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No 62,609 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 




hints 


u-turn 45 men killed in Britain s 
d Tory S worst helicopter disaster 

wets 


By Rodney Lord 

Economics Editor 
Big increases in tbe 
Govern mem's spending plans 
and a buoyant economic out- 
look were announced yes- 
terday by tbe Chancellor of tbe 
Exchequer. Mr Nigel Lawson. 

In a statement which was 
seen as clearing the decks for 
an earlv election. Mr Lawson 
said that the economy would 
grow faster next year and that 
the prospects for some fall in 
unemployment were now 
more promising. Although 
inflation was likely to edge up 
slightly it was at its lowest 
level for two decades. 

The increase in public 
spending will help to fuel 
growth in the economy. But it 
has reduced the scope for tax 
cuts. . 

Mr Lawson gave no indica- 
tion yesterday of whether he 
still expected to be able to cut 
taxes in the Budget hut it was 
expected that the buoyancy of 
revenue would still leave him 
scope for a small reduction. 

The statement was received 
feiriy calmly in the City. 
Market traders were partially 
reassured by what seemed to 
be a more welcoming attitude 
towards foil membership of 
the European Monetary 
System. . 

Mr Lawson told the Com- 
mons that the. balance had 
shifted considerably in favour 
of joining. 


THE MAIN POINTS 

• Public spending plans for 
next year to total £l48.6bn. 
£4.7bn more then announced at 
the time of the Budget 

• Local authorities get an extra 
E44xi, partly to take account of 
planned spencfing and partly to 
increase government aid. 

• Education gets an extra 
£<L2bn next year, mostly to 
fund teachers' pay rises. There 
is more money for universities. 

• Social security spending up 
El .75bn and an extra £300m for 
the health service in England. 

• Borrowing next year wifl be 
kept in line with present plans. 
City economists forecast little 
room for tax cuts fci the Budget 

• Growth Is enectBd to rise to 
3 per cent in 1985 and inflation 
to 3% per cant The balance of 

' will show a £1-5bn 


will still grow- more slowly 
than the economy. . 

The reserve included in 
next year’s plans has been cut 
from £6.3 billion to £3.5 
billion, wnbich is £1 buhon 
lower than this year. And the 


By Robin Oakley 
Political Editor 

The Government yesterday 
ran up the surrender flagjr in 
the face of demands from 
spending ministers which it 
bad become politically impos- 
sible to refuse. 

Mr Lawson's statement yes- 
terday to the Commons was 

tacit acknowledgment, said 
Tory MPs, that foe Star 
Chamber under Lord While- 
law had foiled to trim spend- 

- _ WZA+ 1a MirthtTW 


iuiivii jaw hhu tdiicu ****** 

td the jug Ministers bids to anything 

forecast proceeds from nice the total Mr Lawson had 

. — originally wanted. 

Instead they bad conceded 
that poll evidence of a pubhc 


payments 

deficit 


Parliament 

4 

Statement details 

5 

Leading article 

17 

Frank Johnson 

20 

Market reaction 

21 


He promised also that foe 
projected increases in public 
spe nding would not be al- 
lowed to undermine the 
Government’s prudent fiscal 

^ Ura*i > ATtr_ 


privatization, which count as 
negative spending, have been 
rounded up from £4% billion 
to £5 billion. 

The mam increase is in 
spending by local councils 
which has gone up by £4 
billion. Previous provision 
was admitted to be unreal®- 
lically low. The Government 
grant to councils has been 
mcmiwl also, by almost 10 
per cent. 

With the exception of de- 
fence, contributions to foe 
Fi?r and export credits every 
programme has been in- 
creased over previous plans. 

Apart from the increase m 
local authority spending on 
education - including 
teachers' pay — there is£60 
million more for universities. 
Health and personal social 
services receive an extra £t>uo 
million. Mr Lawson claimed 
that combined with efficiency 
sav ing*, the extra money 
would not only allow the 


Government’s prudent fiscal would not. only allow the bids by department iron 
strategy. Government borrow- Health Service to cope isters in a k “f h 

me this vear remains on target- growing number of elderly Chancellor in touch 
T^mSeases in spending patients but would also allow spending targets, tad beei 


1R UIU T jT 

The increases in spending 
were nevertheless much 
higher than generally ex- apeuuiu& 
nected. Next year's lota! has including that funded by re- 
bSn increased by £4% billion ceipts from council house 


patient* but would also allow 
it to improve services. 
Spending on housing. 


desire for increased spending 
on health and education had 
made it necessary to increase 
spending totals even if that 
made foe prospect of tax cuts 
in a pre-election Budget next 
Spring a gamble. 

In essence, the Government 
had been knocked off course 
by an extra £3.5 billion of 
spending by local authorities 
which they were unable to 
control, a further £500.000 
obtained by Education Sec- 
retary Mr Kenneth Baker for 
the new offer to teachers, and 
the ever-increasing benefits 
bill for the unemployed and 
the old at foe Department of 
Health and Social Security. 

Mr Lawson’s statement to 
the Commons yesterday con- 
firmed that the Government s 
Star Chamber, which has been 
whittling down the spending 

bids by departmental Mm- 
■_ - ijj M me 

his 

spending targets, tad been 
forced to accept that any 
would 





The doomed helicopter in its former British Airways livery. 


ine aoomea neucoprcr u *««»«« 

Crash without warnin 

By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 


Forty-five men died yes- 
terday in Britain's worst heli- 
copter disaster. 

A Boeing 234 twin rotor 
helicopter smashed without 
warning into the sea two miles 
off Sumburgh in Shetland and 
yank within minutes. All but 
two of those on board died in 
the icy waters. . 

The survivors - including 
the captain — were taken to 
hospital and investigators 


British International Chinook 


SHETLAND 


Brant ofl field 



Tomorrow 


Slopes to 
be seen on 



to £148% billion and in 1988- 
89 foe plans have been ra^d 
by £5% billion to £154% 
billion. 

This means that spending 
will rise in real terms - but 


U and non-U in 
the mountains: 
a four-page guide 
to the ups and 
downs of ski 
society 



sales, has been increased by 
£450 million. Roads receive 
an extra £65 million. And foe 

social security budget goes up 
Continued oo page 20, col 1 


father , pnU ^^ , wl! 1 rivm ^‘standing by To interview 
politically unawtablj givm in the hope of finding 

poll “LP“,S C tfaecause of the accident, 

maud for educational and ^ ^ an t helicopter - a 

health service s. . riyit version of foe Chinook 

5hfchSX«d*o«eUinihe 

atdyctargrfMrLawmiw^ Falklands war - was ferrying 
cymcaDy setting o ff ^ employees in a routine 


nil use iu iwu — 

Pound up in hope 
of high rates 


election spending boom 
while Tory Wets thankfully 
seized upon what they were 
Continued on page 20, col 3 


^ /Sumburgh 

crew change from foe Brent oil 
platform in the North Sea to 
Shetland, a duty ft was due to 
perform three times. 

It was at a little over 500 ft 
on its final approach to 
Sumburgh Airport; the men 
on board were strapped in 
preparing for landing when it 
suddenly plummeted into 
12 ft waves. 

No distress warning was 


J ~ • o 

By David Smith. Economics Correspondent 

The pound reacted favour- "LJbfc 3 M 

ably to foe Chancellor’s state- 
ment, buoyed by the expecta- 
tion that foe Government s 
decision to boost pu blic 
spending would keep interest 
rates high. 

It rose 1.1 cents to $1.4340, 
and the sterling index was up 


But 

government bonds fell 
City economists described 
the Chancellor’s statement as 
risky, and one foal was likely 
to create trouble for foe pound 
during foe winter months. 

There was also concern that, 

having moved away from 


&0&S& BiS&s. 



Aviation minister 
rushes to scene 


given by foe pilot and al- 
though foe sea was rough the 
visibility was said to be 
excellent 

The same Chinook was 
involved in an emergency 
landing three years ago when a 
gearbox caught fire. An ac- 
cident investigation blamed 
the failure of a roller bearing 
which has since been re- 
designed. The 35 people on 
board all got out safely. 

It is unlikely that yes- 


Survivors 
owe lives 
to chance 

The two known survivors of 
Britain's worst helicopter 
crash owe their lives to a 
chance in a million coiocid- 

Ca plain Gordon Mitchell, a 
coastguard helicopter piioL 
was on a routine patrol when 
he spotted what he thought 
was either a fishing boat or an 

oil slick in foe water. . 

Seconds laier he heard air 
traffic control on his radio 
calling foe Chinook, saying it 
had gone too low for radar. 

“I went in the direction of 
what I thought was foe oil 
slick and when 1 got there 1 
discovered it was foe wreck. 
Captain Mitchell said last 

n *^Vhen he arrived less than a 


terday's crash was in any way a fteT hearing the alert. 

linked to foe P^viousincident ^ survivors were already 
and there appears .o be no but foe helicopter 

similarity between them. 1D 


• Yesterday’s £8,000 
prize in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition, double the 
usual amount as 
there was no winner on 
Wednesday, was 

won by Mrs Mavis 
Johnson, of Wollaton, 
Nottingham. Details, 

Sphere is £20,000 to 

be won tomorrow - the 
daily £4,000 plusthe 
weekly prize of £16,000, 
double the usual 
amount as there was no 
winner last weekend- 

• Portfolio fist, page 
27; how to play, . 
information service, 
page 20. 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Ford rejected 

The Italian state-controUed 

Sff.warS 

America ■ _ Page21 

Banks lag 


Times ban 
ended by 2 
councils 

By Staff Reporters 

Two of foe three Labour- 
controlled councfls ordered by 
foe High Court on Wednesday 
to end their banning from 
public libraries of The Times 
£nd other News Internationa^ 
titles moved to comply with 
the order yesterday, but the 

third is. delaying obeying foe 
instruction until after tne 

® ,< Tbe n Lontoo L boroughs of 
Camden and Hammersmith 
andFulha mjaveugng i^ 
to council officers yesieraay 
restore the banned papers to 

the Chief 

Executive of ^f M * e *k K s ®!i 
“We shall comply with tne 

court order and the nec^ry 

arrangements are being made 
now: Tbe papers wfll be 
avail able again within the next 

*1 Spokesman for Councillor 
Felice, labour 

Fulham, said; We shaft be 

considering the comis 

Continued on Page icois 


Russia accuses US 
of arms ‘retr eat ’ 

From Andrew McEwen, Dipl 

The Vienna follow-up to the 
Reykjavic summit ended yes- 



~ — V 

terday without progress after 
five hours of talks during two 
meetings between Mr George 
Shultz, the US Secretary of 
State, and Mr Eduard Shev- 
ardnadze, the Soviet Foreign 
Minister, foiled to clear up the 
main obstacles. 

Mr Shevardnadze said the 
talks “left a bitter taste" and 
afflical the Americans of “a 
complete retreat from foe high 
ground reached in Iceland" . 

The Soviets say President 
Reagan agreed at Reykjavic to 
elimina tion of all nuclear 
weapons within 10 years. The 


on the same issue as foe Ice- 
land meeting. Mr Shevard- 
nadze continued to make any 
nuclear disarmament pact 
conditional on foe US ab- 
andoning plans to test laser 
defences against ballistic mis- 
siles. . . 

The Americans remained 
fiim in t heir commitment to 

10 


Mr John Moore, Secretary 
of State for Transport, prom- 
ised in foe Commons a thor- 
ough inquiry in to the cause ot 
the Chinook helicopter crash. 

In a statement, Mr Moore 
said an investigators team had 
already left for foe same, with 
the Aviation Minister, Mr 
Michael Spicer. 

He told MPS foe Chief 
Inspector of Accidents would 
carry out a full inquiry and 
pledged; “Resources will not 
impede the proper mvesuga- 
tion of this accident" 

For the Opposition. Mr 
Peter Snape said the “appall- 
ing tragedy" was a reminder or 
foe pnee paid for successful 
North Sea oil exploitation. 

Mr Moore said; “We all owe 
a debt to those whose tenacity 
courage and ingenuity, win for 
our nation, oil reserves from 
the sea. , 

“I understand no warning or 
any kind was given.'' 

The former Transport Min- 
ister, Mr David Howell 
(Guildford), said foe high 


number killed seemed to in- 
dicate “something much 
worse, an explosion of some 
kind, before foe craft hit the 
water.” 

Mr Malcolm Bruce, Liberal 
MP for Gordon, said he tad 
been advised that foe heli- 
copter was seen “effectively to 
fell out of foe sky, about 500 
feet from foe water, and break- 
up on impact.” 

Mr Bruce asked Mr Moore 
if he was prepared to ground 
other Chinooks. Mr Moore 
replied that any change in 
safety conditions, . a “£ r 
information obtained in foe 
investigation could . be re- 
commended to foe Civil Avi- 
ation Authority immediauey, 
wifoouty waiting for the in- 
quiry to finish. 

“We ought to control any 
suggestions about safety until 
we leant a little bit more about 
foe incident.” he added. 

Mr Moore told Mr Dick 
Douglas (Lab, Dunfermline 
West); “There must be foe 
most thorough investigation 
by my Chief Inspector.” 


The passengers yesterday 
included nine Shell employ- 
ees. The others were contract 
staff who had been working on 
the Brent oilfield. They would 
have been taken to Aberdeen 
for onward connections to 
their homes for a short break 
before flying out to their 
lonely working life on tne 
giant platforms in the North 
Sea again. 

The sudden loss of the 
helicopter indicated a cata- 
strophic failure, probably 
involving the rotors. Although 
foe helicopter has twe engines 
and can easily fly on one, it 
cannot remain airborne u one 
stops. Had foe main shaft 
linking foe two rotors tailed, 
for example, foe helicopter 
would have fallen like a stone. 

It was one of four Boeing 

Continued on page 2, col 3 


tneiwo sui vivuia — - 1 

in the water but foe helicopter 
had disappeared. . . . 

“One was dinging to a nit oi 
wreckage and foe other was 
hanging on to a dinghy. We 
got foe guy off foe wreckage 
and a wiocbman cut free foe 
man hanging to the dinghy-. 

“Something catastrophic 
must have happened. Then 
bodies started floating to foe 
surface.” he said. 

The captain and his crew 
hunted desperately for other 
survivors, but could see none. 

Then a trawler, foe River 
Dee. arrived on foe scene and 
the helicopter flew the two 
men to hospital. 

Both men were injured. One 
had chest pains and the other 
was suffering from shock. 

The survivors, like the vic- 
tims in foe water, were wear- 
ing uninflated rile 
jackets. 


Hopes buried 


the Strategic Defence Inhiai- 

^MrShultz said the US need- 
ed to continue testing because 
of uncertainty as to wither 
ballistic missiles would be et- 


weapons within IU years, me was 

Administration version is that umnated, andb^a ^ -jet 
h« agreed to eliminat ion of ® I that had prompted 
WHafc nrikiles but not disarmament overtures. He 
bombs, cruise missiles or 
nuclear shells. 


11.1601 JUUB. 

No date was set for another 
meeting and no further sum- 
mit is planned. Negotiations 
now move to the Geneva stra- 
tegic arms talks, where die 
Americans have already ta- 
bled their interpretation of the 
Reykjavic proposals. 

The Vienna talks foundered 


disarmament overtures. He 
{dm* argued that SDI was an 
insurance against “cheating . 
Mr Shevardnadze agreed to 

lake a second look at British 

evidence of Syrian intelligence 
involvement in a plot to Wow 
up an El Ai airliner last April. 
Mr Shultz pressed him to re- 
consider foe negative Soviet 
attitude to Britain’s decision 
to end relations with Syria. 


Emergency inquiry into 
ways to curb Aids 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

An emergency partiam- inquiries — » UMlt^ Cwruirf 

entary investigation has been 
launched into the growing 
Aids crisis. 

The inquiry will question 
mini sters and leading health 
experts, and is to examine 
even foe most unpalatable 
options for containing the 
disease. These include screen- 
ing visitors from Aids-affected 
countries, the strict physical 
isolation of Aids victims and 
carriers, making Aids a 
no tifiab le disease, and issuing 
identity cards to Aids carriers. 

The investigation is being 
conducted by the Social Ser- 
vices Select Committee, which 
considers the subject so seri- 
ous that it has deferred other 


-.^MES SPORT 


FTV tackled 

J i iX“tSSrsss 

match on Sunday ton 

Kiw-WSE 

games during 
season ^ ■** 


H .° me ,,19 

Oerscas 
ATO , . 13 

Births^™* 
Ha-TaS* 5 Z 

Besures. 2I--« 
Conn 

CnrsswonbJA-8 

feararcs 14-J5 
War? *? 

Law Report 


Leaden 
Letters 
Obituary 
paiUaiBCBt 
Motoring 
Sale Room 
SO*** 

Sport 3M436 
Tfecafrwi , rtc « 

TV & Radio « 
Weather ** 


pa Page 2, col a j The Vienna times lounoereo — 

judge iails rape victim for contempt 

J UUgv ^ “not fit" to sit past chairman of foe Magii 

■ nn Wednesday, a warrant was foe judge was no ^ IJt ^ ^ iac * a«nciation_ with re 

By Frances Gibb 

riwvanwt 


5gal Al- irs Correspondent lo|d ^ 1( . co uM bcair ^ed,sh= n , I Agndadonof 

An alleged rape wrtun was said to pohee: rn be Schemes said 

jailed for a day yesterday by a -waiting. , 5?. he ^ 0 f videos in taking 

at foe Central Criminal Yesterday foe woman told foeu*^ ^ op ^J x 

r: Staxas ssarrSiftt 

maid from Norfooft, Middl^ th e woman gave a staement 
- J - A — u “ , “ M 10 police and was examined by 
doctors. She also gave ev- 
idence at a preliminary hear- 
ing before Ealing magistrates. 

Witnesses can be jailed for 
up to three months for failing 
to appear in court after an 
eiri aged 1 9. a day’s detention on fer has been made against 
lor’ contempt because she th cm . t . ... „ 

fail'd to comply with a wit- Yesterday the jailing pru- 
nes order made against her at voked criticism in several 

foe committal stage obliging quarters and a call for the party to examine foe 

her to appear. Government Dr oblems of victims in court 

When she -failed to turn up protect viciuns in such rases. b udv Ralphs, foe 

at foe Central Criminal Court r Women Against Rape said cnaireo oy . 


maid from Mormon. 
mv was arrested after she told 

^S^teumstoofnghttrred 

10 speak out at the mal of a 
maia^d 27. from Southall, 
West London, charged with 



proposals 10 . -- 

treatment of victims in court- 
Ms Helen Reeves, a ^rec- 
tor said: “1 am horrified at 
what appears to be so little 
understanding that a woman 

would be frightened of giving 
this son of evidence m a 
public court." 

V The police had taken 
considerable steps to make foe 
treatment of rape victims 

more humane. 

The association had set up a 

■ ■ . _ _ «a dv*ifflinp TnP 


past chairman of foe Magist- 
rates' Association, with rep- 
resentatives from the 
judiciary, police, probation 
service, courts- and the Law 
Society on it 

The Home Office, which 
has announced it is to tn- 
troduce videos into courts for 
foe taking of evidence front 
children who are victims of 
violent crime, said yesterday 
that there were no plans to 
extend this to adults. 

The case against foe man 
who has been in custody for a 
vear. will proceed today. 

' Judge Denison, aged 57. 
was appointed a circuit judge 
in March 1985. He was a 
crown court recorder from 
1979 to 1985 and lists his 
recreations in Who's Who was 
••walking” and “reading rub- 
bish”. 


foe National Health 
and child care. 

The committee took its 
decision on Wednesday, sent 
out ietters inviting written 
evidence yesterday, and will 
hold up to five weeks of oral 
evidence sessions from the 
banning of January. 

Latest figures show ihai by 
the end of October there had 
been 548 cases of Aids re- 
ported. and 278 deaths - a 
sharp increase on September s 
figures of 512 and 250. . 

■At foe same ume a special 
Cabinet committee has been 
set up to tackle the crisis. 

Runde's ch all e n ge, page 3 
WHO warning, page 3 

Manchester 
United look 
to Ferguson 



Alex Ferguson, the former 
Scotland and Aberdeen man- 
ager. is expected to take over 
as foe manager of Manchester 
United following foe dis- 
missal yesterday of Ron 
Atkinson. 

The poor performance or 
foe team over foe last 12 
months was the reason given 
by the club chairman. Martin 
Edwards, for foe dismissal of 
Mkinson. who had been at foe 
club for five and a half years. 

During that period the team 
had uon foe FA Cup twice but 
never achieved the success in 
foe League that foe dub has 
craved since it last won the 
title under Matt Busby in 
1967- 

Full report, page 36 


iging- 

&(juickshank 

Investment Management Sen'ice Ud 


More than just a 
Stockbroker 


A PAff r Or 


Alexanders Loins ‘ 

&Cruickshank Holdings Ltd 

M HVTEIMJJONA SECUPSE 5 






-Fiv *5lK. ' tfFWv. */?+£ '=* ~- 


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HOME NEWS 


THE 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 



Drink-drive test 
option continues 

Motorists suspected of drink-driving are to conduce to 
have the right to take a blood or urine test, Mr Douglas 
Hurd, the Home Secretary, announced last night (Om- 
Chief Political Correspondent writes)- 

He told MPs that he was alio wing a two-year extension 
to enable the growing confidence in the lion Intoximeter 
breathalyser to be consolidated. 

The breath or urine test option was to have ended npon 
the introduction of the intoximeter. But after a campaign 
led by Mr Peter Bremveh, Conservati ve MP for Leicester 
East, complaining about machine inaccuracies, the 
Government initially agreed to allow the breath or mine 
test to continue for a year. 

Mr Hard said the option wonld be reviewed again in two 
years* time. 

Appeal on MI5 gag 

Two national newspapers were yesterday given leave t o 
appeal to the Honse of Lords against an ipjaicrion limiting 
their freedom to publish allegations of “criminal miscon- 
duct” in the Secret Service. 

A committee of three law lords gave The Guardian and 
The Observer leave to challenge a reporting ban imposed by 
the Attorney General, which was later modified by the 
Court of Appeal, to exclude any material disclosed in 
Parliament or the English courts, or in Australia, wb&e the 
Attorney General is seeking to stop publication of a book 
bv a former senior MIS officer, Mr Peter Wright. 

‘Mr Anthony Lester, QC, for the newspapers, said die 
case raised issues of “constitutional importance**. 

IB A cuts Nurse is 

radio fees leader 


EEC law expert questions water 


By Howard Foster 

The Conservative 
Government’s plans to pri- 
vatize the British water in- 
dustry would be banned by 
existing EEC legislation, 
according to documents re- 
leased by a leading conserva- 
tion group yesterday. 

The Council for the Protec- 
tion of Rural England (CP RE) 
engaged an expert in European 
law. Professor Francis Jacobs, 
to give his formal opinion on 
the viability of the scheme to 
hand the ninning of the water 
industry to private enterprise. 
His findings have been sent to 
Mr Nicholas Ridley, Secretary 
of State for the Environment. 

Although the Conservatives 


have abandoned hopes of 
privatization during the life of 
this Parliament, a 30-man 
team is Irani at work within 
the Department of the 
Environment preparing the 
ground for legislation early in 
the term of a third Tory 
Government. 

Professor Jacohs, who holds 
the Chair of European Law at 
King's College. London, says 
Britain's EEC membership re- 
quires it to conform to 
directives on the maintenance 
of water quality and pollution 
control. 

He concludes that: “it is 
quite likely that the European 
Court would decide that pri- 
vatized water companies were 
not bodies which the UK 


The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority yes- 
terday announced a art of 
at least 26 per cent in the 
fees it charges Britain's 52 
independent local radio 
stations. 

In 26 areas, where sta- 
tions have faced particular 
difficulties, the cuts will be 
doser to 35 per cent 

The cots, which are 
backdated to April, will be 
a boost to local radio, 
which has foiled to achieve 
hoped-for levels eff profit- 
ability, although it has 
been successful in attract- 
ing larger audiences titan 
those of the BBC. 


Mr Hector Mackenzie, a 
qualified nurse, yesterday 
became general secretary 
of the 212 , 000 -strong 
Confederation of Health 
Service Employees 
(Cohse). 

In a field of seven, he 
gained 21,700 votes. His 
nearest rival obtained 
<481 votes. 

Mr Mackenzi e, who has 
been the anion's assistant 
general secretary since 
1983 will work with Mr 


Helicopter safety 

Regulations 
tightened 
after crash 
in Scillies 


iag secretary tnrtfi he takes 
op tiie post on May 1 next 
year. 


Opren case ruling 

An arthritis sufferer who is sung for damages over 
alleged side-effects from the drug, Opren, cannot have her 
own observer presort when she is ggaminul by the 
manufacturer’s medical expert a High Court Judge ruled 
yesterday. 

Mrs Ingrid Baker, aged 48, was treated with Opren in 
1981. She is one of more than 1,000 people who have issued 
writs against the American company, Eli Lilly, its British 
subsidiaries and foe Government’s Committee on the 
Safety of Medicines, over alleged side-effects. 

Mrs Baker has agreed to undergo tests in Dundee, 
supervised by Dr William Frain-Bell, a consultant 
dermatologist, on behalf of Eli Lilly. Mr Jnstice Hirst said 
the court most give Dr Frain-Bell the credit of being 
accurate in recording his resalts. The presence of an 
outsider wonld impose “an undue constraint” upon him. 

Jockey’s k ^ 
drink ban 

Walter Swinbnrn, the 
leading jockey, crashed bis 
Mercedes car into a lamp 
post while trying to do np 
his seat belt, Newmarket 
Magistrates' Court was 
told yesterday. 

Swinbnrn, aged 25, of 
Genesis Green Stnd, 

Onsden, Suffolk, was fear- 
ing a dinner party and had 


Specific safety improve- 
ments for helicopters wens 
recommended in a Civil Avi- 
ation Authority report two 
years ago after a British Air- 
ways Sikorsky crashed into the 
sea off the Stilly Isles killing 
20 people. 

Radio altimeters, with voice 
warnings, were installed in all 
commercial helicopters as 
well as automatically-de- 
ployed distress beacons — a 
requirement which came into 
effect on November 1 — and 
unproved liferafts, lifejackets 
and easier escape routes were 
provided. 

The type that crashed yes- 
terday, the Boeing 234 LR, is a 
civilian version of the heavy- 
weight Chinook helicopter, 
almost forty of which are 
currently in service with the 
RAF. It originally appeared in 
the early 1960s and, after 
successful service in Vietnam, 
was adopted by 13 other air 
forces. 

RAF experience with the 
Chinook has been good. Apart 
from three lost when the 
Atlantic Conveyor was sunk 
during the Falklands War, the 
only crashes have involved 
one that went down earlier 
this year — killing three crew- 
men — in a storm in the South 
Atlantic and, in 1984, a forced 
landing by one of the heli- 
copters near its base at RAF 
Odiham in Hampshire. No- 
body was killed in that 
incident 

In 1982, members of a 
I Swansea sky-diving team were 
among 46 people killed when 
a US Army Chinook crashed 
at an air show in Mannheim, 
West Germany, after the fail- 
ure of a rotor transmission. 

That accident, the world’s 
worst helicopter crash, had 


By David Sapsted 
iprove- striking 


striking similarities with 
yesterday’s. 

More than a thousand twin- 
rotor Chinooks have been 
built for the military world- 
wide, most of them being 
operated by the US Army. The 
civilian version first arrived in 
Britain in 1981 when British 
Airways ordered four. 

The machines were sub- 
sequently sold to the Aber- 
deen-based . British- 
International Helicopters for 
service in the North Sea. 

In its civilian role, the 
helicopter is capable of carry- 
ing between .44 and 46 pas- 
sengers, has a maximum 
speed of 165 mph and a range 
of 575 miles. 

In May, 1984, a Boeing 
Vertol, then operated by Brit- 
ish Airways, ditched at a spot 
close to yesterday’s incident 
but all 44 oil workers aboard, 
and the crew of three, escaped 
and were picked up unharmed 
by fishing vessels. 

The worst North Sea heli- 
copter crash until yesterday 
came in August, 1981, when a 
Westland Wessex operated by 
Bristow plunged into the sea 
off the Norfolk coast, killing 
all 13 men onboard. 

An engine or gearbox fault 
was blamed for that crash. In 
September, 1982, a Bdl 212, 
also operated by Bristow and 
scrambled at short notice to 
pick npa sick crew member on 
an oil support vessel, went 
down 1 10 miles north-east of 
the Shetlands, killing its six- 
man crew. 

Last May. a British 
Calendonian Bdl 214ST also 
went down in the North Sea 
on a trip to the Magnus Field, 
but all 20 people on board 
were rescued. 


level of alcohol in his 
breath. He was fined £200 
and banned for two years. 

Mr Jeremy Richardson, 
for Swinbnrn, said his ch- 
art momentarily dropped 
his guard while retaking 
with friends. 



45 killed in worst 
helicopter crash 


Continued from page 1 


At tiie time of yesterday’s 


, 234s owwd by British Intel-- S 

Racism case fails s^yjsf’grs SmkEsS 


Camden council has foiled in its attempt to evict a tenant, 
whose sons allegedly carried oat a racist hate c a m pa i g n 
against an Asian family. 

Mrs Maria Hawkins, aged 46, wept when the judge at 
Qerkenwell County Court rejected the coancD’s re- 
possession order on her HoBwrn flat. 

Mrs Hawkins, a divorcee, said: *Tm so relieved — it’s 
been an absolute nightmare this week.** 

Councillor Barbara Beck, chairman of the borough's 
race committee, said: “Fm very very disappointed.” 




Maxwell from British Air- 


both Aberdeen and Prestwick. 
It vanished from the con- 


ways. Throughout the day, u ,7*™“ 

military aadavilian aircraft **** screenswrthoutvraro- 

and ships searched the area for ^Si 

possible survivors and picked alert revolving afl Scotland s 


ud bodies. rescue services. 

By last night the investiga- . ® nc aircraft on 

hoh the scene was a Bnstow heh- 


tion had begun into why a “ c a ncu " 

heli copter which is known for 


being tough i aS ** to investi- 

shcntid suddenly plunge from gate. But there was little ago 
the sky y ^ ^ of wreckage and when bodies 

Tbe investigators w HI be were . 
looking for similarities be- lifejackets 

tween the crash and two adding support to the theory 


i 




tween the crash and two “jfe tb “ I ? 

si milar incidents involving tiiat whatever caused the crash 
Chinooks. In 1984, an identh v^ssu^enand vtolougvreg 
cal helicopter was suddenly c ?? w “° 

thrown violently about the sky „ 

and ditched into the sea at . , , v*®? *9 

almost the same spot as ha-ve their 

yesterday’s disaster. hfapetets reflated is a further 


yesterday's disaster. uugacneis mnaiec is a runner 

A fatigue feilure in the indication of the suddeness of 
hydraulic system was even- 

toally found to be the cause, nolimeto pufl cords to inflate 
As a result of the ditching, the jackets, 
from which all 44 passengers 

and the crew of three escaped . . given tor people 

unhurt, changes in thepflotS^ abom friends or 


relatives. They are: 0224- 

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the fleet was checked. 

Id the world’s worst rotory 
wing disaster, 46 sky divers 
died when a military Chinook 
crashed in Germany in 1982. 
Investigators discovered that 
tiie synchronizing shaft link- 
ing the two rotors had failed, 
causing the blades to smash 
into each other and send the 
helicopter plunging to the 
ground. 

Had such an incident hap- 
pened yeseterday, the pilot 
would have been thrown' vi- 
olently about his bands al- 
most certainly being tom from 
the controls and unable to 
operate the radio distress 
switch. 

And being so low over the 
sea, the helicopter would have 

smashed into the waves in 
seconds, breaking up on im- 
pact. sinking immediately and 
throwing out the two survi- 
vors as it did so. The other 
passengers would have been 
taken down with the sinking 
aircraft. 


The accident is a further 
Now to Britain’s helicopter 
industry already wracked by a 
dramatic foil in demand for 
their services because foiling 
oil prices have reduced the 
need for North Sea operations. 
This has in turn led to 
generally low morale among 
helicopter crew and constant 
demands from management 
for a reduction in costs. 

The first rescuers to arrive 
found nothing but an oil slick 
and bodies floating m it face 
down.Two liferafts, one wheel 
and some small pieces of 
cabin wreckage were later 
spotted bobbing on the waves. 

The Aviation Minister, Mr 
Michael Spicer, flew from 
Northolt to Sumbujgb to 
oversee the operation. 

There have been remark- 
ably few accidents involving 
helicopters on the civfl register 
in recent years. And in the last 
10 years there have only been 
four fatal accidents involving 
civilian helicopters. 


could properly designate as 
“competent authorities”. In 
EEC terms, they had to be 
“governmental” and act “free 
from the pressure of 
shareholder or other private 
interests”. 

Professor Jacobs also said 
that he believes it to be 
beyond doubt that EEC leg- 
islation demanding the mo- 
oing of the water systems by 
competent authorities as- 
sumes that the bodies' in- 
volved will be public (mes, 
arms of tbe government or 
state. 

Tbe GPRE also said yes- 
terday tiiat if the Government 
were to lay a water privafizar 
tion Bill before Parirament, it 
wonld immediately apply to 


the High COrnt for a declaia- the bands of private com- 
tion against tbe Attorney Gen- pames.CPRE> entire concern 
eral on the question of on tins question has always 
conformity to EEC law. This, been environ ment al- We fear 
in rani, would almost cer- great problems if the water 
tainlyfead to a reference to the system is privatized." 
European Court of Justice for' Conservation groups are 
a rating which rouid take opto worried because private 
a year to emerge. ownership might pass row ite 

Even then, says Professor bands of companies which 
Jacobs, that court would be could abuse their position, 
tikdy to conclude that tbe Last night the D epartment 
companies could not be of the Environment cm- 
designated. finned that it was studying tiie 

C$R£ director Mr Robin document, but issae d-ite o wn 
Grove-White sard yesterday: statement about the opinions 
“Counsel’s opinion appears to voiced by ftoftssorAoote 
deal a very serious blow to the “There is no reason to 

Government’s announced believe that privatized staler 
intention to put tbe control of authorities could not be.com- 


Cash plea 
for babies 


pollution and water quaSty 
standards in Britain’s rivers in 


petent 

law.” 


authorities under EEC 



Mr Simon Roe, 

Fnlham Public library after 


es to available at the 
Peter Trienwr). . 


The Times back in libraries 


victims 

By Pteter&nms 
Home Afiaira 
Correspondent 

A fixed award of £5, 000 for 
rape victims, who keep a child 
boro as a result of the offence, 
is suggested in the report of an 
inter-departmental working 
party on the woridogs of the 
criminal injuries.' compensa- 
tion scheme, published 
yesterday. 

Tbe money wonld be in 
lecc^niticHiortliespecfolVSffi- 
cslues faced by women in that 
position. 

• The report said that, wher- 
ever possible, the offender 
should be made to pay tbe cost 
of such compensation. 

The working party has re- 
viewed the scheme with a 
view to its being placed on a 
statutory basis. AT present 
payments are made ex gratia 
and tire scheme is a oon- 
stetnrory arrangement for 
which the Home Secretary 
and the Secretary of State for 
Scotland are responsible. . 

The Home Office said yes- 
terday: “The Government 
welcomes the working party 
report, which makes many 
useful recommendations for 
the statutory form of the 
scheme.” Effect would be 
given to the report bjf includ- 
ing the necessary provisions m 
the proposed Criminal Justice 
Bifl. The main features of the 
present scheme ^wifl remain. 

Ax present compensation is 
payable to policemen and 
members of the publk iqjured 
accidentally in seeking to 
a p p rehe n d an offender or 
prevent an offence, provided 
that in doing so an exceptional 
and justified risk was taken. 

“We recommend that tbe 
exceptional risk requirement 
should be removed in the case 
of members of the public, who 
wifi almost always be ta k i n g 
as exceptional ride in such 
circumstances,” the report 


Continued from Page 1 
decision in more detail at our 
next meeting but in the mean- 
time there is no question of us 
not complying with it A letter 


know what the position is on 
Monday.” 


fide” and sakk “There could 
hardly be a clearer manifest*- 

- - -i~— - g 


Tbe three councils were said tion of an abuse of power.” 
in the High Court to have set Seventeen English and one- 
out to punish News Inter- Welsh local authorities, all 


is being sent to the Chief national, publishers of The Labour-controlled, have 
Executive instructing him to Times, The Sunday Times , operating similar bans 


comply” 

However, tbe London bor- 
ough of Fating will not be 
obeying tbe order before the 
weekend at least Mr John 


Leabetter, the acting chief tion of the titles was moved to 
executive, said: “There is a Wapping m East London, 
meeting arranged about this Lord Justice Watkins do- 
over the weekend and we will scribed the bans as “inespons- 

1,000 wish to accept 
the Wapping offer 


The Sun and The News of The were yesterday warned by 
World, because of tbe com- solicitors acting for New 
pany’s dispute with 5,500 International to reverse their 
printworkers dismissed after derisions within seven days or 
going on strike when publica- face court action. They are: 


One of the most important 
aspects of the statutory 
scheme is that compensation 
will no longer be awarded on 
an ex gratia basis. Anyone 
who sauces the conditions 
for payment of compensation 
“will have a legal and enforce- 
able right to compensation.” 

Criminal Injuries 
Compenbsation: a Statutory 
Scheme. London, HMSO, 
£4.35p 


rich, Hackney, Harin- — 

Islington, Knowsfcy, 

Detective 
cleared of 


By Tha Jones 
News International has re- £58m, 
caved 1,000 inquiries from Mond 
former members of staff who jho 
wish to accept the company’s r +ftant 
offer of compensation made enmpa 
last Friday, fomr v 

Six hundred people have service 
made formal applications in week, 
writing and the other 400 hare empto; 
indicated they wiO make pany, t 
applications when they have Sim 

farther details of the money to when! 
be paid to than. strike 

When be made the offer to compa 
each employee, Mr Ropot , 
Murdoch, chairman, em- ** 
phasized that the company ■ 

wonld not re-enter negirtia- 
tions with tbe muoas. “ 3 


going on strike when publica- face court action. They are: 
tion of tbe titles was moved to Birmingham, Barnriey, Brent, 

Wapping m East London. Greenwich, Hackney, Harin- 
Lord Justice Watkins do- gey, Islington, Knowsfcy, 
scribed the bans as “Inespo ns - Lambeth, Lewisham, Man- 
chester, Newham, St Helens, 
i n nnanf Sheffield, Southwark, WaL 

L lO dCLvDl tham Forest and Cynon VaL 

• An * ley in Wales. 

||V|Q nflPr A survey of libraries in the 

PAULS* . Ullvl three London boroughs in- 

. voWed in the conn case 

,WBCS _ * yesterday showed that in 

£58m, is open until next Hammeremith and Fulham, ******* v » 

M TW who w» totally teamin S «P ^th an under- 

gockmg The Times and The worfd informer to plot an 

S^^ t £rf e 5 ran< ?? anned robbery was cleared of 


conspiracy 

By Craig Seton 
A detective accused of 


four weeks pay per year rf 
service ap to a limit of £205 a 
week. For those who woe 
employed partly by the com- 
pany, die Emit is £155 a week. 

Since foe dispute started 
when 5^00 employees went os 
strike rod were dismissed, tire 
company has pnb&shed its 


P® If**** Sun had been previously tfis- 
irit wgwi continued for lack of demand , 
e w ®° and the Sands Ends library 
by the com- which had never taken The 
a treek. 5 ^ as it did hot take a full 
pute started range of papers. 
ffegw enton Bat there were no Now 
International papers available 


company nas pnDHsnea ns yesterday in any of Camden’s 
four national newspaper titles fourteen libraries. In Ealing a 
at its new high technology similar picture was evident 
plant at Wapping, east Lon- ^ assistant at the Central 


don. 

In a separate development 


library in Ealing Broadway 
said no copies of The Times 


People who accept the offer 
will be required to rim a 
release, confirming they have 
eaded all association with the 
strike. 


yesterday, journalist s on Tfc e would be available “until 
Sun, deri ded to withdraw farther notice’'. At Northfields 
sabsenpb ons to t he N ational library an assistant said: “ I 
Union oTJonnafists in protest would not bother lookmg for 
^ News International news- 
papers. They have been Wadc- 


bam Crown Court yesterday. 

It took the jury nearly five 
hours to acquit Detective 
Sergeant Graham Sayer, aged 
40 f of conspiring to cany out 
the robbery on a mail van at 
Aldershot, Hampshire in 
April 1985. 

Tbe jury could not agree a 
verdict on a charge of robbing 
a mail van of £300.000 in 
Mansfield, Nottinghamshire 
and was sent to a hotel for the 
night. 

The prosecution had alleged 


The offer, which amounts to their chapel (office branch). felled borough-wide.” 


Ruskin talks today on 
Times columnist 

By Howard Foster 

Tbe case of Mr David dom of staff and students to 
Selboume, the Ruskin College publish articles wherever the$ 
lecturer boycotted by his stu- chose, 
dents for writing an article for 

The Times, reaches a crucial . After tbe publication of his 
stage today when the college’s article in The Times on March 
Annual meeting is convened to 26, Mr Selboume has faced 
discuss his future. tbe boycott by militan t stu- 

Mr Sdbourne, a politics dents at Ruskin, which is 
lecturer, is to sue Ruskin for do m inated by tbe trade 
defamation and breach of unions, and has been censured 
contract after ir refused to for his action by the college's 
guarantee the academic free- executive committee. 



tiiat Det Sgt Sayer, an officer 
with Thames Valley Police, 
had teamed up with Roger 
Dennhardt to plan and carry 
out the two robberies in which 
a sawn-off shotgun, was used. 

Det Sgt Sayer, of Tilehurst, 
near Reading, Berkshire, had 
denied both charges. 

The court was told that he 
bad been given the task of 
“minding” Dennhardt aged 
37, when he decided to turn 
Queen's evidence- . 

His evidence led to Opera- 
tion Carter, a round-up of 
criminals involved in armed 
robberies. 


Reactor to 
shut down 

One of two nuclear reactors 
at Hmkley Point A atomic 
power station will be dosed 
before die end of the year fm- a 
safely inspection of two staad- 
pipes which have shown signs 
of corrosion (Onr Science 
Editor writes). 

The Central ■ Electricity 
Gen er a ting Board said yes- 
terday that as a matter of 
prudence it had decided to 
develop equipment and proce- 
dures to replace toe stand- 
pipes if this proved necess ar y. 

The board said other 
Magnox stations were being 
monitored, but there was no 
evidence tint any of toe other 
stations were affected by tins 
particular corrosion. 

Plans to extend the life of 
the Magnox stations from 25 
to 30 years remained m>- 


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.*-*.*■ , 

**.-. «.*“ ■,**' * » 

Hk!t- k'-> 

* *S* ’ ■ * ' 

„=* 3#*- 


must accept 


the challenge of Aids 


, says Runcie 


The Archbishop of Canier- 
ybury has challenged the hos- 
? pice organization to face up to 
. (he problems of caring for 
: terminally ill patients with 
. Aids. 

z Speaking. at a conference 
- held in London yesterday by 
;ihe voluntary organization. 
Help the Hospices. Dr Robert 
; Runcie said that hospices 
would need to look at the 
? whole range of medical and 
pastoral issues raised by Aids 
as well as less emotive ill- 
nesses. 


By JiD Sherman 

“I am sure this is something 
toe hospice movement. will be 
facing. I am sure they will face 
it as sensitively and coura. 
fieously as they have faced 
other challenges." 

- The hospice movement has 
bceo^ntirized by the Roy al 

claimed that hospices are 
rcfiisang to treat Aids patients 
for fear of losing private 
donations from those in the 
. local community. 

But Help the Hospices 
president. Dame Cicely 


Aids screening is 
called ‘senseless’ 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

Any plans by Britain or “We have to assna 
other crantries to screes for. when this is done, it is d 
eiga visitors for signs of Aids a more political or s j 
infection would be “senseless purpose. It does not * 
aim ineffective”, the World prevent transmission i 


expert on the disease said 
yesterday. 

Dr Jonathan Mann said the 
organization was strongly op- 
posed to sacb moves bat issned 
a wanting that sane countries 
introduce screening of 
foreigners for political or sym- 
bolic reasons. 

“At least a million people in 
the United States and an 
estimate of between 30,900 
and 50,000 people in the 
United Kingdom are infected 
with the Aids virns, "Dr Maun 
told European health affinals. 

“For countries Che these to 
to consider screens^ selec- 
tively people firm different 
parts of the worid in order to 
try to protect their own home 
populations from infection 
does not mate any sense and 
WHO is strongly opposed to 
it,” he said. 

“This of coarse does not 
mwm that some national 
health authorities will not take 
matters into then- own hands 
and pnmrahtote regulations 
that have no justification in 
terms of disease prevention. 


“We have to assume tom 
when this is done, if is done for 
a more political or symbolic 
purpose . It does not work to 
prevent transmission of this 
international disease.” - - 

Dr Mann was 
from Geneva oa a MtrfKte 
television broadcast ar range d 
by the United States Informa- 
tion Agency. He and two 
American experts on Aids 
answered questions from doc- 
tors and .researchers. 

- Government ministers and 
senior hMWi officials in 
Britam have discussed the 
possibility of screening over- 
seas visitors for signs, of Aids 
a ff ection, bat the proposal, 
prompted by concern about 
high levels of infection in some 
African states, received fittie 
support at a high-level meet- 
ing in Whitehall in September. 
• Insurance companies 
were accused by a senior 
immunologist yesterday of 
“driving Aids underground” 
by refusing n t wf f to those 
at risk from toe disease. 

Dr Graham Bird said toe 
companies* attitudes would 
disguise the true size of toe 
Aids epidemic and increase its 
spread because more people 
would avoid taking an Aids 
virus Mood test 


Mr John Mayor, Minister 
for Social Security, addressi n g 
the conference, provided little 
assurance that present prob- 
lems covering attendance 
allowances and individual 
care allowances for the termi- 
nally dl and their carers would 
be sorted out soon. 


The payments are now sub- 
ject to a six-month qualifying 
period but the hospice move- 
ment has argued that termi- 
nally ill people are often 
seriously ill for a few weeks or 
months but die before they 
qualify for benefit- - 

Mr Major also indicated 
that board and lodging pay- 
ments fin* those in nursing 
homes and some hospices 
were likely to rise shortly, for 
the third time in 18 months. 


Detective 

denies 

allegations 


Brent appeal on 
head next week 


By Stewart Tender 
Cote Reporter. . 

senior' Scotland Yard 


detective yesterday criticized 
Labour MPs for hiding behind i 
parliamentary privilege to ac- 
cuse him of corruption and 
claimed attacks against him 
were a repetition of malicious 
and unfounded a llegations. 

Det Supt Anthony Lundy, a 
member of the Yam’s special- 
ist unit investigating or- 
ganized crime, issued a 


statement yesterday after he 
was named by Mr Clive Soley, 
Labour MP for Hammer- 
smith. and Mr Christopher 
Smith. Labour MP for Isling- 
ton South, in an early day 
motion. 

The motion came after a 
World In Action programme 
on the relationship between 
Roy Garner, alleged, to be a 
leading London criminal, and 
the Yard. ■ 

Mr Peter Wright, Chief 
Constable ofSoutbY orieshire, 
has begun an investigation 
into the allegations made in 
the programme. ' . 

In his statement, Mr Lundy 
said he wished to reply to “the 
fa ta» allegations which have 
been made against me over 
the last few days. These are a 
repetition of malicious and 
unfounded allegations which 
have been going on for a 
number of years. They have 
already been investigated and 
1 have been fully exonerated.” 


* The appeal by Brent council 
in north London against .a 
High Court ruling on diset- 
plmary action against Miss 
Maureen McGctkhridc, - toe 
bead teacher accused of mak- 
ing a racist .remark, has been 
brought forward to Monday. 

The hearing was ar$mally 
scheduled for later in the 
month, but a new date was 
fixed yesterday after toe inter- 
vention of Sir John 
Donaldson, the Master of the 
Rolls. 

Miss McGoldrick, of Sud- 
bury Infants School, returned 
to a warm welcome from 


parents ' and children on 
Wednesday after her suspen- 
sion was lifted by the Labour- 
controlled council. 

Despite the move, the coun- 
cil is still pursuing legal action 
| against her. • - 

• The Brent council official at 
the centre of the race storm 
over the suspension of Miss 
i McGoldrick said yesterday 
; that she “absolutely stuck by” 
herdaim that the bead teacher 
l had objected to the appoint- 


By Staff Reporters 

ft councfl n^tofmore black teachers at 
gainst .a hex school ° 
on disci- - Miss SheJashSzulc, aged 31, 
ast Miss a staffing officer in Brent’s 
ick, . toe education department, said 
lofmak- she had been “shocked” when 
Iras been Miss McGoldrick made the 
don day. • remark. 

originally The two women were hav- 
- in toe ing a telephone conversation 
date was on July 17 about four va.- 
toe inter- cancies at the school Miss 
: John Szulc alkgcdhr offered the 
ter of toe services of Mr Sharoim Khan. 

Labour-controlled Brent 
, of Sud- council claims that the head 
returned teacher then said: “I do not 
lie from want more Wade teachers.” 
Iren on Miss McGoldrick has denied 
r suspeu- making- the remark and the 
s Labour- school’s board of- governors 
unanimously cleared her. 
the coux>- However, Miss Szulc said 
sal action yesterday: “There 1 is ab- 
solutely no question of my 
official at going back on what 1 have 
ce storm said: I absolutely stick by it 
i of Miss “When she made the re- 
yesterday mark I was obviously 
stuck by” shocked. As a council official 
td teacher I bada responsibility to report 
appoint- ft to a supervisor.” 


Publicity on 
teachers’ pay 
offer defended 


Backing for 
instruction on 
homosexuals 


Mr Lundy, a detective for 
more than 20 years, raid he 
had been responsible for the 
conviction of many leading 
criminals, including murder- 
ers and armed robbers. As well 

as having to withstand attacks 
on his integrity there had been 
intolerable intrusion at home 
from the media. 

The latest series of allega- 
tions, he said, “have taken 
different and sinister hues of. 

attack”. ‘ 

**The fact that MPS can 
irresponsibly make un- 
substantiated general allega- 
tions that I am corrupt whilst 
hiding behind pariiementaiy 
privilege is absolutely 
disgusting,'’’ be said. 


The Department of Educa- 
tion and Science yesterday, 
defended its decision to 
mount a £200,000 publicity 
campaign in all news- 

papers, setting out the details 
of Mr Kenneth Baker’s pro- 
posals on teachers* pay. 

Tbe advertisements ap- 
peared just before:, weekend 
talks between the teaching 
| muons and tbe local authority 
j employers. They gave details 
of the Secretary of State's 
plans for . salaries for October 
1987 A spokesman for the 
Department of Education said 
that it was money extremely 
well spent if it resulted in 
uninterrupted education for 
tbe nation's children. 

Yesterday was the fourth 
day of 'half-day strikes or- 
ganized. by toe National 

Union of Schoohnastos/- 

Union of Women Teachers. 


More titan: a third .of 
secondary school teachers ac- 
cept that homosexuality 
should be -presented as an 
acceptable way of living, 
according to a new poll 
The survey was conducted 
by MORI for The Times 
Educational Supplement 
Support for the Conser- 


vative Party in the secondary 
sectorhasfallen by 43 per cent 


sector has fallen by 43 per cent 
since May 1983- Now only 22 
per cent of teachers express 
support for tiie Tories! 


Although more than. 60 per 
snt bebeve that parents 


should help to determine toe 
contents of toe sex education 
curriculum, 70 per cent of 
teachers are distrustful of 
parents’ ability to explain tibe 


• MOftT interviewed a 
representative sample- of 520 
teachers in secoudary schools. 




HOME 


Saunders, has said that hos- 
pice accommodation pro- 
vided by the movement is sol 
always practical for Aids pa- 
tients, many of whom need 
intensive medical care. 

Yesterday the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, taking over 
from Dame Ocdy as presi- 
dent, praised her work and 
said that Help the Hospices 
was one of the' most hdpfoi 
and humane movements of 
the twentieth century. - . 

Aids ' was only one of the 
main issues which he and tbe 
movement would need to 
tackle^ he said. 

They would also need to 
look ax improving training of 
both teachers and volunteers 
and strengthen and expand 
existing folks between vol- 
untary hospices and the Na- 
tional Health Service. 

“I wffl do my best to 
advance these things in the 
new phase of onr work”. 

But the archbishop gave a 
warning of the consequences 
of ill-launched ' and inad- 
equately prepared services for 
the terminally ill and empha- 
sized the importance of co- 
operation, to avoid confusion 
over shortterm and long-term . 
goals. “Hospices that try to go 
it alone and too quickly are in' 
for trouble.” ' 






Lord Bfamdford (left) leaving court with his parents (Photograph: Peter Trievnor) 


Blandford gets final chance 


Lord Blandford was yes- 
terday given a two-year sus- 
pended prison sentence for 
possessing cocaine. 

He was also ordered to pay 
£2,000 dusts and put under a 
two-year supervision order. 

Judge Pownall was told at 
Kmghtsbridge Crown Court in 
London that Lord Blandford 
had been reduced to a “phys- 
ical and mwirtal wreck” by 


Lord Blandford, aged 30, 
has unsuccessfully tried to 
fight dregs before and has 

been in court three times since 
1983. However, toe judge said 
he ns con vin ced he conM 
combat Us addiction this time 
with the help of Iris family. 

Tbe judge heard evidence 
from • two drag a d d i c t ion 
specialists and said it was 
i»lMr to him there had been a 


chang e in Lord BtandfonTs 
life. 

He told him: “You are 
indeed qnte a different person 
to tbe one that was found in 

tfwt mbM haonnont flat in 

toe Edgware Road. 

“I shall assume that tbe 
change is not merely slrin 
deep, bat deep down too. 

“Many, of course, would say 
yon had yonr last chance last 
year or earlier this year and 
they may he right, bed I cannot 
for my part bring myself to 
deal with yon in a way which 
would reverse the obvious 
upward trend 

After sentence was passed 
Lord w«»»dih nd left the d<v-k 
to be embraced by his father, 
his sister, Henrietta, and other 
members of Ms family. 

Lord BfandfonTs drag habit 
began at wild parties in New 


York in tbe late 1970s and led 
to Ms father bousing him from 
Bl enheim Palace. 

At one stage be was spend- 
ing £300 a day on heroin, bat 
after being arrested at tbe end 
of last year he started working 
bard at kicking his fetoal 
habit 

Previous attempts had 
failed miserably, but his 
determination to succeed this 
time so impressed Ms father 
that there was a reconciliation. 


He Is now Bring at home 
and has Ms family's suppor t 
His earlier court appear- 
ances were in October 1983 far 
assaulting a pofice officer; 
possession of heroin and a 
burglary, which was in pursuit 
of drugs, hi April 1985 and in 
January 1986 for breaking a 
probation order. 


Solicitors 

support 

reforms 


By Frances Gibb 
•Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Proposals for abolishing the 
restrictions on solicitors’ 


rights to appear as advocates 
in some conns have won . 
overwhelming backing from 
among local law societies, i 
solicitors and legal academics. , 

The proposals are among a ! 
package of radical reforms i 
contained in the Law Society 
discussion paper. Lawyers ana I 
the Courts, which has been the 
subject of wide consultation. 

There is also widespread 
support in favour of a com- 
mon system of education and 


judicial appointments to be 
open to all lawyers. 

- The analysis of the 170 
replies, published by the Law 
Society yesterday, shews a 
two-to-one majority of those 
responding generally in favour 
of the proposals. Tbe pro- 
posals advocate wide-ranging 
reform of the legal profession 
and removal of restrictive 
practices distinguishing bar- 
risters and solicitors. 

But lawyers are split on 


some of the key suggestions: in 
particular . 38 respondents 


particular . 38 respondents 
specifically agreed with the 


proposal that there should be 
direct access to all lawyers: but 
18 disagreed. 

Almost as many disagreed 
with the statement “argu- 
ments in favour of toe present 
system are poor” as agreed; 
and. while 33 respondents 
agreed all lawyers should have 
a compulsory two or three- 
year period of training in a 
solicitor's office, 19 disagreed. 

The responses are to be 
submitted to the joint 
committee set up under Lady 
Maim - 

A draft response is expected 
to go to the Law Society 
Council in January. 


Getty rescues Dam Buster’s medals 


j paal Getty Jar came to toe 

rescue of toe ® 1S ^ S 
from his bed in toe London 
Clinic yesterday mrnng. 
Watching Breakfast T m y ea 
tekerisSo* be saw F&ht 
Lieutenant E B Chandler 
Mfluns about the medals he 
was setting at Sotheby's to 

raise funds for a mfflHHral to 

the 199 men of 617 Squadron, 
known as toe Da® Busters, 
who died fa the fast tiro y«« 
af the Second World War. M r 


By Gerald Nonnan, Sale Room Correspondent 


mentions during toe war, more 
fan throe times w W** 
were wwinaBy alfowed for 
each man. ' 


The medals were scheduled 
for sale at Sotheby’s yesterday 
afternoon with an estimate of 
£M0B£L*OO o« them. Mr 
Getty, reached far the phone 
and spoke toSotoeby’s. Him 
contt he contact Mr Chan- 
dler? He wanted to save him 
from setting Us medals 
Sotheby’s provided toe tele- 
phone number and a bemused 
Mr Chandler found himself 
miKng tff th» m nUhnaBomrire . 

-He made alternative offers; 

either he weald pay for Ate 
memorial which is expected to 
cost £20,000 and MrChandter 
coaM withdraw toe medals 
mat safe or he would top too 
Ugbesfvbid at Sotheby’s and 


buy toe medals back for him.. 
The memorial , is to be erected 
next year at WoodhaD Spa, 
liDcofoshhe, near tbe aero- 
drome where toe squadron was 
based- ' 

. Tbe first choice was derided 
on. Nearly all the funds re- 
quired had already been raised 
and Mr Getty has suggested 
that the fond rasas should 
offer to return the cheques. He 
was particularly moved by one 

pensioner who had sent a 
cheque for £25 and three post- 
dated cheques of £25 each — 
because that was all be could 
afford. A statement issued by 
Mr Getty yesterday says sim- 
ply: “This man^nted Ms 


medals and he should be able 
to keep them. Consider this 
gesture my red poppy for this 
year.” 

Mr Chandler was pleased 
but dearly disconcerted yes- 
terday afternoon. “I just can’t 
get over it,” he said. His nine 
Burials include the DFC and 
bar and the Russian Medal of 
Valour. 

Together with toe other 
three men hi toe crew of a 
Hampden bomber he spent 
nine days adrift is tbe Noth 
Sea in a small robber dinghy, 
without food ; or water, before 
they were seen. 

Sale room, pagelS 


Thatcher 
keeps out 
of battle 
with BBC 


By Phffip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Prime Minister refused 
yesterday to be drawn into the 
row between Mr Norman 
Tebbit and the BBC, as Mr 
Neil Kinnock and Mr James 
Callaghan, the former Labour 
prime minister, led an opposi- 
tion onslaught in tbe 
Commons. 

Mr Kinnock said that the 
BBC governors had now 
convincingly rebutted 39 of 
the 40 charges made by Mr 
Tebbit, whom he accused of 
blatant and obvious coercion. 

He called on Mrs Thatcher 
to say whether she agreed with 
Mr Tebbit or the governors. 
“Is Mrs Thatcher accepting 
Mr Tebbit’ s actions or reject- 
ing them, ” Mr Kinnock said. 

The Prime Minister said the 
governors had a special duty 
to see that the BBC charter, 
licence and agreement were 
upheld People were free to 
make complaints and n was 


— c Qold~~ \ 

Chance of 
a holiday : 
for family 


A housewife is the sole 
winner of yesterdafS Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mis Mavis Johnson, aged 
42, from Woibton in Notting- 
ham, has played toe Portfolio 
Gold game “off and on” since 
It started. 

“I am a bit shocke d, becau se 
rve never won anything 
before,” Mrs Johnson s aid . 
“Bnt I am happy.” 

Readers who wish to play 
tbe game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending s 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: Portfolio Gold, 

The Tunes, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BBI 6AJ- 




up to the governors to answer 
them. “Toe governors have 
made a reply and it is not for 
me to judge between them.” 

Mrs Thatcher’s reluctance 
to become embroiled in the 
dispute did not surprise 
Conservative MPs, who be- 
lieve she must be aware of 
some senior Conservatives’ 
concern about tbe det- 
erioration in relations with the 
corporation. 

Mr Callaghan bluntly asked 
her how long she intended to 
allow Mr Tebbit to go on 
“making a fool of the Gov- 
ernment”. 

Many Conservatives be- 
lieve Mr Tebbh's exercise has 
backfired on him, and that the 
BBC response was a convinc- 
ing one, despite his derision to 
renew his attack late on 
Wednesday. 

• Channel 4 Television is 
expecting charges of political 
bras from the left next 
Wednesday when h starts a 
six-part series that is said to be 
the most sustained attack on 
the welfare state ever shown 
on British television (Our 
Media Correspondent writes). 

The series. The New 



' "■ ‘ : - J M r , . 

Mrs Johnson was shocked 
bnt happy to win. 


Welsh public 
house is best 


restaurant 


Enlightenment is partially 
funded by the Reason 


Foundation, a right-leaning 
American political 

organization. 

Channel Four officials ex- 
pect the programmes to draw 
a vigorous reaction from 
unions and the Labour Party. 

Leading article, page 17 


A Welsh public house which 
has served .first class Italian 
food for toe post 23 years Is 
the Egon Ronay Cellnet Res- 
taurant of the Year. 

The award was won by toe 
Walmri Tree Inn, Llandevri 
Skirrid, Abergavenny, where 
Franco and Ann Tarnschfo 
serve Italian specialities such 
as bresaola (home cared beef) 
and hrodetto (fish casserole^ 
it was announced at a luncheon 
at the Dorchester Hotel 
London, yesterday. 

The Hotel of the Year 
Award went to toe Homewood 
Path Hotel, Freshford, neat 
Bath, a 15-bedroom country 
house hotel 


BobGeldof 

is turning again from famine 
to pop music. In this weeks 
Spectator John Mortimer 
asks the founder of Lave Aid 
about his improbable career. 

Is Geldof a strange 
emissary of God? Is he a 
foul-mouthed self-publicist? 

Or is he simply someone 
who has tried hard to do 
good? 

In this frank interview, 
Geldof explains his low 
view of politicians (despite 
a sneaking admiration for 
David Owen), his realism 
about the problems of hunger, 
and how he combines wild- 
ness with domesticity. 


-■ Mortimer 

a B ^quotes Geldof s ) 
"" ■ . anarchic lyrics ; 

back at him to see; 
0 how he reconciles \ 
M 1 them with the achieved 
ment of Live Aid. 

And, looking at his future in 
rock music, prompts Geldofs 
own question, “Is that it? ” 
Also in this weeks 
Spectator, Stephen Robinson 
reveals hovy the Conserva- 
tives sowed the seed for 
much of the chaos in Brents 
schools. Our Fine Arts special 
issue stretches from Rodin 
through grottoes to the 


auction rooms. 


And Alexander Chancellor 
recalls how his sister’s 200 
word solution to the Suez 


Crisis took him to Jamaica. 

The Spectator - the only 
solution - for only a pound 


THE 


'ficicDcyj 


. which; 
’ex, fee- 
tad rose 
owih in 
vas an 
LTujn- 
of the 
from 7 
ait aod 
entum. 
jgtes is 
where 
d mtt- 


10 mii-j 
exped- 
ited to 
udine 
which 
it not 
Is are 


areas 
nies- 
AZT , 
F £70 


ntedl 
rihel . 
ad tot • 
Shut- 1 
sver-J 
lead . j - 
■ctedi ; 
butt - 
well/ ; 
on. | 

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ndl 
in/ 
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: A - — i 1 1 bin AT' i • ao*f 


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•' --T \ : ; v> ;- 





HOME NEWS 


THE T1 


•R 7 1986 


November 6 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


Lawson tells MPs 
of big increase in 
public spending 


Mr Nigel Lawson. Chancellor of 
ihc Exchequer, in his autumn 
statement, said: Cabinet today 
agreed the Government's public 
expenditure plans for the next 
three years. 

In the normal course of events 
that would be followed by the 
publication of the printed au- 
tumn statement, accompanied 
by an oral statement to the 
House next Tuesday. For ob- 
vious reasons that is not pos- 
sible this year. 

So while the auihomn state- 
ment will be primed in the 
normal way and presented to 
Parliament as soon as the House 
reassembles next Wednesday. I 
thought it would be for the 
convenience of ibe House if 1 
made my oral statement today. 

This will cover all three of the 
key dements in the printed 
statement: the Government's 
outline public expenditure plans 

6 Non-oil tax 
revenues continue 
buoyant 9 

for each of the next three years 
and the expected outturn for this 
year, proposals for next year's 
national insurance contribu- 
tions; and the forecast of the 
economic prospects for 1987 
required by the 1975 Industry 
Act. 

The foil text of the economic 
forecast, together with the pub- 
lic expenditure figures and the 
rest of the information cus- 
tomarily published with this 
statement will be available as 
soon as I have sat down. They 
will also appear in the printed 
autumn statement to be pub- 
lished next week. 

I mm first to the outturn for 
the current financial year. 1986- 
87. 

The public expenditure plan- 
ning total now looks likely to 
amount to almost £140.5 bil- 
lion, £1.25 billion, ora little less 
than 1 per cent above what was 
allowed for in this year's Public 
Expenditure White Paper. The 
main reason for this excess is a 
9 per cent rise in the current 
spending of local authorities — 
far more than was provided for. 

However, other items on the 
expenditure side, the largest of 
which is debt interest, are likely 
to fall short of what was forecast 
at the time of the Budget, thus 
reducing the total ovemm on 
the expenditure side to about 
£0.5 billion. 

On the receipts side, the 
North Sea lax take is likely to be 
even lower, by about £! billion, 
than I envisaged at the time of 
the Budget- largely because fora 
long period the oil price has 
been below the $ 1 5 a barrel level 
on which the Budget arithmetic 
was explicitly based. 

This shortfall, however, is 
more than offset by the continu- 
ing buoyancy or non-oil tax 
revenues, in particular value- 
added tax and corporation tax. 
Non-oil revenues now look 
likely to exceed the Budget 
forecast by £2 billion. This 
would imply a net ovemin on 
the receipts side of about £1 bil- 
lion. rather more than that on 
the expenditure side. 

But this will be reduced by a 
change I propose to make to the 
North Sea fiscal regime. 

The collapse of the oil price 
■ has led to a sharp cutback in 
investment activity in the North 

6 Oil price coliapse 
has reduced North 
sea investment 9 

Sea. with inevitable con- 
sequences for the UK offshore 
supplies industry both in Scot- 
land and the North East of 
England. 

1 therefore propose, on a 
carefully targeted basis, to accel- 
erate the arrangements for the 
repayment to the oil companies 
of advance petroleum revenue 
tax due to them. 

The details of this change, 
which will require legislation 
early in the new session of 
Parliament, are set out in a press 
.notice which the Inland Rev- 
enue will be issuing as soon as I 
have sat down. The new 
arrangements will have a rev- 
enue cost this financial year of 
some £300 million which will be 
fully recouped over the next 
three years. 

Taking this into account, the 
public sector borrowing re- 


quirment for the current year is 
still forecast to be about £7 bil- 
lion. the figure 1 set in the 
Budgct 

I turn now to public expen- 
diture plans for die next three 
years. 

Since 1982-S3. public spend- 
ing. both before and after 
deducting the proceeds of 
privatization, has b cc cn decitng 
as a proportion of national 
output. It is set to be lower still 
this year. 

The Government is deter- 
mined to ensure that this trend 
continues; to see to it that total 
public spending, even without 
taking account of privatization 
proceeds, continues to decline 
as a percentage of GDP. 

Plans I am about to announce 
for the next three years secure 
that objective. Indeed they show 
that by the end of the period the 
ratio of public spending to 
national output will be bock to 
the level of foe early 1970s. 

But within this overall con- 
straint. and in the context of its 
policy priorities, the Govern- 
ment has felt it right to allow an 
increase in the previously an- 
nounced planning totals for 
1987-88 and 1988-89. 

Co m pared with the prospec- 
tive outturn for the coming year, 
we are now planning for an 
average growth in the public 
expenditure planning total of 
about 1 V* per cent a year in real 
terms, well within foe prospec- 
tive growth of the economy as a 
whole: 

The new planning totals have 
thus been set at £148.5 billion 
for 1987-88 and £154.25 billion 
in 1988-89. an increase of 
£4.75 billion and £5.5 billion 
respectively over the totals pre- 
viously published- Fen* 1989-90 
the planning total has been set at 
£161.5 billion. 

As usual, these totals incor- 
porate estimates for the pro- 
ceeds of privatization. 

Last year I increased foe 
estimate of these proceeds very 

6 We are leaving 
scope for spending on 
services 9 

substantially to £4.75 trillion in 
each of the three survey years, a 
figure which I expect to be duly 
achieved this year. Although foe 
privatization programme is now 
moving ahead more strongly 
than ever before, I have decided 
to make only a modest further 
adddition to this estimate, 
bringing it to £5 billion in each 
of foe next three years. 

The new planning totals also 
contain substantial reserves ris- 
ing from £3.5 billion in 1987-88 
to £7.5 billion 1989-90. 

The public expenditure in- 
creases I have announce allow 
us to make realistic provision 
both for local authority current 
expenditure over which the 
Government has no direct con- 
trol. and demand-led pro- 
grammes such as social security, 
while still leaving scope for 
increased speeding on services 
to which the Government atta- 
ches particular priority. 

But before referring to some 
of the more important changes 
let me make one thing ab- 
solutely dear. There can be no 
question of allowing foe pro- 
jected increases in public expen- 
diture over foe next two years to 
undermine foe prudence of the 
Government’s overall fiscal 
stance. The Government’s fiscal 
stance has been dearly set out in 
foe medium-term financial 
strategy published at the time of 
this year's Budget. There will be 
no relaxation of that stance. 

Within the totality of public 
expenditure, the largest increase 
is for foe local authorities, 
whose current spending next 
year is now put at £4 trillion 
above foe previous provision. 

This is pail reflate the feet 
that foe previous plans simply 
carried forward foe same level 
of cash spending as in 1986-87. 
At the same time we are 
increasing next year's aggregate 
Exchequer grant — a contribu- 
tion that taxpayers make to local 
government spending — by al- 
most 10 percent over this year's 
settlement, a rise of almost 
£1.5 billion. 

These substantial sums dem- 
onstrate in particular the prior- 
ity the Government is giving to 
education which, including foe 
new proposals on pay and 
conditions of service for teach- 
ers announced last week, ac- 


Reform plan for 
EEC food aid 

By Bichard Evans, Political Correspondent 


Britain is on the verge of 
persuading its EEC partners 
to agree to a radical reform of 
the Community's £330 mfl- 
lion-a-year food-aid package 
for developing countries. 

After a hectic bout of shuttle 
diplomacy between European 
ca pitals, Mr Christopher Pat- 
ten, the recently appointed 
Minister for Overseas De- 
velopment, is increasingly con- 
fident that he will win support 
is Brussels next week for new 
measures which will: 

• Cut the finks between food 
aid and the common agri- 
cultural policy so that de- 
veloping countries get help 
they need, rather than surplus 
food that Europe wants to get 
rid of 

• Remove bureaucratic red 
tape to make emergency food 
aid more effective 

9 Achieve better value for 
money for the EEC and 
developing countries. 

The EECs attempts to help 
countries struck by famine 
have been repeatedly criti- 
cized, especially as the aid 
policy was originally used as a 


way of cutting European food 
mountains, and not necessar- 
ily providing developing co- 
untries with foe help they 
wanted. 

Mr Patten, who will chair a 
meeting of foe Community's 
development council next 
Tuesday, flew to Boon yes- 
terday to see his West German 
counterpart. 

The new food-aid policy 
would mean a larger propor- 
tion of foe budget bring used 
for direct funding of agri- 
cultural projects in developing 
countries. The EEC would 
also boy more food from 
developing countries with sur- 
pluses and ship it to nations in 
need, rather than automati- 
cally sending them surplus 
European food. 

Areas affected by famine 
would also be allowed to sell 
mm anted EEC food and use 
foe money to relieve hanger. 
Emergency food aid, which 
has sometimes resulted in help 
arriving more slowly than 
normal, would also be over- 
hauled. 


counts for about the increase in 
provision. There is also, a 
su bstantial increase in provision 
for the police. 

On top of the increased 
provision for the cost of educa- 
tion in schools, which is con- 
tained within local authority 
current spending, there will be 
additional spending on the 
universities of £60 million in 

1987- 88 and £70 million in 

1988- 89. 

Spending on the health and 
personal social services will be 
increased by £600 million. For 
the national heath service alone, 
the increase in England amounts 
to over £300 million a year. 
Combined with the additional 
resources be in g generated by 
greater efficiency, this wiD not 
only enable the health service to 
cope wity foe growing number 
of elderly patients but will also 
allow it to improve services. 

Gross provision for housing 
investment is being increased by 
£450 million. This will sustain 
the rising trend of spending on 
loval authority renovation and 
improvements and provide 
additional resources for the 
housing associations. 

In the light os this year’s 
experience, £1.75 billion has 
been added to next year's pro- 
vision for social security, most 
of which represents a greater 
expected expenditure on exist- 
ing means-tested benefits. 

Provision for investment in 
roads is being increased by 
£65 million next year and 
£75 million foe year after, 
mostly for local authority roads. 

For defence, the provision 
remains as planned in the last 
White Paper after allowing for 
minor changes, including a 
reduction in the estimated cost 
of the Falkiands deployment. 
The defence programme will 
continue to benefit from foe 
substantial real growth in pre- 
vious years and foe wide-rang- 
ing action to improve efficiency 
and value for money. 

Taking all programmes to- 
gether. the additions to planned 
capital expenditure amount to 
getiiimonforf} billion in 1987- 
88. of which about two-thirds is 
local authority spending. 

Further details of these and 
other changes will be contained 
in the printed autumn statement 
which wifl he published as soon 
as the House returns next week. 
In addition, full details, together 
with information on running 
costs and manpower, will be 
given in the Public Expenditure 
White Paper early in the new 
year. 

I now turn to national insur- 
ance contributions. 

The Government have con- 
ducted the usual autumn review 
of contributions in the light of 
advice from foe Government 
Actuary on foe prospective in- 
come and expenditure of the 
national insurance fund, and. 
taking account of the benefit 
uprating which the Secretary of 
State for Soria! Services an- 
nounced on Oct 22. 

The lower earnings limit will 
be increased next April to £39 a 
week, in line with foe single 
person's pension, and the upper 







» 




BALL0T 

BOX 


ETFUSSR* - 

earnings limit will be similarly 
raised to £295 a week. 

The limits for the reduced rale 
bands which 1 announced in last 
year’s Budget will also be in- 
creased again in April, but by 
proportionately larger amounts. 
The upper limit for foe 5 per 
cent and 7 percent bands will be 
raised to £65 a week and £100 a 
week, respectively, and the up- 
per limit for the 9 per cent rate 
for employers win be raised to 
£1 50a week. 

The tarqrayer’s contribution 
to the National Insurance Fund 
— the so-called Treasury Supple- 
ment — will be reduced by 2 per 
cent to 7 per cent but this will 
not require any change in 
contribution rates. Thus foe 
main Class I contribution rates 
will once again remain un- 
changed at 9 per cent for 
employees and 10.45 per cent 
for employers. 

Finally, I turn to the Industry 
Act Forecast. 

Both growth and in Cation 
have turned out to be slightly 
lower this year than 1 envisaged 
at foe time of foe Budget. 
Growth now looks like turning 
out at 2*6 per cent, against a 
Budget forecast of 3 per cent 
and inflation in foe fourth 
quarter of this year is likely to be 
Vh per cent, against the Budget 
forecast of 316 per cent. 

The principal reason for this 
slower growth has been the 
disappointing performance of 
exports, which were hard hit by 
the cutback in spending by Qpec 
and other primary producers 
affected by foe sharp fell in 



Kinnock Picture of North 

‘far too gloomy’ 


to wear 
red poppy 

By Angella Johnson 

Mr NeU Kinnock, the La- 
bour leader, 1ms joined in the 
dispute over white poppies 
being included at Remem- 
brance ceremonies and has 
refused to wear one. 

The Peace Pledge Union 
seat white poppies for him and 
his wife Glenys to wear at the 
Cenotaph ceremony on Sun- 
day. but Mr Bannock says he 
will wear a red one. 

In a letter to the muon, he 
said: “As someone who has 
neither parifist convictions nor 
militarist views, I shall be 
weariHg the red poppy for 
Remembrance. 

“Those who attack the red 
poppy disregard its history 
and its sincerity and invite the 
danger of reducing Remem- 
brance itself to a pointless 
colour dispute.” 

Supporters of white poppies 
plan to hold their own cere- 
mony in memory of all those 
who died in wars, after the 
traditional morning service at- 
tended by members of the 
Royal Family 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Mr Peter Morrison, tire 
deputy chairman of the 
Conservative Party, yesterday 
accused the “chattering cla- 
sses” of painting a mislead- 
ingly gloomy picture of the 
North. 

Their “maddening" out- 
pourings overlooked the fact 
that the spirit of enterprise in 
the region rivalled, if not 
surpassed that in the Sooth. 

They also adopted a “pa- 
tronizing" attitude towards 
northerners, regarding them 
as still wearing dogs. 

Mr Morrison, MP for the 
City of Chester, who was 
appointed to his present post 
at Central Office in the 
September reshuffle, singled 
out the denizens of London 
SW1 and the people who wrote 
for The Guardian for his 
rebuke, delivered while cam- 
paigning in the Knowsley 
North by-efection mi Mer- 
seyside. 

“What I fiiMi aggravating is 
tfiarf ritf rhaHw mg rhww talk 

about the North-South. And 
the North-South is nothing to 


do with what actually happens 
in this part of the world. 

“Entrepreneurial enter- 
prise, vigom and energy, 
which is m this put of die 
country, is every bit as good, if 
not better than, what happens 
in tire leafy glades of Sussex, 
Surrey and Kent 

Mr Stan Orrae, Labour's 
chief energy spokesman, re- 
peated his party’s promise to 
bring in a £5-a-week across- 
the-board winter feel payment 
for pensioners aad those living 
on supplementary benefit or 
unemployment benefit. 

He sakt “Last year a large 
number of people in Britain 
died Grom hypothermia. It is 
nonsense teat peole should be 
under that sort «S strain in an 
energy-rich nation. 

Meanwhile,. Mr George 
Howarth, the strikes Labour 
candidate for next week’s by- 
election, was still m hospital 
suffering from a slipped disc. 
General election: R Kilroy-Sflk 
(Lab), 24,949; A Birch (Q, 
7,758; B McColgan (SDP/AU), 
5,715; J Simons (WRP), 246. 
Labmaj; 17,191. 


commodity prices in general 
and foe oil price in particular. 

Combined with a halving in 
the value of oar own oil exports, 
this has meant a significant 
deterioration in the current 
account of the balance of pay- 
ments, from a surplus of some 
£3.5 billion in 1985. and a 
cumulative surplus of £21 bil- 
lion over the six years from 1980 
to 1985 inclusive, to a forecast 
of broad balance for 1986. 

Looking ahead to 1987, the 
prospects are generally 
encouraging. 

While the necessary adjust- 
ment of foe exchange rate to the 
oil-price collapse has now taken 
place, it will inevitably take time 
before the full benefits come 
through in higher non-oil ex- 
ports and lower import growth. 
This means we can expect the 
current account of the balance of 
payments to go into deficit next 
year, for foe first time since 

9 Cash for defence 
remains as 
planned 9 

1979. to foe tune of some 
£1.5 billion. . 

Even so. non-oil exports are 
forecast to rise next year by 
5% per cent compared with an 
increase of only I per cent this 
year, with manufacturing out- 
put, in consequence, up by 4 per 
cent. And, with domestic de- 
mand. continuing to expand at 
the same rate as this year, the 
economy overall is likely to 
grow be a further 3 percent next 
year, foe sixth successive year of 
steady growth at an average 
annual rate of almost 3 percent 

Recorded inflation is likely to 
edge up a little, to 3% per cent in 
the fourth quarter of 1987. This 
is almost entirely due to the 
effect on foe RPI of foe tuning of 
mortgage-rate changes. The 
Government's commitment to a 
monetary policy that will 
squeeze out inflation remains 
I unabated- 

Meanwhile, the tikriybood of 
fester growth next year, coming 
at a time when unemployment 
already appears to have stopped 
rising, suggests that the pros- 
pects for some fell in unemploy- 
ment are now more promising. 
But this promise could stOl be 
frustrated by excessive pay 
settlements. 

The strategy we have fallowed 
since 1979 has brought inflation 
down to foe lowest level for two 
decades, combined with sus- 
tained growth and steadily rising 
living standards. This is a 
combination that has eluded 
successive governments for a 
generation. We have brought it 
about by the determined pursuit 
of free markets and sound 
money. And that is what we win 
stick to. 


Tories swerving 

and skidding, 
r. laims Hattersley 


Much Of the Govenunent's pel- 

ley for almost cSgftt yro ro.hM 
been designed to bold down 
interest rates . Yet to day real 
i in w wt rates were not ont y tne 
is this county's history 
jnathe highest in the iarfns- 

seven years Britain hut toss 
more jobs than S»»wt **** 
EEC combin e d , Mr Roy Hat- 
tersley (BfamtoffeMb Spayfc- 
brook. Lab), chirf Opposition 

spokesman on Tiawy ana 

economic affairs, said. 

He was a* anug a mooes 
f o n d^wming the Government** 

coatiaaed operation of economic 

htotera Me 

levefe of nnemploymeiit, promb- 

itive interest rates, ents in pobfic 
sector capital spending, due 
destruction of 6 n nation^ 
manufacturing base anna sen- 
ms loss of the British share in 
world trade. 

It called on the Government to 


WmM lucuphiyinrot be 
down to force ari&fea by Che next 
general election? When would 
foe namber of jofcsoeal interest 
nte and n re n ufacinring output 
and investment be back to the 
1979 level? WoaM the balance 
of payments be in sorpfas or 


Thatcher 
refuses to 
be drawn 

PRIME MINISTER 


The Prime Minister refused to 
be drawn by Mr Nefl Khmoclc. 
Leader of foe Opposition, into 
malting a judgement between 
complaints by Mr Norman 
Tebbit about foe BBC's cover- 
age of the Libya bombing and 
the governors' response. 

Mr Kinnock, during Prime 
Minister's questions, recalled 
that Mrs Thatcher had told him 
on Tuesday that it was for the 
governors of the BBC to reply to 
the attacks made by Mr Tebbit, 
chairman of foe Conservative 
Party. 

“Now that the governors have 
convincingly rebutted 39 out of 
foe 40 charges made by him, 
does the Prime Minister agree 
with them or with him? 

Mrs Thatcher: It is for the 
governors to- answer the com- 
plaints (Opposition laughter). 
Perhaps Mr Kinnock will rec- 
ognize that freedom of speech 
involves also the freedom to 
make complaints. 

Mr Kinnock: The governors of 
foe BBC have discharged their 
duty to freedom which is more 
than can be said for the Prime 
Minister. 

Mrs Thatcher retorted that, 
bearing in mind Mr Kinn ode's 
Labour authorities which tried 
to restrict foe circulation of free 
newspapers, “he is hardly in a 
position to make complaints 
himself 1 . 

Mr Janies Callaghan (Cardiff 
South and Penarth, Lab), former 
Prime Minister, asked how 
much longer foe Prime Minister 
intended to allow Mr Tebbit go 
on making a fool of foe 
Government? 

Mrs Thatchen He joins Mr 
Kinnock in making effective use 
of freedom of speech 
Mr Peter Snape (West Brom- 
wich. East, Lab): Wifl she speak 
to Mr Tebbit, asking him to 
moderate his intemperate at- 
tacks on the BBC? 

Mrs Edwina Currie MP 
makes almost nightly appear- 
ances on foe media. Will the 
Prime Minister ask her to do 
two things: Make sure a red 
warning triangle is exhibited, 
and second to curb her appear- 
ances before / start believing 
that foe BBC is biased against 
foe Conservative Party. 

Mrs Thatcher: I am delighted 
that he and so many other on 
that side have so few complaints 
about the economy that they 
concentrate on such trivia 


had foiled and to replace it with 
policies for At real economy 
which p ro mo ted investment, 
growth, e mp l oym e nt and ex- 
ports. , _ , 

He said anyone who beard 
today's st atemen t by foe Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer womd 
that foe Government was 
certainly not steering the same 
coarse as Inst year. It was 
steering no steady corase at aB- 

Pait of the reason for foe 
swerving and s ki ddin g was the 
result of foe new amtngaities 
over the mid-twin finiiwi il 
strategy. The Chancellor said 
A'w was still in place, hot that 
view was not accepted anywhere 
outside tire House. The strategy 
was either mortally wounded or 
dead, and so it should be. 

It was bralt around the im- 
plicit faith font rigorous fiscal 

and monetary policies inevitably 

fed to solutions of the problems 
of foe real economy. That was 
dearly not so. 

If in 1979 foe BBC had 
prerficted that the resritof sewn 
years of Conservative Gevent- 
meot would be record anemptoy- 
i MMt an) real interest rates, a 
collapse in the balance of pay- 
ments aad a net job less iff two 
milli on foe f hal ra ap of foe 
Conservative Party would have 
accused the corporation at Bol- 
shevik bias. 

The Government's feiisrc was 

foe Chancellor’s personal fail- 
ure. Although he said font 
o utpu t was at its highest level, 
afl that meant was font foe 
country was no longer doing 
worse than in foe day foe 
Conservatives were elected. 

“We are still doing spectacu- 
larly badly. Since 1979, the 
economy has expanded at an 
average of 1.4 per cent. In the 
jueYhxis30years,it was 2j6 per 

cent." 

A combination of expanding 
world trade and a boom in 


Chancellor 

cautious 


The P ri me Minister had 
promised m 1979 to cr eate foe 
rr^j***” for read jobs so that 
prodarts streamed from foe 
fortunes and workshops white 
the iiintprarn of foe world 
scrambled ever each other. 

“She has done foe exact 
opposite. Unemployment has 
risen by two ndfion. The fac- 
tories and workshops are 
starved of investment and have 
gone into li qu i da tion in record 
mashers. I do not bel i eve that 
the Prime Minister ever made a 
more cynical p ro mis e or ever 
broke her word more cynically." 
• Mr NM Lawson. Chancellor 
of foe Exchequer, moved an 
amendment to the Opposition 
oration congmalntiag the Gov- 
ernment aa foe success of its 
economic policies which had 
h nrwghT down to its 

lowest level for two decades, 
combined with sntfaferd eco- 
■amfcflrewth, a mfitfea new jobs 
created since 1983, steadily 
tiring firing standar ds and 
record levels of investment. 

He said foe c om ing year 
wmdd be yet another year of 
steady p i ogess with healthy 
economic growth and lew infla- 
tion. That steady progress 
seemed n hat at routine aad was 
now takes for granted. Yet h 
represented a remarkable tan 
arou nd h ecaase not so tong ago 
they were Hr hi tin g whether 
there could be sastalnH) eco- 
noTOC growth without a damp 
mgr EBCffeSSP ee* 

OB prices had halved since 
this time last year aad Britain 
had therefore lost half its 00 
r e ven u es and half the tahe of its 
oB exports. Yet pabfic borrowing 
remahwd an track and that was 
a rem ar ka ble achit mm eat 

Britain had been able to 
weather foe cofiapse in 00 prices 
becaase of foe aaderiymg 
strength and resHfewce of its 
economy 


45% pass 
test at 


onEMS first time 


The balance in argument had 
shifted considerably, bat the 
Government had not yet de- 
cided that the time was ripe for 
Britain to join the European 
Monetary System, Mr Nupd 
Lawson, Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, said during question 
time exchanges. 

Asked what recent dis- 
cussions he had had with the 
president of the Bundesbank 
about sterling's relationship 
with the EMS exchange rate 
mechanism, he replied that he 
had discussed the EMS with the 
president on several occasions. 
Mr Robert Madaora (Caith- 
ness and Sutherland, SDPk 
Does he accept that if his 
import-inducing consumer 
boom continues, sterling may 
come under pressure again? In 
that eventuality would it not be 
better to cover himself within 
foe exchange-rate mechanism 
than rely upon the uncertain 
bounty of the Bundesbank? 

Mr Lawson: There is much to be 
said for joining the EMS frilly, 
but one of those reasons is not 
foe soft option which he is 
implying. 

Mr Robert Sheldon (Ashton- 
tmder-Lyne. Lab): Everyone 
knows of foe differences be- 
tween the Chancellor and the 
Prime Minister on joining foe 
exchange-rate mechanism. 

In this instance, perhaps 
uniquely, foe Prime Minister 
may be right. 

Mr Lawson: He is e x t rem ely 
percipient in noting that if we 
were to join sterling would be 
linked to the Deutschmark- 


Labour praise for 
hospitals clause 

The following is a summary of day for cockroaches. Hospitals 
Wednesday's National Health were supremely dangerous 
Service debate in the Commons, places, frill of germs and viruses 
Had - it not been fra foe and sick people who were 
outbreak of salmonella poison- particularly susceptible. . 
mg at the Stanley Royd Hospital Until foe Lords exercised its 
near Wakefield, foe Govern- force majeure the Government 
ment would not have come intended only to lift Crown 
forward with legislation to re- immunity from kitchens. The 
move Crown immunity from well informed cockroach would 
hospitals and other National simply have moved from 


Frank Dobson, an Opposition 
spokesman on health, said in the 
Commons. 

Speaking in a debate on a 
Lords new clause to the Na- 
tional Health Service (Amend- 
ment) BiU, be said that nothing 
could bring back the people who 
died, but many of those in- 
volved would girt at least some 
satisfaction from the thought 
that as a result of what happened 
at that hospital measures were at 
long last being taken which 
should seriously reduce the 
possibility of such an outbreak 
happening again. 

Mr Antony Newton, Minister 
for Health, welcomed the new 
clause, which removed Crown 
immunity from ail parts of 
hospitals and other NHS 
premises and not just kitchens 
as had been proposed in the Bill 
originally. It was an entirely 
sensible move. 

Mr Dofesee raid this was a bad 


The environmental health 
officers reported to the DHSS 
that 60 per cent of 1,000 hos- 
pital kitchens inspected had 
been in breach of regulations 
and 97 would have been pros- 
ecuted had the power to pros- 
ecute been there. 

It was estimated that to do up 
the kitchens property at St 
Thomas’s H ospital. London, 
would cost £1.500,000. The 
House needed to know whether 
the Government had made any 
estimate of the costs arising 
from the Lords amendment and 
if so what additional funds it 
proposed to provide to help 
authorities so that they could 
protect themselves from pros- 
ecution. 

Mr Jack Ashley (Stoke on 
Trent South. Lab) said that the 
clause was a landmark in foe 
battle to erase Crown immunity 
from all establishments. 

The Dew dause was agreed to. 


Forty five per cent of ca n di d ates 
pass their driving tests first 
time, seconding to the results of 
a sample survey conducted last 
year. Mr Peter Bottorafey, 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Transport said. 

But, he told Mr Ric har d Holt 
(Langbaurgfa. C) in a Commons 
written answer, the information 
was not co l lect e d routinely. 

He also said there were no 
plans to introduce motorway 
driving tests. The present test 
provided an adequate assess- 
ment of a candidates basic 
driving skills. 

“There is no evidence that 
newly qualified drivers are in- 
volved disproportionately in 
motorway accidents. Safety in 
general is much better for 
motorways than other roads”, 
he said. 

Investment up 

Investment in manufacturing 
rose by nearly 6 per cent last 
year and further growth was 
expected fra 1986, Mr Geoffrey 
Pattie, Minister fra Information 
Technology, said in a Commons 
written answer to Mr Martin 
Flannery (Sheffield. Hills- 
borough, Lab). 

£80.5bn assets 

Net overseas assets have in- 
creased more than sixfold to 
£80.5 billion since the abolition 
of exchange controls, Mr Ian 
Stewart, Economic Secretary to 
the Treasury, said in a Com- 
mons written answer. They are 
generating income of more than 
£4 billion a year for the benefit 
of foe UK economy, he told Mr 
Roy Galley (Halifax, C). 

Fugitive law 

L egi s la ti on for extradition law 
reform would be introduced in 
the next session of Parliament, 
Mr David Meflor, Undersec- 
retary of State. Home Office, 
said in a Commons written 
answer. 

EEC deficit 

There had been a deficit of 
£10 billion in United Kingdom 
trade with foe European Com- 
munity in the 12 months ended 
in September, but a surplus of 
£5.5 billion in trade with the 
rest of the world, Mr Alan 
dark. Minister of State for 
Industry, said in a Commons 
written reply. 

Price rules 

The Government will introduce 
legislation as soon as par- 
liamentary time allows on prod- 
uct liability and mislead in g 
price indications and an a 
general safety standard. Mb' 

John Botcher, Under-Secretary 

.of State for Trade and Industry, 
sakl in a Commons written 
answer. Regulations would also 
be introduced to implement the 
European Community Direc- 
tive on misleading advertising, 
he said. 


Parliament today 

Commons (930) and Lords 
(930): Prorogation. 


GBBsnet spending bad caused 
imports to rite Mt ta emt faster 

cate. 

The OkaneeUar never told the 
whole mA, larfafori y in (he 
fields «T trade, exports and 
Imports. 

-The Chancellor wflB my 
a ny thing to art out of a critical 
corner. Trapped in a stoking 
be always throws Us 
integri ty o * erb a and and we bear 
foe splash ahnoster ooce." 

North Sea eB was raetog oat. 
Every tnae foe markets ought a 
of what the British 
economy would be like when the 
08 was gene, they withdrew theft ^ 






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■* Th* Treasury is expecting 

* an upturn in growth in the 
economy next year, led a pfr n 

M consumer pending. 

Inflation is forecast to stay 
v under 4 per cem fort foe 

■ balance of payments will be in 
. deficit next year, for the first 

tune since 1979. 

■ The current account deficit 
! u Jfle main new feature of the 

official forecast, which the 

- Treasury is required to pub- 
lish twice a year under the 

- terms of the 1975 Industry 

ACL J 

At the time of die Budget in 
March, the prediction was for 
. a current account surplus of 
‘ £3.5 billion this year. Now, the 
; surplus is put at zero for 1986, 
running into a deficit of £ 1.5 
: billion Tor next year. 

- The deterioration in 

- Britain's external position, the 
' Treasury said, was due to the 

* fell in oil prices, the strength 
of DoiHiil imports and the 
disappointing performance, 

. until recently, of British 
exports. 

- Those factors, notably the 
; performance of exports, are 

- expected to move gradually 
bade into Britain’s favour next 
year. However, continued 
strong growth in consumer 

. spending, expected to rise by 4 
« per cent next year after S per 
: cent this year, will continue to 

- suck in imports. 

That has been a key fector 

* behind the sharp worsening of 


By David Smith, Economics Editor 
ECONOMIC PROSPECTS 


Forecast Average errors 
from past 
forecasts 

1988 1987 


A Output and e xp endi tu re at 
constant 1980 prices (% change) 
Domestic demand 
of which: 

Consumers' expemfitura 
General go ve rn me nt consumption 
. Fixed divestment 
Change in stockbtdkGng (% GDP) 

- Exports of goods and services 
Imports of goods ami services 
Gross do me stic product: 

Total 

Manufa cturing 

B Balance of payment* 

Current Account (Qm) 

C i nflati o n 
Retail prices index 
(% change 04 to 04) 


(% change on prev yr) 

D Moray GDP at market prices 

CX> change on prev yr) . 

the current account in recent 
months. Some outride fore- 
casters are expecting a current 
account deficit of £6 billion 
next year. 

Oil prices are assumed to 
average $15 a band next year 
and growth in the big seven 
economies to pick up from 2.5 
to 3 percent 


35 

35 

1.0 

5.0 

.-4J) 

135 

1.5 


to 

9 JO 

2.5 

235 

0 

05 

075 

1.0 

3.0 

20 

£L0 

AS 

30 

ZJ5 

3.Q 

.75 

0. 

4j0 

25 

0 

-1.5 

3.0 

335 

3.75 

235 

*88-7 

>87-8 


3.0 

3.75 

20 

55 

7J> 

1.75 


Export markets for Britain’s 
manufactures are expected to 
rise by 4 J per cent, and export 
volume as a whole by 3 per 
•cent, compared with an im- 
port volume increase of 4.5 
peroenL 

Mr Nigel Lawson, the 
Chancellor, said in his state- 
ment that both growth and 


Public spending up £7.5bn 


Public expenditure plans 
announced yesterday show 
significant increases in most 
areas. Spending for next year, 
1987-88, is now planned to be 
£7.5 bflXida hi gher than fin- 
plied at the time of the fast 


By Our Economics Correspondent 


Use Chancellor of the Ex- 
- chequer disclosed that the 
Government has failed to con- 
trol public spending this year, 
in spite of toe advantage of 
; fower-toan-expected inflation. 

The public spending planning 
J total is put at £I4fe4bflIion for 
the ament year, £13 bfflioa 
■p oa the original target. 

However, toe main in- 
creases are far the Liter years. 
Hie planning trial next 'year, 
1987-88. fa now targeted at 
£148.6 billion, compared with 
£143.9 bflfion at Bndget-tune. 

Public expenditure plans 


In addition, the Chancellor 
has reduced toe reserve from 
£63 billion to £33 fafltim and 
added an extea £250 udIBon to 
sales of state assets. 

Those three changes add up 
to ao- additional £73 billion of 
speeding. There is au extra 
£1.7 billion on social security, 
£23 billion on education, £630 
milli on for health and £460 
million for the Department of 
Energy. 

Local authority spending for 
the rate support grant is put at 
£4UIKoii. 

. In the fallowing year, 1988- 
89, the pfamuha tote! far 
pnfelic spending fa . raised by 
£53 bflfion to £1543 Mffion, 
and In 1989-90 toe target fa 
£1613 boson. 

The new targets mark an 
abrupt change in government 


policy. Until yesterday’s state- 
ment, toe Government made a 
virtue oat of tight control of 
spending. Now it fa expanding 
spending in a deliberate man- 
ner not seen since toe Latov 
governments spending drive 
of 1974 and 1975. 

The Chancellor justified 
that fry toe buoyancy of non-ofl 
tax revenues, expected to be £2 
billion hi gher than originally 
estimated this year, as# by the 
fact that public spending as a 
proportion of gross domestic 
product is forecast to decline 
as a - proportion of gross 
domestic product 

However, set against the 
new spending plans, this 
declining share requires 
continued growth in the 
economy. 


inflation have come out lower- 
this year than expected eight 
months ago. Growth is es- 
timated at 2.5 per cent and 
inflation in the current quarter 
ax335 percent 
Next year, the inflation rate 
fa expected to rise only 
slightly, to 3.75 per cent by the 
fourth quarter, and on that as 
well as the balance of pay- 
ments tire Treasury is at odds 
with many outside forecasters. 

Economists believe that the 
pound’s sharp fan and the 
prospect of higher oil prices 
will push the inflation rate 
above 5 per cent by the end of 
next year. 

But the Treasury rites only 
the impact of higher mortgage 
rales in its forecast Without 
those, it says, inflation would 
continue much as it fa now. 

By tradition, there is no 
forecast on unemployment in 
the autumn statement, but The 
Chan ce ll or told the House: 
“The prospects for some fall 
in unemployment are now 
more promising. But this 
promise could still be frus- 
trated by excessive pay 
settlements.” 

City still expects 
Budget tax cuts 

City economists, taken 
aback by the large increases in 
public spending, still expect 
sizeable lax cuts in the March 
Budget, although at the ex- 
pense of control over public 
borrowing. 

An independent ran of 
yesterday's Treasury figures 
through its own economic 
model suggested that the 
Chancellor's room for 
maneouvre next March is just 
£500 million, if he slicks with 
his targets. 

“He has gone for a much 
larger reflation than we all 
thought,” Mr Mike Osborne, 
of Klemwoil Grieveson, said. 
“But we can expect tax cuts as 
well, and a public sector 
borrowing requirement of as 
much as £10 billion next 
year.” 

The consensus among City 
economists was that he would 
manage to squeeze out at least 



Mr Norman Fowler (left) with £626 miltem extra to spmA on health; Mr Kenneth Baker (centre) who has £2380 million 
more for education and Mr Nicholas Ridley- who negotiated an extra £230 million for housing. 


Environment 


Council home sales win day 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 


£2 bflfion of tax cuts, enough 
to cut the basic rate of income 
tax by 2p. By doing this in 
train with large spending in- 
creases he will defuse criticism 
from within the Conservative 
Party. 


An unexpected increase in 
the sale of council houses 
under the Government's 
Righr~to-Buy_ programme 
helped Mr Nicholas Ridley, 
the Secretary of Stale for the 
Environment, to squeeze an 
extra £230 million for the 
bousing programme. 

Mr Ridley admitted yes- 
terday that he did not have to 
argue for lorn with the Chan- 
cellor, Mr Nigel Lawson, for 
more money. 

Housing is increaringjy 
becoming a key Issue in 
government strategy leading 
up to the election because of a 
steady rise m homelessness, 
especially among the young. 

Yesterday it was announced 
that £451 million more than 
was planned will be spent on 
bousing in 1987/8. But tbe 
Treasury will have to find only 
£230 million because of the 
increase in receipts from 
council house sales over the 
next three years, which are 
now expected to yield about 
£950 million more than 
forecast 


Today the Right-io-Buy 
programme will be given 
afurther boost when the Hous- 
ing and Planning Bill is given 
tbe Royal Assent Under it 
council tenants in flats will 
benefit from a more generous 
discount 

The total amount of money 
that wifi be made available 
next year for capital expen- 
diture by local authorities, the 
new towns and the Housing 
Corporation will now be 
£3,661 million. 

Mr Ridley emphasized yes- 
terday that he would continue 
to dissuade councils from 
building new bouses in order 
to ensure that the mosey is 
spent on repairs. It has been 
estimated that there is a 
backlog of repair to old coun- 
cil bousing stock standing at 
about £20 billion. 

Local authorities will be 
told their individual spending 
allocations in a few weeks 
time but Mr Ridley confirmed 
yesterday that he would stand 
by the commitment of his 
predecessor that no authority 


Health 


would receive less than 80 per 
cent of their initial allocation 
for the current year. 

Mr Ridley 'also announced 
yesterday that £15 million will 
be provided next year to help 
establish the four new Urban 
Development Corporations in 
Greater Manchester, Teesside, 
Tyne and Wear and the Black 
Country. 

It was emphasized that 
expenditure on these new 
development areas to regen- 
erate the economy in run- 
down regions will be increased 
considerably in the years 

ahftaH 

In the continuing political 
row over the plan to transfer 
cash from well-off areas of the 
Home Counties to deprived 
inner city boroughs, Mr Rid- 
ley said that he had still not 
decided what action to take 
but he admitted that it was 
extremely unlikely that he 
would change his distribution 
proposals. 

More than 80 Tory back- 
benchers have threatened to 
vote against Mr Ridley’s plan. 


Budget increased by £626m 



■ Estimated 
outturn - 

Departments! 

