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— rc. •MVSUrr’&ZIfxj&l'- 


No 62,616 


THE 






ER 15 1986 



tannon acts 

investigate 

sider deals 


at 


Mr p a ^| Channon, Sec- 
retary of Slate for Trade and 
Industry, said yesterday that 
ircubnnging into immediate 

Powers to investigate 
insider dealing. ^ 

rf a I i lA ani l?I. lin S ernent comes a 
day after the Stock Exchange 

referred the case of Mr Geo£ 

trey Collier, who was forced to 
resign as a director of Moreau 
Grenfell, to ihe DTI on Ss- 
picions of insider dealing. 

M «^whi.ie, it is believed 
that Mr Michael Cassell, the 
head of Vickers da Costa in 
Los. .Angeles, has left his 
position with the company 

Vickers da Costa, the stock- 
brokiog arm of Scrimgeour 
Vickers, executed the share 
deal for Mr Collier through its 
Los Angeles office. Mr Cassell 
was sent lo the United States* 
by Vickers da Costa to build 
up ns office in Los Angeles, 


Mr Cassell was not avail- 
able for comment at his Los 
Angeles home yesterday. 
Scnmgeour Vickers would not 
comment, after a request by 
the Stock Exchange to remain 
silent while investigations 
continued. 

Mr Collier was forced to 
resign from Morgan Grenfell 
Securities after dealings in AE 
shares shortly before a bid for 
the company by Holhs, one of 
Morgan Grenfell’s clients. 
Morgan Grenfell was alerted 
to the deal by Scrimgeour 
Vickers. 

Scnmgeour Vickers is in- 
vestigating the matter. 

Mr Channon announced in 
Parliament that powers con- 
tained in the new F inan cial 
Services Act enabling the DTI 
to take evidence under oath 
during investigations into in- 
sider trading were being 


brought into effect from last 
night. 

In reply to a question from 
Mr Brian Gould, Labour’s 
deputy Treasury spokesman, 
Mr Channon said: “Investiga- 
tions are under way. I can 
assure you that I take as 
serious a view as you do of 
what Mr Collier is alleged to 
have done.” 

The Stock Exchange yes- 
terday issued a denial of 
reports that Mr Collier bad 
told its committee investigat- 
ing the affair that others, 
including several investment 
fund managers, were involved 
in insider dealing. 

Insider dealing — using 
privileged information to 
profit from share dealing — 
became a - criminal offence in 
1980. 


Bnig money alert to brokers 


By Lawrence Lever 
The Slock Exchange has 
written to stockbrokers 
throughout the country to 
warn them that new drug laws 
could lead to them being 
imprisoned if they fail to 
re pen suspected launderin g of 
drug money by their clients. 
The letter, sent on October 


14, points out that the Drug partners of firms, pointing out 
Trafficking Offences Act 1986 changes in tax, fraud and VAT 
overrides the stockbroker’s laws,” the spokesman said. 


overrides the stockbroker’s 

duty to keep his client's affairs The Home Office, which 
confidential. instigated the new laws, said it 

Member firms are advised had no evidence of drug 
to report to the police any money being laundered 
suspicion that a client has through stockbroking firms. 

f n>wi rlnuv S ri.f C^L “IITa “ 


onday 


benefited from drug traffick- 
ing as soon as that suspicion 
arises,” the letter says. 


“We haven't been given any 
evidence specifically on 
stockbrokers,” a Home Office 


Passing 
the test 


A Stock Exchange spokes- Spokesman said, 
man said yesterday the letter “Obviously we can’t dis- 
was part of the Exchange's count the Stock Exchange as a 
routine process of informing place where dreg money has 


its members of any change in been channelled.~Some of the 
the law which might affect money may well go into stocks 
them. and shares, but it goes into 

“We regularly send out other things as well such as 
tters to the administration property." 



letters to the administration 


Free air time in 



By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 


Action to stem 
the tide: how 
Britain's doctors 
will test for Aids 


G overament-sponsored ad- 
vertisements warning of the 
dangers of Aids are to be 


casters that in the absence of a 
cure for Aids, the only way to 
counter the spread of the 


broadcast by both the BBC disease was through a public 
and independent television education campaign. 


£24,000 to 
be won 

• There is £24,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition - the 
weekly prize of 

£8, 000 plus a daily prize 
of £16,000, four times 
the usual amount as 
there has been no - 
winner for the past 
three days. 

• Portfolio fists, 
pages 24 and 29. 


^iMES^BVSlNESS' 


Branson price 

The sinking price for shares 
offered in Mr Richard 
Branson’s Virgin records and 
entertainment group is I40p. 
valuing the group at £242 
million. Mr Branson's per- 
sonal holding is worth £128 


Savings record 

Building societies took in 
record receipts last month, but 
the figures were significantly 
affected by; glamorous share 
flotations, including the TSB 
isst 


^TWES'SPORT. 


Joe Bugner. former European 
and Commonwealth heavy- 
weight boxing champion, 
gained a unanimous points 
decision over David Bey of 
the US in his second come- 
back fight Psge*2 


and radio companies, it was 
announced yesterday. 

The IBA and ITV com- 
panies are expected to provide 
air time without charge to the 
Government The BBC will 
broadcast the advertisements 
as public-service announce- 
ments. 

Agreement in principle on 
the advertising campaign was 
reached yesterday with the 
BBC after Mr Norman 
Fowler, Secretary of Slate for 
health and social security, and 
Mr Tony Newton, minister of 
health, met Mr Aiasdair 
Milne, director-general, and 
Mr Maxmaduke Hussey, 
chairman of the BBC. 


Lord Thomson cleared the 
way for the commercials to be 
broadcast on ITV by announc- 
ing in a letter lo the Govern- 
ment earlier in the week that 
the IBA would not interpret its 
television code to prevent ihe 
advertising of contraceptives 

Because of the nature of the 
campaign, it might be nec- 
essary for the commercials to 
be more explicit than the IBA 
would permit a commercial 
advertiser, Lord Thomson 
wrote. 

He sajdTTbe Broadcasting 
Act does, of course, require 
the Authority to ensure that 
nothing is included which 


■■ vm -- --------- u . — ■ _ 

t Th nmeAn n f offends against good taste or 

nf decency or is offensive to 
Monifieth, chairman of me Van thie m 


Independent Broadcasting 
Authority, held a similar 
meeting with Mr Fowler era 
Thursday. 

Mr Fowler told the broad- 


Printer is 
jailed for 
glass attack 

A dismissed printer who 
smashed a beer glass in the 
face of a journalist on The 
Tunes after the newspaper’s 
move to Wapping, east 
London, received a nine- 
month jail sentence yesterday. 
Robin Shirfield, aged 47, of 
north London, was found 
guilty of unlawfully wounding 
Mr Christopher Wannan, 
Judge Crowther. QC, told 
Shirfield: “If you resort to the 
use of a glass in someone’s 
face, you have to expect 
imprisonment.” 

New deadline, page 2 
Case details, page 3 


public feeling, but this has to 
be interpreted in the light of ; 
public attitudes to particular j 
problems." 

Battle against Aids, page 3 | 


mothers 
to get 
£ 5,000 

By Finances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

Women who are raped and 
give birth to a child are 
granted a statutory right to 
£5,000 for the child plus 
compensation for the crime 
itself under the Criminal Jus- 
tice Bill published yesterday. 

At the same time the Bill 
grams women anonymity 
from the moment they first 
complain. 

At present rape victims are 
granted anonymity only from 
- the moment of charge, but 
yesterday Mr Douglas Hurd, 
the Home Secretary, said: 
“We did not feel that we could 
not act, having to regard to the 
public concern after the Fating 
vicarage rape case." 

The Bill also abolishes the 
right of defendants in rape 
cases to anonymity, which Mr 
David Mellor. the Home Of- 
fice minister of state, said 
yesterday should “never have 
been legislated in the first 
place". 

The proposals are among a 
package of measures to give a 
better deal to all victims of 
violent crime. They form a 
main plank of the 128-clause 
bill which is a legislative 
priority, aimed at the statute 
book before a general election. 

But it will face opposition 
on some key provisions: first, 
that to tackle sentences which 
appear too lenient, by en- 
abling the Attorney General to 
refer those raising a question 
of public importance to the 
Lord Chief Justice for a gen- 
eral statement of principle. 

Second, over the proposal 
to abolish peremptory chal- 
lenge of jurors, which was 
singled out yesterday by law- 
yers from both the Law Soci- 
ety and the Criminal Bar 
Association as causing con- 
cern and likely to arouse 
protest 

The Government has al- 
ready feced defeat in the Lords 
on a similar sentencing pro- 
posal during the Prosecution 
ofOffences BflL- - 
But this time the proposal 
goes first tfarongh :be 
Commons."! tape that done 
that way round the Lords will 
come to the conclusion the 
idea is not a bad one,"Mr 
Hurd said. 

The Government was deter- 
mined however not just to 
drop the issue of lenient 
.sentences and leave the sys- 
tem “at the mercy of the 
occasional earthquake" Mr 
Hurd said. 

The Bill's proposals will 
strengthen the powers of the 
courts and sentencers in tack- 
ling large-scale crime; over- 
haul court procedures; 
extradition law and the jury 
system. 

Yesterday Ms Vivien Stem, 
director of the National 
Association for the Care and 
Resettlement of Offenders, 
said the Bill was irrelevant to 
current British sentencing pol- 
icy problems. 

She sai±"Our prisons are at 
bursting point becasue we lock 
up more popte than any other 
major European country. Yet 
the Bill makes no attempt to 
reduce our excessive use of 
prisons, and some of its 
provisions win probably in- 
crease it" Fall details 4 


ij5>; 'i 


I* "Sfv 


Pwrf. r. 





Britain chides 
Reagan over 
hostage deals 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 




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V • . . .... *V.. , „ .. .46fet|£|* + 

The Princess of Wales hanging on to her hat at a breezy 
Doha airport yesterday, with Mr Julian Walker, the British 
Ambassador, ready to assist. (Letter from Qatar, page 24) 


Investigate deaths 

fir Pet-vrErsi.s; isjEie Affairs Correspondent 
Officers from ocotiand val Tamil groups, which could 


unicers ;rora oconand 
Yard's Anti-Terrorist Squad 
were called yesterday to a 
gutted East London terrace 
house in which three Tamil 
men were killed in a firebomb 
attack. 

At least three of the nine 
occupants of the house es- 
caped a petrol bomb attack on 
Monday night because they 
were in another house. Deputy 
Assistant Commissioner Wyn 
Jones, commander of the East 
London area, said. 

There were fears that the 
arsonists could be Sri Lankan 
extremists, but police were 
keeping an open mind about 
the motive. Mr Jones said he 
could not confirm that the 
latest attack was part of a long- 
standing vendetta between ri- 


erupt into gang warfare. 

“1 would certainly hope 
there is going to be no gang 
warfare of any description in 
the Borough, but we are look- 
ing at ail possible motives be- 
hind the attack and that is ob- 
viously one avenue of inquiry. 

The three dead men. all in 
their 20s, are believed to have 
been students. They died 
when at least three petrol- 
based incendiary devices were 
thrown through windows 

Mr PormambaJam Saihiya- i 
baian. aped 38. brother of 
three of the men who escaped, 
said: “My brothers are all 
students but I don’t know if 
they have any political in- 
volvements.” 

Gang fend theory, page 2 


Heads hold the key to 

c# 

schools pay contract 


Inflation steady at 3% 
but sharp rise likely 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

The inflation rate stayed at offset by a fall in the cost of 
3 per cent last month, seasonal foods. Petrol prices 
concluding an encouraging edged up.aJ though the market : 
week of economic news for the appears to have softened i 
Government subsequently. 

Bui the 1 -25 per cent rise in autumn statement 

mortgage rates will push infia- J* Chancellor forecast an 
tion up towards 3.5 per cent avera S e inflation rate of 3._5 


this month. City economists Pf cent for the fourth quarter 
expect a further rise to nearly 4 15 ^ear, nnng to 3.75 per 

nerrent durine the winter. <**1 at the end of next year. 


per cent during the winter, 

before a fall next fining. 

The likely profile of infla- 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 

The National .Association of it also appeaj 
Head Teachers and the likely that the so 
Secondary Heads Association union, the Natio 
held ihe key last night to alien of Schoolma 
whether local authority of Women Teaci 
era plovers could command a oppose anv final a 
majority of the six teaching However, the 
unions to Sign up for their ^ lWQ head teac 
final offer on pay and see m to be in the t 
conditions. NAHT ana the 

After more than 100 hours enormous signifia 
of negotiations in Notongnam . ** 

and London, union officials The fsaor bee 
were squaring up to some more crucial m lij 
difficult decisions after seeing financed raana: 
the written details of the new planned bv the Go 
contract proposals Should Mr K.en 

It seemed likely that at least j!*f Secretary of 
two of the unions, the Na- Education, wish t< 
tional Lfriion of Teachers and deal emerging at 
the Assistant Masters and cuaners m Londoi 


tion has been used in support higher interest rates. But yes- 


-rt. Mistresses .Association, who 

The pound-has been looking between them represent more 
unerable, adding to fears of than half ihe 4A0 non imrbm 


of a late spring election. 

Prices of clothing and 
draught -beer rose last month. 


terday the sterling index rose 
from 68.2 to 68.3. 

Inflation steady, page 25 


than half the 450,000 teachers 
of England and Wales, would 
be eventual signatories, with 
the non-striking Professional 
Association of Teachers. 


It also appeared equally 
likely that the second largest 
union, the National Associ- 
ation of Scaoolmasters/Union 
of Women Teachers, would 
oppose any final accord. 

However, the decision of 
the two head teachers unions 
seem to be in the balance. The 
NAHT and the SH.A carry 
enormous significance 

The factor becomes even 
more crucial in light of their 
enhanced managerial role 
planned by the Government. 

Should Mr Kenneth Baker, 
the Secretary of State for 
Education, wish lo reject the 
deal emerging at Acas head- 
quarters in London last night, 
he v.ouJd have his hand 
strengthened considerably if 
he could convince the public 
that a settlement lacked the 
assent of the very people who 
take the ultimate nesponsibil- 
ii\ in schools. 


Gorbachov tries to rewrite theory 


Gas package 

British Gas has put whether a 
package of benefits to 
encourage shareholder to re- 
tain their investment rather 
than selling fora quick profit 
Family Money, pages 30-38 


From Christopher Walker acts of terrorism which are 
Moscow causing increasing concern in 

« a: • . Moscow and have prompted 

The official Soviet Com- the Soviet Government lo co- 
munist Party paper Pravaa operate with a number of 


published a major theoretical 
article yesterday claiming that 


Horn* News 2-4 LawlW* 
Overseas 5.7.8 Leak* 

Art s 16 Utters 

Births, deaths, . 4 

marriages 23 ParilW®** * 
Bridge I?^3 ReBrif® 5 

Bkukss 2 5-» Sale R*™ e| 
gST” 17 Scfe«* “ 
Covrt 22 Sen«**,~„2 

gsr”* 17 * 

E^s 24 TViRadte 4S 
Feanves 0-20 Weather 24 


****** 


the realities ofthe nuclear age discuss ways of stamping il 
demanded a radical trass- ouL 
formation of Marxism-Lenin- 
ism, and warning revolutioary “Hie nuclear era demands 
groups around the world to from revolutionary forces the 
weigh the consequences of utmost care in weighing de- 
violence. cisions about armed straggle, 

The article, spread across 1 3 ihe principled refusal of van- 
columns, was described by ous manifestations of ultra- 
senior diplomats as the latest left extremism,*' the paper 
attempt by the Kremlin argued in a key passage which 
leadership, under Mr Mikhail seemed to indicate some re- 
Gorbachov, to try to reconcile thinking of Moscow’s tra- 
the theoretical basis of com- diuonal support of leftist 
munism with the sophistica- liberation movements, many 
tion of modem weaponry. of which thrive on Soviet 
It was also seen as indirect finance, training and weapon- 
criticism of the more extreme ty- 


ts of terrorism which are Pravda went on lo point out 
using increasing concern in that the need for caution arose 
oscow and have prompted because the existence of 
f Soviet Government to co- nuclear arras might transform 
crate with a number of local conflicts into regional or 
Western governments, indud- even world conflagration. But 
ing Britain and France, to the author, the Soviet his- 
scuss ways of stamping it torian Mr E PJimak, conve- 
t- niently left the door open for 

“The nuclear era demands lhe , “biinuieg support of 

MOlence in the cause of na- 


tion] revolutionary forces the “ usc UI 

utmost care in weighing de- 1,on J I llbefat,on - 

cisions about armed straggle, “On the other hand." he 


added, “this era does not 
deprive us of lhe necessity to 
repulse reactionary and coun- 
ter-revolutionary forces where 
they try to use force to 
liquidate the democratic and 
socialist achievements of the 
people and to turn back the 
historical progress.” 

One Western Kremlinolo- 
gist explained; “The theo- 


reticians in the Kremlin 
appear to be arguing that 
leftist groups can go on fight- 
ing but they must be careful 
that their struggles do not 
escalate into a nuclear war. 
Some people might call that 
having your cake and eating 
it" 

The timing of the article, 
headlined “Marxism-Lenin- 
ism and revolutionary activity 
at the end of the 20th 
century", was seen as pan of 
Mr Gorbachov's campaign to 
streamline the communist 
stale's theoretical approach to 
a number of issues: 

Pravda stated that com- 
munist countries had scored 
sufficient successes to raise the 
question of banning force 
from the world political arena. 
It went on to quote Mr 


Gorbachov as saying that the 
nuclear era demanded "deep 
changes in political thinking.” 

3 phrase he has often applied 
to Soviet disarmament initial- j 
ivfs^ i 

” i he demend for ‘deep 8 
changes' is also applicable to 
the Marxist theory of class 
straggle - it must help find a 
way cut of a critical 
situation.” added the article, 
which appeared set to become 
the standard ton on the 
subject. “The straggle of 
opposing class forces is not 
disappearing in the nuclear 
era. But our times teach the 
development and broad prac- 
tice of compromise forms of 
straggle.” 

Pravda insisted that such a 
change did not represent a 
departure from revolutionary 
Marxism, 


The British Government 
made clear its considerable 
displeasure at the secret 
.American aims dealings with 
Iran yesterday through rwo 
thinly-disguised rebukes by 
ministers in the Commons. 

.As Mrs Thatcher flew off to 
Washington for weekend talks 
with President Reagan. Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Secretary, declared: “This 
Govemmem will not do deals 
with terrorists for the release 
of hostages. This is not an easy 
policy to follow. Sometimes it 
is agonizing. Bui it is right." 

Using still more forceful 
language. Mr Timothy Ren- 
ton, Foreign Office Minister of 
State, later declared that it 
“smacked of expediency" and 
could not be in the national 
interest “to allow terrorists to 
believe that they could swap 
British hostages for arms, 
money or convicted criminals 
in British jails". 

He conunued: “Doing deals 
with terrorists only gives a 
further turn to the ratchet, 
increasing the spiral of terror- 
ism by encouraging the belief 
that taking hostages was 
worthwhile . . " 

MPs were quick to note that 
both ministers' statements 
implicitly contradicted Mr 
Reagan's denial that the arms 
deal was a quid pro quo for the 
release of American hostages. 

. The two statements made 
Britain's position absolutely 
clear in advance of the Camp 
David talks, at which Mrs 

No deals 
with US 
says Iran 

By Robert Fisk 
Middle East Correspondent 

The Iranian President yes- 
terday delivered a swift but 
not uncompromising reply to 
President Reagan’s admission 
of US contacts with Iran, 
denying that there had been 
any negotiations between 
American and Iranian of- 
I ficials but holding out the 
I possibility that further sup- 
I plies of military hardware 
I could still secure the release of 
more American hostages in 
Lebanon. 

The denials and counter- 
denials by both Washington . 
and Tehran over the “arms- < 
for-hostages" affair- are fast 
acquiring a pace of their own, 
but American officials are ! 
likely to have focused on one i 
key section of the speech made ; 
by President Ali Khamenei i 
yesterday which was quoted i 
on Tehran radio and by the t 
Iranian news agency. 

"You (the Americans) are i 
the real terrorists who at- < 
tacked Libya. ...not those g 
youths (sic) who take a few I 
American hostages to gain l 
Continued on page 24. col 1 


t Thatcher will be expecting a 
: full explanation of the US 
L Administration’s behaviour, 
i Neither Sir Geoffrey nor Mr 

i Renton referred explicitly to 

> Mr Reagan's admission of 
arms dealing, but their dis- 

> taste was evident from their 
. emphasis on the correct ness of 
- the British approach to 

countering terrorism. 

Sir Geoffrey, referring to 
, three of Britain's own hostages 
in the Lebanon, said that the 
Government was doing all it 

Parliament 4 

Reagan blunder 5 

Leading article 21 

could to secure their release, 
but was not prepared to make 
"substantive" concessions. 

"At a meeting of the 12 
interior ministers on Septem- 
ber 25 our Community part- 
ners reaffirmed their deter- 
mination not to make con- 
cessions to terrorists. That is a 
commitment to which we 
attach much importance. In 
our view concessions lead to 
more, noi less hostage- 
taking.” he said. 

Mr Denis Healey, the 
shadow- Foreign Secretary, 
regretted that Sir Geoffrey 
“didn’t show the courage” to 
refer to the Americans by 
name, but backed Sir Geo- 
ffrey's unequivocal statement 
of the British position and 
described Mr Reagan's at- 
tempts to explain his behav- 
iour as “slupifyingly 
incredible'. 

President’s 
diplomacy 
draws fire 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

Widespread scepticism has 
greeted President Reagan’s 
televised explanation of why 
he sent American arms to 
Iran, with many congressional 
leaders saving tin* President 
had tried to put the best lace 
on a serious foreign policy 
blunder. 

Democrats and Repub- 
licans alike approved Mr 
Reagan's attempt to seek bet- 
ter relations with Iran and 
ending the Iran-Iraq war, but 
all insisted that sending of 
arms to Tehran had greatly 
damaged US credibility at 
home and with its allies. 

They also strongly criticized 
his failure to consult Congress 
or keep key leaders informed, 
and said Mr Reagan’s high- 
risk diplomacy had made it 
more likely that more Ameri- 
cans would be taken hostage. 

In his brisk, defence of his 
actions, which he said he was 
obliged to make because of a 
growing tide of distortion, 
leaks and misinformation, the 
President insisted he had not 
Continued on page 24, col I 


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B I*NI6WTSBRICjG 6^ 
Inntton SWIX 7XLO'-ra"23i 



THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1 


NEWS SUMMARY 


TSB applications 
go to fraud squad 

The Trustee Savings Bank has referred more than 20 
people suspected of making illegal multiple applications 
for its shares to the fraud squad, the bank announced 
yesterday. 

Sir John Read, chairman of the TSB, said In a statement 
that the Director of Public Prosecutions would decide in 
which cases criminal proceed ing s should be instituted. 
The names reported by the TSB were linked to more than 

1.000 application forms in September's £1.5 billion share 
sale. 

Several hundred suspected forms are still being 
in vestigated. The bank is hanging on to the money received 
with these, saying the applicants have failed to respond to 
repeated inquiries. They will not get their money ^ until 
they do. 

Peat Marwick, the accountants, were employed to weed 
out multiple applications. They investigated more >|wn 

5.000 forms from more than 1,000 applicants. 

Most were either cleared or rejected, but not referred to 
the fraud squad because it was considered they were 
unlikely to lead to further action, Sir John said. 

Sky diver Race case 

killed for Welsh 

SwtH? 0 tribmral, alleging racial 

pair collided in nud air. discrimination?^ 


Whitehall steps up MI5 files battle 


By Prances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The Government is poised 
to contest right up to the High 
Cburt of Australia, its highest 
court, a court order yesterday 
that it disclose all secret MI5 
documents relating to its in- 
vestigations into the Hollis 
affair. 

Whitehall sources made 
dear yesterday that rather 
than comply with the order for 
disclosure, the Government 


would pull out of hs legal eminent disclose aH papers 
proceedings to, stop publics- sought by lawyers for Mr 
lion ofa book by Peter Wright, Wright and the publishers, 
the former MIS agent Heinemann Australia, 'is a big 

The issue is regarded as of blow to the Government 
such “very great importance" gut in a separate deve 
that it intends to appeal first to m ent yesterday the Austrc 
the New South Wales Court of Government agreed to a 
Appeal in a hearing to take qu est to provide lawyers 


That will help government 
lawyers in arguing that 
publication of the book would 
be damaging to Australia's 
national interests if the case 
reaches a full hearing. 


E lace on Monday, and if it 
ses there, to Australia's High 
Court. 

The court order yesterday 
from tire New South Wales 
Supreme Court that the Gov- 


But in a septat e develop- teaches a M beunug. fi A5HEhlE5 » JKS 

GoSSSVed to a re- W plication in Britaiu a, »e|L 

quest to prowfa lawyers for SE-SSjlJt certam t0 ** The Guardian and The Ob- 
the Crown with an affidavit ‘miner ueiayeu. server have been given leave to 

dealing with “matters relevant The order relates to docu- appeal to the House of Lords 
to Australia’s national inents on the Government's against a ban on publishing 
interest" in connection with conclusions that the late Sir revelations about M25 con- 
the subject matter of the Roger Hollis, former director- taiued in Mr Wright's book, 
proceedings. * general of MI5, was . not a Judge's attack, page 7 


Soviet spy. In his book Mr 
Wright claims the opposite. 

If the Government fails in 
its attempt to contest the 
order, publication of the book 
in Australia is likely to mean 
publication in Britain as we|L 

The Guardian and The Ob- 
server have been given leave to 
appeal to the House of Lords 


Fire bombing 
may be part 
of feuding by 
Tamil gangs 




-MA 



; ^ j 


pair collided in mid air. 


The ample were free falling Mrs Diana Cameron, 
when the accident happened at aged 44, of Bethesda, was 
a military base near Akrotiri, refused a permanent post in 
Cyprus, which is staging the the conncrTs bousing de- 
world parachuting champ- partment because she caa- 
ionships. not speak Welsh. 

Mrs Woodhonse, aged 44, The council will contest 


By Nicholas Beestoo 

As racial tension mounted Mr Krishnan PiUal, aged 47, 
in East London yesterday after a local resident, claimed' that 
the death of three Asians in a the attack was not racially 
fire-bomb attack, police con- motivated. He said that three 
centra ted their investigations “innocent" people had died in 
on the possibility that the the attack and claimed that he 


not speak Welsh. 

The council will contest 


murders were the result of bad witnessed an argument 
feuding within the Tamil between two lodgers who sur- 
co mm unity. vived the attack and a group 


was left with serious neck and the case at Colwyn Bay 
shoulder injuries. next mouth. 


Last night the London* 
representative of a Tamil 
guerrilla group discounted the 
theory that the attack was 
racially inspired and blamed 

*^r v> c 


vived the attack and a group 
of Asians in a public house 
two weeks ago. 

He said that these two were 
meant to >die in the attack 
because, a week after the 





FpWPT OlVll Servants 2S d ^ n ^Z: fora ? trinfi ,v f argument, a group of people 
A ^ v V k/1 VI V jLI UvX V CUT I petrol bombings in the armed with knives and sticks 


Civil Service numbers fell to 594365 last year compared 
with 732300 in 1979, when the Conservatives came to 
power, bat the rate of redaction slowed markedly. The Call 
in 1985-86 was 4,656 or 03 per cent, the smallest reduction 
in seven years. 

The number of white collar Civil Servants rose 
marginally, while the bulk of losses were sastaiued by blue 
collar employees. Privatization, contracting oat, and 
hiving-off accounted for a 2,454 drop, saving £53 million. 


Jail term 
reduced 

A two-year jail sentence 
imposed on a woman who 
fired a shotgun at the man 
who had sexually abused 
her since she was 11 was 
ruled “excessive" by the 
Court of Appeal yesterday. 

But the court, reducing 
the sentence to three 
months in detention, re- 
jected a plea that Lynda '>* 
Ann Birch, aged 21, of 
London Road, West Thur- 
rock, Essex, should receive 
no custodial sentence. 

Mr Justice Taylor said it 
was an understandable * 
vievr but victims could not 
take the law into their own 
hands. 


v: . 


No Murrell charge . 

Police who questioned an alleged murderer for three days 
about the killing of Miss Hilda Murrell, aged 79, the peace 
campaigner, in Shrewsbury two years ago have not charged 
him. The man was brought back to London and remanded 
in custody for a week yesterday on other matters. 


Murdoch sets new 
payments date 

By Tim Jones 

Former employee* of News The dispute began after 


International have been told 
that the offer of termination 
payments made to them by 
Mr Rupert Murdoch, chair- 
man of the company, will 
close on Monday week. 

By last night, more than 
1,500 people had applied for 
their share of the £58 million 
on offer and a further 400 had 
said they will accept as soon as 
questions about their payment 
can be answered. Those apply- 
ing include several union 
officers. 

In a letter to the dismissed 
workers. Mr Murdoch says 
there will be no father negotia- 
tions with the trade unions 
and adds that this is the last 
opportunity for former staff to 
obtain termination payments. 

Those who accept the offer 
will be required to sign a 
legally binding release docu- 
ment’ confirming they have 
ended all association with the 
strike and that they will accept 
the money offered in settle- 
ment of all claims against the 
company. 


5,500 members of staff went 
on strike and were dismissed 
by the company last January, 
shortly before News Inter- 
national moved printing of its 
four national newspapers, 
including The Times, to 
Wapping, east London. 

On the day the offer ter- 
minates, three of the unions 
involved in the dispute, Sogat 
'82. the National Graphical 
Association and the National 
Union of Journalists, plan to 
demand that the TUC carries 
out a resolution passed by its 
conference in September to 
discipline members of the 
electricians' union working at 
Wapping. 

All along, the Electrical, 
Electronic Telecommunica- 
tion and Plumbing Union has 
maintained that it will not ask 
its members at Wapping to go 
on strike because it would be 
unlawful to do so. 

In any event Mr Eric 
Hammond, general secretary, 
has said that his members at 
the plant would be unlikely to 
obey such an instruction. 


petrol bombings in the 
community in recent weeks. 

There are four Tamil guer- 
rilla groups fighting for auton- 
omy against the Sri l-anlcan 
government Only last month 
battles erupted between two of 
the organizations and it is 
feared that the feud could 
have spread abroad. 

Although some of the east 
London attacks against Asians 
have been blamed on right- 
wing groups, the latest arson 
incident might have stemmed 
from a long-running feud be- 
tween two groups of Tamil 
youths who argued and fought 
at a public house in east 
London earlier this year. 

Scotland Yard appealed 
yesterday for calm and assis- 
tance from Asian community 
leaders. 

More than 40 uniformed 
police officers were brought in 
yesterday to patrol the streets 
of East Ham and Newham, 
while extra police joined the 
murder investigation. 

The arson attack at 3.40am 
yesterday on a private two- 
storey house in Burges Road, 
East Ham. was the sixth and 
mosi violent arson attack in 
the street since June 1985. 

Scotland Yard anti-terrorist 
branch was called in yesterday 
to investigate the possibility 
that the murders were the 
result of friction between rival 
Tamils. 

Deputy Assistant Commis- 
sioner Wynn Jones who is 
leading the murder inquiry, 
confirmed that all nine men 
who were in the house when 
the attack occurred were Tam- 
ils. but he did not know what 
areas of India or Sri Lanka 
they came from. 

After a meeting yesterday 
with angry community leaders 
in Newham and East Ham, 
Mr Jones said that police were 
doing all they could to find the 
perpetrators of all six arson 
attacks. 

He said he did not agree 
with claims by community 
leaders that police bad failed 
to be vigilant. “We have called 
in more than 40 uniformed 
police officers to patrol the 
streets in this area and we 
have stretched our resources 
fully to work round the clock 
on this inquiry and the pre- 
vious incidents." 

He said police were very 
concerned about the possible 
repercussions of the latest 
attack and be appealed for 
calm in the community. 

“But this attack is certainly 
the most serious incident in 
this area for many years," he 
added. 

Some local people and wit- 
nesses to the attack told police 


armed with knives and sticks 
attempted to attack them at 
their home in Shoe bury Road. 

On Tuesday night a petrol 
bomb was thrown at the 
Shoebury Road house and the 
lodgers were asked to leave 
within 24 hours. They then 
moved into the house in 
Burges Road. 

Mr James Cullum, aged 68, 
a Shoebury Road resident, 
said that the “few old white 
people" left in the area were 
very frightened. “We live 
amongst it And we are going 
out of our minds." 

Mr Joseph Phillip, aged 21, 
an Indian whose Burges Road 
home was petrol bombed 
about eight months ago, said 
he believed the attack on his 
home was racially motivated. 
But he too claimed that the 
latest attack was the result of 
the argument in the public 
house. 

Community leaders and a 
number of residents however, 
Mamed whites for the attacks. 

Mr Nish Kan war, of the 
Newham Monitoring Project, 
said that there had been a 60 
per cent increase in racial 
attacks in Newham over the 
past year. 

Mr Kan war and a hundred 
residents staged a picket out- 
side East Ham police station 
at lunchtime yesterday, cairy^ 
ing placards saying; “No pol- 
ice cover-up". 

Mr Ezaz Hayat, whose fast- 
food shop in Barking Road 
was stormed last week by a 
white gang who call them- 
selves The Croydon Road 
Gang, also attended the 
picket 

He said that the gang, 
usually armed with knives and 
sticks, had attacked his shop 
several times, causing thou- 
sands of pounds worth of 
damage. 

