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No 62,615 




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last month, government fig- 
ures showed. The adult jobless 
total has now fallen for three 
months running and ministers 
and officials believe the trend 
is firmly downwards. 

The improvement in the 
unemployment figures, which 
particularly reflects the impact 
of government employment 
measures, win add to the 
belief that the Prime Minister 
will call a general election 
soon after a tax-cutting Budget 
□ext spring. 

Mr Kenneth Clarke, the 
employment minister, said- 
“Today’s figures provide 
more hard evidence that the 
job picture is becoming 
brighter. Unemployment is 
down again for the third 
month running, and the three- 
month drop is the biggest 
since 1973.... All the signs are 
that Britain's economy is 
steadily getting people baidk to 
work." 

Later, on BBC radio, Mr 
Oarke said: “Personally, I am* 
not an early election man. " 
But he added: “If we have 
more months of good figures, 
obviously 1 am going to get 
ever more confident about 
how that election will go 
whenever it does come.” 

The unemployment total. 

Tomorrow 

Winter 

sports? 



Cricket John 
Woodcock reports 
from Brisbane on 
the First Test 
Tennis: Rex 
Bellamy previews 
the semi-finals of 
the Benson and 
Hedges 
championships 
from Wembley 


—^dd — 

6 There was no 
winner again yesterday 
in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition so today 
there is £12,000 to be 
wan, treble the usual 
daily prize. 

• Portfolio fist, page. 
31; how to piay, 
information service, 
page 24. 


Dealing upset 

Dealings on the Stock Ex- 
change were disrupted again 
when its computerized dealing 
system was shut down tem- 
porarily amid its worst prob- 
lems since its launch Page 25 

£41m spree 

The New Zealand en- 
trepreneur. Mr Ron Brierley, 
has raised his stake in Ocean 
Transport and Trading to 23.6 
per cent in a £41 m illion 
share-buying spree Page 25 

£271m bid 

Sir Francis Tombs, ch a irm a n 
ofTumer & Newall, is making 
a new offer of £271 million in 
cash and shares for the AE 
group **“8® 


'TIMES SPORT 


«S* 


Cash wins 

Pat Cash, of Australia, fol- 
lowed his victory over John 
McEnroe by beating Sergio 
Casal. of Spain, to reach the 
quarter-finals of the Benson 
and Hedges tennis champion- 
ships at Wembley Page 40 


Home News 2-7 
Oien^as 9-14 
Appls » 

Arts 

Births, deaths, 
marriages 23 

Snsiaess 25-31 

Court 22 

Crosswords 18-24 
Dtar> 2B 

Features 18-20 • 
Law Report 32 1 


Leaders 21 
Letters 21 
Obituary 20 
Motoring 33 
ParGuwnt 4 
Sale Rmmb 5 
Srieste 23 
Sport 35-3M8 

Ttaatres^tc 14 
TV & Radio 39 
Weather 24 
Wills 22 


month. This was the sharpest 
monthly fall since May 1 983 — 
the month before the last 
general election — when rule 
changes produced a drop in 
the total of more than 
120,000. Apart from May 
1983, it was the biggest 
monthly fall since 1971. 

The more representative 
unemployment figure, the 
seasonally adjusted adult to- 
tal, fell by 25,000 to 3.1 67,600 
last month, after a 26,400 
decline in September. In the 
past three months, this tola! 
has fallen by an average of 

Output op 25 

Figures analysed 27 

18,500 a month, the best 
figure since the period 
September-November 1973. 

There was more good news 
.for the Government with the 
publication yesterday of of- 
ficial figures showing a sharp 
rise in manufacturing output 
in September. Output jumped 
by 1.2 per cent and, in the 
latest three months, was up by 
1.3 per cent on the previous 
three months. 


employment measures. 

The Restart programme, 
which offers the long-term 
unemployed counselling and 
direcis them into training, 
special schemes and employ- 
ment, became a national 
scheme in July. Its effects will 
have shown through in the 
August unemployment fig- 
ures, and this is when adiut 
jobless figures began fallin g. 

The uncertainties over the 
impact of Restart has meant 
that officials are cautious 
about underlying unemploy- 
ment trends. The belief is that 
the trend is dearly downwards 
but officials refused to be 
drawn on the likely pace of 
any future declines. 

Opposition politicians con- 
centrated their attack on the 
changes in the unemployment 
rules and statistics. Mr John 
Prescott. Labour's chief 
employment spokesman, de- 
scribed these changes as “a 
combination of fiddles, tem- 
porary schemes and inti- 
midation." 

The new, tighter availabO- 
ity-for-work interviews, which 


Vacandes are also rising carted at. the end of last 
strongly, although they repre- 


sent only a fraction of the 
unemployment total. Season- 
ally adjusted vacancies rose by 
6,400 to 212,800 last month - 
their highest since these statis- 
tics began in January 1980. 

Although there are indica- 
tions that the labour market 
has strengthened in recent 
months, the dominant factor 
in reducing the unemploy- 
ment total appears to have 
been the expansion of the 
Community Programme and 
Restart. 

The average monthly fall in 
adult unemployment over the 
six months to October was 
5.400, almost matching the 
5,000 people a month taken 
off the register by the expan- 


Gorbachov 

lobbies 

Thatcher 

By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomats Correspondent 


October unemployment 
count but could have an 
impact in subsequent months. 

“Today's figures are on 
target for a Tory general 
election fraud of less than 
three million on the un- 
employment register," Mr 
Prescott added yesterday. 
“Whatever Lord Young 
daims, his concern is for the 
long-term unemployment fig- 
ures rather than the long-term 
unemployed." 

Mr Ian Wngglesworth, the 
SDP economics spokesman, 
said: “After seven long years 
of this Government, this 
country still has one of the 
worst jobless records in the 
developed world." 


Fire-ends 
Peterhead 
jail siege 

By Howard Foster 
The five-day siege at 


Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the Peterhead prison in Scotland 
Soviet leader, yesterday sent ended spectacularly yesterday 
the Prime Minister a personal as rioting prisoners set fire to 
letter on the eve of her flight to their cdl block before giving 
Washington for a major re- themselves up and releas in g 
view of arms control prospects their hostage prison officer 


with President Reagan. 

Their talks at Camp David 


unharmed. 

Fires, from wooden roo 


on Saturday will be set against struts and debris, were started 
a background of growing in two places in the prison's A- 
pessimism on arms control. Hall just as the warder, Mr 
Mr Gorbachov’s letter, deliv- John Crossan, aged 25, was 
ered by Mr Leonid Zamyatin, freed, 
the Soviet Ambassador, who Flames were soon shooting 
spent half an hour with Mrs several feet through the roof of 
———■I. — — the cell block and as the 49 


Geoffrey Smith 9 

Star Wars connter 11 

Thatcher, was seen as an 
attempt at last minute 
lobbying. Whitehall sources 
discouraged speculation that 
the letter represented a Soviet 
effort to use Mrs Thatcher as a 
go-between. 

Mr Gorbachov is thought to 


rioters filed out of the building 
fire engines drove through the 
jail gates. About 50 other 
prisoners in an adjoining 
block were evacuated. 

The fire was put out after 
about an hour. Damage is 
estimated at up to £1 million. 

The prisoners are thought to 
have started the blaze in the 
mistaken belief that one of 
their leaders, Andrew Walker, 


have repeated his call for talks J b«n 

the' Pres? The prisoners’ demands tn- 


years. . 

A statement from the Soviet 
Embassy showed no softening 
of Moscow’s demand that any 
arms settlement would de- 
pend on Washington agreeing 
not to lest the Strategic De- 
fence Initiative laser-based 
anti-missile system ra space. 

Continued on page 24, col 6 ! 


The prisoners' demands in- 
volve the relocation of the 
prison to make visits easier for 
families. 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1S86 





US and the Iranian weapons furore 


of dealers 
uncovered 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

An international network of 
ships and planes, supported by 
mysterious middlemen who 
charter vessels from legitimate 
and shady companies, exists 
for the sole purpose of ferrying 
US military equipment to 
Iran, according to details that 
began emerging yesterday. 

Last July, for example, an 
American-registered Boeing 
707 is understood to have 
delivered 23 tons of military 
equipment labeled “hospital 
supplies" to the Iranian armed 
forces. Three weeks laier Rev 
Lawrence Jenco, a Roman 
Catholic priest and head of the 
Beirut office of Catholic Relief 
Services, was released by pro- 
Iranian dements in Lebanon 
after 18 months in captivity. 

It seems that each time an 
arms delivery has been made, 
a hostage has been released. In 
the meantime, however, more 
American hostages were still 
being taken m Beirut. 

According to accounts 
surfacing in Washington, a 


M.liass"* g 

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plane that had carried an aims 
shipment to Iran left Tehran 
on September 14. 19S5. the 
same day that Rev Benjamin 
Weir, a Presbyterian mission- 
ary in Lebanon, was released 
after 10 months’ captivity. 

That plane, a DC-8, is 
believed to have taken mili- 
tary equipment on board in 
Isael before heading for Iran 
and American officials have 
been quoted as saying the 


lamuies. been quoted as saying the 

The prison governor, Mr Alf delivery was in return for the 
Smith, praised his men for release of Mr Weir. 


their handling of the siege. 

Mr Albert McQuarrie. 


Shortly before the mission, 
the plane bad been bought 


Conservative MP for Banff from a Florida dealer by 
and Buchan, last night re- International Air Tours of 
jected any ‘ allegations of Nigeria, based in Brussels. It is 
brutality and called for an not known who chartered it. 


independent inquiry. 


Continued on page 24, col 3 


Man about town, 1986-style 


By Gavin Bell 

Arts Correspondent 

A typical visitor to a West 
End theatre is a young man 
who reads The Times and The 
Sunday Times to check what’s 
on, makes a final choice on the 
recommendation of friends, 
and buys his ticket on the day 
of the performance. 

He prefers to go with a 
companion, rather than in a 
group, to travel by under- 
ground, and to dine before the 
show. If he is resident in 
London, be is more likely to 
come from Camden than any 
other borough: if doL 1« is 
more likely to come " 0£ri 
Essex than anv other county. 

The profile’ of the careful 
spender (a shared programme, 
and ice-cream rather than 
drinks at the interval) emeiges 


from an audience survey by 
the City University, for the 
Society of West End Theatre. 

According to the report, 
published yesterday, the av- 
erage theatre-goer has changed 
considerably since the last 
survey of its kind in 1982. 

Audiences have swelled 
from 8.8 million in 1983 to 
more than 10 million in 1985, 
largely due to a huge influx of 
foreign visitors. 


and Denmark into third and 
fifth places. 

Camden emerges as the 
culture capital of London with 
4 per cent of all ticket sales 
(edging out Kensington and 
Chelsea with 3 per cent). The 
keenest West End patrons in 
the counties live in Essex. 

Personal recommendation 
is the most often quoted 


UlVr UUU1 IU IIUU1UU Ui 1704, A 1 . 1 ... 

sg-aat husE influ,t - isr-Sy&’JKte 

,. s ‘ - , . . ing has increased in impon- 

Most of the new business nnge and the most widely read 
has come from men. who new papers among theatre-goers 
outnumber women with 51 are The Times ^4 The Sun- 
per cent of attendances, and fa.. Times. 
they tend to be younger- During the financial year 
more than baif are under the { g 8 5/86, theatre audiences 
age of 35. __ boosted London's economy 

The US still heads the by spending an estimated 


lays Reagan 


From Michael Bin yon. Washington 
On the eve of a televised ing: “I haven't changed my 


address from the Oval Office 
breaking the White House 
silence on the Iranian arms 
furore. President Reagan 
admitted to key congressional 
leaders that American arms 
had been sent to Tehran and 
indicated he would continue 
contacts there. 

Unexpectedly summoning 
House and Senate leaders to 
the White House, be is re- 
ported to have strongly denied 
that the arms were sent in 
direct exchange for hostages. 

Mr Reagan told the four 
senators and congressmen 
that he still hoped the current 

Banish connection 9 

secret negotiations would lead 
to the release of two more 
hostages and insisted his 
efforts were “perfectly legal”. 

They quoted him after- 
wards saying the Administra- 
tion would not be doing its job 
“if Khomeini died and we had 
not made an effort to lay the 
groundwork for contacts with 
a future regime". 

Senator Robert Byrd, the 
Democrat majority leader- 
designate. said after the brief- 


mind." 

Senator Orrin Hatch, a 
Republican, said yesterday 
that the Senate’s constitu- 
tional subcommittee, which 
he chairs, would hold hearings 
on the arms shipments. 

Senator Patrick Leahy, the 
senior Democrat on the Sen- 
ate Intelligence Committee, 
said the deal had put an 
automatic price on the head of 
any American working or 
travelling in that part of the 
world. 

US officials have raid the 
US is negotiating with Iran on 
the final details of the return 
of nearly $500 million (£349 
million)’ frozen in the US 
Federal Reserve Bank in New 
York in 1981. 

The confusion in the 
Administration over the affair 
has been deepened with 
publication of reports that 
Admiral John Poindexter, the 
National Security Adviser, 
vigorously opposed calls by 
Mr Donald Regan, the White 
House Chief of Staff, for a frill 
explanation becoming in- 
volved in a shouting match in 
from of the President as the 
news was leaked from the 
Middle East. 


Commons I Collier 


to deoate case goes 
Aids crisis to ministry 


By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Government has re- 
sponded to the mounting pub- 
lic concern over Aids by 
arranging a full day's debate 
on the issue in the Commons 
next Friday. 

Mr Norman Fowler, the 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services, will tell MPs of the 
Government's latest efforts, 
through the special Cabinet 
committee on Aids, to connter 

Avoiding Aids 3 

Letters 21 

the spread of the disease, and 
how it will spend the £ 10m it 
has allocated for the news- 
paper and television campaign 
advocating “safe” sex 
techniques. 

Mr John Biffen. leader of 
the Commons, announced the 
debate yesterday. 

Mr Neil Kirin ock the La- 
bour leader, called on the 
Government to announce 
how it would help to deal with 
the disease with the speed and 
funding that was necessary. 
He 5ai±“lt would be im- 
mensely unfortunate if what 
has been described as the 
Prime Minister's war on Aids 
were to be cash-limited." 


By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The Stock Exchange yes- 
terday announced that it had 
referred the case of Mr Geof- 
frey Collier to the Govern- 
ment to investigate an 
allegation of insider dealing in 
the stock market. 

Mr Collier was forced to 
resign as a director of Morgan 
Grenfell, the merchant bank, 
earlier this week because of 
share dealings carried out 
through outside brokers - in 
breach of house rules. 

Insider trading, the use of 
privileged information to 
profit from share dealing, was 
made illegal in 1980. 

Mr Collier was forced to 
resign after dealing in the 
shares of AE. the engineering 
company, shortly before it was 
the subject of a bid by one of 
Morgan Grenfell's clients. 

But the affair seemed to be 
widening yesterday with 
suggestions that others had 
been involved in the share 
dealings. 

An employee of Scrimgeour 
Vickers, the slock broker 
which informed Morgan 
Grenfell of the share dealings, 
may have been involved. 

Scrimgeour would not com- 
ment last night after a request 

Continued on page 24. col 2 






By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 


After more than five days of ibe subject of new negotiating 
negotiations on teachers' pay machinery for pay and 
which began in Nottingham conditions, 
and have continued at the N A HT were arguing, appar- 

London headquarters of the ently with little sympathy, lor 
conciliation service Acas, a separate body to discuss 
teachers and local authorities salaries and working con- 
were dealt a farther blow last di lions for heads and their 
nighL deputies. 

Mr Philip MemdaJe, leader 6 Mr Baker yesterday ruled 
of the Conservative minority out the provision of more 
among the local authorities, money to settle the pay dis- 
revealed that the Tory pule and warned teachers that 

authorities had voted against they would not be forgiven if 
the conditions of service ele- they disrupted education (Our 
mem in the package as loo Chief Political Correspondent 
costly. writes). 

“These proposals would in- In a Commons speech 
volve the recruitment and which provoked an angry 
payment of more than 10.000 clash with Mr Neil Kinnock. 
teachers. The resources being — — ■— — — — 

talked of are massive, and Parliament 4 

certainly outside the cost en- — - 

velope set by the Labour leader, Mr Baker again 

Government he said. made clear that he was ready 

We would be on dangerous with legistelion I0 j mpo se his 
territory if we agree to make dgaJ gf a 16 . 4 per cent in- 
undertakings which we cannot CTease ovcr 2 i months, tied ta 

f0 "j r w n r thp acceptance by the teachers of 

NIr Peter Dawson of the jggaijy binding contracts on 
Professional Association of an d responsibilities. 

Teachers, also appeared to be 

losing patience with the nego- Mr Baker emphasised that 
dating process. He conceded it any deal which exceeded the 
might now be time for the Mr £608 million cost of the pack- 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of age he announced two weeks 
Slate for Education, “to step ago would be unacceptable, 
in and sort us out". And he labelled the talks in 

He said that Mr Baker could London and in Nottingham 
have seen nothing during the *®d ,er m the week “a fiasco . 
past six days to make him Chf^ on Corwervatrve 
think twice about his threat to J 1 ® sa, d ; Joe offer 

legislate and impose his own which 1 have put forward is 
solution generous. It is sufficiently 

, . generous to resoive the 

It emerged yesterday that = robleni - 

the National Association of „ ^ ^ 


Head Teachers (NAHT), 
which represents 70 per cent 
of heads in England and 
Wales, is more alienated than 
ever by the emerging deal. 

Having already expressed 
his grave reservations about 
salary structure, Mr David 
Hart, NAHT general sec- 
retary, revealed yesterday that 
his union was out on a limb on 


He added: “Any teacher 
who disrupts education in Lhe 
coming weeks and months 
will go an enormous dis- 
service to the children and will 
not be lightly forgiven." 

He said parents of children 
who were sent home or locked 
out would not forgive the 
teachers, “and nor would the 
country 


priority TV stunt 


By Martin Baker 

Today is the last day for 
British Gas customers to reg- 
ister their priority in Lhe queue 
for privatization shares. 

More than £4'^ billion has 
been set aside for British Gas 
employees, customers and 
other private investors, but 
only those with priority can be 
certain they will receive 
shares. 

Research suggests that more 
than 5.25 million people are 
certain to buy shares. 

The prospectus, with 
application form, will be is- 
sued on November 25. Prior- 
ity can be registered bv calling 
British Gas on 0272 272 272. 

20 per cent yield,' page 25 


A television slum for 
tomorrow’s BBC l Late Late 
Breakfast Show went trag- 
ically wrong yesterday when a 
participant training for an 
escapology display plunged to 
his death. 

Mr Michael Lush, aged 25. a 
self-employed builder, of 
Southampton, was abseiling 
down a rope tied to a box 
hanging from a crane about 
100 feet above the ground at 
Long Crendon near Thame 
when it snapped. He had been 
handcuffed in the box before 
freeing himself. 

Mr Lush was taken to Stoke 
Mandevillc Hospital. Ayles- 
bury. Buckinghamshire, 
where he later died- 







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overseas league, but a four- £103 million in restaurants 
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Heavy rain kept voters 
away from the polls at the stun 
of the Kndwsley North by- 
election yesterday, but party 
workers in the Merseyside 
constituency were optimistic 

that there would be a rash 
during the evening. 

By early afternoon less than 
20 per cent of voters had 
turned out in lhe relentless 
drizzle. Polling was at its 
slowest in Kirkbv. while in 


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HOME NEWS 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Vauxhall tackles 
absentee blight 

More 8,000 Vauxhall employees have been cold 
that the level of absenteeism at the Loton- based car 
company is unacceptable. The company. Earing losses of 
£60 ntfltipa this year, estimates that at least £7 million of 
that wffl be caused by absenteeism. 

A company spokesman said yesterday: “This is not a 
witch-hunt ... Bat there haw been people m ©nr plant who 
have been abasing the system and they are costing their 
colleagues and the company money." 

Absenteeism at the company is about 13 per cent — 
double the national average — and the problem is 
particularly bad on Mondays and Fridays. 

Vanxhaii has identified workers whose attendance 
record is poor and they will be asked whether they hare an 
identifiable health problem- If their attitude is deemed 
unreasonable, the company will consider dismissal. 

More Legion cases 

Three more cases of Legfrnutaires’ disease have been forad 
in Gloucestershire where an outbreak has lulled a man aged 
62. 

Health chiefs said yesterday that the three had recovered 
after treatment for pneumonia. The cases came to light after 
checks on 27 pneumonia cases. 


Costly 

theme 

Mr Peter de Salary, 
aged 42, appeared at Mart- 
borough Magistrates’ 
Court in Wiltshire, yes- 
terday, charged with 44 
breaches of building 
regulations at Uttlecote, 
his theme park. 

Mr de Savary denied all 
charges and the case 
agaftmt him was dismissed 
after Kenoet conned of- 
fered oo evidence. His com- 
pany, and a consultant, Mr 
John Taylor, were found 
gnOty of not informing the 
council of work being done 
and fined a total of £17,200. 


Secrets 

charge 

A man accused of break- 
ing the Official Secrets Act 
was sent for trial by mag- 
istrates at Taunton, Somer- 
set, yesterday. 

Mark Jackson, aged 30, 
whose address was given as 
the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary headquarters in Bel- 
fast, is accused of unlaw- 
fully retaining documents 
and also of communicating 
documents “while an offi- 
cer of the Queen” to Julian 
Ritchie. 

He was given bail until 
the trial at Exeter Crown 
Court. 


Duchess calls in 

The Queen Mother, making good progress as she rested 
her injured leg, was visited yesterday by the Duchess of 
York in the King Edward VII Hospital for Officers. 

The Duchess, wearing a white pullover and trousers, 
spent about 10 minutes at the London hospital after 
arriving by car with a detective. Earlier, Clarence House 
had said the Queen Mother, aged 86, had spent a 
comfortable Bight- 

Flowers from well-wisliers continued to arrive at the 
hospital. The Queen Mother who suffered the injury in 
Scotland about three weeks ago, was admitted on Tuesday. 

Murrell 
inquiries 

Detectives in West Mer- 
cia yesterday ended their 
questioning of a man, aged. 

32, about the murder oT the 
peace campaigner. Miss 
Hilda Murrell (right), at 
Shrewsbury two years ago. 

The man is dne to appear 
in coart in London today, 
on charges of 
two elderly women 
raping a girt, aged 14. 



THE TTMF-S FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 

Tebbit wins MPs’ backing over break with students 


Tory chief accused 
of left witch-hunt 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Conservative backbenchers 
yesterday solidly supported 
Mr Norman Tebbifs decision 
to sever bis party’s links with 
the Federation of Conser- 
vative Students. 

MPs bom both the right 
and the left said that after the 
recent outcry over allegations 
in a federation magazine that 
Lord Stockton was guilty of- 
“war crimes”, the Conser- 
vative chairman had no op- 
tion but to curb the young 
radicals. 

But last night Mr Harry 
phibbs, aged 20. the libertar- 
ian activist responsible for the 
offending interview in the 
now defunct New Agenda, said 
Mr Tebbit had made a “seri- 
ous mistake”. 

He blamed leftists in Cen- 
tral Office for orchestrating a 
witch-hunt against the ultra- 
right federation. 

He was seeking an urgent 
meeting with the party chair- 
man in an attempt to persuade 
him to overturn his decision 
to cut off its £30.000 a year 
grant and give il a week to 
leave its office in Smith 
Square. 

The federation at national 
level is being replaced by a 
new body known as the 
Conservative Collegiate 
Forum. 

That 20-member group, 
charged with galvanizing Tory 
support in universities and 
polytechnics among students 
and academics, will be chaired 
by Mr Peter Morrison, the 
recently appointed deputy 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party. 

Mr Morrison said yesterday 
that the decision to break with 
the federatioh had been taken 
because some of the leader- 
ship. with the notable excep- 


tion of Mr John Bercow, its 
(-hflirmap, among others, had 
not been attracting the sup- 
port of students in the way 
hoped. 

“They have been taking up 
rather narrow positions,” he 
said. 

The new forum would be 
made up of 12 area repre- 
sentatives and eight others 
draws from postgraduate and 
academic ancles. 

The changes were unani- 
mously approved yesterday by 
the executive of tiie National 
Union of Conservative Assoc- 
iations, which will decide next 
year whether to disaffiliate the 
network of campus-based 
federation branch e s . 

Mr Bereow, who has consis- 
tently booked Mr Tebbit’s 
tough stance, will stay on at 
Smith Square on his sabbati- 
cal salary and join the new 
organization. 

He blamed the federation's 
demise on “a minority of 
recalcitrant individuals” on 
its controlling national com- 
mittee. 

That “barmy” fringe had 
been more interested in grab- 
bing power and “sticking 
knives” into its internal oppo- 
nents than campaigning on 
behalf of the party. 

Speaking on BBC Radio 4, 
he said: “The difficulty has 
arisen by virtue of the feet that 
a lot of extremely good ac- 
tivists are at local level and 
some of the trouble-makers 
have unfortunately been at the 
very top”. 

Mr Gerry Hayes, MP for 
Haiiow, said the federation 
had come to represent the 
“unacceptable face of con- 
servatism” through some of 


its members espousing “lad?, 
seamy” causes such as the 
legalization of incest and 
heroin. 

Mr Michael Brown, MP for 
Brigg and Qeethorpes, a free- 
mar ket right-winger, said be 
had defended the federation’s 
right to speak out in the past, 
but it had tested even his 
patience. 

“1 am not surprised at this 
development Not many tears' 
will be shed.” 

Mr Brown said the shake-up 
should be seized as an 
opportunity to reconsider the 
party's approach to the youth 
vote, both inside and outside 
universities. 

Mr Phibbs said that Mr 
Tebbit’s decision had been 
unexpected and would cause 
astonishment and disappoint- 
ment among the federation’s 
14,000 members. 

He claimed the move was 
prompted by “people in Cen- 
tral Office who have no time 
for Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
and are very much on the left 
of the Conservative Party**. 
They had been “gunning” for 
the federation since 1980. 

He contrasted the 
federation’s loyalty to Mr 
Tebbit with the activities of 
the “weMed” Young Conser- 
vatives who, he said, earlier 
this year had. issued a state-, 
ment describing him as a 
“political mugger. 

He said the federation still 
has t remendo us admiration 
for Mr Tebbit. “And I -‘hope 
our members will get on with 
promoting the Conservative 
cause and not be too dis- 
tracted by these organizational 
problems in London,” Mr 
Phibbs added. 



*: ?. ‘ ; -Vr v; .-=• ... .* 

v ' t r Vv . ' ' ;r •.*.-***■•- **•?/. **v . •.■ 

Mr Phibbs yesterday, when Ire complained of a witch-toast. 


Bradford City fire 


Club lays blame for tragedy 


Bradford City Football 
Club, where 56 spectators died 
in a grandstand fire in May 
1985, yesterday began its ev- 
idence in the High Court in 
Leeds in an attempt to rebuild 
its reputation and save its 
finances. 

Within minutes of opening 
his defence at the High Court 
in Leeds, Mr Roy McAulay, 
QC, for the club, blamed the 
tragedy on the club's co- 
defendants. the Government’s 
Health and Safety Executive 
and West Yorkshire County 
Council 

The hearing will decide 
whether the dub, the excc- 


By Ian Smith 

utive and the now-defunct 
county council must bear legal 
liability for the disaster. 

If a test case brought by Mis 
Susan Fletcher, aged 34, and 
her son Martin, aged 12, 
succeeds then another 109 
claimants will seek damages. 
Mis Fletcher lost her husband, 
a son and two other relatives 
in the tire. 

Mr McAulay spoke scorn- 
fully of two routine inspec- 
tions the Health and Safety 
Executive had made of the 
Valley Parade ground, the firet 
in 1980 and a second four 
years later. 


Mr Stafford Heginbotham, 
dub chairman, opened his 
evidence by shouldering the 
blame for any mis takes made 
by the club before, during or 
after the disaster. 

Mr Heginbotham said* 
“The most lasting memory of 
the fire in my mind is the 
friendly way in which the 
flames were greeted by many 
people when the fire first 
started They went to have a 
look at it and then gently 
walked back to the kiosk to get 
a cup of tea.” 

The hearing continues 
today. 


National Trust plan to 
restore historic estate 


By John Young 


An ambitious scheme to 
restore one of the great his- 
toric estates of Wales, owned 
until IB years ago by the 
reputed descendants of medi- 
eval longs, was launched yes- 
terday by Dame Jennifer 
Jenkins, chairman ofthe Nat- 
ional Trust. 

Dinefwr Hark, near Iiart- 
deila, was a royal estate long 
before the. Norman Conquest 
and was the focal point of a 
protracted power struggle be- 
tween warring feudal lords. 

Tire restoration has been 
initiated by a notable range of 
organizations, including the 
Welsh Office, the World Wild- 


life Fund and Dyfod County 
Council 

The last medieval 
Rhys ap Tfcwdwr, was 
ficiaUy “conquered” in 1095. 
but ft was another two centu- 
ries before the Webb were 
finally subdued by Edward L 
In the meantime Lord Rhys of 
Debeiibarth lad built tiie' 
present castle. 

Around 1440 tire estate was , 
acquired by Giuffyd : ap 

Nicholas, one ofthe new breed 

of ambitious Welsh gentry, 
whose grandson. Sir Rhys ap 
Thomas, helped Henry VH 
win the Battle of Boswonh. 



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MINCLTA 


Life sentence 
for ‘designer 
drug’ dealers 

The Government yesterday 
hundred a pre-emptive strike 
against “designer drugs” by 
announcing that making or 
supplying such drags will at- 
tract a maximum penalty of 
life imprisonment. 

The synthetic drags, which 
have swept parts of the United 
States, can be' up to a hundred 
tunes stronger than heroin. 
Addicts have suffered brain 
damage 

Designer drugs are not a 
problem in Britain, but deal- 
era would not technically be 
committing an offence. While 
pethidine and fentanyi are 
controlled drugs certain of 
their analogues, from which 
designer drugs are made; are 
not. 

However, the Home Office 
Minister of Stale, Mr David 
Meflor, extended the Misuse 
of Drugs Act, 1971 to cover 
uncontrolled analogues from 
April I. 


NUM wins back-pay 
with pension changes 


By Tim Jones 


More than 92,000 miners 
are to receive £350 each in 
back-pay after agreement by 
the National Union of Mine- 
workers' national executiveto 
accept changes in the 
industry’s pension scheme. 

It is understood that the 
£32 million offer was accepted 
in spite of opposition from Mr 
Arthur Scargift, union presi- 
dent. The agreement was wel- 
comed by British Coal, which 
regarded ft as the last 
outstanding issue of the bitter 
12-month pit strike. 

The pension scheme rales 
will be amended to make it 
clear that future strikes lasting 
longer than one complete 
week will not count as 
contributing service. But min- 
ers will be able to “buy back” 
for pension purposes periods 
lost through unauthorized 
absence. ' 


Court action to begin next 
week will decide whether 
strike action before the agree- 
ment counted as contributing 
service. 

If the court derides that 
strike absence did not-count, 
pension scheme members will 
have tile option of malting up 
that period by cxmtributing up 
to 1 per emit of earnings over 
five years, or accepting a 
reduced pension.' 

If the court derides strike 
absence did count, die ques- 
tion of recovery of contribu- 
tions trill not arise. 

Sir Robert Haslam, chair- 
man of British Coal said 
yesterday: “Our offer was 
made to wipe the slate dean 
and resolve problems by 
agreement, which is always 
better than protracted litiga- 
tion in the courts”. 


Cabinet 
plans MI5 
documents 
black-out 

ByMkfawig**” . 

OTtobafiComespontof 

The Government plans » 
fisht an the way any ranter 
attempt by U* defence tew- 

BtSKBSas 

Wright to acquire tofy*n.rct 
documents about p ast acti v- 
ities of foe security sernee. 

Counsel for Mr Wright and 
the Heinemazut company of 
Australia, which hop® 5 
publish bfc book on MI 5, will 
seek a further older from Mr 
Justice Powell in the New 
South Wales Supreme Court 
today to mate the Govern- 
mem hand over much more 
sensitive documents than 
woe released on Wednesday. 

fa- particular, tire lawyers 
want the documents released 
which relate to _ibe 
Government's conclusions 
that the hue Sir Roger Hollis, 
the formerdiiector-gencrai of 
MZ5, was not a Soviet spy. 
which the Prime Minister 
announced in her statement to 
die House of Commons in 

mi. 

: A senior “Whitehall source 
wid yesterdav: “If we hand 
over these 'very sensitive 
documents- where will it stop? 
This whole issue is about 
confetentiality. If a former 
member ofthe security service 
is seen to be able to breach the 
rules of confidentiality, it wifi 
send the wrong signals to 
those people who deal with 
MIS, in other words intrih- 
gence agents from other 
countries.” 

The source added: “The 
danger is that if framer offi- 
cers of MI5 disclose informa- 
tion to the pobtic, other 
agencies wiH be nr less keen to 
pass on information to the 
security service.” 

The plan by the Govern- 
ment to appeal against any 
further order for more docu- 
ments wifi inevitably delay the 
start of the court case in 
Sydney, 

Mr Wright left MI5 11 years 
ago and emigrated to Austra- 
lia. Now 71, he fives in 
sedation in Tasmania and 
feds he has a duty to dear out 
the stables once mid for all, to 
ensure that “the firm” as the 
security service is known, can 
operate with an untainted 
reparation. 

In 1984 he produced a 160- 
pagfi dossier. The Security of 
the United Kingdom Against 
the Assault of the Russian 
intelligence which he sent to 
Sir Anthony Kershaw, the 
Tory MP for Stroud and 
c h ai rman of the Commons 
select committee on foreign 
affair s. 

Tire dossier, which was kept 
secret, was also seat by the 
head of the security service 
and Mis Thatdien But in July 
2984 he appeared in a tele- 
vision programme by Gra- 
nada's World in Action, in 
which he disclosed all his 
allegations and insisted that 
he was 99 per cent sore that Sir 
Roger Hollis was a double 
agent. 

Mr Wright spent many 
years, both during his time 
with MI5 add after he left, 
investigating Soviet penetra- 
tion of Britain’s intelligence 
services, and in particular the 
allegations against Sir Roger, 
and is so convinced of his own 
findings that he offered to 
come to Britain to appear 
before the Security Com- 
mission. 

He was shocked when be 
was told that he would be 
arrested once he stepped foot 
on British soft. - 

His book is an examination 
of the history of Soviet 
penetration of -MIS between 
1958 and 1975, the years when 
he was a member, as well as 
detailing allegedly unlawful 
acts by MIS, including a plot 
to assassinate President Nas- 
ser during the Suez crisis and a 
bugging operation mounted 
against No 20 when the then 
Mr Harold Wilson was Prime 
Minister. 





The Prune Minister and Mr Thatcher with theft son, Mark, and his fiancee. Miss Diane Bargdorf, 


Engagement a ‘family thing’ 


The Prime Minister’s sen. 
Mr Mark Thatcher, and his 
fiancee, Miss Diane Bagdad, 
laced photographers and 
televises crews for a short time 
at 10 Downing Street yes- 
terday. 

But the couple refused to 
allow reporter s into the ses- 
sion, wbaM not answer ques- 
tions, ■ and even hid the 
engagement ring from the 
cameramen. 

The 20 photographers and 
TV crews allowed into Down- 
ing Street bad to prompt than 
to smile. 

“We asked them to show as 
the ring but Merit just held 


her hud so that we couldn’t 
see it,” said one photographer 
later. 

“He even palled her hand 
behind his back so that we 
could Bot get a glimpse of the 
ring. Everyone was every 
serious.” Mrs Thatcher and 
her husband, Denis, joined the 
couple for a family photograph 
in the entrance hall, but even 
they stayed sflent 

The only time Mark That- 
cher, aged 33, spoke was when 
he told the photographers: 
“it’s a family thing,? after, 
they, asked him again for a 
look at the ring. 

Reporters had been refused 


entry on the personal iastrao- 
tious of the younger Mr 
Thatcher, who is know to shim 
pubiidty. 

Mr Thatcher and Miss 
Bergdorf, who is the daughter 
of a Dallas bnsmesstoan, wQ] 
have track at Downing Street 
today and are expected to 
return to the United States at 
the weekend. 

Mr Thatcher, who is fire 
Dallas rep r esen tative for Lo- 
tas Cars, first met Miss 
Burgdorf about 18 months 
ago- 

Tte announcement of theft 
engagement came on the ere of 
Mrs Thstefeer’s rfsft ;t» 

Washington, 


Firm to close 
second factory 

. The Robyn children’s 
clothes group, which dosed a 
factory in Derby Iasi week 
with the loss of 100 jobs, said 
ay that il is to shut its 
„ mWtriKworth, Derby- 
shire, with the loss of about 30 
jobs. 






sHuAtaeSw 



pi 

YugwUvto DM 700. 








HOME NEWS 


BBC draws up code for 
stricter checks on 
portraying TV violence 


The BBC 


By Jon a t han MSBer, Mafia Cocrespoadent 


promised ves- 
terday to exercise more care in 
the portrayal of violence on 
televis ion, especially in news 
programmes. 

Mr Will Wyatt, Chairman of 
a committee of BBC exec- 
utives that produced the new 
guidelines, said last night that 
the expansion of satellite 
communications has resulted 
in a large increase in the 
number of violent news sto- 
ries available to editors. 

The new guidelines call for 
restraint News programmes 
“should and win shock view- 
ers at times” but editors 
should never show violence 
gratuitously because the more 
viewers are shocked, the more 
it will- take to shock them in 
the future. - 

Pictures of bodies should be 
used only with great care and 
dose-ups should be avoided 
save in exceptional circum- 
stances. Grief should be por- 
trayed with restraint and 
reports of suicide may indude 
the method if relevant but not 
the details of it. 

Mr Wyatt said that with 
minor exceptions, the new 
guidelines do not set stricter 
standards for violence than 
previous BBC rules. But they 
do spell out the corporation's 
policy in a shorter, crisper 
manner, and are intended to 
be easier to apply in practice. 

The guidelines are being 
distributed to programme 
makers and will be reinforced 
by an internal video illustrat- 
ing the decisions that must be 
taken before violent acts are 
shown. 

When it is necessary to 
include scenes of violence in 
dramas and films, the guide- 
lines say that producers most 
make efforts to ensure that the 
audience knows what is in 
prospect, “so that viewers are 


not ambushed by offensive 

That is to be achieved by 
announcements before pro- 
begm and through 
'io Times and newspapers. 

Violent p rog ram mes win 
not be identified by die use of 
on-screen symbols because 
that may encourage viewing 
for the wrong reason. 

The guidelines do not bar 
the use of violent portrayals. 
“Violence is part of both 
nature and society,” the BBC 
said. 

But decKions on whether to 
include violent material in 
any television programme are 
complicated arid subtle, the 
new guidelines stale. 

Different criteria apply for 
programmes to be shown be- 
fore the 9pm “watershed” 
when children are expected to 
be watching, and afterwards, 
when audiences are presumed 
to be more mature. 

But whenever a drama is to 
contain violence, producers 


plaints about' violence in 
dramas produced by tire BBC 
hself (the biggest cause of 
viewer complaints is bad lan- 
guage), these can be farther 
reduced if program me makers 
exercise coramonsense, the 
guidelines say. 

In pf ngrammw acq uire d 
from outside the BBC, content 
cannot be controlled in the 
production process, but must 
nevertheless be made to con- 
form to the cm p ota ti on's edi- 
torial policy. 

Violence in purchased ma- 
terial, particularly American 
pr ogram mes, is often different 
in style and emphasis than in 
BBC-made dramas, and , guns 
are used more frequently. 

“In general, this seems 
to the. audience 


which is aware that it is a fact 
oflife in the US to find guns in 
the hands of the police and 
ordinary citizens.” 

The BBC has rejected a 
number of films, including 

The Exorcist, Friday the Tfur- 

must consid en frho i^ nfwnmit- 1 teenth and Straw Dogs, be- 
ting the act, whether the cause they were too graphic. 


viewer is meant to identify 
with the perpetrator, whether 
the perpetrator appears to be 
enjoying the violence, and is 
the violence essential to the 
story. 

Viewers are hkdy to be 
particularly disturbed by 
scenes of domestic violence, 
sexual violence, cruelty to 

children and anfmalg and 

extremeor sustained violence 
of any kind. 

“There is also a danger that 
techniques of violence can 
seem admirable, can be imi- 
tated. Martial arts techniques 
and any violence with ropes 
(especially hang in g s) and with 
domestic knives should only 
be included with extreme 
care.” 

Although there is a compar- 
atively small number of com- 


Mrs Mary White-house, 
president of die National 
Viewers and Listeners Associ- 
ation, a frequent critic of the 
BBC, said last night that the 
new gmdetines were ad- 
mirable in themselves, but she 
remained sceptical. 

“What they need is to 
ensure that the guidelines they 
have are put into practice. 

• Tighter controls on die 
advertising of toys on tele- 
vision are being considered to 
reduce die “over-emotional” 
appeal used by some advertis- 
ers (Oar Political Staff writes). 

The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority is to hold 
talks with toy makers and 
advertisers to meet com- 
plaints. But that will not affect 
toy advertisements shown in 
the run-up to Christmas. 


Battle against Aids 


‘Condoms 
should be 
free 9 call 

By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

The Government is bring 
asked to provide free condoms 
to help to control the spn&d of 
Aids. •••■ 

The Cabinet committee set 
up to lead the education 
campaign on the disease win 
discuss the possibility at its 
next meeting. 

Medical specialists at Aids 
units who advocate the move 
received support yesterday 
from representatives of 10,000 
community pharmacists in 
England and Wales, and in a 
leading article in tire British 
Medical Journal today. 

Miss Kaye Writings, re- 
search officer of the Family 
Planning Infoamation Service, 
says in toe journal: “The time 
is now ripe for a major public 
information campaign on ev- 
idence for toe protective e£ 
fects of condoms and sperm- 
icides. 

“People should be en- 
couraged to use them and 
provided with dear instruc- 
tions for their use.” 

Advertising the products 
should be allowed on tele- 
vision. “There is a case for 
setting aside the sensitivities 
of a minority when lives are at 
stake,” she said. 

“The Department of Health 
and Social Security must de- 
cide whether condoms should 
be provided free of charge for 
prophylaxis as they are in 
family planning dimes for 
contraceptive use.” 

Some drug duties and cen- 
tres for sexually transmitted 
fii«»ases are already distribut- 
ing free condoms. 

Mr David Sharpe, chairman 
of toe Pharmaceutical Ser- 
vices Negotiating Committee, 
representing toe pharm acis ts, 
said: “I do not believe that the 
free issue of condoms wifl 
promote promiscuity, but will 


Tell pupils of gay 
sex, says Currie 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Scboridutdien ulwM .be 
taught about homosexuality as 
part of fee fight against Aids, 
acconfing in Mrs Edwins Cur- 
rie, tbe Under Secretary for 
Health. 

Is as i ate i view published 
yesterday which seemed cer- 
tais to upset many os toe right 
tf her party, Mrs Carrie came 
down dearly in favour of an 
p r piipit ca mpaign the 

Aids disease. 

She told New Society maga- 
zine that she favoured a p hey 
of “calling a spade a spade” 
and that sbe despaired of the 
“young fogies” in her party 
who were offended by fiw- 
letter words. She believed the 
public wanted to be told 
frankly what toe facts were. 

Bat it was her remarks 
about sex education which win 
most upset Tory colleagues. 

Forty-three Conservative 
MPs rebelled against toe Gov- 
ernment last iwnotb over its 
plans to make governors the 
arbiters of what sex ed u ca tio n 
was gives in schools; they 
wanted parents to have toe 


unqualified right to withdraw 
their children from lessons. 

Mrs Onrrie said she was a 
strong supporter of sex educa- 
tion in schools, ‘T’bank God it 
is now enshrined in law.” 

Asked if that meant teach- 
ing duktrea about homo- 
sexuality to prevent Aids, sbe 
replied: “Yes”. 

She also said that she 
favoured giving the contra- 
ceptive pBl to yorag girls. 

“I drat tike the idea ... bat 
I've seen the consequences of 
not allowing it. I don't think it 
is for parents to deride. If you 
don't have young girls on toe 
pill yon will have more school- 
girl mothers. It's two evfis — 
you have to choose the 


. Mrs Carrie's favoured 
health message on Aids was: 
“Be with someone you know”. 
For those infected, the best 
and simplest advice was to 
stop having sexual int- 


But Mrs Come said that 
she was opposed to the com- 
pulsory screening of high risk 
groups for Aids. 

Letters, page 21 


New drug needs more 
tests, makers insist 


By Alexandra Jackson 


al proportions^. 


the free issue of con- 
nd making toe leaflets 
le through pharmacists 
will be considered by 
linet committee at its 
sting”. 


The head of the Wellcome 
company yesterday countered 
criticism about its anti-Aids 
drug, Azidothym tdine (AZT), 
which is under going trials. 

Mr Alfred Stepped, chair- 
man and chief executive, was 
replying to claims that Writ- 
come was slow to make toe 
drug av ailable to individual 
doctors and was thought to be 
unable to produce adequate 
quantities of AZT to meet 
demand. 

1 Mr Shepperd, speaking after 
toe publication of the group's 
results for the year to toe end 
of August 1986, emphasized 
that the group was aware of 
-toe importance of the work it 
was undertaking bn Aids. But 
he said: “AZT is still a drug on 

trial 

“We have only been work- 


ing on the drug for 18 months, 
so both the research and 
development technology and 
the production process are 
very new. I can't over state the 
human dedication which is 
going into working on this 
drug. Yesterday we commit- 
ted £15-£20 million to capita] 
expenditure in order to en- 
hance production-” 

In rltntflwl trials AZT has 
proved effective in toe treat- 
ment of Aids sufferers and 
patients with related diseases. 
However, it is not a cure and 
at present has been given 
under strict supervision only 
to patients fulfilling stringent 
criteria. 

Given the toxicity of toe 
drug, it is unclear at this stage 
as to whether it win be suitable 
for wider applications. 



Lesley ManriDe on stage at the Lyric, Hammersmith, where rite will star in Alice in 
Wonderland, said to be the fist production for 100 years. The show, which opens on 
December 18, is an adaptation by John Wells and Carl Dans (Photograph: John Rogers). 


Campaign 
to simplify 
contract 
language 

By Robin Young 

A campaign launched today 
aims to outlaw hari languag e 
in standard consumer con- 
tracts. 

The National Consumer 
Council and toe Plain Eng lish 
Ca m paig n, who have joined 
forces, are not objecting to the 
profound or obscene — they 
simply want contracts to be 
written in easily understood 
English. 

Miss Christie Maher of the 
Plain Pampaig iij said 

yesterday: “Using gibberish 
makes it easy for firms to pull 
toe wool over the eyes of 
customers”. 

As a first step the NCC and 
P lain English Campaign are 
collecting examples of cases in 
which people claim to have 
suffered financial or other loss 
because they signed a contract 
form which they did not 
understand. 

One case already discovered 
involves a television hire 
agreement which took 114 
words and cross-references to 
two other sections and a 
schedule to inform readers 
that if they signed for a year's 
hire they could not have a 
refund if the set was returned 
early. 

The address to which other 
examples should be sent is: 
Plain English Campaign, Ver- 
non House, Whaley Bridge, 
Stockport, SKI 2 7HP. 


Maxwell praised 
for his courage 


Lord Elwyn Jones, toe for- 
mer Attorney General and 
Lord Chancellor, and a friend 
of Mr Robert Maxwell and his 
family for 30 years, told the 
High Court yesterday of toe 
publisher's “moral and physi- 
cal courage”. 

He said it “was manifested 
on toe battlefield when he 
came from his own country, 
having suffered toe loss of 
some members of his family 
by theNaos. 

*1 think he was one of only a 
few private soldiers lobe 
commissioned on the field 
and had Montgomery person- 
ally pin a Military Cross on his 
chest These things are not 
forgotten in my mind. 

“He is .a pretty tough 
character! don't think he is 
adverse to srif publicity. It 


may well be because he is 
connected with a newspaper. I 
admire what he has done. He 
has pretty well rescued the 
Daily Mirror. 

Mr Maxwell used his pos- 
ition as chairman of Mirror 
Group Newspapers partly to 
influence toe Labour Party 
and foreign governments such 
as Bulgaria, to secure business 
advantages, Mr Richard In- 
grams. former editor of Pri- 
vate Eye, said. 

He said one article in the 
Daily Mirror was “propagan- 
da for a communist dictator of 
a horrible kind. 

Mr Ingrams was continuing 
his evidence on the ninth day 
of Mr Maxwell's High Court 
Kbei action against him and 
toe magazine's publishers. 

The hearing continues. - 


Dismissed printer 
denies attack 


By Michael Horsnefl 


A dismissed printer accused 
of attacking a journalist, who 
worked for The Times, with a 
beer glass denied yesterday 
having been in the public 
house at the time. 

Mr Robin Shirfield, aged 
46, who worked for The Times 
before the newspaper moved 
to Wapping, east London, last 
January, told Southwark Cro- 
wn Court, in south London: “I 
can assure you it was not me.” 

Mr Shirfirid denies a charge 
of wounding Mr Christopher 
Warman. aged 48. 

The alleged incident hap- 
pened in February at the 
Packen ham Arms near The 
Times’ former offices in 
(hay's Inn Road, central 
London. 


Mr Shirfirid said he had 
been in another public house 
near by, the Caltborpe. and 
had gone home unaware of the 
incident. 

Four colleagues from toe 
National Graphical Associ- 
ation, toe print union, said he 
had been in the Calthorpe. 

Earlier, Mr Patrick 
Twomey, licensee of the 
Packenham, and Mr Grant 
Kirkby, a former barman, said 
they identified toe defendant 
as having been in toe 
Packenham that evening. 

The jury has been told that 
toe man was identified as toe 
attacker by Mr Michael Cra- 
zier, a journalist who had 
worked at The Times. 

The trial continues today. 


Girls are 
expelled 
over drugs 

Three sixth form girt board- 
ers at Wymondham College in 
Norfolk have been expelled 
for taking drugs at an eigh- 
teenth birthday party, it was 
disclosed yesterday. 

A day youth who took the 
girls to a drug dealer in 
Norwich has left of his own 
accord and 11 other pupils 
have been suspended for 
drinking. 

Mr Ronald Wolsey, the 
college head, said: “This is toe 
first time we have had any 
hint of drug-taking and we will 
not tolerate such behaviour.” 

The girts, who were vi- 
olently ill, admitted to Mr 
Wolsey that they had paid £2 
for amphetamines. 

Norfolk police are 
investigating. 

Teddy bear 
for £520 

. A German teddy bear, made 
90 years ago and kept on top of 
a great-grandmother's ward- 
robe, has fetched £520 at 
auction. 

Mis Mary Cockram, aged 
76, of Seaton, East Devon, 
whose teddy was given to her 
late husband 77 years ago, 
plans to buy a new microwave 
oven with the money. 

Ferry suicide 

Mr Cbaranjit Dosagh, a law 
graduate, jumped overboard 
from a ferry on its way from 
Ostend to Dover after passing 
law examinations, but being 
unable to get a job, an inquest 
at Hammersmith was told 
yesterday. 

A verdict of suicide was 
recorded on Mr Dosagh, aged 
24, of Kingston Road, Sou- 
thall, west London. 


The General Synod 


Anglicans in split on papal authority 


_ took a 
embracing 


l*S 


accept a do ct rin a l 
i toe nature of 
itbecknrck 


ed overwl 

r this section of i 
f England's te- 
he Final Report of 
m-Ronum Catholic 

pal Commission 

jot the laity, which 
ideal of the Pope 

antral hi fee event 

y t voted JL24.to 89 


This was not enough to stop 
toe synod accepting that toe 
report included ‘‘sufficient 
a wrugea ce an toe natare of 
authority in toe chracb for ov 
wunmniliiw! together to ex- 
plant farther the structures of 

authority and pnHpgialHy airt 
primacy la the church”.. 

The Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Dr Robert Roncie, at- 
tempted to allay fie fears of 
nay synod members saying 
he believed it was passible for 
a new style of papal leadership 
toenme. 

• Dr Philip Gfcfcttogjs, of Ox- 
ford, voiced fee opposition of 
his feBow members in toe laity 
when he said father folk? 
should : be hdd before toe 


report was passed by toe 


Prebendary John Pearce, of 
London, said it would be 
misleading to say to Roman 
Catholics feat there .was toe.' 
slightest likelihood the 
Chirch of England would 
accept fee kind of papacy that 

has existed to Rome far a 
thousand yeas. 

He cored sot conceive it 
possibl e that anyone would 
want the kind of primacy 
which chimed to decide 
whether a husband or wife 
could or could not use 

contraception. 

• The Rev Dr. Richard 
Rodgers, of Nortofidd, Bir- 
mmgham, yesterday talked to 


Dr Runtie about Mrs Irina 
Ratushinskaya, the Rus si an 
Christian poet, who was re- 
leased last month from Kiev 
prison. She wants to take up 
an offer of medical treatment 
in Britain- So for she has been 
mu life to obtain an exit visa 
• Throe Americans hostages 
who have lost been released 
wQl be in frenbefh Palace on 
Sunday and Monday at fie 
invitation of Dr Runcie. The 
three, the Rev Ben Weir, fie 
Rev Martin Jesco and Dr 
David Jacobsen, wffl join 
American representatives of 
the Presbyterian Episcopalian 

and Roman Catholic churches 
to discuss further moves to 
seek fie release of hostages 



over 

Aids should bring about 
the revolution in sexual habits 
which no amount of preach- 
ing has managed. 

In this weeks Spectator, 
Dr Thomas Stuttaford 
explains exactly how the 
disease can reach any non- 
monogamous heterosexual. 

He sets out the great scale 
of the problem and laments 
attempts to downplay its 
seriousness. 

We are confronted with 
a plague to which millions 
are vulnerable and for which 
there is no cure. We are enter- 
ing an age in which no one 
should go further than a kiss 
on the cheek. 

And Dr Stuttaford identi- 
fies two groups now in 


growing danger - students 
and West Indians. What will 
be the political consequences? 

What power has the 
Government to stop the 
disease? 

Also in this week s 
Spectator, Ferdinand Mount 
and Jock Bruce - Gardyne ask 
whetherMr Lawsons election 
boom will do the trick, while 
our wine and food special 
issue tells you how to enjoy 
the good times while they last. 

Colin Welch finds shafts 

of perception in the eccentric 

world of Prince Charles’s 

guru, Laurens van der Post; 

Sally Vincent reveals all about 

her times with Jeffrey 

Bernard; and Frank Johnson 

of The Times contributes 

his first Diary. 

THE 


M6 crash 
driver *was ■ 
travelling ; 
too fast’ j 

A coach driver involved In a ; 
moiorway pile-up in which 13 
people died did not apply his : 
brakes until the Last second, a 
jury was told yesterday. 

Mr John Bonnyman at- 
tempted to reduce his speed 
when be was almost on top of - 
a queue of traffic, it was said at 
Preston Crown Court, Lan- 
cashire. By that time it was too 
late. 

The court also was told of 
allegations that the stretch of 
the M6. at Barton, was inad- 
equately serviced by roadwork 
signs at the time of the crash in 
October last year. 

Mr Bonnyman, aged 63, of 
Millar Place, Edinburgh, de- 
nies four charges of causing 
death by reckless driving. 

His coach, heading to 
London from Edinburgh, 
crashed into a car which was 
flung through the air in 
flames. Attempts to free two 
people in the blazing car 
failed. 

Mrs Yvonne Bowker, of 
Balmoral Drive, Stockport, a 
passenger in a car travelling 
behind the coach, told the 
court she thought it was 
travelling too fast 
She said- "He was two 
coach-lengths away from cars 
in front before he braked. It 
was more or less as be touched 
the cars when his lights came 
on.” 

Her husband, Mr Brian 
Bowker, said a car struck by 
the coach flew through the air. 

He added: “Everything be- 
came still. There was just a 
moment of silence until the 
fire spread and everybody 
started dashing about” 

Mr William Grimshaw, a 
lorry driver, of Kendal, Cum- 
bria, who was travelling in the 
opposite direction, sard the 
coach had travelled towards a 
build-up of traffic near road- 
works as though there was a 
clear road ahead. 

“There was a tremendous 
clout” Mr Grimshaw said. "It 
seemed to climb over the car, 
which then exploded.” 

In a written statement 
Gillian McAverty, an op- 
tician, from Hampshire, criti- 
cized inadequate signs warn- 
ing drivers of a two-lane 
closure. 

"There was not enough 
notice to drivers on a busy 
motorway that there was 
danger,” she said. 

Mr William Waldron, QC, 
for the prosecution, has al- 
leged that Mr Bonnyman 
crashed at about 60mph- 
The trial continues. 


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November 13 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


Baker hopes for 
big change in 
English teaching 


Fundamental changes in the 
way the English language was 
taught in schools were needed. 
Mr Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 
said iu the resumed Commons 
debate on Use Queen's Speech. 
He would shortly be appointing 
a committee to consider the 
issue. 

Mr Baker welcomed the 
opportunity to report to the 
House about progress or the 
Government's education poli- 
cies. Much had happened since 
he last review in June last year. 

He said that the education 
system was a large investment in 
the nation's future. It was an 
expensive investment, met by 
national and local taxpayers. 

Most of the argument in the 
House was about the size of that 
investment. Much less was 
heard from the Opposition 
about getting good value for all 
those billions and about the 
benefits to children, students 
and the nation. Even less was 
heard about quality, achieve- 
ment and standards. 

- The purpose of investment 
must be to promote higher 
-standards of achievement. Re- 
sources were of course im- 
! portant. whether they were 
material or human. But educa- 
tion could not be seen just in 
money terms; it was not cash 
but quality that was important 
and by standards he meant what 
children and students were 
teaming. 

In recent weeks there had 
been tremendous media interest 
in the teachers' pay talks. He 
wished there could be as much 
public interest, not just in the 
crises of the talks, but in what 
was happening in the schools. 

He had been enormously 
encouraged by some of the 
things he had seen during his 
visits to schools across the 
country. 

Many exciting changes were 
taking place in primary schools. 
The minds of the five, six and 
seven-year-olds were more open 
than at any time in their lift and 
a child's desire to (earn was 
intense. That presented a chal- 
lenge for teachers. Science was 
being introduced into that level 
of schooling in a more sys- 
tematic way. 

In secondary schools be had 
seen immense changes in the 
type of subjects taught. Where 
there was a greater emphasis on 
technical and practical educa- 


EDUCATION 


Labour hopes 
for Thatchers 

Offering congratulations to Mr 
Mark Thatcher and Miss Diane 
Bergdorf on their engagement, 
Mr Max Madden (Bradford 
West, Lab) said during business 
questions in the Commons that 
he hoped, if they married and 
wished to live in this country, 
that Miss Bergdotf would not 
have to wail too long for entry 
clearance. 

He hoped that her application 
would not foil the ^primary 
purpose test” and that her 
documents would be considered 
entirely genuine by the entry- 
clearance officer. If that were to 
happen, it would be contrary to 
the experience of many black 
and Asian men and women of 
modest means who found them- 
selves in that situation when 
they married British people. 


lion that was creating interest 
and enthusiasm in the 13 to 15- 
year-olds. reflected in lower 
truancy and absentee figures. 

There should be a n a ti o na l 
school curriculum setting out 
the objectives about what 
should be learnt and standards 
achieved. A good starting point 
was mathematics, science and 
foreign languages. 

Next on the list was English. 
There was confusion at present 
about one essential element, the 
question of teaching how the 
English language worked. 

Our Language was oar greatest 
national asset and there was 
widespread discussion about 
teaching English in schools, not 
just about how well children 
could express themselves in 
writing and reading books, but 
how they expressed themselves 
by speaking out with con- 
fidence. 

Fundamental changes were 
needed. He would shortly be 
appointing a committee to con- 
sider what children should be 
taught about the English lan- 
guage and haw that should be 
tackled in the classroom. 

The GCSE examination was 
important because it would raise 
standards of achievement. One 
thing that worried him about the 
curriculum, and which was the 
curse of British education, was 
early specialization. No one at 
14 years should be able to drop 
science or the humanities. 

“I am working to make that 
impossible.” 

Sixth formers followed a nar- 
row curriculum, and the Gov- 
ernment was pressing ahead 
with the introduction of the new 
Advanced Supplementary (AS) 
levels in the autumn. That 
would enable those specializing 
in science to do AS levels in 
history, and those studying 
humanities to do AS level in 
mathematics or chemistry. 

Changes in the organization 
of the education system were 
being made, particularly with 
the Education Act that had gone 
on the statute book last week. 
For too long they had left too 
much to the professional 
educators and providers and the 
customers had too little to say 
and too little opportunity to 
make a contribution. 

The British system was often 
said to be decentralized, but 
enormous powers were en- 
trusted to education authorities, 
not always with the happiest 
results. The Edu c a ti on Act 
changed that It was a radical 
Act. 

No longer would it be possible 
for a local education authority 
to foist a head teacher on a 
governing body when that body 
did not want that head teacher. 

From September, the govern- 
ing body would become respon- 
sible for spending a sum of 
money allocated by the local 
authority for bools, material 
and stationery, but some local 
authorities already gave much 
iter delegation to governing 


Mr Antony Marlow (Northamp- 
ton North, CV. Will he consider 
giving governing bodies a right 
to their own budgets? 

Mr Baker I believe that is the 
way forward. It will lead to 
keener management of re- 
sources and encourage people of 


higher quality to join governing 
bodies. 

The local education authority 
would still be left with 
responsibility for teacher-train- 
ing and management of the 
teacher force. 

“Parents deserve a choice 
between what the maintained 
sector offers and what could be 
provided by others who have an 
interest in raising standards and 
giving wider opportunities. 9 * 

The Government was show- 
ing its concern for the quality of 
education by the sums it made 

available for it 

The House would need no 
reminding of the long-running 
nature of the problem. 

Reform of the teaching pro- . 
fession bad been mooted at least 
seven years ago and the present 
negotiations had been going on 
for more than two years. There 
had been widespread disruption 
in the schools, harming chil- 
dren’s education. It was tune to 
bring that saga to an end. 

That was why he had made a 
s tatement to the House a fort- 
night ago setting out the 
Government’s position. 

He had made dear that the 
Government would make addi- 
tional resources available if two 
important conditions were de- 
livered. First, a pay structure 
with differentials and, second, 
teachers' professional duties 
must be clarified and carried 
through into enforceable con- 
tracts of employment 

He bad already said the 
Government was willing to 
make large additional resources 
available. It had offered a fair 
and generous settlement to the 
teachers, recognizing their status 
in the community and in na- 
tional life. 

“There can be no question of 
finding mote resources, adding 
still further to the cost of settling 
the present dispute and to the 
£16.6 billion for the education 
services next year.” 

The present negotiatio ns , 
which were still continuing, 
were taking place under the 
Burnham arrangements, set in 
place by the 1965 Act It was 
clear that it had now oome to the 
end of Hs useful life and the 
negotiations in Coventry, Not- 
tingham and London showed 
how ineffective and cumber- 
some the arrangements were. 

It was recognized on all sides 
that Burnham had foiled. For 
the past two weeks it had 
mumbled, fumbled and stum- 
bled. 

The Government proposed to 
bring forwards Bill to repeal the 
Remuneration of Teachers Act 
and establish an interim ad- 
visory committee to advise him 
on the pay and conditions of 
teacbera. It would be introduced 
shortly. The children of this 
country deserved something 
better than the fiasco ofNotting- 
ham and London. 

Mr Nefl Ifinoock, Leader of the 
Opposition, said that it was not 
Burnham but the minister and 
his policies that were dis- 
credited. How could the Gov- 
ernment impose contracts on 
people it did not employ? Was a 
Bill in draft or was Mr Baker 
simply using this as a gambit to 
try to influence matters which 
should be the subject of proper 
negotiation? 

Mr Baker said that there was 
certainly a Bill in draft. The role 
and duties of a teacher should be 
established and laid down. 



Mr Kenneth Baker: The smack of firm government 


School cash condemned 
as too little too late 


Mr Giles Kadace, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on afacatfon, 
replying to Mr Baker in the 
resumed debate on the Qneen’s 
SpeecMaid that he welcomed 
the feet that under pressure from 
the voters the Government had 
at last un d e rs to od th at edu ca tio n 
should be apriority. 

Also welcome was the fact 
that after saying for seven years 
that the nation coaid not afford 
extra money for education the 
money had been found, although 
Mr Bahar Characteristically 
multiplied by force foe actual 
increase In spending on educa- 
tion for 1987-8& 

In this coating year education 
would account for a lower 
proport io n id public spending 
than in the previous year. Par- 
ents and teachers could be 
forgiven for condndmg that the 
Government's last-minute 
change of direction was in- 
fluenced for more by political 
calculation, both electoral and 
personal, titan by genuine 
conviction. 

What was mare, the increase 
announced in foe aatmnn state- 
ment was dearly for too little 
and too fade to put rigid the 
many glaring profefems in die 
schools, including shortages of 
boobs and equipment. 

If the Semtory of State did 
not accept Ms (Mr Radice's) 
word he had only to listen to his 


own advisers. The school rupees 
tors (HMIs) had warned 
successive secretaries of state 
about the inadequacy of pro- 
vision and state at repair m for 
too many schools. 

The city colleges were educa- 
tionally unsound, technoloo- 
cally inapproriate and socially 
divisive. Many pnpfb would be 
creamed off and scarce teaching 
resources would go from already 
hard-pressed inner city schools 
to the new colleges. 

The inner cities would be 
divided because the select few 
would go to the best equipped 
schools rifle the overwhelming 
majority mold go to the schools 
with inferior resources. 

Did he really believe font he 
was going to solve the proMem 
by proriafog 20 colleges when 
there were nmre than three and a 
half million pupils in secondary 
schools who iB needed a good 
technological education? Twenty 
schools made very fittie dif- 
ference. In foe past, that kind of 
experiment had not worked. 

It was common ground that 
the key to rising educational 
s tand ar d s was Ac pe rforman ce 
of teachers. The best graduates 
could not be attracted and 
retained mless teachers were 
decently paid. 

“We have heard a lot in the 
last few days about the Sec- 
retary of State losing his pa- 


tience. All of ns who have been 
working in the last IS mouths 
for a tong-term setiJemeta much 
resent both his attitude and Ms 
dnmsy interference in negotia- 
tions earlier tins week.” 

If the Government and dm 
Secretary of State had come up 
with the kind of money they were 
now offering foe leaders, there 
would ne v er have been a dispute 
ataDL 

Was foe Gover nm ent pre- 
pared to accept the bag-tans 
and comprehensive deal which 
had been so agonizingly worked 
oat over the past few days 
b etw e e n the employers and foe 
teachers? 

The Secretary of State, Ms 
dvil geiTin t a and Ms press 
department had consistently 
“rubbished” foe ne go ti a tions. 

The package offered a lag 
increase in pay which was 
broadly withia the 
Gove rnm ent^ price tag. ft pro- 
vided a stne tnn on pay which 
would help to reerrit the best 
gr a d u a tes while providing a 
career structure. It finked 
togfocr pay and conditions and 
provided a clear de fimfo m on 
what teachers’ duties should be. 

“ft » a voluntary agreement, 
freely agreed between foe local 
authorities and the teachers. As 
such, it is for more likely to stick 
than any setttem eat which is 
imposed from above.” 



with US ‘would 
be complete folly 9 


It would be any ncctaesaytp 

put ai risk the oconratcjp^g- 

ral and security rejawastop 
between foe Uwied States and 

of State for Foreign .«» 

Commonwealth AAn « 

foe Lords when debate cn 

xfte Queen’s 

Opening a debate on roioga 
affairs and defence, she said [in 
foai relationship bad brought 40 
years of peace *«« P**** 0 ^ 
and it was folly enough » 
denigrate it as some had done, 

let alone put it a* risk. . 

"Just when the economic and 
political success of tire Wesera 
worid is getting results, not 
when the Soviet Union is at tong 
last ready to talk seriously, why 
now throw in our cards to 8 
giand unilateral gesture? 

“What & mistake that would 
be. It would dismay our friends 
and delight our adversaries, 
“This Government win not 
make tint mistake. We w£Q 
ensure that our natron is [“**- 
erly defended against 


HOUSE OF LOROS 


Btbwy and kfco- 
i the Soviet 

Union,' 

The Soviet Union had not 
changed its iQflB-ttrtO objective 
of tchsrving superiority over foe 
West. 

The Gove rn ment Sd not 

doubt, however, foe Soviet 
lender's interest is anas reduc- 
tarns. But rbe deeper foe redac- 
tions in the namMritifiiudear 
weapons foe more important it 
became to address foe im- 
balance in co ovcoiio nal and 
c h e mical wrspno s. 

It Hvrafcl be wrung to int erp ret 
as anti-Arab the decision by 
me mber* of foe EEC do tend 
Syria a dear me s s a ge that its 
official iav rihr a ncat m terrorist 
activity was unacceptable. 
Britain and hex partners in 
Eumoe attached mu im- 
portance to tbrirfinks with Artb 
antes. 


Iran arms 
statement 
demanded 

The Prime Minister should 
make a statement now on 
reports that foe United Slates 
Government had sold arms to 
Iran, Mr Michael Foot (Blaenau 
Gwent, Lab) urged during busi- 
ness questions in the Commons. 

If it was not dear that she was 
goiog m make a statement when 
she returned from her visit to 
Washington at the weekend, 
should sic not make a statement 
on those matters before she 
went, he asked. 

There had been a most 
remarkable change of policy by 
foe US Government in its 
decision to go as &r as 
anns to states engaged in acts erf 
terrorism over kmg periods. 

“Can we be told whether the 
British Prime Minister was in- 
formed of these matters and 
what she is going to say when 
she goes to Washington?” 

Mr John BMftu, Leader of foe 
House, said that he was sure that 
font was the kind of question Mr 
Foot would like to put to the 
Prime Minister when foe was 
available next week on Tuesday 
and Thursday. 

Earlier, he told Mr Ne3 
Klmtock, Leader of the Opposi- 
tion, who had asked if the Prime 
Minister would make a state- 
ment on her return, that there 
was no fixed rule on an oral 
sta te ment being made after a 
bilateral meeting. 

• Mr Harry Greenway (Eating 
North. Q raid that now it bad 
been decided that Eating, Caro- 
dea and Fulham eternals had 
been acting illegally in banning 
The Times and other inter- 
national ne w spapers from pub- 
lic libraries, could suitable 
ministers come before the 
House to answo* questions 
about the great costs of the case 
and how these were to be met by 
the councils? 

Electors in his constituency 
were not p re pared to pay foe 
costs of Eating Ccrandrs politi- 
cal action, bettering that foe 
money should come out of 
Labour Party funds. 

Mr Bflfea said that it was not 
dear where mi n isterial re- 
sponsibility lay in the tangled 
aflair, but he promised to look 
at it 


Discounts 
for tenants 
annom 




Tenants who want to boy their 
flats will be entitled to a 
maxtinimr discount of 70 per 
oeat from January 7, Mr John 
Patent, Minister for Housing, 
Urban Affisn and Consmic- 
tion, announced in a Commons 
written reply. 

He aiso announced that the 
reduction of the period of 
titibotiiy an repay discount on 
resale win crane into effect for 
houses and flats cm the same 
day. 

That provision wifi apply to 
owners who have already 
bought at a discount, so kmg as 
they do not sefl before then. 

The changes are being made 
under a co mme nce men t order 
bringing sections one to four of 
the Honstog and Pfenning An 
into effect. 


Parliament 
next week 

The mam business in foe House 
of Commons next week will be: 
Monday (2 JO): Continuation of 
debate on foe Queen’s Speech 
(local govern me nt and Scot- 
land). 

Tuesday (2J0X Continuation of 
debate on foe Queen’s Speech 



Conclusion 
Queen’s Speech 

foe economy). 

Thursday (2.30JE Debate an the 
report oftte Peacock committee 
on financing the BBC 
Friday (930): Debate on Aids, 

The main business in the 
House of Lords next week will 
be: . 

Tuesday (230k Continuation of 
debate on the Queen's Speech 
(borne aflhira and the en- 
vironment). 

Wednesday (230k Conclusion 
of debate on foeQaeea’s Speech 
{economic affairs and em- 
ptoyroent). 

Thursday (3k Debate on nuclear 
power in Europe. 


Parliament today 

Omwom (930): Continuation 
of debate on Queen's Speech 
for debate: foreign af- 


EEC bureaucrats 
attacked over 
Europe TV plan 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Lord Thomson of Mon- 
ifieth, chairman of the In- 
dependent Broadcasting Au- 
thority, yesterday attacked 
“foe European bureaucrats” 
who wanted to control the 
content of radio and television 
rogrammes throughout the 
‘ mmon Market 
The EEC directive, due to 
become law next year, is 
unnecessary and would re- 
strict the freedom of broad- 
casters, he said. 


g 



programmes from within the 
EEC, rising to 60 per cent in 
three years. 

The plan is to regulate 
standards of television pro- 
grammes and advertising to 
meet the challenge of satellite 
and cable television. 

Opponents of the system 
argue that this will mean that 
American soap operas, such as 
Dallas and Dynasty, would be 
replaced by Italian “soft porn" 
on British screens. 

It could lead to a channel 
being entirely devoted to 
American game shows, for 
instance, because game shows, 
news and sport are exempt 
from the directive. 

Lord Thomson argued that 
the plan will lead to an 
objectionable situation with 
programme schedules being 
held up by bureaucrats in 
Brussels. Broadcasting did not 
lend itself to the same pro- 
cesses as, for instance, the 
textile industry. 

“There are diverse national 
cultures. To suggest that there 
is some kind of ethereal 
European culture is bogus”, he 




Lord Thomson: Earopean 
cahure does not esdst 

Giving evidence to a House 
of Lords subcommittee in- 
vestigating the directive, Lord 
Thomson criticized foe dif- 
ference between foe original 
EEC Green Paper, Television 
without Frontiers , and the 
draft directive. New proposals 
include radio in the har- 
monization plans for bro- 
adcasting and set out quotas 
for the amount of EEC-pro- 
duced programmes to be 
shown. 

This calls for member states 
buv 30 Dear cent of their 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, is against foe 
proposals. But, with more 
decisions taken with majority 
voting, Britain could be forced 
to accept them. 

The Home Office has ques- 
tioned foe legality of foe EEC 
to impose such laws under the 
Treaty of Rome. 

An important and unprece- 
dented meeting of the Council 
of Ministers in Vienna in 
December will discuss ways of 
guaranteeing the. quality of 
programmes on European 
television screens. Lord Tho- 
mson indicated that the IBA 
preferred that approach, ra- 
ther titan forcing a certain 
Quota future and sticking to it. 


t 



Mis Thatcher greeting the Soviet Ambassador,] w „ 

yesterday. They discussed the Russian Government’s views on arms 


'Street 


Voluntary schools praised 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


network of voluntary schools 
offers foe best prospect of 
raising e du ca tion al standards 
and bringing greater diversity 
to the state system. Dr David 
Owen said last night 

In an important and radical 
speech on education policy, 
foe SDP leader acknowledged 
the force of some of the fire- 
market criticisms now being 
directed at foe maintained 
sector. 

Farther, by calHng for more 
alternatives to foe present 
order, he indicated a willing- 
ness to risk offending foe 
strongly pro-comprehensive 
lobby in his own party. 

However, he was careful to 
temper his remarks with an 
insistence that the new schools 
must operate within the orbit 
of local edneathm authorities. 

It was on that point that Dr 
Owen took strongest issue 
with Mr Keaneth Baker’s plan 
to set op a network of 20 dty 
technology colleges In foe 


Whitehall and nm by indepen- 
dent trusts. 

“There is no easy short-cot 
or quick fix in CTCs that are 
imposed, rather than grafted 
on to foe system. 

“I suspect fireCTCs, in- 
troduced by agreement and In 
partnership with foe local 
authorities, woald be worth Ear 
More than twenty CTCs forced 
on unwilling focal education 
authorities.* 

The SDP leader said that 
the approach adopted 

by foe Secretory of State for 
Education and Science would 
acker supply by 
off those with a 
urical background, in- 
crease the dangers of too early 
specialization by pnpils and 
disrupt the work of inner dty 
secondary schools. 

He also accused Mr Baker 
of confusing two separate 
problems: foe shortage of 
people with mathematical, 
scientific and tedmofofpcal 


skills, and foe poor quality of 
education in some inner city 
schools, seen in uadfedptined 
children with low levels of 
literacy and numeracy. 

The solution to both lay with 
building on the existing sys- 
tem and foe powers wjfom foe 
Education Act, 1944. 

Under foe Act, voluntary 
schools of a non-dawmia*- 
tiooal character could be set 
up with foe approval of foe 
local education authority and 
the Secretary of State As with 
eacistteg church schools, all the 
money, except 15 per cent to 
cover the cost of mai ntenanc e 
and external repair of taQd- 
mgs, woald come from the 
State 

*Tt is wrong to assume tint 
all education wisdom lies ei- 
ther with foe edneathm 
authorities or with the 
churches. 

“Other bodies with ideas 
and commitment should be 
able to establish and ran 


Tin crisis MPs 
concede defeat 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


A Commons select committee 
conceded defeat yesterday in 
its attempt to prise informa- 
tion from the Bank of Eng- 
land, bat believes it already 
has sufficient evidence to 
write a damning report about 
the Bank’s role in last 
autumn’s tin crisis. 

The trade and industry 
committee had twice formally 
asked the Bank for descrip- 
tions of confidential docu- 
ments relating to the 
impending crisis which the 
Government has admitted it 
showed to the Bank. 

On the first occasion the 
Bank simply sent a list 
containing such Information 
as “one working document” 
and the date. On the second 
occasion last week Mr Robin 
Leigh-Pemberton, the Bank’s 
governor, told Mr Ken War- 
ren, the committee riwmman, 
that he could provide nothing 
further. 

The Bank is understood to 
have taken the view that were 
it reported by the committee 
to foe frill House of Commons 


for contempt it could have 
persuaded MPs that its silence 
was vital to protect its sen- 
sitive relationship with the 
Government 

At a private meeting yes- 
terday the committee took no 
further steps to pursue the 
matter, but members believe 
they have already established 
that the Bank knew what was 
going on. 

The committee has also 
established that the Bank; 
despite the feet foal it was 
advising the tin dealers as well 
as foe Government, made just 
one conspicuously unsuccess- 
ful attempt in the three years 
leading up to foe crisis to want 
the brokers, and none to warn 
their creditor banks; 

The tin dealers, who .es- 
timate their intitial losses at 
£165 millioti, are now . taking 
legal action against foe Gov- 
ernment. while the banks are 
owed £340 million. One of the 
four Cornish mines has dosed 
and the other three were kept 
open only through £25 mil- 
lion in government aid. 


Tory rate rebels may 
get some concessions 


By Oar Political Staff 

Mr .Nicholas Ridley, Sec-, .down from ministerial rank 
retary of State for Environ- and could free if 

ment, is expected to make a 
series of small concessions, to 
Conservative rebels to stave 
off a serious backbench revolt 
on next year’s cate support 
grant settlement. 

This is likely to mean a 
slight shift in foe. amount of 
government money to go to 
certain Conservative-con- 
trolled shire councils in the 
south of England. 

The rebels include several 
parliamentary private sec- 
retaries, who are only one step 


they vote against the Govern- 
ment ..Among the back- 
benchers pressing Mr Ridley 
to vary foe allocation are Afr 
Patrick Jenldn, foe former 
Secretary of State for . the 
Environment, and Mr Ian 
Gow, the former Minister for 
Housimt. 

. Mr Ridley and Mr Rhodes 
Boysoa, an Environment 
Minister, have been listening 
to complaints from foe un- 
happy backbenchers that the 
allocation will mean hi gh rate 
rises in their areas. 


Labour’s 
team 
is named 

By OnrPeBtical Staff 

Lord Cledwyn of Penrhos, 
leader of the Labour peers, 
announced yesterday his list 
of frontbeneb spokesmen for 
foe new session. 

Lord Bruce of Donington 
will become chief Treasury 
spokesman in place of Lord 
Barnett, Labour’s former Chi- 
ef Secretary to foe Treasury, 
who is now deputy chairman 
of the BBC 

Chief spokesman on trade 
and industry will be Lord 
Williams of Elvd, who was 
praised for his work on foe 
Financial Services BrlL 

The main Labour spokes- 
men are: 

^Leader Lord Cledwyn of 
Fenrfaos; 

Deputy Leaden Lord Un- 
dertime 

.Chief Whips Lord Pansonby, 

. Etas’ representative on Zfer- 
Banwntaiy Committees Lord 

Onun; . 

Deputy Chief Whip; Lady 
David; 

Agricritme, Food, Forestry 
and Fisheries: Lord John- 

MacJrie; 

Aria, Libraries, Heritage. 
Broadcasting: Lady Rirfc; 

Civil Service, Foreign affairs 
and Wehh affairs: Lord God- 


Lord Irving of 

Durffbid; 

Education and Science Lord 
Macintosh of Haringey; 

Electoral affairs and trans- 
port: Lord Underhill; 

Employment Lord McCar- 
thy; 

Energy: Lord' Stoddart of 
Swindon; 

Environment: Lady David; 
Health: Lord Enn&lsc 
Home Office: Lord Misbcon; 
Legal affairs: Lord Elwyn- 
Jones; 

Northern Ireland: Lord Ptys- 


Scottish Office: Lord Ross of 
Marnock 

Social secsitj: Lady Jeger, 
Trade and -tadasoy: Lord 
Williams of El vel; 

Treasury: Lord' Bruce of 
Donington; - 


V 


8 

Aa 






(jtfj 


HOME NEWS 


5 


Extremists 

warned not 
to attend 
Belfast rally 


By Richard Ford 


The RUC yesterday warned 
“loyalists” planning protests 
to mark the first anniversary 
of the Anglo-Irish agreement 
of the dangers of demonstra- 
tions being exploited by crim- 
inal and subversive elements. 

There are fears that loyalist 
para mili taries and extremists 
intend organizing their own 
activities, but the two Union- 
ist leaders want to ensure that 
tomorrow's rally in Belfest is 
peaceful 

Tens of thousands of loyal- 
ists are expected outside the 
city hall to “show that Ulster 
stOI says no” to the agreement, 
but the unionist party leaders 
warned paramilitaries and 
hooligans to sjay away. 

Mr James Molyneaux, lead- 
er of the Official Unionists 
ami the Rev Ian Paisley, of the 
Democratic Unionists, 
pledged there would be no cuts 
m electricity services tomor- 
row, and said the purpose of 
the rally was a “head count” to 
demonstrate to the world the 
loyalist opposition to the deal 

Mr Paisley said that people 
could carry union and Ulster 
flags but added: “People w3I 
not be there to have a para- 
military demonstration. We 
have made it dear we don't 
want anyone in hoods or 
covering their feces.” 

The 14 Unionist MPs, who 
have boycotted normal par- 
liamentary business for the 
past 12 months, have with 22 
Conservative backbenchers 
put down an amendment to 
the Queen's Speech and win 
vote against the government 
motion in the House of Com- 
mons next week. 

Mr Paisley and Mr Moly- 
neaux are to meet Mr Neil 
Kinnock, the Labour leader. 


on Wednesday to disc u s s me 
security situation, which has 
worsened since the signing of 
the agreement a year ago. 

A comparison of the years 
before and after the si gning 

shows that loyalist para- 
militaries have increased their 
activities. They daixn to have 
killed nine people in the 
period November 15, 1985, to 
November 6, 1986, compared 
with two the year before. RUC 
officer injuries rose from 113 
to 348 and civilian injuries 
increased from 42 to 186. 

Although loyalist terrorism 
has increased, it has not been 
on the scale frequently prom- 
ised by extremists. 

The grand aims of the 
agreement of ushering in 
“peace stability and recon- 
ciliation” have so far proved 
elusive, with sectarian di- 
visions deeper, increased vi- 
olence, intimidation and little 
hope of the British and Irish 
governments’ aim of a de- 
volved government in the 
province likely in the foresee- 
able future. 

its I 


SECURITY STATISTICS 


1985- 1988- 

Deaths 

46 

56 

Injuries RUC 

285 

456 

Injuries RUC Fteserve 

70 

88 

Army 

UDR 

17 

13 

38 

7 

Civilians 

429 

646 

TOTAL 

814 

1243 

Shootings 

200 

310 

Punishment attacks- 

, 25 

29 

Attacks on-RUC - nr: 

b/U 

1300 

Bombs 



Explosions 

125 

124 

Defused 

Charges 

60 

23 

62 

Murder 

9 

Attempted murder 

45 

24 

Firearms 

95 

113 

Explosives 

34 

20 

Armed robbery 

50 

50 

Other offences 

189 

380 

TOTAL 

435 

578 


1 January 1 to October 31 


admit they 
the stubbornness of loyalist 
opposition to the accord and 
are now preparing to “batten 
down the hatches” and con- 
tinue governing thrdugh direct 
rule while implementing the 
deal with Dublin. 

W hile feiling to bringdown 
the agreement, loyalist opposi- 
tion has slowed down its 
implementation and there has 
been little visible change on 
the ground in the North. 

Nine full meetings of the 
ministerial conference have 
produced little, although the 
Government is to give voting 
rights to 8,000 Irish citizens in 
election to the Northern Ire- 
land Assembly and there will 
be reforms to the Emergency 
Provisions Act although Brit- 
ain has rejected Dubhn's de- 
mand for an increase from one 
to three judges sitting in the 
Diplock courts. 

In the republic legislation 
has yet to be introduced in the 
Daif ratifying Dublin's signing 
of the European Con v ention 
on Terrorism. 

The agreement's firstyear off 
operation has probably been 
of more importance for its 
psychological effect on both 
unionist and nationalist com- 
munities, as well as testing the 
restive of the mainly prot- 
estant RUG which has not 
cracked under assault from 
both sections of the commu- 
nity. 


Obituary hoax hits at 
Shorts plant manager 


Detectives have been called 
into the Short Brothers air- 
rrafl plant in east Belfest to 
investigate the placing of a 
aoax death notice in a news- 
paper naming one of the 
xunpany’s managers. 

The death notice appeared 
ifter “loyalist” posters urging 
rapport for tomorrow’s An- 
glo-Irish protest rally, to be led 
jy the Rev Ian Paisley, leader 
jf the Democratic Uni onist 
Party, were removed from 
walls in the factory. 

The Shorts management or- 
dered the removal of the 
posters on Monday, in line 
with its recent crackdown on 
sectarianism on foe shop 
floor. Shorts is Ulster’s biggest 
smptoyer, with 7,000 workers, 
mostly Protestants. 

On Wednesday night, a 


angle itealh notice n a mf pg a 
production line manner in 
the plant appeared in the 
Belfast Telegraph. 

It was purportedly placed 
on behalf of “The manage- 


ment and fellow workers of 
tbs aircraft division Short 
Brothers,” who “regretted” 
the death of foe manager ar| d 
“tendered their deepest sym- 
pathy to the fenrily circle”. . 

Detectives were first called 
into Shorts in August, when 
loyalist extremists operating 
under the label of the Prot- 
estant Loyalist Council woe 
involved in a campaign of 
hate against Roman Catholics 


working in the plant 
A report on that investiga- 
tion is believed to be with the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions in Belfast 


Saleroom 


Bacon painting 
in auction record 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 

ancis Bacon has taken 
from the late Henry 
ire as Britain’s most 
nsive living artist with the 
auction price record of 
.827 set at Christie’s in 
Wednesday 


on 

ring is tided 
ire”, dates from 
more than 6ft 
a memorial _ to 
term companion 
r. who died in 
head and shoul- 
ited in foe fore- 
id him a crouch- 
ith an umbrella 
/story pedestal 

the lavatory of a 

pom on the day 
1971 retrospec- 
at foe Grand 

t was one of a 
10 important 
i works sent for 


Christie’s 

a price 


to . . 
The price in 
35,000. The 
yr^ain OSOB* 


Other notable Ashley works 
included Roy Li ch ten stem’s 
blown-up cartoon image of a 
green lank being blown up, 
entitled “Blang” which sold 
for £792,000 (estimate 
£600,000-$ 800,000) or 
£546J106 to a Swiss dealer, 
and a small chalk drawing by 
Willem de - Kooning, 
“Woman” of 1951-52, which 
made £638,000 (estimate 
£200,000-£300,000) or 
£440,000. The sheet of paper 
measures 13in by 10. 

. All 10 Ashley pictures sold, 
totalling £3,038*275. Christie's 
mixed-property sale of con- 
temporary art made another 
£2,891,862, with 26 per cent 
unsold and a new auction 
price record for Sam Francis 
at $825,000 (estimate 
$650,000-$850,000) or 
£568,965. Another seven 
records were set for lesser 
artists. ' • - 

In London yesterday a sale 
of Japanese art attracted a 
crowded room 'and high prices, 
at Sotheby’s. There were three 
fine pieces by Zeshin, the 
greatest lacquer artist of the 
nineteenth century. . . 





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Dr eaming of the moon: Jonathon Richards, 
of Towyn, Abergele, Clwyd, winner of the 
under-eight category in die annual Post 
Office letter-writing co m pe ti tion. His entry 
was a letter to the American astronaut, Nefl 
Ar mst rong, hi which he asked whether he 
and Edwm Aldrin had arened about who 
was to step on the moon first and he also 
asked if he conld join the next mission to the 
moon. 


The other winners were Christopher 
Wallaid, aged nine, of Woking, Surrey, who 
wrote to Merlin seeking the tenth about his 
role in Avalon, and Eleanor Margofies, aged 
15, of New Cross, south-east London, who 
wrote to the musician, Barry TuckweH, on 
the difficulties of being a girl horo player. 
The competition attracted 132,000 entries 
from children who had to write to somebody 
famous (Photograph: Ros Drinkwater). 


Travel agents 9 conference 


Short-stay 
breaks up 
by a fifth 

Short holiday breaks in 
British hotels, typically taken 
over a long weekend, have 
increased by a fifth this year. 
There has also been a big 
growth in other sectors of 
short-stay domestic tourism. 

These are the initial find- 
ings of a study being made by 
Mr Victor Middleton, a 
consultant to foe Wales Tour- 
ist Board, who is also a senior 
lecturer at Surrey University. 

The study is the first reliable 
breakdown of the short-slay 
market in Britain and was 
disclosed to the Association of 
British Travel Agents con- 
ference yesterday. 

Visits of one to three nights 
exceeded 30 million in 1985, 
with spending topping 
£800 million, Mr Middleton 
said. 

Spending on short breaks in 
hotels and similar commercial 
accommodation probably 
amounts to as much as £9 mil- 
lion a year, be said. 

This sector has at least 
trebled in size since 1980 and 
Mr Middleton expects sub- 
stantial growth to continue, 
fuelled by foe high level of 
promotional spending by ho- 
tel groups and holiday 
companies. 

So far foe growth of this part 
of the short-break market has 
paralleled that of foreign pack- 
age holidays, which has also 
grown by about a fifth this 
year. 


Australia package 
holidays proposed 

From Derek Harris, Brisbane 

Thailand. Singapore and 
Hong Kong 

They also point out that 
with 17 airlines competing on 
the UK- Australia route there 
is already ample capacity. 
Moreover, discount feres can 
be had for as little as £600 
which would leave charter 
companies with little or no 
margin to make the route pay. 

Britain could soon join the 
United States and Japan as 
one of Australia’s biggest tour- 
ism growth markets, accord- 
ing to Mr John Haddad, 
chairman of the Australian 
Tourist Commission. 


Visits to Australia by Brit- 
ons are up 20 per cent this 
autumn and two leading Brit- 
ish air carriers are ex {Soring 
the possibility of launc hin g 
charter flights as a basis for 
new package tours. 

The Association of British 
Travel Agents was told on the 
last day of its conference that 
both the International Leisure 
Group (ILG), which includes 
Intasun, and Calair, the char- 
ter subsidiary of British 
Caiwtnnian, are considering 
the idea. 

Charter flights would be 
breaking new ground in 
Australia. Three airports — 
Cairns, Townsville and Dar- 
win — are technically avail- 
able for such flights, but no 
carrier has yet used them. 

Mr Sidney Perez, deputy 
chairman of ILG, believes an 
Australian package holiday 
could be offered for less than 
£1,000. He thought the flight 
would be about £500. 

Mr Perez said: “We are 
looking at the possibilities. 
First it means finding an 
airline equipped for long-haul 
work.” 

Bnt scheduled airlines such 
as Qantas argue that charters 
are inappropriate to the 
Australian market, because 
most travellers visit the coun- 
try as pail of a Far East tour 
taking in destinations such as 


Visa applications for the 
third quarter indicate an in- 
creased British visitor flow of 
20 per cent and Mr Haddad is 
confident that 1988 — 
Australia's bicentennial 
year — would see 225,000 
British visitors. 

The longer-term aim is to 
hoist foe British and Irish 
visitor totals to 600,000 by the 
turn of the century. 

• Four-day holidays in Cal- 
ifornia for £299 are to be 
offered by Kuoni, Britain’s 
biggest long-haul specialist. 

It is one of a number of 
bargain packages for those 
prepared to travel at compar- 
atively short notice, because 
brochures will not be on travel 
agents' shelves until six weeks 
before the first departure date. 


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British 

TELECOM 










Army and RAF to 

get £lbn updated 
air defence system 


The Government yesterday 
announced an order worth £l 
billion to equip the Army and 
the RAF with the next genera- 
tion of the highly successful 
Rapier air defence system. 

It has been placed with the 
Army Weapons Division of 
British Aerospace at Stev- 
enage, Hertfordshire. 

The first systems, to equip 
two Army batteries and three 
RAF squadrons in West Ger- 
many, will be delivered in the 
early 1990s. 

The order wfl] secure 
employment for 10,000 work- 
ers and Admiral Sir Raymond 
Lygo, m a naging director of 
BAe, said that the system will 
generate substantia] export 


.Twelve countries have al- 
ready bought the exis ting 
Rapier, 

It is expected that future 
export sales win account for at 
least half of the projected £3 
billion production cycle. 

Announcing the order Lord 
Trefgarne, Minister of State 
for Defence Procurement, said 
that the original Rapier sys- 
tem, which entered service in 
1 974, could not be “stretched” 
any further. 

A new generation was re- 
quired to meet the developing 
threat posed by high perfor- 


mance, all-weather aircraft 
equ ipped with radically im- 
proved counter measures. 

The new Rapier 2000 is a 
mobile, three-part system 
consisting of tracker and 
surveillance radars and a 
launch missile equipped with 
eight instead of the current six 
missiles. 

It will be the principal low- 
level area air defence for the 
British forces well into the 
twenty-first century. 

Its role wiD be with forward 
troops on the battlefield as 
well as the defence of strategic 
targets such as airfields, radars 
and supply dumps. 

Development of the new 
system began three years ago 
at the BAe Army Weapons 
Division and is one third 
through the programme. 

It will be armed with two 
new missiles, one version 
carrying an armour-piercing 
warhead, the other a frag- 
mentation warhead useful 
against likely future targets 
such as cruise missiles and low 
frying, remotely piloted ve- 
hicles. 

It win also have the capacity 
to fire and guide simulta- 
neously two missiles a gainst 
different targets. 

BAe will be the prime 
contractor for the system and 


Demand for MoD 
ethnic figures 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


The Ministry of Defence is 
to be sent a second and final 
demand by a Commons select 
committee for details of how 
many blacks and Asians there 
are in certain rants oS the 
Armed Forces. 

This comes after the 
ministry's refusal last week to 
supply the mformatian. A 
farther refusal will lead to 
ministers being “invited” to 
appear before the defence 
committee far an embarrass- 
ing and hostile pubifc grilling. 

The committee, chaired by 
Sir Humphrey Atkins, the 
former Cabinet minister, first 
asked far the infennation 
covering no more than 10 min 
last July. 

At a private wiring on 
Wednesday night it rejected 
die ministry’s excuse that the 
figures were not afaflaUe, and 
decided to press the issue. . 