1986-87 

Ministry of Defence 

18.600 

FCO - DWomaijc Wing 

FCO-ODA 


European Community 

IBAP and Other Cap 

1090 

1520 

Domestic Agriculture 

Foiastiy 

Department of Trade and Industry 

Export Credits Guarantee Department 

820 

1370 

250 


1986-87 1987-88 1988-89 1989-90 


Department of 


148,600 .154,200 


rnobdfhg local authority spendng aid naflonafeed Industries external fin anca • Adjusted for Budget measures. 


Home Office 


Sizewell 
delay put 
at £230m 


More police and new jails 

By Peter Evaus, Home Affairs Correspondent 


The delay in building 
Sizewell nuclear power station 
in Suffolk means tbe electric- 
ity supply industry will pay 
tire Government more than 
£230 million extra in the next 
financial year. 

The move change will have 
no effect on power prices for 
consumers. 

The industry had, expected 
its external financing hntut 
next year w be sunflar to last 
year when it was given a 
negative borrowing Innit of 
£1,068 minion, but its new 
limit wifl be £1,305 nuflion. 

A negative external finano- 
limftfa effectively the level 


will make to the Treasury m 
addition to its pro® 5 ' 

• The other state-owned 




Chanceflor’s statanffly 
fah Coal, hM had ifa borrow- 
ing limit - the amount of the 
planned subsidy to boveres- 
Sected losses -set at £727 
million for next year. 

• The smaller North Sea oil 
companies had t hrir plea s to 
the Chancellor answered yes- 
terday when he aarotpeed 


. Nearly 3,000 more police, 
two ^additional ire w^ p risons 

support schemes are among 
extra provisions in the law 
and order field, which is 
expected to be an issue in the 
general election. 

The total increased pro- 
vision for the police over the 
next three years is £136 
bfflion. 

Overall, there is provision 
for total police strength to rise 
to 124,363, and for cmfran 
strength to increase to 46,434 
fey March 1988. 

Additions for the prison 
service will allow for the 
design costs of two extra new 
jails to provide room for^ 1,200 


prisoners. That brings toe 
number of prisons in the 
building progr am me up to 20. 

Farther support of £9 mfl- 
lion over three years is pro- 
vided for the victims of crime 
by strengthening the network 
of local voluntary victim sup- 
port schemes. 

To enable ; the Criminal 
Injuries Compensation Board 
to cope with an increasing 
number of applicants, its pro- 
vision is increased by nearly 
80 per cent in real terms from 
1986-8710 1989-90. 

About £7 million wfll be 
available over three years to 
fund a big crime prevention 
advertising campaign on tde- 
viskm. . . . 


The Government is allow- 
ing for an increase in immigra- 
tion department staff to cope 
with increased pressures. 
About £3 million is being 
prorvided over three years for 
organizations meeting the 
needs of ethnic minorities. 

• The cost of the courts and 
legal aid in England and Wales 
is predicted to grow from an 
estimated £620 million this 
year to £770 million in 


The Government has re- 
acted to widespread pressure 
for more funding for the 
National Health Service by 
allocating an additional £626 
million for hospital and 
community health services 
next year. 

This includes two new 
funds totalling £80 million, 
specifically set up to reduce 
waiting lists and to help avert 
financial problems m London 
health authorities. 

Tbe increase anounced yes- 
terday by Mr Norman Fowler, 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services, amounts to a 6 per 
cent rise in the present hos- 
pital and community health 
services budget of £1038 bil- 
lion and represents an addi- 
tional 13 per cent over 'and 
above the previous estimate in 


Defence 


Officials 
glad to 
escape cut 

Officials within the Min- 
istry of Defence were de- 
lighted last night at their 
treatment under the 
Chancellor’s autumn 
statement. 

Tbe spending plans detailed 


■:k VKJ; i fa 1 f * I • r: ci • 1 1 


Legal rid and its admin- 
istration accounts for two- 
thirds of the Lord Chancellor's 
budget Its cost fa expected to 
rise steadily from a total £590 
minio n by the end of this 
finnurifll year to £575 million 


that the defence budget for the 
year 1989-90 will rise by 
almost £500 million to a total 
of £19.47 billion. 

Officials said the figure 
represented a real decrease of 
Vt percent 

In the three years to 1 988- 
89, the department bad suf- 
fered cuts totalling 6 per cent. 
Mr George Younger, Secretary 
of State for Defence, had 
fiercely aigued in the so-called 
‘star chamber 1 of ministers 
that his department had borne 
mare than its fair share of cuts. 

One senior Ministry erf De- 
fence official said last night: 
“We regard it as a reasonable 
and respectable settlement.” 


Nationalized industries 



By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Kg improvements in the 
financial performance of 
nationalized industries sue 
foreseen in the new figures 
covering the state sector’s 
borrowings in 1987 to 1989, 
all designed to hdp the Gov- 
ernment achieve its public 

g pHvtiwg pfanq 
Tbe net .total of external 
financing limitjt (EFLs) — out-, 
ride Joass guaranteed by tbe 
Government to cover losses 
and mvftflment — is £692 rap* 
lion agaihst-£2,193 million in ‘ 
ftprairr aii fimmr ia] y ftar 
Compared -.with the fast 
public expeKfitnns Wlntoil^ 


per in January, most sectors 
have been given lower EFLs 
than envisage«L Some, notably 
the Fast ' Office mid the 
electricity industry, are called 
upon to pay over far less of 
their profits to the Treasury. 

• The cash deficit for toe state 
industries in the coming year 
had been put at £592 million. 

The British Steel Corpora- 
tion, now back. iu profit, gets 
an EFL of £66 million against 
£146 mflKon earmarked . by 
the White Paper, while British 
Shipbuilders, which is still 
raakfog losses Ink fa much 


slfauned down, has an EFL of 
£49 million against £73 
million. 

British Rail receives the 
Eon’s share of external finance 
with an EFL of £751 million, 
followed by British Coal with 
£727 miffios. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry's budget for next 

year has been set at £1,370 
million, down by £160 million 
on the current year, but £60 
minimi up on the January 
plans. The rise is due to 
increased spending on re- 
gional development grants 


and higher shipbuilding 
redundancy payments. 

The department's budget 
for the three yeara to 1990 fa 
£1, HO nuflion, flMfl mfllm n 
and £950 million, the first two 
yearn showing a rise of £20 
milli on on previous estimates 
largely because of higher 
planned spending on research 
and development grants. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry’s budget for toe 
coming year does not indude 
a provision for any increased 
fending of the troubled Rover 
Group, whose future is still 
being reviewed. 


By JfflSherman 
the White Paper earlier this 
year. Increases of 1 per cent 
are planned for 1988-89 and 
1989-90. 

Primary health care costs, 
which are not cash limited, are 
expected to rise by £300 
million next year to £3.7 
billion and will rise a further 
£0.5 billion in toe following 
two years. 

“Total spending in Britain 
wfll rise from £18.75 billion 
this year to nearly £20 billion 
in 1987-88 and will reach 
more than £21.5 billion by 
1989-90,” Mr Fowler said. 

Under toe new waiting list 
fund, health authorities will be 
able to bid for money for 
specific initiatives to reduce 
waiting times. The money will 
be allocated to authorities who 
can demonstrate that they are 


Big boost 
for road 
building 

By Rodney Co wtoo 

Transport Correspondent 

The Government is plan- 
ning a significant increase in 
spending on road building 
during the next three years. 

Commenting on the 
Chancellors autumn state- 
ment yesterday, Mr John 
Moore, Secretary of State for 
Transport, said that capital 
spending on the motorway 
and trunk road network would 
increase by 5 per cent in the 
next financial year, 10 per- 
cent in 1988-89 and 13 per- 
cent in 1989-90. 

Over the three years it was 
hoped to complete motorway 
and trunk road schemes total- 
ling about 450 miles. Work 
was also expected to begin on 
schemes with a value ofabout 
£1,5 billion which will pro- 
vide 350 miles of road. 

In addition to this national 
road progr am me, for which 
the Department of Transport 
is responsible, local authority 
spending on road building is 
estimated to rise from £510 
million in this financial year 
to £630 million next year. 

Figures released yesterday 
confirm the trend of govern- 
ment spending oa roads and 
transport since 1979. 

Whitehall sources say that, 
between 1979 and 198M7 the 1 
overall transport budget has, 
fallen by 12 per cent in real 
terms; but within this overall, 
total, spending on roads and! 
investment by British Rail has 
increased by IS per cent, 
while revenue subsidies to 
nationalized industries have* 
fallen by 13 per cent 

Tbe overall budget next 
year shows an increase of 
£270 million to £5-1 billion, 
but it fa planned to fall to 
£5 bffiion in 1988-89. 


already managing resources 
effectively and thin they need 
additional money to make 
faster progress, for example on 
more nursing staff or by 
appointiiK a bed manager. 

The £30 million to be made 
available for regions which get 
less than national average 
growth — principally the four 
Thames regions — will be 
allocated to enable the health 
authorities to build up facil- 
ities in deprived areas outride 
main cities. ! 

Personal social services will 
be increased by £300 million, 
equal to 73 per cent For the 
first time the Government has 
included an additional l per 
cent, £27 million, to enable 
local authorities to build up 
services in siroport of commu- 
nity care policies. 


Education 


Large rise 
linked to 
pay deal 

By Mark Dowd 

Expenditure on education 
and science for 1987-88 will 
total £16399 million, an in- 
crease of £2380 million on tbe 

1986- 87 figure. 

Planned local authority 
spending will rise to £12,850 
million, which the Govern- 
ment says fa an 18.8 per cent 
boost in cash terms on ibe 
figures given in the White 
Paper earlier in toe year. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Secre- 
tary of State for Education, 
has included in this sum £460 
million for teachers' pay, con- 
ditional on a satisfactory 
agreement 

Universities will receive an 
extra £95 million for recurrent 
and equipment grant, a 73 per 
cent increase on 1986-87. 

Mr Baker made u clear 
yesterday that future funding 
would be in exchange for 
improvements in three areas: 
rationalization of small de- 
partments, better financial 
management and improved 
standards of teaching; 

Universities will also be 
expected to develop special 
initiatives in teacher training 
and help to cope with the 
teacher shortfall in subjects 
such as mathematics, physics 
and technology. 

The science budget, includ- 
ing money for the research 
councils, will receive an added 
£39 million in 1987-88, an 
increase of £24 million com- 
pared with the January White 
Paper predictions. It is envis- 
aged that spending on science 
will rise from £654 million in 

1987- 88 to £680 million by 
1989-90. 

Local authority capital ex- 
penditure fa expected to rise to 
£364 million, an extra £56 
million. This increase. Mr 
Baker said, will allow a larger 
programme of repairs and 
maintenance in schools and 
help to increase spending on 
books and equipment. 


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THF. TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986, 


HOME NEWS 


MPs outraged 
over rebuff on 
ethnic number 


in services 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


The Ministry of Defence 
.has refused to supply a Com- 
mons select committee with 
details of how many blacks 
and Asians there are in certain 
units of the Armed Forces. 


The refusal was contained 
in a letter sent to the commit- 
tee on Wednesday, the same 
day that Mr Roger Freeman, 
the Under Secretary of State 
for the Armed Forces, an- 
nounced that ethnic monitor- 
ing of recruits is to be 
introduced next year. 


well gone out and counted”. 

The committee is also keen 
to discover wbat promotion 
prospects blacks and Asians 
enjoy within the Armed 
Forces, and pointed out that 
this will not be disclosed by 
the monitoring announced by 
Mr Freeman. 





;'£fr 







Libya jets 


US 


ITiWl 


By Harvey Elliott 

Air Correspondent 


i mmm?. 


. 



One MP on the committee 
said that “considerable 
irritation” had been caused by 
the refusal. 


The ministry is on a direct 
collision course with the Select 
Committee on Defence, which 
will discuss what action to 
lake at a meeting next week. 
Options include a formal de- 
mand for the information or 
“inviting" ministry officials to 
appear before the committee 
for questioning. 

The ministry explained its 
refusal by saying that the 
statistics required do not exist. 
This has cut little ice with 
certain committee members, 
however, who said yesterday 
that the request covering no 
more than 10 named units, 
had been made last July and 
that “they could have Moody 


He said: “I would be very 
surprised if the committee lets 
the matter lie here. This 
committee has a long history 
when it wants information of 
not being fobbed off It is 
terrier like.” 


The committee asked for 
information on ethnic, minor- 
ity representation in the 
Armed Forces alter sugges- 
tions earlier this year that 
blacks or Asians may be 
encouraged to join less 
fashionable branches of the 
Army, and the reported 
observation of the Prince of 
Wales that there were few 
Mack feces beneath the bear- 
skins of the Guards’ 
regiments. 


Nearly 150 years ago, Welsh 
scbooichildrefl tike these 

would already have been work- 
ing underground as miners 
alongside their parents fora 
penny a day Co augment die 

family income. Ironstone min- 
ers were paid by the ton and 
every extra nogget helped. 

But now parties of school- 
children — such as these from 
Coed Eva School, Gwent - 
come to Big Pit at Blaenavon 
in Sooth Wales for academic 

reasons. Big PH, which 

as a working colliery m 1980 
after nearly 200 years of 
mining to supply fad and raw 
materials, initially for the 
local ironworks, was reopened 

hi 1983 as a liring mng 
ffintwmt the only coal and 

iron ore pit opes to the pubtic 
in western Europe. 


Wage rules ‘could cost 6UU,uUU jods 


Bv Tim Jones 


A Cabinet minister said 
yesterday that Britain could 
lose up to 600,000 jobs if left- 
wing Euro MPs succeed in 
their attempt to force govern- 
ments to impose min i m u m 
standards of wages and social 
security within the Com- 
munity. 


Mr Clarke, a president of 
the Labour and Social .Affairs 
Ministers, said the proposals 
by the Euro Labour groupings 
would do nothing to help 
employment in Britain. “No 
one really knows exactly how 


UUV IUXUJ . 

many jobs would be lost but it 
would certainly be a few 


In spite of mounting a 
strong rearguard action. 
Conservatives believe they 
will lose the vote to the 
socialists, who cling to en- 
trenched positions which fa- 
vour trade union power. 


Tuckman. a Conservative 
spokesman on employment, 
which argued that Europe had 
to earn its living before it 
could distribute wealth, was 
also watered down. 


The warning from Mr 
Kenneth Clarke, the Minister 
for Employment, came a day 
after Mr Nigel Lawson, the 
Chancellor, was barracked for 
idling union leaders that na- 
tional wage deals were costing 


hundred thousand and pos- 
sibly as many as 600,000". he 
said. 

The Labour groupings will 
iry to force governments to 
adopt agreed standards on pay 
and benefits when the Euro- 
pean Parliament meets next 


The split is so fundamental 
ihat it has already led to the 
resignation of one Christian 
Democrat as a rapporteur 
responsible for drawing up a 
document on how the Euro- 
pean labour market could be 
restructured. 


Even if they win the vote 
next week, it is unlikely that 
employment ministers meet- 
ing next month will adopt the 
proposals. With huge anoma- 
lies such as a German worker 
earning in a month what a 
Portuguese worker earns in a 
year, a universal wage and 
social services policy would be 
too expensive to administer. 


Libya is unable to use two 
sophisticated jet planes after 
failing to recruit British pilots 
to fly them. 

Now Libyan Arab airlines 
may have to try to sell the 
Airbus A3 10s it bought last 
year for more than £75 
million. 

Libya had been trying to 
buy Airbus jets to replace its 
ageing fleet for years, but an 
embargo on the sale of any 
American equipment to Libya 
closed supply routes. 

So the Libyans mounted a 
complicated international un- 
dercover operation to buy two 
Airbuses from British Caledo- 
nian. who thought the aircraft 
were going to a European 
charier organization. 

The Libyans planned to use 
the planes for international 
services by the end of this 
year, but they had no mainte- 
nance facilities, no simulator 
to train engineers and pilots 
and no spare parts. 

Advertisements appeared in 
technical and specialist mag- 
azines around the world for 
pilots and engineers, offering 
up to £40,000 a year tax free 
for anyone prepared to fly the 
Airbuses. But so far there have 
been no takers. 

The Department of Trans- 
port denial putting pressure, 
on British staff. 


Bishop critical of 
justice for blacks 

V _ _ _ „ . « ■ J 


Britain’s first black bishop 
yesterday called for strong 
measures to eradica t e radon 
from the criminal justice 
system. 

The Bishop of Croydon, the 
Rt Rev Dr Wilfred Wood, said 
a wide-ranging anti-racist 
strategy was necessary if Mack 


people were to have con- 
fidence in the system. 

He told the annual meeting 
of the National Association 
for the Care and Resettlement 
of Offenders the proportion of 
black people in prison was 
more than double the propor- 
tion in the community. Black- 
people entering prison also 
had fewer previous convic- 
tions than whites sentenced 
for similar offences. 

Black defendants were 
significantly less likely to_be 
granted bail than whiles 
charged with the same types of 
crime, he said- . 

Decisions taken eany m toe 
law enforcement process 
contributed to the number of 
black people in prison. Young 
black people were stopped ana 


searched by the police roughly 
10 times as often as whiles. 
Young Made offenders in 
London were significantly 
more likely to be prosecuted 
and less Kkety to be cautioned 
ihan comparable whites. 

“There are numbers of peo- 
ple who fed that the law (foes 
nothing to protect their rights 
to decent bousing and fan- 
opportunities for suitable 
employment Many seem to 
have nothing to gain from me 
‘older* of society and nothing 

to lose by flouting ft.” 

He called for personnel to 
be trained in working in a 
multi-ethnic society and for a 
more positive approach to the 
recruiting of Made judges, 
magistrates, court clerks, law- 
yers and probation officers, as 
well as police officers. 

There were only three Made 

judges, fewer than 2 per cent 
of probation staff were blade, 
and in most areas the percent- 

■ f LU.l. MinmatrOlPC W9C 


OI1U III Kuvnn w r 

aw: of Mack magistrates was 

less than half the proportion of 
«ukA«%U «ti inf* local 


UUMiltfUA — 

Mack people in the local 
population. 


Maxwell 
denies he 
brings fear 

W. Dnluft Maxwpll DUb- 


Yard drive 
onstreet 


crime 


Mr Robert Maxwell, pub- 
lisher of the Daily Mirror, 
denied a suggestion m court 
yesterday that his reputation 
inspired fear and apprehen- ] 
sion rather than respect. ! 

He was being cross-exam- 
ined on the fourth day of fas 
High Court libel action against 
Private Eye. which is seeking 
to justify its allegation that be 
acted as “paymaster” for over- 
seas trips by Mr Neil Kiimock,'. 

the leader of the Labour Party, 
in an attempt be recom- 
mended for a peerage- 
Mr Andrew Bateson, QC, 
for Private Eye. asked him: 
“Would you agree mat your 
reputation is one of a ram 
who inspires fear andappro- 
hension rather than respect- 
-j would not agree, Mr 
Maxwell who is cbair^not 
Mirror Group Newspapers, 

^Mr Maxwell aged £3, said 
that he was “appalled and 
shocked” at the cruel and 
wicked” allegations against 

him by Prime £ve.He said 
that they had nqt sought to 
justify the allegations. 

J in cross-examination he de- 
nied threatening Mr Krnnock 
Sat if he did not attend an 
anniversary party atthe 
Minor the paper would not 
rover his African tom. 

Tbe magazine denies lioei 
and claims what they pub- 
lished was. true- Tteyjg 

SSTSv^ a 

article Iasi July jduch tahdled 
ihat Mr Maxwell has a gen- 

SBMSSSK 

^The hearing continues- 


By Stewart Tendter 
Crane Reporter 


Scotland Yard is to use 
undercover police patrols and 
surveillance operations to 
combat street crime in five 
inner city areas of London. 

The decision to allocate 
more resources to fight street 
crime was taken this week at a 
two-day conference of the 
Yard’s top officers. 

They have identified Lam- 
beth, Southwark, Hackney 
and parts of Haringey and 
Brent as areas of concern. 

L ocal commanders are to 
use members of the newty- 
formed tactical support unite, 
which come into operation m 
January as - riot team s, to 
mount a plainclothes opera- 
tion. They will monitor places 
which attract street crime, 
such as lonely alleys and 
underpasses. 

Detectives will also be 
added to local intelligence 
units to target suspects with 
established records for street 
crime. 

The concentration on street 
crime comes at a time when 

the Yard is considering greater 

use of civilian staff as one nay 
of using its stretched pobce 

manp ower. The police staff of 

the computerized information 
room, which handles 
London’s 999 calls, could be 

rented by civilian operators, 

, who might also take over the 
planning of the computerized 

command centres at di- 
visional police stations. 

The Metropolitan Police is 
■ continuing to fail to meet its 
! establishment level, because 
i of natural wastage and officers 
i leaving ibe force, often to 
transfer to other parts of the 
country. 



Print leaders face fine 

■ i at ntv Mr Laurence Wells. 


TWO print -taW-S 

*^JS^Hi^oSrtjS were gUflf of a “flagrant" 
they breach of an injunction 
to L 9 n f 05 U^S" y fi ne s and granted to the Mirror Group 
faced substantial « ™ ty homing a chapel meeting 

^ lb ^l^tehad fomd on September 19 which halted 
of jKoducSon of Da.1, 

SmtsStbs rsrf 

Mr o^mS^ Group officials were acting as “duty 

(chairman) ot ^ authorized agents of the 

W NGA In calling the meeting. 


WeVe taken the 



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THE TIMES FRIDAY NO VBMBER 7 1986 


Ridley backs free market 
to increase rented housing 


Radical changes in the 
rented housing sector, includ- 
ing higher rents for council 
housing and moves towards 
deregulation of the private 
rented market, were hinted at 
yesterday by Mr Nicholas 
Ridley. Secretary of State for 
the Environment 

Mr Ridley, the Cabinet's 
keenest exponent of privatiza- 
tion and leading enthusiast of 
the free market spoke of his 
ideal for the rented sector as 
being “a pretty complete mar- 
ket where people can move 
freely from one pan of the 
country to another, from big- 
ger to' smaller accommoda- 
tion. and to pay the 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 
appropriate rent for whatever achieve, and he foreshadowed 


they choose to rent”. 

He made dear, in an inter- 
view with New Society maga- 
zine. that he believes council 
rents are too low. 

“The average local 
authority rent is £16 a week. 
We think the economic cost of 
those houses is £28 a week, 
and the private sector would 
need to let that house at £30 a 
week if a good landlord, with 
ordinary finance, is even going 
to cover his costs, let alone 
much of an dement for 
profit-” 

He said that rent levels in 
the public and private made 
his desired expansion of the 
private sector more difficult to 


changes on security of tenure 
for new lettings in the private 
sector. . 

Many of the ideas floated by 
Mr Ridley in his interview, 
and other equally far-reaching 
ones, are on the agenda for the 
secret Conservative manifesto 
soup on housing, which Mr 
Ridley chairs. 

He is understood to want to 
go further and fester towards a 
completely free market in 
housing than Mr John Patten, 
Minister for Housing. 

On rent control, Mr Ridley 
said: “There are grave prob- 
lems in dismantling it for 
existing tenants because of 
habits and history. People 


Gazumping risk over delays 


By Frances Gibb Legal Affairs Correspondent 
House buyers risk being “extremely concerned” about 

izmnped as a resnlt of die deb]* jprticolarl, rang HE? 


gazumped as a result of exces- 
sive delays by local authorities 
in undertaking local searches. 
La some cases prospective 
purchases are being delayed 
by more tha n four months. 

The problem has become, so 
acute that buyers are using 
private linns which make 
personal searches within 24 
hours for between £40 and £70 
pins VAT. 

The matter has been taken 
ap by the Law Society's non- 
contentions business commit- 
tee, which says it is 


London boroughs. 

Such delays “make It 
impossible”, the committee 
says, for prospective purchas- 
ers to obtain replies by post in 
the usual way. 

This prejudices those trying 
to buy who “ran the risk of 
being gazumped because they 
cannot exchange contracts un- 
til they obtain essential 
information”, the committee 
says in thfc week's Law Soci- 
ety Gazette* 


to submit evidence of delays of 
more than four weeks. Already 
there have been complaints 
against Tonbridge and 
Mailing in Kent, and the 
London boroughs of Newham, 
Tower Hamlets and Lambeth. 

One London solicitor seat 
searches to Lambeth on 
September 4 and had received 
no reply by October 30. He 
was told that searches were 
taking IS to 16 weeks. 

The reason gives was “short- 
age of staff and pressure of 
work” 


have got into the habat of 
thinking they have got their 
tenancies for life, they have 
built their lives round that. 

“Whether they should have 
bad them in the first {dace is a 
totally separate question, but 
the vast amount of political 
upheaval and upset involved 
in taking away those rights is 
pretty daunting.” 

He adds, however “But you 
can certainly do this for new 
lettings.” 

He said that control on rent 
was the biggest block on the 
provision of more private 
bousing because it simply was 
not economic at existing fair 
rent levels to provide a house. 

The security of tenure prob- 
lem was much more for the 
private individual who had a 
few properties to let and found 
that, when something went 
wrong in his life, his asset was 
unrealizable. 

Mr Ridley said: “So one has 
the choice between going the 
whole hog and doing away 
with both of them, or dealing 
with the rents problem alone. I 
do not think that dealing with 
the security of tenure problem 
and not the rents problems 
would have any effect at alL” 

He defended mortgage tax 
relict although asked about 
the long term, he said: 
“Clearly if housing policy 
evolved in a different way my 
successors might want to do 
different things.” 


Former Chief Petty Officer 
John Nelson, aged 73, receir- 
ing a commemorative medal 
yesterday from Mr Leonid 
Zamyatin, the Soviet ambas- 
sador to London, for “services 
to the USSR (hiring the Sec- 
ond Worid War”. 

Mr Nelson was among 122 
Royal Navy veterans pre- 
sented With gold rmnpaign 
medals for then- rote in ru- 
ning vital supply convoys to 
Russia. 


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Mr Zamyatin told the for- 
mer sailers, members of die 
North Russia Club, that the 
medals, commemorating the 
fortieth anniversary of the 
war, were “tokens of our 
gratitude” from the PresnUnm 
of the Supreme Soviet. 

The presentations were 
made at the Russian embassy 
is London. Mr Zamyatin win 
present 148 other members of 
the dab with medals bier. 

British convoys, which ran 


FROM THE ROCK MARKET w TO THE STOCK MARKET. 


badly-needed supplies to the 
S®riet ports of Murmansk and 
Polyanoe from 1941 to 
were constantly under at t a ck 

Mr Nelson, from Gilling- 
ham, Kent, who served on the 
destroyer, HMS Whiteh a ll, 
on 10 envoys, said: “It was a 
terrible time and the physical 
hardships we endured were for 
worse fbe torpedoes. Bat 
then I had a charmed fife and 
the ship was never hit.” 

(Photograph: Tua Bishop). 

Guinness 

kidnap 

ordeal 

Mrs Jennifer Guinness, a 
banker’s wife, endured an 
eight-day ordeal at the hands 
of a kidnap gang after being 
seized at gunpoint from her 
home, the Circuit Criminal 
Court in Dublin was told 
yesteiday. 

Mr Anthony Kennedy, for 
the prosecution, said Mrs 
Guinness, who was tied up, 
chained and masked for some 
of the time, feared for her life 
because of the chang ing mood 
of her captors. 

She was hdd at four dif- 
ferent addresses before being 
released unharmed after an 
overnight siege outside a 
house in Waterloo Road, 
Dublin, on April 16. 

Brian McNichoU, aged 49. 
of Waterloo Road, Xtobfin. 
who is said to have admitted 
organizing the kidnapping; 
'pleaded not guilty to falsely " 
imprisoning Mrs Guinness 
and to having a gun with 
intent to endanger life. 

Three men sentenced earlier 
were arrested in or near the 
house from which Mrs 
Guinness was freed. Mr 
McNichoU was detained by 
police later that day when he 
turned up at die house with a 
woman friend, Mrs Claxa 
Lenihan. 

Mrs I-enihan lived at the 
Waterloo Road address but 
had nothing to do with the 
kidnapping, Mr Kennedy said. 

On the day Mrs Guinness 
was due to be moved to the 
siege house, they drove to Co 
Westmeath and saw a friend 
of Mr McNichoU, Mr James 
Clark. 

Mr McNichoU, said to have 
been ashen-faced, asked to 
talk to Mr Clark urgently and 
told him: “I am m terrible 
trouble; my boys kidnapped 
Mrs Guinness”. He later 
added: “My boys would never 
teU on me. I organized the 
kidnapping. "Mr McNichoU 
and Mrs Lenihan then drove 
back to Dublin to be met by 
the police. 

Mr Kennedy told the jury it 
was as plain as a “pikestaff” 
that a tot Of force was used 
throughout the kidnapping. 

Three other men have al- 
ready been jailed for their part 
in the kidnapping of Mrs 
Guinness from her home at 
Howth, Dublin, in an un- 
successful attempt to get a 
£2 milli on ransom. 

On Wednesday, Anthony 
Kelly, who is sought by York- 
shire police in connection 
with crimes including the 
murder of a police sergeant in 
Leeds, was sentenced to 14 
years by the court. 

Last May, John and Mi- 
chael Cunningham, brothers, 
were imprisoned for 17 years 
and 14 years respectively. 

Fixed price 
bill worries 

The Electricity Council an- 
nounced yesterday the in- 
troduction of a remote- 
controlled heating scheme 
designed specifically for el- 
derly people. 

* The scheme, called Budget 
Warmth, will be operational 
in six electricity board areas 

where more than 5,000 sys- 
tems will be installed this 
winter. 

About 40,000 more elderly 
people die . in . winter titan 
during the rest of the year, 
according to the British Medi- 
cal Association. Many of those 
deaths are caused by 
hypothermia. 

Budget Warmth will pro- 
vide customers with one- 
room heating' at a known 
weekly cost ranging from 
£2.28 to £4.37. The heating is 
remotely controlled by the 
Electricity Board via radio 



!" asked to ? 

help find 

! boy 

Teachers in private schools 
have been asked by a High 
' Conn judge to wash for a 
missing , boy after hii fether 
! refused to toll the court where 
i be was. 

Tbe judge, Mr Justice Shel- 
don. lifted reporting restric- 
tions and asked for bcip in an 
I attempt to find the boy, Peter 
j Kane; aged II, who is a ward 
of court, after bis, fether. Mr 
Erich Kane, a wealthy intcr- 
I national businessman, aged 
47, admitted sepdinghim to 
beaming school in E ng l and 
bat refused to »y which one 
The bay's mother, Mrs Eliz- 
abeth Kane, aged 44, fives m 
Belgium but has been staying 
with relatives in Colbrook 
Avenue, Ealing, west London, 
since her search for her son 
began in September. . 

She had sent him on a two- 
week holiday to his grand- 

r sus in Vienna in July, and 
went from there to his 
father's home in Switzerland. 
But be felled to return the boy 
to her. 

There are no dues as to 
which school he is at, but the 
judge ordered anyone who 
knows where he is to come 
forward and telL 

£8,000 award 
in blood case 

Miss Caroline Morgan, who 
was given tbe wrong type of 
blood during an operation at 
St Lawrence Hospital, 
Chepstow, was yesterday 
awarded £8.265 dama g es in 
the High Court and given 
hope by the judge. 

Miss Morgan, aged 28, of 
lamhwh, south London, had 
thought the mistake would 
mean she could not have A 
baby by a man with rhesus 
positive blood, but Mr Justice 
Boreham said medical ad- 
vances meant she bad a 90 to 
95 per cent chance of having a 
| healthy baby. ; 

Appeals fee : 
under attack ; 

The Equal Opportunities 
Commission claims today 
that a government plan tf> 
charge applicants to industrial 
tribunals a £25 fee would 
damage progress -against sex 
discrimination by stopping 
women making justified 
rfaime The- Government 
hopes a fee will cut “the cost 
and management effort re- 
qufred to deal with iD-fbunded 
claims to industrial 
tribunals”. But Jbe commis- 
-sion says- that adequate safe- 
guards against these claims 
already exist. 

Major cleared: 
in shop charge 

A shopfifting charge against 
Major Baraaby Roue-Smith, 
an officer in The Parachute 
Regiment, was withdrawn 
when the case came before 
magistrates at Aldershot, 
Hampshire, yesterday. 

Major Rolfe-Smith, aged 
38, a veteran of the Falklands 
campaign, had been accused 
of stealing goods worth £3.17 
from a Gateway supermarket 
in Fleet, Hampshire, on Au- 
gust 22. But at yesterday's 
hearing the prosecution of- 
fered no evidence. 

Nurses return 
from Saudi 

Three women who were 
detained in Saudi Arabia fora 
-week for breaking Islamic law 
arrived back in London yes- 
terday, the last of 29 British 
medical staff deported from 
Riyadh. ; 

The two nurses and a 
secretory at the Military Hos- 

S 'tal in Riyadh were arrested 
r accepting a lift from an 
unrelated man, which is ah 
offence under Saudi law. ; 

Court upholds 
school closure 

A small Essex community 
yesterday lost its High Court 
battle to save Ongar Com- 
prehensive School which won 
the National Curriculum 
Award in 1984. 

The court ruled that the 
county coundl had carried out 
adequate consultations before 
deriding to dose it in 1989 
because of falling pupil 
numbers. ; 

heat saves 
for elderly 

teleswitch in line with local 
weather forecasts. 

The scheme, which has been 
introduced on a pilot basis, is 
pan of a drive to ensure that 
those most vulnerable to the 
cold have adequate heating 
without the worry of- "bills. 

Sir Philip Jones, chairman 
of the Electricity Council, said 
that the Budget .Warmth 
scheme was being introduced 
on a pitot basis to see if 
customers, especially the el- 
derly and infirm, found it 
helpful. 

“We hope that the scheme 
win ease their worries about 
hating bills and ensure that 
they keep warm throughout 
the winter,” Sir Philip said. , 
The boards taking part m 
the scheme are Eastern. East 
Midlands, North Eastern, 
South Eastern, Southern and 
Yorkshire. 




SSft 










landmark bill 
m immigration 

/Washington — President Reagan yesterday sign ed *b 
pforic immigra tion MB used at the fleod ®f 

pBitesof illegal aliens into the United States (Mohsffl AB 

'esX 

He described the bfll as Ae nhnt comprehensive reform 
US immigration lam since 1952, and saidTTntmre 
c*f Amerians *31 be ttanhfnl for on efforts to 
omanely regain control of oar borders, and thereby 

ool>. n ^ oiwcftccwun nr 


: £y ;. 


«• ‘^y 


nnc<v 

n-s r> 

* i i* ■■ 


c;i ! 


vr- 

4 i : & 


ucuiHc. AHimcan pmmismp . 

The landmark bill po nd es amnesty for illegal aliens 
who came to the United States before 1982 and ddl and 
c rimin a l penalties for enpkryera who him illegal afieas-in . 
the future. 

According to official estimates &ne may be as many as 
eight tO 12 milKmi Bring OlrigaHy in the 

States, and 6 millio n more attempt to enter each year, 
mainly across the 2,000-mfle US-Medcan border. 

Prices Life jail 
frozen for spy 

Athens — Greece yes- Baltimore {Renter) ■ — 
terday ordered a three- Former Nary officer and 
month price freeze on all admitted spy John Walker 
domestic and imported Jr has been sentenced to 
goods and services to dis- concurrent fife terms for 
courage profiteering over masterminding an es~ 
the introduction of value pkwage ring that sold mfli- 
added tax on January 1 tary secrets to the Soviet 
(Mario Modzano writes). Union for 17 years. 

A presidential decree His son. Michael, a for- 
that Parfiament mnst ratify mer Navy seaman, was 
within 40 days raled that jailed for 25 years for Us 
all prices remain at the role in the scheme, 
level of November 4 until The judge said he wanted 

Jannary 31. Offenders face Walker to serve oat his 
. six months’ jail or a fine of sentence for the rest of Us 
£2,600, or both. natural fife. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVE MBER 7 1986 

Call for ‘bipartisan co-operation’ after election battering 

Reagan to woo Senate 

*-4SS“ ’’ Blacks 

ssrrfjgr flocked 

to vote 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


COMMENTARY 


XAmiif, or now. nautnu uic. 

Kohl under fire again 

Bonn — Chancellor Kohl, already in international teeife 
over Us Gorbachov-Goefabels gaffe, yesterday ran mto 
domestic flak on it in a stormy debate b the Bonn 
Parliament (John England writes). 

The Soda! Democratic and Greens opposition parties 
called for him to be relieved of his post, and said lus 
“teachable* attempts to mend faces with Moscow over Ins 

“iiKTediW blunder were ^li^tootete^ 

Hew Kohl had once agam said he regretted Jatn fetee 

impressioB had arisen fiom Ins nrterview ufjdifte USnero 

magazine Newsweek that he had aamnA MxNm&n 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, to Dr Josef Goebbeb, the 
Nad Propaganda Minister. 


From MkhaefBmyon 

Washington 

-President Reagan’s defiant 
statement that Ik has no 
intention ofbecoming a lame 

dndc” during his Iasi two yeaxs 

comes as he is pwf »nag_ io 
adopt a concilatoiy approach 
to the newfy-riec ted Dcmo- 
cratic-controfled Sena te . . 

Mr Reagan said he was 
locking forward to a period of 
“hard work and bipar tisan oo- 
operation” when Congres s re- 
tmms in Jannary — in contrast 
to his earlier predictions dur- 
ing the election campaign ot 
“two years of stalemate if the 
Republicans lost control of tne 
Senate 

= But the President, known 
for his pragmatism when the 
odds are against him, will 
probably spend much more 
time consulting Democratic 
leaders and briefing senators 
on his measures and more. 

controversial proposals. ^ 

Administration officials ad- 
mit that the situation is now 
much more difficult for turn, 
and conciliation is the wati*- 

word. However, they mast 

that he will press forward witn 
his political agenda un- 
changed and will make no 
concessions in main t aini ng 
US military preparedness and 
reducing domestic govern- 
ment spending. 

“For this administration, 
pigart* through strength is more 
than a policy: it’s a promise — 
a pro mise we’ve made to the 

r .... MjjjrtMAVwMaW M C C 'M 


Baby for 
dissident 

Tel Aviv (Rentes) - Mrs 
Arital Sharansky, wife of 
former So viet dissident Mr 

Anatoly Sharansky, yes- 
terday gave birth to a 
daughter nine months after 
being remitted with her 
husband. 

Mrs Sharansky, aged 
36 , emigrated to Israel a 
day their marriage in 
July 1974, but . Mr Shar- 
ansky was refused, an exit 
visa. 



****5 the 55-45 Senate advantage the Democrats hold. 

majority leader-designate has 

an™ trade Bill win be on Clashes are Central America 


Kim may 
not run 

- Seoul — Mr Em Dae 
Jung, the prominent 
opposition leader, has said 
that he' will not- ran for 
president in 1988 I the 
Government heeds his call 
for dared presidential elec- 
tions-(NYT reports). 

Western diplomats and 
opposition politicians here 

say Us decision will pot the 
Government on the defen- 
sive «"4 reinvigorate the 
opposition. 



US MID-TERM 

elections 

...... ■ 


people and a promise we 
intend to keep," Mr Reagan 
said. “Hope alone can never 
lead to agreement with the 
Soviets." 

The White Hous e now h as 
time to work out a strategy of 
how to co-operate with Con- 
gress, as the long recess gives 
the Administration some 
breathing space. 

It is hoping to establish new 
momentum in arms control 
talks as a way of building up 
bipartisan support on foreign 

policy in an area where there is 

broad • agreement between 
Democrats and Republicans- 

One confrontation is hkely 
to develop, however, on trade 
policy as the Democrat s will 
use their new strength to press 
for further protectionist mea- 
sures. _ 

Already Senator Robert 
Byrd of West Virginia, the 


majority leader-designate has 
said a new trade Bill win be on 
the President's desk as soon as 
possible. 

Mr Donald Regan, the 
White House Chief of Start, 
said the Democrats will have 
trouble finding enough votes 
to override the veto which Mr 
Reagan is certain to impose on 
any harshly protectionist leg- 
islation. 


and funds for the President’s 
Strategic Defence Initiative. 

The Democrats will be 
emboldened to take a tougher 
stand in opposing further help 
for the contra rebels in nica- 
ragua, knowing that the us 
involvement in this shadowy 
war is deeply unpopular 
throughout most of the 
country. 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

Black voters in southern 
states plaved a central role in 
scuttling 'President Reagans i 
hopes oT retaining Republican •. 
control of the Senate. 1 

The result points to a trend ] 
that threatens to make the 
Democrats the “black” party 
of Dixie, while the Repute 
licans become the “white 
panv. 

Tne black turnout nation- 
ally was dose to the overau 
national turnout of about .38 
per cent. &r greater than 
usual, and the result of an- 
intensive black voter registra- 
tion drive. . . 

Republican hopes of a fun- 
damental realignment in 
Dixie away from the historical 
support of the Democratic 
Party may be coming true m 
the case of whites, although 
the process is obviously 
happening slowly. But support | 

for the Democrats was as high 
as 88 per cent. 

This polarization in the 
Senate races was less striking 
in the voting pattern for the 
House of Representatives and 
for state legislatures. Bui the 
: trend is unmistakable. Ac- 

■ cording to exit polls the white 

i vote in Senate races in Ala-- 

■ bama. North Carolina , 

» Lousiana and California split 
r roughly equally overall be- 
r tween Republicans and 
e Democrats. But the black vote 

was monolithically Democrat. 



Geoffrey Smith | 

Sometimes in politics small 
f flpspg have much larger con- 
sequences. So it is likely to 
prove with the Democratic 
party’s recapture of the 
American Senate. 

The mid-term elections were 
not a test of Presides! 
Reagan's popularity. With a 
few exceptions, such as agn- 
culturat policy In some w toe 
farming states, they were not 
about issues of any national 
consequence. . _ 

So when I arrived in the 

United Stales at die end of last 

week, I thought it might not 
ffialrp all that much difference 
whether or not the Repnb- 


— ■> r - country wasniuuumu««*i*" 

Late results from the polling 


The following results in the MjrhjQan 

House »V wSunSdiaeueCMl 

were declared too late tor 

yesterday's early editions. The Minnesota 

figure for the district number - Weber (80) 

is followed by the winning 

party and candidate’s name, ynntnna 

Lines in bold indicate the seat WHHIBli ia 
changed hands. A date in 2 R Ron Marlenee (76) 
brackets shows when m ^j evaC J a 

orR in brackets to indirate toe fl eW Jersey 
party that previously held the 3 Q James Howarf (64) 

California New York 

uailTomia D l^s****^) 

Illinois North Carolina 


Texas 

14 R David Sweeney (84) 

Washington 

l R John Milter (84) 

In Addition the district 10 
result for Florida was at first 
declared for the wrong can- 
didate. The result should have 
read: 

10 R Andy Ireland (76) 

In the results of guber- 
natorial races yesterday 
Democrat Anthony Earl was 
inadvertently denoted the 
winner in Wisconsin, al- 
though the vote tallies were 
correct. The winner was 
Republican Tommy Thomp- 
son. _ 


of the Senate. Most of the 
Democrats taking over com- 
mittee chairmanships would 

be on the moderate wing of the 
party and they woaM not wish 
topick a fight with a President 
who retained bis astonishing 
personal popularity. 

But the more I have spoken 
to Re pffMkwns themselves, in 
and oat of the Administration, 
the more I have come to revise 
that initial judgment A 
distinction showd be draw® 

between the effect of the loss of 

the Senate on Mr Reagan 
liinwlf and on the Admin- 
istration. 

With another President, the 
damage might have bee® se- 
me. Here is a leader who 
campaigned extensively, who 
attacked his opponents, often 
is harsh person al ter ms, who 
apparently committed much 
political capital to the straggle 
and whose appeal was then 
rejected by the voters m the 
races that mattered most 
But Mr Reagan has a 
I personal standing that tran- 
L scends normal political 
■ considerations. It does pot 

. JUkrttScliail OittlPr 


did not do at all badly m the 
other elections this week. 

At this stage, after six yea** 

m office and with no more than 

another two years to go, some 
exodus of people just bdow 

Cabinet level would have been 
expected anyway. Some are 
exhausted and others wjfi 
want to move to locratire jobs 
outside government while this 
Administration remains mm- 
5ce and their connection with 
it confers prestige. This exr 
odes will now be all the greater 
because it wffl become signifi- 
cantly harder for the Admm- 
istration to get any fresh 
initiative through Congress. 

Tbe Democratic leadership 
in the Senate is unlikely to 80 
oat of its way to quarrel with 
tbe Administration* It win w 

wary of Mr Reagan's continu- 
ing popularity and it will Mt 
mite present a taretfor 
Republican criticism m 

None the less, there will be 
some areas where tbe Demo- 
crats will be expected to make 
things difficult for tbe Admm- 
istradon - on lid for «« 
Contras in Nicaragua, ror 
example, on defence spending 
in general and possibly cm the 
Strategic Defence Initiative m 
particular. There will be a 
mod many more areas where 
they will not be deliberately 
disruptive bat where they will 
be less helpful and less pre- 
I pared to take political risks 
: than Republican committee 
chairmen would have been. 


UU1K3U 1U i»v 

by failure or by disagreement- 
He may not be able to win 
enough votes for his support- 
ers imt be wffi retain the 
affection and the approval of 
the country. ^ t 

The impact of the Senate 
defeat will be much more, 
severe, however, on eus 
A dministration. That is true 
even though the Republicans 


Scope for ppsitive 
actio n restricted 

These tendencies will re- 
inforce each other. The more 
people leave the Administra- 
tion at that critical level where 
the specifics of policy Initia- 
tives are developed, the fewer 
bold new ideas will be pre- 
sented to Congress. The more 
Congress resists new initia- 
tives, the more likely it is that 
capable people will leave toe 
Administ ration because they 
feel that they can no longer 
accomplish much. 

Even if toe change of 
personnel within toe Admin- 
istration — and also on the 
Senate committee staffs now 
that the Democrats are taking 
over the chairmanships — were 
only to slow down the policy 
flow for a while, it would still 
be a critical loss of momeutem. 

There could not in tbe best 
of circumstances be much 
more than a year available to 
the Reagan Administration for 
substantial new initiatives. 
From early 1988 toe political 
process wffll become over- 
whelmed by the presidential 
primaries. . ^ _ 

So the prospect is not or a 
lame dnek President, but of an 
Administatinn whose scope for 

positive action will be much 
t restricted. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


White woman member 
of ANC sentenced 
to 25 years for treason 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


A white woman who con- 
fessed to being a member of 
the military wing of the out- 
tewed African National Con- 
gress (ANC) and planting 
bombs in three police stations 
earlier this year was sentenced 
yesterday to 25 years in prison 
tor treason and arson. 

There were cries of "Aman- 
dte, Awetirn" (“Power to the 
people”) from the mixed 
crowd packed into the public 
gallery of the Rand Supreme 
Court as the Miss Marion 
Spaig, holding a bouquet of 
yellow chrysanthemums given 
to ber by a sympathizer, was 
escorted from the court by 
police. 

Spaig, aged 28. who is one 
of the few whites and still 
fewer white women to be 
convicted of treason, pleaded 
guilty to all the charges against 
her. She accepted the judge's 
verdict with composure, and 
even managed a smile for her 
tearful mother in the gallery. 

During the Gist two days of 
the three-day trial Spaig wore 
a blade suit and a green shirt, 
and yesterday added a yellow 
ribbon to complete the three 
colours of the ANC flag-She 
said that she regarded herself 
not as a traitor but as “a 
soldier and patriot” fighting to 
rid South Africa of the evil of 
apartheid, which she saw as a 
crime against humanity and a 
threat to world peace. 

“Apartheid has to be de- 
stroyed and the only way to do 
so is by going to war.” she 
said. “My motives, I feel are 
not those of a murderer or 
killer or even of a sabo- 
teur ... My motive is that of 
a soldier, a volunteer soldier, 
not one who is conscripted.” 


Spaig confessed to planting 
limpet mines in February and 
March of this year in toilets in 
police stations in East London 
and Johannesburg, and to 
petrol-bombing offices of the 
liberal opposition Progressive 
Federal Party (PFP) five years 
ago. 

The limpet mines caused 
considerable damage and 
slightly wounded several po- 
licemen and civilians. 

Spaig told the court she was 
fully aware that the mines 
could have killed people, but 
said she regarded the police as 
“combatants” and had tried to 
minimize the risk to civilians. 

Police stations were sym- 
bols of the system which was 
protecting apartheid. Sparg 
maintained. She said she 
regretted the bombing of the 
PFP offices. She had been 
“con fused and immature" at 
the time. She still disagreed 
with the party, but would not 
choose it as a target now. 

Sparg said that a turning- 
point in her life was the death 



iv'PSWI 


Marion Sparg: admitted 
planting limpet mines. 


of Mr Stephen Biko, the Black 
Consciousness leader, in pol- 
ice custody in 1977. 

She bad been horrified by 
the lack of concern of fellow 
white students at Rhodes 
University where she had 
been studying journalism at 
the time. 

After practising for a while 
as a journalist, she left South 
Africa illegally in 1981, going 
to Botswana and then to 
Zambia. 

From there she was sent by 
die ANC. which has its head- 
quarters in Lusaka, the Zam- 
bian capital, to a camp in 
Angola for three months mili- 
tary training. 

Sparg spent three years in 
Lusaka working in the ANCs 
information and publicity 
department, and was infil- 
trated back into South Africa 
via Lesotho in 1985 on a false 
passport. 

Early this year she and an 
accomplice smuggled eight 
limpet mines into South Af- 
rica from Lesotho in the back- 
door panels of a hired car. 

The judge. Mr Justice P J 
van der Walt, said it was 
“providential” that no-one 
had been killed as the result of 
Sparg’ s actions, and told her 
“Had lives been lost you 
would almost certainly have 
received the death penalty.” 

• Boesak pledge: Dr Allan 
Boesak, Moderator of the 
Coloured branch of the Dutch 
Reformed Church, said on 
Wednesday night that he 
would not hesitate to repeat 
acts for which he had been 
charged with subversion by 
the Government 


Soviet military chief may go soon 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

A shake-up at the top level 
of the Soviet military es- 
tablishment is believed to be 
imminent following persistent 
rumours about the failing 
health of the Defence Min- 
ister. Marshal Seigei Sokolov, 
who is 75. 

The speculation intensified 
yesterday when the ageing 
minister conspicuously railed 
to attend a major Kremlin 
rally to marie the 69th 
anniverary of the Bolshevik 
Revolution. 

According to senior West- 


ern military sources. the min- 
ister has not been seen in 
public since last July when he 
paid an official trip to 
Finland. 

Rumours about his failing 
health gathered momentum 
with the publication of an 
official notice in the armed 
forces newspaper Red Star on 
Wednesday stating that in a 
break with traditionjhe would 
not be taking the salute at the 
annual military parade 
through Red Square. 

An order, signed by the 
Commander of the Moscow 
Military District Vladimir 



Three American sailors toasting Chen Mimi, of the Chinese Navy, with local beer during a visit to a brewery at Qingdao 
yesterday. The occasion was part of the first official visit by three US warships to China in 57 years. 

Deadlock in Vienna 

Shultz and Shevardnadze bury hopes 


From Andrew McEwen, Vienna 


Archipov, said that the parade 
would be presided over in- 
stead by Genera] Pyotr 
Lushev. the man most widely 
tipped by both Western and 
Soviet sources to take over the 
important defence portfolio. 
• Harvest up: A dramatic 
improvement in the Soviet 
output of grain was claimed 
yesterday ' by Mr Yigor 
Ligachev, the No 2 figure in 
the Kremlin heirarchy. who 
said that the harvest for 1986 
was now expected to reach 210 
million tonnes. The figure 
caught most international ex- 
perts by surprise. 


The brief Reykjavik flower- 
ing of hope for an end to the 
era of nuclear “overkill” yes- 
terday remained where Presi- 
dent Reagan and Mr Gorba- 
chov left it - in limbo. 

Two Vienna meetings be- 
tween Mr George Shultz, the 
American Secretary of State, 
and his Soviet opposite num- 
ber, Mr Eduard Shevard- 
nadze, ended in deadlock. 

Short of a dim bd own from 
fixed positions, there is now no 
prospect of anything but piece- 
meal preparatory agreements 
in the near future. 

The original plan — that 
Reykjavik should pave the 
way for an historic disarma- 
ment summit - have been 
shelved. 

President Reagan hopes 
that agreement will be reached 
before bis term ends now look 
remote, although, as Mr 
Shultz pointed out yesterday, 
“two years is a long time”. 

The two foreign ministers 
have set no date for another 
meeting. The focus switches to 
the humbler level of the Ge- 
neva strategic arms talks. 

Mr Max Kampelman, the 
chief US arms negotiator, 
believes the Soviets will table 


their proposals tomorrow, but 
he expects no surprises. 

Vienna has been a major 
setback for the Americans in 
the struggle for European 
hearts and m i n ds. As a plat- 
form to hammer home the 
Soviet message that the 
American obsession with Star 
Wars is Mocking world peace 
it could baidly have been more 
effective. 

The reality is somewhat 
different, as American experts 
struggled to explain yesterday. 
Far from being the only bar- 
rier to agreement the Strate- 
gic Defence Initiative is bnt 
one of a range of problems. 

Another of these is of for 
more fundamental importance 
to Nato. The Russians refuse 
to concede any automatic 
verification procedure to en- 
sure compliance with an ag- 
reement to withdraw most So- 
viet and Nato troops from 
central Europe. 

The Soviet idea of verifica- 
tion woole be no more than a 
right to request an inspection 
after receiving evidence of 
“cheating”. 

American and Soviet ex- 
perts who worked late into the 
night between the two Shnltz- 


Shevardnadze meetings made 
no headway on these dif- 
ferences. 

The situation holds the 
potential for yet another public 
relations disaster for the West 
next year. Last June the 
Warsaw Pact proposed that 
each side should withdraw 
half a million troops, and at 
Vienna Mr Shevardnadze sug- 
gested a framework of ne- 
gotiation and a “test” proced- 
ure for verification. 

These ideas fall far short of 
the West's minimum needs. 
The decision as to bow to res- 
pond rests on the Nato foreign 
ministers at a meeting next 
month. 

If they refuse the so-called 
Budapest Appeal on troop 
cuts, the West will be open to 
further charges of obstruction, 
but to accept on the Soviet 
terms would be a big gamble. 

The Vienna outcome came 
as no surprise to the British 
Government, which considers 
hopes for a world without unc- 
lear weapons unrealistic. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary'- is openly voic- 
ing his doubts that the Soviet 
Union wants such a world. 

Cynics within the US 


Administration take this line 
of thought further. Some inter- 
pret the Vienna meeting as 
confirmation of their worst 
fears - that the entire Reyk- 
javik-Vienna process was 
nothing more than a Kremlin 
propaganda exercise. 

“My opinion is that they 
would try to lay the founda- 
tions for a PR campaign to de- 
nigrate the US,” a senior 
Administration hawk said yes- 
terday. 

The Soviet public relations 
triumph at Reykjavik and Vi- 
enna has been so total that it is 
the Americans who have the 
explaining to do. Mr Shultz 
and Mr Shevardnadze have 
that vital political quality — 
the ability to radiate personal 
trustworthiness. But the So- 
viet Foreign Minister holds 
the balance of advantage with 
better speech writers, a warm- 
er manner and a more moder- 
ate image. 

Vienna was virtually an ac- 
tion replay tm Reykjavik, with 
a crestfallen Mr Shultz report- 
ing failure while Mr Shevard- 
nadze nibbed salt in the wound 
with his airport departure 
statement that the talks “had 
left a bitter taste”. 


Flowes 
but ni 
tears f<r 
genera 

From Roger Boye 
Warsaw 

Poland's secret polioaen. 
the vintage and the ser.ng, 
joined soldiers veteran ma 
new, yesterday, to say fetvdi 
to General Mieezy&w 
Moczar, one of the stronst 
and most sinister politicos 
in the country's post-war b* 

lory. 

The unexpected mourner t 
yesterday's funeral service we 
General Jarnzdsld. the Polis. 
leader, who could not be class 
ed as an admirer of the former 
Interior Minister. General 
Moczar. during one of several 
pushes for the leadership, 
helped to stir up a vicious 
anti-scmitic campaign in 1968 
that prompted many hun- 
dreds of Polish jews to leave 
their jobs or their country. 

Proefessor Henryk JaWon- 
ski. former head of the Polish 
state, now chairman of the 
War Veteran's Association, 
reviewed General Moczar’s 
career from pre-war commun- 
ist. to partisan leader, to secret 
police chief in Lodz, to In- 
terior Minister and on, by 
means of a series of sidesteps, 
into influential obscurity. 

“Comrade Moczar was 
shaped by history but be also 
gave it shape,” Professor Jab- 
lonski said in his speech, 
which sped, like a skater on 
thin ice, over the events of 
196S. 

The pile of wreaths included 
those from the Communist 
Party - for, despite his jostling 
with party leaders Mr Wladyv 
law Gomulka, Mr Edward Gi- 
erek and Mr Stanisfaw Kania, 
he remained a true betieving 
communist until the end. An- 
other wreath came from In- 
terior Ministry employees — 
the ministry which ov erse es 
the secret and uni formed pol- 
ice and which for so long serv- 
ed as his political base. 

General Moczar evolved a 
kind of nationalistic com- 
munism, which both embrac- 
ed and distanced itself from 
the Soviet Union — to some 
that was an attractive philoso- 
phy. to others an excuse to 
indulge in the crudest of 
chauvinisms. 

Those in power drifted 
away, those out of power stay- 
ed, strangely connected to the 
man in the coffin. They dis- 
persed. shaking off (he rain, 
only when the coffin was load- 
ed into a bus for the last trip to 
a family grave near Lublin. It 
was an unsentimental depar- 
ture befitting an unsenti- 
mental politician. 



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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1 986 




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J^gues Chirac, the 
:n ^nme Minister, held 
c E? val £ ..conversations 
Senor Febpe Gonzalez, 
Spanish opposite number, 
™ ^one-day visit W 
r . . a y- The visit took place 
lta hme when Franco-Span - 
sn c oLiaboration again^ |gp. 
rcwisni has never been better. 
The handing over early 
ssterday to Spain of six 
Spanish Basques, all 
alleged ETA members, de- 
tained by French police after a 
rad on a factory just inside 
the French border on Wednes- 
day, was the biggest since last 
summer, when France started 
a policy of summary extra- 
ditions. 

AH the political parties in 
Madrid praised the Trench 
action, seen here yesterday as 
a serious blow for die Basque 
terrorist organization's 
infrastructure. 

The haul included not only 
sophisticated weapons but 
also internal papers relating to* 
ETA's financial situation and 
future plans for armed attacks,’ 

Spain's ruling Socialist Par- 
ty is enjoying a degree of co- 
operation from the 
conservative administration 


in Paris unknown under the 
French Socialist Government, 
The six Basques handed 
over yesterday were being 
transferred under the Anti- 
Terrorism Law to Spain’s 
maximum security jail, whop 
they will be held incommuni- 
cado. There were, however, 
some street demonstrations in 
the Basque region yesterday 
against the French move. 

The two countries have, for 
the rime being at least, settled 
their disputes - over fishing 
rights in the Bay of Biscay and 
over the admission to EEC 
markets of. - Mediterranean 
products — rivalling those 
from Spain — from North 
African countries. 

France is currently Spain's 
best customer but only third 
supplier of goods and services, 
that position ha$ been 
ing since Spain joined the 
last January. 

Besides reviewing with Se- 
nior Gonzalez further cofiab- 
oraiion on terrorism, M 
Chirac also sought to persuade 
Spain to incrase its defence 
purchases and to collaborate 
more closely with die French 
communications industry. 


Protests in Spain over 
guerrillas’ expulsion 


Madrid, — The Spanish 
Basque country erupted in 
protests yesterday against 
France's expulsion of six sus- 
pected separatist guerrillas as 
French Prime Minister Jac- 
ques Chirac paid his first 
official visit to Madrid 
Demonstrators blocked mo- 
torways and roads around 
several Basque towns, set fire 


to a French-registered truck 
and stoned foe headquarters 
of the ruling Socialist party. 

Protesters marched through 
foe Streets of San Sebas tian 
chanting slogans against foe 
French and 
meats. Earlier a 
out foe display window of a 
book shop specialize in 
Basque-language texts. 



Chile students riot 


hurt 
y. Mane than 
stopped 8 group 
school asking for 
At* seminar 

uu wum— nuuH; v» rrcuimuaj, aujwuCoIoDBI CSllOS 

Castro, commenting on the results in foe elections for 
national student leathers, won by foe ceotre-left, said: “The 
universities are tailing into foe hands of foe manrists.” 


during clashes 
100 students were arrested when 
which had seized control of a 
democratic freedom in foe 
on national security on Wednesday 


Lima’s reformist 
mayor ends myth 
of bungling left 

From Michael Smith, lima 


Mayor Alfonso Banantes’s 
three-year term in office, 
which comes to a close with 
the municipal elections in 
Peru on Sunday, has done 
much to change foe face of foe 
city and the workings of 
Peruvian politics. 

As the first freely-elected 
Marxist mayor of a Latin 
American capital, be and his 
United Left coaliton have 
moved into political respec- 
tability, which would theoreti- 
cally include a shot at national 
power. 

“The Barrantes mayoralty 
has shattered the myth of the 
left’s incompetence u admin- 
istrative power,” said Setter 
Mirko Lauer, a political 
analyst. 

Lima is a sprawling city of 
nearly six mimon inhabitants 
caught in a two-pronged urban 
ptneber. Its inner city suffers 
from deterioration as com- 
mercial interest move out to 
more attractive, new business 
districts. But h is also sur- 
rounded by shanty towns 
where nearly half the popula- 
tion cfammer for basic ser- 
vices like water and light. 

In the f HKt . municipal gov- 
ernment has done little bat 
rubber-stamp birth certifi- 
cates, raise statues in parks 
and keep street vendors from 
usurping whole blocks — often 
unsuccessfully. There have 
only been five free municipal 
elections in ISO years of 
independence so there was 
little precedent on which to 
build 

Senor Barrantes inherited a 
city hall which was unable to 
meet its monthly payrolls. 
Today the budget is out of the 
red, topping $121 million (£85 
million). The investment bud- 
get has been increased 1 1-fold 
fitun 1984 levels, in part due 
to an $83 million World Bank 
loan for urban infrastructure. 

After fighting for 1 8 months 
to get municipal finances 
under control, Senor Barr- 


arnes undertook a major 
facelift of downtown lima, 
painting historic buildings and 
plazas in vivid tones, re- 
routing traffic and buses away 
from congested streets and 
remodeling main boulevards. 
More than ISO miles of roads 
have been repaired or paved. 

In social services, an area 
where municipal government 
has rarely ventured. Senor 
Barrantes also fulfilled his 
most controversial campaign 
promise — to set up 8,000 
neighbourhood committees to 
distribute one million break- 
fast rations a day to children 
iu underprivileged neigh- 
bourhoods where be is affec- 
tionately called "Unde Bean”. 

However, many solutions 
are out of the reach of the city 
administration as it fends with 
state companies, which pro- 
vide public services like water 
and electricity and the na- 
tional Government of Presi- 
dent Alan Garda. 

Many critics three years ago 
were predicting disaster under 
foe Marxists, but balanced 
budgets and improved man- 
agement and services have 
proved doom-sayers wrong, 
though it may not be sufficient 
to win re-election on Sunday. 

Perhaps the change of great- 
est political significance has 
occurred inside the United 
Left ftseJf. The six-party dec- 
total alliance includes the 
Pelting-style and Moscow-line 
communist parties plus home- 
grown brands of Marxists, 
socialists and independents. 

It has been held together by 
Senor Barrantes's political 
glue. 

Senor Barrantes, once again 
foe underdog as he was in 
1984. w ill have to push hard to 
swing enough votes from his 
two opponents to the right 
But for foe first time in Peru, a 
Marxist candidate will be 
running .on his record, not on 
revolutionary manifestos. 



Why should we want to make energy go further? 


At Esso, our business is selling enei^y. Yet for many years 
vve have been helping people save energy 
A paradox, perhaps, but with good reason. 

We know that a strong future for our industry depends 
on the continual encouragement of energy efficiency now. 


I tile Con uiiu«m - ~~ . • - , .. , . 

c . iq7q , ve have invested over £40m in projects aimed . - energy better 

Dintc I- • .,1. r- r :: ■ A J 


Department of Energy Neighbourhood Energy Action, which 
provides insulation for the poor and die elderly 
. We are also sponsoring a nationwide programme of Energy 
Efficiency Education seminars, organised by the Cranfield 
Institute of Technology to help teachers and administrators use 


long term energy conservation within Esso itself. From major 
heat recovery programmes at ourFadey refinery to amply 

encouraeing offices to 'Switch off the bght ' . 

\ alone these measures saved vs around £28m, 

against an annual energy hill of £1 !0m. - 

Enlivened self-interest, you may say Yet were also active 

outside our own walls. ■ . . , , 

lr this EnergV Efficiency Yeas lor instance, we have provided 

00.000 to the national chanty supported by the 


— OJ 

And we continue to promote new thinking on energy matters 
by sponsoring the Royal Society Esso Energy Award 

The Meteorological Office won it this year for a global 
weather forecasting system that enables aircraft to make best 
use of prevailing winds- and hence fuel economies. 

Although forecasting next years winner, is 
impossible, one thing is certain; On the energy 
efficiency front, Esso will continue to make 
further strides. ■ 



ESSO 


Quality at work fer Britain. 

• . # AUtMKftOfTHEEXXOKC'&OlP 


Colombia 
clash 
kills 16 

Bogoti (Reuter) — Fifteen 
left wing guerrillas and a 
soldier were oiled in a dash in 
north-fcastem Colombia, and 
rebels blew up a vital oil 
pipeline in C£$ar. 

An army spokesman said 
foe dash, on foe eve of foe 
anniversary of the siege of the 
Bogota law courts in which 
nearly 100 people died, was in 
foe province of Antioquia. 

Children die 

Jakarta (AFP) — Four sleep- 
ing children were killed when 
a huge boulder rolled down a 
West Sumatran hill after 
heavy rain near Padan and 
crushed two houses. 

Boy released 

Buenos Aires (Reuter) — An 
Argentine boy aged 11, kid- 
napped by security forces 
during military rule in 1977 
and placed in foe care of a 
policeman, has been returned 
to relatives. 

Gold swoop 

Kathmandu (AFP) — Cus- 
toms officers arrested four 
people at Kathmandu inter- 
national airport, two of them 

to smuggle fllojS^ofgoM 
intoNepaL 

Blast admitted 

Osaka (AFP) - A Japanese 
gangster has confessed that he 
exploded a hand grenade on a 
Thai airliner that made an 
emergency landing here after 
an explosion on board on 
October 26. according to 
police. 

Artist held 

Nairobi CAP) — Mr Paul 
Kelemba. editorial cartoonist 
for Kenya’s largest-selling 
newspaper, the Daily Nation, 
has been arrested and charged 
with placing a fake bomb in a 
toilet at his office. 

Yaji resigns 

Khartoum (AFP) — Mr 
Moharaed Ahmed Yaji foe 
Sudanese minister with res- 

msfoiiity for finding a peace- 
solution to foe civil war in 
southern Sudan, has resigned 
for health reasons. 

Pope’s trip 

Washington - The Pope 
wifi visit Miami, Columbia in 
South Carolina. New Orleans, 
San Antonio. Phoenix, Los 
Angeles, Monterey in Califor- 
nia and San Francisco next 
year. 

Aden head 

Aden (Reuter) - South 
Yemen's parliament has 
elected foe interim president 
Mr Haider Abubaker al-Attas, 
head of state for a five-year 
term. 

Planes crash 

Tampa (Reuter) — A Pan 
American World Airways 111 
jet and a light plane collided iu 
fog on the ground at Tampa 
International Airport, killing 
at least one person and injur- 
ing several others. 


s 


Girl Monday. 



Girl Tuesday. 



Girl Wednesday. 



Girl Thursday 



Girl Friday. 



Girl Saturday. 



Every day to the USA. 

Non-stop to New York, Los Angeles, 
Houston, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Atlanta* 

See vour travel agent tor derails. 


* Daily service to Atlanta jointly operated by 
British Caledonian and Sabena usingaSabena B747. 



Caledonsanj 

We never iorgetyou have a choke. 


29 - 


31 

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inL AjuVLha rKlUAy isuV£MiiEfc7 1986 


India’s version 
of Pakistan’s 
secret quest for 
a nuclear bomb 

From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 


When Mr Bob Woodward 
of the Washington Post said 
this week that" Pakistan had 
exploded a high-explosive 
trigger for a nuclear bomb in 
September, and the Pakistan 
Government vehemently de- 
nied it had done any such 
thing. India chose to believe 
the Post. 

The Indians say that the 
detonation of an implosion 
trigger device is but the latest 
step in a long march towards 
nuclear capability by Islam- 
abad. which has been marked 
by subterfuge and illegality 

Border card check 

The Indian Government plans 
to issue identity cards to 
people in “selected areas" on 
the lodia-Pakistan border to 
try to stem infiltrations which 
hare seen dozens shot dead, 
parliament was told yesterday 
(AFP reports from New 
Delhi). 

from Pakistan and a com- 
plaisant attitude from its 
friends. 

This march began, accord- 
ing to the English-language 
newspaper The Times of India 
in 1973. when Pakistan de- 
cided to produce pure pluto- 
nium from the spent fuel of its 
heavy water reactor near Ka- 
rachi. It sought a reprocessing 
plant from France, but the 
controversial deal was squash- 
ed by US pressure in 1 979. 

The other, though more 
difficult, route towards atom 
bomb manufacture involves 
enriching naturally occurring 
uranium by using either a 
laser, or a gas centrifuge. 
According to the latest Indian 
reports Pakistan has now 
managed to upgrade uranium 
238 (natural uranium) until it 
has 93.5 per cent uranium 235 
molecules -good enough fora 
bomb. 


The Chief Minister of Sind, 
Syed Ghaus Ali Shah, yes- 
terday spoke of “a foreign 
hand" behind the ethnic riots 
in the troubled province in 
which 55 people had been 
killed so far. 

Speaking to a select gather- 
ing in Hyderabad, he claimed 
that an international conspir- 
acy was behind the riots 
intending to destablize the 
Pakistani Government. How- 
ever. he did not name the 
country allegedly involved. 

Except for sporadic in- 
cidents. the situation in Ka- 
rachi remained calm yes- 
terday. In many districts the 
curfew was relaxed. However, 
there was no public transport 



The process began with the 
purchase of 100 metric tons of 
West African uranium ~yel- 
lowcake" from Libya and the 
clandestine purchase from 
West Germany of equipment 
to purify it and convert it to 
uranium hexafluoride gas. 

Stage two was the setting up 
of uitracentrifuges to separate 
physically the molecules of 
uranium 238 and 235 in the 
gas. The work revolved round 
a German-trained Pakistani 
metallurgist. Dr Abdul Qadir 
Khan, who had worked in 
FDO. a Dutch subcontractor 
of Urenco. the British/- 
German/Dutch uranium con- 
sortium. 

The Indians believe that 
from 1974 onwards Dr Abdnl 
Qadir passed on Urenco's 
enrichment know-how to 
Pakistan - though it was 
highly classified information. 
In 1 977 FDO itself conducted 
an illegal sale of computerized 
measuring equipment to Pak- 
istan. Other hardware for 
centrifuges followed from 
Switzerland and West Ger- 
many, though these parts were 
not on any blacklist In 
Britain the export-banned list 
was updated twice in 1979 to 
keep up with the Pakistanis' 
wish list - principally for 
frequency inverters, which the 
Pakistanis said they wanted to 
control the high-speed spin- 
ning of textile centrifuges. 

By 1984. The Times of India 
points out, the purchasing 
emphasis had shifted from 
centrifuge parts to compo- 
nents of the weapons them- 
selves. __ 

According to India's For- 
eign Service officials, there 
will actually be no need for 
Pakistan to go the whole way 
to test a bomb — which would 
- immediately end the supply of 
the US weaponry that enables 
General Zia to keep the Rus- 
sians at bay. 



Fisheries protection zon 

UN chief stays rat 
of Falklands rot 

From Zoriun Pysariwsky, *** 


The yard, arrowed, from where Ronald McIntosh freed 
Samantha Lopez. Below, the couple in a prison picture. 



Helicopter hijacker 
frees woman prisoner 


Los Angeles CAP) — A 
woman inmate is still at large 
after a helicopter, hijacked by 
a gunman believed to be an 
escaped swindler, plocked her 
to freedom from a prison 
exercise yard on Wednesday. 

Officia ls at the Federal 
Correctional Institution in 
Pleasanton believed the hi- 
jacker was Ronald McIntosh, 
considered a model prisoner 
before his escape 10 days ago. 

McIntosh ami the woman, 
convicted bank robber Sam- 
antha Dorinda Lopez, had 


been friendly and worked to- 
gether in the prison’s business 
office, said a warden. The 
helicopter was in the exercise 
yard for only 10 seconds. 

McIntosh, aged 42, is a 
twice-convicted swindler who 
is regarded as a key figure in a 
San Francisco-based scheme 
that bilked investors out of an 
estimated $18 million (£12.67 
million}, 

Lopez, 37, was serving a 50- 
year sentence for aiding and 
abetting a bank robbery in 
Georgia. 


Senor Javier Perez de 
Cuellar, the United Nations 
Se cretary-General, has.sard he 
understands the British de- 
cision to impose a fishenra 
protection zone around the 
Falkland Islands contrary to 
Argentine reports, according 
to Mr Timothy Eggar, the 
Under-Secreimv of State a i 

the Foreign Office. 

Reports from Buenos Aires 
said that in a telephone 
conversation last week. Senor 
Perez de Cuellar told Pnsi- 
dfcnt Aifonsin that he consid- 
ered the British proclamation 
a provocation against the 
Argentines. 

President Aifonsin is said to 
have urged the Secretary- 
GenexaJ to try 10 persuade the 
British Government to enter 
negotiations on the sov- 
ereignty of the islands. 

But following a meeting 
with Sefror Perez de Cuellar, 
Mr Eggar quashed suggestions 
that the Secretary-General had 
sided with Argentina in the 
latest turn in the FaUdands 
dispute, saying that the UN 
leader “was understanding of 
our point of view”. 

Since his failure to secure a 
negotiated settlement between 
the two sides when the Falk- 
lands war broke out in 1982, 
Senor Perez de Cuellar has 
refused to put pressure on the 
British Government into 
negotiations with Argentina 
on the question of 
sovereignty. 

However, he is technically 
mandated by the General 
Assembly to pursue the 
matter. 

His contribution has con- 


tht predicts We rcspoe& from 
each side. 

It is not dear wheer the 
fisheries exclusion zre will 
have an impact on theebalc 
in the Assembly lab this 
month. 

Although Argentina has 
promised to pursue ai the 
diplomatic channels a hs 
disposal to chasten the Brish 
Got eminent, it does not *un 
to risk losing support for its 
campaign. 

It has been honed den* 
over the years to secure tie 
maximum number of votes cn 
a resolution enjoining Britan 
to negotiate all aspects of the 
Falkland* dispute. 

• MADRID: Spain will not 
be instructing its fishing fleets 
to seek licences from Britain 
when the 150- nolle zone 
around tire FaUdands comes 
into force next February. Se- 
nor Felipe Gonzalez, the 
Prime Minister, told Latin 
American journalists (Richard 
Wigg writes). 

Reiterating the position al- 
ready taken by the Madrid 
Foreign Ministry when the 
decision was first announced, 
Senor Gonzalez emphasized 
how Spain could not 
recognise any other sov- 
ereignty than Argentina's over 
the islands. 

The British Government's 
decision was incompatible 
with international law, main- 
tained Senor Gonzalez, speak- 
ing only a few days, before 
leaving for a visit to Cuba, 
Peru and Equador. 

He refused, however, to 
accept a South American 


World Television Festival 


Black mark and an honour for BBC 


From David Watts, Tokyo 


1X19 vuhuivuuwu p- — 7 l , . j 

sisted of an annual exchange journalist dtesenuing the de- 
of letters with the two govern- asion as “piracy”. Spain is the 
ments informing them of his most important EEC country 
mandate followed by a report fi s h i ng in South Atlantic 
to the Assembly containing waters. 


Manila ceasefire talks 
end in deadlock 

From Keith Dalton, PfrSfipines 
Government and rebel again “in a few days”. When 


Sind leader puts blame 
on foreigners for riots 

From A Correspondent Karachi 


in most parts of the city. Food 
supplies too were disrupted. 

Commenting on the riots, 
Miss Benazir Bhutto, the 
opposition leader, accused the 
Government of pitting the 
Army against the people and 
of creating a situation in 
which innocent civilians and 
soldiers were being killed. 

The Government's policy 
had created a feeling of 
deprivation and alienation 
among the people, she as- 
serted. The situation might 
explode any time, igniting the 
whole country, she added. 

But President Zia has de- 
fended the deployment of 
troops in the Sind. 


A BBC television drama 
which Japanese Customs of- 
ficials insisted be retouched 
before it could be shown was 
honoured at a Japanese tele- 
vision festival on Tuesday. 

American and Brazilian 
films took the two top prizes 
at the World Television Festi- 
val and Insurance Man, the 
Franz Kafka film, and another 
BBC production. The Haunt- 
ed Heroes, received special 
awards. 

The price the BBC had to 
pay for its Kafka award was to 
pul a black mark over a wo- 
man's pubic hairs in three 
scenes containing nudity. 
None of the participants went 
away empty-handed as each 
received awards to commem- 
orate their appearance at the 
festival. 

But the BBC's decision to 
accede to the Customs' ruling, 
rather retain the integrity of 
the production, has tended to 
reinforce the double standards 


applying in such matters in 
Japan and the authorities' 
inability to distinguish be- 
tween art and pornography, 
particularly where Western 
productions are concerned. 

Asahi Shimbun, the mass- 
circulation newspaper, lam- 
pooned the Customs officials 
with a cartoon that depicted 
them as “stone-headed”. 

Another British film 
production, of George 
Orwell’s 1984, almost didn’t 
make it to the Internationa] 
film festival last year because 
of the nudity it contained. 

The prurient interest cre- 
ated by the advance publicity 
was quickly apparent when 
many members of the audi- 
ence produced cameras to 
shoot their own versions of 
the explicit scenes. 

Ever since Japan aban- 
doned its uncomplicated atti- 
tudes to sex in favour of 
importing the West’s prudish- 
ness, along with its technol- 


ogy, pubic hair has been 
taboo. Having little body hair 
themselves ancient Japanese 
thought curly or excessive hair 
animal-like. 

Fashionable young Japa- 
nese women are just as likely 
to have permed hair as their 
Western sisters but the estab- 
lishment still attempts to dic- 
tate what is acceptable in the 
way of imported sex. 

This gives employment to 
dozens of old ladies, who pre- 
sumably are beyond corrup- 
tion, and college students who 
gently erase or paint out the 
pubic areas of models in Play- 
boy and Penthouse. 

What that does to the 
morals of the students isn't 
related, but these somewhat 
narrow-minded restrictions 
on what comes into the coun- 
try now give rise to a blatant 
double standard. 

Any issue of wbat-are now 
five competing weekly photo- 
scandal magazines without a 


trace of artistic merit between 
them would make most West- 
erners want to redefine the 
word pornography. 

The two leaders in the field. 
Focus and Friday, have now 
been joined in this very lu- 
crative market by Emma, 
Flask and Touch. 

The latest issue of Emma 
has a double-page spread of a 
nude couple in flagrante dur- 
ing the shooting of a hard-core 
pornographic film. Through 
no fault of his own Mr Edward 
Heath, the former Prime Min- 
ister, is shown in the next 
double spread at a conducting 
engagement in Tokyo. , 

Mere sex is not normally 
shocking enough for these 
magazines, whose forte is dead 
bodies — from the decapitated 
torso of the late novelist, Yu- 
kio Mishima, to a recent offer- 
ing, the body of a female Am- 
erican traffic reporter being 
fished out of the water near 
Manhattan. 


negotiators, after lengthy se- 
cret negotiations late Wednes- 
day, failed to rearii agreement 
on a ceasefire in the 17-year 
communist revolt. Outstand- 
ing differences are expected to 
delay a possible peace agree- 
ment by at least a month. 

The first serious attempt to 
hah the insurgency ended with 
both sides agreeing, to meet 



Mr Ramon Mitra: seeking 
peace with rebels 


the talks reconvene, neither 
side will leave the negotiating 
table until a ceasefire is final- 
ized, according to the Govern- 
ment's chief negotiator. Mr 
Ramon Mitra. 

The Government rejected 
the rebels' offer of a 100-day 
ceasefire beginning December 
10 as too long, possibly on the 
recommendation of military 
officials who believe the rebels 
could use this time to consoli- 
date their forces. 

Mr Mitra reiterated the 
Government's 30-day truce 
offer, although this was re- 
jected in September because 
the rebels said it was too short 
to implement and thoroughly 
monitor the ceasefire accord.' 

Mr Mitra confirmed that 
the Government had called on 
the rebels to advance the 
ceasefire period to November 
27. 

If progress is achieved in the 
first 30 days then the truce 
could be extended another 30 
days. 


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THF TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


'£& 


13 


THE ARTS 


Natural 

suffering 

The producer Alan Stewart 
was killed by a land-mme 
while filming Where Hunger is 
a Weapon for This H'«fc(ITV) 
is Southern Sudan. His death 
points out the dangers facing 
everyone, including relief wor- 
kers who try to distribute food 
to civilians displaced by the 
three-year war between Chris- 
tian southerners and the Mus- 
lim-dominated northern gov- 
ernment Most of the time no 
food is given out anyway, 
because both government and 
rebel leaders insist on control- 
ling distribution. The relief 
mocks cannot agree to this. 
Ike rebel troops, who are fed 
by a “grateful populace**, look 
fit Only the civilians suffer in 



Fellini 


New Leeds Interest Rates 
Premium Reserve 

ao .ooo+ 9.25% 

gh Return Accc« Shares 


High Return Access Shares 
(lOdi Issue) £500+ 8.75% 


Liquid Cold 

I £10,000+ 


CINEMA 


Ginger and Fred (15) 

Gate Notting Hill, 
Cannon Tottertom 
Court Road : 




Shoah (PG) 
Curzon 


Ruthless People (18) 
Odeon Leicester Square 


this war, said the reporter 
Peter Gill. “That is natural**, 
blan dly agreed a rebel officer. 


FI 


[ TELEVISION 


-■■■ inbC 


'PPSj 




\hki 




Dennis Potter's Blue Rem- 
embered Hills (BBC2), which 
won the Bafta award for best 
single play in 1979, was aired 
last night as part of the BBC's 
nostalgiafesL Us subject was 
also appropriately nostalgic: a 
group of West Country chil- 
dren, it wOI be remembered, 
pass a day in dappled forest 
and sunlit meadows during the 
Second World War. 

That the production should 
have been landed and awarded 
is not surprising. Potter’s un- 
erring sense id place and time, 
the lyrical photography and 
the extent to which the ad alt 
cast overcome the difficulties 
of playing children add up to a 
drama of lasting quality. What 
does astound, looking back, is 
the critics* rosy view off Blue 
Remembered Hills simply as a 
warmly affectionate remem- 
brance of childhood. 

Consider the plot It cul- 
minates in the burning to 
death of Donald Duck, the 
village cissy, in a barn. He had 
been shut in by the other 
children for a joke and it was 
their third on him that 
day. In the forest, the group's 
biggest bully held down the 
softies and spat in their faces, 
and all joined gleef ully i n 
stamping to death a sfrfrreL 
Anyone who grew Up in the 
country must have recognized 
these children^ but possibly 
with remembered revulsion 
and not affection. 

Anne 

Campbell Dixon 

Shaw said he* wrote Too True 
to be Good out of prty for the 
idle rich; and he summarized 
the play as the stray of three 
reckless youngsters who come 
into possession of unlimited 
wealth, set out to have a good 
time and find that money 
brings them nothing but worry 


ederico Fellini’s Roman 
trilogy, which began 26 
years ago with La dolce vita 
and bad Roma (1972) as its 
— - centre-piece, is completed 

by Ginger and Rred. In each film the 

principal male character — played in 
the first and third by Mar cello 
M astro ianni — is an undisguised 
Fellini self-portrait 
The 40-year-old hero of La dolce 
vita was repelled yet fasc i na t ed by 
the city’s glitter; decadence at the. 
end of the Fifties. Roma was a 
mixture of nostalgic memories and 
middle-ami disapproval of present 
change. Ginger arid Fred proclaims 
the frank, unmitigated revulsion of 
a 66-year-old man at the spectacle 
around him today. Not the least 
attraction of the film is that Fellini 
dares to act his age like tins, while 
most other elderly film-makers are 
obliged to pretend they are teen- 
agers like their patrons.. 

The film relates the events of 24 



and Queen Elizabeth lookalites and enal 75 v«3, in the nfc of the again. The mo* mond 

a mrracte woman who went without 
._t. *■ -* 1 — i- mnnfiu. In 


a miracle woman wno wem wmiuui 
tdevison for three whole months. In 
the midst of this, Ginger and Fred 
seem the last relics of humanity, 
even if she has weathered into a 
bourgeois granny and he xs fat. 


enal 75 years, in the role of the 
levitating monk. 

The mnfe and a half hours of 
Claude Lanzmann’s Shonh (the 
Curzon are showing it m two 


Main. The most mundane details 
are sometimes the most shocking. 
Every fare, it seems, was meticu- 
lously calculated and paid in ad- 
vance - with the one-way journey 
free for children under four. The old 
Nazi who organized the transports 

T ni vvrt tuwn c 


He needs to record their pain: 
“These tears”, he says, “are the seal 
of truth.” 

With the old Nazis who appear 
before his camera (generally tor 
and sometimes not knowing 
the camera- was there) he is more 
ruthless, lading them into terrible 
selfexposure. “People burn very 
weiT, says one, complacently, given 
a little encouragement. Nor does 
Ifln7mann protect the Poles who 
lived alongside the camps and 
contentedly moved into abandoned 
Jewish homes. “The Jewish 
women", they trustingly confide, 
“were beautiful, yes — but that was 
because they never worked — And 
then, the Jews were dishonest — " 
he accum ulation of so 
much detail brings us 
closer than ever before to 
the experience of the 
Holocaust It cannot ex- 
plain, any more than previous films . 
Every film before, however, has 
comforted us with the belief that it 
is inconceivable bow such a thing 
came to pass. The ultimate terror in 
Shoah is that all this mundane, 
everyday record of the process 
suddenly makes it conceivable: all 
that was needed was conscientious 
and unimagina tive civfl servants, 
operatives such as might readily be 
recruited on the football terraces 
today, and the stimulus of prej- 
udice, jealousy and hate. 

For comic relief this week you 
could hardly do better than Ruth- 
less People, directed by Jim Abra- 
hams and David and Jerry Zucker, 
and a marked advance upon their 
previous Airplane and Top Secret. 
The film exploits to good effect a 

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hours- Long ago, Ginger (Giubetta ers momentaril 
Masina, Fellini's wife) and Fred . before they par 
(Mastroianni) toured the variety and the infernal 
circuit with a double act in which 
they impersonated the rather more 
famous American dance team. Now 
for one night they are robe reunited, 
for an appearance on a television 
personality show. The Rome to 
which they return is a Weak .and 
hostile place. Between the bund 
high-rises are urban wastelands 
where vagrants and junkies languish 

- r n mnttan ntlri HMflviniZ d!BS- 


uurzon are snowing » u* _ •_-« 

even if she has weathered into a separate pans) afford an expenence wixTorganized the transports t ne mm »p«h» 

tvMirowois <rrnnnv and he xs fat, that is less like watching a film than • nn «tr£hefore Lanzmann s comic idea — used at least once, as i 

SSSass: 'ssr&'&ssrte 

M tM SSSdbSSSfp.yU.h.vetartata. 

pictures, nor troubles to trace yet off their hands. . .. ._ 


j ncu luup-wipiuw* — — — 

ers momentarily for a last time 
before they pan from each other 
and the infernal city. . 

It is a melancholy farce. As 
extravagant as ever, Fellini’s circus 
has a new quality of nightxnare- 
What relieve it are the marvellous 
central performances. This is the 
finest in Mastroianni’s gallery w 
fiaved roufis — a sick and sligh tly 
mad (Ad man, concealing bitterness 
under manic gaiety ana affronting 
everyone with blue joto and 



UJ Ul& cut# iwv j 

screens, grinning out lewd commer- 
cials for instant food. 


good nature, is a game &+**• 
Their dance routine, when itcomra, 
is unexpectedly touching. Though 
Fred may take a tumble ana-bom 
are a shade arthritic, it evokes all 
FdfinTs regret for a time when there 

seemed to be more grace. 

An incidental pleasure is a 
valedictory glimpse of the seraphic 
Jacques Henri Lartigue, vdtose 
phenomenal career as one of me 
world's greatest and most kindly 
photographers spanned a pbenom- 


Even this is only Kmbo to the 
inferno of the television station, 
manned by bored, cokL inhuman 
young devils. An MC with a 
sequinned jacket and mechanical 
smile whips oh the studio audience 
to applaud a fiantic freak-show: 
dancing midgets, a levitating monk, 
mediums, gangsters, .admirals, 

nonagenarians, transvestites, Kfljaic 

aiur-Ti T> breaks into the open in the 

cha plain's final speech to an 
empty stage, confessing that 
he has to go on preaching 
although he has nothing to 
say. If the play starts as a 
. Victorian throwback, it ends 
in the spirit of Beckett 
Backed by recordings of 


again tiie historical sources and 
ww** of Nazism. Rather he wants 
to re-create the present-day reality 
of the phenomenon and the pain, 
through the few witnesses, animate 
and inanimate, that survive. To mis 
day the ovens stand in Auschwitz- 
Birkenau, and the pain too wtH 
remain as long as there are people 
who experienced ft. 

i hey reconstruct, fragment 
'by fragment, the whole 
history of the Final Solu- 
tion and the mech anis ms 

of the extermination 

camps. We learn precisely how the 
trains arrived, how they were 
unloaded and how efficiently, the 
jews, arriving in their tens of 
thousands, were processed - 
counted, herded, robbed, sinpped, 
beaten, gassed and crema t ed, all 

within the hour at peak times. 

. Lanzmann goes over it ag ai n and 


T! 


11UUL, U w- u 

servants such as this to produce 
fifinur* from the Jews’ own seques- 
tered funds. _ , . . 

The survivors are few and their 
stories are terrible: a man on an 
exhumation detail (the Germans 
had changed their minds and de- 
cided to disinter and cremate 40,000 
bodies already buried) chanced 
suddenly on the corpses of his 
famil y; a barber employed to cut the 
hair of women in the very gas 
chamber found himself performing 
this last humiliating rite upon his 
wife and sister. L anzmann cuts 
from the faces to insistent, monot- 
onous images of the same places % 
today — Auschwitz and the railway 
at Treblinka still intact; the others 
marked by stones or overgrown 
foundations among the fields. Even 
after forty years the memory is so 
terrible that the witnesses oreaic 

down and beg Lanzmann to stop the 

cameras. He refuses, albeit gently. 


off their hands. . 

The kidnapped one m this case is 
Bette Midler, looking a fright as a 
Bel Air parvenue, and giving her 
best coimic performance to date. 
The kidnap proves a godsend to her 
disgusting husband (Danny De- 
Vito), saving him the trouble of 
going through with his plan to 
murder her so that he can move in 
his well-built mistress. The many is 
that the only virtuous people in the 
entire film are the impecunious, 
pui-upon and inept kidnappers. 

Until its complexities get slightly 
out of hand at the very end. Dale 
Launer’s script is expertly crafted, 
and deftly interpreted by the direc- 
tors and cast, with a feeling both for 

fence and irony. 

David Robinson 

• Claude 1 anzmann, director of 
Shoah , is interviewed by David 
Robinson in tomorrow’s paper. 


THEATRE 

i . 

Too True to be 
Good 

Riverside 



brings.themuothingbut worry — — " 

and dissatisfaction. _ T.E Lawrence, complete with ^ a do-it-yourself cut-out 

However, the tnowfeoe^ mo wr cycle; and disquisitions ^ Alfrcds’s Shared 

^ on govemnwn^pcatwjr sex- Expert* Production ^ 

hotel-chambermaid accom- 
plice and a girl hypochon- 
driac. Rich she may be, but the 
message of the first act is that 

the best thing she ever did was 

to quit her life of imagmary 
illnesses and abscond with the 


van faw » v r -- - a 

uality and the wholesale col- 
lapse of belief (typically, the 
chief victim is a framer de- 
vout atheist). 

By all the rules, the result 
ought to be unstageaWy in- 
coherent, and yet the play 


out to anchor the piece in the 
1920s. This has the effect of 
Jeavingthe more fruftily 19th- 
century figures out in the cold, 
nor has Mr Alfreds managed 
to disguise the fact that Shaw 
regularly leaves characters 


w qiui - r—. «i h the coherent, ana yci uw w^y regularly leaves 
iUnesse s and remainsspeUbindintlts sue- hSging about with nothing to 

quality of each scemc nag- 


■-•“Srirvs a-Sa* iisssKSg 

SS. SSarSSMffi sMBSsaa 

colony, strains _connecno^ ma j n f^ce Ues m the gradual .. __ .*.« 

— of these — - 


Yjrv' 


VAJIUUJ) . 

with the fable past breaking- 

^The form is that of an 
extravaganza, well chosen oy 

when, as he said, he had shot 
his bolt and now wrote with 
no fixed aim in ™n£Any- 
thing can happen in 
eanza; and we get army same 
at the expense of bo ne-hea ded 

top brass; a portrait ot 


detachment of these scenes 
from the growing sense of 
underlying melancholy. Shaw 
is unfeelingly soundi ng off 
about man’s need for proper 
work, rational government 
and all his habitual doctrines. 

Meanwhile, the pain of the 
war is echoing through the 
text, together with a-sense of 
SfatfoT- which finally 


Newth; or in the runaway 
girfs scenes with her asphyx- 
iating mother (Selina Cadell 
and Sheila Reid) - and ft has 
you on the edge of your seat 
The company excel in the ait 
of comic reaction, none more 
than Siaxr Thomas as the lady 
burglar, blissfully funny when 
panhandling the lines in 
cockney-French but even fun- 
nier when she has nothing to 
do but look appalled. 

• Irving Wardle 


Sleeping Beauty 

Govent Garden 


Aurora in The Sleeping 
Beauty was Cynthia Harvey’s 
fifth role at Covent Garden 
since her debut ^ with the Royal 
Ballet four weeks earlier. 
Those roles have covered the 
spectrum of the repertory, 
from Ashton to MacMillan, 
from Robbins to Petipa. There 
c an be no doubt about her 
value to the company (all the 
more with Lesley CoOxer ab- 
sent through .injury), and her 
reception as Aurora made 
clear that she has won a warm 
following. 

The chief merit of her 
dancing in this role is a 
smooth, sustained quality of 
movement This shows es- 
pecially in the creamy way she 
phrases the solo in the Vision 

Sane, making it flow lyrically 

without any loss of definition 
in individual movements. She 
aim has a gift for drama, see? 
in the convincing air of giddi- 

J L. nnrtrivl her 



* • ’• ;, 5 '*■" ■ *»"■' ' ' • 

Natural gift for drama: Cynthia Harvey wife Jay JoDey 

. ... _l» T nmdiirfinfi nftll Marc 

enchanted princess, which she 

. j i . Doinnnn 


played last week. Ravenna 
Tucker took over that assign- 
ment this time, and was 
sharply briffiant With the 
blithely bounding Phillip 
Broomhead as her partner, the 
duet sparkled as it should. 

Pearly lyricism rather than 
diamond glitter seems, on 
present evidence, to be 


role was actually her first time 

in it 

Jay Jolley was her prince. 
He is a gentlemanly partner, 
an actor in the romantic style, 
and it was good to see in his 
solos that he has now worked 
through the difficulties that 
beset him last season after 
injuries. Harvey deserved a 
more gallant set of suitors, 
however, for the Rose Adagio; 
of the four, only Mark Silver 
showed any dignity of com- 
portment, or any sense of I 
occasion. 

A misbehaving curtain in 
the transformation scene 
saved us for once from the , 
ludicrous effect of trees appar- 
ently growing down from 
heaven instead of up from the 
earth; that happy accident 
should be retained as a perma- 
nent improvement 
Among the supporting can I 
must mention Deborah Bull s 

qjtaitynot it lU”like aliull! 

girl, and that mca^JSsbehas to n£$s sansora in the 

n»tv on charm and freshness m ^ plorestan and his 


Lake production next March. 
She has a very womanly 


ness when she has pneatecner u arve y» s strength. It fits well 
finger wfth the magic spindle. ^ the Ballet's ap- 

Becanse iff th6se attributes, proach to tins JJ 

' a A imiM a 


■the role of Aurora suits her a 
lot better than the smaller part 
in this ballet, the Bluebirds 


should suit equally weU when 
she dances the premiere of 
Anthony Dowdl’s new Swan 


rely on charm and freshness in 
ter dancing . to convince as the 
heroine still on the threshold 
of maturity. However that is a 
problem others have faced 
and overcome before her. 
Indeed, Harvey is already so 
nearly there that 1 assumed 
she must have played Aurora 
in America and find it surpris- 
ing to team that so well 
considered, nicely shaded amt 
balanced an account of the 






THE 


WOMEH 



iff 1 * 1 


. BY . 

CLARE 500THE LUCE 

SSSh 

BARBARA WK GEORGIA 
EWING FOSTER 

DIANA ZEN A 

QUICK WALKER 

and SUSANNAH YORK 


it*. 


PATTI 

LOVE 


Royal Opera House 

GENERAL DIRECTOR- 

The Beard of Directors of the Royal 
Opera House, Covent Garden, is considering 
the choice of a successor to Sir John Tooley 
who is due to redre-'in July 1989 as General 
Director; and invites applications for this poSL 
The General Director is the Chief 
.Executive of the Royal Opera House. He is 
responsible to the Board of Directors for the 

co-ordination of artistic policy and the 

. .i_„ TUtaim> am 


MEMORIAL 

CONCERT 





Opera, The Royal BaUet and Sadlers Wells 
RoyalBallet 

• Remuneration and conditions of service 
will be by. arrangement 

Applications should be accompanied by 
curriculum vitaeand the names of 
persons to whom the Board may refer. 1 ney 
should be marked in stria confidence wa 1 oe 
sent, to arrive not later than December loth 
to the Chairman of ihe Board> 

Sir Gaus Moser, KCB,CBE,FBA. 
Royal Opera House. Govern C 5 arden 
PO Boa 284, London WC2E / QX. 


| Cornelius Cardew 

Purc ell Room 

This coacert, a tribute to foe 
socialist composer Cwndiw 
Cardew, who died in a road 
accident five years ago (he 
would have been SO this years 

was promoted by an organiza- 

tion called the Progressive 
Cultural Association, which 
Cardew served as secretwy. 
When it comes to pr ^laimii? ! 

principles the PCA certainly 
do not beat about the bush. In 
the course of applauding 
Cantor's new simplistic, pop- 
ulist style of the Seventies, the 
foreword to the programme 
hook decried avant-gardism, 
seriafism and ‘‘formalism''* m 
mainstream new musk. The 
ose of that last term recalls 
Stalin's stock criticism of mu- 
sic he either could not under- 
stand or did not like. And 
indeed the monster Stalin 
t..‘nw»lf got a word iff praise 
somewhere along the fine. 

That Cardew was ensnared 
by the naive vision iff Utopia 
envisaged by the Manrist- 
Leninists was something 
which appears to have dime 

his later music little good. The 

predominant atmosphere was 
of determined doumess. One 
conld sense the composer wiB- 
irigjhy throwing away his 
personality fra what he genu- 


inely believed was the common 
good. But deliberately to write 
for the people is really not to 
write fra them at all, since the 
people are then denied the 
insig hts of an indiridnaL 
Still, there were one ra two 
things here which were ade- 
amte showcases for that dec- 
adent quality of virtuosity, not 


sisters. 

I must also make space to 
mention the new cast I saw in 
Symphonic Variations at a 
schools’ matinfce on Tuesday. 
Demire Eyden and Mark Sa- 
ver showed qualities very like i 
those of Harvey and Jolley as I 
the central couple; the other 
parts gained from the ~ 
of Broomhead and 1 . 

Tucker and Fiona Chadwick, 
all well suited. Now we have 
got that ballet right, it deserves 
fimher performances soon to 
work it in property. 1 

John Percival 


attent quamy « »iru»suj, 

the piano duo BmSemgse 

( 1981 ), given with! suitable 

brilliance by John Tflteary and 
Andrew BalL And there were 
also the distinctly Pagaraiai- 
Hke “The Worker’s Sar® 
(1979) for solo violin (Alexan- 

der Balanescn), the rather 

initeting Thtdnmn Soma 
(1974) for violin, vibraphone 
and marimba (Bahurescu and 
Gregory Knowles), “Moun- 
tains" (1977) fra sofa bass 
darinet (Ian MHcheD), whmh 
was possibly the best of the 

bonch and, with its mib^v- 

banal dhnax. “We Sing 
for the Fntitre** (1980-81) fra 
job piano (Andrew Botrul), 
Cardew's last completed wt 
But of the five examples 
from Songs from the Peop&s 
Struggles, performed by 8® 
PCA's very own rock-com-iazz 

group, and the <*2^ 

pieces smog by a snaQ, enthu- 
siastic choir, I have fittte to 
sav, except that I found then- 
propagandist sentiments al- 
together sinister. Not in the 
y arin sense either, since ex- 
irenies of left and rqjht meet m 

(he end at the totalitarian hack 
of the dr de. 

Stephen Pettitt 


SEASON EXTENDED 


FRANCES 
DE LA TOUR 



LILLIAN 


***** 

WIUWMLUC€ 

Mm o« v-memmee wousof 

LIliWM HCLLPMM 
CORIH RGDGMVIG 

SUNS NOV 9,16,23,31 

at 4pm 

LYRIC THEATRE 

**FTESBUHY»eiAW' 

TEL! 437 3686/7 4341550] 


Our 

interest rates 
ate going 
in the right 
direction. 


l 3 Sb 

PERMANENT 

BUUISNG SOCIETY 

; AU.RAIESARET'ILT. 2 » 6 lC SATE TrUi PAID 


29 . _ 


^ - 

ud ■ 

rficiency 

which 
ex, ha- 
nd rose 
3wth in 
m an 
LTujn- 
of the 
from 7 
nt an 
entnm. 
lglcs is 
where 
d mil- 

10 mii- 
expen- 
kedto 
tidine i 
which; 
xt not 
is are | 

f this 


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ntes- 

AZT 

f no 
















14 




C 


SPECTRUM 


Batting on, or retiring hurt? 


Tomorrow, Somerset 
members will decide 
whether the dismissal 
of two of the dub’s 
best players was really 
cricket Simon Barnes 
sums up the situation 

If Mars challenged the Earth to a 
game of cricket today, there would 
be three Somerset players in the 
World XI; Ian Botham, magical 
turner of games; Viv Richards, West 
Indian batsman-destroyer; and Joel 
Gamer, West Indian fast bowling 
giant. Not a county in England has a 
trio to match these. 

So how did it happen that 
Somerset finished bottom in the 
county championship in 1985 and 
second last in the season just gone? 
Logically the thing was impossible. 

Then, when the dub heard that a 
young Taunton-educated player 
was advised to join Leicestershire 
rather than Somerset because of the 
dub's reputation, it was time to act. 
Somerset signed a young New 
Zealander, Martin Crowe, and did 
not renew the contracts of the long- 
serving West Indians. 