Mr Imran Khan of the 
Stardust Asian Youth Cub 
blamed members of the Na- 
tional Front organization for 
the attacks. He said that there 
was no evidence to support 
claims that the attacks were 
the result of a gang feud. 

Two shops, one owned by a 
Sikh and the other by a Hindu, 
were among the targets of 
previous attacks. The private 
residences attacked, including 
two in Burges Road and one in 
Shoebury Road, were all occu- 
pied by Asians. 

Mr Dave Clark, of the 
Newham-based group Work- 
ers Against Racism, supported 
this view. He denied that the 
attacks were the result of 
political friction. 

“There are a thousand Tam- 
ils here who could be deponed 




. ... — .. 


*?•**■ . > ■ ***’ 



Labour to 
neutralize 


Knowsley 

By Robin Oakley 
Political Editor 

The Labour Party b t o move 
s w iftl y to safeguard the future 
of its successful candidate m 
the Knowsley North by-elec- 
tion, Mr George Howarth. 

Mr Mike McGuire, sec- 
retary of the left-coo trolled 
Knowsley North constituency 
party, which had Mr Howarth 
im pnggrf on it by the Labour 
leader, Mr Neil Kinnock and 
the party's national exec- 
utive — when its members had 
wanted to select left-wing 
MEP Mr Les Hncfcfield- 
mM yesterday that disbanding 
the local party was “the only 
way George Howarth can sur- 
vive as the MF" 

Mr McGuire said that the 
dfl yiinant faction in the focal 
party did not n|te the fact drat 
Mr Howarth was tire MP, and 
they had not congratulated 
him on winning. 

So long as the present 
MOitant-domiiiated o ffici a ls 
remain hi charge in Knowsley, 
Mr Howarth b clearly in 
danger of being deselected for 
the general election. 

■ Mr Ray Gill, North-west 
regional organizer of the La- 
bom Party, who had to step in 
to ran Mr Howaith's cam- 
paign with the help of no more 

than a third of the local party, 
confirmed be wonld be calling 
fin the disbandment of the 


Action is expected at the 
next meeting of Labour’s na- 
tional executive later this 


l :J 



% 

AAA- - 
.... 


A '.'iky* ■ '■ 


Firemen inspect the house in Burges Road, East Ham, where three Tamils were killed in a 
fire bomb attack in early yesterday. Six people escaped (Photograph: James Gray) 



Northern Ireland 


Thousands begin 
agreement protest 


that they believed it was the at “y minute should they get 


result of a running feud be- 
tween rival gangs of Tamils. 

Mr Jones said that despite 
investigations during the past 
1 8 months the police had been 
unable to find those respon- 
sible for any of the arson 
attacks in the area. 


caught committing any 
crime" he said. 

He also claimed that a 
group of whites were observed 
kicking in the door of a house 
in Skeffington Road late on 
Thursday night, only hours 
before the Burges Road attack. 


Security forces in Northern 
Ireland were on frill alert last 
night as thousands of 
“loyalists” began a series of 
protests against the Anglo- 
Irish agreement 

All police leave was can- 
celled as senior officers pre- 
pare for a crucial and tense 36 
hours, culminating in this af- 
ternoon’s huge rally outside 
Belfast City Hall, designed to 
show the world that “Ulster 
still says no”. 

Tension in the province has 
risen gradually, with sporadic 
outbreaks of loyalist violence 
against Roman Catholics dur- 
ing the past few days, includ- 
ing the petrol bombing of two 
homes in Lisburn and an ars- 
on attempt on a Roman Cath- 
olic secondary school in north 
Belfast early yesterday. 

Last night loyalists held 
torchlight parades in many 
towns including Hillsborough, 
Portadown and Ballymena 
and effigies of the Prime 
Minister and Dr Garret Fitz- 
Gerald were burned in protes- 
tant districts. 

Police and the army were 
deployed to prevent trouble 
and to try and thwart attacks 
on isolated Roman Catholic 
homes or nationalist districts 
in predominantly loyalist ar- 
eas. Mr Gerry Adams, Provi- 
sional Sinn Fein MP for West 
Belfast, warned nationalists to 
be on guard. 

Several hundred workers 
walked out of the loss-making 
Harlan d and Wolff shipyard at 
lunchtime yesterday to attend 
a rally. Carrying “Eire 
beware 4 and “Hariand and 


By Richard Ford . 

orthern Wolff says no" placards, they 
lert last were addressed by Dr Boyd 
ds of Blade, a university lecturer 
sries of and leading campaigner for 
Anglo- full integration. The marchers 
also handed in a letter protesl- 
as can- ing about the activities of the 
:rs pre- Dublin-based Irish Congress 
ense 36 of Trades Unions. 
thisaf- Police in Lisburn, CO An- 
outside trim suspect a petrol bomber 
goed to who took part in attacks in the 
"Ulster homes of two Roman Catho- 
lics early yesterday may have 
noe has been burned. No-one in the 
poradic houses was injured, but RUC 
lolence officers found a burned long- 
?• dur- sieved jacket which they be- 
radud- lieve belonged to the petrol 
of two bomber. 

As loyalist leaders put the 
a finishing touches to their 

a 1101111 speeches for today’s rally Mr 
„ . . . Tom King, the Secretary of 
s new Slate for Northern Ireland and 
his deputy, Mr Nicholas Scott, 
irougn, re iierated the Government’s 
l y*° ena support for the agreement Mr 
rrune Scott said the Government 
believed it was in the best 
prates- imprests 0 f the United King- 
dom and the majority of the 
f were community in Northern Ire- 
trouble land. 

attacks Major roads in Belfast will 
atholic dose from midday and while 
, l ? tncls it is expected many of the 
mqjor stores will remain open, 
smaller ones will close 
r West through fear of intimidation 
*° or because their staff wish to 
attend the rally. All senior and 
workers B division football matches in 
naldng the Irish League have been 
yard at cancelled as has racing at 
attend Down Royal in Downpatrick 
“Eire after a threat was telephoned 
d and to the course. 


Golf plan 
hit out 
of bounds 

By John Young 
Mr Christopher Miles wants 


KNOWSLEY NORTH 


Mr HowartiTs victory at 
Knowsley, announced in the 
early hoars of yesterday 
morning, was one of those 
political events that left all 
three parties disappomted. 

Mr Howarth won comfort- 
ably enough, bat Laboar’s 
majority was dipped from 
moretium 17,000 to jnst 6,724. 
And the 8JJ per cent fall in 
Lobov’s share, of the vote, 
from 643 to 563 percent, was 
the wont in- this Parliament. 

The Conservative can- 
didate, -Mr Roger Brown, 
slipped from second to third 
place, in spite of die recent 
Conservative resurgence hi na- 
tional opinion polls, the in- 
creased spending announced 
in the anfamm statement *ad 
the best jobless figures for 
yean announced on the by- 
ejection pollings day. * 

. He only na r row l y avoided 
the ig nomi ny of becommg the 
first main party candidate to 
fose (us deposit since the rules 
were changed. The Conser- 
vative share of the' vote 
dropped from 20.1 per cent in 
1983 to a mere 63 per cent -■ 
The Liberal candidate, Miss 
Rosemary Cooper, the Mcr- 
JSy John Young seyside councillor who fo ught 

MrChristopher Miles wants the seat for the Alliance, 
to tuxn his farm, near strictly on local issues and on 
Bfetchingley, Surrey, into a attacking the MQifant Ten- 
golf course. 

Tandridge District Council 
has vetoed the idea partly 
because it considers a golf 
course would be an intrusion 
into the Green Belt and be- 
cause the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture regards the land as too 
good to be lost to farming. 

Mr Miles disputes the min- 
istry’s assessment and has call- 
ed in his own expert, who rates 
the land as no better than 
moderate to poor grade C 
(there are five categories from 
AtoE). 

“I have been turned down 
without any discussion of my 
plans." he said yesterday. 

The ministry said yesterday 
that Mr Miles’s was a special 
case and should not discour- 
age other fanners from sub- 
mitting ideas for all alternat- 
ive land use. But it does seem 
, to conflict with its insistence 
that aH so-called “set aside" 
schemes should be voluntary, 
and to suggest that permission 
to volunteer is likely to de- 
pend on where the applicant 
farms and on the quality ofhis 
land. 

Part of the explanation is 
probably that any application 
for development of land zon- 
ed as agricultural ■ requires 
sanction for a change of use. 

Government departments and 
local authorities are believed 
to fear that, once this sanc- 
tions is granted, the way will 
be open for the developer to 
decide that a golf course, for 
instance would be unpractical 
and to apply to build, say, a 
housing estate instead. 


George Howarth (L) 
Rosemary Cooper (Lib) 
Roger Brown (C) 

David HaBswoith (RCn 
Roger Weiss (Rainbow 


Corypnd) 



BY ORDER 

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HIGHLY IMPORTANT 
PUBLIC AUCTION 

OF SEVERAL HUNDRED EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND MEDIUM QUALITY. HANDMADE 

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aid others from the more important w ea vetg centres of the East, inducted are many antiques. 
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which hes been cleared from 

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Payment: Cash, Cheque or aH rngjnr credit cards 


‘Houdinl death 9 


BBC "was warned about risky stunts 9 


By David Sapsted 

The Government's safety 
executive twice threatened, le- 
gal action against the BBC 
earlier this year over the 
staging of a daredevil stunt 
planned for the A r oe/ Ed- 
monds’ Late. Late Breakfast 
Show, it was learnt last night 

As investigations continued 
yesterday into the death of Mr 
Michael Lush, a Southampton 
builder, during rehearsals for 
tonight’s scheduled show, the 
Health and Safety Executive 
disclosed that it had acciden- 
tally learnt of another stunt 
being planned for the current 
series. 

Although no notification to 
the safety executive is re- 
quired. building inspectors on 
a routine visit to a John La ing 
building site in the centre of 
Bradford heard that a “Whiriy 
Wheel'* challenge was being 


planned, during which a 
viewer would be placed on top 
of an industrial chimney and 
plucked to safety by helicopter 
just seconds before it was 
blown up. 

“Because this was an active 
building site and because of 
fears of a risk to life, we 
warned the BBC that we 
would take enforcement ac- 
tion under the 1974 Health and 
Safety at Work Act to prevent 
it going ahead," a spokesman 
said. 

“We understand that it was 
then planned to stage the same 
stum at a venue in Wales but. 
again, our local office heard 
about it and warned off the 
BBC" 

Safely executive inspectors, 
as well as the police and the 
BBC. were yesterday conduct- 
ing an investigation into the 
accident in which Mr Lush, 


aged 25, fell 120 feet to his 
death while practising a Hou- 
dini-style escape from a sealed 
box, suspended from a crane. 

The' accident, at Long 
C rend On in Bu cltingha mdiir e, 
was at first thought to be 
caused by a failure in the 
elasticated safety rope in- 
tended to break the escaper’s 
fall, but, in a BBC-TV inter- 
view yesterday, the show’s 
producer. Mr Michael HuriL 
insisted an equipment failure 
was not to blame. 

He did not directly blame 
human, error. “We do not 
know what it was." he said. 

The BBC last night denied 
that there had been previous 
suggestions to scrap the dare- 
devil stums that have become 
such an integral pan of the 
show, which attracts an av- 
erage audience of 8.6 million. 

Mr Edmonds and Mr Mike 


Smith, presenter of “Whiriy 
Wheel”, yesterday met Mr 
Lush's family, when they trav- 
elled to Stoke Mandeville 
Hospital to identify the body. 

Earlier. Mr Edmonds said 
that he must bear some of the 
responsibility for the death. 

The actors’ union. Equity, 
yesterday sought a meeting 
with the BBC to complain 
about “the growing tendency 
to use ordinary members of 


dcncy, had most to crow 
abooLShe put up tbe Alliance 
share of tbe vote from 143 per 
cent to 34.6, an increase 
matched only by the Ryedale 
victory earlier this year. 

Alliance leaders were dis- 
appointed only Mi the sense 
that the the Liberals and SDP 
needed a by-election win to 
restore their national morale, 

after the disaster of this year’s 

liberal Assembly and the 
dash on defence policy which 
has seen their nati onal poll 
rating slump. 

There was a cramb of 
comfort for the Alliance in 
their defeat In a poll con- 
ducted by Harris for 1TN 
among 1368 Knowsley voters 
as they left the palling 
80 per cent of all voters said 
that the defence dash, now 
resolved, between the two 
Alliance partners had made no 
difference to thdr views about 
tbe Alliance. 

But the Alliance vote was 
also dearly shown as “soft". 
Only 22 per cent of Alliance 
voters identified “very strong- 
ly" with tbe Alliance com- 
pared with 55 per cent of 
Labour voters and 44 per cent 
of Conservative voters, who 
identified very strongly with 
their parties. 

Tory’s choice 

Miss Anne McIntosh, aged 
32, of Middleton in Teesdale, 
Co Durham, an honours law 
graduate of Edinburgh- 
University, has been selected 
as the prospective Conser- 
vative candidate to fight the 
Workington constituency in 
Cumbria at the next election. 
The seal is held, for Labour, 


tbe public for this kind of by Mr Dale Campbefl-Sav- 
entertainment”. ours, wbo had a majority of 

Miss Barbar Steeman. who 7,128 at the last election, 
spent two months recovering 
from a broken shoulder after 
being fired from a camion in 
an earlier show, said: “The 
BBC don't give a damn. They 
just want the viewers." 

An inquest into Mr Lusb’s 
death will be opened on 
Tuesday. 


■H* 

iir 


J 


i 









THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


HOME NEWS 


t '■ 


i. 


Test case 
begins over 
island 
atom test 


A test case began in the 
Hip Court yesterday to de- 
cide, whether hundreds of 
servicemen are entitled to 
bring legal actions c laiming 
damages for cancer allegedly 
contracted after they wit- 
nessed the British atom and 
hydrogen bomb tests on 
' Christmas Island. 

Mr Melvyn Bruce Pearce, of 
Backwell, Bristol, a former 
lance corporal, is suing the 
Government, c laiming that 
his illness was caused by the 
10 months he served on the 
island from December 1957. 

The Government sought to 
have Mr Pearce's claim for 
compensation struck out on 
the ground that under Section 
10 of the Crown Proceedings 
Act, 1947, be had no right, as a 
member of the Armed Forces, 
to sue his employers for 
negligence. 

But Mr Pearce, aged 49. 
believes be has found a way 
round the law which will 
enable him to claim 
compensation. 

Mr Andrew Collins, QG 
representingMr George Youn- 
, ger, the Secretary of State for 
t' Defence, and the Ministry of 
Defence, said the preliminary 
issue for the court to decide 
was whether, as the ministry 
contended, the provisions of 
Section 10 provided the Gov- t 
eminent with a complete de- 1 
fence to Mr Pearce’s claim. 

Mr Collins said thai, for the 
purpose of deciding the issue, 
the Government would as- 
sume that Mr Pearce could 
prove his although the claim 
was in feci contested. 

It was claimed that on 
Christinas Island Mr Pearce 
worked on a refrigeration unit 
used in connection with the 
atomic tests, saw the nuclear 
explosions, ate locally-grown 
food and swam in the sea. 

“It is alleged that he con- 
i traded lymphoma and other 
cancerous illnesses as a result 
of exposure to radiation dur- 


ing that time,'* Mr Collins 
said- 

His illness started with a 
rash around the lymph glands 
in 1966 and a severe skin 
condition developed in 1970. 

Mr Pearce chums that he 
was owed a duty of care not by 
his employer, the Army, but 
by the now defunct Atomic 
Energy Authority, whose mili- 
tary functions came under the 
control of the Ministry of 
Defence in 1973. 

He alleges that the authority 
was in breach of its duty by 
failing to monitor equipment 
and warn servicemen of the 
health risks of swimming in 
radioactive waters and eating 
contaminated fruits. 

Mr Collins said that, under 
Section 4(2) of the 1973 
Atomic Energy Authority 
Weapons Group Act, the De- 
fence Secretary took over the 
powers and liabilities of the 
authority, but kept the same 
rights he bad always bad in 
respect of legal actions 
brought by or against him. 

The importance of this was 
that, whereas previously the 
Atomic Energy Authority had 
no exemption under section 
10 of the Crown Proceedings 
Act from being sued, the 
Secretary of State did have 
exemption. 

Mr Collins stressed that 
service personnel injured on 
duty had a right to claim 
compensation, even though 
they could not sue in the 
courts. 

He said the Secretary of 
State for Social Services had 
certified that Mr Pearce’s 
suffering would be treated as 
attributable to Army service 
for the purpose of entitlement 
to an award. 

He said Section 10 was not 
meant to avoid payment of 
compensation but to give 
compensation in recognition 
of the special risks run by 
servicemen. 


Fall kills 
leading 
woman 
jockey 

By Angelin Johnson 

Miss Jayne Thompson, one 
of Britain's top women jock- 
eys, died yesterday from inju- 
ries she suffered in a fell while 
riding Hot Betty at Catteridc 
last Saturday. 

Miss Thompson, aged 22, 
had been in a coma in 
Middlesbrough Genera! Hos- 
pital. 

She did not regain 
consciousness in spite of re- 
peated playing of recorded 
messages from friends and 
colleagues. 

Her family decided to 
switch off her life support 
system at I pen after further 
medical tests proved negative. 

The daughter of Mr Ron 

Thompson, a trainer in Don- 
caster, she is'the first woman 
jockey to be killed from 
injuries sustained while rac- 
ing. since women were granted 
licences to ride more than a 
decade ago. 

Miss Thompson, who rode 
seven winners last season, had 
to stop racing fora while after 
a fell on May 5, had ridden 
two winners this season. 

Her death highlights die 
dangers faced b^ jockeys when 
riding overjumps. 

Mrs Jessica Charles- Jones, a 
fellow jockey, said last night 
“Jayne was the tops. It is a 
terrible shame that this sort of 
thing always happens to the 
best I will now have to go out 
and try to ride a few winners 
for her." 

Miss Dorothy Laird, sec- 
retary of the Lady Jockeys 
Association, said: “We are 
extremely sorry and all are 
devastated. Jayne was such a 
likeable and exuberant pro- 
fessional She was .a good 
rider.” 

The last jockey to be lolled 
at a horse racing meet was Mr 
Michael Blackmore, an ama- 
teur rider, aged 30. 

He was riding Silent Sha- 
dow at Market Rasen in May 
when he was unseated and hit 
by one of the other 18 horses. 



Mike Dennis working in his Binni 

line between lii 


i studio on one of a dozen 8ft high scnlptmes which will decorate the main railway 
and WolverhamptoH (Photograph: Philip Dunn). 


Bradford City disaster 


Confusion over crucial fire warnings 


By Ian Smith 

The Bradford City Football 
Qub secretary's confusion 
yesterday over two crucial 
letters he received about fire 
risks in the grandstand where 
56 people were to die led a 
High Court judge to impose a 
weekend ban on any attempt 
by the official to refresh bis 
memory. 

Mr Justice Cantley ordered 
Mr Terence Newman, aged 
37, not to discuss the case or 
re-read transcripts of evidence 
he gave to the judicial inquiry 
which last year investigated 
the catastrophe at the Valley 
Parade ground. 

The order was applied for 
by Mr Michael Ogden, QC 
one of the barristers fighting to 
prove liability for the fire 
against the dub, the Health 
and Safety Executive and the 
now-defunct West Yorkshire 


County Council, the fire 
authority. 

The application at die High 
Court in Leeds came after an 
admission by Mr Newman 
that he could not accurately 
remember whether he had 
filed or passed on the letters 
from the county council, even 
after being given 15 minutes 
alone in a ride room to read 
copies of the correspondence. 

Before the brief adjourn- 
ment Mr Newman told the 
judge: “I know this seems 
strange but the inquiry was 
two years ago. lots has hap- 
pened in between. Without 
looking at what I said two 
years ago 1 cannot remember a 
thing." 

He later admitted that the 
letters drew attention to the 
fire hazard posed by mounds 
of litter in concrete cavities 
under grandstand seals, but 
could recall only that he had 


passed the letter containing 
the most explicit warning to 
the dub vice-chairman. 

Mr Newman agreed that 
there was a fair chance of the 
wooden grandstand, dating 
from 1909, catching fire. 

Earlier, Mr Stafford Hegro- 
botham, the chib chairman,, 
told the court that he had 
known there was a fire risk in 
die grandstand, but be had not 
been alerted to the enormity of 
the danger 

. He said that the club was 
w alking a financ ial tightrope 
after being dragged* from the 
edge of bankruptcy, and he 
had not considered spending 
club funds on having piles of 
rubbish removed from under 
the grandstand floor 

In May 1985, when a spec- 
tator dropped a cigarette, it 
rolled through a crack in the 
hardboard floor and started 
the fire. 


A test case is being brought 
by a widow, Mrs Susan 
Fletcher, and her son, Martin, 
aged 12, to prove liability for 
the fire against Bradford Cfty 
Football Qub, the Health and 
Safety Executive and the now 
defunct West Yorkshire 
County CounriL 

Mrs Fletcher lost her hus- 
band. second son. brother-in- 
law and his fetherin the fire. If 
her case succeeds another 109 
victims and relatives will pur- 
sue claims for damages. 

R unning in tandem in the 
court is a test case brought 
against the same defendants 
by Sgi David Britton, aged 42, 
with the support of the Police 
Federation. If he wins then 44 
other West Yorkshire police- 
men oh duty on the day of the 
disaster will launch damages 
claims. 

The case will resume on 
Monday. 



Mr Wannan, victim of 
attack. 

Printer is 
jailed for 
pub attack 

By Michael Horenell 

A dismissed Times printer 
was sentenced to nine months' 
imprisonment yesterday after 
a jury found him guilty of 
unlawfully wounding the 
newspaper’s property cor- 
respondent. Mr Christopher 
Warm an. 

t i Robin Shirfield. aged 47. 

' who was dismissed last Janu- 
ary when News International 
moved to Wapping, east 
London, plunged a beer glass 
into the side of Mr Wannan’s 
face in a public house. 

The jury at Southwark 
Crown Court, south London, 
found him guilty by a 10-2 
majority after deliberating for 
nearly two-and-a-half hours. 

But Shirfield, a married 
man from Wood Green, north, 
London, was cleared of the 
more serious charge of wound- , 
ing Mr Wannan, aged 48, with 
intent to do him grievous 
bodily harm. 

The public gallery of the 
court was packed with 
Shirfield’s colleagues from the 
National Graphical Assoc- 
k I iation. 

The attack on Mr Wannan 
occurred on February 20 in 
the Pakenbam Arms public 
house near The Times' former 
offices in Gray's Inn Road. 

Mr War-man received cuts 
to his neck, ear and jaw and 
was taken to hospital for 
treatment 

Shirfield, who has been 
unemployed since the start of 
the Wapping dispute, had told 
the jury, during the three-day 
trial, that he bad been in 
another public house near by 
and was on his way home 
when the attack, which be 
denied, happened. 


Man cleared 
of threats 

A printer was acquitted at 
Thames magistrates’ court 
yesterday on a charge or 
threatening words and behav- 
iour near the New Inter- 
national plant m Wapping. 

east London, on June 17. 

Mr Anthony Adams, aged 
4i of Great Horkesley, Col- 
ctester, denied the offence. 
SS* other men were given 

unconditional bail. 


The battle against Aids 


Backlash 
may follow 
campaign 

• By Sheila Gram 
Political Staff 

The Government is expect- 
ing a moral backlash to the 
explicit details in its planned 
public information campaign 
against the spread of Aids. 

Advertisements and leaf- 
lets, which will go to 23 
million homes, are not gen- 
erally regarded as “lurid". But 
government sources recognize 
that they are bound to upset 
some people. 

It was emphasized yes- 
terday that the Government 
was prepared to weather such 
complaints because of the 
urgency in getting its message 
across — that Aids kills. 

Offence is expected to be 
taken by some people at 
descriptions of the ways in 
which the disease can be 
contracted and emphasis on 
the need to use condoms. 

The message which came 
out of a top-level Cabinet 
committee, chaired by Lord 
Whitelaw. after its first meet- 
ing this week, was that people 
should stick to one sexual 
partner. If this rule was broken 
then they should make sure a 
condom was used. 

The controversial issue of 
screening particular sections 
of the population — or over- 
seas visitors — has not yet 
been discussed in detail by the 
committee. Doctors are 
strongly against any form of 
compulsory screening, but 
government sources believe 
objections to the idea may 
change. 


Bishops call for 
change in morals 


By Angelin Johnson 


Roman Catholic bishops in 
England and Wales have re- 
jected the idea of using con- 
dom - contraceptives as a 
weapon in the battle against 
Aids. 

The Aids epidemic can be 
contained only by a substan- 
tial change in people's moral 
attitudes and sexual behav- 
iour, the bishops announced 
after a four-day conference in 
Hertfordshire. 

Aids, South Africa, peace 
and disarmame nt, and Sun- 
day racing were among the 
moral issues debated by Ro- 
man Catholic bishops of Eng- 
land and Wales during the 
conference. 

Cardinal Basil Hume, who 
chaired the sessions this week, 
told a press conference in 
London yesterday that al- 
though the bishops extended 
“their deep compassion” to all 
those who suffered fro hi Aids, 
they could not accept the use 
of contraceptive sheaths. 

“The position of toe Catho- 
lic Church on this matter has 
not altered," he said. “That 
means accepting that the sex- 
ual expression of love is 
reserved to marriage." 

A short statement issued 
from the conference declared: 
“The most effective and long- 
term method of combining 
this threatening epidemic 
must consist m a substantial 
change in moral and social 
attitudes and behaviour. 

“Programmes of public 
education or information 
must be based on this fun- 
damental principle.” 

Cardinal Hume said that 


although the bishops rec- 
ognized that Aids could be 
contracted without moral 
guilt, they could not change 
their religious tenet that sex- 
ual promiscuity could not be 
encouraged. 

Bui unlike the Church of 
England, which has an- 
nounced that it will publish its 
own guidelines to help Aids 
sufferers later this month, the 
Catholic bishops have opted 
to steer away from any lit- 
erature on the subject Instead 
the Catholic church will offer 
support by working with other 
churches and agencies. 

The bishops reaffirmed 
their abhorrence of apartheid 
but foiled to make any strong 
statement on the position of 
the church. Instead they pub- 
. lished a letter from four South 
African Catholic archbishops 
written under the restrictions 
of the state of emergency. 

The archbishops said that 
although they were concerned 
about how economic sanc- 
tions would affect the poorest 
people in the country, they 
would leave it to churchmen 
to examine their own con- 
science regarding investment 
in South Africa. 

Cardinal Hume applauded 
the work being done by the 
“peace movements” to keep 
the disarmament issue in the 
public mind. 

He said the prospect of 
Sunday horse racing becoming 
legalized, although not bitterly 
opposed by the bishops, 
would not be acceptable if it 
meant the widespread opening 
of betting shops on Sundays. 


MP will 
seek help 
for jobless 

Mr Piers Merchant, the 
Conservative MP who tried 
living on the standard of 
unemployment benefit as an 
experiment, promised yes- 
terday to seek a better deal for 
the long-term unemployed. 

He is to report to the Prime 
Minister and Mr Norman 
Fowler, Secretary of Stale for 
Social Services, and will seek 
talks with the gas and electric- 
ity boards about the problems 
low income families have 

The MP for Newcastle upon 
Tyne Central and his family 
had moved for a week into a 
small flat in Scotswood, one of 
the city's poorest areas. 

He said he was convinced 
the earnings rule preventing 
unemployed people earning 
more than £4 a week (£8 for 
couples) on top of their benefit 
should be changed. 


Drug for baby 50 
times too strong 


A baby died after a heart 
surgeon gave: him a drug 50 
times too strong during an 
operation, an inquest was told 
yesterday. 

The surgeon, Mr Alan 
Yates, said be had asked an 
anaesthetist. Dr Michael 
Thompson, to give him 10 ml 
of the drug to inject into Max 
Gaughan. aged six weeks. 

Mr Yates said: “I didn't say 
I wanted it diluted because it's 
never, ever used undiluted.” 

But Dr Thompson assumed 
the surgeon wanted the con- 
centrated form of the drug, 
which temporarily stops the 
hearts to allow surgery, 

Mr Yates injected it into the 
baby and asked for another 10 
ml 

The surgeon then per- 
formed a successful IVt hour 
operation: It was only when 
they tried to revive the boy 
that they realized their 


mistake. 

Dr Thompson told the in- 
quest he was expecting to be 
asked for 80-100 ml of 
cardioplegia^ and when Mr 
Yates asked for such a small 
quantity he assumed he 
wanted it undiluted. 

The boy’s father, Mr Ashley 
Gaughan, a post-office en- 
gineer, looked close to tears 
and frequently held his head 
in his hands as he heard the 
details. 

His wife was still too upset 
to attend the inquest at South- 
wark in south London. 

The operation was per- 
formed at Guy’s Hospital in 
south London, in August this 
year. 

Mr Gaughan, of Graham 
Crescent, Portslade, East Sus- 
sex, refused to comment after 
the bearing. 

A verdict of misadventure 
was recorded. 


New road 
warning 
signs after 
fatal crash 

New guidelines to improve 
the standard of roadwork 
warning signs were issued by 
the Department of Transport 
three weeks after a motorway 
crash in which 13 people died. 
Preston Crown Court was told 
yesterday. 

The regulations recommend 
that only as a last resort 
should three lanes filter into 
one, as was happening at the 
time of the accident. 

Mr John Bonnyman, a coa- 
ch driver, aged 63, from 
Edinburgh, who is accused or 
ploughing into a line of ve- 
hicles on the M6 in Lan- 
cashire. denies four specimen 
charges of causing death by 
reckless driving. The jury was 
told that tentative calculations 
indicated the Edinburgh to 
London coach was travelling 
at 60-62mph on impact. 

One survivor. Mr William 
Robson, from Ryton. Co Dur- 
ham, said he led his wife and 
child to safety after the coach 
landed on its roof. But be also 
saw two people burnt to death 
in a car. “It was horrific," he 
said. 

Insp Malcolm Herbert, of 
Lancashire police, who told 
the jury about the new regula- 
tions, also said that the signs 
in operation that day were 
within the rules as they then 
existed. 

He said it was established 
policy by Lancashire police 
not to use electric warning 
systems in support of tem- 
porary road signs. 

“Drivers tend not to react to 
warning signs. They tend to 
react to a hazard when they 
have seen it,” he said. 

The- trial continues on 
Monday. . 


Overdose was 
‘large enough 
to kill’ 

A Home Office pathologist 
yesterday said that the mas- 
sive drug overdose given to a 
terminal cancer patient was 
large enough to kill. 

Dr Michael Green told 
Leeds Crown Court that be- 
tween 1.000 and 1,500 milli- 

S s of injected pheno- 
tone would be fetal. 

■ Dr Green was giving ev- 
idence in the trial of Dr John 
Carr, aged 59, of Branch 
Road, Lower Wortley. Leeds, 
who denies attempting to 
murder a retired Leeds en- 
gineer, Ronald Mawson, in 
August last year. 

The prosecution alleges Dr 
Carr injected Mr Mawson the 
day after he returned home 
from a hospice. He died two 
days later. 

Dr Green told the court he 
would not have prescribed 
phenobarbitone to a man in 
Mr Mawson’s state. • 

“I would have been cau- 
tious about giving a sedative", 
he said. “1 don’t regard this as 
respectable medical practice." 

When questioned by Mr 
Bernard Hargrove, QC. for the 
defence. Dr Green agreed that 
Mr Mawson's death could 
have been through natural 
causes but added: “1 think it is 
much more probable that Mr 
Mawson died because he re- 
ceived that injection." 

Dr Green said pheno- 
barbitone was rarely used 
except for treating epilepsy. 
The trial continues. 


Precautions boost for sales 


The recent widespread pub- 
licity over Aids has presented 
a conundrum for London 
International Group (LIG), 
whose condoms have an al- 
most total monopoly over the 
British market. 

On the one hand, the advice 
from the medical profession 
that the use of condoms can 
cut down the risk of contract- 
ing Aids, is undoubtedly good 
for business. 

The group says there has 
been little effect so for on 
domestic sales, but publicity 
about Aids has generated an- 
nual growth of 4-5 per cent in 
the US where the company is 
estimated to control almost 50 
per cent of the markcL 

According to Miss Lindsay 
Jenkins, an analyst at Morgan 
Stanley, the investment bank- 
ers. LIG had condom sales of 
£36 million in 1985. of which 
£8 million were sold in Britain 
and £19 million in North 
America. LIG also dominates 
markets in The Netherlands 
and Belgium and has signifi- 
cant shares in Spain. France 
and West Germany. 

However. LIG will want to 


By Richard Lander 

avoid suggestions that it is 
profiting from the suffering of 
others, especially when extra 
publicity is given to its share 
price — at present just off its 
record high at 253V:p - and 
next week's interim results, 
which analysts expect to in- 
clude a 17 per cent rise in 
pretax profits to 
£113 million. 

The company is not un- 
accustomed to dealing with 
unwelcome publicity. 

Originally known as the 
London Rubber Company, 
the name was changed to LRC 
International in the late 1960s 
to dissociate the company 
from the schoolboy joke im- 
age that randoms* attracted. 
That was changed to the 
present name in 1985. to 
remove the word rubber from 
the group's noiepaper. 

In addition. LiG might fear 

that any anti-Aids campaign 
could draw renewed attention 
to the fact that it makes well 
over 90 per cent of the 
condoms sold in Britain. 

