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TIMES 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 



Cabinet to put 
Aids warning 


in 



By Philip 

Every household in Britain 
is to receive a leaflet warning 
of the dangers of Aids as part 
of a big public education 
campaign agreed by Cabinet 
ministers yesterday. 

The special Cabinet 
committee set up to co-or- 
dinate Government action 
against the growing Aids cri- 
sis. decided at its fina meeting 
that the leaflets containing a 
stark message such as “Aids: 
Don’t Die of ignorance", 
should go to 23 million homes 
and be backed up by a 
national television advertising 
campaign costing millions of 
pounds. 

Mr Norman Fowler, Sec- 
retary of State for Social 
Services, said after the meet- 
ing that the problem could last 
into the next century. He 
warned people to stick to one 
sexual partner. If this rule was 
broken then they should make 
surea condom was used. 

The Cabinet committee, 
chaired by Lord Whitelaw. the 
Deputy Prime Minister, is to 
meet regularly over the next 
few months. 

While yesterday it con- 
centrated on public education, 
it was dear that future meet- 
ings would discuss controver- 
sial areas such as the issue of 
free condoms and free needles 
and syringes. It is acknowl- 
edged that infected needles are 

Tomorrow 


Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


'Whan people can 
stand and argue 
with you and call 
you names, you 
know that you're 
getting 

somewhere': how 
Scotland leads the 
way in community 
policing 


/° 

im 


OThe £4,000 daily prize 
in yesterday’s Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
won outright by Mrs G 
Humphries of Ashford, 
Kent Details, page 3. 

© There is a further 
£4, C€0 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 31; 
how to play, information 
service, page 22. 


City review 

The Stock Exchange is review- 
ing the resignation of Mr 
Geoffrey Collier from Morgan 
Grenfell Securities. 

Page 23 
Feature, page 25 




Mabbutt m 

Garv Mabbutt. of Tottenham 
Hotspur, replaces the injured 
Bryan Robson for England’s 
European Championship 
qualifying tie against Yugo- 
slavia at Wembley tonight 

Page 46 


PgfMES 


There are five pages of prop- 
erty advertisements and tour 
pages of La Crtroe De La 
Creme job vacancies 
today 32-40 

On This Day 

The nation’s first solemn act 
of remembrance ay^aner 
the end of the First World War 
was recorded in The Times on 
November 12. I91*» Page 19 


Home News 2-7 
Overseas 9-M 
APPB “ 
Arts 14.15 
Blrtts. deaths. 

mumps, ZO 

Business 23-31 
Court 20 

Crosswords IW2 
Dior; » 


Law Report 41 
Leaders 19 
Letters 19 
Property 3153 

Sale Room 20 
Science 21 
Sport 4V44^M> 
Theatre*, etc 14 
TV& Radio 4a 
Weather.. 22 


■a * * A <r * 


a major source of trans- 
mission of the disease. 

Before they entered yest- 
erday’s meeting, ministers 
were talking of the “terrifying" 
nature of the disease, all the 
more so because it was in- 
curable. Some senior mem- 
bers of the committee are 
hoping that a national effort, 
evoking something similar to 
a wartime spirit, can be mo- 
bilized to conquer the disease. 

Some feel that measures 
which at present seem un- 

Figures published by the 
Department of Health yes- 
terday showed that 430 of the 
548 recorded cases of Aids 
have occurred in the Loudon 
area. However, other cases 
have occurred is most health 
regions of Britain. In addition 
to those who have developed 
the disease, more than 4,500 
have had positive blood tests. 

palatable, such as screening, 
may become less so as the 
virus spreads. 

Yesterday’s meeting, at- 
tended by a wide range of 
ministers including Mr Doug- 
las Hurd, the Home Secretary. 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, and Mr George 
Younger, the Secretary of 
Slate for Defence, endorsed 
Mr Fowler's plans for another 
round of newspaper advertis- 
I ing, which is to take place the 
weekend after next, and a 
poster campaign aimed 
specifically ai young people 
and drug addicts. 

While it was clear that the 

Stalemate 
as EEC air 
talks end 

By Haney Elliot! 

Air Correspondent 

Talks aimed at cutting 
Europe’s air fares cartel ended, 
as anticipated, in deadlock 
yesterday to leave airlines in 
turmoil. 

Britain was only able to 
convince five European coun- 
tries to back its plans to lift 
restrictions governing cheap 
fares. The other six refused to 
budge and it looks certain that 
a wave of bitter, lengthy and 
costly court actions in several 
countries will follow. 

Mr John Moore, the Trans- 
port Secretary who as Presi- 
dent of the Council of 
Ministers had been hoping his 
package aimed at opening up 
the airways by 1992 would be 
accepted, flew back to London 
last night ready to resort to the 
law. 

He now plans to set up a 
special “court" to ensure that 
British airlines stick to the 
EEC free competition rules. 
This will mean that they will 
be forbidden from colluding . 
with other airlines in Europe 

Continued on page 22, col 7 


Mother in hospital 


By A Staff Reporter 


The Queen Mother, who is 
86, was under treatment yes- 
terday for a leg injury suffered 
in Scotland three weeks ago 
and is expected to remain in 
King Edward VII Hospital for 
Officers for several days at 
least. Her engagements have 
been cancelled for the rest of 
this week. 

On Sunday the Queen 
Mother stood through the 
Remembrance Day ceremony 
at the Cenotaph in Whitehall. 


an occasion she has never 
been known to miss, but on 
Saturday, at the Festival of 
Remembrance at the Royal 
Albert Hall, she was given a 
footstool to rest her leg. 

A Clarence House spokes- 
man said the Queen Mother 
cut her leg out walking 
through the neather at Birk- 
haJl near Balmoral. 

.Apart from the leg injury 
the Queen Mother was in 
“exceptionally good health". 





television advertising and the 
leaflet empaign will come 
from the £5 million which Mr 
Fowler has already set aside, 
ministers on the committee 
believe that, as it continues its 
work, a much larger commit- 
ment of government money 
will be necessary, and forth- 
coming. 

The national leaflet drop 
will take place as soon as the 
Post Office can make the 
necessary arrangments and 
the television advertising will 
take place immediately after- 
wards. Although Mr Fowler 
made clear that decisions on 
bow explicit it should be had 
yet to be made, many min- 
isters on the committee be- 
lieve that it should be as frank 
as possible and the sensitiv- 
ities of some people 
overrriden. 

Mr Fowler said that he was 
not looking for a flashy 
“Madison Avenue” type of 
advertising campaign, but a 
direct, responsible campaign 
which “will show the public 
that we in government are 
taking this issue seriously and 
trying to get the issue over as 
directly as we can". 

He confirmed that one of 
the messages to come through 
in the campaign would be the 
disco uragment of promiscu- 
ity. “I suppose the most 
important thing for people is 
that they should stick to one 
partner. If that is not possible 
they must make sure' a con- 
dom is used. The second most 
important thine is not to 

Continued on page 22, col 8 

Hattersley 
rejects 
levy call 

By Richard Evans ■ 

Political Correspondent 

Labour’s Shadow Cabinet 
was split iast right over 
controversial proposals to 
saddle British companies with 
a multi-billion pound training 
levy. 

Just 24 hours after Mr John 
Prescott, the party’s chief 
employment spokesman, said 
a future Labour government 
would impose the levy on all 
businesses. Mr Roy Halt- 
erslcy, Labour’s deputy leader, 
insisted yesterday the plan 
was not party policy. 

As Mr Hattersley attempted 
diplomatically to distance 
himself from Mr Prescott’s 
proposals, close colleagues of 
the deputy leader did little to 
hide their fury at what they 
consider to be a gaffe by the 
Employment spokesman. 

Mr Hattersley was dearly 
taken back by the way his 
Shadow Cabinet colleague not 
only said a Labour govern- 
ment would have no choice 
but to impose the levy, but 
also said it should be a 
minimum 1 per cent of 
companies’ turnover and 
would raise £6 billion. 


•cx'vY, 


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s .V*,V 



The Prime Minister’s son, Mark, and the girl he Is to marry. Miss Diane Bergdorf, who runs a property business in Dallas. 

Boeing ‘sweetener’ Gloom as 

for Mark on RAF contract teachers’ 
lor iviarK T ^ talks move 

TTiatcher Afigers UK bidders to Tendon 


By Robin Oakley 
Political Editor 

Mr Mark Thatcher, the 
Prime Minister’s son, will to- 
morrow announce his engage- 
ment to Miss Diane Bergdorf. 
a Texan car dealer's daughter 
who runs a property business 
in Dallas. They are expected 
to many there early m the 
New Year. 

Mr Thatcher, who is 33. 
works in Dallas as a sales 
executive with Lotus Cats. He 
has known his bride-to-be for 
about eighteen months and 
the couple are expected to live 
in Texas after their wedding; 

The sometimes controver- 
sial Mark Thatcher, better 
known for his comparatively 
undistinguished career as a 
racing car and rally driv? r 
:ha»: for i/~ r . ii*cr.;^ss life, 
moved to work in America in 
1984 after running his own 
promotions firms. Monteagjc 
Marketing, in Britain and in 
the Far EasL 

Gossip columns previously 
linked him with another heir- 
ess, Karen Fortscn, from Fort 
Worth, who came with her 


By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 
Fierce competition inlen- eas, such as the North East. 


to Al/TTI 




lofiit 


ii30 


si lied yesterday between 
Britain’s GEC and America's 
Boeing Company to secure the 
lucrative contract to supply 
the RAF with a new airborne 
early-warning aircraft. 

Both companies submitted 
best and final offers to the 
Ministry of Defence on 
November 6, but Boeing dis- 
closed yesterday that they had 
furthersweetened their bid by 
increasing the size of their 
offset work commitment and 
outlining the numbers of new 
jobs that would be created. 

Senior GEC executives re- 
sponded immediately by ac- 
cusing . The Americans of 

“gre-S; «C7.w? b C.T!tTOn." fited 

alleging' that seme of their 
financial figures were “totally 
incredible." 

Boeing officials yesterday- 
pledged that the company was 
now committed to a 130 per 
cent offset programme, an 
increase of 30 per cent on that 
demanded by the MoD, and 
the highest in the company's 
history. It would mean, they 
said, that for every £100 
million that Britain spends on 
acquiring the E3 AW ACS 
aircraft, Boeing would spend 
£ 1 30 million in contracts with 
UK companies. 

Boeing and their British 
associates, Plessey, Racal, and 
Ferranti, last week held a 
series of meetings with 
development organizations 
and prospective suppliers in 
unemployment blade spot ar- 


the North West, and South 
Wales, with a view to placing 
contracts there. 

Similar meetings in Scot- 
land and Northern Ireland 
will follow later this week, and 
yesterday the company said j 
more than 250 firms had , 
expressed an interest in work- ; 
ing with Boeing. ! 

The company said yes- 
terday that if they win the 
contract — a decision from the 
Secretary of State for Defence. 
Mr George Younger, is ex- 
pected in the middle of next 
month — h would create 
50,000 new British jobs within 
eight years. 4,500 of them in 
the first vear. 

Only 10 per cent of the 
offset work would be on 
Awacs, the rest coming on 
other programmes. 

Yesterday, Mr Jeny King, 
vice president of Boeing Aero- 
space. refused to disclose the 
exact bid {nice or the numbers 
of aircraft involved. The 
information, he said, was 
classified. 

Some of the Boeing claims, 
however, were met with doubt 
by rival executives. Mr Bill 
Alexander, managing director 
of GEC Avionics, said they 
were- “grossly over-exagg- 
erating" the number of jobs 
that would be created. 

However, he said that 
should Nimrod fail to win the 
order, 2,500 staff working on 
the project would lose their 
jobs the next day. 


talks move 
to London 

By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

Teachers and their local 
authority employers will to- 
day reconvene at Acas head- 
quarters in south-west 
London for the next stage of 
their protracled talks on 
teachers' pay. 

After three gruelling days in 
Nottingham and an un- 
expected intervention from 
Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary 
of State for Education, both 
unions and employers yes- 
terday were pruning on a brave 
face in their search for a 
negotiated settlement. 

Although teachers have 
been sworn to secrecy on the 
fine prim -of the actual pay 
offer. Mr David Hart, the 


France 
thanks 
Syria on 
hostages 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

Less than 24 hours after 
approving the anti-Syrian 
measures proposed b> the 
British Government in Lon- 
don to its EEC partners. 
France officially thanked 
Syria yesterday for its help in 
freeing t»o French hostages in 
Beirut. 

The two, M Camille Sontag. 
aged 84, and M Marcel 
Coudari. aged 54. were wel- 
comed by M Jacques Chirac, 
the Prime Minister, on their 
arrival at Orly airport Iast 
night. 

Asked what France had 
done to obtain their release. M 
Jean- Bernard Raimond. the 
Foreign Minister, insisted that 
there had been “no bargain- 
ing." It was not France which 
had done the negotiating, but 
the states in the area which 
were able to exert some in- 
fluence over the kidnappers.” 
he said. 

The "process" employed by 
France consisted simply of 
maintaining contacts with 
those states. No arms sales, 
financial deals, or blackmail 
were involved, he remarked in 
an oblique reference Ui the 
aikgcdUS arms deal with Iran 
to free American hostages in 
Beirut. 

M Raimond said his Gov- 
ernment would now do every- 
thing to ensure the release of 
the remaining five French 
hostages in Beirut. “Every- 
thing makes me think that will 
be possible." he said, but 
declined to indicate when. 
France was in constant touch 
with Iran and Syria over the 
affair, he added. 

While the three French 
hostages who have been re- 
leased so far — one was 
released in June - have been 
held by groups under Syrian 
influence, at least three of the 
remaining five are known to 
be held by the extremist 
Islamic Jihad group, which is 
pro-Iranian. 

• BEIRUT: The two French 
hostages were transferred 
from their underground ceil to 
Syrian hands here (Juan Car- 
Ids Gumucio writes* 

.As M Soma*, rivj '-1 


general secretary of the N’a- j Coudan traveled home on a 


tional Association of Head 
Teachers, said he was 
pessimistic about being able to 
endorse the deal that was 
emerging. Deep reservations 
were also registered by the 
Secondary Heads Association. 

It isexpected that both sides 
will, for the first time in 
earnest, gather in full plenary 
sessions today to discuss the 
details of the management 
offer, with a veiriici expected 
within the next 48 hours. 

A majority of the employers 
and teachers yesterday sent a 
letter to Mr Baker castigating 
him for his “objectionable 
intervention" late on Monday 
evening. 

• Strike action by NUT mem- 
bers yesterday disrupted 
classes at five secondary 
schools in the South Avon 
area. 


plans chartered by Pans. 
Damascus Radio continued to 
broadcast details of their firs: 
encounter with journalists in 
Syria, nearly 16 hours after 
their actual release. 

“All went well, thanks to the 
Syrian Government." de- 
clared M Coudari. a business- 
man who went missing m 
Lebanon last February. "I can 
tell you that the collaboration 
that now exists between the 
Government of Chirac and 
Syria is absolutely fantastic." 

M Sontag. a former car 
dealer who was kidnapped last 
May, was less communicative. 
But he also appeared to be in 
good health, according to 
reporters who saw him sitting 
in the lobby of the Syrian 
Foreign Ministry. 

Pragmatic Chirac, page 9 






parents to lunch at Downing 
Street two years ago. 

Mr Thatcher, who was earn- 
ing £45.000 a year as a director 
of Lotus when he was sent to 
America in 1984, has faced all 
the difficulties of living in the 
shadow of a famous mother. 

Mrs Thatcher herself has 
been accused in the Commons 
of giving a lift to his business 
career by helping the building 
firm of Cementation to win a 
£300 million contract in the 
Middle East when Mark 
Thatcher was working for 
them. , 

He has in the past been 
criticised for accepting con- 
tracts to endorse goods and 
promote them on Japanese i 
television. He proved a major j 
worry when he got lost on a i 
motor rally across the Sahara 
in January 19S2. I 

Profiles, page 22 I 


Arms talks end in 
exchange of insults : 


s were 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


Serious arms control nego- 
tiations between the United 
Slates and the Soviet Union 
seem to be over at least until 
the spring after top-level talks 
in Vienna last week appar- 
ently degenerated into an 
extraordinary slanging match. 

Administration officials 
who accompanied Mr George 
Shultz, the Secretary of State, 
to the talks with Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister, said that both 
sides screamed at -each other 
“like children.” 

At one point, Mr Paul 
Nitze. the senior arms adviser 
to Mr Shultz, allegedly called 
Mr Viktor Karpov, the Soviet 
chief negotiator at the Geneva 
arms talks, “a liar." Mr 
Karpov threw back the insult 


Heat a shock to Oman’s royal visitors 


From Alan Hamilton 
Muscat, Oman 

The Prince of Wales, a man 
with a well-documented in- 
terest in alternative philos- 
ophies. looked apprehensive 
and conspicuous yesterday as 
the Royal Yacht Britannia’s 
barge bore him through the 
scaring heat of an Arabian 
morning to his first serious 
encounter with the world of 
Islam. 

Bravely attired in an Eng- 
lish double-breasted suit, he 
stood in the barge and fiddled 
nervously with his lie as 
though trying to catch some 
breeze in "the 90 degree heat 
and 70 per cent humidity. The 
Princess, cooler in liiac and 
white siik under an enormous 
while straw hat. remained 
determinedly sealed beside 
him. anxiously nibbing her 
thumbs tege'. her. as well she 
might when about to step into 


a society that unlike her own, 
does not make a public spec- 
tacle of its women. 

The brief voyage from 
Britannia was planned as a 
grand and photogenic opening 
to the Royal couple's four-day 
visit to Oman. It was pretty, 
but the morning sun was cruel. 
Later in the day the Prince 
told a solicitous ex-pauiate 
Briton that getting used to the 
heal was a sudden shock after 
a long flight from an English 
winter. 

They landed in front of the 
Al Alan Palace, a mighty 
pleasure dome built eight 
years ago for the greater glorv 
of its occupant, Sultan Qaboos 
of Oman. Built in an Indian 
modernist style, with pillars 
resembling giant concrete golf 
tees supporting a flat roof, the 
Prince might well regard it as a 
carbuncle if built in St James’s 
Park, but it is perfectly appro- 
priate for as the seat of the 


architect of a roaring oil-fired 
desert economy. 

Its grounds were swept 
clean of every last cigarette 
end and the Prince and Prin- 
cess stepped ashore onto an 
immaculate green lawn coax- 
ed from the dusty earth by 
constant sprinkling. The 
Prince inspected a guard of 
honour, drilled to Sandhurst 
precision, while the Princess 
was left in the care of Virginia 
Faber al-Said, an English 
woman married to a member 
of the Omani royal family. 

It was a long time before the 
Prince and Princess en- 
countered any women in the 
long line-up of officials and 
Omani royal family members 
marshalled for the handshake 
in flowing robes with silver 
daggers in their bells. 

Nor were there any women 
when the royal couple were 
received in audience by Sultan 
Qab;>os at the foot of his 


palace steps. The Sultan, aged 
46. who cut a romantic dash in | 
red and puiple turban, greying , 
beard and light brown robe, is 1 
unmarried and has no heir. 

It was a singular honour 
that he came to the foot of the 
stairs and equally unusual that 
he laid on a female member of | 
his family to look after the 
Princess. When arab meets 
arab on occasions of state, 
they do not usually bother 
about women. 

The Sultan guided the 
Prince of Wales into his 
reception halL a riot of glass 
and chandeliers. He shook 
hands with bis guests and 
walked with the Pnnce as the 
Princess walked behind, look- 
ing distinctly unaccompa- 
nied. 

It was deliciously air con- 
ditioned. The party sat on red 
velvet chairs, and presumably 
made the kind of formal con- 
^ Continued on page 22, col 1 


Senior aides said Moscow 
did not appear interested in 
continuing the momentum of 
the Reykjavik summit 

Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretary, yes- 
terday called for resolve to 
maintain America’s arms 
build-up in a speech marking 
Veterans’ Day at Arlington 
national cemetery. 

President Reagan has been 
reviewing with his senior 
advisers the arms control 
offers outlined at last week's 
Vienna talks. The Joint Chiefs 
of Staff at the Pentagon have 
been briefed on the 
President’s offer to scrap all 
ballistic missiles within 10 
years. They have privately 
expressed grave reservations 
Mars pact, page 10 

British Coal 
could be 
selloff target 

British Coal confirmed yes- 
terday that it is still on target 
to make a profit in 1938-89 
and could be privatized by the 
next Government. 

Output has increased by 
more than 20 per cent per 
manshift in the past year, but 
the industry has lost £400 
million worth of revenue as 
lower oil prices have forced it 
to cut prices. 

Thirteen pits will close this 
financial year: 20,000 workers 
have applied -for voluntary 
redundancy since April. This 
figure is expected to rise when 
the Government-backed re- 
dundancy scheme, with pay- 
ments of up to £75.000, is 
replaced by a British Coal 
scheme, with a maximum 
payment of £25,000. 

Labour dilemma, page 2 
Profit prospects, page 23 

L 

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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Several bids for 
Duchess’s gems 

Several bids have beat made t or tbe Duchess of 
Windsor's £2 million jewellery collection, her laywer and 
long-time personal friend, Maitre Suzanne Blum said 
yesterday. 

She refused to identify the prospective buyers and would 
not comment on speculation that the billionaire owner of 
Harrods, Mr Mohammed Al-Fayed, is set to buy the entire 
collection. 

But Mr Al-Fayed is said to have the edge on other would- 
be buyers becanse he has already bought the lease and 
many of the contents of the Windsors* house in Paris. 

The Duchess left the bulk of her estate to the Pasteur In- 
stitute and stipulated that it organizes the distri bution of 
bequests to associations and charities. 

Her total estate is valued at several million pounds. 


Decision 

delayed 

Judgement was reserved 
in the Court of Appeal 
yesterday on Brent cou- 
ncil's challenge to die tan 
on its holding a disci- 
plinary bearing over a rac- 
ist remark allegedly made 
by Miss Maureen Mc- 
Goldrick, the headmistress 
reinstated last week alter 
15 weeks' suspension. 

Brent claims the High 
Court judge, Mr Justice 
Roch, erred in law when 
ruling tbe decision by the 
governors of Sndbnrv In- 
fants School, who cleared 
Miss McGoidrick, was 
binding on the council 


Remains 

found 

Police searching a Vic- 
torian cemetery in north 
London to the body of 
Keighley Barton, the 
schoolgirl murdered by her 
stepfather, yesterday found 

bones and dothes they 
believe could be has. 

Det Supt Charles Far- 
qatar said at the scene: 
“We may have something 
at last. The clothing is very 
like that which Keighley 
was wearing when she was 
last seen." 

Tbe search began after 
Ronald Barton, now serv-. 
ing life, allegedly confessed 
to damping her body in the 
Stoke Newington cemetery. 


Violence guidelines 

BBC staff today will be given new guidelines to control ‘ 
the portrayal of violence on television. Bat parents most 
share responsibly for ensuring children do not watch 
unsuitable programmes, according to a BBC report to be re- 
leased tomorrow. 

The report is said to urge that the BBC makes greater 
efforts to inform viewers of what it toms the 9pm 
“watershed" to family viewingJBefore 9pm, the BBC 
schedule is deemed suitable to viewing by family 
audiences, including children. 

Hunt for 
mother 

A High Court judge has 
ordered the arrest of Mary 
Side, aged 39, who has 
disappeared with her three 
children. She also toes jail 
for contempt in defying 
court orders to return the 
children. 

Mrs Side (right) has net 
been seen since September 
27 after taking her elder 
daughter Anndka from 
foster parents in Harold 
HOI, Essex. 

Also missing are Nigel, 
aged five, and Natasha, 
four, who had been living 
with their tether Mr John 
Side, aged 49, at Gilling- 
ham, Kent. 

Lincoln title sold 

The Lordship of the Manor of Efigham in Norfolk, the 
original home of President Abraham Lincoln's family, was 
sold for £11,250 at an auction in the Painters" livery Hall, 
Mansion House, London yesterday. 

The bnyer was Mr Adrian Senuys, a Dutch company 
director who has lived in Norfolk for 30 years. 

Fifty titles were sold to a total iff £350,0001 



Fugitive 

seeks 

passport 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 
. Mr Ronald James Everett, 
aged 55, a fugitive Briton 
living in Spain, was granted 
leave by a High Court judge 
yesterday to seek a court order 
quashing a decision of the 
British Embassy in Madrid 
Iasi May, which refused him a 
full passport after his old one 
expired. 

- The reason given was that a 
warrant had been issued for 
his arrest in the United 
Kingdom. 

Mr Everett, now living at 
Parque Marbella, was offered 
an emei^ency passport, en- 
abling him to travel only to 
the United Kingdom. 

! He is also challenging the 
Foreign Office's decision to 
confirm the embassy’s refusal. 

His counsel. Mrs Laureen 
Fleischmann, told Mr Justice 
Russell yesterday that the 
authorities were using meth- 
ods “contrary to natural 
justice" in an attempt bid to 

S t Mr Everett back to Eng- 
nd. 


Woman ‘a 
victim of 
campaign’ 

A catering manageress be- 
came the victim of a smear 
campaign after she ignored 
advances ftom her boss, she 
chimed yesterday. 

Mrs Veronica Snowball, a 
divorcee aged 46, of East 
Grinstead, West Sussex, said 
Mr Bruce Knight asked her to 
make love on the office table 
and sent her suggestive under- 
wear and pornography. 

After ignoring his advances, 
she was accused of dishonesty 
and dismissed, she told an 
industrial tribunal, at Chelsea, 

A company auditor paid a 
surprise visit the day before 
her holiday. On her return she 
was moved sideways, then 
dismissed. 

The auditor said sbe bad 
overspent and not kept correct 
records. Takings in the can- 
teen at Bristows Helicopters, 
in RedhiD, Surrey, went up 
£50 a day after she left, it was 
alleged. 

Mrs Snowball, wfao is claim- 
ing unfair dismissal and sex-' 
ual discrimination, denied 
overspending. 


Catalogue of failure alleged by TUC report 

NHS tendering ‘cuts standards’ 


By Jiff Sherman 

Competitive tendering of 
National Health Service an- 
cillary sennas has led to 
lower standards of service and 
cuts in the pay and conditions 
of low paid employees, tbe 
Trades Union Congress said 
yesterday. 

In a report detailing a 
catalogue of incidents where 
private contractors have foiled 
to achieve performance levels 
set by health authorities, or 
have withdrawn from NHS 
contracts, the TUC claims 
that tbe record of foil ore set 
out in its 1984 report have 
persisted. 

“Contractors are continuing 
to inflict lower standards on 


consumers and workforces 
alike and that is a matter for 
public concern." 

In 1983. health authorities 
were askqd to put all catering, 
cleaning and laundry services 
out to competitive tender by 
September 1986- But the latest _ 
figures from the Department is likely to 
of Health and Social Security legislation i 


show that only 53 per cent of 
these services have gone out to 
tender, at a total saving of 
£62.9 million a year. 

A recent letter from the 
DHSS to the 14 regional 
general managers shows that 
162 tenders have been won by 
private contractors, saving 
million, while 647 con- 
tracts have been won in house, 
saving £39.5 million. The 


majority of the savings have 
come from hospital cleaning 
services, where £28.9 million 
has been realised. 

Savings from catering and 
laundry services have been 
£8.7 million and £5.3 million. 
The Queen's Speech today 
to new 
requiring local 


authorities to put ancillary 
services out to competitive 
tender. Until now this has 
been done on a voluntary 
basis but the response has 
been patchy and confined to 
authorities ideologically 
sympathetic. 

But the TUC report says: 
“Increasingly authorities are 
having to meet the cost ofloss- 
leading contracts and of con- 


tractors pulling out where they 
cannot fulfill those contracts 
fora profit" 

. The report cites one cater- 
ing company being taken to 
court over allegations of cock- 
roaches in kitchens and un- 
hygienic food handling. 
Nortltavon District Council is 
taking Spinney’s to court oyer 
a contract at Frenchay hos- 
pital. near Bristol after a 
report from its chief environ- 
mental health officer over 
conditions at the hospital. 

The South Western regional 
health authority said that 
remedial action had been ' 
taken “with the full coopera- 
tion of Spinneys." 

Further allegations in the 


report include the employ- 
ment of child labour, un- 
acceptable standards ^ of 
ripaning- lack of supervision, 
poor weekend and evening 
cover, and high staff turnover. 
Many of these bad resulted in 
health authorities imposing 
financial penalties on com- 
panies withdrawn^ from con- 
tracts. The allegations cover 
50 contracts in health and 

local authorities. 

■ Last week. Mis Edwina 
Currie, a junior health min- 
ister, admitted that 12 com- 
panies bad withdrawn from 
NHS contracts. Figures on 
companies that have been 
charged financial penalities, 
were not collected centrally, 
she said. 


Satellites 
search 
south of 
equator 

Washington (AP) — A week- 
long exercise is underway 
involving nations participat- 
ing in the Search and Rescue 
Satellite System (Sarsat), an 
expanding international op- 
eration credited with saving 
650 lives since being formed 
in 198Z 

Mr James Bailey of the 
United States National Oce- 
anic and Atmospheric Admin- 
istration said 13 countries 
were lairing part in tbe Sarsat 
exercise, which was extending 
its coverage to the southern 
hemisphere. 

The test will allow scientists 
to measure the effectiveness of 
new radio equipment bang 
integrated into the Sarsat sys- 
tem. which picks up distress 
signals from ships and aircraft 
and guides rescuers to the 
scene of any accident 

Inaugurated three yearn ago 
by the US, Soviet Union, 
Canada and France, the sys- 
tem uses orbiting satellites to 
listen for distress signals 
emanating from equipment 
aboard commercial ships and 
aircraft. 

When signals are received 
they are relayed to ground 
stations with an estimate of 
the location of the accident 

The exercise will test equip- 
ment broadcasting at 406 
megahertz, which will allow 
the pinpointing of an accident 
within about two miles of its 
site. Tbe new radios can also 
be coded to broadcast the 
serial number of a ship or 
airplane to help rescuers iden- 
tify the missing craft. 

The radios used since 1982 
broadcast at 121.5 megahertz, 
Mr Bailey said. They can 
locate a crash site within 12 to 
15 miles and only send a 
signal, without any identi- 
fication. 

In the past this search and 
rescue system has operated 
only in the northern hemi- 
sphere because that is where 
ail ground stations for receiv- 
ing signals have been located. 

Under the new 406 mega- 
hertz system, a satellite receiv- 
ing a signal in the southern 
hemisphere will store it and 
relay the distress call when it 
moves to tbe north, something 
that has not been possible in 
the past 

Chile and Brazil are build- 
ing ground stations to receive 
signals south of the equator. 


Gynaecologist 
electrifies 
birth control 

Dobbs Ferry, New York 
( AP) — A gynaecologist claims 
to have patented a birth- 
control device that elec- 
trocutes sperm inside a 
woman before it can enter ber 
cervix. 

The tiny battery device has 
been tested on baboons at the 
University of Alabama, but 
has not been tested on 
humans, said Dr Steven Kaali, 
the director of the Women’s 
Medical Pavilion in Dobbs 
Ferry. 

Dr Kaali said earlier lab- 
oratory tests had shown that 
sperm die when shot with 
electricity for two or force 
minutes. 


Experts agree Cheetahs 
have become more friendly. 


IF YOU’RE LINDER the 
impression that the cheetah 
is a particularly uncaddiy 
animal there are well over 
45,000 office workers who'd 
beg to disagree. 

Thai s the number of British 
Telecom's Cheetah Telex ma- 
chines in use in Britain. 

: However, when it came to 
designing foe latest model we 
could still see room to im- 
prove our best seller. Hence 
the launch of foe brand new 
Cheetah Plus. 

The Tree Experts 

And who better to test it out 
dura foe true experts — the 
secretaries who'll be using it 
day-in. day-out. Were glad to 


say they’ve given it foe thumbs- 
up. What did they go for 
particularly? 

Word Perfect 

For a stan, there was foe 
large VDU screen and editing 
facilities that make it so much 
eaaer to produce worfoperiect 
messages. 

Then there was foe Autocall 
facility. This enables foe oper- 
ator to leave foe machine to 
despatch messages, and keep 
trying even if the number's 
engaged. 

The Cheetah proved to have 
an impressive memory, calling 
up 100 or more often-used 
numbers at the press of two 


bunons. 

And it proved extremely 
docile, sitting quietly and 
comfortably on an office desk 
<or its own special standi 
receiving messages without 
disturbing tbe preparation of 
outgoing ones. So there you 
have it- Cheetahs really are 
friendlier. 

For further information 
amply call us free or charge 
on U800 400 46ft or write 
ro. British Telecom Telex. 
Freepost. BS3333. Bristol 
BS1 4YR 

Get on in business. Get on 
the Telex. 


Bntsh 

TELECOM 


TIL 



Mr Cyril Smith, the Liberal MP to Rochdale, turned feshion modd yesterday to pnbbazs a 
new line of shirts from Moy Central Manufacturing as part of the fom’s promotion farthe 
British Collections Exhibition in London next week. Models K^tey Smith, l^UandRadiel 
Swinbuni tried on Mr Smith’s shirt from the collection for size (Photograph: Chns Hams). 


The mining industry 

Labour’s Coal Bill dilei 

By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 


mu 


ia 


The Government will to- 
morrow publish a -new Coal 
Bill which ministers believe 
will prove * . a .serious 
embarrassment To Mr- Neil 
Kinnock, foe Labour leader, 
and his party. 

The new Bill will give the 
breakaway Union of Demo- 
cratic Mineworkers (UDM). 
the right to representation on 
coal industry pension boards, 
so giving it a new degree of 
official recognition. 

The Government's in- 
tentions will be bitieriy con- 
tested by Mr Arthur Scargjll 
president- of the National 
Union of Mineworkers 
(NUM) and his members, 
who still insist that they 
should be foe only union 
recognized in the mining 
industry. 

And Mr Peter Walker, the 
Energy Secretary, plans to 
challenge Mr Kinnock and his 


party to vote against foe Bill 

Although Mr Kinnock has 
attacked Mr Arthur Scaigifl on 
occasion over the conduct of 
the miners strike he has 
refused so far to recognize foe 
UDM. 

The Labour leader went to 
the Durham miners’ gala in 
foe summer and called for a 
single union in foe mining 
industry, infuriating the UDM 
members who are mostly tra- 
ditional Labour supporters. 
Ministers believe that if La- 
bour is tempted to follow foe 
Scargill line and vote against 
foe new Coal Bill on its second 
reading then it could have an 
effect on key seats in foe 
Midlands. 

The UDM factor has caused 
difficulties for Mr Kinnock 
already. When Labour mod- 
erate MP Mr Don 
Concannon, originally spon- 
sored by the NUM but a 


s u pporter of the UDM, de- 
cided to s tand down for foe 
next election in his Mansfield 
seat, Mr Alan Meale, a left 
winger, was chosen as his 
replacement rather than tbe 
moderate Mr Bryan Davies, 
secretary of the Parliamentary 
Labour Party, in a contest in 
which only Mr ScaigtlTs 
NUM and not the UDM was 
accredited to send 
representatives. 

The Conservatives believe 
that the fall-out effect from foe 
Labour's refusal to recognize 
tire UDM could affect the 
fortunes not only ofMansfiddi 
but of marginal Sherwood 
next door. Ashfield and the 
three metropolitan Notting- 
ham seats. And they are 
convinced that for many 
UDM men the Labour party’s 
decision over which way to 
vote on foe new Coal Bill will 
be the deriding factor. 


Man was 
still 
alive in 
mortuary 

An investigation is bettered 
to have been launched last 
night after a hospital doctor 
pronounced dead a man who 
was still alive. 

The mao, aged 27, was twice 
certified dead and twice taken 
to a mortuary. Bat he recov- 
ered mad spent more than 24 
hours in the intensive care mot 
of the hospital. 

Health drie& are under- 
stood to have ordered an 
inquiry into foe events before 
foe eventual death of Mr 
Christopher Smale, at the 
East Surrey Hospital RedhiQ, 
Surrey. 

Mr Smale was found col- 
lapsed under a tree in woods at 
ReigMe in Surrey last Friday 
afternoon. His body was cold 
and he was believed to have 
taken a drugs overdose. He 
was discovered by a schoolboy 
who thought he was sleeping. 

An ambulance was called 
and Mr Smale was taken to 
the casualty trait at tbe East 
Surrey Hospital where foe 
officer on duty examined him 
in the back of the ambulance. 
The woman doctor, a locum, 
certified death and ordered the 
ambulance to (he hospital 
mortuary. 

Mr Smale was about to be 
attended by a mortuary assis- 
tant when at least seven 
intakes of breath were noted. 
He was rushed tack to foe 
hospital casualty department. 

There, it is understood, he 
was given a cardiac test which 
felled to show a reading and 
the same doctor p ro wonnred 
bin dead. Again, he was 
ordered to foe mortuary . 

Mr Smale was left in foe 
morgue for several minutes 
until a mortuary technician 
heard a gurgling sound, it Is 
believed. Moments later, hos- 
pital porters pushed Mr Smale 
back to casualty. This time a 
consultant examined him and 
he was admitted to the mten- 
sive care unit, where doctors 
tattled to keep him alive. He 
eventually died on Sunday 
morning. Health chiefs woe 
tight-lipped about the incident 
although ft was understood 
that a fell-scale inquiry had 
been ordered by the East 
Surrey Health Authority. 


EEC fund to cut 
jobless backed 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


The £1.5 billion-a-year EEC 
Social Fund should be over- 
hauled to enable it to spear- 
head a concerted effort to cut 
Europe’s 16 million jobless, 
Mr Kenneth Clarke, foe Min- 
ister for Employment, said 
yesterday. 

Mr Clarke, arguing for -ur- 
gent debate" about the fund's 
role, said it was casting its net 
too widely and needed to 
concentrate on specific mea- 
sures, such as training tbe 
young and assistance for foe 
long-term unemployed. 

Speaking in Strasbourg, he 
urged the European Par- 
liament and Council of Min- 
isters to draw up new 
priorities for foe fund, from 
which foe United Kingdom 
received nearly £300 million 
last year. 

Mr Clarke said that foe 
people living in the EEC were 
right to expect concerted inter- 
governmental action to tackle 
big social and economic prob- 
lems, but too often those 
hopes were frustrated by the 
EEC’s “tortuous and in- 


decisive” decision-making 
processes. 

Some progress had been 
made, notably foe lifting of all 
internal trade tamers. 

Mr Clarke commended tbe 
Edinburgh strategy agreed by 
his EEC counterparts in 
September as foe basis for 
change. That strategy called 
for help for small and me- 
dium-sized companies, more 
flexible patterns of work, bet- 
ter training all round and 
more assistance for foe long- 
term jobless. 

The review of the Social 
Fund, which subsidizes job 
creation and training projects 
set up by official agencies, 
should seek to bring its prior- 
ities into line with those 
mapped out at Edinburgh, he 
said. 

“Large sums of money are 
disbursed out of that fund 
each year. I firmly believe 
these funds should be directed 
towards supporting measures 
which will lead to foe maxi- 
mum reduction in 

unemployment.” 


Anxiety growing 
over school sport 


By Michael HorsueH 

Increasing anxiety about the been less 
decline in competitive sports 
among schoolchildren is likely 
to come to a head at two 
meetings later this month. 

A survey of school sports by 
the Secondary Heads Associ- 
ation, which is expected to 
confirm a national bend to- 
wards a non-competitive pol- 
icy, will be revealed to a 
national conference of the 
Central Council of Physical 
Education a week today. 

Then on November 26 a 
seminar organized by two 
government departments — 

Education and Environment 
— is expected to lea d to 
growing 
bodies an 

The -central council has, 
meanwhile, submitted a 10- 
point action plan to revitalise 
competitive sprat to foe Min- 
ister for Sport and yesterday 
called for an urgent appraisal 
of the trend. 

Mr Nigel Hooks, the 
coundTs senior technical offi- 
cer, said: “The emphasis has 


protests by sports 
id educationists. 


on schools 
participating in competitive 
sports and more on broaden- 
ing the curriculum to a iiquo- 
rice-aB-sports' approach in 
which children have a go at 
everything and achieve 
nothing”. 

Labour Party leaders earlier 
this week dissociated them- 
selves from left-wing educa- 
tionists and councils which 
are opposed to school teams 
because they foster com- 
petition rather than- cooper- 
ation, 

Mr Denis Howell shadow 
Minister for Sport, and Mr 
Giles Radice, shadow Min- 
ister for Education, called for 
the development of sporting 
excellence through 
competition. 

But foe council said declin- 
ing competition is common to 
local authorities, which are 
responsible for funding sport. 

Non-competitive games pe- 
riods spent on yoga and other 
forms of meditation are being 
introduced- 


Opera House chief enraged at grant 


By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

Britain is in danger of 
becoming a nation of Philis- 
tines as a result of the 
Government's discouraging 
attitude towards foe arts, 
according to Sir dans Moser, 
chairman of the Royal Opera 
House. 

Introducing the company's 
annual report yesterday. Sir 
Clans said foe arts budget for 
next year was deeply dis- 
appointing, and much lower 
than anybody in tbe arts world 
had feared. 

Setting aside a substantial 
allocation for a new British 
Library bmlding, be Mid 
planned expenditure repre- 


sented an increase of ZS per 
cent, which was half foe level 
of inflation. 

“T feel enraged because foe 
arts have actually been singled 
out for a lower increase than 
social services, environment 
and everything else, and that 
seems to me very hard to 
defend in a civilised worid- 

♦Tt redly is the most 
discouraging sign, for many 
years, of the Government’s 
attitude to the arts _ one asks 
oneself whether this is gofug to 
become a country of ' 
Philistines?" 

Accompanied by ft suitably 
sombre refrain from a stage 
rehearsal of Janacek's tragic 
opera Jetotfa, Sir Claas 


effect of two consecutive grant 
increases below foe rate of 
inflation was proving disas- 
troas fo£ Covent Garden. 

The “carry-forward” into 
1986-87 had had to be 
radically reduced, and this was 
likely to have serious implica- 
tions hr future artistic activ- 
ities. He wished to make a 
“final and urgent” plea to foe 
Government to ensure that 
subsidy did not tell farther in 
realferms. 

Sir Claus reported font pri- 
vate funding for the Royal 
Opera House had increased by 
7 per cent to some £2 mflUon 
per annuma, tat he doubted 
that “even with the greatest 
efforts and good lock" it could 
go much beyond this figure. 


He suggested a special grant 
he all ocated for national in- 
stitutions, including Covent 
Garden, and that the Arts 
Grand! should go no further in 
diverting fends from leading 
London booses to the regions. 

Sir John Tooley, general 
director, said adequate fend- 
ing would have helped foe 
company to reduce its ticket 
prices and develop its regional 
touring- pro gram me. 

He agreed that ft was a 
“silly situation" that, while 
foreign tonrs were self-financ- 
ing, some UK rqponal perfor- 
mances had to be cancelled 
The Royal Opera House 
received a general grant of £13 
mUOtm from foe Arts Council 
fear foe ernrent year. . 


Jail siege 

staff take 
delicate 
approach 

By Howard Foster 

Prison authorities at 
Peterhead jail near .Aberdeen, 
maintained their delicate ap- 
proach last nightas a swung 
prison officer faced his third 
day as a hostage wih 50 
inmates roaming loose inside 

their cdl Mock. . 

As Mr John Crossan. aged 
25, was paraded on the prison 
roil apparently unharmed, by 
three hooded-men serving ftfe 
sentences for reorder, prison 
staff in rioigcar waited hidden 
in foe courtyard near by. 

Negotiations continued all 
day between senior prison 
staff and prisoners thrown foe 
door Of A Hall where the men 
overpowered the pnson offi- 
cer and took his keys on 
Sunday. Prisoners, were passed 
food and drink yesterday. 

Last night the father of John 
Cant Smith, aged 25, one of 
foe pri ncipal figures m the 
capture of Mr Crossan, was 
believed to be on his way to 
Peterhead to see his son. 
Smith is serving a bfe sentence 
for killing a woman aged 61 
and raping her daughter. 

Mr Crossan has been in the 
prison service for 18 months 
and moved to Peterhead from 
Bariinnie jail, Glasgow, five 
weeks ago. 

He is the eighth warder to 
have been attacked in the past 
year at Peterhead, which has a 
reputation for toughness. A 
Hall houses prisoners serving 
long sentences for serious 
crimes. There have been 18 
serious protests and violent 
outbreaks by prisoners at 
Peterhead since 1972. 

The inmates appear to be 
protesting this time about 
alleged brutality by staff and 
bad conditions at the jail. 

The three ringleaders are 
believed to be Andrew 
Walker, aged 21, a former 
army cwpral who was jailed 
fra 30 years in Edinburgh last 
year for the murder of three 
soldiers during a £19,000 
robbery: Willi am Ballantyne. 
aged 26, jailed in 1983 in 
Glasgow for stabbing a yonng 
man to in a city street, 
and John Cant Smith, who 
received his life sentence in 
Glasgow three yea is ago. 

• Mr Glen Hewson, a for- 
mer Peterhead prisoner who 
broke both legs during an 
escape attempt, is suing the 
Secretary of State for Scotland 
Mr Malcom 

Rflriad for £80,000 da m ages. 
He claimed in Edinburgh 
Cburt of Sessions yesterday 
that his injuries weere caused 
by excessive staff violence. 


Triaris 
bid to 
shut Eye’ 

Mr Robert Maxwell, the 
publisher, bad an "ulterior 
motive" to clearing his name 

^Privat^Eye for tibe^iTwas 
claimed in the High Court 
yesterday. 

It was an attempt to dose 
foe magazine down, said Mr 
Richard Ingrams, its former 
editor. 

Giving evidence on foe 
seventh day of Mr Maxwell’s 
claim for libel damages 


Ingrams said that ref- 
erences to Mr Maxwell in the 
magazine were “just a little 
tease”. 

But be accepted a letter 
purported to have been sent to 
the magazine by Mr Maxwell’s 
wife comparing the Duke of 
Edinburgh to Nazi war crim- 
inal Adolf Eichmann was, in 
retrospect, “a sick joke". 

Mr Maxwell seeks damages 
over two articles in the maga- 
zine in July last year that 
alleged he acted as paymaster 
fra Mr' Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, to buy a 
peerage. 

The magazine denies libel 
and counterclaims libel dam- 
ages over an article in The 
Daily Mirror. 

The hearing continues 


DPP to get 
shares 
fraud report 

A report on attempts tt 
make illegal multiple applica- 
tions for shares during foe 
recent TSB flotation is to be 
sent to the Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

The TSB will anounce this 
week foe results of its internal 
investigation which is ex- 
pected to lead to the formation 
of an investigating team by the 
Fraud Squad. Talks have 
been held between foe TSE 
and the police and a detective 
inspector has been nominated 
to help foe bank. 

Yesterday foe TSB said 
“We will be making, an 
announcement saying how fai 
we have goL The number ol 
people under suspicion will be 
released and foil details passed 
to foe DPP” 


Correction 

In an article on November 4 
on Conservative attempts to 
win the youth vote it was 
wrongly slated that Mr Hugh 
Bygoti-Webb was a Conser- 
vative Party Research Depart- 
ment privatization specialist 
and that be, Mr David Graham 
and Mr Bev Bevan had agreed to 
join the party's youth commit- 
tee. 







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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 3986 


HOME NEWS 


‘Gardener murdered as raiders ransacked mansion' 

error gang 


widow of 75 

three times 


A wealthy elder Jy widow 
was shot three times. Threat- 
ened with a knife and then 
trussed hand and foot by three 
hooded raiders who burn into 
her manor house armed with a 
rifle and two crossbows, a 
court was told yesterday. 

During her two hour ordeal, 
it is alleged, the three men also 
shot her gardener and left him 
to bleed to death as .they 
ransacked the mansion of 
cash, antiques and jewellery 
worth thousands of pounds. 

Mrs Ellen Ditcher told the 
jury at Lewes Crown Court, 
Sussex that she was shot in the 
arm, chest and face when the 
three men broke into her 
home, Olham Manor, Otham, 
near Maidstone, Kent, in the 
early hours of July 7 last year. 

Mis Ditcher, aged 76, sat 
down in me witness box as she 
recounted hearing “a cannon- 
ade of shots.” She was sitting 
in the kitchen nursing her sick 
Great Dane dog Prince; one of 
four pet dogs she kept. 

She said^I thought it was 
young hooligans who had 
been out shooting rabbits 
coming around to cause a little 
bit of annoyance. I opened the 
door and tailed ont ‘clear off 
you silly bastards". 

“ 1 was holding the door 
open when I felt a sting in the 
arm. 1 felt another sting in my 
breast. I got back m and 
turned the key in the lock. 

“I knelt down in front of my 
cooker. I was confused and felt 
feint. Guns were still being 
fired and there was a lot of 


noise. I walked " along the 
corridor and the dogs went 
upstairs. I then got a bullet in 
the mouth. I panicked a bit. I. 
couldn’t talk because I was full 
of blood." 

Mr Robert Harman, QC, for 
the prosecution, said the three 
men arrived at the manor 
house armed with a -22 rifle 
and two crossbows, “hardly 
less lethal” than the rifle. 
Before entering the grounds 
they climbed a telegraph pole 
and cut wires leading to the 
house. 

When they kicked open the 
bock door they were am- 
fronted by Mr WDIiam Aus- 
tin, a gardender, aged 54, who 
lived in a flat on the second 
floor. 

“They shot him in the chest 
at dose rang; with the rifle. It 
seemed that at an early stage 
they dumped Mr Austin in the 

O where he was later 
dead. They just left him 
there to die,” Mr Hannan 
said. 

Mr Hannan said the raiders 
then pursued Mrs Ditcher 
upstairs. 



Damages shared 
between former 
wife and mistress 

By Fiances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


The former wife of a manag- 
ing director of American Ex- 
press who was killed in a car 
crash, and his mistress, shared 
the £205,285 agreed damages 
in the High Court yesterday. 

Miss Eueen Margaret Mili- 
ichap. who lived with Mr 
Bryan Regan at the time of his 
death in 1984, was awarded 
£195,000. His former wife, 
Mrs Coral Regan, was 

awarded £10.285. 

The awards were approved 
by Mr Justice Caulfield. He 
had been tokl that at the time 
of Mr Regan’s death. Miss 
Millichap was living with him 
as his wife. 

Mrs Regan was being paid 
maintenance by her former 
husband. 

Mr Regan, aged 50, who was 
managing director of Ameri- 
can Express Equipment Fi- 
nance, a subsidiary of the 
American Express Inter- 
national Banking Corpora- 
tion, died from multiple 
injuries after a road accident 


on February 22, 1984, on the 
A339 at Knights bridge Hill. 
Headley. Hampshire. 

The driver and owner of a 
van involved in the collision, 
Mr Simon Godfrey, of Tythe 
Court. Middle Utueton. Eve- 
sham, Hereford and Worces- 
ter, and Five Star Express, of 
Halesowen. West Midlands, 
admitted liability and were 

damages ^and costs of^ the 
action. 

A solicitor, specializing in 
family law. yesterday said that 
although the circumstances of 
the death were more unusual 
than most, conns recognized 
that the woman living with a 
man at the time of his death 
had a claim against his estate. 

That was not the case, 
however, on separation: in 
several recent cases co- < 
habitees had tried to secure a | 
lump capital sum from their 
partners when they bad sepa- | 
rated but the claims had not 1 
been upheld. 

Behaviour and diet 


-(gM- 

Welcome 
win for 
war widow 

A war widow is the sole 
winner of yesterday’s Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4^100. 

Mrs Glynn Humphries, 
aged 70, from Ashford, Kent, 
has played the Portfolio Gold 
game since it started. 

She said that when she first 
checked the result, she “felt 


bad made a mistake . 

When asked how she in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, she said: “I am an 
RAF war widow and we don’t 
have big pensions. The money 
will come in extremely asefaL” 
Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Cold card by sending a 
Stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold. 

The Times, 

PO Box 4ft, 

Black barn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Pupils 9 food for thoughts 


ofS^Si&^taln«smhCT Mrs Elks Ditcher, terrorized by a gang of hooded killers Accused: Steve Dougal 


body took herself up to the 
first floor and let three of the 
four dogs into the bedroom 
and shut the door. She stayed 
outside with her Great Dane, 
Prince. The three men, wear- 
ing .balaclava masks, con- 
fronted Mrs Ditcher at the top 
of the stairs. The man with the 
sawn off rifle shot and killed 
the Great Dane .** 

Bradford disaster 


Mr Harman said Mrs 
Ditcher was led into the 
bedroom where a knife was 
held at her face while one 
raider demanded to know 
where she kept cash: They 
then ripped telephone cable 
from the wall and tied her 
hands behind her back and 
tied her feet together. 


Two of the bullets are still 
inside Mrs Ditcher, added Mr 
Hannan, “one is behind her 
jaw and one is close to her 
lung which is considered too 
dangerous to remove.” 

Terence Clark, aged 45, a 
communications consultant, 
of lan gham Copse, Maid- 
stone; his son Martin Clark, 


Stand ‘a known fire risk 9 


aged 20, a bricklayer of St 
Mary Cray, Orpington, south- 
east London and Steven 
Dougal, aged 21, unemployed, 
of St Paul's Cray, Orpington, 
deny murdering Mr Austin 
and wounding Mrs Ditcher 
with intent to cause grievous 
bodily harm. 

The trial continues today. 




American researchers yes- 
terday told a conference in 
London that a four-year 
experiment in New York 
schools had provided irrefut- 
able evidence that a healthy 
diet fed to better behaviour 
and examination results for 
the 800,000 school-children 
involved. 

Dr Alexander Schauss, 
director of the American In- 
stitute for Biosocial Research, 
said that the progressive 
dim mat ing of sucrose, arti- 
ficial colours, unnecessary 
preservatives and other ad- 
ditives had led to the most 
dramatic increase in ability 


By Robin Young 

and performance yet seen 
among American 

schoolchildren. 

Dr Elizabeth Kagan, as chief 
administrator of the New 
York Office of Child Nu- 
trition, ordered the restric- 
tions on sucrose and additives 
in the 500.000 meals prepared 
by her 10,000 staff for the 
pupils in 803 city schools. She 
said that the dietary changes 
resulted in less food being 
wasted and more children 
wanting school lunches 

Before the diet changes, 
New York city schools 
achieved persistently low aca- 
demic ratings. Dr Strauss said, 


and in spring 1979 the mean 
national performance 
rankings of the schools were at 
an historical low of 39.2 per 
cent, having never been higher 
than 43 per cent since 1 969. 

In the four years of the 
dietary changes, New York 
city schools raised their 
performance ranking by 15.7 
points. 

Booker Health Report 3: The 
Liverpool Project (Liverpool So- 
cial Services Department in 
association with Booker Health, 
available to those working in 
community health from BBA, 
Glen House, 125 Okl Brompton 
Road, London. SW7 3RP). 


mm 


Fifty-six people died in an 
appalling fire at Valley Parade 
football ground even though 
Bradford City directors, gov- 
ernment safety inspectors and 
county council officials all 
knew the ground’s grandstand 
was a potential fire trap, a 
High Court in Leeds was told 
yesterday. 

The dub had ignored 
warnings to take action oat no 
statutory powers were used to 
make them, the court was 
told. 

Bradford City were playing 
their last home game of the 
season in front of a capacity 
crowd before promotion to the 
Second Division, and the 
ground was in a general state 
of decay which should have 
put any regulatory authority 
on its guard, said Mr Michael 
Ogden. QC, representing a 
woman and her son who lost 
four relatives in the blaze. 

Utter was strewn 12 inches 
deep beneath seats in the 
grandstand when a lighted 
cigarette was dropped through 
a floorboard joint shrunk by 
age minutes before the half- 
time whistle blew. Soon after, 
pandemonium broke out wh- 
en raging fee engulfed the 
grandstand. 

Mr Ogden made his damn- 
ing statement when opening 
the test case which will deter- 

New Bill 
will help 
consumers 

. Byltobin Young 

Consumer organizations are 
confident that a new Con- 
sumer Protection BiB will be a 
principal feature of today’s 
Queen’s Speech. 

Mr Michael Montague, 
chairman of the National 
Consumer Council, suggested 
yesterday it was long overdue 
because “current consumer 
legislation teaks like a sieve”. 

At a London conference he 
said: “Current British con- 
sumer legislation has its roots 
in the J890s, the days of the 
horse and cart”. 

The Consumers Associ- 
ation. publishers ofKhich? 
predicted that the Bill would 
include a provision making 
suppliers and importers resp- 
onsible for safety of goods. 

The association also be- 
lieves that the Bill will in- 
troduce a new product- 
liability law, enabling con- 
sumers to claim compensation 

from manufacturers if they are 

harmed by defective goods, 
without having to prove 
negligence. 

Miss Rosemary McRobert, 
deputy director of assocation, 
said: “There is still more to 
fight for. We want to plug a 
gap which will leave some 
victims unprotected, allowing 
manufacturers to escape liab- 
ility on the grounds that 
knowledge at the tune of 
manufacture did not enable 
the existence of the defect to 
be discovered.* 

Individual victims should 
not have » cany the btiroen 
of uncompensated sumaing. 
she said. 


1 By fen Smith 

mine whether 150 survivors huge piles of rubbish had 
and relatives of the dead can fallen through the floorboards 
daim damages which . legal and accumulated in concrete 


experts estimate may reach 
£20 million, the highest 
amount yet recorded in a civil 
court in Britain. 

The test case has been 


voids beneath the seats. The 
rubbish was so neglected that 
alter the fire investigators 
found a newspaper dated 1968 
and pre-d ecimali sation rec- 


gSli; 


brought by Mrs Susan.. Piet- e, P^ S- ’i 

SM&?? -one Wore tad ever,- 


son Martin, aged 12, to prove 
liability for the blaze against 
Bradford. City Associated 
Football Club, the Health and 
Safety Executive and the now 
defunct West Yorkshire Cou- 
nty Councfl. ■ 

Mrs Fletcher, aged 34, lost 
her husband John, also 34, son 
Andrew, aged 11, brother-in- 
law Peter -and his father 
Edmond, aged 64. Martin 
managed to scramble over a 
wall to safety. 


thing necessary for a really 
serious fee”; he said. 

West Yorkshire County 
Council was the area fire 
authority and dining the case 
evidence would be produced 
to show it had written to the 
dub saying the stand was a fire 
hazard and warning of the 
consequences if the dub took 
no action, Mr Ogden said. 

The Health and Safety Exec- 






V*-. V ' .■ 

- . ^ - 
’ ■ VijA***V 

• .‘*55 py ■ 


In a parallel second case, the 
same defendants are contest- had 


ing a similar action brought by 
Police Sergeant David Britton, 
aged 42 His case is being 
supported by the Police 
Federation and if successful 
will be followed by another 44 
police claims for damages. 
Another 109 civilians will 
press their claims. , if Mrs 
Fletchers case succeeds. 

The Bradford Gty grand- 
stand was built in 1909 and 
over the years, Mr Ogden said, 


improve conditions by taking 
out injunctions from a local 
magistrates court. 

Then, if the dub foiled to 
respond, they should have 
instigated -formal procedures 
to force the issue. “But it has 
to be said they did virtually 
nothing other than write 
tetters,” Mr Ogden said. 
Worse still, neither authority 
knew the other was in contact 
with the soccer club. 








Judge tells killer: 




A woman who admitted 
killing her brutal husband was 
allowed to go free yesterday by 
a judge at the Central Crim- 
inal Court. 

Mrs Valerie Flood, aged 38, 
wept as Judge John Kazan put 
her on probation for two years 
when he heard how she 
stabbed her husband, Mau- 
rice, after suffering years of 
violent attacks by him. 

The judge told hen “You 
had a very unhappy Christmas 
T=ve last year. Your husband 
attacked you and might have 
killed you, and you ended up 
lolling him. 

“I can only express my hope 
■ that you wul have a much 
happier Christmas this year.” 

The court heard that Mau- 
j rice Flood, aged 42 was a 
“Jekyfl and Hyde" character. 
During heavy drinking bouts 
j he became a ‘‘violent 
monster” — although when 


sober he was a devoted bus- j 
band and father. j 

Mrs Flood was frequently : 
beaten, hit with hammers, cut , 
on the legs with a machete and 
burned with cigarette ends. 

Her nose bad been broken 
on so many occasions that she 
had given up going for medi- 
cal treatment. 

She received hospital treat- 
ment once after he cut her 
head during a hammer attack. 

Mr Flood appeared before 
magistrates on three occasions 
for assaulting ter. 

Yet she continued to love ■ 
him — and stood by him even 
when he drunkenly threatened 
to kill her, Judge Hazan said. 

Last Christmas Eve he tried 
to throttle her and then came 
at ber with a carving knife. She 
managed to get it away from 
him, and stabbed him six 
times. 






TV Crimewatch man 
denies hotel murder 


.A man. whose, photograph 
appeared on the BBC tele- 
vision Crintewcach series yes- 
terday denied murdering a 
hotelowner. 


32 of no fixed address, saw Iris 
picture on the TV programme 
and went to 3 London police 
station, ft was said at Man- 
chester Crown Court. 

He was later arrested for the 
murder rof the, hotel, owner. 
Mrs Bronwen Nixon, at 


Mr John Kay. QC, for the 
prosecution, said 
Mrs Nixon, aged 67. was 
found dead in her bathroom. 

When detectives searched 
her home a number of “quite 
distinctive” red cashmere fi- 
bres were . found, which 
matched fibres also found n 
the driving seat of Mrs 
Nixon’s car, which was taken 
by her attacker and later 
discovered in a car park in 
Preston, Lancashire: * 

-*n»e hearing continues to- 
d»y. 


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tells 

he 


has damaged 

the church 


By AageDa Johnson 


The Archbiship- of Canter* 
bury has pubHdy criticized the 
Bishop of London for refer- 
ring to the Church as a dub 
which he had offended try 
going against the majority. 

Dr Robert Runcie yesterday 
told the General Synod of the 
Church of England that Dr 
Graham Leonard's visit to 
Tulsa, Oklahoma, - was an 
“offence against coffegLaUty’ 1 ’ 
and had done tremendous 
damage within the church. 

He said: “I believe that it is 
the responsibility of the bish- 
ops as guardians of doctrine 
and as symbols of unity to 
take further counsel. 

“There is an inherent 
authority in bishops ■ acting 
collectively both within and 
between provinces.’* 

The Archbishop was resp- 
onding to an unprecedented 
motion, moved by Preb- 
endary Dennis Ede from the 
diocese of Lichfield, which 
called for an adjournment of 
the morning session so that 
the issue could be debated. 

Mr Ede wanted a general 
debate over Dr Leonard's visit 
and the celebrations of Holy 


Doctor on 
death 
charge 

A family doctor accused of 
attempting to murder a par 
tient administered a massive 
overdose to a terminally ill 
cancer sufferer, it was alleged 
at Leeds Grown Court yester- 
day. 

Dr John Carr, aged 59, who 
denies the charge, went to the 
home of Mr Ronald Mawson, 
aged 63, a retired engineer, 
with a syringe already pre- 
pared with phenobarbitone, 
Mr Geoffrey Rivelin, QC, for 
the prosecution, said. 

The doctor administered a 
massive overdose which 
“could not have been possibly 
justified,” Mr Rjvelin said. 

“If adminis tered delib- 
erately it could only have been 
given with the intention of 
hastening Mr Mawson’s 
death.” 

He said that Dr Carr told 
Mr Mawson he was going to 
give him something to maVe 
him sleep. .Mr Mawson’s wde 
told the doctor he had already 
taken drugs, but be injected 
the contents of the syringe into 
Mr Mawson. 

It obviously caused him 
some pain and Mr Mawson 
said; “Good God, you have 
given me a double dose”. 

Dr Carr said he would come 
back in the morning, tort Mr 
Mawson became unconscious 
almost immediately. 

After looking at Mr Maw- 
son the next morning, Dr Carr 
said. “He won’t wake up” and 
“He won’t want any break- 
fast” He added, “I will give 
him another injection now”, 
but Mrs Mawson refused. 

Mr Rivelin added thatDr 
Carr said, “Let me gi ve him 
this and let him die with 
dignity”. 

The court heard Dr Carr, 
from Branch Road, Lower 
Wortley, near • Leeds, was 
causing concern to the family 
as early as February last year, 
when he allegedly told Mr 
Mawson’s wife to leave tablets 
at the side of the bed and let 
her husband take all of them if 
he wanted to. 

Mr Mawson was diagnosed 
as having inoperable lung 
fanrw in January 1985 and 
spent some time in Wheatfidd 
Hospice, Leeds, until going 
home in August last year. 

The day after Mr Mawson 
returned home. Dr Carr went 
uninvited to the house with 
the prepared syringe- Mr 
Mawson was readmitted to 
the hospice and died on 
August 4. The case continues. 


Knowsley North by-election 


Labour vote ‘softens 
with poll hours away 

By Richard Evans, Political Comspofideot 


It is ax wedcs now since the 
roof on the Kirklty Mock of 

flats where Tony McGutnuess 
lives was engulfed in flames 
after an all-too-typical arson 
attack. 

Mr McGmnness, aged 32, 
unemployed, his wife Julie, 
and their two children remain 
in zbeir “home”, sodden damp 
from the firemen’s water, as 
the Labour-controlled 
Knowsley council has refused 
to rehouse them. 

But in the Knowsley North 
constituency the conditions 
inflicted on Mr McGmnness 
are hardly exceptional 

Ami with voters going to tne 

polls tomorrow there are 
mowing signs this could cost 
Mr George Howarth dear- As 
a past chairman of. the 

counciTs housing cmnmittee, 
the labour candidate has bad 
a lot of explaining *> do. . 


campaign he has atiemptedto ■ 

head off the constant entxasm 


fired at him by Miss Rose- 
mary Cooper, the Liberal 
candidate; by proposing a 
four-point housing charter for 
Knowsley. - 

Too little, too late, booms 
Miss Cooper. ■ 

And on the doorstep there is 
a gimiTar attitude. .The Labour 
vote in this supposed strong- 
hold is undoubtedly becoming 
increasingly “soft” . 

Mr Howarth gives the im- 
pression he would be hard 
pushed to punch his way out 
of a paper bag. 

After his expected victory 
one of Mr Howarfo’s main 
priorities will be bow to cope 
with his Militant-dominated 
local party whose leaders do 
not want him as their MP. If 
be is not careful, the voters of 
Knowsley North may begin, to 
feel the same way about the 
Labour Party. . 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 



HOME NEWS 



Communion in Church House 
by a woman priest ordained 
overeeas. 

Both issues have 
controversy in the Punch of 
England, especially as they 
revolve around the general 
call for the ordination of 
women as priests. 

Mr Ede said; “A Christian 
body like the General Synod 
should show to the work! that 
it has its own unique way of 
handling this sort of issue”. 

Dr Runcie intervened mid 
made it dear that he did not 
support the cal) for a dis- 
cussion on “issues too serious 
to be settled by a Adyt* now”. 

But he expressed his strong 
disapproval of Dr Leonard's 
action which be says 'has 
“da m aged ” questions of aut- 
onomy, revelation and 
authority which the Anglican 
Communion is attempting to 
settle. 

Dr Runcie added: “What- 
ever their pastoral motives 
and however sincere they may 
have been, the actions taken 
have done damage to the trust 
in which that debate is going 
forward”. 


Car firms 
criticized 
on adverts 

By Jonathan MSler 
Media Correspondent 

The Advertising Standards 
Authority yesterday repeated] 
a warning to the car industry 
to stop advertisements which 
emphasize speed ns a selling 
point 

After a crackdown by the 
authority two years ago there 
was a brief reduction in the 
number of advertisements 
breaking the authority’s ad- 
vertising code on the ad- 
vocacy of illegal and 
dangerous behaviour. 

But there arc new signs that 
manufac turers are ignoring 
the rules, a spokesman said 
This year tile authority las 
taken action in six complaints 
against five manufacturers. 

AD have been told to make 
certain that future advertise- 
ments do not suggest that it is 
permissible or acceptable for 
drivers to go faster than the 
I speed limit 

Yesterday, the authority up- 
I held the second of two recent 
j complaints against the Rover 
Group; ruling improper a 
1 national press advertisement 
I for the Rover 800 promising 
'“full-blooded power that wfll 
take you to over J3Gmph 
before you know it”. 

Last month the authority 
upheld a complaint against 
Rover over an advertisement 
for the MG Montego Tnibo 
which described its perfor- 
mance as . “awesome” and. 

“exhilarating”. 

At . the same time, foe 
authority gave a warning to 
Citroen, whose advertisement 
j for the BXI9GT1 included an 

1 illustration of the vehicle leav- 

I ing the names of competitor 
models in its wake; "• 

The advertisement prom- 
1 ised acceleration from 0- 
60mph in 841 seconds and a 
top speed of 123mpb. 


Driver and his 
lorry hijacked 

A driver was found wandering 
near Brighouse, West York- 
shire, yesterday after a gang 
hijacked his lorry and look 
him on a 10-hour ride before 
escaping with his vehicle and 
£100,000 worth of wines and 
spirits. 

His lorry had been flagged 
down by two men he mistook 
for police at Bramham, near 
Leeds. 



Increase in border 
security after 
new terror threats 


By Richard Ford 


ft 




The Bishop of London, with a sombre face, listening to the criticisms at the Synod of his comments about the Church and his 
visit to Tulsa which he later described as a “response to a pastoral call”. (Photograph: Stuart Nicol) 


The Bishop of London 
again defended his visit to 
Tulsa which he described as a 
response to a pastoral calL 
He told the Synod: “The 
issues raised from this should 
be debated in a pastoral way 
and not by a body tike this”. 
Responding to the criticism 


from Mr Erie's motion, Dea- 
coness Diana McClatchey, a 
leading figure in the move- 
ment for the ordination of 
women, said she addressed 
herself to the anxiety and 
distress caused to some mem- 
bers of the Synod by the 
actions of her raembera. 


She said: “If lawyers de- 
cided that the action was 
contrary to Canon Law then 
our judgement could be said 
to have been in error”. 

Mr Ede's motion was with- 
drawn but he later said that he 
had done what he set out to 
do, which was to get foe 


protagonists of both events to 
address the Synod. 

• Four thousand members of 
the movement for the ordina- 
tion of women held a silent 
viol outside Church House 
before the Synod began. Some 1 
were holding placards with the 
words “Waiting” I 


Security along the Irish 
border and in DubliQ is to be 
increased after the planting of 
four explosive devices in the 
city by the Ulster Freedom 
Fighters, a group of Loyalist 
terrorists. 

The new measures - were 
I discussed at a meeting of Dr 
Garret FitzGerald's cabinet 
yesterday and will include 
additional check points along 
foe 300-mile border with the 
North. 

Vehicle check points are to 
be placed on main routes into 
Dublin as pan of tighter 
security aimed at thwarting 
the threat from the Freedom 
Fighters to plant car bombs, 
without warning, m the repub- 
lic, unless foe coalition ceases 
to implement the Anglo-Irish 
agreement from this weekend. 

Mr Lawrence Wren, com- 
missioner of foe Garda, re- 
viewed security in the 
aftermath of the discovery of 
the devices in O’Connell 
Street last weekend. 

Yesterday be held a meeting 
with senior officers from bor- 
der divisions as part of a wide- 
ranging review of security 
precautions needed during foe 
next few weeks, as Loyalist 
protests mount -to mark foe 
signing of. the Anglo-Irish 
agreement a year ago. 

Loyalist terrorists believe 
that a campaign in the South 
will bring widespread fear to 


the population who will- in 
turn, pressure the Govern- 
ment to withdraw from the 
agreement 

Dr FitzGerald, whose home 
in South Dublin has been 
provided with extra security 
in recent weeks, said the threat 
from the Freedom Fighters 
would not intimidate his 
Government. 

In the North, Loyalist para- 
military sources are dismis- 
sive of foe formation ofa new 
movement, Ulster Resistance, 
inaugurated in an atmosphere 

echoing 1912 when the Ulster 
Defence Force was formed by 
Sir Edward Carson to resist 
home rule. 

The movement is to launch 
a recruiting campaign and wfll 
hold rallies aimed at mobiliz- 
ing men to “use all means” to 
defeat the Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment. 

Mr lan Paisley, Democratic 
Unionist Party leader, at- 
tended the dedication service. 

• The Lord Mayor of Belfast, 
Alderman Sammy Wilson, 
was yesterday ordered to pay 
£160 in rates which be had 
withheld as a protest against 
the Anglo-Irish agreement 

• The police constable shot 
dead by terrorists on Monday 
was named as Mr Derek 
Patterson, aged 39, a father of 
three who had served in the 
force for 13 years. 


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National Savings Certificates that you own. 

The best guaranteed and tax-free 
return on your investment must be a 
major issue for you. And that’s just what 
this new Certificate is... a major Issue. 


sb NEW 32nd ISSUE 

”1 NATIONAL SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 




























m£c 


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525i £14,895 


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525e Lux £15,225 


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528i £16,995 



528i St £18,740 






535i S£ £21,880 






As you can see, there is more to. the BMW 5 Series 
than you might have thought 

Including a price of £33,995 for the new MS.. one 
of the only 150 mph cars that can carry five people and 

their luggage- 

. More importantly, for those with less speedy ambi- 
tions. the fact that such a car can be created as pari [ ofd 
range that starts at £10,495 says a great deal about the 
engineering standards within the 5 Series concept 

ONE BODY; SEVEN HEARTS. 

You wouldn't expect a company.Iike BMW to com- 
promise on the 518i, just because its the least expensive 

model. * • 


For example, it shares its cylinder 
one that powered BMW's Formula 1 engine to the- World 

Championship in 1983. 

A fact that not only hints at surprising levels of 
performance, but also suggests a remarkable d^jee of 
durability: those racing engines have to take 10 , 000 rpm 
in their stride. 

An unnecessary precaution? It depends on your 
standards. 

Certainly, if we were prepared to accept! he stan- 
dards of others we would not have created “the worlds 
smoothest 6 cylinder 2 litre engine" (Motor!. 

This is waiting tor you in the 520i. in place of the 4, 5 

or even unrefined 6 cylinder alternatives of others. 

Nor if we were less committed to excellence would 


MUSCLE imttlfiAIWfBS. j- 

The. BMW M535i is as .surprising as 
efficient stable mate.' : .. ' :' s - - ■; 

For though its 218 bhp can whisk you to i43.mph.if. , “ 
has none of the vices that normally fiaw.“supefcars. ... 

: lt doesn'i fret in tratfrc or rash from petrpl stefoVi to . . 4 " ■ 

-petrol stetionjlt acfua!& us^s^o.ptore j 

litre BMW of l978.) ^ , V* 

■ -v (t’s-a c^ioktoh^yi^fe :‘Mpl gts 

verdict. "Overall :. there isr nothing- to ^ptiite touch 

M535i” , ■ ;-V -.- j. 

Except we have to say, .two other cars. - •■ ■ ■; ■ r , 

First, the 3.5 litre 5355 ’Special EquiproepMt ^ ^ 
everything lavish*! on it from cruise confrofto ABSjarw- * ■ 
lock brakes to BMW's automatic gearbox which le& y»a ; t 
switch from economy to sports-mode. , ; . -y . 

And secondly, toe -Motorspoft- developed .2*1. valyd;.. 
version: the M5. ‘ 

“It's fast, exhBaraSng and resporteive:.a super[atiye i .. 
engine matched to a superi^ chassis’! tfastlane ), , • ^ : 

Although Journalists have almost ran out Of ’superfa.- 
lives' in describing this car,' we are loath to.quote more., - . . 
here.- . • • ' “• ’ : V\ * ' . " '• ' 

After l alk’.wito;Qn|y JOS cara^jlaBte a.year r .it would..:. •: : 

unkind to make you top interested. . 1 . -?‘< m 

MOTHS tHJffJU 

\ The only c^ci^m'ever'fnade of some 5 SerfeS,^ 


answered by the new Lux veraiqns. , ■; / 
f hey offer you a level of -extras in the price-thaL until 
nbw, were only options. : .v 

■s These, include BBS ‘cross spoke alloy wheels:.; a,?.! 
sliding sun roof,' rear head .restraints, a leather- sports ■ _ 
steering wheel, and many .other., refinements,.,. _ •; ; } my> 
But as you can see, the Lux versions start at aTly _-\ 
£11,545, and even. feature toe .same upholstery.as toe -, 
BMW 7 Series. V ? • : -.•« -• 3' 


M535i £22^95 




uivivi # *■ : - - - 

Which we hope is enough of a carfdt to remove the,/^ 
-last stumbling block between you. and too car you’tixeally 
like to drive. ■ •-> • '• •; ■ ; r »-’• 

Having gpt .this. far,, why . apt -fajre toe Step'-' ^ \ 

Get behindtoe wheel oFtfieBMW 5 Series of ypiir^'- 
choica And youil Start to re-vat ue toe pound. . ; 




• • : -V.” 


' ' : - 

we have developed both a m 

2.5 litre and 28 litre engine for our range. 

The 525i has a serene calmness that makes motor-, 
way miles melt away. 

And the 523 responds to the touch of the throttle 
with “beautifully measured precision" (Motor). 

Only a test drive can tell you which of town would suit 
you better. (It's rather like choosing between toe pleasures 
of a Chateau Latour or a Chateau Maigaux.) 

. Till HHCIHICTIWH®* 

The 525e has perhaps toe most unusual story of all 
the engines in the 5 Series range. 

Font representsa radical^ difeentapproach to toel 

efficiency. Instead of merely shaping toe outeide of the car. 

BMW's engineers look beneath the bonnet 

By an ingenious combination of electronics and 

enginJringtoeycreatedapowerunitthatisonly running 

at 2,000 rpm when the car is cruising at 70mph. 

But allows you to run at.37.mpg despite only taking 
12.7 seconds to reach 70mph in toe first place. - 


Pleases»»dme«^ailsof:- ' I - * 

BMW 518i O BftflW 5l8r Lux^BMW 520> Cr |; : 

BIIW520I UnDBWWSZfeQBMW $2Selx^D^ I 

BMW 525i □ BMW 528f Q'BMW ?52fflSE:Q 

«MW- S8HSE.G tanflwm®- B«il6.:ii^'Q Lm-:): , 


l i ■■ 1 ■ ■ 

(Mr. HiS.'MS5.eto ) . Jwliat ^usresT^ 


M*e» 


fTowntSW, .. 


... . (Counhii 


.(PsstsiCotte) . 


•• -Tefeplww Number 


- . ,V» v r»-.. a t 

J fr. mi ■ 

;"vr -»'} 

\ i i i i ^ t 

; -*'4 : :.!•••> a-,- 1 . 

V •- f^~ r -y '• -- 7 ' - • a .' - 2 
5 . Si* 


‘ ' tVesentCjf 

under 18 ’ , - 


| would liiteto arrangea trat drive | 1 

• 'iTkatMtl 


I. -I. ~-. 

■ ftard.ieg . ' iv v 7;.l 

, '"•u-ltUi v: 


Send to Bf^ jntotrnatp^^ i 

•Hounslow. Middx. Dr telephone 1 01-897 u665.. 








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THE 


WED! 


>AY NOVEMBER 12 1986i^ 




WHU 


Sip’s 

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Ws*#f ^n&^Ur f omariis 
dimfe -.l^ndafi* the Nonh 
Webh and 

™^§day> fr_pb ax;A]efr 

p^#tto^4ifbrx&8^whc«n 
iHey ji^ee . 'to' br-aWest and 
-.ri^ceseiitativ^.. -rather 
pe^ w^-vcrte *3m$ty ^oqg 


that make 
the ideal 
holiday 

: Holidays can be die most 
strcsrfifl periods of our fives, 
aaxrrrfmgtoMr Alan Hadaat, 
senior therapist at fee Analy- 
sis sad Therapy Clinic m 
' GuikifortS, Surrey. . 

.He believes tharthe “ideaT* 
holiday creates an opportunity 
for- stress to be experienced 
• .over ..4 short period as an 
dten^fivi: fo' mundane, noft- 
strcssful life. ■■' 

. Mr HaCfcetz sakfc'“Jns£ ask 
anybody what soil. of holiday 
, th^badandthey wifi teHyou 
all about bad food, terrible 
- journeys, rotten weather anda 


evSi^hofaC- 


taiA c 9«th^cooscie»- 
Ups ’tows maty- wen go for 
some^cawfidatesod. one fist 


tfae>9(£n 

GejmnL- 

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Of 39sCakon 
j^.jsfcw/Bair 
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Bardeptioas 


ontheTjasii-of its' m a n ifes t o 
ffc^Kforat The entire Bar 
Cooncfl is, ^wwvbeang ne- 
dec^asa'nbw^n^te-gov&a 


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- “But they were all preffict- 
l able, mace they happened the 
year' before. The comfort 
comes in - knowing, sub- 
oonsdously, that the holiday 
.stress win end when we retnra 
frame.” ■..'■■ 

I Holiday stress was in many 
ways a raise and anticipated 
stress, source- for most holiday- 
makers. ■• 

“Itbegms with the drive to 
Iheairpoi* arid doubts abora 
whether you cancelled the 
newspaper,” Mr Hadcett said. 
' -‘“Then we- wonder . if we 
tinned the electric fire off and 
whether or not. the drawn 
csrtaim will attract a borpr. 
,. “At the airport we find the 
plane has Iran delayed and 
the kids are tired. The delayed 
ffight is bumpy, the food 
terrible and the people behind 
keep digging you in the back. 

“Finally the hotel is every- 
thing yoo feared it might be 
for the- price and the pound 
has (hopped in value over- 
\ D^tt . ' ■ 

“You arrive home to a pile 
of bflfe and final demands, a 
bunt water pipe and a lawn 
; thatneed&a tractor to cut the 



Brave smiles 


E MlittQ HDrent uvmi naaaunnNiaj \ku/| vaujuiw. ^<u ih uni a MU mukum ymy fc/, niui Esther RsurtzcQ who marked 

courage by presenting them with spedal awards at the Dr Banrarao’s Champion Children Awards ceremony. 

Triumph of the champion children 


Martin Reedy, aged nine, 
friraa Cleator Moor, Cambria, 
saved the fives of his younger 
sister and a friend by poling 
them from his father's van 
when it was engulfed in 
Daws. 

i didn't realise at die time 
that I was doing anything 
brave,” said Martin, who was 
b nr nt on his face. Bat his 
father, also called Martin, 


“Sr he hadn’t done what he 
did I wontd have lost ay 


Mr Hacked added: “But we 
4ove eyety stressful minute of 

ir. 


[nth was one of three 
igatas who were rewarded 
their b rave ry yesterday 


when Esther Bautzen pre- 
sented the Dr Barnardo's 
Champion ChDdren Awards. 

Catherine Carter, aged 14, 
from Birtley, Tyne and Wear, 
was nominated for the bravery 
award after helping to save a 
woman, aged 74, from her 
blazing borne. Catherine cl- 
imbed through a window and 
dragged her into the kitchen 
before rushing oat, gasping for 
air, to get help. 

The third brave youngster 
was Paul Hughes, aged 12, 
from Scartira, Grimsby, afro 
helped his family to cope with 
a number of bereavements. 
There were 24 feMitgos in 


eight different categories for 
the award ceremony at the 
Savoy Hotel, London. 

Russell Marston, aged 13, 
lost a teg four years ago 
because of bone cancer. Today 
he is planning to swim the 
English CbauneL 

Rnssefl and three other 
children receiving “Triumph 
over Adversity” scrolls in fee 
awards. 

Russell, from Stanley Green 
Road, Poole, Dorset, raid that 
despite his (Usability he still 
plays football cricket and 
rugby, and swims regularly. 
He has even learnt to senna 
dive and takes part in junior 


stock car racing. 

“My disability did make a 
diference at first but then I 
derided not to take any notice 
of what the doctors said and I 
just got on with it,” Russell 
said. Donna McGrath, aged 
Id, from Hornbeam Walk, 
Wolverhampton, was also pre- 
sented with a scroll, specially 
signed by fee Princess of 
Wales. 

Donna is almost perma- 
nently bedridden and nearly 
blind. “My teachers say that I 
have inspired other people to 
pot their own pr alems into 
perspective,” she said from 
her wheelchair. 


HOME NEWS 7 - 

Tribunal 
‘calls for 
dismissal 
of teacher’ 

A Church of En gl an d tri- 
bunal has called for the dis- 
missal of a primary school 
headteacher, a member of the 
school's board of governors 
claimed yesterday. • 

The governor, who askea 
not to be named., said Mr 
Brian Dugan's position was 
under threat because be foiled 
to comply with requests from 
the Inner London Education 
Authority to change his teach- 
ing methods. „ , 

The governors of St Jude s 
Church of England primary 
school in Southwark., south 
London, wfll meet tonight to 
discuss the confidential 
Church of England diocesan 
tribunal report, although it is 
unlikely that a decision will be 
taken on Mr Dugan’s future. 

Mr Dugan was suspended 
from the school last July and 
then reinstated pending the 
outcome of the tribunal 
inquiry. 

“The report recommends 
his dismissal" the governor 
said. “And the governors may 
. . take the advice or leave iL The 
to Biinud education authority will have 
eremooy. ^ upper han d unless the 
governors can stop them.” 
Iff He said, however, that Mr 

Dugan has never had the full 
support of the board of gov- 
ra mu « emors, whose chairman, Mr 
t Peter Hudson, was appointed 
SvmXce ^ authority. There is 
«*hIt another representative from 
the authority on the board and 
rartf aw!i one from the borough counciL 
tin Walk, “And a teacher who is on 
salsopre- fee board of governors is 
L specially believed to have given ev- 
rincess of idence against Mr Dugan, 
sa id the governor, who gave 
st perma- evidence in rapport of the 
uod nearly head. 

i ray that I “The board of governors is 
1 people to not an independent or impar- 
Meras into tial body,” he admitted. “The 
m»M from decision about Mr Dugan’s 
future oould go either way.” 






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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


Whfle their publicity may prod aim a keenness to 
help smaller businesses, what’s it actually like when you 

get into their manager's office? 

Don’t you get the feeling that perhaps heS looking 

down his nose at your modest needs? 

Or that he'd prefer to look at your balance sheet than 
get to know your business? 

And doesn’t he also appear to think of your loan as 
merely a risk, rather than a joint venture? 

, If that’s how your bank makes you feel, it’s time you 
talked to your local Bardays Bank 

We’lllendyouour advice as well 


Business name: 


Postcode: 


as our money. 

Our managers take what to some may seem a rev- 
olutionary attitude. 

They treat you as an equal. 

Knowing how busy, the life of any businessman can 
be, for example, they’ll often come out and visit you. 
Rather than demand your appearance in their office. 

This gives them a chance to get to know your business 
first hand. 

So they’ll be able to offer advice and help that’s based 
on a real understanding of your business. 

Rather than on little more than a quick glance at your 
figures. 

Of course, all you may need is a new van or a first 
computer 

In which case, well prove equally helpful. 

Our loans are as hdpful as 
our managers. 

Whether we lend you a few thousand or several 
millions, there’s one thing you can be certain of. 

The amount of service you’ll receive never 
depends on the amount you borrow 

We understand, for example, that smaller 
businesses (or new ones) often have special 
needs, so well probably recommend our 
Standard Businessloan. . 

This lets you borrow anything from 
£ 2,000 to £15,000 simply and quickly. 
It has a fixed interest rate, to help 
plan your finances over the next 
one to five years. And it usually 
takes little more than a quick chat to 
arrange. 

If you need anything from £15,000 
to a few millions, however, well suggest 
our Flexible Businessloan. 

This lets you spread the cost of buying major assets 
over one to twenty years. 

It also lets you defer capital repayments for the first 
two years. * 

And, after the firs t three years at a fixed rate, it gives 
you a choice between variable or fixed rates for each 
following three year period. 

Whatever you need, though, well try to be flexible. 
We’ll certainly never look down our nose at you. 

Because we need your business just as much as you 
our money. 


I For further information please tick the appropriate box below. 

Standard Businessloan Flexible Businessloan Please arrange for a 
(£ 2,000 to *15,000)0 (over *15,000)0 manager to contact me.l~1 

Surname Mr/MrsyMisS*: 




Fore name (s): 


Position: 


Business address: 


TeL no: 


Current bank: 


Branch: 


If you do not already bank with Bardays, please indicate yourmostcon ven ient 
Bardays branch: , . - 


Please send the coupon to: The Manager, Business Services Centre, Bardays 
Bank PLCJfuxon House, 94 StPauft Churchyard, London EC4M 8EH. 


BARCLAYS 


We’ll look at your business. 
Not just your balance sheet 






„■ riln v**-, ^ 


4 * _ 1 



Manila orders 


Sr 


Heg 


attack on rebels 

Mtujita(Beiitav AFft-General Fidel Ramos, chief of toe 


r“ : — T vukigu uuups p lamicu 

Mg offiaayes agamst communist gpenfflas m two regions af- 
ter ceasefire talks broke down (he preview day. "Track 
downJ appr^J and neutralize toe communist ... New 
Peopm Army terrorists without lehr*" General Ramos 
said a an onto issued to field co mmander s in the ««h*i 
Kcol/region and Balaam province, north of Mazdta. 

TmKMDlnMainla MntinnJ<__ tt-L ... . ... 


irawuBiuwiiuiMatiiaaMto IwnBawmiffiB 

feat dissidMt mffitaiy officers loyal to the Defew^MhS^r" 
Mr 4r i Ponce EnrBe, were plotting a coop. Mr Enrfle can- 
celled two app wutn ie nts beause^ a sptami w 
wanted to stop talking. 

Press reports said the New People’s Army “general stair* 

tod vowed to help protect President Aqeino’s Government 
from any coup. NPA spokesmen said they waited to 
“preserve the galas' 1 * of the February revolt that *a fad 20 
years of rule by Pleddot Marcos and were ready to help 
security forces loyal to Mrs Aqp&Hh 


Policemen injured 
in Natal explosion 


JotoBHestagj - Two boohs exploded yesterday in the 
Natal coal-ntining town of Newcastle, injuring at least tome 
people, according to first reports released by the 
Government's Bureau for Information. The local hospital 
reported 19 people injured, seven at them seriously 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

The highest casualties were caused by the second 
explosion, outside the local magistrates’ court, injuring five 
people seriously, all of them black and two of them 
psi«Mea, according to the bureau. Several other people, 
indmUng a magistrate, were reported slightly injmed. 

An earlier explosion in * stationery and took store hi a 
shopping cadre wounded two women, one white and one 
Mack, according to the bareaa’s account 



Powers 


promise 


Bone — Signor Giovanni 
Spad o K n i (left), the Italian 
Minister of Defence, told 
Palermo judges hearing the 
mass trial of alleged Mafia 
criminals that wider pow- 
ers promised to General 
Carlo Alberto DaibChiesa 
to oppose the Mafia were 
on rite way when he . was 
m urdere d in September 
1982 (Peter Nichols 
wrfres). 

The court came to Borne 
from Sicily to hear tes- 
timony from three min- 
isters abort the killing by 
the Mafia of the genual, 
who was sent as prefect and 
sarrived 100 days. 


Minister forced out 


Istamabad — Mr Mohydffih Batach, who was stripped off 
his portfolio as Commerce Minister by Mr Mohammad 
Khan Junejo, Pakistan's Prime Minister, late last month, 
has had to be sacked officially after reportedly retosmg to 
qmt the Cabinet voluntarily (Hasan Akhter writes). 

Mr Babch, a National Assembly member from BaJfo-_ 
dustan, bad held his Cabinet post for nine years, but was re- 
jBOved in the wake of a government inquiry into . 
mknwmgemait of cotton exports by the state-run Export 
Pro m otim Bateau. The bureau chairman was also removed 
inJ tw> other senior officials suspended. Mr Bal u chis 
removal however, leaves Mr Juneje without a faH-ranking 
miiustei from Batadiistsa in Us Cabinet at a time when toe 
commyis being swept by a wave «t regiona li s m . ; . 


Hess man Eta blast 


to leave victim 


Botin (AP) - The 
prism chaplain to Hitler’s 
former deputy Rudolf Hess 
is leaving West Berlin after 
repats that fee bad been 
dismissed for planning to 
smuggle Hess'S memoirs 
and testament oat of jafl. 

Chaplain Charles Gabel, 
aged 54, a French Profe 
pg fy nt, add he planned to. 
leave Bertin later this 
week, ted declined to say 
why. He has been visiting 
Hess at Spandan Prison far 
tfee part nine years. 


* San Sebastian . (Renter) 
— A woman aged 27 has 
died from injuries sus- 
tained 18 days ago .in a 
Basque separatist bomb 
attack that killed a Span- 
ish general, his wife and 
sob, hospital sources said. 

• She was lot by shrapnel 
'from a bomb planted by 
.ETA guerrillas on the car 
of General Rafael GanSdo 
GO, Military Governor of 
the Basqne province of 
Gnipnzcoa, and became the 
fortieth- person killed in 
Spain this year by ETA. 


No state 
funeral for 


Libyans 
cut off 


Molotov by rebels 

.mu • x. .1. ivr.ti.x. • 


From Christopher Walker 

Moscow 

Vyacleslav Molotov, the 
former Soviet Prime Minister 
and Foreign Minister who was 
one of Stalin's closest aides for 
three decades, will today be 
buried in Moscow’s histone 
Novodsvicbi Cemetery — the 
cemetery where Nikita Knis- 
chev, the man who expelled 
him from the Communist 
Paityin 1961, is laid to rest. 

Aitiough the unrepentant 
Molotov was rehabilitated 
and readmitted to the jMJty 
two tears ago at the age of 94, 
Soviet Foreign Ministry of- 
ficials yesterday said he would 
not be given a state funeral, it 
is nat our practice to give slate 
runerab to people so long 
retired from any official 

position," one said. 

iA family friend, however, 
ihas claimed that a number ol 

/prominent Sovjet person^- 
/ hies will attend the funeral 
• and later a reception at the 

! family home. Still, soniatten- 

; tion was paid to Molotovs 
I death in yesterdays official 
! media and one Fot^ Mm- 
islry offidai referred to him as 
“a pensioner". . 

Molotov’s death 
voiced an intriguing literary 
and historical controversy 

here about whether or not — as 

some Soviet sources claim - 
he spent, his last 30 y&rs 
writing hfe memoirs. a»d j[ b 
did. whether the^r stand a 
chance of being published • 
Obituary , page 20 


BAVIB ROBERTS RJL 

’SSHTJSS 1 


The Connoisseur wm 
14-15 Heltot Aisatfe 
LONDON SW1X8JT 


jBjtpattBE m-MS 5431 


py Nicholas Beeston 

Chadian rebels, until re- 
cently allied to Tripoli, yes- 
terday claimed to have sur- 
rounded a Libyan Army garri- 
son town in northern Chad. 

Senior sources in the 
Transitional Government of 
National Unity claimed in 
Paris that their rebel fighters 
had cut off Libyan troops 
stationed at the oasis town of 
Fada, who had launched air 
strikes and. artillery bombard- 
ments against three C had i an 
towns. . 

One source said: “The Liby- 
ans are using jets and tanks to 
attack Gouro, Ounianga and 
Goixrma. The death toll 
among civilians and fighters is 
in the hundreds and may be 
approaching 1,000." ^ 

The remarks confirmed a 
statement made by President 
Habre of Chad, who accused 
t housands of Libyan troops of 
“practising genocide” on the 
people of the north. 

Western diplomats said 
president Habre may have 
been trying to discredit Libya 
in the run-up to the Frapcp- 
African summit- in Lom€ on 
Friday. - ~ 

He has been encouraging 
Paris to support .him in an 
offensive across the 16th par- 
allel. into oonhera Chad to 
take advantage of the split in. 
the rebel camp, but France has 
so far resisted. 7.' ■ 

The current round offignt- . 
ino among the rebels was 
sparked off three weeks ago 
when; a spat emerged, within- 
Transitional Government, 
which represents a coalition of 
j 1 .opposition factions. It has 
accused Libya of arresting ite 
leader. Mr Goukouni. 
Oiieddei. in Tripoli af\er a 
shoftt-out last month and of 
attempting to “annex regions.-: 
of northern Chad". 


TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 19? — =- 




os. 


vS&\ 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


French close ranks behind us admits trust 


t 


From Dtana Gedde$ 
Paris 


S; pragmatism 


in Tehran was 


‘miscalculation’ 


The verbatim account of M 
Jacques Chirac's interview 
with The Washington Tones 
has brought praise here for the 
Ftancfa Prime Minister’s pas- 
sionate and incisive analysis 
of the compter pro bl e m s in. 
the Middle East, rather than 
criticism of his having told 
.much less titan the truth in 
denying the original reports of 
the interview. 

As the Prime Minister’s 
office lad hoped, the Seeing 
yesterday of two more French 
hostages in Bern! with Syrian 
help has effectively stifled any 
criticism that infant otherwise 
have been voiced. Had not M 
Chirac's Middle East policy 
been shown to have paid off? 

There is considerable un- 
ease about the channel chosen 
by M Chirac to make his 
comments, surprise at the 
tauntness of some of his 
remarks and embarrassment 
over his sfeniak, which have 
now been demonstrated to be 
false. But not a single poli- 
tician or commentator on the 
rfaht or left has accused M 
Chirac of lying, or. called on 
him to resign. Indeed, there 
has been very little reaction at 
aD, 

One of the very few to have 
made any comment so far is 
M Claude Cheysson, toe for- 
mer Socialist Foreign Min- 
ister, who appeared to reflect 
the .general view of French 
newspaper leading articles 
when he said that he had been 
surprised that M Chirac had 
chosen to make such an 
important statement to a pa- 
per belonging to the Rev 
Moon, but that “the main 
elements of his argument 
seem very coherent**. 

“What is the Prime Min- 
ister saying?” M Cheysson 
asked. “He is saying that we 
most maintain our relations 
with Syria. He is saying that 
the greatest danger in toe 
medium and long-term in this 
part of the world is toe 
development of Muslim fund- 
amentalism.” . 

In his interview, M Chirac 
makes dear his scepticism 
about Syria’s responsibility 
for the Hindawi bomb {dot, 
even suggesting at one point 
that the British might have 
actually fabricated some of the 
evidence presented at the trial. 

“I spoke to (Chancellor) 
Kohl and Genscher about it I 
don’t go as far as they do, but 
their diesis is that the Hindawi 
plot was a provocation de- 
signed embanass.Syria and 
destabilize /the Assad regime. 
“Who was behind ft?” he 
asked. “Probably people con- 
nected with Israel's Mossad 
(secret service) in conjunction 
with certain Syrian dements 
close to Assad who seek his 
overthrow,” M Chirac said. 

Before the full text of the 



From Michael Binyoo, 
Washington 


Two French hostages, Marcel Cowtarifleft) and CantiHe Sontag, freed toy their Lebanese 
capture, smiling with relief in Damascus yesterday before flying home. 


interview was published, M 
Chirac flatly denied that he 
had made any such sugges- 
tion. “Neither toe Germans 
nor. toe French have ever 
imagined such a thing. It is 
quite absurd,” he said, adding 
that The Washington Times' 
interpretation of his whole 
conversation with toe news- 


paper’s editor was “totally 
without foundation” and went 


without the means to see an 
action through to its success- 
fa] conclusion, all you're do- 
ing is mobilizing opinion 
against you. Your image in 
moderate pro- Western coun- 
tries and throughout toe Mid- 
dle East for that matter, and 
therefore toe Western image 
as a whole, is tarnished, 

diminish ed.” 


“Remember that each time 
one attacks an Arab anywhere, 
all toe Arabs win fed com- 
pelled to show solidarity with 
what they perceive to be the 
victim ... 1 am really aston- 
ished that a country like the 
US does not understand this 
and still goes for toe quick, 
‘feel-good' fix. It is irresp- 
onsible. 


Admiral John Poindexter* 
hi (he first Administration 
confirmation of seen* contacts 
with Tehran, tokJ key mem- 
bers of Congress that tire 
White House made a “miscal- 
cutetiou” on whom it could 
trust in Iran. 

The National Security Ad- 
viser, who beaded the secret 
negotiations, briefed members 
of a puzzled and angry Con- 
gress in an attempt to per- 
suade them that details of tire 
deal had to remain secret to 
protect contacts in Iran. 
According to some sources, be 
said that American envoys 
were finding opportunities to 
work with “some dements” of 
the Khomeini regime as long 
as they were not exposed. 

Mr Poindexter emphasized 
that the White House had a 
“whole network” Of people to 
protect, not only Iranians but 
others outside the country. 

President Reagan, who has 
gone out of his way to dodge 
reporters and ignore questions 
shouted at him, told his senior 
advisers on Monday that “no 
laws have or will be violated” 
by reported US arms safes to 
Iran. And he urged them to 
ensure that their departments 
refrain from speculating, acc- 
ording to Mr Larry Speakes, 
the White House spokesman. 

Mr Reagm insisted that the 
Administration's policy of not 
negotiating with terrorists re- 
mained intact. 

The White House meeting 
was prompted by Mr Reagan’s 
fears that the avalanche of 
angry comment might pot at 
risk the remaining hostages in 
Lebanon. The President re- 
viewed US efforts to release 
the hostages and general pol- 
icy in (be Middle East and the 
Gnif. Both Mr George Shultz, 
toe Secretary of State, and Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the De- 
fence Secretary, attended. 
Afterwards Mr Speakes, in an 


effort to quash reports of their 
bitter disagreement with tire 
arms sales, emphasized the 
“unanimous support” for the 
Pres Meat. 

Mr Poindexter is said to 
have fold Congress that Iran'S 

disclosure of the visits thereby 

Mr Robert McFariane, the 
former National Security Ad- 
viser, had halted Iranian help 
oror the hostages. 

Mr McFariane, meanwhile, 
said on Monday that it was of 
“enormous importance” that 
the US promote a stable 
relationship with Iran. He 
called Iran-US security in- 
terests entirely compatible. 

Without admitting he vis- 
ited Tehran or commenting on 
any with Iran, he said 

secret diplomacy was crucial 
in preparing for the time when 
Iran's leadership would be 
willing to accept a new 
relationship with toe US. 

Congress has said it wOI 
hold hearings on toe affair, 
and will rail on Admiral 
Poindexter and other Admin- 
istration officials to testify. 
But toe White House made it 
dear that President Reagan 
would oppose their appear- 
ance on the grounds of exec- 
utive privilege aad na tion a l 
security. 

In an ironic development, 
federal judges have just sent 
two men to prison for trying to 
sell Iran military supplies in 
violation of the US embargo. 

In New York, a British 
businessman, Mr Herbert 
Smith, received a 10-year 
sentence for trying to sell 
seven BeD 204B helicopters 
and 4,000 spare parts to Iran 
for $22 million. 

- In Los Angeles, Mr Honnoz 
Hezar was sentenced to a 
three-year term for sending SO 
military radios and negotiat- 
ing toe export of $800,000 in 
Spare parts — 80 per cent iff 
which reached Iran. His law- 
yer argued against imprison- 
ment, citing reports of US- 
Iran arms deals. 


“way beyond” what he had 
actually said. 

In his interview, which be 
never intended for publica- 
tion, M Chirac stales plainly 
his belief that “Syria has 
certainly been involved, either 
directly or indirectly, in a 
number of terrorist actions.” 
But, he continues, “if one then 
adopts a eonfrontafionist atti- 
tude which translates into a lot 
of barking and no action, one 
only encourages them to pur- 
sue such terrorist policies. 

“l am in favour of anions 
when they pay off But if they 
are clumsy or purely verbal, 
it’s countmproductive.” . 

He singled out the Ameri- 
can raid on Libya as an 
example of a completely 
counterproductive 
action.“When you attack 


M Chirac went on to express 
forcefully the view that the 
recent wave of terrorist attacks 
or the foiled bomb plot against 
the El AI plane in London 
were “small beer” compared 
with the enormity of the 
problem of the “flood tide of 
Muslim fundamentalism” 
which was engulfing the Mid- 
dle East 


“The West must manag e 
this enormous crisis with a lot 
of prudence and not allow, 
itself to bef 'deflected by a few 
bombs going off in the streets 
of their capitals. The big bomb 
is not the one that explodes in 
the rue de Rennes, but the one 
which could explode all over 
the Arab world if Arab public 
opinion is pushed against the 
walL That is the real bomb. . . 


“Or that a country like 
Britain wants us all to sever 
relations with Syria because of 
some obscure bomb plot that 
misfired. Do they really think 
that people will then say 
‘Bravo, they’ve got balls’?" 
France was not going to 
change suddenly the whole of 
its Middle East policy because 
of Britain. Besides, how could 
Britain talk of Western solid- 
arity when it continued to sell 
arms to Iran? 


Japan agrees to back 
UK stand on Syria 


By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 


M Chirac made clear that he 
felt France was toe only 
Western country left trying to 
stop the fundamentalist tide in 
the region. To achieve that, 
“we should lean over back- 
wards not to destabilize the 
moderate states of the Arab 
world," he insisted. 


Britain received backing 
from Japan yesterday for her 
stand on Syrian-sponsored 
terrorism. Tokyo informed 
the Foreign Office that it 
would implement measures 
approved' on Monday by all 
EEC nations except Greece. 

The measures indude a ban 
on arms exports, but Japan 
cannot- implement the deci- 
sion to supervise Syrian flights 
more closely because Syrian 
Arab Airlines does not serve 
Tokyo. 

Britain has had no Syrian 
flights since breaking relations 
with Damascus. The other 10 


nations are to consider a 
common policy to include 
routine searches of Syrian 
aircraft and withdrawal of 
privileges normally granted to 
aircrew. 

• WELLINGTON: President 
Chaim Herzog of Israel denied 
yesterday that his country 
supplied US aims to Iran to 
secure the release of American 
hostages in Lebanon (Ap re- 
ports). He also reiterated that 
Israel wants the Middle East 
proclaimed a nuclear-free 
zone, similar to those in the 
South Pacific and South 
America 


‘No bargains 9 plea 


Britain wants ban 
on terrorist deals 


By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 


The Prime Minister and the 
Foreign Secretary are to step 
up the search for a pact 
between governments not to 
make deals with terrorist 
organizations. 

After Monday's British- 
initiated derision by U EEC 
nations to- penalize Syria for 


sponsoring the Hindawi bomb 
plot, Whitehall hopes to main- 
'Utinanti-terrorisa momentum. 

Mrs Thatcher and Sir Geof- 
frey Howe are expected to urge 
the US and French govern- 
ments not to waver from their 
staled “no bargains" policies. 

Signs that both govern- 
ments may have sought to buy 
off state-sponsored Middle 
East terrorists or hostage- 
takers have prompted concere 
that recent improvements in 



in the Middle East, is seen as a 
barrier to eariy co-operation. 
The Kremlin has consistently 
backed President Assad’s de- 
nials of Syrian involvement in 
the Hindawi attempt to blow 
up an H AJ airliner. Moscow 
has denounced Britain’s de- 
cision to break relations with 
D amasc us and the measures 
agreed on Monday by 11 of 
the 12 EEC nations. 

Despite this. Whitehall 
sources believe it may even- 
tually be possible to work with 
Moscow. 

The British view is that 
governments should refuse to 
deal with terrorist groups and 
their government backers, 
even at the price of civilian 
casualties. The recent wave of 
bombings in Paris, apparently 
sfaged in a bid to negotiate the 
release from a French jail of 
Ganges Ibrahim Abdullah, 
leader of Fraction Annees 
Revolutionaries, is thought to 
have brought toe French Gov- 
ernment to die brink of 
compromise. 

Threats from both -Damas- 
cus and Tripoli that the mea- 
sures by the 11 EEC nations 
would be met with reprisals 


are not dismissed lightly by 
Whitehall sources, but any 


Chtac interview seen as 
“sand la the eyes” 


inter-government co-opera- 
tion could be compromised. 

Whitehall sources said the 
Prime Minister will press her 
view that such deals play into 
terrorist hands when she 
meets President Reagan at 
Gamp David on Saturday. Her 
summit with President Mit- 
terrand of France on Novem- 
ber 21, and a probable 
simultaneous meeting be- 
tween Sir Geoffrey and his 
French counterpart, M Jean- 
Bemard Raimond, could be 
used to make the same point. 

ha the longer term, the 
Government also hopes for a 
similar understanding with 
Moscow. Although not realis- 
tic asa goal for tire near future, 
preliminary. soundings will be 
taken when British and Soviet 
terrorism experts meet for 
.talks next month; * . . 

Moscow's uncompromising 
support for Syria, her top ally 


Whitehall sources, but any 
suggestion of toning down the 
British line has been ruled out. 

After a day’s reflection on 
an interview given by M Jac- 
. ques Chirac, the French Prime 
Minister, to an American 
newspaper, sources were mov- 
ing towards a view that it was 
designed to confuse. At first 
reading, the remarks attrib- 
uted by The Washington 
Times to M Chirac suggested 
duplicity by the French Gov- 
ernment. On one hand, 
France was saying that it 
would back Britain on Syria 
and would never negotiate 
with terrorists: on the other M 
Chirac suggested that Israeli 
rather than Syrian agents 
could be behind the plot 

The sources did not dis- 
courage speculation that M 
Chirac's motive may have' 
been no more than to gain a 
better press for Syria white 
efforts. continued io tacure the 
release of French hostages and 
to avoid a resurgence of the 
Paris bombings. "It looks tike 
sand in tire eyes:” said one 
source. . 




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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE 


TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 

. . ........... wnREMSSSaBSS 


Caribbean states tone 
down resolution on 
Falklands fishing zone 

rirSduto’jie ^.^jss&r s 

st.k^k ?Sj-r *— b»s»ss = 


scuicu iu «»• vief-r 

American Sates’ Permanent 
Council, OAS sources say. 
These officials say, bow- 


tosive issue nerorc 

— '"7"~ - that of the expanding US war 

Latin America. minat Nicaragua and the fete 

The Uruguayan draft reso- *£Senrated Latin 

353f^aSg S£Ss!5 

countries, who hold a majority ^ ty the Falklands. Group. 

of 18 of the 31 seats w the official said the Eight Latin American sa- 

oraanization, may sdll try to A,. Q r ^ draft was tes, with the five Central 
introduce on the fl°oraimijh ‘‘somewhat ambiguous” as to American 

version condrauungBntam s "SOT^na^ addfifon, it rec- died acteadkwk, with] pro^g 

declaration of a greatly rat claims to Cosa Rica, Honduras and H 

panded fishing zone around ^^g^^dtothe mineral- Salvador aM ? u ”ff g 
the Falklands. „,««« ami fish-rich waters surround- they are no longer wiling 

According to these sources, “JPJJ?*" under present circunurtances 

• k^nA.thpwcranes mg them. _ . . _ ■* ^«h tho Mnmst 


presemeu r ,v«. nAq 

dinary session of the OAS 

Permanent .CounaU con^ E£TZE* more }«“ STm "tte’Ni^ 

moderate resolution aimed rag|iail conflict beause such a 

hea £^fn d RriSin but does ask simply at getting Britain to JgJJJJ; ^ certain to be critical 
g?to B l£fraSiwi Iheir withdraw its extension of ofAeReaganA dininistnmoa. 
r£«!5aLi » temtonal waters. Several Latin American 

jssas*^*'” 



US/Soviet 
pact on 
exploring 
Mars 




4 ■ ; 

£ - 


*! 

■% 


From Christopher Walker — S5 

Moscow gg* by lLfiS^mbas tones. Un^^ red^ous 

The Soviet Communist the party’s Central ^m^ Sc^o^wsSo noted. 
Party is pfenning to intensify tee. Among tho« attendug accidents were _ 

.• _ irkinmdoWU 


Late last montn rreuaui _ — T,V'c»^ U b^o arrived diplomats claim that the US 

announced that it was extend- Secretary ofState. ^ has planted “disinformation 

jSJfts fishing zone around the JjL^JJ^yJlSetdks in the presto orate divraotis 
F^klandsfrom three to nearly j^tES j Foreign amoa Contadora Group 

200 miles. --■_ Minister Seftor Dante Cap- countries. 

This claim, which Britain Ministe r, — 



Western observations that 
the dampdown on alcohol has 
prompted an increase w drug 
Sum appeared to be backed 
up by the communique issuea 
after the meeting which at- 
tacked “imperfections in le- 
gal and medical institutions m 
handling. the struggle against 
drug addiction. 


FnmChrisMtofTta®** 

Washing*®* 1 

The US and the Soviet 
U Jon hive agreed on* new 
for cooperation w 

KS«ed«pK>ra“3>° f 

Man, other planets and deep 
President Reagan and 
3 Tm£a Gorbachov, the 
SJviet leader, may s«3 the 

accord early next 
The agreement centres on 

co-ordination of pnSjp 5 **“} 

exchange of data 

d£riopm«* of WJ.JSS 
tordwme. Aviation »eek amt 
Technology magazine 

win mean the sharing of 
data from eating mesons 
SS as the Soviet Phobos 
SSe ra studv the moons of 
Mare and the 

Observer . spacecraft igSoJ^ 
launched m 

“The new agreement spec 
jficaliv limits technolop™- 
sfo IO the Soviets, ^though 
some segments of the Defence 
Department are. expeoedto 
continue opposition to the 
renewed co-operation,-. Au- 

ation Week said. ; 

The 1972 space co^cra- 
don pact lapsed m l^-when 
martial law was enforced in 

P °During the pact ne*otia- 
tions the Russians avoided 
leaking space co-operation m 
US concessions on 
Reagan’s Strategic Defence 
Initiative. 


s 


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• « 


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rantnred technician 



Peres attempts to 


choose 


things you notice make y 

seTWAs Ambassador Cla 



From Ian Murray, Jerusalem , 

ir • ■(_ U«M mnllMll TWS 


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XM - 


m* me SZA. 


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I noticed how 1 sailed through the 

airport for a start j 

1 had my boarding card and /® m 
seat reservations before I got there..^ 

Dropped my bag at the special^^ 

Ambassador Class desk. Got a lovely ..... 

smile. And 1 was off to the plane. -i# 

You notice the friendly wel- ' & 
come from the crew there. A real. 

Warm TWA American welcome. 

Then the seat Called a 

yum. 'Business Lounger.’You cant miss it- , r ^ v , f 

t the widestbusiness class seatacross ’ 

- - *■ the Atlantic no less. Only six across 
you notice. Two by two. So thereS a lot 

i/Z f f- of room in the cabin. Spacious luxury. r 

You notice how you can- 
really stretch. Tilt back. Sit up. Relax 

or work in comfort Or both. j!f t ? R 

And that marvellous TWA i 1 1 1 
American service. Everyone notices - 1 1 

that Flight Attendants who really 

know how to look after you. Attentive. ,1 
But know how to leave you in peace^ 
ifyouwantit 

Interesting menu and very 
good cuisine. Some nice wines, too. 

"4% Drinks whenever you want them. 

^vV- When you arrive, you know / 

- / they give Ambassador Class luggage , ^ 

/ priority. So you don’t have to wait 
around at the carousel. 



world’s 

Britain' y»- : r .. 

Government to admrt rt bad 
captured Mr Mardechrf Van- 
mm, the nndear te ebninan 
who told The Sunday Tmes 
rtn»t Israel had a nndear 

arsenal- , , 

Mr Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli Foreign Mmister,.a*am- 
ted this on Monday night m 
Chicago. Itis obrions that the 
disclosure was made target? Jo 
try to save Mrs Margaret 


un- 


answer is W, a 

equivocal ‘no’-” } ... . 

Acow tfngto infoi ?ned polit- 
ical sources here it was . con- 
cern about the inteimgonal 
consequences of Mr V wn is 
story whidh led Mr Peres to 
telephone Mrs Tiaatther be- 
fore the first version Appeared 
in the Suudgy Aftwjr® Sep - 

temher 28 . It seems that it was 

only shortly before this that 


9 




Mrs Margaret ®aSy shortly neiore rats 
Thatcher from further embar- MossaiLftebraj^^fre*^ 
The Israeli ad- vke,dfec«^thJ^Vann- 
mfasion came only after the a® was tryingto sdl Ae stoiy. 

ssjaassaSa? 

flat Mr VanH _ create and based on^rfonna- 


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; the carousel. Jg * 9 

TWA flies to almost 100 US. • 

. • ■ j*. * • *- ^ 

. 1 : — . . i.Ua t lOT 


-j£r- 


cities. And you can enjoy the quiet 

_ • r r ■ m T r » J 












IUW. 1 J J 

relaxed comfort of TWA’s superb 
service all the way 

There’s such a lot you’ll 
notice about TWA’s Ambassador 
Class. All of it good. And its tiie things 
you notice that make you like it 

Ask your TWA Main Agent 

allaboutit 


UUt itu a - --- 

tioa with her about Mr V ann- 
uo before he disappear^! from 
London on Septembre 30. ^ 
Denying any telephone dis- 
cussion with Mrs Thatcher oo 
how the nndear technician 
was to be brought to Israel 
from Britain, Mr Peres re- 
fnsed to shed any light on how 
this was done. This, therdfefe, 
contumes to cause prahteis 
for the British Prime Minis- 

4bG9T» 

Wifli Mrs Thatcher feeing 
parliamentary calls for an 
enquiry into the rircrenstances 
of Mr Vanrem’s disappear- 
ance from Britain, the Foreign 
Office has asked thejsraefi 
Government to darifyits 
statement on Swday, which 
merely denied that “Vanram 
was ’kidnapped’ on British 

sofl”. , ... - 

Mr WiBiain Squire, me 
British Ambassador m l et 
Aviv, has asked for this 
clari fication from Mr Yossi 
Beam, the political Dirrctor- 
General of the Foreign Min; 
istry and om of Mr Peres 
dosest personal advisers. 

However, with Mr Pmes 
away in America and Mr Yit- 
zhak Shamir, the Prime Min- 
ister, reportedly furious at the 

way foreign press reports 
eventually forced an admission 
that Mr Vamraa was in Israel, 
there seems little chance ®ff 
early clarification clear 
enough to help Mrs Thatcher 
this week. „ 

Explaining bow Mr Vanmm 
arrived in Israel is not seen as 
important here, let alone a 
-priority. Wife public opinion 
str -agJy behind it in any pro- 
secnfi®n against hire, the G®^- 
enunent remains more con- 
corned at trying to convince 
world opinion that Israel 
really does not have the 
nndear arsenal described in 
The Sunday Times. 

Mr Peres sahfc “This is 
pretended information?’ Even 
tla®ffi3g!3 it w as nntnie the case 
wonM go ahead because Mr 
Vrerenu “does not have the 
right” to disclose issues 
“which are considered ' state 
secrets, or pretending to”. 

While Mr Peres denied die 
story in Chicago, President 
Herzog, on a state ristt to New 
Zealand, was questioned by 
Mr David Lange, the New 


thw supplied by someone 
harbouring a gr«e 
bring Bred from hhp* 
Although statemtuts m 
■t -* Jerusalem last 



i have 


tween the two prime 
in capturing the nndear sci- 
entist, they io not deky that a 
conversation about th| nndear 
story took place, 
here, who say the _ 
common knowledge h 
Knesset, consider the! 
from Mr peres was 
proper and are amazL 
that it is causing probl 
Mrs Thatcher. 

Meanwhile, the <, — , 
of Mr Vanunn appears l 
ended since Mr DavidJ 
the PoUce Inspector^ 
hw confirmed that be 
an inmate of an ordin 
on. This was denied 
day, ind ic a tin g that _ 
then held in the area of 
cm run by Shin Bet, the ' 
tar-intelligence agency 
usually carries out int* 
tins. 

The chary-. 

Vanunn are thetefne — 
to be virtually complete 
the trial, which almost 
tainly wQl be in secret, ~ 
ah parf. if convkted of t — r — 
he could face at least 20 ytiurs 
in jaiL I 

His famil y in Beersbeva has 
gone into MJiag and several of 
the 111 people with his sur- 
name who are listed in the 
town’s telephone book have 
applied to the Ministry of dm 
Interior for a change of name. 


i 


Ipris- 


• >! 


■su. 


Israeli ministry staff 
questioned on fraud 

Frtnn Ian Murray, Jerusalem 


£ 






Police are questioning se- 
nior sa£f in the Ministry of 
Interior and Ministry of Re- 
ligious Affeirs over a bribery 
and fraud case that has led to 
the arrest ofMr Rafi Levy, the 
District Commissioner of 
Jerusalem, and a senior clergy- 
man in. the city’s Armenian 
Church. 

Mrs Anna Janbo and her 
son. Khalil, members of an 
influential Palestinian family 
from the West Bank city of 
Ramaliah, have also 


arrested- PoUce claim they 
acted as paid go-betweens in 
helping residents of the occu- 
pied territories obtain the 
special privileges gained bv 
Mr Levy’s alleged misuse of 
hfe powerful position. 

. The scale and complexity of 
the case is such that police 
suspect, the involvement of 
other senior civil servants- 
There nay be further arrests 
before those now in custody 
appear in court on remand 
next Wednesday. 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 



11 




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uveKseas NEWS 


Second Swiss company 
admits dumping poison 
into Rhine before bla2 


HH TiivifcS whDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 

Bnmh attacks as Botha visits France 

■ — : . WKNMBk 

Terrorists 

hit three 


West German anger oyer 
the pollution of the Rhine 
following a fire at the Sandoz 
chemicals plant in Basle grew 
yesterday when it was dis- 
closed tha t another Swiss firm 
had dumped weed-killer into 
the river at the height of the 
blaze. 

Herr Gerhard Weiser, the 
Minister for the Environment 
in the State of Baden- 
Wurttemberg, said in Stuttgart 
that Ciba-Geigy, the Swiss 
pharmaceuticals firm next to 
Sandoz, had released 400 
kilogrammes of the weed- 
killer into the Rhine through 
its filtration plant. 

The company said that 
damage at the plant had let the 
substance run out of a tank 
and into the filtration system 
and the river. Bui the chemi- 
cals it contained, mostly nitro- 
gen and chlorine, had not 
poisoned the Rhine with a 
concentration that would be 
toxic for fish. 

Herr Weiser said Swiss 


From John En gl a n d, Bonn 

environment protect! on auth- 
orities suspected Ciba-Geigy 
of releasing the weed-killer 
into the river when they could 
not find it on a list of leaked 
chemicals issued by Sandoz. 

Sandoz directors yesterday 
slid ihey would jay com- 
pensation for polluting the 
Rhine as the Greens Party in 
Bonn accused the firm of 
serious safety lapses in 1981. 

Frau Hannegret Hones, a 
Greens MP, said that a report 
by a Zurich insurance com- 
pany in 198! had expressed 
concern over insufficient fire 
precautions in Sandoz’s chem- 
icals warehouses. 

In Bonn yesterday. West 
German Chemicals Industry 
Association leaders agreed 
upon a number of immediate 
measures to check and to 
improve safety and warning 
systems at their plants follow- 
ing a meeting with Herr 
Walter Wallmann, the Federal 
Minister for the Environment 

Herr Wallmann is to make a 


government statement on the 
consequences of die Sandoz 
plant fire in the Bundestag 
tomorrow. 

• GENEVA: Ciba-Geigy yes- 
terday confirmed the disclo- 
sure by Mr Weiser of a spill of 

a 400 litres of herbicide, 
Atrazin. into the Rhine at 
Basle, but said it occurred the 
day before the November 1 
fire at the Sandoz plant (Alan 
McGregor writes). 

• THE' HAGUE: Dutch wat- 
erways officials said yesterday 
that the Swiss chemical pollu- 
tion was now all within the 
Netherlands and the worst 
section was expected to wash 
into the North Sea by last 
night (Reuter reports). 

• BRUSSELS Senior French, 
West German and Dutch 
government officials yes- 
terday accused Swiss auth- 
orities of negligence in their 
handling of the chemical spill, 
a Common Market source 
said (Reuter reports). 


Stockholm 
seeks talks 
on refugees 

From Christopher Mosey 
Stockholm 

Mr Georg Andereson, the 
immigration Minister, has 
angrily denied that Sweden 
plans to limit its refugee 
intake. He said, however, that 
be was seeking a European 
ministerial meeting to discuss 
the growing problem. 

His statement to Parliament 
followed recent incidents in- 
volving the deportation of 
illegal immigrants. 

Mr Andersson refused to 
answer an allegation made by 
Mrs Maria Leissner, a Liberal 
MP, that he was helping to 
bolster racial hatred in Swe- 
den by labelling it as born 
“grotesque" and “senseless . 
Mrs Leissner, however, re- 
fused to withdraw her allega- 
tion, demanding to know 
whether Sweden had held 
secret talks with East Ger- 
many aimed at stemming the 
flood of refugees. . 

Mr Andersson denied that it 
had, but said it was “intens- 
ively’* seeking a European 
min isterial meeting to discuss 
the problem. 


Tension grows in 
Spanish enclave 

X From Richard Wigg, Madrid 
Senor Felipe Gonzalez, the 65,000. But the Spanisb Oms- 
Spanisb Prime Minister, has tian poputetion, which lives 
been forced, while on an largely 
official visit to Latin America, surrounding Morocco, resists 
to respond to a new upsurge of integration, 
tenrion in Melifla, one of Tension sh<rtu? afi^a 

Spain’s two enclaves in North weekend 

Africa claimed by Morocco. of some 1.000 Arabs sum- 
Senor Gonzalez said on moned by Aomar Mohamedi 
Monday night in Guayaquil Dudu, a local Muslim tester, 
that the SoSst Government declared they had JostaJ 
would continue with the confidence m the Spanish 
integration of the Muslim Government ^and asserted 
population living and working ^ ^v^^h Muslim 
loMelilla, granting Spanish and Maghrebi character. 
StioS? ^to thSe legally Granting dual Spanish and 
entitied to it". Moroccan nationality is foe 

Madrid is now faced with a only solution, the assembly 
growing alienation of its Arab found, adding a threat to look 
population in Melilla over the from now on for .support 
chronk and inexplicable slow- “from all sympathetic Arab 
ness in granting Spanish na- peoples . 
tionality to those Arabs who The Mushm Irader. who 
want it was appointed the Interior 

The Madrid Interior Min- Ministry’s adviser on Mushm 
istry has admitted that only affairs two months ago after 
400 of the 2,000 Spanish he help®! put down five days 

passports applied for by Arabs of street dismrtj^ces mthe 
jnthe enclave this year have enclave over Passport 
Sen granted so far. issue, has now threairaedto 

Tblfoare between 20,000 resign. Yesterday he warned 
and 30,000 Arabs of Moroc- the Spanish Govemmrat not 
can origin in the enclave out of to issue aliens identity cards to 
total population of some any local Muslims. 


targets 
in Paris 

From Diana Geddes 

Paris 

Action Directe, the e xtrem e 
left-wing terrorist group, 
Hahnpd responsibility yester- 
day for three overnight bomb 
attacks against the Paris of- * 

Gees of Peugeot cars. Total Oil 

and Pechiney Steel, all of 
which have commercial links 
with South Africa. No one was 
injured. 