Richards reacted angrily: “When 
you have two workhorses and you 
shoot them in the back,” he said, “I 


* They have 
lost their 

enthusiasm^ 


think it's eviL You do not treat 
animals in this way. The word was 
oul Bang bang — Viv and Joel are 
dead ...” 

The move was startling, and 
many Somerset supporters were — 
and are — outraged. Botham 
promptly declared that if his two 
best mates went, then he went with 
them. Rebel members have forced 
the issue to a vote at a special 
general meeting of all the members, 
to be held tomorrow at Shepton 
Mallet. The dub is publicly tearing 
itself in two. 

But long before the decision was 
reached, the Somerset playing staff 
was already split- There were the 
stars, and there was the rest a 
division thai captures the essential 
nature of cricket as it is now played 
in England. 

"County cricket is a matter of 
character, discipline and determina- 
tion. a personal assault course. Cold 
Tuesdays are the nature of the 
beast,” Peter Roebuck, that marvel- 
lous cricket writer who also happens 
to be captain of Somerset, wrote. 
"Cricketers do not expea anyone to 
watch the three-day game. They do, 
not really want anyone to watch.” 

But the game the stars play 
involves vast crowds and intense 
media attention. To them the 
county game means little: but to the 
average county pro, it is life itself In 
Somerset, this gulf caused the stars 
to form a clique, an Inner Ring 
defined by those it excluded. And at 
the heart of it was Ian Botham, who 
by nature loves to be part of a 

ITHE5 





i'.> 

/ . . ■■ ■ . 






racketing clique of friends. The 
creation of this team within a team 1 
— led by three men for whom the 
county championship meant little — 
was utterly disruptive of team 
endeavours in the county 
championship. The stars acquired a 
number of unspoken rights. They 
could leave the field with “muscle 
tweaks" and “cramps" whenever 
they wished to.lt was accepted that 
their batting would show applica- 
tion only when it suited them. They 
could pick and choose which games 
they played: “injuries” never struck 
for one-day finals at Lord’s, only on 
cold Tuesdays. 

In nine seasons up to and 
including 1985, Garner played 76 
first class games for Somerset 
during that time others played 
nearer 200. Garner played almost 
every game this season; it would be 
cynical to suggest that this was 
because it was his benefit season. 

A view of this situation depends, 
of course, on whether you think the 
three-day game matters. Many peo- 
ple love it, but even these are mostly 
Platonic lovers, rarely actually go- 
ing to a game. The county 
championship matters only to 
county cricketers and the club’s 
committee men. By contrast, one of 
the most vocal of the Somerset 
rebels seeking to overturn the non- 


6 When Ian and Viv play, 
cricket is never relaxing 9 

Stars on Sunday: Ian Botham and Viv Richards remain dose friends 


retention of Gamer and Richards is 
Bridget Langdon, who says she has 
missed only two of Somerset’s 
limited-over Sunday league games 
in 10 years. “The three-day crowd 
think that cricket should be sedate 
and relaxing and gentle,” she says. 
“But cricket is never relaxing when 
Viv, fan and Jod play.” 

Why then, does the trio of stars 
not work its magic in the three-day 
game? “Richards and Gamer have 
both played cricket for 10 years 
almost non-stop,” the Somerset 
chairman, Michael POO, says. “They 
have lost some of their enthusiasm 
for day-to-day county cricket” 

It is understandable. There is a lot 
wrong with the unending slog of the 
county championship, as there is 
with county cricket’s overseas stars 
policy. But the county champion- 
ship exists. Counties are judged and 
judge themselves on their drawing 
in the competition, and Somerset 


believe that Crowe — a young, keen 
batsman on the verge of stardom — 
is an attractive proposition. Indeed, 
many rebel supporters have said: “I 
agree with the decision, but not with 
the way it was done.” 

But there was, in feet, nothing 
sinister in the way the decision was 
reached. It was a mixture of chance 
and bumbling. When Australia’s 
captain Allan Bonder left Essex 
shortly before the end of this season, 
that county had a vacancy for an 
overseas star. Crowe would have 
been the right man — but he was still 
registered with Somerset after play- 
ing for them during the 1984 season, 
while Gamer and Richards were 
with the West Indian team touring 
England 

Crowe applied for the release of 
his registration — and the commit- 
tee suddenly realised that this could 
be a bad move. The rest followed 
logically, if slowly, and culminated 


m the announcement of the non- 
renewal of the West Indians’ 
contracts. 

“Neither would give any dear 
indication of what their plans were 
beyond 1 988,” said Brian Langford, 
the cricket committee chair man. In 
1988, Richards Garner win prob- 
ably be with another (Lord help os) 
West Indian touring party in Eng- 
land Langford added: “Both do 
find it hard to gear themsdves up 
for normal county cricket.” 

The response of the “rebels”, has 
been large and loud It has reached 
personalities: Roebuck, blown as 
“The Professor” and seen by some 
as too clever by three-quarters, has 
been accused of being the 
Machiavell behind the move. This 
is untrue: Roebuck was neither a 
prime mover nor, initially, a fellow 
traveller. 

In the meantime, the unsavoury 
reputation of Somerset continues to 
sinead Players have left the dub 
and the game, and the dab is 
finding it hard to attract people to 
replace them. The dub is in a mess; 
that . at feast is something on which 
both sides agree. Tomorrow the 
dub will decide which is the more 
important Stars on Sunday, or the 
austere virtues of cold and silent 
Tuesdays. 


HIMES) 


SATURDAY 



£20,000 to be won 



Ski society, making sura it's not downMl el the way 

On the slippery slope 

Skiing's social strata are as dearly marked as a 
black-flagged piste, and tour operators know 
whether they are catering for the C&A-dad 
mass downhill ers or the designer labels looking 
for perfect powder. In a four-page ski special. 
The Times puts an end to silly chalet-ing with 
an sidelong glance at the winter sprats scene 


Fair game In 
the kitchen 
Fresh ways 
with pheasant 


A sensor of 
security 
Burglar alarms 
for the home 


The ascent of a third flunkey 


They thought he was mad to give up 
his job for the stage. Two years later, 
Dave Willetts is a West End star 


Pm* Trimmer 


Can you always get your copy of The Times? 



On a bleak autumn afternoon 
in Coventry two years ago, 
Dave Willetts cleared out his 
desk, handed over the keys of 
his company car and quit a 
well-paid job as quality man- 
ager of an engineering group. 

Two days later, he began a 
new career in a cold, dingy 
church hall — rehearsing for a 
pan as “third flunkey from the 
left” in the chorus of Annie, 
being staged by the local 
Belgrade Theatre. 

At the age of 32, with no 
acting or singing training, 
unable to read music, and 
with a wife and two young 
children to support on a 
sharply reduced salary, . be 
recalls that former colleagues 
considered him “a bit loony”. 

Now they are hiring coaches 
to London to watch his latest 
performance — as Jean 
Valjean, lead role in the hit 
musical Les Miser tables. 

The rapid transformation 
from engineer and part-time 
singer in amateur shows in the 
Midlands to West End star 
astonished Willetts as much as 
anybody else. 

“I'm amazed to he here. I 
suppose it was a risk, but there 
comes a time when you ask 
yourself if a decent salary, an 
expense account and a com- 
pany car are what you want 
out of life. The answer in my 
case was not really.” 

His ragsrto-riches story be- 
gan with a favourable review 
in a local newspaper. Willetts 
said: “The critic said some 
nice things about me in a 
fringe theatre production of 
Flowers for Algernon, and the 
next ihint 1 was offered a part 
inAnnie.li was very tempting, 
and my wife Lyn encouraged 
me to go for it, so I did.” 

A year later, he was prepar- 
ing for another Belgrade 


production. South Pacific, 
when be learned that audi- 
tions were taking place in 
London for Les Miserabtes, 
directed by Trevor Nunn and 
John Caird. 

“I turned up to find about 
250 guys trying for the last 
remaining part in the en- 
semble. I was a bit surprised to 
be recalled the next day, when 
the hopefuls had been reduced 
to half a dozen. 

“Then Trevor asked me to 
sing something from the show, 
and l had to admit I couldn’t 
read a note of music. But he 
said that was okay, and some- 
body came over and plonked 
it out on the piano. I think it 
was to see if I could reach the 
top scale of the piece.” 

The following day, Willetts 
was asked if he would like to 
be principal understudy to 
Cotm Wilkinson who had 
landed the lead role. Last 
month, some 60 performances 
later, the breakthrough came 
when Wilkinson left to star in 
the Broadway production and 
Willetts was invited to take 
over the part. 

“I got quite used to 
substituting for Colm, but 
obviously it’s different now. 
No matter how good you are, 
as fer as the audience is 
concerned, an understudy can 
never be as good as the star. 
Now I feel the part is really 
mine.” 

Fame and fortune is un- 
likely to disrupt the Willetts 
family — Dave still commutes 
from his home in a West 
Midlands village to his eight 
weekly performances. “Al- 
though this is a great way to 
earn your living" he says, 
"you have to stand bade 
sometimes and realize it's not 
the real world” 

Gavin Bell 



Happy being Afiserabies: Willetts savours his success 



CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 100 

ACROSS 

1 Largest Canadian 
province 16) 

5 Go bade on won! (6) 

8 Soil tiller (3) 

9 Intertwine ropes (6) 

10 Against (fi) 

11 Annoyed exclama- 
tion (4) 

J2 Denmark/Sweden 
strait (8) 

14 Speak freely (42) 

17 Cheap and hasty (€) 

19 Concise (8) 

22 Rouse (4) 

24 Price schedule (6) 

25 Gods* drink (6) 

26 Influenza (3) 

27 Bell lower (6) 

28 Come to rest (6) 

DOWN 

2 Superior (5) 

3 Integral (5,2) 

4 Medica] (5-2) ^ 

5 Embed stones in wall 
(5) 

6 Scandinavians) . 

SOLUTION TO NO 1099 

ACROSS: 8 Ritual killing 9PSI 10 Peninsula 11 Adlib 13 Yew 
tree !6 Agdess 19 Round 22 Subtitled 24IBA 25 Mediterranean 
DOWN: I Grappa 2 Atrial 3 Palpable 4 Skinny 5 Han 0 Li- 
quor 7 Agnate 12 Dog 14 World war 15 ESN 1( Assume 17 
Embody 18Salary 20 Unisex 21 Drains 23 Into 


l 



7 Hungarian stew (7) 
13 Dartmoor hill (3) 

15 Featbers(7) 

16 Rhodesia 1965 

breakaway (1.1,1) 

17 Lockjaw (7) 


18 Downy yellow font 
(7) 

20 Steep sea rock fine 
(5) 

21 Smcfly(5) 

23 Profit (5) 


Fighter in the 

blue comer 

T hough about to depart the CBi, 
Sir Terence Beckett is still 


spoiling for a bare knuckle scrap 


W hen he became 
director-general 

of the Confed- 
eration of British 
Industry. Sir Terence Beckett 
shook his members by telling 
their animal conference that 
in order to get their message 
across to the Government 
they would have to be pre- 
pared for “a hare-knuckle 
fight”. Six turbulent years 
later, he feces his final con- 
ference, which, begins in 
Bournemouth on Sunday, 
still spoiling for a gloves-off 
confrontation. 

Now, however, his target 
has broadened to indude 
politicians generally, trade 
unions, civil servants and 
even some of the confed- 
eration's own members — 
anyone, in feet, who can be 
seen to be in the way of the 
salvation of Britain through 
improved industrial 
competitiveness. 

Contrary to popular belief, 
he does not regret his original 
outburst; neither does he 
believe rt harmed the CBFs 
relationship with the Govern- 
ment While CBI members 
were threatening to resign 
over his supposed disloyalty 
to the one political party that 
represented business in- 
terests, Sr Terence was down 
at No 10 at a pre-arranged 
meeting discussing interest 
rates with Mrs Thatcher. Ten 
days later, he recalls with 
satisfaction, rates feU 
Despite Mrs Thatcher's 
dislike of institutions, cor- 
poratism and consensus, she 
appears to have grown fonder 
of the CBL Sir Terence 
believes this is because eight 
years of pay presentations to 
member companies has re- 


As n gains in moral 
authority, the. CBI and its 
leaders believe they c an tur n 
a more caring countenance 
towards social problems such 
as unempfoymeni and the 
north /south divide, issues for 
which the federation's poli- 
cies have too often been 
perceived as Wand. 

His one testing disappoint- 
ment is the “lack of reality” 
in the business world on the 
matter of wages. Sir Terence 
the nation's insular- 
ity, the “sheer inertia” of 20 
years of incomes policies and 
Government compacts, and 
the dinging habit of the 
annual pay round. “We are 
dig gin g onrsehrs deeper into 
the pit.” he adds. 

Soon to be freed from the' 
constraint of having - to 
appear to be non-political. Sir 
Terence now says that the 
reappearance of a Labour 
government would “put us 
‘ hi back into the mayhem 
the 1970s". Eight years 
before he took the CBI 
job, he played a pan in the 
downfall of the test Labour 
administration. 

As chairman of the Ford 
motor company's British di- 
vision, he was unshakeably 
opposed to the imposition of 
sanctions on the company for 
breaching the “voluntary” 5 
per cent pay norm set by 
James Callaghan's Govern- 
ment. Weeks of fear d lobby- 
ing and discussions with Mrs 
Thatcher, then Leader of the 
Opposition, resulted in the 
fateful Commons debate on 
sanctions during which the 
Government was twice 
defeated. 

“It was Christmas, 1978,” 
he remembers. “I had just 




4 ■ = 


Sir Terence: ‘business provides the wherewithal’ 
suited in rises commg come from church, at about 9 


n ‘r. 


down from 15 per cent to 5 
percent; that CBI dout led to 
the provision of 300,000 
youth training scheme {daces; 
that his concentration on die 
regions has allowed grass- 
roots business opinion to 
surface more readily; and that 
the CBTs business strategy, 
carefully constructed over the 
last three years, has con- 
centrated on self-help and 
self-reliance — all music to 
the Prime Minister’s ears. 

“Our policy is now much 
more pro-active rather than 
foe reactionary trends of foe 
past,” he says. “We should 
never be on foe hustings, and 
we should and will speak 
without fear or favour about 
what is best for business. 
There is still insufficient 
recognition among poli- 
ticians and others that it is 
business that provides the 
country with the 
wherewithal.” 

Sir Terence has also tidied 
up the CBI itself; cutting staff 
by 15 per cent and turning an 
inherited deficit into surplus; 
the CBI npw has £3 ouDion of 
reserves and next year it 

expects earning ? to be 

boosted by ^record £850,000 
from organizing conferences 
at its Centre Point head- 
quarters in London. 


pin, and we heard foe news 
on the radio. My wife said: 
‘What have you done? But 
really, foe Government was 
brought down by foe trans- 
port union and its own 
supporters.” 


A; 


victory for Neil 
Kinnock next time 
would, he says, - 
■leave the country . 
worse off than it was in 1979. * 
On foe industrial front, “La- \ 
hour is planning to takeaway ; 
all our common law rights.” i 
With an election looming, I 
next week’s conference could 1 
find the CBI again open to foe { 
criticism of excessive caution * 
and a lack of spirit ■ 

In bis concluding speech on ' 
Tuesday (which will be in the ’ 
nature of a valediction, air * 
though he wifi not give up 
chair to the incoming Johuj 
Banham, head of foe doyer 
mem’s Audit Commisrio 
until the spring), Sir Terences 
just might find another; bawj 
knuckle comment mesistfitifi 1 
“I could do with another? 
haymaker,” he says. “After foe* 
last one I filled a lot afhaBs* 
with people wanting to hear *, 
what I might say next” j 

Edward Townsend ; 





The feature on Aberdeen and the oil industry, 
planned for today, has been held over 



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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


FRIDAY PAGE 



15 



place, easy 


to 



# A handicapped child can be just as loving as 
any other, yet adoption agencies find it hard 
to find homes for them. A new video scheme 
will give prospective parents an idea of what 
such children are like. Peta Levi reports 


Once 14-year-old Robert's shyness 
slips away, he has a lovely smile. He 
is affectionate, has a sense of 
humour and enjoys playing cricket 
and football and listening to music 
and stories. Robert has been in care 
since the age of six; he is mentally 
handicapped, but can feed and dress 
himself and an intensive toilet 
training programme is progressing 
well, even though it sometimes 
provokes his temper. 

He win amuse himself for hours 
with his cars and jig-saw pozzies, 
» both of which he marshal* into 
orderly lines, showing organiza- 
tional ability. He is helpful, clearing 
plates and fetching water and glasses 
without being asked. 

Although he is living happily in a 

( small, well-nm “amity-group” 
home for mentally handicapped 
children in Yorkshire, he is a child 
who would undoubtedly benefit 
from the stimulation of a loving 
family. It is not hard to imagine his 
darity of speech, his co-ordination 
(he has recently taken to drawing 
with pens), general skills and self- 
confidence developing enormously 
in such a secure environment 
The problem is finding him such 
a family. In the hope of helping 
children like Robert, British Agen- 
cies for Adoption and Fostering 
(BAAF) this week launch a new 
scheme. Adoption by Video. BAAF 
y is a professional association offering 
7 a range of services to aO who work 
in child care. Apart from 1.500 
individual members, its c or porate 


members include all UR voluntary 
adoption agencies and all local 
authorities but one (Staffordshire). 

Adoption by Video is believed to 
be a unique scheme for arousing 
interest in parenting children with 
handicaps. Bridget Warr, one of 
BAAFs assistant directors, says: 
‘‘The idea to make 20^minute 
videos of children with special 
needs seeking parents (such as 
Robert) was a natural development 
from our highly successful book, Be 
My Parent. The book has proved 
very effective in bringing a child's 
particular needs to lire We have 
started the hew scheme by making 
videos of 20 children to see if by 
giving more information on a child 
it win attract more parents.” - 
Through BAAFs Exchange Ser- 
vice, which links adoption agencies 

‘You need sensitivity, 
patience, stamina and 
a sense of humour’ 

throughout the UK, it has found 
families for Z000 children. Since 
the launch in 1980 of Be My Parent, 
a loose-leaf book with photos and 
information about children with 
special needs, 334 children, repres- 
enting some of the most handi- 
capped, have found families. Only a 
few have not settled with their 
families, usually because of the 
severity of their handicap, or be- 



Waiting: Robert, 14, one of the mentally handicapped children featured 
on video, enjoys listening to music. He has been in care since be was six 


cause in the case of older children, 
they have never known famil y life. 

There were about 78,000 children 
in care in England and Wales in 
1983 and more Than half had been 
in care for more than three years. 
BAAFs policy, borne out by experi- 
ence, is that the best place for any 
child to he brought upisina family. 

The handicapped children who 
have been adopted through Be My 
Parent appear to do welL For 
example. Bob was severely phys- 
ically handicapped, could not walk 
or talk and rarely smiled, yet a 
miner and- his wife, with grown-up 
children, “took a shine” to him and 
adopted him. BAAF received a 
Christmas card showing Bob stand- 
ing at the gate with an enormous 
grin, only equal to that of his 
adoptive parents, justifiably de- 
lighted with their “son’s" progress. 

Many of the children placed by 
BAAF are mentally and physically 


handicapped and some have 
behavioural problems. Ware says: 
“Ten years ago it would have been 
almost impossible to place a 
Down's child, but now this handi- 
cap is much better understood and 
they are among the easiest to place.” 

What problems face a family 
adopting a child with special needs? 
One social weaker says: “One of the 
biggest initial problems is coping 
with the stigma of becoming a 
handicapped family, a problem that 
siblings can find particularly diffi- 
cult. I question why prospective 
parents are wanting to adopt a 
handicapped child, to make sore 
they have a realistic, not a senti- 
mental or romantic, approach. You 
also need sensitivity, patience, 
stamina and a sense of humour” 

The backgrounds of adoptive 
parents vary widely, but their 
characters tend to be of a type — 
they have a need or desire to look af- 


ter another human being, a forceful 
personality prepared to fight for the 
child's rights, and frequently they 
have experience of coping with a 
handicapped person. 

One such family is Pauline and 
Greig Stewart and their seven-year- 
old daughter. Aime-Morag. Pauline 
has had five miscarriages, and gave 
birth to a severely handicapped 
daughter who died at the age of four 
weeks. She spent seven months in 
hospital when pregnant with Anne* 
Morag. Pauline and Greig sakk “We 
fdt there was a space to be filled and 
we had an awful lot of love lo give.” 

At first they had wanted to adopt 
a physically handicapped child, but 
after the birth of their own mentally 
handicapped daughter, they felt 
they could not only cope, but that it 
would be a challenge to care tor a 
child with a mental handicap. It 
took them two and a half years and 
30 letters to adoption agencies 
before they found six-month-old 


‘Out aim is to make 
him independent by 
the age of, say, 20’ 

Adam, with Down's Syndrome, 
through the Be My Parent book. 

Adam is now two. On 
from nursery school he 
round the room giving everyone a 
wet kiss. He feeds himself, says 
“hello” and “la”, knows his colours 
and counts up to five. Pauline's 
fighting spirit has expressed itself in 
her demanding a place for Adam at 
the local nursery school. When 
Adam was not considered suf- 
ficiently handicapped for physio- 
therapy from the stretched local 
services, Pauline went on a course 
to learn portage (exercises devised 
for children with mental handi- 
caps), which she regularly does with 
Adam. She also trained in makaton, 
a sign language where you say the 
worn at the same time as making a 
sign, so that the child commu- 
nicates by signs before actually 
speaking the word, then masters the 
word ana drops the sign. 

“Our aim is to help Adam to 
become independent,*' Pauline 
says, “so that at the age of, say, 20 he 
can move away from home and lead 
an independent life." They are 
already inquiring about hostels and 
adult training, and have made 
provision for Adam in their wills. 

gfriMB Nm^Mpan Ltd IBM 

Be My Parent books, located in 400 
homes or offices throughout the coun- 
try. can be seen by applying to BAAF, 
IJ Southwark Street. London SEI 
IRQ (01-407 9763). A video can then 
be sent to interested parents. 


A breath of fresh air for the British perfume market 


The notion of British fra- 
grance used to conjure, up -a 
hazy image of faVeaoer water? * 
scented drawer-liners and foe. 
lingering aroma of visiting 
great-aunts’ moth-balls. Oar 
once-flourishing Mayfair per- . 
fume industry has lagged sadly 
behind in foe highly commer- 
cialized race to clutter smart 
dressing tables with fra- 
grances, almost always 
* French, whose designer links 
?lend them an allure some-, 
times quite out of proportion 
with the perfumes themselves. 

Ironically, that bastion of 
bespoke masculinity, Jermyn 
Street, was the setting for the 
launch this week of a new up- 
market British women’s per- 
fume — the brainchild of a 
dynamic young duo whose 
appearance on the scent scene 


is like a breath of fresh air. 
Amaryllis is the creation of 
Martin W3Uams~andr FbiJip 
Montague-Peters,. who pro- 
tests that too many scents on 
sale- today “are not lovely, 
adorable smells— but cleverly 
marketed odours which could 
strip punt at 15 paces?. 

The impeccably tailored 
partnership was forged when 
Martin was asked by his 
father, foe managing director 
of gentleman's outfitters 
Turnbull and Asser, to find a 
new cologne which could be 
sold alongside foe silk ties and 
striped shirts. Martin, who has 
had a life-long passion for 
packaging, spotted a particu- 
larly beautiful perfume bottle 
and asked to be put in touch 
with the scent’s creator. 

Philip Montague-Peters, at 



Nose for a trend: Montague-Peters (left) and Williams 


36, is Britain's finest “nose” — 
a rare trait, enabling him 
almost magically to identity 
different scents and so conjure 
up alluring combinations. “It 
was a slightly strange career 
choice; I'd always thought that 


smells were something too 
effeminate even lo comment 
on. But having nothing better 
to do, I went for an interview 
with Yardley in 1969, and 
they made me sniff 24 dif- 
ferent lavender oils in order to 


pick out foe best quality. I 
happened to choose the right 
stum” he says modestly. 

Montague-Peters’s nose and 
Williams's marketing skills 
have come together to form a 
partnership called Alpha Blue 
whose express intention is to. 
change the frumpy identity of 
British perfume. After the 
cologne for Turnbull and As- 
ser came several commissions 
— including a request to 
produce “a salty dog smell for 
Captain O. hi Watts, the 
oldest ships' chandler in 
Europe” — but Montague- 
Peters had long cherished the 
dream of launching Amaryllis, 
a perfume “whose emphasis is 
on quality rather than mass 
marketing”. It is a subtle, 
feminine fragrance blending 
rose, jasmine, orange flower. 


hyacinth, oak moss, bergamot 
and lavender oil which per- 
fectly fits their brief that 
“perfume should enhance a 
woman, not be something you 
can smell before she turns foe 
corner”. 

They are both intensely 
proud of foe Britishness of 
their product, of which hand- 
to-please Hatreds buyers 
“took one whiff and they were 
sold". In keeping with one 
Jennyn Street tradition, at 
least, it sells for 20 guineas 
(£21) for !5mL “Launching 
Amaryllis is a bit like having a 
baby,” says Philip, who is 
father to two of his own. 
“Only this smells better,” 
adds Martin. 

Josephine Fairley 

(QTIWIBI Mw wp ap tl ua 18 M 


MEDICAL BRIEFING 


Crack 

troops 

Doctors used to treating 
stress fractures will not be 
surprised to learn that David 
Colvin, Councillor at rbe Brit' 
ish Embassy in Budapest, is 
hobbling around because his 
leg spontaneously broke 
while be was playing squash, 
A recent leading article la 
The lancet showed that 2 per 
cent of male recruits to the 
VS Army developed a stress 
fracture during training. Sol- 
diers in the Israeli Army, who 
apparently undergo much 
more rigorous training, had a 


31 per cent incidence of one 
stress fracture or another. 

Although spontaneous 
fractures occasioned by ex- 
tremes of exercise usually 

occur hi the lower Umbs, they 

can affect any bones. The 
bones which are most apt to 
break are the tibia (the huger 
bone hi the. lower leg) which 
cracks just below fie knee, 
and (he metatarsal bones of 
the foot 

Once someone has suffered 

a stress fracture, he or she is 
more likely to sustain others 
and to have osteoporosis 
(rarefaction of the bones) in 
later life. These patients 
should take plenty of calcium, 
not too much alcohol — and a 
liberal amount of good, steady 
exercise. 



Chopstick trap for unwary 

Although the Queen's skill with chopsticks 
was obviously pleasing to her Chinese hosts, 
a letter in The Lancet from Drs M.F. Myszor 
and J. Rees draws our attention to the 
dangers of chopsticks. In order to avoid 
embarrassing other guests by eating slowly, 

inexperienced users can be tempted to 

swallow over-large pieces of meat Food cut and served in 
the western way will not normally stick in the oesophagus 
(gullet). If it does, or even if it seems to, it is an indication of 
the need for immediate investigation. 

When chopsticks are inexpertly handled, or meat has 
been badly cut up, swallowing can be difficult even with a 
normal oesophagus. The Newcastle doctors describe two 
recent cases in which gastroscopy was needed to clear 
away a Chinese dinner which had become impacted. The 
first was of a 38-year-old man who was hurrying through his 
meal when he developed a sudden chest pain and could 
swallow neither food nor drink. The next day, in hospital, a 
large piece of liver was found to be causing a complete 
oesophageal obstruction. After its removal ne made an 
uneventful recovery. The other patient was a 34-year-oid 
housewife, whose dinner was ended by a bit of sliced beef. 

Even the Chinese have their problems: the largest study of 
obstruction of an otherwise healthy oesophagus has been 
conducted in Hong Kong. 



Smiles that 
reveal all 

Forty years 
ago, when foe 
manufacture of 
cosmetics was 
less sophis- 
ticated than it 
is today, it was 
common to see women's front 
teeth smeared with lipstick. 
Since it began to be made with 
a hydrophobic base, teeth are 
now left sparkling dean, pro- 
dded there is adequate saliva. 
Dr G J. Rniz-Arqoelles has 
written to foe New England 
Journal of Medicine suggest- 
ing that die sight is so rare 
these days that when it is seen 
it has a clinical significance. 
Having excluded other causes 

Hormone link 
with cancer 

Today's body builder 
supplements his regime with 
anabolic steroids, hormones 
of one type or another 
designed to increase body 
mass and muscle power. 

Likewise the insecure mid- 
dle-aged man anxious about 
his failing sexual prowess 
takes testosterone or its 
more sophisticated 
equivalents. 

Dr J.T. Roberts, of New- 
castle General Hospital, and 
Mr D.S. Essenhigh, of the 
Department of Urology of 
the Freeman Hospital, New- 


of dry month sneb as anti- 
depressants, some 

tranquillizers, or dehydration 
in poorly controlled diabetics, 
he says that a diagnosis of 
Sjogren's syndrome should be 

considered. 

Although little known to 
foe general public, the syn- 
drome is surprisingly com- 
mon: surveys show that about 
one in 2,000 of foe population 
are affected. It usually at- 
tacks foe older age group, and 
women more often than men. 

Sjogren's is an auto-im- 
mune disease in which there 
is destruction of the tear and 
salivary glands, so that eyes 
and month are very dry and 
vulnerable to secondary infec- 
tion. The syndrome is often 
associated with rheumatic 
diseases. 

castle upon Tyne, have writ- 
ten to The Lancet suggesting 
that as testosterone supple- 
ments have been shown to 
increase the chances of 
developing cancer of foe 
prostrate, there may also be 
a relationship between the 
use of the anabolic steroids 
and testosterone substitutes 
and this malignancy. The 
disease is uncommon in men 
under the age of 55, so they 
Illustrate their point by quot- 
ing the case of a 38-year-old 
body builder who already 
had an advanced growth 
when first seen. He had been 
taking hormones for 20 
years. 

Dr Thomas Stnttaford 


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FIRST PERSON 


Nightie nightmare 


One of my weaknesses 
m is foe inability to avoid 
b sending for clothes 
■p from mail order cat- 
alogues. The models in 
them look so attractive and 
smart, and yet one might just 
meet them in the supermarket 
- so unlike the glossy maga- 
zine models, who dearly never 
eat, or even sit down at afl. 

So when my eye fell on the 
picture of the lawn nightdress, . 
Victorian style, with lace trim- 
ming, at £17.58, I did not 
hesitate. Off went the order 
(on my credit card) and in no 
time a very large cardboard 
container was waiting o n tty 
doorstep. “A free gift with 
your first order?” Of 
course.. From the layers of 
plastic bobbles emerged: a 
lemon squeezer, a pair of 
spaghetti servos, a “ref ' 
two set”, two tartan 


bottom, a nightdress. Vic- 
torian style. What a delicious 
picture it *11 conjured up - self 
and spouse seated in the 
garden on oar individual tar- 
tan rags, daintily serving one 


tattoo. 

The picture was short-lived 
however; there was an advice 
note fur £36.60. Out came the 
SeUotape and off I went to the 
post office to send hack the 
package by recorded delivery 
(essential when d e a ling with 
mailorder firms). On the way 
home 1 remembered the credit 
card company's rale — pos- 
itively no cancellations - and 
made a telephone calL With 
computer speed I was re- 
assured; my account had been 
debited by HIM. 

A letter to foe firm asking 
the reason for the extra £5 
rereived no reply, nor dW a 
second, a fortnight Inter. 
Directory Enquiries had no 
entry under that name. A call 
to the credit card company 


produced an address in the 
Midlands bat no number, and 
once again Directory En- 
quiries had nothing. I tele- 
phoned the nearest Cha m b er 
of Commence. 

“Oh yes,” they said, “we 
have had a lot of queries about 
that firm.” They gave me the 
number. I dialled it. A faint 
voice assured me “everything 
would be sorted out”. Ami in 
dne (actually overdue) course a 
letter arrived, expressing re- 
gret that I had received goods 
not ordered and offering to pay 
the return postage. The writer, 
from the Customer liaison 
Service, enclosed an ml*. By 
the same post came another 
letter teDing me the writer was 
unable to trace any payment 
for six items. 

Two weeks after replying to 
both I got a cheque for the 
return postage and a letter 
from the credit card manager 
to say the £5 represented 
postage and “off-shore 
handling”. As 1 live in the 
Channel Islands the goods had 
undoubtedly been handled: 
honour was satisfied. 

Ten days later came a letter 
from someone else in the 
Customer liaison Service 
informing me that their stock 
of lawn nightdresses was now 
exhausted and as this Hem 
mold not be repeated, I .wonld 
be credited with £2X50. At tire 
same time came a letter came 
from the credit card 
company . . . “arrangements 
will be made to redebit this 
sum to yonr account and the 
adjustment...* 4 

New catalogues are falling 
through foe letter box like 
autumn leaves at the 
moment Now what 
about the “duvet, with 
cover in exotic or coun- 
try flower print?” 

Ann Carr 


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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


The Iranian 


Eiranians 


Wasted effort 


David Steel received a shock the 
other day when he went to 
Liverpool to film his part for this 
week's SDP party political broad- 
cast. Last year he was filmed for a 
Channel 4 programme on a dere- 
lict site in Knowsley. saying 
proudly that the Liberal-run 
Liverpool council was going to 
transform the area by building 
houses there. What a good idea it 
would be. he decided, to go back to 
that very spot and show the public 
the Libera] achievement which, he 
thought, would be ready by next 
week. .Alas, when he arrived, it was 
in the same state as on his 
previous visit. Steel's advisers had 
failed to appreciate that the Mili- 
tants bad taken over Liverpool in 
the interim and shelved the pre- 
vious council's pirns. 


Browsing 


Has the Labour PR machine 
caught up with Denis Healey? 
Lunching in the Commons cafe 
the other day. I spied him at the 
next table — his famous upwardly- 
curling eyebrows a mere whisker 
of their former selves. I am 
convinced he has trimmed them 
for the new session. 


BARRY FANTONI 




THE TIMES 

TORIES 

ELECTION 

FAVOURITES 

SA'tS 

POLL 


•I wonder how the BBC will 
report that without bias’ 


Case work 


The Museums Association, with 
what Lady Bracknell would surely 
have regarded less as misfortune 
than carelessness, has lost seven 
whole museums. A pathetic para- 
graph in its latest bulletin laments 
that a large number of envelopes 
containing requests for informa- 
tion for the association yearbook 
have been returned marked 
“Gone Away”. Now it is appealing 
for “information as to the 
whereabouts'" of seven museums, 
including the Beatrix Potter, 
Boarding House, Balloch and Bath 
Carriage museums. 


Digital watch 


You can always tell when the 
strain is getting to captains of 
industry; they start to forget their 
own telephone numbers. This 
happened yesterday at a Manches- 
ter press conference to Sir Denis 
Rooke, chairman of British Gas, 
whose number must be among the 
most publicized in the country. 
Commenting on his £20 million 
publicity campaign, he cited the 
□umber to be dialled by putative 
shareholders' as 0242 242242, 
Rothschild managing director Mi- 
chael Richardson had to remind 
him that the two 4s in the second 
part should have been 7s. “Ah, 
welL" said Sir Denis, “I don’t have 
to ring it myself.” There’s no 
answer to that 


All-rounder 


Having hit himself for six, politi- 
cally at least, Jeffrey Archer none 
the less retains his place in another 
arena of controversy, Somerset 
Cricket Club. I discover that the 
risk-prone novelist is a member of 
the club and is expected to attend 
tomorrow’s important meeting at 
Shepton Mallet’s Royal Bath and 
West showground, at which the 
issue of the club's two West Indian 
players, Viv Richards and Joe! 
Garner, is to be discussed I gather 
that his membership of the club 
derives from his connections with 
Weston-super-Mare, and that he 
has become quite a good friend of 
the two celebrated cricketers. In 
which case be cannot be all bad 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 




Kenneth Baker, Education Secretary, is to launch an initiative to improve the teaching of En glish. Here he laments the extent 


to which television for most children has replaced trading and argues that the language is our greatest national asset 


Robert McFariane’s alleged use of 
a false Irish passport on his 
“peace" mission to Tehran carries 
a strong echo of a previous US 
penetration of Iran. The abortive 
operation to rescue the American 
hostages during the Carter presi- 
dency in 1980 was headed by 
Richard Meadows, a Green Beret 
veteran who for some months 
previously posed as an Irish 
civilian living in Tehran. He 
managed to retain bis cover and 
get out of the country. I can only 
conclude that there must be an 
abundance of Irish passports in 
the CIA special printing section. 


Blood boiler 


I have to tell you that Mrs 
Thatcher has missed her vocation.. 
While she was Education Sec- 
retary in Ted Heath's government 
(how distant seem those shrill, 
pre-Saaichi, milk-snatching days) 
she went to Harrow fora chat with 
the housemaster on the progress of 
her soon-to-be-errant son, Mark. 
Sitting patiently outside the 
master’s study, she was alarmed 
when the house tutor appeared 
and mistook our future PM for a 
candidate for the vacant job of 
matron. Unfortunate, perhaps, 
though perfectly understandable. 


N ext to our people, our 
language is our great- 
est national asset: it is 
the essential ingredi- 
ent of the Englishness 
of England. Its role io our national 
life is probably more important 
today than ever before, because it 
endures at a time which has seen 
so much that characterized our 
country change and disappear. 

Fascinating things could be said 
about English in relation to other 
parts of Britain. I shall not venture 
into that territory since my 
responsibilities as a minister are in 
the main limited to England. 

What is it that constitutes a 
nation? It is the people of England 
who fashion the shape, create the 
flavour and determine the direc- 
tion of our changing national 
consciousness. The thing that has 
held them together over the 
centuries, and would still allow an 
Englishman transported back 100, 
200 or 400 years, if you have a 
good ear for accent, to recognize 
that he was in the same country, is 
the English Language. So the 
people of England, wherever they 
came from in the first place 
(Scandinavia. Ireland, France, 
Eastern Europe. Asia or the Carib- 
bean) have been bound together 
and are bound together by the 
English language. 

Our language must not be 
treated as a museum piece: to be 
protected from the ebb and flow of 
daily fife: removed from the 
market place for fear the rough 
longues of common men may 
tarnish and abuse it It is a living 
thing healthy and robust enough 
to thrive in tap rooms, pulpits and 
senior common rooms. But that 
great asset must be nourished and 
treasured and enhanced. We are 
indeed lucky that it has become 
the main language in the world. It 
need not have been so. If Clive of 
India and Wolfe in North America 
had not beaten the French, and if 
Cook had not reached Australia 
when he did. then other languages 
might well have been more widely 
established. 

Like a garden a language needs 
care and attention; it needs 
cahivation and I am not at all 
happy that this is happening. Two 
years ago my predecessor. Sir 
Keith Joseph, authorized Her 
Majesty's Inspectors to publish a 
discussion paper on the curricu- 
lum in English for children aged 
from five to 16. 

The paper invited comments. 
HMI received 931 formal rep- 
resentations. It was quite obvious 
that while there was widespread 
agreement about the purposes of 
English teaching, the importance 
of dealing with language in use, 
spoken and written, and about the 
centrality of literature in English 
teaching there was no agreement 
or consistency about what chil- 
dren of various abilities should be 
expected to achieve by different 
ages. In particular there was 
widespread disagreement and 
confusion about what should be 
taught about bow our language 
works. For example, in a few 
schools there is still an attempt to 
teach grammar in the way that my 
generation understood that term. ’ 
In other schools pupils are no 
longer taught about their own 
language. 

What seems clear from what I 
have seen is the importance of 
reading, both for its own sake and 
to build up the other language 
skills of speaking, listening and 
writing. 

Frequently I hear employers 
complain that many school leav- 


Washington 

In his occasional moods as a 
custodian of the Atlantic alliance, 
Denis Healey argues that the 
principal obstacle to good trans- 
atlantic relations will happily soon 
be removed. President Reagan 
will retire from the scene in two 
years time and with him will go all 
the conservative follies of recent 
years — the Strategic Defence 
Initiative (“Star Wars”), military 
responses to terrorism like the 
Libyan raid, help for the Nica- 
raguan contras and other anti- 
communist guerrillas in Angola, 
Afghanistan and elsewhere, and 
the US arms build-up. 

Under Reagan's successor, of 
whatever party, Healey's friends 
in the East Coast liberal establish- 
ment will return to power and 
influence — and detente, vigorous 
anti-terrorist consultation and Salt 
2, 3, 4, and 3 will be back on the 
international agenda. The Reagan 


presidency will seem like a dread- 
nil nightmare or, to use the 


PHS 


ful nightmare or, to use the 
approved phrase, “an aberration”. 

The manifest element of wish 
fulfilment in such predictions has 
served to discredit them until 
now. But, it is being asked, does 
not the outcome of the midterm 
elections, in which the Democrats 
took control of the Senate, estab- 
lish that the influence of 
Reaganism is doomed to fade? 
The answer is that it does not 

The Republican defeat, as The 
Times pointed out yesterday, was 
a modest one by historical stan- 
dards. They lost eight Senate seats 
and six House seats yet gained 
eight governorships. At the com- 
parable stage in their presidencies, 
Roosevelt saw his party lose six 
Senate seats and 71 House seats in 
I93S and Eisenhower had to 
swallow a loss of 13 Republican 
senators, 48 House seats and six 
governorships in 1958. 

If these comparisons dem- 
onstrate anything, it is that even 
the shrewdest politician and the 
most effective campaigner must 
lose an election some time. That 
being so, they should ensure that 
they lose it by the right margin, to 
the right people, on the right issues 
and at the right time. 

Judged by those criteria, Reagan 
has not done loo badly. He lost 
(where he did not actually win) by 
a smaller than usual margin. 
Perhaps the fairest test here is the 
total popular vote for the nation- 
wide elections to the House of 
Representatives, which divided 
only 51-45 per cent between 
Democrats and Republicans com- 



a dess w read aloud and commu- 
nicate will) the teacher and with 
other children, to have confidence _ 

in ■ |i ° n 8 words in afl cucum- f 
stances. 1 fear in too many of our 
schools passivity has been allowed, 
io be the norm. 



ers applying for a job after 1 1 years 
of compulsory education cannot 
write simply, clearly and without 
obvious error. That is often an 
exaggeration, but there is disquiet. 
Some research which I will be 
publishing shortly shows that nine 
out of 10 of 1 1-year-olds said that 
they enjoyed reading stories, but 
two out of 10 indicated that they 
only read what they had to and 
four out of 10 indicated that they 
do not usually read at home. At 
the age of 15 the surveys showed 
the somewhat diminished enthu- 
siasm for reading among pupils of 
both sexes. About eight out of 10 
said they enjoyed reading, but one 
in four said they rarely read books 
at home and the same proportion 
indicated that, apart from school 
work, they only read if they 
wanted to find out something. 


box. more books 


of television, some of which. is 
excellent and stimulating, but 
much of which is mundane and 
brain-numbing. Even the best 
television adaptations of good 
books are thin when compared 
with the books themselves. ‘ 

All TV drama has a tendency to 
concentrate on intimate human 
relationships. Perhaps this is dic- 
tated by the medium itself. The 
best drama is done consummately 
well; but the excellent series The 
Jewel in the Crown lost that 
teeming presence of India, and the 
politics and turmoil of a nation 
moving painfully towards in- 
dependence, within which the Last 
of the British Raj were caught up 
and buffeted around. 


T W ^^ ere IS 1,0 ^ ou ^ 1 that 
• fa 'children spend a lot of 
§3 time looking at tele- 

11 vision. Popular TV and 

School Children , pub- 
lished by my department in 1983, 
indicated that children aged be- 
tween five and 14 spend an 
average of 23 hours per week 
watching television — that’s about 
a fifth of die waking hours 

1 find this depressing. I know 
there are books and books and too 
many best-sellers today cynically 
cash in on a crude formula of sex 
and violence. But literature, the 
reading of good books, is a richer 
and deejjer experience than watch- 
ing television. A particular feature 
of the written or spoken word in 
isolation from visual image is the 
unique demand it makes upon the 
imagination. Written or spoken 
poetry and prose stimulates and 
enriches the imagination of the 
listener or reader. He cannot make 
sense of what he sees or hears 
without the full play of imagina- 
tion. A society whose imagination 
is retarded or stagnating is a 
society which is looking at a bleak 
future. It is vital as a sustained 
effort, not least in our teacher 
training establishments and our 
schools, to stress the importance 
of books at a time when these are 
threatened by the persuasiveness 


In the recent television version 
of Bleak House, which evoked 
brilliantly the Victorian fog, I was 
sad that one of my fevourite comic 
characters, Mrs Jellyby, was omit- 
ted. 


Books, and the development in 
children of a love of reading for its 
own sake, for the enlightenment it 
can bring, and for the engagement 
with language and authors, wres- 
tling to create sense out of chaos 
and to carve some meaning out of 
absurdity, are under threat from 
some streams of educational 
thought and practice. For exam- 
ple, that which perceives books as 
simply another source of informa- 
tion. inferior to the electronic data 
base or the programmed instruc- 
tion manual. 


Also there are those who use 
books as a kind of hurdle to be 
overcome by dint of dutiful 
reading in order to answer, with- 
out any real understanding, a 
series of peripheral, pernidrity 
questions: “Was Duncan's blood 
really golden?’ or “What colour 
were Madame Bovary’s eyes?" All 
this loses right of and causes some 
of our children never to experi- 
ence, that sense of engagement 
with a common humanity to 
which Yeats referred when he said 
that reading great literature “eases 
the dreadful loneliness of man”. 

Interest in reading should not 
just be left to the teacher or the 
school. The parent can have a 


John O’Sullivan 


Don’t write off 
Reaganism 


•y^vV 



Roosevelt and Eisenhower: both suffered far worse 
midterm setbacks daring their presidencies 


pared to 55-43 per cent in the 
previous midterm elections in 
1978 and 1982. The Republican 
losses, secondly, resulted mainly 
from the victories of southern 
Democrats who are every bit as 
conservative as Reagan himself. 

Thirdly, the losses occurred in 
the middle of bis second term 
when he has only a year of 
effective government before cam- 
paigning for the 1988 congres- 
sional elections begins in earnest 
And. finally, the winning Demo- 
cratic issues amounted to a “me 
too” campaign which refrained 
from criticizing Reagan's policies 
on taxation, defence, the budget 
and Easi-West relations and con- 
centrated on local issues of no 
general or lasting importance. 

To grasp the novel curiosity of 
all this, cast your mind back to the 
midterm elections of 1982. Demo- 
crats fought that campaign in the 
bitterest of terms, damning 
Reagan as an ideological extremist 
whose policies would impoverish 
the country, heighten racial ten- 
sion, encourage crime, and 
threaten peace - the Healey view 
of things, in fact. By 1984 this 


indictment had been reduced to 
the argument that although he was 
a fine fellow personally, his poli- 
cies were risky and unpopular. His 
election was a reflection of his 
personal popularity and therefore 
had no political significance. 

Now, two years later (when, 
according to the 1982 predictions, 
the Tiber should be foaming with 
blood), Reagan’s policies have 
been rehabilitated as well to die 
extent that the Democrats either 
support them or greatly mute their 
opposition. It is a remarkable turn 
around. The entire political spec- 
trum has moved to the right. 
Healey, who has seen the Labour 
Party undergo the same process in 
reverse, should recognize what has 
happened. 

The Democrats are, of course, 
adapting to popular opinion. Hie 
polls have shown a high approval 
rating for Reagan's policies in 
general, and large support for ■ 
certain policies in particular. The 
Strategic Defence Initiative, for 
instance, is distinctly popular and, 
its popularity has risen since the 
Reykjavik summit. It cannot have - 
been part of Gorbachov’s in ten- * 


'great influence and at an early age 
probably an even greater influence 
than school. There is now ample 
evidence to show that children 
benefit in language skills, in 
understanding and expressing 
themselves, n stories are read to 
them by their parents and their 
parents encourage them to read, 
and to talk about their thoughts 
and experiences. But it is aB too 
easy for a child to switch on Bugs 
Bunny or Donald Duck rather 
than take a book off the shelf and 
tead it at bedtime. 

It has become unfashionable to 
teach children the benefits of 
learning things by heart learning 
by heart is not only good memory 
training, it also gives a sense of 
achievement But it need not be a 
chore. Children who come to 
enjoy poetry by bearing it spoken 
welt and speaking it confidently 
themselves, will learn it by heart 
because speaking poetry well can- 
not be done if your eyes are tied to 
the printed page. 1 suspect I shall 
be told by many educators that 
I'm old-fashioned. But being old- 
fashioned is not the same as being 
wrong. 


opinion polls to identify the party 
they felt they belonged to, the 
Democrats received twice as 
much support as the Republicans 
— 46 per cent to 23 per cent cm av- 
erage. These figures have bean 
shifting in the Republicans’ favour 
ever since so that today about 36 


Democrats and 33 with the 
Republicans. 

Barring great convulsions like a 
war or a depression, moreover, 
this trend is likely to continue. 
For, as Public Opinion magnrfnp 
pointed out in a recent issue, 
Democrats are dying and Repub- 
licans are being bom (or at least 
going on the electoral register). 
The most strongly Democratic age 
cohort is that winch formed its 
political sympathies during the 
Great Depression; its members are 
now aged between-63 and 72 and 
win gradually — how shall I put it 
— decline in psephological im- 
portance. 

By contrast there are healthy 
majorities for the Republicans 
among those aged 27 and below 
who came to political maturity 
during the Cuter and Reagan 
presidencies. And since Reagan is 
apparently just as popular with 
their younger brothers and sisters 
at - school and university, the 
natural constituency of the 
Republicans will continue grow- 
ing for some years. This 
that Reaganism is likely to remain 
the status quo to which both , 
parties adjust. 

Of course, there is more to life 
and politics than statistics of party 
identification. The Democrats 
have just received a psychological 
boost from their capture ofthe 
Senate. They may build on then- 
new moderation to launch a more 
serious bid for the presidency in 
1988. Reagan may be followed by 
Republican contenders who lack 
his latent for arousing and uniting 
America’s natural conservative 
majority. Some great convulsion 
might change everything. But 
Healey should adjust to the feet 
that real life is not Dynasty. He is 
not going to wake up to find the 
last few years have been a horrible 
nightmare and that President 
Carter is still dispensing homilies 
from the White House. 


A nalysis of modern cul- 
ture is a hazardous 
affair. Firm footholds 
in the marshy ground 
are few and far between 
but there are some very fine 
popular writers about, both of 
children’s books and adult lit- 
erature. I believe that all our 
children should be exposal to the 
great poetry and classical lit- 
erature of our pasL But I also want 
to promote the habit of reading 
contemporary literature and to 
stress that it is still not only 
stimulating and educational but 
also enjoyable. 

The novels of such writers as 
John Le Carre, Iris Murdoch, John 
Fowles and Beryl Bainbiidge have 
very wide appeaL It is interesting 
that the production of novels on 
film or television still boost 
enormously the sale of the books. 
The television presentation oTThe 
Mayor of Casterbridge, of Hard 
Times and Howards Etui ensured 
a substantial increase in paper- 


back sales. It would appear that 
the public demand reassurance 
from their global village media 
that the written form is acceptable 
or manageable. 

' I would like to see bench marks 
for progress in English which 
actually set out lists of the sorts of 
books or authors which children 
should be able to read and 
understand at particular ages and 
levels of achievement. For exam- 
ple, in the case of children of 
average ability: Animal Farm by 
age 12 or David Coppetfteld by age 
IS. You won't be surprised to 
know that I am told this is too 
radical or too centralist or too 
dictatorial More seriously I am 
warned of the dangers of setting 
minimum or maximum standards, 
because minimum standards de- 
press expectations and maximum 
standards not only hold- back the 
ablest but discourage those who 
cannot reach them. 

I know that there is more to 
selecting books for children to 
read than gauging the difficulty of 
the language. Animal Farm is a 
deceptively simple book written as 
it is m the form of a febfe in which 
animals talk. There is a risk that 
teachers and parents can be 
pushed by ifae presence of tech- 
nical competence to introduce 
some books too early, before the 
necessary experience of life has 
developed in the reader the capac- 


ity really to engage with the book. 
When I discussed this idea with a 
teacher working on the excellent 
but badly named Low Achieving 
Pupils' Project be told me that a 
list of books would be OK but I 
ought to include such works as the 
users' manual for the latest 250cc 
Japanese motorbike. I take his 
point 

It is of course important that the 
new proper emphasis on the 
application and practical aspects 
of subjects as exemplified in the 
technical and vocational educa- 
tion initiative, in the GCSE and in 
the new City Technology Colleges, 
should not lead to any diminution 
of die appreciation of the magic 
and potency of literature. In 
particular I want to see a new 
emphasis on getting every child in 


E ducation must, as one of 
its central purposes, 
make its pupils reflec- 
tive users of our lan- 
guage: able to 

understand it as well as to nse it to 
be in control of it rather than at its 
mere*. The English language is 
our children's birthright. By an 
early age they will aft. with very 
few exceptions, have learnt most 
of its particular conventions and 
svntax in speech. They are from 
tunh immersed in a livin g ton - 
gnyy Through which they mcreas- 
mglv learn to describe, understand 
and' control (heir environment; 
deepen and enrich their personal 
relationships; marshal and order 
their thoughts, and express their 
frgtmg v in teaching English it is 
the teacher’s task to build on this. 
Our children through themselves 
using and e x pe ri e n cing language 
in speech, writing, reading and 
listening should come to respect 
and love it. They should not fear it 
for the stares of its syntax, nor 
regard the language used by them 
as an inferior form to that of great 
literature or of fine orators. 

1 have come to the conclusion 
that a specific new initiative is 
needed. 1 will be appointing a 
high-level independent committee 
to recommend what pupils in our 
schools should know about the 
English language. The results will 
then need to be taken on board in 
teacher training and in classroom ... 
practice. 

One of the great mysteries is 
that the language of the play- 
ground and the market place is the 
same as that of Shakespeare and 
Milton. The trick, polled off daily 
by good teachers, is io explore how 
it is that commonplace words in a 
particular order, in a particular 
context, can move us to laughter 
or tears: can give us a fleeting 
glimpse into meaning that lies 
beyond words. On the face of it 
there is nothing complex about 
' Houseman's 

On iVenlock Edge the wood's 
in trouble. 

His forest fleece the Wre/cin 
heaves. 

The wind it plies the saplings 
double. 

And thick on Severn snow the 
leaves. £ 

But why and how does it flow so 
smoothly and so sadly: and what 
do these relatively plain words 
hint at beyond an autumn wind in 
Shropshire? 

To explore language like this, 
alongside that used in the thou- 
sand and one transactions of our 
mundane lives, in ways that 
generate competence, but which 
do not undermine the confidence 
to use words with freshness, 
felicity and vigour, is what I -see as 
good English teaching. 

My test of quality is that our 
children emerge from the process 
.with a love for English; a proper 
respect for the right words in the 
right order; and with their linguis- 
tic competence enhanced. But 
above afl they should emerge with 
the confidence that comes from 
knowing that the language belongs f 
to them and is in their keeping for ' 
the time being, and that is both a 
reassuring and awesome prospect 
Extracted from the Alan Palmer 
lecture, which Mr Baker wiU be 
giving tonight. 


lion to entrench SDI, but the 
strength of his opposition to it 
seems to have convinced Ameri- 
cans that they have something 
worth keeping. 

But the shift to the right is of 
much longer gestation. In die mid- 
1970s, when people were asked in 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Rallying round a 
rival in distress 


You sometimes wonder if there is 
anything sporting about sport any 
more. Even in a comparatively 
gentlemanly dbtivity like yachting, 
the America’s Cup seems in- 
formed by bitter rivalry, while in 
football it came as no surprise 
earlier this season to learn that 
Manchester United players bad 
been inflicting malicious injuries 
on one another in training. So I 
felt my eyebrows go up several feet 
the other day to hear of a sport 
where generosity still exists, and 
where rivals will help you up when 
you’re down. 

I have a young friend called 
Paul Moss who goes rallying — 
that is, he drives at high speed 
from one check-point to another 
down mean streets and along 
nearly non-existent roads, watch- 
ing bits of his car drop off and 
getting from it a pleasure I do not 
even start to understand. He goes 
in for rallies whenever he can aff- 
ord it and usually either wins or 
foils to finish — last year he came 
first in the Beaujolais rally — and 
has just come back from a North 
American rally — the Canamex — 
of wonderful severity. 

Paul drove 3,000 miles in three 
days from New York to Vancou- 
ver just to get to the start, so he 
was pretty tired when he began. As 
the race was spread over 16,000 
miles, which is the equivalent of 
driving up and down Britain ten 
times, it was inevitable tha t 
sooner or later be would fen asleep 

at the wheel, and he dearly 
remembers waking up and seeing 
a huge rock rush towards him at 
80 mph. He managed to avoid the 
rock but hit something else hard 
enough to nearly cripple die front 
wheels and gear box. He had to 
drive the remaining 300 miles of 
that day’s stage in third gear. 

When he and his navigator 
arrived, they found the wheels 
wen: so jammed up into the wheel 
casing that they had to drain the 

front of the car to a tree and then 

reverse away rapidly to free the 
parte. It still needed major surgery 
on the car if they were to continue, 
and this is whore rallying sounds 


like an old-fashioned sport, be- 
cause some of Paul’s rival drivers 
stayed up most of the night, 
working on die car with him. Can 
you imagine that happening in any 
other sport? 

The only car in the event which 
didn't share this spirit of 
camaraderie was driven by two 
men who constantly attempted to 
get the rest disqualified through 
petty objections. Paul came across 
these creeps on the way down to 
Mexico, thoroughly broken down 
with a shattered axle. 

“So you drove past them with a 
wave, did you?” I asked. 

“Couldn’t really,” said PauL 
“We stopped to find out what was 
wrong, drove into the next town to 

get a Spare axle and caim» fragk 
with it for them. We lost three 
hours, but we couldn’t reaBy leave 
them, could we?” 

As far as I can tell, the Harris 
moments came in Mexico, on 
Highway 51, though it wasn't 
much of a highway.“A lot of it 
isn't metalled and some of it isn’t 
there at afl. One stretch we 
averaged only four miles an hour 
because the road had been washed 
away on either ride and become as 
narrow as the car. Eventually we 
came to a bit where the road was 
narrower than the car, with a steep 
drop cm either side” 

Good Lord. What did you do? 

“We stopped, built a ramp with 
our bare hands from earth, then 
took a run ax it, just hoping that 
me car would fly across the gap. 
Luckily, it did. Oh. this was in the 
middle of the night, by die way.” 

Some of the other cars were 
lavishly equipped, down to back- 
up teams and even a film crew, 
^ul, one of nature's improvisers, 
nad Little more than a bag of tools, 
pttww so managed to come first 
m tus class and ninth overall. A 

disastrous result, in my view, as it 
will only encourage him to enter 
more rallies if he gets the tacking, 
out at least he seems to be in a 
sport where, when in trouble, you 
ran turn to your enemies for help, 
i acre can’t be many like that In 
refit, I can’t think of any 


* 3 * * - 


1; 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 






rm. 



I Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-4.81 4100 


The Autumn Statement 
delivered to Parliament yes- 
terday by the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, Mr Nigel Lawson, 

is a defeat for the Govem- 

; menu The best that can be said 

is that it is a defeat against 
overwhelming odds and unlike 
' some previous reverses tries to 

make a virtue of realism. In 
political terms to have won a 
• i victory and kept public spend- 
’ ■ ing to previously planned lev- 

. els might have turned out to be 

; Pyrrhic. 

Mrs Thatcher came to 
power with the intention of 
reducing public spending. In 
; the event this did not prove 
realistic and the policy was 

■ turned into one of keeping 
. spending level in real terms. 
.. The increases announced yes- 
. terday of £4% billion in spend- 
ing next year and £5'A billion 
in 1 988-89 display an even less 
ambitious profile converting 
the prospect of level spending 
in real terms to one of rising 
expenditure. This was not the 
prospectus on which the Gov- 

■ eminent was elected. 

Although financial markets 
have discounted some increase 
\ in spending in election year 
1 yesterday's statement will do 
little to reassure. With mone- 
tary policy pragmatic to a 
dangerous degree.it is even 
- more desirable that fiscal pol- 
icy should be firmly disci- 
plined. Mr Lawson promised 
in his statement that there 
would be no relaxation of the 
Government's fiscal stance. 
There is no sign that borrow- 
ing is overrunning in the 
current year. Markets derived 
some comfort yesterday from 
what seemed to be a more 
welcoming attitude to EMS 
membership. But it is dearly 


POLICY POSTPONED 


more difficult to maintain a 
prudent fiscal stance if spend- 
ing is higher. 

Admittedly this year’s pub- 
lic spending survey has been 
the most difficult in the life of 
this Government. At this stage 
in the electoral cyde there 
have been strong pressures to 
trail the Government's coat 
before the electorate. Every 
minister has wanted to deck 
himself out in something old 
and something new, and the 
Chief Secretary to the Trea- 
sury, Mr John MacGregor, has 
had to take a more sensitive 
approach to his task than 
comes naturally to the Trea- 
sury. 

In addition to electoral pres- 
sures the Government has had 
to pay a high price for unrealis- 
tic provision in previous sur- 
veys. There is always a 
temptation to pare down 
spending in future years in the 
hope that it can be forced to 
conform to the numbers deter- 
mined by the Government 
father than the other way 
round. But this seldom works 
in the case of the local authori- 
ties where the Government 
has no direct power over the 
majority of council budgets. 
Nor can ministers do mud) to 
control the degree to which 
social security benefits are 
taken up. The Government 
has reasonably taken the view 
that a dose of realism has to be 
applied to the figures inherited 
from previous surveys. 

The need for realism is all 
the greater because of the 
prospective overrun on spend- 
ing of billion in the current 
year. For a brief moment last 
year it seemed as though the 
habit of making plans which 
were invariably exceeded 


might have been exchanged for 
plans which were actually met 
(or in last year’s case under- 
shot). But we seem to be back 
to the bad old days. 

Electoral pressures and the 
unpaid bills of previous years 
go far to explain the rise in 
spending. They do not justify 
it Higher public spending 
inevitably means less scope for 
cutting taxes and the 
postponement of those 
improvements in incentives so 
important to galvanising the 
economy. Mr Lawson made 
no mention of tax cuts yes- 
terday and be is right to be 
cautious. Even if the buoyancy 
of non-oii revenue does at the 
end of the day permit a modest 
reduction, the chances of 
achieving a target of 25p in the 
basic rate of income tax in this 
Parliament now look slim. 

For the future this matters 
much. In the immediate politi- 
cal calculus it may not weigh 
so heavily. Some expenditure 
of treasure to buy off the most 
pressing concerns about public 
spending was almost in- 
evitable. If Mr Kinnock calls 
the Government “high 
spending” who can complain 
that it is miserly? 

The immediate economic 
outlook is good with the 
economy expected to grow by 
3 per cent next year and 
inflation still below 4 per cent 
Consumer spending is forecast 
to remain buoyant and the 
balance of payments deficit to 
be managable at £1 Hi billion. It 
is a prospect which will have a 
good deal of appeal for the 
electorate, as also for the 
wetter wing of the Tory party. 
But it is one of hope postponed 
for the longer term reform of 
the economy. 


FIVE MISTAKES ABOUT MR TEBBIT 


v ••• 


•• * 


The adage that troth is the first 
casualty of war has now re- 
ceived an exhaustive testing in 
regard to the US raid on Libya. 
It has been less tested, how- 
ever, in regard to the war 
between the BBC and the 
Chairman of the Conservative 
Party. Mr Norman Tebbit. 
Indeed, a number of mis- 
conceptions have arisen about 
this latter conflict which make 
the differences between the 
BBC and 1TN handling of the 
Libyan raid (important though 
they are to those concerned 
about the quality of broadcast 
journalism) of considerably 
lesser account 

2 The first misconception is 

T ihat Mr Tebbit’s attack was 
aimed at improving the 
Conservatives' chances of win- 
ning the next election by 
reducing the anti-government 
content of political pro- 
grammes. In order to believe 
that one has to believe that Mr 
Tebbit has completely lost 
touch with the deep rooted 
views of the British electorate, 
at least as far as they concern 
the independence of the BBC 
It is possible to make many 
charges against Mr Tebbit but 
not that. , 

The electorate likes the BBC 
* very much- It may be wrong to 
r ' have such reverential feelings 
towards an organisation which 
needs to change with the times 
and shows little sign of appre- 
ciating that necessity. But 
there are no votes in bashing 
the BBC - as Mr Tebbit well 
knows. 

The second misconception 
is that the Tory party chair- 
man, in indulging himself m a 
vote-losing exercise on behalf 
of his party, has damaged his 
own interests. Quite the re- 
verse is likely to be the case. 

Mr Tebbit does, of course, 
look increasingly isolated on 
this issue, as on a number or 
others. The Prime Minister 
has given him only the. mini- 
^ mum possible support m the 
House of Commons. His Cabi- 
net colleagues — tjfe m j£ 
conspicuously quiet bemg the 
Home Secretary, Mr Douglas 
Hurd - have given him less. 


In the common currency of 
political debate, isolation is a 
bad thing . It means a reduced 
ability to get one’s way. For 
those, however, who are look- 
ing beyond today’s headlines, 
beyond the next election, and 
up towards the leadership 
battle to come, a degree of 
isolation is essential. 

During the Westland crisis 
much of Mr Michael 
Heseltine’s motive in pushing 
his case beyond the strict 
bounds of reason was bis 
determination to escape from 
the Prime Minister’s shadow— 
and to do so on the best 
possible issue to hand. The 
Times came under much 
“informed” criticism for 
suggesting this allegedly ig- 
noble motive. Nothing that 
has happened since has led us 
to depart from it 

Mr Tebbifs position is 
somewhat harder. He is the 
Chairman of the Conservative 
Party. While Mr Heseltine 
would still have a chance to 
lead his party (some might say 
a better chance) if it lost the 
election, Mr Tebbit would not 
That is not however, to say 
that Mr Tebbit should do 
nothing but gamer votes for 
the Tories. (The party is doing 
none too badly at that any- 
way.) He must also consider 
his own position as as an 
independent fighter. It takes 
courage to take on the BBC. A 
reputation for courageous in- 
dependence is likely to live on 
long after the minutiae of Mr 
John Humphrey’s script-writ- 
ing skills have passed back into 
the ether whence they came. 

The third misconception is 
that Mr Tebbit’s action is part 
of the movement to reform the 
BBC, a movement which The 
Times can claim to have 
played a modest part in initiat- 
ing. The BBC chairman, Mr 
Duke Hussey, must have been 
wringing his hands in rage 
yesterday on the first day in his 
new office. His options in, for 
example, dealing with his be- 
leaguered Director General, 
Mr Alasdair Milne, have been 
severely reduced by Mr 


Leadership skills 


From Dr P. M. Gaffney 
Sir, I read your careers feauue by 
Edward Fennel (October 27) on 
“the dismal lack of graduates with 
the talent to motivate and 
organise others” both wig i mterest 
and disappointment. The anictc 
draws many salient points and 
succeeds in clearly defining a 

worrying problem. There e* 1 ** 
however, several movement* * 
Oxbridge and wider, aimeo ai 
addressing this problem un rough 
exua-ctirricular acuwnes an 
with the active help of industry. 

Across flic of 
education nrore effort tta 


bydevclopinfc 

mmasemcm '^f^afcen- 

communication. * ms ‘ 

ieg of TZ 

problem is parti* due » 


finding ourselves in an ever more 
competitive international market. 

Il is also due to a noticeable 
trend in our students showing a 
preference for working within 
small companies. In small to 
medium-size companies the enor- 
mous cost of the traditionally 
accepted nine months to a year of 
induction training after gradua- 
tion is often seriously questioned 
and, as a consequence, attention 
has been drawn to the time whilst 
students are undergoing secondary 
education. . 

Churchill College. Cambridge, 
is leading Oxbridge in promoting 
change and in opening its doors 
and mind to industry. Other 
colleges are rapidly following. 
Churchill has created a fellowship 
post with full academic standing 
with ihe directive to foster and 
maintain close links with industry 
and develop the teachin g of 
management skills. Il is being 
helped by Pegasus, a national 


charity which gives the starting 
resources to secondary education 
establishments to allow their 
involvement in these activities. 

During last year a pilot manage- 
ment-training course was run in 
Churchill as an extra-curricular 
activity. Great emphasis was 
placed on leadership training al- 
though the curriculum in foci 
covered a broad spectrum of skills. 

These activities were very 
successful, as proved by the 
marked change in and increased 
maturity of the undergraduates 
who joined the course and are now 
a part of college life. An essential 
element in the success of the 
project has been the friendly 
cooperation we have received 
from industry. 

Yours faiihfitllv. 

PHILIP M. GAFFNEY 
(Tutor for Industrial Liaison}. 
Churchill College. 

Cambridge. 

October 29. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Change, tradition and European law 


Tebbit’s broadside. His ability 
to manage properly future 
Real Lives or Maggie's Milir 
tarn Tendencies has also been 
hindered Even more im- 
portantly, the Peacock re- 
forms, including the 
privatisation of Radios One 
and Two, can be now all the 
more easily be dubbed 
Tebbitism — and dismissed. 

There is a danger that the 
three misconceptions, which 
we have so far addressed, may 
engender a fourth, the idea 
that Mr Tebbit’s substantial 
attack on the BBC coverage of 
the Libyan bombing was un- 
justified and that the BBC 
made a comprehensive rebut- 
tal of iL Not all of his arrows 
hit the target. But too many 
did so for the BBC to don its 
traditional garb of smug 
superiority in the face of 
criticism. 

It is noteworthy that so 
much of the discussion 
surrounding this affair has 
concentrated on recalling 
other occasions when the 
brave BBC beat off attempts to 
influence its output by Eden, 
Wilson, Callaghan etc. In view 
of the high temperatures and 
stifling levels of dust that have 
been generated by Mr Tebbit’s 
intervention, it might more 
property be argued that the 
principle of public service 
broadcasting — of which the 
news bulletins are so pre- 
eminently a part — has been 
subject to too little political 
debate, not too much. 

It is because the BBC has 
needed to do so tittle to explain 
its principles, because it has 
manned so easily to persuade 
investigators of the inalienable 
rightness of its cause, that BBC 
employees have become so 
arrogant in their manners and 
so uncritical of their own 
behaviour. It is that arrogance 
and that lack of setfcriucism 
that has lead to so many of the 
Corporation’s recent failings. 

It would be a fifth mis- 
conception, were it to be 
suggested that Mr Tebbit’s 
concern about the extent of 
those failings was anything but 
wholly sincere. 


From ike Minister of Stale, 

Foreign and Commonwealth Office 
Sir, Lord Denning, in Monday’s 
Times (November 3), argued that 
the Single European Art under- 
mined Parliament's sovereignly 
but that, now that Parliament had 
taken a decision, all should rally in 
support. I agree with Lord 
Denning's conclusions, but for a 
different reason. 

It is true that the Single Euro- 
pean Art changes the Treaty of 
Rome and thus adjusts the basis of 
our membership of the Commu- 
nity. But it does so in ways which 
are helpful to this country. The 
Treaty of Rome was negotiated by 
the original six member States — 
not by us. 

This time it is different We 
have negotiated changes to the 
Treaty of Rome. Far from saying 
farewell to our sovereignty, we 
have enhanced our ability to act, 
with our partners, for our own 
good. I- will give two examples. 

We need a single large Commu- 
nity market if we are to sell our 
goods and services in Europe. We 
do not yet have it. German law 
prevents German citizens from 
buying insurance on the London 
market. Very few countries allow 
anything like free competition in 
air services. We need to change all 
that 

The Single European Act will 
allow a majority vote on those 
issues where we need decisions 
and where our interests are 
harmed by the current rule which 
allows action to be blocked indefi- 
nitely by one member State alone. 
But we have not gone overboard. 
There are many issues where the 
agreement of all member States 
will be required, for example tax 
matters. 

Second, we need to be able to 
compete on equal terms with the 
US and Japan in the new technol- 
ogies. That means more coopera- 
tion between European firms and 
governments. The Single Euro- 
pean Art creates the legal frame- 
work to make it possible. We have 
the tools. It is now up to us to get 
on with the job. 

Parliament and the people have 
decided that it is in the Commu- 
nity that our interests lie. It would 
be perverse to think that this 
country could possibly gain from 
pulling out of a Community which 
has helped sustain peace and 
promote democracy in Europe; 
which enables us to bargain with 
collective strength in international 
negotiations ami which creates the 
economies of scale which alone 
can make us competitive with the 
US and Japan. 

The Community may have its 
many faults. But the answer to its 
imperfections is to correct them 
from within, not suffer their 
consequences outside, powerless 
to do anything to put things right. 
In the House of Lords on Monday 
Lord Denning warned us not to be 


White poppies 

From the Chairman. Executive 
Committee of the Peace Pledge 
Union 

Sir, Like Christopher Crabbie 
(October 31) I, too, am saddened 
by noisy political intrusion into 
the quiet reflection of 
Remembrancetide. My difference 
from him is that I find the 
booming of guns, the sound of 
marching boots and the clanking 
of medals an intrusion into the 
grief I personally feel over the loss 
of relatives and friends in war. I 
also find the laying of wreaths by 
leaders of parties all of whom 
advocate war as an instrument of 
fiiture policy a political intrusion 
into what should be a dedication 
to future peace. 

It is because thousands share 
such feelings with me that the 
Peace Pledge Union has for over 
SO years used the white poppy as a 
non-militarist symbol of our sor- 
row for the sunering both of past 
wars and the wars which are now 
taking place and will take place 


Defence of Welsh 

From Mr David Philips 
Sir. With great respect, I cannot 
help feeling that Mr Gwynfor 
Evans (November 1) has mis- 
understood Bernard Levin's arti- 
cle (October 28). 

As I read it, Bernard Levin was 
criticizing, not the efforts to 
preserve ihe Welsh language and 
culture, but the methods used to 
attain that very worthy object 

I yield to none in admiration for 
the principality and its people, but 
have myself been exasperated at 
i be mess made by the language 
enthusiasts in splashing green 
paint untidily over road signs, and 
I was somewhat disillusioned to 
see a perfectly good Welsh place- 


isolationist but to realise the 
importance of what we could 
contribute to the European 
Community. 

The Single European Act will 
help us to do that. More important 
still, it will help us realise more 
fully the benefits of our 
memberhip. I am glad that Par- 
liament. and Lord Denning, agree. 
Yours truly, 

LYNDA CHALKER, 

Foreign and Commonwealth 
Office, SWi. 

November 5. 


Pensions as a 
financial tool 


From Professor Emeritus B. A. 
Wortley. QC 

Sir, Lord Denning rightly points 
out that German “inflatable rub- 
ber dolls” which our Customs 
judged to be obscene may be 
allowed entry here under the 
European Economic Treaty. How- 
ever, all may not be lost. 

The other European Court, that 
of Human Rights, at Strasbourg, 
might well accept an individual 
petition against such entry on the 
basis of article 8 of the European 
Convention on Human Rights, 
giving individuals the right to 
respect for his “family life, his 
home and his correspondence” 
and “for the protection of health 
or morals'’. 

Yours obedientlv, 

B. A. WORTLEY, 

24 Gravel Lane, 

Wilmslow. Cheshire. 


Art trade threat 


From Mr George J. Levy 
Sir. Mr Hugh Leggatt (October 24) 
makes an eloquent plea for the 
nation to acquire Constable’s 
“Flatford Lock and Mill”, which is 
to be sold at Christie’s on Novem- 
ber 2J. 


In supporting his views, may I 
i addition point out that this 


in addition point out that this 
masterpiece has been imported 
from the USA into this country for 
sale. Further, you report (October 
28) that Sotheby’s are to offer at 
auction a Rembrandt and two 
Frans Hals portraits, which have 
also entered this country from 
America. 

These auctions underline 
London's outstanding position as 
centre of the world’s art trade. 
Sadly this position is in severe 
danger of beng irrevocably dam- 
aged. No such masterpieces would 
come here for sale but would be 
auctioned in New York if the 
proposed EEC directive requiring 
15 per cent VAT to be levied on 
the import of all works of art 
coming into this country were 
imposed. 

There is imminent danger that 
this legislation will go through the 
European Parliament on the nod. 
Time, Sir, is not on our side. 
Yours faithfully, 

GEORGE J. LEVY, Director. 

H. Blairman & Sons. 

119 Mount Street, WI. 

November 5. 


with weapons this country pro- 
duces. We hold our own walk to 
the Cenotaph and lay a white 
wreath on the afternoon of 
Remembrance Day, but in com- 
plete and reflective silence. 

May 1 also assure John Cohen 
(October 3l)that we in the Peace 
Pledge Union do not forget the 
disabled, the widowed, the or- 
phaned and the refugees of war. In 
the material we publish to explain 
our view of Remembrance we 
make a particular point of drawing 
the reader’s attention to what 
Wilfred Owen, killed a week 
before the 1918 armistice, called 
“the truth untold, the pity of war, 
the pity war distilled". 

Let us also remember that it was 
Wilfred Owen who bade us not to 
repeat “the old lie, Dulce et 
decorum est pro patria mori". 
Yours peacefully, 

WILLIAM HETHERINGTON, 
Chapman. Executive Committee, 
Peace Wedge Union, 

Dick Sheppard House, 

6 Endsleigh Street, WCl. 
November 3. 


Emergency call 

From Mr Stephen Jay 
Sir, Mr Bees suggests (October 28) 
that details of next of kin might be 
included on the credit cards of the 
elderly people living alone. Mrs 
Hams son (November l) points out 
that this and other useful informa- 
tion can equally well be displayed 
on a card pinned near foe tele- 
phone. 

Surely it is more important to 
ensure that elderly people can 
summon immediate aid should 
they foil or suddenly become ill? 
This is now possible at relatively 
modest cost thanks to develop- 
ments is technology. 

Those at risk wear a small 
pendant-like device. In an emer- 
gency, they simply press the 
button on the pendant; this alerts 
foe operator at a permanently 
manned central station; and 
within minutes help can be at their 
side. 

Yours faithfully, 

STEPHEN JAY (Administrator, 

The Home Call Trust), 

34 Logan Road, Bristol. Avon. 


name, Fair-Rhos, obliterated, 
presumably because foe first syl- 
lable (a mutation of “Mair” - 
Mary) spells an English word. 

In the parts of Wales which I 
know best foe children learn their 
lessons in English, but play their 
games in Welsh and thus grow up 
bilingual without foe intervention 
of the Welsh language enthusiasts 
whose activities I understood to 
be foe subject of Bernard Levin's 
comments. 

Yours truly, 

DAVID PHILIPS, 

44 Wincham Grove, SWI 1. 
November 1. 


From Mr lain B. Walker 
Sir. Would the Courage brewery 
workers have gone on strike over 
the proposed arrangements (re- 
port, November I) had they 
believed the Imperial pension 
scheme to be underfunded? In 
these circumstances I suspect they 
would have been glad to see their 
“statutory pension rights” covered 
by the transfer and shed few tears 
for their former parent company 
left to fund a deficit. 

A pension scheme is currently a 
legitimate financial tool of foe 
sponsoring company. The prin- 
ciple has been endorsed by foe 
Government in their setting 
ground rules for foe degree of 
over-funding to be tolerated. 

Pension funds are tax shelters 
for company profits, a store in 
times of plenty and a source ol 
sustenance in lean yearn. Profits 
dumped in them accumulate in- 
dependently of the company's 
own performance — many com- 
pany pension funds have out- 
performed foe company’s own 
return on capital. 

What price does a company pay 
for this privilege? There is a charge 
against foe assets of their pension 
fund — the pension benefits as 
defined in foe pension scheme 
rules. This is. however, often 
minimal in terms of the present 
liability as compared with foe 
potential liability - especially 
when foe prospect of ex- 
gratia /discretionary awards is 
taken into account. 

In times of takeovers and sell- 
offs the company pension fund is 
toail intents and purposes an asset 
of the company. The surprising 
thing about all this is that employ- 
ees agree to pay their contribu- 
tions into foe same fund. 

Yours faithfully, 

IAIN WALKER, 

40 Ennismorc Gardens, SW7. 
November 2. 


Research decline 


From the Editor of the British 
Veterinary Journal 
Sir, Your report on the decline of 
scientific research in the UK 
(October 16) sounds a timely 
alarm. Although research funding 
fell over foe last decade, few 
studies measure the effort of this 
on performance which, in vet- 
erinary science, is considerable. 

The number of UK veterinary 
publications fell from 13.7 to 10.4 
per cent of world output between 
1965 and 1985. In foe US it rose 
from 24.6 to 26.9 per cent, in 
France from 3.6 to 4.5 per cent, in 


Italy from 1.8 to 2.6 per cent, in 

UnllQn^ frrvrr, 1 7 In 1 t nrr rent 


Holland from 1.7 to 2.3 per cent 
and in Japan from 3.5 to 4.6 per 
cent. The USSR and foe Eastern 
block share our decline. 

In the UK foe decline over foe 
last decade has come primarily 
from foe veterinary schools of foe 
universities and foe institutes of 
the Agriculture and Food Re- 
search Council Perhaps surpris- 
ingly, industrial research followed 
suit and thus the commercial 
sector is unlikely to compensate 
for the general downhill trend. 

Doubtless the decline in vet- 
erinary output follows from 
shrinking budgets and decrease in 
number of veterinary scientists. Is 
this sensible when world markets 
for Veterinary products beckon 
and our potential contribution to 
world health gives added in- 
centive? We certainly have the 
advantage of greater use of foe 
English lan guag e for communica- 
tion. 

Yours sincerely, 

JACK M. PAYNE Editor, 

British Veterinary Journal, 
c/o Baillifcre Tindall, 

1 Vincent Square, SWI. 


A straight flush 

From Professor Leslie Collier 
Sir, Mr Bernard Levin’s pref- 
erence for the word “lavatory” 
over “toilet", “bathroom” and so 
forth (November 3) is surely 
illogical, since washing, although 
highly desirable, is not the pri- 
mary object of a visit 

Other euphemisms such as 
“privy" and "house of office” 
have been in general use for 
centuries; and if a euphemism we 
must have, then let it be “toilet” , 
which, with but slight local nu- 
ances of pronunciation, is used 
and understood in most places 
from Calcutta to California. 

When in urgent need abroad, 
pedantry must yield to expedi- 
ency ; and whereas a literary 
description of one’s objective will 
demand time-wasting scrabbling 
in pocket dictionaries, or even 
recourse to unseemly sign lan- 
guage. "toiler will more often 
than not evoke the all-important 
rapid response from almost any 
passer-by. 

Yours feith folly, 

LESLIE COLLIER, 

Bronte Cottage. 

89 South End Road, NW3. 
November X 


Marriage guidance 

From Mrs Philippa Seligman 
Sir, Miss Cato (October 30) sug- 
gests a second tier of less trained 
marriage-guidance counsellors. 

The emotional complexities of a 
troubled marriage and the reper- 
cussions for children, parents and 
grandparents are daunting. By the 
time they get to marriage-guidance 
councils they have usually already 
been dealt with at foe “shoulder- 
to-cry-on” level unsuccessfully 
and need a more objective and 
skilled approach. 

Services such as these should 
not be pressured, by lack of 
money, into a lowering of stan- 
dards. National and local govern- 
ment must recognise the 
consequences of undervaluing 
both foe professional and the 
voluntary helping agencies in the 
community. 

Youis sincerely, 

PHILIPPA SELIGMAN 
(Chairman, Die Family Institute), 
105 Cathedral Road, 

Cardiff, South Glamorgan. 
October 30. 


In good company 


From Sir Hugh Greene 
Sir. In his article in The Times of 
November 1 your Media 
Correspondent, Mr Jonathan 
Miller, stales that since the days of 
Sir John Reifo foe BBC has been 
run by “programmers and 
producers". Reifo’s successor, 
Ogilvie, came from foe academic 
world. Foot from the Gas. Light 
and Coke Company, Haley was a 
journalist from foe Manchester 
Evening News and Reutere, Jacob 
had had a distinguished military 
career, and I had been a foreign 
correspondent 


A varied company. I suppose 
tat one of the few ibines we had 


that one of the few things we had 
in common was that not one of us 
had ever produced a radio or 
television programme. 

Yours faithfully. 

HUGH GREENE 
Flat 7. 

10 Palace Gate, W8. 

November I. 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 7 1846 


The case of Lieutenant William 
Green. RN (1785-1846) was 
strongly pressed by The Tunes, 
in faith twice urged the 
Government to make more 
provision for his widow and seven, 
daughters. He had also left three 
sons, one a medical student, die 


others in the Navy, who fixed loss 
I of advancement through lack of 
hinds. The Coruptenr, in which 
Green served, distinguished itself 
in die Battle of Trafalgar, 
capturing the French flagship, 
Bucentaun. and with her the 

commander-in-chief 


TO TREATMENT] 
OF AN OFFICER J 


No one wfl] have read without 
indignation and disgust the partic- 
ulars which appeared under the 
head of “Naval Intelligence” in our 
paper of yesterday. We allude to 
the details of foe services of 
Lieutenant W ILLIA M PRINGLE 
GREEN, who died lately in pover- 
ty, at foe age of sixty-one, after 
having served his country with 
extraordinary «»»1 for nearly half- 
a -century. His career is a striking 
instance of foe disproportion be- 
tween merit and reward in the 
naval profession; for, though 21- 
Iucfc may have had some share in 
checking his advancement, the 
neglect and disappointment he 
endured could not have been the 
result of mere misfortune. He 
entered the navy in 1797 and was 
immediate ly sent on active service. 
He distinguished himself even in 
foe first three years of his career, 
but, being detained on foreign 
stations by the mortality in the 
fleet, he was unable to obtain leave 
to visit England, which it was 
necessary for him to do before he 
could pass bis examination for 
promotion. . . Again, at a later 
period, foe urgency of the service 
prevented his obtaining leave to 
pass his examination, by which he 
lost more than three years* rank; 
and it was not until he distin- 
guished hlw»q»lf in the capture of 
the Bucentaure, when he was in 
command of the boats which were 
twice sunk, that he was selected fay 
his as haring merited the 

rank of Lieutenant. He at last 
found a friend in the Duke of Kent, 
who got him appointed to the 
Eurydice frigate, which was em- 
ployed as a ship of observation on 
the American lines, where he made 
some valuable observations on foe 
mode of construction and equip- 
ment of foe ships in the American 
navy. . . That these were not the 
mere speculations of a well-mean- 
ing enthusiast, but the valuable 
suggestions of a practical seaman, 
is proved by the adoption of marry 
of his recommendations, for which 
the thanbt of the Admiralty ware 
repeatedly awarded him. In 1815 
the ship in which he had been 
employed was paid off and the 
Duke of Kent personally interested 
himself in Lieutenant Green's 
behalf; bat the answer of the First 
Lord of the Admiralty was to the 
effect that, peace haring been 
proclaimed, there was an mid to 
promotion. The plain En gl ish of 
this waa. that Lieutenant Green, 
who had laboured hard during the 
war, and had introduced improve- 
ments in the navy, many of which 
are in use to this day. was no longer 
wanted. Still fiuthfcl to a profes- 
sion in which be had experienced 
nothing but ingratitude and ne- 
glect, be devoted his time to 
devising improvements in the 
navy, one of which having been 
imitated obtained a reward of five 
thousand pounds, while Lieuten- 
ant Green, foe originality of whose 
invention was acknowledged by the 
Solicitor to foe Admiralty, got 
nothing. At length, in 1829, be was 
appointed to a Falmouth packet as 
a reward for his long and numerous 
services. He gave up a lucrative 
mercantile employment under the 
assurance that his appointment 
was for life; but at the end of two 
years and ten months, foe vessel 
was paid off. withoutany provision 
being made for Lieutenant Green, 
though others similarly situated 
were not subjected to such injus- 
tice. In 1842 he was made Lieuten- 
ant of foe Victory, but in 12 
months he was removed without 
any explanation, and he remained 
until foe day of his death unre- 
warded and neglected. He leaves a 
wife and seven daughters to live, if 
they can, on a Lieutenant’s paltry 
pension of fifty pounds per 
anmim. . . The fete of Lieutenant 
Green will teach all who enter the 
navy, that the sincerest devotion to 
the interests of their profession for 
a period of fifty years may bring 
ruin upon themselves and leave 
little better than destitution to 
their families. We hope the Gov- 
ernment will not hesitate, by some 
compensation to the widow and 
children, to repair, in some degree, 
the injustice dealt to the the 
husband and father. We boast of 
foe security we feel in the strength 
and patriotism of our navy, but 
here is an instance — and by no 
means an uncommon one — of the 
manner in which we repay those to 
whom we are so deeply indebted. 
We have empty compliments, and 
sometimes fulsome panegyrics, for 
“gallant tars" and “British 
seamen” but, from the treatment 
extended to some of foe worthiest 
of our “hearts of oak,” it would 
seem that the national heart was 
made of the same unyielding 
material. 


Phrase or fable? 


From Mr J. N. Hare 
Sir, “Cheer up for Chatham, 
wooden legs are cheap” was the 
expression used by our young 
children's aged aunt when she 
witnessed one of their tearful 
accidents. 

Did Pitt subsidise wooden legs 
for Napoleonic veterans and is foe 
cheer one of three? If so. the 
subsidy is still referred to in one 
household. Is it known in any 
other? 

I have the honour to be. Sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. N. HARE 

School Farm, Bcnenden, Kent 


■ficiency 


which 
ex, tx- 
nd rose 
jwfo in 


/as an 
l Tu ro- 
of the 
from 7 
□t and 
enmm. 
lgles is 
where 

d mil- 


10 roil- 
?x pea- 
ked to 
ildine 
which 
it hot 
is are 




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•£ t? 0.0.2 n <r- 


-»r ^J»- — •‘•VLa; . 





COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 6 : His Excellency Mr 
Stan Scare was received in 
audience by The Queen this 
morning and presented the Let- 
ters of Recall of his predecessor 
and his own Letters of Credence 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from the 
Socialist republic of Romania to 
the Court of Si James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following members 
of the* Embassy wbo bad the 
honour of being presented to 
Her Majesty: Mr Victor 
Chiujdea (Counsellor). Mr 
Gheorghe Culau (First Sec- 
retary). Mr Dragos Antonescu 
(First Secretary). Mr Gheorghe 
Dragu (Second Secretary) and 
Mr Ion Gheorghe (Second 
Seer clary). 

Mrs Scare had the honour of 
being received by The Queen. 

Sir Patrick Wright (Perma- 
nent Under Secretary of State 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affaire) who had the honour of 
being received by Her Majesty 
was present and the Gentleman 
of the Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. 

Mr J W D Gray was received 
in audience by The Queen and 
kissed hands upon his appoint- 
ment as Her Majesty's Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary at Beirut. 

Mrs Gray had the honour of 
being received by The Queen. 

Sir Oliver Wright Sir John 
Graham. Bt.. Sir Sydney 
Giffard. Sir Leonard Allinson 
and Sir Francis Kennedy had 
the honour of being received by 
The Queen upon their retire- 
ment from the Diplomatic 
Service. 

Lady Wright. Lady Graham, 
Lady Gifiartl Lady Allinson 
and Lady Kennedy had the 
honour of being received by Her 
Majesty. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh this evening at- 
tended a dinner, given by the 
Commonwealth High Commis- 
si oners to mark Her Majesty's 
60ih Birthday, at Marlborough 
House. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received by His 
Excellency Mr Shridatb 
Raiuphal (Commonwealth Sec- 
retary-General) and His Ex- 
cellency the High 
Commissioner for Swaziland 
(Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps 
and Senior High 
Commissioner). 

The Marchioness of 

Dinners 

British Paediatric Association 
Professor John Forfar, President 
of the British Paediatric Associ- 
ation. presided at a dinner held 
last night at the Athenaeum 
Club. The toast to the guests was 
proposed by the president and 
Professor Niall O'Donohoe re- 


Abergavenny. the Right Hon Sir 

William Hcseltine and Lieuten- 
ant- Commander Timothy 

Laurence, RN were in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Pa- 
tron and Trustee, accompanied 
by The Prince Edward, this 
afternoon attended a Service in 
Westminster Abbey to celebrate 
the 30th Anniversary of The 
Duke of Edinburgh's Award 
Scheme. 

Their Royal Highnesses were 
received upon arrival by the 
Dean of Westminster (the Very 
Reverend Michael Mayne). 

Major Rowan Jackson, RM 
and Wing Commander Adam 
Wise were in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the Riding 
for the Disabled Association, 
today attended the National 
Conference and Annual General 
Meeting of the Association at 
the National Agricultural 
Centre. Kenilworth. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Vice Lord- 
Lieutenant for Warwickshire 
(the Viscount Daventry) and the 
Chairman of the Association 
(Mrs P Langford). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Marie 
Phillips, attended by Mis Timo- 
thy Hoklerness Roddam, trav- 
elled in an air c raf t of The 
Queen's Flight. 

The Duke of Edinburgh was 
represented by Sir Owen Aisher 
at the Memorial Service for Dr 
Beppe Croce which was held in 
Westminster Cathedral this 
afternoon. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
November 6 : Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this morn- 
ing planted a Cross of Remem- 
brance in the Royal British 
Legion Field of Remembrance 
at St Margaret's Church, 
Westminster. 

Lady Angela Oswald and 
Major John Griffin were in 
attendance. 

Her Majesty was present this 
evening at a performance in the 
Britten Opera House at the 
Royal College of Music. 

Ruth. Lady Fermoy and Sir 
Alastair Aird were in 
attendance. 

Queen Elizabeth Hie Queen 
Mother, Cotonel-in-ChieC The 



WJL Webster and Company 
A dinner was held last night at 
the Middle Temple to celebrate 
the 1 25th anniversary of W.K. 


for General Sir Timothy 
Creasey which was held in St 
Edmundsbury Cathedral, Bury 
St Edmunds, this afternoon. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 6 : Hie Prince of 
Wales. Colonel-in-Chief. 2nd 
King Edward VIPs Own 

Webster and Company, inter- 
national claims agents for Ma- 
rine Underwriters. Among the 
guests, many whom were from 
overseas, were: 

Lord Brandon of Oakbrook. Mr 
JusUcr Shwn. the Admiralty Judge. 
Sir Brian Shaw and Mr Rodney 
Gain in. Executive Director at aw 
Bank of England who ro w i iiH il on 
behalf of Die guests. 

English-Speaking Union 
The Mayor of Chester was 
among the speakers at the 
annual dinner of the Cheshire 
branch of the English-Speaking 
Union held Iasi night at the 
Town Hall. Chester. The Duke 
of Westminster, president, was 
in the chair and Sir Antony 
Buck. QC.MP. was the guest of 
honour. Mrs Elinor Todd and 
Mr Ian Morris also spoke. 


Goorkhas (Hie Sirmoor Rifles) 
this morning received Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel John Brewer upon 
relinquishing command of the 
2nd Battalion and Lieuienant- 
Cokmel Sandy McNeil upon 
assuming command. 

Hie Prince of Wales. Colonel 
in Chief, The Parachute Regi- 
ment, received Lieutenant- 
Colonel Christopher Keebfe 
upon relinquishing command of 
the 1 5th (Volunteer) Battalion 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Walker 
Conn upon assuming 
command. 

His Royal Highness, Trustee, 
The National Gallery, this after- 
noon attended a meeting of the 
Board of Trustees at The Na- 
tional Gallery. London WC2. 

Sir John Riddell Bt, was in 
attendance. 

The Prince of Wales, Patron, 
The William and Mary Ter- 
centenary Trust, this evening 
gave a Reception for the T rust at 
Kensington Palace. 

November 6 : The P ri n cess 
Margaret. Countess of Snowdon 
this afternoon visited the 
London HospitaL Whitechapel. 

Lady Aird was in attendance. 

Her Royal Highness, Deputy 
Colonel-in-Chief The Royal An- 
glican Regiment, was repre- 
. seated by Major General Sir 
David Thorne at the Thanks- 
giving Service for General Sir 
Timothy Creasey which was 
held in Saint Edmundsbury 
Cathedral Bury St Edmunds, 
this afternoon. 

November 6 : Princess Alice. 
Duchess of Gloucester, Deputy 
Colonel-in-Chief, The Royal 
Anglican Regiment, was repre- 
sented by U Gen Sir John 
Akehurst at the Memorial Ser- 
vice for General Sir Timothy 
Creasey which was held in St 
Edmundsbury Cathedral, Bury 
St Edmunds, this afternoon. 
YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
November 6 : The Duke of Kent 
returned to RAF Northolt this 
evening having undertaken 
engagements in Northern 
Ireland. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Captain Michael Campbell- 
Lamerton. 

The Duchess of Kent this 
morning opened the 
Hawksworth Wood YMCA 
Family Centre and later opened 
the Blood Transfusion Centre at* 
Seacroft Hospital. Leeds. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of 32 
Squadron Royal Air Force, was 
attended by Mrs Alan 
Hendeison. 


Birthdays today 

Air Marshal Sir John Donald, 
59; Sir John Egan. 47; the Rev 
Professor Christopher Evans, 
77; Mr Timmy Flint, 34; Dr 
Billy Graham, 68; Mrs Lucinda 
Green. 33; Lord Greenhill of 
Harrow, 73; Admiral Sir Nicho- 
las Hunt, 56: Dame Gwyneth 
Jones. 50; Professor Sir Edmund 
Leach. 76; Professor K- Lorenz, 
83; Mr Wolf Mankowitz, 62; Sir 
Robert Mickiethwait, QC, 84; 
Sir John Muir, 76; Miss Ruth 
Pitter, 89; Dame Joan Suther- 
land, 60: Dame Jean Taylor, 70; 
Baroness White, 77. 


rJc- . ^ ?*** :s : 1 * 






THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 

Forthcoming — — 

marriages 

Mr SJD. Baimbridge 
and Miss J-M. Bartrfngham 
The engagement is annou n ced I 
between Stephen Baimbridge, 

BDS, son of Mr and Mrs A. A. 

Baimbridge, of Slad, 

Gloucestershire, and Julie, 
daughter of Mr and Mre M.P. 

Buckingham, of Kidlingwn, 

Oxford, 

Mr RJ. Barker 
and Miss CJ. York 
The enga g ement is announced 
between Robot, son of Mis S. 

Barker and the late Mr BJ.R, 

Barker, of Haywards Heath, and 
Caroline, daughter of Mr and 
Mis P. York, of Tonbridge. 

Mr SJLC. Blakeway 
aud Mis AJE. KMwen 
The engagement is announced 
betwee n Simon Richard Collins, 
son of Mr M.R. Btakrway, of 
Congleton, Cheshire, and ofMrs 
K.G. Pearson, of freshwater. 

Isle of Wight, and Allyson 
Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and 
Mis EL Carey, of Johannesburg. 

Mr BJ. Corbett 
and Miss RJL Heap 
The engagement is announced 
between Barry John, son of the 
late Mr John T. Corbett and of 
Mrs J.A. Baxter, of Pcwsey, 

Wiltshire, and Rachel Rayner, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
G.R. Heap, of Mellor, 

Lancashire. 

Mr MLEJL Edgley 
and Miss CJEL Tetley 
The engagement is announced -*-■ 

mTn Queen EBzmbeth the Queen B 
Hastings. Oxfbnishirc. and membraace at St Margaret 
Caroline, daughter of Mr R-G. ^ » 

Tetley, of Chasdeton, Oxford- 5216 

shire, and of Mis MJJ. Tetiey, ■ ■ 

of Stewkley, Buckinghamshire. __ # ^ 

Dr MJ. Glynn 

and Dr EXT. Moskorfe W1U 

The engagement is announced • • . 

between Michael younger son 1HCIV%11*A 

of Mr and Mrs Harry Glynn, of lll^ llllCv 

Cheam, Surrey, and Eleanor, MT 

B, Geraldine Noman, £ 
Park, Middlesex. A painting which carried an 

Mr TJ. Holland estimate ofS6,000-$8,000 was 

and Miss E-J.S. Cobbetd sold for $231,000 (£154,000) 

The engagement is announced at Sotheby’s in New York on 
between Thuistan, son of the Wednesday. A long-running 
late Antony Holland. MC. and saga of art detection finished 

onlyl days bdbrathe rale. 
Elizabeth, second daughter of The sixteenth-century panel 
the late Alistair Cobboki and of painting of “The Adoration of 
Mrs Alistair Cobbold. the Magi*’ came in to 

Sotheby's from a deceased 
Mr CM. Hotioa estate with an attribution to 

and Miss CJHL Maifmrlane Manyn de Vos. a Flemish 
The engagement * announced Manners 
between Mark, son of Mr and 

Mrs CP. Horton, of Studham, Sotheby’s thought it was 
Dunstable, Bedfordshire, and Italian and found the opinions 
Christina, daughter of Major- of scholars they consulted 
Ma cfarlan e, CB homing in on Giorgio Vasari, 
and Dr H.D Macfariane, of ** 

Famham, Surrey. Three weeks ago, Edward 

Mr JJSjG. Maitland ‘ 

ami Miss E.C. Rxban PlTDCe Georg Of 

The engagement is announced »v , ° 

between John Benjamin irclUBarR 
Gladwin, son ofthe late Mr J.G. A service of thanksgiving for the 
Maitland and Mrs A.M. Mail- I life of Princ e Offfg nft VimaHt 
land, of Henham, Essex, and ’win be held in Westminster 
Elizabeth Clare, daughter of Mr Abbey at 5 pm on Monday, 
and Mrs US. Rihan, of Sutton December 1, 1986. Those wisb- 
Coldfield. ing to attend are invited to apply 

Mr D.GJL Prior for tickers as follows: Heads of 

and Mbs CH. Holmes Missions to the Vice-Marshal of 

The engagement is announced the Diplomatic Gorps; members 
between David, eldest son of Mr of the family, peers, members of 
James Prior, MP, and Mrs Prior, parliament, friends and repro- 
of The Old Hall, Brampton,, sentatives of organisations to: 
Suffolk, and Caroline Henrietta, The Receiver General 20 



OBITUARY 

MR HOWARD THOMAS 

Creative impresario in 
British broadcasting 

Mr Howard Thomas, C 8 E, 
aitor of The Brains Trial. 

_ iodine figure m the Sydney Newman, pro- 


television, dkxl yesterday 
the age of 77. 


eventually became The 


He was bom at Cwxn, . series which 

Monmouthshire, on March 5. 

1909. but during his child- 


g£*ar*- - 

his career as a Honor Bbctam. and. ter 


^to,^din.9rg ajuge^o-raginjjn^n 
started the commercial tatfio and earned nwro IbanS 10 


department of the London 
Press Exchange. At the same 

' • _ « emfltr fnr 


time be was writing senpls tor h> 


miffion in sales overseas. 
Amazingly, A TV had refused 


the first series. 


radio and. during the early 
part ofthe Second World War, 
he joined foe BBC 


Under foe re-aBocation of 4 
the independent te lev isio n ■ ■ 
franchises in 1967 ABC was 


he iomea toe cbl. — 7 

. to force years he produced merged with Associated 
and directed some 500 pro- Rediffuswn. Tbtatm became 


ana aireticu — - - — 

erammes and brought to the managu® forector of the new 
microphone the “Forces' compar^Ttame^whu* vras 
Sweetheart'’, Vera Lynn, in responsible for weekday pro- 
her series Sincerely Yours, grammes m ifoe London area. 

