep a City office, possibly 
retaining space in its existing 
headquarters. 

Phillips Petroleum UK is 
moving to 120.000 sq ft of 
offices in two buildings in 
Woking, Surrey. It is paying 
rents of£l4 a sq ft and £ 1 2 a sq 
ft with a rent-free period. 

Hunting makes 
£2m provision 
against stake 

Hunting Group is to make a 
£2 million provision against 
its 47 per cent stake in the 
troubled New England Prop- 
erties. 

New England has run into 
problems with a major 
London property refurbish- 
ment scheme. Details of their 
full impact will be set out in a 
circular to shareholders. 

Group profits at the half 
way stage were struck before 
taking account of the pro- 
vision. They emerged at £2.7 
million compared with £1.9 
million last year. 

Profits of Hunting Petro- 
leum Services are held back by 
losses in its oilfield services 
activities but the aviation and 
defence operations of Hunting 
Associated Industries are ex- 
pected to show continuing 
growth in the second half. 


First Interstate ponders 
new BankAmerica bid 

From Onr Correspondent Washington 


First Interstate Bancorp, 
whose $3.4 billion (£2.4 bil- 
lion) bid for BankAmerica 
Corporation was rejected, said 
yesterday it was reviewing its 
options to see if further over- 
tures were warranted. 

It was believed that First 
Interstate would launch a 
hostile takeover bid for the 
California bank if its friendly 
offer was rejected by manage- 
ment. But officials said a 
hostile takeover would be 
unusual in the banking in- 
dustry and would not please 
regulators who maintain a 
tight control over foe industry. 

BankAmerica's board is- 
sued a statement on Monday 
asking all potential suitors to 
withdraw to give it time to 


raise the value of its shares 
and inject new capital into the 
troubled bank. 

Analysts said the rejection 
by BankAmerica was a ploy to 
gain more time to pursue 
other avenues that will allow it 
to remain independent Mr 
A W “Tom” Clausen, the new 
chief executive, has indicated 
this is his goal. 

But BankAmerica's contin- 
uing losses and its urgent need 
for capital have made it an 
attractive takeover target for a 
number of large institutions. 
Citicorp, the largest US bank, 
has designs on the bank. 

First Interstate said h would 
return to the drawing board 
with the aim of producing 
another plan. 


BCal sells last of its 
package tour hotels 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 


Vital information 


British Caledonian yes- 
terday completed its with- 
drawal from the package 
holiday business with the sale 
of hotel interests in the Balear- 
ic* and Canary Islands. 

•The disposal of the 10 
hotels for an undisclosed sum 
to Sol Hotels follows the sale 
of JeCsave in September and 
Bine Sky and Arrowsmrth last 
year. 

Sir Adam Thomson, BCal 
chairman, said that after these 
disposals “there was bo nate- 
ral business relationship 
within die group for a chain of 
hotels geared exclusively to 
the charter-based, mdosive 
tear market.” The sale was 
“on satisfactory terms”. 


BCal decided a year ago to 
move out of the tour operating 
and holiday business and con- 
centrate instead on catering 
for the business travel market 
through its Coptborne Hotels 

subsidiary* 

Yesterday's deals included 
hotels in Mallorca. Ibiza, Me- 
norca and Gran Canaria. All 
of the hotels me holiday units 
with accommodation con- 
tracted out to tour operators in 
Britain and Northern Europe. 

The stamp earlier this year 
in transatlantic traffic, the 
cmtailment of flights to Libya, 
and the sharp depreciation of 
the Nigerian currency mean 
BCal wfll be lucky to break 
even. 



stocks and shares after 



MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


tfoSSSs 188430 HW 

IwSdow 1678&90 (-49-68) 

- 1381.1 1+&4) 
Commerzbank — 2012L3(+1<M) 

®i Mtwagf 

fKAGoneral 546-5° (+27°) 

London dosing prices Pago 25 

INTEREST RATES 

| iy i da « 

Bank Base: 11% 

3-month tatertenfi ill 
3- month aSgi bte 
guying rat© 

Prime Rate 

Federal Funds CKj e«^> 

ts&SSBSStf* 1 * 



Fed unlikely to cut rates as 
economy shows revival signs 




CURRENCIES 


London Airar 

!dn£s°96 

SSSSm* |*S&ir 

&W39LI9 k Yenl64.CB* 
£■ mpex:68.6 & hvtecIlZ-S 

cne «1 HZ.7700 


Mori&nd — 

Meal Trade ~ 

pefyn Packaging 

John Monties 

Atkins Bros. 

Early's WHney 

Coats Vtytfia — 

BAT Industries 

AGS Research 

Mcrottn 

Toy Homes 

TTwrpac 

Photax — — 

SunOS — 

FALLS: 

Otiort tests. 

Kennedy Brookes — 

Shed 

nagaten Props-, -- — 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GPU? 

dose $40&25-tO8.75 GE28&50- 
289X0) 

Nhi Yoric 

Comex $408.10-408.60* 


NORTH SEA OIL 

*b 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


The powerful open market 

committee of the US Federal 
Reserve Board meets today to 
chart a new monetary course 
following an historic agree* 
meat with Japan which gives 
the central bank more flexibil- 
ity to tower interest rates. 

But die consensus among 
analysts is that the Fed will 
not lower rates nowbecaase 
| the economy is showing signs 

of revival as it moves into the 

final quarter of the year. 
During the third quarter, the 
I economy expanded at a rate of 
; 1A per cent, up from a dismal 
I 0.6 per cent in the second 
( quarter. 

“I do art think they are 
going to do anythmg. The Fed 


hugely attributable to a flurry 
of transactions by businesses 
and consumers ready for the 
big tax law changes coming 
into effect on January 1. 

Nonetheless, tire Fed’s 
emphasis since August has 
been to prevent a recession 
through an aggressive mone- 
tary po&ey producing a seces- 
sion of discount rate cats. 

Analysts noted yesterday 
that the recent pick-op ap- 
peased to be only modest and 
that carrot projections are for 
a downturn early next year 
when the effects of the new tax 
laws are expected to retard 


ment in the economy,” said 
Mr Lyle Gramfey, a former 
i central bank governor who is 
j chief economist Of the Mort- 


The recent pick-up is 


Should foe Fed deride to 
stimulate the economy 
farther** avoid a recession in 
1987, it would have more 
flexibility to do so in _ the 
aftermath of Japan's decision 
to cat its discount rate to 3 per 
cent. 

In addition, the US-Japan 


.agreement that the dollar-yen 
ratio is at appropriate levels 
eases fears that another drop 
in American rates would seri- 
ously undermine the dollar, 
causing a revival of inflation. 

Bet time is remarkable 
agreement among economists 
that the Fed will do little at 
present, preferring to hold off 
on another rate cot antiJ foe 
economy shows signs of de- 
cline. 

The current projections 
among a wide range of an- 
alysts are for increased growth 

of between 3.7 per cent mid 4.2 
per cent in the fourth quarter. 

• The Bundesbank has In- 
dicated it is not interested in 
g tipmfaring the national econ- 
omy further at present through 
a discount rate cut. West 
German officials have de- 
scribed the US-Japan accord 

as a “bilateral agreement” 

which does not affect 
Germany's economic policies. 


Discount Brokers International (UK) 
Ltd, a member of the London Stock Exchange, 
has been formed by a group of major Euro- 
pean Finan cial Institutions to bring the benc- 
hes of “Big Bang’ to the individual investor. 

N7cm>yoH cart « — — - — - 

<gif 50% M all pre- H how MUCH C A 

"Bic Ban/ commis- Supposeyoa bo 

rates. 

HT l OSOwicmwumR 

Aii you have to ^nrtdunlupretmgl 

do is make your which could be char^cj 

own investment That maos a saving of 

decisions. ) jvstl5 irai&iaioBSi 

So, if you’re ! 

tired of paying high commissions and you 
thin k it's time you got similar rates to institu- 
tions. this advertisement contains vital infor- 
mation for you. 

how we do rr. 

Simply through a combination of COST 
control, spired, efficiency and professionalism: 
L We don't maintain an expensive 
Research Department -you make your own 
investment derisions. 

2. Our highly trained brokers arc not on 
commission -they are paid straight salaries. 

3. Advanced technology enables us to 
give you quality executions at che lowest 
raies- even if you only nuke 3 or 4 bargains 
a year. 

DBI - A BRIEF HISTORY 

Discount Broking is new in the UK. lets 
not new on the other side of the Atiantic. 

Since 1975 it has developed into a major 
industry in die US, with 20% of all private busi- 
ness now handled through Discount Brokets: 
Our sister company. Discount Broken 
International Inc- was the first 

London based member of the Nrw > wp 

York Stock Exchange to bring ( 


HOW MUCH CAN WESAVE YOU? 
Suppose yem bought 2,000 shares 
ofBnnsh Telecom at £tS2 per skin. 

DBFs SOKk commission rare would be just £30.0 J, 
compared to ikcprc-'Big Bang' commission of £60.06 
which could be charged by a typical stockbroker. 


That mez as a saving of £4S0AS per pair ij you do 
just 15 tra reactions over a 12 mo nth period. 


discount commissions on US shares to the 
European investor. 

With ’Big Bang’ behind us, we are now 
doing the same for the UK. Our dealing, 
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j through Broker Ser- 

WESAVE YOU? n vices Ltd- a sub- 

ht 2 , 000 shares sidiaiy of Barclays 

t £tS2 per share. Bank. And we arc 

: hacked by impres- 
^ typical ssockMrr. sivc shareholders 

150.4$ per parr if you do such as the Amro 

no 12 morak period. Bank, one of 

1 Europe’s largest 

banks, thejardine Matheson Group and the 
Matuschka Group. 

HOW TO MAKE. YOUR MOVE 

Send in the coupon today, or call us on 


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Account Form details and 50% discounton all 
pre- Big Bang* commission rates (subject to 
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Remember, you dorithavetogivc upyour 
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commission rates. 

It’s up to you to make the next move. 


Please send roe more information and Account 


| Form details without obligation. 

| NAME 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


Send to: FREEPOST 

Discount Broken International (UK) Lrd. 

IV Lincolns Ian Fields. London WC2 A 3DR. 


Discount Brokers International (UK) Ltd. 

Culling the cost of commissions 


tKi - Wi . SA . 1* . i 






■2c£. 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


Hong Kong listings 
lowest since 1972 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


Hong Kong has the lowest 
number of listed companies 
since 1972, despite the recent 
runaway success of its stock 
market 

There are only 255 listed 
companies, compared with 
27S a year ago and a record 
313 at the end of June 1973. 
according to figures released 
by the Hong Kong Stock 
Exchange. 

In the last five years, com- 
panies have been listed at a 
rate of only six a year. So far 
this year there have only been 
three new listings. 

The Hang Seng Index has 
soared by more than 40 per 
cent to 2,315 since March. 
Money from foreign and local 
investors has been pouring 
into the big names on the 
exchange — the top 20 firms 
account for SO per cent of the 
market's capitalization. 

There are two principal 


reasons for the dramatic fall in 
the number of listed com- 
panies. Magnates such as Sir 
Yue Kong Pao and Mr Li Ha- 
shing have been expanding 
and taking over a succession 
of local companies. 

Mr Li’s Hutchison Wham- 
poa empire is the third largest 
company on the exchange 
(market capitalization 
HKS22.5 billion or £2.04 bil- 
lion) while his Cheung Kong 
trading group ranks eleventh 
with a market capitalization of 

UL'tPA 


HK$i 2.6 billion. 

But the market is still 
dominated by the Hongkong 
and Shanghai Banking Corp- 
oration (HK530.8 billion). 


While bigger companies 
have been swallowing up the 
smaller fish, some businesses 
wanting a listing have been 
simply reversing into dormant 
shells. 


First for Mrs Fields 


Mrs Fields, the American 
cookies company, and Hong 
Kong's largest property group 
will open the first of a chain of 
cookies and ice cream shops in 
the Crown Colony next 
month. 

Mrs Fields and Hong Kong 
Land hope that the Cook- 
ies 'n Cream shop will launch 
a chain that will stretch into 
China. This is the first time 
Mrs Fields has gone into a 
joint venture. 

Last year Mrs Fields — 


which has more than 380 
outlets in the United States. 
Britain. Japan and Australia — 
reported profits of $72 million 
(£51 million). 

The company will supply its 
soft, chewy cookies and Hong 
Kong Land will provide ice 
creams through its Dairy 
Farm subsidiary. 

Together they have set up a 
new firm, Mrs Fields Cookies 
Far East Ltd, with an initial 
issued share capital of HKS3 
million (£272,727). 


Regan rules himself out 
of running for Fed job 


From Bailey Morris 
Washington 


Mr Donald Regan, the 
White House chief of staff, has 
firmly rejected the possibility 
of succeeding Mr Paul Volcker 
as chairman of the US Federal 
Reserve Board. 

In a broadcast interview in 
which he was asked about 
repeated rumours that he is 
the top candidate to replace 
Mr Volcker, Mr Regan said he 
was not interested. 


the seven board members, 
reports have circulated widely 
that Mr Volcker would either 
resign early or refuse to take a 
third term if one was offered- 
Names reportedly under 
consideration by the Admin- 
istration to succeed him are 


the Secretary of State. Mr 
ige Shultz, Mr Manuel 


“I think that would be. with 
all due respect to Paul Volcker 
and my associates there on the 
board, a step backward for 
me," Mr Regan said. 

He did revive speculation, 
however, that Mr Volcker is 
not likely to be reappointed 


Mr Donald Regan: 4 a back- 
ward step for me' 
when his term expires next 
August 

Asked about the chances of 
another Volcker term, Mr 
Regan said: “It is too early to 
tetr. 

Following the appointment 
by President Reagan of five of 


George 

Johnson, vice chairman of the 
board, and Mr Regan, who has 
been a strong critic of Mr 
Volcker. 

In addition, the Treasury 
Secretary, Mr James Baker, 
has been considered a possible 
replacement bat his associates 


say it is unlikely be would 
accept such an offer, choosing 


instead to return to politics in 
the campaign of Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush for the 
presidency m 1988. 


APPOINTMENTS 


American Chamber of 
Commerce (UK): Mrs Jean 
Wad low, Mr Charles 
McVeigh m, and Mr Archie 
Forster join the board. 

Savifls: Mrs Avim 

Gershnny-Roth has been ap- 
pointed director of marketing. 

SupaSnapS: Mr Andrew 
Miller becomes managing 
director from next month and 
Mr Brian Per kins becomes 
sales director. 

Dearden Farrow: Mr David 
Tallon becomes senior part- 
ner, succeeding Mr Ray 
Whittaker. 

Hunting Associated In- 
dustries: Sir Ronald Mason 


has been made a director. 

London & Cly deside Hold- 
ings: Mr Willie Wiseman 
joins the board. 

Security Pacific Hoare 
Govett: Mr George 

Haodpnkolaoa becomes vice 
president 

Oceana Asset Management: 
Mr Gwyn Davies becomes 
director, corporate finance. 

ECS International UK: Mr 
Antoine Colboc becomes 
managing director. 

CW Communications: Mr 
Martin Durham has been 
promoted vice president, 
northern Europe. 

TecQuipment: Mr AC 


Brightman has been' ' 
chief executive, from Decem- 
ber 1. 

PRO NED: Mr Brace 
Rhodes has been appointed 
associate director. 

Binder Hamlyn: Mr WD- 
tiam Casey, Mr Christopher 
Honeyman Brown, Mr 
Alastair Scrimgeovr and Mr 
Phillip Sykes become 
partners. 

Cusans Property Group: 
Mr Alasdair Mackenzie has 
been made commerical 
director. 

Cullen's Holdings: Mr Ed- 
ward Rockford becomes fi- 
nance director. 


Hogg buys 
two estate 


agencies 


By Alison Eadie 


Hogg Robinson, the insur- 
ance broker to travel and 
estate agency group; yesterday 
announced the expansion of 
its estate agency network to 47 
outlets through the ac- 
quisition of two more agencies 
for £5.8 million. 


It is buying Anscombe & 
Ringland with eight offices in 
central London and Russell,. 


Baldwin & Bright with 14 
brandies in Herefordshire. 


Hogg is the ninth largest estate 
agency group in Britain. 


The combined pretax prof- 
its of the two businesses being 
acquired totalled £366,000 last 
year. The set assets are 
£784,000. Hogg is paying £4.2 
million in cash and and £1.2 
million in redeemable pref- 
erence shares with a further 
£400,000 payable in cash 
depending on die profits of 
Anscombe this year. 


Hogg intends to continue 
buying and in rime 

may combine them with the 
larger travel outlets. It does 
not foipsee any dilution in 
earnings in the current .finan- 
cial year. 

It announced its first move 
into the estate agency business 
in July and plans to sell 
mortgages, endowment poli- 
cies, Tire cover and personal 
insurance policies as well as 
houses. It sees the business as 
a natural extension of its 
personal financial operations. 


TO SELL MORE NAIL FILES. HAVE THE 
RIGHT TOUCH IN RUBBER GLOVES. 


rM 


ts h 


c bl 


Iraq 


wi r 


.->5 N 


•IfTTH 


Lyrics 


■PM.T 


rn 


asm 


aw* 


Gem nail files from the US and Mangold gloves, one 
of the world’s biggest brands in the household glove 
market Behind these successful names, the success of 
London international Group pic We are among the world s 
leaders across a whole series of consumer products and 
services. In photoprocessing and home improvements as 
well as health and beauty products, household and 
surgical gloves and contraceptives 

In seven years our pre-tax profit has quadrupled on 
doubled turnover 


Our yardstick is performance. Our strategy is 
expansion. Wfe can see the potential where others cannot 
-in a market. a process, a company, a product. And we know 
how to make that potential work 

For those who invest with us And for those who work 
with us 

We would like you to know more about us. Please 
telephone 01-250 3078. extension 250 and we will send you 
our latest company report London International Group pic 
20-25 Glasshouse \&rd. London ECl 4IN. 


SEE THE POTENTIAL — MAKE IT WORK. 




WALL STREET 


Profit- 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street stocks feS in early 
trading yesterday on moderate 
volume ss profiMakmg set in 
alter a 16-point item tiie Dow 

Jones industrial avenge on 
Monday. 

Traders noted a tendencey 
to sefi as the average neared 
the L900-leveL The Senate 
elections also led to some 
caution. 


The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down 8J)1 to 


1JS8&25 at one stage. The 
transport average slipped 3J) 
to 83838 and the UtflitKS 
indicator was down just 0.63 to 
21004. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index lost 
0.70 to 245.10 while the New 
York Stock Exchange comp- 
osite index fell 026 to 141JL 

The deefinmg shares led 
advancing issaes fay a margin 
of abort* sevea-todbor. 

Goodyear Tire fed \ to 4Ts. 


NOT 

3 


NOT 

3 


Oct 

31 


AMR 
ASA -35 . 

AMed Signal 41% 
MMStrs 66* 
ABsCMmn 3% 
Alcoa 3755 

Amaxlnc 13S 
Am’rtaHs 259. 
Am Brands *7% 
Am Can 88% 
AmCjmm'd 80* 
AbiBPnt 30 
Am Express 5955 
AhiNobh 79* 
Am Motors 3* 
Am Sturt 41% 
AmTatafA 3*54 
Amoco 68- 
ArmcoStaa! BV 
Asarco 15V 
Ashland OB 57* 
At Richfield 56% 
Avon Prods 3354 
BKraTstNY 44* 
Banfcanar 16 % 
Bk of Baton 43* 
Bank of NY 59 
BsthStml 7 
Boning 53% 
BsaCascde 60% 
Brdan 49 

BgVtenx* 38 
BnstMyera 78% 
BP 3954 

BurrtORM 37% 
BurnonNtR 64^ 

«% 

CHterpBer 40% 
Cttanesa 343% 
Central SW 35% 
Criarapion 39* 
Chase Man 36% 
ChmBkNV 44% 
Chevron 43% 
Chrysler 39 % 
CHfcorp 51% 
CtaricB*Jp 19% 
Coca Cola 37% 
39 
133% 
CbobmGas 43% 
CmtrtnBw 31% 
CorwritaH 32% 
Cons Etts 47% 
Cn fiat Gas 32 
Core Power 15% 
CMOt Data 26 
Coming Gi 54% 
CPCbtf 84% 
Crane 33 
QnZOSer nta 
DartS Kraft 67% 
Deere 24 - 
DM* Air 50% 
Detroit Ed 17% 
DlgttdEq 101% 
Disney 43% 
DowCbsor 56% 
Dresser Ind 18* 
Duka Power 48% 
DuPont 86% 
Eastern Air 9 % 
Esfcn Kodak 64 
Eaton Carp 74* 
Emerson B 84* 
Exxon Corp 69% 
Fed Dpt as 95% 

• fc» 


58% 

35% 

40% 

86 % 

3* 

38% 

13 

259, 

47% 

87% 

.80 

30 

58% 

79% 

3* 

40% 

25 

65% 

6 % 

15% 

57% 

57 

33 


Fit Chicago 


FstmtBncp 
mnC 


15% 

40% 

59 

8* 

52% 

60% 

48* 

38 

78% 

39* 

38 


78% 

63% 

11 * 

39% 

218% 

35% 

29 

35* 

43% 

44* 

38% 

51* 

19% 

38% 

38% 

131% 

42* 

31% 

32* 

46* 

32% 

16% 

£ 8 % 

54 

63* 

33% 

50% 

56% 

23% 

49% 

17% 

99% 

43% 

SB 

18* 

48* 

86 

9% 

61% 

73% 

82% 


95% 


FstPann 

Fort 

FTWachn 

OAF Corp 
GTE Corp 
Gen Corp 
Gan (Vines 
GenBedric 
Gen tot 
Gen MBs 
Gan Motors 
GnPbUtny 


Georgia Pec 

Goodrich 
Goodyear 
Gould Inc 


Gi 

Gt Att&Tac 

Grtmd 

GrumanCor 

Gulf & West 

Heinz KJ. 

Hercules 

HTett-Ptod 


Honeywa i 
1C inch 


IBM 

MCQ 


int Paper 
TafTW 


MTeflW 
taring Bank 
Jtnsn&Jftn 
Kaiser Atom 
Karr McGee 
CMc 
K 


KntftyC 

KMstt 


Kroger 

LTvTCcrp 


Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky 503 
Manrfnrsr 
MamUtoCp 
uaoco 
Mam MU 
Mrt Marietta 
Masco 
McDonalds 
McDonnafl 
Meed 
Merck 
MnsttMng 
MoU09 
Monsanto 
Morgan JJP. 
Motorola 
NCR Corp 
NLfndstrs 
Nat Disttrs 
NMMMEnt 
Nat Smart 

NortofcStti 

NlVBancrp 

OcddntPet 


Ogden 

OtnCap 

Owsm-B 


Pic Gas B 
Pan Am 
Penney XC. 
PBnnzoV 


• E»OT»JWa4cfo*sre*ttkW-k 


2&% 

31% 

53% 

9 

59* 

38% 

39% 

60* 

80% 

73% 

77% 

18% 

69* 

72* 

23% 

3% 

39% 

48* 

44% 

48 

20% 

56% 

22 % 

33* 

26% 

68 % 

43% 

57% 

40* 

71% 

-26% 

58% 

20 

126% 

12* 

73% 

54% 

48% 

69% 

17* 

28% 

81* 

50 

33* 

2% 

80% 

47* 

33% 

44% 

2% 

56% 

48% 

39% 

28% 

63* 

79% 

58% 

110 

109 

38% 

78% 

84% 

37% 

46% 

5% 

45% 

25* 

10 % 

82% 

38% 

37% 

47% 

43% 

42% 

24% 

5% 

79* 

73* 

27% 


28% 

30 

54% 

9% 

57% 

38T. 
39% 
-80S 
80* 
72% 
78% 
18% 
88 % 
71% 
23% 
3* 
40* 
44% 
44% 
48* 
18% 
57 
22 * 
33 
26* 
68% 
43% 
56* 
39 
70ft 
25* 
56% 
19% 
123% 
12 % 
73% 
53% 
47% 
69% 
17% 
28% 
81% 
49 
33% 
2 . 
62% 
46% 
33% 
44% 
2* 
53* 
48% 
39% 
27% 


La Neve 


NOV 


Pfizer 80% 

PfMtasDgs 2t 
PUBoMTO 73 

naps PM 10% 

Polaroid 70% 
PPG tad 89% 
PtetrGmtjt 78* 
POSE&G 42* 
Raytaaon 64 
RyndsMet 47* 
Rockwell Int 43 
ROTif Dutch 88% 
gateway* 61 * 
Sara Lee 72% 
SFESopae 34% 
Sctroerger 31% 
Scan Paper 65*. 

Seagram 62* 

SearsRtx* 43* 

SttaBTra re 52% 
42% 
Be 88* 

22 * 

Slb&BlBl 36 

SPSS'S* 
1SK5P St 

Sun Comp 56% 
Tetedyno 335% 
Tmmn 39% 
Texaco 38* 
Texes E Cor 29% 
Turns fast 113% 
Taxes Utte 34% 
Textron 60% 
Travis Cor 43* 
TRW Inc . 93% 
UAL be 58% 
UnriaverNV 211% 
UnCarbide 22 
UnPacCor 60* 
UM Brands 33% 
USGCorp 40* 
UtriTactmoi 42% 
USX Corp 25* 
Unocal 23% 
JntVUUr 46* 
Writer Lott 56% 
Mate Fargo 112* 
WstgtneB 57% 
WmrtTsar 39% 
WhSpod 72* 
Wbomonh 44% 
Xerox Corp 57% 
ZanRh 21% 


SB* 

20% 

?3n 

10 % 

68 % 

89ft 

75 

42% 

84% 

45% 

42% 

83% 

61* 

72* 

33* 

31* 

64% 

62% 

43% 

52% 

43% 

85% 

22 

35 

n/a 

43% 

47* 

35* 

56% 

341% 

40* 

35* 

29 

110S 

34* 

80 

43* 

92% 

57% 

209* 

22 % 

60% 

33* 

40% 

42% 

28 

24* 

45% 

57 

110 

57 

39* 

70* 

44* 

54* 

21% 


CANADIAN PRICES 


** * 


76* 


84% 


AM& 


43% 


37% 


Men Atom 


13% 13* 


Atom Stl 


46% 


15% 15% 


Can Pacific 


5% 


13* 13* 


Cormnco 


25* 25K 


Con 


24% 


27% Z7* 


Hkr/SdCan 


24% 24% 


HdsnBMta 


82% 


34* 3*% 


36% 


29V. 


48% 


87% B7 


42* 


20 % 21 % 


24* 


28* 28* 


■Reran NA- 


2.70 2.7Q 


78% 




71% 


27% 


SffiSS 


riivM 


COMPANY NEWS 


• A&P APPLEDORE: An 

Appledoro subsidiary, Dover 
Ship Repairers, has agreed with 
Sealink UK to take over die ship 
repair and engineering work- 
shops operated" by Seslink at 
Dover and Folkestone together 
with die employees operating 
the facilities. 

• WB INDUSTRIES-. Sue 
months to June 30. No divi- 
dend. Turnover £2^77,563 
(£2.135^57). operating loss 
£75,160 <£29.497 loss), pretax 
profit £23^09 (£26,053 loss), 
loss per ordinary share CL24p 
(MOpV 

• BANSO: The company 
that 93-4 per cent of 
2,501,503 new ordinary shares 
offered by raw of rights has been 
taken up. The balance of the 
new ordinary shares has been 
sold. 

•ROTHMANS INC: Six 
months to September 30 (figures 
in S million, comparisons re- 
stated). Consolidated net sales 
439-0 or £311 million f 434. IX 
earnings from continuing opera- 
tions — Rothmans of Rail Mall 
4.8 (7.7X Carling O’Keefe less 
minority interest 4.8 (1.0X Earn- 
ings per share $1-59 ($ 1. 42X 

• TR ENERGY: No dividend 
for the year to November 3 
(figures in £0Q0X Income from 
fixed asset investments 1,047 
(1,759). Investment dealing 
lasses 262 (75 profitX pretax 
deficit 563 (256 revenneX loss 
per share 1.8p (Ip earnings). 


• DJ SECURITY ALARMS: 
Conditional contracts have been 
exchanged for the acquisition of 
WR Loftus. Thirty-six new or- 
dinary shares in DJ will be 
issued for every five Loftus 
shares as consideration.. The 
terms involve the issue of 
269,989 hew DJ ordinary shares 
(6.23 per cent of the enlarged 

ordinary shares). Allot- 
tees of 135,079 of these shares 
have agreed not to sell or 
transfer them for one year 
without the consent of DJ. 
Taking DJ shares at I03p, the 
terms value each Loftus share at 
74 Ip. Aggregate value of the 
consideration is about £278.000. 

• TAYLOR WOODROW: TW 
Property has signed an agree- 
ment with Portsmouth City 
Council to develop a new shop- 
ping centre ‘The Cascades'* in 


the city centre. The develop- 
ment wull 


1 be carried out through 


TW Property's subsidiary Tay- 
lor Woodrow Chit 


Cbippindale Prop- 
erties. TWs funding partners 
are British Rail pension funds. 
Although detailed financial 
arrangements have not been 
revealed, TW says it expects an 
initial income of more than £1 
million for itself and TWCP on 
completion in 1989. 

• WA HOLDINGS: No in- 
terim dividend, but the board 
will review the position in the 


fight of the full year's results. 
Figures in £000 for six 


More company news 
is on page 24 


_ MARTIN MARIETTA: 
Hoskyns Group, an MM subsid- 
iary. is planning a full listing on 
the London Stock Exchange by a 
placing of a minority of ns 
ordinary shares. Hoskyns sales 
totalled more than £55 million 
in the year to October 31 last 
year. 

• REGENTCREST: Year to 
April 30 (figures in £000). 
Turnover 401 (2.355X profit 
before tax 71 (102). profit 24 
(330X eps (nil basis) 0J20p 
(0.6 IpX eps (net basis) 0.15p 
(0.6 lp). 

• VSEL CONSORTIUM: The 
company fm< announced the 
sale and leaseback of hs new £50 
million staipfifi and quays at 
Barrow-in-Furness. The shiplift 
is part of the new Vsd warship 
construction complex. The sale 
proceeds will finance the 
re m ai n ing expenditure of about 
£45 million on tbe Devonshire 
Dock Han. 

• FALCON INDUSTRIES: 
The company's contract with 
Abbey Homesteads (Develop- 
ments) has become uncondi- 
tional. Under its terras. Falcon 
will sell to Abbey surplus free- 
hold property fora gross consid- 
eration of £755,000. 

• GODWIN WARREN CON- 
TROL SYSTEMS: Interim 
dividend 1 . 1 p (same). Figures in 
£000 for six months to June 30- 
Turnover 3,657 (3,250), loss 
before tax 452 (225 profitX no 
tax (83). lossper share 9 Jp (3.9p 
earnings). The board remains 
confident that 1987 will prove 
to be a record year. 

• OSPREY COMMUNICA- 
TIONS: Interim dividend 0.5p. 
Figures for six months to 
September 30. - Turnover 


six months 
to July 31. Turnover 7,740 
(6.675X pretax profits 293 (142X 
earnings per share 1.03p (0.47). 
Tbe board says that further 
acquisitions in line with the 
group’s expansion policy are 
planned arid prospects remain 
encouraging. 

• SHEFFIELD BRICK 
GROUP: Results for 17 months 
to May 3! (year 1984). No 
dividend (nil). Figures in £000. 
Turnover ■ 3,380 (2,735). loss 
before tax 1 53 (profit 8). loss per 
share 3JU p (earnings 0. 1 7pX 

• BSG INTERNATIONAL: 
8SG has purchased from Elders 
IXL.and Wood Hall A ustralian 
Proprietary whole of the issued 
share capital of Rainsfords 
Metal Products Proprietary. 
The considera ti o n is being sat- 
isfied by allotment to vendors of 
18.920.500 new BSG shares. 
Samuel Montagu has agreed to 
arrange foe placing of new BSG 
shares as vendors wish to re- 
ceive consideration in cash 
am oun timing to a total of about 
£9.1 milion. 

• MARLBOROUGH TECH- 
NICAL MANAGEMENT: The 
company has acquired Liver- 
pool-based Pure Organics which 
will be ran by a new subsidiary, 
MTM M manufacturing. 

• GABLE HOUSE PROP- 
ERTIES: Offer made on behalf 
of Ladbroke by Charterhouse 
Bank to acquire Gable House 
wifi close on November 1 7. 


£2,037,224 (£1,738,266). pretax 
“ 5 (£ 27 . 987 X 


£28.126 


tax 
earnings per 


• MARLER ESTATES: Agree- 
ment has been reached - in prin- 
ciple for foe acquisition by 
B revert eigh from Marter of 
International Business Centres 
for £1.375 million, to be sat- 
isfied by the allotment of new 
Brcverieigh . ordinary shares 
credited as fully paid up. at par. . 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN.. 


Adam & Company. 
BCD 


Citibank Savings!. 

Consohdatsd Crts. 


Go-opera&ve Bank— 

C. Hoare 8 Co. 


.-IT.00% 

._ti.oo% 

11 . 00 % 

12.45% 

11.00% 

-.-.11.00% 

. 11 . 00 % 


Hong Kong 8 — HJW* 

Lloyds Baft 11110% 

Nat WKtnwsrer 11 . 00 % 

Royal Bank of Scotland — 11.00% 
TSB , 11.00% 


Cftbank NA. 


,....11.00% 


t M onpp toe Rate 







DNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 19S6 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 




S- A 

*=S!§ 


; ? 
- i>w ■ 

- •■IAl JKN 

1 ■ Vi- tf i 

•> 5 - 5 

- .■ S’ r. 

■ £ * 

,- - . :tt \ 


•', By Carol Leonard 

Aquesfiwmpk was hang- - HansmTnist^thebk^ 
"vtg over the independence of est volume equity, noicbira 
Bw*** Itoeto&ments, the up a total of 13 million shares. 

grwip, last mostly on American buying 
nigbl, alter me Kuwartiavest- now that the ADRferiKty is in 
mem Office sold as H per operation. Its shares firmed 2p 


y Dia taiK as 

sell 11% stake 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Japanese throw US 
rivals off balance 


MTfcSTREMJ 


. FEA ALL . 
SHARE INDEX 




• t -to 204p. .la .eased 5p to 
Thestake, worth about £30 1089p, Allied irons te io 
DJilhon, is thought to have 310p, BTO 3p to 2$8p and 
been picked upby an Ameri- Brit*k Telecom 2p to 190p. 
can market-maker and is said Cadtary Sdnretrpes filmed 
to be stm sitting on their 3ptol93pu 




Fatten Ekdranks* 


Some market men c l a ime d Leeds . manufacturer and 
that the stake had been passed dist ri b uto r of rf w V n Tnr am! 


^ < uai wciwi^uiiuwraipBjsea aistnotno 
• ' V >V f an in two halves to non* electrical 


FARNELL 

SLECTROMCS; 

rnymmav^m 




SiSViVli: —MSA 


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I- * • 

"r ■. <j. - i. 

*A 

-:.V M 

hi 

>5 

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‘v&’ 


■ W,A 35«ISa S 


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* ■' ?LS5 


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■ . . \ 1 •• 


ba€. 


on in two halves to non* electrical equipment, began a 
institutional buyers and there series of City presentations, 
was even talk that Blue Chicle, with Mr Henry Ebtonc, the 
the cement group, may have finance dm rtnr talMiw tn IQ 
picked up a piece equivalent institutional fund managers at 
to about I per cent. Chase Securities in the room- 

BlueCnrte later denied this, ing and hmching with Gilbert 
Mr Robert James, group Elliott, . another firm of 
finance director of Barratt, stockbrokers. 

confirmed the stake bad been ■ — - - — , 

sold bat said he had no idea m r.km Ai.Ka 
who tad bought II .tamt 

stares edged up steadily on 
the talk and dosed 4p higher 


Jan Fab Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov 


at I52p. 


could befes for a farther . 
tatteringtnday after a 


jaasssaKf Ssffisasr**- 
rS&Ss* ” " mndl * KSESK& 

a75mfflion. Zantac, win be launched 

Elsewhere die stock market SSeijS market soon. Some 
bad another hrm day, despite British analysts say the 
wme-tbaiMrxp«ted ratt-ve threat of Pepcid tas already 
figures for-Octotor. The FT 30 beeaM»y^Saiit«L^ 
share index closed up 0 2, off • - - — 

its highest level of the day, at 

1294.3. The broader based The company has seen its 
FT-SE 100 index closed a share price mmble freon a high 
touch easier, down at of 25up earlier this year — 
1637.7. ' yesterday it firmed 6p to 177p 

Gilts opened easier but --amid worries about the state 
rallied before the dose to of the semi-conductor market, 
finish with scattered rises of and now it islrying to rebuild 


£Vfe across the board. 


ISM 

Company 

363 248 AHad-tyons 
174 128 AS0A44H 
332 237 BTR 
488 308 BAT - 
590 429 Barclays 
840 820 Bus 
443 318 BMdwn . 

728 526 BUW.CM5 

388 277'iBOC 

289 170 Bools 

808 421 Br Aerospace ■ 

706 SIB. Br Ptfrotonm , 

280 177*2 Br Telecom 

210 SB Brfrtf 

3S0 238 Burton 

3GB 277 CAM A DWrataS 


its City image. 


“They think' they have, 
given too gloomy an im- 
pression to the City,” said Mr 
. Richard Dyezt, an analyst at 
Chase. “They had grown at 
tbe rate of 30 per cent per 
annum for more than 20 
yeare, uhtO last year when the 
semi-conductor market col- 
lapsed. The message they are. 
now giving out js that we 
should now see an annual 
growth rate of IZ5 per cent, 
which is less than it was hut 
still very respectable.” 

Chase is forecasting profits 
of £23.5 million for this year, 
against £22.1 million last 
time, and thinks it might beat 
that forecast 

. “If it does, it will be the first 
electronic parts distributor to ■ 
beat a City forecast for 18 
months,” Mr Dyett said. 

BAT Industries, the tobacco 
group, went up 12p to 480p, 
on American buying after the 
annDUDcejncBl of third-quar- 
ter results from its Brazilian 
subsidiary, Souza Cruz. A 
total of 6.S million BAT 
shares went through the 
market. 


Oils eased a few pennies 
across- urn board, despite 
continued talk that the Saudis 
want to push the price up to 
$18 a barrel Some oil experts 
think an increase to such a 
level might be possible in 
perhaps six months time, 
provided the Saadis can re- 
train the other Opec members. 
Brent crude for December 
delivery eased 60 cents a 
barrel to $14.05. 

Shell lost 9p to 922p, BP 
and Britoil fell 3p to 685p and 
145p respectively. Enterprise 
lost 2plo I50pand ICGas Ip 
to582p. 

Large lines of stock in 
composite insurers changed 
hands as investors took profits 
ahead of their results on 
Wednesday and Thursday 
next week. Trade Indemnity 
dipped 5p to 23pp, Royal 
Insurance 4p to 820p mid 
General Accident a penny to 
853p, 

Commercial Union was 
down 5p to 2&3p after the 
news broke in London yes- 
terday that a Californian court 
had awarded $26 million 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


Bfct OMt Cltti 

307 312 -3 

184 188' -4 

23S 290 • -3 

485 490 • +20 

478 485 -5 

740 750 

435 440 -& 

607 612 -1 

338 341 

296 238 *Z 

<73 m +1 

883 688 O -2 

188 isn -a 

144 ‘ *47 -2 

.288 290 . 

315 322 -B 


198 142 Cadbury Sctaiappu 191194 
338 228 Com Union ‘ 278 282 
704 408 Core GoidflsUs 840 847 

320 190 Couratdda . ■ 318 319 

438 216 Obxns Qrp . 353 382 

6S0 408 Hsona . .. . . 1f, ‘ 577 58%, 

954 701 Gan Accblant - '840 847' 

226 158 GEC . . 188 W 

11 '« 758*3 Glfcto. - ’ ■ 340 950- 

456 328 GranBMat 433 443 

11'* 721 GUS'A . 10V40>» 

954 720 QBE 810 817. 

885 235 GfKN . . 845 349 

355 275 Gubmws . " 330.835 

204 141 Hanson . 203 205 

623 403 Hawkar Sddtoy 432 438 


YM I 
% P/E 

M 14.1. 
ZJ 18.1 
3 A 20.1 
SB 12-7 
58 78 

£9 158 
38 1A2 
48 88 

4.1 128 
48 154 
48 108 

7.1 78 

58 11.1 
&4 88 

24 198 

2.1 174 
45 225. 
jft2 ' 
M. 15* 
as 10.7 
18 258 
1.4-258^ 
4-1 218 
38 108 
Z1 178 

3.1 148 
. 28 13.7 

58 238'. 
78 . 83 
3.1 125 
28 18.1 
48 . 98 


MgALwa 
11 *.734 
583 335 
391 312 

348 276 
288 133 
484 293 
283 1B3 
231 163 
599 417 
583 428 
578 428 
246 182 
942 713 
234 148 

900 605 
547 345 
791 S11 
967782 
426 344 
148**102 
415 321. 
970 653 ‘ 
988 98 
772 SO 
SSr 80 
420 265 
S9 374 

349 248 
209 189 

19*. 13'e 
269 218 


Carewny 

Imp Chom Ind 

j mar •• 

LacBnto 
Land Saortire 
Lags) 0 Gan 
UufOs 
LcnlVD 

Marts SSpencr 
Midland 
Mat West 
P&O Wrd 
Ptoaaay . - 
FrudntU 
Ra cal B» 

RecWt .Caiman . . 
Rauteta ■' 

mz . • 

Hoyai me i 

Saaffifiyjy-01 

Soars 


STC.. 

Sim WHanca 
TSB P fl* 

Taaco ' 

■n»en Bl| • . 

TraMgsr Housa 
Trusttmosa Forta 
sUnlaMr 
- UM Biscuits 


bu otfm g» 


dhr rid 
«* « 


iifeim 



488 

4JS 

510 

515 

• 

~Z 

.127 

Z5 

382 

367 


-1 

168 

48 

329 

332 


-1 

140 

42 

227 

232 

• 

~2 

123 

S3 

. 418 

425 



25.0 

58 

238 

240 



17.1 

78 

v 495 

198 


-1 

58 

28 

548 

555 


-3 

37.1 

87 

■ SIS 

525 


-11 

278 

53 

515 

520 

• 

+7 

25.0 

48 

178 

180 


+1 

1Z 

48 

778 

785 

• 

-1 

38j6 

48 

172 

178 . 


-2 

48 

25 

777 

784 


+11 ■ 

238 

3.1 

543 

548 


+7 

5.4 

18 

885 

892 

• 

■M 

.81.4 

48 

810 

817 


-is : 

386 

4.7 

398 

402 


43 

.78 , 

28 

137^138%.*. 

-IV 

58 

38 


367 372 ' 

822 SZ7 • 
180 164 . 
883 890 
• 80VB1 • 
398 403 
458 465 
287 290 ■ 
171 174 
19 19*. 

232 235 * 


17.1 48 
5M 58 


+6 

2.1 

13 

130 

9800 

-W 

278 

48 

618 

58 

-is. 

p . 


, , 



-1 

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23 

223 

351 

-3 

258 

58 

338 

916 

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183 

83 

78 

BZ7 

+1H 

78 

48 

17.1 

8700 

m m 

553 

23 

178 

228 

43 

138b S3 

127 

1800 


Royal Ordnance prepares for 
the assault of market forces 


By Teresa Poole 

The crown princes of the 
Government’s privatization 
programme, the heads of the 
companies that have passed 
into private ownership, usu- 
ally have much to be than kful 
for. Freed from the supposed 
restraints of operating within 
the public sector, they have 
found themselves at thefrehn 
of public companies, the focus 
of considerable career-boost- 
ing attention, and they have 
often received large pay rises. 

But for one such prince tbe 
reality has for from matched 
expectation. When ^ Roger 
Pinoington gave up a director- 
ship at Norcros to become 
chief executive in April at 
Royal Ordnance, the state- 
owned arms manufacturer, he 
thought he had been hired to 
run a company being fine- 
tuned for a stock market 
flotation within months. 

By July the share rale had 
been cancelled. By October 




. } ■ *’*31 
! i. 






0^011117* V ■ — ^ , 

tank factory had been sold to 
Vickers. And today, Mgona- 
tions are under way for the 
private sale of the rest of the 
business to some other com- 
pany, with British Aerospace, 
GKN, VX tmd. Trafalga r 
Home among the interest** 
As one analyst put rein 
footballing terms, Roger Pm- 
nington should be as sick as a 

*^y\rt*Mr Pinnington tasgpne 
to the effort of devising an 
extensive managemmt re-. 
oi Miiizati on, amwuiteed fast 
•week, designed to put the 
stamp on^jCFs traffifirma- 
tkm from an insulated “pre~ 
fered-source” contractor, witn 
80 per cent of s2es tal«nby 
the Ministry of Defence^fo <a 
business capaWe ofsrnw^ 

a declining defence budg« ami 

the competitive mtemationai 
annsmarixL • 

With the proposed P^®- 

xzation less than three montte 

away; Mr Pmnmgfoop 1 ^^ 

streantiibe the four divjsram 

into twre navaL aD “ e ®“ 
Sjeaing; and land weapons. 

directors are beang mtrodnew 
to have eradte^Q ^avn -ra sP " 

SSemeot wpertise ;on 

. MuiiivniefS. 


pany is to naake assumptions. 
At no time is there any 
certainty m life,” said Mr 
Phmington, who nevertheless 
believed there was a “very 
good dhance” privatization 
would take place next year. 

“Who owns the shares is 
reJeWmt but also indeyant 
hecanse our job is to continue 

to nm-tfaebusmess.” 

The emphasis will in future 
be on stneter fstanrial con- 
trols, improved, marketing 
and customer relatio ns, an d a 
dearer reporting structure. 


• ILL/ U» urn 

bf-m g less than eSective m its 
customer relations,” Mr Pm- 
nington said- “For hundreds; 
of years "we havo had to be 
competitive in fidds of qual- 
ity, specification, and invest-, 
inent bfa qjecific nature. Bat 
tins has not included price 
co mp e ti tiveness with outside 
sources.” . 

. Sntee.RO became a limited 
company in 19&5, inudi has 
been, done to combat a ovil- 
service aproadi* Indeed, to 
the outsider, most of the 
supposed benefits of 
privtnsatibn have already 

been'introduccd.Tta;new 
market awarenesvaoproyod 

jdb euts have been achieved 


“To notprogress tbe com-.v . 


questions about whtf further 


benefits win come from the 
acmalsale. 

. To mtioducie the manages 
ment changes, the top 100 
maiu^era were foought down 
to^ London from the 15 fac- 
tories for an open forum with 
Mr Pianingioa on the restruo- 
.ttzring. “It was a form of open 
management that RO had not 
expenenced- in' the past," he 
saw. 

Worries, shared by the 
unions, about fhrther job cuts 
and factay closures were 
aired, if necessary, throagh 
"anonymous written questions. 
U I have no blueprints whatso- 
ever for any rationalization of 
any kind." MrPinningtontokl 
hisandfence. 

But concerns porist that a 
new owner could hive offparts 
of the business. “If there are 
any job losses in the future, it 
would be because there was 
not the availability of busi- 
ness, and it would not. be 
.related in any form to 
privatization,” Mr Phmington 

ar^d. ^^ foj- tog onfons, 
David Greenwood, at Aber- 
deen University, concluded 
“dedicated managers and a 
loyal workforce” had put RO : 
on a businesslike ana inter- 
nationafly competitive foot- 
ing, and there was no 
necessary link between ef- 
ficiency and privatization. 


Had government owner- 
ship, now an annVlength 
relationship, restrained the 
company? “I have not been 
restricted in any shape or 
form. 1 have not found it at all 
oppressive," Mr Phmington 
said. 

There is also the question of 
whether Royal Ordnance is a 
suitable vehicle for privat- 
ization. The need to maintain 
extra capacity in case of war 
has meant a series of contracts 
that go some way to creating a 
protected market, including a 
giinraniAft of minimum pur- 
chases for the small aims 
division and an agreement by 
the MoD to order all its 
explosives from the 
Bridgwater factory, in Somer- 
set, to ensure the viability of 
the only British source ofmgh- 
standard explosives. 

Mr Phmington said those 
contracts were no different 
from many he had experi- 
enced in private industry. 

So, given tbe company’s 
progression, what benefits will 
privatization bring? “Once we 
get into the private rector by 
being in partnership with 
other people, there will be 
benefits brought by different 
parties.” A higher level of 
investment, perhaps, and help 
in building up exports, but it is 
difficult to see how a sale to a 
larger company can definitely 
avoid any fragmentation. 

“J believe me price that wQl 
be paid is such that it will be 
sensible for the purchaser to 
keep . tbe company as a 
whole.” But while there would* 
be safeguards to keep the RO 
in British ownership, it was far 
harder to sound out prospec- 
tive bidders about their fong- 
■ term intentions. 

Last year, when Norcros 
waHp an agreed takeover of 
UBM, where Mr Phmington 
had been chief executive, 
there was no immediate open- 
ing for . him at - the new 
company. But after four 
weeks, impressed by how he 
had prepared UBM for the 
takeover, Norcros offered him 
a main-board directorship in 
riham s of manufacturing. . 

• With the new resmicturing. 
Royal Ordnance will also have 
been prepared for its sate. 
Whether that sale, which will 
probably raise a meagre £100 
million, still makes sense » 
one question Mr Pm&mgton 
would not be drawn oil 


123 527 

106 MM 

17.4 178 

22.1 549 
295 1,700 

as Z72 
115 <05 

2S5 3500 
205 563 

5.4 999 

145 «93 

13.1 8500 

51.6 624 

18L4 3,700 

169 7*1 

419 670 

9.1 92 

657 1500 
235 1.000 
175 t3fi00 
175 . 608 

9.1 534 


(£18.4 millionjdamages 
against the company toa child 
who fen out of a jeep and is 

lysed fronf^«^ist down. 
The mother of the child sued 
the manufacturer of tbe door 
who was insured with CU. CU 
plaits to appeal and London 
analysts <iqini a i g that the 
settlement may eventually 
cost it about £10 million. 

The expected white knight 
consortium bid for the insur- 
ance broker CE Heath failed 
to nraierialire, although some 
ay it may still happen. Heath, 
down 2p at 344p, is on the 
receiving end of an un- 
welcome £182 million bid 
from PWS Holdings. 

■ Any consortium rescue 
package would almost cer- 
tainly involve Hambros Bank, 

• Pasmore Gordon, the 
broker, has published a bay 
circular on Parkfield ' 

Group, the engineering and 
electrical distribution firm 
bused ss the best USM per- 
former last year. It fore- 
casts profits of £8.75 mfllion 
for the current year, 

4» jninc« gt.lS miltinn fa sT 

time, putting it (m a 
prospective p/e of lfo4. Its 
shares, up from 83p this 
year, finned another 12p to 
I92p. i 

which, before the PWS bid 
had planned to merge its 
Rddings insurance subsidiary 
with Heath. PWS also slipped 
a couple of pence to 307p. 

Banks were dull with the 
partly-paid TSB shares slip- 
ping I V»p to 80Vip. Barclays 
slid 6p to 481p, National 
Westminster 4p to 523p, 
Royal Bank of Scotiand 3p to 
3l5p while Midland and 
Lloyds finned a penny to 553p 
and 423p respectively. 

Sears was once again the 
most actively traded stores 
stock and the second highest 
volume stock in the market, 
with another 6 million shares 
sold and 6 million bought, 
notching up a total volume of 
12 million shares. Its shares 
slipped 2'Ap to l37Vip. 

Most other retailers went 
better. Gns ordinary shares 
rained 13p to 1463p, Harris 
Queensway 1 Ip to 215p. Body 
Shop Sp to 670p. Ward White 
Sp to 3!5p, Storehouse 4p to 
339p and Woohrorth 3p to 
643p. 

Beecham, the Lucozade to 
pharmaceaticals combine; 
eased a penny to439ft despite 
a profits forecast up-grading 
by W Green well, the broker. 
Mr lan White, an analyst at 
Green well, has increased his 
forecast for the full year by £25 ! 
million to £365 million to i 
allow for currency adjust- j 
men is. 


The biggest threat to tbe liberalization 
of capital markets and tbe boom in 
fi nanc ial services is protectionism. It 
is this thought, 1 suggest, that makes 
the Japanese more determined than 
ever to be inside the American fence 
before there is any chance of its being 
turned into a 10ft wall. 

Already the Japanese banks and 
securities houses have a formidable 
presence in the United States, as they 
do in this country. Their power was 
demonstrated for all to see at the May 
auctions of US Treasury debt, when 
they tactically outsmarted the New 
York giants and proceeded to take 
them to the cleaners. Life for the 
clever, complacent American houses 
would never be the same again. Either 
they had to join them (Goldman 
Sachs and Sumitomo) or learn to play 
the game according to Japanese rules. 
But these things all lake time. 

Yesterday, as the November auc- 
tions got under way, the New York 
bond market was in a lather of 
uncertainty. Would the Japanese 
houses bid high or low, and how 
strong? Worse, might they bid for only 
the three-year and 10-year maturities, 
thus perhaps leaving the natives with 
the tricky, more volatile 30-year long 
bonds? And if that happened, would 
the Japanese really screw them to the 
wall by manipulating the dollar-yen 
rate in tbe foreign exchange market? 

There is an understanding on the 
“right” exchange rate in present 
conditions between the Japanese and 
the Americans but what if the rate is 
really tested — and fails to stand up? A 
dollar fall to below 150 yen might 
easily provoke a sell-off in the US 
bond market because of fears of what 
a collapsing dollar would mean for the 
.American inflation rate. 

None of this may happen. The debt 
auctions might go swimmingly, with 
everyone making money. But the 
undercurrent of uncertainty about the 
intentions of the inscrutable Orientals 
would remain. And the rumours that 
the Japanese securities houses, with 
the mighty Nomura in the lead, are 
out to damage their New York 
counterparts in preparation for taking 
over will also continue to swirl and 
eddy. “It is the story of Japan and the 
world motorcycle industry all over 
again” was the rueful comment of one 
observer. 

The doubts remain 

Meanwhile back in what some prefer 
to think of as the real world, 
Americans were voting in their cus- 
tomary disappointing numbers. Elec- 
tions always confiise underlying 
economic realities. And the mid-term 
elections have been no exception. But 
today it is back to business. 

Tbe US economy has given the 
impression of having waved goodbye 
to the uncertainties of a few months 


ago. The trade deficit, according to 
last week's figures, has started to turn 
the comer. Growth, boosted by a car- 
sales boom, appears to be there. And 
the dollar, judging by the Baker* 
Miyazawa currency/interest rate deal, 
does not need to fall any further. 

The true picture is not quite as rosy. 
Growth in the American economy has 
bad a temporary boost which may last 
until the end of the year. But there is 
no evidence of a return to the robust 
expansion of a couple of years ago. 

The trade figures, similarly, con- 
tained both good and bad news. There 
was an unexpected narrowing of the 
trade deficit to $1X6 billion in 
September, although both exports and 
imports were weak and the J-curve 
may not have shortened in duration as 
much as appeared. 

In several respects, growth in the 
US economy has been brought for- 
ward. The tax reform bill will remove 
individuals' ability u> offset local sales 
tax against income tax, and so some of 
the spending on cars and ‘‘big-ticket’' 
consumer purchases is, under- 
standably, being rushed in before the 
end of the year. 

The key question is whether the 
Federal Reserve, faced with a picture 
of impending economic weakness, 
will move early or later to cut the 
discount rate. 

David Morrison of Goldman Sadis 
suggests that the Fed will not feel 
obliged to act on rates until economic 
weakness in tbe US has become fairly 
obvious again, and that is unlikely to 
be until the first quarter of next year. 

But Geoffrey Dennis at James 
Ca pel thinks that the Fed will 
anticipate next year’s weakness and 
act before the year-end. 

It is a fine judgment, and one that 
would be a lot easier if the implica- 
tions of the agreement between Japan 
and the United States, unveiled last 
week, were a little clearer. James 
Baker, the US Treasury Secretary, has 
played off his two constituencies — the 
domestic political and the inter- 
national financial — against one 
another quite well. 

The yen-dollar deal has been seen 
outside the US as a currency stabiliz- 
ing arrangement, but in home-town 
America is regarded as an admission 
by foreigners that they have been too 
cautious on stimulating growth in tbe 
world economy. On either version, 
lower interest rates should be on the 
way in the United States, assuming 
that US industry does not want to live 
with a 170-180 rate against the yen 
again. 

The earliest indication on timing 
•will come with the employment 
figures on Friday. A fell in manufac- 
turing employment last month, 
following September's 38,000 drop, 
could be convincing evidence that 
post-election weakness has come 
sooner rather than later. 


UNLOCK THE SECRETS OF 

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4889 V. 

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HP 

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UNIQUE MONEY BACK 
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We are confident that you win 
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PENNY SHARE FOCUS helps you to spot the pages of PENNY SHARE FOCUS. In ©Penny Share Focns Ltd. 1986 
the next Penny Share winner, and keeps just 6 tightly written pages he reviews the Registered in England 1846796 
you dear of the losers. latest news, recom mend s the h ottest 11 Blomtiebl Street London ETSM 7AY 

^"spScIAlS^SSuSSSy MEMBERSHIP OFFER -iSO OFFFffiSTYESSSsSffnON l | 

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Address. 


JftistCocle ... 


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A/c Name and Nn, (if known) 

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2 Hi Alphage ihghwattc, London Wall, Londnn R*2 for the airmail 
nf Penny Store Focus. Account number 4«fl!tt48 the sum of 
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PjUjHWttaiip wr7^ ■■ ■■ Wi' ** Signed j 








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24 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


( FUTURES AND OPTIONS ) 

Futures surge in Sydney 
defies laws of gravity 


Things tend to happen the 
wrong way round in Australia, 
apart from the bath water, 
whose anticlockwise passage 
down the plughole fascinates 
visitors from the northern 
hemisphere. 

Some of the phenomena 
cann ot be explained by the 
laws of nature. For instance, 
when a conservative govern- 
ment was in power here, the 
economy and financial sector 
were protected by controls and 
regulations more usually asso- 
ciated with socialist countries. 
The Labour Party, which 
might have been expected to 
build on these when it swept 
to power in 1983, proceeded 
to abolish virtually all of 
them. 

The development and 
growth of the Sydney Futures 
Exchange (SFE) presents a 
similar tale of contrary timing. 
After more than 20 years of 
slow and unspectacular pro- 
gress trading mostly agri- 
cultural . commodities while 
the Australian economy pros- 
pered, die SFE has burst forth 
as a leading player in the 
world's non- American finan- 
cial futures markets at a time 
of almost unparralled crisis in 
the domestic economy. 

In 1984 the Exchange 
traded 518,000 contracts, a 
figure that swelled to 1-22 
million last year. In the first 
cine months of 1986, it has 
notched up 2.5 million con- 
tracts. Now the SFE processes 
a million trades every three 
months. 

O f cour se, deregulation and 
the SFFs success are con- 
nected. The floating of the 
Australian dollar and the abo- 
lition of exchange controls 
have exposed the Australian 
financial markets to the 
capriciousness of internation- 
al monetary flows. Over the 
past 18 months, prime interest 


By Richard Lander 

rates have risen from 11 per 
cent to as high as 21 per cent 
while the Australian dollar has 
sunk, rather than floated, 
losing 40 per cent is trade 
weighted terms. Volatility in, 
underlying markets, the prime 
ingredient of any futures mar- 
ket, has not been in short 
supply. 

All this has been done in 
business in purely domestic 
products, with Australian 
treasury bonds and 90-day 
bank-notes futures spearhead- 
ing the phenomenal expan- 
sion, strongly backed by an 
active share index contract. 

Last week, the SFE opened its 
stall to the outside world with 
the inauguration of its foreign 
contract, in US treasury 
bonds. Two more, in Euro- 
dollar deposits and gold, are to 
open within the next three 
weeks. 

Sydney is making its thrust 
into overseas contracts 
through co-operation with 
New York Comex and the 
London International Finan- 
cial Futures Exchange (Liffe). 

Its two interest rate contracts 
are identical and fungible with 
existing Liffe contracts, while 
the gold contract will be 
similarly matched with 
Comex. 

Hopes are pinned on the T- 
bond contract where Sydney 
hopes to take advantage of its 
time-zone location. Business 
starts one hour after trading in 
Chicago doses and ends min- 
utes before Lifle’s traders don 
their multi-coloured jackets 
and dear their throats for a 
day’s screaming in the pits. 
SFE members are being asked 
to consider extending their 
working day by two hours to 


create a full 24-hour market 
But traders would need to be 
persuaded that there is suf- 
ficient profit potential before 
agreeing to such a move. 

Mr Les Hoskins, the 
Exchange's chief executive, 
reckons no more than 20 per 
cent of bond business will 
come from domestic users. Of 
the remainder, he is looking 
for overflow business from 
Chicago and London and 
hedge and speculative buying 
from playera in the huge 
physical market in bonds m 
Tokyo. 

Although Japanese securi- 
ties houses face obstacles 
when it comes to trading in 
foreign futures markets, Mr 
Hoskins reckons there should 
be good demand from the 
American investment banks 
which are active in Tokyo. A 
number of these, which have 
established a presence in Syd- 
ney since the Labour govern- 
ment deregulated the banking 
system, are discussing joining 
the Exchange. 