A senior committee member 
said yesterday: “We think the 
M i ni stry could do rather better 
if it tried harder. We still want 
the information and we are 
gofagtogetlL” 

The committe e began its 
inqwy into ethnic minority 
recrmtraent and promotion 
prospects earlier this year 
after considerable media in- 
terest in the apparent absence 
of blacks and Asians from the 
better regunents, and the re- 
ported observation of the 
Prince of Wales that there 
were few Mack faces beneath 
the bearskins of die Guards’ 
regiments. 

At the sa m e time as re f u sing 
the committee's request last 
week,, the ministry announced 
that it wiD in tro d uce ethnic 
monitoring of recruits to the 
Armed Forces next yew. 



shjiTQ 

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TiluRull 


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But a common feature of 
proposals from groups such as 
the Law Society and Family 
Courts Campaign, as wdl as a 
group of judges, magistrates 
and justices' daks is for a 
model involving laymen. 

There is opposition how- 
ever from the Bax, where 
family lawyers say that mag- 
istrates are not equipped to 
deal with the complex issues 
in family cases. 

yesterday’s report caned for 
a unified court, combining all 
the family jurisdiction now 
split between the High Court, 
county courts and magistrates’ 

courts. . .. 

The bench, it says, should 
consist both of lay members 
and judges. . 

“We see advantages m the 
combined wisdom and experi- 
ence of lay members and 
judges each making their own 
contribution tojhe decision- 
making process.” 

Training, the report says, is 
a priority, and a condition 
service and court-b ased wel- 
fare reporting officers are 
essentiaL 

“These services are so 
imporant ... that they should 
be prodded in a consistent 
and planned way.” 

Welcoming the report, Mrs 
Renee Short, chairman of the 

Sastttjssas 

committee had 

to see progress made on family 
courts to improve the system 
for children. 

-*The family court has been 
hanging fire long enough,” she 
said. 

•m hope the Government 
will now lake urgent action 
and will make use of the 

carefully consider^raom- 

mendations m this report 

Family 


Old-style committal pro- 
ceedings where witnesses give 
evidence cause excessive de- 
lays, put “extreme and totally 
unjustifiable” pressure on the 
prison service and should be 
abolished, the Justices' Clerks’ 
Society said in a paper yes- 
terday (Our Legal Affairs 
Correspondent writes). 

Most of the public are 
“totally unaware o£ and 
equally indifferent to” full 
committal proceedings; and 
the agitation for retaining 
them comes from some law- 
yers “who cannot be regarded 
as wholly disinterested in the 
matter”, it says. 

The abolition of full com- 
mittals would lead to “mas- 
sive reductions in the delay in 
bringing cases to trial, in the 
demands on prison space and 
prison officers’ time, and in 
public expense, especially to 
the legal aid fund,” the society 
says. 

“We consider that no sis#: 
reform would achieve a 
greater reduction in the prison 
population without distorting 
the sentencing of convicted 
persons or involving exec- 
utive intervention in the de- 
risions of the courts.” 

Tie society’s paper repre- 
sents a complete reversal or its 
stance on committal proceed- 
ings, adopted earlier this year 
in ajoinl paper with the Bar. 

Thai paper argued that the 
right to give oral evidence 
should be retained 

The paper now says there 
should be a right, after 
committal, to apply for the 
quashing of the proceedings 
against the accused if no 
prima fade case can be shown. 

After the Criminal Justice 
Act, 1967, old-style commit- 
tals were almost entirely re- 
placed by the shorter pro- 
ceedings where oral evidence 
is not given. 

But in recent years the 
practice of calling witnesses 
has increased. Home Office 
figures for October 1985 show 
in the week under re view there 
were 214 “full ” as against 


a much higher percentage. 

Such proceedings are time- 
consuming. In October 1985 
23 per cent ' were completed 
within 56 days of first listing, 
compared with 57 per cent of 
“paper” committals; 56 per 
cent were still not complete 
after 84 days against 2t per 
cent of “paper" ones. 


the first delivery consignment 
of the new mtssOes, but the 
contract fen: later batches wiD 
go to competition. 

The existing range ofRapier 
has already attracted £1.5 
billion of sales around the 
world. 

The United States is viewed 
as potentially an important 
customer for the new system 
which incorporates lessons 
learnt from its deployment 
during the Falklands 

ram patgn 

Iran was one country which 
bought, but Lord Trefgarne 
said that any request from 
Tehran for the new system 
would be judged under the 
Government’s guidelines to 
supply no equipment either to 
Iran or Iraq which would 
Mihanm the capability of their 
forces or extendthe Gulf war. 

The contract has been 
placed on an incentive pricing 
arrangement covered by a 
maximum price for the com- 
plete package which means 
that BAe makes increased 

S ifit comes in below the 
but wiD lose financially 
seeds it. 

Delivery of the Rapier 2000 
to British forces is expected to 
be completed by the nrid-90s. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


Tax fraud 
charities 
face new 
legal curbs 

By Pieter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

The Government will tain* 
further action if necessary to 
curb charity tax frauds, Mr 
Douglas Hurd. Home Sec- 
retary, said yesterday. 

He told a Charities Aid 1 
Foundation conference: 
“Some less scrupulous people 
have begun to look towards 
using charitable status simply 
as a method of avoiding tax 
and lining their own pockets. 

“This I regard as a particu- 
larly despicable form of white 
collar crime, not only because 
it is wrong per se but because 
of the destructive effect it has 
upon people’s attitude to- 
wards charitable giving.” 

That was why the Govern- 
ment had introduced mea- 
sures in this year’s Finance 
Act to try to curb the abuses 
and would take more action if 
necessary. 

Meanwhile, be said, there 
was room for more sdf- 
regulation and voluntary ac- 
tion. His own preference was 
for letting the charity and 
voluntary sector safeguard its 
independence by developing 
its own methods and conven- 
tions of seJfreguJation. 

Exploitation of legal or 
administrative loopholes for 
short-term gam* could seri- 
ously harm the reputation of 
the charitable worid in the 
longer term, Mr Hurd said. 




Plea to bring the 
jobless into union 
pay bargaining 


By laaMnith 


A shopper passing yesterday to admire Bradford’s Bouncing 
Back bear, which went on display fa Darley Street at the 
launching of a drive to improve the image of the West York- 
shire dty. The campaign, with the “warm and friendly” bear 
symbol, was inspired by the £1 minion Glasgow's Miles 
Better crusade 


Fearful consequences were 
predicted by the director of 
the Industrial Society yes- 
terday unless representatives 
of Britain’s disaffected army 
of unemployed were allowed 
to join managements and 
trade union leaders at the 
bargaining table. 

Mr Alistair Graham said the 
unemployed should be given 
the opportunity to try to 
channel company profits into 
job creation instead of work- 
ers’ pay outs. 

The divide between the 
long-term unemployed and 
those secure in jobs was 
growing wider every day and 
unless some hope of work was 
held out, decay and despera- 
tion would loom ever larger. 

Addressing a meeting of 
industrialists and union lead- 
ers in York, Mr Graham said 
he had turned his bade on 
being general secretary of the 
Gvil and Public Servants 
Association to play his part in 
reducing some of the gaping 
divisions within British 
society. 

His message was bleak: 
unless employers, city inves- 
tors, trade unions and workers 
unite to close the wideninggap 
in society Britain would never 
again rise as a successful and 
prosperous society. 

A recently completed sur- 
vey by the Institute of Man- 


power Studies has disclosed 
that employers forecast art , 
alarming unemployment rate 
of 3.8 million by 1990, which' | 
represents 16 per cent of the < 
adult population. * ] 

What the country must not ! 
do however, Mr Graham said,; , 
was to wring its hands with* 
despair. Instead, it must de-. ; 
ride what urgent measures are* ! 
required to ensure that those* ! 
sinister unemployment figures; ; 
are never reached. 

One workable method of ; 
increasing industrial effic-* i 
iency and effectiveness was 
flexibility. Mr Graham spot- ' 
lighted James Howdeo, a| | 
north-west engineering firm- 
which, with the help of the 1 I 
Industrial Society, persuaded;; 
workers to become more flex4 
ible and as a result move from; ; 
being nowhere in the market- 
for wind turbine power to! | 
fourth product leader in the; ; 
world. 

The feature industry and ; 
commerce appeared to havi£ , 
the greatest difficulty iif ; 
achieving was increased 
competitiveness, Mr Graham! 
said. *' 

If we continue to pay our- 
selves increases well above: 
price levels and what is 
achieved in improved prod- 
uctivity, then further job 
losses were bound to result, hoi 
said. ! 


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t'ji. 


COMMENTARY 

''?mb 

1 

5,1 1 


Geoffrey Smith 


Mrs Thatcher 


mg at Camp David tomorrow 
to a President who has already 
been wounded in his conduct ©f 
foreign policy and who may 
tare more severe Ha«gp» ^ 
come. 

The story of Iran and the 
hostages has. I hare foand, 
upset Americans of every pol- 
itical hoe in different parts of 
the country. It has caused 
them more embarrassment 
than any other foreign policy 
issoe since those other hos- 
tages were released from Teh- 
ran as President Reagan c am e 
to power nearly six years ago. 

The reaction has been very 
different from the response to 
Reykjavik. After the m w n ii i 
the Reagan A dministra ti o n 
mounted an extraordinary 
publicity campaign, which 
somehow managed to convince 
the American people that a 
near-disaster had been a great 
success and the ^negotiators 
were on the thresfahold of 
breathtaking achievements. 

My impression is that this 
version of events is now wear- 
ing rather thin with American 
opinion-fenners, especially af- 
ter the faitare of the ShnKz- 
Sbevardnadze talks in Vienna 
last week. For tbe moment, 
however, the American public 
remains ancritical of the 
President in his attempt to 
negotiate with the Soviet 
Union. 

Bat the reported dealings 
with Iran cat across so much 
that the Administration has 
been saying to allies and to its 
own countrymen. 


Reagan no longer 
above reproach 


I have yet to come across 
anyone in the United States 
who is prepared to justify the 
operation. Hie best that is said 
is that with his maedibie 
political skill Mr Reagan may 
once again be able to justify it 
to other Americans. 

There has been, then, some 
immediate damage. The Pferi- 
dent is no longer above popu- 
lar reproach fbr his handting 
of foreign policy. RtowSB dues 
be more than a passing embar- 
rassment? 

Everything depends, I sns- 
pect, on what the issue finally 
becomes for public opinion. If 
it becomes a question of how 
best to find a way through the 
labyrinth of Middle Eastern 
politics tbe damage should be 
contained. 

It will afi become too com- 
plex for outrage to be sus- 
tained. The Administration 
will be judged to have messed 
it up in this instance, bid: the 
President wo uld p robably be 
forgiven for trying to safe- 
guard American lives his way. 

It will be a different matter, 
though, if the principal issue 
becomes the White House’s 
honesty and candour. If the 
Administration appears to be 
unreasonably withholding ex- 
planations, or offering seri- 
ously conflicting explanations, 
then it could seem to be on the 

ran. Thai is an impression that 

could be all the more easily 
conveyed as this embarrass- 
ment follows so soon after the 

political rebuff of the und-tma 
elections. , 

Unless there are further re- 
velations the present furore 
may well die down for a hit in a 
few weeks. The attention. span 
of the American psbfic is 
tied, even in its bouts of indig- 
nation, unless there is constant 
refuelling. 


Congress will be 
critical test 


The critical test wiD come 
when the new Congress con- 
venes in January. At that 
stage it wifi become of great 
significance that tbe Demo- 
crats now control the Senate. 
They will be able to determine 
the of commit tees ■ 

both booses and therefore 
what investigations are 

conducted. 

The Democrats will be mi 
tbe more eager t c create d gi- 
calties for the Administration 
because they may find it tear® 
to unite on a positive pro- 
gramme in other areas. Al- 
ready there is talk of special 
congressional hearings and 
already the Presidents 
spokesman, Mr Larry 
Sneakes, has been mentioning 
ityfl^ttewwte 
House might invoke executive 
privilege to refuse to answer 
certain questions. , , 

As President Nixon sought 
^eiu entire Privi^e 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


<K>* 




yS& 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Gulf war supplies 

Union alleges Danish 
ships taking arms and 
military parts to Iran 


Defiance of cap 


§!: 

|5 


daring Watergate, w “ 
course would risk raising sus- 
picion of dark secrete itotode- 
a suspicion that could beaw* 
rfnpioflinfi than lie reality- 
that point the issue would he 

broadened beyond a sraglee^ 

«SSJ 5 S» 

business, will be one of the 
most searching tests ofhis pol- 

faced* 


From Christopher FoUett 
Copenhagen 

The Danish Seamens* 
Union claims to have firm 
evidence that vessels reg- 
istered in Denmark have car- 
ried thousands of tons of arms 
and military spare parts to 
Iran since the Gulf war with 
Iraq began in 1980. 

According to Mr Henrik 
Beriau, Secretary of the Dan- 
ish Seamen's Union, about 30 
Danish sbips have been in- 
volved in transporting wea- 
pons to Iran on some 60 
voyages during the past six 
years. 


MrMJr-Hossein Mousavi, the 
Ir anian Prime Minister, said 
the US remained the “Great 
Satan** to ban, despite reports 
of a secret hostages-for-weap- 
ons deal between Tehran and 
Washington (Renter reports 
from Tehran). 

The arms were shipped 
from Mediterranean ports in 
countries which include Israel, 
Italy, Greece, Spain and 
France. 

“Thousands of tons of arras 
have been freighted by Danish 
vessels to Iran,** Mr Beriau 


US plane ‘took airforce 
spares to Tehran 9 

From John Ragland., Bonn 

An American cargo plane The aircraft’s original flight 


made a secret flight to Tehran 
last July with spare parts for 
the I ranian Air Force listed as 
hospital equipment and medi- 
cal supplies, a member of the 
Anti-Khomeini Mujahedin 
Resistance Movement said 
here yesterday. 

Mr Alaeddin Touran said 
the registrations of the TWA 
Boeing 707 had been 
N 345 FA. and he gave the 
name of the American pilot as 
Richard Alen. There were two 
British co-pilots. The plane 
landed at Tehran airport on 
July 4 amid great secrecy 


plan would have taken it from 
the Chilean capital of Santiago 
to Tehran via the south Ira- 
nian port of Bandar-Abbas, 
but senior officials feared a 
security leak and ordered it to 
fly direct to Tehran. This 
meant flying via Yugoslavia. 

Mr Touran said his organ- 
ization had telex messages 
from the logistics department 
of the Iranian Defence Min- 
istry to the Department for 
International Affairs of the 
Iranian state airline saying the 
flight of the firm, Espanko. 
would lake place on June 28 


ordered by the Iranian Prime and later confirming a new 


Minister's office. 

Mr Touran said it was 
believed the aircraft’s 23-ton 
cargo included sophisticated 
electronic equipment for 
airforce -weapons sytems. 

OAS told I 
of growing 
instability 

From Martha Honey 
Guatemala City 

Senor Bernado Sepulveda 
Amor, the Mexican Foreign 
Minister, has warned that 
Latin America and the Carib- 
bean are facing a grave eco- 
nomic and political crisis. 

Senor Sepulveda, in his. 
speech on Wednesday to the- 
general assembly of the 
Organization of American 
States (OAS), outlined the 
deteriorating economy of the 
region and warned that the 
political crisis in Central 
America could spill over and 
destabilize the entire con- 
tinent 

He also said the dispute 
between Britain and Argen- 
tina over fishing rights around 
the Falkland i slands had “ag- 
gravated tensions in the South 
Atlantic”. 

The Mexican minister ac- 
cused Britain of adopting 
“unilateral methods that mod- 
ify the status quo (thereby) 
making negotiations diffi- 
cult". 

He reiterated his country’s 
support for Argentina's claim 
to sovereignty over the Falk- 
land Islands and its surround- 
ing waters. 

Senor Sepulveda began his 
speech by listing indicators of 
foe economic crisis facing 
Latin America and the Carib- 
bean. He said that, during the 
1980s, 130 million people - or 
35 per cent of the continent’s 
population — would be living 
in poverty and would not be 
able to “satisfy their nu- 
tritional needs”. 

The region’s standard of 
living in 1986. he said, was 
almost the same as it was in 
1973. 

Further, be said Latin 
American exports had de- 
clined by 6.5 percent last year 
and tbe price of principal 
export products for the region 


flight plan for July 3. 

Mr Touran was unable to 
produce the original telex 
messages. 

After unloading its cargo the 
TWA plane flew to Madrid. 


said, “although members of 
our union claim to have seen 
American weapons in the 
shipments, we have no direct 
evidence of any link between 
these consignments and a pos- 
sible US deal for the release of 
American hostages held in the 
Lebanon — we are pretty sure 
thougb that there is a 
connection." 

Mr Beriau said arms traffic 
to Iran has intensified during 
the past eight months. One of 
the latest known arms voyages 
by a Danish ship involved the 
Morsoe, which carried 460 
tons of military equipment 
from the Israeli Red Sea port 
of Eilat to Bandar Abbas in 
Iran late in October. 

The ship left Eilat on Octo- 
ber 22 and docked in Iran on 
October 30. 

Tbe union last week halted 
a Danish vessel in the Medi- 
terranean because it feared for 
the lives of Danish seamen. 
Tbe vessel was bound for Iran 
with a shipment of arms it 
took on in Italy, prompting 
the Italian Government to call 
for an investigation. The ship 
was diverted to Piraeus after 
the union was tipped off that 
Iraq knew of its cargo, Mr Ber- 
iau said. 

The union says it has no 
figures as to the exact number 
of Danish ships involved in 
arms shipments to Iran, nor of 
the types of weapons being 
freighted, although unofficial 
sources speculate that many of 
the consignments include 
spare pans for American-built 
fighter aircraft in the Iranian 
Air Force, as well as arms 
from other countries. 




y'C'i :\ T - : n <■ 

U : . J : r : ’■■■/' '■ i r .- . - • ’ C-V 

*1 'V-' J • : ; ; ••• - . ■ >4. 5- •* . . > <• 


Victor)' signs from Arab survivors of a suspected Palestinian guerrilla ship sunk last year by Israeli gunboats as they were 
being taken to a military court in Lod, Israel, yesterday. Four of the eight survivors were charged with attempting to attack 
tbe Defence Ministry in Tel Aviv. The others faced lesser charges. Twenty suspected guerrillas died when the ship sank. 



Japanese lingerie gets 
the ‘Lady Di 9 image 


Canada renews cultural 
links with Russians 


From David Watts, Tokyo 


From John Best, Ottawa 


Young Japanese ladies will 
be potting on Lady Di bras, 
girdles and bodysuits next 
spring. And the company that 
plans to market them is 
blithely ignorant of the offence 
such exploitation of the name 
of a future Queen may cause at 
Buckingham Palace. 

“We wanted something 
practical yet romantic and 
elegant They’re not lacy," 
said the young lady respon- 
sible for the line at Triumph 
International." We’re not 
deliberately using Princess 
Diana- We’re not really posh- 
ing her. We were looking for a 


’lady* name for our product" 
The underwear lines consist 
of three bras, three girdles and 
the bodysuit all in “cameo 
beige ", with the bras in “angel 
blue" or “primrose pink". 
Triumph, a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of the German 
parent is not unusual, among 
Japan-based firms in imagin- 
ing that any Western name in 
the pnblic domain may be used 
freely without concerns about 
copyright double entendre or 
offence. Bat were the name of a 
member of the Japanese royal 
family to be used in the same 
way. no doubt they would be 
horror-struck. 


Canada is renewing a series 
of scientific and cultural ex- 
changes with the Soviet Union 
which were suspended after 
the Soviet invasion of Afghan- 
istan seven years ago. 

The Minister for Externa! 
.Affairs. Mr Joe Oark. said, in 
announcing the decision, that 
the Government believed peo- 
pie-to-people exchanges could 
promote international under- 
standing and help ease East- 
West tensions. 

He also noted that the 
measures invoked against 
Moscow over Afghanistan did 
not work. “One of the un- 
happy realities about sanc- 


tions is that they do not always 
have the results that you 
seek," Mr Clark told reporters. 

“1 think that dearly the 
cutting off of relations with 
the Soviet Union did not have 
the effect that we sought . . . 

“It now makes more sense 
for us to put ourselves into a 
position where we might be 
able to influence their behav- 
iour by our contacts with 
them." 

Limited economic sanc- 
tions which Canada also im- 
posed against the Soviet 
Union, including an embargo 
on wheat shipments, were 
lifted several years ago. 






ran finned to fall. He said the 
current terms of trade for 
Latin America was 52.8 per 
cent lower than it was in 1970. 

In particular, he mentioned 
that the “. . . petroleum crisis 
has bad a disastrous effect on 
the economies of oil-exporting 
countries in the region". 
Mexico's export earnings, for 
example, had declined by one- 
third this year. 

Seflor Sepulveda said 
developing countries could 
not overcome this economic 
crisis until industrialized na- 
tions and, international finan- 
cial institutions “dismantle 
the protective barriers . . . 
eliminate discriminating prac- 
tices and quota systems" and 
renegotiate payments of ex- 
ternal debts. 


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WORLD SUMMARY 


UK presses Israel 
on nuclear ‘spy’ 


J&Jfr-Oz,\jSjG 

, L T- * THE TIMES FRID 


Russians sure 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Mr Van mm. He was told, however, that 


authority. However, they offered him moral support and 
“embraced him as a brother” (Michael Binyou writes). 

, iae Vatican has expressed satisfaction with the 
outeoine, md the road had now been opened for efforts 
U) heal the rift between American rartmlirc ami the Holy 
See, probably indudlng a meeting between the Pope and 
representatives of the US hierarchy. 

The 293 Catholic bishops, meeting here for their annual 
conference, had been asked by Archbishop Raymond 
Htmthausen for support in his dispute with Rome. In an 
emotional appeal, be said he was not a dissident but a loyal- 
ist. 

Seoul dam Nuclear 
protest challenge 


Seoul (AP) - About 
100,000 people attended a 
rally in Seoul to protest 
against a hydro-electric 
dam that North Korea is 
building on a river that 
runs through Seoul- South 
Korea claims vast areas of 
Seoul could be flooded if 
large amounts of water 
were released deliberately 
or accidentally. 

Slogans at the rally also 
called for the eradication of 
communist sympathisers in 
the South. The Govern- 
ment is c u r ren t ly c racking 
down mi “leftist” in- 
fluences among students 
and dissidents. 


Vienna - An Austrian 
former took the Czecho- 
slovak Government to court 
for endangering his crops 
by building a nuclear power 
station less *h*a 60 miles 
from his form (Richard 
Bassett writes). 

The former's lawyer told 
the town court at 
Gansendorf near the bor- 
der that if Prague Ignored 
the court's decision the 
Austrian Government was 
empowered to freeze 
Czechoslovak assets in 
Austrian banks and seize 
vessels on the Danube sail- 
ing under the Czechoslovak 
flag- 


Boat toll put at 1 30 

Port-au-Prince (Reuter) — A Haitian coastal ferry was 
carrying 1 SO people when it capsized three days ago but only 
21 bodies have so Ear been found, Haiti's Ministry of 
Information said in a comnraniqu£. It said military 
helicopters were contra oteg the search for bodies. 

Earlier reposts, quoting a survivor, said as many as 200 
may have died when the ferry Okelele sank, apparently 
without warning, during a 44-mile ret u r n trip to La Goaave, 
an island of 20,000 people, from die coastal town of 
Montroais. The Mayor of La Gonave told national radio that 
20 survived. 

Mr Cestdieu Siravwbo watched people board the Okelele, 
said the passengers included many children. It was loaded 
with large a mounts of rice, bananas, corn and su it cases 

S l£H l e ader of an anti-Viet- 
mgW Bamese guerrilla army in 
Cambodia, appealed to 

(B *9 na yesterday in London to 
|gY-3S come to his aid before 
B'{9 Vietnamese troops lannch 
P#. "03 an offensive on his forces in 
psf ■.;£& the coating weeks (Nteho- 
- ■ >? Jafl las Beeston writes). 

. B Mr Son Sann said that 

jjfcy 'iU bracing itself for^uilteria) 
Wgi -JK and ground offensive, but 
lacked anti-aircraft and 
anti-tank weapons. 


Sharansky attacks 
PLO for trickery 

From Ian M array, Jernsaieni 

Mr Natan Sharansky spent Yesterday Mr Sharansky's 
more than £2,000 yesterday to spokesman said he agreed to 
place advertisements in the the meeting “because be does 
Israeli press vehemently deny- not feel equipped to talk about 
ing a newspaper story that he these issues and wants to 
had a secret meeting with learn.” He did not want to be 
members of the Palestine accused of not seeing people 
Liberation Organization and because they were Arabs, 
offered his support. Reports of the meeting info- 

Tbe meeting did take place, rialed right-wing Israeli politi- 
but Mr Sharansky said yes- dans. One Knesset member, 
terday that it had been “a set- Rabbi Haim Druckman, caU- 
ud iob" designed to try to trick ed it “a grave blow at the stale 

him into saying something to "* 

support the PLO. The news- 
paper report, in Maanv , sug- 
gested Mr Sharansky was con- 
sidering backing a PLO cam- 
paign to stop the deportation 
of Mr Am ram Haniye, editor 
of an east Jerusalem paper. 

The prominent PLO sup- 
porter he met was Mr Faisal 
Husseini. head of a Palestin- 
ian research unit and son ot 
the famous commander of the 
Arab irregular forces who 
fought against Israel ni -Jer- 
usalem. Mr Husseini said he 
went to see Mr Sharansky be- Sharansky: spent £2,000 

cause he was “a symbol of the to advertise his views 

human struggle against op- 0 f Israel and an encourage- 
pression" and “a fellow tree- meal ^ loathsome terrorists”, 
dom fighter". , Mr Sharansky then took oui 

He said Mr Sharansky tola ^ newspaper advertisement 
him he opposed the PLO be- ^ clarify his view that the 
cause it supported the use or plo is “a criminal terroi 
violence. According to Mr organization ... both the 
Husseini. Mr Sharansky »g- purpose and the barbarous 
reed to discuss the caseofme mct hods of this organization 
editor and had been apprised 0 f cutthroats violate every hu* 
to learn that people from the man standard," he said, 
occupied territories could be have ftui confidence thal 
punished without triaL the Government and security 

*■ Fmwk nf IotspI arp maoini an 



DAVID ROBERTS RA 

THE HOLY LAND 

PRINTS IN ORIGINAL 
COLOUR 

jhe Oxwisseur GsMcry 
MS Hstkm Arade 
LONDON SWIXJfT 

TELEPHONE 6431 : 


they will soon 
have counter 
to Star Wars 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 




.. vsf‘ 


Details were published here 
yesterday of methods being 
studied by a group of leading 
Soviet scientists to counter the 
US Star Wars programme, 
including the deployment of 
decoy missiles, space mines, 
land-based lasers and “space 
shrapnel". 

The official weekly Moscow 
News said the group of special- 
ists was now convince that 
the combination of active and 
passive counter-measures 
would “virtually offset the 
danger of military-strategic 
parity being upset by the 
deployment of SDI". 

The paper published a list of 
“active" measures being stud- 
ied, saying they involved ways 
of neutralizing and hitting a 
large anti-ballistic missile sys- 
tem. Two such measures were 
the deployment of small mis- 
siles whose principle target 
would be space-based anti- 
missile stations, and the 
deployment of space mines 
dose to the stations which 
could then be exploded by 
remote-control from earth. 

The paper also said that the 
group — known as the 
Committee of Soviet Sci- 
entists in Defence of Peace 
and Against the Nuclear 
Threat - was studying land- 
based high-capacity lasers in- 
tended to suppress space- 
based stations and “space 
shrapnel", a cloud of small 
objects moving at high speed 
in the orbit of anti-missile 
stations. 

Moscow News claimed that 
this tactic would be highly 
effective because even a I oz 


particle of cloud moving at a 
speed of nine miles a second 
could penetrate a six-inch- 
thick steel screen around the 
SDI station. 

The “passive" responses to 
SDI were said to involve 
methods of strengthening 
Soviet inter-continental ballis- 
tic missiles and of hampering 
the targeting of an anti-missile 
system such as that envisaged 
by Washington. 

The paper reported that 
they included reducing the 
flight time of inter-continental 
ballistic missiles, making 
them more difficult to track, 
and reinforcing them with a 
reflective coating thus chang- 
ing the configuration and 
density of the flame of their 
engines in order to deter laser 
attack. 

The Soviet team is said to ! 
be investigating the develop- 1 
ment ofa missile able to rotate 
on its own longitudinal axis, 
making it difficult for a laser 
beam to lock onto its target, 
the electronic jamming of the 
sensors of anti-missile systems 
and the deployment of decoy 
warheads. 

Explaining the value of such 
fake missiles, the article said: 
“In the event of a massive 
strike, the number of war- 
heads and sham targets 
accompanying them may 
reach several tens of thou- 
sands. Such being the case, the 
'detection system will be hope- 
lessly mixed up and most 
warheads, which can be 
manoeuvrable and high- 
speed. will reach their tar- 
gets". 




,/i 



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' jm .. -..nn 

Chancellor Kohl of West Germany, his face blackened with coal dost, removing his safety 
helmet as he emerges into daylight after a visit to a mine at Hal tern yesterday. 

Kohl accused of lying over gaffe 


The Social Democratic 
(SPD) and Greens opposition 
parties in Bonn yesterday 
accused Chancellor Kohl of 
lying to Parliament over his 
gaffe in comparing Mr Mik- 
hail Gorbachov, the Soviet 
leader, with Dr Josef Goeb- 
beis, the Nazi Propaganda 
Minister, as both befog “good 
PR men". 


From John England, Bonn 

In their second attack on 
Herr Kohl in the Bundestag m 
eight days, the Opposition 
said he had not told the truth 
in his statement to Parliament 
on November 6 that he had 
been misquoted by the Ameri- 
can news magazine Newsweek. 

Herr Hans-Jocben Vogel, 
the SPD floor leader, said the 
tape recording of the 


Newsweek interview with him, 
which was released by the 
magazine, showed that Herr 
Kohl had made the 
Gorbachov-Goebbels compari- 
son “in the same breath". 

Herr Kohl was not in Par- 
liament during the brief but 
passionate early-morning de- 
bate. He was on his way to 
visit a coal mine in the Ruhr. 


Quotas, 
surpluses 
face twin 
assault 

From Richard Owen. 

Strasbourg 

As the European Commis- 
sion in Brussels yesterday 
announced proposed cuts in 
dairy quotas in a bid to put 
pressure on next week's key 
meetings of form and finance 
ministers, the European Par- 
liament passed its own pack- 
age of tough farm proposals 
including dairy quota cuts and 
a fond for getting rid of 
surpluses. 

Both moves were described 
by officials as a new and 
deliberate push to force mem- 
ber states to confront the need 
for reform of the common 
agricultural policy. The com- 
bined pressure of the Par- 
liament and the Commission 
is designed to force the Coun- 
cil of Ministers when it meets 
next week under British 
chairmanship to face up to the 
need for what EEC officials 
call “measures unpalatable to 
European farmers" to reduce 
the growing food surpluses 
Yesterday the Parliament 
voted for a 5 percent cut in 
dairy quotas by 301 votes to 
41, an unusual display of unity 
and adopted, on a show of 
hands, a proposal to spend 
£1.5 billion on disposal of 
food slocks. 

The Parliament also voted 
funds for the distribution of 
surplus butter and beef to the 
needy within the EEC rather 
than sales to non-EEC states 
such as Russia. 

• BRUSSELS: The Com- 
mission's radical plans, which 
could eliminate surplus dairy 
and beef production, are cer- 
tain to arouse the fury of 12 
million farmers. But they 
could bring in savings of more 
than ECU 1.3 billion by 1989. 
the the Agriculture Commis- 
sioner. Mr Frans Andriessen 
said yesterday (Reuter 
reports). 


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Sharansky: spent £2,000 
to advertise his views 
of Israel and an encourage- 
ment to loathsome terrorists". 

Mr Sharansky then rook out 
the newspaper advertisement 
to clarify his view that the 
PLO is “a criminal terror 

organization both the 

purpose and the barbarous 
methods of this organization 
of cutthroats violate every hu- 
man standard," he said. 

“I have full confidence that 
the Government and security 
forces of Israel are waging an 
unrelenting battle for our pro- 
tection against the scurge of 
the PLO. The pursuit of this 
goal ... is in no way^ a 
violation ol human rights." 

Mr Husseini.. who saw the 
statement read out on tele- 
vision. said: "It is sad to see 
such a great man turned so 
s " " 


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12 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THF. TIMES F RIDAY NQ 



iw ^tino nnlliition of the Rhine releases ^ to 

Poison catastrophe h^lesson forever^^uon t0U ghen 

By Pearce Wright, Sdence Editor WtKK^SSSSSSS^^^^'.' ' '.fejlHSI J^lT- ! TU*^ 


The Rhine pollution is re- 
garded by Mr William Walde- 
gravc. the Minister for the En- 
vironment, as a European dis- threat to British coastaiwawa 
aster with implications for ev- or North Sea fisheries, because 
ery country, not just to those currents from the estuary ot 


search laboratory at Burn- 
ham-on-Crouch. 

There is believed to be no 
threat to British coastal waters 


cry VAiuuuy. uwi ™ 
through which the river flows. 

As the president of the 
European environment min- 
isters' group, Mr Waldegrave 
has offered his West German 
counterpart, Herr Walter 


currents non* 

the Rhine at the Hook of Hol- 
land sweep northwards to 
Norway. 

Many of the pesticides 

based on organ o-phosphorous 
hmalr im VfiTV 


au nasea on Oi gnu u-m 

. ^ compounds will 

Wallmann, the opportunity to rapidly. The 
raise the issues of com- r0 us compounds became ^ 
pensation. pollution^ early preferred 


|KIIMUUI1. I"". ", , 

warning and safeguards aris- 
ing from the Rhine disaster, 
when the ministers meet in 
Brussels on November 23 to 
plan action over a number of 
pollution problems. 

6 Swiss authorities 
criticized over delays 
in alerting other 
countries 9 

Herr Wallmann has been 
the most outspoken critic of 
the Swiss authorities for delay 
in alerting the other Rhine 
countries of the discharges 
into the river on November 1 
and over the general approach 
of the Swiss to environmental 
protection and safely stan- 
dards. 

An estimated half a million 
fish were killed as 30 tons of 
agricultural chemicals, mainly 
pesticide compounds ana in- 
cluding a mercury-based for- 
mulation: swept from Baste, m 
Switzerland, through Germa- 
ny and The Netherlands into 
ihc North Sea. A second 
smaller wave of pollution was 
discharged last Monday, 10 

days after the first release. 

The dispersal of the wasie is 
being monitored for the Brit- 
ish Government by vessete 
from the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture food and fisheries re- 



Mr Waldegave: ministers to 

discuss implications 


□leiciibu 

because of long-term destruc- 
tion to wildlife by earlier 

organ o-cblorine versions, in- 
cluding materials like DDT. 

The Dutch, however, are 
concerned about the indest- 
ructible deposits of mercury 
which are expected to accu- 
mulate in silt along the coast. 
The conditions are remuus- 
cent of the pollution incident 
which revealed the extremely 
poisonous quality of m ercury 
contamination 25 years ago- 

The source of that mercury 
poison was in waste effluent 
discharged form a chemical 

works into Minamata Bay- 
The mercury spread from fish 
to fishermen and their fam- 
ilies and scores of people sut- 
fered an agonizing and slow 
death. 

The disaster occurred be- 
cause the mercury was trans- 
formed after it was discharged 
into a form that was viciously 
toxic to people but not to 
shellfish and other fish. 

The Rhine catastrophe be- 
gan when firemen flushed the 
chemicals into the river while 
fighting a blaze at the Sandoz 
chemical works. The building, 
known as 956, was a store- 
house for pesticides and other 
waste materials. 

The discharge has undone 
10 years of effort to clean up 
the Rhine. It followed a cam- 
paign started by the Dutch. 
The river had become so 
grossly polluted by industrial 
expansion in France, Germ- 
any, and Switzerland that by 
the time the water reached 
The Netherlands it could not 
be cleaned satisfactorily by’ 
even the most advanced water 
treatment plant 
An internal report prepared 
for the West German Chemi- 
cals Industry _ Association 
shows the building had none 
of the equipment such as ves- 
sels to catch leaking chemi- 
cals, automatic sprinklers, 
automatic smoke and fire dis 



rules 
on waste 


Gentians operated the Rhine BOIUI S reaCtlOIl tO 

tok, the Mannheim cent^ti^, ££ .£££ tOO SlOW 

From John England, Bonn 


tection systems that would be 
necessary for such a building 
under the European Com- 
munity protection standards. 

The West German Govern- 
ment has published a timeta- 
ble of events which it jays 
reveals a -remarkable indiffer- 
ence by the Swiss authorities, 
particularly as the countries 
Which line the banks of the 
Rhine had a pollution alert 
agreement 

At 3 am on November 1 en- 
vironment officials in Baste 
told West German water offi- 
cials at the Rhine pollution 
emergency centre in Mann- 
heimabout the fire, but they 
saw no reason to operate Uie 
international Rhine warning 
system. 

Seven hours later the Swiss 
Embassy in Bonn informed 
the West Germans of the inci- 
dent but still said there was 
no cause for alarm. 

At the request of the West 
German Department for the 
Environment officials in 
Mannheim tried to obtain 
details of the discharge from 
Basle, without a reply. With- 
out waiting further, the West 


lum . 

pollution was worse than they 

thought , 

It was November 2 before 
the official procedure, in the 
form of an alarm telex, was 
sent by the Swiss authorities. 

6 Netherlands 
diverted chemical 
flow to quickest route 

to the North Sea 9 

At a meeting of the Intern*- 
tional Rhine Commission in 
Colmar. France, on Nov- 
ember 3, the Swiss delegates 
were still unable to say what 
materials had gone down the 

Ori November 4 a list of the 
contents of building 956 was 
telexed to Bonn. 

On November 7 the Swiss 


W1ICU U 

lands on Sunday, November 
9. 

They used locks on Hol- 
land's water network to create 
a channel to funnel the waste 
along the swiftest route to the 
North Sea, preventing- it 
spreading inland. 

Mr Arnold Braun, chief 
eng ineer in the Dutch prov- 
ince of Gdderland, which 
borders West Germany, ssud 
the main aim was to direct the 
pollution as quickly as possi- 

r. .1. _ .L Cm (MWMlf 


The Rhine pollution row 
swamped into the Bw Pjjr- 
tiament yesterday wben tne 
opposition parti^ eharged 
Hot Walter WaHmaim, the 

West Gennaa Minister for the 
Environment, with not react- 
ing quickly enough to tfee 
disaster. 

Hot Hans 

Social Democrat, and 


of the Social 
IteLocrats (SPD) on the 
environment, argued that all 
improvements- in safety at 
finns working with dangerons 
substances would not, m the 
end, be sufficient. 

Hot Wallmann, raak&sg a 
government statemoit on the 

“ fho ttbinr 


Front Richard Owen 
Strasbourg 

The European ^"SSJfto 
is to take urgent ‘ 
tighten regujati ^. 0 ^ ^ 
chemical ^Swit- 

disaster on the Finne y 

zeriand two weeks ago. 

C pS ,C tr ^ in “ * 

^^aid EEC environment 
ministers would meet to con- 
sider joint action i«’ W 
and this would be tot- 

^SteSedbymtaiSBrs 

Eh* by the pollution, 
^Netherlands 

for damage caused by tw 
Candoz chemical plan 1 

SssSESS 

-S*5TS^BBC ■ had 

adopted harmonized tegisla 
tion on the handling of toxic 
XSs after the Seveso 
S Italy foury«f t ^ 
but only four member states 
Britain, West Germany, Den- 
mark and France 7 had comp- 

UecL The Commission woujd 
take legal action against the 
other eight to force them to 



nollution as quickly as possi- Social Demracrw, *". u r 
bte to the North Sea to prevent WalhMuin’sownte^tmtt* 
it reaching the Ijsselmeer and stole of North Rhn^West- 


^ve^e directive. 

Comm* 


vital reservoirs. 

He estimated it would take 
four to five days, even through 
the fastest route, to pass into 
the sea. Water authorities 
were told to stop drawing sup- 
plies from the Rhine on Sun- 

% .J nrnvW 


On November 7 tne awiss mn T” sed 

set a second alert after a query day and fermcra were «lvxsea 

Smlrater authorities from to move livestock from its 

SgKSSBSBS S.sSSt'i 


pbalia, said Bonn had been 
late in sending his stole an 
evaluation tf d* 
ness of the chemoah that had 
been washed mtotbenver. 

. . Dt!na ahnn OTS- 


that West Germany had pot 
die alternation Rhine *1™ 
plan mto actum within a few 

boms of the fire at the Sandoz 

plant in Basle. 

- •’ on his mectit i m 


MprovasseoEs ui 
international Rhine alxnn sys- 
tems and an overhaul of the 
tows on the mann&ctnre and 
storage of chemicals. 

Hot Harald Schafer, the 


neri ~ . — 

toad was prepared to deal a * 


ggesows W tuiupwwiw- , 
^stonthm of the Rhme to Its 
former ecological coflditioa- 


He also suu u»- 
sion would be momtonnBtbe 
Rhine to ensure that chemual 
companies did not tidee ad- 
vantage of the Swiss incident 
to discharge toxic materials 
into the river in the hope that 
additional pollution would 
not be noticed. . 

Mr Clinton Davis called for 
a new “alarm system” to 
inform EEC states of environ- 
mental hazards, saying the 
present system had proved 
“grotesquely inadequate" in 
the Basle incident 


Generating energy is not simply _ . 
providing kilowatts. It must be provided in 
quantity, safely, efficiently and in an 
agreeable environment 



Hitachi's wide-ranging technologies in energy {from left to nghtj: 
nuclear power reactor, generator-motor, laser-test otLPGgas combustion, 
end nuclear fusion plasma testing device. 


■me world's need for energy continues 
to burgeon: and our wish to live in safe, 
oeaceful and unsullied surroundings 
Sis as strong as ever, 
we are working towards achieving these 

twin goals. 

Hitachi’s scientists are mal tin g 
tremendous progress m miciear fusiori, 
often called “harnessing the pcwrefcrt 
the sun.” Nuclear fusion also has wen 
called the ultimate energy source^ 
because it is generated by a nriechanism 

similar to that of the sun. One gram 

of the fuel - hydrogen, deutenumand 
tritium — generates the same energy as 
8 tons (a tank truck-full) of °“* . r 

Recently, Hitachi a 
role in a landmark feasibility experiment 
Spurted by the Japan Atoni^nergy 
Research Institute. The • 

succeeded in prodw^gtiwfi^^ 

for nuclear fusion - and brings us muen 

closer to having this energy source 

•on line' earty in the nerd f^tury. 

Since Hitachi’s beginnings three-^ 

quarters of a century ago. we veb«»me 

a premier developer of manyeMSy 

Soun»s. Besides hydroelecincMid 

ttwrmai power plants^we ve 
nuclear power more ti«n 3C i ^are- 
We are also working on spiar 
energy, coal gasification, and new types 

' of batteries and fuef cells. 

We folk teriwology lo^wniann^ds. 

We believe that _ 

technotogies^lll^^y® 

^Snentiy^ ^safe.and dpnifOrta^Ow 
goal in energy - and communications, 

systems th^ win improve , the quality of 

life the world around; . 




Hitachi, Lid. TokyoJapan 



- • • 





^ i • 

' - ^ 



6 




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wn % 

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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


* i 


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13 


WHAT’S YOUR BANK’S 

LONG TERM VIEW OF MOST 
HIGH TECH COMPANIES? 


29- 


It seems to us that other banks must take a rather pessi- 
mistic view of high tech’s chances of survival. 

At least, that’s the only excuse we can imagine for their lack 
of services geared to the needs of the industry. 

Perhaps, like certain pundits, they see little chance for new 
young companies against todays giants. 

If so, we beg to disagree. 

Uniquely amongst Britain’s banks, we are also well equipped 
to disagree. 

A specialist industry needs 
specialist advice. 

Most banks don’t have any people specially qualified to work 
with high tech businesses. 

We, on the other hand, have 150 specially trained managers 
operating from over 60 specially nominated branches. 

All of whom have had extensive training and experience in 
understanding the particular needs of high tech companies. 

They can, for example, introduce those with knowledge of 
the new technologies to those with more established skills in 
accountancy, law, patents and exporting. They know which equity 
capitalists are willing to back high technology. 

Above all they’re well practised in the art of shaping a 
business plan so that they can help companies with finance in 
both the good and die bad times. 

A management team that’s as skilled 
as your team. 

If you ever need even more specialist advice, our branch 
managers are able to call on a wide range of experts. 

For example, there’s our high tech team based in London 
which assesses new products and their markets at no cost to 
customers. (They also work on a daily basis with larger high 
tech businesses, and look out for new opportunities for new 
companies.) 

There are experts in financing exports who can tailor con- 
tracts and bonds for major overseas orders. 

Or leasing specialists to help fund your own equipment 
purchases, or your customers’ purchases from you. 

And, of course, investment bankers skilled in providing 
direct equity capital or raising funds through capital markets. 

Considering all this, it's hardly surprising that we already 
have over 3,000 high technology companies as customers. 

Or that we have a greater depth of experience (and finance) 
available to help such companies than any other bank. 

You can find out how that experience could help vou by 
sending us the coupon below, or by phoning David Kiliick direct 
at our central high tech team on 01-626 1567 ext 2108 or 4068. 

\bull also find out we’re a bank which thinks only one thing 
should be as dead as a dodo. 

The pessimistic view taken by other banks. 


r 


Please tick rhe appropriate box(es) below. 

Please send me details on Barclays services for high technology business. | i 

Please arrange for a manager to contact me. Lj 


1 


1 

Surname Mr/Mrs/Miss*: 


ruticK j' iffi'pruit) 

1 

1 

Fore name (s): 

Position: 


1 

( 

Business name; 



1 

Business address: 



1 




1 

1 

Pbstcode: 

Tel. no: 


1 

1 

Current bank: 

Branch: 



Please send the coupon to: The Manager. Business Services Centre. BarcLns bank PLC. 
Juxon House, r .M St. Pauls Churchyard, London EGlM SEH. 


BARCLAYS 


We’ll look at your business. 
Not just your balance sheet. 


3 

3 

d 

I 



ciency 

which 
c, iex- 
d rose 
vth in 
is an 
Turn- 
of the 
rom 7; 
it and i 
mum. 
?Jes is 
where 
1 miL 

3 mil- 
Jtpen- 
<edto 
idine I 
which 
it not 
Is are 

f litis 
stages 
areas 
nt es- 
AZT 
f £70 

:nted 
ar the 
lad to 
Shut- 
fever- 
head. 
Fected 
i, but 
well 
tion. 
xant, 

. over 
and 
skin 
well. 
essful 
mi- 
nt 

insid- 
ibies, 
i-can- 

Itural 
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cent 
busi- 
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make I 
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j. 


OVERSEAS NEWS 

Apartheid crumbles in South Africa 

Whites turn blind eye 
as other races move 
into segregated areas 

From Michael Hornsby, Johaanesbrn* 


twf TIMES F pttiaY NOVEMBER 14 19 8 6 


Sureat to white living stan- 

d3 Are^rton the f “ turc ^^ 
Group Areas 

later this month from, to® 

Presid^t's Coun^an aU- 


About a quarter of the stad* ute^fferat S^pricettSi 
people living in three densely SS™ do M -pelvic 

^ulated distncts in centel disco® 

Johannesburg, legsdly r eser gassag flouted ^ once- 
ved for while, residents, are toe ^ b€ pg a ^ m 

Coloureds (mixed-race). In- & m ixed dancing, 
dians or Hack Aftirans. it was taboo busmesr 7 ” 1 *" 

U«a iioclpdlV. rU1 J? . i . 


president s — . 

race advismy bo ^i t t w S^Sl 

recommend outright aboli 


oians ui mo*.!* rui.«- — • — p jaded businessmen numKU . 

^■Eisasjw; {Mjgtssasa 

sssaftstcs a.-.**®-* 
-"ksssikS 


researcneo 

kaans University here into the 
theory and P™““ * ^ 

Group Areas Act the law 

which proyd^f^riiP^f 
pulsory racial separation ot 
residential areas. . 

It shows strikingly how me 
Act one of the remaining 
pillars of ihe apartheid system, 
is being openly violated in 
several of South Africa s big- 
56 -- -h what would 


maximum exposure 

by law, or wresdmg with^a 

other semi-naked m tubs ot 

mU Many Coloureds and i In- 
dians and a growing number 
of blacks can afford accom- 
modation in such areas and 

are prepared to put up ™*h 
racketeer landlords and the 
of eviction f °r ^advan- 
tage of living in the oenttoT 
town, rather Jhan m some 
outlying township ghetto. 

Racially-mixed areas hav e 
also develop^ »n Durban, 
Cape Town and Port Ekza- 


as the zones 
are called. 

At ' the same East London 
coteress. Mr Bolte *to &■ 
sertfid that he had never 
regarded the related Separate 

Amenities Act, whig 1 
regates many public feolitiw 
from public lavatories . to 
buses and trains, as “practical 
legislation". 

Already the Separate Ame- 
nities Act is nddled . with 
exemptions and sep^^Sifv- 
the social level is steadily 
breaking down. 

Earlier this week Durban 



Japanese 

miners out 
over pit 

closures 



l 

* 


iy . 


From David W atts 
Tokyo 


j MP g^ E ^ t Hot *^ NCT j€ISC * 


oe v,ww j ^JyvT hlack urbs ot JonaiuB»uui& 
..idians and 5,000 biacx w ^ Sandton. Un- 

Africans. _ . whiles _ less the neighbours complain. 

In another official wmt^ 1 unlikely to be moved, 
nnlv disuict Mayfair, wtuen mey ^. ;I| noliev 

; c simone the 


only aibui^t, 

despite its name is among the 
purest areas in the city- 6,320 
white residents have been 
overtaken by SjfiOOtodm 
and L000 Coloureds and 
blacks, whose numbers are 

^ISlbro^ a ^nare ^le m 

tfjssaflBft 

hiah-rise blocks of Oats, has 
always had a faintly Bohemian 
reputation, and is about the 
nearest Johannesburg and 
Calvinist South Africa can 
offer to a Soho or a Greenwich 

Village. f 

-• prostitutes of all 


to ssa» «i* b — l a 

elsewhere the colour bans stiU 
the rule, as it is generally on 
trains, though 

coaches have been introduced 
in the Cape Town area. Many 
beaches are still segregated. 

In most city centres, cine- 
mas are now open to all races- 
hoois. snouiu ^ blacks can afford 

frock of Jj^pw themces, and there is also the 
life. But President P.W JS^ESLaitiBg back borne 

.‘! ,d E l £? toSoweto or where ver at n ight 


ey are unlikeiy 10 i*- «uw 
It is still government policy 
that the Group Arras Act, 

which also segregat^ hospirals 

and schools, should remain 

social bfe, 

Botha 


social me. »ui ri«m***- 0 r getting back nome 
Botha indicated at to Soweto or wherever at night 

National Party cong^m the show. 

East Loodon-^ HotelT and restaurants m 
that there could be some urban centres are no 

tmkeringattto margms. Sneer prohibited from admit- 

One possibib* he jgfr of aU races, but 

gesfed, wouid be “ auo J^flyfriey are not obliged to 
blacks (of all shade) wno ^ m within their 

codd afford to do so to mo e doso ^ tumwg aW ay 


Zia claims 
an Indian 
build-up 

From A Correspondent 

Kara** 1 

Pakistan’s President Zbi - 

.rrravi® 

troops on tfee borders. 
Addressing * FS-fS 

ference at Kaiactea airpMtjw 
Wednesday, on ius 
from Saadi Aarabia, GenwaJ 
Zia confirmed news reports 
that India had amassed troops 
on Pakistani borders to 
unprecedented levd^He rarf 

the present 

centratioa of Indian troops 
had not been seen m the 
subcontinent before, and to 
some extent was rare even oy 

relations between the two na- 
tions bad become stram«L 


irat transcontmeat ai mgai ua ^x. ™ 

Aquino leaves Japan wfrh 
hint of Cabinet reshuffle 

From David Watts, Tokyo 


went ^^ protai 
strike yesteiriayra v 

agai^ a P^Smber of 

10 , 000 jobs. - 

flSo iAj- 1 * 

H<s 3 F b ^ h ^ 

'gSiSiSb^ 

KESrfsa 

news bulletin. 

As one of the sinkers ^ 

gBWS 3 i »5 

strike was four yrars^°^ ido 

has lost 4,000 members. 

Later this month the Gov- 

erSSt ofMrYasuhiroNa- 

kasone will receive a r^wrt 
which wifl recommend drastic 

»*!*r!££S? 5 fR 



^ ■ (S 5 S 2 ssr„ara«*g 

g’^ssss - Sje^wS -5 

the coal 


Japan saying u. u«* *— 

ceeded her expectations. 

After some initial reluc- 
tance to support the Aquino 
Government because of its 
lack of stability, it seems Mrs 
Aquino has convinced Japa- 
nese political and business 
communities that it is worth 
supporting. 



Ttikyo also ma2te a commit- 
ment to assist with the 
rehabilitation of two sreei 
mills and the modernization 

of the port of Manila to the 
time of £0.08 billion. 

Given that the Japanese 


mis you — 

assistance given tost year to 
my predecessor. It is a very 
tn rhe Fihmno 



The Hawke Government's 
insistence on introducing an 
Austrafran identity card could 
trigger an early election. 

The issue of the Australia 
Card, which the Government 
says would save about SAus l 
billion (£450 million) a year m 
evaded taxes, has come to a 
head with the confirmation by 
the Liberal and Nation^ par- 
ties of their opposition, on the 
ground that it will interfere 
with individual privacy. 

The Democrats, who born 
the balance in the Senate and 
usually support the Govern- 
ment are similarly opposed. 

Mr Bob Hawke, the Prime 
Minister, said that if Jto 
enabling legislation were de- 
feated. it would be taken back 



Mr Hawke: intending to 

trap the tax dodgers 

to the Senate until it was 
passed, but that would Med 
support from at least four 
opposition senators, which at 
present appeals unlikely. 

Opponents say the cam 


The Government insists 
that the system will contam 
protection against abuses, and 
ooints to European countries, 
Such as West Germmiy, 
Francs, Switzerland and Bel- 
mum. whidi already have 
identity documents. 

Tax experts say that over a 
10 -year period the card would 
save enough to enable a tax 
cut of between 10 per cent and 
15 percent 

As proposed, the Australia 
Card would carry the name of 
the holder, an identity num- 
ber, photograph and signature 
and would have to be pro- 
duced on opening a tank 

account starting a job, buying 
property or claiming social 
security benefits. 


oartiCBiariy aiier - 

1985, f OT “unknown reasons 
• Textile scandal: The Prime 
Minister, Mr Mohammad 
Khan June jo, has been pot 
into an ranbarrassiag P»- 
sitioDbf reports of his auega* 
tavoKanent in the textile 
quota scandal, which resnlted 
5i the sacking of the fedajl 
Commerce Minister, Mr 
Mohyoddin Bolnch, through a 

presidential order on Novem- 
ber 11 (A Correspondent 
writes). 

Media reports here saggest 
that the former Commerce 
Minster had been made a 
scapegoat after the disdosore 
that a textile export quota was 
allegedly wrongfully allocated 
on the recommendation of the 

Prime Minister, the Cow- 
mens Minister, and some of 
the rating Muslim league 
members of Parliament and 
senators. 


build a power siauon, uu«. 
the ba rking of his Govern- 

m Mr Jaime Ongpin, the Phil- 
ippines Finance Minister, es- 
timated that Japanese ass- 
istance to his country m fiscal 
1986 would be worth £0.4 
billion. 

Tokyo agreed Jo a new 
commodity loan of £0-14 bu- 
u ,hi> ohnle of 


- It tOUOwb » 

JSS S MSS® ■ 3 SAa?JS 5 B 

my predecessor’s govern- ««0-5JSSj5S 

refused t° comment on Keport on the i«»^cturmg .of 
Jl^S^te-discussions ^nese industry in the 
Emperor Hirohrto he spring.. 

Such restructuring of the 

OpTPfl iur iu& avMV# “ a °j — rr I coal industry was the one 

hims eu lO uiaiMHM. rr-—- “fTTr TStiniTlO neOple during 1 --C- 

missions to the Philippines to to the 
: — economic coroper- 


out Mr Nakas^ OTmmitted far ^ sugferingraosed , fftMl industry ww «*“ 

himself to dispatch specuu puj-^m) people during I ^n-afic recommendation of 

-.;^*nth c PhihDomesto ^ e t *^^^ 1 ^ ( ^Swar.-She may well 

said, however, that her two \ similar treaunent ot 

meetings with the Emperor 

had been die mortiMmoiaWe 

Of the VMC “T ** 


examine 

ation. . 

There is less certantiy, how- 
ever, about the size of pledge 
from the business commumty 
to import, more. Fihpino 
loicyo rin’iAldL. cmnds. and the willingness or 

commodity loan of £fl^4bti- g Government to 

lion even though the whole ot me complaints 

e^Rr’- , 

Philippines union chief murdered 

The Philippines mostprom- The _ appeared. Mr O.latiavowedio 

inent trade-union leader, Mr ^“-SSroS?3E caUageneral stnkeif drsadent 

Sdo ObJa. aml lrn to^l to *to 

KtoirfiS^^ y ^^^. sub “ bantiadc 

Police said the bodies bore union meeting, 
multiple gunshot and sab 
wounds. “ nf Mr 


of the visit: 1 . 

Majesty is just »chaMa^ 

a ereat man- In a sense ne 
reminded me of my &to 
who also was very kind to 

meT 


Two days before he jdis- 
- - - ved to 

sident 

elements lioy^ to th® 
Defence Minister, Mr Juan 
Ponce Enrile, tried to si^e a 
coup against Preadent Cor- 
ozon Aquino. 

Interviewed earlier on gov- 
— . tahniicmn. the La- 


out, newspapCT was stomc m 
his mouth and his hands tied 
by a belt in front of him. 


wwm — “ 


other indnstries wbch are 
now in trouble, in particular 
steel and shipbuilding. Earlier 
this week Japan’s major steel- 
makers reported their heaviest 
first half fosses for 40 years. 

The rationalization of die 
coal industry is good news for 
the steel firms but rt is not as 
hdpfbl a® hoped for an m- 
dustry which is obliged to buy 
iaraely domestic coal at al- 
most three times the pnee of 
imports from Australia and 
elsewhere. The steel finns tod 
been pressing for ^parity be- 
tween the price of domestic 

| and imported coal. 

' The miners will no doubt be 

back at work today after toeur 
day of protest, taking with 
them worries about finding 
new jobs in areas ot me 
country where new opportuni- 
ties are few. 


- c , 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


THE ARTS 





Black art 


m politics 


In Full Curie (BBC2), tele- 
waon emerged as a black art 
only . meagrely understood bv 
polibaans, but avidly invoked 
by Orem to cast a short-term 

*5?“ °* electoT ate. As 
Michael Cockerell eteaanthr 
illustrated, when the «oeD 
ware off they tend to blame 
the state of the art, not 
themselves. 


TELEVISION 


. -• :~r. .■si . - 




V--vA'^ 




I 

■ : ;'-vi K i*.4iii:«338SP 


Shakespeare 


• £*— ^ iV — • ZE 


• - ■. -ST • < ' 






_ (.?*'■ '*■ ' A ;' "*• 

'JC &|| 

: C„,^ .jjM 


^ ISHH °A REMARKABLY 

^ the astonishing 

-r- 4 -^VrJ penultimate sequence 
,-r takes the breath away" 






'LAURA DERM'S 
astonishing 








. •--• -o' 


<•! 

- ■- , 

r-, ‘ -* • 




More agonies of 
the awkward age 


CINEMA 


~ 1 11,1 F'wjuamme 

on Nnmber 10’s relationship 
with the medium — very much 
a median of impression rather 
than content — began bM 
Harold Wilson's podgy ig^t*! 
Don of President Kennedy 
Lie Kennedy, WiSST^ 
lieved his television image was 

the key to success. And so, to 

b«m with, it was. However, 
when the wind ftianga^ there 
he was. pu ff i n g oat complaints 
of -complete bias” and install- 
ing a political chairman. Lord 
Hill, to stem- the BBC. 

But such are the M<a«iif 
magical powers swirling about 
Broadcasting House, that af- 
ter a couple of seances. Lord 
Hill himself “went native”, la 
the programme’s most telling 
remark, be explained how 
politicians “regard something 
which is impartial as biased 
against them — and some thing 
biased in their favour as 
beautifully impartial**., 

One Prime Minister “much 
too sensible” to have a public 
row with the BBC was Edward 
Heath. Looking very relaxed 
at last, he admitted “I was 


Smooth Talk (15) 

Renoir; Bloomsbury 


Extremities (18) 
Warner West End; 
Cannons 

Haymarket, Oxford 
Street 


Saving Grace 
(PG) 

Cannons 

Haymarket, Chelsea, 
Tottenham Court 
Road 


Big Trouble in 
Little China (PG) 

Leicester Square 
Theatre 


never able to project myself on 
television”. The result was a 
proliferation of media 
witchdoctors who helped 
sweep him and then his Tory 
successor to power. 

Coached by a former adviser 
to Billy Graham, Margaret 
Thatcher has karat much 
since her 1960 television debut 
in which she comes across as 
Vera Lynn in a brace. 

Yet, as with Harold WOsoa, 
there is a smell of change in 
the air. White Magic is now 
seen as Black. “Selective see- 
ing is believing 1 *, Mrs 
Thatcher complains, attacking 
the medium for the very way in 
which she has been advised to 
manipulate it. 

Not that there was a whiff of 
bias in Michael Cockerell's 
quick-moving survey. Admit- 
tedly no other voice could 
make “Wembley: the 2983 
. General Election” sound as if 
. be was visiting a casualty 
. ^ ward, but it was a voice which 

surgically removed all sorts of 
superstitious, left and ripht. 

In his assidnons avoidance 
1 of politics, Cockerell did how- 
ever give the impression that 
i any election’s outcome was 
dependent less on policy than 
* vae p on how well the policy-makers 
did on screen. What he foiled 
- to stress was that if politicians 
have become more adept at 
broadcasting their message, 
the public has become just as 
skilled in deriding whether to 
believe it or Dot Far from 
being a magic mirror or an 
alchemist's stone, te ierfsioB 
remains a magnifying glass 
which seizes on pani c oy 
confidence and then transmits 
it large to every home. 

One of tike most over- 
inflated spectacles at present 
is that hangover from the 
Wembley Tory shin dig, Kenny 
Everett. Camp, manic, un- 
funny, he more and more 
resembles, in Clive James's 
phrase, a rat peering through a 
lavatory brush. In Barry Cryer 
and Nefl Shand, his Television 
Show (BB Cl) also depends on 
scriptwriters who could wipe 
the smile off the Mona lisa. 

Brass Tacks (BBC2) investi- 
. gated the government's policy 
•; of releasing mentally handi- 
• capped patients into a comma* 
nit?' that turns out to be less 
t •- than caring. It was an im- 
portant, understated pro- 
v gramme that raised issues that 
most be addressed urgently if 
we are not to suffer the 
“-catastrophic” result of the 
- j. ? same experiment in America. 

Nicholas 


Running Scared 
(15) 

Plaza 


True Stories (PG) 
Warner Leicester 
Square; Cannon 
Tottenham Court 
Road 


Most current American films 
seem to be about the teenagers 
of middle-class middle Amer- 
ica — not surprisingly since it 
is they who make up the 
biggest part of the audience. 
Joyce Chopra's Smooth Talk 
is no exception in that it 
describes toe private pains 
and pleasures of the in- 
betweens, and the in- 
comprehension of their well- 
meaning but impatient 
parents. The difference in this 
remarkable low-budget debut 
feature is the shrewd wisdom 
of the sympathetic but never 
indulgent portrait of its 15- 
year-old heroine. 

Connie is a pain in the neck 
— lazy and sulky at home, 
trying out lurid make-up and 
tarty clothes, making a nui- 
sance of herself in the shop- 
ping malls with her equally 
screechy girlfriends, baiting 
adolescent boys as inexperi- 
enced as herself. She has hit 
the awkward age with a ven- 
geance — a great upsurge of 
sexual energy that is both 
unrecognized and unsatisfied. 
She knows only that beys are 
nice. The awkward age is also 
the dangerous age: curiosity 
draws Connie to a dubious bar 
where older people hang out 
Instinct gets her out of a 
couple of scrapes, but she does 
not find it so easy to shake off 
a handsome, ntiMish psycho- 
path. In a scary, ambiguous 
afternoon alone with him, 
Connie grows up &sL 

Chopra, with a background 
in both theatre and docu- 
mentary, wins wonderful 
performances from her prin- 
cipals, Laura Dent (daughter 
of Bruce) and Treat Williams; 
and subtly conveys the won- 
der as well as the morasses 


that await an adolescent's first 
encounters with her own 
sexuality. 

Extremities deals more 
melodramatically with sexual 
peril. Adapted from William 
Mastrosimone’s stag; play, it 
relates how a woman attacked 
in her own home by a homi- 
cidal rapist succeeds in 
overpowering him and 
submitting him to the same 
routine of terror which he has 
already inflicted upon her. 

Robert M. Young directs it 
with enough skill and speed to 
provide an extremely gripping 
chamber study in terror, 
though he does not quite put 
at rest the moral uncertainties 
that the audience shares with 
the heroine's house-males 
when they come home from 
work to find her on the point 
of killing her captive. The rape 
victim who jibs at police use 
of the word “compliance” to 
describe sexual submission at 
knife-point has no qualms 
about a confession extracted 
under similar circumstances. 
The point is perhaps that it is a 
work of anger both playwright 
and director admit to being 
affected by rape attempts suf- 
fered by people in their own 

families 

Farrah Fawcett, who played 
the role on the stage, 
marvellously sustains both the 
terror and the hysterical anger 
of the woman. James Russo, 
also from the stage produc- 
tion, is no stock villain, but a 
personable young man who 
gives a chilling plausibility to 
the pathological liar and killer. 

Robert M. Young is 62, but 
only seriously began his fea- 
ture career eight years ago 
with Alambristol, which took 
the Cannes Festival award as a 











Teenage wit and wisdom: Laura Dern, left, and Margaret Welch as girlfriends Connie and Laura in Smooth Talk 


first feature film. Now consid- 
ered the father of American 
independent cinema, bis most 
successful film to date was 
The Ballad of Gregorio Cone:. 
Underlying all his work is the 
same strong social sense and 
embracing benevolence. 

A second Young film open- 
ing this week. Saving Grace, is 
a whimsical but irresistibly 
optimistic fable. Tom Conti 
(with an irritating and point- 
less Italian accent) plays a 
fictitious Pope, one Leo XIV, 
who accidentally locks himself 
out of the Vatican while 
wearing mufti and decides to 
tain* the opportunity to see 
the great world outside ■ 

He lands in a hopeless and 
truly godforsaken southern 
village, and sets about restor- 
ing an abandoned aqueduct to 
bring both water and self- 


Sharp falls a little flat 


DANCE 


THEATRE 


Country Dancing 
The Other Place, 
Stratford 


Even to those like me who 
know nothing else about him. 
Cedi Sharp is revered for 
having saved a mass of Eng- 
lish folk music from foiling 
into oblivion. As these songs 
and dances feature prom- 
inently in Nigel Williams's 
play, you would also expect 
the author to have a soft spot 


for Sharp. 

But, from the first sight of 
the collector patronizing an 
old fiddler, it is dear that this 
evening is not addressed to 
devotees of the Cedi Sharp 
Society. 

As played by Richard Eas- 
ton, be comes over as a tweedy 
Edwardian gentleman who 
may love country music but is 
totally ignorant of the life that 
produced it He may be getting 
the notes down right, but his 
fruity interviewing manner 
takes you back to the early 
days of BBC scripted en- 
counters with the country's 
yeomen. 

True to life or not, there is a 
fair point to be made here. 
Sharp's collection is a national 
treasure; but there is no doubt 
that it has projected an ideal- 
ized vision of the rural past. 
And in the early scenes, it 
seems that Mr Williams is out 



What really punctures the 
story, however, is the treat- 
ment of the collector. It seems 
that Cedi Sharp had a fore- 
bear, also called Sharp, whose 
role in the preceding century 
had been to grind the faces of 
the workers: as skinflint 
squire, brutal factory-owner 
and proprietor of a dance hall 
rharging tuppence a time for a 
polka. . 

Mr Easton gallantly under- 


Mayerling 

Covent Garden 


goes these unflattering trans- 
formations, sometimes swit- 


formations, sometimes swit- 
ching between past and 
present in a few lines of 


dialogue; but the pan is 
unplayable except in the vein 


unplayable except in 
of coarse caricature. 


Murphy wito Nfemk Cusak 

to place these innocent-sound- 
ing songs in a bitter historical 
context 

What Country Dancing 
does go on to do is at once 
more and less than that 
Instead of documentation, it 
retraces a century of industrial 
turmoil up to 1914 through 
the lives of a group of vil- 
lagers. Indust rialism takes its 
toll, as they move into town in 
search of work. There follow 
strikes, lock-outs, unemploy- 
ment, and renewed 
destitution. 

It does not tell you much 
about history, or even about 
the personalities of the charac- 
ters. And the attempt to 
combine public and private 
story-telling leaves a string of 
felse dues. 


. The most interesting epi- 
sode in the play consists of a 
musical duel but it is generally 
hard to discern any direct link 
between the events and the 
music. 

Of the performances, 
Niamh Cusack subsides 
believably from spirited vil- 
lage girl into urban drudge and 
Gerard Murphy dominates 
the stage as a cocky young 
buck, roaring agitator, and 
macho top dog. 

The best part of his perfor- 
mance is his singing. The 
same goes for Bill Alexander’s 
production, which combines 
some lovely intricate group 
dances and fresh melodies in 
the Sharp tradition, with 
yearning pain-filled songs of a 
kind which you do not hear at 
school concerts. 


Wednesday's performance by 
the Royal Ballet bronght to- 
gether in the central roles of 
MayerUng three dancers all 
new to their parts this season 
and appearing together for the 
first time. 

Antony Dowson had the 
hardest job. Grown Prince 
Rudolf is a long role and be 
was precipitated into it at 
short notice. He did pretty well 
— in the drcnxnstances, 
impressively well. His dancing 
was strong and clean, his 
acting boldly emphatic and he 
coped manfully with the vari- 
ous female characters, prom- 
inent or secondary, whom he 
has to catch, lift or 
manipaiate. 

Fiona Chadwick presents 
Mary Vetsera as a romanti- 
cally besotted girl, who throws 
herself into her lover's nasty 
games with more enthusiasm 1 
than anderstanding. Cynthia 
Harvey as the manipulative 
Countess Larisch is the most 
saccessfnh her eyes glittering 
with slv fnnnhitt. her manner 
just that beautifully judged bit 
too intimate, her pride leading 
her insidoonsly into hnmiii- 
ation. Excellent performances 
too from Tracy Brown, sad and 
beautiful as the Empress 
Elisabeth, and Jonathan Bor- 
rows as the coachman who 
serves as the Prince's 
confidential go-between. 


Irving War die | John Percival 


Funny man in the forum 


It was almost a quarter of a 
century ago that Frankie 
Howeiti first opened is 
London as Pseudolus the slave 
in Stephen Sondheim's A 
Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum: tonight he 
returns to the role at die 
Pi ccadill y in a production 

already seen ax Chichester this 
summer and directed by the 
show's co-author, Larry 
Gelbart In the intervening 23 
years Mr Gelbart has been 
most notably occupied in co- 
producing and writing and 


Sheridan Moriey talks to Larry Gelbart, 
co-author of the 23-year-old show and 
director of its West End return tonight 


directing several dozen epi- 
sodes of the hugely successful 
television series 
though be also found the time 
for the screenwriting of such 
comedies as Tootsie and Ok 
God and Movie Movie. 

The only son of a barber 
from Latvia, he was born in 
Chicago 58 years ago and then 
moved as a child to California 
with his family: “My Dad 
mw-ri to cut Danny Thomas’s 
hair, and when I was 16 I 
already knew I wanted to write 
comedy so I went to work for 
Thomas and I guess be com- 



Tmnsg over > new leaf: Larry Gelbart, bow a stage director 


pjeted my education for me. 
Thomas liked me because all 


Thomas liked me because all 
my jokes came very cheap, in 
fact at first I didn't charge at 
all, and from him I moved on 
to other radio comics like Bob 
Hope and Eddie Cantor in the 
days when radio was very big. 
It was Hope who took me into 
television, too. 

“But the success of the 
Forum was the end of my 
writing for individual comics; 
Fd known Burt Shevelove in 
television and, when he came 
up with the idea of adapting 
the Plautus low-life comedies 
of Roman life into a musical 


built around comics and leggy 
girls. I thought maybe we were 
on to something. 

“At first there was some- 
thing scary about a Roman 
follies for Broadway, but once 
Td read all the Plautus plays, 
and figured out that he was in 
the same business as us and 
doing what any comic writer 
has always done, then it began 
to foil into place. We worked 
through all 26 of his plays, 
lifted what we wanted and 
invented the rest 

“In all we spent four years 
writing and rewriting the show 
and finally we took ft to the 
great director Geotge Abbott. 
Steve sang him the songs and 
Burt read him the dialogue, 
and Abbott just sat there 
without laughing until ft was 
over. Then he got up and said 


be was late for the dentist. 
That was all, so we went away 
broken-hearted until that 
night when he rang and said 
he'd loved it and would be 
happy to direct. 

“Then we starred to cast it 
Milton Berle was our first idea 
but he didn't like the rewrites, 
so then wc offered it to Phil 
Silvers who thought it was too 
classical, and we finished up 
with Zero Mostd for Broad- 
way and Frankie Howerd who 
was our first choice over 
here.” 


Gelbart came to London 
with the show in 1963: “My 
fam ily and I came for a month 
and stayed nine years, so the 
five children grew up here and 
they’re all now in the business, 
though all we ever wanted 


were lawyers and doctors with 
safe careers. 

“I don’t know how we 
afforded to slay Ln London all 
through the 1960s. but I did 
some screenplay rewrites on a 
couple of Italian movies with- 
out signing them and I started 
to write for Marty Feldman. 
Then the idea of turning 
M*A*S*H into a series came 
along and I went back to 
California to write some or all 
of 97 episodes. I never meant 
to stay with the show that 
long, but I started co-produc- 
ing and got very possessive of 
the show until battle fatigue 
set in. 

“I also wrote Sly Fox at that 
time, which was an adaptation 
of Volpone, and did some 
work on a disastrous Broad- 
way musical called Ballroom. 
and then along came Tootsie 
which I co-wrote for Dustin 
Hoffinan. 

“This will be my first 
production on stage as a 
director, but it seemed to go 
well enough at Chichester and 
the show is so much a part of 
me that, when Fr anki e wanted 
to revive it, I thought maybe 
the time was right for me to 
direct. The only trouble in the 
summer was that gigantic 
open stage: Chichester is so 
vast that if you want people on 
or off stage very fost they have 
to traverse about half an acre 
so the pace is inevitably 
slower at the Piccadilly under 
the proscenium arch ii all fits ! 
so much better, and Frankie 
and I have really reinvented 
the show. Now it is like a very 
early love that has come back 
into one's life with maybe a 
few wrinkles but still looking 
very good.” 


respect to the depressed 
population. It might be ob- 
jected that his mighty task and 
all the dramatic and senti- 
mental circumstances asso- 
ciated with it are improbably 
accomplished in the space of a 
week; but after all God did 
much more in seven days, and 
literal realism is none of 
Young's purpose here. 
Predictably but entertainingly, 
Fernando Rey and Ertand 
Josephson figure large . 

in Big Trouble in Little 
China John Carpenter, at the 
best of times a master story- 
teller, is overwhelmed by his 
own special effects, without a 
strong enough script to guide 
him (the screenplay was by 
Gary Goldman and David 
Z. Weinstein, rewritten by 
W.D. Richter). 

The confused story lands its 


truck-driver hero (Kurt Rus- 
sell) in the palatial catacomb 
empire of an unwillingly im- 
mortal ancient Chinese ma- 
gician. beneath San 
Francisco's Chinatown. His 
quest is to rescue his best 
friend's fiancee, snatched by 
the magician who wants to 
make her his own bride. The 
extravagant special effects — 
fireworks, apparitions, flying 
martial artists — take over. 
The idea, clearly, was to 
emulate the Indiana Jones 
films, but the comparatively 
disappointing box- 

office results in the United 
States indicate that the bal- 
ance has to be right to win the 
juvenile audience. 

Running Scared is a con- 
ventional buddies ]>olice film, 
with the distinction of a 
snappy comedy double act by 


Gregory Hines and Billy Crys- 
tal, fast and caustic dialogue 
by Gary DeVore and Jimmy 
Huston and imaginative use 
of wintry Chicago locations. 

If it does not finally work. 
True Stories is at least a 
personal approach to comedy. 
David Byrne ofTalking Heads 
habitually introduces into his 
pop-rock sharp reflections on 
the dehumanization of 
contemporary living. Here, as 
director and writer (with Beth 
Henley and Stephen 
Tobolowsky), he extends his 
scope. Inescapably influenced . 
by the pop video form, the 
fllm is a loose assembly of 
comic, caricatural, nostalgic 
vignettes of small-town Amer- 
ica, interspersed with musical 
numbers. 


David Robinson 


Leipzig 
Gewandbaus/ 
Mas or 
Festival Hall 


CONCERTS 


Such is the accumulated 
distinction of the Leipzig 
Gewandhaus Orchestra's 200- 
year history that the ensemble 
could probably claim “special 
links” with nearly every 
Austro-German composer in 
its repertoire. Even so, this 
was a quintessential Leipzig 
programme. Weber’s 
Eurvanthe Overture was fol- 
lowed by the “Italian” Sym- 
phony of the orchestra's one- 
time conductor Mendelssohn, 
and Schubert's Ninth 
Symphony. 

Listening to their present 
warm, well-blended sound 
one could easily believe that a 
thread of performance tra- 
dition has been passed down 
by some process of orchestral 
osmosis; the current chief 
conductor, Kurt Masur. offers 
rock-solid. traditional 
interpretations. 

The evening's most unusual 
aspect was Masur's oddly dour 


was not inappropriate; though 
the flutes seemed for too 
flimsy in tone. 

In fact the orchestra's whole 
wind section sounded less 
than world-class: weedy rather 
than reedy in timbre, for from 
exact in intonation and with- 
out crisp clarity of articula- 
tion. This shortcoming made 
the performance of Schubert's 
“Great C Major” sound duller 
than it should have done; 
considering how magnificent 
was the siring round which 
Masur deployed so effectively. 

The contrast was particu- 
larly apparent in the finale. 
During the bars leading up to 
what should be the colossal 
and crushing entrance of the 
trombones, Masur increased 
the tension by giving special 
weight to the string sforzan- 
dos. But all the excitement 
vanished: could these muffled, 
wavery creatures really be 
trombones? At such moments 
safety does not come first. 


Only a group with their 
intensity of classical ground- 
ing could manage so convinc- 
ingly to control the senza . 
rigore element of the opening 
Allegro. As Hans Keller once . 
commented, it is quite the 
most Austrian of all Britten's 
instrumental works; and the 
Endellion, fresh from the 
Viennese gleam of 
Beethoven's Op 18 No 3, did 
not forget its structural exam- 
ple. nor that of Haydn. 

On the other hand, only a 
group as youthful and vig- 
orous of ensemble as they, 
could produce a Chacony of 
such apparent spontaneity 
and yet such brilliantly sus- 
tained momentum. 

After the interval, the quar- 
tet turned to Brahms to pro- 
vide the second-half ballast. 


The Minor Op 51 Quartet 
offered obvious scope for the 
quartet's voracious contra- 
puntal appetite: they thrive on 
the type of keen wit and tough 
rhythmic argument which 
tumbles out of the first move- 
ment; but it was something 
more subtle which marked 
this performance. 

The Endellion managed to 
generate remarkable intensity 
with cunning anticipation: 
their sights, it seemed, were set 
on the Andante's central out- 
burst, the Minuet's fiery trio 
even in the serenity of their 
openings: nibato, too often 
worn slack, was tightened 
afresh, and the considerable 
strength of the work's inner 
part-writing was exploited . 

Next Wednesday brings 
Britten's last and Smetana's 
first; don’t miss it. 


Richard Morrison 


pacing of the Mendelssohn 
first movement, with the 


first movement, with the 
woodwind slurring their re- 
peated chords rather self- 
effacingly and the string tone 


Endellion Quartet 

Wigmore Hall 


milked unashamedly, admit- 
tedly to gorgeous effect. 


tedly to gorgeous effect. 

The other movements were 
less controversial. The third 
was eased along with particu- 
lar grace and suavity, which 
concealed the fact that Masur 
was actually taking it rather 
briskly; the saiterello finale 
had a tense, edgy quality that 


Wednesday night was the 
centrepiece of the Endellion's 
three recitals to mark the tenth 
anniversary of the death of 
Britten, and it was worthy of 
the occasion. 

The Second Britten Quartet, 
the 1945 work in C, is for a 
stan particularly well suited to 
the Endellion’s performing 
character — and they to iL 


Hilary Finch 



TONIGHT at 7.30 

then Nov 19,22,26 Dec 4 only 

Graham Vick's oc dal mad production of 


UUCRETIA 


"sensuously beautiful 

music" The Guardian 


"a stunningly potent 
Lucre fia" The Independent 


Bax Office 

01-8363161 

Credit Cards 

01-2405351 


"tickets should be 
snapped up" The Times 


"immensely 


distinguished musically, 
dramatically, visually 


dramatically, visually 
and almost unbearably 
moving" Standard 


"a production of 
stature that ought not 


rure that ought no 
to be missed" Da»f 


Tefegrap 


Cast 

Joan Rigby 
Russell Smyths 
Anthony Rolfs Johnson 
Richard Won Allan 
Kathryn Harrlas 
Alan Opts 
Anns-Mario Owens 

Cathryn Pope 

Conductor Lionel Friend 
Designer Russell Craig 
Lighting Matthew Richardson 





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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


The new Vauxhall Carlton will, we suspect, find 
much favour amongst drivers. 

But it could cause feathers to be ruffled amongst 
the makers of its rivals. 


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For here is a car that embodies so many advances, 
it suddenly makes the others seem decidedly dated. 

The Carlton’s new suspension is a case in point. 
We call it Advanced Chassis Technology, or ACT. 

Drivers^ will call it nothing short of remarkable. 

Our engineers, you see, have come up with a 
cunning new geometry design which automatically 
compensates for the forces caused by sudden braking 
or steering movements. 

Thus an emergency high-speed lane change that 
would have the back of other cars slewing out, can 
be accomplished with ease in the Carlton. 

A comer tight enough to cause violent steering 
changes- when you lift your right foot iii rival cars, 
should cause no white knuckles in the Carlton, 

And neither should slamming on the brakes 
when one side of the car is on slush and the other 
is on dry road. 

Whereas most other cars will veer suddenly to 
one side, the Carlton will stop in a straight line. 

But the Carlton isn’t just 
a source of great comfort in 
an emergency. 

Those smoothly- 
rounded lines and 
flush windows do 
more than give it a 
class -leading drag co- 
efficient of 0.28. 

They also give a better combination of head and 
leg room than any rival can offer. 

The dash is totally new So too are the seats. 

The driver’s seat is height adjust^D^^^^^^pi^H 

with deadlocks, even heated washer nozzles. 


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And the advanced stereo system has not two, 
not four, but sir speakers. 

GL models also have a sliding, tilting glass sun- 
roof with blind and electric door mirrors. (Heated 

of course.) 

And the top of the range CD 
models not only have electric win- 
dows and alloy wheels, but a cruise 
control too. 

So what else is new about the 
new Carlton? In 2 words, practically 
everything. 

There are new engines. (Includ- 
ing a 115 bhp fuel-injected 1.8i.) 

There is a new engine manage- 
ment system on the 2.0i models. (The 
very latest state-of-the-art Bosch 
ML4 Motronic shown below left.) 

There are new brakes. (Discs all round. And the 
option of the new second generation ABS.) 

There is a new 5-speed gearbox. There is a new 
4-speed automatic. 

And there is more, much more. 


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driver’s car. We therefore urge you to |jgsJfciJl~| 

° * BACKED BY THE WORLDWIDE 

take a test drive. 

The new 
\kuxhaU Carlton. 


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PRICES FOR THE 


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DELIVERY AND NUMBER PLATES MODEL ILLUSTRATED CARLTON lfiCD £11349 TRIP COMPUTER AND AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION OPTIONAL EXTRAS 



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TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


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SPECTRUM 



The hi-tech force is with you 


481 Wafer 



British scientists 
are perfecting 


‘computer police’ 
which will bring 
radical change to 
the way criminals 
are pursued and 
crimes proven. In 
America, advanced 

technology is already used. In the last 
part of our series, Stewart Tendler 


examines the detective’s new hardware 



■ igh on a Hertford- 
shire hill, in a 
laboratory with a 
boundary of dou- 

■ ble strands of 
barbed wire and surrounded 
by grazing sheep, Home Office 
scientists are working on the 
technical equipment for 
tomorrow’s policeman. 

On a 25-acre site at 
Sandridge near St Albans, the 
scientists, working with other 
government departments and 
private enterprise, are shaping 
a future in which the police 
will be better protected, better 
connected and better 
informed. 

The United States, liaising 
with Britain, is moving to- 
wards the thinking computer 
and the day when the detec- 
tive becomes a 5'A-inch floppy 
disc. New techniques mean 
genetic fingerprinting has ar- 
rived. Real fingerprints can be 
lifted from more and more 
surfaces. Police will soon be 
summoning suspects' photo- 
graphs from a computerized 
archive the sze of a small 
filing cabinet 

On the streets, work is being 
directed and monitored by 
command and control sys- 
tems and advanced tele- 
communications. Constables 
can carry computer terminals 
the size of slim briefcases, 
linked by radio to computer 
records. 

U took more than 30 years 
for the Victorian policeman to 
move from a top hat and rattle 
to a code helmet and whistle. 
The telephone came into pol- 
ice use in the early 1900s, the 
radio car in the 1920s, the 
personal radio in the 1960s 
and the computer a decade 
later. 

In the 1980s the rate of 
technological change has 
accelerated, encouraged by the 
drive for efficiency, the seem- 
ingly unstoppable rise in 
crime and the uninspiring 
level of dear-up rates. Police- 
men are expensive assets in 
need of good management, 
often in tandem with comput- 
erization. More men on the 
beat means more megabytes at 
the station. 

Nothing provides a clearer 
visual image of the rate of 
change in the past five years 
than the developments in 
dealing with major public 
disorder. The police have gone 
from dustbin covers, cricket 
boxes and shin pads to flame- 
proof overalls, riot helmets 
and shields. 

At the Home Office lab- 
oratory, the researchers are on 


to the third helmet design in 
five years. The threat factor is 
constantly advancing — at 
Broadwater Farm Estate, 
Tottenham, last year guns 
were fired at the police lines 
for the first time in a modem 
riot— and the next helmet will 
be tighter but tougher, made- 
from a synthetic resin. 

Researchers are looking at 
materials to protect police 
stations and vehicles from 
bullets, bombs and even a 
SAM 7 missile. Airport 
counters can be protected 
against terrorist attack with 
fibreglass resins. 

Since the Brighton bombing 
in 1984, work has intensified 
on finding better ways to 
detect explosives or bombs. At 
Sandridge the equipment 
under assessment includes a 
Ministry of Defence backpack 
which sniffs gas traces of 
chemicals, such as nitro-glyc- 
erine, and identifies them. It 
can detect one part in a 
trillion, the equivalent of a- 
bottle of orange juice poured 
into Lake Windermere. 


corded acoustically but also 
ape so that 



£12,000 to be won 





Around Miss World 


A glitzy, glamorous media event rating above 
Jeux Sans Fronti&res but below the Olympics? 

Or a television-hyped international cattle 
market degrading to women? The Miss World 
contest arouses strong feelings, both for and 
against. The Times went behind the scenes at 
the Royal Albert Hall last night for an in-depth 
look at the anatomy of Miss World 


Can you always get your copy of The Times? 


Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy ofThe Tunes 
NAME 


ADDRESS, 




No hiding place: Inspector Terry Cox demonstrates information retrieval in a mock aaqttiry. Inset scientists am make “prints” from skin or blood. The “suspect" is a police model 


P olice have already 
been trained in the 
use of back-scatter 
devices which can 
reveal hidden ob- 
jects, by bombarding an area 
with neutron rays which re- 
spond to hydrogen in a mass. 

It was Sandridge which 
developed the ** hoolivan" to 
combat football hooligans 
with video and stills cameras 
equipped with 300 to 900mm 
lenses for indentifytng offend- 
ers. In the laboratories at 
Sandridge, photographs and 
tape recordingsean be brought 
up to high levels of clarity. 

The acoustic laboratories 
have prepared prototypes for 
the tape recorders to be in- 
stalled in police stations 
nationwide. Trials, which 
incorporate tamper-proof 
mechanisms, alarms, a tinting 
device and unobtrusive 
microphones, have shown an 
increase in guilty pleas, thus 
reducing court time. 

A computer programme has 
been sent out to every force in 
the country which will eval- 
uate the facilities they propose 
to use for recording inter- 
views. The programme will 
make recommendations on 
how to meet required stan- 
dards and at what cost 
By the next century, inter- 
views may not only be re- 


V* MIIV W 

portable 
tor finj 


reduces the risk of a challenge 
in court 

But the journey from the 
scene of the crime to the 
interview room can be a long 
one for the detective pressured 
for results, starved of man- 
power and flooded with 
information. The scene-of- 
crime officer and the forensic 
scientist win help to ease his 
frustration. 

In a few years the scene-of- 
critne man will arrive with a 
laser unit to search 
now only' 
under expensive, 
laboratory conditions. He will 
be able to take prints off rough 
surfaces, using a technique 
involving the vapour from 
superglue, and develop prists 
from fabrics such as suk using 
stilpfaur dioxide infused with a 
low level of radio-activity. 

The time may be approach- 
ing when members of the 
forensic science services 1 re- 
search department take prints 
from skin, which will bring 
about a radical alteration in 
investigations of murder, rape 
and assault It is now possible 
to take a Mood or body fluid 
sample such as semen, iden- 
tify the gene structure as 
individually as a fingerprint 
and eventually match the 
sample with a suspect 

The widespread use of the 
technique could lead to the 
inclusion of the data on 
criminal records, together 
with the current standard 
storage of photographs and 
fingerprints. The result would 
be a highly accurate comput- 
erized criminal identification 
system, because radical 
changes are underway in the 
storage of existing criminal 
records. 


photographs of criminals. 
Developed at Sandridge, the 
system uses a video camera 
which records images on to an 
optical disc. 

PROD will scan its files for 
criminals which match a 
witness’s statement, checking 
through descriptions such as 
age groups and sex. A VDU 
shows the colour photograph 
of a named person within 
seven seconds. Black and 
white copies can be made by 
laser printer so that photo- 


graphs can be shown to wit- 
nesses. An optical disc will 
hold a total of 50,000 photo- 


graphs, and the entire photo- 


graphic content of the 
country’s 3.5 million criminal 
records would fit into a broad 
fronted filing cabinet 
PROD will allow police 
forces to build up photo- 
graphic files on the specialities 
of c riminals or their methods. 
Albums can then be produced 
for witnesses to check. Only 
20 per cent of criminals in a 


force area prove to be recidi- 
vists and PROD would allow 
for those to be easily separated 
from the test 

The Home Office is also 
moving towards the installa- 
tion of high-speed auto m a tic 
fingerprint recognition (AFR), 
winch means the comput- 
erization of the national 
fingerprint collection so that it 
can be scanned for accurate 
co m parison with prints found 
at the scene ofa crane or those 
of suspects. 


Tracing a killer in minutes 


Today 3 * low-status, low-paid, 

ill-educated, ill-trained Ameri- 
can cod — it is said lit the 
United States that anybody 
can become a policeman — is 
spring way to a highly sophis- 
ticated breed rf. sopercop. 
Within 25 years, policing to 
gong to become a profession. 
A professional polke officer is 
likely to need a BA or an MA 
degree in the social sciences. 
Asm be will need to understand 
computers. 

The police, like crime and 
criminals, are going hi-tech. 
One of the mast for-reaching 
advances c mnaitly sweeping 
American polke forces is a 
new kind of fingerprint com- 
puter, which could rerote- 
tionbe law enforcement. 



8 S 7 g 874 

kmmmi 


on video tape so that the full 
effect of the interview be- 
comes apparent and further 


Field trials have just 
in Hertfordshire with PROD 
(photographic retrieval from 
Optical disc), a computer sys- 
tem for storing and retrieving 


One of the most notorious 
killers in America was Identi- 
fied three minutes after 
California’s new automated 
fingerprint identification sys- 
tem was switched ok it 
matched a print lifted from a 
car in Los Angeles to one 
taken from a young drifter and 
on September 2, 1985, the 
“Night Stalker", a mass kflkr 
who had terrorized the city for 
seven months, was arrested. 

Computers bare been used 
in fingerprint detection work 




Fingered: Richard Ramirez 
1976, when the FBI 
converting 17 mJDUon 
to digital form. But the 
matching process was slow 
and unreliable, until a com- 
puter combining custom-made 
silicon chips with a new tech- 
ftique for analysing minutiae 
was produced. 

In the Night Stalker case 
the compmer compared the 
print of the respected kfller 
with 380,000 stored in its 
memory. It came up with the 


names of 10 people whose 
prints most closely resembled 
the tiBert; at the top of the 
lot, with a probability eating 
four times as high as that @1 
the nearest contender, was 
Richard Ramirez. 

The implications are im- 
mense. The Los Angeles police 
atone hare 4 r 350 unsoired 
murders, 2,500 unsolved 
rapes, and 20,800 unsoired 
burglaries. "There are a lot of 
people walking the streets out 
there who think they are home 
free," says lieutenant Richard 
Olson of the Orange County 
Pofice. “Once we get these 
computer systems working to- 
gether, they are going to be fe 
tor a smprise.** 

Polke training ac ademie s 
are becoming foil-service 
training centres, with courses 
in an array of new e q ui pm ent 
and in hi-tech detective work. 
Within a generation it is 
possible that the pofice will 
carry stun gras, electronic 
restraint devices and surveil- 
lance equipment The day is 
ending when American police 
send a man on to the streets 
with a badge, a gun, a night 
stick and foe barest of bar- 
rack-room training. 



Christopher Thomas 


Access to the reflection 
would be open to every force 
by direct computer terminal 
instead of the current opera- 
tion through a centra] office at 
Scotland Yard, 

In the 1970s, it took 20 men 
one year to compare a print 
from the Black Panther, Don- 
ald Neilson, with national 
records; AFR would d o the 
same in a matter ofhours, 
working at the rate of 10,000 
prints per second. 

As it turned out Neilson did 
not have a criminal record 
Criminals, aware of modern 
forensic science methods, go 
to great lengths to minimise 
evidence, leaving the detec- 
tive to trawl as widely as 
possible in the hope that does 
will emerge, 

I he results can be 
1 chaotic as the York- 
shire Ripper case re- 
vealed: huge 

amouxits of informa- 
tion were generated, including 
a rfuti " of incidents which 
should have pointed up Peter 
Sutcliffe as a prime suspect 
But because the storage sys- 
tem was manual, it was diffi- 
cult to keep track of possible 
leads ot correlate key material 
In the aftermath of the 
Ripper inquiry, police forces 
used small computers to pull 
together information on large 
inquiries and now all forces 
are taking up HOLMES 
(Home Office laigc/nfejor en- 
quiry system), a computer 
.system developed by the 
Home Office which allows for 
tost retrieval and free text 
searching for major cases. 