■£_ . ■ ■ mum nAiM in 


tin ir . « 

Even more &mous was The He was teen both 10 im- 
Brains Trust, in which a panel prove independent 

of experts answered Questions television's coverage of news. 
- ■ ■ >- and current afrairs and to 


sent in by listeners. — — 

From a tentative start, it break out ofwhat hecaJJed foe 

became one of the most “schedules s&mtracfcet . On 
popular wartime shows cm foe ooe occasion he shook up the 
wireless, feeding a public ap- Thames schedules by screen- 
petite for information and ing two This *>eek specials in 
er udi tion at a time of national one evening, but not all foe 
crisis. It received 3,000 post- ITV companies agreed with 
cards a week, drew audiences his decision and refused to 
of up to 11 million people and take both prog ramm es. 


Mother visiting the field of re- 
st’s, Westminster, yesterday. 


Saleroom 


Painting’s origins 

" O They were the scientist, fleribffity m foe schedules to 

1_ • J J Julian Huxley, foe philoso- allow sews programmes to be 

mSDire Dinners ^CEl JoadlSd a introduced at the last 

^ M. & retired naval officer. Com- moment”. 

By Geraldiire Norman, Sale Room Correspondent mander A. JB. CampbelL Re- He was oireoffoose tipped 
_ • ’ puiBHan cruited by Thomas, they were to succeed Sr Ht^h Greene as 

Hinting which carried an Pillsbury, director of the Fort a nicely contrasted ream, who director-general of the BBC, 
iate of $6,000-58,000 was Worth Museum and the man took questions from “what is but he stayed with Thames, 
for $231,000 (£154,000) who turned down foe director- civilisation ?" to “how does a becoming chairman in 1974 
theby’s in New Yoric on shin of foe London National fhrland on a ceding T equally sod retiring in 1979. During 


turned its three 
"brains” into 
celebrities 


regular “ITV has been too rigid", 
national Thomas afterwards declared. 

“There has not been enough 


younger daughter of Mr Peter 
Holmes, of The Old Rectory, 
Shotesham All Saints, Norfolk, 
and foe late Mrs Diana Holmes. 



A painting which carried an 
estimate of $ 6 , 000 -S 8,000 was 
sold for $231,000 (£154,000) 
at Sotheby’s in New Yoric on 
Wednesday. A long-running 
saga of art detection finished 
only two days before foe sale. 

The sixteenth-century panel 
painting of “The Adoration of 
foe Magi” came in to 
Sotheby’s from a deceased 
estate with an attribution to 
Martyn de Vos, a Flemish 
Mannerist. 

Sotheby’s thought it was 
Italian and found the opinions 
of scholars they consulted 
: homing in on Giorgio Vasari. 

| Three weeks ago, Edward 

Prince Georg of 
Denmark 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Prince Georg of Denmark 
- win be held in Westminster 
Abbey at 5 pm on Monday, 
December 1, 1986. Those wish- 
ing to attend are invited to apply 
for tickets as follows: Heads of 
Missions to the Vice-Marshal of 
the Diplomatic Corps; members 
of the family, peers, members of 
parliament, friends and repre- 
sentatives of organisations to: 
The Receiver General 20 
Dean's Yard, Westminster Ab- 
bey, London, SW 1 P 3PA, 
endonmg a stamped addressed 
envelope by Monday, Novem- 
ber 17. Tickets will be posted on 
Monday, November 24. Ad- 
missions 10 the service win be by 
ticket only. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life ofMr Douglas Tnistram Eve 
was held in the Grosvenor 
Chapel on Monday, November 
3. The Rev A. Marks officiated 
and Lord Silsoe, QC gave an 
address. Mr John Tnistram Eve 
and Mr Bill Tnistram Eve, sons, 
read the lessons. The Royal 
Institution of Chartered Survey- 
ors singers formed the choir 
with Mr Clifford Dann at the 
organ. Those present included: 
Mrs Trustiam Eve, widow, 
other members ofthe family, his 
former partners at J-R. Eve and 
.senior chartered surveyors and 
lawyers. 

Service Dinner 

7 <»l Pmtfah Rfpiw f i i t 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Wordey prodded at the annual 
dinner of the 2nd Punjab Regi- 
ment Officers’ Association had 
last night at foe Army and Navy 
Club/PallMalL 


Pillsbury, director of the Fort 
Worth Museum and the man 
who turned down foe director- , 
ship of foe London National ; 
Gallery this summer, told i 
them it was genuine. A sale- ! 
room notice quoting : 
Pifisbuiy’s opinion was dis- 
played beside the picture. 

Finally two days ago j 
Sotheby's discovered that the 
composition was identical to a 
large altarpiece by Vasari in 
Santa Croce in Florence- It 
became dear that they had a . 
small preparatory work or 
modello on thdr hands. It was 
finally purchased by a New 
York dealer: 

White Dove Ball 

The White Dove foil in aid of 
The Royal Marsden Hospital . 
Cancer Fund, wffi be held on 
Wednesday, December 3. at foe 
Dorchester hotel Park Lane, 
Wi. President of the ball is 
Margot, Countess of 
Budanghamshire. Tickets are 
available at £55 each inclusive 
of c h am pa gne reception and 
iliniMT with Wine. For further 
details telephone the ball sec- 
retary on 352 3786 or 839 288a 

Luncheons 

HM Government 
Baroness Young, Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was host yes- 
terday at a luncheon held at 
Lancaster House in honour of 
Miss Sissd Ronbeck, Norwe- 
gian Minister of Environment. 

The Hem Alan Clark, Minister 
for Trade, was host at a lun- 
cheon held at Lancaster House 
yesterday in honour of M Ber- 
nard Bosson, Minister of 
France. 

Primrose League ^ 

Lord Mutton, of Lmdisfame, 
Chancellor of the Primrose 
League, presided at the annual 
chapter luncheon for members 
of the Churchill Chapters held 
yesterday at the Dorchester 
HoteL Lord Renton, QC, was 
the chief guest and speaker. 


Hyland on a ceiling?” equally sod retiring in 1979. During 
in their stride. his tenure. Thames launched 

Thomas left the BBC in prestige documentaries like 
1944 because, as he explained The World At War, as well as 
in With an Independent Air, ; foe popular drama series. 


1 originality seemed to be val- Rumpole ofthe Bailey and The 
ued more outride it The Sweeney. 
corporation riposted by re- From 1974 to 1976 be was 
moving his credit from aH chair man of Independent 
announcements of Brains Television News. He was a 
Trust programmes both on the governor of the British Film 
air and in Radio Times. institute and a vice-president 
He moved into foe film of foe Royal Television Soci- 
industry as producer-in-chief ety. 

r -a. ; j p^.l .u. 


fra* Associated British Pathe' 
There he looked after foe 


He was foe author of several 
books, including The Brighter 


Path# Gazette newsreel and Blackout Book (1939), How to 
produced many doemnenta- Write for Broadcasting ( 1 940), 
lies, including a record of foe Britain's Brains Trust (1944) 
1953 Coronation called EBza- and a disappointingly ano- 
beth is Queen. dyne volume; The Truth 

When independent tdevi- About Television (1962). His 
son started in 1955 Thomas memoirs, With an Indepen- 
was managing director of dent Air, appeared in 1977. 
ABC, one of the original “lag Thomas was an impresario 
four” companies, From the of tare intuition, and one of 
outset, he had faith in foe ooe- the most talented exponents of 
act (day specially written for the British system of broad- 
television, and among ABCs casting, wbether at the BBC or 
early achievements was Arm- with ITV. For him, the most 
chair Theatre. Broadcast five gratifying aspect of foe success 
on Sunday evenings, it gave a of The Avengers in the United 
platform to young playwrights States was that it was pro- 


like Alan Owen, Johi 
mer and Give Exton. 


Morti- duced to British standards ami 
not dictated by American 



Bticfacn’Conpniy 
Mr Norman C. Poultncy, Mas- 
ter of the Buichers’ Company, 
presided at a luncheon held 
yesterday ar Butchers’ Hafl. Mr 
Alan H. Emus and Lord Vestry 
also spoke. 


Memorial services 


OW 


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General Sr Timothy Creasey 
Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother, Cok>nd-m-Chief of foe 
Royal Anglian Regiment, was 
represented by Lieutenant- 
Colonel Sr Martin GiUiat. Prin- 
cess Margaret, Dejxny Cokmel- 
in-Chief was represented by 
Major-General Sir David 
Thome and Princess Alice 
Duchess of Gloucester, Deputy 
Colonel-in-Chief; by Lieuten- 
ant-General Sr John Akefamst 
at a service of th ank sgiving for 
the foe of General Sir Timothy 
Creasey bekl yesterday in St 
Edmundsbury Cathedral The 
Provost of -St. Edmundsbury 
officiated. Major-General J_B. 
Dye read the lesson and the 
Dean of Windsor gave an 
address. The Lord Lieutenant of 
Suffolk and the Mayor of St 
Edmtmdsbury attended. Among 

Mr Mldc 

Viscount Bcrntcd 
A service of thanksgmng for 
the life ofViscount Bearsted was 
held at the Liberal Jewish 
Synagogue, St John’s Wood, on 
Wednesday. Rabbi Julia 
Neuberger officiated- Mr Robert . 
Waley -Cohen, son-in-law, read 
a prayer. Viscount Bearsted, 
brother, read Psalm 15. and Mr 
Tommy Macpberson gave an 
address. Among those present 


and mh A Ruck. Cotood and mbs a ft 
Reave and Matoc and Mrs A H 
WOdnson (mmoMMaw and. sta- 
ter*). Mr IJCFtwod (brmher-tn-law). 
Mary Lady Croflon and Mrs S Stanton 
(StaMcs^MBw*. Mr Oami* Friend. MTS 
Randle sorrow. Mr Marts wtndmon. 
Colonel and Mn A J K Odder. Mr 
Charted Caidv. Mr Jason calder. Mr 
and Mrs p Sydney-Srotm. ■ , 

Field Marsnal Lord Qgv er. Fl rtd 
Marshal Sir Jdm Storia. OenenUa 
Sir RKtiard TranL S»r Michael Gow. 
Sir Janes Ciavme. Sir RldwrO 
Wore tev. Sn- Frank Kftson. Sir John 

Hawley. 

Whedsr* CSjrfTo'lx* n SSntji Anna. 
B ene v olent Fund Cmnaud: Brlga. 

P Krnffl i (Bamm Setgntra 

Thornton (Army Stars' CWfln* 
SorteOp. J L PowmaH (lo/sa _Lano 

FSSku^JSmnandairt. LMOff Pfc 

Ing the Colonel 'e/ thr Regiment. Royal 
aSgtmentor FusWersi. ■ 


Utr John Cotvuie. Sir Arthur CoUbs. 
Sir Harry Moore. Mr Rphin and 
Hon Mrs Den?-. Mrs. Tomray Mnc- 
ptterson. Rear-Admiral C A WWestoc 
(Khig Edward V11 Hospital tor 
ORmni. Mr Toeyjosset. kp. Mrarw 
Mrs RRr«hy Sitwell. Colonel T 

Cwservaihe Assodadonl. Mr VKar- 
vey and Mr F SatXn (Uplon Ftouse 
cHrk« Ctybl, Mr NctOU w*ro« 
(Warwickshire Yeomanry). Major JF 
Andmoa «Oueeo> Own warw kdt- 
aure and worcestenture veqraanry 
OM Comrades Association). Mr Nor. 
Man Jones (deputy chairman. Ltoyds 
Bank) with Mr Graham Peck (Lloyds 

Ttye ad neepig ^ 

Mr Michael Bwunmi (Na- 
tional TYust). Mr ItoMT Merto n 
, ( Ba r kt ngstde Jewish Youth 6ectre). 
Mr G Salctwr wtUi Mn M Grertwon 
and Mr H Franks (Jewish Home. 
Touennsnu.' Mr Neville Kayman and 
Mr HOQh TaytOT (F w Stephen) and 


When some of the offerings requirements, 
were criticized for being too He married, in 1934, Hilda 
gloomy, Thomas cast around Fogg, who survives him with . 
for lighter Eire, taking as his their two daughters. p 

MR LARRY BLONSTEIN 

Mr Larry Btonstrin, who space and communications 
died in Pans on October 31, division, and spent foe next 
aged 59, was a pioneer in seven years ^expounding the 
British space technology, and cause of. communicating via 
was responsible for tbesuccess space, 
ofthe first ^British satellite. He was both proselytiser 

Bor ?r- on k'Hv'L 7, ^ engineer, and he con- 
served from 1947 to 1949 in ceivedamd wrote foe script for 
the army, where he did a good the Faraday lecture series, 
deal of work on impact char- Let's guild a Satellite. This 
acteristres in colliding veto- remarkable performance, into 
des. Afterwards he put this -which he incorporated audio- 
experience to_ good use as a visual techniques, raised the 
crash inves tigato r on the Faraday lecture from the sta- 
London Underground. tus of a specialist event to an 

He then went to University almost mass andience affair. 
College, London, where he British Aerospace presented it , 
graduated in mechanical engi- to 70,000 people throughout *- 
neering. In 1954 he joined the country in 1983-84. 

English Electric Aviation Blons'tein was a man of 
where “ worked on wind restless, volcanic mind. He 
tunnels and shock tubes. Jived at a terrific pace, and 
to 1957 be became project even in bis leisure time he 
manager of UK3, foe first would not relax. Under the 
British satellite. He had con- pseudonym Felix Semper he 
siderabk influence on the way produced a considerable 
it was designed, as well as amount of journalism, includ- 
bemg responsible for the de- fog articles for The Observer, 
Every of the system on time, and some highly provocative 
UK3 went into space on an items on women's affairs for 
American Scout launcher in SHE. 

_ _ He also published, under his 

By this time he had joined own name, a book on picture 
Pfessey, where be gained wide framing, and had completed a 
experience as a marketing and novel, unpublished, about liv- 
m anu fe etttring mana g er. fog in space. He had a stroke a 

But he was back to space year ago. and had been ad- 
activities in 1973, working for vised to let up. But he was 
the next six years on comrau- temperamentally incapable of 
nications studies with doing so. fi 

Eurospace, in Paris. »- . 

„ . ... He leaves his widow, the 

He brought this vast expert- artist Lys Debray, and two 
enoe to British Aerospace in children of a previous 
1979, as sales manager for the marriage. 


HIS HON JUDGE RIGBY 


His Honour Judge Rigby, 
DFC and bar.' circuit judge 
since 1980, died on October 
30. He was 69. 

Herbert Cecil Rigby was 
bomon April 2, 1917. He was. 
educated ax Sandbach School 
Ellesmere College and Liver- 
pool University, before bang 
articled to his unde's firm of 
solicitors at Winsford, 
Cheshire. 

In 1937 he was commis- 
sioned in the 7th Ch eshire 
Regiment (TA). At the out- 
break of war he immediately 
enlisted and served in the BEF 
in 1939. The following year he 
was evacuated from Dunkirk. 

Later he transferred to foe 
RAF and won his wings with' 
11 Group, Hornchurch (Spit- 

fires) rn In tUi wl.v. 


he commanded 2?? Squad- 
ron, one of foe first into 
France with the invasion 
forces in 1944. 

He was admitted solicitor in 
1947, this time working as a 
partner in his father’s firm at 
Sandbach in 1972 he was one 
of the first solicitors to be 
appointed recorder of the 
Crown Court ofthe Wales and 
Chester Circnit- 

Rigby was an independent- 
minded man who gave many 
years 1 service to foecommum- 
ty, including 14 years- on 
Cheshire County Council 

He married, first in' 1939, 
Elhd Murid Horton, with 
.whom he had two daughters. 
They were divorced after the 
war. He married, second, in 












^JiSi^SSL. ' 




Earklrt 12 ; 28 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS 

AND IN MEMORIAM 


BIRTHS 


JUMMS ■ On 3 1st October 1986. at 
Oneen Charlotic'a HawtoL to VJvfcjn 
(o^e Cotcwuth) and Mdwte, a son. 
/act- a brother for David WfltHun. 
AKIHONT . Oti flih November, at 
Saint Luke's HosptaL GufloftM. to 
Jane fnte Fared and Guy. a «n. 
Christopher Joiut. 

BOWEN - On tth Novembe r. to Debo- 
rah (nte Stronczakj ana Gareth, ■ 
mv AlesauMr Daniel. 

CLABK- On October 22nd. to Helena 
rnieJ-0 and Ctrfui of Paco da Gloria. 
4970 Portugal, a son. Chrtetogter 
Mfna- ■’ 

tCaeMniMMS - On October 77. 
IQ Uz (nee Harding) and Simon. a 
son. Ben edict, a brother for Harry. 
EVEBfTT ■ On 3lst October, to Bate- 
... ra (nfe Rohntndler) and Adrian, a 
P ‘son. Nicholas, a brother tor 
' Charlotte. 

kWlwnt-On November & to Joan- 
na tnte Greenneld) and AbUwny. a 
son. Nicholas Exton. a hr other mr 
ChartoOe sat d Sophia. 

BLASS - On November 3rd- to Leonte 
Me Haratuon) and Lube, a i 
AJAsdakr Charles Dundaa 
■MJOUP-TH O MP u m ■ On sm No- 
vember. . at Queen Ctaariotteto 
HospHaL W6. to Jem (tee Astor) and 
Max. a son. 

IUHMUN9 • On Monday November 
3rd. to Deborah arm Mae), a son. 
Barney Charles Henry. 

MESNE* - On November 5th. at tha 
Undo Wins. SL Mary’s Paddington, 
co Sarah (nee tVftherow) and Rich 
«nL a daughter. Frances MOUcent 
saw tor Edmund Rufus. 

HEXTALL -On 3ra Nove mb er 1986. to 
janle and Nicholas . a daughter. 
MAMNMO - On October 24th 1986. to 
MJiahny Cat* Cedar) and Cohn, a 
dauglUer. Katharine Sarah Atoan- 
. dra. A lovely sister to the twins. 
Andrew and James. 

MORROW . On 4 November, to JUSe 
Me Ptuopsi and Anthony, a son. 
Charles Montssue Clare. brother tor 
AnnabeOe. 

NEWMAN - On 31st October, to Sami 
into StnarO and Jlobefl. a son. OHva- 
James Christopher, 

NEWMAN - On November Oh. to Sue 

l and Adrian, a daughter. Anna vtc- 
tofta. a stecer to Otsste and Nicholas. 
STWflKMMN - On 4th November, at 
King's College Hospital, to Terry into 
Oorbtai) and Paul. a daughter. Anna 
Louise. A slater for Charlotte. . 
THOMAS - On 5th November, to Joyce 
Owe MamilD-and Bryn, a daughter. 
Katy Elizabeth. 

TOOSEY - On November 6th. to 
Monica and Patrick, a daughter. 
Philippa Mary. 

WHALLEY - On November let In Dur- 
ham- to -Patricia into Wens) and 
Fronds, a son. Hugh James. 
WHEELEB - On November 6th. |p ENz- 
abetb into Todd) and Jeremy, a 
daughter. Annabel Jayne. 


DEATHS 


BAILEY - On Wednesday November 
5th. after a short fitness. Biddy, 
much loved wife of Ken. devoted 
mother to Kim and Amanda. Funeral 
Service at SL Peters BrackNy. on 
Tuesday November nth at 11.30 
am- followed by fhmfiy burial ai 
EdgKOte. No flowers or letters 
glass, donations to Bab Chomptan 
Omar Trust. Holland House. 
Burmester Rrt.. London SW.17. 


On 4th November 1986. ptmee- 
totb> after anUtneuvrry bravety ho m e. 
Cntan Ronald Cray Banin OAE_ 
v R o> . R.N.R.-. onto 69. Dearly touad 
husband at Eleanor and fatter ol AJMbo- 
ny.PNrr and Carat Fnem service at 
Si PriWs CJiurrh, Hamumiofi. surra*', 
on Wrdannay iaih November at 2*cn. 
Family flown, only. doMUons ud- 
tomcd. to ~ 


’w l v'.’: 


i-ar 




On November 4th. pencefldhr 

in hospital, ingnd into Modhn) aged 

80. widow of the late lan Barr or 

Cheltenham. Funeral Service^ on Fit- 

day. November 21 st at Cbettenham 

Cremaiortom a|2nm- Ftowere and 

enquiries to WA Trenhalte. Funeral 

Directors. m.Btfti Road. CheKeo- 

ham. Tefc 0242 S14187. 


H 


On 4th November L9B&. 
peacefully at from in Eating WS_ 
David Waller, aged 44. Dearly loved 
son of Betty Troribatti and the late 
Waller Brown and stepson., of the 
late Cordon Tremham. Treasured 
brother of Lynne and Jennifer and 
gnatiy loved brother in law and un- 
de. Funeral Service at St Barnabas 
Church. Pitanaager Lane. EaUngWS 
an Uw UU> of November at ll am. 
No flowers by reoueiL an enouiries 
to WS. Bond Ud. 19 Band SL Ealing 
W5. Tel 01 667 0422. 


BE BDSMELET - On 23rti October. 
- at Uie MNsStos 

“the Hiea Pyrenees. Baron Pierre. 
Oww«er to to Leg tea fTMuMur. 
“da de Ouerre. HN deng hty and 
^a^arahavtt^T^^d 

by LePe raJmnChariesHomrenRa- 

nwntowice Sunday. November 9th, 

12.45 pm at EthNredx'S arareh. Ely 

puce. 

on November Rh. sudden- 
to. Stefan, much loved Doctor. 
husb and, tether and ffsnd&shm. . 
HIBBS - On Novmb w 4th. ta theiav- 

rfi u« Aahteod Hoeptoi. 

Ruwtana Frank. So very dearly 
tovto B y Ms wife pat, children Mi- 
aw g. R|Cftartl. Suran. Strooa and 
snutdcbUdranTm. Laura and Leon. 

Funeral Service at St GHes Church. 

ASMead on Tuesday Novcmborijifc 

w o_fc^iw cd by nrtvate ere- 

inuiflyi- FamBy flours osdy. 
punttons « desired to toe Anneals 
Saawary.RMm 1 CteDcge of Surgeons 
of agtend. 354J Lincoln's ton 
FWdS. tondon WC2A 3Ptt 
MOTWI . On November 4 th 1966. 
*»«ftiDy to Ms 80 th year. Co»I 

tnander John Hubert Qretton OJSEL. 

Iwtond of Mary BUbctb Fletcher. 

runerat nrivate. Family Qdwws only 
Nrare. but donations If dobra to 

Itos Georges Fund for SaBore. at 1 

Cheshaatt SL 8W1. 
LEVET.QnahNo Benaie r.atmriSth 
bote of theQunmwntrand Gotf Cteti. 

SKtaerHeniT warned of Ftxt otm- 

h WL go y h Afric a. Bao ved tether of 

Marg aret. Peter. Jeffrey and Susan. 

MOHHAUNY - OR November SUt. 
Peacefully. Nancy, briovad wire of 

John. Funeral ai Boacwefi. Tuesday 

Novem ber lltb. 2JKtem. 
MVEBMNl-orKWednesday November 

Btb. nraeefU to to hosnoal after a 

tang fitness. Aubrey Sfelwyn. aged 

59- Dearly loved husband of Helen 

mid devoted tether of Jane and Jona- 

Uan. .P rivate temfiy funeraL 
Memorial Service to be autoaaeaiL 
EYNOLBS • On November Bto. John 

PetctvaL fomwrly manager of West 

retarito- BMk. Fhvenbam toora 1937 

to 1969. Funeral wfii take piece at 
Barham crematorium on Wednes- 

day 120> November at 2-30 pm. 
Ftobfly flowers only: Donerions to 

Arthritis Care, c/o National Wes t- 
ndnster Bank. Tankertoa Branch. 

132 TUnkerioit Road, WMteaMe. 

Kent. 

SCHUSTER - On November 4th 1986. 
after a abort Knees, joy StneUr. 

aged 7B years. Dearly loved wife of 

Aubrey wuoam. Funeral. Service at 

Breakspear Crematorium. RidattP. 

on Thureday November I30i at ZJSO 

pm (East Chapefl. FUmBy flowers 

only please. 

WAY - On November nt h atSL-Bar- 
tootorDewsHamtot Loaton. after* 

»«t Illness. Etbabrih. beloved wife 

of Tony and much loved mother of 

LuQa and Gerakl. FimerN Service at 

the Guard's Chapel on Monday. No- 

vember loth at 1030 am. Ftoufiy 
flowers only Mease. A Memorial Ser- 

vice wfif be heU later in Penh. 
1MLSOM - On 24th October, in Califbr- 
nto. after a long mneas. Andrew 
Henry, aged 66. husband of Alene 

and son of the late Rev. TE and Mrs 

Ena Wilson, some time of Anttogty 

College and West Waton. 

-On November 4th 1986. sad- 

dafljraftar a short Buss. Ms Hon. 

Judge Ralph Wood, aged 66 yean. 

Only son of the late Harold and 

Dorothy Wood of WfinMow. Chesh- 

ire. A dearly tewed brother of Sbefia. 

Beryl. Haul and Erica. Funeral Son 

vice on Monday 10th November 

1986. at Wflunlow Parish Oiurrii at 

1pm. Flowers nay be sere, or If de- 

shvd a dodaffon tor The Mutopfc 

SOertais Society. All enquiries to Al- 

bert R Flack (Funeral Director). Lid. 
WQmsJow. Cheshire. Telephone 
0625 wyv« . 

WYLK- On November 3rd i986.trag- 
jtaHtoaamsuRoranaceMlenL Lew 

and Mary of Wtmborne. Dorset. A 

towing emste and the moat dsoirfy 

loved parents of Nkfc and Phfi. They 

wta be satBy ntisned by tnetr facofly 

aid many friends. Private crema- 

tion. A Service of Thanksgfvtoo tor 
their fives wifi be held at St John's 

Church. Wbnbome cd Wednesday' 

November 12th al 2^0 wn. No flow- 

ers please, but donations, if desired, 
nay be nit to Charles Smafl and 

Sons. Funeral Directors, is West St 
Wbnbome in aU of PJLAMA. . 


DIALYSIS AND 
TRANSPLANT THEIR 
ONLY HOPE 

Lift saving t mu n an is loom, bn 
UBavaiJjfcte lbraab Jack of Juodt to 
2X» peo^e who ctic aniuaBy from 
bdtuy Mote. Please bdp axat a 
nprteve for some of them ifis year 
Donations wx 

THE BRITISH KIDNEY 
PATIENT ASSOCIATION * 
Sortim, Ranu. . • 

Tel BcnJon 3021/2 


YOUR WILL 


If yon are making your u 
•sunk of BtCSUA- we wr taraao- 
wrvicv men ms «mm> who haw tod 
Uxnfe* to ttw Kfvtce Of BUS coon try. 


to the ataman. Bruam 
LunMew ri-Stnlt* Moil AMocto 
dan. c/o Midland Bank Bit 60 West 
mimm. m odoo- ecia rox. 


Aeasc «P Ti<e NaaMN OcMvetent 

Fund tor tnr aom to ptovtos TENS* 

owtow for (he res«f of pato to coodl- 

UoosOke strovtot. COOtstysoamchiae. 

DOfiobons pteme- to- The renaa 

Tocypaody. Oiuim. NSFA, IS. New 

Broad su London acaM imh- 
rurimr. V f cant mdet you ra Mn a 

IMUM to toe carve oetween lO and 

i aw un many 7o» • othtfwfM an 
it be mere - Love Puna. - 

ftR AW ft C Gorins oo ttumk Sad 

danttoi Redrsmam Hnmesat in loacna 

ooraMma toe Thamaa. O4VI-0TZ8S5. 


BIRTHDAYS 


wwr Happy aw DtrttKtey. Sferah 
With tove from the teenfiy. 


SERVICES 


memorial Services 


A Memortal Service for Aidho- 
uy E Ledger HBL OAE. D4-. will be 
held at Rumor Abbey, an Monday 
8th December 1986 at U30 nan. 

UTTtX > A. Service of Thanksgiving 
tor the UEe of Marianne Utile, wifi be 
held In the Chapel of SL Edwards' 
School. OsttonL at Bm on Friday 
November 28th. 1986. 


ANCESTRY 

Oomact 

the team wtth the best 
expertence Woridwfde 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T. 
NORTHGATE 

Canterbury 

CTl IBA 
TEL: 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


tewm. Pmaqial A mnoorary 

<qI&Sa^iSSS: 

Read. London W8. TCI: 01938 uni. 
CMMKtCtrs fja profetKionaf currlcn- 
tun vine doc m a a ea- Detatia: oi-oji 
M S S . 

CaMVCYANCasS lv Adty tWShd SoPri. 

£180 + VAT and 

fine caw 319398. 

_ Looetoo School -df 
- Quo. 38 Ktotn Rom. swa 
7am. 


WANTED 


vomse LADY ReoohM tor tovtiy Ken- 
stnotan home, la took after twetvo y 
old nay. at weekly boarding school. For 
- w e ekend*, huff (enn and hofktavr. driv- 
er . preferred, aepiicaai nay study 
during week. GonfaCl Ma Thomas or 
MTV Bia dl sy . 01883 2000 O W cs H w is . 


Prtvau-oonector- 


P Ftofort. 8uk 

caret. High at- Mm Hamuvn. hms. 
Tei 007984 2261 Os nr or 027978 321 
Cvn 


Cash paid. 7 Days only . Hotel tepaania. 
Cruvenor Souxre. Room 206 at 
Trlenhone Mr Ovnhdt 01-6C9 9400. 
OWNS Cold, saver. mgc/coilKSn. Pur. 

chase cash. Private Di 506 1168 
■MOMCNEMUiUd tented ard- 
dro wanna. Tel OJ 229 96i& 


FOR SALE 


WnCWR - On 3rd November 1986. 
In hospUai. Dr. Roper GfibcrL aged 
46: Funeral Service on Friday 7th 
November at AO Saints. Grayswood. 
at 1 1.30 ant. Ennutrim to J.M- Luff. 
Tel 0428 3624. 


On November «ta 1986. 
peacefully in the Royal Berkshire 
Hospital after a short fitness. Joan, 
aged 70 years of Reading. Wife of the 
Me Dourfas and mother of Michael 
and Anne. Reoutem Mass at Our 
Lady of Peace Roman Catholic 
Church. Earley. Reading, esi Tues- 
day November llth at 12 noon. 
Flowers may be senr to AJL WaBcer 
* Son UtL 36 Eldon Road. Reading. 

PALUKTEV - On 3rd November 
1986. peacefusy. Helen Rosamond 
Mabel C Rags’ X Beloved wife Of the 
lair John Roger Dailmeyer. loving 
mother and grandmother. Private 
cremation 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


- Air Wv-Marshan 
Gordoo Arthur CRF - D.F.C- 
jovtng menuuy of my daring hus- 
band. Rachel. 


-Fredrick. 1910- X 975. This 
day Is remembere d and gfindly Iwgt. 
Srila. 


- SARAH, born 6th Nov. 
1970. died 7th Nov. 1976. Dearly 
fo ved at wayv 

MUONSOII - Rom. Fttaenf ati 7lh 
November 1986: ever remembered 
dearest. WMi great love Joan and 
family. , 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


SWAMTQN - NacLEAY. ON Novem- 
ber 7lh 1936 at the chotrii of Stoat 
GBts. Stoke Poges. Harry ttnrie 
Swainsten to Annabel Woone 
MecLeay of Ltnralg 


Science report 

Ozone loss cancer fear 


Depletion of atmospheric 
Oixme could more titan* double 
the incidence eg skin cancer and 
the cancer death rate among 
Americans, according to the 
United States Environmental 
Protection Agency . 

The agency says that the 


enon, no attempt was made by 
the agency to estimate tbe 
cancer risks worldwide. 

The can to a worldwide freeze 
and eventual etimmatiom of the 
use of substances (hat da mage 
tbe azme layer represents 
shift for the United States 


chang» in the protective layer of administration, which has bees 
ga< could to 40 mi l li o n J ■**•—* — 

cases of skin cancer and 800,000 
cancer AatM in the next 88 
years. The State Department 
has told American en ri waaes 
that the United States Govern- 
ment would propose a “seaiv 

term freeze” on manufactured agreement would provide ade- 
cheowytg that depleted the quite time f« industry to shift to 


saying that tether study is 

The iiMg mi adm Mstr mtlon 
would Gke to see an agreement 
on. the subject signed sometime 
next spring. The message to 
embassies i n dicated tint the 


substitutes lot 

cMoroflmrocarbeus. 

Tbe United States would also 

suggest “incentives” Car compli- 
ance, indadtog an agreement 
among signers to reject imports 

Tbe agency's assessment on 

cancer is under review by an couatnronotpartic^ntmginthe 
independent panel of scientists, agreement. 

It presntnro a condonation of the There wmrid be an “escape 
present growth » the use «f danse" enabling some vital noes 
cMorofluorooibims; mamAc- of ozone-dqdetmgsubstaucesto 


ozone. 

The proposal is to be pm 
forward in Geneva next nmatfe 
when the industrialized nations 
meet fo seek an a g r eement on 
control of such cheuucala. 


tuned gases that break down 
ozone in the upper atmosphoe. 
Ozone acts as a shield, keeping 
much of the ultraviolet radiation 
from the sms from reecbfng.tbe 
earth. 


contone if n* adequate sab- 
stitute was found. 


Environmentalists bare called 
for an end to the use of 
(Marofluorocftiboaso*er5tol0 
years. The ad mfafe tiatioa £s 
Tbe agency also said that taking the position dot the 
increas in g utoavfolet radiation rfmfag and ether details of the 
<» the earth would lead to -a agreement are to be worked o« 
growing number of disontere of fo Geneva and thereafter, 
the immune system aid eye 


ca t a r acts , rising losses of a®ps 
and forest products and * depie- 


Officials of the agency cau- 
tioned that the assessment was 
stiUHflder review, but added that 


One potential problem noted 
in tiie assessment is that some, 
gases that tend to neutralize the 
impacttfchbrineiasejLiBclfld- 
fog carbon dwaride, methane m id 
mtroos oxide, also aufribote to 
die. rapid warming of the earth’s 


■f 


if the results me supported surface, which some scientists 
after review, it wmdtf mean tint say could also bare severe 
controls wtmbi have to te environmental effects. 

liras, if action H taken to 
Of d ^^r^*S‘refr£ reduce gases that produce this 

i be Urnled States, in aerosols. 


Abhough oxHie depletion ap- 
pears to b* a global phennm- 


gases could accelerate. • 

©1986 NY Times News Service 


CHAPPELL OF BOND ST 

EST. 1811 

PIANOS 

Now Ptano Showroom ngw 
Spgdal ofton or odttog - 
- - ' ref utOabtneot stoat. 

Law cast credit tnira avoBttde. 

CHAPPELL OF 
BON D STR EET 

GO NEW BOND SHEET. LONDON Wl 

01 491 2777 


over 1 year (in 0%Vtow toterot 
ramover 2 yean (APR 9 JM) A Syeora 
(APR i2.2"M Wrtueti quotations. Frw 
Catalogue. SO* Mghgue Road. NWS 

01-267 7671. 

rOLHAW . W6. TOMOy rHWHAhed. 4 
■ Ordrootn Mum. 1 buimm . 1 en cum 


<1U«I UdWlMMr. Oes C.H. 
Agents. CIOSjDOO. Oi 731 7780 


nf 1701 a 18U> oennuy revtte* toitoat 

«l w BournnnMito Showrooms Oo 

Saturday. BOi November. Peouo W - 

txun by one o( Hr oobr 


eoharau Inlay work. 189/193 OM 
CWWClMnll Road. 

10202) 293880. 


1987 12 SotrodM Views oT Britain 
beonttfVil Qirtsmiae gKL Just C^B3 Btos 
P*tK TO. roots Calendar. Special Li- 
braries Book service. The ow Moat 
mow- SLjoans Rood, awmwjr. Ox 
forwMrt) 0X16 8HX or wnie for order 
form for cMentlOT to be-U afreet to ug 
to 18 friends wttn a Qreettaw torsragr- 
CARMEVS: 0O9> Wool velvet Cii.99 eg 
yrd lO colours. 80% wool twts £899 
sq yrd lO colours. McrafcoR vewur 
. £4.99 aq yrd. Prices tndwtve or VAT. 
We can HMy and-tti any make at car- 
pel. Abacus Carpet Co. Tat 01-940 
6142 Or 01-900 0660 
SWOT duality wool carpets, ai trade 
prices and under, otso avattaMe ion 


naif normal price. Chancery Carpet* oi 
408 0463. 


YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RES1STA CARPETS 

Mranom boniufui natural cork tan. 
Extremely WO wearing tne best tnon- 
cy ran bay £8.95 per sq yd ■* vaL 
MeraxMon velvet ptte carpel 14 puta 
atom. Bun m unaeruy 12* wtar 
Roto stock. 7 year wear guarantee for 
home or ottttv. £4.76 per « yd *■ vat 
pan toe Umesi *«e«on o t oum car 
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EXaema. numa and ether aacegte 

coo dModS. 

New fOSS Room apeay uns 
do w n ttPS . safety, easily. 

For Manx send an to 

SWffWEa HEALTHCARE 

Dept tt. a Mount Ptm 


ST JBinre AVE. Putney. 2 mtihdn (ran 
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ground floor apart plus parage and gar- 
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Tel: 01-788 2157 wficr 7 pm n 
woekends). 


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room w onguud Viemun trrrrace wr» 
2 FetnNes. ur SR station. 16 nuns CHy 
coo pw a a. rnM+3 s 3866 mm 
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w/n, etc. £sapw uua Tet 01 anwra 
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nwfft 2 gtrts 10 share lovely m M 
tine nan- AU mod eoos. Eye. tra s utn 
£38 pw each. Tel:3SB 3932 mo, 


BIZET EX3ING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
CHOPIN LISZT 


Our prices cut be muw a. 

MARKSON PIANOS 

SAMSty St.- NWI 

-01 935 8682 
Antbriy PS»rr, 5£)B 
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Tel 0264 772211 


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nwaL Lux 3 bed town house, taunac 

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features. 3 mins from new noway sin 

£J*6.*»01 M* 0888 teSTot-Se 

9149 older . 


OROTMN SramVEC Grand, model 16a 
ferial 30*86. good condutoo. £3*00 
Tei oi 727 9440 taller 6pm 


KMamwat Great Dane puppte*. Cham 

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Enouiries 082672 3712 


Q#BI 4RNE STYLE carved dtntog ta- 
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raoin + S-anm. velvet aunoWny. 
BaBaml Clow feci Cl .600. TcL 01-840- 

M TOP DESK double 8 appro* 
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ttoons. lO drawees. Mahogany 
and Oak. Offers toOi 622 1817 


Out events. Our charts tnctado moat 

molar companies. Credit carte accepted. 

01-828 1678. 

TK3CCTS FOR AMT CVOfT, Cm. star- 

bghl £». CteM. Us MS. AH theatre 

ami sports TeL 821-6616/828- 
OaVOA 85i / Vba / Diners. 

imtu i omAM noon rum. ionov io- 

7 at The Mariborauph Crest Hotel 

Qrtdl Rutseo 8L AOmtsstoa Free. 
CATS, gtliy LesMiaand Ptmmant am 

thaatrr and spun. Tel 439 1 765. AH ma- 

jor credit cds. 


Uuferdantped acOan. tuned. Area Mtoc 

OondKUn. 01-483 0148.. 
ftoO. set or mnut new iron*. £300 ano. 
Ring POke en: 01-323 2836 (10 am - 1 

tani- 

WAITVZD Edwardian. Victorian and Ml 

banned furniture. Mr ASMon-Ol 9*7 

5946. 667-669 Gamtt Lane. EantfUtd. 

SW17. 


FLATSHARE 


OUUMCH Prof M/P to aharr tat flat with 

1 otter O/r. 224. £178 pan *«ri 
TbL-Ol 299 1023 Mr 6 pm 
HCW Pr uHte o t M U mMe/ferMM. double 
r oo m , smew or couple, csopw. t* oi 
948 0379. 

SMCmres* WM rvs Prof, O/R. CM. 

£i80pem end e £180 retnrhabte depOb- 

a. 026671 3629 or OI 603 0664 
*W1 UghL space and prandetr. Own 

room sharing tnagameent Hal. £112 per 

week tnciunvc. Tel OI 689 0910. 
MU Non amolilng prof lo share hm 
bouse O/R. £140 pero Jori. Tctdl 767 
2091 .(coca). 

YJMXOKT not NWS Own OH ream. _ 
mm Jiddiee Ukji/i nigias 
p/w.«ecri TQJ.Tri OI 686 0880 
mi TO* Huge gdn (laL own bedim. 41- 

ttog rta A phone. 2 adds asoe £66 ow 

1PC 727 2712 
m Nr. 2 tt d ws . Man/Frt. large room to 


RMS £SSpw tncL OI 936 6224 
WANTED - Aatsnarr tor female 20. From 

S.wi ID s W.19. £160 pan max. NOV 

16th onwards. TeL493 2165 tdayu 
TOOMO DCSKMOt Prof Male eeefcs toner 

zone natanarc. Call httco Ol 351 7851 

Man/m after tmatl 6880 su 

5W8 lunvy OaL F. o/r. CM. w/machlar. 

£90 Bw. Tel: 01-731-6639 


RENTALS 


EATON PLACE, 

. SW1. 

A spadoos. degnuly fura and 
dec flat Large rccep with high 
ceilings. Two dbk beds. Two 
baths eosahe and doak. Fully fit 
lot. GCH and HW. Residcm por- 
ter. Price £525 per week. 

Tel: 01-235 4649. 


LUXURY MEWS 
HOUSE 

2 double 1 stogie bedroom. 2 batfl- 
rooms + fccuzzL sep shower, aoft 

jvcen rm. nilty Qttrt JdTrticn. tlln- 
loo m. patio balcony. Oo M. 
£4O0pw 

01 671 1464. 


RDUNTM New one bedroom mews 
bouse available (or combat* let. Newly 
furnished snail but moduli, wtoi all l*~ 
ctutys. Tel. Tv. tnrage- £140 pw.TU: 
Ol 878 7766 


r W 6A8V iMBhagsnmu Services) Ltd re- 
quire properties In Central. South and 
West London Areas lor wniang apoli- 
ennts Id Ol 221 8838. 


•EMtV A MORES Contact ns now on Ol. 
236 8861 tor me Best mmm or 
tbroteied Hats and hmni ro rent to 
KngibWIdti. Ghdma and KenstneBon. 


S uyj t Kd t PLATS A HOUSES ovaa « 
rrtrJ. for omtomao. ouniflwi Long A 
short lets to Ul arms. Uofnend & CD. 
48. AiMntb St Wl. 01-499 5534. 


AVABJUHJT NOW Lsxiay flat* * imw 
£200 - £1.000 per week. Tel: Bnigem 
881 £136. 


PROF COUPfX.10 share home mite _ 

vaagn. 6 HUts from. M25/A2 inter 


lounge A bathroom. Shane luxury kitch- 

en- Rewet no cMMren/pew. 6 _ 

tatntnmtn. Ret iuna nie depottWrefe- re- 
toured. Company Let p referred. p» 
bhoue: o«7483Jl7l after QJOtm 

C» t Omto. ruy. 3rd prof person, o/r. o/r. 

'i 80 «» el 

l» 806 6877 after Som 

OWN ROOM to luxury 2 tmuroofeed Dal 
near tute-CH. wash Mach. TV S Video 
Private garden Non Smoker £200 PCM 
etc Tec Ol 609 2S«6 

JCR END, N8. O/R Jn hot ftot • fust 
decorated and new CM wfli appeal lo 
M/F who la not petty mtadgd- £47pw. 
01 348 3828 or 340 0038. 
FLATMATES SefeciNe Sharing. Weft 
eatob Introductory service. Pise M for 
appe 01-689 S491. 313 - 
Road. SW3 


MX Uocury Qatshare 
l. O/R- an - - 


for prof F 12330). o/R- ail amens. T.V / 
video / todar / dryer etc, £300 pan 
URL Phone: 01 727 6046 after 6 pm. 

9UTNKV WLL Large Hoc apL Suit prof M. 
3tr* to share with aoantrr. 0/0- CM. 
Noimpoker peri erred. Oara ga. £180 
pm 4.MIIS.788 9066 after 7 pm. 

W nHW Second loctobfe pom re- 
toured tothare beautiful period Oat near 
pork and river. £60 pw u>cl. Tei Ol 891 
3312 or 891 8606. 

WE 23 own room in rtmnutnp s pa do n a 
Vld fUL Cttv /-CX 12 tBtos. £36 pw 
excl. Tel 629 7821 day. 291 6212 era. 

WH W I rni lll prot genon. N/s. To mane 
romf Me. O/R. Of. AU tadUoes. Nr 
tranoaori. £186 pan. Ol 947 6639 
ItvtX 

8ARNK8 SW13 O/R + bglcony to am*c- 
Ovehouae. OH free. Bus roam. Voting or 
mature F. £50 pw. T«. 01 741 2832 

■ATTXBSCA Prof M/F. N/tL 26+ . Share 
lux Hat with owner. CJ<te BR- O/R. 
own bath £60 aw 01-488 2188 day. 

CI M . 9 gA , *W Realty saner howe. 2 
Obts io snare. Oi-3Si 6732. Manure 
Irian Scoot Scuare 

CLAFttAM Ccriimoo/Baoersea. Prof F. 
Own ig dbf rm to bar tee. All mod ouna. 
£60 PW eXCL 01 228 2676 

RAM rriMMnW. Prof M/F. share 
fwuoy house, imxvs m oker). £138 fan. 
228 7iao ca/ier 6 oral 


Shepherds Breh. own room. £*o pw. 
Tel 740 6802 after 7 pm. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


CELEBRITY CHARITY AUCTION 

To be opened by JQWHXHtT.roBowing a sreoal video appeal by 
SIP JOHN GIELGUD CM. 

Thmwtay ism Naveraow to the Concert Hall, toipertai CoUepa. 
BaR-Q»<L Prinre Conaori Road (beside the Albert Hall), 
viewing from 12 pja-Maas te nu re 2 jOOO bHooosZOCtoJp. auc- 
tton starts 2 *o o.m. 

Among tori *awted le a gift from Princess Alice. Ducteas Of 
OouceetreaM the DUie and Duchess of Gtouresler.afui giro from 
smrs or stage and screen, politics. sporL srahc—. 

£2 nifldon « urgently seeded to corapine the final ddmcai trials of 
a new cervfcat cancer tasL tout could same the lives or 2X100 
women every year. Fuads also n aedtd tor a new lung cancer 
prefect at .The Brocnpioa Heart OI 
PHase come. OonaOofts greatfuBy received. 

Quest for a Test for Cancer 
Woodbery 

■ - Haiiow Road 
. Roydon • . 

: Essex CN19 5HF 
, „ Tek (027 .979) 2233 

Fondtug neo-aotoial research Iota early cancer detection 
iRUl e red charity number 284826 



MARRY SECOMBE SAYS: 

r Whathaveljpt 
that I cant give? 

Diabetes is noi infectious but 
it can strike anyone. It is sri/I 
incurable bui wc can Hghf 
the damage and snlTrang Ji 
can tit use- every year more .. 
than 1 .500 children develop 
diabetes, the bidden disease. . 

Join usin die 
HgfcVKrntxd 
yourheJp -Nnw 

BRmSH 

tHABEnCAS50OAn0N 

lOQuet'n Anne Street, loncfon 

(^VIMOBD. ' m'. Miiriii ..T-r».^ 




With Sill PCWHiRL ’ 

i Acton; and Itdoicw ic 
■0 nam tahooliyiB. WCr 

&]*» of your dntRlion or 
Iffary soes directly lo 
research. 

Sred Lr PO Bat 123. 

• R**cn Ti. LioretoV Ion FV4ih. 

LntiaWnA^PX 

|wHU 0N IH sWH jpL>8 j 

SBVDFOTYOtB 
FREE CHRISTMAS 

CARD CAT ALOCIjE 

m.ftmanXira Bm48. 

T«m. D£H ?LQor 
icM-ioq,- oaa hww 


CALBMt BROADWAT W» Lpr horary 3 

hedrm Rat. All fartUMs. clow n» shop- 

ntog oentre. £260 PW. ot 840 4481 


8 inicrestlao 1st Floor 
Lux Mats idbf bed. sonny rec kit/ouier 
1 mta HH*» a CI660W tort 938 239E 


PMLieoCWX OgernMy furnished ba- 
8o n*L available early Oeearber. Co m 
preferred. Trt 01 733 2657- 


Pfl Oardm So. Lge patio fl*L 2 dM teds. 
- tux WL llvtag rm. Hr Full narustwd A 
cautbpco. £220 pw. Tel: 10342821 4307 


■MD6EWATES, S OMU t &T T. Retire- 
ment. mren e ar . «/» I bed s/c na*s. ms 
J une 24. 2 at. Gas th. 1st Or. Sate & 
peaceful. Ouaruock Htns. sea lO mins. 
MamuuMd gdna. HtoQ Sherthoid ire. I- 
* yra neg. £46 to £65 Pw. <£xcfl. No 
OHBS Refe reo 0278 451353 eve 5 -7 


ROW cun ARE 2 mtmure tube, out- 
standing. newly dreeratsd and 
runushed flat in rnodem, purpose bun 
Nock. 3 bedrooms. 1 rec e ption. 
kilChen/dln«r. brand new aprtiaoces. 
bathroom. CM. entrance phone. £260 
pw. TeL Ol 722 9691. 


Series Met 
oai/houie: up io caoopw. Usual tees 
reo PhKffM Kay & Lewis. South of tte 
Pam Chaise* ofnee, 01-362 till or 
North of (he Par*. Regent's Park olooe. 
01-686 9882. 


KNMMUMC GAR0CM5SWT. Very lane 
and bright pario flat with atlttog Thom, 
dining ana. good kitchen, uduty room, 
sntdy. sua room. bathTbotn. double bed- 
room. mho. a vail iioie now long let 
£*60 pw. MartccDs. 01-58! 2216. 


MMDAVALA8DW9. LUX fiat. FoUvforn 
a tineo. Croreery. euaery. »*en ret i 
bed. lounge, kit. bath. nan. CH/CHW. 
UtL porter, paratng. Overcooks toiler 
gdna. Ch buses A tube. £150 pw toe. 
Tec Mr Edwards Ol-*9S 1747. 


EARLS COURT- ERtWMful bvtng. to large. 
MON and airy, l Bsdroomed CttL Cn 
sun* battiroom. vuuoraiotlei. Large en- 
trance had. BeaoctfuJ louape- Modern 
block With un. £145 pw. Ol 375 1530 


CMARH8KB uoraar 1 bad flat sto of river. 
TV. CM. Gdn. Slow of Bto Ben. Excel- 
lent »— Ort Only 10 retns My. £120 
PW. Tei 01 720 *806 18-30-19.30) 


WEST 1 9n» town house. 2 dot**- bed 

rooms. 2 reception, tdiehen. bathroorn. 

Oiikratm. tormjculaie and watt 
eoutoed. £280 pw negotiant* tor tong 
let. Company a rf e n rO. MraO-irtswMdy 

01-609 *463 or Ol 580 1260 all Tptn 


■ARNES SW IS. MagntfleenOy foeritished 
2 bedroomed flat oa Bret floor. Receouy 
modernised all modem euuttenem. CH 
YTA * IX. BTC. CO let £136 pw. Tel Ol 
878 7766 


SERVICED APART— Ill'll 1 ip Keosmgton. 
cot T.V. 34 hr Sw. Tom. CoXttnpflam 
Apartme nt! 01- 373 6306. 

TV PRODUCER** riretud DaL 100 yds 
PonaoeSo Road 2 beds. ot. i Moren 
Let £200 pw. TeL Ql-221^969 

MlUtUIBK changtog selection of (ur- 
ote»«J flats * hauso. from £150pw- 
£3.000 m Keostogton * sarroutxiu>g 
areas Breiha m A Peeve*. 01938 3522. 
KOWWCITNI spacious garden flat.- 1 
dble BMno. lounge, large kitchen, batn. 
E rams Oval nux. Newly decorated. CH. 
£130 pw ExrL Tel: Ol 6870854 
tUManrsnsttE, SW1 Esretlem vara* 
2 Bed ftoi wuh Patio off Stoane Street. 
Sunny open PU KH/RRre. Bain. Very 
qufcL £250 all me. Cootes 828 8251. 
937 9581 The number io remember 
whan seeking best mtu nwertito in 
rented and prune London areas 
£130/£2-0QQpw. 

YMMEUMMCS ndte Cay. ttnr new. 
Ua studio. CH. sep k and o. car 
s uaceJ iao p/w TetOl 907 7028 6pm 
unanu Nr PbUl Aipacfivr 5 dm 
house Pabo ganfen fuliy aoutpueii. 7 
teOrth let £166 pw. Tel: Ol 2Za 3486 
O CK Uil — Flats and tman to let 
throwgnoul me Docklands area. TcLOt- 
790 9560 

LUXURY 5amaED FLAT*, central Lore 
dan from £325 PW WHS VAT. Mng 
Town Home A pa rtme n ts 373 3433 
NAVFAflrKrBC PARK. The ttwHT fururi- 
ous lotto/ short tots 1/6 teds tea met, 
01 *US 9612 ill 

MAYFABI Wl Lux torn nuriaonett* 3 
twos. 1 rec. new klB. new theur A 
carpets CSSOBw. Trt: 0342 712617 
Nr ilA W ioea spartous 1 dUe bed- (lai. 
Lounge If A B. FUm. £200 gw. Ot 69t 
8721 >dayl 852 0548 tancr tl 
ratUGO: Suaerb. newly deronneo. 1 
tediwom furnished Oar rune tod pw 
Dll us Ll so pw. 01 228-60*4. Ref OC 
ST GEMGES SO, vn Newty OeC 2 Bed 
Hal with 111 reel accept from im. Rerep. 
MIL Bain Eidcm*. Captca 828 8S61 
«*4 Super snubo. kit. Balcony bed. 
cnw. pang. £70 pw. Nov ■ May. No 
agents 449-7181 day. 622 W25««eB. 

I KEMSWCTON A srMrtfed Ol 
ifl cnarnuiig 1 3 bed art-tnan. 

£120 - 1200 pw toe 676 1890 T 
A WEST 0B FW AM Nam Ust to For 
SaWLet Davis Woofie 01 402 7381 


M you have qualtty properly 
to leL tei) to. 

LANDLORDS - OWNERS 

Esperi orafeniotro sente. 

QURAJSHI 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Earls Court Road. 

SWS 

Cl -244 735S 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

weiu,rin»H«M«tmiif 
penonanv nupmed tuntehedand un- 
furnohed srooertaecin ffiSIty flW 
ReMdenuai cwtecls. raoolna tram 
£ 2 50 pw to KZJOOO pw. 

SHORT /LONG LETS 
MANY HOLIDAY FLATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tet 01-486 8926 


SLASHED PRICES 
KNIGHTSBR1DGE 

Supera quanto 1 pm apart] 
Reree. XU In aat CuBy uniM 


thr ou g h o u t S eevtore Ktcfude: MOW 6 

4aw * week, housrtirtd lauodry nr- 

tori Coigur TV. 2* nr porterage 04 

CmVv Commoamy funuaire. Pm 

UtoOuv Dttxi. lent/Slori Ml 

£275 pw mer ma uy £450 swtui 
AY4XSFORD A CO 

01-351 2383 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


AMMAN 

» Y 
DELHI 
F4ATUHT 
HONG KONG 
ISTANBUL 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 


E3S0 

t2D5 

E360 

SB 

U90 

£170 


1X305 


ROME 

SEOUL 

SYDA& 

TOKYO 


5330 
I E2B3I 

nos 

DSB 

C7GE 

CS80 


SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON Vrt 

7e? tn-L&XZUBOO/ 

A1RUNE BONDS 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo*8urg. edra. Dubai, 
tetanhui. Stnmpore K-L-OrinL 
BaogLok. Hoag Km. Svoney- 
Eurooc. A Tte America* 

Flamiiteo Travd, 

76 ShatteSurv Atetuie 
London wtv 7DC. 

01439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


TA Ot ta t P lA. SICILY £149 SPrelal “LATE 
BROS" tounrr Offer Of booked within 
7 day* ot deoanotex Pnn holy uci. 
rta Ctotwtrk tUgM Inffr Wed llamL 
transtrra. A/Tw. 7 ntgwa 8M Ui twin 
room wiin bath/thotrer and «r. 14 
naghla A £219 Sthtoe + ClBwh. NO 
hidden extras, offer van a 5 Nov 
28 March. BLAND SUN 01-222 7452 
ASTA/ATOL. 


JURTKKrrE Spectator? New Yortc £229. 
l_A/San Francteo 

awntr/ramna C769. Ah natty di- 
rect flights Dartatr ISO 
Strew^fr 839 71*4 


CQSTEUTTKRS OH nfghrt/hots to Eto 
rood. USA A mret dertnuti 
DudoRut Travel: 01-730 2201 ABTA 
IATA ATOL- 


UT & CLUB CLAES FLIGHTS. Hoar Dto 
counts. Sun world Travel. 1057277 
26097/27 109/Z7S58. 


SYD/mL £656 Perth £665. Ad mefar 
earners to Aua/NZ. 01-58* 7571 
ABTA. 


CREAAFLKPrrS Mfortowtde. HaytTUCkM 
Oi 930 1366. 


DtBCOOMT FAXES Worldwide: 01-434 
0734 juptler Travel 


P n eouwTtD a (am fakes w«id- 

wtoe. Tel U T.C. rOTSS) 887056. 


RJOHTMMHUWS DtactMmf Farm wnrid- 
wide. in/ economy. 01-387 9100 


. Canaries Ol Ml lm. 
Travetwhe. AM*. AIM. 


MOKQCC O BOUND. Regent SL Wl. Ol 
734 5307. ABTA/AML 


*. AFRICA From £065: 01-584 7371 


8 8> has gone to Florida- Join Mm for lust 
£279. Pertoor (08957 630871 


SPAIN . Portugal. Cheapest fares. B iggi es . 
Ol 736 8191. ACTA ATOL 


LMZAROTE-- Parra del Carmen. High 
standard opts wrii pooto. 
Fueneventura- Tenerife- urnpotn re- 
sortt. Not -ASrtl. 107231 771266. 

Tlntsway Hobdays. ACTA. ATOL 
1107. 


Worldwide mghts 

specialising tn 1st. Club Class, economy 
to Aiteraha. Soutn Africa. USA. Lnbon. 
Faro. Geneva. Also accomodation Swte 
Alps. Lisbon Coasts, Algarve Apts A, pri- 
vate mills. Ol 656 7026 ABTA 73196 


AKFABE SKOALB1S Sydney o/w 
£420 tin £764 Auckland o/w £420 rtn 
£775 JoTXJTO o/w £2*6 rtn £o«£- Las 
Anoete o/w £178 On 13*0. London 
FhoM Centre 01-370 6332 


rrs ALL AT 
trailfinders 

WortdwUg tow coal fWshts 
Tfre o est - ana «w can grave tt 
195.000 diems since 1970 
AROUND THE WORLD rROH £166 
SYDNEY £37« £660 

PERTH £4QJ £600 

AUCKLAND £MO CTsO 

BANGKOK £209 £380 

SINCaACMF £209 £418 

HONG KONG £245 £496 

OEUfl/MMBAV £23* C38S 

COLOMBO £364 £440 

NAIROBI CM2 £JW. 

joresc £286 £436 

UMA £27 6 £K06 

UK ANGLES £|» Sob 

NEW %-ORK £ 99 £195 

WASHINGTON U37 £374 

BOSTON £137 £J74 

HONOU.UJ £»l £457 

GENEVA £76 £ 8P 

TRAILFINDERS 

42-48 LARIS COCRT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6EJ 
CireeA-'M ripiB Oi 957 5*00 
Long Haul FWMs 01 603 1515 
jod 01-937 963] 
lal/8miBite CUss 0193B 3444 
GoienrnMM Ureraed/BraidM 
ABTA IATA ATOL/ 1*58 


HOLIDAY SALE 

Last nvmde bargains Algarve. 
Tenerife. Nov ember /Winter cun. 
Winter ibgnw - many dretthanonm. 

Xnui. fMius. Xmas wnrta wide 
holidays Egypt Jordan, Sri Lanka. 
Turkey 

Summer ‘87 advance ocwhfngn 
toecial often at ■86 once* 
only direa from 

Ventura Holidays 

Tff London Ot 26I 5465. 

Tet ShrtfMd 07*2 331100 
Tel Manchester 061 834 5033 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return Return 

JOBURG/HAR £466 DOUA1A E42C 
NA/ROfil £390 SrtJUieT £780 
CAIftO £230 AUCKLAND 1385 

LAGOS £380 HONG KONG £550 

DEL/BOMBAT £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AAO MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

16&1G8 Recent SL Wl 
TEL 01-4^625516/7* 

U81 Gtwo Btoro W a c o m 
AMEX/VSA 


LOWEST FARES 

Pam £69 N YORK 

FrreiUurl £60 LA/SF 

Lagos £320 Miami 

Kair obi £ 3*5 Singapore 

Jo-ourg £460 Bangka* 

quo £206 Katmandu 

Dri/Bora LUa Rangoon 

Htaig none £510 


£275 
£355 
£320 
£420 
£335 
£4*0 
£360 

. £426 

Huge Dtsrouoh A»aO on 1st a CmbCtax 

SUN & SAND 

21 SwaHOw SL London Wl 
01-459 2100/437 0637 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WHIZZ!! 

Picnics. Bar'B-Oncs * Parties 
FUN ON THE SLOPES 

THE MOST EXCT77NG RESORTS 
Mcribd, Vataer. Ctnmpcry. Metric 
Courchevel, las Den Alps h 
Oh atoms 

PROM ONLY 084 
Currod Chalets lad of fits 
HUGE GROUP DISCOUNTS 
AND FREE HOLS 
Scrumptious food, lovely chalets A 
lemfk onnosphete - come by yourself 
wiib a lev friends or exunptarty fill a 
chalcl! 

Ring 01-370 0999 ANOL 1820 


SM WEST - NEWI Sorcrtl offers on 
groups. RSVC FOR A OLAU Also other 
amazutgiy low price, starting at £59. 
an for a copy ot our bumper brochure. 
(Oil 785 9999. AMa 69266 AM 1383. 


JUST MANCC Super value ST* catering 
•W hoanayv m ihe tore French mom. 
Ring for newhrochurr now. Tel 01-789 
2592. ACTA 69256 A tot 1383. 


LA CU 4 4 Z. French SU ChaleL Rreideni 
nail Superb, trad arenm S/cai arts. 
Tel 102421 603695 Idayl / 60ZT76 
wvesi 

OK TO hoi m ten la*ni att we Oder. 
We've tte camfiare A fnenditest cnatort 
Ui ODurcnevrtJtecnert prices Call LE 
SKI lor chat/brochure. 0484 5*8996. 

8SCAT 94UMG Holidays. Tin pereoti free. 
January availabllito- Row John Morgan 
Now. ttrrsoi 6862i i24.hra> 

OMWBJKL Xmas A New Year bar- 
m. Coach or S/Orive. Madrion 
Travel 0902 45200 ABTA 

0 TO T4L avuets tetet*. arm. Pre- 

§£5°*^: Xmre /N Y. ya. mow 
gniee. Cnwp dbents. 0932 231115. 

"5s. Su Resorts. Lowest 
Preea^om £S9. ABTA. arach v re: 01 

tel 9 At Chibs, chalets a %/t tianmnia 
ut top Frenrh resorts Talk In our wlniee 
sports team shout Special Show offers 
on stand M* al Tte Earls Court su 
vat 01 200 6080 tzanrei or 

01 903 4444 ABTA/ATOL. 

flttti rate, FREE. Free Un Passes. 
Free Insurance. Free cMMratrs hauaaya 
(under 161 on many dates. Motets A ants 
from Cannes A. Manchester tram El 19. 
SU Freedom Ol 74 1 4686 A 061 236 
0019. ATOL432. 

VOBte. VER8IER. VERBTER -*£1ST| 
Swttserurtd MOST exrtung resort! Ca- 
tered chalets tori, rutoia A FREE 
holidays tor ffihng a chalet. Lois ot fun 
for smgiCB- eoupto* A grouptk Ring 
sauwhp g Ol 370 0999 Alee 1820 

CHRISTMAS In Courchevel. Have a fun 
packed iramtianai Alpine Christmas 
with ALL tte trunmlngM For onto £239 
A free ItoK days for tyoups. Mng Ski 
Bonne Huge. Ol 244 7333 


BEST RUN 
FOR YOUR MONEY 

Stalled and srtf csfertfla chalMs In 
MCRtBEU VERBtER. AWN&AL. and 
ARAB8A Limited Christmas and New 
rear mailartWy to ammatac mrco. 
Ring us for a good deal! 

SKI BEACH VILLAS 
102231 550777 (24 braj 
ATOL 3818 ACTA 14] SX 
A(tdt/VWAIM> Welcome. 



CHALET GOILH - aia t mn Lines are sun 
mooting (or a lew QuW Girtt for the 
86/87 wnter season We mnl goad 
rooks who can create a hsety rnam 
party nUMtoterp. Ptrar nn 01 785 


SKI MMinum - aw mne a few 
taraunn for enthusiasuc ouanfied 

now out rook* Must be user 2l. 
Asaiiabu- lor lull season ore -86 io 
April «7. fitne ftdW On 01-389 6161. 


auucr UlU reoidred far whiter te- 
rn muu op ouaWted (Otto Over 20 
WOT 01 age Tei 0342 27272 or 27* 

DttAveoTT wm • roQO «Aifc reoiures 
ertnenetd ao ras i an i chef. Please write 
with toil CV lo: Mbs j Lawrence. 
Dray cons. 1 1* Draycotr Avenue. SW5. 

WORLDS LARttEXT An Pair Bureau, 
ohm m/ betas, done, ad uve-in staff. 
L'.K. * Qkeneas AU Pair Agents Lifl 87 
Reams SI London W.i 05 *39 653* 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


ASMSTANCC/ADVKC on otuaiatng 
work visa for USA or preferably specific 
offer of emptoyineM by wed educated, 
attractive, out- going young tatty. 23. 
Weu iraveUed. fluent French, at present 
cmMoyed Ui PR sue of hotel tnrtmess In 
L o ndon, wtsiung punue career In tame 
new or similar USA. Reply to BOX H98. 


EDUCATED 22 year AM pul with good 
socreunaf suds and wflBrigneto to Mam 
seeks an Interaslino situation where toy- 

alti-aad integrity are acpredaied. Reply 

to BOX A6t . 


CONTRACTS 
& TENDERS 


TAVSU3E REGIONAL COUNCIL 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
Offers are invited for the Supply oft 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
The above myruments are lor delivery 

to various locations wtinin TavsMe Re- 

Oion schedules anr Forms of Tender may 

be ornamed by aaMKauoa u the Director 

Of Education. Floor 9. Taystoe House. 

Dundee - Telephone 0382 23281 enln 

4&*o Sealed offers. wluMv endorsed 

should be todoed with the undersigned by 

4pm Friday 21 November 1986. 

JOHN A WALLACE 
cruel Exeeutiv* 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARITY COMMISSION 
In me matter of tte following Charities 
administered In cwmbction with the Soci- 
ety of SL Onpe and Angoumoh: 

Tte Poor Fund 

2. The Charily of Margaret Mary Deiafepr 
Tte Charity Conuntejontfs propose lo 
make an Order ap pointing tr ust ees of Pus 
Charily O ogi u of the Draft Order may be 
obtained from them iref. 208718 A/I-LB) 
al s Albans House. 57-60 KaymarVM. 
London SW1Y 4QX. Ohjecticrtt and tug 
gesoons may oe mm io them wtttibi one 
month front today 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HICH COURT OF JUSTICE No. 

007174 of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
MR- JUSTICE MEHVYN DAVIES 
(N THE MATTER OF WESTLAND PLC 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 
AC T 1985 

NOTICE ts tierehs- gn-eo that (he Order 

Ot tte High Court of Justice. Chancery D» 

vtamn. dated the 2Tm October 1986 

cMiflrnilng the Reduction a i the Capital at 

the above-named Company from 
£61.926.600 to L3&2&9.509.22& anti the 
Snare Premium Account from 
£26-397.866 to £7 090-2 80 56 was regto 

teredby ihe Rrwinr ot Companies on the 

31*1 October. 1986. 

Dated ihe 3rd November. 1966 
Sauphler and May 

36 Bamngnall Street 

London EC2V 5DB 

SotiOlora tot tte Company 

(Rrt: GP-IF/UT/PJRi 

IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE NO. 
006666 Of 1986 
C HANCE RY DIVISION 
MR JUSTICE MERVYN DAVIES 

Monday 2«h October 1986 

IN THE MATTER OF SEOUmGUARD 
CROUP PLC 

and 

B4 THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES 

ACT 1985 

NOTICE Is hereby given that the Order 
of ate High Oaun «r Justice (Chanceiy Ot- 
vtatonl dated 2«h October 1986 
cooflrming (he cancetialton of Uie Snare 
Premium Accural was regteered wttn the 
Regutrar of CMnmues on 24lti onoter. 
1986. 

Dalcd litis 71h day of November 1986 
Heroen Smtih 
waning House 
35 Cannon Street 
Lonckm 

EC4M BSD . 

Solicllora for Ihe teove-named Company. 


No. 25 (Ride 58 <6li 
IN THE MATTER Ol AMfBG PRODUCTS 
LIMITED 

By order ot tte High Court taxed tte 
22nd day of October 1986 Mr Roger 
SmHh Ol I Puddle Doc*. Blackman. Lon- 
don EG» V 3po has been apootuted 
LtouMalor of the above-named Company 
wtth a Committer of tnsoectioh- 

Dated Uns 30lh day of October 1986 


FARUr - RONALD BERTRAM FARLIE. 
late of 1SG Dzwieh Drive, nford. Ena 
died in Chadwrtl Heath. Esse* on ihe 23rd 
November 1983 fEstale about £65.0001. 
Tte Kin of the above-named are rroueMed 
to contact Messrs Douglas Wiseman A 
Co . SouatorK of Station Chambers. 22a 
and 2*a Station Parade. Barking. Essex 
Kill 80S. 


ForeL Meal south facing 
tenon* flat Streps 6 Trl 086669023. I 


Coatiamed oo page 29 


OHS CALL for some of tte bea Aufe hi 
furins. awtnwiit. hotels and ear lure. 
Tel Loudon 01 6Sb 5000. Manchester 
061 832 2000 Air Travel Advisory 

u. 


LATM MUK4. Low cool ffigMs r.p. 
Rio £*55 Lima £*9fl rta- Also Small 
Group HoMctay Joarneysueg Peru from 
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LATM AMERICA. Low cost /bento e g. 
RIO £*86. Lima £496 rtn. Also Small 
Croup Hobday Jeumtyaieo Peru from 
£3601 JLA 01-747-3108 
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Tel Ol 254 5788 

_ _ MIL InchBKe Mr wots 
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Cl 09. ABTA/ATOL. VKa Trasrt. Ot- 
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Tunisia. 'MOROCCO Book through toe 
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ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. Dtmeod 
Travel ATOL I7» oi-eei *6ai. 
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I miHBFUll OMtiW Jan/Feb 87 lo 
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EUROPE f world MR low eel fares on 
charier Sxhettvim f*. Pitot FBgnl 01 
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HONG KONG «**, BANGKOK £369. 
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LOWEST An Carre. Scheduled Europe* 
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RMfU. Far your holiday i fflere us am 
summer Oil far gf Brochure now Tu 
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At l US CITIES Lowest fores en wmr 
scheduled camera. Oi 584 7571 abta 

WEEWBW or Weeks. Konrymoom or 
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01-239 8070. 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

Tte lined houses for rental 73 81 
James SL SWt. 01 «9i 0602 
VBJUBDWtA adl 14th Fairway, No 1 
courts. Pmdfe v«4 Not/Mar A tarn- 
Hire smnmcr £30 Bppw 051-259-0015 


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THF TTMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


Pretoria alleges 
Harare-Maputo 
plot to oust 
Malawi regime 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Gulf women prepare 


The South African Foreign 
Minister. Mr R F "Pik" Bo- 
tha, claimed last night i hat 
Zimbabwe and Mozambique 
were plotting the military and 
political overthrow of the 
Malawi Government of Presi- 
dent Hastings Banda. 

Mr Botha said details of the 
plot were in a document found 
at the site of the air crash just 
inside South .Africa's border 
on October 19 in which the 
late President Machel of 
Mozambique was killed. 

The document, in Porm- 
guese, purports to be the min- 
utes of a meeting in Maputo, 
the Mozambique capital on 
October 16 between President 
Machel and a senior Zim- 
babwe military delegation at 
which the alleged plot was 
discussed. 

Mr Botha produced a copy 
of the document, still smeared 
with mud, at a press con- 
ference in Pretoria, maintain- 
ing there was absolutely no 
doubt about its authenticity. 

According to Mr Botha, the 
attack on Malawi was im- 
minent. “They were in a big 
hurry. Plans were already 
underway, some plans were 
already implemented. It was 
not just idle talk, it was a 


definite plan and agreement," 
he claimed. 

Mr Botha said the plan 
would have entailed forcing 
President Banda to allow 
Zimbabwean and Mozam- 
bique troops into his territory 
under the pretext of assisting 
him to repair roads. They 
would then have blown up 
bridges. . 

“They were going to infil- 
trate his police and defence 
force. They were going to en- 
sure that politically and mil- 
larily that (Banda's) regime 
was overthrown." 

Mr Botha said he had sent 
an argent communication to 
Mr Joaquim Chissano. the 
new President of Mozam- 
bique, asking him whether the 
Mozambique Government 
still planned to go ahead with 
its plans against Malawi. 

“1 think they have a pretty 
good idea of bow far they can 
go without inviting severe 
trouble," he said. 

Malawi has long been ac- 
cused by Mozambique of giv- 
ing sanctuary to the Renamo 
insuigents who have been 
fighting the Maputo Govern- 
ment since Mozambique's in- 
dependence from Portugal in 
1975. 


Lawson’s big spending 
hints at early poll 


Continued from page 1 
by £1% billion because of 
greater expected demand for 
means-tested benefits. 

Capital spending as a whole 
goes up by £1 billion. 

The increases partly reflect 
the buoyancy of spending in 
the current year. Spending by 
local councils is 9 per cent 
higher than planned this year 
and in spite of lower debt 
interest, public spending as a 
whole this year is expected to 
be £V: billion higher than 
expected. 

Revenue from the North 
Sea is £1 billion lower than 
planned because the oil price 
has been lower but non-oil 
revenues are £2 billion higher. 
The Chancellor announced 
that repayments to oil com- 
panies of Advance Petroleum 
Revenue Tax due because of 
lower oil prices, would be 
accelerated. .. 

On balance the combina- 
tion of higher spending and- 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
The Duke of Edinburgh. 
Colonel in Chiet the Royal 
Electrical and Mechanical En- 
ineers, visits the Vehicles and 


. 7-^.1 l fiTiT* 


Surrey. 10.30. 

The Princess of Wales opens 
the fourteenth Daily Mail Inter- 
national Ski Show, Eads Court 
Exhibition Centre, 1 1. 

Princess Anne, President, the 


higher revenue is expected to 
leave the level of Government 
borrowing unchanged. 

Following the usual annual 
review the lower earnings 
limit for National Insurance 
Contributions will be in- 
creased next April to £39 a 
week and the upper earnings 
limit to £295. The limits for 
the reduced rate bands in- 
troduced in the 1985 Budget 
will be increased by propor- 
tionately more to £65 for the 5 
per cent band, £100 for the 7 
per cent band. The 9 per cent 
u pperbmrt for employers rises 

Growth in the economy this 
year is forecast to be a little 
lower — than in the Budget — 
at 2 Mi per cent and inflation 
slightly lower at 3% per cent 
with the current balance of 
payments roughly level. Next 
year the balance of payments 
Is expected to be in deficit by 
£116 billion despite an in- 
crease in exports of 516 per 
cent 


Riding for the Disabled Associ- 
ation, attends their annual 
meeting. National Agricultural 
Centre, Kenilworth, Warwicks, 
9.50; and later attends the 
International Yacht Racing 
Union gala banquet the Inn on 
the Park Hold. 8. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, 
Patron, the Helen Arkell Dys- 
lexia Centre, attends the Rain- 
bow Ball in aid of the British 
Dyslexia Association, the Cafe 
Royal, 8.30. 

The Duke of Kent President, 


The Times Crossword Pnzzle No 17,197 


ACROSS 

I Little demon almost makes 
os lose our sight (6). 

4 Support for marriage (8). 

10 Easy situation on board? (9). 

11 Flats on the moon for this 
girl (5). 

12 An element you say? (7). 

13 Cast off a foreign tug (71. 

14 Nearly all following the 
fashion with this fugue (5). 

15 Moriarty or Macavity in the 
world of crime (8). 

18 Fish due to be tailed (8). 

20 Expression of father's grati- 
tude for food (5). 

23 Perhaps one's under this — 
risking financial loss (7). 

25 Pull fish back on the shel- 
tered side (7), 

26 Quietly left the. Pythian 
scene in India (5). 

27 Imperceptible as the sweeter 
melodies of a Grecian um 
(9). 

28 Sign this pledge indeed? (8). 

29 Achates for one could 
surrender his right to the 
Devil (6X 

DOWN 

1 One who has been to some 
degree successful (81. 

2 It is where thought is 
centred in the country t7l. 

3 Implanted by those in of- 
fice? Up to the press chiel" 
19). 

5 Two such words going to the 
Yard? (14). 





v- W *< V" 


Amid reports that another 
Moody round of fighting is 
inumnent in the six-year-old 
Gulf War, both sides hare 
began moM&Bg women to 
serve ns combat soldiers. 

47 rifle Is an Iraqi: the Mack- 
veiled figms (above) kneeling 
in the sand with rocket launch-- 
ers come from Iran. All are 
Mustmra, and when this cruel 
conflict fist began it was 
inconceivable that they would 
be allowed to fight in the front 
line. 

Bat so great has been the 
slaughter, especially among 
the raw Iranian boys charging 
towards martyrdom in front M 
impregnable enemy positions. 


Lawson’s U-turn on spending delights wets 


Continued from page 1 

calling a spectacular somer- 
sault m Government policy. 
Some Tory MPs were dearly 
shocked by the extent of the 
Government's turnaround 
and the response as the Chan- 
cellor sat down after his 
statement was distinctly 
muted. 

The Chancellor’s personal 
reputation with Conservative 
MPs, already dented by his 
recent Mansion House speech 
and the interest rates battle. 


suffered further as a result of 
his lost battle on public 
spending. 

By contrast his No 2, the 
Treasury Chief Secretary, Mr 
John MacGregor, seemed to 
have enhanced his standing. It 
was being said that in his 
negotiations with spending 
Ministers Mr Macgregor had 
shown a good sense of what 
was politically possible and 
what was not 

But spending Ministers 
came out of the chamber 


scarcely bothering to conceal 
their smDes, or their belief that 
the Prime Minister is now 
thinking in terms of an early 
election if the current upturn 
in the opinion poOs is echoed 
in next May's local govern- 
ment elections. 

Despite the increase in 
spending which he has been 
forced to concede, Mr Lawson 
had the consolation that be 
was able to tell Tory purists 
that public expenditure would 
continue to frill as a proper- 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


6 Spectacular speed and en- 
ergy! (5). 

7 Totters off as the pace 
quickens (7k 

8 See articles we have to 
abominate (6). 

9 What Chevalier’s old lady 
must wait twenty years for? 
(7.7). 

16 “I see what you mean" he 
might say to the speaker (3- 
6 ). 

17 D's territorial limit (5.3). 

19 He hurtles all over the place, 
breaking most of the rules 
(7). 

21 Quiet stroll with an awk- 
ward gait (7). 

22 Crown I’d made of unusual 
design (6). 

24 Repenting making one in a 
step op the ladder (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,196 


te g re a in h .e| 
i3Qt3E®HEGS : -£501113131? I 
fn .0 E5- t3 B 13 B| 
K agTJiaiiJ - W^f-nsSBWfite 
res .0 ra s m - re rsi 

M: I3 ci n B E El 

gi (3_; • 0 fg ; 0 i~a • EH 

tt n m b - u' e r? ■ u 
aB KEB P I SI1OTJBIIEI31 
P! [IT 13 ra- El m-ts 
wmrm raasEK/fii vs 


the Royal Institution, attends a 
discourse given by Professor 
J.M. Thomas, Royal Institution, 

21 AJbermarle St, Wl, 8.45. 
Prince Michael of Kent, as 

Admiral, attends the Royal 
Southampton Yacht Club an- 
nual dinner, 7.30. 

New exhibitions 
Prints by staff and students of 
The Royal College, The Royal 
Academy and The Slade School; 
Symondsbury School of Art, 
Syraondsbury. Bridport, Dorset; 
Mon to Sat 10 to 4 (ends Deo 
31). 

Prints by Strang and Cam- 
eron; National Gallery of Scot- 
land, The Mound, Princes Si, 
Edinburgh; Moo to Sat 10 to 5, 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Dec 24). 

In Between the Lines— Willie 
Rodger a re tr ospective; Collins 
Gallery. Strathclyde University, 

22 Richmond St, Glasgow; Mon 
to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 12 to '4 (ends 
Nov 28). 

Musk 

. Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Wessex 
HalL Poole, 7.30. 

Concert by the Halit Or- 
chestra; Sheffield City Hafi, 
Sheffield, 7.30. 

Concert by the Ulster Or- 
chestra; Ulster HalL Belfast, 
7.45. 

Organ recital by Kevin Gill; 
Birmingham Cathedral. 1.10. 

Concert by the Aranjuez Gui- 
tar Trio; Church of England, 
Middle School St Mary’s Rd, 
TTckhUl Doncaster, 8. 

Piano recital by Klaus ZoU; 
The King's School Ottoj Si 
Mary, Devon, 7 JO. 

Bath Internationa) Festival; 
Concert by the Gabrieli Consort 
and Players; GuildhalL Bath, 
7.30. 

Concert by the Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra; Usher HalL 
Lothian Rd, Edinburgh, 7.30. 
Talks 

Jury Decision-Making, by 
Prof Ewart Thomas: Rm 47, 
Psychology Dept, Science She. 
Durham University. South Rd, 

4.3a 

General 

The Planetarium Roadshow; 
Killinchy Primary School Main 
Street, KHliachy, Co Down, 8. 


The pound 


Food prices 


Fresh fish prices are up again 
this week. The biggest increases 
are on flat fish such as Dover 
sole and lemon sole, which are 
up by 32p and 9p a lb respec- 
tively. Large cod fillets are up 3p 
a lb, haddock and coley up 4p a 
lb, plaice up7p a lb and whiting 
up 5p a lb. Boned fresh herrings 
and fresh mackerel sho w only a 
marginal increase and kippers 
are stable at an average 98p a lb. 

Home produced lamb prices 
are op by about 2p a lb with 
whole leg ranging Bum £1.36- 
£1.70 a lb, loin chops £1.48-£2 a 
lb and whole shoulder 60p«£1.05 
a lb. Loin chops* shoulder and 
middle neck of New Zealand 
lamb are also up slightly, but 
whole leg and best end chops are 
unchanged. Boneless sifioin of 
beef is up 6p a lb on average in 
the South-east bat down slightly 
elsewhere. * 

Best buys at shops and super- 
markets are: Sainsbury’s: fresh 
chicken, up to 3%lb in weight, 
64p a lb and New Zealand lamb 
leg £1.28 a lb; Tesotr sirloin 
steak £3.18 a 1b, spare rib pork 
chops 89p a lb; Dewhnrsc 4lb 
pack of ground beef and braising 
steak at £5.60 a pack; Bcjanc 
stewing beef 9?p a lb and 41b 
frozen chickens 59p a lb. 

Brussels sprouts at !0-20paJb 
are probably the best vegetable 
buy litis week. This time last 
year they were costing between 
20 and 28 d a lb. " 


Roads 


Wales ami West: A38: 
Construction of new round- 
about on Braemar Ave between 
Bristol and Hlton. M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (Swindon and Cirencester). 
M5: Contraflow at junction 14 
(B4509); eastbound entry slip 
road closed. 

The North: M62: Contraflow 
E of junction 33 (Al). M6r 
Contraflow between junctions 
32 and 33 (Blackpool and 
Garstang turnoffs); delays es- 
pecially at weekends. M6rM^or , 
roadworks between junctions 17 
and 18 near Chester; lane clo- 
sures; delays. 

Scotland: MS; Contraflow be- 
tween junctions 29 and 30 
(Paisley and Ezskine Bridge). 
M74: Contraflow between junc- 
tion 4 and the Both well service 
area; southbound delays. A9I: 
Resurfacing W of Capon single 
alternate line traffic. 

Information supplied by AA 


Ski show 


The 14th Daily Mail later- 
national Ski Show opens to the 
public tomorrow at Earls Court 
Exhibition Centre, Warwick Rd, 
SW5, and nuts until November 
16. 

Opening hours are Monday to 
Friday 22 noon- to 10 pm; 
Saturday and Sunday 11 am to 7 


Weather 

forecast 

A trough of low pressure 
over NW Scotland will 
move SE reaching central 
parts of England dmiftg 
die evening. 


ti am to midnight 










Frank Johnson at the Commons 


season 


that both these despotic re- 
gimes appear to have deemed 
ft tine to involve the female 
population more dosely in the 
mending ml iwg gla. 

In both countries, too, a 
strong element of propaganda 
must be suspected in the 
release of sach unprecedented 
photographs. Faced with 
growing war weariness, the 
authorities are findmg it 
-increasingly difficult to sus- 
tain popular support m then 
pursuit of uftunste victory. 

Reports from Iran suggest 
that the first KM women' 
entering military service — all 
said to be volunteers — are 
being trained fin- the “Ba sHS,* * 
a unit which will, in tun, 
recruit others- 


lion of GDP and fiat there 
would be no increase in 
borrowing. 

In fie spending plans an- 
nounced yesterday fie De- 
partment of Health and Social 
Security is to get an additional 
£1.75 bullion. Housing gets an 
extra £360 mfllion. 

The Shadow Chsnediary Mr 
Roy Hattecstey, said that Mr j 
Lawson'? figures and foretasts 1 
would be heated wifi increas- 1 
mg suspicion: 1 


Mr Lawson, fie Chancdlor 
of fie Exchequer, amid Sod- 
den talk of an early ele c tion, 
yesterday announced emer- 
gency help fenr a group whom 
ibe Government regard as es- 
pecially needy: fie voters. 

Hesakihcwasannotmcing 
fie Autumn statement on 
public expenditure. But he 
was able to say such firings as: 
“Within fils overall con- 
straint, and in. the context of 
its policy priorities, the Gov- 
ernment has- feh it right u> 

allow an increase in fie previ- 
ously announced planning 
totals for 1987-88 and 1988- 
89" 

And fallen pu Hie 

expenditure increases'. de- 
mand-led progra mm es ... 
soda! security . . . health ... 
social services . . . more than 
£600 million" 

It was, then, a revival of fie 
old Conservative show of fie 
50s and 60s,, Pre-efection 
Boom ! Nothing like on fie 
same scale of cours e. No tax 
cuts, easing of hire purchase, 
or Ann/n-ng girls. The present 
generation of performers in 
his party, not least Mr Law- 
son himself have built their 
careers on rejecting that sort 
of hamming-ii-upu Bat, to 
those of ns of a certain age, 
his generosity brought back 
memories of the sort of Con- 
servatives whom we knew in 
our childhood: Lord Barber, 
dear Reggie MaucSing, Noel 
COward. Ivor Novell o. dart- 
ing Derick . Heathcote-Am- 
ory. They dedicated their 
lives to : delighting a mass, 
audience. Such artists are 
gone now — all gone! Lord 
Barber is now in fie place 
from where no retired Tory 
Chancellor returns: some 
bank or other. Reggie Mahd- 
i ling and Derick Tfeaficoie- 
Amory have bed* gathered 
up to answer before fie Great 
f Deflationist — as we stem 
monetarists regard Him. 

Actually, Mr Lawson fid 
! say a few things to make it 
dear fiat the show was not 
going to be allowed to ipt out 
of hand, as it always did m 
the past, and cause terrible 
| inflation and a thus a general 
decline in fie morals of fie 
mass audience. According to 
him the Government had en- 
gaged in “fie determined 
pursuit of free markets and 
sound money. And fiat is 
what we will stick to.” So, in 
this revival the Chancellor 
was Scrooge as well as Father 
Christmas. • 

Tins presented difficulties 
for Mb’ Roy Hatferdey,- the 
shadow Chancellor. Hewants 


to pfay Father Christmas. 

- This is a common wifi of 
people who wan t to be fanned 
and who on fie whole are 
not But bow to be Father 
Christmas when Mr Lawson, 
who has never strived to be 
loved, seizes fie sleigh and 
begins to lash the reindeer 
forward nearly two mouths 
before Christmas, and per- 
haps half a year before the 
election? 

Mr Hanenley seethed at 
fie unfairness of it. He w^s 
not helped when a Tory back- 
bencher referred to ‘^thc tuck 
shop." A Labour backbench- 
er, no doubt trying to be 
helpful to Mr Hanersley. 
shouted at Mr .Lawson: 
“you'd know about fiat". 
And Mr Denis Skinner, the 

Labour member for Bolsovcr, 

cried “burner” in fie Chan- 
oeJfors general direction. 
These were references to fie 
Chancellor being very plump. 
Bui so b Mr Hatrersley. Both 
politicians have been plagued 
fay the accusation. Hums is a 
dash of giants. AB sides j 
should call a Christmas truce, 
now fiat it does seem to be 
Christmas. 

When the time came for 
him to crossbeam me fie 
Chancellor, Mr Hanersley 
asked how Mr Lawson justi- 
fied fie effect of fie rate of 
economic growth on aktage 
pensioners. Then he embark- 
ed on what seemed tike lots of 
well-informed,, technical- 
sounding questions. This 
confiimed Mr Lawson’s long- 
standing suspicion that Mr 
Hattersley does not know 
much abbot eraoomks. Mr 
Lawson prefaced his replies 
by saying that Mr Hattersley 
had absented himself from 
Treasury question tune, ear- 
lier is fie day, M in order to 
mug up". 

Mr Lawson laboriously an- 
swered each of Mr Hatters- 
fey’s points, intersperse his 
replies wifi such phrases as 
“next, he asked me about the 
medium term strategy,’* and 
“be then asked me about fis- 
cal adjustment" Such tactics 
have endeared him to a whole 
generation of Mr Haiteraley's 
critics in aB parties and none. 
Mr Hatterriey’s instincts 
were probably right the first 
time. Rather than all this 
economics, to which he is not 
naturally suited, he should 
have stuck to the plight of the- 
old-age pensioners. A poli- 
tician can never go wrong 
wifi the plight pf the old-age 
pensioners, especially at 
Christmas. 




Wmmmmm 






fresh or strong; max temp 




Ml 

(adults) and £2.50 (children 



under 14). 

rirf 

I."' 






30~35p a lb and US red delicious 
50-S5p are new this week. 
Russets 30-45p a lb, French 
golden delicious apples 25-35p 
are plentiful as are Coxes at 25- 
45p. Saisumas 25-50p a lb are 
not very sweel but . there is a 
wide choice of oranges between 
8-28p each, lemons 8-18p. 


Top Films 


Births: Marie Curie, physicist. 
Nobel laureate 1903. 19th War- 
saw, 1867; Sir Chandrastikhani 
Raman, physicist. Nobel laure- 
ate 1930, Tixucfairappali, India, 
2888. 

. The October Betobttao in 
Russia, known as stub from the 
Okl Style date of October 26. 
1917. 


Thames Barrier 



fit ill i util Oil Kiln 


lighting-op time 


Concise Crossword page 14 



nrr 




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2 

2m 


£jS?3£pt 


rugnriAto Dr 

Rates tor sroaB dwiorot nt rto n ban* noms 
orty as supptod by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Oimrsni rates apply to travellers' 
CtegirtS amt otf tor lontlgn currency 
buonasc. 

Retafl Prtce Indoc 3B7JJ 

Unttaps The FT Max closed up 73 at 






































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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


21 

SPORT 31 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 35 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 



Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1303-9 (+7.8) 

FT-SE 100 
1648.5 (+4.1) 

Bargains 

32328 (29950) 


USM (Data stream) 
127.97 (+0.63) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4340 (+0.0110) 

W German mark 
2.9526 (+0.0148) 


lYade-weighted 

59.5 (+0.4) 



after Opax offer 

n i 


Lawson 


By Alison Eadie 

declared its new bid final 
which leaves it scope to raise 
its terms. . . M 

If Opax succeeded, Mr 
Maxwell would eiiidgc as a 
16.1 per cent shareholder m 
noimced that it had secured the 
the 19.1 per cent state heW by yesterday that he *^®“J**w 
Mr Robert Maxwell, publisher tbe higher 
of the Dailv Mirror, and this the generality of star^oltos 


Norton Opax, the printing 
and publishing company,. yes- 
terday raised its terras yet 
again for fellow . printer 
McCorquodale with a final 
£165 million offer. Opax an- 
nounced that it. had secured 


approval 


OI LUC L/uxi.K mu tut t fin** vm»* 

took its level of acceptances to 
51.1 percent. 

The management buyout 
team at McCorquodale, 


Mr Holloran said that cash 
would be -the real decider in 
the bid, adding that 35 per 
cent of McCorquodale had 
been bought through the mar- 
ket for cash by Opax ana Mr 
Maxwell. In addition 
withdrawals of nearly 9 per 
cent from the previous Opax 
offer indicated those 
shareholders must have ac- 


.o d* higher buyout 


The stock market gave a 
cautious vote of approval last 
night to the package in Mr 
Nigel Lawson's autumn stater 
menu The Chancellor prom- 
ised an extra £4.75 billion of 
spending across the board and 
also forecast that inflation 
would be lower than analysts 
bad been expecting. 

Government stocks ended 
the day in a gloomy mood 
with marketmen interpreting 
the Chancellor's statement as 
indicating that interest rates 
were Iflody to remain high for 
some time. Analysts suggested 
the Chancellor was injecting 
something like £10 billion into 
tbe economy. 

But oils recovered. Shell pot 
on 5p to 946p, just 7p down on 
the day, while BP rallied 5p to 
629p, a drop of 16p in alL 
Elsewhere, leading stocks 
showed more fells than rises. 
However, any positive re- 
action to the Chancellor's 
measures was tempered by 
news from Wall Street of a 
downgrading of profits by 

IBM, the computer giant 
The pound firmed at the 
prospect of continuing high 
interest rates and the trade- 
weighted index dosed up 0.4 
at 69.5 on the day. M 

Market report page 23 


headed by chief executive Mr 
ioD 


John Holloran, immediately 
struck back with a higher cash 
offer at 3 lOp per share valuing 

the company at £158.8 mil- 
lion. The buyout team hopes 
sufficient shareholders will 
withdraw their acceptances so 
that the Opax bid cannot go 

unconditional . 

Opax’s new terms, which 
will not be increased, are 
seven new shares for three 


; 

There was speculation last 
night that his ultimate goal 


offer. 

He 


New battle fines pagp23 


only 

McG 


was to bid for the enlarged 
company. „ . 

City analysis were divided 
in their opinions. Some sug- 
gested Opax had done enough 
to win and was not 
overstretching itself _ Others 
gid the level of dilution was 
seven new dares for three too much and those wiring 
McCorquodale shares valuing 

McCorquodale shares at 322p m be issued 

each. The cash alternative has 

h--- «,;«*( hv 43.3 d to fry Opax would amount to 77 
^p^sSesy^idS 

e£ed lOp w dose at 138p. aq^Jhey “ 

The buyout team has not underwritten at 130p. 


said it indicated that 
7 per cent of 
mn-'orqnodale shareholders 
had been persuaded to accept 
Opax paper. 

Mr Give Chalk, a director 
of Samuel Montagu, which is 
advising Opax said he _ was 
surprised at the speed of the 
decision by the indfipendent 
McCorquodale directors to 
recommend the raised buyout 
terms. Opax had been seeking 
a meeting with the directors 
He pointed to the capital 
gains tax problems of those 
accepting cash. Mr Holloran 
said tbe loan note alternative 
was being offered as a way 
dCGT 



Key Wico staff 
defect to Swiss 
Bank Corp 


By Alexandra Jackson 
Swi S5 Bank Conation 

. ■ . . - nVinill 


j Virgin flotation set 
to raise £255m 

By John Bell, City Editor 


round CGT problems. 


Benson offers M & G shares 
at 25p below market price 


By Lawrence Lever 


Profits jump 


Bectrocomponents contin- 
ues to make steady progress- 
Preiax-profitwose J3 percent 
to £18.1 ' million for the six 
months to September 30 on 
turnover up 28 per cent -to 
. £l 14.6 million. The dividend 
was increased 03p to 22p. • 
Tempos, page 24 


£4.4m Trend 


M K Electric Group has 
paid £4.42 million for 77.6 per 
cent of Trend Control Sys- 
tems, a manufacturer oibioJo- 
jng control systems. The 
outstanding shares, which are 
being -retained by directors 
and some employees, will be 
acquired by MK over four 
years from June 1989. 


Klein wort Benson formally 
announced yesterday the 
terms for the sale of most ofrts 
42 per bent stake in the 
M&G investment manage- 
ment group. ■ . 

It is offering shares in 
M & G at 270p each - about 
25p below -the price m the 

market. _ . _. 

The sale of 28 million 
M & G shares will produce a 
£64 million profit for 
KlemworL although tax on the 
profits*; according to^a - 
KleinwoTt director, ts fikdy 
to be quite substantia l . 

Mr David Hopkinson, the 
M&G deputy chairman and 
managing director, described 
the shares as “a long-term 
growth investment which you 
should buy and tuck awayC . 
The sale of the shares. 



David HophansoiB ^frny 

shares and tack away” 
of M & G, is accompanied by 


September 30, 1986, compares 
with £10.1 million the year 
before and £7 million in 1984. 

M&G estimates that earn- 
ings per share have increased 
by 65 per cent over the past 
year. It intends paying a final 
dividend of 3.25p net, against 
3p forecast at tbe announce- 
ment of its tatf-year figures. 

Klein wort will not accept 
applications for “an unduly 
luge proportion” of the shares 
on offer. „ 

This is intended to prevent 
a angle applicant purchasing a 
large proportion of the issue- 
even if the issue is under- 
subscribed. It would not pre- 
vent applicants from 


of M&G, is accompanied by vent appixv“u« 
a profit estimate indicating obtaining stakes of about 5 per 
that its profits have doubted cent of M & O. „ 

over the past two years. Klmnwort.sh^l^s^ 

The £15^ milli on estimate be. given pnonty in applica- 


rate of the shares. The £15.3 munun «auuw« H 6 

JSS 3X4 pS of pretax profits for the year to t«ms for shares. 


Yamaichi joins 

Yamaicbi International 
Europe, the London arm ot 

oneof the big fomJapamae 
securities bouses, has become 
a full member of the London 
c tr1r k Exchange. It wants to 
^re^ity serytefe 
London for Japanese institu- 


tions. 


Avis seesaw 


The shares of Avis Europe, 
which started trading on the 
stock market yesterday, dosed 
at 239p, halting opened ai 
226p- The offer for sale was 
priced at 250p. buione^hird 
of the shares were left with the 
underwriters. 

Taiwan tax cut 

Taiwan has cut tariffs on 
1 £43 items to tryjo open up 
ihe Taiwanese market. 


Wall Street 22 
Co News 2 2JA 
Camaeet jg 
Slock Market g 
Tempas £ 

Money Mrkts 24 


Foreign M 

Traded Opts 24 
UnitTiroC 26 
OMWfiW* 2J> 
USMPtyes 26 
Stare Prices 27 


Mr Richard Branson, aged 
364he entertai nments en- 
trepreneur, is hnnging ■“ 
Virara Groop to market today 
with an expected price tag of 
abort £255 miffion. 

The flotation win take the 
form of an offer for sale by 
tender with a rahnmmn 
subscription price in the re- 
gion of I20p to 125p a share, 
HCTftpHng to market sources. 

At the iwwifanim price. Vir- 
gin would be capitalized at 
S out £220 matiou, but the 
price is believed to have been 

modestly pitched to encourage 
the widest possible suwwt. 

Virgin, which started life m 
1970 as a mail order company 
yiHng popular records, has 
grown rapidly, and now ac- 
counts for an estimated 1® per 
cent of the British recorded 
Isaac market. Last yraur it 
made profits of £19 J mfllioa. 

It operates in 17 coumtnes, 
employing 1,600 people, with 
haff its sales originating over- 
seas. The original group, 
which was 70 per cent owned 
by Mr Branson, was reorga- 
nized prior to the flotation. 
The Virgin airline and other 
min or activities have been 
excluded so that the group 
could be launched as a pare 
entertainments concern. 


Existing shareholders, 
including Mr Branson, wdlbe 
raising a substantial sum from 
the sale of their shares. The 

foods wfll be nsed to recapital- 
ize the airline and other 
interests, to be called the 
Voyager Group- 
Ahead of today s prospectus 
details, analysts were expect- 
ing Virein to make anmnd £25 

millio n m the present year and 
possibly £30 million in the 

following 12 months. 

The retail division, which 
last year reported sales o f £56 
minion, should show a return 
to more normal margins and 
profits now that the capital 
spending programme is 
largely completed. The film, 
video and broadcasting di- 
vision is also expelled to show 
some growth this time. 

On a striking price of 150p a 

share, valuing the company at 

£255 mflfion, the shares would 

be selling at around 17 times 
expected earnings for tne 
present year, fai l in g to just 
over 14 firaps m the next 
(mawiai period. 

Initial response to foe 
group’s TV and press advertis- 
ing campaign has been good 
and the issue looks certain to 

attract heavy support. 


JWIA3 w*ua . r ,T#. i 

International put itself firmly 
on the Far Eastern securities 
map yesterday wth the 
recruitment of a significant 
number of senior personnel 
from Wl Carr (Overseas), a 
subsidiary of Exco Inier- 
■ national. 

Yesterday, at 6 o’clock 
Hong Kong time, the resigna- 
tions of at least a dozen key 
Wico personnel were proffer- 
ed in Hong Kong and Tokyo. 

A small sales team in New 
York is also thought to be 
included. It is not dear yet 
whether anyone in the Lon- 
don office has defected. 

Rumours circulating yes- 
terday suggested the defec- 
tions were more comprehen- 
sive. They indicated that a 
considerable number of back- 
up staff were involved from 
Wico offices in the Far East, 
London, New York and Zu- 
rich. If this were the case, this 
would imply a total of more 
than 100 people. 

Yesterday, Mr Richard 
Davey, finance director of 
Exco, said: “This is obviously 
a disturbing situation and we 
are doing our best to patch up 
the diminished business. 
However, Exco has had a 
deliberate policy of keeping its 
exposure to stockbroking 
down to a sensible level. 

-This has proved to be 
sensible in the light of the 
musical chairs being played in 
the City at the moment. In 


LCUI I/I r*“ — t- ?• 

expect it to contribute, about 
ihe same percentage this year. 
We would not have made an 
announcement on this matter 
to the Stock Exchange if there 
had not been a movement m 
our share price this morning- 
Mr Andrew Large, chirt 
executive of Swiss Bat** 
Corporation International, 
said: “We have recently been 
awarded branch status in To- 
kyo and have a requi rerami 
for experienced people, we 
were approached by some 
employees of Wico who were 
interested in joining us. we 
are very excited about the 
opportunities available m the 
Far Eastern markets. I have no 
comment to make about the 
amounts of money involved 
but we are obviously operat- 
ing in a competitive market- 

P 'exco Internationa! recently 
announced plans to invest £30 
million in its Far Eastern 
stockbroking operation. Part 
of this was expected to cover 
the £9.1 million exceptional 
loss provided at the interim 
stage to meet settlements 
made by Wico on behalf of a 
Japanese clienL 

In recent months, there has 
been talk of dissatisfaction it 
Wico and Exco has already 
lost people. 