If the SFE does prosper with 
its new ventures, it will be the 
first market in the Asian time 
zone to tackle international 
financial futures successfully. 
This year Hong Kong has re- 
started with index futures 
after a lacklustre gold contract 
in the early 1980s. The Singa- 
pore International Monetary 
Exchange (Simex) has never 
achieved great volumes in 
spite of bong linked to the 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
(CME) since its birth in 1984. 

Mr Hoskins and other SFE 
officials are confident Sydney 
can lick Singapore. Among the 
advantages they die for 
Australia are language, a 
westernized legal and political 
system and a futures trading 
community that has been in 
place since i960: 



another record 


Hopkinsons Holdings, the 
Huddersfield valve manufac- 
turer, has chalk ed up another 
set of record profits. 

Al the half-way stage pretax 
profits were up 31 per cent to - 
£4.08 million on turnover 17.6 
per cent ahead at almost £38 
minion. 

The interim dividend is 
-2.75p a share compared with 
2p last time. 

In the first half, afl the 
trading subsidiaries traded at 
a profit, with Bryan Donkin, 
supplier of valves to tire gas 
industry, continuing to make 
strong progress- 

• AMBROSE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The net asset value as 
at October 31 per capital share 
was 489.43p (previous month 
46&58p). 

• ABERFOYLE HOLDINGS: 
No interim dividend. Results 
for the six months to Jane 30. 
Figures in fOOOs: turnover 3^78 
(4,084). Profit before interest 
and tax 896 (305). Net interest 
payable 138(167). Share of loss 
m associated company 758 
(138). Ptetax profit 754 (91). 
Tax overseas 42 (33). Profit after 

Minorities 


COMPANY NEWS 


tax 712 (58). 


252 


[65). Extraordinary debt nil (37). 

per share lJ2p (nil). 

• JF PACIFIC WARRANT 
COMPANY: Net asset value as 
at October 31 per ordinary 
share: £33.73. 

9 AMZO: Third quarter results, 
igures in guilders 000s. Net 
ales 3,745.1 or £1,140 million 
4,347.3). Operating income 
*63.1 (346-2). Finanang charges 
25.4 (39.5). Earnings of consoli- 
dated companies from normal 
operations after taxes 2Q8_5 
(1813). Earnings from non- 
cDosolidaud com names 1-2 
(26.7). Extraordinary credits 1.7 
(22). Minority interest 16.1 
20.4). Net income 1953 
.191.8). Earnings per share 488 
guilders (483 gutraen). 

CANNON STREET 
INVESTMENTS: The com- 
pany has acquired Betters 
Bebeer, of Holland, through its 
Dutch holding company. Can- 
non Street European Holdings. 
The hifrial rnch consideration is 
Dfll 6,750,000 (£2,093,000). and 

there will be arMitiwnal 
meats dependent on 
future profits. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Meritat rates 

SEET 

NYorfc 1.4125-14155 
Mammal 1.9630-1 .9600 
Ams'damcL2805-3-2910 
Bnjsmta 60.31-60.55 


Haricot 

ClOM 


1 (north 

0 . 62 - 0 . 60 prem 

0.494.39ix8fn 

1%-1%pmm 

21 -ISpracn 


1.4140-1.4150 
1.9655-1.9685 
&285&&2900 

60.41-60.52 

Cphgen 109280-109650 109460-10S610 IH-tyram 

Dubtn 1.0648-1.0689 1JK55-1 .0665 13-41dis 

Frankfurt 2. 9050~2_91 50 2908025120 1%-lfcprvn 

Lisbon 21265-213.00 21295-213.75 48-110dtS 

Madrid .194.40-195.15 194^5-19495 25-64cfe 

Maan 200690-2015.00 200025-201250 3-par pram 


1.77- 1 .74pram 

1.77- 1.74pnem 
4%4%prem 
57-4fmoi 
3%-2%p8r» 
36-104*3 
4%4%prem 
191-340US 
43-116*3 


Oslo 106150-106375 109220-106365 3-3? 

Paris 04800-05150 9.4865-05030 3%-2%prem 

89190-99330 2%-1%prera 

231 -55-231 9Q 1%-1Uyen 

20.46-20.49 10X-4pram 

24230-2.4270 1%-1%pram 


St'ktibn 9911099360 
Tokyo 231.56-23295 
Vienna 20429050 
Zurich 2.4200-24285 


9*-1 Outfit 

7%-7ptwn 

6%-6%prom 

3X~3V,prem 

27K-23%pmm 

4 ^4 14 prom 


Staffing imta* compared antfi 1975 an down at 689 (day's mag* B&5-6&7). 



OTHER STE RLING RATES 

Argentina austral* 

Austrafea dollar .... 

Bahrain dinar 0930509345 

Brazil cruzado' 1992-1994 


Greflca draenma 

Hong Kong doftar 11.0292-119378 

India rupee .___ 18.16-1896 

Iraq dinar n/a 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Kuwait dinar KD . 
Malaysia dollar _ 
Mexico peso . 


. 04140-0411 
. 3.7060-3.7116 
11500-12000 


New Zealand doOar 2.7972-29104 

Saudi Araberiyal 598059.3205 

Singapore (knar 3.1018-3.1056 

SoShAMca rand 3.1954-39123 

UAEdWwn 5.171002110 

UoydsBank 


RattamppBad by Barclay* Bar* HOFEX andExtaL 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Time Month Starting 

Dec 86 - 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

Doc 87 

Mar 88 

Previous 
Tlima 
Dec 86 
Mar 87 
Jun 87 


8030 

8893 

8845 


Sap 87. 
US Tran 


TmanoryBond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

JWIS7 


Short on 
Dec 88 _ 
Mar 87 „ 
Jun 07 


Long Gift 

Dec 06 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sop 87 

FT-5E100 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 


i interest 13845 

94.11 

94.10 

9394 

9394 

98-10 

Sff 

96-30 

Kff 

111-03 
111-00 

18540 
167.38 


8991 

8994 

8846 

8895 


Low 

8896 

8999 

8950 

8940 

8895 


Eslltal 
6890 2888 

8899 263 

8993 296 

89.44 118 

89.18 0 

8895 4 

interest 28206 


Previous day's total open interest 265 
94.12 9497 9499 3703 

94.11 9496 St-07 1001 

9394 93 91 9391 382 

9394 93.62 9392 88 

Pmvtoua day's total open interest KOI 
90-13 97-27 97-31 3421 

97-04 0 

96-07 0 

831 


Rravtoos day's total openintores 
96-30 96-30 96-33 50 

9635 0 


Previous 
111-08 11 
111-04 11030 


111-07 12270 

111-10 17 

111-10 0 
0 

Previous day's total open Interest 2711 
10690 . 16490 1KL30 510 

16796 16795 16890 2 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FfcatOeatiogn 

Oct 20 
Nov 3 
NOT 17 


Last Dasflnga 

Oct 31 
NOT 14 
Not 28 


Les tOncta re ttow 

Jan 22 
Feb 5 
Fab 19 


For fln tlta i BBnt 
Feb 2 
Fnblfl 
Mar 2 


Call option were taken nut ore 4/11/86 LHC. AudtotroNc, Dee Corp, tartac. Samson. 
Greenwich Res. BOMS, GKN. Ricnarason West. UTC, Hyman. Metarwe. Goodhmd, 
PrestwRh, Franco, THF, Macalan, BiCC, Wellcome. Saws. WA Hoktings, JFB, Tay 
Homes, SI Qroup. Helcal, BCA. North KafcL, Bulgta 'A', Sound DWmton. Gestslnw, 
Peek. Harris Queensway. Seaton, Morgan Grantal, IMPS. British Land, Wlggns. 
System s Desywrs. Bto-botataa. 

Put Hughes rood. Mecca, FUey Leisure. 

Abaca, tawy. Kennedy Brookes, Greenwich Res*New Eng: 


Put* 


• BROWN SHIPLEY HOLD- 
INGS: The acquisition of St 
PauTs Finance and Investment 
Co has been. completed. The 
consideration is the issue of 
301.321 Brown Shipley shares. 

• FITCH LOVELL: The com- 
pany has acquired the whole of 
the issued share capital of Peter 
J Osborn (Osborns) and the 
outstanding 55 per cent of PJ 
Osborn (Packing} not already 
owned by foe Fitch Lovell group 
or by Osborns, together with the 
leasehold premises occupied by 
Osborns and Osborn (Packing) 

in Hampshire an| i O H M in plant 

and equipment used by Osborn 
(Packing), 

• ASTBURY & MADELBY 
HOLDINGS: Agreement has 
been reaped for the purchase of 
British Fittings Co(Manchcst 
for 370,000: The consideration 
will be with £259,000 ash ami 
the issue of 83,459 shares. 

• HANIMEX CORPORA- 
TION: The chai rman writ- 
ten to shareholders, saying that 
the Chase Corporation has 
made an. ofin for all the 
Hanimex ordinary ghaiw at 
$1.15 a share, ire says that, 
while Hanimex welcomes Chase 
as a significant shareholder,, the 
directors, after taking advice, 
have concluded that $1.1 5 is not 
a fair and reasonable price for 
control, of the company. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


PMoltatas% 

Clearing Banks 11 
finance Haunll 


Owmmht HMc ID* Low 9 
WeefctoedTfCPta 


Is {Discount %) 
Buying Safeg . . 

2 mntn 1M4 2rmdn 10 % 

3mntii 10»n 3mnto 107 m 


laxseouniiQ 

at 2 mnthTo 


1 imrih iQOir-lok 2 mnth'fffK- 10 tan 

3mnth Ww-IOHb 6 ninth lO^n-tfl’*** 

Trade Btite (Discount*} 

1 mntti 1 l T w 2 mnmi 1 % 

3mnto llha - Bmnth 11 »n 

OvsrnWK: open 10K ctoee 11 
f week 10 %- 10 X 6 mntti 11-1 O'** 

1 nrth H-ia M ia 9 mntti 11-10»» 

3 mntti 11'»-10 u Sa 12 mm H-10«h« 

Lecet A id hBdtrPepuNta (%) " ■ . 

2 days 16X 7 days Km 

1 mntti m Smnffli 10 % 

6 mntti 10% 12 mb 10% 


ZmL 178-11 

6 mntti 118-11 
12 rath 1114-11 


Local AoHMrity 

1 mntti 118 -tf 
3 mntti 11%-H 
Smith 118-11 

fnmS 8 11-10% 

6ranth n- 10 % 12 mm 10 %- 10 % 

Data- CDs (W 
59M90 


1 mntti 

6 mntti 5904.75 


3 mntti 598590 
IZmtti 596-590 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 5%«"w 
3mrafi 85% 


7 days 4"m4’i6 
3 mntti 4%-4K 
Fnmcli Franc 
7 days 7%-7% 
Snvtth 7 a i#-7 1, i« 
S wia sftonc 
7 days 1 %-% 
3nm0t 3 v nr3 n ia 
Yen 
7 days 
Simtti 


cati 68-58 

1 mntti 6-5% 

6 mntti 85% 
cNi 5-4 

1 mntti 4 ^m-47h 
6 mntti 4%-4K 
call 7 VrWA 

1 mntti 7%7% 
fimntti 87% 
cal 28-18 

1 mntti 3%-3 
6 mntti 3 >»w-'*m 
cal 5%-4K 

1 mntti 4%-4K 
fimntti 4" w-4*w 



with interim results 


GT Management can be wdl 
satisfied with its first- set of- 
results since coming to mar- 
ket. Pretax profits nearly 
trailed from £2_2 million to 
£6 million for the six months 
to September 30 on turnover 
up 65" per cent to £1&& 
imflion. 

Funds under managejoaem 
grew by - 15 per cent from 
£336 bub'on to £3.87 billion, 
largely due to the rise in- the 
market rather than the net 
addition of funds. Indeed, . 
such has been the success or 
its management of Earn 
(Employees' Retirement In- 
come Security Act) money 
♦hat GT has effectively lost 
some, pension money. The 
value of the Erisa funds, the 
internationally invested por- 
tion of certain US corporate 
pension portfolios, grew to 
betoo lag a proportion of the 
total pension fund, causing, 
the trustees to with draw some 
of the monies back to the US. 

In the results statement, 
released yesterday, GT re- 
vealed the high cost of saving 
the Berry Trust from being 
swallowed by the Ensign 
Trust, one of tbe fimds in the 
Merchant Navy Pension 
Fund stable. GT provided 
£882,000 in the first half of 
this year for the diminution 
in value of its 2 milli on Beny 
Trust shares which it used to 
ward off Ensign's attack. 

The charge was made be- 
low the tine and was more 
than matched by profits on 
disposals of group invest- 
ments in Japan to give an 
extraordinary gain of 
£246,000. However, we may 
not have heard the last of 
Enagu as it can conte back in 
a year’s time with a new bid. 

GT has been investing 
heavily in its development: 
In addition to a 0-4 miffi ng 
computerization programme, 
ft is planning a bigexpansum 
in the US mutual funds 



recognized investment man- 
ager status , in Japan in a 
year's time. Both these moves 
will involve higher staffing. 

A senior Japanese appoint- 
ment has already bem made, 
while the individual who will 
run the US mntnal fluid 
operation in San Francisco is 
in the process ofbeing identi- 
fied- GT will therefore be 
raising its cost base ahead of 
the ability to raise its income. 

The second halfhas started 
wdl But Japan has gone off 
the boil and the sepond six 
'months.' traditionally the 


stronger hal£ may this year 
only match die first. 

Nigel Russell, investment 
trust analyst at James Capd, 
the stockbroker, estimates 
GT should make £1 1 mfflion 
in the full- year to March. This 
putt the shares on a prospect 
five multiple of 14, similar to 
that of rivals such as Hender- 
son Administration. 

The shares have enjoyed a 
strong run over the last few 
weeks and look fairly priced.. 

Albert Fisher 

For a company to issue shares 
which, increase its market 
capitalization by almost 40 
per cent and still see a small 
rise in its share price is a 
pretty good achievement 

In the case of Albert Fisher 
Group, which yesterday an- 
nounced a £443 million 
string of acquisitions, ft sig- 
nifies the heavy institutional 
demand for its paper. 

* Yesterday's three British 
acquisitions expand, the 
company’s product range and 
give ft a firmer toehold in the 
catering industry as wdl as. 
wklening its British cheat 
base. The opportunities for 
Halts with its existing British 
food division look good. 

The US purchase trill de- 
velop the company’s Florida 
base, established through the 

re cen t acquisition of Tavilla 
and . the witting Carnival 
Fruit Company subsidiary. 

Apart from the geographi- 
cal synergy involved in the 
deal it tekes Albert Fisher 
more into the value-added 
side of the. fresh frtift am A 
vegetable business where 
margins are higher. The com- 
pany is looking to develop 
this side of the business. 

-Yesterday's acquisitions 
leave the company with £45 
mill ion net tangible worth 
free of borrowings. Albert 


Fisher would be comfortable 
with £30 mdfiou bcBTO w ings 
so there could well be more 
action to come. 

Avis Europe 

Dealings in Avis Europe start 
on the stock market tomor- 
row. Box signs are ominous 
after one third of the shares 
were left in the hands of 
underwriters. 

However, the sponsors’ 
disappointment is the invest- 
ing public's opportunity. 
Shares in the grey market 
slipped . further yesterday. 
Cleveland Securities quoted 
them at 210p to 220p against 
an ofier price of250p. At this 
level they may be worth 

rnever doubted the 
. Abut 
it the shares were too 
highly priced. British inves- 
tors concurred and gave the 
issue a big raspberry. 

At 250p the prospective p/e 
ratio would be 13.9 against an 
average in the motor sector of 
8 or 9. Certainly Avis de- 
serves a healthy premium to 
the sector, but not as healthy 
as iz awarded itself 
The sponsors’ eagerness 
not to have Avis classed a 
motor stock and therefore 
lumped with manufacturer 
seems to have backfired. 
Even as an industrial stock a 
historic p/e of 17.9 is no 
giveaway. 

However, the company is 
offering the prospects of at 
least IS per cent annual 
compound growth. .James 
Capd, the stockbroker, reck- 
ons the shares should be 
bought up to the 230p to 235p 
tevd and stored as a long- 
term core investment 
Any edging towards the 
250p price is likely to spur a 
rush of selling for the nextfew 
months at (east 


GOLD 


Gok«$40B25-408J5 
Kiugarand* (per coin): 
S4W90-4OT90 (£2879026990) 
Soyaragns* (new): 

$ 96909790 <£87.75-6075 } 


PMUfun 
$57690(840795) 
'Excludes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rato Starling Export Finance 
Schema IV Average mtamn ee rata tor 
patod OctoMr 8, 1988 to 
3?; 1986 tacknhB 11937 par 


October 

cent. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Angia Sea (11 


Baker Harris Sndr 
Banv^ircti&NotJte (11 
Blenheim ExMb (95p) 
Citygrove fiOOp) 
Creighton Labs (I90p) 
Euro Homa (IBOp) 
Gttaat Southern jf 35(4 
Guthrie Corp (I50p) 


Hughes 

iinaftink 

LooajLon 


tasrt 


207+6 
183-25 
40 
- -203 
122 
126-2 
102 
191-2 
151 
160 
.169 
167 
28*a + 1 * 
206+1 
255 


„ I Tech mop) 

M ecca Laftum (i3Sjpk 
MMer & SaiKhousa (105p) 

Nawaga Trans fr5o) 

Raoamac Qj (90p) _ 

Rotunda (95pl 
Ryman (110p) 

Sanriefl Pericms fT3Sp) 

Scot Mtga 10Q% *S5 
TS8( Group n«8» 

Thanws TV (190^ 

Treas10% cm *9690 £40 '•hi 

WMttOTS 85 

Yehartonp^>) 38-1 

Yorkshire W (125p) 165+4 


135 
151 -8 
174+2 
72 
94+1 
90 
102 
186+3 
£18 
BJ -1'« 
314+15 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

O ota ay NIP . - 
Blue An8w N/P 
Brown font W/P. 
Bawtok N/P 
R? Group WjP 
Letsumurw F/P 
Norfolk Cap F/P 
Parrish (JD F/P 
Patro c an N/P 
Retttand N/ P 
Siabe N/P 

(Issue pries in brackets). 


7-1 
87+7 
6 
f*. 
7 
80 
21 <i 

- 225 
16 
42 
11 



Daiwa Europe Limited 

is pleased to announce the 
Listing of 

BTR pic 

Ordinary Shares on 
The 

TOKYO STOCK EXCHANGE 

with effect from 5th November, 1986 

The Listing was preceded by a 

Public Offering of 
3,000,000 Shares 

on the Tokyo Market 
Sponsoring Securities House 

Daiwa Securities Co. Ltd., Tokyo 


5th November, 1986 


■ T LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 1g 




tide 



PHta 





tatts 



puts 


1 

8«toe 

4m 

Apr 

JM 

Jan 

Apr 

Jet 


Series- 

_Dee 

tor 

Jm 

Pec 

Mar 

ta 

AIM Lyons 
f309) 

300 

330 

360 

25 

11 

2% 

35 

17 

9 

45 

30 

10 

28 

S3 

13 

30 

55 

18 

33 

Jaguar 

cm 

500 

SO 

600 

38 

14 

3 

55 

26 

16 

75 

47 

18 

47 

88 

32 

52 

90 

35 

67 

BP 

cm 

600 

850 

700 

102 

60 

SO 

120 

80 

43 

8S 

60 

e 

15 

35 

15 

32 

60 

42 

67 

Thom EMI 

cm- 

420 

480 

500 

57 

25 

10 

67 

42 

25 

77 

54 

34 

3 

18 

40 

90 

8 

22 

45 

)3 

25 

4B 




rtn-r 












cm 

600 

650 

as 

55 

102 

75 

112 

87 

18 

37 

35 

52 

47 

67 

Tesco 

r«i) 

330 

300 

83 

53 

70 


1 

3 

8 

14 

32 


Gowtautos 

(*317) 

260 

60 

71 

— 

1 

3 

9 

3 

— 


420 

13 

25 

38 

27 

33 . 

280 

300 

26 

37 

48 

13 

16 


• Stales 

Not 

Feb May 

Not frb Mey I I 







■“ 



420 

460 

600 



-87 

.02 

42 


16~ 

37 

15 

25 

43 

Com Union 
f284) 

2fi0 

WO 

300 

33 

23 

12 

40 

29 

19 

— * 

37 11% 

8 

17- 

29 

20 

Dmmu 

cm 

24 

6 

48 

28 

7- 

30 




32 









Codec Wire 
P318) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

35 

IB 

8 

48 

32 

22 

63 

10 

20 

40 

60 

17 

30 

45 

22 

cm 

300 

420 

460 

SB 

87 

28 

11B 

83 

47 

118 

90 

68 

1 

1 

5 

i 

15 

4 

9 

22 




■“ 



Barctays 

T484) 



- 52 
27 
9 

' 65 
37 
18 

3 

22 

67 

8 

27 

87 

12 

33 

70 

GEC 

H71) 

160 

180 

200 

19 

8 

26 

16 

5% 

32 

19 

4 

12 

30 

3 

18 

8 

500 

560 

5 

1 







180 

200 

220 

13 

2 

K 

22 
. 9 
3% 




10 

20 

34 

Grand Met 
T439) 

360 

390 

420 

460 

90 

63 

40 

17 

95 

70 


1 

2 

11 

32 

3 

6 

12 

37 


DM) 

17 

10 

12 

31 

17 

32 


32 

<5 

40 

gdtaysetapps 160 

34 .42 
15 28 
3 15% 

47 

31 

20 

1% 

3% 

11 

6 

7 

13 

23 

Id 

P0B2) 

950 

1000 

1050 

1100 

170 

188 

-- 

5 

9 

18 

40 

11 

— ■ 


200 

19 

85 

54 

108 

75 

132 

100 

33 

SB 

42 

GO 

Guinness' 

(332) 

300 

330 

37 

12 

48 

23 

S3 

30 

16 

2 

11 

9 

20 

13 

25 
















(*333) 

330 

300 

18 

8 

29 

12 

38 

10 

29 

13 

30 

20 

imperial Gr 

300 

330 

105 

75 

— 

— 

1 

1 


— 

Maries & Span 
P96) 

180 

200 

220 







m 




. 


amm 


9 

3 

IB 

9 

25 

12 

11 

26 

13 

27 

16 

28 

Ladbrofca 

cm 

330 

360 

37 

18 

55 

30 

62 

42 

1% 

8 

7 

15 

10 

10 > 

















C922) 

900 

950 

62 

30 

82 

55 

108 

75 

2S 

46 

45 

72 

53 

83 

LASMO 

nag) 

110 

120 

130 

2S 

16 

32 

25 

18 

37 

30 

T9 

Z 

2 

s 

5 

8 

17 

8 

12 — 

Trafalgar House 

rzo® 

260 

280 

300 

3b 

20 

10 

44 

30 

16 

32 

38 

28 

4 

12 

23 

8 

18 

26 

10 

20 

31 

Midland Sank 

(-552) 

500 

550 

57 

16 

72 

36 

82 

ter 

2 

13 

St 

12 

33 

60 





- . 











(*81) 

90 

too 

3K 

1% 

B% 

3% 

8% 

10 

19% 

12% 

20% 

13% 

P&O 

fSIB) 

400 

500 

"62 

23 

77 

42 

.8 7 
57 

1% 

5 

5 

13 

43 

3 

22 

48 










BOO 

% 



85 


Sarins 

Dee 

Mar 

Jan 

Dee 

Her 

Jin'* 

. Ratal 
H75J 

160 

180 

18 

4 

25 

14 

36 

22 

3 

11 

8 

17 

12 

22 

Daocham 

380 

84 

93 



2 

3 



200 

T% 

. 7 

12 

28 

30 

34 

T437) 

390 

420 

460 

M 

30 

13 

W> 

48 

27 

78 

S 

5 

14 

37 

8 

21 

40 

14 

27 

50 

RTZ 

cm 

600 

650 

700 

92 

42. 

17 

110 

75 

45 

125 

90 

80 

2 

8 

28 

£ 

50 

23 

42 

65 

Boots 

200 

39 

51 

57 

1 

2 

5 


750 

5 



67 



P237) 

220 

240 

21 33% 
7% 22 

40 

25 

4 

12 

9 

14 

10 

20 

Vaal Reefs 
(76) 

70 

80 

9 

TV, 

13 

7% 

16% 

11 

2% 7 

• 7 11% 

9% 

BTR 

cm 

280 

300 

307 

22 

7% 

36 

23 

43 

3D 

5 

22 

11 

20 

15 

27 

90 

% 

3% 

m 

16% 

19 20% 1 

Bass 

650 

110 

120 

135 

a 

7 

13 









C744) 

700 

750 

Ki 

30 

80 

50 

63 

8 

25 

17 

40 

30 

50 


Series 

Not 

Mar 

Jen 

Not' 

Her 

ta 

Hue Circle 

rail) 

550 

600 

050 

75 

43 

18 

07 

57 

35 

S 

47 

7 

23 

53 

15 

32 

58 

22 

38 

63 

Lonriw 

cm 

200 

218. 

235 

41 

22 

9 

48 

52 

1% 

2 

4 

2 

7 

De Beers 

650 

90 

115 

— 

17 

40 

— 


2S5 

a 



19 



(*715) 

750 

55 

35 

68 

H5 

90 

35 

70 

65 

no 

80 

115 


Senes 

Not 

Feb May 

Nov 

Fab - 

May | 


000 

17 

4b 


110 

125 


Tr11%% 1991 

100 

2% 


a% 


% 

1% 1 

Dixons 

t*35S) 

300 

330 

66 

40 

76 

48 

68 

1 

3 

2 

6 

12 

moz) 

102 

104 

% 

*T« 

1>w 

2*18 

1% 

2»,» 

« 

2*w I 
3% ■ 

360 

18 

30 

48 

12 

18 

20 

Trim* 03/G7 

106 

a*. 

4% 

*'!• 

K 

1’te 

2% 1 

GKN 

cm 

240 

260 

290 

300 

19 

10 

4 

2 

30 

21 

12 

5 

38 

S 

9 13 
22 24% 
34 37 
54 54 

17 

29 

40 

CCI09) 

108 
110 
“ 112 
114 
116 

i* 

% 

‘b 

J ia 

3% 

2% 

“ia- 

1% 

4»,« 

3% 

K 

2'm 

X 

*i« 

3% 

5% 

2*w 

3% 

'•te 

6% 

3% 8 

4% 1 

5% w 
6% 1 

cm 

900 

950 

68 

36 

105 132 

80 107 

20 

45 

40 

54 

54 

80 


Nov Dec 

Jan 

Fab 

Not 

Pee 

"j«r 

» 1 


1000 

1050 

20 

11 

68 

38 

84 

80 

120 

95 

128 

06 

FT-BE. 1525 
Index 1550 

120 - 
-98 113 

122 

— 

1% 

3 

7 

14 

24 

.35 

1 

14 

22 

83 

43 


” 1 

Hanson 

cm 

160 45% 49 — 
180 2G 31% 36% 
200 11 17% 24 

1 

1% 

6% 

2 — 
4% 6% 

10 14% 

nm W75 
1600 
1625 
1650 

77 SO 
57 72 

40 57 
25 42 

102 

85 

70 

55 

62 

85 

25 

33 

52 

i J 









1875 

17 . 28 

— 


47 

55 





10 18 




73 

r 

■- 1 


NOTe«bar4,19H. Total cofUmcts 32CS6 


Cals 23754. Pat* 9932,- 
. 1 


*Umtartytog ■■tui tty prtca. 


BIRD SEMHJS^ IRELAND 
T^partoas of 

L S^le\ 

LjCrawford 

Herron 

and 

. ■ FYEE IRELAND & CO. W.S. 

. ' . we pleased to bb tk w pee that tfaeir 6im win nmaimuw^ n. 
in the Spring of 1987 with offices in Edintx . gfa 

• ' and Glasgow under tbc name of 

BtRDSEMPLE&FYFE IRHAND W& 

soucriORs 

• Corporate • Comraeraal Property 
. ■ y l iti g a ti on • Personal 


B W ScnpfcACrawfawtHBnM 

Wat Geame Street 
CBtepovQ24RB 

Td: 041-221 7090 
Tfcfcx: 779437 
ftoc 041-204 1902 


Pjte MmoAA Cbl W9L 
Z7MetvSe Street 
EcfinbargfiEtDZIG 

Td: 051-2254914 
THex: 72388 
Fax: 031 232303 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 

The efficient alternative to si deposit 
account in any major currency. 


For further information and the current prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to: Robin Fuller. 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.L) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242. St. Julian's Court, SC Peter Port. Gaemsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Gurinsey (0481) 26741. ■* 

Name , 


Address 


.•/ _ • ~ - . AQ4 | 

N M ROTHSCHILD ASSCTMANAGEl^^ J 



* 


V* 





so 






pram your portfolio card check your 
- JtiT share price movements. -Add ingm 
Doto give you your overall totaL Check 
5 ms amnsi the duly dividend figure 
nabfchcd on this page. If it matches you 
Wse won outright or a iae of the total 
d aily prize money stated. IT yon are a 
follow the damn procedure on the 
back of yoor cud. Yon must always have 
your card available when ctanning. 


51986 


pyTCTJTgR AND FINANCE 



DAILY DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

Claims required for 

+36 points 

Claimants sbonld ring 0254-53272 


ill I i i — | ■ il 

wvttn 


BE5S11 


Oaoutsjv 


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ui u\rr. ESZTT'T? ,1 1 



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BUfLOtNOS AND ROADS 






of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 



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BRITISH FUNDS 


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1 

| SiPjM-6«.iJ53a 

THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 27 


NEW PROPERTY 1 






: t 





‘ T * . 
•" " 

a> 






■V=c 


“UNITY WHARF” 

Fascinating Dockside Warehouse Flats 



Mill Street, London SEl 

VVAELLIS 


and office suites by 


’otVllOfMflNtS UD 

FOR SALE: Superb newly developed 
luxury flats, overlooking St. Saviour’s Dock 
close to Tower Bridge and within minutes of 
the Ciry. All having immense character, with 
exposed brickwork and original beams. 

Ficus of 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms , etc. 

£249,000 to £275,000 

Also superb penthouse (in “shell" form) 

with terrace £325,000 

MARBLE HALLWAYS ■ LIFT • AUDIO-VISUAL SECURITY • 
DOCKSIDE BALCONIES * LUXURY KITCHENS & MARBLE 
BATHROOMS • NEW DECORATIONS AND CARPETS - 
AMPLE CUPBOARDS 

999 YEAR LEASES FOR SALE — low outgoings 
Also available for sale: Office suites of 600 to 1100 sq ft 
(ideal for the businessman who is tired of commuting). 

• VIEW TODAY and DAILY Ilam - 6pm 

ITaM. 43 North Autfley Street. 

“ fin 7 _ Grosvtoor Square. 

Cardale undno wiy 2 aq 
01-6296604 


. „ oiHP Joint 
01-5817654 Sole 
Agents 




Groves 


CiibSagm 

homev Prtces (rum aroonrf 

£40,450 io £95300 □ 


fniMmc CATEHOMBCKKnaN 

8 |u> _ 

2 M Soums ^^£53350. 3 & 4 bed 
houstiff ore £693600 

| SHoMviUe. 

■ 2,3S4bedhi 

B £40.450 ro £95. 

Si Weibare Cam. hhMn 

IB 2 bed flsii and 2 bed houses, 
ftice Irom around £49350 to 
£753000 

I UBoKtGni^laiM 

l»w. 5 bed luxury detached house* 
remaining from £149350 to CTS935DQ 

I OwbodhwdS Whtfuid 

Studio apartmentv Prices awaited. 

1 & Z bed masonroei from £443500 

Bctoflwd OtoftMeM 

One. 4 bed loam hotae remaining 
at £115300- All umts arcndy 

6 reserved. CmnriMon fct being 
prepared □ 

SfrsMrkhtomml 
DMeU 

1 B 2 bed flats, 3 8 4 bed houses 
2 bed buegakaws. Pricm awaited 
Sales due to start enrty 19B7 □ 
HAm-eCW-e 

luwy 3. 4 & 5 bed detached homes madaMe 
edify tWO 

jfewWMlQaiDgvaoiMnm 

QvMmflnKy Pub. Emacdb 
4 bed detached houses. Meet awaked. 5 bed 
detached house from (B3350 □ 

So. 2 bed luxury maiseneoes remaining from 
O3SS0to£5i/ma 

• fat to far iifcni i <i» if| 


1 



1 
I 


flag dwrdrte be co m m e nced 
IQbftft 

3 &4 bed houses to be nefcmdorfy 1WC3 

BKlbtflig.Oaenaf5t.A4wr ■ 

S bed tunny homes to be reKamdeanf 1*? □ ■ 

CB Brighton. Wot Smsea ® 

5 bed luxury detached homes to be Fj 
released eady 19B7 □ £} 


|Qp>kqMfs.Bechton 
1 bed mai»on«>es. V3 bed town 
coRaces and 4 bed detached horses. 
Prices Item around £47350 to 
£90300 □ 

gibe gowfana. Hiwnc— ra d 

1 . 2 A 3 bed homes front around 
£41350 lo £55300 3 

JBc m og ne C a t i aerf i — 

Stodm sad 1 bed apartments. 
Prices from around E373S) to 
T45350G 

{SlhrRbcfcea. Code Wood, 
Soodnantoc Nc Honbaa 
Range a( 1-4 bed houses, tennees 
and detached. Prices horn around 
£40350 to <90300 Q 


. Name 


Address. 


8 


T e lephone. 




MiMnNccmHOMssoumaN I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

* Hunting || 
Gate y 

4444s 


SfcsAoriftobe 
Blfeabetf. Pa*. Bottom. 

3 &4beddetochcd houses and 3 bed detached 
bungalows. AmtUMeewlf TW □ 

ltl*f 4._ y _a I a 

1 A 2bedaMS«es^ hotna mU* earfy 
1987 Q 

•Phces conea at tfrne of gotog to preif. 


Designed in 1837* 

Still a few left* 
But hurry* 

Londons most up-to-date apartments were designed in 1837. 

Today they are the best new residential property investment available in Central 
London. 

Bess borough Gardens are being built to Thomas Cubic s original classical Regency 
designs. They 11 combine architectural beauty with the latest in luxury living and security 

Video entry phones, cable TV luxury fitted kitchens and bathrooms, wall to wall 
carpets, uniformed porterage and security controlled underground car parking. 

All set in beautiful landscaped gardens in SW1 . 

Since the first sales in November 1985 all but 30 of the 153 apartments and penthouses 
have been sold. 

This is your final opportunity to invest in one of these exclusive apartments. 





PRICES RANGE FROM £130,000-£415,000 

For full details of this rate investment opportunity contact 

CHMSRTONS 

2 Cale St., Chelsea, London SW3. Tel: 01*589 521 1. Telex: 8955820. 
Or phone the on-site Sales Office, 0 1*630 6770. 

WMPEY HOMES 
CENTRAL UMD0N 


NEW HOME 



1966 

This home could cost you a lot more than 
the asking price. By now, it may have a long and 
expensive list of jobs that demand attention, 
some of which you may only discover after 
you've moved in. Here are just a few you might 
consider: 


Meu/iCiKckeM/ . 

fy 120 

fZftrf £2,o9o 

idftfacemiituMw £zo8 

tfoiteRoifih suAfat 

£j,(Aq 

Mw 3 d(um^UAtL £su> 

fyljltUeAHJkifc 

li/iHi dowi igfto 



total £jo/too* 


*8Mtf on «MTO*d irfTdge 
teoUcemm toil in j 3 brfliooro he** 


BRAND NEW HOME 



1986 

A Brand New Home may initially cost a little 
more than the one on the left but your Brand 
New Home features as standard: 

• A better design built to today's higher 
specifications 

• Monergy saving heating system and integral 
insulation 

• The very latest fixtures and fittings 

• A brand new electrical wiring system and 
ample power points 

• Weather treated exterior woodwork 

• A full 10 year NHBC Warranty 

These are just some of the differences 20 
years have made, so experience for yourself the 
benefits of a Brand New Home. It could add up 
to the smartest move you've ever made. 

To find the Brand New Home you want, 
where you want, at the price you can afford, call 
our Hotline 01 -935 7464 now. Within 24 hours 
your free listing will be in the post. 


29 




OPEN UP 
A BRAND 
NEW HOME 

RING NEW HOMES HOTLINE 

01-935 7464 



Issued by the New Homes Marketing Board on behalf of Britain's homebuilding industry. 


CT 


■*d 


3 


$ 


HX 

fg 

.\A;‘ 

* 

. J 


Wraysbury, 
Berkshire (Nr. Windsor) 


A tuxmxy dettiofmm of iadbtdmid detached and 
r by Bambaz Dnehpmeus Limited 




ic A choice of 16 different homes 

it IOyearNHBC*rarra/tfy 

it Finished to a I irony 
specification 

it Traditionally built 

★ Full gas central heating 

★ Ideal village location 

It Convenient tor motorways 
and Heathrow Airport 

ir Prices from 

S98500 to 0226000 

It Guaranteed mortgages 
subject lo status 


Cowtfi Parti House, Cowwtn Park, 
Afccot Berkshire S£5 7SF 
Ascot (0890) 27711 

Living up to your standard. 




Kingswood Court 

Superb luxury homes set in the heart of Surrey 



\ 


A choice of luxury 4 and 5 bedroom character homes- 
eachon a Vi are site -in an area of fight woodland 
acfiobimg Kingswood Golf Club. 

Just a mile from the M25. 15 mfles from central London 
and within easy reach of bath Heathrow and Gatwick 
ai rpo rts . 

Prices from fiZSOOOO. for ftia detsis wstc our Safes 
Office at Wn^wDod Court. Birr h Grove. Kingswood. 

Surrey, (open 10am-3pro Monday - Fnnay. ilam-4pro 
Saturday and Sunday}. Tel: Mogtfer (0737) B3334S or 
c ontact Stapes. Station Paraoe. Cfapsteaa. Tet: flagace 
(07375) 52251. (Open 7 daysaweeK). 


CfflEEEIl 




If you’re buying a 
newhome,here’s the 
answer to an 
important question. 

Q. Which homes offer you a high quality heating 
system and low running costs? 

A. Energy-saving Medallion Award homes. Send 
off the coupon today or dial 100 and ask for 
Freefone BuildElectnc. 


Please send me more information and a complete list of 
energy saving Medallion Award homes. 

Name ....... . - — 


Address- 


.Postcode 


rtrsi to Electricity Pubhcaiions. PO Bo* 2 . Feltham. Middlesex. TtVH OTo. 

In new homes by the thousand 

HEATSLSCTi 

is the cheapest way. 




iMiikiaatu. 

The Elvcinrm Council 
Enibnu jfid IVjfcs 


■«» , 

*>41 8 

nv. ■ J, ' c 

■fii tox 


■f*. • 


■ - I.'.-'-* 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


NEW PROPERTY 


Whatever vnur taste or inmnw we have a hnrrteto suit you, 





onshrre, 

lire, 

shire and 

rsmre. 


‘EXECUTIVE’ 


MEBUYERS 
1ST FRIEND. 

ttaib send to David Wilson Homes, .jSSSl^ 

etaii Swtt. Leic es te r LEI 5BT. -»v 

Bedrooms HI HI E HI DAVID 

1 ~g- wot! 

i« HOMES Mi 


Octagon at Leatherhead 


/aV-M 


m 




CAMPBELL ^ OURT 


A choice of spacious two bedroom 
apartments is available at Campbell 
Court which is ideally situated in 
private secluded grounds m one of 
Leatherhead 's prime residential areas a 
few hundred yards from the town 
centre and local amenities. 

This imaginatively planned scheme 
consists of twelve luxurious apartments 
all having two bedrooms and two 
bathrooms. Each apartment has an 
attractive balcony from which (here are 
extensive views over unspoilt reaches 


of the River Mole and nearby 
countryside 

The gardens which tun down to the 
river bank will be carefully landscaped 
and planted with many coknrful trees 
and shrubs. 

Prices are from £127,000 
leasehold. 

Show flat open II a.m. to 5 pan seven 
days a week off Gimc rack Hill. 
Leatherhead. Telephone 1 1372 386590. 


THE (JK* LARGEST I 

INDEPENDENT HOUSE BUILDER I 


BELMONT 

COURT 

Elegant terrace looking for elegant 
young buyers 

Victorian Henry Rydon developed Court in Islington 
to house a few favoured people. We redeveloped it to 
bouse slightly more. 

Forty-four studio. one^Kdroont. two bedroom and 
penthouse apartments to be exact. Tastefully ap- 
pointed to the highest standards, this lovely terrace in 
inclined Highbury New Park is just waiting for a few 
young professionals with an eye on the future and a 
fed lor the past. 

Do you like the sound of the City and West End in 
minutes by tube and Camden Passage in minutes by 
foot? Parks and shopping? Tennis and swimming? A 
zoo? Sadlers Weils just down the road ami good 
restaurants everywhere? 

If you do. come and see us. Either now or on a 
weekend shew day. (She office open Friday to Mon- 
day incL lOJOam - 5.30pm. Teh 01-354 5997). 


BEECHWOODPARK 
Spacious one bedroom flats on small 
private estate in a parkland setting. 

£66,000 Leasehold, 

Selling agents Osenton Lamdeti, London House. 29 Church Street. Leatherhead. 
Telephone 0372 376633 . 


COPPING 
JOYCE )\ 


284 St Paul's Road, Wl. Tel: 01-226 4221 


EAST HORSLEY 

SURREY. A new development of 5 superb 5 Bed de- 
tached family homes butt to the highest specification off 
Forest Road. 3 Fine Recaption Rooms, Fully fitted Kitch- 
ens. Large Plots. Price £235,000 Freehold. Only 2 
renaming. Full details 

Edward Barclay Estate 
Agents, 

Byfleet (09323) 49362. 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 



f ti 


V • • 

a^ia* i 

V'liffl •«. 



ftumtft Tesayseo boose, Or left, 
-which now has * eansaratey, and, 
above, flac awe fa o h est Kenflwortfc of t 
. Alfred McAlpSue Hooies ’ 


What every buyer needs to know 


The most important _ service the 
housebuilder can provide when he 
presents his new house to the public is to 
be helpful to the customer and gi ve him 
or her accurate pre-purchase informa- 
tion, a survey of new house buyers 
shows. 

The survey, part ofthe Housebuilder eg 
the Year companion run by Express 
Newspapers in association with the New 
Homes Marketing Board, reports that 
the next four services in order of priority 
are advice received on legal matters, 
meeting the building . deadline, the 
condition of the house cm moving-in 
day, and the efficiency of the builder in 
rectifying faults. 

The first priority has remained in that 
position for three years, emphasizing 
that potential buyers rued to be re- 
assured on the facts of bouse buying 
before taking the plunge. 

They axe also increasingly discerning 
in their approach to house-buying, 
whether it is a first home or not, and 
builders, not surprisingly, are taking up 
the challenge ofbuilding better and more 
imaginatively. 

To those buying older homes, it may 
be a surprise to know that new houses are 
more expensive. But statistics provided 
by the Nationwide Budding Society 
show that the average for Britain is 
£45,000 for a new bouse, £40,000 for a 
modem house, and £35,000 for an older 
one. 

For detached houses, the avenge is 
about £60.000 (new), £56,000 (modern) 
and £57,000 (older). For terraced houses 
the figures are £34,000, £32,000 and 
£29,000 respectively. 

“Kerb appear helps to seO houses, a 
feature which many builders concentrate 
on, both in single houses and dusters. 
Berkely Homes, for example, is buikfing 
six large detached Tudor-style properties 
in a wooded location in Aridey, 
Hertfordshire, in whidi each is individ- 
uaQy designed, port rendered, part 
timbered with some herringbone 
bric kwo rk. 

The brick and tile was chosen carefully 
to blend into the rural atmosphere, great 
attention has been paid to detail and the 
houses cost about £395,000. David 
Wilson-.- Home$ ode ‘of the award 
winners, operating largely in the Mid- 


lands^ takes the view that each buyer 
wants something different and, there- 
fore, has 150 deagns. 

Chi its 800-house devdopment at 
Leicester Forest East it is using all of 
them, from bungalow to Thdm; Geor- 
gian and Regency, and probably a few 
more before it is completed as new 
emer ge. 

Bariatf s Premier Collection of more 
than SO styles, launched last year, has 
now been updated and several more 
added.. The range costs from £2Q,000 to 
more than £450,000 and at the latter end 
of the. maiiet — the Sovereign range — 
further luxury features have been added. 

Banatt has noted the resurgence of 
interest in conservatories and has in- 
cluded a Vfctorian-5tyle conservatory 
with its Tennyson four-bedroom house. 
Upstairs the master bedroom has a split- 
level bathroom with a whirlpool bath' 
mid s eparat e shower, while the mam 
bathroom has an adioming sauna. 

By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

The Balmoral is a t h ree-be dro om 
bungalow winch has a unusual spfit-Ievd 
lounge, and a master bedroom with patio 
door fading to the garden. Mike Norton, 
the Barratt Group marketing director, 
said: “Before launching the Premier 
Collection we carried out considerable 
research to discover the demands and 
tastes of modem house4*iyera. Our 
.styles set new standards and now our 
architects have farther improved designs 
and specifications.” . . 

Dulwich Gate, home of the Prime 
Minister, is one of Baratf s fla g shi p 
developments, and now Wxmpey, its 
rivals at the bead ofbuikfing affitirs, has 
come up with what it describes as 
Blackheath’s answer to Dulwich Gate — 
Mayfield, on the Cator estate in 
Blackhealb village, entered through 
lodge gates to prevent through traffic. 

In contrast to the predominantly 
Georgian and neo-Georgian architecture 
of the area, the houses are modern hr 
style, but have proved equally attactive ■' 


to buyers. The five-bedroom detached 
houses are a&tmderofier, but there are a 
few semi-detadied houses -for sale, 
through Winkworth Bfackfaea t h and 
Homore of Beckenham, at £255,000 and 
£257,500. 

They have, among their features, 
“period” rootridings, skirtings and 
azefailzaves througbont 

Alfred McAJpine Homes, faced with 
the many standard “bores” still being 
boil*, has d e pone d with the uniform 
method of home construction and is 
attempting to emtdaEte other builders 
who are providing greater variety. Its 
styles re ma in traditional, but it is 
adopting an adventurous approach to 
ensure mat no two developments look . 
the same, and at the same time offering a 
different combination of desgs features 
and specifications for each house. 

One of its three-storey houses at 
Grange Park Place, Wimbledon, incor- 
porates a turret endoa m a circular 
stairway. At Redkfitch, a four-bedroom 
flftaM**** house built into a hillside on 
two different levels has a split-level 
feature. 

McAlpme has more than 50 house 
types, from saner homes to ret i re m e n t 


homes, ranging in price from £22,950 to 
£350000. They are designed to be as 
maintenance free as possible, with 
ext e ns i ve insulation and energy saving 
standards far above the present building 
regulations. 

The prize for file most unusual new 
home on the market goes to Britain's 
first geodesic dome home — that is the 
claim ofthe builder Nectar Domes Lid of 
Purler Surrey — at Tatsfidd on the 
Surrey/Kem borders. It has been fur- 
nished by inferior designers to com- 
pfemiait the style ofthe dome and has a 
spacious central lobby leading to the 
main rooms and maser bedroom suite, 
with a gallery and three further bed- 
rooms On the first floor. It costs 
about £300.000. 

It is designed &> be thermally efficient 
and has 38 per cent less surface area than 
a conventional home through which to 
loseheaL The dome, 45 feet in diameter 
with a floor area of 2,600 square feet, is 
set m half an acre of wooded ground and 
the selling' agent' Is/Dutincove Homes, 
BromleyfKent. - 



[ 


G 



FASS POINT 



4 bedroom semi-detached homes & 

5 bedroom river front villas 

On the south-eastern ziver-edge ofthe Isle of Dogs' 
exciting and vibrant new community, Costain Homes are creating 
Compass Point a development, outstanding in both quality and 
design, featuring distinctive, dutch style, high gabled elevations. 

• \jp^ r y J)nill ^^| Visit our on-site sales office or 4ggg 
: phone us on (0279) 58264 a 

Prices from £139,000 -£230,000. \ 






Costain jj/p . 

Homes 9 

Costam Hnmw? (Eastern) Limited 

20 Nails Lane. Bishop’3 Stortford. Hertfordshire qH233Rfl 





2 Bedrooms from 

£99,50^ 




* FULLY FITTED. KITCHENS 

* FITTED WARDROBES 

* Fumr EQUIPPED GVM. 
5AUNA AND SOLARIUM 

* WHIRLPOOL BATHS 
♦LIFT ..-'•••• 

* LARGE ROOF CARDEN 
AND TERRACE - 

* UNDERGROUND HARKING 

* 125 YEAR LEASES 


3UNCHSDUKE ReiffiCarilafe Groves 
41 SSBSSBSBB— Canard Sur«oar* 

M *0M^5nm.H«inrv. 
uf LasdoaES IHH 

WiOMnEssg 01-629 6604 nu 




^ 5; 


AdtSsstone Surrey Reach Waterloo in around 
40mjlru^Qs*4bedhousesfTorri£901W0. 

Ph: Weybridge (0932)52260 
Merton PeekSma Seduded. yet only 10 mins 
from Wimbledon centre. 1 bod retirement flats 
from £47.000. 

Ph: 01-5438858. 

North Beckton E6 Gfase tothefastA13 

a485bed homes from 

£71,000. 

Ph: 01-511 6406. 

PahnenCroenM322mins*toMoofaBte 
Station l &2 bed flats from ESI 4JOO. 

Ph: 01-791 1117. 

Sutton- f^^jent services to Victoria and 

£41,000. 93 108 fTOrn 

Ph: 01-6434339 

y'fo^pchapel El 10 mms" to the Qty: Studios, 
1&2bedhousesfrom £50000. 

1117 

WomifMdOreenEia 40 mms’ to Liverpool St 

^*^r nhous8s ' ron,£54 ’ 5oa 

* approx, readmes. t 

i 


l Mouse Company 



1 &2 bedroom superior apartments 

m sought after area, one mile from town, centre. 
Features include, gas-fired central heating, kitchen 
with built in electric cooker & gas hob, audio door 
entry system, double glazing, garage, landscaped 
gardens. Trains into Waterloo take approx 38 
minutes. 

1 bedroom flats from £55,000 

2 bedroom flats from £72,000 


Ptoasa und km derjfls of GuUM J mfco mwt 


Qeeson Homes Ltd. Haredon House. London Rd. 
North Cheam. Surrey SM398S. „ 

Telephone: 01-6444321 ^ 


6LEES0H 


MORTGAGE HOTLI.NL 

Mortgages & Remortgages 
Fast friendly efficient service 

NO FEES 
Ring Today for an 
Immediate Quote 

BERWICK FINANCIAL SERVICES PLC 
43 PaD Mafl. London SWl 
01-930 9631 




FREE CONVEYANCING 

by established firms of W.l . solicitors 

ON TYPICAL £60,000 
PURCHASE YOU WOULD 
SAVE UP TO £700 


O 95% UP TO £500.000 
O 70% NON STATUS up to £250,000 
(no proof of income required) 

O LOW START SCHEMES 
Payments start at 7.88% p4L 
□ 100% UP TO £100.000 

3 x JOINT or 
3.7 x SINGLE income - 

Teh 01-431 0035 for framed late quote 


40A High Street Hampstead, NW3 


NO 

Nb suivey fees ■ 

No legal fees I 

★ Non status mortgages up to 80% 

★ Any purpose ; 

★ Up to 3x joint income or 4x single 
■*r 1 00% forfirst time buyem 

★ Reduced morithjy mortgage payments 
up to 30% 

★ Top-ups tolp0% 

HOME VISITIF REQUIRED - -a 
Commercial mortgages from 11V2%jj 
RAYMOND BRETT & CO . . 

DENBIGH HOUSE ■ j ffSPSFs 

DENBIGH ROAD . 11 / \ 

MILTON KEYNES MK 1 1 YP lllftj 


variable 




amnatmuu.jctTT W Laceu - . 

Tha Wdwrt Q ctoctkm Of Haw Hootw By Ibicoina' LeadlnQ 
... BuMflrtfFremmSiOToffltWXB.. 
■urtratadBraclwras Front 










29 


* .. Si.''***' 



A. A" V 

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ft* * . 


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* 



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* Jtf ^4. 






L^T 


WEDNJESDaV NOVEMBER 5 1986 


^>£*j;S2> 


NEW PROPERTY 





We've got exactly what 


If you’d like to live 
in the town but 



- Whitaaan Porter raw ex tend t h e g service to 
indude London's most exritmg^prognesfiive New 
Homes DrvisiQiL ’ •' 

If you’re kxjking^ expert service, tot’s our ' 
spedafily. If you re lookmg for advice aad professional 
guidance, that’sourforte. Best of aB, ifyopWlodldng fir 
si^efb,newhomeswehave the finest seiec&nin - 
London. ... 

Takealookat someof the propeitiesm our 
portfbfiou 

“PARKSTOET. Acton. W3. 

- DauiylandZbedrocra 

lbedroc»n^3artirientfirwn£54^^0.. - 
2 bedroom apartment from £59,750. 

MONTPELIER PARK. W5. 
Eao^ptka^TcnTOHottsesbadqDig onto open p arit fa nd . 
- 1^ ^£265^000. 

-PROVIDENCE VILLAS”. Hammersmith. W6. 
Unique, mdroM pa By designed Town Houses. 

Last phase soon to bexdeased. . . 

For farther details contact 'Hfoyne Hartfeonon 

01-948 7667 


WMITFVIAPJ 




■JKM 



■■HUM 




Deadline clause: buy before 31st Dec 1986. 
Santa Claus: pay nothing until 1st July 1987. 




NEW HOMES 


BLACKHEATH 

The “Hampstead of die South” still 
tmipsacemflaror^anno^heretyet 
it’s witfmi 5 miles of the dry ’ 
May&H, this new luxury ■ 
de^opmexx^isiadieinosteadasve 

part trftfae prestigious Came Estate 


LUXURY 5 BEDROOM 
HOMES FROM £255 

Tiro boose styles designed, bu3t 
and fitted to the very highest 


by “Michael Aiqgelo” and folly fitted 


4 

z 

o 




secbdedbotoeswiDbekreenedby 
trees and wUagoysoui-fering, 
tur^hwns.Sgnkfetad x dfipgn 
£255,000. 


Christmas has come early to 
East Anglia. And with it, an 
astonishing present from 
Barra tt. 

Complete the purchase of 
one of our superb 3 and 4 
bedroom houses and bungalows 
before the end of 1986, and we 
will pay the entire net cost of 
your mortgage until July 1987- 

There are eligible properties 
at Ely in Cambridgeshire, 
Lexden near Colchester, 



Your Mortgage Paid for 6 months' 


JOINT SELLING AGENTS: 

■ W M creqfa at Gn^ZMbtgpditt \Sfc, 
K*dte4VSge,Xt«6coSEi Tit 0T-J18 9666. 
. Fknwp t l?yGwi l flB R oa ABftfanhim ,KBg. 
Ta«^58S83t 


4 

x 


WELCOME HOMII 



Michael D. Hall 


Building Design Services 

Professionals Established In an aspects of design 

New developments, Conversions 
Refurbtsfmients, Extensions, etc. 

Telephone (0424) 214541 

t; Studio A 

339 London Road, BexhiU-on-Sea, 

. East Sussex TN40 1HX • 


and in Norfolk, ac Ormesby, Thorpe St. 
Andrew and Wymondham. 

Specially selected from the award* 
winning Premier Collection, these are 
some of the finest new homes in eastern 
England. 

And not least of their attractions is 
the price range - from £55,830 to £79,500. 

Now' is that the sound of sleighbells 
we hear, or just the phone. 7 

For details of rhe Barrett East Anglia 
6-month mortgage offer, ring 
(0206) 68431, or post the coupon. 

Barrett #East Anglia 

SHOWHOUSESOPEN DAILY 11 AM-6 PM 


Please send me details of eligible 
properties and developments. 

Name: 

Address: — 


Barratt East Anglia, - 
Oak House, 25 Sr Peters Sr., 
Colchester COl 1XG. 



■Oth < lh.)n 


BARRATT 


PREMIER 


COLLECTION 



















.. „ lV .. ' »' 4«£ £■**&&, c;;^. . 


THE TIMES W EDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 

NEW PROPERTY 



42 -44 


A beautifully restored Grade ll listed Georgian 
building, near Regents Park. 



2/3 bed apts-Prices from £225,000 

Selling Agents 


CLINTON - SCOTT 
♦ PLC ♦ 

01-722 8898 


0t-t87440t 


Reiff^ Diner & Co. 

Emt Agents ft Property Coasultaau 
0t-49t3t54 A 



BERKLEY 

HOUSE PLC 


Honeiyrim Square 


T«m Mgs SCI 


u 

EAGLE WHARF 
Unique Warehouse Conversion 

Pre purchase with 
delayed completion. 

Excellent specification 
and location. , 

From £103,000 
to £275,000 

FOR FULL DETAILS 
AND VIEWING PLEASE CONTACT 

Joint Sole Agents 


CLINTON - SCOTT 
PLC 

01-722 8898 



CUNTON-SCOTT 

PLC 

01-722 8898 

EXPATRIATE 

INVESTMENT 

Investment 
opportunity in 
London’s prime 
residential properties 
from major pic clients, 
with contractural 
completion 1987/8. 
70% mortgages sts. 

Self financing 
repayments met by 
letting income. Full 
letting service and 
management backup. 
Further details upon 
request 


nEMM TV - 
7 BATS A I 


MB Street, London SB (war Toyrer Bridfcs) 


la ■ ■ inv<i«i»riniiii>^ii i i~ nmTiiV^.«l nul 



1/2/3 bad. apartments now salable in thb mpeifciy rafarbUicd mnrin wharf 
Prices range frorn£9&000-£265j000 


JOINT AGENTS 

CLINTON - SCOTT PLC 

01-722 8898 





CMOS 7880 


I M li Na Sq— *■*«*■» 

This Village in the sky offers a unique setting for 23 
.houses arid a penthouse on the top deck of this 
former Courage Brewery budding. All turns wifi have 
generous balconies and terraces and comprise 2/3 
•bedrooms. 

Each unit wifi have fully fitted luxury kitchens and 
.bathrooms, and central heating. 

Sales are being arranged now at todays prices with 
completion in approximately 15 months. 

Prices £155,000 
to £325,000 

FOR FULL DETAILS 
AND VIEWING PLEASE CONTACT 

Joint Sole Agents 

CLHTM SCBH PtC 



^=Winkworth=^ 

Would You like 

The Properly Wee and Home Purchase Costs 
Included in Your 100% Mortgage? 

The hidden costs of home purchase can easily leave your 
current account in the red, even when you have arranged a 
% 100% mortgage. 

Buy a £100,000 property and you will probably need to find 
a further £1,600 in fees within a single month. 
Winkworth Financial Services can reduce that payout to just 
the Mortgage Survey fee - around £80. Your other expenses 
-stamp duty, solicitors’ foes. Local Authority Search Fee- 
can all be added cm to your mortgage and you can zesnsnn 
securely in credit 

For fufl information cm this mdusw envir^ ^ 

01-235 0691 

Winkworili Financial Services 
The people who find you the best deal in town 
25a Motcomb Street, London SW1X 8JU 
fcv OPEN UNTIL 8.00 PM TONIGHT . A 


MmiJUXimY APARTMEmS V s 

15-WEST HEATH RQ\D-NW3 

15 West Heath Road is a remarkable new development 
of 9 laxmy One bedroom a part ments. With a coramandn# ' - - 
view of the Heath yet within 5 minutes stroll of Hampstead High 
Strect, tins property is in a truly unparallded location. .• 

The apartments have been designed and finished to the Utfiert' • - 
standards. Great care has been taken to ensue that the. . - .T; 
external abearance, site layout and landscaping are; . 

in perfect keeping with Qte area. 

Thh unique development has beemdesjgiKsl.to create; 
a style of living which s rarefy round today., 

A few of the many features enjc^ied by each apartiiieiit are? . 

# Fall independent gas fired 0 

r^ntwi taihp wKh aoiob. eoaaoHeo gtnsr 

A speed passenger lift <fa0 ^- .... - ■— 

m ri __ ____ #Fdfy/«^' 

m ‘ ■ with ccremfc tiled walls and 

0 Vktoo Security SyrtetM- ' •• aaodag. . ■ 

0 Landscaped Comnumil 0A^mUmam. ot tmv tmnttr 
Garden. with onHe wall 

• BakxMM/Tcsracee to ail 

apartm e n t!. ®I0 y««r NHBCsnamtoe. - 




New \ 

:I25 year leases-Ny 

weccis 

MBh&ro 


52 Gokfans Green Road, 
Golden Green, 
London NWll 8LN 
Tetophone 01-455 1014 

Joint Sole Agents 



J^ondmcxH 

&hds5. 


L20 Crawford Street. 