The group said the attacks, 
which coincide with the visit to 
France by President Botha eff 
Soath Africa, were protesting 
against support for the Pre- 
toria regime and its apartheid 
policies fro® France, Western 
Emf&e a "d the Untied States. 

Anti-apartheid demonstrat- 
ors later clashed violently with 
guests arriving at Lnngneval, 
in the Somme, for the inang- 
Hration by President Botha of 
a memorial to the 1830® 
Sooth African soldiers who 
fefl in France. 

Windscreens were smashed 
and paintwork damaged as 
cars tried to force their way 
through a crowd of 500 dem- 
onstrators who crossed fields 
on foot to avoid roadblocks, 
«n« waging to get within SOU 
yards of the memorial. 

Chants of “Botha murder- 
er" “Fascists oat of France" 
asd “Free Mandela" were 
heard by the 3,000 P*ests *t 
the ceremony, who mcradeo 

several hundred South African 

war veterans, among them 
many blacks. 

The only official French 
representative was the local 
safe-prefect The French Gov- 
ernment decided to boycott the 
ceremony and has d ecline d to 
have any contact with the 
South African party for fearof 
o ffending their African nines 
on the eve of the Fnmco- 
Africaa summit in Lam*, 
w hich starts tomorrow. 

The National Front sent a 
dele gatio n of war veterans 
from Paris, led by two Na- 
tional* Front deputies, M 
Roger Holeindre and M Jean- 
Piene Stirbois, deputy leader 
of the party. 

President Botha is due to 

leave Paris today to for what is 

described as an “anofficuT 
visit to the Portuguese archi- 
pelago of Madeira. Many 
Portuguese hnmisrants to 
South Africa are 
eira. 


Mr Botha faying flowers on the graves of Sooth African soldiers at Longneval 

Pretoria holds campaigning princes 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg _ •_ ' . 

Two tribal princes who led a which 

«s e w“ssaA s-affssy: 

fSoriTto grant “iodopen- ^ 

deuce" to KwaNdebele, one of _ Cnmeiins Mah- The ex ce sses of KwaNde- 

10 reserves or homelands set told by bete? local tribal adminisna- 

fide K faS « anti- 

haye been arrested and are tire tocau ^ ^ nee alliance bet- 


nave ueeu aura**** 

being held without trial 

Their arrest could fore- 
shadow an attempt by the 
Government to revive the 
“independence” scheme. Pre- 
toria suffered a major setback 
last August when the Kwv 
Ndebele Legislative Assembly 
voted against “independ- 
ence”, which had been set to 
take effect on December 1 1. 

The two men. Prince lames 
Mahlangu and Prince An dries 
Mahlangu, were arrested on 
Monday morning at the kraal 
of the Ndzundza royal family 
near Siyabuswa, a collection 
of shacks and brick huts dom- 


lciau'u — p 7 

under the state of emergency 
regulations. . 

prince Cornelius said that 
anonymous pamphlets dis- 
tributed in Siyabuswa yes- 
terday accused his family of 
trying to get rid of _ the 
KwaNdebele Chief Minister. 
Mr Simon Skosana, and of 
seeking to maintain apartheid 
by opposing “independence” 
for the homeland. 

The device of “indepen- 
dence” is used by Pretoria to 
weaken, or to eliminate al- 
toatiher, the claim of large 
numbers of blades to foil 


independence alliance bet 
ween the royal family and 
young militants. 

• Young detainees: An in- 
dependent monitoring body, 
the Detainees’ Parents Sup- 
port Committee, said yes- 
terday that 66 per cent of 
emet^ncy detainees it had 
identified by name were under 
the age of 25 and 47 per cent 
under the age of 21. lt es- 
timated that about 20JJW 
people had been detained for 

varying periods since the state 

of emergency was declared on 
Jane 12. 


Bali court 
reduces 
Briton’s 

sentence 

jaterufcAFPJ-JhcMi- 
nese High Court bas com- 
muted a lift sentence w 20 
Sjail for a British pas^ 
g? holder caught 
^.7fos of hashish. 

Russel Duparoq. ^ 
who lives m Sydney, was 
arrested in September 1985 m 
Ubud. Ba h , after the hashish 
irasfound tajwi 
stone statues and a i coKKte 
table-top in his rented room. 

Riot dies 

Angelbolm (Reuter) - An 

AuSnanpH* i w™!*? 

Swedish-buiil 

criticized as b«fg obsolete 
and n"* 8 ® 8 - died when the 
plane plunged into the sea off 
Sweden’s west coast. 

Pipeline deal 

Kampala (AP) - Aj» od 
pipeline between the Kenyan 
border and Kampala witf be 
bStiby Lonrho, foe 
b ayrt conglomerate, under an 
agreement with Ugandare- 
ported by a government- 
owned newspaper. 

MP killed 

Santa Cruz (AFP) - Ed- 
mundo Salazar, a left-wing 
member of the Bolivian Par- 
liament whose committee 
work had included m in- 
vestigation injodrug traffa*: 
ing, was murdered m front ot 
his home. 

Death penalty 

Mount Holly, New Jersey 
(AP) - A jury granted the 

request of a 22 -year-old man 

and sentenced him to death 
life in jail for killing 
a young mother. 

Rape graves 

Perth (Reuter) - An ar- 
rested couple led police to the 
shallow graves of four naked 
women believed to be victims 
of sex attacks near here. 

Rocket delay 

Cape Canaveral (AP) — 
Nasa announced the eighth 
postponement of an Atlas- 
Centaur rocket that is to 
launch a US military commu- 
nications satellite. 

Polks resume 

Maputo (Reuter) - 
Mozambique's second general 
elections since independence 
in 1975, suspended after Presi- 
dent Machd’s death last 
month, have resumed. 


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It has to design software as vast as the 
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It has to engineer telecommunications 
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and data bases. Around the office. Around 
the world. 

It has to commit enormous resources to 

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TIMES WFDNF.SDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


US Catholic bishops 
face threat of split 
over Vatican actions 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

American Roman Catholic Catholic homosexual group, v 
bishops have been meeting in Dignity, during its 1983 a 
Washington this week in an convention in Seattle. ti 

. _ C ?_« TL. ' _ L.. — 


atmosphere of crisis, as recent 
Vatican actions against liberal 
Catholics and pronounce- 
ments on sexual morality have 
stirred up widespread anger 
here and threaten to cause a 
schism within the US Catholic 
Church. 

Bishop James Malone of 
Youngstown, Ohio, the outgo- 
ing President of the National 
Conference of Catholic Bish- 
ops, told the opening session 
of their annual meeting on 
Monday there was the danger 
of a “growing and dangerous 
disaffection between the Vati- 
can and the US Church”. 

He said he had proposed a 
meeting between the Pope and 
top US church officials to try 
to ease tensions before the 
Pope visits eight American 
cities next year, and said the 
Vatican had responded posi- 
tively. 

There have been warnings 
that the papal visit could be 
marked by angry demonstra- 
tions if the tension worsens. < 

At issue are the Pope's 
recent attempts to rein in 
reform and quiet dissent, es- 
pecially in the United States, 
bis forthright condemnation 


Catholic homosexual group. 
Dignity, during its 1983 
convention in Seattle. 

■ The organization has held 
regular meetings > before in 
churches in New York, Chi- 
cago. Baltimore and else- 
where, with the consent and 


was excommunicated for her 
activism in upholding abor- 
tion in a planned parenthood 
group. 

Surveys show that Vatican 
teaching is increasingly at 
odds with the views of most 
US Catholics. On abortion. 


where, with the consent ana us r^ainouo. “T IT: 
even occasional officiatioo of more than a third tav ou r 

conservative bishops. How- keeping it legal On divorce. 
. * v r.timiuw holww neonle 


6 At issue are the 
Pope's attempts to 
rein in reform and 
quiet dissent 9 

of homowxuality and 


ever, liberals complain. Arch- 
bishop Hunthausen has also 
been prominent in opposing 
nuclear arms, provoking his 
opponents to complain volu- 
bly to the Vatican about his 
liturgical practices. 

Last month the Vatican 
released a document specify- 
ing some of the charges against 
the Archbishop, which in- 
cluded the practising in 
Catholic hospitals of contra- 
ceptive sterilizations; the re- 
ception of non-Catholics in 
communion; the use of former 
priests in teaching positions or 
as leading participants at 
Mass; the improper ministry 
to homosexuals; and the disre- 
gard of rules on the annulment 
of marriage. 

Bishop Malone singled out 
the affair as a central issue in 
the Vatican struggle to reassert 
orthodoxy. He defended the 
conference's right to discuss 
the case, despite the ban on in- 
terference in relations between 
the Pope and a local bishop, 
and said the conference was 
simply trying to offer /fra- 
ternal support” to Archbishop 
Hunthausen and the Seattle 
Church. 

The disciplining comes in 


most Catholics believe people 
should be allowed to divorce 
and remarry. Most also see 
nothing wrong in pre-roan tal 
sex, favour the use of contra- 
ceptives and say women ana 
married men should not be ex- 
cluded from the priesthood. 
And roughly half fevour legal- 
izing homosexual relations. 

The US Catholic Church, 


6 Conservatives say 
it is high time the 
Pope reaffirmed his 
authority 9 


of homosexuality and 01 f Vatican ban in 

Catholic tmmsuy to homoKx- £“5,2 * n Father Charles 
uals and a senes of rebukes, been forbid- 


with 52 milli on members, is 
large and ipfluentia l . 

The bishops say this is the 
worst crisis with the Vatican 
since their national conference 
began 20 years ago. But there 
were similar strains between 
Rome and the US at the turn 
of the century, when the popes 
strongly condemned “Amen<> 
anism” in the Church, and US 
Catholic support for the separ- 
ation of Chinch and state. 

Liberal concern at the Vati- 
can crackdown has been rein- 
forced by the steady papal ap- 
pointment of conservative 
bishops who mirror the Pope s 
traditional views. US conserv- 
ative Catholics say it is high 
time the Pope reaffirmed Jus 
authority, and blame the Ua 
hierarchy for not reasserting 
Catholic teaching forcefully. 

The Hunthausen case has 
led to considerable con troy er- 


aals and a senes of rebukes, who ^ been forbid- ^me the Pope reaffirmed his 

bans, dismissals and other , teach theology at the authority and blame the US 
disciplinary measures, mclud- university m Wash- hierarchy for not reasserting 

‘"^^n^S cathoUc ingwn because of his liberal Catholic teaching forcefully, 
posed on bberal Caibouc morality. The Hunthausen case has 

rrs b, ss; 

V S&-» jSS'in M wSSS^ 

ference is one recent rase that to the L hiuai P . uetitions asking the Pope to 

MMST-S* Sgggg s&JWJS 

3£!EFE SSssumf 

MS STS vT™ JT5 SST* i- 1 *-d 

lised for, among other things, ream “on Monday Bishop Malone 

"affiliations" with homosex- mat* abort*' tor to «her 

ual groups that opposethe ratoojre*boo] ‘- wh “ ),* the on the otdination of women 
Church's teaching on homo- K.S^AufpSt affects and on theologtal teactnng. 

■"raft wideiy beheved ro n ^? B MS5 

refer l ° his mgjf £ ST end the inequality 

££3* £ !, 0 o£Sember Mary AnS So^tino. wh o faced by women. 



EEC aid 
tailored 
to needs of 


Singapore 
opposition 
leader is 


recipients jailed 


From Our Correspondent 
Brussels 


Common Market develop- 
ment aid will take a new and ; 
more effective course in me i 
wake of the decision by EEC 
development ministers to tai- 
lor it to the needs of recipient 
countries. ... f . 

After years in which the 
entire European food-aid bud- 
get was geared to disposing oi 

EEC food surpluses msi^d ot 

the needs of the Third World, 
Britain and the European 
Commission have taken the 
lead in changing the priorities. 

The 12 ministers decided 
yesterday that food aid should 
now be used, together with 
other development aid. to 
make the best possible use of 
the resources of Third World 
countries to develop their own ! 

agriculture and economies. 

They also decided that food 
could be bought from other 
developing countries and 
riven to nations where there 
was femine. The EECs money 
would be more usefully em- 
ployed in this way than by 
riving away European prod- 
ucts which are of no use to 
starving children. _ 

The decision gives long- 
overdue recognition to the 
serious problem created by 
dumping EEC wheat or milk 
products in the Third World. 

It has long been argued by 
aid organizations that food aid 
ran undermine the agricultur- 
al economy of countries where 
farmers can then not sell the 
domestic produce and that 
wheat aid often changes tastes 
away from traditional food. 
Many Third World regions 
have allergies to dairy prod- 
ucts which makes donations 


mBmstsm& j p; am ., m afore ucls whicfi ^gs donations 

A soldier^ wearing a First helmet, 03111612 

the Armistice Day celebrations on the Champs- Ely sees yesteraay. 


me .uuujuvv 

Canadian Liberal leader challenged 

^ouauitw^ ... „ ho was a dissident Liberals gathered 


the popular Archbishop oi womans uhmi ~ 
s£n!T Bishop Raymond abortion; fata* 


hS&JT 3o m aged IX 
Ld for. among; other thins, i™m £ 


SKK m«t on abortion or leave her 
that oppose the Catholictchoo.', ^er Ten- 


sexuality. Jeauit cider mAugustafterr^ 


^Tffis^s widely beUeved to fusing to 


From John Best 
Ottawa 

Mr John Turners hopes of 
retaining the leadership of the 
Canadian Liberal Party were 
dealt another blow yesterday 
when a prominent Quebec 
Liberal spoke out against him. 

Mr Marc Lalonde. a former 
Finance Minister, called a 
press conference in Montreal 
to announce that he favoured 
a leadership review. More 
than 3,000 Liberals will vote 
on that question at a pany 
convention al the end of the 


Mr Turner, who was Prime 
Minister briefly in 1984 after 
taking over the Liberal leader- 
ship from Mr Pierre Trudeau, 
could have a difficult time 
holding on to his job.Many 
Liberals feel that at the age of 
S7 he is not the strong leader 
needed to restore the party to 
power. 

They point to the feet that 
while the Liberals have for 
several months led the ruling 
Conservatives in the opinion 
polls, Mr Turner himself has 
consistently trailed the other 
party leaders. 


Mr Lalonde, who was a 
senior Cabinet minister for 12 
years in successive Trudeau 
governments, is a power to be 
reckoned with in French- 
speaking Quebec — tradition- 
ally a Liberal stronghold 
despite the Conservatives 
winning 58 of 75 seats in the 
1984 election. Outside Que- 
bec, however, he is anything 
but universally popular and 
his views may not sway the 
convention. 

The increasingly vicious 
fight took a new twist at the 
weekend when a group oi ~u 


dissident Liberals gathered in 
Montreal to form^a “Dump- 
Turner Movement”. 

A few weeks earlier, it was 
reported that a group of 
Liberals was scheming to 
bring back Mr Trudeau. This, 
however, was denied by Sen- 
ator Keith Davey. around 
whom the cabal was said to be 
forming. _ 

A strong “Keep-Turner 
Movement” also exists, how- 
ever. Recently, it published a 
list of more than 100 prom- 
inent Liberals who have 
pledged loyalty to him. 


FromM.G.G.Pillai 
Kuala Lumpur 
Mr Joshua Benjamin 
aratnam, Singapore * 
tkm leader and * b, “fl 
political opponent of Mr ^ Lee 
Kuan Yew, the P™« Mw- 
ister, lost his sea* 
lament yesterday as be began 

a one-month jaU sentence. 

He was also fined SS5.UUU 

I f £1500). The High Court re- 
ted his appeal agaiost a 
rer comt conviction to*, 
ad arising out of his 
□rkers' Party funds, ana- 
used him leave to appeal to, 

» Conn of Criminal Appeals 
mvicted with him was the. 
airman of his party. 

Mr Jeyaratfiam told several, 
indred people who stood 
itside the High Cou rt y es- 
rday that he would return. 

Mr Jeyaratnam, aged 58 
id a British-trained bar- 
ster, became the unlikely 
tallenger to Mr Lee's auto-, 
a tic hold over Singapore 
hen he was unexpectedly 
•turned to Parliament in a by- # 
ection in 1981. 

His support increased over 
ie years and in the 198 4 
enerai elections was returned 
ith a larger majority. 

It was one man against the 
ystem and Mr Lee promised 
i remove him from the public 
cene. . 

This has now occurred since 
Member of Parliament auto- 
oatically loses the seat if he is 
ined more than SS 2,000 
£600) or jailed for more than 
12 months. 

The Government s cam- 
i aipn against him began from 
he day he entered Parliament, 
fie was the first opposition 
nember in 14 years and his 
performance was enough to 
iend a second man to Par- 
liament in the 1984 elections. 

The Government enacted 
several laws to drcnmscribe 
their activities in Parliament 
including the removal of 
protection for libel for state- 
ments uttered in the House. 

Mr Jeyaratnam had wid- 
ened debate but whether be 
has succeeded in persuading 
more Singaporians to come out 
and be counted is uncertain. 

Under Singaporean laws the 
Government need not bold a 
by-election except at its conve- 
nience. If Mr Jeyaratnam is 
replaced by another opposition 
member, then the problems for 
the ruling People’s Action 
Party would only be com- 
pounded. sources in Singapore 
said last night. 


■ficiency 


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n**tc~K 



moves 
ht 


or summit and 
Gorbachov visit 


From Michael Haralyn, Delhi 


Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the In- 
dian Prime Minister, steps 
once more this week upon the 
international stage tor a 
fortnight's festival of foreign 
affairs. The two-week season 
begins as India takes over the 
leadership of the South Asian 
Association for Regional Co- 
operation (Saarc). the seven- 
nation group of some of the 
poorest and most populous 
countries in the world. 

It ends with a visit to Delhi 
by Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, 
the Soviet leader, which is 
likely to be nothing less than 
triumphal 

India's power and size in the 
South Asian region is such 
that for many years the other 
countries had feared to form a 
regional association lest il 
simply prove a vehicle for 
India's dominant ambitions. 
These fears were overcome 
Iasi year in Bangladesh when 
Saarc was officially formed 3t 


11,000 police for 
Asian summit 


Bangalore (Renter) - At 
least 1 1,000 policemen backed 
np by commandos have been 
called rn to guard South Asian 
leaders meeting next Sunday 
at a summit conference in this 
southern Indian city. 

"We consider the threat to 
lives of leaders from ex- 
tremists as very* real.** a 
government spokesman told a 
press conference on the the 
see ting of the Sooth Asian 
Association for Regional Co- 
operation (SAARC). 

He declined to disclose the 
basis of the threat or say 
tthether police had put under 
boose arrest any suspected 
Sikh and Tamil militants in 
Bangalore. 


a summit meeting in the until- 
ihen sadly underused Par- 
liament building in Dhaka. 

Yesterday officials were to 
begin the discussions for the 
second Saarc summit, which is 
being held in Bangalore, cap- 
ital of the south Indian state of 
iCarcataka. As Mr Gandhi 
lakes over the chairmanship 
from President Ershad of 
Bangladesh, some aspects of 
regional affairs are not very 
nappy. 

Bilateral links between In- 
dia and its western neighbour 
Pakistan are worse than they 
have been for some time. 
They have been badly affected 
by the Karachi hijack. Punjab 
terrorism, America's intention 
to supply a sophisticated air- 
borne early warning system to 
Pakistan and reports that 
Pakistan has just conducted a 
lest on a” trigger" foranuclear 
bomb. Relations are so bad 
that President Zia-ul-Haq has 
downgraded the summit 
meeting by announcing that 
he will not attend, and Paki- 


stan will instead be repre- 
sented by the cipher-like figure 
of Mr Mohammad Junejo, the 
Prime Minister. 

Though bilateral — and 
indeed political matters — are 
officially ruled out of dis- 
cussions at the summit, they 
are bound to colour events in 
Bangalore. The weekend 
crackdown against the Tamil 
militants in Madras, will to 
some extent improve the at- 
mosphere between India and 
Sri Lanka, as well as helping 
the task of the security forces 
charged with guarding the 
seven delegations. 

The security arrangements 
for the summit have just been 
reviewed by Mr Buia Singh, 
the Home Minister, during a 
visit to the summit city. The 
huge security operation has 
been undertaken in close co- 
operation with the other 
member nations, a foreign 
ministry spokesman said. 

Security, too. seems likely 
to be major consideration 
when Mr Gorbachov arrives - 
though there is no official 
confirmation, the date of his 
visit is said to be November 
25. The Russian leader is 
expected to spend all of his 
four-day visit in the Indian 
capital, and it will be up to his 
wife. Mrs Raisa Gorbachov, 
to undertake the photogenic 
forays to such tourist sites as 
the Taj Mahal. 

The visit will include the 
signing of a new economic 
agreement, as well as a num- 
ber of protocols, one of which 
relates to the opening of new 
consulates. 

But these nuts and bolts will 
pale into insignificance beside 
the atmosphere of peace, co- 
operation and friendship that 
will be generated. Mr N. D. 
Tiwari, the new Minister for 
External Affairs, said yes- 
terday that not only would it 
be a “landmark” in strength- 
ening relations between India 
and the Soviet Union, it 
would also have a positive and 
healthy influence in the region 
and in reducing international 
tensions. 

Mr Tiwari has just returned 
from a visit to Moscow where 
the plans for the Gorbachov 
visit were finalized in a series 
of talks with Mr Edward 
Shevardnadze, the Russian 
Foreign Minister. Speaking in 
the Lok Sabba. the lower 
house of India's Parliament, 
Mr Tiwari said that Mr 
Gorbachov was looking for- 
ward to his visit, which would 
enable the two countries to 
raise their relations to a higher 
level. 

He said there was "full 
understanding on all issues — 
economic, technical and 
scientific relations”. It was 
agreed, be said, that India and 
Russia would go ahead with 
accelerated co-operation in 
science and technology. 



Mr Kim Dae-jang, the South 
Korean dissident leader, sit- 
ting in his car in Seoul's main 
square yesterday as police 
prevented him attending an 
anti-Govenunent rally. Mr 
Kim was held in the car for 
more than two boors and was 
then forcibly taken home and 
pot under boose arrest. 

His aides said last night 
that a police van was blocking 
the drive of his home in west 
Seoul and that scores of 
security men were ringing the 
single-storey building. 


Mr Kim, a former presiden- 
tial candidate and an oat- 
spoken critic of President 
Chun was forcibly takes home 
from outside the City HaUL 
He returned home last year 
after two years* seif- imposed 
exile in the US and is banned 
from political activity under a 
suspended 20-year jail sen- 
tence for sedition. 

• ROME: On Monday the 
Pope received in audience here 
another Sooth Korean opposi- 
tion leader, Mr Kim Yeung 
Sam (AFP reports). 


US Navy 
ships slip 
quietly out 
of China 


From Robert Grieves 
Peking 

Three warships from the US 
Pacific Fleet left the port of 
Qingdao yesterday morning 
after a quiet visit marking the 
first appearance of the Ameri- 
can Navy m China's coastal 
waters since 1949. 

The chief characteristic of 
the visit to the fr>rmerGerman 
naval base that later served as 
a US Navy port in the 1940s, 
was its predictability. As with 
the visit of British warships to 
Shanghai earlier this year, 
nothing untoward occurred. 

This was a drastic change 
from America's military con- 
frontations with China during 
ti* past 30 years, directly m 
Korea and indirectly in 
Vietnam. 

US officials admitted, that' 
negotiations for the six-day 
visit of the USS Reeves, a 
guided-missOe cruiser, the 
USS Rentz, a guided-missile 
frigate, and the USS Old- 
endorf, a destroyer, were 
smoothed by the Shanghai 
visit of the Royal Navy. 

Last year a scheduled US 
Navy port call at Shanghai 
was postponed when a con- 
troversy arose over whether 
the ships were carrying 
nuclear weapons. This time, 
however, Peking and Wash-, 
ington appeared to agree to 
say as little as possible about 
the nuclear weapons issue. 


Hasenfus 

awaits 

verdict 


From Alan Tomlinson 
Managua 

The revolutionary People’s 
Tribunal trying the American 
airman Mr Eugene Hasenfus 
on charges including terror- 
ism. has begun considering its 
verdict. 

After a trial lasting three 
weeks, the non-jury court 
closed the proceedings to any 
farther evidence on Monday 
night It has three days from 
that time to deliver a decision 

Mr Hasenfus, aged 45. was 
shot down in a plane loaded 
with arms on October 5. He 
admitted flying weapons to 
the Contra rebels, but pleaded 
not guilty to terrorism, 
conspiracy, and violating 
Nicaraguan security. 

The defence has argued that 
he was only an employee of 
the US aviation company 
contracted to deliver suppies 
to the Contras: the prosecu- 
tion alleges the company was a 
front for the CIA, and that Mr 
Hasenfus knew this. 

• MANAGUA: Nicaragua 
said yesterday that Contras 
had killed seven civilians in 
an attack on a village and that 
22 rebels were killed in battles 
with troops close to where the 
supply plane was downed last' 
month (Reuter reports). 


Army’s shadow on 
Dhaka democracy 


From .Ahmed Fari, Dhaka 

From its green cantonment continue to have a “role” in 
- * - government. 

“It is the only way to check 
adventurism from the barr- 
acks,” Genera) Ershad con- 
fided in a recent interview. 
The generals do not warn to 


on the outskirts of Dhaka, the 
Army casts a long shadow 
over the new democracy that 
100 million Bangladeshis 
woke up to yesterday. 

General Ershad, the 
country's military ruler, 
announcing the end of martial 
law, said a new era had begun. 
But he cautioned his country- 
men that "irresponsible poli- 
tics " could once again lead to 
chaos. 

There was no euphoria on 
the first day of civilian rule on 
the streets of the capital, where 
scores of people had been 
killed or maimed during the 
long struggle against martial 
law. 

"Martial law may not be on 
the books any more, but the 
power has not shifted from the 
garrisons, ” said Sheikh 
Ha&ina Wazed, the leader of 
the Awami League, the 
country's largest opposition 
party. 

The opposition called for a 
fresh round of protest starting 
today and pledged to continue 
the struggle to unseat General 
Ershad. 

Fears that the military 
would exercise power were 
fuelled by General Ershad's 
remarks that the Army would 


be Cabinet ministers but they 
would like to be heard on 
national issues." he said. 

Bangladeshis have been 
under military rule for a total 
of eight and a half years in its 
15-year history of indepen- 
dence. In those years the 
country had seen its two 
presidents, including the 
founding father, sheikh 
Mujibur Rahman, assas- 
sinated by dissident Army 
officers. 

“There have been 18 coup 
attempts in the country,” 
General Ershad said of the 
troubled times before he 
seized power on March 24. 
1982, "I have brought back 
discipline in the Army.” 

Government aides are talk- 
ing of a couple of models for 
an institutional role of the 
Army in administration. One 
of these provides for the 
setting up of a National Sec- 
urity Council, composed of 
the top brass. 

But others would prefer the 
Army to remain behind the 
scenes and provide stability. 


THE ARTS 


Harmless outrage in a 

comedy fit for all 


I n the oW Mack and white 
days, television comedy, 
was a matter of consen- 
sus. Pmsfre sifr coni a r- 
rived only when writers 
moved down the sodal scale to 
introduce working-class 
characters, some of whom 
were 'not nice and used “bad 
language?. 

Now it is probably fair to 
say that the over-50s still 
prefer their comedy Wand and 
without sodal content, white 
die past-tyrAnn generation in- 
dsae toward anarchic force 
laced with childrens' sniHt and 
gore. The last two episodes Of 
rCVs Girts ok Top, far exam- 
ple, included derogatory re- 
marks by two giris shorn the 
habited state of their former 
flatmate's knickers and the 
rapturous sniffing of a man's 

smelly sock. 


television 


grew np with the satire town 
ofthcSxties-ThatWasThe 
Era That Was. And, if tw want 


outrageous comedy, where can 
we turn? The agreeably acer- 
bic Victoria Wood is hack on 


BBC2, Fmvby Trnms repeats 
" i popular, but mostly we 


sion into the dark ages of 
comedy for those of ns who 


remain pops 
torn, to America; to 
M*A*S*H, Golden Gate (of 
which more on Saturday), 
Cheers, Taxi and of coarse 
.Stop (Channel 4). 

This is positively ti» last 
series of Soap, because 
America’s . Moral . Minority 
bos pressurized' advertisers 
into boycotting it There are no 
four-letter words in the show, 
and the discreetly fhded-ont 
sex scenes wdsU have passed 
the Hayes Code, so what is oil 
the fuss about? Probably the 


Aids age fa not the best time M 
have, in Jodie, a channmg 
bisexual bero-fifcnre 
other hand perhaps it is jos* 

the right time); the 

rageonsoess of Soap c oaststs 

entirely in the range « soaak 

and criminal aberra- 

tians the characters represent, 
their childlike acceptance ofl 
weS, of almost anything* and 
their tikeabtesess despite it 
alt 

Soap is the brainchild of 
Susan Harris. Her bizarre 
imagination, sharp-edged 
scripts and sheer nerve must 
take primary responsibility to r 
the show’s success, but a large 
measure of credit is also due to 
the ebullient cast and to the 
stick veteran director Jay 
Sandrich, whose past suc- 
cesses include the Lacy and 
the Dick van Dyke shows. 

Anne Campbell 
Dixon 



Van Morrison 

Hammersmith 

Odeon 


As Van Morrison’s superb 
backing band played a breezy 
instrumental version of 
“Moondance” prior to the 
maestro’s grand- entrance, a 
roadie wandered on stage to 
make a final adjustment to the 
monitor speakers at the front. 
A great cheer went up from the 
audience, many of whom had 
plainly mistaken the million 
for Morrison himself, an easy 
error to make given the 
gloomy li ghting and Mor- 
rison's sublime lack of “scar” 
pretension. 

His voice is another matter, 
and there are few who would 
foil to recognize the gruff tones 
and richly evocative qualities 
that Morrison is able to con- 
jure from lyrics enunciated 
like a man delivering a philo- 
sophical dissertation while 
gargling. Though the bulk of 
this brisk, well-paced set com- 
prised his own mystical blend 
of blues, soul and jazz, per- 
haps best described as modem 
spiritual music, even stan- 
dards like Tommy Edwards's 
“It’s AH in the Game” and 
Sonny Boy Williamson’s 
“Help Me” became uniquely 
personalized by Morrison’s 
idiosyncratic delivery. 

The tend watched him like 
hawks, waiting ibr unpredict- 
able signals to indicate either 
stark shifts in volume or 
extended ad lib sections where 
Morrison’s voice would de- 
scend to the level of a hoarse 
whisper, annexing phrases 
with distraught intensity. 
These twists and the lack of 
any formal count-ins to the 
songs contrived to keep what 
was potentially a super-slick 



Von Morrison: tremendous emotional tug and a continuing 
sense of touch and timing in Hve performance 


band in the “rough diamond” 
mode that Morrison prefers. ' ’ 

The newest material tended 
to find him in gentle reflective 
moods; "Foreign Window” 
and “In the Garden” were 
both faced with religious ref- 
erences, while “Here -Comes 
the Knight* was a slow ballad 
with big brassy chords shifting 
in majestic sweeps. But the 
best moment was the segue 


from the attractive descending 
sequence <xf "A Sense of 
Wonder” into the slower 
“When the Healing Has 
Begun”, a change that high- 
lighted both the tremendous 
emotional tug of Morrison's 
material and his continued 
sense of touch and timing in 
five performance. 


David Sinclair 



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LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

tit 8.0 MaB Wed SO. Sal 5.04 
8 SO Rudurrd price mar v*ims 
S ldmli and OV, -Ja rainy 
Group Satei 930 6123 

BOOH NOW FOR XMAS 

Special manner Dec 2a Sum 


DUCHESS S 836 824.C CC 240 
9648 OC 379 6499 A CC 20 
ElT/7 day 240 7200 Eiqs a wed 
mat 3 Sal 5 4 8 

NO SEX. PLEASE 
ltf« BRITISH 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 5)22 Cc 

836 9857/741 4999/379 t-LLJ 

^dnr 2«0 7200- Ei-s a. Thu S. 
Sal 5 6 8 30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award IS 84 

STEPPING OUT 

Hll comedy try Richard Warm 
EMrectcd By Jmm McKenzie 

•ronuMm on tap" sid 
THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FOOTUK B OF CCS 836 S25B/9 
AW 240 7?0D JaMhjry 0X0 IcTI 
Mon in Fn 3. Sal 8 30 mm Thuis 
A Sal 3 «i 

LYNDA REFTM 

BELUHCHAM DAMNEL 

in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

"1 Him rd nerv nuuite" st 
“A itwir of ttiiKMunim - a 
unuMiLitor' r imr tS 

WE DOUBLE DARE YOU TO 
DETECT NOW ITS DONE 
Ran utanaed I* Dr £ 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-888 
T7SS HIM Can rt 24hm 
721X1 IBM (lei. E>ts7 4i. hWl 
Sal 2.30 UNDER ULM WOOD 
6/ Dylan Tiuanc, 

And Imnnnl imaa rwe to n 
_«rarm, hmm and bawdy" 
Duuy TdegraMi 


GARRICK SOI 379 6107. 1st can 
24/hr 7 day 240 7200. Gro Sales 
930 6123. Preuewj iron Tontor. 
Ev« 7 30. Sal SAB Opens Mob 
al 7pm iTues mal al 3 ftwn 36 
Non 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 
MR ann MRS NOBODY 

»■ Keith W'aterhwBe 
Direclrd by Ned SMrrtn 


GLOBE 437 1592 CC 379 6453 
1M Call 24 hr 240 7200 -no bh9 
/eel 74i 9999 too &M lent. Grp 
Sain 9V> 6123 Eves 8 
Mal, Wed 5 Sal 4. 


COMEDY OP TNT YEAR 
Laurence OSnar *w« IMS 

LEND ME A TENOR 

-If in Uuonier you tv after - ... drer 
Uir fun comet, nowlme ituct-n 
anO lasler" Sid 
A Comedy By Ken Ludwl9 
Directed bv David OtaM* 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9901. PreeB 
IH Mm SELLING THE SIZZLE 
A New Comedy oy Peter dun. 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box off ire A CC 01-930 9832. W 

CNI 2dhr/7 day cc hkw 240 7200 

E in7 30 WrdJ Saimaa 230pm 

WEHEH JACOBI iNommalrd Ac 

lor of ine Year Laureocv OUiier 

a v, at da l -a truly 

mesmenemd performance— 
S.TUnr» in 

BREAKING the COD E 

Oy HUGH WHIKNOM 
Joann DnU bubal Dan 

■MuM Boo«h 
Dir by CUFFMD WIUIMII 

MOWING AND ENORMOUSLY 

ENJOYABLE- D.Cxp 


HERMAJCSTYS. Bov mart, el Ol 
899 2244 TICketRiasfPr CC 379 
6151 First Call CC 24 0 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER'S 
NEW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Siarrntq 

MCHAEL CRAWYOR' 

Saiah Sieve 

Briqtiinun Barton 

Claife Moore ptoys ®mi»f 
ai ceriain peefonbancee 
Dir tried by HAROLD 
[in 7 45 Mata wed A Sal 3 
Puvial tiKiw only ror Apr to Oct 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9999 mo bug feci. Find car 
24 Hr 7 DJI CC MO 7200. [Ht 
flue FECI On Sues 930 6135 
Tic M-t maswr 379 n435 
OVEN 200 NIK OF 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
„ COMEDY 

CCORGC HEARN 
A DENIS Ot'fULEY 

U CAGE AUX FOLLES 

— * PALUUMM ROAR- .OF 
APPROVAL" S Trl 

Mon Fn 7.36. Mata Wed ZOO 
Sat ? 30 & 8.00 
hidni conmuora n«ii. ai door 
A SM roan 

SCATS AVAILABLE FROM C7JW 
Now iwwunt M April 25, ISB7 


LTfQC HAMMERSMITH Ol 741 

23H E,es 745 . wed Man 
2 '.30 ■ S al Mats 4(40 TW 
MFCRNAL MACHINE By Cue 

INU taim Mauu KoMb 
g niDIB i E»n (Ml 
SMFTwqRK FESTIVAL. 


LYTTELTON -S- 92 a a262 CC 
•NaMulMl Tlxolre > protferM m 
’tone 1 ldo.iv 0 18 «ow oner 
null A 7 46 rur 7.45 TONS OF 
ITONEY m- w 111 Ei-aiH and v m- 
ennne Tumor, rn. Men 7 45, 

Sal 2 1 5 >ltnv price m&i A 7US 

1 50 now aw man THE 

MAGISTRATE, 


MAYFARt Ol 609 3037 
From Dec 16 la Jan 3 
Twice dairy 20*40 
Wed* Jb SaO 10^0. SO 4 4.0 

SOOTY'S XMAS SHOW 


LYRIC THEATRE ShaReriKinr 
A«e W1 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1B50 01-434 1050. 01-734 

5166/7 


C«M BLAKELY 
-a nrtuuvil A joyously 
roadc performance” F. Times 
in 

The NaBmtol Theatre's acclaimed 
oroducoon of 


A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-Heurtbreaunaiv fumy” Gdn 
-HUarKius. ” S Times 
■■A rare mow ol 
comic extalarauon- Time* 
DC 7.3a Man Wed and SM 30. 
Group Sale* 01-990 6123. 

Reduced price mat* Student & 
OAP Stand-by 


FIRST CALL MNR 7 DAY 

cc BOOKoras on at z*a 7200 

(NO AOOKMG FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL ‘87 

• IMMCCI DC LA TOUR 
AS ULLIAN HELLMAN IN 

LILLIAN • 

A puy by Wiutam Luce, directed 
By cortn Redgrave. Sun* Nov. 16 . 
23 A 30 at 4pm, 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3086. Mon- 
■ Fn/sai 6.40 a a.io 


17HJ 8 

RICHARD TODD ui 

•TtoMIkahrUrNurSM 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unabashed wtmwc" S exp 
‘ fSMMbonaP* Time* 

-8TH TWUUJNS YEAN 


_ . 236 6568 K 741 

9949. cro Safes 430 6129 Fir* 
CaB 240 7200 124 Hr* 7 Oaysr 
Tirtceimaaer 379 6433. 
c*e* 8pm. Sals 6pm a 830 

STEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGRANOi 

-SAVACELY COMKr FT 
Prv-omnre load and drmfc 
LAST 3 PEDIS 


IHERMAID TNEAXWE OJ.236 
£6b8 First Can 240 7200 379 
o433 74J 9999 Group Sole* 900 
6123 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Open* Dererater 15 Mr 4 wmKs 
only Tuner dadv al 2.0 A 6.0 


NATKMAL THEATNE sn Bank 

national theatre 

sec SEF^r^ES Udder 
OUVfCK; LYTTELTON/ 
COTTE5LOL Enctoieul cheap 


mu day* of ntrft as COcarm 
trad IO am. .RESTAURANT 




^033% RASY CAD PIU jB^ IWO 


633 0880. AM ’ 


NEW LONDON DrtirY Lane WC2 
406 DOTS 0.1 379 643J Eie* 7.4fl 


TUT «< Sat. 3.0 16 7^ . 


THE ANDREW . . 

H3. CUOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 


Croup BodwwM 01 405 I567.gr 
Ol 95C 6123 NOW BOOKJHC IO 
HUY SO 1907. Seal* avail lor ad- 
diiHlnal houBay Perl* Wi Dec 22 6 
Jan 2 al 3pm 


ouvn •S' 938 2232 CC IN* 
uonal Theatre^ open stage) 
Preview* Today. lOJWmA 
2-00. 3 Mp n 10.30am THE 
PIED PIPED a musical show 
Iran Browning'* poem (for 6 
u yur otd*. tow price s) Ton T. 
7.15 I4M pert. JACOBOWSHY 
AMD THE COLONEL by Wertef. 
«craon by SN Befitman. 
Tomer. Fn Mon. Tue 7.13. Sal 
200 (low once ITMII * 7. 16 AN- 

n 


OLD VK 928 7616 OC 261 1821 
From 19NOT. Fora limited 
only 

MAMA AfTKEN 

JODI SOWKXR 

FAITH BROOK 


OEOHSNU HALE 
PATTI LOVE 

DIANA QUICK 

ZEMA WALKER 

and 


THE WOMHJ 

A Mi e ft 6^ " ■ »* 

by Cure Boottse Luce 


PALACE YHEATDC 434 0909 CC 
379 6433 FN CaU 24Hr TOay CC 

LES M1SERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET -STEAL ONE" s« 

Eves 7 30 Man Thu A Sal 2.30 
Ltoecomers not a dmi tted 
until die infrtvai 


^^ycTOMOWUBj 


WCFOR HETUIBO ATTWEI 

omcL ■■■■H 


PHOWK B36 2294 Cc 340 9661 

DIANA RIGG 
WILDFIRE 

a new May 

Oracled nv PETER WOOD 
REDUCED PRKX PREV6 NOW! 

Opens 18 Nov at 7om 
in can 240 7200 Grp Sams 930 
612SMon-Tba8 Fn/sai 4* a.16 


PneCACMLLY 437 *606 CC 379 
6666/ 379 6433/ 240 7200. 
Graunsam 930 ol2S/ 836 W68. 
Prnwvm MB 8pm. Open* Frl 
7pm. Sub eiD 8, Sal 4.90 dr 8 16 
Wed macs 3 Hrctn 19 Nov) 


PAtWCK CARCjLL 
ROM STEVENS 
. FRED EVAS« 

wan Royix 

bi 


A FUNNY THING 


OH THE 

•‘actil njly lunny- S E xp 

Yin Funul set WuMaul 


PRRWG EDWARD BW OUW 

734 8961 First CaU 24 Hr 7 DWto 
cc Booking 3464 Grp SJto* 
WO 6123. Mon-Sal 7 50 M SKS 
Thun & Sat 2-30 


CHESS 


BEST MUSICAL OF 7TK YEAH 
BM Admu - Eton P*j» 


DnL Anna - T ammg 
LAURENCE OUVTEX 


AWARDS 

llM 

Nun tif-Mer to Mure* 2S. 19*7 

mat S£j» rs sttoirnMES 

AVAILABLE ON DAY 


PWNCE <r WALES wi 950 8681 
‘ 2 tt HOUU1P 930U84* • ;> - 9. Orn 
Sato* 930 6123 K«01 
tat 94*9 T«*«masiPr 379 q443 
i« Can 24ni/7cmy 240 7200 

'ALLO'ALLO 

with Uie TV SNOW STARS 
Cm B. Frf A Sm 330 A R4Q 
EXTRA PCWN 30 A 31 Dec at 
230 


01-734 1166/7/ 
□261/0120. 241w CC 340 7200/ 

379 643 5. Gn > Sates 930 6125. 

“I* BEST MUSICAL M 
LONDON* Gdn 

“A WONDERFUL STAR” MUB 


MAUREE N UPMAN n 

LEDNAHD BERHSTEBP8 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

“B rubles tofm esrttenmni" 

S. Times "juM wonderful*' D Exp 
Mon-Sal 8 Mats Wed 2.50 sal 6 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1 746/ 
J8S7. OC 24nr 7 day zoo 7200 
ibkg feel UxtB 22 Maw. Evei 
80 fn. SU Mats 4pm KAFKA'S 
DKH by Abut hMriL Dir 
■ Rtcnard Eyre. 


ROYALTY 01-631 0660 24W Cc 
340 7200 « 379 6C53 741 9999 
Croup Sale* 930 6123 


JOSEPH 

i TO* ABIAZME, 


From 16 Dec twice dully al 2.30 A 
7.30 BOOK HOW 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916. 
nr* cam oc aw t day zoo 
7200. L'nni Sal. Today. Tomor. 
10,30 A 2 pm 

THE OLD MAH OF LOCHHAOCR 
A MnM PtarhrCMAip 


SAVOY TTEA7RC Ol 636 8888. 
OC3T9 6219. 8360479. FtoH Cad 
24 hr 7 day ihkg fee) 24Q 720a 
KeWh prow*. 741 9999 fbfcg tool. 
Red Prt« Preve UnUI Nov 19. 
Eva Mop - rna pm -Sal S a 8.50. 

DAVn 


KILLI NG JES SICA, 

The Mm Wnlin TtoBw 

Directed ny MTM FO WEI 


SHAFTESBUmr THEATRE or 


COMEDY 01 379 6399 OC Ol 374 
0433/741 9999. Ftrw Call 24 hr 
240 7200 (hkn toe l. Grp Sato* 930 
6123 

Mon-rn 8. Wed MU 3. Sal 5 & 
8.30 

THEA TRE O F COMEDY CO 

FMAL mou or 


IAN 

OOLYY 


COURTENAY 

• PCQCT 

A LIONEL AFFKIES to 

ROOKERY NOOK 

By BEN TRAVERS 
*'A Sfep-up mnal uie 
bed f nave ever wyh“ Tunes'" 


NOW B OOKING FOR 
WB CONTI ; 


TOW 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 
P re v ie ws front Dee 6 


ST HABTDrS 0J-N6 1443: Spe- 
cial OC NO. 374 64*3 Evgl 8-0 
TIM* 246. Sal 50 and a o 

Mn »r a* acutha cmkiey 

THE MOUSETRAP 


FTSAMD 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/6190. 741 9909. FlrN CaU 
2« Hr 7 Day cr 240 7200 Os 
Saies 930 6123 

CABARET 


“The limpid, mi 
44, inert rtpyUneto 
mrtu to to We 


Wert End" Std 
Sfamny 

WA\74E SLEEP 

Olrectod & ChgNyKmmed nv 

GUto IpM 

Mon-Frt 7 a& Mai w«d 400 
Saf 4 Ml A 8.13 

BOOKWa NOW EXYEHOCD TO 
APRIL 87 


STRAIFtMO UPON AVON 
lOIBOl 203t>aa. ROYAL 
SHAKESPEARE COMPANY 41 
■RET flbeaerti T'onom. 7 30. 
Tomor | 30. 7 30. (Retard ■ 
Fn 7 30. Pnn to 1-30. 
WWUr'a ihie ton T.sO .Swwr. 
Tkwn,rar bUOd Today 1 30 
Tbtuont. Tomor. Fn .7.30, 
Rover. Sat 1-30, KtortwarSaf 
.730 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The vary- pert of BrUauY 
condc Eatonl“ Dally M3fl 


S ee manft e n tr m under 

CRTFERMN "" 


I THEATRE/ 


VAUDEVILLE BOX Office * CC. 

BSD 9987/5646 nm rau.ee. 24 

nr* 240 7200 ipfcg (eel. EVN8J). 

Mats Wed 2.30. Sal 6.0. a3a 


MARTIN JARVIS 


JmCPHOK TEWSON to 
ALAN AYOKBOMDPS Ham Hay 

W OMAN IN MIN D , 

“IWS MUST BE TM* FUNNIEST 


PLAY W LOHDOIC IT » ALSO 

MMinT Mrumnc’ s id 


“ALAN AYCKB OURN, IS YWT- 

IHO AT ms BEST" & Times 

R—— M B— — gvM A 

W UUM Wltt TO TAKE THE 

■M BREATH AWAY" D.T« ■ 


neroRu mlme« 4W ut7 

Eves 7 30 Mai* Wed & Sal 245 

EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December 26.29-30 Jan 1 * 2 

24hr 7 day cc (men u>o extra 

cnarpej on FIRST CALL 240 7200 
“A MIGHT OF SHEER SONG S. 
DANCE MACaerr way Newa 

CHARLIE GIRL- 
ONLY 9 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL NICHOLAS 

CYD CHMHSJE 


NICHOLAS PARSONS 
■ MARK WYNTEJI to 


•«^SkF., G Sf-. 


Also OOOk. TfctoOnactor JC7964S3 

or any W h snstn Travel Branch 


_ B34 0289/4 

cc B34 0048 <CHC H eH HMH r 379 
6433. From 24 NOV. 

JM Hl wg frml tom 
C UOM. T HE WI TCH A 
1MK WARDROBE 
CS Lewis 
CHARITY GALA 
Z 7 MOV W U* 


HOI&i 


WUfTCHAU. sm Ol 930 7765/ 
839 4456 Cc Ol 570 6666/379 
64 SJ. 741 9999. 

JUU E 

WALTERS 
SHEILA 


The Award'WInmng Comedy 
WHEN I WAS A «5L 
I USED TO SCREAM A SHOUT 
by Sherman. MMdonoid 
Preview* 2 Dec - Opens 9 Dec 
7pm Mon Fn 8. Sal 6^50 A a. 30 
wen «uu 3 from 10 Dec . 


WYNOHABPS S 836 3028 or 379 
6306/0433/191 Call 24 hr* 7 day* 
240 7B00/741 9969. Crt* B36 
3962/851 2771. Ton*L Tomor. 
Frl B. &H -3 & 8 

JOHN ROSEMARY 
MILLS HARRIS 

to We H. T. y ito e UMi M 

THE PETmON ■ 

bv BWA lf CLAR K 

py P FTCT W ALL 

.JJLT'FniFMMKDb. 

EXTRAONPOO WY" T>mw 
LAST FIVE PERFS . 


WYtaoHAw* * Has soae «■ sro 

0099/0 -Ai aroa 836 3902. El a 
7 30. Sal BUIS 3 
For a iiroiu-djfeasoit from 19 Nov 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

_ . TOM WESSON m 

Ike Tmmni Vie prodncHen of 

-■ GHOSOS 

By HennDIbKn 
thrected by Dsctd Thacker :• 


TOUHB WC 928 6363 OC 379 
6433. FTOm Touts W 20 Dec 
JUUUS CAESAR Eves 7 30 Fn 
mat 2 . 

Yown Vic STUDIO 928 6363 

ns •%owaa*t i* Mtotoi<e»_ri 
. wm— Ml the to, to 
«iwi" Gdn. Eva ft 

- - 

| ART GALLERIES | 

ANTHONY rOFFAY 9 * ZB 
DxTimSL Wl RKHARDIOMB 
New Week, ago aioQ. 

BARBICAN ANT GALLERY Bar- 
■ mean Centre. EC?. Ol 63a 
. 4141. umo a Jam DnM Heto 
ort» U796-1864I: pBUnnng* or 
Europe A Uie Now East PLUS 
. Um ton by nomadic Far* 
trtbesvromea. Toes - Su 10- 
6-46. Sun A B Hod 12-6.45. 
Ctort Men ilia, Adm. £2 & 
XL Rfovcm raws lor pn- 
hooked parties. Also. 

TAPESTRY WEAVING DIS- 
PLAY by Mamma Button - unto 
. 19 Dec iPhone for deun id 
dates and Umesj 



^CCA GAUGES 

Aim . 

„ _ 8 Omo SL mil 

New C—eeHew Mod Midi 

17 Prm» Arcade Wl 
Bhtori pMttor 

. Recent Watercolours and 

Screen Pram. Uun is Nov. 

01- 499 6701. 

qWWTBNIBI NULL. 17. 

ADAM TC3MSR scunNtire. 

FREE ART SOCIETY 148 New 

Bong target. W l.Qi 629 Si 16 

TMUIOW. Abut . 

- manwc at koiuno 
18001930. and AirrsuT 

POWEM 1918-1986. 

FISCHER 1 FIMT ART SO 1000 SI.. 

1964. Lanu 21 NOS.- 

FKCHBR RHI AJTT 3Q KU*3 St . • 
SI. Jatnei's SW1, 839 3«M2. 
CASTDN . emus SAC 1910- 
1^04. The pcrranor of 
ItobtoHL UnU Z\ NOl 

■flOaOHBUDI STUMP. A Mdnl 
PWRt gL SWT- Ol SSL 0667. 

IMffi 09UUXY . PAMTNMa 
I977-H 

royal academy, prxadil- 
■ LY Ol 73a 9052 Cfpenoa tty lO- 
6 JJV.Surt (reduced nri» Sibl 

1 451 NEW -ANCMYnS- 
TBgfc foana- . aocsg 
sttrunc ana toe sketch- 
■OONS or FICASSO Adm. uor 
<««. exjubj £7.30. st TO 
eg fie.. raft- cc MXHano 01-741 
9999 

XFAHK, Ktrw street. &l. jaMtfs 
SJJL OmtpLM, STAHMUS 
BRAY. 1R96-19S8L LnU 28D* 

NmemDer MonFn 930-630. . 


18 
3883. 
4r. 


THE MALL QALLEIHES. iNr Ad- 
■mrany Arcnj Tel: 930 6844. 
THE R OY AL SO CgTY OF MA- 
'DW ARTISTS, 6 • |7 

Noiemocr daily. io - 8pm. 
Adm £i Cone. sop. 


» An Exhl- 
tnlMn « European Architec 
rural Drawmn* of the 1920-* 
and 1930-8 CUAeryUofanL sc 
PaUMaU. London swi 01-93C 
lfads. Mon-Fn 106 


ARCHITECTURAL 
GALLERY. 36 Store SI. WC1.. 
THi Ol. 636 489S. DAVID 
ROBERTS View* of Egypt ana 

the Hoty Land Monday - Friday 

10& Saroway*. i»i 


CINEMAS 


f- AM I bLH PLAZA op p Camden 
Town ruse 086 2043 MEM < IS) 
FHm al 2-26 4.80 6AO 8.S6 


CHELSEA 'CROW Kino* Road 

SW3 3fil 3742 MEM US}. Film 
at 2-23 4.30 640 886. 


CURa ON W AYFAW Curznn Si 
4gs 37T7. gauge lamnum i 
WIOAH IPO} Pan l Today al 
S.«8om Sai/Sun I L30am Part 
2 Sun 11 30am & D.ofl|Hn 
■ "There's mavc in im* (Urn ... a 
rtieer m awe rptow ’ - srikuw or 
Beanvotr. Le Monde. 


CMtZOH WCST EMD Shanertniry 
Avenue w» 439 4806. Mam 
Snath. Denholm anon, juu, 
PffieB to A ROOM WIW A 
■VWW tPOL Film at 1.30 iNoi 
S um. 3.46, 6-10 A 8.40 
“A fflm as near io perfection at 
us poasibto io concave" 
Alwcander Watoer. Std ~ 


HAYjt OWPHA Him H W Ga te. 
. 727 4 043. FrtbfB's OHHRER « 
FRED no l JO mot Him. 3 so. 
630. fl.SO. AM seeto OookaMe. 


inwm square theatre 

930 3S52 ILnQJiOao 7616 (24 

ftr Access/ yna/ Aro£> Book 

booMWe in- advance. . . 


Si Martin-* 


Una w ^ ^gbU^g 


Og« . LUXEMBURG 

ffSr FB " 1 ®.30 6.00 

JO. 


ODOM HAYMARKET 1839 
76971 MONA DM <18l Sep 
|M9» Today 2 I&A.008A0.AU 
seat*. bo6kabto U, Mvance-. 
A««* and VIM UtoOlMne 
btoxwias wrinme. 


WO* LEICESTER eepmnr 

'■•930.61 111 bno 930 4280 / 
42B9. RUTHLESS FEOFLEllBl 
Sep progs Doors wo Daily 
200 3.00 BOO. uir IHMU 

■ . floors open 

ii-i Sum. Afl prom bookable tn 

raiiSLr tine 

I Access/ Visa/ AmExt oyi 
aaaa/ aw i9». aSiSir 

yj* AM WAD available 
Monday an pern. 


ff 1 *! Wan dmmsi Ptaum 

toouSc jgftj ghT-Bff 
!!^*wwenw -fi» s«p 

hMorrs Snidenl 
..card natoere. Lnoer lai. 


ojjp Ru»u Sq. Tube 





4 . 

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L £Ha»ia» 4-S6 6.46 

!■ sasR'sre-sa'i 

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DAY NOVEMB 


n 

H 


s? 


• ■ fcrV. 


into the future I A 


John RussellTaylor, 
in Amsterdam, 
reviews a spectac ular 
celebration of a 
turbulent time in 
Holland's history 

j GALLERIES j 

Id an Amsterdam recently 
rocked by quite violent 
demonstrations against the 
opening of die new Mus- 
iektheater, it is not perhaps so 
odd that the major shows in 
the city at present are all 
connected with the Icono- 
clasm. Indeed there are, 
throughout Holland, no fewer 
than seven shows all related to 
one another and to the samy 
subject. The Iconodasm in 
question is nothing to do withe 
the eddies of 20th-century 
opinion, however, bat the 
great destruction of Papist art 
which took place in Holland 
in 1566, and again, in a more 
thoroughgoing way, from 
1580, when Roman Catholic 
worship was officially forbid- 
den by the authorities. 

This may sound like a 
purely historical excursion, 
and no doubt that is so in 
some sections, notably the 
show in Amsterdam at the 
Gemeentarchie£ entitled Tbp- 
bnlent Days (until Saturday), 
which sensibly confines itself 
to filling in the background in 
the growth of Amsterdam and 
the changes in its social struc- 
ture at around this time. But 
the principal show at the 
Rijksmtiseum until Novem- 
ber 22, Art Before the Icoao- 
dawns North Netherlandish 
Art 1525-1580, though it too 
has its historic interest, is an 
exhibition of international im- 
portance, and in many re- 
spects a revelation. 

The point is not so much 
the ending of this phase in the 
Iconodasm as the ytunidiir^ 
leap forward that Nether- 
landish art took in these few 
short years, from the Middle 
Ages to the High Renaissance. 
Of course, it had a lot to do 
with history: the rapid deve- 
lopment of Amsterdam into a 
centre of international trad* 
and the jumping-off point for 
maritime exploration meant 
that the citizens became much 
more cosmopoliianly-min- 
ded, the artists were more 
inclined to travel, especially to 
Italy, and there was a more - 
receptive public for the new 
ideas they brought back. 

The abounding feme of the 
Rembrandt era in Dutch art, 
with its primarily secular in- 
terests, has tended to obscure, 
even in Holland, the glory of 




v 




: 4 



Early example of Renaissance Italian impact on Dutch art 
in Jacob van Oostntnen’s Saal and the Witch ofEndor 


what came before, even with- 
out the brutal punctuation of 
the Iconodasm. But the new 
Rijksmuseum show, which 
draws on collections as far- 
flung as Leningrad and Bal- 
timore; should permanently 
open eyes to the splendours of 
the Dutch 16th century. 

Some of this is summed up 
in the curious trompe-l'oeU 
self-portrait by Maarten van 
Heemskerck from the Fitz- 
wilfianu in which the older 
painter shows himself in front 
of a painting of his earlier self 
painting the Colosseum in 
Rome. It is an image of 
enormous confidence, and 
considerable virtuosity. And 
these qualities are not belied 
by the other Heemskercks in 
the show, such as the 
Triptych with the Crucifixion 
from the Hermitage, where the 
compositional intricacies 
learnt in Italy axe combined 
with a very characteristically 
Dutch taste for ruthless re- 
alism in the depiction of the 
feces of the crowd. This ability 
of Heemskerck to absorb Ital- 
ian influence but not be 
ovowhemed by ii seems to be 
fairly typical of the Dutch 
artists of this period. 

Equally striking is the work 
of Heemskerek's master Jan 
van Score!, in which one can 


THE ROW. OPERA 


UoijMttek O 

JEI1IFA 


Conductor 
Bernard Haitink 
Producer 
Yuri Lyubimov 

Nov 17,20 
Dec 3, 6 
at 7.30pm 
Nov 25,28 
at 7.00pm • 


Scenery: 


Cast includes: 


Yuri Lyubimov ‘Ashley Putnam 
Paul Hernou • EvaRandovi 
Costumes: Philip Langridge 

Clare Mitchell NeflRoscnshcin 
Lighting: 

Paul Qeiaon 
* Robert Bryan 


'"T**" ■ ‘Pieaseooic 

duogrofcaa 


Royal 

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win a 

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sense even more intensely the 
excitingly precarious balance 
between the Northern and the 
Latin approaches. His diptych 
of The Virgin and, Child with 
Donor, here reunited for the 
first time in centuries from 
Beilin and Tambov, has this 
same- distinctive quality, and 
elsewhere one can see just 
what a revelation Italian ait 
must have been to him when 
one compares these paintings 
with the very Dutch, very 
realistic Twelve Members of' 
the Jerusalem Brotherhood 
(including himself) all in one 
uncompromising row across 
the panel, which is only about 
two years earlier. 

The show also contains 
sculpture (a little), a wide 
variety of drawings and prints, 
examples of the decorative 
and domestic arts and even a 
full-scale stained-glass win- 
dow, an holiday as it were 
from St John's Church in 
Gouda, while it is being 
restored, by the great . master 
of the time, Dirck Crabeth. 
This last does vividly make 
the pomt that artists in such 
media, though often closely 
co mpa rable with their peers in 
eqsd-painting, are very sel- 
dom compared because of the 
relative inaccessibility of their 
work. 


[ CONCERT 

Nash Ensemble/ 
Friend 

Elizabeth Hall/ 
Radio 3 


Only a few years ago it would 
have been unthinkable that 
the BBC should be able to 
commission a young Soviet 
composer, and stiu more 
u nthinkable that the com- 
poser should be able to fulfil 
the commission with a setting 
of poems by Mandelstam. The 
appearance of Elena Rrsova's 
solo cantata Earthly Life, 
which had its first perfor- 
mance in Monday night's 
Radio 3 Russian Season con- 
cert, therefore would be spe- 
cially welcome if it could be 
taken as a sign that the Soviet 
amhoritiesare recognizing the 
vitality of past and present 
artists, and moving beyond 
the crude (and worse) at- 
tempts at stifling. 

Programming the Fiisova 
alongside Stravinsky’s Three 
Quartet Pieces suggested how 
long the wait has been, for 
only now does H seem possible 
for. Russian- composers to 
make contact with what was 
Stravinsky’s 70 and 80 years 
ago: the objectivity, die 
mecha n ica l patterning, the in- 
tricate simplicity, the utterly 
fresh, naked iynrism that has 
its basis' in' the modes and 
repeated motifs of Russian 
. folk-song. Earthly Lifeisstt the 


j OPERETTA j 

Die Fledennaus 
Fermoy Centre, 
King’s Lynn 

Opera — even Die fie • 
dermaus, even The Bat — is 
something of an event in 
Lowestoft, Ramsgate, Corby, 
even in King’s Lynn; and 15 
towns in East Anglia and the 
northern Home Counties have 
Opera East to thank for mak- 
ing it happen at alL 

Their stark, economic 
Carmen two years ago was 
memorable; this year’s Johann 
Strauss proves an almost in- 
superable challenge on half a 
shoestring. 

The orchestra, a band of a 
baker’s dozen, rise to that 
challenge superbly. Conduc- 
ted by Howard Burrell, they 
play like fun-loving Kaf 
feehaus serenaders, even strik- 
ing up a waltz or two as Act II 
changes into Act IIL Other- 
wise it is goodbye to Vienna. 
Robert Cbrsen sets his por- 
table production in the age of 
the portable radio: it is the 
hedonism and posturing of the 
1960s whir* he celebrates. 

In Lez Brotberston’s set of 
silvery reflecting wall-panels. 


same time a half-hour min- 
iature Song of the Earth, with 
two sharply and tinily gro- 
tesque scherzos separating 
three songs of increasingly 
intense and confident ecstasy. 

On one level the setting is 
immediately responsive to tire 
words: one hears, for instance, 
the '‘muffled sound of fruit/ 
falling from the tree” in the 
first song, and the celebration 
of the body in the second. But 
beneath that one senses a 
requiem for Mandelstam, and 
beneath that a fiercely beauti- 
ful piece of music for soprano, 
flute, harp, percussion and 
strings. Penelope Walmsiey- 
Oark sang it with an entirely 
convincing frozen passion. 
Lionel Friend conducted a 
performance that lived up to 
the refinement of Ffrsova's 
scoring. 

. The same musicians were 
also responsible for the cool, 
guileless offering of a conun- 
drum by Alfred Shnitke, his 
Three Madrigals, for soprano, 
harpsichord, percussion and 
string trio, setting Francisco 
Tanzer’s riddling, cryptic tittle 
poems that seem to tell the 
same story, from three dif- 
ferent viewpoints, in three 
different fe»r>gm>geR. Shnitke 
does much the same, with 
slight suggestions of a baroque 
cantata for the French text, a 
Webern song for the German 
and night-dub *i n B* p E for the 
English, and with a coda that 
loops, snaJcoJike, back to the 
be ginning , the whole thing 
resting with unswerving logic 
on its slightly mad premises. 

- Paul Griffiths 




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a blowsy Adele (Deborah 
dague) chews gum and vac- 
uum-deans; Rosalind (Fiona 
O’Neill) flaunts her Yves St 
Laurent Mondrian mini- 
dress; Alfred (Timothy Evans- 
Jones) is idolized on an Ekco 
turntable; Eisenstein (Philip 
Curtis) loses his battle with the 
traffic warden. The accents 
(particularly Jonathan Brill’s 
Glaswegian Froscfa) are as 
embarrassing as David Parry’s 
En glis h translation; attempts 
to merge the twist with the 
waltz are disastrous. 

Where the production saves 
itself is in the ingenious 
solutions offered to the short- 
fell of sheer personnel. The 
Act II finale, which I was 
dreading, is a tour de force, 
with the hdpof feshion-model 
dummies on skateboards at 
Oriofsky’s party, and with 
shrewd paring in the pit 

Vocally it is asti spumante 
rather than champagne. The 
principals are double-cast, but 
neither soprano I heard has 
adequate brilliance and nei- 
ther tenor enough dan. But 
Jennifer Higgins’s gleaming 
Orlofsky, with Glyndebourne 
and Kent experience behind 
her, is a voice to follow, and so 
is Christopher Blades, who 
governs with resonant auth- 
ority as the Frank. 

Hilary Finch 


JAZZ 


LeeKonitz 

Ronnie Scott's 


One of the important things 
about jazz — perhaps its most 
special attribute — derives 
from the listener’s knowledge 
that it has never happened 
qrfte like this before, and 
never witi again. That com- 
bination of uniqueness and 
ephemeratity gives the music 
its fourth dimension, and is 
very much in evidence in the 
performances of Lee Konitz, 
Che American alto saxo- 
phonist, in London this week. 

Konitz came to prominence 
as an acolyte of the cerebral 
pianist and 1^™ 

Tristano in the late 1940s; his 
pale tone and apparently emo- 
tionless delivery exerted a 
powerful influence on the 
burgeoning “cool school”. 
Over the years, though, his 
playing has ripened, becoming 
not inclined to let its feelings 
show, bat his unsw e rv ing 
commitment to node an as 
inteUectnal activity can be 
beard in the way be and his 
British rhythm section ap- 
proach their materiaL 

He began his first set on 
Monday with a treatment of 
“On Green Dolphin Street”, 
that inoffensive standard, so 
extraordinary (hat tins lis- 
tener, at least, win never forget 
it Opening wife a pianissimo 
examination of a single frag- 
ment of modulation, tbe quar- 
tet spent the next 15 annates 
or se piecing the traie tog e ther 
in a spellbinding series of 
slow-motion variations. John 
Taylor’s piano, Dave Green’s 
bass and Trevor Tomkins's 
drums assumed foil partner- 
ship in (he conversation, creat- 
ing tension without strain, 
intensity without rhetoric. 

We know from his past 
exploits that Konitz is a 
virtuoso on anybody's terms; 
recently, though, be has cho- 
sen to purge his playing of 
technical display. Nowadays 
he can sound almost tentative 
as be tests each note for 
weight, timbre and st r u c tu r a l 
integrity, but his Carefully 

concealed wit stewed through 
at oae point as be appeared to 
play “Chicago” and “Fas- 
cinating Rhythm" simulta- 
neously, and at another as be 

dropped a few bars of “Johnny 
One Note” into an o therwi se 
rigorous mapping of Monk's 
“Straight. No Chaser”. This is 

deceptively unobtrusive music 
of great complexity and 
sophistication, for which no 
recommendation is too high. 

Richard Williams 


A s carbuncles go, the 
monstrous protu- 
berance on the roof 
of the newly-ren- 
ovated Brussels op- 
era-house is doing well in the 
controversy states. The fact 
th at this tent-shaped structure 
perched above the classical 
facade of the Theatre de la 
Monnaie contains a rehearsal- 
room with a spectacular view 
over Brussels, an upper lobby 
of daring d«-«g n and the 
“paradis?" — a large gallery 
accommodating probably the 

best seam in tbe house — does 
little to dissuade tbe average 
Bruxellois from the opinion 
that his well-loved theatre 
looks like nothing so much as 
an old-fashioned toaster with 
the toast popped up. 

Gerard Mortier, director of 
the Belgian Opera, is un- 
repentant. The transformation 
cost only one-seventh of the 
final figure of tbe latest Bel- 
gian motorway section, and 
only half what they spent on 
the opera-house in Hamburg. 
The Belgian state put up the 
entire billion francs needed to 
bring the Monnaie up to 
scratch, and Mortier is ev- 
idently ’well pleased with the 
result- The volume and 
dimensions of the old theatre 
remain the sime, but be- has 
created “a tool as malleable as 
possible, with tbe means of 
our age to do it”. 

Tbe Opera has been dosed 
for a year, Maurice B6jart 
banished with his new produc- 
tion of The Martyrdom of St 
Sebastian to the old Circus 
h>rilffitig i while twhnieians 
from Britain and the United 
States have been working on 
die construction of an entirely 
new stage mechanism. Four 
massive steel columns support 
the “technical grille” with its 
folly automated system of 50 
independently operated pul- 
leys and hoists which can nm 
on wi ygnnaljf as well as the 
more conventional backwards 
and forwards. 

The stage has been taken up 
to install four hydraulic scen- 
ery lifts, and even tbe or- 
chestra pit can be raised in its 
entirety for symphony con- 
certs. Previously it took an 
army of men a whole day to 
remove the pit; now the 
operation lakes only minutes. 
Mortier is most proud of the 
new curtain. “It goes three 
ways. Up and down, the 
German system, very good for 
Elektra or when you want a 
sudden dramatic end. Side- 
ways, the Greek way, for Verdi 
and long drawn-out death- 
scenes. And ITtalien*, 
hooked up from the top 
corners, for romantic ballets. ” 
Not that there is going to be 
much ballet at the Monnaie 
for a while. Bejart is going to 
stay based at the Circus with 
his Fifties Buick convertibles 
on stage and his avant-garde 
martyrdoms. 

In keeping with its new- 
found role as “Capital of 
Europe” Brussels has long 
needed national institutions 
of an artistic kind on a par 
with London and Paris. The 
best singers were not being 
attracted to tire Monnaie as 
they were in the heyday of the ’ 
Brussels opera when Maria 
Malibran sang there and Rich- 
ard Wagner conducted his 
works. But the new season is 
to be launched tomorrow with 
a production of Der Rosen- 
kavalier conducted by Sir 
John Pritchard, tbe cast 
including Felicity Lott “It is 


The Theatre de la 
Monnaie in Brussels 
returns to business 
tomorrow night, 
after an ambitious 
and controversial 
renovation, when Sir 
John Pritchard 
conducts Der 
Rosenkavalier. 
Jolla Owen reports 

Looking 
for the 
room at 
the top 



Gfrud Mortier (above' 


with the new house; and 
Maurice Bejart, temporarily 
a martyr at tire Circus 



the last great national buil- 
ding”, explains one Flemish - 
speaking arts observer with 
passion. “If we lose this 
building, we haven’t anything 
more.” 

G erard Mortier is 
Flemish, from 
Ghent, a lawyer by 
training. Caught 
up with the admin- 
istrative side of the Festival of 
Flanders, his passion for the 
theatre, and opera in particu- 
lar, combined with his driving 
ambition soon took him to 
frill-tune theatre management 
jobs in Germany. His appoint- 
ment at tbe Monnaie five 
years ago came at the .time as 
something of a surprise; in 
retrospect it was the inevitable 
choice. Diminutive, charming 
and conservatively dressed in 
immaculate navy blazer and 
grey flannels, he does look 
disarmingly like a Ghent law- 
yer. Talked of as a possible 
candidate for jobs in the big 
league — New York, London 
or Milan — Mortier is showing 
his mettle at the Monnaie. 

“The Mint with the Hole”, 
as the Monnaie was dubbed 
during the removal of the old 


dome roof was in fact orig- 
inally build on the site of the 
old city mint in the Hotel 
d’Ostrevant after the devasta- 
tion of the French bombard- 
ment which flattened most of 
medieval Brussels in 1695. 
Napoleon, passing through in 
1810. thought the city could 
do with a larger cultural 
establishment among other 
things and had plans drawn up 
by Damesne for a new theatre. 
The gaslit auditorium erupted 
with the spark of revolution 
20 years later. As Auber’s 
long-forgotten duet from La 
Muetie de Portici whipped the 
audience to “Amour saert de 
la patrie”. they rushed out on 
to the streets- and began the 
short but violent revolution 
which was to bring Brussels to 
independence. 

In 1885, during a rehearsal 
for Meyerbeer’s Proph&e, the 
Monnaie burnt down. As in 
1985 it took just one year to 
rebuild the theatre. Poelaert, 
architect of the absurdly or- 
nate Palace of Justice, got tbe 
job. Instead of a traditional 
Italian -style opera-house, he 
went for the French, with 
balconies and loggias and a 
perfectly awful ceiling of air- 
borne matrons in drapery that 
hangs as heavily as wet bath- 
towels — which is the other 
great Monnaie controversy. 

M ortier wanted it 
restored. The 
auditorium has 
mostly been left 
intact, with red 
plush seats, carved gilt 
torcheres and little plaques of 
honour to such musicians as 
Offenbach, ■ Meyerbeer and 
G retry. The other artworks in 
the foyer and in the new Salon 
Royal have been drastically 
rethought Paid for by gen- 
erous corporate sponsors, two 
Americans were chosen to 
liven up the entrance halL Sol 
LeWitt did the zebra-striped 
marble floor and Sam Francis 
did the ceiling, which is 
cheerful and blobby and, most 
importantly, modem. “We 
•wanted to put a modem stamp 
on this building. This is the 
signature of our age”, explains 
the ebullient Mortier. He did 
not give in so easily over the 
ceiling in the auditorium, 
which is now an expensive 
and painstakingly faithful 
copy of the old chocolate-box 
lid. 

Bui controversy in the Op- 
era is nothing new. At least 
downstairs in the bowels of 
the theatre the technicians and 
spear-carriers are content The 
phantom of the opera would 
have no hiding-place here 
among the finely polished 
lockera of the chorus dressing- 
room and the rough brick 
vaulted instrument store. In 
the modem canteen, lighting 
men sit shoulder to shoulder 
with baritones and contraltos 
tucking into a sturdy diet of 
waterzooi and rich cream 
flans. The whole atmosphere 
of the theatre is happier than 
seasoned observers have no- 
ticed during recent years. 

The question now is whe- 
ther the new Monnaie will 
attract the calibre of inter- 
national stars and soloists it 
deserves, or whether tbe gran- 
diose scheme of the architect 
Charles Vandenhove and his 
team will remain the empty 
showcase for middle-of-the- 
road productions it became in 
the Seventies. For G6rand 
Mortier the real work at the 
Theatre de la Monnaie has 
still to begin. 


THE TIMES GUERNSEY GILET 


T his pure wool *g3et* or button- 
through waistcoat is warm and prac- 
tical as wdl as beii^ smart and stylish to 
wear. It is made in Guernsey from 100% 
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knit for added warmth and wind 
resistance and die s tron g high-quality 
wool ensures that it is tough and hard- 
wearing. The styling is classic, with a 
ribbed crew-neck, armholes and hem, 
with the same neat ribbing knitted across 
tbe two patch pockets. The gilet buttons 
through from neck to hem, and is also 
characterised as a Guernsey garment by 
foe small slit openings at either ride of 
tire deep bon. 


S uitable for both men and women, the 
gilet is ideal as a stylish body warmer 
over shirts and tops and will team well 
with a variety of skirts and trousers. The 
Guernsey gilet is a smart high-quality 
garment that has been specially selected 
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choice of navy blue or grey with black 
buttons or oatmeal with wooden but- 
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THE TIMES 


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16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986_ 




SPECTRUM 



% 




\ %• 




A force to be 



i . 



T oday’s raw police 
recruit will have to 
be all things to all 
men. His duties 


will range from 


coping with riots 
to catching 


pheasant rustlers. 
Continuing our 
series, Brian James finds that criticism 

■ « a 


of police heavy-handedness has been_ 
taken on board in the training colleges 

Part 3: Learning to cope 


T he girt seems hysteri- 
cal and the youth m 
that unstable state of 

rapidly-sobering 

drunkenness. Keep- 
ing her from landing one of 
her ineffectual Wows, or him 
from wandering away, while 
at the same time trying to find 
out what has happened, takes 
every atom of the y oung police 
constable's attention. 

Then his sergeant steps m. 
“fine. You've got good con- 
trol. Watching what both are 
doing. Using all your senses. 
But are you remembering 
exactly what she’s saying? You 
must , boy, that’s your ev- 
idence. You looked calm 
enough oustide. Bui inside: 

-jetty”, says the constable, 
and nearly everyone laughs. 


This has all been play-acting, 
one of the dozens of < 


dramas 

uirv v» ***** "■ *** m 

created daily in the street 
mock-up at the Metropolitan 
police training school at 
Hendon. 

“Jelly!” says one attractive 
but unsmiling onlooker. 
“What does he think it will be 

like out there? Here he is safe 
and comfy; be knows the 
classmate playing the girl is 
not going to rip his face, or the 
boy is not going to come up 
with a knife.” WPC Beverley 
Sims is one of the street tutors 
pulled off their beats to visit 
Hendon and administer a 
daily douche of icy reality. 

Reality, meaning real 
events, is impossible to insert 
into the training of the 1,800 
men «nd women who are 
processed through Hendon 
each year. But reality, in the 
sense that no recruit is un- 
aware of the often appalling 
realities of police work, is 
threaded through the training 
in a way that 1 found not less 
than remarkable. 

Until a few years ago, police 
training was 16 weeks’ “chalk 
and talk" training; recruits 
learned the law and police 
procedures by rote. They, 
would get the occasional hour 
on social responsibility; they 
were told it was bad, on 
balance, to call a man a 
“coon”, or to regard all un- 
employed as woricsby. Elf; 
actively, “the Met” has owned 


up, aware of where it had 
fitted and how it has still to 
convince the doubters outside 
the police, and destructive 
cynics within. 

Now, for the first five weeks 
of tire course recruits scarcely 
open the four great binders of 
information they must absorb. 
Their time is entirely occupied 
by personal awareness train- 
ing, l emming the skills of their 
task rather than its rales. They 
learn to talk and to listen, to 
use their judgement rather 
than apply stereotyped re- 
sponses, to deal with the fears 
and suspicions of othe rs whi le 
coping with their own stress. 

In the “listening lab" Ser- 
geant Johnstone Lowry is in 
charge. He plays into the 
recruits’ earphones a loud, 
scarcely-intdiigibk: Glasgow 
accent, and asks: “Tell us 
about this guy?” Words nidi 
as “hooligan” and “drunk” fill 
the room. The man, says the 
sergeant, is a Scottish univer- 
sity professor, reading a folk 
tale. The accent is accurate, 
their expectation has betrayed 
them. 

Racialism crops up natu- 
rally here. Sgt Lowry has a 
tape of a young Rastafarian 



‘There has to be 

give and take 

in the country’ 


As poachers stalk 
through the 

deceptive cahnof ^ y 
rural Dorset, the^ 
vi llage policeman 
is on the scent 


P olice Constable 
David Wright is a 
rare creature these 
days: a sat isfie d 
poficeman. ******** 
this is not surprising, smceg® 
beat covers *5***® 
names Eke Btoxvrorth and 
Here Regis. He keeps waft* 
over WMttam Bottom, Mo*- 
den Bog and another 30,000 
acres norfliof the Partied® m 

white Ford Esc ort 
swings down the autumnal 
braes, through woodsy and] past 
farms. The police radio m the 
car is usually sflMt; there ® 

none of the constant babble of 

radio traffic to be found m an 
urban patrol car. Dawd 
Wright nods or raisraahaBd 

from the wheel to acknowledge 
a villager here or a f armh a n d 

^Warning, Charlie,” he 



field work: PC David Wright 
ooi on rural patrol 


calls to an oEd man carrying* 


hi .rhnid: new recnrits at the Metropolitan police training school in Hendon, where they will ’earn the tore of the 

- - — — — *— l hafivnt T mi 


getting nowhere talking to a 
PC “The lesson here is it is 


the PC who is asking for help, 
so why was he getting angry 
because he couldn’t under- 
stand? It was his problem, not 
the witness's. So you start 
again, own up, and ask the 
youth to help you get it down 
right by speaking slowly. 


L owry comments:“If 
they follow what 
they’re taught they 
can't go wrong. 
TheoreticaUy. We 
know that polution starts the 
day they leave. Because the 
public don’t play fair, can be 
unreasonable and stupid even 
when you are playing iyight 
And because other officers, 
older men, will undermine 
you." 

The next class is watching a 
video taken by a patrol at an 
incident scene. It captures the 
chaos marvellously. Was it a 
crime, a fight, road accident? 
All three. Someone is hurt. 


How badly? Was there some- 
one walking away who must 
be held? Someone saying 
nothing who could tell all? 

The class suggests ways to 
unlock the mysteries. “Re- 
ward them with thanks, com- 
pliments for every little bit of 
help." “Tell them it might be 
them next time. . . bitta black- 
mail.” “Use tbeir language, 
not jargon." “Make it plain 
we’re human. Not what 
they've heard, louts in Doc 
Marten boots.” 

The keenness is impressive. 
But it is just training. "Yes," 
says Chief Superintendent 
Bernard Luckhurst, the col- 
lege commandant, “and there 
is nothing we can do to 
prepare them for the antago- 
nism that awaits them. It will 
be a real culture shock finding 
out that people don't like you. 
They have to learn here that 
the uniform is no magic cloak 
to hide behind. All it gets them 
is a hearing; they had better 
make sure they are talking 
sense." 

But what of that other great 
police “classroom”, the can- 
teen, which can be a lecture- 
room full of vital street lore, or 
a ma li g n repository of corro- 
sive street “wisdom"? As 


REQUIREMENTS AND REWARDS 


HENDON TRAINING COLLEGE: Recruits numbered 1,464 
this year; average age, 23fc years 
SELECTION CRITERIA: QuaWMatfome five O-jevete. 
Examination: an 80-minute test of verbal, 

organizational abilities. Exampte:howmaw 1 bo«es 

wwtt take to fiH a 12 gallon cask (1 gallon is 8 pints)? 

. _ ~ . e-f f. 


Luckhurst says, canteen cul- 
ture is still an obstacle. “It will 

take time to erode the worst 
influences of the know-it-all 
old bobbies.” 

Chief Inspector Syd Oliver 
will even provide a time scale 
for die change to be complete. 
“Two or three years. By then 
we should have out there the 
caring, feeling and thinking 
police force the public de- 
serve. We took a long time to 
chang e. Too long. We took a 
deep swallow, admitted where 
we were wrong. But we still 
don't seem able to sell iL 


fidence Co deal with other 
coppers, they certainly don t 
have what they’ll need to take 
what the streets throw at 
them.” 


“Sure, it seems a bit ‘Lead 
kindly fight’ here. They’ll face 
a moral dilemma when they 
hear some racist remark in the 
canteen. There sue still a few 
animals in the job. But if we 
haven’t given them the con- 


B ack from another 
play-acting session, 
with a woman 
pretending to be in- 
volved in a fight 
with a neighbour over a 
broken fence, (“Trivial? per- 
haps. But then so is 95 percent 
of police work. It’s not all 
Starsky and Hutch, and the 
lass fuming over her broken 
fence is as entitled to a 
professional response as the 
manag er of a burgled bank ), 
we meet Chief Inspector Paul 
Mathias. Possessed of a dou- 
ble degree in psychology. Ire 
insists that the move to mod- 
ernize police training was 


under way _ before Lord 
Scarman's incisive report in 
1981. 

“Some still think our new 
ideology is ‘soft', making us 
vulnerable on the toughest 
streets. Those people are few 
and getting fewer. This force is 
committed to this course. 
There is simply no doubt 
about the commonsense Met 
that is emerging” 

..We finish at Hendon by 
talking to a random group in 
the recruits' canteen- They 
have enrolled * for all the 
expected reasons: pay, sec- 
urity, a job worth doing. 
Beyond that, they positively 
gleam with motivation. They 
have one reservation about 
the training “Too much time 
locked up here insulated from 
the public.” (The force is 
looking at a plan to intersperse 
the 20 weeks’ basic training 
with the six weeks’ beat proba- 
tion.) They have an evident 
fear of the physical danger that 
awaits than. They have ab- 
solutely no illusion about the 
moral problems that will far* 
them, “h is going to be ‘us and 
them’. Yes, inside the station, 
as well as out But if they give 
us a fair chance, we can crack 
it” says one. 


pair of aged shears 
outskirts of a vfllage. 

Wright has been a - 
policeman and rural beat 
or for the past 23 years- In 
that time the cities have been 
rent by decay, laggings, 
dissension and rape. .Even 
nearby Bournemouth has 
mined a bad reputation. Is 
recent years the rural crime 
rate has more than doubled. 
Dming October his work in- 
dialed the theft of 60 bags of 
fertilizer and two vanishing 
wage packets. On a sa©®3iii 
ni gh t a poacher — Wright uses 
the term “gentleman of the _ 
ai o ht" with considerable scorn 
--helped himself to 800 young 
pheasants, slaugh terin g them 
in breeding pend with an air 
rifle and earning £4^00 . 

It's a world where courting 
couples are simply indulging 
in “coraiiry pureuhs" and are 
ignored imkss tbey are being 
outrageous, bat where a car 
with a tardier hound in the 
back win be checked carefafly. 

The dogs are used to pall down 
deer at night. 

An acknowledged expert on 

poaching, Wright has to deal 
wHhafeesd which fadades 
hundreds of deer, pheMants 
and game fish, which fall prey 
to more than 40 known poach- 
ers. He and the fool game- 
keepers constantly exchange 

information in a fluid war of 
attrition. .. 

In the low hills and woods 
north of the small town of 


Wareham, he is often both 
beat officer and detective^ “I 

doubt if I call in the dDmwe 
than once or twice a year, he 

aid. He believes “you have 
got to show people yaw are 
foflowing things "P ** 
are interested in the job- 
A policeman cannot operate k 

without the pubfic and Wright f 

works to maintain a 
relationship. His informal net- 
work of conta c t s is sere* 


- '/■ * J 


i i 

ft 




IHUUWIJ : - - - — 

eyes. They are needed, for 
Wright maintains mat his 
baffiwkk is deceptively cmha. 
Every church has been raided 
for retipons antiques and 
many of the wealthier people* 
homes have been burgled trier 
the years. The homog enous 
nature of the cmmtry has 


to a lawyer. TMs we frowned 
by a surgeon. City Mk are 
moving out here, adding to tire 
residents of bousing estates 
txckedufl to villages-" 

Wright stops as a tractor 
finishes loading manure. 
“That's what they call an 
obstruction in the Met,” he 
says, “fa the country you have 
to have a bft of give and take. 

Stewart Tendler 


* 


( TOMORROW ) 

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our inner cities? 


PERSONAL BANKING 


What's better than a loan? 
A Midland loan certificate. 

With it, you don't have to 
decide on the exact make, 
model, size or price of your 


Counting the notes 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 104 

■ 


How an energetic 
young conductor led 
a college orchestra 
into the top league 





buy what tou want when you want it. 


purchase straight away. 

Just agree your top 
figure with us, and your 
loan certificate is your 
reassurance when you go 
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Come and talk, 

or phone 01-200 0200 for a leaflet. 




WHEN YOU NEED US WELL BE LISTENING, 


“Conductor wanted. £5 a ses- 
sion. Apply Chelsea College 
Orchestra" read the advertise- 
ment pinned to the Royal 
College of Mosfe’s notice- 
board. For music graduate 
(Hons) Nicholas Dodd it was 
the overture to a relationship 
which was to inspire fulfil and 
drain h«n — physically, emo- 
tionally and financially. 

At the time, however, ft was 
precisely what the budding 
conductor was loo long for and 
he offered his services on two 
conditions: that he conkl bring 
in other young nmsiciaiis and 
that the name be changed to 
the Chelsea Symphony 
Orbcestra. “When I took it on 
it consisted of eight members 
who met every week and I 
knew that yon couldn't make 
musk like that," he says. 

Today, six years later, the 
CSO is one of the country's 
leading amateur orchestras. It 
gives about right concerts a 
year as well as the occasional 
overseas performance and on 
Friday it will be playing 
Beethoven and Tchaikovsky at 
its spiritual home, the Chelsea 
Old Town Hall. 

For Dodd, 29, it has been an 
uphill struggle which has 
dominated his life. He sold his 
beloved synthesizers for 
£5,000 to fund the orchestra 
for two years and then ran oat 
of money. When be mentioned 
to one of the CSO's fans, a 
newsagent, that tbe coming 
concert would be the 
orchestra’s last, the man got 
up on stage and delivered an 
impassioned plea for a bene- 
factor. In the audience was 
Martin Summers, who owns 
an art gallery. He offered to 
become the orchestra's nreti- 



ACROSS 
1 Patch op (6) 

4 XJrge(6) 

7 Fearful (4) 

8 GeoerorityCS) 

9 Throaty (8) 

13 PtampkAO) 

16 Rrimscoit Press 
founder (7,6) 

17 Yidd(3) 

19 Abstruse (8) 

24 Kira Charles spaniel 

type (8) 

25 Shaded avenue (4) 

26 Bandage c ompl etely 
(6) 

27 Doanam<6) 


DOWN 

1 Discourteous (4). 

2 Nearly (9) 

3 Spiced rice (5) 

4 Weatherproof coal 

(5) 

5 Overt (4) 

6 Ski course (5) 



•* 


10 Hackneyed (5) 18 Ptenml(S) 

11 Anient male lover (5) 20 Setting (5) 

12 Umestndned(5) 21 Madias language^ 

13 Defiance barrier (9) 22 Mililarytobdiyawo 

14 Twilight (4) (4) - - V' 

15 Exchange (4) 23 Stanera(4) : 


1 SHobo 8 tXaiy 9Dydays it 
Laid 15 Abbievuraons 17 Pram 18 Goodyear 21 Embargo 22 
While 23Meek 24Yatt*r 


Composer at work: Nicholas Dodd in his synthesizer bedroom 

. - w : u 

dent, and holds fund-raising 


DOWN: 2 Amass 3Guy 4 Endocrinolw 7. 

Adam's apple 19 Side street 12 Leer 14 Stud 16 Bambte IS • 
EBte 20Trek 22 Wit ■ - ^ 


musical evenings at his home. 
He even spent £60,00® rf his 
own money to take the or- 
chestra to New York. 

Even so, tbe ultimate finan- 
cial responsibility as well as 

tbe_day-ttHd,ymnni^rftte 


year. “I suppose I was a stupid 
idiot. I should have invested it 
and waited a year." 

He is currently waitin g to 
see the profits from his first 
cassette, Starlands , which be 
composed, arranged, _ per- 
formed and produced In his 


the dav-to-day running o> tue lormea ana piwunu m »» 

CSO remains with Dodd- “It’s bedrock studio. He describes 
90 oercent administration and himself as a “muswsan on 
110 per cent learning of call”, ready to attend^ dinners 


scores,” be says. One ef his 
biggest headaches is finding 
musicians under 25 with the 
talent and commitment he 
demands. It is a measure of his 
success that between 50 and 60 
tarn up every Wednesday- 
night for rehearsal. 

Dodd operates from his 
parents’ two-bedroomed ter- 
race house in suburban Surrey 
which be admits be has taken 
over. His narrow bedroom 
contains synthesizers and 
recording equipment recently 
replaced with the money he 
earned from com po si ng the 
advertising jingles for 
Vauxhafl cars, Uoyds Bank 
and L’Oreal shampoo; the rest 
of the money went on the 
CSO’s Paris tour earlier this 


out , icauj tv 

at a moment's notice *if there is 
a riiamw iff raising funds. His 
ambition is to' be an inter- 
national conductor and to be 
known for his versatile emu- 
positions. Meanwhile he 
would like to be relieved of the 
administrative nressmes of 
die CSO. 

“If I said Nicholas Dodd 
was the CSO I hope that 
wouldn’t sound arrogant,” 
says Dodd. “But I’ve put my 
heart and soul into this. I 
t hink we are more exciting in 
certain instances than some, 
professional orchestras, not 
technically better but more 
electric. We give it welly." 

Sally Brampton 

© Tim Hnopwwre Ud ISM 




Don’t miss the : W 

first of four putt-out supplements on the 
great British -cars of the ’sixties This week 

Jaguar E- Type , Hillman Imp andMGMidgei-~ 

original mad tests and assessments of the . 

cars as current classics. 



At ymirnewsagent 7Qp 


f 












1 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


New taboos for old values 


BRIEFLY 


These days I find myself quite glum 
at all the gloomy news about the 
t 1Sea ^ associated with making 
Jove. What's needed, said one of the 
,7 recently, is chastity, or a 

really serious outbreak of sexual 
loyalty. Perhaps that is why one of 
them chose to put on its front page a 
three-column story on the under- 
graduates of Balliol College’s junior 
common room who voted last week 
to outlaw displays of kissing and 
cuddling. 

r it was all rather outlandish. Jim 

' '-if*. Betts, aged 21. who proposed the 
££ motion, was quoted sounding very 
old Fogey. He spoke of “a long 
history of people groping and fon- 
dling each other in our common 
££■ room", which certainly hasn’t been 

T»r» ‘ 

We don’t like to see * 
fa umans doing much 
S more than embracing 

pnirimMiHiiii.iin mi 

•£the popular view of the Balliol of the 
V'Earl of Stockton and Edward Heath. 
^ Betts dated the college's sexual 
^problems to 1978, when co-educa- 
.gption arrived. 

1 was curious about the story and 
Spielcphoned Balliol. 1 wondered if this 
j*“wai» one of those periodic shifts of 
^manners and mores that happen in a 
SJrity. Were public displays of affec- 
, . tjfftion now doomed by the human T- 
, ^lymphoiropic retrovirus type 1? Will 
i ^sexuality be the new taboo? 

'2* No. said some Balliol students to 
■j£whom 1 spoke. The debate really 
J- -wasn't about sweeping sex under the 
^carpet at all. It seems the junior 
$*common room at Balliol is rather 


earnestly left-wing and Betts’s mo- 
tion to ban specifically heterosexual 
activities was a lampoon of the anti- 
heterosexualism of militant 
homosexuals. 

Anli-heierosexuaJ ism? Surely this 
was a bad joke. “What's wrong with 
defending homosexual rights?" a 
second-year student asked sharply 
when I questioned him about the 
debate. I made reassuring non- 
committal noises. “The motion was 
against body fascists." the student 
said reprovingly. I explained that I 
was quite middle-aged and did not 
know what body fascists were. 
Would he mind telling me? 

“It's someone who won't talk to 
you because of something about your 
body." he said. I was surprised that 
feeli ngs about appearance and sexual 
predilection ran so high. When 1 
asked him if I could use his name be 
said no. “You’re from The Times. 
vou see." he said, i was relieved that 
it was only that about me which gave 
offense. 

I had always thought of myself as 
being fairly level-headed on such 
matters as sexuality. I’ve always 
been keen on genuine human rights, 
which include the idea that people 
have the right to pursue their own 
interests — whatever they may be — 
as long as they are not directly 
injurious to others. But the militants 
behind the new and-heterosexualism 
have a different idea of human 
rights. They want, for example, not 
only the freedom to engage in 
homosexual acts but also to have 
them accorded the same status and 
approval as heterosexuality. 

This expectation is bound to be 
disappointed when a sexual taste is 
clearly a minority preference that 


Sexual revolutionaries 
are showing signs 
of the same bigotry 
they once fought, 
says Barbara Amiel 


Diana Gold 




'©iV : 




O .o 


m 




most people find fundamentally 
incompatible with their own wiring. 
It is also an attitude which seems 
intolerant of the freedom of people 
to make. judgements and hold opin- 
ions about what others do. 

“Are theanti-heterosexualists very 
effective?" 1 asked Danielle Nay, 
editor of Oxford's Tributary , a 
satirical gossip magazine. She didn’t 
think so, although she drew my 


attention to the Balliol discussion of 
a ban on family packs of sweets. Last 
term, she said, there was a Gay Week 
at Oxford and a small sticker was 
made which said, “Why assume Tin 
heterosexual?” 

In the end students of all persua- 
sions wore it. said Danielle, simply 
because its pink triangle was so cute. 
Bnt she was miffed about Wadham 
College, which tried to ban her 
magazine as being fill! of hetero- 
sexual propaganda. 

I suppose there has always been a 
wedge of young people who favoured 
forcing their values on the world at 
large. I was at a lunch recently where 
a woman of 30 or so was engaged in a 
spirited conversation with the host 
about currency rates. Suddenly, she 
got up from the table and returned 
with a baby that had started crying in 
another room. To the bewilderment 
of our host, a genial man in his early 
sixties, she opened her blouse with- 
out any warning and began breast- 
feeding as she took up the 
conversation again. 

Afterwards she explained that 
there was nothing “obscene” — her 
word — about breast-feeding, which 
was part of motherhood. Besides, a 
baby’s needs come first, which men 
simply don’t understand. 

It seemed to me that it was not the 
baby's needs that were being put first 
but the mother’s. 1 thought a six- 
month-old baby would probably 
have been just as happy feeding in a 
quiet room by itself and would not 
have suffered missing some spirited 
conversation. Short of finding one- 
self in a stranded tube train or a 
snowed- in bus. there was no “need” 
to breast-feed in public. 

Afterwards I puzzled over the 
incident Why are activities related 


to human sexuality and procreative 
functions so startling when done in 
public? Why are these sons of 
behaviour taboo? In the end it 
probably has to do with the great 
mystery of life. We really don’t like 
to see human beings going much 
further than embracing one another 
in from of us because we accord a 
certain kind of modesty, ritual, and 
respect to the sexual act One is really 
saluting creation. 

I suppose the motives behind 
efforts to upset old taboos, manners 
and mores are mixed. There is 
always the simple exuberance of 
youth which want to epater les 
bourgeois. There is also the scoring 
of socio-political points, as with the 
anti -heterosexual ists who want to 


Manners and mores 
foster modesty and 
consideration 


see their values replace those of 
traditional society. 

1 may be wrong, but I don't expect 
society is going to be very influenced 
by any of this. It may have to get 
worse before it gets better, of course, 
and we will have a few more 
outbursts of anti-heterosexual school 
books in Brent and some JCRs will 
censor Cilia Black for her narrow- 
mindedness on Blind Date. But I 
don't think we'll lose sight of the 
reasons for manners and mores: they 
are tools with which to foster 
consideration, modesty and self- 
control — without which societies 
lose both tolerance and decency. 

<£) Hmm Newspapers Ltd 1988 


^ A chilling new book by novelist Alice Thomas Ellis tells the true story of the effect a disturbed teenager had on his family 





nest 




*!When a child goes wrong, the 
“finger of blame is usually 
.pointed at mother or father. 
£But if psychoanalyst Tom 
• Pitt-Aikens is right it’s the sins 
Z'of the grandfathers which are 
‘.more likely to be visited on 
JTihe children. His theory struck 
";a chord in the criticaily- 
. acclaimed novelist and Spec- 
tator columnist Alice Thomas 
Ellis and now their book, 
ZJStvrcts of Strangers explores 
. his ideas about the roots of 
“'delinquency through the case 
history of one real family and 
4 jts troubled, troublesome son. 
'* Geoffrey Hutton (the 
r family's names have been 
. “changed) first turned up at a 
-child guidance clinic at the age 
of six. With a history of 
-persistent theft, bedwetting, 
and disruptive behaviour at 
school, he made his first court 
! appearance at 1 3. At the age of 
**■14. after committing bur- 
glaries. smashing things at 
home, iruanting, getting into 
•violent fights, indecently 
exposing himself and stealing 
women's clothing, he was 
admitted to the community 
r-home where Pitt-Aikens is 
consultant psychiatrist 
*- Leaving there at 16. Geof- 
frey was soon back in court on 
•charges of theft and indecent 
Exposure, crowning his crim- 
inal career with an attempt to 
3)low up an immersion heater 
■in a church loft, causing 
l£42.000 worth of damage. 

’ The first surprise, for Alice 
Thomas Ellis, was meeting 
^Geoffrey's parents. Ian and 


Anne. “The families of other 
delinquents I have seen were 
nightmares, totally inad- 
equate" Ellis says. ‘‘But the 
Huttons are completely unlike 
■that They're thoroughly solid 
middle-class citizens, a very 
united couple, with a tremen- 
dous amount of love and 
support and fondness between 
them. Their other children are 
the son you’d be happy to 
have your own children stay 
with." 

So whence came the cuckoo 
in the nest? The answer, 
according to Pitt-Aikens, lies 
buried in Geoffrey's parents' 
own childhoods. “Every delin- 
quent I have ever been in- 
volved wiih.” the psychiatrist 
says, “has a parent who has 
suffered some loss of authority 
in his own childhood - usu- 
ally through a parent’s death 
or desertion — and has failed 
10 come to terms with it.” 

Ian Hutton's father died 
when his son was 11. His 
brother. Kevin, killed himself 
four years later at the age of 1 7 
— a fact which, significantly, 
was omitted from Ian’s ac- 
count of the family history. 

T he book is, say its 
authors, “an account 
of professionally sup- 
ported uphill mour- 
ning," extending over eight 
years of meetings between the 
Huttons, Pitt-Aikens, and a 
floating population of social 
workers and probation offi- 
cers. Ellis attended two of the 
meetings and visited the fam- 



Finally letting go: Alice Thomas Ellis brought her own grief over the death of two of her children to Secrets of Strangers 


ily. She never met Geoffrey 
and he remains a shadowy 
embodiment of projections 
from his parents' past 

As a novelist, she says, she 
found herself yearning for real 
people to write about “I 
began to feel like a child who, 
after playing with dolls for 
years, begins to hanker after 
actual babies." Paradoxically, 
she acknowledges, the actual 
babies - the Huttons — are 
less fully realized than the 
doll-characters of her novels. 

Sbe decided to allow their 
dark history to unfold through 
the matter-of-fact and often 
apparently inconsequential 
case notes of the family meet- 
ings. It gradually emerged that 
Kevin had attempted suicide 
before, but it had been 
covered up “in an effort to 
spare feelings". He finally 
blew himself up in the loft 
with a fulminate detonator. A 
brown-red stain spread across 


the ceiling for days before the 
body was discovered by Ian. 

By not putting more flesh 
on the bones, Elis feels she 
may have let the reader down. 
“I almost promised that I'd 
give a clear picture of the 
Huttons and then I didn't It 
would have been a travesty. I 
couldn't swan into 
somebody's house and say 
whatever, because I wouldn’t 
feel i knew enough about 
them. I'd lost ray bottle. I’m 
, errified to handle real people: 
they're just too important, too 
vulnerable, too fragile." 

How then does she feel 
about the scribes who swan 
into her house in increasing 
numbers to probe and profile 
her? “They haven’t got what is 
really me, so it doesn't matter. 
I’m not there. You know those 
shrikes who sit on their nests? 
Some predator approaches 
and they pretend to have a 
broken wing and go slithering 


away in the opposite direc- 
tion. I do that son of thing all 
the time. 

“Because I know about that, 
1 had a feeling 1 could have got 
straight to the hean of the 
Huttons. But I couldn't do it, 
out of a sense of delicacy." 

B ehind the pseudonym 
Alice Thomas Ellis is 
Anna Haycraft, the 
wife of her publisher 
Colin Haycraft, and the 
mother of four sons and a 
daughter, now in their teens 
and 20s. Another son, Joshua, 
died eight years ago at the age 
of 19, after spending nearly a 
year in a coma after an 
accident, and a daughter, 
Mary, who would now be 16, 
lived for only two days. 

Ellis believes that Joshua's 
sense of self-preservation was 
impaired — he fell through a 
roof while trying to retrieve a 
sandaL ‘Td lost my own sense 
of self-preservation after 


Mary's death and the deaths of 
other close people, and be was 
mirroring me." 

She spent two years under 
analysis by Pitt-Aikens be- 
cause her own family was in 
"a terrible state" after 
Joshua's death. “I felt terrible 
rage, terrible guilt, very self- 
destructive — and the family 
just wasn't communicating," 
she remembers. “I told Tom: 
‘I'm not worried about me. 
I'm worried about my 
children'. He said: ‘Once 
you're all right, the children 
will be all right.’ 

“Mourning is the great thing 
- you’ve got to mourn every- 
thing that happens, under- 
stand it, assimilate it, let it go. 
If you don’t do that, you’re in 
trouble." 

Clare Dyer 

© TtaM Newspapers Ltd 1988 

Secrets of Strangers is published 
on November 20 by Duckworth. 
£12.95. 


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The Times is offering 
a unique chance to 
shop at Liberty’s 
without the crowds... 

One of the great joys of 
Christmas is the hamper 
(writes The Times Cook. 
Shona Crawford Poole). A 
good hamper need be neither 
large nor expensive. Take any 
pretty basket and fill it with 
witty, frivolous or sensible 
presents. There is no law that 
says they must all be edible. 

The whole point of a Christ- 
mas hamper is that it should 
be an extravagant cornucopia 
of good things - a son of 
grown-up Christmas stocking 
that is personal and just a little 
bit silly. A bucketful of scarlet 
tulips may be more memo- 
rable than champagne, a 
home-made pate more wel- 
come than caviare. 

Fill a terrine with home- 
made pate or with dried herbs 
from Provence, or pot pourri. 
Give china filled with choc- 
olates or soaps. Wrap fragile 
fillings in damask or Liberty 
prim napkins, or in tea cloths. 
Pack coffee . beans with a 
grinder or a peck of Brantleys 
with an apple corer ... 

• This week. The Times in 
conjunction with Libeny, is 
offering its readers the 
Opportunity to do as Shona 
Crawford Poole suggests — 
with the added luxury of 
having the Liberty chain of 
stores entirely at their disposal 


JojK» MacOomld 




erty gift. In addition, for every 
£50 you spend during the 
evening. Liberty will present 
you with a £5 gift voucher. 

The London store draw also 
includes, among many prizes: 
a weekend for two in Bavaria 
from German travel special- 
ists DER, with a Liberty 
weekend case; a food hamper 


SMiisifisifr 


for the purpose. We invite you 
to spend an evening shopping 
for Christmas, when the stores 
are closed to the general 
public. On Tuesday December 
Z from 6.30 pm to 8.30 pm. 
Times readers can shop and 
take part in a whole host of 
special activities at the Regent 
Street store, when Times ex- 
pens — among them Shona 
Crawford Poole, Wine 
Correspondent Jane 
MacQuitty and Fashion Edi- 
tor Suzy Menkes — will be on 
hand to answer your questions 
on Christmas gifts . 

For readers unable to come 
to London, Liberty stores 
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same day at the same time. 
The addresses are listed 
below. 

Each store will feature a free 
draw, including, amongst 
other prizes, a £100 Liberty 
gift voucher. You will be 
welcomed with a glass of wine 
on arrival and a special Lib- 


( illustrated here); Cobra and 
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• How to take up our 
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A round-up of news, 
views and information 


Widow’s 

might 

There are more than three 
milli on widows in Britain, and 
each day about 500 more have 
to come to terms with their 
loss. The National Associ- 
ation for Widows exists to 
provide support and to fight 
the widow’s many financial 
injustices. There are' 
branches in most parts of the 
country, run by women who 
are widows themselves. For 
more details, contact the 
association at CheQ Road, 
Stafford. ST16 2QA. 

Older widows in particular 
might be interested in the 
Survival Guide for Widows, 
co-written by the 
association's founder, June 
Hemer. and available by post 
for £3.50 (make cheques pay- 
able to Age Concern England) 
from Age Concern, 60 Pit- 
cairn Road, Mitcham, Sur- 
rey, CR4 3LL. 

Safe reading 

Storytime is a collection of 
children's bedtime tales, 
sold In a good cause. Follow- 
ing a nationwide competition 
to uncover new amateur 
storywriting talent, the 10 top 
entries have been collated 
by Sterling Health and Chat 
magazine into a slender 
volume of bedtime stories. 
Proceeds wai go to the Royal 
Society for the Prevention of 
Accidents. 

Send your name and ad- 
dress, together with a 
cheque or postal order for 
50p, to Storytime, 1 
Hare wood Place, London 
W1R QPQ - and perhaps 
everyone will sleep a little 
more soundly. 

Gloria transit 

Has Ms magazine - Amer- 
ica’s highly successful glossy 
feminist magazine co-founded 
by viva cions virago Gloria 
Steinem — gone soft? The 
November edition (available 
at selected British bookstalls, 
price £Z40) is entirely given 
over to the topic of fashion 
and indudes articles on lead- 
ing women designers, the 
Queen's wardrobe and that 
perennial enemy of the styl- 
ish, clutter. It’s not quite 

From Lady Gilchrist. 
Hazelbank, By Lanark 

1 read with interest your 
article about the situation 
facing Foreign Office wives 
who wish to be with their 
husbands and yet fallow their 
own career (Wednesday 
Page, November 5). Frankly, 
I do not fed it is advisable for 
anybody closely connected 
with a British Embassy to 
work for a local concern — too 
often a conflict of interest can 
arise and in certain countries, 
behind the Iron Curtain fur 
example, it is just not 
possible. 

There is a simple solution 
for the Foreign Office. Pay 
toe wives in their own right, 
not as appendages. The wife 
nms the residence where 
surprisingly often, more real 
diplomatic business is con- 
ducted than in the chancery. 

Moreover, as diplomacy 
becomes more dangerous, the 
Foreign Service wife, like her 
husband, is likely to be killed, 
kidnapped and attacked by 
mobs. Why shouldn't she 
earn a salary in her own right 
with a pension at toe end? 

Of course the Foreign Of- 
fice can protest that though 


Vogue, but at least it acknowl- 
edges that fashion and femi- 
nism can coexist. 

Nick of time 


year? Swiss watch inno- 
vators Swatch have elected 
to make skiing in their coun- 
try safer. 

The Pop Swatch, available 
in Switzerland to coincide 
with toe snowy season (and 
later in toe UK}, has a built-in 
device which helps to locate 
skiers buried under 
avalanches.lt emits high-fre- 
quency sound waves which 
can be picked up by rescue 
helicopters — and it looks 
good, too. 

Quote me... 




“It's a put-down to give a title 
to somebody just because they 
happen to be married to 
someone. 1 have yet to bear 
Sir Thatcher called die First 
Gentleman of Britain” — 
Margaret Papandreou, wife 
of toe Greek prime minister. 

Birth pangs 

Despite ad the advances 
made in their knowledge of 
childbirth, many an expec- 
tant father is still to be found 
pacing up and down toe 
corridor outside the delivery 
room when the day arrives. 
The Active Birth Partners’ 
Handbook tries, however, to 
lay many of their anxieties to 
rest. 

The book contains sound 
advice for couples on preg- 
nancy, labour and birth, 
including relaxation tech- 
niques, massage and coping 
with the unexpected, it is 
sensitively written by Janet 
Balaskas. an ante-natal 
teacher trained by the Na- 
tional Childbirth Trust, and 
published by Sidgwick and 
Jackson, at £4.95. 

Josephine Fairley 


TALKBACK 


they choose the husbands, 
they don't choose toe wives 
and may often be saddled 
with highly unsuitable speci- 
mens. However, just as a 
married couple may be 
weeded out iff the Foreign 
Office at certain stages of 
promotion for faults or inad- 
equacies on tiie husband's 
side so a couple can be 
dispensed with or eased out 
because of the insufficiency of 
the wife. This would repre- 
sent a perfectly fair arrange- 
ment and I put it forward in 
all seriousness. 

From Frances Henton. 
Shepperton, Middlesex 

Gay Murphy, chairman of the 
Diplomatic Service Wives 
Association says, “We are the 
most loyal group of wives”. A 
most loyal group, perhaps, 
not the. Perhaps The Times 
would like to compare toe 
loyalty of these wives to those 
of the serviceman or poli- 
tician, to name jest a few. 

Diplomats’ wives aren't the 
only ones who have to Pack 
Up and Follow On. • 


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18 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Paisley’s 
bitter pill 


Accompanying Sammy Wilson, 
Lord Mayor of Belfast, 10 court 
yesterday to face a races summons 
proved a greater ordeal than Ian 
Paisley, the Democratic Unionist 
leader, and his austere sidekick 
Peter Robinson could ever have 
expected. Teeioialitarians both, 
they were obliged to sit through a 
long list of licencing applications, 
their feces becoming ever more 
doleful as the magistrate granted 
extensions to organizations and 
charities. They brightened only 
when the last application, from 
Queens University rag committee, 
was rejected cm a technicality. 


At stud 


As teachers continue to take the 
classical out of education, the 
Harris Museum in Preston has 
just opened an exhibition celebrat- 
ing what it terms “a marked 
increase" in the use of Roman and 
Greek mythology by artists. It 
admits, however, that unusual use 
these days is made of the old 
iconography. “Rose Garrard, for 
example, explores through mythi- 
cal figures the inadequate and 
restrictive role models which 
mould our perception of 
ourselves," says the museum, 
adding, “in Bruce Williams' work 
the 1 2-foot-high centaur wears an 
evening suit". 


• Pity the British Gas customer 
desperate to contact his local 
showroom. All are ex-directory. 
It's so that staff can deal with 
personal callers without being 
interrupted by phone calls, says a 
spokesman. Better Tell Sid. 


Sting in tail 


Edmond Halley, who died 240 
years ago, is being honoured with 
a memorial in the South Cloister 
of Westminster Abbey, to be 
unveiled at a service at 5.30 
tomorrow. Sculpted out of Welsh 
slate in the form of the comet, it is, 
according to Brian Harper, 
founder of the Hailey's Comet 
Society, “outrageously" late in 
coming, even though it will have 
the consolation of being the centre 
of attention every 76 years as the 
real comet passes overhead. 


On your bike 


Staff at London's South Bank, arts 
centre, employed by the Greater 
London Council until they were 
taken over in April by the Arts 
Council have just discovered the 
financial advantages of being pub- 
lic servants. If they 1156 a bicycle 
for business travel a circular tells 
them, they can claim the princely 
sum of 4.4p a mile, a generous 7 
per cent up on last year’s rate of 
4.1p. However, at least one tan- 
dem-riding executive is upset at 
not being entitled to the 2p a mile 
passenger supplement which car 
users get Considering that staff 
have to cycle 20 miles to claim £1. 
and then spend 15 minutes filling 
in the expenses form, it hardly 
seems worth the effort. 


BARRY FANTONI 



L4B0UR He! 

FAVOURS 

TEAM 
3PORTS 

X_ 



*Vou don't think it’s a ping 
for the Alliance? 


Radiating cheer 


The Silver Sprig, the Christmas 
children’s show at Edinburgh’s 
Traverse Theatre, is advertised as 
“a Christmas entertainment with 
a difference — a musical mid- 
winter fairy tale". When 1 discov- 
ered who had written it — lain 
Sutherland, British Nuclear Fuels' 
archivist at Dousreay — I rang to 
ask if he had a nuclear midwinter 
in mind. “You won't see one of 
those." he assures me. 


• Sign over a display of T- 
shirts at a Plymouth store: “The 
opinions expressed on these shirts 
are not necessarily those of the 
management" 


Not so funny 


John Hinckley Jr, the man who 
shot -Ronald Reagan, has made an 
unlikely entry into a row between 
America's intellectuals. The de- 
bate was sparked by the novelist 
Gore Vidal's criticisms in the 
liberal magazine. Nation, of 
American Jews who supported 
IsraeL In Vidal's reply to the 
letters that rolled In accusing him 
of anti-Semitism, he suggested one 
of his detractors needed psychi- 
atric attention — provoking the 
liberal New Republic to conclude 
that it was Vidal who was "ready 
for the funny farm". This last jibe 
stung Hinckley, clearly a follower 
of America’s highbrow press, to 
write to New Republic saying he 
resented its equation of anti- 
Semitism with insanity. “The 
easiest way to defame someone 
1 and his opinions is to label him as 
loony . . . It happens to me all the 
time," Hinkley wrote — from the 
psychiatric hospital to which he 
has been confined since the 
assassination attempt 



PHS 


Baker’s Burnham gamble 


The government’s legislative pro- 
gramme to be announced by the 
Queen this afternoon will include 
repeal of the 1965 Remuneration 
of Teachers Act. This will mean 
the abolition of the Burnham 
machinery for negotiating pay, 
established in 1919, which ts a 
mirror reflection of the decen- 
tralized nature of the British 
education system. Teachers are 
employed by the 104 local educa- 
tion authorities in England and 
Wales and, until now, responsibil- 
ity for determining pay and con- 
ditions has rested with these two 
parties in joint negotiations. 

Divisions within both sides, all 
UK) evident in the present talks 
which have now been going on for 
more than three days, have dis- 
credited this cumbersome mecha- 
nism to the point where the 
government has finally lost pa- 
tience. 

Repeal of Burnham will eff- 
ectively mean the end of collective 
bargaining and a stripping away of 


Mark Dowd, Edi 


ilttiirr.t 


Correspondent, on 


the risks in dictating teachers’ pay 


the unions' and authorities' jeal- 
ously guarded powers. Replacing 
it mil be an interim advisory 
committee whose brief may be to 
make recommendations to the 
Secretary of State on how cash 
limits on teachers' salaries agreed 
between the DES and the Treasury 
should be distributed. 

Baker has tried to give the 
impression that he wants to 
release schools from the fetters of 
bureaucratic control. “I want to 
see more decisions taken at the 
rim of the wheel and less at the 
hub," he says; a theme which has 
recurred in many of his speeches 
since be became Education Sec- 
retary in May. 

But the truth is more complex. 
Baker effectively wants to weaken 
the spokes, the unions and the 
authorities, and give greater pow- 


ers to head teachers and governing 
bodies, while strengthening the 
government's grip on the teaching 
profession by determining the 
structure of pay and conditions. 

This objective is commensurate 
with his general philosophy of 
how the classroom teacher should 
equip himself In a private meet- 
ing with one union leader last 
week, he gave the strong im- 
pression that teachers should not 
be spending their precious time 
and energy arguing about pay and 
conditions of service but rather 
about the real professional issues: 
educational methods, content of 
the curriculum and pupil motiva- 
tion. Such a virion is anathema to 
many teachers, whose resentment 
has probably been further fuelled 
by the lack of negotiation involved 
in the decision to repeal Burnham. 


If Baker does resort to legisla- 
tion to impose a salary structure 
and a contract, which now looks 
unavoidable, he will be running 
considerable risks. Uninterrupted 
tuition in the classrooms would be 
a grand prize to deliver to the 
voters. However, a new wave of 
industrial action which united the 
National Union of Teachers and 
the National Association of 
Schoolteachers/ Union of Women 
Teachers, until now regarded as 
adversaries rather than partners, 
might be just the thing to knock a 
few percentage points off the 
government’s popularity ratings 
and. scupper Baker’s chance of 
becoming prime minister. 

Until Mrs Thatcher, no Educa- 
tion Secretary — or, before 1964, 
no Minister— had ever gone on to 
No 10. She survived the un- 
popularity of her abolition of 
school milk to take the country’s 
highest political office. Whether 
Baker can do the same is open to. 
question. 


As Protestants launch a resistance movement, Conor Cruise O’Brien shows how 


the Hillsborough agreement is leading to a complete London-Belfast rift 


The United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland lasted for 120 
years. The United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land, after 65 years, does not look 
as though it will last as long. It 
resembles a marriage which still 
subsists legally and convent- 
ionally but has in reality broken 
down through mutual alienation. 

The Anglo-Irish agreement con- 
cluded at Hillsborough on Nov- 
ember 15, 1985, was intended to 
bring stability and reconciliation 
to Northern Ireland by ending the 
alienation of the Roman Catholic 
minority. Its effect has been to 
make alienation the general con- 
dition, while intensifying the mu- 
tual hostility of the two commun- 
ities and sources of violence. 

The agreement was doubly 
flawed from the beginning. Firstly, 
it overrode the known and 
strongly-held wishes of the Prot- 
estant majority for whose sup- 
posed benefit it devised new 
institutions. The second flaw was 
a major divergence in the basic 
assumptions of the contracting 
parlies. Mrs Thatcher held that the 
agreement would strengthen the 
Union.- Had Garret FitzGerald, 
the Irish prune minister, used 
such words it would not have been 
ratified and his government would 
have fallen. In commending the 
agreement to the Dail he con- 
veyed that it represented modest 
progress in the direction of the 
New Ireland Forum agenda, at the 
end of which is a United Ireland — 
the object of the aspirations of 
most Irish Cafoolicsfro one party 
to the agreement saw it as 
strengthening the Union and the 
other as tending to its dissolution. 

Mrs Thatcher may, perhaps, 
still see the agreement as 
strengthening the Union, but it 
would be hard to find anyone in 
Northern Ireland who agreed. 
Protestants and Catholics alike see 
it as a step towards an eventual 
united Ireland. 

In some disquieting ways, the 
situation in Northern Ireland is 
beginning to resemble that in 
Palestine at the end of the Second 
World War when Jews and Arabs, 
while differing on everything else, 
agreed that they had had enough 
of British rule. The mandate and 
the Balfour declaration had long 
been obnoxious to most Palestin- 
ian Arabs; the white paper of 1 939, 
restricting Jewish immigration, 
alienated the Jews without 
reconciling the Arabs. In the same 
way. Hills bo rough is alienating the 
Protestants without reconciling 
the Catholics. 

Since Hillsborough, the Union- 
ist leaders have loudly and repeat- 
edly defied a decision of the 
government of the United King- 
dom, ratified by an overwhelming 
majority in Parliament. This 
behaviour is dearly distasteful to 
most of the population of the 


THE ANGLO-IRISH 
HOT POTATO 





Weakening the 
Union to 
breaking point 


United Kingdom. Many are ask- 
: “Is it foi 


mg: 


people 

Northej 


or the sake of these 
that we have to stay in 
orfoem Ireland? If so, it doesn't 
seem a very good reason." 

The Union today is one of 
mutual aversion: a Union in 
which Great Britain dislikes 
Northern Ireland and vice versa. 
It could still hold together for a 
good many years - habit and fear 
of tire unknown make pretty 
strong cement — even without 
affection or respect. But once the 
partners to any union come to a 
settled dislike and distrust, every 
subsequent stress is likely to widen 
the gap. So it seems to me that the 


Union is beading for dissolution, 
though at a pace which cannot be 
estimated. 

In public at least, the architects 
of Hillsborough - the Sorcerer’s 
Apprentices as I see them -would 
dismiss any such analysis as 
exaggerated and unwarranted. The 
official doctrine is that the Union- 
ists will bluster for a bit, but once 
they realize the agreement is there 
to stay, and does not really 
threaten them, they will learn to 
live with the Anglo-Irish inter- 
governmental conference. 

The private views of the 
Hillsborough partners may be 
different, and distinct from each 
another, though perhaps to some 
extent converging. 

Take the Dublin side firstFew 
of FitzGerald's supporters would 
be sorry to learn that the agree- 
ment was beginning to dissolve 
the Union since that is a pre- 
requisite to a united Ireland — a 
policy objective in the Republic 
since 1932 FrtzGeriasd did not 
repudiate that objective before or 
after Hillsborough- Nor could he 
safely do so. Being both intelligent 
and humane, he must be a bit 
worried about what the break-up 
of the Union might actually 


involve. He knows, too, that 
people in the South are on shaky 
ground by believing that break-up 
of the Union would be synony- 
mous with the coming of a United 
Ireland, although he has to hope it 
may work out that way. 

On the British side, no doubt 
Mrs Thatcher would be sorry to 
think that the Union was begin- 
ning to dissolve, largely as a result 
of her efforts to strengthen it. But 
some of her officials might not be 
so sorry. Repudiation of the 
Union, by the Protestants of 
Northern Ireland, could be the 
means whereby Britain, without 
breaking faith with anyone, could 
be rid of an incubus. And certain 
officials, both in the Foreign 
Office and the Northern Ireland 
Office, are known to have long 
been anxious to find such a means. 

In the Republic, the agreement 
was opposed by the largest party, 
Banna Fad, whose leader, Charles 
Haughey, is generally considered 
likely to succeed FitzGerald next 
year. If be does, he is not likely to 
repudiate Hillsborough, if only 
because it would trigger off the 
biggest orgy of Protestant jubila- 
tion in the North since the defeat 
of Gladstone's first Home Rule 
bill in 1886. 


More likely, he would test the 
agreement by demanding maxi- 
mum concessions for the Catho- 
lics and make dear that he 
regarded the agreement only as an 
interim stage on the road to a 
united Ireland. At some point be 
might well repeat his call for a 
British “declaration of intent" to 
withdraw from Northern Ireland. 
His aim overall would be to speed 
the dissolution of the Union — 
perhaps with the co-operation 
with Neil Kinnock, should he then 
beat No 10. 

The terminal scene might well 
be that, with the security forces 
under attack from the Protestant 
side as well as the Catholic; Britain 
might give Haughey his “declara- 
tion of intent” and might then 
actually withdraw, perhaps 
quicker than he bargained for. 

In Stores of Ireland, pu b lis h ed 
14 years ago, I contemplated that 
line of possibility, calling jt “the 
malign scenario” because J 
thought it likely to lead to civil war 
in Ireland. Under this sequence of 
events, the Protestants, following 
British withdrawal set up their 
own state. Their security mea- 
sures, including searches of Catho- 
lic areas, produce widespread 
Catholic resistance, followed by 
intensified Protestant repression 
and massacres. The resultant in- 
flux of Catholic refugees into the 
Republic precipitates a war, 
involving all of Ireland. 

Those horrors are not in- 
evitable, but they seem to be 
looming nearer now that the 
Union is increasingly in question, 
and British withdrawal in con- 
sequence, more a possibility. In a 
later article, I hope to consider die 
question of damage limitation 
measures should the Union be 
dissolved. 

© Thai Huac^w, IMS. 


When Chinese books are in the red. 