A system like HOLMES wiD 
allow the detective to compare 
statements and collect to- 
gether feds which may make a 
pattern. Plans for foe Police 
National Computer organiza- 
tion will mean that different 
computers in different forces 

hnnriKng major investi gatio ns 


with HOLMES can be linked 
centrally to talk to each other, 
transfenng information. 


The PNC operation will 
also provide extra storage and 
capacity for an investigation 
when the force’s own com- 
puter overflows. But 
HOLMES has its limits. It will 
collect details of bow many 
ginger-haired men with red 
pullovers and a green car were 
seen near an incident once it is 
asked, foil foe next stage will 
be a computer which searches 
its records and tells the op- 
erator when something signifi- 
cant has been found. 
Knowledge based or artificial 
intelligence • systems, under 
examination by America's 
Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, may make the decisions 
rather than the detective. 

To some extent the com- 
puter is already influencing 
policing and detection on the 
ground. At Holloway in north 
London a desk-top machine 
has been used to break down 
local crime patterns so that 
polking strategies can develop 
week by week to meet identi- 
fied problems. 

Weekly reports of four types 
of major local crime are fed 
into tiie computer on a points 
system. The weekly print-out 
is checked and resources for 
foe next period allocated on 
foe basis of beat experience. 

It has brought significant 
drops in several types of 
crime, including burglaries, 
and a similar form of analysis 
will be available force-wide 
with a new large computer 
system. This may well pro- 
duce the same frustratiion the 
north London officers experi- 
enced. With Holloway’s crime 


illoway’s 

patterns uncovered, com- 


manders felt they could work 
wonders ... but they need 50 
more officers. No one is likely 
to .design a thinking computer 
foot can patrol the streets. 


A solemn blot on the humorscape 


Yesterday farceur 


Tom Sharpe found 


honour at a lunch 


in Paris. It was 


not much of a laugh 


The Americans and the 
French take their humor (and 
1 do mean the non-u variety) 
so seriously that it is hard not 
to laugh at them when they are 
hard at work extolling its 
moral virtues to foe rest of the 
world. 

Yesterday, I found myself at 
the Gertie Interalie in Paris’s 


Rue du Fauboure St Honorc, 
iortoff 


which is a sort of Cafe Royale 
plus garlic, where a group of 
eminent ambassadors and re- 
lated professionals held their 
tenth annual award-giving 
lunchepn. of APH1A (the 
Association for the Promotion 
of Humor in International 
Affairs). 

The finest irony of the 
occasion was that foe prize 
should have been won by the 
British farceur Tom Sharpe, 
whose sense of homonr is so 
far removed from that of his 
sponsors. In feet, when Sharpe 
received foe award, “foe Le- 
gion dHumeur” he launched 
into an attack on Sooth Africa, 



Tom Sharpe: a serious rattle from the Parisian cntkry 


where he had spent 10 years of 
life. The dunk of 


his working lit 
uninterested cutlery was 
audible. 

The funniest thing about 
APHIA is foe organization 
itself, which was conceived in 
1969 and founded four years 
later by three extremely seri- 
ous Americans who believed 
that the world of public affairs 
was running out of mirth. 


APHIA bolds so formal 
functions whatsoever, apart 
from this lunch: indeed, it 
boasts the feet that it has no 
offices, holds no meetings and 
keeps no minutes. The only 
proof of hs existence is the 
lunch. 

The occasion is a parody of 
the Nobel Prize (this bunch 
refers to its own offering as tire 
Noble). After the presentation 
yesterday, Barbara Scott, an 
expatriate Englishwoman liv- 
ing in Paris, stood up and sang 
the following words, 
accompanying herself on a 
guitar: 


La situation n'est pas 
drdie, 

EUeest glaciate depoieen 
pole. 

Mats nous A FI OS I, 
Seasons face — 

12 honour est le seul vrai 
brise-glace 

One of APHIA’s tricks in 
foe past has been to award a 
booby prize; previous recipi- 
ents have included President 
Nixon's press secretary Ron 
Ziegler, for his repeated com- 
ments during foe Watergate 
Affair — when it became 
impossible to defend a prepos- 
terous statement by his bob it 


was announced by Ziegler that 
“all previous statements are 
inoperative"; US defence sec- 
retary Caspar Weinberger, for 
disclaiming that his defence 
policy was limited to nuclear 
war, Billy Carter, for his over- 
zealousness in promoting his 
private interests while his 
brother Jimmy struggled to 
promote the public interest; 
Milton Friedman for his re- 
marks in 1974, foe time of tire 
first oil shock, to the effect 
that he would not wony about 
high prices - “OPEC will 
promptly fen apart". 

In future years APHIA has 
decided not to disclose the 
winner of its booby prize in, 
advance of foe luncheon. 

APHIA itself was the brain- 
child of three highly serious*) 
Americans living in Paris; 
Alfred E Davidson, John E 
Fobes, and Richard H Moore; 
who had the help of foe 
celebrated English actor Peter 
Ustinov. The acting director- 
general of the World Health 
Organization, Dr Mahler, sem 
.a telegramme describing hu- 
mour as “essential for good 
health"; shortly afterwards the 
then director-general of 
Unesco, Mr Fobes, cabled a 
message to the effect that 
“humour has educational 
dimensions." 

Former winners of tire 
APHIA prize include John 
Kenneth Galbraith, the Ca- 
nadian economist, and 
Ustinov; a gold plated tennis 
racket was awarded to George 
Mikes, and a first edition of 
Mark Twain’s Huckleberry 
Finn was given to Laurence 
Peter, foe originator of the 
Peter Principle, which dictates 
that a man is promoted to foe 
level of his least competence;: 


and Pierre Daninos, the 
French satirist 
APHIA insists that it has no 
formal activity, year by year, 
and that its prize never takes 
the form of a cheque. When 
pressed on the subject of 
remuneration the organizers 
concede that Art Buchwakl 
received 100,800 American 
pennies in recognition for his 
passion for money; a 16th 
century map of tire Channel: 
Islands was awarded to 
Professor Parkinson, of 
Pbrkinson’s Law, reflecting 
his pronounced affection for 
his home in Guernsey; a time 
capsule was given to Ustinov 


Alan Franks 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 106 


ACROSS 

3 Decomposing ( 6 ) 

S Noisy quarrel (6) ‘ 
8 Amateur radio op- 
erator (3) 

1 9 Eyeball membrane 


10 Extreme poverty (6) 

11 Pavement edge (4) 

12 Venewhbname(g) 

14 Yelp (6) 

17 Emphasis (6) - 
19 Keep up (8) 

22 Chtb fea (4J 

24 Sports arenas (6) 

25 Rudder handle (6) 
36 Wildebeest (3) 

27 Ornamental trail 
snip (6) 

28 Long-sufferer (6) 


19 


■ 

a ; 

■ 

Ml 

■ i 

■ 1 


Ml 

a 

■ 

U [ 

■ 

■ 

1 

Ml 


■ 1 


DOWN 

2 Eticfi(5} . 

3 Befievanle(7) 

4 Choir area (7) 

5 Sufficient (S) 


5 M^vopms. fnil- 17 Holy place (7) 

nSSSrn « Guile thief W 

»SS% - 

15 Rrerth(7) ** ProvetblS) 

10 Towards stem (3) 23 Muscular (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO UOS 


ACROSS S Transport cafe 9 Add 10 Automaton 11 Dogma 13 Ep- 
— - 25 Virginia Woolf 


s3on 16 Canteen 19 Owner 22 Interbred 24 Tab _ 

DOWN: 1 Strand. 2 Lapdqg 3 Escapade .4 Bottle 5 Stem 6Pas- 
td '7 ftanoa 12CH* J4 Slowdown 13 Ode IS Chivvy I7N»-' 
nw- raNordk' JONwaa. - 21 Rebuff 23 Ruin: • 


•f 





I 


"J . 


■?4: 





in which he intends to contain 
. his works for an infinite 
number of years, in order to 
prove to successive genera- 
tions that humour once ex- 
isted on this planet 
A limited edition of Leo- 
nardo da Vinci’s “Medici 
Codices" went to Piet Hein, 
who thinks of himself as a 
modern day Scandinavian da 
Vinci. An original poster of 
tire Marx Brothers, advertis- 
ing Duck Soup , was presented 
to Ephraim Kishon, a fanatic 
reviewer of the Brothers' oid\ 
films. 







pV • 


Jr -Ti™****: 











gw : 






■ 


Building 
on Suzy’s 
memory 

The stDl unexplained disappearance 
of Suzy Lamplugh (left) has led her" 

parents to create a trust aimaH gt 

increasing women’s self-awareness. 
Libby Pnrves, invited to chair the 
first seminar after her Times article “What’s so 
special about Suzy?”, reports on the meeting 

T 





»y* 


he iron calm of Diana 
Lamplugh is extraordinary. 
Less than four months ag o 
her daughter Suzy vanished 
during the course of a 
routine appointment with a client of 
the estate agency where she worked. 
The police search has now been 
scaled down, and after several un- 
pleasant calls out to check the identity 
«of other bodies, Suzy’s family still has 
nno idea of her •whereabouts and no 
r illusions about the things that might 
have happened to women who have 
disappeared. 

Yet this week there was her mother, 
on a platform at the Royal Society of 
. Medicine, with her husband and 
other daughter in the audience, 
talking calmly about the missing girl 
and even dispassionately analysing 
the possible lack of self-awareness 
which led to trouble. “Suzy was 
.. lively, attractive,** she said, “es- 
pecially appealing when she was 
excited. When she was trying to seQ 
something she would be very attrac- 
tive - but still have no idea of how a 
man might react to her. She was « 

- a job, without regard for the feet 
being female". 

The audience listened attentively. 
This was a unique seminar, set up by 
Mrs Lamplugh as a sounding-board 
before the official launch, next 
month, of the Suzy Lamplugh Trust. 
She has conceived the trust as an 
educational service, which would 
research the best ways of protecting 
women in the workplace without 
encroaching on their liberty and 
equality. 

It would also distribute teaching 
aids to schools and colleges concern- 
ing something she calls “self- 
awareness”: not self-defence in a 
crude, physical sense, but knowing 
how to make yourselfless vulnerable. 

She has also a fighting fight in her 
eye when she talks of employers who 
use attractive young women in selling 
roles yet “have a vested interest in 
keeping their employees unaware of 
the risk". 

With this in mind, she and her 
collaborators — many of whom she 
net during her own career as a 
teacher and writer on exercise and 
relaxation — set up the seminar. 
There were about a hundred people 
there, medical and psychological, 
police, professional and personnel 
officers from all over the country. 
The meeting was not intended for the 
oress and the only reason I can report 
t, with Diana Lamplugh's blessing, is. 
bat I was the chairman. I had been 


invited to chair it because she 
approved of an article I wrote about 
the underlying public attitudes to the 
Suzy case. 

Beneath the slightly academic tone 
of the meeting lay the consciousness 
of certain savage, uncivilized and 
irreducible feds: that some men are 
predators, and that even a wealrish 
man can overpower a strongish 
woman. Inspector Sue Best of the 
Metropolitan Police pleaded for 
women to “understand how vulner- 
able we are", yet to exude bold off- 
putting confidence in dangerous 
situations. A nurse in the audience 
said quietly that she had “been 
mugged twice this year already. 
Something you can never get across 
to people is the surprise. I was 
paralysed with shock." A health 
visitor reminded us of her colleague, 
recently murdered. 

One of the most powerful allies of 
the trust is Tony Black, recently 
retired from many years as rimical 
psychologist at Broadmoor. He made 
a brave attempt at identifying, sim- 
ply, the types of male aggressor the 
“pathetic botcher" — in search oflove 
but unabk to find it, replacing ft with 
sexual attacks and brief fits of violent 
anger at being rejected and feared — 
or the man motivated by hatred and a 
desire to dominate, often in response 
to some ancient slight. “Competent, 
assured professional women,” he 
observed mildly, “might well come 
into the category of woman he wishes 
to punch and humiliate.” 

I n the audience, young solicitors 
and surveyors, dressed for suc- 
cess, stirred uneasily, recogniz- 
ing the truth of a situation which 
could fece them any day. The 
men listened dosdy, hut said tittle. 

Strategies for survival were out- 
lined trenchantly by Charles 
Longdon-Hughes, a former world 
karate champion who teaches the 
sport at Suzy Lamplugh's old school 
He attacked the concept of “self- 
defence courses” as being too little, 
and too tightly taken. Run away, was 
his message. “We're socialized into 
looking after property,” be said, 
“doing our job mirier any circum- 
stances. We've got to learn to look 
after our life first I do. Someone 
jumps into my car at the lights, X 
jump out the other door. I can always 
get another car.” 

Longdon-Hughes agreed that 
women — anxious to phase, keen to 
get on in their careers in a man's 
world - were easy prey for attackers 
to lead into vulne rable situations, 



Putting grief to good use: Suzy Lamplugh's parents, Diana and Paul 


“Look, I know how women feel,” he 
continued. ‘Tm black. I know how it 
is to think you've got be better than 
anyone rise to succeed. But you've 
got to leani to understand risk, and 
get out quick.” 

When it came to what path the trust 
should take, the meeting offered a 
choice, ranging from the hard-line 
timited-tazget approach of the man 
from • the National Association of 
Estate Agents — “the attack must be 
directed at employees and their 
following of our safety leaflet 
instructions” - to the broad social 
changes proposed by Professor Brian 
Groombridge of London University. 
He bravely talked about our need to 
form “an analogue of chaperonage. 
Not actual chaperons — not anything 
which would throw away SO years of 
women’s progress — but an equiva- 
lent of chaperoning. We may be 
talking about street-lighting, about 
the environment; we may be talking 
about anti-sexist education.” 

He cited the M4 rapist, John Steed, 
and his compulsive bodybuilding and 
passion for fast cars as being part of 
“a rapist culture”. 

It seemed a significant moment, 
that; this was no audience of leftish. 


feminist thinkers or anti-sexist 
campaigners; tins was at least 60 per 
cent moderate, probably lightish, 
affluent Home Counties England. But 
an England worried enough, after the 
disappearance of Suzy Lamplugh, to 
listen at last to phrases like “rapist 
culture” with some humility. 

“This is not frivolous,” 
Groombridge said, “but we have one 
educational resource in tire field of 
self-protection which has recently 
occurred to me, and we don't exploit 
ft yet prostitutes- They have some- 
thing important to teach other 
women. If any group of women 
knows a thing or two about funny 
men and dangerous situations, they 
do. We should enlist their exper- 
ience.” And, he added, “We do have 
to change men. That's essential.” 

Diana Lamplugh was happy with 
the meeting. “I suppose it began as 
something just for myseif,” she said, 
“to pull something worthwhile out of 
the most horrendous experience. But 
now I’ve talked to so many people, I 
can see that even if Suzy walked back 
through the door tomorrow, the trust 
would have to go on.” 

©Tint Mu r w»p— IMS 


CHRISTMAS AT 


r % 



% ±i 
& **’ 

s*| f' 


I ^ I'SIX RUSSIAN NESTING DOLLS £8.50 



196 Tottenham Court Road London WfTuns^. Guildford 
Drummond Plata Croydon * Eden Liston . 


Festive cheer 


Fine Christmas 
wines deserve 
fine glass. Quite 
why Lafite *53 or 
even Chilean 
Ordinaire should 
taste infinitely 
better out of the 
thinnest, most 
delicate lead 
crystal glasses is 



To Survive 
Christina*, and a 
draw which of- 
fers, amongst 
other prizes, a 
weekend for two 
in Bavaria. For 
those readers un- 
able to come to 
London, Liberty 


war wine The Times offers tS 

j™mSS$W a unique chance 
5SJ! to shop at liberty £ 

— 1-1 '■"* ” without crowds ““ **™“ 


crystal that 
both practical 
and affordable is best. A 
complete set of white, red, 
fortified and spark Hug wine 
glasses is a wonderful sight, 
bid; if thfe is outside yonr 
Christmas budget, opt instead 
for a good all-purpose tulip 
shaped wine glass. 

• This week. The Times in 
oonjiinctien with liberty, is 
offering its readers the chance 
to meet Jane MacQnitty to 
discuss crystal, claret ami 
more. She will be joining other 
Tons experts at die London 
store on an evening when 
Times readers are invited to 
shop without the Christmas 
crowds. On Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 2, from 630 pm to 830 pm, 
other attractions at the Regent 
Street store will include: an- 
ther Jffly Cooper signing 
copies of her latest book Bovf 


same time. Each 
store will feature 
afreedr a w w faichind n desasa 
prize a £100 liberty gift 
voacher. Yon wOl he welcomed 
with a glass of wine and a 
liberty aft. In addition, for 

every £50 you spend during the 
emaSssg, Liberty wiD present 
yon with a £5 gift voucher. 

To take 19 om invitation, cut 
oat the voncher below and 
send it toe Liberty Evening, 
The Times, PO Box 396, 
Mitcham, Socrey, CR4 2XH 
by Wednesday, November 19. 
Please indicate which branch 
you wOl visit. These are; 
Regent Street, London; New 
Bond Street, Bath; Trinity 
Street, Cambridge; Bnrgate, 
Canterbury; George Street, 
Edinburgh; Buchanan Street, 
Glasgow; King Street, Man- 
chester, London Street, Nor- 
wich; Davygate, York. 


exclusive Christmas shopping evening at 

LIBERTY 

Please send mean invitation for - branch 


NAME. . . . 
ADDRESS. 


I 


POSTCODE. 


Screen 

benefits 

Discussions on the feasibility 
of a breast cancer scre ening 
programme in this country 
tend to ibens on dre number m 
lives that could be saved. 
Although studies have yet to 
establish that younger women 
would benefit, experts agree 
that if aO 50 to 74-ye ar-old 
women in the country were 
offered regnlar X-ray 
mammography, 2JM)0 lives 
could be saved each year. 

But this week two doctors 
from Sweden, where pioneer- 
ing research has been done, 
Cold a meeting in London that 
there were other important 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


benefits of screening. Doctors 
Beagt Lundgren and Anders 
HeDeberg, from the Swedish 
county of Gavle, said that 
because regular screening al- 
lows cancers to be detected 
earlier, treatment need not be 
so aggressive. 

When routine screening was 
first offered in Gavle in 1975, 
only 11 per cent of all cancers 
detected were so-called stage 1 
or small, loraifaed tumours. 
Nearly 90 per cent were 
advanced cancers which re- 
quired treatment such as 
mast e ctomy, chemotherapy 
and radiotherapy. 


Now more than 70 per cert 
of tumours detected are stage 
1. The result: by 1985, 60 per 
cent of the women in the 
county with breast cancer 
needed only to have the lump 
removed and no more than 28 
per cent had to have a mastec- 
tomy. No patient had to have 
post-operative radiotherapy. 

British surge ons who were 
present at the meeting were 
not convinced that the Swedes* 
gentle approach would work. 
But Dr Helleberg told the 
meeting that very few of the 
women terted in this way had 
had a recurrence of their 
breast cancer which could not 
be treated — and the majority 
of these probably had name 
widespread disease than orig- 
inally thought. 



Young eyes 

Many health 
authorities 
recommend 
that children 
shoitid have 
theft 1 eyes ch- 
ecked for the 
first time when they are about 
three-and-a-half years ofd. 
But specialists are beginning 
to suspect that, in some 
cases, this may be too late 
and that some defects may 
not be correctable at that age. 
but would be if the children 
were treated earlier. 

Five years ago a Hg 
screening programme began 
in Cambridge and Bristol. So 
far 6,000 babies, aged six to 
nine months, have had their 
eyes tested. 

Dr Janette Atkinson, from 
Cambridge University's vi- 
sual development unit says 
the study has shown that 
those children who have 
refractive errors (tong or 
short-sightedness) as babies 
are highly likely to still have 
the problem at three-and-a- 
half. But if spectacles are 
used in the feet year die chad 
is far more fikeiy to have near- 
normal vision three years 
later. 

Wheel thing 

Cycling is one of tite best ways 

to keep fit, acconfing to sports 
science specialists at the 
U nive rs i ty of Bfrwtfngham. 
They studied nearly 1,460 
factory workers from Cadbury 
Schweppes’s Bournvifle plant 
to see just how & they were 
and how much exercise they 
took. 

The overall results were — 
perhaps not unexpectedly — 
disappointing. Most of those 
tested could only be described 


as “inadequately fit”. Sixty 
per cent of the staff thought 
ftey were relatively active but 
in fact only 28 per cent spent 
any of their leisure time in 
“fairly strenuous activities” 
such as s w immin g or jogging, 
and jest 6 per cent did any 
really strenuoas exercise such 
as eyefing for sport or playing 
squash or football. Activity at 
work wasn't related to fitness 
at aiL 

Bnt the study (fid show that 
those who do exercise are fitter 
and heahhier and (hat cyclists 
do particularly well, gaining a 
12 per cent advantage over 
those who don't cyde. 

A report in the British 
Journal of Occupational 
Medicine says that as a group 
those why cycled were as fit as 
others five years younger than 
themselves and those who 
cycled regnlariy 
healthy 10 years on 
scale. 


Stick stuck 



Those gett- 
ing ready for 
the party se- 
ason should 
be warned of 
a “new and 


I potentially 
rd associated 


serious hazai 

with the hasty Ingestion of 
martinis (or Gibsons)”, as 
reported in the New England 
Journal of MecSdna. 

Daniel Malamud, a PhD 
student at Pennsylvania 
University, downed his Gib- 
son (gin, ice, essence of 
vermouth, and several cock- 
tail onions on a flat wooden 
toothpick) rather too quickly. 
The toothpick lodged in his 
throat and when he tried to 
cough it up it stuck in the back 
of his nose. It took a trip to the 
emergency room and some 
adroit work with forceps to 
get it out 

Double-checking on polio 

Doctors from the Central Public Health 
Laboratory have warned school-leavers to be 
sure to have a potto booster. Concern that the 
level of immunity to ponomyeUtis might not be 
high enough in some sections of the 
community led Dr Phillips White and Dr 
Jonathan Green to tost nearly 1,000 people — 
including babies and the very old - for Immunity. They found 
that 98 per cent of people were protected against at least one 
of the three main pofio viruses and that 77 per cent had ade- 
quate protection against aH three. 

But by the time chHdren reach the ages of eight to 15, their 
Immunity to pofio mis - Type 3 in particular - was on the 
wane. 

Oral pofio vaccines are safe for the person being inoculated: 
they contain live pofio virus which has been treated to make it 
non-virulent But sometimes a newly vaccinated person will 
excrete polio virus which has reverted to Its virulent form, es- 
pecially with polio virus Type 3. Those with poor Type 3 Immu- 
nity risk catching the disease from someone who has recently 
been vaccinated. Older teenagers have better Type 3 
immunity than eight to 15-year-olds, but the associated risk 
makes a booster vaccination important 

Lorraine Fraser 



Fwm Deidre Y. MacKay 
MCSP, Rhodes Cottage. 

Little Budworth. 

Tarporley. Cheshire. 

Yonr report Women’s Woe 
(Medical Briefing, October 
24) highlighted die “dearing- 
sp-the-raess” attitude to stress 
incontinence so prevalent in 
medical circles. 

Bat pelvic fleer exercises 
performed regularly several 
times a day timing pregnancy; 
the wearing of ligMwejgM 
support if the mothers abdom- 
inal muscles cannot cope un- 
aided with the growing bulk 
and weight of the nterns in the 
last three months of preg- 
nancy; birth in an upright 


TALKBACK 


position where gravity aids the 
dilation of the birth canal 
instead of delivery m a redin- 
ing position where the mother 
straggles and strains to get the 
baby out; the judicious 
prescribing of homeopathic 
remedies where suitable, and 
finally progressively stronger 
pelvic Boor exercises after the 
birth can all help to reduce the 
currently vast umber of 
women (about 37 per cent of 
whom have had at least one 
baby) su ff e rin g from stress 
incontmence. 

What a pity the doctors so 


underestimate the help of 
physiotherapists. 

From Catherine Mitchell, 
Haworth Hall, 

Beverley Road. HulL 
I read Married To Affairs Of 
State (Wednesday Page, 
November 5) with interest It 
seemed to take for granted 
that there were no wonun 
high-fliers or even male dip- 
lomatic husbands. Is this truly 
the case? I do hope not 
I do not mean that I would 
like to see men traipsing to the 
four corners of the globe after 
their wives, bat sorely there 
most be some examples of a 
male dilemma. 



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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Relearning 
the chill 


Who says PHS plays bat a 
peripheral role in the great aflairs 
of state? I learn from John Bercow, 
chairman of the Federation of 
Conservative Students, that this 
very column was instrumental in 
Norman Tebbit's action disband- 
ing it. “The feeling in Central 
Office was that the decision not 
simply to send a get-wefl card to 
General Pinochet of Chile (after 
the assassination attempt in 
September) bat to publicize it in 
the Times Diary really was the last 
straw," he tells me. (For my p art ,! 
cannot see the paint of the PCS 
sending the telegram if did not 
make it public). Meanwhile, I am 
told that down at Smith Sqaure 
the Fes’s sober successor, the 
Conservative Collegiate Forum, is 
recalling many a tin of bianco and 
miserable afternoons spent 
square-bashing. For public 
schooboys the initials CCF will 
always stand for Combined Cadet 
Force. 


Left turn 


Stuart Holland, Labour’s overseas 
development spokesman, has re- 
signed from the left-wing Cam- 
paign group of MFs only weeks- 
after his name was omitted from 
its shadow cabinet slate. In a 
resignation letter, quoted in this 
week's Tribune , Holland accuses 
Campaign members of no longer 
wishing to support “diverse or 
even new” viewpoints. “Too 
many members draw lines each 
week and ask who stands on the 
left of them.” be says. Holland, 
still a member of the rival Tribune 
group, can take cheer from the 
comments of Clare Short, who 
bears the yoke ofbelonging to both 
Tribune and Campaign. Dual 
membership, she once observed, 
meant double the membership 
fees, twice the number of boring 
meetings and “twice the abuse 
from both sides". 

• Paper Handling Ltd's inspired 
choice of name for its new range of 
paper-shredders: The Whitehall. 


Revved up 


It seems a long time since Hell's 
Angels were the greatest threat 
known to man's kneecaps but after 
yesterday's headlines they are 
obviously making a comeback. 
Terry Purser, a Margate trader, 
has taken exception to a Hill 
Samuel advertisement warning 
that unwise investors “could end 
up in Margate not the Seychelles”. 
He says that nnleats Hill Samuel 
apologizes he will buy £100 of 
shares and invade its annual 
meeting “accompanied by a bunch 
of 30 shareholding Hell's Angels 
who will drink the place dry”. 


Streetwise 


London stipendiary magistrate 
Eric Crowther writes in the cur- 
rent issue of the Magistrates’ 
Association magazine of a woman 
convicted of soliciting who asked 
for time to pay her fine. “How 
long do you need?" asked the 
bench. “About 20 minutes should 
do," Crowther swears she reptied. 


Camden gloss 


The housing benefit office of 
London’s left-controlled Camden 
council offers a most unlikely 
choice of reading. There was no 
Morning Star or New Statesman 
available the other day — just 
Vogue and Harpers & Queen. 


BARRY FANTONI 




NEWI 
CONSUMER | 
PROTECT- 
ION 


‘But there's no mention of 
compensation for in janes caused by 
broken election promises' 


Contortions 


London Regional Transport has 
banned an advertisement for the 
game Trivial Pursuit from tube 
trains because ft was “likely to 
offend pasengers”. The mock 
questions and answers which were 
to have appeared in the ad are 
indeed too smutty for me to repeat 
here. But I think they could 
probably have got away with 
What part of their anatomy do 
34 million Americans secretly 
bite? Answer Their toenails. 


Political palates 


My truest for dishes you would 
serve our leading politicians 
should they turn up on your 
doorstep has found its way into 
the real world in a book called A 
Taste of Fame, in which sundry 
top people reveal their favourite 
food. I envisaged the Davids — 
Owen and Steel - fighting over a 

g ate of bubble-and-squeak. In 
ct, the former goes for kidneys 
and the latter for Welsh rarebit. Sir 
Geoffrey Howe has forgone my 
choice of Cabinet pudding in 
pursuit of a (non-political) hotpot 
Europhile Ted Heath has spurned 
my sour grapes for French onion 
soup. And the Iron Lady has 
rejected my bully beef for a plate 
of chicken — served cold. 

PHS 



Arms: a message for Reagan 


A year ago I became one of the 
first patrons of the Nuclear Weap- 
ons Freeze Movement, which 
aims to halt the testing, produc- 
tion and deployment of nuclear 
weapons as a first step to general 
arms reductions, A lot has hap- 
pened since then. 

Most significant was the Reyk- 
javik summit at which the two 
superpowers agreed to a SO per 
cent cut in strategic weapons, the 
total removal of intermediate 
weapons (Cruise, Pershing 2 and 
SS20s) from Europe, and to steps 
towards a comprehensive test ban. 
This fell on the stumbling block of 
a full testing and development 
programme tor President Reag- 
an’s Strategic Defence Initiative: 

Nevertheless, a useful frame- 
work for a future treaty has been 
established. Accordingly, when 
Mrs Thatcher sees the President 
tomorrow, she should stress the 
European reservations about Star 
Wars and emphasize the risks 
posed by new technologies to 
much of the potential progress 
that the summit promised. 

Indeed, the major foiling of 
previous Salt agreements was their 
concentration on the numbers of 
weapons to the virtual exclusion 
of restrictions on the qualitative 
improvements taking place at the 
same time. Unfortunately these 
improvements led to fears on each 


by David Steel 


side of a pre-emptive strike. No 
matter how much the superpowers 
may protest that they would never 
strike first, the fact that such a 
strike may appear technically 
feasible is bound to increase 
tensions in peace-time as well asm 
times of crisis. That is where the 
concept of a nuclear freeze has a 
useful rote to play. It could build 
mutual confidence by creating a 
stable environment is which nego- 
tiations for deep cuts could take 
place. 

That could be agreed at the next 
Reagan-Gorbachov summit. The 
superpowers would thereby dem- 
onstrate a commitment to arms 
control and to achieving a new 
system of common security. 

Avoiding further development 
sod deployment of tactical nuclear 
weapons is particularly important. 
At present, the Soviet Union has 
about 14,000 and the USA 12,000 
tactical warheads. The increasing 
sophistication of these weapons 
encourages military planners to 
believe that fighting and even 
winning a limited nuclear war is 
possible. We must halt these 
developments while pressing for 
negotiations on a 150 km tactical 
nuclear weapon free zone on each 


side of the East/West border. In 
foe same spirit, die British govern- . 
ment should pursue these policies: 

• A. commitment to maintain a 
minimum deterrent capacity at a 
level no greater than mat of the 
current Polaris system, until that 
too can be negotiated away in 
return for worthwhile Soviet con- 
cessions. The Conservative pro- 
posal for a massive increase in the 
firepower of our deterrent would 
not only severely strain our total 
defence budget but might also 
block the 50 per cent cots pro- 

be cancdkxL 

• We, must gjve a high priority to 
fo s te rin g the disarmament process 
which, if successful, would mean 
that our minimum nuclear deter- 
rent could be included in multi- 
lateral disarmament negotiations. 
With deep cuts in US and Soviet 
arsenals, and increased political 
and military coherence in Europe 
and Nate, the maintenance of oar 
minimnni deterrent in the mid to 
late 1990s might not be required. 

• A high priority must be given to 
strengthening non-protittratkm. 
As one of the parties to the 
Comprehensive Test Ban tails, 
Britain must take the initiative in 


trying to revive negotiation s. In 
the meantime, we should agree 
voluntarily to a freeze on nadear 
weapons testing — and encourage 
the u5 to do likewise. 

• The government should with- 
draw its support for the “Star 
Wars" strategic defence pro- 
gramme. This, in foot, ts a 
programme in search not only of 
feasibility bat also of a strategy. It 
has succeeded is bnifHng arms 
control hostage to foe myth that 
an effective defence against ballis- 
tic missiles can be developed, and 
has threatened to break the Anti 
Ballistic Missile Treaty, the most 
successful aims control agreement 
to date. 

Britain’s subservience to the 
Reagan view should be replaced 
by one of an honest, friendly yet 
critical ally. We must urge the US 
to negotiate a strengthening of the 
ABM treaty so that withdrawal 
from it would require five years’ 

The true significance of Reyk- 
javik is still difficult to assess, 
particularly after the hard words 
on both sides in the last few days. 
But we can be certain that what 
progress there was is unlikely to be 
consolidated, and certain not sus- 
tained, unless those who have dug 
themselves into a hole just stop 


Ottna* 


As little as a year ago it would have 
seemed inconceivable that Nor- 
man Tebbit, Tory Party chairman 
and darting of the right, would 
have expelled from the party the 
young gorillas of the right, the 
Federation of Conservative Stu- 
dents. Yesterday Tories — of all 
shades of blue — were still 
uncertain exactly why he had 
done. 

Tire fiercely Thatcherite PCS 
was certainly capable of embarr- 
assing the Tory establishment - 
their elders and wetters, as they 
liked to call them. There was the 
infamous rumpus in 198S at their 
annual conference in Lough- 
borough when the party had to pay 
out £1,391 in reparations for the 
damage they had caused to h«il* of 
residence. There was the still 
greater embarrassment earlier this 
year when an FCS magazine 
published an article accusing Har- 
old Macmillan of “war crimes” 
over the repatriation of Ukrainian 
prisoners to the Soviet Union. 
The FCS had become notorious 
for espousing ridiculous policies 
(decriminalized incest, legalized 
heroin, privatizing the Royal 
Family) alongside more sober 
libertarian proposals — major 
increases in privatization and help 
for foe Nicaraguan contras. 

But against this foe party leader- 
ship had to set foe undoubted 
power of the FCS in recruiting 
hard-working Conservative ac- 
tivists in foe universities. The FCS 
was also seen by many on foe 
party right as a useful counter- 
weight to the leftish Young 
Conservatives. While foe FCS has 
given its support to Tebbit and 
Mis Thatcher, the YCs have been 
dominated by the influnce ofFeter 
Walker and foe Tory wets. 

Perhaps the most dangerous 
argument of all against removing 
the party’s backing from the 
organization was the smack of 
authoritarianism behind ft. At foe 
same time as attacking foe intol- 
erance of “foe fascist left" and the 
anti-democratic practices of trade, 
unions, foe party could be seen as 
attempting to snuff out inteUeo 
trial dissent within its own ranks 
and replacing foe democratically 
elected FCS national committee 
with a hand-picked body to be 
known as the Conservative Colle- 
giate Forum. 

So why did Tebbit decide to act? 
The theory most favoured by foe 
FCS itsdf is that this is foe climax 
of a long-running campaign by 
their left-wing opponents to de- 
stroy their influence in the party. 
Douglas Smith, a former vice- 
chairman of foe federation, claims 
that Tebbit has been duped. 
“There are people in foe Young 
Conservatives and Centra] Office 
who have been gunning for foe 


Toby Young gives the background to the 


Central Office action against the FCS 


Why Tebbit 
shot down 
his followers 



attrteAcktarn&e7!» Nm Ycrtnr 

‘Well, Kendrick, still think Pm just an alarmist?* 


FCS for a considerable time,” he 
said yesterday. 

In support of this claim, Smith, 
now a research assistant to Neil 
Hamilton MP, cites foe recent rule 
changes made to foe National 
Union Executive Committee, 
which presides over the Conser- 
vative students. These excluded 
foe right-wing National Associ- 
ation of Conservative Graduates 
from foe committee. In addition 
to this, Smith alleges that a senior 
Central Office official recently 
wrote to two ministers, Mrs 
Angela Rumbold and Rhodes 
Boyson, urging them not to speak 


at this weekend’s annual con- 
ference of the right-controlled 
Greater London Young 
Conservatives^uch facts spell 
conspiracy to foe Machiaveflian- 
minded Smith. 

An alternative explanation is 
that Tebbit himself felt that he 
risked too much embarrassment 
from foe activities of his erstwhile 
supporters. With foe growing im- 
patience at FCS antics within the 
Tory ranks, their continued pres- 
ence in Conservative Central Of- 
fice was felt to be a potential 
political timebomb for their most 
publicly identified champion, foe 


party chairman. The theory runs 
. that, far from the wets orchestrat- 
ing the purge from afar, it was 
Tebbit’s personal decision. The 
news of yesterday’s dedson cer- 
tainly came as a surprise to many 
senior Central Office figures as 
well as to the FCS. 

Whatever the reason for the 
withdrawal of party accommoda- 
tion and funds from foe FCS, 
those who who hope that its 
militancy will go away may be 
disappointed. Hairy Phibbs, vice- 
chairman of the FCS and the man 
behind the “war criminal" allega- 
tions, yesterday made a direct 
appeal to the Prime Minister, 
stressing the loyalty of “one of the 
few party organizations firmly 
supportive of your policies and 
your premiership". It is hardly 
conceivable that Mrs Thatcher 
would intervene to overrule the 
party chairman. But it is unlikely 
to be foe last that she and her party 
will hear from Phibbs. 

Prospects for harmony between 
foe various Tory youth factions 
may not necessarily be improved 
either. Only latt month in Bourne- 
mouth a fracas took place when 
two members of the FCS tried to 
gatecrash the official reception of 
foe National Young Conser- 
vatives and Phibbs was forcibly 
ejected by Mark Wazxal, - vice- 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party Youth Department 

At the previous year's reception 
several members of the FCS had 
got into trouble fer jostling Ed- 
ward Heath. “They're just out to 
cause trouble,” said Shirley 
Stotter, who has the unenviable 
job of heading the Central Office 
Youth Department and who was 
present at foe time. 

Much erf the responsibility for 
pouring oil upon these troubled 
Tory waters now rests with John 
Bexcow, framer Chairman of foe 
FCS, who is staying on as Chair- 
man of the Conservative Cofle- 
giate Forum, which is to replace it 
as foe Party's student wing. “It 
took a fafr degree of incompetence 
on behalf of some members <rf die 
FCS to alienate the most sympa- 
foetic chairman we’ve ever had,” 
he says. Bercow, who fell out with 
his National Committee when he 
condemned Phibbs over the New 
Agenda affair, welcomes Tebbit’s 
decision. 

It is always dangerous to take 
student politics too seriously. But 
it may be more misleading to 
ignore them altogether. The 
Young Conservatives - in state of 
their mainly social reputation — 
have catapulted large numbers of 
MPs into Westminster. The FCS 
hoped to become an equally 
effective ladder. Some of its 
leaders will fight on to transform 
that hope into a reality. 


Shotgun marriage alive and thriving 


Paris 

In cohabitational France, who 
directs foreign policy? For the past 
week Jacques Chirac, the prime 
minister, has dominated the world 
headlines with his forthright com- 
mentary in the Washington Times 
on France's Middle East policies, 
suspicions over the deal behind 
the return of two more French 
hostages from Beirut and his 
public tributes to Syria less than 
24 hours after approving Britain's, 


package of measures. 

Where has President Mitterrand 


of all that has been going on? Did 
be have a hand in them? 
Mitterrand has said not a word 
about these particularly sensitive 
issues, though he had not hesitated 
to criticize other aspects of foe 
government's policies. 

In an interview with this week’s 
he Point magazine, Mitterrand 
speaks for foe first time since foe 
right-wing election victory in 
March about his conception of the 
relative powers and duties of 
president and prime minister, 
insisting notably that foe presi- 
dent has a preeminent role in 
foreign policy and defence 

Was ft to check Chiracs increas- 
ingly audacious sallies into both 
those areas that be chose to 
reassert his authority in this way? 
The interview marks a definite 
hardening ofhis views from before 
foe election, when he spoke of 
foreign policy being a divided 
responsibility. In the Le Point 
interview he now argues that “foe 
person who has tire ultimate 
responsibility for foe use of our 
arms and thereby the decision on 
which the fete of the country 
depends is foe bead of state. He 
must therefore logically fix the 
broad options for national 


defence ... Of course, foe prime 
minister and the government play 
a large part in the initiative . . ." 

On foreign policy he insists that 
the constitution bestows on him 
certain duties which entail certain 
rights — and on essential matters 
these are “pre-eminent.'" 

Mitterrand goes on to claim, 
however, that there was little 
problem between himself and the 
government over foreign policy, 
which was continuing in foe same 
basic direction on Europe, the 
Atlantic alliance, the Arab coun- 
tries. and Africa. The early 
disagreements over South Africa, 
Chad and the US “Star Wars" 
programme had been ironed out 
(in Mitterrand’s favour). “I do not 
complain when I see foe prime 
minister developing with great 
dynamism the policies which suit 
me," he says. On the other hood, 
he insists that the government is- 
entirely responsible for domestic 
policies. 

Even before the elections, 
Mitterrand always said that he 
would "allow foe government to 
govern" while insisting that he 
would not remain “inert”. He has 
done just that. He has not harried 
or obstructed the government as 
much as he could have done, 
although he has set down certain 
markers of disapproval: on 
privatization, new constituency 
boundaries, changes to foe redun- 
dancy laws, foe excessive use of 
the guillotine procedure in par- 
liament the proposed reform of 
the nationality code— all ready for 
cashing into electorial votes when 
the time comes. 

Many predicted that far from 
cohabi rating, Chirac and Mitter- 
rand would be involved in head- 
on clashes, leading to government 
paralysis and weakening France's 
voice abroad. But they have 



Mitterrand: first to realize 
his loss of power 

shown that cohabitation can work. 
Largely that has been due to 
Mitterrand's unexpected willing- 
ness to chang e virtually overnight 
from an absolute sovereign with 
more power than any other west- 
ern leader into a constitutional 
monarch deprived of virtually all 
real executive power save that of 
dissolving parliament and press- 
ing foe nuclear button. 

Mitterrand appeared to realize 
sooner than his opponents that he 
had no option. No longer having a 
majority in parliament or control- 
ling the nation’s purse strings, he 
could not block government ac- 
tions; at best he could only delay 
them. Better, therefore, to submit 
graciously and bide his time, with 
an occasional public protest to 
show he is still there. 

His first public .criticism of foe 
government caused consternation, 
and when he refused to sign the 
government’s, decree on privatiza- 
tion in July there was excited talk 
of a crisis and early presidential 
elections. But by the time 
Mitterrand refused to sign the 
government's decree on foe new 


constituency boundaries in 
September there was scarcely a 
murmur. Jacques Toubou, the 
normally outspoken general sec- 
retary or the GaulUst RPR, said he 
would lose no sleep since foe 
government could push the mear 
sure through parliament in the 
form of a bul, which it did. 

The French people applaud the 
semblance of political harmony 
induced by cohabitation; 78 per 
cent, according to opinion polls, 
hope that it win last until the next 
presidential election in 1988. Both 
Mitterrand and Chirac are riding 
high in popularity esteem. Not 
since de Gaulle came to power in 
1958 has France appeared so 
nninv? 

Indeed, some people are begin- 
ning to believe that the electorate 
has enjoyed foe experience so 
much that they wifi try it again, 
other by voting in another left- 
wing president and giving him-a 
right-wing majority in parliament, 
or vice versa. 

Will cohabitation leave its mark 
on France even if it does not 
continue? Mitterrand believes and 
hopes so. Under the Third and 
Fourth Republics, he says, the 
president had too little power and 
under the Fifth too much. “The 
present situation is sketching out, 

with a lot of groping around, an 
approach which will remain even 
if the president and parliamentary 
majorities coincide again.” 

Others disagree. They believe 
that power will swing right bade to 
the president as soon as be has his 
own majority in parliament again. 
They cannot see men tike Chirac 
or Raymond Barre. being willing, if 
elected president, to appoint as 
prime minister anyone not pre- 
pared to do their bidding. 


* -fr ft -fr St 

David Watt 




of the Raj 



Re me m brance Sunday in Madras. 
A nice conjuncture. There is 8 tot 
for the British to remember m foe 
city of Clive and Corawafio. In 
fact “all our pomp of yestcxday"is 
on urinous display her e. Th e 
spacious imperial boulevards, 
now renamed after obscure Tamil 
politicians, are pothoted, their 
lofty facades covered with a riot' of 
sprall shop signs. The big admin- 
istrative bungalows % are par- 
titioned into mouldering tenem- 
ents. The monuments ofVktonan 
Madras - the colossal head- 
quarters of foe southern railway (a 
|rmd of Indian St Pancras) and foe 
High Court bufldmg (a glorious 
confection of domes and turrets) 
are felling to pieces. 

The less essential amenities of 


BXMfenrization — is also the key to 
the economic future. The intefieo- 
real remnants of the Raj are the 
foundation on which their future 
wifi be built - if the foundation s 

and its custodians survive. 

And are. they surviving? Does 
life still stir in these ruins? Come ;:, 
with me to the Armistice Day .■ 
Service at St Mary’s, foe 17fo 
century garrison church of Fort St -• 
George, foe dd seat of Rntish V- 
gpvGnuncnl in Madras. It is a;; - 
wonderfully odd occasion — partly 
stffl very British. A .harassed ... 
Eng lish clergyman, dearly an ar- 


n 


dent member erf the peace mftwC*. 
meat, leads us reluctantly through;^ 


a deliberate hand. The racecourse 

for rttf good 

of the masses, foe governor's 
mansi on is a cnimbting hostd fix' 
impoverished state legislators. 
The East India Company’s 
magnificent banqueting hall, 
though still in useby the state 
establishment, shares its facilities 
with tire Tamil Nadn raffle. 

B is a melancholy prosper* — 


a heavily bowdlerized service-* , 
from which all reference to foe ? 
possibility of a just war has been 
firmly removed and a hymn ofhis ^ 
own devising about “the mud*-,"' 


rubble of Vietnam” insatedjto^ 


suppose. There are worse fates zb 
any civilization than to have its 
artefacts recycled by its successor. 
The Indian jungle and foe apes 
reclaimed foe imperial relics ofthe 
Moguls. It seems better that a 
jungle tide of bumairiiy should 
engulf the remains of tire British 
Raj. But what is realty saddening 
is that in Madras the intangible 
htttwfifc of British India are now 
being submerged as wdL 

In Delhi a westernized elite calls 
The adminis trative tunes. In the 
booming economic centres — 
Bombay and Bangalore (India’s 
silicon valley) — a cosmopolitan, 
m odernizing business class is in 
control. Here in the sleepy south 
east, as in many other parts of the 
provinces, foe British and Ameri- 
can-educated middle class is bring 
font out from power. 

Populist politicians have cap- 
tured the mass vote by a mixture 
of Aariwm, linguistic national- 
ism and ruthless machine politic&. 
Priorities have changed. Free food 
comes before buildings and roads 
and adequate power supply. 
Educational opportunity comes 
before standards. The peasant 
takes precedence over foe urban' 
poor. This can be seen to be an 
inevitable and even a desirable 
stage in Indian development Cer- 
tainly rt is politically effective. 

ha the state of Tamil Nadu it 
does not matter that the chief 
jztinistef; an ex-film Aar called 
M.G. Ramac&andran, has had a 
stroke and can barely commu- 
nicate, that a lot ofhis mmistera 
are stupid and some corrupt, that 
the Madras business community 
is in despair. The present state 
government win win the next 
election with a landslide. 

The trouble is foat under this 
kind of regime the economic 


the tune of Cwm Rhondda, ). The - 
ftrftfch deputy high commissioner " 
and tire German consul general 
read tire lessons. ..ir. 

- A great doud of British-Indianr 
witnesses looks down on tire, 
proceedings from the memorials^ 
on the wafis — Colonel Neill whot;' 
died in 1832 “from the effects of a;; ■ 
coup de scdetT, Josiah Webbe " 
(1770-1804) “whose extensive '' 
knowledge of the Eastern lan* •: 
guages fowarded his rise to sta- 
tions of high trust where hisr. 
ambition was fired to exalt the 
honour and interests of hit,, 
country" Major Langley RE, : 
“who died from injuries received ’*0.- 
in an encounter with a tiger", foe ■ 
Rev Christian Gerieke, “destined 
to labour in a peculiar vineyard.-.' 
(that of the conversion of tire*, 
natives of India)". . . , 

But foe church is full to 
overflowing. The path is lined by," 
Indian girl guides in full rig. Two ' 
Indian civilians wearing Second * 
World War medals lay vasty 
wreathv The Indian garrison com* :* 
arader leads a prayer. An Indian^ 
professor gives the sermon and • 
quotes from Wilfred Owen. And-. 
we all, both British and Indian, 
listen in sfience to the Last Post 
and siiig Abide With Me. 

Follow now to a big party at an - 
Indian house foe same night Withy 
only half a dozen exceptions the - 
guests are middle-class Indians. 

Miltv-lfir <m«I j uSw u fAMiA «* * 


Much whisky and gin and tonic.' ^ , 


needs of the present The fact that 
the part is also sold up would not 
matter so much, except that in 
India the recent past — Western 


Much talk of recent trips abroad* 
and <rf children in Britain and the.. 
United States. Many shrugs and •• 
curses at foe stale ofTamil Nadu^. 
politics. , 

The room is caHed to order. It fa , 
to be a. musical evening, a ring- ; 
song. Sheets are handed round. A--; 
charming muotrign (whose - 
first name is Handdl because h»*’ 
father had heard Messiah the night, . 
before he was bom) seats himself t 
at foe electric organ and for the'* 
next hour {days a string of English " 
and American tunes. Everyone 
bursts into song — The Lincoln- '- 
shire Poacher, Suwannee Ufaer,' 
Get Me to the Church on Time. 

Suddenly we him a page and I 
swing into Pack Up Your Troubles ~ 
in Your OldJSt Bag and It’s Long' 
Way to Tipperary - 1 have a feeling ; 
that Wilfred Owen and S' -1 — 
Langley RE, and even tire 
Gencke, would be pleased. 




moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Sleuthing beside 
the Tiber 


In Paris they sometimes have 
fierce arguments over whether the 
banks of foe Seine should be for 
cars or people. In Rome they have 
come to a pleasant c om promise; 
there are no cars or people on the 
banks ofthe Tiber, or at least there 
were none last Saturday afternoon 
as we strolled along the huge white 
river walk overhung by graceful 
plane trees. The only sign of 
previous human presence at afi, 
apart from tire graffiti, was the 
handbag . 

It was a dark blue, quite stylish 
handbag, lying on tire edge of the 
river, - torn open and all the 


contents scattered on tire ground. 
It was as if the owner had been 
searching desperately for a paper 
tissue or key rmg and then, driven 
frantic by failure, had jumped in 
tire Tiber to end it alL The more 

we thought about it, the less likely 

a theory this seemed. What 
seemed much more likely, judging 
by the way the strap had been tarn 
loose and foe fining ripped open, 
was that a thief had grabbed the 
handbag and come down to tire 
Tiber to inspect the contents at his 
leisure, and dump the residue. 

There certainly seemed to be 
nothing of value among tire cards 
and documents strewn on tire 
grass: no money, or passports. On 
the other hand, would tire cards 
not be valuable tofbe owner? Are 
not even receipts and permits 
irreplaceable? Would itperhaps be 
a good idea to find out who . . ? 

I don't think I have ever before 
been in foe position of looking 
through a person's portable se- 
crets, attempting to do a police 
reconstruction job. Onceyou have 
lacked up the fira few pieces, you 
cant hdp going on. You feel 
involved, sucked into someone 
rise’s life. Her name was Birgitte 
PromdL She was about 30, be- 
spectacled, plaimsh. with long, 
dark hair, which it did sot take a 
Sherlock Holmes to deduce be- 
cause her photograph was on 
every student card And she had 
been a student for a long time; 
there were college identity cards 
from London, Tel Aviv, Madrid 
and Germany, the earliest dated 
1975. 

That she seemed ;to be still > 
student was suggested by tut 


exercise book with about 20 pages ' 
filled in with first steps in Italian.- 
So, she bad come to Rome to learn,; 
Italian. One of the identity cards; 
gave her nationality as French,.! m 
though this did not seem fiferiy,^ # 
Birgitte is not a French name, - 
unless if s a misspelt Brigitte, and'.' 
sire had written in the exercise- 
book “cattivo * schlecht” If tire 
were French, would foe not have 
written “cattivo » raauvais”? 

She had come from Munich to. 
Rome via Florence (a rail ticket - 
receipt) and had not been well in'. 
Munich (a sick pay voucher and~ 
hospital appointment card). Thercj 
was a Munich address and a" 
German parking permit The only'' 
thing missing was any due as to' 
her whereabouts in Rome. My v 
heart sank at the idea ofhandmg it - 
all in to the police, who would' ' 
make me fill up endless forms and 
even suspect me of the crime. And 
then, previously unseen, there: 
fluttered out a scrap of paper with 
the address of foe YWCA in the.. 
Via Cesar Balbo. A 

This was infuriating. What I T 
really wasted to do was leave the.' 
whole lot lying there. Now I had a. 
due as to where she might ber 
staying, and a Good Samaritan* 
would go rushing off to foe, 
YWCA. I would describe my., 
attitude as that of a Grudging, -' 
Bad-Tempered 1 Samaritan: 

“Yes,” said the YWCA con- 
derge, “we do have a & 2 XKzttel 
PromeS here. FU get her down for" 
you." The concierge was strict and.: 




\N 




around, and so was 
Birgitte FromeH when she ap- 
peared, until foe saw her handbag.-' 
Then it was shrieks of delight an«U 
Oh look, there’s my rail ticket She^ 
would sot have been quite so - 
tidighted if she had known how , 
nearly I left it on the river bank, of 
how thoroughly I had rooted ' 
through her life story. I wanted toj 
ask her why she had falsely put her. 
nationality down as French, why' 
she had been m hospital/ why on*, 
earth she bad gone on .bring 
mature student tor ten years and , 
wasn't it about tune foe grew up* 
and did something? - 
, Birt you can’t ask a person 
tilings like that, when you’re only - 
on good terms with her handbag. " 


>K. 

iv.‘. 


h 


£V,.' 


• ft -. 1 ■ 


( •, 


L'-.v ■*' 




. t 


3ilK‘ 

‘.j-,. . ■ ' 


:w -* •> 








THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


* 1 Penm ngtonStreet, London ^U9X N Telephone: 01^81 4100 

THE BOBBY’S RETURN 






The nineteenth-century writer 
Alexander Heizen, remarked 
that while seeing a policeman 
in Russia had an effect like a 
ule falling on one’s head, in 
England the same sight 
suiprisingly increased one’s 
sense of security. Broadly, the 
observation remains true to- 
day. In spite of the ferment of 
^debate about policing in 
Contain over the last fifteen 
years, public trust in the police 
remains high. 

But it has shown signs of 
wear and tear in recent years. 
Paradoxically, that change has 
taken place just as evidence 
emerges — some of it in our 
senes on the police this week — 
that a very long and gradual 
change in police attitudes is 
bringing some small rewards. 
That change is commonly 
called “community policing” 
although it would be better 
described as a massive process 
of police adjustment to post- 
war social changes. 

The years preceding the 
First World War saw a sharply 
rising crime rate. A relatively 
stable period followed until 
dglhe steady rise of the last thirty 
^years. During that last phase 
the police found themselves 
under pressure from accelerat- 
ing social and cultural change. 
They themselves were coping 
with technological rhan 


abandoning foot patrolling for 
panda cars, mastering elec- 
tronic systems. Social work 
done informally by parents, 
teachers and policemen began 
to be distributed among 
increasingly specialised agen- 


cies: probation departments, 
psychologists and comm un ity 
workers. 

In more recent years, eco- 
nomic recession has tautened 
social tensions. The defects of 
the public housing of the 
sixties have become more and 
more obvious. Prisons and the 
criminal justice system have, 
with rising crime, become 
seriously overloaded. The last 
two decades have seen the 
recurrence of three kinds of 
policing problem which are 
famili ar to history but which 
had been absent in the pre- 
vious twenty years; terrorism, 
major public order distur- 
bances and small areas of 
poverty and misery which 
effectively do not wish to be 
policed. 

Any one of these pressures 
would have produced strain 
inside police forces which tend 
to change only slowly. Taken 
together they have meant that 
Britain's policemen have been 
suffering a prolonged transi- 
tional phase of their history. 
The last fifteen years have seen 
them slowly rethink their 
relationship with the public — 
something effected while 
political debates raged outside 
the forces themselves. 

What some policemen, and 
not a few politicians, con- 
demned as trendy or soft goes 
deeper than a superficial style 
of policing. The fundamental, 
constant objective of uphold- 
ing the law has to be reached 
by routes which are fitted to 
the society which is being 
policed. The police have 


discovered — or rather 
rediscovered — that they can- 
not succeed without a close 
and sensitive connection to 
the communities they are in. 

Much of the tension be- 
tween police and inhabitants 
in inner-city areas with high 
crime rates has arisen in the 
past from the police’s inability 
to know enough about who is 
actually committing crime. 
Operation Swamp, which pre- 
ceded the Brixton riots of 
1981, was a classic example of 
the police infuriating the pub- 
lic in a random sweep for 
criminals they could not iden- 
tify and few of whom were 
caught Community policing is 
one route to better detective 
work. 

A very different kind of 
policing issue has made prom- 
inent headlines more recently. 
There has been a steady series 
of controversies over special 
task forces trained to respond 
to emergencies and sudden 
disturbances. The riots of 198 1 
saw the development of phys- 
ical protection for policemen. 
This appeared to undermine 
the renewed emphasis on per- 
sonal communication with the 
public. Similarly the miners 
strike raised the unattractive 
possibility of a nationally- 
controlled police force. 

Important as these are and 
have been, they are secondary 
to the necessary and beneficial 
developments described 
above. Energies and resources 
should not be diverted from 
the most important changes of 
all - and they are not finished. 


EUROPE GROUNDED 


Europe stalled badly on the 
issue of air rights this week and 
now looks unlikely to recover 
^ before Britain relinquishes its 
* seat at the controls in seven 
weeks time. Of all the areas in 
which the Government had 
hoped to make some progress 
during its six months in the 
presidency, this one had 
looked the most promising. 
The failure of Transport Min- 
isters to make the necessary 
headway at their Brussels 
meeting is therefore all the 
more depressing 
They have made some 
progress. On the question of 
sharing out airline seats, for 
instance, the ministers voted 
10-2 in favour of the British 
proposal, while on that of 
access to routes the voting was 
9-3. With majority voting 
portly to be introduced on 
issues concerning the internal 
market, such margins might 
raise hopes that the end of 
protectionism in the skies 
above Europe is nigh. But on 
the issue which matters most, 
that of price-fixing, the 
Community split down the 
middle, with France, Greece, 
Denmark, Italy, Portugal and 
Spain all opposing reform. 

They were debating, more- 
over, a set of proposals which 
represented only a very mod- 
est compromise. On the shar- 
ing of business between any 
two countries, for instance, the 
■ft package would have ended die 
T present cosy 50-50 airlines 
deal — but only just. On the 
issue of Tariffs, the Twelve 


were confronted with a pro- 
posal to remove the present 
restrictions on discount 
fares — restrictions which eff- 
ectively exclude businessmen. 
Both were voted down. 

If Europe cannot agree on 
reforms as cautious as these, 
Europe is never going to agree 
on anything. Indeed some 
more radical critics of the 
present price-fixing system 
took a perverse delight in 
seeing the package rejected^ on 
the ground that it was hardly 
worth having. In their view it 
was tactically better to let the 
European Commission carry 
out its threat to take airlines to 
court for transgressing the 
anti-protectionism rules in the 
Treaty of Rome. 

This is not the view of the 
British Government which 
bolds that the way forward lies 
through a state-by-stage ap- 
proach. Talks will now take 
place to establish whether the 
remaining gaps can be closed 
in time for the next council 
meeting in mid-December. 
Such optimism is based partly 
on the belief that if only 
France can be persuaded, the 
Mediterranean powers will fol- 
low. 

That sounds over-sanguine. 
The chances of getting the 
Community to commit itself 
to an “open skies” policy 
before the end of the year now 
look remote. So where does 
one go from here? 

The most sensible course for 
Britain would be to extend its 


small network of bilateral 
deals to cover as many of the 
partners as possible. Such 
agreements have already been 
signed with Belgium, the 
Netherlands, West Germany 
and Luxembourg and would 
seem to be working reasonably 
wefL Since the bilateral deal 
with Holland in 1984, the 
cheaper fares have already 
brought increased business, 
with 17 new services — seven 
of them on new routes. Twenty 
new services, 13 of them on 
new routes, have been started 
between Britain and West 
Germany over a similar pe- 
riod. 

Countries which might be 
reluctant to abandon aviation 
protectionism altogether, 
might still be willing to do so 
in respect of an individual 
country — particularly if that 
other country were Britain, 
one of the chief agitators in the 
movement for open com- 
petition. From their point of 
view, they would be buying off 
British pressure. Meanwhile 
from the British perspective, it 
would open the prospect of 
cheaper air travel for Britain’s 
own consumers. Moreover, it 
would increase the demand 
from businessmen throughout 
Europe for a total overhaul of 
the system. At worst it would 
mean some improvement 
while the Commission gets its 
lengthy legal action under way. 
Further advances are now 
overdue and this country 
should promote them by what- 
ever means it can. 


THE RATING GAME 


The abolition of local rates in 
Scotland, confirmed as part of 
this year’s legislative pro- 
gramme in the Queen's 
Speech, will provide an invalu- 
able controlled experiment for 
the later reform of the rating 
system in England and Wales. 
It has been on the political 
agenda for ai least ten years. 

The report of the Lavfield 
Committee published in 1976, 
went over the ground in 
^exhaustive detail, and follow- 
ing the pledge to abolish the 
rates in the Conservatives’ 
1979 manifesto the ground 
was thoroughly retilled during 
Mrs Thatcher’s first term. On 
the eve of the 1983 election 
rate reform was dropped m 
favour of abolition of the 
. GLC, but the disagreeable 
politics of local government 
• have forced it back on to the 
agenda in the present Par- 
liament. 

Scotland is going first be- 
cause the rating revaluation 
north of the border focussed 
political discontent there most 
sharply. The Government con- 
’ eluded that anything was bet- 
ter than a system whicii 
imposed that kind of political 
penalty. Whether minister 
will still think that way once 
the restricted tax base oftbe 
■ rates is replaced by a umyersai 
community charge remains to 
be seen. 

Responses 1 ® 

Government’s green pape 
rate reform published at 


hpginnin g of this year have 
been almost uniformly hostile 
to the concept of a flat rate poll 
tax. Comments were due to be 
with the Department of the 
Environment by the end of last 
month, and so far as England 
and Wales are concerned the 
Environment Secretary, Mr 
Nicholas Ridley, now has the 
task of pondering what 
changes, if any, he should 
make to the original proposals. 

As a principle, greater 
accountability in local govern- 
ment has a great deal to 
commend it. It is partly foe 
lack of it which has forced foe 
Government, in another piece 
of legislation announced m foe 
Queen’s Speech, to impose an 
obligation on councils to put 
more of their services out to 
private tender. Although foe 
burden of rates may be felt 
much more widely than am- 
nlv by foe householders who 
are legally liable - for instance 
bv adult members of their 
families - a flat rate amount 
per head clearly spreads atten- 
tion on foe costs of local 
councils’ decisions more 
widely. Minds are likely to be 
further concentrated by foe 
proposed reduction m foe 

proportion of rate bills 

covered by housing benefit. 

Equally clearly, however, 
there are considerable diffi- 
culties in imposing a tax on 
neople who did not pay one 
before. While those who are 

^st well able to pay will 


continue to be supported by 
foe safety net of social security, 
the community charge is also 
likely to be more regressive 
than rates. For all their mani- 
fest failings, rates are more 
closely linked to ability to pay 
than a flat-rate charge. And foe 
more one looks at the practical 
difficulties of collecting foe 
tax, foe greater they seem. For 
instance, how should foe 
charge be levied on people who 
spend much of their time 
moving between different 
parts of the country? 

All these questions Mr Rid- 
ley will have to weigh. In 
particular, he will need to 
consider how quickly foe 
changeover between rates and 
foe community charge should 
take place. In Scotland a fixed 
period of three years is pro- 
posed. In England and Wales 
foe transitional period is much 
more open-ended. This is 
partly because foe range of 
spending between different 
authorities is much larger than 
in Scotland. 

If big differentials in the 
charge are politically accept- 
able, as foe logic of foe reform 
demands, then there is much 
to be said for following the 
Scottish pattern and compress- 
ing foe changeover period as 
much as possible. Without a 
firm framework, some 
authorities will seize foe 
opportunity to minimise any 
increase in accountability 
while maximising foe political 
agony of reform. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Avoiding Aids in absence of cure 

From Dr KG. Lever 


Sir, To suggest that voluntary 
HTLV-3 mass screening would be 
an adequate method of combating 
Aids (leading article, November 
1 1). or that compulsory screening 
would be efficacious, are both 
inaccurate in the light of our 
current knowledge. 

HTLV-3, the vims known to 
cause Aids (acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome), is unlike 
the viruses causing common infec- 
tions in that it take several 
months, or more probably years, 
between the infective event; then 
the development of a positive 
blood test indicating that the body 
has noticed the virus, and a 
further period between this event 
and the development of sup- 
pression of the infected 
individual's defence system and 
consequent development of 
opportunist infection and unusual 

malignances 

We do not know the latent 
periods with accuracy. We do not 
know the percentage of patients 
infected with HTLV-3 who w ill 
develop the positive antibody test 
Nor do we blow the percentage of 
patients who have a positive 
antibody test indicating that they 
have been in contact with the 
virus who will go on to develop 
the Aids syndrome. 


Screening populations at the 
present time win not pick up those 
in the latent period before the 
antibody has developed and will 
raise anxieties in those who have 
the antibody present but have no 
clinical symptoms and may never 
develop the full Aids syndrome, 
and in those who will develop this 
lethal condition there is as yet no 
therapy to cure iL 

There is no solution to this 
syndrome at present other than 
prevention. As with previous viral 
epidemics the answer is in the 
development of an effective vac- 
cine and to this end most money 
should be channelled. Concentra- 
tion of patients and research 
personnel and equipment should 
ideally be centraused. perhaps in a 
national hospital set in one of our 
closed hospitals like St. George’s, 
Hyde Park Corner. 

For the population at risk most 
attention should be devoted to 
ensuring that those who have 
transient sexual relationships of 
all kinds know of the dangers they 
may encounter and that informa- 
tion about Aids is on display and 
given with contraceptive mea- 
sures wherever they are obtained. 
Yours faifofullv. 

E. LEVER, 

King's College Hospital, 

Den mar k Hill, SE5. 


BBC under fire 

From Mr Tom U. Meyer 
Sir, For six years, variously under 
Labour and Conservative Gov- 
ernments, I headed a Civil Service 
unit the mai n function of which 
was providing advice to ministers 
on the consti t uti onal aspects of 
broadcasting; and before the dust 
has settled totally on the Tebbit- 
BBC battlefield, 1 wonder whether 
I may comment upon one aspect 
which seems not to have been 
given enough attention. 

The BBC's and (IBA’s) indepen- 
dence of Government in matters 
of day-to-day running derives not 
from legal provision or precedent, 
which would ultimately be mat- 
ters of judicial interpretation, but, 
in common with most of the 
nation’s democratic guarantees, 
from external perception and 
upon continuity of practice for 
their mandate. Isolated departures 
weaken a convention. Frequent 
ones can destroy it 

Virtually since the 1926 
Crawford committee on 
broadcasting recommended the 
present constitutional pattern of 
the BBC, the convention has been 
perceived by successive govern- 
ments as meaning that, whilst a 
departmental minister could prop- 
erly intervene about a programme 
relating to his own departmental 
responsibility, government as 
such, as ministers have frequently 
reiterated, does not intervene in 
matters of programme content, 
since such intervention would be 
indistinguishable from the ex- 
ercise by government of some 
control over the programmes 
themselves. 


Whether Mr Tebbit has 
honoured the constitutional 
convention or breached it. de- 
pends upon whether he is per- 
ceived (by BBC governors and by 
the public and Parliament) as 
speaking as a Cabinet minister or 
only as party chairman. 

But, if you are clothed in the 
rich ermine of ministerial office, 
you can hardly expect to be seen as 
naked except for your hat. 

Yours faithfully, 

TOM U. MEYER, 

Meadow Bank, 

Lerryn. 

Lostwithiel, Cornwall 
November 7. 

From Mrs Diana Spearman 
Sir, Whether or not one agrees 
wife the particular case which 
Norman Tebbit argued against the 
BBC surely everyone must see that 
he has done a service to democ- 
racy in making people think about 
the nature of news-gathering and 
presentation. 

It would be a disaster if tele- 
vision and radio news bulletins 
were accepted as completely ac- 
curate and beyond criticism. They 
are as much dependent on human 
judgement as other sources, and 
bias must occur in the selection of 
which piece of news to put first, 
still more in what to include or 
what to omit, without any con- 
scious intention of misrepresenta- 
tion or propaganda. 

This is part of the human 
condition, as Tebbit has most 
usefully reminded us. 

I remain etc. 

DIANA SPEARMAN. 

7 Lord North Street, SW1. 


Neglected exam? 

From the Headmaster of The 
King's School, Gloucester 
Sir, The Chairman of the British 
Overseas Trade Board (November 
3) makes a timely plea for more 
effective modern-language teach- 
ing in the sixth form for those 
students taking sciences and other 
non-Iinguistic subjects at A level if 
Britain is to compete successfully 
in international trade. 

English and Welsh sixth forms 
have now been presented with the 
opportunity to enlajge the curricu- 
lum with the provision of AS 
levels (half A levels), which are 
due to begin in 1987. This 
development could be far more 
important than the GCSE 
examinations which, in many 
ways, may prove to have a 
limiting effect on the number of 
subjects studied and will probably 
do little to alter the current pattern 
of success rates at GCE O level 
and CSE. 

It will, for instance, go some 
way to help English sixth-formers 
to match foe number of subjects 
studied by their counterparts in 
Germany, France, Japan, the USA 
and Scotland. One would hope 
that foe prospective engineer 
might be encouraged to take two 


major A levels, say mathematics 
and physics, while studying chem- 
istry and a modern language at foe 
slightly lower level. 

However, the lack of prom- 
inence being given to AS levels 
suggests foe project is doomed 
from its inception. While univer- 
sities and polytechnics have given 
lip service to AS levels we have 
already heard admissions tutors, 
usually from foe older and more 
prestigious univereities, saying 
that they would prefer three 
straight A levels, particularly in 
foe science subjects. 

Secondly, the teaching pro- 
fession, and particularly foe 
unions, have become so immersed 
in GCSE possibly because the 
proportion of sixth-form teachers 
is a relatively small part of the 
profession, that AS looks like 
being neglected or even ignored. 

Headmasters and curriculum 
planners are unlikely to want to 
risk a considerable economic 
investment in new sixth-form 
courses in such a lukewarm cli- 
mate, which may offer only doubt- 
ful benefits to foe pupils for whom 
they are responsible. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALAN G CHARTERS, 
Headmaster. 

The King’s School, Gloucester. 


Hole in the roof 

From Mr George Breeze 
Sir, In his article in yesterday’s 
paper (November 8) Baraber Gas- 
coigne stated that foe [British 
Library Reading Room] dome's 
glass circle is “weather-proofed” 
like foe Pantheon. The circular 
opening of the dome of foe 
Pantheon in Rome is unglazed. I 
have seen it rain through foe 
opening. Those who have seen it 
snow through foe opening tell me 
it is a particularly magical sight 
Yours faithfully, 

GEORGE BREEZE. 

16 Park Place, 

Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 
November 9. 


Advertising on TV 

From the Director of The Incor- 
porated Society of British Advertis- 
ers Limited 

Sir. Your Special Report yesterday 
(November 3) on the 50th birth- 
day of television in Britain covers 
some interesting ground, but I 
must take exception to one im- 
plication of Peter Waymaric’s 
article which could be misleading. 

In talking about the difference 
between the BBC (funded by 
licence fee) and ITV (funded by 
advertising) be imples that foe 
consumer pays for advertising on 
ITV and even quotes a figure for 
one particular product category to 
suggest that a certain proportion 
of foe consumer price "goes on TV 
advertising”. 

This imples that if television 
advertising did not exist, foe price 
of foe nroduct would be lower. 


Tire reality is (hat aD advertising 
strives for efficiency in selling, 
helping to encourage market 
growth and thus keep down 
product costs. In the absence of 
TV and other advertising, both 
manufacturer and consumer (not 
to mention retailer) would suffer 
and foe unit price would be likely 
to be higher. 

Yours faithfully, 

KENNETH MILES, Chairman, 
The Incorporated Society of Brit- 
ish Advertisers Limited, 

44 Hertford Street, Wl. 

November 4. 

Racing handicaps 

From Ms Bo Goldman 
Sir, “These other horses couldn't 
beat (Dancing Brave) with a 
hammer in Europe,” said Par 
Eddery after his mount finished a 
gasping fourth in Santa Anita's 
Breeders' Cup. 

But an hour earlier, France's 
Last Tycoon didn’t need a ham- 
mer, only four hooves to trounce 
his competition over the same 
race course, despite foe tight turns, 
the bumping in foe stretch, foe 
clods of flying grass, foe terrible 
airplane flight, the California heal, 
the exhausting European racing 
campaign, and ail foe other ex- 
cuses trainer Guy Harwood trot- 
ted out in defence of “Europe’s 
greatest since Mill Reef and 
Nijinsky" 

How can you be English if you 
don’t know how to lose gracefully? 
Sincerely. 

BO GOLDMAN. 

1065 Greenfield Road. 

St Hriena. CA WS74. USA. 


Suez factor in 
defence plans 

From Viscount B aikinson. CH 
Sir. As a past Minister of Defence 
and foe minister in charge of 
shipping in foe Eden Government 
1 must take issue with Sir John 
Nod’s article on our strategic 
defence capacity (November 6). 

It was foe lack of capacity to 
mount an amphibious operation 
quickly that did as much as 
anything to lose us the Suez war. 
So when in 1959 1 became 
Minister of Defence I was deter- 
mined that we would leant foe 
military lessons of Suez and have 
a policy for our defence forces 
“which would speed np their 
reaction time and create a mobile 
military force with a poised capac- 
ity to operate from land or sea 
bases.” 

In this I found a strong ally in 
Lord Mountbauen as Chief of foe 
Defence Staff who also remem- 
bered Suez. 

In this way foe assault ships, foe 
small carriers and the Harrier 
aircraft that were foe backbone of 
foe Falklands operation came into 
being. The concept was tested in 
foe highly successful Kuwait op- 
eration m 1961 when, at foe 
request of foe Ruler of Kuwait, we 
put a commando ashore at short 
notice ready for battle and under 
our own air cover. 

The lesson to be learned from 
Suez and foe Falklands is that 
given foe right equipment and 
training tbe British have a particu- 
lar skill in mounting amphibious 
operations possessed by no other 
nation. This is of great value to 
Nato for the Alliance is most at 
risk not in the centre but on its 
exposed flanks where a seaborne 
capacity is essential. 

So 1 believe that Sir John’s 
policy of 1981 was wrong. Main- 
land Europe is not where Britain’s 
unique capacity for mobile opera- 
tions is best deployed. We must 
make our contribution; but our 
allies are not unaware that, as foe 
Falklands showed, Britain’s very 
special contribution to foe defence 
of tbe free world lies in that mobile 
seaborne role that grew out of foe 
Suez failure and was tested and on 
foe whole not found wanting in 
foe Falklands. 

Yours sincerely, 

WATKINSON, 

Tyma House, 

Shore Road, Bosbam. 

Chichester, 

West Sussex. 

November 6. 

Falklands fishing 

From Mr Alistair Horne 
Sir. Sir John Nott's article points 
up two key ingredients that 
brought success in the Falklands. 
as opposed to disaster at Suez. 
One was foe courage and single- 
mindedness of foe Prime Min- 
ister, the second was that, in 1 982. 
Britain had foe support of foe 
United States — coupled with the 
name of Caspar Weinberger, who 
(and not just over foe Falklands) 
proved himself to be a true friend 
of this country. 

The Falklands campaign was as 
Sir John also revealed, an ex- 
tremely close-run thing. Now. in 
what to foe simple citizen seems 
tike an act of extraordinary and 
unnecessarily provocative folly, 
we are threatening to impose a 
fisheries protection zone around 
lbe islands. 

If this is carried through, we face 
alienating those countries in Latin 
America that ought to be our 
friends (and possibly, now, Spain 
as well). We can no longer be 
assured of unqualified US support 
over foe Falklands. and in two 
years our very good friend, Caspar 
Weinberger, will almost certainly 
have gone. 

Before it is too late, and 
irreparable damage is done, foe 
Government should seriously re- 
consider. 

Yours faithfully. 

AUSTAJR HORNE, 

21 Si Petersburgh Place, W2. 
November 8. 


Industry gibe 


From Mr M . T. Heydeman 
Sir, Earlier this year, foe National 
Advisory Body for public sector 
higher education (NAB) planned 
several economies, including foe 
deletion of foe “04 programme" 
— chemistry, physics and food 
science — from the Reading 
College of Technology. This pro- 
posal drew irate letters from 
numerous private and public sec- 
tor research and industrial con- 
cerns for miles around. 

Die courses in this programme 
are seen as vital for foe training, by 
part-time study, of their higher 
technicians in science. The pro- 
tests, reinforced by foe educa- 
tional arguments and reference to 
tbe NAB's transgression of its own 
stated policy, were forwarded to 
tbe NAB by the college. But 
without avaiL 

Perhaps in response to outcries 
like this, the Government then 
announced increased funding for 
colleges. However, despite Read- 
ing College’s renewed pleas, to 
date the NAB remains adamant 
that it will destroy these subject 
areas. Here we have firm, direct 
links between industry and educa- 
tion. strengthening both. Is HM 
Secretary of State for Education 
and Science aware of how bis 
agent, the NAB, is breaking them? 
If so. how can he justify his failure 
to intervene? If not. will he come 
out of his ivory tower and walk the 
real world in which the rest of us 
live? 

Yours faithfully, 

M. T. HEYDEMAN 
I Governor. Reading College of 
Technology) 

62 Nonhcourt Avenue, 

Reading. 

Berkshire. 

November 4 




ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 14 1851 

The opening of a telegraph under 
the ’Channel joined London to 
other Continental capitals, which 
were already linked oueriand. The 
Times commented: “It is 
wonderful to reflect that while the 
great ships ‘reel to and fro and 
stagger like drunken men’, far, far 
beneath their keels, amid the 
wrecks of former days, the current 
of thought is evenly flowing on 
without disturbance . . . ".Tke 
Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) 
u>as attending the Harbour 
Sessions ceremony in his capacity 
as Lord Warden of the Cinque 
Ports 

» ■ — 

THE SUBMARINE 
TELEGRAPH 

Great interest had been excited 
by the announcement made in tbe 
columns of The Times of the 10th 
inst. that the Submarine Telegraph 
Company would be prepared to 
transmit communications between 
the towns of Dover and Calais on 
Thursday the 13th of November. A 
distance of some three miles from 
the South Foreland Lighthouse, 
where the cable had been tempo- 
rarily placed, had to be laid with 
insulated wire and arrangements 
connected with the necessary con- 
duct of the undertaking completed. 
The complete success of these 
projected arrangements was hap- 
pily insured and made manifest by 
the transmission of d e spatches and 
other intelligence during the course 
of yesterday. At about half past ten 
o'clock in the morning the last 
portion of the wire leading from 
the Foreland was brought close 
under the walls of the Castle at the 
summit of tbe cliff, and thence 
gently dropped into the garden 
attached to the temporary office of 
the company. The wire was then 
led into one of the upper rooms and 
connected with the telegraphic 
instruments. In addition to the 
well known apparatus of Messrs 
Cooke and Wheatstone, the more 
modern Inventions of Messrs Brett 
and Henley had been enlisted for 
the occasion. After some little 
delay, consequent on the rapidity 
with which the arrangements were 
made, the wires were finally con- 
nected, and it became a moment of 
intense anxiety when signals were 
about to be passed. The instrument 
of Messrs Cooke and Wheatstone 
was set in motion, signals were 
interchanged with Calais, and the 
complete success of the undertak- 
ing was completely evinced. But 
very few communications had 
passed when a mounted messenger 
arrived with a despatch from the 
telegraph office of the South 
Eastern Railway Company. It 
proved to be a communication 
containing the prices of the funds 
on the London Exchange, which 
were to be immediately sent by the 
submarine telegraph to Paris. The 
particulars of the message were of 
course kept secret, but it was 
gratifying to observe that it was 
duly forwarded. From this time 
despatches were continually pass- 
ing between the Dover telegraph- 
offices and London and Paris. A 
message from London was sent to 
Paris and an answer received from 
Paris and forwarded to London 
within one hour, and this time, it 
must be remembered, includes the 
distance of a mile traversed twice 
between foe Dover offices, bringing 
the London message to the offices 
of the Submarine Company and 
transmitting the reply to the office 
of the South-Eastern Railway. To 
this must be added the loss of time 
consequent on tbe message having 
to be sent from foe Peris office to 
foe Paris Bourse, and the time 
taken for the reply from tbe Bourse 
to the Paris office. 

It was a singular coincidence 
that the day chosen for the opening 
of foe submarine telegraph was the 
same as that on which his Grace 
the Duke of Wellington attended in 
person to close the Harbour ses- 
sions, and it was resolved by the 
promoters that his Grace on 
leaving Dover by the 2 o’clock train 
for London should be saluted by a 
gun fired by foe transmission of a 
current from Calais. It was ar- 
ranged with Calais that as the 
clock struck 2 a signal was immedi- 
ately to be passed, and punctual to 
the moment, a loud report rever- 
berated on the water, and shook 
foe ground with some force. It was 
then ascertained that a 32-pounder 
loaded with ten pounds of powder 
bad been fired by foe current. The 
report had scarcely ceased ere it 
was taken up from foe heights, the 
military, as usual, saluting the 
departure of foe Duke with a round 
of artillery. 

Guns were then fired successive- 
ly on both coasts, Calais firing foe 
gun at Dover, and Dover returning 
the compliment to Calais. After foe 
transmission of the last business 
communication from Paris, ar- 
rangements were made for foe 
future punctual performance of the 
service, and foe directors and 
promoters, heartily' congratulated 
by all who had the pleasure of being 
present, repaired to the Ship Hotel 
to partake of what may perhaps be 
appropriately termed the inaugura- 
tion dinner. It is hoped that the 
wires will soon be in connexion 
with the office in Dover, when 
communications will be held direct 
between London and Paris. 


Phrase or fable? 

From Dr R. P. Robertson 
Sir, Subsidised by Pitt or not, 
“wooden legs are cheap” lletter, 
November 7). 

It is not 40 years since I visited 
an elderly man who. silling by foe 
fireside, was carving himself a new 
wooden leg from a piece of scrap 
wood he had found on the dump. 

He had been one-legged since 
early childhood when he fell off a 
coal train and, since he used his leg 
to poke ihe fire, a replacement was 

necessary from lime to time. 

1 have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

R. P. ROBERTSON, 

1 6 Park Road, 

RedhiU, Surrey. 

November 7. 


r 


THF TIMBS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


tlR 1 ' 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 


Her Royal Highness was re- beth II — Portraits of Sixty i 
ceived by ihe President, Regent Yeats”, at the National Portrait i 

f C« U-»thi*c lano rhiR 


Street Association (Mr Peter Gallery, St Martin’s Lane, this , 
t .j ttl III J i\ K Tear). evening. 

m M«s Helen Hughes and Wing. The Lady Gtenconner was m 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE Commander Adam Wise were attendance; 

November 13: The Queen, ^ attendance. The Princess November 13: The Duke of 
Patron, the Royal Shakespeare Mis Mark Phillips this Gloucester was present this 

Theatre, this afternoon opened aflenioon opened the new of- evening at the Institution of 
the new Swan Theatre of the 0 f Chilian District Structural Engjncere Maitland 


Theatre, this afternoon opened 
the new Swan Theatre of the 


Royal Shakespeare Company at Council at Amersham. 
Stratford-upon-Avon. Her Royal Highness 

The Queen travelled in the yy Her Majesty 

Royal Train and was received at Lieutenant 

Stratford-upon-Avon Station by Buckinghamshire (Con 
the Vice Lord-Lieu tenant for Hon. John Freman 
Warwickshire (the Viscount ^ the Chairman of tt 
Daveonry). dl (Councillor J Cressw 

The Queen then drove to the Afterwards, The 
Swan Theatre and, having been a,™ Mrs Mark 


Council at Amersham. Lecture at the Barbican Centre. 

Her Royal Highness was re- London, BC2. 
ceived by Her Majesty’s Lord- It Col Sir Simon Bland was m 

Lieutenant for attendance. 

BuctinghamshirejCommaafcr thaTCHED HOUSE LODGE 
toe H l _ on ui°* jn November 13: Princess 

■J*?* Alexandra, Vice-President of 


*SE£K S %r See* thTSttsh RedOosS 
Afterwar*, The Ponces* this afternoon received 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips pai nnoo retirine as 


amp iiraireanu.jM*u,»« u Anne, Mrs want runups p_, ODOO retirmfi as Vice- 
received by the Chairman of the 0 oened and toured a Day Centre 

Governor of the Royal^ Shake- SfaSs J^Hoad for Ihe “SK^feSTnaiuty 
speare Company (Mr Geofirey Handicapped at Seeleys House. c £e?Schie?^Ugbffi 
Cass), unveiled a coramcrao- Beaconsfield. CotoneJ-m-Chiei, laeugmnn 


rative plaque, toured the Royal 


Beaconsfield. 

Mrs Timothy 


Holderaess 


Shakespeare Theatre Woric- Roddam was in attendance. 


shops mid met members of the 
Company, musicians and staff- 
in the evening Her Majesty 


The Princess Anne, Mis Mark 


tamry, subsequently received 
Major General B.M. Lane, 
Colonel of the Regiment, 
Lieutenant-Colonel R.M. 


In the evening Her Majesty Reception at St James’s Palace 
attended a performance of The w mar k the 25th Anniversary of 
Fair Maid of the West givaj by ^ie British Equine Veterinary 


„ : “ ' ■ - _ j_J . LICU15U«UI-VUI«USI ».ra. 

PhiDtpstlusevemagane^a Eacoun upon assuming the 


the Company in the Swan Association. 

Theatre. Her Royal Highness was re- tSiSnS. 

The Hon. Mary Mormon, the President of the 

Right Hon. Sir William Association (Mr J Parker). _ Pmices Aiexac 

Heseltine and Lieutenant-Corn- Lieutenant-Colonel Peter ^ 

mander Ttanmiw Laurence, oibbs was in attendance. 

R.N. were in attendance. __ Charles Aiexanat 

The Duchess of York this KENSINGTON PALACE rednog as ctau 


appointment as Commanding 
Officer of the 6th Battalion and 
Lieutenant-Colonel CG Deedes 
upon assuming Command of 


Princess Alexandra, Patron of 


~ * n ■ v riuiLcaa ru miu wiu i , rowtiu w 

Asooauon (Mr J Parker). CA.R.E. for mentally handi- 

LieuteDan t-Coio nel Peter capped also received Sir 

Gibbs was in attendance. Charies Alexander, BT. upon 


KENSINGTON PALACE 


retiring as chairman of the 



evening switched on the Christ- November 13: T 
mas Lights in Regent Street, Margaret, Countess < 
Wl. opened the Exhibit 

Birthdays today Reception 

Mr Aaron Copland, 86; Mr British Equine 
Quentin Crewe, 60: Mr Eric V ete rina r y Assoeiat 
Crazier, 72; Dame Fiiohatti Princess Anne atten 
Frink, 56; Mgr G. A. Hay, 56; tion held last night a 
Mr Harold Larwood, 82: Sir Palace to mark the 
Joseph Lockwood, 82; Air Mar- anniversary of t 
shal Sir Richard Nelson, 79; Equine Veterinary , 
Lord Ramsey of Canterbury, 82; Mr John Parker, pr 
Sir Brandon Rhys Williams, Mrs Parker received 
MP. 59; Sir Dudley Smith, MP, ■ 

60 Latest wills 

The Prince of Wales celebrates Mrs p u shpan 
his birthday today. Savundra. of Col 

m - ~T " Lanka, formerly of 

The King of Jordan celebrates ^ Berkshire. fef 
his birthday today. Pn frnri and Wale 

£48345 neL 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Miss Angela Bowby will Mr Kazunierz Jc 
be held at St Michael's, Chester of Wentworth Pa 
Square, at noon today. N3, left £267,908 m 

Memorial Service 8SKS5 

„ me Round Table) and l 

Sir Percy Rmx Lora Broxbaunte. 

The Lord Mayor of West-’ K$ b C^ I L& and 


November 13: The Princess Board of Governors and Dr 
Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Michael Dun well upon assum- 
Opened the Exhibition, “Eliza- ing this appointment. 


Reception 

British Equine 

Veteriaary Assodafion 

Princess Anne attended a recep- 
tion held last night at St James's 
Palace to mark the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of tbe British 
Equine Veterinary Association. 
Mr John Parker, president, and 
Mrs Parker received the guests. 

Service Dinners 

Gnrkha Brigade Association 

The annual dinner oF the Gur- 
kha Brigade Association was 
held at the Cavalry and Guards 
dub last nigbt Major-General J. 
A. R. Robertson presided, as- 
sisted by Major-General R. W. 

L McAlister, chairman of the 

Latest wills 

Mrs Pusbpam Cecilia 
Sanmdra, of Colombo. Sri 
Lanka, formerly of Old Wind- 
sor, Berkshire, fell estate in 
England and Wales valued at 
£48345 neL 

Mr Kazimierz Josef Szmhft. 
of Wentworth Park, London 
N3, left £267,908 net 

4th (V) Bn, The Royal 

Green Jackets 

The annual dinner of the 4th (V) 
Bo, The Royal Green Jackets 
was held on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 13, at Haberdashers' HalL 
Lord Holderaess, Honorary 
Colonel of the Battalion, pre- 
sided and Viscount Whitetaw, 
CH, was tbe principal guest 


Fran Maries Banner! showing two of 329 bottles of wise 
found recently In an underground vault in Ubeck, West 
Germany, beneath the ste ra braidings destroyed by Allied 
bombing la the Second World War. The wine, wfazte 
Bordeaux of 1921 and 1922, is to be auctioned at an expected, 
starting price of DM400 (about £133) a bottle. 


Airey Neave 
Memorial Trust 

• Airey Neave Memorial Trust 
Awards for 1986 have been 
made to . Dr Jadwi ga 
Pstmsinska, a senior lecturer at 
the JegieBoaiaa University, 
Krakow, at present engaged in 
postdoctoral reseandi .at Queen 
House, Oxford, who 
receives £9,000 to do research 
on foe efonofinguratica of 
1 Afghanistan, work which will 
help wifo refugee problems; and 
to Mr Michael Fanning, a. 

! postgraduate research student 
I now living in Frankfiut, who 
receives £9,500 to write on the 
subject of terrorism and bow 
European criminal tew can. be 
i improved to combat iu,- 

| Halley Memorial 

A memorial plaque to Edmond 

Halfey, designed and sculpted 
by Mr Richard Kindadey, was 
unvefled by Professor 5Ir Gra- 
ham Smith, Astronomer Royal, 
ax a service held yesterday in 
West min ster Abbey. The me- 
morial was ded i c at ed -by the. 
Dean of Westminster 'and Lord. 
Blake, Provost of The Queen’s 
College, Oxford, and Mr 
FapToim Andrews, a founder 
member of the Halley's Comet 
Society, read the lessons. Profes- 
sor Sir George Poster, President 
of the Royal Society, read from 
the f W I paragraphs of Halley’s 
address to foe Royal Society in 
1705 predicting Oat the comet 
he aw in 1682 would return in 
1758. Sir Andrew Huxley, OM, 
Master of Trinity College, Cam- 
bridge, save an address. Mr D. 
C Link, Mr R. M. Jenkins and 
Mr Mm S im pso n laid a floral 
model of the “Giotto" space- 
craft at the base of the plaque. 
TbeEad ofRosse, Patron of the 
Haney's Comet Society, and 
Mrs Brian Haxpur laid a floral 
reproduction of the figures 


OBITUARY 

PROF R. B. FISHER 

Valuable scientific work 
in war and peace 


Professor R. B. (Dawd) 
Fisher, CBE, a 
dan and one of the last of me 
physiological chemists, mod 
on November H. He was 79. 

Reginald Brettauer Fisher 
was bom » Sheffield on 
February l3,l90THe vras 
educated at King Edward Vu 
<WkvJ Sheffield and at St 


rive load he did. research in 
intestinal absorption; also m 
cardiac and protem roetabo- 
lism. He worked on wtaJc 
living organisms rather than 
hatches of cells, developing a 
technique of using isolated 
loops of 8°* which he kept to 
good living condition to.see 
how it absorbed sugars and 


Schoot^Sbeffidd SsZSBZ Ib&fl-fr 

^^ ofsBsBsbsr,te 


Ul 1 - ■ 

ty demonstrator in bUKaeimfr 
try at Oxford, holding the post 
until 1959. In 1939 he won a 

RockefellerTravellmg Falow* 


W During the early part of the 

war he collaborated with Sony 


fau n of the faculty of medi- 
cine, the first non-mcdtcal 
man to hold. the. post His 

extra-mural activi ties were 
largely connected with gov-, 
eminent departments, partiCr 
ularty the Ministry of 

Defence. , , , .. 

jfc also served on the b 9 dies 


SSBESS 5 S jgSEffi 

•ssr&zsstt ffiSSSSSi-' 

fiasj&sasjsffi asssa-rsM 

Wfifc Princes 

Risborough, a secret base to Oxford where, for the the 
where aerial photographs of nest three yeaitj nuth a gram 
r _ rw,,. th p- medical research 


T Jincheon aldioe Wright The Mhuster of repronic*™ 

l^UHt.UCUU State for Health, the President 1986 , foe sooetyV symboL 

HM Government of the Royal College of General 

Mr Tun Renton, Munster of ftactMoijs and foe President 
State fear Foreign and Common- _ j- ^ Faculty of Community 
wealth Aflairs, was host yes- Medfranc were among those 
terday at a luncheon held at msem. 

Lancaster House in bonom. of imitate of Measmemest 
the new Ghanaian High Control 
Commissioner, Dr J.L.S. P H . Hammond, President 
Abbey. of foe Institute of Measurement 

ninnorc and Control, was host at a 

iJul,iers dinner held last night at the 

Army Beard Naval and Military Club. Mr 

The Speaker attended an Army Oscar Roith, CfaiefEhgineerand 
Board dinner held yesterday at scientist at the Department of 


Terence 


rtCnlQhl President of ttw / 

Honorable Society of «he 

the Round Table) and i«ly . 

Lord Broxbournc. . QC, and Lady 


and Lady Fraser ot 


institute of international Comparative 
Lawi Lady Caroline Faber, die Hon 
SaBy Plummer, sir VaKnOne Abrty. 
Sir Ctoartes and Lady RussHL gr 
Owen aww. Fldd Marshal Sir 
Roland CttOs (chairman of iraua. 


uuuaicr Sir fi*nrfr,u RlnDon 

MalliDSon attended a service of (representing. mb£, ' tm 
thanksgivTOg for the life and jg Sg Lffi 
work of Sir Percy Rugg bdd 

yesterday at St Margaret’s, — 

Westminster. Canon Trevor g£Sd cSTtciSSian'^ 
Beeson officiated, assisted by 

the Rev Gordon Watkins and non*d Bnomaa. 

Mgr Anthony Stark. Mrs Geofc 
finey Duckworth, daughter, and sir Sauries 

Lord Denning read the lessons 

and Baroness Truxnpington putme^pen oraisir Kmnetb 
gave an address. Mr Edward o^t«^^w < t£d > LaES 0 sa 
Heath. MP. was represented by 1 ^iSo^SSrS w * d,na! 
Sir Brian Warren and the Lord w coon wotruew 
Lieutenant for Greater London m 

by Mr Gordon Ratman. Among 

others present were: . tm ten (bow pmosw- 

Lady lingo iwMdwl. Mr and Mrs a Weston UKridaU. OU 


DBHon HaUbiBU. 
(secretary^ 

McOowen (Hocutg maHtunonai Sur- 
vtoui and Mrs 
WUson (RAD 
(heMnUstross 

with Mr Brian Wailao. (dutmon 


the Royal Hosmtal, ChrOsea. Mr Trade ^ industty. was foe 
John Stanley, Minister of State pr in c ip al guest and earlier delh*- 
for the Armed Forces, presided, eredfoe 1986 Thomson Lecture. 