This dominance has twice 
drawn the scrutiny of the 
Monopolies and Mergers 


Commission, with the watch- 
dog body rerammending price 
restraints on its condoms on 
both occasions. 

Such constraints have done 
little to hurt LIG, which has 
earned record profits every 
year since 1 982, with condoms 
still producing impressive 
profit margins of about 18 per 
cent. 

However, this impressive 
growth probably has more to 
do with the strategy followed 
by Mr Alan Woltz, who took 
over as chairman with a new 
managment team at a time of 
declining fortunes in 1979. 

What Mr Woltz. an aggres- 
sively-detennined American, 
has done is to reduce LlG's 
reliance on randoms and rub- 
ber gloves and transform the 
company into a diversified 
group whose interests include 
photoprocessing and fine 
china. 

LIG has so for refrained 
from aiming .at the British 
homosexual market — per- 
haps for fear of tarnishing its 
image - but its Dutch subsid- 
iary has test-marketed a “gay" 
random. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


Tougher 
line urged 
for some 
assaults 


Criminal Justice Bill 


The Lord Chancellor yes- 
terday urged magistrates to 
impose tough sentences for 
any assaults on people in 
“vulnerable” positions, such 
as policemen, bus conductors 
and bar staff (Our Legal 
Affairs Correspondent writes). 

But Lord Hail sham of St 
Maryiebone, rejected criticism 
of apparent inconsistencies in 
sentencing by magistrates, 
saying it would be easy to 
program a computer to pro- 
duce the “right” sentence 
every time - but although that 
would give absolute consis- 
tency, it would not give 
justice. 

Lord Hailsham, in a speech 
in Bath to the Somerset and 
South Avon branch of the 
Magistrates’ Association, said: 
“Assaults on persons who 
occupy vulnerable positions 
call for exemplary sentences. 

“For assaults on policemen, 
bus and train crews, publicans 
and bar staff and the like, a 
custodial sentence should be 
considered though only im- 
posed when necessary.” 

For offences resulting in 
“substantial finan cial gain”, 
such as the overloading of 
commercial vehicles, illegal 
disposal of waste, or salmon 
and deer poaching, punitive 
financial penalties should be 
“the rule rather than the ex- 
ception” 

It was the “easiest dung in 
the world for academics and 
statisticians and journalists” 
to {mint to apparent sentenc- 
ing inconsistencies, he said. 

Consistent sentencing could 


Customs get wider 
power in drug cases 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


New powers for customs 
officers to hold suspected drug 
carriers and anonymity for 
rape victims from the moment 
of complaint are among new 
details of the Criminal Justice 
Bill to emerge with its publica- 
tion yesterday. 

Courts will be able to re- 
mand defendants to customs 
custody for eight days rather 
than prison to help to defeat 
drug-smuggling “sniffers and 
swallowers”; while rape vic- 
tims are granted anonymity 
from when they first make a 
complaint and not the lime of 
charge as now. 

The 1 28-da use Bill contains 
far-reaching proposals which 
give courts new powers to 
tackle serious crime; improve 
the lot of the victim; change 
the jury system; reform tnal 
procedures and extradition 
law. 

Chief among its proposals 
are new powers for courts to 
confiscate from criminals pro- 
ceeds of crime where sums of 
more than £10,000 are in- 
volved. 


The High Court will be able 
to freeze a defendant's assets 
up to the amount of the sum 
involved, whether lawfully 
gained or not, and have them 
sold to meet that sum. 

Introducing the Bill Mr 
Douglas Hurd. Home Sec- 
retary, said: “There is no 
reason why those (other than 
drug traffickers) who commit 
o ther highly lucrative offences 
— the swindlers, the robbers, 
the traders in pornography — 
should be able to salt away the 
proceeds to enjoy on their 
release from prison.” 

The confiscation powers are 
backed by proposals drawn 
from the Roskill report on 
serious fraud, in particular to 
create a serious fraud office 
under the Attorney General to 
investigate and prosecute the 
most serious and ■ complex 
frauds. 

At the same time, the rules 
of evidence will be modern- 
ized so that business docu- 
ments are admissible in their 
own right and “can speak for 
themselves” if bated on 


Court of Appeal’s 
sentencing guide 


be produced simply by reduc- 
ing the number of sentencing 
options and variables to be 
taken into account; and 
producing a sentencing pro- 
gram for a computer. 

Having fed in all the vari- 
ables “h would merely be 
necessary to press a key to 
produce the ‘right’ sentence”. 
The wide discretion given to 


the bench was recognition that 
“life is not mechanistic”. 


In his address Lord Hails- 
ham also strongly criticized 
suggestions that magistrates 
should be made more politi- 
cally accountable. At best 
these ideas were “crackpot”; 
at worst they struck “at the 
very root of freedom”. 

Allegations that political 
pressure was (nought to bear 
on magistrates in the miners* 
dispute dealing with large 
numbers of cases were “utterly 
false” and “pure fabrications 
or the delusions of disordered 
minds”. 


Ou sentencing the Bill seeks 
to reinstate a modified version 
of the Attorney General's 
power to refer crown court 
sentences to the Court of 
Appeal where he considers 
they raise questions of public 
importance. 

The coart can then state or 
reaffirm the principles to be 
followed in sentencing in simi- 
lar cases in future. 

A similar provision was 
rejected by the Lords when 
part of the Prosecution of 
Offences BilL This due the 
proposal does not involve a 
“post modem” on a particular 
sentence, referred on the basis 
that it was deemed “wrong”. 

Nor will the Court of Appeal 
be asked what sentence it 
thought should have been 
imposed instead; hot rather to 
affirm a general principle on 
issne of public interest 

Courts will also be granted 
powers to impose new maxi- 
mum penalties of 14 years for 
carrying firearms in further- 
ance of crime and for the main 
offences of corruption. 


November 14 1986 


Howe reaffirms policy of 
no deals with terror states 


FOREIGN AFFAIRS 


The Government will do no 
deals with terrorists and is 
determined to deal decisively 
with states that sponsor terror- 
ism, Sir Geoffiy Howe told the 
Commons daring the resumed 
debate on the Queen's Speech. 

The Foreign and Common- 
wealth Secretary stressed the 
importance of joint inter- 
national action in the fight 
against terrorism. He said that 
the Government’s determin- 
ation to deal decisively with 
states that sponsored terrorism 
did not preclude contacts with 
those who might be able to help 
secure the release of hostages. 

The Government remained 
deeply concerned about Mr Alec 
CoDett and Mr John McCarthy, 
the two British bostagss w 
Lebanon, and about Mr Brian 
Keenan, the dual Irish-Brilish 
citizen. It was doing what it 
could to secure their freedom — 
if they were still alive — while 

maintaining the principle Of BO 

substantive concessions. 

Britain’s EEC partners had 
recently reaffirmed their deter- 
mination not to make con- 
cessions to terrorists and that 
was a commitment to which the 
Government attached much 
importance. 

“In our view concessions lead 
to more, not less, hostage taking. 
This Government will not do 
deals with terrorists for the 
release of hostages. This is not 
an easy policy to follow. Some- 
times it is agonising. But it is 
right.” 

On disarmament, Sr Geof- 
frey said that the British people 
would not fell for the Labour 
Party's hollow and naive polic y 
of renouncing our nuclear weap- 
ons for nothing in return. 

That policy would smash the 
western alhanne which had 
underpinned Britain's freedom 
for 40 years. It was difficult to 


believe that any major western 
party committed to peace and 
disarmament could choose this 
point in history to try to pull the 
rug out from under the Nato 
position. 

At the very moment when 
years of patient diplomacy to 
bring the Russians to the nego- 
tiating table were starting to pay 
off, with substantial new agree- 
ments in sight in different areas, 
the Opposition proposed that 
we should throw away the cards 
that had brought us to that 
position. 

For all the new thinking in Mr 
Gorbachov’s Soviet Union, for 
all the skilful presentation and 
dramatic initiatives, the facts of 
the East-West division remain- 
ed basically the same. The 
Soviet Union talked far more 
about peace and disarmament, 
but had in practice not stopped 
steadily building up its already 
massive forces. 

Any party which refused to 
face up to that fed could not be 
trusted with the defence of the 
United Kingdom. One-sided 
disarmament had been repeat- 
edly tried and had repeatedly 
failed- Unilateral gestures were 
likely to be destabilizing and 

damag in g . 

Nuclear weapons had pre- 
vented any war m Europe for 
the past 40 years. As successive 
governments had acknowledg- 
ed, the UK's own nuclear 
capability had been essential 
both to give our country security 
and to deter nuclear blackmail. 

While the Soviet Union and 
its Warsaw Pan allies retained a 
massive superiority in conven- 
tional forces and chemical 
weapons, we roust keep our 
nuclear deterrent It would be 
folly indeed to abandon nuclear 
weapons and so make Europe 
safe for conventional or chem- 
ical warfare. 

The Government took a 
consistent and sensible ap- 


shonld be maintained. But it 
was also ready for dialogue with 
the Soviet Union and Eastern 
Europe. 

It believed that such contacts 
allowed it to influence the 
Soviet leadership and, gradual- 
ly, build up cooperation. The 
Soviet leadership acknowledged 
that the UK could make an 
important contribution to great- 
er confidence between East and 
West and a more stable and 
secure world. That was why the 
Prime Minister would be visit- 
ing the Soviet Union on Mr 
Gorbachov's personal invita- 
tion in the first half of next year. 
Mr Gorbachov respected Mrs 
Thatcher precisely because she 
was not weak or ready to 
surrender Britain's interests but 
because she combined firmness 
in our national defence with 
patience and creativity in 
negotiation. 

“We win riot give away 
something for nothing and so 
put the UK’s defence at risk. We 
shall continue to. work for 
confidence between the Soviet 
Union and the UK Bat we shall 
not take that confidence for 
granted. 

“Leadership and consistency 
will remain the h all m a r ks of our 
policy. We will continue to 
promote Britain's interests, to 
do what is necessary and to do 
what is right.” 

Earlier, Sir Geoffrey had re- 
viewed various aspects of for- 
eign affairs in the five months 
since the House Iasi debated tire 
subject. These included mea- 
sures to be taken against Syria in 
the wake of the Hmdawi affair; 
the continuing search for peace 
talks in the Middle East: his 
mission to South Africa seeking 


an end to apartheid and height- 
ened tensions in the region after 
President Macfael’s tragic death; 
and political cooperation within 
the EEC. 

He said the Prime Minister 
was leaving today for important 
talks with President Reagan 


preach to these questions. It 
insisted that Britain’s defences 


Chateau 

Les Drouillards 


ATIMES 

EXCLUSIVE 


PREMIERES COTES BE BUYE 


Appellation Premieres C6tn dc Bbqrc Gomalcr 


peoouca op mancs 



Hie , q oj 

k =h. Foucoue a. w ■■■ iiiith BOt 

\ ao *°* a » MWcraa tor VICTORIA WJMt Ltumo / 


1982 VENTAGE CLARET 

In the Times 
on Monday 
A case of Chateau 
Les Drouillards 1982 
AC Premieres 
C6tes de Blaye 

JUSt £39-50 per case 



information from someone 
with direct knowledge of the 
fects. Thai will apply to all 
criminal trials and not just to 
fraud. 

There wiD be a new proce- 
dure for the taking of evidence 
from overseas. Written state- 
ments will be as admissible as 
an oral statement by the same 
person. 

For the first time, too, the 
Bill enables evidence to be 


given by live video link, either 
from abroad or in cases of 
sexual or violent assault where 
the witness is a child. 

To help to tackle crime 
across international frontiers 
the law on extradition is 
overhauled to enable the 
United Kingdom to sign the 
European convention on 
extradition. 

The Government will have 
discretion to waive the so- 
called prima fade rule — the 
need for a foreign slate 
requesting extradition to show 
it has a case — with countries 
with an “approved” system of 
justice. 


Plea fails 
to halt 
switch of 
laboratory 


Pearce Wrg*ht 
dence Editor 




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Mr Patrick Moore, the 
astronomer, yesterday railed 
. in a late attempt to prevent the 

.r.L. Dmnl frfppnwKn 


in a rate aucmi" w — - 

move of the Royal Greenwich 
Observatory from Herst- 
monceux. East Sussex, to 
Cambridge. 

The appeal was rejected by 
Professor Bill Mitchell, c hair - 
man of the Science and En- 
gineering Research Council, 

who said the £6 millioncostof 
the move would be covered by 
the sale of Herstmonceux. 

Mr Moore has been prom- 
ised that although there would 
be no telescopes at the new 
centre, it would retain its 
The four telescopes at 
Herstmonceux, known as the 
Equatorial Group, may stay in 
operation. 

Professor Mitchell said the 
council had asked the Govern- 
ment for an extra £40 million 
over three years. Otherwise, 
be predicted “disastrous con- 
sequences” from cutting 
grants for first class research 
projects. 

Professor Mitchell also said 
the possible installation next 
month of the most powerful 
type of supercomputer, a Cray 
X-MP/48, costing more than 
£4 million, was still the sub- 
ject of negotiations between 
the British and American 
governments. I (would be kept 
at the Rutherford Appleton 
Laboratory, near Oxford, and 
be available to all university 
scientists. 

The American Government 
bad placed restrictions on the 
use of the computer because 
the machine is on the list of 









Dress rehearsal for Jenftfa at the Royal Opera House yesterday with English subtitles. 

(Photograph: Mark Pepper) 


Opera-goers objecting to captions 


The right to elect trial by 
jury is abolished for the 
offences of driving while dis- 
qualified; taking anfl driving 
away vehicles; common as- 
sault and w i mi i m l Humw 
valued below £2,000. 

Maximum penalties for 
those offences are redneed to 
six months (three months for 
criminal damage). 

order offenders to^e^etstined 
for up to four days in police 
cells is repealed; and a power 
for courts to order oflfenders 
to forfeit goods connected with 
their offence, to apply to all 
offences (not just as now to 
those carrying a maxim ran 
penalty of two or more years). 

The position of the victim is 
to be improved. In fntnre 
courts will have to give reasons 
where they order compensa- 
tion if they have power to do 
so. 

The Criminal Injuries Com- 
pensation Scheme is pat on a 
statutory bams and victims for 
the first time will be entitled to 
compensation as of right. 


Curb on 
challenge 
to jurors 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


Under the Criminal Justice 
Bill, several changes are made 
to the jury system. Most 
controversial is the abolition 
of the peremptory challenge, 
the right of defendants to 
challenge jurors without 
cause. 

The Government is also to 
“ring fence" the right of the 
crown to ask jurors to stand by 
so that it is strictly circum- 
scribed and does not reach the 
extent of the defence chal- 
lenge. 

A recent survey of cases 
brought by the Director of 
Public Prosecutions has 
shown a 65 per cent rate of 
peremptory challenge, of- 
ficials said yesterday. 


The stage is set for the first 
act of an artistic controversy 
at the Royal Opera on Mon- 
day, with the introduction of 
surtities for the premiere of 
Janaceck’s tragic opera, 
Jentifa. 

The experiment has already 
aroused opposition from some 
regular opera patrons, who 
main tain the projection of 
translations on to a black 
graphite screen above the 
proscenium arch will distract 
from the performance. 

The system has been used 
for children's matinees, and 
for touring productions by the 
Glyndebourne Opera, but this 


will be its debut evening 
performance at Covent 
Garden. 

Mr Paul Findlay, the assis- 
tant director, is optimistic that 
the audience will appreciate 
the opportunity to follow the 
nuances of the production, 
which is being performed in 
the original Czechoslovak. 

“We think it is essential to 
give the public the means to 
understand what they are 
seeing and hearing. The sys- 
tem has received overwhelm- 
ing support from children, and 
we believe it deserves a wider 
audience.” 

The £22,000 computerized 


system projects a maximum of 
two lines of text, with each 
character nine inches high, on 
to the screen more than 30 feet 
above the stage. About 500 
slides will be used during the 
three-hour performance. 

Mr Max Rnbow, the tech- 
nical director, has been grap- 
pling with a number of 
difficulties as most of the 
equipment was stolen from 
his office last August 


The replacements arrived 
only two weeks ago, and 
technical problems have per- 
sisted. However he believes it 
will be all right on the night 


strategic technology, which 
would prevent publication of 
the results of scientists who 
used it 


Family Law Reform Bill 


Equal rights for illegitimate children 


The upper age limit for jury 
service goes up from 65 to 70, 
adding 2J5 million new 
potential jurors. 

The Bill proposes that fines 
imposed on juveniles for foil- 
ing to comply with a super- 
vision order wifl be payable by 
a parent or guardian. 


By Our Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

A child conceived by arti- 
ficial insemination by donor 
with the consent of its 
mother's husband is to have 
the same legal status and 
rights as a child of the 
marriage. 

The proposal is contained 
in the the Family Law Reform 


Bill published yesterday, 
which aims to give equal legal 
rights to the 126,000 children 
born in England and Wales 
outside wedlock every year 
and to do away with the 
stigma attached to illegitim- 
acy. 

The Bill win also give 
illegitimate children the right 
to establish their parentage. 

The Bin, based on two 


reports from the Law Comm- 
ission, win do away with the 
need, so for as is possible, to 
describe children as “illegiti- 
mate” in legislation or legal 
documents. 

It amends • the law of 
maintenance so that they have 
the same legal rights as other 
children. Fathers of illegiti- 
mate children will be able to 
apply to a court For an order to 


share with the mother all 
parental rights and duties. 

Illegitimate children would 
be put on the same. legal 
footing in respect of inher- 
itance — at present if the fa- 
ther or mother of such a child 
dies intestate, the child is 
already entitled to succeed but 
that does not apply in foe case 
of a death of a brother, sister, 
unde, aunt or other relative. 


PARLIAMENT 


Healey attacks 
Reagan move 
towards Iran 


SDP urges 
talks on 
Falklands 


President Reagan’s television 
broadcast on his government's 
contacts with Iran was bitterly 
attacked by Mr Denis Healey in 
the Commons wben be replied 
to Sir Geoffrey Howe. 

“We now know that President 
Reagan has been sending arms 
to Iran in the hope of thereby 
securing the release of American 
hostages.” Mr Healey, chief 
Opposition spokesman on For- 
eign and Commonwealth af- 
fairs, said- The Foreign Sec- 
retary had rightly denounced 
this practice in his speech, 
though did not have the courage 
to refer to the issne to which this 
is most relevant at the present 
tune. 

“The Khomeni government 
of Iran is not only a self- 
confessed sponsor of inter- 
national terrorism. It is also the 
main enemy of all western 
interests in the Middle East. 

“President Reagan told the 
world yesterday that he was 
engaged in bargaining with this 
regime at the very moment he 
was asking the British Prime 
Minister to make British bases 
available for the bombing of 
Tripoli. 

“I found his attempts to 
explain his behaviour on 
television last night stupifyingiy 
incredible. I hope the Foreign 
Secretary will tell us what the 
Prime Minister is going to say to 
the President about this extra- 
ordinary behaviour which is so 
damaging to trying to find a 
common approach to the 
problems of Internationa] ter- 
rorism.’’ 

If Iran was successful against 
Iraq, it could set the whole of the 
Muslim world ablaze with anti- 
Western fanaticism, deal a 
shattering blow to all the West’s 
friends in the Arab world and 
ride a massive increase in the 
price of oiL 

Turning to other issues, Mr 
Healey said that the Foreign 
Secretary should take a lesson 
from the US and persuade the 
Commonwealth and the EEC to 
accept the same sort of action 
against South Africa as the 
American Congress had impos- 
ed. The sanctions should be 
mandatory. 

There had not been one word 
from the Government against 
state terrorism, financed and 
organized by tire US against 
Nicaragua in flat defiance even 
of its own Congress. 

The Government should give 
the latest position regarding the 
Israeli government’s response to 
the enquiry five days ago as to 
the circumstances in which Mr 
Mordechai Vanimn left the UK. 
[Mr Vanunu. an Israeli tech- 
nician is now imprisoned in 
Israel after telling The Sunday 
Times of alleged nuclear arms 
production there.] 

“If he is not able w give us an 
answer. 1 suggest be get his 
skates on and get us one by 
Tuesday. It is intolerable that 
Mr Vanunu may well lave been 


kidnapped from the UK by 
members of the same organi- 
zation who helped in the 
kidnapping of Mr Dfldco not 
very long ago." 

The Foreign Office should not 
lie supine and inert when laws 
were broken by another country 
which was supposed to have 
good relations with the UK 

The Prime Minister should 
insist that the US Government 
should not break the limits 
imposed by the Salt treaty. 

“What we need if we want to 
stop the aims race is a freeze. 
We need to stop , the devel- 
opment of new military tech- 
nologies. 

The tragedy was that the 
Prime Minister might try and 
sabotage the agreement reached 
at Reykjavik because it thrcat- 



Healey; Reagan speech 

‘stupifyingiy incredible’ 
ened her major electoral weap- 
on. 

She believed (hat if progress 
were made along the lines laid 
down in Reykjavik she would 
not get Trident because abo- 
lition of aQ strategic ballistic 
missiles would fate place 
between 1991 and 1996, precise- 
ly the period in which she was 
hoping to receive Trident. 

“Is she going to make Trident 
an obstacle to an arms 
ag re e m ent which can be reached 
and which has already been 
sketched out between the US 
and the Soviet Union? I believe 
it would be a tragedy if she took 
that line.” 

The cancellation of Trident 
would leave Britain free io 
maintain its conventional con- 
tribution to Nato. The British 
people had bad cold war 
prop a ga nda right up to the gills. 
Germany. Japan and Canada 
had been free from nuclear 
attack by the Soviet Union 
.although none of them had 
nuclear weapons of their own. 
That would be equally true of 
the UK 

“I appeal to the Government 
front bench to use its influence 
with the Prime Minister to cease 
making what she wrongly 
regards as an electoral weapon 
an obstacle to agreement on 
dis ar m am ent which is now 
within our grasp.” 


Mr Julian Amoy (Brighton 
Pavilion. Q said that President 
Botha's reforms in South Africa 
had brought him scant thanks 
from abroad and had con- 
ciliated very few prominent 
African leaders. 

Mr Edward Garrett (Wallsend, 
Lab) said the Government 
should pay more attention to 
matters affecting the Common- 
wealth. The European Com- 
munity was in trouble and had 
lost its impetus. He said with 
regret that Britain's aspirations 
had never been achieved and 
were not likely to be achieved. 
Sir Frederic Bennett (Torbay, C) 
said they could not have any 
forth in the Soviet Union’s 
peaceful intentions so long as it 
continued its aggression, geno- 
cide and io Afghan- 

istan. Did anyone imagine that 
the Russians would have 
invaded if the Afghans had 
nuclear weapons? 

It would be impossible for the 
Labour Party to go into the next 
election seeking to reconcile 
their policy of closing nuclear 
bases and getting rid of the 
British nuclear dete r r en t with 
membership of Nato. 

Mr Robert Marten nan (Caith- 
ness and Sutherland, SDP) said 
that he did not call for the 
immediate transfer of sov- 
ereignty over the Falkland 
Islands to the Argentine govern- 
ment and be believed it was 
right that the views of the 
islanders should be given the 
fullest consideration. 

But it was now essential for 
Britain to open discussions with 
the Argentines to reach a 
settlement in the South Atlantic 
that would allow the UK to 
abandon the heavy cost of 
maintaining the “Fortress Falk- 
lands" policy. 

Sir Anthony Meyer (North West 
Clwyd, O said that Syria had a 
key role to play in resolving die 
highly dangerous conflict in the 
Middle East. If Britain was 
prepared to ignore that in order 
to give vent to a gust of popular 
indignati on, it could hardly 
expect that its European part- 
ners would be equally short- 
sighted. 

Mr Guy Barnett (Greenwich. 
Lab) said that the House should 
address itself more seriously and 
more intelligently than the 
Foreign Secretary and Tory MPs 
bad done to areas tike Central 
America. Southern Africa and 
the Middle East where conflict 
could spread to engulf many 
other countries. 

Mr Ivor Stanbrook (Orpington, 
C) said he was disappointed that 
tire European Community had 
not yei achieved the type of 
mutual cooperation needed to 
fight terrorism. 

Mr Eric Heffer (Liverpool. 
Walton, Lab) criticized the view 
that one had either to back the 
Americans or the Russians. 

“It is time that Britain 
returned to taking an indepen- 
dent position in relation to both 
of the two great powers.” 


No evidence of 
criminal offence 
in Vanunu case 


Mr George Robertson, an 
Opposition spokesman on for- 
eign affairs, said that the tele- 
vision speech of President 
Reagan left a lot to be desired. 
All the magic he oould summon 
up was simply not going to sell 
this used car to the public. 

The disclosures were a direct 
.hit at Washington’s own allies in 
the Middle East who had fought 
a courageous and sometimes 
very painful war against the 
Ayatollah. 

Mr Timothy Renton. Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, replying to the 
debate, said Mr Vanunu was last 
reported to have been seen on 
September 30 when he checked 
out of his London hotel. On 
October 8 he was listed as a 
missing person and police in- 
quiries stoned. On October 21 
an Israeli spokesman denied 
press reports that' he was in ' 
Israel and bad been remanded 
in custody after appearing be- 
fore^ court in Jerusalem the day 
before. 

On November 9, after Britain 
had made informal inquiries, 
the Israeli government admitted 
that Mr Vanunu was in deten- 
tion in Israel and denied that he 
had been kidnapped from Brit- 
ish soil. • 

On November 10 the British 
Ambassador in Td Aviv was 
instructed to seek clarification 
of how Mr Vanunu came to be 
in Israel and on November 13. 
The Israeli government said in 
reply to his representation that 
Mr Vanunu left Britain of his 
own volition and through nor- 
mal departure procedures and 
that his departure involved no 
violation of British law. 

“The Home Secretary has 
received a report from the 
Metropolitan Police giving de- 
tails of their inquiries and their 
report has not revealed any 
evidence that any criminal of- 
fence has been committed in 
Britain. 

“Allegations that there were 
contacts between the British and 
Israeli governments about Mr 
Vanunu before be disappeared 


are totally without foundation.” 

On terrorism, Mr Batina said 
that every state sought to serve 
its own interest and there were 
continuing predicaments for 
states of where the borderline 
lay between principle and 
expediency in pursuit of na- 
tional interest. But successive 
British governments had firmly 
taken the line that at a time of 
growth in terrorism it was not in 
foe national interest, hot rather 
smacked of expediency, to let 
terrorists believe that they could 
swap British hostages for arms, 
money or convicted criminals in 
British jails. 

“We will, through dialogue, 
seek further opportunities to 
secure the release of our 


Doug deals with terrorists 
only gave a further turn to the 
ratchet, increasing terrorism -by 
encouraging the belief that tak- 
ing-hostages was worth while 
because they could be ex- 
changed for substantial reward. 

“we do not believe that is 
sensible territory for any civi- 
lized country to enter.” 

This was the reason behind 
the concerned calls for collective 
action against international ter- 
rorism, the new curse of our 
times. 

Labour's attitude to defence, 
was extraordinary. They were 
wedded to the concept of giving 
up nuclear weapons without 
demanding reductions from the 
Soviet Union in return. 

One-sided, unbalanced nu- 
clear disarmament would haunt 
Mr Kinnock all foe way up to 
foe next election and ring in his 
ears as the British electorate 
voted for the straightforward 
proposition that as long as they 
have got one they wanted one. 

Why did Labour trust the 
Soviets to behave themselves 
with nulcear weapons when they 
did not trust them to give exit 
visas to Sakharov or thousands 
of Jews? Confidence in a nation 
could not be divided into near 
packages. You could not say we 
trust you about nuclear weapons 
but not about h uman rights. 


Jews may be invited to 
embassy in Moscow 


Mr Timothy Keaton. Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, promised to take 
careful note of a suggestion that 
Soviet refuseniks should be 
invited to cultural events at the 
British embassy in Moscow and 
ro pass ibis on to foe embassy. 

Replying to an adjournment 


Jews were still .subjected to. 
widespread discri min ation. 
Many were prevented: from 

maintaining COQtECt With- fam- 
ilies and friends overseas. 

Much had been heard about 
Mr Gorbachov’s determination 
to present a new and humane 
.face to the world, the ch a n g es . 


replying io an adjournment fay to the wood. The c n a n g es . 
debate in foe Commons on nartiotiaily the first halting 
Thursday night on the plight of tooves -towards a greater open- 
Jews in the Soviet Union, be ness, were not to be discounted. 


. uu uk pugui ui moves -lowaios a 

Jews in the Soviet Union, be ness, were not to be discounted. 

saidihat it was necessary to bear j t was nsrettaWe foal the new 
m mmd the risks involved for- broom had not.swept away me 

a -« > .. . i UMTt Iff 


m miDa me nsJc 8 involved tor- broom tad not swept aw*/ 
the refuseniks and the problems <fi$mal record in recent years in 

that anv Soviet rifi 7 Fiw hfld m vh* -oranm «7 of exit VISAS IO 


ai m ius 

that any Soviet citizens had in 
gaining access to the embassy. 


the .granting of exit visas to 
Soviet Jews. 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER IS 1986 





WORLD SUMMARY 


^ T AAAcma uic ill 

Gulf War flare-up 

SS^SsSSSSps* 

sSrs-s-iYi; 


among the estimated 250 
people In the area and 
tearing die sntTOmdlBg sea 
ablaze. 

Iranian m wB ^ 
at least 26 deaths m bam 
raids on Kafahgg, Tabriz 
and other areas in tte fast 
two dacjs* white ini Bagfe- 
dad, a military 
said a missile bSted a 


US flier Brazil in 

zone talks 


Wave of bewilderment and outrage sweeps America 

Reagan’s Iran blunder 
brings comparisons 
with Carter and Nixon 



guilty 


Managua — Mr Eugene 
nasenfns, the American 
airman on trial is Nicara- 
gua after being shot down 
m a plane loaded with arms 
for US-backed rebels, has 
changed his plea to gaOty 
(Alan Tomlinson writes). 

Official sources appear- 
ed to be djgtttw i ^ g dhe 
Government from earlier 
hints of n possible pardon 

The change of plea ramy 
as the trial, by the Revote- 
tionary People’s Tribunal 
on charges of terrorism, 
conspiracy and violating 
Nicaraguan security, 
reached the end of its 
fourth week, with the coart 
expected to give i verdict 
and sentence at any time. 


Brazil has been asked to 
join Britain in a search far 
an 


policy for the Sooth At- 
lantic (Oar Diplomatic 
Correspondent writes). 

Mr John lire, Ambas- 
sador to Brasilia, was ab- 
stracted by the Foreign 
Office to open d iscus sions 
with senior officials. The 
Brazilians indicated they 
would consider the idea. . 

The. e x i ste nce of the 
talks was revealed in a 
Commons speech fay Mr 
Timothy Beaton, Minister 
of State at the Foreign 
Office. The initiative raises 
hope for backdoor coB- 
abaration with Ar gent in a 
on an important issoe. •. 


Flight ban challenged 

Washington (Renter) — The - Administration 

yesterday ordered an kuedhte halt to airline sor i tes 
between the U toted States and Sooth Africa. Sooth African 
Airways immediately fifed a lawsuit in federal coart here 

ditBtMg h w ftea rtiiw. 

A ban had been ordered fay Congress far sanctions 
legislation adopted last month over President Reagan’s veto. 
Although the ban should hare been in operation within 10 
days, procedural delays slowed the process 


Crisis call 
by Fiance 

Lome (AFP) - President 
Mitterrand of France 
mM oa industrialized na- 
tions to hunch a ‘‘Mar- 
shall Pten” to end the 
Third World's economic 
crisis in an opening speech 
to the 13th annual wimif 
between France- and its- 
main allies m Africa. 

M Mitterrand presented 
a five-point plan be said 
industrialized states 
needed to adopt if they 
were to help the world's 
poor nations to develop. 

The list included e nsuring 
sustained. high e co n o mi c 

grow th in the developed 
world. 

Saboteurs sought 

Oslo — Mr S teing i imnr Hermannsson, the Prime 
Minister of Iceland, is to seek the extradition from the US of 
two members of toe Sea Shepherd conservation activist 
! to have canted oat acts of sabotage 
whaling in dustry test week, the No 
service, NTB, reputed (Tony 


Jail threat 
for insult 

Bangkok — State pros- 
ecutors asked, the Babas 
court In north-eastern 
ThaOaad to impose the 
maxtomm prison sentence 
of 20 years’ on the former 
deputy Interior Minister, 
Ate Veera Mnsfkapoeg, ac- 
cused of insulting the mon- 
archy fa an election, 
campaign speech. He. 
pleaded not gnflty (Neil 


The Iran fiasco is being 
.called President Reagan’s big- 
gest blunder since be took 
office. A wave of bewilder- 
ment and outrage has swept 
through Congress, into the 
newspapers and out into the 
American heartland as the 
bizarre details have leaked 
onL 

There are calb for resigna- 
tions and dismissals; toe 
White House has bad to 
stonewall; an onslaught of 
derisive criticism is expected 
from America’s ’ opponents 
arid allies alike; and wide- 
spread scepticism had greeted 
the President's lame and be- 
tefed explanation. Many be- 
lieve that this might be the one 
foreign policy crisis Mr 
Reagan will be unable to 
weather. Already some critics 
are calking of cover-ops and 
doable-dealings, making 
wounding comparisons to the 
Nixon era. 