•• 


After China's first bankruptcy was 
declared in August, the national 
press unanimously agreed that the 
iron Rice Bowl the long-held 
Maoist principle that jobs were for 
ever, had at last been shattered. 

But although the 72 employees 
of the Explosion-proof Apparatus 
Plant in the northern industrial 
city of Shenyang have had to find 
work elsewhere, or must exist on 
75 per cent of their previous wages 
until they go on the dole, and the 
plant’s meagre assets have been 
sold up, not everyone accepts that 
bankruptcy is a necessary con- 
dition of Deng Xiaoping’s "Social- 
ism with Chinese Characteristics.” 

Indeed, the open debate on the 
matter is an example of the new 
Chinese atmosphere in which, for 
the present at least, the second 
invitation to Let One Hundred 
Rowers Bloom means that party 
policy can be publicly questioned. 

U is always risky in China to 
trust that a political fashion will 
endure, but this time it appears 
that when the party says ji wants 
intellecluals to follow the ancient 
admonition to let One Hundred 
Schools Contend it means it. as 
long as the contenders do not form 
factions to seize power. 


As soon as the Shenyang bank- 
ruptcy was announced in August, 
it was explained that the managers 
of the Explosion-proof Apparatus 
Plant had been warned in 1985 
that they would have one more 
year to make a profit, or else. A 
spokesman for the State Council 
said “Why should we pro tea 
those enterprises which cannot 
keep going?" 


step back from day-to-day admin- 
istrative decisions. Political com- 
mentators in tbe press have 
pointed out that henceforth, if 
such derisions go sour, the party 
will do longer have to take the 
blame. 


anywhere in the world a single 
example ofa state as a legal entity 


declaring bankruptcy. 1 

ojne' 


None the less, although it is 
officially conceded that 25 per 
cent of China’s industrial enter- 
prises are running in the red. and 
that more bankruptcies must fol- 
low — on the grounds that anxiety 
makes workers try harder — in late 
September (he draff bankruptcy 
law came before the counny’s 
legislative body, the standing 
committee of National People’s 
Congress, only to be deferred. 
Despite the NPCs traditional role 
as a mere echo chamber for party 
policy, this time ten deputies 
spoke against the new law, while 
only four supported it 


Others have noted that, cons- 
titutionally, the NPC, and not the 
party, is China's supreme law- 
giving body. In Deng Xiaoping's 
China the law, rather than party 
fiat, has been accorded a central 
role. (Many intellectuals have 
already observed that if taken 
seriously such a position fun- 
damentally weakens party power.) 


That the authorities had not 
already squared the deputies to 
vole enthusiastically for bank- 
ruptcy shows that die party in- 
tends to fulfil one of the key 
aspects of political reform and 


Nor are bankruptcies merely a 
matter of law. China's constitu- 
tion stipulates that every citizen is 
entitled to a job. The Worker’s 
Daily recently asked what theories 
would justify to sacked workers 
the loss of this right The paper 
also attacked the national press for 
going overboard in praising the 
Shenyang collapse, as O' it 
smoothly eliminated the thorny 
question of life-long employment. 

A puzzle remains, said the 
Worker s Daily . How can state 
enterprises be 'declared bankrupt 
without injuring the state itself? 
“So far we have not found 


The party’s People's Daily has 
recently entered the debate, 
emphasizing that there is no thing 
illegal or inhuman about bank- 
ruptcies, which are merely a way 
to avoid needless state expense. If 
there is something particularly 
difficult about tile state declaring 
its own enterprises bankrupt, tbe 
paper suggested, then let the state 
system oi ownership be reformed. 
Bankruptcies should be applied 
“like a cardiac stimulant*' to ailing 
firms, to jolt them into productive 
action. Otherwise, tbe People's 
Daily wanted to know, “with an 
iron ricebow! in hand, what is 
there to be afraid of?” 

What is riveting about this 
debate, not just for China-watch- 
ers but for Chinese, is that the 
party is openly arguing a fun- 
damental issue -foe right to 
work versus economic ef- 
ficiency — on its merits. Simply 
issuing pronouncements and 
denouncing its critics as counter- 
revolutionary is no longer enough 
if the party wants to command 
respect. 


Jonathan Mirsky 




Timothy Gallon Ash 


London calling, 
as seen on TV 


Steaming colonels in La Paz do it. 
Students in Bsking do it- Guerril- 
las in Manila do it Street hawkers 
in New York do it Apparatchiks 
in Kiev doit Shipyard woricersm 
Gdansk do it Listen to foe BBC 

After the monarchy, the BBC 
World Service is probably the best 
known and most widely respected 
British institution in the worid. 
The other day, when a part-time 
Washington taxi driver learned 
that I came from Britain, Ibis first 
reaction was “Yes, I listen to the 
BBC” — and be works for the 
Voice of America. 

Travelling through Eastern 
Europe I am constantly reminded,, 
often in a passionate and moving 
way, of the service Bush House 
provides to people who have no 
other dispassionate and authori- 
tative worldwide news coverage. I 
remember talking in East Berlin to 
a senior Politburo member who 
admitted that his information 
came from 'the latest World Ser- 
vice news bulletin. Even in Tirana 
I discovered that our charming 
lour guide listened regularly to foe 
BBC though mainly for the 
football results. Moscow has paid 
it the ultimate compliment by 
attempting to produce its own 
World Service - imitation, the 
sincerest form of flattery. 

Despite the boosting of Bush 
House transmissions you can still 
be maddened when, in some 
remote hotel room, you think you 
have found the Worid Service, 
only to hear a tinny-voiced an- 
nouncer giving the sensational 
news that the Kiev philharmonic 
orchestra has been greeted with 
rapturous applause during a 
triumphant visit to Kabul 

The achievement of Bush 
House is almost universally 
acknowledged, even by Norman 
Tebbit, so why bother to sing its 
praises today? Because today it 
will unveil its plan to enter 
television: a plan which every 
politician should support 

The proposal is by no means 
premature. With tbe United States 
government's “Worldnet", 
Turner's CNN, French explora- 
tion of the possibilities of direct 
broadcasting to West Africa and 
agreement in principle for the 
direct broadcasting of Soviet tele- 


vision to Eastern Europe (will they 
figures?)*'* 


release the audience figures?), the 
age of international television is 
already upon us. 

The technology moves on 
apace. For what John Tosa, 
managing director of BBC Ex- 
ternal Services, justifiably calk the 
“grand leader” in international 
shortwave radio not to explore 
what may prove to be the main 
foreign broadcasting medium of 
the 21st century would be folly, 
indeed, to an outsider the BBC’s 
proposal seems too modest two 
30-minute news and current af- 
fairs programmes a day, to be 
made, as Bush House officials 
stress, in co-operation and equal 
partnership with BBC Television 
but embodying the news values of 
the radio Worid Service. The 
theme tune will be a slightly 
adapted version of the radio 
World Service's “LBliburiero” 
which, ironically enough consid- 
ering its origins in passionate 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Could you be a 
Tory Wife? 


I have had many inquiries about 
Tory Wives, the organization I 
mentioned last week whose mem- 
bers look after Tory MPs when 
nobody else seems to care. There 
seem to be a lot of women who 
want to know if they have what it 
takes to be a tower of strength. 
Could they back their husband 
through thick and thm, and then 
take coffee out to the waiting 
journalists? Here are some simple 
questions which should tell you 
straight off if you are the right 
mettle to be a Tory Wife. 

1. Your husband phones laie at 
night and tells you that pressure of 
work has forced him to stay in 
London overnight In tbe back- 
ground you can hear corks pop- 
ping, a band playing, and merry 
voices. Do you assume he is (a) 
entertaining a vita] group of hi-fi 
manufacturers from his constit- 
uency; (b) at a Cabinet meeting; (c) 
at it again? 

2. You notice an unfamiliar 
perfume on your husband’s 
dothes. You assume that there is a 
perfectly natural explanation for 
this, namely that (a) he has been 
entertaining a delegation of scent 
manufacturers from his constit- 
uency, (b) he has been standing 
too dose to Mrs Thatcher; (c) he 
has been at it again- 

3. You are at borne by yourself 
your husband in London, your 
■children at their lovely school and 
the dogs out in thegarden, You are 
arranging some flowers when foe 
telephone rings and a voice says: 
“News of the Worid here. Is foe 
MP in? Well, who’s that speaking 
then? His wife? Oh, I am soiry for 
you, love, but we're only doing our 
job.** and rings off. In your heart of 
hearts, do you know that the 
newspaper is planning to reveal 
that (a) your husband is' unlikely 
to be appointed a junior minister 
after all; (b) he is unlikely to retain 
his seat if there were an election 
tomorrow; (c) he has been at it 
again? 

4. You notice several suspicious 
looking people at foe bottom of 
foe garden. Occasionally they ring 
foe doorbell but run away when 
you answer foe door. You assume 
they are (a) gypsies: (b) housed 
breakers fc) journalists waiting 


for your husband, and you had 


d you 

better take them some coffee. 

5. In the morning, your husband 
gets up early and brings in the 
newspapers. Later you see him 
tearing them into small pieces and 
stuffing them into the dustbin. At 
breakfast, he says: “Funny, foe 
papers didn't arrive this 
morning"- You leap to the conclu- 
sion that (a) he is trying to shield 
you from a particularly nasty 
accident; (b) the newsagent deliv- 
ered Today by mistake; (c) he has 
been at it again and the papers 
have found ouL 

6. After a long silence, your 
husband says: “If I suddenly had 
to leave public life, darting, would 
you be terribly, terriblv upset?” 
Wha» do you say? (a) “I would 
feck you up, no matter what.” (b) 
‘■It's what I’ve always dreamt of.” 
’c) “Who are those awful men with 
cameras peering in through the 
window?” (d) “You’ve been at it 
again, haven’t you?” 

7. Your husband dasps your hand, 
looks deep into your eyes and tells 
you that you had better prepare 
yourself for a dreadful piece, of 
news. Do you suddenly realize 
what he is about to teO you? 
Namely, that (a) Mrs Thatcher has 
asked him to go to Belfast; (b) he 
has asked Norman Tebbit to 
dinner; (c) be has been discovered 
at it, but can't think of a way of 
explaining it to you that would 
seem understandable; (d) that he 
wants you to go out with more 
coffee to the journalists. 

8. Your husband has resigned. Is 
your first thought one of the 
following? (a) “At last we shall 
have . a chance to live a normal 
relationship, and I can give him 
the love he deserves"; (b) “WeU, at 
leak we won't have to have 
Norman Tebhit to dinner"; (c) “If 
he’s going to be at home all day 
long, how on earth am I going to 
continue my affair?” 

Resulfc lfyou asked your husband 
for help with the test, you are 
hopeless. If you hummed and 
hawed over it, you are average. If 
you swept through it with a brisk 
. smile, efficiently and automati- 
cally, while doing three other 
things at the same time, you have 
-.got what It takes. 





be a symbol of dispassionate 

° l ^^!f&cause this is what is 
technically known as a “dosed 
broadcasting regi me" (for o nce, 
the jargon is most expressive), tne 
service wifi, initially at feast, be 
available only to viewers m coun- 
tries whose governments wish 
them to receive it: for exa m pl e , m 
North America, western Europe, 
the freer parts of foe Caribbean 
and the Far East, but not m foe 

less free parts of Europe or Asia. 

To judge by the radio figures these 

will be viewers enough to start 
with. In North America alone 
more tfan . two million people 
listen regularly to the radio World 
Service. Bat as an outsider one 
ma y surely express the hope, 
which foe BBC speaking for itself 
may not express so openly, that it 
will not be tong before technologi- 
cal progress enables people in the 
Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 
to watch the BBC television news 
despite the contrary wishes of 
their governments, just as they 
now listen to World Service radio 
despite their governments’ wishes. 
(Incidentally, foe arrangements 
governing such transmissions 
must be a prime subject for 
western diplomats at the Vienna 
conference on implementation of. 
the Helsinki accords.) 

The World Service is also a 
service to Britain. So would this 
be - and not just because those of 
us irritated by the rampant trivial- • 

icy of domestic television news 
(Channel 4 excepted) might be 
to watch this BBC World 
News at home. Tm thinking rather 
of the enhancement of Britain's 
reputation and authority abroad. 

We are told foal tins is one of the 
reasons we send warships to 
di sfemt ports: “showing the flag". 

But a thousand times more people 
listen to the Worid Service, regu- 
larly, than ever see a Royal Navy 
vessel once. 

And at a fraction of the cost 
The BBC estimates that the pilot 
scheme will cost somewhere in the 
region of £10 million a year for the 
next three years, of winch a small 
part might come from paying 
subscribers abroad and existing 
BBC resources. The hugest part 
would have to come mam tax, 
probably as an addition to foe 
existing Foreign Office grant for 
the External Services. (There are 
ferns that foe Treasury might be 
tempted to ask Bush House to find 
some of the money by further 
cutting back its already grievously 
cut language services.) This is one 
exceptional item of public spend- 
ing which the government should 
attempt neither to curb nor to 
delay. It is a scheme to make more 
effective use of this country's 
tingle most valuable natural re- 
source, the English language. 

According to figuresgiven to me 
by the Ministry of Defence, the 
current cost of a type 22 frigate is 
about £150 million. The net cost 
to the taxpayer of this project 
would be £7-8 million per year. 
Surely a BBC television worid 
news is worth the back end of a r‘ 
frigate? 

The author is foreign editor ofT he 
Spectator. 


4 


« 



. . -L .. J. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: Oi-481 4100 


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CAMPAIGNING DANGEROUSLY 




Election fever — like that other 
disease which is currently 
taking up so much political 
time — is . not easy to control. 
And just as the existence of 
AIDS was till recently blamed 
upon a few homosexuals and 
heroin addicts, so was the 
responsibility for election fe- 
ver placed upon the heads of 
scapegoats in the press. 

This week, however, is one 
of reckoning. Senior ministers, 
who yesterday finally faced up 
to the feet that AIDS is 
ubiquitous and real, are today 
gathoing to hear the proof that 
the same adjectives can be 
applied to their reelection 
campaign. 

The legislative progr am me 
for the next parliament is 
designed to cause the least 
possible offense, to take up the 
least possible time, and to 
leave the greatest possible 
space for electoral manoeuvre. 
Them will be no room for the 
toe-treading feet of Mr Nicho- 
las Ridley to privatise the 
water industry. There will be 
many an opportunity to hear 
the mellifluous tones of Mr 
Douglas Hurd bringing refbnn 
to the justice system. 

Mr Lawson has opened up 
the coffers to appease public 
concern over the health and 
education services. Cabinet 
unity — partly cemented by 
this same public spending — is 
flourishing. Most significantly 
of all, the Manifesto Group of 
ministers is on course to 
produce .before Christmas the 
first draft of the programme 
for a third term. 

In 1983 the Government 
went to the polls early — so 
early, in feet, that its manifesto 
was virtually empty. A num- 
ber of the party's subsequent 
problems stemmed from that 
simple feet. This time it is 


determined not to make the 
same mistake. 

The danger is rather that it 
may make the opposite error, 
that the army may be ready for 
a battle which does not come 
soon enough, that the devil 
will make work for idle politi- 
cal hands, that the banana 
skins which fen so freely after 
the last election may fell 
instead in advance of this 
coming one. 

Election timing is never an 
easy art In a three-way fight it 
is harder still to know when 
one is securely ahehd. Some of 
the pressures for a S umm er 
poll are, of course, clear 
enough. The opinion polls 
have turned ' sharply in the 
Government’s favour in re-' 
cent weeks. The Alliance sup- 
port (vital to that large number 
of vocal Tory MPs whose chief 
opponents are liberal or SDP) 
has fallen sharply, mainly to 
the Conservatives* benefit 

The first question that the 
Prime Minister has to face is 
whether this Alliance decline is 
merely a short-term response 
to its disunity on nuclear 
defence. The best indications 
suggest longer term problems 
too. On these grounds she 
could afford to wait 

The second question con- 
cerns the economy. How long 
will the Lawson boom be in 
coming? How long before the 
new employment measures 
take effect? On these grounds 
too, delay looks desirable. 

The thud question concerns 
the effects of next April’s rate 
increase and the prospects for . 
the May local elections. These 
are unlikely to be favourable to 
the Tories in absolute terms, 
because of the seats' being 
contested. Although their im- 
plications for die general elec- 
tion may be statistically 


favouraWe^he results are not 
likely to give a very public 
fillip to Tory morale. 

Of course, if the results in 
May are exceptionally good 
aJTirne election will be hard to 
resist. Thus, whatever the 
desirability of ruling out an 
election before the Autumn, 
and concentrating instead on 
the business of government, 
such an act of selPdenlaJ will 
not take place. 

It has to .be regretted, how- 
ever, that, if the election is held 
in the autumn and speculation 
about June has not been ruled 
out until May, we shall have 
been living in a pre-election 
climate for 12 months. The 
possibility of going on into 
1988 — an otherwise laudable 
ambition — will have been 
ruled ont by the feet that we 
should then have had almost 
18 months of electioneering. 

The Government is, of 
course, to some extent teasing 
its opponents. If it can per- 
suade them to to spend some 
of their campaign funds in 
advance of the campaign, so 
much the better for it If Mr 
Tebbit sounds as though he is 
fighting the election already 
and Mr Lawson can avow that 
nothing is further from his 
mind, then “all’s fair in love 
and politics”. 

But it is important for the 
Prime Minister to ensure that 
the teasing rifts do not become 
real rifts. The Conservative's 
worst current problems are 
more managerial than politi- 
cal A campaign in which 
Central Office and Downing 
Street continue their current 
uneasy relationship is a ner- 
vous prospect Election fever 
is not as surely fetal as AIDS 
but Governments can diefrom 
it nonetheless. 


INDISCRETION IN PARIS 


M Chirac’s indiscretion in the 
Washington Times has had 
quick results. Two French 
hostages in the Lebanon have 
been released, presumably 
under Syrian auspices, and me 
back in France. The Syrian 
embassy in Parishs expressed 
gratification at die French 
Prime Minister's endorsement 
of the official Syrian view that 
it was Israeli intelligence 
which tried to plant a bomb on 
the El AJ plane at Heathrow. 
Since these events seem to 1 « 
linked, public and official 
opinion in Paris takes an 
indulgent view both of what M 
Chirac said and of the feet that 
he later denied saying it 

It would be a pity, however, 
if such an interesting matter 
were to rest there. For M 
Chirac’s interview with the 
Washington Times, both in 
what he said and in how he 
dealt with the subsequent 
storm, reveals a very curious 
blend of innocence and real- 
poliiik. 

In these zig-zagging events, 
he may well have hoped to 
give currency, though not the 
full stamp of his personal 
authority, to a theory of the El 
A1 bomb which would confuse 
the issue just enough to enable 
France to continue its resis- 
tance to joint EEC measures 
against Syria. Perhaps he sim- 
ply miscalculated the dramatic 
effect of his briefing. Perhaps 
he expected a more oblique 
treatment of his words in the 
Perhaps 


Borchgrave’s tape-recorder 
had been turned off and that 
denial was safe. 

Whichever it . was, real- 
politik must be conducted 
with greater awareness of the 
risks. Despite the absence of 
indignation in Paris at the 
deceit involved, M Chirac 
looks foolish this morning. 
The entire episode has 
strengthened; President 
Mitterrand's claim, to exercise 
control of foreign policy under 
the developing rules of “co- 
habitation*'. 

M Chirac's general outlook, 
as revealed in the transcript, 
similarly mixes shrewdness 
and innocence. His theory of 
who planted the El A1 bomb is 
crackpot speculation of the 
dottiest kind. No evidence 
whatever is offered for the idea 
that Israeli Mossad and anti- 
Assad dissidents in Syrian 
intelligence cooperated in 
arranging it. And the Prime 
Minister discounts the ev- 
idence of the Syrian 
Ambassador’s involvement, 
supported by British electronic 
surveillance, by hinting darkly 
that British intelligence was in 
on the plot toor“Nothing is 
easier than to fake that kind of 
evidence without government 
leaders knowing about the real 
plot.” 

But when M Chirac turns to 
Western policy towards terror- 
ism and the Middle East, he 
makes a stronger case. If the 
West is to prevent the triumph 
of Islamic fundamentalism 
and, in particular, to preserve 


Washington Times. 
be thought that Mr Arnaua de 

last of the bolsheviks 


something from the wreck of 
Lebanon, he argues, it must 
either employ effective force 
that actually deters tind over- 
turns terrorist regimes or rec- 
oncile itself to dealing with 
them diplomatically.. What it 
should avoid is gestures such 
as Britain's diplomatic breach 
with Syria or .ineffective pu- 
nitive action such as the US 
raid on Libya. These merely 
unify Arab opinion against the 
West, strengthen the regime 
under attack and undermine 
pro-Western moderate rulers 
in the area. 

This argument tacitly as- 
sumes, however, that it is 
easier and more productive to 
manipulate factions within 
foreign governments by ju- 
dicious concessions than to 
make plain that terrorist ac- 
tions by those governments 
will be punished. That has not 
been the experience of West- 
ern governments in recent 
years. 

It. also offers no relief when 
moderates have already, been 
ousted and an extremist fac- 
tion is plainly in control, as in 
Libya and Syria. M Chirac as 
much as admits that when he 
says that if he comes across 
irrefutable evidence of Syrian 
involvement in French terror- 
ism,; “we . shall take measures 
that will not be verbal ones.” 
How will that action differ 
from President Reagan's raid 
on Libya or Mrs Thatcher's 
breach of diplomatic relations 
with Syria? A stronger answer 
is required than that it will be 
more effective. ; 


The last of the old Bolsheviks 
is dead. . The passing of 
Vyacheslav Molotov, Soviet 
prime minister, foreign min- 
ister, Stalinist and survivor 
par excellence , marks the end 
of an era in Soviet Russian 
history. It is an era few will 
mourn. 

Molotov, his career and his 
fete, exemplify the vicissitudes 
of the Soviet political system. 
He was a subversive when 
subversion paid. He was a 
revolutionary when the Bol- 
shevik revolution succeeded. 
In power, he was a taker of 
orders and to all appearances 
none too fastidious about tne 

methods he used to carry them 

out 

.As one of Stalin’s most 
faithful lieutenants, Molotov 
won many of the rewards the 
Soviet ruling party had to 
bestow. When Slalm was dis- 
credited. he suffered .some of 
the ignominy the Sonet Com- 
munist Party reserved- and 
still reserves ; - for ^owm Yet 
his own life m.ihe Soviet 
political wilderness was a for 
cry from the gub& 

accommodated many of tas 
erstwhile colleagues, a world 
away from the terror be had 
helped to impose. 


Eves then it was chance 
rather than discernment that 
ordained his longevity. For 
Molotov, Stalin died just in 
time. 

For 20 years, expelled from 
the Communist Party, ex- 
cluded from public life, be- 
lieved by many indeed to be 
dead, Molotov was one of the 
Soviet Union’s non-persons. 
His eclipse was seen as tanta- 
mount to the edipse of Stalin- 
ism. This was why, when 
Molotov was readmitted to the 
party two years ago, surviving 
victims of Stalin’s persecu- 
tions, their descendants and all 
who had cause to recall his rule 
with fear, responded with 
understandable trepidation. . 

They did not see Molotov's 
rehabilitation merely as a fa- 
vour from one old Bolshevik 
unexpectedly elevated to 
power (Konstantin 

Chernenko) to another. Accus- 
tomed to seeing the symbol 
behind the action, they inter- 
preted it as evidence that the 
reputation of Stalin himself 
would eventually be restored. 
In a period of weak and 
dirertionless leadership, many 
believed. Stalin’s image of 
strength, decisiveness and na- 
tional-pride would be brought 
in to compensate. 


Yet the readmission of 
Molotov to the party and the 
brief interview with him pub- 
lished in the Soviet press a 
year, later- may have had a 
more profound, and possibly 
less sinister, significance. 
Molotov's name was synony- 
mous not only with Stalinism, 
but also with an episode in 
Soviet history which even the 
most loyal of Stalinists (and 
there are. some alive and 
prospering in the Soviet Union 
- today) prefer to forget the ill- 
judged Soviet-German treaty 
of 1939. 

The Molotov-Ribbentrop 
pact is one of those events 
.which are usually omitted 
from Soviet official histories 
and textbooks^ It -is one of 
many. For this reason the 
mention of Molotov’s name 
again raised hope as well as 
fear: hope that the present 
generation of Soviet leaders 
might fed able to make a less 
selective and more honest 
assessment of the past There 
have been isolated signs of 
change as some hitherto taboo 
subjects have been brought, 
tentatively, into the open. The 
treatment of Molotov’s mem- 
ory will be a signpost for the 
future. - . 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Artists* firm line on copyright law 


From the President and Council of 
the Royal Academy Of Arts 
Sir, The vigorous line taken by the 
Chairman of zbe Arts Council 
over the reform of copyright law 
(report, November 3) will have the 
support of artists throughout 
Britain. 

It is a fundamental principle of 
law that copyright in an original 
work belongs, in the first instance, 
to the author. This principle is 
commonly established throughout 
Europe and it is enshrined in the 
Berne Convention, which the 
Government now propose io rat- 
ify in a Copyright Reform Bill- 

In the UK. and Ireland alone, it 
is subject to a number of excep- 
tions, the most objectionable of 
which (section 4 (3) of the 1956 
Copyright Act) deprives artists of - 
the copyright in certain works 
(principally portraits) commis- 
sioned by others. Writers, 
composers and other authors of 
intellectual property are not so 
treated: aritsts alone are singled 
out as a special case. 

The Jaw in this regard is not 
merely inequitable but anoma- 
lous: the section applies, for 
instance, to painted or drawn 
portraits, but not to sculpted ones. 
It leaves the artist in the absurd 
position of having to bargain for 
copyright in his own work. Nor is 


it a purely economic matter 
deprived of copyright, the artist 
can no longer control the quality 
of reproduction of bis work. On 
the other hand, the interests of 
commissioners can be protected 
quite adequately by contractual 
means. 

The Royal Academy supports 
the Arts Council's case for the 
abolition of section 4 (3) of the Act 
and would also favour the aboli- 
tion of section 4 (4), which deals 
similarly with works made in the 
course of employment. Such re- 
form is long overdue, and it would 
be a matter for deep regret if the 
Government failed to remove this 
inequitable provision from the 
law in the next session of Par- 
liament. 

We are. Sir, yours sincerely, 
ROGER de GREY (Rnesklnn), 

GILLIAN AYRES, OLWEN 
BOWEY. JAMES BUTLER, 

GEOFFREY CLARKE, TREVOR 
DANNATT, PHILIP DOWSON, 
BERNARD DUNSTAN. DONALD 
HAMILTON FRASER, PAUL 
HOGARTH. TOM PHILLIPS. 

PHILIP POWELL (Treasurer). 

PIERS RODGERS (Secretary), 
LEONARD ROSOMAN, JOE TILSON, 
JOHN WARD, 

Royal Academy of Arts, 
Piccadilly, Wl. 

November 7. 


Art trade threat 

From the Head of UK Offices, 
Commission qf the European 
Communities 

Sir, We have been following the 
controversy about VAT and the 
art world with some puzzlement 
and with admiration at the success 
of the art auction lobby is 
generating so much more heat 
than light Sir, the proposal for a 
“Seventh Councfl Directive on the 
harmonisation of the laws of 
Member Slates relating to turn- 
over taxes — common system of 
value added tax to be applied to 
works of art, collectors’ items, 
antiques and used goods” (to give 
it its full title) has been under 
discussion for a long time,’ since 
January 6, 1978. 

May I remind your correspon- 
dents, and particular Mr George 


Levy (November 7), that the 
European Parliament does not 
make legislation under the Treaty 
of Rome. The final decisions, of 
course, rest with the Council of 
Ministers, Le., the member-gov- 
ernments of the Community. 

May 1 also point out that any 
decision on VAT, in other words 
on fiscal matters concerning the 
European Community, comes 
under article 99 of fee Treafy 
which decrees unanimity. Thera is 
therefore no question of the 
matter “going through on the 
nod”. 

Yours faithfully. 

GEORGE SCOTT, 

Head of UK Offices, 

Commission of the European 
Communities, 

8 Storey's Gate, SW1. 

November 7. 


Role of law in Enrope 

From Mr Dennis Thompson 
Sir. It is good to know that Lord 
Deiming (article, November 3) 
has given fee Single European Act 
his wholehearted support Few 
have done more in Britain to instil 
respect far fee rule of law than 
Lord Denning and it is thanks to 
the Rome Treaty feat the law now 
reigns to an increasing extent over 
Europe, concomitant pettinesses 
notwithstanding. 

Here m Geneva the scene is 
very different The international 
arrangements of forty years ago 
are" visibly disintegrating and fee 
disarray may turn into a rouL 

The United States no longer 
backs multilateralism in the UN; 
it seems from fee GATT con- 
ference in Puma deT Este that all 
fee rules of GATT (including the 
most-favoured-nation clause) are 
up -for grabs; and the African 
States have even savaged the 
humanitarian Geneva Conven- 
tions. 


The international rule of law, 
for which there is no substitute in 
a free world, is essential, however 
unwelcome it may sometimes 
seem. It is now for the European 
Union, strengthened by the Single 
Act, to devote its growing in- 
fluence — and its power - to the 
furtherance of worid order. 

The Community has begun to 
stiffen fee sinews in its concern for 
the world outside and already 
encourages regional groupings 
elsewhere. It now behoves it to 
seize fee moment by adopting a 
move positive and collective role 
on fee universal issues that can 
only be dealt with in a worid 
forum and by promoting proce- 
dures calculated to restore to fee 
United Nations its dignity and 
effectiveness. 

Yours faithfully, 

DENNIS THOMPSON, 

1 299 Crans (near Geneva), 

Vaud, Switzerland. 

November 4. 


Nndear deterrence 

From Mr H. A. Sargeaura 
Sir, There has been much mention 
in The Times of fee strategic 
defense initiative. But there is a 
further point to be made. 

The greater fee “uncertainty” in 
fee forecasts made by both sides, 
the greater the deterrence. It is the 
degree of “uncertainty”, not fee 
degree of “fear” that is critical. 

When both sides have com- 
plexes of weapons, and when fee 
results of these complexes in 
action are hard to assess, the 
“uncertainty" is great, and so is 
the deterrence. Where in all this 
does SDI stand? 

It is possible to calculate the 
effects of nuclear attacks against 
given targets wife some degree of 
certainty. But the same does not 
apply to defensive measures 
against multiple attacks. Apart 
from all else, these defences can 
never in practice be tested in full. 
Therefore the degree of “uncer- 
tainty” is increased by such a 
development; and thus the deter- 
rence. 

Attacking mid ear forces must 
no doubt be reduced, but fee same 
does as yet not apply to defensive 
including SDL 


/ours. 

H. A. SARGEAUNT, 

7 Bond Pose. Sway, 
Lymingion, Hampshire. 


Taking advice 

From Councillor T. M. Farrer 
Sir. I must teD Mr John Butterfill, 
MP (November 8) that the shire 
county of Cumbria, wife bi-party 
agreement, has just completed a 
two-year exercise in mam^ement 
restructuring based on a com- 
prehensive investigation and re- 
port by a national firm of 
management consultants. 

The results are manifold: a 
streamlined and more efficient 
management team, a much greater 
awareness by chief officers and 
councillors of each others’ prob- 
lems, more information on other 
authorities’ initiatives, a better 
delivery of services to the public, 
etc. 

Mr Butterfill says that we 
councillors lack detailed informa- 
tion on issues. He must not be 
surprised that both Conservative 
and Labour leaders on this coun- 
cil as on many others, see fee 
urgent need for personal advisers 
to undertake research for policy 
formulation. 

Yours faithfully, 

TREVOfc FARRER, 

Whitbairow Lodge, 

Grange-o ver-Sanas. Cumbria. 
November 8. 


Bus comforts 

FromMrT.J. Williams 
Sir, Professor Nave (feature, 
November T) appears to believe 
feat British cities have passenger 
transit "networks” (his italics) 
which we are in danger oflosing. If 
he means by “networks” a system 
designed to help people to travel 
comfortably and conveniently in 
feeir, or in strange cities, no such 
network exists in the UK prov- 
inces. 

Subsidies to buses may be seen 
as taxes paid by central and local 
government against highway and 
traffic management arrangements 
which more and more load the 
dice against road-based transit 
systems. Had fee bus industry 
been helped to meet the needs of 
its customers, our cities would 
now have city-wide bus lanes, bus 
priority at main junctions, much 
stricter parking regulations and all 
fee other goodies (shelters which 
keep the rain off, interchangeable 
tickets and so forth) which Profes- 
sor Nove pretends we’ve already 
got 

Now, after fifty years of failure, 
monopoly has been abolished. For 
a while things may be confused, 
especially as some managers are 
confusing the subtleties of com- 
petition wife a straight knock- 
down fight for high-street market 
share. But let us give the new 
companies and the other enter- 
prises who will enter fee market, 

two or three years (not fifty) before 
we pompously pronounce them 
failures. 

Yours truly, 

T. J. WILLIAMS, 

71 Howard Road, 

Westbury Park. 

Bri stol Avon.- 

Defence of Welsh 

From Professor John Honey 
Sir, Mr Tegwyn Watkm’s defence 
of Welsh (November 8) quotes a 
noteworthy 1 953 Commons state- 
ment by Aneurin Sevan. This 
claimed that Welsh culture is 
“unique in fee worid”, involving 
“a special quality of mind, a 
s pgrial attitude towards menial 
things which one does not find 
anywhere else”. 

Under Britain’s current race 
relations legislation such a state- 
ment could arguably be classified 
as racist, and a similar claim on 
behalf of English language and 
culture made by a head teacher in 
Bradford or Brent could lead tc 
dismissal 
Yours faithfully. 

JOHN HONEY, 

5 Woods Close, 

Oadby, Leicester. 


An unfair cop 
for visitors? 

From Mr Colin Kirk 
Sir, A little before 5 o’clock last 
Thursday afternoon, two well 
dressed Italian professional men 
walking along Oxford Street were 
stopped by two plain dothes 
policemen, who presented their 
credentials. There followed a 
somewhat one-sided conversa- 
tion, from which fee Italians 
gleaned feat they were to submit 
to being searched. 

To feeir surprise, they were not 
taken to a police station but 
searched then and there. The 
policemen emptied the visitors’ 
pockets, examined their wallets 
and the few other possessions they 
had on them and dropped them 
one by one on to the pavement 
The policemen then left fee 
visitors to pick up feeir pos- 
sessions. 

The stop and search regulations, 
as I understand them, require the 
police to give their names and 
numbers, give the address of their 
police station, explain fee grounds 
for feeir suspicions and report 
back at their police station whom 
they have searched and why. The 
police are also obliged to inform 
those searched feat they are 
entitled to a copy of the report on 
application to fee police station at 
any time during the following 12 
months. 

It seems feat fee regulations do 
not require fee police to provide a 
simple statement outlining fee 
regulations, wife the -names, num- 
bers and police station of the 
officers concerned. Without such a 
statement it is impossible to 
question fee action of fee police. 

Few people know of their rights. 
As 1 discovered when I enquired 
on my Italian friends* behalf; the 
officers concerned cannot be 
traced subsequently. 

Surely any infringement of civil 
liberties requires tighter regula- 
tions than were applied in this 
case. 

Yours sincerely, 

COLIN KIRK, 

1 Bridge Street, Oxford. 

November 6. ; 

Hungarian uprising 

From Mr Anthony J. Clarke 
Sir, Mr Gyorgy Aczel’s article 
(November 5), in which he at- 
tempts to place fee 1956 Hungar- 
ian uprising in the context of a 
“hiccup” along the otherwise 
steady progression towards 
“socialist democracy”, is cynical 
in the extreme. Not once, 
unsurprisingly perhaps, does he 
mention Russia's absolute and alt- 
pervading control of fee country 
at that time. 

In the aftermath of the vicious 
military reprisals beginning at 
dawn on November 4 (4,000 
tanks, a quarter of a million 
mostly Mongolian foot soldiers 
from fee central states — fee Red 
Army already garrisoned in Hun- 
gary having been withdrawn be- 
cause it could not be trusted), 
Russia realised that it would have 
a major propaganda struggle on its 
hands for many years to come. 
Clearly, that struggle is still going 
on. 

“The state administrative appa- 
ratus was reorganized”, says your 
correspondent It certainly was. 
The myth of collective wellbeing 
under fee benevolent Russian flag 
had been exploded for all time. 
The old, crude methods (take 
immediate control of fee police 
force, remove the existing intelli- 
gentsia, eliminate or deport to 
Siberia any dissident leadership, 
and then begin again in fee 
classroom, to build a new genera- 
tion of communist “rightchiks”) 
would no longer work. But fee 
strategy is still very much in place, 
and fee West should not be 
deceived. 

“We must take steps forward in 
the reform of economic 
management . . . carry on wife 
fee process of extending socialist 
democracy”, states Mr AczeL 
“Productivity is still low. We 
must, therefore, shift to a higher 
gear”. 

The language has changed, fee 
aims haven't 
Yours faithfully. 

ANTHONY J. CLARKE, 

8 Wolsey Grove, 

Esher, Surrey. 

Grant of arms 

From the Chairman of the 
Manorial Society of Great Britain 
Sir, In taking issue in his letter 
(October 24) wife your Correspon- 
dent Christopher Warman, Mr 
Tbornas Woodcock, Somerset 
Herald, says it “is wrong to imply 
that possession of a manor readers 
one eligible for a grant of arms”. 

Mr Warm an implied nothing of - 
fee kind. He said (October 20): 
“owners are entitled to — apply 
for a coat of arms” — quite a 
different thing. So far as 1 am 
aware, everyone of English an- 
cestry, or a subject of fee Crown 
overseas, is entitled to apply for 
arms, be they the Prince and 
Princess of Wales, or beggar. The 
fact is a beggar would be unable to 
meet the modest fees involved and 
so would not qualify on that 
ground, in addition to any other at 
which Mr Woodcock hints in his 
last paragraph. 

The use of armorial bearings by 
lords of manors is a tradition that 
predates even fee College of 
Arms as a convenient and tra- 
ditional method of identification. 

I have not heard that fee College 
of Arms bas declined to exercise 
the royal prerogative to a manorial 
lord recently and, indeed, it has 
gone to the trouble of reflecting 
manorial status where this is 
applicable in lettere patent. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT SMITH. Chairman, 

The Manorial Society of Great 
Britain, 

104 Kennington Road (in the 
Manor of KetmingioaX SE1 1. 


NOVEMBER 12 1919 

Total British casualties in Worid 
War I were 2^60,616 of whom 
851,117 were known to naoe died. 

Casualty lists of dead and 
wounded, under the heading Ron 
of Honour, were o regular feature 
of The Times throughout the war. 
On November 6, 1917, for 
example, the list rose to 4,750 
other ranks and 334 officers, their 
names covering a page and a half 
of small print. 


THE GREAT 
SI LENC E. 

NATION’S HOMAGE 
TO ITS DEAD. 

(From Our Special Correspondents^ 

At 11 o’clock yesterday morning 
the nation, in response to the 
King’s invitation, paid h oma ge to 
the Glorious Dead by keeping a two 
min utes* silence for prayer and 
remembrance. 

Deep, true emotion cannot be 
contained in mere words; and no 
combination of phrases could de- 
scribe the feelings of the multi- 
tudes who stood silent and 
prayerful in London’s streets yes- 
terday. Many were experiencing 
again a grid 1 of the war; many 
thfnygfat of friends they would 
never see again. Everywhere there 
was mourning, sorrow, and thanks- 
giving. For some minutes before 
the maroons ushered in the period 
of prayer a strange adf-conscious- 
ness had fallen upon the people. 

A new gentleness seemed abroad. 
People moved respectfully, as if 
saluting- each other’s grief; and 
even the curious, of which there is 
always a goodly proportion in a 
London crowd, gazed reverently at 
the hurrying private cars and cabs 
which took black-garbed relatives 
to the many services. And continu- 
ously the church bells tolled sor- 
rowfully and persistently. It was 
more thaw a call to prayer — more 
than a tribute. In the great awful 
silence that fan upon London's 
streets yesterday feeze was a 
glimpse into the soul of fee Nation. 
Women weep — often, it is to be 
feared — and the best tribute to the 
genuineness of fee moments was to 
be seen in the bowed heads and 
streaming eyes of all too many 
men. And even those who kept the 
tears back rlwnwl their throats, 
coughed, and seemed very uneasy 
when the traffic again began to 
move and hats were replaced. 

LONDON'S TRIBUTE. 

Yesterday morning was bright 
and cold with a keen wind. The 
streets seemed busier than usual as 
one drove along K n i ghtsbridge. 
Outside fee Brompton Oratory 
cars were bringing many religious 
to the memorial service and the 
omnibuses going east were crowd- 
ed. Already outside Buckingham 
Palace there was a large crowd, and 
down the Mail where the red sand 
shone golden for the President’s 
drive to the City, was a continually 
moving throng. . - . 

Everywhere there was life, busy 
and carrying on with fee work of 
fee day. Then from the left off 
Buckingham Palace, from fee 
Guard Room, the Palace detach- 
ment of fee King's Guard came 
out. In a moment or two the 
maroons sounded. The Guard 
could be seen presenting anas — , 
and the guard at the r egimenta l 


headquarters at Buckingham Gate 
- the soldiers stood to attention, 
and from a great babel of noise and 
confusion arose the greater 
silence. . . . 

Everything was still. Motor en- 
gines had stopped. Through the 
trees the streams of vehicles to the 
North could be seen halted and 
people, people everywhere were 
standing with bared heads . . - and 
handkerchiefs. . ■ - 

. . .and then the traffic began to 
move slowly and hats were replaced 
and a few women were to be seen 
powdering their noses. The great 
tribute was over. . 

Slowly, as if in a changed worid, 
you moved on. But it was different. 
The great silence is bound to have a 
permanent effect. Since the Armi- 
stice so much has happened feat 
fee wonderful body of sacrifice 
made in the war has been liable to 
be publicly forgotten. Grief has 
been private. The great result of 
the two minutes’ homage yesterday 
will be to teach the nation its 
general loss — to make grief its 
privilege. 


Phrase or fable? 

From Mr David West 
Sir, I doubt whether the ex- 
pression, “Cheer up for Chatham, 
wooden legs are cheap” has any- 
thing to do wife the Earl of 
Chatham, as Mr Hare (November 
7) suggests. 

It is more likely that it refers to 
fee Chatham Chest, the old naval 
charity which supplied wooden 
legs free to sailors who had lost 
theirs in action, together wife a 
wound pension. 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID WEST. 

7 St Paul's Place, Nl. 

November 7. 

From Mrs Mary Visick 
Sir. My mother (b.1888) used to 
console our infant woes in terms 
somewhat similar to those of Mr 
Hare’s children's aged aunt Her 
version, however, was, “Cheer up 
for Chatham, Dover’s in sight”, 
and 1 wonder whether this may be 
a more familiar variant. 

Her explanation was that it 
referred to fee London. Chatham 
and south-eastern railway — fee 
Slow. Easy and Careful line, from 
which passengers were reputed to 
pick bunches of wildflowers as it 
tonered through railway outlines. 

After it passed through Chat- 
ham there was always fee hope, 
always frustrated, that it might 
gather speed on the second phase 
of its progress. 

Yours faithfully. 

MARY VISICK. 

49a Sussex Square, 

Brighton, Sussex. 


29 *.. _ 


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COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

The Queen held an Investi- 
ture at Buckingham Palace this 
morning. 

Coload Richard Crichton 
had the honour of being re- 
reived by The Queen and 
delivered up his Stick of Office 
upon relinquishing his appoint- 
ment as Lieutenant of Her 
Majesty’s Body Guard of the 
Honourable Corps of Gemle- 
tnen-at-Arms. 

The following Officers of Her 
Majesty's Body Guard of the 
Honourable Corps of Gentle- 
men -ai-Arms had the honour of 
being received by The Queen: 
Major David Jamieson, V.G, 
who delivered up his Stick of 
Office as clerk of the Cheque 
and Adjutant and received his 
Stick o (Office upon his appoint- 
mem as Lieutenant, and Major 
Thomas Sl Aubyn, who re- 
ceived his Stick of Office upon 
his appointment as Clerk of the 
Cheque and Adjutant. 

The Right Hon. Margaret 
Thatcher. M.P. (Prime Minister 
and First Lord of tbe Treasury) 
bad an audience of Her Majesty 
this evening. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs. 
Mark Phillips this morning 
attended the Council Meeting of 
the National Council for Vol- 
untary Youth Services, on the 
occasion of the 50tb Anniver- 
sary of its foundation, at the 
Town Hall, Islington, N.l and 
afterwards was entertained at 
luncheon at the Town HalL 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Mayor of Islington 
(Councillor Bob Crossman) and 
the Honorary Chairman of the 
CoundJ (Mr. Robert AitkenX 

In the afternoon. The Princess 
Anne, Mrs. Mark Phillips vis- 
ited Youth Organisations 
belonging to the National Coun- 
cil for Voluntary Youth 
Services. 

The Hon. Mrs Legge-Bourke 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Peter 
Gibbs were in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs-Marit 
Phillips this evening attended 
the Institute of Marketing's 75th 
Anniversary Dinner at the Dor- 
chester Hotel during which Her 
Royal Highness received the 
Institute's Award 'Marketing 
Woman of the Year’. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs. 
Mark Phillips was received by 
the Presidentof the Institute (Sir 
Patrick MeaneyL 

The Countess of Lichfield was 
in attendance. 

The Hon. Mary Morrison has 


succeeded Lady Susan Hussey 
as Lady in Waiting to The 
Queen. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 

Colonel Sir Geoffrey 
Errington, Bt, today had the 
honour of beit® received by 
Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother, CoIonel-in-Chief, The 
King's Regiment, upon 
relinquishing his appointment 
as Colonel of the Regiment. 

Brigadier Peter Davies also 
had the honour of being re- 
ceived by Her Majesty upon 
assuming his appointment as 
Colonel of The King's 
Regiment. 

Ruth. Lady Fennoy. has suc- 
ceeded Lady Angela Oswald as 
Lady-in-Waiting to Queen 
Elizabeth Tbe Queen Mother. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 

The Princess Margaret, 
Countess of Snowdon was 
present this afternoon at a 
Luncheon given by Tarmac 
PLC at the Dorchester Hotel in 
aid of the National Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children, of which Her Royal 
Highness is President. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Blair was in 
attendance. 

Princess Alice, Duchess of 
Gloucester. President, the La- 
dies Guild of the St John 
Ophthalmic Hospital, this after- 
noon received The Lady Caccza 
on relinquishing ter appoint- 
ment as Chairman of the Guild. 

The Duke of Gloucester today 
visited CoSIRA (Council for 
Small Industries in Rural Areas) 
projects in Castle Dottingion, 
Sileby, Hoton and Wymeswokl, 
and, as President of the 71000 
Duke of Gloucester Preserva- 
tion Society, re-commissioned 
the locomotive 71000 “Duke of 
Gloucester" at the Great Central 
Railway's Rothley Station, 
Leicestershire. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen’s Right, was attended by 
Lt Col Sir Simon Bland. 

In the evening Tbe Duke of 
Gloucester was present at a 
Reception given by the 
Courts ukl Institute of Art Fund 
at the CourtauJd Galleries. Wo- 
burn Square. London WC1. 

Lt Col Sir Simon Bland was in 
attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
was present this evening at a 
concert given- in aid of the 
English-Speaking Union Music 
Council at Goldsmiths’ Hall , 
Foster Lane, London, EC2. 

Mrs Michael Wigley was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 

The Duke of Kent, Vice 
Chairman of the British Over- 


seas Trade Board, accompanied 
by The Duchess Of Kent, left 
Heathrow Airport, London to- 
day for India. 

Their Royal Highnesses were 
received upon arrival at the 
airport by His Excellency Dr. 
P.C. Alexander (High Commis- 
sioner for India) and Mrs 
Alexander. Mr. WJ. HaD 
(representing the Secretory of 
State for Trade and Industry), 
Mr Robert Falkner (Deputy 
Marketing Director - Admin- 
istration, British Airways) and 
Mr. Robert Baxendale (Man- 
ager. Special Facilities 
Heathrow Airport Limited). 

Sir Richard Buckley and Miss 
Sarah Partridge are • in 
attendance. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 

Princes Alexandra was 
present this evening at a Fash- 
ion Show and Dinner held by 
the League of Friends at the 
Royal Marsden Hospital at tbe 
Hotel inter-Continental, Hyde 
Park Comer. W.I. 

Lady Mary Mumford was in 
attendance. 


Hie Countess of Dundee gave 
birth to a daughter on Wednes- 
day, November 5, 1986. 

A memorial service for Lady 
Fisher of Lambeth will be held 
at St James’s Church, Bodley 
Road, New Malden, Surrey, at 
noon today. 


Luncheons 

HM Government 
Baroness Young, Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was host yes- 
terday at a luncheon held at 
Lancaster House in honour of 
the High Commissioner for 
Bangladesh, Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Miar Sbawkal Ali. 

Shrievalty Association 
After their annual meeting held 
yesterday al Stationers* Hall the 
Shrievalty Association held a 
luncheon. The chairman. Cap- 
tain J. Elwes. presided and the 
guests of honour were the 
Secretary of Sure for tbe Horae 
Department and the Hon Mrs 
Douglas Hurd. Tbe guest 
speaker was Lord Justice 
GlideweD and grace was said by 
the Rev Dr Ronald G Gibbias, 
Superintendent Minister of 
Wesley’s ChapeL Among other 

S present were Lady 
veil, Mr M.K. Ridley of 
tbe Office of the Duchy of 
Lancasterand Mr Allen Thomp- 
son. Master of the Stationers’ 
and Newspaper Makers' Com- 
pany, and Mrs Thompson. 


Saleroom 

£2.5m for 
Jasper 
Johns 
painting 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Boom Correspondent 

Contemporary art hit the big 
time hi New York on Monday 
night Mien a Jasper Johns sold 
for &L63#»000 (estimate $1.5 
nation to $2 million) or 
£2312,111, die highest auction 
price on record far a tiring artist. 

The painting. “Out the 

Window”, comprises three pan- 
els in which the muds red, 

yellow and Mae can he discerned 
amid a welter of encaustic paint 

in those colours, phs a bit of 

white and Mack. 

The painting whs christened 
by Johns's sister when she 
visited bis studio in 1959 and 
told him she coald find no 
meaning in his work. Looking 
"oat tbe window” at an empty 
parking lot she added insult to 
injury by suggesting that he 
iwttd what he saw. It has 
become a seminal work of Ins 
great period. 

The 54 by 40 inch picture 
came for sale from Mrs Rrdner 
Scull, former wife of the most 
famous collector of post-war 
American art, Robert C ScnJL 

The Monday night mixed 
property sale made more Bowey 
at a sitting than any previous 
a action of contemporary art, 
£9J million with eoly 3 per cent 
unsold. 

The market ia photographs 
was also hamming in New York 
with a Sotheby’s sale totalling 
£554,796 with 14 per cent 
unsold. A frame containing 
seven photographs of Christ’s 
Passion secured the top price at 
S93300 (nnpabfistied estimate 
$80,008 to $120,000) or £64,705, 
selling to a Canadian private 
collector. 

The photographer, F Holland 
Day, grew Ms beard and hair, 
constructed a crown of thorns 
and photographed himself seven 
times in a mirror, with facial 
expressions reflecting the words 
of tbe Passion. The work was 
exhibited at the first Philadel- 
phia Salon of 1898 and cansed 
the inevitable controversy, cata- 
pulting the photographer to 
tame. 


Birthdays today 

Lord Goff of Chievdey. 60; Mr 
J. A. S. Ingnmelis. 52; Sir 
Ronald Millar, 67; Major-Gen- 
eral Sir Gerald Duke. 76; Mrs 
Peggy Fenner, MP, 64; Sir 
Charles Sop with. 81; Mr Jeffrey 
Thomas. QC, 53; the Rev Dr 
Chad Varah, 75; the Marquess 
of Zetland, 78. 


Dinners 

Institute of Marketing 
Princess Anne attended the 
seventy fifth anniversary dinner 
of the Institute of Marketing last 
night at the Dorchester hoteL 
The president of the institute. 
Sir Patrick Meaney, was in the 
chair, and during the evening. 
Princess Anne was presented 
with her award as Marketing 
Woman of the Year for her work 
with The Save the Children 
Fund. Sir John Egan, Chairman 
of Jaguar pic, was presented 
with nis award as Marketing 
Man of the Year. Mr Norman 
Burden, national chairman, and 
Mr Tony McBurnie, director 
general, were also present and 
the other guests were: . 

com EiTwror Ha*. Lord Hum or 
Ton worth. Lord McIntosh of Harin- 
gey. Lord Moony. com taaonSy of 
Shu I bred?- Lord Thomson of 
Montfletn. Lord Wetnstock. Sir Peter 
Baldwin. Professor Sir James Ban. Sir 
Timothy Sevan. Sir Gordon Barrie. 
Sir David English. Sir Manly 
rinnteton Sir Owen Green. Sfr 
Ronald Halstead, sir Brian Ham Sir 
sr Middleton, r 


Professor G S Bain. Professor M J 
Baker. Pr ote stor p G Moore. Rear- 
Admiral E MacLean. Mr John Cawefc. 
Mr Bryan Nlctioteon. Mr Denb 
Tnaictier and many fellows and 
member* of me institute. 

Royal Commonwealth Society 
Sir Peter Gadsden, Chairman of 
the Royal Commonwealth Soci- 
ety, and Lady Gadsden gave a 
dinner last night at the Royal 
Commonwealth Society in hon- 
our of all Commonwealth High 
Commissioners in London and 
their ladies. Among the guests 
were: 

Lord Trend (Pnaktent of the society) 
and Laay Trend. Mr Ttm Renton 
f Minister of state tor Foreign and 
Commonwealth Affairs) and Mrs 
Renton. Sir Wffllam and may 
Hesefltne. Mr Robert and Lady Jane 


FeDowes. U>e Common wiarrh Sec- 
retary-Genera! and Mrs Ramphai and 
me Director of me Commonwealth 
Foundation and M» FaieCau. 
Dinosaurs Club 

Mr John Redwood was the 
principal guest at a dinner given 
fry the Dinosaurs Club last night 
at the House of Commons by 
courtesy of Sir Geoffrey John- 
son-Smith, MP. Others present 
included: 

Lord HBrvmqton. Lord Mutton of 
UndtaCame. Sir John Pwt. Sir Victor 
aoodnew. Mr Donald Bax ichalnnsm). 
MT Simon Wngackt-Dtgby. Mr Eve- 
lyn King. Mr Arthur Jones, Lieuten- 
ant -Colonel James ADason and Mr 
Pen Crowder. QC. 

UK CoflM Trade Fo d er s t he i 
Mr Kerry Sl Johnston. Vice-Chairman 
of me General council of British 
Shmpfng. was me guest speaker at me 
annual dinner of the UK Coffee Trade 
Federation hold last ntgtit at Groove, 
nor House. Mr A. Milter, chairman of 
ute_ federation, accompanied by Mrs 
presided.. Tire guests Inducted 

w5 

_ Horn- 

Attains and Lord and 


jjte Acting 
Papua New 




A.B. Hiim-n. Master of me 
_ _. htntrtr Company- assisted by Hb 

8KS&r. G MSS? M K 


Hall last night Mr D.V. 
MJ. Kemp and Mr R. 


Gmni Dssw Coma 

Sr Frank ^Lawton, president. 


and 


members of the General Denial 

Council ndd a dinner last night at 37 

wfmpoie Street Professor VW.M, 
Drury. President of the Royal College 

of General Practitioners, and Mr qj. 
de Deucy. Clerk of the Privy Council, 
were Uw principal guests. 

IIWWW AdvrUstng CM? » * LsMaa 

MBs Barinra KHIy wa*U»WBM 

honour and speaker at the November 

dinner given uy the Women's 
Advertising qub of London at the 
uS ntgW. Mrs Lyndy 
Payrie. president of me dub. was In 
the chair. 

Ailglu HMhsrimrii Soetaiy 

Lom Charter** of AmftActd. Provost 
of Eton Col lege, whs the guested 
honour at a dinner given by Ute 

asrxsKEsi ss%/hK 

yesterday. The Hon SrC«ve Bosnom. 
president of the society. Lady Barbara 
Bosom. Mr David Sununemayts and 
Mrs Sumnwfbayes. Chairman, re- 
ceived the guests. 

Cm of 


Mr David Sleet. Leader of (re 

Party, and Baroness Seear. Liberal 
Leader in tne House of Lords, were 


, at. an evMi-sesston dinner new 
at me National Liberal aub last night 
for members of both Houses of 
Pan lament. 

Ben dfnosr 
Tbs van M. Chute 
A dinner for old boyv of me Veit J.G 
Chute's house. was held last night at 
Brooks's. Sir John ArtnHhnot was in 
tne etiatr. Among those present were: 
sir John Bagge. Captain Humphrey 
Ap Evans, colonel DBG 
Forouharson. Mr J f Ford-. Mr T 
Frame -Thomson. Lord Hawke, Mr 
Daniel MomrUumA. Mr R V C 
Men Women? -Clurrington. Mr R D 


P pore. f he Eart «rf SeOtlrfc. QC. Mr E D 
Smonds. MrMRc Thotnasana Mr R 



r, former National Coal Board chairman, and Lady Sybil MacGregor, 
i Palace after neing knighted at yesterday's Investiture by tbe Queen. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Commander KJD. Mackenzie, 
RN, 

and Flight Lieutenant JJ* 
Hammond, WRAP, 

Tbe engagement is announced 
between Kenneth Donald, elder 
son of the late Mr and Mrs KJ. 
Mackenzie, of PJockton Ross- 
shire, and Jane Windsey, youn- 
ger daughter of Air Chief 
Marshal Sir Alasdair Sieedman, 
of Amberiey, Stroud, and the 
(ate Lady Sieedman. 
MrP.LeG. ADen 
and Miss MX. Chamberlain 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Philip, son of Mr and 
Mrs G.P. Allen, of Eaton 
Bishop, Herefordshire, and 
Maura Elizabeth, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs G.S. Chamberlain, 
of Kimberley, Tasmania. 

Mr J.N. Bradley 
and Miss CX Reynolds 
The engagement is announced 
between James Nicholas, son of 
Mr and Mrs J.S. Bradley, of 
Cobhain. Surrey, and Claire 
Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs J.H. Reynolds, of Red- 
bridee, Essex. 

Mr MjC. Bickersteth 
and Miss §. Quinn 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Michael, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs EJ. Bicfcersteth, of 
Tbe Close. Salisbury, and Sally, 
daughter of Mr N. Quinn and 
the tore Mrs F. Quinn. 

Mr JJE.C Davidson 
and Miss AJ. Ftshbnra 


The engagement is announced 
between Jeffrey Everard Char- 
les, third son of Mrs Joyce 
Davidson and of the late Uooel 
L. Davidson, of St John’s Wood, 
London, NW8, and Alexandra 
Jane, second daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Fred J. Fisbbum, of Hamp- 
stead Garden Suburb, London, 
NWll. 

Mr JJVL Everett 
and Miss D J. Hansley 
The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of Mrs J. 
Everett and the hue Mr A. 
Everett, of Mersea Island, and 
Deborah, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs P. Hansley, of Enfield. 
Mr H.C. Graham- Watson 
and Miss AJML Scott 
The engagement is announced 
between Hugh Colin, younger 
son of Mr and Mrs Charles 
Graham-Watson, of La 
Massana, Andorra, and Alexan- 
dra Mary, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs William Scott, of 
BaUtmning. Balfiron, Stirling- 
shire. 

Mr C JR. Page 
and Miss P-A. Nero 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, only son 
of the late Mr G.H. Page and 
Mrs FX Page, of Twickenham, 
Middlesex, and Paoia Ann, 
eldest daughter of Mr J J. Nero 
and the laic Mis D.C. Nero, of 
Cranston, Rhode Island. 

Mr 1VL Scott-Green 
and Miss AJ. Batter 


Receptions 

HM Government 
The Defence Council last night 
entertained the Commonwealth 
Defence and Service Advisers 
and Liaison Staffs in the United 
Kingdom and their ladies at a 
reception given in their honour 
by Her Majesty’s Government 
at Lancaster House. The guests 
were received by the Secretary 
of State for Defence and the 
Hon Mrs Younger and the Chief 
of the Defence Staff and Lady 
Fiddhouse. 

HM Inspectorate of Prisons 
The Secretary of State for the 
Home Department was the 
guest of honour at a reception 
given by Sir James Hennessy 
and members of HM Inspec- 
torate of Prisons at 50 Queen 
Anne’s Gate yesterday. 

Christmas bazaar 
The Norwegian Ambassador 
and Mm Solveig Busch will open 
the Norwegian Christmas Ba- 
zaar at the Norwegian Seamen's 
Church. 1 Albion Street, 
Rotherhitbc, SE16. on Friday, 
November 21. in aid of the 
Norwegian Church and 
Seamen's Mission. 


New headmaster 

Mr CM. WooDey has been 
appointed as Headmaster of Si 
Christopher’s School Burnham- 
on-Sea, Somerset, from April, 
1987. The Rev K.B. EDwood. 
present Headmaster of Si 
Christopher’s, wilt be taking up 
his new appointment as Rector 
of Staple Fitzpaine, Orchard 
Portman, Thuribear and Stoke 

Sl Mary in December 1986. 
English-Speaking Union 
The Duchess of Gloucester was 
present at a concert given last 
night at Goldsmiths' Hall in aid 
of the English-Speaking Union 
Music Scholarship Fund. Mr 
Nigel Kennedy, violin. ESU 
Tanglewood Scholar 1975. and 
Mr Peter Pertinger, piano, were 
the guest artists. Mrs Edward 
Norman- Butler, chairman, ESU 
Music Council, and Mrs Rich- 
ard Luce received the guests. 
Feltinalcers' Company 
Mr Martin Harper. Master of 
the Fclimakers’ Company, 
accompanied by Mr Charles 
Simeons. Upper Warden, and 
Mr John Elliort, Renter War- 
den. presented the Lord Mayor 
with his Ceremonial Hat at the 
Mansion House yesterday. 


The engagement is announced 
between Mark, second son of 
Mr and Mrs Keith H. Scott- 
Green, of Highlands. Reddifie 
Bay, Portisbead, Bristol and 
Annabelle Francesca, eldest 
daughter ofMr Rupert Butler, of 
il Neville StreelSW7. and Mrs 
Jan Barnes, of 42 de Vere 
Gardens, W8. 

Mr G-A. Sbenkraan 
and Miss AJ. Mulder 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Gregory, elder son of 
Mr Alexander Sbenkman, of 54 
St Quintin Avenue. London, 
W10, and Mrs Bettie Shenk- 
man, of The Mill House, 
Wilsford, Perwsey, Wiltshire, 
and Jet, eldest daug hter of Mr 
and Mrs Nanno Mulder, of 
Laged uinendaasewgg Number 
7. BloemendaaL Tbe Nether- 
lands. 

Mr ALE. Wallis 
and Miss SJL Truphet 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs E-A. Wallis, of 
Alverstolce, Hampshire, and Sa- 
rah, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.R. Truphet, of Carshahon 
Beeches. Surrey. 

Mr M.G. West 
and Miss NJL Dempsey 
The engagement is announced 
between Murray, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs RJ. West, of 
Wormiey, Surrey, and Nicola, 
eldest daughter of Dr and Mrs 
AJ»I. Dempsey, of Prestbury. 

Marriages 

Mr N-F.G. Brown 
and Miss PA Swinfen 
The marriage took place on 
November 8. at St George’s. 
Hanover Square, of Mr Norman 
Brown, son of Mr and Mrs 
Michael Brown, of The Vale. 
London. SW3, and Miss Pa- 
tricia Swinfen. daughter of Mr 
and Mrs RA- Swinfen. of 
Tealby, Lincolnshire. The Rev 
W.M. Atkins officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her fetter, was 
attended by Miss Elizabeth 
Stewart and Miss Tacey Cronin. 
Mr Paul Symes-Thomson was 
best man. 

A reception was held at 
Buck's Club and the honey- 
moon is being spent in the Far 
East. 

Mr G-R- Davies 
and Miss SAP. Choke 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. November 8, at St 
Martin's Church, WomersJey. of 
Mr Guy Davies, younger son of 
Mr ana Mrs C.N. Davies, of 
Waltham St Lawrence, Berk- 
shire. and Miss Susan Cooke, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.G Cooke, of Stubbs Walden, 
Doncaster. 


OBITUARY 

MR VYACHESLAV MOLOTOV 
Old Bolshevik who had the dishonour to survive 

war of Stalin’s life he. too, 
became an otgcei of suspicion 
10 his increasingly paranoid 
chief Though he remained a 
member of the Politburo, he 
was, according to Khru- 
shchev; "absolutely never 
invited* to meetings of the 
inner circle. 

Along with another loag- 
time ally of Stalin, Anastas 
Mikoyan. Molotov came per- 
' iiousty dose to losing more 
than nis political position in 
the months before Stalins 
death. • 

Alter it occurred, however, 
they chose different sides. 
Mikoyan allied hintseh with 
Khrushchev. Molotov contin- 
ued to support the kind of 
policies he had pursued under 
Stalin. As foreign minister and 
as a leading member of the 
Politburo, be often found 
himself in conflict with Khru- 
shchev. 

He was against de- 
Stahmsa lion, against reconcil- 
iation with Tito's Yugoslavia, 
and hi fevour of a tougher 
response to Polish unrest in 
1956. He was probably the 
mai n organizer of the "anti- 
party group" - an actual 
majority erf 1 the Politburo - 
which strove to remove Khru- 
shchev from office in 1957, 

but was defeated by the central 
committee in which, at that 
time, Khrushchev had strong 
backing. 

Molotov was expelled from 
all his ports, having already, in 
1956. been forced to give up 
the foreign ministry. With 
brutal irony, Khrushchev ap- 
pointed the man who had 
been involved at the highest 
levels of diplomacy in war and 
to Outer 


Mr Vyacheslav Molotov 
died on November 8. He was 
96. 

For 40 years be was at the 
centre of Soviet life, and after 
his eventual fell from .power 
be was at least permitted to 
exist unlike so many old 
comrades in whose liquida- 
tion he had been an accom- 
plice. His earlier survival - all 
the more miraculous is view 
of his bourgeois origins - was 
due to a combination of 
shameless servility and ruth- 
less bureaucratic efficiency. 

He served as a candidate 
member of Lenin's Politburo, 
and then became Stalin’s un- 
questioning henchman for 
more than a quarter of a 
century. It was not through 
any failure of obedience on ms 
part that he fell from grace 
during his master's last phase. 
And even then, he was not 
completely dismissed, let 
alone killed. 

As Soviet Foreign Minister 
he negotiated, in August 1939, 
the infamous pact with Nazi 
Germany with which (as well 
as with a petrol bomb impro- 
vised soon afterwards by the 
Finns) his name will always be 
associated - though the story 
of the part is still concealed 
from Soviet schoolchildren. 
Later he was an exceptionally 
stubborn man for Western 
leaders to deal with, both as 
wartime ally and postwar 
opponent. 

Like the Abb6 Sfeyfts in an 
earlier revolution, he conk) 
claim at least to have stayed 
alive through turbulent and 
murderous tunes. But he did 
so at a terrible cost to others, 
and by sacrificing all vestiges 
of human decency and self- 
respect 

Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich 
Molotov's real surname was 
Scriabin, and be was a nephew 
of the composer, Alexander 
Scriabin. He was bom into a 
middle-class family in the 
village of Kukarfca in the 
Vyatka province of Russia on 
March 9, 1890. At the age of 
12, he entered the gymnasium 
at Kazan, where he was to 
remain for the next seven 
years. Kazan was at the time a 
focal point of the revolution- 
ary movement and its influ- 
ence was strongly felt by the 
young Scriabin. 

La 1906. at the age of 16, he 



in the new Soviet capital, turomg to Hamman s danrih- 
Moscow. As early as 192 1 , at a ter, remarked, .1 thought he 
time when Lenin, Trotsky, was going to ^say something 
Stalin, Zinoviev and Kame- new about me., 
nev were the only foil mem- As relations between the 
bers of the Politburo, Molotov wartime allies grew, ever more 
became a candidate member strained tn the postwar period, 
of that body and attended its it was Molotov, as leading 
meetings. He was also from Soviet representative at van- 
1921 until 1930 a secretary of ous conferences, who mam- 
the central committee, occu- tained the_unyidding Soviet 


second place - after 
S talin . within the secretariat 
Once described by Lenin as 
“the best filing derk in 
R ussia” and, more hostilely, 


position. Thus at the Paris 
Peace Conference in 1946 he 
accused Britain and the Unit- 
ed States of attempting to 
destroy agreements between 


by Trotsky, as “mediocrity the three powers; and at the 

n flumrn mini«lprs’ mwtin? in 


incarnate", Molotov 
wholehearted supporter of 
Stalin from the beginning of 
the latter’s struggles with op- 
ponents within the party, and 
against all recalcitrant de- 
ments within the society. 

Molotov took a leading part 
in the liquidation of the 
Mensheviks and went to Len- 
ingrad in 1926 to put down the 
Zinoviev opposition. He pre- 
ceded Kaganovich and Khru- 
shchev as head of the Moscow 
party organization and en- 
sured that Stalinist norms 
prevailed there. 

For ten years from 1930 he 
was no minal head of the 
government as chairman of 


joined the Bolshevik faction of the Council of People’s Com- 
the Social Democratic Revo- missars. though Stalin was, of 
lutionary Party (forerunner of course, the effective ruler as 
today's Communist Party) in * secretory-general of the Party. 
Kazan. Between 1907 and in 1939 be became Cbmmis- 


1909 his propaganda work 
took him outside his own 
student circle and into the 
then still unorganized working 
class of the town. 

His activities did not escape 
the notice of the Tsarist 
authorities for long and in 
1909, on tbe eve of his final 
examinations, the 19-year-old 
Scriabin was arrested, together 
with other members of the 
student revolutionary 
organization. 

Two months later he was 
exiled for two years to the 
province of Vologda ia tbe 
north where he continued to 
study but also made contact 
with an illegal Bolshevik 
group, anti was soon engaged 
in agnation and propaganda 
among railway workers. Be- 
fore the end of this first period 
of exile; he had become the 
leader of the local Bolshevik 
group. . 

On the completion of bis 
exile, he set out for St Peters- 
bmg where he entered the 
polytechnic as a student and 


sar for Foreign Affairs, suc- 
ceeding another bourgeois, 
Maxim Litvinov; and for 
most of the remainder of his 
political career lie took a 
leading part in Soviet diplo- 
macy. He was head of tbe 
Commissariat (from 1946 
Ministry) of Foreign Affairs 
until 1949, and again from 
1953 until 1956. 

In one of his firet pro- 
nouncements as commissar, 
in the summer of 1939, he 
accused Britain and France of 
a concerted effort to force tbe 
Soviet Union into war with 
Germany; and in August of 
that year he was the Soviet 
signatory of the Nazi-Soviet 
non-aggression pact 

In November 1940 he was 
back in Berlin for his last 
meeting with Nazi leaders. 
Molotov and his colleagues 
listened as first Hitler and 
then Ribbentrop blandly ex- 
pounded plans for the parti- 
tion of the British Empire 
between Germany and Russia. 
Later, with Ribbentrop still 


foreign ministers meeting u 
the summer of 1947 he de- 
nounced the Marshall Plan as 
a weapon in the hands of a 
strong power to gain sover- 
eignly over weaker ones. 

Ernest Bevin found it diffi- 
cult to be in his company, 
feeling that he was a murderer. 

In 1948 Molotov began to 
fen foul of Statin, and the 
principal cause was his wife, 
Paulina Zhemchuzhina. She 
was a considerable woman in 
her own right, having earlier 
been a candidate member of 
the central committee and for 
several years bead of the stale 
cosmetics trust 

In Stalin's eyes she was 
doubly suspect: first, because 
she was Jewish, and he was 
becoming obsessively anti-se- 
mitic. When he saw her 
converting in Hebrew with 
Go Wa Metr, his distrust was 
reinforced. 

But the earlier and deeper 
source of suspicion was that 
she had been a close friend of 
bis own wife who; before she 
committed suicide in 1932, 
had first poured out her 
troubles to Paulina. Statin 
therefore increasingly came to 
look upon her as an enemy, 
perhaps also as a reproach. 

Paulina was arrested and 
sent into internal exile. For a 
time Molotov continued as 
foreign commissar despite 
what bad happened to his 
wife. But in 1949 he was 
removed from the post, which 
was given to his former depu- 
ty, Vyshinsky. 

From then until Stalin's 
death in 1953 he was vice- 
chairman of the council of 
ministers, but during the last 


But in 1960 be was sent to 
Vienna. as Soviet delegate to 
the International Atomic En- 
ergy Agency. There he re- 
mained until speaker after 
speaker denounced him at the 
Twenty&coad Congress of 
the Soviet Communist Party 
in October 1961. By Novem- 
ber of that year he was back in 
Moscow, this time as a pen- 
sioner. During his remaining 
years he was occasionally seen 
reading in Moscow libraries, 
and it was rumoured that he 
had written his memoirs. He 
was, however, too much of a 
Statinisl even to think of 
following Khrushchev’s ex- 
ample in permitting this docu- 
ment to be sent to the 
capitalist West. 

For all but two of his last 
years he was not even a 
member of the Party, having 
been expelled from it in 1964. 
Bui his readmisskm in July 
1 984 could be seen as a reward 
for his orthodoxy and past 
services to the regime, il also 
reflected the great influence at 
that time of Andrei Gromyko, 
who had earlier benefited 
from Molotov’s patronage. 

Churchill wrote of Molotov; 
“His cannonball head, black 
moustache and comprehend- 
ing ryes, his slab race, his 
verbal adroitness and imper- 
turbable demeanour were ap- 
propriate manifestations of 
his qualities and skilL He was 
above all men fitted to be the 
agent of the policy of an 
incalculable machine.” 

His wife died in 1 970. There 
were no children of the mar- 
riage. 


MR ROMILLY JOHN 


soon became the organizer of talking of imminent British 
a group of Bolshevik students, collapse as they sheltered in a 


At the begmoing of 1912 he 
joined the editorial staff of the 
Bolshevik newspaper Zvezda 
(Star) and subsequently 
played a prominent part in the 
establishment of Pravda. It 
was during this time that he 
first came into contact with 
Statin and, as secretary of the 
editorial board of Pravda, 
carried on a regular correspon- 
dence with Lenin. 

Scriabin had been under 
constant police surveillance, 
and at the end of 1912 he 
turned to more underground 
political activity and took the 
name of Molotov (the Ham- 
mer). This change of name 
and residence did not prevent 
his being arrested and under- 
going several periods of im- 
prisonment and exile in 
remote parts of the Russian 
empire. 

In 1916, however, he es- 
caped from tbe province of 
Irkutsk and returned to the 
capital, now named Fetrograd, 
where he soon became a 
member of the Russian bu- 
reau of the central committee 
of Bolsheviks. He was editor 
of Pravda at the time of the 
February Revolution and vig- 
orously opposed the Provi- 
sional Government from the 
outseL Daring the days of the 
October Revolution, he 
worked closely with both Le- 
nin and Statin. 

Immediately after the Bol- 
sheviks seized power in Petro- 


celtar from an RAF raid, 
Molotov (according to him- 
self) quietly asked: “If Eng- 
land has been smashed, then 
why are we in this shelter? 
And whose are these bombs 
that are felling?" 

Immediately after tbe Ger- 
man invasion of the Soviet 
Union on June 22, 1941 - 
which Molotov announced 
over Soviet radio - a stale 
defence committee was 
formed, and he became its 
vice-chairman. He also set 
about establishing the basis 
for cooperation with tbe allied 
powers. There were talks with 
Britain in July, and later in the 
month Molotov took part in 
discussions between Stalin 
and Roosevelt’s emissary, 
Harry Hopkins. In September 
and October he led the Soviet 
delegation in three-power 
talks in Moscow. 

He visited London in 1942 
and, after farther talks with 
Anthony Eden, signed the 
Anglo-Soviei Treaty on May 
26. In the autumn he was in 
the United States, where he 
reached agreement on ’’mutu- 
al aid.” In 1943 he took part in 
the foreign ministers’ confer- 
ence in Moscow. 

‘ At the Yalta and Potsdam 
conferences in 1945 be was 
Statin’s closest assistant and 
while, both during the war and 
at the end of it, Stalin some- 
times invented differences be- 
tween himself and Molotov in 


Mr Romilly John, poet, 
novelist and eccentric, died on 
November 10. His age was 
probably 80. 

But he never knew when he 
was bora. The second son of 
Doretia McNeil and, he calcu- 
lated, the seventh child of 
Augusms John, bis birth took 
place in Normandy in 1906. 
.He survived a haphazard Bo- 
hemian upbringing, which was 
complicated by spells at an 
amateur open-air school in 
Hampshire and at an educa- 
tional villa in France: 


Power, he was to gain distinc- 
tion as an author. 

His first book, published in 
his mid-twenties, was a collec- 
tion of poems. He followed it 
with a crime novel. Death by 
Request, which was recog- 
nized as H a splendid example 
of literary puzzle-setting’', and 
is still in prim. 

He wrote this with his wife, 
Katherine Tower, whom he 
met and married at Cam- 
bridge (where he read phys- 
ics). His most original and 
enduring book is The Seventh 
Child, a minor masterpiece of 


His more lasting education . ... . 

was left to hisfotirer’s cronies 

h as the nennatettc scholar. derfuUy evokes the pleasures 


such as 
John 
an 


scholar, 
me, aw! 
Trdawney 


Dayrell Reed. From this be 
emerged “habitually in expec- 
tation of disaster”. 

He had a varied early 
career, inducting a teetotal 
apprenticeship at John 
Fothcrgilfs famous inn, “The 
Spreadeagle", and long explo- 
rations of tbe river Stour and 
tbe Book of Genesis as cook- 
general on board the boat of 
Dylan Thomas’s philosophic 
father-iu-Jaw, Francis 
Macnamara. 

Though be later served in 
the RAF and as a dvfl servant 
in the Ministry of Fuel and 


and miseries of his first 20 
years. 

He was the child who saw 
that the Emperor was wearing 
no dotbes, but was too polite 
to say so. 

A deeply - some would say 
obscurely - humorous man, he 
had contemplated a comic 
work on engineering, but fi- 
nally contented himself with 
the formulation of a “law" 
that the obstacles in the path 
of a grievance are inversely 
proportional to the square of 
the distance between it and the 
reigning monarch. 

“I have yet to decide wheth- 
er this is a blessing or my great 
misfortune” he concluded- 


MR AUBREY MYERSON 


grad, Molotov was appointed order to gain concessions from 
chairman of the northern the Western leaders with, 
region's council of national whom he was negotiating, 
economy, a task which in- Molotov in reality never devi- 
volved bis taking control of ated from Stalin’s line, 
the compulrory nationatiza- ^ relationship between 
lion of factories ana jjj e two men - Molotov the 
wprkships. Stalin was .Com- courtly automaton, Stalin the 

cynically contemptuous mon- 
arch - is captured in an 
incident during the war, when 
Churchill and Harriman were, 
being entertained at a gala 
performance at the Bolshoi. 
Between tbe acts, there was a 
banquet at which Molotov 
proposed a toast to Stalin, 
“our great leader”, and Stalin, 


jmpulsory nationatiza- 
or factories and 
ups. 

missar for Nationalities in the 
new Bolshevik regime, and his 
trust in Molotov was dis- 
played when he put him for a 
time in charge of the Ukraini- 
an party organization. 

But most of Molotov’s po- 
litical life from now onwards 
was to be spent at the heart of 
pany and government affairs 


Mr Aubrey Myerson, QC, a 
respected practitioner on the 
“Wales and Chester Circuit, 
died on November S. He was 
59, and had been ill for some 
time. 

Aubrey Selwyn Myerson 
was bom in Johannesburg on 
December 10, 1926. Later his 
family lived in Dublin and 
Cardiff where he went to 
Cardiff High School and Uni- 
versity College. 

Called to the Bar 
Lincoln's Inn in 1950, he 
embarked on a successful 
career in Cardiff taking silk in 
1967 before . moving to 
London as a predominantly 
criminal leader. " 

He was elected a Bencher of 
his inn in 1975 and the leader 


he was appointed a member of 
the Criminal Injuries Com- 
pensation Board. 

He seemed destined for the 
High Court Bench, particular- 
ly as he bad gained an enviable 
reputation as a recorder and 
was often called upon to sit as 
a deputy High Coart judge. 

Myerson was an urbane, 
gracious man with a fine 
physique and commanding 
appearance; he was also ex- • 
of .tremely athletic. 

• He was a formidable advo- 
cate with a complete mastery 
of detail, who was at his best 
when prosecuting in criminal 
c ay* 

His wife. Helen, whom he 
married in 1955, survives 
him, together with their so® 


of his circuit in 1981. :In 1985 - and daughter. 



o* \£jy 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


21 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS 
AND IN MEMORIAM 


A good tin- cannot arum rontve r\ii imu. 
neither ran a rorrunl Irrc bring forth 
wad I rull 

61 MXiMw 7 IB 


BIRTHS 




CHASTEL DC BOWVHJJE - On 

November 9tti 1986. to Stauna# 
cnee Magffil and Simon, a son. 
Reuben James. 

EYNOtf-LEWIS - On November 6th. to 
Kale (nee Snargo) an Andrew, a 
son. Oliver Edward 

FMNMAN - On November 7 1986. to 
Sarah (nee FBrmfcrquQni and Peter, a 
daughter. Alexandra Claire, a sister 
for James. 

IK W D B B OW - On November an. at 
Queen Charlotte's. ioDtnainteGold) 
and Simon, a son. Daniel Matthew. 

PTTT - On November 10th 1986. to 
Catherine (nee Artiiuri and Edward, 
a daughter. Elinor Catherine Imogen, 
a a staler for Alexander and Timothy 

COMER ■ On November Utti. to 
Charlotte and David, a son. 

STORE ■ On November 9th. to Helen 
tnee Turnbull) and Charles, a dauoh- 
ler. Charlotte Helen, sister to Emily 
Caroline. 

WOODS ■ On JOUi November 1986. to 
Fiona I nee Bryce) and lan. a daugh- 
ter. Elizabeth Rebecca. 


MARRIAGES 


KELLY dHOFFATT on Saturday Octo- 
ber 2S0i 1996. at ute Church of 
Christ the King. Bromborough. 
Wtrr.il. Martin Stephen, only son of 
Mr and Mrs William Kelly of Ox! on 
lo Patricia Margaret, second daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Frauds Moffatt of 
Bromborough 


DEATHS 


ACHESON ■ On 8th November, trag- 
ically as a result of an acodetiL Ruth 
nances, aged 24. Moved daughter 
of Donald and Baihara Acheson and 
sister of Susan. Anne. Kale. AJastair 
and Elizabeth. Enquiries and dona- 
tions. If desired, to AcDon Aid lor a 
special village protect tn Africa to 
John Steel and Son. Chest! House. 
Winchester. 63195. 

ADMAN . peacefully on 6th November. 
1986 following a long Illness. Mieke. 
most dear wife of Tom and beautiful, 
beloved molber of Annette. Michelle. 
India and Maertsna. Funeral service 
al St Joseph's College. Lawrence 
Street NW7. on 13Ui November at 
lpm. followed by burial al St 
Andrew’s Church. TMfendge Lane. 
N20 Flowers may be sent to Donne 
and Co.. 39 Brent Street, nym before 
5pm on 12th November. 

BARNETT - On 7th November. WD- 
Uam Edward Rupert of Woiverton. 
Moorend Grove. Chellenham- Be- 
loved husband of Mary and dear 
father lo Margaret. Matthew and Re- 
becca. Funeral Service, al Chellen- 
ham Crematorium, on Thursday 
i3in November ai 12.30 pjn. Family 
flowers only, but donations- in lieu to 
I he League of Friends. Chellenham 
General Hospital. Cheltenham 

BONNY - On 9U> November 1986. sud- 
denly at home with tus family. 
Edwin Walter (Ted). Service on Fri- 
day 14th November at 1.00 pm at St 
Peter's Church. Ayksford. followed 
by private cremahou. Family flowers 
only. Donations lo Multiple Sclerosis. 
57 Wyles Rd. Chatham. Kent ME4 
6UJ. 

BOYLE - On November 7th. peaefuoy 
ai home al Mill House. Fdtbeck. 
Paieiey Bridge. Margaret Sybil (Peg- 
gy,. inee Ttinngi. Widow of Peter. 
mother of Humphrey. Anlhea. Kale 
and PhiUida. Funeral Sendee al Mill 
Hut Chapel. Leeds, on Friday I4th 
November at l pjn. followed by pri- 
vate cremation. Enquiries to W 
Bowers. Funeral Directors. Harro- 
gate Tel. 0423 770268. 

BRAWN-MEEK - On November 9th. 
Peacefully at his home In Norfolk, af- 
ter an illness so bravely fought. Bob. 
Dearest husband of Maigara and fa- 
ther of Adam and James. Service 
and cremation. SL Fifths Crematori- 
um on Thursday November 13th. at 
t .OO pro. Family and dose mends 
only. Family flowers. Donations. If 
desired to The Big C Appeal, c/o Pe- 
ter Taylor Funeral Services. 85 
Unihank Road. Norwich. 

BULWER On 9th November 1986. 
John, alter a long battle lougni with 
tremendous courage and humour. 
Dearly loved husband of Phyllis and 
much loved and lores father of 
Aidan and the tale Juliet. Donations, 
if wished, to Cancer Research or 
Wildfowl TnnL SUmbridge. 

CAKNEGY-ARBUTWOTT - On 

November 10 1986. U» her 89th 
year. End tJtn of BALNAMOON. 
beloved wife of the late Vv’iimot and 
much loved mother, ^anamoiher 
and great grandmother. Funeral Ser- 
vice at St Andrew's Episcopal 
Church. Brechin on Friday Novem- 
ber 14 M 2.15 p m . /Plowed by 
private cremation. Family Dowers 
only and no letters, please. 

CLAY On November 8th. peacefully 
ai his home. Golden HtU. Si Arvans. 
Nr Chepstow. Richard Leigh, aged 88 
years. Beloved husband of the tale 
Flora Funeral Service, on Thursday 
November I3th al 2 00 Jkin. at St 
Arvans Church. Chepstow, followed 
by tremabon. Family Dowers only, 
bul donations ui Ueu for St Arvans 
Churcn Fund, to Reverend J Win- 
ston. The Vicarage. SI Arvans. Nr 
Chepstow. Gwent. Inquiries to J 
James. Funeral Directors. Bridge 
Street. Chepstow. Telephone 
(02912) 2371 or 3241 

CRA8BE - On eth November 1986. Dr 
John Ceolirey Sandtson, aged SO 
years, alter a long illness pabenliy 
borne. Cremation al the Mid- 
Warwickshire Crematorium. Oakley 
Wood, on Thursday 13th NovemDer 
al 12.50 p.m No (lowers, by re- 
quest but donations. If desired- to 
The Cancer Research Campaign, c/o 
Mrs E Ptncfcard. 27 Fieldgatc Lane. 
Kenilworth. 

CSWICKSHANH ■ On 9th ktevmiber. J. 
Norman. M.C . D Sc.. MJXF.R-CP. 
London and Glasgow. of Bnn. near 
AyeKbury. Bucks. Late « S 
Andrew's. Fife. Suddenly in he 95tn 
year, after a short Illness. Beloved 
husband of EUzabdh .Mayi and 
much loved father of Roger and Mi- 
chael. he surviving children, a 
W aving father, grandiathw and grew- 
grandiattw>r. Funeral Service at SI 
Peter's Church. Bril! on Fnday SJU) 
Novembwa! 11 00 am Family flow- 
ets only Donalions to: CMbre 
(Talking Books.'. Ay lesbury. Bucks. 

CfWNDDf ■ On November 9th 1986. 
peat dully m East burV Stanor NUre- 
mq Horae consrance UlUan. aged 91 
years of Godaiming. DearO' lovedby 
son-in law John and grandchlwen 
Peii-r. Trisha and Lift- Funeral Ser- 
vice. al Guild! ord Crematorium, on 
Monday November 17th al 11 -am. 
Fanriy Dowers or donations to 
R.N L I or C MS. 

DOWNTON - On November 8th- peace- 
lull., ai St Loonards-on-Sea- Joan 
Margarel. aged 90 years, late of 
Beckiev. Sussex. Beloved 
orandmolher and great grandirom- 
er. Pin ate a cm alien 


ENOLAND - On Sunday 9Ui November 
31 MJlton Tories Hospital. 

O^rue aaed 78 years Dearest 
mother of Ninel. Juliet and Cohn. A 
very fine lady who win be sadly 
missed. The Funeral Service will 
tafce place al Oownnill Crematori- 
um. Minon Keynes on Friday 14th 
November at 3.30 cm. Enquiries 
please to H.W. Mason and Sons. 
Funeral Directors. 9 High Street. 
Newport PagnriL Bucks. Tel: 0908 
6X 1U2. 

FAWCETT - On November 7th. Honor 
Kathleen, peacefully at Edgecombe 
Nursing Home Newbury. Wife of the 
tale Captain John Fawcett. RN. 
mother of Ntgd and Rachel. 

WDNOE - On 7m November 1986. in 
a bade aeadenL Atastatr Peter 
CuUme. deeply loved younger son of 
Rhone. Lady Guthrie and Ihe l&te Sir 
Gttes Guthrie. BL Beloved husband 
of Tats and adored father of Alexan- 
der and Barnaby. Funeral private. 
Memorial Service to be announced 
later. 

•WUUUE - On 10th November 1986. 
at Easton. Woodbndge. Surtofk. Her- 
bert Roger Haiaane. son of the tale 
Frantss and Gertrude Haldane. Ser- 
vice at Ipswich Crematorium North 
ChaM. on Monday I7th November 
at 2.30 pm. No Downs please, but 
conirtbuttans. tf desired, to the 
Cancer Research Fund. 

HARVEY - On 10th Nouembre. The 
ven. Francis wrntam (Frank), in nos 
trttal. Funeral Service at St Paul's 
Cathedral on Monday t7tti Novem- 
ber ai 11.30 a.m~ followed by a 
strfcoy private cretnaoon. 


On November 8th 1986. 
peacefully in hospital alter a long fit- 
ness. Philip Sydney, former High 
Sheriff of Surrey, aged 86. late of 
Elm Race. R ua U w gt o n. Devoted hus- 
band of the late Jessie, loving lalher 
of Mary and much loved wMfaiher 
of Andrew. David and Kate- Funeral 
Sendee at United Reformed Church. 
Dorldng. on Tuesday 18th Novem- 
ber at 12 noon. Flowws ordonattons 
U desired wflj be spiff between five of 
his special charities lo Sherlock it 
Snnv Trents House. Dorking. 

HUSSEY - On November SUl suddenly 
al home. Maior Percy frank M.B£_ 
R-A-. dear father of David and Jennl. 
Cremation Service, on Friday No- 
vember 14th id Southend 

Crematorium. South Chapel 12.15 
pjn. Family flowers only, but dona- 
tions tf desired to Treasurer 
Addertbrooke's Kidney Patients As- 
sociation. 13S Monks Walk. 

Buruingfonl. Herts. SG9 9DF. 

SVMG - On 8th November, suddenly 
in London. Lady Irene Hazel. M-B.E- 
aged 92. Widow of str Stanley. 
K.B.E.. OM.G-. daughter of Allan 
Maclean. C.M.G. and Anna Margaret 
and mother of Arm. Marie Louise 
and Otma. 

JESSUP . (hi November 10th 1986. 
suddenly but pearenwm m Sarasota. 
Florida. Wilfrid SMneyfBBD. beloved 
husband of Eleanor, dear father of 
Mary and Adam, paadfather of Lac- 
ey and a much loved cousin. 

KEKNY On November 5th 1986 tn 
Paris after a long Dines most coura- 
geously borne. MikotL daughter of 
Augusta and the late Janos Kemeny 
or Transylvania and loved niece of 
the late John Paton of Grandhome. 
Aberdeen. 

LAWSON - On November 9 Ul tragkal- 

. ly in hospuaL Diana, dearly loved 
younger daughter of Robert and 
Margaret Lawson. Akfixjume. Wilt- 
shire and dear sister of Anne. 
Funeral Service at KIngsdown Cre- 
matorium. Stratton St Margaret. 
Swindon on Monday 17th November 
al ll am.. Family flowers only but 
donations If desired lo Prospect Hos- 
PKe Foundation. 6 Church Place. 
Swindon. WlHshire. 

IOWMN - On Thursday November 
6th 1986. tragically, as the result of 
an acadeM. Douglas F W Lowson. 
aged 30 years. Beloved eider son of 
Ehpeth and Wtntam Lowson. brother 
oC Ctatte and Andrew and dearly 
loved donee of Sbeena OgUvte. 
FUnerat Service at CratgiebucUer 
Church. Springfield Road. Aberdeen, 
on Thumdoy November lSUi at 12 
noon, thereafter to Sprtngbank Cem- 
etery AH Mends respe ctf ul l y inviied- 

LOBBOC K - On November loth altera 
long illness, at Ms home in his 87Ui 
year. Marie Hugh, dearly loved bus- 
band of Bee. Funeral private. No 
Dowers but donations If desired to 
The Mustaans Benovetenl Fund. 

LYSTEX - See Marshall 

MACKENZIE - On 30) November 
1986. peacefully at her home in 
Lynungum. La vandal, widow d 
Kenneth. Funeral Service at Bourne- 
mouth crematorium on Friday 14th 
November at 10.00 am. Flowers to 
Diamond and Son. FJ3 . Lymington. 
Telephone 10690) 72060. 

■ADAH - Oh November 9tb 1986. Ag- 
lies Emma, bom 2/9/1933. 
Requfescat in pace. 

MARSHALL - On November 8 1986. at 
her home In Pennsylvania. Sheila, 
wife of the late Commander AJX 
Marshall UJS.N. and much loved sh- 
teroi Evelyn and BeryL Donations. If 
desired, to West Dorset Hospice Mac 
roman Service. Edward Road. 
Dorchester. 

MMHS - On November 6th. Margaret 
Kaie Minns (nee Cockerell), widow of 
Anthony Minns. Sadly mimed by her 
sons Martin. Jonathan, and Patrick, 
and by all her grandchildren. Funer- 
al at St John's. Church Row. 
Hampstead, at 12.00 on Monday 
I7lh November. 

MURRAY - On November 8. at home, 
after a long Illness. John Kenneth 
Ronald UockJ. Lt COL 2/4 todwt 
Grenadiers Herd, aged 76. Beloved 
husband of Joan. Funeral Service al 
Chellenham Crematorium Chapel, 
on Thursday November I3that2.30 
dji).. Family flowers only, but dona- 
Uons if desired, to Salvation Army. 

OATES - On November 8 1986. peace- 
fully in hospital after a long Btness. 
Gordon Douglas dale of Hardy and 
Hmsons. Kimberley Brewery. Not- 
tingham). aged 73 yean. Service at 
Si Patrick's Church. NuthalL Not- 
tingham on Thursday November 13 
at 12.30 pm. fallowed by private cre- 
mation. Family flowers only Please, 
but donahons for Parkinson's Dis- 
ease Society, may be sear to A w 
Lymn. Rotun Hood House, Notting- 
ham. Ten (0602) 505B75. 

OTtORKE - On Monday November 
torn 1986. suddenly at Wadfutrst. 
Muriel EdUh Leila OTterke inee 
Mawdesley) of Bexhlll. Much loved 
mother of BrtdgeL TUhothy and 
Brian. 

PLATT - On Sunday 9th November, a! 
ihe Bromoion HospUaL Heather 
Mary inee McCracken), beloved wife 
of Anthony and mother of Rupert 
and Imogen. Funeral Service at Si 
Nicholas. Church SL CMswKfc Man 
at 12 on Friday I November 
Flowers to W.S Bond lid. 127 Chis- 
wick Hioh Road. 

REEDER - On 7th November 1986. 
Mildred iBIUiel (nee MaWmenIX age 
78 at The Queen Elisabeth Military 
Hospital. Woolwich. Peacefully after 
a most gallant fight. For -53 years be- 
loved wife of Colonel EJl Reeder, 
tale Royal Army Service Corps. Lov- 
ing mother of Tiro and Judy. A dear 
and roost respected grandmother and 
loved younger sister of Sister Nora 
Lucilta. CSP. Sendee at SI Peter's 
convent. Maybiury H1IL Woking al 
1.45 pm Friday 14(h November, fol- 
lowed by cremation al Wofcrog 
Crematorium. 


5AVA6E- On November loth I9se.at 
biworth HaN Lodne. Essex. Harold 
Savage M.BiL FJ.C-E-. aged 87 
years. Much loved husband of Henri- 
etta. father of jui and Lydi . and 
grand# athw of 6 grandchildren. Pri- 
vate cremation, on Monday 
November 17th. famtfy only, no 
flowers please. 

SCOTT - On November 9. peacefully at 
Pershore. Ledua Lesley. In her B9tti 
year, widow of the Reverend John 
Scon, beloved mother, fyandmotlter 
and {real -grandmother. Funeral Ser- 
vice. al Pershore Abbey, on 
Thursday November 13 at 12 noon. 

BEATON - On 8tti November 1986. M 
the Royal West Sussex HosnuoL 
Chichester. Elizabeth Mary 
Ctasepoale Seaton, (nee Pootey). 
wife or the late Hugh Seaton of Pea 
LeveL and beloved mother, grand- 
mother. great grandmother and treat 
great grandmother, aged 106 years, 
cremation at Chichester Crematori- 
um- on Friday. x«n November at 6 
p.m. Funeral Directors: Edward 
wnoe & Son. 6 South PtritanL Chich- 
ester. POi9 ISY. 


i -On November & In hos- 
pital at Bam. Florence Liman 
fTeddiek recently of Devizes and for- 
merly of BurghflekL The loving and 
loved wife of the late Captain R T 
Shepherd (Ronnie), devoted mother 
of Peter and Valerie, adored grannie 
of MKhaeL Nigel. Wendy. Ctare and 
Jackie, wni be sadly missed by all 
her family and many Blends: FUner- 
al Service at Si Mary's Church. 
BurghflekL Berkshire. 12.00 noon 
Wednesday November 12. tnumeni 
at NtHhah Cemetery. Nuthafl. Not- 
tingham at 12.00 noon Thursday. 
November 13. Family (lowers only 
please. Donalions if desired to the 
British Heart Foundation. 102 
Gloucester Place. London wi. 


- On 7th November 1966. 
peacefully in hospital after a loos Ill- 
ness. James Shepiey. Husband of 
Grace, father of Christopher and 
Joan and grandfather of James and 
Jonathan. Sebastian. Timothy and 
Nicholas. Funeral or Peppard 
Church, on Friday 14th November at 
2 pan.. Enquiries and Dowers to Ar- 
thur Butler Ltd.. Pepnard Common. 
Henley-on-Thames. 


- On November nth. 
peacefully after a short utness. at 
The Little House. Nostell Priory. 
WakeflekL Ralph, much loved tattler 
and grandfather. Service at Wragby 
Church. Nostro Pnary at 2pm Fri- 
day 14th November, followed by 
private burial al St. Betel's. Sandal 
Family Dowers only, donation*, d de- 
sired. to Guide Dogs for Uie BUsd. 
r/o Barclays Bank. Westgate. 
WafeefleM. 


VAIURTBK - On November 9th 
1986. tan. OJLE.. aged 86 . Some- 
time headmaster In India. Brazil. 
Jordan and Malaysia. All enquires to 
I — I. Butler and Sons ud. 40 Kenton 
Park Parade. Kenton. Harrow. Tel 
01 907 3163. 

VINCENT - On 10 th November 1986. 
In hospital. John Wtutam (jaefcj. 

aged 87 years, of 11 
Shttfrack Street. Bearnlnster. DorseL 
Funeral Service win take puce at St 
Mary's Chuncti. Beaminster on Fri- 
day 14 th November al t pm. followed 
by cremation. No flowers by requesL 
but donations for St Mary's Church 
Fabric Fund, c/o A J. Wafcety and 
Sons. 7 North Street Beaminster. 
nonet. 

WAUBS LEY-DRESSER - On Friday 
November 7th 1986. suddenly at 
Soum Wing Hospital. Bedford. Sybil 
Motion* aged 72 years of Beech Ou- 
tage. Kimboiton. Huntingdon. 
Cantos.. Widow of Guy. devoted 
mother of Ann and Virginia. Funeral 
Thursday November ISM. service al 
Great Staugbton Parish Church at 
10.00 a jn.. followed by private cre- 
mation- Flowers nay be saK ta T L 
CobbotaL 54 High Street Hafl Wes- 
ton. St Neots. Huntingdon. Cantos _ 

tmLMMS - On November 8 th 1986. 
at the Princess Alice Hospice. Esher. 
Geoffrey Ernest, much loved hus- 
band of Elizabeth, father of Geoffrey 
■wni Malcolm, father- tn-iaw of Sue 
and Lwni. grandfather of Vanessa. 
Pbdlp. James. Katherine and Ed- 
ward. Funeral Service at SI Mary's 
Church. ©attends Avenue. 
Weybrtdge. on Tuesday November 
I 8 U 1 at 2.30 PJn Family Bowers 
only please, donations If desired to 
the St Mary's Church Appeal Fund. 
Oaltanos Aveune. Weybridge. Sur- 
rey. KT13 9SZ- 

WNW . On November 8 th 1986. 
peacefully at the Royal Kaiiamshire 
Hospital. Sheffield. Waller Vernon. 
Most dearly loved husband of Vanda, 
father and grandfather. Service al 
Great Vcmgsume Parish Church, on 
Friday November l4Ui at 2.00 p.m. 
Family flowere only. Donations to 
British Heart Foundation. 102 
Gloucester Place. London W 1 H 4DH. 


- On Bth November 
1986. David Garmondsway. sudden- 
ly. Enquiries to w & f Grooamndge. 
Tonbridge 363964. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A Reutaem will be sung 
for Tatiana cocker at the Russian 
Orthodox Church of St MkdiaeL 
Enmsmore Gardens. SW7 on Sun- 
day November 23rd al noon. • 

KENT - A Service of Thanksgiving for 
the hfe d Sir Peter Kent wffi be ludd 
at 11.30 am. on Wednesday Novem- 
ber 19th 1986. at St. James* 
Church. Piccadilly. London Wl. 

OSBORNE - A Thanksgiving service 
for the Ufe of The Reverend Malcolm 
Osborne, of Flushing. CornwaU. will 
be held at Holy Trinity. Seer Green. 
Bucks, on Friday November 14. at 
2.00 pjn. 

STREET - A Service of Thanksgfvuig 
tor the Ufe of John E Street will be 
held al the Church of St Sepulchre 
Without Newgate. Holbom Viaduct 
on Wednesday 3rd December 1986 
at 12 noon. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


BECQUART - Andre CX. in tovtng 
memory. Honorary School Director. 
Veteran 40-45. Curator of the Muse- 
um of Peace, wi/achate. Bom In 
Hazenrouck (F) on October 25 1921 
and deceased Ui Ypres (B> on Septem- 
ber 29 1986. The Funeral Service 
has taken place In (ntiroiti. Architect 
Ignacc and Mrs. Joslane Becquart- 
Dederuq and son Beauregard. Engi- 
neer Erwin and Mrs. Marganrta 
Vei mce a c h O e cq uart Insurance Oro- 
fcer Bernard and Ovffid Bequart- 
CrauweL His children and 
grandchild. Miss Suzanne Sealant, 
his sister. 8940 HeuveOand- 
WJttschate. voormezeJestraaL 2a . 

HERRON - Guy D. 18.9.1989 and Hel- 
en F. 12.il.198S. Reme m beie d with 
Love. Deborah. 


Science report 

Dinosaurs died ‘with a whimper’ 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


nise of the dinosaur 
example of nafnraJ 
p»er several million 
:er than more a caxas- 
rioked by a pfeanric 

saster when a mete- 
asleroid crashed to 

tence that dinosaurs 

suddenly was chaI “ 

a scientific meeliiig 

ir Robert E Sloan and 
J Keith Rigby, pro- 
Jence from southern 
I from an area cal M 
'ounfv, »a Montana, 
ates. to dispute the 
praent. 

eseiueo their findinp 
nual awerins of Vf 
Vertcbtafe Paleonfrrf- 
iladeiphia. Tliey 
inn did not go out 


with a bang. b« with a whimper. 

They believed the prehistoric 

oeateres liwi “* taas * 
years after the impact 65 millioii 
years ago of the object that was 
believed to have wiped them out. 

Professor Stoaa. of ihe 


, OI lisuv 
several reasons 
the creatures’ 
seven-mOliou- 


t'TOieSSOr jmttuM. — - 

IWersirj 

professor Rigby, of Note* Dome 
University, said 
contribnfed to 
decline over a 
year period. 

They said that excavations in 
Monona sbuw«l ^al batf the 
plflUtS in the «g*0° 

Stetr miltiou hM 
altering ihe dKmsanra food 

snpply- 

Changes in the sea floor 
cansed the global sea le vel to 

Sesame period, £ ? ea *^ 8 
bridges between Asa and North^ 


America. Mora animals mi- 
grated into the dinosaurs* habi- 
tat, increasing competition for 
food. 

In 1988, Lois Alvarez, a 
Nobel Prize-winning physicist, 
and his son Walter, a geologist, 
were among those who proposed 
that a six-in ile- wide (9Ani) 
asteroid smashed into the planet 
at a speed of 40,000 mph (64360 
tphu The impact would hare 
been 1,000 rimes greater than a 
blast created by exploding the 
world's entire endear arsenal. 

The father and son team said 
the impact sent so much dost 
nod soot info the atmosphere 
u.ar sunlight was blocked and 
temperatures plummeted. As a 
result, plants withered, animals 
starved or froze to death and the 
dinosaurs went e x tract , enabling 
'mammals, and eventually 
tinmans, to dominate Earth. 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


BANCAV. HORACE FREDERICK 
BANC AY tele at Fnuan 0 Boots, htrtun. 
CarawwWsrare amt At iwunurkri. Sul- 
lotk on 26lh April ivus. 

(Etij te abn ui c 17.000) 
BAVUSS ftwmrrlv EVITTS lie* HAD- 
LEV ORE LILLIAN BAVLISS Iwmnty 
CVTTTSi nee HADU V. WIDOW tele « 31 
Seymour Raid. Oidbury. Wpr1«y. W«l 
MMtends AI BucMmlh. Wes Mld- 

IWK on vrnh February J«86 

lEslaie obQuI ClZ.OCOi 
FAWSON. WILLIAM HENRY FAWSON 
tele M 21 we*i Arm. Srolon. Devon diet 
Uierc. on ZOUi Ntetcn l«wo. 

lExtele aboul C(J40O) 
FIRTH. WRIGHT FIR TH Lilt- of 59 Part. 
Road. DttWU Moor. Huddersfield. York 
uure died ai HuAanVwW on 16 U 1 July 

1966. 

■Eatelr aOout CZOMOi 
GILBERT. GRACE CO-BUTT tele of 
Meeeswonn. FhM Wav. Ricunansworto. 
HrrnordUiire died Uiefr on 3rd November 
1906 

(Estate About £5.0001 
HOPKINSON. IDA ROBE HOPN1NSON. 
SPINSTER late of The Old Manor. Sal tv 
turn. wuuMrc died tone on I Bin May 
1906. 

(Estate about Eia.SOOi 
MAURICE nee EDOOLLS. GERTRUDE 
MARCARCT MAURICE DM CDOOUs. 
WIDOW late of 159 Main Road. 
Bryncoch. Neath. West Glamorgan died ai 
Nr a UI an 131h Apnl 1986. 

(Estate about £23X300) 

SKERfUFF formerly WHITWORTH nee 
VREYS. JUSTINE CAROLINE SHERR1FF 
otherwise JUSTINA CAROLINA SUER- 
RIFF formerly WHITWORTH nee 
VREYS. WIDOW tele of lO Wave!! Home. 
Cell Barnes Lane. SI Albany. Herl/ardsnue 
dMd at SI AUtem on 2701 February 1986. 

(ffifia oboua £&jiO0) 
The Kin of the ahovr-nameo are requested 
to apply lo the Treasury Soucucv iB.Vi. 
Queen Anne** Chambers. 38 Broadway. 
London SWIH 9JS. faking which uie 
Treasury Solicitor may take sum to ad 
mtmsler me estate. 


IE lota am 

mala. disenclB people. He need* the 
security of a loving family. Help BA AT 
find teln one wnn a dona U on to Room 
21, Briton Agencies lor Adoption and 
Fostering. 11 Southwark Street. London 

sex iro. 

PLEASE HELP The Notional Benevolent 
Fund (or the Aged to provide 'TENS' 
machines (or me relief of pain ui condi- 
tion* like arthritis. £60 Buys a machine. 
Donaoans please lo The Viscounl 
Tervpandy. Chairman. NBFA. 35. New 
Broad SL. London EC2M 1NH 


Simon Happy anniversary 

from Dawn. Studio City. Alice Spring* 
and emnourob- 

MON RSU6IOUS FUNERALS. Book £2 
tram me Brdwfi Humaw to. i Peg 

Charily) 13 Prince m Wales Terr. W8. 

Miami heart OF JK3HI9 Hearucil 
thanks far showing me where Bridie 


BIRTHDAYS 


> button, adas possum, alias 

nu (ace. level m* monnicr. Happy birth- 
day. the broom swam 1 


SACKED MEANT OF AESOI Hearted 
Ihanks for showing me where Bridle is. 


■UNO Irene - many happy retort*. Alt my 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


6LYNK Ttie taitiDy of the late Dominic 
Gtynn wish to thank Reverand Fa- 
ther McCann for his kind 
ceualstraootts. ad relatives menus 
and nagMoin for cards and letters 
of sympafty. also donations lo Brll- 
Mh Hean Foundation received In 
their sad loss. 


SERVICES 


Love or Marriage. All ages. 

areas Oaiedne. DeM 1 QI 61 23 AMngdon 
Road. London WB Teit 01-938 toil 


S.A-EL 14 Beauchamp PI. SW3. 01-267 
6066. Essex area. Ol 504 4142. High 
success raw. Men 45-66 In donand- 

CALBRE CVS Ud professional runlcii- 
lum vi ipe documents. Details: 01-631 
5388. 

FERSMM ORIENTAL A aU other rugs re- 
paired. Personal Service. Call anytime. 
01-339 9978. 

SELECT FREWS. Exchwve Inteodur- 
uons for the Unattached. 58 Maddos 
SDeet. London wi- Telephone ax-493 
9937. 

CARITALCVs prepare Mgh quality curric- 
ulum I'llln. 01607 7906. 

A LOAM with a money hack guaranceef 
£2000 to £30,000 with mongagr KW 
rtty. APR 10.5»o vonaMe. Free 
redundancy cover offer. Free IMe cover. 
Dial FREE on OBOO S2S 383 until 
a.OOotri Premier PorUoto. Freev csl. 
Reading. RG1 1BR. 


; & ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
Allen lev foreign Otilcrj personal inter- 
view*./ Seoley PI. Wl. Ol 499 2666. 


CONVEY ANCSK by lutty oualttlcd smel- 
lers Liao •+ VAT and standard 
flltoors em enrs ring 0244 3193M. 


HBKC London School of Bridge and 
Club 38 King* Road. SW3. Ol 589 
7201. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 




YOU CAN HELP 
OUR OPERATION 
BE A SUCCESS. 
OnrSuiEical Reseaictt Fund 
reliesscfey on donations 
6om the public. 

Ftease hdp us © continue 
ibis viral wotk by sending 
your donations to-. 

THE SURGICAL 


m 


RESEARCH fUNO 

*tjv*iCofle*e afSorpma 
4 1 Lncakft inn Folds Loedcn 

WC2.V3PN 


25 Year Anniversary Appeal 

BLOND MclNDOE 
CENTRE 

1961-1986 

Yoir support is vital to the 
continuing research into the 
problems of rwectmn of 
transplants of heart, kidney, 
cornea, and skin, treatment of 
bums, and the causes of many 
serious diseases. Pounded in 
memofy ol Sir Archibald Mdndoe. 
Dantes to ten* Director. 

EAST GRINSTEAO MEDICAL 
RESEARCH TRUST 

W. Sussex, MIS 3DZ 


FOR SALE 


YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

Wicanderv beautiful nalur.il cur* lile* 
Cvrrenieiv ham wunm me or* mon- 
ey ran buy CU “5 per -told * val 
MrraKalnn velvet pile carpel I a plain 
cotour-L Bum in under toy 12' widv 
from IMCI . 7 year <~oar guarani er tor 
home or OHiee K4 75 per *g yd * vaL 
Plus toe larpnl velrclion of plain car- 
prluvg In London 

m2 L'poer RKhnvona Road 
Londcui sv»n 

Tel:0I-876-20S9 

Free Eshmalev Expert Filling 


BIZET DOING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
CHOPIN LISZT 

Br sure you include Marteon*- 
Our pores rani be nuued 

MARKSON PIANOS 

6 AD>any 9. NWl 
01 936 8682 
4ri>8rr> Plare, SE1B 
01 BS4 4617 


FRANKLIN Slerilng stiver Mini edition. 
>.000 vears of Bnlun monarmy. Of- 
fers Tel -0332 703658 (after 6 pm). 


GDOT1AN SIC1NWKC Grand, model 160. 
Serial 5642b. good candihrer. £3200 
Tri Ol 727 9440 tatter DPnu. 


OnOMTS OF NETTLEKD ChlPbendste 
and Sheralon styrr dtning furnrture 
made io order Over 60 dining suiies 
always available for immediate oetiv- 
en. Nettlebed near Henki on Th^nev 
■04911 641116. BounvrmouUi '02 -j2i 
293580. Toosnam. D«*<dli .039287/ 
7443 Berketey. CBo* 10453" B109S2. 

ANTKMJC Glass Iro hied China Display 
Cacunel. in Laid Rovrwood C450. Victori- 
an Armcnair. carved lee* and handles, 
deep buttoned £360 0272 522090 


FINEST guaJICv wool carpels. Al trade 
pnm and under also available 100 ‘s 
psira Large room vire remnants under 
halt normal price Chancery Carpel* Ol 
406 0433 

SHERATON STYLE DUunp Tames, cham. 
sideboards and dak* Catalogues from 
w 11 Dam Tillman Crouch Lane. Borough 
Careen. Kent. 0732 883278. 


SEATFINDCRS Best ttri.ee. for ad told 
out event* Our clients Include mou 
maior companies Credil earn* accepted 
Ol 828 1678. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT, Cal*. Star- 
noil Exp. Chess. Lev Ml*. AU theatre 
and sport* Tel: 821-6616/828 

04 96. A. E* / Visa / Diner*. 

BROAD WOOD ORAND Antique rose- 
wood. hfsmpavm. exr. cond. £i .600 
ono. 0460 20348 iDevon/Someneti 

CATS, CHESS. Les Mtatond Phantom. AH 
inealr' ana man Tel 439 1763. All ma- 
ior credit cds. 

m > r» j 9 )n c Excellent rendition Hard 
case + 2 bowv £3jOOO. Tel. Ol 876 
1349. 

FMD6ES 'FREEZERS- CooLeri. etc. Can 
you buy cheaper? BAS Ud. Ol 229 
1947/8460 

CEOROAM carved ptne fire surround to 
mint Pond I lion. TH. 0234 708139 
I0SBI 

PORTRAIT in oil of 1 7Th century genUe- 
inan. 7|| be ad. Tine duality TeL0234 
708139 

III iqmari Piano. Manogaony nnnhhed. 
exreuenl condition. Ouamy German 
Oventtung. £2.760. 061 432 0397 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE credit 
over 1 tear rAPR (F«>. Low interest 
rates over 2 year* iAPR 9.5A>iA3yean 
IAPR 12.24,1 Written auoiauons. Free 
Calajotmn. 30 b Hjphgale Road. NW5. 
01-267 7671. 

1985 911 Porsche 
Carrera Targa Sport. 

B rev Guam red/wack leatber ratorvor. 

Siereo nadir, eiecfnc windows. 4 
month* Porsche wanamy . all eatra*. 


£35.995 000. 

Tel 0483 606402 (work) 
Hlndhead 5303 (home) 


PDMCIIT MS a 1982. 26.500 mites, 
one owner wiav rec or d of services. 
£2.900 Teteph u oe 01-957 5523. day 
01-727 916«. 


HANOE HOVE* Option pat*. 1979. WMle 
with oiaat vmyi roof, full lengln sun 
roof, new seal*, lamp guard*, bull bar. 
spoftigevts. jihw. 64.000 rmtes. service 
hdlory inunaculate Cb nonum. Lady 
owner. Any trial. Onfy £4.696 Tel: OJ 
991 0713 day / Ol 968 7538 evening. 



WANTED 


t-PATEK-CARTIER and all fine 
watches warned. We wiu pay highest 
prices instantly Tetebhonc 01-240 
2343 or send details to Mr Kaye. 408 
Strand. London WC2B ONE. 


CAR WANTED a lime runner desperately 
nr ro v e) by single parent ifunds limited). 
Please reply to BOX X». 


P: photographs wanted, old or rerenl 

foi booL Please wnie to 80 Cheaon Rd. 
London W14 90U 


FLA1SHARE 


WIMBLEDON COMMON Protcvstonal 
Mrfh-A'envdr lo share nal. Own large 
room £60 Pto incl. Tel 01 947 9223 

HMniil linw prof t. as*, o/r m tor mxd 
roe with gdn. n/s £160 pem eacf. Ol 
946 4724 att 6pm. 

SERVICES APARTMENTS in K»nangion. 
Col T.V 24 hr Sw Teton CoUinuham 
Apart mm (V 01-373 WOn 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


: ^ THE MIND. 1 
CAN T AKE ONLY-; 

V ; - : S0 MUCH : %- 


Maior C. afar years c Bomb Disposal, 
now sees an explosion m every ncttig 
dock. All Servicemen risk mental 
breakdown m peace or war akk£. We 
devore ousel ves to die welfare of 
Uiese men arel women. We must go on 
helping mem. We must tave funds. 
Please send us a Donation, a Covenant 
or remember us with a Legacy. 

EX-SERVICES MENTAL 
WELFARE SOCIETY 

B9KMr Home- T * BrndMi 

WnUBOte SW1« IK. To 01-543 KU3 


CELEBRITY CHARITY AUCTION 

. To be opened by JOHN HURT 
Thursday 13th November in the Concert 
Hall, Imperial College, Beit Quad, Prince 
Consort Road (beside the Albert Hall). 

Viewing trom 12 p.m. Mass release 2,0 00 balloons 
2.00 pjxL Auction starts 2J30 pjn. . 

£2 million is urgently needed to complete the final 
fli rtiml trials of a new cervical cancer test funds 
also needed [or a new lung cancer project at 
The Brompton Hospital. 

Please come. Donations gratefully received 
QUEST FOR A TEST FOR CANCER, 
WOODBURY, HARLOW ROAD, RGYDON, 
ESSEX CN 1 9 SHF 
Tel: (027 979) 2233 

Funding non-animal mearvh into early- cancer detection 
Registered charity number 


S i rli o h rrB e tj eman^ 
K^nrietH^Mor^ 

aa--mP. . 

Ud 0,they; ha 




Parkinson's Disease. 

Ii strikes men and women everywhd*?. Perhaps even you. 
Researchers need your help. So do^mo/2 than l OG.iJi.fO 
sufienirs in ihe Uniied xingdom. 

Please support 

Parkuisoc’s Disesse Society 

36 Portland Place. London WIN 3DG. Tei: 01-323 1 174 


FLATSHARE 


HAMFTON WICK Third M/S lo lluif » 
pnL Inr V/S. ovv7i room. BR 4 min*.. 
£160 00 pom. rvr but*. TflluO 1 Ol 
379 7672 -Oay i. Ol 943 3309 i rites I 

KEMSMCTON MTS DoUto room f dm 
inq room available to torgr inunar 4 
Etoaroom rui TraroPort rasritoiu Hri* 
required £60 pw fit- Ol 9 JO 2872. 


ST JOHNS WOOD NW8 Prof m/l to 
snare iww luxury nal Own room. «i 
mod cons, near tub*. C7S»" mriu»vte 
TH Ol 289 0002 iHonvm or Ol e>29 
0160 iWorVi. DcpcrtU + Hen regd 


WAKOS WORTH COMMON Profnstonal 
M/F or couple » snore vuprro large nal. 
all am men H re*. £200 PCM mdl Avail 
able now Tel:OI 26B 3485<day>01 874 
4073 ievc*i 


*W4 Prof l>m* reaund. to share ftaL 
O/R. GCH £60 pw exclusive. Tel: Ol 
622 6361 oiler 2 pm. 


CHELSEA 2 F 120’ si sh toveiy room m 
maiv Ear transport dc £38 pw. PO 
TeL-Ol 352 3932 tovwsl 


CX-APHAM at/ F read la share lovely 
house very close to Ctopham Neelh A 
Stock well time Own dbto rm Dbh. 
w-aaher. washing mocnine. . video ete. 
£45 pw Phone 831 0542. days or 736 
7684. after 7pm. 

HOLDERS GREEN Spacious rm/ aep 
knuien. all laoltues. 3 to 4 mrhs let 
only. £220 pem Inclusive. Peefcered atw 
Phcam 21 *. prof eeonaL easy going 6 
enticed Tri 465 0349 

ML* Large room m 
. rden. mil. 
H/e XloO pern me. 834 8386 exl 4686 

idayi 888 loS4 I eves.) 

CHELSEA 4 bed matstoarRe. terrace, roof 
garden. 2 bairn. 4 mere snarers wanted 
around £30 pw earn. 68443299 (Eves) 

CH B WI C K W4 2 proir pm. Snare lux 
gdn Hal. Own rooms £226 or £176 
lem me. All forum— avail. Tel: Ol 
747 3044. 

DULWICH pro! M/F lo share modern, 
centrally nealed fiat, dose lo station 12 
mtus BR lo BlaCKIrMTs/Mriona. £46 
pw curt Tef Ol 669 1687 an 7 W). 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. Well 
nub introductory service. Ptee irl for 
apw Ol SB9 5491. 313 Brampton 
Rea a m%'3 

HOLLAND PARK Clrl lo Share spacious 
oaraen flat, own douHej bedroom. 
CaOpw exclusive. Tel: 01 727 3129 Of- 
fer 6om 

l&LiNCTON Georeaan house. ESegani an- 
tiques. garden. Suit professoral. £65 
pew. 01 607 2104 

OLD EROIPTON RD. Lunory flaiSDare 
lor oral F • 25-30i. O/R. all omens. T V / 
video / washer / dryer ete. £260 pem 
incl Phone- Ol 727 6045 after 5 pm 

SW5 M 23+ io Share Mansron rial. O/R. 
Central Heating. Constant not water. 
Preferably Non Smoser. £68 pw INC. 
Ol 373 9208 Eve* 

3HU Nr tube. Prof M/F. own room m 
napp* lux t uny modernised C/H house. 
SOpw ex cl. Tei. OI 675 1892 eves. 

BAYSWATER Second person, tfarr 
flaiAwn room. CS6 pw. TH. 221-7304 
after 6.30 p.m 

CHELSEA. SW3 Really super house. 2 
girl* IO Share. 01351 6732. Minutes 
from Stoane Square 

HAMPSTEAD- F. share, lux gdn flaL O/R. 
£52 pw exrf.Cfote to tube.rlO mtnsi. 
and amreuues. Ol 408 2366 \ 244/843 

M2 Prof F. 2&+. N/S. Lqe O/R In v. anr 
nal. Nr tube 20 mins city. W.mach / 
dryer £40 pw rxc 883 9949 

MW 2 Cul. own room in luxury flat, sitting 
roam. CH. TV Video, garden*. £45 pw. 
TH 01-431 1819 

lUCIMWlNP Prof M/F. shore lux house. 
O/R 1A6-C55PW. Tel 01-434 4475. 01- 
940 9486 levesi. 

SW17. 2 rm m 3 bed flal. Prof M/F. 22- 
32. N/S. O/R. C/H. All arr»uue5 
£l40/£lb0pcm.Tci01 96b 4030 eves 

tW It M/5 26 ten to share attractive 3 
bed maisonette Own room. ElSO pem 
exclusive. Tei 01 22B 3678. 

SW 17 own room in friendly shared 
house with garten. near luOe. Gas CH 
£3-7 ow Tel Ol 38S 2790 Klayunrel. 

SM7 0tou* Rd. NrTuOe Fern n/s lo share 
rm L9e friendly flat £125 pem EXC. Ol 
370 6828 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


LOWEST FARES 

Pans £09 N YORK C276 

Frankfurt £60 LA /ST C3SS 

Legos £320 Miami £320 

Nairobi £326 Singapore £420 

Jo'burg £4 to Bangkok £336 

Cairo £205 Katmandu W40 

CM/Som £335 Rangoon £350 

Horn kunq £510 Cateutla £425 

Huge DBCOums Avail on 1st 3 f3ob Class 

SUN & SAND 

21 Swallow si. London Wl 
01 439 2100/437 0537 


VENICE 

HOTEL LA FENICE 
ET DES ARTISTES 
30124 Venice. San Marco 1936 
Five minutes waA Irom Si Mark's 
Souare. every ccnrt ori. envy aimospnere 
al rooitorate prices. 

Reserv ation*. Phone 394 1-6232333 
Teles: 411150 
Director. Dante ApoUonio 


DISCOIMTED ft GROUP FAKS World- 
wide. TH U.T.C >07531 851035. 


FU U fT BO OkPB Dtoraunl Dm world 
wide W/eeonomy 01-387 9100 


PfALAfcA. CANARIES. Ol 441 >11 J 
Travel wise Abto Atol 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent S5. Wl Ol 

734 5307- ABTA/AIOl. 


S. AFRICA From £466 01-384 7371 
A BTA 


TAORMINA. SOI V £149 Sped* "LATE 
BIRDS'' Wlnier Oiler vlt booked wlinm 
7 days of departure) Price fliCy incl. 
nn Calwtek (IlgM l every Wed. 1 lam). 
Irantieev A/Tax. 7 night* 8*8 In twin 
room with haih/shower and wc 14 
moms w- £219 Single ♦ ClSw* NO 
HIOOCN (YTHAS Otter valid 5 Nov- 
26 March ISLAND SUN 01-228 7462 
ABTA/ATOL. 