London W1H1AF 
Telephone 01-480 0079/D 


Surprisingly they 
often cost no more 
than ordinary homes. L 



" i i ' Tl i 7 l t V 'z 7 ; r * i 1 *; 

i ilw i li mi UMLJ . 1 11 



BLACK HORSE AGENCIES 
Gascoigne-Fees 


klgr DOCKLANDS 




H »« i* 



~ : A “ M 


LONDONS NEW LAND MAKE 

Pori vf u bniciti cunriis <>t luxury 





VJ&A: ;• ’c'N- j 



IATVE HOUSE 

CAFEL, nr. DOBSING, SURREY 

A Magnificent Victorian Mansion in a be a u ti f u l 
Parkland setting skilfully c on verted to form 18 
Luxury Apa rt ment s . Typical units offer l or2 Fine 
Recaption Rooms. Oak Fitted Kitchens. 2 Large 
Bedrooms many with 2 Luxury en-smte Bathrooms, 
Quality Refinements, 6 Yean N.H.B.C. Warranty. 

FIRST PHASE PRICES from £80,000 to 
£1154)00 LEASEHOLD. 

For brochure please contact DORKING 
OFFICE— TeW0306) 884089 


New Homes Si 
TefcTadwerth 


now available 
2882 for yonr copy 


ftafii for her | Hit preview invitation contact sole agent 


cyA Ian Seibv ^ c Partncrs 

01-9869431 



VIEW DAILY 

121, SUTHERLAND AVE, W.9. 

GARDEN FLAK - Hd. k!R UL 3 bedma. 3 betium, 

rfioewfc«aam.Tra^w^rtMi«l fl wrh 

STARLCROFT LTD 
0783 7SI6I 

AVAIL ABLE S HORTLY. PENTHOUSE WBBBt 


STOKES RIDINGS 

RETIRE TO TADWORTH, SURREY 

A Uniq ot Village D e v e lop ment of 21 Luxnrv 
netireuient Apartments Romhinfa g privacy wire 
excellent communal facilities- Each f h t rf 

Cloakroom, Ixtnxwe/Dnnng Room with patio or 
balcony. Kitchm /Bg eafcfii B&Boom. 2 Be d r o oms and 
Lmmry Bathroom, lift. Entryphone, gas central 
beating. Landsc aped Grounds. 

LAST FEW REMAINING FROM 

£664)00 LEASEHOLD—. , 

For brochure please mKsV&ssssa 
contact WALTON ON 
THE HELL OFFICE- 
Tel: (073781) 3671 


MIDWEEK 
MORTGAGE SERVICE 

















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


31 


NEW PROPERTY 



MM. 


This\ 


have won 


than any other builder. 








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wm 

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Hi 

prtgSsii it 

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■HI 


& $ 
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$iiSS 


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MmeiHnitli' 

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/tOiiSjJJf l-‘ 


ENJOY 


lifestyle with 

RAIL SERVICE 
70 PADDINGTON 

luxury detached 3/4 bed- 
room country homes, many 
with double garages and 2 
bathrooms, dining room, 
lounge with fireplaces and 
luxury kitchen with 
appliances. 

Come and see the very best 
ot new home building at 
Pewsey Meadows, Pewsey, 
Wiltshire. 


which 
. tx- 
i rose, 
■th in 


0672 62089 


BLACK HORSE 

AGENCIES 

Gascoigne-Pees 


WALTON- 

ON-THB- HIIA. 

OFFICE 

(073 781) 3871 


FULHAM, SW6 
FINAL PHASE RELEASE 
Well designed town hones just off Kings 
Rood. Reception, fuDy fitted and equipped 
Kitchen /Breakfast Room, 5 Bedrooms, 3 
Bathrooms (2 Eaauite). Cloakroom. > 
South West facing Carden. Gas Cen- 
irni Heating, fitted Carpets. 

Freehold £2150)00 01-730 3435 jdSgBr 
Joint Soto Agents 
Keith Cantata Grows 
01-581 8155 


BATTERSEA, SW8 

NEW RELEASE 

6 beautifully presented 2 Bedroom flats supertily fitted 
whilst retaining period features. Lnxmy fully equipped' 
Kitchens, 1st clan Bathrooms, Reception . Room, 
Wardrobes, quality fitted Carpets, tnd. Gsb Central 
Heating. 2 with private Gardens, 2 with Terraces. 
Lease 09 yean £86,000 01-730 3435 


Flatt&Mead 


THE OAKS, GROSS OAK ROAB, 
BERKHAMSTED, HERTFORDSHIRE 


Nr farther «ctaOs mi M fenctom pta 
cntacl BartfcarasM 18*427) 73368 


WATERS EDGE- CUFF TOP LOCATION 


AWfoles home at Limpsfield. 
Alitde like living on the village green 


Architectural Technicians Partnership 

Planning & Design Service for new 
Housing. Improvements, 
Commercial & Industrial Buildings 


(OFF SEAWAY AVENUE - FRIARS CLIFF • CHRISTCHURCH I 


Your home will be architect -des^ned to 
Mend with the charm and character of die local 
en v iro n ment. It will be tuU-heared, and 
thoroughly insulated to cut costs. Well also 
landscape your bade garden tor you ifvou wish. 

And natu rally youl! enjoy ail the comfort, 
convenience, style and prestige that goes with 

every \Vtues-buih home. 

' Seetheshow homes now Or get more 
details by phoning Qsled 7538. 


TRINITY HOUSE 
TRINITY STREET 
DORCHESTER 
DORSET DTI ITT 
Tel: 0305 66010 


beaunfiA jmspoihXktlaixl Ya Lonckmand^e 


4 bed detached house, from 
JL*145,000. 


’WS*’*'** y*-* — — — — 

The ratal phase o( dirt superb evdiKhw development is nearirtp Prices from £14>,000 
mmpfct ion nd offer, quality homes in this truly magnificent and 

songfu after position. Well ptanaed spacious acctumnotiarion triih rmny toxin? feaiuirs mthriins 


CATHEDRAL SETT OF UE3C01N 

The tv«Jesi selection o< new homes hy Lincoln's leadmj 
builders. From £16,550 - £90.000. 

Illustrated brochures from 

A JACKSON & SON 
42 Silver Street, Lincoln, LN2 1TA. 

TEL (0522) 513456. 


Visit our beautiful sbowhome 
Open 6 days - I Oa.m. - 5p.m. 
(excluding Tuesdays) 
Telephone 04252 3 1 ?4 


Prowling Southern Ltd 


72 Aid wick Road. Bognor Regis, W.Sussex Telephone (0243) S2P1S9 


V^tesbinld with care* 


p iVM a \to This i$ certainly true at Baymans Wood, where Allred McAlpme Homes are building 
D/il JTlAl v 9 just 16 elegant 4 and 5 bedroom detached houses in a private woodland setting. 
117A An complete with a qated entrance. 

VW V a number of these splendid houses have already beer? s old and their owners are 
Glanthams Road. Shenfield. now experiencing the luxury lifestyle and enjoying the spacious accommodation 
Brentwood. Essex. and superb specification to toe fall. So why not wstf our showhouse and take (he 
K , J * K firet step towards joining in the success!! Pricea from around £220,000 

FURNISHED showhome and sales 
CENTRE OPEN DAILY 11am to 5pm. 


Vis currently have a 
number ot new and 
newly ■ built properties 
throughout this area. 

Houses: - 2-3 Beds. 
From £62,000. 
Flats: - 1-2 Beds. 
From £47,500. 




nmjfmAlS, COBHAM, SURREY 

^ U ' *diac«n River Mofe and only short wrfk from village. 

Adjacent Cobham . W aierioo approx30 mins, 

T KflHmnmi 2 twihrooms etc. Pnces from. £155,000. 

. 5^ntber. Tetephone Cobham (0932) 63209. 

Me*, and ready mVTrTWttfir^rrs T.TTi 


Homes 

TEL (0277)210226. 


dUiNCKAM MfiSCT. Rniml? 
■ tot 2 lu-iuri 1 . t>rtl 

JW SuarrD ertarom 

4u£«wl Jot <urti camv 
£S..QSO. For Brorti mw 0252 
ST8o8a/6r«AT 


The Barnard 4 bafttwm 



















[TTmiyixSrt a i)Ci w WM art i :) a *1 V£ii 


NE 



O PADSTOW '•* BARTON , O 



ABBAS COMBE 

- 6 rifles from Sherborne. 20 individual 
properties & bam . conversion in a de- 
lightfully unique setting, lamp posts, 
archways, cobbles etc. 3 & 4 bedrmd 
houses from £52,500 to £69,950. CSents 
may choose kitchen & bathrm fittings. AH 
amenities In nearby Temptecornbe. 

Contact VALARETTE LTD 

0258 820414 



i 5 


UARLYN ° ' CORNWALL 


LARGE BEAUTIFUL NEW HOMES 
AT AVON PARK, BINGWOOD, 
HAMPSHIRE. EDGE OF NEW FOREST. 

• Elegant, executive houses combining c harm, 
nidrvidtntity and character. Devdopom wittua a 
IS acre park ate, average acco m modation S beds, 3 
luiUiooins, superb lounge, sep formal diiiing room, 
fabulous kitchen, utility, double garage. Som e with 
swimming pools. Every house isdifibnu with 
acre plots. A truly unique development srimne of 
traditional superior properties, three remainin g from 
£169^0GLFandejaas: 


Jdiill- Euntevi 

SSL MM*— lMteHUff 
TfefeGW 81887 \ 


PRESENTS A WEST END HIT 

FOR A VIEW OF HYDE FWtitYOUHS. FROM £30000019 SPSOfiOB WO BEW3KX 
... FORSAL&*P9tTHOOSES<1nali* . 

COMPLETION - CHRISTMAS UK 
LOCATION - LANCASTER TERRACE . BAY W ESTBB. LONDON SB 
p »uM i i iog Ptir c frnawB Only 

AmmuTKxjtton ccnipRSSs; \.Vte . . 

2 »4 Doable Bedrooms, pressing Rowoiranta. 2to3Batoroow«(1 ao^^. 
Superb Uvinq/Dintag Rooms. Pafiutota Wttfwna. Large Tyn ^Cy Partonq. 
Re sident PtetBr. Passenger Lift- Ws a Entranc e m&m; Gae C Uteri HaaBng. 

. . Doubto ©tejPQ- . " 



Hayward &Coi»dIey 

Bagmet (64254)2133 


* FIRST RELEASE * 

Opportunity to pre-purchase at 
todays prices. 

Earliest completion late 1987. 





DUNDEE WHARF 

73 Wfapping High Street, El. 

Prices from 

£99,500 -£395,000 

View plans and brochure at 216 Tower Bridge Road, SE1. 
Weekdays 9 - 5pm. Weekends 11 - 3pm. 

lomt SdUpe Aeents 

CLINTON - SCOTT 
♦ PLC ♦ 

01-4030304 

i nM.m i Mn.w iT Expatriate Investment Scheme 

further details contact Clinton Scott PLC. 


Listed Victorian Building - 
H Mow. Beautiful Tlpurtnienis 


VICTORIA COUHT,NEW NORTH ROAD, ISLINGTON 
1 , 2 & 3 bed Apartments from Just C54g950 to £85,000 

A Victorian Grade II fisted building, Victoria Court has been 
superbly restaredto meet the highest standards of modem living 

whilst incorporating many of the original features. 

*Spacfousaccommodatiori Guaranteed Mortgage (STS STV) 

★Full GasCenfral Heating * Fitted carpets 

★luxury bathrooms *Security Entryphone 

★Fullv fitted kitchen *C lose to tube 



SCAHHUVIM STYLE BOW FOB SALE 

Ux3ted«BrfflicfirVHtage,near[Wge*au,inbeauti- 

fulS(K}wckxiiaNatkytEd>^2or3De(kx»rntypeS' 

ready for fenmedata occupation. Show house open. 
Price From: £27,500. 

For Brochuro ring Ruth on: 

061 624 5631. 


■Ullage GreeN 1 

. i 


RETIRING? 

Move to freedom with security 
Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire; Wmrftam; 
Kent; Wemngtan; Cambs; Ledbury 
and Fownhope, Herefordshire; - 
Shipston-on-Stour, Warwickshire. 

Phone 0093 76367 

far fall details or write to: 

3 Meadow Court, High Street, 
Witney, Oxfordshire, 0X8 6LP. 





WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
; YOUR PROPERTY 

. And ffttkeba qf your e*s&r . 

if hmaWng Ccamd Heath* 

★ Rrfiufaii t im c n t of your jopen; 

It E o nni on of yocr property 
^School Fees * Buying i Car . 

Ik- Gang on e-Midnr eta 
l NoJc*p&m 

NON STATUS MORTGAGES A VAfTABZM • 

HZRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

Oet cf Eanpfx Leafing Mo rtgag e Brokm . • 

. 15. Mtskdey Stent, T telee WlX ME. , 

Tet W-42958m/2 . TEUEX J374 


FUNDS 
AVAILABLE 
FORA 
UMITED 
PERIOD ONLY 





oral MON-HU 9am-7pni SAT 10am4pm 


UUKMWMORHtUE 

INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS tumamernmnumnu umn- 



Bctaave qaafity retrnanent ayetimorts in burnt qf 
town some wito river vkws: Z beds; beriunom arid 
e snite sfawrr roam: lounge/dina; lusny Laches; 
gas HH ; A«h )» gfatntgi- smalF garden -or 
|W £ >mA|ble; emergency call qstooc Sahlife 

Aiilrmr tadro firm Tminf ri i r ii Ti 
REDFEBNS, Fore Streri,.Tepiliao^ Exrier \ 
(939287) 5126 teg- 

FULFORDS, Fere Street, IMah, Eaftr 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


- * 


★Full GasCenfral Heating ★ 

★Luxury bathrooms * 

★Fully fitted kitchen * 

Visit this magnificent 
development any time Saturday 
and SinKlBy between Ham. and 
6p.m. or cal I Jacksons on 
Te). No: 0860 620623 



msmm 

OFFICE 

MANCHESTER HD EM Deceptively spurious first 
floor spit level rarieo n et tp having lags accommoda- 
tion throughout 3 bedrooms, 30* through lounge, 
fitted ktehen/tiner, bathroorfashower. Gas Central 


Thre e supe rb GRADE II LISTED Bara conversions 
PROBABLY THE FINEST RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN KENT 

BOLDREWOOD COURT 
HARRIETSHAM 

The properties, brick and stage built under meflaw day tih; ruo£s. origmaDy of 
the most robust construction, have been converted to the highest standard to 
outsta nding character dwellings of a design and in a location which win remain 
unrivalled. 

In a seduded position with panoramic views of unspoilt farmland, and yel only 
7 miles from Maidstone and convenient for M20/M2/M26 and rail Knits to 
London. 

• Extremely spacious 4 & 5 
bedroom houses with 3/4 
reception. 

■ Each with 2 luxury hilly 
tiled bathrooms. 

• Double Garages. 

• Gas fired central heating. 
•Superb feature brick 

loung fireplaces. 

•Wealth of exposed beams. 

• Fined kitchens to buyer’s 
choice. 

•Doubta glazed patio doors 
... -• . and paved patio areas. 

PRICES £160,000 — £178,000 

GRACIOUS AND SPACIOUS— MUST BE VIEWED TO APPRECIATE FULLY 


OXTEO, STOREY, 

toe, avri faroou- 

g»«. co waffled tor 

j™*. u»F nn. 


TED \D\ID TTODl.. ES iol 


Heating, roar ganJen. £86,750. 

PTOSPECT PLACE El Attracfive writ maintained 
first fl oor flat In poptiarc to v eto pment dose to Wapp- 
Ing Underground Station. 1 targe bedroo m , hnony 
fitted kitchen, spacious bathroom, lounge, parking 
space. £75.000. 

WAPPBK3 El Exceptional fiftt floor warehouse con- 
version. Luxurktusiy equipped & fitted throughout 2 
bedrooms, excelent b at leoo m . sep shower room, 
dressing room, kitchen, uttfty room, basement park- 
ing. £166,000. 

ISLE OF DOGS EM Reafisficely priced town house 
situated in an attractive square. 3 bedrooms, 
through lounge, fitted k itchen. Intepel wage, 
bathroom, cloakroom, utffity room. Gas Central 
H aatina. £92*950. 

EAST QUAY WAPPMG Excsflsnt first floor 
a p art m ent overlooking a picturesque Canal & 
Tobacco Dock. 2 good sized bwfrooms. targe 
ktunge, fbfly equipped & fitted kflehm. he t hr o om. 
basement perking. Central Heating. £108400. 
SURREY POCKS SEM A s ele ct i o n of newly buflt 1 
bedroom flats on popvtar devetopnent overtooWng 
Greenland Dock. Lounge, open plan kitchen, 
’modem bathroom, right storage heating. Prices 
from £55.000. 

LONDON YARD E14 Attractive Dutch style spHt level 
apartment overlooking the River Thames. 2 doiijle 
bedrooms, modern b a throom, en suits shower 
room, is* lounge, fitted kitchen. Gas Central 
Heating. Parking space, balcony. £119,000. 
WAPPMG El Sigtorb fourth floor ap artment with 
outstaying views of The River. 2 bedrooms, lounge 
with balcony, luxury fitted kitchen, fifed bathroom, 
basement parking, central heating. £149,000. 

ISLE OF DOGS EM Newly buflt quayside house 
offering spacious ac commodation throughout over- 
looking the water. 3 bedrooms, luxury bathroom, 
fatly ecgrfeped kitchen, excellent touroe. Gas Centra) 
Heating, mooring, patio gdn. £3481000. 

LATEST LIST OF DOCKLANDS PROPERTY 
AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


roT553T3TS!3^ 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 

j* 




• MORTGAGES • 10096 advanced up to 
B 120,000 • SVixmafn Income plus • lx secondary 
Income • H x Jo int Incomes taken • nonstatus 

• REMORTGAGES Foranymason, eg:. 

• Home improv em ents • Business Reasons 

• educational expenses* large leisure Purchase, 
(boat caravan, etcJ • Second House, (UJC or 
Overseas} • Mtatrimonal Settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• shops. Factories, Etc. 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 


CtELSEA AND KENSINGTON 
1ST THE ADVERTISED 
■gale, SW7. MgflBcnt entt mdoniwl 2 Mm 
jsr hweriMscctoeto Owy ri w i s Niimfl y wur 


PH1LBEACH 


^ SW5 

BBqtoreflfr eel andrnM ^ 3 IN w eabcmife 4 Z 

talks n « 2 naps, W tt. Dtnct mm to aapdflatc 

to fag Mil axmunl ck ha. wmma 

HOLLAND PARK, W11 
EMgidkd fed as gad lie. Ige neap, baton, btttho, UL.EWtOKL-. 


Robson 

Limited 

01-623 3495 




106 Henefcny Rend, WestadntaE, Uriel SW1P ZEF 

Telrph— «r §1-222 7028 

W ES T — S I tR, SW1 Hne period hone wife lovdy drwlng nn 
to dfegh W writ street nmr home at Conaons A Tn C teir y . 
Om^rS ^. ( 2 B«b, 3 Reaps. 2 Kin. Ctaria. Pned Peea CK 

PHBJCt, SW1 Owning Gartfen flto 1 Bkd. 2 Reaps. ML ft*. 

ca 82 yens. eiOSAOQ. 





E K»K.ttcteTlH Brim 4W*. 3 

H2 gate «cl 121 )in. asSjODp. 





OUSES AND HATS THROUG 




EATON HOUS E .. 
UPPER G80SVEN0R STREET 



J* *to JBk H aae tond- 
e^ -J7 K E719J50. 

S^Wattefed 


COTSWOLDS 

Small devdopment of 
hixuy homes in 
tranquil nverside 



Prices from ^4^00. 

Forbrodwe 
0453677431 (T) 


CAN YOU AFFORD TO 
MISS THIS BARGAIN? 

Thi* J bedroom. 2bnhnxni .botBc is located in dietaBt of 
Docsends pnjvkfing good sued ftmily accomodaijoa sad 
a i vale jueden with cenron. 
osutmjm 

For 


CONVEYANCING £250 

BY WEST END SOLICITORS .- ■ 
Meet to our stmdaid wan & condhiow on prices opto 


TASSELLK&CO 
8 Wlaqmle St Lomkta W1M 7AB 
01-323 3244 




Beg** reefr rafatobtd 2 Mm. 2 tefli tefa waa»B» 

men entrance, )ge UrirDpin, mt hfly Kd kk- Rndy to mow in. 5225JOOO. 

















( * y ^ 




|-ni_r. ■ T* i/ J -’*1 

































\'S& 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 



LONDON PROPERTIES 


Around a new harbour overlooking the River Thames 
superbly designed and spacious apartments 
are for sale on long leases. 

This exciting development by PSO and Globe 
includes studio workshops , office chambers, 
shops , restaurants and houses . 







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& 




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'T .**■ 




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SHOW APARTMENTS CrVv*b\bAY^ -if.tZ PH. 


‘SATURDAY AND SJND^Y 12 . OS A.H. - S. 2 C ?.H.. '£Lc c H.pNE': O'.-^STDBOO. 







SMsa 

MM II. 

straw) Shot jwi*; 

card ■ nvmnt Struct 3 

ck*t*> ME OHMk 3 «m 
non. tm* ucfinitHog 


3S2C 




BAKER STREET 

Ntfl 

MdMnminKMBMiaMt- 
ML 2 imu Bate* SMMrivtevm 
West End Opto rtsaS Boons. W. 
ream. MB. ac Cm owl aOWe to 
itsnnO M l nrammi SCH. 
□Orlov Lon. rruoa ten 


Tel 01 422 



oT&aw? 




rM frr 


:«« • 

a,; * •-•' 


Sr. 






M fV.il »\ || f 

ni-354 0066j I 

\ f ) • 


MAI DA VALE . 
SUTHERLAND AVE 


Exclusive Conversions 
A Selection Of; 
Luxury 1 Bed Flats 
From - 54.950 
To - 71.950 

Bay Direct From Dewtaper 
For Viewing Riraj 

Lotusxone Ltd* 


289 4254 Gliice 
S98 3815 Eveninas" 
Mortgages Ar-rangeo 


ST JOHNS WOOPSPadno 

aroctod floor n*L 

nurpow budi mansion bwtj*- 

wnn porterage. 

Icitthw. Mi chen. 

Cmlr* !£ &J£C' 

£146000 Tei- 01 722 8661 


wclkck ST«mjn ag? 

noor. wan lifk Jiw£ 

3 naih*. «JW *J|>- “'^SSX, 
ut/bri. 17 nt Be. conwieten't 
lumantd mroWgrt- j Q£ 
cmioatowv cits OOO Oi^an 
tUWS 


cxnvncK: Large 
0 1 *04 *477 \i90 lO> 
i urnMirw Suomi virunan one 

rs tSK 

fflirgSar- “ 75P0 
«S^!SSS^^ 

O'. S»> «<oJ 

KIS. m *t»S- 

X KSoiTST-^ 

UNCUUS NO. g 

Oil MS-COCK Ji Co no* 


StsWiSS 

£: & 7.0W? Hff*aro u ‘ 

2ts« o;oa;t»s55 

fTwn OQ Park YilTLiJ^iwuvr 

&SSS?£o*^f« 

HOHLtCO. ALCCHNrtVv ^ 

»« « Niora^t 

»*!!« raOMW <0 

asc touf.m f JrvS siJ®. I 
wuni-r “ ^Luwnsp' 

5W1. « Ce®«* £ "EKV*» 
rranormr "2 £7n ir T and 1 
hr-riv sSL <1W 

:rtrp. LfifoS.000 

Hun Inf ^^“!L n , hnB ir 

WBUN. .W acm- e 

n^nJ ire »« 

LXc 

STxj&cooo won**« wr w 

■ 11 52^0 I'vguiiilP 

jNTAMSTty gyy ^^a nun 

QX-. -at* _ jg g* ViSr ,t5 " 1 

«W IM?" lease 

!««!-!*= "23^0, &b rai5 

UJ^IOCC V.9<71 IrJ *Ti 


01-73 J 4448 


WEST KBIS1KTM 
33 Avunm Bd, »J4 

Excellent new conver- 
sion of a Victorian hse 
into five 1/2 bedim flats, 
ftd cpts, indep gas OH, 
fully fit kitchens. 

Prices from £68,000 

View Today 
& Next Week 
01-381 8733 


NHQUE 

NEW YORK STYLE 

apemneiri to Hammersmith. 3 
mm (Wc. haLShrt smcase. 
Open ptan Utitoi/«a«g j roam 
m fined imits. 2 tM bedrooms 
with en sum betmqms. Rootfiw 
qtassjaakbeam kwng room and 
gin tenaca 98 year lease. 
tlSBlHD 

Tel: 01-848 9778 


FULHAM- W Brow wv Home / 
jnvmtmcnL Me B BnMI Wf A 
«m. scope for ptmumo o mom 
rooms, smu n owe rewp. toe 
dtntng. fOtcfien and M»wr. bam- 
roorn. Ol SBS 9B04. £130000 


HOUSEBOAT - Repent, Canal. 9. 
Jonm Wood area. StMS nroi 
and super stnicfure. beautifully 

appoinim. Maim etecmaty. 
TeJepfwnfe Central IMBM , 
Sauna- £35 jOOO neoMUbie. 
Tel: 01 724 36M 


:rt-icEf3 



i. r rw Tr 



L1TT1X VSMCE WP OeHphBol 
3rt noor Ral In Stooco ftonlad 
building o»ie«1<K*«iB comio 
yST 2 beds. oalh. re«b. 
Ui/wrkttL Lae ISO 
KiBOOO 01-407 0714 inffieel. 

mtearcwe Twt. w. 2. very 
(Mooua treenoW (amity home. 

S uedrooms. 2 baUirotam* 
rfftnkToofn doiIm loom. rcce&- 

SS?7oc«u WWjgu 

Fun och C4IOOM tadutuno 
cumin and cwoet,. Tel Ol 
269 0446. 

HOLLAND PARK: For ^e by 

oumer 3 / 3 Bemoan n* a. Mr 
south laonv recap, floed ***- 
dlnino rm. a MUis B W - ‘ggg 
iiow oui-pouimi o?2?“5J5 
raSo-OQOLTcL * 232 

or 229-5044. Must selL 

LITTLE VDdCZ RandMpb a w 
i U noor NMi style Grade U list- 
m luamrv Hal- 1 Ocd . Tccg p 
i nit ‘**tf f«n «e"P u> ^¥ 1 ??S S 

ooeninv f>M*J>*1 C0 ™f 2 Sp*S 2« 
at>n 4 & fttiaic of IWJ** 
gSJoo! TO Ol 286 1*17 

BWUB^rStHttTNltM- 

lenl IMtSomCfe. 2 !»*■<»»• 
wdcn 122 vr lease. £90000 
Tel^Jl 350-9897 

havSWATER SirpERB PIES A 
iSewSTmod. 1 bed. 1 

recco foW * “L Se-^ 01 ’ 
£62.500 wo- Ol-eab 75**. 

iaKffl niHaC TERRACE. W2 

I ■ m>l« ktfl &f gnrfffMB, biuAWCU- 

^ h 2^ ^TtSd fat. Alt 
SSiMncci. Bath. BeauWiBRe^ 

^SKSiSSlSSf^; 

rui *a»e 

I SlOTfein 

•e^siwarrsi 

gL/wSc/ war bed- *« to*: 

"USi 4^5oon. OL dM 

SST®-™- 749 1 

wood - Brwn wo| 
sT ,^P- taaw.-istf 1 - 
SST/";; wc. batcony-; 
limned- supntty denwal- 1 

?SS?as-3ra ! 

A DeauHHH n«rt* 


Out „ 

tUh. £210000. 

BATTY STEVERS GOOD 
81-340 3424 


MORTGAGE 

HOTLINE 

MORTGAGES & 
REMORTGAGES 
See New Homes 
Berwick Fin Svs 

01-930 9631 


PROPERTIES 


Contact Moored 
Estates 589 4567 or 
584 7727 


HUUtaMAVIME HO W6 Semi del 
me for sale, a beds, baotroorn. 
larye recep. mod Midi. 
OJ.CH. Walled flita + Oi.P. 
£145.000 Rtdloy A Ck 385 
£623. 


SWSFOU1AM Moderated new- 
Me family lenr house. 2 recpL 
dawinn. Ut/nraL 4 tM beds, 
oardm. roof twr. South Pork, 
nod shops. transport. 
£175.000 :0» -731-27*1 EVM 


POD CAJUE Charm Inc maootaa 
Carden DM. 4 Dlie HR 
Moorpate Lounpe- RU/ diner. 
One dbte bed. £49.950. Tel 01 
460 SISl i« MIL 


HAMMERSMITH OHOVE Wfi. 
Brlohl 2 dbte bed Oai with «m- 
HV balcony OCH. £67.950. 97 
year twr. Tet Ol T4i «68 
(Sunt 0l-2«5 3155 CMon-FTi) 


WB End terrace umei cuHte-sac. 
very spaoous lownhouse. 3 
beds. Garden. Unjmt sale. 
£105.000 OOP Tel Ol 2SI 1999, 
oayfBakcyj.Oi 840 0*07 eves. 


MILL MLL VUME Superb 
janduunun style town borne 
In h* an of vinw 4 dal bed. 2 
bath, split tevet recent . 2 
ciknns. lux Ui.. rtW me. eaaOt/ 
mNnumed wins. £iB7^oo 
freehold 01-959 0511 


QUEEMS QUAY EC4 Chiace of 1 
bed Rats tn mod rtserst dc pty 
Mock vniti communal imace 
oiookmo Thames. Un»- potter, 
in d CM. and H.W. 90 yr he 
From £67.500. Frank Hams A 
Ott 387 0077 


SOUTH Etco Ptaee ■ Sunny 2 bed. 
flat rerun res some rood on 3rd 
Boor. P/B Mark With im Lae t>2 
j-ri. £155.000. 01 4090714(0); 


DSC MV TIME to imd yomr per 
feet properly. Gail Cathy 
(TBnen at Huntert Pnopeny 
Search: 834 4689. 


ACTON. W3. cticecr of 4 new 
flaw In attract Viet hw All with 
lor (to Period foaium + c* 
(Htmul uandanl of finish- 1 
bod with private run trap paUo 
E64.750. 1 bed eases flat 

£56.750. 2 beds £66.750 A 
prod fir 2 bft» * pnvoie 7Cr «h 
1019 9dn £70.950 Call. Adam 
Walker Ol 994 6477 lefftouer 
01968 een utnsr semu. 
CLOSE CITV Nt Deiioldful MThr 
Vie town house in iranonU 

ertac. also 2 none Mb of KJiw 

Crum Cleverly and tnoentousty 
restored wllh superb pailtflfd 
siRinp room. 2 Beds, sen dtmrifl. 

kit. bath. o« CH PreBy paao 
odn. £135.000 F/H. View to- 
day: 278 5602- Then so* 
Agents HoMen Matthews: 226 
1313. 

tJOJOrma. Carden IVU in 
wn 2 beds. Iuk kitchen * 
bath. LU9c Hvuro room apcfflno ; 

lowaUcd garden wnhiruH trees 

and borders. £71.950- Tel: 01 
229 6076 e,e« 4- wkd* or OJ , 
381 6739 Wert DaystTi I 


Sutmy matsonem. 3 bod- 
rooms. tarQB Bring room, 
(fining room, Utahan, bath- 
room, stripped floor- 


boards. good decorative 
order, goodjpnca for qUcfc 
sate, efaojow. 

Tet 01-221 3748 


W2t Mews freehold nr. MartHe 
Arch. 2 dbl bedi m s. I angle. 1 
receo. good coad. Great pom - 
(Hi. £185.000. Tet788-777S. 


FULMAM-W6. Totally ref«r.| 
btahed. 4 bedmom house. II 
bathroom . 1 en sun* auow*r* 
roam, double, reception, targe ■ 
mwd kttchcn/duier. Gas C3CE 
No Agents. £165.000. Ol 7311 
7780 

HAMLET ST, WL Luxurious 2 
bemoaned flat m prcsWUoos 
Mock wtm potential to expand 
and medical practise. £229.950 
long lease. Garaqe neglotabte- 

01 936 4191 or 9941. 

am Superb 3 Bed Maiden 
stock (lai m exeeoenl oondRIon 
with etegauit rooms * period 

featured. PUe Btcm.3Bec£2 

Bains. KB. U leose. £260000. 
Cootes 828 3661 
srn DeUgbmd i/2 Bed flat on 
1st floor or purpose bum Mock 
in uulet one way street. Excel- 
lent condHHm UiroowmuL 4tT 
Recep. Bed. ML Battj 93 »t toe^ 

I £1 50.000- Oodles 828 9651. 

NtSlMNSTE*. Elegant Hrtng 
i combined with modern ameni- 
ties Tot.iUy ntfurOMwd. 4 6.3 
baths. 2 toe recep. 4th n mav 
«m RaL ue 79 yrs. £315-00- 
Hunur Estates: 828 2148. 
BLOOMSOUICY WC1. 1st Bargain 
or the month i This good steed t 
bed Rot foe HUM* sale ue« to 
Queen Souarr. £68600 Td: 

I idea) Homes. 01-406 444d. 
MAIOA HAL F SUa d oui B bed Rat, 
overlooking and with use of 
communal gardens. Oo*e it**, 
noses, shout 123 year lease. 
£i i5.ooo. Thai 289 oibs 
MAPESB mnr ESTATE NW2. 
MaenUtcoU 3/4 bed garden apt 
in oa w th a iat order throudh- 
out £129.950 94 yrs lease. Tel 
SUM 1)00 Ol 46) 6644. 
MARINE ARCH Large lO room 
house for modenilsaDon. ...— 

2 both+2 wc + 2/a car garage * 
parking. Roof terrace. 41 yrt, 
£296000 TCt. 01 486 3630. 

NR PARSONS GREEN 8W6. 3 
storey. 5/6 bed. 2 bath + sop 
WC. ganexfed cxicnMon. fun Ai- 
led kit CM. cedar. SW garden. 
£2563000 01-736 13S9. 

KM Brondeifcury Vfnas. fia- 
nous 2 Bed flat. L«e Recep 
Room KM/Otoee. Bam. C»w io 
Transport £65000. TM: Ol- 
626 5367. 

W. MNSAfOTOH. .Huge new 2 
bed ronverslon. Own entrance. 
CM CH- Corner bath. Fid ktten- 
en. carpels. 99 yr lease. 
£69^00 ono. Ol SOB 0959. 
BAKER ST. Superb laroe- 4 bed.' 
J? bam flat. Prestige mock 
with roof ganten. 71 yn. 
£295.000. TM ; Ol 486 3630. 
BLOOMSBURY MCI 1 bedroom 
om in p/b mock. 999 year 
tense £62.950. Tel: Ol 387 
5436 leves/wkendSL 
EALING - Hose. 2 bedroomed. 
luxury flat- Fined kitchen, etc. 
87 yean lease. £79.995. Tef: 
01 998 3709 

FULHAM a bed larmty house 
Close io afl amsHUes. Lovely' 
manageable garden. £210000 
01-736 5887. 

IIAAMHJli Mil'll. Attracnw first , 
floor one bedroom flat, wrfiap- 
potnted. £53/300 Tel: 01-836 ! 
2442 weekdays (Ref -IPS). 
HUM VALE Mansion flat UK 
F and F 3 beds. Receo. K awl ' 
Bath. Long lease £97.000 cmo. 
Tel OL 286 0270. i 

MVDISMC maisonette. 5 beds. 1 
fuO cju. garden vines or 
Thantes fo Kew Carden* , 
£99.000. Teh 01-847 2239 m. 
ST JOHNS Weed 1 bod flat In u/b 
premotaua Mock Modernised, 
newly decorated. CH £73.500 
Tel: 01 452 8890. 

SUSSEX CARMENS W2 Smafl t 
bedroom Oaf. Newly 
modernised, new inuMn Real- 
ly nice. £58/300.0836 2361 18 
WL2, CtMrmmg detached vjciort- 
an house. FuMy RMderntoed. 4 
beds. X oaths. Uegr garden. 
035.000 Tel: Ol 743 4886. 
BY BKHOK PK- LarueS bedr 
ItaL £112.500 T. HOSKINS: 
730 9937. 

»X REHSUMTUN BUMS W2 

. large 1 bedr flat. CB63CXX T. 
HOSKINS: 730 9957. 

EAUHfe arUste period home, sw 
dio. pottery. Sf 5 bed*. SHI 
tounge. £166.950 01 367-4033 
FULHAM, a d. bedr ttse. study. 
Mbo/gatden. £245.000 T. 
H06KIN& 730 9937 
INSTANT SALE: RrturhW wd, 2 
bed frrriuM. King's cross. 
£99.500. TeLOl -27845446 
THE Wtotsr CHOICE orer 2000 
housm * Hats. Peterson Ruth 
01-741 7127 


HOLLAND PARK 

Newty converted and fintditd 
to an nmaadte stanited. A 
dstjndWB masonefle bavrig 
access to and use ol coftunnn 
Bardens. Magnificent doubto 
reception Afcwfl -room, spa- 
cious mhm/BnaUast room. 
3 bedrooms, 2 bdbrooms (1 
an state) and doakroom. Sis 
ch. Lorn leasehold. Price 
£245X100. 

JOHN WILCOX & 00 
01-602 23S2 


CHELSEA MU 
FVLBAM BORBEHS 

E»C B| tin mlr HBriow & sn»tt 
tnuttonn. 4 dauUt bHrootB. 
2 bnaroams. (1 en suie). Lsge 
sunny tpcepbon mom, dug) 
man & «l fitted modem 
bte&en. 2nd reception to wMed 
pBio gsdai (ram tens ennance 
loBmv- BW + 

Efflrtma dm to Ub*. 090.000 
to NcWe asm A agues. 
Td VeRMoa Estate* open 
7 days a week - 

01 n6 9822. 


cwpait aunerTCT 
SUE 

SWT 2 Bad. 2 Bdt. 1 ' Reap, 
ttofcrtiMd R8t E119D00 1/H. 
SW3 CtasaJc Chelsea Home ^ 3 
Bed. 2 Beths. \ Rtcep. E2SBXD0 

at KnUtstntfB lunw 3 Bed 

^merf£2BSJI00LlL 

3W7 BeautiM 4 Bed. 3 Recto. 3 
Bath rowtouK a £4*5jmJ/ft 
JttUABUM OK OR 
SBWUtTE LOTS 

Hffitt&TOH SMHRHB LTD 

01-584 2551 


MOSTHU la KeasMmmm 
New cnnveiri«msn*Otnped “J®" 




SOUTH KEN. 

Quiet cul de sac. Sdedion of 
new dekKB fids witti 6ft and 
all amenities. 1 , 2 , 3,4 rooms 
K, 1 and 2 B. 



1 1 T* r. ’ H 


SOUTH 

KENSINGTON, SW7 

Oumodemised House. 
DUe Recep. 2 Beds. 
Bath, Kit, Tenaoe. 
Garese. Freebold- 

Si5,ooa 

Chesterfield A Co 
01-581 5234. 


OWNER MUST SELL Onumtofl iS 
bod top floor flat hi maU Cawf- I 
sea -fir— Woeh. 86 yomr , 
tease. £168.000 ngg. 01*373 i 
2176 home. 09904 2924 Office. 


IT QUMTM AVENUE bmaaco I 
: late l bedroomed top floor flat 
with targe roof terrace. Ufi» 
outgoings, long learn, offers 
over £69800 01-968 8128. 


CHELSEA HARROUR/WORLOB 
END sunny x beuroomed rw 
with balcony. iW-VM. No 
Cham. Tet Ol 352 0568 


MLIUNE sa - 2 ram. Bright spa - 
clous l bed OM on 4tb floor of 

P/B Mock with MB. Lw 49 yrs. 1 
£116000.01 4090714 (Office) , 


FED UP BOTH UMHONC? We 
help buyers of property over 
£150.000- 01 370 3758 CD. 

CBELSCA Htea Road: Superb 
lux 3 bed. aSRuuU. Fitted ward- 
robe# ttwoughooL Lae oak and 
stained dm lilted kU/tUner. 
sen wc and mud tathrm wtm 
mirrored cetung A sunken 
Mta>. Jge IMBway with tented 
ceUngL Fun CM. New carom, 
drapes tnc + many extras. Low 
outgoing! 91 yr Bsae £165.000 
Tel: 3624071/756 4747 ^ 

toll Cbemww CrascroL ter- 
raced house on four floors, wttni 
south wot racing garden, and] 
off meet barking. Magntfleem, 
. artommodaHon. arctmcrl de- 
stgned. CantaetK quality of HMI 
and space. £460000 Freehold- 1 
Tei Ol 221 8404 


SI 


2 bun t en sum. ige recp/iMD 
na wriM Wnttur. 
CAL podn Specady desonod 
carpets md arena. 123 yr lense 


(WOVE COURT, Drayion CdnS 
SW10. A comfortable Onztty 
Oat on me sm noor of tbta we« 
run mansion block. The room) 
are brtghl and soactom and the 
accominociaftan M well UU Mt 
G beds, drawing rm. dining rm. 
kn/braakfsn rm. 2 wDek dto. 
uUllty rm un. porter. Cn CH. 
Lease 88 yra. £528000 Mal- 
verm Ol 681 2357 
O H S LO W BB I M . 8W7 Alt rate 
Ilcmatly attractive fu*y 
modernised ground and tow 
rjrojsssd raatsonene. in a high 
quality convendon m the neon 
of South Urn- 2 dele beds, 
drawing rm. kmhrn. 2 buto. 
independent gas Ot-JRaUMl 
caretaker. Lease 62 yrs. 
£197.500. HKmy recommend- 
ed. Malccrro 01 681 2337 
mmowiRiBiro w noor oat 
in popular garden square In 

SW7 At present 4 room,- hl 

bteh and W.C. on two levels, 
but tan be made into a tab mai- 
sonette of 2 beds. 2 baths, large 
reern wtm views over ga r dens. 
Gum cloakroom. 70 non 
lease. £ 1 20-000 IhJ da n Sect*, 
rttlek 370 5190. 

CRES6WCLL 6DN5 8W6 A 
rmohi and adraettw (M ante 
SM noor of Uds ronvertM peri- 
od house, dote » te acorttent 
shoMHog ft tranwon WgMg 
of South Ken 2 beds, dra wteg 
rm. tat/ breakfast mJ bom, 

CH. Lease 91 yrs. £138000. 
Malvero.Ol E81 2337 


RMS - Late of space in garden 
swore, maosien Hock flat. En- 
trance hau /study. 2 double 
beds, kitchen- dining room. Ige 
reception, bam. wc. elegant 
nafe decor it gch. Lse 117 yrs. 
£120j00a Tel: Ol 570 5298 


HOLLAND MBK unroac 2 bed 
widen fiat with large recep. 
baihnn. mower rm 6 ruled 
ksctei/bmfcfasi rm. 

£160.000 for quick sale. Ol 221 
3778 l w/ ends, avesl No Agents 



MEUEA GREEN. Charming 
HSM Med 3 terrrin 9DM MOCK, 
l bed. 1 recep. 86 year least 
C8SL5O0 Tel (HI 0892 890996 
or lOl 01 9S2 88980 


HOLLAND PARK 

RSWCB) FOR QUKK SA1£ 
Supotty daaniHf froaboM 
htwso nariy modonsed. Lge 
reesp/dring. Fofly find to- 3 

Ms, 2 Mb, prim. Lge mb. 

Ext value. E295D00. 

Mu MU. (tostu seal MS 
221 3090/ SS3 4530 


HAMPSTEAD & 
H1GHGATE 


HAMPSTEAD 

SgaciDus and unque mews 
house. Large artrance nan, 3 
oedroond. am bed/saidv 2baa»- 
moms lone ensuto). smng njtso. 
cmavg mom. kuoben. uutey mom, 
t|teauw m r»Mm. large south 
tang rod Mneca md caobtad 
carryara. 

Otoo teteM DIMM W* 

01-435 MM6 sm. 


HGRUTE ULL. Unique oppor- 
tunity lor me discerning 
executive to purchase a new 3 
bed town hie. Thoughtfully ar- 
■ ranged A eauUwcd w Ube im 
oorvCom Dei of mundane living. 
Set in quiet secure Ctose with 
private Rd. entrance gate Adoer 

to own uitearai gge etectromcai- 

1} operated. Spiral staircase to 
tiuge roof gdn with wide views 
| over London to 81 Potfls. 
£195.000. J B Hughes A Co. 
01-885-5406/6. 


WQMSATE N6. BtsuiUul luxury 
Gnrgum. 2 bed. first floor pur- 
pose both flat In quiet ctose. 
wtm balcony. Luxury bath- 
room wftn gold fittings, fully 
lined kitchen. Including hob 
and spin level oven. Minutes 
from village Gas CH . Ga ntM- 
Lovely gardens. FH. £79.500. 
T« 01 546 3615. 


HUBWATE VILLAGE. Newty 
renovated Viet seml-dCI 3 UO- I 
rey characaier hse witn views 
ctow to Mr. 2 Intercom reran*. , 
period f-plaee. cunservaiOTy. ] 
new Kix/dlner. 6 beams. ? , 
barorms. all store/work rm. 
waned 9-SreL.eS. 1 CIL gw to 
cent nearby. £279000 F/H. 
PrtckrB L EDIS 340 7000 

(VEST HAMPSTEAD. IMlgltlf ui 2 ' 

bedrm ran apt. «r gdn + 3 aero 
raimwa g»h» ■ Mira - 
yds from Flnctoey Rd tube. 120 
year lease ■ Exe rood. Gelt ele. 
Avan immediately. Qutcksale 
£93250. Tel Ol 461 6280. 

HAMPSTEAD HEATH Well upf 
vicL family house. 4 double 
I beds. 2 recep. 2 large kits. 2 
I bams. gdns. roof letr. Home 
tncls. self contained flat. 
£180-000 Trl 01 485 8912 

I HKSHCATS 2 bed fim. AS spa: 
clous as a house. Newly 
renovated CommunM gdns. Nr 
Tube £92.000. Ol 340 4228. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


FLAT 

REFURBISHMENT/ 

INCOME 

6 FWtx p|p at B3MD0-C4EOOO each 
mtolte >2 tos pawnN nooma 
CEfiOETOOpn. LowdemMpmn 
coax Saudi EasttiXidon. Oflors 
£100000+-. 

B3Z2 61*285(1) 


BLACKHEATH 

in ythgn, speni D rated 2 
ran nM Vkovor linte Incc. S 
batons. 3 mm «*e 
Scape la w mHM BRL £227®® 
raid/ Sole Apae: 

SfimpsoBS Eves 
76, Beacmt^U Rd. 
UadoaSE3 
01-458 7860 


WEST OF HILL, 
S.W.15. 



CLAPHAM 

OLD TOWN 

Desgfatu 3 storey Vtctoran 
twracad house rataraig US 
oiigmal temurei 
2 raeepbon'5. new fitted 
kaclwn. 5 tearoom's. 

2 modemaad hathroom's. 

SHparBWWCenddklBk- 

toom, Dsntra hobteig. 
Slunnmg sechidad garden. 
Close tube s City mo 
Wsst-EiYd- 

rrfi&JMDFREBKHJD 

TEL 01-622 7720. 


SO 

VICTORIAN FLAT 
SW 12 

ENGLE SHAM ROAD 
3 bed Vidonn la mm 30 « 
optlen £>r*Oeni lesumon mat 
uigtut teatue tro good deco- 
raun <E n icceotnn io«m -»n 
nnn i«e. ifi ft htdtoi nifli 
senalc MhOBt Uh> nwdsmised 
namoom. ok CH. Canien seen 
ted pTgtc Baum Tnmsoon 
cupium Souai iuk w Wsnds- 

Morre Conns' BB 

£B».500. 

Wennonc 01 675 0339 
Wreuad / Exnnf 


CUPPERS QUAY E14 wateriw 
di-vetophiml Luv 3 bod town 
house bmnac condition. Large 
kii/dlRCT. fully MJM 
Lounge/dincr. gjragr + -J* 3 **- 
mq spam water views. Sowh 
facing waited paii? gon + 
many, many Ofhcr ntalureL 3 
mute iro«n new rattway stn. 
£175.500 Ol SIS- 0888 home. 
01-980 9149 Cfliee 


SPtSfT QUAY Wappmq. 4 bed 
house overtoQUag canal, nr 
Town Bridge. </uick sate 
£119/300. Tel 01 3b5 0719 . 
533 3859 or P»jr W RoMmoi 
MB 6161 / NO. «» 


DOCKLANDS. RivenMto Cconpa- 
ny accumadanon? In 

conservalion area. 2 bed. 2 
recep. lilted Ulchen. gdn FH. 
ciasaoa Tei oi 516 mi i. 


DOCKLANDS - CRT - BOW. 

Selection of period & New 
Houses 4 Flats clow- caty and 
River £36 ■ £250.000. Phone 
McDowalte Rt-Mdeniial- Ol 790 
983? Or 0860 71 1064, 

EAST LONDON, nala/housei 
throughout the Easi London 
area item £35.000 Last Lon- 
don Rm. Tel, Ol 729 l BIS 

SEX. superb newly- built 3 bed 
iwnlue next to Tower Bodge. 

Gee Gdn £ld£LOOOe 4 Shaw 
1 Partners Ol 403 7T50 


WEB quarters acre Ctose 
BIKUirrth: 20 mtas cent Lon- 
don. It npt ca s tvc del ■country 
bouse' style rmtoence secluded 
to mature landscaped gdns. 
Many fine period luium. 6 dbJ 
bedrtns. 3 lge receps. conserva- 
tory. tarmnouu kllchen. 
magnlftcent oa* panettod 
snook er/gamrv room Trtjfc- 
. gantfng Property beoutllully 
matolatoed. F/hokL Offers In 
regtoo £300.000. 01-857-5109 


NORTH BARNES. Lonsdale Road. 
Supremely etegaiK raid- vision- 
an vtUa dose snons and 
Henunersmith Bridge. 2 large 
reception rooms. rort 
kuchcn/breaklast room, study/ 
sun room. 6 beds. 2 baitte. utili- 
ty room, sun terrace and 
garden. Dbte garage and OS.P 
Freehold £360.000 Kiiwn * 
King: 87 b 4948. 


WANP»TW»nW C OM M ON Ctose 
ID DM and mabume services. 3 
unusual I le bed luxury flats in 
bnaglnauvr new lateral convw- 
Moo- White custom bum 
, kj tchrns. gas cental nerang. 
luoy rarnried and Peauttrully 
flntshed. £68.600 each. For im- 
mediate viewing phone 01-SB4 
1920 or 01-622 1268. 


STREA1HAM: 4 bed drt house 
Frrohold. Situated In most sort 
alter road. Oortstste oC. dresang 
rm. nathrm. 2 receps. braakraoi 
rm. lge Ulchen (Italian raiet. 
laundry rm. GCH. garage, land- 
scaped gdn/pabo. For owk 
sale. £168.500. By appouumeni 
769-0749 afler 6-30Mn 


BATTERSEA VKJLACCr saw 1 

bed (tot. attractive surroundings 
in a uiet location, f/l Mch CT. en - 
try Here, car pa^no- oorwr. 
121 your lease CS9.780 ono. 
Tel. 01-350-2973 levesi. 


KITtCV EMBANKMENT TOP 

floor flat. Outstanding views 
overlooking Thame and park. 
Smalt balcony, double rerro- 
unn- 3 beds, kitchen >' breakfast, 
bain, wo WC. GCH Low 
outgotrar. Long lease. 
£186.00 O Tel 01-788 986S 


WEST PUTNEY. DHIgnUuL sub- 
stantial detalcned Old Manse in 
CtmsercaMon area. 6 beds, 3 
recEPs. Ml/ brusL utility rm. 3 
astro. Cloak, crllar. CCH Small 
W -facing gdn. Gge and otf st 
parking. F/H £299 .950 lor 
quick sale Ol 788 4079 


BATTERSEA Park • Victorian 
House with 4 double beds. 2 
baths, unary area, large kitch- 
en. tofl. cellar 6 gas central 
heating, cxceuent access 10 CUV 
and West End. £'.60.000 free- 
no Id. Tel- Ol 622 6278 


TOTALLY UNIQUE: Designer 'i 
18th. C listed terrace house to 
Krnmnnion i5 mini Wntmm- 
SMT>. Donwleiety modernised A 
hnmacuiate throughoui with 
luxury titled Mlchero. gas CH. 
dM glUnf. etc etc Main house. 
4 beds. 3 baths, kit during rm. 
siuing rm. Self contained t bed 
gdn flat 50 n landscaped rear 
garden, front garden. £215.000 
for immediate sate. Absolutely 
do offers or tone wasters please. 
Td 01-7356236 w/ends. eves 
or before 9-15 am 


WANDSWORTH CO MM O N ; Old 

rl road abutting End of let-rare-. 
1918. Hght and large roomed 4 
bed house. 2 reception, large 
kilrtien/ diner. 90fl garden. 
Com c-ondi lion. Many original 
reotum. Scope for extension 
£159500 Tet:01 874 2147 


GREENWICH lnunac. 3 bed town 
hse to Conserv Area, fun CCH. 
integral Gge. secluded S -facing 
Can. ctose BR 110 rains City I 
£88000. Tel -Ol 691 2163 

name or Ol 219 6387 office. 


SREEHWlCtl - Grade fl 4 Morey 
Victorian 3 bedrooms, huge 
baihrtn. 2 rereps, dtotng room 
ft idichrn Lovely 6ST garden. 
Oom to BJt.. Park and River. 
£185.000 Tet Ol 692 4829 


TOOTBIC BROADWAY 3 bed 

wound floor widen nai.ruUCh 
and dbte glazing, excellent deco- 
rative order, convenient an 
amenities and lube. £53,500. 
Tet: 01-707 4759. 


MAGNIFICENT 

6 bed lamiity house wiifen 
division bell overlooking 
park and tennis courts. Near 
2 tubes for West End and 
CSy. Genuinely umlerpriced 
tor guck sale at E17B.50D. 
Tel: 582 5507 (horna) 
491 2233 (office). 


WAREHOUSE 

CONVERSION 

oT splendid Victorian bnld- 
ijre with private coimyzrd. 
SEIS. 3 a 1000 fq ft approx 
unique uni is comptetcd us 
■shnT finuiL lac 125 yis. 
£69.950 cadi. 

Daniel South 
01-582 5558. 


HUGE Edwardian semi, off Tool- 
ing Bee Common, in 3 s/c n«s. 
CbnMdrraMr potential 

' £136.000 Tel: 10732161905 Or 
Mon-Fri 01-222 7658 <n 

321 Forest HUI sm only 2 mins 
walk away from this beautifully 
mod lop fir 2 bed aaM -woh free- 
hold oarage Long lse. £52000. 
Tel: Ideal Homes. 01-405 4444 

SW11 BATTERSEA IN floor spa- 
cious 3 bedroom fltoy 
modernised flat £86.000 for 
viewing Ol 223 

92T6 1 ansa ohonr< 

: DE NMARK MLL cun ctty/Kings. 
» brm service rial sunny bale 
CH CHW nn £49500. 7333896 
'no TUBE TO SEARCH? Contact 
Armchair HousehuttUng Ol 
223 0650 


DULWICH 


HVUK MUM WAY. ideally lo- 
cated on ties highly praised 
exchsive mad. too B a indue 
detached tanehr home. Mastet 
bedtoom sute (mth an 9SK 
bathroom and dressing room), 3 
further beds, family bWnoom, 3 
receps. M/wwk room. Garage 
and beauoM rear garden. 
Viemnq recomniended. Pnce 
£345.000 Freehold. 

AUEVN PABtL Sitostanted Ue- 
oched house ol mdmoual design 
aid great character ovalootoig 
DuU«h College The property a 
m good condom tmoughom and 
it* tcaimahtkm comt mes - 5 
betoooms. 2 bathrooms, double 
drawmg room, damg room, 
games room, tai/breax wan. 
urrfffy room, large single garage 
and 200 ft West facmg garden. 
Pnce VMwmo recommended. 
Price: £400 .OdO Freehold 

HARVEY & 


i ddldtl 


01 737 6211 



-WEST DULWICH A superb house 
clOBr vulaqc. Mod over POST 13 
rnlhs and broul Wt ifly decorated. 
Has some of toe llncsl leal* 6 
HUGE loti and cellar tor v ex- 
citing con versions. Lovely draw 
rm. din rm. ige fined icU/b'fast. 
elks. 3/6 beds. 2 baths. 2 sen 

. w c "s. gdn. 900 £166.000. 

VIEW TODAY. MORGAN GtL- 
uc Dulwich offlcei lam -2pm. 
01 761 0900. Stock well Otnro 
ttam-6Wn. Ol 7205361 Both 
office* Mon - Sat 9.30am - 6ptn 


DOCKLANDS 


THINKING OF 
MOVING IN 
DOCKLANDS? 

Think.. 


Collins a 


Residential 

A huge selection ot central^ 

properties av^abte )nB . j. ued 

from £37.000 - £350.000 batorm. kit 

Throughout Docklands gg ™. 1 

Open 7 (fays a week wimbcldon 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


STRAWBERRY ffiLL 
TW1CKEHHAM. 

Enomt 4 doable POT Met mte 
smew on 3 Itons MMeenSOd 
m * htft aande d throughout 
yei oiMironnig nuny ongnai 
features. 2 mamte beins.il en 
svmI. racepL daw. M. Se- 
etuoed pnrnte gtrts QtoU 
consvrasbon area dose ® row 
and si amembosIWeteffoo 20 
i«t) Cl 47500 tar fpnek sale 
offered wkh vaant possowm 

Cortaci Hckarf Nefeo 
(hone) 01 SS8 1386 n 
01 mD 7166 (Blfica). 


TWICKENHAM 

GREEN 

Unique new 4/5 bedroom cha- 
let bungstei tuh to efflw- 
tonalty high specMalion in 
seduded location. 

Price: £250.069 Freehold. 
Fufl rietetfe Hyatt ft Day: 
01 570 0017. 


STJHAINMRE1S TSvlckcnham. 
Edwardian 2 bed lerraced 
home Upstairs bathroom Al- 
tractive- S4iuil garden, large 
rooms Well arrangwl 

acromodaiion.GCH 5 mi os nv 
«• £84.950 lor dulCK sate. Trl 
01-677 6644 day 01 B92 eves 


HAMPTON COUNT- Sprrtaruiar 
vtews over Bushs Park ft 
Hampton Court MJtor part of 
1 8th century hse J bros. 
30x20 living rm di rung nn. on. 
batorm. tc sh«*T rm Gqe. 
Mans- onqinJl fcanirm 
£175.000 Tel 943 2400 


WIMBLEDON 


WIMBLEDON MLL Modern Free 
nold Georgian town house in 
rtroanl ruf-de sac 3 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms, cloakroom, dou 
ble garage, utility f emw 
rooms Walk BR Tube and 
Common £195.003 Call Ol 
946 2162 



rut to sardeo souarr tn South 
Kensington SW7. Ortgtnil hiMi 
ceuiiias. mnwuvw. nrraBK*. 
use of private gOtta. Large re- 
ception. double bafreom. 
UicTien. Udhroam and W.C. 
Long lease. £120000. HeMan 
Securities: 370 3190, 

IMMOOERNOED lower ground 
floor brtgm paiia flai In ganten 
mure te South Kcnauvmt 
SWT. At wreactu a roama. Muto- 
en. bainroom end w.C- but can 
be nwdera*2 bedroom and S 
bathrooms. kmsc. 

£110000 HeMan Seewues: 
370 3190. 

rontrt swiB. FrttMd col- 
lage on three stew in qwet 
cul-de-sac. in need or 
mooerttBauotL 3/* bedroom*. 
lounge, kurocn and bathroom. 
£165.000 Jaeteon QropHty 
Services: 01 351 5633 Oiirn ev- 
ery day UI 7pm. 

SWT GRENVIUE PLACE bngKL 
HKteioaL outer 1 bed basement 
flat, ige recep room, Sited kitch- 
en. lull. t*d- tutnnwm. 

Eyeefleni ireaDon for Gtemv 
ter rd rube. SabataavL 

£86.000 ono. f« duKH private 
rate. TeL- 01 373 2241 

CHCUEA SW10. soarfoua 3 bed 
flat to swell kept manaon block. 
2 rarepnon rooms. rt»d «w»- 
en. Uri. double grains. pa sCH. 
£150X00 IreehoW Jackson 
Property Semc^v oi 351 SoSS 
floni wny day ID Tp«u 


MURHgfOII Magnificent Mod- 
ern townhouse to aider lanuaa 
wtlh excellent amenmea toe Ga- 
rage. Garden. 4 Beds 4 en-oult* 
Baths 2 Receps. 2 Cthrms. Kit. 
£350.000. Codies 828 3651. 


MARKHAM ST SW3 4 bed 
house2 bath. 2 reotnl. balcony 
small garden. C296JJ00 Free 
hold Ol 581 3516 nr 0243 
773353 


«UFL 7 bed A bam house 
wun garden. 2 roof temree. 
Freehold £32&000. Looden 
Property F. 058 2222 


f ffl « ra gwto. 2 Mrecmt) 
garden IUL btunamlate. 122 

k ytur leaar. quick sale £MjOOO 


' Tef .01 352 8911 


FREEHOLD » bedr Me. Large 
<frg«to>o rm. terr * Garage. 

, OsaOOO T. HOSKINS; 730 
9937. 