HoaeoraHe Company of 
Freemen of the CSty 

an* {JGSVIWSSW 

commemorate Lord Mayra's 


Str _ 

MHwrw Mr A G Mamie. Mr K C wmuiwuviaiv wiw « 

>m. w day. Hie Master, Mr Rex W3- 
cnS k oils. raondnBartohK. Mr Iuhik, presided and the prin- 


Ueutenoni-Generm Sir 
Huxuiue. Oencral Mr » 


emu. Sir q 

Maitrtiwood. 
Humphrey A 
Robert Fiord .1 


l Sir Hcbard Vin- 
ineum: Viscount 


trt Andrew, sir 
Allstair MM 



k. -- I 


jotinOrtsL Dr David: 
Keeffm Mr Amur 

Plumbers’ Company 


Lwty Rum iwtdowL Mr and Mrs 
Simon Rum (son and dauBMmjto- 
law. Brloatuw Geoffrey Duc»w«Oi 
i son- In -law). Miss Belinda Ruga. Mr 
Edward Runs. Mbs Yolanda Rugs. 
Miss CSawte Rung. Mr Jeremy 
Duckworth and Miss Juliet 
Duckworth (grandchildren'- Mrs John 
Bourne ntsterk Mr and Mrs Chris- 
topher Bourne. Mis M Bourne Mr and 

Mis Roger KeepW. 

viscount Simon, _ Lord CrataUm. 
Lord and Lady Pteonwr .of St 
Maryteuone. Lord MarabaU of Leeds 


Ronald Brockman. Lady (Chutes) 
Norton. Lady Armltage- ©t Colin 
Cole. Sir James Ctemtason. Gawfal 
Sir Charles and Lady Hartngton. gr 
Ralph and Lwbr Southward. SU 
Danond Heap. Sir James and Lady 
Dunned. General Str Kenneth Darting. 
Lady Ptrie. Ummufit-Cokml Stuart 
cawn-BonMii and Lady SanMB. 

Mr T G Benyan (headmaster. The 
Leys School. Cambridge) with Profes- 
sor Cotta Renfrew (Chairman of 
governors). Mr Michael Marchont 
Uxtnnr). Mr Gearga Rode. Mr Dsyta L_ 
Gardner. Joe Boyle (senior nda| 
S-'flEy Gamer (deouty senior sre 8 >. 

Tom Bent (Rugg Prizewinner). Mr J P 
□ Weston (sreMaU. Old Leyslan 
Union) and Mr and Mrs N 
WbMsrun: the Mayor of San dw ich. 
Mrs J Du Boiday fiouwtdi NSPCC 
and Sandwich Yount GlubL sir E W 
Swanton (St demenfs. Sandwich). 
Lieutenant Commander H J Lavers 
and Mrs Lavers (Sandwich Society). 
Mr Michael CndgGooper (president. 


with Mrs J Craig and Mr Desmond 
Harney (total chairmen). Malor-Gen- 
rral Mtctawt Walsh (Chief Scout). Mr 
Denis C Sealy -Jones (Butcratgu. Mr 


ivsfiaf Sir wick Offe preataoiL .Samuel : 

of trustees, and Company). Mr R Cardhjer-HUl | 
(StrutUmS) and Mrs GanUner-USB. Mr 

R Wheatley (Hayes Dash wood | 

y (Ovaries) Foundation). Mr A H &urf 0 ol 
Sir Colin c representing special trustees. 

General Hospital). Mr D W BrotnOeld 

sir conservative AsaoctaXtanL Mr Rtctiard 
Van Oss (representing the chattman | 
s and Lady and trustees. Game Conservancy). Mr 
ieth Darting. A Barred (WeornWnster Chamber of 
lone) snarl Commerce). Mr M Lufflosv (AMoaue 
Trusiees Methodist Church). Mr D M 
master. The Sunmncaie (Head Master. West- 
wtth Profes- minster School). Mr E W _ Hunter 
of Chrlstte and Mr M A F LyrtUoo - , 
l Marcham Stanford. QC (representing me Cham - 1 
bers at DOM smare. Lincoln's inn), 
Mr T A Mutr 

Warren and Scrtmoeour viouers mb , 
nar). MrJP Management); Mr fflcnart Blake 
Nd LeyMan (Baker ftoofee). Mr P van Vliet (KLML 
a Mrs N Prince Yurt GaUntna. Mr Harold H 
r sandwteh. Sebag-ManteOore. Mr wutam F Da- i 
NSPCC vts. Mrs P Barnett. Miss Muriel 
bit. Mr E W Bowen. Ihe Master Of the Barter's 
Sandwteh). Company. Mrs Trevor Beeson. Ooun- 1 
H j Lavers rtOor Mrs Frank Taylor. Mr Petw 
ch Society). Ewan. Mr Michael Wheeler. QC. Mr 1 
r (president. Harold Mote. Mr John Harvey. 
Association) Captain Lewis Dtxon-Browa. BM. Mr . 


Turd Emails 

Lord Ennfds entertained Mem- 

niT., ■ . . ' - beta of the Houses of Par- 

S£ J olm cipal piest was Mr Robert fiameot, members of the 
Plunhera’ Cofiawof Kauffman, President of the National Federation of Kidney 

The (tinner of the Carpenters’ Company, Patients’ Associations and 

Plumbers' Company was held accompanied by Mrs Kaumnan. members of the medical pro- 
last nicht at Ironmonasrs’ Hall Those present mduded past fession at a reception yesterday 
Mr Cyril Gntysmark was in the ^ evenfogfo theHouse of Lards, 

chaff and tbember speakers Mr William tV fiflg, MrAnthraw MmEdwina Currie, Par- 
wen: Mr Geoflfrey Marsh, Mas- Kenro ^ ^ffy Hall, Mr lkunentary Ua&pSecndaiy of 
ter Mr George Nash and Mr Stephen May, Mr Godfrey Ja- state at foe Department of 
Huab Smith who, on behalf of cobs and the Honorary Clerk, Health and Social Security, was 
the company, presented the Mr Roger Aflons. the guest of honour. 


bombing wests analysed. Dar- 
ing 1945 ' he worked as a 
consultant to the US War 
Department. In this role he 
-visited Japan to study- the 
aftermath of the atomic 
bombing of Hiroshima and 
Nagasaki 

After the. war he became 
chief research statistician and 
later director of a speciafced 
operational research unit at 
Porton trader the Air Minis- 
try . He returned to Oxfoid as a 
lecturer at Wadham College. 
In 1959 be was appointed 
professor of chemistry In rela- 
tion to medicine (later bio- 
chemistry) at Edinburgh 
University. There he re- 
mained until his retirement in 
1976. 

JFisher devoted much of ms 
time to teaching and, under 
his leadership, . the honours 
school of biodienixstiy in- 
creased in size; Advanced 
students thrived onhiscritical 
approach to scientific argu- 


from the medical research 
council, he continued his gut 
research ax the university’s 
physiology laboratory. 

He was the author of a lame 
number of original scientific 
papers. He was editor of the 
"Journal of Physiology from 
1949 to 1955 and fro* many 
years on the council of the 
Quarterly Journal of Expert- 


The year after his arrival at 
Edinburgh, he was elected 
fellow of the Royal Edinburgh 
Society. He never was ejected 
fellow of the Royal Society, an 
honour which many felt was 
his due. 

Fisher was an outstanding 
tutor whose clarity of mind 
stimulated his coueagues. He 
could turn his hand to every 
fundamental laboratory skill, 
from building his own appara- 
tus to gfo« blowing. He 
walked on his toes and was 
small only in stature. 

He married, in 1929, Mary 


OinjlUOM* w OVW M MM W ~ — * . — , • _ » * 

menu and to these younger Sateeby. She survives him 
men be devoted- endless time with their three daughters 


reception 
he House 


and energy. 

Despite a heavy administer 


(their only son predeceased 
him). 


MRS GERTI KVERGIC 


foe oompMiy, presented foe Mr Roger Alkms. 

Silver Ladle to Mr Mft Caroe, Paintmakers 1 Association . 
immediate past master. of Great BriCaia 

British Geriatrics Society Tbe seventy-fifth atmrveraaxy of 

Professor J. G Brockldrorst, foe establishment of foe first 
President of the British Geri- uatictnal trade 'association for 
atrics Society, presided at the - the paint industry was ede- 


anmial -dinner held ax the brated last 
London Press Oeaue yesterday dance at 


1 at a dinner and 
; Hotel Imer- 


Mlcttolas Scon MP. Mr Roger Harris. 
Mr and Mrs Geoffrey Gay. Mr 5 
Lewis LoiMdon. Mrs C A Preodergast 
and Mr wnilam Httn em a nn. 


“Doctors spent fourteen 
years developing this diet. 


It changed my 



Tbe Cambridge Diet 
is a unique very low 
calorie diet which con- 
tains all foe vitamins, 
nutrients and trace dements you 
for a dieting period in just 330 Cal- 
ories a day. 

It is one of foe most nutritionally 
dense foods known to man and Is foe 
only very low calorie diet to have been 



and presented the bi-annual continental' in London. Mr 
Dhote-Eddlestone memorial Quin tin Knight, of ICI I^ints 
prize to Professor Norman Division, and president of foe 
Extoo-Snrith and foe 1986 Eliza- association, proposed foe health 
beth Brown prize to Dr Ger- of foe industry and of^ the guests, 
_ _ and the director, Mr Michael 

Levete, spoke on the 

association’s history. 

Angle Jotdaaian Society 
I Tbe Anglo Jordanian Society 

<r held its annual dinner at the 

— Savoy Hofei last night The 

— ■ • - A Jordanian Ambassador and Sir 

Frederic Bennett, MP, presi- 
dents, Lady Bennett and Mr 
Michael Snow, chairman, re- 
ceived foe guests. General Amer 
Khamnam, Major-General F. 
Fursdon, Sir John Moberiey and 
tbe Right Rev Lord Coggan 
were tbe speakers. 


Coipoeatfea of the 
Sottsof foeOagy 
Tbe 308fo annual general crant 
of Govonors of the Corporation 
of foe Sons of the Clergy took 
place at Lambeth Palace yes- 
terday. Mr MJLJ. Marshall, 
senior treasurer, was in the 
chair. The following were 
elected treasurers fig. the year 



A service of foanksgiviijg fra the 
life of Sir Reg Goodwin will be 
bdd at All Hallows by foe 
Tower, Bywsni Street, EC3, at 
noon today. 


Forthcoming marriages 


to. There's no need for foe usual calorie 
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tions of food. Thais already- dene for 
you. AO you have to do each meal time 
Is mix up your chosen meal. 


ALL YOUR FAVOURITE FLAVOURS 
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There are curecntly eleven ddidous 
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Plenty of variety there, for only 57p a 


Read what other users have to say: 

*1 lost 16 lbs in 4 weeks ami I'm 
bow back to foe me a s uremen ts I had 
when 1 was married - and that’s over 
20 yeans ago." 

MW. R BRUCKWELL VDiDKML 

“1 started to lose weight literally 
in die Gist few days and within 5 
weeks rd lost 1st 10 lbs without any 
difficulty" 

MRS. J. FREEMAN. MWTHANT 5 

“I now enjoy buying clothes. 
Dressing up to go out is a pleasure 
and no longer a chore. It’s given me a 
totally new outlook on lire." 

MBS C. W WTON. CHELMSFORD 

"At last I cam make up for foe 
years when my weight was an 
embarasscoent to me,” 

MISS I- tOOFEIL NORmsNTS 


granted patents worldwide. 

DEVELOPED BY DOCTORS ~ 
AND CLINICALLY TESTED- 

The Cambridge Diet was developed 
and tested by doctors at the Wwa 
Middieses Hospital and at Adder ■ 
brooke’s. Cambridge over a period of 
fourteen wars - a longer test than any 
other diet in history. 

The man who pioneered it is Dr. Alan 
Howard MA, PhD. nutritional research 
lecturer at Cambridge University 
Department of Medidnc and Chairman 
of foe Food Education Society. 

EASY To STOCK TO. 

SIMPLE TO PREPARE. 

When you start foe Cambridge Diet, 
you won’t believe how easy it is to stick 



the Cambridge Diet 

TO, CAMBRIDGE NtrTRJTICW LIMITED. DEPT. DM3E . FREfPtYrT. THORPE ROAD. XOKWTCH. NR l IBR. 

Pkasc send me. bj’ mum. fiinher mformatkw about the Cambridge Diet 4 w* Mamp n-quired) 

I NAME MK MRS MIS*. 


prised just hw quickly vou can reach 
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THE CAMBRIDGE DIET HAS BAD 
THE LONGEST CLINICAL TRIALS OF 
ANY DIET IN HISTORY. AT THE 
3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 
ON OBESTTY IN DALY IN 1980, 

22 DOCTORS AND MEDICAL 
RESEARCHERS PROM NINE 
COUNTRIES PRESENTED NINE 
SCIENTIFIC PAPERS ON CLINICAL 
TESTS OF THE CAMBRIDGE DIET. 
ALL INDICATED IT TO BE SAFE 
AND EFFECTIVE. 


ADOKfSS 


HWCQDt ( >«iur Lifnrci pnioklr will help until pmiil th’Lm) TEINKAF 


Cjrobridp: Nmrntoo » a onn prortj nufcinc nmniMCWR. AH ptaft* *wf ftijattic* pj«j die Whelp fond (mMnttliaU rCMSOfo. 


Dr HJ>. Beauchamp 
and Mbs EJVL OXjou^r 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Hairy, son of Dr and 
Mrs Gerald Beauchamp, of 
CamphiU Grange, Nuneaton, 
and Elizabeth, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Brendan O’Connor, of 
113 St Helen's Road, 
Booterstown, Dublin. 

Mr SLA- Bird 
and Miss CM Savage 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Simon Armhage, son of 
Captain and Mrs LA. Bird, of 
Trent, Sheibome, Dorset, and 
Calhiyn Mary, second daughter 
of tbe late Mr J.V. Savage and 
Mrs K.B. Savage, of Qford, 
Essex. 

Mr M.T. BncknaU 

and Megtdfrouw C. van dtr 

Pluym 

The engagement is announced 
between Marcus, elder son of 
Mr and Mr Tim BucknaU, of 
Knaytoo. Thirsk, North York- 
shire. and Ouotine, daughter of 
M e neer and Mevrouw Jan L. 
van der Pluym, of Zeist, 
Holland. 

Mr MiG. Cooke 
and Miss J. Gineoefeurai 
The engagement is announced 
between Geotge, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs Michael A- Cooke, 
of Shriveuham, Wiltshire, and 
Joslyn, eldest daughter of Mr 
Thomas Gruenebanm, of New 
York, and Mrs Iris 
Gruenebanm, of London and 
New York. 

Mr M^k. Frizzell ' 
and Miss £ Hoboes 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, son of Mr Brian 
Burrows, of London, and Mrs 
Cherry Frizzell, of DuddlesweH, 
Sussex, and Kale, only daughter 
of foe late Dr William Holmes 
and Mrs Alison Hoboes, of 
OxfonL 
MrAJVf. Grice 
and Miss CA. Quick 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Tony Grice, of 
London, and Carafe Quick, of 
Ctevedon. Avon. 

Mr JJXA- Griere 
And Miss SLA. Janiim 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between James Duncan Allcyne, 
youngest son of Colonel and 
Mrs Gordon Grieve, of 
Murrayfield, Lockerbie, 
Dumfriesshire, and Simone 
Anne, eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mr Peter Jaithm, of Fondes 
Amandes, Pent of Spain, 
Trinidad. 


MrNA. Lines 
and Miss BJ. Abbey 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs D.W. Lines, of 
Denham, Buckinghamshire, 
and Bryony, younger daughter 
of Mr ana Mr £ Abbey, of 
Stoke Pages, Buckinghamshire. 

Mr JX Nicholson 
and Mbs JA Wallace i 

Tbe e n gage m ent is announced ! 
between James, son of Mr 
George Nicholson, of New i 
York, United States, and ofMrs ' 
Susan Bradshaw, of Cannes, 
France, and Jane, elder daughter i 
ofMrand Mrs John Wallace, of 
Tonbridge Wells, Kent. 

Mr EX. Norris and Mbs L. 
Fodfees 

The en gag e men t is announced 
between Edward Charles, son of 
Mr and Mrs EA. Norris, of 
Burgess HOI, West Sussex, and 
Louise; daughter of Mr and Mr 
O.D. Foulkes, of Warrington, 
Cheshire. 

Mr SLWLF. Norton 
and Miss CN-A.T*ytor 
The engagemeut is amumneed 
between Richard, elder son of , 
Mr and Mrs Richard Norfon, of 
Burnham Wood, Welwyn, 
Hertfordshire, and Caroline, dr , 
der daughter of Colonel Charles 

Taylor MCofTheOld Rcdory, i 
Lea, Herefordshire, and Mrs 
Elizabeth Taylor, of Talbot 
Firm. East Burton, Dorset. 
MrEF.Smtn 
and Mbs W J. MHler 
The engagement & announced 
between Michael Fabian, youn- 
gest sou of Mr and Mis t 
Sm to. of Liverpool, and 
Wendy Joseete. daughter ofMrs 
V. . Miller and the late Mr H. 
Miller, of Ilford, &sex. 
MrTJXV.TywhB 
and Miss KJVL White 
The engtotement is announced 
between Tim,- son of Mr and 
Mrs V.C Tyndall, of Rainhifi, 
Merseyside, .and. Kathryn, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs NjHL 
White, of Beverley, North 
Humberside. . 

Mr R.T. Watehaa 
and MSss A-G. tlmmmsy 
Tbe engagement i s announced 
between Robert Thomas, only 
son of Mr Jack Waisbam, of 
Pattietons Farm, Westfield, East 
Sussex, and the late Mrs Patricra 
Bell, of Mumbles, Swansea, and 
Anne Grierson, only da ug h te r of 
Major and Mrs Charles 
Rummey, of Healey-on- 
Thamgs. Oxfordshire- 


Mrs Gerti Kveagic, a lead- 
ing specialist bookseller of the 
immediate post-war period in 
Britain, Iras died at the age of 
7& • - 

She established .-the 
Economist Bookshop : near 
the London School of Eco- 
nomics which, under her. fead- 
et^op, became the dominant 

social science bookshop in the 

country. 

Gerti KVetgic was bom in 
Vienna ■ on No vember 30, 
1907, and $rew up in an 
affluent and intellectual Jew? 
ishcirci& 

On ieavii^ school die 
worked for a year al Heller's 
Bookshop', then in 1925, with 
backing from her uncle, she 
established '* lending library 
specializing in Freodi and 
English literature. The enter- 
prise mduded the Finetid &m- 
riy among its customers. She 
ioitied the Society of Friends 
m 1937. 

The Anschluss placed ^ber in 
immediate danger. Her htur 
band, who was not Jewish, hid 
her until he was able to obtain 
visas for them to Leave Aus- 
tria. They arrived in Britain in 
1938 and settled in Cambridge 


where, dining the war, she 
worked at Bowes and Bowes 
Bookshop. 

In 1947 die began the work 
for which she wifi be retneio- 
bercd- lfwas decided to open a 
bookshop owned jointly by 
foe LSEand The Economist to 
serve foe students of foe one 
and the readers of foe other. 
Gerti Kveigic was chosen as 
the first manager, and she ran 
it until she retired. 

She built for it a world-wide 
reputation, trading as much 
by mail as over the counter. 
The first premises in Clements 
Inn Passage soon became 
inadequate and in 1961. she 
supervised foe move to a 
larger shop in Clare Market 

She had an international 
orientation rare among British 
booksellers at the tune; a 
fierce precision and grasp of 
detail; a wide knowledge of the 
subjects and contents of the 
books she was selling; and an. 
absolute refusal to accept sec- 
ond-best But her toughness, 
while quite genuine, was com- 
bined with charm, and 
masked warmth and humour 
towards those she liked and 
respected. 


LADY IRVING 


Lady Irving, MBE, who 
died, on November 8, at foe 
age of 92, was able, as the 
daughter of a diplomat at 
Valparaiso in 1914, to make a 
contribution to Admiral 
Sturdee’s victory over von 
Spee’s squadron at the Battle 
offoe Fafidands. 

. Born bene Hazel Maclean 
on June 27, 1894, she was 
brought op in Casablanca 
where her rather was consul, 
before going to Sherborne 
Girls 1 ScbooL 

When her father became 
consul in Danzig she went 
with him to Germany, where 
she studied music and ac- 
quired a . knowledge of Ger- 
man that was useful to her 
later. 

In 1913 her : father was 
appointed consul-general at 
Valparaiso, and she accompa- 
nied him there. When Admi- 
ral von Spee’s commerce- 
raiding squadron, was causing 
some havoc in the south 
Atlantic in foe eariy months of 

AIR VICE- 
MARSHAL 
BRIAN YARDE 

P. G. writes: ~ - 

Your obituary of Brian 
Yarde (November 4) records 
foe ■ important role that be 
played as stetson commander 
of- RAF Gatow during the 
Soviet blockade of West Ber- 
lin, which was* -effectively 
countered by foe Allied Air 
Lift. 

But it deserves to be men- 
tioned foal it was Brian Yaffle 
who first sawfoeposabilityof 
supplying the beleagurecLrity 
by air from foe West. At foe 
top levd the Americans and, I 
believe, the British, were 
doubtful ,and hesitant, but 
Yaffle's enthusiasm and deter- 
mination prevaited- 

The outcome is history. . 


'x . 

*. .. . 




foe Erst World War, she 
helped decipher signals pass- 
ing between the Gentian 
ships- 

. The information gleaned 
from these interceptions was 
then relayed to Stnfflee’s 
squadron and helped him to 
bring foe Germans to baffle on 
December 8, 1914, when a 
complete victory obliterated 
the fast instrument ofGerman 
naval power from the outer 
seas. She was appointed MBE 
in 1919. 

. In 1920 foe married Stanley 
Irving, who had become act- 
ing consul-general after her 
father s sudden death in 1918. 
She was noted for her wit and 
youthful charm as his hostess 
in postings which took him to 
Lisbon, Rio de Janiero, Bue- 
nos Aires and, finally, Panama 
and Costa Rica. - 
Her husband, who was 
knighted in 1947, died is 
1970. She is survived by a 
daughter, foe author Marie 
LowseBruce. 

DR SIEFAN 
GALESKI 

. DrStefen Galeski, a doctor 
in London for over 40 years, 
who translated the poetry of 
the Pope from Polish into 
Hebrew, died on November 5. 
Hfrwas77. 

: Bom at Lodz, Poland, on 
August 10, J909, he studied 
medic* h** in Lausanne, before 

' ALtfie outbreak of .-the war 
he was posted to the Frendi 
Hospital in London, which w 
ran virtually smgle>handed 
throughout foe war. For his 
services to medicine, he was. 
honoured by Poland* Bripo® 
and France. • ' 

Qaleski was a gifted fingoist 
who, published articles on 
French and Polish fiferam*®- 
He leaves a widow, ‘Anna* 
and two daughters. . . 


% on 


rr.. ‘ w 

•> V.- •: • 

I 1 ,., ■"•I. , 

K '•mi 

. V'- 

H P ? ”1 -• 

. , 

*i* ■ 


Tv. ' 1 * ' T . 


S^- 

■ :j K 


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births, marriages, 
deaths 

and in memoriam 


tnunniMr S3 kwiS? w1Ul “ 
PHlm as e 


i 


BIRTHS 


■ Op 12th November, at 
Queen Mary's al Boehamwon. to 
Lena and David, a sou. Andrew a 
brother tor Malcolm. Douglas 
Anna. 

■ On 6Qi November, to Mar- 
ian tnfe Ginns) and Julian, a son. 
pwbp Gregory Hicham. 

WJJWABD - On November 12 th. at 
The Homerlon Hospital E9. lo Diana 
inie Atteridge) and Ryan. a son. a 
brother for Alexander. 

CLARK - On November lsi. at North 
Tees HosottaL to Caroline (nAe Field. 
Ingland Robin, a son. Phillip James, 
a brothe r (Or Adam. 

COOMBS - on November 8th. at 
ShrodeUa HosnUaL Watford. to 
Sarah and MaJcdm. a son. 

FRKDA - On November 12 th 1986. lo 
Sophie (n6e PonsfonD am PaoL a 
daughter. Oiloe. 

CARE - On November loth, lo Rose- 
mary Cn«e Anderson) and Stephen a 
dau ghter Camilla Alim Matilda. 

8LAUERT - On 27th October, to Jessi- 
ca and John, a daughter. Emily 
Carolin e, a sister In Anna and Sarah. 

M«w« - On November 6m 1986 
lo Julie (nte Sffiett) and Chains, a 
daughter. Emtito Charlotte, a 
tor Matthew. 

HOGARTH . on November 5th 1986. 
lo Lydia and DavkL a son Isaac Lou- 
is. a brother for SaraueL 

KIBBLE ■ On October 21 st 1986. lo 
Nicola (nfe Spence) and JuUan. a 
daughter. Sophie Louise. 

JAY ■ On October 22nd at Lincoln 
County HospttaL to Susan (nfe 
BarUe) and Andrew, a daughter. 
Josephin* Eleanor, a slider far 
Katherine and Elizabeth. 

LA1NG - On November 12th 1986 lo 
Penny (nte Heate) and Nick, a son. 
Alexander. 

LflMG - On 9th November 1986. at 
Fomboraugh Hospital. Kent, to Ka- 
ren ui«r Coleman) and Chrtstoftter. a 
so n. Al exander Edmund. 

MPB BtSOM - On November £Ui 1986. 
10 Jemima and Rob. a son. Fergus 
Alexander, a brother for Duncan. 

NEWSOH - On November 9th. at 
Queen Charlotte's Hospital. to Jean 
1 nee Stewart) and Kevin, a son. Roy 
Christopher, a brother for Clare. 

OGDEN - On 13th November 1986. to 
Rachel and Edward, a daughter. 
Helen Mary, a sister for Thomas. 

PATON - Qn 10th November, to 
Yvonne and John, a son Christopher 
C3tea . a brother for Alexander. 

PEEK - On November 12 th. to Etgn 
and Geoffrey, a daughter. Helena 
Jane. Chemlntle Beaumont 18. 1400 
Yver don. Switzerland. 

PRESCOTT - On October 31st 1986 at 
Friraley Part HospttaL Cambertey, 
Surrey, to Lyn wee Ethertngtoni and 
Tony, a son James Robert, a grand- 
son Tor Pat and Jim Prescott. 

RAU ■ On llth November at Hammer- 
smith Hospital, to Jeannie (nee 
CattraO) and Nicholas, a son. Clovis 
James 

RAYMENT . On November 10th. al 
Newham General Hospital, to 
Wccolette into Hodspktn). and Ste- 
phen. a son Stewart Stephen, 

SMITH - On November sth. to Janet 
into Galbraith) and Lawrence, a son. 
Conor Haw Galbraith 


DEATHS 


BURNE - On Wednesday November 
12U> 1986. very bravely after a long 
Alness. Elizabeth GUison. widow or 
Peter of Kotlan. Devon. Funeral Ser- 
vice al St Clemen is. Powderiiam m 
3.00 p m. on Friday November 2lsL 
Flower* to Powderfiatn Castle, near 
Exeter, or kind donations lo The 
Roweroit Hospice. Avenue Road. 
Torquay. 

DAVID - On Kovembs- llth 1986. Ste- 
phen Trevor of 293 Cromwell 
Towers. London EC2Y HDD. Hus- 
band of Ruth, father of Canflla. 
Stephen. Andrew and Hugh. Reqnl- 
em Mass at St EtheUredas. Ely Place 
ECl on Monday November 17th at 
11 a m., followed by cremation at 
Gowers Green Cremaurtaim at 
1215 mu. No flowers Please, but 
donations If desired, to British Heart 
Foundation. 1C2 Gloucester Place 
Wl AD enquiries to J H Kenyan 
Ltd.. 9 Pond Street. London NW3. 
Tel 01 794 3535 

ELLEXBOQEM - On November l3Ui. 
Eileen, cherished end loving wife of 
Gentian, mother of Kate (Mrs Petw 
Whiteman), sister of Lionel and 
Dicky Alexander. Cremation. 
Goider9Green.Suudayii30.Dona- 
Uons. If desired, to any cancer fund. 

FISHER - On November 1 1th peaceful- 
ly in hospUai fit Oxford, after a short 
Uhtess. R-8. (DavkU Fisher. C.B.E.. 
aged 79. Professor Emeritus. Edin- 
burgh Untvenuy. beloved and laving 
husband, father, grandfather ana 
great grandfather. Private ownaHon 

GRAHAM - On November 8th. as the 
result or a road accident. Andrew 
Timothy i run) aged 26. deariy loved 
son of Rosemary and CoUn and be- 
loved brother of Bridget and Bryony. 
Enquiries to John Steel and Son. 
Chest House. Winchester 10962 
63195) through whom donations 
may be made If wtahed to Action AU 
for a special vtUage project to Africa 

CRHHTHS ■ on November 12. peace- 
fully alter a tong Alness, surrounded 
by his loving family. Frederick W0- 
llam m his 6901 year, dearly loved 
husband of Joyce, greatly missed fa- 
ther of Barbara. Simon. John and 
Richard and to Helds and Michael. 
Funeral Service Tuesday November 
!8U» at 230 pan. al St Mark's 
Church. Talbot Village. Bourne- 
mouth. Flowers may be sent to 
Deric-ScoU- Portman Lodge Funeral 
Home. 755 Oirte tehurch Road. 
Bournemouth 0202 34511. 


GRflNEWALD - On 12 th November 
W86. afire a short Illness bravely 

seivto a Breaksoear Crematorium, 
m^ttBLOo Tu^ay November 18th 
2*1*5; rantin' now. 

SSL*!!* « desired. 10 

TheFrtrodsofMM^SobeH House. 
MptmtVwnon HospttaL Nonhwooti 


— - On 1 3th November 
1986. Rupert WUUam enr gs Kmg 
Edward VD HospttaL MUtnusL Be. 
tovro husband and dear mend of 
C^ndDe. father of Michael. Penny 
and Jane, grandfather of WUUam. 
Kay. Alexander. Ntchotas and Rob- 
ert. Strictly no flowers: no 
mownlng. Donations if desired to: 
National Canine Defence League. 10 
Sewnour Street Wl. Funeral 2 pjn. 
"•^November, at Fhsewarth Par- 
Ish Church. 

HAYES . On November nth. very 
peacefully tn Cheltenham. Phyttta 
Mmy. wife of the laic Commander 
TS^H^oRJil. and beloved mother 
of Elizabeth and Bridget, (band- 
mother of Timothy. Phyiuda. Peter. 
Tiggy and CbnhiK. Funeral Service 
2.00 p.m. Tuesday 18 th at Sy- 
nmnds^irviiaa- Bridport. Flowers, 
to toe toe Chruch. donations, if de- 
stretolo toe RJM. Benevolent Fund. 
HEMDERSQM - On November 10th 
lfwo. suddenly at home. Bruce 
Trevor, loved h u s ban d of raium and 
father of Frances and Madeleine. Pri- 
vale cranahod on Monday 
November 17th. Flowers may be 
sent to G Smith Wooburn Lid. 7 The 
Gr een. W oobum Green. Bucks. 
HOLFOBD - On November lOto 1986. 
Monica Peregrine, dearly loved wife 
of Surgeon Rear Admiral. J.M, 
HoHUrd. CB., O.B£. and mother of 
Andrew and Charles. Cremation has 
taken pl ace, privately. 

3WAHIS - On the I30i November. 

* Lots, wife of Admiral Sir Frank Hop- 
kins of Ktogswear. peacefully In her 
sleep alter a long illness. Funeral al 
Torbay Crematorium at li oOamon 
Wedne sday 19th. 

LINDCMANM - On November 10 th. af. 
tor a short Illness. Karf-Tiieotfor 
CDutH). A Memorial Service win be 
held al the Lutheran Christ Church. 
Montpelier Place. Kntgh&brldge on 
Friday November 28th at 12 noon. 
No flowers please, donations tf de- 
sired lo The Leonard Cheshire 
Foundation. 26 Maunsef Street. Lon- 
don. SW l. 

LOWKH . On II to November, at 
Inane. Nicholas Manning Lowick. 
aged 45 . of The British MuMtan. Fu- 
neral Service at toe Putney Vale 
Crematorium on Tuesday 18th No- 
vember at 230 pan_ No flowers 
Mease but donattons. If desired, may 
be made to the R.S.P.CLA.. Enquiries 
to W Gar stin A Son. 01 935 4868. 
McKITTniICK - On November 11 to to 
Gravesend and North Kent HospttaL 
Thomas Edward Maurice (Tom), 
aged 72 of New Asb Green. 

RYAN • On November llth 1986. 
peacefully at her borne. 3 High Bank. 
West HOI. Ottecy St Mary. Isabel, 
aged 86 years. Cremation at Ex eter , 
on Wednesday November 19th. at 
Il.lSam. NoCowns. but donations. 
If derired. to The Star and Garter 
Home for Disabled Servicemen. 
Richmond. Surrey. 

TOMLIN - on 12th November. Freder- 
ick Ernest Cecil (Tommy), loving 
husband of JDL darting father of 
Marie. PhVL John and Peter and 
grandpa of Richard and Fetidly Re- 
tired Imperial' Airways / B O. A C 
Funeral Is arranged to take place on 
Tuesday 18to Nov ember-1986, at St. 
Mary's Parish Church. Twickenham 
al 3.15 pas. followed by cremation tn 
South West Middlesex Oematorhan. 
Han worth at 4 pm. Flowers lo F-W. 
Paine 31 Church Street Twickenham 
WALKER - On November llth 1986. 
peacefully after a short Illness. Major 
Denzfl George Walker (WMsky). Ur 
ofThe Duke of Cornwall's Light In- 
fantry. Beloved husband of Patricia, 
dearly loved father and ffundfatoer. 
.Funeral Service 3 pm Monday I7Ih 
November, at All Saints Church. 
Wytoam. Oxford, followed by inter 
- roent at Wytham. Family downs 
only, but donations If desired, to toe 
Army Benevolent Fund. 41 Queens 
Gate. SW 7 5HR. 

WESTON - On 3M November, peace- 
fully. Ada Dorothy, late of Flat 11 . 
Graytium Court. Beverley. North 
Humberside, (and formally of Bishop 
Burton Beverleyi. Funeral and burial 
in the grave of her late husband. Per- 
cy WUUam Weston. look place on 
Friday 7th November M Bishop Bar- 
ton Church. 

YOUNG - On llth November 1986 nr 
Sonuhig-ari- Thames. VMet Babel 
HewlL formerly of the John Lewis 
ParbmMp. Daughter of toe We 
Thomas Moflan and Afftes Young 
and aunt of SOv ester ami Terry. No 
flowers by request. Funeral Service 
at Reading Crematorium, al 3.15 tan 
on Wed n esday I9to November- 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BENNETT - A Meeting In commemora- 
tion of the Hfe of Joan Bennett will be 
held al Orton College. Cambridge on 
Saturday 29th of November at 230 
pan.. 

At EERY - A Manorial Service for Dr 
LJf. Jeffery, wfl) be heM on Satur- 
day 29th November, al 2.16 pm to 
the Chapel of Lady Margaret HaU. 
Oxford 

KHM - A Memorial Service of Thanks 
giving for toe life of Charles W.G.T. 
Kirk, former Town Clerk of Heme! 
Hempstead will be held at SL MaryU 
Church. Hemd Hempstead, at 12.00 
pm. on 27th November 1986. 
Enquiries Tel. 01-660 0698. 

POTTS - A Service of Thanksgiving, 
for the ufe of the late Charles Potts 
M.C- will be held at the Parish 
Church of a Thomas. Lyntingioo. 
Hampshire, on Friday November 
21st- at 12 noon. 


Science report 


Work on budgies may 
save species in danger 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

eriag work in protecting 
red species by scientists 
Ion Zoo and at die 
i of Zoology is saving 
, from birds to creatures 
treat such as the black 
us, pant panda and 
vid's deer. 

ork on birds involves a 
in breeding bod- 
' the zoologists 


hum. 


„ yooag pn- 
fiemag primate 


tbe work lay the Cast 
nt and export of birds 
estricted. Soon tbe only 
itrodndu potent new 
naterial into cwbibd- 
are species, threatened 
Sty or other reasons for 
rill be from semen that 
frozen and stored by 
liqne devised for bsd- 

nservation research 
tammals, the work in 


treating infertility 
ans has been appUcd to — . 
wild mdmals. The research team 
of tbe Institute of Zoology report 
the greatest success rate in the 
world of br 
mates from 
embryos. 

Advances in treating human 
infertility employed for conser- 
vation work inctades tbe adapter 
ties of ^Unreal nttrasonul 
methods for examining an ani- 
mal without surgical interven- 
tion . 

The zoologists can recognize 
pregnancy this way two day s 
after implantation in anil 
B nmUan monkeys. Ultrasound 
is used also to scan tbe eggs of 
birds and reptiles for fertufty, 
and to establish the sex of ytwog 
awtimilc and birds in breeding 
programmes. _ L „ 
Sources Doctor, October 30, 
1986. 


The Royal Society 

1983 University 

Research Fellowships 

The Council of the Society 
has made appointments in 1 983 
University Research Fellow- 
ships as follows (appointments 
taken up on 1 October 1986 
eaccm where stated otherwise): 

Or ~P*nalefM J NEHC fe- 

scotch frilow In Ow Builard L^v 
arslnHot. deurtnwnl of . 
?CK>«5CS. utlvmtty of Cambridge. w» 
ionunS «o work more mi 


wsiaAi in the dKiartinenl of 

unTCnricmO' « Oxford. Jg 
10 work .mere 

r moeneroetics In genetically 


nimii SERC senior research 

ETaSe school of tiMHOOir-jil 
Lmv^rsKy.Qf Eas AJjMWttp 
tne deswtmenr of 
■&JIW. cardtf r.OT 
sf snfYTjiODfl in tJW DfOWn 

a riSugs^Rc s 
aSKAM9U| 

orwKh. to wruinue w^orK 
ai IM John tones 
inly erf too TuycBtocytr 
m 


Or C J Fool Junior 


rch fellow 




',l,:silO-5S4fr,r5S| 

metobomm ami cdnicai Hocneroapy- 
UMiHWj’ W Sfvrtfieia Medical 

ISIS & 

gSi- 

cunirtl of 

Or C jmkinc. Ante wxWoneni 

tJZLrax SSSii to toe d«a 

agricvllonil botany. UnlserstW Col- 
lege af Wales. Abfvvsrwojtn. 10 
continue >0 work . Iherr on 
gynsustonenui complex tanmation to 

SERC resrareh 


Du-rran uh? " 

rnnory rcseereh reflow in the tieftMTt- 
mmt of veterinary ??152, I SSC; 
University Of GJasqOW ' 

School, to ntoltoue lo workthere on 
Sudies on canine parvovirus ano 

SERC OMtf; 

dCKlorai fellow tonwsrfwol 

l December 19861- 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 



23 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


KEBLE COLLEGE, 
OXFORD 

OLD 

MEMBERS 

If you have not received your 
copy of the 1986 Record, please 
send your address and postcode 
to ibe College Secretary. KeUe 
College, Oxford. OXI 3PG. 


■ALE ti-as Nov. A unlaw 



Moivrn sjo-itjol su 

10.30-16.00 Bl Aran Oeskmfi. 3 Kean 

SL Covent Carden. London WC2. 


* lor my 

I and LATHAM MmUtai 

native Dnon DnHian. HorMtam ana 

toHMon. Writs to: Midm CHMn. 8. nw 

pmuut. eocoo Maronv les Co omHuna. 
France. 

tIHPPIFR LIVES For Lonely otd people 
can be brovMed bv your WO. Please 
include a beouerf tor The National Be- 
nrvoHni Fund for the Aosd. New Broad 
street Haute. 3S New Broad Street. 
London EC3M 1NH. 

BLACKWELL'S ANNUAL BOOK SALE 
bdnt TODAY. 9 am. Thousands or 
taeisMOi aamauad books at ludt price or 
K90. BtaricwNTs Broad Street- Oxford. 
Tel: (0066) 2491 ll. 

K 1 YOU already have a Mb in toe Atos this 
Winter and wtah to boon your wages tor 
minimal effort: pri m touch 01-22S- 
3481. 

UK C Fr aMCE. coring an Thames. Res), 
denuai RetBemenr Horae set to lO acres 
bordering the Thanes. 0091-872803. 
PAUL DOUGAL - Trying Hard to get tin 
touch wlti) yon. Please urgently 
phone me ■ Sis. 


BIRTHDAYS 


KKM Haw BfrtfMtior O we emrar t. an 
ray have, potty BOIL* 1 


SERVICES 


Love or Marriage. Altaoes. 
. Dalettne. DetKiQ 16)23 AMnsdan 
R oad. L ondon W8. Tot 01-9X8 toil. 
MUMf CV* Ud oroCeaslanal curricu- 
lum vitae documents. Details: aioii 
3388. 


ANCESTRY 

Contact 

the team with toe best 
experience Worldwide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CT! 1BA 
TEL: 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


tmirt THE OAXCi Laser fonts, com- 
miter graphics and other software to 
typeset, spellcheck, pagomake and re- 
produce your newsletter, business 
report or onupage visual m one day. 
For prompt DeskTop PuMtsMng and du- 
pUcaUno services can MedlaCen CL Jo 
Ud. Tel: 01-957 95BB 

msull MKHTAL A H other rugs r» 
paired. Personal Service. Call anytime. 
01-349 9978. 

ncantt man nnmrad Hr SoMcWom. 
Nationwide. Tel: 01 273 8301. 

WANTED. Experienced Onaiifted tutor for 
■A' level Maths. Private weekly lessons 
In CoMtrs Green area. TelOi 5S6 1 77«. 

NEAL'S REMAKE BEDDING SERVICE 
trill restore the comfan and (Ml new Ute 
imo your bed. Write or tri- ter detaus of 
this service and sample prices to Alan 
Dear. Hod's BerkUno. laEBhorneltaad. 
off Hotteway Road. London N19 4BD. 
Tet. 01-381 2461. 

BMDQE. London School of Bridge and 
Club- 38 Kings RomL SW3. O1S09 
7301. 

caMVETANamtar lufly auanfled Soilri- 
um. Cl 80 4- VAT and standard. 
dodMinemems ring aa«4 319398. 


WANTED 


AfAWIMS Menorca villa C3 bad. pool) We 
wm> to meet athera a> share on co-own. 

wvjttraSraiM 
your Holidays now? Many other adv 
unes. Reply to BOX«S. 


IVAJfTED Edwardian. Victorian and all 
patoseoi furniture. Mr Ashton Oi 947 
6946 667-669 Garratt Lane. EartifleM. 


FOR SALE 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RES1STA CARPETS 

Wieandera beautiful natural cotk Uka. 
Extremely hard wraring the best mon- 
ey can buy £8.95 per ig yd + vat. 
Msrakaien vriwn pile caruri 14 plain 
cufoura. Burn hi laWcnay 13* wide 
from •WL 7 year wear guarantee for 
no™ or office. £4.73 per m yd + rat 
Ptin Ihe total se l ectk m of ptadn car- 
peting m London. 

148 Wandsworth Bridge Rd 
Pareons Green sw« 

TeLOl -73 1 -3368/9 

Free Esumates-CxpeR Fitting 


BIZET DOING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
CHOPIN LISZT 

Be sure you Include Marbm' 
Our prices cant be mused 

MARKSON PIANOS 

KAlbany SL NWI 
01 936 8682 
Artillery Place. SC18 
01 854 4517 


CHAPPELL OF BOND ST 

EST. 1811 

PIANOS 

New Oibbo Showroeui now open 
Gborial offers on exrsttog 


Low com credit lerms avaujrfrfr. 

CHAPPELL OF 
BON D STR EET 

GO NEW BOND STREET. LONDON Wl 

01 491 2777 


Hampstead garden 
suburb 



Freehold £167.000. 

Tet 01 455 3736 


HUM VALE Three beds, two tveem.. 

one dMng. two bathrooms. HcuzzL Ftrei 

dam large, first noor DaL Bandnnghaai 

Goan, long lease. H18-LOOO todudina 

lUrntehtega. Fur aittck sale call Sara Qti 

Ol 938 9993 or 995 7063 Unytlme) 


3 HECE SUm- UplMstertP tn Cnm 
Hide. 3 Morans old. Out £2.600. wtu 
8e0 til Cl JOO or near offer. Owner Em- 
terming. 0276 6*522 


WANTED 


■MSOMC mM and aB rented articles 
wanted. Orain Antteuss.1 17 Kensing- 
ton Church SLWB tei Ol -339 9618. 

TtKT) pnotognohs waned, old or recent 
lor book. Ptame write to 80 cnesson Rd. 
London WI4 9QU. 

VARD18C hgepuab. Mfonnatton wanted 
on hnu converted during cither 
World War. Mrs Curry (0202J 0066 04 

TELLOW MOES- Wanted, a Cwry of Cen- 
tral London Yellow Pages fttr 1981. £10 
paid plus postage. 0233 311649 Days 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


How near 
C#j we are to 
W the cure.,. 
depends on you. 


LEUKAEMIA 

RESEARCH FUND 

43 Gawtet Omotid Stmel, 

London WC1M3H 01 -US 0101 
| ii in Irn rtiwiiliuif liMili 



With Boll scimlnU. ' 

I dnctoa and technicuaB in ■ 
our own hbarttories. aver 
bfl.l'r- Of Joar ifanriinn of 

IqUCT ineb (fimib to 

mearefa. 

Bend M PO Bra 13, 
Asen Tl. Lincoln's [nn Fiekk 
l/adna WC2A 3PX 


JJjs 


SEND FOR YOUR 
FREE CHRISTMAS' 
CARD CATALOGUE • 

U).Kooni4S.PO.Bot48. 
Bunon-onTretrf-DElf 3LQor 
30b?9 


' V''. 



HARRY SECOMBE SAYS: 

'What have I got 
that I cant give ?’ 

Diabetes is noi infecnVus but 
ii can strike anyone, k is still 

incurable but we can light 
ihe damage and suffering it 
can cause— every year more 
ihan /.500 children develop 
diabetes, ihe hidden disease. 

Join us in die 
fight. Vifenced 
j we heJp-Nuw 

BRITISH 
DIABETIC j^SSOOATTON 

10 Queen Anne Sireet. Ltindun 
WJM OBD. mi. i ii Him -i r". 



MfTIQUE Glass fronted China Duplay 
CaoineL Inlaid Rosewood £460. Victori- 
an Armchair, carved tegs and handles, 
deep buttoned £360. 0272 623090 


and filMMon style dining rurnKwe 
made to order. Over 60 dmtoo suites 
always available lor bnoiauate deliv- 
ery- NMUrtetf. onar Homey on T name* 
10491) 64tl IS. Bouruemouth 10202) 
29068a Toosham. Eleven 1039287) 
7443. B er k el e y. Gkn I04S3) 810962. 


CMWEn* BOW Woof Velvet £11.99 So 
yrd JO cowura BOW Wool MP ate 
M yrd 10 colours. Merakon velour 
£4.99 so yrd. Prices iuclustvr af VAT. 
We can supply and fit tew make of car- 
pet- Abacoa Carpel Co. Ten 01-940 
6142 or 01-948 0860 
NEAR VKUME Victorian S/DMadted' 

housa. S«lt beds. 2 Iga raoeps. ffUbd 

kb. adteUfog fc/toi rm. 3 baths. GCM. 

laundry rm. cellar. Nswty decoratad re- 

tatobag aritoroi faatures. ntfad cats 

thro u i huia . BOR omul o u t ri de wt 

£178.000. TeUll 733 3824 
THE WHO WORKSHOP FREE credit 
over 1 year lAPR OU Low tnieresl 
rales o vet 2 years lAPR 9.5% I & 3 year* 
f APR 1 S-2W> Written duotoUons. Free 
CaUloeue. 30a Mghgate Road. NWS. 
01-267 7671. 

rfaEST quality wool carpets. Al bade 
prices and under, also available 100’s 
extra. Large room stse (snianb muter 
half normal price. Chancery Carpet* Ot 
406 04&3. 

SHTnOCK. Best tickets tor ad sold- 
out events. Our clients include mod 
malor compsida. Credit cards accepted. 
01-628 1678. 

TICKETS FOR AMT EVENT. Cals. Site 
ugnt Exp. chess. Lea Mis. An iheaire 
and sports-Teti 821-6616/828- 
OS96JL£x / VUa / Dtnera. 

CATS. CRESS. Las Mte-teui Phantom. AH 
theatre and sport. Tai 439 1763. All ma- 
jor credit cds- 

rtOOf Jama HcrriMt? You 71 ctflay 
Joyce Stranger's new paperback tCoiW) 

• A Dog In A Mutton'. In your bookshops 
now.' 

CELLO 19th c. ExceUssu cendtoon. Hard 
case * 2 bows. £3.000 Tel: Ol 876 
1349. 

FROBa/n anUL cooker*, etc. can 
you buy cheaper? BAS Lid. 01 229 
1947/8468. 

FUR COATS Full length modal*. Perfect. 
Canadian WoB. £13560; SUvto Fo*. 
■CL BOO. Musi be teen. TeLOl -365-1246 
PIANO, Very pretty tnlayed walnut OP- 
nghL Excellent Pteytog order, timed. 
£645. MH Condition. 01-463 0148. 
BALLOONS In a bos. bouquets delivered. 

Telephone: Ol 267 <ME 
safU PA VALE/ 81 John* wood. STOCtion 
of nau. ADens. Tetaohons Ol 26*0648 


FLATSHARE 


WAMDSWORTH COMMON Professional 
M/F or eoimte lo share *upert> large fW. 
all atnmeneues. £200 PCM exet. Avw- 
stale now .Tel; Ol 268 3485 idayiOl B74 
4073 levc*) 


KENSfKRrOH W8 Double rootn/dretotog 
room available In large Uproar 4 bed- 
room flat. Transport excellen t. R eW 
requ ir ed. £60 P~ tw. oi 938 2872. 


BUWORTR w dWe bed. share tovely 
[■my fined Mo. BR/tuM. parkins. 
£17Sptrn. TeLOl 374 1734 . 


Prof M/F. to chare gar 

den flat with lawyer. O/R. tel sroenlhto- 
fafrad lor City. £130 pern e*cl. 01 881 
0607 after 8 pm or w/r. 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. Wea 
efiata Introductory smite. Pb»e Id W 
(Mt 01-639 5491. 313 Brompton 
Road. 8W3 

FOREST MLL Prof. M/F. N/S to Slure 
garden dal- O/R C/H. 1 1 mlroLoodon 
Bridge. £40 pw eaccL Tel Ol 291 0148 

PROFESSIONAL LADY MTks Own rorap 
in Central London flat Tef 01-349 
3629. 

KWI7 Prof* for 2 large rooms in wnw 
toouoa. 2 mttudra lube. £36 each. Trie- 
phone.OI 229 9009 I eves V 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


IT'S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 
WofKtwMe low cost (tights 
The best - and we cu prove U 
196.000 client* since 1970 


AROUND TUT WORLD FROM CTOS 

SYDNEY 

£57* 


PERTH 

£402 


AUCKLAND 

UW 



£200 



£209 

£418 




l.lJlMll-'. 1 .’ 1 , 

£231 



£264 


NAIROBI 

£242 


JO-BURG 

£286 


LIMA 

£276 



£195 


1 ■ 

£ 99 


1 Tl "iSlVB 

£157 

£274 

1' I I , 

£137 



£291 

£457 

LijLalllKi 

£ 76 

£ 89 


TRAILFINDERS 

4348 CARLS COUfT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6£J 
carooe/LSA nigbn 01937 s*oo 
Long Hate Ftepa* 01603 ISIS 
ISt/BusUws CUte 01-938 3444 
Ooverranrtti Lenmed/BouM 
AST A IATA ATOL/14S8 


FLIGHTS 
MADE EASY 

The searob b over. One caH to 
Holidajtii the computerised dearinjj 
boesr for chartered Sights 10 Spam 
and other popular resorts, gives yon 
.instant bo otin g*. Instant 

confirmatioB. 

Phone SOW file these destinations 

MAUGA. ALICANTE. PALMA. 
FARO. TENERIFE. LAS PALMAS & 
LANZAROTE. 

HOUDAYFAX 
01-878 9141 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return Ral ur n 

JO'BURG/KAR £465 OOUALA £420 
MABIOBI £380 SYDNEY E7B0 
CARO £230 AUCKLAND £785 

LAGOS £360 HONG KONG £550 

DEUBOMBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

1 82/162 Rroora SL Wl 

tel. m-taTasifip/a 

Lett 8 Group 
AMEX/WSA 


LOWEST FARES 

Part* £69 N YORK £276 

Frankfun coo la/SF £Sfts 

Lagos £320 Miami csso 

Nairobi £326 Singapore £430 

Jo-bara £460 Bangkok £335 

Cairo - £205 Katmandu C440 

Dti/Bora £335 Rangoon £360 

Hang Kong £310 Calcutta £425 

Huge nhawwts Avan on m 6 ctebcaasi 

SUN & SAND 

21 Swaiiow SL London wt 
01-439 2100/437 OSX7 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

£235 KAflACHI £280 

BOMBAY £360 LAGOS £330 

CAIRO £205 MUM £283 

DELHI £360 ROME ETQ5 

FHA"RJRT £65 SEOUL £805 

HONG KONG £490 SriUMEL E765 

ISTANBUL £170 TOKYO £580 

SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON Wl 
T«t 01-439 35211 
AIRLINE 


SVD/MSL £636 Perth £566. Ati mater 
carriers to Aui/NZ. 01-884 7371 
ABTA. 


a wen UR T FARES Worfdwtde: 01-434 
0734 Jupiter TravcL 


MMWWl l il St CROUP FAMES Wortd- 
widr. Tel ll.T.C. 107331 887035. 


FLMHTROOHERS Dtscount Fares world- 
wide. lat/aconomy. Oi-387 9100 


MALA8A. CAHARMS- Ol 441 till. 
Travehvte Abia. ami. 


MOROCC O BOUND. Regent SL Wl. Ol 
734 6507. ABTA/AML 


S. AFRICA From CfldS. 01-884 7371 
ABTA. 


SPAIN. Portugal' Cheapest fares. Bteote*. 
Ol 73S 8191. ABTA ATOL 


TAORMRI A . SICILY £149 Special ~LATL 
BUtDB~ Whuer Offer Uf boohed wtudn 7 
day* of depart u re). Price fusty too. rtn. 
Oatwlck Qtaht (every Wed. llani). 

. A/TU. 7 


' ntghla BAB m Iwtn 

room wwi taaui/ahowcr and wc. 14 
MOMa I® £219. Stogie 4- CIGwK. NO 
HIDDEN EXTRAS. OHor valid 6 Nov-28 
March.. BLAND BUN 01-222 74«2 
ABTA/ ATOL. 


Nsvar knowtngly under toML we boat 
any tore, on any cfaa*. any where to the 
worm. Dteeoum on hofete. fhvdit cards 
welcom e. Me mber ABTA Try im. Tal 
01 879 7776. 

TAKE TUBE OFF 10 Pari*. Amsterdam. 
Brussel*. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lhu- 
sanne. Zurich. The Hague. Dirotin. 
Rouen. Boulogne A Dieppe. Time Off. 
2a. Chester Ckae. London. SW1X tbq. 
01-233 B07a 

AHtTARE SPECIALISTS Sydney o/w 
£420 rtn £764. Auckland o/w £420 rtn 

£775. Jo-burg o/w £246 rth £488. Lor 

Angeles o/w El 78 rm £340. London 

Ftigni Centre 01-370 6532 
ORE CALL tor some of the tost deal* in 
nights, apartments, hotels and ear Wre. 
Tel London Ol 636 6000. Manchester 
061 832 2000 Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 

XMAS. Winter. Summer. Algarve. Tener- 
ife. Greece. Turkey. Spain. Coin*. Sri 
Lanka and many more hoh/ftight*. Ven- 
tura: Ol 261 3466. ATOL 2034. 
L4TW AMDS CM. Low cost rights 
RM £488. Lima £496 rtn. AM Sroafl 
Group Hoi Way Journeysjes Pstn from 
£3801 JLA 01-747 3108 
LOW FARED TO America. Australia * 
New Zealand. Tel: 01-9302666. Herons 
Travel 36 Whitehall London. 5Wl. 
ABTA 348 3X. 

LOW FARES WORLBWBC - CSA. 5. 
America. Mtd and Far East. 8 Africa. 
Trays ale. 48 Margaret Street. Wl. 01 
680 2928 (Visa Accepted) 

N IP PO N A Bt Seal sale lo LiSAGariboean- 
Far East- Australia. Call the 
profewonau ABTA IATA re excepted. 
Tel 01 254 5788 

NY.LA, MY.LA, NVJA, Worldwide ttesti 
nation*. For ihe cheapest fare*, iry u* 
1st. Richmond TraveL 1 Duke BtreeL 
Richmond Surrey. ABTA Ol 940 4073. 
■BERK. inclusive air mm* 
Nov/Dec/JaMNot Xmas), day timings 
£109. ABT A/ ATOL- Viva Travel. Ol 
247 1982. 

V ALEXANDER Christinas at allaMUty. 
Catwlck/Ls* Patinas 18 Dec £227 M» 
toga 22 pec tanner. £179. oi 723 6964. 
Abia Aloi Areass/Vfu. 

WRITER SUB Specials prices to Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga • Te- 
nerife. Nov 4r Dec Pin World HoHday* 
01 734 2662. 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. Dtinond 
Travel ATOL 1783. 01-581 4641. 

Horsham 68641 

EUROPE/ WORLD WIDE lowest fare* on 
chanar/scheduird fits Pilot rugiii oi 
631 0167. Agl AIM 1893. 

FIRST 'CLUB Class Concorde Discounted 
lares. Duma* TraveL Ol -488 9011 
ABTA 


[ 


WINTER SPOBTS 


3 


JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££‘S 

LOOK AT THESE AMAZING OFFERS FOR 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
LOOK Deu*. 20Ui/21«t December 

VAL D-I5ERE 
Chalet Hotel Savoie 
Chalet Hotel Crew* Stanches 
COURMAYEUR 
Chalet Marconi 

MERISEL 
Chalet La Grange 
Chalet Bachai 
Alplnea 4pb. 

ST ANTON 

Chain Rauch jrw . UNES m bjcoest choice on skis 

Qff/Htng Hold SrtT Gitoring & Ctuld P*nitt hi *7 of Europe w iwfb 
Manch Detn. ' O' 783 2200 a,rr “ 

0422 78121 


FB 

£249 

SAVE £B9 

FB 

£249 

SALE £89 

FB 

£199 

SAVE £68 

FB 

£199 

SAVE £108 

FB 

£249 

SAVE £1 IO 

SC 

£149 

SAVE £156 

FB 

£199 

SAVE £108 


ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


RESTAURANT 

GUIDE 

Eat, drink and be Meny this Christmas! 

For ideas on dining out at Christmas, 
why not refer to our special Christmas 
Edition of the Restaurant Guide, which 
appears on page 35. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. jo’Burg. Cairo. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Singapore. K.L. Dei to. 
Bangkok. Hong Kang. Sydney. 
Mexico. Bogota. Caracas. 
Europe. 6 The Americas. 

Flamingo Travel. 

76 snancibun- Avenue 
London W1V7DC. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-1 3.00 


TRAVEL 

WORLDWIDE 

Semi edwa »M gudaniz on 
reduced long MU n»d mas 
EXTRA SPECIAL 1 ST & CUR TO T« USA 
(03721)43558 

SPECIAL 1ST & CLUB WORLDWIDE 
(03727(43560 

LOW COST ECONOMY MHLPWPE 

(03777J 42739 
ABTA 72102 IATA 

Udbobi n! nt kebue ef Travel S Toonon 


ARtTfCKRTFSpecteUM* New York £229. 
LJV/San Francticn £329. 

Sydney /Melbourne £769. All OaHy di- 
rect Itights Darufr 130 Jerrnyn 
StrecLOl 839 7144 


COS I CUT I KMX OH (IMua/hoh. to Eu- 
rope. USA & most destination*, 
pguomat Travel 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL. 


1ST 3> CLUB CLASS FLIGHTS: Ktioe Dtir 
counto. Sun world TraveL |03727| 
26097 /27 109/27638. 


WINTER SPORTS 


BEST RUN 
FOR YOUR MONEY 

Suntd ant serf cBintng cholrti m 
MER1BQ_ VERBIEJ*. ARINSAL and 
ARABBA. LilQUed Christina* and New 
Year avauanuuy al unbeatable price*. 
Rina us for a good dean 

SU BEACH VILLAS 
1 0223) 350777 (24 hr*) 

ATOL 381 B ABTA 141 SX 
Actres/Vlsa/Amra welcome. 


SKI WHIZZ!! 

Picnics. Bu'B-Qurt & Pune* 

FUN ON THE SLOPES in 
THE MOST EXCITING RESORTS! 
Catered Chalet!, tnrl of fit* 

FROM ONLY £184 
CHRISTMAS BARGAINS £199 
FREE HOLS FOR GROUPS OF 9- 
Sournpuoor (bod. (ovriy ebafctt t 
terrific annotphne - come by youndf 
wnb a fen (heads ED a dialed 

Ring 01-370 0999 ATOL 1820 


JUST FRAMES - Super value self catering 
rid hotiday* in the bat French res ort*. 
Ring far new brochure now. 

Tal OI-7B9 2S92. 

ABTA 69256 AMI 13B3. 


SKI WEST - MEW! Special offers on 
groups. RING FOR A DEAL? Also other 
amazingly low price* starting al £39. 
ash for a copy of our bumper brochure. 
■Oil 786 9999. Abia 69256 Altai 13B3. 


unrs OFP* tn Oourehevel on Nov SOth. 
Why rhh low rraortt) Early Specuis: 
0W (Ml £139/519 2WU. XMAS 
£247/337 2wta. H/B by coach. Alradd 
£40 air. Free wine A superb food. Lr Ski 


FREE. FREE. FREE. Free Lin Passes. 
Free Insurance. Free children "5 noflday* 
rundcr (6f on many dates HoteteAaM* 
f rom Gatwick A Manchesaer nrom £1 19. 
Shi Freedom. Ol 74 1 4686 A 061 236 
0019. AT0L432- 


VERBUR. VERBIEH- VEHBTCR • H8TI 
SwlizerlaiM MOST mating resort' Ch- 
irred chalets incl. ttights A FREE 
holidays for ntitog a Chalet. Lots or fun 
for single*, couples A groups. Ring 
SUWhtez 01 570 0999 AM 1820 


CHRISTMAS to Courchevel Have a fun 
ported traditional Afpute Christmas 
wUh ALL the trimmings? For only £199 
a free hotiday* lor group* Ring Ski 
Bonne NOgr. Of 244 7333 


SKI DRCROUROL. ExceUrnt bBTWrfns. 
B/B. Hoia*. S/a Coach or S/Drive, ft 
£ 136. Madison 0902 46200 ABTA 

■KHKMOLB Tap Ski Resort*. Lowest 
Prices from £59 ABTA Brochure. Ol 
602 4826. 

HOLLAND. DaUy flighty £36 O/W. £65 
Rtn Frankfurt from £69. Miracle JeL 
Ol 379 3322 

HOM HONS ML UMOKOK £369. 
Stngapree£457. Other FE ClUe*. Ol -584 
6 614 A BTA 

LOWEST Air Fare*. Europe and world 
wide. Ol 836 8692. Buddntftoro 
TraveL 

TUMMA For your hotiday where ns 3U1 
summer. Call for our brochure now. Tu- 
nlsidn Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 

lUttBtAf MOROCCO Book through (he 
North Africa SpcculiM. Samara Hying 
Service* Tel Ol 262 2734. 

ALL US CITES Lowest lirea on major 
scheduled earner*. 01-6B4 7371 ABTA 

ALOARVE ALTERNATIVE 
The fine*! houses tor rental. 75 Sf 
James SL SWl. 01 491 0802. 

MCE comfortable flaL nr flower roorkrt. 

suit rouplr. avail now. 2 roaniM. £86 
ow earl. Iri.Ol 589 1563 


DOMESTIC A 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


CORDON BLEU Cook to work In 
Champery. Swta. AIM. lor winter sea- 
son lo run rooting service. Tel OL 736 
5611. 


UVUN e xp er i enced cooks for young fun 
PUD/reataurau tn Qebn Phone Ally 
on OI 362 2908 before 7 pm. 


required for winter sea- 
son mugs hr ouaufled C PQtti. O ver 20 
years of age- Tal 0349 27272 or 274 
9008 

MOTHERS HELP required January 2 
girl* 7 year* and 7 months old. Own 
rial. Grrrard* Cross Car driver essen- 
tial. 23 plus. Musi love children and 
dogs. Tel 0753 880432. 

WORLDS LARGEST Au Pair Bureau, 
offers m/hetov. dome, all live in stall 
L- K. 4 Overseas Au Pair Agent* Ud. 87 
Regent Si London W l Ol «39 6534 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


- Cook immediately avail- 
able. lor dlnnere lunches and Bullet 
poriin/no agents Te* Ol 627 1892 


AimcULATE dynamic, penert Spanish. 
EngUHi. French. Kalian. Willing io trav- 
el abroad. Seeks responsible pan as 
negotiator /representative or stmllar. 
Excel lent knowledge Costa del Sol. Tel: 
Ol 764 2391. 


RENTALS 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks lira 
flat /house, to IO £800pw L'sual lee* 
req PmlUtis Kay A Lewi*. Sown of ine 
Park. Chelsea office. 01-362 am or 
North of me Park. Regent's Park office. 
01-586 9882 

HAMPSTEAD super flat ilurnl m Idyllic 
country *ettmq. a/looung Hcalh & gall 
course. 30 n L shaped sludio. bakonv. 
kil bUirm/wc CH. phone Avail now 
<oi I yr £96 pw Owner Ol 586 4569 
or 883 2321 . 

RV HAMPSTEAD HEATH . Well furnished 
rjr basement tint. 2 Im. bLL5 MUtt 
luoc/SfiopB £IOO pw. CH Incl Seal 
voung couple or single person Non- 
smoker* only- 01-974-6678 after 3pm. 
FINCHLEY 1 bed lux flris. CH. TV. trie- 
phone, entryphone He Serviced. IS 
mm* cny/wrsf End Fully furnished 
from £226 pw 01-883 0042 
SWl kleal for enferlatnlna Elegani & 

bright mansion rut. newh dec Spacious. 

Dtite Recep retain* Original feature* 3 

Bed*. 2 Bam* F/F Kir £495pw unfurn. 

Coates 828 8251 

HAMPSTEAD'S fabulous £180 p w flat 

wilh vpactous recep. 1 double 4 2 smote 

bedrooms. Dining Area. GCH. T v, Ol 

286 6040 iTI 

WTliffUTNO rfianpUo srkdJon of fur- 

nished flats 6 houses from £lS0pw- 
£3.000 in KrnMnpon 6 surrountitog 

area* Benham & Rem s Ol -938 3&22 

HNKUrrSBRIDBE Ughl dean basemeni 

flaL furnished. I bedroom, polio, dbung. 

reception £196 pw No agrnl Tel: 01 

408 1019 

SWISS COTTARS Outstanding- spanou* 

lin furn flat 2 mm* lute 3 beds, l 

recep.. K A H. CH. freezer, wash mac 

He. suli family £195 pw. 794 8701. 

*17 9681 The number to remember 

when seeking bed rental properuo* in 

central and prime London areas 
£1 BO /JCS.OOOpw 

WRCharndnaGaRage newly decorated 3 

Beds. 2 Bam* D&K Drag. Kitchen, ma- 

chine*. Roof Terrace & poue. Co m 
£376pw. 828 0040 .Tl 
WR Luxury maMonrtle lust refurblehed 
rerpi. 2 dble bedrrm. K i B. 
washcr/Oiyer. lurtta shower rir £240 
pw TH 937-3984/0722 79639 
AT SWIM COT7ME s mlm lithe. Vllperb 

I tty fum rial l dbte bed. 1 recap. k*b. 

CH.wa*nmacnc. £i5©pw 7*»8Toi. 

CLAPiMM. M prof tor o»n ten rm in hix 

rt> Irto £200 pem itnci Phone Caroline 

223 0050 (Ml 580 9030 ext 410 <W). 

DOCKLANDS nan and house* lo lei 

throuMwwi the Deektenda area Tenoi- 

790 9560 


RENTALS 


If you have quality property lo leL 
tcUaSu 

LANDLORDS - 
OWNERS 

Expert prafcsaianal service. 

QURAISH1 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Earls Court Road. SW6 
01-244 7583 


HARLEY 

STREET 

Top floor rental ual flat Unfumiihed 
2 bedroom, sillingrm. kilchen. 
baihrm. separate w.c. UfL Roof 
access. Reot COOpw i net usivc. 
Company leV business couple. 
Tel: 01-935 2181. 


HARR OW P H T HRURLL Loroe fuHy lia-- 
mshed detached house in private csiata. 
Conventenl for Harrow -on- meHTU ana 
Sudbury Hill station. 6 be d rooms. 2 
bauiroonu. 5 large reception room*, 
luify now uutien. uuuiy room. GCH. 
garage, large garden, c 360 pw. Tcu 01 
890 4268. 


DORNEV near Windsor. 4 bedroom tom 
house vnih secluded garden. Luxury 
kjtenen/breakfasl roam. 2 recep*. Un- 
furnished but with fulty lined curtains 
and carnets. Healed pool. £1600 pan 
Telephone: 06286 4658. 


M.1 Lovely modern two bedroamed Rai to 
M. C/M. F/F. carpeted uirougnom. ori- 
vaie parking, dose lo Utoam/Angri. 
Very conventenl for prof-monai* work- 
ing In the aiy. £150.00 per week. 
THAI 229 6602 or 01 609 7826 


F W CAIf iTdanagement Service*! Lid re- 
aoue properties to Central. South and 
wm London Areas far walling wM 
cams let Ol 221 8838. 


NWI Large 4 bedroom fnahonene. lully 
(urnlshro. rrocnll*- decorated. GCH . CM# 
lo shop* h transport. To IH £200 pw. 
Congreve Horner A CO Ol 7418672 


OH FINCHLEY RD NW3 Spurious 4 bed 
faro miManeff# tn cbtiminp 
neighbourhood. GCH. HW. ML too 
recep. dining rm. yep both, showers. 2 
VIC>. £250pw Owner Tel 01 633 9466 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


THE ROYAL MASONIC INSTITUTION 

FOR GIRLS 

A SPECIAL GENERAL COURT of the 

Governors and Subscribers of me Imuiu- 

iton will be held al FREEMASONS' HALL. 

Great Queen Street- London. WC2B 6A2 

on THURSDAY. 11TH DCCEMH3R 198ft 
AT NOON. 

RK. HIND 
Secretary of the iratmmoa 
31 Great Queen street 
London. WC2B SAG 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 

No. 004448 Of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF HAB TE INT ERNA 
TONAL CROUP LIMITED 

AND 

IN THE MATTER OF TOE COMPANIES 
ACT 1985 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Peti- 

tion was on 13th June 1986 presented *, 
Her Majesty's H«Bh Court of JtaUro Mr the 

confirmation of uw reduction of the rap*- 

■al of the above named company from 

£2-500000 lo £84&&28j60- 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 

the said Petition 6 directed lo be beard 

before the Honourable Mr Juatire 
Mervyn- Da «** at Uw Royal Courts of Jts 
lice. Strand. London WC2A 2LL on 
Monday me 24ih day of toovemtier 1986. 

ANY CtedU or or Shareholder of the said 

cranpony desiring to oppose the making of 

an Order tor the confirmation of Uie Hdti 

reduction of ennui shored appear a* toe 

time of bearing m person or by Counsel 

for that purpose. A copy of (he retd Peti- 

tion win be furnished to any such person 
requiring the same by the under-men- 

tioned SMlrilors on payment of Uw 
regulated charge for Ihe same. 

DATED this 12m day of Novem b er 
ISM 

Booth & Co 
Sovemgn Moose 
South Parade 
Leeds LSI 1HQ 
Ret PJC 

Solti tors for me aforenamed Company 


SOUTH KENSINGTON. Carden furnished 
rial One double bed Recep. KttChet,. 
Bathroom with WC. Gas 04 £140 pw. 
Phone: 01-373 2252 (between 9 - lo 
am. and 6 - 8 rail 


THE LONO, SHORT LET spreutistn. We 
have a Ige selection of luxury 1 / 2/3/ 
4 Br d rown Cals wlih maid service Inte- 
rior designed & centrally located. Avail 
Now Connaught Properties 727 3060 


KENSHMTOH, 3 beds, ige recep with 
balcony, a 1 ': oath*. American kit F1M In 
prestige Mk with garage Furn/unfurn 
Palace Properties 01-486 8926 


WANTED. Three bedroamed flaL unfur- 
nlshea. Swiss Collage area. Long 
Gompany let Up lo £250 per week. Tot 
Oi-SSo 2873 i alter 6 00 pmi. 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats & house* 
£200 £1.000 per week. Tel Burgess 
681 5136. 


■MVPAHt S/C lull equip flat. 2 Bod*. 
Bam. KU Lge Lng*- £200pw. Tal: 4gs 
7B30 On. 


Wl Garden Sq Lge patio flaL 2 dbi bed*, 
lux ml living nn. etc. Fun furnished tk 
equipped. £220 pw. TN; <034282) 4307 


EXHOYIMN. Turnpike Link. Lux 3 bed 
acini £600 pan. V.A.D. Ol 942 9883. 
rr>. 


EPSOM. SURREY. Lux cut 4 bed nse. 2 
bath. dbM- oarage, full*' turn. £ XCp tv. 
VA.CH* Management. 01 942 9883. 


FULHAM. Top floor of luxury house and 
usenlml. Inc office facilities. £1 SO Pw. 
OI 731 7734. 


I Wl 1 bed flat Central 
location near River A Tube. Good 
value £lco pw Priory 01-940 4535 


MGHGATE NS super rriurntshed 2 bed- 
room luxury nai. garage available. 
£145 PW fang. Ol 340 7408. 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, central Lon- 
don from E32S pw pu> vat. Ring 
Town Htnur Apartments 373 3435 


MAYFAIR HYDE PARK. The modi tiwlri- 
oib long/ short leu 1/6 bed* best price* 
01 935 9512 HI. 


MAYFAIR Vs'l Lux mm maisonette. 3 
bed*. 1 ret. new KSB. new decor « 
carpets. £32Sgw. Tel. 0342 71S6I7 
HW6. MWB G N6- Newly decorated 2 8 5 
bed flat* available £200 lo £280 pw. 
Ring Rufus Raven 01-191 7545 
RKMMONO. -The Alberts- Unusual Cor- 
ner vi[T coll 2 beds, thru recep. ww 
gdn.gge. £150 pw. Priory 01-9*0 4B55 
SHARE M EAST SHEEN. SWl a. Attrac- 
tor 2 siorey flat. 4 beds. 2 baths, lux luL 
£185 pw. Priory 01-940 45« 
STOCNKWELL. Nr lube Lux. */c flat. I 
bed. furnished, suit couple. £99 pw incl. 
Cleaner Tel- 583-1075 or 735-9803. 
SUNNY newly mod house to North Ken- 
Unglon. 3 bed*. 2 receps. Kit. CCH. 
gdn £170 pw TeLOl 968-8007. 

SWl Ideal bachelors Studio flaL Bain. KIL 
Porter. Exceffrnf lacunae* * close fa off 
amenities. £90pw. COMes 828 8251 
W2 Sunny 1« near tJc recep. 1 double 
bed rial £125 pw. View weekends. Tel: 
01 229 3760 

WS Too quomy lurnlshed offlce/fiai. new 
conversion in exrellenl location £186 
pw. Tel Ol 937 3954/0722 72639. 

W KENSINGTON a selection of f/f charm- 
ing 1-3 bed ant-mat*. £120 - £200 pw 
me 675 1896 T 

A WEST END Flat and Houses Ltsl to FW 
Sale/Lcf. Dart* woofle. 01 402 7381. 
CHELSEA Attractin' 1 DHe Bed. Recep. 

KAB £120pw 828 00*0 «T) 
5ERVtCCO APARTMENTS to Kmsfngtoit. 
Col T V. 24 hr Sw Tries. CofUngham 
Awrunetlls. Ol 373 6306 


IN THE HIGH OOURT OF JUSTICE 

NO. 000138 Of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
89 THE MATTER OF CROWHURST 
TRAVEL LIMITED 

AND IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPA- 
NIES ACT 19S5 

Nonce is hereby Given mat a Pen- 
Uon was on ihe Sih July 1 9B6 presented to 

Her MateWs High Court of Justice lor the 

cooflrmauon of the reduction of too capf- 

ul of the above-named Company from 
USjOOO to £13.750. 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 

the said Petition is dlreelad lo be heard 

bet ore the Honourable Mr Justice Marvyn 

Davies at the Royal Courts of Justice. 

Strand. London WC2A 3LL. on Monday 

Ihe 24U1 day of November 1986. 

ANY Creditor or Shareholder of the aatd 

Company destnng to oppose the making of 

mi Odder lor the confirmation of (he said 

reduction of capital should appear at the 

time of hearing to person or tty Counsel 

for that Purpose. 

A ropy of the said Petition will be fur- 

nished to any such person requiring Ihe 
same by the undermentioned Sotirttare on 

payment of the regulated charge for the 

same 

Dated im* 7!h day of October 1986 
Messrs RsUsons 

27 Chancery Lane 

London WC2A INF 

RM: JJ A/AN 

CF.Crawhur.Ord 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 

No. 006737 Of 1985 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF SCOOPS HOLD- 
E4GS Pt-C 

AND IN THE MATTER OF THE OOMPA- 
NOS ACT 1985 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Peti- 

tion was on the 8th day of October 1983 
presented lo Her Matostys High Court of 

Justice for the ronflmatlan of the reduc- 

tion of the capital of the above named 
Company from £i ooo-ooo.oo to 
£757.39920. 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER OVEN that 

Ihe said Petition U directed to be Maid 

before The Honourable Mr Justice 
Mervyn Davtes al Ihe Royal Court* of Jus- 
tice. Strand. London WC2A 2LL oi 
Monday Ihe 24th day of November 1986. 

ANY Creditor or Shareholder of the said 

Company desiring lo opoove the making of 

the Order for the confirmation of me said 

reduction of capital should appear at the 

lime of hearing In person or by Com m 

for that purpose. 

A ropy of the nld Petition will be fur- 

nished to any such person requiring the 
same tty the undermentioned Sottcllors on 

payment of the regulated charge for the 

same. 

Doled IM* Ulh day of November 1986 
Rom wuuams Wakefield and Co 

13 Harley areet 
London WIN IDA 
Solicitors for Ute above named Company 

IN THE HIGH OOURT OF JUSTICE 

NO. 007239 of 19B6 
CH ANCER Y PIVia ON 
IN THE MATTER Of HSBC HOLDINGS 
U.K. LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER Of THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1985 

NOTICE bi hereby given thaf the Order 
of the High Court of Justine (Chancery Dh 
rtsfool dated the 2Tui October 1986 
CONFIRMING THE REDUCTION OF 
CAPITAL of the above named HSBC 
HOLDINGS U.K. Limited from 
£100.000,000 to £56.001.000 and Uie 

Stipule approved by Ihe Court showing 

with respect to the capital of Uie Company 

as altered me several particulars required 

by the Above mentioned Art were regis- 

tered by the Registrar of Companies on the 
30 October 1986. 

Dated me 3rd day of November 1986 
STEPHENSON HARWOOD 
Saddler's HaU 

Colter Lane 

CheapsUe 
London EC2Y 6BS 


THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
STONEHIVE PROPERTIES LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant 
lo section 588 of Ihe Companies Art 1985. 
Uul a Meeting of Ute Creditor* nf me 
above-named company win or new ai 12 
Nottingham Place. London W.I.. on Fri- 
day. Ute 1 4 th day of November 1986. ol 
1 1 .00 o'clock in the lorenoon. for the pur- 
poses mentioned in sections 689 and 590 
of Uw said Act 

DATED Ud* 29th oay of October 1986 
By Order of Bit Board 

G Beaumont 
Director 


RE: GOLDEN TOWN APPAREL 

LIMITED 

BY' ORDER OF TH E HIGH COURT DAT- 
ED THE 24TH FEBRUARY 1984. 
NEVILLE ECKLEY F.CA of 332 
BRIGHTON ROAD, SOUTH CROYDON. 

HAS BEEN APPOINTED LIQUIDATOR 

OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY 
WITHOUT A COMMITTEE OF 
INSPECTION. 

DATED 1 1TH NOVEMBER 1986 


RE: BOLTONS & SON (INVEST) LIMITED 

BY ORDER OF THE HIGH COURT DAT- 
ED THE 17m March 1986. 
NEVILLE ECKLEY F.CA. OF 332. 
BRIGHTON ROAD- SOUTH CROYDON 

HAS BEEN APPOINTED LIQUIDATOR 

OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COM PANY 

WITHOUT A COMMITTEE OF 
INSPECTION. 

DATED fOUi November 1986 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


Designers. Permanent A temporary 
poviuon, A MSA SfteOaltei Recruitment 
Cnnulum* Ol 734 0532 


Please telephone ihe appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and 6 p.m. Monday 10 Friday, 
or between 9.30 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saturdays. 


Private Advertisers 
01 4S1 4000 

Birth. Marriage and Death Notices 


01 481 4000 


Birth and Death notices may be accepted over the telephone. 
For publication the following day please telephone Ini 1.30 pm. 
Marriage notices not appearing on the Court &. Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 


Trade Advertisers: 

Appointments 01 481 4481 

Public Appointments 01 481 1066 

Property 01 481 >986 

Travel 01 481 1989 

U.K. Holidays 01 488 3698 

Motors 01 481 4422 

Personal 01 481 1920 

Business to Business 01 481 1982 

Education 01 481 106b 


Forthcoming Marriages. Weddings, etc for the 
Court and Social Page 
Cannot be accepted by Telephone 
Please send Court and Social Page notices to: 

e_ fi. -i . j .. .'V _ 


Court & Social Advertising. 
Times Newspapers Ltd.. 
(.Pennington Street. 
London El 9DD 


Please allow at least 4S hours before publication. Anv enquiries 
tor the Court & Social page may be made after IOJO a.m. on 
01 822 9953. 


You may use your Access. Amcx. Dii 


































A 

pec 

pot 

Job 

ved 

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24 

Shine 
company 
admits 
liability 

By Out Foreign Staff 

' The Swiss company whose 
plant near Basle caused ®e 
spillage of 30 tons of tone 
chemicals into the Rhine two 
weeks ago yesterday admitted 
“fUIl moral responsibility for 
the disaster and promise to 
compensate those affected. 

The technical chief the 
Sandoz chemical com^ny, 

Mr Hans Winkler, said: “San- 
doz and the insurance compa- 
nies concerned are ready to 
ensure effective treatment ot 
demands for compensation. 

He said it was premature to 
assess the amount of damage, 
but suggested that the compa- 
ny’s insurance would meet tne 

costs. . . 

An official in Basle warned 
that unless rapid efforts were 
made to dean the riverbed m 
the vicinity of the accident 
flood waters threatened to 
wash more of the d estructive 
pesticide downstream. . 

Mr Benedict Hurrn, the 
environmental officer tor me 
Canton of Basle, said several 
hundred kilograms of chemi- 
cal deposits, including mer- 
cury, were lying in the Rhine 
and that they should be clean- 
ed up before heavy rams wash- 
ed them away. . 

The threat of heavy rainfall 
is also causing concern to 
Sandoz officials, who . are 
working to prevent further 
leaks from the burnt-out ware- 
house. They have weeteda 
foot-high wall around the site 
containing the contaminated 
water and have blocked drains 
The threat of new contami- 
nation and the effect of what 
has been described as Europe s 
worst environmental disaster 
for a decade has shaken the 
confidence of people in the 
Basle area, where chemicals 
are the main industry. 

Swiss embarrassment was 
heightened by claims from the 
West German Environment 
Minister, Herr Walter WaU- 
mann, that the leakage of her- 
bicides into the Rhine by an- 
other Swiss company was 
more damaging than at first 
thought. 

He said more harmful toxic 
chemicals had been acaden- 
taDy spilled into the Rhine 
than the Swiss company, Ci- 
ba-Geigy, had first admitted 

Initial health "tests by 
Sandoz medical staff suggest 
that “the population of the 

region has not been harmed , 

although people exposed to 
the gases have complained ot 
headaches and chest and 
throat pains. _ 

Recrimination wave, page 


Today’s events 


THE TIM^ FRIDAY NOVEM BER 14 1986. 


☆ fr * & •ft ft ^ 




.yirty ^ — 

to Labour cast 

n.i* hu vesteroay 


But by vesterdav, the big 
Mr Healey we*® notodgprm 

Ete&ws= 


aswsgs 

ssssswSs 
tsHssa-SS 

The debate had eu» __ pgjfiaps pursu- 

promisxngly^^J^^ ^ ^ researches int0 
when the Pnme Jde pubbe 

launched an anack ti* KfeMr Hesdey bad appar- 

KneihtoW 

^Tssi'tfssss 

jffisas Dirty Den- on the stretch 


tv**** 


i twi ns aa ■*- — . . 

At least one assumes that 
Mr Healey is i^Detio 0 ^ 

SStSerg 

amazing hfcstyte^ 

K jmiching of American nuc- 
lear weapons from Britain 

S Shim the Wg fove- 

hate figure in the stow that 
now goes out daily fro® the 
Labour left — East Euro- 


femily poverty . 

asRagta; 

t#»rt«ted in the other. Or 
rather MFs who make a tot of 
on television, or at 

Jri me time d urii« Con^w 

Questions, about edu*»tioo, 
tend also to do it about *uch 

5*£»m P°Sl 

TtoSdifferentfiomarg*- 
iiK debates on the subjects. 
That is much less fun. 

Poverty didnm^®uch 
of a look in, excem the allied 
poverty of teachers being 






[ 

C 


Royal engagements 
The Duke and Duchess of 
York attend a lunch given by foe 
Corporation of Loodoi^Gund- 
hall, 1; and later, die Duke of 
York, as President, the Royal 
Aero Club, accompanied, by toe 
Duchess of York, chairs toe 
panel of judges of toe Pres- 


Ceotinued from page 1 
by the Stock Exchange to say 
nothing until the exchanges 
own investigations are over. 

Morgan Grenfell has main- 
tained from the start that it is 
satisfied that no one else in 
Morgan Grenfell is concerned 
mtheaffitir. 

The special Stock Exchange 
committee investigat in g Mr 
Collier’s share dealings has 
decided to refer the matter to 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry. If the ministry 
considers the evidence strong 
enough it will pass the case to 
the Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

As a senior director of 
Morgan Grenfell Securities, 
Mr Collier was in possession 
of information on a “need to 
know” basis which would be 
kept secret from other 
employees in that part of the 
company. 

Morgan Grenfell insists that 

there has been no breach of its 
system of Chinese . Walls 
preventing conflicts of interest 
between the various parts ol 
the company. 


ident's Rotex Trophy. Gold- 
smiths' Hall, 230. 

Princess Anne. Preside nt, the 
British Knitting .and Ocrthmg 
Export Council, visits CHovctau, 
London Road, Wellingborough, 
Norfoants. 10: and visits toe 
Royal Army Veterinwy Train- 
ing Centre, Melton Mowbray. 
11.30. 

The Duke of Gloucester un- 
veils a plaque to celebrate the 


UVl-TTV*— 

- , something of a slanging match ist nations” and Iran is on that 

Coatraned frontpage 1 as questions are greeted with a hst 

Last month, it is believed purine “No comment” . 
another delivery of arms predsely who chartered the 
reached Iran. Twelve days ago . , planes, their exact 

Mr David Jacobsen, director ^ ^financed the 

of the American University undear. 

Hospital, was released after 17 said the Iranians 


Members of the Danish 
seamen’s union have recently 
claimed that they had been 
involved in shipping arms to 
Iran from Israel Last mo nth s 
delivery is said to have been 


Although the Aamunsua- 
tion insists that it has violated 

A-snaa 

ffiFBS aatasMK 


known 

ship. . 

Iran has for some tmte been 

hungry for * variety of arms 
amT spares. It has sogfat 
spares for its F-4 and. F-14 
fighters. 


Gorbachov 
lobbies 
Thatcher 

Contmaedfrom page 1 

The White House has said 
that President Reagan agreed 
at Reykjavik to the dimina- 
tion of ballistic missiles but 
not other nuclear weapons. 
The Government considers 
even this too ; ambitious, 
con taining a “dream element” 
Which is unrelated to political 
reality. Britain would favour a 
more limited pact to e l i m in a te 
intermediate-range nuclear 
weapons from Europe, bin 
Moscow’s “an dr nothing 
approach has virtually ruled 
that out. 

• HELSINKI: The Kremlin's 

• — leader, Mr Yegor 
uhmkV, announced here tost 
night that the Soviet Umon 
has dismantled all memum- 
range missile launchers from 
the Kola peninsula and mow 
of them from the Leningrad 
and Baltic military districts 
(OUi Kivinnen writes). . . 

Mr Ugachey, who tog been 
having talks with Fmntsb 
leaders for two days, retard 
to specify the type or number 

of launchers in question. 


Left — Easi siuru- uovCTty ot 

neons. , wound down by the Secretary 

in the Queen’s .Spew* for Education,. Mr 
DUl> — Rak er. Nor did- education. 

The debate was almost en- 
tirely about the complexities 
of teachers* pay. That is how 
most politicians define 
“education". 

They do not see it as being 
about Latin gerunds, smelly 
and useful experiments dur- 
ing chemistry lessons, and 
discussing the reasons for 

Austria-Hungary’s annex- 
ation of Bosnia and Herze- 
govina. Indeed, tte j mfr 
historical figure refereed to 
was Burnham. Amid some 
talk abo6t proved technical 
« «kA Anlir ltAtn fit 


bonus 


debate, the - ■ -r rr- 
ri gh t-wing tabloid pokj*®? 0, 
Mrs That^r, paWisl^a 
shock revelation about Den s 

P ^coriding to her, m 1981 
he was asked what he would 
do if Labour adopted uni- 
lateral nuclear &sarmanwnL 
He replied that to would figrt 
to change the policy and that, 
if tofefled, he wouldnot 
accept office in a Labour 
government 

Since then, the labour 


Party coma 

untoteral disannanent tra 

has showed no signs of mi 
accepting a part in.me next 
Labour cast. He is stffi sitong. 
on the labour front bench- 
That was how he stayed 
after Mis Thatcher publi- 
cized the 1981 incident To- 
ries jeered at him to answer. 

-He confined him self to 
muttering inaudiWy. Perhaps 
he was making a heart- 
rending plea to the media to 
leave him alone. It had all 

hapjpeneda long time ago,, to 
seemed to be saying. Sore, he 

had once been a moderate. 
But in 1981; be had been a 


|HIK. illMU jnw— - -- — — . 

education, the only item ot 
engineering anparanis re- 
ferred to was the Burnham 

machinery. 

We need look no further to 
explain the decline of British 
education. It is even said that 
Dirty Den is to be taught m 
Cambridge English seminars 
soon. What has Mr Healey 
got to do with our literary 
heritage? 

Expert speeches about pay 
weremade by Mr Baker, the 
Labour education spokes- 
man, Mr Giles Ra dice, and 


: man, Mr uues muk*, 

But m 1981; be tod been a Liberal education spokes- 
kid of 64. All toaskedwasto: MrCtement Freud. The 

be left alone to gpt on with ms . surprise was that the 

- — -.nhe, u^aieducalioii spokesman 

was Mr Freud. Apparently, 
be has been so for years. . 
Is to not a Gambler and 


ue jtuaiuuw ^ or--. — - , 

tete vision career and to oe a 

decent extremist like anyone 

else in the Labour Party. 

It was a tremendous story 
with which to launch the new 
Queen’s Speech debate: It is 
stifl possible that Mr Healey 
will think of an answerbdiore 
.< _ wpnn«- 


somewhat raffish? The tab- 
loid p&fe should look into 
tfiis matter. Keep This Man 
From Oar Kids, Isay. 


k- 

r. 


the times information service 


As consumption of chicken 
continues to rise sbtw«s » 
advised to. took om for tto 
Quality British Chicken wtart 
ensures they arc gettmg the 
value for money. Small oaa 
turkeys may be m short stoW 
for Christmas and .win oe 
slightly more expensive than 

to* y** 


The Times Crossword Pnzzie No 17,203 


C 


[ 


^F^capiial loss for blunder 

4 Gave febe identity and dis- 
appeared (6.3). 

9 He improves if no red meal 

is cooked (9). . 

10 Author of “The Spanish 
Armada" you initially find 
pompous (5). 

11 Exclusive he may be. using 
Sirand entrance with fellow 
member (8.7). 

12 Get a small bite from bees 
in the river (6). 

14 Mountain retreat, invigorat- 
ing and harmless (J8). 

17 Indigestible food giving us a 
hard time l8j. 

19 Stick present on bill W- 
22 Removal of black from the 
works improves output i i ai- 

24 S African antelope or tailless 
bird (5). 

25 Made to work in a sort ot 
sludge (9). 

26 Police officer Gogol made a 

General (9). . o 

27 Sort of vessel in which Boot 

of the Beast appeared (5). 

DOWN . 

1 You sav 1 am to go in nrst. 

What a surprise! (3-61. 

2 Piped music is inevitably so 
shrill (5). 

3 Breed of Rusrito parrot? 

< 3 ' 4 >- 

4 Small shrub planted in what 
sounds like sphagnum 161. 

5 Dons have a new bible to 
write (8k 

Concise Crossword 


6 An achievement to turn to 
account (7). 

7 Third man. say,. might rateh 
it — a feint possibility (j.oj. 

8 Cook's vessel — could it 
have been a ferry? (5). 

13 Waste bits of potato - we’ve 
got good stocks (4,5). 

15 Made orderly put an end to 
immorality (7.2). 

16 Being in the dark. I allow no 
intrusion (8). 

18 Male part in the Orient for 
the leading lady (7). 

20 Verv dense, these stars, 
though animated on the 
screen (7). 

21 Derelict or antiquated office 
. holder (6). 

22 Climbing, qne. would get 
very warm inside this gar- 

. ment (5). 

23 Short opening paaagp - it 
could be a psalm (5). 

Solution to Pnzzie No 17,282 


1985 Civic Trust Award for I Food JHTCeS 
^oration of Dennnuk HiU 
Station and its ccmvrasion mip 
The Phoenix and Firkin Public 
House, SE5, 11-15- 
Prince Mkhad K»JJ 
presents awards for the b«i 
K ept Station m Bntish Rail, 

House of Lords. 12 noon. 

New exhibitions 
Recent work on paper and 
canvas by John Cooke; The 
COach House, 9a Mam St, 

Kirkby Lonsdale, via Candorth, 

Lanc^ Mon to Sat 9.30 to 6. Sun 
II to 5 (ends Dec 14L 
23rd winter exhibition ot a 
changing mixed coll^on oi 
drawnre, paintings and scuip- 
tureS^S artists: Cohn JcUtcoe 
Gallery, 82 Portland Sr Man- 

chester-MonioFri 10 lo 6, Sat 1 

! to 5 (ends 28). 

Music 

Concert by Halle Or- 
chestra; Dewsbury Town Hall. 

W Yorks, 7.30. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Hmver- 
sity Great HalL Exeter, 7.30. 