TAKE TIME OFF lo Pari*. Amsterdam 
Brined*. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau 
•anne. Zurich. The Hague. Dublin 
Rouen. Boulogne A Dieppe Time Ott 
2a. Chester Close. London. SWIX 7BO 
Ol 236 8070 

ONE CALL lor some ol Ihe bet! deals In 
(Hants, aparimeni* fioteh and car lure. 
Tei London Ol 636 5000. Manchester 
Pol 832 2000. Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau 

MOROCCAN MAGIC - Holidays. fUghls. 
ac torn, car hire Call 5eaguU Holidays. 
4a Maddox SI. London Wl . Ol 629 
9712 AST 4 ATOL 1178 

MPPOMAIR Seal vale to LSA-CallbOean 
Far Casl- Australia. Call Uie 
prnleNSlonJls ABTA IATA cc nrrpltd 
Tef PI ?H 5788 

NYXA. NY .LA. NY J-A. worldwidr deal 
rwuicms For me cneapesl rare*. Iry us 
l-.l Richmond Travel I Duke SVrrl. 
Ririunona Surrey ABYA 01-940 4073 

V ALEXANDER Christmas availability 
Caiv.iri/La* Palma* 18 Dec £827 Ma 
Lhxv 22 December £179 01 723 69t>4. 
AUj \ioi Att eos/ visa. 

WWTER SUN Specials pricn to Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco Greece. Malaga 3 Te- 
nenlc Nov & Dec Pan Work) Holidays 
Ol 714 2568 

ALICANTE, Faro Malaga dr Dimond 
Travel 4TOL I7B3. Ol 581 4541. 

Hcrynam 586a i 

AUSTRALIA /It TFAt AND £660 aval)- 
auk- over Oinsunas Tel The Travel 
snap Ol 631 1714 

BEST Fare*. Best FI rah Is Best noiida>-s 
ahvwnere Travel OJ 834 7426 

JOI 4 

EUROPE -’WORLD WIDE towesr rare* on 
cnarirry-a.ite-dulrd III* Pitoi rijgni PI 
53 « 0167 4ql AlcH 1893 

FIRST- CLUB OdCiO Conrorue DscoiuiM 
hire-. DiiRUi Train oi-aas *WU 
aut v 

HOLLAND. CttUtv tophi* £35 oyw £66 
Bin r ra'iHurt irom £t/> Miracle -tef 
PI 370 3322 

HONG KONG £48*. BANCKON £359. 
'.iivuN-rr LAST Oine, F£ tillri Ol 584 

OL14 101 £ 

LOWEST Vr Fare* Europe and world 
uo.- Ol Moo 8o22 BucklteAiani 
Tr u \ rl 

LOWEST Air Fares SriwdUtefl Eurt-pe* 
Vvvridwuk-. Med Sfar Travel. Ol u2B 
3230 

TVNBIA For your fiNrd aj' wftelf IF 'fill 
■.unimer (Vjii for oia brochure noiv Tu- 
nisian Travel Bureau. 01 573 4411. 

ALL us emes Lows! larev on maior 
srtMUteO rarriPI* Cl 684 737] ABTA 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


♦ALL FUGHTS BONDED* 

♦♦save rs r s 

♦ ♦TOURIST CLASSY* 

♦ ♦CLUB CLASSY* 

♦ ♦1ST CLASS* ♦ 

*+ CONCORDE** 

■ SVDNFY * *• MELBOURfiE * 

■ PFHTH * * BRISBANE * 

HOBVRT * * ADELAIDE * 

JiTBHRG » * S AFRICA » 

: AUCKLAND * * WELLINGTON * 

nn * * PT MORESBY * 

r Bangkok * * tolyo • 

SfNfi-vPdKE * * MANILA * 

DfiBAl * * BAHRAIN * 

’ MID EAST * * NAIROBI * 

i LUSAKA * * HARARE * 

r TORONTO * * VANCOUVER * 

- 1 ANGELES * * MIAMI * 

• CARIBBEAN * * S FRANCISCO * 

** SOUTH AMERICA ** 

* USA * USA * USA -eUSA * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

lEsFd I'M) 

r>u S«ah Sl Eptom . Surrev 
|0J73T| nSMOMJU-’TIW/ 
LMlS/3«V)3NI»7 


rrs ALL AT 

TRAILFINDERS 
Worldwide low-cost fBflhta 
The best - and we can prove It 
190.000 clients since 1970 
CURRENT BEST BUYS 
Around the World ft-om £781 
SYDNEY COLOMBO 

PERTH NAIROBI 

AUCKLAND JO - BURG 

BANGKOK LIMA 

SINGAPORE GENEVA 

HONG KONG ISTANBUL 

DELHI/ NEW YORK 

BOMBAY LOS ANGELES 

WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

TRAILFINDERS 
42-45 Earts Court Road 
London W8 6EJ 
OPEN 9-9 MON-FBI 9-6 SAT 
Lone-Haul 01-957 9631 
and 01-605 1516 
Eoiropc/LISA 01-937 5400 
lat/Busness 01-938 3444 
Onrrranrm Utemcd/Bomed 

ABTA LATA ATOL/ 1458 


DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 

o/w Rln 
Svdacv £420 £764 

AudJand £420 £T7S 

Los Abgcks £D8 £340 

Jo>urp E4t> £4«S 

BanekoL £220 DM) 

RK. 082 £504 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return R 'i u £5 

JOBUBG/HAR E465 DOUALA £«M 

NAIROBI £390 SYDNEY C760 

CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND E78S 

LAGOS £350 HOMO KONG ESSO 

DEL) BOMBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BAN&OK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

182/168 RepM SI Wl 

TEL 0I-A37 8255(6/7(8 

AME^^ 80 ^^^ 


new low fares 


AMMAN 

£235 

KARACHI 

£2» 

BOMBAY 

£360 

LAGOS 

£330 

CAIRO 

£205 

MIAMI 

£283 

DELHI 

£360 

IC1UE 

£105 

tRATURT 

res 

SEOUL 

reos 

HONG KONG 

£490 

SYD/MEL 

£765 

STANBUL 

£170 

TOKYO 

ESBO 


SKYLOR D TRA VEL LTD 

2 Oe«VWN STR E ET . LOUDOH Wl 
Tel 01-439 3521(8007 
AMUNE BONDS) 


TRAVEL 
WORLD WIDE 

Sauu iovee aM oiuasce or. 
(Dhicsfl long haul irivel con* 

EXTRA St DAL IS! a auB TO THE USA 
*03777143559 

SPECIAL 1ST * CLUB WORLDWIDE 
<03727)43550 

LOW COST ECONOMY WOfILOWDE 
(03727142739 
4B7A7JJU2UM 

Menu* H the IntuiK o> Trawl & Tonsm 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Burq. Cairo. Dvdial. 
tsianbuL Singapore, h L. Delhi. 
Bangkok. Hong Kano. Sydney. 


Mexico. Bogota. < 

Europe, ft The America*. 

Flamingo Travel 

76 SMDeSutv Avenue 

London Wl V 7DC 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday I0.00-i3.00 


am T*CKE1S Specialists New York £229. 
t_A/Son Francisco £329. 

Sydney /Mrfbounvc £759. AU datiy di- 
rect (tights Dari air 130 Jermyn 
Steed .Ol B39 7144 


M night*/hoK lo Eu- 
rope. LSA A mail destinations. 
Dipramal Travel; OI 730 2201 ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


SYD/MBL £6 36 Perth £666. All maior 
earner* lo Aus/NZ. 01-584 7571 
ABTA 


CHEAP FU8HT5 Worldwide. Haynwia 
Ol 930 I3o6. 


MSCDWrT FARES Worldwide. 01-434 
0734 Juptlcr Travel 


SPAIN. Portugal Cheapm (are*. Biggies. 
Ol 73S 8191 ABTA ATOL 


WORLD WIDE CHEAPWX Never know- 
ingly under sow. we beat any tare, on 
any class, any where in the world. Dts- 
counts on hotel*. Credit cards welcome . 
Member ABTA. Try us. Tel Ol 679 
7776 


TRAVEL CENTRE specials) no in Finland 
Club ON travel wonwide Budget 
Fare* Aussie. NZ. 8. Africa. USA and 
Portugal with actom Tei Ol 666 5546 
ABTA 73196. 

XMAS. Winter. Summer. Algarve. Tener- 
ife. Greece. Turkey. Spain. CgviK. Sri 
Lanka and many more nois/fhgnla. 
Ventura: 0748 331100 ATOL 8034 

AMERICA ilignts with Manchester depar- 
ture* 6 M*o South Africa ft New 
Zealand Tel Travel Centre. Blackburn 
102641 53257 ABTA 73195 

LATDi AMERICA. Low cost Drams eg. 
Rio £4B6. Lima £495 rln Also Small 
Croup Halida* Journeys <eg Peru from 
£360' JLA 01 747 3108 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE - USA. S 
Amenta. Mtd and Far East. S Africa. 
Travialc. ad Maroarrt Street. Wl Ol 
580 3P2B ivuta Accepted! 

XMAS/REW YEAR Tenerife. SorclM note 
day* selec s e d accommodation from 
£299 Colour brochure City Travel Ol 
580 8191. Abta. 

XMAS) NEW YEAR Algarve Special holi- 
day* -velecied hotels from L2&4 Colour 
brochure. City Travel Ol 380 8191. 
Abto 

AL CARVE Al TT BNAT1 Vfc 
The finest house* lor rental 73 SI 
James SI. SW|. Ol 491 0802 


SANTA POLA Fidly lum nal overloounp 
sea. Sip* up to a £80 pw. 01-769 8868. 


WINTER SPORTS 


VERWER. VERBIER. VCRBIER £187! 
Switieriand MOST evrtnnq rr*on> Ci 
tried main, incl hrants 6 rREC 
nciidat* lor DUina a chain. Lois of fun 
for vmalps. emote* 4 ora lips Ring 
Si l*v hire Ol 370 0999 Atol 1820 


CHRISTMAS in Courchraei Have a fun 

tucked imiuoful Ajpuir ChrttJrias 
uiin ALL me inmmtngs' For oniv tl«9 
& irer noitdav-s for groups Run ski 
Bonne Imw Ol 244 7333 

FREE. FREE. FREE free Lilt passes. 
F-*v insurance. Freecntidren-- noitgav* 

I uftorr ) u> on manv Hat., Miner. A .vpiv 
from Gaiu-Kk a vv.incta-Mrr trom v.119 
St- 1 Treedom Ol 741 4b85 ft Obi 236 
0019 ATOLA32 

FUM& al over 3.000 hi ft 2nd larqesl ski 
an-a m swiirerLmd. no queues. *-L 
ouidc* Ptumr Po>«(lei Birne Ihe only 
Co to oiler Chalets/ hotel*. Ol 223 0501 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WHIZZ!! 

Piano. BWTWJoto ftPsrhe* 

FUN ON THE SLOPES in 

THE MOST EXCITING RESORTS! 
Qicnd drains ind <v fits 

FROM ONLY £184_ 
Christmas bargains ii w 
FREE HOLS FOR GROUPS OF b. 

Sctbcnpuous food, lovely daki* A 
lemfk aunosphae - awe by jtrarsctt 
wnb i (ear friends fiH a chalet! 

Ring 01-370 0999 ATOL 1820 


JUST FWAMCE - Super value seif catering 
ski howtays In ihe bed French mm. 

Ring lor new brochure DOW. 

Tri Ol 789 2692. 

ABTA 59266 AIM 1383. 


SKI WEST - NEW! Special offer* on 
group* RING FOR A DEAL! Aten other 
amazingly low price* Starting ai £59. 
ask tor a copy of our bumper brochure. 
■Oil 786 9999. Abta 59256 AIM 1383. 

LA CL IM AX. French Ski Chalet. R moral 
slab Superb, trad, acrom S/eat ante. 
Tel 102421 603696 idayi/ 602776 


MORE FROM SKI LES ALFEB Vernier. 
Mrrtbrl. VUIars. Megrve. Comfort, ser- 
vice. great, skiing- Rhone 01 502 9766. 

SMIWORLO Top Ski Resort*. Lowest 
Price* from £59 ABTA Brochure: Ol 
602 4826. 


U JL HOLIDAYS 


SHOOT. Ihn. play golf, slaying in 
Budding* fine coumry houses. Parties 
ol 2 10 Colour brochure: Blending*. 
Old vicarage. France Lynch. Stroud 

CL6 8LN 104531 882344. 24 nrs 


LUXURY HOME furnMied: hotioay lets: 
lour bedrooms: Lyrmngmn: £«00 per 
week. wrue. 7. SouUt Crave. 
Lymmgloo. Hampshire. 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


CORDON BLEU Cook to work in 
OumprrY- swm Alps, lor winter sea- 
son to run (oolong service Tel Ol 736 
Soil 


TEBWORARV COONS required. 2 aMt*- 
larti cooks wanted from now until 
Chi-isimas. Piesoe ring Mariorfe Ed- 
wards 607-1366. 

M HHTUt NESOHT Representame with 
Hotel ft Catering background ft spokrn 
French required. Tel: Fieri 1 02321 
626175 


— — . Au Pair Bureau. 

ofrers m/he ids. donts, aU llve-ln sUtff 
C’.K. ft Overseas Au Pair Agent* Lid 87 
Rrtvni SI London W.l Ol ft39 6634 


' cook early 20-a read Of 

outetoe caterer* tor central London 
kitchen*. Ol 406 2224 

CHALET ML WANTED for snuo compa- 
ny Cooking guals ret. Ring 01-731 

0927. 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


WANTON Women seeks house or flat 
minding, imoonnbte and wUMpq io care 
lor pels, available immediately. M l wag e 
01 373 0162. I Ann Parker). 

COftDOM-BLEU. Cook Imnaedtalely avail 
able. lor dinner* lunches and bjmei 
MriteS/nO agent*. TH Ol 6JT7 1892 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


POTATO MARKETING BOARD 

ELECTIONS OF CERTAIN DISTRICT 
MEMBERS. 198* 

Tn- Potato Marketing Board announce* 
inal. in accordance with me provisions of 
Ihe Potato Marketing Scheme. |456 <as 
amended by me Potato Marketing scheme 
■ Amenamcnli orders of 19o2. 1971. 19.6 
anrt 1-1851. ihe toiMwing candidate* haw 
been duly elected Members of me Board, 
for a prnod of three sear* inm 31sl OCto- 
bet lotto. 

DISTRICT NO 2 SOUTH EASTERN 
1 1 wo mem bers i 

Mr S.P Buck. Manor Farm. Snavc. 
Hamsireel. AsnlotvL Kenl 
Mr w M BrawtL Crow* Hall Farm. 
Lav am. emcheuer. Sure* 

Disirvci No 7.ii Norm-wesi England 
lone m ember 1 

Mr R M Kidd. North Bank. Lazonby. 
Pennih. Cumbria 

District no. 7i2i - North East Entfand 
(two members* 

Mr RH Bovomworth. Maroerbv Hau. 
Fetixkirk Thirst. North > orWuni 
Mr. H La no) home. Crawford Cranbe. 
Bromoion Nunnaltetton North Yorkshire 
District No 7.31 • West Riding of 
Yorkshire lone memberi 

Mr C TVewflltt. Peach Tree Farm. 
MtnsUP. ' OTk 

Ofttnci No. 1 1 SoulhEast ScoUand 
tone member i 

Mr J Mam. Wtiltekirl. Mam*. Dunbar. 

East Ltd titan . . . . 

Dtstrict No. 12 ■ North and North isrsl 
Scotland tone member i 
Mrs B.A Cordon. BSc . Rovriarm. Crom 
arty. Ross ft Oomart* 

H L SPRKJCE 
Secretary 

SO Harts Cmctnl 

KniaMsbridge 

London 

SWIX ONB 

bin November 1966 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Church Conniwraoncn have pre- 
pared a draft redundancy scheme 
providing for Itw continued vesting in Ihe 
York Diocesan Board ol Finance lor care 
ana maintenance of Ihe redundant church 
Of Si Mary Lev vs lum i York dlorasfi. 
Copies of me draff scheme mas be ob- 
tained front ihe Church Commisaiann-.. i 
Mill bank. London SWIP 3JZ lo whom 
any representations should be serai wilhln 
28 davs oi the puMtraiton of ml* notice 


LEG AL NOTICES 


MICHELANGELO TRAVEL LIMITED 
tin Voluntary Lunuoaboni 
NOTICE £ HEREBY GIVEN Utal the 
Creditors of Uie above-named Company 
are n-auired on or before me 12 m day of 
December I486, to send m their name* 
and adore-***, ram particulars of iheir 
debts or claims, lo me undmignei] M S 
Langley FCCA of Gabie House. 259 Rte 
9*bU Park Road. London. N3 3LF Ih* 
Lmiudalor ol the Company: and. If so re- 
quired by notice in writing oy the said 
fjguKfator either personal (y or by (heir 
Solution io come In and prove (heir said 
denis or claims al suen nm* and place as 
Utah be specified in such notice, or in de- 
fault thereof they will be excluded Irom 
Uie oenefil of any iftstntiufMn made before 
Such drill s are proven 
DATED mis 4th oav of November 1 086 
LIQUIDATOR 
MS LANGLEY FCCA 


MARTIN WAGNER Ads ERTEStNC 
LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREBY Gl\ EN pursuant to 
Section 588 of Ihe Cwiuunm Arl. 1985. 
Inal a MEETING oi Uie creditors of Ihe 
above named Company will pc held al the 
Offices 01 LEONARD CURTIS ft CO wiu 
ated al 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Thursday llte K«i 
day ol November 198* al 2 SO o'clock in 
Ihe arti-mcon for me purposes provided 
for in Sections S89 and S^Ci 

naira Ihe 5in da>- of November 1985 
Mrs R Wagner 

Direrlor 


THE HILL MIXJRL PARTNERSHIP 
LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant lo 
Section $89 ol Ihe Cnmpanie* Art. 1985. 
■hat a MEETING of Ihe creditor* ol ihe 
above narra-d Convaant will be held 41 the 
offices Of LEONARD CL PTtS ft CO si III 
ated al 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 5LF on Thurvtal Ih 2dm 
da> ol November 1985 al 12 OO o'clock 
midday lor Ihe Pinions provided lor in 
Sections 589 and 590 

Dated Ihe 41h day ol November 1986 
V i MOORE 

Director 


UNIQUE DESIGN' IV COIV-rrPLCTION 
LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HER LBS CIA ES Pursuant 
insertion 588 m me Cc-rr names Ael 198S 
Ihat a MEETING ol toe Creditor* of 

L nvgue De-aAtv A Culls Hue Iran Limilrc.. 

will no ftria at Ihe offiri-s of Leonard Cur 
lev and Parmer-. Jo Eovlnes Slre-I 
Liverpool LI 9AA on Fndav the 21*1 dav 
oi Nm ember 198b al 12 OO n'l'lock noon 
for Ihe burrme provid'd for .r. Section 
589 and 590 

Li mra ihe 3rd dav ol November 1986 
C ASHTON 
DIRECTOR 


SPARKLERS 'LONDON. LIMITED 
NOTICX IS HEttEPl ct*. EN p.iriu.ini IO 
SretHHi 588 or me Companies Ad 
inal a MEETING 01 Ilk 1 rredllors Of till' 
jIkii.- ivonHsl Cran.panv will be nrld al Ihe 
of no* at LEONARD Cl. KTIS ft CO . *lln 
aled al 30 E A-STHC'L RTVE TERRACE 
LONDON w: oil" nn Fndav me Sim da-, 
ol not ennui l°*V: ol i: Wo fWI mid- 
day tor me puruteM- pre.idvd f-n in 
Sirimn. 589 Jim £*0 

Cui-r tne Jl-i .1 j- of Ormlwr tafia 
C WALLER 

Direct ui 


RE- EACl LCCPSL LIsiriT 
I" OHDLR OF THI HIGH CC 
O -.TED THE :*TH FEHCL AE\ 
wrilLU FfJvLEY FGA O 
BRIGHTON ROAD. SOUTH CW 
HAS KEEN APtiofVTED L!OL 11 
Ot THE ABOVE NAMED CO' 
A <0MM ™ 
OATED Silt Novi-mbi 


\ 

i 

I 29 


■fidency 

which 
ex, ex- 
jid rose 
jwth is 
/as an 
t-Tuni 
of the 
from 7 
and 
enium. 
igles is 
where 
d miN 

.'0 mil- 
ex pen- 
Iced-to 
lidine 
which 
it not 
ds are 

f this! 
stages 
areas 
nt es- 
AZT 
f £70 




* 


22 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


Mark Thatcher and Texan millionairess 


Genteel 
Dallas 
belle meets 
her match 

From Paul Vallely 
New York 

Despite what British tele- 
vision viewers might imagine 
the society columnists of Dal- 
las (the city, not the soap 
opera) are a fairly sedate and 
rather proper collection. That 
much has been evidenced by 
the genteel horror they have 
voiced this week at the 
depreciations of their British 
counterparts who have been in 
town to uncover the finest 
de tails of the private life of 
Miss Diane Bergdorf. 

Miss Betgdorf. aged 25, is 
the society hostess whom No 
10 Downing Street is expected 
to announce tomorrow is 10 
marry Mr Mark Thatcher, the 
Prime Minister's only son. 
The British popular press are 
pursuing details of her past 
and his courtship like .“blood- 
hounds chasing a pair of East 
Texas possums", in the words 
of the city’s Times Herald. 

Society hostess, it has to be 
admitted is rather a loose 
description. But then every- 
one worth writing about is 
automatically a society host- 
ess in Dallas. 

The Bergdorf family, how- 
ever, are not in the same social 
league as the multi-millionaire 
Forston dynasty whose heir- 
ess, Karen, was Mr Thatcher’s 
first Texas belle. 

Diane Bergdorf is the 
daughter of Mr Theodore 
Bergdorf of Bergdorf Chev- 
rolet Inc of Pittsburg, a small 
town about 100 miles north 
east of the Dallas/Fort Worth 
megalopolis. He is a successful 
car salesman but cannot touch 
either the “old money" oil- 
wealth or the local social 
standing of the Fortsons. 

All of which is rather dis- 
appointing for the Mood- 
hounds. Miss Bergdorf is 



Mbs Diane Bergdorf: hoping to be the next Mrs Thatcher. 


described locally as an attrac- 
tive and vivacious brunette 
with “an unexciting past". 

A graduate of the Southern 
Methodist University she 
worked as. what is rather 
grandly known here as, an 
associate with a real estate 
firm until recently when she 
joined a Texas bank. 

The unexciting past encom- 
passes the fact that she was is a 
former cheerleader who once 
came second in a local beauty 
contest. 

She lives with her parents in 
a four-bedroomed house at an 
address described as " smart 
but not swanky" on Yacht 
Club Drive, in Chandler's 
landing , by the Sam Rayburn 
lake to the east of Dallas. The 
family has a smaller home 


near to Mr Bergdorfs large 
used car business. 

The pursuit of details of the 
wooing has yeilded nothing 
more titillating than the 
revelation that the Prime Min- 
ister's son bombarded his 
girlfriend's office with flowers 
for a number of months. 

The couple are said to have 
been introduced by Mr 
Bergdorf whom Mr Thatcher 
met through his work as a 

S60.000 (about £42,000) 
consultant to Lotus sports cars 
in Dallas. 

The society writers in Dal- 
las and Fort Worth are taking 
a very blase view of the whole 
business. 

The couple are expected to 
make their home in Texas. 


A lover of 
fast cars 
and jet-set 
lifestyle 

By Robin Oakley 
Political Editor 

Mis Margaret Thatcher, 
who has been making plain for 
some years her impatience to 
become a grandmother, will 
move a step closer to realising 
that ambition with an an- 
nouncement expected today 
that her son Marik, aged 33, is 
to become engaged. 

Mr Thatcher and his twin 
sister Carol a journalist, have 
been romantically linked with 
a n timber of partners in recent 
years by the gossip columns 
bat neither has prerionsly 
shown much sign of establish- 
ing a permanent relationship. 

Mrs Thatcher is said by 
friends to have been especially 
keen that Mark, a motor 
racing enthusiast who has 
spent Ms recent years in 
America promoting and sell- 
ing Lotos cars, should settle 
down to marriage aad a stable 
career. 

The Thatchers have been a 
dose family and Mrs That- 
cher has an especially soft 
spot for her son. One of the 
rare occasions when her public 
composure has ever cracked 
was in January 1982 when she 
shed tears during the days that 
Mark was missing in a motor 
rally across the Sahara. 

Suffering all the usual prob- 
lems of being the son of 
somebody fumns, Mark Tha- 
tcher, who shares his father's 
robust opinions, cannot be said 
to have been an asset to his 
mother's political career. 

He was educated at Harrow, 
where he was racqoets cham- 
pion, but turned down the 
place he was offered to go on to 
Oxford, opting instead to try 
chartered accountancy. He 
abandoned his training in that 
discipline before qualifying 
and there then followed a 





Heat a sudden shock to Oman’s royal visitors 


Continued from page 1 

versa lion that visiting states- 
men do in front of cameras. 
Their words were inaudible, 
but the Prince gesticulated a 
loL the Princess hovered on 
the edge of her seat and Sir 
John Riddell, their private 
secretary, showed an expanse 
of tan socks that would have 
been indecent on an Omani 
woman. 

The Sultan took rare to 
engage both his guests in con- 
versation. With a house in 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
The Queen opens Parliament, 
11.30- Princess Margaret and 
the Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester attend the State 
Opening of Parliament, 11.30. 

Princess Anne presents the 
1986 Structural Steel Design 
Awards at a lunch, the Savoy 
HoteL 12.45; and later, as 


Berkshire, be is well versed in 
English ways. 

While the Prince went off to 
do duty with members of the 

1 0,000 strong ex-pa triale com- 
munity at the British Council, 
the Princess visited was led 
her separate way to visit the 
gentle pastures of the Oman 
Women's Association, a mid- 
dle class organization dedi- 
cated to education and good 
works, which might be de- 
scribed as a charity were it not 
for the fact that they would 
find offensive the idea that 


Patron, the Gloucestershire and 
North Avon Federation of 
Young Farmers’ Clubs, attends 
their annual meeting. Gold Cup 
Room. Prestbury Suite, Chelt- 
enham Racecourse. 7.30. 

Princess Margaret attends a 
service of thanksgiving to mark 
the centenary of the goodwill 
service of the Salvation Army, 
Southwark Cathedral, 7.15. 

Princess Alice Duchess of 
Gloucester, as President at- 


anyone in Oman needs hand- 
outs. 

The Princess squatted on a 
cushion on the floor, sipped 
coffee and tasted halwa, the 
local version of Turkish de- 
light, while being told of the 
relative liberation of Omani 
women and bring treated to 
the re-enactmcnt of a marriage 
rituaL 

At one end of the loom 
stood an ornately decorated 
miniature four-poster bed. be- 
hind whose all-enveloping 
curtains lay a schoolgirl, aged 


14, playing the part of a bride 
the night before her wedding. 
She was entirely covered ex- 
cept for her bare feet, richly 
decorated with henna. Danc- 
ers re-enacted the custom of 
keeping an Omani bride bare- 
foot in bed all day before her 
wedding, while the women 
dance and feast around her, 
and the men shower gold 
coins on her feet. 

“Poor bride," said the Prin- 
cess, presumably recalling her 
own rather different hen party. 


Mr Mark Thatchen 

somewhat misty career in 
public relations and promotion 
work, often related to the 
motor racing and rallying 
world (hat has been his great- 
est enthusiasm. 

The obtrusive Fleet Street 
interest in his business activ- 
ities was randy folly sa tis fied 
and there were embarrassing 
incidents as when his company 
Monteagte Marketing was 
several years late in filing 
accounts. Bnt without any very 
visible means of support Mark 
Thatcher contrived to live a 
jet-set lifestyle, raring care, 
flying on Concorde and telling 
interviewers breezily “if you 
put in the necessary work-rate 
and have foe commitment to 
succeed then yon will succeed 
do matter what foe business 
enriroument is". 

There was sniping from 
columnists and Labour MPs 
when be mn lucrative con- 
tracts endorsing products for 
Japanese TV advertisements. 

He said in 1975: “I do not 
want to be known as Mrs 
Thatcher’s son. 1 want to 
preserve my own identity. She 
is the best mum in the world 
bnt I do not want to be known 
as a son who has found success 
tied to his mother's coat- 
tails.' 1 

But Mark Thatcher has 
rarely been aide to escape the 
accnsations that he has 
achieved success in foe promo- 
tions world precisely because 
he is his mother's son. Some of 


model or front for them have 
admitted that candidly. 

He has inevitably been a 
major target for investigative 
journalists and gossip column- 
ists. They revetted in Ids 
Saharan disappearance. Jokes 
abort Mark Thatcher’s lack of 
ability to find his way became 
a stock item in comedians’ 


fuss about foe cost of the 
rescue operation to find him 
and his lady co-driver Mrs 
Thatcher stopped in to pay 
some of the bins personally. 

Bnt if being his mother’s son 
has helped to keep Mark 
Thatcher in a comfortable 
lifestyle it has also brought 
him plenty of problems. The 
ISA has made death threats 
against him and he has had to 
spend recent years shadowed 
by Special Branch detectives. 
As a result he has been forced 
to leave apartments becanse of 
neighbours objections about 
the obtrusive seemrty and the 
risks they imagined were in- 
volved in tiring dose to him. 

In March 1984 Mark 
Thatcher moved to America, 
taking up a £45,000**-year job 
with foe sports car company 
Lotus Performance Cara. Mr 
David Wfckeas, the head of 
British Car Ahctions, which 
took over foe Lotos group that 
year, also employed Mr Denis 
Thatcher as a director of 
another of his companies, 
Attwoods. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,201 



ACROSS 

1 Mad aunt frantically follow- 
ing king is the Himalayas 
( 8 ). 

6 Chesi of a bronchitic, by the 
sound of it (61. 

9 Way a leftist was striking 
( 6 ). 

10 .Advance like demons, two 
at a time (81. 

11 Witty retort about separate 
quarters (8). 

12 He may suppress many an 
expressionist painter (6). 

13 Old teacher in Edgar Allan’s 
house (5). 

14 Moon trip smoother in this? 
Surely noi (9). 

17 Hard in trade to get substan- 
tial growth (9). 

19 Burial area where a pack of 
hounds exercises? (5). 

22 Rough touts round the fin- 
ish at Epsom are the limit 
(6). 

23 Namely, an article one finds 
harshly critical (8). 

24 Double share of profits, say. 
from its branches? (4-4). 

25 It's material to gel the point 
on following this (6). 

26 Boldness of pci abandoned 
by pound (6). 

27 In Scotland a cause of irrita- 
tion? Not at alii (8). 

DOWN 

2 Clumsy, and cruel to Cock- 
neys (1), 

3 Lothario, bogged down in 
Morocco (9). 

4 State in which our early 


forebears were never tired 
( 6 ). 

5 One Parisian, before owning 
to being plain? (IS). 

6 One or two dogs the Chinese 
preserve (4-4). 

7 Disentangles super climbing 
plant (7). 

8 News of the old city, inter 
alia, emerging again (9). 

13 Like Shelley's Prometheus, 
a man without limitations 
(9). 

15 Moving quite slowtv to the 
righl goal, perhaps (9). 

16 Contracting to produce 
clothing (S). 

18 Boiler for tea and eggs in 
parts of Mars? (7). 

20 Criticize Mrs Coppcrfield 
for being an earthy woman; 

(7). 

21 Scallywag in the sun god’s 
slate (6). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,200 



'H'M C|lg q‘L P;Tl£ 

E 

r Tit malt ip | 



Coarise Crossword page 16 


tends the annual open meeting 
of the Queen's Nursing In- 
stitute, Royal Institute of British 
Architects, 66 Portland Place, 
Wl, 2J0. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends a fashion show in aid of 
Cancer Relief Macmillan Fund 
at the Cafe Royal, 835. 

Princess Alexandra attends a 
gala performance of Rookery 
A'twfc Shaftesbury Theatre, 
7.55. 

Prince Michael of Kent, as 
President, the Royal Patriotic 
Fund Corporation, visits Royal 
Caledonian School, Bushey, 6. 
New exhibition 

Tin glaze and smoked lustre 
pottery by Allan Caiger-Smith 
and the Aldermaston Pottery 
1 955-85: Art Gallery and Mu- 
seum, Kelvingrove, Glasgow; 
Mon to Sat IQ to 5. Sun 2 to 5 
(ends Jan 4). 

Exhibitions in progress 

A Private View: paintings, 
drawings and prints by Jane 
Lewis: The Royal Museum and 
Art Gallery. Canterbury: Mon to 
Sat 10 to S (ends Dec 20). 

Designing and Making: work 
by school children; Doncaster 
Museum. Chequer Rd; Mon to 
Sat 10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5. closed Fri 
(ends Dec 2). 

Fred Archer Centenary: Piti- 
ville Pump Room Museum, 
PittviUc Park. Cheltenham; 
Tues to Sat 10.30 to 5 (ends Jan 
24). 

Last chance to see 

Recent Works by Carola Gor- 
don and band built ceramics by 
Kathleen McLellan; The Open 
Eye Gallery, 75 Cumberland St, 
Edinburgh, 10 to 6. 

The Animal in Photography; 
The Ffoiogallery, 31 Charles 
Cardiff, 10.30 to 530. 

Music 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Wessex 
Hall. Poole Arts Centre, Poole, 
7.30. 

Concert by the Leeds Choir. 
Leeds Parish Church. 8.1 5. 

Concert by the Penrhos 
Chamber Choir; Lawrence Sher- 
iff School. Rugby, 8. 

Piano and cello recital by 
Robert Max and John Adams; 
Radclifle Centre. Church St. 
Buckingham University, 1.15. 
Talks, lectures 

Don't Trust the Label: second 
thoughts, by David Phillips: 
York City Art Gallery. 7.30, 

Electricity in Medicine: 2000 
years of electrotherapy, by 
Dr, S. Salmons (Department of 
Anatomy); Large Lecture The- 
atre, Physics Poynlmg Building, 
Birmingham University. ] 1. 

Slratcgues used by educa- 
tional psychologists to assess 
children with learning diffi- 
culties. by Mr. P.T. Farrell; The 
Findlay Society. Room B4:4, 
Humanities 11 Building, Man- 
chester University. 6. 

General 

Belfast Festival; opera, con- 
certs, theatre, dance, cinema, 
exhibitions, jazz, literary events, 
folk music and architectural 
tours in and around campus o f 
Queen's University, and Grand 
Opera House, Belfast; for fur- 
ther details tel: |D232) 667687 
(until Nov 29), 


New books — hardback 


The Literary Edtor’s sateettan of interesting books pubksbed 8w waste 
A Ftutriy & Its Fortunes, try Rachel Kempson, Lady Redgrave (Duckworth, 
£12.95) 

A Portrait of The Artist as a Young GM, edted by John Quinn (Methuen, 
£835) 

Jodhpurs to the Quantocks, by Sen Baxter (Capo, £7.95) 

A Wdk with a White Bushman, by Lairens van der Post(Chatto & WSndus. 

fi g 95 ) 

Northrop Frye on Shakespeare (Yale, £1 895) 

Something Understood. An autobiography, by Gerald PriesHand (ftndrd 

Deutsch, £12-95) 

The Brontes and Nature, by Enid L Duthte (MacmBan, £27.50) 

The Great Slip, by Ernie Bradford (Hamish HamHtoa £1&9ffl 

The Norman Achievement by Richard F. Cassady (Sidgwfck & Jackson, 

£16-95) 

Women, Marriage and FoMcs, 1860-1914, by Pat JaHand (Oxford, 
£19.50) PH 


The pound 


AustnateS 
Arabia <Scb 
BeigtomFr 
Canada* 
Denmark Kr 
RnhndW* 
France Ft 
G orman* Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong Kong $ 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Lire 
Japan Van 
NeOtertandaGM 
Norway Kr 
PortngalEac 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pin 
Swiedeo Kr 
Switzerland Ft 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 


Bank 


2130 

63.75 

£085 

1151 

735 

*82 

3.055 

24000 

11.50 

1.122 

211000 

245.00 
XA6 

11.25 

232.00 
4.10 

20890 

10.41 

153 

1.50 

90000 


Bank 

Sails 

2.18 

20.40 

60-15 

1J75 

UL91 

7.05 

942 

2485 

2I2JD0 

11410 

1.062 

1995.00 

231-83 

338 

1045 

21000 

3.40 

19240 

SJS 

238 

1.43 

700J0 


Rales far small deno mina bon bank notes 

orty as suppted by Barclays Bate PTC. 

RataB Price Indue 387 3 

Loudon: The FT Index dosed down 1.6 at 

1311.7. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Richard Baxter, Pu- 
ritan minister, Rowton, Shrop- 
shire. 1615; John William 
Strutt 3rd Baron Rayleigh, 
physicist, Nobel Laureate 1904. 
Maid on. Essex. 1 842: Sun Yal- 
sen, first president of China 
191 1-12, Hsiang - shan, 1866. 

Deaths: Canute the Great 
king of England (1016-351 and 
Denmark, 1035: Thomas Fair- 
fax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cam- 
eron, commander-in-chief of the 
Parliamentarian army. Nun 
Appleton, Yorkshire. 1671; 
Elizabeth GasfcelL near Alton, 
Hampshire, 1865; Pereira! Low- 
ell, astronomer. Flagstaff Ari- 
zona. <916; Baroness Orczy, 
novelist. Loudon 1947. 


State Opening 


State Opening of Parliament, 
1 1 JO. The Queen, accompanied 
by the Duke of Edinburgh, 
leaves Buckingham Palace at 1 1. 
They drive along the Mall and 
Horse Guards Parade, arriving 
at the House of Lords at 11.15. 
The time of the return journey 
depends upon the length of the 
Queen’s Speech. Gun slames at 
Hyde Park, 11.15 and Tower of 
Loudon, 12 noon. 

The following streets will be 
closed due to the State Opening 
of Parliament from 9.30 dm 
onwards; 

Attngdon St. Barton St. Btadcam Wah, 
ridge st Broad Sanctuary. ftjcanflham 


Gan (northbound carriageway between 
Palace St and Spur Rd). Buckingham 
Palace Rd (northbound cantumway be- 
tween Lower Grcsvemor Pace and 
Buckingham Gate). Caiman Raw, Gonstt- 

tutton HW. Cowley St, Crags Court! Dean 
Bradtey St Dean StarieySt.Dean Tronch 
St, Datjy Gate, Gayfare St, Gres Codejje 

Si (a8wr Ban cafia jxowwfing to ranks). 

Great George SL (Sow Pater St Great 
Scotland Yard, Horse Guatts Rd. Horse 



Parliament today 


The House of Lords and the 
House of Commons come to- 
gether at 11.30 for the State 
Opening of Parliament. After 
the State Opening the Lords and 
tire Commons sit at 2.30 and 
both bouses open debates on the 
Queen's Speech. 


dsar.froety start 

patches, sum 

day becoming 


some rain in pieces; wind 
mmtemp 10C_(50F). 


periods becoming cloudy later; 

variable Kghl becor - * ‘ 

orate; max telnp 9C 


SgW becomjng^sauttarty mod- 


Orkney, Sh e tfm d : Some rain or gleet 

showers A first, sunny periods denratao- 

mg. cloudy later vdna tight and variable 

becoming southerly moderate; max temp 

8C(48FT 

OuBoofc tar tomorrow and Friday: 

Showers in most seas being heavy at 

Ones. Rafter windy. Temperatures matafy 

above normal. 


□ 


StairfseK Sunsets 
7.13 am 4.16 pm 


£25 am 234 pm 
Fun moorc-November 16 


Lighting-up tune 

xtoo4A8 pm to 845 am 

1 456 cm to 854 am 
i4S.1_pmio7.14am 
*r 4>C7 pm to 7.00 am 
i S.12 pm to 7.02 am 


Yesterday 


Roads 


The Mdtaw to HI: Contraflow contirv 
ues between junctions 27 (ASM) and to 
(A38). W O tenflftg ms t u ra: delays possible 
during rush hour. 

and Weal: M Roadworks 
between unctions 16 (Swindon) and 17 
(C tffl nctftw). m& Nonnbound carriage- 
way a: umetton 14 (B4509) is dosed: 
MrtraflowsQuiMkxinttnQ^ 
sSp road dosed. A3B1: Rosurtacnw work 
between Barnstaple and Sort) MoGen. at 
Lamftey village: temporary Rgtaa. 

The North: Ml: MSfW repair work 
between junctions 31 (writeup) and 33 
(Rotftrtjam): driorswrt « operrton. ito: 

curves at )unc«on 23 (MereaysHie). 
MKb Manor mdsrung scheme at Barton 


M®or wCWBOg 

Bnoge. Greater Manchester, king i 
cononue art at ernes BK&scfcs of t 


.delays 
up 8# 7 

mies can occur. 

Section* 8789: Only one lane « each 
dirtew on Thombeback Rd. Strathclyde 
at AuWhouse HP. king delays during peak 
penoas A3tt Contraflow aiModdrabum, 
Dunoartonsmra: delays fifcaiy. Aberdeen: 
Bon Accord St remains dosed causing 
congestion: diversions. 

information wppBed by AA 





pon ta Ho - how (a p fay 
Mttrwtey-Sarurdsy record your duly 

Port! otto total. . 

Add Utese weeHwf MdetenMrw 
your wcduy poraouo total. 

'■ kbit lofet matches the published 
- dividend ngure you bate won 
a or a share of Ore prise money 
stated lor that week, and must claim 

^ . pfto jjagrssai 

You mini have your card with you 
when you lefeuhone. 

If you are unable to telephone 
someone else can claim on your behaH 
hut they must tia\c your cart) ana call 
Tne Times PorHoiio claims Urn 
between me sbpuuted times. 

No raworomutty can be, accepter! 
to failure lo contact the claims otUoe 
(or any reason wttmn Uie stated 

hours- 

The above itwtruccons are ao> 
nkoabie io both oauy and weekly 
dividend claims. 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c, 
cloud; I, Mr; r, mm a, sun. 

C F 


Buffett 

ffr 


■ 846 (Skianaey 

1 1254 ■ 


Canftf 

EtfHMtfl 

Qugew 


846 
f 1355 London 


r 1050 
r 846 
1 846 ffnkhwar 


Air chaos 
to follow 
failed 
EEC talks 

Cautioned from page 1 

in serting fores and limiting 
competition. It coaid also 
mean, however, that retal- 
iatory action might be taken 
them by the countries 
to wMch they fly, spelling 

(nr met w tont 


. NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 

- , ** y London PwT “ ‘ 

enl Unwed or l Virginia 
London El 9XN andby 
snxtemf Ltd-, tad mmnn __ 
k wrung Park., Otesaow Gat 1 
Wednesday. November 12. ig__ 

ueouuted as a newroabte' at (he Post 

WM. 


Despite the deadlock, Mr 
Michael Spicer, the Aviation 
Minister, remains politically 
committed to reducing fares 

He described the talks as 
having partial success, with 10 
member states agreeing to a 
more flexible distribution of 
capacity share on main air 
routes in Europe, and nine 
prepared to . accept that more 
than two national carriers can 
compete on a given route. 

Many consumer grout s and 
those pressing for cheaper 
fores wffl be delighted that the 
package deal has foiled. They 
are convinced that only by 
tackling the problem head on 
in the European courts will 
those countries still dinging to 
protectionism be forced to 
compete. 

British Caledonian said, last 
ni gh t that it had been fighting 
restrictions in Europe since 
1979. British Airways reacted 
by saying: "As for as we are 
concerned, as a company we 
have nothing to fear from 
(the) further progress towards 
liberalization”. 

Mr Moore and Mr Spicer 
wfll now study the arguments 
put forward by the opposing 
governments to see if there is a 
eh?™* of holding direct talks 
with them before the next 
planned Transport Ministers 
meeting in December. 


Pamphlet 
on Aids 
for every 
UK home 

Oatinwdfrwn page I 

abuse drugs by injections. If 
people cannot stop tbevmusi 
not share equipment Those 
are tire messages, wtachmusi 
come out most directly. 

The minister added: "This 
issue will not just go away- It is 
probably with os for the next 
10, 15 years and conceivably 
for the rest of this century" 

The message from the Go*'- 
era meat was that everyone 
could lake action which would 
prevent the spread of Aids. It 
was not just a matter for the 
Government but for the gen- 
eral public! 

# Church booklet: The 
Church of England will pub- 
lish a booklet on "Aids — 
Some Guidelines for Pastoral 
Care" the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, Dr Robert Run- 
cie, announced last night 

Dr Ruiicie. chairman of the 
House of Bishops, said the 
document was to inform peo- 
ple about Aids **in a. quite 
sensitive and compassionate 
manner". 

The booklet written by the 
Board for Social Response of 
the Home of Bishops, will be 
published on November 27 
and will be widely available in 
bookshops throughout the 
country, 

“1 am concerned,” Dr 
Rnncie added, Thai the 
Church should be involved 



He was responding to a 
question by Mr Baroaby Miln 
of Hereford at the General 
Synod. 


The 

terday lost its appeal against a 
fine imposed by tire European 
Community because of its 
attempts to block the 
reimportation of cars from 
Belgium for cheap sale in 
Britain. 

The European Court of 
Justice upheld the fine of 

350.000 European currency 
units (£210,000), imposed by 
the Community's executive 
commission on what was then 
British Leyland, in I984 v afler 
British Leyland had refused 
certificates to allow left-hand 
drive Mini Metros made In 
Britain to be reunpexted. 

The court was ’ told the 
company refused the certifi- 
cates to a British garage 


Minehead, Somerset, in an 
attempt to protect the high 
prices chareed by its approved 
dealers in Britain. 

lire price gap between care 
bought in Belgium and Britain 
was so large that dealers could 
impart care, convert them to 
rigbi-hand drive and still sell 
item more cheaply than 
authorised dealers. 

The court ruled: “British 
Ley land's conduct could only 
be construed as a deliberate 
intention to create barriers to 
reimportation which came 
into competition with its ap- 
proved distributors.” 

Mr. Merson's solicitor said 
yesterday that he now intends 
to sue Rover Group, 


Weather 
forecast 

A ridge of high pressure over 
the UJL will more east ahead 
of an Atlantic frontal system 
which is expected to affect 
western districts fader in the 
day. 

6 am to uifajiwgiit 


. East tosHa: A 
a taw mist or log 


peteftas, sunnyjprtoc^for most of tfw 


with 

fight 

pOF). 

S, E. cfloturi N, IE England 
. Chantei ■stands. Baton, 

r j flh M rtfh . DandM, Abatoea, Moray 

FMcCjBaiTrtnty sttetehi tawrimor 

beaming ttmp 

SW^rnVBigteed, Wales, Lake Dftaict, 
M» el Man: Hazy sunsrane becoming 
cloudy ana rain later wM> ftU and coasts 
log patches: wtnd soctheny moderate 

increasing strong to gale torce; max temp 

SW, NW Seotood, Gtetgow. CaoM 
MgMnto. Araya, NoribmSvtawfc Hazy 

sunshine at test soon becoming ctoudy 

with rain later: wind souttatly moderate 

increasing strong lo gale fore* max temp 

Ctasr troBty «mt sang 



High Tides 


tt-otuv sky; bottiue sky end dood. e- 
cteudy: o-owreast f-fog: d-ortate: i»- 
naW; mtat-mtst; rmn; mtow; tt»- 

ttnmdmionii; 

Arrows show wind <Hr«rcOon- wind 
speed unz*» circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PU 

HT 

London Bridge 1023 

6 2 11.11 

87 

Aberdeen 


88 10.41 

89 

AmnnA 

345 

103 

4.16 

11-6 

amm 

8.11 

81 

83U 

84 

Can*H 

320 

10.1 


10J 

Devaepwt 

2.41 

4.7 

257 

5.0 

Dover 

802 

53 

843 

89 

FMmwOi 

2.11 

43 

73J 

40 

ffiesgow 

Kanridi 

9JA 

U27 

4.1 

86 

10.09 

936 

43 

88 

iHMmaa 

7.34 

2.47 

43 

84 

El 

53 

84 

fflmccmbe 

246 

76 

3.10 

8.2 

LbMi 

11.46 


82 

Lhwspool 

8.12 

81 

827 

8.6 

Lowestoft 

523 

23 

7.07 

23 

— gete 

822 

43 

934 

45 

WfonlHavai 

3JK 

53 

3-27 

63 


2.02 

53 

233 

63 

Oben 

3.14 

81 

824 

3.7 

Psazincfl 

150 

47 

234 

5.1 

Portland 

3.33 

1.7 

846 

1.9 

FortvfrjKift 

831 

43 

849 

4.1 

Sborabsm 

8.04 

55 

836 

84 

SouthmaptoB 

8.11 

42 

836 

4.1 

Tuiniii 

812 

7.H 

335 

83 

Tees 

12.11 

4.7 

ion 

43 

WYtocMxt-Nza 

816 

3.7 

803 

33 


In tnearaa: 1in=3L2808ft. 


Around Britain 


■-I *■* a 

wwvon 


LOMStaft 

Cbutoa 


Tore? 


ESC 


“SSE, 


ShoiMbi 

Boami 

Poole 


C F 
CttSZ 
f 745 
C 1355 

C 1355 

IftieitelBr etisa 


We yro o ufli 

cxrootnn 


Sun Ram Max . 

lw in- C F 

K - 1 3 55 sunny 

ea 02 14 57 sunny 

1.0 - 15 50 bright 

1.7 - 13 55 aaurty 

x - M 57 dufi 

- - 13 55 doudy 

- 02 13 55 cloudy 

- i® 14 57 rain 

1.1 .10 14 57 sbrarara Bristol (Cun 

09 .10 15 59 doujy Cvmtpab 

02 .04 14 57 Ctoudy Attorney 

OB .07 14 57 ehomm .VpooC&m 

0.1 .13 15 5S Ctoudy Manchester 

02 -19 14 57 snowsrs Wottft tf ia wi 

OJ .13 15 m Showers irc»«-iym 

SJD .31 “ “ 

13 J» 

03 M 

1.0 23 

08 -40 
5.4 IB 


15 59 showers 

17 B3 

15 50 

W 57 

14 57 

14 57 

14 57 eunny 
Throe *» Monday's 



Swftato 
hrs in 
ta .11 

5.4 .06 
as -56 
x .17 
73 JSO 
0 6 j 07 
4^ 09 

3a - 

5.0 .10 
55 .16 
02 .01 

6.0 - 
5l9 - .12 
7.7 .13 
5.0 .11 
0.1 54 

ao .01 

0.1 54 
09 .CM 
- .05 
14 .12 
02 .10 


Max 
C F 
16 51 
14 57 
14 57 
14 57 

13 55 
12 54 

12 54 
16 61 

14 57 

15 59 
14 57 

13 55 
13 55 

13 55 

14 57 
12 54 
12 54 

9 48 
11 52 

10 SO 

11 52 
11 52 


rain 

gunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

bright 

brtgm 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 


showers 

sunny 

showers 

showers 

showers 

ctoudy 

showers 

showers 

sunny 


r B48 

C 948 


Abroad 


HUM* o ctoutu d. mate; f. Me te fog; r, rainj s, awe «n, snow; t, Hiundar. 


General Synod 

The General Synod, the Par- 

liament of the Chinch of Eng-, 
land, meets in Church House, 
Great Smith Street, West- 
minster today and tomorrow. 
The Synod si is from 9.30 to 1 

and 2.30 to 7 today, and from 

9.30 to 1 and' 130 to 6 
tomorrow. The Public Gallery 
will be open as usual. 


Alaccki 

v t - ■ 

WuOflll 

Martina 

Algien 

AmPdm. 

Athens 

Bahrain 

Sarfaads* 

Baraetaa 

Beirut 


C F 

f 20 BBGotogna 
c 17 63 Cftop 
f 19 B6Cor«l 
s 25 77 OoNn 
1 13 55 DabiWto 
t 13 61 FKO 
s 24 75 Florence 
t SB 84 FnnMurt 
( 20 68 Ftnchal 



8 15 99 
8 13 55 tMsMd 
3 25 77 Hong K 
f 18 « t n n & c fc 
8 16 Sl 



8.15 

8 10 50 Karacfi 
s 18 64 L Patens 
C IB 84 Lisbon 
4 22 72 Locarno 


C F 

a 15 59 Majorca 
f 11 52 Mags 
s 19 GB Malta 
s 8 48 MaMae 

« 18 64 Mexico C~ 

r u 57 man r. 

c 18 Si Man 
fi 11 52 MooteaaP 

e 18 84 Moscow 

s 10 SO Monich 

f IB 64 MaireW 

c 10 SONMas 

r 19 66 N DftM . 
a 11 52 NYorfc* 

( 11 52 Men 
a 32 SO Oslo 
1 17 (S3 Pans 
a 31 88 Pairing 
a 23 73 Partft 
t 13 55 
.1 13 55 


Chicago* 


C a 70 L Angels* 8 24 75 RWW 
C 3 37 Lnxaatog 8 11 52 fflodej 


CtfCtench f 17 63 Madrid { 13 55 Wy*ft 


denotes Mondsy's figures are Mast evnteMb 


C F 
t 19 86 
8 12 5* 

8 32 90 
r 22 72 
s 948 
f 31 88 
S 10 50 
S 15 59 
( 20 « 
1 21 70 
c 13 55 
s 24 75 
s 15 59 
I 4 38 
t » 88 

* 19 5? 

0 . 1 34 
9. 10 50 
S -6 43 

i 18 81 WaahW 8 « « 
r 20 68 HMftoh J SI 
* 21 70 Zori eft *9 6 


C F 

f 19 60 Rona 
e 18 84 Sabfaorg 
( 19 68 SFriaM* 
c 14 57 
I 19 68 S . 
Seoul 

c 10 50 
C 3 37 
r 2 38 SMIll'ig 
s 13 65 Sydney 
( 26 79 Tangier 
* 19 KTtfawa 
a 28 82 Tenerife 
s . 8 46 Tokyo *■ 
t 19 S6 TororXD* 

I 9 48 Tunta 
% 16 61 Vteeada 

f 13 55 VeotfW* 

1 28 79 Venice 
a 6 43 Vtahoe 
S -3 27 Weraete 



•>r.: 




Royer Group loses its 
appeal over EEC fine 

By Robin Young 

Rover Group, yes- owner. Mr Derek Merson of 













” :T "' •. 1 


: ;r* l* 

’ HI 

>. "k 

' t, i.* 

* . * *•>. 

,. • Mi 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



| ^ l-go 


TIMES 


23 

SPORT 41 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 45 


-*;■ -• ■— o-i — , »IV «T»S : 




iff. 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 




Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1311.7 (-1.6) 
FT-SE 100 
1660.9 (+4.7) 

Bargains 

34978 

USM (Data stream) 
130.47 (+0.19) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4385 (+0.0001) 

W German mark 
2.9266 (-0.0131) 

Trade-weighted 
69.3 (-0.1) 


BSC fined 
by EEC 

The European Commissi on 
has fined British Steel Corp- 
oration and Badische 
Siahlwerke of West Germany 
for exceeding production 
quotas. 

British Steel was fined 
ECU 34. 100 (£24,000) for 
exceeding its quota for gal- 
vanized sheet steel by 682 
tonnes in the third quarter of 
1984. 

The commission fined the 
West German company a total 
of ECU6.56 million for 
exceeding its production and 
delivery quotas. 

About 65 per cent of EEC 
steel production is covered by 
quota restrictions under a 
policy to restructure the trou- 
bled industry and reduce over- 
capacity. 

SE proxy vote 
backs Isro 

Sir Nicholas Goodison, the 
Stock Exchange's chairman, 
yesterday revealed 

overwhelming support for 
proposals paving the way for 
the merger with the Inter- 
national Securities Regulatory 
Organisation. 

Proxy votes from half the 
members showed that 92 per 
cent backed ihe SE converting 
to a limited liability company. 
And 87.8 per cent voted for 
proposals to pay £10,000 
compensation in return for 
members sacrificing voting 
rights. The full result wifi be: 
known after a poll today. 

Apricot profit 

A recovery at Apricot Coin- 
's puiers enabled it to report an 
1 : interim pretax profit of £2.5 
J million compared with a loss 
-• of £4.6 million last year. 
Turnover for the six months 
to September 30 was down 32 
Rpcr cunt to £33 million. There 
is no dividend. 

Tempos, page 2 8 

De La Rue rise 

Pretax profits at De La Rue 
rose from £16.41 million to 
£ 1 7.95 million for the first half 
to September 30. Turnover 
was 36 per cent higher at 
£i80.46 million. An interim 
dividend of 2.75p has been 
declared. 

Tempos, page 28 

Talks off 

Helene of London, the 
fashion wear manufacturer, 
said talks on a possible take- 
over offer announced on 
Monday have broken down 
without agreement on lerms. 
Helcne s shares fell 4‘:p to 
27'. :p on the news. 

Five Oaks 

The British Car Auction 
Group does not hold any 
shares in Five Oaks Invest- 
ments as stated in yesterday's 
T:wv s British Car Auction 
sold its shares las: nonth. 


Walt Street 24 
CuNtvs 24JH5 
Slock Martel 25 
Cacmcat 25 

Tempos 28 

Mwi Mrkis 28 


Foreign Fxch 28 
Traded Opts 28 
fait Trests jO 
C.nniuodities 30 
I SM Prices 30 
Share Prices 3! 



Beckett 

with blisteri 
attack on 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


out 




Sir Terence Beckett, retiring 
director-general of the Con- 
federation of British Industry, 
ended six years of delivering 
a nn ua l conference speeches 
yesterday with another savage 
attack on Labour Party poli- 
cies and warm endorsement 
for Mrs Thatcher’s Gov- 
ernment. 

Sir Terence reserved much 
of his venom for Labour's 
initial proposals on industrial 
relations law, which, he said, 
would put industry "back into 
the slit trenches of the 70s." 

After a one-and-a-half day 
conference remarkable for the 
CBI leadership's more open 
criticism of the Labour Party, 
and the lack of detailed dis- 
cussion on unemployment or 
interest rates. Sir Terence said 
Britain had begun to reverse 
direction on the road to ruin. 
"It would be a tragedy if this 
reversal was itself reversed in 
the next 18 months." 

At a press conference later. 
Sir Terence, who leaves the 
CBl next spring, said:. "It is 
very important that the La- 
bour Party understand thor- 
oughly some of the issues as 
industry sees them." 

The CBI would continue to 
meet Labour leaders and dis- 


cuss all aspects of policy for 
industry. But Sir Terence 
added: "If they don't lake our 
advice, ft is going to be 
damaging to them and the 
country, and it will be the 
greatest possible pity." 

In his speech, which was 
greeted with a one-minute 
standing ovation. Sir Terence 
said it was unfair to blame 
Mrs Thatcher for 3 million 
unemployed. 

"This criticism surely closes 
its eyes to the fad that we were 
in a world, not just a British, 
recession. And when ft hit us 
we were uncompetitive, un- 
profitable, and woefully over- 
manned. Previous govern- 
ments, by intervention, had 
postponed change, part- 
icularly structural change, so 
that when reality finally 
caught up with us. its effects 
were more drastic here than 
elsewhere." 

The present government 
bad set a course to improve 
the ultimate opportunities for 
business and the prospects for 
the country in a more radical 
way than had been attempted 
since the first measures on free 
trade were introduced more' 
titan 150 years ago. 

Sir Terence, a former chair- 
man of Ford of Britain, stoutly 


defended the investment of 
capital abroad, which pro- 
vided "a reserve for the 
future." Repatriation of over- 
seas investment would mean 
that the benefits of research 
and development, training, 
product development, and 
innovation carried out in this 
country by British-controlled 
multi-nationals could be lost. 

It was not true, be said, that 
company profits had recov- 
ered from the "cresia run" of 
the 1960s and 70s. Profits had 
now reached only two-thirds 
of the level of company earn- 
ings in the early 1960s. 

Sir Terence recalled his 
controversial “bare-knuckJe 
fight" conference speech of six 
years ago anti said that 
businessmen were now more 
prepared to stand up and fight 
for what they believed. “If we 
don’t, we've only got our- 
selves to blame.” 

He added that free enter- 
prise was the best hope to 
meet people's aspirations for 
more jobs and a better stan- 
dard of living. "The alter- 
natives, every one knows, have 
not and will not work. I 
believe the CBI must stand 
four square behind free 
enterprise.” 

CBI conference, page 26 


Exchange reviews 
City resignation 

By Richard Thomson, Ranting Correspondent 


The Stock Exchange was 
yesterday considering the case 
of Mr Geoffrey Collier, a 
director of Morgan Grenfell 
Securities who resigned 
abruptly on Monday. 

It was revealed yesterday 
that Mr Collier's resignation 
resulted from information 
given to Morgan Grenfell by 
Scrimgeour Vickers, a firm of 
stockbrokers where be pre- 
viously worked. 

A Stock Exchange spokes- 
man said: “This was reported 
to us last night and we are 
looking into foe matter.” 

Morgan Grenfell submitted 
a report on foe affair to the 
Exchange's Professional Stan- 
dards Panel which is foe first 
stage leading to any major 
disciplinary action which 
could be taken against a 
member. If foe panel feels that 
a case has been made out, a 
special committee is then set 
up to examine the affair. 

Mr Jeremy Paulson Ellis, 
chairman of Vickers da Costa 
and non executive director of 



Mr Geoffrey Collier: could 

face disciplinary action. 

Scrimgeour Vickers, said yes- 
terday: " Certain dealings on 
behalf of a company were 
drawn to foe attention of foe 
management of this group. In 
view of the nature of these 
dealings they were referred to 
Morgan Grenfell which pro- 
mpted yesterday’s statement 
by them." 

Mr Collier was a senior 
partner of Vickers da Costa 
before he joined Morgan 
Grenfell Securities. 


Opec ministers may 
join in pricing talks 


By Our Energy Correspondent 

Oil ministers of foe Organ- which turned 
ization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries may join its 
pricing committee’s delibera- 
tions to explore a return to 
fixed prices for crude oiL The 
committee is to begin its 
dicussions in Ecuador on 
Friday. 

The meeting, under foe 
chairmanship of Kuwait’s oil 
minister, Sheikh Ali Khalifa, 
is due to report to a full Opec 
meeting in Geneva on Decem- 
ber H. 

However, its membership 
has been expanded from foe 
original three to six and it 
could ultimately be convened 
as a full ministerial meeting. 

Under Opec rules any of the 
13 member states can join in 
committee sessions and it was 
a price-fixing committee 


into a foil 
ministerial meeting in March 
1 983 in London. 

The present meeting has 
been called in response to a 
request from foe new Saudi oil 
minister. Sheikh Hisham 
Nazer, to consider returning 
to a fixed-price system. Saudi 
Arabia wants a price of $18 a 
barrel set so that it can be 
adopted by all member coun- 
tries in December and come 
into force on January I. 

Sheikh Ali Khalifa said 
yesterday that the committee 
would "do its utmost to 
realize foe objective of raising 
oil prices to 518 a barrel and 
fulfil the agreement of the 
Gulf Cooperation Council in 
co-operation with the other 
Opec members." 


Hillsdown 
deal to 
form force 
in timber 

By Cliff Feltham 

Hiflsdown Holdings, the 
acquisitive food-io-ntrniture 
group.- last night unveiled a 
complex takeover deal to cre- 
ate a £400 million force in foe 
British timber industry. 

Hillsdown. through its 
controlling stake in Hunter, 
the separately quoted timber 
importing business, is paying 
£45 million for another in- 
dustry leader, Mallinson- 
Denny. 

As part of foe arrangement, 
Hillsdown will then inject its 
May and Hassell timber prod- 
ucts operation into the new 
group. 

MaJlinson-Denny was foe 
subject of a £90 million 
management buyout from 
Unilever last year. Hillsdown 
will be taking on about £55 
million of its debt 

Mailinson-Denny’s princi- 
pal businesses are importing, 
processing, distributing and 
selling limber and allied prod- 
ucts. Profits for the latest 10 1 /: 
months’ trading are £2.6 
million. 

Hunter, which is 74 per cent 
owned by Hillsdown. sells 
plywood, particle board and 
other products to foe furniture 
trade, limber merchants and 
related outlets. It also has a 
substantial furniture manufac- 
turing operation. 

Hillsdown bought May and 
Hassell for £14.1 million in 
August Speculation has been 
rife for some time that it 
would hive off all its timber 
interests into foe Hunter 
group. 

Last night Mr Sol- 

omon. the joint chairman of 
Hillsdown, said foe deal 
would enable Hunter to de- 
velop its limber interests with 
a range of products across foe 
board. 

The enlarged Hunter group 
would have a turnover of 
about £400 million a year. 

The price Hillsdown will 
receive for parting with May 1 
and Hassell will be fixed by 
independent advisers. 



Sir Robert Haslam: he would oppose pit by pit or area by area breakup of the industry 

British Coal could become 
target for privatization 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


Sir Robert Haslam, chair- 
man of British Coal, con- 
firmed yesterday that foe 
industry is still set to break 
even in 1988-89 and could, 
ultimately, become a target for 
privatization. 

Once the coal industry has 
established a good track 
record of profits it was logical 
that foe Government would 
return foe pits to foe private 
sector, he said, bat like Sir 
Denis Rooks, chairman of 
British Gas, he would be 
opposed to any proposals to 
privatize the industry on a pit 
by pit or area by area basis. 

Sir Robert added that be- 
cause the industry had a 
dominant customer in the 
electricity supply industry it 
made sense to deal with that 
customer on a national basis. 

British Coal supplies more 
than 70 million tonnes a year 
to the Central Electricity Gen- 
erating Board and hopes to 
add another 10 million tonnes 
to that if the CEGB, as 
anticipated, has to announce 
the building of two new coal- 
fired stations 

Sir Robert announced total 
losses is foe industry la foe 
5rs; six mouths of this year of 
£240 million. He said be 
expected loses for foe full year 


to be contained at £300 
million. 

The industry is now setting 
new productivity records in 
almost all of its nine areas - 
Scotland and South Wales 
have been affected by produc- 
tion problems but are now 
catching up — and that indus- 
trial sales continue to increase. 

Sir Robert confirmed also 
that foe industry has achieved 
its cut m losses despite losing 
£400 milliofi in revenue be- 
cause of haring to renegotiate 
its contract with the electricity 
industry in foe wake of falling 
oil prices. 

The next problem foe in- 
dustry could face is a shortage 
of skilled manpower as foe 
present Government-hacked 
redundancy scheme under 
which men can apply for 
voluntary redundancy pay- 
ments of- up to £75,000 is 
replaced by a scheme funded 
by British Coal which sets an 
tipper limit of £25.000. 

Miners have until the end of 
this year to apply under foe 
existing scheme and there are 
fears in some coalfields that 
there will be a rush of ap- 
plicants at Christinas time in 
addition to the 16,000 men 
who have volunteered for 
redundancy already this year. 


Sir Robert said yesterday: 
"We have seen a radical 
change in our circumstances 
since the beginning of this 
financial year, primarily doe 
to the collapse in foe world oil 
price and foe decline in 
competitive coal prices. 

“Our prime concern has 
been to maintain volume, in 
which we have been largely 
sncccessfoL but this has been 
at a heavy cost. We have had 
to reduce onr prices to m^jor 
customers by some £400 mil- 
lion a year, which represents a 
dramatic loss of potential 
profits. 

“The task of major 
restructuring of foe coal in- 
dustry wjj] be completed in 
large measure by foe middle of 
1987. Healthy restructuring, 
which is always present in any 
extractive industry, will need 
to continue although obvionsly 
the pace will be at a more 
moderate level. 

"Both productivity and 
costs are responding to our 
current efforts. It is this kind 
of progress which gives me 
every confidence that manage- 
ment. officials and 

anuieworkm can, by working 
together, achieve onr objective 
of creating a viable and self- 
reliant industry." 


Unilever 
interim 
leaps 30% 

By Alison Eadie 

Unilever, the .Anglo- Dutch 
foods and consumer products 
conglomerate, yesterday pro- 
duced buoyant third quarter 
results and announced a 30 
per cent rise in the interim 
dividend to I4.99p. The 
shares soared to new highs at 
£20.13 at midday. 

Pretax profits rose 22.5 per 
cent to £299 million on turn- 
over 4.2 per cent lower at £3.9 
billion. The decrease in turn- 
over was due to past disposals 
and lower raw material prices, 
which contributed to lower 
selling prices. 

Attributable profits rose 28 
per cent and exchange rate 
gains added £13 million. 

Operating profits in Europe 
were 7.4 per cent higher at 
£159 million with all busi- 
nesses contributing to im- 
proved volumes and margins. 
Ice cream and edible fats were 
strong performers. 

North American profits 
rose to £37 million from £23 
million after strong volume 
growth. Difficult trading con- 
ditions in West Africa contrib- 
uted to the drop in profits 
from associated companies. 

Taxable profits at nine 
months are £812 million, 20 
per cent higher than at the 
same stage last year. 


market summary 


US: 

r-'Trs “ S8 “ 

"'■-S 


CURRENCY® 


n:-* ‘ z* 1 

s- £1 -353 

= avs.sseo 

l c. v ?r:.5S67 

£. ?F'6 55:0 
f: ye?: 162.1 5 

e MSOVili • 5 
z£~CC-'4QX! S3P £0-831131 


r T ■ Z~ t“ 

: F^pVsVrK 

f-rt-c ni.'O 

» --crli: S 

P ip,-' 


STOCK MARKETS 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

“s:lc°£ s «*>■• H+iSV 

nSSsm... -!7300.3* (-247.36) 
JSgJK? 2207.25 (+CA9J 

JSSSc^ 1 . :: 

cjSSSaNt .. . 2305.1 1-15.50) 

. . . . 3S05.-S3tsame| 

?££:*£ VMW** 

USSwo- 

London Closing prices Page 31 

Dieefr 

Bums Anderson jgP HJjjP} 

British Aerospace — gTp t+gpj 

Glanfield Lawr. # f+15p) 

Saga Hotetays -JSOp j+11P) 

Reed inL 289p t+1lp) 

Ctiris&es Int 3Mpj+1^) 

Equity & Law - 294p f+16pj 

Consolidated Gold _... 686p (+24pj 
Keliock Trust 253p (+35p) 

458p(-12p) 

interest rates 

Victoria Carpets 

Longer 
[v , IT 

S’ -rv:.r 
S-rrj-.: 

2 5C - U-- •• • .««« 

;,je: ■«.*:!> 

5X::::SS 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

SSiSfflBSB®"*- 

2flS.CS ) 


north sea oil 

Brer. t (Sec-) pmSl4.60SW (S14.80) 
Muncies latest trading priee 


Britannia Arrow pays £47m 
for American 


Britannia Arrow yesterday 
joined the ranks of London’s 
biggest independent invest- 
ment managers with a £47.3 
million purchase in foe United 
States. 

It has agreed to rake a 45 
per cent profit participation In 
Invesco, an Atlanta-based 
fund management group, and 
at the same time is buying 
Gemini, a broker-dealer. . 

Jnvesco and Gemini are 
growing fast. Since 1979, 
funds under management have 
grown tenfold and at present 
stand at more than $6.6 bOh on 
(£4.6 billion). 

In the nine months to 
September 30, Invesco and 
Gemini produced income be- 
fore tax of £11 million. 

The move gives Britannia an 
opportunity to develop in foe 
field of US pension fund 
management, which is a 
significant part of Invesco ’s 
business. 

’‘Invesco has a large number 


By John Bell, City Editor 

of US company clients and we 
hope that we might be able to 
market some of our inter- 
national products within the 
group," said Britannia’s Mr 
David Stevens yesterday. 

On completion of foe deal, 
funds under management 
within the Britannia group and 
the Invesco partnership will be 
about £15 billion. a similar 
order to those of leading 
Investment banks such as SC 
Warburg or Morgan Grenfell. 

Mr Stevens has been talk- 
ing informally to Invesco since 
last year. "We like the people 
and because they have a 55 per 
cent share in foe partnership, 
they hare every incentive to 
keep the business growing," 
he said. 

Analysts said that foe 
Invesco deal was not expensive 
in terms of price relative to 
foods under management and 
that there would be a positive 
initial benefit in terms of group 


earnings per share of perhaps 
10 to 15 per cent. 

Britannia is funding foe 
purchases through a sale of 
34.6 million new shares to 
.Morgan Grenfell at I40p a 
share with a clawback 
arrangement for existing Brit- 
annia shareholders who can 
also purchase at 140p. 

The balance of any stock not 
taken ap by existing share- 
holders will ' be bought by 
investment clients of Morgan 
Grenfell, Cazenove, and Rowe 
and Pitman. 

Mr Robert Maxwell’s Perg- 
aroou group, which holds 17 
per cent of Britannia's shares, 
will take up the whale of its 
entitlement. 

Britannia's prospects for the 
rest of foe year remain good, 
the group said yesterday, and 
the board expects to be able to 
recommend a dividend of at 
least foe 1985 level, of 4.2p a 
share, for this year. 


Maxwell’s options open 


By Alison Eadie 
Mr Robert Maxwell, wbo further 
bad been backing Norton 
Opax in its takeover battle for 
security printers 

McCorquodale, before a 
higher management buyout 
offer, bas taken foe unusual 
step of writing to 
McCorquodale shareholders. 

He explains in his letter that 
he would be "free to take what 
action seems best in regard to 
any shares over and above foe 
19.1 per cent necessarily 
pledged to Norton Opax". 

Mr Maxwell revealed yes- 
terday that he had bought a 


parcel of shares at 
31 Ip. Ip above the cash offer 
from the McCorquodale 
management buyout team. 
His total holding is now 21.4 
per cent and be intends to 
continue buying, he said. 

Norton Opax shares slipped 
5p yesterday to close at I33p 
valuing its paper offer at 
310. 3p for each 
McCorquodale share. Its cash 
offer is 303. 3p per share. 

Mr Maxwell pledged his 
19.1 per cent stake to Norton 
Opax, before the buyout team 
raised its offer to 31 Op. 


half- 


Sainsbury 
f-time 
profits 
soar 34% 

By Alexandra Jackson 

J Sainsbury comfortably 
beat the most optimistic City 
forecasts yesterday when it 
reported pretax profits up 34 
per cent to £123.5 million for 
the six months to the begin- 
ning of October . The figures 
made it the company's stron- 
gest firs! half for five years. 

Retail margins widened 
from 4.7 per cent to 5.5 per 
cent on turnover up from 
£1.83 billion to £2.1 billion. 
An interim dividend of 2-lp 
was declared, representing a 
24 per cent increase on the 
previous year. 

Most analysts were estimat- 
ing half-year profits of about 
£112 million, with highest 
expectations at £120 million. 
Although the Christinas pe- 
riod has started slowly, an- 
alysts are now increasing their 
fail-year forecasts to more 
than £240 million compared 
with £192.7 million in 1983- 
86 . 

Fust-half trading conditions 
were buoyant despite low 
inflation. Productivity in- 
creased by 5 per cent helped 
by economies of scale in larger 
stores and the benefits of store 
computerization and check- 
out scanning. 

Price inflation accounted 
for less than 3 per cent of foe 
14 per cent improvement in 
group sales. A similar percent- 
age increase was gained from 
existing stores. However, the 
contribution from units which 
were not open for all or pan of 
foe comparable period last 
year accounted for 8 percent- 
age points of sales growth. 

J Sainsbury now operates 
267 supermarkets of at least 
4,000 sq ft. The geographical 
bias is towards the South and 
Midlands although Yorkshire 
is growing in importance. The 
average store size is 17,000 sq 
ft but all new stores are 
approaching 30,000 sq fL 
Sainsbury has 15 smaller 
stores and freezer centres. 
Eight new supermarkets will 
have been opened by the end 
of the year. 

Homebase. the DIY sup- 
erstore. opened one new outlet 
in the first half and plans to 
open four more in the second 
half making a total of 33. The 
opening programme is to be 
stepped up to 10 new stores a 
year from foe beginning of the 
next financial year. 

Profits from Homebase in 
the half year rose by 31 per 
cent to £2. 1 million on turn- 
over up 27 per cent to £61.9 
million. 

Sainsbury operates six 
Savacentre ’hypermarkets in 
partnership with BHS. The 
benefit of the creation of 
Storehouse after foe merger of 
Habitat Mothereare and Brit- 
ish Home Stores is still to be 
fell. 

J Sainsbury’s 28.5 per cent- 
owned US associate Shaw's 
added 12 per cent to its sales 
area. Pretax profits grew by 5 
per cent to Si 5.9 million 
(£10.81 million). 

Tempos, page 28 


J ° hn £¥ r <: ofe 
Elusive ^ 



Wouldn't it bo marvellous if yuu could choose how much you 
pay each month in mortgage repayment? 

It is possible. .loiin Char-col's new flexible mortgage is quite 
unique. 

ft combines the advantages of a fixed interest floating 
interest mortgage with the possibility of reducing the monthly 
payment without prior notice. 

Unlike other mortgages, which cither have a fixed interest 
rate or one that floats up aud down depending on the market, our 
new mortgage gives you a choice. 

You may opt for a floating rate and then change your mortgpjae 
to a fixed rate at a month's notice. More interesting, you may opt 
to defer up to 30*J« of the payments whenever you wish. 

This means you can choose to pay less if the interest rate rises. 
Or if your other commitments rise. 

If your other expenses come down, or your income climbs 
temporarily, you may opt to pay more. 

Our new mortgage is available to everyone who is looking to 
borrow between £15.001 and £250,000. up ro 3.5 times a single 
income. 

It is available to purchase properties up to 100% of their 
value, although sums up to 70% can be borrowed without a status 
enquiry. 

In short, if your income is flexible, if your outgoings are 
flexible, if you just don't know enough about your future earnings, 
or own if you just don't want to be tied down to a fixed luunthly 
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Telephone us on 01-589 70SO for our brochure or to make 
an appointment. 



IWJtXlJENT Mi *KTI IV it: ItKi WFJtS 
Mercury Hi ui.su. 1 93 Knightsbriilii^ London S\Y7 lKE.TH:»l -5h 1 i7»NO. 


29 _ 


m/ 

•ficiencyj 

which 
ex, iflsc-l 
nd rose] 
jwfo in 
/as an 
l Turn-! 
of the! 
from 7 
■at and 
emum. 
Jgles 25 , 
where 

d mil- 

10 mil - 1 
sxpen - 1 
kedto, 
tidine 
which 
it rioti 
is are! 

f this 
stages 
areas 
nt es- 
AZT 
f £70 




24 


WALL STREET 


u 


Shares make headway 
at start of trading 


Wail Street 
headway in moderate early 
trading yesterday, supported 
by continued speculation 
about companies involved in 
takeovers and l ehUuct ui ing. 

Airtiiies, however, came 
trader setting pressure after 
talk abort renewed fire wars. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was 1-27 at 
1,893.56. Advancing issues 
were atom even with declining 
issues, mi a vofmne of 23 
minion shares. 


Meanwhile, the transports* 
lion average was down 7 to 
837.63 and atilities were up 
0.64 at 210311. Stocks were 
down 1.13 to 746.96. 

The Standards & Poor's 100 
index was op 036 to 23125, 
while the composite figure was 
ahead 0J9 at 24652. 

UAL fell iy« to 57% and EF 
Hutton fell 1 to 45. Scfahnn- 
berger was down % to 33. 

Mobil, at 38 Vi, was op 14, 
with Bora- Warner op J /t at 

41 >/«. 


Nor 

10 


Nov 

7 


AMR 

59* 

50% 

ASA 

38% 

38% 

ABM Stentf 

41% 

41% 

AfflodSlrB 

86% 

68% 

AttCfthus 

3% 

3 

’ Alcoa 

35% 

36 

Amaxlnc 

13 

12% 

' AnVrdaHs 

2% 

24% 

Am Brands 

46% 

48% 

Am Can 

sms 

87% 

AmCwwi'd 

ArnSrwr 

80% 

2S% 

79% 

20% 

Am Express 

58% 

58% 

Am Hams 

78% 

78% 

Am Maws 

3% 

3% 

' AmSfnrd 

41% 

41% 

Am Teton 

25% 

25% 

Amoco 

«% 

67% 

. Ammo Steal 

S% 

5% 

. Aswco 

16% 

16 

Ashland 08 

66% 

56% 

AfRfchfleid 

57% 

58 

. Avon Prods 

30% 

31% 

. BtosTWNY 

43% 

44% 

Bankamer 

15% 

15% 

. Be of Baton 

42 

42 

. Bank of NY 

39% 

39% 

, Setfi Steal 

5% 

5% 

Boeing 

f*te</4BrT*Y 

52% 

61 % 

52% 

61 

. Briton 

50% 

50% 

. Bo Warner 
Bnst Myers 

41 

38 

77 

78% 


40% 

38% 

BurftmM 

38% 

38% 

BurVtonNtn 

81% 

62% 

Bwrougfta 
■ QnpbSlSp 

78 

02% 

78 

61% 

CanPacMc 

11% 

11% 

- Canrpflter 

38% 

39% 

- Cetenese 

241% 

241% 

- Central SW 

34% 

34% 

Champion 

31% 

32 

■ Chan Man 

35 

as 


ChnQkNY 

Chevron 

Ctnyator 



DawShera 

Dresser In) 
Duke Power 
Du Port 
Eastern Ai 
Estm Kodak 


Eaton Com 
sons 


Emerson I 
Exxon Corp 
FodDptSts 


44% 

44% 

38% 

51% 

20 % 

36% 

40% 

184% 

42% 

31% 

32% 

47% 

33% 

15% 

25% 

55% 

81 

33% 

52% 

57% 

24 

50% 

17% 

102 % 

44% 

57% 

18% 

47% 

88 

9% 

62% 

76 

84% 

89 

93% 


Nov 

10 


NOV 

7 


Fat Chicago 


FMMfocp 
imC 


FstPmnl 
fort} 
FTWadna 
OAF Corp 

GTE Carp 
Gan Corp 
GenT 
Ganl_. 

Gen hat 
Gen MBs 
Gen Motors 
GnPbUtny 


27% 

31% 

52% 

9% 

57 

90% 

41 

63% 

81% 

72% 

78% 

18% 

43% 

72% 

23% 

3% 


Georgia Pee 39 


GooAkSi 

Goodyear 

GouidkK 


GtAQ&Toc 
Grind 
GnmnOor 
Gtf&MfeSt 
Heinz HJ. 
Herein 
HfoO-Pkrd 
Konevmi 
ICtfttB 
tagenofl 
Wand Steel 
IBM 
INCO 


54 

44% 

47% 

19% 

56% 

23% 


27% 

31% 

52% 

9% 

56% 

37% 

42 

63% 

81 

72% 

78 

18% 

89% 

72% 

23% 

3% 

39% 

64 

46% 

48 

19% 


25% 

65% 

43% 

56% 

41% 

74 


33% 

28 

65% 

43 


MPaper 

Terfil 


MTt 
taring Bank 
Jhnen&an 
Kaiser Alum 
Kbit McGee 
Cfcfc 


59% 

19% 

123% 

13% 

73% 

54% 

49 


KmbTyl 

KMeit 
Kroger 
LTVTCorp 


Lkton 
Lockheed 


Lucky Svs 
Man fewer 


ManvSeCp 
Mnco 
Marine MU 
Mr? Marietta 
Masco 


McDonrwa 


MhsteMng 
MOM OS 


Morgan -LP. 
Motorola 
NCR Corp 
NLkKMr* 
Natnedm 
Net Med Hw 
NetSmcndt 
NorfoASJh 
NWBamp 
GtcUrtFW 
Ogden 
OtnCorv 
Owe ns a 
PscGasB 
Pan Am 
Penney XC. 
Ponnzoa 
Pepteeo- 


17% 

30 

60 

52% 

33% 

2 

80% 

46% 

34% 

44% 

2% 

56% 

48% 

39 

27% 

64% 

79% 

58% 

107 

111 % 

38% 

78 

84% 


41% 

72% 

25% 

57% 

20 % 

121 % 

12 % 

73% 

53% 

48% 

89% 

17% 

29% 

81 

51% 

34% 

2 

61% 

45% 

34% 

44% 

2 % 

57 

49 


47% 

4% 

47% 

25% 

10 % 

94% 


28% 

64% 

60% 

59% 

107% 

109% 

38% 

78% 

83% 

97% 

47% 

4% 

47% 

25% 

10% 

84% 


46% 

43% 


24% 

6 

82% 

74% 


28 

48% 

43% 

43% 

24% 

6 

82% 

75% 


• Ei ft. ■ aiMcEk MMU. k M. I MM 


dsjea 


to 


NOV 

7 


Pftw 

PtwipsOga 

PNftoPet 

rOHIWJ 

PPG mu 
PrctrGnOi 
POSE&Q 
Raytheon 
ftyntds Met 
Rockwellnt 
Dutch 


62 

21 % 

71% 

10 % 


SFESopec 
SchTborger 
Scott Paper 
Ceewatn 
SeereRbck 
She! Treat 


63% 

75% 

42% 

64% 

47% 

41% 

89% 

61 

70% 


fSr&MEa 

S*WetnBe8 
SUO« Ohio 

Sun Comp 
Tatodyne 
■Rjreoco 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas Inst 
Texas UWs 
Textron 
Travlra Cor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 


62% 
21 % 
70% 
10 % 
69% 
70% 
76 
42% 
64% 
47% 
41% 
88 % 
61 
71% 
33% 
33% 
63% 
63% 
43% 
54% 
40% 
88 % 
20 % 20 % 
35% 35% 
106% 108% 
49* 48% 

48% 47% 
3B% 36% 
56% 55% 
329% 330 
39% 40 
38% 36% 

30% 32% 

117% 116% 
34% 34% 

62% 62% 
43% 43% 
92% 91% 

59% 59% 


33% 

64% 

63% 

43% 

5«% 

40% 


Unlever NV 2tS% 215 
Un Carbide 23% 23% 
UnPacCor 61% 62% 
UW Brands 33% 32% 
USGCtxp 37% 39 
UUTedvml 45% 45% 

USX Corp 23% 23% 
Unocal 25% 24* 

Jkn Walter 48% 50% 
Writer LmM 56% 57 

WWsFWw 109 108% 

VJWWH 57% 58 

38% 38% 
73% 73% 
44% 44% 
Xerox corp 58% 57% 
Zenith 21% 21% 


CANADIAN PRICES 


MgarneSal 

CanPacMc 

Ccminco 

ConBsthrst 

rta/SWCen 

HdSnBMU 


OR 


29% 
87% 
20 % 
28% 

VBKvCcrp 2.60 230 
, WCT 12% 13 

I Waste 30%_ 30%. 
SKkMeiTHM.vteqwhd. 


Co 

WmanN'A’ 


28 

43 

13 

16% 

13% 

28* 

28 

24% 

33% 

47% 

38% 

29% 

88 

19% 

28% 

2.60 

12 % 


27% 


13% 

16% 

13% 

29 

28 

24% 

33% 

47% 


Lloyd’s 
acts again 
on Brooks 
and Dooley 


By Alison Eadie 

Three members of Lloyd’s 
insurance market have been 
censured for their part in the 
Brooks and Dooley aflair, in 
which reinsurances from 
B &D syndicates were placed 
with offshore companies con- 
trolled by B & D directors. 

Mr John Raymond Parry 
and Mr Frederick Charles 
Raven, of Lloyd's underwrit- 
ing agency Beflew Pany and 
Raven, which placed the 

reinsurances on behalf of the 

B & D syndicates, were found 
guilty of foiling to obtain 
market or arm’s length terms 
for the business done. 

The Lloyd’s disciplinary 
committee found thin the 
terms were “‘unduly dis- 
advantageous” to the syn-, 
di cates and that Mr Parry and 
Mr Raven were aware of this. 
Mr Bryan Cyril Beers, a 
director of B & D, was found 
to be in breach of his duties as 
a director. 

Mr Raymond Brooks was 
expelled from Lloyd’s two 
years ago for his part in die 
affair and Mr Terence Dooley 
was suspended for 21 months. 
Related party reinsurances, of 
which they were found guilty, 
have since been banned by 
Lloyd’s 

Disciplinary action is 
derstood to be in 
against Mr Arthur 
Beliew, Mr Parry and Mr 
Raven over allegations of 
related party reinsurances 
from their own syndicates to 
offshore companies they con- 
trolled. The action follows a 
Lloyd’s inquiry into Beliew, 
Pany and Raven under Sir 
Edward Singleton, a former 
chairman of foe Law Society. 

The council of Lloyd’s also 
announced that aviation syn- 
dicate 859, owned by J H 
Minet, will now be managed 
by All A3, the agency respon- 
sible for dosing down foe 
lossmaking PCW syndicates. 

Mr Brandon Gough, senior 
partner of Coopers & Ly- 
brand, the accountant, is 
standing down as a nominated 
member of foe council after 
four years’ service. Mr Alan 
Hardcastk, a partner at Peat 
Marwick Mitchell, the 
accountant, will take his place. 


un- 


Japan trade surplus against 
US reaches record $5bn 


.Tokyo (Reuter) — Japan 
marked up another record 
trade surplus against the 
United States last month, 
ensuring friction with its big- 
gest trading partner will 
continue. 

The Japanese Government 
said its trade surplus with the 
United States in October was 
$5 billion (£3.42 billion). The 
previous high was $4.83 tril- 
lion in September. 

The figures are likely to 
disappoint American officials 
who had agreed about two 
weeks ago to end calls for foe 
yen’s appreciation against the 
dollar to help improve the 
trade imbalance. 

Japan also posted an overall 
surplus of $7.81 billion with 
all its trading partners for 
October, not for below foe 


record $8.95 trillion surplus in 
September, 

But economists say a turn- 
ing point may be near. “Octo- 
ber could be foe last month 
before foe turnaround,*’ one 
said. 

The October trade figures 
were high mainly because of 
price increases for Japanese 
merchandise shipped abroad, 
said Mr Takashi Kiucfai at foe 
Long-Term Credit Bank of 
Japan. 

Japanese manufacturers, 
who had prospered from the 
weak yen before its recent 
singe, had bear reluctant to 
raise prices of their goods for 
fear of losing market share. 

“But they could not bold 
bade any longer and have 
started raising prices,” Mr 
Kitichi said. 


An informal, survey of his 
bank's clients in August and 
September indicated that only 
half bad increased prices. 
“Now they find themselves 
losing money and have tittle 
other choice,” he said. 

While the higher prices for 
goods helped lift the value of 
Japan’s overall exports, the 
volume of merchandise de- 
clined, Mr Haruo Muto at foe 
Rank of Tokyo said. 

“In volume terms, exports 
were actually down 1.2 per 
cent from September.” 

But he cautioned that al- 
though price increases had a 
trig impact on Japan’s trade 

figures with the United States, , 
the volume of exports was still - 
relatively high. 

Cars, computers, precision 
machinery and chemicals 


were an up in quantity, help- 
ing increase foe value of 
exports to foe United States to 
a record $7.50 billion for 
October. That was up 24 2 per 
cent from the same month last 
year. 

Imports from foe United 
States; however, rose only 6 
per cent to $2.50 trillion. 

Japan’s overall exports to 
-all its trading partners were up 
19.4 percent to$J9J4 baboo, 
while imports fell 3 per cent to 
$11.33 bfition. 

Exports to the European 
Economic Community rose 
43.7 per cent to $2.79 billion 
as imports singed 12L6 per 
cent to a record S 1.81 billion. 
That left a trade surplus of 
$985 million with the EEC in 
October, about half foe figure 
in September. 


Volkswagen down 13% 
after fall in dollar 


Wolfsburg (Reuter) — Volk- 
swagen, West Germany’s lead- 
ing car maker, has reported a 
13 per cent fall in profits for 
foe Gist nine months of this 
year. It said the lower dollar 
was partly responsible. 

The company's worldwide 
net profit fell to DM369 
million (£127 million) com- 
pared with DM424 milli on in 
foe same period last year. 

Analysts forecast that 
Volkswagen's results for the 
whole ofthis year will fell and 
some expect further declines 
next year. 

, Last year, the car maker's 
results were boosted by the 
surging dollar and profits 


cent to DM596 million. 

Its shares dropped on the 
latest results and analysts said 
they highlighted VW’s prob- 
lems in the United States car 
market 

An analyst in Frankfort said 
West German producers of 
luxury cars such as Daimler- 
Benz, BMW and Porsche 
coukl raise prices in foe US to 
compensate for the lower dol- 
lar and still lift sales, but 
Volkswagen was competing 
against hundreds of other 
companies in foe small car 


soared by more than 100 per 


Volkswagen said its sales in 
the United States fell 23 per 
cent to 251, 102 vehicles in the 
first nine months. 


• EQUmCORP TASMAN 
INTO) 


RRNATIONAL: The 
company has agreed to seQ its 
holding in ACT International 
and has made arrangements for 
the disposal of its shareholding 
in foe Broken Hill Proprietary. 
• COSALT: Results for 52 
weeks to August 31 (figures in 
£000). Final dividend 2J25p 
making 3.Sp, payable on Janu- 
ary 21. Turnover 49,398 
(41392) inducting exports 5,429 
(5,855), operating profit 2,038 
(1.S92), pretax profit 1,077 
(1,047), eps normal basis &2lp 
(8.62p). 


In 


-AvuJK^v tfeo^r Of- 


puofitS 







8ASKARD0L 

Chairman, i. Bibby & Sons pt£ 


For the eleventh succe ssive year Bib by reports record 
pre-tax profits, up 213% to Q78 million ) 

Turnover has passed the £¥2 billion mark for the first 
time, while dividends, earnings per share and net asset 
value per share have all advanced strongly. 

Since 1985 Bibby has successfully diversified into 
distribution and packaging services, with both groups 
already making significant contributions to our results. 

At the same time a number of smaller companies 
were sold, reflecting a refocussing of Bibby*s activities. 

Bibb/s financial structure remains extremely strong 
with the debt/equity ratio falling by a third (hiring the year. 

With our low gearing profile and extensive finance 
facilities in place, Bitoy is well set to embark on an 


expansionary phase. 


For a copy of the latest Annual Report please write to 
the Company Secretary at the address below. 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 

FOR YEAR ENDED 28th SEPTEMBER 1986 


1986 

IS 8 5 

Turnover 

UP 14.1% 

£502.6m 

£440.5m 

Pre-tax 

profits 

S$P2L3%) 

(|37JBjjl) 

£31.2m 

Earnings 
per share 

UP 17.4% 

2L0p 

17.9p 

Dividends 
(total for year) 

UP 23.7% 

8.25p 

6.67p* . 

Net asset 
value pa- share 

UP 10.5% 

105p 

95p 

it 

DOWN^rd 

242% 

36.4% 


*As adjusted for equivalert period. 


AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY ♦ DISTRIBUTION ♦ PACKAGING 


WHERE IT ALL COMES TOGETHER 

J. Bibby & Sons Pic. 16 Stratford Place, London WIN 9AF. 




World platinum market 
‘moving near to balance 9 


By Richard Lander 

The supply deficit in the The review says^Uader re- 
‘ " newed speculative pressures, 
well rebound 


world platinum market could 
shrink to just 10,000 ounces 
this year because of static 
demand and higher shipments 
from South Africa and foe 
Soviet Union, according to a 
study released by Johnson 
Matfoey. 

The market was last in this 
state of equilibrium in 1983. 

The refining firm’s interim 
review of foe 1986 market 
suggests platinum prices util 
remain unsettled after dou- 
bling so ftr this year to touch 
$670 an ounce in September 
on speculative interest and 
fears of reduced supplies from 
South Africa. 


prices might 
again but equally prove in- 
capable of holding higher 
levels far long in such a 
nervous and unpredictable 
climate.’' Platinum traded at 
around $550 in London 
yesterday. 

Johnson Matfoey put foe 
mid point of its 1986 supply 
projections at 2.81 million 
ounces, up from 274 million 
last year and the highest level 
since 1980. 

Western demand is pro- 
at 2.82 million ounces. 


Goldsmiths 
losses down 
at half-time 

By Lawrence Lever 


The Goldsmiths Group, foe 
bold, jewellery and insurance 
group, yesteniav announced a 
smafidrop in pretax losses in 
its halPyear results. 

Losses for foe six months to 
June 31 were £267,000 as 
opposed to £298,000 in foe 
corresponding period Iasi 
year. Turnover was down 
from £21.4 million to £16.56 
million, largely due to foe sale 
of the company’s betting di- 
vision last year. 

The benefits of Goldsmiths 
expenditure on modernizing 
and expanding its Jewellery* 
brandies are being felt: foe 
jewellery division made pre- 
tax profits of £391.000 com- 
pared with a loss of £50.000 at 
the half-way stage last year. 

Mr Jurek Piasedd, chair- 
man of Goldsmiths, said yes- 
terday: “Our gross margins on 
the jewellery ride have un- 
wed 2 per cent while our 


proved 2 pe 

like-for-like sales, that is 


y up on last year. 


comparing foe results of the 
same brandies, are up by 
more than 10 per cent” 

The trading result for foe 
overall group in foe first half 
showed a profit of £51.000, 
offset by interest charges of 
£318,000. 

The group's borrowings 
stand at£17 million, reflecting 
a large intake of jewellery 
stock in anticipation of foe 
Christmas demand and £7 
milli on worth of borrowings 
for foe recent purchase of 
Prince of Wales Hotels. 

Mr Piasedd said that “the 
major impact” of foe com- 
pany’s strat^y would be felt 
in foe 1987/88 financial year. 
The company is declaring 
an increased interim divi- 
dend, is anticipation of future 
results, of 25p (2-Op). 


COMPANY NEWS 


• BRYANT HOLDINGS; 
connection with 20,003,783 1 
ordinary shares is Bryant’s 
rights issue, accept an ces have 
been received in respect of 
1 7,997,232 shares (90 per cent of 
the issue). The 2,006^51 new 
shares not taken up have been 
sold at 107peach. 

• LADBROKE GROUP: The 
retail property development di- 
vision of Ladbroke has woo the 
tender to purchase two prime 
freehold sites in Preston and 
Blackpool owned by United 
Newspapers for a total of £13 
million. 



• HILLS DOWN HOLD- 

INGS: Applications from 
shareholders for 31,381,814 new 
ordinary shares (763 per cent) last year's total. Turnover in 
have beat received. The balance electronics rose more than 30 
has been placed with the - per cent.AU three group trading 
institutions. ■ divisions are profitable and 

• GOLDSMITHS GROUP: **ead of ’ n,e group is 


Six months to August 31. In- 
terim dividend 25p (2p), pay- 
ir 12. Figur 


opportunities 


able on January 12. Figures in 
£000. Group turnover — 
jewellery 8,730 (7,606), betting 
nfl (7,966), insurance 5,878 
(5,833), hotels 1356 (nil). 


central costs 48 (117), interest 
charge 318 (70). Loss before tax 
267 (298 loss), loss per share 
2.78p (3_12p). 

• STEWART NAIRN 
GROUP; Year to June 30 
in £000). Turnover 


1 (2,873), loss before tax 371 
fit 933), loss j 


i for the year 657 
(profit 462). loss per share — 
basic 0.78p (eps 0-56p), fully 
diluted 0.55p (eps 0.45p). Net 
asset value — basic 12.91P 
(13.66p) and folly diluted 
11-lOp (11.69pX 

• ARMOUR TRUST: The 
chairman said at the annual 


flamming 

for expansion. 

• MOORGATE MER- 
CANTILE HOLDINGS: Six 
months to September. 30. In- 
terim dividend 0.65p (04p), 
payable on March 9. Figures in 
£000. Turnover 16,907 (13£23X 
pretax profit 851 (431), tax 298 
(172), profit attributable 553 
(259), eps 2.l3p (l.lp). 

• GERMAN SMALLER 
COMPANIES: The unaudited 
undiluted net asset value of 
GSC investment trusts at Octo- 
ber 31«as 187.3p. 

• TIGER • OATS: Year to 
September 30. Figures in mfl - 

Hnal 165 


lion rands. 


cents 


making 270 coils (230 cents), 
m»U 


£108,638 (£124,643), operating 
loss £41,390 (£4,043 profit), 
interest receivable and similar 
income £17.312 (£57,522). in- 
terest payable nil (£146), loss 
before tax £24.078 (£16.419). 
retain ed loss £24,078 (£16,419 
profit). 

• NZ3 CORPORATION: 

Half year to September 30. 
Interim dividend 4 cents (3.75 
cents). Dividned scrip option. 
Figures in NZ5000. Turnover 
951311 or £3423 million 
(594330). profit aftertax 56333 
(38373X profit before extraor- 
dinary items 57,968 (39,411). 
The company expects the results 
for the fuO 
satisfactory. 

• J BIBBY A SONS: Year to 
September 1 986. Final dividend 
5.5p making 8-2Sp, payable on 
January 14. Figures in £000. 
Saks 502335 (440.530). pretax 
profit 37,828 (31,178). eps 
21.01p(1739p). 


year to be 


turnover 35133 or £9363 
lion (2795.0), operating profit 
188.7 (157.4), profit before tax 
200.1 (1693), eps 775cents(693 
cents). 

• BRYSON OIL AND GAS: 
Sx months June 30. Turnover 


More company news 
Is on page 28 



THE DE LA RUE COMPANY p.Lc. 


Chairman’s Statement 


Trading 

Profits ror the half year to 30 September 1986, showing an increase of just 
under 10% to £18 million, are very much in line with the Board’s 


expectations. Crosfield Electronics has fully maintained its progress, but 
exchange rates have been unfavourable and, on the Security side, an 
effective devaluation of the Nigerian currency and a lack of invoiced sales 
at De La Rue Printrak have had an adverse impact. The latter situation 
should correct itself in view of the suhstantiaFsaies programmed for the 
second half. The Board remains confident of a satisfactory result for the 
Group as a whole. 

Dividend 



ear 

end 


1 paid last year, adjusted for the Capitalisation issue ; 

August 1986. The total cost of the dividend, which Is payable on an 
expanded capital base following the Rights Issue in June 1986, will 
therefore be £3.79 million (1985/86: £3.14 million). The interim dividend 
will be paid on 5 January 19 87 to Ordinary shareholders registered on 
4 December 1986. 

Sir Arth lit Norman KBE, DFC. Chairman 

De La RUe House 


3/5 Burlington Gardens 
ion Wl. 


London W1A 1DL 


11 November 1986 


INTERIM RESULTS 



HALF YEAR TO 

YEAR TO 


30 SEPTEMBER 

33 MARCH 


1386 

1985 

1986 


£•000 

£TO0 

TOGO 

Turnover. 




. Security 

Crosfield Electronics 

105*192 

75,266 

81,049 

52,041 

182,205 
■ 127,647 


180,458 

133,090 ' 

309,852 

Profit before tax 

17,953 

16,405 

49,359 

Profit after tax 

12,484 

12,162 

33,642 

Earnings per. Ordi nary share 

9.1p 

9.9p 

27.5p 




_ A copy o/tiw/ullannuuncemenfismni/oWe/rom tiie Secmtom 

The De La Rue Company p.L&. De La Rue House. 3/5 Burlington Gartens. London WlAlDL 
Thp half v«m’ fi 






■It* 


»![y 


... . taY-- 






* 3 


■ --V ' 


' Vi 



* . •• 


i 


:% f ? s\: 

1 i » *• 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY N< 

STOCK MARKET REPORT 


IER 12 19S6 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


Ranks Hovis soars on fresh 
stake build-up speculation 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


Shares of Ranks Hons 
McDottgall (RHM), the 
Mothers Pride and Mr Kipling 
Cakes food group, jumped 6p 
to 269p yesterday, just Ip 
short of its year’s high, on 
speculation that another 
antipodean corporate raider 
was building a stake in the 
company. 

In August Goodman Fiel- 
der, Australia's biggest food 
manufacturer, paid £107 mil- 
lion for S&W BerisfonTs 
crucial 14.6 per cent stake in 
RHM. Dealers in London 
were confident that a full bid 
would follow from Goodman. 
Goodman was formed earlier 
this year with a three-way 
merger between two Austra- 
lian companies. Fielder, Gill- 
espie Davis and Allied Mills, 

• First dealings in Lloyds 
Chemists, tbe Midlands chain 
of retail chemists, start to- 
day, and should go Co a 

“strong premium” accord- 
fag to Scrimgeour Vickers. At 
the I05p placing price, It Is 
on a prospective p/e of 15.2 
and should be more like 18 
according to analyst, Mr Dan 


million. Dealers have reported 
heavy turnover of the shares 
over the past few weeks. 

A spokesman for RHM said 
there was no evidence, so far, 
of a build up on the share 
register, hut the company was 
watching events closely. 
“We’re aware there is aoertam 
amount of activity in the 
shares,” be said. 

The names Mr Robert 
Holmes A Court ofBell Group, 
Mr Ron Briertey of IEP and 
Chase Corporation, New 
Zealand's ihird-largest quoted 
company, are being 
mentioned. 

Inflation worries stemming 
from the Chancellor’s in- 
creased public expenditure 
plans, knocked up to £’A off 
gilt-edged stocks, and had a 
knock-on effect on equities. 

The FT 30 index, was be- 
tween three and five points 
down all day, and closed 1.6 
points lower at 1,311.7. The 
FT-SE 100 index managed to 
close 4.7 higher at 1660.9. 

Among leaders ICI eased 3p 
to I064p, Thom EMI, 5p to 
4£7p, BTR, 6p to 290p, 
Hawker Sidddey Group, 6p to 
429p and Vickers was down 



JOHN J LEES 
CONTINUES 
TO HIT 

NEW HEIGHTS 


T-.J S 

80 Jan Fab Mar Apr Titey Jun JuJ Aug Sap Oct Nov 


and Goodman Group, a New 
Zealand company. The 
merger received considerable 
backing from Mr John Ell- 
iott’s Elders DCL 
• ■ Now it looks, as though 
someone else has been build- 
ing a sizable holding in RHM. 
That body may own a near S 
per cent stake worth about £35 


slightly to 396p. Glaxo gained 
Sp to ?2Sp, Allied Lyons was 
up 6p to 31 9p and Grand Met, 
3p to 441p. Reed Inter- 
national, the publisher, 
jumped 13p to 291p after a 
lunch at rhaa» Manhattan 
Securities. 

Lucas Industries lost ISp to 
455p, while Armstrong Equip- 
ment, where Lucas is men- 
tioned as a possible bidder, 
jumped ISp to 13Sp. 


L MesseL, the stockbroker 
now owned by Shearson Leh- 
man American Express, has 
picked up a portfolio of lead- 
ing shares from a big British 
institution in a £30 million 
deaL 

The package of shares coxn- 

O Dealings begin later to- 
day on tbe London stock mar- 
ket in shares of News 
Corporation, the parent cora- 
pauy of News Inter- 

which owns Tbe 
Times , The Sunday Times, 

The Sun and Alow of the 
fVortd. The shares are al- . 
ready quoted in Sydney, and 
In New York, where they 
enjoy an ADR facility. 
Otzenove and Morgan 
Grenfell Securities are 
sponsoring the introduce 
turn and the shares are ex- 
pected to start trading 
around the £15.70 leve L 

prises alpha and beta' stocks, 
but Messel refuses to identify 
them or the institution from 
which they came. 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.46pm 


IMS 

Wtfh Law Company 

363 283 ABKUjana 

174 12S ASDA-MR 

483 278 STB 

491 361 BAT 

572 448 Bvctsys 

840 880 B«ss 

460 3S6 Bewtani 

72B S2B Bft» CSrtte 

383 293 BOC 

288 170 Boats 

808 423 Br Aerospace - 

709 530 BrPMretaan 

280 177 b Br Tatocom 

183 93 Britofl 

354 250 Burton 

738 277 Cabto & IHMm 

196 158 Cadbury Sctwnppn 

338 259 Com Unto 

704 409 ConsGoMMda 

327 ’i 252 CourtauM* 

438 318 Dixons Grp 

650 408 Hsona 

954 781 QenAtxUm* ‘ 

228 158 OEC 
11<«750hGlB(O - 
456 328 Grand MW 
11'a72l GUS-’A 
954 720 ORE 
385 235 G(KN 
SS5 278 Gumnass 
215 141 Hanson 
623 403 Hawfcar SUdtoy 


men to YM tm tad 

BM OOar CWgm puts % P/e VOO 

318 321 44 134 "* 4J& 144.27 00 

164 168 4JS 2J 18.1 ®8 

287 282 • -6 94 34 203 Iff 

472 477 • -4 1M 39 124 3200 

473 480 -2 2B.1 5J 6S 338 

780 780 +15 21 J 2* t&f ®8 

435 440 -8 17-1 3a 182 1.100 

835 640 +2 BOLD 44 94 1400 

832 335 14.1 42 124 1200 

238 239 ■ 10.1 42 

492 497 +12 4M 47 1M 

683 806 +5 4&fi 7 j0 72 £6 

196 200 107 5L4 112 W 

186 167 . +2 83 M 44 2300 

288 282 . +2 • M 23 2QJ» 690 

303 310 +5 S3 22 T64 34» 

188 188 -1 ' « U BJ W 

200 283 * -2 172 82 6g» 

885 702 • +37 352 52 202 1200 

310 322 -2 92 22 102 294 

946 &0 +2 43 12 242 572 

570 575 • -8 24 12 252663 

B40 847 -3 »3 41 212 b «1 

178 180 +4 .8.1 S4 11.110200 

823 933 +8 202 - 22 tBA 880 

438 443 43 132 . 3.1 142 1200 

IDHlOfe * .. 302 22 142 *» 

788 795 • -7 422 54 232 « 

255 258 • +2 172 . 72 82 I#® 

343 348 -2 102 32 121 717 

20 215 -J 5 J 27 182 12W 

428 432 • -8. 214 52 94 867 


11%734 top Cham M 
583 335 . Jaguar 
391 312 Ladbrofcs 
348 276 Land Sacurtias 


288 133 
484 233 
283 183 
231 103 
509 417 
593 426 
576 428 
246 162 
942 716 
234 148 
900 60S 
5624345 
791 511 
987 782 
420 344 
1484102 
415 321 
970 653 

tear- 98' 


Legal 8 Gen 

Lloyds 

Lontao 

Marks 8 Spanc 
INand 
Nat waat 
PIODM 
Piasaoy 
Prudential 
Racal Elect 
Rack# Cotoan. 
Raiders 
RTZ ■ 

Royal im 
Sarabury (J) 
Sears 

Sedgwick Op 
Shaft. 

Sip- • • 


BM 

Offer 


DMM 

% 

P/E 


' KHz 10*i 


.. 

484 

44 

114 

428 

510 

515 


-6 

12.7 

2 5 

IDlB 

284 

373 

378 


-2 

148 

44 

174 

28Q 

342 

345 


+8 

144 

4.1 

234 

3400 

442 

247 

• 

-1 

124 

54 

314 

404 

415 

422 


-8 

254 

64 

8J 

657 

240 

242 


+1 

17.1 

7.1 

114 

363 

ir 195 

198 

• 

+3 

64 

24 

284 

3400 

570 

577 


+6 

37.1 

84 

214 

940 

510 

517 


-5 

274 

84 

54 

1400 

520 

533 


. +8 

254 

4.7 

154 

559 

186 

190 


.. 

74 

34 

134 

2400 


772 520 Sun ABanoe 
98 784TSBP/P 
420 2SS Teuco 
529 374 Hum EMI 
348 248 Trafalgar House 
209 139 Tnmthousa Fona 
204 murttowr 
289 218 UU Biscuto 


813 620 • 
174 178 
813 820 • 
540 545 
898 705 • 
808 815 • 
420 424 
134 1354 • 
383 388 
.948 -953 
15B 162 
075 682 
78 80 
400 405 
483 490 
288 291 
173 178 
20 U 20 4 
241 244 


see 4J 532 589 

42 24 18-8 2,100 

234 24 174 581 
54 in 41.1 378 

814 45 92 910 

384 44 084 319 

74 14 244 2,100 
54 37 174 2400 
17.1 4v7 174 285 

514 34 94 1,000 

2.1 14 144 2400 

Z74 4.1 61.1 87 

84 22 230 979 

254 31 354 544 

184 64 74 3400 

74 44 174 1.100 
552 2.7 1B7 80S 

134b 54 13.1 1400 


Collier case seen as shot across 
bows of would-be rule breakers 


The City showed predictably 
mixed reactions to the resigna- 
tion of Mr Geoffrey Collier, s 
director of Morgan Grenfell 
Securities, on Mms&n y. If 
there was any smprise, it was 
at tire severity of the sentence 
for what must hare been a first 
transgression of Morgan 
Grenfell’s house rules since 
BteBang. 

Bat everyone recognizes the 
necessity that setf-regulation 
must be seen to work, why -' 
ever measures that might 

imply- . 

Of dismay to outsiders was 
the complete lack of surprise 
that it had happened. It hardly 
matters whether yon call 
breaking the rales im example 
of traditional City en- 
trepreneurship or sheer greed. 

Tlte one thing cm which all 
in the City agree is that it Is 
bound to happen. That leaves 
only a lingering sense of 
surprise that it has happened 
when ami where it did. 

That is really the essence of 
Morgan Grenfell's sharp, and 
wholly laudable, reaction. 

That Mr. Colfier was caught 
appears to have been dne to 
lock and not the infallible 
workings of the merchant 
bank’s own compliance office. 

Yesterday's statement from 
Scrimgeour Vickers refereed 
to “certain dealings on behalf 
of a company". No one- yes- 
terday was being specific 
about what had reaOy been 
going on. But compliance offi- 
cers all over the City wore 
miring another look at then- 
boose rules governing per- 
sonal account dea lin g by 
employees. . . - ' 

Virtually every securities 
house in the City now malms it 
a house rale that personal 
account dealing should be 
done through its own books, so 


that it can check, on what its 
employees are up to. 

But if an employee does in 
feet deal through an outside 
broker, there is no way that 
any compliance officer w£U 
necessarily know. 

Miscreants can take the 
avoidance of detection even 
farther. As Mr Martin Harty, 
compliance officer for FhDBps 
& Drew, pots it “BT someone 
j fh through an trade with a 
different name using some 
other firm of brokers, you 
cannot reaOy stop tt" 

The second problem is that 
Mr CoOfer was hi a high 
position. He was _ partly 
responsible far setting up 
Morgan GrenfelTs securities 
operations and be was a 
director of MG Securities 
Holdings. Most oompfianoe 
officers insist that they cannot 
do their job rnthoat help from 


Mr Goim Confeen, compli- 
ance director for Barclays de 
Zoete Wedd, said: “We band 
oat a copy of every individual's 
private dealings' to his man- 
ager at the start of every day. 
We rely oa management to be 
the first fine off defence in 
compliance matters." When 
management itself is beading 

the rales, -the system is in 
danger of leaking down 


Retribntion must therefore 
be swift and terrible. “When 
someone hits at the heart of 
the rales you have to get 
tough", Mr Condren said. 

The Collier case will no 
doubt encourage compliance 
officers to greater feats of 
rigQance. It is a curious fea- 
ture of the City's post-Big 
Bang regulation foot there is 
no attempt at unfiormity 


never sat down together to 


work oat a pommon system of 
internal regulation, with tbe 
result that each house has a 
different set of rales. 

Most apply the rale about 
nsing only the house broking 
service bat there are wide 
margins of strictness in other 
areas. 

Phillips & Dtew, for exam- 
ple, ban all personal account 
deating in companies which 
are being handled on the 
corporate finance ride. BZW, 
on the other hand, allow 
employees to deal in shares of 
corporate finance customers, 
even during a bid; as long as 
they hold the shares for at 
feast time months. - 

Other typical timitatimis on 
personal share dealing 
adopted by many securities 
booses nictate: not allowing 
short selling, payment in cash 
the foUowiag day rather than 
at the end of the account, not 
trading in and out of stocks 
within the same day and - in 
some cases — not selling any 
holding within a month of 
purchase. Most of these rates 
are designed to cut down 
outright speculation by 
employees. 

But they have the effect also 
of making the compliance 
officer's job — difficult at the 
best of time ~ slightly easier. 

Co m pliance officers admit 
that their two main tedmiqiies 
for retching nfeoreante rely on 
steady vetting off personal - 
account dealings and spot 
checks on unsuspecting in- 
dividuals. The less em ployees 
are allowed to job rapidly in 
and out of shares, the earner it 
is to monitor what they are up 
to. 

Morgan Grenfell chose the 
‘‘nuclear option” and asked 
Mr COlKer to resign. There is, 
of course, a range of lesser 


sanctions appropriate to lesser 
■ misdemeanours. 

A company can, for in- 
stance. cancel the wrong-doers 
deals, ban him from personal 
account dealing (with the dan- 
ger that he may simply do it 
elsewhere), or impose finan- 
cial penalties. The 
misdemeanour can be entered 
also on tire employee's fife, 
which will assume a greater 
signi fican ce when SIB rales 
will enable individuals to be 
excluded from the securities 
industry on the strength of 
their past record. 

The anti seffreguiatum 
lobby will no doubt take the 
opportunity to point out that 
tbe Collier case proves their 
own case. On the current 
evidence, however, It does not 
After all, Mr Collier was 
canght even if it was through a 
tip-off rather than the rigours 
of tbe regulatory system. 

Compliance officers freely , 
acknowlege the need for some 
hick hi detecting breaches of i 
the rales. It fa not dear that 
any other system could plug 
this gap infallibly or any of the 
Others exposed by the current i 
debacle. j 

Tbe more important long- j 
term result is that it may | 
encourage firms to work to- 
gether on compliance more 
than in the past, both in 
formulating a set of common 
rules and in faformauig one 
another of strange goings on. 

As Mr Harty put it “This 
will send a snot across the 
bows of traders tempted to 
break the rales. _ In tune, 
everyone involved in comp fi- 
ance trill become tougher." 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


I C Gas to spend £300m, says Gulf 


l C Gas, the energy group 
best known for its Calor Gas 
interests, is currently planning 
a £300 million diversification, 
according to Gulf Resources 
which is making a hostile £750 
minion takoever. offer for i l 
T he suggg^tion is contained 
in the’ formal offer documents 
from Gulf, which is controlled 
by the Barclay wins, David • 
and Frederick. • • 

Gulf strnnriv criticizes I C 


By John Ben City Editor 


Gas's “lade of strategic 
direction'' and points out that 
il bought CompAir in 1980 for 
£64 million and sold five years 
later fora loss of£13 million. 

Ther board of I C Gas is 
understood .to be casting 
around for some further 
div e rsification, suggests Golf, 
and ..figures of up . to £300 
million have been mentioned. 

The document poiiits out 


that the value of Golf s cash 
bi(L 550p per share, is a 64 per 
cent premium over the market 
value when Gulf mode its first 
share purchases. Gulf main- 
tains that the I C Gas board is 
unlikely to be able to produce 
results which would sustain a 
share price comparable to the 
.level of its offer. - 

Mr David Barclay said yes- 
terday: “Tbe dismaT perfor- 


mance of I C Gas is a 
depressing tale for its 
shareholders. The share price 
in March. 1986. was below 
that of November 1980 de- 
spite a 143 per cent increase in 
the all-share index." 

1 C Gas shares closed last 
night at 589p. maintaining a 
substantial premium to the 
Golf offer as speculators await 
the widely rumoured counter- 
bid. 


Messel bought tbe portfolio 
at a % per cent discount to its 
market value. Mr Jonathan 
Out, an equity salesman at 
Messel, says: “This sort of 
thing happens in tbe US quite 
a tot but it's the first time 
we've done it." 

Lees & Co, the manufac- 
turer of snowballs and other 
confectionary in Lanarkshire, 
hit another new peak yes- 
terday. It rose 3p to 141p. 

The shares trade in a tight 
market but some buying has 
been prompted by the com- 
pany's record interim results, 
unveiled recently. They 
showed profits for the first half 
of £213,000, almost the same 
as the previous set of full-year 
figures, at £229,000. The com- 
pany should make profits of at 
least £400.000 this year. 

The company has been 
boosted by the steady decline 
in tbe world price of coconut, 
one of the key ingredients for 
hs snowballs. Snowballs ac- 
count for about 30 per cent of 
turnover. In the past 18 
months the price of coconut 




COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Last rites of the old 
Stock Exchange 


has dropped from £1,200 a 
tonne to £500 a tonne. 

Mr ran Coyle , the company 
secretary, says: “The price of 
coconut is less significant than 
it used to be but it is still an 
important factor. " 

GEt firmed 2.5p to 176.5p 
as an instituitional meeting at 
tbe City of London Club, 
hosted by Hoare Govett, the 
broker, got underway fate 
yesterday afternoon. One of 
the main topics of conversa- 
tion was GECs bid for the 
RAFs airbourne early warn- 
ing contract, where a rteHri o n 
is expected next month. 

At the same time Boeing, 
whose Awac system is the 
main rival to GECs Nimrod, 
announced al a press con- 
ference that for every £ I spent 
by the Government buying 

• Lex Service Group, the 
electronic components and car 
distribu to r , dropped 9p to 
310p and then recovered to a 
5p fall at 314p, after an in- 
stitutional lunch at 
Scrimgeour Vickers, the 
broker, yesterday. Scrimgeour 
has trimmed its profits 
forecast to just under £30 mil- 
lion and is now a seller of 

the stock. 


AWAC, Boeing will spend 
£1 JO in Britian. This could be 
worth up to £1 billion to 
British companies and create 
as many as 50,000 jobs. 

If Boeing were to win, 
Plessey, up a penny to 189p 
and Ferranti, up 3p to 103p, 
would benefit City analysts 
say the Fen-anti share price 
has been left behind and is 
looking cheap. 

Consolidated GoM Fields, 
the mining finance group, 
enjoyed another revival on 
news of a bid by South African 
businessman Mr Harry 
Oppenh rimer. Mr Oppeu- 
heiiner has a 28 per cent stake 
in the shares througjh his own 
publidyquoted Mineral Re- 
sources. Most of yesterday's 
activity took place in the 
traded options market where 
Interest from Swiss investors 
drove the share price up 29p 
to 691p. But only 1 J million 
shares were traded on tbe 
main market “It's a case of 
the options wagging the mar- 
ket tau again," one dealer said. 

In August Consolidated 
Gold Fields' shares stood al a 
lowly 400p before a tide of 
buyers lifted the price to a new 
peak of 7 lOp last month. Since 
then the shares have come in 
for a certain amount of profit 
taking, but the absence of any 
real sellers has meant their 
downside potential is limited. 


Today the Stock Exchange's 5,400 
members will vote on constitutional 
changes necessary to pave the way to a 
merger with the International Securi- 
ties Regulatory Organisation and tbe 
creation of tbe International Stock 
Exchange. The technical changes 
members are asked to approve are 


change to a limited company and 
forfeiture of the individual members' 
voting rights. Instead, member firms 
would have the votes, while members 
would each receive £10,000, payable 
at age 60, as “compensation". If, as is 
likely, these changes are accepted, 
virtually all that remains of the 
structure of the u old" Stock Exchange 
— unlimi ted liability, the partnership 
principle, and one-man-one-vote — 
will have been dismantled except on 
the Stock Exchange floor. 

There are two distinct issues: Is the 
merger with Isro necessary? Secondly, 
is the route the right one? 


A merger with Isro was on the cards 
from the date the Financial Services 
Bill was published last December. 
This made it clear that the regulatory 
and exchange functions were to be 
separate. In addition to self-regulating 
organizations to police members, 
there would also be separate rec- 
ognized investment exchanges, to 
devise and maintain proper market 


conditions for trading. The door was 
wide open for Isro to set up its own ex- 
change dealing in major British 
securities, irrespective of the fact that 
the Stock Exchange already operated 
one. 

The arguments in favour of a 
merger are logically compelling and a 


own more than 50 stock exchange 
member firms. The way the merger is 
to be achieved has met with 
opposition. 

For tax reasons compensation has 
been linked to retirement. If it is taken 
on or after retirement at age 60 or 
more, it is liable only to capital gains 
tax at 30 per cent Some members 
consider the payment inadequate, 
others think it too much. But it does 
strike a balance between older mem- 
bers who are unlikely to see the 
payment ravaged by inflation, and 
younger members who are more likely 
to reap the benefits inherent in a 
stronger, more unified, international 
capital market 

As the Governor of the Bank of 
England told a Frankfurt audience last 
night: “There are obvious regulatory 
advantages (and) obvious commercial 
and economic advantages if the new 
London Stock Exchange can become 
established as the major world centre 
for trading International equities." 


Boards must heed the City 


Yesterday's CBI debate over relations 
between industry and the City, though 
lively, had a predictable quality. By 
for the most positive contribution 
came, not from the CBI, but from the 
invited speaker, David Walker, the 
Bank of England director who a year 
ago made the issue of the short-term 
City intellectually respectable. Speak- 
ing principally to the industrialists, he 
put much of the burden of blame for 
the problem and responsibility for 
lessening it on company boards. 

His suggestions are basically un- 
changed. “Boards and their main 
proprietors need to work at relation- 
ships just as companies need to and 
do work at those with their suppliers, 
their customers and their workforce.” 
Pension funds and other institutions 
should earmark a proportion of their 
funds for long-term holding. But Mr 
Walker has developed his thi n ki ng in 
intriguing ways. 

In particular, if pension fund man- 
agers are to be more responsible, it is 
up to trustees and their ultimate 
paymasters, the companies, to give 
their own pension fund managers 
clearer instructions on how they are 
supposed to behave. If all companies 
asked their pension fund managers to 
take a longer-term view and to be 
more receptive to the risk involved in 
new projects, then by definition, 
pension funds would take a longer- 
term view, especially if the jobs of 


pension fund managers did not hang 
on the occasional mistake or lack of 
short-term performance. 

The logic is unanswerable. And 
there is no doubt that if companies 
followed Mr Walker's sensible advice, 
they would enjoy better relations with 
their big* investors. Whether that 
would make much difference to the 
minute-by-minute conduct of take- 
over bids and the institutions’ 
predilection to make a fast buck in the 
market is another question. Probably 
it would not 

Competitive market forces in the 
City — quite apart from the vested 
interest of the new City conglomerates 
in generating takeovers — have gone 
too far to be moderated to any extent 
by better exchanges of information 
and personal relationships. 

If the problem is to be countered 
effectively, there will need to be 
changes in the framework of rules in 
which market forces freely operate. 
That can come either from increased 
Whitehall interference in takeovers, 
which neither companies nor the City 
want, or by new boardroom and 
voting structures agreed by com- 
panies, institutions and the Stock 
Exchange, which would give institu- 
tions a greater direct say in the 
running of companies. Unfortunately 
there is little sign yet that either City 
or industry is prepared to do much 
about this. 