The blow to President 
Reagan personally is indispat- 
able: it shows in bis strained, 
face, his unusual dnsiveness, 
the defensive and half-apolo- 
getic tone in his voice. The 
mstoric irony of. the whole 
sorry mess is summed op in a 
headline in the respected Wall 
Street Joumat “This Iran 
policy makes Carter's look 
good.” More than any other 
issue, ft was Iran that de- 
stroyed the Carter presidency; 
Mr Reagan’s most biting criti- 
risn six years ago was that 
Carter allowed America to be 
humiliated and did not show 
muscle when he should have 
stood up to terrorism. 

For this reason both the left 
and the right are outraged. 
The Democrats are angered by 
what they regard as deception. 
They accuse the White House 
of bypassing proper constitn- 
finn&i consultations, of con- 
ducting an illegal operation, of 
flouting toe very principles 
enunciated so strongly over 
the past year and lectured to 
the wimpish Europeans. The 
conservatives can hardly be- 
lieve that Reagan, of all 
people, should have bowed to 
tire demands of what bis own 

Arfminirtraffn n htut rafter! a 

terrorist regime— “the biggest 
collection of loony tunes and 
misfits . since . the Third 
Retch,” in Reagan’s own’ 
wdnds. . 

Repeatedly, to conservative 
cheers, he has rejected any 



dealings, any n e gotia ti ons, 
and concessions to terrorists. 
Repeatedly, he has boasted 
that America was “bade and 
standing tair. It does not 
square with the spectacle of 
furtive trips to Tehran by the 
former National Security Ad- 
viser, the risible rumours of an 
emissary bringing a Bible and 
a cake in toe shape of a key. 

Even Mr Reagan's support- 
ers, who acknowledge the 
need for too US to play a rote 
again in an area of sack 
geopolitical strategic 
canee, believe him JurihY of 

misjudgement. 

overtures were 
premature. 

They applaud his motives 
in wanting to free the hostages, 
but say their rescue became an 
obsession that skewed Ameri- 
can 'diplomacy and ohsenred 
US security interests. Hostage 

Washington View 

By Michael Bfayon 

fam ilies sh(uiM not malm 
foreign policy, one com- 
mentator said last week. The 
White House showed failure 
of leadership in patting in- 
dividuals above some huger 
national purpose^ and thereby 
made American foreign policy 
itself a hostage. 

It is the waspish comments 
of the conservative columnists 
that have been particularly 
wounding. “JFareweD to our 
moral authority,” one re- 
marked. If the investigation 
showed the MacFarlane- 
Poindexter-Regan ransom 
pten to be as it looked, “the 
Reagan posture would turn 
out to be a lie”. 

Another talked of the 
“byzantine twilight of the 
Reagan Administration”. One 
said America’s “foreign policy 
bender” was the result of an 
obsession with freeing hos- 
tages no mailer what the long- 
term consequences. And 
many have accused Mr Rea- 
gan of improvising policy, 
flying “by the seat of his 
pants”. 

• It is the disarray in the 
White House since the story 
brake that has also caused 
dismay. The press has been 
frill of stories, leaked from 
anguished officials, of shout- 
ing matches b e twee n Admiral 
John Poindexter, the National 
Security Adviser, arid Mr 


Donald Regan, the Chief of 
Staff on whether the affair 
should be revealed or kept 
secret. It is undear whether 
Mr George Shultz and Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the Sec- 
retaries of State and Defence, 
really knew wbat was happen- 
ing, m whether they were kept 
is the dark because their 
opposition was known. 

It is- not even dear whether 
the arms deal was legal, de- 
spite an apparent assurance by 
Mr Edwin Meese, the Attor- 
ney General “Yon get the 
impression nobody is at toe 
tflkr” one strategic studies 
analyst remarked. 

Political perceptions const 
for much in Washington. The 
crisis comes when Mr Reagan 
is suffering a string of what are 
perceived as failures; toe 
breakdown of the Reykjavik 
talks, which, despite bis at- 
tempts to proclaim them as a 
success, appear increasingly as 
a setback after the failure of 
the Schnltz/Schevardadze 
m ee tin g in Vienna; the 
Republican loss of control of 
the Senate; the growing criti- 
cism of toe President from 
friends and allies that arms 
control policies are adrift; and 
the stored up resentment in 
the press over such things as 
the “disinformation” cam- 
paign against Libya. 

Mrs Thatcher’s visit here 
today is not expected to make 
things easier for toe Preadent. 
Indeed the peception that 
America’s most loyal ally has 
sharp disagreements on issues 
ranging from arms control to 
toe Salt 2 treaty to terrorism 
and Iran, does nothing to 
bolster Mr Reagan at home. 

There remains, of course, 
the intractable question now 
of what to do about the 
hostages. Those already re- 
leased have been cautions, 
re ti cent, bnt there is a dear 
note of bitterness in their 
voices as they speak of height- 
ened dangers for their fellow 
hostages in Lebanon. 

Dr David Jacobsen, whose 
release triggered the present 
crisis, has appealed again and 
again for press restraint and 
patience. But it is too late. 

The affair has become more 
than just a hostage issue. It has 
sucked in American policy in 
the Middle East, the credibflty 
of White House staffc the 
President’s relations with 
Congress and even his own 
cabinet members. 



Dr David Jacobsen, the freed Lebanon hostage, displaying 
bracelets bearing the names of other American hostages. 

Reagan gives own 
version of contacts 


Peres hints at Israeli involvement 


prosecutors argued 
rtut toe con stit u t ed 
threats to Thailand^ peace 
and security because they 
were made by a cabinet 
mini ster. His trial will 
beg» next month. 


national news service, NTB, reputed (Tony Samstag 
writes). - 

Last Saturday night two whalers, half toe re m ainin g 
kebmfic wfaafiag fleet; wan sentfled in ReyWavik harbow 
and machinery was damaged by s l edgehamme rs at toe 
whaifag station 63 mites to toe north. 

Swiss plan 
chemicals 
rule action 

Zurich (Rooter) — Swiss 
officials promised a change m 
rules governing the chemical 
industry yesterday and said 

their confidence was shattered 

by a chemical teak that pol- 
luted the Rhine. 

“The incident has shattered 
our confidence — and that of 
our neighbours — in seif-regul- 
ation for toe industry,” Mr 
Hanli Gyrin, a spokesman for 
the Federal Office of Environ- 
mental Protection, said. , 

“A number of far-reaching 
rules regulating the industry 
exist but in the past they have 

often not been strictly enough 
applied by cantonal authori- 
ties . . . this will change.” 

Mr Gysin said the accident 
had also led authorities to 
focus on dangers surrounding 
the storage of dangerous che- 
micals as well as foe more ob- 
vious risks from production 
and transport ... 

Experts admit flat they are 
still far from knowing the mil 
effects on toe local environ- 
ment and toe Rhine. 

More contaminated water 
will flow downstream until 
traces of heavy pesticide are 
removed from- toe bottom of 
toe river, toe exports say- 
There is also controversy 
over a sjnll^ofwMd^ 
from a nearby OTa^Seffiy 
irfant hours before toe Sandoz 
blaze. _ . 

The West German Enjoron- 
ment Minister, Herr Walter 
Wallman told toe Bonn Par- 
liament on »***■;. 
damage caused to the nvff by 

toTfeak of SS^sof 

weedkiller 
than first repo rts 
‘The Swiss branch of «*. 

Rhine three days before toe 
leak. 


Mr Shimon Peres all but 
confirmed yesterday that Is- 
rael has acted as the carrier for 
American arms to Iran as part 
of a deal to release hostages. 

In an interview with Army 
Radio yesterday .morning, the 
Foreign Minister said; “If the 
US asked us for help to 
liberate hostages, in my view 
— from toe viewpoint of moral 
commitment and political 
common sense— Israel should 
accede and wooid certainly do 
so. . . 

“This is a hnman? matter; 
one of principle. There is 
nothing to be ashamed of. . . 
This is not arms sales, it is not 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

money-grabbing, it is not seek- 
ing advantages . . .Even when 
one fights terrorism one never 
forgets the fate of toe 
individual... 

Mr Yitzhak Rabin, foe De- 
fence Minister, also came 
dose to admission. 

Mr Peres .carefully denied 
throughout that the Israeli 
Government had been in- 
volved in any such arms rirak, 
bnt his denials do not cover 
the 800 or so officially-ap- 
proved Israeli arms dealers. 

According to Sword, a 
specialist Israeli arms publica- 
tion, Israd has supplied $500 
million (£347 million) of the 


$10 billion worth of Western 
weapons bought by Iran be- 
tween 1981 and 1984. 

The arms-for-hostages idea 
is credited as being the brain- 
child of Mr David Kimche. a 
former Mossad secret service 
agent who was Director-Gen- 
eral of the Foreign Ministry 
until last month. 

• MADRID: Spain has begun 
checks on container traffic 
through toe Andalusian port 
of Algedras, across toe bay 
from Gibraltar, to see whether 
any of toe arms supplied by 
the United States to Iran have 
passed through the port (Rich- 
ard Wigg writes). 


Washington (Reuter) — The 
following are excerpts from 
President Reagan's speech on 
his Administration's secret 
dealings with Iran: 

“I know you have been read- 
ing, seeing and bearing a lot of 
stories the past several days 
attributed to Danish sailors, 
imMimnl observers at Italian 
ports and Spanish harbours, 
and especially unnamed gov- 
ernment of my 

A dtefaas tiadon. 

Well, now you are going to 
hear the facts from a White 
Hoase source; and you know 
my name. I wanted this time to 
talk with yon about an ex- 
tremely sensitive and pro- 
foundly important matter of 
foreign policy. 

For 18 months now, we have 
had underway- a secret dip- 
lomatic Initiative to Iran. That 
initiative was undertaken for 
toe simplest and best of rea- 
sons: to renew a relationship 
with toe nation of Iran; to 

bring an honourable end to foe 
bloody six-year war between 
Iran Iraq; to eliminate 
state-sponsored terro ris m and 
subversion; and to effect the 
safe return of all hostages. . . 

For 10 days now, the US 
and world press have been foil 
of reports and .rumours about 
tins initiative and these objec- 
tives. Now, my fellow Ameri- 
cans, there. is an old saying 
tftaf nothing spreads so 
quickly as a rumour. So I 
thought it was time to speak 
with yon directly, to tell yon 
first-hand about oar dealings 
with Iran. 

' The charge has been made 
that the US has shipped 
weapons to Iran as ransom 
payment far toe release of 
American hostages in Leba- 
non — that toe US undercut its 
affies, and secretly violated 


American policy against traf- 
ficking with terrorists.Tbose 
charges are utterly false. . . 

During the course of our 
secret discussions, I author- 
ized the transfer of 
amounts of defeusive weapons 
and spare parts for defensive 
systems to Iran. 

My purpose was to convince 
Tehran that our negotiators 
were acting with my authority, 
to send u signal that the US 
was prepared to replace the 
animosity between ns with a 
new relationship. These mod- 
est deliveries, taken together, 
could easily fit into a single 
cargo plane. . . 

At the «n»e time we under- 
took this initiative, we made 
dear that Iran most oppose all 
forms of international terror- 
ism as a condition of progress 
in our relationship. 

The most gMnirffrant step 
which Iran could take, would 
be to use its influence in 
Lebanon to secure toe release 
of all hostages. Some progress 
has already been made. . . 

Our con tinned 

into the spring of this year. 
Based upon toe progress we 
felt we had made, we sought to 
raise the diplomatic level of 
contacts. A meeting was ar- 
ranged in Tehran. I then asked 
my former National Security 
Adviser, Robert McFaiiane, to 
undertake a secret mission and 
gave him explicit instructions. 
I asked him to go to Iran to 
open a dialogue, making stark 
and clear oar basic objectives 
and disagreements. The four 
days of talks were comforted 
in a civil fashion. . . 

To summarize, our Govern- 
ment has a firm policy not to 
capitulate to terrorist de- 
mands. That “no concessions” 
policy remains ip force. . .” 



_ ,0*0 of toe first people hi The Netherlands to fish in toe Rhine since 

it was polhited. “i throw the fish back anti wash my hands when I get haae,” be said. 


EEC to consider a levy on UK lamb 

ftom Ow Correspondent, Brussels 


. The European Community 
could Impose an export levy oa 
British koto next week to 
ynalte It less attractive to 
French shoppers, and coid foe 
tempers of angry French 
farmers, ' 

A levy is one of theeptioas 
for ending toe Anglo-French 
fam b war flat the European 
C yrimkaw wffl examme ra 
Monday motafag- before a 
meetfag-of ag ri c ultu re min- 
isters fa the aftexMoa. 

The leiy, hflsed on the 
difference between toe com- 
mercial vafae oftoe pound and 

a fixdagrknltm^cxchafige 
rate, mgdfrja tee-toe price, of 
British fambta France by 

•’Vrmr'zy'' '■ •“ - ' 


about 20 per cent ' 

. As export, levy would be 
excellent news for the British 
consumer, alfaoigh k would 
seriously damage . Britain's 
lamb export business, and wfll 
be presented as proof of unfair 
French manfaidatioa of toe 
Common Market. / 

British fanners, still xeefatg 
from heavy losses this summer 
when they were banned from 

marketing lamb contaminated 

by fallout from thie Chernobyl 
disaster, are fikdy to: be 
opposed to .the deaL \ . 

' Bat their anger at m new 
levy will be tempered' by the 
knowledge that its effects oa 
them would be fisuted. Farm- 


os could recoup much of toe 
lost value of their lamb 
through higher EEC pre- 
miums paid oa slaughtered 
animals. 

Meanwhile, French farm- 
ms, who have recently resorted 
to spraying British lamb with 
pesticides in protest at low- 
priced imports from aouss toe 
Channel, would tool be able to 
demand higher prices for their 
owe produce. 

The Commission's other op- 
tion is a devaluation of the 
British agricattnral currency, 
known as the Green Pound, 
butthis would have fiftie effect 
on lamb exports to France. 


Brazilian elections 


Winning candidates face a 
constitutional deluge 


From Mac Margolis, Rio de Janiero 


When 69 million Brazilians 
vote in nationwide elections 
today they will not just be 
selecting another quadrennial 
oop of pofitirians-Tbe SS9 
representatives in the Par- 
liament will also comprise a 
Constitutional Assembly, 
whose task is to rewrite the 
basic rules of government. 

Indications are that the 
le g isla tors will have their work 
cut out for them. Response to 
a government committee cre- 
ated to work up proposals for 
the new constitution from all 
over Brazil was startling: a 
of 10,000 documents 
_ more than a stone. 
The committee whittled the 
mountain of paper down to 
438 projects, and that is only a 
start. 

The Constitutional Assem- 
bly opens in Brasilm on Feb- 
ruary 1. The senators and 
federal deputies wfll have to 
juggle their normal duties with 
the job of rewriting toe 
constitution, its sixth major 
overhaul. The last time was in 

1946, after a restive military 
toppled toe populist charis- 
matic caudilho, or personalise 
President Getnlio Vargas, 
whom the generals suspected 
of plotting ms own coup. 

The milftary had twice be- 
fore provoked constitutional 
reform; in 2890, after depos- 
ing Emperor Dom Pedro 0 
and in 1932 to install Presi- 
dent Vargas and his “new 
state” populist regime. 

Now, 40 years laier, the 
military have retreated safely 
to the barracks and coups 
d’&at appear to be a phantom 
of a distant past. The new re- 
formers will, however, have to 
recast a constitution that is en- 
crusted by more lhan 20 years 
of authoritarian fiat. 


One of the first assignments 
wi0.be to establish a date for 
popular elections. President 
Sarney, the first civilian presi- 
dent since the military coup in 
1964, was voted in as Vice- 
President last year by an 
electoral college, but became 
President after the death of 
Senbor Tancreo Neves, the 
president-elect. 

Under the old military 
government's rules, Senhor 
Sarney would serve a six-year 
term, but he came to power 
pro misin g a shorter mandate 
and sweeping changes in the 
ancient regime. 

Yet toe President's extraor- 
dinary 80 per cent popularity 
ratings may fuel a move by the 
Assembly to stretch the man- 
date to 1990, or even give 
Senhor Sarney the right to run 
for a second term. 

Farther down the road, the 
Constitutional Assembly will 
debate toe rote of the presi- 
dency, currently blessed with 
nearly imperial powers and 
privileges. The Assembly will 
undoubtedly boost toe sway of 
Congress, especially as a mon- 



Senhor Sarney: mandate 
may be extended. 


itor of government spending, 
and peihaps install some mo- 
dified form of parliamentary 
government. 

The pre-constitutional com- 
mittee has also proposed re- 
ducing the work week from 48 
hours to 40, and enhancing 
labour rights, which were se- 
verely restricted during the 
military years. 

One proposal would add a 
“social function” to the con- 
cept of private property rights, 
much as in the Italian Consti- 
tution. That proposal may 
meet with opposition from 
conservative land owners, 

who have stiffly resisted toe 
Government’s agrarian re- 
form. An emergent ranchers’ 
lobby group, toe Rural Demo- 
cratic Union, is bank-rolling 
dozens of conservative can- 
didates by holding massive 
cattle auctions. . 

Another delicate committee 
proposal would restrict for- 
eign capital in Brazil, a pros- 
pect that worries multi-na- 
tional companies. 

Yet for all this concern, 
polls indicate that the leading 
contenders for toe Constitu- 
tional Assembly wfll represent 
the middle of the political 
spectrum. The lion's share of 
seats in Parliament seem des- 
tined for candidates from the 
two-party coaltion that backs 
Senhor Sarney, a dulcet-timed 
conservative. 

“Talk of radicalizaiion is 
really a bit of ideological ter- 
rorism,” argues Senhor Boli- 
var Lamounier, a political 
scientist and one of the pre- 
constitution committee and 
also a congressional 
candidate. 

“This will be a Social 
Democrats' constitutional 
project, not the Bolsheviks” 


Uganda 
leader 
on five 
day visit 

By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 
President Museveni of 
Uganda, widely seen as a 
saviour of his troubled nation, 
arrives in Britain today for a 
five-day official visit. 

Credited with drastically 
reducing bloodshed, Mr Mus- 
eveni is to be left in no doubt 
about Whitehall's desire to 
help him restore stability. 

Increased aid will be of- 
fered. including a new military 
training programme to replace 
the 32 British instructors 
whose current exercise ends 
this month. 

Britain’s strong links with 
the former protectorate — 
never a colony — will be 
emphasized during an audi- 
ence with the Queen and 
meetings with the Prime Min- 
ister and Dr Robert Runrie, 
the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

A Tanzanian-educated mili- 
tary tactician who seized 
power in January, Mr Mus- 
eveni might not seem an 
obvious candidate for White- 
hall enthusiasm, but his per- 
sonal values have won respect 
A teetotal Anglican with a 
strong streak of self-depen- 
dence, he is seen as toe man 
most likely to tackle Uganda’s 
fundamental problem — ram- 
pant tribalism. 

For 10 months Ugandans 
have enjoyed the unfamiliar 
taste of freedom. The mass 
slaughter of civilians in the 
Lnwero Triangle north-west of 
Kampala ended when Mus- 
eveni's National Resistance 
Army drove former govern- 
ment troops farther north. 
Substantial remnants remain 
a continuing threat north of 
Gulu. 

Ugandan leaders, since in- 
dependence in 1962, have 
enjoyed brief boneymooons 
with Whitehall, only for rela- 
tions to cool as evidence of 
brutual repression emerged, 
in Mr Museveni's case the 
grounds for long-term op- 
timism are stronger. 

When the NRA toppled 
General Tito Okello, who in 
turn had ousted Dr Milton 
Obote six months earlier, 
ordinary Ugandans were 
struck by their discipline. 
After five years in the bush, 
excesses were to be expected 
from the barefoot guerrilla 
band. Previous conquering 
forces had treated victory as a 
licence to plunder, the NRA 
showed respect 
Despite some serious in- 
cidents, discipline remains the 
basis of the NRA’s popular 
support Some of Britain's 
future aid may focus on 
ensuring that troops are paid 
regularly — a key factor in 
maintaining behaviour stan- 
dards. 

Western diplomats link Mr 
Museveni's chances of con- 
quering tribalism to economic 
factors. With a shattered econ- 
omy, derelict infra-structure 
and an over-developed belief 
in Uganda's ability to stand 
alone without help from the 
Internationa] Monetary Fund, 
Mr Museveni remains vulner- 
able to tribal jealousies. 

There is concern in White- 
hall over his economic policy, 
which indudes an unrealistic 
exchange rate and excessive 
taxes on coffee producers. 

Britain’s top political prior- 
ity is to foster greater regional 
stability, particularly in Ugan- 
da's relations with Kenya. 

• NAIROBI: Kenyan govern- 
ment officials are trying to 
work out an arrangement with 
their opposite numbers in 
Uganda under which some 
1,600 Ugandans who fled into 
Kenya last weekend can re- 
turn home and be given state 
protection. 

According 10 a refugee 
spokesman, they are from the 
Bagisu tribe apd refuse to go 
back over the border as they 
fear further attacks from their 
neighbours, the Sebei. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Battle over MI5 man’s memoirs 

Sydney judge attacks 
Britain’s ‘serpentine 
weavings’ in hearings 


A late attempt by the British 
Government to delay Mon- 
day s scheduled start of its 
action to gag Mr Peter Wright, 
die former MI5 officer, 

was 

yesterday sharply castigated 
by the Australian judge who is 
to hear the case. 

Mr Justice Powell, freed 
with an appeal against his 
order that Whitehall should 
produce further confidential 
documents, said with obvious 
annoyance in the New South 
Wales Supreme Court that he 
fell “a rising sense of 
. frustration" over what he 
termed “the serpentine weav- 
ings” of the Government 
Against a background of 
legal manoeuvrings which 
have gone on for more than a 
year, the judge also spoke 



Mr Peter Wright: explosive 
allegations in book, 
scathingly of distinctions be- 
ing made by counsel for 
Whitehall which, he said, were 
“m umbo-jumbo" and “too 
exquisitely fine". 

His ruling yesterday left no 
further room for doubt about 
the documents which he or- 
dered to be handed over. 
These are: background notes 
and briefings relating to Mrs 
Thatcher's statement to the 
Commons in 1981 in which 
she cleared Sir Roger Hollis, 
former head of MI 5, ofbeinga 
Soviet double agent; and ev- 
idence of official approval 
given to the publication of 
previous books by Chapman 
Pincher and Nigel West. 

The British Government 
later said it would seek 
through the Appeal Court a 
stay of Mondays proceedings. 

At the centre of the case is a 
manuscript by Mr Wright in 
which he reportedly main- 
tained that Hollis, his former 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

boss, was a mole, and alleges 
illegal activities by MIS. 

Yesterday’s bearing was at- 
tended by senior civil servants 
recently arrived from London 
for the case, but not by Sir 
Robert Armstrong, the Cabi- 
net Secretary, who, after a 
fracas with a cameraman at 
Heathrow, was more dip- 
lomatic on his arrival in 
Sydney on Thursday, suggest- 
ing that photographers use 
their "second best” cameras. 

The sequence of- events 
yesterday in the extraor- 
dinarily complex legal battle 
in which the case has become 
enmeshed was: 

• Mr Malcolm Turnbull, 
counsel for Mr Wright, and 
the Heinemami publishing 
company in Australia, which 
wants to publish his memoirs, 
applied to Mr Justice Powell 
for an order to make the 
Government hand over the 
papers, which had not been 
among those madp available 
earlier this week under an- 
other order. 

• After considering Mr Turn- 
bull’s argument that the docu- 
ments were germane to the 
issue of whether Mr Wright 
should be allowed to publish, 
Mr Powell ordered that the 
papers be produced. He left 
open the issue of when, but 
hinted it should be on Tues- 
day, the day after the injunc- 
tion hearing is due to bqpn. 

• Mr Theo Sim os, QC, who is 
appearing on behalf of Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General, and the plaintiff in 
the case, then gave notice that 
he intended to appeal against 
the order, and asked that the 
Monday start be amounted. 

• The judge said that applica- 
tions for adjournment had to 
he evaluated as to possible 
hardship for either party. He 
feared, he said, that if an 
adjournment was granted, the 
trial would not proceed this 
year. If what he had heard 
about the stale of Mr Wright’s 
health was accurate, “he may 
not be around when the trial 
ultimately comes on". 

In the end the judge said the 
Government could make its 
appeal against -the order, but 
he would proceed on the basis 
that the injunction case will* 
start Hi 2 pm on Monday. 

It was miring the final stage 
of the day’s hearing that Mr 


Justice Powell became, he 
said, "testy”. His judgment, 
he said, had been first deliv- 
ered last week and no appeals 
had been made then. 

He also took issue with 
what be said was Mr Sxmos’ 
assertion that he bad broken 
new ground in swing that the 
truth of Mr Wright's allega- 
tions was relevant 

This was sparked by an 
exchange in which the judge 
said; M i have always beat 
under the impression that at 
some stage in this case I was 
going to have to say that, for 
example, if MIS could make 
Gniy&re cheese look like Ched- 
dar, would public interest be 
better served by them canying 
on him mushrooms in the 
dark, or being told the truth?" 

Mr Simos responded: “We 
submit that is not an issue." 

The judge: “I have always 
thought it was." 

l ater he added: “If the truth 
of the matter is that the (right) 
material reveals acts of treach- 
ery by the security service and 
others, and acts of an illegal 
nature, then much can be said 
that it is in the public interest 
to be made aware of such a 
state of affairs.” 

The Government main tains 
that the truth of the allegations 
is irrelevant, that whether Mr 
Wright’s Haims are true or 
false, or are public knowledge 
or not, he is prevented from 



• Sir Robert Armstrong: 
mote diplomatic 

publishing them by his con- 
tract with the Crown. 

This is despite the feet that 
for the purposes of the bearing 
the Government has admitted 
that Mr Wright’s explosive 
central allegation about Sir 
Roger is true. 


Peace marchers cross America 


>lS3v . ■ : ■ 



Men, women and tired children, who for 
months have been striding along the 
highways of the United States in a mass 
protest against nuclear weapons, nearing 
their destination week. The Great 
Peace March arrives in Washington 

today after a trek of more than 3,000 miles 
across America from Los Angeles. 

The Htfliphi which has shrunk and 
swelled in' the eight- and-a-half months it 


took to cross the deserts, mountains and 
plains of America, now comprises some 
1,500 participants, who wtU gather today 
in the park opposite the White House for 
a final rally and a ceremony of prayers 
and farewells (Michael Bin yon writes). 

The marchers averaged 18 miles a day, 
and had something of the atmosphere of 
an extended family, with many young 


people taking leave from work to join 
veteran anti-nuclear campaigners. The 
multi-coloured caravan, which mostly 
numbered 700, included 50 chi Wren. 
Some 400 made ft all the way, with several 
participants from overseas, including 
Britain.There have been encounters with 
hostile opponents, but on the whole the 
march has seen few violent incidents. 
(Photograph: Jeff Share) 


New York 
police 
action ends 

New York — A six-day 
unofficial “amnesty” in the 
city which is often described 
as the crime capital of the 
world, has come to an end 
(Paul Valldy writes). 

New York's policemen have 
called off a work-to-rule after 
agreement was reached be- 
tween city officials and police 
unions on a controversial new 
plan to rotate most police 
appointments every 6ve years 
in attempt to crack down on 
corruption in the force. 

During the protest, police 
issued 91 per cent fewer 
parking and other traffic tick- 
ets than normal. Misdemean- 
our arrests also dropped, by 27 
percent 

The city’s Police Commis- 
sioner. Mr Ben Ward, has 
declared that the scheme is 
being suspended pending talks 

with the union . 


Call to free child detainees 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The Black Sash, one of. 
South Africa's leading civil 
rights organizations, launched 
a campaign yesterday to se- 
cure the release from jail by 
Christinas of an estimated 
1,300 to 1,800 children being 
detained without trial under 
the state of emergency. 

Meanwhile, the United 
Democratic Front (UDF), the 
largest and most radical of the 
anti-apartheid organizations 
still operating lawfully, has 
called on its supporters to 
observe a “Christinas against 
the Emergency" from Decem- 
ber 16 to 26. 

The UDF said that during 
this period white-owned shops 
should be boycotted, sporting 
fixtures and music festivals 
suspended, and shebeens (il- 
licit drinking ban.) in black 
townships closed. 

Many young UDF members 
have been detained during the 
emergency, and the UDF is 
one of a number of groups 


supporting the Black Sash 
campaign. Others include the 
Union of Jewish Women, the 
Detainees’ Parents’ Support 
Committee and Lawyers for 
Human Rights. 

“If we don’t succeed by 
Christmas, we won,’t stop 
trying. Children belong at 
home, not in jail,” Mrs Ethel 
Walt, regional president of the 
Black Sash. said. 

According to estimates by 
the Detainees’ Parents' Suj>- 
port Committee and the Un- 
rest Monitoring Group of the 
Progressive Federal Party 
(PFP), the official Opposition 
in the white House of Assem- 
bly, about 20,000 people have 
been imprisoned for varying 
periods since the state of 
emergency was declared on 
June 12. 

Of these, it is reckoned that 
at least 6,000. and possibly as 
man y as 8,000, are under 18, 
and that between 1,300 and 
1,800 are still in detention. 


More than 400 are from the 
Witwaiersrand area alone, 
where at least 50 children 
seem to have vanished. 

The Black Sash, which is 
run by while women, says 
that, despite government 
assurances to the contrary, 
parents are often not notified 
that their children have been 
detained, and have great diffi- 
culty in finding out where they 
are being held. 

It further alleges that juven- 
ile prisoners are thrown to- 
gether with adults in over- 
crowded cells and frequently 
subjected to physical and sex- 
ual abuse. 

The Government is obliged 
to table in Parliament the 
names of people who have 
been detained for 30 days or 
longer. The names of nearly 
9.300 detainees have been 
disclosed in this way. But 
Parliament went into recess in 
mid-September, and does not 
sit again before next February. 


Detained 
Israeli 
linked to 
woman 

By Nicholas Beeston, and 
Tan Murray in Jerusalem 

Mr Mordechai Vanunu. the 
nuclear technician in custody 
in Israel for revealing secrets 
of bis country's nuclear arse- 
nal, was seeing a blonde wo- 
man before he disappeared in 
London, The Sunday Times 
confirmed yesterday. 

The newspaper's editor, Mr 
Andrew Neil said a woman 
called Cindy was seen with Mr 
Vanunu four days before be 
vanished. 

Reports from Israel had 
suggested that Mr Vanunu 
was lured away from the 
Mountbarten Hotel in Covent 
Garden by a female under- 
cover agent working for the 
Israeli intelligence service, 
Mossad. who took him back to 
Israel to be tried for treason. 

He was last seen on Septem- 
ber 30 when he checked out of 
his hoieL 

Reports from Israel had sug- 
gested he may have gone to 
the continent with a woman 
who lured him on to a boat 
where he was arrested by Mos- 
sad agents in international 
waters. 

Details of his return have 
still not been fidly released by 
the Israeli authorities and spe- 
culation in Britain that he was 
kidnapped and sent back to Is- 
rael in a crate prompted the 
British Government to de- 
mand “clarification". 

Jerusalem has denied that it 
broke any British laws and 
sent its version of the details 
in a diplomatic note to the Bri- 
tish Ambassador in Israel, Mr 
William Squire, on Thursday. 

The Foreign Office said it 
would not comment on the Is- 
raeli answer, but the Foreign 
Secretary. Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
is expected to reveal its con- 
tents in Parliament on Tues- 
day. 

If Cindy was an agent it is 
still not clear how Mossad 
managed to locate Mr Van unu 
so quickly in London after he 
arrived secretly, under a false 
name, to tell his story. 

Ond suggestion is that he 
was identified to MI5 by the 
nuclear experts who were con- 
sulted to verify the technical 
details of his story. In turn 
MI 5 passed the information 
on to Mossad. 

This version would suggest 
that this was the reason Mrs 
Thatcher and Mr Peres dis- 
cussed the case on the tele- 
phone — although this has 
been denied by both govera- 

ments * Parliament, page 4 



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OVERSEAS NEu/g 


tt-tf TTKfFS SATT rRDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 





es inquiry 

1 A A 




IM 1 


President Aquino of the 
Philippines yesterday prom- 
ised a thorough investigation 
into the killing of Mr Orlando 
Olalia. the country's most 
prominent trade union leader, 
"whatever the cost in political 
terms", as 5,000 protestors 
marched to military head- 
quarters accusing supporters 
of the Defence Minister. Mr 
Juan Ponce Enrile. of the 
murder. 

Chanting; "Enrile resign", 
the protesiors were held back 
at the gales by more than 100 
riot police. 

In a quick reaction to the 
murder of Mr Olalia and his 
driver. Mrs Aquino created a 
committee of investigation 
and offered a $10,000 (£7,000) 
reward, a general strike was 
called and rebel negotiators 
postponed indefinitely 
ceasefire talks with the 
Government 

The murder of the two men, 
whose bodies bore multiple 
gunshot and stab wounds and 
were dumped in grassland in 
Manila's northern suburbs, 
was characteristic of the death 
squads of Latin America, la- 
bour leaders said at a press 
conference. 

Two days before he died, 
Mr Olalia said the two 
organizations which he led. 
the KMU — the most militant 



From KpMi Dalton, Manila 

and largest trade union federa- 
tion — and the People’s Party 
~ the country's biggest left- 
wing party — would organize a 
national strike if a rumoured 
military coup by officers loyal 
to Mr Enrile took place. 