Recital by Kym Cooper (so- 
prano) and Phillip Snmh (pi- 
ano); BinninghMn Catiiedral, 

Colmore Row, 1.10. 

Redial by Gy orgy Pauk (vi- 
olin) and Peter Frank] (piano); 

The Music HalL The Square, 

Shrewsbury, 7.45. 

Organ recital by Peter Good- 
man; Hull City HalL 1230. 

Concert by the London Oboe 
Trio; Fermoy Centre, 

L3 Concert by the BBC 

harmonic Ondiescra; L annw ta - 
University, 730. 

Concert by the Ve™°yden 
Concert Band; Hmfidd Hi^t 
School, Doncaster, 7.30. 

(Sot by the Orchestra da 
Camera and the Midlands 
Chamber Orchestra; Attoan 
Bouh Hall Birmingham- 7-m 
Concert by foe Anuci Clara- 
ber Group; Clifton CaihediaL 
Bristol. 8. 

General 

Eastern Counties Craft Mar- 
ket; Rhodes Centre. B*sh°PS 
Stanford, Hers, today and to- 
morrow 10 to 6, Sun 10 to 5. 


Roads 


Wales and West: M4: Various 
E and westbound lane ckKurra 
between junctions 34 
Glamorgan; contraflow, jmo: 
Nrathbound carriagew ay occ ed 
at junction 14; contraflow , 

contraflow between XJsk ana 
Coldra, Gwent (junction 24), 


““6“ - j 

be unchanged. ___ 

Meat and poultry on promo- 
tion in shops and supermarkets 
include: Tesco: pork chojw 
£138 a lb and New Zealand 
lamb shoulder 66p a lb; Presto, 
home-produced lamb £1. 36a fo 
and bimh chops £1.76 a IK 
Fresh fish prices are up yet 
y g iin this week but the quah^ 
offoose available is wry 
Large cod fillets, i*uce and 
whiungare up about 3p a lb suxi 
Son and Dover sole are also 
more expensive. Sprats are g oo d 
value at 55p a lb. The aW 
price of peeled pawm is«.66a 
fc but foe range couid be as tow 
as £2 in some area® and as high 
as £8 in others. Cockles, mus- 
sels, whelks and shrimp are 

around £1 a PV® 1 *- _ t 

The choice m fruit is mod at 
present and satsnmas at 25-45p 
a lb are much sweeter than they 
were a few weeks a^x Oranges 
S-20p lemons 8-18p each. 

apples 25-50n. 

Delicious mid GraMy Smith 
apples 25-45p a lb. CttufcenM 
pears 25-46p a lb and avocados 

from 25p e ach - n hin 

Home grown root vegetaoies 
are plentiful and good value. 
English green cabbaa»10-20p a 
lb, celery 35-45pT^fo«^- 
flowor 25-50p each and 
sprout 9-20p a lb, are aD^ beg 
buys. Imported broccoli » 
slightly cheaper this week at 
between 50p and 85p a lb. 


Barton dtiojw, — rr 

Chester, continues to canse de- 
lays. A49: Roafowrks on 
Warrington Bridge, Warrmgton; 
various road ctosure^ ai the 
junctions with A49/A50 / 

A5060/A5061. 

Scotland: A82: Sn^e hne 
traffic on foe Gtasgow to Fort 
William road at Bndsc oi 
Orehy, Strafodyde. 
bound inside lane —— — - 

pear the junction with the M o. 
westbound carriageway caosea; 
two way traffic eastbonnd- 

Information sawdied by AA 


The pound 


Top Films 


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London: 


Anni versaries 

Births: Lucas von H2to- 
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land. 


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LyelL geologist Rinnordy-Scotr 
i-v«i i7Q7- Claude Monet. 

Leo Bxekplapd, 


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3 ( 2 )MonaLisa 

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pjwfilris3E*e 230J10 20MO 

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MM Rica tadacHTJ 

nw /rind« ctood down W a 

iwk.7. 


Weather 
forecast 

A deep depression to the 
Soflceland will maintain 
a generally showery 
»riy airstreamLOver 
most of Britain, while 
mino r frontal trenghs nm 
northwards over western 
districts, giving a parod 
of more organised ram- 

d am t o midiri^ht . 

London, SE,_c^r^ &. E 

13 W blinds, N WMaa, MW. 

SSti SSra later, wi nd 
sw fresh to strong; max tamp 12C 

Srsagtrarttg 

fresh; max tem^ 12 C 

ds, Moray Hrtb,.—, 

Orimsy, SIwBands 

Rrtlw ctorfy, ^Brscr tongar 
outbreaks ofrrin;wk ri mwy 
southerly moderate or town; max 

moderate; ma x temp IOC POf k 
OuMock to towemiw and SiflP- 

day. Sunny Intervals “fiJ'SESS 
showers tomorrow , tot her drag 
and rain spreadkigfro mfoewon 
Sunday. Wear normal temperatures. 


7.16am <.13 pm 


1295.7. 


1797: 

1840: 


inventor of JSakelite. Ghent. 



anasaaiaEQH 


jmnnnriTa raPtgLflJrtHH 


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pans, 

inventor 01 ““r;’ 

1863; Pandit Jawaharal Neta^ 
first prime minister oflnda 
1947-64, Allahabad, 1889; .Sir 
Frednid Baimns, physician, 
/ Ulis ion. Ontario. 1891. 

Deaths: Nefl G*ya» London, 
1687; Georg WHhetm Hegej, 
Berlin. 1 83j iBobfft Wlute h j ^ . 

Roberts, 1st M Roberts, fie d- 
inaishaL Sa»t-Omer. 1914; 
Hector Munro (*^alti"). wnteij 
killed in action, 1916: Manuel 
de Falla. Alta Gracia, Argentina. 
1946. 

The first London to Brighton 
motor run, 1896. 


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Full nwen: Mowmtw 16 

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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




TIMES 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


stock markft 

FT 30 Share 
1295.7 (-9.4) 

FT-SE100 
1644.6 (-9.9) 

Bargains 
27780 (32691) 

USM (Datastream) 
130.50 (-0.41) 

THE POUND 

US DoHar 
1.4245 (-0.0015) 

W German mark 
2.8647 (-0.0215) 

Trade-weighted 

68.2 (-0.3) 


T&N scents victory 
with new £271m 
bid for AE group 


Hoover 
bonus 

British employees of Hoo- 
ver, the US domestic appli- 
ance group, are offered a 
lifetime pension contributions 
holiday in a package to cut the 
surplus in the company's pen- 
sion fund. 

The surplus is estimated at 
£123 milli on. Hoover’s British 
workforce has fallen from a 
peak at 16,000 to 5,500. The 
company has proposed wind- 
ing up the existing scheme and 
replacing it with a new scheme 
with improved benefits. 

The distribution wiH total 
£87 million, of which £42 
million will go towards im- 
proved pennons. Hoover will 
taicf! £27 million and the 
Inland Revenue £18 million. 

Employees had ofcyected to 
earlier proposals to split the 
cash equally between the com- 
pany, employees and the Rev- 
enue. Hoover said yesterday it 
felt the package met all reason- 
able objections to the earlier 
proposals. 

Profits rise 

Laud Securities, the UK’s 
largest property company, re- 
vealed a 7.2 per cent rise in 
interim pretax profits for the 
half year to September 30 
1986 to £58.1 million. The 
interim dividend is 3-2 5p per 
share, a 12 per cent increase 
and *ar "m g « per share stood 
at 7.5!p compared with 6.46p 
for the same, period Are pre- 
vious year. 

Tempos, page 29 

Wellcome up 

Wellcome, the 

pbamaceuticals group, raised 
its pretax profits for the year 
to August 31 by 3 per cent to 
£125.3 million on turnover 
virtually unchanged at 
£1,005.4 million. A dividend 
of I.32p has been dedared. 

Tempas, page 29 

Royal record 

Third quarter results at 
Royal Insurance showed an 
spectacular recovery in the 
United States and a good 
performance in Britain. Pretax 
profits were £105.7 million 
compared with £34.4 million 
for the previous third quarter 


Sir Francis Tombs, chair- 
man of the engineering group 
Turner & NewaH, last night 
matte his long-awaited re- 
entry into the battle for con- 
trol of AE group. 

T&N is making a renewed 
and final offer of £271 million 
in c ash and shares for the 
beleaguered automrve en- 
gineering group, which is on 
the receiving end of another 
bid from Mr Robert 
Maxwell's Hollis group. 

Sir Francis also disclosed 
what may prove to be the 
card in the tong-fun- 
_ght for AE. In addition 
to the near-30 per cent holding 
which failed narrowly in 
September, T&N now has the 
baddng of unnamed parties 
who can deliver a further 14 
per cent With dose on 44 per 
cent of AE shares under his 
belt. Sir Francis looks to be in 
a dominant position. 

Terms of the new offer are 
11 new T&N shares and £8 
in rash for every 10 shares in 
AE. On the basis oflast night's 
closing price of 174p for 
T & N shares, the offer values 
each AE share at 27 Ip. 


By John Bell, City Editor 
Sir Francis said last night; 
“We have renewed our offer 
because we believe in the 
powerful logic of combining 
AE and Turner & Newall and 
the benefits which can be 
expected to accrue to 
shareholders and empl oyees 
as a result of the merger. 

“The board of AE has tried 

to pre-empt a renewed offer by 
reCOm mwirfing shareholders 
to accept an offer from Hollis 
which has no industrial logic 
whatsoever and which is 
unnattractive on terms." 

On November 4, Hoffis, the 
much smaller furniture and 
timber arm of Mr Maxwell's 
business empire, emerged as a 
white knight in an agreed bid 
for AE. The move came less 
than a week after the City 
Takeover Panel gave per- 
mission for a renewed offer 
from T&N after a month-long 
investigation into share deals 
during the first takeover bat- 
lie. The investigation ended 
with the cerisure of AFs 
advisers, Cazenove and Hill 
Sam uel. 

The Hollis offer was warmly 


Manufacturing 
output up 1.2% 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

Industrial production 
showed a healthy rise in the 
third quarter, helped by a 
September surge in output. 

There was a strong, 1.2 per 
cent rise in manufacturing 
output in September, although 
die figures may be erratic. 

They included a 21 per cent 
increase in car output in 
September, largely reversed in 
October; accoraing to Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry 
figures yesterday. 

In the latest three months, 
manufacturing output was up 
13 Tier cent on the previous 
three months, but o nly 0-9 per 

cent up on the third quarter of 

last year because of a down- 
turn in manufacturing output 
in the second half of last year 
and the early part of this year- 
Industries enjoying a robust 


welcomed by AfTs chairman. 
Sir John CoQyear. He said 
then that Mr Maxwell's in- 
tended strategy of developing 
Hollis as a high technology- 
based man ufacturing group 
was entirely consistent with 
the aims of AE. 

One of the more controver- 
sial aspects of the Hollis deal 
was that control of the com- 
bined AE-Hollis group would 
switch to Mr MaxweU's mas- 
ter company, Pergamon. 

Sir Francis commented last 
night that Pergamon is not 
controlled in Britain but by 
Pergamon Holding Founda- 
tion, a trust based in Liechten- 
stein, the beneficiaries of 
which remain secret. 

T&N confirmed its earlier 
forecast that profits for this 
year wiH be greater than those 
for 1985 ami also repeated its 
promise that shareholders will 
receive a 50 per cent increase 
in total dividend this year. 

AE shares dosed last night 
at 268p, just below the level of 
TAN'S final offer, while 
Hollis shares were 'unchanged 
at76p. 


Defections 
may end in 
court fight 



25 ' 

SPORT 35 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


Brierley 
lifts stake 
in Ocean 
to 23.6% 

By Cliff Fetthsun 

Mr Ron Brieriey.the New 
Zealand entrepreneur, raided 
the stock market yesterday to 
lift his stake in his potential 
uikeover victim Ocean Trans- 
port and Trading to 23.6 per 
cent. . . . 

Mr Brierley - who is bid- 
ding more than £300 million 
for the company - already 
holds a 10 per cent stake but 

■ -- r.u _ CA 1 millinn 


^ raised it with a £41 million 

Virgin s quarter-mile queue 

... . ... > — ot I InuHc Rank in * 40 pashar&. tcd ths 


The Virgin c hair man, Mr Richard Branson, 
left the rock market behind for a few minutes 
yesterday as his company beaded for its well 
publicised entry to the Stock Market. The 
£250 million share flotation of the records and 
entertainment group closed oversubscribed 
after queues of investors stretching almost a 
quater of a nDe thronged the City with last- 
minute applications. Mr Branson met prospec- 


tive shareholders at Lloyds Bank in 
Bishopsgatc. where extra staff had been 
recruited to handle the issue. Investors had to 
tender at a ra«n»n um price of 120p. The final 
striking price is expected to be announced 
today. About 1 00.000 applications for the 
flotation have been received at prices of 
between 140p and 180p. according to es- 
timates last night. 


Computer overload brings 
further disruption to SE 

n /Wj CTj CT 


recovery in the July-Septetn- 
ber period included chemi- 
cals, up 3-2 per cent on the 
previous three months, and 
electrical and instrument en- 
gineering, up 3.9 per cent 
Bui output was down in 
| metals, motor vehicles and 
— in spite of the sharp 
! WK .jmber rise in car output, 
[and man-made fibres. Food, 


drink and tobacco, clothing 
and footwear, ' and other 
manufacturing sectors showed 
increases in line with the 
overall rise in manufacturing 
output 

Industrial production as a 
whole, including energy out- 
put was up 0.7 per cent in 
September, and by 1.5 percent 
in the third quarter, compared 
with the previous quarter. 
Third-quarter North Sea oil 
output rose 63 per cent 

The industrial production 
figures, while more encourag- 
ing than for some time, under- 
line that the output of 

consumer goods is not keeping 

up with high-street sp en d in g. 

Consumer goods output 
was up 1 per cent on a year 
earlier, while consumer spend- 
ing rose 5 per cent However, 
manufacturers may have run 
down stocks to accommodate 
extra spending. 

• The pound fell further 
yesterday but recovered some 
ground. It dosed 0.3 lower 
against leading currencies at 
an average value of 68.2 after 
earlier felling to 68. Against 
the dollar it was % cent lower 
at $1.4227 


Profits up 

Storehouse, the Habit- 
at/Moihercare/BHS combine, 
announced its first interim 
results since the merger. Pre- 
tax profits for the 24 weeks to 
September 14 rose 20 per cent 
to £37 million. The dividend 
was increased 15 per cent u> 
23p. 


£22m rights call by 
John Waddington 

By Richard Lander 


Bid talks 

Glasgow Stockholders Trust 
has received an approach 
which may lead to an oner, a 

further announcement wuljie 

made "as soon as possible. 


WaB Street 26 
Co News 26^9 
Commeut 27 
Stock Market 27 
Mooey Mrkts 28 
Foreign Each 28 


Traded Opts 28 

IhrftTrests 3® 
Cbmaoditfcs 39 
USM Prices 30 
SfaarePrices 31 


John Waddington, the 
sing, games and busi- 
ness forms group, is raising 
£22.4 milli on through a rights 
issue, most of which will be 
ii yri to finance expansion of 
its plastics and packaging 
I interests on both sides of the 
Atlantic. 

Waddington has already 
[earmarked a home for £8 
million of the one-for-four 
issue, which was announced 
alongside a 60 per cent in- 
crease in pretax profits. 

A total of £4 million will be 
invested in plant and equip- 
ment for the recently-acquired 
Comet Products, an American 
company making oven-proot 
plastic trays, while a similar 
amount will be spent to 


inp made in Label Converters, 
another new Waddington 
company 

The rights shares, which are 
underwritten by Kleinwort 
Benson, are being issued at 
180p. The existing shares fell 
lOp to 205p on news of the 
issue. % 

Figures for the 27 weeks to 
October 4, which inclu ded a 
jump in pretax profits from 
£3.2 million to £53 million, 
showed Waddington’s 
increasing dependence on 
packaging, which now ac- 
counts for half of group sales 
and 63 per cent of trading 
profits. 

Famine s per share, restated 
after a four-for-one bonus 
issue in June, rose 35 per rent 


amount will tie speni. w i»ue 

expand the British cartons and to 7 5p and foe rntenm ±vj- 
6 ’astics businesses. demd was raised from 2.6p to 

Further investments are be- 2.9p. 


By Richard Thomson 

Ranking Correspondent 

The mass defection of staff 
from W I Gut, the stock- 
broker also known as Wko, 
appeared to be escalating yes- 
terday as it looked likely that 
ap to 80 people would be 
moving to Swiss Bamfe 
Corporation. 

Most of the defections are 
happening in Wire's Far East 
operation where there has 
been foog-standmg disaMitem 

Miwg staff Apart from SBC, 
Barclays de Zoete Weddis 
also Interested in attracting 
staff from Wire, altinwsgli 
BZW is bettered to be aainly 
interested in the London end 
of die operation. BZW has 
already reomted a team of sa 
Japanese Eurocoavertible 
stocks experts from Wico this 
month. 

Mr Richard Davey, foe 
ffpanrtal director of EXCO 
In ter national which owns 
Wire, said yesterday: “The 
numbers of staff who have 
already given notice exceed 
fln» origsKsd estimates." Al- 
though he did not give an exact 
number, first reports of the 
dejections saggested that 26 
directors, analysts and sales- 
men were leaving. 

“The situation is in a state 
oFflnx. The eventual number 
of resignations have yet to be 
added. 


Dealings on the Stock Ex- 
change were disrupted yet 
again yesterday when foe 
mar kers SEAQ share trading 
$ystem was temporarily dosed 
down amid its worst problems 
since it was launched on Big 
Bang day, October 27. 

The system was shut down 
for about 30 minutes in early 
business as about 10 market- 
makers found it impossible to 
feed in secret signing-on codes 
and quote their prices. There 
were further problems 
throughout the day as partici- 
pants were unable to update 
prices and report trades. Sev- 
eral firms found themselves 
switched off from the system 
as their input lines to the 
| SEAQ computer foiled. 

A Slock Exchange spokes- 
man said that the problems 
! were due to overloading 


By Our City Staff 
of foe Topic price information 
system. He said SEAQ was 
shut down on the principle 
that aO firms should have 
equal access to the markeL 

“Some firms had problems 
this morning. After that parts 
of the communications sys- 
tems of some firms ran into 
problems. There are still five 
firms which foce sporadic 
problems," foe spokesman 
added. 

Mr David Rochester, a 
mana g in g director of Merrill 
Lynch, one of the firms af- 
fected, said: -SEAQ had a 
hardware problem which im- 
peded our ability to pain entry 
to the system until around 
930am" 

A spokesman for County 
Securities said: “From 9am to 
2pm we had problems up- 
dating our prices. We sus- 


pended almost all our dealing 
through SEAQ because people 
get very annoyed with you 
when yon say that the screen 
price is not firm because you 
haven’t been able to update 
it" 

Firms affected by foe prob- 
lems, which have dogged 
SEAQ since its launch at Big 
Bang, resorted to dealing 
through foe floor of the Stock 
Exchange, although some 
continued to update prices 
and trades through back-up 
work-stations. 

In reply to the adverse 
publicly that SEAQ has at- 
tracted, Sir Nicholas 
Goodison, the chairman of foe 
Stock Exchange, said in a 
letter to The Times on Octo- 
ber 31 that the system had 
worked for more than 97 per 
cent of scheduled service time. 


260pa share. __ . 

A spokesman for IEP, the 
investment vehicle through 
which he is mounting foe bid, 
said : “This proves there are 
enough shareholders around 
who think our terms are 
reasonable." 

But Ocean Transport, 
which is bitterly resisting the 
takeover attempt, hit back in a 
letter to its own shareholders 
claiming Mr Brierley was try- 
ing to get the company on foe 
cheap. 

Mr Bill Menzies- Wilson, 
the chairman, said: “The bid 
values Ocean on a 
price/eamings ratio of only 
13. Clearly, a bid at such a low 
multiple is nowhere near ade- 
quate to secure control of a 
rapidly expanding company 
with excellent growth 
prospects." . . 

IEP dismissed the claim by 

saying “We have heard all 
this before." 

Mr Brierley, who is keen to 
acquire Ocean Transport to 
integrate its transport opera- 
tions with those of Tozer 
Kerns! ey & Millbourn in 
which he owns a controllfog 
stake, recently lifted his offer 
for the company by £48 
million to £306 million. 

Under Takeover Panel rules 
he is free to carry on buying in 
the market up to foe 29 per 
cent level 

Ocean Transport shares yes- 
terday finished at 254p, up 4p. 


Plessey wins £75m 
Rapier radar order 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 


One vote throws out 
London Wall plan 


Plessey has been awarded a 
contract worth more than £75 
million to supply the surveil- 
lance and target acquisition 
radar for the British Aero- 
space Rainer 2000 air defence 
system ordered yesterday by 
foe Ministry of Defence. 

The announcement came as 
Sir John Clark, chairman and 
chief executive of Plessey, 
revealed a 24 per cent increase 
! in pretax profits to £87.4 
milli on for the six months to 
the end of September. 

He also said Plessey was 
I seeking approval from the 
French authorities for System 
X to be considered as foe 
alternative digital exchange 


for foe national telephone 
network. 

The jump in Ptessey’s first- 
half profits was mainly due to 
a sharp improvement in foe 
telecommunications business 
where operating profits un- 
proved from £23.8 million to 
£37.9 million, thanks to a £6 
million turnround at the US 
subsidiary Stromberg-Carlson 
and much higher deliveries of 
System X equipment to Brit- 
ish Telecom. 

The results, however, foiled 
to liftthe shares which slipped 
lOp to 180p. Sales in foe half 
rose by £30.3 million to 
'million. 

Comment, page 27 


The Corporation of foe City 
of London has decided by a 
hair's breadth to overturn the 
decision of its pfenning 
committee to allow MEFC, 
mie of Britain’s largest prop- 
erty companies to demolish 
Lee House on London Wall 
and replace it noth 3fl©,000 sq 
ft of new offices designed to 
accommodate financial 
corporations in die aftermath 
of Big Bang. 

Mr Michael Cassidy, the 
chairman of the Corporation's 
planning committee, said last 
night “We are roost dis- 
appointed especially in view of 
tk closeness of the decision.” 
The vote was 57 against and 
56 in favour. 

“The overwhelming need for 

the City to meet demand fur 


such property within foe 
Square Mile remains as ur- 
gent as ever. We must now 
consider foe other applications 
for London Wall ami judge the 
public response to this 
decision," he sai d. 

Last night, MEPC Mid it 
was reviewing foe situation on 
whether to appeal or go ahead 
with a new application. 

Six other applications are in 
train to redevelop tendings 
lining London Wall and which 
are now considered inadequate 
to cope with the demands of 
Fig Bang. And the City is 
feeing the threat of an alter- 
native 10 million sq ft finan- 
cial centre in foe shape of 
Canary Wharf in London's 
Do cklands planned by a for- 
eign bw»kwig consortium. 


Ex co is actively considering 
taking legal action ova- the 
defections. Mr Davey saH that 

Wico had a total staff of abont 
400 in London and foe Far 
uw and that although the 
defections were a Mow, the 
company bad already began to 
repair the damage by recruit- 
ing new staff. He said some 
existing staff had given assur- 
ances that they would be 
staying with the company- 


£18m hotel 

Rush & Tompkins, tire con- 
tractor and developer, is to 
build an £18 million hotel next 
to the Scottish exhibition and 
conference centre in Glasgow- 

The 300-bedroom hotel vrin be 
operated by Forum Hotels 
IntemationaL 


Clyde in £14m 
Berkeley bid 

Clyde Petroleum is offering 
to acquire foe whole of the 
issued store capital of Berke- 
ley Exploration for £13.96 
million in an agreed bid. Tins 
is well above Ranger Ons 
cash offer of £1 1 million. 

Clyde is offering 11 of its 
own stores for every 10 
Berkeley shares. The share 
offer is worth approximately 
57p a share, and there is a full 
rash alternative worth 51.7p. 

The terms of the merger 
mean that there will be no 
dilution and Clyde's chair- 
man. Mr Colin Phipps, said 
; last night that Clyde was not 
paying a premium. He said 
foal the merged company 
would have more than 60 
milli on barrels of oil and gas 
reserves and 5 producing 
oilfields in the North Sea. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 

ESX£s 1889.48 (-4^2) 

Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 


Hong Kong: 


17438.47 (-9.43) 
22 


-Gen 282.6 

Sydney: AO 137ai 

1386.41*1*) 

E&==*KW 

544.001+0.50) 

London dosing price* ps9 ® 31 


INTEREST RATES 


IB% 


I WI*W 

ESSSastt* 

toying rate 
■’rimaFteteTJW 

SSSw**” 



London: 

^ Si. 4245 

& OM2JSS47 

CSwfr2^6 

FFr9.3803 

-Ven2Mj92 


NffwYOffc 
$: £1.4260* 

S: DM 2 . 0145 * 
&SwFr1.6700' 

SLFFrS^TS* 

& Yen 160.85* 

£ IndoxillM, 


•£§^,4 SDRHLB41336 


main price changes 


RISES: 
Grand Met 



Redfeam 




462p(+14p 

rjflss 

220pc+1 _ 


Op) 


FALLS: 

British Aerospace 

Smiths Ind. 

Untew 

Waddington 

Storehouse 


- 487p(-11p) 
_ 262p(-l3pj 
2Q28pI-22pj 


1C Gas 

Tate & Lyle 

FCopson 

BPS ind- 

Blue Circle 

Hflflcai Bar 


205P -m 
31 5p -10p 
lOOp -16p 
566pi-12p 

584p -lip 
103p -ISp 
509p -12p 
639p -12P 
440p -10p 
180p -10P 


Pries* ante* at 4pm 


GOLD 

USKtonFMnff 
AM $40385 — 
d0S8$407J 
28650) 

g^2t«78(M07.eo* 


north SEA oil 


Bond (Dee. 
* Penates 


[$14180) 


Gas shares 
‘yield’ 20% 

By Martin Baker 

Small investors in British 
Gas will have a strong finan- 
cial incentive to bold their 
share s. 

A combination of gas 
vouchers, worth a £10 .dis- 
count against bills on 150 
shares, and a forecast gross 
dividend of £5.63 to be paid in 
October, 1987, will provide a 
net return of 208 per cent on a 
■winiimim outlay of £75, says 
NM Rothschild, bankers to 
the privatization. 

The calculation of foe cap- 
ital outlay assumes that foe 
second tranche of payment 
will be £50. 

“This high yield is to 
encourage people not to sell 
straight away, while foe bonus 
store dement is designed to 
hold them for three years," 
said Mr Michael Richardson, 
Rothschild's managing direc- 
tor of corporate finance. 

Today is the last day to 
register priority. Customers 
who wish to do so should call 
British 0272 272 272. 


Bonn cuts back its 
spending targets 


Boob (Reuter) — The West 
German government has 
scaled down its forecast for 
1987 new net borrowing to 
below DM23 bffliw from 
igmal target of DM243 
Dion (£838 billion). 

The revised figures aunem 
a statement by Herr Fnedncn 
Voss, parliamentary secretory 
at foe finance romistty^New 

Herr Voss also said spend- 
ing would rise in 1987 by only 
sl&My over 2 per cent, com- 
pared with an estimate of 2.9 
per cent increase approved by 
the cabinet in July. Spending 
had prorishmaBy been tar- 
geted to rise to DM271 bflfion 
from DM263.48 bDKon in 
1986. 

Herr Voss's statement came 
dining a meeting of the par- 
liamentary budget committee 
which the proposals with 
foe backing of the government 
They will be presented to 
MrUameat next week- 


Hezr Voss said the targeted 
reduction in federal borrowing 
for next year was a remarkable 
achievement, especially since 
the central government ex- 
pects its tax income for 1987 to 
be DM800 million below foe 
original target 

The government said earlier 

this week that total public 
authority fax income fin both 
1986 and 1987 would be some 
DM24 biffioa below target. 
Herr Voss said the coatms- 


was necessary in order not to 
endanger the primary finan- 
cial aim of the government for 
the next legislative period of 
reducing significantly tike tax 
burden oh both individuals 
and companies. 

Herr Voss said federal 
spending had risen by an 
average of 2 per cent per year 
since 1983, but noted that 
since 1985 there had been a 
markedly sharper increase in 


and local authorities. 


PEPs. Listen 
before you leap. 

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MAKING MONEY MAKE MONEY 


29 . _ 


i - 
t 

ciency 

which 
«. «*- 
td rose 
nth in 
is an 
Turn- 
of the 
rom 7 
it and 
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where 
i mil- 

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ked to 
lidine 
which 
it hot 
ils are 

>f this 
stages 
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»f £70 

anted 
or foe 
radio 
Shut- 
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fected 
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well 
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lover 
and 
skin 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street prices declined slightly 
on moderate volume in early 
trading yesterday. A mild gain 
in bond prices foiled to spark 
an advance in stocks. 

The Dow Jones industrial 

Nm Now] 

12 11 


average was down 4.22 to 
1,889.48 at one stage when the 
transport Indicator slipped 
0.13 to 840.09. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor's 500-share index lost 
0.52 at 246.12. 


Support for 


NOV N» 

Nov New 

12 11 

IS 11 

Pfizer 61 62% 


A&edStre 
AfisCMttfs 
Alcoa 
Amaxtnc 
AmideHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCynmd 
AmETPw 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSinrd 
AmTflbph 
Amoco 
Arrow Start 

Asarco 
AattandO* 
AtReWmW 
Avon Prods 
BtasTtfNY 

BanKamoi 
Bit Of BSIWI 
Bank of NY 
Beth Steel 




Srflen 
Bg Warner 
BnisfMyere 
BP 

BurTtonfrid 
BurTton Ntn 
Burroughs 
CmpbeBSp 
Can Pacific 
CaterpOer 
Cebnesa 
Central SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 
CtenBkNY 
Chevron 


Oarx Equip 
Coca Cola 


ClmbiaGas 
CmbmEng 
ComwIttlEd 
ConsEWs 
CnNarGas 
Cons Power 
Cntd Date 
Corning G3 
CPC lira 
Crane 
Curtiss wn 
Dart&Krett 
Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser Ind 
Duka Bower 
DuPont 
Eastern A* 
Eatm Kodak 
Eaton Cop 
Emerson B 
Exxon Corp 
fed Dpt Sts 
• £mMi I 


39% 39 Pst Chicago 34 1 -'. 31% Ph*k»Dg8 

41% 42* PstJma ncp 53.% S3 PtvMpMrs 

66% 66% FstPennC fl”. 9% PWbpoPet 

2% 2% ford 5?% 57 Pgfeart 

35% 35% FTWadwa 38% 38 Vi PPGW 

1214 12% GAP Corp 41% 41?'. *CtrGmM 

264 26 GTE Corp 6?% 63 PbSEfiG 

46% 454 Gen Corp K% 82% Raytheon 

88% 88K GenDyVncs 73% 72% RynWsMrt 

61% ®% GenBWric 76S 76% Rockwell M 

29 29 Gen Inst ffi% t$% 

57% 59% Gen MBs 42% 42% 

76% 76% Gen Motors 7214 72% 

3% 3% GnPblttny 24% 24 

41 4114 Genasco 3% 3% 

25% SS^i [ Georgia Pac 3S» 28% 

67% 68*4 GDletl 5SS 5514 

5% 5% Goodrich 45% 44% 

18 16% Goodyear 47% 47% 

5751 57 Gould Inc 19% 19% 

59% 59% Gr3W 86% 56% 

29% 29% Gt Att&TBC 22% 22% 

43% 43 Grind 32% 32% 

15'/. 15% GmmanCw 26% 26 . 

4311 42?-. Gutf<S WC5? 65% 85% 

40% 40% HemzHJ. 42% 43% 

5S 5% Hercules 58% 58% 

50% 51% H'lett-Pkrd 

62 62% Honeywell 

48% 49% 1C teds 
4i% 41 tegersot 
79 li 73% to&ndStatf 
407. 40% IBM 

39% 38% IN CO 

63 61 Int Parser 

77% 76% kit Terra 
61% 62% Irving Bank 
11 % 11 % Jhnsn&Jhn 
38% 38% Kaiser Alum 

241% 241% Kerr McGee 
35 35% Ktnbly Clrx 

31% 31% KMart 

34% 34% Kroger 

44% 44% L.T.V. Corp 
46 45% UttCte 

39 38% Lockheed 

51% Sl% Lucky Stre 
20 V. 20% ManH-rwer 
37% 37 MawfleCp 
40% 40% Mapco 

139K 136% Marne MW 
42% 42X fJJrt Marietta 
32% 31% Masco 
33% 32% McDonalds 
48% 43’. McOomteU 

34% 33% Meed 
16 15% Merck 

25% 25% Mmsta Mng 
55% 56% MoOUOU 

79% 79% Monsanto 

36% 36% Morgan JP. 84% 83% AgncoEag 

S3 53% Motorola 36% 37% AfcnAJum 

56% 57 NCR Corp 46 46% AlgomaStt 

23% 23% NLIndfitre 4% 4« Can Pacific 

48% 48% NaiDtstbs 47 47% Comteco 

17% 17% Nat Med Ent 26% 26% ConBachra 

102 101% NalSmcndt 11% 10% Kkr/SdCan 

44% 44% NorfoftSttl B4% 84% HdsnBMfti 

57% 57% NWBanctp 39 36 tome* 

19% 19% OcodntPot 28% 28% Imperial OB 

47% 47*4 Ogden 4814 46% In Pipe 

86% 87% OfcnCoip 43% 44 BylTrestCO 

9% 9Ji Ow«« 43% <4 Seacrem 

65% 62% PacGasB 247. 24% StedCo 

7S res Pan Am 5J4 5» ThmsnN'A - 

867. B4% Penney J.C. 86% 85% Verity Carp 

69% 70 Permzcfl 74K 77 WGT 

98 99 PeoBco 29 28% Westn _ 

'aum TUmSSm! na kMarVM dosed niton raw pSOttt* n9B 


70% 70% 
10 % 10 
69% 89% 
69% 70% 
76% 7 SS 
42% 42% 
65% 65% 
47% 47% 
42% 42% 
90* 90% 
61% 61% 
69% 69% 


43% 
55 
42% 
B5% 
20 % 
35 
107% 
49% 
Ora 47% 
Jk 36% 
57% 


39% 

36% 

30% 

116 
33% 

67% 

43% 

91% 

57% 

223% 222% 
23k 23H 

62% 81% 
33 33 K 
38% 38% 
45% 

24% 

27% 

47% 

55% 

109 

59% -- - 

33% 33% 
74% 73% 

44% 44% 
58 56% 

21 21 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


28% 28% 
42% 42% 
12 % 12 % 
16 16% 
13% 13% 

23 29 

27% 28 
24% 24% 

32% 33% 
49 4754 

39% 38% 

29% 29Z. 
88% 88% 
19% 19% 
28% 28% 
2.65 2.63 

13 13 

30% 30% 

. jl/iquOm 


statement 

By Rodney Lord 
Economics Editor 

The Treasury and Civil 
Service Select Committee, 
which is due to take evidence 
from the Chancellor next 
week, has received advice 
endorsing the decisions in the 
autumn statement 

In a memorandum to the 
committee, Mr Gavyn Da- 
vies. an adviser and chief 
economist with Goldman 
Sachs, the investment hanker, 
says the decision to substitute 
public spending for tax cuts is 
a sensible one. 

There is no economic case 
for fuelling farther consumer 
spending and imports, he says. 
Public spending is likely to 
create more jobs than tax cuts, 
though too much of the in- 
crease in spending plans repre- 
sents public sector pay rather 
than help for the unemployed. 

If the Chancellor keeps the 
public sector borrowing re- 
quirement (PSBR) at £7 bil- 
lion next year, the fiscal stance 
will remain roughly neutral. 
That could leave scope for tax 
cuts worth about £1 billion. 

But Mr Davies believes 
public spending is likely to 
exceed the revised targets, 
raising next year’s PSBR to £9 
billionor £10 billion. This 
would re- in force the case for 
counter-inflation action. 

With public spending 
planned to rise in real terms, 
the conflict between prudent 
borrowing levels and objec- 
tives for tax cuts will continue. 
The buoyancy of non-oil rev- 
enues will cease when the 
consumer boom ends, and in 
the years after 1987-88 a tax 
increase of £3 billion might be 
necessary to maintain the 
PSBR at £7 billion. 

Unless pay deals slow 
down, a fail in the pound may 
be needed to maintain 
competitiveness and offset ef- 
fects of a fall in oil exports. 


Brokers’ reports add 
fuel to Gulf and 
IC Gas bid dispute 


By John Bell 
City Editor 


City Editor 

Is Imperial Continental 
Gas, the Calor Gas company 
fighting off a £750 mulkra 
takeover bid, planning a £300 
millio n acquisition of its own? 

Mr Michael Rendle, the 
deputy chairman, says not 
But 1C Gas’s bidder. Gulf 
Resources, controlled by' the 
twins Mr David and Mr 
Frederick Barclay, is con- 
vinced otherwise. 

Mr Rendle accused the 
Barclays of misleading share- 
holders after their formal offer 
document suggested that a 
deal is in the wind. But 
according to recent reports on 
IC Gas by four firms of 
stockbrokers, the. idea has 
been discussed in some detail 

Laing & Cruickshank said: 
“Certainly the company has 
declared that it intends to 
make a major acquisition 
(£100 million to £300 million) 
in an energy or hydrocarbons- 
related business, but so far 


3o*ct n wi w 


VjT Continental Gas -« 
Tv--v v- Share Priced? 

there has been no sign of it" 
The firm of Wl Carr is 
more specific. On June 25 this 
year, foe company’s team of 
oil analysts wrote: “The 
strength of the balance sheet 
leaves the group well placed to 
expand by acquisition. Tar- 
gets, Tanging in value as high 
as £300 million, have been 
evaluated." 

Also in June, the leading 
siockbroking firm of Scrim- 
geour Vickers reported: “I C 
Gas has said it intends to 
make a sizeable oil and non- 
oil acquisition. A range of £50 
million to £300 million has 
been mentioned. ” 


clients at the end of last 
month: ‘The group is still 
looking for a major ac- 
quisition, of the order of £250 
million, to relieve its position 
following foe sate of CompAir 
last year.” 

, IC Gas has, of course, 
made no such statement of- 
ficially. But it is unlikely that 
researchers from four such 
reputable firms could have 
dreamt up the idea. 

Mr Rendle says the message 
to analy sis was that his group 
had the capability to mount a 
bid of the size mentioned by 
the analysts. But he stressed 
there was in font nothing 
specific in mindLT think that 
this is a side issue," he said 
yesterday. 

I C Gas is now preparing its 
defence document in response 
to the 530p per share cash 
offer from Gulf Meanwhile, 
the shares remain well above 
that level, suggesting that the 
market is expecting a counter-- 


County Securities told its offer from elsewhere. 


Merrett set for record profit 


Merrett Holdings, one of 
Lloyd's largest naderwriting 
groups, expects record pretax 
profits of about £5-5 nultion 
this year, compared with £1.8 
million last year. Half-year 
profits to foe end of Jane were 
£5.03 million compared with 
£134 mfllion in the previous 
first half. 

The chairman, Mr Stephen 
Merrett, who has jest beta re- 
elected to foe Council of 
Lloyd's, said foe figures re- 
flected the return to more 
acceptable profit commission 


By Alison Eadie 

in foe 1983 account on marine 
and aviation syn d ica tes . Non- 
marine resalts were dis- 
appointing. 

Mr Merrett also said non- 
marine syndicate 799 bad 
exceeded its premium capacity 
in 1984 and 1985, but foe 
overwrftincwas expected to be 
profitable. He added that foe 
board believed foe committee 
of Lloyd’s had failed to take 
foil account of the improve- 
ment in management systems 
and controls at Merrett, when 
it issued its direction restrict- 





m 








l . ■' ••• ;• 

'7. 

" mx? v - 


Reviewing the Group's 
past year, Mr A. J. Shepperd, 

Chairman of Wellcome pic, 
reports: “Our results have 
been adversely affected by 
the weakening of certain cur- 
rencies, notably the TIS dollar, ^ ixj 

against sterling. In fact, in sterling terms, Group 
turnover was slightly ahead at £1 ,005m, com- Dis 
pared with £l,Q04m for the previous year. Group 
profit before taxation was £l25.3m - an increase Eai 
of 3% - while the overall Group profit margin to _ 
turnover was 12J% against the previous year’s ohc 

figure of 12.1%. 

“Movements in exchange rates are estimated 

to have adversely affected the comparison between 

the two years by some £ 1 10ni in respect of turnover 
and £2Gm in respect of profit before tax. 

"However, if the figures are re-expressed at this 
year's exchange rates, turnover and profit belore tax show 
increases of 12% and 23% respectively. 

"The Group’s tax charge this year is 51%, compared 
with 54% in the previous year. Changes in tax legislation 
being undertaken in the L'SA should lead to some reduc- 
tion in tax charges and. while the eiiect will be minimal in 
1 987, there should be greater benefits in 1988. 

Growth in overseas markets 

‘The growth in Group turnover was most marked in 
the USA. Cominemal Europe and Japan. 

"The continued introduction of acydoiir particularly 
assisted growth in the latter mo markets. 

Borrowings reduced 
"The issue of new 
shares earlier in the year 
raised £45. 0m. enabling 
'WJ us 10 reduce our Group 

net borrowings at the 
year end io £46. lm. Net 
borrowings now repre- 
1^1 sent 9% of shareholder?” 

jtfj Kinds, compared with 

llvf 1 6% for lo-t year. 

“Our tola! expendi- 
ture on research and 
development for the year 
„ t L , . ^ was £ 132m. representing 

burf\ ir.Miei-cjnw-J»»j!’ni<ir'"<1' n tf[«'nr-al Ji5«»«/0 - 1 L»rOlJp tUrnOteC, 

ttetmi-'n. anti reflecting the in- 

creased number of compounds moving 
from the research stage and thus 
sa req uiring more expensive development 

resources. 

‘■During the year we al>o saw our 
»9B6 capital expenditure programme con- 

*» accoBtag to plan. Over the year 
Mm- nr y.-.,r „. h lV e ^pent f88m. compared »nh i - 4m in 
the prev ious year. 


Turnover 

Research and development 
expenditure 

Profit before taxation 

Profit attributable to shareholders 

Distributions to shareholders 

Earnings per ordinary share 

Shareholders' funds 


Employees 


mSf:;' 


1986 

1985 

£m 

• £m 

1,005.4 1003.6 

132.5 

122.0 

125.3 

121.7 

63.9 

59.6 

17.4 

16.8 

7.8p 

7.5p 

513.6 

438.6 

18,764 

18,342 


Acyclovir becomes largest seller 

“In the field of human healthcare, sales of acyclovir, 
the active ingredient of our antiviral products, have reached 
£105m. a 69% increase over the previous vears figure of 
£62m. 

“Acyclovir has this year become our largest selling pro- 
duct in turnover terms, and we believe there is further sales 
growth to come, particularly in Japan. A further reason for 
optimism relate; to the expected use of acyclovir in the treat- 
ment of shingles. 


Turnover bv customer location 


1 98* 

£1.0(13 miUjnrt 


NORTH AMERICA I 


Kt-rOF 

rHF.UijRuiVlS 




t. OVTINENTAL 

El ROVL 



} 1 XIUlIKlNOPCiMIl- j 

“Sales of our muscle-relaxing agent, atracurium. con- 
tinued to increase, with a rise of 18% in USA sales, compared 
with the previous year. Total sale? for the year were £35m. 

“Other established products - particularly cotri- 
moxazole and allopurinol — have continued to sell well. 
However, in the face of generic competition, they now- 
make less of a contribution to Group tumo\ er and profits 
than was once the case. 


* “A major success in the USA. was NEO- 

SPORIN, a topical antibiotic, which was adver- 
rj tised for the first time on national television with 
^ beneficial results. 

!1.7 “In the UK, the adverse effects on sales of 
some of our products by the Government’s 
9.6 limited list’ have-been miti gated to some extent 
by the active promotion of ACTEFED as an over- 
6.8 the-counter product. 

c “Overall, the balance of our business has 

■ 3 P changed slightly, with faster growth in Japan and 

q k Western Europe than in the USA. The dramatic 
' increase in Japanese sales is due almost entirely 
to sales of acyclovir which is providing a base 
J42 from which we can increase the growth of our 
— — Japanese company. „ 

Coopers Animal Health 

“Coopers Animal Health was formed in 1984 by a 
merger of the international animal health businesses. of 
Wellcome and ICI. Today, all but three of the operating 
units are trading profitably. 

“However, the prob- ^HHp98P£EiHpBPil 
lems of Farmers in the 
world’s major agricultur- 

ai areas have continued, ' 

and the depression in 
agriculture has ^affected 

pre-tax loss off 9.7m for L 1 

Coopers is iiiduded in 

Dividend and future Thr Q><uiioii cd W'dkanc pk in t'fbnuii 

nnvnprtc n^2raundmhL«da*« 

prospects ^wrWHnoiMta u.^a 

“The directors of 

Wellcome pic are recommending a final dividend for the 
year of l.32p per ordinary share. This is equivalent to the 
dividend of 1.86p per ordinary share, inclusive of tax 
credit, forecast in the prospectus. ■ 

“It has been an eventful year in which the Group has 
made considerable progress. We are all set to face the 
year ahead, which I view with continued optimism in the 


Lv L j a \~rirurA , knowledge that the Group will draw on the great strength 

-i ,9-^ r rA COU? ^ P 1 ^ ucts ACTl FED and 0 j- - lts man y employees throughout the world. I thank 

SU DATED, retained t heir lead s n die U S markets against jjjgm for theirefTwts during the fast year? 


substantially more aggressive competition. 


pTsmcac esa 

i.. -J- 




iE4 m 


— 2 


If you would like a copy of the Welkome pic Annual. 
Report for 1986 (available _ 

from 4 December), please write fwS^l 

to The Public Relations 
Department, Wellcome pic, 

The Wellcome Budding, PO 1 M 

Box 129, 185 Euston Road, 

London MV12BP. 


V.V r.vf piair. .ii ». .>U>nia. .Mirfralm. 


.1C TfFtO. XEOSPtjMX and SC DAFED m 
hade swffa of ll'r/timw Groap (wtfkittiMi. 


Wellcome 


Trade talks with 
China Ho become 
an annual event’ 

From Robert Grieves, Peking 

2 SS tSTwl S m M«« of ia mBS P° n 

Shanghai dun® the Qumb s ^5^. hetwrai Chins and 


Shanghai dun® the yneen s between China and 

iSSTSuS" BritSThi inmasag *« *e 

iSrJTSET? %£&&& 
>s£,ssssL£mS SHSra: 

Tsmf ££?&*£ S-& than £396 

muhoa. , 

i/»niY<Rroa:ismeetinga32- British Aerospace yesteiuay 
mtmber trade ddega- 


law sfisrss tsssssz 

toeand at Tianiin ending on 

rnTWta indues the assembly of ad^ 

representatives of Balfour turbo-prop 

Boitty, British Aerospace, the Sbenong Aircraft Coipo 

BritiA Shipbuilders, TDavy ration in LiMmng P2° vu “*~ 

1 x.v' CM/laUu In 9nmtlOIL MT JOQT) 


McKee, Hawker Siddetey, m addition, wr jonn 
Rolls-Royce and Short Glascock,, coramercial direc- 


Brothers. 
Lord Y< 

“a very, 


4&11U. OUWIl \jwojwvwh, . . . . 

tor of British Aerospace, said 
called the visit ihe firet of 10 BA-1 46s ordered 
tamt^opponu- the Civil Avranon Admin- 


fog foe premima income of 
syndicate 799 in 1987 to 85 pa 
cent of gross capacity. 

An appeal has been made 
against the committee’s direc- 
tion. If it is mancewsfid, 
syndicate 799’i capacity next 
year will be foe sane as foe 
160 per cent capacity this year. 

In 1987 foe group expects 
an increase in foe premium 
capacity of managed syn- 
dicates of abort 18 pa cent, 
but profit to shareholders is 
-odikely to rise ranch above 
1986 levels. 


a very, signncani opponur vy 

nity” in the imported goods istranon of China (LAAL) 
market and in transport for was delivere d yesterday. 

Mitchell Somers edges 
ahead to £957,000 


Mitchell Somers, the West 
Midlands engineering group 
yesterday announced a mar- 
ginal improvement in half 
year pretax profits, rising to 
£957,000 up £30,000 on the 
same period last year. 

The company said results 
from its traditional engineer- 
I ing areas were 1 *‘dis- 
1 appointing* ; although r recent 
L aquisitioos produced “en- 
I couragmg* paformances. 


By Lawrence Lever 

the West The interim dividend of 
ig group 1.75p a share is being main- 
i a mar- tained and the company is to 
in half appoint a finance director to 
rising to strengthen its ma na g ement 
0 on the team. 


Turnover for the six months 
to September 27 was 
£15.5 mntion (£13.9 million) 
and earnings per share 3.9p 
(3.5p). Trading profit was up 
on last year, but interest 
charges claimed £76,000. 


COMPANY NEWS 


group, made pretax profits- for 
the half year to September 26 
of £3.5 milUoiL, a rise of 25.7 
per cent on turnover up 7 A 
per ceni at £62,4 million. 

The company pointed out 
that the two first halves were 
not comparable because Valor 
had disposed of its motor 
components business, its di- 
rect kitchen sales and its South 
African offshoot, and had 
bought electrical apptiance 
businesses. 


OUP: Mr Paul Channon, the 
Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry, has decided not to 
refer to the Monopolies 
Commission foe proposed ac- 
quisition of the company by PK 
Bankea. 

• AG A: Figures in Skr millions 
for nine months to September 
30L Sales 6.832 (7,192k operat- 
ing income 698 (845), income 
before year end provisions and 
tax 1,040 (663± The company 
says that plant investment in 
19 86 wi fl be higher than in 1985. 
•THE SWINDON PRIVATE 


The board expected a better HOSPITAL: Figures in £000 
result for the year end, with for year to July 31. Turnover 


the help 01 a seasons 
winter. It sud it was Iookr 
forward to foe privatization 


1,626 (1,350), profit before tax 
46 (51 loss), no tax (same), 
earnings per share 33p (3.6p 
loss). The company has in- 


^Gasandttoc^- ' 

mlies it should oner .tor a in its second full year of trading. 


wider range of its products m 
gas showrooms. 

Older books are strong, foe 
company said. It recom- 
mended a 12.5 per, cent in- 


but the drairman rays that it is 
not anticipating increases in 
occupancy to maintain this rate 
of growth. 

• WORDPLEX: Rank Xerox 
pension fund’s bolding in foe 


smium uiuicoxc tu iuc wm. sKJr: The company has ac- 

• INFRARED ASSOCIATES: auired foe Mexican Bearing 

The company announces that its Company Ibisa (Industrie de 
subsidary, Infrared Systems, has Baleros Intercontinental SA). It 
acquired from Barnes ahrady had a 40 per cent stake 
Enginecmg Co. of Stanford, ■ and bas now bought oat its 
Connecticut, its Infrared Mexican partner, Dcsc. 
Radiomete product line. » ■■■ 1 — — m 1 — 

More comply news 

value as at October 31 . page 29 

was 246.9p a foare. ■ ■■ ■» ■■ » ■■ ■■■■■■ 

• JARDINE MATHESON- *■ 

HOLDINGS; JF Special Hold- 2.4p, making 3Jp (jk 

mgs, an investment arm of foe S« UI PJS 4 £! £? r for ^ 
group, said that talks are taking 31. Profit J»fore tax 1.67 1 
place which may lead to an offer (L6S8). tax ■ (599). ^nunp 

being made far foe company. P®” share . ]0.36p (P-95). The 

chairman says profits in foe 

• NO LTO N; Ibe purchase current year are running well 

cousuteration for Executive Ses- ahead of those of last year. AH 
v ices, Executive Services group companies produced 
l London J. and Executive Ser- acceptable results with the 
vjccs now derer- exception of Wade (rrehtnd) 

mined at£860,8l8. based m foe where a loss of almost £300,000 
.combined profit of £182,404 for was incurred because of - a 
foe companies (for foe year to reduction in demand for dec- 
Jrty 31. Additional cons.d- meal porcelain insulators and 
erabou could fell due for each temporary production prob- 

J987 *i?5« K^iSSffcJSw 

and 1989. After payment of foe been resolved, 
uutid consideration of£593,41 9 • « RAUMA-REPOLA OY: The 
2 ?- ^ company has agreed to sdl 

: &h!£S?nAKim Stesele Mekamsfca Verkstad 
satisfied by the issue o f 57 5 ,05 2 (SMV), part of its forest ma- 

SfainesdSSon, to the Swedish 
company. Actor Sweden. A 
condition is that foe buyer 
should agree to employ foe 
Margetts A Addenbrooke. pfent's workfo rce of about 100. 

• NEW TOKYO INVEST- • KENSITRON INTERNAT- 


ahead of those of last year. AH 
group companies produced 
acceptable results with foe 
exception of Wade (Ireland) 
where a loss of almost £300.000 
was incurred, because of - a 
reduction in demand for elec- 
trical porcelain insulators and 
temporary production prob- 
lems, These problems have now 
been resolved. 

• RAUMA-REPOLA OY: The 
company - has agreed to sdl 
Stesele Mekanisfca Verkstad 
(SMV). part of its forest ma- 
chines division, to the Swedish 
company. Actor Sweden. A 
condition is that the buyer 
should agree to employ foe 
plant’s workforce of about 100. 

• DENSITRON INTERNAT- 


MENT TRUST: The Bank of IONAL: Ftske and Co has 


Scotland 1976 staff pension 
fluid's bolding has been reduced 
to 1.4 million ordinary shares 
(2m). 


purchased 60,000 ordinary 
shares on behalf of foe Water 
Authorities' Superannuation 
Fund, which now holds 910.000 


• RFH: Results for the half year Tte KSStfon 

&W£ASfS8JE ^SSSSSSSSmn 


SMS Z MA JBAS 


(i 1.9). Earnings per share IS^p 
(8 - 4p> - 

• ROBERT FLEMING: The taking 

company^ has announced foe takeov 
issue of $100 million undat ed ^ 
primary capital floating tan? c 

notes through its subszdimy, 

Robert Fleming Netherlands 

BV, under the guarantee of 
Robert Fleming Holdings. The _ . 
issue, led by Credit Suisse Hret FJ 

Boston, bas been placed thmu g fr *■' 

a small group of banks. . ^ 

• ANGLO AMERICAN CO- i 

AL CORPORATION: Interim 
dividend 80 cents (same), pay- 

able January 6. Figures m Mam 

RandOOO for _ half_ year to BCQ„ 


be* 

fore tax 236.089 (229, 7S8t tax 
130,500 (127,401), earning per 
share 424 cents (412.1), The 
company says that, . if foe 
dollar/ rand exchange rate re- 
mains, at the higher present 
level, lower earnings can be 
anticipated for the second half 
and for the year. Bui the final 
dividend of 160 omits will be 

tnamiainrH . 

ft 


• HUSKY OIL ENERGY: The 
company says that talks are 
taking place on a possible 
takeover of Husky. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


Mam & Company,.; 
BCQ : 


C. Hoare i Co ^11® 

Hong Kong & Shanghai — tf-OJ* 

LLoytto Bank 

MM WesfiWEter 

W Bank of SooBafid-j-ll^* 

ca^“^ZZZI!Zii.o« 

t Mttipp Base Rate. . 


i * r ; 


Valor profits up 25% g 

By Alison Eadie 

Valor, the home appliance • ENGLAND TRUST GR- 0, 











***** 


an 




M 


* ; V ' li. ! ; ^ ' 

InfQjr 




f ‘ r, 


i^nlilsn. 


t * 









THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


27 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



whispers of a bid brewing 


rJS^. Gl i^?’ tbe NoniHMsi 

r^ional brewer, yesterday 

SS.2PJ® fSOpainS^^ 


By Michael Clark 


. j corner. 
Speculation has 


creased by a fluriy ofSvSy 
m shares of Fteasanuna, the 
and casino operator, 
wfech advanced IQp toSShfip! 
inis led _ to suggestions that it 
was flexing its financial mus- 
cle ahead of its next big dea l. 

. “ *s known that Pleasurama 
is keen to make a large 
acquisition- This summer it 
held talks with Mount Char- 
lotte Investments, the hotel 
operator, but the talks broke 
down because both sides 
ajJjparently failed to agree on a 
price. 

Pfeasnrama’s name ha$ 
been linked with Vaux before, 
and this meant Vain's board 
was taking the threat seri- 
ously. Vaux has seen its share 
Price hit a new peak of 550p. 
There have even been sugges- 
tions that Vaux, which is rsnt * 
of B ritain's oldest established 
brewers, may have considered 
a friendly merger with Ken- 
nedy Brookes, the fast growing 
Wheelers and Mario Franco 
restaurant chain. Word in. the 
market last night was that a 
bid of 6O0pa share may be 
made. That would value v an* 
at £231.6 million The Vaux 
board was unavailable for 
comment 

There were fun and games 
for Grand Metropolitan, the 
Truman and Watney Mann 
brewer, where it is thought one 
predator may have built up a 
near 5 per cent stake. The 
group was forced to announce 
that the trade report of 5 
million shares by midday was 
a mistake. The correct figure 
was 5,000. However, business 
picked up and by tbe close 8.4 
million, share s had been 


traded. Tbe shares finished 
the day I3p higher at 461 p. 

The chiH wind of higher 
interest rates continued to 
blow through the rest of the 
equity market and soon bad 
investors cm tbe retreat. Prices 
were marked sharply, lower as 
lorn over slowed to a trickle. 
The FT 30-index dipped be- 
low tbe 1300leveL The index, 
which had been 17.4 down at 
lunchtime, dosed above its 
worst levels of tbe day 9.4 
lower at 1295.7. . 

The broader , based FT-SE 
100 managed to halve earlier 
losses dosing 9.9 down at 
1644.6. 

The weaker pound and 
renewed fears about inflation 
took their toll on Government 
securities where prices at the 
longer end of tbe market fell 
by £2. But the London Inter- 
national Financial Futures Ex- 



BLUE CIRCLE: 

STILL VULNERABLE TO A BID 125 


OATASTREAM 

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT 


cent 


• Keep an eye on Blen- 
heim Exhibitions, whose 
USM debat at 95p last 
month mis overshadowed by 
gig Bang. The company 
has since made an impression 
cm analysts aid next 
month's “Export 86” ex- 
hibition is a sellout. Pretax 
profits of £800,000 against 
£502,000 are on target this 
year. The shares wen un- 
changed at 136p. 


(Life) reported a 
record number of contracts in 
gflts. A total of 23,600 were 

made in longs 

One of the few gains among 
blue chips was scored by BTR, 
the industrial conglomerate. 
The shares advanced 6p to 
297p as a total of 9 million 
shares were traded. Dealers 
claim this latest rally in the 
price is a sign of support by. the 
market following the appoint- 
ment of Mr John Cahill as 
chief executive. - 


Dealers who were rocked by 
the disappointing figures ear- 
ner this week from Commer- 
cial Union and General 
Accident were comforted by 
third quarter figures from 
Royal Insurance. These re- 
vealed pretax profits of £193.1 
million compared with £16.6 
million last time. Royal re- 
sponded with a rise of 25p to 
824p. This enabled General 
Accident to rally 8p to 837p 
and Commercial Union Ip to 
271p. - 

But sentiment in the stores 
was hit by a disappointing set 
of figures from Storehouse. 
Pretax profits at Storehouse 
climbed from £30.9 ntiDion to 
£37.14 million. Tbe rise was 
below most analysts' expecta- 
tions. The market expressed 
its disappointment by mark- 
ing Storehouse shares 13p 
lower at 31 Ip. Great Univer- 
sal Stores ‘A’ foil lOp to 
£10.55, Dixons, 6p to 334p, 
Burton Group, 6p to 274p, 
while takeover favourite, 
Sean Holdings, the Setfridges 
and Saxone stores group, 
eased 3p to 229p. 

But Ratners, the jeweller, 
finned 2p to 243p ahead of a 
seminar with the powerful 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


1988 

High Low Copny 


BU om 


Oi'ga pwe» 


tiu m 
% 


p/e -ooo 


AfiacRyom. 
ASDArMB 
BTR 
BAT 
Barctays 
Bass 
B aaetwn 
Bkia Ckcta ■ 
BOC 
Boots 

Br Aoraaptca » 
Dr Patrotoum “ 
280) ITTaBr Tatacofn . 
193 98 BfKM 


383 283 
174 128 
483 278 
491 381 
572 449 
840 680 
450 356 
728 528 
383 293 
289 170 
606 423 
709 530 


314 

910 

-4 

13LS 

48 

145 

1800 

157 

181 

-3 

AS 

28 

174 

1800 

295 

300 • 

+7 

0-8 

as 

208 

asm 

483 

488 • 

-7 

184 

38 

1 22 

3800 

46B 

475 

-7 

28.1 

80 

68 

157 

733 

743 

-18 

21.7 

23 

157 

456 

430 

435 

-8 

17.1 

38 

160 

744 

839 

844 

-6 

30l0 

47 

9-1 

1800 

834 

337 

-1 

14.1 

42 

128 

2,700 

230 

233 

-8 

10.1 

44 

15.1 

3400 

483 

488 

-12. 

234. 

48 

108 

1800 

'*890 

995 1 ' 

... . 

488 

7.0 

78 

3.100 


166 200 
181 184 


-2. 

-a 


9l3 


54. 

57 


11,8 ABOO 
44 4.600 


354 2S6 
389 277 
196 156 
338 259 
704 408 
3Z7’s2S2 
438 3TB 
660 408 
954 701 
228 158 


Burton . 272 

Catto & Wretew 300 
Cadbury ScfnwppM 191 


276 

307 

184 


Com Union 
Cone GoWSuWb 
Qouflau to 
Dixons Grp 
Ham 

Gan AcoUsnt 
GEG 
11 ’» 756*3 08X0 
482 328 oand m« 
11*2721 GUS ’A 
954 720 GRE 
383 238 G[KN 
355 275 Guinns** 
215**141 Hanson 


269 272 
685 702 
311 314 
332 . 336 
563 558 
833 540 
180 194 
920 980 
458 483 
10 *a 10*1 
788 775 
948 252 
332 337 
205 206 


-* 

41 

+7 


-9 

-14 

+9 

+2 

+5 

+19 


+3 

-3 

-3 

-44 


&a 

82 

a? 

174 

3SJ) 

93 

43 

.94 

343 

8.1 

203 

1X5 

30.0 

4U 

.17.9 

103 

5.7 


25 
2 2 
48 
84 
50 
an 
u 

15 

41 

34 

22 

25 

25 

55 

7.1 

3.1 
25 


185 1,300 
165 1.700 

214 2500 
.. 3500 

200 1,400 
105 1.700 
235 2,700 
247 1500 

215 9S2 

115 5500 
103 1400 
155 4400 
149 337 

224 767 

84 451 

127 785 

168 1.000 


Nth imr Caapnnr 


BU Offer CTO pane* 


Vld 

* 




October jobless figures bring 
blurred light at end of tunnel 


The October unemployment 
figures, published yesterday, 
appear to provide firm ev- 
idence of a sea change in the 
labour market After seasonal 
adjustment tbe jobless total 
fell by 25,000, after a 26,400 


fall in September. 
The fall ove 


lover the latest three 

months, 55,600, is the biggest 
for any three-month period 
since autumn 1973, Job va- 
cancies , even excluding the 
effects of the Community 
Programme, rose fast month 
to their highest since the 
at series of statistics 
o—j in January 1980. 

It should be unambiguously 
good news. But it is not And 
there are several reasons why. 

The first is that unemploy- 
ment remains at a very high 
level. The fan over the three 
months to November 1973, 
with which the latest drop is 
being compared, occurred 
when an earlier Conservative 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, 
Mr Anthony (now Lord) Bar- 
ber,. was . creating the con- 
ditions for both a consumer 
spending boom and higher 
public expenditure. 

There are similarities be- 
tween the Barber boomi then 
and the Lawson boom now. 
The difference is that un- 
employment was falling then 
from a level of wen under 1 
millioa. Now it is falling from 
a level comfortably above 3 
million. ■ - - ■ ' 

There are three factors at 
work in the unemployment 
figures. The first is that, after a 
pause in tbe second half of last 
year and the early part of this 




(U -K1 “ ; 

manufacturing output figures, 
showiofi rises of 0.7 per cent in 
the second quarter and 13 per 
cent in foe thud quarter. 

There was a thud quarter 
slowdown in the rate of job 
decline in manufacturing to 
20,000. from -40,000. in the 
second quarter; Other iodfca- 
UoDS of recovery, notably in 
foe service industries, nave 
contributed -to an increased.- 
*- n 2 KuraT buoyancy in the 
jabour market . i . 


Tbe second important fac- 
tor, and one that has been 
present for some time, is the 
impact of foe Government’s 
employment measures. Over 
foesix months to October, tbe 
expansion of the employment 
measures, and notably tbe 
Community Programme, con- 
tributed a 5,000-a-month fall 
in unemployment. . 

This, coincidentally, almost 
matched; the 5,400 a* 
monthly ‘fall in the 
adjusted jobless total 

Btrt there U . good reason to 
believe that this understates 
foe , impact of government 
schemes. Tbe Department of 
Employment . has become 
rather self-righteous about tbe 
Youth Training Scheme in 
recent months. It is no longer 
regarded as an employment 
measure, but as a -training 
m easure. . 

Thus, while figures are pro- 
vided Jqr foe number on the 
. Yomfi" Training Scheme — . 
.360,000 si the end pf Septem- 
ber compared with 330JOOO at 
the end of August - no 
estimates, are. now provided . 
for.: theirt impact bo the un- 
employment count. BuMAere 


dearly is an effect, wbidb can 
be expected to increase with 
foe impact of foe two-year 
Youth Training Scheme, 
which started in ApriL 


The Restart programme, 
lauded by . the Secretary of 
Stale for Employment. Lord 
Young of Graffham, as one 
factor behind tbe September 
fall in the jobless total, is also 
having an effect. Restart, 
under which tbe long-term 
unemployed are counselled 
and directed into training, 
special measures or employ- 
ment, became a national 
scheme in July and would 
have first affected tbe August 
unemployment statistics. 

August was the month when 
the jobless total began to fell, 
and Restart must have played 
its part, although officials are 
unable to give any indication 
of the scale of its impact 

The scheme, like foe new, 
tougher interviews for un- 
employment daimahls which 
began at tbe end of last mouth 
but did -not affect the October 
count, may have a once-for-aD 
.impact on the figures." A huge 
proportion of the unemployed 


fall into the category of dis- 
couraged workers, who have 
effectively dropped out of the 
labour market for lack of 
incentive. 

The number of discouraged 
workers .was estimated at l .08 
million in the 1985 Labour 
Force Survey. On the other 
hand, there were 760,000 peo- 
ple who were actively looking 
for jobs but were not eligible 
for benefit and so did not 
feature in the unemployment 
count. 

The Restart programme can 
.be expected to eat into the 
number of discouraged work- 
ers, shifting a proportion of 
them off foe unemployment 
register. 

This raises foe third factor, 
changes in foe figures them- 
selves. The Unemployment 
Unit has chronicled foe 19 
changes in foe official rules 
affecting the statistics since 
the Government took office. 
The unit estimates that foe 
changes have reduced the 
unemployment count by 
about 500,000. 

Within the past month, 
three more changes have been 
ann ounced. The tighter avail- 
ability for work interviews 
could reduce foe unemploy- 
ment count by 95,000 oyer 12 
months and by 220,000 in two 
years, the unit estimates. 

The abolition of the right to 
reduced-rate benefits for those 
with insufficient National 
Insurance contributions will 
cut the total by 24,000 in a 
year and 30.000 over two 
years. And the extension of 
the period for which refusal to 
work means disqualification 
from benefit from six to 13 
weeks could mean 2,000 a 
month off foe count. 

It may be that unemploy- 
ment really is coming down as 
the economy improves; that 
there is a light at foe end of foe 
tunnel. Unfortunately, not 
enough people believe foe 
figures. 


David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 


Scottish institutions arranged 
by Kleinwort Grieveson, the 
broker, later today. The mar- 
ket is hoping Mr Gerald 
Ratner, foe chairman, will 
have some good news for foe 
fund managers. The shares 
have been a firm market this 
year having come up from 
about the lllp level after a 
rights issue and rerating for 
foe group. 

British Aerospace came in 
for profit taking after foe 
Government announced it 
had placed a £1 billion order 
with the army weapons di- 
vision of the group. 

The contract is for the 
design, development and ini- 
tial production of foe ultra- 
modern Rapier 2000 air 
defence weapons system for 
delivery by the mid- 1990's. 
The shares, which had antici- 
pated news of the contract, 
opened at 498p before drifting 
to 488p and later rallying to 
491 p. The price dosed 12p 
lower at 486p. 

Blue Circle Industries lost 
some of its speculative froth as 
the share price dipped lip to 
640p in spite of confirmation 
that Adelaide Steamship Co 
has built a stake of 8.17 


million shares, or 63 
of foe total equity, 
remain convinced that Blue 
Circle is still vulnerable to a 
bid. 

A dull profits performance 
has hit the shares and earlier 
this summer saw them at a 
new low of 526p. But tbe 
appearance of Adelaide 
Steamship as a big buyer has 
repaired some of the damage. 
Adelaide may have chosen to 
remain tight-lipped, but foe 
market hopes for a bid of more 
than 700pa share. 

Mr Rod Brieriey, foe New 
Zealand entrepreneur, made a 
stock market swoop to lift his 
stake in Ocean Transport and 
Trading to 23.6 per cent. He 
paid 260p a share — tbe terms 
he is offering - and gathered 
more than 1 5 million shares to 
add to his original 10 per cent 
stake. Ocean hit back, claim- 
ing Brieriey. through his IEP 
investment arm. was trying to 


• Merger talks at Crown 
Television Productions could 
be good news for its 
shareholders. There are whis- 
pers that die mystery 
sostor is a privately-owned 
television and production 
company in foe consamer in- 
dustry with an enviable cli- 
ent list. Word is foe deal 
could boost Crown's bad- 
ness by 50 per cent. The 
shares slipped 2p to 78p- 


1 523 

403 

Hnftar Skkfq* . . 

414 

420 

• 

-a 

214 

5.1 

82 542 

Tf’i734 

imp Cham md 

miff*. 



48.6 

43 

123 765 

583 

335 

Jaguar 

507 

512 


-3 

12.7 

23 

105 238 

391 

312 

LacSxTJk* 

388 

373 


.-4 

1&B 

43 

177 85 

348 

'278 

Land Saarttos . 

340 

343 


-2 

14JJ 

4.1 

229 3.800 

238 

133 

Lagsl & Gan 

237 

242. 

• 

-5 

123 

5.1 

303 1300 

494 

2S3 

UojfOs 

410 

417 


-a 

25.0 

&0 

6.3 47 

2S3 

183 

Lcmhra 

243 

245 


+2 

17.1 

73 

123 2.100 

231 

183 

Maria A Spencar 

194 

197 

• 

♦1 

S£ 

ao 

234 2700 

599 

417 

MHand 

565 

572 


-5 

37.1 

63 

21.1 BIB 

593 

426 

N*t WMt , 

500 

507 


-5 

27j6 

S3 

-S3 295. 

578 

428 

P40DW' 

516 

523 


-7 

25.0 

' 43 

149 ses 

’246 

IBS 

Ptesaay 

178 

182 


-10 

72 

49 

133 8.000 

S42 

71B 

FrudamM 

BOS 

812 

• - 

-5 

386 

43 

534 1400 

234 

146 

Bocal E 

170 

174 



43 

23 

182 2.700 

900 

606 

BacHt Caiman 

BOS 

812 

• 

-5 

239 

ao 

173 380 

582*i 345 

Reutare 

533 

538 



54 

13 

405 466 

701 

511 

RTZ 

.688 

696 

• 

-7 

314 

43 

92 257 

967 

762 

Royal Ins 

825 

832 

• 

436 

383 

4,7 

883 2300 

\ 426 

344 

Salisbury (J) 

412 

416 


-4 

84 

23 

243 603 

I48*i UK 

Sews 

12B 

129*11 • 

-3 

53 

39 

163 4400 

415 

321 

SadsMcfc Op 

363 

368 


-2 • 

17.1 

4.7 

174 162 


653 

Shod 

9SO 

955 


-5 

514 

54 

941.100 

168 

86 

STC 

158 

M2 


-2 

2.1 

U 

149 1900 

772 

620 

Sun AUanca 

658 

665 


. . 

273 

42 

583 847 

8l r 

78* 

res P/I* 

78 

79 


-2 

. • 

. . 

.. 

420 

285 

Tauco 

394 

397 


-7 

89 

22 

223 779 

529 

374 

Thom EMI 

485 

492 


+2 

253 

5.1 

353 368 

349 

248 

TraMQar House 

282 

283 


-4*i 

189 

8.7 

7.71300 

209 

139 

Trusthouea Forte 

168 

1/0 


-5 

79 

4J 

16.7 882 

1 20S I3*i Unlaw 

20 *>20Vi 


-*a 

60-1 

33 

183 260 

J 288 

216 

Usd EHkUKs 

238 

240 


-4 

133b 5.7 

1231200 


grab foe company on the 
cheap. IEP is free to buy up to 
29 per cent and says it will 
monitor the market before 
deciding whether to take an- 
other plunge. 

BonzL, the packaging and 
paper group, lost some of its 
recent momentum and slid 3p 
to 200p. Earlier this week, the 
group met Phillips & Drew, 
the broker, and dearly made a 
favourable impression. Deal- 
ers reckon similar meetings 
may be in foe pipeline and this 
could benefit foe share mice. 

Pearson, foe publishing 
group, held steady at 586p. 
Recent bid speculation has 
disposed since Hutchison 
Whampoa announced it 
would not be taking its hold- 
ing above foe 49 per cent it 
held. Hutchison has been busy 
raising about $2 billion in 
extra funds. This has led to 
speculation that it may decide 
to make an aggressive bid for 
Pearson. At these levels Fear- 
son is capitalized at £1.16 


Philips Lamps 

Owing to transmission er- 
rors, Philips Lamps shares 
were shown as suspended and 
incorrectly quoted in 
yesterday's Stock Exchange 
price tables. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


GEC and Plessey with 
antlers locked 


Both GEC and Plessey are in 
unstable equilibrium but as each 
company is led by a dominant figure, 
each hostile to the other, no one would 
put Iris shirt on a constructive 
realignment of interests (in tele- 
communications and advanced com- 
ponentry) that might benefit both. 
Below the top attitudes are more 
realistic and accommodating but the 
decisions are those of Lord Weinstock 
and Sir John Clark. 

Meanwhile, Plessey continues to 
burnish the image that helped to 
secure its independence in tbe hooded 
eyes of the Monopolies Commission 
while GEC still finds it hard to accept 
that external perceptions of what it is 
about really matter. The latest mes- 
sage from Plessey concentrates on its 
spread of activities and the wealth of 
opportunites in the international mar- 
ket where Plessey claims it can 
succeed by its own exertions. Ironi- 
cally, only a later announcement of 
the £75 million Rapier success in 
Britain stopped more pennies falling 
from the share price. 

Plessey is a tiddler among the 
sharks of the international tele- 
communications market In France, 
where Sir John is hopeful that System 
X might be chosen as the alternative 


digital exchange, Plessey is in com- 
with Sier 


petition with Siemens arid American 
Telephone and Telegraph and in need 
of a reciprocal arrangement which 


British Telecom has no intention of 
making. Like it or not. System X, 
which probably accounted for as 
much as £10 million of the jump in 
pretax profits, will remain centre 
stage. The best bet appears to be 
Bulgaria, which is playing host to Sir 
John next week: the Bulgers might just 
come up with an order. 

In the United States, where Plessey 
admits it made a major mistake in 
anticipating the cost of adapting 
System X for the American market, 
tactics have changed. Plessey reckons 
that Sirombeig-Carlson's own prod- 
ucts can compete in 85 per cent of the 
market and that there in no financial 
sense in bringing over System X. The 
subsidiary is now firmly profitable but 
it needs a leap of imagination to see 
Plessey emerging ahead of Siemens 
and Enccson. 

The obvious market remains the 
US where the company has at least 
learned from its mistakes. The pur- 
chase of a specialist company, such at 
Digital Switch which makes high 
specification transmission equip- 
ment, still looks the most obvious 
course of action and would fit in with 
Sir John's wish to be able to offer big 
companies a turnkey telecommunica- 
tions package. 

One thing is certain: the Plessey 
share price cannot be sustained by 
francophilia and vigorous public rela- 
tions alone. 


Agency brokers feel fallout 


Suggestions that James Capel may be 
facing serious problems as an agency 
broker for equities appear to be 
exaggerated. Capel itself insists that, 
far from business dropping away to a 
trickle as clients go for deals at net 
prices, their equity turnover is up 
since Big Bang. General market 
activity has been on the high side 
recently which has no doubt helped, 
but Capel claims that it has had 
several days of record business in the 
last two weeks. 

But these are diffi cult times for 
agency brokers, whose business has 
almost certainly dropped since Big 
Bang. At this early stage, the agency 
broking arms of market-makers are 
suffering most. At one, the agency 
business on one particular day dwin- 
dled to a meagre 10 per cent of total 
turnover. This does not constitute a 
sample but may be an omen of things 
to come. 

The reasons for these pressures are 
not wholly obvious, but may simply 
be a manifestation of the old City 
tendency towards specialization. If an 
institution wants an agency service it 
probably feels it receives a better one 
from a broker specializing in agency 
business. That way it can spread its 
business more widely around the 
market, using the market-makers 


direct to do its net trades when it does 
not want the extra services and 
commission charges of an agency. 

In the gilt-edged market, events 
have taken a slightly different course. 
Plenty of business still appears to be 
coming the way of the broker-dealers, 
but sonfe of their number, according 
to market-makers, have been acting 
like spivs. They took advantage of the 
early technological problems by regu- 
larly picking off market-makers who 
had been left behind by the system. 

If turnover has been buoyant in 
equities, it has been positively boom- 
ing in gilt-edged. Estimates of turn- 
over range from about double to three 
times the turnover before Big Bang. 
The reason is largely the advent of the 
Interdealer brokers, which are living 
up to all the Bank of England's 
expectations. Roughly half daily turn- 
over appears to be channelled through 
tbe six IDBs as market-makers take 
advantage of the anonymity they 
provide to offset positions. 

So far' buoyant volumes has been 
making life easy for the IDBs. but few 
expect all six to last the course. Many 
market-makers have already settled 
into regular dealing relationships with 
two or three favoured IDBs, though 
not all market-makers favour tbe 
same IDBs. 


WE HELP 

TURN MORE THAN 
THE WHEELS OF 
INDUSTRY 


BTR companies have played their 
part in the development of the impressive 
new Jaguar. 

Metaiastik and Peradin supplied 
engine mountings, bushes and hoses, and 
Dunlop Hillex came up with the power 
steering, air conditioning and cooler hose 
assemblies. 

Clearly, using top performance 
suppliers is the way to build a high 
performance car. 



BTR PLC. SILYERTCWN HOUSE. VINCENT SQUARE. 
LONDON SW1P 2PL. 01-834 3£4& 





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28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


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EQUITIES 



saw** 

Interlink - 


0B5J>) 



-RECENT ISSUES 


LOn Assc utv Tat n< 
Utoytfe cnemtst (ie&r 
Marlborough Tacti j-nop) 
M«xa Lateura (igsp) 
Miter & Santtouse (lOSp) 
Ntwm Trans (7Sp) 
Quarto (iiSp) 

Rotunda (96p) 

Sandal Parkins (II 
Scot Mtge 1( 


T$B Group MOOpJ 
Thames TV ftSOpj 
Traaa 10% C-91 «S&50 
Wimnoy Mackay (isop) 
Woortons Bettor p«p) 
Yehrartcn (38p> 


5’j 
128+4 
132-1 
148-1 
184 
72 
130 
101 +3 
178 
£19 
78*1-2 
333 +2 

163-3 

84-2 

34-1 


Yorkshire TV p25p) 191 +5 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Beteray F/P IK +4 

Slue Arrth* N/P 55 

Br. Benzol N/P 4 

Brown Kent F/P 90 

BswiekN/P 

FR Grot* F/P 2M 

Norfolk Gap F/P 23'* 

Pstrocan N/P 8+1 

Redtsnd N/P 52 -5 

S Me F/P 375 

(issue price m brackets). 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS . 




Cafls 



Ml 



S«ta 

Jan 

AO r 


Jm 

Apr 

M 

ASed Lyons 

300 

30 

40 

48 

8 

11 

15 

r317T 

330 

\? 

22 

30 

23 

2t) 

32 

360 

2 

11 

— 

47 

SO 

— 

BP 

600 

too 

117 

_ 

2 

12 


C894) 

650 

fi? 

8? 

mo 

13 

zr 

35 

700 

32 

*6 

6b 

35 

57 

65 

ConaGoU 

550 

1R5 

18? 


4 

10 


{■687) 

600 

115 

137 

145 

6 

17 

25 


650 

77 

100 

114 

17 

30 

4b 

GourtauUs 

260 

57 

68 


1 

2 

__ 

C312) 

260 

3/ 

V 

62 

2 

6 

9 

300 

74 

ffi 

60 

8 

11 

15 


330 

11 

18 

31 

23 

26 

28 

Com Union 

260 

73, 

30 

38 

6 

12 

15 

P271) 

280 

13 

19 

26 

17 

23 

26 

300 

b 

12 

16 

33 

38 

42 

Cable & Wire 

300 

20 

33 

40 

14 

27 

30 

(■302 ) 

325 

10 

71 

— 

32 

37 

—• 

350 

3 

12 


50 

£5 

— - 


375 

2 

— > 

— 

7b 

— 

— 

DEC 

160 

27 

80 

36 

7* 

5 

8 

(■181) 


12 

70 

26 

9 

K] 

18 

!K7l 

4* 

8 

— 

22 

El 

— 


380 

113 

tie 


1 

3 

— 


330 

85 

90 

— 

1* 

6 


*20 

■ 1 

77 

80 

b 

12 

17 


460 

30 

42 


20 

27 

33 

ia 

950 

14? 

158 


5 

13 


P06B) 

1000 

97 

11H 

— 

10 

25 

— 


56 

8b 

110 

2b 

42 

46 


1100 

33 

60 

8b 

50 

70 

74 

Land Sac 

300 

43 

52 

60 

1* 

8 

8 

r342) 

330 

21 

30 

38 

« 

11 

1b 

360 

5 

14 

19 

24 

27 

31 

Marks & Span 

180 

21 

29 

36 

3 

5 

9 

nss) 

200 

8 

lb 

23 

10 

13 

17 

220 

2 

B 

11 

27 

28 

29 


850 

115 

135 

155 

4 

18 

25 

1-959) 

900 

76 

100 

118 

16 

32 

42 

950 

45 

65 

85 

3b 

60 

K> 


260 

29 

38 

47 

3 

12 

12 

(*283) 

260 

18 

27 

36 

1b 

19 

24 

300 

8 

16 

24 

27 

30 

34 

TSB 

80 

5 

9% 

11* 

4 

6 

7* 

("79) 

90 

2% 

4 

6K 

12* 

13 

14 

TOO 

% 

2 

— 


tJ 

E3| 


States 

Dec 

Mar 

Jtn 

Dm 

Mar 

4ai 

Beecbam 

360 

76 

84 

_ 

1 

3 

— 

T431) 

380 

46 

b7 

67 

3 

8 

14 


?B 

4? 

49 

11 

23 

28 


460 

7 

23 

33 

35 

45 

S2 


200 

34 

42 

El 

1 

3 

6 


220 

17 

77* 

36 

5 

10 

13 

240 

4 

17 

23 

14 

16 

23 

BTR 

280 

26 

36 

45 

4 

8 

13 

(*2«) 

Kill 


25 

32 

— 

17 

22 

307 

7 

— 

— 

17 

— 

— 

Bass 

650 

100 

115 

130 

2 

7 

9 

(-741) 

700 

58 

70 

900 

6 

15 

25 

750 

2b 

40 

bD 

2b 

40 

50 


600 

60 

73 

85 

10 

20 

2? 

<■640 

850 

25 

43 

60 

28 

3 i 

47 

700 

11 

— 

— 

87 

— 

— 


650 

145 

180 

_ 

4 

20 



CT68J 

700 

105 

135 

ISO 

13 

3b 

50 

750 

73 

105 

120 

30 

50 

65 


800 

40 

75 


bb 

70 

— 


300 

4? 

54 

_ 

1 

4 



C35S) 

330 

20 

34 

52 

10 

15 

17 

360 

7 

18 

38 

28 

32 

34 

GKN 

240 

21 

34 

41 

B* 

11 

IS 

cssm 

260 

8 

20 

?S 

17 

21 

26 

280 

4 

11 

18 

33 

3b 

39 


300 

2 

5 

— 

Si 

51 

— 

Glaxo 

■Cvl 

42 

87 

112 

22 

42 

n 

{*91 7) 

■r '1 

17 

El 

65 

46 

67 

77 


8 

El 

62 

95 

104 

115 


1050 

4 

24 

— 

145 

ELil 

— 


160 

48 

51* 


* 

i 

__ 

("207) 

180 

29 

32* 

10* 

% 

3* 

5 

200 

12 

18* 

<*4% 

3* 

7 

I0K 


220 

4 

8* 

15 

15* 

18 

20* 





Min 



Put* 

■M 


State 

Dec Mv 

■lun 

Dec 

®2L 

Jita 

Jaguar 

rsizf 

500 

550 

600 

30 

8 

3 

50 

23 

14 

70 

42 

15 

47 

S3 

27 

50 

S3 

35 

58 

Thom EM 

420 

77 

87 

102 

2 

4 

8 

cm 

460 

500 

43 

17 

60 

32 

72 

50 

9 

25 

17 

35 

20 

40 


550 

A 

16 

— 

bb 

70 

— 

TOSCO 

380 

TO 

_ 

— 

* 

— 

— 

cm 

350 

390 

40 

18 

60 

35 

48 

1* 

9 

IS 

20 


420 

6 

IS 

30 

30 

35 

37 


Series 

Nov 

Feb Hh NW Feb «ey 1 

Brit Amo 

420 

85 

85 

S55 

V 

9 

13 

C484) 

460 

2b 

57 

6/ 

1 

IS 


500 

3 

35 

4b 

SO 

30 

eo 

BATUxte 

360 

108 

120 

— 

K 

1 

— 

C487? 

390 

78 

9M 

97 

K 

1* 

4 

420 

48 

BH 

7b 

* 

7 



460 

11 

35 

43 

2* 

15« 

25 


460 

17 

45 

57 

3 

12 

23 

r*71) 

500 

560 

1 

1 

22 

8 

3b 

17 

30 

80 

33 

8S 

87 


180 

ma 


32 



6 

(196) 

200 

■1 


■ 1 




220 

ma 


HJ 



29 

( Cadbury Sctwrppa 160 


1 

39 

25 

* 

1* 

6 

10 

8 

16 


200 

i 

10 

IB 

16 

K£fl 

26 


300 

37 

50 

55 

1 

5 

8 

<334) 

330 

6 

77 

37 

3 

16 

22 

360 

1 

13 

18 

30 

3b 

40 

Imperial Gf 

300 

115 



_ 

* 

— 

— 

f413) 

il 

85 

— 

— 

K 

— 


360 

bb 

— 

— 




UObraks 

330 

45 

58 

65 

1 

5 

7 

(■371) 

360 

IS 

33 

4,'1 

3 

11 

18 

390 

2 

19 

25 

22 

2b 

32 

LASMO 


2? 

32 

37 

* 

5 

8 

H57) 

140 

1? 

77 

31 

1 

9 


160 

5 

18 

21 

12 

19 

k3| 


500 

75 

97. 

105 

1 

5 

12 

C570) 

560 

25 

49 

60 

3 

18 

25 

600 

2 

18 

28 

32 

40 

47 

P40 

460 

n 

80 

Of) 

1 

5 

8 

rsai) 

500 

23 

48 

60 

2 

13 

20 

550 

2 

17 

26 

32 

2/ 

47 


600 

* 

— ■ 

— 

60 

— 

— 

Racal 

160 

17 

26 

34 

2 

6 

11 

H72) 

180 

2 

13 

19 

10 

17 

■ fl 

200 

1 

7 

13 

30 

32 


prrz 

600 

Evl 

IIS 

132 

% 

11 

20 1 

r©8) 

650 

■rl 

77 

92 

2 

23 

mm i 

700 

>0 

4 7 

82 

10 

42 

wm\ 


750 

i* 

— 

— 

67 

— 

— 

Vaal Reefs 

70 

15 

18 22* 

1 

4* 

4* 

CBS] 

80 

S* 

10% 

16 

2 

7* 

8)1 

90 

% 

5* 

10* 

6* 

12* 

14 


Series 

Nov 

«T 

Jan 

Nov 

Mar 

Jon 

Uirotn 

200 

43 

51 

54 

1 

2 

8 

(-2*4) 

218 

25 



1 

— 

— 

236 

8 

%!■ 

mrnm 

1 

— - 

— • 


2*0 


19 

25 


16 

23 


2S5 

1 



14 




Cute* 

owes 

No* 

Feb May 

No* 

Feb ter 1 

Tr1f%%1991 

100 

1* 


«!<l 

ha 

I** 

1% 

f2101) 



1* 


1‘i« 

2‘4 

— t* 

104 

*» 


1 1 10 

3* Ml 


4*,* 

Tr 11%% 03/07 

106 

* 

2* 

3*.o 

1*1. 


«'M 

reiflB) 

108 

Vi 

1* 

2% 

“33 

4* id 

5 

110 

V 

i* 

2‘io 

4* 

6* 

6* 


112 


K 

1* 

654 

7% 

7* 


114 

'w 

* 

1* 

8* 

9 

fl>.« 


118 


*32 

«» w 

10* 10* 11* i 










No* Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Nov 

Dee 

Jan 

Fab 

FT-SE 1525 

120 - 



1 



_ 

__ 

Index 1550 

95 98 

108 


VA 

7 

13 


(1642) 1575 

70 80 

B75 

— 

4 

15 

2 2 

- — 

1600 

45 S3 

72 


10 

73 

30 

— 

1625 

27 45 

57 

en 

16 

33 

43 

52 

1650 

15 33 

45 

b7 

29 

4b 

SB 

60 

iera 

7 22 

33 

38 

48 

57 

b6 

70 

1700 

3 12 



70 

77 




November 13, 1966. Total contracts *3488. CaBs 31008. Puts 12458- 
ft-se index, cmkiibi . PutsnC34 


nJMedytagsacurttypdCB. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AMO FORWARD RATES 


day's range 
Nraramberia 
NYOtk 1.41BM.4255 
Mtxaraal I.98KM 3722 
Ams'Qon3^38&a£S20 
Btussels 58.60-59.88 
Cptaen 10^148-108675 
DiSST 1.0514-1.(671 
nanUurt£8680.28963 
Lisbon 211902100* 
Madrid 19080-193^6 
tartan 1S8225-199S60 
Oslo 10055-10^848 
Parts 9375384285 
SrUftn 9458008838 
Tokyo. 22045-22028 
Vienna 20.1 900-203098 
Zurich £378029815 


Knbtstn 

d on 

NnwobarlS 

14240-1 .4250 

14894-147X2 

ajM 10-0245* 
59.67-69.78 
1043238-104385 
1.0537-14647 

24594-24735 

5nzifr2iM4 

19338-19346 

198943-199540 

104800-10.6946 

9^164^4249 

947S7-94S38 

22841-22946 

202813-204098 

24781-24819 



21-I6prem 
1 a-xpnm 
24-33tfs 
IK-IKprem 
76-18*ds 
IMOdte 


3 months 
140-1 77 pram 
1.49>l41pmn 
4K-4Hprem 



25 

2tt-2%pram 
1JH Hprwn 
1%-iMpram 
10-8% pram 

iMrIKpram 


>13009 
64pram 
ttV-IOMfe 
7%-6%pram 
SH-5%prem 
aiWSprem 
28Hr25% pram 
4%-4Kprem 


Stating index eotnpared wflb 1975 ms dam tt«Jt tar's ranfle 884454). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 

Anwnjna ausfrar 14170-14240 

Australia donv 23013-34047 

Bahrain 0nar 0534WJ4385 

Brazil cruzado ■ 1942-2004 

Cyprus pound fl.72C0-0.7300 

FWamtnwtai 54630-74330 


DOOAR SPOT RATES 


Main — 
Singapore. 
Malaysia - 


14450-14*80 
. 2.19002.1910 
.2415024170 


044500.6*65 


Greece drachma .. 
Hong Kong doiar. 
India ropes 

vaq Anar 

KuwaitdkiarKD ~ 
Malaysia doflar — 
Mexico peso- — 
New - ‘ 


_ 1954019740 
f 14855*11 4941 
1840-1970 


~ QAl45~(iA'l85 
— . 171008.7225 
— 118001230.0 
— Z73862.7515 

Saudi Arabia rtyol 54020-5342Q 

Singapore doter 3.113011187 

SouSiAfricarand , — 11838-3^003 

UAEdstum 5407052470 

■UoydsBank 



Austria 


Rdntq«MtrDin%i8M*H0IH«dEiU 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staring 

Dec as 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

SCp 37 

DecB7 

Maras. 


Previous day's total open Merest 1 

Three Month EbkkMv 

Dec 68 - 

Mar 87 

Jun87 M46 

Sop 87 9346 


<S * 

Low 

Cktee 

EstVol 

88J55 

93JB9 

5117 

89.00 

8891 

8990 

1344 

8127 

88.19 

89-27 

409 

88-24 

86.12 

Mon 

263 

89.03 

6990 

6990 

8 

8873 

8873 

8873 

8 

Previous tots! 

9395 9393 

open Interest 26291 
S394 . 1822 

9197 

93.95 

93.97 

1547 . 

9398 

9396 

9398 

228 

93J6S 

3393 

93-65 

199 . 


US Treasury Bend 

OecBS 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


ShortCtt 
Dec 88— - 
Mar87-. 
Jim 87 


ran 

DflCl 
Mar 87. 
Jun87 . 
Sen 87. 