WL Large 3 bed 2 bath balcony 
Dal to need of reUneoratom. 
I £139.990. London Property F 
938 2222- 


PATIO Am off TedworBi £q. Gas 
QH. Low cnargn. Cl 20000. 
T HOSKINS-’ 730 9937 


rH8EE MML FLAT Cheyne a 

Two receptuns. £325000 T 
M£«NS. 730 9937 


V-- Chartered Surueyort ^ 

HONEYWOL ROM, SW11 
viMa ihan wage end oMernre 
Vioonan house a na garag e mol 
wav between dajmm and 
Waidswrih Conununs. Fidty 
rerewamJ win new root awl gas 
antra heating ttenrgtwui toe ac- 

CQfnmodaMn compmas- Hafi. 

Double Rtcschoo ttym, lotthan/ 
dmngnwm. ubKyrwm. ertar. 3 
beuroonB. batvootn. raito tac- 
nq garden. £135,000- 

M2*. 

TREfiAHVON ROAD, 58/11 
Bud (H wrace Victorian tmse m 
pDputar road running torecuy oil 
C^BMConmwiNcnhsile Ar- 
ranged on bw and a taB storeys, 
luly nfNMBd and retaningono- 
rfia) Dander 3 bedrooms. 2 
batinoons. double leawbon 
room, krtchenmnaldast room. 
celly. an aM gatdeo. AU only re 
aumg personal laucW £122300. 

' FREEHOLD 

L-228 7474 

(40NOR7HCOTE ROADSWi i 


CLAPHAM South Fully 
I modrmbed 2 bedroom flat. 

Bathroom. Fully flfled Wfdierr, 
I kirar common. Clow io all ame- 
niucs. £65.000. ojjg Tel 01 
673 4061. 


CUtPfUM. Arrtuwcf itunntTK 
garden nalJ»«enL 1 tied. 2nd 
Recent/tted. Ur fined ML bath. 

dtnlnq/conservaiory leadiiw to 

garden £69.500 lease 99m 
tefOl 274 20C>5 


FULHAM: vmortan end of ter- 
race toe. Side entrance 6 beds 
tZ dM. 3 batorm J- u- e. 

shower rm * w c. lounge, lge 
Ut & rotor 35- gittv Freehold. 
£l 83,000. 381-0639 anilnur 


SDUTMPIC2JK. SWIB Comfort 
able t bed flat In large Vlclonan 
House. Conservanon Area 
Modern eonvemton. GCH. LOU. 
outgoinck- £65.950, Tel 01 829 
6650 (day). 01 871 3'.4i leiesi 


£69,006 Super vmonan end of 
terrace in Tooting. 3 beds, z 
recep*. an original feature wc 
1 1 replaces. dM glazmg CCH 
carpets, nuuiwaoie getn Rmg 
6736176 afler Tom m day 


BLACKHEATH 1 brtf f» tr wc 

hse Strong rtn K and B corn 
mun.il gdm, qas CH £.46995 
Tel. Oi 858 3715 (a/pUgne* 


01-538 1821 
28 Skylines. 
Lime Harbour 
London El 4 9TS. 


DOCKLANDS 

PROPf gTy CENTfit 

FLATS & HOUSES 

THROUGHOUT THE 

DOCKLANDS 

TEL: 790 9560 


CENTRAL Wimbledon Charm 
tog. 3 bed semi. gdn. CCH. 
batorm. Ulchen / oiiict. lge 
recep rm £120.000 freehold 
Ouick sale. TeLS42 7962 


flMBCLDON <Saulhi A »mi del 
4 bed family house only 
£98.750 F/H. TeF.Ol 675 1896 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


ISLE OF DOGS 

Luxury house, spectaoiar 
views, newty decorated. 
FuBy furnished. 2 gardens. 
Easy part on g. 6 nuns oty. 2 
recaptions. 1 games room. 5 
bedrooms. 3 baths. (Can be 
used as 2 units). Company 
let. £480 pw. Tel 01 515 
9912 end 01 BO 3 7289. 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


BERKSHIRE 


WALNUT TREE 
COTTAGE 
STREATLEY 

M'-c* WBnr.jPairfflraii wpof 
ism Ainx»t 'Ttti C wujqi caiaie S 
eee ?>««> ac aunihnefl 
E [Waarr ttiBWJo®' is be WWte 
m:,’ sv Vmr inic tiler 
wu isemet w ’"us -m Otr a 
6 Sip? tidMtrt O^ioft f 4 Up 
Si ■•area i(WuK:i2‘ 


nfFBU Non cvtale S bed def j 
hOUM- 3 rvena 2 batlrv W 
raqe quirk late £.125 WO I 
n n d TW i034Ji 42^01 j 


BUCKS 


BEACONS FIELD Private Sate 
Ctturtnifiqu Bed 2 Bath. Rrrep 
linn Dlnino Rm '■ acre wperp 
Cdn rC05CC*:« Tef 04946 
’1:96 Sun ft Mon OT Tue-Fn 
alter 7pm 


NEAR BERRARBS CROSS Oak 

be anted character noire- 5 
t.ft- 1 acre C 2 esOOOOa «46 

SW 


*Mff WDfOOVEK -In xiMiic 
Buck.'- bnrt. ami riinf reit.iDK- in 
ever 1, . acre ideal wre-kejyi 
con jw scotH- lor ewciraon 
Pejre duide >1125 COO Chnate 
Vher Panel 8 Htab Strrei 
vvendover KP22 OEA 

M Uc"dfli er iQ2Qw 6 ’i«J > 





























THE TIMES WEDI 

PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


THE FAST MOVING 


>AY NOVEMBER- 5-- 1986- 



FIFE 17 ACRES 

& Aiulr«ai55mi/es. EJmfnngh Airport 42milts. 

Attractive mid nineteenth century 
country house with beautiful gardens 
and grounds and outstanding views over 
its own parkland. 

Mansion house: Hall. 4 reception rooms, 
kitchen, cloakroom, utility room, 5 principal 
bedrooms, dressing room. 2 bathrooms, 
secondary bedroom and bathroom. 

Wing with potential for conversion ro a flat: 
Sitting room, kitchenette. 2 bedrooms, 
bathroom. 

Oil central heating. 

Garaging, outbuildings. 

Garden . paddock, 12 acre park. 

About 17 acres in all. 


4b Charlotte Square. Edinbuigh EH2 4HQ 

031 2266961 


At Midland we want you to 
buy the home you want. 

When you want That’s why 
well lend up to 90% of the 
valuation price, and up to three 
times your income (or twice 
joint applicants’ combined 
income). You don't even have 
to be a Midland customer 
Wfe also move fast (an answer 
in principle within a couple of 
days). We have just one interest 
rate (currently 125%, 

APR 13. 1% )*, no matter what 
the size of your mortgage or 
whether you choose endow- 
ment or repayment And we’ll 
give you a certificate to prove 

® MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

frm the Lsta*«W&^ 

i; Midland Bonk pic 1986. 


we’re prepared to lend, hall 
adds up to a better mortgage. 

Any Questions? 

Get us on oar new mortgage 
‘Hotline’ - on 0742 761231. 
Well be talking as well as 
listening. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield SI 1AZ. 

•Interest rates are variable but are 
correct at time of going to press. 


V'^t-7 


mt: 



H £ 


A medferal-style classic rf modem tiroes. Sir Edward -Lutyens’s Little ^ 

Verv best ss y-rg& ss 

ss^attssnss i. t ■ 2^ 

syar ^sw ag of Lutyens . 2 

are winch it is catalogued as onerfhis great humorous and loving tocch^ i 
occasionally ascribed wrongly by estate houses. . . • r r ihe door fittings, wmrti hOmmm. w Home 

agntc This classical house, s«m ah^ five sopteasanL . . ; . 

Little Thakeham, near Pulborongh, ^ a 

West Sussex, now a bold, is being sold 1 fading ttude JekyH,wbo 

on behalf of Mr, and Mrs Tim Ractliff drawing &S*** 1 *, w 

and it is the real thing. Considered not The drawing room is35 ttetvy l* m, Blackburn, a keeagantonr 
onlv hv critics as one of his best works, south-feeing. . _ ... — ■ whom the bouse ! W uuL Taast a a 


qnM described as by Lutyens are winch it is catalogued as one of his great 
occasio nally ascribed wrongly by estate 

Little Thakeham, near Pulborongh, fens* has a recegion 
West Sussex, now a hotel, is being sold leading 
on behalf of Mr. and Mrs Tim RactlifT rwnL overio^e^ 

and it is the real thing. Considered not The drawing room is 35 feet by texx, 

l.. Uort ofnrtrc tnuth-fecinff. 


bedrooms, two bnUnucms. iha^ag 
room dari ng room . 
room and extensrveceSeragp. ' _ 

Lutyens was ooeaklered to be at me 
height of powexs at the turn of the 
sentmy, and apa rt from : t he gran deur of 
the house, it oop tmns wasp of las 


the door fittings, make die bouse 


only by critics as one of his best works, south-feeing. „ ntnjMic 

Lutyens himself thought it “the best of A huge ond mnlfions 

toebanrfT extends the fuflfeagfat of ffieroora. The 

It was built in 1902 for Ernest property was converted prraem 

Blackburn, and is an evocation of the ownere^S^^toacouimyfa^ 
Elizabethan manor house, probably in hotel with the 

part the result of the influence mi andreta^tte^og^rfapm^e 
Lutyens of his visit to Maptedurham country house. Before that d was divided 
four years earlier. Planned in an H shape, into apartments, but would oavoon- 

. . __ *_ • , * mrf hick In tfcnmum) use as a UfiUlV 


Humberts 

Residential 


SUSSEX 

UcftMd 3 oriel TaMga Writs 10 Dries. HjywrtJ tan 12 arias 
ft Mpfikni cmW pmIm ol ■ aopafc mitotan k m Mriadtag pat- 
bori jriflap itt rims to to Soft tan. 

Unvote ML tabby, raasbon ML tu taoo m . dang mum. doing mom. 
riudy. Udm 3 praevri betawns. 3 se am M y bedrooms. 3 baOroams. 
OJ central beafcOQ. Ganging and otftaridngs. PnMe gatfeo and morint 
aamtog to about ft acres. 

Cammual me ol onwris and mrUand eneafiog to about 20 acres. 
<H > k 1 mtaft 1 BUM Flirt ill 
MaBc Lcms Office. Tat (9273) 47020 ad 
London Oflkn. Tat 8*829 8700 


NEAR BATH 

Batti 4 k dries Chuntan 8 Dries IM IJ. 17 ) 12 mass Bnstot IS Dries 
8 matt tapmriw bona nth toady rim marSa 8 a Vdtoy. 

3 —‘■t*— ran ns 4 bcifrmns. tmhcuo. 2 clod room, latehm/Breatfasi 
nm 01 com tmdng. Gnge and orilwfttogi Gnta. 
rnsjno FmaMd irife aboat 1 acre. 

Dato&E HMH—tam Office. Tat (8249) G55SB1 nd 

Laadaa OSes. Tat 8*829 8700 ( 10 / 3575 /M 3 L) 


SURREY 

OovdoDE Dries BR «*injjOT/V<lOfU /London Sndoe #J mcntti d25 5 


COUNTRY 

HOUSES 

ASSOCIATION 

LIMITED 



(C95) 41 KINGSWAY 
LONDON WC2B 6UB 
TELEPHONE 
01-836 1624 


CAREFREE 

RETIREMENT 

Private apartments tor long-term 
occupation are available in our 
historic houses each of which is set 
within extensive private grounds. 

The properties are easfy accessible 
and are situated in Kent, Surrey. 
Sussex. Essex, Oxfordshire, 
Berkshire, Wiltshire ami Devon. 

AH have been tastefully converted to 
provide luxury living whilst retaining 
their original character and 
atmosphere. 

All services including meals, 
cleaning and heating are provided 
by Resident Administrators. 

Write or telephone for our illustrated 
brochure. 


lour ycaib caiua. r m i ii d m iu am »» ~ — r— ; ■ ... . 

the house is built in local sandstone, vert back to its oztgmal useasa fiumty 

which has weathered to create an house. . . . . . . M 

imuression of greater age. The accommodanon mdudes eight 

been variously described as bedrooms with cu-suite 
French mannerist, baroque and Man- further b edroom s and a shower room, 
tuan, according to the notes accompany- drawing room; dmmg • rocan, stung 
ing the Lutyens* exhibition at the room and kitchen. The east wing is now 
Hayward Gallery in London m 1981, in an executive staff wing, with three 


and the mam gaoieps toAenAiae 
floodfit. These cagMieoaisommand 
croquet bwa .aad a' h ea te d a w topng 
:pooL . • 

The house 5es leas than a mflesocah of 
the viQagr rf Thafajhaan, sod has fine 
views to fee South Downs over the 
surrounding drohatd s aad to- dpe North 
Downs over the WeakL it has; sab- 

of over £U isffioa fhro^ Kiright 
Frank ami Rade/s London And 
Guildford officer dSV 


H College Heights is a Victorian 
buikfmq on the fringes of tho City whicn 
shows that there are places other than 
Docklands to live tor people who work m 
or near the Square MBe. Set in St 
John's Street, Islington, dose to the 
Angel, between Sadlers Wells and the 
Barbican, it has been converted to 24 one 
and two bedroom flats costing from 

£62^00 to £128,000. 


Rtccpbsn ML toga song room, tinog mam. Uctan/traUan room, 
study. Mbnb room, dmtanom. Mzstor bedroom wilt en site taftraom 4 
tattiRf bednams. bafttoom. Ml gas trod ami bang, 
atom «bu« | pool ad bob aHipkn. 

Oatai gnge. 

Far Sals FnaUd rib aboal lb sen. 

BaMc Itadn OHn. Tat 81-829 £798. (01/29807/MFflR) 


OCGrosvenor Street London W1X9FE 
Z O Telephone 01-629 6700 Telex 27444 


STRUTT &^5i 
PARKERS 


KENT - GREAT CHART 

Ashford 1 mi Bl Ternorden 8 mdes. Cgntafany 18 mies 
(Oaring Cross 80 rnmutes). 

A superb 15th coatury timber framed bouse with lovely 
seconded gardens. 


CHELTENHAM. ExcfuUvr Oml. 
ounrni or turl 15 Kwr and live 
brtroomtd iMactiH execom* 
homes. Sarmti location clow M 
town ecu Uf «« with nw ac 
im la MS tad main Hik 
station. TratUttotulty moil id 
ronnrallna a wealth of luxury 
(calures. From £110.000. Far 
lull Brochure contact Robert 
Humm. The Manor. 
BotUHnolaa. OMtenhom. Gh». 
TH. 102439 68694. 


to complement the original Victorian 
architectural features, but also have . 
electronic-security gates and video 
survelBance. A multipoint sataitite TV 
dish provides 10 channels, including one 
from the US. Service charges are 
about £500 for a one-bedroom and £700 
for a two-bedroom flat 
■ The Clock Tower at Lees Court, 
near Faverstiam, Kent,was buflt m the 
18th centwy to designs by Sir John 
Some , architect of the Bank of 
England. Grade il, thii Ctock Tower 
ana Gate House have been converted to 
provide a recaption worn and a 
bedroom, with the use of 15 acres of 
formal gardens and grounds, amt 
swarnimg pool and tennis court Strutt 


. BRIEFING. 


and Parker's Canterbury officers 
asking £S2^00 l 

■ Turks Croft at lfield, Crawley, West 
Sussex, dates back to 1425. and was 
ones a five-bay, opei»-ha8 residence, 
still retaining tis caown-post and queen- . 
post construction. Later extended, the 
old timbered bouse looks much as A ad. 
although towersections of infStare 

now In brick instead of wattte and daub. 
The house, renovated eight years ago, 
indudes three reception rooms, a master 
bedroom sute and this forther 
bedrooms, it stands in an acre of 
grounds, and has a heated swimming . . 
poot and two garages. 

St John Vaughan's Crawley offc8 Is 
asking £275 JKX). 

■ Mabns Cottage, Easton, near 
Winchester m the ItdienVaBmr ten 
three-bedroom collage on foe edge 
of the village, set in two acres, and te 
considered erf great pnotenSUtdr 
extension and mprovmmm^ Sfctajectta 
planning consenL There tel 4 Seres 


offered for 
Partners’ 

or in two lots, £155,000 being 
terthe wboteu . 

■ A bam, oastboiiseandbing^ow 


three sides df a private fpaen close to 


- be auctiouatfat UckJfeWon November 
13by King and Chasemore. . . 

4Eadi property ittsabottiaff an acre 
and they offer a line ebanoa for . . 
restoration. The barn, an 188*century, 
SstBd, ftnber-frtene boBdng. has ptera il ng 
consent for conversion to a foim- .. 
bedroom house, it has a heated 
swimming pool and trontage to the 
green. Fa*wttiBbamtelfie oast house, 
feting from 1755, stone-bait The 

bungalow was butt 50 years ago of brick 

and tile, and has two bedrooms anda 
reception room. 

The agent’s Pufocrawb office gives 
gufoeprices of £145,000 to £175,000 for 
the bam, aOQ.OO(M20Wforthe . 
oast house and ^tWXKMlO^XXJ kr the . .* 
bungalow. 



















































tfcjk-te.IjS&i 


T-" ’ ■■ ' *4 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


7*7Km , ';F»| 




/ 7 ITv 




•* 

/ ' 
X-. *: 






V 1K> 



x ^ ’ . 


Sixty-three acres of woodland and 
gardens- and only seven acres for 
development... that's the Marina 
del Este. 

A little over an hour's drive east of 
Malaga, the Marina, with 326 berths, is 
positioned with exquisite care around a 
sheltered bay- with enticingly luxurious 
apartments in a garden setting. 

For more information, please contact our 
London sales office at 150 Regent Street, 
W1R 5 FA. Tel: 01-439 6288 or the Marimi 
on 010 34 58 640 400 (7 days a week). 

HaaI^a M *Ul fc'Ut. 

V"^ - - 

Alwnaccai. Pr u t te ar W G rew dfcSp e ia 


EXHIBITION FEATURING 

CIUDAD QUESADA, 

a complete village 
community on the glorious 

COSTA BLANCA 

Put together what has been termed 
“The world's Healthiest Climate" 
(World Health Organisation), the 
Costa Blanca’s growing reputation 
as the number one choice for the 
discerning buyer and sales direct 
from one of the ansa’s foremost 
construction companies - Promociones 
Quesada S.A. - and what do you 
get? Some of the best value 
overseas property around! 

For example: 

(i) “Bungalow style” 

(with garden) £12,590 

(if) Villa, 60 m 2 £19,550 

(iiQ Villa, 88 m 2 with 

garage.. £27,605 

Come and see what this superb 
development has to offer and take 
the opportunity of talking directly to 
the developers at- 

THE SPANISH CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE 
5 CAVENDISH SQUARE 
LONDON W.l. 

on Friday November 7th, 
Saturday 8th & Sunday 9th 

For further information, contact 

RAFAEL LATORRE or 
LEE HULBERT on: 

(01) 741-4869 / (01) 681-5459 

CONTINENTAL CAMP ft LEISURE 

mvttB you to the Caravan & Campir^j Exhibition. 

Easts Court, London. Stand No 373 

From Saturday am November - W NowmOar 

I0am.-6pra. everyday (StMtey-lfth Nov to OpJn.) 

Luxury mobile homos auattbfe. 

5 *ites-fftce-Royao-Vias-Hye«*s or Span. 

New hem ES£00 + T.VJA + second ha nd from 
£2,500 

Letting Service- Maragemeitf on ste 
Buy 1 & have 1 free torn tax rebate etc. 

Coma &ta* tousor writs to 

COSTA DEL SOL 

Apartmenis/Vilios/Business 

From £6,000 to £500,000 

Mortagrs available. Also Spanish Bank loans, 

18 Stars experience Owa Od Sol 

BURNSIDE 

OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 
(0524)781809 

MON/SAT 10 a.m. TO 7 pjtu 


Qualitv Spanish villas, coastal farmhouses and 
apartments at very reasonable prices 




«!./ 


LSFT1J B i i r Welcomes you to thecal 
™ KtRre5 Costa del Azahar. ^ 

We are an established Spanish registered estate agency with offices 
both in theU.K. and Spain. We specialise in what we consider to be the 
most idyllic area of Spain which is served both by Alicante and Valen- 
cia Airports. Our after-sales service office is open 7 days a 
week and offers a very comprehensive range of services. 

We ats have our own legal department. A few examples of 
our current portfolio are: New 3 bedroom 2 bathroom 
beach apartment - £23,000. Superb beach penthouse. 114 ^ . 

aqjnetree, fully furnished - £28,000. Beach re-sale apart- 
meat, 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom - 
£14,000. Beach villas - £35,000. 

Mountain villas - from £26,000 to 

For colour brochure write of *r 
telephone: Asetear Properties; "* 

Courtney House, Station Approach, ^ -r - 

KhqtstOB-Bpoa-Thames, Surrey 

01-546 *706 




H * " 

Costa Blanca ★ Costa Calida 

Personal callers welcome. Brochures on request 

biddy baye 

crow* suite. ■ 40 ^ 

Costa Blanca 

W.DESTCHO.CEALONO THE COAST 

Antares Overseas Proper^. 

ns re r™» 

in November- 


SUNDAY 9th NOV. 1 1 am - 5pm 


-n.KRiixn£i(tn>:is ix»noon road, eastgrinsteal 


0562 885 18 1 BtfUClWX 


[EXHIBITION 

SUNDAY 9 NOVEMBER 1986 12-8 pm 

THE NORMANDIE. MANOR ROAD. 
EAST CUFF. BOURNEMOUTH. D ORSET 
& THE POST HOUSE HOTEL HIGHROAD. 
BELL COMMON. EPPfNG, ESSEX 
Tavneistar 01-549 4251 

Damme Hour. HI-171 U»ndig|»)cd.Kmgg<wUAW»-Tho-P-Su»ry *n?6BA 


BAHAMAS OCEAN FRONT 

One acre with 140feet on Hartootr bland’s famous 3-mrie 
coral sand beach. Architect designed spacious mam resi- 
dence and guest cottage. Three bedrooms and 2» 
bathrooms, wean view from an rooms. Superb location 
for year round water sports. 

8S£425 I 8OT set. 

Serif t* 

tt. Baseaberg, 99 VUttredn lead. 
Smalt, 14 97901, nJX 


MALLORCA 

The most desirable seaside 
property in liietas, Crown Ma- 
rine enioys a sheltered 
southern aspect ioc^ad be- 
tween the two ma/or tradfionaf 
hauls ui This lovely resort 
M mutes from PaJraa asetl. 
Crown Marine is am dose to 
goB comes, terms coats and 
bQd«s. At Crown Marne you 
bwe a ctvwe at two and dree 
bedrooms, lams Mrq rooms 
with u ntapeBable wews. two 
bathrooms, iftted bteben and; 
private parking. In adtotnn- 
ttwro am two pools, set in 
magnificent landscape^ 


Crown Marine ttB ideal mss- 
meffl in resort &vtng. 


CANARY BLANDS 


**I CAN PERSONALIA 
RECOMMEND EL 
BOTANKO" 

TB'Rny Varanl, dataaoior j 
Oconto wtooavml a bcantod 
datkoaxm of apart m ents in i 


CYPRUS 


emut Property. cheated 7 
Conrad ot now, C.P.P. Areoe. 
45 Ptrtar Horn. London WtO 

son. 


M^ne 


1 sat oetsamSy axxmntol 
BBcne to b CTB el bwenateB 
iwaammhaDie." 

Twal fee brodB« - Vs ELM. 
8ov*ecu 051-2369306 


Ln CKJUnCS. Trarrtfc. lvkv- 
ly Z Deflrm ao» t««l ■* for 
aalr. Funv Atm. MamUOttut 
View over 5» Exc 

oi^SS 

0045 rfffcx Ol 609 TOSS. 


PRANCE 


WY-BkVALMS 

BaautMlynstand. iter 0. tor- 
. mer forge stoated 1 hr (rani 
flBie b b»*y* 6* «ar Set* 
& CtwnOy. I beds. 2 hate. 2 
1 (Kspun&G/HAasirJrtmaBfc 

hL. Lwdy ados. OTOsa. jn. 
reftadbAUm 995J00 F 
T* HeroeEsdj- 
: onxnanHMtfSM 
sttntAftetHKoi. 


CWWRV ISUIHBS cneuai DUd- 
re ggfra tend antf cwtrnqton 
DR the bnutHM tea He La Pal- 
ms. team — Ma n : AjwuM«l 
r—canr Teoew-tedUi. 


LB RJLVOt, souoi of Pram- 
N*w 5 OMtooct vtOa iwartno 
nanreuan in aurere untaur re 
men onrMefctee towiy 

ma»Bt woeded Uy SO vm m 

Mu dy b—rh- FT 16 mUUon- 
tm 10632} eoeae fKenU 


Alex Nea & Co 
118 Ktesutem Church SL 
LoteodWAHl- Tei (B1) 221 
aoop j. 


GENERAL 


ANDORRA. 

Buy daset from buNder 
apart* from SKWJOO- RjC 
management & rental 
service. Ctsa Andoran 
Props Ud, 5 Princadala 
Road. London Wit 4NW. 

Tel 01 221 6843. 


GENERAL 


OHIO CAYMAN BWt New « 
Ded. 5 UM. A non. m houu 
pool. £200000. 0932 65668 


PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

RflMy does ft better! 

BW3 tnm nS SO fi - E9XLQG1 
fa tmteA. ptere or wiXe 
(I2J, Stspba Bsacrril 
wsnamaL 
Prewte nc e Hots#. 
Rtoer Street. 
Wtodscr. Bats. 

Tflt (9753) 866278. 


GRIFFITHS & 
GRIFFITHS 
PROPERTY 



ALSAITVE. 0 bed MMrt tvu. 
own pool A oranw rew 
r. 60 000 lumnlinl. Aba tOU 
nmuuciwn. rannMian. tend. 
r«iln RNO I0B23) 7761 1 


SOUTHERN SPAIN 
ALMER1A 

FOR riff BEST SELECTION 

NEW APARTMENTS 
JUST COMMENCED AT 
LA PARATA, MOJACAR, 
only 1 hour from Akneria 
Airport 2 bedmut. 

2 bathrms^ swimming 
pooL E25JML 

Abo 

ROQLETAS DE MAR, LOS 
HBI9006. 1 bedroL, 2 swim 
ning pools. E23JM. 

Ft* debut * our 
Property AnUfa 

Peter A Mifis. 

P & S MUXS LTD.. 
Cette Mews, 29a CustkSL, 
Safistary, WBts. 
ns (0722)334551 
Teter 477019 ASR. 


CASTELL MOHTGRI 
COSTA BRAVA 

30 n x 10 It Luxury Mobte 
Homes. Fully turashed to stoop 
up to aghL H/C wafer to todet. 
sncwB and Mthea Ma^itaal 
saa. 2 pools. MstavacrL tors red 
caiis. Urateroound dsra/mgtt 
Ctohfrua). Free emotarranert. 
E1<L475HDna avafiaUe (wnt- 
tm detab on request). M arm 
mm tenng serve* t rcKtrac 
RK cotaff brodure - 


&di spoons md baw^bly ntpoirtai pjpaly on ihe Boyd Keqhts s set in die pmoty 
ted saurty of its own haaious Icmdstoped gudats. Vte with 3-5 hedwsmsOTd 
piiwte pool, fu8 mtirtenonffi ond seturty sbwbs, range fraet 1160^00 to £250,000 
aid mortgage m maMk. for our IndBre aJ 5333 at contact m/ fept/hile 
a^OiaBteQeapBaiNivtstti)theste.OurQifkestneopen7 j ; . 
days a week (fefc Modda 773368 at 773411). London Office: Ml > v*,. 
BtotyLtue, Unite WQB 5TV let 01-336 S333 ^ W *4* 


Buy direct & save money 

Villas, bungalows, town houses, apartments 
We offer value for money in prime positions 
from £10,000 to £100.000 

Cap for brochures and further information- 

INTERVENTAS ESPANA S.A. 

Group Caia Territorial tie Matiriti, 145 Oxford Street, London W1. 
Tel: 01-434 0484 (24 hro answering service) 


| FRANCE j 

core D'AZUR - pm aw owner 

wfehrs lo «eU MO so w. luxurt- 
ous vina- pool io i"*. 
CANNES cenUf . Fto* too vtr w. 
Land&capfd vantefL Tet 
FRANCE 93 86 22 SI 
FRANCE - All cj£a»« 

CtiMeaux rrow Etc 1 COO. Fl- 

nance JZ}i a>un! - 

Vlllowi Ud Ol-aSS 2733. 

ARE YOU lOOKDK for A Mnr 
io or wound Cannes? Vv> hnr 
a «ood ndecttoa ei villas ana 
apuitoente and can oaswtr 
yovr outsiutti about wa» 
Inq property on me Cote 
D'Azur. Ptn sc cad Chrteanr 
DavU Oil OlO 35 93 43 19 19 or 
write to roe at Memll* France. 
Iff Rue UMir MOHOourq. 
06400 Cannes (France). Telex 
461603 

| BA LEA RMS | 


COSTA BLANCA 

0BI1A, JAVEA, 
M0RA1RA 

No gmumcxs. no Irw ftghs 
or gifts Just the most 
comprenenswe range of 
deaunfrd hoeMtf nomas 
bunt to the h^tasi Stan- 
0310s. Backed Dy our No 
Risk Ftm Legd Protection 
Scheme. It you areconsMBr- 
mg mvestmg £20.000 to 
ZISOPOO on a home m Spam 
then can us hrsL 
SA8L0 OfTERMATIOML UO. 

> ARGYLL BOUSE. ARGYLL SI. 

covBfrar evs m. 

Afc- — TOi (B2B3) 443886 
n Lankin & 

r vfi* Home Coddms 
t ASytv(»«tt}52S41/6Zra 


OPPORTONITY 

Brand new chalet for 
sale, near sea in El Port! 
Umhria4iiiehfa‘ 
Espa.). Unique beach, 
location, style and 
quality. Wot (3 900m 2 , 
320m 2 building. 


Tel: 955300126. 
Address: 

MrPeracaula, 


ep(A8, Mobde Hone 
Amed, 72 East HB1, 
Cotefrerter, Esso. 


COSTA DEL SOL 
MARBEUA - 
FUENGIROLA 
BENALMADENA 
AND NERJA 

Freehold wSas & 
apartments. 

New & resale properties. 
Wide price range. 

SOLYANA PROPS LTD 
Tel (0454) *14141 (24bis) 


EL NARAN4AL 

Spnsii style, seduded spts leva 
rise n WOge canvkx. Close gofl. 
pools. aU AMuaities. 5 rats' 
dinr* Marfcella. Offers around 
£42000 p p hsc. for turttie o 
frarnffiun ro o u c t 

Mb ianvL Lfi TiwbL 
Concorde Hob*. 

MSI _ 
Chester. CHI 1QR 
Tet 8244 41131 


RSftHLT, 471 UTK C8A57 
Casts de to lei 

Uk 3M vte on teactfiwiL 56- 
pert> tocauxL BUM 
Attractive vsta win landscaped 
Bins. 3 beds. 3 baths, guaa sect 
£39588, hmwtwd 
For de&Ns « toes & other propsr- 
ties. contact 

BREZAL PROPBITES 
9672 B706BS. 


COSTA BLANCA 

1 bed apses stared pool S9.625 

2 bed apsis stared pool£l7,1B7 
1 bed iraeorente £13,125 
Regular low cost mpcc&on (h0S. 
AS propertie s ijuaBy consowted. 
litas’ sea. sbops. etc. 

FEW & PHILIPS 

I Stefan Bead. (fata. Guta 

tat 822823 2MT (24ta) 


COSTA DO. SOI. t Lm BMIctwc. 
Luxury beacn IToni enartrornt. 
2 bMs. teihroom. larre Khbtop 
/lairtvn. 3 years oid. Fullyrur- 
cubed £5O.00a TU: 0934 
418843 


SAN PCDRO - nr MARBEIXA. 
cow open Pten holiday vUte- 
foMy rum- HUin letettt./ pool/ 
gdns. £39300 letoi 458 3010 


COSTA DEL SOI. wmww 
/town houses (ram £22.000 In 

Sonesta Beach villa** atlovrW 
Puerto de la Ououesa. Beam. 
Dwm Mnnts. OOtf. roNaurahi. 
shore plus free shares in the 
only new reft rairrse oi, Itw 
, roan- Coll: (06341 33693/4 to- 
day (or coteur bradiurr. 


■BRAFLORES/ WMBIA Re- 
saws. considerable savinf Sob? 

| Aorn ts for luxury vtua dev elop- 
meni & Spanish male aacncy. 
Fumplrotee Oo owiMdiO 

Kttanre T«: ai-446 zasi fn 

S8UMB HW W rtT AfeHOADT 

Save hftfti aoency frost Deal 
with buyer* direct. seH qidcfcly 
and efficiently. IdweU rial fee 
Villa Maui. 01-891 6172 ritam 
60RII 01-542 9068 (9teH-9MtU 

COSTA ML SOL/0OA. Apart- 1 
men Is and viuas for tale from 
£20000 to £2 mutton. Yor* Cs , 
tales. 61/82 Crawford SL | 
London w». 01-724 0335. 

PRES usT of privacy tor sale 
oraperties Uirauohoul the Medl- 
terawan from Cl 0.000- vioa 
Match 01-891 6172 iBanvOwn) 
01-642 9088 lOOB^wtO- 

NEHJA £ bedrootned eBorttnenr. 
(utiy furnUhed. fitted IQtchefu 
bathroom. adteCMl Own. 
£21000. MON «H TehOW7 


MEK4A. BeauIHul drtaehed villa. 1 
3 bed*, superb runtWdlMS. 
CMSOO. Tel: t078»J ZSStao. 


| VtLLA Marheite am. Vny spa- 
cious 3 bed, 2 both, 1 shower. 
| tealnp room, lounge- luBy fined 
kitchen, marble floor through- 
oof. landscape garden, walking 
l clfedance an amoofiie* including 
I Orach. Dtrert sale £87. 

1 PhCW 01 609 8158 


^ For 

rweshaTOBi 


gMItarfCiveamr hscKac- 030 


RENTALS 


mm 


LONDON'S LEADING RESIDENTIAL LETTING AGENTS 
offering that personal & professional service 


RICHMSHD GOttRT $«15 

An aCiemefy anractwe id ft fiat m p.txb. with 
balcony and own parage. 3 bedrooms, double 
f Bcepwn, batfwwm with pnua, shower room 
with gold fittngs. tt totchen will all macbmes. 
Aval now for long co let. 

£200 pw 

BROMPTOM PARC SVf 

Superbly fitted and tunstwd flat in new dnei- 
opmern Prof, landscaped paroen w ah smm- 
mnp pool Sana and gym 2 bediooms. 2 
bathrooms (1 ensure), it kdchen wdb ma- 
dinos. paifana. 3va4 now. 

£200 pw 

FULHAM SW6 

Amazing 2 bed flat. Shower msute. Large open 
plan lounge, tt knctien with aO appfimees. bath- 
room. pwfcmg, landscaped gardens. Ava4 now 
lor kng oHnpany let. 

£140 pw 


MARBLE ARCH W1 

Brigftt. spacious Sefepant 3 bedrooms 1st floor 
flat set in well managed btodt Newly deco- 
rated. mtt planned Utcben w*h aU appfunoas. 

E Half, double recepbOfl m bath, balcony. 
Loin co let inct uOes CU & CHW. 

£375 pw 

BELS12E PARK RW3 

Bright first How flat- Newly refmtxsiKd and 
a tvactnely decorated. 2 bedrooms, reception, 
daung room, bathroom with shower, tt koeften 
with all aifUensxs Avxt now for long cempay . 

let 

£175 pw 

KEW SURREY 

Dehphttul, spaoous Rat opposite Kew Gardens 
5 nuns from lube. 2 bedrooms. racapASnaig ' 
roonrntah balcony, ft kncben/breakfasl area, \ 
bath. w.c. parkrg. Co lei. 

£160 pw 


TO ALL LAHH.Q8DS/0WIIERS 

It you have outety pnwrty lo let in pftagos London areas, tedi u& first tor acwm. 
PROPERTIES IN MANY OTHER AREAS ALSO AVAILABLE 


(Huefra EspsgueV 


COSTA 

BRAVA 

Surtmar, UJC 
The speoaSsta for tfiff Costa 
Brava, oriar you the bast se- 
lection oi properties 
inriuefang their own British 
built luxury complex. Las 
Cases Blancas, overlooking 
toe beautiful bey of Rosas, 
prices from CUL000, low 
cost inspection Bights. Brit- 
ish representative m Spain. 

Tel: Q21-5S3 3S89. 


MARBELLA 

RESALES 

Spea^sts lor vftas. 
apartments, townhouses. 
Easi/west gf lliaibelta. Beuh. 
gott. pueblo, frSstoe etc. Main 
agents (or new properties also. 
BROMPTON 
01-351 3568. 


COSTA 
DEL SOL 

Exclusive, private 

OcSCBSBK USfOOVUzSm 
2 fed. kuury wWa oetwen 
PWrOeaNTivglB^lPmBW stof 

Video Sm available. 
0992 4630W. 


HOLIDAY COMPLEX 
FOR SALE 

few 3 wom S Sk 2 baton hfly 
him sewoaus apis fi/ttm 
manq txtol a landscapeo ores 
etc. S mrc tram beach * 3,600 »q 
mobs* o» butane tmO a6to*irp 
FrcetuM. Mo enarrvnncas. 
SmatoO m paoum Umm 
notary resort Pr U et e m a ipnakr 

Tet (8384) 638330/273918. 


PUERTO BANUS/ 
MARBELLA 

tocrattHe v afoef Luxuriously 
tumsshud 2 bedroom apart- 
ment. £ 58 , 000 , or would 
consider a London apariment 
to part exchange. 
Contact Weal Homes. 

01 405 4444. 


MARBELLA. S badraom 3 bain- : 
room aurtinmu In O* I 
nrmMttius Don Carlos | 
uMwiteUDU pnvair aeons to i 
b*acli. own swHnmitfo pool, 
panoramic sea view £57.600. 
Tet <06891 53619 


SWITZERLAND 


THt SWISS SPECIALISTS Own- 
Wetc range of propeitln tn ov*e 
60 wfniecAummer room- E r- 
VerWer. vwars. Lake Luceinr. 
Bernese Obertand elc. Contaci 
Hilary SooU Property. 422 tip- 
per fbeftmond Road West. 
London SW14 TO; 01-876 
6655. 

exwmteux. Luxury apartment 
merino Una lake. 1.3 m SFR 
Chaornn SoUcnors. 93 Park- 
way. London NW1 Tel: 01-485 
8811 

SKI RESORTS. Apartments and 
cnafets in Vfiten and Haute 
Nendaz. Osbornes Sol tenors. 93 
Parkway. London NWl Tel: 
01-485 8811 


MEW YORK CITY Co-op Apart- 
ment Neo-Frencn ctesdc 
luxury otop. Central Park view 
5466.000. Family or exeduwve 
residence. Conrad Mr.Cano 
weekdays 212 371 8653 FAX 
212 693 2191 


.III 



Horner Hill 

MAKING ALL THE RIGHT MOVES 


Offices ai Cobham. Esher. Horsham. 
Onshott. Stewgrih, Waypndoo. Wimbladon 
yixl Woiung 


To Let 

WEYBRIDGE, SURREY 

Put-tumisited delightful property situated in 
an exclusive and much sought after private 
estate. Set in beautiful secluded grounds, 
offering good family accommodation, ideaf 
for entertaining. 3 large reception rooms, 4 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, krtchen/hreakfast 
room. Full gas central hearing and telephone 
installed. 

PRICE: £1.850 P.CJW. 

TEL: (037284) 3811 




PI 

Hpg 

mm 




E 


£ 

Q 




FURNISHED RENTALS 

ONSLOW MEWS WEST, SW7 PALACE C OURT, W2 

Ctvanrono houses vmtn gataang in new cob- Elegant and nacrous apartments wtoi 24 how 
bted mSns oewWopmam. Acavrmodanon;. p orwrage. Addi^to facdihBS Bvadalte. laim- 

2/3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms, targe double re- dry. maid and secretarial services. 3/4 
ception room. fuBy fined kitchen. Some with bedrooms. 2/3 bathrooms, drawing room, an- 

Uaccofves. mg room. fuBy fltrod kitchen. 

From £400 per week From £550 per week 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 

6 Arlington Street, London SWlA 1RB 01*493 8222 



EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

Personal help in selecting from over 500 prestigious 
properties. 

Ranging from Studios from El 50 per week to five bedroom 
Ambassadorial residences up to £3000 per week. 
Booklet - Guidance Notes for Tenants' available on request. 

■■■■■ 4/6 St Anns Terrace FQ/ T AQQ wumum 

St Johns Wood NW DOO JUOOawti 



HANS CRESCENT 
KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

i 3 bedrooms. £575 pw. 

► 2 bedrooms. £550 pw. 

) 2 bediooms. £500 pw. 

» 3 bedrooms, £300 pw. 

» 1 bedroom. £250 pw. 

DRAYCOTT PUCE, 
CHELSEA 



Studo. 

I bedroom. 

1 bedroom. 

2 bedrooms. 
2 bedrooms. 
2 bedrooms. 


£130 pw. 
£180 pw. 
£225 pw. 
£250 pw. 
£275 pw. 
£300 pw. 


fTpr Anscombe 
\_t ? &Ringkind 
^.Residential Letting^^ 

II Plaza Estates 


QUSNS&ATE TBBIAK SW7. 
Large 1 bed flat on gmd hr. or 
suite bath, cloak, recep and 
gdferted ut New cocrv. mod- 
emttmshnaE2S0pw. Long Id. 

QlOOOff GMOEHS SW1 
Good send masonette over- 
kwkmn gdnsw 2 beds. 2 baths. 


HARBESA/MarMU-Timahare 
WNU l>»4 If 2 wdnonirt 
villa wttn rra/ *«*»- ttmo 
4/6- Own pool WUO sank n. 
near wall. Maid *fti**. fully 
■MinuiMif. SSfooff ac £7.700 
TO: 0532 674098 


MORftocO snunrias MWJW 
paSwTtoJnP » Sluatos * j 
rngm, l week avafteUe hr 
SS? 10.000 FT ANCEL 84 nre 
StOiaries. 7SOIS ttens. Ranee 

TOTEWre 

rtynotfowp 3 Wlci M Cl.7%. 
Brodwrv. 091-746 9808. 


hmesraseux 


UMGDALE ummnarc wantrw. 
Week 30 4V 32. I or 2 M- 
roSrti. Tds 091-629 2S37 
tswiiiW- 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY! 
TO LET 


BOUSE CXCHANeS WAfmtD 

Jan Jure 1987 wntMon 1 
A reo / WaMMIen DC- Ctell . 
0101 202 338 0964 I 


ige due recra - doors to gdn. I 
new Ui Aval now lor long Ml 
£550 pw- I 

01-581 7646 


SLASHED WMCJE5 
KNIGtfTSBRIDGE 

Sucerti <jbuj 1 8ul xarmm. Hccra. 
KM m ras h#y sennas Woe*. 
CjmStoeh imneJietl uvwghHL 
SreasnebSe MuSDariiweA 
WuMtala la**v s*iw» CokwTV ?e 
* DC*Bw)L CH CHW. Coaeimayy 
toman PwJflot W«A 

ung/sten to 

*2J5 pw (awwafly MS9 pall) 
ArLESFORD & CO 
01-351 2383 


SHEEM. Orrouiw Tndov retaOence 
(lore to fhcnmoito Park. 3 
reegre 4 Btre wraoe. £3 00 p y 
wnr. Oeh-rr Jonn: 878 8535 


SWI SnWta Snuare. Quirt 6C 
siudtn anarrmenl. comenleni 
cl tv and West CM. £500 pem 
Uia . TO T71 6668 or 222 I8S3 


CMOteKA SWI- Penthouse. suU- 
sw 1/2 htbw. Bright and 
Light . Loos Irt. 6 lo Iff rrtohUK. 
£270 per week. Orel cumoany 
lei- Tw 01 731 3776. 


canm eunn. um. wkt 

R3i in small new block. DM* 
miner with balcony- wmwn. 
K & B- E 2 BO pw ntg- on tong m 
only. 01-363 0211 Wd 2W9- 


PUHOMED naL doe Ctoham 
Common tube. 2 roams, uun- 

en. Il»w»r / WfcL telephone, 

sun couple. £270 pem (Ml- TO.- 
01 720 3311 


EARLS COURT- Del Khtftd bvmu. 
in large, now and airy. 1 
BntroonM flat. £n ut tie ham- 
room . v 61101s KM let. Large 
cnirance hall. Braulilul tounre. 
Modem block with Uft. £l«S 
pw. Q1 3 75 1630 
BATTERSEA. Very attract newly 
decorated let nr (ML DHr hrO. 
km. fufty tuny fitidt tn. 
baihrm. partono. ronmuiw 
Sdto. inc rti. 4 chw LlSO P— 
SulUs-on Thomas 731 1333 


Company lets only 

Mf M— or Mte Mggtas 

r -244 7441 
M Old fmosbn And. 
Lataaa&WJ. 

HIlettingHB 


ST KATHERINE’S 
DOCK 

Luxury house on water next 
to dock. 3 drafts beds, 2 
batn rooms. 2 reca pti ons, kit- 
chen and cloakroom. AynD- 
atte long 1st. C22S pw. Garage 
available. 


01-708 


THE VERY BEST 

LandftxdS & Tenants 
come to us for 
BELGRAm. HAMPSTEAD, 

KHsmeroB, wimbihuw 

and similar areas. 


mucus co 

81-734 7432 


5 

Bar^s 

ananwmGE. «n 
Stnerti 3 Bed. 2 Baft Ml MU to 
dose lo Harods. E400pw- 
SW1SS COTTftGE. MM3 
Newly retwtesned 3 Bad Gdn WL 
£375ow. __ 

Sends progenies requeed 
for naong applicants. 

01-724 3160 


AROUND TOWN 

TZO BoMtari PHt Am. UTff 
QUE0tSDM£ ROW 
Spaoous deta d ad pend bouse 
on 4 floors, m quet conswvtaian 
atea. Elegantly larmsliBd- 
Parkaro tfoored dmfte reception. 
Uarbfe I rep lace. 3 double bed- 
rooms. Separate ft) im. Wd) 
eoupped kd and bam. Access to 
privzft pins and tennis cns. Can 
be Cat tumeswf or uduneafied. 
Aval now tot company /vtstore. 
£425 p.w 

01-229 9966 


PWOF woman veeks Ipee/c bedsit W1 Cartfen Sa. L«e palfo ftoi. a 
/rut m mlrawb qiM butlrt- dhi hnh. lux ML living mi. etc. 
ino. nr tubr. £30- fiSOewmax. Full (matted A rnulppnt. 
Tel Sue 734 67tO E» 2513 £220 pw Tet <0342821 4307 


*. MNWeTtM Luxury 2 Obi 
bed. 2 tor r*c. bath wfen w/c. 

VP rtk £276 pw TWO) S81 
5109 1 10-73 

F W SAPP (Management Ser 
ur»< IM reuwre praoertm. in 
Central. South and West Lon 
4on Areas lor wattinp 
appHranR IN 01 221 8838 


AVAILABLE HOW Luxury IWsA 
hoenUTO C.1.000PPT week. 

Tel. wrgnt Set B136. 
AVAILABLE For siwurte. nicw- 

mood HlU Luxury mansion 
work 2 bed not £660 PX.m. ft 
MaraaceU newly ftp, S bed 
Hour £600 b-c.tn ArlandAQO 
01 948 1122 


HEMIY A JAMESContBCt us now SIIPCMOR FLATS A H WHff 

(to 01235 8861 tar me beet se- avau. & reod. lor aiokjmou. 
lection of r unvoted IWs and exeeuilvfa. Umq 
nausea to rent IP Kiughlsbrtdee. all anm UofrtoM 
Otetoea and Kensington 03 AHwnirteSI W1 01-499034, 

LAtMOW A amc MAH a ptonun ^ Available 3 to 6 months. New 
4 executives urgently seek audio. £176 

duality prooernesinaBceritral/ £2^??'bed apartment. £2SO 

Hon J»«Bse nn9 oi-naa qj y# ^ssi 


Rt SUPcrb newly necorased t bed 
national Ooie etty- WtoStont 
ftnea garden ware Ciaopw 
Cd,T\ - Own CH A nrm Sou 
Co/lH. Refc. TO 01 609 0058 

HAJtCOURT TtBMCC CIW to 
TncSoHatsSU'IO Large wen 
rumbned inn floor Mud» flat 
with balcony and row Barden 
Own Half, Kitchen. Bathroom. 
Large studio roam, c/h £170 
pw available «*o“' Co NT P»P- 
Irrrcd- Ring 01 370 1405 

AMERICAN eXECOTTVE Seek* 
Im tui/nwx up to caOOiw 
l.iud l«» «e- Phillips tev 4 
Lews*, south ol the Park. Chrl 
CM oinrr. 01-392 8111 w 
idorth ol the Park Regents 
park of l icc 01 586 9882 


WALK TO MIHMMn 
TUBE Bed + bath ui new pent- 
house luxury UM. am 
busnnaiMn- £50 pw Inc. 
Teeai 748 aso5 


MBMEWATEX. SOUKHSTT. 

Rrtiremcnl. bvunet*. w/p 1 bed 
MS June 2e. 2 m Gas 
cb 1st fir Sate A Maceful 
OuantOCk HU is. sea 10 mins 
Mai [turned 93 ns. car park mg 
SnortiuU be 1 Bars neg. US 
lb £65 pw fExen. No DHS& 
Refer eg 0278 «5|»3(V8«-B 


Conrinued oa next pajtr 






HJ0 


._. ...-., .... r ■■ .... 


THF TTMKS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


RENTALS 


NATHAN WILSON & CO 

64 ROSSLYN HILL, LONDON NW3 1ND 


HAMPSTEAD. NW3 

In beau*/ Vicwnan cmewm 
dose io wbjs ground non Hat 
o*l Bring t /2 bedrooms, gooa su e 
reception area, wtfh cUmuuj 
UJai and bathroom 
£160 p.m. 

BGLSZE PARR, NW3 

Dekgratul tU conage m sedated 
noshon on Haversnck Vfcll 3 
bedrooms. baOwoam. shower 
room. cnanrung kugr with din- 
ing area Modem kitchen witnaH 
moms. 

£250 JL«. 

HAMPSTEAD, HW3 

faDotous Victo rian terraced 
bouse wnti pabo 'garden ottering 
mote accommodawii. 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 bathrooms |i en suaet, 
(fide wtew reception area, large 
TV. studv. auaarv Mdten/ Ow- 
ing room. Newly decorated 
throughout 

£375 (LW. 


BELSIZE PARK, HV3 

Large (pound Boor manKW Hat 
ottenog spawns accommoda- 
tion. 2 oedrooms. 2 recemmi 
rooms, low* Mdwn md bath- 
room. Eacefern vatac. 

£185 fkw. 

HAMPSTEAD, KW3 

Suoerb modem ground door Bat 
with pain sduded m ®duswe 
mate estate. 2 bedrooms, ex- 
cedent retortion area. Modem 
lot then and bathroom. 

E2B0 P-«. 

ISUK6T0N, HI 

BeauHd Georgun house stoaied 
r lovdy square rewwig many 
ongnd leatuos Superb double 
reception area. 3/4 bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms (1 eiKulel. fabulous 
tar then; diner. sludy/IV area, 
conservatory. 

£375 p-w. 


THIS IS A SMALL SELECTION OF OUR CURRENT LISTINGS 
WE RECEIVE NEW INSTRUCTIONS DAILY 
CALL NOW FOR DETAILS 

01-794 1161 


MARLER & MARLER 


OAKLEY HOUSE, SLOAHE STREET 
SLOAHE STREET, SW1 SW1 

A wry pkasanl Nat « extremely Magnificent UNFUHNIStCD flat 
good Dortered block, overtook- m exceflenl Nock. 3 bedrooms, 
mg gaoen souae. 2 bedrooms, double reception loom. 1 cloak- 
1 reception room. I oafiroom room. 3 baDtroorns £600 p*. 
£325 pw. 

LENKOX GARB BIS SLOAHE STREET 

SLOAHE STREET. SWT SW1 

frnmaeaifaie penthouse mason- Good fopth jjoorttat wrth fat 
ette wttti rool terrace. 3/4 ^ P orteT - 2 double berbooms. 
bedrooms. 1/2 reception lraaiaran room. 1 bathroom 
rooms. 3 bathrooms £525 pw. ^325 pw. 

M0TC01R STREET, HAMS C8ESCERT 

BELGRAVIA SW1 eon 

■Recently returbshed mason- w 
etie 3 bedrooms. 2 reception W e ” wea le d, one bedroom 
rooms. 1 bathroom +• 2 Ctoak- 2?S mert °W raB fonote 
rooms £400 p.w £180 

To view these properties today please ring 
Kristina, Judith or Peter on 01-Z35 9841. 

RENTAL DEPARTMENT OPH TODAY FROM IS - 2pm 
PLEASE CONTACT PETER G1IXES TO VIEW PROMPTLY 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


BRUCE 




: ST ATE AGENTS 


LETT18S fOm HOME? PROSE SOW Hffl BOT HELPFUL BHOCHWE 
DRAYCOTT PLACE SO 3. Superb Tninfl ilooi flat ei wcellenr decorative 
order Hall, reception room/dner. htted kitchen. 2 bedrooms |l douMs. 1 
tw mi ba thwiam. separate WC. Company let rawed Unbeatable value 
at 1225 pw. 

LASDFQRD HD. Large and spasms Vttanai family house m EJCTftrt 
decorabve order. Hab. 2 reception rooms. breaMasi/dmng roam, hilly 
htted luxury kitchen. 4 bedrooms, cellar, garden AvaJahte tut tang let 
£225 n, 

FULHAM SW6. Close HuMmgham Park. Mewtv decocted ground floor 
flat Hab. r e c e p ti on room. 2 bedrooms, kitchen, twtnmom. Long ieL 
CffiS pw. 

TEKANTS ! PROS M» FM 0B8 F8EE UST 


Fulham 
01-736 5503 


Putnev 
01-789 5004 


CHESTERTONS 

^ — R E S I'D E N T I A L-— — v ~ / 


HANS ROAD, SW3 

we have llwe magntfnail Mats a Ihe 
most nctasne besot nvenookmq 
Bmmmon Road and besdc Hamms 
Al Uab tunvsned 6 decorated » a 
very hun standard and pendiouse has 
asprataanaseiorooi let 4Mds.2 
ensure narhs hither hath, tge lee®, 
n iol nnoTiiuopw 
Chelsea Office: 
01-589 5211 


MAIDA VALE, 

WS 

ExcartunaBy spacious ground Max 
apartmeru ai tree Incd aremn; 
BndUudy hrmgned 6 (tacorated 
roans & (mate gantan £275 pw 
Early irewraj aansed 

Little Venice Office: 
01-286 4632 


SLOANE GUNS SW1 PONT STREET SW1 

Wefl decorated flat 2 beds. 2 baths. Newly iriurtwhed. unhnresned flat 
large receo mod kit £375 aw. 2 beds. 2 baths, targe dmble reap. 


ALBERT PLACE WB 

Pretty house m ai -du-sac 3 beds. 


mod krt £400 p.w 

FERNSHAW ROAD SWIO 


2 baths, recep. M.'dwng room •tiradwe fUL 1 bMioombairiooni 
£500 pw recep kd /break, pabo £250 pw. 

ORR-EW1NG ASSOCIATES 
TELEPHONE: 01-581 8025 


RAOJET7- HBOS Newly 
renovated and Rntnaadataiv 
decorated 3 bed UNFURNISHED 
house. Ideal In mam tme BR 
(Kings X 20 rnns). strops aid 
schools Large double recep. tidty 
hoed btchen/breaMasI room with 
aU machines, cloaks, bam. garage 
& rprden El 75 p.w. neg. Co Let 
pnderred 


PUTNEY SW1S Large detached 
house 4 beds. 2 recep taKhen/ 
breakfast roam wnh 4\ mactaes 2 
baths, ctoaks. garage, rynden £475 pw 
RATTStSEA SW11 hrenaadate 
house 2 reap, brae htchen./- 
bieaktast mom wdh aHmacbuies. 2 
double beds, dressing room, 
study .’bedroom 3. bah. garden. 
Ample parking. £175 pw. neg 


MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
01 727 7957 or 937 9801 


MASKELLS 

I5TATEAONT5 
HHAHIOVBIT GARDENS SW3L 
Braid new lower grain] floor 
Rat wnh 2 double beAoams. 
string room wth small dung 
area, good luicben. bathroom, 
avadabfe row long IeL £250 pw. 
Iowa SLOAHE ST SW1. Large 
imsonefte on 3 Hou rs with 3 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. 
Mcfien/diw. sdtrng room, 
avafatte now long Isl £400 pw. 

107 WALTOD STREET, 


Tel: 01-581 2216 


EATON PUCE, SUM. 

A spadous, efegantty turn 
and dec Rat La^e recep 
wtth high cafings. Two 
dbte beds. Two baths 
ensuita and ctoak. FUlly Bt 
IdL GCH aid HW. Resident 
porter. Price; £600 per 
week neg. 

Tet 01-235 4649. 


W ROfSWPCTOM A s*rton of 

r/f cfMmrtna 1-3 h«l 

«ZO £300pWUK67S I896T 


OMHISMBSC 14 flr flart In 
wrnlMX- Worii oTooWuu oartawn 
HtUfr. Z bnh. ZIulhtCiMUIIr. 
mm. dmtae. wtenen ail m* 
chum un notin' a, krvi io 
■unhw. Co um LcH UOQ dw 

Goddard & Srallh Ol SUO 7321 



MC8CATC MBJ_ Superb lux 3 
dbto bed I own h*> 2 bams 1 en 
suite, toe root lm with wxte 
views, integral w. S« bi quiet 
wcmrCMK. AvadbMe now tor 
6 mnUrs. C220 pw J B Hugbes 
A Co. 01-883 5*85/6. 


sr. jams wood nwb sum 

newly modernised nm to let. 
UnfanuMd or fumniied. 3 
double beds. LW lounge. 
Fully (Pled K a> B. En M4Je 
qoafcrooni. FarUna £ mins 
tube A shops. Co let. 
£2Z5/C2£0 pw. TU. Ol 63* 
3348 No apenB. 


BARfES; Spadous detached tally 
lum house racing Common. 3 
recep. 3/* beOrrus. 2 baUi. elk. 
Gas cti. w. all nuditaei. Long 
lei. £325.00 HW. JW Lid. Ol 
SM9 2482. 


BAHMES SW 13. Magnmcmny 
lumHIwd 2 bedrowned flat on 
lirsi door Recently modernised 
all modem equipment. CH VTV 
Tel. etc Co let £135 pw. Tel Ol 
870 7766 


moon «ON Wl« inmar 
nwdvmtsod * oed iamUy hsr. 2 
baths il en suiteL 2 recep. 
kll/diner. cooservautry. oar- 
den. Long Co let. £450 pw. Tel 
Ol 602 5669. 


zi rsaEggg 
£?2 >. 






ms 


KManSMDGC SWT A truly 
wtiMuotn Wmor aes rui In a 
handsome block. Momenta 
Iron Hyde Park. 2 dbta> brda. 2 
baths 1 e/a. apartow recep and 
excel US. ill C400 pw. Rec. 
ommmdedr Avol Properties. 
Oi 486 5741 

MOMTAMIC SOOAMK Wl Com 
oenv DirmoR dreand Very 
slylMi apt. mmnoMny square 
pardens 3 bedrooms, hnrly 
bright recep. super kit and balh. 
Musi Be seen £326 p w. ASCM 
Properties Ol 486 5741 

OPPOSITE TUBE. SW4 m prt- 
aole Regency annul 
Luxurious, newly appointed 
ntalaonrtle 2 dm bedrooms, re- 
eppUon. din mo room. MB. 
GCH. paUo. Free par kino. £186 
mu Refs. cp. IeL Tet: 7238081 

WANTED Rural rotupe in Herts 
Max GO miles north of London 
Price neo 6-L2 monllis IeL 
Phone 629 22B2 day or 
nnun,. 

AMEWCAN UW urgrntly re 
ouirex luxury Dali/lwua. 

CMwa. KnbhUrbgr. BcHxa- 

ila arc*. £300 . £2.000 pw 

BurgeasEsiaie Avtin £81 £136 
IM T mMl'f Kl ct u biqlno s c lec t top 

Of VU misfire! ftato A houm. 

cram uaopw cyooo In Km- 
sintdon & a u rrwindlno areas. 1 
Pralun A Reeves. 01-938 


KDU1NCTON Newly furnished A 
■Mwalnt. 2 Bedims. Mod 
Batumi. L«p KU. Recep. 
CIBOpw. 493 2091. Eves 870 
4703 m. 

MUUOA »*« ope o# uw areas 
whn, sap hate some super 
apartments, for Central Lon- 
don Proocmre Tel: ASMeton 
Erun. Q1 409 0394 



ENNIS MORE GARDENS, SW7 

Stunmng lower ground floor flat Largo Reception Rm/DMng 
Ftm. Rned Kit, Utility Rm, Conservatory. 2 Bertaoona. Bath- 
room. Sep CtoaKroom & flooefflt garden. £450pw. 