The KMU blamed an "ul- 
tra-right faction” in the 
Aquino Government for the 
murders and, in a statement, 
railed on the people to “work 
for the ouster of rightists in the 
Aquino regime led by Defence 
Minister Enrile and other 
coup plotters who concocted 
the murder to terrorize the 
public” 

Mrs Aquino, reading from a 
prepared statement, said: “Ev- 
ery resource and power of my 
Government will be brought 


1 * 




to bear in bringing the per - 1 
pelraiors ofOlalia's murder to ; 
justice. 

"We shall pursue this in-, 
vestigation wherever it leads. ! 
and mete out swift and un- 
equivocal justice whatever the 
cost in politcal terms." 

Mrs Aquino said she was j 
“horrified and outraged" by • 
the murders, but refused to 
answer questions. 

A general strike, possibly on 
Monday, will be joined by the 
1.5 million-strong Bayan org- ! 
anization whose members in- ; 
elude students. labour, pro- 1 
fessional and religious groups. 

Reacting to the killings, die 

communist-dominated Nat- 
ional Democratic From called 
off a scheduled meeting later 
in the day with Government 
negotiators on a planned 
ceasefire to end the 17-year 
insurgency. 

The Front, in a statement 
blamed the murders on a 
"militarist clique” in the 
eight-month-old Government 
and said it wished to reassess 
its position on the talks which 
began on August 5. 

The prospects tor peace I 
were becoming "less and Iras 
possible" because of dif- 
ferences within the Govern- 
ment and its failure to provide 
guarantees on safety to the 
rebel negotiators, it said. 



Sri Lanka attacks 
slow progress 
on terror policy 

From Michael Hamiyn, Bangalore 

A s ting ing attack on the summitry”, adding .that 
fitorToF the South Asian historians 
nations to agree on what the referential pietMra may 
constitutes terrorism, and an be laced with * 


even more surprising assault 
on its comfortable procedural 
assumptions, have come from 
the Sn Lankan delegation at 
the seven-nation meeting of 
the Sooth .Asian Association 
for Regional Co-operation 
(SAARC). 

The meeting, which will 


tiornWhai was SAARC? 
“Repetition alone may lead 

them to the answer thaut was 

nothing," he said. 

The meeting in Bangalore, 
the garden city of India, is 
being held under the threat of 
a serious chill in relations 
between India and Pakistan, 


I lie mvciiufr TT LUUM ; . 

culminate in a summit gather- which has culminated in mas- 
ing as heads of state and give troop movements by 


government arrive here today, 
has been shaken by Sri Lankan 


India on the border. 

Pakistan officials have said 


1UU IAAU OUOAVIl I#/ — - rSKI y?" OIUV14U X !«***. OOJU 

vehemence on terrorism. Mr a quarter of a 

W. T. Jayesingbe, the Foreign JLy| ioil Indian troops are in- 
Secretary, told his colleagues j yec j in exerc ises close to the 
that he felt bound to “stress international frontier, and Mr 
our disappointment” at the Abdus Sattar, the Pakistani 
work of an expert group on F jgn secretary, told a press 
terrorism, set up at Sn Laukas conference yesterday: “When 
insistence at the first SAARC h «*r t h e quantum of 


insistence at the first SAARC hear $i e quantum of 

summit in Bangladesh a year ^ iavo j ve d you will see 

SCO. . ■ _ * 7 . wnt a 


President Castro of Cuba greeting Sen or Felipe Gonz&lez, dm Prime Minister erf Spain, 
daring arrival cennonies for the visiting Spanish premier in Havana on Thursday. 


Ass 


angers Russians 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


• a o e 


The New Zealand Govern- 
ment was placed in an 
embarrassing position over its 
anti-nuclear policy yesterday, 
when its Ambassador to 
Washington. Sir Wallace 
Rowling, described opposi- 
tion to nuclear-propelled ships 


From Richard Long, Wellington 

as "anachronistic". _ 1 

The remark stunned Cabi- ( 
net ministers, but the Prime 1 
Minister, Mr David Lange r 
would make only a terse, two- 
sentence corament:“Sir Wal- c 
lace was expressing a personal r 
view on nuclear power as a ( 


technology. That is not the 
Government policy and I 
have no further comment to 
make on his statement.” 

The comment was startling 
coming from Sir Wallace, 
regarded as the architect of the 
Cabinet's anti-nuclear policy. 


In a bizarre development 
that seems calculated to anger 
the Russians and lead to 
prompt retaliation, a Cal- 
ifornian lawyer and two US 
federal marshals marched into 
the home of the izvestia 
correspondent in Washington 
on Tbnsday mid seized his 
typewriter. 

This was the first step in 
their effort to collect $413,000 
(approximately £291.000) in 
Soviet assets in the US to pay 
for a libel judgement won last 
month by a Californian bos- 




Mr Olalia said the two < ment and its failure to provide in a bizarre development inessman against the Soviet 

organizations which he led Mr Crispin Beltran, of guarantees on safety to the that seems calculated to anger Union. The marshals said 
the KMU — the most militant Bayan: strike plans. rebel negotiators, it said the Russians and lead to they would return yesterday 

— — * prompt retaliation, a Cat- wizi a truck to remove the rest 

NZ mvm criticizes Lange policy SssrA£<s£ 

W ^ & the home of the Izvestta called the seizure a “symbolic 

From Richard Long, Wellington correspondent in Washington victory” in the attempt by his 

The New Zealand Govern- as "anachronistic”. technology. That is not the seized his cBe11 ?' Mr Raphael Gregorian, 

ment was placed in an The remark stunned Cabi- Government policy and I ^ *®gain redressforanartideiH 

embarrassing position over its net ministers, but the Prime have no further comment to . ^,”*rL?J* p n00 Izvestm in iVX4 

anti-nuclear policy yesterday. Minister, Mr David Lange make on his statement” far™?™ OOOiin Mr Gregorian claimed that 

when its Ambassador to would make only a terse, n*o- The commentwasstartling in toe USto pay he lost a S10 million (approxi- 

Wash.ngton. Sir Wallace sentence corament-S.r Wal- coming from S.r Walkra, ^T^Xment mm ES mutely £7 miliioa) export- 

55 ^ ^ 

Seoul MP 
faces trial 
for speech 

Seoul (Reuter) - South 
Korean state prosecutors have 
ordered an opposition Mem- 
ber ofParliament to stand trial 
on charges of violating the 
national security law in a 
speech they say was pro- 
communist 

Mr Yoo Sung-hwan of the 
New Korea Democratic Party 
was arrested last month after 
members of the ruling Demo- 
cratic Justice Party, shielded 
by hundreds of police, voted 
unilaterally to lift his par- 
liamentary immunity. 

The prosecutors said Mr 
Yoo was echoing North Ko- 
rean propaganda when he told 
Parliament that Seoul should 
put more emphasis on uniting 
the divided peninsula than on 
anti-communism. 

G unm en ‘kill 

eight’ in India 

Delhi (Reuter) - Eight 
people have been killed and 10 
wounded in a wave of sepa- 
ratist violence during the past 
three days in the north-east 
state of Tripura, the Press 
Trust of India reported. 

It said that in one incident, 
guerrillas of the Tripura Na- 
tional Volunteers, armed with 
automatic weapons and 
knives, raided a village and 
killed four people. 

PM to resign 

Honiara, Solomon Islands 
(Reuter) — The Prime Min- 
ister, Sir Peter Kenilorea, has 
decided to resign next week. 
The move follows a political 
row over French aid to repair 
bis home village after cyclone 
damage 

Dutch bomb 

The Hague (Reuter) — 
Bomb disposal experts safely 
defused an improvized fire 
bomb yesterday which had 
been left in a package outside 
the headquarters of the Royal 
Dutch Shell oil company in 
the city. 

Couple shot 

Harare (Reuter) — Rebels 
shot dead a man and his wife 
at G wan da. in Zimbabwe's 
southern Matabeieland prov- 
ince, on Tuesday, police said. 

Crew rescued 

Azores (Reuter) — A Portu- 
guese fishing boat picked up 
all but two of the 26 crew of a 
Greek cargo ship listing in 
heavy seas 200 miles north- 
east of the Azores, a Portu- 
guese Navy spokesman said. 

Train crash 

Belgrade (Reuter) — At least 
eight people were killed when 
a train hit a bus at a level 
crossing in the north-east. 

Sii^cr^s aw ar d 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER STORY •ass.r.ass! 

PRESE NTED BTMELVYN BRAGG ON A S OUT H BAN K SHOW SPECIAL mander of arts and literature. 

^ ^ " more than a SI million of bad 

. - ...... p. s »... a •<* ~: { j Tvf V*" cheques by pretending to be 

— jm*, g.v \Jxir - * the sister of the late Sipping 

! magnate Aristotle Onassis. 


article, accusing him of 
“contraband operations" and 
of selling outdated medical eq- 
uipment, led to the closure of 
his Moscow office. 

The Soviet Government did 
not respond to the libel soft, 
which Mr Gregorian won by . 
default. A Los Angeles court 
has now been asked to seize 
foods kept in US banks by a 
Soviet bank. Mr KroD said 
after the confiscation that the 
Soviet Embassy was now will- 
ing to disenss die case. 


ago. 

“My delegation views with 
regret the lack of progress." he 
said, “on finalizing a list of 
offences which are to be 
regarded as terroristic, and 
which for the purposes of 
extradition are to be regarded 
as political.” 

Mr Jayesioghe added that a 
failure to agree on terrorism 
would be the first instance 
when the collective spirit of 
Saarc was tested and found 
wanting. “It will be a bad 
precedent and a blow, a 
grievous one at that, to 


that it cannot but generate a 
sense of unease.” 

Mr Sattar also indicated 
tha t India was in breach of an 
agreement to notify Pakistan 
of any major exercises, al- 
though he said he had been 
assured that India would fulfil 
the unwritten understanding 
to do so. 

Mr Sattar insisted, however, 
that no shadow was being cast 
on the proceedings by Indo- 
Pakistan relations, and that 
there were good expectations 
from the brief talks that the 


SAARC’S prospects two prime ministers, Mr Rajiv 

elsewhere,” he said. Gandhi and Mr M. K. Junejo, 


Mr Jayesinghe also com- 
plained about the plethora of 
grand-sounding declarations 
associated with SAARC He 


have over the weekend. 

The SAARC conference is 
expected to end with the 
establishment of a permanent 


OOJUVUUW WIU1 WUM/HUUIUVUI VI 

insisted that to launch further secretariat based in Nepal, and 
into a restatement of the basic with a Bangladeshi Secretary- 
aims of the organization in General. Mr Abul Ahsan. the 


aims of the organization in 
another Bangalore Declar- 
ation will be “to devalue the 


General, Mr Abul Ahsan. the 
present Ambassador to Paki- 
stan. There mil be three 


currency 


SAARC directors under him. 



Somali congress to 
reselect Siad Barre 


By Nicholas Beeston 


Somalia's ruling Socialist 
Party will reselecl President 
Siad Barre for the country's 
single-candidate presidential 
elections when it holds its 
congress this weekend, dip- 
lomats and analysts predicL 

But the sources suggest that 
of greater significance to the 
future of Somalia will be the 
appointments and promo- 
tions that the aging and ailing 
leader could make during the 
congress. 

General Siad Barre's 17- 
year rule nearly came to an 
end in May when he was 
severely injured in a car 
accident and had to be flown 
in a diabetic comatose state to 
Saudi Arabia for surgical 
treatment. 

Although diplomats believe 
he has made a “strong 
recovery” for a man in his 70s 
and cite his last public appear- 
ance in October at a rally 
where be stood for 90 minutes, 
they warn that a bitter succes- 
sion feud is being fought 
behind the scenes. 

The most likely replace- 
ment is the Vice-President, 
Lieutenant-General Moham- 
ed Ali Samatar who assumed 
power when General Siad 
Barre was injured in the crash. 
He is not of the same clan as 
the President 

Analysts said there is 


mounting pressure from the 
President's immediate family 
and his clan, the Marehan, for 
him to draw on their ranks for 
the top posts in the military 
and the ruling Somali Revolu- 
tionary Socialist Party. 

“The problem of clan affili- 
ations has worsened in So- 
malia over the last few years,” 
said one analyst "It is a very 
sensitive issue, but plays an 
increasingly important role in 
internal politics.” 

He predicted that unless die 
Marehan succeeds in securing 
key positions in the Govern- 
ment and ensures that the next 
president is from the dan, 
there could be a purge under a 
new leadership. 

The dan wants Mr Abdir- 
ahman Jama Bane, the 
President's brother and For- 
eign Minister’ to lead its 
succession attempt for the 
presidency. 

“The Marehan will try to 
consolidate its power, but 
there is a lot of ill-feeling 
towards it from other Somali 
clans who believe it has 
abused its role in the last 
years," said the analysL 

Experts predict that the US 
could play a vital role in 
easing the tension and restor- 
ing calm as it has access to 
naval and air facilities at the 
port of Berbera. 


Rowland in 
Zimbabwe 
discussions 

From Michael Hartnack 
Harare 

The chairman of the Brit- 
ish-based multi-national com- 
pany, Lonrho, Mr Roland 
“Tiny” Rowland, had confid- 
ential talks with Mr Robert 
Mugabe, the Prime Minister 
of Zimbabwe, this week. 

Lonrho is taking a pioneer- 
ing role in reviving the war- 
shattered economy of the vital 
“Beira Corridor" through Mo- 
zambique, which provides 
Zimbabwe with its only outlet 
to the sea independent of 
South Africa. 

Mr Rowland's company has 
reopened farms along the 200- 
mile road, rail and oil pipeline 
route, which is guarded by 
upwards of 6,000 Zimbabwe- 
an troops against the threat of 
sabotage from the Mozam- 
bique Resistance Movement 

The talks, described as 
“friendly”, took place during 
the course of a southern Afri- 
can tour by the Lonrho chief 
which took in Lusaka and Ma- 
puto. He had talks with Presi- 
dent Kaunda in the Zambian 
capital. 

It was suggested in Harare 
that Lonrho is planning fur- 
ther joint ventures in Zim- 
babwe on an equal partnership 
basis with the Zimbabwean 
Government 


Italian state television reforms 

Calling time on tear-jerkers 









IM «r ; 




From Peter Nichols 
Rome 

Television viewers hare had 
an emotional week, with one 
leading lady anoonncing from 
the screes that she was preg- 
nant while another, more 
popular still, opening her 
prime-time programme by 
reading a statement attacking 
a magazine for alleging that 
she neglected her ailing 
mother. 

And, Just when national 
emotions were coming to grips 
with these dramas, the un- 
expected word came from the 
top echelons that aO this had 
to stop. 

The intriguing point was 
that both tatties work for RAL 
the state network, and not for 
private tdeuswn where the 
star system is more at home. 
And their disciplining was the 
first public act after new ar- 
rangements made at the top of 
the hierachy after months of 
straggle had brought Signor 
Enrico Manca, a leading So- 
cialist, to the chairmanship of 
the corporation. It may mean 
some fundamental changes in 
the relationship between pub- 
tic and private television. 

What the new chairman bad 
to face from these two ladies 
was nothing new as far as RAI 
was concerned. Last year, dv- 
ing a televised show organized 
for Platido Domingo's efforts 
to raise foods for earthquake 
victims in Mexico, the pre- 
senter. Pippo Baudo. who is 
one of RAI’s most popular 
personalities, announced that 
he was about to marry Katia 
RkciarellL, Domingo's co-star 
in the film version of Verdi's 
Otello. 

With this precedent' long 
established, Enrica Bonaccorti 
confided to her television a inti- 







Raffaella C-ana, whose TV 

style is under scrutiny. 

ence a fortnight ago that she 
was pregnant. 

Two days later, Raffaella 
Carra, RAI’s unchallenged, if 
rather brittle; leading lady, 
opened proceedings on her 
Sunday afternoon show with a 
tearful statement denying that 
she had neglected her sick 
mother while attending to the 
success of her series. She also 
announced that she would sue 
the weekly publication that 
had made the allegations. 

Telephone calls, said to 
have been largely m Cana's 
favour, punctually arrived. But 
they were not enough to dispel 
a new wind blowing through 
the corporation, which first 
made itself apparent in an 
article mi the front page of 
Aventi, the Socialist Party 
newspaper. Signor Manca's 
predecessor was a Socialist, 


but not as vigorous as the new 
chairman. 

The article opened with the 
chilling statement: “We do not 
like scandalistic journalism 
bHt we like even less the use 
for personal ends of the public 
network." 

The article bore the sig- 
nature “PP”, which insiders 
know to be that of Signor Pao- 
lo PUlitteri, who is not only the 
Socialist Party's television ex- 
pert, but the Prime Minister's 
brother-in-taw. 

As soon as the A vtati article 
appeared, the political eleineut 
was enlarged because the 
Christian Democrats came out 
in her favour. But she fell from 
the clouds when she was 
shown the official response 
from RAL which this tune 
took the side of her critics. 

Performers were forbidden 
to use the cameras and micro- 
phones -for statements and 
comments totally outside then- 
roles". 

The question of Cana’s 
mother or Boaaccorti’s baby is 
what worried toe general pub- 
lic. The deeper issue is 
whether the Socialists mean to 
insist that tire corporation 
drop its system of cultivating 
personalities and leave tele- 
vision star wars to the private 
network. 

In the Grid of popular 
entertainment, RATs answer 
to the private networks was to 
rise to meet tire challenge. In 
toe field of cunont affairs drey 
epjoyed a comfortable lead 
provided by long experience. 

But the consequences of the 
controversy over mother and 
the baby may be that toe So- 
cialists will make an early 
start with their attempt at 
imposing more dearly a dif- 
ference in functions, rather 
than straight competition be- 
tween tire two networks. 



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November 15-21 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


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At the 
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Dang MeH—tenfi 



I 


to late, very late, and 
Eric Morley is sweating 
furiously. He is fum- 
bling with a box of 
photographs of Miss 
Worid, also known as Miss 
Trinidad and Tobago, *iy* 
known as Giselle Jeanne- 
Marie Laronde, secretary. She 
sits on his right hanri ; fei gning 
the back of each picture and 
adding a couple of kisses with 
a mechanical flourish. Each 
signed shot goes for a fiver in 
aid of one of the endless 
children’s charities patronized 
by Julia Moriey, who sits on 
Eric’s left, still being exhaust- 
ingly wonderful after three 
weeks of uninterrupted 
hyping. 

It is the fag-end of the 
proceedings in the London 
Hilton Ballroom and Eric is 
clearly drooping, so 1 go 
straight in with the tough 
question. I ask when the Miss 
World show will move to 
America. 

“Yes, well, we are talking 
about that-.it is something we 
have to considex—there are 
television and merchandising - 
possibilities. -but not just at 
this moment.'’ He looks 
pleadingly at me; Miss ThT 
drums her fingers waiting for 
the next picture to sign. 

The feet is that Miss World’ 
Group pic (turnover £13 mil- 
lion, pretax* profits £555,000) 
has a problem — 36 years 
. down the line its primary asset 
is an astonishingly dated’TV 
show based in the wrong 
country. Everything about the 
operation, from E rie’s - 
greased-back hafcto the hump * 
and grind poses adopted by : 
the guts, redes of awind^d&y 
on Southend Pier m 1955-But 
it still pulls in big television 
money from a worldwide 
audience put at 700 nuffich 
it just happens to be in the 
wron g rime zone for US 
television. For the tng bucks, 
Eric should be in Las Vegas. 

But it is — like so many 
other faded* ridiculous things 
— a British institution.- An- 
nually 70-odd women teeter 
into London and spend two 
weeks bringing back the days 
when men were happily, in- 
effectually lecherous and girls 
giggled. They even go to the 
Houses of Parliament to talk 
to a group of MPs led by 
.Neville Trotter. 

Actually, “talk” is some- 
thing of an exaggeration. The 


Bryan Appleyard 
finds the Miss 
World contest 
tottering along 
on high heels and 
wiappedmthe 
coyness of an era 
otherwise foigotten 

gids do not converse as such — 
titty simply say how wonder- 
ful everything is, whatever 
yon say to them first During 
d rinks before ftmch at the 
House, Michael FaBoa (C 
Darlington) had established 


tiling was indeed 
and both had taken to staring 
Manldynf the wainscot Mean- 
while, David Bevan (C 
Yardley) was lurching about 
pluddng bits of paper nom his 
pockets. He had font every one 
of the girls he was supposed to 
be looking after. 

“You haven't seen Miss 

Airiffrirap Vir gin Tdanris, have 

you?” he pleaded. Meanwhile 
Miss Denmark, a joint favour- 
ite who was burdoied with the 
responsibility of the bets 
placed by the entire tabloid 
press corps, was grinning 
inaoelyl T asked her what all 
this meant to her, gesturing 
vaguely at Pugin abd Barry's 
enufle. of democracy. . . 

- -fpoooh,” she murmured, 
stating seductively at a mul- 
lioit- ^nothing.” . 

After the first couple of 


Fallon assured me. that 
Mauritius had unexpected 
depths and Marcus Fox (C 
Shipley) was convinced that 
Miss United States was worth 
persevering with. But gen- 
erally it is best just to regard 
them as mobile wallpfgier 
which keeps dunering up 
perfectly decent drinks 


The week had started at the 
Hilton Ballroom when all 77 
appeared for the first time in 
swimwear — a fifties knee* 
trembling ter m if ever there 
was one. In feet they sauntered 
in among the cameras wearing 
leotards by Top Shop — the 
competition sponsors. Sec- 




rtgflNftUF.tro 2 


.Available from Garrard. Asprey and Mappfo«V«Ob.; 
^Brampton Road^Knigfttsbridfla londorrSW .■ ^ 


urity was tifidit. Bodies were 
not . allowed in. It didn't 
matter - the tabloid photog- 
raphers acted as spies for than 
so odds were being circulated 
within minutes of the girls 
appearing. 

Pictures .were taken and 
then the girls stalked over to 
tables where they sat whisper- 
ingtoeach other. Ch^xarones, 
some of whom wore menac- 
ing-looking boiler suits, 
accompanied them. The press 
were astonishingly supine, 
asking juha if they could just 
have a quick word with Miss 
New Zealand or whoever. Mrs 
Moriey agreed, always with 
the proviso dot “somebody is 
listening” — th« meant a 
chaperone was thought-pofio- 
ing the quotes. 

Julia herself broke off from 
stopping Miss Yugoslavia 
, vanishing into an ante-roam 
with somebody who claimed 
to be a radio reporter to 
explain her corporate plan. 
She, it transpired, had trav- 
elled 500,000 miles in the last 
year persuading participating 
countries to turn the whole 
shooting match into a trade 
fair. Girls will arrive complete 
with industrial products, 
which will be displayed in a. 
vast marquee in Hyde Park. 
She reckoned this will start in 
two years — always assuming 
Eric hasn’t moved them all to 
Las Vegas. 

She managed to say every- 
thing in a tone of atgect 
pleading. This became pos- 
itively imploring- when she got 
on - to ifie subject of the 
rigorously moral and hyper- . 
scientific nature of the judging 
process. 

“The personality is terribly" 
important,” she- exhorted, 
“you may think a gift looks 
stunning and then you speak 
to her and suddenly it’s all 
gone.” So fir this seemed to 
have been true of all the gifts. 

Presumably they are pro- 
grammed to avoid scandal — 
or at least uncontrolled scan- 
dal. The odd tabloid flare-up . 
— usually involving drugs, sex 


6 Like many 
other faded, 
ridiculous 
things (his 
contest is 
a British 
institution < 



Tire world according to the Motleys: high heeled, carefully wrapped and labelled with country of origin, they also save who only stand to lose 


computers fin* the judges and a 
Chinoisene . backdrop. It 
looked like a cross between the 
Barclays' de Zoete Wedd deal- 
ing room" and the mantlepiece 
of an Edwaidian rone. The 
RAH was half empty and, 
without the -dosenips and 
zooms of the cameras, the 
show was a desultory amir for 
the Teal audience. In the vast" 
space you suddenly became 
aware of what an absurd outfit 
swimsuit and high beds is. It 
draws attention to the knees. * 
Now they had to dance not 
to Julia’s tune but to that of 
men behind the cameras who 
waved luminous green sticks 
at them indicating 
“Forward ... Stop . . . Get 
Off” During the char, Den- 


or inappropriate swimwear — 
is a sort of annual ritual which . 
can do Miss Worid Group pfc 
nothing but good. This year 
two reporters from a Sunday 
tabloid bad been unmasked at 
. the gifts* hold — he had been 
disguised as a bdlboy and she 
as a chambermaid. 

“We - had their 
photographs”, murmured Ju- 
lia mysteriously. 

After the super-soft porn of 
the Hfltpn we moved on to 
TopShop at Oxford Circus. It . 
had opened up on Sunday to 
allow everybody to buy 
clothes with a 40 per cent 
discount Store executives ap- 
peared looking grotesque in 
their best groovy clothes and 
awkwardly making gruf£ mas- 
culine jokes. 

• But, after everybody had 
been hyped tip by corporate 
pep talks abodt “the world’s 
press and the most beautiful 
gifts in the world”, the contes- 
tants in their street clothes 
were a let-down. They looked 
rather like, well, average Top 
Shop customers. The world’s 
press wasbegmniog to look, 
well drunk. . 

On the night the Hilton was 
frill of Burton Croup employ- 
ees who had aD won some 
kind of office competition to 
stay overnight and have a bdx : 

. at the .Albeit Hall for the show. 

Within minutes of hiuing.tbe 
white wine and canapes in the 
boxes they were making the 
press corps look sober. Yet 
another pep talk , had been 

given at. pre-show drinks by 
Sir Ralph Ha^iera,. group 
chai rman and a member ofthe. 
judging paneL He told his staff 
to roar and dap furiously 
when he was. introduced on 
television. They did so and 15 
million potential Top Shop 
. customers were.suMiminaBy 

convinced that here was a r*f L1 - . 

helluva guy, li&'tmd soul of v^nOStEQflS p UClOlflfi 


mark blew it by forgetting her 
life-long ambition while Aus- 
tria wanted to write a 
book . . . any book. 

The Coronation Ball was 
like something out of 
Hkronymous Bosch. Copy 
phoned over, the hacks were 
slavering over the girls — they 


drive having finally seized 
into a manic grin, the night 
wasHalpem’s. He chatted to a 
succession of lovelies, one 
hand just slid into the jacket 
pocket with the thumb 
projecting, the body language 


of the man with the money. 
Didn’t he think that the i 

had dearly been aroused by - ofihis thing was a bit dated 
Miss USA’s public statement Top Shop customers? 


of how impressed she was by 
the British press. Top Shop 
employees were bitching furi- 
ously about ‘ Debenhams, the 
latest Burton Group ac- 
quisition. A photographer es- 
timated the result had cost 
him £2,000 in missed 
winnings: 

But, with Eric looking clini- 
cally dead and Julia's over- 


“Yes, it is old-fashioned. 
But these youngsters — with 
Chernobyl and Aids they 
haven’t really got a future - so 



Aid the trainer is.. . . JuHa Moriey with Miss T VT 

■■■■SATURDAY 

Taste of festive £ 

things to come: SSn, !< 
tips for the tops in gS""*. g 

Drink 13 Shopping 
Ealing On* 13 TtaKVCSob 
Ffljw . 18 Imre] 

GaUcriK IS TV £ Radio 


What with 
Chernobyl 
and Aids, 
youngsters 
really do 
not have 
any future 


this is a bit of nostalgia for 
them.” 

Winning hadn't exactly 
swept the mechanised Miss 
TnT offher feel She was just 
out there doing the business 
for Julia. For the truth was 
that nothing much had hap- 
pened The Southend Pier 
show had just gpt too big for 
its high heels, some shop- 
keepers had had too much to 
drink and 76 girls had come 
second 

“Nobody wants this stuff 
any more”, said one poor 
hanger-on. “It is all wet T- 
shirts or .topless shows they 
want nowadays.” 

And he was right For, try as 
they will with their gruf£ back- 
slapping jokes, nobody could 
make this thing sexy. Except 
Miss Belgium, and she just 
kept laughing her head off. 

Next morning, as the Top 
Shop crowd lurched bleary- 
eyed up to the Roof Res- 
taurant for breakfast, the 
shares of Miss World Group 

pic fen 5p. 

£> Ttowt Nwwpimm IM 1986 


Silent night 
...every night 



Each and every day and night will be "siJenr". Can 
you just imagine a totally si l e nt world? 

At Christmas Tune there would be no carols, no 
sleigh-bells and no "Happy Christmases”. Because 1 am 
totally deaf, that will be my Christmas. I and hundreds 
of thousands like me who are either locally or partially 
deaf urgently need your help. The RNID cares about all 
deaf people bur to do much more we need you to one by 
helping us. 

We could do so much more but that requires a grear 
deal of money. 

Amon^t our many services are: 

• Residential facilities for the rehabilitation and care 
ol deal and deafiWind people, young and nld. 

# Advisory services, on communication, education 
and employment. 

■ Scientific, technical and medical research on 
deafness and tinnitus (noises m the head)- 

# A specialist library and comprcKusivc information 
services. 

■ Regional development services working m improve 
community services lor deaf and deaf/hlmd people. 

• A telephone exchange for the deaf. 

However, in older to carry out this wink we desperately 
need a great deal of. financial support. A trht> Christmas 
time, please give what you can to help. It vou would like 
ftjrriw details of qur work « how to regularly support u» 
through a deed of covenant please write its me: 

Mike Whitlam (Chief Executive) 

RNID 

IHE ROYAL NATTCWU. J^^T!I^T£ JSfilHLDEAF 

Boom XT, 105 Cowte Smet, Lovulon WC1 CAR. ■ 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


STANDOUT 

FROM THE HERD 








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CHECK THE CHARGES 

FORTOCRSELF. 


SOUTH AFRICA. 


Stand out from the herd. 

You could be there tomorrow via a dozen 
or more international air routes. 

Catch big game fever Be mesmerised by 
cities built on gold and diamonds. Marvel at the 
scenic beauty of the Cape and T^ble Mountain. 

Best of all though, you’ll be pleasantly 
surprised by the positive changes taking place in 
South Africa. 

And witnessing that is worth a trip in itself 

Right now, currency exchange rates also 
make South Africa superb tourist value. 

A 12 night Fly-Drive holiday departing in 
November by scheduled international flights 
costs as little as £530 per person increasing to 
£777 during December 

We even include free car hire. 

So exercise your personal right to see this 
beautiful country for yourself. 

You’ll be captivated by the magic of South 
African hospitality. In fact you’ll come back. 
Again and again! 


more travel 
on South Af 

Myname_ 
My address 


Satour, I'd love to have 
more travel information 
on South Africa! 


satour 


.Postcode. 


Send this coupon to SATOUR, 
Regency House. 1-4 Warwick Street 
London W1R 5WB. 

OS Telephone 01-439 966L 


YOU'LL COME BACK.AGAIN AND AGAIN 




















Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 1 


««• 


Survival 

of the 



AlanP onsford rediscovers the unspoilt 
island beauty of Grena da, worlds apart 
from its bustling neighbour, Barbados 


Jn just 24 hours 1 was 
reassured. My favourite 
tropica] island was — out- 
wardly. anyway - little- 
scarred by nearly 10 years of 
repressive, often vicio us , gov- 
ernment, clearly not ravaged 
by the violence of its recent 
pasL Grenada was free, stable 
ready and eager to receive 
guests. In feet, the tiny coun- 
try seemed hardly changed 
from the one I had fiiitseen 
and admired nearly three 
decades ago, in British colo- 
nial days. 

The emerald, closely d a d 
mountains remain unblem- 
ished. High-rise has not come. 
The narrow, steep streets of St 
George's, the capital and only 
sizeable town, retain a plain, 
unspoilt grace and bustle, 
m a kin g few concessions to 
tourism, disclosing only a tight 
sprinkling of white feces, ex- 
cept for the few hours when a 
cruise ship is in. There has 
never been die money for 
developers and improvers to 
disfigure the blend of gravity 
and gaiety concocted by the 
solemn 19th-century ware- 
houses and churches and the 
neat, brightly-roofed houses 
hanging on the precipitous 
hillsides that rim the prettiest 
harbour in foe Caribbean. 

The same grubby, inter- 
island schooners rub them- 
selves against the quay 
encircling the Carenage, while 
a hundred smart yachts ride 
on the inner harbour and in a 
dozen sheltering coves, start- 
ing, finishing or just 
contemplating idyllic 
wanderings through the near- 
deserted Grenadines, which 


are dotted in a crooked One 70 
miles north to St Vincent. 

It was in less tangible re- 
spects that differences were to 

be sensed. In 1980, when I had 

last visited in the depths of the 
island's despair, it had been 

ebullient Grenadians ccwed 
by the tyranny of Maurice 
Bishop's People’s Revolu- 
tionary Government. Old 
friends glanced fearfully over 
their shoulders as they whis- 
pered to yon. Marxist slogans 
and barbed wire abounded. 

The Cubans* was 

pervasive. Out at Point 
Salines, just south of St 
George's, they were braiding a 
big new airfield, threatening to 
become another thorn prick- 
ing America's under-belly. 

It was the murder of Bishop 
in October 1983, and the 
threat of an even more sinister 
regime, that brought the 
United States 'intervention**, 
as it is determinedly called 
locally— neverthe invasion or 
occupation. The Grenadians' 
consequent hero-worship of 
the Americans in general and 
President Reagan in particular 
is matched only by their 
puzzled dicip p <rintnM»n t that 
Britain did not initiate, or at 
least support, their deliv- 
erance. I had feared it might 
be reflected in their attitudes 
to B riti s h visitors. But I 
should have known better. 