Yesterday the share price of 
Exco International fell 12p to 
230p. 


Ford bid rejected as 
Fiat moves for Alfa 

. . _ . An ministerial com 


Rome (AP-Dow Jones) - 
Finmeccanica, the Italian 
state-controlled holding com- 
pany, has accepted a takeover 
bid made by Fiat for Alfa 
Romeo rejecting a rival bid by 
Ford 

The Finmeccanica board 
took its decision at a two-hour 
meeting yesterday FonnaJ 
approval was sought from tne 
board of lstituto per la 
Ricostruzione I nd us in ate 
(IRf). the state holding coi£ 
cent which is Finmeccanica o 
leadmgshareholder. 

Final approval must be 
given by the Italian Govern- 


h J i 

menu An ministerial commit- 
tee is expected to discuss the 
Fiat-Aifa case today. 

Fiat made a oid or about 
8.000 billion lire (£3.9 billion) 
to take over and rescue Alta 
Romeo. 

The bid countered a pre- 
vious offer by Ford Motor for 
the acquisition of the seepnd- 
laraest Italian car maker in an 
effort to foil entry of a 
dangerous competitor on the 
Italian car market 

Fiat, which ts controlled by 
the Agnelli family, bid for at 
least 5! per cent of Alfa 
Romeo Motoring, page 28 


Regalian 
cash call 

By Jaditii Hmtiey 


Ji piCUUl J 

Berkeley pays £18.4m Oil use "to 
for John Govett nse 2% 


By Carol Ferguson 


. Regalian Properties 
whichspecializes in turning 
nin-down council estates rata 
marketable private homes, is 
coining to the market for £35 
million in a three for seven 
rights issue at 325p per share. 
There will also be a one-for- 
one capitalization issue. 

This coincides with the 
company’s half-year results to 
September 30. 1986, which 
show pretax profits at £4.1 1 
million, a 120 per cent in- 
crease on the. previous hall- 
year and up £440,000 on the 
year to March 31, 1986. 

The company says that the 
sharp risewill not necessarily 
be repeated in the second half. 

Earnings per share have 
risen 70 per cent to l(L83pand 
the dividend has been in- 
creased by 100 per cent. 

City sentiment has been so 
strong that the rights issue has 

been underwritten at only a 5 
per cent discount instead of 
the 15 per dent which might 
have been expected for a 
company of its size, 
pretax profits are expected 

I IS Mar wnl 9 


Berkeley Technology, the the balance owned by 
specialist investment com- directorSjStaff and the Goven 
pany which offers develop- pension fund, 
mem funds to grewing Rerkelev Technology will 

coStiS specialized t«±- 
acquweJohn Govett & Co, me .»# investment. And while 
fend, manager, for £18.4 group «U 

mimcra - . , change its name to Beitetar 

The Govett group » a long & Company Limited, 

established British investment wju operate under its 

management group with more and existing 

: fl 1 ■ hilKnn mfrfw 

management. 


Bonds boost 


than £1.3 ^biffion under 
management, including three 

investment trusts totalling consideration for the 

£820 million, ft ^dso purchase win comprise a mix- 

unit trusts of £1 OOmiHion and gash (£5.7 million), 

pension funds of £270 million. unsecuret j notes (£3.5 

About 57 per cent of Govett million) and 4.2 million 
is owned by the three invest- Berkeley ondntary shares at 
meat trusts it manages, with 220p a share (£9.2 million). 


to rise by about.25 per cent a 

year over the next four years. 


market summary 


STOCK MARKETS 


gSSL - 1878J56 (-20-3ST 


ESSdow .... 1675&35 f+44.64)' 
3.-- 1393-31+3-2) 


**££* nk_- 2021^ (+2Z7) 
fiS&nera! 

London closing prtee*|*9^_ 


main price changes 


nrac* 

MKPectnc 


A. Cohen ‘A’ r - 

Bactrocomponents 
Famafl 


TomWnsons 
LU 


t 4 ■ •Jr* 

472p(+l2p) 

340p (+24P| 


interest rates 


LWkJot: 

Bank Base: 11% 


. ■_* — J* 


buykig rate 
US: 


pnme ?SSwfa* 



London 
c St .4340 


£ SwFT24^2 


£ ?Frg63S 
£• Yen 234 02 


L' index ® 5 
ECU M 71235 


NewYmte 

S- £1.4320* 

$- DM2.0605* 
aSwFrt.7170^ 
I n^6.7l95* 
IrYenl^ir 
S: tnck»c112^3 
SDR £0.847700 


211p +1 

McCoquolate 

Daks Sim‘psori'-Z^335p j+Mg 
Shiloh — — : HOPltlS 


Five Oaks profits rise 

Five daks Investments' pro- More than 60 per cent (by 
tax profits for the year ending sale value) of the company s 
June 30 were up 40 per cent to projects are in the City oi 
£650,514. Net . asset vajue^a. London, it has soW its 16.500 


share, taking, this year’s £7 _ atv office project at 

million rights issue mto ao- ^ u L Ke Po utney Hifl - 
count, was 42.74p - a 56 per Laurem* 
cent increase. Earnings per sod m^eabouttiJ 
share were 9.1 8p. • • million from the deaL 


By David Young 

Energy Correspondent 

Opec’s attempts to force oil 
prices upwards at its meeting 
next month may benefit from 
tbe latest statistics released by 
the International Energy 
Agency (IEAX .These, dmw 
that Western industrialized 
countries will use 2 per cent 
more ofl next year. 

In addition, consumption 
for the rest of this yem- is 
expected to increase by 2.5 per 
cent. 

The overall oil use of the24 
member countries of the IEA 
is expected to rise by 3 per cent 
next year. 

The report shows that for 
the third quarter of this year 
ofl stocks in the Western 
world have been increaang, 
with an average of 3.5 million 
barrels a day going into stocks. 

Since 1973 the IEA has 
attempted to co-ordinate : the 
response of the industrialized 
world to Opec's attempts to 
control tbe ofl market 
Opec hopes it can send the 
oil price up to $18 a barrel by 
the end of this year. 


The coupon rate of 10-year 
Japanese government bonds 
for issue this month has been 
raised to 5.4 per cent from 5.1 
per cent, but the issue price is 
raised to Y99 from Y97. The 
move is to stimulate sagging 
bond prices. 


You and your pension 

. _ p- :u. AAinanrlo iinlmnwn tO VOU. 


In tomorrow's 10-page Family 
Money, The Times assesses 
the implications of Mr Roy 
Hattersiey’s plans for pension 
funds and their impact on the 
11 million members of occupa- 
tional schemes. 

al^S^the^evolution in tRe 
mortgage market and explains 
. iamI hiiilrtinn 


someone unknown to you. 

.The latest unit trust perfor- 
mance figures are examined 
and Family Money signals the 
dangers of not having personal 
belongings properly insured 
during mat winter weekend 
break away from home. 

Plus the emerging boom in 

■ — ni+>f nhhm iff) 


how your friendly local building 
society might sell your debt to 


share shops and wtw platinum 
? ■ * gold s role as 


has taken oyer gc^- - ---- 
the precious investment metat. 


THE BEST 


CHOIOOF 


FLIGHTS FROM 


HEATHROW 


TOUSfiON 


are wcac 7 . 101 *. — • — 

European bankers wary of 
new technology, report says 

rwn DanbSno rnnwoumdeit 


TRFs daily Heath row-Lisbon services offer the best 
business choice - lunchtime or evening departure, splendid 
hot meals and wide range of fares to irneet all n«ds. 

And TAP’s celebrated Navigator Class provides a sefarate 
checkin, superb comfort, the finest food and wines, and 
unobtrusive hospitality in the best Portuguese tradition. 

You won't find a better choice. . .. . , 

For reservations and 

mo men ^ Manrhodpr nfi1499 216L Prestei 344 26UZ. 




l..).. anerrte one of less inclined to invest in new 

systems in Europe and share the oos- 

many of the shortcomings of 8y revereed, with 

inadequate use of market re- Britain, trance, opwn 


retailing chains, snch as in- 
store credit cards and instau- 
ment financing, are seen as a 
serious threat 
But tbe survey snowed tnar 
increasing competition 


Nwigwcq: 

CLASS: 

top executive * 


'PORTUGAL 


Helical Bar 
Norton 
OE.HI-. 
ExooIntnL 


Prices are as at 4ptn 


so9p(-aip) 

230p(-12p) 


GOLD 


tQHuuen™ France. Snain and increasing 

madeqaate ase of market re- tween ba ks and other institn- 

search and a haph»ard ap- -ujjonic payments lions will lead to a br^Wown 

^roach to new technology- effiaent ewaronic^j . t — 1 


London Fbttng: 

AMS405J0|- 
ctoseS4f " _ 

285.00) .. 

Sm«W)9.O(Mia50- 


150- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brant (Dec.) pi'f™'"" 
■ Denotes tatast tasdln® i 


14J35) 


Tte* is IMe pros- 
A sfflrvey of Evopean jL t ^ a single European 
bankers 7 attitudes, published _ avinei its system being 
yesterday by Betail Banker J 

InternatkmaL presents a p*> , France have 

tore of rapid change in refea JEUSSJL S 

banking and nmnerons dan- toorecashd^p«s«spfftoto 
^ffSngbankiiigsys- of popnlaiion than any rite 

terns for’ the next 15 years. m aihm 

Tiip best naratenta services than ISO for every muiMn 

are found is* northern Euro- inhabitants. Both 

according to towards f ®± 

MrRon Nevan, flw aiithor of 

the renort These banks op- shop purchases are oeonea 

direedy to » 

direct debits and automatic couuti jnore.rapidlj than most 


In the traditional foD-service 
rctationship banks have with 
their clients. 

Few banks base their prod- 1 

nets and services on an under- 


UUCLi wmu — — 

transfers, while ofltf Euro- 
pean countries rely on paper 
transactions, such as cheques, 
which are costly to service. 
But tbe success of the giro 

system means these banks are 


I.WUIH ■ ■ , . 

qther European coantries. 

Id many countries com- 
petition from outside testitn- 
ftra, such as US banks, is not 
taken seriously- But fihfeacmi 
services offered by domestic 


"through market re- 
search. This leave s th em 
vulnerable to other institutions 
which research the market 
place more thoroughly* ft® 
survey added. , 

European bankers are wary 
of investing in electronic back- 
ing technology. They rec- 
ognize that much of it tes been 
planned badly and is late- 
grated poorly into the banks 
commercial strategies, the sur- 
rey says. But tbey agree that 
farther automation is essential 




29 _ 


jficiency 


winch 
ex, ex- 
nd rose : 
swih in 
/as an 
{.Tuim- 
of the 
from 7 
•nt aod i 
entURL, 
igles is 
where 
d mil- 


10 mfl- 

?xpen- 

kedto 

ridine 

which 

it noli 

is are ! 


f this 











22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


ICI chairman calls 
for stronger links 
with universities 

By Out City Staff 

A wide-ranging strategy for 
greater co-operation between 
industry and universities was 
outlined yesterday by Sir John 
Harvev-Jones. chairman of 
ICI. ’ 

A real partnership was 
needed to ensure a prosperous 
future for Britain and “some- 
thing needs to change hands, 
span from money'", he said. 

Sir John also gave a warning 
to politicians cutting expen- 
diture in higher education. 

“Any politician who thinks 
the burden of cost in its 
totality can be borne by the 
private sector is living in 
dreamland." he said. 

He was speaking at Brad- 
ford University during a one- 
day conference, entitled In- 
dustry and Education - 
Partnership to Success, held to 
mark the 20th anniversary of 
the granting of the university's 
charter. 

About 350 representatives 
from industrial and commer- 
cial concerns and educational 
institutions attended. 

Sir John, who is chancellor 
of the university, said it was 
no accident that a society that 
was careless about its indus- 
trial future should lack under- 
standing about the future of its 
universities. The problems 
faced by higher education 
would not be solved by money 
alone. 



Sir John: warned politicians 
about education cutbacks 
He said both the industrial 
concern and the university 
involved must want _ the 
partnership and work at it 
Many of these collabora- 
tions take years before they 
really take off, he said. "If you 
are in any doubt start with the 
small things first Don't try to 
produce the entire range of 
your company’s next genera- 
tion of products. Do some- 
thing practical and relevant 
and both partners can share its 
success." 

Sir John said work with a 
university should be seen as 
normal, not a fringe activity or 
simply because it seemed a 
goal idea. “Trust is built over 
a period of time by openness, 
understanding and goodwill." 


Japan blames West 
for trade imbalance 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 
British companies were told He added: "Another exam- 

comes with the asser- 


yesterday that a greater effort 
was needed if the trade im- 
balance between Europe and 
Japan was to improve. 

Mr Kideo Kagami, the 
Japanese ambassador to the 
European Communities, criti- 
cized European and American 
businesses for failing to under- 
stand traditional Japanese 
commercial practices, con- 
sumer habits, and corporate 
decision-raakiag processes. 

He said foreign goods would 
be accepted by the Japanese 
market if their producers 
made the necessary commit- 
ments. 

But while the number of 
Japanese business representa- 
tives on long-term assign- 
ments in Europe was about 
33,000, the number of Europe- 
ans in Japan was about 2,000. 

Japanese businesses have 
6,100 people in Britain, but 
there are only 640 British 
business representatives in 
Japan. 

Similarly, the effort to learn 
the Japanese language was 
"dearly still lacking". 


pie 

tion . . . that Japan’s distribu- 
tion system constitutes a 
barrier to market access for 
foreign products. In actual 
fact, in most cases the only 
barier is that the Japanese 
system is different from those 
of Europe or North America, 
and our partners often hesitate 
to constructively deal with the 
difference.” 

He pointed out that the 
trade imbalance between Ja- 
pan and the EEC. more than 
S17 billion (£12 billion) in 
Japan's favour so far this year, 
was the result of increased 
competitiveness on the part of 
Japanese enterprises. 

"Their efforts have led to 
their rewards.” he said, adding 
that Japan’s current account 
surplus was “not in any way 
pursued intentionally". 

Mr Kagami criticized the 
EECs tendency to create 
structural trade problems in 
the forum of die General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade. 


Royal Dutch Shell 
profits jump 27% 

despite price slump 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 
Profits of the Royal Dutch lion compared with only £21 depreciation 


Shell Group have increased by 
27 per cent in the first nine 
months of this year despite 
stock losses approaching £1 
billion because of the slump in 
world oil prices. 

Earnings on a current cost 
basis in the third quarter of 
this year were £554 million, 
virtually unchanged com- 
pared with earnings of £553 
million in the corresponding 
period. 

However, the figure for the 
first nine months of the year 
rose to £2,772 milli on com- 
pared with £2.190 million in 
the corresponding period. 

After-tax stock losses for the 
nine months were £984 mil- 


million in the equivalent nine 
months of 1985. The results in 
the third quarter of this year 
were also depressed by charges 
of £200 million for company 
reorganization. 

The figures show that 
exploration and production 
earnings were lower despite 
increased production levels 
because of the foil in crude oft 
prices. 

Earnings on refining and 
marketing were substantially 
higher, with marine sates and 
chemical production also 
gaining from the lower crude 
costs. 

Corporate currency ex- 
change losses were consid- 
erably reduced, reflecting the 


of sterling 
against the dollar. 

Currency losses of £25 mil- 
lion in the third quarter of this 
year compare with losses of 
£177 million in the third 
quarter of 1985. For the first 
nine months of the year group 
funds generated totalled 
£5,356 million compared with 
£7.276 million in the 
corresponding period. 

Capital spending and 
exploration costs this year 
have totalled £3,275 million, 
29 per cent down on the the 

everfm° 1 985*Sfcellspent £600 
million on acquisitions in 
Colombia, and the figures also 
reflect the weaker do 


Why Britons must learn 
to become foreigners 


‘ By Edward Townsend 

Industrial Correspondent 

The Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry today takes a 
swipe at all the old established 
values of the pin-stripe suited 
British businessman abroad: 
to succeed he must increas- 
ingly see himself as "the 
foreigner.” it says. 

In a bid to shake Britain's 
overseas salesmen out of any 
remaining sense of flag-wav- 
ing complacency, the CBI calls 
on them to stop thinking of 
themselves as exporters and 
begin seriously to call each 
other “overseas marketers”. 

Marketing abroad, says the 
employers’ organization in a 
new book published today, 
demands a shift in attitude, a 
willingness to learn, to acquire 
new habits and a new under- 
standing 

“Some Britons are among 
the best in the world at it. 
Most coukl do a lot better.” 

The traditional exporter 
tries to sell what he can make: 
the new slogan from the CBI is 
“we must make what we can 
sell not try to sell what we can 
make”. 



The British abroad: we are 
the foreigners, says CBL 

Part of the secret, according 
to the new CBI formula, is to 
begin to realize how foreign 
we are. The concept of foreign- 
ness differs from country to 
country so that in Greece the 
word for foreigner is the same 
as that for guest, while in 
Spain, all foreigners are tour- 
ists. “Others may see our suits 
and ties as symbols of the 
mythically prosperous hi-tech 
western world,” the book says. 

Abroad, the British sales- 
man is the foreigner. “It is 
your strangeness and unpre- 
dictability that will condition 
responses; your odd clothes, 
customs and language.” 


Foreigimess, however, can 
have its rewards, says the CBL 
“You can represent both a 
long tradition of craftsman- 
ship and the new technologi- 
cal frontiers of the West. The 
best of British is a perfect 
combination of the two, cou- 
pled with an inventiveness 
that some more disciplined 
nations envy." 

And the CBI presents its 
members with the tempting 
prospect of becoming “for- 
eigners everywhere”. The pre- 
dicted global village is becom- 
ing a reality, it says, and all the 
overseas marketer needs is to 
satisfy a universal human 
want. 

For the professional over- 
seas marketer the world must 
be his ultimate aim, says the 
CBL and the journey of 40,000 
kilometres (tire circumference 
of the world) begins with a 
single, single-minded, com- 
mitted step. “As those in- 
scrutable foreigners say.” 

Working for Export Cus- 
tomers — I'm a foreigner : CBI 
Publications, Centre Point, 
103, New Oxford Street, 
London WC1A 1DU £3.50. 


Coloroll interim up 47% to £3.5m 


The pretax profits of 69 per cent increase in turn- 
Coloroll. manufacturer of over to £44.4 million, 
wallcoverings, ceramics and Mr John Ashcroft, the 
household textiles, rose 47 per chairman and chief executive, 
cent to £3.5 million for the expects group turnover in the 
half year to September 30. year to March 1987 to rise to 
Yesterday’s results showed a about £110 million. 


■ The dividend was in- 
creased by 15 per cent to 2.3p. 

Worley Wallcoverings, 
Billons and Staffordshire 
Potteries are thought to have 
contributed £14 million of 
turnover. 


General 
Motors 4 to 
close eight 
US plants’ 

Detroit (Reuter) — General 
Motors has derided to dose at 
least eight US plants with a 
loss of almost 27,000 hourly- 
paid workers as part of a cost 
cutting drive, the Detroit 
News, quoting unnamed 
sources, said yesterday. 

Company sources said an 
announcement on plant clo- 
sures was expected 
imminently. 

The Detroit News said five 
vehicle-assembly plants and 
three metal-stamping plants 
would not be dosed immedi- 
ately, but phased out with 
different timetables. 

GM, tiie world's biggest 
carmaker, said last month 
several of its US plants would 
be dosed as pan of a 
restructuring programme to 
boost sagging profits. 

Industry analysts say three 
jobs in supply plants would be 
lost fa each lost in an 
assembly planL 

Unionized workers affected 
by closures would have the 
right to transfer to other GM 
'plants, the report said. 

£84m loss 
is first 
at Nissan 

From David Watts, Tokyo 

Nissan Motor, Japan’s sec- 
ond largest carmaker, has 
returned an operating loss of 
19,741 million yen (£84 mil- 
lion) for the six months to 
September 30. 

The company, which 
opened its first factory in 
Britain this summer, showed a 
38 per cent drop in income for 
the same period. This is the 
first time the company has 
shown a loss. 

The company's reaming 
profit, which excludes excep- 
tional items, was down 55.4 
per cent for the same period. 

Overall production is down 

8.3 percent and vehicle sates 
are down 6.3 per cent. 

Nissan's British unit built 
875 cars during the April to 
September period, while total 
overseas production was 
158,514 vehicles. This repre- 
sented an overall increase of 

1.3 per cent 


Onoda profits 
soar by 80 % 

Tokyo (AP-DJ) — Onoda 
Cement, one of Japan's largest 
cement makers, said yesterday 
its net earnings for the six 
months to September 30 in- 
creased by 80.2 per cent to 
1,150 billion yen. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
of 


Federative Republic of Brazil 

8V4% External Bonds Due December 1, 1987 ■ 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE N.onbehalfof the Federative Republic of Brazil, that on December 1. 1986.$l.32U.U00 
principal amount of its External Bonds will be redeemed out of moneys to be paid by it to Dillon, Read 6i.Cu. Inc- 
as Principal Paying Agent, pursuant to the mandatory, annual redemption requirement of said Bonds and to the 
related Authenticating Agency Agreement and Paying Agency Agreement, each dated as of December 1.J972. 
M anufacturers Hanover Trust Company, as Authenticating Ag< 


bearing the following serial numbers: 


tgen’t. has selected, by lot. for such redemption the Bonds 


Coupon Bondi to be red ee med in whole: 


71 

1230 

3345 

5236 

5546 

6398 

7795 

9122 

11457 

12738 

12877 

14401 

15547 

16435 

18458 

21140 

23651 

23763 

307 

1244 

3346 

5237 

5585 

6399 

7796 

9123 

11458 

12740 

12878 

14542 

15548 

16473 

18463 

21141 

23652 

23769 

3J1 

1249 

3347 

524) 

5508 

6419 

7798 

9134 

11467 

12742 

12880 

J4543 

15661 

16493 

18464 

21142 

33659 

23775 

312 

1250 

3363 

5242 

5589 

6420 

7799 

9558 

11468 

12755 

12956 

14544 

15579 

16494 

18465 

21143 

23681 

23776 

315 

1441 

3364 

5243 

5590 

6423 

8238 

9559 

11469 

12758 

12958 

14545 

15832 

16495 

18466 

21157 

23662 

23778 

318 

1443 

3365 

5352 

5593 

6425 

8241 

9560 

11473 

12761 

12962 

14553 

15833 

16501 

20211 

23547 

23664 

23780 

363 

1446 

3369 

5356 

5605 

6435 

8242 

9772 

11476 

12762 

12965 

14681 

15835 

18502 

20212 

23548 

23665 

23781 

364 

1448 

3387 

5357 

5607 

6438 

8243 

10081 

1147B 

12767 

12965 

14682 

15838 

16504 

20213 

2355T 

23667 

23783 

384 

1465 

3388 

53S8 

5608 

6441 

8268 

10382 

11481 

12769 

12967 

14683 

15840 

16505 

20527 

23552 

23676 

23792 

386 

1469 

3389 

5360 

5788 

6442 

8269 

10383 

11483 

12772 

12971 

14686 

16283 

16620 

20529 

23554 

23679 

23793 

935 

1472 

4233 

5369 

5967 

6443 

8270 

10384 

11484 

12780 

12974 

14688 

15296 

16621 

20531 

23567 

23680 

23795 

961 

1473 

4235 

5370 

5972 

6449 

8272 

10385 

11485 

12783 

13056 

14689 

16298 

16622 

20532 

23569 

23681 

23801 

964 

1504 

4241 

5372 

5975 

6450 

8344% 

10387 

11560 

12784 

13057 

14690 

16299 

16633 

20541 

23572 

23683 

23803 

969 

1509 

4265 

5377 

5976 

6482 

8345 

10396 

11957 

12785 

13059 

14684 

16300 

16634 

20542 

23573 

23688 

23804 

871 

1510 

4270 

5373 

5977 

6484 

8346 

10398 

12162 

12786 

13066 

14696 

16302 

16636 

20544 

23576 

23689 

23806 

975 

1667 

4283 

5379 

5992 

6500 

8347 

11014 

12163 

12787 

13069 

14699 

16303 

16638 

20545 

23578 

23890 

23007 

980 

1669 

4452 

5380 

5983 

6502 

8512 

11075 

12164 

12794 

13231 

14700 

16309 

16639 

20546 

23587 

23691 

23808 

986 

1670 

4453 

5392 

6000 

6505 

8514 

11018 

12166 

12798 

13232 

14701 

16310 

16642 

20550 

23588 

23693 

23814 

989 

1671 

4454 

5393 

6002 

6507 

8521 

11053 

12167 

12799 

13233 

14702 

16312 

16643 

20551 

23590 

23694 

23815 

993 

1673 

4470 

5394 

6110 

6514 

8733 

11054 

12168 

12806 

13342 

14703 

16313 

16650 

20553 

23591 

23699 

23817 

1054 

3045 

4486 

5395 

6114 

6524 

87J4 

11055 

12169 

12807 

13617 

14714 

16315 

16655 

20555 

23592 

23701 

23823 

1059 

2049 

4489 

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6115 

6525 

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11057 

12312 

12809 

13618 

14715 

16320 

16657 

20556 

23598 

23702 

23825 

1060 

2052 

4490 

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6120 

6526 

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12314 

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13620 

14716 

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5468 

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20S60 

23801 

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23828 

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4769 

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12318 

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23829 

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20563 

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23710 

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5477 

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16328 

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20564 

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23712 

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4775 

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7266 

8761 

11249 

12325 

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13637 

14728 

16329 

16945 

20568 

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23713 

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1080 

2139 

4849 

5481 

6158 

7269 

8780 

11251 

12327 

12825 

13638 

14727 

16362 

18416 

20569 

23609 

23727 

23846 

1083 

2537 

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6160 

7281 

8782 

11255 

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12826 

13781 

14728 

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18419 

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4853 

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Regfoered Bonda vnthoat ooupoaa to be redeemed in whole or hi part and the p rinci pa l a mwrt to be redeemed: 


Mr 

Priadiai 

Amid 

tote 

Moan) 

■—tr 

ffi? 

fete 

fefeteff 

■tenter 

ES? 

Itefe 

assart 
_ fete 
town! 

■—ter 

Watipal 

tarn 

fete 

fete— 

RB 

898.. 

5 10.000 

RB 978 

. S14.000 

RM 178.. 

SI. 000 

RV 240. 

S 5.000 

RX 137 . 

. 510.000 

RB 

815.. 

. 100.000 

RB 980 

3.000 

RM 239.. 

5.000 

nx 8i.. 

3JOOO 

RX 138.. 

10.000 

RB 

916 

. 100.000 

RB 982. 

2,000 

RV 80.. 

5.000 

RX 96 

3.000 

RX 138 . 

. '10.000 

RB 

934 

. 25.000 

RB 983. 

8.000 

rv no. 

&000 

RX 127 . 

. 10,000 

RX 140 . 

10.000 

RB 

935.. 

. 25.000 

RB 984 . 

5.000 

RV ill 

5.000 

RX 134 

10.000 

RX 149 

. 10.000 

RB 

972 

1.000 

RM 87.. 

. 10.000 

RV 11? . 

5.000 

RX 135 

. 10.000 

RX 224. 

3.000 

RB 

975.. 

1.000 

RM 150. 

1.000 

RV 129. 

1.000 

RX 136 . 

10.000 

RX 965 

28.000 



i lobe redeemed) will become and 
Dillon. Read & Co. Inc^lH Reccnr 

per cent UiKrtl of ttie principal amount thereof with interest 

accrued thereon to the redemption dale. Coupon Bonds should be presented for redemption together with ail 
appurtenant coupons maturing subsequent tn the redemption date, if moneys for the redemption of all the Bunds 
to be redeemed lor in the case of a partial redemption the portion to be redeemed I are available at Lhe office »f 
Dillon. Read & Co. Inc. on the redemption date, interest thereon will cease to accrue from and after such date. 

.upon presentation uf such Debenture on or after the 
’ redemption price in respect of the urincij xti amount 

, . r pal amount remaining unredeemed will tiedelivered 

thereof without charge. • 

. At the option or the respective holders of the Bonds selected for redemption, the principal amount thereof and 
interest thereon may be collected upon presentation at the offices of the Co-Paying Agent. Banco Do Brasil. S.A. in 
New York. London. Paris. Hamburg and Tokyo. 

DILLON, READ & CO. INC. 

Dated: November 3. 1986 Primupnl Ptufm, A'.n ul 



Shareholders treble to 
7 million from 1983 

By Martin Baker 

One person in six in Britain factors in the spread of share 
owns shares, according to a ownership, 
survey published yesterday by However, more than half 
the financial publicity and those taking part in the survey 
marketing consultants, Dewe (53 per cent) disagreed with 


Rogerson. 

The number of shareowners 
has more than trebled from 2 
million in 1983 to about 7 
million after the TSB flota- 
tion, the survey says. • 

The Government’s 
privatization campaign and 
the growth of employee share 
schemes are seen as key 


the proposition that they had 
often thought about investing 
in stocks and shares. 

Half felt that they did not 
have enough money to invest, 
while 20 percent did not know 
how to invest in shares. 

The survey was conducted 
among a sample of 933 adults 
aged over 18. 


WALL STREET 


Shares follow bonds 
down in early trading 

New York (Renter) -Wag utilities, at 210-31 were (torn) 


Street Shares slipped ta early 
rewHing yesterday. Traders 
shares were following the 
lower trend of the bond mar- 
ket Profit-taking was also 
reported. . . 

The Dow Jones industrial 
was down 3-51 points 
Declining issues 


The Standard’s & Poor’s 
100 index was up 0.32 at 
232.69. 

Goodyear Tire MI ^ to 
48!?. The company said its 
board had authorized re- 
purchase of atom 20 milliofl 
Shares. 

ted advances on a three to two L*ar-Si*xJer,a takeover tar- 

a of 19 get, ©uwd Iv *“ *5**! 

rrriiif£r«inTrc- Motors wasoptttaWzoa 

The transportation average Western Union, at 3H, was op 
was op 1.12 to 850-75 and %. 


to 


Nov 

5 


Novi 

4 


AMR 60* 

ASA 38* 

Abed Signal 
AttedStra 66% 
ARsChtmrs 
Atom 
AnisKftc 
Am'RJa Hfi 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCymn'd 
AmBPwr 
Am Express 
Am home 
Am Motors 
ARlSrmd 
AmTefapn 
Amoco 
Armoo Steal 


Asarco 
Ashland 04 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNY 
Bankamer 
BkotBston 
Sank of NY 
Beth Steel 


3% 

36% 

13 

24% 

46% 

88 

80% 

as* 

53 

79 

3% 

41% 

23% 

67% 

6 


Sse 
Bitten 
Bg Werner 
Bnst Myers 
BP 

Burton tod 
Burton Ntn 


3714 

41 
E6% 

3% 

37 

13 

24% 

46% 

88% 

80% 

28% 

58% 

78% 

3K 

41% 

25 

66% 

6% 

16% 

57% 

57% 

33% 

44% 

15% 

42 
58% 

6» 

51% 

60% 

50% 


78% 

39% 

38 

63 

77S 


Can Pacific 

Campffler 

Catenate 

C erarais w 

Champon 

Chase Man 

ChmBkNY 

Chevron 

Ctiiryster 


Clark I . . 
Coca Cola 


CfrntraGas 
CtnblnEng 
COfflwflhH) 
GonsEdte 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
Cnoi Data 
Comma GI 
CPCtntf 
Crane 
Curtiss Wn 
Dan & Kraft 
Deers 

Delta Air 

Derail Ed 
Digital Eq 
Dlsnw 
DowCnatn 

Dresser End 
Duka Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Ar 
Earn Kodak 
Eaton Cora 
Emerson B 

Exxon Corp 
Fed Dot Sts 


17 
57% 

57 K 
33% 

43% 

15% 

42 
58% 

8% 

49% 

81% 

50% 

30% 

76% 

40% 

38% 

63% 

77% 

62% 

11 % 11 % 
39% 40 
241% 241% 
34% 35% 
30* 30 
35% 35% 
44% 44% 

44% 44 

39% 39% 
50- 50% 

19% 19% 

36% 36* 
39% 40% 
130% 132% 
42% 42% 

31% 31% 
33 ' 32% 
48* 48 
31% 31% 
16 15% 

26% 26 
55 55- 

78 84% 

33 34% 

53% 52% 

58% 57% 

23% 23% 
50* 50* 
17% 17* 

103% 102* 
43* 43% 
55% 56% 
18% 18% 
48% 48% 

87% 86* 
9% 9% 

63% 63* 
74* 75% 

84% 84 

69% 70 
95% 96* 


Nov 

5 


Ner 

4 


27% 

32% 

52% 

9% 

58* 


RTHsmne 
FstOveaso 
FstfntBncp 
FetPemC 
Ford 

FT Wecftv* 
gap Cora 
GTE Corp 
Gen Corp 
GanOy'mcs 
GoaSectrtc 
Gen test 
Gen MBs 
Gen Motors 

GnPUUtnr 

GenftscQ 
Georgia Rec 39% 
Gdeta 53% 
Goodndi 44% 
49% 

me 19* 

Grace 5S% 

GtAtl&Tac 23* 


28* 

33% 

S3'- 

9 

58% 

39* 

41V 

GO* 


Gr'ftnd 
GnanartCcr 
Guff 6 West 
HWKHJ. 
Hercules 
Hlett-PkRl 
Honeyweft 
tCtowto 


IBM 
WCO 
lm Paper 
reTMTcl 
Irving Bank 
Jhnsn A Jftn 
Kaiser Alum 
Kerr McGee 
KmOTyCMt 
KMart 
Kroger 
LT-VTCorp 
Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Sm 
MsnH'nw 
ManwfleCp 
Mapco 
Marine Md 
Mrt Manana 
Masco 
McDonalds 
McOomel 
Mead 
Merck 


43% 

62* 

601* 88 
73* 73% 

79 78% 

18% 18* 
91% 93% 

74* 73* 

23* 23% 

3- 3* 

38* 
52 
44% 
48* 
19* 
56% 

_ 22% 
34* 34 

2G 25% 
65% 66 
43% 43 

53 56% 

<2 41* 

74 

28 26% 
57% 58* 
21 % 20 % 
122% 125% 
12 * 12 % 


73% 
54 V 
48% 
68* 
17* 
28 V, 
82* 
SO!. 
3*. 
2 

80S 
47 
32% 
44'', 
2 % 
56% 
47% 
39% 
28% 
63* 
79* 
59% 
109% 109% 


74% 

54% 

46% 

70% 

17% 

28% 

50% 

3«% 

2 % 

81% 

45% 

33% 

44% 

2 % 

57 

48* 

38% 

28* 

84% 

79% 

59* 


MnsaMng 709* 109% 
Matte 04 38* 37* 

Monsanto 78 78 

Morgan J.P. 83% 84* 
Motorola 38% 39 
NCR Carp 47% 47% 
NL Msa? 5* 5% 

NStttsCfS 47 48% 

NatMedEnt 25% 25% 

NatSmendt ID* 10% 


Norfolk Stt 
NWBancrp 
Occam Pet 
Ogden 
CfinCerp 
Owens-W 
PecGesB 
Pan Am 
Penney J.C. 
Pemzod 
Rococo 


84* 83* 
377, 37% 
27% 27% 
46* 47 

44 43'. 

42 42 

24V, 25 

6% 5* 

80* 80% 
74* 73 

27% 27% 


NO* 

5 


NO* 

4 


pE5 EOS SB* 

pneiciOae 20* 20% 
Pr£pSfc* 71* 72* 

PSt**»Pet 10% 10* 

pecans*} 72% 73* 

PPG Ml TO* 89* 
Pro Gael 78* TBS 
POSE&G 42% 42* 

Raymeo n 64* 84 

RynMsMet 47% *7% 

RockMOBBS 41% 43 
FcyteOuttft 89* 88* 

6£ 81* 
Sara Lee 72% 71% 
SFESooac 33 34 

ScJdlMraer 33% 32% 

Sees Paper 84% 64% 

Seagrani 82% 52* 

Sears Rbcfc 43% 43% 

Stall Trans 54* 52* 
Strvjer 42% 43% 

StKTMnBk 87% BBS 
Sony 21V, 21% 

SmCeiEd 35% 25'/. 

SWterSeff 107% 106% 
SaCHOfMJ 49iy 49 
Sterfcno Ora 40% 47% 

SonmS? 35% 35* 
SonCcara 55j 55% 
Tetodra 339% 336* 

t*«*» m> £% 

Tones 36 % 35% 
Texas 6 Cor 28% 28* 
Tens Inst 116% 116* 
Texas Utils 34'i 34* 
Textron 63% 62 

T hitera Cor * 3!fc 43% 
TRW Inc 93*4 93M 
UAL Inc 59*4 59* 
UMMrNV 210* 210% 
Un Carafe 22% 21% 

tin Paccar 60% SOZ 
Uta Brands 33% 33% 

USGCorp 40* 29V 

UttTocftnd 45* 43% 
USX Cora 24% a* 

Unseal 24* 23* 

Jim WWW 47 % 

Wmr Lmta 57% 56% 
We9i Fargo Hi* 112% 
Ws^nseS -58* 58 
Wyft-.MC MX 
Wtwtpoot 72 V, 73 R 
WMtoonft 43* 43* 

Xerox Corp SB 58 

zemn 21* 22 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AgncoEag 
Alcn Alun 


AigomaSd 

Can Pacta 

Com oco 

ConBamrst 

Hkr/Sd Can 

HdsnSMm 

tmasco 

rnipenalCM 

inPtoa 

ByiTraseo 

SoBTam 

StaeiCo 

TTaianN A' 

VanwCora 

Westo 

wCT 


27* 

43% 

13 

16 

13'i 

27% 

28 

24% 

33* 

ST 

291. 

87% 

20 % 

28% 

265 

31 

13% 


27% 

43% 

13* 

18* 

13* 

26% 

27* 

24* 

34% 

47 

38% 

30 

87 

2C»; 

28% 

265 

30% 

12 % 


•Irn xJ&ec iEgS psao sr.irt W r ifit^ars 

Hong Kong home 
loans rise by 33% 

From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


Hong Kong citizens are 
queueing up to buy their own 
homes despite fears over the 
Crown Colony’s future when 
it is handed back to China in 
1997. 

Latest government figures 
show mortgages are the biggest 
growth area in Hong Kong’s 
banking sector, with home 
loans to inviduals soaring by 
32.9 per cent to HKS39.84 
billion (£3.6 billion) at the end 
of September. A year earlier, 
home loans amounted to 
HKS29.97 billion. 

Hong Kong’s industry also 
#vas boosted by the news that 
loans to the manufacturing 
sector rose by 16.4 per cent to 
HKS23.77 biltion over the 
year. That is a good sign for 
industrial activity in 1987. 

The colony's overall loan 
demand grew by 14 percent in 
September, after rising by 2 


per cent in August, which 
suggests loan demand is fi- 
nally breaking out of the 
doldrums. Even in the early 
part of this year loan demand 
seemed to be stuck at 7 per 
cenL 

However, there has been 
negligible growth in loans to 
budding, construction and 
property development firms 
in the latest quarter, up from 
HKS36.47 billion at the end of 
June to HKS37.64 billion at 
the end of September. 

The Crown Colony’s de- 
posit base continues to ex- 
pand, with total deposits up 
from HKS424 billion to 
HKS525 billion over the year 
to end-September. The broad- 
est measure of money supply. 
M3, is showing a year-on-year 
increase of 23.4 per cent to 
HKS554.74 billion. 


History of a great shipbuilder 


From Robert Rodwell, Belfast 


accountancy sleuths 
will lie among the keenest 
readers of the detailed history 
of Hariand and Wolff, the 
shipbuilding firm. 

Uke so many of the vessels 
from its yards since Edward 
Hariand, aged 27, took over 
his employer’s shipyard for 
£5,000 in 1858 and formed his 
partnership with the even 
younger Gustav Wolff a 
Hamburg Jew. in 1861, the 
book itself was a massive 
undertaking. 

For an “official” history, 
commissioned by the com- 
pany, it is surprisingly un- 
bowdlerized and in no way 
bland as such books often are. 

“An ounce of pluck is worth 


• A CAIRO & SONS: Results 
for lhe 17 months to June 30 (12 
months to January 31 1985). 
Final dividend O.Sp (nil). Net 
rental income and surplus 
sale of properties £388, 346 (nil). 
Turnover from discontinued 
retailing. activity nil 
(£1.802^572). Profit on ordinary 
activities before tax £176348 
(loss £89,467). Tax £13,682 
(£32). Net extraordinary income 
£21,1 J 1 (£24,038). Earnings per 
share 3.27p (loss !24p on old 
share capital). 

• GODWIN ELECTRICAL: 
At close of business on Novem- 
ber 5. acceptances of die offer on 
behalf of Bennett & Fountain 
Group for the entire issued 
share capital of the company 
bad been received in respect of 
9,549,613 ordinary shares 
(91.52 per cent). 

• FRA MONCTON OVER- 
SEAS INCOME AND 
GROWTH FUND: A dividend 
or Ip per share has been 
declared. 

• BASF AG: BASF and Sie- 
mens will merge their compat- 
ible processor and peripheral 
activities to form a new joint 
company. The new company, 
which will be owned equally by 


s ton of luck” was the philos- 
ophy of the autocratic William 
- later Viscount — Pirrie, who 
joined the partners as a 
‘gentleman apprentice” in 
1862 and who dominated the 
firm as an absolutely un- 
challenged autocrat from 1 885 
to his death in harness,. aged 
78, in 1924. 

He left his managing direc- 
tors, all fine engineers, un- 
equipped for fiscal 
management during one of the 
major downturns in the in- 
dustry. 

Desperate measures fol- 
lowed during the six-year 
reign of his successor, Lord 
Kylsant who was unable to 


keep the whole edifice stand- 
ing and was eventually jailed 
for fraud. 

By then another autocrat, 
Frederick Rebbeck, a brilliant 
engine designer, had been 
managing director for three 
years and was to serve a 
further 29 as chairman and 
sole managing director. 

Rebbeck piloted the com- 
pany into the modern age of 
welding — which he adopted 
belatedly and reluctantly — 
modular construction, build- 
ing docks, a much diminished 
British merchant marine, 
retrenchment and ruth/ess 
competition, from, initially, 
continental Europe and later 
Japan. 


COMPANY NEWS 


BASF and Siemens, will be Deposit interest £102,916 
based in Mannheim and com- (£40,809). Underwriting 
mence operations on January i. commissions £13,179 (£22,961). 


Initial capitalization will be 
DM80 millioo (£27 million). 
Total turnover in 1987 is ex- 
pected to exceed DM1,000 
million. 

• TELEVISION SOUTH: The 
company has reached a con- 
ditional agreement to acquire a 
controlling interest in the But- 
ton Design Contracts of 
London. Button has a control- 
ling interest in London Markets, 
organizers of the annual London 
television marker place, which 
will no longer take place. After 
the TVS acquisition of Button, 
London Office IniemationaL a 
permanent fuff-service media 
business centre in London, will 
be created to offer international 
film, television and video exec- 
utives a fuDy-equippod year- 
round base for European 
operations. 

• KEYSTONE INVEST- 
MENT COMPANY; Results 
for the year ended September 30 
(II months ended September 30 
1985). Final dividend 3.Sp (3p) 
making 55|J. Revenue — divi- 
dends and interest on invest- 
ments £1,571.164 (£1,250,549). 


Profit on' investments in the 
subsidiary £140.612 (£67.497). 
Other revenue £48,480 (nil). 
Group revenue before tax 
£1,216.855 (£1.110,708). Tax 
£430.295 (£346,438). Net group 
revenue £786.560 (£764,270). 
Net asset value 343p (237p 
adjusted). Earnings per share 
5.48p (5_32p adjusted). 

• MCINERNEY PROP- 
ERTIES: Interim dividend lp 
(same payable December 9). 
Figures in IrEOOOs. Group turn- 
over 36.187 or UK£33.898 
(29,131). Pretax profit 1,059 
(668). Tax 183 (credit 20). 
National 265 (84). Group 
nci/profii after tax 61 1 (604). 
Earnings per share (annualized) 
9.4p (same). 

O SOUTH AFRICAN BREW- 
ERIES: Results for the six 
months to September 30 (figures 
in ROOOs). Interim 12.5 cents or 
3-S6p flOcj. Turnover 3,219.6 
(2,627.0). Trading profit 205. S 
(139.1 1. Financing costs 64.9 

(66.5) . Pretax profit 140.6 

(72.6) . Tax 43.0 (12.IL Divi- 
dend income and equity ac- 
counted earnings 243 (15.4). 


Rebbeck’s reign en- 
compassed the frantic efforts 
of the Second World War. 

With the ending of the post- 
war boom in the early 60s 
H&W was cut back to its 
Belfast roots, all its mainland 
foci I i ties being closed and 
sokL 

But it now has, perhaps 
belatedly, some of Europe's 
finest facilities and an ad- 
mirable grasp of high technol- 
ogy. 

Shipbuilders to the World — 
125 years of Hariand and 
Wolff, by Michael Moss and 
John R Hume. Published by 
Blackstaff Press, Belfast, and 
Lloyd’s of London Press, £25. 


Earnings per share 30.3c (19.4). 
Net asset value 507.4c (458.9). 

• AMBRIT INTER- 

NATIONAL: Results for the six 
months to June 30. Total rev- 
enues £1,057,466 (£1.806,712). 
Loss before Lax £996.016 
(£55,J39X No tax (nil). Loss per 
ordinary (restricted voting) 
share 4.7p (0.3p). 

• BROWNLEE: Meyer Inter- 
national has now received 
acceptances in respect of 
23.268.083 Brownlee ordinary 
shares (about 97.3 per cent). 
Acceptances have also been 
received in .respect of 9.078 
preference shares (about 90.8 
per cent). Meyer intends to 
acquire compulsorily any 
outstanding ordinary or pref- 
erence snares. The share alter- 
native is now dosed and will no! 
re-open for acceptances. 

• INGERSOLL-RAND COM- 
PANY: Quarterly cash dividend 
$0.65 (4.5p) per share, payable 
December 1. 


More company news 
is on page 24 


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..x 



THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


Bumpy 
flight 
to freer 


skies 


The recent 10 per cent 
increase on internal' air WG , 
in the United States and Texas 
Air’s takeover of Peoples Ex- 
press could prove, say some, 
to be the final nail in the coffin 

of deregulation of US air 
travel 

The eight-year process of 
injecting competition into the 
airline business is receiving 
greater attention in Europe as 
politicians realize the vote- 
catching attraction, of a free- 
for-all in the skies. 

But after spawning dozens 
of new entrants in the airline 
business, the US industry is 
likely to comprise only six * ' 
earners and about 20 regi 
minnows. 

. In Europe, British Airways, 
m its pre-pnvati 2 ation phase, 
is one of the leaders in the 
drive towards deregulating the 
European system. 

Lord King of Wartnaby, the 
chairman, is concerned dial 
wiih elections in the offing the 

airlines should try to maintain 
control over their- destinies 


and negotiate freer access to 
routes and introduce greater 
competition in the setting of 
lares, rather than waiting pas- 
sively for the politicians to 
deregulate their environment 
in the US fashion. 

. No cheap feres 


* & 


European air travellers 
should indeed be worried by 
the way in which deregulation 
in the US has led to mega- 
airlines and a (firth of cheap 
feres on the lesser-used routes. 

The takeover by Northwest 
Airlines of Republic, for 
example, resulted in the 
airline’s home base of Minne- 
apolis being dominated by 
almost one carrier, dubbed 
America's Aeroflot European 
analysis are now asking 
whether the same could hap- 
pen at Manchester, Dussefcfanf 
or Amsterdam. 

In the US, however, govern- 
ment officials remain ecstatic 
about the impact of deregula- 
tion on a previously en- 
trenched and conservative 
industry. 

Mr Vance Fort, deputy 
assistant seoetaxy for policy 
and international affairs at the 
Department of Transporta- 
tion, said - ‘'Deregulation has 
been an unqualified success. 

“The number of airimes has 
gone up from 41 to . 17$. Some 
of the carriers are doing very 
well and while there are some 
newsworthy exceptions; the 
process has made possible a 
new business opportunity.’' - 

Politicians like Mr Fort rely 
heavily for their argument on 
airlines such as USAir and 
Piedmont, locked in com- 
petition mostly in the eastern 
states, buz making money as a 
result of their newfound abfl- 
lo be flexible and more 
and accountable to their 
customers. 

USAir success 


USAir has become one of 
the most financially strong. It 
has adopted a policy of how 
and controlled expansion and 
made made Si 17 million (£82 
million) net profit last year. 

Mr Fort estimates that de- 
regulation has saved the 
American flying public up to 
$10 billion a year and that 
between 1981 and 1985 the 

average fere a mile dropped by 

30 per cent. A total 380 

million passengers was carried 
by US airlines last year, up by 
40 million on the previous 
year, and the 1986 figure is 
expected to be dose to 400 
million. 

Id September, me market 
value of 47 publidy quote US 
airlines rose to $21.7 billion, 
up by $545 million on the 
previous month, and a 26 per 
cent increase on a year earlier. 
Since January the value of aD 
airline stock has risen by 55 
per cent or $7.7 billion. 

Safety has also improved 
under deregulation. But de- 
spite the gains, the probability 
of new arrivals on the Ameri- 
can airline scene looks doubt- 
fuL 


Protectionism 


Equally, there appeals to be 
little opportunity in the short 


opportunity r 

term for foreign earners to 
enter the protected US domes- 
tic system other , than by 
arrangements such as BA has 
with USAir. Mr Fort mam- 
tains the US has done more 
than any other cou ntry to 
open up its markets to foreran 
c o mpetition. In banning for- 
eign airtinfis.frwn 
routes, it was simply following 
international agrwpradKe. 

There is also scepticism in 
the US industry about how 
fast and how widespread de- 
regulation might occur m 
Europe. Mr Randy Mahn, 


U1 

-ine u-» worships — 
shrine of competition; we 
never had a debate about 
deregulation, we just^weat 
straight to the solution- 
Headds “Remember that 
the market that has responded 
most to derefulationm the US 
is the ‘visiting, friends or 
relatives* sector winch ac- 
counts for mote than 20 per 
cent of all air nwd. 
package tounsts 
only 7 per cent. In Europe; 
neopte living in Manchester 
^ most unlikely JO. have 
relatives in Majorca. . 

Edward Townsend 
Industrial ^afespoment 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares lose some support 

statement 




By Carol Leonard 

The ChanoeBor’s « »mmn 
statement knocked -some of 
the wind out of the. equity 
market but it failed to damage 
its underlying finnness. 

Initially the FT-SE 100 
shareindex went better on the 
speech, notching up a H.7 
points rise by 4pm, but second 
thoughts about increased pub- 
lic spending lowered its gams 
to just 4.1 points ax 1.64SJ by 
the dose. . . • 

The FT 30 share index 
dosed at 1,303.9, up Ijg. 

Gilts began the <fey cm a 
slightly improved note bat 
they -went f% worse at the long 



bolding in the group to more 
Our report 


• Savory Minn, the bro- 
ker, has ^graded its profit ’ 
forecast forDubitier, the 
fase vurfBcturar, and is 
recommending the stock as 
a bay. It expects at least £5 
utfffiea profit from the year 
just ended and £7 anffion in 
1 987. Its shares finned 4p. 
to 154p, a two-day rise of l6p. 


end half an hour before the 
speech, and they stayed there. 

Among leading equities 
Hanson was the most heavily 
traded stock, with a volume of 
33 million shares. Most of the 
business is coming from 
across the Atlantic, where the 
company introduced an ADR 
facility on Monday. 

Traders in London think 
that Hanson is gearing op for 
an acquisition in the United 
States within the next week 
and possibly one in Britain as 
wdL Its shares gained 5p to 
21 lp. 

ICT went up 5p to (089p 
and Beecham a penny to 441p, 
while British Telecom eased 
5pto I84p. . 


Bid speculation refuses to 
die around r.Pilkington, 
Britain’s biggest glass manu- 
facturer. The latest word is 
that a stake of about 5 percent 
will.be declared today. Its 
shares eased 8p to 545p on 
profit-taking. 

Talk that the Prudential 
Insurance Company of Amer- 
ica, the biggest insurance com- 
pany in the world, may be 
casting a predatory eye over 
our own Prodential Corpora- 
tion, sent shivers through the 
life insurance sector. 


of the American group. 

The British Pm, capitalized 
at £3 billion, has climbed 30p 
in the past two days to 814p. 

The life sector was further 
encouraged by good third 
Quarter new business figures 
from The Association of Brit- 
ish Insurers. 

An increase in endowment 
mortgage business helped in- 
crease non-finked new annual 
premiums by 57 per cent on 
the corresponding period and 
15 per cent on the second 
quarter of 1986. 


than 23 per cent, 
yesterday that Harris 
Queensway had increased its 
stake in GUS was back to 
front We apologize for tins 
error. 

GUS ordinary shares slid a 
further 25p to 1463p while the 
A shares gained Z7p to i,057p. 

Speculators who hope for a 
bid from GUS for Harris 
should remember an agree- 
ment signed by GUS in July 
that it will not increase its 
stake above 29.9 per cent for 
the next ten years without the 
express permission of the 
Harris boanl 

Electronic component 


• Enthn^theindas- 
trial aututpatinp stock, has its 
low ef250p, rising 29p to 
279p rathe past two days. 
Several stockbrokers have 
been re-wor kin g their sums 
and are bow upgrading 
their profit forecasts, from 
about £11 million to more 
than £12 nuBiaa. They say 
the stock is cheap. 


• BeOair Cosmetics, which is controlled by Mr Mehznet 
Tednier, brother-in-law of PoDy Peck’s died; Mr AsB Nadir, 
has ctinriied a deal to market L’Oreal hair products and 
cosmetics in Turkey, via its subsidiary Hoar Tone, which is 75 
per cent owned by BeDair and 25 per cent by Polly Peck. Bdbdr, 
suspended in 1984, Is having a £223 ntiDiofl rights issue, its sec- 
ond in two years. Mr Techno** bolding has been reduced from 
72 per cent to 51 per cent and the shares in issne have m c rease d 
from ^ miiiiftn to 45 j 6 "lillton. Mr Charles Keep, Beliair’s 
chairman, hopes to restore the quote next year. 


manufacturers did well with 
the arrival of the old 
Soimgeour electronic team at 
Smith New Court, who were 


raid to be strong buyers. 

to 183p, 


The British company, 
which is a completely separate 
entity from the American 
company, is ranked nineth in 
the world league table of 
insurance companies, and it is 
well within the financial grasp 


Legal & General reacted 
first, jumping lOp to 245p. 
Pearl gained 12pio l,513p. 

Harris Qneensway eased 
another penny to 213p after 
the announcement yesterday 
that GUS has increased its 


Faroell gained 8p 
Diploma 3 Op to 175p and 
Electrocomponents 13p to 
366p. 

Lucas recovered I Op to 
47Qp. Brokers ray that the 
profits down-grading last week 
to below £90 million by 
Phillips & Drew was too low. 


Most are sticking by their 
£95mil- 


estimates of between 
lion and £100 million for the 


preliminary figures, out on 
Monday. 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


Htf) Law 


BU on* Cfc*g» 


383 2B3 MM-Lyons 
174 128 ASOA-MH 
483 278 0TR 
481 381 BAT 
572 443 Barclay* , ‘ 

840 680 Bam ' 

444 358 O weH w ■ 

72B 526 Sub CM* 

883 283 SOC 
289 170 Bools 
80S 423 Br Aarocpaca 
709 530 BrPMrotoun • 

280 .177*1 Br TMacom 
183 88 Brito* 

354 258 Burton 

738 277 Cabto ft Wratoaa 
196 156 Cadbury C c i wpp m 
336 259 ComlMDQ 
7D4 409 Cora GoMMdt . 
3Z7V 252 Oourttukk 
438 3JB. ebconrmp . ■ 
flSO 408 Runs 
954 701 Gen AeaUM 
226 158 BBC 
nv 796*1 Oran 
458 328 Grand Mat 
114721 QOS ’A 
95* 7» one 
385 235 QfKN 

355 275 Grimms 
213b14» Hanaon 

623 403 Hmrtur SkkSty . 


312 317 . 

168 168 
292 295 • 

482 48S * 

483 490 

738 745 
438 443 
630 635 
332 335 
235 237 
470 475 
685 690 • 
192 194 
153 155 
280 282 
315 320 
137 189 
277 260 0 
860 667 • 
322 325 
350 . 854' ■ 
-575 360 
843 650 . 

172 174 . 
915 925 
436 487 

10*1 10 n i • 

805 812 
252 255 • 


+S 

-1 

+6 

-7 


+1 
+10 
-5 
-3 
. -7 
-20 
44 


-1 

-2 

+2 


-6 

+3 

-2 

+3 

-10 

-2 


211 212 
432 438 


43 
45*1 
■ -2 


dh YU 


paoca 

% 

P/E WOO 


Laa 

Caapany 

M 

OHor 

Ctfgo 

PW 

% 

P/E 


'• 13JI 

45 

144 1500 

I 11«»73* 

knp Chora Ind 

10»4l0V 



485 

45 

12.1 

753 

4.5 

2.7 

165 1500 

583 

335 

Jaguar 

513 

516 

• 

46 

123 

25 

10.7 

747 

*8 

35 

205 2,1® 

391 

312 

LadBroka 

372 

375 


+11 

165 

45 

175 

2400 

1&4 

35 

126 3,900 

348 

276 

Land Socuriftra 

330 

333 


-1 

145 

4 2 

999 

745 

26.1 

55 

75 1.100 

288 

133 

Logoi & Gan 

242 

247 

0 

+10 

125 

55 

315 

4400 

21J 

25 

155 359 

484 

293 

UoydE 

425 

432 


+2 

255 

55 

65 

393 

17.1 

35 

185 2500 

£63 

183 

Lonhra 

237 

£39 


-1 

17.1 

72 

11.7 

511 

soa 

4J 

90 1500 

231 

163 

Msrfcs ft Spancor 

192 

195 


-1 

55 

35 

235 

2500 

U.1 

45 

12.7 1J00D 

599 

417 

MtSsnd 

573 

560 


+6 

37.1 

64 

214 

3500 

10.1 

45 

154 2400 

593 

426 

I 

I 

520 

527 


+2 

275 

53 

55 

1400 

234 

45 

105 2.400 

S76 

428 

P ft 0 Dfrd 

518 

522 

• 


255 

45 

145 

179 

4&6 

7.1 

75 6500 

246 

182 

Pteoaay 

182 

165 


+1 

72 

35 

736 

5500 

10J 

55 

11516000 

942 

718 

Prudential 

810 

677 

• 

+12 

385 

4 3 

537 

709 




234 

146 

Ratal B act 

174 

177 


+4 

45 

24 

136 

6500 




900 

605 

Rack* Oofcuan 

807 

814 


+7 

2 39 

25 

175 

500 




S62’i3*S 

Reunre 

556 

560 


+3 

5.4 

15 

425 

1500 




791 

611 

RTZ 

683 

690 

• 

43 

314 

45 

9.1 

269 




967 

782 

Royal ins 

810 

617 


-3 


4.7 

663 

116 


25 


428 

344 

Sokwtwy (J) 

410 

414 


46 

75 

15 


1500 

4J8 



146’i102 

Sure • - 

130*3 131 'i • 

-S*a 

55 

35 

165 

8500 



253 471 

415 

321 

Sadg»A* Op 

385 

370 


.. 

17.1 

45 

175 

310 




B70 

SS3 

Shea 

940 

943 

• 

-11 

514 

55 

95 

6500 


55 


168 

96 

src 

160 

163 


.. 

2.1 

15 

155 

2400 

200 

22 

192 1500' 

772 

520 

Sun AMonco 

680 

687 


-5 

275 

45 

615 

230 

130 

51 

145 1500 

98 

79*4 TS3 P/P 

73'i 80 


-1*4 

.. 

.. 

.. 


300 

25 

14.7- 716 

420 

2SS 

Tasoo 

400 

403 


+2 

as 

£2 

225 

435 

425 

55 

234 346 

S29 

374 

Thom EMt 

468 

474 


+2 

2S5 

65 

345 

344 

175 

70 

85 971 

348 

248 

Tratatgar Houaa 

283 

2SS 


.. 

185 

6.7 

7 J 

9500 

105 

5.1 

127 2.100 

209 

139 

Trinthoure FdrtO 

174 

178 


+2 

75 

<5 

175 

6500 

'-S3 

2.7 

165 33000 

1fP» la’eUniBvar 

19*a 19*» 


+‘4 

5S5 

25 

185 

234 

214 

45. 

95 292 

289 

216 

tXri Bloo4t» 

235 

237 


+1 

135b 65 

125 

434 


COMMENT 


Spending will keep 
interest rates high 


There is, apparently, no limit to 
Nigel Lawson’s ability to take risks 
with the markets. The Chancellor 
does not do things by halves. Even 
more than Sir Geoffrey Howe, Denis 
Healey and Reginald Maudling before 
him, he has responded to the prospect 
of an election with some blatant 
pump-priming. 

And yet, judging by the reaction 
yesterday afternoon, the statement 
appeared to be just what the City 
ordered. The pound rose as the 
Chancellor was talking, in contrast to 
its response to his two previous efforts 
— at the Party Conference and the 
Mansion House. 

But neither this, nor the muted 
reaction of gilt-edged, should be taken 
as approval. Rather, the markets 
reckon that the spending plans will 
keep interest rates high for longer. It is 
not quite Reaganomics, defined as 
loose fiscal and tight monetary policy. 
instead Mr Lawson appears to have 
slackened on both sides — though the 
proof of that must await the Budget. 

The planning total of public spend- 
ing for 1987-88 was set at £143.9 
billion in the March Budget. In raising 
it to £148.5 billion and at the same 
time cutting the reserve from £6.3 
billion to £3.5 billion (against £4.5 
billion last rime) and lifting asset sales 
to £5 billion, the Government has 
been able to boost public spending 
next year by no less than £7.5 billion. 

We bad already plenty of private 
spending in the economy, thanks to 
the strong growth of real wages and 
modest tax reductions. Now the 
Chancellor has decided that the public 
sector should do its bit, helping some 


builders and public suppliers to catch 
up with the stores sector. 

According to Stephen Lewis of 
Phillips & Drew, the main hope for 
the markets is that the election comes 
soon so that something can be done 
about the present excesses. In the 
meantime, rite ride could be bumpy. 

Mike Osborne of Grieveson Grant 
said that the reflation was a lot larger 
than expected and, added to the 
likelihood of tax cuts next March — 
whether the cash is available or not — 
means higher public borrowing. We 
shall see. 

Mr Lawson's tactics over the past 
few weeks might have been designed 
to give the impression of lack of 
resolve. He has played down mone- 
tary targets, delayed raising interest 
rates and allowed the pound to fell at 
the risk of inflation higher than the 
3.75 per cent forecast by the Treasury 
for next year. Now, the public 
expenditure plans too have gone out 
of the window. There may have been 
method in his madness. 

Letting go of the reins on public 
spending would have sat ill against 
respectable monetary targets. And 
allowing either interest rates or the 
pound to go too high would dearly get 
in the way of an economy that, for 
both public and private sectors, is 
intended to be firing on all cylinders, 
albeit at the expense of a trade deficit 
and greater inflation risks. 

The instinct of the markets, given 


the Tories' improved showing in the 
let him get away with it 


its, is still to 
br a while, for fear of something 
worse. But that generosity may not 
last for too long. 


Even the oilmen benefit 


All this year, the oil companies have 
been looking for a bit of help from the 
Government to compensate for the 
impact of lower oil prices. Even so, 
given their cynical view of govern- 
ments, they should still be surprised to 
be offered a handout of £310 million 
in early repayment of advance petro- 
leum revenue tax (APRT) over three 
years. 

The most likely reaction, however, 
will be disappointment at two im- 
portant caveats in the Chancellor's 
proposals which severely limit the 
amount repaid to any one company. 

Repayments will only be brought 
forward for those fields which had not 
readied payback by June 30, 1986. 
This automatically excludes most 
North Sea fields. Only late developers 
like Hutton, Brae and Magnus will 
qualify. And repayments are restricted 
to £15 million per company per field. 

APRT was introduced in 1983 as a 
device to speed up tax receipts. It was 
initially charged at 20 per cent of 
revenues on production over 20,000 
barrels a day and was to be deducted 


from the petroleum revenue tax 
(PRT) bill just as advance corporation 
tax on dividends is deducted from the 
mainstr eam corporation tax bill. 

Where the final PRT bill was not 
big enough to get full relief for the 
APRT, there was a provision whereby 
the Government would return these 
advance payments over a five-year 
period beginning in 1988. 

Now that the oil price has fallen, 
there are huge amounts of APRT 
owed by the Government to com- 
panies with significantly reduced or 
no current PRT liabilities. The pros- 
pect of repayment in 1988 held little 
appeal as the cash squeeze caused by 
crashing oil prices meant that some of 
the potential beneficiaries might not 
be around in 1988 to enjoy the refund. 

Initial calculations suggest that the 
companies who will benefit most in 
proportion to their size will be the 
pure exploration companies such as 
Lasmo, Enterprise, Sovereign and 
Britoil. For BP and Shell, the con- 
cession is immateriaL But it is the 
thought that counts. 


New battle lines drawn 

epic 





The tattle far printer and 
publisher McCorquodafe is 
proifeg to be one of the raore 
eventful and drawn out take- 
over straggles in recent 
mouths. The determination of 
afl parties involved intensifies 
as the st at es W re m *. 

It looted as if it was all over 

yesterday, when Norton Opax. 
raised Its share offer by £25 
uuUhw and g a i ned more than 
50 per cent acceptance s 
through die backing of Mr 
Robot Maxwell, pubfisher etf 
tite DoHyMirror. 

Opax advisers and taxer 
stives were at die Mirror 
building until 2am yesterday, 
pleading for Mr -Maxwell’s 
19.1 per cent stake. They had 
no intention of rai sin g their 
offer unless Mr Maxwell said 1 
yes. He did and as soon as the 
stock market opened, details 
of the higher offer and 51 .lper 

cent acceptances hit the Tope 

screen. 

However, the 

McCorqnodale buyout team, 
suspecting* higher offer was 
on the way, had been up until. 
3um at the company Bat in the- 
Barbican, fnwKring details of 
its higher offer. 

Within minutes of Opax’s 
announcement die' buyout 
team added lOp to Hs 3B0p 
cash offer, topping Opax’s 
cash alternative and securing 
the recommendation of 
McCarquodale*s mdependent 
directors. 

A feed but resolute Mr 
John Hnllanin, chief executive 
of Mi£orqtiodate and lender 
of die buyout, said yesterday 
that his team was “steady 
under fee” and there was 
everything left to jffay for. 

Safe at Samuel Montagu, 
Mr Dive Chalk, who is advis- 
ing Opn, was- also in con- 
fident umoA attboagh Ms 1 
characteristic ebullience was. 
tempered by feck of sleep* He 
had been up since 7am on 
'Wednesday. 

'.'The I _ 

Prsdeatial-Bache and 
by money from S tandar d 
Chartered Bank,. Prudential 
Insurance Company of Amer- 
ica and Electro Candorer Di- 
rect Investment^ Plan, is 
pinning its hopes, on 
shareholders (other than Mr 
MsxwdO withdrawing their 
previous acceptances to Opax 
and. switching sides' to die 
buyout 


htk .v*'i 



Richard Hanucfl, determined 
chief executive of Qpaou 

Onax had received indica- 
tioim of withdrawals from &97 
per cent .--hut that was under 
the terms of the previous Opax 
bid and the previous buyout 
offer. Shareholders now hare 
two new offers to consider. 

Opax cannot declare its 
offer unconditional until eight 
days after publication of its 
offer document The buyout 
team has to persuade 
shareholders .to lake its 310p 
cash, with capital gains tax 
liabilities, rather than the 

higher paper offer from Opax. 

Its argument Is that Opax’s 
paper Is extremely vulnerable. 
It says also feat Opax is mad 
to tod for a much larger 
company, where fee 30 senior 
managers are rommitted to a 
buyout and totally opposed to 
fee tod by Opax. 

Opax is proposing to issue 
three tunes and a half as many 
shares as presently exist in 
order to secure its. prey. Al- 
though its shares held up weQ 
yesterday, the buyout team 
contends that they are being 
supported, by friends. Mr 
Maxwell haarmade small pur- 
chases in recent weeks. 

Opax argues feat anyone 
wanting to keep a stake m the 
company, as Mr Maxwell 
does, should take fee paper , 
offer. It points to its stare 
price performance yesterday 
as evidence of strength. 

McCorqnodale sharehold- 
ers have .witnessed, a' great 
many twists and turns ha the 
tod for their company. Opax’s 
original £110 mfifion tod was 
made in March tat it was 
thwarted by a reference to fee 
Monopolies . and Mergers 
Conumssfoo. ' 

‘ Clearance from fee commis- 
shh) came in September and 
Opax promptly rebid. The 


interv en ti o n of Mr Maxwell, 
who started to buOd a stake in 
McCorqnodale, clouded the 
issne for other shareholders 
until -his motives became 
dearer. 

An increased offer from 
Opax at the end of September 
won fee support of Mr 
Maxwell's then 10B per cent 
stake. 

McCorqnodale made fee 
record books wife fee largest 
British management buyout 
attempt at £156 unUitm. It has 
since re-entered fee record 
books by being fee first buyout 
to be raised in a contested tod 
si tuatio n. 

It is also fee first major 
corporate finance move made 
by Pro-Bache's merchant 
Hanirtng arm, headed by Mir 
John MacAithur, formerly 
wife Kteinwort Benson. 

The one twist feat has not 
beat seen is a counter o8u 
from McCorqnodale for Opax, 
which i* substantially smaller. 
McCorquodale has always 
maintained feat fee quality of 
Opax’s businesses are lower 
than its own, so it is not 
interested in this attacking 
mode of defence. 

The bid saga can now ran 
fora possfble oO days after fee 
offer documents are produced. 
Neither side is gofegto give in 
gracefofly, after fee high level 
of acrimony that has charac- 
terized the bid- 
. Opax is breaking even on its 
bid costs. The profit oo its 14-9 
per cent stake, at fee buyout 
terms of 310p, covers fee caste 
of fees and underwriting so far. 
But Mr Richard Hanwell, 
entrepreneurial chief exec- 
utive of Opax, is a determined 

man and would not be happy to 

bow out even with a small 
profit 

By the satoe token 
McCorqnodale managers, who 
have been incensed by fee 
attacks made cm them by 

Opax- some of which had to 
be corrected by Order of fee 
takeover panel — are going to 
fight all the way. 

Institutional shareholders 
can expect another round of 
lengthy presente dons and 
must be somewhat bemused by 
fee fire and passion going into 
a straggle. But they can only 
be delighted by fee value put 
an their stares which were at a 
low of l40p earlier this year. 

Alison Eadie 







Is your credit getting out of hand? 


Look at your credit card stfflemetgg and other loan agreements. 
WouMo’t h be nice JO wipe ibe slate dean and make a fresb start? 


jostcbaL 

You cao pay off all your 
credit card balances or H? 
agreements and include ibe 
amounts outstanding in ONE 
SECURED LOAN, leaving 
you with only one payment 
each month- - almost certainly 
much lower than ycur&dsung 
payments. 


We can offer a loan, secured by your bouse, from £1.000 to 
£15,000; all arranged through the post. 

Free Life Insurance is normally included; sickness, accident and 
enforced redundancy cover is 


BH 



Amount 

36 MONTHS 

60 MONTHS 

90 MONTHS 

130 MONTHS | 

of 

Lon 

£ 

Monthly 

Repay- 

inert £ 

Total 

Repay- 
ment E 

Monthly 

Repay- 
ment £ 

Total 
Repay- 
ment £ 

Monthly 

Re pay- 
ment £ 

foul 
Repay- 
ment £ 

Monthly 
Repay- 
mrill £ 

Total 
Repay- 
ment £ 

1000 

3>m 

4000 

5000 

7500 

3555 

10736 

143.41 

179**6 

26389 

12«J5ti 

3872.16 

5162.76 

545356 

968U04 

2307 

7320 

10027 

12334 

18301 

150480 

4S1260 

601620 

7520.40 

11280.60 

19.5*6 

SHJB 

7986 

WtC 

149.74 

1796.40 

5390.10 

71B7.40 
8983 HO 
I3476JW 

S2M 

7084 

6617 

#5348.00 
84i>4*U 
105S040 
1567 150 


available for a small premium. 
Ail information is treated in 
the strictest confidence. Your 
employers are not contacted. 

If you’d like to make 
a fresh start. fiD in this 
application form and post k 
today. No stamp needed. 

I Offer applies- ro UK Mainland ontyl 


NO WDOEN FEES OR EXTRAS. 

Lloyds Bowmaker, Finance House, FREEPOST, Bournemouth BHI 5TQ. OR PHONE 0202 293024. 



Lloyds 

Bowmaker 


PRIORITY APPLICATION for your personal secured loan. 

(Please complete and return all sect ions ofthis form). BLOCKC APITALS PLEASE. 


LOAN REQUIRED £ 
Period of repayment . 

Purpose of Loan 

YOUR WORK 

Employers Name and Address 


YOUR PROPERTY 

Name and Address of Building 
Society 


fm months} 


Occupation 

Number of years service 

Spouse’s Work 

Employers Name and Address 


Roll No 

Monthly repayment £ 

Amount of Mortgage outstanding 

£ 

Name and Address of Second 
Mortgagee 


Tel. No. Home 

Surname 

Forenamcts) , 

Surname (Spouse) 

Forenameis) 

Address of Property offered as 
security 


PostCode. 


Occupation 

Number of years service 

Annual Income £ 

Spouse's Income £. 

fPrwjl oi income muw be entr.o«J) 


Amount or Mortgage outstanding 

£ 

Date property purchased 

Price paid for property £ 

Estimated value of propttiv 

£ 

1/We da'do not occupy premises 

YOURSELF 

Dale of Birth 

Self. Spouse 


To Lloyds Bowmatwr 
l/We confirm that all information shown 
abo%« i* accurate and agree that it shall 
fortn ihc basis of any loan agreement. IAVe 
authorise you to take up any reference* 
you require including information from 
our existing mortpageetsl. lAVe hereby 
authorise you oryour agents to inspect the 
.register of our title at H.M- Land Registry 


Signed. 


\ 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

1 

1 

s 

I 

I 

1 

I 

I 


Signed iSpousel 

l4fC.1S/7i» 

j: . ■■ j sti ... ,vr.:y •• 

■X . . • V ; J ■ \'V- .. . 


29 


3k 

✓ 


rfidency 


which 
ex, tot- 
ndrose 
3wib in 
/as an 
t Tum- 
or the 
from 7 
mt and 
eotum. 
igks is 
where 
d mil- 


ffl miT . 
rxpen- 
fced lo 
tidine 
which 
tt riot 
Js are 


f this 
stages 
areas 
nt es- 
AZT 
f £70 







vv 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


First Deafens 
Oct 20 ^ 

No* 3 
Now 17 


IMDattn 

0031 
Now 14 
Now 28 


Jon 22 
M>5 
Fob 19 


Decu on fca . 
Holdings, S&U 


For SeStonent 
Fob 2 
Bob 18 
Mar 2 

& General. 
Mines, 

AspftKtJ. rempwon. Amend Conatmr 
Hem SKJuewes, Bepm, TricenooL nwim TV. Ryan 
Put Dcrons. Put a Celt Equity* Gen* * 


M ooton ««« toton on dr: 6/11/86 GesKriner. Mcvg»i Granlal, Equity &E 
9*7 vo tan. Hanson Trust, mars. HMh. Alpha Soft DrWu, NorthKafaurii 
•jemme, London haemaftoiW Group. Sears. AspSrta. rempwon, Amend Qu 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMPANY NEWS 


.• ARBUTHNOT JAPAN 
GROWTH FUND: 
DvkJcnd 0-25p (same) for the 
year to September 30. Gross 
revenue £13,618 (£15,725), 

operating expenses £28,688 
(£18.743), deficit for the year 
£15.070 (£W)15). 


• EBC GROUP: A receiver has 
been appointed for Baileys 
Roofing, a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of BBC acquired in 
1985. 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's tang* 


Marital rates 
don 


N York 1X245*1.4350 
Montreal 1 8775-1 29lS 
Ams'danO.3210-33415 
Brasses 61.006185 
Cphgen 11JJ82S-1 1.1275 
Oubfin 18782-18858 
Fraricfijn 28440-28550 
Lisbon 214-50*216.75 
Madrid 19880-197.60 
Milan 20 30-50 -20 *2.75 
Oslo 1 0.7276-10.7725 

Parts 9-5995-9.6350 
srw*n 100275-108650 
Tokyo 23380^3480 
Vienna 208980.79 
Zurich 24545-24675 


1X335-1.4345 

18883-18311 

333S5&M02 

61X1-6153 

11.1130-11.1275 

18823-18933 

285CB-29S45 

215-7521 650 

197.10-197.40 

2O38X5-204275 

10-7580-1Q.7725 

9816098325 

108*95-120840 

23385-23480 

20.75-20-78 

2-4600-24640 


O59-086prem 

a43-083pretn 

is-i%prero 
22-16Brem 
Ift-Kpram 
12-49<fis 


1.73-l.68prem 

1.19-1. 04prem 

4Kx«pram 


IK-Koratn 
144d» 


96-1-1 

iwass 

3-oar urem 

2&-3*d* 

Zfr&iprem 

2 %-l^prwn 

1%-i«prem 

SVrSKmm 

1%-1Xpiwn 


3K-2xprera 
6S-13USS 
4V41 


44-1 190S 
6-2prem 
10V 10% 


10Vl0%dte 

7%-6«pretn 

6%-6%prem 


3%-3%pnsm 

-23%prem 


27 

4%4pmtt 


Starting IndncoaipafMwMh 1975 wee up«tG9Ji (day's range S94-6&5). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Senauhn i ai icfTfll* 

1^101-1 6167 

fi®tend 

18165-1.3195 

niuunmia UUMToi 

Australia dotar — 

Z2242-2-227B 

Smora 

2.1930-2.1940 

Bahrain dinar 

n>a wJ pyiiiuilft ■ 

O53fflHl54fl0 

on najn 

Matoyn 

2.6235-26255 

08424-08429 

D1 rt/J UUmmAJ 

fSffYtK fVirtVl 

■■■ fclMWXU- 

0.7406417500 

Canada 

1.8862-18867 

SgPg 

™ 71160-71560 


7.0175-78225 

mono iiiqim ■ « 

' Greece Cradsna 

1998020189 

Nomay — 

75125-78175 

Hong Kong denar _ 

IndarupM 

11.1479-11.1565 

1&40-7&® 

Denmark 

WestOonnany 

7J500-7.7550 

28ES5-2.0605 

% 74flC_1 TiQC 

Iraqd&nr . 

Kuwait dinar KD — 

"to 

0.4180-0. 4220 

Swltzsrland 

Nelhertands 

28255-28275 

■ Malaysia defer — 

lloYi/yt rfecn 

3.7516-3.7571 

1160 0-121 on 


6J160-6.7210 

16287-16387 

MVXim poso ■ ■ 

New Zealand dedar 

Qaiufl AfwNn rinl 

— 1 lUVilrlwllMJ 

2.8066-2^130 

58335-58735 

ta»y_ 

BguumfGOflvn) — 

14230-14248 

42.74-4289 

ooiv raouBi liydi — * 

Singapore doiar — 

CU-Mifh Afrtps rmd 

313EB-3.1397 

32440-38612 

Hong Kong 

Portugal ,,,, 

78012-78017 

15050-15080 

wUUIII mitvik 1 OKI 

UAEdktnm 

.. 5823558635 

Span 

13780-18780 

44 Cf|_|4 n 

•Lloyds Bark 


Austria 

, 14JXH4XK 


Raws tupptod by Barclays Bank HOFEX and ExtaL 


• A COHEN AND CO: Six 
months to June 30. Interim 
dividend 3-7p (3.3p), payable on 
February 14. Figures in £000. 
Group turnover 24,231 
(24,229), trading profits 1,192 
(478) and eps 3X66p (L59p). 

• FLOYD OIL PARTICIPA- 
TIONS: No dividned (nil) for 
the year to June 3a Turnover 


• PRUDENTIAL CORPORA- 
TION: A wholly-owned subsid- 
iary, Prudential Property 
Services, is acquiring estate 
agencies Sir Bands Prttis and 
Sons, Scoicbbrooks and Ensors. 
Each consideration is partly in 
cash and partly in Prudential 
shares and is not material to 
PCs balance sheet 


£2.03 million (£4.34 million), 
i,782 (£1,18 


doss loss £385.782 (£1,18 mfl- 
Bon), amortization of explora- 
tion expenditure £457,374 


expei 

(£358,289), costs written off 


relating to relinquished acreage 

£1.7 million (nil). Loss before 
tax £2.729 million (£659,380 
profit), loss per share 13.69p 
(2.45p earnings). 

• SHILOH: Results for the half 
year to October 4. Interim 


dividend Up (Ip). Turnover 
7,066,51!). Pretax 


• CITY SITE ESTATES: 
Funds managed by Scottish 
Provident Institution bold 
1 ,390,000 ordinary shares 
(15,53 per cent) 

• FREDERICK COOPER: Re- 
sults for the year to July 31 
(comparisons restated): no final 

dividend (0.55p), malting nil 

(l.lpX Turnover £20,038,809 
(£24,158,779). Pretax profit 
£466,567 (£320.608). Tax 
£270880 (£181,850). Extraor- 
dinary credit £1,253,438 
4,560 


(£174.560 debit). Earning, per 


£6,730,370 (£7,0 6( 

" 194,919 (£256,017). 1 

£173.221 (£60895). Earnings 


profit £4S 


Tax 


share 1.9p(I.4p). 

• WA TYZACK: 


per share 1 1.49 (6.97). the group 
has again made steady progress 
and the increase in profit reflects 
foe continuing benefits of recent 
investment Liquidity has im- 
proved and a redaction in 
interest charges has contributed 
to the better results. Trading 
conditions remain reasonably 
stable and the company is 
confident of further p ro g r e s s 
during the second half. 


This an nouncenKfii appears asa matter of record only 



P LC 


Private Placing by 

N M Rothschild & Sons Limited 


of 2,670,000 units of one Ordinary Share 
and five 5 per cent Convertible Preference Shares 
at a price of £16.75 per unit to raise £44,722,500 


Brokers 


Pammne Gordon & Co. Limited 


Investors 


Adamic Assets Trust PLC 
Carolina Bank 

Charterhouse Development Limited 
Clerical Medical & General 
Development Capital Corporation 
Fountain Development Capital 
HambrasBank 
Investors in Industry 


British Telecom Staff Superannuation Scheme 
Charterhouse Development Capital Fund Limited 
Charterhouse Investment Management 
County Bank Investment Management 
Eagle Star Group 
Gartmore Investment Management Limited 
Holbom Small Companies Unit Trust 


Klein wort Benson Development Capital Limited 
Legal & General Assurance Society Limited Legal & General Vfenture & Development Capital Fund 
Mercury Warburg Investment Management Limited Midland Bank Equity 

Murray Ventures Panmure Gordon Fund Management 

Bast Office Staff Superannuation Scheme The Prudential Assurance Company limited 

Refuge Group Rothschild Ventures limited 

Throgmorton Investment Management TSB Group Pension Scheme 



NM Rothschild &. Sons Limited 


October: 1986 




electrocomponents 


Interim Results 

30 September 1986 


Trading results and prospects 

• Growth continues in first half. 

• Earnings per share increased by 22.5%. 

• Interim dividend increased to 2.2p (1.9p). 

• Further progress anticipated in the second 
half of year despite competitive markets. 









'*‘5- 


Half year ta Half year to 

30.9.86 30.9.85 

(unandiced) (unaudited) 
£m Lm 


Year to 
313.86 
(audited) 
£m 


■ :.w 




vs,- 


Sales 

114.6 

89.5 

199.7 

Profit before tax 

18.1 

16.0 

35.3 

Taxation 

(6.4) 

(6.4) 

(14.2) 

Minorities 

— 

(0.1) 

(0.1) 

Earnings available for shareholders 

11.7 

9.5 

21.0 

Dividends per share: Interim 

2.2p 

1.9p 

1.9p 

Final 

— 

— 

4_35p 

Earnings per share 

11.48p 

9.37p 

20.6p 

Increases <nvr corresponding period: 




Sales 

28.0% 

213% 

21.7% 

Profit before tax 

13.1% 

25.7% 


Earnings per share 

22.5% 

36.6% 

28.7% 


The ro orecOmui fiorti the fcnpny'ifiiileaMim fir the year e*M Jl Match tWo. These oujubu irmra/ 

i report tal hear ben filed wvh the Rsfisaai efCampatati 




■ vrt-4 1 *4.. n a . 

■; ■■ . * , ■. ” ■■■*. • 

■ iipv • i '• ' *' 




electrocomponents 


electrocomponents pic. 21 Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7LY. 
Telephone: 01-245 1277 





Final divi- 
dend 1.4p malting 2p (1.7p) for 
the year to July 31. Figures in 
£000s. Turnover £9,136 
(£6.734). Pretax profit £401 
(£233). Tax £115 (£120). 
Extraordinary credit nil (£48). 
Earnings per share 5.62p 
(3.26p). 

• LONDON AND METRO- 
POLITAN ESTATES: 
Klein wort Benson, the mer- 
chant bank, and Phillips & 
Drew, foe broker, announce that 
the underwriting of the L&ME 
was completed by 3pm yes- 
terday afternoon. 


• GOODE DURRANT & 
MURRAY GROUP: Discus- 
sions are taking place with 
Impala Pacific Corpn, a subsid- 
iary of Ariadne Australia, which 
owns 20.82 per cent of GDM*s 
ordinary share capitaL The talks 
relate to a proposed substantial 
increase in GDKTs ordinary 
share capital through a capital 
subscription ax 145p per share 
which, if implemented, will 
result in a chang e of control and 
an offer for all the issued share 
capital of GDM at that price. 

• GLAXO HOLDINGS: A new 
£3 million pharmaceutical 
manufacturing plant for its 
Pakistan subsidiary was inaugu- 
rated in Lahore. The plant, the 
first of hs kind in Pakistan, adds 
substantially to Glaxo's existing 
production capacity there. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Raise Industries Mb' John 
H Bancroft takes over as 
financial director. • * 

J&J Crombie: Mr Robin 
Edwards becomes safes and 
marketing director. 

Kleinwort Grievesoo 
Investment Management: Mr 
Geraint E B Thomas joins the 
board as finance director. 

ROCK: Mr David Dann- 
hanser is promoted finance 
director. 

Severn-Trenc Mr Abut 
Heim, Mr Andrew Simon and 
Mr Roger Boissier join the 
board. 

Templeton, Galbraith & 
Hansberger Dr Mark Mobius 
is to be managing director. 


Control Risks Information 
Services: The board of this 
new Control Risks Group's 
subsidiary wifi be: Mr Arlsh 
Turk (chairman), Mr Roger 
Means (managing director). 
Mr William Orerbolt (US), 
Mr John Eckersley, Mi 
Christopher Grose, Dr Peter 
Janke, Mr Michael Martin, 
Mr H ans Nenb ro ch and Sr 
Clive Rose. 

Stewart Wrightson Avi- 
ation: Mr Jonathan Palmer- 
Brown is roatift rhamyian and 
Mr Peter Buffer managing 
director. 

Edenspnng Investments: 
Mr Michael Braham takes 
over as chairman and joint 
managing director. Mr Chris- 
topher HRl becomes joint 
manag in g director. Mr PS 
Jones joins the board of 

Br aham Hill. 


Mountkigh Group: Mr 
John Watson has been made a 
main board director and also 
joins the board of United 
Royal Property Trust 
Nationalised Industries Fi- 
nance Panel: Mr PbOip Sed- 
ers has become c hairman 
HiD Samuel Group: Mr 
David Davies is now a non- 
executive director. 

AMT (Holdings): Mr Rod- 
ney Hornstein is to become 
manag in g director. 

Gestetner International: Mr 
H D Wiltshire and Mr A C 
Shariand are to be regional 
managing directors. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Tinea Maa0i Startog 
Dec 86. 

Mar 87. 

Jon 87 . 

Sep 87. 

Dec 87. 

Mar 88. 


nmoue days total open 


Thme 

Dec 88 
Mar 87 
JUI87 


89.40 
BS57 
89X7 

saza 

N/T 
intmt 14399 


£3 

Low 

CtaM 

EstVel 

8887 


3750 

88X8 

6984 

89X7 

335 

B8-66 

ftQCT 

8980 

161 

6980 

89.47 

6982 

55 

m*} 

8980 

8984 

8 


89.00 

0 


^TraeawyBond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


94JJ6 

94« 

9S01 

safis 


Pravious day’s lou open kitaratt 28150 
9407 94.03 94JM 2108 

94.08 94.02 94JJ4 G99 

93JJ4 33.88 3359 B41 

Sa69 89.82 33.83 89 

i interest 5363 


98-03 

97-03 

N/T 


RwkxB day's total open interest 53 

96- 07 97-19 97-23 3311 

97- 03 97-03 96-27 5 

85-80 0 


Short GK 
Dec 88 — 
Mir 87 — 
Jun 87 — 


interest 847 


LonaOi 
Dec86 . 


Dec! 
MW 87. 
Jun 87 . 
87. 


9S28 

N/T 


Prertaus day's totf ppon Wore: 
96-28 96-24 96-24 51 

9646 0 


111-18 

111-15 


Previous 
111-84 111 

111-18 111-14 



m 


'-ffilOO 
Dec 87 — 
Mar 87 — 




111-02 1361B 

111-06 53 

111-06 0 

0 


18880 

188X0 


16680 

188X0 


Pmtous day s total cpan Interest 2792 
5.40 165.70 429 


165.4 

16880 


188.70 14 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


* 

Clearing Banks n 
11 


OwmtoMHIglcil 
Week 6iad:T0% 


Local «boriUr Dapoeto (%) 

2 days 1(W 7 days 1M 

1 firth 10X Sfnrtti 1(Ht 

6 ninth 10V 12 m » i 10V 


Low 10 


Trseway l 


3nrtb 10% 


i (Discount %) 

2n% 10% 


Local Aoewriw Bonds (%) 

1 rirth 11%-10% 2mntft TISMO* 
3mnth 11 %- 10 % 6nrth 11 - 10 % 
9mnth 11 %-l 0 % 12 /nth 11 - 10 % 


3irrth 10% 

l'miSi n i^»O0^92mSi ,! %%-10n*r 
3nrth 10*’»-10% firarah 10 >w-10»m 
T rade Ba*JDtecourt%) 

1 unto 11 *c 2nrth 11 % 

3 ninth life B firth 11 >m 


Storing CDs (%) 

imnth 11-10% 


3 nrth 11-10% 

6 HBith 11-10% 12 fifth 10%-10% 


lnrth'SffisO 

6 mrth 5.85-580 


3 firth 585480 
12mth B8IV585 


TO 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Ownqp: open 11% dose 11 
1 weak 11 %. 11 % ernmh n-io»» 

1 rmth 11%-11 9 nrth 11-l0«ie 

3nwh 11-10** 12mth 11-10 


7 days B-5 u «i 
3mmh 6-6% 


Imnth 

6mnih 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


. 11 . 00 % 


Mm & Company 11.00% 

BCQ 11.00% 

Ctibask Sawigst 12.45% 


ConsoUbied Cols 11.00% 

CiHiperatM Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Kong Kong & Shanghai — 11.00% 

LLoyfls Bank 11U0% 

Nat W estm wst er 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 11.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank HA lim 


f Mortgage Base Rate. 


7 days 

3 nrth 4%-4% 
Reach Franc 
7 days 7%-7% 
3 nrth 7%-7 % 


1 iiulfll 

6nrth 


7 tfays 2 '«- 1 “t« 
3 nrth 3*»3 n vi 
Ten 

7 days 4*1*4*.# 

3 ninth 4 %uy, 


1 nrth 
6nwith 
c all 
1 nrth 
6 nrth 


1 ninth 
enrth 


6)4-6% 

6-5% 

6 «% 

5-4 

4%-4% 

4%-4% 

7V6% 

8%8 

2 %- 1 % 

3V3 

3"ta-*»tt 

454-374 

4fe4fe 

4%-4% 


GOLD 


Gokfc$40880-40(k50 

Kragonwr ft 

00-409 J 


*1 

Platinum 
S 599.50 {£391 8S) 
■ ' l VAT 


80) 


ECGD 


Rxed Rate Sterling Export Finance 


Schema IV Averaaa'referanca rate tor 
od. October 8. 1888 to 


cent 


period 
ST. 19 


1986 (ndushNK 11837 per 


INVITATION 
TO TENDER 


No. 86-2 


VIDEO-TAPE TRANSFER SERVICE FORf 
SPECIAL BROADCASTING SERVICE k 


(AUSTRALIA) 

IS SWSL Bpadcasling Service is AustraHa’s 
Nahonal Multicultural Broadcasting Service and, as 
such, obtains its programming material from world- 
wide sources. 

To facilitate operations, this program material is 
transferred in the United Kingdom from its crtamal 
format onto one inch “C" format videotape, suitable for 
transmission iff Australia. This material is then 
despatched to SBS in Australia. 

Tttecontracts for the current transfer services expire 
on 31 December 1986, and suitably qualified United 
Kngdom based organisations are therefore invited to 
offer for this service. 

Tender forms are available from the SSSs* United 
Kingdom representative: 


TVS international 

60 Buckingham Gate, London SW1E6AJ 
ATTENTION: PIPPA BARRETT 
Telephone: 01-828 9898 Telex: 291602. 
Please note that tenders dose 24 November 1986, in 
Sydney. Australia, and /ate offers may not receive 


( TEMPUS ) 

Hill Samuel ‘halt’ 
upsets the market 


T 


I 



The stock market has been 
handling bank shares like hot 
bricks for months on fears of 
what Big Bang may bring- No 
doubt much of this caution 
has been overdone, but H31 
Samuel’s interim results 
show that the benefits in 
terms of profits from moving 
into the securities markets 
are not yet obvious- 
The Hill Samuel profit ma- 
chine lurched to a “halt" 
during the six months to 
September 30. Group pretax 
profits crept up by £600,000 
- from £27 2 million to £27.8 
milli on. After tax — the 
figures the bank prefers to 
quote — the improvement 
looks better, with an increase 
to £19.2 million from £17.5 

mfllipn. 

Merchant banking profits 
fell by nearly £1 million, 
compared with the 
corresponding period, to 
£11.1 millio n. Lumped to- 
gether, Big Bang costs and 
fosses in “’unusual and some- 
times difficult conditions” — 
as the bank describes the 
securities markets — come to 
around £4 million. 

Hill Samuel wisely 
acknowfeges that the foresee- 
able future holds further un- 
certainties with “sharply 
higher costs and unusually 
unpredictable revenues.” It is 
not the only institution feeing 
this prospect 

The merchant bank's pos- 
ition would have been a lot 
worse if Treasury, commer- 
cial hanking and corporate 
finance activities had fet- 
tered. There has been a steady 
stream of medium-size cor- 
porate finance business and 
there is the pleasant prospect 
of the British Airways flota- 
tion next year. 

The merchant banking re- 
sults would have looked dif- 
ferent if HUl Samuel included 
hs investment management 
services in them as many 
other hanks do. The invest- 
ment division showed a 



Electrocomponents 


powerful improvement — 
from £2.8 million to 


£6.4 

millioQ. Most of the improve- 
ment was from internal 
growth. 

Not surprisingly, the stock 
market was not happy. The 
net interim dividend is up 
from 3.6p to 3-Sp, not enough 
to stop a slight weakening in 
the shares from 371p to 369p. 
At that level the shares look a 


At long last. 
Electrocomponents has mas- 
tered the art of issuing cau- 
tious statements about its 
prospects without distressing 
the market Yesterda y’s i n- 
terim announcement carried 
a warning that market con- 
ditions were far from buoy- 
ant, but the expectation ofMr 
Tony Chubb, chairman, of 
further progress during the 
second half carried the share 
price up 16p to 369p. 

Pretax profits increased 13 
per cent to £18.1 million for 
the six months to September 
30 and sales rose 28 per cent 
to £1 14.6 ntillion. 

The group has net cash of 
£3 million; its interest in- 
come exceeds its interest 
payments and its tax charge 
has fallen from 40 per cent to 
35 percent 

The news is not all good, 
however. The group made a 
small loss in the United 
States, where a significant 
reorganization is under way. 
Some improvement is ex- 
pected in foe second halt 
in West Germany 
were satisfactory. 

Consequently, pre-interest 
margins are being squeezed. 
From an average of 173 per 
cent last year, they have 
fallen to 153 percent in the 
first -half of this. Pretax 
profits of £39.5 million imply 
an undemanding prospective 
multiple of 14.8. 


profitable life assurance arm. 

Tbc same degree of conser- 
vatism is not reflected in the 
offer of 28 million M & G 
shares by Kleiswoit Benson 


M&G 


little cheap, with a prospec- 
fijfl-year 


five p/e of 7.5 on Bill-year 
profits of about £47 million. 


The M&G same has been 
synonymous with conser- 
vative, long-term retail 
investment. Being first in the 
field it has picked up an 
enormous stipe of foe unit 
trust business and, latterly, 
has developed a smaller but 


At 270p they represent an 
8.4 discount to the market 
while M&G will have a 
market value of just over 
£200 million. 

True, the offer was 
accompanied by an estimated 
53 per cent increase in profits 
ana a 65 per cent leap in 
earnings. Nevertheless, the 
p/e ratio of 20 does look high 
for the sector. 

Comparables such as 
Framlington Group, Hender- 
son Adminis tration. GT 
Management and Templeton 
Galbraith are on prospective 
p/es of between 11 and 13. 
Nevertheless M&G does 
look fairly pricey, particularly 
since it has deliberately 
avoided the dynamism dis- 
played by some of those 
mentioned above. 

The big question is whether 
M&G's concentration on 
the retail sector will continue 
to pay oft 

The reverse side of the coin 
comes in terms of the heavy 
investment focus on the Brit- 
ish market which accounts 
for almost 75 per cent of 
funds. Moreover SO per cent 
of M&G's business comes 
through the financial inter- 
mediary network. 

Seffrcgulation when it 
comes, in the form of greater 
disclosure of commissions 
and surrender values, may hit 
this source of earnings. 

Some of the investment 
houses have a broader and 
more even spread of fends, 
with investment trust money 
and greater percentage of life 
and pension funds. 

Not one for the stags. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Europe 
BCE pari 
Bator Harris Sndr (170p) 
Berry .Btrcft&NoWe (ll5p) 
Btonfnkn-CxftB) (95p) 
Citygrove (It , 

Euro Home fl! 

Great Southern 
Guthrie 


Harrtsan{l1op) 




222 +5 
160-8 
239 
39 

204-2 
122 
128 
102 
148 
163+3 
167-2 
157 
2S's 
207 +V 
275 46 


_ 11050 
Newsge Trans (75p) 
Radamee Gp (90p) 
Rotunda (95p) 

Ryman (IIOpi 
Sandal! Perkins (135p) 


138+1 

150 

182+4 

72 

93+1 

89-1 

102 

167+1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Scot Mtge 10Q% *25 




Thames . . . 

Trass 10% c£1 *96.50 
WhJrowy Mackay (160p) 
Wooitons Bettor (I04p) 
Yelverton (38p) 
Yorkshire TV (125p) 


£19 
793.-1 
340+24 
£41 + 
184 


Beltway N/P 
Bhw Arrow N/P 
Be. Benzol NfP 
Brown torn N/P 
Sswtck N/P 
FR Group N/P 
Norfolk Cap F/P 
PWnocan N/P 
Redtand N/P 
Stebe N/P 


5-1 

67+1 

4 

4 

1»a 

4 

22 +'a 
13 
46 
4 


36 

170+4 


(issue price in brackets). 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 





tots 



Pies 





Cafe 



Pots 



Series 

Jan 

JSL 

JU 

Jan 

Apr 

Jol 



Serin 

Dec 

Mar 

■tan 

Dee 

Mar 

Jta 

AIM Lyons 

300 

30 

38 

48 

9 

13 

18 

Jacuw 


500 

37 

55 

75 

18 

30 

35 

(-316) 

• 330 

11 

ao 

32 

24 

25 

33 

- (*317) 


550 

14 

25 

4b 

46 

50 

55 

360 

3 

9 

— 

48 

Ml 



600 

3 

ib% 

— 

8b 

88 

— 

BP 

600 

115 

132 

_ 

3 

12 

_ 

Thom ail 


420 

84 

75 

85 

3 

6 

12 

(*897) 

660 

lb 

93 

113 

13 

25 

35 

(*472 ) 


460 

32 

47 

Ml 

13 

18 

2b 

700 

42 

60 

/8 

28 

53 

63 


500 

12 

21 

40 

35 

40 

45 

Cons Goto 

550 

180 

ISO 



8 

18 

* 



ao 

3 

10 

— 

82 

87 

— 

(-666) 

000 

SI 

110 

122 

16 

27 

40 

Tosco 


330 

K) 


— 

1 

— 

— 

550 

65 

60 

94 

38 

46 

60 

(*402) 


360 

50 

68 

— 

3 

8 

— 

Courts*** 

(*325) 

280 

260 

70 

SO 

80 

63 

73 

' 1 
2 

2 

8 

9 



390 

420 

23 

11 

40 

22 

55 

35 

8 

28 

IS 

32 

20 

35 

300 

330 

33 

16 

48 

2B 

SI 

36 

7 

17 

11 

21 

13 

23 


Series 

Mow 

Fefc 

Mg. 