97-00 


95-18 

an 


107-20 

10801 


Previous 
97-09 


r -Q9 

96-15 

95-15 


Interest 4984 


i interest 825 


95-28 




9503 


w = 


Previous day’s tcW ooenware«i73B0 

107- 30 107-10 10726 23812 

108- 01 107-24 107-31 «3 

107-H O 

, 0 


FT-SE100 

Dec 80 

Mar 67 


16440 

16640 


Previous day's total open Merest 2578 
16*40 162.70 16180 66S 

16648 26 


1E&40 


16640 


1 mmh 100-545 3mnfli 546440 
Smntti 545440 12mth 110445 


■MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Base ltatu% 

Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11 

Discount Market Loens % 

OvernkSit tOglr 9 Low4 
Weak feted: 10 
Treasury Bale (Dtscoufl %) 

101k IS m 

3 mnm 10K 3mnth 10% 

(DrsCQUit%) 

. 2 moth 10»»-1(pa» 


EURO MONEY DB*OSriS% 


Prime Bank 

1 rnnth 10%-IDli 
3 mnm 10 u »-1D"u6rtnh 10%-10% 
Trade aas(Dtecoam%) 

1 mmh 11% 2tnmh IJ’is 

3mndi 11°K 6mnth 11% 

hderiiwkm 

Overnight open 9X dose 7U 

1 week 104-10 6mrth ll 8 «*-ll% 

t ninth 104-10% 9 mmh 114-11% 

3moBi 12 rath 114-11% 

Local Authority Deposits f%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mnth 10V 3mnth 10% 

6 ninth 10% 12mm 10%zZ 

Local AMhcriiy Bends f%) 
imnlh iHfr-lfM 2nmtti 11%-n» 

3 mmh 11 V10% 6mnth 11%-10% 

9 mmh 12mtti 11-10% 

9tRflnoCDs(%) 

i mmh io u i«-io i J»3iiwh nhrit'* 

6rmdh lliwll’n 12 mm 115W1 


7 days 6-5°u 
3 mmh 


7 days 4%-4% 
3mrth 4%-4% 
French Franc 
7 days 3-7% 

3 mnlh 8 ,, i«-8 , ta 
MesRsac 
7 days 1«-1X 
3 mmh 4-3% 

Yen 

7 days 4*H>-4 , ie 
3 mnm 4"he-4 ,, w 


cd 6%-6% 

immh 64% 

6 mmh 6 l w4 n *M 

cal 5-4 

i mmh 4 »m-4*i« 
6 mnm 

cal 7*4? % 
immh 8%-8% 

6 mnlh 8"ia4*i« 
cal 2%-tM 
1 mmh 3*i»4'io 
firanth 4-3* 

CBS 4*4* 
1 ninth 4*4* 

6 mirth 4 M i*-"ie 


GOLD 


NOTICE OF REDEIWPTION 

of 

Federative Repubfic of Brazil 

8V4% External Bonds Doe December 1, 1987 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, on behalf of the Federative Republic of Brazil, that on December 1. 1986. $1,320,000 
principal amount of its 8 ‘a% External Bonds will be redeemed out of moneys to be paid by it to Dillon. Read & Co. Inc., 
as Principal Paying Agent pursuant to the mandatory, annual redemption requirement of said Bonds and to the 
related Authenticating Agency Agreement and Paying Agency Agreement, each dated as of December 1, 1972. 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, as Authenticating Agent, has selected, by lot, for such redemption the Bonds 
bearing the following serial numbers: 

Coupon Bonds to be redeemed in whole 


71 

1230 

3345 

5236 

5546 

6398 

7795 

9122 

11457 

12738 

12877 

14401 

155*7 

16435 

18*58 

21140 

23851 

23763 

307 

1244 

3346 

5237 

5585 

6399 

7796 

9123 

11458 

12740 

12878 

14542 

15540 

16473 

10463 

211*1 

23862 

23768 

311 

1249 

3347 

5241 

5588 

6419 

7798 

9124 

11467 

12742 

12830 

14543 

15561 

16493 

18464 

21142 

23659 

23775 

312 

1250 

3363 

5242 

5589 

6420 

7799 

9558 

11468 

1Z7S5 

12956 

145*4 

15579 

16*94 

10465 

21143 

23661 

Z3776 

315 

1441 

3364 

5243 

5590 

6423 

6238 

9569 

11469 

12758 

12958 

14545 

15832 

16495 

10466 

21157 

236® 

23778 

318 

1443 

3365 

5352 

5593 

6425 

8241 

9560 

11473 

12761 

12962 

14553 

15833 

16501 

20211 

23547 

2366* 

23780 

363 

1446 

3369 

5356 

5606 

6*35 

6242 

9772 

11476 

12762 

12965 

14681 

15825 

1650? 

70212 

23548 

73665 

23701 

364 

1448 

3307 

5357 

5607 

6438 

8243 

10381 

11478 

12767 

12966 

1*682 

15838 

165G4 

20213 

23551 

23867 

23783 

38* 

1465 

3388 

5356 

5606 

6441 

8268 

10382 

11461 

12769 

12967 

14083 

15840 

16505 

20527 

23552 

23676 

23792 

386 

1469 

3389 

5360 

5788 

6442 

6269 

10383 

11483 

12772 

12971 

14636 

16283 

16920 

20529 

23554 

23679 

23793 

935 

1472 

4233 

5369 

5967 

6443 

8270 

10384 

11484 

12780 

12974 

14688 

16296 

' 16621 

20531 

23567 

23680 

23795 

961 

1473 

4235 

5370 

5972 

6449 

8272 

10385 

11465 

12783 

13056 

14689 

16298 

16622 

30532 

23569 

23661 

23801 

964 

150« 

4241 

5372 

5975 

6450 

8344 

10387 

11560 

12784 

13057 

74690 

16299 

16633 

30541 

23572 

23693 

23903 

969 

1509 

4265 

5377 

5976 

6482 

8345 

10396 

11957 

12785 

13059 

14694 

16300 

16834 

20542 

23573 

23688 

23804 

971 

1510 

4270 

5378 

5977 

648* 

8346 

10398 

12162 

12786 

13066 

1*686 

16302 

16636 

20544 

23576 

23689 

23806 

975 

1667 

4283 

5379 

5992 

6500 

8347 

1)014 

12163 

12707 

13069 

1*689 

16303 

16638 

205*5 

23578 

23680 

23807 

980 

1669 

4452 

5380 

5993 

6502 

8512 

11015 

12164 

12794 

13231 

14700 

16309 

16639 

205*6 

23587 

23691 

23808 

966 

1670 

4453 

5392 

6000 

6505 

8514 

11016 

12166 

12799 

13232 

14701 

163x0 

16642 

20550 

23588 

23693 

23814 

989 

1671 

4454 

5393 

6002 

6507 

8521 

11053 

12167 

12799 

■13233 

14702 

16312 

155*3 

20551 

23590 

23694 

23815 

993 

1673 

4470 

5394 

6110 

6514 

8733 

11054 

12168 

12806 

133*2 

14703 

16313 

15650 

20553 

23591 

23699 

23817 

1054 

3045 

4466 

5395 

6U4 

6524 

8734 

11055 

12)69 

12607 

136T 

14714 

16315 

>6655 

20555 

23592 

23701 

23823 

1059 

2049 

4489 

5458 

6115 

6525 

8735 

11057 

12312 

12809 

13618 

14715 

16320 

16657 

20356 

23598 

23702 

23825 

1060 

3052 

4490 

5466 

6120 

6526 

6736 

moo 

12314 

12310 

13620 

14716 

16322 

1S5S8 

20357 

23600 

23703 

23826 

1061 

3115 

449 2 

5468 

6123 

7039 

8740 

11151 

12316 

12811 

13621 

14717 

16323 

16661 

20560 

23601 

23705 

23028 

1073 

2134 

4769 

5469 

6124 

7040 

8744 

11152 

12318 

12813 

13632 

14718 

16326 

16639 

20561 

23602 

23706 

23829 

1074 

2135 

4770 

5470 

6153 

7252 

8748 

11246 

12319 

12821 

13633 

14719 

16327 

16541 

20563 

23606 

23710 

23830 

1077 

2136 

4771 

5477 

6154 

7264 

8749 

11248 

12323 

12822 

13634 

14725 

16328 

16842 

2056* 

23607 

23712 

23836 

1079 

2137 

4775 

5480 

6156 

7266 

8761 

11249 

1232S 

12824 

13637 

14726 

16329 

16945 

26568 

23608 

23713 

23837 

1080 

2139 

4849 

5481 

6158 

7269 

8780 

11251 

12327 

12825 

13638 

14777 

16362 

18*16 

20569 

23609 

23727 

23846 

1083 

2S37 

4850 

5482 

6160 

7281 

8702 

11255 

12338 

12826 

13701 

14728 

16371 

15419 

20579 

23613 

23729 

23850 

1114 

2539 

4853 

5483 

8161 

7282 

8783 

11256 

12339 

12828 

13782 

14739 

16372 

1B420 

20580 

23616 

23731 

23851 

1117 

7665 

5142 

5492 

6162 

7288 

3787 

11257 

12341 

12833 

13783 

14007 

16374 

16422 

20502 

23617 

23732 

23852 

1119 

2666 

5143 

5493 

GIBB 

7306 

8786 

112S8 

12344 

12835 

13784 

14009 

16379 

18428 

20583 

23619 

23733 

23853 

1120 

2068 

5153 

5494 

6193 

7307 

8783 

11348 

12627 

12536 

13794 

14815 

10361 

10479 

20584 

23620 

23734 

23861 

1121 

2670 

5155 

5496 

6243 

7308 

8642 

f 1349 

12629 

12837 

13796 

14831 

16356 

13431 

20585 

23621 

23736 

230S2 

1122 

2688 

5159 

5501 

6291 

7309 

8847 

11352 

12630 

12838 

13817 

14333 

16388 

18432 

2G6G4 

23622 

23737 

2386* 

1129 

2689 

5160 

5508 

6292 

7326 

8875 

11354 

12681 

12840 

13823 

1*835 

16389 

18*33 

20605 

23627 

23738 

23865 

mg 

2690 

5185 

5509 

6294 

7379 

8876 

1)356 

12663 

13843 

13825 

14836 

16390 

18435 

206O9 

23629 

237*0 

23868 

1150 

2715 

5188 

5512 

6295 

7330 

8877 

11357 

12693 

128*4 

13827 

14838 

16400 

18*36 

20609 

23630 

237*1 

23870 

1175 

2720 

5169 

5514 

6297 

7346 

8916 

11414 

12694 

12857 

13030 

14839 

16*01 

1S*42 

20086 

23633 

23751 

23871 

1176 

2727 

5190 

5520 

62S8 

7347 

8917 

11415 

12696 

>2860 

14093 

14990 

16*03 

10443 

20897 

2363* 

23752 

23872 

1177 

2728 

5200 

5521 

6335 

7348 

9094 

11418 

12706 

12861 

14094 

1*991 

16«11 

16444 

20979 

23635 

23754 

23874 

1180 

2729 

5201 

5524 

6338 

7776 

9096 

11420 

12707 

12862 

14153 

14993 

16*12 

18447 

20980 

23536 

23756 


1183 

2754 

5202 

5526 

6373 

7773 

909 8 

1M39 

12709 

12863 

14396 

14994 

16415 

18448 

209fll 

23639 

23757 


1215 

2755 

5216 

5530 

6380 

7781 

9101 

11440 

12725 

12835 

14397 

14995 

16*24 

154*9 

20982 

236*4 

237S9 


1216 

2757 

5218 

5532 

6382 

7783 

9111 

11441 

12727 

12866 

14390 

14996 

16*29 

18450 

20384 

236*7 

23760 


1218 

2759 

5219 

5533 

6386 

7786 

9» 12 

11451 

12729 

12869 

>4399 

15001 

16430 

13455 

21137 

236*6 

23781 


1220 

2765 

5235 

5545 

6397 

7787 

9120 

11452 

12736 

12871 

14400 

15003 

16*33 

12456 

21138 

23049 

23762 



Regiitgvd Borafa vrithout ccwponi to be red e em ed ip whole or io part and lire princqal amount to be redeemed 
RUM 





htetal 

Ante 


car 


IS 


mug 


Uto 


tot* 


uta 


lata 

Hater 

n 

tetter 

Maori 

tetter 

BttHMO 

tartar 

Butowpvtf 

RB 976- 

- $14,000 

RM 178.. 

. $1,000 

RV 240- 

.. $ 5.000 

RX 137. 

- $10,000 

RB 960 

3,000 

RM 239- 

. 5.000 

RX SI.. 

.. 3,000 

RX 138. 

.. 10.000 

RB 962. 

- 2.000 

RV 80.. 

. 5.000 

HX 96 

.. 3,000 

fiX 139. 

.. 10,000 

RB 983. 

.. 6.000 

. RV 110 . 

. 5.000 

RX 127. 

10.CQ0 

RX 140 

.. 10.000 

RB 984. 

.. 5.000 

RV 111.. 

. 5.000 

HX 134 

. 10.000 

RX 149 

- 10000 

RM 87. 

.. 10,000 

nv ii2.. 

. 5.000 

RX 135 

10A0D 

RX 224. 

.. 3.000 

RM 150. 

.. 1.000 

RV 129.. 

. 1.000 

RX 136. 

.. 10.000 

RX 965. 

.. 28.000 


RB 698. ...S 10.000 
RB 915.— 100.000 
RB 916 ... 100,000 
RB 934..., 25.000 
RB 935.... %00O 
RB 972.... 1400 

RB 975 ... 1.000 

Bonds so selected for redemption (or ir» the case of a partial redemption the portion to be redeemed) will become and 
be due and payable in United States dollars on December 1. l!iS*i. at the office of Dillon. Read & Co. Inc.. 19 Rector 
Street. New York. New ^ork 10U06. at one hundred per cent 1 100%) of the principal amount thereof with interest 
accrued thereon to the redemption dale. Coupon Bonds should be presented for redemption together with all 
appurtenant coupons maturing subsequent to the redemption date. If moneys for the redemption of all the Bonds 
to be redeemed for in the rase of a partial redemption the portion to be redeemed) are available at the office of 
Dillon. Read & Co. Inc. on the redemption date, interest thereon will cease to accrue from and after such date. 

In lIlG mrfdmntmn aPomu iMn!«f<kWAJ T~ .■■k.m .w m ab*h*!am aE«.. 1 <tw o** n f*« 

redumj 

thereof . 

thereof without charge. . 

At the option of the respective holders of the Bonds selected for redemption, the principal amount thereof and 
interest thereon may be collected upon presentation at the offices of the Co-Paying Agent Banco Do BrasiL &A. in 
Nea* York. London. Paris, Hamburg and Tokyo, 

DILLON, READ & CO. INC 

... . * JYiwripo/ Pnyituj Agent 

Dated: November ft. 198b 


Gokfc*4O74O4074O 
Khjgerrantr (per <3*1): 

S 40S)0-40600 (E2B4-MK206.75) 

0067-75) 

PtoUmun 

5530.00(237340) 

*ExdudBSVAT 


ECGD 


Rxvd Rata Staring Export Rnanca 
Sckems IV Avanns ratarance nria lor 
wtod October 


htaraat 

October 

cent 


8, 1986 to 

JncfcOkMc 11437 per 


Readicut 

profits 

doubled 

ByOiffFeltliasi 

Readicut International, the 
specialist textile group headed 
by professor Roland Smith, 
has chalked up its best half- 
time performance since 1978. 

Pretax profits for the six 
months to September have 
risen from £1.7 million to just 
over £3 million. 

A big boost has come from 
supplying carpets to high 
street stores undergoing reno- 
vation. 

Mr Alan Dodman, manag- 
ing director, said yesterday; 
“Renovation in the high street 
has created a lot of extra 
business for us. All big stores 
are improving their facilities 
and this - has pushed up our 
sales considerably.” 

Latest figures show group 
turnover up from £57 million 
to £63.6 million. 

The group says improve- 
ment is due to its carpets,- 
yams and fibres, and indus- 
trial products activities. Firth 
Carpets, in particular, 
achieved what Readicut de- 
scribes as an impressive profit 
level, maintaining fts position 
as one of the most successful 
carpet companies in the 
United Kingdom. 

The board says trading is 
high at most of Its companies. 

Mr Dodman says that, in 
addition to expanding its 
present businesses, Readicul 
is keen to hit the acquisition 
trail. 

“Ideafiy, we are looking at 
companies in the textile sector 
and preferably those based in 
the Yorkshire area where we 
operate.” 

Analysts are looking for fuD- 
year pretax profits this year of 
about £7 million compared 
with £5.64 million last year. 
The interim dividend is up 
from 0.165p a share to (X25p. 


Eagle Star in 
£8m sale 
to Frogmore 

Frogmore Estates, the prop- 
erty company, has bought £9.8 



ertiesfbr £8 

Both buildings, one in cen- 
tral London and the other in 
Middlesex, will be kept in 
Frognaore’s investment port- 
folio producing £799,650 per 
annum next year. 

The company is also 
improving the quality of its 
portfolio by buying file free- 
hold of its 1 6-acre estate in 
Essex for £1.2 million from 
Whitehall Securities. 

It recently paid £18 million 
for an investment portfolio of. 
which £5.4 million of prop- 
erties wffl be retained with the 
rest being sold. 


Record profit at 
Royal Insurance 
surprises Oty 


Royal Insurance, Britain's 
largest insurer, beat City 
expectations by a spectacular 
margin when tt produced its 
highest quarterly profits, n 
made pretax profits 01 £IU5. t 
million for the three months 
to September.. This took the 
total for nine months to 
£193.1 minion compared with 
£16.6 million for the previous 
nine months. 

Third quarter profits from 
Commercial Union and Gen- 
eral Accident this week dis- 
appointed the market but 
Royal’s results in America 
caused the surprise. The com- 
pany made an underwriting 
profit there of $8.7 mtition 
(£5.9 million), its fust since 
1978. . , 

The combined underwriting 
profit of the-US and Britain 
gave a worldwide underwrit- 
ing profit of £2 2 million, die 
first quarterly underwriting 
profit since 1979. 

Royal writes more commer- 
cial business in the US than 
other British insurers and has 
benefited from the hefty rate 
rises imposed in July 1984. 
Rate rises. are tailing off — ' 
commercial multi-peril rates 
were up by 39 per cent in the 
third quarter compared with 
SO per cent in the second and 


58 per cent in the firs*.— hut 
there are only limited a gns o f 
capacity returning in the bread 
and butter business. . 

Royal's operating ratio in 
the US — claims and expenses 
to premiums — fe9 below its 
competitors 10 98 per cent- 
In Britain, Royal made a 
marginal third-quarter under- 
writing profit on its motor 

business _ . 

Royal believes the under- 
lying trend of its Amen can 
business is more encouraging 
than its results show. About 
per rent of its exposure is in 
workers' compensation and 
personal lines. 

Wood Mackenzie, the 
stockbroker, has raised its 
estimate for full-year prone; 
by £45 million to £280 mil- 
lion, against £41.4 million in 
1985. In 1987 Wood Macken- 
zie estimates profits of £«5 
milli on. 

Royal expects to produce 
dividend growth of 1 5 per cent 
a year for the next five years. 
The shares bounced 29p 
higher to 82Sp. 

If Royal, like its compet- 
itors, had used end-p enod 
instead of average exchange 
rates, its nine-month profits 
would have been £4 million 
higher at £197-2 million. 


Iran to back Saudi line 
on raising oil prices 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


Iran, the Opec member 
most consistent in its de- 
mands for a fixed price sys- 
tem, said yesterday that it 
would support Saudi Arabian 
moves to send oil prices back 
upwktds by the end of this 
year. 

The country’s o3 minister, 
Gholamreza Aqazadeh, said 
that prices should be at $18 a 
band by the end of the year 
and then move back up to $28 
in 18 months. 

Iran has been a bitter oppo- 
nent of previous Saudi tactics 
which defended market share 
but sent prices down and hit 
revenues. The two countries 
have had strained relations for 
several years because of Saudi 


support tor tne regime in Iraq. 

However, at this weekend’s 
Opec committee meeting in 
Ecuador, it will support the 
new Saudi oil minister, Sheikh 
Hainan Nazer, in his efforts 
to arrive at a fixed price 
formula which Opec can 
adopt at its meeting in Geneva 
ion December 11. 

The Iranian oil minister 
stud, as he left Tehran for 
Ecuador, that all 13 Opec 
members should undertake 
not to sell oil at less than $ 1 8 a 
barrel tinder any cir- 
cumstances. 

He also revealed that Iran 
has had negotiations with 
Russia about the possibility of 
selling Iranian natural gas. 


Wiggins may buy mill 


Wiggins Teape, the paper- 
making subsidiary of BAT 
Industries, is negotiating to 
buy a. Spanish eucalyptus 
wood pulp mill in a deaLthat 
could have significant ^im- 
plications for the future of the 
European industry- 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FMMtai Urtl) »ta taj» LMtttoctanUan 

Oct 20 Oct 31 JanZ2 

Nov 3 NOT 14 FBbS 

No* 17 No* 29 _ Fob IB _ 

Ctatoptlaia wnrotakwi outon: 13/1 1/58 OaMStn, 


Lynton Hotdnos, Mamie Ftes_ Stone tat. Munton Bros, Team. L HC. 
Etanro *id- Mecca. Read. LCA. Burton. Ptessoy. Bteke LbOhpb, STC. 


tosJock. Brttbrt CommommsUh, Hapwortft 
Put Somite Oothea. 


For Seta — w i ta 

FOb 2 

Fable 
Mar 2 

Now Court 
’. Bteks LetavB, STC. JF Brown, 
Waknan. 


The Spanish company, 
Celulosas de Arturias 
(CEASA), produces about 
130,000 tonnes of eucalyptus 
pulp a year, and Wiggins 
dearly has plans for expansion 
if the deal goes through. The 
“■acquisition” price is thought 
to be about £40 million. 

A takeover would 
strengthen Wiggins Teape’s 
presence in the Iberian penin- 
sula after its purchase of a 42 
percent stake in Soporcei, the 
Portuguese eucalyptus pulp 
maker. 


Land Securities 

INTERIM RESULTS 


Year to 


Extracts from toe consolidated revalue account for toe half year ended 



31.3.86 

(audited) 

£'m 

152.6 

Rental income 

30.9.86 

(unaudited) 

Cm 

85.2 

30.985 

(unaudited) 

£'m 

74.1 

171.5 

Total Income 

97.6 

81.8 

134.0 

Net rents and interest receivable 

77.9 * 

€3.5 

21.1 

Interest payable 

19L8 

9.3 

112.9 

Income before taxation 

58.1 

54.2 


The large development programme currently being undertaken will not be 
income-producing for some time. The income before taxation is after 
charging all interest, including that on capital expenditure, and for the 
second half of the year to March 1987 is not expected to differ material^ 
from that of the first haft to September 1986. 

An interim dividend has been declared of 3.25p per share (1985- Z9p) 
which with the related tax credit is equivalent to 4.577p (1 985: 4.1 43p). 


j 


□ 


a 


□ 


□ 


□ 


a 


A £45m freehold, 200,000 sq.ft shop development scheme in Darlington is to 
be undertaken in association with Pengap Securities Lid. 

The Longmarket site in Canterbury has been acquired for development in 
about three years’ time. 

The 250,000 sq.ft covered and air conditioned Ards Shopping Centre in 
Northern Ireland has been purchased as a freehold investment 

The retail warehouse portfolio now totals some 2.9m sq.ft of space of which 
1.9m sq.ft is completed and income producing. 

The freehold of Britannic House North, EC2 has been acquired. This, together 
with Burmah House, Chiswell Street, forms an island site for which a planning 
application has been submitted. 

Planning permission has been granted for Moorgate Hall, EC2 and Grand 
Buildings, WC2 and applications have been submitted for three further City 
and West End schemes. y 

The gross building area of these City and West End developments totals 
nearty 1m sq.H 


A leaflet setting out the Interim Results and comments in more detail will be desDatriwt ch™**,, 
Shareholders. A copy may be obtained from The Secretary. parcneo snortty to the 

LAND SECURITIES PLC Devonshire House, Piccadilly, London wix 6BT 
























< ■ , ■■ 

X ... ' 




■Mrtr- 


4 * .-"'S ' 

F !,r — ’ * 
fc-ir -W ' -- 


New-style 
rates ‘will 
hit profits’ 

By Judith Huntley 
Commercial 

Property Correspondent . 

The Government's plan to 
reform the commercial rating 
system and reassess ratable 
values by 1990 could lead to a 
S per cent drop in operating 
profits for a typical chain of 
high street fashion stores, 
according to a report from 
Debenham Tewson & Chin- 
nocks, the chartered surveyor. 

The Government intends to 
revalue commercial property 
and to introduce a uniform 
rate in the pound for busi- 
nesses. The impact of these 
- measures would be to boost 
such a retailer’s rates bill from 
£700,000 a year to £1 million, 
shaving S per cent off operat- 
ing profit net of tax. 

The last revaluation of 
commercial property was car- 
ried out more than a decade) 
ago. The boom in consumer 
spending has ted an expansion 
in retail business and a strong 
demand for property. This in 
turn has resulted in rising 
retail rents which will be 
reflected in dramatic increases 
in rateable value, Debenham 
Tewson says. 

Tbe firm says its model 
portfolio of shops, based on a 
medium-sized fashion chain, 
shows companies with a broad 
network of high street stores at 
flourishing market towns and 
in central London will not 
emerge unscathed from the 
revaluation. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


fillister urges offshore 
c o m panie s to battle 
for contracts abroad 


Britain's offshore construc- 
tion industry, which has been 
hit by a fell in orders as the 
low world oil price slowed the 
pace of development in the 
North Sea, was told yesterday 
to step up efforts to win orders 
in overseas markets. 

Although Shell yesterday 
announced orders worth 
£4.5 milli on for hs Tern and 
Eider oilfields, the industry in 
Scotland has been badly hit 
and has announced several 
hundred layoffs in the past ax 
months. 

Mr Alick Buchanan-Smilb, 
the Minister of State for 
Energy told an audience of 
offshore company executives 
yesterday: “The present 
downturn in our domestic 
market is both a challenge and 
an opportunity. British suppli- 
ers of offshore equipment and 
services must not make it an 
excuse for neglecting the 
possibilities offered by over- 
seas markets. New initiatives 
and effort are needed. 

The minister said that if the 
industry is to outlive North 
Sea oil h must become an 
exporting force, providing 
proven technology, equip- 
ment and services for overseas 
oilfields. 

He said: “The best immedi- 
ate opportunity for the UK 
industry is Angola where our 
presence to date Iras been 


mimmaL Angola has low cost 
reserves interesting deep 
water potential, no real 
capability of its own and the 
impending loss of US export 
credit. 

“For technology specific to 
tbe North Sea, Canada bolds 
major opportunities. Mobus 
Hibernia development plan 
was approved a few months 
ago and there is a strong 
political will to bring the fiscal 
negotiations to a successful 
conclusion and get the project 
going. 

“Currently we have a mar- 
ket research missi on in Brazil 
which has seen major_ deep 
water discoveries. The Brazil- 
ians will be carrful what they 
take from abroad and on wtat 
terms, but there should be 

openings for specialized prod- 
ucts. 

“The Indian Government 
has announced a new initia- 
tive to attract foreign .oil 
companies into exploration 
on subs tantiall y improved 
terms." 

The minister also said that 
strong trading links between 
Britain and China should be 
built on and that the agree- 
ment on technical co-opera- 
tion signed between the 
United Kingdom and Russia 
could lead to opportunities in 
the 1990s when the Russian 
offshore industry starts 


operating in the next five-year 
economic programme. 

The minister was speaking 
at tbe launch of a new 
catalogue of company cap- 
abilities by the British Indig- 
enous Technology Group 
(Brit) which was Tormed to 
increase Britain's share of the 
ownership of companies and 
in the technology of tbe 
industry. 

Dr Dickson Mabon, Brit's 
chairman and a former energy 
Secretary, said yesterday. 
“Currently, British indigenous 
companies get just 3 per cent 
of the global onshore market 
There is general agreement 
tha t Britain is now entering a 
critical stage and we in Brit are 
determined to build on 
success. I 

The order placed by Shell 
yesterday is for steel piles 
which will be sunk into the 
seabed to support tbe Tern 
and Eider production plat- 
forms 93 miles north east of 
the Shetlands. 

The £2.5 million order for 

the Tern piling has gone to tbe 
McDermott yard at Ardeseir, 
near Inverness and win pro- 
vide 60 new jobs. The Eider 
contract, which is worth 
£2 million and wfll provide 50 
new jobs has gone to Lewis 
Offshore on the Isle of Lewis 
in the Outer Hebrides. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• WESTPAG Final dividend ! 
14c (same), making 28c (27). 
Gross income bf sar » 
September 30, $7.68 billion 
($6.21 bmion). 

• NATIONAL AUSTRALIA 
BANK: Final dividend 14.5c 
(14), making 29c (27 J). Gross 
income for year to September 
3a $5.36 billion (S 1.04 billion). 

• HANOVER DRUCE: In- 
terim dividend Up (1.1). Fig- 
ures in £000 for half year to 
August 31. Turnover 5.775 
(3,820). pretax profit 768 (401), 
tax 276 (164). attributable 492 
(237), earnings per share 9.5p 
(4.7p). The board believes it 
would be in the long-term 
interests of the company, to 
increase the number of institu- 
tional investors, and arrange- 
ments have been made to place 
3.250.000 convertible pref- 
erence sharesat the £1 par value. 

• HAMPTON TRUST: In- 
terim 0-Sp (035), payable Janu- 
ary 8. Figures in £000 for six 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

C TEMPUS ) 


1 ~ 

Market needs time to 
appreciate Storehouse 

. . ■. - niiirpH Immune Defif 


As a concept, the grouping of 
Habitat. Motbercare and 
8HS into the big non-food 
retailing combine Storehouse 
has a tot of appeaL The 
potential strategic benefits 
could be enormous. It can 


Obsessed as it is with short- 
term performance, the mar- 
ket cannot see beyond the 
end of its nose. Investors who 
lake a longer-term view 
should not be of feint heart 
but start accumulating shares 


CO ti Ki De enormous, u uuisuui«.wi»— — o— 

achieve economies of scale by now. 

streamlining warehouse feed- T^nd Securities 

ities, and centralizing its 

computer facilities. It has Securities, the United 


appointments 


iciuu V-IIJ " 

ary 8. Figures in £000 for six 
months to September 30. Profit 
before tax and minority interest 
637 (219). tax 212 (92), minority 
interest 22 (28), earnings per 
share a63p (0.27). Contracts 
have been exchanged for the 
purchase of a modem freehold 
office building at 175, Preston 
Road, Brighton, let for 25 years 
from 1975on full repairing and 
insuring terms at an annual rent 
of £141^00, subject to review in 
July. 199a 

• CRYSTALATE HOLD- | 
INGS: The acquisition of a ; 
products division of TRW, with 
the exception of its Barbadian 
asreis , has been completed. 
Exchange control consent is 
expected shortly. 

• FROGMORE ESTATES: 
Tbe company has purchased 
two folly lei freehold office 
buildings, totalling 77,000 sq n 
at Aldwych. London , and 
Hayes, Middlesex, from Eagle 
Star Properties for a total 
consideration of about £8.0 
milli on. It has agreed to pur- 
chase a small development site 
in central Brighton from British 
Telecom for £600.000, and it has 


Michael Peters Financial 
Communications: Miss JiD 
Satin becomes marketing 
director. 

Clarkson Pnckle Midlands: 
Mr Nigel Morris is made 
managing director. 

SAS International Holds: 
Mr Michael Duffy takes oyer 
as director of business devel- 
opment. 

City link Transport: Mr 
David Kenaard and Mr Bob 
are appointed asso- 
ciate directors of CSty Link 
Transport Holdings. Mr Peter 
Phillips becomes managing 
director of City link-London. 

Knight Wendling: Mr T 
EricPktt is made vice-presi- 
dent. Mr Martin Christopher 
becomes non-executive direc- 
tor. 

Epson (UK): Mr Bame 
Etherington joins as director 
of and marketing. 

Royal Bank of Scotland: Mr 
Jim Rafferty joins the board 
of tbe Royal Bank Group 
Services. _ . . . 

Coverdale Organisation: 
Mr Robert Lintott is elected 
chief executive. 

Citicorp Corporate Ad- 
visory Services: Mr Jean 



-t 

- £ . 




visory Services: Mr Jean 
Caste becomes chairman and 
chief executive. 

BT&D: Mr Paul O’Donnell 


Mr Barrie Etherington 
takes over as marketing direc- 
tor of BT&D Technologies. 

British Telecommunica- 
tions: Dr Alan Rndge becomes 
director of research and 
technology. 

Alpha Micro: Mr Thomas 
Anthony is elected senior 
president of sales and market- 
ing. *. • 

EMI Records (UK): Mr 
David Mums is made director 

of A&R and Mr Andrew Pryor 
will become director of popu- 
lar music marketing from 
December i. 

American Express Europe: 
Mrs Jennifer Fryer takes over 


Mr Jim Rafferty 

as 'rice-president of public 
affairs and communications. 

Bunge & Co: Mr R 
Pandered is appointed chair- 
man and Mr D Airey lakes 
over as managing director. _ 
George Wnnpey: Mr Cliff 
Gill and Mir David Hotbed 
are made joint m anagin g 
directors of Wimpey Homes 
Holdings- Mr P WMtehoose 
becomes prescient of George 
Wimpey, California. 

Coca-Cola SchwepgraBev- 
erages: Mr D R WHbams 
becomes managing director; 
Mr R A Cm finance director, 
Mr G R Dale, employee 


relations director, Mr J P 
Gum, organization and re- 
sourcing director, Mr J S 
Morrison, dispensed engineer- 
ing services director; Mr S A 
Sherrod, business systems 
director, Mr J M Sunderland, 
commencal director and Mr P 
N White, operations director. 

C E Heath & Co: Mr David 
Graham will become a direc- 
tor, North America from 
December 1. Mr Jonathan 
Bloom will be made associate 
director. North America. Mr 
Geoffrey Dixon, Mr Philip 
Holdway-Davis and Mr Neal 
Thomas will become assistant 
directors. North America. 

Carlton Communications: 
Mr Bob Phillis is made group 
manag in g director. 

Micrelec Mr Simon Gum 
joins the board as finance 
director. 

Ernst & Whinney: Mr Ivan 
Ca r n rth er s becomes a partner. 

Technical Component In- 
dustries: Mr Doris Robson 
and Mr Michael WeOs are 
made partners. 

Hambros Bank: Dr A W 
MaQmann is appointed a 
director of die international 
debt issues division. 

William Collins: Mrs Sonia 
Tjmd is promoted to group 
finance director. 


Telecom for £600.000. and it has 
acquired the freehold of its 16 
acres development at west 
Thurrock, Essex, from White- 
hall Securities, for £1.2 miUion. 

• MJ GLEESON CON- 
TRACTORS: Final dividend 
4.26p (3.87p). making 5.9 Ip 
(5.37). payable January 28. Fig- 
ures in £000 for year to June 30. 

Turnover 77,000 (61,000), pre- 
tax profit 5,659 (5.029), tax 
2, 1 52 (2,067), earnings per share 
35.07p (29.62p). The company 
says it seems likely that the 
higher level of turnover 
achieved will be main t ain ed 
with an increasing contribution 
fiom tbe group’s residential 
estate development s. 

• HIGH-POINT SERVICES 
GROUP: No final dividend 
(15p), making 1.7Sp (4). Results 
for year to May 31. Turnover 
(company and subsidiaries) 

earnings per share 8.08p (16.1 /)■ 

The boom says it is confident 
i hat foe group is well pos ition ed 
to advantage of greater 
opportunities within its market. 


computer facilities. It has 
enormous bargaining power 
in obtaining sites in new 
shopping centres, and tre- 
mendous buying strength . 

Not everyone is convinced, 
however, and despite the fact 
that the first six months’ 
profits were much in line 
with expectations, they failed 
to please the market. Pretax 
profit rose by 20 per cent to 
£37 milli on on turnover up 
by 8 per cent to £433 million, 
excluding discontinued op- 
erations. In response, the 
shares were marked down 
lOpto 315p. 

Part of the trouble is that it 
is not easy to see immediately 
the benefits of the merger to 
the bottom line. Profits from 
BHS rose a healthy 22 per 
cent to £18.5 million, but 
results from both Habitat and 
Mothercare were sluggisiL 
Mothercare was flat at £13.5 
million, while Habitat profits 
declined 10 per cent to £3.5 
million. This was blamed on 
the recent move into a new 
central warehouse with capa- 
city to service planned out-of- 
town stores, but where only 
50 per cent of the space is 

being used now. 

Before the merger, BHS 
shares stood on an average 
multiple for the non-food 
retailing sector (now about 
15.5). Both Habitat and 
Mothercare have tradition- 
ally commanded premium 
ratings of nearer 20. With all 
the prospective benefits of 
the i merger, Storehouse 
should also be standing at a 
premium instead of languish- 
ing around 15. 

AH the ingredients for a 
successful business seem to 
be there, but for the short 
tenn, the market’s verdict 
appears to be that it is a case 
of “not proven”, that status 
peculiar to Scots law where 
the deftndent is neither inno- 
cent nor guilty. Despite its 
familiari ty with the chair- 
man, Sir Terence Conran, the 
market will need more time 
before rerating Storehouse. It 
is, after all, a new group with 
only a six-month history. 


Kingdom’s largest property 
company with a portfolio 
worth £2.5 billion, dis- 
appointed the market yes- 
terday when it revealed 
interim pretax profits of 
£58.1 milli on, an increase of 
only 7.2 per cent on the same 
period last year. 

With the property sector 
beset with bid fever, even the 
mighty Land Securities is not 
immune from such rum ours. 

The company has stirred 
its stumps remajkably by 
acquiring a 2.9 million sq ft 
retail warehouse portfolio 
where rents are rising and 
yields 

About 1.9 million sq ft of that 
is already income producing. 

It remains bullish about 
City of London offices. Plans 
are afoot for 1 million sq ft of 
new offices in the City and 
West End which will boost 
profits in the next three to 
five years. . . 

The company is moving in 
the right direction but it is 
paying in heavy interest costs 
on the substantial develop- 
ment programme and suffer- 
ing a toss of income until 
developments come on 
stream. Borrowings at the 
half year to September 30 
stood at £19.8 million com- 
pared with £9.3 million. 

Gearing is modest despite 
the £300 million raised at 
favourable interest rates, 
standing at £530 million 
against assets of £2.5 billion 
and there is scope to increase 
borrowings which will be 
needed to sustain the dev- 
elopment programme. But 
the company says it has 
enough in the Ritty. 

The interim dividend has 
been increased by 12 per cent 
to 3.25p per share. 

Wellcome 

Given Wellcome's phil- 
anthropic reputation, it is an 
appropriate twist of fate that 
the products most focused on 
at present are drugs which 
treat the social diseases her- 
pes simplex and Aids (Ac- 


quired Immune Deficiency 
Syndrome). , , . 

Sales of Zovirax, which 
treats herpes simplex, ex- .* 
ceeded expectations and rose .. 
70 per cent while growth m • 
the US market was an ; 
impressive 50 per cent. Turo- ; 
over as a percentage of tne .. 
group total increased from / - 
per cent to 12 per cent aid . 
has not lost momentum- _ 
Approval to treat shingles is . 
imminent in Britain where 
there are an estimated mil- 
lion sufferers. ; 

Between £15 and £20 mil- 
lion additional capital expen- 
diture has been earmarked to 
develop Azidothymidine 
(AZT), a paliative drug which 
is said to alleviate but not - 
cure Aids. Clinical trials are 
under way. . 

The development of inis 
drug is still in its early stages 
and its fall applications are as 
yet unqualified. Current es- * 
timaies suggest that AZT 
could generate sales of £70 
million by 1990. . 

A US space-onented 


advertising campaign for the 
OTC product. Actifed, had to 
be abandoned after the Shut- 
tle disaster last year. Never- . 
theless, sales moved a£ead- 
The market was also affected 
by tampering incidents, but 
US margins held up well 
despite intense competition. 

The muscle relaxant, . 
Tracrium, is growing at over 
15 per cent a year and 
Neosporin, used for sfcm ;• 
infections, is also doing weu. 
Other potentially successful 
products include Nix. ini- 
tially for the treatment : ot ; 
head lice but being consid- 
ered for use against scabies, 
and Piritrexim, an anti-can- . 

cer drug. . ,, a l - 

A depressed agricultural 
market made life difficult™ ^ 
Coopers, the 50 per cent , 
owned animal health bust- 
ness which lost £9.7 ntiBion 
pretax. Although _ benefittmg • 
from rationalization, it will 
remain in loss this year. 

Wellcome should make . 
£160 million in the current 

year. A slightly lower tax rate . 

gives earnings per share of 
9.5p. The rating is still exces- 
sive in the short term but the 

impressive range of products 
makes Wellcome an interest- 
ing investment for those pre- 
pared to take a longer term 
view. However, Aids-related 
news may provide trading 
opportunities. 


XWT (Holdings) pic 

(Parent Company of London Weekend Tfeleviskm Limited and Page&^MoyUtoldmgs) mi 


Royal Insurance 

Estimated Nine Months Results 

for 1986 



9 months Id 

sasept 

1986 

(nagwBttd) 

£f° 

9moolhstt> 

30 Sept 

1985 

(unaudited) 

Year 

1985 

(audited) 

General Premiums 

Long -tenn Premiums 

2^05 A 
4805 

2^740 

356.7 

2,7795 

479.1 


General Insurance: 

Underwriting Balance -107.3 
Allocated Investment 
Income 2005 


Investment Income 
attributable to Capital 
and Reserves 
Share of Associated 
Companies’ Profits 

Profit before Taxation 
Taxation 

Minority Interests 

j 

j Net Profit 


902 

-TS2 

-80.4 

it 209 

18.1 

253 

G4JZ 

69.7 

873 

115 

7.0 

8.7 

193.1 

16.6 

41.4 

322 

4.1 

123 

15 

02 

03 


* There was a pre-tax profit of £193 Am 
compared with a pre-tax profit of £L6.6m in 
the same period last year thus producing a 
£176.5m improvement The third quarter 
pre-tax profit was £105. 7m. 

# The recovery was most marked in the 
United States with a pre-tax improvement 
of ,0163m. In the UK it was £35 Jm and in 
Canada £27.7m. 

sfc 'Wbridwide general insurance profit of 

£96.2m (1985: £78.2m loss). 

^ The contribution to total ear n i n gs from 
Royal Life Holdings rose from £l8.9m to 
£2L9m. 

The full statement for the first nine months ofl986 (of which tins is 
an extract) will be mailed to all sharehol d e xs, and nm 6 

from Corporate Relations, Royal Insurance plc(01--83 4JUU). 



CHAIRMAN: CHRISTOPHER BLAND 
Results for the year ended 27 July 1986: 
Highlights from the Chairman’s Statement 








1986 1985 

£000 £000 

157,802 159,458 


Earning s per share 87.5 5-2p 12-2p 

Capital and Reserves £2£78m £l,714m £l,905m 


HET 








■mm 




Turnover ^ ~ 

Group profit before exchequer levy 18,769 10,358 

Exchequer levy 5,977 20 J; 

Group profit before exceptional item 12,792 10,157 

Exceptional item 908 (1.881) 

Taxation on profit on ordinary activities 6,087 4,156 

Group profit attributable to members 
of the company 

Earnings per share 42.93p 23.01p 

Dividends per share (net) 18.15p 14.40p 

Assets per share 280.21 P 239.50p 






(Holdings) pic 


Royal Insurance pic. Group H«id Office, 1 Comhill* London EC3V 3QR 


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AND FINANCE 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


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Bid Om Cn’n 



S3 29 2M 
313 33 41) 
4.4 IT W9 

!» a 07 
09 no 649 
890 29 509 
13 07 .. 

a 4i si 

i.J 19 Wa 

aa 48 309 

fi S S 3 
fts a * 

&4 43 S3 

>J M .. 

Me 02 .. 

50b as m 
U 03 Ml 
a m ®a 
84 13 677 

53 53 MX 
a a mi 
13 13 53 

13 U 013 
71 09 657 

ito 23 3& 
muSI 

HO 4.1 Ml 
IX 11 .. 

« is « 
tt s ss 

33. 11 .. 

Ub IX 713 
14b 24 663 


U 14 .. 

179b 39 Z7J 


49b 24 SS 

53 14 .. 

54 11 643 

24 03 .. 


to +*i 'l$ T 


300 3J7 
£53 m 
7B W7T. 
19 112 


y b 11 256 

“S £3 

19 23 513 

14 #9 .. 

JS S S 3 

69 as tfM 
lib 59 283 
198 U 957 

S3 14 Ml 
49 U 447 
7.1 209 7J 
83 11 507 
13b 43 .. 

£9 73 209 

23 15 829 

23 11 623 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


73 

a +i 

as 

30'- 

18 

Si +1 

178 .. 

227 *-2 

as • 

ho *-a’ 


O w Joymoo and Ob rapnt 
SUGAR (From & Czorofco*) 

f42.0-39LB 

1517-51 .S 



157 -6-57.0 

- 160^595 

165A€2fl 


Vbfc 

GASOfli 

Doc 

Jon 

F86 

Ur — 

Apr 


2110-035 

2100-070 


13025-3000 
133J5-82L5Q 
135-7&S5£0 
13£«W1J0 
130XKW6J0 
126JM-16.0B- 
1 25.00 22JX3 
13000-15X0 
13000-15® 


LONOON SEtAL EXCHANQE 

UAofftewpricii 
OfflcM Timoirar Bnaw 
Mm MC par nouic bokm 
32vMtafM»cm par troy ounce 
tludoHWotf<iCa.LM.MpOit 
COPPSKAAOEA 

Cash 911X0412X0 

Hmw Months. 93000-935X0 

VW» .1250 

ltt» — BamyStndy/QuM 


m 

COMMODITIES 


MAflSt LARGE 

Cash , r .... .... 40000-407X0 

Three Months. 416X0-410X0 

WW ___S 

TWiB OAK 

SILVER SMALL 

Cash 40000-407X0 

Thrm Month* . 418X0-418X0 

Vd ta 

Tone ■ Mb 

ALUMMIM 

Cash 009X0-804X0 

Thrss Months . st3JWi« 

vot 7700 

Tow — Booty Study 

NICKEL 

C88h 2536-2540 

Tina Months — 2S734575 

Vot 6 

Tboe QuM 


nos-Dcmniaj 
79X2p(+aa2) 

lgndon meat niruna 

EXCMANQE 

U« «B Contract p.por |«o 

Month Open Ckwe 

N«F 101X0 100X0 

5* 98X0 8620 

Apr 87X0 87X0 

Jim 87.00 87X0 

Aug 96X0 98XQ 


LONDON POTATO 
FUTURES 

£ per tone* 

th Open does 

112X0 112X0 

158X0 154.00 
178X0 174X0 
85.oo mm 
96X0 99X0 


— | GILL Arotgbt RdormUd 


AMraga MModh griom at 


GttQtftoSaXSpitarhglip 

7Ra^rprh8» 


(+1.HS 

esLoerWcarcaOT weight 
England MdWhtow 
Cahta no*, up 308 %, ova. 
prto6.9d.trpH7.43a) 

Snap nos. down OX 


» W 13 13 293 

o J ti 18 JflX 

8>tti -tt .. .. .. 

TO - .. BOD 69 .. 

<# to .. M tS -o 

on lha ntitkB* Brie* 


vbfcii 

Pig Maa rt onto 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
UttiCM— Cwuraet 

p-fmtOo 

Month open omo 
gw 9840 96X0 

5* 87X0 8630 

Apr 96X0 

•An 96X0 fl&OO 


. ■■■ ■ ■■»—! 
VtafcO 

LONDON GRAHnmjDES 
Epntow* 

WJWK Bartov. 
MQnth Cton aon 
loe-M mss 

iiaSI 
•!SE 

fOl.SO 1QUB5 


HigbtfLow 006* 

Jan 07 740X-737X 737X 

Apr 87 7800-799.0 7B0X 

J07 
S187 
n8B 
kB8 

Ji# 789X-7S9X 789X 

K88 


Vot 54 lots 

Ctoenkmmt20Q2 


Wgh/Low Ctoso 
Nov 80 915X-916X 01^0 


Voc 12 lota 
Op4NTMenrat24 

SpMfiiafhMoonmaMsrr: 

Tanharlnchac 

895.0 UpTSX on 1E/11/BB 


























































THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


«,H ! 5Si 0!a ^ *•*» dividend 5am 
??n^S, paee - r r 11 noatdiesvou 
naye won outright or a share of the toial 
da*Iy pfjae money stated. If you area 
wnner follow the daim procedure on tire 
tart of your canL You must always have 
your card available when cfrimi^g 


Nervous selling 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end November 21 . §Contango day November 24. Settlement day December l . 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

When stocks Hava only one plica quoted, mesa aremtudia prices taken daBysi 5pm. Yiald. change and P/E are calculated on the mMOepriee 



-'Sold- 

© TlraraNwajraperilJMitod 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£12,000 

Claims required for 
+36 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


Nn. Conway 


m m bi ii | i— »- .. r | 


E tv jgggggca SMI 


Industrials A- 


533 426 MIMS S 

m so onw t 

4U ZED Pm*j*a 2 

78 S3 Altai 1 

us lis RttaH (1) HU i: 


imBEESB^—i m i i— 


Drapery. Stores 


Indusuals A-D 


SOD SOS -6 STB 55 52 

Its - . U 14 U 

m va -i tun u iu 

7SS Bl'i -*4 

in 132 r.t « Hr 

n 3H -f H3 <r 11 


es4 ns smom 
su are urn 
7**43VMbFMgo 
320 220 (Mat 


m BI m .. 

1J1 132 -J. r.t 64 or 

n ]R -f U3 If aa 

700 723 .. 1S.4 22 au 

S m 4 d an ia 

670 -3 529 60 S7JD 

VTi . +•§ .. I 

290 300 7J U Mi 




l ■ HI M 



•E EEE 2 ^SMI^B lEEdSdl ■■ 
B1EBE— — EssgggEsa i 

EOgM Eia B 

E3 — ~ 



/fTTOI ESZB 





wWSTTTrWnTT^ 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



23 12 res 
157 59 150 

u u u 

ras is a 2 
b? « rs 

5M Si S4 

ai 07 mo 

.. . oj 

U 23 V 
111 U «J 
£7 12 212 

.. .. US 

U 23 S3 
2* 17 S3 
56 17 251 

73b 33 1Z2 
17 10 15S 

43 SB 209 

id as .. 
u ii 17 
15 42 15 

25 as 21.1 

23 43 115 

4.1 2£ 120 

95 25 TU 
10 12 .. 
U 12 <U 
ISa 28 171 
05 24 145 

1.1 U ISO 
SB 20 ns 

24 14 186 

ID to 204 
41 55 115 


SB 

25b 

90 

a 

as 

SB 

120 

62 

3 

S3 

7 

4b 

a 

IB 

99 

Cfi 

EB 

62 

its 

63 

7E5 

231 

to 

SW 

35 a 

248 

a 

3C 

an 

150 

1*4 

13 

BOB 

430 

zs 

165 

Mb 9 

11* 

65 

94 

a 

235 

210 

5J0 

356 

126 

SO 

115 

70 

426 

331 

77 

57 

174 

(36 

224 

ire 

art'.ttPi 

81 

33 

5(5 

215 

as 

ZSS 

24'. 17b 

00 

45 

2S3 

163 

ISO 

S2 

IM 

JOS 

259 

159 

as 

71 

JH 

205 

a 

IS 

365 

158 

182 b as 

m 

79 

ia 

96 

(50 

65 

97 

re 

65 

56 


15 ft* 90 

ib ■ 4 a ti2 

15 45 my 

9 3 1 


u is r»7 

ig ft & 

a n ss 

“ ** So* 

iO 27 
rc ai m 
130 £5 
18 42 KB 

15 15 215 
7.1 32 

15 25 125 

25 25 445 

iO 58 110 

S ft £ 5 
» 15 8 
g U :: 
S & §5 

8 & U 

U 17 12 

47 45 115 

M U 27 
15 42 08 

05 45 £4 

08 SB 185 
75 42 110 

74 77 (35 

7.1 55 143 

75 75 115 

21 17 745 

64 85 145 

44 94 125 


«•» Lam Canoe* 


19S'i1S4 Tmsmn Da* 

a niMa 

90 SB TnM 

144 re Tram 

241 75 Tim S Ifeafl 

12S 74 lim 

20*> IT.liiMHI 
93*1 SB-.IMM ?W) 

S3 212 VMsr 

mi m vow* 

130 KB taw Patera 
T9S IS Vnw 
ZHbUibVWaram 
163 130 VSL 
204 116 WSL 
IS 127 MAfMTO 
245 148 MMU 
99 S Wgjr. rniWOM* 

(44 (8 MWBBI 
IBB IS) WtfOWB 
569 2S women 
IS4 a Mb 
231 174 won 
50b UbWdkan 
110 55 MU 
110 78 WWM 
71 39 Wta*cw) Owes 

295 no Mares Rmbb 
i 24 ffi warn 
2B3 177 Ktetaoe 
IBS 12S MOBS (JKMS) 
740 2ES liBant Hap 
HO IS <M8 fip 
588 42E MOM 
SB 58 WaUlMw) 

56 28 mod (SMI 

83 43bUtoCdhBM & At 
123 9 wyataB&i 
1» 93 VaraqM 


Pij* 6 »t> Yi: 

Be Oner pirgrav a k P.t 


193 195 -I 

Ifl'r Wl -S 

SB 82 -1 

134 1 37 -I 
173 175 ■ . . 

102 106 +2 

Mb »'• -b 

W9b +b 

W 290 .1 

3BS 390 -S 
103 107 

140 148 

15C0. . 4-lb 
157 IS 

149 IS2 

145 i» .. 

232 235 *1 

64 HI -1 
IIS IMb -1 
1E0 1SS 

are 521 

102 1GJ 

S3 204 *5b 

:}“ 

”2 * 

■S ft? :: 

2*5 243 

133 136 -4 

» SB A 

140 MS 

560 £E -5 

B0 94 -4 

48 52 -4 

3 & - 1 . 

IM MB *44 


S3 48 *7 
(LIB 02 404 


Ml II 67 
18 IS 202 
801 SO 185 

73 28 160 

»0 52 112 

7.1 01 85 

£3 15 248 


45 24 140 

rei 5j ij.i 

tin t> W5 
5.1 SI »7 
M3 27 170 
4 s 44 85 

35 18 271 

... 188 
O 42 3X2 
79 7.4 148 


MOB S3 135 
95 71 95 

205 38 238 

If U 

164 25 US 

IS 35 230 
. . . . 17.7 

404 60 95 

20 £1 185 
5.1 40 107 


58 9 G(U Pd 

aa x amsBiw 

lib PiHBBM 

152 98 NBBOO 
583 271 CSC 
7b 4'aCC IM 
54 wen 

re o’etft oiftaa 
240 65 USUO 
300 39i» On IMS 
21 4 NbiDMI 

ft 15 MnlMtiMOl 
7 2'iCtSWB 
37b 11'iDi Sana 
110 a Penm* 

113 M'-Pareran 
41 21 Pmbbi 

84’ I 43 Aim Qua 
070 B3 5BS9 


97 (I Smraqn 

23*1 Il’sTn tnaw 

19 SbTMM 
153 41 liSmi 
280 90 7 reel Etcapd 
2 iB n LBnm 
GO 5'iWMbW 


40 45 

% * 

S ? M, 

'1 k $ 

11 IS .. 
141 158 -5b 

in m •*t 

§ '£ :: 

3J 35 * 

X 40 *3 

S S -a- 
« 

155 190 • ■ . 
31 S3 -I 
11'j 12'i 

U 19 -1 

am- 1 * 

143 MS 

’S SP *31 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


158 127 CMo«an 
107 75 Hurt*m*L 
481 325 

504 303 Hxtiapt 
37 rebJUaMH 
283 IB3 LBOtK 
90 34 Ocann fffesa 

275 190 PatnoB zacb 
274 190 Do A- 
M 128 POOTPK* 

33 5niM| 

585 545 StedBRS 
Si 6i Tan* camn*r 
271 153 VWCIBB 


143 14 -2 

52 SS -I 
464 467 -2 

4*. 497 • -2 

Sf«*A 

75 85 +12 

Z72'i 277'j m*9 
27ib 276b *«B 
171 177 »-4 
57 SB e«-i 
580 590 • .. 
04 107 + 1 

as 270 -3 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 



BRITISH FUNDS 


4.7 3.1 .. 

40 S3 
30 20 21.4 
250 48 98 

18 10 110 
80 SB 110 
U 72 IBB 
320 25 ffl.1 
50 43 2114 

28 28 130 
15 17 U 
50 41 OJ 

44 72 715 

U 81 112 
20 IB 402 

B ii \& 

tf 8 & 

ft; ii ss 

20 41 (BO 
71 U W 
140 U «0 
hu a iu 
H7 a hu 

g l7 70 
BUS 11 

xu iJ ns 

74 SO M2 
IU a ju 
84 43 240 

TO U ISO 
ai o.i .. 
nil 4 A 112 
41 10 187 

82 11 140 
1.4 £9 . . 

BO 42 202 
207 54 115 

157 20 HI 
90 46 142 
90 41 80 

.... 83 

200 43 85 

288 11 145 

17.1 43 127 

120 45 EB 

84 14 195 
35 17 »J 
SO 82 81 

135 11 08 

127 42 1S2 

848 47. 117 
82 20 172 
10 10 010 
TOO 40 349 
140 45 114 

104 SO 184 
14 17 95 

88 15 119 

is 17 aa 

07 08 175 

12 U 114 
60 20 183 


245 202 ttmleu I17 'j 

153 109 AddSS3 Can 1<7 

57 45 fctfnjmw 43 b 

25S 225 Asm fbf*r 235 

WZ 1 A* B Aon) 1 

158 103 tekVlCMK) KC 

248 ISO Bbibm ta 

359 242 kutSW S3 
310 230 Wtt 2S0 

IBS 145 tanMng 167 

573 186 Boas 198 

53D 720 CmanCam 9io 

224 187 Uam 205 

374 SO CTOJ» U»MD 380 

jm 254 me a* 

ire 130 BbmMod Pan i33 


177 

3 & 

ITS 2® 
314 316 
187 190 
148 153 
IS 156 
*20 424 

aa m 
260 zm 
170 rrs 


108 m -2 
(87 0-1 
290 • .. 
243 M-l 
172 -3 

202 m-3 

aa 

210 .. 
370 -5 

ass -j 

138 M-2 
73 -15 

278 • .. 
330 -2 

90b *2 

190 .. 

M2 

3 2D .. 
122 -1 
33 .. 

308 .. 

148 a+1 
136 


FINANCE AND LAND 


M2 205 Wmaanh 
177 m Altai An 
157 125 J M4ua 
£30 IB BMW Tic* 

22 IB Crate 
263 229 QSMMT 

SB rebMuTl'Gw 
iSS 132 ferav 1 So* 
207 153 ItofOa 
ur a Ms nor* Lam 
M6 W D o W 
148 IM IWwnrtM 
223 195 thnpUBB fitna 


220 2M a-4 

139 (42 .. 

iso 140 -a 

23 230 *-2 
Mb Mb 
227 232 .. 

32 35 

S2b 33b a .. 
ID 16S -2 

an 297 .. 

96 99 a .. 

105 107 4-1 

125 130 . 

213 218 ♦S 


HoaocWnttBls spposr on M 0 V 30 


FOODS 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


48». 40 MQOWVftni 
235 145 AW Cota* 

455 355 A MUM __ 
247 199 latiaOmukM 
158 132 BIX 
US BibBqar 0*00 
02 102 saoaa 
1® (34 BUrtCWoi 
100 aB & Band 

163 1® Com* Bab 
<71 IS b 'A' 

23 16 ODiy (Ham) 

783 142 Cnw 

134 119 0» DM , 

245 175 Bkf E«rt 

M 258 pSacBltisrei 

Ml'* 72brtMdH* MOD 
106 H AiS U9|d 
11b734 Up OMB W 
747 333 Upern 
IM 99 Uagn 
isb 1 1 ’.Narai nrm 

is in nw _ 

no EBbRatoaekMoi 
178 VS BwbM 
330 2« 5WABPO 
73 38 Jankm 

240 178 WHlUU 
ISO 87 Yortttti Ctan 


4U 82 

IS 1.5 
ms £4 
81 £7 

6.4 46 

7D31 07 
IU u 
86 b 4B 
14 £0 

81 49 

m.7 *2 

7J IB 
70 4.1 

. 10 49 

m 84 


CINEMAS AND TV 


836 84 
25 12 <84. 
29 U 18*i 
24 12 ■■ 

ass 

a s st 

43 £3 158. 

a a si 
n S-l 

£B 08 .. 

as 43 527 
178 18 181 

90 1 BO 227 
74 28 254 

33 

£7 21 298- 

58 32 56- 

89 37 54JJ 

no si 123 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 



326 213 Mm IV 'A' 
4(7 365 CvOTtTV 
52 27 Si i m 
240 178 KTVfcV 
466 263 IWT Mp 
363 MB So* TV 
278 149 7W 4/V 
50 31 TWT 
341 223 Anas TV 
229 t5flbTV4U 
149 1D4 UtoW 

191 M4 vawniv 


S2S 327 49 119 43 17.1 

410 415 .. .. v .. 

« SO -1 23 59 1.1 

2a 232 a-i tti u aa 

465 467 (f M <f 117 

3BD 363 U-1 159 44 119 

*8 f .-X ’S -a B 

330 335 +2 

2ZZ 227 •-! 64 £8 

M8 - 0-1 89 80 88 

M8b W3b 


195 133 FlMrHWS 
«2 328 taM M 
290 3H feorU Bggte 
391 312 uam 


391 312 uarau sm 372 -4 IBS 43 177 

& 447 LonPrtJM* «5 - • • M3 39 M3 

10Q 76 b User* Cara »b -1 il H Si 

IBS 07 Pnct* W W Hs«3 87 « -1 £1 24 159 


IDS 07 PwEtOIW 

70 40bOmsHW 


DRAPER Y AND STORES 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


SB l» JWIW^. 

^ ,g SS': nm 

IT. 7bBaM»«» . 


iWM 

aucomwaMB* 

201 l *21?'S DuWJ M 

2SB lSbEom 6 flw 

P2 146 fra ftaPO 
2ffi 2fi) GonW K* 

122 56 Guam* PW 

433 S5 

i» »* *sii»ooB 
570 377 IBf«W«1W®“ 
4» S’ (Wf_, 
a 58 l ®1 Ecu! 
4*b2« 

1H 106 Ol 6b A 

as 417 *em 
«s 3BS ifcTJBB 
si mi w feet W 


WS 

80 K . « 
246 22 +2 

IIP. - . 

283b 2S3b +98 
’OV* ■■ 

240 ^ ... 

413 4U "f 

4£S 473 -8 

37 « • .. 

Hi SCO 

=! 1 

47 <B -h 

iaz»« .. e+% 

3Bb - ♦>* 

B 87 . . 

IDFi - **• 

ETC’. - ■*».*• 

V £ *5 

222 227 -3 

356 38? *"3 

71 b ra +1b 

*05 SB .. 

3 S J 

413 417 -7 

71 74 -1 

330b 933 1 , *1S 

13 131 +3 

5S S72 -4 

407 412 U*4 
231 235 -13 


a* 52 
289 M.7 
23 81 

mi 87 

20S 87 

3.4 5Z 

bo ai 

an 44 

U 39 
88 18 
22.1 79 
23 U 
HUB 4.8 


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148 




108 

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125 

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32 

23 

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30 

65 

652 

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1.4 

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52 2 

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768 

84 

£5 

190 

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32 

22 

178 

• .. 
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11 

68 

2BO 

77.9 

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M.1 

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104 

47 

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67 

48 

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UL0 

29 

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13 

18 

173 

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-6 

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13 

13 

238 

193 


3£ 

40 

112 


UL6 

22 

9*2 


88 

37 

179 


63 

28 

163 


£9 

SLl 

70 


57 

£3 

S3 

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8 3 

48 

64 


106 

25 

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14 

£1 

393 


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114 

55 

464 




208 


300 

28 

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£5 

173 

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177 

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80 

18 

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64 

18 

256 

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£1 

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131 

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1.1 

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43 

IB 

313 


7B 

M 


1 • +9 

88 

50 

W£\ 


t S iJ S3 

SB 139 TlWOWa* fa* 1® l» -5 79 47 HL7 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


HB 205 AW 

239 M4 AGBASBK* 

131 98 *•* 

575 31S APV 
110 TSbteTO* 

OT 27D Stearin mtmmt 
189 M4 Orel if 
315 V*5 fcnsaU! 

3B (SO HWOt 

S 35 Aram 
b £3 MM 
440 373 AdiStW* 

XP 26S*^W«r 

s titer** 

AS 375 KTDrt 

J £ S? 

433 Z78 B7H 
StS 153 E»wck 

CfsEa. 

?io is no w 
170 i3b'jBaan_ , 

397 227 BiMM 
57 42 bwWan 
305 ISO BRiTMM 
3i ii bps iDQJte} 

3»i 170 Bbjisbo ana 

133 55 BaUBM 
063 MO Be*» tCHJ 
450 358 Braaae _ 


398 285 AB EU 
% ,33 ***** * 
MQ abAware. 

S 43 mreaGBu 

VfU « 4*1 


ELECTRICALS 


38 VB »*1 MJ 46 IU 

233 233 +1 £l 09 24S 

116 ia »-i us cu res 

MB 57 58 «J>> . a .. 87 

ss sn -b .. 3SJ 


SI 24 Sets 
SB S5 BggiDta (SBW1 

^ 8tt“ 

3S 2S0 B4& (Jf 
193 153 £3* 
is A Bten IJ> . 

IS 115 swim Mas 
200 148 anawnm IM 

175 Ii* 8»V. 

255 573 B*a IfUart 

B7 Qbhacnooa reata 
405 272 BtaAnaM 
SS 236 Balnata 

™b’ 8b Boson (Wral 
563 293 BMW 
22', (BbEorara W. 

176 100 b arak Ga 
378 248 Brraw 

97 44 BW» 

271 EB SWIM* 

so a &s 3 «o Ga 
2*0 IS SejGrT-fioWT 

ss i 2 ibft Sta * &n A* 

SB B6 SSS BOB 
113 77 h &H«H 
mi 2Wb B «A ._ 

•Zi SB U»« 

145 B Bwnenn »s 
34 17 Broa c*5 
48 31 Brant rn 
is mo Bra* l Tnsr 
SI 22 JmiW, 

74 48 towtora (*4a) 

» 262 sm 
2SB IS fe*E*9 
110 12bB«*!!»0« 

(SB tt CAP W4 £*U 



1« M4 +1 10 07 SI 

*60 4(2 40 IU U 1U 

35 3» £4 OS J4J 

sm 372 -4 188 43 177 


61b 83 -b £30 17 184 




























































































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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


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Law Report November 14 1986 


Power to order solicitor to 


pay costs must be 
exercised with great care 


Orchard, f Sooth Eastern 
EJectririty Board 
Before Sir John Donaldson, 
Master of the Rolls, Lord Justice 
Dillon and Lord. Justice Croom- 
Johnson 

[Judgment November 13] 

The jurisdiction to order a 
solicitor to pay costs under 
Order 62. role 8 of the Rules of 
the Supreme Court was to be 
exercised with great care and 
discretion, and only in clear 
cases. It should not rest solely on 
inference without evidence. 

It was not For solicitors or 
counsel to impose a screen 
through which a litigant had to 
pass before he could put his 

complaint or defence before the 
court 

The Court of Appeal dis- 
missed an appeal by the Sooth 
Eastern Electricity Board 
against the refusal of Mr Justice 
Steyn to aider that the board’s 
costs in an unsuccessful action 
brought by the plaintiff Mr 
Joseph W illiam Alexander Or- 
chard. should be paid by the 
plaintiffs solicitors, Roderick 
O’Driscoil & Partners, Maid- 
stone, under the provisions of 
Order 62, rule 8. 

Mr Dermod O’Brien, QC and 
Mr Andrew CoQender for the 
board; Mr J on a th a n Playford, 
QC and Mr Roger Eastman 
(neither of whom appeared be- 
low) for the plaintiff and his 
soliciiors. 


judgment was obiter- Neither 
Lord Justice Ackner not Lord 
Justice O’Connor had adverted 
to the topic in terms, and tiw 
opening words of Lotti Jo* 12 ® 
Ackner’s judgment (“I ag* 16 ®. ‘ 
conveyed no more than his 
agreement that the appeal 
should be dismissed. 

Lord. Denning's judgment 
provided a useful summary of 
the duties of a solicitor acting for 
a legally aided client- Whether 
that duty was owed to the 


party was open to 
Me doubt, at least 


The MASTER .OF THE 
ROLLS said that the plaintiff 
assisted by solicitors and coun- 
sel under the Legal Aid Act 
1974, had brought proceedings 
against the board claiming dam- 
ages few negligence and breach of 
statutory duty. After a 12-day 
hearing Mr Justice Steyn had 
dismissed the claim with costs, 
but had stayed execution of that 
part of the order relating to 
costs. 

The board had from the 
outset contended that the 
plaintiffs claim was without 
foundation. In default of being 
able lo look to the legal aid fund 
for reimbursement of then- 
costs, they had applied for an 
order under Order o2, rule 8 that 
the plaintiffs solicitors be re- 
quired to pay their costs of 
defending themselves. 

Order 62, rule 8(1) merely 
confirmed the ancient jurisdic- 
tion of the court to exercise 
control over its own officers, 
who included all who were 
yfmi rad to the foO of solicitors. 

In making the application 
below Mr O'Brien had com- 
prehensively condemned not 
only the plaintiffs leading and 
junior counsel, but “anybody 
else who has been involved in 
the handling of the plaintiffs 
case". He daimed to make no 
distinction between them and 
submitted that it would be 
invidious for the court to do so. 
He had asked that die solicitor 
be asked to pay the costs, die 
coart recognizing that tbe solio- 
it or might have claims, which he 
might see fit to exercise, against 
counsel one of the witnesses or 
others. 


oppqang r - 

conaderaWe 

where the solicitor was aOiflg 
with the authority of his diem 
and was not carrying on the 
on his own account. 

While there was no doubt that 
members of the Bar owed a duty 
to the court as well as to their lay 
client, there was so basis for 
contending that they owed any 
independent duty to their lay 
client’s opponent. 

Furthermore, the courts bad 
never asserted any jurisdiction 
over members of the Bar, apart 
from their general jurisdiction 
to control the conduct of all who 
appeared before them, apart 
from their appellate jurisdiction 
as Visitors to the four Inns. of 
Court, and it would seriously 
undermine the independence of 
the Bar if they were to do so. 

Equally there was no basis for 
bolding that the essential public 
interest immunity affirmed in 
Rondel v FVorsley ([1969] 1 AC 
1) protected the Bar only m 
relation to their own lay clients, 
leaving them unprotected in 
respect of the for greater risk of 
riaim* by disgruntled litigants 
on the other side. 

The only order made by the 
court in KeUy’s case was that the 
solicitor concerned should at- 
tend before the court for consid- 
eration of whether he should 
pay the defendant’s costs. The 
liability of the solicitor and the 
correctness of Lord Denning's 
opinion never received further 
consideration. 

In Edwards v Edwards Q1958] 
P 235) Mr Justice Sadis had mid 
piai the mere feet that litigation 
fa ifed was no reason for invok- 


ing die Jurisdiction, nor was an 
error of judgment, nor even the 


It was not dear what rights a 
solicitor would have against a 
witness in respect of evidence 
given in court, and the assertion 
of such a right, other than 
rhetorically, would raise an 
issue of considerable public 
importance. 

On the question of rights 
against counsel the court had 
been referred to the judgment of 
Lord Denning. Master of the 
Rolls, in Kelly v London Trans- 
port Executive ([1982] 1 WLR 
1055, 1064-1065) where he had 
said that a solicitor was under a 
duty not only to his own cheat 
who was legally aided but also to 
the unassisted party who was 
not legally aided. 

The circumstances in which 
those remarks came to he made 
was unusual. That part of the 


CHIU 7" 

fed that an error was of an order 

which was equivalent to neg- 
ligence. There had to be some- 
thing which amounted to a 
serious dereliction of duty. 

The decision of the Court of 
Appeal in Davy-Chiesman v 
Davy-Chiesman ([1984] Fam 
48) was to the like effect. The 
jurisdiction could only be in- 
voked in the case of serious 
misconduct and tire initiation of 
an action when it had no or 
substantially no chance of suc- 
cess might constitute such mis- 
conduct 

It was a jurisdiction which fell 
to be exercised with care and 
discretion and only in dear 
In the context of a 
complaint that litigation was 
initiated or continued in 
circumstances in which to do so 
constituted serious misconduct, 
it was not to be forgotten that it 
was not for solicitors or counsel 
to impose a pre-trial screen 
through which a litigant had to 
pass before he could pot his 
complaint or defence before the 
court. 

On the other hand, no solic- 
itor or counsel should lend his 
assistance to a litigant if be was 
satisfied that the initiation or 
further prosecution of a claim 
was mala fide or for an ulterior 
purpose, or if the proceedings 
would be an abuse of the process 
of the court or unjustifiably 

oppressive. 

Justice required dial the solic- 
itor should have full opportu- 
nity of rebutting the complaint, 
but circumstances could arise in 
which be was hampered by his 
duty of confidentiality to his 
client. In such circumstances 
justice required that the solicitor 


be given the benefit of any 
doubt. 

The plaintiffs compla ints ha d 
been weird in the extreme. 
Substantial quantities of water 
had been found on a number of 
occasions is different parts of 
his cottage The phenomenon 
hart conti nued and spread to 
such bizarre happenings as. the 
uncovenamed and raecpfcuned 
movement of physical objects 

within the rooms and damage to 

the t yiH n g s and pipework to an 
exten t that the plaintiff end his 
family bad left for rented 
accommodation. 

The pontiff had consulted 
sob chore who took expert ad- 
vice. That fed to the theory that 
the cawsc might lie in defects in 
the board's system of earthing or 

some discontinuity in the neu- 
tral electricity line serving ate 
cottage. 

Those solicitors had applied 
for and been granted an un- 
conditional legal aid certificate, 
immediately thereafter the 
plaintiff bad changed his sotic- 
liois. It was in relation to the 
firm which took over the con- 
duct of the proceedings that the 
application was made. 

The plaintiffs case at trial was 
that all the water phenomena 
were caused by an escape of 
electricity through the earth at 
the cottage, thereby beating 
water in the soil to the point at 
which it became steam or 
flinang the water to change into 
hydrogepand oxy^g^^^ 

of the “dynamic” phenomena, 
-that is, the movement of phys- 
ical objects. 

In act, on counsels advice, 
reliance on the dynamic 
phenomena was abandoned 
some time before triaL 

It was a quite astonishing 
situation in which the truth, as 
determined by the judge, that it 
was probably all the work of the 
son, but that the plaintiff and his 
wife must have realized from an 
early stage what was going on, 
was even stranger than the 
fiction propagated by the plain- 
tiff 

His Lordship accepted that 
the plaintiffs solicitors had a 
duty not to further a claim 
which could be characterized as 
an abuse of process of the court 
It was contended that no com- 
petent counsel, solicitor or ex- 
pert could possibly have 
supported the plaintiffs daim- 

In the end what mattered was 
what the judge had thought. He 
had unrivalled opportunities for 
hearing the plaintiffs case pot 
and knowing what it was like 

before it was destroyed by cross- 
examination and the deploy- 
ment of the board's evidence. 

None of the board’s sub- 
missions caused the slightest 
doubt about the unassaflabilhy 
of the judge’s conclusio n s. 

While mere was no objection 
to an application under Order 
62, rule 8 at the conclusion of a 
hearing, given appropriate fac ts, 
it was another matter where 
such an application was threat- 
ened during or prior to the 
hearing. 

Objectivity was a vital 
requirement of professional 
advisers. Threats to apply on the 
basis that the proceedings were 
abound to foil not only made the 
solicitor something in the nature 
of a co-defendant, but they 
might well rightly mate him all 
the more determined not to 
abandon his client, thereby los- 
ing a measure of objectivity. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON, 
concurring, said that the charge 
against a solicitor which would 
have to be made out before the 
court oould impose personal 
liability for the costs of an action 
on him was serious. Such a 
charge ought not to rest solely 
on inference without evidence. 
Lord Justice CroonvJohnson 


Solicitors: L. Watmore & Or, 
Barlow Lyde & Gilbert. 


Obtaining evidence for use 
in foreign proceedings 


Regina t Secretary of State for 
tire Home Department, Ex 
parte Spennacet Whaling and 
Shipping Co SA 
Regina v Secretary of State for 
the Home Department, Ex 
parte Panova Investment 
Trust SA 

Before Lord Justice Glidewefl 
and Mr Justice Farquharson 
[Judgment November 7] 

Where a request was received 
from a foreign government for 
an order to obtain evidence for 
use in foreign criminal proceed- 
ings, the Home Secretary was 
entitled to use either the proce- 
dure provided by the Extra- 
dition Act 1 873 or that provided 
by the Evidence (Proceedings in 
Other Jurisdictions) Act 1975. 

Accordingly he was entitled to 
select the procedure under the 
1873 Act even where the request 
raised, or was capable of raising, 
difficult questions of law or the 
application of law to fact- Fur- 
ther he was not under an 
obligation to consider those 
questions himself in determin- 
ing which procedure to select. . 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court therefore dis- 
missed applications by 
Sperm acet Whaling and Ship- 
ping Co SA and Panova Invest- 
ment Trust SA for judicial 
review by way of certiorari to 
quash two orders made in 
identical terms by the Home 
Srcreiary on March 3, 1986 
under section 5 of the 1873 Act 
requiring the Guildhall Justices 
to lake and transfer to him 
certain evidence. 

Mr J. M. Chadwick, QC and 
Mr Jonathan Harris tor the 
applicants; Mr Robert Alim 
Jones for the Home Secretary. 


LORD JUSTICE GUDE- 
WELL said that Mr Joigcn 
John; and Mr Bjorn Bettiun 
were Norwegian citizens and 
each was chained with the 
violation of a Norwegian tax 
Act, the allegation in each case 
being that each had failed to 
include in his tax return for 1978 
substantial sums of money aris- 
ing out of the trading activities 


of a company registered in 
Liberia, which in mm owned 
other companies. 

Lazand Brothers were bankers 
to those companies. In early 
1985 a tetter of request was 
received from the Norwegian 
authorities, which was transmit- 
ted via the Foreign Office to the 
Home Secretary. 

When a prosecuting authority 
in a foreign country wished to 
have the assistance of the Eng- 
lish courts to obtain in England 
evidence, oral or documentary, 
for use in a criminal trial 
abroad, the request could be 
granted in one of two ways. 

The way chosen is the present 
case was that the Home Sec- 
retary made an order under 
section 5 of the 1873 Act to the 
Guildhall Justices requiring 
them to take and transmit to 
him such evidence as (hey could 
obtain from witnesses in 
furtherance of the request 

The court issued a witness 
summons to Lazards to give 
evidence. The evidence was to 
be taken as if they were old style 
committal proceedings in Eng- 
land. Alternatively, under the 
1975 Act the matter could have 
been sent to a master or judge of 
the High Court. 

Under either procedure, the 
objection could be taken that the 
evidence sought to be elicited 
was inadmissible or privileged 
from production, and therefore 
should not be disclosed if a 
document, or obtained if oral. 

Mr Chadwick submitted that 
the evidence and documents 
sought to be dicited from 
Lazaids were the subject of 
privilege or were otherwise in- 
admissible for three reaons 

First, because the obtaining 
and transmission of such ev- 
idence would contravene the 
long-established principle that 
the English courts would not 
assist, directly or indirectly, in 
the tax-collecting functions of a 
foreign government. 

Second, because they 
breached the principles of 
confidentiality between banter 
and customer, the protection of 


which was a matter of public 


■"EL. 


because the questions 

to be asked and the documents 
sought were part of a fishing 
expedition. 

It was submitted that the 
Home Secretary should himself 
have considered whether the 
evidence would offend against 
any of those principles, and if he 
was confident that it would, he 
should not have made the order. 

Mr Jones said that the Home 
Secretary never considered 
whether the evidence was in 
contravention of chose prin- 
ciples because he bad no obliga- 
tion to do sa 

Mr Jones was right and there 
was no such duty on the Home 
Secretary to see if the riving of 
evidence contravened those 
principles. 

Section 5 of the 1873 Act 
provided that the Home Sec- 
retary “may” require a mag- 
istrate to cake evidence. 
Therefore be bad a discretion. 

Mr Chadwick submitted that 
in exercising that discretion the 
Home Secretary bad to consider 
the two alternative ways of 
meeting the foreign 
government’s request He said 
that where, as here, it seemed 
probable that difficult issues of 
law and application of fact to 
law would be raised, the proce- 
dure under the 1975 Act was 
dearly the appropriate one. 

However, is order to succeed, 
foe applicants had to show that 
the Home Secretary’s choice of 
route was perverse. 

His Lordship agreed that 
where complex issues of law 
were raised, there might be a 
case for preferring to proceed 
under the 1975 Act. But it could 
not be said that the Home 
Secretary's decision was so 
wrong as to be irrational. 

The Home Secreiaiy’s route 
had its advantages and the 
choice was well within his 
discretion and the challenge 
therefore foited. 

Mr Justice Farquharson 


Sofia wre: Cameron Maxkby. 
Treasury Solicitor. 



CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 




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| BALW. WANTED | 


■MTS tmtar u vttuaOeOS NB- 
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PORSCHE OFFICIAL 
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mime. Buy wane new. Pro 

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Ctia U l M ior. 36J3O0 Idw. S 
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A KS 728 1. 46,000 mOes. Bur- 
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ono. TEL 0983 33988 Wayi. 
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31M 1966 Bn*. Ceanwe. *4. sun 
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01-949 8779 lOV 


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Tei oi 940 6309 Sun. rws 


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374276. 


JUH CMttMUT 1980 CB) Woe. 
12.000 tnOe*. > owner. 


pmtor my. _ Eio-aoo 
cpcneywoou (092781 3667. _ 


1281 C Rn. 2 do 
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sunroof Wfc PSM. OHeetor*« 
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12-000 MM. POM 6 stereo. 
£16.999. Tck (0642) 312407. 


924 HUSO 1980. Nw nriaUc. 
FSH. aaeeUdUy tmroaeutota 
tbrawhouL sun root. £6460 
Tel 0Z73 674710 


944 Aupmc '83. Mack imtane. 
Ftfll tnstory. nranacraate condt- 
Don, £12600. TeL 029 IB 468. 


mate* seders with ban* To 
sail nr buy. TU 01-368 0683. 


944 .Manual 86. Red. 1600 
MM. As new. Many extra*. 
09260 ono. TeL 0730 87236 


911 SC: 1978. SaOOO ML Dm* 
oMtHtur btoe. LOR new. 
£11.900. TeLOl -468-2006, 


MI TVRBO 1999 ouraemnfle- 
age only. Rao/Black Interior. 
£47.000 7*1:0388 88209 


911C 197X RHD. nW 
RS boqy conve ra k m . base metal 
respray, an wtags replaced, 
whale (all. reeetn enstne 
overttiUL KCM IWW UHtdi Oil 
rank and hces exetongers. 
£6960 Otto Town 691818 


P0BKHE9M to*. A res- 
with Lc Mans strip**- wide 
wneets- ran root and many **- 
tna. only 26.000 mfleo with /uB 
wsriice luswry. this ear B ln 
mud coAdntat. £1X250, Tel 
0626 877609. 

Ml Cuar de rag. MB Madt lratVr 
Interior. 1983. 36JOOO ndM. 
FSH. s/root- PEBL immaculate. 
flrB 10 fee wnl tray. £12280 
ovna Ten Ol 900 2621 none) 
oi ago 662* comay. 

WB B B 9299 « 983) A KB 
Auio . MMaHk mam. brown tft- 

terior. 20000 IWM. ems toe. 
Sunropi. run service Utswtr, 
One owner. £19^00 find. TU: 
01 364 0689. 

1994 PMSCHC 944. 29.700 
mOra. * ray recent new tyree. 
£2. SCO worth extras. Service 
tosioar. Excellent condOon. 
£14,960 ovso. TeL Waning- 
ton (0925) 61311. 

Ml rUBBO UVn» WOK 
blue, tor con. euctrira. tttoher 


£17.750. Dealer tadKM Ot 
464 0578 Or Ol -* 62 B397.T 

994 TUteO, Meteor Meonfc. JC 
RS 2 owner* P DM. FSH, *8 
todras. recant service, new 
ares, fan vasts not. c 7X00 
ono. 0263 661281 Of 860026. 

944 Lax auto. 1965, fluan* rad. 
porarinv. pas. (He shim, ex- 
n. FSH. warranty. £t&600. 
Tei. GQMtam 46941. 

POMCHEPaSS (983 Aowtnaoc 
only laooo mm ffem new 
£2i.9S a Jack note lkl 
Wdtoeton. 01 647 4473. 

944, 1984 Rnay Amt/ bew tme- 
rior. fth- EMC S/R. natron^ + 
windows. New Panaeceuc R/C. 
£13600. Tel « 9*7 9139. 

9tl OHrawwi Sport 79S& 
3300 mb. £29,000. TCLOS84 
393236 (tew 0384 231371. 


924 LUX 


1353 34000 rrttat 1 
Sacs nw. M teWM ri 
A nw MS. Bk ta9^W>- 

don / ntnws. m riper. 


first dua cowfiHon 


Tri.Of-221 9466 
(anjriBte) 


944 LUX 1985 & Iwoiy 
with coded skirts & 
wheels. Bectric roof. 'En- 
dows & mirrows- 

Panasonic radto cassette. 
BaaufiU comfifcn. 

.&16J9B 


924 LUX 82 X Rub mefe*- 
«c. BbcMc reof, windows 
& mlmws. 32,000 mflos. A 
vary edfovablB pries 

JOJHS 


Tet 0502 66582 
Gooch Motors Ltd. 


944 LUX 
AUTO 


August i9B3.Matrifc 
bronze. Sunroof , electee 
wMows. power door b*- 
rore, qaadswwo and fog 


Tet 




IIS. 


911 SC Spsrt 


T^gWWte-Treg. 


Recently 
servicedarxffuned. 
1 years MOT. Good 
corxfition. £9^S0. 

Teh 8734 504744 
ar 416595 (T) 


TOO FAST FOB BE 
Oil TBftBO 

7 JBOO ndtas. C Reg. Pmaaan 
bktt wtti bkn teatoer/crawn 
piping. Fto a pB c ffic a Mo n . 
BhupurM Nw York vtorao. 
£41,250 

T4fc STUB 8363 (WaoksK^ 
«MB62ZS3t7(WMta9fo) 


PORSCHE JAM 88 
944 In 






riwh: st&. tetny 

cool, tot dsn. w v&U a 
ten. i cstMWycww. riV 

■xrzfl a* a an umlte coofr 


Tri 


121361 
(6243) 514861 


CAS HIRE 


KKCCBCS 300 SE told 2BQ SL. 
Self drive Mr*. £76 par day. 
£460 per week. Tel: 01 449 
1157 (OfOcel or Ol 449 S065 


COLLECTORS CARS 1 


E TYPE jeonar 196B « 
F/Hend. 2 rawer (Mar* iB’L 
White ~tm Black to tortar . 
Chro m e wire wheels. 1 owner. 
22 jOOO rale Bran new «wh F9H 
n super* orintoal o nntoW ss i , 
£12.760 onp. car — 
0377 was. T 


rwaaraa sufl - ism «bl 
WWW tan tmerior. tuna. PAS. 
Hard M son top. Pitted 
osm e/rato l owner Oran 
■mw. GeruPae 29 AOO ndM ha- 


hnMMBRt ai £4J8a T* 061 
227 6861 tome* noon) 


MW te Hl 4/4 91. BJLC. 


er. MUB extras. ImnwaSsle. 
Only C7JXXJ. Tel 0*6 0 73619. 


1967.1 . 

t ax an 

V yr astir. FtoMora condttym . 
£A£Oa Tel: *0234) 708121. 


198B s Type Jwm SA. Recem 
£1400 expenmtuiT toriraUng 
re-»c*y tn artginsl goto cnioar. 
Recent MOT. Motoring weft. 
WfU accent CE300. TeldQ293J 
883132 


la cooper “S“. «m «*. 

raa&btocfc. 1964. rwMOt body- 
work. & enctoe. ortglnel 
tbrwWiatK. E2JOO ono. 
7Daks <07321 61216. 

19» RHD AntortCM Reo Uidme 
open tornr wttb DtOO> Mb. 
ah- era ico arse conn. Opm in af- 
ters or exetum g r aroowi 
£30000. <0*8*1 8*11*8 T. 
BZKTLET 1938 414 Par* Ward. 
Ch NO. 8*9KV. £3.980. Tet Of- 
nor 0*60 23(00 to- Hone 
0*38 260193. T 
VOLVO 1 9 0 9a. 1987. while wmi 
hbduiMor. very ooext coodf- 
ftbn. always garaped. £2.996 
ana. T6.W9* 36991 
aaCBOT 1979. Blue. 1 lady own- 
er. 19x00 atom. naj pa cnM a. 

CaJSO. ~W >06272) 230 
T4UUM U TR7 conv. t tody own- 
er from new. I8,cx» an, 
£4ja» case "in* firms i 


V.W. AND AUDI 


AUnCDupfrCTL 1984. Area. 1 
owner, psm. 33-Soo mis. 6 


PAS. euars. radio/ caasede. 
e/wmsaws. cs.996. TttJamn 
01-731-3388 or Ol -3704194a. 


Atas 280 E A0TD 1984A, 

stmt,*p.aAat&,WBb 

and. 


WOI COUPE 22. 1984 A. s / 
roof, afoys, nd as, rage 


WffljeOWEET *11751983 Y, 
sjttf, nd cos. » m- 
narW ftroughoix — £W*L 

JttSX tt 9DBT 1984 B. S/ 
roof. An afioys, eac/c^. 
mac threuctota — iM95. 

fiOLF SL CIWKKBt KOTO 82 
Y Atoys, rad cass, aaraejj- 
oi&tfi — WK. 


SCaBOCOST86C,S/rorf J raJ 
ces, decora C&99S. 


m a 85 8 «* a* »■ 

mriBd cond Unughorif5^95. 


GOLF WHO 83 A finjs&ri ri 
UBg 35jX» mb orrfv. Ott. 
ftraiflout ... 

KCGttFGnnoteedb^ 
m. 4JD0Q mis only „ 0295. 


0442 217101 T 


AIBH209 AvaweQuaitrtjiwrai 

Tbrt». nnwL CW9.2M00 

mae».fnfl Malory. cfajnyBto^ 
rarer mini BmugAMlL Cost 
£*7j°qo_^^pr_ i| Jgw 


£16.996,01 -263 91*V 91 


VW AUDI 1987 modeto save unto 
£3.900. wot Un por t a-rre ec to o n r 
brocbnra Bdento- 0978 360909 


VW/ AIM IncOOU GTl At Hope 
operand. Rapid Driver- ~— 
WX (026 126)4676. 


Tun Headlamp gr M, ™ 
cass. ste anpes, fflriM 

MHff - ' 

19S G M8H SO CC 


Tornado nd. 1 OWW trap 
new. ■»«- 


ncTT i 

1988 DAUB *8 «- 
tSat. son roof, ttrad 

rAocteg, rai rass- 

^Vjowi 


dm I STRffF 
“ GARAGE 
(0933)73277 



100 AVART CC 


ICKh86.AteanafeapM8 

HWAe.eaMcMdBK 

am roata. 4 Itonfla.lK 
2750 nWss a*/, foouatfy 


CWatetebsNBVg 

E11JS00 

098915383 


LISTERS 
of Stratford Upon 

new a audi & 

VOLKSWAGEN 


Mott Models In Stock 
Cornet: 

‘saSss 8 


JAGUAR 4 DAIMLER AUTHORISED 
DEALERS . 


>L WADHAM 
J^'STRIIIGE 

<^cg[ — Specialist Cars-* 

Tfc wdentoe raqviac* teytfe g D — md New Or OtC*!? 

XMOStoktot 1 










0WRnp Rover Wrataora*. 
SerSaVBiSaa. ht Rstk — COJ» 
6*|Bjll P 9e n iarer4drWaastt^ 


telURPWaftMWdWAattoBmtoy 

Bnee i. — notes 

»K3 




■HMVHBMbmo- cAssft 

toWJa OBarSrawriBnVg-Crt^tf 

teWqi 



row na nse tto rar boa u sA qto. 

OenmOban W 

8*|4RapgeftmrltognaAtt*. 


seMriOrayTAIrCoad tttteS 


W— ralQey. 




«»■ 

Oo to tei 


%-cx*Y *.sjr^ s&ssr *"*** 1 


mate 


S SLS S^^ Z 


For further details contact 
Richard Harper on (0243) 863794 (Sundays) or 
Group Marketing on 0705264421 (Weekdays)., 


JOtSCR Interceptor Mark 5 1971 
(3J2L Flrssned to Claret Rad 
wttb black woe totortar. AH 
u»ual le a n e urei B s . Very reor 
example of tUfl svst sports 
own . Oenator reason forsake. 
£3.996. TBkO«a* 616067 or 
6*2087. 


.... tyw. A/W. 

C/l_ and more. 13-000 macs. B 
resMKii. warranty. Coll CTI- 
• grey. C7«9S obb. Tto Ot 


943 


VW GOLF CT» CC tn w vwt tole. 

1906. WMte wttb bfue interior. 

fun vw ewa m eeHng cocver- 

si«k StoumiM arm. 9.000 
miles. Offer* ovor £BiBa Tet 
0339 253472. 


MIDI 2M Tutbe. V Rft. Navera- 
tor -82. Metallic gray, t owner. 
39.000 tolled, sunroof, cruise. 
PAS. Panasonic fiervo. FSH 
CA49&. Tell (0673) 61983/6. 


«Hfffi.Btt.T6.UOO«s. 
BBS body ML a»w wtieets. re- 
mots alarm. Panasonic nemo. 

ttnHd WHdBwa. Imrna c nto te 
£8.996. Tel 01-00* 2836 


AW *8 1986 (CL wldto. Pto- 
tor wtadowd. a/r, Rismm * 
soroker radio eatoffte. tounaca- 
luc. 7.000 ibB. warranty, 
£9200 Tel 051-667-4980 eve* 
AW 100 » 1983 C rep. 0 
speed. 7.000 bbIo*. service Ma- 
lory. white. £&600. 6 BMfittd 
part A looour teWtt. Ptort x 
SOSS&te. 0243 670004. T 
1999 1303 v W Easier Beetle. 
60000 mues Own new. MetoL 
Be brown. SwMtft condKloB. 
Radio. FSH. 0800 OPO. 
TcfcOM 8 326143 leva), 
war GOLF carlo CL Canverifti* 
Finbiwd to Bed wtoi maKMns 
cream (toad. 28300 rodcs. 
FSH. IK Re pBteSBd 15/3/ 85. 
£3493 ono. 0222 77738P T 
OMVBRaU CB IV rao) 
taooee com ouur. radio 
casssette. MOT. tow nnieaoe. 
£3.700 T4L- Ol 608 7068 
OOLP DOLT GOLF cvw lOO new 
cars psrMb many « prv rn. 
creeae price. 0682 87218Z. 
rvw deafcn 

GOLF STD C re«. wtdR. fc m no ov 
uuu out*, apart, pnu. Lea* 
one hear central I rmrtrm 
£6.980 ono T& mO*} 880888 
GOLF CTI CTl CTL 0*4* 30 new 
A used don neUMe. 0082 
872183. (VW dealer), 
itete OOF OTT3. OsavartMa + 
iuu vw Audi range at <k 
Prices ran ICC 01-202 




■ Bre*s8m7jHwn 

ssreat RU-KiMSMO 

rnrrinMrin"^** 


eaBaammm 

mw- 


U09SC. Btoe Bate I 


Hadmmm*'** 


teo e U-8 Srocke Shtt 
^toectefirtinTtaflrttSrid* 

Wtoto I6T547 1XW94C2 


MffiCBMS 

450 sa 


S&'S&SSS 

ar«tW8k>K«. PnsWB OB' 

Abb. Bastes cadi) aeam, 
ta» HOT. teasy ted » 
FW»o5*ai«y 


m: D1-5Z7 1723 


KV 2885 _ 

UtuncbtoB. MtowwJ 
A8& Br toa Wt ar stats . 

Stem. Unnsrand. Mums 

pwri fWfrC 

tetm 377 U19 


280 TE ESTATE 


Rasteterad June 19SS. Orte 

mwnML Auta Bsttrle 

wMows. Uajtt «ttv pbs 

raarbanoh: 

.For. 


TflU444 457W2 
or d*y 457772. 


1984 A 

KKOBSHSK 


BwmedtetenerBbPBdftBBB 

‘ r. 1 owner bon 

U UKsda sgMra m- 

ewas Mud* Pr can- 


Cory, nans maude Or con- 

aixA*} & ABS, ZMKWrtto 
£2AS60 


HWnfHLS (BHMD u» 
BHB2HH3 



230 CE 


Auto. Soptaraber 1984. 
tmbm onaivaaani dom. 

E/W.E/SfRRpcSo/ 
cvs&stfs. 1 caratuJ owner. 
1 0,605 mBefl-F-SH. 
£13500080. 