' Nevertheless, Unde Sam's 
dollar aid will do wonders for 
long-neglected services — 
roads, drainage, power, hos- 
pitals, education. A pittance 
has been found to promote the 
redeVelopment of tourism, ■ 



'"J ? • 

‘•r 


provided it is up-market, con- 
trolled and unpotfntrng. Not 
for them the way of some 
more northerly West Atlantic 
resorts where foreigners 
swamp local life, culture, 
streets and beaches, breeding 
avarice and sourness in once- 
congenial people. 

Links are strong with 
neighbouring Barbados. That 
rolling, sugar-coated island 
has long served as a gentle 
introduction and stepping 
stone to the more ruffled, 
luxuriant ones. Increasingly it 
will pass on to Grenada those 
experienced, affluent trav- 
ellers for whom Barbados's St 
James coast luxury hotels still 
provide high standards but 
who have come to resent the 
sprawl of cheap guesthouses, 
selfcatering apartments and 

mmf - mwrkrrc 



In Grenada you will find no 
Woolwonh's, no McDonald's 
or Kentucky Fried Chicken, 
less commercialization, 
urbanization add indus- 
trialization, little crime «nd 
virtually no drugs problem. 
On the other fran/t Grenada 
does not offer many man- 
made attractions ana activ- 
ities away from the hotels. 

But its natural beauties are 
stunning, whether in the 
charm of St George’s or the 
sublimity of lakes and water- 
fells embraced by high moun- 
tains. or m Jong, distant 
beaches and deep, fiord-like 
bays which once hid pirate 
ships. Everywhere the prolific 
greenery yidds cocoa, nutmeg, 
ginger, allspice, cloves, cinna- 
mon, turmeric, bay leaves, so 
dosely-packed it seems the 
word “lush” was invented for 
the “Isle of Spec". 

Though it is now getting its 
own direct international air 
services — the Americans 


WEATHER EYE 


i — usually 
low to mid Sds. Humidity - 
sometimes uncomfortably 
high, but moderated by sea 
breezes. Rainfall — dry season 
from December to May gives 
sunny mornings and 
occasional heavy showers 
(about one day in three) in the 
late afternoon. 


finished the new airport — 
Grenada is hardly likely to be 
overrun. It has scarcely more 
than 400 guestrooms and 
nearly half of those are m one 
hold being reopened on the 
miles-long Grand Anse beach 
after a robust occupation by 
the liberating army. 

Nearby, the 30 bungalows 
of the elegant Spice Wand Inn 
stand among the palms right 
on the pale coral sand. The inn 
is unfenced, an eloquent com- 
ment on the local folk whose 
beach this is. Here town ami 
village people bring their chil- 
dren, ample ladies proffer 
little straw baskets of nutmeg 
and doves, reputations are 
made and lost in cricket 
matches at the water's edge. 

For the rest, the hotels are 
intimately ‘email — nine., IQ, 
1 6, 20 rooms, mostly cottages, 
suites, bungalows, with a cen- 
tral restaurant and bar area. 
Many are tucked away in 
secluded, sandy coves or — 
tike the aptly-named Secret 
Harbour, where I stayed — 
quiet bays, providing relaxed, 
superb service and privacy. 

New, bigger ones will triple 
accommodation in the next 
four years. But they will have 
to conform to the convention 
of building no higher than a 
coconut palm which, despite 
evidence to the contrary, is 
deemed to stop growing at 
three storeys. 


Colorado powder power on and off the pistes 



F. • . ; y; • •• 

JO'..' AyjSsfck 


Snow spray: deep and crisp and downhill in Colorado 


ACAPULCO- 
a NIGHTS. FROM £499 

Acapulro as in Mexico? The very ai^ AtoCaaim^the 

largest of the Mexican Carfobean Islands: 1 2 Nights, 

Prices indude return airfare, hotel accommodation and 
tra nsfers. 

Ask your Travel Agent. Orring us on (0293) 776979. 

^CONTINENTAL A1HUNE5 TOURS 


& 


Switzerland 




It taka® a Swts* company 

to stow you the best of Swtawtand. 

For iwm, a a**. 

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Discover somewhere speciaj^ 
W SUN THIS SUMMER. 

From the Azores 
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just the sun with 
Sovereign. 

See yourlocal ABTA travel agent 
SoYPl*pi^D • or call ns on 01-572 7538. 

IT’S V IE Qtjygwnri TRAVEL 



Just about the fim thing I saw 
on the. slopes at Vail was-a. 
feUow in stais-and-stripes 
dungarees playing a trombone 
very noisily while executing a 
series of test turns down a 
steepish blue run. The trom- 
bone, of course; requires the 
use of both hands, yet some- 
how he contrived to make 
what be was doing look per- 
fectly natural. 

A few days later, grabbing a 
final inn, I hopped on to a 
deserted lift. Just it was about 
to ascend, a figure leapt on 
beside me, pulfing down the 
dear plastic canopy that keeps 
out the draughts. That’s odd, I 
thought; there isn't a breath of 
wind. 

“Hi,** the voice behind the 
expensive Bollfe goggles said 
cheerfully, “How’ re you to- 
day? Mind, if I sendee some of 
this?" And from within his 
Head suit he produced a tiny 
pipe, which he filled with a 
greenish herbal substance 
from a plastic bag. He lit the 
pipe, drew deeply and ex- 
haled, fflling the canopy with a 
pungent sweetness. 

“You a viator?" he asked, 
before refilling his lungs. “I'm 
a realtor here in town. Took 
two and one-half millio n dol- 
lars of business this morning. 
Now I'm going up to get high 
and ski." . 

Colorado often lives up to 
its caricature: rich hippies 
with snow on their boots and 
up their noses, John Denver-' 
lookatike policemen driving 
Saab prowl cars Take the day 
our guide suddenly pulled us 
to a halt and asked: “Yon guys 
want to try some adventure 
skiing?" Barely pausing to 
register the party’s wary sig- 
nals of assent, she headed fuU- 
tih off the piste, through a gap 
in the foliage and into a hell of 
kidney-wrenching switch- 
backs, branches at ganoting 
height and tree roots booby- 
trapping a trail not much 
wider than a man's shoulders. 

It might inve been five 
minutes or it might have been 
an hour later that the final 
bump pitched us back out on 
to the piste, white-faced and 
whimpering. “That," our 
guide said, “was where the 
kids go to smoke their dope. 
They figure they won't get 
disturbed.”. 1 

■ Lest you get the wrong idea, 
it must be said that Vail is in 
general a. temple of civiliza- 
tion, the village successfully 
imftating the ^Austrian am- 
bience and pleasantly free of 


Over the top of the Vail Mountain, far from 
the cDsmo^pbfitan bustle, Richard Williams 
skis down the glinting crystals of Shangri-La 


Dallas - style ostentation. 
About 100 miles east of Den- 
ver, it was founded in 1962 by 
a couple of developers who 
had trained nearby during the 
Second World War, the 
resort’s longest run is known 
as Riva Ridge, in memory of 
foe men of the 10th Mountain 
Patrol Who gave their lives in 
the Apennines. 

Most of Vail’s other runs 
bear names — Timberline 
Catwalk, Whiskey Jack, Mill 
Creek Road — that might have 
been borrowed from the songs 
of Bruce Springsteen. These 
are on the front face of the 
mountain, amply served by a 
superb lift system. 

It is on the back bowls, 
however, that Vail’s legend is 
based. Here, over the top of 
the ridge on the mountain's 
south race, in a yewo-be- 
developed tract of the White 
River National Forest, is 
where the legendary Colorado 
powder can be experienced in 
a setting a world away from 
the cosmopolitan bustle of the 
north side. 

No piste machine grooms 
these bowls. Two of them. Sun 
Up and Sun Down, are served 
by the only tift on the whole 
south face, a double chair 
which carries skiers from a 
picturesque gully up to the 
summit at 1 1,250 feet. 

The real adventure, though, 
is a trip to the adjacent China 
Bowl, which gets its name 
from a long rock wall that 
meanders along the ridge, 
brooding over a silent vast- 
ness. Accessible only via a 
Sno-Cat which leaves hourly, 
carrying a couple of mountain 
guides and six or eight cus- 
tomers at S10 a bead, China 
Bowl offers a couple of alter- 
native ways of descending. 

Either they can take a short, 
sharp and exhilarating route 
down the fell line of the steep 
West Wall, or they can opt for 
a longer, gentler and extraor- 
dinarily. beautiful run called 
Shangri-La, which meanders 
through copses of cedar, fir, 
aspeu and pine, down to the 
rendezvous from which the 
writing Sno-Cat makes its 
juddering return ascent 

The day we cruised down 
Shangri-La, slalom ing through 
the trees- with varying degrees 
of expertise but sharing a 


common euphoria, the sun 
was glinting off the crystals of 
what the locals call “com 
crust", spring snow that has 
melted and refrozen over- 
night. At the bottom our 
grade, Jean Richmond, re- 
minded us that while we 
might see snow simply in 
terms of powder and slush, the 
Eskimos — to whom it is a 
matter of life and death — 
have more than 100 names for 
the various types. 

Jean Richmond, who has 
spent 13 winters on Vail 
Mountain, leaches in fluent 
Spanish, German, and Italian, 
and gets by with Brazilians 


and Japanese, imparting the 
.sort of epigrammatic wisdom 
that you are unlikely to get 
from the average Alpine 
“bend zee knees" merchant 
“There are a hundred different 
ways of skiing moguls, and 
traversing across the slope is 
not any of them.” she noted 
crisply — an admonishment 
that still rings in guilty ears. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


I travelled as a guest of Venice 
Simplon-OriantExprass 
Hotels, owners of The Lodge 
at VaB. The American Dream's 
Ski USA brochure offers seven 
nights room and breakfast at 
The Lodge, indudirafiights 
from London, from £859 (4 
Station Parade, High Street 
North, London EB; 01-470 
1181). 


Amsterdam Foster 
For a fe e copy of an 


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If you have a curiosity about the worlds 
great civilisations - you will certainly come to 
Mexico. 

No other country evokes its past with such 
extraordinary power or offers such a wealth of 
interesting things to see and da 

Exuberant art and sculpture Lively mariachi 
music Colourful outdoor markets Dazzling sun. 
Crystal dear waters 

Warm, friendly people to make you wel- 
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Find out more Askyour travel agent - or fill 
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Please send me more information. . 

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Being whisked smooihly 
and rapidly to his hotel is one 
of the first and happiest of 
surprises 10 greet the returning 
visitor. While they were at it 
the Americans slapped down a 
spanking new highway into 
town. Everyone is delighted — 
except the taxi-drivers. They 
used to bump us right over the 
spine of the island at great 
length and expense from the 
former, distant airstrip. 

Elsewhere, roads untouched 
for years have not yet been so 
tacky. When I made the 
beautiful but tortuous 25-miie 
drive up the western shore it 
seemed the entire adult 
population, male and female, 
was pa rching and filling cra- 
ters like shell-holes. 

As they moved aside they 
peered gravely at this rare, 
white stranger. But a greeting 
or wave from me always 
brought answering smiles and 
many a “Good day to you”. 

Their Hfomal clothes and 
the humility of the tumble- 
down villages was illuminated 
every few miles by dashes of 
laughing schoolchildren, 
dressed immaculately in shin- 
ing white blouses or shirts and 
navy blue skirts or trousers. 

This morning's expedition, 
tracing the coasts of the par- 
ishes of Stin ts George, John 
and Mark to return over the 
heights of St Andrew in the 


Down to a son-kissed sea: the narrow streets (left) and 
graceful boats (above) of harbour town St George's 

ing. .Alas, it had become the 
American embassy. 

However, there was 
compensation to be found at 


afternoon, offers a special 
lunchtime treat on a hilltop in 
St Patrick's. Here, at her home 
on a former plantation, Mrs 
Betty Mascott, a lady of 
mature years and Somerset 
ancestry, serves some of the 
best of local creole food. 1 
discovered spiced pumpkin 
soup, pork with casareep (a 
local preservative), 
christophines, cailal oo (a kind 
of spinach), plantains and all 
sorts of vegetables and 
seasonings, rounded off with 
guavas and coconut ice- 
cream. Such delicious West 
Indian fere is not easy to find 
on many of the other islands. 
In Grenada it is a recognized 
attraction. 

I had hoped to relive a 
lunch I recalled beneath a 
great sapodilla tree in the 
garden or the Ross Point Inn, 
renowned for its creole cook- 


TRAVEL NOTES 


There are two through air 
services (five flights a week) to 
Grenada from London, both 
requiring a change of aircraft - 
at Barbados with Caribbean 
Airways and at Trinidad with 
BW1A. British Airways makes a 
same-day connection with the 
local afrfine. UAT. at Barbados 
most days. 

Booked direct; first-class 
hotels in Grenada charge 
upwards of US$100 per person 


Mama's. Here is a truly for- 
midable cook, who lays before 
you simultaneously IS dishes 
that include such delicacies as 
stewed mamcou (opossum) 
and tatoo (armadillo) — both 
rich and gamey. 

As I drove home 1 picked up 
a passenger, as is the local 
practice. He looked like Louis 
Armstrong wearing my 
gardening clothes. Bui be was 
wise and refreshingly articu- 
late in the English language, as 
are so many humble people in 
Grenada. He concluded bis 
account of his island's virtues 
with: “God put it here with his 
own hands". 

I was inclined to believe 
him. 

a day during the winter season 
(December 15-April 15), but 
packages, offered by a number 
of British tour operators, bring 
prices down sharply. These 
examples include airfare, 
room, breakfast and one main 
meal: Tradewinds' (01- 
734 1260) seven nights at 
Spice Island tnn in season: 

£1 ,136 (14 nights £1 ,625), out- 
of-season: £798 and £1 ,086; 
Kuoni's six nights at the 
Calabash in season: £804 
(£427 for an extra week), out of 
season: £644 (extra week 
£266). Kuoni (0306 885044) . 



Germany 


Once upon a time there was a fairytale 
land of glittering snowy mountains, warm 
friendly inns and enchanted castles; with 
brightly-lit towns full of musicians and 
entertainers, where Christmas seemed to 
last all winter long. . ” 


Winter makes German Cities come alive: the 
night life warms up, the concert season 
starts, the long, sheltered shopping arcades 
are ablaze with colour and light; every 
town has its traditional Christmas market 

— the air is filled with the aroma of 
gingerbread, candy floss and mulled wine 

— just the thing for a heartwarming 
winter break. 


Winter Is welcomed in the mountains, too, 
where well-groomed slopes, neatly swept 
paths, modem ski lifts and hundreds of 
miles of cross-country ski tracks await the 
visitor. The air is clear and fresh, and the 
hospitality is open, honest and traditional 
- the friendliest place for a winter holiday. 


Hamburg Hop ideal for a short break. Cruise FROM 
to bustling Hamburg - famous for Its CCC 
night-fife, art galleries ana elegant shops... XiUJ 

2 nights at sea. 2 nights In Hamburg. 


Black Forest staving in friendly from 

guest-houses at Lake Trtrsee or Fefdberg. £172 

7 nights. 


Fine skiing and lots of sleigh rides! 


Bavarian Alps ideal winter holidays at 
Baiderschwang. the highest village In FROM 

Germany. Alpine skiing and cross country rOHI 
trails in a typical family atmosphere. Zi£U I 

7 nights by air and ralL 


Please send me vour free brochures of holiday offers in the 
Federal Republic of Germany. prestel aia 

Name — 

Artrtrpcx - 


TM1 


Tt> German National Tourist 
Office, (Distribution centre! 
Park Farm. Folkestone. 

Kent, trig soz 


DZTifg 


DEUTSCHE ZENTOALE 
FlfliOURISMUSEV 
GSMAN NAhONAL TOURIST OFRCE 


l Germany 
Morettianjust a holiday. j 


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TWF- TTMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


TRAVEL 2 


OUT AND ABOUT 


Grandeur and gardens of grace 


Petworth House 

may be majestic, 
but not far off is 


Little Thakeham, a 

more homely jewel 

The more popular an ex- 
hibition is. the less likely I am 
id see it. It is not that I would 
be bored by Picasso's sketch- 
books or the Mary Rose. It is 
the likelihood of being swept 
past the exhibits in a chatter- 
ing tide of humanity that adds 
more places and pictures to 
mv list of pleasures put oft 
The snag with the impov- 
erished aristocracy leaving its 
fine houses to the nation is 
that the nation and his granny 
have an uncanny knack of 
turning up for visit at the same 
moment as I do. Was it foolish 
not to have expected a crush at 
Petworth House in Sussex on 
a summer 5 afternoon? 

while the town's 30 or more 
antique shopkeepers traded 
brisklv with each other and 
with smoothly gaberdined vis- 
itors from across the Channel, 
the halls and salons of 
Petworth House shook with 
tramping British feet. Young 
men. wearing jumpers knitted 
on big needles and with 
children on their shoulders, 
had to stand well back to see 
Sir Peter Lely's identikit 17th- 
century beauties looking down 
from the walls of the Square 
Dining Room. 

The Marble Hall is tittle 
changed since the sixth Duke 
of Somerset, nicknamed the 




Air fares to the French Riviera 
this winter are being brought 
down with the launch of a 
series of charier flights to Nice 
bv Euro Express. Two flights a 
week are being operated from 
Gatwick by British Island 
Airways, starting on Decem- 
ber 19, and running through to 
the end of April. 

Fares start at £99 return, 
increasing to £149 at peak 
periods, and accommodation 
packages are available at a 
range of hotels in Nice and 
Cannes at prices Tanging be- 
tween £50 and £145 for three 


“Proud Duke" for his exces- 
sive haughtiness, lavished his 
wife's fortune on rebuilding 
the house after she came of age 
in 1688. Now National Trust 
members look from its win- 
dows over hills and woods 
designed by Capability Brown 
before taking tea in the hail of 
the servants' block. 

Petworth's Turners excite 
more admiration that its Ti- 
tians. and Grinling Gibbons’s 
swags of game birds and fruit 
carved in astonishing deiail in 
wood draw more comment 
than the head of Aphrodite, 
believed to have been cut by 
Praxiteles in the third century 
BC. 

The frustration of days like 
these is that television allows 

days Car hire can be arranged 

from £105 for three days, 
including tax. Information: 
0293 775555. 

• Eurocamp. the specialist 
self-drive camping and cara- 
van-holiday operator* 1ms 
launched a series of special 
offers for next summer in 
advance of its main brochure. 
Holidays are being offered at 
1986 prices or less, with 
children under 14 travelling 
free, while three-week holi- 
days for die price of two are 
available on departures before 
June 21 and after August 28. 
Bookings under this scheme 
carry a deposit of only £12 per 
party, but the special offers 
will not be available after 
December 18. Holidays are 
operated to 115 sites in eight 
countries. Information on 01- 
935 0628 or 0565 3844. 


one to see so much of it better. 
The cameraman’s lighting 
provides finer views of the 
paintings and the rooms can 
be seen without crowds. Being 
there is for seeing the minutiae 
of a child bride’s wedding 
slippers and being dwarfed by 
a garden urn. 

After the public crush or 
Petworth. the peace of Sir 
Edwin Lutyen’s Little 
Thakeham was balm. 

Lutyens was involved in a 
project in Dieppe when he met 
Edward Blackburn on a cross- 
channel ferry. Lutyens was 
invited to visit the site of the 
house Blackburn was building 
on the South Downs near 
Storrington. Soon after, work 
was scrapped on the first 

Sailing with the stars 

The Norwegian-owned Royal 
I'ildng Line has recruited a 
heavyweight team of guest 
lecturers for its 1987 cruise 
programme. Sir Yehudi 
Menuhin and Paul Tortellier 
will be giving performances on 
North Cape sailings. Omar 
Sharif will host a bridge cruise 
through the Panama Canal 
Cary Player and Bill Rogers 
will give coaching sessions on 
a golf cruise through the 
Caribbean, and the Earl of 
Lichfield will be on hand to 
give tips to amateur photog- 
raphers during a voyage to 
China. Information: 01- 
734 0773. 

Better by half 

Dutch-owned Transavia has 
launched a new scheduled 


house and a second house, 
designed by Lutyens, was 
begun. 

The current owners are Tim 
and Pauline Ractfiff who run 
it as an hotel. Their records 
include photographs of Ed- 
ward Blackburn’s daughters, 
wearing big bobble tammies 
riding in a carriage past the 
unfinished Lutyens house, 
and Sir Edwin in a crumpled 
suit, walking the site with a 
dog. 

Lutyens himself thought’ 
Little Thakeham the best of 
his country houses. It is not a 
statement I am inclined or 
qualified to argue with. What I 
can report is the pleasure or 
staying in such a good house 
with time to savour its quality 

service between Gatwick and 
.Amsterdam with a half-price 
offer on basic fares. Business- 
class now costs £85 return 
instead of the normal £170, 
while economy-class comes 
down from £ 146 return to £73. 
The offer is valid only up to 
the end of the year, but a £73 
return fore will still be avail- 
able for the rest of the winter 
on a late-booking baas. 
Information: 0293 38181. 

• Greyhonnd is cutting die 
1987 price on some of its 
popular Ameripass tickets, 
which give unlimited travel on 
its bus network throughout the 
USA and eastern and western 
c amidfl. The 15-day and 30- 
day passes come down to $150 
and $225 respectively (about 
£106 and £158 at current 
eyrhang g rates), while the 
seven-day pass is held at this 


A piece of history for sale 

Little Thakeham (left), 
and (above) builder 
Edward Blackburn'S 
daughters photographed 
outside the house 

and detail undisturbed, and to 
wander the oh-so-English 
garden paths and pergolas in 
the style of Gertrude JekylL 
Little Thakeham is up for 
sale, and its future as an hotel 
uncertain. But the Ractliffo 
will be carrying on at least 
until the New Year. 

Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Little Thakeham, Merrywood 
Lane, Storrington, West 
Sussex (090e6 4416) Is a 
partner in the Pride of Britaai 
consortium. A stay In one of 
its eight suites costs £80 per 
night per couple with 
breakfast Dinner is £19.50 
each plus VAT. 


OUTINGS 


DISCOVERING MAMMALS: 

The Natural History Museum's 

latest permanent exhibition 
explores the relationship _ 
between mammals and they 
environments with emphasis 
placed on the role of 
conservation. At a time when 
many mammals are on foe 
verge of extinction, foe plight 
of whales, rhinos and tapirs is 
highlighted but you can also 
learn about hundreds of other 
mammals from fossils of 
extinct species to foes' 20th- 
century relatives and many 
others. 

Natural History Museum, 
Cromwell Road, London SW7 
(01-569 6323) Mon-Sat 10am- 
6pm, Sun 2.30pm-6pm. Free. 

ROBOTS AND AUTOMATA: 
Fascinating exhibition of 
mechanical toys made 
betweeen 1850-1950, robots of 
an kinds, some of which 
visitors may operate, and a 
delightful collection of 
automata. Suitable tor aH ages 
but chBdren should find it 


- TT . • • /* 


fluseum, 682 OkJ Kent 
Road, London SE1 5 (01- 
639 5604). Mon-Sat 10am- 
5pm. Free. 

ART EVENT DAY: A number of 

artists showing their work and 
demonstrating watercolour 
and printmaking techniques. 
AJso talks relating to the 
cathedral and music recitals. 
Southwark Cathedral, London 
Bridge, SE1 Today 11am-5pm. 
Adult £2, chfld £1.50. Family 
ticket £3. 

GLASTONBURY CAGE BIRD 
SOCIETY SHOW: Between 
1,500-2,000 birds on show - 
and some for sale - including 
canaries, budgerigars and a 
variety of foreign birds. 



Relatively different: a 
elephant’s oldest ancestor, at 

Competitions In various 
categories judged this morning 
- winners on display this 
afternoon. Related society 
stands. __ 

Glastonbury Town HaB. The 
Cross, Glastonbury. Somerset 
Today 3 pm-l 0 pm : tomcHTOw 
10am-4pm. Adult 20p, child 
lOp- 

YORK CRAFT FAIR: Over 50 
stalls showing and selling 
traditional craft items and 
many demonstrations of craft 
skills and technique®. 

Assembly Rooms, Blake 
Street York. Today, tomorrow. 


the Natural History Museum 


I0.30am-5.30pm. Adult 40p, 
child 20p. 

GUITAR WEEKEND 1986: 

Celebration of all aspects of 
foe guitar, indudkig an 
exhibition by guitar-makers 
and master craftsmen, 
workshops in guitar playing 
and repair, a large selection of 
acoustic and electric guitars, 
many of which can be tried out, 
and guitar performances 
throughout the centre. 
Barbican Centre, SUk Street 
EC2 (01-638 8891). Today 
10 am -9pm, tomorrow 12noon- 
8.30pm. Free. 


year's level of $99 (£70). 
Ameripass tickets are obtain- 
able through travel agents or 
direct from Greyhound (01- 
839 5591). 

Celebrations in style 

Packages to Boston far the 
Thanksgiving celebrations are 
being operated by the Sonesta 
Hotels group in conjunction 
with Northwest Orient Air- 
lines. The price of £750 for a 
couple includes the return air 
fore from Gatwick, departing 
on November 26, accom- 
modation for three nights at 
the Royal Sonesta Cambridge, 
a number of free sightseeing 
tours and a special Thanks- 
gjving dinner. Information on 
0800 898410. 


Philip Ray 



CROMFORD 

Derbyshire 
Distance: 8 miles 

This walk starts in 
one of the cradles of 
the Industrial Revolution: 
Richard Arkwright's Crom- 
ford, where water-powered 
factory coteffltt-spinnfe&g be- 
gan in 1771. It then climbs 
np to Wirksworth, George 
Biot's SaowfiehL 
From the car park opp- 
osite Arkwright's parish 
church, walk west to his mill, 
now a museum. At the 
junction, turn right on to the 
A6 for a quarter of a mile to 
look at Arkwright's Masson 
Mills, partly of 1783. Re- 
trace your steps to the 
Wirksworth road and follow 
this, firing in Arkwright's 
worker’s housing in North 

Chut r'flntmnp unllHI ftp- 



fore tnnnug right into a lane, 
tiimi a footpath, that weaves 
through old quarries until it 
winds into Wirksworth. 

This town has tine 17th, 
18th. and 19th-century 


houses and a spacious 
church. There is a choice of 
.pubs for lunch, tat check on 
a Sunday. Leave th e tow n by 
a precipitous lane north-west 
from the Market Place. 
Then cross small fields, 
heading north-west to meet 
the High Peak Trail, which 
follows the course of the old 
High Peak Railway opened 
in 1830. Turn right along the 
trail to Middle Top Engine 
House. This houses a beam 
engine of 1829. 

Qntiime along the trail, 
leaving it at a bridge to walk 
north into the long, stone 
village of Middleton. Turn 
right at the crossroads and 
follow the lane to Groaning 
Tor, bearing right to descend 
the steep wooded slope to Yia 
Getiia MOL Follow the val- 
ley road back into Cramford. 

Martin Andrew 




HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


NOW YOU CAN 
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Or nng Iberia: London (01) 437 5622 (30 lines), Bmfnghcm (021)643 195a 
Manchester (061)436 6444. Glasgow (041)248 6581. 

M major ciKfit cads cccspted 


Ireland. 
Weekends 
From £ 122. 

Ireland. Whether you fancy a weekend break 
in the character and charm of the city or prefer 
the gentle pace of the country there's some- 
thing for you - and all from just £122 
per person. Prices are based on two adults 
travelling together and include: 

• Return air travel from London to Dublin. 
(Shannon/Cork only £20 extra per person.) 

e 2 nights' accommodation in a choice of 
superior town and country houses. 

• 2 DAYS' FREE CAR-HIRE. 

To book now, call Aer Lingus Holidays on 
01-439 7262. But hurry this offer closes on 
1 5 December. 

^L*AiY£> 

\t)U ll Only Know By Bei ng Th eke. 



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CHRISTMAS TRAVEL 


a TRA/BLBAG ?• = 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Rwum fWwn 

jotounj/Hat £i55 Dctafa £<20 

Naroft S3S0 Sidney £7H? 
Caro £230 fcsiand £735 

Laps £380 Hone] KaogSSSO 

oefawion £350 wan £330 
£350 Ana Many Un 
ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 


TH. 

ms a Ents 
WOflBA 


3. Anne* From M6& 01-404 
7JTI ART A 


LOWEST FARES 

pw ffl tiw 

Ural £80 IV* OB 

Laps £330 Man ECO 

run!. EJS toWOT 

■Jo tag £*» B ang* JOT 

Can £205 UnMi £«0 

Dri/fim £335 Raw EOT 

Hoag ham £S10 Caron MZ5 

Hoe Ifrsrwf* Md oa is & Old Oa 

SUN & SAND 
21 SweSw St, LoadnWI 
01-439 Z 168/437 8537 


j ■ Estapadtt-lrcmi3tol5davs- 
ghvyuu real llaiNitytotike the 
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i Selected holeb. . .comfartahle 
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i Phone 01-749 7613 (24 hrs> 

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IO Eorooe. USA A most dnllna- 
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2201. ABTA IATA ATOt- 


LOWEST FARES 


it XMAS SPECIALS * 

Airaota 24/12 £199 

Afcanto 21/12 £119 

Faro 19/12 £125 

Malaga 21/12 £119 

Tenerife 19/12 £175 

Car rme/m x an tr ESS p.w 
Open San 

FLIGHTS^ 


SVD/MKL USB PRO, EE6S AU 
near t arner, lo Aib/NZ Ol- 
SSM 7371 ABTA 


JMSCOUNTED * CWOW FJJRjJjl 
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uaiiy nienu. US 
O/w I5S Run. Fran fciurl m an 
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ALL US CIT1I 3 Lowest Hrw«i 
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onFiutE SPECIALISTS Svmwy 

Clf* AurW«n« 
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o/w £24* rln £*«& Ixo | 

■os o/w ciTf! rtn tMJ. Lenoern , 
FbqM CrnW 01-370 *332 

CHWtSTMAS in C “*" , 
CJrau.1 Maderu. ElUU 
Apts/mo** !rom many 
pom rouwasTrodO- W 
0203 ABTA. Open Sunday 10-2 

low rocs womnMmt • 

l-sn . S Ainfrm. MW and Far 
Casi. S Alrira TrdirnM. « 
Marturn Street. W* OI 680 

2A2H i Visa Arreotedi 

MYAA. WT^Jt. K7XA For 
ctieapn) lares Hi ctr/nond Trav- 
el. t Dukr Street BlctunorW 
Surrey ABTA 01940 **073 

TUNISIA For yew 
where- its sUlt summer. Call or 
our Mwlwn- now Timjun 
Trasrl Bureau OI 373 4—1 . . 


£3*9. Singapore £457 Other 

rt eiUes 01-584 *514 ART A 

LATIN AMOI1CA. Low emu 
ApMi e «. ftu> £485 Lima 
£445 rln Also Snud Croup 
H0hda>- Jwmev) ■*» Peru 

from £3M3i JLA 01-747-3108 

MBTOKAIN Seal uto- lo LSA-Ce 

nbOean-Far East Australia Call 

the professionals ABTA IATA 

« nrrplM TM OI 2*4 6788 

warm 5UW Open Sat Soeetal 

prices to Cyprus. Malta. MofOC 

CO. Crteee. Malosa A Tenerlle 

nos & Dee Pan tworla hou- 
iU>s 01 734 25*2 
XMAS, winter. Svmrnet. Aloar- 

w. Ti-wrl t e- Oree«-. Turiir>. 

Stum, cwvt- Set Lanka ami 

mans' More IMt/nigtia Ventu- 

ra OT4S 331100- ATOL 2094 


OF FftMTASY rt 


01-6313529 


AIN IICMII Specialists N York 
£249. LA/San Fran £329. 
Sydney /Mcjnoume £769. All 
direct daily ru«nt» Danatr ISO 
Jermsin SnveLOl 839 7144 


W C WIT FARES worldwide-. 
01-43* 0734 Jupiter Travel. 


GENERAL 


AtORKAI CUP Acnan. BAB. 
prtsaie cn suUc. IO mins drive 
from Fremantle. £26.00/4*y. a 
HartfWSd Cm. Leenung *188. 
WM AwtraHa. PIU61 91 332 
17*2. 