REDCUFFE SQUARE. SW5 

Brand new fiat on raised gain] floor. Lga Stttmg Roan & 
Kitchen with aB machines. 2 Dbte Bedrooms. Battvoom. 
£350pw. 

BROMPTON PARK, SW6 

Flat in new development i Bedroom SWlngriJinlng Room. 
Pitted Kitchen. Lge Entrance HaL Bathroom. Small Balcony. 
New Swimtreng PooL Gym. Sauna etc. Car Pkg Space. 
£l70pw neg. 


ST JAMES HOUSE: 13 KENSINGTON SQUARE. 
LONDON V/B 01 -.S3 7 9 SC 7 'S3 “ 95 S- 


LEADING OFFICE SYSTEMS 
FURNITURE COMPANY 
REQUIRES TWO ADMINISTRATORS 
nFATF.ll OPERATIONS ADMINSTRATOR 

To work with director and hia dealer managers in a fnDy 
supportive role. Ability to work effectively under pressure and 
good WP gin'll* are required in the rapidly expanding area of the 
company’s business. 

marketing administrator 

To become part of marketing team in a hectic department. 
Previous marketing experience, a cool head, initiative and good 
WP skills are needed. 

Competitive salary packages are offered. 

If you are 25 +, with a minimum of 3 years commercial 
experience send your application and CV to: SheOa Anderson, 
Herman Miller Ltd, 149 Tottenham Court Road, 

London WlP OJA. 


TRAIN FOR A* 




Become a vital member of our expanding, progressive team. 
Visiting clients, interviewing candidates, writing advertisements 
and helping the business flourish makes this an exciting, fulfilling 
job with bags of potential. Full training aid support wUI be given 
but you must essentially be a highly motivated, quick thinking 
person. 

if you are aged 22-30 with at least three ‘A’ levels, secretarial 
experience and the ability to project your personality in a 
marketing role this wiQ give you the career opportunity you are 
looking for. Initial salary £10,000 phis benefits and bonus. Please 
ring 437 6032. 


nECRUITMaVT CONSULTANTS ‘ 


MEDIA- FINANCE- ADVERTISING ■ SALES ^ ■ PERSONNEL-MEDIA^ • FINANCE 

1 PR Prospects | 

1 c £9000 l 


FINCH & CO 

WMOfDGft Lunmous fuSv tumefied VtcJoran house. All origin] fur- 
irisJutjjs uKtadmg: Fully stocked Library ant ctattens ptaynum. 
pwitngs and all tumtin:. Accnnrxlition armprees 4 beds. 2 tutta () en 
sute). Sue wo kitchen + aU ropKBitss, 1 receotnn (carpeted nits etc). 
E1200-SJ400 pero. 

RAYNES PARK 3 bed modemeed ifflerkF designed house. ExtsnEMS 
Lounge/duwg room with service hatch to superb kitchen. Larne garden 
and patio. Garagmg lot 4 cats. Dtrie Gtaad, Gas CH etc. £800 pan. 

TEL: 01 542 3345 


WEST KENSINGTON 

Charming interior designed traditional mai- 
sonette. 3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms, fully fitted 
kitchen, through living room South Facing 
Balcony. 5 mins Queens Cub. £250 p.w. Com- 
pany Let Only. 

Telephone Angela on 01-581 4045X0 


15 A biisy and forward thinking PR ,j- 

< /I Consultancy n&ds a young star to join z 

3 their team. Working with one of the Directors £ 

you 'U use your secretarial skills but have the a* 

Z opportunity to leant the ropes and move onto sj; 

9 bigger and better things. They expea the best- g 

> energy, enthusiasm and commitment. £ 

5 Age 20-26 Skills: 90/50 | 

1 HAZELL- STATON i 

S RECRUITMENT SPEOALISTS S 

7 8 Golden Square, London V\l. C 

P Tel: 01-439 602L g 

MEDIA - FINANCE- ADN’ERTTSING -SALES • PERSONNEL- MEDIA • FINANCE 


Wbrk for all season 

• Immediate work 

• Competitive rates cmd a holiday pay 
scheme throughout the winter 

m The pick of the best assignments in 
London 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone Kama Hendersort 
today for the latest 
assignments 
on 01-439 0601 






HOUSES AND FLATS THROUG 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RESIDBUML LETTING DEPARTMENT 
TEL: 01 01-790 9560 


Home 

.ftom 

Home 


D ttas b wthd you are loohni 
i oi we mQ find it lot you! 
We have a acerb range ol 
properties from 
£150 ■ £1.500 pw 
01-225 1022 01-946 9447 

(CHELSEA) (WIMBLEDON) 



Property Management Services Ltd 


barnard 

marcus 



OM34 7316 


HOLLAMS PK MEWS, ML Lux- 
ury fully turn nwwi Use. 2 
bbdmu. 2 rees. rr kit. £300 pw. 
BrtK Diner & Co 01-491 3164 

SOUTH KctHinqton SuorrtaUxp 
imltirrnlHHl bnnd nfw Interi- 
or dtowwl nuratan rial. 4 
beds. 2 b4ta. WC 2 larpe 
rnrrp,. iludy. kJIrfien ill 
nurtilnrv LML r«>s porter A 
ih Ira enlraitcrphcmc. Co Loop 
Lrt C6SO pw Coddird A Srralh 
Ol 930 7321 



r» Mnn«nn pfwrsaetiAir 

HAYFAffl, Wl 

Superb 3rd floor Ha n 
handsome btocfc wth pretty 
communal gardens. Recep. 
Kit. 2 DtHe Beds. 2 Baths. 
£400pw to me CH /Const HW. 
hit porterage & E 'phone. 




EALING BROADWAY WS Lw 

luxury 3 bedrrn FUI. AI1 
factum. eb»e la 4MPPtng cen- 
tre. £230 PW. Ol 840 4481 


MAYFAIR, Wl 

Luxury Stixfio. 1 & 2 Bed 
apts serviced 6 days pw. 

24 hour porterage. 
For viewing telephone. 

BERKELEY ESYATES 

41*493 0887 V 81-409 2373 


«E»OH NW4 25 rains to W/E. 
Modern 2nd floor nai. 2 pens- 
lave creep . baui/WC phis sep 
WC. Fully fined KU inO. wash + 
dryer Parfcmq included. Inde- 
nendenl CJCH. TV. BfL C/T 
£160 pw. Co. M only, un 1 
year TMrOl 203 6906 


NWll wen maimamed det a ched 
4 bed. 2 reception unfurnished 
family home Spacious Ameri- 
can kllcftefi/dTner. 2 hath. Gas 
CH. Garage. Garden Lxcellcnl 
transport and snopMnq. Co IeL 
£320 p.w. Tel Ol 4SS 1266 


Wl Immaculate lop 5th floor flal 
wnh south facing roof terrace A 
use of supers communal gar- 
dens 2 Bedrooms, fully litled 
Kronen. Bathroom. Sitting 
room. Newly decorated A fur- 
nished. Long Co let. £250 pw 
Day 724 2818. KUghl £84 7130. 


BEIRUT PARK NWS Sonny 2 
bed id floor flaL 1st time let. 
Now furniture, central heating 
elci Working 1 1 replace £140 
pw. Co. let. Tel: Ol 222 4343 
ext: 31E idayi / 361 4924 leies 
after 6.O0L 


CHELSEA SWIO Charming seif 
con lamed flat, ground floor, pft- 
vale house. 2 bedrooms, swung 
room K/B. gch. resi dent ial 
parking One year nrtnirnum. 
References required. £125.00 
per week. Ring Ol 5S2 0636 


BEMf A BUTmOFT for luxury 
properUes in si Johns Wood. 
Regents Park. MakLa Vale. 
Swiss Con A Hampstead OI- 
586 7561 

9*7 Mil The number io remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
properties in central and prime 
London arras ClSO/CZ-OOOpw 

ALLEM BATES A Co have a large 
■wsecuon ol flal, and houses 
stall Hw long / snort id from 
£86 00 pw. Ol 499 1665 

CHELSEA fabulous Mala . 3 bed. 2 
b(h Lge rerep. good in. pretty 
oalu. £4Q0pw. Ben bam A 
Reel re. Ol 938 3522 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
mural London rrera £326 pw 
plus VAT Ring Town House 
Apartments 373 3433 

MA-muK HYDE PARK. The 

most luxurious lone/ short Ids 
1/6 bnta best prices Ol 936 
9512 ill. 

ATTN Landlords - We urgently 
seek quality flats/housss for 
walllog dlMomatS A co let s. 
Piers. FOX A Co. Ol 835 S77S. 

AT Wll one b edroom funkhhed 
■news house with garage. Com- 
pany let. £200 pw. Tel Ol 748 
0226. 

BATTERSEA Nr Park- Attractive 
3 oed bout PaUo Harden fully 
equipped. 7 month Id. £1£6 
pw Tot Ol 228 3486 

NR HMHOM SBOdOUS I due 
bed. flat Lounge K & B. Fonj. 
£200 pw. Ol 691 8721 l day! 
852 0548 I after 7). 

S. HEN. Beautiful recep. 3 bed. 
classic fum autei naL CH. 
washer, col TV. maid, snort/ 
teg let. £300 pw neo. 373 0753 

CHELSEA. StaTJ AD new btlerlor 
designed I Bed balcony flat 

wiih lovdy s. facing views. KU. 
°4th. Recep/Otncr. Porter. 
OSWpw WC CH/CHW. Guides 
838 6231 . 


^. 01-629 6604 /^ 


SW2 - £250 p-w Attracllie and 
very spacious detached Geor- 
gian Home of! Staeathara HW. 
with large walled garden hi be 
maintained by owners. 5 bnfe. 
3 balhs. 3 rectos. Gas CH. dbie 
garage Available for 1 or more 
years prolessluial share con- 
sidered. Dixon Hind 32/34 
High Street. Sin loo. Surrey. 
Tel 01 642 6044 IREF:LS/PBi. 


TWO SMALL country cottages 
rear Chreus Hospital Station 
Ready wring "87 bed. balh. 
kllrhen. reception room Lovely 
secluded gardens. Occupation 
weekends and holidays only. 
Long lerm rental required. Sun 
single professional or quiet cou- 
ple. £HO pw neg. Tel OOQ3 
731984 i keep trying 1 ! 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH NW3 beau 
turn fully lunrushei) ground 
floor garden nm. 2 dMe. 1 single 
bed Dimtig/recepnon room. 
K3B. CH. sale use of garden 
and access io Heath. Avan 
I turned. £200 pw Tel 01 43S 
6812. 


KEHSMSTOM New one bedroom 
mews house available for com- 
pany Id Newly furnished small 
bid modern, win, all faculty*. 
Tel. TV. garaqe. £140 pw.TM: 
01 878 7766 


KWCSTOA- iinfumlsM modem 
del ftse. 4 beds. 2 ham. elk. open 
plan recep. gas ch. gge. Fully 
carpeted A curtained, all ma- 
chines. Co lei. £360.00 pw JW 
Lid 01 949 2482. 


NTEHSHAWb Unfandshtd do- 
laefted house wnh £ beds. 2 
balh. CJK. 2 recep. all machines. 
Fully carpeted and curtained. 
Gascti. 99e. £-300 00 p w Long 
IeL JW Ud 01 949 2482. 


REGuvrS PARK Stunning mod. 
rm 2 room rial Pert touuon 
£226 pw rod. Trl 936 9066 

Wll. Pretty. 1 bed. gdn flat. Her. 
Kil/dui. balh/W/C. GCH A 
Gdn. CPSpw Bonham A 
Reeves. 01938 3622. 

Wll Small s/r flat. Staple wom- 
an CEO pw Write fully. Woolth 
Manor. Bndport. Dorset. 

A WEST END Flat and House, 
bM U For Sdr/Ut. Davb 
Wooue Ol 4G2 7381 

WZ - Dbie rerro A bed. pauo/gdn 
HaL »ni parkin*. Nov 17th ■ 6 
mltn . EtBOpw neg. lei Ol 221 
2811 

MAYFAIR Wl Lux fum mats. 3 
beds. 1 rec. new k A B. new 
decor. £3GOpw. 0342 712617 
HR REREMT3 PARK. Furnished 
luxury 1 bed fM. £125 pw. Tel: 

01 935 9441 

HR RE6f3<TS PARK. 4 dMe hen 
house, dbie recep. £460 pw. 
Tel: 01936 9441 
U3 Blackhead,. Luxury S bed 
hse. ds to station. 20 rains cKy. 
£200 pw. TPM. 01-446 2025. 
CMARMBM Immac 1 bad flat xUi 
of river TV CH. Gdn. Stow of 
tag Ben. Only IO mtaa cKy. 
£120 pw. Tel Ol 720 4806 
CHELSEA STUDIOS FuPiam nL 
BeauUftiPy furnished and deco- 

rated. 2 bed maisonenr. 2 
recegs. Porter, conmtunai gar- 
dena. £200 pw TM.O! 331 
5825 

EAST SHEER. GW14. AttracUva 

2 deny apt la mgh sta n d ar d. 4 

bnyi.2bauis.iux ulsuHsm* 
lure prof people. £185 pw Ol 
940 4SSS 

DOCKLANDS Ftxl* and houses m 
M inroaphout the Dockland* 
area TeJOl 790 9560 
RYDE PARK. Lovely Mews 2 
bedims. Inge, fc A b. CSi. £160 
pw Watson A Co 580 6276 

CWMKK AttraOhro spactoto 3 
bed lufly rum house. Co IeL 
£340 pw + dtp 01-095 8680- 





Royal Postgraduate Medical School | 


V (iHnatyeftantae 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

PERSONAL SECRETARY 

The British Heart Foundation Professor of 
Cardiothoracic Surgery requires a competent 
personal secretary with good shorthand/typing 
speed, who win also supervise the running of the 
cardiac surgery office. 

Interesting, varied duties including typing of 
academic papers on word processor. Pleasant 
modem offices. 

Salary accorcfing to age and experience on range 
£7,300 to £9,100 p.a. 26 days annual leave. 
Application forms may be obtained from the 
Personnel Office. Royal Postgraduate Medical 
School, 150 Ducane Road, London W12 OHS 
quoting reference AS/55. 

Closing Data: 15th November 1986. 


Highly Dynamic 

cfc 13,000 package 

The company provides high grade invest- 
ment management throughout Europe. 
They now seek marketing experience at 
‘initiative level'. Placed at the forefront of 
their growth you will handle UK and 
European marketing needs - developing 
relationships, techniques and material as 
required. Versatility valued. Languages 
useful. Typing essential. Age 25-35. Please 
telephone 01493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 





EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/P.A. 


Age 30-45 

Eastbourne WatenwrKs Cm 
over 200,000 residents m 
Susex. 


c. £9,006 

provides the water for 
square mites of East 


An experienced and well educated Secretaiy/PA is re- 
quired for the Chief Executive and Ms management team 
of three. 

Full secretarial and ad minis trativa stalls are needed, to- 
gether wth the abifity to communicate effectively at all 


The Company is long estabSshed, but the envroranent is 
changing are) the work will be varied, offering the oppor- 
tunity lor someone with initiative and enterprise to pfay a 
vital rote at the centre of the organisation. 

FuH c.v. and present salary, marked 1 Personal’, to Gil 
Hostels Esq.. Director & General Manager, 14 Upperton 
Road, Eastbourne, BN2T 1EP. 






We would like to introduce our new 
temporary controller, Judi Hutton. 

After seven years specialising in secretarial and 
Word Processing services, Judi has both the 
experienece and the knowledge to give you pro- 
fessional advice on the current temporary 
market 

If you have any queries or would like detaSs on 
future bookings please contact her on 

628-1313. 


PA/SECRETARY 



Interested 

iteCVta 


61-6296116. 




Administration 

£7,500 »£10,000 aae 

We are currently working with several high-tech 
companies who are looking tor graduates with 
typing and WP skills -and preferably some 
commercial experience - to work in a variety of 
admin support/ customer Batson rotes. These are 
demanding career positions which wB appeal to 
numerate people who are fascinated by new 
technology and who possess the energy to |oin 
young dynamic companies with tIITS 

enormous growth -dPOIHTW^T 

“ OBAPUATE^' 


SECRETARY/ 

ADMINISTRATOR 

Secretary aged 25+ required for company 
secretary at small Holbom head office of 
publicly quoted group of companies. 
Excellent shorthand/typing skills are 
required and in addition, the position also 
carries considerable administrative respon- 
sibilities relating to the secretarial function 
and the running of the groups head office. 

The salary is around £9,500 and offers 
scope for someone seeking challenging, 
interesting work. 

Telephone the Company Secretary 
on 01 405 0812 


KING’S COLLEGE 
LONDON (KQC) 
University of London 

SECRETARY 

Estates Office, 552 King's Road, Chelsea Campos 
SECRETARY required in College Estates Office at 5SZ 


SECRETARY repaired in College Estates Office at 552 
King's Road, SWIO. Applicants should have a good 
telephone manner, be aum emte and able to progress 
order with styphe r a. Usual secretarial sk3h required 
but shorthand fa not neoasaxy. 

Salary within the range (CRA 3) £7,728^8,632 per 
annum inclusive of London Allowance. 

Applications, in d nd n ig C-V. and the names and ad- 
dresses of two referees, to Assistant Personnel Officer, 
Krug’s Collega London (KQC), Norfolk Bedding, 
Strand, Loudon, WC2R 2LS by 12th Nov e mbe r 1986. 


PR in Chelsea 

£9,000 

Stylish... busy... high-achieving. .. this is a super 
company where a young go-getter can move feat. Work- 
ing one-to-one with a hard-working and ambitious 
young female exec you will handle exciting hi- tec 
accounts; oodles of media liaison; lots of events and 
functions (organising' attending) and masses of client 
contact — while learning about the PR business. Good 
typing? Age 21+? Call now 01-409 1232. 

Rwruibnenl Consoltsnla 


liSlE 


EUROPEAN INSTITUTE OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
FONTAINEBLEAU (FRANCE) 

(60 km South of Paris) seeks 

QUALIFIED 

SECRETARIES 

• Aged between 25-28 
_ .... „ . • Good fra neb 
• Fun of initiative, well organised and flexible 

. . Location on edge of Forest 
international University Environment 

Send C.V. and PHOTO to 
. Raymonde LEFRANCOIS 

Constance 

77305 FONTAINEBLEAU Cedex- FRANCE 



ASSISTANT 


75% admin for ttiis 
EC1 investment 
team. Must have 
ex cetient audio 
skills, v. tittle typtog, 
but must be 
nummerate. Age 
21/25. Mln'O’ level 
education. WP 
experience. Scope 
to progress. 

Cry 337 *600 
Ife: bd <397001 


Secretaries Phis 





Alternatively - if temping is what you are (ooteng 
for come and join our team by ringing Fiona. 


PR & Advertising 
Mania?! 

are searching for a young new team 
member for a bright ascending star in the 
advertising wo rid. \ou must be prepared 
to tackle anything and everything and be 
happy co work in an unstructured 
environment with young frantically busy 
people. The successful candidate wfll have 
good typing, some short-hand and plenty 
of initiative. Super prospects with this 
outstanding, gtvahead company Salary 
c£9,000+ perks. Call today. 01-493 5787. 


GORDON YATES 


ADVERTISING 

OPPORTUNITY 

£9,S00 

We are a leading advertising agency in the West End 
looking for a young experienced secretary to work for 
ooe of ourdians Services Directors and his team. 

You win need excellent skffls, enthusiasm and lots of 
common sense together with the ability to liaise wftb 
both clients and staff As wed as the usual secretarial 
lades the job will allow plenty of opportunity to 
become involved with the work of the group. 

tf yo« hare to mtuest in advertising and are lmlciig 
for new fkaUmgp enjoying aH the benefits pf bang 
part gf a team within a large agency, please telephone: 

Snsamui Jacobsen on 629 9496. 


TELEVISION 
JUNIOR SECRETARY 
£8,900 

Exciting opportunity for a bright young 
Secretary, with at least six months experi- 
ence, to work with a lively sales/marketing 
team in a wen known television company. 
Good shorthand/typing needed plus 
TOWtmity, enthusiasm and commitment 
Great chance for career progression. 

Telephone 01 499 6966 

TU 

GROSVE NOR 


TWO PROFESSIONAL SEC/PA’S - NW1 

Ybuna mother figures required to Director and Group 

Go-twmator 

Organise us rote us and help us control and motivate a 
growing staff of 40 and nsmg Effic ienc y without triplicate 
memos Activity without toss Enemy (fedwttOfl and expertise 
in detegeon 

The group rangas from computers to consumer protection vn 
records and deodorants a passionate interest bi atl these 
areas would be steal (if not wen sell it to youW 

D W ot tte perfert W Sec and seflte to arotmd £!1 500 

or £9500 respectnrety Ifor now) their phone us on 

01-482 4411. 














































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EXECUTIVE CREME 


PA Extraordinaire 


IIMBDRAKE 

■ PERSONNEL ■ 


Aig&btyoneofthemoste&itarjring paid overtime. Minimal shorthand -9Q/6G -f WP. 

^ atouncf 1 tts PA to the Manage Director of one Age imiator2B^0 yeas. 

of the trust important iniematto&tmes^ tatanhnna fil.ATQ 6477 

latewtoancamtiMtabeco^ nease l&epflDne W H330*Uf 


c. £13,000 -^exceptional benefits ■ Hoi bom 


PA M RESEARCH 
£13,000 + BSO0S 

A true cam wtfiki too Her- 
KWnUV rammed Maria* 
Rasenh Group. As Personal 
Asssrani tntfie Ctnrman you 
«* M ibedly invoked in aU 


aspects of wring Stic enm- 

S - wrong iff Kcn&ntf 
aaansng tenBoraty 
an. omes mamenance and 
a mituuk at otter points «s 
well* brain a n#t Rand pa- 
wn. II you tore exatatt SH 
«» ^wa am dm? mate 


am rorgeotEu ropefs largest direct sales 
vwhidl has "»de 

nruaentjai the mightiest name in the 
RnanoalServices Industry He is also at 
me forefront of a major programme of 
within the Prodentfef, driving 
forward a wide range of new key 
initiatives. 

He now needs a first-class FA. 
Someone he can count on to supervise a 
secretarial team and organise his hectic 
? -feysso effectively thatthe word 
lNDiSPcN5ABLE will readily spring to 
mine. Occasionally you'll need to sit 
down and use your WR audio and 
shorthand skills when an overload 
threatens. Otherwise your rote *s N 
will be as a trusted, resourceful 
W in the traditional sense. A " r 


He doesn't want a 'yes' person. He 
wants someone with a first class eduea- 


wants someone with a first class educa- 
tion, a strong personality and lots of 
initiative. Someone who will really get 
involved in this rapidly changing business 
and can handle large volumes of varied 
work, sometimes under considerabte 
pressure. The kind of experience, skills 
and maturity needed would suggest mid 
to late 20 ’s as the ideal age. 

A package including low interest 
mortgage and non-contributory pension 
awaits. Could it beforyou’Telephonefor 
more information or write enclosing a CV 
to: Mrs Lesley Adamson, Personnel Officer, 
Dept PSFAS, Prudential Corporation, 142 

Holbom Bars, London EC1N 2NM. 
v -tel: 01-936 8181 Closing date 
? m for applications 20th November 
ft f 1986. 


HessnexfTemefysuccessfi^andttftdirr^ 
Amencun who regidrgs j committed efficient PA 
wtv can totafyor&mse he business and private fife 
acting very nuchas the interface between frnand 


Affteantsstmicfteive banking experience, strong 


subsidy 




GdPBBUFMEn 
01-034 0388 







PRUDENTIAL 



£10,000 


UnHappBbte, enthusiastic 
ana byname shorthand 
uc s urgently needed to 
asset the Genera! 
Manager ot tins expanding 
muse co. Must be smartly 
presented, writing to get 
malty Involved, viorve 
under pressure and use 
own IMHM. Exc skids 
essential (SO/BO). Great 
opportunity to team about 
the mus>c world. 


930 8207 


P.A. IN ADVERTISING 
TO £10,000 

One of the joint MD’s of this London based prestige ad agency needs 
a good P.A. with excellent skills (100/60) to assist at weir superb 

LI J IMS! 1_ . . i*. * 


Head Office location. 

The ideal age range is 23-28 and key qualities wiQ be personality, 
presentation, a tactful and diplomatic manner and a good «*»»» of 
humour. 


The main accounts he handles arehousehold names, constantly seen 
in major TV advertising campaigns, and he is prepared to delegate 
lots of duties to a suitably qualified candidate. 


MARKETING SECRETARY 
c.£10,000 


To work for the Market 
group at their London 
(100/60). 


1 Executive of this world famous cosmetics 
est End offices. Good skills are required 


Suitably Qualified candidates will be aged 24-32, experienced at 
Director level and preferably have worked in a marketing 


environment. 


For either of the dboue positions please telephone Paul Saunders for 
interview arrangements or send your CV to him at: 


HUNTER TURNER ASSOCIATES LTD, 

2nd FLOOR, EDINBURGH HOUSE, 

40 GREAT PORTLAND STREET 
LONDON WIN 5 AH 

TELEPHONE: 01-637 3006/01-636 9891 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT/ 
SECRETARY 
circa £11,500 + benefits 


We require an astute and adaptable person to work 
for the Mana g in g Director and Construction Man- 
. ager of our London operation, which is involved in 
House Building and Development within the 
Greater London Area. 


The ideal applicant will have sbonband/typing skills 
of 100/60 w.pjn. and have the capability of doing 
some audio work. The person appointed will be 
totally responsible for the da; to day administration 
or the office, as well as being able to hold the fort 
whilst the Management team an out on site. 


The operation runs on an informal but interdepen- 
dent basis and the successful applicant must be 
intelligent, able to contribute and be flexible in their 
approach. 


If you think you may be interested in hearing more - 
please telephone: 


Louise Anderson on (01) 930 S202 


or write, enclosing a current CV. to- 
wards Construction (London) limited 
.27 John Adam S treet 
London WC2N 6HX 


TRILINGUAL TOL 


German/French 
package c.£13,000 


PJL-’s AND 
SECRETARIES 
WITH LANGUAGES 


PA SECRETARY Cl 0,500 
+ CHRISTMASBONUS 


This top management consultancy in W1 
are looking for a smart weH educated 


This prestigious bank rn the City ts 
looking for a senior trilingual secretary 
tor their Capital Markets Department. 
Mtwt important is your ability to work 
as pan of a leant. Languages must Iw 
fluent as tots of outgoing corres- 
pondences needs to be translated. Skills 
of KM/60 3rd a sense of loyally will be 
expected. 


Whether you work on a temporary or 
permanent basis, if you can comm- 
unicate effectively m one or more 
European La n guage, our interesting, 
professional diems need you with yout 
excellent secretarial skills. 

Please call if you would tike to find out 
more about using those skills to your 
advantage. 


and professional Secretary 60/80 wpm 
to look after one of their top partners. 
First class benefits. 



International Secretaries 


01-491 7100 


01-4917100 


LITIGATION SECRETARY 
£10,000 + BENEFITS 

A leading city solicitors are seeking a 
confident and well dressed secretary. 
24+ with at least 2 years litigation ex- 
perience 70 wpm essential 

CALL: LIZANNE/HELEN OR UA AT 

SPAN SECRETARIAL ON 

01-734 7394 


I DIRECTORS’ ASSISTANT 

Ad. Agency To £l5k 






ttr v. j urn. uv po»iBf ajr nr? h*4cd m Bbdktwh Vilh|t *'*''*■ n 
a\,i -uni .d i hi- fci*&3i caWm- 10 lake o»« Md wpnvra aD diJ-uMay 

jdpiii.ijnju.ji 

|I L-.valul ir.y »B'C a voo"4 tuctemnd m office aMramaWm WHBIII w 
M<n\ enuiiHuimL preaiahh anb xmuni eittMvr axneart- rw nw« 
1., U. Thai ■ ran »0|V on you* o*n manure - «* mB n« haw tune 10 

jra.r. ,uu 1 41 the Hr 40 rt adicrnurp 


VkOltund jrnl c* aodtn rtjrmtiicr and t» are fgn anL 

II ..4i .-an [ii'.c it. ov iba< »<nr are deiKxtnL (uodmatuat apeneawl profc*- 
Muod »il! pa* up “ tlx.iV*) 

Wine, in cunfalcnce. racXWBg * M C.V.. wc 
A tan WQwa Managing Dinner, 

Rebus Advertising ,4 Mariuting, 

St Agnes House, CressweBPariL 
fflyklwiih -tillage. London SE3 9RD. 


OFFICE MANAGER/ 
SECRETARY 

up to E1L50Q 

Tins oil trading company 
based m W 1 . needs a good 
administrator wto s cit- 
able of working on ai m iw- 
native As the Otftte 
Manager, you wri< be res- 
oonsifle lor slab, sabres. 
PAYE and act as central 
bason between New York. 
Sutherland and London, 
Tins post win sut s omeon e 
wit it a strong alrmmstraova 
background Skills Sl/60 
plus WP. -oe 25-35. 

01-499 0092 


Retpred immediately for small lively grftware 
import company based at Hatton Gardea No 
typing or shorttend needed but common sense, 
organisational ability to manage day to day- 
administration. Remuneration above average 
according to past experience. 

Details of your C.V. can be discussed during 
interview but please apply in a very short letter to: 

MRHDKENLET 
40 Marlborough Mansions 
Cannon HUJ, London NW6 


RE-INSURANCE 

(£12,000 


SWEET 

CHARITY 


£ 10,000 


Tt» Director mutt- 
rrxlfcon pound Hospital 
appeal is lookmg tor an 
»cco/npfcs*wd Pa witf) a 
sense ol numour and a mmd 
lo pursue a caroar n cnaniy 
aanwesvatov 


You wfll prevtie a Ml 
support noie. generate your 
own coreespondence. and 
be prepared to 'muck m'. 


TMs ts m opportunity to 
team about cnanty tund- 
raising in a professional 

/nenefly environment. 


Age 21 -30. 
is; lDO/60 + 1 


Senior 

SeerMaries 



PA 

with excellent 
presentation, 
good skills and 
insurance 
experience 
required for the 
Chief 

Executive of 
this smart 
City Company. 
Age28+. 


CONSULTANT 

£10,000 PA + PROFIT SHARE 


Matching people to jobs in a earing and professional way is 
our business. 

At our Strand office we need an enthusiastic, articulate, 
motivated person probably mad 20‘s who can confidently 
and successfully Introduce applicants to our clients for per- 
manent job vacancies. Experience may be an asset but H 
you have tf» necessary Bar and a sound office background 
come and talk to us. 

For interview telephone 
VERONICA LAPA 937 652S 


SECRETARY 

(SHORTHAND) 


Oy 3778COO 
Ubn End 6397001 


C€OTACOm 


Reautmam Consultants 


Secretaries Plus 


Required for small friendly 
evesnnera managetnea com- 
p»ry dose to Liverpool Street. 
To assist wth afl tusness ini 

B irsonal corrasDonOeflce. 

ust have fasL acurae typing, 
shorthand 100 wpm. word pro- 
cessing experience pretoned. 


MM D RAKE 

‘" personnel si 


PA OFFICE ] 

manager 

£104)00 

Tr© B no ’Sf L2L5 

feezes srmMK.-- 

Sms 

•tC ~au aSSB!& ,0Qe 

C82erj Srt ais: SWS 


£17,800 TO 
£24,000 


PA - RECRUITMENT 
c£10,000 - review in Jan 87 


EfO.QQO pa plus other 
benefits. 


ph! & ? ]£ j Uy . 


Highly talented, had work- 
ing PA required for dyn- 
amic, suiiswitat afrepre- 
neur in BaJgravia. woven 


mmistrativematolmeswrai 

minimum 1ff/75 a mg 
for tins smctJy protestors 


Ttvs is b toy position to join an exclusive international 
recruitment consultancy as PA to two Managing Asso- 
ciates, who are keen to delegate, working to a very high 
level of confidentiality. They will involve you in research 
work, seating up office systems, co-ordinating meetings, 
travel and mrarviewing arrangements. Excellent sec skills 


9 Wegato Stra 

Knihsp. 


{ 100 / 60 / will be b) much demand, as well as an organised 
and flexible attitude to an often hectic workload. 


ciB »*» " 

01-734 oan 


verieg Wto. CSh 
MM. N|W 
if possabto, to BO, 


CaH Melanie Laing. 
OI 631 fS4!R»;Com 

Pnce-lamesw 

ARartaersLW 




BROAD SHOULDERS 
ABD SMALL-fiHRSEQ 
£12,000 aeg 

STOM, succesful FfnancW 
Management company irt 
taaay offices needs a 
mature secretary to take the 
amffl off mar Rnanbfl) 
ComroNer's shoukiers. Ha . 
wants someone who wS 
evwwaly be enable of 


more la creme 

APPOINTMENTS 

appear on 

PAGE 10 


PRIVATE SECRETARY/PA 


running their HQ. Good 
typing essential. SO SIM and 
WP useful. Age 24 +. 


ienceA otgacised decficued, and wdi pracmed. 
90/60- Knowledge of fteoch * Genztan ase&L 
>• £12.000+. Luxury offices in Central London. 


send your C-V with your tdephooe number 

(daytime A home) 

Ta BOX H32, The Tows, PO Box 484. 

) VngiiBt St, Lorakra ECL 


To comptet® thw 
pietuM, 
phrase contact 
Rosemary WhftfWd or 

Lindsay Anderaon on 
01 631 0802. 


acwnwwM*5u.MiKn 


arweon ftp CiywOibg new ideas rioalja 
dass people and die /tbs they desene. 

IT you feel you do<d be dong bene: we 
went to help ffu Alter at. you spend erough of 
in* nay wtag-joj watt »en|oys So 
tanenbenhe name ta pnmses ha efise 
sabpestofesj class tempsand petnanens. 

Lte aj oa seam Pa s. legal 





flyouieSracassandw3B2pbioiTaih 

yomTafermngusno*- 


01-628*4200 


■FIRST CLASS- 

BUSINESS INTRODUCTIONS 


C(TYQU£tfC5SC6mC.2L0( < fi(MV^BUtL[]IK3S. 
L(»IDCW«l^U>aXW£C2M5FP 


IATOTHE 
CHIEF EXECUTIVE 


Our Client, a major [ntemational Leisure 
Company, is currently seeking a PA/Secretary to the 
Chief Executive based in Central London. 


The successful candidate will probably have 
abour ten years' experience with at least two at Main 
Board level. Excellent secretarial skills and a good 
telephone manner are essential. 


This demanding post requires a smart, intelli- 
gent and energetic person with the ability to work 
under heavy pressure and to supervise other staff as 
necessary. Anyone earning less than £12,000 is 
unlikely to have the appropriate career background. 


The hours are long and include occasional 
weekends bur in return we offer an attractive remuner- 
ation package with all the benefits normally associated 
with a large International employer. 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE £13,000 


If you are interested please apply to Martyn 
Loach, Saatchi &. Saatchi Recruitment, SO Charlotte 
Street, London W1A 1AQ. 


Our City based client is a public 
company with an expanding 
international network. 


Saatchi & Saatchi Recruitment 


The Chief Executive requires a 
senior secretary with director level 
experience. The role has a light 
secretarial workload and is very 
much organisation and co- 
ordination for a much travelled 
boss. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 
MD’S PA £15,000 


£ 10.000 

PROMOTIONS 


Age: 28-40 Skills: 100/60. 

: RECRUITMENT 

e-COMPANT TEL 01-831 1220 


Do you thrive on pressure and enjoy managing 
the hectic working life of the Managing Direc- 
tor of this young expanding public relations 
consultancy. You will need patience and dedi- 


The administration manager of 
die leadng rtemawnal 
sports promotion company b 
looking lor a stt/admini- 
stratnn assistant 


cation. You wHI enjoy the pressure, the hours 
(probably I0am~7pm) and have the skills 
100/70, which mil make short work of the 
mechanical aspects at the position. The very 
nature ot the business means that a high 
standard of personal presentation is essential. 

Ideal age probably 28 - 40. 


Recruitment Executive 


We ere looking for one more person tola 
demanding role in a Company which has grown in 
stature. Our diems demand high standards from 
the Consultant This is because we specialise in 
providing professional staff to one of the leading 
professions - LAW. We now need someone with 
at least one year's current Employment Agency 
experience (dealing with Secretaries) but took mg' 
for a challenge where professionalism is ot prime 
importance. 


w 


j In tins new position you wrt 
ad as a hndqun in me central 
atintmtstration and must haw 
a mencuious apwoacfi to you 
I tesponsdHbties wfMdi wD rrr- 
] coporale assisting with the 
upkeep ol stall records, theca 
ifefei insurance petaes. cen- 
tral fifing, office computin' 
systems aid secretarial back- 
up. 

You wifi need lots of common 
sense an d a sense ol humour. 


/.AFX? 




Your previous experience wdi 
■ have tested your admimsvaiiw 
skills. 

Stalls: f 00/80 Age 22^5 


WEST END OFFICE 
629 9686 


Gone are the days when you canvass from morn- 
ing tin evereng! Gone are the days when you type 
your own CVs! We have five in-house secretaries 
who perform that function for us. 


If you are of good education and now looking for 
a fresh challenge where initiative is recognised 
and rewarded with Es £s Es. please contact in 
confidence Mack Dinshaw. 01-242 1281 during 
bus. hours and fll-204 5819 between 9 and 10 pm. 


TOP FLIGHT SECRETARIES 

FOR ALL THE BEST “OUT OF TOWN” JOBS! 

BMingual Secretary, Engfish/Frencfi for Croy- 
don executive £10,000 pa. 


Asm&MQ mm 


Secretary/adminstrator for W6 Company, 
£10,500 pa. 


PARTNER'S 

SEC 


£11,500 


Ito^onneC Appointments 

95 Aldwych. London WC2B4JF 


Graduate secretary for Wimbledon Company. 
Beautiful Georgian style offices. £10,000 -k 


Please telephone Carol Wisby 
on 947 0319/879 3180 
or send your CV to 
Top Flight Secretaries 


26 The Broadway 
Wimbledon, SW19 IRE 


Large Accountancy 
firm in WCl seeks 
experienced sec with 
good skills, WP 
experience and 'O' ; 
level Englisb/maths. 


In the Limelight 


c£11,500 

WBB known city Chairman and fits Number 2 require top 
notch PA Who’ll emoy running their office at a dvmed and 
pleasant pads. Maresting mrature of private and busmass 
matters wfl call for excatem people sMte, shorthand and a 
certain swofr fairet Age 21-35. 

Can 588 soar 




Middleton Jeffers 


Director’s 

Secretary/P.A. 


Ability to deal with 
people essential, 
since lots of client 
contact. 

Age 25-35 max. 


City 3778600 
Wen End 4397001 


Reraa.TrHtKT uwted 


MARKETING/PR 

£15,000 




Ncwfy created PR rale for small dynamic marker leaders. A 
coafidausdTsnrleriouuliaieand implement ideas and 

projects. Marketing wiihm UK and Europe. Liaising with lop 
London consuliaBis, Ibr press-writing your own releases eic. 
Creating and promoting the ‘Corporate image'. This is a key 
position witfi amazing pomdatif you ran present yourself and 
the company. Please call 

Jane Graham Partnership, 

17a Newman St, London W.l 637 2552 
Sec Cons 


We’d like to hear from graduates, aged 24+, 
who enjoy working on their own initiative, under 
pressure and who can organise a busy Director 
and his office. Excellent skills and previous 
relevant experience are necessary. 

First class executive terms and conditions will 
be negotiated, with salary not less than 
£10,000 p.a. 


Secretaries Plus 


please write, m strict confidence, to: 


The Director, 

British Ports Association, 
Commonwealth House, 

1-19 New Oxford Street, London WCl A 1DZ. 


British Ports 


OFFICE 

MANAGEMENT 


(£12,500 

As co-ordhnUr mid 30‘S ter 
professional oqj. in WCl Run- 
ning sil MpecK, reception and 
overall support lynems. Some 
rii/hand. good typing • At 
presentation! 

PA 

ORGANISER 


c£l 1,000 

As secretary, taic 2ffs » MD of 


Mayfair Beauty Clinic. Sitom 
sh/band/iyptng. social eonfi- 


ASSOCIATION 


ADVERTISING £10,000 

Lively Agency with superb offices in Nwl require 
experienced sec lo work for account group. Good 
audio typing & enthusiasm required plus ad exp. 
Social life guaranteed plus lots of variety & tun. 
Age 25+. 

24+ & £11,000 

International Construction Co with smart offices 
in SW7 an; looking for see with BJ*** SH/iyptng + 
WP exp. No pressure, but ability to cope widi 
difficult boss vital! 


PA 

PRODUCTION 


PA in 
Mayfair 


EQUITY 

£14,000 


c£ 10,000 

As team member, mid ZD’s of 
lively PR setup in SW6. Good 
typing, venaulily Queens Eft- 
swrit aB cssemiaB 


£12,000 


The Head office of a fearing 
international construction 
company is lookmg tor a 
graduate (or equrvalant) PA 
to run ttte office ol a -suc- 
cess! ui main board director. 

Ha respensitrtiiw are 
pnmarty on the sates and 
martteong wla and you wfl 
have a junior secratajy to 
help otnanise he busy diaty 
and travrt arrangemortfa. 


INTERNATIONAL 

AIRLINE 

Seeks Admin Assistant/ 


PA SEC 


fiducationai background 
and exseflent secretarial 
skids. 

Ceolro! Lnaifn offices 
Usual aiiflos pelts 
Salary CXHJH8 

Reply wtthfnSaVfo 
BOX 693 


Ha busmess « NgWy 
cjortlctenoaf end you should 
have wpertence of tiering 
wttti people at senkw levels, 
ana be looking fora 
ehaflengmg caraar mow. 


in the cofltotiMvs world of 

- international Equity Derating 
cme company has me 
backing and experience » 
lead the pack. Aa PA to one 
ot the MD’s you wii be ai 
the leading edqa of the 
market fulfilling a 
demanding, varied and last- 
moving secretarial rote. The 
emphasis of the pots 
organisational and trouble- 
shooting ratherman a 
heavy typing toad and It wb 
grow hrther as tne 
department increases. 


-01-5838807- , 

JOYCE GU1NESS 

. BrnfflOfrawaaiiwB J 


2! Bnq*e hub KfigtaUm SB 


pmm pin wc a respusonr 
Snap adwftttegroji SW. 
5*i* yc tetM S 
Tefauhone H*mn tat 
01 789 839? 

seam mpumm 

SERVICES 


Age 2555 SkfisiOOffiQ 


Pose, confidence and me 
aboiy fo work last under 
pressure are me keys to 
rhs position. 


TV £10.000 

CnUfflBTS qwcatkm 
ASSIST BJfiWS 
S/H SBC 

IKti a 5f«al iBPcrci*y 
Warts ad cMdran. ga 
m*ied wufi amrnesianng 
new pmgranraBS. partqrtag 
n soecol «o«s vd typing 
amtxfBBeti rtumaton for 
me BA. Also assa a® a» 
pu&katon of fte Mast 
magaait S weds hot 


Speeds . 100/60 Age 23-28 


West End Office 
629 9686 


CITY OFFICE 
01-600 0286 




AMSESAJMaEQmi 'B/RNatHSEaffR 


St ItegwdSMMtl«BdeBWll 

T*LD1 -429 2306 j 
















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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOV 


SlAtSjSf 



SPARKLING 
SELECTION! 

EXPLOSIVE! to £11,000 

An experienced Settlements Clerk will find these 
plush new Stockbrokers' offices just what the big 
bang ordered, when dealing with American and Euro- 
pean accounts. Ref: (FI) 559/43004 

BRILLIANT! £10,000 

This is a gift edged position as PA to a City MD. Your 
excellent organizing ability will be matched by fault- 
less presentation and confident client contact Ref: 
(Bl) 562/43001. 

STRIKING! £10,000 

Shorthand wifi only be part of a Secretary's extensive 
Director level involvement in this City firm's busi- 
ness. A profit share is the reward for excellent admi- 
nistration. Ref: (Bl) 559/44001. 

BRIGHT! to £9,500 

A confident thorough Secretary will graduate to this 
Senior role, running an office and supporting a 
Professorial Assa cation's work. Ref: (A1) 

551/44016. 

CRACKING! £9,000 

This is a designer job for a Secretary who will thrive 
m a young, lively team. Plenty of variety m shaping 
our future environment Ref: (Bl) 551/44003. , 

TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! TOO!; 
Phone or call NOW! 



19/23 Oxford St W1 
131/133 Cannon St EC4 
185 Victoria St SW1 
22 Wormwood St EC2 


TeJ: 437 9030 
Tel: 626 8315. 
Tel: 828 3845 
Tet 638 3846 


AUDIO SECRETARY PA 

Our regional sales manager and his small team, 
based in Kingsway. need an enthusiastic PA. 
Good secretarial experience, the abifity to accept 
responsibility and work on your own initiative are 
essentials. WP skills would be an advantage. 
Working conditions and benefits are excellent. A 
salary in the region of £9,000 is anticipated. 

Pleae write with fun cv to Miss Christine Weston. 
Personnel Officer. Hogg Robinson Travel Ltd, Inter- 
national Buildings, 71 Kingsway* London WC2B 6SU. 

<@> HOGG ROBINSON TRAVEL 

With Us You’re In Good Company 


TBE B0TAL BBTTT4TI OF HTE8MTKML AFFJU9S 

Seeks part-time secretary for Publications 
Manager. Half each day Mon- Fri. Needs solid 
secretarial skills, wore! processing or willing- 
ness to (earn, and attention to details. 
Interesting work and environment Publishing 
experience useful but not essential. 

Telephone Personnel 
01-930 2233 or write 
10 St James’s Square, 

London, SW1Y 4LE. 


mi 


I DRAKE 

PERSONNEL ■ 


EXECUTIVE 
BEAD ROUTERS 
£9,588 

ties rtmawcHf racnpaiy based 
• MKWuuRir 
CMJ- qfcn a nd cte taol *av 

wtten T 

■ wry ftgb ML, raw «U and 
aauai sites not be at n 
mra*, hgSi sandard. B yai teel 


Cri HHDU FBIWG « 

01-734 0911 


SHORTHAND 
SECRETARY 
£8,500 p.a. 

Inlcnotiooal Management 
Consultancy mjentiy 
rcqinres a shorthand 
secretary Tor iberr pleasant 
Kingston office. 

The successful applicant 
wilt be srff-motivaied. well 
organised and have good 
shorthand and typing 
skills. Knowledge or ibe 
French language an asset 
but not essential. 

For immediate tacerrenf 
contact G)Eb Herman oa 

01-549 9476 


£ 12 , 000 + 
M0RTGAGE 
AGE 25-30 

Bright smart secretary with 
excellent shorthand/WP skills 
and U» maturity and experi- 
ence to cope tnUi a senior 
roto. required for the Head at 
Trade Finance. Major City 
Bank. Lois ol organising and 
meeting ol clients. Finance/ 
Banking experience essential. 
Immediate start. 

Fiona Smith 
430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


(B TOP FASHION 
" £10,500+ 

Outgoing Vice Chairman of 
Has Regent Street fashion 
house needs unflappable, or- 
ganised secretary. Busy, var- 
ied duties, help set pnoribes. 
International (favour, nice 
friendly people. Eoceltotf dis- 
counts on high quality cloth- 
ing. Good skills 

01-4080424 



acqmd stc stts and mo- 
ons pKonky to p re p are 
ctaut imauwuufc, deal Mb 
press rebeses. ow anaa sxlb- 
IMnns and geontfy repuse 
Inn compictsiir. The oompey 
a wrjr tug rad kran to pro- 
mpt people hM tta ngte 
KMufe mg m now for a 
prana 



MLESrnUVEJ. 

■woo oppoowwiw irwa ina 

sales iitysndtenguagm 
TDJ40UaUUST Cl «X>0 ♦ 
nxnren , CMJ.OOO 
Look am dwno^ffliwi 


caooo 
Bo PA sec enpy xanety 
n ctojm 

Ura sws fcjBey ywnana- 


WONDERFUL 

OPPORTUNITY 

Young person aged 23-30 na- 
tural to run retak axle ol 
citannmg waX-estSbfehed to- 
Brior Decorating rfwp. Rets 
experience essential. To Ue- 
gin December 1st Salary 
£9,000 juu 

Tdephom 767-2241 
and ap eak to Janie. 


Edmnai scare 
TV 

Use nw and sac arts 
fuukoptxm trjsaa 


PRESENTABLE, 

ENTHUSIASTIC 

SECRETARY 

Aged 19-22 needed Mryoirag 
successful team of Fttfion 
e s t a t e agents. Accurate typ- 

a ts essendal though dunes 
be varied. Sense of tu- 
mour a a must 

c£BJ09 

Telephone 

Michael or Charles at 
Vanstons 
01-736 9822 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 


Working in a prestigious office in Parliament 
Square, within walking distance of Waterloo, 
Victoria and Charing Crass mainline stations, you 
could play a vital role as PA to the head of a busy 
team concerned with the careers and educational 
requirements of the surveying division. 

Employment package includes starting salary 
cjff® K, reviewed annually, subsidised restaurant, 
season ticket loan. 

If you are an experienced secretary with excellent 
typing skills, (no shorthand required - Olivetti 
ET1 1 1/VP typewriter) lots of common sense who 
car fit in to a hectic office deali n g with a wide 
vari e t y of queries from students, educational 
establishments and members of the profession and 
give some adminsitrauve support, write to: 
The Personnel Officer, The Royal Institut ion of 
Chartered Surveyors, 12 Great George Street, 
We stmin ster SW1P SAD. 

Telephone (01) 222 7000 Ext 212. 


HQ MOSS EURSOaoa-.iwyi IMW wau. iwww rayy 

, accttiaral research fa the edsonal teem and yotTB aho 

chan* of office wlnii ii Wniira a. You'D oqogr • bow 

mfaraai abnombtre sad tear offices we vey mortal mb mb 
wmoperi- B^to indude^ wrote boBdayv aai emfr *6*xj 
review. 80/55 skills aad WP aUky needed. 

50% ADMINISTRATION 

£10,500 + early review 

A leading Brm o f ewutht m arch mrauh a nt * racks 
Secretory/ PA to tfaeb Manugnt Associate. This h — 
varied PA rote 505- secietarial sad SOSi irimiualfativ e. Si. 
offices sod a relsaed wry bmpy reorfaw atarapfam 55J90 
skiDs needed sod WP sfaBily. Age 23+. Phase takphone 01-240 
3531. 

Elizabeth Hunt 

RecrutmertCorsutante 
18 Qrosvenor Sheet London W1 




extrovert sbsbw® 

Bag} us ta more details 


We need someone witktop retail 
experience to sell antique coQectois’ 
items and contemporary enamels. Very 
busy, happy atmosphere^ . . 

Excellent salary and prospects. 

Please write in catenae to: 

Managing Director, : 
Halcyon Days, " 

‘ 14 Brook Street, 
London, W1Y 1AA. 





WANTED : 

A “WHIZZ” RECEPTIONIST 

Accord Pubiicuioos, the young, successful and expanding 
greeting card c om p any , are looking for a bright young 
person to help run the reception! If you enjoy communi- 
cating with people, have a wonderful voice and are 
organised this could be your chance. We offer hard work, 
responsibility and a great deal of fuo and satisfaction and a 
salary of £ 8 . 000 - 
Cunoin? 

Stan by ringing CHERYL QUINN on 01 354 0101. 

Accord Publications Ltd 
Baldwin Terrace, 

London N1 7RU 

accord 



SECRETARY FOR 
AMERICAN LAW FIRM 

London Branch Office near St Pads has 6 month posi- 
tion (which may become permanent). Audio, fast and 
accurate typing and good organisational skills eaaential; 
Wang word processing hefcifuL Standard tans with 
pw^nrml paid overtime. 4 weeks annual holiday. 
£&500 negotiable, acconfing to experience. 

Please write enclosing CV to Kngfoa, Dana & ConM, 
5 Cbespshfe, London, ECZV 6AA. 

No rl rase 


MARKETING IN CHELSEA 

TO £11,099 

Woriiing fora young, ftsi DkecforiBJhfc Svsly oo 
spedatetog m new food & drinks products you 
win never have a duB moment Your sense of 
humour.' charm & easy going wiKngness are just 
as important to this co as your good typing &, 80 

SH. WP exp pref. Age 2&4D. 

Vacancy also exists here working for 2 young 
consultants. Gd typing. SH usefifl but not ess. 
Sal £9,000, age 2t+. 


INITIATIVE? 

Experienced BcwatiwSeaeta^ 

Seans first class secretarial 
fast shorthand needed by manaaemert tram- 
- - consultant Smith Square. 


The Fountem 
secretary with fast 


also needs part-time 


Please ring Thelma Seear 01-222 6037 


Susan Beck 


RECRU’.TMEN' 
01-584 624; 


OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 
£9,500 aeg VI 

Lnefy PR Ca is mrremty seekreg a Ottke AdniisMor/PA to 
oiganisu and on the office a wfl as tfs hm DRciofs. 
ideaDy Between 27 and 35. rate sand adfumstrawn and s e cre tou l 
sWte- (Atsi hM kiwite^e ol WP. 

Sa weeks taSday. B15A, travel murance. 

For further details, please telephone 
Jenny Ftatman on 888-4050 


FULHAM - PART-TIME 

Receptionist required to work as member of friendly 
team in busy purpose-built surgery in Parsoos Green. . 
Bdl and/or part-time. A good telephone manner is 
Btial as is the ability to cormnunkaie with | 


at all levels. Typing an advantage. Salary 
Interested persons please contact < 


between 9 am aad 5 put 
on 01 736 7557. 


PERSONNEL ASSISTANT 

To work in a dcw laboratory development in Hrafcy 
Street area. Applicants should have scti ct aria l skdh. 
nrnhaWv mfrfintl c n y qlfi il rtmftftofi oriH he 

invtdvtd in til nan- te ch n ical t ab or Aiot ywcavhie*. GhkS- 
lions of service are atgouabk. 

Farther fadtemtieo maybe ebtabred I 
M 274 2621, or appBodiaBS sMd bet 


OFFICE CO-ORDINATOR REQUIRED 

c-£9,000 

• tiis w fo r Bgara&grift B ctxnpany. 

- WmSqtamriedge oTGOTt iWM 

:S3 

varied posSocr. 

Ptere scad CV ear contact 
. . Karen Mc D o na ld , 

4 Tregunter Road, London SW10 9LR. 
Td 370 4334 


UWVERSITY COLLEGE 

UMB08 

DYNAMIC 
SH SECRETARY 

with experience or Briefest n 
Medical Eiiucahon required by 
Administrative Secretary. Fac- 
ulty ol anneal Sciences for 
Committee work, correspon- 
dence and range of duties. 
Considerable contact with ac- 
ademic and tospfci staff and 
medical students. Salary on 
scale £8,432 - £9,764 pa re 
For an informal discussion 
contact 

Mr David Imrie. 
AdmmisfrafivE Secretary, 
Faculty ol Cfiskal 

Sciences, 

Diversity Street, 
Londffli WC1E 6JJ 

81-387 2958 

to whom written applications 
slnxrid be forwarded. 


MAYFAIR 
PROPERTY CO. 

S/H SEC £9JB0 
+ ALL BflMOtG BB6TTS 

A social PA secretary to the 
sennr partner, you will 
enjoy yore day m a relaxed 
and trend ty office, co- 

KSUL 

devekpemert actwioes of 
die canpany. 

Pteam phone NUL 

Afetpre^E 

RB3UTIMEOTa>SUnANTC; 
St lUgnt ShMl. LcndmWl 
Tel CB-C3 2308 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SECRETARY 

We are a small bat expanding teun of esttfe a 
devdoper* and seek a young. »*H (Htanised. i 
lent -alWoimd' Secretary with «od 
i nil till vc to join us 31 our Mayfair office- koowfcuge B 

esscnual: cmrently Amstrad PCW 8256, w e will g am. Ropo m- 
sibiijttes mdade ivjreDg cheat correspondence, pmpwtjr 
deajls. miuMtporis etc. Bhngand keepttgan up-u>-4Ue 
record arawibblc properties, ample book-Leepm* and B>- 
swering ibe lefcplwire. £7^)00 negptiabte depmdnig on age 
( 18+1 and expeneact Ptasecalt 

Gillian Fry on 

01 491 3497 or 491 3823 (No Agencies) 


■DRAKE iAI:Ulitill;l*Milil 

PERSONNEL “ 

Y0QRG PA 
lor PR 
£ 8/100 

lira Wher dararalinB Account 


Secretarial 

Assistant 

Reraned to provide support 
to professor and his team of 
busy doctors and scientists 
engaged in asthma and al- 
lergy research. Previous 
medical experience not es- 
sential. atffiDugh flexibility, 
accuracy and a gereane mter- 
est at the work ®e important. 
Vaned and interesting with 
scope for mitefive. Dunes in- 
dude typing of general 
medical antf editorial cor- 
respondence. manuscripts, 
and grant ap pl ica ti ons, and 
organizing postgraduate 
teaching courses, as well as 
mane office adnraustratma 
Good typewriting and arefio- 
typewntmg skite essentrf. 
mrd processing experience 
an advantme but trailing can 
be given. Salary up to £8432 
pa- 

Far tarter daWts M rat u iae 
Pratamr by aa fli-351 S2S8. 

sas T&m 

HtapaH. 


(■■■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

CALLiK ALL 
UWfflSTS 
£8,000 

Hr e a doaca n «a ora d fa 
limpera boBagra •Ww* 
rank Frntt.bnraii.teMh. 
BHaa v an ta> H*s teno- 
feaday 


lottog hr a yoaaq dyrat* sw 
n i<n dra wmwl 

d*c ttrna rTom n Atate » 
uuun u ab . *an Mnn * 
manes rad era «n itei 
owr lfa wd ■ m» hm goad 
tiMXdMb am to m ww ’ 
«htt*a *« flK rattwe. ett m 
w 

URBiiaKn 
01-734 0911 

A jfaafr Axi& 

TWMMittBarnRWioam 


FRENCH CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE 

require junior b ilin g ua l se c r e tory with excellent inringr 
organisational and x» mm unication skills, plus nuest 
French. Send CV to F.C.C, 54 Cbcdirit Street, London 
W1 for ihe attention of Mrs BruIeL 
No Agencies • 



ADVERTISIHG 
COVERT GARDEN 
£8,500 

We are a TV based Ad 
at 15 atari wWi a fifo . 
mosphena but a d i Henq in n 
task taces you wo r kfog wdr « 
Directors, we need acaracy 
and stds BO/SO. Pref w ah 
some achng exp. Aga 20-25. 

_ Deborah on 
1-379 6505 


MUNICH/PARIS 

BMingual sec/- 
I administrator to set up 
office in Munich. Excl 
prospects. 

I Two bMinguai secs for 
I multi national Paris Co. 
Suit 1st/2nd jobbers. 

For further 
details can 

Merrow 
01-638 


Agy 

1«7 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNR 

CWEBEMCE 
CHALLOGE 
£3,000 


Mm organised Jon ns 
company a gal torahad In 
flec&ng up confe ren ce* . You 
itti be m on era popca tern 

s ^srsL 9 st 


that the day goes araoolMy. 
Ytti most be brapM 6 on the 
UaL djou lava good —cm- 


& non you can 



THC DRAKE MTSMADOriML' 


NATIONAL 

NEWSPAPER 

Mraagw nuttaa seeratoy 
"r to be imehed »jla 

rank. Stony BaattMs. 

5 weeks hototoy- tea amW- 
my prom scheme, pkara 
Phone 630 1300 «t397._ttdar « 
sradBnafcv. 

VdbM fttoge 


10 AM START 
£9,500 

O toW te benttts aad an urty 
■him lei a yooeg Mas Seoeury 
■ho nodd Khe to ** aOfi a soca- 
ttt l earn * hmsv SBitmodngs. 
Very nutt a yraMrad -tWyhifl 
Hx w neat bray wmmsnv to 
maw atrar tram seceirto a me 
d yoa can pwve yon drw aad 
axu am ent 938 1846 

ilfisn«55r~ 


tTMJMU BntiWItta Cl 0.000 
Wold you bke Jo work for 
Manama ouvetor of muin- 
nauonal hoMtnv company? 
17th chanrans sen Uetnan nma 
aSKTCUiy wUh nueol Balkan to 
nmirr Ut# smooth rutuung of 

stun U K oner in wi Good 
presenlallan. skJUs or 80/60 
and a knosvlRlgr of arcocmts lo 
trial balance MsnulaL B you 
arr ?a+. iwv« bam of initiaUw 
and rahui a small office envi- 
ronment phone os now on Ol- 
434 4512 crone Corkai 

RecrumnetH Oonsaiano. 


HRMOSATtON ASSIST AWT 

£&SOO Ini CMy Co well person 
29 - 90 IMID ad O Level Ed) » 
MU) 2 others on busy info desk 
Provide mupio dale Info K> 
both lnlemal/exiemal fn 
oulres. iMosny m phone). 
KnowMee or S/Board, prof at- 
Utnde pii»eoiifKleiice/a«l>ty ro 
liaise al all levels. Call Nicky on 
01 4 04 0022 KINCSLAND 
FERS CONS. 