Td: 0504 740336 


: 'l~ * 

.-v : 


A 


IM B. 86. c reg. saoo ndks 

only, m new_ Dark tone, a 

■MOd totoiBM. Air condKtanlBB. 

ato.- Allay 


IBM. Onto) MCfc- 

M PAS. Owner a broad. Oort 

£16.700*. Bargain at £i*JOO. 

Tel 0932 238109 everttog*. No 


—THOROUGHBREDS 


Tfrtfadmgscfari on of pre-owned prestige ntatqngs. 

IBWtClJiViraBorarwItei^CnMtavryi ^OMnJes. — £MteS 
T986 tO JagrarSoeerel gi *2. C te B t wffidQaslon Intenor. — CtrjM 
M65 to JaguBr S as B tolBn A2.Srtln beiBB.flAOO nAe » .. tCTfiAS 
lM3MJ>tevSp«araigaVt2HE.O>nbrtTyrBd.27,7D0inlae. 


G1A8S6 


lWDaknterDotete««.OirtBnyr0cL 
I PO J^tor X4S «2 Coupe HE Cobte bfu* ^mjaoo nrt». . mats 


Contact our tearing specialist Datrid Jones 
London Hoad, Pufoorough. Vtest Sussex. 


(07982) 2407 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER || 


JAOIIAR Xte 83 CtertcM. Jno4 
on. rtr i 


sooo Ma w. oy»t«Biy 

fknes rate. £21995. Tel: QT7B 


HU JA0UAR XJ8 1983. Wte 
red Deane, one rtdn Mae. 2 


48000 mile*. FSH. cxraqaB 
cattoMtan Bg ran toout. £14.780 
one. DBy Mrtdenftead 78S796 / 
Eves Twyford 343292. 


U8UM MVOKKH 82 Ante 
Saloon. Ctareodon Blue. Fully 


owner. 19.000 nAce. Ftm Reo- 
M (red Jute 1985- £14.768 
AwtOl 888 8638 


SOVCRCXBi. B reg/84. RTtodtem 

saver wSQi grey doesldn Wtrt- 

or. Sunrool. wr cowl Electric 

seato. ABoar wtwa M . Many ex- 

tra*. 19.000 Kto* £12.900. 
Tet Ol '589 soar tomce hoars) 


1888 X38 36. Ooba tt blue wtm 
Bate blue leeowr tu«rtor. 
12.500 twies. Unmaottate crav 
dtttOB. FSH. £13980. Tel 
(07343 417011 gffln or (0734) 
410293. 


Xte RB 1983 A Reg. Coronet 

Gold. AU teaDmr to wn or. all 

(MU Jaguar reBDeenento. Low 

udNsb Prirttne GondHltoL 
CtL MO Tel l (Hi 0702-201807 
or (Ol 0702441187 


•C ' TVPE V12 2 + 2 - 1973. PHD- 
rose. 82000 nMcs. FAH 
Superb onrmHkln. 1 lady own- 
er. Liasoo ono. Tet West 
Coker <093 086) 2687 


IMUU XMO Sovereign 3.6. 
Artto tow. w« toB Blue toteri. 
or. Sunroof, attars. £88.960. 
TbL- (00063 778957 


Xte HE 1933 <AX Sllesr/Moe 
leWhrt. «ZOOO itdlas. PSH. ««ve 
private owner, tounacuiate. 
£11,995. Waybndge 46797. 


C TIW 1970 2*C red mno. 
VearV MOTbbi roof, rtoorri. 
FSH. OBen 01 876 4041. 


NEW MOHR wrtMHe now « 

January let TO: <0279) 
444346. 


XX 198Z. 
sreen/creain lamer. DtracUn 

Cdf. esraruuy mustrtned. pria- 

nae candUBO. dcueesy or new 

nrad farce* ttk. E7.000- Td 

Ol 360 1920. 


(A) JA6UAR Xte 49 auto, coro- 
net Cold rMfaHK. Dove skto 
Mde trim, wrt reflnamente. 
4 AjOOO miles, art price £7.998. 
PX Welcome. 081 677 9983.T 
NOV 88 <Q jaguar Sovereun 62 
auto. grasMto. Hscttt MaOwr 
tatenar. 13300 pdee. nu«u>- 
fatem wwanr. fiiTMB. 
Snowdoas 0803 669062. 

XteC 3.d caortoist Ctartt/oae 
Skin. Z7 J)00 ndke, Aprs 1984. 
atUl udder wamnar. JC1&7S& 
: day 021 *712883 era* 066 


JJWUMt/MMUH 1983/86. 
CMo of 48 wtMto range. 
D6.99S-E19.000. Eat 19 years. 
PX. Trt 01 -664 9833 Eteexm 
TWRXte U CaoroBeC CgboR 
snia/SM. 1986 cfcbL sow 
m. coot £30000 accept 
£22.000. T at 0464-778713 
Xte RE '84B reg. aafte Bteen. Mb- 
curt Hide. ftiU epee. + tear ftrtts.- 
new tyres, mi goad c nertl Bo n . 
£15.960. Tef 01 722 674a 
NEW JMMI Save up to 
£1,000. Not im port- uma 
0978 380909. 

'HEW XJ4Q so v emgp 3-6 bi 
erven deDvor raSeftae. oam. 
0234 67388 .ffimiitto. 


JUMP THE QUEUE 

XJ6 19 

DAIMLER SOVHIBtSN. 

Unvared pRsMou or, von 

totcomiK&cn. tefitwy 


complete tttb VAT .rote 
fund licence, rote tn and mad 
dregBSpre-patL 

£l9J)0e Prfca Gahte. 
To! 0303 49148. 


XJS COUPE 
1986 

AOOOml8S.U 


CrwtJwrvlSijSicea Mde. 

EirMano. 


0782818900 day. 


280 AUTO- Baroundy. Power aw 


Radto/caawtla. £19.000. 

240 t> 1984. Pale Blab. Anso- 


fion Wtof. 

SSJXXX 022 * 321407 


«0 «LC- 1979- bmaculwe. Un- 

marked. Denaaestted 87XW0 
nHes. Mercedee Matrohsed 

rtnoe n«w. U9M Bhw MvtMMC. 

Fawn vetovr unsrinr. Ab- Ooa- 


T-:* 


dHtooed. Quad stereo. La w twu 

90. 0273 


N ew M OT. £10400. 
418728. 


3H> SLC- Oram wtm ton MrtC 
tnlertor. PerMMrtsed Reg. Late 
1972. Only 71.000 mOee. Hog 
UBt and tool Vers good condi- 
tion. Sports wheels. E/wtnda. 
6tnoCaMH.I3»6OT4M 
0903 776088 ewe*. 0903 

207769 days 


888 E (W124I Jan 86. 11.000 
ml* After White. Auto. .ABS. 
Air. Elec S/R. Rear H/resto. 
Factory (htarhitd e Tow bar. 
Alarm. B/pmkl stereo. 
£236 00. T eh Cemrda X. 
Backs 0703 883401 «vn. 


3*0 SSL 1981. _ 

grey velour u phutetoiy . 4flay 
wheels, sunroof, a/r canmea- 
tng. cruise cooitql psoow u- 
n. SS3BO. TeL 083 481 3999 
affer 6 pm. A wraneods. 


300 B. orngiwnl Deowrr 
toUeage- Air cood. Stereo. AMI- 

-theff muni- Allay*. Manual 
mnaaMon. £19.900. 0276 

64364 OIL Ol *71 3138 HQ* 




JAfiBM 58VEBBGR 

1884 (A) 

Rotated ta caret ritt testa 
Interior. 1 oimsr from /wr.faB 
seme* hewy. 33500 rae- 
antod nrtes. Nr out" 

ffiS-jaSte 

£f%B9SL 
04427 2232 T 




NEW MODEL Jaguar XJ 
3J 8uto, daovaqr image. 
Qraam /aay doth, POA. 
NORTH OXFORD 
OARAGE. 

. 0809 737566. 
>511481 


Xte HE V12 28 montea old. ma- 

roon. FuUy eottppaa (Deluding 
air con A on board compute-. 8 

nmnlbe esocndM manatacrur- 

«s war ranty- 17.000 miles. 

£16.998 no offer*. Far ftatMr. 

«tti Ptom contact Mr A.W. 

Fitter or Mr R.W. Burned, at- 

Oce law* 0734 483388 «r aner 

hours 0*91 681797 


JAGUAR &DAIMK£K 
WANTED 


CUT SALMON Rem** your Ja» 

u*r Dalndrt (under 20.000 

mBssi. tonattto d aamiu .- 
Banters draft. NoOoawtde eoL 

ketkm. TU: Mm* Lewi* 01 398 

,4222 Sunday 0836 202936. 


MERCEDES 


280 SE. Y ragta- 

MWrt- Thteae 9«n. MS. aa- 
(X4M. FSH. 1 owner, noerttoat 

Otori mon, £12 *760* Trad*. Tel 
0283 782827. 

1M1 Mttcedee 380 SL Span 
Cow. aaacb ml 4S.000 
tnOea. tua service history, ttft- 
mariits £16995. Tel 0222 
707*06. T 

388 a 198a new model. Smote 
rtw.Hto.CC.EW, E9R.WW. 
BMW. stol e n rMBo tHda. 
7.0qpmft«s. £g3A60. T Hi 0287 
ZWw* X 

080 race 84 A. IMNK snver. 
“avy wuber interior. *4.000 
mftM. Imwyuta fe. F$H - 1 awn- 
p. £26.900. - 0707 «2*5 

(SredWInbL 

228G8M986. Met rtlver. Backer 
radio, rev headrest*. B meed. 7 
aeati. 24000 man. many ax- 
aaa. F3 H. nerf ea. SSJK8- Tel 
Ol 398 3277. 


198 C Brand new. peal my raw 
tslftc. Mue cMh. auto. ESR. 
central ana resL Offers over 
£14.96 0. Te L- OTS5 320770 
<b» / 0763 44121 evenings. 



238 C Sept -86. man. white. 
Maty extras, quality radio / 
cassette. ifESOQ mUs. prefect 
coraurton. £11.000. Tel: 
Fxcnhoroogh (00S2) 618676. 


■ PWi lBgtt T WHin. 

300 TD TuHxj. mb. pas. FoO 

spec. 1982. low - 



C&60Q. Tri. 0202 420966. 


.OPIUM 26 - valve cetwer- 
rton. Jraae 1986. e rto t lUWln a 

penormanco. blue/ biaot- Im- 

ntacutata. SSAJSSO TeL 060* 
66218. 


tB88C V regHwed. 36000 raftos. 
FSH. elec sottroar. elec wttv- 
daws. new lyres, muacatote 
£16.9 96. Te fcoaaa 872660 or 
0662 872776 


ZK Amo. 1989 <Y M8. Rad. 

9UXX) raflea. 1 year MOTM. 

r/c. _ manacuttto cand»an. 
£6660 asra. Tel: 061 4290608 


288 SL. -80. Srane* rad. 12.000 
rnlles. Totally nriphal. Anoys. 
Blauponkt R feast. Priva te sale 
fZl.afiOgpo.T4t 01 8769932. 


*88 SUL 1980. While. Private 
rertsuateoR. FuBy Matod. ftts- 
hne conoraon, £1 3.996. CaP 
« 224) 694211 beftra 6CML 


->r. ■ • . 


*88 SLC 1980 Lapis Uw/bW 

valour Menar. Aid ttrtSK 

heawUftt. Cia99& 01-263 
9190/ 9189 T 


300 T Estate- B* CAL Bur. sum. 
Central locks*, atonp/caa- 
S&OOO rnlles. on e . owner. 
£ 7.900 Tab 01-657^21*9 


188 ZJt 16 Vttee. SnoKqreOv^ 
or .1t/ex. 088* 298791. T. 


C?| i„ 


2*8 C 1980. iwl cnertahed rtte*- 
61.000 -miles. Good ewvHOcav 
£3560. Ttt (0777) 8*799. 


880 3E6 3Q0D- 2800. Bate; 
tta deOvery. Tax ton or UK- 
TeL 038* 296791. 


280 SB 83 Y. Chine sW»* 

vefcsy. 09.000 ah HR. O 


roof, E/wMwa- E/iraiirt*. 

Cf tacHno. paS. Pkawrt- (W); 

a*c. esevntnaa) ear. OZu 

PX pw. PM.R Q6S8 l 

or 0602 393386. 


zioc ,984. «a. .•raro^ra 


con*, net windows. 

mots. F.&M. - itorter 
£11.996, ottek saw. 

Tel: 07S5 888329~ 

238 EC reft. 'Auto, matte Onaa 

nw. 19,000 UttML FSH- gfc 

E/w. Raa/eau. HWW. dW«- 
torrear. tosnaettate. SU3*- 
0326 7*3161 AnytenriJ 


•zi 




























Motoring by Clifford Webb 


TTTF TTMF.S FRTDAY NO VEMBER 14 1986 

r“ CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 




The Business, 

In the palm of your hand 
SPECIAL OFI 


LIMITED OFFER - SAVE £8000 


s %Sgg&ffl2SS&'J&F 

01-681 2600 

PEUGEOT’S 


Portable 
Tel ep hone* at 
tbe right cost 
‘from the rigM 
compmiy 


SOB on 2-21 85 C. SBver. many extras • 

605 FAMILY ESTATE Auto - Choloe of 2: 

Chany Red, 7,000 mte—. 

Midnight Blue, 14.000 mtej -rrr z ~ Z? 

505 am Man 84 B. Extras. 11.000 mis 

505 GT1 Auto 85 B. 15,000 mJs— — — “ 

505 cm EXEC AutD 88 C (New shape) 

306 GT88C, Extras — 

305 ORB 1-9 Diesel 84 A — — 

305 GR 85 B Red — 

OTHER MAKES 

Y10 Turt» 85 B, 10.000 rrts. 1 owner — 

VAUXHALL CAVALIER 1AL 85 

V/W GOLF 1JQL 84 A (New Shape) 




£7.400 

£8,795 


araonaoMlie 
Uggest micro- 
computer anti and 
wnunu ntf aiions 
product distributor 
in Ok UK and an 
ptaased to announce 
that they have been 
appotted your local 


£B£9S 

£8.795 

„ £10,700 
£5885 

__ 


Noi^Ud 


_ £5,795 
M . £4,785 



HiHC > z ?/~ ""4 


fell ure on prototype cars it is over three quarters of a mu- 
manufacturers to conduct bon pounds on one emi test 
meticulous testing in emi programme, 
environmental chambers as Future cars will replace 
well as in the field, and their today's heavy a nd c oin- 
findings have persuaded plicated wiring harnesses by a 

, IN BRIEF——— 


' ' rr£' 

! 

5 i /* 



• Foreign care scooped aD 
the awards in the Caravan 
dob Towcar of die Year 
1967 competition with the 
premier award going to the 
Renault 21 GTS (pictured 
above). The £7,875 1.7 litre 
GTS also carried off the dare 
win for care costing raider 
£ 8 , 000 . 

Other winners were: 
S&jm-iym the new GT! 
version rathe Citroen BX19 
costing £9,184, over £11,000, 


the 16 


• The Automobile Associ- 
ation recently carried out free 
checks on fights and tyres far 
customers raring a Black 
Country store. They food 
that nearly half the vehicles 
had at least one serious 
defect An official said: 
“With winter approaching 
there are an alarming nmn- 
ber of vehicles on the road 
requiring attention.” 


even me irouuu i 
Big Three — GM, Ford and i 
Chrysler - to ape it with their 
new models the Japanese were 
not slow to follow suit 

That process has been gomg 

on for the past five years and 
how well the Japanese have 
learnt to Europeanize their 
cars is dearly demonstrated in 
the new Nissan Sonny range 
which has just gone on sale in 

A dose friend whose shrewd 

appraisal of cars I have 
learned to respect came for a 
tide in a new 5-door hatch- 
back Sunny 1.6SLX. He pot 
into the car as the evening 
light was fading. Within a few 
minutes I was conscious of 
him subjecting the dashboard 
and steering wheel to an 
unusually close scrutiny. 
“Good heavens!” he said, “it’s 
a N issan. I thought it was a 
VW Golf” 

Tbe old Sunny was the best 
sdfing Nissan in Britain for 
many years. Indeed the com- 
pany claims it has been the 
best selling imported car for a 
decade. But its rather bland 


onw consunnw*". «■ 

mpfl,56mph49.6 mpg,75mph 
37 Jmpg. 

Length: 1&Sfeet 
Insurance: Group 5 

(provisionaD. 

series to give more torque and 

lower revs. The result is very 
obvious on the road. It is now 
a zippy performer. 

A longer wheel base, wider 
track and independent 
sus pensio n has unproved the 
road holding and handling 
quite appreciably. It is still not 
up to the Golfs very high 
standards but has moved 
notkably closer. 

I also tried a 1.7 diesel 
Sunny, the first to be offered 
in a car of this size by Nissan. 
It was encouragingly quiet for 
a diesel, free revving and 
powerful enough to be mis- 
taken for a similar-sized petrol 
unit. By omitting some of the 
“goodies” on the well- 
! equipped petrol SLX such as 
electric windows and central 
. iwrfnrifl the price is a useful 
' £300 less. It should make an 
I excellent fleet car. 



AUTOTECH 
FOR RENAOLT 

Sates Service ft Parts. 
New & Used Models. 
Part Exchange Welcome 
Licenced Credit! Broker 
New Workshop & 
Showroom opewng in 
New Year. 

Cafl Keith or Pat today on 
01 701 8547 or703 M60 
or 708 1294. 

Road, SE17. 


DP automobiles 

i 6 S tn Purley Way. 
i Croydon(AlJ)- 

Of esi 2600 

OP£IM 7 DAYS A WEEK 


GRAVELLY A 

FDR 

RENAULT 

ON NEW RENAULTS 

Tet 0554 890436 

TEST DRIVE 
A RENAULT TODAY 
REN AULT B UILD 
A BETTER CAR 

0 ~~ KldwUy, A 

DyM V 



The most competitive pnea 
in the ILK. For quotations 
and delivery details 
telephone: 


- »— *" 





Hew Car Brokers 

■aura Mscaarisl 

on km «*«• Kd mocWa 
Pwt luilra p ri 
to» ten* mm. op« 
Sunday UM (or p rtW I nn 

mm ssMB/mra <wml 





Transam 1984 Latest modal 
T root. Previously owned hy 
major record company, to 
mieaga. Exceptional Hwoufln- 
out, PX welcome. 


COMMUMCATIMS 

for people on 
the move 
OUT NOW! 
from all good 
newsagents 
only E1.95 













theua lx turbo 

16S BHP M2 nr* « sees 
AU OTHER MODELS AVNLAHi 
FOUHCE ■ LEASE CONTRACT HRE 

TELEPHONE 
MICHAEL IVES 
0708 42242 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS 


NISSAN COVENTRY. LT u | 

Tel: 0203 555399 


SAINT JAMES 

^D7W^Mm«CWaoV 

1 GoU nat/dow rata. bu/sm 
Sa.o*niow5dB.e5asB«tnJ 
eass. mid flips st. 


Fta>. sriadw d ng» * P* turned 
W*» w wet Wbm» Pflpw w 
Ht for turtfcw irate, 

01 S42 22DS- 


5h*ss 



AOTOS 

WTERHATIOIIAL 

Amazing discounts on 
most mates and 
medals. 

bntant, no nonsense 
Quotas. 

0772 324 154. 


BEST BOYS 

toy Car /Tea mpM 

■0 DEPOSIT HP 

(■JUKI »> *tt«l 

SVB lion no. 

01 950 0052 


In mstaEc. 1984, 25,800 
rcfles. tn pristine contBtan 
wldi Ml service bMory. witi 

avwy concetvaWe wxa- 
Gttijtfte reason tor sate- Of- 
fan In the region o» S2ZJ5M. 

Tel 01 992 5862. 


VOLVO 240 6LT 
AUTO ESTATE. 

A ^2tM , J!SL l !35 

gnat rrth Mw taper ipw- 
S«y. ExceUrt amilotn. 
£ 8,100 

Tel: 01-228 0242 

eeu 

(weekends/evenings) 



,9nO: : N 

1 AUMiKEZUODEtS OFCArtSSUPfUEO I 


ojtnmrarewus 

ujmJiuruMtimrASKa 

OHTMCTHK 
awrocHMEeacaF 
game hbkubbuhsm maui m 
RU.MflH»ra»WMSBMeEm 

enuusHEDOvsrssraMS 

01654 If™ 


RENAULT 25 
V6i C re*. 19*5. I owner. 
28.000 mOes. Full service 
history. Superlative condi- 
tion- Full warranty. 

£10,495. 

TeUS76 10388 
Eary & Jones Ltd. London 
Rnad. Kdvedon. Nr. 

Catectawr. Essex. 


FORD XR3t SaMom «ng CaKW- 
Itts. D R*4L OeMvwy M»ast»- 
M ofWIUtP. C7J5BO awl 
cs.ssa 

ramt W: 0827 66222/0830 
602700. T 






























r*»-: * 


m 




vsrc 


34 


Ttct^ ^VBUSINESS 


your own business 


New bid to review rates system 

- — * — are from two to five times mow ithm 


ACUCmU^il3USiH|«I^U 111 

rating Systran overhauled so that rates 
are paid as a percentage of pre-tax 
profits. 

A 50-page dossier of information Ins 
been sent to Nicholas RM ley,_ tjtf 
Environment Secretary, representing spe 


JUlVinHimcm aecreiary* rejiiww**—® “ 

yeare of members’ surveys to back np me 

forum’s claims fiat bosmess rates smmia 

Robot adds 
icing to its 
backers’ 
profits cake 

a Paa C muth 


be based on the ability to A study 
completed this year by 8>00® 
members shows that in England and 
Wales business rates account for Is per 
cent of pretax profits on average, m 
Scodand the figure is 24 per cent 

After examining the resnlts «f 3® 
public limited companies, the 
claims that bnaness rates paid by SMB 
Gnns,isa 


now constdoiBg response *e 
goveramenf s Green Paper, wh ich pro- 
posed a m ri|m i aniform rate pommage 
linked to property valuation. 

LnnMerm changes to me rating 

system are not I 

fonim also wants an 


l OPPORTUNI I Y 

* FOR 

MANAGEMENT 
TRAINING 
STRATEGIST 


By Amanda Gee Smyth 
The cake for the BBCs Tomorrows 
World 25th birthday was iced byarotmt 

- Cran tech Robotics' Nff ."2** 1 * 
normal function is to apply adhesives to 

^AtSSflOQ. the Crantech robot claims 
to deal rapidly and efficiently with the 
most intricate comixrant promes. 

The company was started two years 
ago by engineer Tony Besiand. econo- 
Xsl Paul Moser 

identified a gap in the robot market tor a 
KSSki flexible adhesivwitspensmg 
See inaccurate manual or 

* from the Depart- 

sssss&'sssSiSS 

Sms Loan Guarantee Scheme, the two 
men set up business only to find that 
they had underestimated the inordi- 
nately long time - up to two years - 
manufecturers would take to place 

“S-—1 the original financial 
forecasts were not met and Crantech was 
forced to extend its borrowings. But 
prospects now look brighter and foe 
company should break into profit next 
year on sales of around £500,uuu. 

Mr Moser said: “The chanow are 
excellent for doubling turnover 52& : gj 
for the next two or three years. Thetwo 



— II ► 


Vfell established o^nisation development 
conaltancy seeks to strengthenand ^ 
expand Hs managementtrainingservice. 
Opportunity for asirategistwitti a desire to 
invest in own future. 

The ideal candidate is probably a directorin 
the Human Resources Developmentor 
ManagemerrtGwisulfancyfield, strongin 

problem analysis, marketing and team 
building, with immediate credibility at 

board level. 


Please write, giving details to: 

Robert Wileman, 

TPL Management Development Ud. 

64 North Street, Guildford, Surrey GUI 4AH 

Allans Promotions Limited Group Company 


► w 

TPLI»MANAGEMENTpEVELOPMENT LIMITED 




Our diems are private ” 

ftice range is. £3m to £7m- M he 


Si Whinney, Bedrec House. 1 ta:0 i^28 

London SE1 TEUTdephonrO W2B 2000. h*. u 

I345.THejc885234ERNSl.OG. 







Ernst &Whinney 

toamm Advisas. Consult*"*- 




residential 

CARE HOME 


Lease far tor tap 

Mill In retina OQBMon on South M PM* 


BLACKPOOL NORTH SHORE 

■tA DAibnnm K mBPh J Hlltd 


their Polar adhesives robot 

Sticking w m anew model is also now being sold, 

entrepreneurs concentrated on uk Wnrffing from a tiny factory in 
highly-specialized mche market of HertfoSshirelthe highly-drilled team of 

si^dispensing.p^!rs^enowoom^ “ ySno^Toobi^rSrSr premises, 
from companies such as jaguar, ^ J aMnoement with a 


in nom rompuuw 
Austin Rover, MorphyRichante, toe 
Ministry of Defence and Lochte UK,the 
adhesives manufacturer which is adding 
it to its range of application equipment 
offered to users of its industrial products. 

Mr Moser added: “We arelopkmgto 
Europe to expand and have had several 
inquiries, especially from toe French 

motor industry. - 

“The DTI grant helped enormously 
and we hope to be included in the 


en is now iwwus «« — o— *■--- — . 

It has made an arrangement wnn a 
leading Japanese robotics manufacturer 
tomareet its products as an additional 
and complementary feature to the 
Crantech lines and has recently or- 
ganized a nationwide promonon aeaL 
Tbe software for toe robot wras 
mastenninded by Mr Best and allows tiro 
robot to be reprogrammed in rmnuta. it 
can be adapted to processes such as 
drilling, earring, automatic, mrt-and- 



■wjaMBXtssffssn 

EnooZriee In aWdwt confidence from direct 
buyers only pinna* 

Reply to BOX A87. 


OFFICE! 



Perwd and 

jssttsaA. 


MJ. HINDLEY & CO 
25 Eire Street Bbckpod 


NORTHERN CYPRUS 
rnonetic factory ftOOOsa feet. 


. Write for rietafe 

I Loodoo KW8 8 EP. T el Ite: ul 

I 723-7378 

16 total* Rpai. "W3 

1 Tel HK 01-722-4902 




x— Es-. 


•1 




Td: 025322951 
Business transfer & Estate Agents 


inc wn — r - r* - ^ Hritline. earring, antomauc amw 

and we hope to be induded m the pick-and-place. 

FAMOS (Flexible Automaton Mam** *** c^Xbeused in toe prediction of 

ture Systems) as part of the European instruments, batten*, 

^fSVSS** robots have been domestic appliances, plastic components 
iveml orders taken for five more and andfoptym. 


private school/training centre 




briefing 


I The Scottish Development^ency 

S3«™ 

^(SS^Iabtetobustness 
centre membera. 



Enterprise agencies, educ^or^ 
estabiistimems ■ 


which run courses, arto 
schemes 





m The views of compani^intoe 
Nottingham area are wanted for ■a study 

of how management trsming ran ne 

planned more specifically totoe needs of 
focal small businesses in toree key 
sectors: clothing and texffles, en#neerlng 
and irvdushial services. The project, 
funded by the Manpower Services, 
Commission and toe Department of 


sasssssssSum* 

arailabtefrom county libraries and 
career offices. 

■ A video guide for small businesses 
on unfair dismissal legislation and good 
employment practiceTs available on 
free hire from the Department of 
Employment’s smaB firms cemras 
regionally. It explains industrial trfounal 
procedures an d giv es guidelines tor 
taking on new staff. 


MR FRIDAY 



Iadastm! NoA "b— 

A most 

ssfs m67?v«» «o s 

Million {MHWOI. , „ nirr 

bnriries m stridest c onfidm ce ftw PfflNOPALS 
miy pi® 3 *. 

No writtm details allocattd 


Iaspediaii risks arranged on receipt of bM C.V. 
Reply to BOX A34. 



TELEX 


A COMPLCTE TELEX SYSTHjI FOR 

£795 + VAT 

phone syntra 

01-582 2958 FOR DETAILS 


♦These days I don’t know what takes 
longer - clients to pay me or yen to 
deliver itf* 


CARPHONES 

Sates/instaflation nationwide. All popular 
makes supplied. 

Tet (0803) 527789 
or 0860 714903 
Telex 42585 XgNIA. 

Mobile Communications (U-n-* 



i never 

wcaBoes 


Wbrikin’t^be great 
tolet someone else 



Intoatal Factor? 
viHdopeaselytbaL ' 


Hvmuijmj — - 

cashimmefiatdyon 
the kivracesyrai smd 
out and manage your 




FOR 


SALE 


Due to retirement wad 
established security 
company cowing 

-* “ — mul MinM 


serving with franchise for 

spsdaBsed proAxta, 
operating on a national 
basis but concentrating on 

ik. ■■ rwi6nr sanrl 


OaSIS DUt wnHxniawy 
the Norttwm Counties and 
Southern Scotland. Woi*i 
be ideal opportunity to 
obtain operational base m 
Cumbria. 

FOR IMMEDIATE SALE 
ASQOMGCONCSM 


sTS Street,' Carlisle 
Canlllta CM 1HT 


FOR SALE 

PETROL 

filling 

STATION 

£700,000 Freehold 


IKTHOS PRINTING COMPANY. 
LONDON NW10. 

TEL: 01 960 4386. 


A conn** printing service 
ton nm full ootasr 


one e uuhi rr~_ jii— . 

short ran full cotow . Gnat pefcnnance fiom a small fen 
expjnKUng company. 


eapantnng cthupomi- 

CALL STUART DUNCAN ON: 01 960 4386 


SflAREHOLHK 
FOR SALE 

nocessary w* mvowea 
Ctrea E&500.NO «me 
wasters please. 

Reply to BOX A78 


PRONTAPWNT 
SHOP 

I Souft coast location. Long 
ffqanfahMl - currently nil 

profit tor woridng w»ws. 
toTune Pi qutfBS. 

E22.500 tor Bomedais sate. 

HertrBOX A56. 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 
IN SECURITY 
No FrancMae Fee 


Wc Ar nonubURn vrtatait 

far Fall or Pm-Ti« Don*«gr 

Axrsn » DP HIGHLY 

SDfHKnC^Tlp 
CHALLENGER I2STXIAWHRE 

DETECTION ALARMS no rf* 1 

wub n> wmdonor ooan. 

‘ PW 7^^S3L iBboL 

• Kaiaix rctul iyc. 
soci. 


Very Attractive 
Mortgage facility 
a\ 



Reply to BOX A92 . 


CAMWAl'C^MimWMTtSOCOj 

Lines bor*r town. FJH 

pr n m e* blu aj| * w f J1 T ^nSff 

trximq O oawa ny: rrMHQ^y-- 
LKnm onOon tor S3 
HJ unlla UK nrt Hi <XJOK 
S5, . <06351 23695- 


VICTORIA 


Vi RWUWA*a**fc** J 

. « •„, business. Now its tune 

Fact0rs the rewards. 


Smart snack bar taking 

T jo £ 6,000 p.w. 

(season) £3,000 winter. 
Low rent IS year lease. 

E15SJ100. 


Tel: 01*821 9154 


BUSINESSES WANTED! 


Fer deeds Write or Ptuoe 
•21-2364939/3832 

INTERNATIONAL 

ELECTRONICS & CO L TP 
ARGENT CENTRE 

te FREDERICK ST. 

HOCKLEY 

BIRMINGHAM B1 3HS 


|| TaIrfmB6rfFadasIj33iEd,P.O.Pax2^SoMdsflBaBe.Q B i £J ^ s ^ sa 4 II 

11 Bfi#nB»3WI. THtphor: (E3212IL 


WAKTEO 

EARLY RETUS FROM 
sOTOBPOsmwm 

0ORSTROCTION WKWJSTHY 
to effect high level 
in trodn ctrons to qnaliiy 
jornery mannmetmer. 
RrpHeM pUaf to: 
Linda CatnubtsO 
01-222 5835 



RETIREMENT 

SALE 


PRIVATE 

INVESTOR 


Window manufacturer/ 
installation business (6 
staft}. Sootfitorrjstiire. 

Good margins. 


BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Erosmrfa 
12 


I LEASE OF OF HA8XET' 
1 UUHESVEAB SHOP 
FOB SALE 


NORTH LAKES 

AREA 

(CUMBRIA) 

(hews ot suttflaiti ti awfl ry 


pnsDifUG rr~.-T 

Sesist hi dwetoomeni ot to- 
ny retncmaS iMfl*- 


M 


WE A—: mkm (* wtih 

i mmBtt 


^jTHEBBM 

SUPERIOR 

Btgasi 

PROMOTIONAL LEAFLETS 
FR0N * 

£169 

INTSRBSTEDI 


For t SUPMOA OGML 
wM*t|AHiw-rtdmfc 

mdourprinffMaen 

02257 Q 43 II 


CDONiM • VHCROOVMin 
■ pB iauRw enw__ 


induded. Sttu- 
in central Stockton on 
T^. £5,000 + SAV. 


Reply to BOX F38. 


required to participate 
in exciting new busi- 
ness, operating in the 
travel guide industry. 
We have an exclusive 
part of the market with 
proven success and no 
competition. £50,000 
minimum capital 
required. 


CAR PHONES 


From. — — . . 

Fully guaranteed. Any model supplied 
TeW274 871386 
Telex: 51567 W1LSEW G 

NORDIC TELECOM 


TECHNICAL 

PARTNERS 

wrg. E 

O- nlu anqiMs orty n be 


T ^ar- 

mb are 


HAW— Flnaner wanted Mr p<M 

Looinr tow of DJaV 

by known writer. Star 'MB 
enntraewd. top ttoealres booked. 
Reply to BOX 088 . 


tng mrr«or. aeUre m»“ 
rmutred with npertence. RwW 
to BOX P06. 


Reply to BOX A40 


IROOUE Property BruMOwalO^ 
nurtantty pmrrtdea nMB- 
Bamanleed animal taewiie and 
fast Investment ^ow*- For de- 
tails rlns: 0483 333001 


THE ROUTE TO 
SUCCESSFUL 
GROWTH. 


Your new TELEX Machine 
from £549 + VAT 

B-C.S- Limited 

01-735 8171 


HMMtiOMjtt U WWtAS 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax machines. 

Cheapest prices in Eu- 
rope. Limitso 
cjuaniits^s available 
now. Please phone 
Fax IntemationaK 

Tel: ( 0243 ) 888682 


0 A 


'.itr 


. *.*« 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 


lb 


MCBcrTS - Prtnt)drK»i«tv. a UM - 




WHOLESALERS \ 


EBONY WOODEN 
HAND CARVINGS 
AND ARTEFACTS 
■ FOR SALE 


At gragH^reAjoed prices 


Teh 01-4® 0814 
all hours 





fcjartdiOdniid wfa i 


OMK aiaorto toegar^ 

QMWMaetvflBtnto 

FMkrdMA- 

UNDREW LTD 
011 778 3260 


WANTED 

fweto auprir. «d 
spmts gov ■*! sports wxnmo- 
Raati'gfla ptBObtymo daato 
t um men ca bat raptor < *™ n 9- 
Contact- 

n H.WJU5 ul 
iMriM.nn. 

Ent OMda. Bwmo. 
Tttac 777W3 pUHUW G) 
FKU552 Sn» 


HOTELS AUOTSED I - 
PREMISES | 


Jl.-r- 


C »' 


At brt. tto« is sswto 
tostfe ftr P 

CXS 

Bury Btwwte yrewg** 

emmawy dowpos™ ■“ 
■HreSt- _ . . 

Our npsrtw .is 


ESraice. Poison PWk Owg 




u 1 row y b jw ag 

pznd lab to So pthn 
lOE 


Bray HhrerdinU Awctore. 

T8SW6^sJ«J*C«, 

DO 


CATERING* 

VENDING 


] 


DISTRIBUTORS 
* AGENTS. 


LOANS* 

investment 


] 


SEEKING 

INVESTMENT 

Successful fast grow- 
ing timber miB and 
joinery manufacturers 
are seeking invest- 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


SPORT 


35 


A city prepares its valediction to modem chariots as they go the way of ancient Rome 


* 




*S' 




Order of the 
Bath boot 
for the rally 

supercars 


SUNDAY NOVEMBER IS 


LOMBARD RAC RALLY 




By David DnffieW 


OSLOO 

09.30 
1020 
1020 
1030 

13.15 

14.15 

15.30 
15J0 

17.20 
1000 

19.20 

19.30 


SS Spedai stage 
TCTime control 



Bath 

Badminton 
Cirencester Park 
Sutton Park 
WalsaB 
Weston Park 
Trorrtham 
Buxton 
Chatsworth 
Clumber Park 
Harawood House 
Rudcfing Park 


f 




y 




* 


"*«a 




Bath is about to play host to 
another piece of history 
When, at 9.0am on Sunday 
the first of the Group B cans in 
the Lombard RAC Rally set 
off to cover the 350 miles of 45 
special stages dispersed over 
thei,500 miles of the rare 
distance, it will be the last time 
that they will compete in an 
international rally in the 
United Kingdom. 

Unlike the Roman chariots 
which frequented the streets of 
Bath nearly 2,000 years ago, 
the Group B cars have not 
been superseded by progress 
but banned by FISA, the 
world governing body of mo- 
tor sport, because they have 
become too powerful. 

Race within race 
for world title 

While many of the 160 
machines taking part are more 
directly related to many cars 
in daily use (although spe- 
cially prepared for the rigours 
of the four-day event and 
suitably decorated to promote 
their sponsor involvement), 
they are out-and-out specials 
bearing only a passing resem- 
blance to more mundane 
transport. 

Reputations are at stake. 
Peugeot, with their four-wheel 
drive turbocharged cars, have 
already won the world 
manufecturers’ championship 
and hiha Kankuane n in the 
Peugeot 205 T16 leads the 
drivers* championship -He is 
holly pursued by Markku 
Alen in a four-wheel - drive 
turbo-chaiged Lancia Delta 
S4. 

For Alen to have any chance 
of winning the championship 
he has to beat Kankunnen by 
the time they return to Bath 
on Wednesday eveningJt is 
virtually a race within a race 
conducted over closed tarmac . 
private roads or the rough 
trades of forestry tend. 

Apart from the battle for the 
individual title there is the 
accolade of winning the rally. 
Unlike other world-ranking . 
events the special sta&s are 
secret There is no practising 
or compiling of pace notes to 
guide the drivers. So the 
unexpected can and does 
happen. 

The Group B MG Metro 
6R4 made its international 


debut in last year’s rally, 
driven by Tony Pond, aim 
finished third behind two 
Landa Deltas. This year 13 
MG Metros are taking part. 
Although slightly down on 
power compared with the 
P&ugeot 205 T16 and Lancia 
Delta S4s, they are said to be 
more at home in the forest 
stages. Can a British driver in 
a British car succeed? 

It is 10 years once a British 
driver won the rally, Roger 
Clark in a Ford Escort tri- 
umphing in 1976. This year 
there will be four factory- 
hacked Group B Ford RS 
200s, one of them driven by 
St^Blomqvist, who won in 

Hie permutations are end- 
less. For instance, who will 
win Group A, the category 
which will dominate the 1988 
world scene? Kenneth 
Eriksson in the VW Golf GTi 
leads the drivers* champion- 
ship in this divirion and win 
be hard to beat. ■ 

Brier, now, a dark horse. 
The sole entrant in the four- 
whed drive turbo Mazda 
hatchback will be Ingvar 
Carisson. This car, the class 
winner in tire Finnish 1,000 
Lakes Rally, could herald a 
new era. 

The car that could 
herald a new era 

Lone rangers, but not in the 
running for top honours, are 
Roy Bradford in a Honda 
Civic CRX; Russell Morgan 
in a Mercedes 190; Mure 
Buckler in an A1& Romeo Sud 
TT; and Susanne Kottulinslcy 
in a Volvo 240 turbo. Spon- 
sored by the Swedish Air 
Force, she will have to fly to 
beat Louise Aitken-Walker, 
who is driving a Nissan 
240RS. She finished sixteenth 
in 1985. 

Unusual in today’s high- 
pressure field of sport, the 
RAC Rally is a conglomera- 
tion of fall factory-sponsored 
entr ants and hopeful but ex- -, 
pert amateurs all doing battle 
over the same piece of ground. 
Less than half wifl finish and 
die winner will come from any 
one of the first 20 cars to leave 
Bath on Sunday. It win take 
1,500 miles to decide which 
one. 



Drivers who should steer 
their way to the front 


TWO SALONEN 
Finland, aged 35, Peugeot 
205 T6 (No Ik Principal suc- 
cesses: 198& Five times 
winner in worid championship 
raffles and 1985 world 
champion. 1986: Rally of a 
1,000 Lakes wavier. 

ST1G BLOMQ VIST 
Sweden, 40, Ford RS 200 
(No 2). Princfptf successes: 
1971 and 1983. 1st RAC 
Rally- Winner of 12 other worid 
championship raffles since 
1971. 

MARKKU ALEN 

Finland. 35, Lancia Delta S4 



sica and San Remo Rally. 
1986: winner of San Remo 
Rally. 

TONY POND 

England, 41, MG Metro 6R4 
(No 4). Principal successes: 
Winner of the Manx inter- 
national three times and the 
Scottish International 1985: 
3rd, RAC Ratty. 

JUHA KANKKUNEN 
Finland. 27, Peugeot 205 
T16 (No 5). Principal suc- 
cesses: 1S86L' Wfriner of 
Sweetish, AcropoHs and New 
Zealand raffles, leader of 
World Drivers’ Championship. 

KALLEGRUNDEL 
Sweden, 38, Ford RS 200 


Pond: challenging a gain Aitken-Walker: consistent. 


1980: Swedish champion. 
1985: German Rally champion. 
1988: 3rd, International 


Swedish Rally. 


: 





MARK LOVELL 

British, 26, Ford RS 200 (No 

12). Principal successes: 

1985: RACNational Ratty 

1986: British Open 

RaBy Cham 
KENNETH! 

Sweden, 30. VW Golf GTi 
(No 27). Pttodpal successes: 
1986: Leader of the Worid 
Drivers’ Championship, Group 
A. 

RUSSELL BROOKES 
Britain. 41, Opal Manta 400 
(No 1 6). Principal succe sse s: 
1985: British Open Cham- 
pion, 5th, RAC Rally. Consis- 
tently one of the highest 
placed British drivers in the 
RAC Rally for 10 years. 

PENTT1 AIRIKKALA 

Finland, 41, VauxhaU Astra 
GTE (No 291 Principal suc- 
cesses: 1986: Group A 
RAC Open Ratty Champion. 


Fifth drive for 
leading lady 

Louise Aitken-Walker, 
Britian’s leading woman rally 
driver, win make her fifth 
appearance in the Lombard 
RAC rally driving a Nissan 
240 RS. 

Previously she has recorded 
da« wins in the race, received 
the ladies' prize in 1982 and a 
16th outright placing in group A 

in 1985 at the wheel of a Peugeot 

Miss Aitken, partnered by 
EDen Morgan, has consistently 
finished in the top 10 pfarings in 
Open championship rounds this 
season, despite their normally 
aspirated vehicle being unable 
to maid) the power or traction 
of the four-wheel drive specalist 
group B cars. 


The Peugeot 205 TJ6 which the Finn, Hmo Salonen, hopes wfll take him to victory. 


Vehicles with potential 
to take chequered flag 

Six of the cars capable of winning their group 

GROUPA 

VauxhaB Astra GTE: 1798cc engine, 4 cyfindere, 8 valves, 164 
bhp. Drivers: Andrew Wood, Perm Airikkala. 

VW Goff GTI: 1781cc, 4 cylinders, 16 valves, 193 bhp. Drivers: 
Kenneth Ericsson, Simon Davison. 

GROUP B 

MG Metro 6R4: 2991cc, 6 cylinders, 24 valves, 380 bhp. Drivers: 
Tony Pond. Malcolm WSson, David Lteweffin. 

Lancia Delta S4: 1795cc, 4 cyftxJers, 16 valves, 470 bhp. Drivers: 
Markku Aten, Mikael Ericsson. 

Ford RS 200: 1 803cc, 4 cylinders, 1 6 vahws, 420 bhp. Drivers: Stig 
Btomqvfet, Katie Grundel, Marie Lowell, Stig Andervang. 

Peugeot 205 TIB: 1775cc, 4 cylinders, 16 valves, 500 bhp. 
Drivers: TTmo Salonen, Juba Kankkunen, Mikael Sundstrom. 


Safe spots 
for crowds 
to watch 

Last year in the Dyfam Forest 
the BncontroUable volume of 
spectators ctnsed the RAC of- 
ficials to cancel a special stage 
(David DoBield writes). 

A month ago in die San Remo 
Rally the organizers cancelled a 
stage for the same reason. In 
Portugal earlier this year spec- 
tators were killed and injured 
when a rally car went off the 
road. 

Despite the danger — or 
perhaps because of tbe excite- 
ment created by being close to 
the action — there has each year 
been a massive increase in the 
number of spectators along the 
route of tbe RAC Rally. 

In die interests of safety, the 
RAC advise spectators to watch 
at specific “ staii ed" stages 
where there are good safe van- 
tage points and car parking 
facilities. 

On Sunday November 16, 
these are at Badminton near 
Bath (09 JO), Cirencester Park 
(10.20), Sutton Park, Bir- 
mingham (1224), Weston Park 
near Stafford (13 J5), Trentham 
Gardens near Stoke (14,15), 
Chatsworth near Worksop 
(15JS0), dumber Park near 
Mansfield (17.20), Harewood 
House, (19.08) and Redding 
Park (19-30). Harewood House 
and Rndding Park are both are 
near the overnight halt at the 
Harrogate Show pound. 

Aim to arrive around half an 
hour before the listed time of the 
first car. Listen to the advice of 
the marshalls. Keep off foe 
actual cheats and away from 
the points where an out of 
control car could leave the road, 
for example, on the exit of a 

sharp bend. 

Chasing across country to find 
the Forestry Commission stages 
on days two, three ami four is 
best left to tbe experts. 

Inglistoa near Edinburgh 
(Monday, November 17, at 
1930), Lowtber Park, near 
P euiith (Tuesday November 18, 
at lUWk Haigh Hall near 
Wigan (November 18, at 17.00) 
and Margram Park near 
Bridgend (Wednesday Novem- 
ber 19, at 16.00) are tbe other 
specially arranged spectator 


armchair enthusiasts, 
check foe BBC 2 coverage. A 
total of four hours has been 
scheduled starting with a pre- 
rnnr at 2\ 


view tomorrow i 


1135. 


GOLF 


Norman makes a 
slow start to 
his Open defence 


Melbourne (Reuter) — The 
British Open champion. Greg 
Norman, made a less than 
impressive start to his Austra- 
lian Open title defence yesterday 
with a volatile round of two- 
under-par 70, four strokes off 
the lead. 

A fellow- Australian lan 
Baker-Finch, seeking his first 
victory of the year, and the New 
Zealander, Greg Turner, winner 
of this year's Singapore and 
Scandinavian Opens, drew first 
blood with rounds of 66. 

On a day of low scores, they 
were only one shot away from 
the course record, set in 1981 by 
Norman. 

Three players - Magnus 
Persson. of Sweden, and foe 
Australians Jamie Crow and 
Rodger Davis — were grouped 
on o7. with foe West German, 
Bernhard Longer, another two 
shots behind. 

Norman finished the from 
nine three under the card after 
starring with four successive 
birdies and five one under para. 

But be wasted shots with on*- 
under-para at the 10th, 1 2th and 
13fo before birdies at foe 16fo 
and 17fo restored a measure of 
respectability. 

“I got what I deserved.” 
Norman said later. ”1 don't 
know whether it was concentra- 
tion or bad dub selection. 

”1 played very well on the 
front nine and could have shot 
anything — but could have shot 
anything bad on the back nine. I 
could have easily shot 74.” 

Baker-Finch, who has re- 


cently overhauled foe physical 
and mental aspects of his game, 
showed great determination to 
get four birdies and an eagle 
yesterday. 

*Tve been stagnant foe last 
year. 1 kept saying negative 
things to myselL" he said. “Bui 
I'm starring to see there’s no 
need lo knock you/self. There 
are a lot of other people who will 
help you do foal.” 

[Maying off the 10th tee first, 
he quietly birdied the 14fo and 
I6fo but came alight with a 
birdie-eagle- birdie spell from 
the third to the fifth holes. 

Turner, the younger brother 
of foe former New Zealand 
cricket captain, Glenn Turner, 
also had a flawless round with 
three birdies on foe front nine 
and three on the back. 

Both Turner and Langer 
warned that if foe wind and hot 
weather continued foe greens 
would become lightning fast. 
Langer said his long iron ap- 
proach shots were going through 
foe greens and it would be 
difficult for all the players if they 
continued to gather speed. 

LEADING SCORES Pint maut (Austra- 
lia unless stsUdE 6& G Turner (NZ). I 
Bokar-fuidi. 67: M Persson (S*e). R 
Davis. J Crow. 89: B Langer (WGl. P 
Senior, ft Shearer. S Sam. J Sew. 7ft D 
Talbot (Can). G Marati. G Norman. M 
Clayton: 71: P Teravamen (US). R Madcay. 
B Ogle, V Somers. 72: G Aiawmnw. K 
Tnrnbta, L Stephen I Stanley. P O'Malley, 
G Hohnen. J cattord. S Owen (NZ). G 
Serhan, W Grady, T Gale. M Coiandro 
(US). S Wort (Jap). 73e A Armjs. B Dunk. P 
Nobao INZ). P Harvey. B Officer, ft 
McNaughton. T McDonald, O Moore. S 
Ginn. K Dukes. R Picker. M Bembndga 
(GB).TPnee. 


Faldo and Love tied 
in windswept lead 


Hawaii (AP) — Nick Faldo, 
who has been British PGA 
champion three times, bad a 
wind-whipped four-unde r-par 
68 to share foe first-round lead 
in the Isuzn Kapalua inter- 
national golf tournament. 

Davis Love 111, a rookie, 
scored eagles on consecutive 
boles lo lie with Faldo, who 
never went over par in winds he 
estimated at “50 to 60 miles per 
hour". It was even tougher for 
tbe early starters. 

Both leaders played in the 
afternoon half of the field when 
conditions — while still difficult 
— were not so severe as tbe rain 
and gale-force winds which 
lashed tbe early starters. 

*Tve been here 1 1 years and I 
think these are the most diffi- 
cult, most severe conditions I’ve 
seen," said Mark Roifiog, tbe 
tournament chairman, who also 
is one of the 44 pros chasing a 
$150,000 (£105,600) first prize. 

He was among the early 
starters who played in winds 
that stripped names and num- 
bers from tbe leader boards, 
knocked down a sponsor's hos- 
pitality tent and ripped branches 
from trees on foe Kapalua Bay 
course. 

“It blew pretty hard all day," 
insisted Love, who used his vast 
length to maximum advantage. 

After starring his day’s play 
from foe 10th tee. Love needed 
only a seven iron second shot to 
reach the green on the 557-yard 
18th, and dropped a 25-foot 
eagle putt 

Turning to the par-five firsts 
he holed a 40-50 foot eagle putt 
after a three-wood second shot 
He also took two putts for a 
birdie four on foe sixth and 


drove the green on the Jeo-yara 
par-four 13th. again taking two 
puns for a birdie. 

Paul Azingrr and Dan Pohl, a 
two-time winner this season, 
shared third at 70, two back of 
foe joint leaders. 

Sandy Lyle, of Britain, who 
won here two years ago, had a 76 
while foe defending champion. 
Mark O'Meara, of foe United 
States, bad a 77. 

The only others to break par 
were Bobby Wadkins and Tom 
Purtzer at 71. Of those leaders, 
only Wadkins played in the 
more difficult morning con- 
ditions. which foe 12-year vet- 
eran called “maybe the strongest 
I’ve seen." 

Bob Tway, foe PGA cham- 
pion, rallied for a 74 after 
starting with three straight bo- 
geys. Ben Crenshaw and Lee 
Trevino each had a 76. Defend- 
ing champion Marie O'Meara 
had a 77 that, he said, “wasn’t 
that bad." All played in the 
severe morning winds. 

The conditions, along with 
the format that has foe pros 
playing with four-man amateur 
teams, produced six-hour 
rounds. Two players — David 
Ishii. of Hawaii, and Anders 
Forsbrand of Sweden — were 
stranded by darkness on the 
course. 

Each had one hole to play. 
They marked their positions on 
the course and were scheduled 
to complete tbe round at day- 
light. Neither had a chance to 
move among the leaders. 

LEADING SCORES: FM round: (US 
unless sated) 68: Mck Faldo (GB), D 
Love. 70c P Azingar. D Pohl. 71: T> 


B WBdkins. 72: N Oart (GB). A Bean. J 
Mahaltey. J Sindeiar. 73: D Pooiey. M 
HullMR. S verptank. L SuzukL 


Brother leads brother 


Gotemba, Japan (Reuter) — 
Naomichi Ozalri, of Japan, tbe 
youngest of three brothers, shot 
a six-under-par 66 to lead by a 
stroke after the fust round of a 
S 500,000 (about £350,000) tour- 
nament at the Taibeiyo Club 
course yesterday. His eldest 
brother, Masashi, shared second 
place with two other Japanese, 
Yoshimi Niizdri and Yasuhiro 
Funatogawa. lan Woosnam. of 


Wales, was foe best-placed for- 
eign competitor, finishing two 
strokes behind tbe leader. 

FIRST ROUND; Laadfeu acorn (Japa- 
nese unless stated): H, N OzaKfc 67, M 
OzaJd. Y Nfizsk), Y Furotooawa; 88, K 
Yoslumn, l Woosnam (Wales). Other 
leading toraMi worn: 69, Chen ' Tia- 
Chung (Tal). D Graham (Auak 70, O 

n«sssrsv»& 

KM L Nelson (US). 73, Chen TzMting 
pal), T Kta (US), J Thorpe (US), K Green 





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SPORT 


Lack of a race 
may prove 
no obstacle to 
Gaye Brief 


THE1TMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 _ ■- . — 

RACING: FORMER CHAMPION HURDLER CAN MAKE WINNING REAPPEARANCE FOR SIXTH SUCCESSIVE SEASON 


By Mandarin 


Gaye Brief, who runs his 
best races when fresh, can 
extend a remarkable record by 
winning the A. T. Cross Ascot 
Hurdle at the Berkshire course 
this afternoon. 

Mercy RimeiTs stable star 
has won his opening race for 


the last five seasons, including 
this race, under the guise of 


this race, under the guise of 
the Fairweather City Hurdle, 
in 1984 and 198S. 

Further evidence that Gaye 
Brief is at his best after a long 
break came in last season's 
Champion Hurdle, where he 
beat everything except See 


when beating Ten Plus and 
Mis Muck at Newbury .nine 
days ago and should confirm 
the form with the third on 
only 2ib worse terms. 

Steer Gold, from the in- 
form stable of Toby Balding, 
completes the line-up bin she 
took five races before hitting 
winning form last season and 
that was over three mite on 
heavy going. Even if she is fit 
enough to do herself justice, I 
would expect Gaye Brief to 
have too much pace for her 
from the last Sight 

The Hurst Park Novices* 


You Then despite being off Chase looks the best race of its 



Broadheath heads 
for Hennessy 
after sound trial 


\0fk : 

her 


ftlfU 


. . -_ ht He still tended to hurdle 
Broadheath put up one of *c but Ben dc Haan. 

est Hennessy trials seen th» onece wn ^ ^ 




m the SflverBuck Steeplechase 
at Wincanton yesterday- 

David Barons’s griding, un- 
locky to be brought down jost as 
he was beginning to make 
progress, in . last Saturday’s 
Madceson Gold Cup, was at 
ways ofing wdl and jumped 
ahead five from home to come 
in four lengths ahead of last 
month's Newbury winner, I 
HaventahghL 

Broadheath was Sib out ofthe 

handicap here pud will meet 
everything on better terms i n the 
big Newbury race tomorrow 
week. Barons said: “The 


6vw Can* Phrase, 
who was receiving a swot. 

Mrs Pitman sard. He 5 .a 
lovely naturcd horse but his 
confidence has been shaken. I 
feh very sad for h un . 3D ^^ 1 ] 
worried about 

hist didn’t want bun to finish on 
the Boar again. He is now 
setting higheralbis fences but I 
want his confidence fully re- 
stored and he wifl not run m the 
Hennessy " . . 

At Towcester, the in-form 
Fyfidd trainer. Toby Balding, 
again proved the man to follow 

aii. i None Too 


week. Barons sard: ~iue ^8^ l VI,I , Z^wTlMnne Too 


the course since Christmas- 

He then demonstrated his 
versatility and Ids liking for 
Ascot by outclassing Crimson 
Embers, the winner of the 
Waterford Crystal Stayers’ 
Hurdle at Cheltenham, in the 
Keith Prowse Hurdle. 

Aonoch will be fighting fit 
after winning at Stratford and 
Huntingdon last month but he 
met Gaye Brief five times last 


type so far this season but I am 
confident that Long Engage- 
ment can atone for his coaly 
lapse at Cheltenham last 
Saturday. 

Backed from 6-4 to odds-on 
to complete a quick treble. 
Long Engagement was travel- 
ling like a winner when part- 
ing company with Richard 
Dun woody three out. The fact 
that David Nicholson’s five- 




V? 


Gaye Brief, never beaten on his first run of die season, pots that record on the Use in the A. T. Cross Hnntte at Ascot today 

Strictly on the form book, with a welcome change of The only trainer with a Dnnimr -filmc 

Kevinsfort is entitled to re- fortune. better record at Market Rases IVaLlllH HlIll J 

__ an. a a : - % A 


season and got the better of year-old reappears so soon 
him only once — in gluep ot Indicates that be was none the 


conditions at Kempton on 
Boxing Day. 

Sally Oliver’s seven-year- 
old gained a notable scalp 
when beating See You Then at 
Liverpool in April but that 
looked a clear case of the 
Champion Hurdler running 
out of stamina. Gaye Brief 
certainly has no shortcomings 
in that sphere. 

A bigger danger may be the 
progressive four-year-old, Ibn 
Majed. He made maximum 
use of his fitness from the Flat 


worse for that experience and 
he can resume winning ways 
here at the principal expense 
of Chipped MetaL 
Peter Easterby has an 
outstanding record at Ascot 
and 1 shall not look beyond 
Neutral Cross, his only runner 
on the card, in the Charles 
Davis Handicap Chase. De- 
spite looking backward, Nor- 
ton Cross won in a fast time at 
Wetherby on his seasonal 
debut, beating Kevinsfort by 
lVk lengths. 


Strictly on the form book, 
Kevinsfort is entitled to re- 
verse the placings on 4D> 
better terms but Norton Cross, 
a course and distance winner, 
may have come on more for 
the race and is marginally 
preferred to his fellow north- 
ern challenger. 

Protection, one of the best 
quality recruits from Flat 
racing in recent years, makes 
his eagerly-awaited debut is 
the Bingley Novices’ Hurdle. 
The winner of last year’s 
Britannia Stakes at Royal 
Ascot under 9st 71b when 
trained % Henry Cedi, 


with a welcome change of 
fortune. 

Monica Didrinson is with- 
out a runner at the day’s 
principal meeting but has 
bright prospects of landing a 
Market Basra treble with her 
only three runners at the 
Lincolnshire trade — Royal 
Greek (2.15), Hand Over 
(3.15) and Hopeful Mission 
(3.45). 


The only trainer with a 
better record at Market Rasen 
than Mrs Dickinson, in 
percentage trams, is Martin 
Pipe, whose sole repre- 
sentative today is Careen. He 
has the Hexham winner. 
Patrick’s Star, to beat in foe 
White Swan Selling Hurdle. 


on television 


1 am particularly sweet on 
foe chances of Royal Greek, 
who was apprentice-ridden 
when fourth to Robin 
GoodfeQow at Newbury last 
week and now has the assis- 


Protection is reported to have lance of Graham Bradley, who 
adapted well to his new role also rides the other Harewood 


and can provide Andy Turncfl 


Grinders, who provided 
Ted Carter with his first 
winner for 10 months at 
Newcastle last month, can 
follow up for the Malton 
trainer by defying top weight 
in the Limestone Edward 
Handicap Chase where foe 
pick of his five opponents may 
be foe veteran, Fortina’s 
Express. 


Bating aronad foe world is to 
be featured on television in a new 
series tfsewa 30-srinnte flam, 
entitled MUBom DoBar Storing. 
The first featuring the Mel- 
bomt Cup, win be shown by 
Channel 4 to U MKTOW and the 
others win be broadcast once ■ 
month during the chameFs 
coverage of big meetings. 

Big raring occasions in the 
United States, FInnce, India, 
Singapore and Switzerland have 
been incorporated in foe fist 
series. A second aeries goes ten 
production next year when rac- 
ing in Scanfinavia, New Zea- 
land and South America wffl be 

* - -i ■ _ j 

DuBucOL 


a. very good ftocse to stop himJ” 

1 Haveutaligbt is also in foe 
Hennessy bat would have to 
find 41b and four lengths to 
trouble Broadheath, while Char- 
ter Party, oply fourth here, 
would have to find Sib and 16 
lengths. David Nicholson, how- 
ever, intends to run Gunter 
Party, pointing oat that foe 
ejghx-yearekl was . staying on 
wefl and is never at his best first 
timeout 

Nicholson sent out another 
exciting prospect when Annie 
Ra, a thirtieth success of tire 
season fir Richard Dmnroody, 
led with two to jump and beat a 
big field with a touch of styfc in 
tile Hopeful Novices’ Hurdle. 

Annie Ra was giving hex 
owner, Mrs Aim Bevan, hex first 
raring success The filly will be. 
ridden w futare by Mrs Sevan's 
18-year-old son, Richard, who is 
being tutored by Nicholson. 

Von . Trappe had . got round 
only once in his last six races 
when he weal out for the Badger 
Beer Handicap Chase but he had 
some very intensive schooling 
from Box de Haan — under 
Jenny Pitman's eagle eye — and 
be rewarded than by giving 
weight all round. 

. They have had tire ho rs e out 
almost every day in aO weathers 
and kept him out tmtiUregotit 


v vffi ffl Conditional Jockeys’ 

Novices' Hurdle. 

pairffrtg who has now had 
right winnos in the last fort- 
njjght — three an the Flax and 
five over jumps — was also on 
tire mark with Gtenside Jerry in 
the Grants of St James Whote- 
sale Novices* Chase. 

Guest, the seasons reading 
conditional rider with 10, win- 
ners, coolly made up ground on 
None Too Dear to join Toni 
Fo r res te r at the last flight. 
Gaining the lead almost im- 
mediately on la n di n g, the 1 1-8 
on favourite forged six lengths 
dear of his Epsom rival with 
Camden Belle, who made a lot 
of tire running, staying on fra 
third place, seven lengths fur- 
ther away. . , 

Gknside Jerry’s nearest rival 
in the novice chase was Ivor 
Anthony, trained by Balding’s 
brother, Jan. 

Eamon Morphy, last season’s 

leading conditional rider, 
comfortably won the Bentidns 
Bitter Handicap Chase on 
Golden Minstrel, who is likely 
to ran at Huntingdon 

tomorrow m tire Macer Gifford 
Handicap Chase, ran in mem- 
ory of his trainer’s brother. Josh 
won tire race last year with 
Greenwood Lad. 


ASCOT 


140 A.T.CROSS ASCOT HURDLE (Grade lh£1 3, 43£ 2m <f) (5 rumort) Fjyp. ^ V CDtTY SYStClP Wt 8 gfl- flliefld 

in, mu, irmnni im ni r*- j it. r rum- tut JDom AM (U I V • • * ® 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Protection. 
1.35 Glen Miel. 
2.10 Norton Cross. 


2.40 GAYE BRIEF (nap). 
3. 1 0 Long Engagement. 

3.40 Kildimo. 


401 3015-11 AONOCH <D) (H G*«f) l*s S OBrar MM . J 

402 3F213F- GAYE BMEF(CO)(Shsfl(hAaAtXi Khamsin) Mre M RfeneSfMI^F— 8 N 

406 F1 110-1 BN MAJTO (CO) (P OTXmnal) C Spvas 4-10-11 JMc 

409 441FS0- SHEER BOLD (CO) (Lady Haifa) G BaUng 6-10*11 SS 

410 PltOI-3 HRSMUrafCreiNTwrfstarDavw^NTTristanDnriwS-lIVO PSe 

1985: GAYE BREF 8-10-11 R Lirtey (13-8 bv} Ms M FBmal 8 nm 


CAQM GATE £»»= {12-2? looked tar 
rUrtlfl AONOCH M 2-21 H Ml 111 ran 


By Midiael Seely 

2.10 KEVINSFORT (nap)- 2.40 Ibn Majed. 3.40 Kfldimo. 


rwrun AONOCH {1242)61 ml 11lrapac*reiy.wfihSHffilOOUJtt1-1t)«toWaMaWI 
here (3m. £9318. good. Ajy a. 11 raft. fVNritxaiy AONOCH (11-8) ran the race of hte Be to ba« 
Hunter SEE YOU THEN (11-1 1) a lengti at Liverpool, w*i SHEB1 QOinhl-1) 161 bedtin 3rd (&n 
good to aoft. Aar 5. 9 rani TMa stated prow We optimum rtp. BN ■AJED{1v2) shewed sigh! hr 
mtJMlTw Plus {114)1101 with MRS MUCK (10-13) a oodkaWe 10X1 3rd on good B Arm ground i 


Guide to onr in-line racecard 


pm 4t. £3257. Nov S, 9 ran). Beet noth some cut in the ground. 
SdeaMoee GAVE BRlff 


irB Hartals when heating Crimson Embers (122} and 
i. w&h SHffit OOU) pi-11} • total at 1SKI beck in SB, 
QNOCH (11-0) ran the race of hie Be B beet Oarapton 
, wtth CHER QOLDni-1) 10 bedtin 3rd pn 51. C137M. 
mum rip. BN MAJED{lt2) showed sight improvement 

laedtabtelQXI 3rd on good to flrro ground ntNeadxey 


0-0432 TWESKXaetcn^n (Mrs JRyterfB Hal 9-100 


BWMtW 


Racecanl number. Drew in brackets. S&~figure 
form (F-m. Paused up. U-unseated rider. B- 


brouqUJ down. S-stoped up. R-rebaed). Hone’s 
name (&Mr*ars_ IMrtsor. H-hood. E-EyeshWd. C- 
IXfisanc® wfemer. akom 


and distance winner. BE-beetan fareurta in letest 
racet Owner m brackets. Trainer. Age end 
weight Rider plus any n te wa nc e . the Times 
Pnvme Handkspper’s retag. App rox i mate arereng 
price. 


3.10 HURST PARK NOVICE CHASE (Grade lb £8,232: 2m) (8 runners) - 


Going: chase course- good; hurdles course- good to firm 

1J) BINGLEY NOVICE HURDLE (4-Y-O: £2£1& 2m) (7 runners) 


501 211211 BUTLBIS PET (0} (60s J T HaMott 7-11-0—.. 

502 00300-1 COCAME (DJ (C Hofeaee) C Hsbnee 6-11-8 

503 2032-11 JraNT SOVEfBDONTT (D) (A Budge) Jtomy Azgarakl B-11-8 

60* 29*12-1 CH0VB)mTAL(0) (Sir J BaHJwt R Fngtds 

505 13011-2 FOYLE FISHERMAN (OF) (Mrs K Hutchinson) J Jartdne 7-11-4 , 

506 300-2F WTT1NGB1(BF)(H Joel) A TumM 5-11-4 


-pneteid* 

HTbDwjm 
- sjcnm 

JWtBe 

.ammntm 


JU.TD CtraULUS [Mrs A Rart&ncn) N Gaaelee 11-0 — I 

0 CHICLCr(BF)(Dewlresh Mushrooms) JJenkks 11-0 

0 GOO'S HOPE o. Bush) RAkNuret 11-0 

OUffTEEN BOY (J Morgan) RHamon11-0 

0 MR PARKER (G Hu&tmd) J Gifford 1141 

020- PRHE OATS (Miss P Watwmgn) N Henderson 11-0 S 

PROTECTION {HJoeO A TUnoUIMt 

1905: DOMINATE 11-0 R DuwMOdy (5-1) P MKchaO 7 ran 


- PS ta tem — 6-1 
__ S Sherwood — 9-2 
_ ROmwody 7110-1 

H DbNm — 12-1 

R Rowe 75 8-1 

SaNAEcctae *9911-4 
Steve JGdofet — »4 


508 0RM1F LON3«GAaEMDfT(D^(GMord»irm)OMcriotexj5-t1-4 — H D u wio udi 

511 31104^ TBI OF SPADES (W WhRbreed) S Ma9or 5-11-4 BCMea Jones 

-IMS: OeSBITOncnD 9-11-4 C Brown (C9 taw) DBMarti 4 ren - 


Mire 
7S 7-1 

02 92 

» »r 

90 4-1 
Tiio-1 
• ft FW 

— 14-1 


The Jockey C2nb have given 
the go-ahead for tire new five- 
day entry scheme to be in- 
troduced m the whiter of 198S- 
89. The new system will allow 
trainers to rater for races only 
five days in advance instead of 
three weeks as at present. 

The delay in introduction is to 
allow systems to be set up and 
thoroughly tested. Trainers will 
make their entries through Brit- 
ish Telecom’s Ptestri service 
which will be finked to compar- 
ers operated by Weafoeibys, the 
Jockey Club’s se c retariat . 


The scheme was recom- 
mended by a writing party 
iiroW flip rfiainromship of the 
Jockey Chib steward, Louis 
Freedman, after more than four 
years of discussions. 


There have been critics of the 
plans, jpclnriing the Press, who 
fear an enormous increase in 
five-day entries over the present 
four-day declarations, and train- 
ers, who are concerned about 
the increased cost of entry. 


introductory period during 
which time trainers will make 
four-day declarations via Prestd 
underfire present entry system 
so fiat tire geographical network 
can he tested and trainers can 
gain experience of using the 
equipment 


There wiD be' a six-month 


The Jockey Club are still 
looking at tire possibility of a 
•system for overnight declaration 
of jockeys which has been 
strongly opposed by owners, 
trainers and jockeys. A report is 
expected in tire New Year. 


CAPM ama s pet ni-a tree wen 4 at t 

runm KTTTWGSltl 1-3)1 wet Kempton (&n 
CAINE (11-1) iflvroved an some modest efforts lest 
£3603, good to wn, Oct 22. 5 ran) on le e e o nN debut 
Hie Hand, beet I nn ocen t John (10-10) 21 a! Whttnrtw (2 
an that thte Afternoon. CMPFED METALfl 0-13) made 




Results from three meetings Queens way 

Wincanton S’Sh; BOV for 

<MwgoodB.lt GtfjardetFfSon. Tate: XIjN. DR £2.1 & 

chase final 


OOtete. 7 
tends Lad V 
Afford at Ffci 
C8RE3J33. 


ALSO RAW IB WDbd- 


4 ran. 10L 10L 25L J 
Tote: niKLDF: £2.10. 


CADM CMa^rwasbougMafttnsHatfrell ^OOgnsiwtnosiantvailitoEweLtenbflO-l) 
ri/nm tingdon an hudfog debut (2m. 8997, goad, <fe 25. 16 ran). GOD'S HOPE (10-10) neweri 
(he front rank when 241 7di of 22 SeMna Camden Beifa(lO-igal Windsor (2m, £l123.aood,No«&22r 
PARKS) (10-11) wea there lor much of the nip when 9#i B Skwrange (10-12) at Worcester (2m 2f, 
good. Oct 25. 23 ran). PRIME OATS wuB supported but behind S otar Oo ud in die THumpn hurtfla last ttne, 
Barter (1148 runner-up BTengagna (1 1-7) et Chattenham pnv E7683. good B soft. Jan 25. 1 1 ran). PRO- 
TECTKIN was Wgtvdass on the Bat 
SctectiOR PRHC OATS 


i (10-1) at Hun- 
never reached 


b soft. Nov 1, 10 ran) accamtfrn lor CameMto 00^ 
cfeaer. BketdersdatacoiBto offences when2Ja«J t 
Ikm, 5 ran). LONG OGMSlBirwas my rooeh in a 
en impraeshw 10 


_ * ' •‘1 !> *■ i )*. |7n i" iV. li 


1^5 PUNCH BOWL HANDICAP CHASE (Amateurs: £3,312: 3m) (3 runners) 

201 300FIT- JUST FOR THE CRACK «RDJ(S *V»B) KSafeyfrf 1-10 TTharaaon Jowte •9BF4-7 

202 321D2-F GLHJ MBL (P McKeevarJO Sherwood 8-10-1 A McXeamr (7) M 52 

203 2PF424 CB.TIC HAMLET (A Sttson) P CmM 7-100 SOowl lay (7) 96 3-1 

1985: INTEGRATION 11-11-0 C Brooks (3-1) E Ratter 4 ran 


3M LION GATE HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,038: 3m) (8 runners) 


CAPM JUST FORI 
runm B^Mbd 


11 ran). QLEH MSLsSppet 
n i- 4 ) he ran a good race at 
If. £ 1035 . soft. Now 28, 10 


r ( 10 - 0 ) 31 Huntingdon 
S e le c tion: JUST FOR THE 

2.10 CHARLES DAVIS HANDICAP CHASE (£6,719: 2m) (7 runners) 

306 101 OP -2 KEVMSFORT(D) (Mrs R Haggle) Jimmy Rttgorald 8 - 11-7 U Dwyer 9811-4 

307 43222-1 NORTON CROSS (CO) (Maj J LWetf M H EoswrtTy 8 - 11-6 ( 4 ex) LWyer 98 FM 

308 S1241-0 BRIGHT OASSIS (D)(U-Cal E PRA«a) K Satey 10-11-4 — Mr T Tbonaoo Jonoe 9S72 

309 41321-2 UXWIUN(D)(Snwh Mansfirfd Meat Co Ud) Mrs J Pltnan 7 - 112 . PScuctemora •» 0-1 

310 Q 30 P -03 TOtROEALBHACH (CD) (H Harpur-Oewe) P CTComor 12 - 10-13 H Davies 9012-1 

311 200-121 WELSH OAK (D) (G Amey) D GsxUto 6 -HM 1 : sSmhhEcctaa 90 6-1 

313 fVKH* DENNIS AUBURN (D) (Am Duchess of WeBtnttister) R Prands 9-105 SjOTteW 9610-1 

1985 : DESTWV BAY 7 - 1 D -13 S Srrftt Bxles (540 N Henderson 



10 - 7 ) beating 
Lfimj.MayS 
rur 2 m 2 f and 
National (an 
atSandown. 


601 003/011- BOTtVATDR (D) (T Ranqden) M Rywi S’ll-IO . 

603 128041 KUMMO (Lady Karris) GBBfng 6-11-7 ftaxj- 

604 11/0P0P- CELTC CRACKBt (D) (P Evans) R Hartop 8-11- 

605 22BQP-0 SHANGOSOT (J Green) J Jenkins 5-1 1-2 

606 POP1M V&ESO (T Forda) J King 3-1 1-1 

607 P203-11 CRISP (J Levy) C Head 5-10-7 


— R Crank 
_ J White 
SOkMaB 
.MPanett 


97FS4 
• 99' 9-4 


1985: RHY7TQBC RAST8MK 5-1J-8 S SmBh Ecdea (45 1«») J JanMns 4 ran 




Course specialists 




TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


Oct 16. 5 ran) last tm ouL DEMOS AUBURN (10-12) lacked the pace upte the naMn when 51 2nd B Hope End 
^C^at^Bmi^r^TL g|774 . good. Nov 7. 5 ran). 


MH Easterby 
SMefior 
MGaseiee 
N Hend e rson 
DMcndson 
Mrs M Rlmel 


iwra 

27 

Bar cent 

40.7 

SSraftbEodos 

Hten 

14 

fSetaa 

76 

23 

28.1 

PScudsnxra 

23 

137 

34 

17.6 

H Davies 

6 

55 

65 

13 a 

RRom 

7 

88 

83 

42 

135 

115 


Otey t&nfters 



Per Cant 
184 
16* 
10.S 
&0 


. . MARKET RASEN 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.15 Careen. 

1.45 Just Aiick. 

2.15 Royal Greek. 


2.45 Grinders. 

3.15 Hand Over. 

3.45 Hopeful Mission. 


245 LIMESTONE EDWARD HANDICAP CHASE (£2,880: 3m) (6 runners) 

5 U0P4O-1 ORIWBtS(OM N ee Wi e nu ButtfWfS) E Carter 8-11-7 M Pepper 

6 DfPVM- FORTMA’S EXPRESS CD) (P P#er) W A Stephenson 12-11-6 RllB 

9 38P0O-0 PHa. THE FLUTES (BF)(G Money} H Wharton 11-11-0 S Voted en(4> 

10 22-1334 BOOK OF KELLS (CO) (R Beeson) JBhmdte 11-10-11 DDteten 

12 221244 MEISVEK (CO) (Mr»JJoRteri)GMoora 11-10-1 M l la w m ond 

13 OflOO-m STWCTLY BACON (PMcOeeson} A Brown 7-IOO Cftte 

19tt: PLAfeTMAN 8-12« G Bradtoy (1-2 lav) Mrs M DkMnaon S ran 


The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: 3. 15 HAND O VER. 

Going: good 

1.15 WHITE SWAN SELLING HURDLE (£721: 2m) (12 runners) 

2 QP3W0- TRUE «P(0) (Mrs FDicJdrson)MDttnacnB-1 1-12. J Bartow 

4 1-PP042 CAREBi(pD#FHMP4»)M Pipe 6-1 1-10 P Leech 

6 OFO-Ott OQMANUS (V Thompson) V Thompson 5-11*3 MrMTbmpm(4) 

7 O-P POW7OTPS PROTEJN (Mrs S Poirtcsn) D SurcfteB 5- J J-3 SOmtea(7} 


3.15 ASTON ARMS NOVICE CHASE (£1^24: 2m 5Q (14 runners) 

2 DC2F3-1 HAMDOttRlhtoM Haggas) Mrs MOddnm 7-11-13 

6 OOF- CHORAL SURPRISE (MThomfaotDVThOtepson 6-1 K - 


10 

■n 

mo MR PANACHE (L Naylor) M C Chapman 4-10-12 

<M PATRICK'S STAR (B£)(J FitzgemS) JkTBiqF Fltzgaraid MO-12 - 

— $MBcta8(7) 
-i— J J Qww 

14 






19 

22 

0 DOffiCE (J Norton] J Norton 3-10-0 — 

0 OIW MUMSffi (WWftsan) N B|OWt3-1(H) 

— S Woods (7) 

— M Hammond 


a 210204 MO FOREVBi (A McChokey) MHEejteTOy6.il -6 

9 F FOREST GOLD (M Mackenzie) N Ownp 8-1 14 ________ 

12 214010- JACK OF CUBS (B McLean) B McLean 6-1 1-6 

13 U3«V JAYS UREY (K Krttiy) J Stand* B-11-* 

14 000f2-0B JUPnstPR8lCE(WA Stephenson; IVA Stephenson 7-11-6- 

15 p- KING OF THE HUMBSI (A Cariboo W8say 7-1 1-6 

16 38^6 OWEN DUFF (Use Mnmess)R Tata 7-11-6 

17 64/OOPS- S U DBROOKEPAIlK(CKaiBe)B Richmond S-ff6..,, 

18 0-43PF2 SWEET STREAM (M Thompson) V Thompson 7-1 1-8 I 

2D OOQ TWSU£S1WK(N South) Mss LSddal 6-1 1-6 — 

24 F4P12U/ SOUND OF LAUGHTER (Mrs B Burgas^ JBundte 8-11-1 

25 2000(00- SWOP SHOP (J Lane) H Wharton 7-11-1 


_ CHawMee 

. MrLKMby 
RLmab 


J Henan 

__5JCM0tear 
IThonpee" W 

P NNen (4) 

OOteton 

SYoeMae(4) 


188& (teOMMTAK HOUSE S-11-SM Meager (2-1 fafln Rtenr 11 ran 



Annabd King has plans 
firmly mapped out for her 
young stayer, Queensway Boy, 
who fought his way forougfi a 


downpour to take the Tom vV 
Curran Memorial Trophy ^ 


ba 

ou 


Handicap Chase at Uttoxeier 
yesterday. 

■ Having watribed the race from 
the running raft, tire Stratford- 
upon-Avon trainer was soaked 
to the skin, despite having 
b or ro w ed a hat and coat from 
her mother. However, she still 
managed. a. beaming smile as 
Queensway Boy returned in 
triumph. 

The gelding’s next stop is the 
BMW Chase Final at Newbury 
next week. “Then we will give 
him a long rest before preparing 
for the Midlands Grand Na- 
tional over this track next 


Richard Francis is predicting 
a bold showing from Chipped 
Metal in the £12,000 Hurst Park 
Novices Chase at Ascot today. 
After saddling the former Irish 
point-to-po inter. Yellow Stag, to 
win die Foundation Novices’ 
Chase, Francis said: “dipped 
Metal is in fine form and will 
nm very weU. He has a first rate 
chance of winning and I am 
really looking forward to tire 
race. ” 

Yellow Stag, bought by 
Richard’s father, Doug, in Ire- 
land, was virtually foot-perfect 
as be bowled along in front and 
was left with a dear led when 
Secret Veil came down three 
out. Secret Veil’s jockey, Reg 
Crank, was concussed in the foil 
and wifi be out of action until 
Monday. 

Fervent Hope, backed from 3- 
I to 9-4 favourite, tried to make 
all in the EBF Novices’ Hurdle 
Quaker but was a spent force 
two flights out and trailed in 
fourth behind Jenny Pitman's 
Smith's Gamble. Tire adding 
was a much needed winner for 


- — — »U4U\.l 1W1 

Mark Berrett trying to re- 
establish bis c a reer after break- 
ing, his teg on two occasions last 
season.; 

Jimmy Fitzgerald was con- 
cerned the soft ground would 
fonder Cotneragh King in the 
Redbank Chimney Pot Handi- 
cap tart the 6-4 favourite can- 
tered home by 12 lengths. 

A fine, strapping' horse, 
Comeragh King win now switch 
to chasing and tackles fences for 
me sra tone in public at 
Newbury next week. “He is a 
pant horse, standing 17J2 
hands, and the galloping course 
“*«1 ^ 

him, Rtegerald said. 


23 SUNTAN (M Hugh) P Ftegan 3-100 — 

19B& WIMMG STAB MM D Murphy (9-4) A Bafley 10 ran 

LA5 RED UON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (El .553: 2m) (3 runners) 

1 2210-02 JUST AUCX (CO) (S CWds) M H EastBrtiy 7-11-10 Rttertyp) 98 5-4 

3 222112 TUM8LE JM (CILBF) (T Cuvringham) TCinwighaR 7-10-10 RMariey (5) B99F4-Q 

6 FPUPO-O STQHELL GROVE (□) (R Lsstar) R P bococK 9-105 Kflyw —25-1 

1905: TARN 7-11*7 J Davies (&4) T TatB 5 ran 


345 EASTCATE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,423: 2m) (1$ ftatners) 

1 133- JfcSTO (D) (R M*son) Anmy Rtzgoraid 5-11-11 : 


2.15 GEORGE NOVICE HURDLE (£1,621: 2m) (20 runners) 


tfH BUCKLOW HILL (D) (N NuuaS) resgerald 9-11-7 

0- GRJUQS VENTURE fWrsERudgaj E Cnfar 4-1 1-0 

CHEEAflERpM Berry) W Wharton 4-114) 


10 048030- DAUAS SMITH (SEbmriMC Chapman 5-11-0 


PARK CTGNET (G Laggoft) 0 Lee 4-11-0, 

OORAY1HYM (Mra O McFartand) RwCaner 4-1 in 

0 ELMM(RCariMi1gM)TFNriiURt 7-1141 

42000- Oi EXCEPTIONAL (F H Late F H Lee 4-11-0 

20- fflISM COMiCCTKni (M Thcunrine! J L Harris 4-1 141 

MO-NESS (Rfcs F Raps) V Thompson 4-1141 

NO CflED&LfTY (M Stewart] B Acranond 4-11-0 

0 F1MCH DRUNK (1 Swoon) JJeMgisan 6-11-0 

0 RtencYSAV (R ScolO J BhmdNl 4-1141 

4 ROYAL SISK (J Renton) Mrs M Dtednyon 4-1 1-0 


27 P0OOQ-3 RUSTIC TRACK (N Buckte) Denys Smkh 6-11-0. 


JJOMmi 

MPtppf 

MBbub 

S88SMI fl) 

ifrHSrown (7) 

S Woods (7) 

CFoktwrat 

SHoAsnd 

J A Homs 

K Joan 

PCoolgn 
m hh 

- D Dutton 

OBcateey 

C Grate 

Mr M Thompson (4) 


2 431800 MTTlSteLP BAND fCJ (Mrs J DtesteflJSkmdte 9-11-11 

3 203120- l»tAUS TROVE (D)(B Cotetson) H CoOngrttge 5-11-6 

4 2/01204} HOPffUL MISSION (fl Hagptt) M DJcktescn 7-1 1-5 

5 022-024 EA8SLADfC0/{R Lindsay) K A Morgan 4-11-4 

7 230/00-1 BOT SANDTORD (CD) (R Roes) JMadda 7-11-1 

9 U01223- DOVER (CD)(J Woods*) HFMffltog 8-10-13 - 

12 201/3-14 CAWUSBOrite petted ftofegn Judos $-104 

13 mum WKE CRACKER (D)(Moidian 8 Can BfcfgjGRieftarts 5-10-7 

14 04000-1 MDYKH{Cte{JQUnesflMCOapnan 6-107 (7ax) 

15 F421DP- jSMYFICK(D)(HPScfcering)J Leigh 8-108 

18 030400 81LLID0R (CD£F) (S Lycett Grasn) N Cnanp 4-103 

19 OlflOiyP BAIMA’S RETREAT (IR(F Barlow) Ms S Austin 5-10-1. 

25 0-20324 DRAW 7TC UME (D) (Mre M Stevrart) 8 Kctaond 7-104 ^ 

26 4F100- HR STEADFAST (CO) (Stntent Scattokq J Leigh 4-1041 — _ 

27 000- SB.V81 CANNCM /G tierpU) B Worthousa 4-10-0 

1985: APPLE WDE 8-11-0 G Bradtay (18-1) D Chapman 14 


JJOteao 

D Dutton 

_ REMTtete 
_ Q Bradtay 

KRywitf} 

.MBotereW 

t»w 

PTuefc 

SIOkMBtn 
_ 8 J u te i o n 
_ CHnktea 


PCnrigiR 88 — 


04- SWaADES(VThoopson)V Tho mpso n 5-114) Mr M Thenp* 

000- C3M fflRL (R Wocxlhouoa) R WtoexTouse 5-1M 

00- CROOIAN STAR (F C Lwsl F C Loss 5-104 

nffiNOL7a£E/fiMetc«e}jeowr4-itM — SJte 

P- LADY SONGS (S Bim>) M C Chapman 4-109 : 

1385: DANISH FLIGHT 6-11-7 M Dwyer (54 tan Jimmy Fitzgerald 19 ran 


• 99F7-4 
90 4-t 
79 — 
87 12-1 
77 — 


Course specialists 

TRAINERS JO 


M Pqi 

MrsM Odanson 
G Richards 
MHEasteby 
GMoore 
*«ny FtegwaM 


Par Cent 


JOCKEYS 

iwmera 

RMu 

Percent 

6&7 

G Bradley 

9 

2S 

S«.0 

533 

REamatww 

8 

25 

32C 

29R 

DCuaon 

27. 

160 

• 16J> 

26LS 

C Grant 

13 

83 

1ST 

288 

S Johnson 

18 

14t 

12.8 

233 

M Brennan 

20 

212 

. BA 



• The condition oljoekey Jayne 
Thompson remained "critical” 

al Middfesbrough General Hos- 
pital yesterday evening. Miss! 
Thompson has been in a deep 
coma since foiling from Hot 
Betty at Catterick Bridge ax' 
days ago. 


V : CsT 




corresporwent 
^Chettenhamjal 
and in & r{ 

Auslrafefor 
the Melbourne Cup 


an (3m 180yd) 1.60U 


1, GOLDEN MHSTRBL 
f8v); 2, Bmdte Boy fH 
3, Donagbte^nw (R 


HO] 




•Bofobridge 
ratefsafe 
Nnwrtrer National 
Hum Sale. 

• Amsterdam World 
pku meeting, 
accidents in foe 




A •’ .• " * 










% 
\\ 




THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


SPORT 


37 


CRH 


Yorkshire rumblings 

herald a gloomy 
future for Bairstow 


Alter the storms over Taun- 

“JL., cricket’s 

turbulence returns to its usual 
home today, with at least 
minor squalls expected at 
Headingley, where the York- 
shire Committee meet to de- 
cide on next season's captain. 

They will also discuss their 
response to the Palmer Re- 
port, but the captaincy is likely 
to command the greater atten- 
tion* In the garrulous tra- 
ditions of Yorkshire cricket, it 
has been the game’s worst- 
kept secret in recent weeks 
that David Bairstow, the cur- 
rent incumbent, is likely to be 
replaced alter three troubled 
seasons on the recommenda- 
tion of the cricket co mmi ttee 
His vice-captain. Phil Carrick, 
is the odds-on favourite to 
replace him in the absence of 
any outstanding candidate 
Boycott no longer b eing a 
member of the staff 

Bairstow still has his follow- 
ing among the ramp of the old 
pro-Boycott grouping, but he 
has lost the confidence of 
Brian Close, the chairman of 


By Peter Ball 

the cricket committee, and for 
aB his own indonrifablc qual- 
ities. his leadership proved 
neither inspiring for the youn- 
ger players nor tactically 
acute. His perceptible loss of 
form last summer, with inju- 
ries and the pressure of cap- 
taincy taking a visible tell, has 
made his removal almost a 
foregone conclusion. 

Carrick, aged 34, is the most 
likely replacement. He is rec- 
ognized as one of the 
shrewdest thinkers on the 
game among the senior mem- 
bers of the Yorkshire dressing 
room and on his tew opportu- 
nities c a pt ai ning the side in 
BairetoVs absence, there were 
signs that imagination and 
thought was being brought to 
the task even if it was not 
always successful. 

Although the genial Jim 
Love has been floated as a 
possible outsider, the only 
other serious contender is Neil 
Hanley. He was given the job 
briefly as an inexperienced 
player by Illingworth, but 


found the politics inside and 
outside the dressing room too 
much for him. 

At the age of 30, Hartley is 
older and wiser now, and both 
by example and strength of 
character, he would probably 
prove a more dynamic leader 
than Carrick, while be is no 
fool tactically. The days of 
Ronnie Burnet are over now, 
however, and Hartley’s inabil- 
ity to establish his place 
beyond doubt in a side well- 
stocked with batsmen has told 
against him. 

Lack of form would appear 
to argue also against the 
aifencular Carrick, who took 
only 36 first-class wickets at 
just over 43 runs apiece last 
season, but there is no slow 
left-arm spinner pressing a 
conclusive case for inclusion 
at the moment, and he is 
known to have Oose’s sup- 
port That should swing the 
day, with the possibility of 
Martyn Moxon taking over 
the vice-captaincy with an eye 
to the future: 


TCCB meet over Wesseis in 
county structure A «steiian 

J rebel team 


By Ito Tennant 




fc v- 




0 ;;w 


If. '.I 
. » \ 
r “LL *M 


The Test and County Cricket 
Board are to hold a rare consul- 
. la live meeting on Tuesday to 
. consider recommendations to 
change the structure of county 
. cricket. Any decisions, which 
may include implementing four- 
day championship matches and 
doing away with one of the two 
knock-out competitions, will be 
deferred until the TCCB's win- 
ter meeting on December 11. 

The meeting on Tuesday, 
chaired by Raman Subba Row, 
will concentrate on the Palmer 
Report, published earlier this 
year, and in particular its recom- 
mendation that four-day 
. matches be introduced in the 
county championship. The need 
for an improvement in coaching 
at school and junior levels will 
also be discussed. 

The Palmer committee, 

' chaired by C H Palmer, for- 
merly president of MCC and 
chairman of the TOCS, was set 
up by the TCCB to look into the 
standards of En glish cricket 
after the West Indies trouncing 
of England in 1984. Among its 
suggestions was that each 
county play 16 three-day 
matches and eight over four 
days. A decision will be taken on 
December 1 1, as to whether this 
will be the formal for the 1988 
county championship. At 
present each county plays 24 
three day matches. 


“We see the championship as 
the main competition for the 
development of cricketers,” said 
Alan Smith, the chief executive 
designate of the TCCB, who was 
a member of die Palmer 
committee. “We wfll also be 
talking on Tuesday about run- 
ning the Sunday League on the 
same lines as present and 
abbreviating or possibly doing 
away with one of the two knock- 
out competitions." 

As a result of a paper drawn 
up during the summer by the 
Cricket Council, whose mem- 
bers include representatives of 
the TCCB, MCC, the National 
Cricket Association and Minor 
Counties Cricket Association, 
proposals win be mooted for 
improving the standard of 
youpg cricketers. 


that 


the paper says 
TCCB, who ran the , 
game, and the NCA who or- 
ganize the recreational game, 
should be working together 
more closely, ” Smith said. "We 
trill be looking al Palmer's 
proposals to set up a special 
panel of coaches. 

"lhe structure of cricket has 
been a major -topic for 80 years - 
and the purpose of having a 
consultative meeting before tak- ■ 
ing decisions is to try and be as 
thorough as possible." 


MCC back school 
for young stars 


By Marcos Wffltems 


On the eve of an Ashes 
series in Austinite, in which 
; England’s strength in inter- 
national cricket is likely to 
: receive another stem examina- 

■ turn, it was good news that a 
scheme to develop future Eng- 
lish Test players was bunched 
at Lord’s yesterday. 

A School of Merit, or- 
ganized by the MCC and 
sponsored by Thorn li g h ti ng , 

■ who have made an initial 
commitment to the scheme of 
four years, wfll provide : regular 
coaching during the winter for 
30 youngsters of outsta ndin g 

■ potential, aged from 12 to 18. 
It is loped that they will 
graduate to county and al- 
thnately national level. 

Tuition, in the indoor school 
at Lord's, will be under the 
watchful eye of Den Wflson, 


MCCs head coach, who will 
instil into the boys the need for 
a high standard of discipline to 
be allied to the development of 
their playing ability. 

Boys have been chosen from 
all over the country — the 
sponsors wfll assist with lhe 
cost of travel and coaching — 
and former Ragland captains, 
snch as Mike Breariey and 
Bob WiUis, and the Test 
umpire, Dickie Bod, 

are to be invited as instructors. 

As part of their support, 
Thorn have installed new 
lighting in the indoor school 
No one at yesterday's launch 
would serioasly entertain the 
thought that floodlight pylons 
might some day be installed 
around the main Lord’s 
ground, as they have been at 
Melbourne and Sydney. 


Sri Lanka opt for youth 

_ . L -m I Allftn 


Colombo (Reiner) — Sri 
-Lanka have named a youthful 
squad of 14 with ideal qualities 
. for limited overs cricket to 
compete in the four-nation tour- 
nament starting in Shaijah, 
-United Arab Emirates, on. 
November 26. 

The Test captain, Duleep 
Merntis, leads the party, with the 
aJf-rounder, Aijuna Ranatunga, 
as his deputy, and it includes 
wicketkeepers, Guy de Alwis, 
and Bnsndon Kurappu, who is 
also an aggressive opener. 
Graeme Labrooy.a promising 
young fast bowler, joins sea- 
soned campaigners, Asantha de 
Mel, Rumesh Ramayake. and 
. Ravi Rama y eke, in four- 


pace attack. Three of 
iri Lanka's most experienced 
batsmen have been omitted. 
Opener, Sidath Wettimuny, 
vice-captain, Roy Dias, and 
Ranjan MadugaHe. 