OUR RESULTS 
ARE WAY ABOVE PAR 
SEVE’S, 

ARE WAY BELOW 

Leading companies always attract 


This year the name on the European 
No. 1 golf title was Seve Ballesteros. 

The name on his bag was Slazenger 
Staying on top. For all BTR com- 
panies that's the name of the game. 


BTR PLC. SILVERTOWN HOUSE, VINCENT SQUARE. 
LONDON SW1P 2PL. 01-&J4 3S4S. 








n\ 




26 


s' 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NQVE1 


November 11 1986 


CBI CONFERENCE 


Britain on right 


course, says 
retiring CBI chief 


British industry bad begun 
; to reverse direction on the 
! road to ruin in the past six 

• years and the Government 
had set a course to improve 
the opportunities for business, 

■ Sir Terrace Beckett, told dele- 
' gates at the CBI Conference in 

Bournemouth today in his 
; farewell speach as director 
general. 

But, he added, the Labour 
Party’s proposals on industrial 

• relations law would take in- 
! dustry back to the slit trendies 

• ofthe 1970s. 

He received a standing ova- 

• tion at the end of his speach in 
: -which he said: “It would be a 

• tragedy if this reversal were 
1 itself reversed in the next 18 

■ months. 

“This is why we don’t like 
the look of the Labour Party's 
1 initial proposals on industrial 

- relations law.” 

Labour said there had been 
a change of attitude among 
. trade unions which now ac- 
cepted the need for the law to 
, play some part in strike ballots 

• and trade union elections. 

But that was as fer as most 

■ commentary on this proposals 
had got Did anyone properly 

- understand the rest of them? 

Labour's plan did not give 
an employer the right to late 
! trade unions to court for 
felling to hold a ballot, even 
' when his business was in 
jeopardy. Employers would be 
deprived of any legal redress 
when unlawful strikes oc- 
; cuired. 

“Not only would we be back 
‘ to the slit trenches ofthe 1970s 
if these proposals were 
' implemented”. Sir Terence 

- said. 

“New taws are threatened 
on trade union recognition, to 

• promote what they call indus- 
trial democracy and, beyond 
that, economic planning more, 
generally.” 

On top of that there was a 
whole new tranche of costly 
individual rights for employ- 
ees envisaged. He gave dele- 
gates only one guess who 
would pay for it 

Did they not realize that 
industry needed more, not 
less, regularity in working 
practices if it was to be world 
competitive? 


OPPORTUNITIES 


“We believe it is our role to 
talk to each of the political 
parties on policies to help 
industry and to endeavour to 
get changes made where their 
proposals would do real 
harm”, he said. 

The CBI was willing to talk 
at senior level to the Opposi- 
tion parties on their proposed 
industrial relations law 
changes. 

He hoped that the initial 
proposals would be changed 
and that they could get a better 
understanding on those mat- 
ters soon. 

His own difficulty in the 
past six years had been that 
the CBI, rightly, bad had to 
differ from the Government 
occasionally. But that had 
been on tactical problems. 

“In terms of strategy I 
believe this Government has 
set a course to improve the 
ultimate opportunities fer 
business and the prospects for 
the country in a more radical 
way than has been attempted 
since the first measures office 
trade were introduced over 
half a century ago”, he said 
amid applause. 

The CBI had worked closely 
with government in reducing 
the burdens on business, en- 
couraging enterprise, reducing 
red tape, fostering small firms 
youth 


and esta 

training, for instance 
Much of CBI thinking had 
been incorporated in policies more titan three million un- 
the Government had adopted, employed fair? 


could pursue was cease l essly 
to search for new prodcuts, 
new services, new markets 
and new niches in those 
markets to find higher value- 
added opportunities. 

There would never be an- 
other opportunity as there was 
now to get pay settlements, 
down, with 3 per cent infla- 
tion. 

“Buy Now” was his mes- 
sage. Employees now under- 
stood much better that profits 
were the cost of staying in 
business. 

Sir Terence said that to stop 
the export of capital and to 
encourage its return to this 
country by tax penalties would 
deny industry the benefits it 
achieved. 

Industry was doing much 
better on profitability than six 
years ago. but the recovery 
had reacted only about two 
thirds of the level earned in 
the early 1960s. 

After all their efforts, they 
had reached only half the rate 
of principal competitors a- 
bread. 

Improved productiveness 
required management to draw 
out and (earn from the know- 
ledge and potential of all 
employees so that “them and 
us” disappeared. 

Earlier, Sir Terence said 
that the past six years had 
been difficult They had been 
through the worst recession 
for half a century. 

But was the criticism in 
terms of Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher’s responsibility for 


CBI strategy over six years 
had campaigned for compet- 
itiveness, profitability and im- 
proved productiveness. 

Decline and unemployment 
were caused not by compet- 
itiveness but by uncompet- 
itiveness. 

Industry must sharpen its 
competitive edge and progress 
was being made on attitudes. 
Wonders never ceased — poli- 
ticians of all parties and trade 
union leaders were beginning 
to pay tribute to that disgust- 
ingly beastly thing called 
competitiveness. 

On profits, the most im- 
portant single strategy the CBI 


recession came 
uncompetitive, 
and woefully 


When the 
Britain was 
unprofitable 
overmanned 

Previous governments, by 
intervention, had postponed 
change, particularly structural 
change so that when reality 
finally caught up, its effects 
were more drastic in Britain 
than elsewhere. 

Many of the rhang ps in- 
dustry , bad wanted in the 
1970s had been achieved. 
Today there was time to 
develop new products, to im- 
prove them and to get then- 
costs, quality and delivery 
right. 



Walker spells out his 
vision for the future 


Mr Peter Walker, Secretary 
of State for Energy, set out to 
the conference his virion of a 
capital-owning democracy 
which could lead to Britain’s 
embarking ou a great commer- 
cial revival and bringing a new 
and better atmosphere to the 
country. 

He also set out his case for 
expanding the nuclear energy 
industry, but gave no hint of 
when any decision would be 
taken or what it would be. He 
pointed out that even die 
Soviet Union, after Cher- 
nobyl. intended to expand its 
nuclear industry. 

He said he defied anyone to 
create a scenario in which he 
could cope with the problems 
of the next 10 to 40 years 
without nudear energy. 

He added that during this 
century the population of the 
world had quadrupled and the 
industrialized world had ex- 
panded by a huge amount 
The result was that this cen- 
tury was the first when the 


NUCLEAR ENERGY 


had 


SAINSBURYS 



& million 


1986 

28 weeks to 
4th October 


1985 

28 weeks to 
5ch October 


Increase 


Sales* 

Retail Profit 


Retail Margin 
Associates 


Group Profit before Tax 
Group Profit after Estimated Tax 
Earnings per Share (at 35% tax) 
Dividend per Share 


2,087.6 

115.1 

5.51% 

8.5 

123.5 

80.3 

11.38p 

2.05p 


1,831.6 
85.2 
4.65% 
7.2 
92.4 
60.1 . 
8.60p 

1.65p 


14.0% 

35.1% 


17.1% 

337% 

33-7% 

32.3% 

24.2% 


‘Includes VAT million ( 1985 *82.5 million) 
The results are unaudited 


Profits up by one third 


Profitability 

The increase of 33 - 7 % in first half Group profit Is 
the largest for five years. This reflects above budget 
growth in sales In existing stores and further 
improvements in efficiency throughout the 
business. Productivity has increased by 5 %. Price 
competitiveness has further strengthened against 
major competition. Hie retail margin increased for 
the 4th year running to reach 5.5%. 


£8.3 million, benefiting from strong in store growth 
and good cost control. The company continued to 
have the lowest food prices of any hypermarket or 
superstore group. 

Shaw’s increased its sales area by 12% and profit 
before tax grew by 5% to S35-9 million. In September 
the Group increased its holding in Shaw's from 21.2% 
to 28.5%. 


Sales 

Supermarket sales grew by 13.6% with two thirds of 
the growth coming from hew stores. Sales volume 
growth of 11% compares with 9.3% a year ago. The 
level of food inflation during this period was the 
lowest for twenty years. 


New Stores 

The seven supermarkets opened in the half year have 
an average sales area of 29,000 square feet and are 
trading very successfully. A further eight new stores 
will open in the second half, of which five will open 
before Christmas. 


Profit Sharing 

Profit sharing for 1986 amounted to £15.8 million of 
which over £■? million was taken in die form of 
1.8 million shares by 13,000 employ -ees - nearly half 
those eligible to choose shares. This was the highest 
proportion of employees to take shares since the 
scheme’s introduction in 1980. As usual no provision 
for profit sharing has been made in the half year's 
accounts, since the level of profit share is dependent 
on the full vear s results. 


Subsidiary and Associates 


Homebase sales increased by 27% to £ 63 .9 million 
while profit grew by 31 % to £2.1 million. Five. 
Homebases will open in the current year, bringing the 
total number of outlets to 33- 
SavaCentre profit before tax increased by to 


Dividend 

The Directors have declared an interim dividend of 
2.05p per share ( 1985 I.65p) which, together with its 
associated tax credit, is equivalent to a gross dividend 
of 2.89p. The total amount of the net dividend is 
Xl-t .6 million < 1985 it 11.6 million J. This dividend will 
be paid on 16th January 1987, to shareholders on the 
register of members at the close of business on 
19th December 1986. 


Good food costs less at Sainsbury’s 



availability of energy 
become a big problem. 

If they looked forward to 
the expansion of the indus- 
trialized world in the next few 
decades, uot only in the 
Pacific Basin but in Africa, 
Asia, and South America, the 
demand for energy from finite 
resources would be an ever- 
increasing problem. 

If they rejected a form of 
energy that provided 35 per 
cent of the electricity of the 
European Community, that 
was an important source of 
power to the great indus- 
trialized nations such as Japan 
and the United States, and if 
they remembered that the 
Soviet Union with all its 
mineral and energy resources 
was to double its nudear 
investment, then a scenario 
without nudear power was 
not possible. 

He went on to discount 
other new forms of electricity 
generation on the ground that 
they would not make a big 
enough contribution. “I gave 
up research on solar energy 
mainly due to the lack of 
solar”, he said. 

The Severn Barrage, the 
second best barrage scheme in 


the world, if successful, would 
produce only 2 per cent of the 
country's electricity. 

He added: “So we have to 
see that the advantages of one 
of the cheapest forms, en- 
vironmentally one of the best 
forms, of energy is available to 
mankind, but available with 
the maximum of safety”. 

Turning to the Gov- 
ernment's privatization pro- 
gramme, he said that since 
1979 there had been what 
could only be described as a 
revolution in making this 
country into a share-owning 
democracy. 

Shares were being bought by 
more people, younger people, 
and people from all walks of 
life. So fer seven million 
people had registeral an in- 
terest in buying British Gas 
shares and inquiries were still 
coming in at a rate of 70,000 a 
day. 

Recent' research showed 
that 37 per cent of the adult 
population were interested in 
buying shares in British Gas. 

Between 1979 and next year 
the picture would have 
changed from one in which 
one family in ten owned 
shares to almost one family in 
two. “I believe it is vital for a 
free enterprise system to rec- 
ognize the advantage of this 
transformation.” 



Mr Peter Walker The demand for energy in the fatare is go- 
ing to be an ever-increasing problem. 


City men defend 
themselves from 
industry attack 


THE CITY 


Representatives of the City 
of London strongly defended 

themselves at the conference ^ 

against the contention by one Japanese and Euro- 

industrialist that the square ^geagoes. “And we 

mile was nothing more than a cB ^ 

gigantic gambling den whose ^ d PoHock. of the Stock 
wheeler-dealers andanatysts Bajaa&St ^ to call it a 
wwe nomorethanj^tM5. ^ only inaccurate 

Ttecorfe^Jb^tang The future of the 

5*2“ Sock Exchange and the future 

ended m a draw: a split vote ^ hrterdepen- 


right down the middle on a 
resolution critical ofthe City 
from the West Midlands Re- 
gional C o p wdl of the CBL 

The resolution stated: “Go- 
vernment and financial in- 
stitutions in particular most 
recognize if manufac- 
turing industry is to survive, a 
long-tain view must be taken 
in terms of financial returns, 
rather than the short-term 
view forced by them cm 
British managers”. 

Defenders of the City made 
dear that in the main they did 
not like the last 12 words of 
the resolution. 

As CBI members held aloft 
their blue cards the voting was 
so obviously even that Mr 
David Nidtsoa, CBI presi- 
dent, said he would leave h at 
that The resolution ted di- 
vided the conference and he 
felt that that might be a good 
starting point for everyone to 
work together. 

During the debate it em- 
erged that bridge-building 
seminars throughout the CBI 
regions are being arranged 
between industrialists and 
Chy experts to' improve 
communications between the 
two, to increase understand- 
ing and iron out differences. 

The attack on the “short- 
tennism” of the City was led 
by Mr Tom Brintou, of the 
West Midlands, who com- 


6 This situation 
cannot be allowed to 
continue # 


plained ' of the obsession 
among financiers for bottom- 
line figures. 

Many firms had had to 
abandon worthwhile projects 
because the returns would 
only come in seven to ten 
years rather than the two to 
three years which the financial 
interests would prefer. 

. That situation could not be 
allowed to go on. It militated 
against research and develop- 
ment the • results of which 
could not be seen for years. 

The boom in takeover 
activity was an extension of 
the City enthusiasm for short- 
term speculation. 

Mr Charles Green, of the 
National Westminster Bank, 
thought it wrong to take the 
view that the City was forcing 
a short-term attitude on 
manufacturing- . 

Long-tom money was rea- 
dily available for the right 
oject and the well signed 
isrness case. Long money 
meant long-term risk — politi- 
cal marketing and financial 
risk -and that ted to be 
balanced by proper reward for 
lender and industrial cus- 
tomer. * 

The most swingeing attack 
on the Gty came' from Mr 
Norman Record, of C & J 
Gaik, who complained that 
the frantic switch of funds 
from one company to another 
was achieving nothing. It was 
he who contended that the 
City had been converted into 
nothing more than a gigantic 
gambling den. 

All the wheeler-dealing was 
just non-productive. By all 
this activity and by the ridicu- 
lous and hysterical merger 
mania the Gty was debilitat- 
ing industry. 

Mr C Day, of Henderson 
Pension. Fund Management, 
coming to the defence of the 
City, said that it was a great 
success story. The City com- 
peted internationally against 


dent. 

Mr J R C EJmsfie. deputy 
chairman of peart Assurance, 
said they were not first and 
foremost investors; they were 
first and foremost salesmen of 
insurance. They bad to obtain 
the funds before they could 
invest. them and they must 
give their customers what they 
wanted, nos what they ought 
to have. 

Sir Jeremv Morse, chair- 
man of City Communications 
Centre and of Lloyds Bank, 
said he could not support the 
motion as it stood. The politi- 
cal p endulum had swung to- 
wards freer markets all over 
the world. 

Earlier, Mr David Walker, 
executive director of the Bank 
of England, said in a review of 
relations between the City and 
industry that remarkably few 
companies seemed ready to 
quantity how much they were 
committed to innovation to 
ensure their future compet- 
itiveness. 

If boards wanted their 
shareholders to support them 

m committing resources to the 
longterm, perhaps depressing 
current performance on the 
wav, it seemed only reason- 
able that they should indicate 
bow much was being commit- 
ted, in what direction, and 
what the pay-back period was 
likely lobe. 

He was not suggesting that 
company boards should seek 
to influence individual invest- 
ment decisions, but they 
should not feel inhibited 
about engaging in dialogue 
with their pension fund trust- 
ees as part of the process by 
which the trustees arrived at 
an appropriate risk strategy. 

He acknowledged that re- 
cent developments in the City 
bad as much to do with 
ensuring that UK. financial 
institutions and markets were 
competitive on a global scale 


6 We cannot afford 
to take a Little 
Englander view 9 


as with the immediate needs 
of British industry. 

“But we cannot afford to 
lake a little Englander view of 
all this”, he said, “and British 
industry would certainly not 
be better served by a weaker 
securities industry.” 

They should surely seek to 
make the liberal and market- 
based system that we had 
work better, despite its flaws. 
• The solution to the take- 
over argument lay not with 
government but with industry 
and the Gty, Dr Malcolm 
SkfiKcora, of the Industrial 
Policy Committee, said when 
successfully moving a resolu- 
tion stating that the con- 
ference believed that mergers 
and acquisitions were not 
necessarily a bad thing, but 


regretting that too many were 
uedfi 


pursued for the wrong reasons. 

He said that business 
should not rely on politicians 
and bureaucrats to protect it 
from itself. 

Britain needed businesses 
which could match imports 
and which could compete in 
the world market Large com- 
panies which bought smaller 
companies could develop and 
market their ideas. 

However, big companies 
were not always a good thing. 
The records of con^omerates 
made up of businesses from 
many areas were often poor. 


Energy resources 


Industry leaders back nuclear power 


A motion on the need for 
nudear energy was strongly 
attacked by a delegate who 
described ft as “tainted with 
industrial self-interest” and 
said ft paid little attention to 
the interests of the nation as a 
whole. 

Several other delegates ex- 
pressed doubts about the 
nadear industry. 

The conference, however, 
overwhelmingly passed the 
motion winch expressed the 
belief “that an expanding, safe 
and efficient nudear industry 
is essential if the UK is to 
proride competitive electricity 
prices in the 1990s and 
beyond” 

The attack on the motion, 
pat forward by the CBI Energy 
Policy Committee, came from 
Mr Stuart Johnson, ma paging 
director of King Taaderin and 
Gregson (Holdings), and 
chairman of Yorkshire and 
Humberside CooutiL 

He said he would abstain in 
the vote because it was impos- 
sible to give the resolution 
[ualified support 
course industry required 
efficient and competitive el- 
ectricity, but nothing should 
be done to jeopardize the 




overriding issue of long-term 
safety. 

“I do not stand here as a 
latter-day Luddite and hare no 
mandate from the Greens, the 
anti-nndear lobby or my 
Yorkshire coal industry”, be 
said. 

“I come here as an engineer- . 
mg observer trim has learnt to 
live with Murphy’s Law that if 
ft is possible for something to 
go wrong, it will go wrong.” 

The reason for something 
going wrong was invariably’ 
the nmmagroed consequence 
of human shortcomings. 

They could not expect the 
nudear industry to achieve the 
glorious goal of eradicating 
human error. 

Moving the motion, Mr 
Maurice VogeL of Air Prod- 
ucts, chairman of the Energy 
Policy Committee, said that, 
despite propaganda to the 
contrary, there was no sound 
evidence that the UK nuclear 
energy industry was unsafe. 

British reactors were de- 
signed to override operator 
error. 

There was a need for more 
competitive electricity prices 
into the twenty-first century, 
end nudear electricity was 


cheaper to generate than coal- 
fired electricity . 

It would be folly to eliminate 
nudear power. It would have 
dire consequences on Britain's 
competitiveness, prosperity 
jobs. 

Mr Vogel was among those 
speakers who emphasized the 
importance of renewing peb&c 
confidence in the industry. 

Mr Roy Lawrence, of Bayte) 
Group, said Seflafield’g record 
had not been good. “And the 
way its management have ted 
to be Unshed into the open 
does not inspire confidence.” 
Disturbing medical reports 


“Those who gathered around 
the bfirez ate cannot all be the 
lunatic fringe, and their view 
should be listened to. They 
should not be pushed aside." 

Mr Christopher Hardrag, of 
British Nuclear Fuels, re- 
minded delegates that Britain 
ted ted safe nudear electric- 
ity since 1956. 

The Chernobyl disaster had 
affected public confidence and 
those in the industry under- 
stood the need to regain it 
What they did had to be 
explained in simple lan guag e 


that everyone could un- 
derstand. 

Without a growing nudear 
contribution the price of power 
would rocket, foe ability to 
compete overseas would suf- 
fer, as would firing s tandar ds 
and unemployment. 

Dr LG^ovden, of the 
United Kingdom Atomic En- 
ergy Authority (UKAEA), told 
delegates: “If the British econ- 
omy expaads at a mere IS per 
cent over the coating decades, 
by foe year 2010 we shall need 
twice the energy that we 
consume today, 

“With foe most optimistic 
success of energy conservation 
we shall save 50 per cent of 
that increase, so we still have a 
SO per cent gap. 

“So the reference to 
conservation of energy as a 
solution to our problems is a 

fallacy.” 

Mr John Talbot, of the 
Electricity Council, and a 
member of foe CBI Vision 
2010 Group which has re- 
ported on foe needs to prepare 
industry for the year 2010, 
urged support for foe resolu- 
tion. Electricity customers 
wanted .cheap, reliable and 
safe electricity. 


Conference reports by Alan Wood, Bob Morgan, Derek Barnett and Edward Townsend 



T 


i 




TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 17 lQRfi 


ifrjli ci» U5*k> 


27 . - 




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And alongthe way Uno has become Europe’s . 
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COMPANY NEWS 


• D RAY TON CONSOLI- 
DATED TRUST: Final divi- 
dend Sp, making 10i75p (JO), 
payable December 22. Figures 
to £000 for year to September 

VVi 

Grass income 6.133 (5.757). 
expenses and interest 709 (672). 
pretax revenue 5,424 (5,085). 
earnings per share 10.78p 
(1034). 

• ECOLi CONSOLIDATED 
MWESs Figures for six months 
to September 30 in rand. Turn- 
over 9349,936 (3,822,451), pre- 
tax income 3,323,961 
(7,874,305), tax 155,915 
( 108,6 1 8). earnings per share on 
attributable income after trans- 
fer to non-disci butahie reserve 

13.1 cents (14.9 adjusted). 

• HEALTH CARE SER- 
VICES: Figures in £000 for half 
year to September 30. Turnover 
4,643 (3,473), pretax profit 3)1 
(205), tax 109 (80), earnings per 
share l,7p (1). 

• PACIFIC SALES 

ORGANISATION: The chair- 
man told the *""nai meeting 
that sales in the first four 
months are running closely in 
line with the previous year. 

• THE NEW 

THROGMORTON TRUST 
(1983); Interim dividend 1.25p 
(same), payable January 15. 
Figures in £000 for six months 
to September 30. Gross revenue 
1,636 (1,400), pretax revenue 
1342 (1,104), tax 392 (361), 
earn mgs per share 2.43p ( 1 .90). 
The board anticipates that the 
total dividend for the year will 
not be less than last year. 

• CITY OF DUBLIN BANK: 
Final dividend 2.2375p making 
33p (same) for the year to 
September 30. Figures in Irt 
Income 14,877,958 or UK£14 
million (14,127,783). Profit be- 
fore lax and extraordinary items 
803,1 18 (286,089). Tax 406,748 
(108,173). Earning per share 
3.88p (!.75p). Proposed rights 
issue of 8, 51 5,097 new shares of 
It£25p each, at Ii£47ftp per 
share. This will raise about 
lr£3. 8 50,000 net, on the basis of 
five new shares for every six 
existing shares held at close of 
business on Novem ber 7. 

• HAMPTON AUSTRALIA: 
HA, which is 75 per cent owned 
by Hampton Gold Mining Ar- 
eas, now part of Mr Alan Bond's 
private gold interests, reports a 
consolidated operating profit of 
A us$363,000 or £ 1 64,000 for the 
six months raided September 30 
(loss AusS57.000 for the same 
period in 1985). Overall costs 
Aus$2l4,000 (Aus$ 1,545,000). 
Total revenues Aus$8 15,000 
(AusS 1.61 3,000). 

• WATSON & PHILIP: Ap- 
plications have been received in 
respect of 3,472,712 shares 
(120.9 per cent). Applications 
for up to minimum entitlements 
were received for 1.739,004 
shares and further applications 
were received for 1,733,708 
shares, the minim um entitle- 
ments in respect of which 
amount to 562^34 shares. 

• WHITBREAD AND COM- 
PANY: The company has sold 
its 20 per cent holding in 
Television South. The shares 
befog sold comprise 800 voting 
shares (20 per cent of that class), 
6,623,333 ordinary non-voting 
shares (19.2 per cent of that 
class) and £1 million nominal of 
1 0 per cent sub convertible loan 
stock. 


Intasun livens up 
price war with 
more cheap flights 


From Derek Harris 
Brisbane 

A new move in the foreign 
holidays price war was 
launched yesterday by 
Intasun, part of Mr Harry 
Goodman’s International Lei- 
sure Group (ILG), with a big 
increase in cheap charter 
flights. 

Intasun brought out its 
brochure on Skyworid “seats 
only” flights during the ann u al 
convention of the Association 
of British Travel Agents. 
There are 400,000 seals on 
offer, an 80 per cent increase 
on this year’s programme. 

In order to stimulate early 
bookings, special offers for 

people making reservations 
before January 10 include a 



Mr Harry Goodman; 
400,000 seats on offer 

three-night hotel break for two 
in Britain and reductions for 
children during high season. 


Seal prices start from £39 and 
most flights are to Spain. 

Skyworid has enhanced its 
programme despite com- 
plaints by the Spanish authori- 
ties about increases in the sale 
of such seals on holiday 
charter flights. 

Seat-only arrangements re- 
main within international air- 
line regulations covering 
package tours on charter 
flights but essentially offer 
cheap return flights. 

The Spanish claim that they 
threaten the country's hotel 
industry while undercutting 
scheduled fairs. The British 
and Spanish governments are 
.renegotiating die air treaty 
between London and Madrid. 


New holiday breed emerges 


A new style of holiday- 
maker, the aspiring traveller, 
has been identified in new 
research by American Ex- 
press, the charge card com- 
pany which has also travel 
agency interests. 

It believes there are about a 
million of them in Britain — 
about three quarters of whom 
live to the South-east — seek- 
ing to break out of a famil y 
mould of packaged foreign 
holidays and become 
independent. 

The incomes explosion in 
foe South-east through in- 
fluences like the growth in 
financial services was creating 
new leisure habits, said Mr 


Christopher Rodrigues, 
manag ing director for travel at 
American Express to Britain. 

He was presenting the re- 
sults of foe 
to the Association of 
Travel Agents. 


aspiring 

tripled 


The number of 
travellers has probably 
over the past ten yean, Mr 
Rodrigues said. One indica- 
tion was the big increase in 
sales of charter aircraft seats 
unattached to foil packaged 
holidays. 

He described foe new breed 
of traveller as wanting to 
create fresh experiences for 


themselves, adding: “They are 
not snobs. It is not a question 
of wanting to go to Gstaad 
because top people go there. 

“It is much more a question 
of going to a particular winter 
resort because it offers a 
particular type of challenge or 
a summer resort because, as in 
Agadir, you can wind surf in 
the day and go out to the high 
Atlas in foe evening. 

“If they are to stay ahead of 
foe game, agents wul have to 
keep boning up on new 
destinations and travel ser- 
vices to meet foe needs of this 
increasingly sophisticated 
type of traveller.” 


APPOINTMENTS 


Mr Graham Gascogne has 
joined foe board of Thomson 
T-Lineand will act initially as 
finance director. 

Mr Richard EUert has been 
appointed to foe board of 
Oceana Consolidated Com- 
pany. 

Samuel Montagu & Com- 
pany have announced the 
appointment ofMr John Grif- 
fiths as an executive director. 

Mr David Kve has joined foe 
partnership of Rowe & Maw, 

Fastfhnue Franchises have 
made Mr Trevor Smith direc- 
tor of marketing. 

Mr Bui Gray and Mr Don- 
ald Davis lave joined foe 
main board of HunterPrint 
Group. 

E G Cornelius <& Company, 
announce that Mr Paid 
Parkinson has been made a 
director. 

Sir Derek Palmar has be- 
come chairman of Boythorpe. 

Mr Graham Day has joined 
the board of P-E International 
as a non-executive director. 

Mr Laurie Wood has be- 
come sales director (designate) 
of Fame Computers. 

Mr Tony Blyth has been 
made managing director of 
Sydney. 

Heseltine, Moss & Com- 
pany has appointed the 
following directors: Mr Philip 
Dyson, Mr Denis McSweeney, 
Mr David lags and Mr 
Jeremy MadfbnL 

Mr Nicholas Mitchell has 
been appointed director-gen- 
eral of foe British Industry 
Committee on Sooth Africa 
and executive director of 
United Kingdom South Africa 
Trade Association. 

Bradstock, Blunt & 
Crawley, foe Lloyd’s brokers, 
have made Mr Vincent Byrne 
and Mr Malcolm Straiten 
directors. 

Mr Brian Jody has been 
appointed to the board of 
Walter Lawrence Project 
Management 


Daniels for market 


S Daniels, a company supply- 
ing grocery products to most 
of Britain's leading high street 
stores, is coming to foe stock 
market valued at £9.9 million. 

Mr Paul Daniels, foe chair- 
man, said: “Going public will 
enable us to go on the takeover 

trail straightaway.” A total of sales of 
2,077,000 shares are being million. 


placed at a price of 130p each 
through Robert Fleming, the 
merchant bank. 

The amount raised for the 
company will be £1.18 

milli on. 

Daniels earned pretax prof- 
its of £460,000 last year on 
more than £32 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Jar 22 
Fob 5 
Fob 19 


For Boll 
Fob 2 
Fob 16 
Mar 2 


HntDsatoge LaatDaaHngs 

octai oa si 

Nova NOV 14 

Nov 17 Nov 28 

CaB opflom m Unn mt on: 11/11/88 Alpine soft Drink, NoRon Eat. IMeaninoL 
Hughes Foods. Quart Auto. Arestrod, Braan. UUramr, Heateir, Control Saco, PHMt 
ulRonold.JF Blown. SQuftMM Stadium, STC. London & Northern, JE England, LMay, 
ftaatwfcb. Atonic Rax. Bearwood. 

Put Norton 
Put 6 Cat 


Channel. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


AAty 

11.00% 

Adam & Company. 

11.00% 

Rm 

11.00% 

Citibank Savings! — - 

12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 

Co-operative Bank 

C. Hoars & Co 

...11.00% 

—11.00% 

...11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai. 
Lloyds Bank 

—11.00% 
iijio% 


—11.00% 

Royal Bank oi Scotland. 

"ren 

11.00% 

—11.00% 

Citibank NA .. 

—11.00% 


t Monpse Base Sate. 


BaaeRatesft 

CJrarihg Banks 11 
Finance House 11 


Dolor COaflU 
imnth 6.05-6.00 
6 moth 6JD0-5-95 


Small amass 
12 raft 6.10-6JJS 


___ % 

lift Low 10N 


Overnight High: 11> 
UfettfiMftlOV-% 
Thaaewy BUo (Oiscowt %) 


EURO MONEY DE P O S ITS % 


2rimftio* 

3 ninth 10>'w 


2mntfi 10M 
3itMh KPia 


7 days 

3ranft eft-6 


Prime Bar* MstDtacauni ft) 

1 mnft 10 "»- 10 K 2mft 

Smnft l0' , wUP , 3j6mnft 10»w-10"« 
Team BMe (Discount ft) 

1 m5i ««£^2mnft 11* 

Smnft 11«K 6 mirth 11 »m 

JntMbankfK) 

Overnight open 11 ctoae 13 

1 weak It *10-11 fiimift ll'ia-lf 

imnth 11'w-ll Smnft lt'w-11 

Smnft IIUe-11 12 mft 11‘w-ll 

Local Antoorty Dapoatta f%) 

2 days 10ft 7 days 10* 

I mirth 10V Smnft 10* 

Smnft 10* 12 mft 10* 

Local Authority Baade OH 
1 mnft 11»-m 2 nmft lift-lift 

3 mft Ilft-IOft 6 mnft Ilft-IOft 
9 mnft 11K-10K 12 mft 11-10* 


7 days 4 "i*4»i« 
Smnft 


7 days 7*i*-7'n 
Smnft a'lihT*!* 


7 days 2ft-1ft 
Smnft 3*w3 n w 

Van 

7 day* 4'irS"w 
Smnft 4 n i#-4*w 


cat 6K-5K 

1 mnft 6 , i»6 , *ia 
emnth 6H-8 
cal 54 

1 mnft 4’*i*4ki* 
Smnft 4ft4ft 
cal 7*-6ft 

1 mnft 7*-7% 
Smnft 814-8% 
etf 28-1 X 

imnth 3X-3 
Sranth S***- 0 !* 
cal 4K-SK 

1 mnft 4ft-4K 
Smnft 4»w4»» 


GOLD 


Gok tS *OS2S-40SJ5 
KT 
S< 


imnttfiQ^I&ft Smnft 11-IQft 
8 mnft 11 - 10 % 12mft 10«wl0»i 


Si 

Platinum 
S 64000 (638005) 
*ExdudasVAT 


JM) 


IF YOU'RE 
ACTUALS 
MARKETING 
MALE VOICE 
CHOIRS, ROMAN 
TOGAS OR 
WHAIEVER- 
YOUUDOIT 
FASIRFROM 

THURROCK 

Wales. Peterborough and Milton Keynes are splendid places but 
will never match up to Thurrock tor big business relocation. 
Thurrock is adjacent to the Thames, the uartfotd Tunnel and is 
the selected site for a multi million pounds giant service 
complex cm the M25. 

With motorways to air and seaports, Thurrock has the finest 
communications network in foe UK, giving fast access and 
product distribution to your clients worldwide. 
Thurrock is rich in land, nch in working, social and 
environmental resources - and is wide open for tug business. 

Thurrock - working, living, growing. yx 

Make good use of us! f l 

THURROCK- FOR BK3 BUSINESS IN A BIG HURRY- X 1 
TO REACH UK AND WORLD MARKETS Aa 



NAME 


COMfWY 


P THURROCK 
[ BUSINESS 
RELOCATION 

| For full details and WSTTIQN 
I brochure please call "" 11 

| 0375 SiBmht 2030 ADDRESS 
I or post this coupon to 
| Public Relations Office 

I Thurrock Borough 
Council. Whitehall 


“1 


L 


Lane. Grays. Essex 


RM17GSL 


J 

id 


ECGD 


Ftxad Rata Starting Export Finance 
Scheme (V Average reference rats lor 
Merest period October B. 1986 to 
October 31. 1988 tocbsiVK 11237 par 
cent 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Time Moth Staritog 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jim 87 — , - — 

Sap 87 

Dac87 

Mar 88. 


5.01 

89.31 


Fievtauadnr* total open 
Tbrea— otenEureduiar 

Dec 86 

Mar ST 

Jun87 

87 


SOM 
89.10 
88.78 
14140 


USTremwyBond 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jw67 _ „ — _ 


Dae 86. 
Mar 87. 
Jun87 . 


.. JOB 

DbcI 
Mar 87. 

Jim 87 

Sap 87 

FT-seioo 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 


9389 
9 330 
93.79 
9354 

98-12 

95-19 

N/T 


9804 

N/7 


109-24 

109-13 

W 

1B5J» 

16020 


£6 

Low 

Ctoae 

EatVM 

BOSS 

SOSO 

2467 

8031 - 

6020 

8020 

471 

8048 

8942 

8043 

199 

8044 

8932 

8034 

248 

8010 

8006 

8009 

30 

8078 

88.78 

8084 

1 

PimtouadaVa total 
9392 saJBO 

open Marast 28571 
9390 1682 

mm 

33JB9 

9090 

654 

S3J0 

9377 

S07B 

282 

SS.S8 

9054 

9054 

83 


96-17 

96-19 


Pravtoueda^s total open interest 5108 


98-1. 

95-17 


I open Ir 

si-io 

95-16 

94-19 


040 

2 

0 


9580 


P randoua 


uaday’at 


Previous daVst 
109-24 109% 
109-13 109-13 


rial opan Marat 808 
96-00 95 

9M2 0 

0 

lopanMaraM18204 
1&18 


13427 

109-23 20 

109-23 0 

rVavtous day's total omnkriaraatZBOS 
16600 16450 16600 SIS 

18850 18850 18858 82 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


ftqr'amaga 
M u aara b ar 11 
NYoik 1,4850-15415 
Montreal 15990-15990 
AnWdamS5045-35275 
BnjBBBisea798i.il 
Cohan 11.0525-11.1085 
DuMm 1.0701-15753 
Frankhat2545D-2JM46 
Lisbon 2144041542 
Madrid 19650-19750 
Man 202325-2037.60 
Oato 10.7889-107965 
Parts 95830-65225 


No — barll 

15380-1.4390 

15942-15970 

35080^3105 

80508091 

115525-115675 

15730-15740 

25250-25290 

214.40-21525 

13007-19855 
202025-2029 JOO 

107708-10-7855 

9563065796 


1 BKNrih 

O.G3-OfiOpnBm 

051-047pmm 

1 %-lKpnm 

23-18pr° m . 

1 %-Xpram 

9-400& 

1%-imnm. 

Tt-llsSa 

19-57c8s 

Opra-pram 

aiUrifta 

3%-2Mpram 


SmaaBm 

1.74-159pmm 
154-158pnm 
4K-4Hprwn 
59-60piam 
46Kpram 
51-1 Vklla 
4* 


Sto rinB In dai «» p» ad wflti 1975 1 


45-135(la 
4-par pram 
ifX-IWOa 
7%-6Nprwr 

ft— atflOLSOtafa ranga 665685>. 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



New Zealand dotar 
Saudi Arabia rtyal 
Singapore doBar. 
South Africa rand 
UAEdMtam 
‘Lloyds Bank 


Rates soppHed by Barclays BwftHOFEXMdExtaL 


This adwertlsement Is issued la compliance with the requireraenls of the Council of The Stock 
Exchange. It does not constitute an invitation to the public to subscribe for or purchase any shares. 



The News Corporation Limited 

(A public company in corpora led with limited liability in the 


Authorised 

1.000,000,000* 


Slate o/ South Australia, Australia] 

Ordinary Shares of AS0.50 each 


Issued and 
fully paid 
126,744,010* 


The News Corporation Limited (“News Corporation”) and its subsidiaries 
constitutes one of the world’s largest communications groups engaged 
principally in the publishing of newspapers and magazines, the broadcasting 
of television programmes and the production and distribution of feature 
films in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. 

The Council of The Stock Exchange has granted permission for all of the 
126,744,010 issued Ordinary Shares of AS0.50 each to be admitted to the 
Official List Dealines in such shares will commence today, Wednesday. 12th 
November, 1386. The Ordinary Shares of News Corporation are also listed 
on The Australian Associated Stock Exchanges and in the form of American 
Depositary Shares on the New York Stock Exchange. 

The Listing Particulars relating to News Corporation are available in the 
Extel Statistical Service and may be obtained during usual business hours 
up to and including 14th November, 1986 from The Company Announce- 
ments Office. The Stock Exchange, Throgmorton Street, London EC2 and on 



Morgan Grenfell & Co. limited 
New Issue Department 
72 London Wall 
London EC2M 5NL 

Cazenove & Co. 

12 Tokenhouse Yard 
London EC2R 7 AN 

12 th November, 1986 


Morgan Grenfell Australia Limited 
17-19 Bridge Street 
Sydney 

New South Wales 2000 

Morgan Grenfell Securities Limited 
20 Finsbury Circus 
London EC 2 M 7BB 


*At ihe Annual General Meeting held on 7th November. 1986 the authorised share capital was 
increased to its present level ana the number of issued and fully paid Ordinary Shares will, on 
21st November. 1986 pursuant to a bonus issue, increase to 253.488,020. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Productivity the key to 
success at Sainsbury 


;at J Sainsbury must _ For foe ixesem yearj ^ Apricol^rwov- 

adhering to a minor Sainsbury should make prot- ot ■ ^ v « reticent 
^Thfention foe ktfflfl Swl sale . P*>«9R 


Shoppingat J Sainsbury must 
resemble adhering to a minor 
religious cult Mention the 
mum* qj one of its followers 
swd cries of adulation are 
followed by anecdotes of 
what amnring products or 
service are provided by 
Britain's largest food retailer. 

Even from a financial 
viewpoint the performance is 
impressive. Retail margins 
have increased for the fourth 
successive year to 5.5 per 
cent, several perce ntage 
points higher than its nearest 
competitor. Sceptics are low- 
ering their voices when say- 
ing that Sainsbury cannot 
continue to grow at this rate 
as the facts continue to prove 
them wrong. 

Economies of scale are 
making themselves felt in a 
very real. way. More than 35 
per cent ofSainsbury’s super- 
markets are larger than 
20,000 sq ft m area. 
Productivity is still increas- 
ing, with foe wages to sales 
ratio staying level despite a 7 
per cent wages increase. 

Scanning equipment has 
been installed at 65 super- 
markets, which not only 
speeds up the check-out pro- 
cess but also removes the 
need to price products 
individually. 

By the end of the year, 
computers will have been 
installed at 200 outlets, thus 
giv in g additional informa- 
tion on stock controL 

At the naked gross margin 
level, “own branding” earns 
the group a higher margin. 
However, taking into account 
the additional overheads in- 
volved to having to supervise 
foe preparation of the jxod- 
uct, foe margin is not signifi- 
cantly higher. 

For Sainsbury, selling a 
high proportion of own label 
products has the effect of 
enhancing the image of the 
group as well as increasing 
foe number of shoppers at- 
tracted by foe “value for 
money” ideal Consequently, 
the group has the opportunity 
to sdJ other products at a 
considerably higher margin. 

Horn ebase is compensating 
for having been a slow starten 
Its sales per store are more 
than 20 per cent higher than 
the competition. With this 
advantage, it feds well pre- 
pared to expand aggressively 

in foe DIY market, which it 
believes has good prospects. 

Savacentre should begin to 
flourish now that Storehouse 
is involved- 


shares are selling on a p/e 
ratio of 18-5 times, which 
hardly distinguishes tiiem 
from foe competition. Buta 
return to a more marked 
premium is in order. 

DeLaRuc 

Fust half margins at De La 

Rue are always lower than for 

the foil year, out this tune the 
effect was more noticeable. 

A contributory factor was 
the devaluation of the Ni- 
gerian paira. It weakened 
from 1.43 naira to 6.7 naira to 
the pound, reducing 
associates' profits by about 
£1.5 million. 

Estimatessuggest Priptrak, 
the finger-print identification 
business, lost about £1 mil- 
lion. However, it is on foe 
verge of making a break- 
through to the valuable US 
market It has won several 
sizeable contracts thert- 

Work is progressing on a 
security card iriudh operates 
through voice identification. 
This has considerable poten- 
tial. Bradbury Wilkinson is 
taking time to be integrated 
and was not a noticeable 
contributor in the first half 

De La Rue could be a 
beneficiary if Norton Opax's 
.bid for McCorquodale suc- 
ceeds, as customers may not 
wish to put all their business 

into a grou 

share of m 
cent 

In the foil year De La Roe 
should make £55 million. 
This would place the shares 
on a p/e of 1 1.5 times. 

With the 5-times exit p/e 
paid recently by the group for 
a Spanish security printing 
business, the printing side 
needs to improve its perfor- 
mance to justify foe present 
rating. The shares may do no 
more than consolidate at 
present levels. 

Apricot 

Compnters 

Apricot Computers is staking 
its future on XEN4, its up- 
market IBM-compatible 
computer launched last June. 
It hopes to sell the computers 
in £10,000 to £20,000 multi- 
user packages to corporate 
customers. 


into a group with a market 
more than 40 per 


Combined safes of XEN- 

and foe older XEN are about 

900 a month, but there is no 
further detail except ; hat sales 
of foe XEN-i are six weeks 
behind budget- It is wifo tins 
scanty information that the 
shareholder must assess how 
popular XEN-i w»D become. 

Apricot yesterday reported 
an interim pretax profit of 
£2.5 million. However, n « 
estimated that less than £1 
million of this came from 
sales in computer hardware. 
Of this ffeure about £400.000 
is estimated to have come 
from foe cut-price sale of 

obsolete computers. 

There will be no profits 
from this source in the sec- 
ond half. Nor will there be a 
repeat of the £200,000 gain 
made with the sale of the 
company's head office. How- 
ever,- a steady 10 per cent 
advance to £1.3 million in the 
financial systems and 
maintenance divisions and a 
halving of losses to France to 
£400,000 should allow Apri- 
cot to make £5.5 million in 
the year next March. 

It is hard to see when? 
Apricot goes from here. As 
foe only British manufacturer 
of powerful micros, it is 
favourably placed to win 
orders from central and local 
government. It may carve 
niches in the market by 
sefltog machines on the back 
of customer-designed soft- 
ware for people such as 
solicitors or formers. 

To succeed as a high- 
growth computer company, it 
most capture a decent share 
of the business market All 
computer manufacturers are 
trying to do this, and IBM. 
DEC and other Goliaths of 
the industry will not be 
knocked out teadily by foe 
stone in Apricot's sling. Nor 
will Apricot be immune to 
attack from the cheap end of 
the market, since the new 
Amstrads can be plugged into 
any IBM compatible net- 
work. 

Apricot's financial strength 
— it has £4 million cash and 
no debt — means it will be 
here for some time. But 
investors wanting above-av- 
erage ear nin g* growth and a 
dividend would be advised to 
look elsewhere. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQWTIES 


A* 

BCE ( 38 p) 

Baker Harris Sndr f 170 p) 
I1F 

Exhfo 

BflstonABanerssa 
Cftygrove (lOOp) 

Euro Homs (ISOM 
Groat Souftom (I 35 p) 
Guthrie Coro ( 150 p) 
Harrison (I 50 p) 

Inter** Express ( 185 p) 
Local Lon Gp 


158 -2 
240-4 
40«a+1 
200-2 
122 
130-1 
148-3 
100 
145 
162 
189 
180+3 
208 +2 
288-7 


5«a 

133-1 
148-1 
184+2 
72 
92 
85 
175+2 
£13 
79Vi +V 

Thomas TV (I 90 p) 331 -4 

Trass tO* cat #9850 B 40 *ia-»ia 

Whirmey Macfcay C 160 p) 165+1 

Wootens Batter ( 104 p) 88 

Yatverton 08 p) 34 

Yorkshire TV fl 25 p) 183-3 


London Assc tnv Tst 
MartxjrOugh Tech (UOp) 
Mecca Lnsura ( 135 p) 
MBar & Swiftouse < 105 ty 
Newage Trans C 75 p) 
Radamoc Gp ( 90 p) 
Rotunda ( 9 Sp) 

Sanded Peridns ( 135 p) 
ScorMtge IDO* 

TS 8 t Qrouj) (I 00 p) 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Baftmy F/P 
Btoa ArrOw N/P 
Br.BenaH N/P 
Brown Kant F/P 

Bswfch N/P 
FR Group N/P 
Norfefc Cop F/P 

PMTOCSI N/P 
Radtend N/P 
Stebo F/P 

(Issue price in brackets). 


144 

65-5 

4 - 1 
91 

1»2 

5 

23 ’j 

5 - 5 
60 -5 

370+10 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 

' 

Jan 

tola 

JM 

Jan 

Pun 

_*gt_ 

JM 


Sadat 

CMa 
Doe Mar 

Jon 

Dae 

Me 

Mar 

Job 

ABed Lyons 
r« 5 | 

300 

330 

25 3835 4343 
10 18 27 

8 

25 

12 

28 

18 

35 

Jaauar 

(W 

500 

550 

600 

33 

9 

3 

51 

23 

15 

IS 
. 45 

14 

47 

92 

28 

SO 

90 

33 

55 

380 

2 

9 

— 

SO 

52 


ThomEM 

420 

77 

67 

102 

2 K 



BP 

(W) 

600 

680 

700 

107 

65 

33 

128 

as 

50 

100 

67 

a 

- 14 
35 

12 

28 

58 

35 

65 

cm 

460 

500 

550 

45 

IB 

4 ' 

68 

32 

16 

72 

50 

12 

25 

67 

17 

32 

7 Z 

20 

40 

Cons Gold 

cm 

550 

600 

650 

160 

110 

72 

182 

124 

90 

134 

102 

B 

12 

20 

13 

23 

38 

32 

S 3 

Tens . 
rm 

330 

360 

390 

420 

78 

43 

23 

9 

65 

40 

22 

55 

1 

3 

7 

"i 

IS 

19 

Courtaulds 

F 320 ) 










25 

32 

45 

280 

44 

58 

68 

2 

8 

9 


Series 

Nov 

Fab Mar 

Nov 

Feb Hey 


330 

14 

2 B 

aa 

21 

24 

28 

Brit Aaro 
(* 486 ) 

420 

460 

BOO 

77 

37 

6 % 

95 

60 

35 

103 

'1 

7 

13 

Cam Union 

260 

81 

38 


4 

8 


85 

IK 

13 

12 

25 

■17 

32 


300 

10 

16 

22 

25 

30 

34 

BAT Ma 

P 473 ) 

360 

115 

85 

55 

16 

128 

— 

K 

1 

— 

Cable & Wire 

ra»> 

300 

32 S 

26 

12 

37 

23 

45 

18 

30 

26 

38 

28 

420 ' 

400 

75 

40 

106 

82 

45 

1 

4 

1 ft 

7 - 

15 

3 

9 

20 


375 

2 


— 

75 


— ‘ 

Barclays 

(* 484 ) 

460 

500 

550 

22 

IK 

1 

47 

60 

2 

14 

20 

GEC 

160 

22 

20 

30 

3 

5 

0 

25 

9 

37 

18 

28 

77 

Jb 

00 

40 

62 


200 

4 K 

7 » 


26 

28 


BritTetacom 

( 183 ) 

180 

18 

28 

34 

ft 

5 

8 

Grand Mot 

360 

88 

93 

- 

1 

3 

- 

200 

220 

3 

K 

13 * 

6 

21 

13 

4 

23 

14 

26 

16 
• 29 


420 

460 

38 

20 

47 

28 

63 

43 

« 

33 

17 

40 

22 

42 

Cadbury Schwpps 160 
087 ) 180 

28 

8 . 

37 

21 

41 

27 

* 

2 ft 

. 6 
' 8 

a 

15 












13 

18 

14 

72. 

26 

C 1063 J 

1000 

1050 

1100 

92 

57 

30 

ITS 

83 

58 

107 

80 

11 

25 

60 

27 

46 

73 

52 

77 

•Amass 

( 344 ) 

300 

330 

380 

45 

18 

2 

57 

30 

14 

63 

36 

20 

1 

3 

20 

4 

13 

25 

10 

17 

33 

Land Sac 

C 344 ) 

300 

330 

360 

46 

23 

9 

55 

34 

15 

65 

43 

22 

2 

7 

20 

5 

10 

23 

7 

14 

28 

imperial Gr 
(* 418 ) 

300 

330 

360 

120 

90 

80 

— 


1 

1 

1 

~ 


Marks & Span 
P 97 J 

180 

200 

220 

23 

10 

2 

30 

16 

8 

37 

24 

12 

3 

9 

27 

5 

13 

28 

9 

16 

SO 

Ladbraka 

(* 375 ) 

330 

360 

390 

50 

18 

4 

63 

37 

22 

70 

48 

28 

1 

2 

15 

5 

10 

21 

7 

17 

27 

Shell Trans 

rwi> 

850 

900 

850 

112 

78 

46 

133 

100 

67 

162 

120 

87 

5 

18 

37 

18 

35 

68 

25 

45 

68 

LASMO 

051 ) 

.130 

740 

160 

23 

13 

2 

30 

24 

13 

36 

29 

20 

ft 

IK 

12 

8 

10 

in 

11 

16 

23 

Trafalgar House 

cm 

260 

280 

300 

34 

21 

11 

43 

30 

19 

52 

39 

26 

3 

1 Z 

23 

10 

16 

27 

11 

21 

34 

MtcBand Bank 
C 57 Z) 

500 

550 

600 

72 

26 

2 

82 

SO 

18 

105 

02 

77 

2 

4 

37 

5 

18 

40 

10 

25 

47 

T 8 B 

(■791 

80 

90 

100 

5 

n 

■ X 

916 

SR 

2 

12 

6 R 

4 

12 

21 K 

6 » 

13 

22 

7 * 

14 

P&O 

(* 528 ) 

460 

500 

550 

72 

32 

S 

85 

S 3 

23 

95 

65 

32 

1 

2 

25 

5 

12 

33 

8 

17 

42 










BOO 

Vt 



73 


Sartos 

Dec 

Mar 

Job 

Dee 

tor 

Joo 

Racal 

077 ) 

. 160 
180 

20 

29 

38 

24 

12 

IK 

8 

8 ft 

Doecham 

T 434 J 

360 

m 

420 

460 

78 

48 

28 

8 






* 200 

1 

a 

24 

m 

30 

60 

45 

26 

71 

64 

66 

2 

10 

35 

S 

21 

42 

13 

26 

48 

RTZ 

cm 

600 

850 

70 O 

750 

97 

47 

11 

2 

110 

78 

47 

127 

90 

60 

ft 

2 

15 

12 

25 

45 

20 

40 

62 

Boots 

cm 

200 

220 

240 

40 

22 

7 % 

50 

39 

21 

58 

40 

2 S 

1 

4 

10 

3 

9 

14 

fi 

11 

19 

Vast Hoofs 
(* 80 ) 

70 

80 

90 

11 

2 K 

18 

9 K 

4 K 

19 K 

14 

1 

ax 

5 ft 

9 

7 

lift 

17 

BTR 

cm 

280 

300 

307 

19 

6 

32 

22 

36 

28 

s 

iw 

10 

20 

18 

a 






Boss 

rrs3} 

650 

TOO 

750 

110 

TO 

30 

120 

83 

S 3 

125 

90 

60 

2 

6 

25 

6 

13 

as 

” 

25 

4 fi 

Lonrtto 

P 241 ) . 

Swfes 

200 

218 

Nov 

42 

24 

Mar 

49 

Jaw 

54 

Hot 

IK 

IK 

Mar 

3 

Jon 

a 

Blue Greta 
(* 8378 ) 

550 

600 

650 

95 

68 

26 

110 

88 

40 

115 

78 

57 

4 

5 

30 

9 

20 

40 

17 

25 

45 


240 

255 

1 

19 

25 

1 

16 

18 

23 

Do Boers 

rm 

650 

700 

750 

800 

m 

155 


20 

23 

40 

60 

90 

S 3 

88 


Striae 

Nor 


Hay" 

Nov 

Prih 

Kfay 

57 

32 

98 115 
70 — 

J. 

Tr 11 %% 1991 

reuw 

too 

102 

«" 

% 

SFh 

T»» 

3 

2 

I’m 

I'm 

2 

1 ft 

2K 

Dorans 

(W) 

300 

330 

360 

52 

30 

10 

68 

42 

24 

64 

48 

1 

4 

18 

2 R 

8 

26 

14 

30 

TM 1 *% 03/07 
. rei 09 j 

106 

108 

*’«# 

•‘w 

3 H 

“n 

IX 

l'» 

V 

4 »» 

3 % 

ft 

»«* 



GKN 

f 2 S 74 ) 

240 

260 

280 

300 

29 

13 

7 

3 

39 
24 
•14 
„ fl . 

46 

34 

a 

7 

13 

•25 

44 

8 

19 

31 

44 

13 

23 

35 


112 

114 

115 

h> 

*•# 

IK 

IK 

2 ft 

4 ft 

6 ft 

6 K 

4 ^ 1 * 

5 ft 

T'm 

9 

5 ft 

6 K 

7 ft 

Oft 

813 X 0 

C 8 Z 79 ) 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

55 

98 

68 

48 

13 

125 

97 

73 

IB 

38 

85 

!§! 

53 

78 

110 


Nov Dae 

Jan 

Fab 

Nov 

Dee 


Fan 

11 

6 

84 

iao 

FT-SE 1525 
Index 1550 

135 — 
110 IIS 

120 


1 

2 

~8 

13 


Hanson 

(* 215 ) 

160 

180 

200 

220 

56 * 58 H — 

36 X 40 « 44 X 
17 m 30 % 
6 K I 2 » 18 H 

» i - 

* a 4 

2 5 ft 94 

10 14 R 17 X 

1600 

1625 

1700 

65 92 
62 70 
42 53 

25 38 
13 27 

5 16 

100 

82 

65 

50 

35 

75 

58 

42 

3 

7 

§ 

40 

sa 

11 

18 

2 B 

35 

48 

62 

20 

2 S 

35 

47 

58 

40 

52 

65 

| Haweaftar 11 , 1988 . ToW -Uortartringaeoaniy price. 




r'-jp 



With $2.5 billion in capital, we are the second largest 
investment bank on Wall Street. We are also one of the 
most profitable. 

Our 1250 employees in London will be housed in 
Broadgate, one of the largest and most sophisticated 
office complexes in Europe. 

We are investing nearly £16 million in computer 
technology. We are developing one of the warla's most 
sophisticated trading systems in partnership with the 
London Stock Exchange and IBM. 

As the only U.S. broker to buy a UK. broker, 

L. Messd&Co,, forBigBang, we 
will offer our combined clients 
these professional services. 

In Gilts, Messel Gilts 
Limited, our primary dealer, of- 
fers continuity. They will build 
on the same sales and research 


^ 

; • ' *• • • ■ 


teams as pre- _ 
ther offer consistency in prices 
fcomateamof traders who draw 
on Shearson Lehman's Govern- 
ment trading experience. They 
will be working with the confi- 
dence of a back office that will 

be equipped with systems JL 

technology to handle major increases in volume while 
preserving our full range of agency services. 

In U K. equities, L. Messel & Co., with a team of 
21 market makers, will trade 350 issues. They will be 
backed by the strength of the largest OTC equity 


trading operation in the world. 

Our U.K. research includes regular publications on 
macroeconomics and portfolio strategy. Our 38 analysts 
cover 85% by capitalisation of the U.K. equity market. 

We have 32 salesmen to ensure that our trading and re- 
search strengths are effectively communicated to our clients. 

In the U.K. money markets, our activity in sterling 
FRN, CD and Commercial Paper markets is highlighted 
by the Allied-Lyons recent sterling commercial paper pro- 
grammes, the benchmark issue in that market. We have 
also been appointed dedicated dealer of over £2 billion 

In commodities and futures, 
Shearson Lehman's long- 
established position in world 
commodity markets has been 
strengthened by our leading 
presence on the London Metals 
Exchange, LIFFE and Gold 
Bullion market. 

No commitment to fire U.K. 
would be complete without 
offering our clients a full service 
in corporate finance. We have 
attracted some of the City's 
brightest merchant bankers. 
Together with Messel's corporate finance team, they are 
now providing U.K. companies with advice on M&A, 
leveraged buy-outs and capital raising. 

Inis is Shearson Lehman in the U.K. We invite you 
to put us to the test. 




> . 


' ificiency 

which 
ex, h-, 
aid rose 
3wih in 
ras an 
lTdtd- 
of the 
from 7 
at and 
entum. 
Jgles is 
where 
d mil- 

10 mil - ’ 
cxpen- 
ked-to ' 
tidihe 
which ' 
it not • 
ds are ; 

f this ' 
stages 
areas 
nt es~ j 
AZT , 
f £70 

nted .’ 
>r the 
ad to • 
Shot- 
ever- . 
lead • 
acted 1 
but : 







/• 


C MB6 Sbtauwn Bratha* toe. 


Messel Gilts Limited: Philip Howard (626 2525) . L. Messel & Co, (ILK . Equities): Mark Cannon-Brookes (377 0123) 

ILK Money Markets: Stuart Clenaguan (626 2525) 
v . Commodities: Craig Black (283 8711) ILK Corporate Finance: William R, Harrison (626 2S2SJ 


































































STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


— ^cld— 

From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 

E u Wished on this page. If il matches you 
ave won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. Yon must always have 
your card available when claiming. 






— ^cld — 

#?) Tines Neesgapm Liwiied 

daily dividend 

£4,000 

Claims required for 
+36 points 

Clflimairts should ring 0254-53272 


r 


Gakier 

In*, q—j 

Gnat 

to» 



Hob Inn OWT 


Property 


Chemicals, Ptaa 


Rnbrmfl & Harrey 1 Industrials E-K 


Drapery, Stores 


510 515 -7 

112 - 

an so .. 

71 75 +1 

131 132 -*i 

3H 312 -1 

no 715 -2 

77B 7B0 -3 

870 p3 • 

m 300 +to 


Z7X S* 53 
an 3.4 u 
uSb 62 m 

7*1 s'* 

Ml U i; 

K it OX 

M JS-S 

fiU 80 BIB 





El 


Lon A Ediu To I Pnjjeny 


Schoks (GH) | Ekoricab 


Properly 


Amsuad 


Hambro Coumrywid 


Simon Eng I lndmiriafe S-Z 


Motors, Aircraft 


Young (H) I Industrials S-Z 


LASMO I Oil 


t~m 


Irr- 




ySST 1 


*e rax o m b 

*«. ft V $ 

« 

-2 4.1 ZB SS 

-I It 51 112 

+2 &4 2.1 2*2 

. 11.4 25 15-6 

? as b 

S i 

+Z 350 41 158 

JT, il 44 135 
• 88 48 9.1 

69 16 .. 

+<i 32 28 til' 

+a- u u m 

-3 KtO 48 03 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


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stero 6ptt t Tan-tree . . to sigrencent data. 





































































— e 


•V.-.-T* 

V" 



32 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


LOOK 
DOWN ON 
LONDON 



TOP FLATS 
NOW 

RELEASED 


LAST PHASE - i4th-2Qih FLOORS 

JAY COURT, BATTERSEA PARK ROAD, SW11 

PLEASE PHONE 

30* INUUOR 

HEATED POOL \ / 

SQUASH COURT POOL\ / _™3rc«( S 

DANCE PARTY COMPLEXj | ^ *3 

SUN TERRACE SOLARIS 
MULTIGYM 

BUY 
NOW 

FOR >OUR 
SON/ 

DAUGHTER 
TO SAVE 
TAX 


RESIDENT 

TRAINER 


ROOMS RICH CARPETS 
PORTER AND VIDEO 

entryphone 


ONE MILE CHELSEA 
TWO MILES WEST END 
THREE MILES CITY 


200 YARDS TO PRINCE 
OF WALES DRIVE AND 
BATTERSEA PARK FOR 
JOGGING AND TENNIS 




VIEWIN G SUN DAY 
AND WEEKDAYS 
UAM-7PM 

NOT SATURDAYS. 


PUCE GUIDE THIS X COME ROUND 

WEEK ONLY NOW AND GASP 

ONEBEDOHStm - AT 4 SUPERB 

TWOMQO«1I2J«» SHOW FLATS 

THREE BED UM-CLftOM 
SHOW FLATS: 81422 9993/720 43M 


DRUCE 



JOHN H JAMES 
& TIFNEllS 


ELM PARK ROAD SW3 £169,000 

Immaculate First Boor Hat Newly decorated communal en h a nce halt 2 beds, large 
living room with access to South-iacing terrace, garden views to front and rear. WeB- 
fitted kitchen and bathroom. Lease: Si years. 

CRANMER COURT SW3 £183,000 

Bright 3rd Boer Bat to update. Airy southerly aspect 19*1 T living room, large 
kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom. EXECUTOR SALE. Lease: 85 years. 


A CHALLENGING MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY 
See Situations Vacant "Non Secretariat” Page 40 


BARKSTON GARDENS SW5 £225,000 

3/4 Bedroom Ground Boor Bat with large living rooms tar entertaining. Use of 
gardens, freshly decorated common parts. New bathroom suites. Lease: 1 1 B years. 

CHEYNE WALK SW3 £650,000 

A BeautifuBy Renovated Period House with superb River views. Bne hafl. drawing 
room with South-faring balcony. library, conservatory, dining room. custom-huH 

kitchen. 5 bedrooms. 3 bathrooms. Lift. Long waited garden. Lease: 64 years. Joint 

Agents: John D Wood. 

JOHN H JAMES & TUFNELLS 
01 730 9112 

28 Elizabeth Street London SW1W 9RF 


B manure 

dose to aw Park. tWAWWG BOOM MAW BEDROOM WITH 


the soiaM m* put at Kiwntstjr^w'^^M j 
WITH MESSING AREA MO EN SCfflE 'N I 


am ^ Tj 

cnsjte a] 


■ BATHROOM BBmOOM 2 BATHROOM 2 KITCtCN EXCELLENT STORAGE SPACE HOBUfflENTSAS WW 

HW LEASE APfflBX 40 TEARS . 

Hoof nest faeng roams. Racenfly 

WITH EH SUnt SHOWS* BOOM 

BEDROOM TWO BATHROOM KITCHEN UFT CH & UhW WWIWUU USE Of COMMUNAL SftBDEHSl 

entrance phone lease 73 years _ _ , _ „ M— !M 

srs KMsiasa 

CENTOL ttiTWG & HOT WATER OW0NAL VCTCftAN RflERACES WIWNCE PHOHfc 
LEASE 996 YEARS PWCE K ra a JM 

HYDE PMK GATE SOT An imrassiw U totems aril imttBWU 
aiHte-sxmlto IN Soulti of me Parti. DOUBli RECEPTION ROOMTHREtBSWOONS 

en sure shower roo m urg e kttchejc/b^ast room spacious entrance hail ch 

& HW PATO SAUNA POKTBWGE LEAS NTOOX 122 YEARS 

HOOD SIBBT. SW3 MB RBUCTHM A Ikw Cfarttt house AMhrsteM dose toto and taKra* 
tari. THREE RECEPTION ROOMS FOUR BOTOOMS TWO BA1H8PDMS P Bl SUITE) EN MT E SHOWS 
ROOM M TCHBt C LOAKROOM PATO LARGE ROOF TERRACE GAS CH FWBWin WUCE £ 415209 
BfflmNE STREET. SWl A mast anm oenoa house rac entfy moaemnd to a ragu saoaara. Stcerfi 
■■■a k£ DRAWING ROOM OMNG ROOM STUDY TWO fiffiflOOMS RATH ROpg MTOCi UtCty 
IPA im/SARDEN GAS CW LEASE APPROX M YEARS ■ 



RESIDENTIAIi 

20 Montpelier Street &rigtnsbridgeSW7 IHE. 

01-5846106 



OFRCE 

E.14 EXECUTIVE 5 Bedroom Houses with river views 
now inter construction by “Costan Homes' tow 
mmsfiwg on first phase from £209,000. 

Shad Thames PDA THE SOBH8TOA7© OTTER A 
superb split level apartment with dazang River Views, 
lounge. Gafleried Bedroom, fitted Jtaran Unify Ba- 
throom, Video entry phone. Porter £ 1 87 JOG. 

E.14 BUOY THE LUXURY of owing tins ftewtous Quay 
side House with Private Mooring 2/3 Bedrooms. Lange, 
Luxury Bathroom. fitted Kitetafl £155.000. 

£1 UttUOT PLUS Outstanding fbm Mews from this 
fetey Constructed apartment. 2 Bedrooms, Lounge with 
Balcony, fitted Kitchen, Bathroom. Private umgropn 
prang £149.000. 

£14 A CLASSIC TOUCH PREVAILS in this attractive 
Period style, 3 Bedroom House on which the Vendor has 
spaed no expense. His property can only be appre- 
etted by an internal inspection £135,000. 

£1 KMB SQE ACCQMMODATHM Is a feature of this 
Vfctonan Warehouse Conversant 3 Bedrooms, 44' 
Lounge, fitted Kitchen, Utity Room. 2 Bathrooms. 
Central Heahng. Garage £275,000. 

£14 RELAX AMS BUOY the outetemfing Rver View 
tram the Lounge of the 2nd floor apartment fitted Be- 
droom. writ appointed Kitchen, Bathroom. Central Heat- 
ing. Garage £11540. 

£1 CAN YOU AFFORD not to view this attractive apart- 
ment overlooking the exciting Tobacco Dock" 2 Be- 
drooms. Lounge, fitted Kitchen. Bathroom. Hasting, 
Garage ftoW&O. 

£14 A RATIO GABOSi By the Rhw is oniy one of tt* 
many fea&ns of too newly constructed 1 Bedroom 
apartment. Lounge, fitted Kitchen. Bathroom, Heating 
£85400. 

£1 DEAL FOB BITBITABBRG Spacious Quotes 
apartment overlooking Tobacco Dock" 2/3 Bedrooms, 
Lounge, Kitchen, 2 Bathrooms. Central Heating. 6mge 
£140 WL 



The Businessman’s 


home from home. 


Luxurious Apartments 
for the international businessman 
in this famous London building 

FOR SALE 

FROM £68^00 - US YEAR LEASES 


Sales Office Open Daily: 01-589 5100 
MON. — SAT. SUNDAY Tekac 937067 

lCb.«o.— 7pJa- Um.— dp.ro- F>» Ot-225 Z2B6 

HamptnASns • Keith CmdaleGraws 
01-4938222 0T5810155 




JUST RELEASED 
AT UNBEATABLE PRICES 




Wickham Court 

7/8 Ashfaurn Gardens, South Kensington, London SW7 
Large 2 and 3 bedroom apartments all with terraces at prices you 
can't afford to miss. Large rooms - High ceilings - Luxury finishes. 

2 Beds.. 2 Baths. Terrace. £149,950-£1 79,950 

3 Beds.. 2 Baths. Terrace. £169,950-£189,950 

Lift: Video Entryphone: Fully Fitted Kitchens: Modem Bathrooms: 
Large Reception Rooms: Carpets: Original Features: Terraces. 

125 Year Leases Low outgoings 
Show Flat Open Today 12.00 - 4.00p.m. 01-373 0461 

Nelson Hearn 


=9 


K 


96 Earls Court Road 
Kensingron London W8 
Tel: 01-937 3811/4408 


viewing 
TTr V ttF.COMMENPEP 



1fl0% UP TO £150400 
95% UP TO £500,000 
80% NO PROOF OF INCOME 
4 X SINGLE INCOME 
3 X JOINT INCOME 


FREE 

SURVEY 


RING: 01-435 3138 


For 


Windsor Mortgage Services 

28b Hampstead High Street NW3 1QA 


u: 


FUNDS 
AVAILABLE 
FORA 
UM1TED 
PERIOD ONLY 




Aim START SCffiK 
BASS) M 11% (114 APR) 


NET CALL B3 Kf OE OtH MTlffi 



'4 1 86T83]QI 


OR GALL 0202 8^23 

HIOEPENKNT MORTGAGE SKCiAllSTS 7 HMUY MUSE VPPSR HWi£Y ST idsdn ran 


! 4 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 





• MORTGAGES- 100 % advanced up to 
e 120,000 • 3Mx main income ptus. ixsecondary 
income • %x jo int Incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES For anv reason, eg 

• Home improvements. Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses. Large Leisure Purchase, 
(boat caravan. etcJ • Second House, (UX or 
Overseas! • Matrimonai settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings 

m COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shoos, factories. Etc. 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 


'i A 


6lovatune. 
Lena on 
ECJ 


Robson _ 4 !t|f 

i!im 

01-623 3495 mzz&Zg 


>^=Wlnkworth=^v 

* MORTGAGES X 

SCHEMES CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 

* 4 fines see me or 4 + Z for joint 


100% mortgages «0b bo upper Until - 
all legal costs added to mortgage 
No etrfdeace of raceme required for 
loaos lor qaaOfyiag applicants 
Re-mortgages far quaStyisg purposes 

Ring 01-235 0691 
For full Information 
Open until 8pm today 


\ 


Winkworth 

Financial Services 
25a Motcomb Street 
London SWl 


/ 


DE GROOT COLLIS 

facrifeai Vatee - Priced For Qfc 


CAM YE PLACE. S*M 
A pancawtv «w*. oamv^ FnAM 
twtaaWHMWg a wimn 
annioaaiDniH«%o« 6n- 
na Room 2 BeK Bib F«bJ 
KidK Ga«n. CSSjU 

CH5LSEA GR^LSWa 
Baffin* wnmBVfl . nertor Ot- 
santa iparo ooar lu wh dctqtflU 
POBMAtarMUaiK 
taw 46 Teas tH2DOO 


gUI PAM MMOL MO 
rtanai noamsed 2ni tag flat 
DiM- 
taop 
Yias 


ma ton ascecr *i 

S 2 Beos: Sewn „ 
taiooy: far 6*m.- 
D4S400 
PCWB PIACE. SW3 
Dewww fWd smy cottage aM 
panwg consss :or an aawwwi 

hppr. M rasas 2 Bats: Reap: 
g&tJHk Praawo 

E187JM0 


CHELSEA OFFICE 01-352 1066 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 


How the 
Green has 
trebled 
its prices 

By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 


As London 


prices continue to 


property _ 
rise to the limits of people’s capacity to 
pay and beyond, there is a never-ending 
search for parts of the capital which have 
been lost or forgotten and yet- have the 
potential to join the ranics of highly 
desirable areas. 

Brook Green in Hammersmith, a 
green oasis among rather patchy prop- 
erty in west London, is just such a piaoe, 
and judgingfrom the prices being paid in 
die area it has pot there, providing a 
focus for fast-mcreasing values all 
around. 

It has some good, solid Edwardian 
houses, a few older ones, and now a huge' 
new development at its south-east 
extremity on tbe site of die former Lyons 
headquarters, Cadby HalL 

Marsh and, Parsons, with an office 
round the comer from Brook Green in 
Shepherds Bush Road, has watched its 
rise and rise in recent years. Michael 
Hyatt, in charge of the office, believes 
that residential prices there have been 
substantially bolstered by the Cadby Hall 
development and by foe extensive 
programme of renovation carried out 
during foe foe past 10 years within tin; 
Green. . 

Brook Green is a distinct local 
community, with famil y amenities of- 
fered by foe Green itself and served by 
shopping and transport in King Street 
and locally within Blythe village. In 1983 
a freehold family house in Brook Green 
sold for around £70,000. Now it fetches 

Teople found other 
areas too expensive 9 

more than treble, at least £250,000, a 
reflection of the demand for family 
houses and their comparative scarcity. 

Mir Hyatt points out that the major 
part of that enormous increase came in 
one year, from early 1985 to early this 
year, when the market was particularly 
strong. He says: “People were finding 
areas like Holland Park too expensive 
and were looking for somewhere else, not 
too for away. It was not much of a 
wrench for them to come here. In 
adriiiinp t others have been moving 
further into London from places like 
Chiswick, and one of foe attractions is 
the schools — St Paul’s Girts’ School and 
the Ecole Francaise.” 

The main property at present for sale 
on foe Green is Oxford House, built 
around 1750 and believed to be the 
oldest surviving house there. This fine 
semi-detached and double-fronted house 



is on two floors, and has been carefully 
restored by foe present owners. It has a 
30ft entrance hall, a double drawing 
room, a dining room and study, five 
bedrooms and two bathrooms, one en 
suite. Tbe cellar extends to almost tbe 
total floor area, and tbe kitchen-break- 
fast room has french windows to the 70ft 
rear garden. 

The house was originally put on tbe 
market at £495,000, but Marsh and 
Parsons is now asking for offers around 
£450,000, which could weD be a record 
price for tbe Green. 

The same agents are selling number 88 
Brook Green, a substantial Edwardian 
house with a double sitting room, six 
bedrooms and two bathrooms, and a 
further sitting room or extra bedroom. 
The house has a paved patio garden, and 
is on offer at more than £300,000. By 
contrast in Queen's Mansions, the 
agents recently sold an artist's studio 
needing renovation for £83,000. 

Further down tbe Green is a new' 
development of town houses by Mat- 
thew Homes. Oxford Gate has 13 houses 
in a mews behind electrically operated 
security gates. There are two styles of the 
three-floor four-bedroom house, built in 
yellow stock brick with slate roofs. Some 
have a drawing room and dining room, 
with a detached garage, while others, 
with an integrated garage, have one large 
living room. Electrically operated garage 
doors, video entryphones and internal 
intercoms to every flora- complete the 
modem, security-conscious picture, and 
several of foe houses have been sold. 
Those still available are priced at around 
£325,000 through John D. Wood, .. 


many local people believe looks lime 
better. They are disappointed with the 
unprepossessing look of the blocks which 
they say presented a fine opportunity for 
a really imaginative development. 

The units are none tbe less designed to 
a hi gh specification and they have been 
selling successfully. In the first four 
phases, foe agents, Druce Developments, 
have sold 70 apartments and penthouses 


Roof garden with gr 
views over Loadoi 


and 

on 


in foe past 10 months, as well as !9 
townfaouses. Phase five is Regent House, 
incorporating 21 two-bedroom and 
three-bedroom apartments of five types, 
each with two bathrooms and a living 
area opening on to a balcony. There are 
also two penthouses — one to be tdeasd 
later— with a 3,000 sq ft roof garden giv- 
ing grand views over London, regarded 
as the pinnacle of foe whole 
development. 

The penthouse to be offered for sale 
soon has four bedrooms, four en suite 
bathrooms and large reception areas. 
The price is £525,000. The two-bedroom 
apartments start ax £199,950 and those 
with three bedrooms at £265,000. 

A second courtyard of 20 town houses 
soon to come on to the market includes 
six different styles, each with four 
bedrooms and private gardens, and 
priced from £350.000. 


MORTGAGE or REMORTGAGE 


AM- G 



FREE CONVEYANCING 

by established firms of W.i. solicitors 

ON TYPICAL £60,000 
PURCHASE YOU WOULD 
SAVE UP TO £700 


□ 

□ 


95% UP TO £500,000 
70% NON STATUS up to £250.000 
(no proof of income required) 

□ LOW START SCHEMES 
Payments start at 7,88% pJL 

□ 100% UP TO £100,000 

3 x JOINT or 
3.7 x SINGLE income 
Tel: 01-431 0035 for immediate grate 
40A High Street, Hampstead, NW3 


MILLBROOKC MORTGAGE 
4- INVESTMENT SERVICES 

235 Upper Admontf fW, Putney, tendon SWI5 2SN 

01-788 7775 (24 tarsi 

100 % op to C 120400 9M% BP «o dJMXMXM 

10.25% 

RasidenSri iMOttgo *x «ny purpose pfus cobimkW mortgages 
job 3 x Jotat x 4 (Protacskmate) 

apecUtaty In IsMtae a w e**. satf«fl¥*»acl non - aote rtWW fl*pafna»s. 
Compteoon mVwi tnrw> nooks o! fnKfng prapeny 
Mso pension + Bwasonew txokere • • 

Urmmmmt *r OfUcm of Art r nrn tXu g lb 190797. 


MORTGAGES 

INTEREST RATES FROM 


9.75% 

(13.4% A.F.R) 


• 100 % 

• Non-Status 

• Principle decisions within 24 hours 

• Solicitors Conveyancing £180 + 
V-A.T. . 

• Pennon Mortgages 

Piece yodf raortmgB aith one of tbe north most we- 
cental independent financial adrieary aerticee. Whh 
oc ean to efl tht mortgage oampanwe operating at tba 
UJK- Qm a m Ftna n o a l Services can provide the moat 
arato t and coat e ff ec ti ng option to soft titer di- 
esu needs. Impartial advice » jut on* of the 
advantages of dealing with O wnw Financial 
Service#. 

Telephone 01-379 3452 

■ Centric House 
391 Tbe Strand 
London WC2R OLT 
OVERSEAS 
FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 



ST. MARY’S VICARAGE 
Stamford Brook, W12 

4. presuee development h> : 


Splendid Victorian vknrage, btamrffnfiv reoored and 
refiutiisbed to retain (be wftsKhof period lea tores. 

Eleaam reception hafl, spacious reception rcwm.diniiu; 
room, library superb LU/Mst room, utility room, nusaer 
bed room u-iiti en suite bath & iacuzsishr. b further 
hednxfnv i further bathrooms. *iunj jucuzzi. ^vm. 
landscaped iHUtien. off street parkirn: fori 

Leasehold ; 9K years. Freehold avaflaNe. £5953)00. 

HALLETT LINES & Co. SAVILLS 

01-7412102 01-7300822 


5 Luxury Apartments 
1, St Georges Sq SWl 

Elis and Co are delighted to offer for sale a 
selection of 2 bedroomed flats and 1 penthouse, 
overlooking saugbt after garden square. Offering 
a high specification to include: folly fined 
kitchens, bathrooms, carpeting, video entry 
phone, and UFT to all floors. GCH. Sensiblrly 
’ d between £125.000 - £145.000. Penthouse 
,000. 110 year teases. 

Sole seffing agents 
EBis and co, 285 Brampton 
C,U Road, Knigbtsbridge SW3 
Td 91 225 9625 



KHALEEG INVESTMENTS 
LTD. 

Wit. HoBmd Park. Snwnig onire pomd floor apt in 
bant rfiU period bmWing. 3 beds, 2 bams (1 en suheL 28 ft 


w n gon. uw WS- Uast 93 yis. £435,000. 

W14. Elegant town bouse dose- Ken High St- S beds, 2 baths 
(j ensurte) w/ jaenzzi. 30 ft drawing nn, dining no, 
iit/bftakfe« nn. 60 ft gdn. F/H OTOD00 

WL Seymrar Race. Spa c 2nd floor nit in P.B. Woct 3 
beds, rec. Ipe kiL bath, W.C fliaoCWfor quick^fe 

WL Maiyidwoe Lane. 2 bed rnsns. Low o/g. Long lease. 

toS.000. 2 be*,' w, kn and bath, w/balc: £83,00a All new 
90 years leases. Gul now for apt to view. 

01 486 2321 


MARBLE ARCH 

Segtffl netey nfuitfefnti 2 baOroom, 2 baOawni Bat m westea btadc mh> 
bra tong room, am MJy fraed Kflcten. flwty is 

IHM 0L £225,000. 

FIRST AMONG EQUALS 

"W* •ton ram. 3 ensuts 

ss j^ssr ." l ** , ** te id! - 

Tel: 01-221 2221 


INTERCITY 

CONVEYANCING 

BySOfficeFkniOfSolidteis 

Offers 

CONVEYANCING 

From £175 (flirt VAT plus disbursements on et 
iransacaon. Written quotations on reouesL 

DIAL 100 AND ASK FOR 
FRE EPHONE, 
LAWHELP, STOWE & CO. 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


SWEBY COWAN 


RESIDENTIAL 

01 631 5313 


soocuuaa wz 

Sri up » ta a mn 2«o ih m 
» LanYma Can* »wk* 
sum m<m) Routt. OniriV' 
race ih ms. to u si 2 ri 
ob» sieaOBD 

listed pBonotaevn 

Doofaieairad m Sow a mum 
bowm on ramie Si » it i««p 
M 3 W Ml Ih Brin Ut aod 

VAST FMMY HAT mm 
sranpi *d * «on H urn Ob 

WMtS 

Twnri tariRs aari ridi ue 
«ms ne» HMB PaK 0* lies 

mat STono wi 


MB 24 Hour grillage 
ijfl nwr sec kn W ** 
Mh 97 yn. E72JDOO 


ASSOCIATED WITH 

HTLLKAMLTEL 

IMm»m MSIUIG 

Mortgages, Savings, 
Tan Planning, Pensions, 
life Assurance and 
Insurance 


LIQUIDATION SALE 

SW3 


EtoCWie «M*B * ntriy nsw- 

rawrig 4 utaons. 2 MK. 

a eqw raceptoi mm new 

Wrioora Me 2 h aw ori wi . new 

riown iri nobBCBi. Ois □< iwri 

wmog riROUce). b*. UK aoregr 

HiBtoWM O « pnHB g*BB6 Mtl 

asms com Mai Hr cafe b» mo ot 

OcnMf Lease 61 nas. 1470 jW 

Vpv or bw w w 
Teh 61-689 4567. 

91-738 2142 

Saba 





LOOK 

Are you 

* In foe country 

* Abroad 

and require property to 
test or purchase in Lon- 
don? CiO die complete 
professoral property Sod. 
ms service <n 

01-627 4713 (T> § 


MrtWAin aHuwui. *»»- 
atari lower qrtuod ww 
om-ewon. a muuiiea from 
Htue park. Arujctlw brim 
mm wilh onund Bmjtatr 
*Oa& nulri. auoowog tUmtm 
roomfttuav. 2 beds. -S hail»- 
whi nn« kHcnni * uuiib 
room small «abo. Oa <* m 
im r a rp rfa UnriuoMiri. 
1. 145.000 Tel Ol M9 a«.’ 


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Two sides of Brook Green: Oxford House, 

Way, regarded by some local people as Me better than Cadby Hall 

The 3.7-acre aie of Cadby Hall, a “red- 
bride monstrosity" according to Mr 
Hyatt, is being replaced by 42 bouses, 
127 flats and nine penthouses in foe 
Windsor Way development, which 


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i'HE liMta whi-nNtauAif l^uvcivuscK li. i^tio 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


.-■is aSfc. 


offered at more than £500,000. 
The house, on the site of the 

West MU, is semi-detached, 
coart house and neariy half an acre 
fwafled garden. H m divided into two 
tote, but could provide one property 
of fou r reception rooms and six or seven 

bedrooms. The agents for both are 
Jaofeawj-Stops A Staff’s Chelsea office 
and Winkwrorth and Co's EHackheath 
vWage office. 

■ Winkworth's office at 
Twickenham, Mfdcflesex, has a three- 
bedroom houseboat converted from 
a barge. The boat moored at Hollows 
WhaH near Kaw Bridge, has a sauna, 
two battifoores and a 27ft recaption 
room. Askmg price: £140,000. 

Nests in the West 

■ The Wttshlre-Bertcshire borders 
boast many fine country properties as 
either first or second homes. Pitt 
Cottage at Baydon, near Marlborough, six 
miles from a junction with the M4, is a 
Grade II listed cottage with the potential 
to join them but needs total renovation 
and improvement The property, originally 
butt as two cottages, has two 
reception rooms and three bedrooms. It 
has a recently re-thatched roof and is 

set in half an acre. Peter Rapson, of 
Ramsbury, Marlborough, expects 
keen interest The cottage will be 
auctioned at Ramsbury on December 
9 with a guide price of E80, M0 to 
£90,000. 

Still in Wiltshire, Surtton House, at 
Colling bourne Duds, is a William amt 
Mary house formerly betongingto the 
Marquis of Aflesbury's estate. The brick 
and flint restored house has four 
reception rooms, eight bedrooms, a staff 
fiat a heated swimming pool and nine 
acres of gardens and fenced paddocks. 
Pearsons at Stockbridge and Knight 
Frank & Rutiey at Hungerford are seeking 
more than £550,000. 

■ Pear Tree Cottage is a charming 
18th-century property in stone witn a 
thatched roof in the 
Northamptonshire conservation vSage 
of DudcSngton. It has been restored, 
retaining its period features such as 
exposed beams and an mglanook 
fireplace. The cottage has two reception 
rooms, a conservatory, two 
bedrooms, and a wa&ed garden, and 
Humberts' Stamford and London 
offices are askaig £80,000. 

■ The agents for Cotiege Heights, a 
refurbished block of 24 flats in St John 
Street, Islington, London, mentioned 

in this coJiann last week, are Bunch and 
Duke and Keith Cardaie Groves. 


The Castle at Castle Eden, County Durham, is a Grade II listed property built in 
1757 to the order of Boland Bunion, a member of the Company of Merchant 
Adventurers of Newcastle, designed by a local architect, wUliuii Newton. A 
conservatory, added ia 1863, is t honght to be the first bwilt in this corortiy of pre- 
cast concrete, and in 1893 servants^ quarters were added of freestone salvaged 
from Castle Eden coBiery. The castle has been modernized in the past six years, 
but a substantial amount of farther improvement is needed. Internally, mist of 
the rooms have been refloored and replastered. The ornate plaster m oa l d ja gs 
bare been restored a n d the cupola to the landing rebeflt Colin Mackenzie of 
Hampton & Sons, the *AiHng says it could form a superb and substantial 

house, or has potential for ®mer uses fagfadfag a number of apartments or 
houses. The agents’ guide price is £250,000 to £300,000 

Life in the stately style 


PRIVATE GARDEN 


Three beautiful flats set around a lovely 
secluded garden close to Hyde Park. 

The flats are large with well-proportioned 
rooms. They are presented for immediate 
occupation. 

There is a fully staffed resident 
management office to service the day to 
day requirements of the tenants. 

Lease 1 24 years. Prices from £345.000 to 
£550.000. 

VIEW TODAY 

52-05 Palace Court 

opposite Kensington Palace Gardens 

Telephone 01-221 3590 or Agents 

Aylesford 01-727 6663 

Savllls 01-221 1751 01-730 0822 


It says something about the value of 
owning property that to buy a part of a 
big house, albeit a portion of a castle, 
costs more than buying most houses. At 
the same time, it is a justifiable way of 
saving and using homes both historic 
and too large for single-family 
occupation. 

What better, then, than the address, 
Devizes Castle, Devizes, even if the 
occupant is not Lord Devizes. Devizes 
Castle, standing 200 yards from the 
town's main street, is a rather modern 
castle, built in the 1830s, but neverthe- 
less a proper structure in stone with 
caste liatioas. 

The old castle, rebuilt in 1138 after a 
fire in 1113, had been a ruin since 
Cromwellian times, although some of its 
stones still adorn buildings in the town, 
stolen by local people. 

Apartment Four of the castle is one of 
four and shares the old entrance hall and 
ground-floor reception area. It has been 
modernized and has its own front door, 
leading to a 37ft hall, three bedrooms, a 
large drawingroom with a bay window, 
and a small private chapel through a 
door in the comer. 

The owners of the four apartments 
have the use of the large and private 


fine Sussex country houses. No 4, 
Oldlands Haft, at Herons GhyU, near 
Uckfield, is the central part of a mansion 
set in 45 acres of gardens, park and 
woodland overlooking the South Downs. 

The mansion was designed by Sir 
Matthew Digby, built in 1869 for the 
then Italian Ambassador to the Court of 
St James, and occupied for many years 
by the family, who had made 

their money in cotton and gold. When 
Sir Bernard Eckstein died in 1948, the 
estate was broken up. 

Distinguished house 
facing the Downs 

The apartment for sale is on three 
floors and has a reception hall, a 
ballroom, a drawing and dining room, 
three principal bedrooms and three 
further bedrooms. It has a private garden 
ofa quarter ofan acre, surrounded by the 
remainder of the estate, and it will cost 
around £250,000. 

Humberts’ Lewes office is also selling 
another well modernized portion of a 
distinguished period bouse near 
Cowfold, West Sussex. Westbmds 
House, in a rural position with views 
towards the South Downs, has 16th- 


NO FUSS MORTGAGES FROM 

:ssr 10.75% 884 


No survey fees 
No legal fees 


— m — _ _ _ __ - _ IT 4 H J SXI'V' ■ n» 111 mmmwf 

grounds, and Mortimers ot Man borough cennmr origins, and has recently been 
is asking for offers of more than £89,000 OTm rU^ v ^^fortnshed. The part on 


for the long lease. The maintenance 
charge, one-fifth of the costs of upkeep of 
the Castle, is about £450 a year, and the 
agents say the apartment would be ideal 
either as a weekend retreat or a 
retirement borne. 

Humberts is selling portions of two 


completely refurbished. The part on 
offer has two reception rooms and three 
bedrooms, and has the use of the two 
acres of communal gardens and grounds 
containing a swimming pooL It is priced 
at around £160,000. 

cw 


BBC THE BEST - FORGET Tffi REST! 

MORTGAGES OP TO 100% 

• 4 x 1st INCOME + 2nd INCOME 

• 4y miNT INCOME 

* SPECIAL LOW START SCHEME FROM 4.7% 
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* BUSINESS FINANCE. REMORTGAGES, 
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4. INVESTMENTS 

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01-439 1448 

SuilB 512 Radnor Hauso 98 Rogntf St London W1 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
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It Installing Central Heating 
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SON STATUS MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

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(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

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• V> :mr* me. HjoL m existing lenders references 
roumrsd. 

• REMO KTGAUE for jny suiuble pu rpow. 

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• L '.-.!!!■ i:pM “if of purchase price i <r valiurii m 

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Phot Faiau Huk-ParUror Romaine Allum on 

s ,>r t» 7 ?re rr. Dctcmshire Fiiuncul ServKtt. . 
Ucti nsliifi House. 1 Devonshire Srreu. 

r)rV 'ONST)OQ , - «l 

FINANCIAL SERVICES _ 


CENTRAL PARK 
LODGE 

ssjsa rattsAS ns 

Station „ . , 

2 beds £215,000 (Penthouse). 

(Show Flat) £235,000. 

3 beds £199,500 & £205.000. 

4 beds £179.5000 & £260.000 & £270,000. 
FoJI details and floor plans available. 
FITZROY 
01 431 0184. 



★ Non status mortgages up to 80% 

★ Any purpose 

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★ 100% for first time buyers 

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up to 30% 

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HOME VISIT IF REQUIRED 
Commercial mortgages from llVffiij 

RAYMOND BRETT & CO 

DENBIGH HOUSE 

DENBIGH ROAD III-. I 

MILTON KEYNES MK1 1YP 1U4SLJ 


SYDENHAM SE26 
FROM £69,500 

LUXURIOUS 3 BEDROOM FLATS 

In tte Barash of Bromley and done to tin Crystal Pstace/Duhneh 
borders. Ceramic tibd bubnon* and fitted kitchena. Carpets. double 
■kuu* and pi CJL lift. 

SOLE AGENTS 


terens 

Establlahad 1B70 

01-650-8268 

tar colour Brochure. 


n«5 



HOUSES AND FLATS THR0UG 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RESIDBIT1AL UTTUIfl DEPARTMENT 
TH: 0101-790 9560 


CONVEYANCING £250 

BY WEST END SOLICITORS 

jen to oar standard term* & conditions on prices up to 
,000. Quotes available for higher figures, mortgages aim 
arranged. 

TASSELLI & CO 
8 Wtapde St London W1M 7AB 

01-323 3244 


FIT .IS & CO ESTATE AGENTS 

CHARLWOOD STREET SW1 Spams 1 bedroom a« 2nd 
floor. Urgent sale reamed Sole Mails 122 yr lease £80.000 
(FIELD ROAD SWifl Spadoos J bed maifenme, poKsnul 
roof icnace 1 20 yr s ClSqflOO _ .... . _ , 

FLOOD STREET SW3 MapuficenM bed dengner fill, fca- 
turing apird s a nose 83 y « £200.000 . . . 

FULHAM ROAD SWfi umqoc 3 bed tonstjutaonBj de- 
dioaL smdia roof Brace. jjdn, Pirobold £29^000 
Tel: 01-225-0® Open today. 



BAVSWATHR W2 2 bed 2nd floor coouwted flat in vary come- 
ntant position ctose station & shops. Recap. WBun. bathroom. 

Bth floor stucSo flat in snaH develop- 
ment in prtme position. Sap ta ping area, bathroom, 
kitchenette. C/H Long Lease 877,500 
inaftur tiuanne set ExcdM Interior destcmed 3rd floor flat 
m sought-after mansion dawtapment Dtste bed, ta rqa touiao. 
newmhen & bath. 24hr.porter, etc. Fu»y furnished. ei28 .« 5 


'EVANS 

BAKER 



EAUKG «5. 

Prestige tom centre devetap- 
mem own stws to large icunge 
and double bed both wth bench 
umtoir's teadmp to 30M x Ml 
south tamo root terra*. Limy 
filtad hdchen and trath mOi sepa- 
rate shower. GdMHHae parting. 
123 soars lease. Town/HMthrrw 
2D mins. IM . 5 mre. tot* 300 
yards. 

E85y000 
NO AGENTS. 

TEL: 01-840 0647 


W1LLESDEN 


[H d d 


beautiful * bod hsa. set in 
elegant cut- de- sac. This 
property has 3 reeepts and 
expordy maintained 
shrobbartes and lawn. THs 
ta a taxurtous and 






CMSWtCK, WC Mesretlcenl S 
ben send, z huge rcccouons. 2 
baoirtns. shower rro. hoe 
Ictt/Dfastmi. 160' rear garden. 
Nr mue * food Mroo w na la 
sough! after Rd V/H. OfTctS In 
Ihe region E? 50.000. Tiner 
Greenwood & Co PI -99a 7022 


COttBIXP HEWS Cham With 
every modem amenity UpU 
modernised house near Hyde 
Part nttfi 3 bednns. baUvra. 
shwr rm. recrouon. nd Wlctven. 
integral oaragr. rufl CH. iTiold 
E2 76.000 Tel: PearsoM Lon- 
don 01-499 2104 


FULHAM. Luxury 2 bed ground 
lloor Hat. rrcepudn. Idicnen/ 
diner, gas MOhai beatutu- own 
rear large naiM In occluded cot- 
tage oiertooldne gardens al 
Irani Rural asnecl. near 
BeMDS Part:. CB5.000 ooo. Ol 
370 *368 or Ol STS 297 a 


SW6. The nest Vlcionan house 
mine area. Comnletely restored 
10 ortgtaal condmon. with 
named dm windows A dram 
throughout, a double Mdrnoms. 

a large thing rooms, modem 
tilled Miction. «eo wc. Victorian 
bathrodm. S facing garden. 
£260.000 T« -01-7 36 7841 


HMGHTSBUDGE Egerton Oar 
dens. New converson. 2 double 
Ded roomed (Topi -tin floor nat. 
Sun young nrrson/o. BngM. 
quiet, with excel lent views. 
Tiled bathroom- senaraie show- 
er. fuHy ntted klktien 
rBosch'.'Zanussa'). CCH Fitted 
carnets and ounds. osdi sale. 
El 39,000. Tel 01-373-9981 


MUMt VALE Mftft Oegani raised 
ground floor Mansion flat lac- 
ing park. Excel lent decora live 
order retaining many original 
features. 3 bedrmv 2 rents, 
fell. oaUirm L sen WC. Rear bal- 
cony overlooking communal 
landscaped gardens. £156600. 
189 year lease Ol 734 8466 ext 
373 9 366pm. 


PARSONS GRECH Underground 
8 nuns Large Vlct end of ler- 
race house 4 beds. 2 oaths. I 
Shower, double recto, dining 
room. Poggenpohl ku/tri an 
room. EXceUent decorative or- 
der. Double Mtto/garaen. 8 
cellars. C F C.H Freehold. Of 
fere oi-er £839.000 Tel- lOJ 
730 8291 rm IHI 736 8826. 


PARSONS csocm- Over kiaidng 
EEL BROOK COMMON. 1 bed 
rial, large pme panelled strung 
room with nrtMare. stairs to 
balustrade kitchen, antique 
Bathroom, bedroom with walk 
in dreadng area. Trench doors to 
patio. 91 year lew £68.7BO 
Private sale Tel weekends 
067285 210 or 01 736 0628 


RfVEVSIDC - »«KTs purpose HOLLAHO PAHKi fw s y by 
bum rial. 3 mins walk to BR owner; attractive 2/3 bedroom 

Chiswick. unit) Waterloo}. flaL Uf evert Icru fexaumi.. !ge 

Large recep rm. dliudng rm. (u south lacuig recep. fitted feu. & 

led fell, tathrm. Ige bedrm wlllt jonUamaes.dUUnu no. 2 baUn 

fitted wardrobes. Cxceiient dec- 93 yr lease ilow otd^omgsi. Of; 

oralive order, off street parking. fers around £820.000. TCL 

M mESe. TcToI 262 6033 *222 or 2295014 

994 2842 eves Regrel to sell 


CAN YOU AFFORD TO 
MISS THIS BARGAIN? 

This 3 bedroom. 2 baihroom bouse is located m the heart of 
D ocklands [tmviriitig good 6errd tanwly snr o mn d a l in n and 
privaic janten wilh Caroort. 

ONIXtMjm 


For Quick sale Tetepbw^naw, P*nis & Quirk 


£360 

CONVEYANCING 

For Sales &. purchases 
for prices up to £80.000 



EATON HOUSE 
UPPER GROSVENOR STREET 

Seoood floor flu in Eaclnave street just off Grasve&or Square. 
Lane L shaped reception. Large Master bedroom plus I other 
Double bedroom. Maids Bedroom with shower room. Spacious 
fined bathroom, phis g neat doo tro wn, Neff fitted kitchen, lift. 
Genual beating. IA hour P or te r age , in good decorative outer. SO 
yean imsd. For catty completion. Vacant now. 

£ZIBJDM 

01 439 9051 «t 22, Office boors. 


CONVEYANCING 

£230+ VAT & DISBURSEMENTS 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

WE CAN ALSO 5EU YOJB HOME THROUGH OUR ESTATE AGENCY 


WffTTEH QUOTATHBK & QETAA.S SWUED UPON REQUEST - 

CORN1LUE & CO 
SOLICITORS 
01-729 4360 


we charge £360+ VAT & 
disbursements. 

Barretts Solicitors 
01-248 0S51. 


INI lHI VALE Mod terraced 
house in frwndty Cnaiwru-n 
Road. Open pun mud floor. 2h 
bedroom*. OCH. pretty veroen. 
£884)00. Tee Ol 226 3636. 

BAKER ST. Superb large 4 bed. 
_2 bath flat. Preattge mock .... 
ivtdi root garden. 71 yrs 
£29SuOOO Tel : Ol 486 3630. 

■LOOaaSRURT wet l bedroom 
0,1 ki p/n Mock 999 vrar 
feM £62.950 Tel: Ol 387 
5036 leiWwkend&t. 

CL MSMOK Pk. Victorian two 

DMr con. vast recetmon area. 
West far. garden. £149000. T. 

HOSKINSs 730 9 *st. 

EALM0 - Huge- = oedraamed. 

luxury flat. Fitte d im ehen. etc. 
STT year s leas e- C79.99S. Tel: 
Ol 998 3709 

FED UP WITH LOOMN6T We 

help buyers of property over 
£150^)00 English Homes Ol 
570 3758 


B M POHlai in Shepherds Bush. 

2 beds. 2 reeepts. well decora! 
«L £61.950. tor a uk:k sale. No 
Agents . ox 743 85 1 a 

GROVE PARK, W4, Outstanding 

3 bedroom 2 rev family house 
Garage 70* gdn. £146.000 
John Spencer 996 8904 

UTILE met BtomOeU Rd 
Huge Md recep dining K A B 
120 yn £94.960. Goc £14.950 
Eure wfcnds 289 0856. 


SroKE-NEWINGTOM MKiuib 
from ausold Park in guiel 
road, inunacuiaie vicionan 
family home retaining many 
UN features 4 beds. 2 recepv 
luxury LHchen/dtner/eooserv- 
jmry Secfuded 60 n garden 
FH £1 34.960. TcLOl BOO 1369 

•ELGRAVIA/Chrtsea Borders. 
Unusual opportunity lo agutre 
for iusi under £1 30.000 a small 
3 store* nofmaar me nf period 
home whhln easy walking db- 
Dmre Of Statute Sq. and 
Victoria. When modernised u 
would provide 3 beds. 2 tecesw 
etc — fin plrasral small garden 
73 year lease. Friend A Falke 

Ol 730 0064. 


NWS Newly decorated 2 oed 
ground/lower ground maison- 
ette. unusual potential for 
massive appreciation. Prestige 
block onposlle Primrose Hill 
Price reduced lor quick ole. 
£119-500 subtect IO con trad. 
Ring Many on Ol 986 3711 
Mon to Frt 

tausmex WWL Period garden 

flat. Refurnished, mgh cosed 
celling, lux hath, ut/dlntag rm. 
Close to inutsport. shops. M4 In 
me Iwan oi cnifwick ideal nrei 
tune buy/pied-a-ierre £66^00 
99 yr ho. OI-99S S1SS. Scott 
L-ren 6 Co. 


creeps., one dining, iwo Oath- 
rooms. lactsm. First class large, 
first floor flat- Sandrlngfuun 
Court, long lease. £184.000 in- 
cluding furnishings For mack 
sale can Sam on Oi 933 9993 ra 
936 7062 ianvumei 


UBA VALE W9 Newly conv 
tuxurs' interior designed 2 door 
penthouse 36 n double reorp. 3 
beds. 2 hams (I en suUei. luxu- 
ry fufly mud kiiChen. large roof 
lerrace. fUDy hard rarpeis 
£167.000 Howard Estates. Ol 
289 0104/6656. 


20 WMS Central London 
Wo. Large refurtushed Vkion- 
an house. 5 beds. 2 baths, l en 
suite. 3 receptions. Cloaks. 
Newfy fined Wfcfien. Cellars 
Carden. CCH Offers in the re- 
gion of £220000. ireenokL 
Trt-OI 992 7810. 


BCDfORD PARK iConservatum 
areal we. Lgr 5 rmd mandon 
rial in small bar. Lge U t/ 
BTOsfnrt. communal gardens, 
excellent decorauve order. Nr 
Tube LTwId £129.950. Tyser 
Cnrenwrad A Co 01-994 7022 


IROfeB TUTS SQ SW3. BeautMudy 
refurtusned spartous flat with 
pauo. a beds lux bain. kU/ 
bYasirm. recep. dining hall LW 
of Muare gardens. £149.600. 
60yrbe. Tet: PMfll A Company 
01-499 9876 


HARM VALE; Beautu id. apart - 
menl. tastefully designed 
UirouNwia. Lge recep. dining. 
fannf»use tty/e mi / break/o si 
rm. lux Baihroom. 2/3 bedrms. 
£116.000 Tel:72d. 5734 / 289- 
6939 iw/day exes}. 


SHEPHERDS BUSH. Fulty mod 
■err Itse Lge landscaped polio 
gdn. 3 dt*f beds. 24 n Inge. Sep 
diner Lux kH.Sep WC. CasCH. 
small cellar Lgr lofl storage. 
Quid St. Bui only 2 mins la bus. 
lube. £130.000 01-749 2853. 


CROUCH HILL. M4 3 storey VK 
Terr Itse in auks mldenbal Rd. 
close shops, lube. Buses. 4 Dble 
Beds. 16' MOP Fit Kit. All newly 
refurb K> lugn standard. 
£129.960. 346 9440. 


FULHAM SW8 Spacious 2 bed 
nuisonene. Fully fitted kii and 
barn, dining rm. 19ft reception 
plus pm garden, urgent sale. 
No agents. EB9.950. 01 6CX2 
7171. 


UTTLE VdRCE. Sunny spacious 
3 bed 1st flr flat m period rnohf 
me. yds Irom Canal. 35' recep. 
£166.000. Tel: 01-286 2710 


SOUTH Eaton Phce - Sunny 2 
bed flal requires nnr mod on 
3rd floor P/B Mock with bfl 
Lae 62 vrt- £135.000 Ol 409 
0714 iQl 


SW1 Pretty fettle nouse. oulci lo- 
cation with large lerrace. Reep. 
2 beds, fitted cpbds CCH. 
£>65.000. Tel. Ol 834 0178. 


USE HY TIME ip find your per 
fed property. Can CaUty 
O'Brien al Hunters Property 
Search- 83d 4689. 


W2; Mews fteenold nr. MarMe 
Arch. 5 dtp bedrms. 1 single. 1 
recep. good COnd Great poten- 
tial. £168.000. Tel: 788-7779. 


MATF AM Park Street 2 Bed aBL 

LUL 30 yr Me Law Outgoings. 1 

25? ‘£52? C<W,,I C H IMWCH. nVERSME. ' Strand 


celling, lux bath, kll/dlnlag rm. CMSWtCK. W4. Excepbona] S 
dose fo transport shops. *M in bed S baihrm 3 recepoon large 
the heart W Ctuswirt Ideal nrei knclten/dbier family house, 

nine buy/pied a-ietne £66;500 Large ipuden. Ofl si pkng. Close 

99 yr be. OI -99S S15S, Scott | S nin Fulty mod £276.000. 
L-reo 6 Co. John Spencer 99S 8904 

MUnWUHtTK Brack t-Ptou ry LITTLE VEMCE W9. Near Ca- 


CANNOHBURY Nl Altracuve 3 
Morey rerraee house 4 beds. 2 
tec. ? bath, garage. Gas CH. 
Freehold. £166.000. 

BroomhaUs Ol 222 1324 

CHISWICK W4L S bed terraced 
house. CH. modern kltcnen. re- 
wired. new roof. Meal pattUOD 
for BBC 41 Shepherds Butt,. 
£119.000. 01-994 6969. 

tUMMa RD. Fulham. Edward, 
a double Bedroom hse. Small 
garden, doubie reception rm. 17 
R ton/kilchen. £200.000. T. 
HOSKINS' 730 9937. 

FULHAM y HAM. Spartous lenids 
court of a garden with lovely 2 
Bedroom flal attached. Close to 
Cnarlng Cross Private sale. 
£79.960 ono 741 3038 nn. 

LITTLE VEMCC W9. Inunac 2 
bed rawed ground floor flal in 

1 err. Vic. prop. G.C.H. Carpets. 
Long be. £90.000 Howard Es- 
lairs Ot 289 0104/6666. 

UTTLE VENICE. WB IBlomnetd 
Roadi. Garden flal wtUi polen- 
ttal lo evtend ■ in need of rood. 
Good size gdn. £130.000. How- 
ard Estates. Ol 289 0104/6566. 

MARBLE ARCH Lame IO room 
house for modernisation. 

2 battie 2 wc -«■ 2/4 car garage -e 
parking. Roof terrace at yrs. 
£298.000 Tel: Ol 486 3630. 

HOTTING KU, Wll. Superb 1 
bed ndn flat with prtvale «th 


Estates. 01-491 3609. 

ST JOHNS Wood 1 bed rial to p/b 
prestigious Mock. Modernised, 
newly decorated. CH. £73.600. 
Tel: Ol 452 EB90 

ST JOWtt WOOD, cnarmmg 1 
bed mews flaL Long lease. Fan 
■asttc locution. C64EOO. TM Ol 
289 1977. 

SUSSEX KAROOS WT. Small 1 
bedroom rial Newfy 
modernhed. new kliChen. Real- 
ly nice £68.000. 0836 2361 18. 

Cuts men, W4- Superb fully 
mod 3 bedrm house. £116.000. 
John Spencer 996 89o» 

ODSW1CK MML SdacMos 2 bed 
manooene well maintained 
£90000. 01-747 0645 

LET OUR LESS Do the walking 
Wr'U find your nnai home. IV- 
tmon Rush 741 7127 

MAIM VALE/ St Johns Wood 
Selection of flail. Allens. Tele- 
pnow Qi 283 0540 


on the Green' One erf 6 Mprro 
lux Lown houses In exclusive 
resldenhal devetoproem. 4 dnlc 
Beds. 2 baths, efrgant drawing 
rm. fll HI. Prtvale gdn. Gge- 
Vcntfor going abroad. Drasbcaf- 
ly reduced lo ML £186.000. 
view today Whitman Porter 
994 IOQO 

ELM PAR* COHS SWIO. Suprrt- 
ft - modernised groun d floor flaL 
udMalh' decorated with sne- 
ruitsl painl finishes. Direct 
acms to P acres welikew rorrv 
munai gardens. Rmp. bit. 2 
double beds 2 baths H enrullel 
cioaJiioom. porter Lease 121 

ilSraeso .000 c. Kuttey 4 

p^TOf 226 0365. 


village. W6. Deughtrui 
modernised nertod lerrare 
house. DWe recep rm. dining 
rm. 3 bedrms lux baihrm. new 
Ut. utility rm 6 pretty ndn. 
Quirk sale needed. USOJCO 
wanted - no fere. 748 5BS9. 

ST JOHNS WOOO Bright 3rd flr 
flal. 3 beds i2dbl.lsal>. baih/ 2 
WC. bale, modern rwd. sooerbiv 
decorated, i dW recep. au furni- 
ture 6 finings Quick sale 
owner fearing CifiO-OWBJin 
fee with opt too 10 Purchase 
F /now. Ol 996 9622/372 5209 

MADIA VALE Spacious 2 dMe 
Bedrm duplex wuh original fro- 
tures. Large reception. Iw 
kit/breakfastrm. line bain. 
CCH fitted rarpets. communal 
3 acre gdns. F/HOld £166.000 
Trt Ot 286 8792 


xMBHnvaPK CW7. Suports PML1CO. Alderney SI An im 
apartment In manilaie wrlHAwnM 1 «« 
nixil^. secure Mock near Hyor wlinothlng room and mM r 
bS*. 27“ reception. 3 Bed- walled oaroen Lots of slorape 

H enace. Artisi owners, miwn mg to 

the ctmnrry F"nold £96.000 
Hunter Ettales: 828 2146. 


FULHAM 4 DM f amity lunar . I Wll- Lwrury. newly mod. 3rd 


rooms- 2 mantle bathrooms. space. A row owners movmgra 
Idled Mlclten 86 yrs uur eounrry Fiwtd £96.000 
£240.600 Ollter freehold 8 Hunter Esiales: 828 2146. 

Carlyle Place Bmmfid 

SSrS^id^Mf 01^09 66M. 


CMU 10 an arnemhes- Lovely floor. 7 bed RaL fitted klfrtten, 
manageable garden. E21QAX) carpets. £89960 01 996 3667 
01-736 8887. 

CUSmCft 2 sorev iron terraced himPFIUD NW3- 6pacioui 


Raised Grd now nw in tins su- 
perb locanon with uwcianiiar 
Pecrp nnt. Accomodation. 3 
Beds, oue Recep. KlI/SfasL 2 


vmonan 3 bedroomed how. 
Adaptable being gacr. GCH. 
50 ft gardch- conveunetK 
Heathrow anm. BR and 
Gunnrebury tube JCt 20.000 FH 
open io MfeTS-Trt 01 994 1104 


garden 2 Bed n,l. fully fined 
MKiten. carpets. Ughtlng Bath 
Mid Cloaks, tuning rm. Elegant 
largr reception. Juol rommeigd 
Share freehold £165.000. Trt. 
01 203 3509 ITI 


ST RfTERS W V*. An rtegbM Beds. Dble R«ep, Kll/3faa. 2 
Surra 4 (Nd Edwardian rest- paths 92 *r Re. £2 10.000 tor 
denre Modernised, spacious. qlurK ^k, Omlrs 826 3661 
croc accommodation SW In pit • 

Iiuesgue Souatp oienooklflQ CHELSEA. A beautmu garden 


ewnmunal gaidao. E«i acc»*. 
Mj/HiiUhrov Higfin 

receemnenaed rraUstk once 
£396.000 F/H 01-996 8166 
Scon I ren * Co 


flat in Tcdworen Square Large 
recep. dlnuig room, doublr bed. 
prelb patio In Immac tend. 
GCH 36 VI Wc. £146.500. 
Home a Sons: agg 0304 


nal Very spaoous 2 bedroom 
ngni lower ground floor flat. 
Bark and iron! palm. Parourt 
flooring. £90.000 Hogarth es- 
tates; 373 9537. 

MARIA VALE. Ultra Hoc mansion 
flal. Entrance naJL recep. 

bll/dfner. 3 beds. bath, shower 
ere CH cots, balcony, huge 
communal gdns £157.600. 
Greene 4 Go Ol 2B6 6787. 

MOUNT ST/Berkrtey Square Wl. ! 
Otamung 3 bed flat. 4u> floor 1 
imtomsN 69 year lease. 
£205.000. Phone Ol 724 5714 
weekday or 02518 2057 revs/ 
weekends No Agents 

PHUCO SW1. Spacious 4 I reel 
adaptable arconimodalion m 
prestigioiB buUding vacant 
possesuon. hbroc/buttnee use 
£220.000 F/H. 01-996 S16S 

Scon uren 9 Co. 

SWL. Ashley Gardens S bed 3rd 
n nai with lots of potential. 
Owners have already moted K> 
the country and mutt sell, 
therefore £l«9J5O0 Lsr 12$ 
yrs Hunter Estates' 828 2K& 

SUM itVilei Garden*. Superb 4 
Bed mansion man. flat in escel- 
hml condtDon 4 Beds. 2 fi«eps. 
Z Baths. h'rf/Bfasf Rm. Ctkrm. 
90 i r ke OH «l Pkg. £275.000, 

coolrt B28 SoBI. 

BARGAIN! The Village. NWI 
Kr» fully turn £ NiilnMl. 1 
bed. lunflai £ 82 . 000 . Ore elop- 
ers pnee. un/utn. C79.99B< 
0403 62242. 


NR PARSONS CREEK SW6. 3 
storey. 5/6 bed. 2 bfeth + sen 
WC. oaaened extension, lull Ai- 
led kiL CH. cellar. SW garden. 
£266.000. 01-736 1399 

SB5. £98.000. Fabulous up flr 
comeroon fiat with lls own pri- 
vate roof terrace. 1/2 beds, 
huge rcc. kll Mg enough to ecu 
in. good balh. 731 4448 >17 

SWL £72.500. Bright 5 bed flu 
in heed of renovation. Good 
sized recep with fireplace, needs 
new iji baih CH tb decoration 

Couu Or Lately. 73 J 4448 iTi 

SW1. Ouief contenleni bnmac 2 
nedrm ten nule shwrmi bath 

rm. 2 recs kit. utility rm. pa y, 
He ittiare ot frertwld)£i49.60a 
for guKk sale. 0625 42716. 

W. KENSMiCTOH. Huge new 3 
bed comeKMh Own enUanm. 
CasCH Comer hath Fiaunrh- 

rn. Carpets 99 yr leue. 
£89.600 ono. Ol 206 0969. 

W14 £ 11 5.000 ono Queens Chib 
Cdbs Superb 3 M Hat In prec- 
hgc Block. >7' recep. mi/pTm 
area. 2bdllK. useaf inuUscfsA 
gardens T3i 4448 m 

W4 EdwznlHn Terraced Housr 
3 dble beds. 2 large receps. new 
" a R 'toau garden. Fulls 
04 £106000 
*1 3708 No Annuls 













































DE 




TERRIFIC 

0FPOBTB0TY 

Magnificent 3 bed 2nd flr 
Oat with panoramic wm 
at Kanswgton m need of 

^vSnar* 

CHELSEA HEABT 

2 ttjutous 2 fied flats 

modameed ® highest 
aandaTO toaoyng otegarn 
proportioned rooms. If 

gEgwsft 

01-431 1342(1) 


CHELSEA BIG BABB 

GaUfim nymuna y to Ptfti BM 
nosi aware 3 b ewn ejig 
floor fta. lo w* w maram to* 
dtasa B ibv- G ood VaKpat nun 

flaonons. ten* 

ftweijr Hawing room, im o j q» 
board & storage wee. Garten 

(»rfM 


UMfogmC HOUSE Holland 
wwftiL ag nr. 
1 bed flax in MOB ong artists au- 
dios- 14 n celling*. perms, or* 
features. m waw^MteJ/r^M 
and bath. new cptt- CCH. ray 
i «. 07 yrs. Low o/wtmp 
a&.OOO TO: OI 229 1694 


tnrian a mwan lowe r groan a 
floor to. Lounge, bathroom. 

MKtwn. pauo. comrmmal gr 

den Ground floor tmuance 
£167.500 no agents. Tet 01 
244 &34E- 


SWJSS COTTAGE, 

mre. 

Top nr «*■ ' snH*a 0"? m - 

1 dWe bednn. Spadous 
Bvmg mi. Ml & catnnri + 
k)« w* P*»™SP»«^ 
slon lor 2 more obje 
b ufln wa & baawt t Man y 

Other features. Enormous 
tu rtpntinL FNd ESSjOOO- 

P 431 3121-TO 



1 OwmrtS»MVW-< 

Wham coho* snanf 

hraessie wjwweowtedlriw 
M steps grauid mar roona a 

taobigitH Coamai 20H rewtan 


marlqes road 

KENSINGTON 


tot, )pt Mmed areonaBa y ntnt- 
nnAtt. hcB cnieonof*! 2 won' 

alOBBMUHOnWHlM toW M* 

Hoa g to ra m" ad 
shots SUM m fntau 


1137508 


Tet (H) 01-373 4944 

or pi 01-608 1206 «* mi 


wtt tagfl amau ce tey. teg* " 
drag ream, double bediwtn . Offl-, 
nm Wflw end ownJWtwIW 
garten. Many «gtt BCBri«B Bfr 
S»OT BMlj ** " 

t wL500 B5 yM rt»B..., nrr 
BETWra* T«COT«WS 
WBe. vwfl oaiB»n*d WownW; 
md house wUi new rots, cnpw j 
MM but neabnj juwte Hjejmi 

SSWSSvwESi 

M and shops Soantarnggaoen. 

£2! 7474 J 

140 NORTHCOTE ROADSWl I 


STUNNING FLAT 

■ HEART Bff CHELSEA 

Decorated « the i»gb« 
stMnL 2/3 Mraoms. \p 


PUTNEY 

Impuanc Wdnrian s/dhsain 
me enter with s/c 1 tain rest 
Putney. 4 beds. 2 ras. Ige 
tat/bfct rm. 2 taflts lien 
suite) (Ann rtftry rm, cw. 
MStgdn. S/c 1 bed Hat- Oft st 

Dloig. £210000 

Warren 788 7884 


CLAPHAH SOUTH 

Spacfews 2 bedrooBMd fct 
bafwwn and 

then, ftrty carpemrt. fiCH. 

tube 5 minties. 

£59,000 

TeL 81-673 Z883 
eveamss o«y 


WEST PUTNEY 

iMiwmii HoMyew- 

SXUATSUB 

&■««»& 


THE BEST HOI W UMH Fanny 

tZJTSo «*•* ""2S5,. s S£ 

MH to IWB lf » SEZ* *4J[* 
huge drawing nj- * *g 
kit/famUy m W >«* » 

MiM. 2 scd w-C*i. cellar Jio* 


itasTra % 

CdSTtoi— B FOatCHBogo 

Mn. FJy MM- Sure ** «■ 

“nsoiioa Fwteai 
TB 0VTO»433(H) CT. 
01-633 7 WO EA 




CAMBRIDGESHIRE - HELPSTON 

London 49 minutes 

<***■* 

Lovely waned gardens. 

About 2 Acres. 

— 

HERTS - PIMLICO, NR ST ALBANS j 

Offers in the raqion ol Jg^g^^S'itortw AL5 2SP Tel (05827) 64343 
John D Wood, 66 ' (Ret. MA6T) 

John D Wood 6 Co, Berkeley Square Office. 


— ^BjgSura 

S« in erf to rmnQuOty ®nd - 


30 mknrtes of (T^Wling-CQunfry 

opportunity to acquire a ate tor toe wwn*OTm « oenods of domestic 
w tth designs avatoble reflecting toe rest p«wt» 

■MttTcaloiir brochures waitable »c TeL (0932) 57077 

>. 23 Berkeley Squ*m 6AL - 

\ Tel. 01-629 9050 Tele* 21242. 




iBSpBBBH 



I'Bm 








K 






1 Umz 


1 





Ertcowe development of 
bousosaMfbttigakws 

1MHH ire UMfrem 




; 1UL1 . V > 




recamm.lawioW’eh/ 
bcddasi roam. 16 *1 a 
itcemm wih mjj wtndow. 

CALL PAUL FISHER 
581 3623/602 9727(1) 


PUTNEY SW15 

Sapobty modtraoed. 4 tatte 
BaSnom famdy hewej 2 k“Qf 
badwoBSti n«y 1”™}: 
Massive afl Bosch Mtw wtenen 




lairlili 


M 


KENSINGTON 

Brand new, exclusive, 
development of 4 luxury 
acts & a pentooww, all 
superbly furnished & qut- 
sdy located. 

Prices from £110,000 
Cafl us now. 

405 4444 (T). 


caasEA oameta 2 Bed iipirt- 

mart. £110.000 lc«eb°lA . 

fflSSSWffiSI 

SOUTH KBWWST0H 26 
roomed Freehold f* 58 - JS9f JK 
U 9 MRL K30000 
Freehold. 

BABiniWTOM 
SAUNDERS LTD 
PI-584 2551- 


CLAPHAH Sown. ruw> 
2 bedroom nai 

22TS 'S2E 

Near rorrmiorrClose lo Ml orae- 
nlb». £66.000. 041.0. TO: Ol 
673 4061 


OJUHAIH UI MMOH tWeOgde) 
Immaculate Vict orian MW. 
Period fMWw rwam cd 4W«- 
rooms. a batn rpoma. rePgl 

Totally modern ned. UW.tw 
QuKfcrolet 686 2220 Afler Open 


siflL End upper mb. hiW/S 

/E SS 

race 1963. iromac. W*ce» 17* 
13 a 2 b«to ntwi awtt. Prr 
vaw Dkg- Shared fldn. 123 yr 
bo B66 j 000. 01223 S688e*«. 


■UUmSHUarH Common 6W17. 
Sunw dpaewus 2 Ortnal 

floor) 2 m ms BR -saon^Kn 

/breakfast room. I*”? J***" 

New roof. 87 yr lease. £66000. 

0T767 3443 ail day Tliumday. 


WANDSWOKTH BneM. 
mao nr common Recently dec- 
oraied. 2 dWe liediro. brw 
recep A 16ft twch/rtn^GOT 
£70.000 TO 01*31 OT64 ext 
217 tors. 01-870 6944 eues. 


FULHAM Pretty 1 bed IM w» 
conical neeittig. carnets 86 
year lease uroem rare 
S 7 . 000 . 01 731 0826 

eves/ weekends 



tndudea cafity cwwts + antWB. 
Pbaae 81 351 1587 4 * 1 
870 4923 am 


«™“S, ?*2U. v SS£a 

S3K ut«w STcentnu 

headno. E**“«S' i gS5R5 , S!i 
and West End. £160- 00 0 tTee- 
MM. TO. 01 602 8278 


mJACKMaATW vtcMrtaw 

ram Fully fUTZL 4/0 DPOS. 4 

recep*. snO oen. fined kliiaji»- 

Niances Utci. mod bainrm . 

CMaum. SHUS'^nSBOM 
Offen mreretm oj. £166-000 

(reenoM. TetOl -6904HB9. 


Fife Road, \ 
RICHMOND PARK 
A snbsantial family boost 
irfstyWandcfaann- 
BeceotlydeaiifiiKd 
and bulk to the highest 
specification for Interior 
Designer, 
s double bedrooms. 

3 bfflhmora. 

28 ft drawing nuim 
A further receptit'n mum> 
Swtnuningpon! und sauna 
AJlmfontt fined kitchen 
Equipped inMin rhidi 
1 , acre landscaped prdens 
DnuWeprqse 
Sminiv svsiLtn 


KENSINGTON W8 

Z bed Perttrousfljnmoccow- 
BOT/woadMsn^ "J" 
BKorat Soboous^ to" 

Easy access to Itflh Streei Ken- 
smpm and Kiujlisbngs. 

Oners inviied in jegion ' of 
£110.000 tor awn disposal. *» 
year tease, store hi nEenoni- 

01-244 7353 


■OLTOBi 6ABPEM tSrunnina 

fKcnai a double beds, bam . 