No* 

Feb 

May 

COmUnton 

rm 

263 

280 

300 

32 

18 

9 

39 

27 

18 

35 

25 

4 

12 

28 

8 

17 

32 

2\ 

38 

Bril Aero 
("474) 


420 

460 

500 

58 
■ 19 
4 

73 

40 

25 

85 

53 

38 

1 

5 

32 

10 

20 

42 

17 

27 

47 

Cables Wire 
(*319) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

34 

19 

8 

4 

48 

35 

25 

62 

9 

17 

37 

57 

18 

30 

42 

25 

BATIndS 

(-489) 


380 

390 

420 

460 

132 

102 

72 

32 

144 

114 

88 

43 

1 22 
97 
62 

% 

% 

1 

1 

1 

1% 

5 

13 

1 

8 

18 

GEC 

H75) 

160 

180 

200 

22 

10 

3K 

28 

18 

6% 

36 

20 

3 

10 

25 

5 

16 

30 

5" 

18 

Barclays 

(*489) 


460 

500 

550 

34 

6 

1 

56 

30 

11 

67 

42 

20 

2 

20 

65 

8 

27 

67 

12 

32 

72 

Grand Mat 
(*439) 

360 

390 

420 

90 

62 

42 

95 

80 

60 

63 

1 

2 

10 

8 

6 

13 

20 

Br6 Telecom 
(*194) 


180 

200 

220 

17 

2% 

1 

26 

11% 

4% 

32 

19 

11 

1 

8 

27 

6 

14 

29 

8% 

18 

32 


460 

20 

82 

43 

28 

35 

40 

CadtJuryScfmnps 

ISO 

30 

40 

47 

1 

6 

7 

ra 

n082) 

950 

1000 

160 

115 

180 

138 

— 

5 

9 

13 

23 

— . 

nm 


180 

200 

12 

2% 

23 

IS 

31 

19 

3% 

13 

8 

19 

13 

23 

1050 

II 

103 

124 

21 

40 

.^5 

Guinness 


300 

43 

53 

58 

1 

8 

12 


1100 

48 

73 

97 

42 

65 

70 

(338) 


330 

13 

27 

32 

6 

15 

23 

Land Sec 

300 

39 

50 

58 

4 

7 

9 



380 

2 

12 

1/ 

27 

37 

42 

r334) 

330 

360 

19 

6 

31 

13 

38 

10 

30 

13 

31 

20 

Imperial Or 
(*393) 


300 

330 

ISO 

90 

mmr 

— 

1 

1 




Marks&Spen 

180 

21 

28 

36 

3 

5 

9 



360 

so 

— 

— 

1 

— 


H95) 

200 

8 

16 

24 

11 

14 

17 

LaOtxoks 


330 

so 

BP 

70 

1 

4 

7 

220 

2% 

6 

12 

28 

29 

30 

(*375) 


380 

20 

35 

48 

3 

9 

IS 


850 

128 

143 

160 

7 

18 

25 



3MI 

3 

18 

29 

17 

21 

28 

r»D 

900 

90 

107 

127 

16 

35 

43 

lasmo 


110 

35 

40 

45 

1 

3 

7 

sso 

50 

73 

90 

30 

6/ 

70 

(145) 


120 

25 

33 

35 

1 

6 

10 

Trstolgar houh 

260 

28 

37 

45 

4 

12 

13 



130 

1b 

25 

28 

2 

9 


("281) 

an 

16 

26 

33 

16 

2?. 

26 

Midland Bonk 


500 

m 

in? 

116 

7 

5 

11) 

300 

I 

13 

22 

28 

32 

37 

rS7B) 


!S0 

37 

60 

72 

E 

20 

23 

TSB 

80 

6% 

11% 

13 

4 

5% 

7 


600 

6 

25 

32 

27 

32 

42 

(*80) 

90 

a 

5% 

7% 

11 

12% 

13% 

P&O 


460 

67 

80 

90 

1 

5 

B 

100 

i 

3 

— 

21 

21% 

— 

£621) 


500 

28 

47 

60 

4 

IS 

20 










560 

3 

20 

30 

35 

40 

45 











600 

K 

. — 

— 

82 

— 

— 









Race! 


160 

19 

28 

38 

2% 

8 

12 









(178) 


180 

5 

16 

24 

11 

1/ 

23 


Series 

Dec 

Her 

Jon 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 


200 

1% 

7% 

12 

25 

28 

3b 


360 

87 

Sfl 





RTZ 


600 

90 

107 

122 

2 

11 

25 

T«3 ) 

390 

56 

68 

62 

4 

7 

10 

w 


650 

40 

72 

87 

4 

21 

44 

420 

36 

52 

ffi> 

10 

17 

23 


700 

12 

47 

60 

30 

50 

87 


460 

14 

30 

40 

32 

37 

43 



750 


* 


70 

— 

’ — * 

Boots 

200 

4l 

53 

58 

1 

2 


Veal Reefs 


70 

6% 

12% 

16% 

2 

7 

9 

(•2401 

220 

23 

34 

4? 

37, 



f-76) 


B0 

2 

7% 

11% 

ti% 

11% 

14 

240 

9 

22 

28 

10 

12 

17 


90 

% 

3* 

/% 

15% 

18% 

20 

Utfi 

280 

21 

SB 

41 

S 

10 

.16 










(*233) 

300 

— 

22 

29 


IS 

26 











307 

7 

— 


21 





— — 







Ban 

650 

105 

115 

130 

3 

7 

“ii" 


Series 

Hwr 

Mar 

Jun 

Mob 

Mar 

Jon 

(744) 

700 

56 

75 

93 

8 

17 

S3 

LOTffftO 


200 

40 

48 

52 

1% 

3 

8 


750 

2/ 

48 

63 

30 

40 

53 

(■239) 


218 

21 

— 

— 

1% 

— 

— 

BtoeCtoto 

r53l) 

550 

600 

90 

57 

T08 

70 

115 

80* 

4 

15 

10 

23 

-18 

30 


236 

240 

/ 

20 

25 

4 

19 

24 


650 

30 

43 

57 

38 

43 

50 





"" ■ 





__ 

DeBeere 

660 

105 

125 


12 

35 

_ 


Sarin 

Nov 

Feb 


NOV 

Feb May 

r7soj 

700 

re 

98 

125 

30 

55 

70 

TMW%1891 


100 

V* 

3 

3'mi 


V 

1% 


750 

45 

n 

100 

55 

80 

105 • 

(•£102) 


102 

1 

1* 

SK 


1% 

2 


800 

23 

BO 

— 

90 

110 



104 

** 

1 

T'«« 

2h» 


Pm 

Dtxons 

300 

60 

78 

— 

1 

2% 

■ — 

. Tr 1145% 03/07 


106 

3% 

Vw 

6 


1% 

2% 

nssj 

330 

38 

48 

66 

3 

6 

12 

(*£110) 


106 

1% 

•’is 

4% 

% 

Pm 

3% 


360 

15 

28 

48 

16 

24 

28 


110 

% 


3% 

1% 

3 3 n 

4% 

GKN 

240 

n 

37 

«> 

8 

11 

15 



112 

’4* 

»'■» 

3 

2% 

4*n 

5% 

r2S4) 

260 

12 

26 

37. 

18 

73 

27 



114 


1% 

2*w 

4V 

5% 


260 

6 

16 

20 

31 

35 

39 



ire 

_iVi» 



B* 

Jlmm 



300 

2’ 

7 

— 

4V 

49 

— 


NOW 

Dec 


Ob 

New 



Feb 

Glaxo 

(V28) 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

55 

29 

14 

7 

970 

70 

48 

30 

134 

100 

75 

24- 

52 

87 

IS 

40: 

65 

95 

140 

85 

77 

105 

FT-S6 132S 
Index 1550 
(1656) 1676 
• 1600 

130 

107 

83 

62 

m 

98 

75 

132 

108 

87 


' t 

a 

5 

8 

6 

11 

18 

IS 

20 

27 

— 

Hanson 

' 100' 

56 

59 

mrnmm 

% 

1 

— 

1626 

43 

MS 

67 

83 

18 

25 

33 

42 

r?l4) 

180 

36 

40 43% 

* 

3 

4 - 

1850 

27 

45 

57 

65 

29 

33 

45 

62 

200 

17% 23% 

31 

2 

5% 

9% 

1675 

17% 

32 

n— 


40 

47 

— - 

■— 


220 

6% 

12%- 

19 

9% 

14 17% | 

1700 

9 

20 

“ 


58 

63 




NmaDberB.1888. T Ma a m BM. Ca8s4?4l6... Puts 11573. 


nfmtoflyfa 

















•Sciency l ' 


*0 mil- 
rxpcn- 
krdto 
lidine 
which, 
it not; 
ils are j 

f this}' 
stases I 
areas] 
nt ( 
AZTI 
f £70 



rhat’s the dosing date for registration 
ier the special Customer Share 


f you are a domestic 'British Gas 
;0 mer and are thinking of applying 
shares, you may be able to do so 
er this scheme. This gives you the 
ortunity, if you are eligible and have 
istered by November 14th, of being 
ranteed at least 200 shares should 
, apply for that many. Of course you 



Everyone can 

-ISSUED BY \ M ROTHSCHILD & SONSJJ. 


can apply for a lot more if you wish. 

So far, nearly 5 million British Gas 
customers have registered under this 
scheme. If you haven’t done so already, 
simply fill in the coupon or phone 
. 0272 272 272 to register yourself. 

This will not commit you in any 
W ay — you can still make your decision 
on whether to apply a little later on. 

In return you will be sent information 

about the offer and, when they are 

a share of the shares. 

MIT ED ON BEHALF OF H M G OVERNMENT . 


published, a prospectus and personal- 
ised application form. 

Remember, registrations must be 
in h y November 14th if you want to 
apply under the special Customer 

Share Scheme. 

I™ Please send me. without obligation, information about the British 
■ /- .u«n> /-.FTqt- ioi facf COMPLETE IN BLOCK CAPITA!^) 

I 


Please send me, wnnout uuiig« lu .h — 

Gas share offer, iplease complete in block capitals) 

CTick) MR □ MRS □ MS □ or TITLE (Specify) 

— 

SURNAME- 


address (in ftilll 


I POSTQPDE r v=a r 

I Are you a British Gas customer? □ ^ 'RrifishGdS 
n I , f crick YES NO Dl llwl 1 

__ When complete send to: K « E mb 



When complete send to: 

| British Gas Share Information Office. 

P.O. Box 1. Bristol BS991BG. 1 M 

L — — — — — — — — — 


SHARE 


I M F O B 


A T I ObN 
office ate 








FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 



an Offer Crag Vtd 


H D» OQ W 


CKbr Chr^ W 


wa Oflfer CMg nj 


1U r.y i 


uc bom m su -« JW 

UK Ormcft tan 472 BBS -OS 243 

Pd Ota 47.2 EOS -02 2XS 

Brawi Brawn 5BA eai -09 123 

Pw-KT&wwa « n« -07 ■ 


era uwr tutot manmem 

Amrfcan FtfW 723 77.0* 

Cb|Nf ffantf 9T9 HK 2 
Grown t me Fond 129.1 137 X 
Htfi DM FUW 1083 1132a 

IwaknlFM 3*2.1 ms 

HMOunxg Bind 252 2B3 
an*- Jn Co's Fnd 33.1 352 
7t*fO find 1503 TB&S 

(EdMMT « 148.1 1932* 

O femR 102X 1052 

ted nSt;M 3oao sias 
{&} Snww\fep (4) 1*73 2023* 
Brand 28.1 at 


aw Ju Co's Fnd 
7 j*»o find 


IMUflTM IMriWarMNWOM 
Bwn Road. CMMhm Gtomnr a 
DM2 521311 

UK Ds fe n osil Inc 70.7 753 

Do Accun 713 702 

UC Mi Aocun Ota SSM - 

UK Hflb 8 * be 883 71 . 0 * 4 

N Amman Accum OBJ# 733 

ftr Cra m Accan 983 iou 
Brawi Acown 87.1 929 

UK Gtt & B Ino Sit 9.1 4 

Do Man 535 538 h 


.. 237 
233 
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402 6.10 
-02 1 X 7 
<45 300 
-OX 1-88 
+0.1 6JB 
+02 348 


eMDWIANCE FUND MANAiOOmir LTD 


AMD Ctnon hmsood House, 2 R Mnfern 
Road. Ron+ord RM 1 3 LB 
OTtffi-SBS#® 


1080 KlW +15 308 





Lost Thursday of nwi 




m 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 



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1) 

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285 


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315 


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114 

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140 

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205 


7.1 

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4 NOW I 2 D 

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27 21 217 
52 12 I 7 X 

2« m m 

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51 37 175 


305 +5 

a +v 

115 43 42 125 

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KB.. 43 IS 122 

140 +2 62 33 123 


» 13 81 

18 115 


O 29 HU 

S 42 34 

43 TIJ 
7.4 43 131 

42 35 Ht 


TO 133 
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480 3 B 3 b 
395 ZKFi 
150 1431 
186 
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163 as 
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353 no 
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33 71 
330 283 

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330 253 


33 88 72 

35 13 SSJ 
31 23 HI 
IB 31 lU 

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30 22 223 
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K S H 

as 2 J 232 
21 1-1 229 

33 21 143 

10 SIX 15 

. .. 102 


48 a*.. 

50 55 -S 

17 JB 

S £ :: 
B 

no m 


33 17 112 


CL7 3. 1 174 

33 0.9 314 

70 44 167 
. . 4 .. U 
80 62 125 

318 65 120 
25 33 105 
47 15 131 

U 27 H 5 
H 9 47 152 
17 30 32 

10 25 ISO 
IS 44 BJ 
41 KB 75 
S 3 54 12.4 
05 12 175 

32 40 117 
50 15 315 

u u m 

80 70 HU 

338 21 ISO 


to n Smmn 


LV-'-j 


60 17 184 

29 19 m 

U 75 SJ 
45 20 232 

22 17 292 

05 14 209 

37 48 >47 

SB 40 04 
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4 Ja 30 170 
17 47 107 
45 25 37 

25 25 at 
37 81 05 

.. « .. 22 
40 44 133 

47 75 83 

30 30 290 

258 52 *14 
82 07 57.1 

43 U 132 
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4 * 19 2 U 

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75 37 95 

77 73 57 

48 IX 43.1 

21 12 131 

11 37 275 

7.1 34 H3 

8 13 204 
15 312 
41 01 87 

47 32 W7 

V8« 48 2B5 
32 32 177 
75 IS 238 
15 19 177 

m u u 
54 73 03 


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139 110 Bi 
254 MM (8 
6 J>j S 3 h 0 r 

53 

31 Br 

485 

415 fr 

TO 

GO Bn 

BS 5 

756 S 

250 

178 & 

w 

TO OS 

140 

TO _ 

TO 

316 & 

UK 

ui a 

772 

502 Dr 

208 

135 Do 

117 

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183 

136 Ed 

396 

3 Z 3 a 

TO 

j« a 

101 

Ml 

85 E« 

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in 

m f 

221 

M 2 F 

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348 

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505 

4 S 0 ft 

138 

145 F 8 

345 

3 W ft 

133 1 ! B 4 *»F 8 


in h 


EM ft 


123 ft 


123 ft 


MO ft 


107 ft 


OS Pi 


BB • Q 


rtf si 


135 Gfl 


27 S Gi 


115 B 


97 a 


1 27 a 


138 a 


215 a 


344 a 


213 a 


35 22 240 

313 18 303 
44 U 87 

S 23 629 
38 SU 

SB “ 
8SH 

217 4? 298 

35 32 472 
SU 39 342 


.. 140 

U 

-1 1 X 4 


+0 30b 

+1 as 


.. 828 

:: £ 

-1 25 


a 
71 
OB 
SDH 
224 W1 
W8 OB 
17B4I97 
364. ns 
428 311 
440 4 14 
207 40 

20 TO 

271 JB 

384 m 
n a i 
am zra 
ns ms 1 
ns « Me Awn 
47 a a*** 

42 as Rnand AmH 
438 334 Rabun 
174 H7 HW1IM 


+8 408 

+4 32 

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OP 

tan 

% 

7/E 


M 

3J 

459 

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+1 

17.1b 

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469 


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49 

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B7 

11 


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37 

46* 


39 

ZB 



OS 

XI 


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U 

308 

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as 

66 

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1.1 

19 

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+1 

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322 

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37 

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842 

+2 

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64 

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♦1 

7.1 H 

40 

361 


as 

11 

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39 

467 

+8 

nj 

49 

302 

♦■a 

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16 

679 

-1 

6J 

79 

4B7 


49 

IX 

182 


Ut 

06 



49 

IX 

987 


HU Lb* entmv 


mr 

ao OHM an 


M TO 
am % PfE 


MB OTiTfl 
103 m IK 
167 115 TR 

S 4hn 

01 TK 

ns isg n 

IS 
218 
tg 

B 79 
303 217 
51 35 

82 : 

iSi- 


59 

49 

20 B 

Zfi 

23 

518 

1.4 

02 


87 

29 

8.4 

IS 

i 

89 

33 

482 

Olb 

51 

272 

1128 

42 

3321 

59 

25 

849! 

42 

29 

M.1 

17.1 

302 

771 

U 

32 

589 

126 

47 

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29 

79 

W.7 

29 

17 

sod 

23 

21 

829 

157b 

41 

399 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


ill 



COMMODITIES 


10 45 1EL7 
13 35 74 

tt h SS 

57 65 132 


35 26 719 

13 33 135 

27 07 S35 

1.1 20 482 


EXCHANGE 
JcqfMonnMl 09 nport 

SUGAR PRroai C. C»fl<M) 
FOB 

One 147X-46.6 

M8T 1«MS* 

May 161*01 * 

Aug 1KMHW.6 

03 „ tB8.MJ7.2 

Pec 172-8-59.2 

Vofc 2108 

COCOA 

Ok 1489-88 

Mar 1521-20 

May 1542-41 

M 156MB 

S8p 1585*4 

DOC 1813-11 

Mar 1839-37 

VOt 1466 

COFFEE 

No* 2320*72 

Jan 2290*85 

Mar 2170-185 

May 2190-180 

Jut .... ■■ 2195-185 

Sap 2210*00 

NO* , 2220*00 

Vofc 4331 

SOYABEAN 

Dec - 132*320 

ft* , — isaxwsr 

Apr ; 135.0*34.5 

Jun 133JM2.0 

Aug 1320*0J5 

08 134*325 

Dec 137.0-340 

Vot - - 103 


7BJOO-7&0 
7aj»-mo 
78.00 



UkxtfflsWpricas 
Official nMw8gm 
Wca In 8 par MaM c tame 
S9*arfa paaca par toy o u nce 
Radotf Wolf ACe-LftL report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 90900-91000 

Three Months. 931JX>-S3i*0 

VU 3350 

Tom Easier 


| Vot 

^ M60 I 

1 Tone 

SaretySteady 1 

I 3HLVER LARGE f 

Cash 

_ 382*0333*0 1 

1 Three Mcrths. 4oa.5tMp4.5D 1 

1 Vot 

r- « 

. .one 1 

I SILVER S34ALL 1 

1 Cash 

— . 392*0-883*0 I 

I Throe Months. 403*0-404*0 1 

1 VOI ----- 

M 1 

1 Tan# 

Me I 

1 ALUBWHM 

1 Cash 

— . 803*0-8044)0 1 

1 Three MenM. 806*0407*0 1 

Vot 

66S0 

OewluPNMkfJu 

ions — ... — 

IRCKEL 

^w* DOIBIf dWIUy 

Cash 

sktkJxzk 

1 Three Monda ZB1 0-2820 1 

VU — 

42 

n- -iA. ff|»4rtii 

Tone 

^ma BflWPf SWOjf 



□pan Close 
UnqTed 10230 


97-50 97*0 
97-00 97*0 


Pig Meat vot: 14 


Lb* Ctote Contact 

p-perkw 


h Open 

Ctaaa 

97.00 

97*0 

98*0 

96*0 

100*0 

100*0 


1328-320 

I34j0-33jr 

135.0*34.5 

13&M2.0 
732030 J5 
1345325 
137.0-340 

100 


Cash 6860C38200 

Tina Months. 91Q*W13*0 

VU_ NB 

Tone .. Mb 


GB: Cattle, 93*7pperkg Iw 
cati^Bap I6231pp«r kg' 
78.1 Ip par kg M 


MTBRNATIONAL 
PETRQLBM EXCHANGE 


LEAD 

Cash — - 319.00-320.00 

Thraa Months . 3125031400 

Vot 450 

Tana — Quin 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash S65JXW8SJM 

Wat M 

Tbne — — — . — — _ Ms 

22NCMGN GRADE 

CMh 600.0060200 

Three Months. 682*0-5831® 


Vot 2 

LONDON GRAM FUTURES 


England and WMbk 

Cam* naL Oam 2JS %. 8*8. 


+^JL> 


Cpartama 

Wheat Barley 

Ctosa Ctoaa 

10225 mao 

111.25 1J&00 

714*0 H5*5 

110*5 115*0 

117.75 — ^ 
101*5 101*0 





















































-< 8 M- 

From yoar portfolio a TO check your 
eight share price mo v e m ent s . Add them 
up to give yoa your overall total Cheat 
this against the daily dividend figure 
pubfis&d on this page If it matches you 
nave won outright ora share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If yoa are a 
winner follow the dahn procedure ml the 
back of your card. You oraatahvays have 
your card available when claiming. 





Gdaer 

No. Onpaq 

Cm* 

loBB 


m\ 

El 

El 


II E 3 


xai 


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CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


Motoring bv Clifford Webb 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


Alfa Romeo polishes up the image 


Far-reaching changes are in the wnd 
at Alfa Romeo, the state-owned Italian 
manufacturer of sporty cars which nas 
lost its way in recent yeare but is suu one 
of the proudest names in motoring, u 
new looks certain to be taken over 
Fiat after yesterday's rejection 01 me 

rival offer by Ford. 

Either gianl would add the pragmatic 

approach borne of vast JJ 

world markets to the acknowlj^ed but 
poorly directed talents of Alfa s brilliant 
Sneering team. One thing jscerta^ 
Whoever wins will want to keep Alta 
Romeo's name and distinctive ap- 
proach to fast car design. 

But it is of the changes 
much nearer home that l ^ant to wnte 
lodav. Two months ago I re jP? rt ~ !” e f 
shocking story of Mrs Serena 
Homdcan, Hampshire who had been 
fighting since December !98 4 to have 
her grievances redressed in the firet 
placefor a flawed Alfa Romeo 33 and 
laiterlv for an equally troublesome 
Giuhetia. The main problem as with so 
miny of the marque was excessive 

™I U suggested that in view of the 
countless times both care had ^en 
relumed for respray and other recmica- 
tion work the only way out appeared to 
be a financial settlement. Now Mrs 
Emmas has written to say: -Thank you 
for vour interest and support. t am 
pleased to be able to say thaibecauseof 
your article on Sepiember5 the probkm 
has now been resolved. The dealership 


has taken back the car and jwid offthe 
outstanding loan to Mercantile Credit 
The only condition was that I bought 
another car from them. I now have an 
X-imstered Volvo 345 and when I went 
to pick it up there was a large basket ot 
flowers on the passenger seat - a very 
nice gesture on the part of the garage- 
One of the biggest stumbling mocks 
facing Mrs Thomas in her battle tras the 
change in ownership of Alfa. Romeo Oh 
which wok place in April this yearwhen 
the Italian company sold its subsidiary 
to the British group Tozer, Keinstey & 
MitlbounL Maurice Rourire, managmg 
director of the new company, says with 
commendable honesty that market 
research at the time showed that 
motorists had a very poor opinion 01 
Alfa care. They said they were prone to 
resting, unreliable and had a poor resale 

value. . . . 

The residual values pro mem was 
almost certainly caused by the excessive 
discounting which the old company 
employed to register care. If you buy a 
cut price new car you get a cut pnee 
valuation when you resell it Mr Rourke 
says he has put an end to registering cars 
and claims that as a result residual 
values are already improving. _ 

The latter will soon show up in trade 
figures available to the public. But a 
reputation for rusting and unreliability 
once acquired takes years to stake off as 
Lancia are still finding. Rourke insists 
that there is concrete proof of improve- 
ments in both these fields. 


Too many times in recent yearn 
however Alfe GB executives have sajd 
the same and gone on to predict that the 
company would turn the corner and 
safes would clim b again. Rourire win 
have none of that By dropping 

discounting he admits Thai sales win mi 
from around 3,000 last year to 2^00 this 

year. He was only prepared w speculate 
on marginal increases over the next 18 
months to around 3,0(X) with a target of 
5,000 some three to four years hence. 
Even 5,000 will still be way below Aim 
GITs peak of 13,000 sales in 1979. 

When TKM took over it found that 
the dealer network was a mess-Today a 
single tier dealer system is being bunt 
up. There are about 30 open points to be 
filled in a network which will eventually 
number 130. 


PORSCHE OFFICIAL CENTRES 

NOBODY UNDERSTANDS PORSCHE QUITE LIKE FOLLETT 


as c canta Scow SaortCaW 
2 700 - - t37,Z ® 


■ cemilwItWtflJl 
6X100 mVs. 






■ . .7 7,-. ..- 'I- 


»ssss3Hl 

18000 sales — tZ*** 


Somoal. IS.GG0 rafts, twm j 


.. ■ ■ 


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surewf. tiMflS. m «« 
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li k 921 UIX Sit«er. aavod. 

^ S .oOoHda -n w 


.. . - _ . Ay,,'”’/. ’ l ; 

Vis . N.~ ’*! — jA— am- .Iff itote 


| PARK B * MM®, 


a is -«-* 






Finally as an example of the new 
company's awareness of consumer re- 
action 1 would quote the following, nrst 
deliveries of the new Alfe 75 reached 
Britain this summer. Along with other 
motoring writers I criticized the hi gh 
pedal mountings which made operating 
the clutch extremely cumbersome. En- 
gineers at Aife’s Dover hewkparters 
built a mock-up with modified pedal 
positions and sent it to Milan tor 
approval. They got it almost immedi- 
ately. Future right hand drive models — 
they were the only culprits - will have 
the new angles when they leave the 
factory. If you already have an unmodi- 
fied 75 your dealer will do the wont nee. 




FOLLETT 


v “S&IF 5 


. •„ ; If 

•7 -t 


Porsche super power 
- with a little extra 


The 25 litre four cylinder 
Porsche 944, with or without a 
turbo charger, is by far the 
company's biggest seller in 
Britain accounting for nearly 
half the Forsches sold here 
last veor. Its popularity b well 
deserved. The cheaper 924 is 
an excellent sports coupe 
partic ular ly now that it stares 
the same genuine Porsche 
engine as the 944 and not a 
thinly disguised Audi unit. Brat 
its road holding and handling 
is not in the same class as the 
superb 944. 

Of coarse there are still 
those diehard Porsche foU° w " 
ere who are scornful of all 
front engined Porsches like 
the 944 insisting that the 20- 
year-old rear engined Porsche 


Vital statistics 

Model: Porsche 944S 

Price: £23,997 

Engine: 2479cc 16 valve four 
cylinder 

Performance: 04S2mph 7.9 
seconds, maximum speed 
142mph 

Official consumption: Urban 
22.6mp<i, 56mph 42-Scnpg 
and 75mph 34m pg 

Length: 30.8 feet 

Insurance: Group 8A___ 


911 remains the only tine j 
product of the legendary i 
Ferdinand Porsche and his < 
son Ferry. The 911 has been 

fine honed year after year mini 

today it represents the zenith- 
of road going rear engined 
muscle car design but it is 
quirky to drive particularly m 
the wet Get it wrong and the 
lightly loaded front develops a 
min d of its Own. 

It is also physically 

demanding with a heavy dutch 

and agricultural gear change. 
The ride is harsh and tiring. 
911 owners readily admit 
these shortcomings but in a. 
way that suggests they wet- 
come them as a challenge to 
their skill as a driver. 

The 944 is much more 
predictable and forgiving in its 
handling, more comfortable 
with a softer ride and al- 
together a more manageable 
car. That is not to suggest that 
it has no real claim to a place 

in the super car class. Without 

a turbo it will reach 60mph in 
8.4 seconds and has a top 
speed of 137mph. With a turbo 
the acceleration is electrifying 
packing 60mph in only 63 
seconds and topping 150mph. 
With that choice of perform 


fSsil 





maliin 


serves 

* bodysfxip 

parts 


r <9491) 


OFFICIAL PORSCHE CENTRE FOR KENT [?rj 

HART STREET. MAIDSTONE MS1S-8RA _ ^ 


PteasecaHAtarewMcMeekin.to^cwss ET 

your new or pre-owned require ment s. 

LxbIAL PORSCHE CENTRE ! Cj 

843056 Maton G> 


^Porsche 944S: Smoother, hot is ft worth the extra? 



(0246) 


SR UH 451611 


mance already available it was 
at first difficult to understand 
when Porsche recently came 
out with a new four valves per 
cylinder version — a 944S — 
giving only marginally better 
performance than the nor- 
mally aspirated 944L and at 
£21^97 costing an extra 
£1,445. The answer I discov- 
ered is that four valve technol- 
ogy combined with an 
apfeiizei combustion cham- 
ber and a knock sensor regu- 
lator allows die new engine to 
rm at wwvimBm eflirie?: : 
whether fitted with an anti- 
pollution exhaust gas catalytic 
converter or not. Most 
Porsches are sold in two 
markets: Germany where an 
nuTpa^ing number id catalytic 
equipped cars are bei*g 


bought and rtie USA where 


they are compulsory. 

On the road you have to go 
looking for the advantage of 
the 16 “vah-er* over the 
standard engine. It is only 
when yon get into the middle 
and upper rev ranges that the 
extra torque and power (up 
from I63bhp to 190bhp) 
ntakfK its presence felt The 
rev limiter has also been reset 
to permit a maximum of 6300 
rpm - up from 6^00rp®* 

The overall effect is to make 
the car smoother through the 
gears but not appreciably so. 
In my view that is not suf- 
ficient to persuade me to spend 
the extra money but then if you 
are already forking oat over 
£22,000 what does an extra 
£1,500 really matter? 


Official ftasche Centre 

MMtaBy KfccttdteauMd 

pnetd - as posAty tt® b®3 
MU lie. 


FINLAY 

GORHAM 

LIMITED 



Henley-on-Thames 

924 CARRERA GT 1981 
Guards Red, 2 owwss. 
50,000 mis. FSH. Fac- 
tory S/R- RHD. 1 ofo^ 

944 1984 While. From 
6 a, coin/cass bolder. 

928 MAN 1979 model 


Stocks 


: HI Daientip tte Year 


FOBRanuePP EW LS 

■IB- CHKS LLOYD 

n« 0783 20 mr 
BISflNC HZ7073341.. 

OPM T DWS. 8UM» 1M 


1S88 oil 8C sport Oaopj 
nUc PSH. E17»0 

ion Mi sc. apQH -nw a*. >*w 
row*. Pomjo^M.OOO 

nos. PBK 

1S79 928 M WI, Mnanrs bto. 
tan MOwr. 03.000 m*». F8H. 

1085*944 Msausl. 

1078 2JT CaiM BS, Huge »■ 
u. mMHL mm £2S«0 


BMWM635 CSS- 

BMW MS 

BMW 329 amt. 
BMW 329 A 


POA 

POA | 

poa ; 

_ei^B85 I 
-B43395 

_rta,®5 ! 
_nB.7S0 j 
_ £21^00 t 


pmdw S44„ FIS.7SC ; 

gSSSgL — si-g g i 

Paradis SZ8 S2 134^95 I 

Ths dxyrs hi s araaptedow : 

SOleet BMd w* •»«*■ | 

p tm u natl nm by j 


Ma«n «000 iMisum ra •"> 


f*.B i. iiwhiy md laOi Porsche. | 


Light Blue Met FSH. 

| 60000 mis. SpeciidRg 


cwttd 9ns m HMdi lara 
dnnibla fs asy al U* . 
iSSS-Tusiiiia 


trim £8.995 

924 LUX XRu-Mn. 
Pewter met 57,000 rolx 
I FSH £SJ9S 

0491 576407 


mShsi DWJ0«l» kBnsrWllWML 

08,95 

(0782)202277 


0473 212456 
Sun 0473 36726 9-lpm- 


autorapide 


911 SC Sport 


SpedaHsts in prepa- 
ration of Porsche 
Cars 


PORSCHE 924 
LUX 


Taroa White. T rag. 

F.S.H. Recently 
serviced and tuned. 
1 years MOT. Good 
condition. £9.850. 
Tefc 0734 504744 
«r 419595(f)- 


johnlamB 

3 CHESTERFIELD. DERBYS 


PORSCHE 



CITROEN 



SALES 
, SERVICE 

''GENUINE 

PARTS 

unashamedly 
personalised 


1986 0 CX25 , 

TH1 Safari Automatic 2000 miles 
1986 C CX28 
RE Saloon. 3000 miles 
1986 C CX22 

TRS Saloon, E.S.R, 2000 miles 
1985 C (86 MOD) CX2D 
Re Saloon. 1500 miles 
1985 C CX25 

GTi Turbo EJ5.R-, 18000 miles 
1983 A CX24 

Safari Automatic. 40.000 miles 
1983 A CX24 _ _ _ 


£10^90 


£6395 


^^^speowiJncAisia 

SELLING Oft BUYWG 
CONTACT 
The Personal . 
Porsche People 


PORSCHE 911 
CJLHEHRA SPORT 
C08PE. 

D registration. I 

Black «*0i part bather hta- 
nor. 4S50 imioB. Etoorts 
anutanwit. Sunroof. P7s. 
Sadrtc goals. Central tocMng. 
Raito/cassetts. 
Immaoiara contWton. 
E294S0 


TetAadrew Adamoa 
0B 0934 713224 
UnO 1, 

WUetwiise Farm, 
Cock Une,. 
Wednwe, SemerseL 


1980 nwi 

bote. Brorar w«i Oof 
Sunm d BKo ww 


WflD OF BfHIRNSWHrTU 
T*t 82*2 Z94SZ1 
-■ Dfioo SoattT 


[ 9B sa. 86 SmM Ml High 11 

warsMSS I 


l«HYB8Y*8E*P®SCflE 


. Pasd* 811SC wwt 

I FVsimgiam 19Ba WAY PC . 
I mars Rm <nti MadUeaQurtaow 
Oat wnoNs tte or a »i riwt cwo»- 1 
ifc.n Pa muiM lurnmr 1 


Tefc 01-736 9569 jH) 
or 01-350 0092 (0). 


CARRERA 

C REG 


I 2IB 1 14 n«siie am/iw ££ 

vm. hi. 2tBW ott i 


don Hnurfne. tanW iWBMr 
pbu KrtOOa £22:000 Wtafl 
pmaiBiwteoriauB. 

Td: 8491 36465 
office bows or 
MSI 3488 7, 
emngs tod woeknuBs- 


£8^95 


£5395 



BROADFIELDS 
01-449 7301 


Meteor gray metaBto. ■ 
10,000 rattes. Sport seats. 
Central locking PDM. 
Owner's weekend car. 
As new. £26,500- 
Tel 061 941 3858 
01 969 9955 (W) 


| «u sa. 13 m ora vw''*** 

kx i 45000 1« Irty ayj » 

on b* IB (rum in. 


ssrv. by o& nK * 

S G Smith Motors Lid 
01-778 3252 


£ 8,995 


£4^95 




Pallas Automatic Saloon, 2300 miles 


£4JH5 


THE ABOVE ARE ON OFFER 
LONDON’S PREMIER DEALER. 



1UB* ait Tattoo 6.650 mb. 
while wnh brown leallicr. firil 

sptccbcmbcdoo.Mncwcwv- 

diuon^— ■ •— EJ * JWU 

iwerattl C-rajrj 

SC, 7.000 mb. red wiih bbek 
prasuipe. mini cow<butm- TM 


924 S 
FEB *86 


Guards Red. 
plnstnpe (ntanor. 5.000 

mb- PDM, Ru^caswUa 



911 SPORT CAREER* 

Jan 85. Guards red, Mdc 
Panchedom. awmcajnrool. 
deeme widow, vo&sp 


01-749 6091 


eon^fem. 

13J00 mb s. Incha fiag 1 

wore-agwr- 

c wBwln > 


» PORSCHE 
AT WO80BRIDGE 

gii n trams - 85. CfcronadJBl 
nunber. Quarts roUbd Oa. Wro 
gresJv&H. MiBWtam 8*ampB. 

914 - Y ico. Bade. POM. lift 
Mdto casSte FAR C11A95. 

Osal tadHes arf Bxc&mgo 
I* 021 449 42Z7 


Office 0274 725165 or 
Hows 0924 492014 


lwtbi amu 

1988 TirfioMM 81 1 Cttrid a. 
mdsBMWMf'ray 
deal .13JUD mm irib u rj i 
HU BW S«WW BCTfl- 

Hessen to rte. dvMn d ta* 

aaar wra* 

mas 

fm ph*e du»c fl»w «■» 

81-626 0556 
Chutes H*lfa»-Gnr«i 


928S 
Auto 83. 

Chedstud Rate. Champagne 
with Bobw-lealtw. Air con- 
ditioning. Electric tinted 
windows. Cnose, etc. 30,000 
miles. FSH. 

v £18.459 
0895 36539 (T) 


PORSCHE 924 S 


1986 C Res , 

Guards Rad- Becmc sunoof 
X Urrara. Ortx WHO rotes. 
Manulaaors wamnnj. 1 caro- 
firi owner. . , 



(SOUTHSEA) 

94-104 Palmerston Road, 
Southsea, Hampshire P05 3PT 
Tel: (0705) 756644 




South West 
Scotland 


KM I mm 1979. MteUJk 
ism mat and tax. TOOOftnx. 
S^roof. sttno. ExMUenl OT; 
dmon. £SJ9E TH Ol B76 1660 


HMHa a *44 Luxury. C REG. 
manual. G W«l- ta MM- Gkc- 
Inc son -cool. aU 
mki. Maftm warranty unUl 
Aug 87. Man «mkt **«*!*■ 
one wmw. ra**** * on- 5ffij . 
CIOJSOO ona. Tel: 0742 
73996S (day] 568213 ICWSL 


0273 461411 Offica 

frost of shorbum 


911 SE Sport 1979 i 

ta and Pih Whh. MTjh 

»3ftrsass ss 

fram MTwtM. Powrai lit Ha*. 
Absotab Baffin. 

tl23» 

ZjreponsB Wwf aanrey 

Indudtd- 


911 TURBO 85 

nea Jan 86 f83 FuB 

Spec Air coreL LS.0. SJOOmb. 
Samett Red Watattc »ai marefr- 
ino leaOw ton. Pertsid 
i leather seas. UaWmg door in- 
sure. Must be sam. 

Very ratodMi jrtnta gate. 


0532 508003 ( 0 ) 
0943 464230 


01 3t14TO Tutor «r 

1240771401 


911 Carrera CabrloKl 1984 A. ; 
wMle/toUdt W«w. 1 avow:. • 
21 OOO mtt, FSH. Irtimacuriau- . 




£21 .950. Barfwrd Carage 09^6 I 
«244Ga/0789 8759GiSunday> ' 




911 1 ' U I UIO 1983 model. CM 
Pdx wtme. Mack l«aUwr 


nmche •“»®r rt a H a -JS2K; 

automaUc. tept.SP.tKS 
nntgry, 03.000 MUCH £19.780 
0242 603099 «toc» 


ALFA ROMEO I % 


For over 30 years a! 

BOUTS MGTCBS 


in Edinburgh 


Scoiloitab. Isrecst sckciipn 
i.r nci* and incd Alfa 
Romero harked by 
So-ilamh larp-,1 pans nock 
SALES 
031-337 2700 
031 337 7281 


ROW Alta 75 
New Alta 33 


Brat deal on terms/ 
Isa&ing/cash/part enchange 


MARIO 

DELI0TTI 

LTD 


Braehead Garage 

Gallowiv Avenue, Off Whiiletts Road 

Tel: Ayr 260416 


cwrowrawrowscHK-wen^ 
MlHn with bujnra. To »TO or 
Oay.Td 01-388 0888. 


911 Carrera Soocu TiraK 1988. 
27.000 ran. Mrtwuc jflr^. I 
toaUMr trim. 1 roroar. Fou mt- 

CondltKIfl. £a*.76a T«. 091- | 
2817783 (busmrou (tours) or 
(00341 717723. 


niA «nara- ------ 

or. FSH. Jmmacutal* wndipon. 
C21.000. Tek-Ol *37 0322 Cf- 
Oce/0371 820392 home. 


911 SC Taroa. IW) rrqbd msd - 
36.000 mUml owm Al con- 
dllKMV £14. BOO or P /XMwrO 

wagon- Days - CWneswr 
774*02 / ovctdiigs - Bognor 
BTOts 868628. 


924 LUX-1981 imM. mHaUk ' 
ahrr. only 40.000 MUm FSH. 
sunroof. PDM. Stowo. extras. . 
immaculate _J? ,r 2£?!5 ,L . 
BbJSGO ODO TH.-OB21 80642 ( 


91 1 TVMMh 1 988 B. Ouarda Red. 

ncd/MM* inm. 3.632. tnUes 
only Mini £40.000 or v.n.o 
now- car imratnent. TrtBZSm 
224 or 029677 383 (ofiOCtt). 


Full range of new Alias in slock 
Good sctacuon of Alfe Romeo approved used cars 


944 Manual. 86. Re*. 
mites, as new. mmj era 
£19.980 — Tat 0730 87238 


SZ4 UUX June 83. <V1 Srawtgy 
neuiiK. Mack auwt npe uwera - 
or. 15.750 mflra. «***“£: 
radio. Hectoic vdpa..”* 
floor raurocs ww^. JF5H W 
AFM. One owner. £9.3 sa tw 
08832 32*2- 


911 CAWBEBA Jan 84. <3acw r 
Hue. 31.000 rutin, good town- 
ben and fun raw- SSti.^eo. 
, Ol 928 6781 PCn / 0277 
l 840924 IIO. 


911 SC Goods. 82 <Yi 45.000 
mU» Bed. Epon spoilers. JRSH. 
Taxed and MOT. Price; 
£14.960. Tel: iO*ti T24T344 
(03 or (061 ■ 7403070 (HI 


944 LUX -198* C. PLEOO mdffll 
Mack. Ml extras. PAS. 4 k s/r. 
alloys, sp o r ts seal. riortsL fogs, 
i £19300 TeL-Ol 388 4713. 




Call us no* on 


WOLVERHAMPTON 
(0982) 23295 ^ 
BOOTS motors >3 


PARTS 
031-220 1800 


Angle Park Terrace 
Edinburgh 


For your new & 
used Alfa Romeos 
Servicing 
AND 
Parts 

Tefc 021 778 1295/6 

BIRMINGHAM 


ALFA ROMEO 


911 TUMOSIxfc tow raneage. 
1979. O.OA TM C04S11 
31*20/90327 


II LA8CASWBE & 
HERSETSGBE COXTACT: 


PJBLETS OF AmSDALE 
609 Urcipsel Bsad, 
Ala stale, Soatlqiort 

0704 74114 


imrmKfiate or early reteSv- 
aty on most mo date. 
Demonstration cars 
available 


m c m sit miiMM. ami . mag 


9U TAft&A rrfJtSSr, 


924 LUX 1982. 39.000 raura. 
wMbr. iidr Pond*- se n.*x aa - 
■orv lady owiNr. eweuro} 
SSiltlO^TH 0444 489K» 
OMM ■ H ayward ajrrah. Ol- 
882 4814 idDC* E7J200 ono. 

911. 1973 model. Wl llte *7*4 
mr spotters. Enjonc bJuJ 
1-000 to rn mqo . .Bee S/rorf. 
wnido-s. personal Bl». 6m 
lani mraugnooi. £* 300 062* 
51298 (Ol / 0*267 78243 (HI 


944 AIM. I9M. 1 rojaraT-O” 
miles. E/sr. c/L. B/C^ E/wgts. 
•e leainer Iol £(9.9 9*. 02^ 
823628 Es-enmss/weelienda. 
01*68 7973 WOcr HOOT*. T 


924 Lux 8 1986 Metallic OOML 
etec POM & extra - *. Average I 
nrtaaar £9.996 ono. 08643 
2*93 n 021 706 2266 w 


1982 928S Manual. Guards red. 
qrey Berner, a/c. e /sra a. 
cruise, etc. 1 owner, 47.000m. 
48k service conuttewd. Excel- 
I tent £16-660 01948 8986 T 


om LI|DC Auto 1986 B. 12.000 
ml*. BtianH 

sietm Law (T) 0789 872*9 00 
or 0*08 62961 tOI 
911 TAMA STOBT V ra9 - FSH. 
Good copdtoon. Rad/cstaL 
^aO^STo*' 833 3993 
Mlkrl 0*677 2830 


911 Carra ra Ta rga Snort. *88 B. 
Meteor, tiuiuac-- only 3.700 
mis. £27.950. Tel Ol 938 212a 
198S 928 S2 1. owner. FSH. 
2*000 man. .06.930. Phone 
B Classic Lid 06*3 830423 


924 LUX ■ 1984. Wnlle. Sunroof. 
Fun service ntaorv. hraiucu- 
laic, saaoa miles Bence 
C7.94S. Tel. TBoraas A 
HoUmowarOi 021 384 5711 
KHKCM 944 Amo tomKuWr 
condlliofl. 2 owners Irom new. 
1982. 28^00 miles, bronze me- 
ladle, sun roof, alarm me. 
£11.950 281 4444/954 2124 


* URGE SUXnOI OF 

■ouo nun * siu 


Tat Qxkari gSBSt ZMIttl 


OPEL 

MONZA 


BLACK FERRARI 
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ALL OlHfR MOORS AVAILABLE 
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MICHABL IVES 
8708 42242 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS 


WILLSHIRES 


CHALLAC0MBT5 

LTD 


; Coupe 3.0 A reg. 1 
owner. 16,000 miles. 
Automatic. PAS. All 
electrics. Gun maal me- 
tallic. HP/PX 1 £6,995- 
Tefc 09323 51330 {TJ 


in mauBe. 1994. %000 
man. bi prfetoa condition 
wttti fan BsnriCB hqtary. rotti 

•toy eoneOTI £!?_ - f t ?5- 

Genuine waon to tod. Of- 

fare fa rarogtanol £22500. 

Tel 01 992 5882. 


best buys 

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AUDI 100 CD ■ 


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FOR ALPHA ROMEO 

IN HAMPSHIRE 


Industrial Estat*, 

St. Ednwids, 

Suffolk. 


14 PARK STREET 
SHJRLSY aBfe 

90UTM«te*roH 

Tgfctm 783822 


0359 70039 

The MM crartrg for 
AHaho&a ui SuffoW 


an 3£k aa v Cam bhnfeff 

ABS. 4 MteMraMND . 

MXOO rm. FSH. SuOUdl.ttXSM. 
m SC BUM MM n*L M.«0 
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ama amr. JC' 

von n« guy. » ua»:-Xia» 


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BBET 8 M 

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Autontoc & air condUotvng. 
flntoed tti grapMe wMi grey 
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only. 

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01 459 1281 


LISTERS FOR QUATTRO 
New Models 

(haanfateB TomdoRad S/R 
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0462 678191 


Amazing discounts on 
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models. 

Instant, no nonsense 
Quotes 

0772 324154. 


RENAULT Z* VWJww» 
16.000 mu. i owner. EM* 
winuiM. suu roof. *e«s. aw 
Ktrra. cruac control- jv»wd 
lorkinv- MuU CondlWra £9-000 
ano Tel' 01 4500346ld»1 « - 
208 0042 


1.BD0 nte (W. » Iwe.'-MtSSB 

H E MARSHAU 
MOTORS LTD 
Td 8753 23831/24285 


I Sff AMD DRIVE THE NEW 7b I 


ftANOE ROVDL June 83. 4 floor 
auto. Vogue nmnliruilon. Mc- 
(HiiK 90 U. 2M0O mac*. LAW 
owner. £9.000. Tel OMB 
; 64308 or Ol 894 1300 iMtoca. 


IW 41 S UPPER fflCHHOUD 
ROAD WEST 

EAST StffEM . * 

UWDON SW 14 7 JX am 
T* 81-876 7636 


Rbte AHa 8 M Dcatera 

m Better uiiBi BWIOri 

MaOMone, Ken* 

Tefc ( 8822 ) *12358 


vrooo a ptetumr Goir cm a ae- 
mi*. B reg. Mar* raa. On board 
comMcr- Pi® “S wt. *«i 
low nratlic tym. Recaro inwrl 
or ffd rtnartc seats. Sunroof 
BUHmtmirt 4*4 «en» rose., 
wuh uranMc cuuauaer. Lxca- 
isit wndKwo. SB-9O0- TffrOi- 
3SS 2434/6 monffl 


VW OOLF en CC convenlbh-. 
1986. WlMle wnh blue Interior, 
lull vw ammeenng comer 
non. B h w ui i wtd sierra. 9.000 
mtks. Otlere over CB .2 S O Tel- 
0599 233472. 


1*7 Don*. m*t toL ? *»■ 
unmOC * wall nBWjwlw 
oi Director* 2 cara-BLM C nora 

nrauceracnt. 4 ®52SL.JJ l 5£i 
£5 l2&0. T#( M*s HUkJna> 061 1 
480 061 1 tollice hunrO 


1987 VuUv 740 GLE 
\rri tilde. Hid mwen on. 
WIKQOf. elec uimwwt. 1.000 
Sto^tis JOO Tel -04253 3536 


XRSi TURBO - itiniM *3. Rm * 
VIO. Lntjue in -Mnununir;. 
£6.100. 0732 46D7M 


p£U5fOT Family EW C 8*4 
Ha. 7.000 miles. Manual 
&7.S5C. B rra. a«. S2.000 
mllTO- auto C7.400 Trt 023375 
ZS9Z Kent 


RAMSC ROVER V 09 uc EFI 4 W 
Mon- i486 iDi Croon SOW- 
BluccbMh 5.000 Air cww- 

£18.995 Td Ol 431 0666 0(1. 

01 874 7865 Hra T 

AMCC ernnssn Tovon- ajw 
■as. 2 bire Prooie earner. P«- 

2 sunroofo. tow 0» 15 000 

mile* C7JOO ono 047864 373 


ALFA ROMEO 76 Green clover 
lerf 4aon mile*. A»a red. 4 
ranker wrw £10.760. Trs: 
0382 77266 FT) 

ROMM PTOflMK IBEX Aifl» 
I486 2.600 miles. Metauic re* 
Mud. £10.000 Tel 0382 
77266 rri 


RANGE Rawr EFI AUTO . aw 
con - Osittan Bw. CJ« 

£17.450. 0925 1 wauocdl 62976 


HMAN EUilcMra 198* D ragis- 
tj.Uton WIIS1C. Radio cassette 
nd auren fitted 3.500 mile* 
omi reason for *■►. cnerioanv 
ear mooned £7200 Tel ■ Ol 
659 21 1H IH> or 251 5900 ‘O* 


RAHCTROVCBCFi vooue Crea 

14.000 mu imraanoato. w“ 
nuity rnnatning. £17-7 50 ■ ^TeL 
Mr Wood, aayii fOT95i 672679 
/ r\tn 107951 BG2»I 


MAZDA RX7 1984 (sarin 3k 
h totti "" 9 *Mie wtm TVuR styt. 
tug UL rectory need sunroof, 
electnc window*, mirnn and 
acrul Attoys. immaculate m- 
adeaod out dmontta tax. only 
, £6.460 000. Tel: 0244 513366 
uus-l 061 7954883 (me* A 
wat k en dak 


M:uoa ® T 

non Low mneaoe. 8 door, v 
pood cono. £1300 ow. TeUH 
323 8713 12* MU- 


- AUDI COUPE Z.2 (osl Intectton. A 
m. wack. pas. alectnc win- 
dows sun rota, auperto stereo. 
36J3O0 miles. <&200 Ten Ol 
731 7206 (evenings and 

weekrtutu 


VOLVO 7(SOCL Cdrte. ante 8«C 
2.8 emm. Hi'er &uck leffl*- 
er 5.000 miles. £14.996- OBI 
366 2821 Bus-T 


MOriDA Prelude EX 84/U 1 BOOO | 
iwn. m/BHje. manual £6.780 1 
TO 01 794 1914 
PEUCEOT tarsanu CTL 
nuffi dtscauDL ctKKce of coimr. 
Cofl Ptooew* on. 025 126 46T*. 


■AMOK HOVER. 4 or. manto; 
7J»0 tw* ontofc l 9*"*2vl“2 
new £8496- 061 431 7094 T 
RENAULT I2HP MOT, MX- 
37000 IMM*. («w*Jv»W»V. 
Beamy orty £380 Ol 422 8763 


203 an Jan -a*, n.eoo mue*. 

I rate owner. White. iWMCidM# 
a montm warranty. £6290 
ono. Teh 0481 22050. 


meuar ***** 

rmln one OWflCT tertm PBCDTQ Of 

SrSU E*-900 . 

937 4»3. day 01727 visa 


CMXJf OTI Campffsn Model 0« 
1983. Uwsa green. 29.000 
ratin. I owner. FSH Cmmt 
i radio plm eteeinc aenel. alann. 
cun root, (ronl/rcar auoder. 
£8.100 0072 738011. 


GOLF GTI MK B unusual Lhasa 
Breen, sun roof, alloy P* 1 *. 
Blued glass. » nk snreo. <hc 
19.000 m. 1 yr* tax. recenUv 
semcM. no. ABffrt *8E. Outok 
sale £6.960 ono. Tel ci 486 
B007dwor01 385 2707 home 
AUDI M 1986 (Cl. white, pas. 
dec windows, s/r. BtauounM 4 
soeafcor radio cassrtte. unmacu- 
taic. 7.000 nds. warrj-ey. 
£9300. TO 0314367^1980 eve 
GOLF «m 5 dr- Apr 86. Alpine 
White. a.OOO mis. s/roof. unto, 
ra/raar seat. PuetlH. aute/rev 
8L radhran. e*tr» ♦ ym RF i 
as new £8.995 042873 6203 
QUATTRO Turbo Coupe C red. 
nark Lhasa RMUUlic. Blaci: 
leather iul VR. FuAy ar^inaL 
2L000 mile*. TX. £.17.950 
Tel: 09303 B43Z1 <TI 

COHVCirraU «OU« England's 

. . 1STOMI stockist or new it road 
cars 0882 872182. (VW 

dealers) 


h j v 

HR 


I mew Cotf CUT*. Oonvernmat * 


IMS XR2 Taad, 17.00gjrtk». 
£5.100. Tel: Yaverfon 883900 


TOYOTA MHTOtLA^ 

•aimia nrirt twin mn. 

- iSg? gysS-rore. _»■ .fey 

SC.9SW06OW 73829 


fun vw Audiranoe reascmiw 
. pro Irani WC pi so? RS96. 
vwyJUM Inc Wf OTi ar hw 

V ^S , l (Sregjj 

Phoenix on: 025 126 4676- 


liOOccS cyL 19B3-Y VCC Tax. 
I MOT Extra*. S/R- FSl. 
B4JBO-. THAI 2«7 6078. 


C ontin ued oa page 29 


ivf-v • ; -•= r . 




‘-■A: -v. - i. 

V' 1 !; ?,?>■ 

Xl^f) 










TWE TTtjn^L FT? TO A V NOVEMBER 7 1986 



CAR BUYERS’ 



V.W. AND AUDI 


MERCEDES 

AUTHORISED 

DEALERS 



ofSIoane Square 

SPOUTS CAB WITHOUT 
TOLLING YOUB FAMILY 

★ Special Offer this week* 

Two vehicles equipped with high performance pettfoger 
engines. V.A.G Approved, engineered and installed in Germany. 

B8 D AUDI BOQUATTRO Stone grey, 2^00 cc. 1B7 Dhp. 0-80 7A 
mass .... 

8SDVW PASSAT GLS ESTATE R*shadwr.a500ec.1 50 bhp. 0-60 Mwwxingt. 

1.500 mites SIMSD. 

L Phone the profOTstonais for or tartdriwg. 


^ 214 PAVILION ROAD, LONDON, SW1 Tel: 01-730 2131 


© 



AND 

young 


SEABR00K GARAGE 


AUM QUATTRO TURBO- 
1985 (June). Tornado red. 
sunroof. 17.000 miles, full 

service history £17.795 

AUDI QUATTRO TURBO. 
1982 (Y). silver, stereo. 
34.0DQ miles. 1-s.h.. superb 
condition WJ950 


•(0303) 38467:35336 


BMW 

AUTHORISED 

DEALERS . 


BJM.W. 529 1 
1986 -C rag. Alpine white 
wtm PocHtc slue Interior. 
Manual sunraol. Hauptmkt 
Cambridge ratio cassette. 1 
owner. £800 tries. 

£11,485 


8S B 2 BB SL BBoy wheel*. 

aal lUtt 

Srff'WJS 

wty £U»8. 

ffi B WISE** sun raoLgw 

■IWts. sK tnxA 

85 B 288 E dec son root, stay 
SeriT**. Bit. nfljDj nte 

MA288CEMeatt.M0.e)tC 
son rod ^ As. ensse, 

iad/au. 13JD00 « n *® msst 


MERCEDES 280 
TE ESTATE 

1382 -x - rogstmton. Auto. 
CHAUFFEUR DRIVEN. 

, . IrranacuUto condition. 8otow 
1 average miteage. MBtsate 
r»f 1 1 sdver blue. Full BervtoB ws- 
j I ttxy. Sunroot C Otlffal 
J50. 1 1 lotting. Cotee cortroL 

1 1 Power meenng. ElocWC wBV 

iDRB I flows- ABoy wneett. ttew 
I rest MoT and taxed lor i 

c ™ II year. 4 new tyres, 

nwss [I 

L9S8. II E9J50 or neer ea t offer 

rS2 1 1 TeU 01 940 5677 


g 

nj 

1 380 SEC 1S84 A petrol | 

1 9uB - 

SH 125^50 fl 


1 86 C Sm Oh 
H E/mna 


EBB 

EjH^; 


ROLLS ROVCE& BENTLEY 


Ivan. Page-RatcTrff 


1S76 

ROLLS ROYCE 

SILVER SHftCOW 

Sjkj&~ -ViCTs 
t.Vi Baja -urr*' rimor a 
et&rzit ■' f'l snesr 

HARTWELLS OXFORD LTD 

CS65 2MB33 


GOLF CTI while. MVCA 1986. 
iC>. under 5.000 mlto Immac- 
ulate BlaupunJu Boston 
sinco/rassetu. 3 door £8.300 
Tri lAinrrMuml 0Z40S 29108. 


am coNVERimc aii while. 

immaculate. W. 23 jOOO imto 
Hnl Christina* «fll £7.250. 01 
757 6161 



BJM.W. WANTED 


y Modena 


EXCUtStVELY F BWAB) 

88 G 328 STS 'ed/mwoto M 

ssec. 6000 mfc. M 1 fl» 

SS C S88 GTS QU ral/tai MlM 

spec. 7.600 mis OMSS 

BS B 308 GTS JW effUSAi Hfe 
at. stereo. 4.400 mis.- S3M9G 
B1 W 388 BIS GARB. Wtaw/tWJf 
Me. good spec. tBflX Mm jj 

BIX 4W Ate red. btae M*. mo 
sierao. 36000 mis.-...- 
OR Stee Giceewaod 




BMW 323IA CABRIOLET 
AUTOMATIC 1982 (Y) 

29.000 mb 1mm new only «HB FSH 
inooxjWr <n qksmg Wd unmarked 
lane blue wdti eoatramng coach- 
toes. A we & «gwy des wMa open 
top motor car m nauMceiii eonanme 
Unrepeatable and me to be mssed. 
PA6 alloys. Ueont mrnms. r/easa. 
nemo, uearc asnal. etocoonit eye 
biFQtai aum. tkrxUffle wrtti U t» 
an) dDcunemuin 

SUFS1B £7358. 

A DflWALD SAVAGE CAR. 

9-7 RB 


3201 1985(0 

Menu BWW Bwgi ivdour 
Haer. «uio aooy umate 
tteanc sunoor. oBtnrai ttetanp. 

on board computer. electee 
wrdo.rt.fF Atotn-pawwaf 
speaker syswm. 1 own er. fa n. 
Pioins co m oton. mcerwy 
toman 

FI 0950 ono 

Tot 8737 221896 (hone) 
or B7372 49393 tartans. 


COLLECTORS CARS 


1964 Rote Reyes Sh« CtoBd 

HL Excellent example rfl totem 

vogue classic EIM5B. 

1958 Barter SI. 

1979 Msmdes 35B SUL im 
1977 Jagnr XJ6 Cnpe. 
1376 JagBV XJ&Coepe- 
1975 Dafmtar Dotele Sb 


FERRARI IHHBUL 

MOV 1985. 

Rosso red with tan hide uphol- 
stery. 1 prorate owner. Genuine 
10.000 notes. Air carehtnang. 
electric sunroot, stereo, any 
wheels, etc. etc. Cost new today 
£40000. 

Save K12J»e at £27,995 
Tet B21 388 3852 




7321 19S4 iAi. Slher/WueUilert 

at 4 speed am**- __” CIr1 f 
windows, sunrort. mirrors, a* 
loy wheels. Iron! armrwls. 
fronl and rear ate JW 
MD's car l c~n« pronwrojv 
dilKm. 110J60- Tel OZ77 
S65251 


320 1902 X re«. CSrapWle mate- 
lie + orey mwnor Ainmnjnr- 
PAS sun i wl. decl rtcji^rors. 
expensive Pioneer »larro. al- 
loyv low nu*e-W- DD t- l ?S 
OwnrT BeauUlul Car. KSJOO 
ono 01-794 66S2 


ALPtKNi Cl K!3l 85 '»=’* 


SSSo MKn 

£15.000 Trl P3B4 271 131 lOl 
firei. 074651 5o9 Wonwl 


mu 3251 Metallic 
conieruMe with teJJJ? 

u.ienor D remsl^ ranorijto mg- 
-l9 e Plus m«r* uj* ABS - 
Ofirrs Td 01 650 OlOO. 


31U 1 SB5 F req. Cosmos. 4d. sim 

* tool rear -ooilrr. BUummhl 
Cl -M4 BT79 iOi 


1974 Daimler Daabta Six. 

VoxtenPlas. 
igTG Datmlar DhUb Six 
Coapa. irate). 

I960 Japmr Hark DL 
19S7 Dilate N/W, 2 door 

Abe large seteBDB ol 
Daimler and Priocexs U®- 
oudoes & classic cars. 

DOT art Sfqffcg anwged. 

H J SIBLEY 
CLASSIC CARS 

01-968 6335. 


1961 E Type 

Roadster 3.8 flat floor. 

Monza red. 
Chrome wire wheels. 
Possibly ttm best 
'm the world. 

mooo. 

01 589 6894 


u.VB TE 2i Ounvote lte 

AulD iranwngd"; O^edWi 

Sir DMieu» Badw rrom 
TTcmend**** »mgtejLSS£ 
and mone» tpenl onre«o™» 
work but body needs IWaWnB- 
£5.000. Tel BrewnMBa lW ^ 
375609 021 

3605656. 


rrnxPWPH STAG - 1978 » 
WMle/lan mtejw- AJte Pg& 

nunilair CondUwei. Bouna 
« £4 J60. Tel: 061 

HTsSt '“"lee W« 


MORGAN + 8 

82 (VJ. 83 model Aksnkaum Sflht 
body. Flams rod. Sack tnm. 
Km compalionsuspanwia Stain- 
less axhusL IBjOOO rates. Fuji 
heavy — : E109R5. 

HABCSS MAimA 3588 


Site. M tetter- Profesrtmtfy 
boR and erajne mnlfied to pe 
22D hhp. 0 - GO S seconds. 150 
nxtas pr hour +. R«y 
htstny. 7JX0 mite only. £11995. 

Weeken tfe - (8252) 727183 
SSS^m 723333 

m 



COMPART 


TOYOTA Septa |U*» J9K. 
White Mtt doth “TSt 
2 JOO miles.— — — 

TOYOTA MRZ. 1985. Grian/IWf 
roenSc. 1 owner. 16 - a)0 r { 1 ^' 


Tot WortWag 



MERCEDES 

508 SL 1988 

5,500 miles. Smoke 

silver. 

As sew 
£30^08 

Tefc 84895 82933. 


280 SE 1985 

«4iuaas MBECTMS CAB. 

Bibo. 18^00 nUBTOOFctnotta 

<raen wdi nsrh green dam tmn. 
teSne sunraoVanW. wwunid 
Boson laoiwaaett e. FSH. l 
owner man new. Excaaan 
tondlaon. 

Elitel . 
B2B4 25738 (Office) 
0204 48968 (Home). 


500 SEC 

1985 Lorinser body IdL am- 
pension & wheels. 8,600 
tides only. Fun service his- 
tory. Unmarked Signal Red 
with Beige velour intenor. 
C%Q>in 

Teh 02707 7802GO. 


MERCEDES 
190 E 

1886 . DMvary miteage- Fitt 

LorinsBTMBC. Spwore. 
Wheats. ETC. Swte «*l 
Bta* doth- 5 speed. £18.700 
finance avadahla. 

Tet 01 629 8818 
ask for PrlsdHa (T) 


190 E 

Amo. 'S5. Red. 

Ex cond. Quad radio 
MHHif. etc I careful 
professional oww. FS.H. 
£1 1J1S0- 

Telepbone: 

(091) 284 1683 


MERCEDES 199 E 
ZJ3 16 valve. 

Oew 6 noM ok! b nWM ■»- 

OT s a*B) ™«d to. St ate 

sah bx*cmb»je tUnvemas 
old ESA EW. AES. Bejraji rjjjj 0 
ad HBBfcH »■ OF HiBML 

Onf prim £22999 
Toi 0908 569107 
or 587374 mfim. 


| Evans Halshafw 

ifWA'ffiiANTE-bli 


Also China blue, roof, 
28.000 imies. service he- 
tury, stereo, superb 

condition. 

£9,758 lor qidck sale 
Tet 061 720 8827 T 




GARAGE 
(ROMFORD) LTD 

Mercedes Benz main 

dealers. 

Underwriters for late and 
low mBeage Mercedes. 
CONTACT 
MIKE D UNFORD 
ON 0708 23511 
AFTER 7PM 
0245 442172 


SILVER SHADOW 

> l~>b] i ti-Ji raeii i.i bodv- 
v:s.l a-V immacotss 
*-di frru-v : i»" r" 1 -*! vd 
duck Mj.bj.-sct: S’ ran Pi* 
dninfe.tr* 

£30.000 

Phone Bristol 
(02721 681451 
9am - 530pm m(H1 - 01 


SHADOW il 

1979 Le-Mms £w over Sd- 
yer fcte Sul Slw tndc 
meres 5S.O00 ncles. FSH 
HLtfW immacuCu 

£15.750 ono 
Kings Laralay 
(09277) 67795 
(Herts). T 



SHADOW 1*74 ■ 67.000 mis. « 
aiitllK »cocrti conu .non only 

actimM bk nwHculouscarr W 
i o»wr from n.-« 
tcT» cxirjs LlO.COOTrl OtS> 
8S2W1 •Wan.Kfcsnimi 


SHADOW n 

1978. Gold metallic 
with brown leather in- 
terior. 28.000 miles 

warranted. 

£15,750 

Tet: 01-328 6272 (T) 


SHADOW n- T rcn. SU*cr Ctvono 
OLur U M*re. Blue. Headlamp 
H j&ti wipe AHIrk wrtour ini*- 
nee. only J-'XIOO mile. 
BUuuwnll Sieeep. recenl Avon 
iifK painiwort rums anefi- 
turn Ta» ull ABtii.mor im July 
£11 050 0053 46076 anytime 


CO m uta te m June 1974. rin 
4 am Mh« mmk/djrk WueWJte 
A rool. FSH W RP- BSOOO mW. 
£13495 ono Viflwum LmMiHi 
or UttPilcr. Oil** 

Ranton 01-657 ]7S5/4. 




SAAB AUTHORISED DEALERS 


QUALITY 
HAS A NAME. 

‘SAFEGUARD’ 

Saab dealers only 
AWARD 'SAFEGUARD' STATUS 
TO THE VERY BEST USED CARS. 

Safeguard' is our 

MECHANICAL INSURANCE. 
EXCLUSIVE TO APPROVED 

SAABS and other quality 
USED CARS. 

EVERY CAR 'VITH THE 
Safeguard' symbol has 

BEEN THOROUGHLY CHECKED 
AND TESTED BY OUR TRAINED 
TECHNICIANS. 

IT'S JUST THE STANDARD 
OF QUALITY YOU'D EXPECT 
FROM THE ONLY CAP. COM- 
PANY IN THE JET AIRCRAFT 
INDUSTRY. 


■flciency 

which 
ex. ex- 
nd rose 
jwih in 
/a s an 
u Turn- 
of the 
from 7 
nt and 
entum. 


jes 

vhe 

m 


CAR ACCESSORIES* SERVICES 


.\ci*-t<''Hsrr- SAF EGUARD 
5>-.at t>l S° 
thj'.-i. 

in !>:•’* p-^ctv 

« .0 tirt.C L-i. ■>*. 

an— 


^ _ K. . fl-'- 

APPROVED'. £ 'J 

USEDCARSMl^aH^I 



Pay less at 


W. 


7,000 MILES ONLY 

500 SEC bte wdh nbxr 
nuSo/stHw. Bteanc «xte 
UX iBWtaiO suspotaon 
tadny ftfcd Bmoar 
UK awteUwwad 
1 Dwnw. 19B* 

Cwi aoty be described as^ 
inmiaa^. wite *aMte*(ttdW 
E44 jlOO attend at £29.750. 
Tel (08077) 5889 aayfiae 



authorised 

dealers 


E (124) Auto 

1988. White «ith Hue d«h 
interior. AHoy wheels. Stereo 
Radio cassette 

£15.758 

Tel: 0925 755988 Sen 
8925 818500 office 
Eesi Motors Ltd 


MOKEDCS esw c wagon 290 
nr 5WB C 1*9 lilt VS- 8 
SwriwtfMc. wtdle -m> 
mm FSH. i 

nm. stereo radio cas&etu luted. 
26.000 ^123S0- 

0960 54499 5 90 pro onw ards 
midweek any uroe w/end. 


LAMBORGHINI 

C0HNTACH 

5000 Oaatlri Vahe 

waSB-tg L rad«J^“j* 

O&JDOOono. 

TBim -859 6281 

Cvphooe D836 231437 


320. 1<W5. Polaris MeUUIC. 

jl oOO mil*»- °m' SJ* 

roof Pioneer stereo erogM*-“: 

rwidiucn £5.800. Tut. 

S57e4 


7354. A Hi-’. 1^81 ’W 

™sur, JBWWS? 

ssars 


At ail not, POA 
53S i May 85 «lr* 

' 7W r 5 .oHKCl 775451 tnomel 

gS«»jSsJ*r 


ay-5-r-iria 

., £10.500 

SJteK-.weo^-O 9278. 9667 

= iJTS^Tei. M ' uon 
'k^c- mnn* 

3lG 

7Vos?7S ^iw fa swm T 

525 . 

"fftS-wS-T-i oa«4W*»w 

rS-i? ssss 

S&rStxsr* 

I, IIKI*"**' . jiiiElW 

XlOititm 1 ' 

n .-t <. ,W * 

— ^ 'i'qpt models 

sw-aSsWa 





230 E S^t ‘85 P UIO. WW W; 
Many extras. auaUOf r»JJJ I 
cassette. lB^OO mOra- pertecl 
randKMTO. £11.000. Tet. 
FamtNHduoti I02BZJ 5185TB. 


LHD zSO « A reo. ZB-OOO mnro. 

superb cundlbon. air con- we- 

[M. ailo. unmartied. £6.7B0. 
TO; 04S5 632594 horoe/021 
2» 9547 bus. 


SOO SIC Black mKI, black Mdo. 

ACT crutse. alloys. 

owner. FSH. WMeWMOMl- 
£13.650. Ol 948 8986 T 


wwa tt Auto. 84, B. ivory* 
*32.000 milM. Stmronl. Etec^ 
windows Orutoe cunuul. MB 
Tex Alloy wheels Stereo/ Iwo 
/ OfaThninaculale WBMWjy 
*. service £10250. TM 061 
2487100 w/dayi icontact Jane 
smytnei. 


*30E«l23s**l*»l-Cre«. 19000 

^rnlei. metallic mboe 5 *^- 

autornaUc. gecblc stmioot and 

windows. Pioneer d«»B* 
hot,. 1 owner. £12.500. 
THertKMW. Ol 60* 9033 or 
0727 38111. . 



DWBA Commercial 

™ ET 

l^pi ^ ^ Supermarkets 

KEW HOBBY POWER WASHERS 

£205 + VAT. DeL £6 

MASSIVE DISCOUNTS 

On S.I.P. welders: Numatic vacs; 
Compressors; Air Tools: 

Space Heaters, etc. 

e.Q. S.I.P. Migmate 100 
£130 -t- VAT. Del £6. 

HENRY YAC 

£65 + VAT. Del £4. 

PHONE NOW FOR FURTHER DETAILS 

96 London Road, Manchester 
061-273 6347 

474 CoHeoe Road. EnTmgton. 


Get your business on the road 




Readlnq Common Icahons. one ol 
Sy wen MtaDMIwa 
oXertnq tonrasbc botgeura on me 2000X 
and BOOOS. ONLY • rJ«^ w '' v V- 

. r >"■ 

We also have a large range o« V. 

•ALL BRANDS' ol cellular car and MSr., 
portable letepnones available. 

Heading Communications guarantee a 
pQcofioi service and very competitive 
prices. Phone us now lor immeaiate^ 
quotations ana mtocmahon on tne totesr 
Motorola products 

■ ceflnei • vodapnone • Motorola • NEC 
• Mobka • Roomer • Mobiles ■ Ponabk^ 

MSTAUATKMAr VOW PPBMSES V 
P£PonG cofTirnurncHTiDns 


MM Turbo 16 ultn- lealnw 
^ March B6. low ' mte 

art- POA Td EwW iOS92i 


S**n MO TURBO 1983. 5 door, 
black wiUi tan interior Phlllilfe 
Quartz tteif-o. PAS. rtectnc 

window,. cwnOMr Saab dr Jter 

tort ice record since- te" ftenn. 
in ucrlccl rcutdUion. £5 99S Ol 
,,93 631 1 ihomci 01 251 2S2S. 


MEW Saab VMO Turlw 87 ModH 
Inc aulcmalic cUm-ite cdblrol 
S-ltr- HKfion L k 'isr -ti£l 
able nnmedialrti . 03. 2. **49b 
iCMIlcci or 0737 3 1-88.7 

■Sunday' 






IRtt 1Y> ^*2 Aum. ftvx»«uni 'Am* -i* 

JQLXWrr-e. 

«m Bdte-Hoy«» S*te Cloud M-B'^7- 

icowad renege MtWrrwet. 

FSH. i.u*a be 

Pftowned JaguBns/DaimlHB 
New cars ■ Service - Parts _ 





JAGUAR A DAIMLER 


230 TE Estate -B- Brl). automatic. 

"^rarra*. reawn f« «» ' ^ 

Mercedes 

ono TH 0626 520706 ihoroe 
5247471. 


240 D 196*. sun roof, air con. 
fully auloroalK. Ij“ ™WJ- 
munac. £8-9500! 347 4541 of- 
fSToi-743 9420 home- 




)TI I'll 


WAKTED Ferrari 24fr80>. W- 
vate purchaser iTOC memba-' 

reauirts row nHteme wnin cd- 

ei or roe 

tamixiilaie cooffltton t** 
iwf-4<] Top cash pouf for Uw 
r|om vcMdv. 0268 26600 fOf- 
S?S> /Srn 821327 fHomrf 


■ n | J i Jli i 


200 AUTO 1982 Y red- WJIte/- 

Wueimertoc. pristine cundlUon 

IhrouramuL 1 owj^L *“521 

mites. FSH. C8400TH. OTO| 
05667 n« * weekends, ozos 
271758 day. 


280 CE ii)l smok ed sU ver. 

Lrinfd DV MntHW*- “V 
S/roo (. windows. ABov wheels. 

|iSo r*d/aBS. 24.OO0.mito. 
£16.500 OJ16. Tel Ol t£S 7 




JAGUAR XJ6 
{New Shape) 

erfras. 

Price on aoofcrabon. 

Contact 
Brian Jnhnson 

Bristol SVeet Motors Ud 

Bristol Street 
Binaiogbate 
Tet 021 622 2777 


KEW JAGUAR 
SOVEREIGNS 

For Ire* sale. 

Silver Spiras. Range Rows- 
Mercedes and rnaitv other 
moorisriB) available 
Tet COLMANS CAR HIRE 
01-340 9280 
01-340 7902 


ALLOY 
WHEELS 

POLISHING SERVICE^ 

edbaOWWL H> Bw to* roord 1 S»“ tor tender 
14/18 iWSDOWHNKWS 
GOIBERS GREEN. LOUDON mill 

Tet S i-455 7405 mnw ,. 

m ml 1 d «■ r""" 1 **“ *“ w " WB59 ’ 


igaun 388 OTS Q.V. US IBJ. 
1 aooo Mlto Red tvimcream 
leather. I owner. FSH. Aro 
Sid- Pri stine e ondMIon. W W 
tm ry in create ro 

£35.750. Leeds O' SOtee- 

(0532) 629006 AnVItme 


LOTUS ESFBfT TWRBO Jtme 8* 

ExceMenl «* nd ®2 , J^ OT t JSl' 
am» FSH- 29.000 mllea- 
KirfAlHr Slher. blue Mdwr. Alt 
S5rEi2W ™ Cranurom 
area r 04 7685 > 712 


280 SL *88 SronJil red. 12.000 
miles. Totally oiWnai. Alloys. 

eiaununid R/Cto^. PntTUe«l< 
£21 .450 MTO TO Ol 876 9922. 




LOWS KSP8BT S3. 

nS3»er- ‘9G2. red. btaAtoWlv 
er aK cond- CTtd/eam. Prlsllne 

SiiSJron- 

onlv. EIOjSOO. 0915 230856 


280 SL 1**B6 Convetlttte Auto- 
matic. Hard & Son uws'vmic 
16.000 mUca. £21.995 Tel. 
0083 277696 (Office! T 


450 SLG 1980. white Private 
rcwsi radon. Fully I bated- Pris- 
tine condidon £15.9 9^.C all 
<02241 63421 1 before 6pm 


mmms 


tovota »e» 98 fi?LS*^5g; 
nnck interior. 15.000 mito 
wheel locus. usuW "J; 
tr». Perfert ctmdllKm. £8.000 
Tel. 01-670^380 



450 SLC. 2 door raw. V red 
MetPll* brorew. AlKo AbEx 
Das £9.995 ono. 01 223 6493. 


MERCEDES 230C AUW. * A* ^ 
Wr.roori. tocull wlUl brown 
Inlerror. eteetrlc sunre ot. a ttr- 
toe nuteaoe foe year. cxoeUem 
3S.S25rC7.760 TH ; LUton 
10682) 32365 10 VW* 

*80 SBL. 1982 Citamnagng nie- 

^3iJT^ESI» ftago 

casselle 50.000 ntttBLl F»f. 
Cjtcellenl. 1 owner. Mffs ® 
£11.996. TH rods' 

3191 let®! 091 *88 7566. 


500 5EL October "83. sBv-er blur 

Ir mtftP tVHlf IrttRhOWf- 

XSS^ J7XOO milr». !«■ 

s^TSSI? 8 * 

sale. Tel. D1 969 *6 ™- 
360 D. Unregmrred. Dernw 

lhrn J?Smo mre 


041-8823381 

0PEM7DAYS 


ROLLS ROYCE* 


SHADOW ■ 1979 Cbmlnul. Ian 
liSHwr. eveffle*. u -?® '"jj’ 
FSH. Cassete. years MOT. tm- 
{SniuJr^ £16.950. view, 

u uidlesbam. Surrey Tel OZ76 
71866 


SB-VER wrann u with dls 1979 
25 000 mites. 1 owner. Cnauf 
feur driven Black, nrev 
btienor Phone ironi and rear 
£26.750 Tel 062882 40*5 ial 
ter 8.00 nml. 


SILVER SHADOW 1W Walnul 

mown Wrth magnolia leaincr 
interior VI. OOO FSH B 

track cassette. All 
Das. £1 5.995. Tet. 0858 34064 


5H.VER SHADOW 1977. row 
mtleaoe. orey wiifi black roof. 
£11.000 (Al&o per^mdieed 
number ntue U redulrrdi 
Tri.O-ws: moo uiyi»te 


MOTORS LEASING 



FOR PEUGEOT 


PEUGEOT 285 Std Van gJ-35 JJ + 

PEUGEOT 305 SW VM PeW pw + VAT 

sBsarg SSiS 
ssTAsraSm-gS;" 

TALBOT EXPRESS VAN 1BB0 Dffisel £39 Jl pw + VAT 

Telephone Gerald Gough, 

Fleet Sales Manager 
01-720 5151 extension 42 

lionheart LONIWN’S leading 

PEUGEOT TALBOT DEALER 


XJ6 3.4 

C registered, auto. 
WhrtB, tweed mm, 
20.000 miles, air con. 
2 yeare warranty. 
£12.500 

Tet 061 794 202*. 


TWR JAGUAR *" S r JS ,, S 
red metallic, doe skln tude. 2 
awmTs. air cbndllKWilng. 
48.000 miles. FSH. 
nuulllion ihrouflhout £14.750 
one Day Maidennead783.9S / 
Eies Twvferd 343292 


1985 XJS. 3 6 Sewing red. Doe 
&kin tealher Inlertor. Air candl- 
Monin*. Hwyw. Cmiujuict. 
7^0 mHes. Wimaodaie 
£16.000 Trt Htenrtiurcti i 
040241 48163 evea A w/endi. 
HornctiurOi 71808 days- 


JAGUAR 

NEW MOSEL 

XJS 3.6 

Silver Birth. tsaWr rale- 
nor. an undinining. eic. 
Automatic. Defcverv nnto- 
age only 522350 
1922-55677 
(weekdays) 


jUS he Via 28 months aU. ma- 
roon. Fully «y*Ki' n « 1 “2 n 2 
air con A an board romouier. u 
morons ekiended manufactur- 
ers warmnly. *7.000 mile* 
personaUzed numb* Plate, 'rd 
class coiuuiron FSH a'-a^te 
£15.995 no offers For fu™rer 
details please ctmlaci Mr A »• 

Fuller or Mr B " 

Iter hours 0734 483388 or afler 
hours 04° I 681797 


SOVEREIGN- B red/84 Rhodium 
niter wilh 9«y doeskin interi- 
or Sunroot Air cond Eicclnc 
seals. Alloy wheels Many >«k- 
Ira-. 19.000 miles £12.950 
Tel 01 539 3937 (Office noior.' 


1S81 XJS HE 39.0X1 miles. E-i 
con. FSH. Jersey red. 16.600 
Ol 958 E-978 


MCW Rrahl hand drive Mercedes 
660 SEC. Paid red/cream 
leather. lull sprofiralions. 
available Immediately tor utr 
pon or lor export, nw lax free 
124.995 DM UK drt« 
£63.995 Tel Ajditony Brad- 
bury 01-800 7995. 

S0O sc 82 iXk ro« Hold. *"5“™ 
vetour. s/roof- al» 1 ». Bfi. 
E/W. C/C. 68.000 mb. ^ 
FSH. £1 1 .250. Tet 01-508 
B593. Ol 790 1195 ollice 

2M T Ecmte 1982 Manual. 1 
Doctor owner from new FSH 
EHtenstuT stereo Ted I* 
MOT Sfowreom conam on 
£6.550 Tel 04034 <6069 T. 
200 (1241 ■ 1986 8200 mUcs. 
TTHsiK orecn. Centre arm rest 
Manual 

£14.950 Tel. 0382 77256 IT* 
200 SE. May 85 14.000 mlto 
cream. M** 1 * «*(* ■™J ac - 
£16.975. Tel 02403 22654. 
2S0 SL Dee 83 Siraud w<j . 
36.000 mis Hard A 
£19.250 Tel; 031 Ml 6806 T 


na CE Coupe- * res iBIi. 
*^Ss/bUrl. **!. . ABS. auto ^H. 

Kk /E 01-741 75*6 
IS8 5 8 Mercedes 3» SE Auto 
Vrofsted m notwaneto arewn 






SILVER SPBBT 86 Model, rtajet 
with mMnoUa hyde. vntej 
4.000 miles. 

£51.930 TetiOl «*7 OOCto 
. I name 1 Ol 316 7363 (worm. 


ML vat SHADOW Jan 79^ 

nul with mavndla Interior. 
64.000 mlto FSH 1 14® min- 
er £14.995 Tel 08444 3561 


0ENTLEV SI Connnenlal '19651 
door. MuUiner Coupe. Prwter 
MC con<, ■ ° 24q ' 13361 
ancc. 0249 713*01 home 
SILVER SHADOW Mark IN BeO- 
nipf rh condihon. £10.000 Td 
01 636 J45J 

SILVER WRAfTH. 7 row Umou 
sine 1953 Etcdienl Cl!.? 30 
Tri 05*38 252* 


THE NEW 
JAGUAR 

avaiaNe on coraab tvs/ 
leasing rnttot wittmi 
mamEnance. 

Detrvery winra « tns on 
certain models 
Ctod KHTH BHXMDtt 
CRYSTAL FACIUT1K LTD 
M82 Z5732 


NEW VOLVO 

estates 

For less man S9.300. lor 
special leasing arrangn- 
mants. please phone 
01-543 3232 

IAN ALLEN MOTORS 
OF WIMBLEDON 


FORB^-f 
j^OTBRINT^ 



1ARY 

OF 


frASSfflED 


The Times CbHfM 

eohmms arc read by 1J 

millfam of the most 
people in the country. The 
foltowiag caje^ries 
appear regularly each 
week and are genendly 
accompanied by refeTant 
editorial articles. Use toe 
coupon (righlL and find 
out haw easy, fast and 
economical it is to 

advertise in The Tlsies 
Classified. 


mwm 





WEDNESDAY FK^AY^ j 

iigs Sigg gLT SSitatto- j 

gasassMSiA S - S ““; . 

«d CaUedaWes. 8**"™* 1 Guide - ' 

SATURDAY ! 

sssaSJiwaw- ; 

secretarial appointmtius ^ 1 

roc °l s ggE; ,NCLUD,NG ! 


JAGUAR XJS Hfc Y rcg. 1 owitef 
Ctraming black tytt b ac k ■d d n 
interior All u&ual retinnnenis- 
3 ) 000 mlto. IW. UrunarV^l 
ccmdllwn £10.950 Trt*03Z9i 
336577 anytime iHanlsi 


JAGUAR XJS HE AUIO. July 
1903 . SiWw flreyAwack teaih- 
er 29.000 miles immaculaie. 
£13 950 Td -03841 23*4dl 
i of lice i 0«» 731173 ihomei 


US HE. v rea Pmtbterorifter 
Mark Burt. Udn inltoor AJI «« 
tras. air cond «« 3SD00nuto. 
FSH Mini condition £10.760. 
Trt <08831 8*3231 


183 IA) Daimler Soieretem * 2 
Auto. In mart, air cond e™J»* 
conlroL alloy wheel*. 35XJOO 
miles, service history. £9.960 
0234 870214 T 


XJS 1981 40.000 mlto only. Full 
htslary and -^cr'.icr 
beautiful cmwilion. 

TO. ClSlitnlrom -02*2- 37477 
Mini- or 0452 78587 home 


DBICTOM *J2 Auto 1984 A. 

1 escrpuonal on rial cond. 

27 007 miles. rSH^ *<**■ 

£9.500 0242 527796. 

JAGUAR /DAIIBXR 1983-86 
Cnoure <d 45 whan- ranoe 
£6.995 C 19 OOO. Esl 19 year* 
P\ Trl 01 -6&* 9833 Essex m 
XJS 3 o Cabriolet Mu- 84 28.000 
miles, brnnw mill doe "’.'ri*"; 

e,eelf*-ni condllKm £14 96" 
TO 0276 01)33*1 

MLW januar x J6 Z 9 Full wt 
realKlic orice-. Ilnonce ntall 
Tel i07&Ji 22459 inVUnw T 
XJ6 3.4 83. Aulp. Creen *3£00 
inh ExTOlHU rond £5 995 
T.4- Ol 486 0122 Ofllte T 


Fill in the coupon and aliach il 10 your advcmsemcni. written on a separate 
Of papcTaliowin* 28 .hum .and ^ per ring- 

Name 



farmer safBnaatkjn 

01441 7089 




Telephone °*xc of memo* 

(Pk-asc allow Ihrro tkorHing, da >5 pnor to insertion date.) 
Use your Access, Visa. A*» or Diners cards. 












































YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


Oueueing to start up at the village 

"SSrSKS SssSss 
-5hr 3*?=S£ aSssaasscs £Si S mSss 

Chester, also under the co®pjs»f§ 


manager, bod v.raoiwm «aiarv. paw vy «»» »«-«*, 

SkrSptkn area b«a^d^ break eren this year, 

s^ce has been so great he has ktlus He says: “We are not running it as a 

office to a small business. enterprise but as part « 

Designed for sESinK cotoBoitmaA to help small 

businesses in the commmuty. 

The 25 existing rants are offeree on a 
four-year lease at about £2^0 
metre a month for office space and np to 
£3 for workshops. . 

Over the last year, jest two harnesses 
have moved out because of hunted 



Design wi 

nesses and start-np ventures, the Brttj 
Oak village is unable to ke e P®JJJ!™® 
iJJSestofor office and workshop 

“SSft- nnits will havebeen 

to abo ^ . ~ ' "iMWid - mrt becaose of KmiteO mg gear, awn 

5MI^A ?ia g S g ZSJTA Ztt* rn»«« bioc^n^coc ^ 

Three women 
who went 
high-tech 

By Sally Walts 

Firms with expensive 
that they have no idea howto op««e a« 
providing start-up 

Cardiff cooperative launched by 1b ree 
women who, a year ago. ted Uttle 
knowledge of the new technology. 

But the three - T J? ird r e c5S n ^ 

Helen Paterson and Carol Esposti 
sin«laken a nine-month courem 
computing and elatromcs moimted ^ 

South Glamorgan Women s Workshops 

<S oT V implemig U. they became 
SGWW's first trainess to start thrarjnm 
business. Ha^ng surmounted numerous 

priate computer system and to help 
Sp, prepare the database and tram the 
staff to use the equipment. 

Market research pointed to the need 
forsuefa^ fiSouih Gtamotj^ 

Even so, the trio had not expected io 
SSw so many costly MM 
idle because no one knew bow to handle 

* nSs Holland recalls: “We were aston- 


THF. TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 * l_,„„rrCC! 

wnsiN ESSTO BUSINESS 

WATERSIDE STUDIOS 

OFF LADBROKE GROVE 

from £35 A WEEK 

is where, tor 

| 1 HIW i the cost of many a damp 

CANALOT «-/555m-S; 

chocolate factory overhaugiog Ufa 



MrOravriord says: “We ^**“^*2 
wben we are in sole charge browse w* 

cannmkaswewaBttormrt. 

The businessis at Broad Oakbave 
created about 70 jobs, ■gjjt 

Carousel, carriers and t raoer, 

S^rawrB««st, which nrairafecliire^B- 
ins gear, and Bkranalytocal Research, a 
r?-£ :_i mocorol, nunnanv. 


cmexbea»niii« Bc tevirf>^^^^. 


NEW CONCEPT open market 

INTEXTILE 

WALL-COVERING flk.P.JutoWra** 


pt&seanua 

tor further deoils 


HOTE IS* 
LICENSED 
WEflSSS^ 

pewsey vale, 

WILTSHIRE 


MANAGING DIRECTOR 

TO £30,000 + EQUITY + BONUS 

gsMswaafiis sag 

! gsffjggaaM ■& i LgggftAgfi graffs 
l S^^SS^’S3S n S--- „ 




SOGER CALVERT 
mi Are oda tra 
hm! CMUC* 
Wwfcnp 
Nans 


MR FRIDAY 



local authority’s economic unit, which 
made a £1,500 grant for equipment* The 
thev had simply been instaUedand left 
Yet some ted cost about £12,000. In one 
case, the person who had bought the 
system had gone and it was being used as 
a pot-plant holder.” ... ■ ,k» 

The backbone of their busi^sisihe 
pac ^ iys they can offer to meet clients 
needsand training staff m using the 
equipment The three have not ad- 
vertised; commissions have come from 
word of mouth recommendations and a 
story in the South Wales Echo. 

The three supply business services 
such as word processing phone answff- 
ing and accountancy skills. They also 

supply temps. ■ ~i 

Despite having attended abaan® 
course for cooperatives, they found the 
start-up brought problems. One J^sthat 
under the Enterprise AUowancx Scheme, 
they each had to put up £1,000 to 
guarantee the business. . . 

Another was preparing a busmess plan 

for the bank. A cooperative development 
agency helped - but several tanks 
trio started with two computers, an IBM- 
PC-compatible machine and the 
Amstrad PCW, and hope soon to invest 

* D T(fkecp overheads manageable,ihey 
rent their premises on a monthly- 
renewal basis and have negotiated a 

.■ * nrtjtfml 


obfcms. No nod ^OTgoy 
ytafr or mstall expensive 


[ looking FOR a GLASOOW base? 

WORRIED ABOUT COST? 

We can solve your 

reception/secretam 

equipment. , 

ness community. 

167 BATH STREET, GLASGOW « 

TEL: 041 2042811 


INVESTORS REQUIRED 


i-h-d. Many ted never been used st all; 

created difficulties by raising qu^hons 

about their husbands' fiuancaalresouiTXS 
1 somewhat irrelevant as two of the 
women were single parent* 

Eventually they found amaxjjger ot 
Midland Bank’s Docks branch - who 

^r^Xuy 

ities. as they had nme dependent 
children between them, two under 
school age. These two have free nurrery 
places at SGWW, which aiso provided 
temporary business pannes 
days, plus guidance from a researcher, 

Sl There was support too, from ^ufo 
Wales Microsystems Centre. jk loatL 
businessman, Ron Saunders, and the 


business 
be 


:■ briefing 


a'SSrjar 

£275* The three-month programme, 
including four residential courses 
lasting 15 days in afl, is being runby the 
Hotel and Catering Training Board, 
K^^TOanpo^rServgs 
tori mission and the Eng lis h Toun^ 
Board. It follows a successful launch for 
the scheme in York earfierthis year. 

. j LujiwiA rfuff mananf 


Unique opportunity to run your own bus 
from homes 2 - 3 days per weekJCan 

operated by husband or wife. 

Minimum investment required. 
£25,000. 

2 maHon satisfied customers World-wide 

Growth rate 54% per annum 
since 1980 

Fbr further information write to: RdraBrown. 
Consolidate Property thMI/I S Wtaworto 
Street West Manchester. Ml 5WG. 

Teh 061 236 0906. 


TELEX 

A COMPLETE TELEXWCTEtl FOR 

£795 + VAT 

phone syntra 

01-582 2958 FOR DETAILS 


HOVE, SUSSEX BY-THE-SEA. 

nU ^AM BESTAUABAHT 

.150 awers. 

RARE apponruNnY - S0L£ aobus 

HAYLORjM® 

TEL: (0273) 721041 


Your new 
from 


TELEX Machine 
£541 + VAT 

B.OS. Limited 

1-735 8171 


renewal basis ana nave 

_r .1.- Mm&ccinnals tdviu£ advice had 


Boara. it rouows a ueirarc nuwum — --- 

the scheme in York earterthis y®^-,. of the professionals giving advice 

Areas covered indude staff management neve r run a business themKlves. 

finance and coshng. # Contact: Microhelp Cardiff Ltd, Unit 

P27 Cardiff Workshops. Lewis Eoai. 
EaamMrz Cardiff Tikphone: Cardiff 
(0222) 496142- 



\^||9IUbuv A 

conqwcn l» 

nnvn 


Asking price £300,600- 

Reply: Mr Kay 
35 Dahomey Rd. 
Loudon SW16 6NB. 


MIDLAND BAS ED 
ENGINEERING 
COMPANY 

(SQA l K &ated) 

Doe to expansion has spare 

capacity on power presses 
to 500 tomes) 



SNOOKER 
WINE BAR 
SHOPS 

Property tn South Hants 
town for conversion to 
Snooker H ail. W Kw 
Bar /Restaurants and 
Retail Shops. 
0,000 sq ft, £340,000. 
Phone 0705 462932- 


A HEAL ESTATE 
COMPANY 
IN COSTA BLANCA, SPAIN 

j, looking for an afflomt pn w "ft qgrtoca 

? n ^ Lto.,t a En^^ 

wrthciOTiculum vitae to Box A47, in* 


FoU transport 1^. 

ava latte. 

For further eitoinanon: 

021 772 4M1 
■ TELEX: 333180 

w in, at Sahara AIW . laM 1 !* 


time. Pliooe Ol- 


KUemem «««««: 

29180. 


— 

— 29180. 

3M Whisper Telex ^ business for sale | 


A real alternative to 
TELEX BUREAUX 



m the heart oMte 
Very well-known 

VEGETARIAN 

RESTAURANT 


BABE 

OPPOBTOMITY 

■na acquro gagrao 
sale tn last ®qmngjgm»: 
ural food sector. 
in 1976. lnstti®on m 6W 
trada. BSwaa T/O vw»i 
good m8i9ns. PrmdpaB 
only. 

CONTACT BOX H8S. 


SOUTHERN 
ENGLAND 

For sale. Cawing 

i Equipment/Sundries fflW 

pSSrrade WhojMaiers. 

t/oceSxlooo. 

Tremendous potential, 
excaBent town centre, 
f/h premises- 
Continuity assured. 
RMA 0245 252525 
anytime 
Ref. 4000 


URGENTLY 
REQUIRED 

Companies or aged* 
contact with ftnedwe com- 
ptoas particilaiftf n owismb 
locations. Requf wl tn m aiim 
unique. patflirtBO poflun. oe- 
signed s pedn aHy to 

mutapie ^ mrunrt. J]* 

product ml ma tsting 
are in phw. The pow-^- 
unliniited. Thbjs » 

busmess mwton^wnw 

opM P*??? ™S£J® a - 

tjons 3 existing contacts. 

Richards 
Consultants 

06846 2062 or 
0684 73122 

TECHNICAL 
PARTNERS 

srsss msssi 

’TUS»5w»ortY“»* 

“raEBr 

TaRx 296595 


■■ im HOMES Lana. 
SXS-OOO- THi 02s« S97377 

LOANS* 
INVESTMENT 

I HMHWACnlRHM Cooauny In 
1 TorS U«^an 

(he UJt. and 0 . 6 ^. Um**™' 
mum mi Uxltvidual 

ESSStoortaae* ««-««• "5“ 
u iMM Hfed cp IbvcA *®to 

s LSSS JmMM 1 

me tuwiiw. Repin BOX hm . 

«rk wew on I Wff i 

qcarad ttt Gw 

SuBfllng »oc»el» d w» °«»* “BSS ! 
Hand. Wtco HMW 0706 
833541. ' 


BUILDING supplies 
ft SERVICES 


) 


engineering 

a'aggtfu 

non fsnnus, aso Byoraws- 

T WX 


EXPANDING 

COMPANY 

building 4,000-5,000 
sq ft in or near a etty 
or major town hi 

Southern England - 

fnctuding outer 
London. Must have 
■ good road and 
rail connections. 
Please repty: 

Ref: ROH, 

ILS.T. Limited, 

■ 203 Temple Chambera, , 
Tensile Avenue, London. 

1 ^ECSYOBi 


hi i finn Room R4MR. 

Comra/pw with 
and tana. 6.000 n B. A wlw 
Swumt y. 

MuiOnenL BaxnMd MaiCdS « 
S^^I 2220 jea*» Amo« 
01-789 8099. 

MVESTMEMT OWlKJI«un«y. 

mmm In gmndi of (rt** 

BOUOOurse mSntaSSS 

mm cernrr of 

jsgsa.jss'Sic'SfiS 


distributors 
^AGENT^ 

URGENTLY 

required 

sales agents with [Strong 
mail chemist 
i conoecdons in London 

area to sdl fbr Christmas 
trade a new iqHnariset 
British perfume. High 

coni'" 1 ™ 00 - Stocks 

available now for 
immediate delivery. ' 
Export and outer 
. LoodOn -whoksalc . 
enquiries weteome. 
Tdt 81-909 3454. 


IMPOBT/EXP ORTgj 

finance for 

IMPORTS 

Unlimittd GnaiKE fix latere 
of aedit. Deformans m- 
oomd pios dzuonot of 
ixiroices in one nnujec 
packoff- 
TdeitoK 
Barry Wood oa 
01-5433322. 


lenvhcnvMriL 

W^aKirafWMWr 

deteispieaMniamting. 


ttol 

status- 

gspfy t> MXML 


WALES 

Exceptional modwr 1, 
purpose bitet 25 
bethoom Hotel with ex- 
tensive fimdtons rooms 
in POPU^toMtiooT/O 
£435301- Good profits. 
fiMyWnaas.PALCS^ 
Chamd&nwym. 
SlMriaS **£****- 

Tet 064B 68Z342. 


WINE BAR 

lx bisy west Wmfe Ob. 


nasal Cde BjrjWfe th^r 
lincwporaws aupnt> toe 

ia*i sta npoq ttf* b R^- 
□peoRBS unds imysam wnn 

hones (20 ^ rema- 

| rag) mb on oKB a siiot 

Reply fa BOX H69. 


£285,000. 
HISTORiC AMD 
MUCH FAMED 
SOUTH DEV0H 
FREE HOUSE 
Occapying an axceflent trad- 

iSe onier ttiroughrai-W^ 1 
T/0 £160254 (BNdudw 
VAU For Ml deou s a nl- 

charnwg prooeny please 
tBlBphone: 

HELUKER HOGG 

& C O- - 

(0202) 477338 



GENUINE IMPORTERS 

Wanted for- finds I cmWM 
boara. bw* crudD-oB Ms hub 
n Anbc patei oi. Woora or 
r enqanas only tn M: 

General Manager, 

. Reetaks IM, 
75-78 Rose Bank Road, 
1 LONDON E17 8NH 
Telex 2965S5 


LKE TO BW.A 
pn/nnEL/ 


Send tar fiw tart o* ai crates, 
afl prices. Sutton a ftidiere. 
Counirys Ingest teenced Prop- 
era_Apents. 

Tefc Bauiumuouth 
(0202) 296S91. 

■Ino 81 Orally (0382} 385556 


I COMPANY NOTICES | 


WMfTBI OorraRic raid Icanra^ 

cM wrara _ 

•sutaBumi. W FOiers. so TPicra 
cic Alsu nhlly oortewe driTOPS 

artesian wdb. Reply »» Mi " 


BUSINESS SKitVlCEs]| 


for only £8 a week. 

Have you noticed how expensive it can beto 

use aTelex Bureau? Registraton fees^ Extra 

costs for outgoing and incoming tetexes. Not to 

as little as 'E8.00 a week. To find out more, post 
the coupon or call the number below - day. 
night or weekends. 

Virtually silent. • From just *£8 per week. 
Comparand • AcompleteTtelex 
easy to use. machine. 

0272 217300 personal service 

Trt iiJjAi. 55865- 


IT TUnDof 

tel Gillian Kelly on 
(0966) 33903 or 33151 

ARCHITECT 
W1 

Busy eantral London prae- 
tied satej+gn roput; 

aaon lor as wofKm Purac 

and Private sectors. May* 
awards ra eacn 


nStei'pw* 

pracnoa raqumng a «ong 

London presence and/or 
wotting to broaden as dL 
ent base. Annual fee fiwe) 

£350,000 


duty fiw Ou»laocW»g ««i 
s^aned bialwra wli n iaiHm U_ 

canons JSSPnr 

Hiih Hah vaUnw hgnrarr. rsr 

lu SS»Ed«ara 9»« WT g-!® 

IM Adv lrt»f. B« 3**r- 

c p.o Sydney. Axctrata MOi ■ 
WORSMOP, 

svui tffiOM social SttUWmV. 
gHli arTM»' nwMerta»5_ »i JW 

krt SgiiKC of leading Kvta pon- 
Turnover £I&5O00 ‘mc , udnH 
£75.000 boofcii unravmra 
win. fWnra 4 

+ s a.v . Lariuae * Lwiuna. a> 

SioonolW* C=»i»r*»ra«7r. 
VERY 

tuun J** P *J“ 

Turnover up WH 

?j [..gy MgjBy- £”m" 

Famborouqh. BM*V «> *** 

ALE OT JURA soK- shop /Prtr ol 
suiun and 

T/o £150.000. Pbonr 049682 
231 day S55 nn. 

jo. but. Clfl.OOO wo DWan* 
,0932* 246342 to/' 1 '*- 

i Uu^^^WANTEpj 


PARTNER SOUGHT 

with 

EERGT aid HAGNUTIN 

to assist witti the operation 
and management of a 

Tounsm 


in the 

South of Scotland 

Box No. A21. 