SELF-CATERING 


T uu a mo 20/21 Oec-VlO JAP 

Xmas spmal £2*0. New York 

fr £106 o/w. Alecos TOOTS. Tel: 

01-2*7 2092 ABTA 
TAORMBUL SK2LV £ 13 8 Spe- ] 
cut -late BOUTS- wroror 
Otter t« Oookea wltl*i 7 Mir* 
ot departure' Price HuBy mei 
on calwlch mow < every We*. 
It ami. iramlers. A/Ta*. 
nranu B&B m twu, locon wm 

oain/snower an* wc. 14 nltM | 

« £179. Single + £»Bw*- NO , 

HIDOEN EXTRAS. 

an BS Marcn -87 BLA WPS UN 1 

01-222 745 a ABTA/ATOL 
TAKE TWZ OFF to Parts Am- 1 
slerdom. Brunets Bruges 
Geneva. Bern-. Lmasan ne. Zu - 
rten. The Havue. P uOOn- 1 
Rouen. Bou l og pe A Djrope- 

Time OH. 2a. Owner , 

Lomtu*. SWIX 7BQ. 01-238 

8070 


Never knowingly wider SOUL 

we Deal any fare, on w «““■ 
any where in Hie world. Dto- 

nuil, on hotels Credll cords t 
welcome mwb mt A BTA. Try 
us. Tel OI S79 7T7S 
VALCXAMODt OvtoUn* avail 

M«ty. CatwtcL/La»_Pai n*» 18 

Dee £227 Mean 53 
per. £179 01 723 *964. ABU 
AIM Acxesa/Vtu. 
ow call i dc sente of me hh 
dean hr flights aparOneoJ*. »* 
Irfsand car hire. Tef London Oi 
toi* 5000. Manchester Ml OSS 
3000. Air Travel Advnoni 


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(0883) 45267 
t!ikr Mwmajr tmiert 


'VeShed 

lam art (or & in nix bold- toe 
port, sauna, games rot etc; 
verymw to Hits: Total fm £300 
no Tel 0234 720027, 


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CANARY ft MADEIRA 


selfcatering 

FRANCE 


fT/y HOLIDAY 

hombsin 

s FRANCE, 

Holland, Go rmerty, 
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dcepog 2-l2-Alpcrtsert]r 
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Pnot* bom E4S pp per ¥**k. 
mdadnt to ntrire mwl oBerler 
cMdren tod*- H on TT Ferns 
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In 


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bed bungatow. Stoss 4. ntcebr 
(mwed. iteectol ro e to r 4 
weeks or more. Tel: BrtBMai 
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UMMI Dei MartaUa owl Lax 
boot tot 6. B Part, lac nrw . 
eidroert. nrooet HrtMay Wtaa 
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74228. 

MlrtaiJL* - San Pedro, next lo 
p MWi din Ooif. lux rum. VC 
apfmL dpi 2/3. Private vtna. 
Pool nta e nMIrsit d views From 
£140 pw. Tel: OI 440 2884 

BWBKLUL Beautiful G bed too- 
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From Esaa pw. ot-aea 4447. 


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SWITZERLAND 


Ml Mtr - mm Special oBm 
on srouon. BWO FOR A DEAL! 
Also oilier araartnrty low prtcea 
Martina rt £89. ank for a copy 
of our bumper to wch u ro. Mi; 
788 9999. AMa 692B6 Alrt 
1383. 


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xertand from 22/12 ■ 6JI/B7. 
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7 Mtfi St, Aldershot Hants I 
- P 0232 318448 (Z* Hup— 


WINTER SPORTS 


BSnTTAMY Lovely vIBa. Sea 400 
yards. SoperMr aauami. 
Seem 12. Tel: 01-226 7800. 


SEL F-CAT ERING 

GREECE 


CORFU - Panto * 8**rttM>s. If you 

are looktne fm a pood selection 
of lypteaHy Greet: Was we are 
now euuno bookmm tor 1W7. 
Corfu a la cone. o*35 SMCi. 
airt 1S79. 


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ITALY 


njOMMCC Central martmcDl 
dorps 4. AvattoWe Ottow. 
£150 pw. Tel: OI 381 9222. 


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PORTUGAL 


ALBUnan Laror noos e. 3d »to. 
I sort bdrui * eoL 3 tonrim 
video touape. spool, own 
Winds, rutto staffed- BrnKUM 
included. 8 nH beaeft Pnone-. 
Monday VIBa* Imemaltonal. 
0*24 74028 office hours only 
ALCJUWE ALTERNATIVE. 

The finest iwuan for rental 
James SL SW1. OI 491 0802. 


aUBHUOX Now S/C ants. Per- 
sonal service. Jan from £38 
D-w. Self drive. 0509 842477 


LA PLASMS Charadng private. 2 
beds. 2 baths, run. From £125 
pw 01-589 6988. 


no FLAME Luxury flal NOB 4-6 
Tel: <073731 G1216 (hornet. 
<011-588 1952 (Office!. 


EM TOTAL. Chalet Parties, ho- 
Mb. a Ms In Froner/ Austria. 
es. 109321 231115. 


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FOR YOUR MONEY 

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ATOL 381 B ABTA 1415X 
Acas/vm/Anm Wdcnma 





¥ 


ANOONKA AMMSAL/PAL Lux 

private Apt. Log fin-, rtpa 4. 
from Jan. T6M62882 4302 


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gaUo onto pteteb Keeps 4. Tel af- 
ter hours 0522 730678. 


■acnrmSKED suing uoUdays 
wHh your car. A wide selection 
ol SeM Catering A Hotel accom- 
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Tel 01-789 2892. 

ABTA 69256 AMI 1383. 


CSTAAD 2 mnea. sectnded chalet, 
sleeps S. furnished autoue. 
s pectacular views. Feb/- 
March/ApriL £300 pw. Tel 0*0 
489 606. 

VACANCBCUTE. Extrusive ski- 
ing holidays In Venter. 8 win. 
where peroonrt service, htgn 
alandanto 6 oM toaUan values 
count Can roc 86/87 Winter 
brochure Ol 891 6843 

V EBBrtB Xmas A New Yaar. Loe 
6/C ana n. Sips 8. Gd pas. Xmas 
£480. NY £660 pw 1KC . Othe r 
whs avail. Trt 0003 710287. 



UJK. HOLIDAYS 


9NC country houses who staff, 
nailer horn and cenagea lor 
holiday renlaL Many with maid 
service, catering and other re- 

teas A new approach combined 
with a very special selection 
Colour brochtn: Btandimto- 
OM Vicarage- France Lynch- 
Stroud OL6 8LN. 104531 
882S44. 24 hr*. 


Continaed oo pa*e 14 




SELF-CATERING 

SPAIN 


<W8TA DEL MIL Eslcpona Lux- 
ury auu tine ill for 4 ui 
naturbrs saradae. Chnsunas 
and 1987 from £70 uw. Phone 
Obi 76*0790. 


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LOOK AT THESE AMAZING OFFERS FOfl 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
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Atemea Apts. SC £149 

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jhona Crawford Poole makes a gift of 
the best - and healthiest - rhrfgtrr.se ' 
pudding, and a rich traditional cake 





tflofiraoi you a low fet, high CHRISTMAS PUDOWQ 
flpra, cholesterol free, low sail Serves oiqm to ten ■ 

^S a rLS^J^ niDe ^ ^9 (8oz) stoned muscatel or 

ncn umstmas pudding, you texiaraJsfas 

tnight well esk whether we sSSi «nri nmMe • 1 " 

couldn't forget about all that r; — 

for one day of the year. Butifl ^esh wholemeal 

offered you a bit of the best breadcfumbs 

Christmas (Kidding I have 1 1 °9 (4oz) glacri cherries, 

ever tasted, your interest Qtiarterad 

would perk up, would it not? 55g (2oz) light brown sugar 
And if I admit that the super ^ ^ 

pudding is that verv same chopped 

^ ^monds. hazel raits or pecans 

want to try the recane. 30g C1ozl cancfiad orange peal. 

Looking at some of the chopped 

current recipes for trendily 1 tablespoon finely grated 

healthy versions of traditional cyan 9 az e 3t 

Christmas fere, I wonder if 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 

future food historians will i teaspoon freshlv orated 

smile over our efforts. vj^oon iresniy grama 

The dishes which have be- X teaspoon ground doves 

come fixed in Christmas tra- 3 tame eons : 

dmon are, almost without n 7~V.. ^ — 

exception, festive versions of 1SOn " (* pint) port ; 

what was once everyday fere. 6 tablespoons brandy 

Shortbread, which calls for the Put all the dry ingredients - 
finest white flour and pro* raftfa^ cu ranla h readcngDba, 
digious quantities of fresh' glac£ cherries, nuts, sonar, 
butter, is quite simply the fresh and candied peel and 
special occasion version of spices — into a large bowl and 
oatcakes made with oats and a mix welL 
little fet Likewise, Christmas In another bowl,- whisk 
pudding is a richly_ fancy together the egg s, port and 
rendering of spotted dick and brandy. Pour tins m i itim 
the tribe of plainer steamed over the dry ingredients and 
puddings which our ancestors . mix very, thoroughly to ensure 
used as centra! heating. that everything -is evenly 

Now we worry about the distributed, 
wisdom of using the white Oil or butter a 1.5 litre (2Vfe 

flour and dairy fats our fore- pint) podding basin and place 
beats eqjoyed as an occasional a circle of greasproof paper or 
luxury. hairing parchment the size of 

Sharp-eyed followers of this a smafl saucer in the bottom of 
column will find that 1 my foe bowL 
fatless pudding formula has . spfmn the p nAffng m i lium 
changed little in this, its fourth into foe prepared basin and 
successful year. It makes a cover it with buttered grease* 
pudding that looks and smells proof paper and fofl tied on 
as richly fruity as any tra- tightly with string, 
ditional recipe. It keeps just as ‘ Stand thepuddmg basin in a 
well, too. The cake recipe is large saucepan and pour in 
conventional because I have boiling water to come halfway 
not found a fettess recipe that up.foesidesoffoe basm. Bring 
mates a good t^ke: • ■* -4he water bade to the boil. 


17Dg(8oz) fresh wholemeal 
breadcrumbs . . 

110g (4oz) giacd cherries. 
quartered 

55g (2oz) light brown sugar 

55g (2oz) finely chopped 
almonds, hazel rarts or pecans 

30g(loz)carKfied orange ped, 
very fine lychof^ed 

1 tablespoon finely grated 
orange zest 

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 
1 teaspoon freshly grated 


ISOml px pint) port ~- 

6 tablespoons brandy 

Pin all the dry ingrediaris — 
raisins, currants, breadcrumbs, 
glac£ cherries, nuts, sugar, 
fresh and candied peel and 
spices —into a huge bowl and 
mix welL 

In another bow!,' whisk 
together the eggs, port and 
brandy. Pour tins mixture 
Over the dry in gredients and 
mix very thoroughly to ensure 
that everything is evenly 
distributed. 

Oil or butter a 1.5 litre (2% 
pint) pudding basin and place 
a circle of greasproof paper or 
having parchment the size of 
asmafl saucer in the bottom of 
foebowL 

Sptww foe p ndding mgtUI P 

into foe prepared basin and 
cover it with buttered grease- 
proof paper and fofl tied on 


MPW 



reduce the heal to a steady 
simmer, cover and a«m> the 
pudding for five horns. Check 
the water level during cooking 
and top it up -with boiling 
water as required. 

Allow the pudding to be- 
came quite cold before cover- 
ing it with flesh papers and 
storing h in a cool pi ace; On 
Christmas day, steam the 
pudding for two boms. 

CHRISTMAS CAKE 
Makes a Mkg(4to)caka 
285g {1 Ooz) fine whofemeal or 


1 teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons ground dnnamon 
1 teaspoon freshly grated 


Vi teaspoon ground doves 
22Sg(floz)unsafted butter 
225g (8oz) Bght brown sugar 
4 targe eggs . 

2 tablespoons honey 

225g (Boz) stoned muscatel or 

teoaratww 

225g{Boz) currants 

110g(4oz) chopped nuts, 
almonds, pecans or hazels 


quartered 

110g <4oz) gtaci fruft - 
pineapple, peaches, phjns etc, 

chopped . 

2 tablespoons finely chopped 
candied orange peel • 

1 tablespoon finely grated ‘ 


Butter a round cake tin 20cm 
(8 inch) diameter and 7.5cm (3 
inch), and line it with buttered 
baking parehment or grease- 
proof paper. Sift together the 
flour, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg 
and doves and set the mi nin g 
aside. 

Cream the butter is a large 
bowl, beating h until it is pale 
and fluffy before adding the 
sugar. Beat until the mixture is 
very light 

In another bowl, whisk the 
eggs with the honey and beat 
this, a little at a tin*, into the 
butler mixture, adding a 
spoonful of flour with the last 
few additions of egg to lessen 
tire likelihood of tire mixture 

ratrHImg 

In another bowl, combine 
the raisins, sultanas, currants, 
glace cherries, glace fruit, can- 
died peel and nuts. Add a 
couple of spoonfuls of die 
flour and toss to mix, then add 
the freshly grated zest. Mix 
weO. 

Fold the remaining flour 
into the r i Mmwi mixture, 
followed by tire fruit and nuts 
and finally the spirits. Mix 
very throughly to dfetributeall 
foe ingredients evenly then 
tom the mixture into the 
p repared tin. 

With the bade of a spoon, 
make a shallow depression in 
foe centre of foe cake so that 
when the mixture has finished 
rising, the top will be about 
level t 

- Bake the dake in a preheated 
cool oven (150°C/300°F, gas 


mark 2) for 146 hours before 
reducing the beat to 
(140°C/275°F, gas mark 1) 
and baking it for another two 
hours, or until a warm skewer 
plunged into the centre of the 
cake comes out dean. 

If tire cake browns too 
quickly, cover the top loosely 
with foil. And do check from 
time to time to see how it is 
doing. 

Let the cake cool completely 
before taking it ait of the tin 
and stripping off the (repos. 
Store it in an airtight 
container. 

While there are still quinces 

to be make them rntn 

quince jelly to eat with Christ- 
mas breakfast toast or into the 
most old fashioned of sweets, 
guisce pastilles. Either would 
make a lovely present. The 
quince pastilles are taken from 
The Sweets Book, my own 
recently published collection 
of redpes for making sweets of 
every kind from uncooked 
peppermint creams to Edin- 
burgh rock, by way of treacle 
toffee and unctious tr uffles. 

QUINCE PASTILLES 
Makes about 680g (1% lb) 
680g(1Xfo) ripe quinces 
150ml {X pint) white wine or 
water 


Juice of two lemons 

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 
X. teaspoon ground doves 
Grarmteted sugar to dredge 


EATING OUT 


Aliment of surprise 
south of the river 


Ranee Mosley 


Cheam was where Gabon and 
Simpson had Hancock and 
Sid James five; Railway Cut- 
tings, East fheanv Sinrfi that 
time, two and a half decades 
ago, not a lot has been beard of 
this outer suburb. Its do m es tic 
murders are evidently not of 
sufficient quality to bring 
them to national attention; no 
great planning battles were 
fought there; there have been 
uo riots. 

‘ Life behind the leaded lights 
and staunch studded doors of 
thejote oak villas looks pretty 
cosy. Too cosy, maybe; the 
homes of the Chramots axe 
clearly not places from which 
to venture put How else can 

one explain the lade of patron- 


Jonathan Meades 

finds culinary 

treasure trove m . 

deepest suburbia 

age of a restaurant of such 
quality as Al Son Vincenzo, 
which is probably the best 
thing to have happened to foe 
place since The Lad Himself 
moved on. 

If s a small establishment, 
plainly decorated (painted 
bricks, Neapolitan snaps, 
wooden bfindsX it shouldn't 
be a problem fifimg it, but it is. 
The chef wandered out of the 
kitchen towards the end of the 


J 

y SsEP” J 

I restaurant" j 

Lavish praise _ 
[Not-so-lavish price. £8.95. 

tot as much as > nu »w.uu* 2 dnWAs an(l 

3 iffrtahlr 

lfvxiftamtolx , qulck.>u u . 

can (iilihoush yjSHL- ' 

\ iiu'll want 10 dash ofT fnmi . _ 

iiurrrtavdiamospheffand . I 

«ji«>rtHTiisini‘).\\crednwti> InQ CgSg&Sf 

SSSSS* i Drasseri® 

mi ® LDNDOK Sft7.m.0W7040W 




evening when two of us had 
had the place to ourselves. He 
claimed, rather desperately, 
not to mind that business was 
so fiat. It must be peculiarly 
depres sin g to know that you're 
turning out Italian food as 
good as any to be found in 
London and yet have no 
audience. 

The feet that the cooking 
has nothing to do with the 
formulaic travesty of a great 
kitchen that 99 per cent of 
I talian joints foist on their 
undemanding punters prob- 
ably discourses the gastro- 
uomically timid. I don’t know. 
ffreara is only 40 minutes 
from central London, and it’s 
worththe drive. 

If s not actually called Rail- 
way Cuttings, this street of 
small shops and car show- 
rooms, but it does run beside 
the trade to Sutton and Car- 
shaltou. The incongruity of 
setting and restaurant is mas- 
rive. The main concession to 
local taste is the bread, which 
is brown and soft. Otherwise, 
foe authenticity is mitigated 
only by the service, which is 
conducted by the chefs wife, 
who is English and unpr oce to 
the nitvinea; and leering 
“charm” which are the norms 
of those men bearing pepper 
grinders. . . 

The cooking is true to that 
of the Bay of Naples — for 
instance, foe quite delirious 
aubergine, done with layers of 



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tomato and mozzarella in the 
oven, is a riassic of titet city. 
But there’s mudh more to the 
menu than archaeological 
correctness. A dish of minced 
veal stuffed with mozzarella 
country hwm no doubt 
owed something to some 
precedent, but its accompany- 
ing butter-based sauce was 
straight out of the repertoire of 
modern French cooks. Sauces 
here are first rate: that with a 
giant chunk of fresh tuna was 
based on Marsala and suc- 
ceeded in cubing the liquor's 
bullying tendency. 

The one pasta dish we tried 
was offosffii (the things that 
look like shorn ringlets) done 
al dente and not smothered by 
its sauce of home-made spicy 
sausages, tomato, cream, and 
parmesaa Vegetables include 
pumpkin and cabbage pre- 
pared with pine _ nuts and 
sultanas. 

The selection of cheeses 
shames those of most Italian 
places. The sweets indude a 
number of combinations of 
fresh fruit and alcohol — figs 


that kind of thing. I ate a 
marvellous dish of fresh 
mango and Dolcelatte. 

There is also a splendid 
version of the “trifle" called 
tiramisn (literally, pick me 
up). The wine list is short and 
unremarkab le: a 1581 JJarolo 
by Folini was all right, heady 
and soporific* The set dinner 1 


costs £13.50 and two will pay 
between £40 and £50, which 
may be a lot for Cbeam but is 
not at aQ bad besides the few 
other (daces in this league. 

Barnes may be just over 
Hammersmith Bridge but it 
feels as securely Surrey as 
Gieam. It, too, has recently 
acquired a restaurant that is of 
more than parish interest 
Sonny’s has had a bit of 
money spent on it and is 
calculatedly modish — bare 
boards, Billie Holliday on tap, 
a glo-log fire for customers 
who know they can have a 
laugh ath. 

It also has sweet-natnred 
service from a guy who may 
want to be a movie star but 
who is at the moment actually 
proud of doing his job so weU 
and does not confuse service 
with servility; he quite rightly, 

I guess, reckons that his 
ament calling is a more 
dignified one than that of, say, 
loutish adman. The place is 
foil oftoutish admen and their 

Claret for 
Christmas 

CHATEAU TfflBERLAY 
1983 CB 
Rab«t Gawd 
Gold Medal Paris 1985 
£45 per case MuSng 
Mmf UK UartanS 
Redpsth « Tfesckray Wires 
Common use. Suwon, 

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Stay SOM. ChM4P.CB2SiK. I 



belles. While at Al San 
Vincenzo your aperitif is 
likely to be an obscure medici- 
nal bitters such as Avema or 
Cynar, here it will be up-to- 
the-minute blackberry liquor 
with bubbly. The menu is 
related to those of such places 
as the Soho Brasserie and 
L’Escargot, places which 
Sonny's che£ Sue Miles, set 
up. 

Mrs Miles has probably had 
as large an influence as anyone 
over middle-range rest- 
auration during this decade 
and she is not resting on her 
laurels. It is foe fete of most 
pioneers to be overtaken, to be 
rendered vieux jeu by their 
disciples. 

The cooking here suggests 
that Mrs Miles is not going to 
let that happen to her. There's 
a fine fish soup, based on 
conger and served with proper 
m ini le. The Algerian beef 
sausages, merguez, are 
accompanied by tabouleh, 
which is co us cous4ike grain 
dressed with mint and chilli. 
Veal is served with an intense 
alcoholic sauce and saute of 
oyster mushrooms. 

Best of all was a very game 
wild duck with a celeriac 
parte: One sweet was a mis- 
take — a bland bread and 
butter pudding with decent 
vanilla-flavoured custard. 
This feshioa for culinary in- 
fantilism is one that should be 
sat on quickly. A walnut tart, 
on the other hand, was lovely. 
With a good Vino Nobile di 
Momepulriano, the bill for 
two was £45. Again, well 
worth crossing tire river for. 

Al San Vincenzo 52 Upper 
MuJgravre Road, Cheam, 

Surrey (01-681 9763). Open 
Tu^Sun. 12-2.30pm, flio- 
10pm. Closed Sat lunch. 
Sonny's 94 Church Road, 
London SW13 (01-746 0383). 
Open every day l2^0-3pm and 
7.30-1 1pm. 


SelColle 



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When foe best 
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Chop the quinces coarsely 
without peeling or coring 
them and put the pieces in a 
pan with the wine or water. 
Cook them gently, covered, 
until the pulp is soft enough to 
pass easily through a sieve: 
Strain the puree. 

Wash the pan and butter or 
oil a 20 cm (8 inch) square tin. 
Use a non-stick tin if you have 
one. 

Return the puree to the pan 
and add the sugar, lemon juice 
and spice. Simmer foe puree 
steadily, stirring it often, until 
it is very thick. Pay attention 
to the paste as it thickens 
because it tends to stick to foe 
base of the pan and may easily 
bum. It is ready when a spoon 
drawn through the mixture 
leaves a permanent groove: 

Spread foe paste in the 
prepared tin and leave it to set 
for at least 24 horns. Then, 
except if you plan to use it as a 
filling for chocolates, turn ft 
on to a surface which has been 
generously dusted with granu- 
lated sugar. Leave the quince 
to dry in a warm, airy place for 
at least 24 hours before cutting 
into individual sweets. 

Flat squares are a tra- 
ditional shape for pastilles, 
bat using a set of canape 
cutters, circles, hearts, leaves 
and many more shapes are 
possible. Dredge the pastilles 
in sugar and leave them until 
dry before packing. 

77W Swears Book by Shorn 
Crawford Poole Is punched by 
Coffins, £755. 


Jane MacQgitty on 
the difference a 
year can make to a 
splendid champagne 

“What's your favourite 
wine?” is’ one of those 
aggravating, perennial ques- 
tions that wine writers are 
asked. Pointless, really, be- 
cause we love 'em aLL But if 
Armageddon arrived this 
afternoon and I could only 
down one more glass of wine 
before bowing out, Roederer’s 
sublime *77 Cristal cham- 
pagne would be high on my 
list of possibilities. 

As it happens, I have al- 
ready probably drank more 
than my fair share of this 
luscious liquid. Four years ago 
my local cut-price off-licence 
was selling bottles of '77 
Cristal for just £18.49, a good 
£10 cheaper than elsewhere 
and less than half the price 
Cristal costs today. Inventing 
a fortnightly or so excuse for a 
celebration was not difficult 

Great was my disappoint- 
ment when the *77 Distal was 
replaced with foe soft, rustic 
and, by comparison, dis- 
appointing *78. By rights, the 
warm summer of* 78 in Cham- 
pagne should have produced a 
fiirer Cristal that year than in 
foe damp, difficult year of '77. 
So why was Cristal *77 so 
much better than Distal *78? 

It has taken me four years to 
find out I knew already that 
Tsar Alexander III and the 
rest of the Russian Imperial 
Court were especially fond of 
Roederer. So much so that in 
1876 Tsar Alexander asked 
Roederer to supply him with a 
superior bottle to the ordinary 
dull green variety and the firm 
dutifully came up with the 
chic Cristal bottle made in 
crystal-clear glass. 

I also knew that Roederer 
owned 445 acres of prime 
vineyard land in Champagne 
of which 185 acres were in the 

Oiftnrtnnnay^lnmiTiant Cote 

des Blancs and the remainder, 
bar one acre, are all planted to 
Pinot Noir grape in both the 
Montage de Reims and the 
Bailee de la Marne regions. 

My tastebuds had already 
told me that Roederer, per- 
haps more than any other 
grondes marques house, pro- 
duced remarkably consistent 
rich, honeyed, biscuity-goklen 
champagnes year in, year out, 
even m poor years where the 
two-thirds Knot Noir 10 one 
third Chardonnay blends are 
all too apparent. I put this 
down to the unusually high 
proportion, for a champagne 
house, of their own grapes 
which Roederer use. 

Roederer’s relatively lim- 
ited production of some 
208,000 cases annually is an- 
other quality factor. 

What I had not realized, and 
what rapidly became obvious 
at a magnificent comparative 


tasting of seven Roederer 
Cristal vintages, is that not 
only is Cristal *77 still streets 
ahead of Distal *78 but it is 
one of the starriest vintages 
that Roederer have ever 
made. Unlike other cham- 
pagne houses* 77s — the 
majority of which suffered 
from foe spring frosts and 
poor summer of that year — 
Roederer’s Cristal 77 escaped 
foe vicissitudes of foe weather- 
primarily because the firm 
delayed foe piddiu of their 77. 
grapes, allowing them to soak 
up foe hot September son. 

The end result is a 
mouth wateringly textbook 
glass of Cristal whose pale 
gold colour, creamy mousse 
and rich ripe smoky-biscuity 
bouquet and palate is as near 
to perfection, in my opinion, 
as any champagne producer is 
going to get. 

After the 77 Distal, my 
second favourite in this line- 
up was the 76 — a very hot 
year with foe earliest vintage 



start dale, in living memory, 
of September 1. The *76 
Cristal is a big, warm, fruity, 
bonney champagne whose 
tidiness and fruit 1 enjoyed. 

A fraction behind the "76, in 
my bode, was tire 75 whose 
fine mousse smoky character 
and perfumed aromatic nose 
and taste is an unusual Cristal 
year but worthwhile all the 
same. 

Next in line came the 74, 
whose buttercup gold colour 
and delicious butterscotch 
nose and honeyed hazdnut- 
like palate has already taken 
on the scent and style of an 
aged champagne. 

After that came the current 
vintage Distal *81 whose pale 
gold colour and crisp, lively 
well-made digestive biscuit 
scent and taste needs time yet 
to. round out into a rich 
honeyed Roederer mouthful, 
but it wifl. The lively lean 79, 
like other prestige cham- 
pagnes from this year, is not a 
good Cristal vintage and nor is 
the 78 that came last in my 
line-up. 

Older vintages of Distal are 
very difficult to find but 1981 
is foe current vintage nn *l is 
available from Addison Vim- 
ners, 8 Addison Avenue,' 
London Wll (£33.85); Andrt 
Simon, 50/52 Elizabeth Street, 
London SW1 (£35.15) and on » 
Monday from Majestic Wine 
Warehouses (£35 JO). 


Display your 
crown jewels 
over dinner. 


CROFT 

TRIPLE CROWN 1 




Croft Ports. Appreciated 
at the finest dinner parties 
for over three centuries. 


Fm offering tlia new Beaitjolals for 
mere francs, Mr Clarice. 

Mo one could accuse ytmafbeeoming 
nouveau riche, Mr Johnstone. 



It’s that tame of year again at 
Majestic. 

Our buyers were in pole position 
haggling for this year’s Nouveau. 

Racing back with the famous fluid 
quicker than, you could say ‘Prosfc’. 

Be one of the first to get in a few 
laps. 

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price list and mall order 
ffivi* BO service. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 



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IN THE GARDEN 

T hinking small. 



Francesca Greenoak 
on an attractive and 
fruitful method that 
makes the most 
• of the tiniest plots 

The deg) bed gardening sys- 
tem suits me down to the 
ground. And after five years, I 
feel confident about 
recommending iL It is a good 
way to enjoy the fruits (veg- 
etables and fiowere) of the 
minimum of your labour. The 
only really complicated thing 
is the name: it has been 
described as The Chinese 
Method, the French Intensive 
and The Biodynamic Method. 
Even the modem nomencla- 
ture — the deep bed method 
and the raised bed method — 
seems confusingly contradic- 
tory, but the explanation is 
simple: having dog deeply, 1 
you raise the level of the soil 

We chose to garden this way 
because a front garden veg- 
etable bed needs to look 
reasonably attractive all year, 
and since we do not have 
much space, we require a plot 
which could be gardened 
intensively. 

Our soQ is heavy day and 
flint, incredibly sticky to work 
or tread on in wet and wintry 
weather, ami rock hard in 
summer. I sought a method to 


st <*> 
<B 


up a structure with as jmle 
interference as possible. If you 
do not dig or fork over the 
ground, however, it is point- 
less to spread manure straight 
on the soft. I always pm it 
thmugh the compost heap first 
and amity it to the beds in the 
spring. 

Most soQ will come into 
fertile condition fairly quickly 
by these means. With deep 
beds you plant deep and dose 
because the root system goes 
down rather than along the 
surface. Among my favourite 
crops are carrots, with their 
great waves of feathery foliage, 
the decorative Swiss chant 
and curly leaved lettuces. 

On a four-year rotation of 
crops, I usually fill one bed 
with potatoes. A dense bank of 
dark green potato foliage dot- 
ted with flowere looks nice 
throughout the summer, like a 
giant leafy window box. 

If you are gardening on a 
limited space, it makes sense 
to work on foe “high nse 
principle and go up as far as 
possible. A nice, rich soil 
should be able to support as 
much as you can plant on it. 

Some authorities suggest 
Sweet peas, runner beans and 
Jerusalem artichokes all do 
well, but care must be taken 
not to cast shade on other 
plants. 

- With so much organic mat- 
ter incorporated into it and 
without being dug about and 








Ctore Roberts 


Packed out how Francesca Greenoak’s deep bed plot looks 


get the sod into good con- 
dition organically, rather than 
artificially, as soon as possible 
and which would avoid 
compacting it again. Finally, 1 
love working with plants but 
loath lengthy and repetitive 
chores, so foe deep bed 
method might have been tai- 
lor-made for gardeners like 
me. . 

The principle is that you 
make fertile beds no wider 
than you can work comfort- 
ably without ever treading on 
them — four to five feet wide, 
depending on your reach. 
Down foe length of these beds 
(10 to 15ft) you make access 
paths. 

The only real chore with 
deep beds is their initial 
working, and this can be 
started this month. Each bed 
needs to be double-dug, pref- 
erably after a good layer of 
manure has been laid on it. 
You dig a trench one spit deep 
along foe short tide of foe bed, 
and put the earth into a 
wheelbarrow, then with a fork, 
loosen the soil at the bottom 
of foe trench and proceed to 
fill it in with foe topsoil from a 
second trench next to foe first. 
You repeat foe sequence until 
you reach foe end of the bed 
and fill in foe last trench with 
tbe soil in your wheelbarrow, 
that beds should be double- 
dug every four years or so. 
Others, like myself feel that it, 
is best to leave the soil to build 


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dried out, deep beds, under 
foeir leafy umbrella, require 
less watering than con- 
ventional plots. 

In very hot weather, I water 
in foe evening or early morn- 
ing, givinga quick spray to wet 
foe leaves, and a heavy water- 
ing to the roots. Light, fre- 
quent watering keeps the loots 
on the surface where there is 
less moisture, and the idea is 
to encourage the roots to go 
down deeply. 

Like most gardeners, J wish 
I had more time; often jobs are 
neglected or carried out late 
because L garden when I can 
rather than when I should. 
Our deep bed garden has 
proved remarkably tolerant, 
with very little effort, pro- 
vided us with fruit, vegetables 
and flowers — and a great deal 
of pleasure. 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Plant heathers, foe lower 
foliage touching the sofl 
before you firm them in. 

• Bonfires are a health 
hazard to yea and to 

hibernating animals. If you 
must have one, check there 
are no hedgehogs or rodents 
in the rubbish. 

• Finish winter digging on 
heavy softs before the ground 
gets too wet to work. 

• With mild weather, foe \ 
grass is still growing. Mow 
unless ft is wet or frosty, but 
set foe mower higher than 
usual. 

• Plant blackberries aad 
hybrid areas and art stems 
back to 10 inches to encourage 
new shoots. 


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Home fitness has 
really taken off. ~ 
Tania Robins 
looks at the wide 

range of exercise 
equipment on sale 
for Christmas 

S choolday heroes were the 
boys with Blues. every- 
one despised the swot 
Adult life demands a 
curious inversion of this 
principle. Team spirit is exalted in 
the boardroom; little more repel- 
lent than the cheery "Pre-working- 
breakfast tennis anyone?" 

No wonder the growing trend is 
for exercising at home. It’s conve- 
nient lump-sum layout is more 
attractive than years of healih- 
ciub dues, and you have the 
additional satisfaction of knowing 
you've had the good taste to sweat 
it out alone. 

The boom in home fitness has 
been particularly remarkable in 
the last three years. "Now man y 
people are turning their fourth or 
fifth bedroom into a gymnasium,” 
said Lisa Salonen, of Liliywhites. 
And even those of us with slightly 
smaller houses can still manage to 
squeeze an exercise bike or rowing 
machine into a convenient comer. 

Fitness is now a famil y affair . 
And a new female interest could 
account for the peak buying 
periods. November, when 
thoughts of that figure-hugging 
Christmas frock are sufficiently 
close to demand drastic action, 
and February, when the need for 
that posi-Chnstmas diet has be- 
come tightly obvious. 

Over the last few years too there 
have been dramatic chang e* in 
prices. The growth in mail-order 
sales has hotted up pricing and 
virtually excluded die smaller 
retailer, who can compete neither 

‘Many people are 
turning their 
spare bedrooms 


into gymnasiums 


& ■■■ . ■ 



0k 


Pictures by CMrtos 






j * * <*• 


• ' y,. A'~.tSL 



™.'. -r:V- ' . 


on economy of scale or on tow 
overheads. Today mail order ac- 
counts for about 25 per cent of the 
market, with by far the largest 
portion of the rest going to major 
sporting goods chains such as 
Astral (60 branches), Olympus 
(100 branches), Liliywhites, and 
the larger department stores. 