ESee. marale dminq room. 

kitchen and balcony. CWMWM 

oanfen £215.000 no roOTs 
TO: Ol 373 1467 


HOLLAND PABK lmm« 2Eg 
garden flat with laroe troro- 
oaitirm. shower rm & HIM 

kuctien/brcaMMl . rm- 
Eis^ OOO WMdf* aLSi 
3778 iw/ends. eve*i No Anenia 


MOENWATC SW7 Iromac mtr 
TSSdSffmd 1 6« toinam 
purpose buUi Woe* tm tod 
noor win an. c*se to m*. igo 
tow guMop. £124.000. 
SS e S89^«6«n 627 4400. 


SW1S In popular Tondew' spa- 
*S5i iM°^r2 bed to. imrt 
wants, oas CH- new deair. easy 
acCTos City. £66.960 tnc car 
SSTt« 01-670 366a 


sms SPW1 lewrt Mtort 
fiaL Lower qround al rear- z 

fxjng rear ganlai- Ctowjfl 

amenities l -*> s 2!? , w SEES. 
rube. BR sattpn tor. W aterloo; 
immediate sale wjm irowua 
£93.960. TO:OI 789 2970. 


KACkllEATH Weu maliitalneCL 
oJtaWred Victorian 
mm and basement. Oos Cen- 
tral neaumi- Swe^to «ww 

double soraae. Larne, . 
smefced. S^ni 

Freehold. £2Jb-0°0 TelOl 

866 9999 9onday * eventual 


IKMLV REUAMD. Oapinra. 
Two superb 2 bed 
spaoous. mwe roof icr acig lCF 
drUiHi tones- FWwdto 
hi siajidard. l non 0**- MIBI 
£^ST«9.«p. Vjg-lggn' 

368 7660. w/day 622 26W 


*W* 2 bedroom POTOje btoto 

to, pu sH WOUS Mock- CP®* 

twauto pood deetoUvemto. 

P«»«9e- ®SS!^ 
SSSb. %£% eSrSw 

evenlnos. 


IilPiJ 


£690,000 

VIEW TODAY 

01-8785938 


THE BARN 

HAWKESBURY UPTON 
NEAR BRISTOL 

POR SALE BY AUdlON 
Tuesday, 2nd December 1986 
AT: 7.00 pjn- 
(Unless Preriossly s old) 

At The Gommras Imt, Tocmxrton, Aren 

. SOLICITORS 
Albery, Cbwnu & CouipMy 

vxf ssir n 

Tet (0272) 277218 

AUCTIONEERS 
Lnlnude Bros. & Ptarfamn 
64 Qwens BristBL 

Teh (0272) 290731 




Lane Fox & Partners 

v.rr. nVisndS 


uXFORDSHIRE 

Oxford 9 miles, Dideot Station 8 miks, 
M40 2 miles, London dSjmte ■ 
a spaoous & well 

HOUSE attrecuvdy situated in sought attCT village 
2 Reception Room*. Kitchen/Break&st Room. 

5 Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms 
FuH Oil Fired Central Heating 
Lovely mature and well timbered Garden 

ABOUT Vj ACRE • 


HlbdeM Cheney. Banbury, Oxen Teh 0295 710592 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

COTSWOLDS 

Stmhon-tho-Wotd 4 mites. OwUmtmm IS nubs, 
London 8S tides. 

Superb t nufitioMi atyte C oimtrT Hoaae m; 
delB^nfid, elevated ethtawm. 

«ii fncBD&on rooms. 4 bedrooms, 2 UsUwo orns . 
indoor swimming pooL 

? ss sr’ 8 ’- 

. For sate as a whole or in 2 iota. 


Bernard Thorpe 


Park Street, Stouf-oo-the-Wotd, 0 m. 

Tet 0451 30731 

1 Queans Orals, Cheltenham, Glos. 

Tel; 0242 30202 


■DM. Dsprtn Road Beaoluul 

^t^ay noudCjtoWtorto 

Stum. O r rtf^™i535M?3; 

GC» Baroamal £135.000 T«fc 
Ol 646 7 ‘ > ^ & 


top Cron. viWto 2 bedswoL 
OCH. modcnasM rtoW 
ortolnal Waiurwi + 
oarapr £59.000 ovno. Tet Ol- 
692 9213 


clashah soom. Sjto'Stt® 

Md modem mrw* bow. MBS 
tube & S-R_tos.9cn-.rtm9 
foaev. Paoa gdn. £79.960 ono. 
673 4667 eves * wfcend*. 
osoonm MMMMki 
nuanuro Mew* how to wtog 
dWPlaWB WWL 3 bed* , w 
Neff appuamw. W«to«mtoi. 
£120000 731 4448 CT1 

east rarer swia a aw 

nouse. Superb fH Ml Pme 
gt r tp ped DT5& window*. I Sauna. 
Oh £187000 674 8195. 
mNCC OF wales Drive. SWil 

4 Md ftoL L9e totoWJ- T4W; 
ty views ove r .p ark, L«w 
oulsomps £160000 622 3629 

SOUTH LONDON Urt awWUte 
Houacs/nais Irom xaoooo » 
£376.000. MOrtSBgO araUaMe. 
Alan Fraser Ol 507 1004. 
CLAMIAM between comtog. 
Knur 1 bed odn to £69.960 
or consider lemngOl 73*4 8790 

EAST PUTNrr -3 bed to»86. 

23' roc. sen d»B ira. Muar. 

lov pdn. vpe. £136*. 871 0704 

SUNHCY POCKS ISMS? 
nmnn/nab. H ub £47^600. 
Alan Fraser 01 687 1004 


RICHMOND 

2 bedrewwl ntteBB »*“*«« 


Hew nw tnd ib 

UA For IflHH* 


Tat 01-948 4824 

oi^&’rSPltoi) 


war CAHKin on vtcurun 
boose on 3 storeys 5 beds. 3 
2 bams, mbw i sen 

bmktiBt room, mhi, bos# 
SSirC373^0O Freehold. 

MTO- tioorlbrt 

conv to 

Adand A Company Ol 948 
1122 


FOLKESTOK 


aESAMT APAffTljOITS 
ON THE SOUTH COAST 

MANY WITH SEA "VIEWS 

1. 2 4 3 BEDROOM 
HATS AVAUABLE NOW! 



THE BARNSTAPLE WOODLANDS 

394 ACRES IN 8 LOTS 

Situated in North Devon 8 high 
woods planted between 1959 and 1971- Lots 
from 21 to 92 acres. Prices between £13£00 
and £80,000. 

Full particulars and our Hst of over 100 woods 
from: 

JOHN CLEGG & CO. 

Forestry & Agricultural Surveyors, Valuers 
The Bury, Church St, Chesham, Bucks. 

Tel: (0494) 784711 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 
REGISTER 

The only monthly n ational OTatoguc of old and historic 
Buying or setting contact: 

The Historic BufldregsCo, 

PO Box 150; Ckehha*CU24 8JD 
TdW905-7983/6I28 


Btwm i HOWFO CK. WIBB. per^ 

0 h c om et 1 . Dd TPdudfd 

MaatMdlTtoxL 2 Rec. MtAUn. . 
. l5i CIM. f* 1 btto. harden 
■uidy equipped for wtallwwt 
HOwM proMaotna- approx 1 
m ' CB9.0D0 ono for quick 

Ke Trt 0264 624394 


llHlireT Soutb Lines £66.960. 
Del exec ***}£? JSYa.^IEh 
ml 4 beds. oflCH- f»rod7^ 

6 Lawrenw PnidenUaL 32 . 
Wide BaroteJ- ■SSE' 

P£21 6RX TO. 102061 62334 
IKWMMMCV Pit .rattoy 
bouse newly renovated. 9 
2 bdt». larpe aaen. ba rojd " 
£170 000 mold: Ol 603 0876 

suftolk "Away from ll an * 

acoF9HMe~ Urtqoe e—UV »vn 
cooddt home enwyuw Idyibr 
' nenceful HUM dw Bury SI 

gSSSSarmmiy a46(mu 

■deal an sptendto weekend 
borne muy ca rp e ted acrommd 
danon to luxury duuwato 
Han. Sntmo Room. Study Area, 
ptotop ftooenTPlayrooui. Cto* 

■ room. KIKheo wu h H 

SSS Sto».m«m »- 

a Bato rooco. 

KI38XW0 M« t* 

\ld Botfori IS GutHmy 
Sireei.SurySl Eranund»oz84 
2832/68940 

CASTLE ACRE Norfolk Lane 
Edwardian bouse of character 
Situated in popular Norfolk vW- 
lw 3 bedrooms, bam. lounne. 
dunng room, uiditn. ctoafee. 
CM. Good sned sarden Many 
exura £42.000 Ref aw 1432 
Abbots 0760 21669 or 0760 
6386 • 

•SLDESTOH. Period bouse. 4/S 
beds, usual office 10 be s old 
wKh \Wape shop torrotnwnl 
and former subm for rendw 
ual com opportunity ladl. 
boudtnp tool 

nepj Offera aroimd £1^000 
coraact Frasers 0473 36621 






HW3 Nr Chalk Farm lube- Spa 
1 bed to imniw 

SSSl J tof "W Jggg ^ 

Min carpeted. £w.OW. Tet 
Ol 722 0346 tW/E and e ‘ ie9> 



DOCKLANDS 

PROPBny_aNTtt 


flats & houses 

THROUGHOUT THE 

docklands 

TEL: 790 9560 


nmmsiDC - «£22-«5gf , £ 

■ndivuuBUsM 

warehouse iumcrrtotrB«jn“ 
munos. baemy ««*gSS 
Thames al Tower BRrW" 
pun. urge sc naraW 
Recently iMW Wlaf Agrra 
aOOvi n Nus Dasemrni stora ge- 

heaira sw,mmM 

nil aarden. £133 jOOO. izo 

ytarsltSae. Hew «*“* * et0 ’ 

237 zb 16 


ISLE OF DOCS 8pa«ous Sto- 
rey town house «** LIJ^eJs 
rlimdr qaroen Muare-g/J 
beds, targe rttom. wmny 
bMcony. kUOwn wdh rrv«J 
views, integral garage - niieg 
carpets. »«y PC*9 itoWsuve 
order Oose lo oora iarffi to 
way & deieiopmroN OrTJBOO 
01 S16 2616 01-922 2060 


PARK SW19 

Detarfwd houw. 4 at IWte. 3 
DU|1 on nne). 2 i«sm. 
iKhfn.oMHy. garage. OCH. 
aadarinaai MM 


Tat B1-947-S363 


s SIB To wnhouse w BUs a reffh 
nve aecHopmeni ■ overto ok ure 
me Cenire coral wTOi panorm- 
it news oier Crert [London. 
Sauna, mdoor pool EgMOO 
Td-Acouni Ol 879 3393 

WEST WWOUEDOM Cdwanban 
3 bed house. Mansrorremalf^ 
mre. Mature from and wr 
gdns £121.000 TO 946 1866 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 



HILL HEAD - OH THE SOLENT 


eOUKIH VAUJEV Cnadort 
House needing renovadon tor 
saneono wilt, Inuglnailonsci 
bus side of nlB wiu, W acre of 
wooded garden, nouse *ras 
once a basnl mttelon room On 
3 floor's Hie lop now ban crior 
mous rm. 33 x 33 x 20« whlcl l 
is Ideal for anM studio, work 
shop or galiened nvmo ray* 
X66J00Q. To 01-929 4683 Qay 


MAGNIFICENT 


okd and church, Medieval thatched HALL 
HOUSE- 3/4 beds, dining room, sitting room, 2 
bathrooms, kitchen, library. Also adjoining bnck 
and flint cottage ideal . for dependents or holiday 
^ lets. Wee guide: £150/£ 170,000. 
niastratfid brochure Luff Kemp: 0787 77770. 


STM COTS WO LDS Spac dd/H. 
FH. Dnmae. 3 6/tote, tong;- 

/d/rm. UPC Mtn/kn. OK/UUI. 
d/qge. *■' acre i/tcoped gdm. 
?S5l E97XXXJ 043363 3601 
COTS WOLD Land Handng7 Con 
lad: (tenures. Equ^rtan 

Property RetoraUW Service 
(0386) 862210 124 tin) 


WORCESTERSHIRE 

B artle y 

(s~ n«M eandn cnwjy resttnea. 2 racos. bTaa im, kttdan, 
SiW^Samw ua/suio. 1H taa gdns.and grands, suparh 

m PD0 *‘ Offers kautf on tmm 

Agents: Andrew Grant, 
Worcester (0805) 24477 


CHELTENHAM 


Cflnw S!SI22ffl : SS. 5 Baoms. S BaaSu^ propor- 
0 to».as BuBSBB^f bMomgfir area 

stanang m. owr » fsLzLUTh, « a wrv com- 


St Homes Ltd, 11 North Pteco, Ctetoihain. 
0242 S84457 



HANTSJ)ORSET,& 


6MXIHQHAM PCHET- Reifrecff 
ton a luxury i/iac mc l bed 
am- Superb iduiift Corteroes 
dwcowtl foe rarlv 
E57.9&0 For Breen nng 028Z 
878686/879447 


mars T O W H House, return 
Aireswnt- Ideal *Mie person^ 
beds. 0*10. drewino, "r 
ku/brkM nn. 

C67JM0 F/H (0690) 71300 
VEHTMM tw- New am dijw.* 
superb large lux Hats.oyc cwox 
mo uie sea 2 mib . g/c/n.(r«b 
£41.750 0M3 863389 
VENTNM - Lnfoue 

Superb 6 ned noose ntos 6 hw 

day Amu overtreWnsSSiS? 
spirt. C34SJWO 0983 882299 

CoHthnxd on teattfS 8 

































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1 2 1 986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


< W>jtJ lm \&0 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


HANTS, DORSET, &. 
IJO.W. 


HAMPSHIRE 

Near Southampton 
A too tamSy house in 1/2 
stars. HM. Cloakroom, 3 Re- 
ceptkms, Kto*»n/&ttst Rm. 
Utsay Ffcn . 4 Badrms. 2 
Bathims. CH. Due Garage. 
Out Offices. Faecumr safe. 
£225^000 

Beales (0794) 518237 


WJKWJUOWni EASTCUT 
Ground floor fUL Sea views. 
Close 10 stums and emenain- 
inmL Lounge. tuning room. Z 
double bedrooms < 1 fitted!. fmiy 

S5S ■“to™*™ 

SSyOO Trinhom 00*3 

SZOOT9, 


~ DefacfiM Regency 

. 3 . . 3 reception 

gfftT- 00 1/2 acre Diet- Com- 
g* wnotMM. Ore* 
nyetmoit pantuu dor to 
2S5!' Tifflnil. £89.996. 
i«cw»np: Pnonty ciU04i 
83*609 or 105031 MaoSO. 


£ 117,000 

DebcM2/3 baton bungakw 
& rotted with no expense 


MMTMUrrS tamretofv* wing of 
country houto. Grade D mad. 
folly rmcthm. 2 large dou- 
ble bedrooms, gallery, dining 
room, kitchen. l ux u ry bain- 
room. I acre private garden ■* 
Imncb and run * communal 
paddock. 56 monies DR 10 Lon- 
don. £92.000. Tel 0636 
710927 evumnma. 







rajJMSTMUE Spacious marison- 
rtu * to MacM house dose 10 
sea. 6 bedroom*, large lounge. 
5* A _all f/f Included. 
£37.800. Ted 0003 BOZ78. 


I KX I ABLE, ctunning n/det. 3/d 
bed bungalow wioi usual er- 

'trae. Lge Barden. laundry /work 
shop. £90.000. T«1 0329 64686 




mm m 


a ~ Mml3g£& 

Hi 






TmWT&S!! 




STAMMOHE WILL IramacubUP. 
newly decorated. halls adjoin 
tog- 4 beds. 3 reeep. semi. Now 
tottll in Utcften. new carpets, 
garage. prune position. 
£138.600. Evenings and week- 
ends O! 954 9829. 


ET7&fS00 

0707-^429 


KENT BEACH COTTAGE Very 
special seaside fisherman's ter- 
raced cottage. UnUHeniBtCd 
views of While cuffs & France. 
Meal Uroitar weekend retreat - 
goK. fishing, wafer sports & ev 
ceUnu locution for French trios. 
2 reads. 3+1 bedrms. 
SmalUione Ulchen. pretty 
paved slocked rev qa t diai with 
huge garden sited. Freehold 
£76.000 Tel: Oi - 937-4774 






ST ANDREWS 


Ml 


ADJOMMG MANSION 
H OUSES rf liaonc tf 
MvM in ununi 
consarvafiorr ana of 
ntierstty town. Offers over 
35.000 and £150.000 are 
touted. 

Tel 0334 771D7. 


SUP E R B WOODLAND BtttMtaa 

She at 3 Acres with detailed 
Planning Pennbewn. excep- 
uonaily situated in the grounds 

of one of engtand’altnwl coun- 
try houses on the Gomplon 
Vemey Estate, between Ban- 
bury and Stratford on Avon. 
Offers over £80.000 Freehold. 
1-66 acne paddock and 
architect's plan for the house 
alio available. Lane Fo* A Part- 
ners wttti Hylands. Middleton 
Cheney. Banbury. Qun. Tel: 
0296 7105921. 


JMDUXTOM PARK. Former 
Lutyens lodge set wtttvin otm- 
sive naruand. use of swimming 
pool A I rants CL bevulttfUOy 
matnialned. HaD. 28* drawing 
rm. dim no rm. luxury fitted 
kitohen. 6 bedrms. 2 baths. CH- 
Dbte gtag. ggc for 3 can. good 
gardens. superb netting. 
£132.600. ttaflWy oucUand 
Aytsebnry 0296 25662 


NEW HOMES 


“UNITY WHARF ,> 
Fascinating Dockside Warehouse Flats 

and office suites by 

r '^^^OivilOPMtNilS LID 

FOR SALE: Superb newly developed 
luxury flats, overlooking St. Saviour’s Dock 
close to Tower Bridge and within minutes of 
the City. All having immense character, with 
exposed brickwork and original beams. 

Flats of 2 bedrooms , 2 bathrooms, etc. 

£195,000 to £210,000 
Also superb penthouse (in “shell” form) 
with terrace £ 250,000 

MARBLE HALLWAYS ■ UFT • AUDIO-VISUAL SECURITY ■ 
DOCKSIDE BALCONIES - LUXURY KITCHENS & MARBLE 
BATHROOMS ■ NEW DECORATIONS AND CARPETS - 
AMPLE CUPBOARDS 

999 YEAR LEASES FOR SALE — low outgoings 
Also available for sale: Office suites of 600 to 1100 sq ft 
(ideal for the businessman who is tired of commuting). 

Mill Street, London SE1 • VIEW TODAY and DAILY 11am - 6pm 

. TToith 43 North Audky Sum, 

v-v r A V IT ~w £~*1 uaM^HliKP joint Grosvtmr Square. 

XJi/ A r J J J I N Sl’SfvZS 54 A 5016 KSdardale London W 1 Y 2 AQ 
f Ta Z J» ■ did Li l LJ htM-ffliKfc Agents IV Graves 01-629 6604 



WA.ELLIS 


Bill % 

IlLffl ■ 


Cinnamon Wharf- luxurious waterfront flats m the fascinating 
rmtalisuhon of Butins Wharf. Close to Tower Bridge and the City, this 
exciting area offers a special lifestyle for the future. 

VIEW SHOW FLATS TODAY 

Sales Office and show flats open every day I lam to 7pm 

SPACIOUS 2 AND 3 BEDROOM FLATS 
FOR SALE ON 99 YEAR LEASES 
PRICES .£157,500 TO £325,000 
GARAGE SPACES £7,500 

Features include: balconies; views ofSL Saviour’s Dodt and die 
a5^£SrSSS«d batkrcxrrnstgas central heating. 

Tel: 01-403 2563/2o72 


BARN HEY 

The Wirral 


Btrecttf averfooUng 
Royal Liverpool GoH 
Caorse 

are 20 superbly buQt 
2/3-bed apartments 
- and one bungalow 
-with glazed 
conservatory, gas 
central heating, two 
bathrooms, fully 
fitted kitchen and 
garaging. 

a Reel vaka, tan only 

A £74.950 

Ml «i to 

VJwnrani nous 

W W WMWMGTCR HOWS 


SOMERSET & AVON 


UIH FARMHOUSE UK -6 bed* 
2 hath, "i acre, abl garage, mk 
box. Bub anrax B male*, dim 
tn the- region of £156.000. Tel. 
0761 a ITT l a tosyuma 


BATH Central Listed 6 mm 
Georgian house. 5 recess. 7 
bMs. garden/partiag- FGCH. 

£165X00. Trt (022*1 64 124 


rnOHAH. OoBcptH ul country 

cottage 6 miles irotn Oxford 2 
beOrrta. sKhng rm. KU. bottsmi. 
wr. Cat Orm I cl). Open ingle- 
nook fire- Soutt pooo gdn. 

£56X300- Contact Odlhom 3263 
or Ol 870 0271. 





HEAHTFELD. E. SUSSEX 

A fine dencbed amor style tarnd, 
tamsnea m secluded ye, cotnb- 
nem Muaocei. 3 recap. S bed. 
kitohen. utdqy. cloakroom, both- 
rootn. ah oetoroom 3 PoCer room 
(Oes OK) plus ganae. sunw 
Muse 8 towy gamSTnSSJJOO. 

ffiATHFSLD OUTSKIRTS 
E SUSSEX 

A Superb detached person rosy 

dence wsn wuoi cd expcaec 
beams. SHkno room wth kwte- 
nook. 3 M&ttnnal rgcefnfcn. 

tamhouse tacnen. conservatory, 
dapmom vmn shower. 4 bed- 
rooms. ba throom sow fuel Cii 

M_sarasa » vnm. 
El 35.000. 

mat a w 

6N3SZ) 3J33N 


■ (ont/n (hr. InU r national pic 


Leisure Properry Developer- 


Mow secure your lifestyle with a sunshine home investment 
even through a pension fund - a family trust - a company incentive. 


> *1S 



unique detodiad stone bum 
iMuar afluaied V> acre oTaMnt 
Toy Estuary. 4 beds, dbto glaz- 
ing. tone ggc. conscrvaiory. 
£80X300 T6UOS823 541G77 



(0372) 374094 


HWWN 8 Favoured area. Spec- 
tacular co rw c m on of \iuonan 
cowshed providing union*- com 
fortatoc (amity hone. Principal 
DM with study t, rnSOUe d fur- 
ther beds & famtly Dairy C 3 Krm. 
atrium hah A -pair, vaulted Hiv- 
ing rm. anting, family rm. large 
ni kUrti. GCM. lame dbie gge 
with miUtv ww. Secluded Ij 
acre gds. oners over £300X300 
FH 04862 27394. 


CKCAMi suratanUai detached 
resdCncr to lecluaM road, in 
prune forai*m. <*WI nwln- 
tamra. 2 receps. moorrn nurd 
K» / tt/lasi rm. uuhor rm. 
cloakrm. 4 beds. 2 barbs. 2 fur- 
liter rm* on 2nd Boor. Garden 
6 garage in approx "■ acre. 
£256X300. TN: 01-642-3540. 


MB OULOFORD rwalerloo 58 
Mtnsl Attractive & suactous 
family amxn mode bon m 

Htught aflcr (ocolloii. 5 beds. 2 
recid. sruay/olaytioani. urgr 
kiichea/breakrasi rm. naUinn. 
shower rm, Gae- CH. garage Se- 
cluded Y: acre garden. 

Cl 80.000- Tel: 0483 89293S 


iOUTN CH£AM, Surrey. Luxury 
3/4 bedroomed deuiched 
house with lounge, dining 
room, large mahogany Ittltd 
kitchen, break! as: room. 2 bath 
raoiito. anmehed eiectnc double 
oarage and single garage- p»io 
ortii gardens £ 16^.000 for 
quick sale. TN Ol 643 30(36 


BVFLEET - Non estate, in a cul de 
sac. S year old detached. 4 beds. 
2 baths. 2 receps. downsuuis 
dock, titled kitchen, douwe 
glazed, double garage, garden. 
Easy ream schools, shops & 
M2S. £127.500. tfL09323 

54461 anytime 


A5HTCAD B nuns from M25. 38 
mins train waiertoo/viaona. 
Detached twe a beds. 2 bam. 
tuning, lounoe. rated ml 
puyroom/nm lounge. dMe gge. 
IJOn south thong «m 
£134.980. TN 1037221 76813 


WALTON ON THAMES Town- 
house in landsraoed grounds, 
lun may nunaiced heated 
whirlpool in ‘patw garden. 
Three double bedrooms, bath- 
room. cloakroom, huge lounge, 
fitted kUChen/dining area. Inte- 
gral garage, cot Fne rains 
sin. 28 mins London. 10 rants 
M26 OH cm around 84X500 
TeUXUa 236356 


CQBUAM- Beautifully proeored 
ouallty character house ui quiet 
location dose open couocry 
CCH. 8 tge beds. 2 baths. 3 Nr 
recent, fabulous new wi/hrldsl 
rm. uuuty. dole gge. mature 
gdits. £285X300 F/H. Sole 
Agents: Goodman * Mann. 33 
High Straw. Cobham. TN: 
109323 64131. 


SOUTH SUTTON - Character 6 
bed. 3 bam house + 1 bed an- 
nexe. indoor pod romnte* - 
Suberb noollloa E365XX30. 
Pearson Cole Ot 642 2244 


ROUTE Urge 1930‘s 4 bed del 
house in ptimt* location, lux ku 
and oath, dbte gge. •r acre. 
£162X300. 0757 242222 eves. 



1 MOrrr D AZUR Valbonne. 5ouUi of France [ 

Enchanting country houses inc. swimming poo) 
with stunning views to the Cap d'Antibes in total 
calm. 5/4 bedrooms - 2300.000 FF 


a family trust - a company incentive. 

Why not spare i hour for an exploratory discussion 

at our presentation at: 

THE CONNAUGHT ROOMS 
1 61 GREAT QUEEN STREET 

J LONDON WC2 

10-50 am - 7XIQ pm 

12th Sc 13th November 


CROIX VALMER 
South of Trance 


Provencal villas set in 
the tranquillity of a 
wooded green zone. 3 
bedrooms - 950.000 FF. 


EZE-SUR-MER 
South of France 




Palais Flereze now being 
converted to 10 unique 
apartments. From 
1-500.000 FF. 


I8th century style 
architecture. Apartments 
and Houses from 
£24,000 to £60.000. 


PORT VILLAGE 
Almerimar. Spain 


Freehold marina 
waterfront property 
adjoining beach and golf 
course from £27X300. 


All properties are located so as to enjoy lovety views, golf beaches, pools and sunshine. 
Management rental income, security, concierge and maid service through Uie unique Montpelier Owners Club 

5% REDUCTION FOR PRE CHRISTMAS PURCHASE 

Telephone for colour brochure & details of our presentations at Oxford Be Harrogate. 
LONDON 01-589 5400 BATH 0225 539035 MANCHESTER 061-834 3586 FRANCE (931 65.09.96 


KTPRB SUSSEX Stole country 
house In over 3 acres, on re 
Surrey /Sown border Qioeno- 
cation 3600 square loot 5 
be<B.3baun. 3 rernw. sunertHy 
filled kllchoi. utility. £273.000 
neg i040572i 2949 anytime 


CBAWL1Y Larw detached. 4 
beams. 2 receps. Quality house, 
luxury flUutgs. convenient for 
Cal wick and M26/M23. |a-J 

tnan to London. £122.000. 
Tel. 0293 883963 evenings 


LODGE In Ashdown Forest for 
modernisation to 1 and quarter 
tots Auction 26th Movwmef . 
Ctuoe price £125.000 R.661. 
Powell £ Parmer Ud.. Forest 
Row <0342 82 1 2261 


V I LLARS— SWITZERLAND 


Imagine an exclusive resort, just 70 minutes from Geneva . . . Sunshine . . . sif tin g 
. . 5Katmg . . . swimming . . . golf — bone-riding . . . superb restaurants & shops. 
International schools ... all set in wooded slopes with stunning mountain view. 
All this- and more - you will find at VTLLARS - a historic village with 
a sophisticated yet vXXA r friendly atmosphere. 

OB 


LE BRISTOL 


WALES 


WEST WALES 

Near CarfSgar. FuBy mod- 
ernised and tumefied 3 
bad Mil cottage. Attracwe 
mate fireplace. TS acre gar- 
den with mer frontage. 

£324X10 

Tel: 0491 36003 (day) 
36061 (eve) 


CAMBRIAN COAST. Barmouth. 5 
bud bungalow. Ulcfwn. dfnlng 
room with lounge, bathroom. 
Kultf. CCH. Flower and veg 
garden. Garage, store room. 
£45.000 OdO 0341 280189. 



WILTSHIRE - BARN FOR CON- 
VERSION TtuKtied barn in 
lovely postlion between 
Hunger fold and Swindon. 
Planning permosKm for con- 
version to spectacular 3 
b e droom house with cavernous 
reception are*. Lb u» 2 “i acres 
available. Guide £80XX» John 
German. Ramsbury- Martoor- 
ough. Wilts SN8 2PD 10672) 
20691 


WILTSMfltE - RAMSBtBTV Marl- 
borough 6 rale*. Hungerford 5 
mne* A charming Victorian 
urhcMraatter * home Cf!»e to 
the centre of Uie village 3 nv 
ceplion. kitchen, uuuty and 
cloakroom. 3 bedroom*, bath- 
room CtmUni owbuiisiim 
and pretty garden. Price guide - 
reraon oi £100.000 John Ger- 
man. Ramsbury. Marlborough. 
Wilts SN8 2PD. *0672 1 20691 


PROPERTY WANTED 


FREEHOLD GROUND Renl Want- 
ed Anptedcee Finance Lid. 2 
Etphlmfone Road. Hastings. 
EUSussex. 0424 434891. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


JERKS Pretty del rottage In con 
dllion in qvuel oownLwd 
village-. 3 beds. 2 rec. 2 hath, gw 
CH. dbie garage. ■* acre garden 
AAoid £130.000 Dreweaus 
NewOury i0636> 4600. 


New investment opp ort eni t y in Swiss Real Estate 
a unique concept ia vdcci folly serviced apart mem* mth all ibe Polities of a luurry hoid-indoor pooL 
squash, bars, rnuiuanL etc. I to 4 room apartments from SF 130.000. • Up 10 80% Swiss finance available 
at favourable terms. 

• MEET THE SWISS DEVELOPERS AT: 

THE MAYFAIR HOTEL, STRATTON STREET. LONDON Wl. 
12 NOON - S PM 20TH & 21ST NOVEMBER 
12 NOON - 4PM 22ND NOVEMBER 

HILARY SCOTT LTD For details and appointment; 

422 Upper RictBBoad Road West, Inrawbfliete de Vffius SA, 

London SWI47JX n 1884 Wan, Swftzerind. 

Tefcpbooe: 01^764555 Kb J Tckphoae 01041 25/353531 

Teka 927828 Tdez 456213 GESE CH 


r ASgTUR . _ _ Welcomes you to the\jft 

wsmmm Costa de ( Azahar. ^ 

We are an established Spanish registered estate agency with office? ' 
both in the U.K. and Spain. We specialise in what we consider to be tbe 
most k)yUic area of Spain which is served both by Alicante and Valen- 
cia Airports. Our after-sales service office is open 7 days a 
week and offers a very comprehensive range of services. 

We als have our own legal department. A few examples of 
our current portfolio are: New 3 bedroom 2 bathroom 
beach apartment - £23.000. Superb beach penthouse, 114 ^ 

sq .metres, hilly furnished - £28,000. Beach re-sale apart- 
ment. 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom - 

£14,000. Beach villas - £35.000. WjVrajK 

Mountain villas - from £26.000 to' 

For colour brochure write of ~ 

telephone: Asefeur Properties, * 4' -\4L a *' a i^49Nfci 

Coartaey House, Station Approach, jK.^- ^ ^ 
Kingston-apon-Thames, Sarrey 

01*546 2706 


FLAINE 

Purpose twit ski and sum- 
mer holiday vdaas. high in 
French Alps. T54 hours drive 
horn Geneva. Flats fursata: 
studios from 140.000 FF. up 
to 4 rooms from 4 00,000 FF. 
THORNCUFFE 
PROPERTIES 
(0885) 512777 


SKI FLAT EXHIBITION 

Mp on feaubac* detts awl tv s»- 
<qs fdl uetsh al apts n MeN»> 
Avonaz & mnrre 

LOMDttM WEST HOTEL 
(opp SU Store) 

TODAY KD Oil MOV 
I TAN - 8PM. 

F. Ralticrtocd b Co. 

51 Bronana RS. SW3 IDE 
01-581 1978 


CANNES atwttncnl iwrlral con- 
dilion 73 M2, two balconies, 
pool, urgent. £65.000 Croud 
Mkndia France IS Rur Lalgur 
Maubourg. 06400 Cannes Trt: 
OIO 33 9343 1919 Tlx 461803 

BUYERS M FRANCE Whtr «MK- 
lion of rrsKtmen. vUla& Me. 
Free nLakigue on request Ell 
Marcnand de tuens. ISP 78. 
33077 Bordeaux Cedex. France 

FRANCE - AU regwos cotlagn 
cruicaux from £IOXX)0. Fi- 
nance available Brochure. 
ViUOtel Lid 01-485 2733. 


GENERAL 


GREECE 

POfrra HYOMVIUAGE 
Enuano* 

KINGSTON LODGE HOTEL 
KWGSTOU.SUHKY. 

IEBi NdV 19K. 

11am - Spa. 

Fui deals 

Varner Wme LW_ Domm* Houst 
177 LoratonRs. Kr^SAivw 
Thames. Sure* KT? BPA 
01-548 9465. 


AMONGST THE ORANGE GROVES OF JAVEA 

IndiutdiuBv designed muss on Dials af around a 1/4 acre m tho zrea of outstanding natural teatfv 
Javea resiles or the MnHwosnean (noway between Valenoa are Mcante and was pronounced as Uie HeaUues 
Place m toe WbikT By Hie WotM Heath Oroamsanon. 

Javea is nor suftected ro ‘oaaageti laxl hoMays aiw thus istaeis its oW imrtd efurnt. mahng a me Meal spot lor a 
hguav home at omraneni residence 

Bufl By itxHewsi devrtmn on the Costa Bianca, a 2 bedroomed detached rtia m ^pi« of a 1/4 acre, set in nature 
petes and within 5 mnnes drive oi the sea. would cost approMiutely £41.000 F/H. 

Vsd out ExWxtwn Centra in Dover and see on ndeo. die quaHy oi the Mdmgs and the Beauty ol Javea 
For fudief WonnaDon contact 

OVERSEAS PROPERTY INVESTMENTS 
3 CHURCH STREET, DOVER, KENT. CT16 1LY 
TEL: (0304) 201102 (24 HRS) 


MARBELLA 
UK CO. 

Wish to lease flats/ vfllas 
in the Marbella/ Natanya 
areas an an amuai 
basis. 

Pis contact 
Nicole Sanderson 
91-9503575. 


NEW HOMES 


COSTA BLANCA & COSTA DEL SOL 


Buy direct & save money 

- Villas, bungalows, townhouses, apartments 
We offer value for money in prime positions 
from £10,000 to £100,000 

Caff for brochures and further Information: 

INTERYENTAS ESPANA S.A. 

Group Caja Territorial de Madrid, 14S Oxford Street, London Wl. 
Teh 01-434 0484 (24 hrs answering service) 


TREDEGAR VILLAS • E3 

just released by award winning builders - 
choice of 4 bouses set around pretty courtyard 
setting. Located in the heart of this pretty con- 
servation area only ISO yards from Mile End 
Tube and under & mile of Docklands. 
Georgian charm and elegance throughout of- 
fers 2 double bedrooms, luxury bathroom/WC, 
drawing room with feature fireplace, fully fined 
kitchens, gas central heating, fined carpets, 
landscaped gardens, 10 year NHBC, secure off 
street parking plus much much more .... 

FANTASTIC VALUE 

£115,000 FREEHOLD 

SOLE AGENTS 

Ricketts 
Boreham 
01-980 7431 

34I-M3 ROMAN ROAD-LONDON £3 5QR. 


"aBissiW i 

SgSjiSS&gB 


beaheiKbesatmur /' 



IknimsstbapAtm 
OPfHVtMUlfortOBT 
boKfialbram. 

TckpAmte 

f OWJ/StoifiOif • ^ 

gn&uszwt CAS10NA 


ViHnr/i'Vlh hit ” 

iiffiVuiM4i tmrluDvn .-ue eat* i-f'inwitec 


BALEARJCS 


MALLORCA 

We have ihe oesi prooeny fast & 
Englsn sort on toe island, sup 
Ft ess. Investment suites aval, 
horn £7.950. 

Cooper & Co., 

22. York Rd, 
Northampton. 

0604 36610/ 863397. 


Bn*. SMdous lumtsfiM Uirre- 
bra roomed aMruiwnl Near 
shoi»4 and bedcti in Engusn. 
Speaking Block . £30.000 One 
Ring. 1 0705* 463552. 


BAU.ORC* Wide range of prop 
erne, ig suil aU icguireincnLv 
O StuiKTO 06CG 413593. 


CANARY ISLANDS 


ANDORRA. 

Buy direct from buMar 
aparts from £20.000. Full 
managerwit & rontsi 
service. Cisa Andorran 
Props Ltd. 5 Princsdale 
Road, London W11 4NW. 

Tel 01 221 6843. 


ZIMBABWE Good nmir/smr 
ranch overlying aguaier 
31 OOO acres. £74.600 For «c- 
tails Tel 01 386 8084. 


EPfOAVROS. Greece. New t A 2 
bedroomed oualilv soartroentt 
Small coastal resort Magnlli 
L-cni environ mmi Rare 

ODDOnunilk From £20.000 
Roben Comlm. (0799) 22641. 


PAROS. Greece Lrgrol uie 
Beauliiul 7 80 acres by Uie sea 
Tel Ol 623 5035. 



Joint Setting Ago* - 


WAELLIS 


The last few traditional style homes are now on sale on 
our select development at Hook Green. 

Like the Trenton i similar to that illustrated J. An executive 
style four bedroomed house with study, living room, separate jp; — 
dining room, a shower room en-suite to the master bedroom 
and a double garage —from £104-105,000. 1L 

Visit us now — we’re open Fri, Sat. Sun. Mon or phone Tor Ih 

more information on Moopham i0474» B13081 jQ/fa 

Make us a* offer. but hurry I 




^ 1, 4 



PROPERTY IB SPAllf 

PROPERTT BMESTMEHT THROUGH THE MSTflBMElT OF 
A GIBRALTAR COMPANY ■ THIS RESULTS H 3% 
SAVOGS M ACTUAL COST. 

Rac omwnfflwv to acgroc inn knixv swmnwru wurafl hr twin mC wcMI 
comwnct di a turoc nroiiiamttn oi n# Kow ir* owv 25 nviuei Ciw nrm 
tenO* mi B EsBnona. leqji :wie Ituroni »xj Not?h> cku jii raB lb «na 
evil: nvonM Cxnoamci. I't 'iWV o*A icniiBWdli c«umoi ante. Punnctt 
all aj.-c iOO“ aTOni oi Corajanv • Pnwnv vo ww anawrur •: £mra Pnws 
ijr« ''om F38000 ID £160 000 

hi durnwtv Jir it a Xm iflW Wdwo 5*3 vires Torts cart S»»r™tq 
Cfiti 'mump TV Wl (Mwsnuw PmumftKsessiO" iwsosie vrten C»ftt 
nom d»h*i f*i OoMS I«rw GtoWU# 3»j1 t« Milt IB 

Lawrence (sola. 

Suite 3, Ha se te rach Court, P.O.Box 469, Gibraltar 


■1 CAN PERSONALLY 
RECOMMEND EL 
BOIANKXr 
Tm Ibiy vestoanl. dHimari cf 
flir pnip who uratm » bCBitel 
devaromerx ch apaiuneras m 
Ttnaifc. 

‘I ran persoulh' irtoraraeod 
B Boairoj Cmauic'l hare raat u 
nay permanern iv*nc:‘ 
fit a free bnxJnre - IBs R M. 
Bnwtus on 051-296 930o 


CYPRUS 



OF PSUPERTKS ON THE COSTA BUWCA AND FLORIDA 

SUNDAY 16 NOVEMBER 1986 12-8 psn. 

THE LADBROKE SEVEN HILLS HOTEL 
SEVEN HILLS ROAD. COBHAM. SURREY 
& THE POST HOUSE HOTEL. BREAKSPEAR WAY. 
HEMEL HEMPSTEAD. HERTS. 

& THE REIGATE MANOR HOTEL RE1GATE MANOR. 
RE1GATE. S URREY. 

TavnerstarOl -549 4251 

nonunir Hmjic. ITmTJ Loitiirfi Raid. Kingran-iiymi-riiainca. Fura- v 


CYPRUS 

Luijry wiicjs an! ntasoneftos. 
Burt to Ixgn qiUMy and tonoaid 
Saimnning k» tnvy taste ano 
P"» 

Jn we unumb PAPHOS w*a. Vat 
cu genruneni luraomon c> sens 
ip* ae-ve. ro 

S. RAFtts IUJC-1 
PTWprrn Bmeoxts 
it wmimjnm Straw 
AWitew-lXyae. Lanes. 

OS 1-330 *4*2 |m) NT-43* (501 


FRANCE 



Use our years of experience to guide you. Com- 
plete choice of villas, townhouses. apurtmems. 
Weekly four-day inspection trips £75 per person 
in November. 


_ .»■ ::£clovrjuoitiuro'. 

: f-v; *- , 1 B E R I A • i f|i Of EP.T'^ A SS 0 Cl ATcS ... . . , 

4 Bfinriian R o ad .. T adv.: oftti :'SLr (% : 0,7.37 8 3390 2- 


35 Iub norm of 
SLTrepez 

Lumjt, Mtajpjnonmc vires 

Bun 1990 n Pro^ncv st**- 
«rtns pod 4 oauo 8 lerraceo 
pan oweriung t5e3utrtul 
KMtP’vwe So«»usi<v5e( 

Ortn u rm GtWnM^W^ S 

twonro * 1 ""08"C 3 bariums 
tntracmf lamnwc '*4. - b laM 
area »*m Dok-ooc- 
tt Zbumm 
B372 GS147 (ftayUme) 
0372 65757 (cm 8 vdoubi- 


PORTl’CAL 


ALGARVE 
Nobody does it better! 

Coratrefleosw range Ol toasv PM6 
ernes inuTi 135^01 - £300j00. 

Fot mocikue. phone w wrte 
(TZL Stepben Bancndl 
IstenatloBaL 
Pnmdence House. 

River Street. 
Wi ndsor. B erts. 

Tefc (0753) 866278. 


GRIFFITHS & 
GRIFFITHS 
PROPERTY 
CONSULTANT 

Western Algarve 

Wc hudd supcrti Vilas nagog bum 
K9CE9D 10 £2000000 
Fw M oeuts on n war onr Eton 
ofin i30 Hip«i Snen. Eton. Mndw. 
Berts 5L6 6t*L 

Tet 0753 866012. 


AL CARVE- EMIiKIve MVflop- 
rnctli bclM«cn ValMoloba and 
QuinU Do Lagn Fully lur- 
naiwi two ben luxury villa, 
own cool 6nvai*vde Funner 
drCuiK pnegu- iC>483i 222683 


ALCABVE Cirvwirii family re- 
diurcd la snare in Irani 
purrnav of Jaroo vjua wttn 
pool £17 OOO Him 1/6 Ih 
marc- and cul> out l nr nuadir. 
man Phunr. lOTiai 701444. 


ALGARVE. Nr Sllvn Rare op- 
poriuiulv id purctiasr I acre 
pirns. hiIIv oununqinq i»wi of 
surrounding (nils and vaueys. 
The peace and brauiy of the 
I rur Algarve, vel "lirun S min. 
vile* ra Stives £5.000 each, in- 
fill also build your vHia from 
£20 Otw Please phone- Martin 
Properties Portugal Tel; OIO 
3S| 825 363S or Telex- 58853 
BELTRA P 


ALGARVE. Land. ComarucUons. 
rarranoinn. Mila Search 
Caros ke OSPs (OTTBi 34«49g 


MARBELLA. 1 bedroom 3 «j(h 
mom apanmeni. in the 
pri-nlnMiis Don Carlos 
urwmMiKm Private anna lo 
be.irh. own swimming pool. 
P,:nor.iniK sea vh-w £57.500 
Trf •06«ni S3619 


ex, ex- 
sul rose 
)wth in 
/as an 


' ked to 























































































d 


RENTALS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986. 




LONDON'S LEADING RESIDENTIAL LETTING AGENTS 
offering that personal & professional service 

■uuku m etui OAKLEY STREET SW3 


GROOM PLACE SW1 

Beautiful mews trace competoty refurn- 
ished. Super location views over Betgrava 

Square. 3 beds. 2 baths. 1 iacu=y ensura. 

shower rm. (fining nn. racepBW. large 
chen wife machines, pano. 

E450 p* 

PUTNEY SW15 

Outstanding 4 bedroomed twi h ouse m 
one at most sough! alter location. ■ 
overlooking stunning garden. 1 >»jn._l 
shower nn, H tatcften wdh aB mactwws, 
garage. Long co lei 
^ £240 pw 

brompton park SW6 

Rural trantjudav m FUham. Brand new war 

tn Ok desraole deveiopment. 2 tw&owra. 

2 bathrooms it ensurtei reception. Amen- 
j ran kitchen, tanasaaped gardens. »»«■ 
swimnsng pool aid gym. Long co let. 


OAKLEY STBOTSSL 

Sensational tatenor dwgnw nmsonaca 
ust awuteDte in the heart of Chelsea. 3 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (1 ensutal dou» 
reception with ortgma! feanes 
restored. Siting room, super Mown 
designed for perfect hostess, roof wrace. 
Avad to co tenant tor 6 months only. 

E55Q pw 

flat to rehirttished Mock. 2 be droom s, 2 
bathrooms P ensutse). targe recaption. R 
krtchen wdti a# macttnas. 

E27S p« 

SLOAKE STRKT SWt 

ABractivefy presented wp flow Wwnmrom 

Mcrace, convertentfy whwiftd fn fwart at 
Krtightstmege- t bed, 1 bath, reception. H 
Mcnen. ^ ^ 


UTMBV1 

£350 p.w. ^ 
FuBv hmwhed 4th flwW 
tnbusitinoawtfwfls*^ 
ha i double bed. stogto 
bed. bain, ctoata. w«P- 
ion hj gy Une d 

Mayfair OHWri 

I?h3sJ 45*3 

MHein iruge vs 

. £250 P.W. _ 

Umquefy **?! 

convened church. Mrfem 
recap. 2 beds , fined 
kitchen, bathroom^ 

-rs?ss r 

nHaaoMRUKrtts 

£250 p.w. 


BIS FIB «2 

£220 p.w- Co. Let 
mmi location tor Xmas shop 
pM Ckoa w Oxford SbeetJ 
Erf Bat tealunftfl hflh Cg- 
im Recommend wewng tor 


314S2 5060 

BttHUUBSEU 

£200p.«- 

Award wmung howe wflj 
Stuffing . «aer v ya. _S5 
beds. 7/2 recaps, z bmhs. 
waum »/i m. gga 


01-538 4821 


WIPW ‘-"-“TT — -T... „ n 
detached perad hrwse. 2 
dbiebeds. spid level recap, 
bath. 1 1. hi Cotoreal veran- 
dah leading to tgrden- 


01-946 9448 


£325 P-W. 

The most speca^atwwin 
London bom UwdBbgMfU 
apartment in prestige PS 
Sock 2 date beds, spflptws 
dUe mcep. , .Mfl. _g*3 
dodo, mod tatchen aB 
mac H nes. 

U»e VwjwOTr* 
01-236 4632 


GLMCSiaHUVI 

EOT P.W. Co. Ut 
Stuffing spacious taoftf . 
house n prssngous. area. 5 
beds, 2 reaps. 3,tw 8a 6 
garden, urtumotied - highly 
recamaended 

vm tom an 

£178-300 p w. . 
KDEbenh Tsnaces sturnan 
setaction d t 8. 2 bed flail 

Pfcnfco OWcet 

01-834 9988 

nmnus shush 

wa) p.w. 

Lovely body house, Ml 
slusled n B® chanting 
dewBpmenl dare Chetaw 
Green ft weB loafed tor Kings 
Road S Sth Ken. Setta land- 
scaped cottot gdra - lge 

dodo. 

HmHm Wet 

PT«S5«1 


BEWWMW « 

»50 

BeautifuBy «***“>** 
house aval umOlSM. o 
dbta beds. 3 baths (1 
ensure) ctoeks. 3 weeps, 
superb tided tatchen. 
QyCHW. Baden. Av atiabte 
aunffflfftrey . 1236 months 
NotfiRO HB Office: 


NATHAN 

64 ROSSLYN HILL 

BBSCE PUjUHe „ 

Brag a a 
sssra^g 

shower, ^d Jmn. 
ExCflBent Vs*». W0 9* h 

BaS&E PARK, NW3 

\ SSStt—se 


IBUmSSffiE w S« 

£300 p.w. 

Chamang faulty home m 
onmecutate aider tfimualj 
out dac otation a 

good qitaBfy furMmps. 


n-jm I ; 

Ah/few jt^^f l nideniiaiFitKte^3ennaam 


way tube 2 dbta beds, 1 

single, dbta recep. drttg nn 
seats & Kitchen 8 a8 me- 
dunes, bathroom, show 
Avail end November. 
Fuihsm Office: 
01-731 3111 


drooma. 

recaption eraa.»jd^ r y 

kgchen with al m^wjes. 

EZBD JfcWe 

KARLBOROUffl 

wws«ms. b wg_ 

aweaBCg 

3 racapoons. 2 bgWW 


PIMLICO MEWS HOUSE 

Nr Tube. 100 wde. Hirer. 


m «***> 

• THIS ts a SMALL»^2 w 

■ . uatmm JSSS!9m 

01-794 
UMPSTEU GARBall 


£225 JWI 

. ^ « - w 

PROPERTIES /A MANYOTHERARE^^^^^^^^__^ 


Horner Mil 

MAKING ALL THE RIGHT MOVES 

HIGH STREET, Aogjwf 

WIMBLQKJN VILLAGE 
(TEL: 01 846 6262) 

TO LET 
KINGSTON 

FuUy tumahad bBautduU family home m 
secluded oarten m the exdosrve and aougt 
after area cfCoombe H4L This tyoparty Is July 
doubts glazed with exceptionally targe fury 
equpoed tarchan/breakfast room; g as central 
heating and tetaphone are Instated. 

The town centres of Kaigston. Wimbledon and 
New Malden are aB wdhin easy access and 
schoob of aB d e nomi na tions are witivn easy 
reach. 3 recaption rooms. 5 bedro o nre. 2 
bathrooms. 1 on-soke and separate shower. 
£2.000 par cal. month. 


■imiabd PARK OARDOCS. W14i i 

able now to r kxig let £S 50 pw. 

fur in vm* known block. Newly dagh tiled. 

ity Rm. Separata loo » Shower. EBOOpw. 



Seperate Loa Roods Gdn. E450pw. 


Offices, at CoSham. Esher. Horsham. 
Oxshott. Sunmnqhdl. Weybndge. Wimbledon 
ind Woking 


PHONE NO^^ ( OW 1 SlS^ 7 BROCHURE 

Ut*ty room. 5 bedrooms. 3 batmans. AnUtatote Iran 1st Dswmtw. i 

^S^. s itr^, , ssss“ 

TENANTS! PHONE NOW FOR OUR FREE LIST j 


Tel: 01 993 7881 

Betweea 9J36a«4 M/m Maday ® Fridiy- (D- 

HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH 
OUT THE D 0 CKLAHDS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL DffARTMENT 
TEL: 01-790 9560 

WWW agwg SE. Jgiaa* 

remain iwi »“ l^r i i« h*st«. dorfta reap- 


5operfo 4 Mboon. ^ZWnw 
napaity. ExcdWt cgwflwn. tov-[ 
neraaoennte. GompiQf bL 
E480 pw. 

Lame 6 bedroom . 2 Mta ffl *■' 

tntfirt ruse a preaner tocaioi- 
Ews®mt aniBaa. Cobw kt- 
£860 pw. 

SdecKd Has arf cattares a* 
abh for onpaty rwd»*s nwn 
£135 - £240 per week. 


nra fW Boa ftaLB«®e tobta W 

bedroom, tame roan, bath tab “S s .JJ / £t »li mv 
SSS, nod Bt £225 p.w. t«. iwd tat. £231 pw. 


FURNISHED RENTALS 

CADOGAN GARDEN atLSre 2 bedroom flats in i 

Elegant and bediwm apawmis. ^^^^JSwersion. Each flat has 

to^^unal garderreand many 
rnceptton and targe gratae* or private garfans 

From £300 per week 


dmmg ML 


g5 50 per week 


MILNER STREET .JJJ® 

a,E750 P " 01 730 8748 


A SELECTION Ftt OM OUR REGISTER 

. , c W ,a’Trr 01-493 8222 

6 ArimgfflP Street. London! 


KNIGHTS BRIDGE 

( 1 I V , Ideal Pied a tare. Defighthi! 

stuSoflanrthsmaB patio. 

TrO T pre^decorated and hvnshed. 

H 1 ■ If | Elfflpw. Company let only- 

XrV\All?gHI22 019*6 9447 

Oil l c iSea) tWMfateM 

Property Management Services Lid 




EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

Personal help in selecting from over 500 prestigious 
properties. 

Ranging from Studios from £150 per weekto five bedroom 
Ambassadorial residences up to £3000 per week. 
Booklet - 'Guidance Notes for Tenants' available o n reques t. 

St Johns Wood NW 586 3088 saJ 


— Stuoo ra* wan simh i»» 

J Pretfly decorated and hinnshed. 

I £120 pw. Company let only. 

|i 225 1022 01 9*6 9447 

I It? (iS*m) &«***») 


ORR-EWING ASSCK^ATES 
TELEPHONE: 01-581 6025 


( RAHAM SW6 

EnptianalyiKefbLlMviko- 

tUBi and tamstal to a wry tap 
samtanL 1 twtionm. t tothroom. 
1 reception, hay Mtad Motion. 
Long LeL £120 pn 

TS 225 1972 

HOTTING HILL W11 

Ednmdv anractiw gmhn H 
■i- « n nT w i ami tuKlied to hph 
riandarf anuffttoL 3 bertiooros. 
i Da nooav fnBv fitted toctiea. 
spaoous reception rooni Ctasa to 
iKdotmnd and aftoppma taefr 
ties. Andabio now. £22D pjw. 
Id: 727 7227 

ST JOHNS WOOD NW8 

atgaal laaeti HOUM • erctiam 
re»MM real 2 bedrooms. 2 
tHdnooK. dndig room, tame re- 
cepton room. My flood Krtttien 
and Bve*r root gwdeo. Gwago 
nakm ES00 pw. 

ret fe rtm 



yirwi MTO Smer masu naBs re d] 
Rnw mews fta We .rteeam' t 
bHB. baa. doatt. Mdn [/bn?**** 

monnnBiaPmattanre.jarien.gw 

I Padood tibri Qty Ef75 pw. hoo- 


tafflSEA SWn Sumg Mure m 
■nine dec order. 3 3 bate. * 

Iritis (1 “®! tt L55*?wn n nS 

n a dMWtt. rod ttn**- £500 p.w. 

m 


RENTING IN AND 
AROUND LONDON 
WIDE S ELECTION OF 
pnOPBTflES 


rnre ™ ' ■ - ___ ah 

»w-* aB iS 1 JESSS53 

MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
727 7957 or 937 9801 



PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

WB tiwo a MSSj^sSSSrjS 
nmyrifv oepeeffid funsred a™ 
{Smrfied p ropfih” * 
Redartai disiFOs. ringing non 

"■ftRSTim 

WNN HOUbWf FLATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tot 81-488 8926 


ST KATHERINE’S 
DOCK 

bathrooms, 2re“^o n *jj2r 

ctron and rioaktoom- _Av»* 
^tongtet E225 pw. Garage 
avallabla. 


jean WOBemf Lid 
Tet 01-949 2482 


01-708 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 


MALLORCA 

The most desirable seaside 
property «i W«as. Crown Ma- 

Hfl* 8B|WJ a .®!!®l!, er £ 
southern aspect lo^edbe- 
tween the two major badtow® 

hotels in this iwetynwirt. ■ 
M mutes from Pa'nta rKall. 
Crown Mamw s also cw« ito 
qolt courses, terms Mutts and 

have a choice ot two and three 

bedrooms, large *m rooms 
with unforgetrabie views, two 
bathrooms, lined Wtciien and 
private parting, hi J iddrtion 
Oiera are two pools, set m 
I magnificent landscaped 


frown Marine the ideal invest- 
ment in resort wmg 


%lo*vh 

•Marine 

Alex Ned & Co 
118 Kensington Church 5L 
London W8 4BH. Tel (Ot) 221 
2000 

SOTOGMMK- Ub OorUiOi. on 
valrlrranu Ml 

SKS JBSTLff iW 

A53 6169 . 

MKAFLORES ' MARBELLA Ro 

(omuKraMi- saiino Sojf 

unli tor luxury wild an«op- 

mmi a Spaiw h 

rurfitnro4a. Ca owMn^P 
schemes Tcf. 01^0 24B1 >Ti 

HEHIA. R««alo. S 

Miporti rumabin^s. n**? 1 ,r rsi' 
qSck Mlc K?9.a». Tel- 
107891 29318a 1 

NERJA. CM.I HH Sol V.IUS,/ 
anorunena. land/ rjrms csllln 
D*-» rtopmcnls 0827 872080. 


LUXURY a 

development on ffl 

FAMOUS SPANISH/f 
GOif COURSE nj 
iroin only £22,00%// 

l/2/3bedopfsond ra 
milos with sen view on US 
vaJamamn Gofl Course*' 3 
- Amadng value i I 

these pmpertres are 

aHJECtea looouttem MANY . 

wqUk in o year EXTRAS 

; Mongogesawtlome wcuffiED 

, jw nowondfri® i 

odwnfoge of ihE \ 

HunAsncQPPOKfl wnYfN^ 

f r ~zr~castlef>\ 

fe v inspainj ) 

lor further tfsSEand 
SSS FREE C01DUB BROCHURE 
QKw cd aliour properties 

82*^ PHONE (0234) 713849 


WIDEST CHOICE 
ALONG THE 
COAST 

Casta Blanca 

AMs tiom. 115JM0 

SenjHteOTKd vrita. 1 Mmr 

£13^390 

3 MAms CZlieBupwards 
Four hxnsed free osrwmin 

lh#ns „ 

Mares Ora««w Property 
187 Ctaibroofc Hd. lUord. 
Essex 161 4TA Telephone: 
01-5547093 


COSTA BEL SOL. 

/Irjivn hows from £22.000 40 
Son«la &Wt. VUUW 
Puerto do la Duquesa Bwcti. 
nviriru. tennis. ooU. rrsLainrani- 
UKMM. plus irrr durn in U« 
only nn« 90ll cmiPW on inr 
Call I05MI 33S23/9 U> 

I o-i (or colour brochure 


BLOT <K land l .640 so mnw-isn 

Spain. Hnwwr hrJJW 
aiH> swimminq boo** 1 ™* 
IS COO TpI 01-784 1890 
PUERTO POLLENS*. Mallorca 
lux .-ipartmrols. wml*"™- 
ncu, qou cnurw. f romCl 8 «» 
K McCalluBl ovas T« 
i OU26i 64086 


CWABLAHCAl 

DENIA, JAVEA. 
M0RA1RA 

NO g (mucks, no tree fbghta 
or gifts. Just the m ost 
comprehensive range ot 
DeautiM ireehoW h omes 
bum to me rignea stan- 
dards. bached by o ur |**° 

Reh Free Legal Protection 

Scheme M you are considar- 

rng investing £20.000. » 

E 150.000 on a home m Spam 

then can us first. 

SJUfl.0 BTERMTtOML LTD. 

8 ARGYLL HOUSE. ARGYLL ST. 
GOVENTTRY CT2 4fL 

S mz (82*31 44S8W 
or London ft 
Home Cowihes 
{0689)52641/62425 

mSN&T, ATLAITf COAST 
Costa da Is Ln 1 1 

Lux 3-bed vfla on beadrfranu Su- 
perb hxriuw. ET10B8 . . 

Ajtradiw villa wnti lamistapw | 
ajns. 3 beds. 3 baths, guest suffi. 
mm lunelied. 

Fcr detate ol mesa ft other proper- 
ties. contact 

BKZAL PROPERTIES 
D672 8706(6. 

FUENGIROLA 
SOUTHERN SPAIN 

2 bedroom apartipents 

from £35,000 

dose to beach. Low overheads. 

Law dassoaL WWhty mpsaalon 
fll^NS. 

Contact 

Sunburst VHas Ltd 

i ”jsE3aa5sff ,, | 

J MARBCLLA m ti IbV *r- 

; «5? r ^ a -TS!SSwSii 

r 

lt SSSJS. J S5ff3-"ȣ 

* latuza. out rif ll “" r L?lf, 
f- «3Sn9 arra 
U .Mimof sra, moualaim. Gilrfal- 
•* vS^nd North * ln c3- ^imr> 
(Mjritv And qood nUinlBBiWirc 
a mum* I 8WW induumn 
6, I1PW rurntshrom- 1 [SlJISaSr 
a tween 27 • 30 Noveitrow 
d PI caw ietrtBjKinrinr opoourt- 
mail. Ot aas 1Q33. 


2 Year Old Vila. 

Large Living Room 

with Gatteried Landing. 
3 Bed, 2 Bath, 
Swimming PooL 
Beautiful Views. 

PRICE OW 
APPUCAHOM 

JV1ANY OTHER 
VILLAS FOR SALE- 
ALL PRICE RANGES. 

eK 

0927420622 

WIDEST CHOICE 
ALONG THE 
COAST 

CastaBlanca 

Apts tram. niORO 

Senn-deradied mfla. 1 beomr 

£19,390 

2 Defitits 1 S21JBH0 uBwds 
FuBy btensaL F«e ntflednn 
W& __ 

I Aotares Omse« Piqrarty 
187 Cranbrook Rd. Won). 
Essex IG1£r^Teteph°nE 
01-K4 7093 


MALLORCA - Ses Alquerus. 
bMutitunv reMrwwi 
houw. ui pKiinwi* 

25 minute* drive to cwitrePB^ 
nu 4 wdrooim all 
cloakrooms. ? recep tions, uree 
Urmhouw Mtchcn. 
insulated. Law rertiw wrg 
pool, aulomauc ’W WW, W» 
m for la«n and fruit ojenard^ 
larqr found sun lerracc. olort- 
ous i *wv iriMro™; 

Olle« around 1250P00 Tej^ 
pnone dirtxTPalnVLOiO 347 J 
717516 or 09B5 740256 


PUERTO BANUS/ 
MARBELLA 

incracflWB vatotf Luxritoutfy 
furmhed 2 bedroom apart- 
moiiLEfiaDOO. or would 

consular a London apartment 

in part exchange. 
Cubct Meal Homes. 

01 485 4444. 


WANTED Menorca vma *3 tad. 
^ool. Wc wran in meet 

whaev on «MJfwner9»iiD 

Why not ore the cata 
hondavs now? 

vantaves- hroly M BOX A03 . 

COSTA DEL SOL / Leo Bond**- 
Luxury beach front ana-t menL 
2^?£; bauuroom. 

/ www ■ 3x < as. oW T r^ ,1 ?«£ 

nHMd G60.000 Tel: 09»» 

418843 

1 SWITZERLAND | 



puorra banus 

super luxury aparonent- rew» 
e!oii the beac h gswm mdfTO 
pools, secluded gardens, short 
walk to the nort. finest 
timetiare avallaWe. 2 or 4 
weeks Aud/ Seri- ”**■ 

Irl: 07983 3556 evenaro*. 


SW2 - ** w *£ 3S"cS? 
very Min. 

nwwtainrf lWm«wBrej6tigk 

iSK-fSSSRSWgg 

goBreja&sa. 

nuABfc sure Puruoee twBL Z 

bed rial wdh river view y new 

med ML Z bedrms. Z tiaomns. 

i en sulle. Use o« 

Had porteraoe. Underpouno 

careartiyce- F »“*g£ W T.°P 

let preferred, czsoww. m. 

037Z7 28906 

BAMP5TZAD SWOB spadoiB 2 
bedroomed rial tn prune rest- 
derma! position. Elegantly 
fumbbed and luHy equipped 
Available now tor Ioc b coron a 
ny let at 6270 pw jraoiWE 
DAVID & CO. 01 431 0245 


01-455 4755 


MASKELLS 

fCTAIT ATTNT5 _ 
HH ftT5IBEETSM. KwHwtaf tire.ta 
aari dacoam war nm^wc Sw: 

OM rating BA wywti UtiW"! 
ws ti rfw b> w* ra ff Irfe 8 4> 
ore ZWiti ta*”- ? tiranu. Arf 
me. Una to WL ESSO am 
UflaiE GNBBBB SM. ftaM dR. 
«M!WMrM2 n wStiti 
Sum. NtatiltilfifK 
SatiMn Wr CtiritaB. Wta MSP 
uGoM sad Mbto wwGi WWB bw 
M atm. Laos tit £300 fcw 
107 fTALim STROT, 
LOnOH SW3 28P 
Teb 91 S»1 2211 


IS Plaza Estates 


OLOUCESm? THWACe 
W2 

ctwinna iMtaonetts an 
■ji^wnd firs. Weal forrantrar- 
miIkl 3 bods, 2 baths. 2 
rscap. Wt U »9 tot £400 p*r 
aSWORTHY RD NWS 
Modem Bat on 1 « t£opp<> 
j site Primrosa HM PM. 2 
bads. 1 tmtu recep. taL Av« 
6 mtt» £250 pw nog. 

I 01-724 3100 


01-714 31X1 Ci-5a. 76^5 


MAYFAIR, 

W1 

Luxury Sturta 1 12Bed 
apts serviced 6 days pw. 2* 
boor portarage. 

For viewing tatopboriB. 
BEIWH-EY ESTATES 
01-433 0887 OT 
01-4092373 

NEAR MAIDSTONE 

How cofftby ® J*^ ir 5 

tnorths to 1 m 3 ”»■ 2 
Whs. 2 recaps, doate, Wraen. 
nasty, gnags. £700 pw catenas 
msith inemw ol ate 
Oena. Derats taarc Lamb wl ft 
Foster. 77 Contmercttl wad. 
Paddock Wood. J«t 
Tat 0892 83 2325. 




ASSOCIATED WITH 

HHXSAMUEI/ 

, v. i - ir ’ 

Mctngages. Sevtags, 

Tax RantraftO- Pe^sroDS. 
tile Assicanceasa 
Insurance 



barnard 

marcus 



CHEYE GMBBiS, 
OLD CHELSEA SN3 

Charming compact 

orie bed frat pwfecBjr 
located. 6 months 
company let, £175pw. 

Tet 01-351 9639 


k. 01-629 6604 ,/^ 

RIB 

JERT 1F.VNG -r BURNS 


OficretwBcadccuoaof 
flats & bouses m: 

cnv. 

. RNJGHT58R1DGE. 
KENSINGTON, 
WIMBLEDON, 
and atber arras. 


01-637 C821 
MARGARET STREET W1 


AROUND TOWN 

128 HeBafl Part Ave 
911 

HOUJWD VB1AS ROMS 

Bsaseus 

Mtaticc. Bataroom. Sbmer 
nHRL Htfl OS^Y toTOBTIBWl 
ami bangs Atm system 
two Antabte raw lor Com 
229 9266 


DITT6K HHJ- 

Gocw Eoto tot Two mins by 
’ car. Surbiton Bfl - 16 «na» 
Wstartoo. Easy acaats » 

Amancan. Gwnran and ottrar 
schools. Faor/flva bad- 
^SFuByfitKrL2V.t»ms. 

Dbto gg^SCH. «»- 

kn rmmmanded. £350 pw- 

Tet 81-949 1358. 


CHELSEA.WZAWbto 
bed flat Rerapt K <8 B. 
£275 pw. 

W2. -Attractive 1 bed flat 
RecepL K & B. £145 pw. 
SW7- Ught 1 bed HaL 
ReripHfAB. £130 pw. 

KYCOCT 4 OT: 
81-584 6863 


■ruatAVIA- Luxury ffeanrow 


LBXBRY MEWS 
880SEBEL6BAVIA 

2 dtxtto. 1 sin0a bedroorra. 
2 Batwwxn* + pcm»- *5* 
dww. a«l wrap n*. My 
torfMcnmvrtnngrm. 

pnobracony-CotaL 

095 P«. 

01-671 1454. 



Baigets 

uneatTLY RHHinCD 


[ swiss H 

H CHALET H 

If - a OTritavesttHBra abroad. II 

l| -nwea bedroamadmcDniro U 

I <»^S3S§Si?r” y 

II Mountains - excaBent I 
1 downfta and crog-coun- 1 
y| try doing in waiter. I 
U waking, saflwg and | 

B "usssr- 

I Tel: 01-834 0297 I 
|j lor tether totamaBoti- [ 

lake. 1.3 in gm 
SSJmrTsollclIoei. 95 Park- 
way. London tiWl . Tel; 01-486 
881 1. 

SHI WSOHIS. Apartmenta and 
cnaieta in VUtars and HaJ* 
NrniUi. Osbornes SoUrtlora. 93 
pS^rTow»n NWl Tel: 
01-485 8811 


n ciBVt a weeks Easie r : time 

- freehold. ftP”«nqu 

Shm 6. sea view. pool, reetau- 
rani and leisuro CTlfej? 

smaU ^"SrS'oSSSi ' ES-000- 

Phone 089 ZTZ 


QUEENS CATC Terrace. SWT. 
New conversion 3rd floor with 
tin. 2 Beds. 2 hath ten «oH»». 
recep. (T ku and lerraret £300 
pw. Please contact Suzanne 
Conway al Sounder* of Kwi- 
■dnraon on Get - 3623. 


ST.JOWMS WOOPN WreSnpffp 1 

newly tnoderntted M IQ, teL 
Unfurntahwd or rmtob**-* 
dotaxe betta. urge- Ksunoe. 
FuOy iroed K « B. Bi "gw 
cloakroom. Wrtdno 6 mto 
rube A shells. Co JJi 
JC225/£260 pw. TeL Ot 624 
3348 No aaents. 


THE LOWB/SHQirT LTI ^N. 
HB. we have a taraerewe flonof 
luxury tTa/ 3/ d Bedroom 
flats wlih rorid service, jnwxr 

deemed * c "^^ 1 JS2S. 

AvwttaWe Now pNMeuJcPho"* 

ConnaugM Prop* T27 acno 


WEST K EHS a WT OH Unftp 
nished spacious manriao fM 
wiui ex c security, pard en and 
car space, f be ds, taree wgro-3- 
baDis. kitchen -^1 macMiM. 

Long co ki £400 pw. OD& 
CARD * SMITH Ol 930 7321 


■nntmfO Slunnina renovated 

ooonr ancel as rue 
SSwrles. 76016 Paru. France 

T UUMF E SIR Lux Umesnare- 
tiunpaiows^ wg j gs" • TO5 - 
Brochure. OZ1-74S 9800- 

1 nMESHAREUjJj 

j "S^v^toE^S^ 

^t ^ n« :,, (or health} 1 

i country turn tartHtrik ««hr 

; swjBftftr 

! | LAND FOB SALE Hi 


RIVER FRONT LUX flat SW6 In 
pood-decorallve order. 3 tied*. Z 
igr rec. new fully IltDed Idi and 
bathroom. Gas lire and CH. Fab 
views. Nr lube. Porter. Oonmi 
Ddns £275 pw neg. Trt Ol 878 
2238. No aOHlta. 

WANTED. Three bedroirinsdOaL 
ooiuntohe a_ Bwtxs Corowe 
area. LoiW OeaparaJ 
J52BO per wee*. Tel: 01-886 
2873 (after 6.00 pro). 


BAY5WATER quWt t/t J&- 
necep. xm bed- k. b. Nr ^ TUbev- 
n/*. £120 PW. Tet OL 727 
9889. 


ALL vNMn to London. At Hunt, 
ero we specialize biquaUW 
furnished property, can u* 

837 7365. 

MAYFAIR S/C full erodp rat 5 
Beds. BaUi KU + Loe upe 
£200pw. Tet «93 7830 ITL 


Save tirih apney Ices' Deal 
with buyers direct, sell aridity 
and emoeniry. lowesi flat lee. 
Villa MaMnAl.R91 6178/01- 
542 9088 

FREE LIST of privately (or sale 
properties lnrougnouithe Mgjji- 
rerranran Irom Et O iaXX VTOd 
Match 01891 6172 / 01-542 
9088 


CALIFORNIA Lake Atraanor 6 
burnt house on Vk acre prime 
lakeinmi Near local airport. 
SI 95000. i London) TcL Ol 
7Z7 12B4. 

OVERSEAS PROPERTY! 
TO LET | 

MCE comfortable ML nr 
marVei. sun couple, avau now. 
2 months. £85 pw exCL lellOl 
689 1565 


GREEK ! 
ISLAND 

140 aims rf lawi 

beach tor teriMKl 

CYctaite5 Maris. ^ataMotounst 

Oflws rB » 0!1 “ 

£ZZ5n* _ 

01-097 5438 



saggar ■"} sarotSsi^- 1 ^ - 1 " — 

The first resort in the Med with a marina 

~ heachcsanddrepbUwrea .faiptollSdklHnAecMA 

LUUchMi renowned Us supcroviBas ^ /-■! L i u .1 t. i,- lUnftrfntan- 


SotO«jai«fch» tong b«n rmiwned fords superb wBre 
and apjrtirenLf and for wrra <* lk mr« 
and leisure facilflin n Eint^- 1" f^ 00 , to 
ideal cfimalc (or bathing, sajmgand wrierdrong. Srota^anw 
offer; championship golf courses, temp. ™ng - and even 

And now, for completion by July 1987* 
magnificent marina too, with an exehraive 
development of apartments. 

The fuM phase of the new mama, w+wh rompns® a 
vacht harbour and a beautiful tiiljge wmxmcfcd fiy anpt>- 


PUERTO 

SOTOGRANDE 


' ^a afc - 


^iiiTTiiiiuuiinF 

aillli mlM IM W AII 


In it ii miii 




Tir Ti ii ■« LL 51 L! 


beaches and deep blu? sea. Ees just 15 dies afetethtcoa* 

fromGhrahar-raakB^itlteftratniarioadiesaikirenco«i- 

lers on enlrfng the McdilaTasiean itrouflh the SfraitS- ■_ 
Marina moorings range from £&000 for wa 8m 
berth 19 to £180 ,000 for a 50m both- Apartment* 

from £27,000 to £200,000. , 

Over ths past seven years the vahie of Puerto Sotoffjoac 

brachapaitma«sh»aweasedlhree-fidd. It is expected fe at 
[he manna apartments w31 match, w even exceed, fen 
incretfible rale of appredaben. 

For details contact any of the apponud agents befaw ar 
scsid the wcnpletad coupon tor. 

Puerto Soto^ande, 27 HiO Street, London 
W1X8AS iTa- 01 403 1333). 

Chestertons Td; 01 937 7244 

FbkkoI Tdt 0722 26444 

Euro Property Advisors Tet 0722 330847 

Caudtdo.Nidnlsan. ORP Ud Td: 024029 8152_^ 

| FVw mid roe fill drtaili of ftaw Soiograndc -H] 

j Name;--, - " ■ " " * * | 

. Address: ,,F “ t 


TelephonK — 

sSslfss 


Z7H9 Street 


||s=.^u>ni j LootoiWjxaASiTaOl 


HAMPSTEAD super flat CUmj) In 
idyllic country settma. 
o/iookma Heath te vMt. course. » 
30 n L -shaped studio, b alcony. 

ML btnrm/wc. CH. Phone. 
AvaU now lor 1 yn. £96 pw- 
Owner 01 586 4569 or 883 
2521 

MAMIE ASCII ML BrtghL spa- 
cious a rmuM is! nr flat set in | 
well manaecd mot*. - Newly 
decorated. 3 bedrooms, tv, 
baths, double reception, well | 
punned Mtchen with all apoU- 
ances. baituny. Loan co lei. 
L375 pw 244 7353 m , 

■CRMOtiD COURT SHIS. An 
cxtreuMty attractive 3n) nr flat 
tu PBB with balcony and own 
oarwe. 3 bedims. dMe ream 
non. balhrni with tac uzrt. 

«bower rm with 0OKI mttnss. ft 
Htrnen writ ah machlnm Lono * 
n let £200 pw. 244 7363 m 
AMEMKAN EXECUTIVE Sans 
-. lux Rat /house: up to SSOOpw. 
Lhual fees red PtiUHm Kay A 
Lewis. South of Die Parle. CM 
« oil ice. 01-352 flmor 
Norm of 

Pare otnee. 01-6 8 6 98 82. 
MMJJRAMK TERRACES, SW1 
1/2 Bed flat In new luxury 
ThamKMe Devekaanem An 
Obie Gtazed with excotfent *■ 

. curl tv A acre*, to Cmnm Co m . 
£175pw-£260pw Coates 828 
8251. 

W JL Baywaier/NoTOng Htil Su- 
perb first floor one bedroom 
moony nal. KUctienJouBSe. 
bathroom, all machines. OCH. 
sir couple dose public trans- 
port £1«0 p/w Oewnii 
Tvoutred Tel 01 263 0995. 

NUL 4 be dr oomed route. £250 ! 
per week. Nrod HoMert Ol 883 

saw. 

SPAdOUS SWS flat. 2 Able bed- 
room*. tarnished. ureal 
k>c abort Avail from 23rd Nov. 
£520 pcm. 370 5857 lEvesi 

wn AtuurfiewcU pJothni *u- 

• flat wtiti m-n a tv. uk 
KH/B rk. Bain. £1 lOpw. Coates 
828 8281 

SW3 Pretty 1 Bed IW. 
inunoc/CHner. Bath/WC. MM 
Kit. ezOGbw. Bcnftam L Reeves 
938 3322- 

HOCABTH ESTATES 373 9537. 
pqidMiui lettings tn Central 
London. COnttuny and holiday 
amrtroentB. 

flOU-AND Ifft MEWS. Wll. Lux 

un fulls iron mews Irv-. 2 
brturns. 2 ncs. It kit £300 pw 
Retfl Diner A Co 01-491 3154 

untiarr sonkd flats, 

. mural London from £826 pw 
pM9 vat. RinB Town Home 
Mwtnvnb 373 3433 

I ■XFSSS1 Ttu- number u> retnem- 
, b«r when seMuno beH rental 

woprrtlrt in reptiri«idsr»e 

| London areas ClEOf£23UOpw. 


CHELSEA. 1 bed IW wtth WBO- 
. newly redecorated. LongOo-let 
£160 pw. OODDARD ASMITH 
Ot 930 7321 

KENSWOTOH. AWacltve 
ctous ground Door n 
mansion Mock. * beds. 2 
2 receps. lai / diner. At _ 
chines- Lift 
Co let. 947 7261 IT) 

NWl minutes from Rw* 

Kings Cross. aONStM 
estate. 2 beta. Town 
Lux lure 111 KUctiew. raL~ 

den partdnaroare £220pw 

Tel 388 6992 pm 

docklambs umo - 

Studio. DoriUeMC 
Idtcbcn 700 SO ft 
cor Light maiBtnai or 
ut Underaround 
many other features. 
«OT^67*/0Z64 790860. 
RECEHTS PARK Stroud 
era 2 room fUL Pert 
OPS pw Incl. Tel 93L. - __ 

REC HM OWE Pretty 2tw 

Paoo gdn. Fud fwt 
ore. £130 pw. PrtorV , — 




-ww GREXH W14- Bnmac 
•^Smsed 4 bed lamMi 
tiatm <t J SStwrer 

kit/ diner. COnsert.arory- 
den Long Co let. £4K»PW. Tel 
Ol 602 3669- 


SUSi 


BLIIIIIWItillHT ML Setacflcm 

01 nu n flata 

pany fctflnW from Ltoopw 
Ka 6monm» torn ^rin. FranL 
Harris A Co- 387 0077. 


uif i» ; mi 


meneretL «»? JZn W 
806 5517 after a pm. 


AVARJWLE NOW Luxury flaw * 
homes £200 -g.OOOper we*- 
Tel: Burwm BBl 5136. 


W14 Off KenrangEon 
utf contained luxury z we- 

Sm e S?cStraih«a« Bfc aAl 

2/3 abating. £126 P-w. Oo Let 
Only- G8Z 4011 (T) 


CHELSEA SW3. Good lacawm 2 
bed flat, recep.. ■** 
uth. AvaU now. £175 pw FW 
GAPP 01 221 8038. 


AtaorBQUPWJtorUSBro»rar.2 
3SaeSLWtorSW3.2yr 
Co tot E 400 pw. 

01-724 3160 


CLARUM Z tnl» Wbe. torS/C 


CLAPHAM C«WtoO« Nontrade. 
ym off Nrwtor converted- uqm 
2 bed. rux lUL 4U mod 
coos. Funyluni 
0904491276 or 016H I7*. 


HYDE PARK CATC. BWT. Z w- 
perb uira "tv*™, 
iirajlimrrt Pals avail. 2 due 
MdrtMi. “titerewrirov 2bal h» 
r- jp Holly 01-581 0012 


LAWSON A MBHHMNI MPUm^ 
a executives luymuy w; 
. qvwUB- wwertlev In 
West London 

bon pEeUM* nn9 01-938 3425 


LUXURY flats and houses tn 
Hampstead. St •*8™*'*“** 
area urgently reoutred fro US 
and Japanese Company Ewni- 
Sri BrtWjn, Ot 436 7191 


FEEL ST WB. House. 3 WTO- 
loomv rec. kttetum aero 2t»acW 
Excelletii central ri»*i»n S*«- 

abfe lor comositv C»0 pw. 

Hogarth Estates 373 9637. 


NonwcHILL BATE LwmahLZ 
doubl e bid s. 1O0 vat * ■ trm 
Cube. £Z2S pw Co leL Tel Ol 
540 7466 Itvesl 


ol fu niu he d 

tram EISQtw ... 

smoton 6 surrounding 
Betuiam A Beeves. 

3522. 

CRBJEAl IHMque s /c gr ound 
nal. I bed. 1 recep. mod 
6 ku. prtvate corotyrod. 
iy pate, tnxn »»*" 

Moron aperaoc. £200 P 
01-351 1242- 

STH KEN 2 tied, mews iron I 

Inr. CH/CHW/Ool TV/WHOB 
M £1% PW : 01-344-7561 

SW5.2Uttt>B.rec.M- 

Nrwly dec. Lift. 

KM pw. CO let 947 7261 
SWS. cmd flr stw» flat, 
enetle. barium LULNTI-. 
Co W £160 pw 947 7261 
W KOKMGTOM A 
t/r rtiatmtno 1-3 b< 
£12O-£200PWlhC 

sn aHMl Ea t g t ee for reTOtat 
letting d Central London 

Ol 409 0594 

WANTED. To renl Ur*Ory 
bedroomed Dal from t»x 
Dm unci) In &.W 5. area 
Mr Kea togW S® 1675 111 
WESnUHSm tawawtMi 
bedroom nu tin Manaon a 
Close to w. AIW. .AD 

Uo £200 PW 01 6* 






tR. TOWER RRHIOE Lux 2 bed 
RaL o/look wroer. in- tube- 
£150 DW. Tel Ol 265 0427. 


r W SAPP tMtinaaem ewt S er- 

vtresi Lid renutre propevtn in 
Central. South and Wrol Lon- 
dan Areas for waning 
id Ol 221 8838. 

PCEO-A-TEBRE. Well End/Oty 
Attractively iron m M«i gre 
nal (oration. 2 mins lube. Db*e 
■ bedrm. recendon. badhnn. if 
known witn anrotances. £130 
pw. 244 7563 in 
AMERICAN Prolemn * ; Uwjr 
famines require flats * houses 
arming January. 3-6 months- 
Contact Josephine Brtonnu 
Residential LeOmg* 738 3766. 
EAEJNSe lux B bedroomed now. 
luUy fUnmbed. nr tube zo 
mms West End. 15 nmes 
Heathrow eidSpw.nM»fri 
Draesh on 10628) 29695 exi 3 
MMOA VALE- Flat. Spacious 
reccpt. 2 Mer Bed andwidy. 
Modern kh and Bath. Coomm 
Gdns. Long let. £300 per week. 
Ol 289 3262. 

HU r ill * 8IIB .L CATE Wll Excel- 
lent gaDened - shnilo «"■ 
furnished modernised. IB 
monihs. £90pw oa.o. Tel- 065 
349 284 day + eve 
WC1 tdose lo Opera Howcia tru- 
ly fiuperbty fiaiiBftec is 
bedroom Ojl tun rrturoMrad. 
Highly recommended. £350 
pw. Hunters. 837 7366. 


, p raywi i i r 


i-v,Y,*a , .a 




QUBvfl hixiiry 

anSSiw. ««»SS2 Brt S?AjS 

via areas- £8 00 - fi3 g» 
BrowEeuw Agents S8t ! 

■omiMW*.*****®** 

Uve gunny. Z bedroom 
rat. £150 pw. Teh 
0667. 

g35rco^«lSS£« 

sat, 7561 r , , 
h AM P WM MPWI ftau*— 
p.w. oat wtthspoctot 
do u b l e * S taRg**- - 
Dmmg mm. CCH- t.v, . 
8040 IT) 

ALLEN BATES 6 CD have ■ 
selection of Itols * •“— 
roc tang / ihoa M 
p.w. Ol 999 1665 • 

MCKLANDS Flats and 
m tWOUBlKta* °V- --T 
drra- TeLOl-790 9560 




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GENERAL 

appointments 


COOL CALM CAP ABU 
CLAPHAM 

Lsfeng Nogottator nesetodtor 
our friendtyofflcB-in Northcot 
Road. Ctoflsnfltog apP“££ 
ityoftetog good satHy^bpraa 
scheme and car. Rantol e»- 
perranc a and local knowledge 
{watered. 

Farrar Stead & ®yn 
■ Tel 01-370 4329 
(Ref SGL 
no agandes. 


WWC SUPERS rewnre enmim- 
asur adaptable person to serve 
in. inert weu known <W 
bar Some cellar work mem oir 
DornmHy tor young «voianl to 
wum- trade. Write wlih fun C.v 
to BOX E89 . 

A LONDON Society Maw ancjr - 
mum an ciuhunasUc. row"- 
ban] working, organised »d»- 
ctuiv aware Dsniw .eehot- 
£ 5.000 pa. Tec 01 «1 1253 




KfOLSET HALL: Homr shtab; w 
ccc. Degrees. ProfewWM 
sped US. - Dent AL2.WotaCY>^ 
Oxford. OXZ bPft Ts« 0*5 
53300 1 24 hTSl 


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LA GREME DE LA CREME 


29 ' 


DIRECTOR’S SECRETARY 

• A highly reputable international Insurance Brokers 

business and has constant contact with major multi- 
nationals. He is keen to delegate and will involve you in 
tpe sooal aspects of his work — looking after visiting 
dents, arranging functions and itineraries. This position 
^rfers excellent srope for a highly motivated, professional 


person aged 20-23. with skills 

A * 4 

■is v 


'9050. c£9,5Q0. 


BECOITVE RTED 

Marry of the positions we are curr ently handling for 
leading City organisations ar e available on a temporary 
to permanent basis. If you are unsure of exactly wliat 
sort of job you are looking for. this method will help you 
avoid making a wrong deasion. With good shortiiand 
or audio skills plus WP experience, you may find your 
next career move is only a temporary 
assignment away. 


jests 








•:y 


■:* 


*nrE*BQUtS 
m thicm 

OT-2567261 

FiN^e 


recruitment consultant 

C.£16,000 

The Secretarial Dhrfskxi of Graduate Appoi n tme n t s has long been a 
teaoer m the field of executive secretarial recruitment boasting an 
trqpressnre and growing cfient portfolio. To maintain this business 
growth a nrst-ctass consultant Is required. 

You should have proven sales skins preferably gained in a service 
industry, cou pled with an educational background and career record 
w !™cn demonstrates achievement and consistency. Most important wUl 
be your ability to operate effectively in a hktftiy pressurised environment, 
rpsponcfing quickly and creatively to both cfient and candidate demands. 

K you have the stamina to succeed the career potential 

--fiOUATZ APPOfi, 


Please contact 
Helen Scarlet 
on 01 629 7262. 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
FOR GERMAN BANK 

General Manager of the London branch of a 
major German bank requires a secretary who 
has several years experience of working at 
senior 'executive level with usual secretarial 
skills md complete fluency in both English 
and German. 

The post will be demanding but interesting 
and will offer very attractive working condi- 
tions, ; a competitive salary and excellent 
fringe benefits. 

Please apply, with full CV, to: 

BOX Fll 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S 
ASSISTANT-GUILDFORD 

The recently appointed Chief Executive of 
this newly awakened international corpor- 
ation is lookmg for a graduate PA. 

The successful candidate will be highly 
motivated and career orientated, and will be 
looking to move Into an executive role. 

Your C.V. will demonstrate a well-planned 
career to date, probably including Director 
level experience with a major company. 

As weB as normal PA duties, you wiB be 
expected to monitor subsidiary company 
activities and executive objectives. 

Speeds 90/60. Age 27-34. Salary negotiable. 


COMBO AID DAYS 
REGOVJTMBfT LTD. 

35 Brnbrn MaotWl. 01-493 7789 




JOIN THE SMART SET 
: c.£12,000 +.■ Bonus 

Do yoi. have the enthusiasm and Bair to be a member of a young, 
dynamo team in a hi ghly successful executive search consultancy? If 
so joir this leading international firm in Wl. Working for 2 senior 
conscdants you wiS be completdy involved at the highest level with 
prestigious clients -and candidates where di scre tion and are 

ew n tff l. There is potential to undertake independent research' while 
providng fast, efficient secretarial support (90/65+ , audio, WP). 
Graduate preferred, immaculate appear ance and a' cheerful and posi- 
tive agyroach esaentiaL Age 23-35. Please ring 464 45X2. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


FINANCIAL TIMES 
BUSINESS INFORMATION LTD 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT 
Commencing Salary £8,493 

Lively, tateUgent and hard waiting kvSvkkal needed 
for busy office within an Intern a tional pubtistung anw- 
ronment to work on prestige product Previous pubfish- 
jnp experience not essential but enthusiastic approach 

Good secTBterial/a dnvrfct r aflv a skSs required to 
support manager and dep ai tmarti as a whole. 

Varied arid interes tin g duties with opportunity for the 
right applicant to deal with customer s , suppliers, etc. 
Please reply with c.v. toe 

Steve Bevan, 

Personnel Officer, 

F.TAL, 

Q rey e fafce Place, 

3“ A Fetter Lane, 

*- -* London EC4A 1ND. 

Tel 01 405 6969 ex. 289. 



OFFICE ADMINISTRATOB 
to £13,500 

Oar Jab , t respected long established firm of 
chartered aorvepoa is Wl, needs an experienced Office 
Manager to enure the ■Doathxnxming of their offices. 
You wiO need the toribSity to ov e r see many different 
aspects of this busy company sinmttaneousfr. Wide 
ranging lapomiMBtiss cover all aspects of personnel 
nvAntting recruitment, maintenance of the 

pee h a sche m e, convening and attending pBitnudup 
T Mrfinp , «— ■ n e lnte nanci and organising 
company Foil secretarial support is 

provided. Age 28-35. Excellent educational background, 
smart presentation confidence and sound relevant 
experience wncnfkl. Please ring 434 4612. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ARE YOU— 

”• a good organiser and administrator? 

• tactful, discreet and diplomatic, even under 
pressure? 

* a skilled shorthand secretary with word 
processing experience, used to working at a 
senior management level? 

If so, you could be one of the people we are looking for to 
assist Barnet’s foremost Councillors m fulfilling their civic 
functions. 

Secretary to Mayor 

(Ref 600/160) 

Salary:' £11,307 - £13,035 per annum Inclusive. 

In the important role you would be responsible for 

- deating with all the Mayor's secretarial and administrative 
work and signing correspondence as appropriate; 

- arranging receptions and other functions; 

- supervising the Mayor's Chauffeurs and Attendants; 

- maintaining a diary of engagements for the Mayor 

tt would also be expected that you attend certain Civic functions and 
undertake other duties which involve occasional working outside 
normal office hours. 

Secretary to the Leader 

(Ref. 600/SEC) 

Salary:- £9,129 - £10,902 per annum inclusive. 

This post has recently been created to provide secretarial assistance 
to the Leader of the Council in relation to his civic and constituency 
role. Your responsibilities would involve 

- hanging correspondence , initiating and signing it as 
appropriate; 

- maintaining the Leader's (Sary of appointments, arranging 
dates of meetings etc; 

- maintaining a tiling system, updating information sources 
and imdertaking Bmfted research; 

- attending meetings to take minutes. 

The position involves a good deal of contact with Councillors, other 
outside departments and members of outside organisations as well 
as members of the public. 

Minimum shorthand and typing speeds of 1 10 w.p.m. and 80 w-p.m. 
respectivety are required tor this post. 

Works outside normal office hours may also be required from lime to 
time. 

Beneftis include generous annual leave with extra days at most Bank 
Holidays; a 36-hour week with flexible working hours in operation: 
interest-free loans for annual season ticket and staff restaurant 

Closing date 28th Novembe r, 1986. 

Application forms and further particulars from the Recruitment 
Office, 16/17 Sentinel Square, Brent Street, Hendon, London NW4 
2EN. Telephone 01 202 8282, ext 424 (01 202 6602 outside office 
houre). 


WAtnHOftnVCOMIItfrTEDTPKKJALOPPOffnJNm^ 


^ ^■lonoon BOROUGH* 

^bornet 


HARDWARE £11,509 

Outgoing and assertive but not looking- 
for a high powered career? As senior 
secreaiy to the MD of a major company 
at Corent Garden you will use your initia- 
tive, usty shorthand + WP wills. Own 
Office. Age 27-40. 

PUNISHING £9,000 

You ire early 20’s and ‘special’. You will 
wort alongside the Chairman’s secretary 
(she is late 2Q's and easy going) m this 
major Wl publishing house. 

SOFTWARE £11,000+ bonus 

Yoi are 30+ and able to organise toe 
gfojp MD of this fast expandng City 
rcKToanv. As his PA you handle usual 
^arsecretarial duties. SH/typing + WP 
slots please. 

Pf £8,500^9,000 

Yoi are wefl spoken, don't 
mu* in and enjoy cfient contact Wfth 
2£s of 80/60 + WP you wUlenioytte 
exiting pressurised environment in SW1. 
2nl jobber. 

Cin 377 S6QO West End 439 7001 


Secretar ies Plus 

E 


Musicians Benevolent Fund 

SECRETARY/ PA 

TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE 

The Funds chief executive requires a TA 
to help him administer this busy national chancy 
which helps needy musicians. The post requires 
good organisational skills, initiative and the ability 
to handles varied woddood under pressure. 

WP experience essential. Ah interest in music an 
advantage Salary negotiable from £9.7 50 p^. 

SECRETARY 

TO THE DEPUTY SECRETARY 

The Fund’s Deputy Secretary requires a 
secretary oo assist her with the casework, and the 
management of 2 residential homes for the 
elderly A sympathetic and tactful approach to the 
problems of die Funds beneficiaries is essential, 
and relevant experience in the sociai services field 
would be an -advantage Salary from £8,750 p.a. 

The successful candidates will be over 25, 
educated in A-leud standard and have first-class 
secretarial skills ( 100/50). Non-smokers preferred. 

Please write far an application 
form/job description to Alison Evans, 

Musicians Benevolent Fund, 16 Qgje Street. 
London W1P 7LG seating which vacancy you 
wish to apply, for Previous applicants need not 
re-apply. . 


Records & Books 

to £8,700 + benefits 

Thu super company in Sloone Square seeks a 
young BA/Sec for therr PR monoger. Lois of 
organising ond all-round involvement moke this 
a particularly rewarding position — ond a 
great opportunity to get info PR Fast typing 
requeued Shorthand useful not essential For 
details please call 01-493 4466 

MEUKYWt/UHER ADVERTISING 8 SELECTION 

^Q2g^ATUD2./ 


WHITEHALL 

cJ£9,000 

Political organisation requires lively s/h sec. 
Minute-taking, own corresp. and Involvement- 
WP exp pref. 5 weeks hols 

SOUTH KENSINGTON 

c.£8,500 

Busy Estate Agents urgently need bright, well 
spoken sec with good audio skills. 


Susan Beck 


ROYAL POSTGRADUATE 
MEDICAL SCHOOL 

(H ammere nrith Hospital) 
Department of Medical Physics 

Euxnenced secretary required for a cMati N past as De- 
partmental Seanary and Personal Secretaiy to ibe Professor 
of Medical Physics. 

The Department s unique in being the only joint Department 
on site covering both Medical School asd Hospital Service. 
There is coosderabir scope for imtovatkm and secretarial staff 
are encouraged to pzrbopate folly hi this. 

Salary win reflea the seniority of the post commencing be- 
tween £8432 and £9764 a year wnh 35 days annual leave 
(including public bohdaysj. 

Application is by c.v. with the names of two referees to: 

The Perseaaet Office. 

Royal Postgraduate Me£cal School, 

ISO Docaw Rd, 

Louden W12 OHS 

Quoting reference AP2L 
Telephone 01-740 3295 
for farther details. Closing Date 21 November 1986. 


ELECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


The Sharp End of 
High-Tech £12,000 

This revolutionary video based marketing 
tehnique is g ain i ng ground fest in stores 
throughout the UK, Europe and the States. 
The Chief Executive and -Founder of the 
ompany urgently needs a Prawnal 
who can cope with m te ma ti on ri 
raison at the highest level and a prepared 
Ur some travel. 


PR IN CHELSEA 

To £9,500 

Established PR company in Chelsea is looking for 
brain power, confidence, personality -and career 
minded attitude. Heavy admin content & so 
ongarBsatfonat'sUSs are every Wt as Important as 
your 80 shorthand and good typing. WP interests & 
exp ext . advantage. Aged 22-26. . 



Susan Beck 


RECRUITMENT 
01-584 6242 


'GET into banking 

£ 10,000 . 

, international bank seeks a secretary to\ 
. senior etec te i v e. Preview banking 
experience not essential as loogasyoa have a stable 
commercial background. This is a busy responsible 
position and needs a bright, wall organised person wt» 
is keen in get very involved. Superb benefits indude 
free fores to wort and generous mortgage subsidy. 
100/SO "frits needed Please tele p hone 01-240 3631- 

• Elizabeth Hunt 

Reauftment Consufcorils 
18 Grosvencx Sreei London Wl 




FRENCH DIRECTION 
to £13,000 

Put your energy and enthusiasm into this young 
Geneva based Investment Management bouse and hdp 
Ibem establish their t-nwlnn base in superb Wl offices. 
You wiQ need fluent French to provide full secretarial 
support to die Managing Director and you will be 
working closely with the investment and trading team 
lairing with thair exclusive group of riinata. As the 
MJD. travels frequently be wiD rely upon you to keep 
the pN itf naming smoothly. Excellent cKlla 
(100/60/WP) and presentation pins ‘A’ levels are 
essentisL Ape 25-35. Please cafl 434 4312. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


01-629 9323 


RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANT 

Ew 0 «panaM s 

ix or t»o Biwvirt* 1 * 

7-^.1 u.nn!(i he DT 


0 teeferotmd wodaog cowbuons. 

m coiitiociwc. . 


asm.-* 

5ga\- accororis w 
nscinzfioo 


0X^23 8257 



IIMDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

HOTEL 
SECRETARY 
.es^ooo 

Make your second 
mermans one ' 

the top ra» Lo 
nor Cfrwnfl .Cress as 
Sectary to the Sales and 
Uuteting Manaoer. Hues 
hare good 9scntapal s«Bs 
and a nforti. outgomQ 
personalty. It Is a tost pacH 
(06 ntfi tots of dart 
contact and mfmvsn 
car 

Marie Tberen Ostaadti 
oa 01-831.0869. 

#ayWHEvB«E 
MtswxinnuMiaas 


TssuTn s® 


£10,000 

The Park Lane office is 
one of the most beautiful 
ws'vb seen. The boss is 
fcmA supportive and ap - 1 
predative. The job is; 
varied and interestir 

but not loo pressurise 
Skiffs 100/60. Satisfac- 
tuxi guaranteed. 

now! 

01-408 f 


IDRAKE 

PERSONNEL H 



CALLHK ALL 
GRADUATES! 

CT.o go 

As H satti ste d md rso o mmi 1 
pnv** fie* reed a sal moo- , 
wad etoouest pern* wfih 
tots ri nuwe to become the 
Nan) ol tar LJoyflS , 
mere. Liaise with cients os i 
dady bans, team me bb« 
wad me Csj tee bean 
attnato to the Success ol tms 
depjtiian u joo hare a 
rttsftd tuple a 6 nms 
! wdc BBanenre for more de> 

; lads oftns osang poa ofl. 

UMUBKhim 
81-731 0911. 


MSMWIBn W PIW t flto W 


HARPERS & QUEEN 
SECRETARY TO 
EDITOR 

The Ettor a Hanes & Queen 
magarme is lookirio tor a 
vara, entbstasoc as wtti 
nnsnsftj seoaanr to swii as 
pan tt a busy m Ubm I team 
mat possess MceOem snort- 
hasd and types store and 
preteraMy be adacaad to A 
Lwd sauted. 

Ream area wSifuBCV.m- 
cfcitog aotattv and presert 

saay Hr 

Bevertie Rower. 
Rational M a ga z ine 
Ceropany, 

72 Brestwkfc Street 
Ltadn W1V 2BP 


QUICK THINKER 
UNFLAPPABLE 
FAST WORKER 

Satey negotiable 

Age 2S+, literate and accurate typing. It this is you and 
you are enthusustic. highly organ Bed. versatile and 
want to worirfor MD-Of wed established, but small 
employment agency based in Wl. please' phone for 
funner details: 01 629 2228/9. 


AGE IMMATERIAL 


s ecr et a ry awa y o n^namm e^laa^ Abevo aVBraflB typing 


and presematar . 


s h odhsnA 


Please telephone: 
Maggie Thornton 01-580 1365 


[Director's Secretary) 

Perfectionist £15,000 

successful and expanding Public Rdarions 
company bases ip growth on a fo uhlcs rf y 
p r ufe mional approach and a emta sr m uxkrcayrd 
for high quatiiy wort wiife long aanrfing roajor dieng. 

Its entreprene uria l MD depends on his PA to £ive 
unwaveringly calm and intelligent support amidst a 
pressurbedand coroperiri*e atmosphere. He iovoivs 
himself in aO aspects of »he business including 
qmseeingihe bait(ning oftasBadient J c no a ms ,so 

you wiD be fnOy inunCTSed m die day today nuttung 

of die firm. 

All ifae Ailk erf a senior PA (including speeds of 
100/60) wifl be complemented by an unruffled, 
naturally organised te m p erm nem and the poise and 
immaculate presentation to handle cfient contact at 
the highest lead. 

The successful applicant wfll also appreciate that dae 
PR Industry demands a dedicated approach and long 
houre in retnrn for highly i nterestin g work concent. 

Age range 2&-35. Pfeasc telephone 01-437 1564 • 

MacBlain 


8c Associates Ltd 
01-417 1564 

Rcmutmem Consultants 130 Regem Street, 
London W1R5FE 


^4- 


?ficiency| 

wfasch, 
«, Ax- 1 
ad rose i 

)wth in | 
fas an ] 
L Tain - 1 
of the! 
from 7j 
at and 
entnm. 
lgjes is J 
where! 
d mil- 

10 mil-! 
sxpen-| 
ted- to 
lidine i 
which 
it dot 
is are 

f this ' 


Welbeck Public Relations Limited. 

London WC2 requires a secretary/PA 
to work for the Chief Executive and 
two others. Applicants should have 
excellent stalls (55/100), be over 24 
and have good commercial work 
experience including at least one year 
at senior director level. 

We also require a secretary to work 
for two Executives on a variety of 
accounts. Applicants should have 
good skills of 50/90, preferably with 
previous PR experience. 

Please apply in writing with full 

C.V to: 

Peta Spinks, 

Personnel Executive, 

Welbeck Public Relations, 

2 Endell Street. 

London WC2H9EW 
stating which position you are 
interested in and details of salary 
required. 

Lwelbeck PUBLIC RELATIONS LTD_J 


areas 
ntes- 
AZT 
f £70 


Top Young 
Receptionist? 

yfte are looking for an intelligent, 
elegant and sparkling Receptionist who 
can chaperone VIP dienes induding 
world leaders in champagne production 
and fashion design. This super 
Advertising Agency is a prominent 
leader in Its field and has a very 
impressive record for looking after its 
own people. Some previous reception 
experience is essential- Age to 28 years. 
Salary c£9.000. To discuss this exclusive 
opportunity please call 01-493 5787. . 


GORDON YATBS 


Recnttnar CcMBokuas 


SECRETARY - £9,000 

The National Interactive Video Centre is the focal 
point for one of the most exciting new 
technologies in Britain and is visited daily by 
people from industry and education. 

The Centre seeks a literate, outgoing Secretary 
to provide a fufl secretarial back-up at the Centre, 
operate a small switchboard, welcome visitors, 
deal with the sate of publications and maintain an 
extensive mailing list 

For further details please contact 

Louise Vaux, 

National Interactive Video Centre 
27 Marytebone Road 
London NW1 5JS 
Tel 01-935 8190 




JOB SATISFACTION 

RING US 

FOR MORE DETAILS 




70-71 NEW BONDSTREET-W10T40B 0424 


QUICK THINKER 
UNFLAPPABLE 
FAST WORKER 

Salary negotiable 
Age 25+. disrate and accurate typing, if this is you and 
you are enthusiastic, highly organised, versatile and 
want to work for MD of w< 


employment 
further details; 01 


wen estabfished, but smafl 
based in wi, please phone for 
2228/9. 


TELEPHONIST /RECEPTIONIST 

FOR INTERNATIONAL CITY 

BROKING HOUSE 


for a 


We are a taring C*y Insurance Brokers and we are 
Teftphoresj/Reoaptoixti to work n our nasty rtilBta 
You must be smart wrth a dear and hetofad telephone mamar as you 
trtf row (Henry 0 / eortaef adh our dents both face to tea and fcv 
phone 


23. Safry is nag. 

tnttnswf tin please send C.V to arrive m 
Jimanta 1986 itr Miss Deborah Batons, , 

Msnaiiona] Uri, 32/38 Dukes Pace, London 


ttaT Frktoy 2ist 


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CREME DE 



/ 


Administrative Secretary to 
Training Department 

Salary to £10,000 

Ws are a major firm of chartered accountants with !5 UK 
offices employing some 700 staff, of whom half ore based in 
our London office. 

Currently we are seeking a secretary to work ter our Training 
Department. The position requires excellent organisational 
and secretarial skills as it involves the administration and co- 
ordination of oil Stott training. Word processing experience is 
essential with a minimum typing speed of SO wpm. 

The position is busy and varied and will require the ability to 
work under pressure and liaise with staff at all levels with a 
calm and confident approach. 

Please apply in writing to: 

ROBSON RHODES 


Chartered Accountants 



Secretary/Assistant 

TO GROUP ECONOMIST 

The international Thomson Group is a leading : 
publishing and information company with strong 
interests in travel, oil and gas. 

Based In our Centra) London Headquarters, 
you will support our Group Economist who is also 
responsible for our computing operation. This is a 
stimulating role demanding more than good 
shorthand typing and secretarial skills and 
offering real career satisfaction. 

Your professional secretarial qualification 
must be supported by either an economics 
degree or a good economics ‘A’ level We will give 
you full training on our computer systems, and it 
wifl be heipful if you already have WP experience. 

An attractive rewards package features a 
salary of {£8,500, discount on holidays and 
private medical insurance, season ticket loan, 
LVs and five weeks holiday per annum. 

Please write with your detaled CV to: 

Mr. N.J.M. Bennett 


/mi 



Intern ational Thomson Organisation Plc 

| THE QUADRANGLE. 160 WARDOUK STREET, LONDON WlA 4VcT | 
MEDIA • FINANCE- ADVERTISING ■ SALES • PERSONNEL ■ MEDIA • FINANCE 

^ UJ 

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ADAIR INTERNATIONAL 
5 SHERWOOD STREET 
LONDON WI- 
RE* BORO STREET £*2,000 

A company operating more than 80 specialist 
shops selling a wide range of books and 
related products (posters, prints, greeting 
cards) Is looking for a capable PA/Secretary to 
assist their Chief Financial Officer with hts 
interesting and diversified responsibilities. 

THE CITY (Ha Shorthand) £10,500 

The Partnership Secretary of a thriving ven- 
ture capital company is looking for a capable 
administration-oriented secretary to assist him 

in Ws busy role. He w3J rely on your self moti- 
vation,, powers of persuasion and attention to 
detail to ensure efficiency and effectiveness. 

For further information, 
please contact JwSth Seerflwuse on 
01-734 9582 


./mi . 


MEMBER. OF FRES 


Personnel Assistant 


MULTILINGUAF 


EXECUTIVE 

c.£17,000 


P.A. 


Realise your potent**! by joining PLC as P-A. to the Chairman - the 
varied tj gdk* will stretch your administrative and organisational abilities to 
the full. As his executive assistant you will be responsible for arranging 
conferences pnd dinners, beeping the chairman's office ru nning on oiled 
wheels and should be free to travel occasionally. You will enjoy a high profile 
wi thin the company and so should be accustomed to dealing with people at 
all levels. The ideal candidate will be in their early 30s, with sound secre- 
tarial »nnn, a good sense of humour and the confidence and poise this 
position demands. Please telephone 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


o 


c£9,500 


ur professional. West End client needs an assistant 
to join their expanding Personnel Department. 

You wilt be closely involved in all a s p e ct s of personnel 
administration, including training, pensions and man- 
poorer planning. 

Initially you will use your secretarial dolls, but as the job 
p r og r esses so will you. Ideally, candidates should bare 
previous personnel experience hut other applicants will 
be considered. 


Age: 21+ 


Skills: 90/50 


z 

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HAZELL STATON 

RECRUITMENT SPECIALISTS 
8 Golden Square, London WL 
Tel: 01-439 602L 


MEDIA- FINANCE- ADVERTISING ■ SALES- PERSONNEL ■ MEDIA 


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FINANCE 



Rcmritmcnt Consultants* 


FRENCH-SPEAKING Bt-lingual Secretary* 
with shorthand and/or audio skills, to assist 
Chairman and Reaseach Executive of EEC- 
related Association. Short term contact m 
Hayes (Middx) and possible long term pros- 
pects abroad. 

PORTUGUESE: Bi-linguai secretarial post 
with considerable administrative content in 
the City. Both languages need to be of 
excellent standard. Shorthand not vitaL 
Small, busy office and lots of responsibility, 
circa £10.000. 

GERMAN, FRENCH and ITALIAN: From 
Slough to the City - several jobs for Bi- 
lingual Secretaries who have worked for 2 or 
3 years and have the full range of secretarial 
skills - ask for details. 


018363794 

$2 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H OHR 


Consumer PR 
to £11,000 

The Administrative Director of this 
dynamic, successful organisation 
needs an energetic P-A to be 
response for office manage- 
ment and secretarial resources. 
Busy, pressurised position. 
Young, friendly environment Age: 
25-30. Skills: WP (WANG pref.) 
and good typing. Solid 
experienca Good benefits. 

“"sUss 

"^TSiu 


Receptionist Plus 

£11,000 

Enterprising new division of an 
international bank needs a 
“receptionist with a difference". 
You wifi be dealing with fop-level 
clients, and should therefore 
possess an articulate, confident 
manner. Excellent presentation is 
vital, as is previous receptionist 
experience and typing skills. Age: 
25-34. 

‘■"SesKSS 

7 princes str ee t,,^* 


Enroll R 


BE A TEMPORARY 
SECRETARY 
NOT JUST ATEMP! 

Tired of being taken for granted? As an experienced 
secretary with extensive knowledge of word processing, 
we can offer you: 

► Up to £7.00 per hour 

► Overtime Pay 

► A friendly, professional service 

► A selection of London's top assignments 
To join our team of valued, high calibre 
secretaries, please call Camilla Arnold 
on 01-63 10479. 

Seer Selection Recruitment Consultants 



INSTITUTE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
(UNIVERSITY OF LONDON) 

Secretary/PA 

£8,432 - £9,764 inc p.a. 

This post provides an excellent opportunity 
for an experienced secretary to develop ad- 
ministrative skills m a busy, stimulating 
environment. You wiK provide an efficient 
secretarial service to the Dean and Student 
Administrator. 

Good shorthand and typing skills are essen- 
tial, preferably you wftl have University or 
Public Sector background. The successful 
candidate must be able to relate to staff/ 
students from aH walks of fife. Job description 
and application form available horn Kim 
Hurlo-Jones, Personnel Department Institute 
of Dental Surgery, Eastman Dental Hospital, 
256 Grays Inn Road. London WClX OLD. Tel 
01 837 3646 ex 2783/84. 


FILM COMPANY 
OFFICE 
MANAGERESS 

£10,000+ 

Age 27-35 

To organise small friendly office. 
General day to day running of office, 
working on own initiative, good typing 
and experience in office management 
essential, WP experience useful. 
Contact Valerie Skinner 43 7 0600. 
(No agencies). 


Gardens Research 

c£8,00 0 

Famous prestige magazine publisher seelts a 
go-ahead young sec to | pin this very interesting 
deportment West End-bosed. you will enjoy a 
super, informal, busy environment with Jots of 
variety and admin content. Good organising 
skills and excellent typing requested Age 20+ . 
Please ea/l 0 1-493 4466 

me rry weather advertising & selection 


SOUTH BUCKS 
SECRETARY SALES & ADMIN 
£11,000 + profit share 

Lh*b property company seeks sdf motivated secretary to 
Ofpnise Estate Agents and puisne sales enquiries. 

Capable admimsmur with direct seoea i rial shorthand, an- 
dw and WP supp ort t wo of its Direeun arranging and 
luiptim m nng then- busy agenda's. 

Participation in sales proceeds aimed ta> provide an ufcfitiaoal 
£5.000 pa annum alter iaiua) trial period. 

Company antemfy operate in Watford ai med to mere to Ofd 
Amenkam in Summer 1987. 

Send ct. (k 

Hilary Jenkins, 

31 The Aram, Watford, Herts WDl 3NU 


DYNAMIC 

610,000 

We are looking lor an 
organised SH/PA wttn 
excaSent skits who is 
interested in joming a fast 
moving computer 
environment. Musi t» 
atse to co m munfc a w at 
an levels ot staff and 
Baoe with chents. WBI be 
getting totaliy involved 
end perform Ml PA 
duties. 

Can 930 8207 


WHIZZ KID 
69,800 

Young friendly 
Management Consultancy 
need outgoing and 
enthusiastic Sec/PA 20 + 
(no SH) to work for Seles 
Manager. You need to oe 
a good organiser and 
wAng to gar involved. 
Fantastic benefits 
including mortgage 
subsidy. BUPA. SILS and 
23 days tots. 

Can 930 8207 


PA/SECRETARY 

To vorfc for Egiorr Director. Minimum age 25 with lots of 
experi en ce and a p re p ared to work on a one to one basis in • 
snuU company. tO wpm rrpujg. RSA IL or equivaknl, plus 
perfect FMghsb. WiB be mined to use wp/Teta. 

Most be prepared to work alone and use own initiative. Pleas* 
am and responsible manner, together with a tidy mind, sense 
of buraour and good organisational abihucs. Job involves 
general office dudes as well as dealing with oversees 
customers. 

Hours 8.30 - 5.00 pm. 
race, bat oca less than £7. 

(Piccadilly Line statical. 


it upon 
pa. Short walk 


Applications in writing with foil tv. la 

Export Director. H Fine A Son, 

93 Manor Farm Bw o, Wembley. HA0 1XB 



STRUCTURE 2000 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

MARKETING IN 
WEST END FILMS 

Enter to w M ot naWnp 
IV WS Urge network TV CO 
Tbe successful afteant *4 
be nssonsb* to a ww 
variety (rtad mc cgai re ftaes 
wnta the n in tot a a i Ini n 
MUtoen id a very rferamSr 
ami wed secmzrai rt» 
you enjoy a creative, dynamo 
tnwmmera. co upted web 
minm stytsU offices and 
lew enauoit foennand aid 
W»9. cmott 

JACKS WB HW W now « 
■7*731 B9JL 


iWDaMsentmmNKOioar 


AMBITIOUS 

WP 

SECRETARY 

required for Estate Agents. 
Prospects for negotiating, 
car driver preferable. Salary 
by arrangement. 
Telephone 73MBS9. 


LIVE WIRE? 
£11,000 

Dynamc Ctwnen mqired In 
new ousnoas acq u ortwns to 
tearing awava «i agency 
reads a second Secrewy. 
You must be enttareasts. 
ambrtaia and wates to cope 

mtn ban) won, and long 
hours. At best 3 /Mrs 
e m s w ncBassBmat 

Age 22+ - SoKAudo/sO 

BHJNSBAL SPORT 
£10,000 

tenufional jpons promotion 
Comoanv based mlftsst 
London neeo a Secretary 
bent » German to asset 3 
Breams n then tenrus **■ 
Mn WA torttve some trareL 
Age 24+ S*^s 1OO/G0 

BESSS3 m 
naucm 

£3,0GS 

Picduown cepanmere rf 
eOjcanota dook ous^hers 
eiwtmm me oaa^i ate 
{BO TOCo n ol new OogfcS need 
acut young secretary. 

Pfouy of jew* ik 
mvafcertwxand eanwg 
Age 31+ Sms rusty/60 

CMS! 8775 
Rec Csss 



IS0QDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

5 STAR 
SECRETARY? 

For Plush Ho tell 
(to ebeid b an vp-nwtaL rm 
star into wno rvoure a Per- 
sonai Seoosy rfflo can reefly 
ga involved wilt the wofid of 
lecWng. «hauwg and pre- 
pnwi of noucson mnenal. 
Won un g logubr oteea noun 
and mdi a jalaiy of E7.000. 
you wtl be a college law or 
second lower until good se- 
cretarial smu U tns sows 
Ms you. catt 

ftansca Pebn « 

01-631 060. 

TytfOIUllteiNTZfBMnONM.CROUr 


umnum-n 

MMiMtani 



mbsiiwtc top P* abdty 
ltd ravMiiMk Mvoni’ 


Humfcmc ere^oq 


HUWMMMnWnM 


r-TT? 



Admin/Liaison PA 

to £10,000 

Top job fur an exjjerienced self-assured 
professional PA in an exciting 't4 art-up" 

iiituatiori for an international corapauv. This 
will be a challenging o>ortl mutiny liaising 
role — setting up systems, troubleshooting. 
proares> chasing, office admin etc. Energy, 
sparkle and a confident approach important. 
Excellent skills rtH) W.U requested. Please call 
III- MW 1232. 


K.n-nillui>-iil I'i.ir-ulljiiK 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
£9,000 - £11,000 

Hie Hong Kong Trade Development Council, a semi* 
po vo rm ont trade promooon txxjy. aorentty seeks an 
Executive Secretary to work for the Sereor Represen- 
tative In its busy London office. 

The successhd candidate must be totaBy proficient 
In shorthand, typmg and office routine. Good 
omantsahonal snls and the atritty to communicate 
ettecovefy and twxte todepondam correspondence are 
also required. 

This •* be a great opportunity lor a mature and 
experienced secretary who seeks greater respoitsdtfity 
and exposure in the job. 

Please submit aopBcalion wOh C.V. to ktes Bum, or caS 
for an appointment at 

TOE HONG KONG TRADE 
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL 
ENSERCH HOUSE 
8 ST JAMES'S SQUARE 
LONDON SW1Y 4JZ 
TEL: 01-S30 7955 


EXPERIENCED PA 

To work for the Senior Partner of laroe cen- 
tral London Estate Agents. Must have init- 
iative, good secretarial skifis and be efficient 
Varied and interesting job - not for the feint 
hearted. 

Salary £11,000 per annum 
Tel: 01-727 0530 


SECRETARY 

Westminster Solicitors need an ex- 
perienced legal secretary to work for 
a Partner. The work is demanding 
and varied and is predominantly liti- 
gation. As well as good audio typing 
skills, a first class telephone manner 
is essential. 

We use Olivetti electronic typewrit- 
ers and training will be given. 

Good salary for the right applicant 

Please telephone 
John Ward: 222 1103 


QUALIFIED 

MEDICAL 

SECRETARY/PA 

£8,600 

Required by 
Sloane Si Physician. 

Tel tl 235 5222 
After Spa 
01 874 754S 


BBDRAKE 

PfttONNEL 

STRIKE IT RICH 
IN VI 

ESD0C++ 

An otoonuniiy las nai te 
ion this snfl. efts team of 
i satos based n ta heart of 
Maytaa. You yrfl be fetoOft- 
; site for wamaonal comma- 
luatuns ve tee WP and Tetsv 
i idMion lo dsdy wephore 
: tasoo wn asai co mpany 
; rt Mw Yoiv ana Zim. 0 you 
tow a unjn emmeasHc na- 
: sonaiy ate oalim lyosig 
sms me retails are g rea 
: ate «» to y» n Bis to- 
; name wSsoy. Ad ww cat 

4acxe SMonra « 

fft-w B XL 

THCDWUaMTEBMMiaMM.aiOV 


FARTERS SEC 
£10,000+ 

Working for the Tax 
Partner of this me- 
dium size firm of 
CH/accountants you 
will enjoy a varied 
and trrte restinq work 
load which will in- 
clude lots of client 
contact and adminis- 
tration work. 

Tel: 248 5627 

ASA Accountancy 
7 Litigate Square 
London EG4 


IIBBDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

PROPERTY 
PA/ADMIN 

£10,000 

This wnartal property CO to i 
NW1 q aaoim ) M Pk wta 
e caDteHe of hantoig a to at 
amm ssa tm. Ota tee 
nay day ruruKi at. tin office. I 
get myaheo to ti» paoeny 
dteitt sat tfn readames of j 
wmetoq M dsalng n the 
grooeny ima u you ta*e ] 
good (yooq, can to sitoo.j 
raw a bxwtet^e of WPstej 
oonstov yuurseiJ a peiaJD- \ 
ate. cygancen human oetog; 
cA 

MTMJE DttUKER atm to 
81-734 Oil. 

TWBwmn — W M rra e uto 


STOP PRESS 1 
cXI 0,000 11 

A successW national 
newspaper, urgently 
requires a secretary to 
wax for a young 
editorial team of low. 

This newspaper has a 
growing reputation for 
feature s and - 
photographs and its 
offices are friendly and 
WonnaL You must be 
bright, efficient and 
above aB wfflng to get 
involved, m aaatioo to 
normal secretarial 
duties, you w9do 
soma research. 

You w til be working 10 
am - 5 JO pm and will 
got 5 weeks hohday? 

Age: 21-30 Skins 90/60 

WEST BSD OFFICE 
01-629 9686 


ABSSASiBEaSR 



INTERNATIONAL 

FASHION 

£10,500 

Thekteoiftteieaang 
testeon tunas a toolung for 

Your respensfoities win b« 
malung tta btflev and 

to Me rut smoothly, 
mdu&ng ntemsncmai 
Wfion. argansng mwwgt 
and tenches, rani 
arrangemantA dtoias, trow 
ti» ion ate preMbng a fi« 
PA back-up. 

You wte mad a reSaUe and 
rifiganr man ner and have 
foe mamnJr getneo ho m ■ 
womng ai Dtoecmr foveL as 
weB as the Bodtfty » 
mpy being can of 6 team 
m litis young and tiwtely 
enwpnmert. 

Sktos tOO/SO Age 2S/35 

West End Office 
01-629 9686 

A 


AUDIO YOUR WAY TO 

£11,000 




tags. ExCBBtoit W*r*pany — 

advertisement for 
advertising 

£S,500 

H you lava sM. Md tBSfc 

awnto restei this posfoon as a aiweaxywvw' 

essential 55 wpm. toge»8r wW» 

abKf » P«* i)p the ph»» ^ 5paaK w 

US ROW. _ ’. 

LITIGATION SECR ETAR Y 
£10,000 + BENEFITS 

Bbgation experience. 70 wpm WP essamiaL 

CALL: Lt2ANNE/?«LEN OT UA AT 

SPAN SECRETARIAL ON 

01-734 7394 


(TI-5S49033 

TM mTHgWtKWiM. 

stcvrww. 

RfoMTHEm 


^m) 


01-5848931 


UEfK»S*r 


fPERSONAL ! „ ~] 

ASSISTANT £12JW0 ;+ Package 1 

One of trie top man in a smeB am expandmgl Bank i 

I under your own bvtiatnre. Tharejwtil be pbtty ^ 

‘ contact wdh ctients, BS h eci ^^T ranclB i^ > ^? j 
,- French is useful. Speeds iQO/SDJsge c 2B. Occa- 
| sionai overtime requried. 

FOUR 

SECRETARIES 


£|0-£14,000 

ano extremely sue 


Our. ctients a young dyn amic . 

cessfUf P.R agency, are expanefag some of tfwfr j 
departments. They are looking hr tow wea pre- . 
seated and competert who v«it J 

to get totatiy involved, aren't afraid of hard work j 

and can cope with executive work being delegated I 

to than as the executives are uraer great pres - 1 
sure. Speeds 90/60. Age c2A. \ 1 

Please caPustoranintenfe wuri( 6.3 0pm. J 


A SPECIAL PERSON 

seeded by Member of European fiariilmeni to be his 
Constituency Assistant Tbe wide vkiety of work 
and substantial delegation of ropontbilities make 
the job unusuaL Based in Bigpn HiUlmamty work- 
ing solo, the post involves liaisot with press, 
indnstry and coaunerce,- schools, tool authorities, 
voluntary organisations and individuils. as well as 
basic secretarial tasks. 

Constituency covers Bromley, Bexley a d Greenwich 
boroughs. A friendly and supportive ersonality is 
essential, together with die abflny to p adnee results 
both when working alone in quiet surnundin& and 
when under pressure. 

First class secret aria l skills fine SH) atf experience 
indispensable. IBM Displaywriter usei an interest 
in computers necessary. Attractive salty (+ or al- 
lowance) to match responsibilities. 