SURVEILLANCE 

MONITORING 

and counter 
«dwpm»J £rb^»e 

ao»W*J. prol^«>^- 
Rng or wdte fi yg teBigL 

RUBY ELECTRO MGS 
^CIROMCSLTO 
nSjiLira Brtdfl* M 
London CI O SAW 

oi-sr 


COMPUTERS ft 
COMPUTING 
SEHV1CK 


munn icl JS5«^S!£ 
A DRS KX ara»_a90Q sratra 
Mauilrame iraicliasm. 

0742 307388. 

COM l HOC car Itact cow **wn 
OCWi CaCMl PIW ««» 
gS^qaoa 474462- 
WAMI1U IBM dWWWj"}' 
AERO A04 6360 ■ 022. 7997. 
|SSe'S74®M7388/. 


Reply to: 
BOX HSO. 


otn tan Scaled MW“™ 

m inrrafr inwne imiKiwv 
rj'iOK gi. F« further tnlor- 
Srton 0293 3WI»7 


VHJLAGE POST 
OFFICE & STORES 

In the heart ot 

Beatrix Potter Country, 
Lake District. For sale as 

■■asr 


busine ss 

OPPORTUNITIES 


] 



Details telephone 

■“■■“too 

Wtodennae 4532_ 
VMflmereA 


PHlUpAR WOOL 
SHOP. 

Prormnan position at 

WitettaraB Cny. 7 JKL. 

tuse Rent ndume S5.«H 
per annum. £liOW * 
SA«. 


•SB*MsVA7jwra*Kn xiv3W9K-tM3«r<>">*** smrn Tet 0902 75457B 


BECOOffiPARTOFA 
£420ra GROWTH 
INDUSTRY 

We se looking fwBcwsees & 

ioiniargtoi»ii€ neIS *^®* 
Hour Photo Codies m toe ujl 

L-S’ce c v&s f-.zsxzs ft 

vc JT9.1KS eipWKt raws®- 
VT-T IliOOQ. 

serc a' ass»K saws so 
issue fryafe* 

For a conateiepiciuteai m» 

u nu)ue oseJdmwtX "Trts to 7 

ilSIot 


Vanessa Gem 
Out) PWO. 29 Denng Street 
London W1R 944 

UHfnSbefltfh 

■ " — ■ a A— taM, 


AD 

VEHICLE 

full hoarding size for own 
use or can oe rented to 
others. 

ffiSo. 

01-250 1538. 


pall mall 

+ W2 

Low premium 24hr 
+ narking- ram 


CaiPCICU Uiuw- 
phone^ietex/fi»x- Fr 

£75pw. 

01-839 4808 


distributors 
ft agents 


PRESSURE 

VESSELS 

8 araSaMe 1500 pst 

PHESSUHE VESSB-S 

x 4ft 6hl *L 
STORAGE 

Spec, ted photos avaBaWe 
by retom. For a il plant and 
equipment ted conprawn- 
sive Hiustrated list contact 

WMXER « PMnNBB LTD I 

Tat 8246 <7214 7 
Telex: 547323 


OtfOm- Coim^rtoni on W*»J- 
rnss rewrana tenra 

mtrodMdjM^ 

me oa. Phone 01-422 5677. 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 


wSSswrawSSSf 


wanted oarmer/nniewor wjtn 

carttai » nurltrt sjtaJ raKteMj- 

ic tawnu ra wnta > _, rsr,M 

mwrame. deoi eo nofi. agcaa. lCT 
M gi oner psyonosonwUtc 

syntfam Ne f *2l '"J’PSrXP 
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idly eepaodmg Cotopany **» 

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w Reply w> BOX OMS. 

SIVUK TMHC PuftncM with afUB 

un>e income 10 tw a mown ■ 
Doaedtaq ■ nocamprtUW - cap- 
ita] required E6.500 anax>ce 
maiUMc Wi 
sea B3I1 or WHM Preagrara 
Lid. DetO ST 136 Repent 
Street. London Wi. 

WITH TRABOI Oeriara W w- 
raoetes. cold- Add L'S stock 
SSZZbMrs. NraSWMB i »■ 
dors, u is po«uWe lo turn 
£ 1.000 info £10X00 vrry 
quKiuy Low Known nak I Wire- 
nnan inveanwnl ^ELSOO. 
Derate PX-PS OI 930 8732 
HEPUCA cLnatc apons o«r menu; 
lecturer seek* uiseotraent m 
jwaSe enratsMn S worumg 
SSS for orwem orter. I Mjn 
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II. Loonnnaler HR6 9VN. 
rnil"^ All oraMUows people 
wima aeme o« orarew ^ei mfla 
CB*sirw ioticx«ry nett. Piwufivi 
994 6364 


ESZoZ"* 01769 7467- 

S^to»3 64899. 

PAYROLL 
r %22™££, 



MANUFACTURES 
AGENTS 

Boquired to 8«a weB- 
astaMshed ran ge olBtte f 

bins and rawfanonmental 
products to Local 

Authorities and sfitdar 

outlets. Exclusive areas 
and excellent 
commission. 

Apply in writing tot 

Jeremy Grice 

^BOWOSIf 

mg rsxbr 

Longbeck Works, 
Marske 

Redcar, Cleveland 
TS116HW 


management 
SERVICES ft 

training 


iTXAmw^rnm 

SUPERIOR 

PACKAGE 

AtRIlLOSlOUrt 

PROMCrnONALlMRETS 

- more 

£160 

INTINRSTRDT 

fooSUWWORDCAL. 

wdourprirap**®" 

•nsM 


I H.V. 

ULM 

H ■ — 

„ ™. wnmeidny. 


HOMO 


» 2J0PW 


l. Oneidn*. 


i To nccCTee and adop t Oj« 
Report of the Mamrana D> . 
muri tat V* naanoal 


3. TO 


1988/1986. 


, tip determi ne me anranwt 

— — proin 


B. To compose 


the Board of 


**““ 01 ‘iTbSteS 
STii^SSS! ffi 

^Jss^tssj^ 

vice accb«/VIssu 


COMMISSION 

AGENTS 

tow * « y* 

SiSSBMi 

tea to a iwrattefl B«l 
wnt* * an conUaBe u 
Tim Atorarttew, - 
PJL Box 7Z2, 

SW1Y BAG 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


] 


uSormed * *u«ee«i TJc Prop- 
erty D^'*S5S rt .,J2SV w ‘ 

C a m h rtdpe <02231 312467. 

I B rr" Remember can u» 
- and oei imoived Tn the raooe%- 
plctute l>uame» «W*3K“!{LiS 
ihe UK looay Tel 01 S» 787B 


KINGS 

LANGLEY 

AREA, 

HERTS. 

Weal tor warehouse 
distribution. 

1 minute Kings 
Langley main Rno. 

2 MINUTES M25 

Consisting of 
5 offices & 
warehouse. 
Long lease. 

Tet ( 0442)56860 


CU —W M I lWSnUt ftgraBwmi-: 
Pd lor home Imoroiirment. 
pradnetk Beaawic eannngs up 
wrilt «IP UBW» 
raeSSwmo «n> pood ouaUQ?. 
vupfl cniahfted leads. For derails 

phone tOTSS) ® 1246 or tOTSSJ 

T0O35. 

II wi III rani eeouired UmnHhout 
U.h- CaWnsr on **■*“•* ouurti 
vrtth revoiunonaty new n*rf^ 
hm fluonamt W«- no 
nraneUMn. tew «™5» *»■ 
I fiHM Tel: CT7Q2 7153SS 
wcdoit adim tune. Wc ran 
SU Store and dtalrflMte vow 
gUSrtUu ongaaut Humtar- 
Mb and Yo naln re mo. Tel. 
ScffTBrtW. 0482 21HSS6 or 
20040 

UNIQUE cranmmr ajirat. » 
uduit approved tor sale Mo 

SSrtcimg depwtnwmj palm 

and aoentt n®» 

per Systems 044382 3853. 

AGENT with wholesale MBWC- 
can »U ouanttoes 
branded rtothtna ■ ownrtswear. 

. TcuOSl S& 1«« anytime 
E tf O ac ncm Sale onenratM 
mSS man rat*»ra*8 W; jfe 
tnmnorslup. 

TM-I0532I 873836 
an im p Newly redtmdam Ex 

"SsZf **•**?' **"1 £ 

MBd/repreumtattve ^wemises 
av^UDto DUMP 947870. 
TREBLE Setting yoor producW 
Tiy sn> lupMV * JCW Wt3 20 
ivtr wfling organaatlon 

7*6373 63302 

tbsp MCOMC3 for T#P_Beopie. 


. WOULD TOU LIKE 
TO RUN TOUR OWN 

management 

TRAINING 
CONSULTANCY? 

YOU MUST 

- BE 35/45 

- HAVE BOAHD LEVEL 
EXPSHBKE _ iiw 

. POSSESS EXCELLENT 
PRESENTATION 
SKILLS 

Wia PROVIDE 

- PROVEN 2 AND 3 DAY 
COURSES 

-TRAWcagus- 

- HELP TO SET IF 
YOUR BUSINESS 

I SEND YOUR CV, PLUSTOE 
1 ATTRIBUTES tot have to 
[run your OWN training 

I COMPANY, 

Ttt ROGER SHAW 

IrOGBI SHAW ASSOCIATES 
^^WELL HOUSE 
GAliOWSTREE ROAD 
PffPABD 

OXON R69 5HT 


•CWMRVAM 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax machines. 
Cheapest prices in Eu- 
rope. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International. 

Tet (0243) 860662 


OFFICE 
&~’ 


iCE E QUIPME NT | 
FURMSHEKS | 





PACKAGING 

MATERIALS 


cahtow UW gwattmof 
once used plain latal P")* 
wan. IGma * 1 lWra x iiVana. 
18“StmxT3in»x9*^Bi*. 19tn«x 
13bn x «*r*. »»“ 

TOO. od»«r earn to Mo c k - A»o 
rwumdanl -itoctei nooohl and 
JSg'pSSw 0480 452363. 


SECURITY 

SERVICES 


prices. 

gs??ssir«54«3 


Utt bmtarl 
A c otnptanii 


IWHOLJKAXER^J 


Period and HeoradiMtionD^o. 
Write tardaate 

JbUJMKs. BtttoTQ 

BBBVBWti 

723-7976 

6 EnUn Va*. N * 3 
Tai Mr- A1-77?-4902 


BATHROOMS Galore atSCOOtain- 

■re Slows - OdW paaM ratings ■ 

wfa r*t- E2 MUhonal retail ■ 
owe around C3.ooo will se- 
cure. CbH-0703 t»»ik»' 1 
You went take hath with tn* 
ooeti 

raiPOtB. Ranged wool mtx suits | 

and sports jacKeo. &OQO pam 

at cactL Fruantted eraort ordra 

includes a twanniy of 

tacked aH perfect. R.RJ». , 

£120. «WOt8«««» f I 

(UIH CMI John OTOfl 769691. 


HOTELS ft LICENSED I 
PREMISES | 


"UR nm-raMd BrttMi ojkned 
tmro 1968. to me heart or 
jUMUi/Mstinca. 7.h0*el9 wjnv 

to a radHH Of SOtOKA Wp 
yante« dw w. romptrtebrftjr- 
mined. 5^000 -PPon* 01 
911 ®J7 670. addra» 

Srhnndrr. Fuertheetr. 56a. J> 

8802 Zirndort. 


ihk RAH/Freehouse. Qnra 
oMy opportunity xmascoMiag 
. quick sale required. Whal es- 
tobntned mratwes mhwM 
IOC £4Sj 000 Uxw Le*S: 
m*. large w- w^d *#,» *■_ 


. IU 

Supenrooty DIWW. 

Mr. Hit f 

by roiaUou 
U will be 

[ 6,*To compose Use Board of 
M“naato9 Pteector^ , 

n Win Be proposed to pw 
P toto Mr. SJ**?**'-^' 
mupng director os. 
cramany- 

T. Any oUwr W*x» 

Copies of the fun agenda 
and at toe Annual BwntJ* 
1986/86 can he obtained 
from National Weatmunter 
Mk Pt-C. Stock Office Ser- 
5S£ 3«1 ™or. aoOMWoud 
Sweet. CC2 C,. l .SLw 

Hotoera of Stale Warrants 

to Bearer deshwnof aoeno- , 
too or betagrixgs enwd tothe 
Meeung. anotod KWoe toew I 
Share Warrants tor toad 
(postal neocenes wOl not be . 
accepted for noUnp 
Mm uie National westmm- 1 
afer Bank WXLaocl. Offtre 
Services. 3rd Floor. 20OM 
Broad Street, umdtm EC2N , 

ICJ t between the haursof lO 

am and 2 n jn ->to 1 25? , S3J 
fo r a rec eipt, no* I 

Wrdncoday- L9tn NOvcraon i 

>986.11 _ 

aStSvISiaiib a re pre iePW I 
dnosutf wtm a Bank must i 
ootauiai Cartmcate of DepoaH 
word by me Bank as evl- 

3SS? ma* «« 

hOWmp toe Sta«Warr»«. 

The Certmeale 
most be loctoed against re- 
cap*. by mat Bat*. i 

Nauonai Westminster Bank 
PLC. to accordance wtm t he 
requirements nMJwf 
Th e recy pl for O to Shge 
W miwm <k Of ittf lcaf r of Df- 
POSH will COONJIuto ev^« 

ota shareholders enuueroent 

lo attend find v<4f m thrMfCf- 
mg and should be preaciiWd «d 

Ihe door o f. the M eet t nq HaP. 

U a Itotdw demtojo raj"* 1 » 
proxy, who need not be a 
ine^ier of me Company, to 

form of prmey may beotk 

tamed from me ^“oi— 

Westmtoster ■ «* P!- G . 

above and tWs form of proxy 

SSwprtsenledaimedpor 

oi the Meetmo toMthar 

wiih me r*e«Bt ftrmeaiore 

warrants or OarUfloale « 

t> &c*i owner s or auft- 
■hare Cert ICIcates registered 
Save name or National Pro; 
vuvoal Bank tktomineeai 
Undid d emnta o f MtendtoO 
or tong repr esen te d a »* 
Mmmg must o nto” a r eeetpl 
or CerUflade el Oe*»f to toe 
toW way at borders or Share 
warrants to Owwr If OWV 

dcanr to attend toe Wt ce unfl to 

person or to Be rewwen*" 
umr mini ohtam a form a 

ffi« , £2 ,N ^SS 

LSded. which form nxJ« » 
presented M U» e aoor o r to e 
Meeting H all logetne ^wto; 
toe rtcrtpf exchanged tor me 
8A4KVI! CortdVcatcs or Mr- 
Id icw of Oepodt 
BemfKtu owners of Sim , 

snares regraered many name 

ouvrr than tool of National 
Provincial Bank Ikwn mfcM 
Luiuicd. hotdere « iwraP£»o 

Fun Snares and snarehotoers 

who nrantam J 

Shareholder's ACCOtmL wfto 

Ibe Company wwwn p.M. * 1 ; 
lend and vote ot me Meeltot 
ar in appotetfa proxy mam^g 
and vote tn then Head, most 
■tonify their Inwaora n 
m« io Ihe Secretary nomro 
NV. Herr Bottrtwe q >33 - 
3032 AD. BatVefdam- Netoer- 
itoidi lo vamra nnl ****£. \ 

WMBWRSW. I9ltt ■h*0 p v««1 0 ^ ! 
S9Q6. 

Service contracts ar e no t 
«MRd Into «dm me Ck roc; 
ton. who notd. I" 

a tcordance with Ihe Articles 

gf Atsdoadoa . 

By older of the Manwen^m- 
- Dated mi*7im»yofNmg^ | 

PO Box 973 

BOTTEHDAM 





Law Re port November 7 1986 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 19E * M 



LAW/SPORT 


31 






Home Office must disclose 
Bill of Rights case papers 


Regina v Governor of 
Pentonville Prison and An- 
other, Ex parte Herbage (No 
2 ) 

Before Lord Justice May, Lord 
Justice Purchas and Sir David 
Cairns 


n>; 

"N : 


f s * 

* 

•* m 



n.: 




T r JH. 


r c 

w • 


f \L 


ft 


**»c ^ V 

i * • • 





{Judgment November 5] 

Leave ro apply for Judicial 
review had been property 
granted to a prisoner on the 
basis that the conditions under 
wbich he was detained 
amounted to “cruel! and 
unusual! punishment'* contrary 
to the Bill of Rights 1688. 

The Court of Appeal in a 
reserved judgment. Lord Justice 
May dissenting, dismissed an 
appeal by The Secretary of State 
for Home Affairs and the Gov- 
ernor of Pentonville Prison 
from a decision of Mr Justice 
Hodgson {The Times, May 29, 

1986} who granted Alexander 
William Herbage's application 
for discovery in judicial review 
proceedings. 

Mr John Laws for the sec- 
retary of state and the governor, 
Mr Alan Newman and Mr 
Delray Duncan for Mr Herbage. 


LORD JUSTICE MAY, 
dissenting, said that the judicial 
review proceedings, comprised 
an application for an order of 
mandamus directed to the Gov- 
ernor of Pentonville Prison and 
the Home Secretary directing 
them to detain the applicant 
according to law. 

Mr Herbage, the applicant, 
was the subject of extradition 
proceedings at the instance of 
the US Government in respect 
of a total of 25 charges of 
obtaining by deception, Mse 
accounting and handling stolen 
goods. 

The Bow Street Magistrate 
made an order on March 25, 
1986 committing the applicant 
in custody to await the extra- 
dition warrant of the secretary 
of state for his surrender to the 
USA. 

An application for an order of 
habeas corpus by way of appeal 
against the magistrate’s order 
was dismissed by a single judge 
and then by the Court of Appeal 
on July 30, 1986 (The Times 
August 6). (A petition to the 
House of Lords was dismissed 
on November 6]. 

The applicant was greatly 
overweight. He was aged 56 and 
his condition prevented him 
from walking upstairs. From 
August until October 198S he 
was held in Winchester Prison. 
He was then transferred to 
Pentonville Prison. 

The prison medical authori- 
ties at Pentonville directed that 
having regard to his condition 
he should be kepi in the hospital 
wing of that establishment. Thai 
wing extended to two floors. 

The ground floor contained 
offices and accommodation re- 
served for prisoners who were 
mentally disturbed in varying 
degrees. The quieter patients 
were housed in cells nearest the 
administration offices. - - 

The first floor of the hospital 
wing housed prisoners who were 
medically ill and comprised 
cells, a ward and further offices. 
Access to the first floor was by 
two flights of stairs. There was 
no lift. 

As tire applicant was unable to 
walk upstairs, the prison gov- 
ernor arranged for him to be 
accommodated in a cell on the 
ground floor, near the staff 
quarters and at the quiestest end 
of that floor. 

The applicant complained 
that he was constantly subjected 
throughout die night to shout- 
ing. screaming and banging 
from the mentally disturbed 
inmates and that although he 
was wholly sane, he was air- 
rounded by schizophrenics, 
psychopaths, menial 

depressive* and other mentally 
disturbed persons whb the re- 
sult that be found himself 
unable to sleep. He made other 
specific complaints about the 
conditions in which he was 

detained. . „ 

The applicant s overall 
contention was that he was 
subjected to “cruel! ana 
unusual! punishment** contrary 
to the Bill of Rights- 

His case was, further, that not 
only had there been breaches of 
that statute, but also that m 
purporting to carry out tbetr 

duties under the P^°° 

1952 and the Prison Rules (SI 
1P64 No 388) in breach of the 
European Convention on ^Hu- 
man fS*b« ( 1 953) (Crod 8969) 
both the secretary of state and 
the prison governor had been 
and were acting illegally. 

In those circumstances tne 
applicant obtained leave from 
Mr Justice Hodgson to move for 
i he orders of mandamus. TDe 
substantive proceedings were 

Sl Or?May22, 1986 (The 
May 29) the judge granted the 
applicant’s application that the 
respondents should 
documents sunng whether they 
had or bad at any time had in 
their possession, ^ 

power any medical and/or 
psychiatric re ^° ns 
the applicant since his remand 
in custody on August 1.1 985- 

Mr Laws argued that the 
present appeal, 

stance one against the J°£*er for 

discovert', w 25 01 e8e ?J 30 

appeal against the grant of leave 
m the first place. 

His Lordship said that than 
was no reason wh>-__on 


review would not be granted to 
regulate the exercise by a prison 
governor ofhis managerial func- 
tion of governing his own 
prison. The instant case was a 
fortiori. 

In Ex parte King what it was 
sought to rim (teng e was an 
adjudication by the deputy gov- 
ernor, in R v Board ofVtsitarsqf 
Hull Prison. Ex parte St Ger- 
main ([1979] QB 425) the Court 
of Appeal had held that an 
adjudication under tbe Prison 
Roles by a board of visitors was 
subject to judicial review; thus 
in Ex parte King there was 
dearly a strong argument avail- 
able to tire appeflam that an 
adjudication by a deputy gov- 
ernor should similarly be sub- 
ject to judicial review. 

If a jgoyemarts derision on an 
adjudication on a prisoner was 
not subject to judicial review, 
then it was clear that neither, for 
instance, was his decision about 
which cell a particular prisoner 
was to be housed in. 

For those reasons, the judge 
was wrong to grant leave to 
bring the present judicial review 
proceedings against the prison 
governor. 

So for as the secretary of state 
was concerned, tbe Court of 
Appeal in Ex parte King painted 
out that in approp ri ate dreum- 
standes instances of mismanaae- 
mem in prisons could be 
controlled by the courts by way 
of judicial review proceedings 
against tbe secretary of state. 

Lord Justice Lawton held in 
that case that since the enact- 
ment of the 1952 An the 
secretary of siate bad had tbe 
‘ duty to ensure that the Act and 
all rules made under it were 
complied with. 

The difficulty in tbe instant 
case, however, was that there 
was no evidence before the court 
of any act or omission by the 
secretary of state or his depart- 
ment which could be said to be a 
breach of his duties under tbe 
1952 Act 

It was upon the secretary of 
state that Parliament bad by 

that gmtme imposed the rtnty of 
running the prisons and it was 
not for the court to intervene 
unless it was shown that by 
taking some decision or foiling 
to lake a decision which he 
ought to have taken tbe sec- 
retary of stare bad foiled to carry 
out that duty in accordance with 

the statute and the rules made 
thereunder. 

On the material before tbe 
court, leave ought not to have 
been granted to apply for ju- 
dicial review of the secretary of 
state. 

The appeal, however, was not 
against the original giant of 
leave but against tbe order for 
discovery. In exercising his dis- 
cretion to order' discovery the 
judge ex hypothesi acted upon 
an erroneous view of the taw 
and ft™* it was open to the 
Court of Appeal to exercise its 
own discretion. 

If the application for judicial 
review, when beard inter porta 
was bound to foil in limine, then 
clearly discovery was not nec- 
essary either for disposing feiriy 
of it or for raving costs. 

Mr Laws’ alternative conten- 
tion was that the order for 
discovery should be set aside 
because the basis upon which it 
was made was that the court 
would have to investigate the 
primary facts of the applicant’s 
detention, that discovery would 
be necessary for that investiga- 
tion, and that a court should not 
constitute ftsdf a fact-finding 
tribunal in that type of matter. 

That contention was, un- 
acceptable. In the majority of 
applications for judicial review 
the underlying facts were agreed, 
or appeared in documentary 
form, and the issues for the 
court were largely, if not en- 
tirely, questions of law. 

However, although the court’s 
function was supervisory, it 
might well* involve some in- 
vestigation of the ftets of a case. 

Farther, the power given to 
ihe court by Order 53, rule 8(1) 
together with Order 38, rule 2(3) 

of the Rules of the Supreme 
Court to permit cross-examina- 
tion of the deponents of affida- 
vits filed in judicial review 
proceedings was clearly only 
consistent with some fact-find- 
ing role of the court in such 


application _ for j£22£2 Jd 


It should ntft.be often that 
that power needed to be ex- 
ercised. but m the instant case 
the judge was right that if tbe 
merits of the judicial review 
proceedings and allegations 
were to be gone into then clearly 
the discovery ordered would he 
necessary and proper. 


LORD JUSTICE PURCHAS 
said that he had reached a 


KUU uuu uv ““v* 

different conclusion on the grant 
of leave to apply for judicial 


judicial review proceedings and 

on an appeal aga^ “y orter 
made on such an J ^' ,c3 " 0 ^ c 
should noi he “I*? * “J 

respondent ». 

matter of law tt had been 

to grant the original leave ana 

that ronsequentiy no ondef be 

d S^ U teri^^ 

proceedings were snwpeertKJ. 
SSSTo order fcrd-25 

SForiS’ 

ss?,sisfisrisi“5 

"Krt?- - I-S5S' 

against the prison governor were 

concerned, the p 0 ^L prn nrof 
dear. In X r Deputy 

«M%SS a 


review. .. . . . 

Notice of the application had 
been served on Che Treasury 
Solicitor representing tb e two 
respondents and a repre- 
sentative had been present zn 
court. No action was. taken to 
invite the judge to adjourn tbe 
application so that the Treasury 
Solicitor coukf be heard inter 
partes before granting or refus- 
ing leave. 

But Mr Laws said that it was 
open to him oo appeal, and he 
had been permitted by tbe court, 
to argue the full merits of 
whether or not such leave 
should have been granted. 

He submitted that if, as a 
matter of law, there was no 
ground upon which an applica- 
tion for judicial review could 
possibly succeed then it would 
bean abuse of the process of the 
court io apply for discoveiy and 
that, therefore, disco very should 
not have been ordered, 

Mr Laws submitted that, m 
relation to the outer sou^t 
against the prison governor, the 
Court of Appeal was bond by 
Ex pane King as the applicant s 
complaints related to matters ot 


mana g -menf SJid they fbH 
within the Prison Rules. 

Further, he submitted that 

thar case established that ju- 
dicial review was not available 
where the complaint concerned 

a breach of the Prison Rules pr a 

misconstruction or misapplica- 
tion of the powers granted to the 
governor thereby. 

Ex pane St Germain was 
considered in King's case. The 
St Germain case was authority 
for the proposition that an 
adjudication by a board of 
vision under the Prison Rules 
was subject to judicial review. 

A complaint, therefore relat- 
ing to an alleged breach of the 
Prison Rules had, in the first 
instance, to be made to the 
prison governor whose 
adjudication thereon was to be 
considered upon complaint to 
the boaiti of visitors. It was only 
at that stage that the courts 
would assume powers of review. 

However, the instant case was 
uot restricted to alleged 
breaches of the Prison Rules and 
was dearly distinguishable from 
King's case. 

It was clesr from, inter alia. 
King's case that tbe courts 
would review administrative 
action or failure to exercise 
adminis trative duties by the 
nrinister under section 4<2) of 
the Prison Act if it was estab- 
lished that the mtmct»»r had 
tailed io perform those statutory 
duties or used his statutory 
powers unlawfully. 

In the present case, although 
tbe original application for leave 
to move for judicial review was 
directed both to the prison 
governor »nd tbe secretary of 
stale, it had not so for been 
detected from the evidence any 
specific aspect in which it was 
atipgffd fhat foe ■«ini»iw had so 
foiled. 

The argument was, however, ■ 
that if in a notorious case, as the 
applicant’s case was. it was 
established that serious breaches 

of the Bill of Rights were 
occurring then there was a 
foundation of an allegation that 
the secretary of state had foiled 
to perform his duties of super- 
vision imposed generally upon 
hint by section 4(2). 

That would be an issue to be 
argued inter partes before the 
judge at first instance rather 
ihan as an issue introduced 
more or less by a tide wind on 
an appeal m interlocutory 
proceedings. 

The rev « p»nst the prison 
governor was not based merely 
up on breaches of the Prison 
Rules but upon an alleged 
breach of the provision of the 
Bill of Rights, namely that the 
applicant was entitled not to be 
inflicted with “cruefl and 
unusual! punishment”. Thai 
was a fundamental right which 
went fir beyond the ambit of the 
Prison Rules. 

If it was established that a 
prison governor was guilty of 
such conduct it would be an 
affront to common sense that 
the court should not be able to 
afford relief under Older 53 of 
the Rules of the Supreme Gourt. - 

There were unusual features 
in the present case which, prima 
fade, called for further in- 
vestigation. Mr Laws did not 
appear to have co n descended to 
refer to them before tbe judge 
and, before their Lordships he 
merely argued King's case. 

The existence of medical re- 
ports going to the resolution of 
the matter could not be ignored 
in limine. If it was established 
that medical opinion supported 
the contention that the 
applicant’s detention was 
inflicting a “cruel! and unusuall 
punishment” upon him, then 
the court had power, and ought 
U> intervene. Certainly leave for 
a proper investigation should be 
granted. 

If in order to determine 
whether a case that “cruefl and 
unusuall punishment” h»<l bw f w 
inflicted was esta b lis h ed it was 
necessary to investigate con- 
flicts of testimony, then, if there 
were documents which would 
assist in the resolution of those 
issues known to be in existence, 
it was unarguable that they 
should not be made available to 
the court. 

The course adopted by Mr 
Laws acknowledged the exis- 
tence of such documents other- 
wise he would not have 
restricted bis argument to 
attacking the granting ofleave in 
the first instance but would 
have, better perhaps, directed 
his efforts to attacking the order 
for discoveiy on the merits 
which remained a matter of 
discretion in the judge under 
Order 53- 

For those reasons Mr Laws 
foiled in bis submission for the 
prison governor on two 
grounds: namely, first, that he 
had adopted tire wrong proce- 
dure . having foiled to avail 
himself of the opportunity to 
challenge the original granting 
of leave; and, second, as he did 
not specifically attempt to .dis- 
pense with the separate in- 
cidents of tbe alleged breach of 
the Bill of Rights and because 
indeed in the absence of specific 
evidence as to the effect upon 
the applicant of the conditions 
of his detention it would be 
impossible fin- him so to do. 

For the secretary of stale, Mr 
Laws foiled only on the first of 
the two grounds advanced for 
the prison go* nnor. ■ 

As to Mr Laws’ alternative 
contention that tbe order for 

discovery should be set aside 
because the basis upon which it 
was made was that the court 
would have to investigate the 
primary fads of the applicant's 
detention, his Lordship, like 
Lord Justice May. found it 

unacceptable. 

SIR DAVID CAIRNS deliv- 
ered a judgment concurring with 
Lord Justice Purchas. 

Solicitors: Treasury Solicitor, 
Shone & Barker, Stepney. 


No damages tariff 


psoe v Enfield and Haringey 
Area Health Authority 
in assessing damages For loss 
of earning capacity or handicap 
on the labour market, it was™” 


on tne »ooui * *“*-—-- ■- ----- 
nennisrible to make a con- 
ventional award or to apply an> 
. IT nr marker de- 


venuouai rr ■* r- 

Smila, tariff or mark* de- 
rived from previously decided 
Each case was unique and 


no assistance could be derived, 
save in the most general sense, 
from the levels of awards made 
under that bead in other cases. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Purchas, Lord Justice 
Musliil and Lord Justice Woolf) 
so stated on November 5, 
allowing in part the defendant's 
appeal. 


Mast set-back gives British challengers an uphill task against New Zealand 


Error costs Crusader dearly 


From Keith Wheatley 
Fremantle 

White Crusader suffered se- 
vere mast damage in her race 
against die United States yes- 
terday, Harold Cndmore, the 
skipper, was forced to pull out of 
tbe race while leading the San 
Francisco helmsman Tom 
Kackaller. by 36 seconds a! the 
first windward mark. The Stil- 
ish boat dropped from third to 
fourth place in tbe points table 
as a consequence of the loss. 

Perhaps more importantly, ft 
means they are forced to sail 
today’s race against New Zea- 
land with a spare mast pulled 
out of Crusader IL Tbe replace- 
ment would be no one’s first 
choke for such a tough match. 

“Tbe rig we’ve damaged was 
very, very fine. It was the fourth 
sequential step in a five-mast 
programme and was one of the 
best around tbe entire fleet,” 
Cudmore said. “The one we are 
stepping now is much more like 
everybody rise’s.” 

Tbe damaged mast, built by 
Proctor of Southampton, re- 
vealed a distinct banana-shape 
in the lower third as it was 
hauled from tbe deck. About 
10ft up there was noticeable 
buckling where the foot of the 
spinnaker boom bad pushed 
into the alloy extrusion. 

Tbe cause of the accident was 
the foil ure of a pin inside the 
windward running backstay 
Mode. As White Crusader 
rounded the first windward 
mark she made a gybe-set and 
bore away to the left side of the 
course. At tbe next gybe, a mile 
later, the block foiled. With the 
mast unstayed firom the rear, the 
enormous pressure exerted on 
the bed of spinnaker boom 
inverted the normal brad of the 
mart. Only quick work on the 
part of the crew avoided the 
entire £50,000 mast going into 
the sea. 

After yesterday's injury to 
Paul Rushent, a grinder, now 
resting with severely bruised 
ribs, and the broken spinnaker 
pole, it looks as if a jinx has 
descended on the Crusader 
camp. Cudmore docs not see it . 
that way. “This wasn't luck,” be 
said later on the dock as the 
buckled SI 40,000 (about 
£ 100 . 000 ) rig was pulled out of 
White Crusader. “It was a 
complete choker, unnecessary. 
The pin in tbe block was too 
light. It was probably put in and 
never looked at again. I've got to 
investigate property the reasons 

“I'm not a great believer in 
luck. You make a whole series of 
decisions and if somwbere 
along tbe line, one of the team 
makes a decision that isn’t good 
enough you pay the penalty. It's 
a shame because we were beat- 
ing Tom quite wdL He was 
quick downwind but we were 
just plain quicker on the 

Graham Walker, the syn- 
dicate chairman, attended an 
immediate dockside de-briefing 
with Cudmore and afteiguara 
Chris Law and Eddie Warden 
Owen. Angus Melrose, tbe sail 
designer, gave technical advice. 
The consensus was that a new 
lower section could be inserted 
into the mast. Walker said that 
the sailors were not depressed 
by the sequence of mishap* “It 
can have a different effect. 
There’s now a huge 
determination.” 

The fifth new mast in the 
development program m e ar- 
rives from Britain in two weeks. 
It will be available for the third 
round robin but tbe team will 
now be doubly anxious that an 
equivalent spare fo available: 

In tbe other race hit by 
Aimay. Kean of America with- 
drew from the dash with Eagle 
after a running backstay winch 
foiled. It was a blow for Buddy 
Melges. With only four wins 
since racing began a month ago, 
his crew need a victory and had 
stayed within 20 seconds of tbe 
revamped Eagle up the five legs 

that were completed. 

The all-French bottle between 
French Kiss and Challenge 

France was always one-sided. 
When the French bowman Al- 
bert Jacobsoon was washed on 
the bow by a rogue wave, his 
yacht was four minutes and 47 
seconds ahead. The big guns 
won fairly soft races; America II 
over C an ad a IL Dennis Conner 
against Italia and tbe Kiwis over 
Italia. 

New Zealand marched all 
over Azzurra, gaining an av- 
erage of 50 seconds on each leg. 
Although quick enough io tight 
breezes the Italian boat really 
has no chance in the sort of 20 
knots-phis winds that are start- 
ing to predominate here. 


A TV- 


S' 

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ir‘« 1 


4 A 


va-*;- • . ;• : •;* *4 


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fr- : 

>,J?L • 


Tommy Souwitfc's Endeavour almost coffiding with the American defender Rainbow in the 1934 America's Cap. It gave rise 
to thefirst protest in the evert hat wasnotaUDwed because it was rated oat of time (tbe protest flag ms boisted late). The 
modest gave rise to the headHae; "Britain rules the waves - America waives the rales'* (Painting: Tira Thompson) 


Riding the waves of greed and 
power at the America’s Cup 


Keith Wheatley,- our 
America's Cup correspo n dent in 
Perth, provides the clearest 
insight yet into the men and 
money bring thrown into the 
dritom of winniug the Cop in 
his book tided America’s Cap 
’87- The Inside Story (MJchad 
Joseph, £12^5). 

The five month long event is 
fast turning into a aoap opera of 
Dynasty p roportions. Two hun- 
dred million dollars have been 
invested in the boats alone but 
the rewards for the winning 
coentry run into bBItoos and 
syndicate bosses are p ollin g no 


to 


RESULTS 


Second rouad, W* drv 
(subject » 


bgte (U^3fcj7em 29sac. M Heart Of 


NBw^Bjau^' 3:12:18. M Azzumi (ML 

America U, 3:1 127. » Caned* MJM&OS. 
French Kiss. 3:18*5, « ChsBenge 

UtSA^TT^fifbt WWW Crusader (G9). 
mstrod. 

Stars and Stupes (US). 30K38, M IBka. 
3:1453- 


TABLE 


America ■ . 


Stars and Stripes , 
White Crusader _ 
USA 


Hate 


FVencft Kiss . 


Canada H . 


Heart of America. 


Cheflenge France . 
Azam. 


W L Pt» 

16 1 38 
16 1 36 
14 3 28 
U 6 23 
11 6 23 
10 7 22 
S I 20 
. 7 ID 19 
. 7 10 11 
. 4 13 8 
. 2 15 2 
. I 16 1 


TODAY’S RACES 

WMe Crusader v New Zealand; Canada H 

V USA; EagM V Stare md Stans: Aauna 
¥ CH aOange France.- French Kiss v Han 
of Amerce: America U v Rate. 


in their efforts 
sideline the opposition. 

What would happen to Tor- 
quay, if Britain's White Horae 
Challenge get their hands on the 
Cup and choose to stage the 
defence in Torbay? 

If Freaxsnde is anything to go 
by, prices wO) increase by a 
factor of 10. According to 
Wheatley, a bouse fetching SlOO 
a week rent a year ago is now 
priced at $1,000 after agents 
took oat adver tisements in local 
newspapers asking “Landlords, 
are you getting enough?** 

The apogee of unrealistic 
greed that has now l eeched into 
every corner of the America’s 
Cop scene was reac he d when 
Bruno Trouble, the French 
representative of Louis Vaftton, 
sponsor of the challenge series, 
was offered a totally ^distin- 
guished apartment for $300^00. 
The former America's Cup 
helmsman assumed the owner 
was trying to sell him the 
property. When it was explained 
to him tills was the proposed 
rent per month, he exploded 
with rage and the story appeared 
in newspapers across the world. 

With profiteering on tins 
scale, is it any wonder Anstre- 
ijaa authorities now predict a 40 
per cent drop in tourists from 

their own eastern states? 

P aintin gs of The America's 
Cap 1851-1987 by Tim Thomp- 
son. Written by Raunif Rayner. 
(David & Charles, £30). 

The idea of coimissioaing 27 
painting s depicting a famous 
scene from each America’s Cop 
challenge came to Ranulf 
Rayner in tbe bath. But the 


inspiration came from Ted 
Turner, the American ‘‘Mouth 
from the South", who won the 
Cap ia 1980. 

Tamer first came across Tim 
Thompson's distinctive sea- 
scapes at an exhibition at Cowes 
Week in 1 983. Talcing a fancy to 
one on display in the window. Ire 
was politely toM it had already 
been sold. He then ponded to 
another and when told that one 
too had been reserved, the 
exasperated m edi a m i ll io n a ir e 
bmst out “What is this — a 
bloody charity. These pictures 
are too dammed cheap. I'm 
going up the street and when I 
come back I want to see these 
prices doubted.” 

When be did retnra. Turner 
found tbe exhibition sold out so 
he promptly commissioned the 
artist to produce 24 paintings. 

Rayner. who was promoting 
Thompson’s work, took 
Tomer's advice to heart, 

commissioiuag die artist to 
paint a famous scene from every 
America’s Chp match, i n ri o din g 
the final round of this current 

series. 

The first 26 have become the 
bass of their book providing a 
beaotifaUy illustrated history of 
Otis spurting event and bnyets 

can obtain foe 27th plate from 
the publishers after the Cap has 
been woo. 

And of the paintings them- 
selves? They are now on view at 
tbe newly-formed Crusader 
Yacht Club in Fremantle with a 
price tag Ted Turner would 
approve of — £250,000 for the 
set. 

12-Metn Images by Bob 


Fisher (Pelham Books, £25^5). 

12-metre class yachts have 
become an anacronisai in a 
modern sport. Lead bellied dino- 
saurs that cost millions to 
campaign, take a 50 strong 
squad of dedicated sooh to crew 
and maintain ia racing condition 
and move through the water at a 
paltry maxiinmn of 10 knots — in 
an age when even sailboard 
sailors are pushing towards the 
40 knot barrier. Yet the beauty 
of 12-metre yachts is unmistak- 
able, and once involved, they 
become an obsession. 

One who admits to have been 
badly bitten is yachting 
correspondent Bob Fisher. He 
has been following the 
America’s Cbp scene with the 
dedication of a disciple since 
Alan Bond, of Australia, gained 
his first grey hairs c ha lle n gi ng 
for the Cap back in 1974. 

Using bis wealth of historical 
notes, rem i niscen ces and pio- 
tnres, Fisher provides a personal 
insight into this ratified world in 
an aptly titled book 12-Metre 
Imaga covering the develop, 
meat of the class, the scandals, 
secrecy and foe raring. An ideal 

introduction for those who have 

yet to be bitten by the teg. 

From Newport to Perth 

(Nautical Books, £15.95). 

Written as an introduction to 
the current America's Cap, this 
glossy coffee-table book paints 
the scene in Fremantle, pro rid- 
ing an insight into the key 
players and their boats compet- 
1 in tbe challenge and defence 


trials. 


BanyPickthaU 


GOLF 


Victorious first round 
for European team 


Tokyo (Remer) - Bernhard 
Laager's European team, losing 
finalists in the inaugural Pro- 
fessional Golfers' Association 
(PGA) Cup last year, made 
amends with three wins and a 
draw against ihe Japanese PGA 
team to prevail 7-5 here 
yesterday. 

Tbe United States' defence of 
the PGA Cup, which they won 
in Kapalna, Hawaii, got off to an 
inauspicious start when they 
went down 7-5 to the 
Australis/New Zealand team. 

Only Hal Sutton (67) and 
John Mahaffey (68) could man- 
age wins, against Rodger Davis 
(70) and David Graham (73) 
respectively, with Payne Stewart 
(69) accounting for the fifth 
point through a draw with Brian 
Jones. 

The British Open champion, 
Greg Norman, Graham Marsh 
and lan Baker-Finch won out- 
right for the all-Australian team. 
Marsh and Baker-Finch look a 
share of the individual event 
lead with Sunon and Japan’s 
Koichi Suzuki on five-under- 
par 67. 

The $900,000 tournament 
pits four teams, each comprising 
six leading players on the Euro- 
pean, US. Japan and 
Australia/New Zealand tours, 
playing against each other in 
three days of round-robin 
competition. 

The fourth day win sec a 
championship decider between 
the top two teams in the points 


standings with the bottom two 
vying for third place. 

At stake are $300,000 for the 
winning team and $100,000 for 
the individual winner. 

TEAM event (two points for s win. one 
tor a drawt Europ*ai PGA team bust 
new PGA tasm 7-5. Scores fEu re- 
names Srstt < Woosnam (G8I tit 

.art Ozakl 60, 7i: A Lyto (GS) M N 

Yitara 68. 72: B Lunger (W Ql W T OzMo 
68. 74; N Faldo (GB) <Bw wiltir NakaSma 
68, 58; Q J Brand IGB) tost to N Ozakl 72, 
68. H Clark (081 lost to K Suzuki' 70. 67. 
AnrtWa/Maer Zeeland PGA teem beet 
US PGA tea 7-5. Scores (Australian 
names ftretf: B Jones drew Mtti P Stewart 
B9, 69; l Balw-Flntai ot R Tway 67, 69: R 
Daws toe* u H Sunon 70. 67; G Marah tt D 
PoM 67. 70; D Graham tost to J Mahaftoy 
73, S& S Norman tt C Peeta 68. 72. 
INDIVIDUAL EVENT: 67. G Marah (AuS), K 
Suzuki (Japan). I Bakwflnefi (Aus). N 
Sutton (U§)T 68: B Langer (WGV S 
Nakapms papan}. J Mahaffey (US). N 
Faldo (GS). A Lyto (GB). G Norman (AuS). 
69: B Jones (Aus). N Qzaki (Japan). R 
Tway (US). P Smart (US). I Woosnam 
(QB). 70: R Dsvts (Aus). D Port (US). H 
dark (GB). 71: If Ozatf (Japan). 7 4 C 
Peete lUSi N Yghara (Japan) G J Brand 
|iBBW 3: 0 Granam ( Ausrj. 74: T Qzaki 


Moore leads 


Australia (Reuter) — Tbe 
former Australian amateur 
champion. Ossie Moore, rev- 
elled in calm early morning 
conditions yesterday to take the 
lead m the opening round of the 
Victorian PGa Championship 
in WarmambooL 
Moore scorched round the 
normally windswept coastal 
Warmambool course for a 
seven-under-par 65 10 bold a 
two-stroke advantage over 
Wayne Smith. 


RACKETS 


Three new 
Old Boys 

By W illiam Stephens 


The public schools old boys 
competition for the Noel Bruce 
Cup. which begins tomorrow at 
Queen's Oub. has attracted one 
of the highest entries for many 
years - 47 pairs — including, 
most unusually, pairs from three 
schools without rackets courts; 
Milffield (Jamie Robertson and 
Francis Williams). Portsmouth 
(the brothers Nick and Paul 
Danby) and Shrewsbury (Dud- 
ley MacDonald and Barry 
Williams). 


First seeds are the holders. 
Harrow I: John Prenn and 
Charles Hue Williams. They are 
seeded to meet Eton 1 (William 
Boone and Tom Pugh), who 
were winners in 1984 Seeded 
third are Radley I (James Male 
and Julian Snow), the 1982 
public school champions. 
Fourth seeds are Malvern I 
(Mark and Raul Nicholls), the 
1974 schools champions 


Tonbridge have two seeds. 
Richard Gracey and Martin 
Smith (5) and Jonathan 
Spurting and Rupert Owen- 
Brown (8), Mari borough 1 are 
seeded sixth with Christopher 
Worlidge and Maizhew 
Morioidge. 


An important competition 
designed to take top^lass 
competitive rackets into courts 
at the schools — the invitation 
doubles sponsored by Celestion 
loudspeakers — begins tonight. 


HOCKEY 


Two leaders could be 


challenged by a third 

By Joyce Whitehead 


After three more weekends 
the five territorial champions 
will emerge, weather permitting. 
Tomorrow and Sunday there 
will be 49 matches at eight 
centres. In tbe South seven 
counties play three matches at a 
time, so to date not all tbe 
counties have played the same 
number of games. 

There appear to be two dis- 
tinct leaders: Berkshire, who 
have bad three good wins, 
scoring eight goals with none 
aping, and Middlesex, the 
national champions, with two 
wins, having scored seven goals 
against one. There could be 
competition from Buckingham- 
shire and Berkshire have to wait 
until November 22 to play 
Middlesex. 

Tbe East stoned only last 
Sunday, so there is link to 
compare as yet, though 
Huntingdonshire demonstrated 
their ability when they beat 
Lincolnshire 5-1. One of the 
tightest matches, Essex against 
Kent, ended in a 1-1 draw, so 
anything could happen in the 
fruure. Their matches are at 
Essex University in Colchester. 

All nine Midlands teams have 
played three or four of their 
seven matches and so far 
Bedfordshire have the best re- 
sults. four wins with ] 2 goals for 
and three against 

Warwickshire surprised 
Staffordshire, beating them 1-0 
to spoil their unbeaten record 
ami Leicestershire (Midlands 


champions) had a goalless draw 
with Shropshire, which put 
them a point down. Matches 
tomorrow are at Abbey Part 
Leicester and on Sunday at Sir 
Christopher Hatton School, 
Wellingborough and LUleshall. 

The North counties have each 
played three times and Lan- 
cashire and Yorkshire are neck 
and neck. Each has three wins 
but Lancashire are just up on 
goals. They have scored JO 
against two, whereas Yorkshire 
have nine against three. How- 
ever, Cheshire should not be 
underestimated. They drew 

with Lancashire Central League 
and Yorkshire have not yet 
played them. The North 
matches are at Platt Lane, 
Manchester, and Hyndburn. 

The West, like the East, have 
played only one match but 
Devon and Avon are used to 
scoring. Devon beat Somerset 7- 
I and Avon beat Dorse! 6-1 and 
they plav one another on Sun- 
day. All the West matches arc at 
the Do reap Sports Centre. 
Covingham. Swindon tomor- 
row and Sunday. 


Record attempt 


Britain’s Adrian Moorhouse 
tries to become the first man to 
beat the one minute burner in 
the 100 metres breaststroke 
when he takes on the West 
Germans. Rolf Beab and Bert 
Boebel, at the Cumbernauld 
Open meeting on November 14, 
15 and 16. 


29 - __ 


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Sr’fs.-r. 


2V 


32 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


RACING: WORCESTER WINNER REMAINS ON HANDY MARK 


Fudge Delight to make fitness 
tell against Hennessy entries 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

With one eye upon the 
Hennessy Gold Cup. it should 
prove most informative to 
watch the Allied Dunbar 
Handicap Chase at Chelten- 
ham today. Charter Party. 
Plundering and The 
Langholm Dyer are all still 
engaged in the famous handi- 
cap chase at Newbury in 15 
days' time and this will be 
their warm-up for it. 

Twelve months ago 1 
thought that Charter Party 
would ’ win the Hennessy 
following a heartening first 
run at Wincantoo. Like bis 
trainer. David Nicholson, I 
now concede that, in hind- 
sight, he would never have 
beaten the runaway winner. 
Galway Blaze. However, we 
both remain convinced that 
he would have finished in the 
first three had he not fallen 
four fences from home when 


should be better this season 
following an operation in the 
spring. Nicholson went on to 
say that he will still be a little 
surprised if he manages to win 
this afternoon, simply because 
he is a gross horse and has 
always needed a race to bring 
him to peak fitness after a 
summer outto grass. 


Charter Party ended last 
season in a blaze of glory at 
Cheltenham by winning the 
Ritz Club Chase at the Na- 
tional Hunt Festival and the 
Golden Miller Chase. In this 
instance, though, f cannot 
help but wonder whether he 
will be able to concede two 
stone to Fudge Delight, who 
will be as hard as nails 
following that win at Worces- 
ter last month. 


still going conspicuously welL 
After 


telling me yesterday 

that Charter Party’s breathing 


At Worcester, Fudge De- 
light gave Eton Rouge 41b and 
beat him by a neck. Now they 
will be carrying the same 
weight. In the meantime, the 
form of their race has stood up 
well under scrutiny because 


both the third, Fitzherbert, 
and the fourth. Burnt Oak, 
have won. 

Good ground will help die 
Whitbread winner. Plunder- 
ing, on his seasonal debut buz 
the feet still remains that he 
was beaten 20 lengths by 
Charter Party here in the 
spring. And they meet now on 
the same terms. 

No matter how Charter 
Party feres. Nicholson and his 
young jockey, Richard 
Dun woody, still look the 
combination to follow in the 
John Seyfried Mickleton 
Chase with French Union, 
who appeals as the day's 
banker following that runaway 
win at Worcester, 

Also a winner at Chepstow 
and Newbury last season. 
French Union is a fluent 
jumper of fences on good 
ground and I doubt very much 
whether either Music Be 
Magic or Captain Dawn will 
be able to give him this 
amount of weight. 


At Doncaster, I have no 
intention of deserting my 
Cesarewitch fancy. Misrule, 
even though he will be meet* 
ing both Accuracy and Path's 
Sister on rather worse terras 
than be did at Newmarket 
where they eventually finished 
third, fourth and fifth 
respectively. 

To say that things did not 
exactly go according to plan 
for Misrule in the Newmarket 
stamina test would be an 
understatement. The nearest 
he gpt to winning was passing 
the line and afterwards his 
connections had a tail of woe 
to tett. With Willie Carson in 
the saddle this time. Misrule 
has a good chance of 
compensating them for those 
losses. 

Carson should complete a 
double on Queen Helen in the 
Royal British Legion Stakes. 
Last time out my selection ran 
the race of her fife at Newbury 
where she finished third to 
Jupiter Island and Verd- An- 
tique in the St Simon Stakes. 



Smyth adds oMC 
another 9 
string to , tM 1 
his bow 


Astral (Dale McKeown) dears the last flight i 
success over hurdles at Kempton Park 


fine styieon his way to an impressive first 

rapier 


Ron Smyth unveiled another 
smart jnvenfle prospect at 
Kempton Park yestenlay when 
Astral a winner on the Hat for 
Paul Cafe, wraa the Sprig iTnree- 
YeanOM Novices’ Hurdle by 12 
lengths from Spring FfigW. 

On Wednesday, the Epsom 

trainer took the juvenile hurtle 
at Newbury witix foe JO-ta®lh 
winner, ftdbtep Odd, fen tm 
yesterday's performance Astral 
may not be & behind. 

Smyth refused to be drawn 
into comparisons between As- 
tral and Problem Child, but 
sakfc “We’ll .know soon enough 

— I may erven nm Astral again at 

Hampton 

BaDymuHish, who won tnree 
point-io-points in Ireland and 
fwU y w * fen 1 form in busier 
pW** last season, outclas s ed 
his three opponents in ibe 
Standard Life Novices' Chase- 
Jumping impeccably, he had 

established a IWCDgfo kfd 
before the home turn and at the 
line had doubled that advantage 

Jodi Gifford, die trainer of 
BaUymullish, completed a 
short-priced double when Yeo- 
man Broker fulfilled the prom- 
ise he had shown, last season 






- > * 


yesterday (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 


with a lS-ieagth success in tbe 
Vauxball Novices* Hurtle. 


CHELTENHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Fifty Bucks. 
1JS5 Desert Hero. 
2.10 Corbitt Coins. 


2.45 FRENCH UNION (napf 
3.55 &S 1 


Michael Seely's selection: 3.55 Saffron Lord. 


103 (12) 


Guide to our In-line racecard 

0-0*32 TTMESFORM (CDflF) (Mrs J Rytey) B HaU 9-1 M 


BWWW 


7-2 


Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Stx-flgure 
form (F4&S. R-ndad up. U-unseatad rider. 8- 
brcwfJ! down. Shipped up. R-refusedJ. Horse's 
name (B-UWws. ifaiscr. H-hooO. E-l 
Ccourae winner. fTdistanco winner. 


and distance winner. BF-baoten tgtrawfte In latest 
race). Owner m brackets. Trainer. Age and 
weight. Rider plus any aSowsnca Tbe Times 
Prime HarKkcapper's rating. Approximate stating 
price. 


Going: good to firm 

1J> COLN VALLEY FISH & GAME COMPANY RIDERS NOVICE CHASE (Amateurs: 
£3^12: 3m) (9 runners) 


101 


11 HIS FWSK (D) (Mr# H Duftoy) K Bafley 7-13-5. 


102 0FQF4-2 HFTY BUCKS (E Wheatley) Mm MFtfme# 6-11-7 _ 

103 0000/2 MNTBI CITY (HHarafcQH Handel 6-1 1-7 

104 P-CFM2 4APUWG (J □ Thomas) J O Thomas B~1 1 -7. 


tunmmmmm 
M Price 


105 4/01004= NNQSWICK(Saiix UK Ud} J Francome S-1 1-7 _ 

107 0/0F-O4U LORD GHEENRELD (R Fates) O O'NaB 6-1 1-7.- 

108 00000-2 MW BUN (J Graham) tvwieate 5-1 »-? 

109 FP204O ROUGH E8TOUTE(V Bishop) VBtstnp 10-11-7. 

no p-fzop cuonoa (j Trapp) j Trapp s-n-o 


97 FB-4 
— 9-4 
1 99 4-1 
T Jones 91 10-1 

A Martin — 8-1 


M — 


1985: GOLD MEASURE 8-12-5 T Thomson Janes (10-11 fa*) J Spearing 5 ran 

Corns (11 -7) 71 in a Stumer event at Caritee 


COQM The front-naming MR FRISK (11-7) beat 

runm ^ £3a i i fjmi.sa* 291. mr 

hi 2) at uaoxeterSn, £1858 
MidnigM Madness 111-^ at Newton Abbot, 

ROUGH ESTIMATE (10-12) tafcxKrff behind 
good, Oa IB. 8 ran). 

SetaCtton: MR RUSK 



1.35 GLOUCESTERSHIRE ST JOHN & RED CROSS CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,295: 2m) (8 runners) 

201 1QF/Q60 DESERT HERO (CD) (W Ponaonby) F Walwyn 12-11-13 I Bhu—rk 98 7-2 

202 2102F1- PREDOMR4A7E(D) (501 CM? Racing Group) OShonnod 5-11-10— RBoutear 94 11-4 

1012-00 HASTY GAMBLE (D)(L Comal) F Winter 6-1 1-3 VKwedcy 94F2-1 

4F00-2D COLONEL JAMES (P OCaBaghan) Mra S OOver 4-1 1-1 Jacqui OKver • » 7-1 

OOOOPO WAREY<D) (A Price) PArthcr 8-104 LJoteaoy 

0-22034 ZACC»{RCterfca)S Dow 8-104 H Quest 9712-1 

00301-0 GALTRH4 (BP) (J OTtarlon) T BR 7-1041 JOWateto 79 9-1 

PP4QIH rtAL. OF LOVE On (WLm) Ms A Lee 7-1 0-0 JNnt 82 — 


203 

207 

213 

218 

219 

Z2f 


1985: CORAL LEISURE 6-T 1-0 ft Guest fl1-1)G8efdhig 7 ran 


I when beating Don 
IMWATE(1D- 


CHDM DESERT HERO (11-11)ls8gh8y raced. andwa6 seen at his beat n IS . __ _ 
nvmm Gtovannr (10-10) 151 ovar course and distance (1625, good. Apr 12 SranlWIBXjaBHAT 
1 1) was an easier whiner than the 41 marain suggested when beating See Pennant (1 0-2) at Wdroastar l 
£2442. heavy. Apr 23. 9 raid. HASTY GAireEtvncB a novice laadte Warner last season, tea oome on tar a (10- 
1 3) 4X1 5tt to Sap Upjl 0-3) at Ascot (2m 4f, £2948, flnrt. Oct 29. 10 ran) wBhWAMLY (9-12) weakening into 
fltfi. COLOtEL JAWS blundered away his donee at Chepstow last lane. Decant efforts In 1965/86 indude 
110-12 a m length 5th wMy DcvrurrimlTIM) at Newbury »r> 100yds. £10254. good. Mar 22. 23 ran). ZACCJO 
(l04)Kx*ed a onto one paced BXl behind Black Shoap(104) at Vmcanton last m pm. £1352. good, Oct 30. 
14 ran). 

SetKOOK COLONEL JAtES 


2.10 PHIUP-CORHES NOVICE HURDLE (Qualifier £1,626: 3m If) (14 runners) 

19-114) 


302 

304 

305 

306 


P BALLYVOOOCK (R Howefc) R Hwtete I 
OOOOP- BIGSUN (J Horn) D Nchoteto 5-fl-O — 


2 BOKANZA BOY (Mrs J Debenham) P Hobbs 5-11-0- 


MreLSbaady 

»OT 


BRAVE ADUBUL (R Tooth) N Henderso n 6-11-0. 


307 400-300 CANT DISCLOSE (B) (Mrs J Fountain) S Dow 6-11-0.. 

308 n/1002 CORNISH MKER(TJ Price) TJ Prim 7-11-0 

308 FOP-P80 DELATOR (P Brewer) I WsnBe 9-1 1-0 

310 F004 EN GOUNASITHBON(Mre M Snow) GDotdge 5-11-0- 

312 04)00 KMG*S SLAVE (W Hamson-ABan) G Doidge 5-11-0 — 

3)4 LET H3B OTP Painting) DNttxtacn 6-1 1-0.. 


. S Soitti Ecdea 

R Guest (7) 

G Davies 

PDevsr 


$7 72 
— 6-1 
70 — 
64 8-1 
7812-1 


Cites 


315 0/32440- MKSB4G MAN (Mrs L Simpson) J Giffcad 8-114- 


316 043800 MOUNT OLIVER (D Snath) M Scudamore B-11-0. 
321 WARNERS S® (Lady Lyei)J Matter 5-1 14). 


96 4-1 
7010-1 


323 220004- CORBITT COMS (Mrs J Corbett) F Wateryn 5-10-9- 


I F3~1 


7985: THE DtBSE 6-1 1-0 C Mam 1S2 C Holmes 8 ran 


FORM ROMAMZABOValiliRal race winner heroin October made an encciwnlwg hurdles debetni- 
rwniri nwhm n h«»d Pntl to Pttwffrtms ni-m M Chonoiniu B>m {1348, good 50 soft. Nov 1. 22 ran). 


CORNISH I 


)whsn a head 2nd to Powerless (11-0) at Chepstow (2m. £1346, goad _ 

- * i Member (11 -9] at Chepstow (?m4Cci <32. fttn. OcM.fi 


trip no I 


(11-2)8) 2nd to Peaceful . . ,_ ... 

“ "■* ' a 1G 3rd to Plaza Toro 

J was Kl 3rd to Sir's At 

i May l3, 17 ran). hOS^NGMANH 14)? H*9nd this 

1 13) 40i to PDce's Peek (11-5) at Newbury last season (3m 120yds, £7648. 

ITCOBIS (109}3Klftir1her back in 6th. Subsequently OORBnTOorNS(T1- 

Muck (11-9) over a trip too short twre (tin 41, £2430, imvy, Aj» 17, 23 ran). 


i45 JOHN SEYFRIED MICKLETON HAM3ICAP CHASE (£4,409: 2m) (5 
rentiers) 


401 

402 

406 

407 


111FP-U MUSIC BE MAGIC (W)(N Mason) G Rtehards 7-11-HL 


4-11113 CAPTAIN DAWN (CDJff) (P Hopkins) J Gifford 10-11-7 
34-3322 RWBtSBXSE(0)(0 Knights) Denys Smith 6-103. 


- Pits* 

- Rl 
_ Cl 


90 5-2 
99 4-1 
04 6-1 


13230-1 R1S4CH UNION (D) (Mrs C Smnh) D Nicholson 6-10-3 (Sex) RQunwoody #99F7-4 

408 4030P-Q TOWDEALBHACH (Ctfl (H Harpu'-Crew^ P O'Connor 12-10-1 NOsvtes 95 7-1 

1895: PETER ANTHONY 7-100 J Bryan (5-2) R Hickman 4 ran 


FORM CAPTABi DAWN'S winning run came to an end at Ascotlasi week (2fri). Previously he had oom- 
rurtlVI plated a 4-ftnsr with a 2! dn^t (70-12) of RIVERS EDGE (IDSJhera pm, £3844. firm. Oct 8, 6 

ran). FRENCH UHKW (1 M3) beat Chesmui Prince (itwn at Worcester by 19 (2m, dto, good. Oct 23. 9 ran). 

TOfDEALBHACH 7th al W^iertoy. (2m 50yds) whsn ttoSIC BE HMICutseated Ms rkfer tour out has not 

wona race since the 1984/85 saascn-MUSlC BE MAGIC won two novice chases here test season and (11-11) 

bBa|awwtfV W ^(ll ^ W a Doncaster (an 160yds. £7001. good to firm. Dec 14. 3 ran). 


220 ALLIED-DUNBAR HANDICAP CHASE (£4,331: 3m) (6 runners) 


ROnwoody 
PS 


501 FtlOII- CHARTER PARTY (CJD) (Mrs J MoukJ) D Meholson 8-12-0 - 

502 040F21- PUMDERMGCC) (Mi* M Valentine) F Winter 9-11-6 

503 2P1PQ2- THE LANGHOLM OYER (SdHburgh WooSen Ml Lsd| G Rkhards 7-10-10. P Tuck 

505 FtflPO-1 FUDGE DejCHr(D}(DDoray?0 Sherwood 7-100 (5U) S Sherwood 

506 0312/2F- DOM SABREUR (CD) (□ Pernnen) D Peerman 9-104) CCos(4) 

507 01104-2 ETON ROUGE (D) (Mns B JenkS) Mn MfflmeS 7-100 GMcCoot 


94 PS-4 
89 9-2 
88 6-1 
94 11-4 
9716-1 
99 6-1 


198& ajwaor 7-11-1 G Memegh (3-1) W Mawfe 6 ran 


form here 10 beat PU1MJBONG (1 1-0) 201 pm 2f . 

on to win the Whitbread Goto Gup at 


COQM CHARTER PARTY ft 0-10) showed Imra o ve d form here le 

runm £8544. heavy. Apr 16, 9 ran). PliDfflefflHG (10-6) wart . . _ 

Sandown to aphok>4ntsh with Buckbe (107) (3rn 5ft THE LANWCMJI DYER (1 1-3) 1 %l 2nd to Stsarato |1 1- 
Q)8l AMree pm 1f.E5033.good.Apr3.il ran)-FUDGEDEUaiT(11-9w8sala9erlherebut(10-S)p«dina 
good round and held off ETON ROUGE (10-5) by shock bri reappearance at Worcester (3m, £3215. gcxsa, Cta 
ZS, 7 ran). DON SABREUR pulled up on Ms Anal start, but had made Ms seasonal debut to thsiaca. Dnettng 3L 


3JSS BRITISH BEEF COMPANY HURDLE (£3,002: 2m) (6 runners) 


601 

602 

80S 

606 

607 


121-141 SAfflON LORD (CD) (A Hunt) L Kamard 4-1 1-6- 
1002-3 YALE (D) (H HiObanD J Gifford 4-11-6. 


0-41412 WUA CWS=(J Upson) T Casey 4-11-3- 


99F7-4 
SZ 6-1 
85 S-1 


R Rowe 

EBucktey (*) 

1C Burke (4) • 88 10-1 

D Browne 83 5-1 

808 P/322-11 TARTAN TAILOR (S)(EdiriixaghWbofaR *40 UP) G ftUardsS-11-0 PTeefc 88 7-2 


F30314- MERRY 4ANE (D) (D Scott) E H Owen )un 5-11-1 . 
22-1113 PARANG (D) (P Wahvyn) P Walwyn 5-11-0. 


19BS: (4-Y-O) NOHAUBHIN 1 1-6 j J O NeR (46 tsv) M H Eaanrby 3 ran 


FORM SAFFRON LORD 
runm SniOOyds.E391 
n 0-7) dW ho finance no good when 
PARANG (10-12) another II back In 3rd 
below par 14(SI4(h to Patnck's Fair (HW) « 

TAOjOrJi 1 8< umnete Wtoner tram Kanin (1 
1. Oct 23. 16 ran). 

: SAFFRON LORD 


ran) WUl Jiuaw.uv. 

Ihe last at Wercestor and Unshed 71 Def end Skygrange (10-12? wdh 


bsT«rne( 
12/ont3tostiunandG< 


I, May 17. 14 ran). ' 
on the upgrade (2m, £$85, 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 



Winners Runners 

Percent 



0 Sherwood 

5 21 

218 

D Browne 

B 

F Writer 

39 199 

193 

P Barton 

9 

F Walwyn 

20 140 

1A4 

SSrruth Eccles 

7 A 

G Richards 

7 52 

CWy OuaBrers 

13-5 

R Rowe 

P Scudamore 

13 

23 


ttdes Percent 
3« 23.5 

83 11.0 

135 IQL4 

133 9.8 

236 96 


• Devon BJKt Exeter Will stage their first listed race on Tuesday — the £7,500 added 
Plymouth Gin Haidon Gold Cup. Entries for the race include Admiral's Cup. 
Bickteigh Bridge and Oregon Trail. The going at the West Country course at present 
is good. 

• Corals report substantial support for Alarm Call for Tomorrow's November 
Handicap at Doncaster and have shortened the price of David Morfcy's three-year- 
old from 33-1 to 20-1. Alarm Call was an impressive winner over tomorrow's course 
and distance at the last meeting. Exceptional Beauty remains tbe 1 0-1 favourite. 


I \ 


Masterplan completes double 
and repays debt to Morshead 

_ _ _ - wra ■ _? _ 1 47 . * -- -V- - tow ato *ViA P5lt 


Sam Morshead, whose career 
was almost ended after a bad fall 
from Masterplan at Warwick 12 
months ago, completed a 54S-E 
double on tbe same horse at 
Stratford yesterday. Masterplan, 
a 20-1 chance, made virtually all 
the running in the De Vere 
Holds Novices' Chase and was 
the only one of the 1 1 runners 
not to put a foot wrong. 

Morshead was badly con- 
cussed when Masterplan slipped 
up between hurdles in a race at 
Warwick on November 23 Iasi 
year and suffered headaches for 
months afterwards. Morshead, 
who has now ridden nine win- 
ners this season, said: 
"Masterplan has schooled wen 
at home and be jumped 
beautifully.** 

Masterplan's trainer, Pam 
Sykes, said: “I drink the horse 
owed Sam that one. Masterplan 
also missed most of last season. 
He knocked a leg at Warwick 
which kept him off for a long 
time and then got the virus. Td 
like to run him now in tbe Fred 
Rimell Memorial Chase at 
Worcester.” 

Steve Smith Eccles performed 
miracles to keep Broken Wing in 
the race, but the horse had no 
more to give on the flat and just 
lost second place to Stars and 
Stripes, costing Smith Hecks a 
£125 fine for not riding out. 


Rogairio initiated 
Morshead double when malting 
all the running to spring a 25-1 
surprise in the Ha wires Bay 
Trophy. Morshead, putting up 
lib overweight on the 10-year- 
old, had to work hard for victory 
but the combination never 
looked like fettering and from 
the second last forged into a 12- 
length lead. 

Rogairio's trainer, Peter Bai- 
ley. said: “He has been very well 
at home but was under a cloud 
last year like all my horses and 
you can never be sure until they 
have had a run. He is a smashing 
old horse. I'm very fond of him 
and he has always got on well 
with Sam Morshead. 

. “Rogairio kept gargling fe» 
year so he bad the soft palate 
operation during tbe summer. 


finally broke-the ice in the First 
Division of the Southern Cross 
Novices’ Hurdle thanks partly 
to a change of riding tactics. 

Kevin Mooney had die 7-4 
favourite in front from the start 
and soon after hallway he was 
looking round to see what had 
happened to tbe others. The 
only one able to give any son of 
cfta «y in the last half tnQe was 


tbe other grey in the field. My 
Ion. but be was never a 


lie has got one strange-loojring 
joint and is 


usually lame for a 

fortnight after a race." 

There was an even bigger 
tum-up in tbe Archie Scotx 
Memorial Gold Cup when that 
tough stayer, Aniece. fought off 
Super Grass to score by 2Vi 
lengths at 33-1. “Aniece was 
going to go chasing but after this 
he'll have to stick to hurdling for 
a bit," said the winning trainer, 
Gillian Jones. 

Ramadi Dawn, in the frame 
in all his five starts last season. 


Son My Son. 
threat to the winner. 

A KMb penalty stflileft Severn 
Sound 71b out of the handicap id 
the Warrnambool Trophy but 
he stormed in by 2 ■A lengths 
from Just Alick to record his 
third win in less than three 
weeks.' His owner-trainer. Mil- 
ton Bradley, who bred Severn 
Sound from a mare dial had 
won him 24 poinl-to-pomts, wfll 
have the gelding out again in 
' another week or so. 

Cindie Girl, who pot . 
lengths between herself and her 
market rival, Keynes, on the 
run-in in tbe second division of 
the Southern Cross Novices’ 
Hurdle, looks a 

prospect for Stan 

said: “She jumps really well, 
stays, loves the lame and does 
everything with her ears 
pricked. She’ll win something 
decent one day.” 


Kempton results 


Going: arm 

14) ffln 4f ett 1. ROUSPETER (W 
Humphreys. 4-1 R Z Mr Petpnr l r 
(Samantha Dunster, 6-1): 3. Professor 
Plum (L Harvey. 3-1 taA ALSO BAN: 7-2 
Landtog Board (ib). B Tha Roortayer(Sth). 
12 Lcttpopman (put. 20 IMfnut Wondar 


NR: Mount Bolus. 25L 2XL 3L 31. 2L J 
Sayers at Rndon. Tow eiJBO ; £2.10, 
£290. £2.10. DP: S2 Sl 90- CSP £9596. 
Tricast S843J7. 

3J0 (2m 41 Ms) 1. YEOMAN BROKER 
p) fkme. 5-4 " “ 


Provide (pUL 11-4 AitM Ctartay (< 
One RatMiSht. 33 Haddak, MuaSoer 
50 Rem's 
Wtnmarts 


20 


Info, Spartan 
WSyks 


Castte |bd). Lucky Vtotano (6th), 
(pid. 11 ran. NR:. Double Up. 
tan Orient. 19. 2X1.30. 71 15L 


, Castle. Tote: 
.40. DR: £39.50. 



1JC (2m Me) I, 
McKeown. 14-1); 2. 


•w&SiKS bS s - 

" ' 245 (2m CM 1, 5EVEW* SOWD (G 

Davies, 3-1 tevk 2 4uei Aflck CLWror.4- 
1t 3. 71* Wte&r (R H)Wtt ALSO 

RAN: M Marini Ster (46). 8TW Jong 
ffilh). lOChesnut Prince tor), 20 Iten Arctic 
(6*), 25 Oafdand Jason. MaHnatelpif). 9 
rwi.Wt Annette’s DaBgW.2)M.8L 


Penett. l*-1L 
Tavern (504. 9 Maatar Muataid. 14 
Advocsie, 16 Lockner Lad 
Padcfymp ^u^20 BosteorOi 


Jarvis, 7-1t3. Adasuow (PScudarnore, 
5-4 lav) A1£0 RAN: 5-4 Bronze Opto (up). 


Our 

ran- 


(up). 

_ Floreamus. Nautical 

Sedate (pu). 11 ran. 121, 1*L 1 __ 

R Smyth « &Rjm. Tola: flS.W; £2^0. 
tl 50.21 2a OFTeSOSO. C5F: £9281. 
2J0 (3m ch) 1. BAU.YMI1UJSH (E 

Murphy. 10-11 bvfc Z WSMrad Uticfe £ 

Scudamore. 2-1 k3, Spmaa lOrtegl P 
McNafl, 4-1). ALSO RAN: 33 Spmr Hawk 

(pul 4 ran. 20. 5L J Gifford at Ftodon. 

T% 21 NO. OF: £2.10 CSF:2234. 

230 (2m eh) 1. RNB SONS (Mr P 
TownsJey. 10-lfc 2. Bftastoue lady (P 
Scudamore, 11-3 fw); 3. WooSMdWwe 
(C Mann. 9-1). ALSO RAN: 9-2 Prtopsse 
Isis J4th). 5 Sailor Mbs (pu). 8 Mtes Matoe 
m. 20 Hopeful ettenes (Sim. 33 Armagh 
i.CBtocBetKohinoor ' ‘ 


Sumsood. 33 lord Lucky. 

Hayashi (6th). 13 ran. 15L 15L 6t. 151. 2L J 
aWord at wden. Tc«: £2J0t ElJO, 
21 AO. £350. DR 8350. CSF: £501. 

RnpttMUS. 

Stratford 

1.15 (2in IrdM) 1, RAMADI DAWN « 
Mooney- 7-4 fa>^ 2. Mr Sen My BW fa 
Chartes-Jones, 7-1): 3. River Trout CJ 
Suthem, 50-TL ALSO RAN: 100-SO 
BucktowHH^^&andMebratkjn.H 


5L J MOwpctow. JatK S4- 2D: 


Every Effort, 


Knda, 26 


) MjiifcBnn(48i).J» Baat» jM y 


nniu>tn Y to Lad, SardaT, 
M^Mdnn. Watch Ti 

Misty's Star. 
r »iL 4L 
Lamtxun. 

210.10. DP: £350. CSR 21257. 


1.4S (3m 
Monfead. 2 T- 1 ); 
Snath Eccles. fr4 


2f 


1 


1. ROGABUO 
Lord 

3.1 




(G McCowt 14^«jS0 RAfe 7 A Boy 




at Dorlwig. Tots: 21020; S2M, 

2150. OF: £9.20. CSF: £2352. 


5L Ms P Tonmstey 

X 2150, 


Named Sue (0 
twg (5«i). 10 flying 
Wootfand Generator, 25 Prtnoely 


21.10 2150, 2250. DF: 2750 CSF: 

21350 Tricasc £5258. 

3.15 (2m SIMM) I.AMECEUSuthern, 

S '&S&2S ' 

fcrvChariotto'sfttoce. 

6 Wye Lea (fttikWel Covered. lOOnmM 

Player (4t«. 14 Tight teiM » 'J** 
Tut 25 ft&iey House, 33 Regsnt LMatn 
(pu). StaBorware Knot tout ConmugM 
draws (pm 14 ran. 2!ft 0, 12L 2L Ml 
M ra QE Jones at Itoton-OrbSwero/ri^: 

£3120: £850 £420 8850 DR £9750 

CSP- £27051. Tricast: £9,44052. 

X45 (2m hdte) 1. CDEME OWL (M 
Hantogton. 11-8to<): 2. Kmh (J Whte, 
64ti a Lady MM** (A Adams. 50-1). 
ALSO RAN: 10 Ante's Ante. 16 Ctwce 
J BnwdWood (BthL 
3 Galois Bosquet Mr 
Nothing But, Fte*. 




Wessex HaUL l 

W^S^ic^on. Pantep P dnotos (g^ 

fWuctant Gm. Shahdaroba. 16 ran. Nft 


Seawy (3msral(p^S0^Mr_Mote (0 11 


ran. 12L 1KL 1KL 


l «fvfle)1.E0GEE(PDoutfe. 10- 
weBB«r(H Davies. 10-1): 3. Ene 
(C^rurm. 9-1) ALSO RAN: K fav 

Boneafras. 5 mi kteght (4th). 10 Foot 

Patrol. Man OT&gte ^0 12.Hg* Now 

tou). 14 Gallic Plante. McxHMa (Wt). 25 

Shaman Way &u). Dtofcv Brown. 12 ran. 


SaSsbwy. Tote: £2440: £820 £1-40, 
£250 DF: 


P Bailey at 
320 F5-40. 

£39 AO CSF: 26042. TrtaS 

252627. 

2.15 (»n « CW 1. MASTERPLAN 
Morshead. 20-1); 2. Stero And Stft 
Frost 12-1): 3. Breton Whig (S 
Ecctes. 52 JM ay). ALSO RAN: 5-2 jWw 


Wtomar Saids. 10L5L4L12L 1LS Meter 

at Lamteum. Tots: £250 £i.r 


£090 OF: £250. CSF: 2557. 
PtooepoCrCSSAO 


1.60 2120. 


Blinkered first time 


DONCASTER: 2.15 WBhy Bank. 2A5 
i Goodr 


Shannon River. 3.15 1 


1 Naturad. Sea 


BANGOR 


11 2F3- HAND OVHI Mrs M OWdnson 7-n-l 


13 OOF JUVQ4LE PRMCC M Ofter 6-11-1 . 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

1.0 Hooeycroft. 1.30 Bobby Burns. 2.0 Stable 
Lad. 2.30 Gold Tycoon. 3.0 Splendid Magnolia. 
3.30 ItsgottabealrighL 4.0 Autumn Sport. 


Going: good 

1.0 COON TURNER PHOTOGRAPHY 
CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SBJJNG HURDLE 
(£805: 2m) (16 runners) 

2 U01- HAM90UR BAZAAR (D)RSrop3on 6-71-7 


4 anas push worfflERO^Gfioe 5-1 M— 


5 3-Ptl CHEZARlT 

6 P3QF SUNNY RSF 

10 OOO LUCKY 

11 tMUOTGFTJ 


13 OOF PRIVATE 1 


12 . 


12 009- NAKEKWter4-l 

: LABEL CRFH 
14 OF-F RUSTY ROC MWDtertas 


6-11-4 P CatonaS 

8-10-12 Cl 

4-10-12 Penny FH>* 




15 SAUSAGE ROU. M &*** 5-10-12 

IS 0022 DONNAL DEUX R Lae 4-16.7 


Lea 6-10-12 C Ngian 

5-10-12 A Pocr (5) 


20 0-02 E7BBML QANCSI G BamaQ 5-10-7 . 

21 492 HONSYCROFT (BF) R Frost *-10-7 . 

23 3 MCKT DAWN JWrson 4-10-7. 


CHopwood 


24 PM PRETTY FLY AW Jonas 6-10-7. 


a MB SECRET SIOUX DMcCton 4-10-7 AKwpfcy 

2- ( HoneyuroS. 7-2 Rori Wonder. 4-t KbiDoV Btuasr, 5-T 
Eternal Dancer. 8-1 Lucky ted — L Dormai Deux. 12-1 offiera. 


1.30 CHORLTON NOVICE HURDLE (£827: 2m) (14) 

1 1 BOBBY BURNS Mrs M Otdanson 5-11-7 GBrede* 

2 0020 OISCOVEHOOLP (CO) K Bridgwater S-11- 7 

W Wuttirtiri 

10 VO- tiWJHTNATTWE M Caste! B-11-0 i D Ogte ffl 


12 


LYNWOOD LAD G M Pnce S-1 1-0. 


13 F- MAMNSTS STAR Mrs CUoy*0ones*-S1-0 — 

CO- IBSTER IQLO AW Janes 5-1 1-0 KUteD Jones 


u Q00- _ . 

15 2340 IBMCLARE TROPHY PBMn 7-) 1-0. 5: 

2D -020 PENLLYNCS PRD3E R Judes 5-T1-0— Lome Vincert 
£2 00 -0 RACHAHMASIBttes J Baft— 4-t T-Q,. MEotfeyH) 

31 nw ACTIA E H Owen oxi 5-1 0-9 GDntesJones 

33 OFP/ AFWOOQIACR Morns 5-104 HssLWatece 

37 F- acnei OF TWTmDnngor 4-i0J)_D ten— w 

41 pp- RJUKLTONMrsCUtmKIorasS-lM JSutoern 

« 244- SWEETWATER LASS M Edfey 4-105 ArtHegen 


55 Botoy Stem, Wflwoyiies Puds. luSOaeooorGakt, 
S-1 Sweetwater Lass, 12-1 Mondara trophy. 16-1 otters. 


ZO MOLD HANDICAP CHASE (£1,777: 3m) (8) 


1 FPP- H7SBM7TON 
3 P-33 VALLEY 


F Hate 12-12-7. 


. _ . C TrwSne 6-11-11 JSMtaro 

« SU12 NATIVE BREAK (B^O) Mrs WSyhes 9-11-5 

5 00 a IMKEHSUM (TO Mrs C9MA 11-11-4 _ *■**%** JO 


6 &rl POOR WL(D)RFrenS3 8-11-4.. 


9 IB-3 STABLE LAD (0) J EfiwrdS 7-10-11 . 

10 029- WARD BOY P Ransom W-194. 

12 33-2 BRONWyN Mrs SEteOnporr 9-100. 


. P Barton 


. RJBegmn 

_ AT 


3-1 Stable Lad. 1 00-30 Naure Break. 4-) Vafey Jusace, 
13-2 Pow Hal 8-1 Laisensua Brormyn. 12-1 Im egr a wi. 


Z3C JONES & SON, AUCTIONEERS NOVICE 
CHASE (£2^)49: 2m 41) (14) 

1 03-1 LMG PW Hares 8-11-8 R Strange 


MBosteyM 

..... _ _ . J Brown (7) 

8 ODD GOUJ EXPRESS Mrs SDarerwrt 7-11-1 — AS 

9 010- GOUITrCOONJ Sprang 6-1 M A 


7 -046 SQWGOR BTOwn 7-11-1.. 


IB 111- PATWOraHWRPaacock 10-11-1. 

T7FFPB RUSTY SOTRLes 7-1 1-J 

19 3 WLO ARGOSY TBS 7-11-1. 


20 81-0 6fT OF ORDER Rfltfter 5-11-0. 


21 FB23 SPARTAN NATIVE A WJores 6-10-10 SJ( 

11-4 Hand Over, 4-1 QoU Tycoon. Patrick’s Pair, 6-1 Bright 
Sheriff. 7-1 WW Argosy. Ung. 10-1 Spartan Native. T4-1 others. 


ZQ TILSTON NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O; £685: 2m 
4ft (10) 

ir-7. 


I nil SPtBOD MAGNOLIA M flpe 
4 2311 HOP PRXER K Morgan ll-zZ 
B GLYNCEMOaR Francis 1D-12-. 

11 BB5H PHQ&AX J Townson 10-12 

12 0 JB WYWVEB B Wells 10-12 
15 0(34 KLOSmtBRAUJSpeartoglO-t 

|H03ei(H2 


15 2222 STEP ON BF)H Dale 

16 0 CUPfflsaOWSUBJA 

17 0 GOLD SOVEREIGN M 


19 


STATFOLD PAM D L 



11-8 Hop PW«r._5^ Sptenrfd Magno^^l Step On. 


8-1 Ktosterbrau, 10-1 Gold Sovereign, 

&30 WORTHENBURY HANDICAP CHASE (£1 .774: 
2m) (5) . 

1 02-1 nSOC5TT)UJEALM®fr(C^MraWSrfes^-1M 


I Rflancte 9-10-12. 
"i Bshar i040-n_ 
>8-104. 


.Rente 
N Doughty 
,C.' 


3 DOF DEMOS AUBURN j 

4 02-3 TR065HA(~.~.~ , 

6 3«t H0PEEM3ia»Rl 

12 IVO- B WM B U.BRWE P) R Peacock 9-100 — SJOTfeB 
10-11 t ua ot ia twetilabt. 3-1 TreAana. 5-1 Hope End. 
8-1 Dennis, waowte Grove. 


4 JO ESP NATIONAL HUNT PUT RACE (£1,173: 
2m) (20) 

AUTUMN 8FQ0 J EdMrds 5-1 !■»_ S McCrpte (7) 

BARI BRAET Barren 4-11-2 teav&anw 

BELL OP J Webber 5-11-2 Mssji 

BOOTHS BOV BSaort 5-11-2 DHn 


1 

2 
3 

7 

8 
11 
13 
16 
17 


BOTANY BLADE M Arison 4-11-2. 


a PAJUJSOB H®1» 4-11.2 
CLASS MOUNTAMTE 


'8*4-11 

HATTON PARK J HR 4-T1-2 



10 

21 

22 

24 

25 
27 
43 
45 
47 
45 
S» 


HAMOMM1H LAD Mrs M DKMnun 4-11-2 

HrHSteMi 

ICE NMK Mrs JBanw 5-11-2 »HAnmm 

MARCUS IMBHsPRghMN MnPfeA 

WMLQT1E J Sprartng 
WAY ONCTritene MI-2. 


..A taster (7) 
. Hr J Cadeo 


POCMEV THE GREAT J Carden 4-H-2. 

Rtt£Y BOY A ThumI 4-11-2 Mr A tester (?) 

FRAMES baby K BddgteMr MO-li — s Crete (7) 


BOLD RACER Miss S Brstoar 4-10-11. 
LUCKY FOUR M - 


MGS WHBTLEteaSGB 4-10-11 

PADRrtS express RHor^ss 4-10-11. 


.J iwffi 
LHarvayrt 

W ferine (7) 


54 Hatecsteonh Lad. 2-1 Amm Span. &i Sal Op. 

1&1 others. 


8-1 Lucky Four. i0-1 PtBnpey Tbe Great. 

Course specialists 


TnulBtS! D McCMn. 12 rifemare (rare 58 nsnm. 20.7%; Mrs 
WDSyfces. 8 tram 42, ffttnfcff fbw. 18 tram ffi. )&3%;MW 
Ecklay, 6 from 32. IOlSV (Only tour qualifier^. 

JOCKEYS: N Doughty. 7 wtonarS K001 20 rides. 36.0%; 3 
Mdrahead. 14 ftanW.2flJ9%i R Crete, 13 tram Wl, ft99k(My 
three qusWiars). 


• Warwick are to stage a race in memory of 
Michael BJackmore, woo was killed al Market 
Rasen in May. The race, to be run on December 
27. is a 2Vt-mile handicap chase for amateur 
riders. 

J 




DONCASTER 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


1.15 Knoddn' Express. 

1.45 Gold Loft 

2.15 Misrule. 

2.45 SandaU Park. 

3.15 Oueen Helen. 

3.45 


By Our Newmarket 
Corre^Jondent 

1.15 Knockin' Express. 

1.45 Repealcd- 

2.15 Surest Alexazxhn- 

2.45 Mon Balzar. 

3.15 JoifsGiri. 

3L4S Znaetxeh. 


By Michael Seely 

2.15 WETHY BANK (tap). 3.25 Qneeo Hdea. 

The Times Private Handicapped top rating: 2.1 5 KNOCKIN' EXPRESS. 


Going: good . Draw: low numbers best 

1.15 DUNKRK MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: Div t El, 17® 81) {23 rurmar^ ^ 

000 BROOM STAR QR MacgragoOD Haydn Jonas M— — WRyan ~ — 


4 (20) 

5 (15) 

7 (14) 

8 f») 
11 (18) 
12 0 ) 
13 03) 
U (8) 

17 (22) 

18 (Ifl) 

21 OS) 

22 (1Z) 
24 09) 

28 M 
27 (23) 

29 (7) 

30 <8 

31 (17) 

38 (3) 

39 9) 

40 (21) 
*1 (1) 
42 m 


80 CHARLIE ME DARUNG(M» A VWa®iM)CHMgte 9<L 
000 F»S«t£rtDwriete)P*tMteteBM 


80 FRSRJLY FELLOW (Lord Gnownfl J W Wats 9-0. 
00 MOHAM BROKE (MHtt^WMiteOh M 


fl (NOMN aOVEHQGH (K fisettej R HoMronrad WJ 
OO BfTROMEHT(PHabM9AStote»4) 


022 KNOCKM- EXPfKSS Wi Joyce) GHoffarOO 


MUNAWAR (H AHriafctoind A Stewart 90 
M PAQITBi (F KnigWjS Norton &0 


0044 QIMSSRR(ASaMi)FDUT94 


0 RAISE A FLYER (I ABtei) M JarteM 


STRAW YALE (B Haggre) M Preaoott 99 
0 WATER COY (Or GStrifefl) * Armstrong 90 


0 YORKBAT (I DougaMC Hvgsn 90. 


0 BENZ SBjLE(T Banned) MHEatoarhyO-T! 
CAFE SOCIETY (C YWgng O Lang 8-11 


0 CLOUDY lIBHT (Mrs MCaJhmte^WHastkigteBaas 8-11 
ML RUN (T S Smfeh) O Latog «-11 


S SRMMG SUNSET (FVtenODArtatenc* 8-11 
202000 SURELY GREAT (V)gUvOCk)Q Thom 6-11 
TWAL BD pi PhRps) W Jarvto 8-1 1 


00 TRICKLE (S Johnston) WHMghB-ll 







;n 

{;jSL‘ 
pi- A l 


190& LASTCOMBI 8-11 W SnrinlMn (4-6 lav) M 8iouto21 ran 

1.45 WESTERN DESERT 8B1MG HANDICAP (E1.5W: 1m) (20 runners) 

naronn REPEALED (Mrs E W H**Hnga-B»ts 4-S-ia BUnwP) 

000003 nATCreUHG(r*ate°)WHal»4» fi _ ... 

002400 NATUA (BF) (T®*«xxl EBocxWoc* Ltd) P MMdn 30-4 TtAAm 


1 0 3) 

2 (7) 

3 (3) 

4 (tZ) 

5 (5) 
9 (9) 

10 (17) 

11 P« 

12 (8) 
13 0) 
15 (IQ 
18 (19) 
18 (15) 
20 (4) 
22 ( 11 ) 
23 (Z) 

26 CO) 

27 (10) 
ZB (14) 
29 ra 


012200 MAFTW(B)(tessSL«vefy)MJ«Tire-4-®-T 
300100 MSS APEXfeHHGrimhQFYantey 4^-1 
1-00820 TARRAKAH (D)(H QoRnS)CVAferam4-94) 


0-33203 RYMOS(BH)(BocftaUd)R Simpson 3*1 
000401 IOGHLAMDTALE(Mo M Jaivlfe) A JtevIsSR-' 
000-000 TAMA MIST (R Vooropuy) R Voorapuy 4-6-11 


000020 QUITE A QUEST (M Bavin) B McMahon 3-8-11 


000000 MAfla. ALICE (Mr* B Mastx^ P FMflai* 3-6-10. 
100002 GOLD LOFT (EBanMQP MfchaK444 


200003 CHAMma VIEW (p)(Mra A JomQDHayifei Janas 4«S 
000000 COSHflCRjaKTCEPatertM Usher 34W 


00-0103 JEUMIRE(n (Mrs FRaiflQN Rohan 34-7, 


004000 DB.TA ROSE (tea F NarriQ C Banatted 3-9T. 
000640 UK3CSBI (D) (M Cteroaoce) G Gtenos 4-5-5 


236033 POCO LOCO (Mrs CHcmbQ A Osteon 


040340 POXT WORTH (A Sexton) M Usher 3-65 



290040 SWEET OFMM A (Srna* Acorns RactotfO Haydn JOOM4-650J1 
tfl85:nU£ STAR 3^-10 L Ashworth rt1-2«V?JO»H~ 20 ran 

2.15 UNKNOWN SOLD®? HANDICAP (E3.464: a?i 2ft (21 ninrwra) 


(13) 3/0000-1 TROY FAR (CD) (RMcMptoa)J Edwards 4^-13 (3a>4- 
1040 HOUJSTON (D PiMto) R Houghton 4-9-B. 


2 W 

3 (ID 
* (D 

6 (7) 

7 (17) 

8 ( 12 ) 
« <5) 

11 ( 8 ) 
12 0 ) 
IS (IS) 
1* (IQ 

15 (18) 

16 (20) 

17 (3) 

18 (14) 

19 (15) 

20 ( 21 ) 
22 ( 2 ) 

23 (4) 

24 (10) 


PMEddvy 
. JRtel 


BBFB-Z 

84 — 


010004 ACCURACY (CD) (Man B Swire) G Baking 5-94 

AKfeteariay 

96 

92 

7-1 


M Birth 

96 10-1 



93 

91 





MIMS ACnMUal(P^knn^ Pnnte.44.fi .... 


96 








90 

85 




10-1 



000010 PATH’S SISTER (CD) (Wsa B Duteury) C Thornton 5-54 _ 
012022 LEPHKHAUN LADY (GCcfbettJS Norton 444 

~ MTahhattp) 
JUNTO 

95 

08 

6-1 


204224 RALLET CHAIte (S GaMagherl R Haidar 56-1. 


340042 CAROUSreROCreT(ASaeoonutodo)R Wtvtteer3-04 
311200 SteST ALEXANDRA (fl) (J Manager) R ShBtr 3-7-12 



OOO-QBO THE LOOQEFRMCE (Quriftalr Hotel Ud) K. Stone 4-7-10 . 

440333 LA ROSE CRISE (R Dalanay) Ammy Rtzgarafe) 4-74 

044000 STANDARD ROSE (H Oppanhatote) H Candy 97-1 


1985: PATH'S stSToi 4-8-1 M Tebbut (8-1) C Thonaon 16 ran 


LCharaocfc — — 

"c Rutter (3) 03 — 0 


2-45 NORMANDY BEACHES NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2,918: 51) (14 runners) 


1 (5) 

2 W 
s (3) 
6 (7) 

8 OS) 

9 02) 

10 ( 10 ) 
1* <8J 

16 (9 

17 (11) 
20 (14) 

.22 (D 
23 (6) 
27 W 


031300 SHARP REMHQER (R Jacobson) D Lalng 9-7 . 
20*01 MASJBI (D) (K AbduSa) G Ksrwood 9-2. ' 


4240 POLLY’S SONG (Mrs J Ej**rt) a HMa 84. 
200331 STBJto(D)(VSaNQOBranrten7-11. 


. GSteteay 
RHMa 


9010-1 
82 7-1 


B Cwa rtay «99F4-1 

*te0*2 SAWAtXPA WfD^ ffOppodrttow Raclnfl) MWEatewtry 74 LOMaitate « 6-1 

300000 amHANTBD TIMES (BJD) (Mrs HCOrtMtQCHorgte 74 A Proud 92 — 

322D MASHBtM (H AI-MteKMil) C BanMaad 74 TTB 94 7-1 

023423 8AtXARLEADEH(AFfttogBLM)JtmnryFtega»aM74 J Lcroa 8810-1 

001 UICBto) (DJ (J GooQ R HoBnahted 7-7 ACUteaQ 94 6-1 

231040 FOUR LAPPS (Um (A B»rtt«)HVWritog 7-7 LHWdO) 87 — 

000004 MON BALZAR (Cawtfrarne In Ltd) A Stew 7-7- JQtemS) 92 — 

4Q0441 KALA’S MADE Aral) Parry) 6 Moore 7-7 (7«4 ANtCtay 88 5-1 

1400 VWA RONOA(D)(JU) Pte Mhchel 7-7 NCarMe 83 — 

0000 SHAWVON (OVER (B) (J Keogn) J Boday 7-7 CMter(3) 70 — 


isos: CATremres wax 7-7 g Carter 0O&4O) U w Easton* 17 mi 


h 




iM l Yy 


3-t5 ROYAL BRITISH LEGION STAKES (£3,672: 1m 6f 127yd) (17 runners) 

AMway 89 

M Ha » nitg J RaM 90 

swrerarih or 

°^CAing(JI«c0uaw)MNaMBhtonX»4 _MM0ter 64 




2 IH 

3 (27 

4 (11) 

5 (6) 

6 07} 

7 (15) 

8 (13) 

9 0) 
10 (16) 
11 (13 

IS (3) 
14 (Q 
18 (4), 
22 (7) 

24 (8) 

25 (9) 


8-1 

10-1 


2T40te auaBYHELSI (St MSotteRW Ham 54-12 
030308 JOLTS <HRL (Mr* M Ryan) M Ryan 44-11 _ 
WVTOWCTKEpMorgwJB Morgan 6-54 


80 


_-GBwiftraB{7) 
-PN rrWri P) — 
K Hodgson — 

— M Wood — 

O Carter SB 

Bred® 3T-12Z M Ate 74 


F4-6 

15-1 


«V CHART flNDER (B Kfepeiricfc) A Smfeh 444 , 
““J? •^*C0HE(RWyn»4Kwiite44«___. 

384 0 1 EAN OMM (A HR) Jfermy FtagarMO 4-8-S 
OOOOte BULLY BOY (A Richards) D 


“ CAEBA R tePCTATOR |R Dtey) R AtodarM 3-8-1 . 


14-1 


— .tz Rohin8on) R wwBrar.3-7-i2_ 

28 (14) 454342 SEA POWBt (BAF)(R HoOngsworth) W Haro 5-7-12, 

1965: ROUGH STOres 4-04 J Tanferf 00.1} K MMte 19 ran 


113-1 


3A5 DUNKIRK MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O; Dhr II: El ,191 : 6f) (23 runners) 
1 IMI WiOIHamiCA8(L lueaQ LCfarwrm 


1 pi) 

2 0 
3 (10) 
5 « 2 ) 

7 {Q 

8 (IQ. 

9 W 
12 ( 22 ) 
18 fQ 
21 (IQ 
34 (6) 

27 <23? 

28 (11) 


* lliu HUOU J yMI . 

00 DAireOMN ORppcxfeqiito Racina M w BnteTOv 94 

0 DOWSING or totoMJThmru? " 

“ ^WmFWTOCOt.iranictaBrii^LCioMnreM 

‘*■*1 j &*0P 94 



• 1 nwaru J 'ITBTMI JW). 

“ wrarac(AOtera)PiS^94_ 

00 SOCKETS OAA (B Morgan) 8 Morgan &-Q . 


BUSSM M AFFAIR (M tfowW) A Smnn 94 

!gT , *C8r»tewUd)RSteBte94 JHBroan^) 


400 aWCHAUENQBI(Steff ww . WMUjn<s<lllJl 


.PaMEddwy 

NOMRUNNB 

BT h g art o n 


. JRdd 


30 (3 ) 
.31 P4) 
33 (17). 
3* P) 

37 ( 18 ? 

38 « . 

42 (18) 

43 ti) 

44 pgj 


_rr V} H ranemroon 50 

-s ~ 

D TMEBRWERlBRpbartMSWoftotTDQ 

81 VRIlfftB Nt _ » Fk . » ■■ ^ te •* WM 



i * 


p VANms (Mr* JBrookaQH Candy 94 ' 

Ml IfnMil MiNnu ritu i. a f. _ . 


00 VStDON CAKYON (Mira H Gera^ G PriMard-Gordon 
00 LWG COLD (A WaBortMHtorttefrII 

3000 fflAa*ENT(G Ward) OArtMtmot 8-11 


WTBIM# wr rouuumoi »U _ 

4000 SPA WOJW S JUDY (B)(P Partes) JScalanB-11 

2 ZUA£TREH<HAI-MMs)eum) H77wmapnjaneeB.il. 


198& ROYAL LOFT 8-11 T hraa (20-1) W Jarris iflran " 

Course specialists 

JOCKEYS 


WHsrn 
G Harwood 
JOuntap . 
BH#S 


TRAINERS 
Wnnare flprmare Per Cera 
2S SB ■ 29 .1 

21 108 1 9.4 

. 18 10S -17jfl 

24 1S1 158 


Only QuaWters 


GStartey 
W Canon 
flat!' 
WR_ 
RHta 
WRyan 


: ^ , 








THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 


SPORT 




33 


The champion who came from nowhere to win the Athlete of the Year award 

Black’s golden touch puts glamour 
back into unfashionable event 


By David Mflfcr 
Chief Sports Correspondent 

The 400 metres, or what was once the 
gsartn- mile, is slightly a kwt event rathe an* 
naterf taackhistory. Famous rnanm tend to 
have been the short sprinters or the middle 
and Joag distance men. In poUic appeaL the 
one lap sprint has even become secondary h, 
wme people s estimation to the 400 metres 
todies, gtamonzed by fignres such as 
Bwghtay, Tixdafl, Davis, Hemery, Aku-Bna, 
Schmid mid Moses. A 20-year-oM British 
ragby enthusiast, and recently retired medical 
student, may be about the change the pattern. 

Ripr Black, a huge, amiable son of a 
Southampton doctor, would at this moment 
itave been a relatively anonymous trainee at St 
Bartholomew’s Hospital, with a bothersome 
saaro-tkac vertebra tipsy bom a rugby 
tack le, had he not pteagfej his maths A level 
two summers ago. Instead, he will tomorrow 
receive the British Athletics Writers Associ- 
ation award as bkh’s athlete of the year, an al- 
most unanimous recognition of his exceptional 
potential after a season whea Coe, Cram and 
f'fe&m'psiira, that trio of regular «vfaim also 
won Earopean championship gri d medals. 

Sadden exposure as a 
national sporting hero 


two years, and as hesits by the log fire in his 
parents’ home having tea and donghnnts 
before an evening training spell, he is still 
trying to come to terms with the sodden 
exposure as a national sporting hero. “My life 
has changed, but it hasn't changed me,” he 
says optimistically. “All that has happened is 
that other people’s reaction to me has 
altered.” 