Wettimuny has not come to 
terms with the one-day game, 
while both Dias and Madugalle 
are not folly fit. But the trio are 
expected to tour India for next 
month’s three-Test series. Paki- 
stan. India and West Indies 
complete the Sharjah quartet. 

cm LANKA: 0 Msndto (captain). A 
routuiga. R Mahanarotu BJtunypu. A 
00 SOW. A GunJ*^9<«. H fi 

,4a uni r Ratnawke. D Amman. G 
SbSS. R r£Sw*Tg da AWs. A de 
saw. 


Johannesburg (Reuter) — 
Kepler Wesseis, is to join the 
rebel Australian cricket team for 
then- second tour of Sooth 
Africa. 

Dr Ali Bacher, the South 
African cricket chief; told a press 
conference yesterday that the 
South African-born former 
Australian Test opening bats- 
man would be available to the 
tourists from the beginning of 
next month. 

He said the Australian Cricket 
Board (ACB) had agreed to 
release Wesseis from his con- 
tract with tbem.“We are very 
appreciative of the cooperation 
of the ACB," said Dr Bacher. 

The announcement ended 
weeks of speculation about 
whether Wesseis, who emi- 
grated to Australia some years 
ago. would be included in the 
tour and which ride he would 
represent 

He re l umed to South Africa 
earlier this year after announc- 
ing his retirement from Test 
cricket and was appointed cap- 
tain of Eastern Province. 

The presence of Wesseis will 
strengthen the tourists’ batting 
line-up — their weak point 
dating the first tour during 
which they lost both the limited 
oven and four-day soles to the 
Springboks. 

"I am delighted to get a man 
of Kepler’s stature bode into the 
system,” Dr Bacher said. 

Some of the tourists are 
known to have opposed the 
inclusion of Wesseis because of 
his refusal to join tire first tour. 
Flayers who undertook that tour 
were banned by the ACB for 
three years from international 
and interstate cricket. 

The houses of two Gape Town 
cricket officials were attacked 
this week and “Ausries go 
home” slogans daubed an walls 
by a mysterious group opposed 
to the tour. Oil was also poured 
on the Newbmds cricket pilch in 
Cape Town. 

The Australians, most of 
whom have not played compet- 
itive^ since the first tour ended 
in February, should not be 
stretched in their opening fix- 
ture. a one-day match against 
Southern Cape in Oudtshoora 
today. 

Bricks and stones were hurled 
on Wednesday night ax the 
luxury seaside hotel where the 
tourists are staying in Cape 
Town, police said. 

A group calling itself The 
Commando has claimed 
responsibility for earlier attacks 
in protest ax the tour. But a 
South African police spokesman 
said no “person or 
organisation" had so far claimed 
responsibility for the incident 
on Wednesday night 

The Australian team man- 
ager, Brace Francis, said: "It 
happened on my ride of the 
building ... I thought h was 
just a bloke falling off a ladder or 
something ami didn’t even 
bother to open the curtains." 

The tourists have been con- 
demned for breaking the inter- 
national sporting - boycott of 
South Africa, imposed because 
of the Republic's apartheid 
policies. 


Charity mn 

- The Football League is to next year. 
mark its lOOih anniversary next directors 
season with a nationwide char- supporter* f * ^ nrses 
ity fan run on September 20 92 club grounds 

LATEST AVERAGES FROM AUSTRALIA 


Help for skiers 

Richard Tracey, the Sports 
Minister, win officially open the 
new £65Qj000 alpine ski c e n t re 
in Capstone Farm country park, 
Chatham, Kent at noon on 
Friday, November 21. The 
200m x 30m artificial ski slope 
is one of the largest in the south 
of England and will be able to 
accommodate np to 1,600 skiers 
per hour. 




England four 

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TENNIS 



French flam Noah displays his athletic ability and grace in stretching wide for a backhand 

Find the heart of London 
for therein lies the soul 


In the dimly-lit corridor that 
leads from the dressing rooms to 
the somewhat primitive show- 
ers at the Wembley Arena, he 
looked like some African chief- 
tain, draped in brown and gold 
towels, his spiky hair topping off 
a dramatic silhouette. "Can you 
believe it? I won a match in 
London!" Yannick Noah ex- 
claimed upon spying a friend in 
the semi-darkness. 

The Frenchman's delight was 
understandable. Ever since he 
emerged from the Cameroons to 
give France the superstar that 
tennis-crazy nation had craved, 
Noah has hurled his superb 
physique around the courts of 
the worid with increasing levels 
of success and acclaim every- 
where — except in England. 

For more reasons than one 
could dream of he has only 
played at Wimbledon three 
times in seven yeara and has 
only made it to the Benson and 
Hedges championships twice 
before this year. 

Injuries alone do not quite tell 
the story, tike the man himself^ 
the reasons are more complex. 
First, there was an inherent 
mistrust of Wimbledon’s grass. 
Then there was the city itself 

“I have to fed well m a place 
before 1 can ptay my best tennis 
and, until now, I have never felt 
at ease in London. I know it is a 
great place but I still haven’t 
found its heart" 

The observation is revealing. 
Life for Noah is an emotional 
odyssey based on an implicit 
understanding that tears often 
mingle with laughter and that 
you are do less of a man for 
shedding them. There were tears 
when he bugged his father on the 
centre court at Slade Roland 
Garros in 1983, having just 
become the first Frenchman in 
37 years to win the French 
Open. And tears of a diffe rent 
kind soon after when he found 
that fame placed an intolerable 


restriction on his free spirit and 
forced him to move into die 
anonymous limbo ofNew York. 

Although marriage and 
fatherhood has matured him. 
three years ago he was still not 
so far removed from the wide- 
eyed little boy of eleven we had 
found one night at a tennis club 
in Yaounde when Arthur Ashe 
and Charlie Pasarell passed 
through on an exhibition tour in 
1971. 

The lights on the court were 
yellow and large, furry, insects 
had to be flicked off the baseline 
before be could serve. But when 
Ashe handed him his racket, the 
skinny little child served up a 
huge ace and. after a few more 
shots we had not expected to 
ffiul in the middle of Africa. 
Ashe was telling Yannick’s fa- 
ther to send him to France. 

“I had beard Arthur's name 
but I didn’t know who he was” 

Finest athlete 
to play tennis 

he recalled. “1 couldn't speak 
English and I didn't really 
understand what was happen- 
ing. But when he spoke to my 
father and told him be thought I 
was good, I felt so proud. It gave 
me great inspiration." 

Within a decade, that sprig of 
talent had blossomed into a 
sporting entertainer of colossal 
proportions. "As far as pure 
athletic ability is concerned, 
Yannick is in a league of his 
own" said the Texan doubles 
expert, Sherwood Stewart, who 
has been on the circuit longer 
than most "He is probably the 
finest athlete ever to play the 
game". 

Ironically, considering he 
plays Noah at Wembley tonight, 
Johan Kriek, the newly natural- 
ized American from South Af- 
rica, was mentioned by Stewart 


as the black player’s nearest 
challenger. Proving that height 
is not everything in tennis, 
Noah has yet to beat 
diminutive Kriek. 

Last spring, Noah rained his 
plans for a serious assault on 
Wimbledon by dropping a suit- 
case on h is ankle and then 
compounding the injury by 
bunting the laser-treated skin 
with chemical ice. That put him 
out for most of the summer and 
the injury is still restrictive. 

Noah has always imagined be 
would rive up tennis around the 
age of 27 — a milestone he will 
reach next May — to pursue 
other interests m the world of 
entertainment. "But I still feel I 
have so much to do in tennis. 
These injuries have held me 
back but, all the while, I fed I 
am getting better as a tennis 
player miner than just as an 
athlete. Bat it lakes time and 
people tend to be so impatient 
with me. They see me having 
fun but don't realize what I have 
given up to get this for". 

One thing Noah is giving up 
at the moment is the company 
of his Swedish wife, Cecilia, and 
their two baby children, Jo- 
achim and Yelena. "I know the 
whispering has started about my 
marriage but the fact is that 
Cecilia stopped travelling with 
me after the US Open because it 
just got too difficult" said Nodi. 
"One child was bad enough but 
two was ridiculous. And, any- 
way, tramping around after me 
is no life fora strong, inteDigeni, 
woman. She is going to art 
school in New York now and is 
really enjoying it". 

Meanwhile Noah, a fierce and 
spectacular competitor but a 
very sensitive, even gentle, man, 
will continue to adorn the game 
with a special kind of grace — 
and one that might even be seen 
u> full effect at Wimbledon next 
year. # 

Richard Evans 


SNOOKER 


Hendry aims for early 
upset against Higgins 


By Sydney Friskin 


Stephen Hendry, aged 17, in 
only his second season as a 


beans his chaJ- 
ie Te 


ienge for toe Tennents UK 
championship tomorrow with a 
first round match against Alex 
Higgins al the Guild Hall, 
Preston. The tournament starts 
today with a heavy programme . 
of six morning matches and 
another six in the afternoon. 

Hendry, already bailed as a 
future world champion, made a 
fine impression at Sheffield last 
season when his first attempt at 
the world title ended in a 10-8 
defeat by Willie Thorne in the 
first round. More recently. 
Hendry’s talent delighted spec- 
tators at Reading where he lost 
5-4 to Jimmy White, the ul- 
timate winner, in the quarter- 
finals of the Rothmans Grand 
Prix tournament. 

Higgins, the 1983 UK cham- 
pion when the event was spon- 
sored by CoraL has not been at 
his best recently, but be has an 
impressive record at the Guild 
Hall, haring failed only once to 
go beyond the quarter-finals 
since the championship was 
started in 1977. Steve Davis, 
who won the UK title last year 
after heatin g Thorne 16-14 m 
the final, begins his defence 


today with a morning match 
against Tony ChappeL Davis, 
particularly after his return to 
form at Toronto where he 
recently won the Canadian Mas- 
ters tide, is the favourite. He 
could meet Thorne in the quar- 
ter-finals at Preston and Dennis 
Taylor in the semi-finals. 

Five first-season pro- 
fessionals, David Roe, Brian 
RowsweU, Jon Wrigbt, Paul 
Gibson and the local favourite, 
Ken Owers, have qualified for 
the first round in which a total 
of 64 players are in contention. 
Wright meets Johnson, whereas 

Roe and Gibson play the former 
world champions Dennis Taylor 
and Griffiths respectively. 

The tournament wiD continue 
until November 19, then take a 
short break, and resume on 
November 22. It finishes on 
November 30. All matches will 
be played on the basis of the 
best-of-17 frames except the 
final, which will be over 31. The 
winner will receive £60.000. 

TODAY'S MATCHES: S Davis » T 
Chapped E Oertton V V Harris; S 
Ftanca c o v K Owers; D Reynolds v B 
MMceisan; R WVarns v T Drago: J Virgo v 


G MHes lioogj. W Thom V TMwphy: M 
McLeod v H Grace: O, Martin v I 
WMamson: T Moo v J CBoye; M Hstiatt v 
W Kng; R Reardon v M Gfcson (2-45)- 


Lights go out for stars 


Eleven of the worlds top 16 
players will be missing when 
television viewers switch on to 
the fifth round of the Mercantile 
Credit Classic at Blackpool in 
January. 

By then a field of 1 15 would 



_ um m figure 

top31 Danny Fowler, a former 
dustman, and coalface worker, 
the Scottish teenager, Stephen 
Hendry, Wayne Jones, and 
Steve Duggan of Yorkshire are 
the quartet 

~ - tradition the Mercantile 
Classic has thrown np 
some shock restihs and over lhe 
past two days at Blackpool's 
Norbeck Castle Hotel, the pat- 
tern has not changed. 

Cliff Thorbura and Rex Wil- 
liams were the last two major 


casualties. Dean Reynolds, of 
Grimsby, brought off his best 
result since turning professional 
in a match which lasted nearly 
four hours. Then veteran, Eddie 
Chariton, not to be outdone by 
the heroics of Rex Williams at 
the Rothman’s Grand Prix, 
defeated the WPBSA chairman 
5-4 in another match which 
lasted five hours. In contrast, 
holder, Jimmy White, was home 
and dried in 54 minutes and 
Hendry, needed just 85 minutes 
to beat Jon Wright 5-1. 

High speed action from the 
Englishman and the Soot but 
after such a long gruelling 
evening few could have forecast 
the shocks that bad bit the game. 

FTTH ROUND DRAW; J WN» v S 


;BWestvDfloyhaWs:S£>a*js 

vT Mao: EOwtton v J Panotfc 0 FowW v 
S Hanky. S FfanciEca v P Frano&ca 


ATHLETICS 

Sponsors lift 
for British 
junior team 

Britain’s unparalleled 
achievement of winning 18 
medals at the 1985 European 

C ior championships in Cort- 
has led to approval being 
given for the British board to 
stage these championships at 
Birmingham's Alexander Sta- 
dium next year. 

Dairy Crest have already 
pledged £60,000 towards the 
cosl The company will also 
spend another £15,000 on an 
awards scheme aimed at giving 
further encouragement 19 ju- 
niors to improve at inter- 
national IcveL 

Since Britain first entered the 
European junior championships 
in 1970, five who won titles - 
Steve Ovett, Daley Thompson, 
Steve Cram, Todd Bennett and 
Fatima Whitbread — have gone 
on to break world records or set 
world best figures. The 
outstanding development of 
Britain's young athletes enabled 
them to bring home eight med- 
als from this year’s inaugural 
junior world championships in 
Athens and Roger Black, winner 
of the 400 metres at last year’s 
European junior champion- 
ships. followed up with a British 
record breaking gold medal 
success in the European senior 
championships in Stuggart this 
year. 


Clarke’s opener 

Dave Clarke (Hercules 
Wimbledon), the former English 
champion. has his first cross 
country race of the winter when 
he competes in a 10k event in 
Grenoble, France, on Sunday. 
Also running is Gateshead’s 
Kevin Forster, who competed 
for England in the Common- 
wealth Games marathon in 
Edinburgh- 


YACHTING 


White Crusader 
slips to fifth as 
gremlins strike 



From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 

Gremlins were boatlengths under the stern of 
America II. 

The lead did not last. Stars 
and Stripes was sailing faster 


BA back aboard 
White Crusader 
r . . in her race 
against French 
Kiss. The British 
iffiim bad a nian 
overboard and blew out two 
spinnakers and a genoa before 
losing by more than four min- 
utes to the French. 

It knocks Harold Cndmore 
and the crew back from third 
place to joint fifth in the points 
table for the Louis Vuioon Cup. 
The second round robin in the 
elimination series to find the 
challenger for the America's 
Cup is now over. New Zealand 
leads with America 13 second. 

In the hour’s delay before the 
start the wind gusted up 10 27 
knots and French Kiss bent her 
boom. It folded in the middle 
like a boomerang. Marc Plot's 
team were able to fit the spare 
carried on the tender in under 
IS minutes. 

Up the first beat French Kiss 
seemed to have more boat 
meed, gaming steadily on White 
Crusader through foe lumpy 
seas. "A couple of things went 
wrong for us but basically they 
had the speed." said Chris Law, 
White Crusader’s helmsman. 
Among the things that went 
wrong was Mowing out a genoa 
on the first beat, a contributory 
factor in rounding the top mark 
45 seconds adrift. 

As the yacht came around, 
Mel COleman. the mastman, 
was swept off the deck and then 
hauled out by Law. "I saw it 
happen, jumped over the com- 
puter box and then the port 
trimmer and was able to grab 
him," said Law. "Unfortunately 
the boat luffed up when I let go 
of the wheel and the spinnaker 
burst." 


through the lumpy square seas. 
Three-quarters of the way up the 
first work Conner was able 10 
come back and cross 20 seconds 
ahead of Kolius. At the bouy he 
was 48 seconds in front. 

Thereafter Stars and Stripes 
never looked under pressure. 
Conner seemed to be revelling 
in the heavy, wet conditions. 
Exactly what be says the petrol- 
blue boat is designed for. His 
two minute margin at the finish 
of a shortened six-leg race 
demonstrated that Conner in- 
tends to remain a big force in 
this regatta. 

lain Murray piled pressure on 
the Alan Bond camp and took 
the Kookaburras to first and 
second slots in the defender 
elimination series. Murray 
switched boats, with his tac- 
tician and navigator, and sailed 
Kookaburra 17 in ber vital 
match against Australia IV. On 
Wednesday Murray beat Colin 
Beashel while sailing his normal 
boat. Kookaburra ill. 

Colin Beashel bad nothing to 
cheer about aboard Australia IV 
after winning the start. The four 
second margin at the gun was 
not enough to help him on the 
first leg. At the top mark the 
golden-hulled Kookaburra was 
17 seconds ahead. 

The 20 knot breeze was strong 
and steady, with the grey drizzle 
dispelling to be replaced by fitful 
sunshine. Uphill again Kooka- 
burra Q really soared away from 
her opponent. 

At the third and final leeward 


mark some spirited sailing and 
clever downwind tactics by 
Beashel had reduced the margin 
to 50 seconds. 

Such antics enabled the It was good, but not enough. 
French to almost double their The tacking duel up the final 
lead Al the bottom mark Pajot work took the : stwm and the 
fumed up for the second beat «°m!s out ofAustraha TV. She 
one minute 33 seconds ahead kjj. ftirtiier behind with each 

On this leg White CYusader and crossed the line one 
was able to hold them off and at “d 41 ttomds behind 

the second windward mark the Jhe gleaming stem of kooka- 
manrin was unchanged. Good ^ 111X3 H- 
fbrtSne did notion deck 

long. During the second reach g 1sec R WK ft ( K]8s w wms cnisader. 
the spare heavy weather spinna- 425; New ZoMand bt Ctaifange France, 
ker blew out. “It wasn't a good 
day for the British. But there's Canada 11 bt Eagle. i:3£ 
two weeks of fiddling around challenger semes standings 
and then everything to play for.” 

In the other big race of the day 
Dennis Conner reveUed in the 9 wsandStnpes 
big sea and stiff breeze to defeat Rnnrti kisg 
America IL skipped by John 
Kolius. After a bad few days, 
losing to Canada II and White 
Crusader, the win puts Conner 
right back in the bunt. 

Pre-start manoeuvres be- ChaflangB Franco 
tween Conner and Kolius were 
packed with aggression. Kolius 
got on the big Californian’s tail 
at the 10-minute gun and never 
let go. 

Kolius enjoyed by far the 
better start, nine seconds ahead 
of Conner who was down at the 
pin and sailing slower. Four 
minutes up the track the fleet of 
spectator boats and New York 
Yacht Club VIP vessels saw the 
first cross. Conner passed two 


Now Zealand 
American 


USA 


WMBCnjsader 

Canada II 

Kala 

Eagle 


Heart ot America , 
Azzutra. 


W L 
22 1 
20 3 
18 5 
13 10 
15 8 
15 8 
11 12 
11 12 
B IS 
S 18 
3 20 
2 21 


Pis 

68 

56 

48 

45 

43 

43 

31 

27 

24 

13 

11 

2 


NO RA CING TO PAV- 
□EFENDER SEMES RESULTS 
Kookaburra HI bt Australia IV 1 min 41 sec; 
South Australia M Steak ‘n'Kidney 24sec; 
Kookaburra n MAustraBa IH 21)1. 
DEFENDER SERES STANDINGS 

W L PtS 

141 19 

114 15 

114 14 

510 6 

411 8 

014 0 


Kookaburra !U 
Kookswra II 

AusHaHa IV 

Australia III 


South Australia 
Steak 'n' Kidney 


TODAY'S RACESe Kookaburra II v Austia- 
*a IV: South Australia » Stank V Kidney; 
Kookaburra HI v Austral* HI. 


Cnisader breezes 
into legal scuffle 


' Fremantle — The British chal- 
lenge are preparing themselves 
for possible protests and legal 
action from rival syndicates 
following the admission that 
they have fabricated at least part 
of a keel for the next round 
robin in Australia (Keith 
Wheatley writes). One view puts 
this outside the Deed of Gift 
governing the America’s Cup. 

“We have cast a keel or part of 
one." confirmed the syndicate 
president. Admiral sir Ian Eas- 
ton. “We're not saying exactly 
what." Crusader's skipper. Har- 
old Cu dm ore, said that the 
syndicate had taken extensive 
advice and were ‘relaxed’ about 
the position and possible chal- 
lenges. The relevant clause al- 
lows. one to work on a keel in a 
foreign country but not build a 
new one. 

“If someone wants to protest 
against us let them go ahead.” 
Cudmore said. "It's a matter 
that needs clarification. It could 
be brought quite quickly 


through the courts in New York 
if necessary." Since the Deed of 
Gift was drawn up and sub- 
sequently amended in New 
York, the relevant authority to 
interpret it is the Supreme Court 
of New York. Other syndicates 
may well be reluctant to take 
this trouble and expense but it is 
by no means certain. 

The New Zealand skipper, 
Chris Dickson, gave a blunt 
warning to Cudmore of what his 
team thinks. “The rules are very 
obvious, Harold," he said at a 
post-race news conference. 
“You're not allowed to build 
keels in Australia and the pro- 
test will follow." 

The Royal Perth Yacht Club 
have unequivocally told the 
White Horse Challenge that its 
view is against the fabrication of 
keels anywhere outside the 
challenger’s own country. But it 
has yet to show the willingness 
to seek a definitive ruling. Both 
sides are, to a certain extent, 
bluffing. 


ICE HOCKEY 


Flyers seek final form 


While the International 
Olympic Committee might not 
consider Birmingham a suitable 
venue, an increasing number of 
domestic sports are turning to 
the National Exhibition Centre 
and, this weekend, ice hockey is 
added to the list. 

The final of the Norwich 
Union Cup between Fife Flyers 
and Nottingham Panthers faces 
off at two o’clock tomorrow 
afternoon, and it represents 
both a boost to the cup and an 
exciting new departure for the 
sport. 

In past seasons, the final has 
been played at one of the 
premier division rinks, but this 
has inevitably led to criticism. 
Although Mmrayfield Racers 
proved their success in the 
Norwich Union Cup last season 
was no fluke by winning the 
Heineken championships at 
Wembley in April, it was sug- 
gested that they had an untold 


By Norman de MesqnHa 

advantage in playing Durham 
Wasps in Edinburgh. There can 
be no such accusations this year. 

If asked to name the winners 
three weeks ago, there woujd 
have been no hesitation in 
suggesting Fife. They carried all 
before them in the Scottish 
qualifying group, while Notting- 
ham were beaten by two En- 
vision One sides, Lee Valley and 
Telford. 


But the Flyers have lost their 
way since the league started. 


ering three successive de- 
feats and scoring only 12 goals 
in those three games. Panthers, 
on the other hand, have run into 
form and won their last nine 

pmw. 

If Dave Stoyanovitch regains 
his scoring touch. Fife can still 
win. Fred Perlini is similarly a 
key player for the Panthers. The 
most important thing is that 
advance sales are 


Corden can go 

Middlesbrough have released 
Stephen Corden, a member of 
his first team squad, who had 
been on a monthly contract. The 
20-year-old broke a leg on his 
League debut at Wimbledon on 
the opening day of last season 
but has My recovered. 


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38 




SPORT 

GOLF 


Statistics show 
fine line 
between pain 
and gain 

By Mitchell Platts 


Anders Forsbrand, of Swe- 
den, finished the 1986 Euro- 
pean golf season £48,800 


pared with Parian's 29.1 1. 

Peter McEvoy, twfoe ama- 
teur champion, compiled the 


richer than Philip Parkin, of statistics on behalf of Philips 
Wales, all because he hit one Business Systems. He said: “It 


extra green per round in 
regulation. 

That conclusion can be 


is clear that in Andeis and Phil 
we have two players of im- 
mense potential but that An- 


drawn from the Philips perfor- deR j,as slipped ahead simply 
mance statistics issued follow- t j 1 r DU o]j hitting that one extra 
ing the most comprehensive green «ich round It doesn’t 
survey of European golf ever ^q^se me because it sup- 


conducted. Moreover it re- 
flects how the line between 
success and failure on an 
increasingly competitive cir- 
cuit is now even slimmer than 
the balata skin of a golf ball. 

Forsbrand and Parian, who 
were both born in 1961, each 
made significant progress in 
1985, but whereas this year 


ports the general belief that 
the tour is so strong now that, 
as in America, if you are weak 
in only one department then it 
can prove extremely 
expensive. 

“Consistency is such a fea- 
ture of success in golf. You 
have only to look at the 
statistics and there are glaring 


Forsbrand. with winnings of '“mnlK of whv a riUve? 
m.JM.climtedfrom^thto eJoSSnl 


£84.706, climbed from 34th to 
eighth in the Epson Order of 
Merit, Parkin (£35,905) 
slipped from 32nd to 33rd. 

Yet the astonishing assess- 
ment is that Parian’s progress 
would have been as electrify- 
ing as that of Forsbrand if he 
had managed to hit the target 
once more often each round 
with possibly no more than .a 
seven iron in his hand. 

The statistics comprise five 


more successful year. 

“Nick Faldo has changed 
his swing, for the better he 
thinks, yet be figures low in all 
the categories except sand 
saves and putting in which he 
is first and second respec- 
tively. Yet he still claims that 
it is his short game he must 
improve. 

“But Sam Torrance is well 


categories and Parkin finished aware t hat putting is his 
sixth in the “driving distance” problem so he will be in full 
department with an average of agreement with the statistics. 
268 yards — two yards ahead He was joint first in greens in 
of Forsbrand. Neither Parian regulations, seventh in driving 
nor Forsbrand can draw any distance, 1 2th in fairways hit. 


confidence from their acc- 
uracy marks in the “fairways 


23rd in sand saves but 50tii in 
the putting category. He didn't 


hit” category as they tied for wi n because he had two putts 
65th place with 50 per cent per round more than Mark 


managing to stray into the 
rough as often as they re- 
mained on the straight and 
narrow. And it was from off 
the fairway that Forsbrand’ s 
margi nally better perfor- 
mances dramatically changed 
his income so catapulting him 
into most observer’s minds as 
a potential candidate for next 
year's European Ryder cup 
team. 

Forsbrand managed a 66 
per cent strike rate in the 
“greens hit in regulation" 
category against Parkin's 59 


Mouland who led that 
category". 

The statistics were com- 
piled with the assistance of 
PGA European Tour volun- 
teers at events in Britain and 
on the continent and die 
players were monitored 
throughout their rounds al- 
though it proved imprac- 
ticable as far as driving 
distance was concerned, to 
measure more than two fair- 
ways each round. 

Peter Senior, of Australia. 


per cent and that apparently (driving distance— 272 yards), 
minor difference in their John Bland, of South Africa, 
games is responsible accord- (fairways hit — 80 per cent), 
ing to the statistics for their Sam Torrance and Bland 
vastly contrasting earning (greens in regulation — 72 per 
power cent), Faldo (sand saves — 81 

Forsbrand was only six per cent) and Mouland 
places above Parian in “sand (putting — 28.53 per round) 


saves” and his putting average were the leaders of the respee- 
per round was 29.06 com- rive categories. 



Parian: nudged oat Forsbrand: fortunate. 

Philips performance statistics 


DRIVING DISTANCE: t. P Sartor. 272 O’Connor A. 70, R Davis 70, Q Brand 70 



BOWLS 


Wood chases title 


Willie Wood will be trying to 
forget his disappointment in the 
CIS UK singles when he at- 
tempts today to win the Scottish 
title la Special Correspondent 
writes). Wood has won a 
Commonwealth Games gold 
medal and a world champion- 
ship silver but has never 
achieved what might seem to be 
the more modest objective — his 
own national title. 

Wood is favourite to beat 
Auchinlccfc’s Neil McGhee to 
reach the final, where his oppo- 
nent could well be David 
Gourlay junior, of Prestwick. 


whose father partnered Wood in 
Scotland's world pairs team in 
1984. Gourlay. aged 21 and the 
Scottish junior champion, has to 
beat Leslie Smith (Newton 
Stewart) to reach the final. 

In the junior event, the charis- 
matic Richard Corsie, aged 19, 
of Edinburgh, meets Frank 
McCartney, aged 27, of Irvine. 
Both have won the event before, 
lit the other semi-final. Hugh 
Duff, the 23-ycar-okl from 
Auchinledc, plays against Wil- 
liam Watson, aged J8. of East 
Kilbride, 


SHOWJUMPING 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 

FOOTBALL 




Game Is the Spun the men who stitched op Yugoslavia, Hoddle with a scar to show fbr it, Mahbntt with only a sa3e 


Ton Pentre 
plan City 
take-over 

By Paul Newman 


Player exchange deal urged 
by Yugoslavia’s top coach 



FA CUP 


Cardiff City arc neither the 
biggest club, nor the best team 
competing in the first round of 
the FA Cup tomorrow, but if 
they lose away to Ton Pentre 
they will be victims of surely 
one of the most remarkable 
giant-killing acts in the 
competition's history. 

The contrast between the two 
could hardly be greater: Cardiff 
the former first division club 
and FA Cup winners, against the 
side from a Rhondda Valley 
village with a population of 
3,000. 

Ton Pentre’s arrival in the 
first round for the first time in 
their 51-year history is a great 
feat in itself, but there are 
indications that an even greater 
cause for celebration may be still 
to come. Cardiff, despite beating 
Chelsea in the Littlewoods Crip 
last month, are languishing in 
the bottom half of the fourth 
division, whereas Ton Pentre 
are in excellent form. 

They lie second in the na- 
tional division of the Abacus 
Welsh League, having lost only 
once, and have reached this 
stage of the cup despite having 
been drawn away in three of tbe 
four qualifying rounds. In 
knocking out Basingstoke 
Town. Sharpness, Clevedon and 
Minehead, they have scored 12, 
goals and conceded one. 

The team, who are paid only 
expenses, are a mature of youth 
and experience, villager and city 
dweller. Colin Williams, a mid- 
field player, is the only one to 
live in Ton Pentre, but most of 
his colleagues come from 
surrounding villages Three, 
however, make tbe journey 
from Cardiff for each match. 

Four of the team have had 
experience with League clubs 
and by a strange coincidence 
Garreth Bees and Phil Green, 
who between them have scored 
31 goals in 16 games this season, 
recently had trials with Cardiff 

The manager, Des Bank, who 
lives less t han two miles from 
the ground, used to play for Ton 
Pentre and is in his second 
season in charge. He is realistic 
about his team’s chances against 
Cardiff “Looking at it logically 
they should beat us 
comfortably.” he said. “But 
we’ve raised our game in the 
Cup this season, we have home 
advantage and on the day 
anything is possible." 

Ton Pentre’s average l ea gue 
gate is around 300, but 500 
turned up last week and 730 saw 
the last cup game. Their Ynys 
Park ground has a capacity of 
6.000 and some 600 seats, but 
tomorrow's gate has been lim- 
ited to 2.700 by police request. 

By a remarkable coincidence, 
the local rugby club, Treorehy, 
whose ground is only a mile 

away, are playing Cardiff tomor- 
row in the Schweppes Welsh 
Cup. Local police resources, 
bearing in mind the hooligan 
element among City's followers, 
will be stretched to the limit. 


For somebody whose country 
consistently produces some of 
tbe. world's most adroit players, 
MUjan Mfljanic, Yugoslavia’s 
national director, is 

encouragingly enthusiastic 
about the values and quality of 
the BqgBsli game. 

“The difference is that Eng- 
lish players are so fast and 
energetic, but think too little, 
while we think about the game 
intelligently but are indecisive,” 
he said at lunchtime on Wednes- 
day. It was a fairly precise 
analysis of what was to happen 
at Wembley a few hours later 
when England's characteristic 
determination orereame 
Yugoslavia's fatelligcTr give or 
take some gratitnous finds by 
both teams. 

Mifianlc is going to propose to 
Bobby Robson that the top 30 
juniors in Yagoslavia should 
have an exchange deal with the 
Fa's pKfe school at Lilies ball: a 
month's exclusive English 
coaching for the Yugoslav boys 
and the opposte for the English 
in Yugoslavia. 

A tether suggestion is that all 

English and Yugoslav first di- 
vision dubs should “have hone- 
and-nway friendly ma tc hes in 
August to maintain European 
contact during Engla n d ' s exclu- 
sion. “There is no problem 
between oar su pp ort ers,” be 

soys* 

Twice the national manager 
for the World C^. « 1974 and 
1982, and ontstandingly 


By David Miller 

successful with Red Star and 
then Real Madrid before a spell 
in Kuwait, Mfljanic has one.bf 
the most fertile of coachlHg 
minds. He is pessimistic about 
the state of tbe «n»— wtjftwt 
game. 

The most damaging aspect of 
the contemporary presumes of 
con u nerce snd over-compe titi on, 
he says, is teat there isno longer 
any role-model of excellence, at 
dob or notional level, as was 
formerly cr e ated by Homed or 
Hmtgsry, Santos or Brazil, Real 
Madrid and Beafica, Ajax or 
The Netherlands. Bayer* or 
West Germany, at which the 
rest can aim. 

Big decline sets in 
after World Cop 

“The p ressnres are such 
nowadays that bo team out 
sustain, or even repeat trace, a 
major achievement,” Mfljudc 
says. ”01111 Liverpool have, 
been able to do this. Last 
season Jurentas lost to Barce- . 
Iona, already Steaaa have fost 
this season, and Barcelona 
nearly went ontto aa Albanian 
team. Russia are probaWythe 
best national , team, yet they 
lost in Mexico to Belgium. 
They are different: their prob- 
lem is that they are not 
professional enough.” 



Striking figure: Stunned sfleoce attended 
the imveSfing of Italy’s 1990 World Cnp 
mascot, pictured above. 


,fss Chance for Barnet to go top again 


Non-league football by Paul Newman 


While the attention of most 
non-Lcaguc followers will be 
focused on the FA Cup tomor- 
row. Barnet will be hoping to 
steal a march on their rivals and 
return to the top of the GM 
Vauxhall Conference Table by 
winning away to Dagenham. 

Barnet recently had a run of 
seven games without a win. but 
such was their form in the early 
weeks of the season that they are 
still only one point behind the 


leaders. Maidstone United, and 
have a game in hand. Although 
Barry Fly. the manager, would 
rather see Barnet playing in the 
Cup tomorrow, he recognizes 
that their defeat in the first 
qualifying round against Dul- 
wich Hamlet could eventually 
prove to be a blessing. 

“Season after season you find 
that teams which have had a 
good run in tbe Cup then slump 
m the league,” he said yesterday. 


Barnet's loss of form co- 
incided with a series of injuries' 
which deprived them of up to 
five players, but only Gary 
Roberts and Keith Alexander 
are likely to be absent tomor- 
row. Barnet entertain Luton. 
Town on Monday in a testimo- 
nial for Steve Mahoney. 

• Tony Evans, tbe framer Car- 
diff City and Birmingham City 
forward, has joined Stafford 
Rangers from WalsalL 


riigby UNION 



of former glories 


i # 


. ByGewMD** 5 ® 5 

Andshonldw.lwongr,^ ? n ^rS!lk^ It^tS 


indifference? . 

The strip or water *s there to 
divide us and serve *° 

emphasise that what happens on 

the' other side is really of no 

concern of us. But we have every 

right to bemoan a loss. That 
something which aroused so 
much pleasure should now 
appear to be fading out of the 
world is asouroq of regret winch 
■m a tc hes beyond the limits at 
boundaries. 

The Tseocb, in supposedly 
rtfwiipg to terms with tbe so- 
called realities of modem com- 
petition and the consequent 

desperate need to ; win, lm 
sacrificed a good deal of umt 


and opinion. 

But the defensive attitude is 
confirmed in that cunous tactic 
of Betting fas scram nail, 
Berbrzier, to throw in at the 
lineout and to place the booker; 
Dubroca. at scrum halt. The 
reasoning ought to be that, , in 

older to ensure as far as posable 

that France gams possession, 
they use their most accurate 
ipan to throw in. Bat Berbiaer 
is not especially gifted m this 
way. , . . 

In which case, tbe determin- 
ing factor for Fouroux, the 
coach, is that Dubroca, ibe 
heavier and more powerful 
man. should tighten things up at 
this set piece. This is the only 


colour which ran, so inspire- ^ piece. This is the only 
tionally, through their veins. apparent advantage. There is 
W ha t might be expedient for nothing much else he can do. In 
one is not necessarily true an other respects — kicking, 


of another whose personality 
and substance differs. The 
French once appeared to be able 
to do -with the ball as they 
wished, mesmerise their oppo- 
nents and enchant the viewer. It 
was a spectacular game they 
played. - 

They did not ignore the more 
absolute necessities at forward. 
They have, after all, been pretty 


an other respects - kicking, 
passing, running and todies 
which arise from these — 
Bertxaer must be the superior 
man. 

From what should be a source 
of useful possession from which 
to determine the manner of 
play , Lescarboura, the stand-off 
half, has a player inside him 
who is not capable of giving hi 111 
tbe. land of service he deserves 




tucy rave, <uia au, urc uuu ui uv u^i 

rugged there in their time. But which imposes severe 

their means were always geared limit ations on the team as a 


Red Star and He points out Brat most 

id before a spell great contemporary players 
uric has one.bf tend to dedine after a success- 
e of coaching jy World Cup campaign: 

“£fJSK3 Breitner after 1974 (with Real 

* international Mfljanic was manage^ 

Kempes after 1978 (Valencia 
y S S S fff were relegated), Rossi after 

JrSSSoS (dropped from the 

lerefanolociner Jarenfns team), Maradona 
£ excellence, at this year (Naples eliminated 
I level, as was from European competition), 
i by Heaved or 'Mfljanic believes that had 
iw Brazil, Real Cesar Menotti, Argentina’s 
*** manager, not kept the youthful 

a* whSTrti gemns of Maradona oat of the 
at which the ,978 team, against 

public damoor — thereby 

. protecting him from pre- 
te sets ffi mature exposure - Maradona 
,ij a™ would not have survived to 
M CUP 1 ,^ Argentina, saccessfoBy, 

in a third World Cup finals 

tres are such campaign this year. 
bo team can ■ . “For many of (be leading 
repeat trace, a players, football now comes 
lent,” Mftjaaic second to commercial 
iverpooi have interests,” Mfljanic says, 
do this: Last “Puma or Coq Sportif comes 
» lost to Barer- first. There is so much demand 
lean havefost on a player’s time, from com- 
ind Barcelona meres and from the media, 
to an Albanian that he does not have a free 

* probaWy the day m the whole week, bo 

cam, yet they weekend. And if he does not 
9 to Belgium, have a free day, a weekend, he 
rat: their prob- cannot be relaxed, and only 
they are not relaxed players produce great 
mgh-” foothalL 

Mexican formula 
to be retained 

Rome (Reuter) — The much-criticised 
formula of this year’s World Cup finals in 
Mexico, including penalty shootouts to 
settle drawn matches, is likely to survive 
unchanged for the 1990 competition in 
Italy, Interna tiona l Federation of Football 
Associations (FIFA) secretary Joseph 
Blatter said today. 

He added that the knock-out system of 
the final rounds was regarded by FIFA as 
fundamental to a cup competition. 

Italian organisers are proposing 12 sites, 
Ttiriitriing the Sicilian ami Sard in i an capitals 
of Palermo and Cagliari, for venues-Turin, 
home of Juventns and Torino, has Wans for a 
new stadium, and tbe Olympic Stadium in 
Rome needs to be enlarged. Other venues 
proposed by tbe organisers were Milan, 

Genoa, Verona. Udine, Bologna, Florence, 
Naples and Bari. Extensive work was 
needed ro bring most stadiums up to - 
standard. 

Organisers revealed tbe mascot, a 
stylised player in red, white and $reen made 
from the letters of the word “Italia”. 


tp a running attack. whole. 

They rah and changed direc- yheover 
tionat wflL Perhaps a little more nated ^ ^ 
control was necessary at tunes, ^ on 

Yet, they now appear to suffer fomtidabl 
from too mm* government; the 
freedom to express themselves rvoii-v d 0 
is kept strictly tinder control 
until such tune, usually late m ^ pi%seDt 
the game, when the forwards 
have achieved _ a superiortty. CSlJtIin . ^ 
Elsewhere, it is a defensive ^^_ but 
mentality which prevails. ing to do » 

Gharvet, initially,- and quality of 
Godoraioa, as a- result, find it disposal. 


whole. 

The overall attitude is domi- 
nated by the class of ‘77 when 
France won the grand slam with 
a formidable pack of giants. Of 
that terrific team. Bastiat, 
Cbolky, Romeu, Bertranne and 
Fbnroux. then captain, are on 
the present selection panel of 
nine. Tbs. ambition is to re- 
capture the influence of that 
team — but France are attempt- 
ing to do so without tbe same 
quality of player’ at their 


Carminati latest 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

Alain ' Carminati. the Beziers Erbani, who came on as 
No 8, has become the second - Carminati’s replacement last 
player to withdraw through ... week, is brought into the team. 


injury fr om the French side to 
play New Zealand, at Nantes 
tomorrow. This brings 10 five 
the number of ffang * France 


His place as a replacement goes 
to the uncapped Toulouse cap- 
tain, KarlJanik. 

HTV Wales, who covered last 


XHC nmnoer UI UflUJisca ruuM, ' ni ▼ wuvwvvivwuw* 

have made since last weekend’s week's game live, de cided yts- 
- 19-7 defeat in Toulouse. terday to repeat the exercise in 

CamitTHrtt . left die field Nantes. They do not have 
shortly after the interval in that viewing figures yet for the 
mntrh ■with blurred vision after Toulouse ma teft but they feel it 
a dash of heads -with Sean would be illogical, to onec ope 
Fitzpatrick^ Jin "New Zealand.' game ancLnot the other, despite 
hooker. U is.not the huge lump - rectadcaLprobtemfr encountered 
on hfa fistiwadiwhidi prevents fast week, -mainly to do with 
him from winning a' third cap quality of sound and tuning, 
but a thigh “injury - -a similar Negotiations Were going on 
injury forced Patrick Estirve out =■ yesterday; with other .ktieplen- 
ot the ode on Wednesday-' - ” "dent companies ^. seyen 
Lament Rodriguez -moves ir ansagaedthegaoteffemTon- 
frotn flanker to fill tbe No 8 louse— to see how many wished 
position and Dominique . to screen the match. 


Back row 
Ulster’s 
big worry 

• By George Ace. - 

‘ ■ Only one problem faces the 
Ulster selectors when they meet 
tomorrow to choose the side to 
play . Leinster at Ravenhill a 
week later with the inter-provin- 
cial title at stake: the com- 
position of the bade row. 

' And if the selectors were 
■normal, logical thinking men 
there would be no problem. Bat 
this present crop seem obsessed 
with the idea ofplaying a world- 
class blind-side wing forward, 
Philip Matthews, in the middle 
of tbe back row to the exclusion 
of David Morrow, at tried and 
proven number eight of 
ootstanding ability. Tiro -ploy 
enables them to play Willie 
Duncan at number six. 

Duncan, is an admirable 
player who won two caps in 
1984 against Wales and Eng- 
land; fearless, tremendously 
strong and who never gives less 
than'lOl per cent. But he does 
not have Matthew's pace on the 
flank nor does he possess the 
flair of tbe Wanderers man. 

Meanwhile, Leinster have re- 
called Francis and Kearney to 
the pack after injury. Francis 
rqplabes ’ John Coflins in the 
second-row while Kearney takes 
over on the. flank from Ryan 
LBNSTBt H W ac W B (London irist* J 
(Oxford Univer- 

(Grojrstonaa), P 




HmWkm (Boafva _ 

raid (Lansdowno), P ' Collins 

ore). D fencing (SI Mary-s). 


FOR THE RECORD 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


April Sun yields positive drug test 


The FE1 (Federation Equestrc 
Internationale), show jumping's 
ruling body, announced yes- 
terday that a positive medica- 
tion control test was made on 
Cecil Williams* April Sun. one 
of Britain's top showjumpers at 
the Liege Nations Cup meeting 
in Belgium in August. The test 
showed positive procaine, a 


By Jenny MacArthnr 
pcnecillin by-producL Tbe 
horse had been treated with 
antibiotics because of a. poi- 
soned foot. 

The matter is being consid- 
ered by theFEl Judicial 
Committee. Mr Williams was 
not available for comment yes- 
terday and Peter Charles, the 
horse's ride - , is currently 


ADVERTISEMENT 

CORRECTION 

The dividends shown in the Pools 
Promoters Association advertisement 
which apeared in yesterdays edition of 
The Times referred to matches played 
on Saturday 1st November. These 
dividends were in feet for matches 
played on Saturday 8th November. 


competing with April Sun in the 
British team in Toronto- 

MrSam Hienett a British vet 

who acts as foreign veterinary 
delegate at several international 
shows, points out that it is 
possible fora hone to have been 
treated with the antibiotic sev- 
eral days before the competition 
but still have traces of die 
substance because horses elimi- 
nate these drugs at different 
rates. 

April Sun, an eight-year-old 
gelding, made a dramatic return 
to top class show jumping this 
summer after being injured on 
the boat to Sweeten for die 
World Cap final in April. 

If the horse is disqualified 
from the LiCge Nations Cup as a 
result of this positive test, it will 
alter the placings for that event, 
but Britain would still retain the 
Prince Philip Trophy as the the 
country with the best Nations 


ATHLETICS 

HCHUOND WUW: CW Swwie* cron coun- 
ty O lW upta n iHpE fEUa£ 1. P CusMn 
(Depl at Enrnfcnrnena 31mm 7**c 2. S 
Ftefcana (Mind Revenue). 31 JO: 3 , P Stem- 
mmg iD ectd Enotoymant). 31J4. Team 1. 
Dam at EmpKi y r y nt 2lpc« Z Mmd Rm- 
nua, 37: 3. PHSS. 77. woman OlCmk i. S 


ICE HOCKEY 


country wit! 
Cup results. 


(DHSSJ. 2DL0& Z 5 As&y ffoSS. 
20.1S; Z N HettJur (Hand Rrau). ZIZB. 
Torn: 1. DttSS. 9. 2. Mand Rewnuo. 14; 3. 
uejrt at Erraknwan. 30 
HMOW-. Open lom modern: i. P jedm 
(RAF St AOrnn). SQmn iSsoc; 2. S Sraee 
(Bnjganai. 5023 X R Watson IMP 
Cotrwmore). 5024. Toma; i. RAF wantefran. 
n*aj. 

BASKETBALL ~~ 

UNITED STATES: Ndkjral A ijmJoBn q 
Ojtojs BoetonCeHcs 124. Mfwauhee Bucks 
116; Detroit Pawns 10& Pttoom Sons 100. 
WKtanqqn Bulu$ 101. CMcsn Bulb 99; 
Da*as Mavericks 114. Houston frocum as, 
S ao a mena King* no. Denver Nuggms IDS, 
ins Angelas Lafem T2Z Seattle Surnames 

UNITED STATES: CAALSBERG HATtOHAL 
LEAGUE: tat i»iWbi l Draper ToaU Salem 
Son 112. Leicester Keen KM: Ponsiuuth 
PC a s. Bjne mrtg Buffets 91. 
mmsH MASTERS CUP; Realeal mm* 
BCP London 1 14. CBS Cenanus Cnienes® 

n. 


VOLLEYBALL 

KUE: Jm Cep (men^Outeo Sates £ 
Sweden 1 02-7. 12-1 11 T 2 . 12-% USSR 3. 
Soutn Korea 0 HKJ. 12< 1»& Japan 3. 
Chnu 1 (12-5. 12-4. ID- 12. 12* Bast X 
Canada 0(12-3. 12-4, 12-4). 



RUGBY UHIOH 

SCOTTISH UMVEasmES W toipib» 
SMP& Dundee l* St Ambwm Tft »•$!!. 
SMMydo 40; Heriot Wttt 3. t 

TENNIS 



European Championship ^ 

Group four England 2, Yu&ntavte 0; 
Tutor 0. Northern frotond 0. 

P W O LF APS 
aigtond 2 2 0 0 6 0 4- 

Yugoslavia 2 10 14 2 2 

N found 2-Q 1 1 .0 3 1 . 

Turkey 2 0 1 1 0 4 1 

GROUP SEVEN: Scatond 3. Lummbaus . 
0. 

P W P L F A RB 
Scotland 3 12 0 J ; »’ 4 
Belgium' 11 10 8 2.3 

Rwofire 2 0 2 0 2 2-2 

Biigam 1 0 1 0 0 0- T. 

Liamwig 2 0. 0 2 0 8 -0' 
GROUP ONE; Spain I.Romsria a ". 

. : P W D L F A PI* 

Spain 1T00.ro 2 

Bemwra 2 10 14 1- .2 . 

Austria 2 1 0 ‘t . 3 '4 2 ' 

Albania 1 Q 0 1 0 3 . 0 

OBOUP Five Greets 2, Hungary 1. ' 

P W D L F A PH 
Poland 110 0-21 2 

NeOmriands 1 1 DOT "0-2 

Greece 2 1 o 1 3X2 

Hungary 2 0 0 2 1 3 0 

Cyprus Q Q 0 Q 0 0 0 


Uaecnbowg 


BM0PEAN IWDER-2T CHAMPK2N- 
SMP-.OroupOae: Spain 1 . Romania 0 . 
BRBDWTIONAL MATCH: Poland 1 . 
RepubOc of Ireland o: 
FOOTBAU-COM H BOTlOte Brighton and 
. Hoee AibJon 4 , bnwieh Town 1 ; Bristol 
Rovers 2 , Mfbmi. . 

CCNTHAL LEAGUE: FfotdhMaa: HuB 1., 
SboIBirid United 1;. NMbngtafli Forest 3. 
LAicesBerCttygSMMrfawfltaKOsfina- 
«m 2. Grimetiy 3: Doocsatar 2, Rathartum 
1: Scunthorpe 3. Sradfoid 3: Stoics 2. 
Baton 1; West Btommcii ABMn 2, Notts 1 
- aunty 0; York 5. Port U* 2. 

SOimtErat LEAGUE aBdlantf dMator 
Sutan-CctdfMd 4 , Leicester United 2 . 
Sowhem dWafec: WatarioonBe f. Ruisto 1 
.X. BM Mow Ci*e Rat raamt Poote fl, 
'-Trowbridge 2: . 

MACBAfl SOUTH-WEST COUNTIES. 
LEAGUE Plymouth Aigyto reserves C, 


Wend 

Netherlands 

Greece 

Hungary 

Cy^us 


GROUP 50t Csechdstoyafca 0, Mmark 


CYCLING 




Qaroa ffrj one lap. rt; 4. UtarerffiOgg 
ISM) ora Imi oeHna. i3; 5. R Wnwi/P 
Taraottv (Heai/FO one fep. .tt - X C 

Woaet/Tony D9Tfe{Fr/G0Jo«feo. it. 


Caectioana 

Denmark 

Wares 

taand 


P W O L F A Pto 
2 1 1 0 3 0 3 

2 110 10 3 

1 0 1 0 1. 1 

3 0 1 2 15 V 


FuB Members’* Cup 
Second renak Aston tela a.'. Daby . 
■Cwm^l. (VBte am y » Reartog.or' 


GSIAC CUP: Ctatramd! Atmelwtcti 0. 
WiOenMI 0 ( a bandoned after <7 mw; 

1: Wortor^ttira 

UAUCHAMPKMSHP; Bradford 1. Leeds 
1; 

. RUGBY UNION 

THORN EM COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP; 
MUdb&ax 4V Eastern Counties 19; 
Surrey 29Jtou T2; ' 

TOUR MATCH: West Hsrttapoof 25, 1^24. 

CLUB MATCHES; Coventry 30. Nuneaton 
8, Gtouoettsrsk CWwAam i* cam- 
bridoe LWreretty 10 Loieasters^ Wake- 

gtedT£Moeatw32. ;; 

UAU CHAMPlOHSMR Bradford 9n 


SCHOOLS RUGBY 

Unbeaten 

record 

preserved 

By IVGchael Stercnson 
Two distinguished men of 
nigby, John WiUcox, the former 
England full-back and Brian 
Ashton, recently retired from 
his post as England’s assistant 
coach, met on the touch-line at 
Stoayhurst on Wednesday, 
where Ampleforth, coached, by 
Wi&cox, just managed to main- 
tain their unbeaten record. 

Tbe teams were more than a 
little Overawed tv the occasion 
and a rather disappointing con- 
test resulted in a 13-13 draw 
with both sides well aware that 
they could have played better. 
Probably a draw was a fair 
result. 

Christian Brothers* College, 
Monkstown Park, on the out- 
skirts of Dublin, had an enjoy- 
able and successful short tour of 
the Liverpool area, where they 
defeated St Mary's, Crosby,-(l£ 
3) and in tbe annual fixture 
against St Anselm's, Birken- 
head, who are coached by the 
former England player, Martin 
Hep il, they won (20-4). ~ 
Stowe's northern tour yielded 
a victory over Barnard Chstie 
(12-3), a drawn match - "with 
Kdnaride Academy (7-7) and, 
their first defeat of the season 
(10-4), inflicted by Fettes, whose 
pack proved -too strong. The 
nearest that Stowe had come to 
loosing prior to this was their 
14-13 win against Radley and 
their equally traumatic 7-6 away 
win against Oakham. 


WOMEN’S HOCKEY 


British squad 
count injuries 

The Groat Britain squad will 
be training at i jfleshafl this 
weekend, but without the Eng- 
land player Vickey. Dixon. Sheis 
unfit after a car accident at die 
'•eetand (Joyce Whitehead 
writes). 

m ' ss * n 8 are Joan Dobie 
(Scotland), who is having diecks 
<>“**«* injury. Susan Walters 
who is ill, and Margaret 
Medlow, the. Welsh captain, 
who has retired from the squad. 

After this weekend, the squad 
rost until February 5-6,’when the 
members will be reassessed so 
that those not needed are free to 
pfay for their countries. 

Thus the cost of entry into, the 
Olympics becomes more appar- 
ent. A ll three home countries 
agreed to tbe undertaking, but 
now England will plav the USA 
at Wembley Stadium next 
March with possibly only three 











THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 




39 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


f f* 


Getting over a delusion of royalty 


• Wu i J waier - passing under 
many pndges^ has swept away the 
excessive deference with which 
fimi and television cameras once 
treated our royally, and it is the 
steps by which a more sensible 
.attitude wa. arrived at that pro- 
vide the stuff of The “ 


C CHOICE ) 


* ■* 


■■-V- 


vide the stuff Q f The Story of 
’Royal Broadcasting, (BBC1. 
930pm), the latest of BBC 

' ttwiPvSSP.? *if-congratulatory 
. 50th birthday documentaries. To 
rrausejust how much things have 

- changed, you only have to remem- 
ber that back in 1922, when 

- Princess Mary was married, the 
.newsreels showed no more of her 
than a flicker as she went by in her 
coach. Compare that with Princess 
of Wales's wedding when the 
cameramen were so dose that they 
practically trod on the traio of her 

; dress, or the night when Selina 
Scott, in Wogarty tried to get 
Prince Andrew to spill the beans 
about his “Randy Andy” so- 


briquet. But whereas it took along 
time for the BBC high-ups to relax 
the rigidly correct relationship 
they had with the Royal Family, 
the democratic process long 
been at work lower down the 
social scale. There is a reminder 
tonight of the malapropian BBC 
engineer, R H Wood, who treated 
George VI and Queen Elizabeth 
like old chums. So much so that 
when the Queen suggested that 
some ehafig es might be made in 
the King's script. Wood told her 
that the monarch had buttered his 
bread and must lie on it. Scattered 
throughout Maryse Addison's film 
are piquant illustrations of what 
David Jesset, in his commentary, 
calls the BBCs delusions of 
royalty. During the last two days 
of the Abdication crisisjbr exam- 
ple, nothing went out except 
solemn musuX. 


• Just Another Day (BBC2, 
9.00pm). Roger Mills's film about 
John Pitman's visit to the exterior 
and interior sets of BBC 
Television's EastEnden, is an 
exercise • in demythologization. 
The daffodils in Albert Square 
were only plastic, and the bulge 
which, on screen, indicated that 
young Michelle was heavily preg- 
nant. turned out to be the clever 
lump of muslin and foam padding 
that was. hanging up in her 
wardrobe. Such revelations should 
aotscriously disturb you if you are 
addicted to EastEnden because 
you will still continue to swallow 
the "fantasy — hook, line, and 
sinker. And. thanks to newspapers 
like the Sun, there is little the 
actors interviewed tonight can tell 
you about their real lives which 
you did not already know. 
Whether the intention behind Just 
Another Day was to boost the 
EastEnden viewing figures even 


higher than their present sensa- 
tional levels. I cannot tell. But the 
BBCs publicity machine is getting 
so well oiled that I have just been 
sent a video cassette’ packed with 
EastEnders semes including the 
birth of a baby to Michelle — a 
creature of flesh and blood, not a 
thing of foam artrl m uslin 
• Radio choice: BBC Radio's 
Russian season, which is offering a 
staggering range of programmes, 
continues tonight with Natalia 
Gutman as soloist in the BBC 
Philharmonic performance of 
Prokofiev's Syrapbonia 
c oncenantc for echo and orchestra 
(Radio 3, 7.30pm). On the lighter 
side, there is a full-bloodied 
production of Vladimir Arro's 
comedy Five Songs in an Old 
House (Radio 3, 9.35pm). Ail 
about a dead poet who disrupts a 
proposed wedding. 


Peter Davalle 



EastEnders ffNw ny Dick Lee and John Pitman: Just Another Day, BBC2J>.OOpm 


>-f ‘ l -S* r ' *. t 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

630 The Fin ta tones. Cartoon 
series, (r) 635 Weather. 

7.00 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough, Sally Magnusson and 
Jeremy Paxman. National and 
international news at 7M 
730, 830, 630 and 930; 
regional news and traffic 
reports at 7.15, 7.45, 8.15 and 
845; weather at 735, 735, 
835 and 835. 

935 Sweet FA. A 40 Minutes 

documentary profile of the aH- 
Tirt sinqing/sonawntmq trio. 


4.10 SuperT«d.(r) 4.15 


Odysseus toe Greatest Here 
of Them AI 


i AB. Part two of Tony 

Robinson's tales from Greek 


mythology 430 A Day hi the 

Life— The first of a now series 


of real-We animal adventures - 
The Kestrel's Tate, wfth the 


voices of Roger Daftrey, 
Twiggy, and Anthony 
VtiJotena. • 


• ?*■- 


gin smging/songwrnmg 
Fascinating Alda, (ri 941 
Advice Line. Paul Clark 


:end 

EHeen Evason with the 
answers to social security 


1035 




Schofield with news of 
chHdrsn 's television 
programmes, and birthday 


1035 


with a thought for the day 
I Public School. Part 



v -■ 


1235 


- 

\v.. 

, i — ‘ r-~ .* - ‘ 


..r. 


■if - - l . - J,.- 

•. .i. 7 ‘ 


11301 

three of the series i 
staff and pupils of I 
features me Warden, or 
headmaster, Dennis Silk, (r) 
1130 Open Air. Viewers 
comment on television 
programmes. 

BMweek. From the WBdfowi 
Trust SKmbrldge, Sir Peter 
Scott and Chris Packham 
choose their favourite bird 
films. 1235 Regional news and ■ 
weather. ■ - 

130 News with Martyn Lewis.. 
Weather. 13S neighbour*. . 
Weekday soap set in a 
Melbourne suburb 130 1 
RoHo. (r) 135 Gran, 
by Patricia Hi 
230 The Liver Bin 

mating snippets of Bertrand 
Russefl, decides to do 
something for humanity, 
despite Beryl’s protestetions. 

(r) 230 Knob Lending. 

330 Box Clever. A family quiz 
presented by Emjyn Hughes. 
330 ifimboandtoe Jet Set (r) 430 
PhUomene. The first of a new ■ 
series about a white kitten. 


4.55 JofmCmvwiteNewsraund 
S10 Grange HH. Episode 12. 
(r) (Ceefax)S35 Masterteara. 

630 News with Sue Lawtey and 
Nicholas WltchelL Weather. 

635 London Ptus. 

730 Wogen. Guests are Catherine 
Oxenberg, from Dynasty; Mbs 
World; Pat Kerr, a British 
Airways stewardess who cares 
for Bangladeshi orphans; and 
Val Doootoan. Music is from 
UKrevox and The Chieftains. 

> Blank. Las Dawson’s 
i week are Fkrefla 
nin, Barry Cryar, Jenny 

y, Tom O'Connor, Greg 

Rogers, and Dinah Sheridan. 
(Ceefax) 

8.10 Dynasty. This final episode of 
the series finds Sammy Jo and 
Amanda in the swimming pod. 
And what wffl Blake do when 
he reads the news heatisies? 
And what is Alexis planning in 
order to wreak revenge?. 


735 



(Ceefax) 

News twtti John 


930 News 

Andrew Harvey, 
news and weather. 


and 


930 The Story of Royal 

Broadcasting. A look back at 


-W 


royal occasions, written and 
narrated by David JesseL (see 
Choice) 

1035 Omnaics. To coincide with the 
first major Rodto axhfoition for 
16 years, aprofie of the fife 
and work of the sculptor 
described by some as the • 
’greatest since Michaetangoto’ 
1130 Bodyfioe. Episode four of the 
five-part dramatization of the 
Infamous ’bodyfine’ tour of 
AustraBaby the MCC in 
- . 1932/33. t 

130 Weather. 


j-i. . - 
ri;-. 







A detail from Aeguste Rodin's faiwms statue The Kiss: It Is 
featured in the Oamibns fibn abort Rodin (BBC1, 1035pm) 


BBC 2 


930 Ceefax. 
935 


and 

in Germany 937 Part 
five of nw story about a art 
who befriends a badger 10.15 
The VHdngs of Scotland 1038 
MstoemaiBcal investigations 
11.00 WondermathsTll.17 
Apiculture in East Angia. 


1140 LMng things as inspirations for 
"B0 tin p ower 


art projects 1230' 
of language 1232 A young 
man leaves Belfast to Hvem 
London 136 Learning English 


by watching popdanotevision 


p r ogrammes 133 The 
biotechnology business. 
230 You and Me. (r) 


2.15 Tennis and Rating. Barry 
Davies introduces coverage of 
the Benson and Hedges 
Championships from Wembfay 
Arena; Julian WHson Is at 
Ascot for the 240, 3.10. and 
340 races. 335 Regional news 
430 Pamela Armstrong. The 
guests ara Richard Branson 
and Chew Btyth. • 

430 Intanufional Tennis. Further 
coverage of the Benson and 
Hedges championships from 
Wembley Arana. 

535 RIre HandforcPs Point (1970) 


starring Lassie. Two young 

' “ 'ialake-aide 


children who five ini 
cabin befriend Lassie and 
come to her rescue when she 
is trapped In a mine-shaft. 
Directed by Jack B Hivotey. 

635 Cricket Ffeat Test Hlghij^its 
of the first day’s play in the 
match at Brisbane between 
Australia and England. 

730 Micro Uva includes advice for 
the smat businessman 
contempl a t in g using a 
computer. 

730 Choir of the Year 1988 l Choirs 
from Scotland sing for the 
three remaining quarterfinal 
places at Hopefown House, • 

• Effin burgh. * 

830 CO — Beyond the Lew. Glyn 
Worsnto investigates th8 


abuses of (fipkxnaiiclmmunity. 
^Worid. This final 


830 Gardeners*' 

programme of the series, from 
Bemsdtie, features some of 
- the important te ak s to be 
completed before the oold 
weather arrives. 

930 Just Anofitar Day. John 
Pitman returns with another 
series Jieginnlng with a look at 
what life is Bkd on the set of 
EastEnders. (see Choice) 
i Along 


940 


and 


Screenplay: Drams 
Bebnorel Drive, by I 
Livingstone. Colin E 
Rowena Cooper star hr 
drama about a married co 
In Zimbabwe coming to terms 
with life under a black regime. 


1050 

1140 


NavsnigM.1i 

uuemaoonai 


1235 


1135 Weather. 
Terate. 

HighSghts of this evening’s 
matches in the Benson and 
Hedges Championships. 
The Rockford Fites. Jim 
Rockford thinks he has an 
easy task when asked to 
negotiate the return of a 
valuable stolen diamond, (r) 
Ends at 135. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Thames news headlines. 

9l 35 Schools: chtidren’s ideas of 
those who need help 947 How 
We Used to Live: The 
Children's Charter 1039 Junior 
maths 1036 Science; lighter 
than air 1048 A 13-year old girl 
Is pressured to marry 11.15 
Preparing for a Christmas 
puppet pfcjy 1137 How the 
arrival of twins affects a family 
1144 Adapting to the 
elements. 

1200 FBcks. (r) 12.10 Rtinbow, 
Leaning with puppets. 

1230 New way of Living, the first of 
a new series about people who 
have taken up a second 
career. Jermi Mils meets a 
former oil company executive 
who is now Sving on a remote 
island off west wales; and a 
mother who has created an 
exclusive fashion design 
business. 

130 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Themes news. 


non-votina judges are 
Margaret Forwood. Barry 
Cryar. and Barbara Windsor. 

830 The TWo of Us. Domestic 
comedy series starring 
Nicholas Lyndhurst and Janet 


. June takes a 


love nest in Shepherd's 
ihard looks for 


Market; Richer 
Nancy; and Unde Nick 
searches for another dwarf. 
1030 News at Ten with Sandy GaR 
and Alastarr Stewart 

1030 The London Programme 


presented by John Taylor. 
Tonight's edition examli 


130 Flm: Master Spy* (1962) 
rtien Murray. 


starring Stephen 
ThriUer about ad 
Russian nuclear sdi 
issus 


who 
a 'plant’. 


With June Thornton and Alan 
Wheatley. Directed by 
Montaomery Tufly. 330 Take 
the Hub Itoed 335 Thames 
news headfines 330 Sons snd 
Daughters. 

430 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 12.10 
4.l5ThaTetebuga 435 
Inspector Gadget The first of 
a new series of cartoon 
misadventures of a bungling 
detective 430 Wo ri d wtec 


i examines the 
sms surrounding Brant 
i rears anti-racist policies. 
Followed by LWTNews 
headfinas. 

1135 South of Watfotd. Hugh Laurie 
introduces examples of the 
paintings and Illustrations of 
The Urbanites. 

1135 International Heavyweight 
Boxing. Joe Bugner versus 
David Bey In Sydney. The 
commentators are Reg 
Gutte ridge and Jim Watt. 

1235 BIBy Crystal - Runnteg 
Scored. A portrait of me 
American comedian. 

1Z35 FHm: Grip of the Strangler* 


(1958) starting Boris Karloff 
and Jean Kent i 


A 19th century 
novelist investigates the case 
of a man hanged for murder 20 
years previously, and is 
convinced that ne was 
innocent Directed by Robert 
Day. 

230 Night Thoughts. 


TV- AM 


Geography quz presented by 
David Jensen. (Oracle) 


(Oracle) 

5.15 Blockbusters. Genera! 

knowledge quiz for teenagers. 

presented by Bob Hdness. 
545 Newa with Alastair Stewart 
630 The 6 O’clock Show 

presented by Darmy Baker. 
730 Bruce Forsyth’s Play Your 
Cards Right Game show. 

730 New Faces of 86. Talent show 
presented by Marti Caine. The 


6.15 Good 


Morning & 
itedbvAnr 


Britain 
ne Diamond 
and Geoff Meads. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 630, 
730, 730, 830, B30 and 930; 
financial news at 635; sport at 
640 and 740; exercises at 
IL55; cartoon at 73S; pop 
music at 735; and Jimmy 
Greaves's television hi^i&gttts 
at 835. The After Nine guests 
include RusseB Grant 



John Castle, right, selecting a dwarf for his magic act 
episode of Lost Empires (TTV, 930pm) 


act in this week's 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their Lordships’ House. A 
repeat of last night’s high fights 


the day’s proceedings In the 
or Lords. 


House 
23Q Gallery. Art quiz 



by Sir Micnael Levy and i 
Henri. The student panelists 


an and 


are Catherine Good 
Kevin Carmody. (r) 

330 A Pair of Shoes. A comedy 
drama, in Welsh, about two 
Welsh boys on a hiking trip in 
the West of Ireland, during 
which they experience for the 
first time the illegal brew, 
poteen. Starring Dylan Roberts 
and Tom Richmond. English 
subtitles. 

430 World of Animation, a comedy 
from Russia, How the 
Cossacks Played FootbaH. 

430 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner of the words and 
numbers game is challenged 
by Ian Robertson from North 
Wingfield, Chesterfield. 

Richard Whrteley is the 
questionmaster, assisted by 
Bill Tidy, adjudicating. 

5.00 Cer 54, Where Are You?* 
Vintage American comedy 
series 

530 The Tube. Among the guests 
are Heaven 17, Path LaBeHe. 
Madness, Nick Cave and the 
Bad Seeds, and Scarlet 
Fantastic. Interviewed on film 
is Dave Lee Roth. 

730 Channel 4 news with Peter 
Sissons. Includes an interview 
in West Germany with Hamed 
Hast, brother of Nazar 
Hindawi, who tried to bomb an 
B A1 airline. Weather. 

730 Book Choice. Moira Shearer, 
the former ballerina, reviews 
Michael Powell's memoirs, A 
Life in Movies. 

830 What the Papers Say. Paul 
Foot reviews how the Press 
has treated the week's news. 


policy; and analysis of toe 
Knows! ey North By-election 
930 Newhart American domestic 
comedy series, starring Bob 
Newhart 

930 The Great Plant Coflecfions. 

Roy Lancaster visits Mount 
Stewart a ooflection of 
s, many of them 
1 by Lady 
i- W (Oracle) 


1030 Golden Girts. Award-winning 
comedy series from the United 


States about four middle-aged 

women who share a Florida 


coast house. (Oracle) 

»f Mind. The first of 


to 


1030 A Change of Mnd.' 

a six-part series designs! 
take toe mystique out of 
psychotherapy. (Oracle) 

1130 FBflK Montenegro (1981) 
starring Susan Anspach. A 
Special Discretion film about a 
bored Swedish housewife who 
finds excitement with a group 
Of immigrant Yugoslav workers 
and a young lover. Directed by 
Dusan Makaveyev. Ends at 
130. 


VARIATIONS 




c Wales Td- 

DSporttofo. 1.20am- 
SCOTLAND 


■L2S News and weather 

1O50*ji-11 M Seat! Seo. 8JS-7JM Report** 
Scotland. 1035-11.50 Lett FUflM and 
Centre. 1136-1Z30am Oortbusi Rodin 1B<0- 
1917. 1U0-13O FUm: vWonsol Death 

130-135 WBaBwr. MWTHERN IRELAND 

535|Xit&40 Today's Sp3rt &A0*8jnin- 
sk» luster 635-730 MesMtsani 130-135 

News ENGLAND S35piB-7J0 Regional 

newsmagazine. 


• Mastarteam. B3SS30 btsrvtri. 


10l 15-1038 Outook; Farminc Thrarfjtiw 

Bowls X00-S30 CO— Beyond the Iaw. 
NORTHERN IRELAND 10.15WH03S 
Ceefax. a09pni-630 Kenny Everett 
BhohCD As London except: 130 

Border Nmsltt Short Story 
Theatre 230 Fam: I CMy Arekad (1958) 
330-430 The Young Doctors GJtt Lookarouid 

Friday 630-730 Take the High Road 1030 

Border tiiesttm Time 1130 Heavyweight Box- 
ing Joe Bu^w v David Boy 1230 1 


channel 


130 Soireil and Son 230 Three litne 


Words 330-330 Country QP 6-00 Channel Re- 
Diary 830-730 Country 


port 63S Jane's Diary AS 

Ways 1030-1130 Action 


South special 1230 Kojak 


on Drugs lacing 


GRAMPIAN 


Girt Friday (1953) 8307.00 North Tonight 
1030 Crossfire 1130 Harter 1230 Intwt H on- 


_ Heavyweight Boxing (Joe Bugner 
David Efay]?230 Norm Headhnesar 


and weather 


GRANADA As London except 130 
unHNHUH Granada Reports T30 Hw 


Weak in View 230-330 Hotel 330-430 
The Young Doctors 630 Granada Rapon 
530-740 The Cuckoo Waltz 1030 Cate- 
brahon 1130 Fine Mommie Dearest 


my west aBsags 


30-330 


Film: Silent Duat (1849) 355-430 Week- 
end Outlook 830-730 HTV News 1030 Your 
Say 1046 Scene '86 11.15 Mickey 
“ i‘e Mho Hammer 


HTV WALES Ae HTV West ex- 
m v WHU -° cept 830-730 Wales at 


Six 1030-1130 The Story and the Song 
1130-1230 Mickey Spitene'e Mike Hammer 
1230-1230an Freeze Frame 


Scottish 8HSSS&. 


One-Thfety 230-330 Fflnc Rafls Mo Lara- 
mie 630 Scotiend 


Today 630-730 DifTrent 

Sttokes 1030-1130 Scottish Questions 
1230 Late CM) 1235am Tales tram oertalda 
TQW As London except: 130pm TSW 
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FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14 1986 


THE 


SPORT 


England keep an 
open mind on 
their two spinners 

From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Brisbane 
The only surprise when DeFreitas was Dilley, at Perth record for wfaai were for so 


England's choice for today's 
first Test match was an- 
nounced yesterday afternoon 
was the inclusion, even among 
12 players, of both Edmonds 
and Emburey. The pilch 
seemed green enough for one 
spinner, let alone two, to have 
to expect very little bowling, 
anyway early in the game. 

None too soon, Gower had 
been co-opted on to the selec- 
tion committee. From the day 
the party was announced it 
had seem unimaginative not 
to involve him in some such 
way. His experience alone 
equals that of the other four 
selectors — the captain, the 
vice-captain and the two man- 
agers — put together. Having 
been rejected, when he lost the 
captaincy, Gower was being 
made to feel it, and from what 
I hear it may have been 
starting to show. 

The point about the spin- 
ners is best and most concisely 
illustrated by ibe bowling 
figures since the grass was left 
on the Woolloongabba pitch. 
In ordinary conditions I am all 
in favour of fielding a bal- 
anced attack but there can be 
no overlooking the fact that of 
the 233 wickets to have fallen 
on the ground in the last seven 
Test matches the spinners 
have claimed a mere 26. 

Athey found himself as 
Broad's opening partner after 
only two first-dass innings on 
foe tour, in which he scored IS 
and 0. At least, though, he 
made a hundred last week in a 
country game. DeFreitas and 
Richards were both awarded 
their first caps, Richards as 
much for his batting as his 
wicketkeeping, and DeFreitas 
because he has been foe best 
as well as the fastest, of the 
faster bowlers. Richards is 28 
and DeFreitas only 20. The 
last Englishman to win his 
first cap when as young as 


in 1979. 

Such ideas as putting Gower 
in first with Broad, as a means 
of including Whitaker, or of 

to ^Whitaker into foe side, 
were not pursued, though 
Gatling himself was giving 
thought last night to battingat 
No. 3. Gatting said an open 
mind was bring kept about foe 
two spinners in case the match 
should start in bright sun- 
shine, thus raising the chances 
of the ball turning after foe 
weekend. 

England's last practice has. 
in fact, been rather abortive, 
overnight rain having done 
foe net pitches no good The 
batsmen in form steered dear 
of them, those out of touch felt 
frustrated. The impression 
was of a side badly in need of a 
good day. 

England’s choice 

B C Broad CWJ Atfiey. 0 1 Gower. A J 
Lamb. M W Gating (captain), I T Botham. 
J E Emburw. P H Edmonds. C J Rfchanfc 
(wckstkaeper). PAJ DeFreitas. G R 
ftaey, GC Small 

But they were all fit for 
selection, which is not often 
so, even at foe start of a Test 
series. There are a few niggles 
about, and a bruise or two, 
and Broad has a slightly 
troublesome wrist; but every- 
one was hoping to be chosen, 
none more than Foster and 
French, who are fighting foe 
feeling that they are getting a 
raw deal 

Of foe Australian side that 
lost to England in foe sixth 
Test match at foe Oval last 
year only Border, Ritchie and 
Lawson survived. But of their 
first six batsmen all have 
scored Test hundreds, as 
against four of England's. 

For both teams it is a vital 
match. Between them they 
have won only one of their last 
27 Tests, an astonishing 


long the two greatest 
cricketing nations. It is not, 1 
think, overstating it to say that 
in Australia the game of five- 
day Test cricket is fighting for 
its very life. Australians are 
fed up with losing. 

For foe corresponding Test 
match last year, which was in 
its fifth day when New Zea- 
land won. foe total attendance 
came to an embarrassing, nay 
alarming 1 6,044. Because Eng- 
land are foe opposition, and in 
the fond hope of seeing foe 
start of a new era, there will be 
more now. Heaven help us if 
there are not. 

So foe battle commences, 
and may it be a sporting one. 
Border has talked of “foe 
verbal tete-a-tete" in 
Australia's recent series in 
India, especially during foe 
tied Test match, as being 
unlike anything he had known 
before. His manager, Alan 
Crompton, admits, somewhat 
compromisingly, that the 
behaviour might not always 
have been acceptable “at other 
times in other places." 

In foe coming weeks there 
will be some bad umpiring 
decisions. There invariably 
are. and that is not peculiar to 
Australia. But Gatting and 
Border know well enough 
what is expected of them and 
what they owe to a great 
tradition. Although Australia 
are made warm favourites, foe 
side fielding first must have 



y/ 





Cash advance: McEnroe'S conqueror who went on to best Casal yesterday to read the quarter-finals at Wembley 


Pate through to 
quarter-finals 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


David Pate will play Libor 
Pimefc in one of today’s 
quarter-finals of the Benson 
and Hedges championships at 
Wembley. That sort of thing is 
happening because five play- 


foe better chance of winning if ere seeded to reach the last 
they bowl anything like eight -notably Stefan Edbetg, 


decently. 

Play starts at 12.30am 
London time, with a mini- 
mum of 90 overs to be bowled 
in a day. weather permitting. 
As dusk comes earlier here 
than in any of foe other main 


Australian cities, bad light is relevant that Edberg and prob- 
seldom not a factor in a ably Leconte can already look 


Brisbane Test match. 

Tour averages, page 37 


Somerset pair keep Pakistanis 
their distance . 

Jan Botham and Peter Roe- “Roeboek hasn't got in touch lHvli ^UmIU , 


Ian Botham and Peter Roe- 
buck appeared on the same 
cricket ground in Brisbane 
yesterday — and stndiously 
ignored each other. 

Botham was hard al work 
during England's final prac- 
tice before today's first Test 
against Australia. Roebuck, 
Somerset captain and part- 
time writer for The Sunday 
Times, chatted to several play- 
ers but kept bis distance from 
the all-rounder. 

Last weekend, Botham con- 
firmed his intention to quit 
Somerset over the Viv 
Richards/Joel Garner affair — 
and advised Roebuck against 
trying to change his mind. 

“I suggest he stays In 
London, 1 think he win be 
safer there." Botham said. 

Both men denied reports of 
a planned afternoon meeting. 


“Roeboek hasn't got in touch 
with me. I see no point in 
talking to him," Botham said. 
“All I am concentrating ob is 
the Test match." 

Roebuck, ivho backed 
Somerset's decision, said: “I 
have made no attempt to talk 
to fan Botham. I wouldn't 
approach him oa the eve of a 
Test, bat a meeting coaid 
happen in the future, particu- 
larly if he initiated it’’ 

• Somerset have passed a rote 
of confidence in the secretory, 
Tony Brown, following criti- 
cisms levelled at hhn during 
Saturday's special general 
meeting at Shepton Mallet 

The chairman, Michael 
Hill, said foe secretary had 
been nnjustiy criticised in 
public for implementing 
committee decisions. 


Sialkot (Reuter) - Pakistani' 
authorities yesterday acted to 


dUUIUHUVJ JUIUUBJ — O - 

thwart crowd trouble at foe> commitment to play a fixed 
third one-day international number of grand prix toor- 


against West Indies here to- 
day, following interruptions to 
foe second one-day ma’ch. 

Apples and oranges have 
been banned from the ground 
to prevent the fruit being used 
as missiles, and spectators will 
also be searched for fire- 
crackers and soft drink bottles 
as part of a security operation, 
government officials said 

During the match at 
Gujranwala last week sections 
of foe large crowd threw 
bottles on to foe pilch as 
fading light halted play. Sub- 
sequently. West Indies won on 



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0 lead in foe five-match series, j bley have been let down: by 

RUGBY LEAGui 

Bamford goes for broke 


By Keith Maddin 

five changes are made, and Warring 
there are two additional po- Duane, 1 
siiionai changes, in the British mate, sci 
squad to face Australia in foe ory, foe ! 


Warrington centre, Ronnie 
Duane, his Warrington club- 
mate, scrum-half, Andy Greg- 
ory, foe Hull Kingston Rovers 


third and final international of forward, Chris Burton, and 
foe series at Wigan a week foe Widnes loose forward. 


tomorrow. Thus, has foe coa- 
ch, Maurice Bamford, bowed 
to the inevitable following his 
loyalty to a well beaten team 
in foe first two internationals? 

It was obvious after the 
thrashing at Ellanfr Road last 
Saturday that heads would 
have to roll, and foe sacrificial 
lambs in foe search for a team 
that can give foe Australians a 
game are: Ledger, Marchant, 
Fox, Potter and fiddhouse. In 
their places come the Widnes 
winger. John Basnett, the 


RUGBY UNION 


Fouroux and 
the soul of 
French game 

Jacques Fouroux, the 
French coach, is under consid- 
erable strain and tie is showing 
it (Chris Thau writes). His 
controversial decision to cur- 
tail contact between French 
players and journalists has 
outraged foe Press and is the 
latest development in increas- 
ingly bitter conflict between 
him and French media follow- 
ing the defeat in tire first 
international in Toulouse. 

He was savaged by the 
French Press. He was in a very 
defensive mood and blamed 
almost everybody — save him- 
self — for foe defeat. He felt 
that he was unfairly singled 
out and made a scapegoat for 
all French mishaps. Fouroux 
has also antagonised the Press 

The debate is now less 
about Jacques Fouroux 
personally, it is about foe soul 
of French rugby. 


Harry Pinner. 

Bamford said yesterday: 
“Changes were inevitable after 
our first two internationals. 1 
have now chosen men of 
proven power <and 
aggression." 


Christie to 
box Sibson 

Tony Sibson, twice winner 
of foe British middleweight 
title, could be m line to fake 
foe championship belt out- 
right. Sibson. the Common- 
wealth champion, has been 
named to box Errol Christie in 
a final eliminator for the title 
held by Brian Anderson , of 
Sheffield. 

Sibson, from Leicester, has 
returned to middleweight after 
losing to Dennis Andries, in a 
world light-heavyweight 
contest- 

Bristow's first 

Eric Bristow, winner of the 
woiid dans championship 
five times in foe past seven 
years, has been drawn against 
foe American. Tony Payne, in 
foe first round ofthis year’s 
championship from January 
10 to 18. 


Henri Leconte and John 
McEnroe — were beaten in the 
first round. Grand prix tennis 
in November is like a golf 
course with tees placed in 
bunkers. 

. It may or may not be 


forward to a big pay-day at foe 
Masters Tournament in New 
York next month, whereas 
McEnroe is out of foe running. 
Note, too. that Miloslav Medr 
and Yannick Noah, two seeds 
who did make winning starts 
at Wembley, are still trying to 
make their Masters places 
secure. 

Motivation and fitness 
count for a lot at this time of 
year. Some players are doing 
little more than meeting their 


naments. In view of all that, 
November’s grand prix results 
are not as surprising as many 
of them seem. 

During the first two days at 
Wembley only 52 per cent of 
foe singles results confirmed 
foe rankings- By contrast the 
figure for Antwerp a week 
earlier — in a tournament of 
distinctive character, outside 
foe grand prix — was almost 6 1 
per cent. The implication that 
Antwerp was more genuinely 
competitive may be mislead- . 
mg, as statistics often are, but 
it seems reasonable to suggest 



foe system, foe players, or 
both. 

Wembley, after all, is a big 
event, carrying $300,000 
(about £210,000) in prize 
money. The organizers also 
have to find three sums of 
questionable merit: about 
£42,000 for the grand prix 
bonus pooL, and £10,500 and 
£7,000 in “administration” 
fees for the Association of 
Tennis Professionals and the 
grand prix council respec- 
tively. Such huge costs deserve 
a stronger line-up lor foe last 
eight than Wembley has to- 
day’. Not that Pate and Pimek 
are bad players. Pate, who 
cpmes from Las Vegas and has 
been coached by Pancho 
Gonzales, reached foe semi- 
finals last year. Pimek, a 
Czechoslovak who lives in 
Antwerp, ranked 25th in the 
world at the end of 1984 but is 
now 50 places lower — and 
struggling. 

Three months ago Pi male’s 
endorsement agreement ex- 
pired. His agents could not 
negotiate a new one and 
Pimek has been too busy to do 
much about it himself “When 
you come to a tournament you 
have to cover your travelling 
expenses," he said yesterday, 
after having disposed of 
Leconte's conqueror Amos 
Mansdorf “and if you don’t , 
win two or three matches you 
don’t make any money." j 

McEnroe has no such prob- j 
Jems. On Wednesday evening , 
he played a listless match i 
against foe fitter, stronger and 
altogether more businesslike 
Pat Cash. The resurgence of 
Cash - who reached foe. 
Wimbledon and United States 
semi-finals in 1984 and rose to 
eighth in foe world — is 
exciting but not yet as pro- 
nounced as a win over 
McEnroe may suggest. 

McEnroe was embarrassed 
and apologetic about his 
performance. But after more 
than six months out of the 
game he has made an en- 
couraging comeback since Au- 
gust, winning four 
tournaments and. m the pro- 
cess, 17 consecutive matches. 
Only five men have beaten 
him. Except for an eight-man 
event in Atlanta the week after 
next, McEnroe can now rest 
and “regroup" as he puts it 
until the Australian 
championships two months 
hence. 

Cash still has pressing busi- 
ness to attend to at Wembley. 
He reached the last eight with 
a 6-3, 6-0 win over Sergio 
Casal of Spain in a match 
featuring foe last two players 
to beat McEnroe. 

SECOtiS SOUND: l PhMft (Ct) M A 
Mangdorf (lsa% S-3. Mi P Ce&h (Ausj M P 


Robson prepared 
to stick by Wright 

By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Fleet of 
rescues 
raises 
doubts 

By BarrjPJckthaJJ 
With yet another call for 

assistance from antong foe 
fw 0 f single-handed sailors 
competing in the Route du 
Rhuxn Transatlantic race yes- 
terday - thfc time fro m Io nise 
Cfaambaz who has contracted 
an infection in her left am and 

asked for help to sail her small 

trimaran back to her home 

port of La Trinite - many are 
questioning the wisdom of 
sending a fleet of solo yachts- 
men out into the north Atlantic 
in November. 

A winter gate has been 
Mowing retarttessly e vm- smee 
the race began from St Malo 
on Sunday, producing a string 
of early casualties that are 
certainly urging French rescue 
authorities. 

First to falter was the 
British-designed catamaran, 
laAa Poch, which was dis- 
masted within 20 minutes of 
the start, followed shortly by 
the fp™ of Herve dens’ 
MnfrthHil, FNAG 
During that first night, 
Nems Luang (formerly 
Exmonth Challenge) and 
Apricot both suffered exten- 
sive damag e in collisions and, 
on Wednesday, Eric Tabariy 
and fellow Frenchman, Domi- 
nique Marsandon, both had to 
be rescued after their craft had 
began to disintegrate in high 
seas off Cap FiaisfeTre. 


Bobby Robson unwittingly 
put one of his own England 
players on trial yesterday. In 
assessing foe 2-0 victory over 
Yugoslavia on Wednesday 
night, he found himself argu- 
ing a case for and against 
Mark Wright, the villain in an 
otherwise heroic performance. - 
The prosecution won 
convincingly. 

There could scarcely be any 
defence for the defender 
whose international career has 
been littered with errors. Yet 
England's manag er is SO 
committed to Wright, in spile 
ofhis wrongs, that it would be 
surprising if he is not retained 


League, especially since the 
European bon was imposed, is 
not the ideal breeding ground 
for technically gifted individ- 
uals. Robson pointed out that 
“our dubs are full of good, tall 
central defenders who are a 
little embarrassed when they 
have to come out and play 
with the ball". 

The answer is to withdraw a 
midfield player who is not. 
Robson is far from being short 
of candidates. Either Bryan 
Robson. Stevens of Totten- 
ham Hotspur or Mabbutl 
could fill foe role and the game 
against the Spaniards provides 
an ideal opportunity to pot the 


for foe next fixture, a friendly theory into practice. 


in Spain in February. 

Robson's loyalty, as well as 
being misplaced, is puzzling. 
As he went through the details 
of the previous night at Wem- 
bley, be kept reminding him- 
self ofWrighfs alarming series 
of mistakes. “He went in too 
early when Vujovic broke 
through in the ninth minute 
and he left himself and us 
exposed. 

“He was at fault for not 
cutting out the cross when 
Hodge cleared off the line 
midway through foe first half 
He caused a flutter in 
everybody’s hearts during the 
last half-hour when he had his 
name taken and we contrived 
to give them two dear open- 
ings through poor defensive 
play". 

But for the profligacy of foe 


Instead, Robson is likely to 
persist with Wright “He has 
all the requirements,” he said. 
“He has pace, is comfortable 
on the baD, is more than an 
adequate header and is strong 
in the tackle, ft is his judges 
meat font is worrying. If he 
gets that right, there will be no 
problem". 

Yet a defender without a 
sense of timing is as effective 
as a midfield player who 
cannot control the ball or a 
forward who cannot shoot. 
Wright has been so consis- 
tently wild and rash sincehe 
made his debut 30 months ago 
that it would be unreasonably 
optimistic to expect him to 
learn the art now. . 

IfWrightonce more maned 
his 1 international claims, 
Hoddle enhanced his yet 


Yugoslavs, and particularly of again. “If any big dob had 
Zlatko Vujovic. the price Eng- watched him on that stage, 
land would have paid would they couldn't have failed to 
almost certainly have been have been impressed,” Rob- 
feilure to qualify for the finals son said. “Sliskdvic showed 
of the European strains of classing. Hoddle was 
Championships. foe dominant force. 

That they escaped from a “He has rich talent, high 
damaging defeat and held on technique, he worked hard 
bravely for a potentially do* and he was brave at the end. 
dsive victory should not He asked not to be taken off 


cloud Robson’s vision. After and we didn't have time for 
all, he can see for himself the stitches. All we could do was 


solution to foe central prob- 
lem that has always existed 
alongside foe reliable Butcher. 
The trouble is that foe 


patch him up. He had a 
horrible jagged gash down his 
forehead and be will bear foe 
sens of eight stitches for life”. 


itches! Howe decision delayed 


Don Howe, England^ coa- 
ch, may -have to wait until next 
year.before be knows whether 
he is to be appointed as Bobby 
Robson's fail-time assistant 
(Stuart Jones writes). The 
Football- Association’s inter- 
national .committee met yes- 
terday tb discuss his role and 
agreed only to postpone a 
decision for at least another 
month. ■ , f 
Tire committee is playing a 
potentially dangerous game. 
Howe, who has been out of 


March, has already stated to 
The Times that he has reached 
the stage when he must, for the 
sake of his family, consider 
any other approaches that are 
mad& * 

/ He. has already rejected one 
substantial offer, believed to 
be from Aston Villa, and is 
eager to “put on a tracksuit 
again and return to the game 
in some capacity.” He will not 
do so for England for another 
three months, by which time 


SPORT !N BRIEF 



Whitbread top 

Fatima Whitbread, foe 
European javelin champion 
and world record holder, las 
been voted Sportswoman of 
foe Year by foe Sports 
Writers' Association. Lloyd 
Honeyghan’s six round vic- 
tory over Don Cunytowin the 
undisputed world welter- 
weight boxing crown in 
September, earned him the 
title of Sportsman of foe Year. 


work since leaving the man-, foe committee will presum- 
agerial post at Arsenal in ably have made their move. 

Sterile display 
New squad threatens 
.JEK5SSSS55: impotent Irish 

national squad with a view to 

.sfflBtefars 

the women's Tour 

de France and foe world Joeir disappmnong gcwllcss 

IJAlinlm Win ' ' lmP0«®cy in_atteck is a 
Ijruuuica Wiu problem foe Irish have had to 

Paul Nichofls and Norwood five with even. through more 
Cripps won the invitation prosperous times; but foe loss 
doubles tonrnament at j during foe past 22 months of 
Queen's Club on Wednesday, O'Neifl and more recently 
beating John Prenn ami McHroy, the creative fortes in 
Thomas Brudendi 4-15, 15-5, midfield, have left Northern 
15-2, 15-5,-9-15, 25-11. Tire Ireland with a huge void to iilL 
competiton was devised by Up front the timely emer- 
foe sponsors, Celestion Loud- grace of .Clarke, following 
speakers, to show top-class Hamilton's enforced retire- 
rockets to schools — where foe meat, cannot alone . quench 
preliminary rounds were foe thirst for goals, which add 
played. This was the first year up to jiist eight in the last 14 
foal foe formal was doubles - matches. •• - 


limp into port to effect minor 
repairs and three more, indad- 
ing the present leader. 

More failures than 
there should be 


Loic Garadec, sailing the 85ft 
wing-masted catamaran Roy- 
ale, pin to call in at the 
Azores before oMtiamng the 
chase through foe Tradewinds 
belt across the Atlantic to the 
French island of Guadeloupe 
in tiie West Indies. 

The winter gales have cer- 
tainty played a major part in 
dedBUrtmg foe 33 strong fleet 
hot the disintegration of two 
French mnftihiifis at sea 
places a serioas question mark 
over the strength and integrity 
of these craft. 

“There Is no question that 
there have been more failmes 
than there should be" Nigel 
Irens, Britain's leading 
multihall designer, said yes- 
today. “But one most not 
cnnftae these boats with stan- 
dard production designs. They 
are designed and buffi cinse to 
the edge of what will survive to 
be competitive and the lessons 
we learn are then incorporated 
mto standard designs'* he said. 

Commenting on the timing 
of this race, Irens said: “Un- 
doubtedly, setting out into a 
winte r gale is dangerous, tat 
danger is one of the reasons 
why sponsors and the politic 
take soch a keen interest la 
titis sport Most people lad 
excitement in their lives hot 
this race is raw adventme and, 
for the same reason that motor 


Irens’ first loss in 
ten-year career 


raring is so popular, people 
Eke to see others baJanring on 
a knife edge". 

The loss of Tony 
Bnlfimore's Apricot, wrecked 
on rocks off Brest on Monday, 
is the first loss Irens has 
suffered doing his tea-year 
career as a designer and 
builder of moltihuUs. 
Launched early last year, this 
high-tech yacht proved a 
significant breakthnragb both 
in design and construction 
having benefited greatly from 
foe input from Martin Smith, 
chief stress analyst at British 
Aerospace, whose knowledge 
of compesite stroctmes helped 
to prodace a boat that was 
lighter and stronger than rival 
craft. 

Fleary MSchnn VHI, an- 
other of Irens' designs BOW 
challenging Royale for the- 
lead m the race, has also 
benefitted from Martin's 
experience, while many of foe 
French boats have been taflt 
to lew budgets without foe 
benefit of research and 
developmraL It is this that has 
ted to Irons beliefs of a history 
of feilares in this race, and 
ethers. 

Robin Enox-Johnstoa, foe 
.first to sail around foe world 

alone, also came to the defence 

of single handed isaflmg yes- 
terday. “Sailing alone has 
always been a hard sport bat 
those who choose to compete 
know, and accept, font the only 
lives at risk are their owh." 

LSADBtB POSITIONS (ntt? » 

Guadeloupe): 1. Aovata {Laic Cwaded. 
287tti*K2.«»iyMchan VHI (PNfcge 
PDupon). 2875: 3. CekNlinmitLeittrie S 
IScM tOBwer Moussy). «PL«. ^ 
Cadet* (M BoucHei). SS6S; 5. Bncaw" 
(ftuoo Peron). 30M. . 

America’s Cap. 

en page 37 


TODAYS FIXTURES 

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