Hand written applications with typedfev to 
Pete Price MEP, 

7 Juniper Close, 

Biggin HD1, 

Wesfarha m , 

Kent TN16 3LZ. 


auMattve, 


★ ★ FASHIONS 
£9,000 

Aristoc rati c. KrogMshridge Ooflaction need 
socreory with good shorthsndAypvig and friemy 
inanow. Lows at cBmt contact Sroafl Input 
computer. 

★ ★HOTEL IN SWtif* 

to £9,000 

Carow powteal tor trttora young ssc/pa to 
Manage* xrbaatsoM presO^ota hotel, 
toportm bi* diplomacy, iteracy, nuiwracy and 
CBsemaL 

★ ★VICTORIA 
£7,500 + briffiant 
Raafly bnam. eager, accurate, last 
department wttten superb SW1 oMcas. _ 
a mo ap nera and gram pro ap ects lor foe 


smart 
confidant tel 
abnpte IBM 


OrdntSB 


s/hArp/aufo 

andornmaod 


a Senior 
sWBs 

aOflttyaU 



Susan Beck 


RECmiTMENT 
01-i84 6242 




COLLEGE LEAVE 
c£7^00 + BENEFITS 


H«My monvaKd Seoaary wrtb a Levdt required . 
for eventual profrcBBOu uuo a Don-tanking career, 
benefits. 


City Bank 
Ml Bukins 


PA SECRETARY 
c£10,060 + BANKING PERKS 


Exciting career move into Mcrt hu t Bank for sbontu d 
wiifo financial background. Euetieni pwapeo s and 
Far tether i ntn n oari oei on either of the 
pte»se contet Joaana Stephenson 
01 638 9205 «r 01 628 0494 

ZARAK HAY ASSOCIATES U D, 
BANKING & FINANCIAL 
RECRUITMENT 


Secretary 

irwardv 

Wxwe, 


Manaffirs 


BILINGUAL/FRENCH ENGLIS 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY! 
C £12,000 

MD of International Investment 
quires experienced bffingual secret^ 
will be a key menfoer of a smaB a 
team. Salary and benefits negotiabie. 
including current salary to: 

4 Bristow, 

Apax International (UK) 
103 Mount St, 
London W1Y 5HE. 


in 


IDRAKE 

PElfSONNEL 


W1 


re- 
WtX) 
cortmlned 
pcv. 


Lb, 


HOTEL GABES 

£9,000 

tejnfo tteitti and tama 

SKKrSa 

an H qramsaun. As Ps- 
-soq] tes snm id tte 
GawNttaajeiwuMBhaw 
: M nwawme w a me dw to 
lump of me boM 
, a w m tSent tea*, 
i wsm nur. omssabnnaf 

; IBWJOHB GVBH5 (wru 

W* HL Good 



PStaiA PRICE on a 

BTOMton 


wanted to wort ita Wj 


based adrertisn , 
toerepber. Bot eeprog 
secretarial and a ce du- 
ties. Salary £&£ t. 

Please cafl 58(1053. 




T- 

if 


P 


7 


ft. 

' # ! i ■ 





r -. r '‘ f; 











LA CREME DE LA CREME 




Senior PA. 

Sultanate of Oman 

c.£l4;000 tax free 
Plus free accommodation and car 

. A maiw Omani organisation bos retained us to find a too 
™S™ graduate secretary as RA. to their Chief Executive to assist ■ 
him in a« aspects oftfie business. Based in Oman, fauf wifh 48 
days leave a year this position offers tremendous variety and 
challenge together with a superb benefits package. 

To apply you must be a graduate, aged 30-45, with full 
secretarial and administrative skills and have at least ten years 
work experience after graduation. Commitment, integrity and 
involvement in the business is essential as is poise, personality 
and a sense of humour. Experience of working in the Gulf would 
be an advantage. 

Following a three month trial period the contract would be 
open ended with guaranteed repatriation at the end Benefits 
inaude free accommodation, car and petrol, medicare and first 
dros travel The tax free salary is negotiable around Rials Omani 
600/- per month plus R.O. 44/- per month expenses. 

Please send a detailed career history to David Konrath at 
the address below Initial interviews win be held in London. Please 
note non graduates will not be considered. 


mm 


Administrative 

SECRETARY/PA 

Financial Research 

The London School of Economics, an oiascancfirig hstirun'onwith 
en international reputation, is in trie forefront of econorrric thinking. 

VMs have now decided to use our unique position to form a 
Financial Markets Group to research this practically important and 
intellectually rewarding area. 

. A &st-T3te BA to the Directoc also axing as the Group's 
Administrative Secretary will be an enthusiastic person with initiative 
and the commitment to respond os the challange of laurxhing and 
a dminge e rin g the Group. 

Proven seatetariaiand administrative sfdfls, cotpled with the 
confidence to deal with people from a variety of backgrounds, are 
essential. All round aWJfty is necessaiy to ensure the Group's smooth 
operation, and organization of related activities such as our regular 
seminars and conferences. 

iBMt If your background and experience will lead to a 

positive contriDution to mis rewarding rote, please apply 
J with a detailed cm to Men/yn King, Professor of 

Economics, London School of Economics, Houghton 
YSSSsST Street London WC2A 2AE. 




MOOSER& PARTNER AC 

PersontSberatung 

YOUR JOB FOR 1987! 

On behalf of our client, a loorld-ivide operating 
Non-Profit-Organization, we are looking for a 

TRANSLATOR/ 

TRAVEL EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Assigned to the Secretary General, you shall be resporaibte for translations of 
reports, minutes, releases etc. from German rep Flench into Rngtfoh and 
shall also write correspondence ({ty dictaphone) in these languages. You shaB 
further assist in the preparation and oqpnigatkm of local meetings as wefl 
as abroad where you ghaO be hunted to attend as Secretary /Translator. 

This very challenging position with a varied range oT duties demands a good 
basic education, some years of secretarial irpwrMmw-, a perfect command of 
English (motbertongue) as well as a good working knowledge of French. 
German and possibly Spanish. Knantial too is a very versatile, with 
initiative, wefl organised and pleasant personality, ready to make a 
positive contribution within team-orientated working environment - both at 
home and abroad where flexibility and stress-resistant humour shall be the 
name of the game! 

Interested candidates (age range 25-40) that would Bke to link their 
professional and Rnpantic ekfflx with occasional travels abroad, are kindly 
requested to send us their detailed application or to call ns Cor further details. 

Lfsterisfrosse 17 am Lowenptafz 
8001 Zurich Teleton OV2I1 9969 


HIGH CALIBRE RECEPTIONIST ...+ 
Circa £11,000 

WONDERFUL CAREER OPPORTUNITY for smart, well spoken 
socially confident receptionist with •'personality plus"! This is a truly 
unique and interesting position with plenty of scope for client contact at 
the highest level and involvement tn day to day running of the reception 
area mr exclusive, but above all friendly company> in prestigious offices 
based in SWl. 

(Very tittle shorthand and typing - speeds requited 80/50) age: 22-40. 

Please telephone Jtil Wotton on 
01-630 0221 (no .ag e n c i e s). 


COLLEGE LEAVER TO £10,000! 

Are you confident enough to idea raapcnslbifiy from Via word “go”? Do you hare the 
intepity to handto privileged Information and the assurance to taix to influential effects? 
Then this exceptional opportunity to Jem a prestigious underwriting agency in tiro heart of 
the City (EC3) wM reaRy involve you tn the workings and atmosphere of Lloyds. Develop 
your sWBs of 90+ shd/50 typ. & WP training + good "O’s ind. maths. 


437 6032 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 1 


Wbrk for all season 

• Immediate work 

• Competitive r<ites and a holiday pay 
scheme throughout the winter 

• The pick of the best assignments in 
London 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone S ally Dowson 
today for the latest 
assignments 
on 01-439 060L 


m 


awounENnci 




IS 


COLLEGE LEAVER 
c£7,500 + BENEFITS 

Highly motivated Secretary with A Levels required by City Bank 
Sw eventual proercunM inn a non-tenlring career. Alf Banfcuw 
benefits. 

PA SECRETARY 
c£l 0,000 + BANKING PERKS 

Exciting career move into Merchant Bask for shorthand Secretary 
with R na nr in i background. Excellent prospects and 

For farther information n either OT the above, 
pl ea s e contact Joanna Stephenson 
01 638 9205 or 0] 628 0494 
ZARAS HAY ASSOCIATES LTD. 
BANKING & FINANCIAL 
RECRUITMENT 


BANKING c£l 2,000 + MORTGAGE 

Excellent opportunity for a senior secretary to join one 
of America's most successful banks. As PA to the MD 
of this Urge corporate finance department your role 
will be roughly 40% secretarial and 60% admin. Corpo- 
rate finance background ideal. Skills 100/60 and WP 
experience. 

DESIGNERS £10,000 

As PA to the chairman of one of the TOP TEXTILE 
DESIGNERS in the UK. your role win be incredibly 
varied, very exciting and definitely fun. You could be 
helping with PR one minute or organising a photo- 
graphic shoot the next. Someone who has lags of 
energy with excellent skills (100/60) and is under 28 
should apply. 

please telephone; 01 -499 8070 

87 New Bond Street London W.l. 

CAROLINE HM6 SECRETARIAL APPOINTMENTS 


VICTORIA cJEl 1,000 

Smart, intelligent, well spoken and 
experienced Secreiary/Giri Friday for 
Executive Search and Management 
Consultants, rapidly establishing an 
excel lent reputation. Needs:- 

* Fast accurate audio typing (golf ball 
and/or WP) 

* Fit into small, intensive professional 
environment 

* Start immediately. 

Applications in writing to Barbara Tatty, 
If, Palace Street, London SW 1 E 5HW. 


OPPORTUNITY 



AUDIO 

SECS 

We are a targe International 
firm of Chartered Surveyors 
nitli secretarial vacancies in- 
cluding two at Partner level 
tusedin Wnsnd BB.^^ 

and^awe eircllcnt^ andio 
•#«% . Ware WP i rain mg wifi 
il necessary. Sabry 

Please contact 
MiqSimx 


Bkfaard Efflsrm 
01 256 6411 (ac toll 
derails. 

(No Agencies) 


MATURE EXPERIENCED 
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONSIST 
£8,500pa + 

EXCELLENT BENEFITS 

Required for prestigious buernational Data Commu- 
nications Company. Superb office in Whitehall SWl. 

Excellent telephone manner and typing dulls 
essential Word processing and shorthand important 

Apply to Personnel Manager, 

CCI Ltd 01 930 4300 

(No agendo) 


m !'■ V. i \ I ! i ; i\> • 


University of London 


Department af Pure 
and Applied Biology 


Appficatkxu am imbed from 
■rely and mpanenoad per- 
sons to be personal 
secretary to the Head of this 


typing of comes- 


. .. 


£9,000 

A Matt nwodure* «*s 


ESS5£d 


mere. lne«B» POT* ««> 
Ngb atorv. to rare yen w* 
need wed sJwrttentL] m 
ml WPridh. Voo v* ten 


VIDEO FUJI PRODUCTION 
£8,500 

Stnal and succmsful production company 
need a good aH round secretary /administrator 
to replace their present one who they have 
promoted to production assistant Plenty of 
variety and responsMty for someone capa- 
ble of acting on own initiative and who 
responds wan in a relaxed, busy and creative 
environment Good typing + WP experience. 
Occasionally helping on location. Aged 21-30. 


GROSVTNOR: 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


SECRETARIAL PA. 

INC. OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

A busy Managing Director requires a person wflh the highest aUities gained from their 
past Secretarial, Administrative and Communication achievements to run and 
organise Ms company's busy office in NW London. 

You dtn»l4 excel in; nmnaymem of staff awareness of profitability, derision making 
and client liaison. This position is for those ihat achieve commercial aims, not the feint 
hearted. 

As PA. to the Director yon will take urinates of meetings and type confidential mate ri aL 
Early starts and late finishes are normal fin keeping control in die Transport Industry, 
with loyalty and n’ *ftinrefiiin««s necessary qualities. 

Therefore the reward affixed is high. 

£10,000 - £20,000 p.a. 

According to age. abifity & experience. 

This position is availablB itnmed ta tety and In the first instant please write to your own 
hand to; 

THE MANAGING DIRECTOR 
SQUARE MOVES LTD. 

MOVES HOUSE 

(31 SALISBURY ROAD 

LONDON NW6 

Stating how you consider you meet toe above ^reqtrirwnante. enclosing your C.V. 
qualifications 


showing education & 


gained typed by yourself. 


SECRCTARY / ADMINISTRATION 
w I MANAGER I SK 


CENTRAL 

LONDON 


We are Greenfield Human Resources, one of the leading computer 
recruitment consultancies in the UK. 

As a result of substantial growth, we need to recruit an experienced Senior 
Secretary/Administrator to play a key role in our future development 

Supporting ttie Managing Director, your responsibilities will include 
management of toe secretarial function, aft Company administration and 
undertaking special projects such as organising a forthcoming office move. 

You will probably be in your fate 20's or 30 s with good secretariat 
experience and a sound background in office systems. You must be self- 
motivated, capable of ‘making things happen’ and able to demonstrate affair 
for organisation. 

We can offer toe committed individual excellent career prospects and, in 


COMMERICAL £9,000 
BREAK + Bonus 

This is a very special opening into 
television. Working for one of the 
industry's most prominent person- 
alities, you'll be meeting top 
executives in the tv and advertising 
world. 

Exceptional candidates with just a 
year’s secretarial experience will be 
considered if skills, grooming and 
telephone manner are first class. 

Aee* 19-24 Skills: 90/60 


ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY 

. We nc a yang sreB fiimSy company is Wl pravidiag nncMKH and 


Wr and toneme witti and acreml drifc Morins durtbnd). a pfcam 
pa w afay and ■ wgw a a dBaal Ur. 

fa lenm re ofer farataoncat variety ad a pod okry far U riti* pawa. 
lfpjaarejMaeaed tba plow wrilp fa omfidnac wiik ana dereH. ar and 
liana! uliry u 

SAJ INTERNATIONAL LTD 
82 Mount Streeet, 

W1Y 5HH 

or telepkooe 01 499 5894 


s Aj 


International Ltd 


Age: 19-24 

“RECRUITMENT 

B-C 0 M p A N I 


GERMANY 

Out efert 

gaassagg 

exp + a namre tndrespais&t 
aaffljfc o esscnU- 
expend ce « GemBDj a 

gtea assa £ /uoacore an*- 

BOYCE BIUHGUAL 
01-236 5501 

Jlataate Sg, EG4 

(opSa urn 

'^BHP AfiY 


5 GARRICK STREET 
C0VENT GARDEN 
TEL 01-831 1220 





MANAGING DIRECTOR’S 
SECRETARY/P J^. 
c^l 1,000 p.a. 

DO you tike working in a fast moving business? 
DO yon tike ibcMatf working ia Reademia] property? 
DO yon want more than jus a 9-5 job? 

DO yon nsaUy want to be involved in the business? 
DO ytw want id woik in a yomg professional environment? 
. Wha* do jao do next? 

- ■ Apply today with full C.V. toe 
Nigel Coaraxfi, Managing: Director. 

40 Conaugkt Sheet, London W2 2AB- .. 


CHESTERT0NS 

^ — RFSIDENTI A L - - 





c. £11,588 + Ptckagt 

OmcSertt seeks a seoalay 
to work for a group of 
traderotatteffCfcpitfUark- 
ets Division. Ydu must erioy 
woriong as part of a youaj 
tram in a last movin g, often 
pressurised envjromrwtL 
Hib position requires ften- 
bdtty and initiative and in- 
vofves much telephone con- 
tact- work. Banking experi- 
ence an advantage. 100/80 
plus WP. Age mid 20 s. 

01-606 1611 

Senior 

Secretaries 


Our city efients are the 
cream at tie crop. They 
need secretaries with good 
storthand/typing sfdBs and 
beesrioflrily WP abSy to 
work with Hero for high 
sdaries and excellent bene- 
fits packages. If you have 
relevant banMag/broking 
experience and bare the 
ambition to develop your 
earning potential wa want to 
hear from you soon, please. 

01-606 1611 

Senior 

Secretaries 


EC4 £10,000 

A highly successful and re- 
spected pubtistang boose 
offers a real opportunity to a 
secretary who wfl work 
alongside a rising star' 
editor and Iris very bright 
financial editorial team. 

If you have 100/60 skills 
and (SM WP experience 
coupled with a determina- 
tion to dwelop a secretarial 
role into a career in publish- 
ing, this is your chance Ape 
early 20'S. 

01-606 1611 

Seniur 

Secreiaries 


CITY BROKERS 

need your 

SPANISH 

High language content 
and test moving, young 
environment. 

Your fluent Spanish, 
compeiaut s/hand and 
good second language 
wiH be used rewarding! y 
in this busy Secretarial 
job. 

£11,000 + Benefits. 

01 370 5066 




to T^l ZZH 


personnel 

oar 

msems pa 

£9^100 

I Ufa CBBSODBS? OOJW 










|— 


















TEMPTING TIMES 



BUST nut ncnUUU jotn IM 


part-time shorthand-typist 
- REQUIRED 

p«iar?gmt- lyplnt cttcfufari. may thprUnnd»cccpcabk. £30 per 
**3» °*X. . , 


Tl* Sccwtvy. The 


oT tadn OoaMhUfa. 


Ladgar Hnue. IwillW Rut Sam, 
Unta BC4A 2A8 % 


nta BC4A 2AB 
(01 3S3 1688). . 



PA/AOMIN 
DESIGN CD SW6 
c£ 11,000 

Eushaid conxiarthl ana tsctncai 
knowWue lo nil (Mat. Ample 
scope (or mrahemenL 

SUSAN HAMILTON 
PERSONNEL LTD 
33 SL George St 
London Wl 
01-499 5408 


C£1500 

This supervisory position requires a 
molti-talented indimdaal who can administer 
and control a busy team, dispensing tea and 
sympathy when necessary, always being 
prepared to lead by example. Wang experience 
and a Central London base essential 28+ . 
Middleton Jeffers 


EXEC SE 

£l2,000+bens 

PA Sot wifi look after viators seeing them ioi o company Hals, 
organising Kwinfl activhies and eewrady pul people. » case al 
very sor level, fim class SH & typing req. High admin cometu. 
25-35 yis. 

ONE TO ONE 

£11,000+ mortgage sob 
shareholder of Merchant Bank you nerd social 


in any si motion. Hdp with family estsia etc. 3% mortgage and » 
bencfiis. Ideally late 20«rty 30 yrs. 

MORE THAN A SEC 

£12£00+ bens 

An outgoing perconaliiy & good skins are needed by 
noiMinoUng PA sec lo Snr Pmr of Property Co. 
Suit good orgamser with discretion who wants 
employment at the lop. 

Serai CV or phone for appointment 



/» £7 • f v. 


Secretary/Office Manager 

Young architects practice require full 
time secretary/office manager. Knowl- 
edge of wordprocessor would be an ad- 
vantage. We offer a vety good post and a 
pleasant working environment for ibe 
right applicant Salary cXllK. 

Application with CV to: 

Sampson Associates, 
20-22 Vestry St, 
London N1 7RE. 


£12,000-jC16,000 
+ BONUS FOR TOP SEC/PA 

who tan organise and mmagp smaB, rapvfly gnawing Giy 
firm. 


lob req u ir es a had-worting carcer- g rinded professioaal who 



Superb opportunity in 
S.W. Germany to work 
as P^. to me M.D. 
of a large iniemational 
organisation dose to 
the French and Luxem- 
burg borders. 

You will be the link 
between them and their 
local contacts and must 
iherefom be fluent in 
German. Lois of scope 
to move more into 
administration as you 
will by now be at a 
stage where secretarial 
duties « senior level 
are second nature! Age 
fete 20's, and a dean 
driving licence. 

174 New Sand St, W.L 


International 

Secretaries. 


PRESTIGE PA 
£12,500 

Die Senior Partner ol a 
prestigious 
International firm of 
Chartered Surveyors 
needs a PA to assist 
him in efl aspects of his 
work. 

You wa liaise 
frequently with the 
overseas offices, deal 
with major clients and 
be capable of holding 
toe tort m his absence. 

This la an exciting job 
tor someone wtio can 
combine quicfc-tfttnking 
with a high degree or 
irabatjveand wtx> 
enjoys fuH support to a 
busy executive. 

Age 2fi/35 SMBS 120/80 

City Office 
01-726 8491 


CHAIRMAN'S SECRETARY £13,000 

o you enjoy a chalange with no time to be bored? ‘Them 


Prestigious Col based in Wt are cunwfey seeking a secre- 
tary to wore lor ttwr Chairman, tf you have goocT sec sKUs 
100/60 and have worked at tHs level do lore, then cafl us on 
636-4000 tor farther delate on tfw gotten opponumty. Sut 
mature person. 

ATLAS EMP AGY. 


OFFICE 




for Wl Commercial 
Property Co. ' 
The Job. resporisote lor total 
srnootn running of oflice of 
40. Al aomm from personnel. 
bo car pokey to partners 
meetings', co antertammeni. 
You organised, motivated, 
with relevant exp. ^ 

Salary: c £12,000. 

01-408 042-1^^ 



£15,000 

The Chief Executive of 
one of the UK's major 
companies needs the 
right person to organise 
his fjst moving and 
complex life. You must 
have experience at a 
vety senior level to qua- 
lify for this blue chip 
opportunity. Age 30-35 


DIRECTORS’ 

SECRETARIES' 

ff.CTX'nS'.iX T CON'S?. V. T/tVIX 


01- 629 9323 



































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


«*'v; - 


EXEriJTTVE CREME 




n 


OPINION INTERNATIONAL GROUP pic. 


Financial Services ■ Property Development - 
Natural Resources 


JOBS WITH 
LANGUAGES 


RESEARCH ASSISTANT/SECRETARY 


We are looking for an energetic and intelligent person, capable of 
making an immediate contribution to trie activities of our dynamic 
Corporate Planning Department The role of this Department is to 
identify, investigate and evaluate potential investment 
opportunities for the Group. Your function will be to provide 
research assistance and some secretarial services to a small 
team of highly professional managers. Ideally you will be a 
graduate, with secretarial experience and a business background, 
now looking for an expanded role and interested in gaining 
exposure to business in an international context. 

Dominion is a multi-national public company with its main offices 
in Wimbledon. The position will command a good salary and 
excellent benefits. 

PSease send detailed Curriculum Vitae in strictest 
confidence to: 

Mrs. Angela Lammond i 

Dominion International 
Group pic., 

Dominion House, < *0 / 

49 Parfcside, 

Wimbledon /\ \ 

London SW19 5NB. r 


PA WITH SPOKEN FRENCH AND/OR GERMAN. 
NEW VENTURE £13£*t EXPENSES + 18 
WEEKS HOLIDAY the Managing Director of Far 
Eastern concern netting up a European venture in Lon- 
don, Paris and Zorich seeks a PA with strong PJi 
potential who will feel at home m the Reims of high 
finance both co mm ercially and at a social level. Pro- 
tracted sojourns abroad in Europe pins odd working 
hours restrict applications to persons 30-40 with no 
ties. Shorthand is not required 
FLUENT GERMAN SEC/PA, FROM £U«W+ 
JVIORT FAC ETC. The moat senior c h al lengin g and 
lucrative secretarial role with a leading International 
Bank is now vacant. Applicants aged 28-40 should have 
Genu? shorthand ana ideally previous finan c e area 


BLLJNGUAL FRENCH SECRETARY £12,008. Ex- 


citing new ent er prise in W.l requires smart, outgoing 
secretary fluent French both written and spoken to 

Haw with French associates. Officially the Chairman’s 
secretary you would be involved in all aspects of an' 


intriguing ve nture . 

ITALIAN SPEAKING SECRETARY, package 
c£ 13^000. A great opportunity for an Italian speaking 
Secretary moving op to a more rewarding post after at 
feast a year's working experience. Yon win earn a basic 
salary or £10,000 and be working with professional se- 
nior rwnrmggnwTtf in an environment. 


S/Hand is req ui red in English only. Package in c h i des 
mortgage Earinty. 


mortgage facility. 

RING 01 839 3365 

CLC LANGUAGE SERVICES & CO 
(RECCONS) 

6 BUCKINGHAM ST, 
LONDON WC2 N6BU 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES 
ACCOUNTS CLERK/SECRETARY 
NEW MALDEN £10,000 p.a. 


Three executive secretaries and one accounts clerk/secretary 
are required to join this international company moving into new 
offices in New Malden. 


Candidates should be 23+ with Director level experience and 
excellent shorthand and/or audio typing and WP (IBM DW3) 
skifls. The ability to take initiatives and to work under pressure 
within a fast-moving environment is essential. 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARY 
Executive Search W1 
£12,000 

A busy Mayfair based executive search consul- 
tancy requires an experienced secretary. The 
ideal ranHidatp will enjoy the variety of a small 
office, be technically proficient, have an as- 
sured manner in d wiling with clients face to 
face and by telephone and be educated to 'A' 
level Age over 22. Please write with a brief c.v_ 
to: 

A. P. Raft, 

Director, 

Euram Consol ting Ltd, 

115 Mount Street, 

London W1Y 5HD 


Salary will be circa £10,000 + benefits. Please reply with cv to: 


Ms Sue Merry, 
Seven-Up European Division, 
Phillip Morris House, 
21-47 High Street, 
Feltham, Middx, TW13 4AD. 


Publishing 

to £7.500 


PERSONNEL 
GRADUATE 
ABHRNiSTRATDR 
c£18jQQ9 + fwMfts 
+ review 


Bright, enthusiastic College Leaver sought by 
the dynamic young marketing department uf 
this world leader in magazine publishing. 
Super Vest End-based position requiring 
sell -motivation, an outgoing approach, 
excellent command of English and accurate 
shorthand tvping ( 80 50). Age 18-21 Please 
cill DIhViT 


Em an atom mason orjwsflg 
the anal is* round .coDsbnay 
rnsecoo ant reouarg (names, 
m iBKftnq aH fritted atom 
tstrjscn.il care® rate tar a graduate 
wtt i w»s e© + «0^*n 
Dm tore (tea Sarah to an 


MDs 

ASSISTANT 

UP TO £12,000 

Batten Sc &n Bfahctwn 
Deu&di? It wouM Da useful in 
fhnrin s export CO. 
Run the MDs office. Ms trawl, 
he meetings. Occassional 
OpperjLtngy ID D3VBL Take on 
more response*** as they 
grow (and Bigy wfl) W ytw 
must tore good sMJs 100/60. 
An exceHant. gerwne PA 
posrion. 

. Ring 01 434 0030 y 


DIRECTORS 

ASSISTANT 

£10,000 +! 

Great openog with extremely 


house. Ptosfi offices m Oran 
new twfidrig a stone s throw 
from Bcnmdt Si Uartcet Assist 
Brectcr by airangmg meetings. 
argsrtSTO lunchae « Iftnr own 
fSnmg room, fistsmg ctosaly 
i wtthh»dfortS8ftdnancSinghis 
I correspondence. (100/60). A 
, young relaxed but professor^ 
team- 5 weeks holidays. 

L Phene 01 434 0030 , 


CHAIRMAN’S SECRETARY £13,000 

> you enjoy a Cftatenge with no tvne to be bored? Then 


S^SSB 


tary to work lor mer Chaxrezn. H you have 
100/60 and have worked at trie level before, 


GORDON YATES 


S4 Regent Strata. London WlJ 
T«HB-<39230e 


Prestigious Co. based m Wl era currently seeing a secre- 
tary to work for titer Ctwrrnan. V you have good sac sfcffis 
100/60 and have wortied at trie level before, Wn cal us on 
636-4000 tor further details on this golden opportune/- Surt 
mature person 

ATLAS EMP AGY. 


Boitinima,: Cm-ulnm? 


BI-LINGUAL SECRETARY 

MONACO 

First class bi-liopial secretary aged 23/26 is required for 
this well known entrepreneur. The work is extremely 
varied and calls for someone with excellent 
stionhand/typiug skills and fluency in French. An ex- 
cdlcnl salary package is offered tax free, including 
accomodation and use of car. 

Please telephone 01 631 4978 
DeMain Consultants Ltd 

1 7/1 S Margaret Sl, London WIN 7LE 


SECRETARY 
£10,700 + 
Subs Mortgage 

Tha high profile Ctiy Co offers 


KN1GHTSBSUDGE 
CONSULTANTS 
£UJM0 + BENEFITS 


PA/SECRETARY 


sa*r oppommiy to a versatile 
aid duopinsd secretary (23-35) 
wtit drib 90/60. Pret 'K level 
education and a knwtadfls of 
computet languafle mM be use- 
ful A senior paaton requmg 
good aamswunen awsy to 
crgaxseatacflcdwcion 

Please «xw tnrf 
Sena Pries 


Mature (35 +) P A/Sec 
for MD of Human 
Resources. Involving 
confidential position for 
candidate with excellent 
secretarial U 00/60) and 
interpersonal skills. 


01-2409384 


SUSAN HAMILTON 
PERSONNEL LTD. 

33 St George St 
London Wl 
01 4995406 


L Betty, 

18ft Root, 
Princess House 

ptreb Lane, 

London EC4R BAN 


(No Agmbes Please) 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


OIL SECRETARY 
PROM £7,500+ 


COLLEGE LEAVER /2nd JOBBER 
PRESTIGIOUS WEST END 
INTERIOR DECORATORS 

Wc look for a hard working Junior Personal /AdnnttiamicH 
Secretary to jure our snail very friendly tcaun. 


Should have rood shorthand and audio typing skiHs togesher 
with an excellent telephone manner. 

Horn: 9. 30-5 JO Surung salary £6J00; with irtw afier 3 
mouths. You will be emitted to 4 weeks annual holiday, pins 
the toll Christmas period. 

Please write, endoring C.V.. ux 

Karen Mftcfcefl. Da rid Laws Design Ltd. 

9-10 Sank Row. London W1X IAF 


A leading International Oil Company requires an effl- 1 
oerrt secretary in their London office to work in its I 
Refined Products Department Applicants must be able 
to use a word processor and possess shorthand and | 
general secretarial skiVs. An interest in world affairs 
would be a definite advantage, buf is not essential. The 
selected secretary wtU also have the opportunity to 
carry out basic research and reporting duties. For the 
right candidate there Is ample scope for personal 
development and rewards are measured strictly in line 
with the working attitude and performance of the se- 
lected individual. 

There is a competi ti ve starting salary from £7,500 pa + 
overtime, 4 weeks holiday, free lunches, Bupa and 
pension scheme. 

Please send C.V tot 

MISS SULLIVAN PERSONNEL DEPT., 
GENERAL PETROLEUM AND MINERAL 
SERVICES (Cl) LTD 
15 KNIGHTSBRIDGE 
LONDON SW1 
Or Telephone 01-235 7060 


CHELSEA I 
ARCHITECTS 

cX1 1,000 25+ 

Effnm ngla land pvson reqmd 1 
B provide backup for 2 Senatr 
Partner of ttas thnwyj practice. , 
Good shortftaid/ typing. Flexible < 
p ers o nate? and ma tem flcal 1 
afitey essan&aJ 


MONTY DON LTD 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY/PA WANTED 
With good shanband/tyj/wg ( min 120/60). Eacefleot 


PERSONNEL/ ! 

RECRUITMENT ; 

j E8£00 + bonus 20+. ! 
I No shorthand Hut auto and WP 1 
: ftrel Won! Star) reourwj b assist 
newly women Personnel Han- j 


ajHwffl day to nay ceouaranl 
tundnns of tte young fast ! 
Wl Marajpmeo! 


exaa atog 

Co n suttancy 


telephone manner and wdl oiganised administrattve 
skills. Minimum age 25. Salary £8-10.000 aae. 
Please apply with CV and fetter of application ta 
Jill Hacket, Monty Don lid. 

46 Oxford Street London. WIN 9FJ. 


SCOPE FOR 
DEVELOPMENT 


SOUND AND 
VISION 

£7,500+ 19+ 

Surasslul ritorannents concern 
based n West London Studio 
ireentfy ware a hytwr-actwe ad 
rounde r wtti flood shonband 
tyjwvj and meet modern 
appearance tnjomtfter busy tssro. . 


non caB Uadi McLeod m 
01-439 3*54 
{01-439 0UZ (24 boot) 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

RECEPTIONIST 


BnflM. enttaaoK secretary. 16 to 21. with ensdent base sfclls recueed 
tor am fxSnp Covsrt Garden adwrt omp/PB agency No shordand re- 
qwed tu audio - typng and word processing essermri. Very good 
prospects tor a wdtog (eemer Satey nagounte- EB.000 plus. 


16-la three he I 


Far terftsr information please csetact 
KnM Man or tea WBson oo 01-379 3234 


Required for a very busy Estate Agents in the 
Village. Musi be an excellent typist and be able 

to work a frantic switchboard simultaneously. 
A sense of humour and ability to woric under 
pressure essential. Salary in excess of £7,000 pa 
with reviews and bonus scheme. 

Ring Ref. NJC - 01 584 6106. 


kexmcm. sccnrrM( 

WlroualvSI Lnxnenrcd. ml 
craMy YKTir nurv tnnninq. For 
qvrwnvlom Good ihorttund 
escftld Musi tu\P SCTrsc of 
Humour and Ik- rota] ly unriap 
paMe Rind 7179 


FBCNCM SPAMStH mwttI * y lor 
InilradindCo Outqatnd pvnon 
aULy and lean sWnl ea lor M 
lUilv voting dept. English S/H 
only £9 r<J0 aac Mcrrow Ejnp 
A os i me language Specialism 
Ol 63e l-»87 


BOOKKEEPER fov Bimlrn 
Champers, rempie cXtl.OOO. 
2fr* Some Typin') and Telex. 
Belle Blip Agv -W 4665 


ESTATE A CENTS Wl BrWil. 

itruiikr. hnurty organisca and 
molualed swrrury rea muned 
l or buss luph tech olfKe wllh 
denMnding young saw-t Team. 
Hard work but clrould He dm 
Tniw. to sun. Stuart Wilson Ol 
72d 0241 


EXECUTIVE SECRET ART/P A 

c LIQ.OOO* borne and STL Wc 

m -at a Wfgirl liteiy secretary 
•coking ub iniahemnltl and ci- 
mt prospects, lo torn a super 
raunq VKc pmUml in our 
presOwous Morkrtmg Croup la 
fh' Wed End Superb condi- 
lions, dealing moxnty with 
European clients A overseas 
prok’cM. lon*r> useful, or IBM 
K’/WPcxp RiogCoUedatsOl 
485 4011 


KMtLEY STREET Part lime med 
■cal secretary reounvd. Hours 
to- neg Non-wnoser Ol 9X. 
979i 


IXCAJL EAGLES’ El 0.000 many 
oppommibes In one a I 

London s WodUig Law rums for 
e»P sec's in conveyancing plus 
conmicrcwl law. Don't delay 
phone us today Tel to Of 491 
3928 DMA AGY 


SECRETAHY 

£7, «!0 

far Imematrwsi Catering 
Co. based m W. London, 
at outgoing person wWi 
good telephone manner 
and accurate typing. Soto 
S/H rea UflfflfT. 
Cafl 

Wcbtob A p p ofartmeNs 
on 01-37B 1562. 


Richard Hewlett Gallery 

FINE ANTIQUE PRINTS AND MAPS 


presents 

An Exhibition of Victorian and 
Edwardian Watercoloms ana 
OH Paintings 
15th-29th November 


24 Gale Street, Cftebes Green, London SW3 3QU 
01-584 8531 






h 




BS5LRR: coloured copper plate engraving 

Pifotished Oenoeuy, 1613 


Monday to Friday 9 JO ajn.-6JX) pja, Satonfay 10B0 aAD.*L00 jun. 


96 Page Coloor catalogue arvaij^jte at a cost of 
£5 DO and £&50 overseas apply to:- 

Ric James, The Priory. Station Rd 
Bishops Qeeve Cheltenham. Glos. 

Tel: 0242673226 

All paintings are available for purchase subject 
to prior sale. 


OLD WRISTWATCHES WANTED 



ROLEX 
PRINCE 
18 ct £1,200 
9ct £800 
Silver £500 
Steel £3 OO 


JAEGER 
REVERSO 
18ct £900 
9ct £500 
Steel £200 




CARTIER 


1 8ct £1.000 


PATEK 

PHILIPPE 

Moonphase 

£3.000 

Chronograph 

£1.500 


Fumitnre, lace, jewelleiy, poredain, silver, 
books eic. 

Mejor new stall extenstion now complete. 

13-25 Church Street, 

London NW8 

A few rmite still availahle. 
Enquiries tel 01-723 6066 


AM59CAH BUYERS SSX 


Alt other Rolex/Quality Watches Wanted. 
Tgftt ^mta ge ^atc^ C ompany 

»w>«Pto> rerISBS»Ttofi??S«^». iwtoi m mHimu, 



rUASE IBBWtt »« YATSI. m 3U13I 


iree Sritate*. 117 taM 
tredM M 7UL Tri 812* 
(Mm ia Haw Turk} 



ANTIQUITIES 
Anduit Greek 
Egyptian 
Roman 
Anglo Saxon , 
Medieval 


MU. el tnsmuforaJ Equities lean 
requires a cate-mndeC PA/Sec- 
ret ay. Darapd ng aid varied wort 
to sacrutt^irg en wonront *tvdi 
THjncs good organtsanrai sSafc 
md an werness to taan the tasi- 
nBS. WPexperimce desnole. 

Salary £10,000 plus benefits. 

C.V. ur 


Illustrated sales 
catalogue 

Vincent McCarthy, ADA 
165 Dimond Road 
Bitterne, 
Soathamptoa 
0703 583766 i 


INVESTMENT 

STOCK 

Sen/ Person carpels & rugs 
indnding Kasfaan. Tabriz. 
Estohan and Mabycr. 
Escdkaf prices. 
Telcpheoe after 6pa 
0903213378. 


FREE STAMP 
VALUATIONS 


For sale through our auc- 
tion or Private Treaty 
Sales without chaise or 
obligation to sett. We are 


pr e pare d to navel to your 
' home. Write or ldephooe 


BFTM L 08 SE 6IU1BBES 


for free brochure. 
PLUMRIDGE & CO 

(Est-JSSB) 

. 6, Adorn Street Strand. 
London. WC2N 6AA. 
TWc 01-338 8694/0339 


KELVEDON 
ANTIQUES CENTRE 

130 High Street. 
Ketvcdoa. Bmwx 
t *n AH tom t Otrirofard 
aadCnkhmrri 

w. matay. tatoM. boa. corn*, 
tarn, to 0a W nn ctatOKStens. 
Uma cpra MowSm. HTSpn 

' lotbir two bj aral 
Trlipboni 0378 70800 
(centre) or 0206 973638 


ROCKING CHAIRS 
AND CHURCH 
PEWS. 


ftcraT7& aerate VAT 
MMarnplmy n nock b redo 




rrwmttiK. 

8L4JP&71 


' ^ ,-r - , 


JEWELLERY TO 
SELL? 

non MaBMwd f*n>r |enw 


Avannq House, fae wi lottivtif. 

©oucesleTtoe GU 0*1 

TOtoOonrr ttStwaTti (945 333) 

«xa . 

THE rOflft TOUCH 

1963. and (neattfl. uaunsfews 
and d to U P to wenen 
artets 


[ancient rings 

[The Gidbou Co&eefaoo cate- 


an 


logued by Seyropnr de RkriJ 
in a Enuted edttion of 2001 


fafrzs 


(ewtkery no aMaw rarnage 
dodw id add too* wad and 


0 ■ E ar^r , ■ 

Tet 01 483 5937. 


MUm*n 2 sn Tuesday 
istti Noi'oitor. The Snencer 
CoMcunef itUHM itoicrii- 

lury ruRdture. vroodwark. 

iwoiw*. tenure and rwge. 
Catalogues S3 town 
HoUmemy"*. 12 Higii StmrL 
StreaUcy ROB 9HY. Tel: 0491 
072318. 


CASH IN OH 
HIGH PRICES 

by se*ng wi 
Jovretenr^toktCoins etc 

EJUBE 

Roar ol 24 BaNn Qvfca. 
towloo a 1H88Q 

01242 3151 


copies, Para, 1912. An on- 
larged faesunite of this tare 
wtA. tot aai plates, boond, 
linritnd to 350 copies only, of- 
fered for Bale at £50 per copy. 

0932-225612 

Trcdc enquiries invited. 


)UAUTY VETTED DATEUNED 


Antiques Fair 


I KINGSLEY AMIS 


The Old Devfc Booker 
prize winner. 250-copies 
ratly. Speciafly bound sig- 
ned first edDon. £25. 


Stoke Rochford Hall 

OAfeH sign posted) 

November 14-16, 1986 

Fri: lpra-tipni, Sai: llain-6pin, Sun: llam-5pm 


WANTED Edwardian. Victorian 
and Ml nomad lamRure. Mr 
ANdan Ol 947 694*. 667-609 

OarTon Lone. Carttftoid. SW17. 


■U WWT UNTO Edition Brtnls; | 
Freer Van .-Lev el Crocsdnfl. Ref- 
wnw unrary. ana oihere Brel 
offer, Tet: (03291 4 SMI 


London Ltd Editions, 
30 Long Acre, WC2. 



01-836 0723 


PRIVATE owner, seeks contact 
wilti Americ a n Amc.MiiMMl 
in coaecting Htstoncal Engutn 
Docuroents. C09 7 30780 
PRIVATE COLLECTION. SMe. 
Onenial artV crafts/ anUgues. 
mcl old /ovaneM puppets no • 
£600 per llcms Ol 883 9949. 
RUSSELL FLINT signed vtu 
proof. Unseen TarvrT £850 
, goo. TH. (09051 61221. 
WANTED MarWe llreptoces any 
condition AHo Iran and tiled 
grows. 01 301 5641 anytime 


30 FT BANQUET Table. Fine five 
pedestal mahogany uHt CISSO 
ansmswide. 2 D ends. 3 centre 
sections. 4 extra leaves. Good 
useable condition but Ms had 
some UMrtentKe. £ 18.000 
ov no. Reply to BOX MB. 


1870. brato inlay. Ormvhi dec- 
oration. 72 In. wide. 42 In. 
high Imeamenl? £060 00 ooo 
Ol 43S 6777 


I ' H P T O CHAPHI CoQectkm of 
1000 old oraUc Photos isome 
VtdorLm. same 30s/40si plus 
few old glass negatives. Imo- 

rant vendor suggests £1600 or 
bonfire Any offers? Reply » 

BOX ML 

MAPS COLLECTOR wishes to 
purchase pm 19U\ century and 
19U, century maps of South Af- 
rica. Eh*. Ceylon. Australia 
and Seychelles. Telephone 01 
730 07676. 


ROBERT BAILEY 

TELEPHONE: 01-550 5435 - 


I FAIRS 


Satariay November 22ad 
. Battenra Tam HoB 
Lreeaicr HBLSW11 
10J6m»-43apm 
(Trade 8am) 
Soiarday November 29tk 


WAKEFIELD 
ANTIQUES FAIRS 

MsNdber Mb 

THE fiOEBNUT. MO Lordn tool. N«a 
tUbto K«LrtQ aa«fci 
swofe m NwaHEB 
KHUW wra. Ext ensteu 
WSreot ozandtl 

saaatr tm ibmw 

ML BUBS «Bi b Ltton 


Jour n a 


Please contact W. Hoad. 9 W 
Peters Rd. tOrklry. L ows so n 
NR3S OLH. 0600 S77C8 


opn un e ra N the cons odnq of the 
1st European Parttamant 1979. 
Limned addtoon no 3 of 500. 
0278 T&06&O 


Centra. Nortb Choc. 

Crawley. 

Mm -5pm (Trade 9am) 


WHKEHHD WnaOEI FMB 


Bsdwdw. RmL (KM) 1Z3K1 


PUBLISHING CO. 

£7,000 p^- 

bUBmadonal PubNsMng Co. 

req i sec/rec dealing with 
ctents. companies and 
administration. 

■ Exceflent tsieotone 
mawiBf with capable, 
outgoing personatty 
to»SSl19+. 

Cafl 


HEXAGON 

Require an expoienced 


Recejjtwnst/Tefcptionisi for 
our busy HlobgatB BMW 
Showrooms. You wdi be over 
21. enthusiastic, sett 
motivated and capable of 
joining our energetic sales 
team in a lively working 
environment Salary 
negotiable. 


SUPEBTRAVEL 
STEALS SUPffi SEC 

' bo w need nobceam %rer Seq 


PA to wrt entoft for Putner hi 
ctwflt <t nor spuffhed* lid namr 
rarnmero al OBBTOaem 2 rons waft 


fnvn rtorods Ktdy mdto aus WP. 
Stray a*. 

FMBMSTEAB 3 BLYH 
01 501 3817 BN A 
No Agendas 


£1X300 - Legal audio secretary, 
mid 20 V. with WP experience 
for EGO 30 bettors. CaB 01-377 
8 WO iCHvl or Ol 439 7001 
(West End) SECRETARIES 
PLUS ttto Secretarial 

Constdttoit s. 

PHHIWNTI Young secretary to 
wort oi the pmannel dart at 
lh» eeueytionally surcuafii) M ■ 
vwttouw agency. 5&-t- tynng 
Sal cJSLBOO. Please contact Oc- 
tavta at BJ Crawfords CRrc 
Cons! on 936 9693 



Monroe Appoi aim site 
n 01*370 1562. 


Inrbafiy piease contact 
Kami M 01-348 5151 


NON-SECRETAMAL 


ART 

GALLERY 
ST JAMES'S 


Young versatile 
secretary tot . 
responsible position to 
small firm. Accurate 
typing and shorthand 
essential. 


FILM BUYING PA Start your ca- 
reer In Wwawi axstoUng In 
buytsg material lor Bit a motor 
T\ cnanneL You win llotae 
with todependent production 
comsamre and am lo an 
aspects of an exciting tuncWo. 
Wiui Ibc vcope to become In- 
vMicd m prou and Mdmctiy 
acnxiure. there wtu be lota of 
vorUEV Skllb 90/55 warn. Sal- 
ary: £9748 pa Synergy, the 
recmumeol consuttancy. Ot ■ 
637 9633 . . 


P PU OtO m ASSISTANT. Inter 
renng ponarau herpmg ro racndl 
graduates for urge IMernallon- 
« Go. £6200(3 rnceith review). 
60+ typmg. prospects and ». 
votvemam guaranteed man 
Phone Sarah for an taamcdiale 
Interview. M aqi rreUge Ree 
Cora *39-2308. 

COLLIDE LEAVER I9tUi or rata, 
ocpencncv. rusty sh/hana. 
9bod typmer for diaottc but ex- 
ottno NW6 magazine 
production deni. ci7.000 oh + 
eweBent pro m tc ti Joyce ' 
Oulnre Ol 089 0807/0010 I 
fBec Cons) . 


CAREER OPPORTUNITY 
SMART WELL SPOKEN 
AMBITIOUS YOUNG LADY 


required far small friendly sales co near Victoria Stn/Rmlrco. 
Mbs hav e sale s ezjjcneivcc to assja custcnncrs on irirphonc 
saa to UKhrnxrms. Good lenmnavtioa portage A bto mki i 
lor lia ri l ipg i coascicgrioos person who warns a career in a 
young expanding co. 


Telephone 01-821 3485 


pip3o«aaa/877i 


flUDfT Prmclt and ir«> K» fra»- prakYO. Lang, useful, or IBM 
rtf Cl 2.000 join uus Ian at* K’/WPexp RingCmUeda»oi 
roaituny secretary W lh>-lr 485 401 1 
IHJefl chairman. You Should 
hate no tire j* you will be ex " 

pectcd to travel Wllh lam lo 

Eurup,- oh orrMons. 1'cu CDHWAN SPK SEC iCngUsh M/T 


should be VtoV wrtl prncnlcd 
will) LXi/50 stollv Please toto- 
phone OJ 240 351 1/3531 
iwrei End i or OX ^*0 3801 
< 0 ( 11 . EhnJicth Hunt Recruit, 
men! ComuUonH 
SHOWROOM Sec cCS.OOO well 
educated and well prreenMd see 
TOuuhl by International rmmu- 
nv siiuniml in SWI Suit 
praresHanoi 2nd »bocr 
vwrrhond r«w«wJ Knowledge 
of WordStar wp resenbel 
BnwiL arncutate pereooaitty (o 
v-ork a- ruut or miegral team 
w-ithin inn -xvfrj/i company 
Accurate bmnq 50 worn re. 
uureied tonose call 01-409 
1232 The Wort Shop 


sumurdi for Director of 
frntol Dept trt bit Co Relevanl 
exp + S/H preferable bul not 
eweniul lor lhr» lntemttng and 
rrepomtoh? ppalKm £&£ 0 O 
oae For donate’ Morrow Emp 
'The Lo ng u o gr SprcUnbl 
01 1407 


see.’ PR ASStST/Urr For Beau 
ly/ CasnKim comusv. )ou 
could ploy an iraport.m! rote m 
I he PR and AdceHruno nf Ihn 
smalt tall expanding company 
which is Pari ol a nutor infer 
lutxxtal ole A -eiter ol humour 
and praletWMUl. fncndlv man 
wr ore rwelni .<» ini mu 

deal comlanlty with nwganiiK 
and members ol the putitac and 
wnie your own pro* rcleasre. 
Speed-L 100/60. Saury C7.SOJ- 
£10.000. age 20+ Flnrew Ap- 
pamintcnb Ltd Ot 256 7261. i 
(tec Coral 

MOHLY dynamic young oiack 


FOSMON No -Jiot litond £10.000 
The manager ol ihe torpor ale 
planmng department Of this 

cum pony Closely affiliated to 

uw fotfuon industry k mtUm a 
senior tod PA. Uucaied to A 
level sumtard and wllh 5 years 
experience, yon wtU be dCWB a t- 
tng ro a minor yeemary and 
in-Quenlli mdmno me fort. In 
addilmn you will IK« lo be 
able to deal will) your own car- 
respotMence and iuir strong 
organ isabonal and ccenmunica 
lion stills Age 38+. V3 wptn 
ivnmq & WP Telephone Carol 
Inq King Appto- Ol 499 0070 


LONS TERM TEMP - £10.000 
The bueraatMitai arm W Exec- 
ullve Serrn treed an excel ten! 
PA wllh book keeping expert 
rncr lo tout than lor a run 
month roturacl. You sbaidd ro- 
m organising, have oxt oki B 
sktlls and prcfrraMy a Scaadl 
naiian language. Ago 28. Skills 
80/60 ■» wp West Ena office 
Ol -629 9606 'Rec COB) 
PERSONNEL ASSISTANT igy 
c.CB.500 Lwemional appartu. 
roly lo are into the bm maxing 
world of High Street fashion. 
An outgoing personality ana in- 
lerrei in WP a must. Pleasv 
contort Joanne Gregory. La 
Creme Rec Cans 01-191 i860. 


FASHION WRecrORSSMi W I 

£9.000 «u* many bewflta. o 
you naxe ■ytod Nt/gw ra i a n d 

«e KtoKirig fpr a lob wWi C3UW 
prospects then «|1 iWJV 
phone us today. Tel Jo Ol 491 
2928 OHA ACY 


NO SnONTHA»1 C10800. If 
you haxe good audla abuny ana 

would Uke to work® toe centre 
of the West End Uistiour cuenL 
a top nrm at management cori- 
suoante. would Dte to meet 
you. VouTl be PA to a muqt 
ewcudxp and «nli need to to a 
good ammiwstrawr aod «w 


PiBBaaw legal firm offers tot- 
oinsitc surroundiogs to 
exchange for curse breaento- 
' cton and efftdem monagemeiu 
at conference rooms Call Bos 
at Ritz Reuuttmenl 626-1318. 
SECOM> JOUUCII or CoOege leav- 
er lor cnarrmara office of 
Nailonal newspaper. Salary to 
£7.600. age IB plin Shorthand 
and tymng necessary. Gnreer 
posuton STOCKTON AS60- 
CZATESReCCONOl 7540446 
TRAINEE Sales neg/ser fur Estate 
Agency would sun bnmu cai- 
tage teoxyr living In Wes 
London Good accurate typmg 
suite, sot cx&ooo Please con 
loci Orta via a! BJ Crawfords 
<Rec Coral 935 9692 
RMD RAISING smOTMT to 
become Involved in motor 
events o 4 wt chanty. Audio + 
rusty SH. win tram on wp. Age 
- 3955. £8.000 Woodtmao Rec 
Cora 01 -404 4646 


’M f T nTT 


TO SPEARHEAD REVITALISED 
SALES TEAM 


lif ial h 


raBUSMNC A young PA k sort PERSONAL ASSISTANT wilt, 


working very much on y«r J TCL/AEC/TYP Hr aws rerty 


thinker sought by inrx superb 
PR company. Piraentabons- 
prey, retoasre. rftenl uod rnedu 
barton fin a I jm- moving role 
workmn on lop Mn» accoune 
okmgMde two voung Hemaiei 
itoriilnrt Stunning WM End 
offices Benefits me men! 
bon rare obd dterounl on ellcnl 
products. Work cxpenMice 
muested Cood shoruund / 
typing resrnliid Salary lo 

16 500 Find out more on Ol- 
409 1357 The kgrt Shop. 

CONFERENCE CtMJRWMATOR 
This roint OPP offers Ids « 
scope to handle year own range 
of ranferoncei and octaWuona. 
Dculutg wnh all aspects ol exeiM 
orgaunalion and admut. you 
Will be dex doping a iwn-jac- ca- 
reer Tynng ai to rea d 
for your own use. Saury to 
110.500 pa Syncmy. me re. 
rruilment ccnsuuancv 01-63? 
9535 


NO SHORTHARO - Markrllng 
Director Secretary Great to- 
rteiy. tote or admm and lots ot 
Iptepboue enguinn to handle, 
for lira prmligHnte hKlitute 
rinse lo Piccadilly £9.000 Call 
Ol 377 0600 (Otyl OT Ol 459 
7001 'Wca End i SECRET A R 
IES PLL S Ihe Secretarial 
Cantuitante 


TRAM mio legal te sto.ooo *hte I j^DMIN SEC 3t>45Kh tor SW I 


«v a tnaltemnnq rote to a 
fHOqiTVJip hsHl dart for a 

bnaM. ctcvfidrnl and profes- 
sional un cun Our ciicm. a 
Uxrsi nbgrlbnq restaurants 

group, needs, your presence of 
mind, common sense, uuhaflite 
and excellent audio skills In- 
intim.ienl and rt) arxetotiiiicni 
wured Previous legal eitoeO 
eoee ihk esactiiuf piease icioi 
409 1ES2 The Wort Shoe 


SctenldK arganeolion. SkilV | 
8 C/6Q capacity to radrdinate ; 
dceraU work nor* and deal wllh 
remru. comrnilRra and paper 
flow] c. £9.000 s- extra note, 
and early review. Jo »C«* 
tannest 01 509 8907/0010 
iRec Conti. 

OtiRMAN/KMCUSK exp PA 30*. 
b, Imoual SH OIV KIBjODO. 
Language SlaU Agy 4666922. 


by Ihrt totabng prewipr raw- 
zurc putatswr to function 
wiiMn flic Cnauman'4 suite In. 
xolved in a fngh level rote, vou 
win nave iota of osn» to bro a de n 
sour exp and to make a very 
worthwhile nmlrtButagi. Skills 
90/50 worn Salary, to £8500 
pa. Synergy- lb* recrouniera 
consultancy. 01*37 9533 


lo C9.900 * Bonus. PrrtmtaouL 
■nb mar tonal firm of cmcuHw 
wared ronumnb needs an 
exaermced oenon for iheir 
iniKtibun) Oubre include 


qreeiing csilort and uroenng 
taxis and couriers. Age 2S-MI. 
Smart appearance. superb 
offices Plrrar call 434 4 613 
Crone Corktull RerruitninU 
Consultants 

Stair ARKS FOR ARCHI- 
TECTS A Designer* 

Pen nine ! A te mpo ra ry 

pramora. amsa Spcctmta Re. 
reurtmnu Consultant? Ot 734 
K1S> 


SH/tj-ping arm wp or cmnput- 
ii»9 starts tor motor Co it. 
Bishops Stortftnd area £9.000 
* free lunch Can Ol 37? 8600 
•cary i or oiajg 7O0i iwey 
EndiSECRET ARIES PLLS ■ me 
Secretarial Consultant!. 

ABHOR SECRETARY - ,-xce H em 
ypornatify to work alongside 
the cuairmant Secretary in on 
reroanditig investment Co. in 
B eorti e. street, wi Great van. 
enl7.opiy.ii7J 00 cau 01-377 I 
8600 iCityl or 01-439 7001 
iteest End! SECRETARIES 
RLCS ihe Secretarial 

mj mull unis 


own tin hoove w artuiy need- 
«j. Benefits include «««• 

yearly ntary review. Plear 

2*0 Mllflg; 
i West End) or 0» 340 3861 
ICityl. Eizsbech Hum Remit 
mem Oarauliano. 


30’s fra SW3 based H.Q. of mo- 
tor tmetnabonai co. Cducanoii 
presentation, fftoe telex lo cope 
with fast moving scene! 
c £10 030 h + fnnge Mocftte. 
Jey« Ouum 01 889 

8807/0010 I Ree const. 


-JOHN H JAMES & TUFNELLS offer a chaltenging opportunity for an 
ambitious and dynamic person to become MANAGER of their Elizabeth 
Street office spearheading a revitalised sties team. 

JOHN H JAMES & CO who recently acquired TUFNELLS are currently 
the second largest independent firm of estate agents in the Country, 
now wish further to expand their already considerable and highly suc- 
cessful residential and commercial business in London. . 


°fder 


EXMBmONS PA Start your Ca- 1 AOVOtTBOtC and Pitauc Rata- 


rrer in Ihe eatobibmt field w*n 
this kaoutg cootpany As you 
asasi in orgmusutg ovrreeos 
events, you “U °* 9«mn9 «*» 
to a find whan trwwrortate 
leads lo a noirscc CPtrr • Sjan» 
9O/G0 wpm Salary to 03000 
pa + nr nencfiB. Wnciw- R* 
zecrultmeni consultancy. 01 - 
637 9533. 


NEW Jobs tartore Xrwfl Can GRADUATE SOUGHT to asw 


now on Ol 5t B 5050 lor 
wmor/ftHitar posJttons. Sol 
rjnops t6.000.ci0.00o Open 
Mon a Thun, until 8nn>. Rec 
Con* 

MARKETRce HCS M major hr- 
tec Co needs litely »« tor busy 
solaemironRRnl. No SH. will 
W Irate ££9.000 LBVK 

APPOINTMENTS 846-0743. 


Ste banco) Anaiyxi within a 
toghfv sueewsfuf fi rm of m>rat - 
meut monogen In EC3 Degree 
in Statnfm. Economics or 
MaUtemouc rranred. plus *ec- 
retanal WWW 
A«> 2025. 9 305.50 

Ctl 1.000 ♦ bomn Ptaore ran 
S88333E Crone CorkUl Rr- 
aiallTWTrt Ooraullanta. 


bora. Carcanvo secretaries for 
Htah ProtOr opemngs with (he 

bop nanm to rommumranous 

£aoOO£iQ^JOO+ Cavan Oar 
dm Bureau. 110 FTO« St. EC4 

•aaa 7Mb 

RUBUCnr Atorttani/Secretan' 

Kallaway. KMbng Arte 

Sponsfrsjnp cnnwttancy re* 
autre a sccreury/aurManl. for 
tnor Press and taiBbcuy Man- 
ager EnQiusiasm. excebest 
typing and tetephonc ntartoer 
mmiia. The ton metuoea goi- 
n* other dobra word 
processing (experience m*. 
lerran and working n Backup 
to the bray nieb managteTtetit 
team Detaltv- Kaltaway Lid 2 
Portland Rd. London Wll 4LA 
iTef Ol 221 7983). 


The successful applicant n likely to be aged 25-36, of good education 
and with a proven record Ir the London market A top salary and a 
stimulating incentive commission scheme are available together with 
other benefits and expenses. 


This post is open to existing managers and highly successful 
negotiators. 


Apply in writing giving full details of past experience to 

C J K Foxdhain, MJL, FRIC&, . 

2& Elizabeth Street, London SW1W 9RF. 

01-730 9112 



A 



YACHTING; SURPBI! 


- WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


IR STARS AND STRIPES AS WHITE CRUSADER SHOWS IMPROVEMENT 


SPORT/LAW 


- \ 






Important victory for Cudmore 


MODERN 


PENTATHLON 



m 


: 

; 


From Keith Wheatley 
Fremantle 

_ In the biggest' 
upset for some 
r *:■ weeks in the 
^America's Cup 
elimination se- 
lies. White Cru- 
sader beat Stars and Stripes by 

over two minutes on a short- 
ened course. The win is an 
important pyschofogicaj vic- 
tory for the British who have 
beat struggling against a re- 
cent run. of baa lode. “We’re 
pretty pleased.” said Ptril 
Crebbin, alte rnate skipper a wl 
technical director with the 
British syndicate. “It was ti gh t 
conditions but not fluky and 
we beat them on pure boat 
speed.” ■ 

The races did not start until 
nearly 4.0 p.m. local time. 
Race officials waited for the 
morning easterly to die away 
and there was then a consid- 
erable delay waiting for the 
'Fremantle Doctor’ to pay his 
call When the breeze came it 
was a light but consistent 10 
knots from the south south 
west In the soft conditions, 
neither skipper was going to 
try and mix it before the start 
With two minutes to the gu n 
both boats hung almost 
motionless just seconds from 
the line. At the gun Cudmore 
and Dennis Conner were both 
heading for the pin; White 
Crusader' to windward, the 
American yacht crossing one 
second later hut sailing foster. 

Cudmore always knew 
where he wanted to be; the 
right-hand ride of the course 
where a flesh breeze might 
come off nearby Rottnest 
Island. White Crusader tacked 
over on to port and began a 
long drag out to the starboard 
lay line. Conner came over to 
take a look once or twice (rat 
backed off short of a cross and 
returned to look for a lift down 
to the south. It was a day when 
one little wind shift would 
settle the big race. 

Crebbin estimated that 
White Crusader actually gave 
away around IS seconds on 
the first leg through 
oveistanding the mar k. “In a 
sense we were surprised at 
how fast she was. The bad luck 
and gear failure of the last few 
days have obscured how much 


-S - AMERICAN 

" •: FOOTBALL 

; Browns prevail 
; In battle of 
| the gunslingers 

‘ In a dud of the bazooka- 
- armed quarterbacks. Beanie 
. . * •*> \\ Kosar, of the Cleveland 
S y.iC ’. Browns, outpassed Dan Mari- 
'’S* . no, of the Miami Dolphins, 

• -401 yards to 295 on Monday 

*- * night, and the Browns pre- 
i' vailed 26-16 in Cleveland 

- * (Robert Kiriey writes). 

. Kosar became the first quar- 

terback in National Football 

* League history to pass for 400 

- ' yards and not complete a 

* touchdown strike. Hairy Holt 
\ and Curtis Dickey, a former 
’ world-class sprinter, each ran 
> for a touchdown and Matt 
; . Bahr added four field goals as 

* Cleveland, who have won six 
I of their last seven games, 
■ moved into first place in the 

. AFC Central division. 



Cudmore: In confident mood before beating off the rhaHengr from America’s Stars and Stripes by 2min 20sec yesterday 


better the boat is,” said 
Crebbin. 

Cudmore tacked on to star- 
board as soon as he was laying 
the top mark. Conner came 
across on port to try to 
intercept but was way too low. 
The two extra tacks be had to 
put in to round the mark 
accounted for the 44-second 
margin to White Crusader. 
The first two-thirds of the run 
was conservatively sailed but 
with a mile to go Conner 
gybed over and headed to the 
Penh shoreline. Cudmore 
covered him but as soon as 
White Crusader was able to 
lay the bottom mark gybed 
back and ran down. 

Inexplicably, Stars and 
Stripes stood on towards the 
sand dunes, looking like diffe 
in the late afternoon heat haze. 
When he brought the petrol- 
blue boat in to the mark she 
was just over lmin 17sec 
adrift. 

The final leg of die short- 
ened course was a classic 
tacking dud, over 50 between 
the two boats. Time and again 
Conner threw a lack at the 


White Crusader, always 
Cudmore responded with a 
half-minute delay and then 
went over himself The classic 
loose cover. Unless someone 
panics or something breaks, it 
is almost always the trailing 
boat that gives away time in a 
tacking dud. So it proved in 
this case. At the fin™ imp of 
the 10.6-nufe race White Cru- 
sader was ahead by 2mm and 
20sec. 

The British knew that their 


progressed, although the big- 
gest race was against the dock. 
With a time limit of five hours 
and 10 minutes ou the race. 
South Australia crossed the 
finish line with just over seven 
minutes to spare. It was the 
first win for south Australia in 
this series and jputs her in joint 
fourth place with Australia m, 
her sister-ship. 

“I really did like the initia- 
tive the crew showed today,” 
said South Australia's sailing 


you're showing some real 
s ucces s.” 

CHALLBK3ER SERES RESU 
French loss bt Italia. 1 min 39mc; 

New Zeeland tn USA. 1:25: 

America ft bt CtaSange France, atft 
White Crusader bl Stars end Stripes, 220; 
Eagle M Azzurra, I7sec 
Canada II M Heart ot America. 4.-05. 

CHALLENGERS' STANDINGS 

W L Pta 


and as ^body’s 


and position as everybody’s 
nap for the fourth semi-final 
berth meant little unless they 


genoa and set a drifting stay- 
sail. I sent them a message 


New Zealand 

America II 

San and Stripes . 
wrote Ciusader — 

French Kiss 

USA 

ttaha 

Eagle 

email 

Heart ol America. 

Azzurra 

Cttsflenge France . 


19 1 56 

IB 2 51 

17 S 41 

13 7 38 

10 10 35 

IS 7 33 

11 9 27 

7 13 24 

8 12 21 

S 15 13 

2 IB 6 

2 18 2 


uaui iwzuii uuic uiikm u»y -it., . „ n n . ,l. . 

could start winning against ^Q^fi^cally across the water 
r«nnJ Am JrTn nXiS ^ up it went then I did the 


Conner, America H and the 
Kiwis. They arc still fourth but 
foil they may have turned a 
comer. 

The other big stray of the 
day was South Australia beat- 
ing Australia IH. In the light 
breeze it took the two yachts 
an hour and three-quarters to 


and up it went then I did the 
same with a spinnaker and up 
that went too.” 

“They sailed the boat wefl 
all the time with a lot of 
concentration. Phil Thomp- 
son, our helmsman, made a 
very conscious effort to keep 
the boat high on the wind. I 
hope this is the b eginning of a 


reach the first weather mark — turn-around for us. We've 
where they were 2min 37s ec been on the ropes a bit It's a 


ahead. That margin did not 
vary much as the contest 


little bard to lake the hat 
around the sponsors unless 


TODAY'S RACES: USA v Cftatenge 
France; Canada B* Chacenoe Francs: 
New ZeMand v Hate; America fir Heart of 
America; Azzurra v French tGss: White 
Crusader v Eagle. 

DEFENDER SEMES RESULTS 
Koofca fore W tit Kookaburra IL Into 
34eac 

South Australia M Austma HI. 227 
AuetraBa IV bt *n' Kkfciey. 523. 

OCTOBER SELECTION STANDMGS 
W L pts 

Kookaburra n 11 1 15 

AuaratolV 10 2 14 

Kookaburra D 9 3 11 

Australia III - — 4 8 4 

Soulti Austrata 2 10 4 

Steak 'n Kidney 0 12 0 

TODAY'S RACES: « taM HI V Steak 
V Kidney: Austria IV v Kocfcatxrra I* 
South AushaSa v Kookaburra IL 


BOBSLEIGH 


Swiss knowhow powers new British sledges 


By Chris Moore 
Nick Phipps, • the British 
ch am p i o n, is eacpwrtng to raise 
more than a few eyebrows this 
week as - die world's . top 
bohslejghMS recaaveae la Can- 
ada afar the naamet recess for 
their first taste tf the action u 
the. newly coo s tmcted 1988 
Whiter Olympics bob track at 

‘lev ducts are that 
temperetares wffl be gpaag op as 
i well, partkufarty those fa the 
Swiss camp. Britain's team hare 
recently taken defray of &w 
new sieves, two tiro-man and 
two fom-mao, which when they 
are aareOed for the first time m 
public wfli, apart from their 
coiaar, resemble almost replicas 
of the enstom-huat Swiss 


That is not altogether sarpris- 
iug, coraadering they have been 
secretly des i g ne d and Mb hi 
Switzerland during die summer. 

The new bobs have been 
boagfat and paid for by Phipps’ 
baefcess, Alfied Sled, as part of 


a £100.000 two-year sponsor- 
ship w ith the teririefc 

tin hsWg fc • Aal yhHM, fca d ^ 

op Co the next Olympics. 

The Cardiff based company 
came to foe amdmfen at the end 
of last season that if you cannot 
beat them, join them. So they 
daaftkd a sufficiently juicy car- 
rat before one of the top Swiss 
constructor?, Qdtehard Fasser, 
a former world champion, who 
has dofy obliged and come np 
with the goods. 

The Swiss, together with foe 
East Germans, have in recent 
time s led th e way with the 
aerodynamic desi g n of the 
world's fastest bobs. In a spot 
where medals are invariably 
decided by lOOths of a second, n 

fastaf to give its crewTdecishe 
advantage over fomr rans. - 

Word is already on in 
Sw itzerland that the Brits have 
something resembfing a carton 
copy of thor own design. 
Britain's highly respected conn. 
Gin Caviezd, is the technical 


advisor to the sport's governing 
body, the Federation of Inter- 
national Bobsleighing and 

B^hlt Moritz, Caviezd 
paid a flying visit to Allied 
Steers headquarters last month 
fur the official announcement of 
their new tfe-np with the BBA. 
“These new bobs, without any 
doubt. should prove the best that 
Britain has ever had,” Caviezd 
said. “I don’t think Fasser is 
going to be too popular hade 
borne. But AM won’t concern 
him too much.” 

Fasser had previously loaned 
Phipps mm of his former sledges 
la last year's world champion- 
ships at Ktaigsee. There's no 
doubt oat new sledges are going 
to erase a bit of a stir,” Phipps 
said yesterday before flying out 
from Heathrow for Calgary. 
“Bat at the same time, they are 
going to lake some getting used 
to.” 

Phipps will again be 
partnered this season by brake- 
man Ahua Ceants, who helped 


him win Britain's first gold 
aiedal in the sport for 20 years in 
last winter’s World Cop two- 
man event at Cortina, Also on 
the transatlantic trammg trip to 
Calgary are Tom De La Ehmty, 
the 1983 British two-man cham- 
pion, and second-year driver 
Peter Bragnam. 

Stan Toot, Britain's other 
principal driver, is already in 
Innsbruck with his army crew 
p reparing for the British four- 
maa championships at Ig}s later 
in the month. 

The British two-man tide will 
be decided at Kftmgiwee dnriag 
the week following the opening 
international event of the season 
for the Veltins Cop at 
Winterberg from December 3, 
and which also incorporates the 
opening round of this season's 
World Cop. The world 
championships take place In St 
Moritz from January 6, followed 
by the European championships 
at Cortina where Pluppo and 
Cearns broke the track record 
last season. 


Poles took 
drugs at 
UK event 

By Michael Coleman 
Poland has aocepied that its 
three-man mam at the Bir- 
mingham international contest 
last June took drugs before the 
shooting event- An invitation to 
the Poles to witness the opening 
of the second sample taken at 
that event (known as the B) has 
been declined. 

This amounts to an ad- 
mission and means that all three 
athletes can expect severe pen- 
alties to be imposed when the 
executive of the sport's govern- 
ing body. the Union 
Internationale de Pentathlon 
Modeme et Biathlon (UIPMB). 
mwa in S tockholm on Novem- 
ber 24. 

The Warsaw authorities have 
been requested by the Modern 
Pentathlon Association of Great 
Britain to return the silver 
medals won by their team at the 
Birmingham contest which was 
sponsored by that city as part of 
the publicity for its Olympics 
bid. It was the m^jor event of 
the year outside t he world 
championships, attracting the 
top three m the sport: Starostin. 


I talian*. MassuOo and Masala. 

The three offenders were: 
piotr Maciaszczyk, who finished 
fourth overall, Zbigniew Szuba. 
who was sixth, and Slawomir 
Kopec, eleventh. All had high 
scores on the 25-metre pistol 
range, Maciaszczyk returning 
198 out of a possible 200, Szuba 
194 and Kopec 196. 

Each target score is worth 22 
points and many a modern 
pentathlon contest has been 
won or lost on the shooting 
range. The points to be gained 
are so precious that competitors 
have for decades been resorting 
to illegal nerve-steadying aids, 
such as alcohol, beta blockers 
and other sedatives. 

With Poland’s disqualifica- 
tion at Birmingham, the Italian 
B team moves op to the silver- 
medal position, Hungary to 
bronze and Britain to fourth. 
The Soviet Union won both tbe 
individual and team contest. 
Szuba later placed twelfth at the 
world championships in 
Montecatini Terra e, in Italy. 

Britain, a pioneer in the fight 
to stamp out drug abuse, took 
the unusual step at Birmingham 
of checking the breath. Mood 
anrt urine of all 46 competitors 
after the shooting. Two urine 
samples were taken, one of 
which, the A sample, was 
opened and checked at the Drug 
and Control Teaching Centre of 
Chelsea College, London. 

Where a positive reading was 
given, the athletes were in- 
formed through their associ- 
ation and invited to be present 
at the opening and testing of the 
B sample. Poland declined the 
invitatioo by telex and the B 
sam ple has remaine d sealed. 

Had the Poles cared to dispute 
the initial finding, the B sample 
would have been opened in their 
presence and. should the read- 
ing again be positive, they 
would have had the chance to 
explain the presence of the 
banned substance before the 
next meeting of the UIPMB’s 
executive board. Their decision 
not to challenge the Chelsea 
findings means they will accept 
whatever punishment the 
UIPMB cares to impose. The 
minimum sentence is a suspen- 
sion from competition for 30 
months. 

The disqualification of the 
entire Polish team supports tbe 
British view that the only way to 
root out the drag takers — and 
tbe team managers and coaches 
who condone it — is to check all 
competitors and not just the top 
four plus a random two others as 
is tbe current practice at world 
championships. 


Davies powers 
her way into 
the big league 


By John Hennessy 


It is dangerous to deal in 
absolutes where golf, and many 
another spore, is concerned. To 
identify any modern player as 
uniquely outstanding is to invite 
indignant correspondence, as 1 
recently discovered in overlook- 
ing tbe stature of Ronnie White 
among post-war amateur 
players. 

Bat one should be safe where 
Lawn Davies Is concerned, once 
organized women's professional 
golf is s&U in its infancy. The 
names of Joyce Wethered. Ce- 
dle Lettch, Diana Fish wick and 
others echo down tbe years in 
this country, bat they were not 
subjected to the same measur- 
able financial pressures as their 
modern counterparts- Their Irv- 
ing did not depend on this 
particular tee shot, that particu- 
lar honker stroke and the other 
particular part. 

Miss Davies, born in Cov- 
entry and brought up in Surrey, 
has achieved in only two years a 
string of records as a member of 
the Women's Professional Golf 
Association which stamp her as 
a woman apart. She was the first 
newcomer to finish top of the 
Sing & Brymer order of merit 
last yean she has retained that 
distinction with a blistering 
finish over the last five tour- 
naments of the season, and her 
prize money this year — £37,500 
— is a record, as are her four 
victories in the season. 

Nor is that aflL Her spectacu- 
lar 63 over the 5339-yard Haigh 
Hall coarse on the first day of 
the Greater Manchester Open is 
die lowest by two strokes, since 

the WPGA was set np in 1979 
aad her score in relation to par, 
nine under, is one stroke better 
than dm previous WPGA 
record. 

A personality to 
match her game 

Bat to see Miss Davies in 
terms of statistics is to overlook 
the whole point of her appeal. 
Even to enlarge the scope to 
incorporate her prodigious 
power of strike (she is now 
generally acknowledged as the 
Longest hitter foe women's gome 
has known, with a drive mea- 
sured at 304 yards at Haigh 
Hall) is still to miss an essential 
beet after character. 

She is not only a big woman 
with a big game, bet she is a big 
personality, unlike any that I 
can recall ia many years of golf 
watching. The nearest parallel 
would be Nancy Lopez, of the 
United Stales, but on a different 
leveL Miss Davies is the prettier 
but cast in rather too formidable 
a physical mould. Their smiling 


course personnae. reflecting 
their demeanour off ft, are much 
■like, though Miss Davies offers 
us the greater fascination of 
never knowing what she is going 
to do next, good or ill. in- 
tentional or otherwise. 

She has an unquenchable zest 
for adventure which coranra- 
nicates itself to ha game. On tbe 
morning of the third round of the 
last tournament rtf’ the season at 
La Manga Club, vital event 
though it was, she appeared with 
a stiff shoulder and cat leg, 
legacies of overnight essays into 
rounders and go-karting. The 
WPGA tennis (Durnaraent was a 
most, of course, and when a 
football match between cad d ies 
was in Ml swing on tbe only 
afternoon of rain in La Manga 
week, there she was under an 
umbrella to lead support to Tim 
Clark, her faithful Sancho 
Panza. 

She creates an 
air of expectancy 

She is 23 and has accumulated 
£59.236 of official prize mosey 
in two seasons, a queen’s ransom 
compared with the £2.494 won 
by Catherine Pantoo when the 
pioneers of the WPGA set sail 
into uncharted waters seven 
years ago. Miss Davies's 
£21,736 last year was topped up 
by £3,000 from Ring & Brymer 
and £7,000 from IBM, her 
sponsor. This year there is no 
IBM boons bat Ring & Brymer 
have come np with £5JMMk to be 
presented at a ceremony next 
Monday, to bring Miss Davies's 
total up to £42300. To think 
that two winters ago she was 
keeping body and soul together 
by working in a betting shop 

It was Miss Davies's greater 
powers of endurance that en- 
abled her to dislodge Lotto 
Neumann from foe top of the 
money list last mont h. She 
launched a hfovirig counter- 
attack by winning three of the 
last five tournaments, modestly 
the Greater Manchester Open, 
momentously the British Open 
and memorably foe Spanish 
Open. Thus she converted a 
deficit of £12,466 compared with 
the Swede into a winning margin 
of £494. 

It is no exaggeration tn say 
that she creates some of 
Ballesteros's air of awed expec- 
tancy. When she unsheathed her 
three-wood for the fearsome 
carry over tbe ravine and Sahara 
of that were meant to 
protect La Manga's 18th green, 
one was reminded of the same 
reaction to the Spaniard's bold 
attack da The BeffryTs lOthbole 
a few years ago. 


Law Report November 12 1986 


European Law Report 


Luxembourg 


Journalist can protect his source BL abused dominant market position 

A Rn4kt> 1 mihn^ nil- v fnannK- PndMirp nf ilnmmanl nmdtion fCctnluihnn cvclcm hnH hn>n nnHpf ihp Rrilict, niln it alnnf 


Maxwell v Pressdram Ltd and 

Another 

Before Lord Justice Kerr and 
Lord Justice Parker 
■ {Judgment November 1 1J 

For a journalist to be required 
to disclose his source of 
information the court bad to be 
satisfied that disclosure of tbe 
source was necessary in the 
technical sense of the admin- 
istration of justice. 

Tbe Court of Appeal dis- 
missed an interlocutory appeal 
by the plaintiff; Mr Robert 
Maxwell, from a ruling of Mr 
Justice Simon Brown pven on 
. November 10. Daring foe 
course of bearing Mr Maxwell s 
; libel action against the defen- 
, dams. Pressdram Ltd, and Mr 
Richard Ingram, the publishers 
! and the former editor respeo- 

- tively of Private Eye , the judge 
■ruled that the 

. article complained of, Mr Chris- 
topher Paul Victor Sylvester, 
land Mr Ingrams were not 
• obliged to disclose then; source 

- of information on which the 

article was based. . . . , 

Further, foe judge deaded 
that the disclosure would not. 


within section 10 of the Con- 
tempt of Court Act 1981, be 
necessary in the interests of 
justice. 

Mr Richard Hartley, QC and 
Mr Thomas Shields for Mr 
Maxwell; Mr Andrew Bateson, 
QC and Mr Desmond Browne 
for the defendants. 

LORD JUSTICE KERR said 
that the issue concerned the 
disclosures by journalists of 
their sources of information. It 
turned on section 10 of the 1981 
Act The words of the section 
“in the interests of justice” were 
given the meaning “in foe 
Kfhnicai sense of foe admin- 
istration of justice in the course 
oflegal proceedings in a court of 
law”: see Lord Diptock in 
Secretary of State for Defence v 
Guardian ' Newspapers Ltd 
([1985] AC 339, 350). 

Tbe article complained of 
smeared in Private Eye on July 
LL 1985. It alleged that Mr 
Maxwell was to finance Mr Neil 
Kitmock's trips to East Africa, 
Moscow and Central America. 
It also alleged that Mr Maxwell 
was doing that so as to be 
recommended for a peerage. 


Those allegations were denied 
by Mr Maxwell and Mr 
Kmoock’s press se c r et a ry in 
letters to Private Eye, Those 
letters and further allegations 
were published on July 26 in 
Private Eye. 

Mr Maxwell tried, unsuccess- 
fully, to obtain an injunction 
against the publication of foe 
second article.. The main basis 
for the refusal ai that stage of an 
injunction was that foe defen- 
dants were pleading justifica- 
tion. 

On July 24, 1985, the writ was 
issued, Mr Maxwell chiming 
exemplary damages. The 
defendants’ main defence had 
been justification. 

Dining the course of the trial 
which started on Monday, 
November X 1986, that plea 
was dropped. From the ev- 
idence riven by Mr Sylvester 
and Mr Ingrams it appeared that 
Mr Sylvester's informers were 
not going to give evidence. 

Mr Hartley applied, under 
section 10 of the 1981 Act, that 
Mr Ingrams and Mr Sylvester 
should be required to reveal foe 
names of those informers. 

Mr Justice Simon Brown 


rejected the application on the 
ground that be proposed to 
make strong comments in his 
summing tro and that foe public 
interest of non-disci osore of 
sources which underlay section 
10 should be regarded as 
outweighing the requirement in 
tbe interests of justice for those 
sources to named. 

Bearing in mind Lord 
Diplock’s observations in Sec- 
retary of State for Defence v 
Guardian Newspapers Ltd that 
“expediency, however great, is 
not enough; section 10 requires 
actual necessity to be estab- 
lished, and whether it has or not 
is a question of fact . . one 
had to identify the issues and 
then apply that test 

In view of all that happened 
here the judge was right in 
concluding tbai tbe only issue 
left was damages. He was right 
in thinking that h could be dealt 
with by strong summing up to 
the jury. 

Lord Justice Parker gave a 
concurring judgment. 

Solicitors: Nicholson, Gra- 
ham & Jones; Wright Webb 
Syren. 



i b 


Criminal bankruptcy Note on defendant’s 
order valid costs is incorrect 


Regina v PreCas 

Lord Lane, Lord Chief Jus- 
tice. said that a judge was 
entitled to make a criminal 
bankruptcy order against a con- 
victed defendant evro though 
no opportunity was afforaedfo 
counsel to address foe jud^ 
before it was made., . 

His Lordship, am « 

Court of Appeal with MrJusuce 
Taylor and Mr Justice Rose on 
November U, so Stated, when 
giving judgment dismissing an 
appeal against conviaion and 
sentence by Takis Prefes, a 
Siv^TagS 56. He con- 
victed ofarson of 
factory which rcqum*|L gj 
attention 40 firemen and ax fire 

engines. He was convtct^ai 

Kingston upon Thames Crcwn 
Court (Judge Figgis and ajuri) 
and sentenced to ax 
imprisonment and made subject 


to a criminal bankruptcy order 
for £797.000. 

The LORD CHIEF JUSTICE 
said that by section 40 of the 
Powers of Criminal Courts Act 
1973 no appeal lay against the 
making of a criminal bank- 
ruptcy older. 

Mr Howard Shaw, for foe 
appellant, endeavoured to es- 
cape from that difficulty by 
saying that the order was a 
nullity because the judge had 
not given counsel an opportu- 
nity to make submissions. 

However, it sufficed to say 
that that omission by foe judge 
did not come within a distance 
of making the order a nullity. 

His Lordship added that as a 
matter of common epunesy it 
would be advisable in fa rare if 
judges were to invite counsel to 
address them about the propri- 
ety of making such an order. . 


Goldsworthy v Brkkell and 

Another 

Note 62/2/46 in The Supreme 
Court -Practice 1SH15, to the effect 
that a Bullock order (ordering a 
plaintiff to pay a successful 
defendant's costs- but allowing 
the plaintiff to recover such 

costs from an unsuccessful 
defendant) would not be made 
where foe causes of action 
against tbe different defendants 
were separate and distinct or 
based on separate and distinct 
sets of facts, was incorrect. 

Mulready v J. H. & W. Bell 
Ltd Q19531 2 All ER 21 5) which 
it was claimed supported that 
proposition did non the de- 
cision in that case turned on 
very special circumstances. The 
court's discretion to award costs 
was. very wide: see Aiden Ship- 
ping Co Lid v Imerbulk Ltd 
(119861 2 WLR 1051). 


The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Parker, Lord Justice 
Nourse and Sir John Megaw) so 
stated on October 30 when 
making orders as to costs: see 
The Times, July 21. 

The Court made a Sanderson 
order requiring the first defen- 
dant to pay the costs of both foe 
plaintiff and the second 
defendant. 

Correction 

In yt’pkdey v Hyams ( The 
Times November II) the second 
paragraph of our summary of 
Lord Justice Ralph Gibson's 
judgment that the police officer 
mistakenly required the motor- 
ist then to provide a breath test 
should have read “Wood test” as 
the subsequent sentence made 
Wain. 


British Leylaad pic v Commis- 
smhi, Mersoa intervening 
Case 226/84 

Before Y. Galmot, President of 
the Fifth Chamber and Judges 
F. A. Schockweiler, U. Everting, 
R. Joliet and J. C Moitinho tie 
Almeida 

Advocate General M Damron 
(Opinion July 8) 

[Judgment November 1 1] 

By obstructing the 
reimportation into foe United 
Kingdom of left-hand drive 
Metro cars BL had abused a 
dominant position on foe mar- 
ket and had thereby infringed 
article 86 of the EEC Treaty. 

BL marketed its vehicles in 
Great Britain through a selec- 
tive distribution network. Out- 
side that network, however, a 
trade developed in the 
reimportation of Metro cars, 
mainly from Belgium, as a result 
of foe differences between tbe 
prices charged by BL in foe UK 
for right-hand drive vehicles 
and in foe Continental EEC 
member states for left-hand 
drive vehicles. 

in Great Britain a person 
seeking to register a vehicle far 
use on the roads had to produce 
a “certificate of conformity” 
certifying that the vehicle con- 
formed to a previously ap- 
proved vehicle type. 

Thai certificate was issued by 
foe manufacturer of foe vehicle 
on foe basis of a National Type 
Approval (NTA) Certificate 
which it had obtained from foe 
Department of Transport or, by 
the .bolder of a Primary 
Minister's Approval Certificate 
which could be obtained front 
the Department of Transport 
only if foe manufacturer pro- 
vided the necessary tec hn i c al 

information. 

By a decision of July 2. 1984 
the Commission found that BL 
had infringed Article S6 in three 
respects relating to that proce- 
dure and consequently imposed 
on BL a fine of350.000 ECU. 

British Leyland brought an 
action under article 173 of foe 
EEC Treaty seeking tbe annul- 
ment of that decision or. in the 
alternative, a reduction in the 
amount of the fine. 

In its judgment the Court of 
Justice of the European 
Communities (Fifth Chamber) 
held as follows 


Existence of dominant position 

In foe light of the British rules 
the relevant market was not that 
for the sale of vehicles, as BL 
had dairned, but a separate; 
ancillary market, namely that 
for services which were in 
practice indispensable for deal- 
ers who wished to sell foe 
vehicles manufactured by BL in 
a specific geographical area. 

Tbe British rules conferred on 
BL a form of administrative 
monopoly in foe relevant mar- 
ket and, with regard to foe issue 
of certificates of conformity, 
placed the dealers in a position 
of economic dependence which 
was characteristic of a dominant 
position. Consequently the 
applicant's submission that it 
did not occupy a dominant 
position was to be rejected. 

Abuse of dominant position 

According to foe Commission 
BL had abused that dominant 
position in three ways. In foe 
first place, in November 1981 it 
allowed foe NTA certificate for 
left-hand drive Metros which it 
bad obtained when that model 
was first marketed to expire. 

Second in certain cases, it 
refused to issue certificates of 
conformity for vehicles of that 
type which had been reimported 
from the Continent, although it 
was in a position to do so. 

Third, in other cases it 
charged an excessive fee for the 
issue of a certificate of 
conformity. 

(a) Non-renewal of NTA 
certificate 

By initially obtaining an NTA 
certificate for left-hand drive 
versions, BL had created a 
situation in which left-hand 
drive cars reimported from foe 
Continental EEC member states 
were sold in foe UK. As was 
dear from the minutes of its UK 
dealer council meetings, the 
only reason for the refusal to 

renew Ihe NTA certificate for 
left-hand drive Metros was BL's 
intention to impede 
reimportations and to protect its 
distribution network. 

BL could not rely on the 
selective distribution system 
which it operated in the UK in 
order to create barriers to foe 
reimportation of vehicles by 
independent dealers from other 
member states. 

lit any event the fact that BL's 


distribution system had been 
accepted by the Commission 
could not justify BL's abuse of 
its dominant position. 

Fora measure to be regarded 
as adversely affecting trade be- 
tween foe member stales it was 
not necessary to establish 
specifically what effects it bad at 
present on the volume of such 
trade. Acccording to the express 
wording of ankles 85 and 86 of 
foe EEC Treaty it was sufficient 
that the measure might affect 
trade between member states. 

It was indisputable that by 
making it impossible to register 
vehicles reimported on a 
commercial basis. BL was acting 
in a way liable to affect foe trade 
in such vehicles between tbe 
member states. 

It had therefore to be held 
that, by deciding to allow the 
NTA certificate for left-hand 
drive Metros to lapse in October 
198] with foe object of creating 
a barrier to reimportations, a 
lawful trade in which had been 
established following foe initial 
issue of an NTA certificate for 
that type of vehicle. BL bad 
abused the dominant position it 
held by virtue of foe British 
rules concerning registration. 

(b) Refusal to issue certificates 

Since BL had ceased 10 notify 
foe alterations made to its left- 
hand drive Metros in October 
1981. it could validly Issue 
certificates of conformity both 
for vehicles manufactured be- 
fore that date and for vehicles 
manufactured after that date to 
which no non-nolified alter- 
ations had been made. 

It was clear from an examina- 
tion of the applications submit- 
ted to BL by traders that, in at 
least four cases. BL mighr have 
concluded that foe cars con- 
cerned were still covered bv the 
NTA certificate. 

BL had given evasive replies, 
leaving the traders uncertain as 
to the formalities which had to 
be completed, so as to dis- 
courage them from re-importing 
vehicles. 

It was clear from BL's replies 
that il had deliberately refused, 
if not to issue the certificates of 
conformity which were perhaps 
not always clearly and expressly 
requested, at least to commu- 
nicate foe information and to 
provide foe services necessary 
for icgi&icriag the vehicle which. 


under the British rules, it alone 
was in a position to supply to foe 
dealers. 

It followed that BL's conduct 
could only be construed as foe 
manifestation of a deliberate 
intention on its part to create 
barriers to reimportations which 
came into competition with its 
approved distributors. That 
conduct was therefore to be 
regarded as an abuse of a 
dominant position. 

(c) Excessive nature of fees 
.As tbe Coun had beld in iis 
judgment in Case 26/75, Gen- 
era/ Motors v Commission 
([I975J EO* 1367). an under- 
taking abused its dominant 
position where it had an admin- 
istrative monopoly and charges 
for its services fees which were 
disproportionate to foe eco- 
nomic value of the service 
provided. 

BL itself admitted at foe 
hearing that the difference 
which existed at one time 
according to whether foe certifi- 
cate was requested by a dealer, 
who was charged £150. or b>* a 
private individual, who was 
charged only £100. was not 
based on foe cost but on the 
consideration that foe trader 
who was carrying out tbe trans- 
action for gain could expect to 
be required to pay a higher fee. 

The fact that the fee was first 
reduced to £100 and then £50. 
while for right-hand drive ve- 
hicles it remained at £25. also 
suggested that it was fixed solely 
with a view to making the 
reimportation of left-hand drive 
vehicles less attractive. 

In those circumstances the 
Commission was entitled to 
conclude that foe fee was fixed 
at a level which was clearft 
-disproportionate to foe eco- 
nomic value of the service 

provided and that the practice 
constituted an abuse by BL of 
the monopoly ii held by virtue 
of lhc British rules. 

The applicant's contentions 
that various principles of law 
had been breached and its claim 
in the alternative for a reduction 
of foe fine were rejected. 

On those grounds, the Coun 
(Fifth Chamber): 

1 Dismissed the application. 

2 Ordered the applicant to pav 
foe costs, including those of the 
intervener. 


-fidency 


which 
ex, be- 
nd rose 
jwth in 
<as an 
i Tujn- 
of the 
from 7 
nt and 
enftun. 
igles is 
where 
d rail- 

10 mil- 
sxpen- 
ked to 
lidfne 
which ' 
n sot 
Is are ' 










3 

* _ 


/ 




SPORT 


RACING 




/ 


THE TIMES WEDNESD AY NOVEMBER 12 1986 

Richardson: 


Rejuvenated 
7 Burnt Oak 


to complete 
a treble 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Few who watched Burnt 
Oak win at Newbury a week 
ago will want to look further 
for the likely winner of the 
Arlington Handicap Chase 
there this afternoon, especially 
as he has already shown a 
great liking for the track by 
winning three times in all over 
the course and distance. 

Two seasons ago. Brigadier 
Roscoe Harvey’s ten-year-old 
took a particularly nasty fall at 
Liverpool. Whether it was that 
which affected him last sea- 
son. 1 know not. But he 
seemed to be was a shadow of 
his former self in the only 
three races he contested. 

Greatly to his credit, David 
Nicholson has coaxed Burnt 
Oak back to his best this 
autumn. That is evident from 
a quick glance at his record. 

Following a heartening first 
run at Worcester. Burnt Oak 
won nicely at Wincanton. 
Then came that runaway vic- 
tory in the Lionel Vick Me- 
morial Chase last Wednesday 
when his jumping and overall 
zest for the game was a 
revelation. 

Caught again in a similar 
bullish frame of mind. Burnt 
Oak is unlikely to be stopped 
easily even by a 7-lb penalty. 


Burnt Oak has a somewhat 
unnerving tendency to swish 
his tail from time to lime, bui 
the laei remains that he still 
finished like a tiger a week ago 
and I think that he will prove 
capable of giving 91b to Play- 
boy. who was beaten a length 
by Yacare on his seasonal 
debut. 

None of the other runners 
have run this season but that 
should not stop Polar Sunset 
from making a bold show now 
dial Tim Forster’s horses are 
running well. Nevertheless. 
Burnt Oak is the nap. 

With Nicholson's horses in 
such fine fettle, no one should 
be surprised if the stable’s 
talented young jockey. Rich- 
ard Dunwoody, also wins on 
Cottage Ron (3.0) and Loddon 
Lad (1-30). 

Cottage Run. my selection 
for the Halloween Novices’ 
Chase, showed useful form 
over hurdles last season. But 1 
always envisaged him as a 
chaser and now I hope to see 
him prove the point by beat- 
ing Kino. 

Led den Lad, my selection 
for the second division of the 
Wood Spoon Novices’ Hur- 
dle. undoubtedly did well to 
beat the more experienced 



Live In Hope at Chepstow 
first time out. 

Looking at him in the 
paddock beforehand that day. 
it looked as though a race 
would do him a power of 
good. If I was right in my 
judgment, he should be very 
hard to beat this time. 

The earlier division can go 
to Mad About Ya now that 
Robin Goodfellow is not run- 
ning. 

The winner of a bumper at 
Leopardstown in Ireland last 
season. Mad About Ya was a 
thoroughly convincing winner 
of a similar race to today’s at 




Devon and Exeter last month. 

The Winterbourne Handi- 
cap Chase looks poised to 
to Midnight Song for 
second year in succession. He 
wiU be all the better for that 
run behind French Union at 
Worcester. It wilt also be a 
bold person who opposes the 
recent Ascot winner Slip Up 
in the Chequers Conditional 
Jockeys’ Handicap Hurdle. 

Meanwhile, at Kelso the 
main point of interest will be 
the presence of Monica 
Dickinson's Hennessy Gold 
Cup entry By The Way in the 
small but select field for the 


NEWBURY 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103(12) 09432 TaaESFORM (CDJff)(Mra J RyWy) B HaH MM 


BVM(i| 88 7-2 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


LOO Mad About Ya. 

1.30 Midnight Song 
2.00 BURNT OAK (nap). 


2.30 Slip Up. 

3.00 Cottage Run. 

3.30 Loddon Lad. 


Michael Seely's selection: 2.00 PLAY BOY (nap). 


Going: Chase course- good to soft; Hurdles course- soft 

IP WOOD SPEEN NOVICE HURDLE (Dtv I: £1,442: 2m 100yd) (16 Turners) 


102 

103 

10 « 

106 

107 

106 

110 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 
117 


0-401 MAD ABOUT YA (P Byrne) L Konnard 5-11-6 

0- AH HELLO (Middleton Aggregates Ltd) J Jerhats 5-11-0 S Sherwood 

BfiXASJS (P Wales) R Gow 5-11-0 C - 

04- DUBLIN BAY (J Surmec) T Forster 5-11-0 H 


BPmrefl 97F7-4 


GAY MOORE (Miss C Beasley) DMwray-SmBi 5-11-0 

HAVE FAITH iNGovmerjS Woodman 5-114J 

0 KWGSHflOOK (J LaaveH-ShentejtfW WightmanA-ll-Q 


MosCBeutoy 
M Richards 


— 3-1 

099 — 


RANDOM CHARGE (P De WBde) J JenWns 5-11-0. 


JW* 


POO- ROVING GLEN (Mrs L Ihwher) B Annyoge 5-11-0- 
00440; RUM (Mrs C Ctatworttiy) J Gifford 8-11-0. 


R Rowe 


0 SALMON RUN (M's J Mould) □ Nrixrfson 5-11-0. 
0- SKY BLUE SINGER (J Poyttfon) J Giftord 6-11-0- 
SURGE (B) (C Jordan) Mrs J Rmen 5-1 1-0. 


R Dunwoody 
E Morph* 


120 3FQ0/P-0 TOURNAMENT LEADER (D Marks) D Marks 6-1 1-0 

121 2004F4) TRIBAL DRUM (V) (Mrs G McFenan) l Dudgeon 7-11-0. 

123 0-0 WITHOUT (D Cowt^O M Ta® 5-11-0 


G MeCourt 
.BdeHean 

— P Barton 

— CSratti 


— 12-1 

— 5-1 

— B-1 

— 12-1 
tl — 
9010-1 


1985: KSULAHS-fl-0 BRoSfy (5-d /■») ISaJtfng 11 tan 


FflDM MAP ABOUT YA won a Leop B d M own N-H.Rat race when trained by Liam Bmwne and (10-12) 
■ wrliwi landed theodds laid on him at Devon, beating Royal Rehearsal (10-7) an easy 13 (an If. £494. 
firm. Oct 7. 7 ran). DUBLIN BAY, (11-7) 18KI 4th of Z6 behind Barge Pole (11-7) hera in March (2m, £2172. 
— - , UE, (n-fl) showed prom - — ' ~ 

n. 17 ran). RUM was last; 


good). GAY MOORE, (11-0) showed promise when 2) 4th to Sir’s At The Qtn (11-7) at Foflcastone in May (2m 

N-H.riaL £855. firm. Irran). RUM was last seen out when behind HARRY HASTINGS at CftetenftamFestnaf in 

1965. Barker (1 1-0) 14'/,! 4th to Wash Warrior (11-7) at Windsor ffln. £81 1 . soft. Mar 4 ’85. IB ran). TOURNA- 
MENT LEAD£RftO-T2)prtiriifrient/ora long way wherr 20l Sift tousporf (10-19) at Fontweiirar^, £885, good 
to firm. Septa 13 ran). TRIBAL DRUM ties not raaly fulfilled his premisa, last time (1 1-0)201 6th to Loddon Lad 
m^Che^OwgjL £1307. good to sett. Nov 1. 21 ran}. 


1.30 WINTERBOURNE HANDICAP CHASE (£2,996: 2m 160yd) (4 runners) 


SOI 1PB2-I3 iTSGOTTAKAUUfr Aar9(MrsWSyft«) Ms WSyfcet 9-11-10. SMMbHd «8»F84 
207 33232-3 WDWGHT SONG (CO) (Mrs D Price) T Forster 11-10-4 H Denies 96 7-4 

210 2/4FQ33- CARE (S Salisbury} T FocstBr 10-10-Z L Nanny (4) 94 3-1 

211 22242-0 TAFFY JONES (P Hayes) M McCormack 7-10-1 P Barton 9210-1 


1S8S: MIDNIGHT SONG 10-11-7 H Davies (9-4) T Forster 3 ran 


FORM nSGCTTABEALRIGHr was below form an latest start an seasonal 
rvnm beet DoubMon/iiLfiiHjtKnnMniiOm. ram m«i rvtiR_sn» 
son ITSGOTTABEALRIGHT (T .. 

4) at Stratford (2m, £3i83, good to soft Apr 
reappearance when 23 3rtf»Fremm Union (11-13) at Wtarcaster (2m. £1803. good, Oa 25. 9 ran). CARE (11- 
10) tun up besl performance last season on final outing when SKI 3rd to KDogar Kfm(IO-S) at Uttaxeter (2m 41, 
£1625, heavy. Apr 26. 10 ran). TAFFY J0IE5 (11-3) we8 beaten 5ft to Severn Sot*id(i 0-0) on reappearance 
at Stratford (2m. £2177. goad. Nov 6. 9 ran); batter judged on final start o» last season when (11-1(Sf 3 2nd to 
Broad Beam (11-3) at Wrideor (am Nov Ch. £1787. good to soft. Jan 1. 14 ran). 


Selection: I 


2 JD ARLINGTON HANDICAP CHASE (£3,811: 3m) (6 runners) 

301 23P01U- BALLYMILAN (CD) (F Sheridan) F Sheridan 9-11-11 ... 


302 312211- SACRED PATH (D) (Mrs C Heath) 0 Sherwood 6-11-0. 


. P Dover 
CCox(4) 


- G McCourt 

— H Davies 


304 0/0323=- PORT A8KAIG (CD) (Lord Chelsea) T Forster 11-11-1 

305 01/41 IF POLAR SUNSET (CD) (C MacSw*wy)T Forster 8-11-0 

308 240-411 BURNT QAK (CD) (BngC Harvey) DNichotson 10-10-10 (7es) R Dunwoody 

312 P0F11-2 PLAY BOY (DiAa ot Atberquerque] F Whiter 7-101 P 


9010-1 
88 8-1 
- 93 6-1 
87 4-1 
96 11-4 
• 99F2-1 


1985: GLENFOX 8-1 1-6 C Charts Jones (2-1) S Mrior 4 ran 


FORM BALLYMBJIN (11-0) successful on perWWmaiB start ol test season 
rvjnnri J1M)« twePmZf, £3563. good. Mar 21. ifi ran). SACRED PATH* 


I Co Me m b e r 
I was successful three times 
last season, the last ot which (11-13) was a head besting ot Mithras (109) at Cheltenham (3m II Nov Ch, 
£3999. heavy, Apr 17. lOran). a racein which POLAR SUNSET?) 1-9) was a beaten 3rd when fatting affte last 
PORT ASKAIG (1 02) was not Osgraced an penultimate start last season when i V41 2nd to course special 1st 
Maori venture (11-7) at Lrtgfletd 13m. £6240. good to soft. Mar IS. 6ranL POJW SUN8ET (1 M2) second ot 
two victories last season was a hard fought neck beating ot Pharoahs Own (1 1-6) at Devon (3m 11 Nov Ch. 
£1 909. good to soft, Apr 4, 1 5 ran). BURNT OAK (i 0-131 is on a hat-trick after a corrdortabto 13 success over 
Rig Sari (10-1) here (3m. £2981. good. Nov 5. 7 ran). PLAY BOY (TT-S) stayed on at one pace when a lengfii 
2nd to Yacare (U-Sjjnera (2m 41, £3798. good, Oct 24. 9 ran). 


Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Six-figm 
form (F-teL P-putod up. U-ureealBd rider. B- 
brought down S-sl&pedup. R-reiused). Horse's 
name (B-Wmkars. V-vteor. H-hood. Feyestaeid. C- 
coursewmer. D-detanee winner. CD-coirae and 


distance winner. SF-baaten favorite in 
race). Owner In brackets. Tremor- Age and 
wetght Rider plus any aHowanoe. The Taues 
Private Hamkcapper's rating. Approxarwa swung 

pree. . 


Z30 CHEQUERS CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP HURDLE (£2£11: 3m 120yd) 
(10 runners) 

403 OOP/OOO- 9HMYCOPPER(D Tyleil Mrs N Smith 8-11-7 R Guest 

404 4F0111 SUP UP (F Gray) F Gray 6-11 •£ PCBeney 


405 OPOF4/4- HV-KO (Mrs M Brubaker) OQanddVO 19-1 1-2 

40? 0P4O82 SUPER GRASS (Mrs MMeta*) S Mater 7-19-1 1- 


TWuNay 
.G1 


498 

409 

41T 

412 

413 
415 


U33-43Q KOFF1 (BF) (Sadord Van Hire Ltd) 0 Mchctson 4-19-8 
00314-0 WW FAR*R (J P Price) JP P»ce 4-10-3. 


22/BP STAHORDSHRE KNOT (C Nash) C Nash 11-194). 
2 30300- THE SMNER (M MaBerah) M Tate 5-100. 


BDnwang *99 


9812-1 
92 7-1 
KM 


D40Q9-2 TBI IN HAI0 (J CiechanowskQ M WnchStfe 6-100. 
008039- OOUBLEUAGMN (B Clark) C Hofcnes 12-190 


CLteWy n 
— Ml 
_ LI 
_ TJ 


M 4-1 
98FB-4 
— 14-1 


1985; PfWCE-S DRIVE 7-100 C Evens (9-1) B Paffng 9 ran 


FORM SUPUP 


s» 


id *»l when 3rd at 


>(1 


best when a \ 
£3209. go od. Nqy 
4L £2826, 


at Ascot 

2ndloAniace(190)wfl 

6. 14 ran). JCOFF1 not dtoraced last tkna. ran H94) __ . . . 

good.Oci 18, 14 ran). NEW FAHMBt ran body on reappearance and on final Mart at last season: prevmiKly 
it 0-6) beat Write The Music (1 1-0) 1KI in a Hereford novice hunfie (3m li £572. good to soft. Apr 5. 17 rah). 
S elec tion : KOffi 

AO HALLOWEEN NOVICE CHASE (£3. 10& 2m 160yd) (8 runners) 

501 2230-F3 8RAUNST0N BROCK (Mrs E Boucher) DOughton 6-1 1-6 HOnfM W99 3-1 

'502 21P234J BUCKFAST ABBEY (Mrs P W Hants) P W Karris 6-11-8 RSbooge — 12-1 

503 qn<BP2- COTTAGE RUN (Mrs M Rogers) DNkMson 6-11-8 R Dunwoody — 11-4 

504 00 DOUBLE UP (Mrs P Ha^eaves) Mrs P Harpeaves 9-11-8 J White 

506 142100- nmO{WSpaaknini O) Fwmiar 6-11-8 : PBcndwew — F2-1 

509 V PAUL PRY (H Joel) A TuneD 6-11-8 SteveKnWd 

510 F4210-4 TARCONEY (R Whittle) p Qmdefi 6-11-8 AOeman — 0-1 

511 10114/U- TAmBDGE(L AH Anna Ltd) A Tumea 8-11-8 CManu -10-1 


tIO- 

rm). 


at Aaoat^Bri. £2929, firm. Oct 29, 




1985: HIENCH UMON 7-1 F13 P Scudamore (7-4 p-fav) D McMaon 8 ran 

FORM BRAlMTON BROOK (10-13) was rather Itsiunels to finish 23 3rd to Imperial Champagne < 
iwlTiTI 1 3) at Chepstow Mtermt^aps had befafion his rivals (2m. £1567. good to soft Nov 1.11 n 
COTTAGE RUN (11-2) on final start last season was 21 aid to Catanaro (10-4) at^ Worcuster (2m 41 Nov H’i 
H. £1009, good to firm. May 14m 21 ran). KITTO (11-10) teat successful when beating Joint Sovereignty 
31 et Huntngdon (2m 4f Nov H. £1248. good. Jan 23. IS ran). TARCONEY (1 1-4) a we« beaten 4#i to 
Prtw ni^J. With BUCKFAST ABBEY flf-4) a " . - — - - 

TARCOfEY (10-12) sucoessiul test seasoned) 

£1433. good, Maria 17 ran). BUCKFAST ABBEY (1 
Carectacus (10-10) at Hunthqdon (2m. £1 127, good to 

&30 WOOD SPEEN NOVICE HURDLE (Dtv It £1,434: 2m 1 00yd) (14 runners) 

60) 022421 DISPORT (Mrs J Thomson) WWightmsn 4-1]^ MHnteglni 90 3-1 

1 LODDON LAD (!*s J Mart) D Itfcnolsan 4-11^ ROmoody 97F2-1 

MOO- COatPTON PARK (LCfd VBsteyJJ Kkig 5-11-0 SMcNaM 88 8-1 

09- FEDERAL TROOPBl (P BomsT) Mre J Pitman 5-H-0_ — M Ptenou — 10-1 

GOOD SAMAftfTAN (Lady WateS) P GOW 6-11-0 C 

0 HOLLOWELL (Mrs A Hughes) F Hcfils 8-11-0 R 

00/0- LOOffW/D GMU DG«$ 5-11-0 « 

F LOSS A0JUS1ER (J HucktNCTriatfna 4-114) J 


(1 0-1 2) 51 at Huntingdon (2m 4f Novi 
aucoemU over fuadtea last t erai w han beating to 
Nov 15. Bran). Sitecte KTTTO 


602 

604 

606 

807 

608 

609 

610 
6T4 
618 
617 
818 
619 
621 


SOW® OF MULL fl Steer*) Pawley 4- tWL 


OOP- THE LQRD5 TAVERNER (M Peraficos) J Gittord 8-1 WL. 


TIE WEST AWAKE (Mrs C HsaffiJ o Sherwood 5-11-0. 
TRACY BOY (T Nfaeon) T Forater 5-1 1-0. 



— 12-1 


— 12-1 


CAIVAJtRA BELLE (Mrs M Kenyon Hoidanj C James 5-109. 
3MF- LADY NEWTON (SrjrteyHcttngs Ltd) J Fox 5-109 


QMcCOmt *98 6-1 


1985: DEO* AND EVQi 5-10-10 Mr C Brooks (3-1 fav) F Winter 11 ran 
FORM PCPgflT(HMQ)lus)gofiy to beat Masheen (10-10) a neck at ro ntweafi&n2L £685. good to 

rwnm firm. 13 ran). He rws onty prorsd hfmsad on fast ground ao far. LODDON LAD (11-0) rnade a 
wnraxytebut at Oi^tow by a neck from live i n Hope (11 -5) (an. £1807, good to soft. Nov 1. 21 jrm). 

ot 17 to aue'ca^irMfjfl 


» Hope (11- 5) (2m, £ 1307, good to soft. Nov 1, 21 ran! 
iheba ck mar ke rs. COMPTON PARK'S best effort to date when (11-4)asih 
(2m, £753, good to seft. Mar 20). iLHilai race wtrmer i 


TROOPS! showed some aftity when (H-7)9r/i to Barge Pole (11-7) here (Zm. £2172, good. Mar 21, 28 ran). 
The most notabie ot LADY NEWTON’S best bffort when(10~8) strong finistvng _ 


axrae^|dgano^E»55. good to fihn. Nov 23. II ran). 


1 141 M to Accuracy (109) over 


Course specialists 

TRAINERS _ _ JOCKEYS 



Winners 

Runners 

PerCwrt 


WinnefS 

Ridas 

Percent 

T Fewer 

17 

55 

309 

S Sherwood 

8 

35 

229 

F Wln»r 

48 

ISO 

249 

? Scudamore 

41 

ISO 

21.6 

O Sherwood 

5 

22 

22.7 

H Davies 

28 

137 

204 

DNtthoison 

32 

154 

208 

P Barton 

7 

49 

143 

J Jertans 

13 

71 

103 

R Rowe 

17 

143 

119 

S Motor 

6 

50 

1Z0 

BdaHsan 

6 

58 

103 


KELSO 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


2.45 By The Way. 

3. 1 5 Oaken. 

3.45 Doughty Rebel. 


1.15 Rancho Bamado. 

I.4S Centre Attraction. j 

2. 1 5 Lam i urn. | 

By Michael Seely 
1. 15 Rancho Bamado. 2.45 By The Way. 

The Times Private Han dicapper’s top rating: 1.15 VALE OF SECRECY. 


Going: good 

1.15 CAVEHTON MAIDEN HURDLE (Amateurs: £695: 2m6f)(20 runners) 


OOOP/ ARK INVADER (HMahretSpW SK»6y 7-1 1-7. 


5 0030/0-0 BOUNTY'S CLOWN (R ShiekS) R Shrels 6-11-7 

S U BUSTED SPRWC(WM9ng Engineers) JSWUSon 5-11-7 — 


. Mkm F Storey (7) 
RStMs(7) 


10 32/2903 GRANGE OF GLORY (J Heliens) J HeBens 5-11-7 

11 P KARLS CHERRY fCRen»rfson)W Storey 7-11-7.. 


, 0 Marti pguit (7) 
L Hudson (7) 


85 S-1 


Mae D stock (7) 


17 Q/09344 PEARL MERCHANT (M* S Branwtf) Mrs SBramat 5-1 1-7 — 


3M RANCHO BEHMADO (M HeVyer) Mra M Odanson 5-1 1-7 . 

232200 ROVIGO(yv A Stephenson) W A Stephenson 5-1 1-7 

thP RUGGED BATON (A Barron) V Thompson 5-11-7 ... 


P) 


P Johnson (7) 
M Thompson (4) 


87 10-1 
91 F6-4 
8810-1 


UFP SEALED OFFER <M«ssJ Hey) P Beaunont B-11-7 MSowenby(7) 

340-43* SUW1A ID Tomer) Turner) D Lee 5-11 -7 H Brown (7) 


87 8-1 


TREASWE HUNTER (Mrs A Robson) W PQ3IC8 7-1 1-7 — 

20* VALE OF SECRECY (Mrs DMaerJBRetrer 5-11-7 

0020- VfOftTHY KNIGHT (B McLean) 8 McLean 5-11-7 ... . 


0 ANSWER SACK (Mrs MBeaumwiQPScsianonl 7-11-2 

P GALA RUN (J Roche) G Oktroyd 6-11-2.. 

00M 09 KERSIBJJI (Lord Cadogan/NCrunp 5-1 « 


A Robson (7) 

— A Fowler 

A Orkney (7) 


199 7-2 
80 14-1 


Mas A Beanaom (7) 

NQN-HUNN51 


JOsbomefT) 


0009- UMAR ROMANCE (M Tharoson) Thompson 4-1 1-2.. 

36 P04/0O9 PMSTWE (J Nevrffe) N Qiamberiarr 5-11-2 

38 M/OOPO- TYNESIDE (D Lamb) D Lamb 5-11-2 


KAndcraon(7) 

. PDoyte(7) 


TReed 


1985: MASTER RICKIE 4-119 0 Swindtehurst (20-1) 0 SWtrefia/nast 18 ran 

1.45 CH5RHYTREES HANDICAP CHASE (£1 .612: 2m 196yd) (9 runners) 

2U3D2U- KARENOIBORE fU-Ccf B Wantar) M H East erby 8-11-10 — 

041R30- TRIPLE VENTURE (TCra^)T Crag 7-11-8 SCterlton 

04414-0 VEILED OTT(C)(F Storm) F Storey 10-11-0 


40 11 P-0 CENTRE ATTRACTION (CD) IMreV Mason) GtWwds 7-10-6. 


98 7-1 
9012-1 
B Storey • OTPS-* 
PTUck 92 7-2 


24F0/34 THE SMALL «R8AClE(0fteBH5)N Bycroft 9 109..., COtod 

121/32-1 THE HOWLET (CD) (W Stuart WfisonJKOtwer 7-109 JKKmnne 


00613-2 TASAR (CD) (Cnvfoae Lady Reayj W A Stephenson 5-10-0 

P0244-4' WARBSOFF (B) (R Thormnn) T CuWSftrt 9-109- 


□DPI 00- BOSTON LAO (M Okaum) R Woodlouse 5-10-0'. 

1985: SOKCRLED 8-109 C Hawktos (5-2) R McDonald 3 ran 


D Dutton 


83 16-1 
90 92 
SO 5-1 
79 12-1 
81 25-1 


Course specialists 



TRAINERS 

Winners Runners 
8 25 

Per Gent 
32.0 

G Bradley 

JOCKEYS 

Winners 

11 

RWes 

45 

Per Cent 
24.4 

Mis M DtCktniQfi 

5 

17 

25.4 

TG Dun 

1? 

93 

183 

Mrs G Sewiey 

6 

33 

102 

PLamb 

21 

139 

15.1 

Denys Snwh 

12 

68 

17.6 

PTuck 

IS 

104 

14.4 

JOiner 

12 

71 

109 

C Grant 

T7 

131 

13.0 

W A Stephenson 

36 

236- 

1i3 

CHawKms 

11 

38 

125 


2.15 SCOTTISH BREWERS JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £2,008: 2m) (19 
runners) 

0231 BANTEL BUSHY (D) (John Taylor Ltd) J Berry 1l4 — JHenetot 98 5-1 


1 

2 

4 

5 

6 
7 
B 

9 

10 
12 

14 

15 
18 
18 
19 
22 
24 
26 
27 


12 CUHBRWO NUO (V) (Cumbrian industrials) M H Easterly 11-3 RMeriey<7) 999FS-Z 

CftANRELD (W Kane) T Feirtiurat 10-12 C Fcktwst 

GOOOUNOV(6*ei»Ud)W Storey 10-12 ACamdl — — 

STAND CHATOE (J Thompson) G RctiwQs 10-12 — PTVwk — 7-1 

040 HUBBARDS LODGE (R Read) W Reed 10-12 Mr T Read 8316-1 

0 LAMUU (Li-Goi R Warden) M H Easterby 10-12 tl 


LATRHaG LODGE (HocMey Chapman Payne) N Bycroft 10-12 ■ 

30 LOCH AVKM(CHaO)MtSSM Bel 10-12 

0 MERCIA GOLD (M WQBS) P Daty 10-12. 


CCklst 9016-1 


PATS JESTER (R P Adam Ltd) R Aten 10-12.. 


21 PMC 3S«SA-nON(D)(MB*tey) Mrs G Reveley 10-12. 

STATE JESTER (E Sarbed W Bsey 10-12 

F3 TUMBA (Racegoers CfabOwrwre] K Otver 10-12 

PO VAN DER PUP (4 Lanet Mtes Z Green 10-12- 


ObK Anderson (7) 

NOou^ny 

PMvsn(4) 

Ml 


— 16-1 
95 4-1 


, JK 


80 8-1 


CHEVET LADY (D GDOORSI RWnftaker 10-7. 
444 KAMPHALL(C Cory) kfissZGrean 10-7. 


F 8PRWG GARDEN (M Moriey) N Chamberlain 167- 


32320 SWEET SNUGF1TR8 (A Greenwood) RWMdhouse 10-7. 


97 10-1 


1S8S: BALLYARRY 11-3 R Lamb (46 fav) W A Stephenson 15 ran 
245 ARPAL CONQUEST HANDICAP CHASE (E3.85& 3m (3 runrurers) 

1 171 1=41-1 BY THE WAY (CJD) (Mrs C Feather) Mre M KcWnaon 6-12-0 G 


01P431- HARDY LAD (CJD (Mrs J Mkgan) B VAtoneon 9-10-13 . 


12124-1 LITTLE FRENCHMAN (£) (EH Robson) EB RobSQn 13-10-7 (4«k)— MrTReed 84 
1985: WHY FORGET 9-10-7 R Lamb (6-4) W A Stephenson 6 ran 

3.15 NEWTON DON NOVICE CHASE (£1,233: 2m 196yd) (8 runners) 

1 00FFO-1 o*xm(nteotStJtwfUrf} Soya Sm*}) 5-ii-iD c& ** 

2 0020-14 THE WHA (F Scotto) W A Stephenson 7-1 MO — HLfltob 

4 2 DAWN ATBGWJAMaeOewapS Payne 11-11-a — — B Storey 

7 000000- FRED ASTAIRE (Maj I Stndrer) N Crump 5-11-3 


• 99FV6 
98 6-1 

64 64 


423-2F2 HOLD OFF (BJtF) (Jj«s H HarnrfcTO) Mta H S-15-3 

011-012 SHARP SONG (J Latham) T Fartant 5-1 1<3. 


TGDuo 


IS 4/OORB2- VALarmOS JOY (G CaanyfOl G OktrOfti 7-1 1-3- 
20 00-2003 RHHTCU)UJV(PUdiae)PLjddta 8-1 0-12 


CMtent 

MDwyur 


MrTRMd 


9« 
87F94 
9211-4 
— 14-1 
9B 4-1 
— 6-1 
3714-1 
9* 61 


1916: PITCRUVE 6-11-3 P Tuck (2-1 jt-fev) G fUcftarda 13 ran 


3.45 aOORS HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,406: 3m If 120yd) (21 runners) 

2 430/100- CHAMPAGNE CHARLIE (Me S Austin] Mrs S Austin 9-1 MO WH Brewn (7) 

12104-4 DAD’S GAMBLE (C) (C Alexander) R Fisher 5-11-3 - M Meagh er 

243100 THEFIXEna ROSS) J Mooney 5-1 1-0 JUoonn 


203-112 DOUGHTY REBEL (BF) (G Wilson) G Richards 5-10-13. 

21RJOO- FLYBKS OATS (B) (W McGhW) W UcGtVS 6-10-13 

1000-90 HAIEEt (Mss J Eaton) Miss J Eaton 6-10-6,,- 


P Tuck 


17 — 
92 92 
87 — 
96F3-1 


200-431 LARRY HRJ- (C) (Mrs J GoodfWtow) Mrs J GoodWtow 11-104 


N Doughty 
.. J l inen 
B Storey 


22302-1 GOLDEN HOLLY (T Deputy) TDalg«Jy 6-162. 


310434) JAY ai£ THAW (JL ThBWi DMOtWt 6102-. 
003100- MOUJN BARN (O (Mis S maps) DLM 7-769. 


MrKAudBnonP) 

K1 

- - - Cl 


004010 BfRASCRSK(B£)(rj=asMa)JS wagon 4-109, 

300000- SVSAWA/J Andrews) jAn*am 6169 

040406 H060URNE3 (G A Femdon) R Woodnousa 4-10-0.—-.,., 
340F33 MOOrfiJGNTMG/KHaqj Parkas 6169 

22 32/2-003 GRANGE OF GLORY (J HetoftS) J HeagnS 5-10-0 

23 2U41P3 KMATURE BBS (FScotmjW A Stephenson 4-169 

3* FOMD-O ANOTHER FLAME (Mrs P Rwrtson) W Storey 6109 

25 334W=P- FINE STEELS (Mrs PBiDwne)B MGLeah 6-109 

26 002230 SPECIAL SETTLEMENT (T Beary) R Aaan 5-109.— 

28 4RF4M PRINCE SOL (VTTwciwbOO)V Thompson 7-109 


S Charlton 


95 — 
95 61 
91 7-2 
9510-1 
— 80 
89161 


18B retfntme 
ODUQen 


, PMve n(4) 


, - r - NON-RlM«R 

Mr P Doyle (7) 

NMa Oa— efc 


00 — 
9T — 
SB 16-1 
91 — 


— SI — 


29 0F2/PP*- AVAHTTE (Taggart & Wfeon] J S W8S0H 16104) 

1885: GLEN LOCHAN 611-3 C Hardens (5-1) N Cnanp 12 ran 


Mr M Thompson (4) 
C Grant 


25 -year ban 
in Flockton 
Grey affair 


Sir Gordon: true 
professional with 
the human touch 


The 

Grey 


JOHN U1SLOP (racing 
yestpdi; when Ke o Bichm d- ' breeder QTlu QWttfT 
•oa. the map who masterminded “ 

the amp, was humed for^25 


years by the Jockey Chk Two 
ethers, Colin Mathison find 
peter Boddey, were disqualified 
for 15 and three ywn, 
respectively- 
The trio had 


author and journalist, 
jnxudier Gerard, and jormer 
leading amateur jockey) pays tribute to Sir r on 
Richards, who died on Monday 



One of tbe few advaaiags 
of age Is breadth of experience. 
Thus I was fbitunaie to 
entered racing shortly after 
Gordon Richards had begun 
his riding career, to _ have 
known hire throughout it and 
so to have been able to form a 


already been 

^ _ rt of switching 

the (befryev'fiU Good Haim 
for Flockton Grey in via a two- 

year-old anction rece nt Ibices- ^ 

tor in March, 1982. £frjcaiasessreenl^ of hire as a Barfing uad) tbe tra* nCT 

At a disripttnary i«»wy ^ compared with riders fired, ronanoing 10 ihceoo oj 

“* rfSems,Mdtoappredate -- --- — “*' h 


if he was iwpdred under a 
reamer he would nev» tag 
off, however tempting the 
offeror bad the retained nde. 
His hero among trainers 

was Fred D»hng. wtswnding 

in his profession but not an 
easy master. Richards rode for 


Portmau Square day werefimnd 
to he in breach of Rule 261 (nil 
of which gives the 


By The Way, Monica Dickinson's Hennessy hope, will start a warm favourite at Kelso today 


Arpal Conquest Handicap 
Chase. 