PABSONS Green to CIOOOO. 
Jca this conference, promo- 
Dora and de s ig n company as 
PA / nc Wtur to Ihe Director c# 
O uutoaitt produnion Tms is 
a new poswon with good pros- 
pects envisaged. Lots of contact 
wttn cllentt and your own arms 
of rrapo wM MMy bdormal al- 
mospnere. 50 wpm cywng 
ability, shorthand an asset. WP 
aunty needed. PteJie tetephooe 
01 as O 951 1/SS31 <w«3i End) 
or 01 3405551 1 City). Ellrabetn 
mu Recruitment Consol taots. 

rxLSAOO tBdaue 

with 
The 

company is invoiced hi theatre. 
. opera, poo concerts etc. Work- 
ing closely with a newly, 
appointed, dynamic young 
director snu will Bah* with pro- 
moters. ncip out on me admin 
ade and handle ittepnone cans 
on hts behatf. super )oo. Lottos 
scope. Accurate suns 1 80/461 
essential. Age 21+ 

01-499 <W66 M 
ADvtg A Selection. 

MCK to College CSjOOO. A toad- 
lag secretarial college see ks a 
secretary for Uietr busy advo- 
nsmgano ptmttchy d ep ai tm e m. 
A great lobaa you ca n mee t par- 
etna, talk lo me press aad 
arrange tor prwpeenve pupils 
lo vMl the college. You should 
be very sOctoBy confident with 
50 wpm typing. Shorthand an 
advanugr. Please t el ephone Ol 
240 SSI 1/9531 fWcfl End) or 
Ol 240 9661 iatyk EBzaoeih 
Hun t teem ament ConauWantB. 

RUM BOYHs Start your career 
In lefovtSKHi net hung In busing 
ma ter ia ls for due iturior " v 
channel. You will Uatte tvtft to . 


corapartea and assist In aB as- 
pects el an exdUng tonctsoo 
With the scope lo become to- 
vohed In press and pub l icity 
activities, there wtU be lot* of 
satiety SUBs 90/56 wpm. Sal- 
ary C9V60. Synergy. Ihe 
reer um ne u t mew ll ew o'. Ol- 
617 9539 


WEST END 

Secretary required for 
Chartered Surveyors. 50 
wpm +. £7.000 + aaa. 

Contact Penny Denver 
491 7880 or send Cv to 
14 foes Coot, 

St Ortsfopk cn Place, Vf. 

No Agencies. 


ra 600 neg. Mo» Consultants 
based In superb Mayfair offices 
seek professional Receptionist 
wills knowledge of one or mom 
foreign langs. fe mal goon- 
tog. common sense and 
d&potobon are lemdred to run 
tots busy rft t ttbn area. Baric 
cyping/arcts- uatfbl. Mer row 
Emp Agy rme la n g u age Sue- 
dallsttl 696-1487. 


LEGAL Audio £84)00 Team Of 
CKy lawyers derimg with big 
property transaaJons seek 
TWO youngish tecreUrtes (suit 
21 23 yr oldt) to share the 
tonus and e*ci»e«n*«itt Open- 
plan. -lively atmosphere her e 
with lots o I laughs. LV*. 6TL. 
xmas bonm CaU Rachel Cam 
Office Angett Rec Cora 01-490 
2631 


muo uwx Secretary £10250 
Wang OtS will an the frrat 
Smashlng career opening for 
d isc reet, ottvo. ambUloub person 
■3308. Take cha rge of 200 
staff rccoms. LVs. PPP. STL - 
yon name U they give to Oose 
Liverpool SI era. Call Dawn 
Cutler Office Angels Rec Con* 
01-490 3531 


STRATFORD to £10.000. Wny 
commute when you can work 
locally- (Or (hi* lop International 
bank a* sov ie ta r y to tbetr Ber- 
sonnel OotonUnator. PuB 
Involvement In ail areas of re- 
cruUmenl. Bmeflts Include 
bonus, subsidised Umcb and 
generous mortgage auMdy. 60 

. wpm typing and WP *0411 ty 
needed. Please tetepfione Ol 
300 3511/9531 rWrat End) or 
01 200 9651 (CUVL Dtzabeto 
Hunt ReeroKmenf ConsoUanlx. 

VBCO A nun £7.000 ** • great 
Orsl )ob for a aoKy iWnktog 
young stc. m (Ms world 
fBm/video company. Wortdno 
a* part of a small team you win 
http lo organise adv ert tetng and 
PR compalttriin Mpport or aim 
rrieasea around tbo wWd. Su- 
perb benefits Include free video 
nmry. private ecresitug*.' free 
cinema ockett. health dub 
mrabmhu etc. Coos ammo 
rvgutred. AOe 1822, Ple» let 
01-400 1232 The wot* snap. 

FRENCH A German £9/100 - Ms. 


Involved in worldwide consnu- 

ideations via riertroolc mrik A* 
International Jdarkrtteg pa m 
uus axanog new arid you win 
enHp tout invorvemeni In: a 
dynamic gloonimartutfeagenvi- 

ro ur p eiU Ftoeocy In FTtadi 

and German osendaL Good 
skins (90/60) nSmo r ogue nut . 
For details pkraae.iel 01-409 
1252 The Work Shod. 


£ 10.000 - presti- 
gious nupaane sacks pa to 
Company Secretary. I mportan t 
role carrying fdgh degree of va- 
riety and le awaitlBUffy A- level 
ediKaBon preomd. Catm ub- 
flappabuuy and Ihe capacity to 


Goad typing/shorthand re- 
ntuneo. aw 31-26. - new 
Iriephooe 01-495 S787 Qordon- 
Yales CoosuKam*. 


AKTKMJAfUAN 

CDveni Gdn rea BteraieSer. 18- 
22 . wlto audio. SH A -60 wpm 
typing- Interesting work to 
Pleasant em-kuneneat- Apply to 
writing to Bert ram Rota Ud. 30 
A 31 Lonparre. WC2E 9LT or 
phone Jam aayton on 836 
0723 for further details. 


BREAK into Public Rrtoliotnf 
SDttth 22+ P A/Secs wUh S/H 
for tending PA grotto unmett- 
ate . un. oh.em mi wnn pm 
rekases. cnad meeti ng s, tora- 


£9.000+ Count Carden Bu- 
reau. 110 Fleet SL ECU 953 
7696 


m jo court sofKKor cioxwo 
plus £7SOpw LVs. He's a man 
in demand with crazy diary 
Protect turn' And type well and 
speedily. Here probably fall 
madly in love wan tun! Can 
Dawn Cutter Office Anpets Rec 
Cora 01-490 2S31V 


£14*000 CPU m ens PA. Chal- 
lengUig poaUloo ane mbug *0 0 41 


busy day. Ebc HH iu app earanc e 
w skins loo/AOwpm. Jaypar 
Careers iStoanr Sol LU. Ol -730 
6148. 


EXPERIENCED Secretary re- 
quired to commence to 
November. AIKtto 

tyutog/recepoon Cubes for pri- 
vate medical practice SWL. Sun 
age34e. PliiH working com 
<auons Ring 349 9996 


swell -known tiapnesario. Eaten- 
sivr ranged duties Car driving 
and cookbtg Hkflw advanU- 
9eou* SL John’* Wood Bring 
^ccornodathm - * 


IKKNDLY Holbont firm Feaobe* 
experienced legal sec to wan to 
cooseyanrtng and Httgalton. 
salary begin* at £9.000 with 3 
monrtuv review. Tel Jo 491 
2928 DHA AGY 


CC20.000. Areyousrif raollval- 
ctL cfltoy a challenge, able to 
work within a.- lriRb 
pressurised enutrorunsil? If 
you lee* this i* for youthen read 
on: you may already have di- 
reel selling experience or have 
exper ie nce within the reeruK- 
meni Held. We are now looking 

to expand our professional team 

wttoln central London We pro- 
vide exnrotve training and 
offer a Wgft baric sa l ary > e ac- 
crilenl. conuularion strncnire 
totmung to a package of 
c£3 0J3O0. For mare detail* con- 
tact Patrick (TOonnor now on 
01-623 1236. Drake fntenu*- 
booal Agy. ■ 


of -li 

reputation mndre an experi- 
enced MTcwy w«i ON. nod 
accurate audio typing Von wre 
enjoy a varied rale with a sub- 
stantial amount. . of 


and you wttt be able to develop 
the areas of imotvenwnixsyoo 
became au fail with the 
department - * wale. Exceoent 
benefits Inducts a free hmcn. 
The enrisaped sriaiy I* 
CJC 8.000 per annum with an 
additional prom share, scheme. 
Please telephone GHUan 
Etwood. 01-491 1968 La Creme 
Recruttment ConsukSnEL 

BMNKETRia £10.000 - do you 
have markeUngrcetaied experi- 
ence la a large compan y 
environment? As co-ordtoaung 
•ecretanrln iMsiheim cue up any 
you wta arranpe con f erenc e * 
aad exWWbon*. handle PR m«d 
(ns Uatsan and travel around 
toe worid when the lob raouires 
U. Hammersmith based. Bene- 
flts todude use ol company 

- awtountag pool H arln m . 
aotiaah coots etc. SkfBs 90/fiO. 
Age 22-28. Please caB 01-493 
4466 MetTyweather Allrig A 


Reception £7.000 - 
lovely tab In a lively, creative 
environmeoL They specialise In 
graphic de ri pn ttrochaes. com- 
pany togo* «tcL As reoapBonlst 
you ww coordinate co nf arawce 
roams, meimcngtts. visual aM 
library, xarawy - etc whUe 
welco mi ng caller*. Bubbly, out- 
going approach and typing 
a nutty rcctuested Ape so*-. 
Please tel 01-409-1232 The 
Work Shop. . . 

ADtoDI/PA GBJ500 '- super lob 
Cor a young sec looking ra a 
kudor office manapoWl role. 
The, Bvriy yousg architects' 
practice regott# someone with 
at leasl one yearY experience to 
handle o«k» admin, rilent liai- 
son. poriMiaa etc wtrir lending 
secretariat support. ' Accurate 
skills lao/as essential. Please 
can 01-409 1252 The WodL 
Shop. 

CLOttf MASAXWC OkMO 
Ae P A lo the Extftor or this lop 
semap pttoticMIon you wm deal. 


I Strang ad«IB «Hltt 
Of 90/6 O. ntevas 
is praterred. Can 


L K oganMlioa 14 seeking a 
non onnani to aastal wltb 
an mp ects d a guard 
sag tole. You must I 

6H and typing aad- . 

desire m handle a tot a 


media, erasto and attend re- 
<*pMonv etc and avai l with ad 
toperts at I Hr drpor&nnrti 
wpm. Wttn 4 lu a aiuum ol two 
yeara* wotbrid experience 
ihi* siamap salary is envisaged 
to hr c. Of/ 500 . Please contact 
Joanna Bad 01-491 IMS La 


A CXXUCOC LEAVER 


W&tbcCOD- 

ty 


to# ■Office 

ofsecro- 


rate audio and copy mhsiM 
* prnutnr dedre to develop a 


The company u ncyuaa 4 very 
competitive satory tup to 
ca ooo k you hare a tone exne- 
nenon. Please contact Joanne 
Gregory 01-491 laMUOuM 
Recrmtoenj Consottants. 

CREATE a rote StoOOOneg ■- 
smalL exclusive. Utofiihl PR 
company or SI Jbnri ward 
you to come la and create a 
new secretarial pmSlloa from 


tots a hatacn wills atetfts. Soar- 
ndHL hsto to ot umu sc 
conference*, l a un c h w etc aad 
pnwfde fidl sec saworL Confi- 
dence. ttdUsUve and wpdi 

w srie nrs emeoUaf. sum 
80/50. AgeWK- Please tel Ol- 
409 1252 The work Shop. 

■BCDIMMST £9jOOO tap UK 
company seeks smart, wn-mo- 
ken receptkwtti fa rm ni gl iai * 
West Bad HQ. BeneOB bvetade 
free lunch dally Same experi- 
ence mounted atthoogh 
totolpg given on Moa m li 
wBttonri. Typing reamed 
fa own wadi. Ago 23+ . Far 
da _ 


01-493 8787 Gordon Yales 


SBC TO PEER Oevriop tor » 


look great on yoor C-V. Assist- 

tog to** wOHmo w n -tear 

lovotved hr Ihe entenattunaitt 
field, you wB cany out a var- 
ted and urotving ttmctkm 
which wfll opoi rawer door* 
tor yoa. Skma 100/50 wjan. 
Salary: c. £8600. Sm«. the 
recruttment cnn a n l i a m y. . 01 - 
657 9855 

AMDITBWa £7.000 - young 
icc/coueoe leaver sought by 
mala advertbtag company m 
Wl. Young, trendy ftmron- 


coniM toctodtog. tola _ 
mvaivegiBd. 'phone wale, ad- 
mkuanratton. cottratt chasing 
•tc. Good tdtorthadd/iypfeag re- 
quested. Please hd 01-409 1233 
The Work Shop- a 

EXECUTIVE PA £12300 pa «- 
•xc benefits- T7dsleadU)9prop- 
erty oamuny te seeking a pa w 
become involved in a varied 
and demanding hmettan, A 
mu t i ng a Senior Parmer, you 
win need tots of initiative, to 
deal with * fast moving rout 
Skins 120/60 wpm. Synergy. 


014157 9833 

pc i— mow* join ore , 
company and to Bw 

orgmusattoo of ovemoss events. 
AUe to wort on your trwn U*- 
tlaitve. you wfll be gaining exp 
to a field tradttlopagy leading 
out of ihe sec fraorttan. Skills 
90/50 wpm. Batonr: to £8000 
* too c benefits. Synergy- the re- 
rriHtinem consultancy. 01-657 
9S33. . 

lUttZWn £9J0QThe proreo- 
Oons Director of a consumer 

ma g ortne ptMtshmo 

needs a PA. who — • 


ptassovta an imera^jg. fan 
moving environment. DecaUeal 
lyptog; Rwrtaand usefuL Age 
3&4- Pteese ran 01639 7362 
Graduate Appointment* Rec 
Coos. 


EC with min 

100/60 and Words tar experi- 
ence 1 pref -on IBM PCI to work 
far Manager a HttfvTecn swi 
Go. Buw and varied poshttm 
wttn tots of scope far wen 
spgjuso/lprasented person. Aged 
Safer E9.KXM-. 439-7001 
twe« End) 577^600 (City; Sec- 
retaries Plus - The Secretarial 


fklenL 


self-motivated. 


keen to get Into PuMte-Ma- 
ttono. to Iota smafi group 
naoanng me Gontpamrs neritb 
and Brainy Accounts. Lois of 
typing and telephone work. Of- 
ten pmmnrimA . Teteptwoe 
Paulette Winner. Mono and 
Forster PR Ud. 631-4547. 


young Sec. age 2025. wfm ex- 
ceaenl skins and presan tattoo 
far foli range « duties and lots 
of cBent contact PosslbBBy of 
progeamon fa the rittil person. 
Salary £9.000 + super perks 
can -577-8600 tCUy) 439.7001 
rwest Ebdi Secretaries pua - 
The Secretarial Gansuttaatis. 


TECTS 


ABO* 
Destonera, 

POiMmns. ANSA SCMan?«e 

enaunent Consuaanta. 01 734 


£91280 + JIM Review- wah 
yor nmarr ib* aw — 
die actmoes a Bar ~ 



an) to OtoPiRdc AffairaPeptl 
a this wed nsm Go based in 
Wl 430-1001 AM total 5T7- 
8600 (CU-i tawtnvi Pius I 



office, tel . 

aptarr and nree tanch. 60 »mn 
typing and wp duo needed. 
Please Mfepfione Ol 2(0 3511/ 
3631 (West or 01 200 
3561 (CRV l Ehrabtth HUM Re- 


-Id ciofioo Rom 

net M sn ia a of HdtotoM 
lavtatmom co. need* a pa 
with excellent shdtt > 100 / 60 / 
wro sod l& mtmOw ramesn 
to MR to haiimg wfih ncraO 


mnvltM etc. Age 22+ Phase 
tafl Ol -629 7263 Gradate Ap- 
yuiidin e als RecCtana 

aa a mw tB— r * tn- 

■crnatMBai immsany serin 


90/60. perafan. BliPA STL. 
paid O/T £9300X10000 be- 1 
Una Asfifnh AypoatonentsOl 



Salary negombfe. Serious ap- 
pucaab only, vend C.V m 
M ayfair CammodRies Ud. Pre- 
mier House. 7T Oxford Sksd. 
London W1B 1RB. 


German Finn's 


Pi 

James Park 


gash s/bsod to provide fun 
back-op lachkang secreUriof 
aaridanoe. Age 20+-. salary ne- 
gotlawe 8S9 3366 CLC 

l angns g e services tree cons) 

■IlifilORT ID tt/WOL Cm* 

Rk/Sk .{typing only) for up 
market Wl Design Co. Aansi 
nanny ettentete + back-a> to 
Sates Dir. to sumptuous sur- 

. mundtogs. Call Di Warren 
Scruples Rec Cora. Ol 680 


PWIPIJITY CO Mayfair. Get In- 
volved In reridtnual 
man n g eme nL Secret ar y /PA ip 
director. dllO.OOO Snd busy 
' -friendly office, only 6 *aH. 

CVj 10 PJD. 15 Dover SL Wl. 
I 493 2244. . _ 

B STAR luxury hotel currently 

- seeks stver sec in MariMUng 
■ Dept to return fa etc 

BH/Typtoa tortHs will be afTSied 
taexctttng poauion with aH usu- 
al beneOtt. Salary £7^00++ 
377 0488 CSC Agy . 

ADVBRHM8 ACTS Chatman 
rea sec with SH to ansan 
smooth roudog a Ms anddfari 
ous Interests, wci. £11.000. 
Wootfliouse Rec Coni 01 404 
-4646. 

COtfifTRY House Property- PBb- 
Uc M3MMM educated 2nd MbberS 
reauhed fa teadtog west aid 
. property company. Up to 
£9.000. AGP Rec Oons 01-638 
8 987/0 680 
FXUDfT French? -Admin a w e- 
buy read for French, meal 
Director. Worn 60/50 f/Eh 
VO or sod tobcX&OOO. Tel Ol 

- 361 6931 Shelia Pagan in 
nati onal P erso nn el Counsel 

FRENCH cosmetics IWkta Dir 
seeks PA for.fuUy involved bi- 
1 pastoon. Ante wUh an 
1 of martteUng 90/60 exc 
praspectt USfflO 23+ . Uak 
Language Apott 846 9743. 
KWWN 81 U WO PA L Sec 
Flench 10 work with MUgTMr 
of pmsiMotis Co., No SH dm gd 
typing. Bow. Involved a nitsr- 
eadngl CJSIOJXX). L 
Language Apptt 845 9743. 


SH + OOwpra 


... _ .J * own bdUaUve. 

£9.000. 0«fl Natalia TED Agy 
Ol 736 98S7. 


EC* accosmesnts. Full sec rot*. 
A1 staB lacutucs. Raid ower- 
Ume. £10260 Woo dtt o u se Rec 
COPS01 404 4646. 

RUWIUHBT WP operator .. 
ouhvd fa seaab friendly arm a 
chartered sorv e y or s m new nr- 
nee on Knp Rood. Phone Ol 
361 4223. 

R8568 bl U ng ual secs typing 
only wttn oxo a a cc o u nts Mr 
pasts w.i and SWI fast Ol 
404 4854. Carrel our Agy 

kDEMOim/xc tartan Co 
Own prafecia. need tmuauve A 
entnoMasm. go/eo Mils. CaB 
Mate TED Agy Ol 736 9857 


STJIWW asaapte silver dealer 
. wgerftv rraom euitiem non 
Mueking mMira nw» ring 
Ol 839 4714. 


. EMBUS* •» PA Ol 

h y iaiin 000 . Language 


TEMPTING TIMES 


041 ttc dms attractive, fteti 
Ne aid welT presented H4ri Id 
' cbenti al pxMbi- 
3036 
1491 1461 


1 Oanarect £ 11.000 

Pro 1 ska Frae tattB Jlfar OhrHi. 
mas? Thro to* thH lop 
toteraabonal aty banhassecra- 
Hn to « ortcia la mvfnana 
90/60 stalls and WP afaunv 
smi te. P leant W egbpsic Ol 
840 3611. dsabrth MUM Rc- 


NON-SECRETAKIAL 





CHABITT FOND 
RAISiNG 

UfoenBr reqiM &M tar 

wubiMtati mm fctwrt m 
fiMOBNl Ftrtun atten Cretan 
i tiw tent moDer *d arfrienl 
pfitsonality essential. Good 


Tel 01-581 1597 


r -• 

i- 


ffUX OPERATOR far hma- 
gsoM offlrrs date W Aa met 
«8L Ol 589 1256 lEvetvncl 


PAST TIME 
'VACANCIES 


W CUl Secretary wtm ftarnl 
French a KaHan read red (o 
work in private home In SWIO 
4/8 afleroooos per week. Du- 
nes dm fade handling man and 
invitations, travel arrant 
meets, voting aaberies and 
shoos and some c wr wgo w- 
dcnce. iSOwpsn typttnl. Smart 
aggsarwia. social prise and 
channmg personaoty essential. 
Age 2640. CX7.0O pJl. nog. 
Please caU 434 4812 Gram- 
Corkttl Recruttment 

ConsuRantt. 


COUBSES 


DEVELOPMENT 
FUND MANAGER 

An jmssfoatiw p6«on reacted 
lo suggest ways of raising . 

fortlw finds, taping in (ouch 
with donors rod darting with 
th* adnwastratioo of the Fund. 
Approwmatttytwj day* work 


Furthordatafoand 
aspgcatiorts: Tht Dtrector, 
RoyNCoUege o* Mask, 
Prince Comoft Road,. 
London SW7 2BS. 


WOtSEY MALLc Home study hx 
OCE. Dooees. Professiaas. Pro- 

spectra: DM AL2. Wrisey Hal. 

0 x 2 era. t«i 0666 
- esaoo (24 brs). 


PORSCHE 


UNABLE TO AFFOHB 
£48,006 ? 

FOR A NEW 928 S. 

Than bo* ne 9 worth aid Mitel 2 
atto Mriafc hwgunay sxtater. to* 


isnty Pttegaa uusttwn 
WrOU* 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


LAW/SPORT 


Law Report November 5 1986 


fflips \faritime Corporation » 
“* v Pttffldtntof India 

- Before Lord Justice Neill, Lonl 
Justice Nichofls and Sir 
■ 4 j : Rooaleyn Gum ming-Brpce 

. ' [Judgment October 31] 

'S[ Where a Cbarterparty between 

\« a shipowner and * rfaartnrT 

4 , provided that demurrage should 
be calculated in US dollars but 
. pud to the shipowner in British 

• i sterling, at the rate of exchange 

„ prevailing on the date of theWI 

v -of ladings and payment was not 
made by the charterer at die 
‘proper time, the currency ex- 
change loss suffered by foe 
■I -shipowner was recoverable as 
xneCial rfamaiw: 

The Court of Appeal so held 

: K- allowing an appeal by ship- 
It ^ owner. Lips Maritime Corpora- 
'i non, from a decision of Mr 
*■. ,-Jusdoe Sranghion on April l 
' 11985. . 

\ Mr Steven Gee for the ship- 
owner; Mr Roger Buckley, QC 

■ { 'and Mr A. J. Glennie for me 
,Ij charterer. 

: LORD JUSTICE NEELL said 

;that the President of India Had 
‘ Chartered the MV Lips, owned 

•by Lips Maritime Corporation, 
‘to cany a cargo of tfianunoah un 
i .phospatefrom Mississippi ports 

to India. 

“• I. Clause 9 of the ch ai tc r p art y 
provided that demurrage was to 
be calculated in US dollars and 
clause 30 provided that demon- 
rage should be paid in British 
external sterling at the mean 
exchange rate ruling on the date 
t -of the bill of lading. 

* The charterparty also pro- 
vided for the reference of any 
.dispute to two arbitrators in 

- London and for the arbitrators 
' j*, to appoint an Umpire in the 
<W event of disagreement. 

■ ; - The vessel completed loading 

‘in Donaldsoavifle and dis- 
-charred at Visakhapatnam and 
at Calcutta, d isch arge being 
completed after some conaul- 
erable delay. The parties won 
-unable to agree as to the period 
. of time for which demurrage 
< .was payable and the dispute was 
; referred to arbitration. 

-\ . On February 22, 1983 the 

, -umpire, who had entered the 

• reference when the two ar- 
i bitraiors nominated by the par- 
ties had foiled to agree, 
-published his final award. 

He awarded the shipowner 
£19,896 which included interest 

Meaning of 
^ report for 
m l school closure 

Regina v KfrUees Mtingofi- 
tanBomigh Council, Ex parte 
MoOoy 

, , Before Mr Justice Mann 

[Judgment November 4] 

A report by an edneation 
committee of a local education 
authority made for the purpose 
of exerc ising its functions with 
respect to edneation, pursuant 
m to paragraph 7 of Schedule I of 
the Education Act 1944, mast 
necessarily' involve an 
evaluation of all issues relevant 
io making a decision. • 

Mr Jnstice Mann so held in 
the Queen's Bench Division, 
granting an order of certiorari to 
the applicant, Mrs Melanie 
Mofloy, mother of three chil- 
dren attending the West 
Slaithwmte Church of England 
. Junior and Infonts School, 
. m b which the respondents, Kiikkes 
Metropolitan Bramah Council 
by a derision dated September 
' 25, 1985. proposed to cease to 

TwainTain- 

. Mr Richard A&ftey .for the 
applicant; Miss . Elizabeth 
Appleby, QC and Mr John Steel 
; for the respondents. 

■ MR JUSTICE MANN said 
'that the appl ic ant contended 
that there was no report. R was 
common ground fiat, that the 
decision to initiate foe closure 
procedure was the exercise of a 
reaction with respect to educa- 
tion; and second, that the report 
was a condrtton precedent to a 
lawful decision being satisfied. 
The issue was. thus whether 
there was a report. ■ 

On January 25, 1985 the 
respondent’s director of educa- 
tion services reported to foe 
authority’s edneation - sub- 
committee for a meeting on 
February 5, 1985. His report 
recommended that officers 
should consult parents, govern- 
ing bodies, teaching staff and 
gdi others with a view to dosing 
ft three schools with effect from 
d* • August 3L 1986. Among those 
schools was foe _ West 
. Slailhwaite Church of En^anfl 
Junior and fnfint School. 

The edneation subco mmitt ee 
accepted foe recommendation, 
and that resolution was con- 
firmed by th e ed ucation 
committee in Febnraru 198 5. 

On August 20, 1985, there was 
another meeting of the educa- 
tion subcommittee for wmch 
the director of educatio nal ser- 
vices prepared another report. 
On September 3, foe ed ucati on 
conmuitee resobred that the 
minutes of the edn^ion snb- 

■ that minute came before foe 
W education authority, and afier 

debate it was adopted eta 
\ Confirmed. 

In his Lordship's jraJgmcnt 
y there was no repwi such as was 
■* required by the Education Ari 
1944. There w» a single recom- 
mendation. . . 

A report had to invoke an 
evaluation. If had Joj* “ 
account of era* 
malting the deosion. An *> 
count could be in the fiw® °* 

. adoption of a teprat. 

* - Here there was simply a 
.• ;*• rccornmendaikm. 

AAnia bad no evaluation an® a 
t* 

satislV the 

statute. An evaluation was 
CS &ace^ii was accepted t&ata 

■r 

Vause, Huddersfidd.- • 

5 m . — 

Law Society exams 

In the LawSoriay fed 

examination (Faday October 
31) the foBowng 

Smith- 


es foreseeable 


afoMrating to £4,658. The awaid 
a«ted that on foe date of the bfll 

St if .ft * wml h 

Thus, if conversion of foe 
amount awarded was made at 
foe foma rate the shipowner 
would snflfer a considoarae loss: 

The award -further stated that 
the charterer was in breach in 
not malting payment at foe 
proper tune and the damages for 

that breach -was the difference 
between foe respective rates of 

rxchnngn. 

The Charterer was fossatisfied 
with the derision of foe onqne 

Mr 

final award to the umpire for 
fiuther coruwferation. 

. The judge said that it seemed 
inevitable that be should have 
to allow foe appeal for there was 
no better establisfacd rule of 
English common law than the 
rule that a creditor could not, in 
the absence of some express or 

ttnptied agreement, recover 
dam age s for late payment of a 
debt see Zorti&wt. Chatham and 
Dover Railway Co v South 
Eastern Railway Co ([1893] AC 
429). 

But foe rate was not without 
exceptions. It fotb&de foe recov- 
ery of general damages for late 
payment of a debt, but not 
special damages. 

. The difference between, gen- 
eral damages and special dam- 
ages mthat connection was foe 
difference between 
recoverable under foe first part 
of foe rale m ~ Hadley v 
Baxendale ((1854) 9 Each 341); 
tlud is, damages foreseeable as 
flowing naturally and probably 
from foe breach of contract in 
foe ordinary co ur se of events; 
and damages recoverable under 
the second branch of that rule, 
foot is, damages foreseeable in 
foe particular ritnm wanw* of' 
the case because of special 
matters known to both patties at 
foe time of malting the contract. 

On November 23, 1984 foe 
umpire, having received further 
submissions, published his fur- 
ther award by which he stated 
that the loss by the deval u ation 
of sterling was something which 
was reasonably fo reseeable by, 
or wi thin actnal or assumed 
contemplation of the parties, 
that such loss was liable to resub 
if payment at foe a p pro p ri ate 


time was not 'made and that, 
therefore, the care mare .within 
the second rale vx /Hadley v 


On March 29, 1985 foe case 

returned to foe - Commercial 
Coon. It came before Mr Justice 

Stangfaton who held that foe 
umpire's condmioo as staled in 
his timber award- could not 
stand. 

What foes was the present 
bw as to the recovery of 
dam age s at common law for a 
bread of contrac t which con- 
sisted of foe' Ada- payment iff 
money? h his' Lordship's view 
the portion was as follows: 

A payee could not recover 
damages by way of interest 
merely because the money had 
been paid late. The basis of that 
principle ap pea re d tobe that foe 
court would not impute to the 
parties the knowledge that in the 
ordinary course of things foe 
hse payment of money would 
result in loss. - 

In order to recover dama g es 
for late payment it was nec- 
essary lor the payee to establish 
facts which brought foe case 
within foe second part of the 
rok in Hadley v Baxendale. 

It might be said that the line 
between foe two parts of the rule 
had become blurred so that foe 
division had lost much of its. 
utility. But it was dear, as Mr 
Justice Stoughton recognized in 
the instant case, fora foe court 
bad to. the dividing Haa 
because ri was outy ff the dram 
feO withte the second part of the 
rale that the loss could be 
recovered. 

lu foe present case foe umpire 
based his conclusion ou the feet 
that the parties knew or should 
have known tbe following: 

(a() that it was the genera] 
e x pec tati on among business- 
men that sterling would decline 

(b) that clause 30 was designed 
to protect the Indian Govern- 
ment against the devaluation of 
stating between the date of the 
wih of lading and foe due dale 
for the payment of demurrage 
and 

(c) that it was almost universal 
practice of Greek shipowners to 
Opera te th*ir -buriire s f in US 
dolbix so that if a sterling sum 
were paid late the owner was 

Klrrty in nffi»r an ftrKawp Intt 

on coaverrion. 

Mr Justice Staugbton con- 


cluded that none of those facts 
constituted a “special fact 
communicated by the owner to 
the charterer which would not 
have been appa re n t to any other 
botinessman m the same trade”. 
In his Lordship's view, tbe judge 
in reaching that amdurios took 
too narrow a view of rite 
Imitations imposed on foe rule 
in London, Chatham and Dover 
Railway Co v South Eastern 
Railway Co. 

The question in each case was 
to determine what loss was 
reasonably within the 
cotaanrhnon a f foe parties at 
foe time when foe contract was 
node. In dealing with that 
question foe court would not 
impute to tbe parties the know- 
ledge that damaas flowed natu- 
rally from a delay in payment. 
Bui where lhere was evidence of 
what tire parties knew or ought 
to have known foe court was m a 
position to de te rm in e what ms 
m their reasonable contempla- 
tion. .- 

For that purpose foe court 
was rr ti tl’d to aio account of 
foe terms of the contract be- 
tween tbe praties and of tbe 
surrounding ctrronmances, and 
to draw inferences, hx drawing 
in fe re n ces as to the parties* 
yc figrt or imputed knowledge 
Hoc court was not obliged to 
ignore facts or circumstances of 
which other people doing simi- 
lar > w ii TM-<s aught have been 
aware. 

In view of the co n tinued 
existence of the rale in the 
London, Chatham and Dover 
Rxzilwaycax the court conld not 1 
matri- foe assumption in favour j 
of a plaintiff fora tbe parties . 
contemplated that foe me pay- 1 
meat of money would result m I 
loss, but where the proved facts , 
were such as to lead to tbe 
inference that foe parties would 
have reasonably contemplated 
the relevant special loss, the loss , 
could be properly recovered. 

According, in his Lordship’s i 
view, the exchange loss which 
was suffered by foe. owner by , 

reason of the late payment of foe 

demurrage was recoverable as 
damages within the second part 
of the rule in Hadley v 
Baxendale. 

Lord Justice Nkholls and Sir ' 
Rooaleyn Cumming-Brace . 


Criminal standard of proof required 
in committal for contempt 


Deborah BnUiag Equipment 
Ltd v Scaff co Ltd and Another 
Before Mr. Justice Potts 
[Judgment October 31] 

A plaintiff who sought the 
committal of a defendant for 
breach of a court order had to 
establish foe breach beyond 
reasonable doubt -. 

. Fartbenuorc, unless thettxms 
of foe order wuro absolute and 
unqualified, a breach would not 
.be proved unless the plaintiff 
also established that 'the 
defendant's d i sob e d i e n ce to foe 
order was w2fol or deliberate. 

' MrJpstioe Putts so held in foe 
Queen's Bench Division, grant- 
ing a motion by Deborah Build- 
ing Equipmen t Ltd to commit 
Mr Patrick Bria ngtt, a di rector of 
Scaflco ltd (in fiqnidation), for 
breach of an order of Mr Justice 
Gatehouse of August 14, 1986, 
and ordering that he be commit- 
ted to poscra for foree mtmfos, 
such osder to be suspended for a 
year. 

Mr B-Ctive Freedman for foe 

ptrimiSs; Mr Barry Stancombe 
for tbe defendant. 

MR JUSTICE POTTS said 
that Scaflco Ltd, Mr Pricket’s 
one-man company, had -faired 
substantial quantities of 
scailbkfiag equipment from foe 
plaintiffs. m . . 

became concerned that Scaflco 
would be in cap able of paying 
foe hire charges and would m» 
return their equipment wrath 
about £21 1.000. 

. ..They, obtained ex parte an 
order from Mr Justice 
Gatehouse against Scaffco 
requiring them, inter aha, as for 
as possible to disclose equip- 
ment and foe quantity thereof 
on ate; to deliver up forthwith 
equipment supplied to the m by. 


.foe and restraining 

them from moving eq u ipment 
from tbe sites on which it was 
then situated, save to permit the 
plain tiffs to take delivery 
tnereoL. 

On October 13, 1986 Scaf&o 
was wound up and the present 
motion was brought against Mr 
Pricket alone, h having been 
conceded that foe lenns of the 
older affected him andlrad been 
brought to his attention. 

■ Two questions as to the 
applicable law arose; . 

1 What standard of proof bad 
file plaintiffs to discharge to 
show that the defendant was m 
breach of the airier? 

2 What had the plaintiffs to 
prove as to the defendant's state 
of mind in order to establish a 
breach? 

Reference had been made to 
foe judgment of Mr Justice 
Hutchison in West Oxfordshire 
District Council v Beratec Lid 
{The Times October 30, 1986), 
who bdd that the civil standard 
of proof applied m proceedings 
for breach of an undertaking 
given to the court. 

Itwas further held intitet case 
that it was. no answer to a 
contempt charge to prove that 
non-compliance with an order 
was casual inadvertent or ac- 
crdentaL 

It was to be noted that that 
case was one where the relevant 
court order, or undertaking 
riven by foe defendant, was 
-unqualified in its terms. 

Tbe previously settled law 
was reared in Barrie & Lowe’s 
Law qf Contempt 2nd edition 
(1983) at p399, which stated that 
m contempt proceedings the 
contempt hod to be proved 
beyond reasonable doubt. 

The authority for that state- 
ment was In re Brambltmde 
Q 1970] Ch 1 28), in which Lord 


Time not limited in safety cases 


Kemp v Liebherr-Great 


Before Lord Justice Gfidewril 
and Mr Justice Ottou 
[Judgment October 2ZJ 

There was uo time limit for 
foe bringing qf prosecutions for 
offences under section 33(1X«) 
of the Health -and. Safety at 
Wo* Act 1974. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visknrel Court so held, allowing 
an appeal by Charles William 
Kemp, a rectories inspector, 
against tbe derision of Ports- 
mouth Justices on February 4, 
1986, that they had no jurisdic- 
tion to hear ra in fonna non laid, 
by the inspector against 
UebhernGreai Britain Ltd be-, 
cause the information bad been 
fetid outside the time limit 
provided by section 34(3) of tbe 
1974 AcL 

- Section 34(3) provides: “Suxn- 

Qtery proceedings for ro offence 

to Wmdi this subsection ^jbes 
may be conmienced at any time 
within six months from the date 
on which there comes to the 
knowledge of a responsible 
enfoirmg authority ev^mer. 

sufficie nt in the opnrioo of that 
authority to justify - a 
prosec u tion . - 

By subsection (4), subsection 
(3) Applies to any onence mtdn- 
any of the relevant stannary 
provisions which a person com- 
mits by virtue of any provision 
or requirement id wmch be is 

subject os the. . - supplier of any 
Urine 

Mr Philip Harare for foe 
inspector; bfr Seddon Cnpps for 
the defendants. . 

LORD JUSTICE GUDE- 

i WELL said that the infonnao on 

alleged that the defendants had 
connuvated- section 6tIX a ) «« 
the 1974 Act in -that, they 
supplied a. teJescopic SMW& ; 
oouso wbkh was not, so ar a* 
reasonably practicable, so de- 


sgped and constructed as to be 
safe wben property used, con- 
trary to section 33dXa) (fofluro 
to dischaira a duty under sec- 
tions 2 to 7). ' 

The justices proceeded sum- 
marily at the rcquert of the 
inspector and with the 
defendants' consent, but after 
hearing evidence and sub- 
missions,, they conducted that 
they had no jurisdiction because 
, the information bad been laid 
outride tbe period stipulated in 
section 34(3). 

Counsel feir the inspector 
submitted that by section 33(3), 
-foe offence : under section 
33(1 Xa) was nrablc eifoer sum- 
manly or on indictment; it was 
thus an “indictable offence" as 
defined by section S of and the 
Schedule to the Interpretation 
Act 1978 l. ’ * • 

He submitted that in the case 
of as indictable offence tried: 
summarily, section 127(2) of tbe 
Magistrates’ Courts Act 1980 
disappfied the rix-maatb time 
limit for the laying: of informa- 
tions provided by section 127(1) 
.anddisa^)hed“anyj^hereiact- 
ment, however framed ra 
wpided, which would, but for 
section 127, impofeg&nKfimit 
on tbe power of a magistraies' 
court to try an information 
summarily or impose a fimire- 
tion on tii e time for taking 


it was sad, since 


Words in informations 


Jones V Thomas (Jote Barrie) 

An information which aDejted 
aa offence "contrary to section 
6(1) of the Road Traffic An 
1972 as amended” would have . 
been more property worded 
"contrary to section 6(1) of (he 
Rood Traffic Act. 1972 as sub- 
stituted by rectum 25(3) of the 
Tranmort Act 1981” so that foe. 
iccreteot should be. dear as to 


viskmal 


i's Bench Di> 
t (Lord Justice 








mm 


Ralph Gibson and Mr Justice 
McNeill) so held on October 21 
in allowing an appeal by way of 
case stared by tire; prosecutor 
against foe dismissal by foe ; 
Dolgellau Justices or an 
information allying an offence 
against section 6(1). 






• * ■ : 


Dennis Barrah, Los Airies Bams, in 1 


i encoun t er won by the Rams 20-17 


RUGBY UNION 


Sofidtras: Ridmds Butler, 
ZaxwaOa&Co. 


Second shock for Coventry 
as Rugby snap up Thomas 


Darning, Master of tbe Rolls, 
said: “A contempt is an offence 
of a criminal character. A man 
may be seat to prison for it it 

must be proved beyond reason- 
able doubt . . 

His Lordship followed that 
authority iu considering the 
questions of fact raised fay the 
p re se nt motion and appfied the 
criminal standard of proof 

After considering foe authori- 
ties, some of which were re- 
ferred to In Berates and others 
'which had been cited in argu- 
ment in the present case, indud- 
ing Heaton's Transport (St 
Helens) Ltd v Transport and 
General Workers’ Union ([1973] 
AC 15) and Stancomb r Trow- 
bridge Urban District Council 
([1910] 2 Ch 190), his Lordship 
proposed to approach foe case 
on foe bass that foe plain tiffs 
had to establish that the defen- 
dant wilfully, that is delib- 
erately, breached the court 
order. 

On foe evidence, his Lordship 
was satisfied that the de fen da nt 
had disobeyed the order in a 
number of respects. If the 
defendant, who was legally ad- 
vised. had sought to question 
foe terms or scope of the order 
he could have crane to court to 
do so. He should not simply 
have disobeyed it 

The only a p p ro p ria te way to 

deal with those breaches was to 

impose a sentence of imprison- 
ment of three mouths, which 
would be suspended for 12 
months on condition that the 
defendant cooperated to the best 
of his abafity with foe terms of 
the court order and assisted in 
the recovery of the p l ai ntiffs 1 
equipment. 

Solicitors: Rowleys & 
Blewms, Manchester, rreeth, 
Cartwright & Sketchley, Not- 
tingham. 


foe offence in question was 
triable either way, section 127(2) 
of foe 1980 Act applie d. and 
there was no time hunt withm 
which to bring the proceedings. 

Counsel for the defendants 
submitted that that approach 
deprived section 34(3) of all 
effect since, by virtue of sub- 
section (4), the tune limit in 
section 34(3) could only apply in 
the case of an offence under 1 
section 33(1 Xa). . ■ ^ 

However, Mr Havers pom ted 
out that should the secretary, of 
state decide, in accordance with 
his powers under section 15 of 
the 1974 Act, to mate regula- 
tions excluding proceedings oh 
indictment for contravenoou of 
the duties imposed bysectioos2 
to 9, then breach of foe duty- 
under section 6(1 Xa) would 
become triable only sumxnaruy 
. and section 34(3) would late 
upon it 

Thus, section 34(3) was not 
dead but merely skaspmg and 
aw a iti ng the awakening kiss of 
thosecretary of state. 

' His Lordship accepted Mr 

Havers’ submission s. There was 
no timehmit for the prosecution 

of tbe offence- „ ' 

The appeal would be allowed 
and the case remitted to the 
justices for foe hearing to be 

continued. 

Mr Justice Otton delivered a 

concurring judgment. 

Solicitors: Treasury Solicitor; 
Slaughter & May- . 


A major row was brewing in 
tbe Midlands last night over foe 
Warwickshire flanker, Paul 
Thomas’s “defection” from 
Coventry to Rugby. Coventry 
officials admit to being 
“shocked stunned” at 

Thomas's departure, _ which, 
according to rate official, will 
“hit Counden Road like a 
bombsheH” 

The dust has only recently 
settled over the loss of Steve 
Brain, the England hooter, to 
Rugby earlier in the season/'We 
all but turned a blind eye to foal 
one,” said John Butler, tbe 
Coventry press officer. “Obvi- 
ously we were disappointed to 
see him go but there was no 
friction afterwards betw e e n the 
dubs. However, in the light of 
the present position and latest 
devdopment, we must reserve 
the right to review the 
situation.” 

Coventry are incensed at both 
foe timing and circumstances 
surrounding their latest Joss.- 
Thc underlying influence is that 
he has been “poached.” “We 
certainly received nothing in the 
way of an official approach from 
Rugby,” Butler said. “To say we 
are extremely disa p p oin ted 
would be an understatement.” 

Thomas had been sidelined 

Argentina 
to compete 
in sevens 

Hong Kong. (AFP) - Argen- 
tina will return to tbe Hong 
Kong international sevens in 
1987 after a five-year absence 
while three other teams wifi 
mate their debuts in the 
competition. 

Tbe last time foe Pumas 
competed in what is regarded as 
foe unofficial world sevens 
championship was in 1982, 
shortly before the Falkland* 
confhct-Announcing the 24 
teams for the tournament, to 
late place ou March 28 and 29. 
Brian Stevenson, chairman of 
the Hong Kong Rugby Football 
Union, said yesterday that of- 
ficial clearance had been sought 
to allow the Argentinians to 
compete in this British Gown 
colony. 

He said clearance had been 
given by the Hong Kong Gov- 
ernment and foe United King- 
dom Government through tbe 
office of Hong Kong’s political 
advisor. 

The newcomers to the Hong 
Kong sevens wffl be Spain, Tbe 
Netherlands and the Welsh 
Arademicals select sicfeSpain 
have made significant headway 
recently, entering the first di- 
vision of Eur o pea n rugby and 
bating England on the way to 
tbe quarteranals of the inaugu- 
ral Sydney sevens tournament 
earlier this year, while tbe Dutch 
have won promotion to tbe 
second division in Europe. 

The Wdsh Academicals win 
be the only representatives from 
foe British Isles, although 
Stevenson said that once again 
foe five-nations countries had 
been asked to send oar national 
rides instead of repr e se n t ative 
select rides. 

He said the Hoag Kong 
organizers were vary dis- 
appointed with the British and 
Irish alti t ude. 


By Chris Moore 

since tbe start of the season after 
suffering a recurrence of the 
groin iqjtrry he sustained in last 
season's semi-finals of tbe 
Thorn-EMI county champion- 
ship. He returned fra Coventry 
Extras last Saturday and os the 
strength of that performance, 
regained his place in tbe 
Warwickshire pack for last 
night's Midland group semi- 
final against t fi r wawisiiw B at 
Counden Road. 

Buffer added:*T can't say what 
action, if any, Coventry wfll take 
on foe matter. But it seems 
certain the issue will be dis- 
cussed at committee leveL The 
most disappointing raped as far 
as we are concerned is thaa after 
being out injured for eight 
weeks, Thomas made hzmsdf 
available for our second team 
game last weekend. Then, hav- 
ing proved his form and fit n ess 
to the county selectors, he 
turned up at our next training 
ygffoii to announce be is leav- 
ing to join Rugby.” 

Thomas’s recruitment under- 
lines the determination of 
Rugby, under David Rees, then- 
new millionaire chairman, to 
put tbe dub on tbe map. Indeed, 

after yeara in the doldrums and 
of constantly Irving under the 
Coventry shadow, they are in 


Devon are looking 
for quick return 

By David Hands, Kagfay Correspondent 


Devon, whose holcyoa years 
a ttecoanty championshi p wtre 
aromd the torn of foe ceotary, 
set oat on Saturday on foe road 
bock to foe first dfvistoa of foe 
Thorn-EMI championship. 
They raftered re l eg a tion last 
season to foe lower pool of foe 
Soafo-Wcst dfririoa bnt will be 
looking fee a morale-boosting 
victory over Oxfordshire at foe 
Comity Ground, Exeter. 

They have won the county title 
seven times, hot not since 1957, 
so there is considerable leeway 
to mate up. Bat they had the 
encoaragesnent of a 27-9 win 
over British Police Inst Thurs- 
day and field a ride against 
Oxfordshire showing only one 
new co m er: Richard Hogan, foe 
Paignton hooker who played 
against Italy for England Chits 
last season. 

They have the support fob 
season of senior dob players 
from Plymouth AHwhj whose 
four representatives include the 
experienced stand-off half, 
Lrirsey, who k ick ed mast of 
their points against the Police. 
He is partnered by Lander, tte 
former Coventry scram half 
while Widdecombe, foe Newport 
lock, win be a pillar among foe 
tight forwards. 

Berkshire, who replaced 
Devon la foe top pool last 
season, entertain Cornwall at 
Newbary while Gkmcestershiie, 
send-fisofisis last season, meet 
Somerset at Bridgwater . 
Although ooae of foe 
Bristol sad Bath first-team 
legators are available, Somerset 
am call upon Stanley at scran 
half, who is deputy to England's 
Richard HHL at Both. Stanley 
ployed on foe losing Somerset 
side in foe 1984 final against 

Gloucestershire. 


Morrow loses his place 


By George Ace 


- Philip Matthews is beyond 
doobt the finest blind side wing 
forward in Ireland and if a 
British lions ride were to be 
named tonight, it is a near 
certainty he would claim the 
No. 6 jersey. Maithews plays at 
No. 8 for Ulster against Con- 
nacht at RavenM! on Saturday 
at the of David Mor- 

row, the outstanding back row 
forward in the recent Muaster- 
Ulster dash in Cock and aign- 
ably foe best baltpbying No. 8 
in Ireland. 

The only other change from 
foe team that defeated Munster 
17-6 is BiD Haifa Lnson in foe 
centre for tte interna ti o n a l, 
John Hewitt. 

Cdiu Dunne retains the out- 
side half mot for Connacht and 
Liam Mulcshy replaces Derek 
Holland in the centre. Brian 
CantreU, Che Waierpark wing, 
has withdrawn owing to injury 
and to replaced by Colin Hitch- 
cock. Joe Daty, hi centre, fecra a 
fitness test later this week afier 
sustammg a neck injury. 


Ciaran Fitzgerald, the de- 
posed Ireland captain, will lead 
foe ride and tbe former British 
lion John O’Driscoll, to also 
included. Both missed foe re- 
cent game agaisnt Leinster in 
Galway. 

The Irish Rugby Football 
Union is appreciative of the 
sponsorship provided for the 
provincial series, known o£- 
uctofiy as the Dry Blackthorn 
inter-provincial championship. 


bwftP 
(Baiymffne).o 

HarbiRMB ( 

nutcrisnsk I 




frftositnS 

to<*P9,w 

■Cn»*n 

sazKBs: 

Dun cm (Malone). W Anacreon 
JUamm c Mcn teo n [MHoM), N 

■Hnmn lYwano^WwL 

M OTW* (CortnWms); 8 

L 

Molcaliv (Torenn), C tWKocfc 
oorat. fiottwe (mrimnic McCMfe* 
(OcG)i T Clancy Hansd cank C HP- 

J Otirtofl frandon traft lT tonaBn 



foe middle of a purple patch 
which has seen them reel off 
seven straight wins. 

y fl cr ni gh t, Rees was adamant 
that Rugby bad sot contravened 
any written or unwritten rules. 
“To put foe record straight. 
Thomas approached us not the 
other way round,” Rees said. 

“I admit that during the dose 
season we are on r ecord as 
saying there were people here 
intent on bringing about a 
resurgence of Rugby RFC. We 
wiadf- no secret of the feet we 
were on the lookout for new 
players. Out of season it's 
perfectly legitimate to approach 
other players and I admit we 
rftd But Pud Thomas was not 
one of them. 

“He has since come to us and 
regardless of what anyone else 
says or thinks. I am perfectly 
relaxed about it. From oar point 

ofview, if he joins us, he will be 

an exceedingly good capture. 
But at this moment in time, I 
am still waiting to hear from 
Thomas that he has officially 
resigned at Coventry. 

“If and when I do, I will then 
go through the proper channels 
of contacting them and request- 
ing clearance for his 
registration.” 


back — but without a 
ending — was between French 
Kiss and USA. 

At the first windward mark, 
the plain grey yacht from foe 
Cote d’Azur was 2min& 25 secs 
ahead of Tom BlackaOcr, 


legs in a breeze that freshened, to 
14 knots. 

As the wind got up, the radical 
USA lengthened her snide to 
dose the gap, but she was still 44 
secs behind at the finish — a a 
big disappointment for 
ButckaOer, who had started the 
week on such a roU, having 
beaten Dennis Conner, aboard 
Stare and Stripes. 

BlackaOer revealed earlier 
that be had not cut loose a 
trading psnoa — because the 
syndicate could not afford to 
lose a $15,000 sail — and had 
thus lost Monday’s race against 
•Eagle. 

Eagle suffered a major defeat 
by being beaten by more than 
three mioutes by New Zealand. 
The team from Southern 
California had warned before 
the round robin that, unless they 
did better than in October, they 
were probably bound for home. 

YESTERDAY’S RESULTS 

Write Ctusadv (SB) bt Canada B(Cv4 by 
n Wae 

French Wss M USA fl!8) by 44 aacs 

Stars and SWpes fUS) tt CM Sang* 

America*? Amina (tt) by Imta 

30S8C 

New zatttwj <NZ) M fogto (US) by Un 
42sac 

STANDINGS 


AMrttCdrec*,trirf 

America IT (US 

New Zealand (NZL- 

Write Crusader (GS) 

ItefafU) : 

Stere end Stripes (US) 

Ranch Mss (ft) 


Canada f I (Can) _ 

Hast of America ( 
Chaflenga Franca 
Amina (it) _ — - 


W L PM 

.14 I 28 
.14 1 26 
.11 4 23 
_ a 6 17 
.12 3 16 
_7 B IS 
_S 6 13 
_ 7 8 11 
-.510 9 
-411 3 
-.213 2 
-114 1 


(Ftst mad rottn Ipt second must nUn 
5pt third round robin 12pQ 

TODAY’S RACES 
Write Crusader v America ft Mia v 
Canada lb Stare and Strlpas v Hast <4 
America: Anurra v USA; Engle v Cbafr- 
langa France; French IQaav Haw Z eala n d 


MOD PENTATHLON 


Somerset’s two mm-ap 
games hove included one against 
Dorset and Wiltshire, whose 
pool two game on Sateday to i 

cShTO^tb™ 8 Un^^happier ' 
rira u nstances, foe combined 
counties might have played foe 
three O'Loqghin toothers from 
Sherborne in their side but one 
of them. Dale, who plays at 
loose-head prop, was taken to 
Yeovil Genual Hospital with a 
seme neck fejary sustained in a 
dub game last weekend. 

Of his brothers. Glen, plays 
on the wiag against 
Buckinghamshire and Sean 
male** his debut at lock along 
with five other newcomers 
MdUaghlin (Weymouth) and 
Handley (BoarnemoWh) fa foe 
centre. Pfacock (Wfafoorne) at 
prop ami Windoss, foe Bomwe- 

mouth flanker. The side is led by 
another Bomroanonth player, 
Marriott, at lock, bat does not 
inefade more than two players 
from the unbeaten Salisbury 
dab, Gloag on the wing and 
Morgan, the Array stand-off 
haUL 


The demands of Eng hod 
sqaod weekends hare limited the 

MSSotofitiskHuSwSd, to- 
gether In preparation for foetr 
tompetotoi — which begins 
against foe North on December 
6 — bat among players who have 
bees watched to Coin Laity. He 
is a centre and may bo consid- 
ered as a partner for Stooa 
Holliday, the Bath aad England 
player, in the dmsiooal side now 
that John Palmer, Halliday’s 
dob ceQeagoe, has retired from 
in t e rnational and divisioaal 
games. That would allow foe 
dhtomoal selectors to consider 
Ralph Knibbs, the Bristol 
centre, on foe left wing. 

Davis back to 
strengthen 
Staffs’ hopes 

Mark Davis, the Lichfield 
booker, who missed 
Staffordshire’s last game — 
against East Midlands a fort- 
night ago — because of iqjury. 
returns to the county side 
against North Midlands at Bur- 
ton this evening in the second of 
foe Midlands divisional play- 
offs in the Thorn EMI county 
Championship (David Hands 
writes). 

Davis is tote of seven repre- 
sentatives from foe unbeaten 
Lichfield dub, though five of 
there are in the backs. Stafford j 
provide half the pack in a side i 
led by Robson, of Moseley. 

North Midlands, too, are led 
from scrum-half by Page, foe ■ 
former England player. 

The winners of tonight’s game 
will meet foe winners of last 
night’s match between 
Warwickshire and Leicester- 
shire for the Midlands tide on 
November 19. 


top men. looking for world 
qualification marks. 

The UIPMB itself is grappling 
with what might develop into a 
most embarmsing drugs scan- 
dal concerning tbe wodd 
championships held ia 
Mootecatini Tenne, Italy, tost 
August As many as a dozen 
competitors, I now learn, gave 
positive responses to the dope 
tests. Since the leading three m 
each contest plus others at 
random, are su bjected to the 
drag checks, ft can be a ssum e d 
top names are involved. 

The UIPMB executive meets 
in Stockholm on November 28 
to hear evidence, listen to 
excuses and administer pen- 
alties, if necessary. For the 
medal-deprived British, who up 
to now regard themselves as a 
cut above foe drug fiddlers and 
blood dopers, foe UIPMBJ 
of this matter will 


prove 


Doyle’s third 


auadc by the cyclist Tony DpyJe 
2) minutes before the end of foe 
Grenoble Six gave foe Briton 
and bis Italian partner, 
Francesco Miser, victory here 
ou Monday night They stole a 
lap from foe Franco/Dantoh 
team of Bernard VaUer/Gert 
Frank wbo had slacked op more 
points. It was Doyle's third to- 
day win since foe season began. 



•T^nr.r 












J ISJZHL . SKttB 




• /.. ■: ■■ 


SPORT THE T IMES WEPI 

RACING: COMPETITIVE LINE-UP FOR NEWBURY HURDLE 


Ten Plus to earn full marks again 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


With Ten Pins, Bronski, 
Atrabates, Ibn Majedand Mrs 
Musk, all standing ihcir 
ground at Newbury today for 
die Tom Masson Trophy we 
axe assured of the most in- 
teresting hurdle race so far this 
autumn. 

Br onski will be as hard as 
nails as be has had two races 


already. But fitness should not 
be a odor as far as Ten Plus 


and Atrabates are concerned 
as they both won first time out 
last season: Ten Plus at War- 
wide; Atrabates at Hereford. 

Ten Plus went on to win his 
three other races which were 
all at Cheltenham while 
Atrabates also kept her un- 
beaten record intact when 
visiting Worcester, Newbury 
and Cheltenham. 

What is significant is that 
on one occasion they both 
beat a horse from Jenny 
Pitman's stable. Timely Star. 
Ten Plus beat Timely Star at 
Worcester where he gave him 
41b and a 12-length drubbing, 
while at Cheltenham 
Atrabates gave the same horse 
71b and a two-length beating. 

That suggests Ten Pins 
ought to be capable of giving 
Atrabates 51b now and he is 
my nap. 


Ten Fins reserved his best 
performance of the season 
a p propriately for file National 
Hunt Festival at Cheltenham 
where be galloped his rivals 
into the ground in the the Sun 
Alliance Hurdle. He sewed by 
15 lengths from Pike's Peak 
who was to pay him a fine 
tribute afterwards by winning 
valuable races at Newbury 
and Ascot. 

In the Sun Alliance Hurdle 
Ibn Maied was among those 
who finished in the rude. As 
the winner of his three pre- 
vious races at Uttoxeter, Don- 
caster and Ascot he was dearly 
capable of better. 

He should run weD a gain 
this afternoon following that 
quite promising run on the 
Flat in the Cesarewhch which 
will have put an edge on him. 
But I still much prefer Ten 
Plus. 

Indeed, at the weights Mrs 
Muck could easily be much 
more of a danger because l 
know that her owner-trainer 
Nigel Twistan-Davies has 
taken her to a race course 
twice in the last month just to 
ensure that lack of fitness does 
not bring about her downfall 
on this occasion. 

However, it is pertinent to 


point out that Mrs Muck has, 
not ina pp ro p riately for one 
with her name, run her best 
races when there has been 
plenty of mud flying about. 

The going, on the other 
hand, was perfect when Tea 
Pins scored that resounding 
tr ium ph at Cheltenham in 
March. With identical con- 
ditions underfoot likely this 
afternoon, the stage looks all 
set for Fuflce Walwyn’s nice 
six-year-old to resume where 
he left off on a winning note. 


Results, page 42 


Otherwise, it should pay to 
follow Richard Dun woody as 
weD as the man he succeeded 
as David Nicholson's first 
jockey, Peter Scudamore. 

Dun woody appears to have 
an excellent chance of landing 
a double on the recent 
winner’s Burnt Oak (1. 15) and: 
Voice Of Progress (1 .45) while 
Scudamore can counter by 
doing likewise on Pods Place 
(12.45) and Ulan Bator (2.45). 

Pocks Place was a horse 
who very much took my eye 
last season the twice 1 saw him 
in action, at Sandown and 
Newbury. Now I expect to see 


him go really well in the EBF 
Novices’ Hurdle Qualifier es- 
pecially as Fred winter has 
agreed to let. Scudamore off 
ndingCanford Palm. 

Ulan Bator, my selection for 
the Cokethorpe Novices’ 
Chase, finally got his act 
together when he won ax 
Wrncanton last Thursday after 
a series of frustrating perfor- 
mances in similar races last 
season. 

A dear round will have 
dense his confidence no end of 
good and I believe that he can 
build on that go on to 
even better things. 

Those whose judgment is 
governed fay a coin c i d ence will 
be qukdc to seize upon the feet 
that F ir e wor ks Night is run- 
ning against Ulan Bator on 
this of alt days. 