When, with a moving start, he ran his 
remarkable anchor leg in Stuttgart to bring 
Britain the 4 x 400 gold medal, Coe came up to 
him immediately afterwards to show him his 
handr-timing of 43-9sec and offered Mm the 
watch as a souvenir. Such a tone is no more 


than a stride or so off Lee Evans's enduring 
high altitude world record of an electrical 
43.86. 

Five factors suggest that Black may not 
only surpass Juantorena and Evans hot 
become the first British Olympic whiner at 
400 since the 1924 victory by Eric Iiddefl, 
whose achievement was overshadowed, not 
feast m the fihn Chariots of Fire, with the snh- 
consdoas prejudice already mentioned, by 
Harold Abrahams’s short sprint 

The memory which is rooted in Radi’s 
miad as much as the unpremeditated array of 
gold medals is the race in Zurich shortly 
before Stuttgart He ran a personal best iff 
45.0 and came an muneationed seventh. Back 

home the public did not even know he bad ran. 
Never mind the time, the defeat annoyed him. 

So, as he proceeds through only the third 
winter of arduous preparation muter the 
guidance of Mike Smith in a squad which 
includes rivals and friends Kriss Akabasi and 
Todd Bennett, those five advantages are: that 
he is oonsekras, above all, iff winning, that he 
is not seduced by record hunting, that he’ 
regards his inexperience and relative naivety 
as a boons of freshness, that he knows he has 
an academic background to fall back on 
should he become seriously injured, and that 
he is free of any pressure Grom permits or so- 
cial friends. He doabts if his mother could tell 
you his Stuttgart time. 

“Because I've been in the sport only two 
years, I didn’t, and I don't, over-complicate 
the sport I just ran. MOce Smith Is a trainer 
rather than a coach. He knows that / know 
what I've got to do, so that be never says go for 
this or that He arts ns into superb shape, 
which mast be evident from ru nning five races 
in five days in Stnttgar J. He wasn't there, but 
we talked regnlariy on the phone. He doesn't 
talk about 'peaks’, bat he produces them 
without discussing it 1 get a lot of help, in mo- 
rale, chatting with Kriss. He helped give me 
the belief that I could win.” 

A sobering experience was this year’s UK 
Championship, in which Black went off like a 
greyhound-track hare, lost control, and died 
after 300 metres. He has not been beaten by a 


Briton since then, but as be headed off into the 
rata of a dark a uto wm evening for another, 
session of gymnasium work with Smith, his 
mind was tuning to the knowledge that next 
season everyone wfil be out to beat him. 

Much of his trainmg with Smith, therefore, 
is concentrated on relaxation, the mastery of 
which always eluded the brilliant yet frits- 1 
(rated Dave Jenkins, the tanner British 
record-holder. Black recognizes that, at 20, 
his peak may be five years away. 

His emergence occurred, in fact, indoors. 
Having to retake his maths in the autnnm iff 
1984, having failed for Barts, aid with 
nothing mere behind him than conventional 
success at school sports as a rugby winger — 
and England's schools triafist — he had a try 
at 400 and ran 47,8 in Southampton. 

Obliged by regulations to 
use starting blocks 


With a year off before bow going to 
Newcastle University, be joined Smith's 
squad, won the Costard Games, then an 
indoor International against Italy, a relay 
against West Germany (in which it had to be 
by a woman official that he was 
by regulations to nse storting Mocks, 
for the first time), and then the European 
junior championships, which he won. (rat of 
nowhere, he hml arrived. 

It made sense to switch, with their 
acceptance, to Southampton Un i versity to be 
able to train with Smith. It made farther 
sense, after only one term, to abandon medical 
studies with father's sanction. 

“Tu not naturally intelligent” he says. “I 
have to work hard to pass exams, and I 
couldn't cope with the demands of medical 
school and training. For a month or two, with 
nothing to do hi the morn i ng s , it was awfni, so 
I got a part-time job. Before the Common- 
wealth and Earopean championships, I wasn’t 
sure of what I was. My objective was oo more 
than to run at Edinburgh- Now, 1 never have 
time to be bored.” 

The prospects are that we will not be, either. 



Black: not seduced by record hunting 


CRICKET: RICHARDS EARNS VOTE OF CONFIDENCE AS ENGLAND GIVE SLACK HIS LAST CHANCE TO SHINE 


French set 
to lose 
Test place 

Bruce French is in danger of 
losing a Test place for which be 
waited two-and-a-half years to 
make his own. The Nottingham- 
shire wicketkeeper, aged 27, has 
been leFt out of England's team 
for the four-day match gainst 
Western Australia beginning in 
Prttb today. And unless his 
replacement, Richards, of Sur- 
rey. messes up the opportunity, 
there seems little chance of 
French playing in next week’s 
first Test at Brisbane. 

French is being penalized for 
his lade of success with the hat 
and not because of any doubts 
about Jus ability behind the 
stumps. Having chosen a team 
expected to include four seam 
bowlers and only one spinner, 
England believe they need 
Richards’s greater run-scoring 
potential to stiffen a tail which 
would otherwise start at number 
seven. 

French finally won his first 
cap last summer having been 
understudy to Downton in India 
and West Indies. He played in 
five Tests, kept wicket superbly, 
but scored only 43 runs in five 
innings. His fotm with the bat 
for Noitinghamslure was not 
sparkling either -7 361 at an 
average of 20. Richards, aged 
28, is still uncapped despite 
touring India with England in 
1981. He topped 1.000 runs for 
Surrey last summer and av- 
eraged 40. 

It could be argued that a 
middie-order hatting line-up. at 
Perth of Gower, Lamb, Gatling 
and Botham should not need 
much help. But Gatting. the 
England captain, said yesterday: 
-We felt that if we were going to 
leave John Emburey out and 
play four seamers we would 
have rather a tong tail. Jack will 
make that tail a tittle shorter.” 

Gatting admitted that the 
choice of wicketkeeper was dis- 
cussed at some length as was an 

opening partner for Broad. Sack 

finally got the vote over A they. 
“There were one or two po- 
sitions which we were coin 
cemed about getting right. 



Spin will torment 
West Indies again 

Fhwn Richard Streeton, Lahore 


Testing time: Slack (above) needs a big score to clinch a Test place at Brisbane next week 
Gatting said. But he added: H We the deep end against West Indies DeFrcitas, a good work-out op 


mg si 
are still 


keeping our options 
he first Test’ 


open for the : 

However, it will be Stack's last 
chance to clinch a (dace in the 
Test side. The demoralized 
Middlesex player has hit only 
one run in a first-class match 00 
tour but the England selectors 
are desperate to find a partner 
for Broad. 

“Stack came on tour as an 
opener — be must get his chance. 
He has played in only one first- 
class game and needs the work;" 
Gatting said. The Test place lies 
between Slack and Alhey, who 
pressed his claim on Wed ne sday 
with a fine 124 against a 
Western Australia country side 
in England’s 1 17-run one-day 
win. 

Snack bit some big scores for 
the England B team in Sri Lanka 
in 1 985-86. But he was oat of his 
depth when ins was thrown in at 


after Gatting was injured on 
England's last tour. 

while England batsmen 
tame the double threat . 

Western Australia's successful 
left-arm Test pair, Reid and 
Matthews, their bowlers win be 
up against ibe Fremantle Doc- 
tor. That is what people in these 
parts call a chill wind which gets 
up every afternoon and Mows 
across the WACA ground from 
the direction of Fremantle on 
tbe coast Some bowlers are able 
to use it to their advantage, 
while others find it a formidable 
handicap. Why it is dubbed the 
Doctor is a little unclear. One 
popular explanation suggests 
that anyone who tails to don a 
sweater on its arrival will prob- 
ably need toe services of a 
medical man. 

England are likely to give 
theirpacemen, Dilley and 


what is expected to be a quick 
wicket “Dilley needs to get his 
rhythm back and both need 
plenty of work,” Gatting said. 

Western Australia will be 
without their Test wicketkeeper, 
Zoefarer, who Iras been troubled 
by a knee iqjtny. Zoehrer is 
confident that he will be fit for 
the first Test but as a precaution 
his understudy Dyer, from New 
South Wales, has been put on 
standby. Zoehrer’s place in tbe 
Western Australia side goes 10 
Cox. 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA (font *G Wood. 
W Andrews. T Breman, P Gomuta. K 
MseCoav. G Marsh. C Mattiaws, T 
Moody, B Mulder, B Reid. M Watte. -fM 
Cox. 

ENGLAND-. B C Breed. W N Stack. D I 
Gower. A J Lamb. TM W Gelling, I T 
Botham, tc J Rfctwds. PA J DeFreeas. P 
H Edmonds, 6 ROBBy.GCSfflafl. 

Simon Barnes previews the 
Somerset showdown, page 14 


Local forecasts are that the 
second Test match starting at 
the magnificent Gaddafi sta- 
dium here today will be a low 
scoring game. Surprise , sur- 
prise, the baked mud pitch is 
experied to bdp spinners and 10 
be of little use to fast bowlers. 

West Indies, unexpectedly 1-0 
down in tbe three-match series, 
are dearly going to have a 
struggle to draw level in what 
should be a tense, hard fought 
Test. It will always have a 
special place in history because 
two neutral umpires win be in 
charge. 

Messrs P D Reporter and V K 
Ramasee Ramaswamy have ar- 
rived Grom India. They watched 
the two reams practising yes- 
terday as the temperature 
dropped a little to a mere 88 or 
so. It is toe first time either man 
has travelled outside his own 
country and it is impossible not 
to foe) a little sorry for them. 

A large proportion ofPakistan 
cricket opinion continues to see 
no reason for two Indians being 
p re ferred to home grown of- 
ficials. They will be very much 
under the microscope and their 
judgement and commonsense 
could be tested, if there should 
be any crowd trouble, 
remembering the events at 
Gujranwala. 

That match, I suspect, did 
tittle to help relationships be- 
tween the two teams, while 
crowd misbehaviour has a nasty 
habit of escalating in these pans. 
Yesterday, additional barbed 
wire was placed on top of the 
nine foot high railings, topped 
by inwardly curved spikes, 
around the ground. The Lahore 
police, too, are better drilled, 1 
gather, than their Gujranwala 
counterparts were. 

Imran Khan, (he Pakistan 
captain, has not yet been able to 
bold a bat property because of 
his damaged finger; the swelling 
subsiding more slowly than 
expected. He can bowl, but as he 
put it; H It could be my batting 


that will be needed on this 
pitch.” If Imran decides not to 
play. Saieem Jaffer, tbe left-arm 
bowler, who performed so well 
at Gpjranwata. is expected to be 
his replacement 

Pakistan have named 1 7 play- 
ers. Kaz Ahmed, an 18-year-okl 
right-hand batsman, who has 
has made a wealth of runs 
recently, including 82 against 
the West Indians at Rawalpindi, 
is expected 10 win his first Test 
cap m place of Salim Malik 
whose left arm was broken in 
the first Test 

Nobody believes the West 
Indies will bat as badly again as 
they did at Faisalabad when 
they were dismissed for 53 in 
their second innings. Several of 
their main run-genets, however, 
remain unusually short of runs. 
Though Dujcra has now found 
his fern, and Haynes has hinted 
be is doing so. Greenidge, in 
first class matches, has made 
only 1 15 runs in six innings on 
tbe tour. 

Richardson has a top score of 
67 in his six innings and Gomes, 
in four innings, has scored 101 
runs. The great Richards, in- 
evitably, has become a talking 
point alter tailing to leg spin for 
two ducks and 17 in his last 
three innings. He has not been 
well recently and I still believe 
Pakistan are going to suffer soon 
from his bat. 

Several West Indians con- 
tinue 10 struggle with chest 
infections and stomach upsets 
and they are not naming their 
team until shortly before the 
toss. 

PAKISTAN (from): Invan Khan leapt). 
Jawad Miandad. Mudessar Nazar. Mohan 
Khan. Qasxn Omar, Rama Raja, 302 
Ahmad, Abdul Qsdr. SaSm Yousuf, 
Wasm Akrsm, TauseeJ Ahmad, Stooib 
Mono. Astf Mujtata. Zakir Khan, Ghattar 
Kazmi. Sateem Jaffer and Rtzwan Zamao, 

WEST MDSES (from): I V A Richards 
(capOAl P Marshall. WKM Banjanan, P J 
L Dujon. H A Gomes, A H Gray, C G 
Grwmfclga. R A Harper. D L Haynes. A L 
Logie. BP Patterson, R B Richardson and 
CAWaten. 


COUNTY CRICKET 


Stevenson in demand 


amorgan are chasing an- 
r Test cricketer just 24 
s after announcing the cap- 
of the former England 
er Alan Butcher, 
hn Steele, the Welsh 
tv's assistant secretary* 
irroed that he had spoken to 
ast bowler Graham Steven- 
following his release by 


ted to find out whether 


n pressure that he was 
ng over the shock of 
ased by Yorkshire but 


it seems as though be wants to 
carry on playing.” 

But Glamorgan, who finished 
bottom of the County 
Championship last season, may 
have to art quickly if they warn 
the experienced Stevenson her 
cause the 31 -year-old is under- 
stood to have already attracted 
the interest, of another county. 

Stevenson played for England 
against India in 1 979, along with 
Butcher, who has signed from 
Surrey on a thre-year contract. 
“ Alan has got a proven record as 
a batsman and can only 
strengthen our top order,” Steele 


7.30 Lrtass stated 

FOOTBALL 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

OTHER SPORT 


round: SfWHlon * 



BOWLS: as UK sriglss eframpionsfiips 
(S Preston). 

TENNIS; LTA women’s Woer tDUiwnenl 
(Queens eMy. 

RACKETS: GeMstion mvrtttxm doubles 
tournament (round ratal matcnes aiBoq 

gSfcSSSs old _ boy* doubles 
champainsrap Ouoen *1- 


ERS’CUP 


iFoxfortJhasadaywitft 
the North Shropshire. 
» Olympics and 
professionals: Steve 
Hadley discusses 
^•implications for 
sricw jumping. 


NON-LEAGUE FOOTBALL 

Buckley is named as 
Kettering’s manager 

By Paul Newman 



Alan Buckley, who lost his job 
as manag er of Walsall in the 
summer, was yesterday given 
the task of taking Kettering 
Town into the Football League. 
Buckley has signed a two-year 
contract as manager of the GM 
VauxhaH Conference club, and 
will take charge after 
tomorrow's match at borne to 
Weymouth. 

Cyril Gingefi, Kettering’s 
chairman, said: “We are budd- 
ing the club on the basis that we 
go into the League. Alan does 
not view tbe job as moving 
down a grade but as. taking the 
responsibility for netting Ket- 
tering info the fourth division. 

-The introduction this season 
of automatic promotion into the 
Football League has meant that 
clubs like ours can attract people 
of Alan's calibre. We bad 21 
applications for the job and 
seven were from people with 
League management 

experience.” 

Buckley, who plans to move 
into the Kettering area, will be 
employed on a full-time basis. 
His predecessor, David Need- 
ham, who resigned last month, 
worked only part-time for the 
dub. 

“Alan wflj Have a completely 
free rein on the football side and 
he will also help develop our 
links with local schools and the 
community generally, "Mr 
Gingell added. 

Buckley, aged 35, began his 
career at Nottingham Forest 
before joining Walsall in 1973. 
Apart front one season with 
Birmingham City he spent the 
next 13 years at Fellows Park, 
the last four as player-manager. 


He made about 400 appearances 
for them and scored more than 
170 goals. In the summer, 
however, he was replaced by 
Tom Coakley after a boaitiroom 
reshuffle. 

Kettering, who probably have 
as much potential a&any club in 
the Conference, have been 
Steadily rebuilding after finan- 
cial problems took them to the 
brink of closure more titan once 
in tbe early 1980s. Needham 
resigned after a poor start to the 
season which was climaxed by 
an S-0 defeat away to Sutton 
United. 

Arthur Mann and Billy Jef- 
frey, the two senior players who 
put in temporary control after 
Needham’s resignation, have 
both said they will be happy 10 
play under Buckley. 

• Kevin Blackwell who has 
joined Scarborough from Bar- 
net, is staking a clai m as the 
most distant commuter in the 
GM Vauxhafi Conference. The 
former Boston United _ goal- 
keeper will continue to five in 
the Luton area despite his 
transfer. Two Telford United 
players might contest his claim: 
Kevin Chariton travels from 
Anglesey and Tom Morgan 
from Aberystwyth. 

• Runcorn, who were on the 
brink of liquidation in 1983. 
Have announced an operating 
profit of £20.666 for the last 
year. 

• Colne Dynamoes. of the 
North West Counties League, 
hope 10 sign Billy Hamilton, the 
Oxford United forward Who has 
bad to retire from full-time 
football because of a knee 
injury. 


MODERN PENTATHLON 

Two schools of thought 
over drug-takers 


The Union Internationale de 
Pentathlon Moderns ex Biathlon 
(U1PMB) will decide on 
November 24 what action to 
lake over three foreign compet- 
itors whose drug samples at the 
international meeting; in Bir- 
mingham in June proved pos- 
itive. Until then the identity of 
the three athletes and their 
country, or countries, will re- 
main secret. 

The UIPMB secretary -gen- 
eral, Tbor Henning, said yes- 
terday: “The competitors 
should have the right to come 
and present their case before we 
make any punishment- We have 
sent them a tetter but. as yet, we 
have not received a reply.” 

Under UIPMB rules, a first 
offender will be banned from 
competition for 30 months. A 
second offence will result in a 
lifetime ban. The offenders at 
Birmingham are believed to 
have used beta-blockers, a 


depressant drug that helps 
steady the arm when shooting. 

Danny Nightingale, develop- 
ment officer of the Modern 
Pentathlon Association of Great 
Britain and a team gold medal- 
list at the 1976 Olympics, said: 
“We have known that there 
were some positive tests at 
Birmingham for some time. The 
feeling among athletes may be 
that the powers that run the 
sport, the international commit- 
tees, are not damping down 
hard enough.” 

But Henniog said: “There 
have been cases where we have 
found the competitor is com- 
pletely innocent. He has trusted 
his doctor over a period of time 
and taken tablets in innocence." 
He also confirmed that some 
tests taken at the world 
championships in Italy during 
August had also proved 
positive. 


HOCKEY 


Olympic search starts 


A Great Briiain junior men's 
leam, bearing the name of 
Unicorns, will take part in tbe 
Los Reyes tournament in Barce- 
lona from January 3 to 6 next 
vear (Sydney Friskin writes). 
They will play a few training 
matches also, agaiast a Spanish 
XI at the same venue. 

Selection for these events will 
be made after two training 
weekends, at LiUeshal) from 
November 28 10 30 and at 
Crystal Palace from December 
12 to 14. A total of 33 players 
have been invited from Eng- 


land, Wales. Scotland and 
Northern ireiand for the first 
training weekend, which is the 
sorting point of Britain's search 
for talent for the 1988 Olympic 
Games in Seoul The purpose at 
this stage is to exclude the more 
established players. 

GREAT BRITAIN JUNIOR SQUAD: J 
Pees. N Tncmpson, D Camueri. A Oaten. 
D Rooerts, A Ferns, G Swayne. P Ffltend. 
■S Fraftps. J Rnc*ro>. S haziert, S 
Rowlands, N Brown. N Barker. C Mayer. 
M fttev. P Util. J Hsu 5 B Ismry. A EWSOfl 
~ glanfl): J Fry. DhaAar.oMacwwy. 

rm. a aakstoagh, 0 Co*a ougfi 

: A NrcficL N Cox, C McLeod. & 
: (Scotian#. R Richardson, 6 
Kamflton. D Gordon (Northern (ratand)- 


tsilEi 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Hanley hospital 
bound with 
mixed feelings 


By Keith Madeira 


up. I 
after 


It was with a sense of relief, 
mixed with sadness, that Ellery 
Hanley yesterday ruled himself 
out of tomorrow's second inter- 
national against Australia at 
Efi&nd Road. 

After his trip 10 a specialist in 
the Midlands had resulted in the 
diagnosis of a chipped cartilage 
in his knee. Hanley said:** While 
I haic the thought of missing the 
two remaining internationals, I 
am glad the worrying is over and 
] know what is wrong. 1 have not 
enjoyed my rugby these last few 
weeks. Every time I have played 
for Wigan or Great Britain the 
knee has hurt and has swelled 
It has even been swollen 
I have done training runs. 
“I am sick at having to miss 
the games agaiast Australia, the 
pinnacle of my career, but now I 
want to have my operation and 
get completely fit again. I would 
not have wanted to play and let 
the lads down”. 

Hanley will enter hospital on 
Sunday and will be inactive for 
the better part of a month, 
which rules him out of the third 
international at Wigan a fort- 
night tomorrow. 

Maurice Bam ford, tbe Great 
Britain coach, was already re- 
signed to losing the services of 
Hanley, one of the game's great 
individuals and the leading 
Rugby Lea g ue try scorer. Tony 
M archant, the Castleford 
centre, moves back to his 
favourite position of centre and 
Barrie Ledger, of St Helens, 
comes in on the wing. 

M archant will wear the No. 4 
jersey in which he made his 
Great Bn lain debut and scored a 
try against France at Wigan last 
season. 

Strangely, the loss of Hanley 
will be greeted with mixed 
feelings rather than total dejec- 


tion. In the first international be 
was below form and was one of 
the principal culprits in the 
failure of the team to adhere to 
the game plan evolved by 
Baraford and the British coach- 
ing team. In many respects bis 
brilliant individualism, which 
can win matches singlehanded, 
can be a drawback when team 
plans are tightly knit. 

Bamford took the news of 
Hanley's injury philosophically 
and practically. “It is tar better; 
for us to have a player able to 
give 100 per cent chan Hanley 
able, through no fault of his 
own, to give only 60 per cent. 
Martrbam is a specialist centre 
and Barrie Ledger a specialist 
winger and the ifireequaner line 
will at least have perfect balance 
on paper, with Gary Schofield 
retaining bis best position at 
right centre”. 

Both sides were training full 
out yesterday, the Australians 
concentrating on absorbing Paul 
Dunn, the front-row forward, 
and Dale Shearer, the winger, 
into the tactics which won the 
first international 38-16 at Old 
Trafford. Dunn replaces Roach, 
who was injured against St 
Helens, and Shearer replaces 
Kiss, who has not played since 
the first international. 

The Great Britain squad had 
two long, brisk training periods 
yesterday. Tbe first was at their 
training camp at Shaw Hill 
Country Cub at Chorley and 
the second at the Knowsfey 
Road ground of tbe St Helens 
Club. Today the British squad 
will train at their headquarters 
and at the Salford ground before 
they move on to El [and Road 
for the international Great 
Briiain need to win to avoid 
losing yet another series to their 
Opponents, 


SWIMMING 


Trust funds have 
Wilkie’s backing 


By Roy Moor 


David Wilkie, Britain's 
Olympic gold medallist, has 
warmly applauded the Amateur 
Swimming Association’s de- 
cision to allow trust funds for 
their international competitors. 

“This is the best thing that has 
happened to British swimming 
for a long time.” Wilkie said. "It 
will help to develop tbe sport in 
a much needed positive way. 
Young competitors will be en- 
couraged to stay in the sport 
longer and that in itself is 
important because we lose so 
much good talent for lack of an 
incentive of this kind." 

Wilkie added: “Look what 
trust funds have done for athlet- 
ics — Seb Coe, Sieve Cram and 
Steve Ovett are among the stars 
who have benefited from this 
form of financial support and 
look what a marvellous shop 
window they have provided for 
athletics, 

“1 am convinced that fi- 
nanced in this way, once the 
shop window of swimming is 
similarly developed, Briiain win 
become far richer in Olympic 
talent for their sport." 

Wilkie, who still has a training 
swim every day. added with a 
smile: “This idea of trust funds 
for swimming almost tempts me 
to make a come-back." 

Martyti Woodruffe. who so 
narrowly missed a gold when 


winning his silver medal at the 
Mexico City Olympics, looked a 
little sad when commenting on 
the advent of trust funds, said: 
“It has all changed from the 
lovable amateur game of my day 
to a serious professional out- 
look. Tbe problem as I see it is 
that it will cost £10.000 to 
£12,000 a year to sponsor one of 
our outstandingly successful 
internationals. Britain has 10 
swimmers of this class. It*$ going 
to be a costly business giving 
them this son of financial 
backing." 

Discussions are still taking 
place with the British Swim- 
ming Federation to decide the 
grants leading competitors are 
to receive from the Minet 
Awards for Olympic Excellence 
being administered by Sports 
Aid Foundation. 

Both Wilkie and Woodruffe 
were giving their support yes- 
terday to the launching of tbe 
“The Arena Splash" scheme 
being promoted at a cost of 
£20.000 by Arena, makers of 
swimwear, to raise funds 
through sponsorship to help tbe 
British Federation meet the cost 
of special Olympic team 
preparation for tbe 1988 Games 

The intention is to send the 
British swimming team to Flor- 
ida in January for special 
training 


YACHTING 

Debate on 
floating 
billboards 

By Barry PtakthaD 

Yachting, mice the sole pre- 
serve of rich Co rint hia ns , is 
poised for a fiery debate today 
on sponsorship and pro- 
fessionalism. Commercialism 
has been creeping np on the 
sport for several years but it is 
only this season that the bar- 
ricades were over-nut when an 
international jury gave their 
blessing to names like French 
Kiss aim White Crusader at the 
start of the America’s Cap. 
despite the subtle links these 
have with then principle spon- 
sors, the KisGrokp ia Paris and 
White Horse Whisky. 

This week the battle lines 
have been drawn at the later- 
national Yacht Rating Union’s 
annual conference in London 
between the conservative old 
guard, who want to reinforce the 
roles against farther incursions. 
and a test-growing array of more 
liberal minds who see no ma- 
terial difference between rich 
owners wbo can afford to boy the 
best boats and equipment and 
talented suitors wbo persuade 
tbe commercial world to do the 
same for them. 

Those fighting for change at 
today's final meeting of the 
lYRU's Permanent Committee 
have powerful allies, not least 
the US Yacht Rating Union, 
whose delegates have been 
lobbying hard this week for a 
three-tier approach that would 
preserve dub rating for ama- 
teurs bat segregate certain na- 
tional and international events 
for sponsored entrants. 

Also pressing for change are 
tbe 12 Metre Cuss Association, 
for almost every America’s Cop 
syndicate have acute fending 
problems. Tbe greatest cause for 
Concern is the belief that rating 
yachts wiU become little more 
than floating billboards. 

Not so, argues Dr Penrose 
Courtney- WiWrran. campaign 
planning manager at British 
Airways, who Imre a £250,000 
investment id Britain's 
America’s Cup effort and spon- 
sored Robin Knox-Johnsi tin's 
assault <m tbe French -domi- 
nated offshore mnltifiiill scene. 
“Yachting represents a high- 
class segment of the market and 
the best way to present onr 
message hi to paint the boat ia a 
subtle 2nd elegant way," he said. 


GOLF 

US captain 
defends 
cup defeat 

Lee Trevino, the first Ameri- 
can Ryder Cup captain to be 
beaten in 28 years, has labelled 
his team “cry babies." The 
former Open champion., whose 
captaincy was bitterly criticized 
by some members of bis team, 
has broken his silence 14 
months after Europe’s historic 
victory at The Bdfiy. 

Trevino was said 10 have 
become a recluse for much of 
the match, but he puts bis side of 
events on the record in an 
album released for the charity. 
Sparks. He says: “What was said 
didn't bun me. I've played this 
game for many years and I've 
been on six Ryder Cup teams. 
All's well wben everything is 
rosy, but there are good losers 
and bad losers. To tell you the 
truth. 1 thought they were cry 
babies and 1 told them so." 

Trevino was accused of failing 
to support his team on the 
course, and Peter Jacobsen felt 
the Americans would have woo 
had the European captain Tony 
Jacklin led their team. But 
Trevino insisted: “None of my 
team said anything to me, but 
I’ve read some of the things they 
wrote. They can say what they 
want and do what they want as 
long as they don't pul iheir 
hands on me or say anything 
about my wife and kids. 

"My wife made sure they had 
all their meals and made all the 
arrangements for them. 1 was 
out 00 the course every day, 
supplying them with water, fruit 
and candy bars. I probably spent 
$3,000 out of my own pockeL 
But they didn't perform well 
and they got the socks beaten off 
ihem because they ran into a 
team who wanted to win more 
than they did.” 

Trevino also dismisses the 
team's criticism of the Belfry 
galleries, who were alleged to 
have cheered bad American 
shots and hissed at players’ 
wives. 

He added: “I’ve heanf a lot 
about that too. 1 told them lhe 
crowd would be biased — that's 
only natural. But they were 
never in unruly crowd." 

Trevino is one ofsi\ golfing 
personalities on the double al- 
bum along with Jacklin. Peter 
Alliss, Alex Hay, and the BBC 
pair Renton Laid law and John 
Fenton. The record was re- 
corded at Woburn in June. 



mZ 

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34 


SPORT 


TRF TTMFS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1! 


TENNIS 


Boys front 
Austria 


on way to 
the top 


From Rex Bellamy . 
Tennis Correspondent 
Antwerp 


Two teenagers called Horst 

Skoff and Thomas Muster .have 
charged from the tennis wilder- 
ness into the lop 50, which » 
where the money is. They are 
hardly household names, even 
in their native Austria. Bui it is 
frustrating for Britain, who can- 
not produce one such player, 
that a -nation with Austria's 
modest tennis traditions can 
produce two. 

Muster has beaten Ramesh 
Krishnan and Brad Gilbert to 
win a minimum of about 
£33.500 by reaching the last 
eight of the European Commu- 
nity Championship. True, 
Krishnan had just Sown in from 
Hong Kong and Gilbert's mobil- 
ity was inhibited by tendon 
trouble in his right knee. But at 
this time of year lots of players 
are tired or injured or both, but 
remain interested in piling up as 
much money as possible. 

Gilbert looks rather like the 
dark-haired half of the Starsky 
and Hutch TV series. There is 
nothing spectacular about his 
game but it is neat and always 
makes sense. He has a good 
touch, too. He flew from Pans to 
San Francisco last week to have 
that knee examined and then 
arrived in Antwerp a week later. 
He has been advised to rest for 
tin days but has yet to make up 
his mind. 

This year Gilbert beat John 
MacEnroe in the Masters tour- 
nament- then won four grand 
prix events and made more 
money than he bad ever 
dreamed about- He does not 
want to put down the pot of gold 
until he has emptied it 

Muster, aged 19, is a left- 
handed player whose short fair 
hair is always such a mess that 
one suspects his barber is an 
eccentric who wears a blindfold 
and works with a penknife. 
Muster is a busy and bouncy 
base-huer who goes in for long- 
range aggression. He serves hard 
and uses top-spin on both 
flanks. Fierce cross-court back- 
hands and delicate forehand, 
lobs were features ofhis 6-3, 6-7, 
6-4 win over Gilbert yesterday . 

Sooner or later Muster will 
learn how to volley and could 
then be veiy good indeed. He 
reckons his advance, like 
Scoff’s, has been inspired by 
good coaching, latterly from the 
tactically shrewd Baiazs 
Taroczy. But Muster is also 
convinced that be made a wise 
move two years ago when, 
dissatisfied with his national 
association's development 
scheme, he decided to take a 
chance and go it alone with the 
help of a manager. 

On Wednesday evening there 
was a connoisseur’s match in 
which “The Big Cat”, Miloslav 
Mecir, beat the quick and crafty 
Paul McNamee. Mecir reached 
the last eight at Wimbledon and 
.was runner-up for the United 
States championship. His 
strokes and speed of foot are 
equally deceptive and he has 
unusual weight of shot, timing 
the ball so well that — with what 
seems to be no more than a 
nudge - he can make it fly like a 
bullet He is also bigger than 
McNamee and almost 10 years 
younger. 

One quarter-final will be be- 
rween those formerly renowned 
juniors, Jimmy Arias, now 22, 
and Aaron Knckstein, aged 19. 
Neither could, consolidate a 
rapid rise to the upper crust, but 
with the help of new coaches 
each seems to be regaining 
momentum. A change of coach 
is often beneficial: a fresh ap- 
proach can open windows in the 
mind. 

RESULTS: T Muster {Austria} M B Gttert 
(US) S-3. S-7. fr4. H Ds La Pona M E 
Swwft«!S»W,7-*. 


The Football Association has 
blocked a move to slum foreign 
league games five oh teteristoa- 
The coverage was to have 
opened on Sunday with the 
potentially fixture be- 

tween Joreatus and Napoli, the 
joint leaders in Italy, but ITV 
has been forced to take their 
imaginative idea off their 
■schedule. 

The Italians, who so admire 
the English game that they 
readily import its leading play- 
ers, are astounded by the paro- 
chial attitude. A headline in 
yesterday morning’s Corrdre 
dettn Sport summed op the 
reaction. “Onr game is too 
beautiful for Ac English" it 
read. The assumption is not 
unreasonable. 

“The fast that the two teams 
are the leaders in Italy was pore 
coincidence", an ITV spokes- 
man said yesterday. “We picked 
it simply because we thosgbt the 
viewers might like to see players 
suck as Platini Landrup and, 
particularly, Maradona in ac- 
tum. Obviously, we an very 
disap p ointed about the FA'S 
derision. 

“Since it allows os to pot 
foreign football on live only 
outside the English season, it 
has effectively stopped us al- 
together. Spain and Italy are the 
oaiy ieagaes worth covering and 
the Spaniards Rajah at the end 
of Match and the Itafiaas pack 
np on FA Cap Aral day here." 

Ted Croker, the FA secretary, 
admitted that “we are retactant 
to allow the tetrisum companies 
to show these games, which they 
pick op for low lees, while they 
•are reluctant to show highlights 
of domestic matches.” The view- 
ers, it would seem, are caoght hi 


Big profits 
but few 
dividends 


The manag em ent committee 
of the Wimbledon champion- 
ships announced yesterday that 
a record surplus of £6,200,848 
would be passed on to the Lawn 
Tennis Association “for the 
benefit of British tennis" (Rex 
Bellamy writes). The surplus is 
taxable, so part of it will go to 
the Government. But the nebes 
at the disposal of the LTA will 
again make them the envy of 
most other national 
associations. 


Overseas associations remain 
puzzled by the feet that British 
tennis has so little to show for its 
series of huge handouts from the 
game's most famous tour- 
nament. As I have pointed out 
before, Britain can make money 
out of tennis players but, de- 
monstrably. cannot malm tennis 
players out of money. 

Most of us are getting more 
than a Hole fed up with LTA 
promises of a new dawn at some 
indeterminate point in the fu- 
ture. True, much has been, and 
is being, done to reorganize the 
British game, encourage junior 
development, increase com- 
petition at all levels, and im- 
prove playing facilities. 

The fad remains that, by 
international standards, 
Britain's leading players — the 
goods in the national game’s 
shop window - have become 
something of a joke. The LTA 
may (too slowly) be creating a 
climate for excellence. But no- 
body is excelling - and the 
responsibility for that must rest 
largely with the LTA. 

The paradox of Wimbledon's 
record surplus is that it co- 
incides with a year in which 
Britain sank to a rare nadir ol 
failure in three team events. 

In a Davis Cup tie, Australia 
achieved a winning lead over 
Britain without conceding a set: 
in the corresponding Federation 
Cup competition. Denmark, 
baldly formidable opponents, 
beat Britain in the first round; 
then, an American reserve team 
inflicted on Britain their heavi- 
est Wtghtman Cup defeat at 
home for 34 years. The Wimble- 
don surplus looks like financial 
aid for a disaster area. 



BOWLS 


The rebels 
trying to 
assassinate 

the King 


wMi the eat from Ifte iaw- 

nasK 5 of AeScojsfo to- 

Wood and Wa tson, 
*0 of the 
finaHsS*1S tfe 
fins** 

at the Preston GnM **“ 
d ro ope d to 26 j*® ” 
leave the astonishing Da«« 
J^om<tftheredw«®& 
Tfext is. of coarse, the vary 

tfilag that his youuRchalten^; 

must not do, 3*32? 
and well though the 2 wa ®8 st *5 
haw done to efimmaie thetiW 
grant, they sdB have enfiml * 


Hand-to-hand combat David Bryant (left), tile old master of English bowls, and yoan g Irishman, Rodney McCntcfaeon, signal their intentions at the CIS UK championships 

FOOTBALL: FOREIGN LEAGUE SCREENINGS IMPAIRED BY FA INTERFERENCE 


Sadly blind to a vision of beauty 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


the gulf that divides the two 
parties. 

“We have to look after our 
own interest". Croker added. “It 
is a delicate balance ami we by 
to be flexible but we are con- 
cerned about the increase in tire 
coverage. The other weekend, 
for example, we saw four or five 
other sports while the national 
game was ignored. I thoug h t that 
was disgracefuL" 

ITV*s plan was inspired by 
public interest during the World 
Chp finals. Some two months 
ago, it was noted that Sunday's 
in Turin, involving three 
of the most prominent figures to 
Mexico last summer, happened 
to fen conveniently into almost 
the only gap in the domestic 
television programme between 
October and March. 

According to UEFA'S rales 
governing such matters, per- 


Seafer executives at ITV. were 
so incensed about the FA’S lack 
of vision dial they considered 
taking legal action. EM 
were advised by their 
lawyers that the FA’s __ — 

appeared to be “w ate rti ght " and 

that* the proceedings m court 
woald be pointless and poten- 
tially expensive. 

The Football League, after 
being consulted shoot the pro- 
posal, pointed oat that the 
co v er ag e, which was due to start 
at 130pm, aright affect the 
attendances of the two games 
that were being staged here on 
the same afternoon. For the sake 

of the few who will be assembled 

at the Recreation - Ground, 
Aldershot, and the CHd Show 
Ground, Scunthorpe, the many 


ended at 


authorities of the nations in 
which the fixture is being 
staged, and in which it is to be 
(devised. The Italian FA fati- 
tfefiy granted it bat sub- 
sequently withdrew it after 
receiving a message from Lan- 
caster Gate 


have been denied an e x ten d e d 
view of continental footbalL At 
least they were offered a trun- 
cated version of Real MadrWTs 
tri um ph on penalties over 
Inventus in the European Cup 
on Wednesday night. 


The second leg of the second 
round tie started at 8-30 in 
Turin's Studio Commutate and 


All glued to the box 


Zurich (Rea ter) — A tele- 
vision audience of 580 million 
watched the 1986 World Cup 
final between Argentina and 
West Germany in Mexico City 
on June 29. 


The Inte rnatio nal Football 
Federation (FIFA) said in a 
newsletter that this was one of 
the largest television audiences 
recorded. The 1982 final in 


Scots aspiring to 
the aristocracy 


Madrid between Italy and West 
Germany attracted an audience 
of 450 million people. 

An aggregate total of 12,800 
million people watched tele- 
vision coverage of the 52 
matches in Mexico- 
FIFA said. The quarter-final, 
viewed live at midnight in 
Europe between West Germany 
and Mexico, was seen by 17 
million in West Germany alone. 


1U6. The quality, 

I by BBdmtanhhk 

fatigue dini n g the later stages, 
was otherwise of an astonish- 
ingly high standard and the 
finale was drama itself. Eagfish 
viewers were treated to teas than 
20 minutes. 

Those highlights iodaded 
Cabrinfs goal, which levelled 
the aggregate score, and the 
series of penalties which Real 
won 3-1 (JuventaS nervously 
missed three). Inevitably, It 
excluded a shower of golden 
moments that were being re- 
called well into the early lions 
by those privileged enough to 
have seen them. 

The tie was screened live in 
Italy. Indeed, fitter Milan’s 
narrow UEFA Cop victory over 
legla Warsaw, put on immedi- 
ately beforehand, appeared as a 
sideshow before the main event. 
Even so, it was estimated that 
thousands of spectatora were 
locked outside a stadium tint 
was !UI horns before the kkk- 

By Sunday evening, Juvestns 
will have collected £l%m in torn 
days. That amounts to almost 
half of Rush's transfer fee. As 
their supporters prepare to ha& 
their new arrival, they are 
already hi the process off burying 
their old respiration. Platini,, 
they are convinced, is sow little 
more titan a ghostly figure. 

The apathetic Frenchman, 
who has won every honour 
except a World Cup winner's, 
medal, was overshadowed in 
both legs by Chende. As he 
leaves the global stage, it is a 
pity that the English public are 
not allowed to catch at least a 
final gfintpse of fab glorious 
career. 


By Hugh Taylor 


A touch of irony 
as holders go out 


Rangers and Dundee United 
expea to meet formidable 
opposition when the thaw for 
the third round of the UEFA 
Cup is made in Zurich today. 
Scotland's remaining repre- 
sentatives in European com- 
petition have performed with 
distinction but they realize that 
the clubs left in are comprised 
mainly of the elite, among them 
Barcelona, Inter Milan and 
Borussia Monchengtadhach. 

It might be to the Scots' 
advanta& to be drawn against 
one of the aristocrats rather tban 
the less fashionable, but perhaps 
more rugged, middle-of-the- 
road representatives such as 
Dukia Prague, Beveren and 
Ghent of Belgium, and Spartak 
Moscow. Scottish clubs have 
usually found it to tbeir advan- 
tage to be reckoned underdogs 
in Europe because it is the 
nature of their players to snap 
more fiercely at well-heeled, and 
famous, opponents. 

Meanwhile, Celtic arrived 
home from Russia disappointed 
but not despondent after tbeir 


defeat in the European Cop fry 
Dynamo Kiev. The manager, 
David Hay. said be was all the 
more determined to make his 
team a major force again in 
Europe. 

He feels that Celtic are dose 
to becoming a top-class side. 
That was obvious in tbeir play 
against Dynamo, one of the best 
clubs in the world he main- 
tained Although Celtic gave 
Kiev a fright before losing 3-1, 
they, like Rangers, will have to 
strengthen their resources 

Just as Souness will be doing 
when he comes out of hospital 
after an operation. Hay will 
continue the search for new 
players 

No praise can be high enough 
for Dundee United Because of 
injuries to key personnel, they 
were forced to field a makeshift 
team against Umversiiatea Cra- 
iova in Romania. But they 
proved even though they are 
undenting a transitional pe- 
riod. that they remain 
Scotland’s foremost specialists 
in European tournaments. 


A missed penalty proved 
influential in Bucharest where 
European Cop h oldere Steana, 
bowed out against Andertecht, 
of Belgium. Steana won the 
trophy in Seville six months ago 
when Gavrila Baftnt converted 
the decisive spot-kick in a shoot- 
out against Barcelona. 

But Balint, aged 22, missed 
from the spot early in the second 
half against Andertecht and the 
holders, 3-0 down from the first 
1% were doomed to failure 
despite Ladislau Boloni’s 58th 
minute effort which inspired a 
late onslaught on the Belgian 
goal. 

With the 1985 winners 
Jnventns, making a sad exit, 
most people will now be hoping 
fora Real Mmh-sd-Dyuamo Kiev 
final next May. 

Russian dub football has 
reached new heights since the 
national team's scintillating dis- 
plays in the Mexico Work! Cup 
— notwithstanding the unfortu- 
nate defeat against Belgium — 
and the Soviet Union still have 
powerful challengers in all three 
competitions. 

Torpedo Moscow enjoyed the 


most impressive result of the 
night in the Cup Winners' Cup 
when they thrashed Stuttgart 5- 
3 in West Germany to oomptete 
a 7-3 rout, while city rivals 
Spartak also hit five against 
Toulouse, of France, in the 
UEFA Cup. 

Spain also boast survivors in 
all three competitions, though 
Real Zaragoza, in toe Cup 
Winners’ Cup, and the UEFA 
Cup favourites Bmcdoaa, both 
squeezed through on away 
go als. Belg ium and West Ger- 
many also have three repre- 
sentatives left to fight another 
day, two each in the European 
Cup and one in the UEFA Cup. 

Country-by-co oirtry break- 
down of qualifiers 


EUROPEAN CUP (flight teams}: Belgium 



nidi). Yugoslavia (Rad 

EUROPEAN CUP-WINNERS CUP 
teams): Bulgaria (Mtosha Sofia). East 
Germany (Lokomotiv Leipzig), Franca 
(BordeaiA). Soviet Union (Torpedo Mos- 
cow), Spain (Real Zaragoza}, Sweden 
(Mahno). SwfizeilandtSioiikTne Netter- 
UndsMud. 

UEFA CUP (6 teams): Austria (SwarovaKi 
Tyrol). Belgium JBewren and Ghent), 


More gold in 
a night than 
in one season 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


Wrexham raked in more rev- 
enue from tbeir away-goals de- 
feat by Real Zaragoza in 
midweek than from an entire 
Football League season, Tony 
Ranee; their general manager, 
said. . 

As the Welsh side readjusted 
to the more basic demands of 
their fourth division promotion 
battle. Ranee saicf'Receipcs on 
Wednesday were not far short of 
£50,000. Television fees and 
advertising will lake that figure 
up to £60.000 - and that beats 
the £55,000 gate money «* 
would expect from a League 
season.” 

The financial rewards under- 
line what Football League dubs 
are missing as a result of tire 
indefinite UEFA ban — al- 
though Wrexham did lose 
£10,000 on their first-round 
encounter with Zurrieq of 
Malta.* 4 If we'd cleared £20,000 
from Europe we'd have been 
happy,” Ranee said. "But this is 
fantastic." 


EUROPEAN CUP: Second round, aucoM 
leg: Austria Vienna 1. Bayern Munich 1 
jemg: 1-3); Dynamo Berlin 1, 
Broendbyomes 1 (ago: 2-3): Dynamo Kiev 
3. Cette l (agg: JuvwHus t. Real 

Madrid 0 (ast score attar 90 mtn 1-0; agg 
l-l: Rea/ Madrid won 3*1 on p*wffl»s£ 
Porio 3. Vikovtee 0 (agg: 3-1): Red S&r 
Belgrade A RosoXxxg I Jam 7-1); 
steana Bucharest I.AnSwlacTOolagg:!- 


UTtLEWOOOS CUP: ThW round raptor- 
Nottingham Forest 1, Crystal Pttaca 0 
{Nottrighani Forest away to Bradford City 
m tourni round). 


Sf. 


FOURTH DWKIOH: P w Krt oro ug h Untied 
2. Tranmera Rovers 1. 

SCOTTISH FIRST DIVISION: 
AWrtwntans fl, Clyde Z 


umww Swiflt Union IMMW. 

Moscow). Sewn (BarcakmaL Sweden 

Borussia MBnehengjadbach). Yugoslavia 
(Hapuk Spill). 


EUROPEAN CUP WMMERS 1 CUP: Sec- 
ond rmnd. second leg: Bordeaux l. 


FOOTBALL COHBMATKJW MDwafl 3, 
Brighton th Swmdon 5. Portamoodi 2. 


BenfiraO (agg: MfcLoKwnottr Leipzig Z 
Rapid Vienna 1 (agg: 3-Zk Mahno I 


Menton Tram 0 (agq: any. 

Piraeus 1, Ajax TTaga i-Sk Sion 3, 
Katowice 0 (agg: S-aTvetez Master A. 
Vtoeha Sofia 3 (ago: 4-5): VTtj Stuagart 3, 
Torpedo Mos«S?(agg: 3-7); Wrexham 
2. RetoZaragma Zlaot score after 90 min 
O-ftjgg 2-4 Real Zaragoza won on away 

UEFA CUP: 


FA 77SOPHY: Second 
leglaye: Cambridge Cto 4. 0 
Worksop J. Tow Law 3 fact). 


rand 

OtyO: 


UEFA CUP: Second round, eocodd Ik 
Athlete BH&ao 2. Beveren 1 (agg: 3-4 k 
AM noo Madrid >. V&orfe Gunwaes O 


VAUXHALi-OPEL LEAGUE: . . 
watoK Yeertl 3. Wokingham a 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: EM Onflow Cap: 
King's Lynn 4, Rushden l. Pwn lar 
division: Postponed: Shspshed 
Charterhouse v r 

GMAC cup: 

Maidstone. 


Captain Arica 
dropped from 
Turkey squad 


Postponed: Crawley 


Ankara (Reuter) — The Tur- 
key captain, Erdogan Arica, said 
to be disheartened afiertbejr 4-0 
European . Championship 
qualifying defeat by Yu gosla via, 
was dr o pped yesterday fromthe 


1-2): Bayer Uendngea 2. wto® 
7 2-0£ kmmx&onale t. LsgJs 


l dm 0(395 2-.,. .. -TT- 

Warsaw 1 (agg 3-3; imomaztonoJe won an 
array gwtfw r eyenoord a Borussia 
MDnehengadt a chg (agp:1-7^ Ghent 1, 

1-1; 
SEto 


M Hjnm m s aaouacn c mui i wm 
Sportul StudMtesc Magg: 4-1): M 
chats* Xanax i. Giflnngen 1 (agg l 
Grdrtnoen won on away goatett two# I 


CENTRAL LEAGUE: First (Mata* Derby 
3. Evenon % Sheffield Unflad 6. Bteckbum 
a Second dtt l on: Barnsley 1. Boton 1; 
Btock&ool 2. Bradford a 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Southport 1, 
Caurnarton 2. 


squad of f8 for the group four tie 
a Ireland 


in 


FOOTBALL COUBINATtOtl: Bristol 
Rovers 1. Quean'a Ptsfc Rangere a 


FA YOUTH CUP: Hist round: Croydon 2. 
i, Eran a 


iwaw. r. ■ Qiesham 1; Uxbridge i, mm ana 

Bahmaara 1: Epsom end Ewefl 6. Canaan 

f&Gtitstnra T teBSE Standard ijoge .14,1 rwAUPHtettMi* RMU st 


and 


against Northern 
Izmir on Wednesday. 

The Turkish manager also 
omitted the forward, Erdal 
Keser, who was injured against 
Yugoslavia in Spot The mid- 
field player, Yusuf Altmtas, of 
Galaiasaray, is to captain tire 
side. 


i'sSSSSgTySrS UAUCHAIUWH8W: Sheffield 3. Bnd- 


GdWJ^tfaai I-® Standard Irege 
_ JwerovNa Tyrol 2 (agg 4-4; Swwovflki 
Tyrol won on away g»Er* TraKa Plow** 
2. HajttA Sott z (asp: Mfc iwverata“ 
Crawa 1. Dundee vime 0(agg: IS). 


ford 3. 


REPRESENTATIVE MATCH: Cambridge 
U nire rs tty |, Norwich City 6. 


SQUAD: F Ura*. T Cotok. S OswW. O 
Kapucu. Y AflMas, 1 Denurtz. U 
Tutuneker, S Yawrikuran. M T*", JC 
AkbufcA. S Coriu. H Vadr. O Gesaatt, U 
Karaman, I Tavla. R Cettn, A 
Kopnnicigriartndn, R Owen* 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


GOLF 


SHOWJUMPING 


l-i 

KaJ 




PRUDENTIAL NATIONAL CUP: L»_-_ 
Draper Tocft Sofem SS ID Marsh 32. R W«« 

m. Sham Manama* Uratad « (D Gwdmr 

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R0NCHETTI CUR. W omen's second round. 


WARRNAMBOaU 

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:mmd(Au*tfaiaa unless 

re 67: w Sam « G 

C Hearten, s Bam R 


NEW YORK: Nadeos Cup: StancSags: 1. 

Canada. Apts: a us. a a Bnren. afct- a 
F ranca SSL BdlW lodMfltad remits: RaffiM 


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ag gWBL' T Gftmcre. temp Mari jkttp). R 


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Harwood. W Way. I Sttritty. M Barry. S 
Harder (Can*, PTa 

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Mca^jNpjn^Tanon 1 (Sp) 


dub Franw (Fr) S7-87 (TanoM won 17D-K- 

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circuit points table. 


RUGBY UNION 


Play fair and fair 
play is the need 


By Gerald Danes 


Tire sending off of Adrian 
Owen, the Bridgend captain, in 
the wi j gtch against Bristol, is 
further demonstration, if any 
more were needed, that rugby 
exists precariously on the tine 
edge of robust aggressive play 
and that which is mean bellig- 
erence. And that it is the referee 
who has to determine what 
constitutes dangerous play and, 
if so. to determine still further 
whether, in his opinion, the 
action was carried out ‘wilfully’. 

A rugby referee is put in such 
a position to interpret these fine 
distinctions arid is expected to 
pass judgement immediately. 
He needs an unflappable tem- 
perament and iron wifl tem- 
pered with a sympathetic 
understanding of that intangible 

spirit of the game as well as to 
have the psychological insight 
into what toe players’ intentions 
were. 

With so many variables in the 


it wrong. The surprise 
among afl toe oddities, that they 
are in the right so often. With 
the rugby season in Wales 
laving started in such on explo- 
sive fashion, with two court 
cases, it means that if die game' 
isto retain its integrity those 
who are responsible for ft need 
to be. extra vigilant. This has 
inevitably placed a further onus 
on the referee. 

Gareth Sunmonds, who has a 
gathering reputation which 
could soon see him on the 
international panel, had no 
hesitation in sending Owen 
directly to the dressing room. 
But the action not only puzzled 
the player but also the majority 
of the spectators. He was 
thought to have kteked a Bristol . 
player. 

On the run of play Bridgend 
were trying to get m and disrupt 
Bristol in open play. Hogg, the 
Bristol centre, went down on the 
ball, but foiled to gather and the 
ball rolled on. Owen, in dose 
attendance, tried to avoid Hogg 
ty jumping over him but Hogg, 
simultaneously, tried to get up. 
Boot and head collided. Some 
wit suggested that it was the 
head that was at fault and that it 
could have done untold damage 
to Owen's toes. 

Be that as h may. The referee 
interpreted the kick to have 
been intentional; Owen pleaded 
that ft was an accident. Hogg, in 
his comments afterwards, 
thought so too, but added that 


Value for 
money 
in Portugal 


Schools rugby 
by Michael Stevenson 

Ian Peck, master in charge at 
Bedford, reports a thoroughly 
enjoyable half-term visit to Por- 
tugal with the first game lost (6- 
33) to Derrito and good wins 
thereafter, against Lisbon Com- 
bined XV (23-12) and 
Beteoenses (264)). Thirty six 
boys and four staff made the trip 
and the 2nd XV also registered a 
loss and two wins. 

Bedford found the opposition 
fast, strong and physical, but 
relatively naive tactically. The 
party was weQ looked after and 
Peck warmly recommends a 
visit to Portugal as “value for 
money and a good balance 
between a representative school 
tour and bofaday atmosphere’". 

Downside, with four wins, a 
draw and three defeats from 
their eight matches, visited It- 
aly, where they beat Mogfiono 
(15-13). Betimes <3*d) and lost 
to Prase (14-18). Damian 
Sibley, tbe scrum halt scored 22 
pn jnt^ a gamM Bril imn and the 
26 tourists and staff enjoyed 
their visit immensely. Their 
hosts are anxious to visit Britain 
and to entertain British schools 
in Italy. 

Wirral GS** meeting wife 
Bradford GS bad especial 
significance as both schools 
were unbeaten. Tbe contest 
could hardly have been closer; 
Bradford maintained their 
record, winning 15-14 through 
three penalties by Jonathan 
Mitchell, the final, winning kick 

beirq; from around 45 yards, and 
a converted penalty try, when a 
pushover seemed probable, 
wirral, dangerous in counter- 
attack scored two tries, a drop 
goal and penalty. 

Durham School have played 
10, won six, lost three and 
drawn one match- They success- 
fully repelled Serem viks’ in var 
sioru winning 16-6, through four 
penalties, kicked by Jason 
Greaves and a try by Liam 
Ryan. Sevenoaks’ points came 
from a pcaafty try, converted by 
Graham SiddJe. 

Sevenoaks other match dur- 
ing their short northern tour was 
against Barnard Castle, which 
they also lost (12-4). The tal- 
ented younger brother of Rosy 
Underwood, the England wing, 
Rory Underwood, scored Btf- 
nani Castle's try and, with 10 
minutes to go, tire winners were 
leading 12-0. before Chris Oang 
a try for Sevenoaks. 







the referee, in taking the action 
he did, . must have seen it 
differently. Hogg's free reflected 
his sympathy and — not to be 
interpreted as an expression iff 
irony - shook Owen's hand 
before be departed. Neither of 
these actions could be thought 
to be the' common response off 
an injured opponent m such 
circumstances, _ . 

The matter is now m the 
hands of the Welsh Rugby 
Union disciplinary committee. 
So, what is tbe procedure? Since 
the referee is tbe sole judge of 
foots, the committee is there to 
support the referee's decision 
and, in effect, to administer the 
appropriate punishment. 

Until this season the player, 
having read the referee's report, 
could p»*»t ou his own observa- 
tion. But a modification m the 
regulation introduced this year 
means that a player will be 
provided with a personal bear- 
ing in tbs company of his own 
club official if he so wishes. 

A television recording of the 
iniadent could' be accepted as 
arimiwflifr i evidence. On this 
occasion the television cameras 
were there but the camera’s eye 
was not all-seeing in this tn- 
stance as, in flffknring the ball, it 
missed the ambiguous offence. 

“Whilst we are prepared toot 
such a hearing should take 
place,” comments Ray Wit 
Items, the WRU secretary, “ we 
would not like to think such a 
hearing would tUTU OUt tO 
function as a court of law. It is a 
positive measure to ensure that 

there is feir play for player and 

referee. We do nol want to enter 
into anything, resembling a legal 
argument in these matters. It is a 

game after all, something that 
people do in tbeir spare tune.” 

But is there a dilemma? 
“Yes,” concedes Mr Williams. 
“If we find that a player, any 
player, is exonerated, as bas 
-happened in 'the past with 
mistaken identity, we must ' be 
careful that we do not under- 
mine the referee’s authority tn, 
such a way- that they win be 
retumut, m future, to send 
players from the field of play. 

”We want them to remain ma 
strong position because the good 
health of the game depends so 
much on them. Onr motto in the 
Welsh Rugby Union ‘Teg 
Chwarae, Chwaiae Teg - Play 
feir, feir play*. That is what we 
are aiming to achieve in this 
instance.’’ 


chief of the young lews 
has alr«»^ becoraea csraalg 
Richard Come, aged 19, the 
pedestrian portman 

1 who won a 
sOrar medal in tbe Co» 
wealth Games, went out to «oy 
Cats, an inssrance assessor 
frOTlpswich, who - at 33 


_ je England champion. 
Cats, a compose gnm- 

chewer, was opposed m tbefirsi 

narlirfod yesterday of a 
' l sfira Welshman who, at 26, 
a considerable ehUectmi of 
Welsh and British titles. John 
Price, a dvH servant 60m 
Aberaven, who plays bow ls at 
the impressive Swansea Lfjsore 

Centre, has set up a formidable 
bowling partnership with the 
bariy Steve Rees, another young 
quarter-finalist at Prestom 

Store Rees b the Bnbsh 
junior champion, but mfl be 
tmahlp to defend his title next 
year as be has reached the 
advanced age of 26. Looking 
more like at archetypal darts 
player (fate a bowler, be offers a 
sharp visual contrast to the lean 
and hungry appearance of his 
Swansea colleague. Like many 
tag men, he bas a fine «nd 
de&cate touch, and his sk31 — 
■Mi patience — make him a 
consistent and dangerous player. 

Today he pfeys Tony Alkock, 
whose charisma and goodfoobs, 
as wnD as his consmmnate skuL 

are a major feature in the 
development of bowls* new im- 
age. 

Allcock has been playing 
.since he was a toddler and a the 
perfect example of how bowls 
ran (or rolls) in families . His 
mother, Joan, a fine English 
Internatio nal player, who re- 
cently died, gave birth between 
two rounds of the dub pairs 
championship — which she went 
on to win. Her offspring was 
Anthony AHcock, who was first 
capped at 19; he followed np bis 
wand fours win in 1984 with 
successes in the world indoor 
purs and singles championships 
dang the past[12 months. 

Bowls Is a family concern for 
David Corkffl, too. Thfett- 
«earoM assists fats father, 
David Corkffl senior, who is the 
Irish national coach, in bis work 
with parapfegk - fawto. A»M, 
■iiwgnhf <nul ambitions. Cor kill 
iossed tiw bowls superstars 
when he won the Liverpool 
Victoria Snperbowl last month. 


His Irish cnlleagae. Rod 
McCittcbeoffi. is aneaqjfered 
and smgfe. He spends a lot off Ms 
time ptaymg bowls, and w» the 
British junior cSampum tom 

yean ago. He is stiH only 23. 

Bob Hitrh ea k a ^asshonse 
pot-maker, a crown green 
bowler, and keen enough to 
delay hB boneymeon. so that he 
ceaM play hi tins event. He is 
28. 

RESULTS: Socowl roond; R McCutclwon 
|r| M J Watson (SCO t). 7-4. 7-4, 0-7. 6-7, 


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TWiijSSE 


Steel fist in the velvet glove of Chopin 


• Perhaps noi everybody watch- 
ing Witold Siaredd’s Omnibus 
film Ciumoo in Flowers (BBC1, 
10.25pm) will fully understand 
what a Polish intellectual means 
when, casting about for the musi- 
cal metaphor that best makes his 
political point, he describes his 
country’s present predicament as 
that of a nation in tempo rubato. 
Other Polish contributors to this 
documentary that works hard to 
establish a strong link between the 
music of Chopin and his 
homeland's long history of defi- 
ance of oppression, reinforce the 
argument with sentiments that are 
starkly contemporary. There is a 
clear hint, for example, about 
Solidarity and its supporters in the 
statement that “ if you can't do 
anything yourself, you begin to 
live vicariously through 
symbols.". If it is true, then, that 
the voice that speaks through 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

" 6.50 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 
Greenwood. Weather at 625, 
725, 725, 825 and 825; 
regional news, weather and 
traffic at 6.57, 7.27, 7.57 and 
827; national and international 
news at 7.00, 720,84)0,820 
and 9.00- 

9.05 Freshers. A 40 Minutes 
documentary about Gtlian 
Wake, a Wind, 18-year old 
Liverpool University student (i) 
9.45 Advice Line. Paul Clark 
and Eileen Evason answer 
social security problems 10.00 


1025 PhiU^Sctwrfteld with news of 
children's television, and 
birthday greetings 1050 Ptav 
School. 10.50 Henry’s Cat V) 
10.55 Fnre to Eleven. Joanna Lumlej 


sub-warden of Radley who is 
to leave the school after 30 
years to become headmaster 
of another school (r) 

11.30 Open Air. Viewers comment 

on yesterday's tetevfeton 
programmes 1225 Star 
Memories. George Metiy 

recalls fond television 

memories 1225 Regional 
news and weather. 

1.00 News with Martyn Lewis. 
Weather 125 Net^ibours. 

ssscasm 

RoUo. (r) 1-55 ®f«i- (0 _ 

24)0 The Liver Birds. Sandra is 
having trouble with her 
boyfriend and Beryfs attempts 
to smooth things over only 
make matters worse. Starring 

PoUy James. Nerys Hughes, 

and Derek Fowlds. (r) 220 

Knots LancSng. Laura Avery 
returns to the marital home 

with news for her husband that 

could make or break trier 

rocky marriage. 320 Box __ 

Clever. A family quiz presented 

160 

4.15 Best the Teocher. The 


f CHOICE ) 

Chopin's music is as revolu- 
tionary as it is romantic, it seems 
like an act of folly that when 
General Jaruzelslti imposed mar- 
tial law on Poland in 1981, he 
■ ordered the radio stations to relay 

a non-stop proecamme of Chopin 

to keep the nation calm. Cleany. 
he had not heard about what 
Schu mann - said about Chopin's 
music. Gannon hidden in flowers 
is bow be put it, adding that the 
-Czar would probably have banned 
the "simple and romantic pieces" 
bad he realized what a dangerous 
enemy was lurking inside them. 

• Pleasure Palaces (Channel 4, 
3.30)JDee Dee Glass's repeated 
aeries about British cinemas, ends 
today with flashbacks to the late 
Twenties and early Thirties, when 
people would go to the pictures to 


final of the Champion of 
Champions competition. 420 
Cheggarc Plays Pop. Keith 
Chegwin introduces a 
collection of games, quizzes, 
and pop music. 

54)0 John Craven’s Newaround • 
5.10 Grange HHL Episode 10 of 
the 24-part drama sertaL (r) 
(Ceefax) 525 Masterteam 
presented by Angela Rippon. 
64K) News with SweLawley and 
Nicholas WltchelL Weather. 
625 London Plus. 

74)0 Wogan. Tonight’s guests 
include C3wtene Tilton, Bo 
Derek and Derek Fowkte. Plus 

- a song from EBw Brooks. 

725 Btanfcsty Blank. On Les 

Dawson's panel tots week are 
Roy Barrariough, Rustle Lee, 
Jan Leeming, Unda Nolan, 
Paul Shane, and Jeff 

- Stevenson. (Ceatax) 

8.10 The Colby*. In this test 

episode of the series Sable Is 

fighting for hsrRfe after the 


celebrate a wedding anniversary, 
when the foyers of the super- 
cinemas were made magnificent 
by replicas of Buckingham Palace 
candelabra, and when white- 
gloved cinema managers held staff 
inspections that even took in the- 
examination of finger nails. But 
the particular strength of this 
doc umen tary series has been its 
social awareness. There are 
reminders this afternoon of the 
jobless in the Depression years 
who crowded into the local "flea- 
pit" for warmth and, as they 
watched the screen idols of the day 
warbling optimistic ditties such as 
Keep your Sunny Side Up. and 
Happy Days are Here Again, 
found much-needed reassurance 
of better times to come 
• Highlights of today’s 50 Years 
of BBC Television celebrations 
are the Yosser Hughes episode of 
Alan Bkasdale’s play sequence 


Boys from the Blackstuff (BBC2, 
9.45pm); Jonathan Miller's 
adaptation of M R James s genu- 
indy scary ghosl story 
and HI Come to You (BBC2, 
1125am) which MiUer also di- 
rected in characteristically intefli- 
oeni style; and the Stanley meets 
Livingstone episode from Chris- 
topher Railing’s dranra docu- 
mentary series The Search for the 
Nile (BBC2, 8.00pm) 

• Radio choice; Michael Frayn's 
translation of Yuri Trifonovs 
bitter-sweet comedy Excmmsj 
(Radio 3. 720pm), with Mitfiad 
Jayston as the wrdy-tned hus- 
band and son; and the Kaleido- 
scope verdict ( Radio 4, 9.45pm) 
on what we have beard so ar of 
Peier Buckman’s adaptation of 
Thackeray’s Pendennis.Episoac 
two is on Radio 4, at 3.00pm. 



ulio4.ai3.00pm. WHMM' ..i of Lost Empires. (ITV9.00pin) 

Peter Davalle coun 


1TV/LONDON 


94» Ceefax. 

“«sJ5aas-a* 

six of the story -abort :a aM who 
befriends a badger 1IMJA 
profits of a street in Stirling 


925 Thames news heatffnes. 

■“sssaaassswWi- 

Used to Live; comparing 
country life with th«ffia cjty 

in ne Maths: triandes 1026 


• llfcjo twauwm ie i """ 

Investigations: m proportion 
and scale up 1120 
Wonderments 11.17 The tutors 

for the coal industry 11.40 My 

1220 Verbal powers of persuasion 
1222 An up-date of the 
programme shown sot years 
ago in Which Belfast Roman 
cSmoac and Protestant young 
people were Introduced to 


Monica makes a deturang 
discovery when she surprises 
her lover at his apartment; and 
Bfiss's new boyfriend 

threatens to cause the famay 


programmes 123 A simple 

guide to lasers. 

220 You and Me. (r) . 

2.15 Raehig and Bowie. The^45. 

3.20 and 325 races from 

Cheltenham; and the CIS 
Insurance United Kingdom 
Indoor Singles BoWte 
Championship, [mcluding 
regional news and weather at 


Andrew Harvey. WeShe? 8 
920 Call Me Mfeter- Jack 

Bartholomew gats a lob as a 

minder for a very rich French 

ttasaass&M 

1025 Omnibus: Camion in Flowers. 
Witold Starecki's fHm 
fflustrating how Poland of 
yesterday and today relies for 
Its Inspiration on the muafcof 

Chopin, (see Choice) 

11.15 ChamptonshfoBowfekt-ThB 
CIS insurance United Kingdom 
Indoor Singes Bowls 

11.45 BoSS»EP«« :i ®5 w>< ? f,ha 

five-part dramatized senes 

about the lead-tfo to and the - 

actual Test Match series m 

1932 between England and 

Australia, (r) (Ceefax) 


c y g Ouatarmass and the PIT 

starring Andre MorelL (shown 

620 riivSe^ 1 '^w*Annandand 
Michaels Dems go *i search of 
Q^arttinocerpswiman 
extremely longhorn, (shown In 


625 CoWttz. Wing Commander 
Marsh decides that the only 

way out of the prisoner-of-war 

720 ffita 

Andrews has a surprise In 
store for HanySewnbe- 
(shown In March 1958) 


girte from Birmingham give 

tneir views on runni ng ahome. 
Buckley and Michael Gough 

star as Stanley and 
Livingstone In the episode of 
the drama documentary series 
which covered the historic 

meeting between the two men 

on ttte shores of Lake 

Tanganyika, (shown in October 

94)0 Mot Only— But Abo-* Wfh 

Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. 
Their gueste included Diahann 
Carroll and John Lennon- 
(shown in Janu ary 1965) ^ 

9.45 Soys From the Bfactajm: 

. Ywaei's8toTy.Asup«trtr« 
performance by Barnard Hffl as 
Yosser. a man who 

disintegrates mentally ana 
physically as his desperate 
attempts to And work come to 

nothing, (shown In October 
. 1982) 

1025 NewsrtflM includes a report 
on the strife at Somerset 
Cricket Club. 


1029 Maths: triangles 1026 
Science: evaporation and 
condensation 1028 The fives 

of women farmersm Burkina 

Faso, Kenya and Zimbabwe 
11.15 How steel band 
instruments are made and 
ptayed 1127 A day out with 
Grandparents 11.44 A survey 
of leisure activities. 

1220 Fficks. (r) 12.10 Rambow. 

i» isaneBSt-* 

AmiB Brand with more money- 
saving ideas includtog advice 
on entertaining 10 people for 
£ 20 . 

120 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 120 Thames news. 

120 Film; Assignment Reread 

erkrtnai Impersonating a 
British agent Directed by 

iHSEEtiS*" 

news headlines 320 Sons and 

420 taiiSiOT^ repeat of foe 
programme shown at 12.10 
4,1a The Trap Door. Cartoon 

series. 420 Woridwtoe. 

ABas the Jester, (f) 

520 Be«amy*s Bugle. David 
BeBamy with another 
programme in his conservation 
series. 5.15 Blockbusters. 
General knowtedga quiz tor 

teenagers presented by Bob 
Hoi ness. . 

5.45 News with John Suchet 
64)0 Hie 6 O’clock Show 

presented by Danny Baker. 
720 Bruce Foroyth's PlayVdur 
Cards Right Game show. 

720 New Faces of 88. Talent show 

presented by iteti Caine. The 

Lu iMthn nandl »TB JRTI 


Bowen. Nina Mystow. and 


Simon Napier-Sefl. 

820 The Two of Us. Domestic 

comedy senes starring 
Nicholas Lyndhurst and Janet 
Dibley as a young couple Uvmg 
together. This evening there is 
pressure from both sets of 
parents for the pair to pfight 
tear troths. (Oracle) 

94)0 Lost Empires. Episode three ot 
the dramatization of 
J.B. Priestly’s novel, starring 
Cofin Firth and Carmen du 
Sautoy. (Oracle) 

104)0 News at Ten with Alastair 

Burnet and Sandy Gall 
1020 The London Programme. An 
investigation into the shady 
side of estate agencies. The ] 

market has experienced an 

influx of agents who employ 
methods which range from 

sharp practice to activities 

which are blatantly 
IBegai.Presented by John 
Taylor. Followed by LWT News 
headlines. 

1146 South of Watford. The story of 
fiie launch of the man's 
Bfestyle magazine. Arena, 
launched on November 5. 
Presented by Hugh Laurie. 

1125 Nigh! Heat Giambone hunts 
for the killer of a rock star. 

1225 F*m: Vampire (1974) starring 
David Niven and Teresa 
Graves. Dracula at last finds 
the right Wood group tobring 

his beloved wife back from file 

dead. Directed by Clive Dormer. 
24)5 Night Thoughts. 


TV- AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Armeka Rice and 
Richard Keys. News wWi 

financial news at 625; sport at 
6.40 and 720; exerases at 
625 and 9.17; cartoon art 725; 
poo musk; at 725; and Jimmy 
Greaves's television highlights 
at 825. The After Nine guests 

include Russell Grant, and 
there is news of a poetry 
competition. 


CHANNEL 4 


220 Gafiery. Art quiz game 

and Frank VtfhBord are joined 
by Harry Rabtnowitz and Mane 
Boxer. The guest students are 
Danielle Laima and Neil 

34)0 Wortd' o^An imation includes 
The Rug, made by American 
animator Maureen Selwood. 
320 Pleasure Palaces. The third 
and final programme in the 
series examining the history of 
onema-gaing from the earty 
days to the Thirties, (see 

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Frances Ktcul, from Brigg, 

North Humberskte. 

520 Car 54, Where Are You?* 
Vintage American comedy 
sariesabout two hapless New 
York policemen, today, 
unwittingly helping a gang 

5^0 

Holland and Paula Yate®. The 
guests include Kg Audio 
Dynamite, Lone Justice, and 
BonJovu Plus an interview 

74)0 channel 4Mws with Nicholas 
Owen and Nik Gowing. 
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720 Book Choice. John Carey 


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on how merchant bankers and 
government ministers are 
exporting the idea of 
privatization to Europe. 
aim Newtiart Domestic comedy 
series from the Unit ed States. 
920 Gardenera'Ctemidor _ 
presented by Hannah Gordon. 
The Wlsley experts 

demonstrate how to grow 

vegetables through winter 
using doches and frames; and 
how to prepare h ousa plants 
tar the winter months, (r) 
(Oracle) 

1020 The Golden Guts. Comedy 

series about four middle-aged 
women sharing a Florida coast 

house. Tonight, toe new love m 

Dorothy's life confesses that 
he is married. Dorothy drops 
him. but after a short time 
begins the affair again, much 
to her fetow residents' 

disgust (Oracle) 

1020 Wefl Being special: llajyte 

Mad Law. A repeat of the 
programme examining me 
revolution in Itafian psychiatry. 
1120 FBm: Persona* (1967) starring 
Liv LHimann and Bite 
Anderson. A powerful portrait 


Uilmann a mute patient at a 
psytfiatric dink: and 
Andersson the nurse who 

breaks down during the course 
of treating the woman. 

Directed by Ingmar Bergman. 
Ends at 120. 








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725 Concert Roustel . 
(Symphonic tragrnw'vs. 

The Sfader's Banquet 
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National Orchestra under 
Georges Pretre), Chopai_ 
(introduction and Polonaise 


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Wdton (Synwhwiv No2: 

LSO under Prevm). BdO 
News . 

8.05 Concert (continued) 

Rossml (Bel raggto 

lusinghier, Semiramide. Joan 
Sutherland/Royal Opera 
House Orchestra and 
Chorus), Strauss (Horn 
Concerto No 1; Hermann 

(Sospiri). Britten (DiversionSi 
Op 21: with Julius 
KaBhoi. piano^aXCNews 
94)5 The Week 1 s Composers: 

The Five. Balakirev (tea 

Symphonic poem Russia). 
Cuirnie statue in 
Tsarkoye Seto: I loved you 

Irina AiWdpova, mezzo. 

Also Burnt letter, with Lbvko. 
mezzo, and Sergei 
Muntyan. piano, pfaykra 
Etude Op 40 No 6. and 
Berceuse. Op 20 No 8). 


Tippett (Son^N 0 4) 

ajs i artiag Lost and Found: 

Martin Jarve^Chaij^. 

in pert five ot Ttw Book ot 

the Duchess and The 

House of Fame (r) 

420 Sequence of Musk and 
Readings: a recording 

made at the Etflngton 
Festival. The wganlstjs 
Andrew Lumaden. Indwias 
Stravinsky's Intrort. The 
dove descanding.and 

Howate's Psakn 

Sat 1, No 2; a nd Ps alm 23 1 
heard a voice from 
Heaven. 425 News 
5.00 Mainly tor Pleasure: 

recorded music 

selection, presented oy 

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Lanoham Chamber 


Maurice Handtord). Haydn 

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1D20 Schubert Sorgs, written 
In the Bass Clef: (3) lan ■ 
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1125 Cherubini String Quartet: 
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ErSnS.O P 59No2)120 

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14)5 BBC Scottish SO (under 
Jiri Starak). Haralfl 
Genzrrw (Divertimento for 
symphoniewmds). v 
janacekjSmte fa - strings),, 
Mozart (Syrrqtoony No 
33) 

24)5 university of Wales 
reatai: Paul Crossiey 
jpleno). Brahms (Three 
IntarmezzLOp 117). 


sssarnSMre 

Frayn’s translation of me 
otav bY Yuri Tritwiov. The 
cast indudes Michael 
Jayston as the man whose 
wife arid mother have 

been at daggers drawn until 
the family is stricken by 
an illness. The setting: 
MOSCOW in the 19705- 
Cast also includes Patnoa 

Garwood and Margot 
Boyd 

9.10 BBC SO (under U*har 
Zagrosek). with Phyffts 
Bryn-Jufson (soprano). Lmda 

saGS£S(»i. 

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620 Today! "md 620, 720, ■ 

820 News. 6-45 
Business News BJK. 725 

Weather. 7.00, 8^00 

News. 725, 825 Sport. 7.45 
Thought for the Day- 825 
Yesterday in Pari lament. 

B20 Letters. 827 
Weather Travel 
94)0 News 

925 Desert Island Discs- 
Jeremy Ircmsjsme 
castaway on Michael 
Parkinson's island (ms) 
94)5 The Luthier's Tale. Thg 

work of musical 
Instrument-maker Trevor 
Couvella. A report by 
Malcolm BilUngs. 

1020 News: International 

Assignment BBC 

correspondents report from 


chance to hear last 
night’s edition. Includes 
comment on Tons of 
Money at the Lyttelton, and 
the Russian season now 
running on Rado3(r) 

520 PM. News magaane. 

520 Shipping. 525 
Weather 

6.00 News: Financial Report 
620 Going Places. Clive 
Jacobs presents the 
consumer magazine about 
travel and transport. 

720 News 
725 The Archers 
720 Pick of the Week. 

Margaret Howard with 
highlights of the past week s 
programmes on BBC 
radio and television. 
a so Law in Action. Joshua 
Rozenberg with news 
about the few and 3 


Chorus. Part one. Webern 
(Soi Pisces, Op B) and 

York Holler (Dreamplay). 

Recording cf a 
performance given Barter 
this evening at the Royal 
Festival HeuL in London 
920 What Books I Please: 

at University of London. 

The topic. Vatentte 
Rasputin's book Farewell 
to Mayors 

10.10 Concert: continued. 

MaWar (Das Hagande 
Lied) 

1020 Radoslav KvapH: toe 
pianist plays Sufc's 
Thu^Hved and weamed, . 
Op 30 i 

1125 Les marie6s de Ifl Totff 
Eiffel: the Phitiarmonia 

under Geoffrey Simon 
partormfiiewakbyLes 

1127 Sws. 1220 Closedown 


oiuuiiu 

1020 Morning Story: The 

gSWtJStfflSLi 

by David Ashford. 

10-45 CteMy Service (New toieiy 
Morning, page 50) (sy 
1120 News; Travel: You the 
jury. A controversial 
issue is hied before a studio 
audience of jurors (r) 

1128 Natural Selection. The 
Koala. With Mike 
Stoddart, 

124)0 News: The Food 

programme with Derek 

Cooper- 

1227 Hoax! Lestte Thomas, 
Maureen Upmanand 
Frank Thornton tea the 
stories. Tim Brooke- ^ 

Taylor, you and the studto 
auefiance, try to spot the 
Be ( 5 ) 1225 Weather 
14)0 The Wortd At One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 125 
Shipping 

220 News, Woman's Hour. 
Includes an interview 
with Nigel Wiliams who has 
written a play about 
Engfish folk song and (fence 
collector Cedi Sharp. 

320 News;Penetenni8,by 
WIBiam Makepeace 
Thackeray. Part 2 of an 
eight-part dramatization. 
Wim Hugh Dickson and 
.Dominic Guard (e)(r) • 
4.00 News 

44)5 The News Huddbnes. 

Roy Hudd toughs efthe 

news with June Whitfield, 
Chris Emmett and The 
Huddiiners(r) 

420 Kaleidoscope. A second 


BamnH9uauw>> w. 

8.45 Any Questions? With 

Afl stair Graham (director, 
industrial Society), Mary 
Baker (chairman of 
Holiday Care Service}, Sue 
Sltpman (director , 

National council for One 
Parent Families, Graham 

Dawson (industrialist). Fran 
Kid sg rove. North 
Staffordshire. In the chaff: 
johnTimpson. 

920 Letter from America, by 
Alistair Cooke. 

925 Kaleidoscope. jndudre 
comments on the David 
Smith exhibition at the 
Whitechapel, and the 
Hadlo 4 serial, Pendennte. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: A Bit 
of a Do, by David Nobbs 

S O of 12). Read by John 
pwe 1029 Weather 
1020 The World Tonight 
1120 Today in Parliament 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1120 week Ending. Satirical 

review based on the 

week's news (S) ■ 

1220 News; Weather. 1223 

Shipping 

VHF (avaHabta in England and 
S Wales orty) 35 above 
except 52M20ain 

Weather Travel.1120- 
12.00 For Schools: 1120 
Earth Search 1120 
Playtime (s) 1125 Music 
Workshop (s). 125- 
320p*« For Schools: 125 
Listening Comer 225 
Let s Join in 225Talkwaves 
(SJ 2.40 Listen! (s). 520- 
525 PM (continued). 1130- 
l.iom Schools Night- 
time Broadcasting: Radio 
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44 C7 Maws 1220 Ctesdown i — ~ ■ ■ 

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amy 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7 1986 




First pnMIsbedin 1785 


SPORT 


Scot in 
shoes of 


Ferguson lined up for United 


the Big 
Man 


By Hugh Taylor 

Sharp is the word for Alex 
Ferguson. Iliac can be tittle 
argument that this Jock the 
Lad from Glasgow's Goran is 
the among 0 m ou t standi n g 
managers in Britain today. 

The mantle of Jock Stein 
the motivator has fallen on 
Ferguson. Like the famed Big 
Man of Celtic, Ferguson has 
presence. Footballers snap to 
attentioa when he tells them 
what he wants — and woe 
betide anyone that falls oat of 
line. 

Dapper, looking fit enough 
still to be playing, the former 
Rangers Inside forward spells 
oat to his players a modern 
gospel of football tactics, 
which include supreme fitness. 





Alex Ferguson, who led 
Scotland during the World 
Cup in Mexico, ts expected to 
become the next manager of 
Manchester United following 
the dismissal yesterday of Ron 
Atkinson. Martin Edwards, 
the chairman, was travelling 
to Aberdeen last night to talk 
to Ferguson after the Scottish 
Premier Divison dub had 
given their permission. 

The Old Trafford board has 
cast envious eyes north ever 
since Ferguson led Aberdeen 
to Victory in the Cup 
Winners' Cup final three years 
ago. He is a man of stature, 
commanding great respect 
from those around him. In 
carrying off numerous domes* 
tic trophies in recent years his 
teams have played with a 
panache reminiscent of the 
great pre-Munich United 
teams. In short he fits the 
shoes first vacated by Sir Matt 
Busby in 1969 better than any 
of the five managers who have 
followed 

Ferguson was seriously 
courted two seasons ago by 
Tottenham Hotspur who he 
eventually turned down after 


By Clive White 

led share team duties with Fer- 
rid gason while be himself has 
to also become a director on the 
of club's board. This season's 
ng first round elimination from 
on the Cup Winners' Cup was a 
is, bitter disappointment and 
ng may have left him more 
dk amenable to fresh challenges 
sb elsewhere. He has two years to 
ad run of a five-year contract 
which at times has netted him 
las £100,000 in a season after 
per bonuses. Compensation to 
en Aberdeen will be considerable, 
up He became United's ob~ 
us vious target the moment 
re, Atkinson was dismissed, 
set along with his assistant, Mick 
In Brown, at yesterday morning' $ 
s- board meeting; the 
us gen tieman’s agreement among 
a Football League chairmen 


More football 
on page 34 


agreeing to join the club — a 
decision he later regretted. At 
the time he still hankered after 
winning the European Cup, 
the one trophy which eluded 
him as it did Busby for many 
years. Bui that great Aberdeen 
team has possibly begun its 
decline in the last >8 months 
and while still carrying off 
both domestic cup com- 
petitions last season they, 
foiled for the first time in 
seven seasons to finish in the 
top three. 

This season Archie Knox 
has returned from Dundee to 


■***£&&>* 



Ferguson: relentless power 


relentless power, and touches 
of good old fashioned Scottish 
style. This Aberdeen became 
the country's team of the last 
decade. 


It was doe almost entirety to 
Fergasou, who combines street 
wisdom, awsome grasp of 
modern football knowledge, 
baseness methods and burning 
ambition for any dob of which 
be is manager, that Aberdeen 
put Rangers and Celtic in the 
shade for so long. 

Ferguson, who also man- 
aged St Mirren, can be tem- 
peramental has a quick temper 
does not suffer fools or inquis- 
itive sports reporters gladly. Is 
a workaholic and sometimes, 
os when he assumed the 
Scotland job as well as that of 
Aberdeen, be takes on too 
much for his own good. Fer- 
guson is articulate, can be 
witty, demands from his play- ‘ 
ers what he himself puts into 
the game, but he is adored by 
the supporters of Aberdeen, 
who will be violently upset if 
he leaves Pittodrie. 


that they would not poach 
each Ollier’s managers while 
they were under contract 
meant that United were al- 
ways likely to look outside the 
League for a replacement, 
in announcing the board's 
decision to terminate 
Atkinson's contract after five 
and a half years at Old 
Trafford, Edwards said that 
the decision was taken "in the 
light of the team's poor perfor- 
mance over the Iasi 12 
months" and that it was "in 
the best interests of the club 
and ferns”. The United board 


to receive about £100,000 in 
compensation, said: “Obvi- 
ously I'm a bit disappointed. 
Things bave gone against us so 
I suppose it was inevitable this 
would eventually happen. -Ev- 
ery managerial positron has its 
problems, but here they are 
magnified because United are 
the biggest dub in Britain and 
the best known in the world." 

It was common knowledge 
that Atkinson's future hung in 
the balance this season. He 
could hardly have made a 
worse start, losing the first 
three League games and win- 
ning only one m the first nine. 
Again he has been hampered 
by injuries which have 
plagued him right through 
until the end this week when 
he Jearnt that he had lost 
Whiteside for a month whh a 
knee injury. 

A recent run of seven games 
without defeat was a mislead- 
ing sign of improvement, a 
fact confirmed when 
Southampton knocked United 
out of the littiewoods Cup on 
Tuesday by a humiliating 4-1 
margin - the biggest defeat 
United bad suffered since 
losing 5-1 to Waifond in May, 
19 85. It provided the United 
board with a ready-made ex- 
cuse. Despite continued sup- 
port from the chairman be has 
had his critics, among them 
Bobby Charlton, a director on 
the board. The demands for 
success are naturally enor- 
mous at a dub tike Manches- 
ter United who insist on 








mm 


arc known to become particu- winning in style. Men of the 
forty nervous about foiling calibre of Bobby Robson, 
gates at Old Trafford where Lawrie McM enemy and Ron 


the break-even figure is be- 
tween 30,000 and 40,000. 
Atkinson, who is expected 


Saunders have declined the 
job. In the board's eyes Atkin- 
son flattered to deceive. 


A year in the life of Manchester United 


November 1985 - Top 

P W 

Manchester United IS 13 

Liverpool 15 9 

Sheffield Wed is a 

Chelsea TS 8 

Arsenal 15 8 

West Ham United 15 ? 


November 1986 - Bottom 


2 32 16 31 

3 24 23 28 

4 21 15 27 
4 19 15 27 


Watford* 
Leicester Cfl 
Manchester 
Chelsea 


IB 15 
19 IS 


ManchesterCtty 13 


13 3 4 


16 16 13 
14 23 13 
10 15 9 
9 22 


mM 


3 26 17 ' 28 Newcastle Utd 


On November 6, 1985, Ron Atkinson's unbeaten Manchester United ted the first 
division by ten points. A year later, on the day of Atkinson’s dismissal. United were 
third from bottom. In the interim, United played 40 League matches, winning 12, 
drawing 1 2, losing 16, scoring 51 goals and conceding 46. Of 12 matches in the FA 
Cnp, Milk Cap, Soper Cnp and Littiewoods Cop over those 12 months, they won 
fire, drew three and lost four, scoring 16 goals and conceding 13. 

United’s XJirrVi flvor whn 




Bowing out: Ron Atkinson at Old Trafford yesterday aftea- his d is mis sal 


recent 

managers 


McNeill’s 

sympathy 


Matt Busby - appointed Oct 1945, 
retired May 1970. 

WBf McGuness - appointed Aug 

1970, sacked Dec 1970. 

Sir Matt Busby - temporary return 
as team manager Dec 1970- Jun 

1971. 

Frank O’Farrai - appointed Jun 

1971 sacked Dec 1972. 

Tommy Oocberty - appointed Dec 

1972 sacked Apr 1981. 

Ron Atkfnson- appointed Jun 1981 
sacked Nov 1986. 

• United sacked Dave Sexton 
in April 1981 (after a run of 
seven wins) and Atkinson 
replaced him as first choice 
after Lawrie McMenemy and 
Bobby Robson turned the job 
down. In five seasons under 
Atkinson, United bave fin- 
ished third, third, fourth, 
fourth, and fourth again in the 
championship and won the 
FA Cup twice (1983 and 
1985). 


Billy McNeill, the Aston 
V3fo manager who was Ron 
Atkinson's opposite number at 
Manchester City for three 
years, yesterday expressed 
sympathy for the departed Old 
Trafford manager. 

He said: “I feel Ron has 
been unlucky. He had very 
good players, bat unfortu- 
nately he did not have any- 
thing tike maximum use of 
them this season. 

“1 don't care what team it isj 
if yon pick up injuries then 
things are difficult for a man- 
ager. And of course it’s even 
worse at Old Trafford- 71 


By Peter Ball * 

Ron Atkinson's tragedy, if 
there is any tragedy in his 
dismissal by Manchester 


who was then dominating 
them for Mancheter City. 

If so, it was a profound 
misjudgement, for the fons 
who had never wanned to the 


United, is that is his time as reserved Sexton were no more 
the club's ma n age r be did not sympathetic to his successor 

La mrj% Nka MumiAa m A pf bm* ■ ■_£* * * 


have the courage* in Arthur a m i their antipathy left t»h n 
Miller’s aphorism, to let him- vulnerable as results slipped 


self be known. 

That seems an unlikely 


badly. Walking a tightrope 
since United's crashing de- 


obituary for one of the game's dhi e last season, and with his 
most Oamboyant managers, press relationships increas- 


who occupied centre stage for 
five years as manager of the 
most glamorous dob in the 
country, bogging the back 


ingty sow, he wtil be mowned 
by few in Manchester now that 
be has fallen off 
But if his image ultimately 


pages constantly and appear- did uttie to help him, that was 
fog regularly as a television not at the heart of his dis~ 


twice (1983 and 



DO YOU HAVE A FLEET 
OF LIGHT VANS? 

THEN YOU NEED 
LEX VAN CONTRACTS 


pundit His friends, however, 
insist that behind the flashy 
exterior ties a solid, down-to- 
earth football man. 1 

There is at least a partial 
truth in his friends' interpreta- 
tion. A powerful jo ur ne yma n 
player who captained Oxford 
United in their heady early 
days in the League, earning a 
reputation for honesty and 
enthusiasm iu the lower di-. 
visions, there was tittle in his 
background to deny that view, 
and his early success as 
manager of Cambridge United 
was built on solid worth. 

It is still said that he is at 
his happiest playing in five-a- 
sides in training or talking 
football with football people 
away from the public stage. 

It is not a persona which he 
has elected to show to the 


missaL Even if his friends' 
account of him could be ac- 
cepted without question, toe 
dub's record of only 11 wins 
against first division opposi- 
tion in a year suggests that 
United's problems ran much 
deeper than a poor start to the 
season. 

His feeling for the game is 
undoubted. If Manchester 
United have always demanded 
style as wen as success, that 


gelled with Atkmson's own 
preferences. He has always 
espoused attractive football 
and at West Bromwich and 
Old Trafford he put together 
teams to fulfil that desire. 

The suspicion, however. Is 
that he mistakes style for 
substance in football as in 
appearance. Surprisingly, 
given his grass-roots back- 
ground, be has apparently 
never understood that teams 
have to be built on solid values 
and the tack of them has cost 
United dear. Unlike Liverpool 
and Everton, United players 
have had no solid core of team 
unity to ping into when things 
got sticky. 

If fare players generally have 
stayed loyal to him — Robson 
and Whiteside have spoken 
out in his defence in recent 
weeks, saying the team should 
take the Maine for United's 
failures — it is noticeable that 
the team leaders in his early 
days, Martin Buchan and Ray 
Wilkins, were disenchanted. 
And Frank Stapleton, another 
powerful figure in the dress- 


ing-room, has not been lamas 
for taking people aside to sing 
his manager’s praises. 

His friends will point agate 
to the ran of Iqjmies, which 


Wednesday in April had j 
ended their chances of winning i 
the League, and he was be- 
lieved by friends to be on the 
brink of resignation, he re- 


undermined their challenge jected that excuse when it was 
last season ami have recurred, proffered by a reporter. “Irt 


deprf«g Eton once again of not effing injuries!” he 
the jewel m his crowu, Bryan snapped. 


Robson, one of his first and 
certainly most expensive 
signings when he took over 


The assumption is- that be 
had no answer to what it was, 
atthoagbafier that game he 


The ran of injuries have confessed that he could not 
raised questions among oaf- raderstand how players could 


siders about the club's 
preparations, especially toe 
number of hams t r in g injuries 
which have run through toe 
team, leading to scepticism 
over the amount of tone United 


fail to give their a]9 ' 
Atkinson’s responsibility 
for that cannot be evaded. He 
has perhaps not understood 
the delicate mechanism which 
» a football team, and bis 


spend training on an artificial response last season , was to 


surface and over thefr warm- 
up procednses- 

More fundamentally, al- 
though Atkinson himself has 
regaiariy referred to injuries 
as an explanation. United 
have not been the only chib to 
suffer severely with them. 

In a rare moment of self- 
knowledge, after the humlKat- 
ing home defeat by Sheffield 


Stairway to the Red Devils 


Ron Atkinson, was bora on 
March 18, 1939 in LiveipooL 
After being rejected by Wolves 
and Aston Villa, be estab- 
lished himself as a wing half at 
Southern League, Oxford 
United, just before the dub 


style of play earned him. the 
nickname “tank”. 


.was during his spell at Albion 


bring in a series of new 
plqyeis, which did notoh^for 
the group's, cohesiveoess. 

ImlMdualty : excellent as 
tiny undoubtedly were, only 
Colin Gibson proved a 
successful transplant, Terry 
Gibson, Peter Davenport and 
John SIvebaek finding toe 
ntirdooction into an unsetfed 
team horrendously diffiarft. , 

A more serious criticism 
concerns other transfer deal- 
ings which have left United 
fons wondering if success on 
the field is the prime object at 


world, who see only the gold joined toe Football League in 
bracelets, flash cars, ostenta- 1962. 


'Afe at Ite on?. 1 speeriS company 
tefcaefl asety io t» ccmraa ute of 
SgHvar&Aidbecajtevwaftspeoe- 
ists, we do i beKr jid /tub effiefety 
than anybody eise 

Bacassar My irarea seff at La Vbn 
Gartza® uttteaarj te prabtems you 
fece it wring a feet of wans. «e can 


tions clothes and champagne. 
Possibly that was an image he 
cultivated when he was 
brought in to replace Dave 
Sexton, in toe knowledge that 
United wanted a larger-than- 
life character to claim head- 
lines away from John Bond, 


He was dub captain by the 
age of 20 and played alongside 
bis younger brother, Graham. 
He made 382 League appear- 
ances and helped Oxford win 
toe Third Division champion- 
ship in 1968. His aggressive 


He became player-manager 
at Kettering, twice winning 
the Southern League 
championship, before return- 
ing to League soccer in charge 
at Cambridge in December 
1974. He won the Fourth 
Division championship in 
1977. 


that be acquired a high-life GM Trafford, Ike sale of Ray 
image with a taste for gold Wilkins to Italy and toe 


jewellery, champagne 


expensive dotoing. 

He took over from Dave 
Sexton at Manchester United 
in June 1981 on a salary, 
reputed to be £30, 000 per year. 

He guided United to two FA 
Cup wins in 1983 and 1985 
and the final of toe Milk Cup 
in 1983 losing 2-1 to 
Liverpool 

His League record at Old 
Trafford is: 3rd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 
4th, and currently 19th. 


pursuit of Strachaa and Olsen 


Atkinson moved to First 
Division West Bromwich Al- 
bion. in January 1978 and 
took Albion into Europe three 
times in his four seasons: It 


tiated at a time when United 
were ebaDe n gjag strongly for 
the championship, raised 
doadMs about what United's 
prioriti e s were. 


of Whiteside to Italy m 1982, 
and of Stapleton to Bordeaux a 
year ago, and most markedly 
the sale of Mark Hughes to 
Barcelona last year, dad noth- 


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Frost defeats 
Yu for place 
in semi-finals 


mm 

VANCOWiR ACTS 




Indonesia (AFP) — Morten 
Frost again go! the better of 
Shanghai-born Sae Yu of 
Australia in a closely-fought 
game in Bandung yesterday to 
ensure himself a place in the- 
World Cup semi-finals. 

Frost, toe England-based 
Dane, won 18-15, 15-9 to 
follow up toe straight sets win 
over Sze which brought him 
toe British Masters title for the 
third year in a row under a 
fortnight ago. 

Frost will free Chinese 
Yang Yang in the semi-finals 
to be played off in Jakarta. 

WEN’S SINGLES: Group Oats: N VatM 

f iqj bt Sompof Kufcasamfcff (Thai) 15-S, 
)£ 15-13. Swg»TWDc!4firo«JpM)t 
Szv Yu [Aual 18-iS. 15-9. Qwm Tferac: _ 







Robertson is 
troubled 
by youngster 


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Chris Robertson, normally 
a quicksilver player of in- 
ventive court presence, took 
an one-and-a-half hours to 
dismiss Umar Hyat Khan, a 
■young! Pakistani eight places 
behind his own '15th world 
ranking, at the .World Open 
djamjnonshqj in Toulouse 
yesterday (Colin, McQuillan 
writes). ... 

The 2I-year-cdd Australian, 
who won 3-9, 9-3, 9-2, 9-7, 
. meets toe winner of today’s 
tost sound dash between Brit- 
ish champion Philip Kenyon 
and junior world champion 
Jausher Khan, Khan, aged 17. 
crashed Welshman. Adrian 
Davies to quality. . • 


Men of 
Harlech 
steal 
a march 

ByDarid Bands 
R^iyCtonrespoadent 


MostoftoosewtoTfewiMj 
(year’s inaugural rugby w mm 
Cup wfll do so ria tgCT^- 
The righto are Stifl befog 


wgonaww ui 

wSrid, notably North Amw«a, 
but agreements b*v* $een 
concluded with the B®- ^ 
Britain, who hope to show 


playedh with New Zealand 
television who hope to put 
every match Kve, and vrito two 
companies in Japan. 

Inevitably, huwever, there 
w£fl be cariosity mUke fw « 
the 16 enuspetiffi^ nations as 
the World Cup approaches. It 
is this curiosity whichbas 
encouraged Harlech Tele- 
vision to become toe first 
independent company to show 

an cnternatHmal match five in 
fts entirety, that between 
France and New Zealand ® 
Tonloase tomorrow (2.45). 

Viewers who have come to 

regard the BBC as the natural 

Bedim n for televised rugby 
win watch the difference in 
technique and commentary 
with interest The four home 
muons, especially Wales, wffl 
watdL.wito some concern the 
effect such a programming has 
on crowds at toe gate-taking 
data. 


Project floated 
set weeks ago 


> & & significant that the six 
companies who hare agreed to 
take pictures from French 
tidevwaot - HTV Wales, 
HTVWest, TSW, Grampian, 
STV and Ulster - are all in 
areas rift either a natural 
affinity with toe game, or 
recent success, or hoto. If any 


dent companies, Ywks ire, 
Granada, Central and 
Thames, could be bred into 
iarafvement it would reduce 
costs to each independent 
company considerably. 

The project was floated as 
fitde as six weeks ago by John 
Roberts, producer and director 
of HTV Wales's sports 
de p artme nt: “tt struck me 
during the summer Hud, with 
the World Cup coming up, we 
should he looking to get as 
nmch action from major faster- 
nationals all over the world as 
we curiA” he said- So HTV 
showed daring the summer 
film of France in Australasia 
as well as Writs in Fiji and 
Western Samoa, toe latter 
game bringing a large audi- 
ence considering toe hide of 
advance publicity. 

“That was further fuel 
which suggested there was a 
beg audience waiting to see 
international rugby. I was 
aware of tire New Zealanders' 
games in Tcmlottse and Nantes 
and found they were available 
to us- n Such an option is not 
open to tire BBC who are 
midway through a three-year 
agreement drawn up whh the 
television committee 
representing toe fear home 
unions, which Hants to 10 
minutes (with no advance pub- 
fidty) the amount of live rugby 
which can be shown on a 
Saturday afternoon apart from 
Five Nations Championship 
games. 


Protecting the 
gates of clubs 


: HTV could have accepted 
toe Eurovision version of the 
Toulouse m a t ch, complete 
with. commentary from a New 
Z e alande r, bat hare decided to 
send their own team of Bob 
Symonds and Gerald Davies, 
plus a Webb language team 
induding Gareth Edwards, 
whose contract with toe BBC 
has been concluded. 

“I would like to see Iu^ 
dependent Television as a 
iriwrte bid for toe contract next 
tone it is decided by the four 
home anfeos.” Mr Roberts 
said. XTV policy on sport over 
the last couple of years has 
been to go for live and exclu- 
sive coverage but there has 
been tittle interest expressed 
en either side for dhsUeagiag 
toe BBC’s hold on rugby 
union, even if 'the renewal m 
each contract between the 
corporation and the home 
unions has always been tire 
subject of hard-headed 


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Graham also fine 


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up in the first round today 
after finishing in the top eight 


in tirequalitying tournament, 
but Simon Taylor and Zain 


I but Simon Taylor and Zain 
^Safeb feU at the last hUrdfe* 


“There is interest m rngby 
unioa but it's not big ratings,* 1 
an ITV spokesman stud yes- 
terday. “ff yon look at ITV 
sports ratings when we are up 
against a Rogby Union inter- 
national, our sport normally 
bents toe Rugby Union ride. 
Bat if there were the possibB- 
ity of a Rngby Uakn contract 
around' to he discussed, obvi- 
ously we wacrid discuss 
The concern of the moons 
has always been to protect the 
gates of. dubs . The Welsh 
Rsgby Union have suggested 
that tomorrow's programme 
could “dedmate” gates ; it will 
be instinctive to see bow 
stenificasii toe. effect is or 
whether the average rugby 
follower enjoys parochial first- 
hand entertainment rather 
than a game between two 
cou^triesfrora overseas. 






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