An easy winner over the 
course and distance already 
this autumn. By The Way 
should be too good for Hardy 
lad and Little Frenchman. 

Earlier in the day travelling 
companion Baacho Bannrdo 
can initiate a stable double by 
winning the Cavertoa Ama- 
teur Riders' Maiden Hurdle at 
the expense ofVate of Secrecy. 

Finally, the distance of the 
Floors Handicap Hurdle looks 
tailor-made to bring the best 
out of Gordon Richards’ dour 
stayer Doughty RebeL 


« r yuip caimcted of a cri aiMw l 
offence in retafiba to racing. 

The inquiry, chaired by .Sir 

WHlttBiW^ ‘“rtiJEj 
over tww bores and was thetluni 

tobeheWinooiH^ctkai wirathe 

case, which began after flockton 

Grey landed a hag gamble wbea 

trotting op by 2® lengths- 

Following a dBdpfiaBy 
ias in July 1982, Bockton Grey 
was (fisqnalffied ftnm the. race 
antler the nries which state a 
Inst most be h the ease of a 
frrwfJ tn d ner for 14 days 
i » m »4i«tdv before a race- 

1W». years later, at York 
Crown Court, Richardson, 
Matiuson and Boddey were 
convicted of conspiring to de- 
fraud m various places m 
Britain- 

Richardson, a' banBessaan, 
was riven a nme-aaoiith sear 
pended sentence, fined £2M<HL 
and ordered to pay 1100,000 
cowards prosecution costs. 
Matiuson. a company director, 

was fined £3£M, and Boddey, a 

driver, was given a conditional 

Hm trio, aB bom Driffield, 
Hamberside, lost appeals 
against their cod victims earlier 
this year, and it eras only then 
that the Jockey dub coaid 
continue with its own inqmries 
and disciplinary process. 

Last month, Stephen Wiles, 
who held tbe ficeace to Train 
Flockton Grey, was banned for 
five years for breaking tbe rales 
concer n ing bones having to be 
la tbe atre of a Kcenced trainer 
{ot 14 days immediately before a 
race, wflfnHy entering a horse 
who was known net to be 
qualified, and deBberatriy or 
overtly the Jockey 

dab. 

His father, Fred Wiles, also 
admitted misleading the Jockey 
Chib and was derived a dis- 
qualified person for three years, 
bet his wife, Elaine, who con- 
fessed to aiding and abetting a 
breach of the rales, escaped 

ptmiibftrt. 

Before yesterday's hearing, at 
which he and tbe other two mat 
were legally represented, 
Rich a rdson said: “Tins Is a 
foregone conclusion, bat 1 have 
never docked anything in my 
life.'' He refused to comnaat 
afterwards. 

The Jockey CM was repre- 
sented by Mr Christopher 
Nickels, and As case was pre- 
sented by Jockey Club security 
in v e stigating officer, Mr Dennis 
Brown. 


him as a person. 

It is a strange, but perhaps 
apt coincidence that his death 
should feB so dose to the 

centenary of that of a jockey of 

commensurate feme, Fred Ar- 
cher: for they am the two 
of -their profession in 
though their lives 
wens so different,. Archer's 
short and tragic, Richards 


his riding career 
Darting's successor, Noel 
Murtess, for whom he had a 


"et they had in common 
the insatiable determination 
to win and ability which 
plac ed them far above their 
contemporaries. 

Cordon Richards’ path was 
a tougher one than that of any 
champion after him. The stan- 
dard of riding in his day was 
higher and top ability ex- 
tended further down the scale. 
Lack of starting stalls and 
patrol c am eras put a premium 
on technical skill at the start 
and the ability to cope with 
rough riding* impossible to get 
away with today. There were 
fewer meetings and no motor- 
ways to speed travel. 

Richards was essentially an 
individualist. He rode with a 


That Richards rode only 

one Derby winner wa s bec ause 

his other mounts were wt 
good enough, or he made tbe 
wrong choice. 

Out of the saddle, whether 
in tbe jockeys’ room, on the 
racecourse, in public or at 
home, he was always courte- 
ous. cheerful and helpful. 

Though keen to be cham- 
pion year after year , be^was 
not greedy for winners: “Let 
those lads up there have it on 
their own today,” he would 
often say if offered a spare ride 
in die north on a Monday, and 
he seldom rode abroad except 
for his retained stables. 

He was highly strung and at 
tiwws suffered fits of nervous 
depression, brought on by the 
thought that a run of losers 
was letting down his followers, 
but he fought off these moods, 
which wore never allowed to 
affect his performance. 

He had a sped as a trainer, 
hems more successful than 



and control his horse perfectly 
by neck-reining and the use. of 
his legs. 

His whip was swung vig- 
orously and brought out a long 
way from home, but he did 
not punish horses, often never 
touching them, and it was 
difficult to tell what he bad in 
reserve. 

Often he seemed beaten 
some way out, but miracu- 
lously produced a final effort 
which brought victory. He 
never gave up, was never 
caught napping, and for him 
to lose a race be should have 
won was virtually unknown. 

As a result of having con- 
tracted tuberculosis as a bay 
he was always careful of Ins 
health and prepared for each 
Flat racing season iikea boxer, 
employing a trainer to get him 
fit. 

His patrons and the trainers 
for whom he rode praised him 
not only for las a&fity, but for 
tbe znetkadoas way in which 
he honoured his agreements. 


training victories. Then he 
became racing manager to Sir 
Michael Sobefl and Lady 
Beavertoroak, when not a little 
of their success was due to his 
guidance and advice. 

He rode out regularly at 
West nrfey on his pony Pip, 
who looked a dreadfully un- 
comfortable ride bat seemed 
to suit his master and he took 
great interest in the training 
and - career of Brigadier 
Gerard. 

A fine speaker and ringer, 
he loved a party, especially if it 
entailed a sing-song, but 
avoided hangovers and pre- 
ferred home life to night life. 

Tbe death of his wife, 
Margery, a few years ago was a 
great blow to him, bat his 
character and way of life did 
not change. He looked 20 
years younger than his age and 
as fit as in his riding days. 

If ever a man deserved his 
knighthood it was he. We 
drink to your memory. Sir 
Gordon, and wish your spirit 
wefl. 




Clara Mountain’s effort Keyboard King 


grinds to a halt 


Clara Mountain. 7-1 on 
favourite in the two-runner 
Shepherds Meadow Chase at 
Hereford yesterday, refused in 
spectacular fashion. Tim 
Forster's normally consistent 
chaser was a furlong dear of 
Rockfidd Boy when be ground 
to a halt at the 11 tb fence. 

Richard Dunwoody was un- 
seated as Clara Mountain re- 
fused going into the fence, bat 
be was baric in the saddle in a 
flash for another attempt. Three 
more times Dunwoody tried to 
got tbe griding over the obstacle, 
and on every occasion be stub- 
bornly refused to co-operate. 

Finally giving tip, Dunwoody 
said: “Even before that fence he 
was never going well and was 
always jumping badly left 

Rockfidd Boy, a 5-1 chance, 
was the reluctant hero. He 
attempted to run out after the 
seventh fence and his jockey 
Tony Carroll reported dm more 
than once bis wayward charac- 
ter tried to puILhunself up. 


It was not a good day for 
Forster. The Letcombe Bassett 
trainer’s Lefrak City, 7-4 favour- 
ite for the Hugh Sumner Chal- 
lenge Bowl Handicap Chase, 
was merrily bowling along in the 
lead when he unseated Luke 
Harvey at tbe seventh fence. 

His departure left the way 
dear for Hope End to maintain 
tbe excellent record of ex-jockey 
Robin Dititin since be started 
training in Ai^usl From just 15 
runners he has now saddled five 
winners. 

“If has been a marvellous 
start,” said Dickm, adding: “I 
have (S horses at the moment, 
but can do with a few more of 
the right sort-” 

Paul Barton was giving ev- 
idence at a Jockey Club inquiry 
in London, and missed out on a 
winner when Lord Frantic, 2-1 
favourite in the .All Pasmore 
Novices Chase, came home 30 
lengths dear. Dermot Browne 
proved an aWe deputy on the ex- 
Irish gelding 


hits right note 
for Scudamore# 


•1 1 . 

mm -J, 


Peter Scudamore's supporters 
made a good start at Devon and 
Exeter yesterday when the 
champion jockey won the open- 
ing novices’ handle on Keyboard 
Kwg, who had been nibbled at 
from 8-1 to 6-1. • 

Mrtma Spring made it a 


Royal hope foil of promise 


Ametbea, the first racehorse 
bred by the Prince of Wales, 
made an encouraging debut 
overjumps when finishing third 
at 3>1 in tbe Novices' Hurdle 
Qualifier, won by tbe Nick 
Henderson-trained Tsarefla, at 
Hereford. 

Racing in the scarlet and royal 


blue colours of the Prince, the 
filly ran. well for most of the way, 
but dropped back when lack of 
experience told over the final 
two flights. 

Her trainer, Nick Gasefee, 
stressed that Prince Charles is 
not planning to ride over hur- 
dles this season. 


a big lead and was not 
overhauled until coming to the 
last flight. Keyboard King, who 
bad been hard driven by 
Scudamore from a long way eat, 
took over and battled home to 
win by four le ngth s from BeMivar 
Prince. Nearly A Pine, tbe 13-8 
fevoauite, never get in a Mow 

Jnst like Mzfrna Spring in the 
first race. Skylark Wonder 
looked ancatcfanMe as he ap- 
proached the home torn 15 
lengths dear, bnt the West, 
Country coarse is a tongh place 
to make all the tanning. 

■ Skylark Wonder was over- 
hauled approaching the last 
flight and it was New Forest Lad 
who took it np, briefly before the 
3-1 favourite High Viscosity 
jumped the last in the lead and 
score by two lengths. 

It was a triamph for the Jarvis 
fondly from Roystoa. High 
Viscosity, bought nn broken in 
Ireland last year, is trained by 
Alan Jarvis, was ridden by his 
22-year-oU sin Tim and is 
looked after by the trainer's 
youngest daughter, Sarah. 


Results from yesterday’s two meetings 


Devon & Exeter 


Going: soft 

l.lSCm Ithdta) I.KEYKNkHDKMG 


Scudamore. 6- 1 ^, 2^ B 




. _ Spina7 
Mama, 14 Legal AH. 16 Gara Rock (50i), 
NOrwSmoker 30 Obama Expres. 
Tait Stops rati), SO Pucka Paddy. Tha 
Contractor. Tudor Squire (pul 
Girt, Laura Grey (pu), Mawnan Girt 


Cocky Vane (4 UtL 9 »*er Warrior. U 
Gotten Korn* (f), 16 Bit pth), Maggie 
Dee. Mister Donuttftw, ZD Wo Of Stone. 
11 rav NR: Tudortteed S, 10, 2L 3L 15 l 
FW kiterst Lanitjoum-Tote: £3.70: E2.00. 
£2.50. BLOT. DP. S2JM, CSF: £19.15. 
Tricast: £280.10. 


lirr- 


1M. 

Tc 


. D A Wllsar « 
£250. gLSO. £3i 

i £ 6 * 11 - 


USffieltndMI.imiMGMIttE 
T Thomson Jones. 3-1 tt-ftwt 2, 

*si ssswty* 1 * 

J1-n ALSO RAN: 


~R udaraca. 18 ran. 


Ntitieih, i1-1\ ■) 

Punters Lad. 7 Mr DM*. 9 Fbmg ..... 

20 Air Space, Broche, Ur. 25 Bin) Ot 
SperWo ttStti). 33 Foretold. 


1.30 ran 4f Mb) 1. BRONZE 0=FK3Y 
ea Charles Jcutes. 15-2L Z Ktegtor 
T Davies, 2-1 fev}r 3. Geny Doyle 
‘rmytaga, 7-n. ALSO Ran: 8 

Monarch, 8 HateaMion (pu). 12 
Artist MM, 1* nort wohdar. 16 
(6th). 20 Cantabiie. Corora (put 
caster (5th). Last Thai (pu). 
Times. 33 Fading Dawn. 14 ran. 

. ML JH. 1XL A Henmquas at 

(Sweater. Tots; £12.70; £4.10, £1.70. 
gjIOjDF: £17 JO. CSF: £23.06. Trtcast 
£108.00. 



1^«S (2m If hdM 1. MGH VISCOSITY (T 
Jarvis. 3-1 tavfc i Caaiahe w (H Davies, 
162* 3. Hair Fore* Lad (M Ptaan. ML 
ALSO HAN: 11-2 SMsrti Wander (80$ 
13-2 Gay Edftton, 9 Hot OH. 20 Jknstar 
(MhL Comfec Pratts ffiuX Stent Journey. 
25 Wanting (pu). GMRH 50309. 33 
Morpton. 50 Donna's Boy, General Sprta 
(puL Duskey Comte Hefcwa Season (am. 
Motn’s Star. ShaMarotn tpu). 18 ran. S 
4t 2»L a tB. A Jaws « Rowm Tcib: 
£6.00; £160. £430. £200. OF: £19.40. 
CSF: £24,14. 


(Wi), BofakinciCXi8aw. Maan 
17 ran. NFt Ametflv shhd. 2M. 


26 (2m 41 ch) 1. ROCXFELD BOY (A 
CteBttTHk. ALSO RAN: 1-7 fav Clara 


nk. U 3L p Gandrtto at 

^rS0-J*^a. gjt L £230. Oft 
£3260, CSF: £4261. Tricast £46679. 

FtoMpflCEISaoa 


HounWn (rep. 2 ran. D WMte at Wesl&uiy 
on Severn. Tote: wn £3.80. 


Hereford 

Going: good to sett 

1230 J2m_4t hete) 1. RSW0M> (C 


|1,HCB J EBa)(CJones,5- 
1 Stef iS-^ALSolXN 1 . 

Brian « Wewent Tote; £3.76. £160. 
£160. Oft £890. CSF: £1067. 


1. AOMRAL’SOJP 

2. Yfeston SuAtflt 


OD^-A^lAN-SHQpeSKJ 

arulW. 15L CbsL F wloter at Larfooum. 


zis (an if 
Scudamore, 11 
Dawes. ‘ " ' 

X 

Tcftsx £260. DF: £l JO- CSF: E568, 

ZAS (2m If Mlo) 1. GROVECOIE 
Chartes Jones, 8-1): 2 Fteidango Boy 
Rost. 1004% 3. Salem Branre . 
Strange, 11-ZL ALSO RAN: 64 Iter Aunt 
Bty (reft. 0 Oakdale (4tm. ID Oav BoD 
(pul 14 RubSH (SOi), 33 Home Mas 
fernam (pul SO Chariots Ot Rre «. 
Monatauon mu), Pences SpeddJWiL 11 
ran- Nft Bediwac. 101. 7L ia ldLl&.P 



AS (sui.sSl£& 


30 ran AM 1, TSAHELLA (S Snwh 
BW88. « toft 2. ceUc Cygnet (S 
JtodwaASyj: 3. toMhea prSoonajL 
A150 BAN: 5 Supreme ChartBr. 25 
Sfadft jn(5d?). «Casfi Reduced. Hariey 
Street Men Wth). GworaTs Girl (I). Janey3 
D 9 bgf 7 t La ante Rose. Ruhr ra^rf (eft)- 

Si* *3-10. OF: 

E250.CSftS2S4. 


130 


1 7 raa Wt ttte Ol Pandora. SL U. 
«L 15L R P Jones attAstoCiraughAc^ 
£18-20; 1430. £200. ££50. mp WS* 
CSr E7628 

Itch) J.JQHB FRANTIC (D 


1 IRHI II trie) 1, BARDSEY (P De 
£EaiitoMOam(Ja0tuOffiar. 



Oewv. 




MaWnaMartwrough. Tote; £260, 
mo. OftTl7.70. CSR £2496. 


£150. _ .. 

Boutrin £100 gns. 




w, 


3.75 (3m If ch) 1, CONOUBUNO P 
Scudamore. 1 1 -* feet z TWoCocners S 
Prevail, 139): 3, Fua tu (S »- 

1). ALSO MUfcH Ferocious KMgM. 13-Z 


. j Concrete Caore 
(4m). 33 The Butcher 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


SPORT 


FOOTBALL: SUB-POSTMASTER PUTS HIS STAMP ON SOUTHERN LEAGUE SURPRISE PACKET 


* - 


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Golden chance 
for Andries 
as Hearns 


moves up 

By Siiknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Dennis Andries, of Britain, 
the World Boxing Council 
light-heavyweight champion, 
has signed to defend his title 
against Thomas Hearns, of the 
United States, the former 
world welterweight and light- 
middleweight champion in 
February. The bout will take 
place in the United States, in 
Las Vegas or Atlantic City, • 
although Andries was even 
prepared to box. Hearns in the 
American's home town of, 
Detroit. 


“I'm really excited to be 
fighting Hearns and looking 
forward to getting him in the 
ring and doing a job on him. I 
don't mind where I fight him 
Ifhe is fool enough to come in 
with me then let him come," 
Andries told boxing writers at 
a lunch in London yesterday. 

Greg Steeoe, Andries’ s 
manager, was rather 1 more 
deferential. “Hearns is a 
legend," he said-“It is a fas- 
cinating match with tremen- 
dous incentives on both sides. 
If Dennis gels past Hearns he 
will become a million dollar 
fighter overnight If Hearns 
wins there is always the 
possibility that Marvin Hagler 
will stay around long enough 
to fight him again.” 

The contract does not pre- 
clude Hearns first meeting 
Herol Graham, Britain's 
World Boxing Association top 
middleweight for a vacant 
title if Marvin Hagler is 
stripped of one of the three he 
currently holds. Hearns 
would not only have to meet 
Andries within 90 days of a 
middleweight tide bout but 


also pay him compensation 
and give him a bout on the 
bilL 

Steene said: “Hearns is now 
duty bound to honour the 
contract even ifhe first fights 
for the world middleweight 
title. We have got it all tied up, 
as I am the co-promoter with 
Ringside Inc. mid Emmanuel 
Steward. American cable net- 
works warn Dennis very much 
and we are planning ms next 
three fights in the United 
States." 

Andries, who will be leaving 
shortly for a holiday in Bar- 
bados, plans to go to United 
States in December to start 
training for his defence. 

Steene also said that 
Andries would be giving up 
his British title to allow other 
fight-heavyweights to keep the 
division active. He said that 
Andries had been holding on 
to the title to pet his photo- 
graph taken with two Lons- 
dale Bells around him, even 
though be could not win the 
second belt outright wens be 
successfully to defend his title 
again. The British Boxing 
Board of Control have agreed 
to let him have the belt on 
loan so it can be photo- 
graphed. 

The former British light- 
heavyweight champion, Tom 
Collins, who has had five 
contests with Andries and lost 
four, is likely to meet 
Manchester’s John Moody for 


the vacant title. - They have 
final etimi- 


been paired in a fi 
nator but expect the status of 
the bout to be enhanced by 
Andries's derision to give up 
the title. 


Medical initiative 


Washington (AFP) — Three 
hundred boxers are to take part 
in a medical research project 
designed to determine the ef- 
fects of the sport on the human 
brain. 

The project, to be carried out 
by a team of specialists from 
Washington’s John Hopkins 
School of Public Health, has 
been set up jointly by the United 
States Amateur Boxing Federa- 
tion and the United States 
Olympic Foundation. 

Doctors in the United States 


have long been opposed to 
boxing on the grounds that h 
leads to irrecoverable brain 
damage. Walter Stewart, who 
will bead the research team. 


said: “The obvious conclusion 
is that there is a risk correlation 
between boxing and neurologi- 
cal damage. The question is bow 
much.” 

Designed to last four years, 
the project trill examine 300 
young amateur boxers and 100 
Other young athletes in the 
Washington area. 


OLYMPICS 


TABLE TENNIS 


Seoul fear 
of flood 


sabotage 


Joint team 
first ever 
for Asians 


Seoul (AFP) -South Korea 
expressed fears yesterday that 
North Korea might try to ob- 
struct the 1988 Summer Olym- 
pics here by opening a dam now 

under construction to flood the 
Olympic facilities along the Han 
River in Seoul. 

“We expect North Korea’s 
provocations with die use of its 
dam water on the eve of the 
1988 Seoul Olympics." Lee 
Woong Hee, foe Culture 
andlnformation Minister, told 
the press. _ ^ 

President Chun Doo Hwan 
chaired a recent Cabinet meet- 


ing to study how to protect the 
Olympic facilities during the 


V1 .... K „ lines during 

June and July flood period, just 
before the Olympics . 

Lee said the dam which North 
Korea has started building just 
north of the demilitarized zone, 
1 00 miles north-east of Seoul, 
could pose “a big threat” by 
storing about 1.8 billion tons of 
water several months before the 




Lee Ki Baek, South 

Korea's Defence Minister, said 
if the dam collapsed or was 
artificially destroyed, the flood 
waters could hit the Han River 
valley including Seoul with the 
force of a nuclear explosion. 

North Korea has sow 
objected to Seoul hosting 
1988 Olympics and has de- 
manded that the Games be co- 
hosted by Seoul and the NOrth 
Korean capital, Pyongyang- 


From David Watts 
Tokyo 

China, Taiwan and North and 
South Korea are to form joint 
teams for the first time for the 
Euro-Asian table tennis tour- 
nament - beginning here next 
month. 

None of the countries have 
ever joined with them political J 
rivals in any sporting event 1 
before. 

The Asian Games goW medal- 
list from South Korea, Yoo 
Nam-kyu, joins two North 
Koreans — the Asian junior 
tournament winner, Kim Song 
Hod, and Chu Jong CtraUn one 
of the three-man teams. Wu 
Wen Chia of Taiwan, who 
defeated the Chinese world 
champion, Jiang Jialing, in the 
US Open last year, forms an- 
other men's team with Hod Jun 
of China and Teng YL 

In one of the three women's 
teams, Li Bun Hui of North 
Korea teams bp with Lee Sun of 
South Korea and another north- 
erner Pang Chun Dolt. 


Hobbs out 


David Hobbs, the Oldham 
and former Great Britain rug 
league forward, has been rti 
out for at least a month with 
knee ligament damage: Hobbs 
limped off during Oldham's 
match last week with the 
Australians. 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


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Post master: Bobby Hope at work in his sab-post office in Bi rmingh a m (Photograph: Phil Dunn) 


Hope back on the glory f 
trail with Bromsgrove 


By Pan) Newman 


When Bobby Hope chose to 
leave professional football seven 
years ago he was confident he 
had made the right decssaa. He 
had enjoyed a highly successful 
career, dominated by 12 seasons 
with West Bronnridb Album, 
and after r e turn ing to England 
from a two-year spell in America 
the time seemed right to make a 

flmwy of direction. 

“1 had one or two offers to 
continue playing, but 1 was 36 
and obviously didn't have mneh 
time left as a player,” he said. 
“With a wife and two children, 
security was very important. I 
wanted to get estabfabed in 
tasiaess and so when the chance 
came along to boy a sub-post 
office in Bitmogiun I took it" 

The only pro bl em was that 
Hope had not folly appreciated 
ite bow deep his love of 
_jtball ran. Not even his 
involvement as nianagre of a 
local Southern League dub, 
Bromsgrove Rovers, whom he 
takes mis Saturday inis the first 
round of the FA Cup, has been 
able to quench his thirst for the 
game. 

“I took the manager's job at 
Bromsgrove hnricafly because n 
lot of people wanted me to do it,” 



he said. “1 wasn't very, keen 
because although Td been play- 
ing for them for a few seasons I 
wasn't really looking to extend 
my football career. 

“But I've come to really eqjoy 
the job and if the opportunity 
Mm* now to get back into the 
professional game J woold have 
to seriously consider it The 
basmess provides me with a 
firing and a secure base, bat on 
reflection I think 1 made a 
ndstake leaving foO-time foot- 
balL If I had stayed and done the 
rounds I would probably have a 
job in the game today.” 

If Bromsgrove maintain their 
enrreut rate of progress, Hope, 
now aged 43, might not have to 
wait long before his managerial 
ability is recognised. Last sea- 
son Bromsgrove won the South- 
era League midland diriskm and 
league cup; this season, with 
attendances up to a healthy 
avenge of about 600, they have 
lost only twice in the premier 


division and are through to the 
first round of die FA Cup — in 
which they entertain Newport 
County — for the first time in 30 
years. 

Some observers see hints of 
Hope's own elegant style in 
Bromsgrove's play, but the for- 
mer Scottish mternatioual is 
careful not to expect too ranch of 

hit I— m. 

“Some players who have been 
at the top Cud it difficult 
working at this level because 
they try to impose ideas which 
are beyond most of the players,” 
he said. “With all due respect to 
the players, most are at this level 
because they 'TO nut good enough 
to be professionals and yon have 
to make allowances for that. 

“We play attacking football 
because that's the way 1 believe 
the game should be played. Also, 
players at this level want to 
exrite and entertain, because 
theyVe certainly not m it for the 



Fast master Hope In his 
playing days 


Newport win provide Hope, 
winner of an FA Cup winner's 
medal with West Bromwich in 
1968, with his stiffest test yet. 
“If Newport play to the best of 
their ability they should beat as, 
bat don't rule os out, especially if 


luck is on our ride,” he said. 

“That can.be afi-ira portent in 
the Cup. I remember drawing at 
Colchester with West Bromwich 
in the third round is the year 
that we won the Cup. They 
scored in the last inmate and to 
this day I don't know why it was 
disallowed. Tbe referee said it 
was for a foul by one of our 
players, bntl don't dunk anyone 
rise in the ground saw it.” 


Schools football 


Debut goal 
is one to 
remember 


English disease goes Dutch 

• - - - ■ ■ — - «ir« mwinr hflnc *1 male) 


By Simon O’Hagan 


By George Chesterton 


Shrewsbury 

Repton 


..2 

-1 


Shrewsbury scored tbe decid- 
ing goal three minutes from the 
end of a fast, closely contested, 
match. Reptoa. fell of con- 
fidence and well led ty Dro 
Anderson, set a quick pace and, 
in foe first ten minutes, con- 
stantly threatened the Shrews- 
bury goal Alasdair Wynn, one 
of three colts making their first 
team debuts, beaded off the line 
with the game but a minute old 
and Mark Lascefles, the Shrews- 
bury captain, kept a cool head in 
marshaling a sound defence to 
lead his side baric into the game. 

Twice Shrewsbury might have 
scored in tbe next quarter of an 
hour but for the fine positioning 
of Robin Williamson in the 
Repton goal In tbe second-half; 
Repton again looked the stron- 
ger and, with 20 minutes to go, 
Peter Gillespie found Neil 
Pashley unmarked in the centre 
to put Repton in front. 

Ten minutes from time, 
Repton conceded a penalty 
which Martin Griffiths con- 
vened. Griffiths, s ee mi ng to 
find an extra yard of pace, 
dominated play in midfield and 
initiated the move which gave 
Gordon Co? tart the chance to 
score foe winning goal from ten 
yards, a moment be is unlikely 
to forget in his first match. 
SHREWSBURY: M Jones. A Wynn, M 
LasoeUes, J Wansttfl. G HutcWnson, J 
Caiftnan, P Oeans. M Qtfftfts, P Venn, 6 
Cotort. J Pncfcam. Sub: D Rout 
REPTON: R ttWtenson. <3 Mooter, C 
Adams, B Gftmto. 8 Hsfl. S Evans, D 
Andwscm. P Bsom, N Pasfttey. S Jtrtsn, 
P (magpie. Sub: J Hart 
Refsraes A M Seddoes (Shrewsbury). 


A proposal in The Nether- 
lands to Nay some Leag u e 
matches behind dosed doors to 
avoid the possibility of crowd 
trouble highlights the feet that 
the so-called English disease of 
football hooliganism is conta- 
gious. even if it has taken a little 
while for the germs to spread. 

This season, the second since 
foe ban on English dubs from 
Europe which followed the 
Brussels tragedy of 18 months 
ago, has seen numerous out- 
breaks of trouble on the Conti- 
nent, notably in The 
Netherlands. 

Dutch hooliganism has es- 
calated this season and seems to 
be growing worse by the week. 
The scale of foe problem was 
apparent last month at 
FeyenoonTs UEFA Cup second 
round, first leg tie at Borussia 
Monchengtadbacfa in West Ger- 
many where 71 arrests were 
made after supporters from the 
Rotterdam dub had fought local 
people, wrecked shops and over- 
turned cars. 

Crowd trouble is becoming 
increasingly common is Dutch 
League g p m**, foe worst in- 
stance of which occurred at foe 
weekend when foe match be- 
tween Excelsior, of Rotterdam, 
and Den Haag was abandoned 
by foe referee early in the second 


Ban may be lifted 
says Millichip 


The FA chairman, Bert 
MtUickip, predicted that 
England's bam shment from 
Europe wffl end wftitia 12 
months. “We shall be back next 
year,” he said. “They (UEFA) 
want ns back and are only 
waiting for me to tefl them we 
are ready." 

But Mfifichip, speaking at 
Shrewsbury Town's centenary 
dimer on Monday, warned: “If 
vre do go back and vre get the 
slightest bit of croaUe vie shall 
be oat of Earopean football and 
world football for the foresee- 
able future.” 


half after the Excelsior players 
aiened by 


bad said they felt threat 


visiting fens. Early in foe match 
■n Haag 


Den Haag supporters had 
thrown an explosive device on 
to foe field and. after its 


abandonment fought with pol- 
ice. The use of incendiaries has 
become a particularly sinister 
feature of crowd violence in Tbe 
Netherlands. 

The trouble at Excelsior came 
only three days after the Dutch 
national association had an- 
nounced they were considering 
a ban on spectators for certain 
matches. After a meeting be- 
tween association officials and 
foe mayors of towns where 
professional football is played, 
Wim Jesse, an association 
spokesman said: “Barring the 
public would be tbe ultimate 
remedy to avoid violence and 
ensure fair competition.” 

The attitude of Dutch mayors 
is important since they run the 
local police forces and have foe 
power to ban a match. Jesse 


If there is a feeling among 
football officials in this country 
that these problems put English 
hooliganism in in a rather 
different light, then it is unlikely 
to be reflected in UEFA's atti- 
tude when it comes to foe 
question of the ban on English 
dubs from European com- 
petition. UEFA officials are 
monitoring behaviour at League 
matches hoe this season and 
their findings will be considered 
when the executive committee 
meet in February. Bert 
Millichip. tbe chairman of the 
Football Association, believes it 
is only a matter of saying “We 
are ready” but a UEFA spokes- 
man reiterated this week that 
tbe ban was indefinite and that 
an end to it was not forseen at 
foe moment. 


Shaw is given another 
comeback chance 


Chigwell owe 
success to 


young Davis 


Chigwell, in winning 
attended • 


against 


3-2 

Ue, extended their 

_ record of success 

(George Chesterton writes). Un- 
til this exciting match. Highgate 
were also unbeaten ibis season 
— and. indeed, their hopes must 
have been high when they 
reached half-time one goal 
ahead. Chigwell equalized and 
went ahead shortly after foe 
interval but. gave away an own- 
goal before Seaton Davis, who is 
still under 16, scored the winner 
with ten minutes to spare, his 
second goal of tbe match. 

Eton, who have been improv- 
ing steadily, defeated Forest 4-1 . 
although Forest fought back 
after trailing 3-0 at half-time. 
Malvern, ai home to Wolver- 
hampton GS. won by the same 
margin. 

The Southern- independent 
schools squad for foe North v 
South dash at Wolverhampton 
on Sunday, November 23. has 
been selected, 

SQUAD; S Plait (CrtgweCV d «**»■; 
(ttfihgatoj. S toafasr (Mat**?. | 
Anomz (Forest, O Um*wu (Fq wwl.. ? 
Law (KES Wta* I dtttefld* 

A Lee tCrtsrwrt). O Robert* (C£ Guern- 
sey), H Dooetas-Pemnt (Mawmji w 
rtaicg {Etofi*. C Jenkins (CharterTwuse). J 
Guernsey! 


Gary Shaw, the Aston Villa 
forward, will be given a chance 
10 rebuild his injury-interrupted 
career in the Full Members’ Cop 
tie at home to Derby -County 
today. 

The former England Under- 
21 international had four opera- 
tions after damaging his ngm 
knee in a match at Nottingham 
Forest over three years ago. He 
made a limited comeback with 
10 league appearances last rea- 
son. and is now set for his first 
• senior game of the current 
campaign after scoring a hat- 
trick in the reserves last week. 


• Luton Town made a loss of 
£102,000 last year - a big 
improvement on the 1985 fig- 
ures. The first division dub 
made a profit of £522,000 on 
transfers in foe year up to May 
31 1986. compared to an outlay 
of £868.000 over the previous 1 2 
months. 


• An appeal launched by third 
division Mansfield Town to 
1,300 local firms for financial 
backing produced a repfy from 


that Lincoln directors will i 
antee all but £50,000 of the I 
needed to finance the new 
development 

Lincoln are relying on 
supporters to raise foe extra 
£50,000. bur only £17.000 has 
been contributed so far. 

• Brian Cough’s Nottingham 
Forest will provide the opposi- 
tion for Shrewsbury Town’s 
centenary match at Gay- 
Meadow in April 1987. 

• West German club FC Co- 
logne said yesterday that, they 
had agreed to loan Israeli inter- 
national midfield player David 
Pisanti to Hapoel Tel Aviv until 
foe end of foe season. 

Pisanti, aged 24. can also play 
as a defender, but has failed to 
become a standard member of 
Cologne's first team this season. 

• Asgcir Sigurvinsson. the 
Icelandic international and cap- 
tain of the West German side 
Stuttgart, will be out of action 
for several weeks after under- 


Two managers 
keep Hearts 
in equilibrium 


going an operation on 
dis' 


one per cent of them — just 13. 
;r Ian Greaves admi"" 1 


lined 

that the appeal has failed, and 
warned today that apathy could 
endanger the future of the club. 


• Lincoln City chairman John 
Reames U to meet city council 
representatives on Friday for 
ihe go-ahead to build a new 
1. 300-seal stand, costing 
£350.000. at Sincil Bank in lime 
for next season. Plans for a more 
expensive development were 
shelved last month because of 
rising costs, but Mr Reames has 
now promised share-holders 


theshoufder he dislocated in the 
European Cup Winners' Cup 
defeat by Torpedo Moscow last 
week. 

The 3 1 -year-old midfield 
player was injured after 59 
minutes, leaving Stuttgan with 
ten men as they lost 5-3 to 
Torpedo in the second round, 
second leg tic. 


long way to go.” 


Swinton get Grima 


Swinton. who are chasing 
promotion, have been granted a 
work p e rm it for Joe Grima, the 
New Zealand prop, and he joins 
the second division Rugby 
League dub next week 


Littbarski set to 


return home to 


revive Berlin side 


said: “If a mayor bans a match, 
we'U first try to have it played 
earlier in the day, then we'U try 
to postpone it to a later date, 
then well try to have it played at 
another venue, and if all that 
fails to cancel the ban. we’ll have 
it played without the public.” 

Instances of hooliganism at 
Italian League matches have 
occurred almost every weekend 
this season despite a ban on 
alcohol and the carrying-oul of 
body searches. There has also 
been trouble in Greece — a fen 
was killed by a flare fired before 
the start of a match last 
month — and in West Ger- 
many. where tear gas was used 
by hooligans, and later by 
police, during a riot at a match 
in Munich at foe weekend. 


Berlin (AP) — Blau-Weiss 
Berlin, struggling to avoid 
relegation from foe first division 
of foe West German league, are 
negotiating to hire Pierre 
Unbars la from Racing, of Paris, 
on loan until tbe end of foe 
season, dub officials said 
yesterday. 

The Blau-Weiss business 
manager. Kari-Heinz Voger, 
said Linbarski would speak to 
Jean-Luc Lagardere. foe Racing 
president, today and ask that he 
be loaned to the West Berlin 
club, which won promotion last 
season. No terms of foe pro- 
posed deal were disclosed. 
Littbarski, aged 26. a West 
German international winger, 
joined Racing after the World 
Cup finals in Mexico. 

Bui hr has been unable to 
secure a regular place at foe 
Paris club, wbo also have two 
Uruguayan internationals, Enzo 
Francesco!) and Ruben Pax. 
Linbarski, in recent interviews 
with West German newspapers, 
said, he was unhappy with his 
status in France and would tike 
to return to West Germany. A 
native of Berlin. Linbarski 
joined Racing from FC Cologne. 
• MADRID: Tbe Atletico Ma- 
drid coach. Vicente Miera. who 
helped guide Spain to foe quar- 
ter-finals of the World Cup in 
Mexico, has lost his job after less 
than three months with foe dub. 

He is foe fifth coach to have 
been sacked in foe Spanish first 
division with only 13 matches 
played so far this season. A dub 
spokesman said Miera was be- 
ing replaced despite the 
weekend’s 1-0 home win over 
Real Sociedad which lifted his 
side to fourth in foe table. 

Ati&tico finished fifth in foe 
league last season and reached 
tbe final of the European Cup 


Winners' Cup. going down to 
Dynamo Kiev. But they were 
knocked out of the UEFA Cup 
by Viioria Guimaraes. of Por- 
tugal. last Wednesday and have 
performed modestly 

Miera. aded 46. was deputy to 
the national coach, Miguel Mu- 
noz, from 1982 to 1986 but foe 
Spanish football federation de- 
cided not to renew his contract 
after tbe World Cup finals 

• NICE: Rolando Barrera, foe 
Argentine forward, is leaving 
foe French first division dub. 
Nice, after nearly 18 months, 
ten of which have been spent on 
foe sidelines through injury. The 
Nice president, Mario 
Innocentinj, said he did not 
know ifBarrera, previously with 
Newell's Old Boys in Argentina 
and then foe Spanish side Real 
Mallorca, was in negotiation 
with any other dub. 

• WARSAW: The Katowice 
goalkeeper. Miroslaw Dreszw, 
has had his spleen removed in a 
Swiss hospital following injuries 
received during foe Polish side's 
European Cup Winners’ Cup tie 
against Sion, of Switzerland, last 
Wednesday. 

Dreszer's spleen ruptured, 
with subsequent heavy internal 
bleeding, in a 56th-minute dash 
with foe Sion winger. Domi- 
nique Cina, the Katowice man- 
ager. Marian Dziurowicz, told 
Reuters yesterday 

Katowice lost foe second 
round, second leg. match 3-0 
and went out 5-2 on aggregate. 
AU three goals were scored after 
Dreszer. foe national under-21 
team goalkeeper, was replaced 
by Robert Sek. Dziurowicz said 
Dreszer had the operation yes- 
terday and would stay in hos- 
pital for at least 10 days. 
Nothing could be said yet about 
his future career, he added. 


Denmark aiming 
to make history 


Bratislava (Reuter) — The re- 
turn of their forwards. Elkjaer, 
and Laudrup could spark Den- 
mark to a historic win over 
Czechoslovakia in tomorrow's 
European Championship Group 
Six qualifying match here. 


Liverpool pair oat 
for Poland dash 


The two Italian-based players, 
so lethal in Denmark’s impres- 
sive run in the Mexico World 
Cup finals, missed their team's 
opening group game against 
Roland and foesidc struggled to 
a disappointing 1-0 win. 


The Czechoslovak manager. 
Josef Masopust, is aware of foe 
danger posed by Elkjaer. in 
particular, but he is confident 
his side can prevent Denmark, 
semi-finalists in foe last Euro- 
pean Championships, recording 
their first win over the Czechs. 

Much of Masopust's con- 
fidence is based on his team’s 3- 
0 drubbing of a strong Finnish 
side in Brno last month. ”We 
played well against Finland and 
if we repeat our performance I 
think we can win again.” he 
said. “The Danes are always a 
dangerous side and we shall 
have to watch out for Elkjaer 
and Soren Lerby. who are a 
threat in every match they 
play.” Masopusi said he had 
concentrated op strengthening 
discipline in his midfield of 
Hasek, Chovanec. Kula and 
Janecka, who were criticised for 


Dublin (AFP) —The Republic 
of Ireland Hill almost certainly 
be without Liverpool’s Mark 
Lawrenson and Ronnie Whelan 
for tonight's match against Po- 
land in Warsaw. 

The Liverpool players are 
both suffering from slight inju- 
ries and their absence could 
leave tbe way dear for Leeds 
United's John Sheridan to win 
his first cap. 


slackness in foe match against 
Finland. 

“I think we have gpt the 
midfield straightened out and 
this time 1 hope it will fulfill 
both its defensive and offensive 
roles. We want to concentrate 
on quick breaks out of defence.” 
Masopust said. 

He has made only one change 
in his squad, calling in raid- 
fielder Herda to replace Siva. 
Herda will start the game on foe 
substitutes' bench. 


CZECHOSLOVAKIA; LMMosko; S Levy. 
J Ondra. F Strata. 4 Bata. I Hasek, J 
Chovanec. K Ktaa, P Janecka, T 
I KnoHcak (or S Gnga). 


BC (from): T Rasmussen: O Ovist 
M Otsen. S Busk. 


... _ Ivan Nlelsan. H 

Andersen. Kent Ntalsen, S Lerby. F 
Anersan. J Joem Bertetsen. J Ofcan, J 
Moiby. K Bwggreen, M Laudrup. P 
Bkjaer. J Eriksen 


Greeks hit Romanians 


by loss 
of secrets 


Athens (Reuter) — Marion 
Estcrhazy has enraged many 
Greeks by turning his back on 


inspired 
by cup win 


his adopted country to hefp 
for 


Hungary prepare for today’s 


European championship 
tlifier. 


quali 


Hungarian-born Esterhazy, 
‘ ■ “ k dub 


who plays for foe Greek 

AEK Athens, has put his experi- 
ence of Greek soccer at foe 
disposal of Imre Komora. who 
took over as Hungary manager 
after foe team’s debacle in foe 
World Cup in Mexico. 


Seville (Reuter) — The core of 
foe Steaua Bucharest side who 
snatched foe European Cup 
from Barcelona on penalty kicks 
six months ago return to Seville 
determined to inflict fimher 
misery on Spain in a European 
championship group one 
qualifying match tonight. 

Nine Steaua players are in- 
cluded in Romania's squad for 
the match against Spain. The 
venue may be different — the 
Benito Villa Marin stadium of 
Real Beds instead of Seville's 


Heart of Midlothian yes- 
terday ended speculation about 
foe future of foetr assistant 


manager. Sandy J online, who 
had been linked with foe vacant 


Some Greek newspapers have 
criticised foe winger, running 
headlines such as “Esterhazy 
reveals the secret s of our na- 
tional team.” and “I told them 
everything.” 

But Komora is grateful for his 
player's help. "Esterhazy has 
told us a lot about the Greek 
team, and 1 saw them playing 
against Poland on video. They 
played well and 1 can say they 
lost uqjustly.” 

Both sides lost their first 

S oup five qualifying matches, 
recce 2- 1 to Poland, and 


Sanchez Pizjuan — but just 
Duldstir 


H angary 1 -0 to the Netherlands, 
anddefea 


managerial post at Aberdeen. 

Wallace Mercer, club chair- 
man. announced that Jardioe 
and Alex MacDonald, foe man- 
ager. had signed new three-and- 
a-haif .year contracts, which 
would tie them to the club as 
joint managers until May 1990. 

“It's a major step forward, not 
only having a team on the field 
but. more importantly, to have 
the team off il” he said. He 
hoped it would end speculation 
about what they were doing at 
Tynrcastle. 

“I felt we owed it to the 
players and to foe supporters to 
clarify the situation.” 

Jardioe. who is 37. said; “1 
was not approached by Aber- 
deen and if I had been I would 
have turned them down. I am 


and defeat today would dent the 
losers' chances of reaching foe 
1988 finals in West Germany. 


Greek manager Miftos 
Papapostolou is confident of 
viclorv, while Komora has 
warned the team that another 
defeat could spell foe end of 
many international careers. 

"We came to Athens to win 
and we have no other choice but 
victory. If we lose it is certain we 
will demolish the team and form 
a new one.” said Komora. 


happy here. We're just starting 
ro build lhings but there’s still a 


mg'. 

Hearts also announced that 
two of their lop playing assets. 
Saiufy Clark, forward, and Craig 
Uvnn. defender, had signed 
new. foree-vear contracts. 


Lee injured again 

Sammy Lee. the Queen’s Park 
Rangers midfield player, has 
broken down again. Lee. who 
has missed Rangers’ last four 
mutches with a groin injury , had 
to conic off during a Football 
Combination fixture at Ports- 
mouth al Loftus Road. Tbe 
injury has been diagnosed as 
tom 'fibres of the groin 


- The manager first tried id 
build a new team with younger 
players and without those play- 
ing abroad. But he changed his 
mind after the Dutch defeat, and 
has recalled midfield playets 
Nagy — the team captain in 
Mexico — and Burcsa. both of 
whom play in France. 

Komora’s recall of Nagy sig- 
nals the end of another of his 
experiments, that of convening 
defender Garaba into a midfield 
player. Tbe manager will now 

rely on Deiari to feed the two 
wingers, Esterhazy and 
Meszaros. 


GREECE; A Mtnou. T Papadopoutos. S 
Apostotakis, P Xenihopouios. P Mtchos. S 
Manoiaa. K KafotnitrousiE. n Alavamas K 
Mavridafi. K Antancu. T Mhropoutos. Y 
Ktftate. L Papaloamou. S KoMes; D 
SaravBkos, K Batstnikas. N 
Anaswpoutas. 


HUNGARY: j Sandra. P HegeCus. S 
Satoi, A Roth. I Garate. J Ptoszefler. L 
Deem. F Meszaros, > Boda. M Esteitazy. 
A Nagy. G Burcsa. G Csortta. J Rtos. L 

Dajte. k caapo. z Pew- 


being back in the city shot 
memories of that famous night 
in May for foe Bucharest 
players. 

Since failing to qualify for the 
World Cup finals in Mexico, the 
Steaua coach Emerich Jenei. has 
introduced eight of his players 
and the club’s attacking style 
into the national squad, which 
be also ruris. 

Ladislau Boioni. foe captain, 
aged 34. still runs the midfield 
with his authoritative left foot 
and in Gbeotghe Hagj, aged 21, 
Jenei has one of Europe's most 
exciting young players. The 
Steaua players will have the 
added incentive of trying to 
atone for their second round 
European Cup defeat 

The Romanians began their 
European Championship cam- 
paign by thrashing Austria 4-0 
in Bucharest last month and foe 
Spaniards might have wished 
for an easier opening encounter. 
But Spain, runners-up to France 
in the 1984 championship, 
showed that they could compete 
wuh foe best in the work! by 
reaching the quarter-finals in 
Mexico. 

Miguel Munoz, the Spanish 
coach, has kept his World Cup 
side largely intact, though inju- 
ries have robbed him of his first- 
choice central defenders 
.Antonio Maceda and Andoni 
Goikoetxca. Spain will also be 
without the Real Madrid mid- 
field pla>er Rafael GordiUo. 
who dropped out with a pulled 
muscle on Monday, and his 
place on the left seems likely to 
go to Julio .Alberto. Both 
Alberto and his Barcelona col- 
league Victor Munoz, will be 
grateful for the chance lo avenge 
bsi May's European Cup defeat. 

The in-form Miguel 
"Chendo" Porian. who wiped 
out Michel Platini during Real 
Madrid's -European Cup tri- 
umph over Juvenius, and loyal 
servant Pedro Tomas, are wing 
for the right back position while 
the choice of a forward partner 
for Emilio Buiragueno rests 
between Hipolito Rincon and 
Eloy Oiaya. 


29 


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ORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


CRICKET 


it-arm bowlers threaten to 
urther undermine England 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Brisbane 


there is not much danger of 
ji gland suffering from over- 
confidence when the Test 
Series starts here on Friday. 
Australia's journalists, no less 
than their left-arm bowlers, 
are seeing to that. ‘"Poms of 
course are the worst in the 
world,” was the first headline 
to catch ray eye on arrival on 
Monday. The next referred to 
Botham's “saddest day”. 

Precluded be may be from 
giving interviews to the Press, 
but there is no keeping 
Botham out of it. I. too, shall 
miss seeing him hitting the 
ball out of the Taunton 
ground on Somerset's behalf; a 
lot more, certainly, than 
listening to his gratuitous 
observations about loyalty. 
Somerset's treatment of 
Botham bas been indulgent to 
a fault Should he now finish 
his playing days with 
Worcestershire and Queens- 
land. he will not be the first 
Englishman to have done so. 
Tom Graveney signed off here 
in Brisbane. 

From a distance, perhaps 
the most disconcerting news 
from the front has not been of 
England's defeat by Queens- 
land in their opening first- 
class match, nor of the catches 
that have been going down, 
but of the decision to send in 
Small as a night-watchman 
against Western Australia last 
Friday evening. It was done to 


save Slack from facing the one 
over that remained to be 
bowled, and if it was necessary 
Slack should not be in the side. 

Worse than that, it smacked 
of pessimism, a consequence. 
I suppose, of England's con- 
stant baiting collapses. In the 
30 first-class innings they have 
completed in 1 986 — in West 
Indies. Australia and at home 
— iheir average total is not 
much over 200 — Few enough, 
in other words, to make each 
innings an ordeal Carting (79 
runs in six first-class innings 
on the tour). Slack (16 in four 
first-class innings) and Gower 
(37 from four and but a single 
hundred in 43 first-class in- 
nings this year) all landed here 
from Perth last night in need 
of reassurance. 

England have had trouble in 
the past with left-arm opening 
bowlers in Australia, most 
recently in 1979-80 when 
Dyrnock won the first Test for 
Australia by taking 6 for 34 in 
England's second innings and 
9 for 86 in the match. Before 
that there was Davidson and. 
in 1958-59, Meckiff As a line 
of attack it presents its own 
problems, especially when the 
ball is swinging about as it can 
on a steamy Brisbane day. 

There were times when 
even Davidson himself was 
surprised to find the ball 
moving in a direction he had 
not intended, so that it was 


hardly surprising if the bats- 
men were baffled. I am not 
sure that Alan Davidson re- 
ceives quite the recognition he 
deserves as one of the great all- 
round cricketers, 

Medriff was quite different. 
Peter May's side came across 
him for the first time when he 
played for Victoria against 
them, almost a month before 
the first Test. Preparation for 
the Test series consisted then 
not of three first-class matches 
but of seven, the side progress- 
ing gently round the crescent 
from Perth to Brisbane; via 
Adelaide, Melbourne and Syd- 
ney. Already ou this tour they 
have been from Brisbane to 
Perth and back, a distance not 
much short of the return 
journey from London to New 
York. The modem itinerary 
makes a good excuse when 
things are going wrote. 

Meddff took five for 85 in 
that match with Victoria, and, 
although no one was in much 
doubt that he threw, the 
concensus was that he posed 
an insufficient threat to war- 
rant an objection. We coukl 
hardly have got that more 
wrong. When, in the Test 
matches, he let fly, he was a 
very different proposition. 

It was here in Brisbane, 
incidentally, five years later, 
that Medtiff was finally out- 
lawed. No-balled by Umpire 
Egar four times in the first and 


The long trek to the first Test 


1 Oct 18-20 England v Queensland Country 

2 Oct 22 England v S E Queensland Country 

3 Oct 24-27 England v Queensland 

4 Oct 29 Engfand v S Australia Country ^ 

5 Oct 31 -Nov 3 England v S Australia r.i ; 

6 Nov 5 England vW Austrafia Country H 

7 Nov 7-10 England v W Australia " \ ' 

8 Nov 14-19 t st TEST \ 


> ;\V'- ISV' 1 :': 


Kalgoorfie 


Perth ✓ 


WUdJnna 




^"Adelaide 


ifpSl 

Ban 


Mm 


■' A ImUi 


Daring the first month that 
they bare been in Australia, 
England’s cricketers have play- 
ed seven matches (1*0 Tennant 
writes). Preparing for the first 
Test match on Friday has meant 
travelling 5,640 miles. 

“In an ideal trarid England 
would not do so ranch tra- 
velling,” said Alan Smith, chief 
executive designate of the Test 
and County Cricket Board. 
“England, or MCC, would not 
have travelled so ranch in the 
past- Although there was no 
Test cricket at Perth in the old 
days, this is the inevitable 


cooseqaenoe of one-day matches 
in different venues. 

“They will do even more 
travelline for the one-day 
matches la the month of Janaary 
than they have done so far. I do 
not agree in principle with the 
amount of limited-overs cricket 
they have to play, and the. 
(ravening becomes a part of it,” 

he said. 

“Vet there has to be give-and- 
take om toms. The Australians 
designed their itinerary to sait 
themselves just as we do here. 
We do not make money oot of 
going overseas bat this is the 


Australians' opportunity to gain 
some income. They argue that 
flying from Adelaide to Brisbane 
is no more ardnons than driving 
from London to Manchester. 
Yet one of the most tiring 
aspects of flying is driving from 
airport to hotel and hotel back to 
airport,” be said. 

As can be gleaned from the 
map above, three visits to Bris- 
bane in one month might be 
deemed to be unnecessary. The 
Australian High Commission 
admit as ranch. It is not just on 
the field that cricket has under- 
gone great change. 


Riot cities remain as venues 


The Sind provincial govern- 
ment have decided, after study- 
ing army and police repons, that 
West Indies can safely play next 
week's scheduled matches in 
Hyderabad and Karachi, where, 
more than 50 people have died 
recently in civil riots. Both cities 
have virtually returned to nor- 
mal in the past three days, after 
a week of arson and shooting, 
which involved different ethnic 
groups and students. 

Those best placed to know 
feel strongly that the matches 
may improve the situation. 
According to the Pakistan 
Cricket Board secretary, 
LieutenantColone! RafTNasim. 
they “will help to restore con- 
fidence locally in law and 
order.'’ 

Jackie Hendriks, the West 
Indies manager, said the touring 
team could only be guided by 
the Pakistan authorities. **We 
must assume that every precau- 
tion will be taken to ensure our 
safety. We are in their hands. 

Spinal injuries 
fund gets 
appeal boost 

Show jumping's biggest span- 
sin's are backing an appeal to 
raise £250,000 for spinal injury 
victims. Everest Doable Glazing 
are to support the Spinal Inju- 
ries Association’s .appeal on 
behalf as its 5,000 paraplegics, 
many of whom received their 


From Richard Streeton, Lahore 

Presumably if the position 
changes again, nearer the time, 
the venues could still be 
switched.” 

Clearly a great number of 
fingera will be crossed that 
nothing untoward happens to 
the cricketers. It was small 
consolation, too, to read in a 
guide book that the Sind area, 
with its vast barren tracts, was 
even known to ancient trav- 
ellers, such as the Persians. 

1 Greeks and Arabs, as the “land 
of uncertainties.” 

For both teams the tour’s final 
10 days will be an anxious and 
. hectic time. The one-day inter- 
national in Multan next week- 
end, having to be put back from 
Sunday to' Monday, has done 
nothing to help. 

This is because numerous 
religious processions being held 
on Sunday at shrines adjoining 
the Multan cricket ground. They 
are part of the celebrations to 
mark the birthday of the boly 
prophet. Id Miiadun Nabi. The 


anniversary is governed by the 
moon's movements and this, 
apparently, was overlooked 
when the tour itinerary was 
originally planned. The Multan 
police felt it best that the 
processions and lhr 30,000 
cricket crowd were kept apart. 

Both teams will leave Multan 
to fly the 520 miles to Karachi as 
soon as Monday’s game ends. At 
dawn on Tuesday, November 
18, they will make the three- 
hour journey by road to Hyder- 
abad fora one-day international 
there. They will return to Ka- 
rachi the same evening in 
readiness for the third Test 
match starting on Thursday, 
November 20. 


Knee trouble 

Adrian Jones, the Sussex last 
bowler, is to have another 
operation on his left knee early 
in the New Year. Jones had a 
cart i lege operation last winter 
but the knee has continued to 
handicap him. 

SNOOKER 


only over of his eighteenth 
Test match, against South 
Africa in 1963-64. he retired 
there and then. But nothing 
like that is likelly to happen 
now. No one has. suggested 
that Reid and Matthews, the 
two left-arm swing bowlers in 
the Australian 12 for Friday, 
have dubious actions^ 

It in his prime. Boycott had 
an Achilles heel, it could be 
said to have been against left- 

arm bowlers armed with a new 
ball There was Sobers for one, 
and a theory existed that his 
prolonged withdrawal from 
Test cricket in 1974 was 
prompted by the thought of 
the Indian, SoDcar, swinging 
the ball late into him from 
over the wicket or running it 
away to the slips. The most 
successful English county, 
bowler of recent years, John 
Lever, uses the same method. 
So, loo, does David Thomas 
of Surrey, which makes it that 
much more of a pity that 
injury has held him back. 

That Reid is so very tall (6ft | 
Sin) and willowy could turn 1 
out in the long run to be to | 
England's advantage. To re-| 
mam consistently effective, | 
bowlers of that height need , 
usually to be strongly built, I 
like van der Biii and Gamer, j 
rather than of the gangling! 
type that Reid is. If England's | 
prospects at the moment are 
clouded by the trouble they 1 
have been having with the , 
swinging ball, Reid and Mat- 
thews are not, I fancy, a threat 
in the way of the West Indian 
fast bowlers so much as an 
interesting challenge. 
England's batsmen should be j 
well capable of coming to 
terms with it. 

When Slack is good he is, of 
course, admirable; but he does 
have these very barren 
“trots”, as the Australians call 
them. Early last summer, 
when he was in the middle of 
one, he wanted the selectors to 
forget all about him, which 
made it all the more surprising j 
that they preferred him for 
this tour to Robinson and : 
Metcalfe, both of whom had 
made a lot more runs. And 
unfortunately present-day 
Australian tours, comprising 
mainly Tests and one-day 
internationals, provide few 
chances of batting or bowling 
oneself into form^ 

Had the itinerary been simi- 
larly intensive in 1954-55, 
Tyson, after making the very 
wildest of starts, might weft 
have been written off as not 
worth persevering with. In the 
event he got the work he 
needed and went on to reduce 
Australia's batsmen to a state 
of shock. Slack, for his part, is 
a man of much determination, 
and, after last Friday’s indig- 
nity, be mil need to be. 

Lancashire 
put four 
on shortlist 

Lancashire have drawn up a 
shortlist of four for the position 
of coach. They are Jade 
Simmons, the county’s vice- 
ca plain last season, Alan 
Ormrod, captain of the success- 
fill second team, David Lloyd, a 
former Lancashire captain and 
now on the first-class umpires 
list, and Mike Harris, the only 
outsider in the quartet. Hams 
played for Middlesex and Not- 
tinghamshire and now coaches 
at Lord's. 

Lancashire will deckle upon 
the captaincy for next season 
when the former West Indies 
captain, Clive Lloyd, settles 
plans for his future. Lloyd, who 
was Lancashire's captain last 
summer, is considering a new 
contract together with offers 
from abroad. The dub are to 
take no action over Lloyd's 
alleged criticisms of the 
committee at a recent dinner. 
Lloyd has apologized. 


Centurion Thorburn in a hurry 


There will be a fund- raising 
campaign at next year’s main 
horse shows with special empha- 
sis on the Everest Nations Cop 
meeting at Hickstead and the 
Royal International Horse Show 
at Binarngham. The appeal wflf 
conclude with a draw for an 
estate car at the Horse of the 
Year Show, 

Sports medical 
centre planned 

Derek Doogan, fee former 
Wolverhampton and Northern 
Ireland international, an- 
nounced (dans in Dudley yes- 
terday to build the first all- 
purpose sports medical complex 
ia Britain. It will be known as 
fee Duncan Edwards Sports 
Medicine Centre ia honour of 
the former Manchester United 
footballer who was bom ia 
Dudley. 

Work on the £665,000 project 
will be financed entirely by 
donations. A £400,000 trust fond 
has been set op to pay for its 
day-to-day costs. 

“The centre will not just be for 
professional sportsmen" 
Doogan said. “It will be open to 
everyone in the country who has 1 
a sports related injury. Treat- 
ment at the centre will be free,” 1 


Cliff Thorburn. the Canadian 
champion, whitewashed a for- 
mer wall-of-deaih rider, Gra- 
ham Cripsey. with successive 
century breaks in the third 
round of the Mercantile Credit 
Snooker Classic in Blackpool on 
Monday night. 

Thorburn, who won 5-0 in 
just over an hour and 40 
minutes, bad a break of 1 12 and 
a total clearance of 140. Eight 
rods and eight blacks put him in 
line fora 147 maximum break, 
but after the ninth red he lost 


7.30 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 

European Championship 
Group One 

Spain v Romania .... 

Grotq} Four 

Erajland v Yugoslavia (at Wembley, 

Turkey v N Ireland (4.0) 

Group Five 

Greece v Hungary (3.0). 

Group Six 

Czechoslovakia v Denmark (at 3J0) 
Group Seven 

Scotland v Luxembourg (at Hamp- 
den Park, 8.0)- — - 

Full Members’ Cup 
Second round 

Aston VSte v Derby 

INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Poland v 
RepucHc of lratand / A0>. 

EUROPEAN UNDER-21 CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Group dm Span v Romania (3,0). 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Snghton v 
[pSWcTt (2.0): Bristol Rows v Maw*. 
CENTRAL LEAGUE; Rrat division: HiJI y 
Sheffield United (7 Jft Nottingham Forest 
r L&oesiar Oty (7J&. Second (Stowe 
nftriHmvi w Rflnwhr. Fkm*«**r v Piwh- 


posilion and was forced to lake 
fee blue. 

A maximum would have been 
worth £5,000, but if Thorburn’ s 
break remains the highest of the 
pre-iele vised stages, he will have 
to be content with £1 .250. 

The start of the third round 
had brought about the elimina- 
tion of Dennis Taylor and Neal 
Poulds, and last night, the 
former Classic champion, Willie 
Thome, and the Welshman. 
Doug Mountjoy, joined them 
among the also-rans. Thorne 
was beaten 5-3 by John Spencer, 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 

grtiam {6-30); Seurmarpe v Bradfont 
Sioka v Bolton (7.0k West Bmrrwnch 
AJbon v Notts County (7.01; York v Port 

vtfe. 

VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Rrat * 
vfcROK Souttiwncfc V Warn and Heranam. 
Second dMtfon noth: Rutettp Manor v 
Egham. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Midland dMuuc 
Sutton CoMfieW v Leicester umtad. 
Southern Avtstwc WasriocMHe v RusHp. 
OB (Mow Cop: First round: Poole v 
Trowbnege. 

GREAT MILS WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier dwbiore Mnehegd v Barnstaple. 
NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: NFA Senior Cup: Long Buckby 
vRaunds. 

MACBAR SOUTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Boumemoum v Swansea (2.0): 
Plymouth Argyte v Hartford United. 

GIB ACCEPTANCE CUR First round: 


bridge Cay vSnepshed Cnartemausa. 
SURREY COUNTY PREMER CUP: Pint 
rttund: Doncmg w Cobnarn. 

BEDS SENKK CUP: Rrat round: 
DuistaM * EfceWlux. 

FA YOUTH CUR Rrat munch Sutton 
Untied vOnent 

REPRESENTATIVE HATCHES! Kent FA 
Xi v AFA » (Greenwich Borough FC. 
Btttam); Cambridge Umwrady v Royal 
Navy (at FflraWsTiO). 


(7.15J; Gloucester v Cbettanham (7.0); 
Wakefield v Moseley ISO) 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

TOUR MATCH: Widnes v Austrians. 
JOtt PLAYS! SPECIAL TROPHY; 
Prefcat ne ry round: Hafltax v York. 

OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY; Pt223 Express LomSm League: 
Spencer v Oxford University. Repre- 
sentaova rotenes. Army v Hampshire (at 
AWersnot 2.30). Cambridge Unhrarstv v 
Hocxay Association W (at Basham Abbey). 

RACKETS; Cafcjsflon kwHstlan doubles 
tournament (at Queen s Cub. lonoonfc 
Noel Bruce Cup (at Queen's (Sub, 
London). 

SNOOKER: Mercantile Great Classic 
tournament (st Blackpool}. 

TBINtS: Benson end Hedges champkm- 
Etipa (at Wemfateyk LTA women’s tour- 
nament (at Brsmhafll 



Juggler: Reggie Langhome, of die Cleveland Browns, has trouble controlling the football 
but finally catches rt against the Miami Dolphins. Browns won 26-16. Report, page 41 


RUGBY UNION 


the former world champion, 
with the Leicester player making 
only one break of over 30 in the 
eight frames played. 

Mountjoy, the ex-United 
Kingdom champion, was beaten 
in the deciding frame by the 
former Southport taxi driver. 
Les Dodd. The title bolder, 
Jimmy White, had a dose match 
with the Welshman Steve 
Newbury before clinching vic- 
tory in fee last of the nine 
frames with a break of 90. 

Results, page 43 


RUGBY UNION , 

THORN EM COUNTY CHAMPKMSMft- 
Mddesax v Eastern Carafes (at Sud- 
bury. 13(1): Surrey v Kant (at imoor Counj. 
TOUR HATCH: West KSffepMI v FU 
Barbarians (2.30). 

CLW MATOESc Cambridge Unheraityv 


University 
challenge 
for Lynagh 

Michael Lynagh, fee Queens- 
lander who played centre during 
Australia's grand slam tour of 
Britain and Ireland m 1984 and 
was at stand-off half during fee 
Bledisloe Cup series against 
New Zealand last summer, is 
one of 10 internationals chosen 
in Major R. V. Stanley's XV 
against Oxford University at 
Iffley Road on November 19. 

Lynagh, it is hoped, may 
become a student at Oxford 
after he has completed his 
studies at Queensland Univer- 
sity; for the moment his appear- 
ance this month owes much to 
fee sponsorship of Yaimichi 
Securities, worth £4,000 this 
year, the fourth year of their' 
involvement with the annual 
Stanley's game. He will be 
partnered by Robert Jones, the 
Swansea and Wales scram half. 

Four Oxford Blues appear in 
fee guest side: Halliday, the 
Bath and England centre, and 
three forwards, Macdonald, last 
year’s captain. Brooks, fee 
Rosslyn Park No. 8 (though a 
flanker on this occasion), and 
Malleti, who has appeared for 
South Africa and is now 
player/coach to St Claude; fee 
French second division side. 
Mallett will captain Major 
Stanley's XV, having been 
robbed by injury of fee chance 
to captain Oxford in the 1980 
University match. 

The trustees who organize fee 
invitation side had hoped to 
include two Russian players. 
They approached one of the 
central sporting organizations in 
Moscow fin- a lock and a wing 
from the Russian national side 
who recently beat France ‘A' 
“because Russia have been ex- 
cluded from the World Cup and 
we wanted to give one or two of 
their players a chance to sample 
rugby here” Derek Wyatt, a 
member of the Oxford univer- 
sity Rugby Cub committee 
said. But permission was re- 
fused for individual players 
rather than a whole team; nor 
were fee Toulouse centres,, 
Charvet (who made such an 
impact in this match last season) 
and Bonneval, available. Never- 
theless, the team assembled will 
give the University, despite 
their successes this season, cause 
for thought. 

Two of the backs," Wilson, the 
New Zealand wing, and 
Roussel, fee France ‘B’ centre, 
appeared together in a charity 
tram against Ulster ' three 
months ago when Wilson found 
be bad only to serve fee 
Frenchman for something elec- 
tric to happen. Since Lafond will 
hardly be content to lurk quietly 
at full back, the same should be 
true at Iffley Road. 

UAJOR R V STAtOffS XV: J B Ltfond 


Returning players 
bolster Middlesex 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Middlesex, who already head 
the London division of the 
Thorn-EMI County Champion- 
ship. are able to restore two 
internationals to their side 
against Eastern Counties at the 
Wasps ground. Sudbury, today 
to ensure that they stay top and 
qualify for the semi-finals on 
March 14. 

Nick Stringer and Simon 
Smith, both of Wasps, return at 
full back and right wing after 
recovering from, respectively, 
neck ana knee injuries. But 
Middlesex optimism feat two of 
their forwards — Jackson, the 
captain and No. 8, and Olver 
(hooker) — would play was not 
home oul Jackson's chipped 
ankle bone and CM vet’s twisted 
ankle, injuries sus ta i n e d during 
Harlequins defeat of Gosfoirth at 
the weekend, preclude them and 
their places go to Lee Adamson, 
of Saracens, and Raul Tappin, 
the West London Institute 
hooker. 

A draw would be sufficient for 
Middlesex purposes since they 
have already beaten Surrey and 
Kent, buz they should overcome 
Eastern Counties, who also 
make changes at full back and 
wing. Wiltshire, the London 
Wetsfa player but late of Metro- 
politan Police, and Gregory 
(Southend) join the side. 

Kent, runners-up to Warwick- 
shire in last season's final need 
to beat Surrey at Imber Court 
this evening to avoid demotion 
to Group 'B' in fee London 
division. However, Surrey have 
Gibson, tbeir captain, back from 
international duty and have 
made substantial changes in the 
tbreequarter line where David- 
son, ofLondon Irish, joins three 
Harlequins players. Summers, 
Cooke and Davies. 

Thresher, the Harlequins full 
back, is doubtful fra Kent 
because of damaged ligaments 
and Staples (London Irish) 
stands by- Bond, the Blackheath 
centre is not available fin- 
business reasons and Skinner 
(Harlequins) is recovering from 
a knee operation. His place in 
the back-row goes to Steve 
ChevaL brother of Rob, the 
No. 8 from Askeans. 

The Swansea full back. Mark 
Thomas, returns to the Cam- 
bridge University side after a 
year's absence for tonight's 
game against Leicester at 


Second-strings keep 
All Blacks • record 


Ronsatf (Racing OU^R Uxtomood 


Loveridge will 
face Oxford 

Dave Loveridge, the New 
7<«g|gnrt serum half who helped 
destroy the 1983 British Lions, 
will make his full debut for 


The 34-year-old All Black, 
capped 24 times, lives in 
Staines, and joined Harlequins 
just after fee-start of the season. 

Bui he has been ineligible for 
the first team for most fixtures 
since, then because - he m ost 
serve a three-month apprentice- 
ship before being qualified to 
turn out in merit table or cup 
games. 

That embargo ends on 
December 27. and he should be 
available for his side’s John 
Player Cup third round tie at 
i Wakefield on January 24. 


From Chris Than 
La Rochelle 

French Barbarians — 12 
New Zealand 26 

Wife the second International 
against France — the final 
match of their tour - only a few 
days away there was a‘ lot at 
stake for -fee second-string All 
Blacks in their game against fee 
French Barbarians at La Ro- 
chelle. 

First there was their unbeaten 
tour record which they wanted 
to preserve. Second, they 
seemed particularly keen to 
catch fee eye of Brian Lochore, 
as the team for fee second 
international at Nantes is not 
going to be announced before 
this morning’s training session. 

By beating the French Barbar- 
ians by two goals, two tries and 
two penalties to one goal, one 
drop goal and one penalty goal 
the All Blacks achieved, their 
objective. They have main- 
tained their 100 per cent win- 
ning record and produced good 
quality football which no doubt 
has pleased the All Black 
selectors. 

In the early stages of fee game 
New Zealand - captained by 
Mark Shaw, their veteran flank 
forward — seemed better pre- 
pared to handle fee high de- 
mands of the Barbarian type of 
rugby. They swept the ball wide 
regularly and showed enterprise 
nnti inopniiitv with RntirtL Thrir 


Grange Road. Thomas, the son 
of former Wales captain, Clem 
Thomas, has played only two 
reserve team games for Cam- 
bridge since damaging knee 
ligaments playing for the 
University against Micky 
Steele- Bodge^s XV last Novem- 
ber. His return will help bolster 
an inexperienced Cambridge 
side who suffered another injury 
blow when Andy Cushing, the 
Scottish scrum half, d amayd 
shoulder figments in scoring 
his second try in Saturday's 46- 
20 defeat at Rosslyn Park. , - 

Also missing is fee En gla n d 
students wmg, Chris Oli. with 
an ankle injury. The University 
make their first voluntary 
change to their pack this season 
with fee boxing Blue, Rob 
Wainwrigju, switching from the 
second row to No. 8 — a move 
allowed by fee return after 
injury of die lock, Mike Pepper. 

The international between 
England and France at Bath on 
February 20 — the eve of fee 
Five Nations Championship 
game at Twickenham between 
the two countries — will be fee 
third of its kind at a level which, 
in England at least, has been 
plagued by inconsistent fixture- 
making. Curiously, the first ‘B’ 
game between England and 
France was at the Heysd Sta- 
dium in Brussels in 1979 when 
England lost comfortably. 

They won the second en- 
counter, at Bristol in 1981, by 
20-10 when, among the team, 
was Peter Williams, of OrreU, 
then playing stand-off half to 
Nigel Melville, but now an 
England squad full back. Of fee 
forwards from that game. 
Rendall, Bainbndge, 

Winterbottom and Simpson 
have remained in the squad 
though Simpson, the Sale 
hooker, has yet to win a cap. 

It was the expressed hope of 
the present selection panel feat 
*B' internationals could be 
staged back to back with senior 
internationaK By awarding the 
game to Bath, fee Rugby Foot- 
ball Union doubtless hopes that 
fee enthusiasm for the game in 
feat city will spin over for a 
major representative occasion; 
games between Bath, fee John 
Player Cup holders, and other 
leading dub sides are now 
regularly attracting crowds of 
between 6.000 and 8,000. 


stand-off half, again 
outstanding. 

A star-studded French selec- 
tion — 10 lull internationals — 
captained by another hard 
man, the booker, Phillipe 
Dimrans, answered in kind, in 
fee second half in particular, but 
handling errors or excellent 
cover defence by New Zealand- 
ers foiled their efforts. 

It was an entertaining though 
sometimes scrappy occasion 
which saw fee favourite local 
player. Jean-Pi erre El isalde, a 
former French international 
scrum half, scoring fee only 
French uy; 

For New Zealand. Andy Earl 
picked up and forced his way 
over from a scrum near the 
French line to score fee first try 
while Craig Green rounded off 
an intelligent move which in- 
volved the whole back division 
to add the second one. Terry 
Wright went over on fee right to 
crash on fee bouncing ball 
cleverly set un by Kenny, the 
sernra half; for a third. The 
fourth, fittingly, was touched 
down by Shaw who provided 
fee-reward for a few minutes of 
intense New Zealand pressure. 

FRENCH BARBARIANS: J B LaW R 
gossan-. LFmp awrrat. Y Rousett. 
CDofags, J P EfcsatoG, G Portotonirep- p 
Sawrai), P Dwoans (caotEWi), j m 
R owans, T Maset F Hager (ran: P 
PuMite). P Samara, p Ertani. J L JoStf. 


i.G Wheaton. M 


Befeme: J N Nmttc (Frahetf. 


! bug BY LEAGUE 

Widnes in 
bid for 
a repeat of 
1978 feat 

By Keith Maddin 

At a time when British ragby 
league k once again on us wwra 
fee skill rad might of 

were the last dub«3!n™ 
hem the Kangaroos. This was 
fcw* in October I9”S. 
Australians 

Widnes were zoatded z penalty 
kick in injury time, and mick 

aSU taSd UK ** 

them an 1 M0 v **°*y- . , Uai > 
knight Wktart make their 
bid to repeat their 1978 win. 
Since then 21 dubs have tried to 
lower fee Australian rolours 

without success, and on 

so far the Kangaroos have swept 
aside dub opposition, with only 
minor frustrations against 

,fn-» 

stand-off half, is virtually cer- 
tain to miss tonight’s game wife 
■ knee and back injuries, and 

there mua be some doubt atxwt 

his chances of being tit for the 
third international a week neat 
Saturday. Team selection has 
been delayed until a tdnes cute 

a full slock of their injured. 

Two players who will be 
anxious to get to grips wifet be 
Australians will be the loose 
forward. Pinner, and fee winger. 
Basnert. Both can stake firm 
claims for inclusion in the Great 
Britain squad wife good perfor- 
mances tonight 
Pinner, in particular, wrH be 
out to impress the watching 
Great Britain management 
team, since he has made a 
remarkable comeback wife 
Widnes after being out of fee 
same for so long during fits 
dispate with St Helens. He 
wants the Great Britain jersey 
bade again, and would like to 
remind Maurice. Bamford and 
company that he captained the 
international side against New 
Zealand last season. 

However, Widnes were well 
beaten bv the 1982 tourists, and 
it will need a top class perfor- 
mance tonight to shake the skills 
and composure of a 1986 tour- 
ing-party who are already being 
described by their captain, 
Lewis, as “better than the 1982 
team". ■ 

HOCKEY 

Australia 
to play 
in Glasgow 

By Sydney Friskin 

Australia, the hosts for the 
1988 Inifoor World Cup tour- 
nament at Canberra; are sending 
feeir national side to play in the 
, eighth Glenfiddich invitation 
tournament at Glasgow on 
January 10 and 1 1 next year. 

This will be Australia's first 
overseas tour at the indoor game 
although two of their state sides, 
Victoria and New South Wales 
have already played in the 
Glenfiddich tournament. They 
will have some of the talented 
players who helped them to win 
the World Cup outdoors in 
London Iasi month. 

The English challengers at 
Glasgow are Tulse Hill, the 
national indoor dub champions 
whose team, indudes Richard 
Clarke, the scorer of more than 
100 goals for England. They will 
be playing in this tournament 
for the first lime. So too will 
Arminen of Vienna who have 
won fee Austrian national 
championship for the post 10 
years. 

Murray International Metals 
of Edinburgh, fee holders. 
Menziesbiil of Dundee, last 
year's runners-up. Team 
Indispension of Glasgow, 
Kaliber (formerly Team Volks- 
wagen) from Northern Ireland 
and Avoca of Dublin make up 
the eight sides for this distin- 
guished tournament. 

MOTOR CYCLING 

Championship 
first for 
Donington 

Donington Park win stage all 
or Britain's rounds in the world 
and european motorcycle 
championships in 1987. It is fee 
first time feat the same British 
circuit has held fee four road- 
racing championships run by 
the world governing body. 

The highlight will be the 
British Grand Prix meeting on 
August 2 which, will indude all 
the world championship 
dases - 500 ce. 250 cc. 125 cc. 
80 cc and sidecars. The pro- 
gramme opens at Easter — April 
19 and 20 — when tire European 
championship races for 500 cc, 
250 cc. 1 25 cc and sidecars form 
pan of Domngton’s Easier bike 
programme, which is headed by 
the seventeenth running of the 
America v United Kingdom 
transatlantic superbike 
challenge. 

After a three-year gap, the 
world endurance championship 
returns to the United Kingdom 
wife an eight-hour . round at 
Donington on May 24. 
Donington runs the final round 
i“ fee 1 0-race world TT For- 
mula One championship on 
September 27. 

European boost 

.J*? 1 Bak f r * J° iat Jeader of 
fee National Trophy Cyclo 
Cross senes, after beating pro- 
fessional rival. Steve Douce, in 
fee second round, heads a Great 
Britain amateur team in a 
European challenge race at 
uorzow. Poland, on Sunday. 

New man ia charge 

Featherstone Rovers have ap- 
pointed Paul Date}- as their 
jeam manager. He succeeds 
kteoqte Piemazek. who was 
dismissed last week. It is Daley's 
spell in charge at 
Featherstone. He guided them 
to the second diviston- 
chamoionship iq jggo; 




* M 


i 


4 

f 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 




TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davafile 



% 


0 Churchill would have nothing 
to do with it. Eden usfd it to woo 
the nation. Alec Douglas-Home 
blamed it for losing him the 
prime-ministership. Macmillan 
used it as a platform for his 
histrionics. Wilson owed his pipe- 
smoking image to it Television 
and Number 10. a two-part report 
by Michael Cockerell which be- 

. gins tonight (BBC2. 9.25), is the 
first serious attempt to assess the 
impact on politics of what Chur- 
chill called “a robot organization 
that threatens the supremacy of 
Parliament”. Serious in approach, 

1 mean, if not always in content 
How can we be expected to keep a 
straight face as we watch Mac- 
millan inviting the TV cameras to 
accompany him to the grouse 
moors just to prove that he was 
not depressed over the Christine 
Keeler affair; or as we watch Eden 
and and his favourite interviewer 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

6 JO The Ffintstones. Cartoon, (rt 
635 Weather. 

7.00 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough, SaHy Magnusson, and 
Jeremy Paxman. National and 
international news at 7.00, 

7 30, 8.00, 8J0 and 9.00; 
regional news and travel 
information at 7.15, 7.45, 8.15 
and B.45; weather at 7.25, 
735,8.25 and 835. 

935 Health Farm. A 40 Minutes 
programme about visitors to 
HenTow Grange, a slimming 
clinic, (r) 9.45 Advice Step. 
Margo MacDonald end Dilly 
Braimoh explain the appeal 
procedure should the DHSS 
office turn down a benefit claim 
10.00 Neighbours, (r) 

10-20 Phillip Schofield with news of 
children's television 


CHOICE 


programmes, and birthday 
greetings 10.25 Play School. 
With Sarah Long and Stuart 
Bradfey.(r) 

10.45 The State Opening of 

Parliament Live coverage of 
the procession to Parliament 
and of the Queen's Speech. 

1130 Open Aar. Viewers comment 
on television programmes. 
1235 Midweek. iony Soper 
and Nick Davies report from 
the Wildfowl Trust SSmbridge. 
1235 Regional news and 
weather. 

1.00 News with Martyn Lewis. 
Weather 135 Neighbours. 
Weekday soap set in a 
Melbourne suburb 130 Lithe 
Misses. Little Miss 
Scatterbrain. 

ZOO Film: Mae West (1982) starring 
Ann Jlliian as the legendary 
Hollywood character >r. this 
msae-tor-teievision biography 
of the actress whose private 
life mirrored the women she 
played on the screen. With 
James Brofin as her long-time 
lover, Jim Timothy. Directed by 
Lee Philips. (Ceefax) 

3.30 Off the Record with Russel) 
Gram 3.40 Save c Life. Dr Alan 
Maryon Davis's emergency 
first aid series, (r) (Ceefax) 


Leslie Mitchell spending hours 
rehearsing every word of their 
impromptu’' chat (“and then I 
say” .... “no, you say”, etc); 

or as we hear that Eden once 
complained that “those Com- 
munists at the BBC” were shi ning 
lights into his eyes to stop him 
reading his script; or as we hear 
Lady Falkender recalling that, in 
order to minimize the distraction 
caused by Harold Wilson’s contin- 
ual exposure of his fist while 
making points on TV, she got him 
to stick a pipe in it — and by such 
subtle means as this, a reputation 
for dependability was bom. 

Michael Cockerell adds to the Yes, 
Prune Minister quality of tonight’s 
documentary by reminding us that 
the BBC used to believe that if it 


330 Pintiy’s House, read by Matilda 
Thorpe 430 Animal Fair with 
Don Spencer 435 The 
Adventures of Buflwmkle and - 
Rocky. Part two. (r) 4.10 
Heathcftffe and Co. Cartoon 
series 435 Hartbeat. Tony 
Hart's entertaining guide to 
picture-making. 

5.00 John Craven’s Nemround 
5.05 The Cuckoo Sister. 
Episode three of the tour-part 
drama serial 535 Master! earn. 

630 News with Nicholas Witch ell 
and France Coverdaie. 
Weather. 

6.35 London Plus. 

730 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
include Susan Hanson and 
Jonathan King. Plus, a song 
from Gorden Kaye. 

7.35 The Clothes Show includes a 
report from Selina Scott at the 
Stars in silk fashion show; and 
from Jeff Banks on what the 
best-dressed country-dweller 
is wearing, (r) 

830 Dates. Sue Ellen continues to 
plot J.R.'s down fell. (Ceefax) 

830 Points of View. Barry Took 
dips into the BBC's postbag. 

930 News with John Humphrys and 
Andrew Harvey. Regional 
news and weather. 

9J0 The Visit The first of a new 
series introduced by Desmond 
Wilcox. Pat Kerr is a British 
Airways stewardess who is 
leatfcrtg a rescue campaign for 
450 destitute Bangladesh: 
children whose orpnanaga is 
under threat of closure. 
(Ceefax) (see Choice) 

1030 SpoftBrtight introduced by 
Steve Rider. Tennis: the 
Benson and Hedges 
Championships from Wembley 
Arena; Cricket s preview cf 
the First Test between 
Australia and England which 
begins cn Friday; and ? sctbeO: 
a report on tonight's gam* 
between England and 
Yugoslavia at Wemb»ey. 

1135 She meet 86. The fina 
selection of entries tor the 
Radio Times Film and ViC90 
Awards. 

1Z10 Weather. 



Professor Kenneth Minogue, presenter of The New Enlightenment, 
which begins tonight on Channel 4 at 830pm 


was deferential io the PM of the 
day, it was demonstrating its 
impartiality. 

© The Visit (BBC1, 9.30pm), 
returning for yet another season 
with Desmond Wilcox stilt at the 
helm, is a perfect illustration of the 
old saying about the ripples that 
fan out when you throw a stone 
into a pond. Once British Airways 
stewardess Pat Kerr started using 
up her off-duty hours by gening 
involved in the work of a Bangla- 
desh orphanage for destitute chil- 
dren, the humanitarian spark that 
she struck became a blaze. Other 
crews manning BA's TriSiar fleet 
threw in their lot with the woman 
whom die children call their Pat 
Mummy, and the net result has 
been most impressive both in 
terms of cash raised and lives 
saved. This could easily h3ve 
degenerated into a mawkish film, 
but it is anvthing but Much of this 

fglpfti 

9.00 Ceefax. 

9.15 Daytime on Two: Scotland's 
- new products industry 9.35 
Ceefax 10.00 For the very 
young 10.15 Science; joins 
10.38 Science in action 1130 
Words and pictures 11.17 
Scotland's River Flndhom 
11.40 The second of five films 
on women in society. 

1Z02 Maths: statistics 1Z25 
Working as e technical 
photographer 1Z48 Spam 1.10 
Fart three of the series 
examining the state of English 
law 138 The Vikings in 
Scotland ZOO Keeping warm 
Z15 How the senes about a 
young ouzzard was made. 

Z35 International Tennis. The 
Benson ano Hedges 
Championships introduced by 
Barry Davies from Wembley 
Arena. 3.55 Regional news and 
weather. 

430 Pamela Armstrong meets 

Joan Wyndham, trie author of a 
diary that describes what life 
was like in Bohemian Chelsea 
during the Second World War; 
and some of she Gl babies who 
were abandoned when their 
fathers returned to the United 
States. 

4.30 International Tennis. Further 
coverage of the Benson and 
Hedces Championships. 

530 Cover to Cover presented by 
Co tin McCaoe. Under 
discussion this week are Bolt, 
Dick Francis' latest mystery; 
Michael Moorcock's mythic 
saga. The Chronicles of 
Co-urn; and the humorous 
novel. Life is Elsewhere, by 
Czecn writer Milan Kundera. 
630 Film: Trail Street* (1947) 
starring Randolph Scott and 
Robert Ryan. Western 
adventure aoout a Kansas 
snentf battling with lawless 
cattle drovers who devastate 
farmland as they drive their 
charges to *6 railroads. 
Zi/ecied by Ray Enright 
7.20 Cartocc Two. The Hare and 
the Tame. 

7.30 The Secrets of Suez. The 

. s;o<v behind the controversial 
Ir.voson cl Egypt 0v Britain. 
France and israel, 30 years 
aao. 

S.3G Cut cf Court. The first of z new 
series about law-makers and 
iaw-bieakers Presented by 
David J^ssei and Sue Cook. 

930 5r>A'3’H. Hctrips takes srtxrk 
or her ii'e ano decides that her 
G3d.cat»onto tne nursing 
profession has cost her a 
n,jst&nd, children, and a 
home, (r) 

9.25 Television and Number to. 

Tn& first of a two-part 
documentary examining the 
•o*e-hate relationship between 
Prime Ministers and the small 
screen, (see Choree) 

1020 The Trouble With Sex. Doreen 
Browne, a Marriage Guidance 
Therapist in St Austell, 

Cornwall, deals with a couple, 
piaved by Joanna PhilBps-Larw 
and Matthew Solon, whose 
marriage is falling apart 
because they don't talk and 
oor.'tmake love. 

1 1030 Newsntsht 11 35 Weather. 


can be put down to the warm 
intelligence of Pat Kerr herself 
who can say things like ”1 have 
known more affection (through 
her work at the orphanage) than 
some people experience in a 
lifetime" without our fearing that 
a Hollywood heavenly choir is 
about to open up at any moment. 

• Best of the rest tonight: The 
Secrets of Suez (BBC2. 7.30pm) 
which, because it focuses on 
Eden's role in the 1956 crisis, 
makes a good curtain-raiser to 
Television and Number 10: and 
The State Opening of Parliament 
(BBC I, and 1TV, at 1 0.45am) 
which, in addition to its political 
significance, never fails to bring a 
mighty splash of ceremonial col- 
our to our television screens on 
drab November mornings. 

Peter Davalle 



ltv/l'ono® 


Up* 


Pat Kerr (second left) in the Dhaka orphanage: The Visit, on BECl, at 9.30pm 


935 Thames news headlines. 

930 Schools: Maths - the number 
eight 9.42 Science • sources of 
energy939 Junior maths 
lO.lePhysics - experiments 
on the Doppler Effect 

10.30 Nahamti - Two Weeks on the 
River. A documentary about a 
two 'week expedition made by 
young men in the Canadian 
wilderness, who reflect cm how 
the trip has affected their lives. 

10.45 The State Opening of 
ParfiarnenL The royal 
procession to Parliament and 
the Queen's Speech. 
Introduced by Ala stair Burnet. 

12.00 The Giddy Game Show, (r) 
12.10 Our Backyard, (r) 

12.30 Spin-Offs. The first of a new 
series in which Tun Brooke- 
Taylor investigates places of 
interest that are now easily 
accessible thanks to the 
completion of the M25 orbital 
motorway around London. 

1.00 News atone with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news. 

1.30 A Country Practice. Medical 
drama serial set in rural 
Australia 230 Farmhouse 
Kitchen. Grace Mulligan and 
PauUne Sykes with hints cn 
baking and icing 3.00 Take the 
High Road 33s ' Thames news 
headlines 330 Sons and 
Daughters. 

430 Thomas the Tank Engine and 
friends. Narrated by Hingo 
Starr 4.10 The telebugs 4.20 
S.W.A.LL.0.W. The first of a 
new series in which David 
Bellamy leads an intrepid oand 
of young explorers on an 
investigation into the world in 
whicn we live. 4.45 Hold Tight! 
includes guests, Lone Justice 
and The Daintses. 

5.15 Blockbusters. Bob Hotness 
press ms another round of the 
general knowledge quiz game 
tor teenagers. 

5.45 News with Alastair Stewart 
6.00 Thames news. 

635 Help! Vrv Taylor Gee with 
information about Guildford's 
Cherry Trees Project 

635 Crossroads. 

7.00 This is Your Life. Eamonn 

op. 


Andrews emotionally mugs 
another unsuspecting worthy. 

730 Coronation Street Brian and 
Gail arrange to meet tor a 
drink. (Oracle) 

8.CC Strike It Lucky. Game show 
featuring (he latest technology, 
presented by Michael 
Barrymore. 

8.3C Full House. Domestic comedy 
series about two couples 
snaring the same house and 
mortgage. (Oracle) 

930 The Equalizer. McCall comes 
to the assistance of a 
dedicated lady police oficer 
who discovers her partner is 
crooked. Starnng Edward 
Woodward. (Oracle) 

1C.CO News at Ten with Aiastair 
Burnet and Sandy Gall. 

Weather followed by Thames 
news headlines. 

10.30 Midweek Sport Special 
presented by Nick Owen. 
Highlights of the football match 
between England and 
Yugoslavia played ionioht at 
Wembley; and news of the 
Turkey and Northern Ireland, 
and Luxembourg v Scotland 
matches. 

1130 Film: Game For Three Losers*' 


who finds himself caught in a 
• blackmail plot Directed by 
Gerry O'Hara. 

1Z50 Night Thoughts. 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne Diamond 
and Geoff Meade. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 630, 
7.00, 7.30, B.tio, 8.30 and 9.00; 
financial news at 6.35: sport at 
&40 and 7.40; exercises at 
635 and 9.17; cartoon at 735; 
pop music at 735; and a video 
report at 8.35. The After Nine 
guests include CUM Richard 
and. discussing zinc in diets. 
Professor Bryce-Smith. 



Mari e-Christine Barrault and Rutger Hauer in Andre Delvaux’s 
film. Femme entre Chien et Loup: Channel 4 1 0.00pm 



235 Film: Lancer S: 

starring George Banders. First 
World War spy thriller with 
Sanders in the dual role of a 
German officer and British 
naval lieutenant who 
impersonates the German in 
order to discover military 
secrets. Directed by Gregory 
Rato if. 

433 ftiavi3 on 4. Mavis Nicholson 
presents tne first of 
Predicaments, in which victims 
of enme talk about their 
experiences. 

430 Countdown. Two new 
challengers this afternoon. 
Eijabeth Jardine from 
Greenforci, and Ashley Connor 
of Stoke-on-Trent. 

530 Hogan’s Heroes, Vintage 

American comedy senes about 
a group of resourceful Allied 
prisoners-of-war. 

530 The Abbott and Costello 
Show* A series of 
misunderstandings leads a 
boxer. Killer, to believe tnat an 
innocent Lou is having an affair 
with his attractive wife. 

630 Family Ties. American 
domestic comedy series. 

630 In Thne of War 1939-1945. The 
May 1943 film. Bill Jack v Adolf 
Hitler, in which the Allies, in the 
form of a Cleveland company, 
Jack and Heintz. are seen to 
be winning the battle of 
production with their German 
counterparts. (Oracle) 

730 Channel 4 News with Trevcr 
McDonald and Nicholas Owen. 

730 Comment This week's political 
slot is filled by ian 
Wrigglesv.ortn, SOP MP tor 
Stockton South. Weather. 

8. DO Five Women Photographers. 
Part four of the five- 
programme series features the 
work of Ursula Powys-Lybbe. 
(Oracle) 

8.30 The New Enli gh tenment 
Programme one of a new six- 
part series examining the ideas 
and philosophies underlying 
the recent worldwide return to 
classical libera) economics. 
Presented by Kenneth 
Minogue. Professor of Political 
Philosophy at the London 
School of Economics. 

9.00 Down the Line. Topical 
magazine programme about 
Scotland, presented by Julie 
Davidson. Tonight's edition 
includes an item on Glasgow's 
'Milas Better' campaign. 

10.00 FUm: Femme entre Chien et 
Loup (1978) starring Marre- 
Christine Barrault and Rutger 
Hauer. Second World War 
drama about a young Belgian 
wife whose husband becomes 
a German collaborator, and 
her loverwho is in the 
resistance. Directec by Andre’ 
Delvaux. 

1ZC0 FUnr The Stateless Man* 
(1955) Scotland Yard 
investigate the murder of a 

S woman found dead in a 
3 house in the 

docklands. Directed by Paul 
Gherzo. 

1230 Their Lordships' House. 
Highlights of today' State 
Opening of Parliament. Ends at 
12.45. 




Denman 6. J5pm-rjw P.e kjupc Santana. 

NORTHERN lRELPh’3 

Tccay'i Sport 5.43-C.C0 mslM U.o'.cr. 6.S5- 

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Ctese. 

CENTRAL ^ '-'^aor. 4 *kst. 

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Time *.25 KTV News Sceresrow 

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and Weather 2^5-2.3C heme Cooken, 

CicD S.l£ Gus ncroybur'A '.tEqic Sirtncays 
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TVS as € -* s r is rne 
— Y suur. ans -:ZS ~S ’••"•s i-Sv Sr.an 
S:oh' TnBCtre 2-OC-2wO A:acr> On ?-vcs. 


monoi i£i5a m Company, cose. 

T1-* VF TFFQ -As Lanccn except 

I C ^SOpm-t.CC Conans Ol 

The VWS 120 R*3«r*l >.'c»S 1-T31X0 
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God 12.33 Dose 

IJISTCm As London e«:spt 
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wad wad Worio Of Animas £.03 Go&e evening 
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Hollywood :c.:Sam Mew». 

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er 1Z46 bi»GJK> Wusic So: 

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terval 12.15pm Ram nud»n & Say- 
, Paul Uiunii 2.00 Ccun:do.vr 2.ZC £ pang- 
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pners 6.03 Brodtema ijUks Or. < 

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Concert under Trevor 
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harpsichord), Mozart (Glgue , 
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635 Concert (continued). 

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9.05 This Week's Composer: 
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suits Chout (LSC), Plana 
Concerto No 5 (Richter 
with Warsaw PO under 
Rowickl) 

10.00 Mozart Members of the 
Amadeus Quartet play 
the Divertimento in E flat, K 
563 

10.45 Liszt and Mendelssohn: 
Benjamin Kaplan (piano). 
Liszt's Sposailzio . Vsise 
Impromptu, and Les 
Jeux d'eau a la Villa d'Esta: 
and tnree Fantasies by 
Mendelssohn. Op 16. Also 
two pieces (Op pcstn) 

11.30 Matinee Musicals: Ulster 
Orchestra (under Coiman 
Pearce). James Hariey 
(Divertimento overture). 

John Ireland (Minudtand 
Elegy for strings), Brian 
Boydeli (Shiaknsrtin Suita). 
Lambert (Aubade 
herotquel, Khachaturian 
(Masquerade suite), 

Youmans (Tea for Two, 
arranged by 
Shostekovfoh) 

1230 The Essential Jazz 
Reeorasianother Max 
Harrison selection. Includes 
recordings by Duke 
EHington and his Orchestra, 
the 1949 Benny 
Goodman Sextet, end 
Sidney Bechsr (clannet), 
and Earl Hines (piano}. 130 
News 

135 Concert Hath Aurefi 

Bagczokfwoan), 

Krystyna Borucinaka (pizno) 
Brahms (Sonata No 2). 
Szymanowski (Sanaa m D 
minor) 

ZOO Schnittke Quartets: 

Charnel on play the No Z 


Silvsstrov's Quartette 

piccolo, and 
Shostakovich’s Two 
nac merits from Hamlet 

2.50 Racord Review: with 
Paul Vaughan. Includes 
John Steane's guide to 
recordings of 

Schumann's Liederkrels Op 
39. Also a talk by Barry 
Fox about digital audio tape, 
and Gordon Reynold's 
review of new racordtegs of 
choral works by Bach, 
Handel, Franck and 
KokKonen.fr) 

A 00 Chora J Evensong: from 
the Queen's Free Chapel 
of St George. Windsor 
Castte. 4 .S News 

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Mon;us:ko (Mazurka, 
recitative anc Jontek's 
Dimka, Chopm Preludes 
Or £8 Nos 9 te 24. with 
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Karlowtcz (Sympnomc Poem 
No 2). Schubert (String 
Quartet in G. D 887. payed 
by tne Allegri) 

7.00 OeDut Richard Crabtree 
(vioial, Hubert Dawkes 
(oroah).. Otto Sieg! ( 
Weihnachts-Sonate). 
and Leo Sowerby (Poem) 

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B.00 Tatiana Nikolaeva: piano 
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London. 

9.15 City of Light: French 
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9.35 Moscow Autumn: 
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with Nataua Gutmznl. 
Sergeyeva (Plano Concerto 
No 2 .witr the composer;. 
Schnittke (Concerto Grosso 
Nr 2 . with USSR State 
SO. Olec Kagan, violin, and 
Nataua Gutman, cello) 

f0.55 First Night The RSC 

production of Country 
Dancing at the Other P| 3 ce is 
reviewed by Howard 
JacdOSOn 

11.00 Chamber Music from 

Manchester: Takacs 
String Quartet. Haydn 
(QuaTet in D minor. Op 
76 no 2]. Schubert i Quartet 
m A minor, D 805) 

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46 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12 1986 


FMpBUbWbnSS 


■*•***★* 


SPORT 



Mabbutt charged 


Bingham 


with England’s 


midfield security 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


The finals of the European 
Championships may tie two 
years away but. by tonight. 
England could find them- 
selves standing on the thresh- 
old of a place in the last eight. 
If they beat Yugoslavia at 
Wembley, they will have 
opened up a gap in group four 
that would be unlikely to be 
closed. 

The argument is not un- 
reasonable. England have tri- 
umphed convincingly over 
Northern Ireland, who are in 
the process of being rebuilt, 
and would expea to collect at 
least a point from the return 
fixture in Belfast next year, 
even though it is to be staged, 
ominously, on April Fool's 
Day. 

Turkey, the other contend- 
ers. are so feeble that it would 
be a surprise of unimaginable 
proportions if England failed 
to overwhelm them at home 
and away. That would leave 
only the final tie in Belgrade 
next November, by which 
time the destiny of the group 
may already have been 
decided. 

The next 90 minutes inside 
the national stadium is there- 
fore crucial. Yugoslavia’s plan 
is to reduce the match to little 
more than a tedious bore. 
They will show the odd flash 
of technical brilliance, particu- 
larly from Sliskovic and 
Skoro, but they are otherwise 
expected to perform like 
steamrollers intent on crush- 
ing everything in their path. 

They will do so legitimately 
for the most part, though there 
must be some doubt over 
Katanec's intentions. He 
started the game against Tur- 
key a fortnight ago by attempt- 
ing to dismember his opposite 
number above the knee. 
Hoddte. his likely individual 
target, would be advised to 
check the state of his limbs 
after each shuddering assault. 

With a sweeper operating 
behind the relatively small 
and fleet-footed central 


defenders, the Yugoslavs will 
push their fofi backs into a 
midfield that they trust will 
resemble the foyer of a theatre 
during the interval. No 
Englishman will be allowed to 
move freely there for more 
than a couple of yards. 

Zlaiko Vujovic. the scorer 
of three of their goals against 
Turkey, may spend a lonely 
evening in the company of 
Butcher, England's new cap 


England team 


ENGLAM3: C Woods (Rangers), V Ander- 
son (Arsenal). K Season (Arsenal). G 
Hoddlo (Tottenham), Wright 


(Southampton). T Butcher (Rangers, cap* 
tain). G Mabbutt (Tottenham). $ » ‘ 


Hodge 
‘ G 


(Aston Visa). P Beardsley (l 
Lineker (Barcstoflat C Mb 
ham). Substitutes: 0 Seaman (Oueon n 
Park Rangers), G Steven (Bvmoni A 
Codec (West Ham). R Wfflrina (AC Wart], 
■I Barnes (Watford). 


tain, and Wright His twin 
brother and fellow colleague at 
Bordeaux should retain his 
position at right back in a line 
up that will probably show 
two changes. 


Hadzibegic. significantly a 
defender, is expected to re- 
place the injured Mikhaiiovic. 
one of only two forwards they 
employed against the Turks, 
and Mlinaric, out of form and 
favour, will give way to 
Sliskovic. the individual that 
Bobby Robson most fears. As 
a central midfield or- 
chestrator. England's manager 
rates him as highly as Platini. 

Sliskovic was passed fit 
yesterday and so was Skoro. 
the other obvious threat. He 
will act as Sliskovic's right, 
hand man. He glides with 
deceptive speed and his flow- 
ing runs in Split a fortnight 
ago were interrupted only by 
Ivica Osim. Yugoslavia’s 
manager, who withdrew him 
midway through the second 
half 

Robson, who was “not 
particularly impressed" by 
their 4-0 victory over Turkey, 
was unable to retain all of his 
representatives but he has 


Robson omitted Steven for 
the sake of adventure. “They 
won't come charging at us so 
there is no need for a strong 
midfield force. We want 
wingers who can take on their 
defenders and run to the 
byline. That is where we will 
inflict the damage and that is 
why Waddle is in." 

Barnes stands by, as usual, 
and so does Cottee in pref- 
erence to the taller, but less 
mobile, Hateley. Yet England 
will rely principally on the 
man who will shortly be 
entitled to wear a pair of 
golden boots. Having received 
one award for his scoring feats 
last season. Lineker will to- 
morrow collect another. 

Hod die must command the 
stage if Robson’s team is to 
reach its goal. That the heavy 
burden would rest on his 
fragile temperament is as 
disturbing as Yugoslavia's 
record. In conceding only two 
defeats in 1 1 fixtures so rar, no 
other European nation in 
history has been so successful 
against England. 


Cooper and Nevin key men 


The new manager. Andy 
Roxburgh, is making as brave 
attempt to bring a smile to the 
mournful face of Scottish 
football .Certainly his 
combination of fearless 
attackers and masters of close 
control looks attractive. 

But a a warning note was 
struck yesterday when Rox- 
burgh pointed out that while 
Luxembourg may be the whip- 
ping boys of Europe, who have 
not won a competitive inter- 
national in 14 years, it would 
be suicidal to consider 
Scotland's opponents at 
Hampden tonight as "lambs 
to the slaughter." 

Roxburgh said: “How can 
we treat anyone cheaply? We 
are hardly in a position. 


By Hugh Taylor 

tations." Roxburgh, has how- 
ever. chosen a side with flair, 
for the Scottish supporters 
have become weary of na- 
tional teams who lack spirit 
and reveal few traces of cul- 
tured play. 

And there can be no argu- 
ment that attack must be the 
theme for the Luxemboug 
defence is not impressive and 


his only chance of success lies 
in preventing the Scots from 
scoring an early goal. 


Grot?) Swan table 
p w 

Bekjum 2 1 

Rap at be 2 0 

Scotland 2 0 

Bulgaria 1 0 

Luxemboug 


Pt* 

3 

2 

2 

1 

0 

Btf- 


Scotland team 


SCOTLAND: 


art (West ham). ^Gc n^fljo 


(Aberdeen). Stcw- 


Honaan (Liverpool). 

Nemn (CfsteeaL AitKan (Cento. 
McCMr (Celtic). Cooper — 
DalgBsto [Liverpool). Johnston 



considering our poor record in 
cham 


the European championship, 
to have unrealistic expec 


will be sorely tried to stop 
Cooper and Nevin, who de- 
light in bamboozling oppo- 
nents. 

.The canny manager of 
Luxembourg Paul Phillip feels 


New chairman 


As a famous 
athlete, you 
are offered 
£ 50,000 
to endorse 
a product you 


wouldn't use. 


EE 


endorse it? 


It's a question of Scruples. 


Si IU HU S 


THE GAME OF MORAL DILEMMAS. 



Britain’s Adrian Moorhouse 
tries to became tbe first man to 
beat the one minute barrier in 
the 100 metres breaststroke 
when be lakes on the West 
Germans, Rolf Beab and Bert 
BoebeL at the Cumbernauld 
Open meeting cm November 14, 
15 and 16. 


Turning a 
profit 


The Rugby League spokes- 
man, David Howes, said yes- 
terday that the unbeaten 
Australian tour party had 
already cleared all expenses 
for their trip to Britain and 
France. Averaging crowds of 
18.000 per game, the Austra- 
lians have collected £278,402 
from nine matches. 

They have made a profit of 
£48,000 after clearing the cost 
of the trip- The Australians 
have four more matches in 
Britain and seven on their 
visitto France. 


No change 


Fremantle (AFP) — A de- 
cision by the International 
Yacht Racing Union (IYRU) 
to change the advertising roles 
in world-class racing wifi have 
no effect on the present 
America's Cup regatta, the 
Royal Perth Yacht Club 
(RPYC) said yesterday. The 
RYFC, the cup defenders, said 
that the rules for this regatta 
would not be changed. 


. The club had received no 
official notification of changes 
to rule 26, which bans 
advertising on the racing boats 
in international events, the 
RPYC commodore, Alan 
Crewe, said. Various associ- 
ations, including Canada and 
the United States, wanted to 
allow advertising during 
world-class events. 


begins 

another 


era 


From Clive White 
1 mm 


chosen to maintain the shape 
of his side. As expected. 
Woods, Wright and Mabbutt 
have been brought in to fill the 
gaps left by the injured 
Shilton, Martin and Bryan 
Robson. 

Mabbutt, recalled after an 
absence of three years, is to 
take over the role as Hoddle's 
defensive security. Robson 
revealed that he is effectively 
fifth in line for the job behind 
his namesake. Reid, 
Brace well, and Stevens of 
Tottenham Hotspur, all of 
whom are unavailable. Yet be 
had no hesitation in selecting 
him. 

“He was in the squad a 
month ago so he knows what 
was required from Bryan 
Robson." he said. “He is such 
a good character and such a 
good listener that I don't think 
for one moment that he will 
let us down. He is bionic’*. 


Today marks the beginning 
of a new era for Northern 
Ireland. Names like Jennings, 
Mcflroy, O’Neill and Hamu- 
ton will play no further pan in 
the adventures of football's 
most mischievous little jpeo- 
- pie. It is a time of transition 
and, it is to be hoped, growth. 

Billy Bingham, the Irish 
manager, is not despondent 
On the eve of their European 
championship game here 
against Turkey today he de- 
clared: “I don’t fed any pres- 
sure about this game,” How 
many international managers 
must wish that they could say 
that 

*Tm rebuilding now and 
using the European 
Championship to give the 
boys extra international 
experience and hopefully to 
get one or two good results 
along the way that will give me 
the confidence to play them 
again, he said.” It is a young 
squad which was reduced to 
16 by the withdrawal through 
injury of Whiteside, Nicholl 
and Stewart 

The recent rule change on 
eligibility, allowing tire Irish to 
call upon players with only an 
Irish mother, has made com- 
plete Irishmen out of Danny 
Wilson and Lawrie Sanchez, 
whose father comes from 
Equador and who was born in 
Lambeth. Wilson, aged 26, 
and Sanchez, aged 27 have a 
lot to live up to in following 
such legendary figures in mid- 
field as Mcliroy and O’Neill. 
Yet they may prove to be just 
what tire Irish have nettled 
more of ail these years — goal- 
scoring midfield players. 

Three years ago, defeat in 
Turkey cost Northern Ireland 
their place in the European 
Championship finals, allow- 
ing West Germany to go 
through instead, and 14 
months ago a goalless draw 
here in Izmir almost proved 
fetal for their Mexican am- 
bitions. The problem is that 
the Irish have always lacked 


sufficient goal scoring power 
defensi 


vely 


to expose the 
vulnerable Turks. 

What with Campbell. Not- 
tingham Forest's attacking 


midfield player, and tbe pro- 
be of So 


PREVIOUS RESULTS? Scotland 
garia 0. Repubic of Wand 0 Scotland 0. 
Beigjum iRepctfk; of inland 1. Luxem- 
bourg 0 Belgium &. 

REMAMMG RXTURE& Tatty: Scotland 
V Luxemtaag; November IS: Babwinr 
Butoutc Mnan ifc ScollmJ fttoj*- 
ttot3 Ireland: April 1: Buigartiv ftopiiojc 
o) Ireland. Belgium y ScoBaret » 
Repubic of Ireland v Bdgitm; 38: Luwn- 
boieg V Butov* M» 2Cfc - “ 
Luxembourg;^: Luxamborc 
at Man* September BgpyMc of 
InAnd » Luxembourg; 23: Bukjarta v 
BoUhxn; October 14: Seottand 
Republic o! Ireland v Bulgaria: H u iawbm 
11 : Belgium v Luxembourg. Bulgaria v 
Scottana; December to Luxembourg V 
Scotland. 


lific Clarke of Southampton in 
the side, there is no shortage of 
potential match-winners. The 
likelihood is, though, that 
Campbell, will play in attack 
alongside Clarke and that 
Worthington will he drafted 
into midfield. 

Bingham said: “I’ve had a 
lot of defensive players in my 
midfield down the years, 
though I like attacking players 
in this area. Our midfield 
needs reconstructing and I will 
be fiddling about there and in 
attack.” 

TURKEY (probable): Fatih; R Ismail. Yustf. 
K terns*. KodRr. Mem. Saeas, Ugur, 
Oman. Tanju, FenoL 

NORTHERN IRELAND (probable): P 


Forest). 

Donald 


Rangers announced yes- 
terday the appointment of 
David Holmes as chairman of 
the club following the resigna- 
tion of John Paton. 


IRELAND 
G - 

ad (WaUordL A Me- 
(Queen's Park Rangers). Ill 
Dom(to (Luton Town), D Waan (Brigh- 
ton and Hove Atoori). O McCreary 
mewcasfle United* N WorWngtoo 

Ca« Wednesday). SPorevy 

Hone AMoro or L Sanchez . 

D Campbaa (Nottingham Forest). 
CJorlce (Southampton). S DUM te i J 
Quinn (Btacktam Rovers). G Dunlop 
(UnflaftJJ, J omm (Letoostar City), B 
McNaOy (Shrewsbury Town), 

Groop Four table 
p w 

Yugoslavia 1 1 

England 1 1 

NttSfcnd 1 0 

Turkey 1 0 


L F A Pti 

0 A 0 2 

0 3 0 2 

10 3 0 

10 4 0 


PREVIOUS RESULTS: Yugoslavia* Tir- 


29: 


1 FIXTURES: Today: 

a, Turkey v Northern 

■U Northern Ireland v Er 
Northern 

r 14: England v Tur- 
key. Yugoslavia v Northern .Ireland; 
Nwnmber 11: Ywosiavn » England. 
Northern Ireland v Turkey; Decamber if: 
Turkey v Yugoslavia. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Smith: job in Newcastle 


New post 


Jenny Lee Smith, who 
dominated the WPGA tour in 
1981 and 1982, has been 


appointed teaching ^pro- 


fessional at Parklands in New- 
castle, her hometown. The 
former Curtis Cup player win 
take up her post on December 
1. 


Final leg 

The final of the Kodak AAA 
10km road race championship 
will take place at Heme! 
Hempstead on April 4. The 
series, which has already vis- 
ited Bangor in Northern Ire- 
land, Barnsley, Rhyl and 
Southend, will Stine tbe last 
regional event in Glasgow on 
March 8. The winner last year 
was Steve Harris, of Shaftes- 
bury Harriers, who went on to 
run the 10,000 metres for 
Britain is the European 
championships. 



Mike DePalmer on his way to defeating JPmd McNamee in the first round of the Besson anti 
Hedges tournament at Wembley yesterday (Photograph: Hugh Kentledge) 


Kriek bounces back to pop 
the sixth seed in the pot 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The Benson and Hedges 
championships at Wembley 
began yesterday with a seeding 
upset that was no surprise to 
anybody who knew Johan 
Kriek’s record. Kriek has 
twice been Australian cham- 
pion and has also advanced to 
foe semi-finals of the United 
States and French champion- 
ships. The remarkable feature 
of his 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 win over 
Emilio Sanchez yesterday was 
that Kriek was playing his first 
match for 10 weeks. 

After the United States 
championships, Kriek had to 
withdraw from the game with 
the shoulder of his racket arm 
so badly inflamed that a long 
rest was essentiaL He even 
had to adjust his service 
action. Aged 28, he must 
seriously have doubted his 
ability to regain peak form and 
fitness. 

“I couldn't be happier,” he 
said yesteitiay. “Coming back 
is so hard, such a strain on 
your mental capacity. To 
know I am still out there, 


muscular, bouncy, unusually 
agile man who often raises 
images of the days when a 
man had to catch mid don his 
dinner before popping it in the 
pot Kriek could probably 
look after himself pretty wefi 
in the jungle. 

At 5ft Sin he is small, as 
tennis professionals go, but 
Kriek is difficult to lob be- 
cause he is so springy that it is 
as if be carries around an 
invisible ladder and climbs it 


Results 


FIRST ROtMfc M DaPabner (US) tt P 
McttamM JAua). W. Mr C Stwn (SA1 tt 
M PurceS (uS). 6-4. 3-6, 6-4; SCasal (So) 
tt M Schapera (Netfi). 34. 0-1. 7-5. S 
Davts{US)H tt Sniper (CA B-7, 8-4. 8-6; 
J Knak (US) M ESancfWz igp), 5J. **> 6- 
4; J Svansaon (S*o)trtT Smid (Cz) B-4, 6- 
3. 


fighting, is the important 
thing. It’s as if I had won a 


tournament.’ 

During his enforced lay-off 
Kriek spent mostofhis time at 
borne. U I couldn't do much 
because of the shoulder, so I 
stayed home, fed the parrot 1 
and trimmed a few rose 
bushes." That reference to the 
parrot was a reminder that 
Kriek and his wife have 
something of a domestic zoo, 
the other components being 
three dogs and a python. 

Kriek should feel at home in 
such an environment He is a 


fast in emergency. He is also 
exciting to watch because he 
tikes to get to the net, where 
everything happens fast. 

By contrast, Sanchez tikes 
to play rallies and for a Jong 
time was frustrated because 
Kriek evidently did not share 
this preference. Sanchez, tike 
Kriek, is sturdy and strong 
and a tough competitor. He 
came to tbe fore in this year’s 
Italian championship, in 
which be beat Boris Becker 
and Mats Wtiander. His name 
keeps cropping up in a variety 
of tournaments, for both 
sexes. It seems that the entire 
family play tennis and are 
intent on leaving their mark 
on the highest levels of the. 
game. 

The match began with 
Kriek playing from memory — 
•and his memory was good. 


Everything he tried seemed to 
work, and Sanchez looked 
thoughtful and rather down- 
cast. But in the second set 
some of the inevitable rest 
began to corrode Kriek’s ten- 
nis. A gleam of optimism 
came Into the Spaniard’s eyes 
and instantly he was a livelier, 
more assured, more free- 
swinging player. He also took 
8 hostile interest in Kriek’s 
second services. Thus it was 
that Sanchez came from be- 
hind to win the first set 

At that time it did not seem 
logical to have much con- 
fidence in Kriek’s chances of 
beating die sixth seed. Bat 
Kriek carefully played his way 
back into form, began to serve 
increasingly weH and just 
managed to win a match that, 
in view of his long absence 
from competition, gave him 
ample cause for satisfaction. 

Kriek’s next opponent will 
be Scott Davis, a qualifier, 
who beat Milan Srejber 6-7, 6- 
4, 8-6. In the third set Davis 
was serving at 24 and 0-30 
down, but won 12 of the next 
16 points. He is a more 
flexible player than Srejber 
but bad to struggle with his 
own confidence as well as 
Srejberis formidable service. 

Srejber is 6ft 7%in tall and is 
one of the few tennis players 
who could almost stand eye- 
ball to eyeball with a giraffe. 
He eineiged from the crowds 
last February to beat Becker in 
Florida. When preparing to 
receive Srefber’s service, Da- 
vis must have fell that a sniper 
was spraying him from an 
upstairs window. 


Games fund 


The Commonwealth 
Games fund could benefit by 
£60,000 after a move to 
approve a donation by- the 
( i~>thian regional council in 
Edinburgh yesterday. The 
move is part of a joint package 
put together by the Gaines 
company chairman, Robert 
Maxwell, in an effort to avoid 
liquidation. The Lothian 
donation is conditional on 
Maxwell and the Japanese 
tycoon, Ryoichi Sasakawa, 
giving £2 mfltion towards the 
£4 J million deficit. 


Result stands 


ROME {AFP) - The result 
of the San Remo world 
championship rally, won last 
month by- Lancia, will stand, 
despite a protest from the 
disqualified- French team, 
Peugeot. The appeals commit- 
tee of the Italian motor sport 
commission ratified the result 
of the race yesterday. 


A reminder 


A two foot wreath was 
planted- in the middle of 
Somerset’s county ground at 
Taunton yesterday by 
supporters of Ian Botham and 
the two sacked West Indian 
players, Viv Richards and Joel 
Gamer. Staff discovered the' 
wreath, professionally made 
from carnations and dahlias, 
propped up on the artificial 
wicket and carrying the 
inscription: “In memory of 
Somerset's three greatest 
cricketers.” 


YACHTING 


Apricot wrecked after 
rendezvous mix-up 


By Barry PtckthaU 


Apricot, tbe yacht that car- 
ried Tony BsOnnece to victory 
in last year’s Round Britain 
and Room} Europe races, ms 
wrecked on rocks off Brest on • 
Monday night after Baltimore 
and a tow-boat foiled to make 
a rendezvous. The sailor, who 
had been competing in the 
Rnote dn Rhtun single-handed 
transAdantk: race mjt3 a col- 
liston the previous night forced 
Mm to return to France with a 
damaged port float, said yes- 
terday that he was lucky to 
escape with his life. 

“ft was Wowing a force eight 
gale and the .seas were crash- 
ing right over the boat 1 had to 
dive over the side between 
waves then ding on to a rode 
tike a limpet,” Baltimore said 
yesterday. HeeventaaBy man-, 
aged to ctimb the cliff race to 
safety and watched la dismay 
as the £250,000 craft ms 
pounded to pieces ml file rocks 
below. % yesterday morning 
all that remained was a foot of 
her mast, a section of galley 
and a small piece of Apicot’s 
60ft carbon-fibre oiainrhuU 
Describing events leading 
ap to the disaster, a shaken 
Baltimore, who was voted 
Yachtsman of the Year at the 
end of last season, said that 
earlier on Monday he had 
made arrangements with the 
port captain at the Marina 
Moulin Blanc to have a boat 


ready to tow Apricot into port. 
“We arranged to rendezvous 
flae-and-a-half miles south- 
west of Point de MBkoa at 
18.00 GMT,” the British skip- 
per said. But when he reached 
the agreed position, just as 
dnsk was foiling, there was no 
boat in sight . 

Half-an-hoar lata when 
there was stiO no sign of the 
powerboat, he radioed again 
and was told the boat was 
definitely on its way and bad 
him in sight. By the time the 
strong on-shore winds had 
poshed the trimaran closer to 
the Point hot bettering that a 
tow was at hand, BnUhnw 
decided to anchor 

A qnuter-ofan-hom' later 
he realized that. Apricot was 
dragging her anchor and wife 
stflfao sign of assistance be 
radioed the tarimir- office 
again, warning than that tbe 
situation was now turning into 
an emergency. But still the 
promised tow-boat felled to 
materialize. Baltimore finally 
sent out a May Day message 
at I9J9 GMT. when his boat 
was .within ISOft of the break- 
ing surf, and oofy then did the 
J$ft outboard powered speed- 
boat -sent out to look for him 
finally materialize. .. . 

ROUTE DU RHUM RACC (Leading po- 
m waaft w aw < eiiia gs untmn wlnw ) 

Bfcxaon (B Percmjf 3,1 £7; . 3,1 ^ *" 


Norman 

conquest 

of the 
world 


From Grfm McQniUan. 
Toulouse 


Extraordinary run 
of supremacy 


Certainly the match which 
ended as extraordinary run of 
total supremacy was for from a 
classic of shot or adventure. 
Rather it was a door battle 
between a champion for once 
knocked out of his osnal 
dongaam stance and a chal- 
lenger who served a long hard 
apprenticeship in percentage 


The match opened on tire 
aO-transparent plastic court in 
front of a capacity crowd with 
a fow minute rally which 

indtaded three routine UA calls 

before Norman took the fh-st 
point. The Palais des Sport 
erapfed more m anticipation 
dun excitement 28 minutes 
and 20 let caQs later when 
Norman took what was only 
his second game in a sane of 
meetings with Jibengir. 

' Norman played nine major 
fiiwk a gains t Jahangir hst 
season, coming dose to him 
only mice, in last year's world 
open final fn Cairo when he 
took that first game. He went 
ifown hi straight games in 
every corner of the world, hot 
always karat from the experi- 
ence and always maintained 
that he could succeed where 
others bad signally foiled. 

*T knew when I had the first 
game here I was in with 
another chance,” Norman 
said. “I forced myself to staj 
calm and play for the 


lu the end It took 42 minutes 
and the character was again 
established in the opealKg 
phase. Nine lets were called in 
the first three points and 
Nwman drew an official warn- 
ing from the heferee, John 
Robinson, for backing up on 
his opponent in mid-coart. 

M I thtsmbl tint was a mis- 
reading of the si tuation ,” Nor- 
man s* L “But I refused to let 
it disturb me. I settled in to 
play foe game to the absolute 
end and I could feel that 


Jahangir was thing more than 
I was.* 


The defeated champion 
agreed that he was feeling the 
effort by that stage- *T had a 
month off with a knee injury 
before this tonraament and I 
was nm as match fit as nsoaL” 
he said. 


New Merco bail 
unpredictable 


Jahangir also felt that the 
new Merco reflective ball was 
unpredictable and contributed 
to tiis downfall by skidding on 
the walls of the plastic court 
and hopping unexpectedly 
from the floor- “I might have 
managed to win with a more 
regular ball,” he said. “But 
Ross played very wefl, so 
perhaps oot” 

The young Pakistani was 
remarkably contained for a 
man toppled from a record 
reign. “It bad to happen some 
time. I have dose everything in 
tiie game. 1 feel OK about it 
Now I have the chance to a 
comeback of my own.” 

In Toulouse he won foe 
third gum in 24 minutes, 
acceferatin&away from 7-7 as 
tho ugh that comeback were 
already assured. But Norman, 
a 27-year-old from Whitiaega 
near Anckfend, New Zealand, 
was not about to settle for 
bring merely the first man to 


Khan since that was managed 
by Hiddy Jahan in 1982. 

Ha began to fire drops in 
from the deep court from the 
outset and soon discovered 
that foe younger man no 
longer bad the heart to reach 
them. In just nine minutes he 
had clinched foe $10,000 first 


and the greatest scalp in sport- 
*Tt wa&an amazing feeling” 
he admitted. “At test I could 
let go and jpst shout for joy. I 
had done it the hard way, wwu 
him off foe court, the greatest 
play er the game has seen.” 



Ross Norman, foe 
Zealander fcaomt on foe inter- 
auucsfc circuit as 

“BOB mar, yesterday ham- 
mured Ms way to the victory 

isuversaBy considered impos- 
srWe, Seating Jahangir Han. 
offtkistaa£-5,9-7,7-9*$-I m 
foe Z1Q remote final of the 
IMP world open 



*T won as 1 always knew I 
canid,” said Norman, who has 
pursued tike 22-year-oW Paki- 
stani for 18 months to become 
foe first man to heat him in 
five and a huff years, since 
Geoff Hut overcame a virtu- 
ally unknown 17-year-oM w 
the final of the British Open 

championship ea April 10, 

1981. 

“I have always said it would 
take two hours os court to 
wear him down and here, 
finally, 1 came dose to that.” 
Norman exulted. When he 
reached 8-1 sad match point in 
the fourth game he told hira- 
seff “Yon gat here playing 
sensible squash. AH you have 
to do is play settable squash to 
take out the leader of the 
pack.” 




, . ’w 


fi 





M ... 


'C ‘ ■. 

v' - 








, "*—*•. i 


•■ "J. ' •