Well that be is expected to 
go, my information is still that 
trainer Nicky Henderson’s 
best chance of visiting the 
winner's enclosure this after- 
noon will be after Scafiscro 
has contested the bumper (the 
EBF National Hunt Flat race.) 

Apparently, this half 
brother to that good young 
chaser Rentaghost, has been 
showing a lot of promise in his 
homework. 



t 5(l 


♦, / 


r 




*& _ 



The blinkered At TaJbq storming dear trader Michael Clarke's strong driving in yesterday's Mefooume Cup 


NEWBURY 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Pocks Place. 

1.15 Burnt Oak. 

1.45 Voice Of Progress. 


2.15 TEN PLUS (nap). 
Z45 Ulan Bator. 

3.15 Problem Child. 
3.45 Scatiscro. 


Michael Seely’s selection: 2.15 Ten Phis. 


Going: good 


1245 EBF NOVICE HURDLE (Qualifier: £2,059: 2m 100yd) (22 runners) 


102 

103 

104 
US 

105 
108 
110 
111 
112 
113 
1U 
TJ8 

117 

118 
11B 
120 

123 

124 

125 
12fi 

129 

130 


P-0 ADMIRABLE CRICHTON (Major R Thoonan) D BworitJ S-11-0 
CANFORD PALM (Mm M Cobham) F Winter 5-11-0. 


. C Brown 


OBI- COIIYN LEGEND (Mrs £ Baucftsr}J GHtoret 5-1 1-0_ 


COMXCOTE BOY (D Sanger) D Nicholson 311-0- 
DAMSHCMEF(HJooQ A Turned 5-11-0. 


.Beta Hot 
— R I 


— 11-2 


■ RJ 


X GENERAL BEE (Mn P W Hanta) PW Harris 4-11-0. 
GREY GSS1AL (J Scoiw) M Otar 5-11-0. 


. StomKMtfA 

_ R! 

— Jl 


0- HANSEL'S RUN (R Hannan) Miss E Snajpd 311-0- 
IV MAJESTIC BUCK (0 Paata} C Holms 6-11-0. 


WMGHT TRAIN (L Oberetata} Mrs J PUmn 5-11-D. 


AJCOM 


PHAR0AH5 LABI (T Jotewey) J ftanconto 5-11-0 
040W- PROVEHITV (Mnt P Shaw) J EflwanJs 5-11-0 


l Pimm — 8-1 


00- FUCKS PLACE (JBaHnga)NGaaaM 5-11-0. 


3- ROOM GOODHULOW (Mss BSw**)G Balding 5-11-0 
2 ROYAL GREEK fj Ranlon) MisMDlGidnson 4-1 1-U 
03- ROYAL ffiRO (Mrs F Bowden) P Bowden 5-11-0 


0000- SOUTieiN HENBT (Min NCarroqRArmytaga S-11-0. 


SUNBEAM TALBOT (Mrs R Lagoufo R Arrayttga 5-11-0 
YELLOW CARD (A AmMBfje) D MchOiSOD 5-1 1-0 


30- CELTIC CYGNET (David Timothy Lid) Mrs M Rknad 5-1 
MGHER STILL (W Blond) W Kemp 4-10-9 


TELLING TALES (P Gwyn) H Holder 4-104 



1SBUE1MLA8 LAD 4-1 0-5 H Jenkins (4-7 fan) J Jenkins 4 ran 


1.15 LIONEL VICK MEMORIAL HANDICAP CHASE (£2£81: 3m) (7 Turners) 


201 3IV4PPF- TRACYS SPECIAL (TOIL Ames) A Tumal 3131 

-^StawlU^tt 

— 131 

■ 98 31 

203 1^240-41 BURNT OAK foq^Cttanny)DMdiateon 131313 (Sax) ROunwoody 

95F3-1 

94 32 



94 31 



91 31 

208 012144- MGSTEHL(R RobWra) P Cuidoi 3109 

AGoanaa 

9912-1 


1985c FLAMENCO DANCBI 11-10-O M Kfeama (5*) R OSrifivan 3 ran 


71, good, J 

1 1I.E4021. good. Oa 30. 7 rad. 
tan (11-3} at Stratford Chi &. 
.p 1-8} had scored a 41 Hunt* 

StaSSoK BURNT OAK 


UEODEGRANCE, 


ffl-s 


last Sow 


eerier ( 


(-11)41 
14} held on by II from 
successful over 2m 51 


£2283, firm, Sept 6.8 rw}. _ __ 

Humr^donwinouarSidgtomGW (10-1 Q (3m 100yds. £1671. good. Mar 26, 


145 MARSH DENHAM HANDICAP CHASE 03*11: 2m 41) (7 runners) 

302 4014F-1 VOICE OF PROGRESS (CD) (M Vestey) D Metatarsi 8-122 (7sx)~ ROcawoody 92F5-4 

304 3P/2444- ARDBfT SPY (Q Taytar) R Aimytaga 9-10-12 BFomB *9914-1 

305 B21F3-0 MALYA MAL (BF) (Shekti Afl At*J Khamrtl) F Writer 7-10-9 PSctamn 04132 

306 F/P1P14- BBJQBOVE LAP (CO) (S Sarebmy) T Forstar 3-10-7 - HDwtas EMM 

307 3032-33 PNBBBt CHARLIE W (F Hjecomb) M HtadSBta 8-KW RJBaggaii 89 8-1 

309 182FM OYSTER FOND PLBF)(K Martin Ctart^ M McCourt 9-1 M LK»rwy(4) 94 52 

311 422UF- BOLL-A-JOOT (D) (M Nngstay) G Thomer 31M C Brown *813-1 


1986c WB.Y YEOMAN 3-11-11 R Rom (11-10) J OBbrd 3 nm 


COP II VOICE OF PROG RE SS <10-11} was an eesywlnrwr»s»kne out wwr course and risancs.beat- 
• Vfllfl Ing WSxT«r»s( J(T7)1 a (E5MO.good.Ort 24, 7 ran). ARDENT SPY 110-71 out uoftte best Bftort 

whan 5X1 49i to Gold Cup 4th Run And Ship (11-1) at Sandown (3m » 18yds, 

BaGROVE LAD tll-3) beat Echo Sounder (132) 21 ba 


,. I CHARLIE (10-8) was 4X1 

StS). good to Arm, Od 22, 7 ran)wtai MAL' 
put up ho best pernnnance in defeat v 

STiorari. 


to Golden Friend (11 -13) at Cheltenham test tarn <2m <t 

YA MAL (11-D 1X1 back in fiUL Last season MALTA MALfii-03) 

when a 12) 2nd to Paartyman (11-1?) ■* Liwpori pm, £5348, StaOd. Apr 


Selection: BBGROVE LAD 


Coarse specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


Wooers Rides Percent 


T Forster 

17 

54 

31 A 

SStaremod 

8 

32 

250 

R Smyth 

5 

18 

qua 

P Scudamore 

39 

185 

21.1 

F Writer 

47 

180 

24,7 

H Davies 

28 

134 

239 

O Starwood 

5 

21 

238 

SSmWi Ecctea 

19 

128 

148 

0 Mcttfaon 

31 

149 

20-8 

n Row* 

17 

142 

12J) 

JJMdns 

13 

BS 

19.1 

B da Ham 

6 

57 

105 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 (12) 30432 TWESFORM (CO£F) (Mi* J Rytey) B Hal 9-130 

Racecard number. Draw ki brackets. Six-fignre 


B West (4) 88 7-2 


and rictanca wfenar. B T -tw a ten tavowlta in West 
race). Owner hi brackets. Drainer. Ago end 
weight Rider plus any aftmmnce- The Times 
Private H an dfeapper's rating. Apprcmfrnata starting 
price. 


2.15 TOM MASSON TROPHY HURDLE (E&256: 2m 4f 120yd) (9 runners) 


401 20/1111- TEN PLUS (LThweto^FWldwynB-n-B. 

402 080312 BRONSKI (P McHata) J Jenkins 5-11-4 — 


403 20/1111- ATRABATES (CO) (Atrabates Crickat Club) 0 Sherwood 6-11-3 — _S Sherwood 

404 F1 113 MN MAJBIfP Ottoman) CSpB«e4-TM! JMcLaagHn 

408 8F1101- MRS MUCK (N1VMoaDntoi)N1MMoa Darias 31313 **1Tnr* 

409 312S14- JMHIY LOHENXD (J ds Harare) P Hedger 4-1312 P Corrigan 

411 43 DETHCfT SAM (A Sofroniou) R Akehwst 3139 RDunroody 

412 8^0839 PISTOLE FMENDtfi Dart*) JRk 310-9 „S 


• 98FS-4 
•8132 
88 31 
87 31 
94 99 
87 


417 B3321F LADY HR90WBI (BP) (RMgMtagatalHHaMBr 3132 m 


8712-1 


198&C NASSAU R0YALE 5-10-4 Q McCourt Mrs M Rknei Weired aver 
FORM 101 PUISf,1 ~ 7,,a8an Wiwlw 151 wtmar otlheSun A Ran oa at the Chaltartiam Fea8wd 

beatan after 



BLEFR0END(13O)ran on at tlm death wtian 413rd WAmadtaatMaantarCam, £(583, good, Oct2 
tastfime. 

SMecflOE TEN PLUS 


245 COKETHORPE NOVICE CHASE {£2/fl7: 2m 41) (9 runners) 


502 FTPF2-1 ULAN BATOR (Mrs O Jackson) F Winter 31V5. 

503 02082-2 ACE OF SPIES (BF) (A Jacobs) Mrs G E Janes 5-1 


Ml. 


• 99F5-4 
98 31 


SOS 00(8243 BALLYTREMT(MmG MCKey) MO&W311-&. 

507 4300/ COUNT FRBSBCK (I WbdBBr)S Dow 311-0 

508 29/22F3 WCT7WE (A WBsan) R ArmytRjs 9-11-0 

509 03 F MEW OH Mt MQHT (J Rose) N Hendmson 7-TML 


511 09/2330 GASOOF (HAs G McBride) W Kemp 31 1-0. 

513 823332 KAMAG (D Holy) D Hady 311-0 

517 M23 SWORD PLAY (Mrs D Kent) PHmmee 31 1-0. 


RQu«*t(7) 

17 31 
— 31 

— . C Seward 

MrP Hamer 10131 
A Webb 


1996: RHYTHMC PASTWES 311-6 S SmKh Ecctas P-1) J JanMns 5 ran 


FORM 1B-AM BATOR (1 1-4) tost ground at the start and ha the last but a« beet JmminyQuIchlt (130) 
rwnm 4lat Wlncantan(2iT»5f,£l852,BOOd.Oct39, 17ra^. ACE OF SPIESf 11-0) bad ha firm run over 
tancaa when 10 2nd to Umg Engaggniant (11-5) at Worcester (2m, E13OT. good, oct 25, 13 nml 


_ _ _ Long Engaggrnant (11-5) at Worcester (2m, £1307*. good, oct 25, 13 ran). 
BAL L YT R Pi rs best run owhurdtes lest season wm a head 2 nd (10-12) to Bronsldni -81 MWoNer ha mplod 
4f.£219^goodtofkra.N(w2S.l5ran).DiCrTIVE,afe8ertoChmttntiatn'sStmAttance{3(i4.waspnnrious- 
1 -S1XI 2nd to OraganTral (11-3) over 2m at Ltagftald (an. £1803, heavy, Jan 16, 17rpnL KAMAG (11-Q 

of 5 to Sam Da Vind (11-ira et CheBantiam ^n. £3093, firai, Oct S). 

Patartion. UUIM BATOR ' . . . 


3.15 COLD ASH NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £1,417: 2m 100yd) (15 runners) 


601 

1 PROBLEM CMLD(LonJ R Smyth 11-8 

_ Date McKaown (7) 

F7-4 




— 31 

606 






611 

812 

613 



— 7-2 

MYSTHTT CLOCK (B) (Miss K Towrawic)) P Bd«y 1 1-0 — 

— SMnratOTl 

614 

615 
618 

SO RKMAR (B) (Mtes WHmwiJ)J JsnkiaB 119 

.S Starwood 

. — . 69 

80 i— ma teiiBjT (M>)or N HauttYO) L Kinrd 11-0 

RUPERT BROOKE (K Man) 1 CfflC 119 

- H Darias 


817 

818 
619 

RUBSK1 (Itanataunr Racing) K CuwiuflrianvBrown 11-0 

A WOT 

131 



620 

0 PCPTHORH (TTliom) J Bridgor 10-9 

G Mom 




1995taOOF»7HBrS OFT 114) SSmHi Ecctas (7-4 lay) JJenUns 10 ran • 

345 EBF NATIONAL HUNT FLAT RACE (£1,197: 2m 100yd) (25 runners) 


i 

6 

B 

11 

12 

13 

IS 

19 

23 


LE GAROTTE (Mra J May) P Hcbbs 311-7. 
BEJ. BA-ROO(P Carter) J Old 4-1 1-0. 


. L Rwvey (4) — 


BROWN WMD80R (WShatM Kydd) N Henderson 311-0- 
CHANCELLDRSWUJEpWlPWHWltS)PW Hanli 31 1-0. 
CHEEKY KMGHT (C Ctwke) J Gifford 5-11-0 


CHBQ0V(S Tlndaq S Metor 31 1-0_ 


CUp...8y n (7) 

- M Beaky W 

- D8kyme(7) 
. RferDBaher(7) 


F52 

131 


FAIR DAIK. (P ScarmeO Mrs J PMman 311-0 . 


QQOIVA BEAHM68 (Godhra Bearings) J Fox 4-1 1-0 . 


Mr G Jam (7) 
,S Seliy (7) 


■14-1 
■ -31 
■131 


HONEVBEAR BEAD (Paw MB J Thome) Mbs J Thome 311-0 . 


35 

37 

41 

42 

46 

47 
55 
80 
81 
68 

70 

71 

72 


KARAZONA (Mis SOKtfsr) Mrs SOBver 311-0. 
KBUTS KESTREL (R Kersfafc8}M Pipe 4-11-0. 
Ml KATE (»s P Hamtaon) A Moore 311-0- 


. N Hunter (7) 
.JIM (7) 


. JecqelOfter(7) 

.Jl 


MY HEUONAN (0 HubbwJ) J GWord 311-0. 


NORTHERN GAMBLER (T Huawhi g s) S Mefcr 44 Ml. 


Candy Moore (7) 

-a i leW OTw CT 

0 Leaden (4) 


RARDOUFH PLACE (Ecflnburgh Wao8en MB) G Richards 311-0 — JR Orton (7) 

RAMXNITnAVmm(AFhetps}MniJPaman311-0 J Sertb (7) 

SAUBUN (Me) G Rodwrt) J Webber 4-11-0 Mtaa JHatny 


31 

131 


SCAUSCROp Mackenzie) N Henderson 5-11-0 


WAR DANCBI (Mra J M-Smtafl D Murray-Snrth 4-11-0, 
CHATTY LASS (P Beehera-PoMriB K Bishop 3139. 


CRAWTBtS MOS (B Stems) R Shepherd 3133 
OFFSHORE GIRL (J Rubin) G Roe 4-109, 


fYFMHMNT LASS (H Shorter) D Mdrcbon 4-139. 



13-2 

31 


SLEEPUNE SIESTA (Staepfine Hordtage) R Holder 4-109 W McFwtand (7) 

DWO LAPT (Mrs J Barrow) Mrs j Barrow 4-138 MtaeC Fabey (7) 


1986: NoComipandtog i 


EDINBURGH 


1 245 TENNBns SPECIAL SELLING STAKES (£919: 1m) (16 runners) 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


1.15 Cornelian. 

1.45 Ski Captain. 

2.15 Reform Princess. 

2.45 Natija. 

3.15 Mists Of Avalon. 

3.45 Crown Justice. 


By Oor Newmarket 
Correspondent 

1.15 Springwefl. 

1.45 Tap The Baton. 

2.15 Keep Hoping. 

2.45 Career Madness. 

3.15 Mists Of Avalon. 

3.45 Crown Justice. 


By Michael Seely 

2.15 Reform Princess. 3.45 CROWN JUSTICE (nap). 

The Tunes Private Han dicapper’s top rating: 1.15 NORTH OCEAN. 


Going: good Draw advantage: 5f-1m, high numbers best 

1.15 TENNENTS 80 SHILLING ALE STAKES (3-Y-O £938: 1m 4f) (11 runners) 

" 038001 COME POUR THE WINE (D) (E Atkinson) H Wharton 31 JOrtaaO) 84131 

BANTEL BUBIY (John Taytar (ShudBhB) Ltd) J Berry 99 NON-RUNNBI 

303323 MONTH OCEAN (BF) (S FradkofT) L Cunani 30 RCochtana *99 31 

03*233 SOME T IU M G 8liatAR(B)(AMacagBBrt) J)m«y Fteawrtd30— ^ MBbtb 81131 

03041 COmraiAN(0)(DHwTis)G Harwood 9-4 pen) GGrtriray 9SF2-1 

00000 MAMLE NOON ( O eec h g row Stud Ftam LM) R HoBnehead 311 „ S Parka 70 — 
300242 RARE LEGB8) (B£F) (M Stndak) M Ryan 31 1 PitahtaOT 80 4-1 


1 

S (2) 

4 0 

5 OD 

10 (7) 

11 (IQ) 

« m 

15 (4) 
« CTO 

17 & 

18 (1) 


40 SAVE TT LASS (J Robson) R HoHnshaad 311 
440404 SHOT KAY (Mrs M Butter) W assy 8-11 


Srt ELNAAS (Hamdan At MrtMtmi) H Thomson Jonas 311 

00334 SPfUNGWELL (A Simpson) G Htrftar 311 



isase FOUR STAR THRUST 311 N Carflata (31) R WMttkar 12 ran 

145 TENNBVFS EXPORT MAIDEN AUCTION STAKES {2-Y-Cfc £829: 5f) (7 runners) 

— DMcboft — 14-1 
— C Dwiwr — 131 
- — at Wood W99 F7-4 

000000 -T HE Drn-s'^ ms^inr) — LCanioc* 82 31 

" “ “ - M Rtaaatr — 31 

- J llaWilaa 87 59 


1 (7) 

4 (5) 

5 <a 

7 (4) 

8 (B) 
10 (T) 
12 (3) 


00 Mirra MlLER (K Dyke) T Barron 39>___ 
0 MONT ARTHUH (1 lAitdiuwu) I MaBhaws 30. 


0022 SKI CAPTABI (V) <J Etharingiari) J Blwringtan 30 . 
000344 TAP THE BATON (B) (J Hasten) M ToapUw 39. 


OM P ATENT tWEAMBI (Mrs S PataraQ HCgemgridgsB-H. 
2 SLEEPERS (D Hwdng) C Booth 311. 


19S: ROVE 30 J Loam (2-1) S Norton 11 m 

2.15 TENNENTS NOVEMBER HANDICAP (£1,923: 1m 7f) (17 runners) 

1300-00 KUARY BAY (RGoinar*sa)NTk*ter 4-310 Kha 


1 
Z 

a 

5 (17) 
S W 
a <5) 
9 (iq 
io P9 
« (?) 
12 W 
18 (IT) 
IT (14) 
18 (13) 
22 <1* 


CD 03*1 KAFAIOIO (M Kayo!) G Harwood 39-10 (4 oh) 


340092 TREASURE HUNTER ((S) (Mrs A RoMtn)W Pane 7-38. 

00403 2 KMSW 1CK(BF)(R KJrtesteir^ J Ourtop332 

500012 REFORM PR2MCESS fB) (B GsrhauMr} M Ryan S9-T <7«xj , 
*41t3 tOH£ NATIVE (CD) (BAMahOS Norton 3311, 


. GStrakay 91 32 


320300 MtSS BLACKTHORN (Mrs JWabb)N Vigors 4-3H. 

004100 PONTYATeSfC)(JMdLai«n)JSWBson 4-311 

132300 PATS JESTER (R P Adam Ltd) R Atei 3^-10. 


003113 MIAMI MSPMNG(MGaymor)RSbbbs 3310. 


041142 STONE JUG (CQ3F) (MISS S Hal) >9 ki S Hal 38-7- 


000190 PRB*CE8SANDHaMH»A(BWad«ngtoriDCheanien336. 
001333 KEB 9 HCPWQ (J DutteQG Hultar333. 


_ . , “M 00 NMHT GUEST (J FKMaa) P Morartb 37-8 

S 22 ° 00WH > gmATHCONON tB WalacrtT Crete 37-7 

S' 22 800084 S?°!F roABSOOW tumtoy) J Ethertagtoo 37-7 
Zfc (8) 080000 PMLBA SECRET (JSfeipaan) Danya Smtat 37-7 


iSBfe STONE JUG 533 M Btaeh (7-2 l8Vt MMS S Hot 13 ran 


- DMeMta 

94 131 
B9F7-2 
97 31 
96 31 
» — 

ACoefotM 

— SDawioa 

SPesta 

92 

— CDwyar 

— KDratey 

94 14-1 
09 — 

^MBbeft 

S3 31 

— WRyao 

90 — 

— . GCartar 

• 99131 

. JOOTito 

98 — 

_ AMickay 

— — 


8812-1 

LCbamoeh 

90 — 


2 (6) 

3 (10) 

4 0) 

5 (3) 

6 (IS) 

8 (7) 

9 <a 

10 pi) 

11 m 

12 (16) 

13 (14) 

14 B 

15 (13) 
21 ( 12 ) 

22 (4) 

23 (1) 


001080 AVRAEA5 (CO) (Mrs E Dwrtts) R Morris 7-03. 


180803 BOLD ROWLEY (R A Black Ltd) J S WBson 38-5- 
000010 TBEJAY(D)(D Wektran)PBe«n736i_ 


000000 ALWAYS NATIVE (0 CtngraaR) 0 Chapmwi 5-9-0. 


240004 CONPOSBi (C)(MreK Jackson) M Jamas 330. 
220390 O I OYSTON (CJQ (J Berry) J Berry 1389. 


GStarttey 
tatdwa8(7) 
_ K Dwiay 


000000 TOP OnrifLAHE (R Cooflim) N Byorofi99-0. 


000000 THSnBLLA(DChapmv9DChBpfnan330_ 


400443 NATBUWHAY (I EwtSoy) D Yaoman 5-311 . 



000-440 HALFSHAFT(W ASMpbensorO W AStephera o nS-BO 
003000 KHtG COLE (P Ctriqubour^ Mrs G Rewstey 4-89 
000004 VIA VTTAE (lbs A hkiKti) R HoBnshsad 4-30 


81 131 


008000 CAREER MADNESS (V) (T RanadariM Ryan 38-6 
000000 MBS BLM(E(MBr8tdri)M Brittain 332 
000044 MUSICAL AID (V)(T Craig} T Craig 38-2 


000240 NATIJA (Tadwaod Btoocfcstock Lid) P Mafch 3-8 

1908: PALE STAR 389 L Ashworth (7-1) J Darias 18 ran 



3.15 TENNENTS LAGER MADEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,303: 1m) (14 runners) 


3 TO 
6 p2) 
12 (14) 

14 (13) 

15 TO 

16 TO 
18 (TO 
20 ( 11 ) 

23 (7) 

24 (2) 
V « 

29 (9) 

30 (1) 

31 TO 


OF CEDAR CREBC (J Anthony) M Prescott 9-0. 


00 HOPTYNG AROUW (Racsgoore Club) C Ttartaon 9-0 
0000 PIT PONY (Mra H Baadte) H Wharton 30 


000 ROYAL LUISXM (J Llsianan) G Mom 9-0 


3 8 3020 SCOTTISH FUNG OR (J Ctarir) J 8 W8son 9-0, 


040 TRBBFAGLE (Mrs EHewaQG Harwood 9-0 


00 BUY NORDAN (F Watson) F Watson 311 
0 DAWN SKY (MraJPrtttteOC Thornton 311 


4242 MISTS OF AVALON (BF) (3 Nartbos) H Cadi 311 
00022 OKDSAN (V) (J Nottwrcoe-Hunt) S Khnort 311 
0 TALLAND BAY (B Stertan) M Cbsacho 311 
000000 TOOTSe JAY p Poanton) G Harman 311 


0 HMML PAGEANT (lady Mabhaw s) I Msahaws 311 
00280 WHL0WBANK (V) (Mrs J Van Gaest) S Nrattn 311 



72 — 


91 131 
90 31 


90F35 
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aa 14-1 
98 131 


1988: ICARO 30 R Oochrana (31) N Crtaghan 16 ran 
(3^45 LAMOT PILS NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1^20: 7fl(16 runners) 

STATE (TWrtWd) P Maun 37. 


ON DANNY BOY (Mrs N Napier) E Woymos 9-7- 


9 (TO 
12 (4) 

14 (1« 

15 (7) 

16 (HI 
« (1) 

20 (IB) 

21 TO 

22 
23 (I S) 
28 TO 

27 (10) 

28 TO 


MM BUNDUKEYAp) (Hamdan Al Mafctoum) H Thotnan Janas 3W, 
020010 AFRABBLA (A WragtfM Brittain 313 


o2oSli ■ 


KATIE SAYS (V)(P Granted Hasp) JBharington 36. 
00030 TAMASSOS (A ChriHodoutoiO G Hwu 


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= OPTBMST (B) (G BteaadrtpR P en codr 31. 

004000 OUR HORIZON (F Tirompaon-H^ T Barron 7-13 

003004 CREOLE BAY (Mra K Sand) TFahhuret 7-8. 


T Oaten 

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99 8-1 

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94 31 

_ K darter 

94 131 

• Ohm (7) 

88 — 

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J Loan- 

87 

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- AMackay 

V — 

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A Fraud 

95 

GCartar 

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SAU.Y FOXTROT (p Thornton) CThonton 7-7. 
000000 JUST A DECOY (M Blades) N Bycroft 7-7. 


— 94 — 


19BS; BRAVE AND BOLD 8-4 R Cochrane (7-1) N Cala gh a n 18 ran 


Course specialists 



Vftnrm 

Rumars 

Par earn 

MHrch 

JOCKEYS 



GKuftar 

6 

14 

42J 

20 

121 

1&5 

MCamacto 

5 

. 17 . 

294 

AMefcay 

11 

67 

164 

SHaO 

12 

41 

233 

KOutay 

15 

139 

103 

M Prescott 

22 

SO 

27 £ 

LCtantock 

15 

140 

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10.1 



Arab influence spreading 
as At Talaq triumphs 
in Australian showpiece 


From Chute* Besson, Meftxwrae 


At Talai] probably dnn|ed 
the coarse off^ AnstraHanraaKg 
history when winning the Mel- 
boraoe Cup yesterday. 

For not ooly did At Tate), a 
10-1 rhaw» t successfully 

cany the colours of Sbdch 
HanAw, only the second 
horse to ran hoe representing 
the rating family of Dubai, but 
he proved that an American 
pedigree and an extensive 
European racing programme 
is no bar to success In 
Australia. 

Now that At Talaq has mm 
the big one — worth 
$AUS650^M (£308^57) plus 
toe trophies ~ he should 
imlodt the floodgates and let 
in toe Arabs whntesde. Fer 
there was massive enthusiasm 
here for the success of a man 
who Es almost totally un- 
known, a m y ster y eves if he 
and his brothem are regular 
features of the Krffisb racing 
scorn. 

Perhaps, die nicest thing 
about At Tatars -vfetery was 
that he represorted toe in- 
credibly popalar trainer Colin 

Hayes, saccessfal only once 
pieviuRsly in tois national 
event with BeUale Ball in 
1980. Hayes is the top trainer 

in Victoria and Sooth Austra- 
lia and, year after year, topped 
the wimnag tables m these two 
states. 

But, in spite of his snpexb 
record which has made trim 
something of a national hero, 
he remains untouched by toe 
adulatio n in w hich he is held 
and is, quite simply, a very 
nice man and a very modest 


But then ifepatharig for 
Ganchi, stffl an apprentice, 
was harder to bear. Bitt Chute 
hue it all phflosophically, 
than&h he admitted last a itte 
“I don't deny it was a tittle 
hard on occasions Bat I knew 
I was work ing for toe best 
stable m Australia and my 
time would come.” 

Not an attitude m atc he d by 
many, of ora mere impatient 


Big-race result 


Going: Good 
3A1 (2mt 1. AT TALAQ 
10-f): 2. rasing Pear (R 


Ctarka 
50- 


1t 3; Sot Lbgeod Oy« 20-1* 4, 
i6wi (N Kants 10-11 Also rare 


._ Row (5th). My Trtsbwn-s 

(6th). RbcMms Tradtion, MY 

Lomondy, JoaL Bom To Ba Quean. 
Mnt MasTOr. PR da Roi. Our Sophia. 
Ench an teur. BMck Knight, fndfam 


R4, Just Now, Smnasaan, Fot ^ pb. 


Final Advance, Vtoratah Bay, 

Intruder. 22 ran. NR: Foxseal, The 


So it was equally appro- 
priate that the winoing jockey, 
24-year-old Michael Cfauke, 
should have bided his time as 
deputy ami anderstndy to two 
local champions, Brent Thom- 
son and Dairen Ganchi. 

Leanmg under T ho ms o n, 
new a swxessfitl jockey riding 
in Eng l a n d , was fair enough. 


young sprats stars these 
bat one that bore fridt 
a year ago when Ganchi left 
during die middle of. toe 
Melbourne Cap carnival 12 
months ago. So Oarite, toe 
mdostndy, came fotwod and 
has become the top man in 
Melbourne and a very pol- 
ished rider. 

Hayes, amid toe e up horia 
which surrounds a Melbourne 
Cop wnmer, had mixed feel- 
ings. He was happy but it 
brought bade bitter-sweet 
memories. Fra ra this very race 
back in 1979, the best horse he 
ever trained, the 1978 Victoria 
Derby winner, Drirify, was 
killed. And even winning the 
race 12 months, latier with 
BeMale Ball for Rogert 
Sangster, did not entirely heal 
that sadness. 

Most Anstrafians among 
the near 14MM)00 crowd yes- 
terday hoped to see the 
m y s terio us figure of Sheikh 


Hwndu- But he was attend- 
ing a beads efstete conference 
in Aim Dhahi and corid not be 
(here. 

However, fae and Us broth- 
ers had arranged for a five 
transmission of toe race to be 
beamed-in. A great sportsman 
he fores shooting and 
though hen ajreat 

comparing At Talai, fovto in 
the 1984 Derby, with his 
favourite camel PetroL 

As for the others in the 
Mtorase Gth it ns ratn- 
aOy no contest, etea though 
toe winning distances were 
only n foot neck and a neck 
from toe 58-1 chance Rising 
Fear and Sea Legend. 

It may have sonaded dose 
hot the winner always had 
matters hi hand. He is rated 
down brae as a sfac-yeraold 
bmia fact he is only fire in all 
logic, having been awarded by 
the Anstrafians a second 
birthday this year on An^st 
1, the tone when all horses hi 
the sooth era hemisphere 
progress by one year. 

The most dramatic ran of 
toe beaten horses was pra np 
by the 1983 wtacr Kiwi, now 
nine years old, who came with 
his cus t omar y flashing late 
rim to he dose up fourth, only 
to break down and finish 
hopping lame. 

Bra tins national event, 
CRjoyeti as t holiday by so 
many in Australia, was 
successful as ever, a dramatic 
coop for the sponsors, Foster’s 
lager, who pot np a mill k m 
focal dollars, and who are now 
basking in a major media 
hype.' 

The parties m the car parks 
started before 84 in the 
morning and were still gong 
strong into Wednesday, tt was 
a wonderful, hot; sunny, windy 
day, appropriate for the occa- 
sion when the arabs fait 
Australia. Where will it 
finish? 


WOLVERHAMPTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 Accmitam. 2.0 Chalet W; 
Franciscus. 3.0 Eirnnason. 3 JO Sweet 
4.0 UnihOc. 


230 


Going: firm; good, back straight 

1.30 SMFHAL NOVICE HURDLE (£1,249: 2m) (12 
nmfwrs) 



i -iso Baca mm b Pnww 3ii 
4 ACOWTUMOSbanKiad 31312. 

9 D0HUNCMraMRtaM8 3131Z 
10 BY DUAraJSUBtaa 31312. 

14 0^-fBBra<wSOTERD4r(lunnM31(M2_ 0 

15 8/3 HBl QgYPS YCTWder 31312 MDwyar 

16 . MGH8HDQE B CamMdgo 7-1312 Mr J Cambfdga {4) 

17 JRJSTSMOKEYWMon«4-1312— i W Manta 

22 MEW FO REST U>D M« J P— HU 4^312 JJ— ~C MOT 

26 3 StBBVANQMICERPFataaM 31312 -SJotw* 

32 24-3 SPAHiSH REB. J BJ»es5«4-1312 P Baton 

38 89' L4DV CATCHER J Boatejr4-TO-7 MBoatey(4) 


59 Aconitum, 31 Height of Saraow. 7-2 Heto Gypsy. 

2j 0 TOWER CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS NOVICE 
HURDLE (£855: 2m 4fl (12) - 

2 312 CHALET WALPESG (DXBB D Ganriatto 31 313 

-EftSdS 


9 0 BtOSTMRULBBT Casey 5-1312- 

10 009 Q OOIMUWf SMASH J Vqmg 7-1312 

11 iPP- HAPPY Hone LM 3T312 

12 MV LOfBODljOOBSnart 131312 C 


KRyan 


16 UFO RKCO STAR TO JBrader 4-1312. 

17 P- RUSTY RAILS MWDnvteS 4-1312. 

18 P90 SIRUMlY.nOiMte 31312^. 


•SJm 


19 429 SARTHY BEAR R Oickn 4-10-12 W Hraoptnys (7) 

21 MM3 THACK MARS HALL PLWMteM 4-13120 Qentaar (71 
25 003 OTVERUIIUi T BM^3137 BDontag 


26 6PP- SURELY A Janes 310 


11-8 Chalet Wrttagg. 31 Smithy Beer, 31 Track Menhel, 

Z30 RACING POST HANDICAP HURDLE (£1 ,934: 
2m) (18) 

1 423 UFE GUARD (CD) S Harris 311-13 

I fSS ” Mra J Ptanan 5-1 1-10 - GHcCorai 

6 1113 AL-ALAM (mnF) Jbnetv Fttzotrald 4-1 1-4 MOwyer 


8 10U0 ASMD 
10 090 TAGIO 

13 1311 SNAKE 

14 349 1WTDN 

15 POM SHADY 


17 003 ORARBNJM 

18 003 CRUDEMBAY 

19 0011 FRAHOSCUS 



20 OOP- DCTYBiTlaNGKTO Mrs J Croft 3136 
S 25i ABrtateame 1 V135 . 

i gi 


SSJSt 7-130. 

261*003 AraCULAPUt (DIR Judes 5-Jfl 
27 0P3 WIUTWBXi MAR (D)R Spicer 3109- SIWrtatay 


Lttgacy. AWHam, 132 


7-2 FHsing Sovereign, 31 
Ensigns Kit, 7-1 Mr Otto, 131 

Cameron resigns at Lingfield 

David Cameron has resigned as derk. of the 
course m Lmgfield Park: Cameron, who has held 
the position since July 1985, will continue his 
association with Folkestone, where he has-been 
derk of- the course for several yezrsJdichael 
Webstra. who is ckrk of the course at Kempton 
Park, will also take on foe rin gfirfd post 


4 * 


MOIARLECOTE HANDICAP CHASE (£2^50: 2m 

3 P4-P H4MASOM (C-D) J Spearing 11-11-7 PDmr 

7 431 SR BADSVKVTTH Tuorton 3T19 RCemifcitt 

8 421- COLE PORTER (DU Barts 11-1311 G McCorat 

11 293 BAYHAM SR VMtDONG Graham 13138 RGoktetain 
13 31-F MASTER KLlDDY (D) W Kacfcan 1310-8— K I 

20 40P- WOOOBURGH J Bosiay 3130 MBc 

21 4840 OTADB.ROCnJBmdey 11-109 G 


...3:1 Bsryhara Sr Vardon. 10380 StrBadnmrth, 31 
Melody, 32 Cato Porter. 31 Emmescsi, 131 Citadel Bt 



Roc. 


3M MOSELEY NOVICE CHASE (£1,464: 3m 11) (4) 
' 2E5? 2!S r ^py2I°?l!9 JK,n B 7 - ,1 -3 smom 

3 20F- BACK LOG J DaRon 31312 M Boteae (4) 

10 JOH PR ™ B Morgan 31312 t RbLil 

13 089 ROY'S HOUSE E Jones 313t2 ______ S J 01M 


Jon pSw*** 1 Sdk * or ' 11-8 BkWc * 13^ Hoy^i Hoosft131 


4.0 GASTLECROFT HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,357: 
2m 6fl (10) 


5 443 LITTLE MELS K Dm 311-7. 


law BABPSEY fl Hoteshead 311-2- 
14P2B-2 UNHOCW Moate 7-133^OT 


18 123 CRISP AM) K^3f K WMte 3137- 


W Monte 
Ki 


17 JPOI MVER RAMBLER Mrs WTeBnrigM 3137. 

MhiKMMrihl 

19 4140 AGMN KATHLEEN ABF) PMrtfct 3134 

OIF- PUN9T AU.B Moreen 3134 G 

22 904 FREBIAC HI.S Hera 4-liK*. . 

23 090 MSS MAUIOWSKIJOQSram 3131 J 

2« OOP- DUSTY FAHLQW R Monte7-T30_ MtaLWriO) 


. ?-1 VJWhoc, 31 Again KMbtaen. 31 Crisp And Kean, 31 
>«asey, 31 Drawtea. 131 Fraerscer. 12-1 — 



Course specialists 

raAWTO&^MnraaB 2Swimmfrom 102 iuvnre.24^%; j 
Bdwa^ 10 (rant 63, 15J9%cJ Spearing 10 from 67, 143%(Mra 
JPI^mngfrom (ort» tourMftftaca- 

JO*30EYS;0 Brewma 8 wrtnoara from 15. 5a3^ P Barton 5 from . 
68. 7.8% (only tan quafifiare). 


Blinkered first time 

3«*S Herr FSck. Geota rit oiiy, Crtegendanoch. 


Cecil shooting ahead 


Hewy Cecfl, locked in a private battle with 
uuy Harwood to saddle most winners tide 
season, reached the 114-maric, extending his lead 

*" **0 over the Pnlborough trainer, whea 


to 


arren Place team 


Shooting ftmy scared for the ’ 
ax Leicester yesterday. 

Shooting Party was with the leaders from foe 
»rat £ud the 6-5 favourite left his rivals toiling in 
the final (brioqg, drawing four lengths dear of 
Fearless Man. 

Paul Cote, who moved stables loWhatcotnbc 
this year, reached a total of 62 winners, the best 
season of his career,, when stable jockey Richard 
Qnhm, scored an easy four lengths success on 
xTttneN _umber ^ the first division of the Fosse 
•way Oaiming Stakes. - 

« has been a fine season loo for the Arundel- 
. bused John Dunlop,' who has reached a century of 
domeaicwiimers fbrthe first time in 22 
He registered-winBer No 105 with Betty- Jme in 
the first division of foe.ltifoy Maiden ■Stokes 


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Jill 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 


41 


M a rcus Willi ams investigates the oldest known artefact depicting cricket outside Britain 

of a mud-covered buckle 




hen a small 
piece of metal 
“like the lid of a 
sardine tin” 
was found 
embedded on the banks of the 
River Tweed one drizzly after- 
noon seven yeans ago. little 
did its discoverer. Give Wil- 
liams, conceive that be had 
unearthed the oldest known 
artefact depicting cricket out- 
side the British Isles. His 
metal detector, however, must 
have been aware of the signifi- 
cance of the occasion, for it 

* gave up the ghost and never 

* worked again. 

The metal object, no bigger 
than the palm of a man's 
hand, had lain two inches 
deep in silt, and a preliminary 
cleaning revealed that, far 
from covering the last resting 
place of some hapless fishTit 
was a bell buckle depicting a 
batsman hearing the 'death 
rattle* that haunts aQ cricket- 
ers, the ball spread eagjing the 
stumps. 

The presence of a windmill, 
hut. and foliage is the back- 
ground and coarse gras at the 
batsman's feet suggested a 
rural setting, maybe the Eng- 
lish -Scottish Border country 
where the find was made. 

.' Interesting, but buckles show- 

v ing a cricketing scene and 

attached to colourful belts 
were a common feature of a 
cricketer's attire in the Vio- 
torian period, so Mr Williams 
* thought little more of it, and' 
consigned the buckle to his 
sock drawer. 

Il was four years later, while 
cleaning jewellery for his wife, 
that he remembered the 
buckle. The removal of further 
layers of accumulated deposit 
from the brass set off a train of 
painstaking detective work, 
which has yielded several 
exciting discoveries and tanta- 
lizing theories — and given rise 
to a dream that one day the 
cricketing nations of the world 
might compete in the West 
Indies for a trophy adorned 
with the buckle as motif. 

From this second cleaning it 
emerged that the batsman, far 
from being an Englishman or 
Scotsman, had negroid fea- 
» tures; that the but and wind- 
mill were of a type Mr 
Williams had seen in Carib- 
bean sugar cane fields; and 
that the decorations around 
the rim of the buckle had a 
distinctly tropical air. In- 
quiries began. 

The date of the buckle: The 
Victoria and Albert Museum 
opined that, although such 
buckles generally dated to the 
middle Victorian years, the 
“gothic’’ fed of the strut 









Naval chain slave collar 



From the mud of the Tweed 

suggested earlier origins. A 
subsequent X-ray analysis of 
the metal at Oxford Univer- 
sity revealed that copper ac- 
counted for over 90 per cent of 
the content, zinc for almost all 
the rest, and the total absence 
of lead and tin placed manu- 
facture in the early Victorian 
period or before. 

The batsman: According to 
Arnon Adams, a West Indian 
historian consulted by Mr 
Williams, the batsman looks 
'like a well-fed, weB-muscled 
mulatto, probably the off- 
spring of a white overseer and 
a black slave mother. She was 
perhaps a cook, which would 
account for his access to good 
rations and a better-than- 
avcrage diet. He spears to be 
in his late teens. The ring of 
naval chain around his neck, 
and apparently bare feet, con- 
firm his slave status. 

The cricket equipment The 
batsman is wielding a straight, 
spliceless bat, which would 
accord with the late 18th or 
early 19th centuries. 

S pliced bats, in which 
the handle is separate 
from but attached to 
the Made, date from 
the mid 1830s. The 
wicket, shattered by the un- 
seen bowler, consists of three 
stumps; a third stump was 
introduced to the game circa 
1777. 

The location: Visits by Mr 
Williams to the Caribbean 
High Commissions in London 


comes this scene depicting a batsman bearing die ‘death rattle’ 


produced a consensus that the 
buckle had dear West Indian 
cricket connections. However, 
expert botanical opinion was 
able to pinpoint the scene to 
Barbados: the foliage at the 
bottom lefi of the buckle's rim 
is from the Cabbage Palm, 
which is indigenous to the 
island. The windmill and hut 
are typical of cane-growing 
areas, which in turn were 
typical of Barbados. Wind- 
mills are known to have been 
sited in the vicinity o f Bridge- 
town, which now houses the 
island's main ground, Ken- 
sington Oval, and it is a 
tempting thought that the area 
depicted on the buckle is 
where that Test match arena 
now stands. 

Hie date of the scenes The 
first dated reference to cricket 
in Barbados is 1806, though it 
indicates that the game had by 
then been established for 
some time on the island. The 
cabbage palms already men- 
tioned were prolific in the late 
1 8th and early 1 9th centuries, 
their numbers — and those of 
the island's windmills — being 
drastically reduced by a great 
hurricane which raged for 26 
hours in October, 1780. 

Thus, a location and 
approximate date for the scene 
can be agreed, establishing the 
buckle's antiquity and slams, 
but several questions remain 
teas’ ngly unanswered. Who 
was the slave? (The National 
Portrait Gallery suggested to 


Mr Williams that this might 
be a specific example of 
portraiture.) Was he playing in 
a particular match or is it only 
a representation of cricket as 
then played in the West 
Indies? 

Who owned the buckle, or 
commissioned its engraving? 
More than likely it was a 
wealthy patron and this led 
Mr Williams to investigate the 
great famili es and houses 
along the Tweed Valley, 
particularly families con- 
nected with the West Indies 

L o and behold from re- 
search at the British museum 
and the National Maritime 
Museum at Greenwich there 
emerged on the Tweed, up- 
stream from where the buckle 
was found, a branch of the 
Ho thams (“o“ pronounced as 
in mother), a noted naval 
family with records of service 
in the Caribbean in the 18th- 
and 19th-ceuturies....and 
whose prowess at cricket while 
at Westminster School is re- 
corded by the family biog- 
rapher in the same context as 
the game's famous 18th cen- 
tury patrons, the Sackvifies 
(Dukes of Dorset). 

The biographer, Anna-Ma- 
ria Stirling, wrote: “The 
innovation (of cricket at West- 
minster) owed much of the 
approval it quickly gained to 
the enthusiasm of the Sack- 
viiles, several of whom en- 
sured their future laurels as 
cricketers in those pioneer 



Clive Williams with the buckle — a design which he hopes 
will adorn the 1991 World Cup in the West Indies 


attempts on Tuttle Fields 
(now Vincent Square); while 
the Hothams, both on account 
of their proficiency in the new 
pastime as well as their suc- 
cess in after life, were later 
described with dual meaning 
as being ‘among the lucky hits 
of Westminster’.’' 

The best known of the 
Hothams was Admiral Lord 
William, the first baron (1736- 
1813), and in 1779^0, then a 
Commodore, he was stationed 
off Barbados. 

P erhaps he organized 
cricket matches for 
Ids men — and there 
were many hundreds 
of marines as well as 
sailors in the fleet, and local 
slaves proficient at the game 
were induded. Perhaps again it 
was Admiral Hotham's neph- 
ews, Henry or William, both 
of whom also served in the 
area, that were involved in 
cricket in Barbados some 
years later. This must remain 
speculative, although Mr Wil- 
liams hopes that the Hotham 
family archives will yet yield 
further clues. 

How then did the buckle 


turn up on the shores of the 
Tweed? Stephen Green, Cu- 
rator of MCC, points out that 
many cricketing buckles have 
been' found in the soil, the 
assumption being that when 
the cricketing belts grew faded 
or tatty, they were then used 
for gardening or outdoor 
work, and were subsequently 
lost after an energetic spell of 
digging; the material would 
then rot away but the metal 
survived. In the same way one 
of die Hothams' or other 
noble families' gardeners 
might have worn the belt 
which bore this buckle and 
lost it in a part of the estate by 
the River Tweed. 

A planned forensic 
examination of the buckle 
may offer further evidence, 
such as whether the engraver's 
signature perceptible beneath 
the bottom edge of the bat is 
what may be EAKor EAA and 
time wfll tell whether Mr 
Williams's dream that the 
design of his beloved buckle 
appears on a world cricket 
trophy — the 1 991 World Cup 
in foe West Indies? — might be 
realized. 


w Indies win after The rifts that cannot be healed 

barrage of bottles 


By Ito Tennant 


From Richard Streeton, Gujranwala 


Bottles and firecrackers 
thrown on to foe outfield, 
together wifo appalling light, 
combined to bring a chaotic 
finish to the one-day inter- 
national between Pakistan and 
West Indies here yesterday. 
After the players had walked off 
the field, leaving the 26.000 
crowd puzzled and angry, the 
umpires ruled in their changing 
room that West Indies had won 
on faster scoring rate. 

By foe time the scorers had 
deducted the seven maiden 
overs bowled by Pakistan, and 
cross-checked foe Pakistan bat- 
ting details. >i emerged that 
West Indies' 196 for seven was 
clearly superior to Pakistan s 
155 for six. That, at any rate, 
was the explanation given to me 
by the umpires. 

West Indies, averaging 12 
overs an hour, were never going 
to complete their 50 overs 
before complete darkness felt 
When Richards led his side off 
at 5-16 p.ra. they had already 
been in foe field for three hours 
41 minutes. laved Miandad and 
Salim Yousuf who were sharing 
an exciting seventh-wicket 
stand, wanted to continue but 
foe umpires over-ruled them- 

Four times during the after- 
noon West Indian deep 
fieldsmen were barrassed by 
bottles, firecrackers and banana 
skins being thrown m them; the 
game having to b£ halted while 
the missiles were cleared. There 
did not. however, seem to be 
any vicious intent behind it alL 
Ii was a tragedy for foe local 
officials who have built a new 
pavilion for foe World Cup and 
whose other arrangements were 

first-class. , 

West Indies first thing had 


struggled and only an at 
late stand between Dujoo — 
Marshall had enabled them to 
reach foe score they did. Paki- 
stan made a similar poor start 
before Miandad, leading foe 
side in Imran's absence, raffled 
bis team. 

Pakistan needed 69 from foe 
last 10 overs as Marshall and 
Patterson returned. They 
continued to play aggressive 
shots despite foe light, which 
was dreadful, even by English 
standards. 

There were regular consulta- 
tions between the umpires and 
captains before a final barrage of 
bonks decided foe officials that 
there was no point in trying to 
continue. 

WEST MOSS 

C G Graemdge c Yousuf b JaJfer 
D L Haynes c Yousuf b Jaffar — 

B B Rfchwrbon tow b BaN 


A L Log* b Jattec _ — - — s 

-I v ABfchonw c Tauseef b 0»*r 
fP J L. Dujon not oul 


RAKarpartbwOQacfir- 


. 10 
- s 

. 23 
_ 0 
. 17 
, 57 
_ 1 
.66 
Z 


MD Manual run out. 

WK R Benjamin not out _ 

Exras pi, R> 4, w 2, nb 4) 11 

Total (7 wtds. SO mars) 196 

C A tfwteh and B P Patterson did not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-tB, 2-22, 342, 4- 
67. 5^7. 6-79. 7-194. 

BOWLING: Akram 10-241-0: Jatfnr IOC- 
42* SaW 102-25-1; Qaflr 10-1402; 
Tausaof 5-1-17-0; Mujbtn 5-1-14-0. 


PAKISTAN 

MofiEta Mian b Marshal _ 
Shoato Mohammad run out 
Ran* Rate c fficifflnte b St 
Astf Mujfita c Richardson b 
"JavedMandadrenout 


4 

3 

- 30 
- 0 

jjyhu warn iww> *5 

Msnzoor Safe c Dulon b 8en}am) „ 4 

jukU Qacte c IX4on b BaniaiTBn 0 

tSafim Yousuf not out — 23 

Exteas (bl.tbS.w 7) JJ 

Toted (6 whts. 4345 owrs) 155 

Wasim Ataam. Tauseaf Ahmed and 

Sateem Jaffar tto not baL 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-5,228,083.4-65, 

5-75, 6-75. _ 

BOWLING: Marshal aa-ifrjg Patterson 
7-5^233-0; Benjamin 101-21-3; Wafeft 
iOl-31-O; Harper 0042-0. 


So immer se d in thought was 
Peter Roebuck as he made his 
exit from the Comity ground, 
Taunton, on Monday af terno o n 
that he all bat mowed down a 
middle-aged wanly lady. She 
told him. Jokingly, that il he did 
that again he could no longer 
coast on her rate at the special 
meeting of Somerset members 
this Saturday. 

Sadi jocularity came as a 
relief to the Somerset captain, 
an intense aad singular man 
even when be has a hundred to 
Ms name. Many of the com- 
ments directed at him since be 
seconded the commitlee’e de- 
cision to release Vh Richards 
and Joel Gamer have been far 
from pleasant He has been 
n untewi and physically threat- 

that during the past fortnight, 
three investigative reporters 
pitched camp fa Taunton. 

It has been a time of broken 
friendships, not least wifo Rich- 
ards (as the West Indian made 
dear in The Tinas yesterday) 
Garner and Ian Botham, who 
will leave Somerset if the 
committee's decision is not over- 
turned on Saturday. Whatever 
the outcome, Roebuck says the 
rifts are now too deep to be 
healed. 

Should the so-called rebels 
win. Roebuck, now aged 30, win 
leave Somerset, eschewing a 
benefit, and probably leave 
cricket. He can afford to, meta- 
phorically at any rate, since he 
has a first-class mind. It is 
nmnwed that one n at i on al 
newspaper is delaying appoint- 
ing a cricket correspondent tmtfl 
Somerset’s problems are re- 



The severing of Ms relation- 
ship wifo Richards is, one 
suspects, the hart Roebuck has 
felt most keenly. He waald not 
<*omm«it oo RSdtnds’s remarks 


Roebuck: may leave cricket 


m The Tima yes t er da y. Their 
friendship grew originally be- 
cause their natures were so 
opposed. Roebuck, who won a 
scholarship to MjUfieJd and a 
first class degree 'at Cambridge, 
is an insecure figure, 31 at ease 
with JeDmr players and wifo bis 
batting until success as a writer 
exorcised the latter. “I cannot 
abide failure,” he said. **I have 
always feared 3 more than 1 
have loved success.” 

However, Roebuck does not 
see the meeting oo Saturday in 
that light; foe future of the dab 
Is at stake. It is to his credit that 
he has stayed aloof from foe 
mod slinging of Ms opponents, 
partly because by Ms own 
admission be is aloof and partly 
because reading law at Cam- 
bridge engendered a respect far 
foe other party’s point of view. 

1 do net tea hart by foe 
criticism of me as a captain or as 
a person. I have always liked 


Joe! Gamer and although my 
tolhp about V|t Richards are 
very confused I bear no animos- 
ity towards him.” 

Other than the breaking of 
friendships, foe aspect of the 
saga that has upset Roebuck 
most was the placing of foe 
notice ‘Jodas’ above Ms dress- 
ing-room peg. 

“Rarely does a cricket team 
throw together dose relation- 
ships and at Somerset we have 
had a turbulent mix of people, 
some of whom could not spot foe 
difference between an argument 
and personal dislike. I am not 
sure if socially and in terms of 
character deretopoeat, cricket 
was foe right career for me.” 

When, fa August, Somerset 
announced their decisfaa to 
release Richards surf Garner, 
Roebuck made a mistake. “I 
kept quiet for two or three weeks 
until personal abuse forced me to 
make my opinions known,” he 
said. **I was then seen as a 
Machureflha uuoeoverer. I 
became one of the instigators 
rather than someone who quietly 
agreed with the decision. It was 
the price I paid through being 
deemed to be clever and resulted 
in a campaign to discredit me. 

“The point is that Somerset’s 
record is just net good enough. 
Our history is littered with 
mistakes, our dob needs mod- 
ernizing and our constitution 
needs to be more democratic but 
things have not been going well 
on me field. The supposition 
that they started going wrong 
only year is unfair. Why 
have we had three c a ptains in 
four years?” 

Roebuck does not intend 
speaking on Satnrday — unless 
foe accusations become too 
defamatory to st o ma c h. He ex- 
pects a charge of racism to be 
raised a painat foe dob by 


supporters of the two West 
Indians. “One or two members 
of foe committee may not be 
fibers) ore r race matters but the 
rebels will have a bell of a job 
proving; it If the committee are 
racists, why have Richards and 
Garner been here so long 7” 

By foe beginning of this week. 
Roebuck's diary of the whole 
affair had reached 50,000 words. 
Although selling it would be 
worth a substantial sum to him. 
Roebuck never intends to pub- 
lish it- He does not believe in 
making personal comments and 
letters public and is not a 
materialistic ntoo . 

In fact, Roebuck welcomes 
adversity: be Bkes to worry over 
his cricket, which comes to him 
far less easily than writing. It 
dates back to his first net. His 
parents, both schoolteachers, 
took him to an indoor school in 
foe hope that he would be hit, 
not want to go back and con- 
centrate instead on cerebral 
matters. Roebuck teas hit but 
returned for more and has been 
seeing off the bouncers ever 
since. It will be no surprise 3 he 
still is come Saturday evening. 

Somerset show 
profit for 1986 

Somerset, who finished sec- 
ond from bottom of the Britannic 
Assurance championship, have 
annoimced a profit of £38,778 
for the year ended September 
1986. 

Despite an increase of more 
than £10,000 in players’ salaries 
and expenses foe Somerset trea- 
surer, Ray Wright, was able to 
report the pre-tax profit saying: 
“Prudent management has pro- 
duced the surplus despite a 
continuing drop in membership 
and lack ©f success on the field." 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

UNITED STATE& 

Las Angles Sams 30. Cmag 6 Mws u. 


SPEEDWAY 


GOLF 


TENNIS 


BADMINTON 


LEAS** CUPS Final, Memd toff Ajsponet* 

^CT ( LESuE B poap{in«t OOotd v 
Sheffield. 


dukrshukE: SM*- 

tand v OWta (Scawsh tunes fin*b 

Sutler lost TO L Jan end Z Snaum. 5-i5. 18- 


ICE HOCKEY 


:6 


BASKETBALL 


UWTEO STATES: 

(VBAt’ 5oa Ww**** iM. new >Q*R 

MCI ^pOD- 

m Acnts* 96. USSR 101 


WOffW MEHCX- wq ooflj 

Ctfgwy Raima 4. Los Angelas! 

Wates Conference 
Patrick Division 

W L TPtS FA 
PWtortW* l I ? w g ® 

KX | 1 ? !? S a 

srsr I - « i 

NYltoflers 2 5 4 B « « 


wTsS £ Oui ML 4sas» 8. Haw 
29-434; 7. T We, W.WB. B Omshaw. 
388.189: 9. R Fbyft 3M50B: 10, B Unger 
(WG), 379300- 

RUGBY FIVES 

U9 TOUWAIBIT HNAL9: (SpuBOoroMh. 

usaA'it&m 






(Merchant TatortJ 
BeOtonWW Cu* i 
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w. *** 

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J C*»tW(fj^t?T Notion 


Alexander Wi 
STOCKHOLM: 


2-6. 7-6. 64 

,_JWBB*Oa|SW,M. 

>. 7-5; J Tacon (Hortoft) bt B 
V4.64:CD«anan(&rtir“ 
6-4M,C&msunfNi*) 


IHJ 


Adams League 


CYCLING 


ray nen iMffi 

R Pron and PR 

M. Wpera £ Da watte and S 


«AD«0: Sa-tm 
pmiMM: 1. "J--, 

Cam-sow s 

Ttwme ffieS. 25: 3. 

HeH-WWi <UWl 145. 4. J Mwter fflW 
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CurfVK tOenl ano G Mavda fSW. 


Quebec 

Montreal 

Beeton 

Hartford 


W L TPts F A 

6 3 d W 55 48 

a 3 3 15 49 43 

5 6 1 11 59 42 

4 3 3 11 » 41 

3 7 2 8 38 41 


Toronto 

SI Loots 
Detroit 
Mrnne&aU 
CWMjJO 


Conference 

L TPts 

B 

4 

5 

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3 6 


SQUASH RACKETS 


2 3 IS » 

3 3 11 34 

5 1 11 31 

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WTA IWOHOSa 1. M 

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wmJlSiK _ 


WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES 

Public’s ticket problem 


Toronto (AP) - Abom a 
quarter of the tickets for the 
1988 Winter Olympic Games in 
Calgary, Alberta, hare been set 
aside and wfll not be available to 
foe public, the chairman of foe 
Calgary Olympic Organizing 
Committee (OOOQ said on 


The COOC have been criti- 
cized since H was leaned last 
month that many of the best 
seats for the various events 
would not be generally 
avaibbfewFranb King, the chai r- 
man, aid the COOC “will push 
as many tickets back into the 
public hands as we possibly 
cap (hm) we hare ■ few events 

b which we’re not going to make 
everyone happy". 

King said about 25 per cent of 
foe ii. million tickets would go 
to Games officials, members of 
the Government, Sports 
organizations, corporate spon- 
sors and the media. 

Though ffrpadtea officiate 
hare been asked to cat back on 
Chefr ticket needs. King said the 
committee’s international 
commitments were “cast in 
coacrete M .He added: “So we 


must remember that Canada «s 
inviting the world to come here. 
If they (foreign visitors) can’t 
attend foe Games, they’re not 
going to come. - 

King said foe recent firing of 
Jim McGregor, foe former 
ticket manager, bad been “a 
good-nevrs-bad-news 
stcry". McGregor was dismissed 

after being charged last Friday 
with two counts of fraud and 
theft in connection with ticket 
orders distributed in the United 
States. 

King said he thought most 
Canadians now realized “that 
foe organizing committee is 
doing its best to he on the top of 
its game. We’re looking after 
their interests as best we can." 


SNOOKER 


SOUHUX: DBfce BritWi OfW* ^Sacww 

STTowmSn^iaA icaarne* iftep-ol iei. 
W, G w5w»«i (Aus) M P Mans ISA}. V2>Q 
BmaMtCanitt P Browne (Rep « W). 5< 

TTw^ reuaet 5 Fra/icao (S*f m B «i>wseu 
(Bw). W>: T IWai) MJ R&a iScnn. 5- 

i rjones t&Bt tit M MacLsoa fSom». 54: K 
Steuens Ksni W R Chaperon (Can). 54: 0 

— 


Time to get the act 
together as 
sponsors move in 


Last month Moncn Frost, the 
world’s leading player, made an 
impassioned attack upon the 
way in which badminton was 
marketing itself. "The product is 
absolutely right, but I am begin- 
ning to feel more and more that 
we are dealing with the wrong 
people." he said. 

What annoyed Frost, and 
many others as welL is that 
politics interferes with the 
progress of the game so much 
that it is extremely difficult 
gening top Asians to play top 
Europeans in the West. 
Westerners go East, and usually 
gel beaten in tile humidity ana 
beat. Easterners, on the other 
hand, come here only very 
rarely, apparently at the mercy 
of the dictates of their political 
officials. These are the ones 
whom Frost is referring to as the 
wrong people to deal with. 

More annoying, all this is 
happening at a time when 
badminton is making lucrative 
progress. There is a S3 million 
(about £2.1 million) sponsor- 
ship from Pro-Kennex for the 
world grand prix, and in the Far 
East there are big prizes, big 
crowds, and big media coverage. 
The game goes into the Olym- 
pics in (992. If only it could get 
its whole act. East and West, 
together, everything in the 
garden would be very lovely 
indeed. 


Eater Walker aad 
skirmishes begin 


By Richard Eaton 

two establishment figures, be- 
cause there is little doubt that 
some of foe matches bad only 
limited meaning in competitive 
terms. Bui the company’s sub- 
sequent enterprises might make 
a very big contribution to the 
sport if, that is. they are aimed 
in foe right direction. 

The overwhelming need is to 
open the European door so that 
the big money and big players of 
Asia can come flooding in. 
perhaps to travel on to even 
more exciting developments in 
North America. Currently how- 
ever. the development of Euro- 
pean badminton looks 
becalmed, even though immedi- 
ate progress was made in several 
Communist countries after the 
announcement of Olympic 
badminton. 

The game here is dominated 
too much by Denmark and 
England. Worse still, the Euro- 
pean championships still do not 
offer any prize money, and have 
been declining in status since 
ibe sian of foe open era in 1979. 
Several of the leading players, 
including Baddeley and the Eng- 
land No. 2, Nick Yates, have 
even stopped competing in 
them. 

One of Walker's first selling 
points was to talk of a Europa 
Cup. This, it was said, would be 
the biggest event on the Conti- 
nent. and with the biggest prize 
money — the All-England 
championships included. Those 
plans were voiced 18 months 
ago. bit there have been no 
further announcements about it 
since. 

There is no doubt foe idea is 
an outstandingly good one. But 
the slowness of progress is 
beginning to look worpdngly 
ominous. There will certainly be 
Walker International events in 
Ireland in March, and probably 
in India sometime is foe New 
Year. 


It is not surprising therefore 
that the entry into the sport of 
Walker International, a promo- 
tions company currently manag- 
ing the affairs of Ian Botham 
amongst a large number of other 
sportsmen ana women, has been 
welcomed by a majority of top 
English badminton players, as it 
has been publicly by some of the 
game's official bodies. Privately, 
though, there was quite a bit of Djnlif nlaVPK flt 
Skirmishing between the lUgUl piHyera ai 

Establishment and en- 
trepreneurs, especially over foe 
choice of name for Walker 
international's first indepen- 
dently organized event - an 
England Select v Europe Select 
match in Dublin in September. 

Sceptics are suspicious that 
Walker International will at- 
tempt to exploit the game. They 
fear the creation of an un- 
necessary circus within an inter- 
national calendar that is already 
expanding, and see it as poten- 
tially a Packer-type operation. 

“But it is unfair to compare it 
with Packer", says England's 
Commonwealth gold medallist. 

Steve Baddetev, who is one of 
about 20 British players to have 
signed up with the company. 

“There is no attempt to take 
players away from the con- 
ventional game as there was in 
cricket, and 1 do feci there is a 
gap that can be filled in promot- 
ing and marketing foe game," he 
said. Fortunately, Walker 
International’s badminton sec- 
tion is led by a man whose love 
for foe game ought to outweigh 
any temptation for short-term 
profit. He is Ciro Ciniglio, once 
England's successful manager, 
and briefly marketing manager 
of the International Badminton 
Federation. 

Walker’s first foray into foe 
market may have upset one or 


the right time 

Whal’s more, the strengths of 
Ciniglio's Japanese contacts are 
well known. Bui the tough truth 
is that the right sppnsors, with 
the right players, in the right 
venue, at foe right time, is 
proving to be a difficult 
combination to create. 

The biggest danger from all 
this is that desperation could 
lead to a series of competitively^ 
meaningless events, cluttering 
an already busy international 
schedule for many of the top 
players, and even causing the 
clandestine rivalry between the 
Establishment and the en- 
trepreneurs to develop into 
open hostility- 

On the other hand, however, 
discussions about payments for 
playing for England have occ- 
urred since Walker's involve- 
ment — probably as an indirect 
result of it — and according to 
some players foe services pro- 
vided to them by the Badminton 
Association of England have 
definitely improved. 

If the entrepreneur can finally 
land that big European event so 
much talked of, then it will be 
providing the whole game a 
service. Establishment induded. 
Let no one — not even the 
sceptics — think differently. 


Scots pressure Chinese 


Scotland came close to taming 
an under-strength Chinese team 
on Monday evening, going 
down 5-2 to foe world cham- 
pions in a challenge match in 
Dunfermline. 

Kenny Middiemiss, an Edin- 
burgh student, gave foe Scots a 
fine sian by defeating Xu Biao, 
ranked fifth in China, 15-S, 8- 
15. 18-17. 

Though foe Chinese took 
control after this, moving 
quickly to an unassailable 4-1 
lead. Kilmarnock's Alex White 


- celebrating his 50th cap — put 
foe Scots back in touch. The 
Scottish No. 2 look only 30 
minutes to defeat [J Jian, the 
Chinese junior champion, 15- 
10, 15-6. 

In a captivating mixed dou- 
bles, Dan Travere and Jenny 
Allen nearly took foe final 
rubber against Liu Zinghau and 
Lai Caiqin. The Scots saved five 
match-points to come back 
from 7-13 down in the second 
game, bat eventually lost 1 1-15, 
18-17, 10-15. 


TODAYS FIXTURES 

Ktck-otf 7.30 unless stated Nottfngfiam Forest v Sftttfleid Wtone*- 

FOOTBALL 

European Cup Blackpool « BraOtoiO : Gfttn-^y v Port Vate 

Second roim^second leg 

(First loci score in DrackwsJ West Bromwich AWon v Doncaster. 

Juventus (0) v Real Madrid (1) FA TROPHY: Second qwWyfa) round 

Porto 10) v vitkovice ,'Cr) ft) JP*"** ^ w 

Be f^ r 1( S el9ra0e(3,,BO5SnbOr9 

£SS as ’ssraesi « 

Dynamo Berlin (1) v Broemfayernes building scene eastern league: 

JDenJ {2J Cnatterts w HaveriW. 

- 1U . . - KNIGHT FLOODLIT COMPETITION: COL 

European Cup Winners’ Cup her row v cnerms/onsaty. 

Second round, second leg FA YOUTH CUP: RJW ro u n d: Croydon v 

Wrexham (0) v Real Zaragoza (0) -. Bedey (7.45). 

Lokomotiv Leipzig (1) v Rapid other MATCH: Cambridge untarafty v 
Vienna (1). — Norwich City XI (at Farmers. 2 jB>. 

ve afiSS ar i0) v Vit0 ® ha bugby union 

Bordeaux |1J v Benfica (1) 

Mai mo (3) v Nen tori Tirana (Atbi(O) g^" wanderers v et te t anha miaouceste' 
Oiyrnpiakos Piraeus (0) v Ajax (4J „ south Wales Police. 

... WILLIAM YOUNGER TROPHY: Old 

UEFA Cup Westcfiffiana v Harlem (at Thurrock RFC). 

Seccnti round, second bfl OTHER S PORT 

(First (eg score in bceckfllsl rs«. 

NeuChatfll Xamax (0) v Groningen Quarwr-fmai: Draper Tools Sotemw Sharp 

(Nethl (01 Manchester United (at Southampton, fl# 

Athletic Bilbao (1)v Beveran (Bef) pfl BOWLS: OS UK angles championships 
Bayer llerdinaen (WG) (0> v WlOzo w (« Prason}. 

LjOdjiO). TCNNi&LTA women's indoor tatg na roard 

Inter-Milan "(2) v legia Warsaw (3) .. 

Atietico Madrid (0) v Vitoria 

Guimaraes (Por) (2)... * Confaran “ Cmm ' 

Feyenoord (t t v Borussla amnuui - 

Monchengiadbach (5J 

Ghent (3/ v Sportui Studentesc f1 . ... 9 . 

Raha Eto Gyw (Hun) (0) v Torino (4) ^ JrM a 

Sportmq Lisbon (Cl v Barcatona (t). Stoke City axe to Qous a 
Trakia "Plovdiv 11) v Hajfluk testimonial match in recog- 

&iiit (3) - nition of the 25 yeais’ service in 

Standard U6ge (1) v Swarovski football of their former man- 

Tyrof (2J — - a ger, Tony Waddington. Stake's 

Saw Brandenburg (EG) (0> v Gate- 1973 League Cup-winning side, 

bom 12)— which achieved foe only major 

honour in their hisiory, is to be 
U DurSSjwSdS 3 reunited for foe game against an 

, — All-Star X 1 on Sunday April 26. 

Littfewosds Cup 

Third round replay """ 

Nottingham Foresl v Crystal Palace JVffaUeodCr plflflS 

SS.Stilwri, The Northamptonshire scam 

Peter^°ugn v Tranmere ........ — bowler. Neil Mallender. cur- 

S^ttsh fibbt wires on: Airdne v wn ,jy paying for Otago in New 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION; Bnsioi Zealand, may. return 10 his 
Rows, v Quran's Pbtk Hangers; Miiiwal name ’j orkshire. Brian Close, 
« 1 Bnnhon 12X1): 5wnflor v Poramoutti Yorkshire cricket chairman, 

admitted the dub were in- 
lSI' reresied and said they would be 




« n o-o . b a <r 





TTMFS WFDNFSDAYNQVEMBei 5 1986 


FOOTBALL 


The oldest Welsh club 
looks forward to 
ma king history again 


Wrexham, the spoilsports, 
have taken the fan out of their 
challenge to Real Zaragoza, 
this year's Spanish cup win- 
ners. What was originally a 
cute tie with comical possibil- 
ities has now become a serious 
contest in which the little 
north Wales dub might even 
be considered — whisper it — 
the favourites. 

The Wrexham manager. 
Dixie McNeil, whose very 
name conjures the thought of 
the kind of heroic deeds we 
used to read about in comics, 
refuses, naturally enough, to 
accept such a position. In- 
stead. he is trying to recapture 
that happy-go-lucky mood of a 
fortnight ago when Wrexham, 
the Football League's only 
representatives in Europe, 
confounded logic by de- 
servedly holding the individ- 
ually gifted Spanish side to a 
goalless draw in the Aragon 
capital. 

But even McNeill had to 
admit that the excitement of 
the occasion has got to him. “I 
intend to enjoy every minute 
of h and I hope the players do 
too. Whatever the outcome we 
ran savour with pride what we 
achieved a fortnight ago," he 
said. 

Real will 
gamble 
on attack 

By Stuart Jones 

Football Correspondent 

Leo Beeahakker is preparing 
to gamble here tonight on the 
temperaments of his unpredict- 
able players and with the sec- 
urity of his own position. The 
manager of Real Madrid be- 
lieves that he most uphold the 
historic traditions of his famous 
dob, even though be may he 
risking his side's immediate 
future in the European Cap. 

Although Real hold only a 1-0 

lead as they eater the second leg 
of the second round tie against 
Javentns, he win send them in 
with a triple-handled shotgun. 
Beenfaakk er, who was once fa 
charge of Feyeuooid, Ajax and 
the Netherlands, puts forward a 
refreshingly convincing case far 
doing so. 

“The great teams of Madrid 
always played with three 
forwards,” he says. “Remember 
Puskas, di Stefano and Gento in 
the sixties? FVe got three great 
strikers now in Batragneno, 
Sanchez and VaJdano and I 
could mdnde SantiUana in that 
HstasweU. What am I supposed 
to do? 

“There could be a time when I 
might use only two op front bet 
tint is not the way 1 like to play. 
Besides, we are talking about 
football, not mathematics. The 
public expect ns to attack. That 
Is why between 80,000 and 
90,000 people come to see ns 
every week. The trouble is 
want results as well. We wSl go 
on the offensive tonight becaase 
the first goal will be crucial," 

There could be few more 
inhospitable arenas than the 
Stadio Comnnmale fa which to 
test the streng th of his ho nosr- 
abte convictions. Jmratas hare 
justifiably earned the reputation 
of being the most powerful 
defensive side in the world and, a 
fortnight ago, they confirmed 
that they have not lost the art 

Little has yet been seen of the 
Italian strike force and particu- 
larly of PlatmLBrt therefore o! 
Serena, another absentee daring 
the first meeting, should stir 
their collective ideas 

The prospect Is fascinating 
enough to GD toe giant concrete 
fortress. AH 70,000 tickets were 
sold within boors of being put on 
sale a fortnight ago. 


By Give White 

Encouragingly, the mag- 
nitude of that performance 
has not meant that concentra- 
tion on fourth division games 
has suffered. Indeed, the tenor 
of that evening in the la 
Romereda stadium has been 
maintained with Wrexham 
re maining unbeaten in their 
two subsequent games while 
Real Zaragoza's form has 
continued uneasily. 

Wrexham prepared nicely 
for tonight's return leg in the 
second roand of the European 
Cup Winners’ Cup with a 
tough workout at the weekend 
at Scunthorpe, where they 
drew 3-3 without their most 
vigorous forward, SteeL It was 
Steel, the 27-year-old hero of 
those memorable ties a g ai n s t 
AC Roma and FC Porto two 
years ago, who arrowed a shot 
against the Zaragoza crossbar 
in the first leg — and almost 
straight through the failing 
Spanish hearts. 

Worried representatives of 
Real, watching Wrexham yet 
again 10 days ago against 
Aldershot, were no doubt 
relieved to see Steel limp off 
with a strained ankle. One 
suspects, though, that the iron 


man of Welsh football will be 
welded together and sent out 
as good as new. 

Real themselves should be 
bolstered by the return from 
suspension of Fraile, an un- 
likely name for a defender. 
Sedron, their first-choice goal- 
keeper, is fit again. Wrexham 
intend to make sore that they 
need him. 

They win be lighting the 
bonfires from Colwyn Bay to 
CartfrffifWrexham can satisfy 
an expectant crowd of be- 
tween 12,000 and 14,000 at 
the Racecourse Ground. They 
have become used to seeing 
Wrexham spring nasty sur- 
prises upon the high and 
mighty at home and abroad, 
but victory now would surely 
be the most memorable in the 
history of Wales' oldest chib. 
Wrexham in the quarter-final 
round of a major European 
competition — that would 
cause some fim. 



. *;v- 

HUIkTlSiir. 



of. toe seres foil 


Over to too, partner: Francesco Moser, of Itafohandsa winning 

Tony Doyle (fetft), for the fast lap of the Grenoble six-day cyde racein the French Alps 


SKIING 


WREXHAM Amt*** C PNrce; N 
Safe***. S Cunrtngton, M Wteams. J 
Cooks, P Constfvs, fiConroy, B Home, J 
Steel (or S Buxton or S Massey), S 
Charles. P Emaon. 

realzaraqoza fenfaUa): j Cadnre J 
Cbsuco, R Garcia Cories, N Jfaa. M 
Praia, F Giant P Vote. J Sartor, R Sosa, 
P Herrera. MAynata 
ReferaerJKrfrar (Netty. 


Slaloming 
on Berlin 
rubble hill 

Safin (AP) — A Worid Cap 
sblosi slti race will be held on 


extra £4 million 


Aitken holds the 
key to victory 


By Hngh Taylor 


Celtic are delaying the 
anwroiTirwment of then team to 
play Dynamo Kiev in the 
second (eg of their European 
Cup tie tonight until just before 
the kick-off in the hope that Roy 
Aitken. their inspirational cap- 
lain. will befit. 

Aitken has inflnHHa but 

David Hay. the Celtic manager, 
admitted last night “I could not 
envisage going into a match 
such as this without Aitken.” He 
added that there was hope that 
Aitken would have shaken off 
the worst effects of the virus. 

Although Celtic face perhaps 
the most fathnidaring task m 
their illustrious history in Euro- 
pean competition, there is no 
mood of despondency in the 
Scottish camp and Hay remains 
defiant. “This is not a lost 
cause,” he says 

Yet a 1-1 draw at P&rfchead is 
hardly the kind of result to lake 
to Russia or to bring confidence 
that victory can be gained 
against opponents who provide 
the balk of tin Soviet Union’s 
national side. 

There is a suspicion that the 
Celtic midfield player, Paul 
McStay, who is still only 22, has 
not fulfilled his potential but as 
far as his manager is concerned 
he is an exceptional player. “He 
will be a major factor in our 


plans for this game.** he 
sauLMcStay remains distressed 
at having been taken off in the 
iwntrfi a pimef RangCIS OO Sat- 

urday but Hay believes that this 
p^- rcnnal affr ont will make him 
all the more determined to show 

the Russians Dynamo do 
not have the monopoly of 
cultured exponent of the art of 
midfield play. 

Even if Aitken plays, he 
cannot be reckoned 100 per cent 
fit, and the defence is anything 
but impregnable and can bardfy 
hope to keep at bay attackers of 
the venom of Bessonov, 
Belanov, Rats and Blokhin. 

Pride, tradition, spirit and 
scoring ability — attributes 
Celtic have in plenty — cannot 
compare with their opponent’s 
smooth efficiency, paoe or 
confidence. 

m David Hay’s comments after 
Celtic’s Skcd Cup final defeat by 
Rangers last month have pro- 
duced a response from the 
Scottish Football Association 
(SFAX 

The Celtic manager has been 
asked by die SFA’s executive 
committee to explain his post- 
match observation that the club 
should apply to join t he En gl i sh 
league because of what he 
believed to be referring errors. 


slalom slti race wtH be held on 
December 28 ou a 396-foot West 
Berlin “mountain” that onjgi- 
from a heap of Second 
Worid War rabble, officials 
hare aHaoaaced bare. 

The three Western AEBes who 
oversee the city have approved 
the- opening of a slti fift on the 
Teafdsbeg (DeriTs Mountain) 
to fc> the event possible, 
according to Thomas Homan, 
spokesman for the United States 
diplomatic m i ss i on in West 
Berlin. 

An American radar station 
oc c up ies the summit of the hffl, 
which Ces fa the Gnmewuld 
forest section of West Bertfa. 
The western sector of this Foot 
Power oty is su rrounded by 
communist East Germany. East 
Berlin is die postwar Seriet- 


The Sports Council is c a l l in g 
for a £4 million increase from 
the Government to cover its 
budget for 1987/88. But John 
Wheatley, Sports Council d&o&- 
tor, said: “We have no idea 
whether we will get ft, although 
we have energetically made our 
or *, for the increase.** 

For 1980/07. die Criundl 
for £8 million to cover its 
budget fart received only £5 
mflhon. This time ft lists these 
sums as extras: £800,000 for 
community participation, 
£400,000 to support governing 
bodies, £50ff000 for national 
indoor arenas, £1.7 million for 
regional and local facilities, 
£500,000 for puM he relations 
and £100,000 for research. 

Fan Sports Council backing is 
being given for foe construction 
of an internationally-sized, ice 
rink in Liverpool. The ice pad 
will be the frill 60 metre s by 30 
met r e s, die measurement re- 
quired for championship con- 
tests. The stadium will have a 


conflict over die running of 
sport in Britain. According to 
John Smith, dtaznfam of toe 
Sports Coonczl, “We have 
. readied an if f wWn t so far as 
the defining rotes of toe two 
bodies are concerned.” 

It is toe first time toe rotes 

have iWmwl anw the 

royal charter in 1972 when the 
Spoils Council was created from 
die CCPR to d s t r g n fte funds 

« nH promote maw p irtia p itinn 

in sport. 

Smith added; .“It hasn't been 
easy, but ne v ertheless we have 
reached agreement and we hope 
we can bund on this. “It doesn't 
alter the ti ri g it wi a gr e eme n t- All. 
we^edotRK to define oar roles 
vis-a-vis one another: 

“It is something that has been 
sadly lacking in sport, when you 
consider we go back to 1 972 and 
we have only just reached 
agreement now.” 

He also disclosed dm the 
council is to set up an inter- 


















rffr. 




! 1 1 ! r; •? 1 




a V - - < 







11 ■ 


iTtfi " I Ih Wu 


ByXekhMachfia 


marking the 750fo a mduaaa iy 
of toe ctfy next year. 

Teufelsberg, the largest dera- 
tion fa Berlin, has a vertical drop 
cf 264 feet and wfllaffera L32&- 
foot long course for the slalom 
race, Hme said. If the weather 

fa not cooperative, saow-mafcfnr 
caanons win be used to lay a 
aoo4 slri surface. 

Tbebfllhas long been a 
popular winter lecra alfa a spot 
for West BofiuefS, bat has 
oever hooted an faterational ska 
meat. Bom' said there were 
roughly 206^06 d efers among 
West Bertfa’s 1.9 nriBtou 


ATHLETICS 


Facing a handicap 


Dundee United are forced to 
face the Romanian side, 
Univerriatea Craiova, in toe 
second leg oftheir second round 
UEFA Cup tie Untight without 
their two most experie n ced 
European campaigners: Paul 
Hegarty, their captain, and 
David Narey. 

Between them, this central 
defensive pairing, have over 1 00 
European appearances. Narey 
was not fit to travel because of 
damaged knee ligaments. How- 
ever, ft was hoped Hegarty 
would be fit. Unfortunately, be 
failed a test on a stubborn groin 
injury leaving United ro defend 
a 3-0 first-leg lead without either 
"I""*. *he first rime this has 
in 16 years. 

.. experienced Richard 
Gough now at Tottenham, 
United’s back four for today’s 


From a Special Correspondent 

sd are forced to game — which starts at the 
manian side, unearthly hour of 11.00 am. 
xaiova, fa the British time — will be the most 
ar second round inexperienced since they started 
untight without out m Europe 20 years ago. 
st experienced Gary McGinnis, John dark 
paigners: Paul and Dave Beaumont will a& 
captain, and play. Theft collective experi e nce 
amounts to just nine g a me s. 

No WODder Jin > McLean, the 


“This will be by far our stiffest 
test. However rflstiH field a 4-3- 
3 formation. 

“This still isn’t an excuse for 
us not trying to score To sit 
back and defend will only invite 
trouble”. 

And there will be enough of 
that anyway. United are guar- 
anteed a torrid time at the Stade 
Central where a partisan 50,000 
capacity crowd fa anticipated. 


SNOOKER 


King knocks 
Parrott 
off his perch 

John Rurott, from Liverpool, 
became the first major casually 
of the Dutnx British Open 
tournament at Solihull yes- 
terday. P arro tt, ranked 17th fa 
the world, was beaten 5-1 by 
Warren King, the Australian 
champion, fa the third round. 

Parrott took die first frame in 
his attempt to reach the last 32 
of a tournament drat will re- 
sume at Derby fa February, but 
King produced a aeries of teffing 
breaks, inducting a dearance of 
71 fa the fifth frame, before 
sealing victory. 

Kixfc Stevens, ranked ninth fa 
the worid, scraped to his first 
victory of the season on Mon- 
day night, edging out bis fellow 
Canadian, Robert Chaperon, 5- 
4 to reach the last 32. The 
nervous Stevens had been 3-1 
down, but be eventually won the' 
deciding frame on the colours to 
earn himylf his first ranking 
point of the season. 


• ■ •• aanoay om^aga m, an m 

Victim of success 3-SIN 


New York (AP) — The suc- 
cess of the New York CSty 
Marathon has created a prob- 
lem, according to Fred Lebow, 
the race director. The. field is 
now in danger of becoming too 


355E5 S53355S9E555 


One day after what he called 
“our most success fu l marathon 
ever” in the 17-year history of 
the race, Lebow sakfc “I think 
we’ve inched our limit. This is 
ft.” 

He was referring to the size of 
the field, which readied 20502, 
the largest ever for a marathon 
fa die United States. Of those 
starters — revised from 
Sunday’s figure of 20,141 — a 
total of 19,412 finished, another 
record and an exceptionally high 
percentage. Those were fag in- 
creases over, last year’s race 
record totals of 16,705 starters 
and 15,887 finishers. 

Lebow explained that when 
the mass of runners gathered for 
the start, they were “backed into 
the toll booths at the Ve nazan o 
(Narrows Bridge).** It took the 
women rurmera an age to get off 
“When the lead runners were at ; 
the one-mile mark, tome of die 


MOTOR RALLYING 


runners hadn’t even readied the 
starting tine.” 

Lebow forecast “We probably 
wiD reduce the field next year.” 
If so, it would mark only the 
second reduction since the first 
New York race fa 1970, with 
127 starters, of whom one was a 
woman. The only time there was 
a drop in the number of starters 
was 1982, when 14,308 beg an 
the race, compared unto 14,496 
in 1981. 

Allan Stemfeld, the race tech- 
nical director, was also surprised 
at the size of las Sunday’s field. 
“We expected to have fewer 
people competing,” he raid. 
“Not as many neopie canccBert 
as we thought. '• - -1 

Stemfeld said that 23£90 
people retostered for the race, ■ 
22310 peeked .up their race 
numbers mid there were only 
1,808 absentees. He noted that a 
took toe lead men a p proxi- 
ma t e ly 1 rnfanre 50 second s, to 

five minutes to get dear df toe 
starting crowd. :c • • 

provMlmgtife leading ra mfeg 
with a much specdieJr getaway 
remained amajnr problem, be 
admitted. " 


For several weeks now, tire 
injured knee of EBay Hanley 
has been a source of consid- 
erable c on ce ro to toe player, 
Wigan, and Great Britain. 

The knee has tended to swe& 
up after evexy game, and Hai- 
ley, a tough character notj giv cn 
to complaining about injuries, 
has lint hfa Vim*- IS 

“sore?*. As a result, he is to visit 
a specialist today fa toe hope 
that the knee may be declared fit 
enough for Itim ro take hfa place 
fa the centre for Great Britton 
against Australia at Sand Road 
on Saturday. 

It has been a moderately weH- 
kept secret that Hanley's knee is 
giving I rim far more trouble 
than has been a dmi tted. He 
played a leading part fa toe 62- 
JO rout ofWakefield Trinity fart 
Sunday bat* again. Ins knee was 
swollen afterwards. • * 

Despite the optimistic noises 
coming yesterday from toe 
Great Britain camp, toe injury 
must make Hanley more than a 
little doubtful ‘ foe . the 

fntjwrtgffowaL 

The Great Britton coach, 
Maurice Bam find, has coo - 
seqnently brought into the titon- 
ing squad the St Helens wfagc*£: 
Barrie Ledger. This give* tom 
the option of moving Tosy 
Marchant into ' the. cebtn£ Ins 
normal dub position > ar 
Castfeforffishodd Hanky fail 
today’s examination. 

Otherwise Bamford - has 
pinned hfa fifth on tfie same 15 
players who appeared fa top 38- 


16 defeat m toe first inter- 
national at Old T ta flb n d. 
B amfi ad has been criticized fa 
several areas for hfa choice, 
which many people re ga r d as 
being more a tribute to his 
loyalty than to his judgement 
Bamemt, Bnnfoed believes that 
his squad cannot ptay as badly 
acton as ton did at Old 
Traffbid, and that they will have 
leaned a great deal from then- 
first painful brush with 
geMStiih »«wi 
- The sqoadwffl train at EQand 
Road today, giving toe players 
plenty of opportunity to accli- 
matize themselves *0 yet an- 
other fine football enclosure. 
The Aasaafians wiD, of course 
be jranted a simftar ficiGty. 

- Thc-Groat Britain squad wfll 
tocp moveoB.orvermghtto their 
tiniu bid r w m headouartere at 

SElaTSiffaXcStoy 

Ghto at CZwriey. Lancashire. 
There, Bamftxd » rare to lay 
greater emphasis on baH han- 

- rflm&bacfcingnpandnmnfagra 
« possession —areas ofbasic ptay 

in wfaefa Great Britain were 
Sadly hddwm the first imer- 
nationto anarn which they were 
taught severe and painful les- 
aoasby toe Aust r a lians . 

' Tickets for die match are 
selfing furiously at the Rugby 
League headquarters in Leeds 
and there fa . every sign of 
soother foil bouse. The capacity 
of Efland Road is 39,000 and 
only several hundred of toe 
19,000 seats remained to be said 

fast night. • 


'Hill 


iiir.ivvt- 



Spectators follow the stars 


SQUASH RACKETS 









MSA 












[ >. /t ^ 1 5 3 [ 

Pi ■! riliil 





Each one of the 45 special 
si^es <a this year’s Lombard 
RAC Rally has been graded 
according to its spect ato r 
suitatriKto. The sysem, like that 
used to identify the best hotels 
around the country, uses a star 
system gradi ng the locations 
from one to fonr. 

A four star stage offers best 
viewing, car parking, safe pro- 
tected viewin g areas, a public 
commentary and ease of access. 
One star identifies the . stage as 
difficult viewing, no car perking, 
difficult access, a long walk and 
carries the additional advice — 
forget it* 

The system was devised by 
Malcolm Neill, the cleric of the 
course, who raid: “In the past 
there fats been no grading 
system and spectators didn't 
know what to eniecL The result 
was that a lot of people went to 
bad viewing places and came 
away disappointed. We hope 
this new system will help than 
find the three and four star 
places where they will be able to 
see (he cars easily and fa 
comfort.” 

AD of the nzncspectator stages 

on the first day, Sunday, 
Nov embe r 16, carry the four 
star rating as are the service 
areas and pares fermis, where 
toe event stops each evening. 

The first of the four star night 
halts is at the Royal Yorkshire 
showground, fa Harrogate, at 
about 7.15 pjn. on toe Sunday 
evening. Spectators will be able 
to see the cars returning and. 
“wrapping up” for the night and 
hear foe leading drivers being 
interviewed. Car parking is free 
and admisriem charges are £2for 


• adults and £1 for accompanied 
children under 15. 

Monday everting at fagtisttm, 
just outride Edinburgh, prom- 
ises to be atop attraction as the - 
halt fa corohmed with the last 
stage of toe day on the famous 
Scottish race arcuft. The show 
gets on the road at 7.0 pin. and 
toe admission charge is. £4 per 
peoon. Faridng is free. It is 
Liverpool's torn to play host on 
Tuesday evening — at 5.45 pjn. 
— when the action takes pface fa 
toe new Albert Dock complex. 
Again there is free parking and 
an admission fee of £2 per bead. 

The finish at Great Pulteney 
Street, fa Bath, at 8.15 pjn. on 
Wednesday, November 19, also, 
rates four stars. 

The youngest competitor on 
tins year’s rally is Guy Ander- 
son. aged 19, from Cralfom St 
Peter. Buckinghamshire, who 
will be driving m his third RAC 
Lombard Ratty — toe previous 
two have ended in retirement. 
He drives fa a Group N I600cc 
Talbot Tv with. his co-driver. 
Ant Rands, aged 36, from 
Chiswick, London... 

fa co n t ras t , the oldest driver 
will be Harry Mellor, aged 57, 
from Denfagton, near Stafford. 
A seasoned campaigner with 31 


registration number— TUG 5— 
that was mi toe car he drove 15 
years ago in the 1971 rally. 

- Ph3 Harris, aged 30, from 
Towcesier, is driving on toe 
ratty fwtbe first time but he will 

him to' t^wro’'forad^^^^& 
has previous international 
experience on the Monte Carlo 
and the Circuit of Ireland 
eventri 

The oldest car fa this year’s 
event isthe 1976 Opel Asconaof 
Gavin Cox, from Hatoereagc*. 
Yorkshire. Cox is a motor 
e ngi neer and is able to keep hfa 
135,000-mik: car fa tip-top 
shape. This will be the fifth time 
the car has been entered for the 
RAC Lombard Rally. 

The most luxurious car is 
likely- to be the £23.000 
Mercedes 190 23 litre Cosworto 
belonging to Russell Morgan, a 
Blackburn car - salesman who 
will be taking part fa the Group 
N class. "Not as qikick as some/’ 
be says, “but very comfortable.” 
Russell won his class on. this 
year’s Manx international. 

. The sponsor with the most 
colourful logo at this year's rally 



.lix’d i> 0i 1 

1 


Uw V 1 fr 'i iii M i Wt 





Riva, co-driyen by . Ed d i e 
Bastuna, also aged 57, from 
Hyde in Cheshire. 

One person hoping for a 
double celebration is AJex Jack- 
son. of Pontefract, Yorkshire, 
whose birthday is on Sunday. 
“Noparty forme this year,” said 
Jackson, who will be. at the 
wheel of his Opel Marita 40Q. 
The Opel carries the same- 


wfll be. the pop group UB40, 
whose e m b l em will be canted 
00 foe Nissan 240RS of James 
Prochowskl Glasgow-born but 
jiow rcsktan m . S oBhuti, 

Prochowski is takfag part fa the 
rally for toe first time. 

The leadfag women' twKng 
part indude Louise Aftlcea- 
WaDcer, from Lamplugh, Cum- 
bM. pd ^ten Morgan, ‘ of oommeuted: 
Witaislow, Cheshire. Aitken- fa toe first r 
Walker competes in a Nissan Open so Ik 
240RS and. is favourite for toe player On tt 

SS’LSif ““ a 800,1 W matt 

ptoang overall - - more stren wr 




fa toe first round of the British 
Open so I knew he was a good 
plajer. On toe oirooit these days 
every mat ch is hard, there is 
more strength fa depth.” ■ 


~ ii 1 • • 01* Hu* 


«Mtepn»ir6ta«70.St 7-A 




























tup times WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5 1986 

. M * 


43 


Edited by Peter Dear 

and Peter Davalle 



Just the boys for a 


fc 


V . 






. . i > ' ■» ' 


• I doubt very -much if it realty 
happened that way, bat a picture 
has come into my : mind of die 
production team puzzling over 
who to get as narrator for The 
Boys from the Smelly Staff 
(BBCl,'9.40pmX and some clever 
spark, seeing a sort of link, 
suggesting the actor who plays 
Dirty Den, in EastEnders—Les&e 
Grantham. In all other respects, 
Jane Oliver's documentary steers 


CHOICE ) 


them off and loss them into their 
mobile crushers. The cleaning 
department are not wnhomalUes. 
Th»»T« » larivin Oueensway who 


v — ■ — — department are not wnnoin atues. 

left behind by a Polish reduse to There is a lady in Que^^^ 
the horse droppings on the pro- takes tn 

cesskmal route to the Abbey tamant 

durinfl th* rmnl weddmi in Inlv the kxsl health authority. UK 






T: »*• 




nccuna unu » u»» »u an aSyta/ 1 1^9 

attendant a nasty moment or two the avenpng 
nnmthanL In all other respects, when she had to act rid of them. thanahmt€H > ra^J* , ° 11 * 

Jane Oliver's documentary steers As the Kasghstafe -Safl¥ saw contributed to that 

dear ofthe clever stuff and paints when stepping [gingerly through ^ Tfi* <wnm wielded by another 

a snaighforward picture of a city the shoppers detritus: “ff yotfre •JJ* Maigaret Monde, in 

tlul seems he&tent on diammr- 

the. ttenme must betme of 
those folk lower down the social 
scale who, on the way to the 
reception, put their wedding pits 
outside their front doorc-in Mack 
b ag s and then complained when 

.U. e m.l Kf .t uff rart 


• ' ^ 


B ll D (J1UIUU VI U UIJ 

that seems hdQ-bent on disappear- 
ing under a mountain of refuse. 
Eight hundred ions of it every day. 
And every bit ©fit to be dimed by 
the men and women of the City of 
Westminster’s cleansing depart- 
ment Everything from dead bod- 
ies found in doorways, empty 
handbags discarded by Oxford 
Street thieves, and a five-year 
accumulation of rat-nibbled food 


sort of cause, me aw 
took between 1935 and 1939 wens 
ofLondon’s East End: rantet 
stallholders, meal porters, chil- 
dren at play, street-comer ««*- 
steamships and * 


bags and then complained when 
the boys from the smelly stuff cart 


Hill Titians sitting at men- w 
taco tz*ks.far iintlB 
they woe sbB tadc 
Note. Tbe net “g 11 “MS 
Monck’s photographic ac^y 

^ to have been a b«* ahoid^ 

in a part of a city that could have 
been a thousand miks away fiwn 

what she calls “ the driny square 

ofBdgravia”. In ^ w aft j g 
evocative pictures woe 
published. AH the tnore reason. 

Sin, to welcome tonight’s 
esOy made film which gjvtt toe 

viewing piiWic a first chance to see 

.them, and praise them. 

• Richard Everett's 

is an account 

of sublimaicd heartbreak. 

PeterDavalle 


BBC 2 




V . * 


'r 


"• -Vv 
'*■' >». 


820 Caetax AM. 

820 BmakfwtTIm* with Frank 
. - Bough and Debbie 

Greenwood. Weather at 625, 
7.25.725,825 and 826; 

- regional news, weather, and 
' traffic at 827, 727,7.57 and 
: 827; national and "mtemationte 
news at 720, 720,820, 820 
- 'and920i 

325 The Harrison* Don’t Go to 
School. A 40 Minutes 
programme shout an 
education authority’s attempt 
by legal means to force a 
family to comply with a School 
Attendance Order^O 925 


320 PW> House 420 Antoni 
Fair with Don fencer 425 
The Adventure* of BdMnUe 

Yacht (r) 4.10 ileatncsffe ana 
Got Cartoon adventures of an 
alley cat 425 Hartbeet 

Drawing the Tony Hart way. 
520 John Craven’s He w* rou nd 
525 The Cuckoo Stator. 

Episode two of toe drama 

sarM in four parts 525 


^^ffjaasar 


industry In Scenario *■*»__ 
Ceefax1020 Forfour- and 
fito-yo g olds IC^IS The wwM 
lum n ihrpuQh the eyas of 


SSisnsfiviiM 

through an electron 
rnWracoperanoine 


620 News with Nicholas WBchel 

DMUn llawfnn 


andPWtoHayton. 
don Plus. 


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■ 4 . 



44 WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER S 1986 


England may lose 
Howe if FA fail 
to move quickly 


THE 



TIMES 


By Stnart Jones, Football Correspondent 


The Football Association 
are in danger of losing the 
coach of the England team. 
Although agreement was be- 
latedly reached yesterday with 
Bobby Robson, who is ex- 
pected officially to sign his 
contract later this week, the 
position of his assistant, Don 
Howe, has again been left 
open to question. 

Howe has already rejected 
an offer from one of the top 
domestic dubs, believed to be 
Aston Villa, and he admits 
that he must now consider his 
own future. Although he was 
involved in the World Cup 
finals last summer, he has 
effectively been out of work 
since leaving Arsenal in 
March. 

“The rest has done me a 
world of good,” he said. “It 
has given me the chance to 
take a neutral view of the 
game. It has fired my enthu- 
siasm rather than deadening 
it. I feel hungry now and the 
sooner I get beck in a full-time 
capadly the better’'. 

After announcing a squad 
that contained no surprises, 
Robson said that he had 
“ironed out one or two 
problems" with Bert 
Miilichip, the chairman of the 
FA. and Dick Wragg, the 
chairman of the international 
committee. The role of Howe, 
who works on a part-time 
basis, also entered into the 
discussion. 

The decision was deferred. 
“This is a matter for the 
international committee.” 
Miilichip said. “I expect there 
will be a meeting next week 
and we'll sort it out quickly. It 
is purely a question of whether 
there is a need for a full-time 
assistant. It is not about 
personnel.” 

The FA's vacillation serves 
as another example of official- 
dom that is anything but 
progressive. The authorities in 
England, the nation that is 
regarded across the world as 
the cradle of football, remain 
unreasonably reluctant to 


leave ancient history behind 
and step out of the Middle 
Ages. 

Scarcely anywhere else in 
Europe, for example, are first 
division programmes com- 
pleted on the weekend before 
a competitive international 
fixture. And of the leading 
countries, barely one inter- 
national manager does not 
have the assistance of a right- 
hand man. 

Howe, one of the best 
coaches in the country, may 
not be available for much 

England squad 


ipton), woods 
(Queen's Park 
Rangers), Anderson (Arsenal), 
Sanson (Arsenal), Thomas (Totten- 
ham), Butcher (Rangers), Wright 
(Southampton), Mabbutt (Totten- 
ham), Hoddie (Tottenham). WHdns 
(AC Milan). Steven (Everton), 
Hodge (Aston Villa). Webb (Notting- 
ham Forest), Beardsley (New- 
castle), Lineker (Barcelona), 
Kateiey (AC Milan). Cottee (West 
Ham), Baines (Watford). Waddle 
(Tottenham). 

Under-21 squad 
v Yugoslavia. November 11 
Sodding (Manchester City), Hew- 
ers (Southampton), Moraan 
(Leicester), AHen (Queen's Park 
Rangers), Pearce (Nottingham For- 
est), Walker (Nottingham Forest), A 
Adams (Arsenal), Knight (Sheffield 
Wednesday). RocaalM (Arsenal). 
Bre n n an (Ipswich), Parker (Hull). 
Carr (Nottingham Forest), Clough 
(Nottingham Forest), Dozzefl (Ips- 
wich), Connor (Brighton). N Adams 
(Everton). Simpson (Manchester 
City). 

longer. Although he concedes 
that “there are no firm offers 
at the moment”, he says that 
he would have to give his “full 
consideration” to those that 
will doubtless be put in front 
of him. 

The FA. a body that has 
become notorious for setting 
up a committee to set up a 
committee to make a decision, 
is facing a race against time. It 
will be no fault of Robson's if 
he loses die man he wants by 
his side as he travels towards 
the finals of the European 
championships. 

That immediate aim will 


Brian Gough last night 
urged Bobby Robson not to 
think twice about drafting 
Nottingham Forest’s Neil 
Webb into the England side 
against Yugoslavia next week. 

“If he’s looking for someone 
to replace Bryan Robson, he 
should slick Webb in right 
away.” Gough said . “He 
might not be able to tackle like 
Robson but he is working on 
that and he does have other 
attributes.” 

The former Portsmouth 
midfield player, bought by 
Gough for £300,000 last year, 
is Forest's joint leading scorer 
this season with 1 1 goals. 

• Steve Perryman, the Oxford 
United defender and former 
Tottenham captain, was due 
to sign for third division 
Brentford on the pitch before 
last night's home game with 
Notts County. 


Brentford's manager. Frank 
McLintock, said: “We are 
signing Steve as assistant 
manager, but as he is not 35 
until next month we could get 
a couple of seasons out of him 
as a player. His presence and 
experience will lift the whole 
team.” 

• Southampton's manager, 
Chris Nicholl. has dismissed 
reports that Newcastle United 
are set to sign his former 
England midfield player, 
David Armstrong, and that be 
is preparing to sign Manches- 
ter City’s Graham Baker. 

Armstrong, aged 31. has 
been in dispute at Southamp- 
ton since the end of last season 
and was replaced as captain by 
Jimmy Case. He had a calf 
muscle injury recently and 
even though he is fit aj^in he 
is unable to regain his place. 

Nicholl said: “Newcastle 


Now 

’Mclever clogs 
can fly 

to Amsterdam 
-£119 return! 

Try British Midlands new Diamond 
Service to Amsterdam from as little as £119 
for a day-return. 

There are up to five flights a day leaving; 
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;-.v ‘ . 


also be under threat during 
next Wednesday’s qualifying 
tie against Yugoslavia. The 
unmistakeable strength of the 
opposition lies in midfield, the 
area that appears now to be 
England’s weakness. Robson 
has lost five of bis potential 
representatives there. 

The most notable loss 
clearly is that of his namesake, 
Bryan. Robson resisted the 
temptation to call in replace- 
ments. even though he is also 
without Stevens, of Totten- 
ham Hotspur, Reid. BraceweO 
and another of his namesakes, 
Stewart, of Arsenal. 

“I already have one in- 
experienced midfield player in 
Webb and I don't think that 
this is the kind of match for 
newcomers anyway**, he said. 
“Besides, we have enough 
alternatives to cater for the 
requirements as long as there 
are no more injuries this week. 
Then, Til lave to think 
again.” 

Apart from the omissions of 
Bryan Robson and Stevens, 
the inclusion of Wright repre- 
sents the lone change from the 
party that was assembled last 
month. Robson revealed that 
Wright, who broke his leg in 
the FA Cup semi-final last 
season, had been watched 
during each ofhis seven first- 
team games for Southampton. 

“He had five outings in the 
reserves before that so he's got 
over his injury,” Robson said. 
Wright, who has taken the 
place of Watson in the squad 
is expected to fill his role in 
the team as well. Robson has 
otherwise yet to deride 
whether to keep the same 
formation that beat Northern 
Ireland 3-0. 

He will either ask Mabbutt 
to take over from the captain, 
and protect the talents of 
Hoddie. or recall Wilkins. 
“There is no point in saying 
who will come in for Bryan 
because there are a few domes- 
tic fixtures to negotiate first. 
But Wilkins has come back 
into the running.” 




1 \ 





b ^.JV 












id' 




Photo-fuiislc White Crusader (right) pips Canada n by the smallest recorded margin in the history of the America’s Cop 


Cudmore bluff 
foils Canada 
by split-second 

From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 


Robson urged to pick Webb 


British N&Band 

At ways one step ahead. 


have made no approach to 
me. If they do l will listen to 
them” 

Baker, who left Southamp- 
ton four years ago for 
£225.000, scored City's late 
equalizer at the Dell on Sat- 
urday in his first fill! game 
since recovering from a ham- 
string injury. But Nicholl 
stated: “I’ve made no ap- 
proach to City for Graham.” 

• Noel Cantwell said yes- 
terday he was definitely in- 
terested in making a 
comeback as manager of 
Peterborough United, 

• Mickey Droy and Brian 
Sparrow are doubtful for Crys- 
tal Palace's Uttlewoods Cup 
replay at Nottingham Forest 
lonighLSteve Coppell, the 
manaer, adds Gavin 
Nebbeiing and Ken 
O’ Doherty to the squad. 

Leeds fans 
facing 
life bans 

By Peter Ball 

After the baiting of Michael 
Brown, Shrewsbury Town’s 
1 8-year-old forward, last Sat- 
urday, Leeds United have 
announced that they will ban 
for life any supporters found 
guilty of racial abuse. 

The problem has persisted 
for some time, but has reached 
a new intensity in recent 
weeks. An appeal by the 
supporters’ club in a recent 
match programme, loud - 1 
speaker announcements at 
games, meetings between the 
club and groups of supporters, 
and a strong condemnation by 
Billy Bremner, the Leeds man- 
ager, having had no impact, 
the club have decided that 
they have no alternative. 

“We like to think that it is 
only a small minority, but 
I they are a very audible one,” 
said Maxwell Holmes, the 
Leeds director responsible for 
crowd affairs. “We are deter- 
mined to cut out obscene 
racial abuse, which is as bad as 
fans fighting” 

Witnesses believe that there 
a greater level of abuse di- 
rected at black players at 
Leeds than any other 
Fooolball League ground, but 
Chief Superintendent Cahill, 
the officer in charge of polic- 
ing at Bland Road, does not 
believe. that the chants — or 
Nazi salutes seen there - are 
racially motivated. 

"The black players have 
been the best players in the 
opposition in recent weeks, 
which is why the home fans 
have selected them as targets,” 
he said. 

But Portsmouth’s manager, 
Alan Ball, sees it differently. 
After his team’s visit to Leeds 
last month, he said: “I’ve 
never beard those chants at 
any other ground in the coun- 
try. I can think of only one 
word to describe them — 
frightening" 


White Crusader won her 
America's Cup race against 
Canada 11 here yesterday by 
less than a second in one of the 
closest finishes ever seen in a 
12-metre event. But only a 
daring last-minute manoeuvre 
by Harold Cudmore, the skip- 
per, gave the race to Britain. 

Two hundred yards from 
the finish line, Cudmore was 
trailing by around seven sec- 
onds, after a tacking battle up 
the final beat, but Canadian 
skipper Terry Ndlsen then fell 
for a mixture of bluff and 
cheek. 

At the finish of the 18-mile 
battle, there was no measur- 
able difference between Can- 
ada II and White Crusader. In 
fact the yachts hit the line loo 
dose for even the computer to 
measure the gap. But old- 
fashioned committee eyeballs 
awarded it to the British by a 
split-second. 

When the two boats had 
come together three-quarters 
of the way up the final beat, 
there was nothing in it 
Cudmore, on port, was the 
give-way boat, but he put a 
prerise lee-bow tack on Can- 
ada II. 

White Crusader was vulner- 
able at this point, but Neilsen 
failed to exploit the situation 
and, two minutes from the 
finish, with the Canadians still 
slightly in front, Cudmore 
threw a last-hope Muff at his 
rival. 

“There was no other way 
out,” explained Cudmore 
later, “or be would have 
crossed the line first” 

The young Toronto skipper 
tacked away to avoid White 
Crusader — a crucial error. 
Had Neilsen just parallded 
Cudm ore’s luff, the yachts 
would have stayed in the same 
relative positions and he 
should have been able to 
power up to maintain his 
winning margin. 

But the two extra tacks, put 
in as a consequence of 
Cudmore’s feint destroyed 
his lead and cost Canada the 
race. In that one incident one 
saw why Cudmore. aged 42, is 
rated the wiliest skipper in 
international match-racing 
and Neilsen, aged 28. merely 
one of the most promising 

“He may have over-reacted, 
but the Canadians had had a 
lucky race prior to that" said 
Cudmore. "We were sailing 
into 20-degree headers and 
they were getting lifts as big as 
that” 

Even without the prospect 


Lawson in 
Test hope 

Geoff Lawson, Australia’s 
most famous fast bowler since 
Lillee and Thomson, could 
make his Test comeback 
against England in Brisbane a 
week on Friday. The New 
South Wales paceman, aged 
28, is fit again after recovering 
from a back injury that threat- 
ened to end his career. 
Whether he has done enough 
in two matches this season to 
convince the selectors will be 
known today when the ride is 
announced. 

Land ahoy 

Harry Mitchell, aged 62, 
from Portsmouth, the sole 
British entrant competing in 
the BOC Single-handed 
Round the World yacht race, 
was bring hampered by strong 
headwinds over the final 50- 
mile stage of the first 1% from 
Newport yesterday and was 
not expected to reach Cape 
Town in his 41 ft Double Cross 
until early this morning. 




v-v. • 

••• • 1 





of a cliff-hanger finish yes- 
terday, most interest had fo- 
cused on the light- 
heavyweight bout between 
While Crusader and Canada 
11. The big gun boats, such as 
Stars and Stripes and New 
Zealand, all had predictable 
wins lined up. 

White Crusader has done 
far better in the points battle 
than Canada II, but that may 
have much more to do with 
experienced crewing than 
intrinsic boat superiority. 

All round, the close-period 
modifications — notably a 
new keel — seem to have 
worked well for the British. 
“We’re starting to go a lot 
better in the stronger breeze 
and haven't lost much at all in 
the soft stuff.” added 
Cudmore. “If we beat Amer- 
ica 11 tomorrow, we're right up 
in the reckoning.” 

Cudmore and the British 
had the better of the start 
yesterday. The preliminary 
skirmishing— off to starboard 

- More America’s Cop and 
results — Page 39 

of the commitle boat - was 
more desultory than agressive 
and, with 30 seconds to go, 
both boats were sailing down 
the line toward the pin end. 

At the gun. White Crusader 
was in the leeward position 
and sailing faster. The clock 
gave it to Cudmore by one 
second. 

On the long starboard tack 
down to the south — the 
course had been set at 220 into 
a fluky five-knot south-west- 
erly breeze and shortened to 
rix legs — the British boat 
opened up a slight, but dis- 
tinct, lead. 

I5y the top mark, after a 
series of unpredictable 
windshifts, it had turned to a 
Imin 2sec deficit. “We were 
about seven boat-lengths 
ahead and one to leeward of 
them at the first tack,” ex- 
plained Cudmore. “They got a 
15-degree lift and we got really 
thrashed on the shifts.” 

Nothing changed down the 
first run, bar the sun coming 
out and the breeze filling in to 
around 12 knots, though still 
shifting constantly. Up the 
second beat, the British 
pegged back the lead to 
around nine seconds and it 
stayed that way until the 
incident dose to the line. 


Victors: White Crusader’s delighted captain (left) and crew 

Cudmore cunning 
yields narrow win 


By Barry PfckthaU 


r ‘ 


Lawson: fighting back 

Games bid 

Zurich (Reuter)— La usanne 
will now apply to stage the 
1994 Winter Olympic Gaines 
following the International 
Olympic Committee's ruling 
to switch to a new four-yearly 

efthe IOC ancMhe^ federal 
capital. Berne, had submitted 
rival applications to the Swiss 
Olympic Committee to host 
the 1996 Winter Games. 


White Crusader's victory 
yesterday was the closest in 
the 135-year history of the 
America’s Cup. It was also 
most probably the closest 
margin recorded in any yacht 
race, for with photo-finish 
cameras inoperable on the 
high seas, the difference be- 
tween the two yachts as they 
crossed the invisible finish line 
was as ranch a measure of the 
timekeeper's reflexes as the 
few centimetres that divided 
the bow of the British boat 
from that of Canada EL 

The closest previous race in 
America's Cup competition 
was the exciting battle two 
weeks ago between Kevin 
Parry’s two Taskforce IO 
Syndicate boats, in which the 
Iain Murrey-skippered 
Kookaburra m gained a two- 
second victory over Kooka- 
burra II, steered by Peter 
Gflmomr. 

Even then, it was impossible 
for those watching to differen- 
tiate firtf from second, and all 
ears turned towards the radio 
for the race committee's 
decision. 

Before this year, the closest 
official shave had been the 
26sec defeat of Australia’s 


Treble chance 

Three British girls have 
reached the last eight of the 
£7,000 LTA women's indoor 
tennis tournament at Queen's 
Gub. Sally Reeves, of Kent, 
the No. 3 seed, scored a 
typically gutsy 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 
second round victory over 
Simone Schilder, of Switzer- 
land. The other two Britons 
through are Katie Rickett, 
from Birmingham, who beat 
Jo Louis, of Devon, 6-4, 7-5, 
and Joy Tacon, of Norfolk, 
who defeated Belinda Borneo, | 
of Bedfordshire, 6-4, 6-4. 

Halifax blow 

Halifax are to hold an! 
extraordinary meeting of 
shareholders and creditors on 
Wednesday next week when a 
resolution will be put to wind 
up the football dub vol- 
untarily and appoint a liq- 
uidator. In a letter 
accompanying the notice to 
shareholders, John Maddey, 
the Halifex chairman, said he 
was still hoping that the dub, 
who have debts of more than 
£300,000. could be saved. 


first Cap challenger, Gretef, in 
the 1962 series against the 
New York Yacht Gab defend- 
er, Weatherly, skippered by 
Bos Mosbacher. 

That year, the Alan Paine- 
designed challenger, owned by 
Sir Frank Packer, was 
acknowledged to be the fester 
yacht, but Jock Sturrock, the 
skipper, was outsmarted by 
the more experienced 
American. 

In that memorable fourth 
race, described by one Austra- 
lian journalist as “the most 
thrilling America's Cap finish 
in history” GreteTs crew came 
dose to winning her second 
race of the series only to be 
fooled into sailing well above 
their course in the same way 
that Sir Thomas Sopwith's 
British challenger, Endeavour, 
lost two of her races 28 years 
before. 

As Gretd closed up on 
Weatherly on the final spinna- 
ker leg to the finish, it became 
obvious that the Australian 
yacht would surge past unless 
the Americans did something 
dramatic. 

And that is what they did. 
Hoisting their genoa, 
Weatherly's crew hardened ap 
on the wind sailing away from 
the foie. Stnrrock called for a 
genoa to be hoisted aboard 
GreteL too, and gave chase, 
and for two muntes the 
Australian boat was closer to 
the fine than Weatherly. 

^ Moste cfaer hdd his nerve, 

to^atcl op, then* jodg ig the 
moment right, suddenly 
dropped foe genoa, hoisted the 
spinnaker and ran for the 
finish busy to leave the dis- 
orientated Australians in 
disarray. 

It was a famous victory, now 
overshadowed by a similar 
display of cunning displayed 
by Harold Cudmore, of 
Britain, over the Canadians, 
who must stiB be ticking 
themselves for allowing White 
Crusader to slip ahead In the 
fast seco nd. 

. j 

Debate date 

Counties are being given an 
extra chance to help them , 
decide whether important 
changes to the fust-class 
cricket structure will be bene- 
ficial to domestic cricket The 
Test and County Cricket 
Board have called a special 
meeting for November 18 to 
debate the recomendaiions 
made by the Palmer report 


Steaua , 
must 
fight for 
crown 

The European Cup holders, 
Steaua Bucharest have a 
mountain to climb if they are 
to retain their tide tonight 
They trail Anderiecht 3-0 after 
their first round, second leg 
European Cup tie in Brussels, 
and will have to rely upon the 
Belgians' reputations as poor $ 
travellers, and the return of 
three regulars — the midfield 
player, Boloni: the forward, 
Lacatus. and the defender, 
Bumbescu — to overturn the 
, deficit. Steaua beat Anderiecht 

3- 0 in the semi-final of the 
same competition last season. 

Steaua. who were given a 
first-round bye, stayed top to 
the Romanian league with a 3- 
0 win over Olt over the 
weekend. If they lose, they will 
join a distinguished list of 
champions failing at the first 
hurdle the year after winning 
the title, including Liverpool. 
Nottingham Forest and Real 
Madrid. Anderiecht warmed 
up by beating lowly Berchem 
8-0 in the Belgian league on 
Saturday. 

Bayern Munich have to gel 
over the shock of Saturday’s 
first Bundesliga defeat of the . 
season, 3-0 at home to Bayer f 
Leverkusen, as they take a 2-0 
lead from the first leg against 
Austria Vienna to the Prater 
Stadium. 

The Germans also met their 
opponents last year, winning 

4- 2 in Munich then drawing 3- 
3 in Austria in the second 
round. Bayern's coach, Udo 
Lattek, has said that he will 
probably drop one West Ger- 
man international Brehme. 
but another, veteran striker 
Hoeness, has recovered from a 
broken jaw and will be 
substitute. 

Despite the confident mood 
in the Austrian camp, man- 
ager Tommy Parils has a 
number of problems. Ogris 
and Degeoigi are suspended, 
Tuermcr and Baumeister arc i 
recovering from injury — 
though they should be fit to 
play — and key defender Stei- 
ger is definitely out with an 
injured back. Another absen- 
tee is Hungarian international 
Nyilasi. who may face another 
back operation. 

Another West German side. 
VFB Stuttgart face a tough 
task to stay alive in the Cup 
Winners’ Cup. The Ger 

More football 
on page 42 

mans lost the first leg against ,* 
Torpedo Moscow 2-0, and p- 
their chances of overturning 
that scoreline have been hit by l 
an injury to striker AUgoewer. 

The Swiss side Sion, who 
defeated Aberdeen in the first a? 
round, can continue their run. 
Two late goals earned them a V. 
2-2 draw against Katowice in 
Poland and they should now . 
finish off the job. 

Johan Cruyffs Ajax 
Amsterdam take a 4-0 lead to 
Greece, which should ensure 
that the Dutch league leaders 
qualify at the expense of 
Olympiakos Pfreas. The game 
was m danger of being called 
off on Tuesday when employ- 
ees of the 80.000-seat Olympic 
Stadium in Athens threatened 
to stage a one-day strike overa 
contract dispute. 

Barcelona, beaten by Steaua 
Bucharest on penalties in the 
European Cop final last year, 
face one of the toughest tasks < 
in the UEFA Cup. Lucky even 
to get to the second round, 
after eliminating Albania's 
Flamurtari on the away goals 
rule, Terry Venables’s side 
defend a 1-0 lead in Portugal 
against SportineLisboiL 
Ajax's big Dutch rivals. 
Feyenoord, have an almost 
impossible task in the in the 
same competition. The 
Rotterdam side trails 1-5 to 
West Germans Bornssia 
Mtacbengladbach. 

Officials at UEFA, the 
European soccer body, have 
still not yet decided what 
action to take over the rioting 
by Feyenoord fens before, 
during and after the first-leg 
game in West Germany when 
police made 71 arrests. 

One top side will be elimi- . 
nated in the intriguing clash “ 
between French league leaders 
Bordeaux and Portugal’s 
Benfica, a club with a famous 
European history. They drew 
1-1 in the first teg in Lisbon. 

The Portuguese have doubts 
about midfielder Nunes, in- 
jured in Portugal’s 1-1 Euro- 
pean championship draw in 
Switzerland. 

inter M few should pull 
back from 3-2 down after the 

first 1% against Leeja Warsaw 
in Poland. Inter field a full- 
strength side, including West 
German sinker Karl-Heinz 
Rummenigge and Argentine 
Passarefla. 

Last season’s beaten 
Gxpwinnefs Cup finalists, 
Atietico Madrid, are in danger 
of elimination after losing the 
first leg 24) to Vitoria SC 
MaSwEj who have just won 
the Swedish league, lead Ti- 
rana of Albania 3-0. There are. 
a host of other return legs 
which could swing either way. 
as Spartak Moscow, against 
Toulouse, Athletic Bilbao 
against Bereren. Trakia Plov- 
div, against Hajdnk Split and 
Stahl Brandenburg against 
Gothenbera all attempt to 
cancel out first leg deficits.