Despite the mail-drder boom; 
the advantage undoubtedly still 
lies with the retailer. Exercise 
equipment demands considerable 
initial outlay (the average expen- 
diture on major pieces is about 
£200) and can, if you are unfit, be 
potendaly dangerous. Shops pro- 
vide the opportunity to try out a 
variety of equipment — gauge size 
and weight — and generally give 
advice on the type of machine that 
would be most suitable for your 
age, level of fitness, and aspira- 
tions (as with all strenuous ex- 
ercise, those with health problems 
should consult their doctors first). 

Most larger stores now have 
staff specially trained in individ- 
ual apparatus or general experts in 


Run for your life: the Ton tori electronic treadmill, 
£3,500, at UUywhites, ideal for indoor jogging 

physical fitness (Liliywhites’ 

Piccadilly branch, for example, 

has two frill-tone qualified PE 

instructors in their gymnasium 

department). The other major 

advantage of buying from a shop ’ 

is the ease of after-sales service. 

There are basically five cate- 
gories of larger scale modern 
, equipment for home use: the fSi 

exercise bike; the rowing-machine; 

■ the treadmill; the rebonnder, and 
the multigym. 

The exercise bike is everyone’s 
home-gymnasium stereotype. . 

There are a myriad of these on the 
market and new technology has 
finally hit "this particular form of 
wheel, with many of the latest and 
more sophisticated models com- 

;ipg with push-button computer * 
consoles which divulge all sorts of ^Ur**-* 

fa urinating information. In this' 
market, as in most others, you get . 
what you pay for. 

Features to note are smooth 
action, saddle comfort, footstraps, 
levels of difficulty, stability, • 

speedometers, rev-counters, calo- ■ " 

rie counters and pulse-meters. 

Although the simplest cycle starts 

from around £50 (Terry’s, an *11 nail 

English firm, do one at £59.99 at tosether: 

Astral), the most popular by for is Zga ' 
the Finnish Tunturi Executive nmig. 
(recommended retail price about 
£250. but which you should be MR 

able to find, at least until the end 7? JKra 

of January, for about £1 85). This JHJSjrr 
model comes with a manual fiir Astral jBJs 

fitness testing and a capacity to §g 

‘ enable you to work out how many w 

calories you’re burning. 







Heave-ho: the Kettler Multi-Train- 
er, £400, at Astral and DJI. Evans 


a ' * 

Jump for jov: the PT Bouncer, 36 inch, 40 inch, £59, 
£69, at UUywhites, and other sporting goods shops 


- 






On yonr bike: the Tunturi executive exercise 
bike, £250, at Liliywhites and sporting shops 


B ikes are primarily of 
benefit for cardiovascu- 
lar fitness with little 
benefit to overall muscle 
tone and as such are 
primarily bought by men, who are 
wolfing heartcare rather than 
overall aesthetic improvement*- .. 

The rower is the other classic 
form of home exercise. Excellent 
for all-round fitness, it is particu- 


& 


lady effective for streamlining the 
shape — tightening up those 
recalcitrant stomach, thigh, and 
arm muscles. The most popular 
make on the market is the Tunturi 
GL, a quiet, smooth bike with 
eight levels of resistance and the 
capacity to be stood upright for 
easy storage (about £165). Newer 
developments in this piece of 
equipment include the Spanish 
BH (about £1 59 at Astral) in 
which the rowing action is revere- 






asr 


ible and the seat can be stood at 
right angles to the base for a 
greater variety of exercises, and 
the combined exercise cycle and 
rower (BH. about £139, at Astral). 

The treadmill is for the jogger 
who dislikes fresh air. There are 
two base varieties, the manually 
powered, the track of which is 
rotated by the action of the runner 
(these start from about £200), and 
electronic track (about £1,500). 

The rebounder or PT Bouncer, a 
circular trampoline look-alike 
with far fewer springs, is one of the 
newest entrants to the market It’s 
particularly effective for cardio- 
vascular fitness and leg muscle 
tone. It is also very hard work 
indeed. Primarily bought by 
women, it comes in two sizes (36 
and 40 inch) and a variety of 
colours. Its advantages are price, 
from about £59, starability and 
ease of use. Its main disadvantage 
seems to be the level of stamina 
demanded — at first, averagely fit 
victims wiO only be able to 
manage a couple of minutes of 
intensive jumping. 


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THE ARTS 


Right Royal 

roadshow 


TELEVISION 


In The Story of Royal 
Broadcasting (BBC 1) we saw 
bow televisioii cameras at the 
wedding of the Dnke of York, 
later George VI, to the Lady 
f niiwht»»h Bowes-Lyon were 
carefeDy banished to the far 
side of Westminster Abbey 
Yard. Three Royal marriages 
on, and the cameras were 
pointing down die 

dearage of Princess Margaret 
as she brat to step from her 
coach. That’s progress for you. 

By 1969, the Crown was 
medn-coosdoas enough to 
bring in Lord Snowdon and 
theatre designer Carl Toms to 
oversee costumes and scenery 
for the Prince of Wales’s 
Investiture. The Prince him- 
self, in a contemporary inter- 
view, seemed a little uneasy 
and hoped It “meant a little 
more” than a showbiz spec- 
tacle. 

The last Royal visit to the 
United States was trailed on 
television there, only half in 
Am, as “Windsor Dynasty”. 
Some would find post-war 
Prime Minister Attlee’s com- 
ment more apt today flan it 
was In the Forties: “There is 
too much boosting of 
royalty . . . fulsome adulation 
and vulgar snobbery". Quite 
right, but isn’t it /bn? 

The Golden Girls (Channel 
4) is Susan Harris's latest 
sitcom. Compared with her 
first success. Soap, it is natu- 
ralistic and conventional in 
format, based on the lives of 
three middle-aged women, 


Rose, Dorothy and Blanche, 
who share a house. Also 
resident is Dorothy's mother 
Sophia, whose inhibitions 
have been destroyed by a 
stroke. Last night, scatty Rose 
found that the man with whom 
she had spent the night was 
dead. Worse to come: his 
“sister 3 ’, to whom she had to 
report the death, tamed oat to 
be his wife. 

Two weeks ago, the ac- 
cident-prone Rose was dating 
Dr Jonathan Newman, a 
psychiatrist at the Grief Cen- 
ter who was also a midget. 
Sore that Jonathan wmdd 
propose. Rose literally had 
nightmares over her decsshm. 
In the morning, sitting on her 
bed and hogging her pillow, 
she told herfrieads that she 
most go on seeing him. “Fine,” 
said grandmother Sophia. 
“We are all adults here, we 
don’t mind if he sleeps over - 
let the man out of the 
pffiofflcase!” 

If we went in for this 
merciless treatment of what 
nsed to be called “the 
afflicted” here, I imagine that 
midgets would rather be 
treated roughly, like anyone 
else, than ignored. In any case 
instead of proposing to Rose, 
Dr Newman explained ever a 
candl elit dinner that much as 
he liked her, he wouldn't 
many bear because she wasn't 
Jewish. “How was the 
shrimp?” asked the waiter. 
“Unfortunately, m never 
know,” replied Rose sadly. 
That’s comedy. 

Anne Campbell 
Dixon 


Bitter-sweet music 


TV PREVIEW 


Watching Granada’s docu- 
mentary Making It (TTV to- 
morrow, 10.30pm) is an 
entertaining enough way to 
pass 90 minutes. It offers a fly- 
on-toe-piano4id account of 
how three talented young 
instrumentalists, fresh out of 
London music colleges, take 
first steps towards establishing 
solo careers. 

But if Michael Beckham 
had called his film “Not a 
hope of making it” it might 
have steered him towards a 
truer prospect of post-acad- 
emy life for most music 
students. The feet is that of the 
300-odd pianists, for instance, 
who leave British music col- 
leges every year, fewer than 
ten can reasonably expect to 
secure long-term solo careers. 
So when, in the programme, 
we see the pianist Joanna 
MacGregor touring North 
Devon village halls, we should 
remember that even this 
unglittering prize constitutes, 
in blunt statistical terms, 
“making it”. 

Of course, she has not made 
the £6,000-a-performance 
Ashkenazy bracket Neither 
has the young violinist Clare 
McFarlane, even though she is 
engaged by the Halle Or- 
chestra to play the Men- 


delssohn Concerto to packed 
houses. For this she appar- 
ently receives a scarcely 
princely £300 per night Her 
fiance, another bright fiddle 
prospect reveals that when he 
toured America his agents 
tucked away 30 per cent of his 
fees. Yet these are the lucky 
ones: the country is littered 
with musicians, trained at 
considerable expense, for 
whom there is simply no 
musical work to do. 

While playing down this 
matter, toe documentary’s 
backstage glimpses certainly 
have an authentic ring. There 
is the pianist who likes playing 
contemporary music, bemg 
crisply told to learn the Grieg 
and Tchaikovsky Concertos if 
she expects any orchestral 
bookings. There is another 
pianist, Amanda Hurt on, 
making toe painful discovery 
that in a piano/violin duo it is 
the violinist who gets noticed. 
And there are the hard-nosed 
agents, assessing the fruits o£ 
perhaps, 15 years’ intensive 
instrumental study, with 
scintillating and astute com- 
ments like “she will need to do 
something about that hair”. 

In toe course of Making It 
you hear some snatches of 
pleasant music-making, too. 
But that aspect seems rather 
incidental to the serious busi- 
ness of “making it". 

Richard Morrison 


Powerful Brecht in any language 


L’Opera de 
quat’soos 

Chatelet, Paris 


Giorgio Strehler has returned to the Paris theatre this week with a cast 
of stars in his favourite Threepenny Opera. Report from John Higgins 


A! 


s the voice of .Bertolt 
Brecht himself is heard on 
an old record, grinding out 
in German tones as rough 
as sandpape r the Moritat, 'at toe 
opening of this French Threepenny 
Opera,!t is dear that the Chatelet is 
out to take an international ap- 
proach to the story of Mac The 
Knife — and possibly a reverential 
one too. Giorgio Strehler is in 
charge of the theatre's major winter 
production unveiled this week: the 
Brecfat-WeiH L'Opira de quaTsous, 
as we most now call it 

He tends to work with stars: 
Nastassia Kinski was originally 
billed and Michel PiccolTs name 
was among those canvassed as 
Mackie. In the event Strehler settled 
on Barbara Sukowa, currently on 
screen in London's West End as 
Rosa Luxemburg, as Polly, while 
toe chosen Mackie is Mi c hae l 
Hdtau, for a long time the leading 
actor at Vienna’s Burgtheater where 
he worked extensively with Strehler, 
notably in Shakespeare. The cabarei 
singer Milva was brought in from 
Italy and so was the design team of 
Ezio Frigerio and Franca 
Squaxriapino. 

The number of foreigners in 
leading roles singing ana, more 
importantly, speaking in French 
may well nave encouraged Strehler 
to move the action from Brecht’s 
mythical London to interwar 
Brooklyn, which was almost as 
strong in accents as in banditry. 
Connoisseurs of London’s Dock- 
land may regret the absence of Polly 
Peach urn's second lover who 
“owned three ships down at 
Wapping”, but Brecht’s morality 
transfers neatly to a world which 
brings back the caustic flavour and 
hard-bitten life-style of dames like 
Roxie Hart. . , .. 

Strehler has lived with The 
Threepenny Opera for a long time. 
He first worked on an Italian 
version, in collaboration with 



v'Mli- 

A v illain in Brooklyn: Michael Helton as 

himself bow to ring in a 
baritone. This Mackie is a 


Brecht himself in 1955. Before 
starting he presented toe playwright 
with “twenty-seven precisely for- 
mulated questions” about the piece, 
and some of the answers (noted in 
the Methuen paperback of the play) 
have clearly had lasting influence. 
Strehler came back to the piece in a 
Milan production in the early 
Seventies staged, if memory serves, 
with a strong cabaret em ph as is , and 
the pop singer Domenico Modugno 
in the lead. 

Cabaret apart from a pair of 
comic troupes - Keystone cops and 
Keystone robbers - is absent at the 
Chatelet Michael Heltau’s Mackie 
is direct from the theatre: a powerful 
and mesmeric actor, lithe and 
dangerous on stage, who has taught 


high 
pro- . 

fessional immoralist, riding the 
disadvantages ofbalding middle age 
as he rides his good hide while it 
lasts. At the end, when tire 
hangman's noose hits the stage with 
a crack worthy of Madame Guillo- 
tine herself Mackie feces death with 
equanimity until the reprieve ar- 
rives in best melodrama style from 
the wings and Strehler, taking his 
cue from Brecht’s words “this is 
opera, not life”, turns the Whole 
finale into an early Verdi parody. 

During it Barbara Sukowa lets out 
a few squally notes. Whether it is by 
accident or design will probably 
remain a secret Otherwise her 
Polly, with the long golden curls ofa 


Warner Bros Thirties heroine, ex- 
rales sweetness — except when 
crossed by her rival Lucy (Annick 
Ctsaxuk). Miss Sukowa puts some 
flesh on this rote which was none 
too wed fashioned by Brecht —how 
did Folly and Mackie meet in toe 
first place, and what did Peachum 
really have against his son-in-law 
who, after all, was in the same line 
erf business: villainy. 

. Among the actors Strehler has 
taken the risk of using one pro- 
fessional singer, Milva, who was 
also in that .Milan production. 
MBva, the original flame-haired 
temptress, takes on the shadow of 
Lenya as Jenny, leader of the doxies 
or dames, and her delivery of the 
Solomon Song is masteriy — a bit 


too masterly, in feet, as there is a 
/fona w that she will flaw out the 
muscat balance of Jhe 5**™?*; 
which is otherwise exedtentiy mam- 
faww-d by a tiny band of musicians, 

rapidly switch^ intrumen«ran» 

the expen guiding hand ot rerer 
Fischer. Later performances win Be 
shared by Nicolas Kemmer and 
Diego Masson. 

Gfcagio Strehler. in a production 
which has been immacularelyre- 
hearsed as one might expect from 
this director, carefully spans the 
worlds of WeflTs songs and Brecht s 
dialogue. The singers metapbon- 
caily step out of character as they 
come to the footlights to deliver the 
music; twin neon arcs revolve mtfae 
darkness white above tire stage 
Brecht’s verbal placards are turned 
into the equivalent of operatic 
surtrties. Alienation, indeed, and 
not so fer from the technique 
Strehler nsed when he “froze” his 
singers in silhouette in that famous 
EntfMrungxtSahbuiz. . . 

■ Musically and visually this ts an 
unusually powerful Threepenny Op- 
era. Frigerio's sets and props delight 
in a fantasy Brooklyn where every 
stage limousine is likely to open and 

reveal a double bed for Mackie's 
instant delight within. 

The weakness remains with the 
text itself which, as Irving Wardte 
remarked apropos the Nati onal 
Theatre’s dismal attempt at staging 
the work earlier this year, all too 
often leaves you wanting the next 
number to begin as soon as posable. 
The Pencfaums especially are a* 
tedious couple and tire female half 
of the partnership is undercast their 
wards need a snip of the scissors 
and so ddes tire evening as a whole. 
It runs dose on four hours even 
though Acts 2 and 3 are played 
without an interval Giorgio 
Strehler pays homage to Brecht by 
Vttfngr me occasional song revert to 
the original German — and admit- 
ting coincidentally, perhaps, that 
the Dreigroschenoper loses a hat of 
its snail m French translation — but 
fidelity to a complete text with this 
piece is misplaced reverence. Ahatf- 
hour cut would turn a distinguished 
evening into a greater one. 


Donald Coopar 


CONCERTS 


RPO/Temirkanov 

Festival Hall 

Those who believe Yuri 
Temirkanovto bea showy but 
inoffensive dilettante who 
flies in from Leningrad, tosses 
a few airy waves in the brass 
section’s direction, then flies 
off again without doing the 
music any lasting damage, 
would have been reassured by 
his “interpretation” here of 
Prokofiev’s Lieutenant Kiji 
suite. 

The maestro graced it with 
an eye-catching choreographic 
display. My own favourite is 
his gesture which tells us that 
the woodwind are playing 
trills: he raises his hands high 
above his head and flutters his 
fingers, like A1 Jolson singing 
Mammy. Of course, some 
people will claim foat they can 
hear perfectly well for them- 
selves that the woodwind are 
trilling, but perhaps 
Temirkanov was thinking of 
the folks at the back of the 
hall 

However, Sibelius’s Second 
Symphony is not a sardonic 
little flibbertigibbet of a suite, 
but a towering masterpiece 


La Musique 


that demands a conductor 
who has a dear sense of 
foreground and background, 
and fine judgement of 
tempo.That the Royal Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra should 
have let Temirkanov per- 
petrate his coarse, bloated 
vision of the piece suggests a 
slight miscalculation in the 
casting department 

The first movement was 
presentably paced, if garish. 
But the stow movement was 
turned into a series of musical 
high hurdles, tackled with 
increasing ferocity by brass 
and drams. The scherzo 
skimmed along without any 
real attempt at delineation 
and, in the trio, a pleasant 
oboe solo was not enhanced 
by the uncoordinated chortl- 
ing underneath. As for the 
finale, Temirkanov’s hearse- 
paced dog reduced Sibelius’s 
subtle revelation of his great 
melody to bathos. 

Miriam Fried’s playing m 
Bruch’s First Violin Concerto 
struck an arguably authentic 
vein of sugary ardour, with 
plenty of scoops colouring the 
slower passagework. But the 
Adagio was at times pressed 
rather hard, and charmlessly, 
and the double-stopping dash 
into toe finale seemed rushed 
and insecure. 

Richard Morrison 
LSO/ 

Tilson Thomas 

Barbican 



Cool jazz with a cool drink in the 
Burlington Bar from the keyboard of 
Janies McKissic the celebrated 
American pianist. 

Savour tea in the lounge to the 
delicate strains of the harp with 
resident harpist Katherine White. 

Enjoy sweet violin and piano 
melodies with Eduardo Gallardo and 
Adolph Ziros over your gourmet meal in 
the Oak Room restaurant. 

La musique at Le Meridien. 


MERIDIEN 


K*1 


The very soul of France in the very heart of London. 

Le Meridien Piccadilly, Piccadilly. Lxtndon 1\ OBH. 
(Formerly The New Piccadilly HuieltTel: 734 8000. 


In his second concert with the 
London Symphony Orchestra, 
before their Shell UK tour 
together, Michael Tilson 
Thomas extended his concern 
with building the Iarger-scale 
structures, which Richard 
Morrison noted on this page 
last Tuesday, into an 
exhilarating account of 
Beethoven's Ninth 

Symphony.lt was not that he 
took it so fast (actually slower 
than Klemperer used to), but 
that he maintained a consis- 
tent pulse and tension. 

He took no chances with 
soloists nodding off while they 
waited (as happened when I 
last heard the work here) and 
brought them on stage only 
after the sea m less unfolding of 
toe Adagio. Benita Valente, 
Alfreda Hodgson, Arthur Da- 
vies and Stafford Dean were 
mellifluous of tone, separately 
and together, and perhaps 
took their cue to forthright 
character from orchestral 
playing which, in general, had 
a breezy directness rather than 
subtlety. 

For reasons unexplained, 
toe choral voices were not 
those of toe LSO's own 
chorus, but toe Pro Musica 
Chorus directed by John Mc- 
Carthy. The male voice entry 
at "Seid umschlungen" was 
tremendous, and toe choir 
altogether brought as much 
vividness to familiar Beetho- 
ven as they earlier did to 
Stravinsky’s Symphony of 
Psalms , in which the 
composer's emphasis on the 
crucial relationship between 
tempo and meaning was dem- 
onstrated through the 
conductor’s commitment. 

Tempos were kepi modest, 
but the rhythms crisp, so that 
the originality of Stravinsky’s 
writing, for both voices and 
instruments, irradiated the 
spirit of praise and prayer. 

Noel Goodwin 



1 Want 

Old Red Lion 


Torihle trio: Ian Hart, Sean Mdfiee and Jake Abraham (left to right) at the Young Vk 

A wild scouse fairytale 


Pinocchio Boys 

Young Vic 


Jim Morris’s “fantasy- 
comedy^ is a retelling of the 
Pinocchio fairytale from the 
puppet's point of view. There 
are three of them: a gang of 
Liverpool teenagers who 
break out of school for a 
reckless joyride beginning 
with arson and ending with 
murder. 

Their first random ideas of 
a good time are to bum the 
school down or go to Wales. As 
it happens, they smash up the 
adventure playground they 
had built in their days of 
innocence, and go on to 
destroy a nightclub before 
taking to toe road in a stolen 
car, snorting tire fumes of a 
fire-extinguisher, for an ac- 
tion-packed trip involving the 
crash of a police helicopter. 

The comic element, which 


THEATRE 


only heightens tire ugliness of 
these events, lies in their 
detachment from reality. 
Through the eyes of tire boys, 
adults took like ridiculous 
dolls: an illusion powerfully 
conveyed in Hazd £11611)/$ 
and Kevin Currie’s grotesque 
performances of robot-like 
police, teachers, and mugging 
victims.The only realistic 
adult is an old woodwork 
teacher who fears tire boys are 
leaving his workshop “before 
they have been properly glued 
together”. 

Meanwhile; alongside their 
trail of destruction, toe boys 
are living out fantasy lives as 
guests on a television show, 
answering questions on their 
criminal records and winning 
large cash prizes. 

You. could object that tire 


play is simultaneously didac- 
tic and ambiguous. Is tire 
blam e being laid on television, 
or is the cause left to the 
spectator’s „ social 

im'aginationTBut in Pip 
Broughton’s Paines Plough 
production, sudr questions 
are swept aside by toe authen- 
tic voice of 'Liverpool: 
stunted, virile, , and calculated 
to make soft Southerners 
quaff. 

Jake Abraham, Ian Hart, 
and Sean McKee play it with 
ferocity and build three 
sharply defined characters 
within the. limits of a . tiny 
vocabulary and bludgeoning 
insuItSuAs their performances 
are simultaneously projected 
on a bank of monitor screens, 
they appear both as a group of 
callow thugs and as. heroes in 
their own dream: an alarm- 
ingly believable combination. 

Irving Wardle 


Inspired shades of Fonteyn 


DANCE 


The Sleeping 
Beauty 
Covent Garden 


At test, an opportunity to see 
how the Royal Ballet's balleri- 
nas used to dance The Sleep- 
ing Beauty. To find a 
comparison within the com- 
pany for Gelsey Kirkland’s 
performance at Covent 
Garden on Thursday, you 
have to go back to toe days of 
Fonteyn, El vin and Beriosova. 

Like them, Kirkland dances 
beautifully, and eloquently 
too; and of course she does not 
look the least bit like any of 
them because, as they did, she 
has absorbed a tradition and 
made it entirely her own. 

In toe birthday scene, I wish 
1 could show you the way toe 
seemed positively to skip with 
happiness at her first entry, or 
how she brought a hushed 
enchantment to that moment 
when Aurora turned gently, 
raptiy among her four suitors, 
catching up toe other dancers 
into the quiet magic. 

In her main solo, the car- 
riage of her arms became a 


metaphor for a young girl's 
shy excitement at being tire 
centre of all attention. Her 
next entry was a light delirium 
ofjoy, destroyed by the pain of 
the spindle, but turning 
momentarily to an almost 
hysterical relief before tire 
spell worked her collapse. 

The virion scene found her 
dancing with such soft move- 
ment as to draw the audience 
into extra alertness, like an 
actor compelling attention by 
whispering. Tire adagio, in 
which toe prince fills in love 
wito this vision, was almost 
transparent in its delicacy, but 
her solo generated a warmth 
that became incandescent. 
Then the awakening, bringing 
such a rush of gratitude; and 
the big set pieces of the 
wedding duet and solo, beauti- 
fully phrased, building grad- 
ually and inevitably to then- 
climaxes. 

Right through toe coda she 
maintained a sweet, fresh 
delicacy, and into toe finals 
where a raised arm became a 
gesture of blessing and thanks, 
and an arabesque gathered 
into its long, slow sweep all toe 
implications of dvnasuc gran- 
deur implied by Petipa’s 
choreography and; 

Tchaikovsky’s music, and toe 
promise of happy ever after 


which Perrault’s story 
demands. •’ ... 

What a pleasure to see so 
many young dancers on stage, 
and in the auditorium, with 
eyes out on stalks, to take in 
every monrenLOne can hope 
her example , will inspire oth- 
ers as Fonteyn's and 
Makarova’s once did her. 

John Pertival 



NEW SADLER’S WELLS OPERA 

For nobs, -s wellsj -b uffs people 

theQ^? 

07OUNT 

UXEMBOURG 

Franz Lehar 

RUUUlQORe 

Gilbert & Sullivan 

New production sponsored by PRLDB^TIALTv" 

February 19-Mardbi 14 

Sadler’s Wells Theatre 

Tickets from £3504tl650 01-278 8916 



. X 
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Nell Dram and Adrian Henri 
- pace Miss Dunn’s Steaming 
and Mr Henri's constant pdy- 
nmto ambitions — are writers 
so identifiaMy of their period 
feat it comes as something of a 
shock to learn that they hare 
collaborated oa a script wMi* 
spans 60 years. It Is almost as 
tfoffisgi the rapid grin of toe 
1960s had spread to en- 
compass moat of the centary. 

■ I Want fMhrire tire retetion- 
ship, from tire 1920s to the 

present day, of auupper-dass 
girl and a working-doss lad. 
First meeting hi a bookshop, 
they share a taste for Ro- 
mantic pods whose names are 
revoked tike items oa a shop- 
ping list Their yonthfel fling 
over, they centime to keep in 
touch the rest of todr tires. He 
marries and works in a fee- 
trey, she tots about exotic 
places with a string, of lovers. 

Sfece they comramfeate 
hugely by letter, the play’s 
strnctare resembles that of a 
staged biography. The prob- 
lem is tint DoDy and Albert 
are token characters rather 
than specific people: their 
mdying affection for each 
other is something to be taken 
on trust rather than achieved 
in person. “We did nse to 
make each other laugh,” en- 
thuses Dotty fe old age — bat 
one’s memory of too first half 
provides no evidence fer this 
as se rt i o n. Worse, their mode 
of address gleefully embraces 
the rosy rash of MGHs & Born 
dfehfc, while Albertis effusion 
recaps Mr Henri's witless 
fourth-form lyricism: the 
reader or aadilnr can only take 
so many pairs of flimsy white 
panties. 

Sex and its metaphors are 
the backbone of the play, fen 
tire occasional attempt to com- 
ment cm the conflict Of dass 
and Inst with such observa- 
tions as “We were both intimi- 
dated by oar cultures” 
soggests nothing so ranch as a 
pair of biochemists in a horror 
film— 

A two-hander sp a wning 60 
years is a tall order without 
recourse to ageing make-up. 
Naomi Bach and Carl Chase 
strata! a brisk tick and almost 
imperceptibly slow down, but 
there is little rise to suggest 
that time haw made any im- 
pression on them. Kate 
Shout’s excellent inddeatai 
music oa the cello is tire prime 
attraction of the evening. 

Martin Cropper 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 




Minor classic of a 

musical maestro 


REVIEW 


Dirty tricks diplomacy 


T: . ■ -. 

■ :.'• * „ > 

;y- • 

/ T - / ••■•. 


JA2Z RECORDS 


No one taOcs much about 
Oscar Petuford thpy 
which is a miserable fate for 
one of jazz’s • faalf-do 2 cn 
outstanding exponents of the 
douMe bass. You need only 
hea j-Qpj ntet & Nonet once to 
undmtand the size of the loss 
incurred by his death in 3960 
at the age of 3& here was the 
hnk betwen the pioneering 
work of Jimmy Blanton and 
the fully-fledged virtuosity of 
Charles Mingus. 

Formed from a pair of 
sessions recorded in 1954 — 
each originally available as a 
10-inch LP on the Bethlehem 
label - this compilation also 
features Peniford in his addi- 
tional guises as an imaginative 
composer . and- arranger, a 
fastidious bandleader and an 
occasional bat very effective 
jazz-cellist 

The quintet features the 
unusual front line of Julius 
Watkins’S french horn and. 
Charlie Rouse’s tenor saxo- 
phone (Later to be reunited in a 
short-lived band called 
Jazz Modes). Rouse is the star 
soloist, proving himself to. be 
among Lester Young's most, 
intelligent disciples in the way 
he clips his phrases to match 
Ron Jefferson’s crisp brash- 


ROCK RECORDS 


Idling Joke Brighter Than 
A Thousand Suns . 


(EMI EMD1001) ■ . 

With Brighter Than A Thou- 
sand: Suns. Killing Jokehave 
taken another step forward on 
the not-so-rocky path to main- 
stream acceptance^ a process 
which they began with last 
year’s Night Time. 

Jaz Coleman’s previous 
stentorian bellow is- now 
moderated to convey the 
sweeping . melody of 
“Adorations” with carefully 
pitched . notes and precisely 
articulated words, while the 
clanging resonances .of 
Geordie’s gtritar ate muted 
behind Coleman’s more 
prominent keyboard parts in 
‘"Sanity” and “A Southern 
Sky”.- .•- ,y.' . •• 

. “Rubicon” with its heavy , 
disco: beat add *edgy doom-‘ 
laden efimax, is aboeras nasty 
as it gets^- . with TCcfleman 
gleefoBy cxiebrating' the sup- 
posed .poetry ofctoSteiation, 


CLASSICAL 

RECORDS 


CoOn MatthfM; Ceflo Con- 
certo, Lmdscapo- Baflfie, . 
London Sbiforiiatta, Beifrn 
Radio SQ/Carewe. Unicom 
DKF9053(U*) 1. 

Bax: Symphony No 3 and . 
ofiierwonm. LPO/Thomsqn.- 
Chanck»ABRD1165(LP) 
Bmc Spring Fire and other 


workf.RFO/Handiey. 
Chars»gABM) t1B0(LP) , 

An .earlier record of chamber 
music by Colin Matthews had 

tested- the waters, but the pew 
Unicorn. release jumps right 
in. Both these works are. those 
of someone who las been 
burned by Mahler and. wants 
to return' to the fre. ■ 

This .recording transmits 
fully _ the fine arristry of. 
Alexander Baillie . without 
making it a. showpiece cofl r 
certo. ft is almost a concerto 
for orchestra against cello, and 
an . enlarged London 
Sinfopietta under. John 
Carewc bring' out its dark, 
long-ranging force. ■ 

This is » perfbnnance that 


y 0 * . on Geny Mullizan’s 
ncet ‘Sextette" and mming 
gUteacoolWenCteeron 

mufoni’s boppish “Ride* 
Again” 

Petuford was working with 
Rake Ellington at the time the 
nine-piece session took p i*'**, 
which is presumably why the 
Ducal shadow looms so 
nearly above it,- both in 
mpertoire ( indiutmg “lark the . 
Bear” — a_ homage to Rfan ton 
— and a jaunty treatment of 
Mood Indigo”) and -the 
choice Of ademen Oar V 
Terry’s trumpet and Jimmy 
Hamilton's clarinet and tenor < 
saxophone are' among the ' 
authentic . voices of 

Ellingtonia. carefully de- 
ployed here alongside a sec- 
ond trumpet (Joe WHder), 
trombone, amt aho and bari* 
tone saxes. - 

Despite that, the music is 
always Fettiford’s own, at its 
most pungently personal in a 
- marvellous miniature titled 
“Tamalpais”, in which 
horn seems to carry an in- 
dependent contrapuntal line 
beneath the ethereal purity of 
.Wilder’s lead. Hamilton, 
Terry and the trombonist 
Jimmy Cleveland are the solo- 
ists who, benefiting from j 
PeUiford’s artfully scored 1 
backgrounds, weigh in with 
briefbut telling soios that help 
turn the. piece into a min or 
classic. 

Richard Williams 

' the nuclear holocaust to which 
the album title refer s . 

Kraftwerk reveal, the cheer- 
ful _ face Of 

innovation with a /trf jghtfiii 
album that tackles the hip hop 
challenge head on, and pro- 
vides a vibrant c o mp ut eri z ed 
.sound track for die Max 
Headroom generation. 

These chaps know a thing or 
. two about prog ramming a 

dram machine Electric 
Cafe sketches an ingenious 
patchwprk of sample .indus- 
trial. street . -and . keyboard 
sounds over sparse frmk/disco 
rhythms' that defy the listener 

m git gtm , 

‘‘The --Telephone Call” 
weaves a fascinating rhythmic 
speff froin a concoction of 
telephone noises, . including 

dialling ; Mips ' and recorded 
operator announcement!. 
“Techno _pop”is Vkllkostage 
byjgtpwlwg Germanic voices 
add a deep funk bateftne, and 
tfieH^ te-echoes ofeverytt ii ng 
fteii^Talco to Lauries Ander- 
sq^jpwhat mnstheoheof the 
bear- v&nbfe records to - be 
T3ea!»d dnsyear. . 

• ' . ; Bavid Sindalr 

would well earn its -place on 
die * A’ side of the record were 
the accompanying account of 
Landscape, not so awesome. 
As a hatfhour symphonic 
movement of massive weight 
and constantly increasing ten- 
sion, it indudes a wealth of 
jfTMtp ac a dense but luminous 
dream chorale, a magma in 
the .bass, and beautiful mo- . 
ments from solo string groups. 

Matthews has been pro- 
fessionally concerned so for 
with the music of Btjtten and 
Holst, but the appearance of 
his music alongside Bax's does 
not seem inappropriate: both 
compose r s see m to he nsingan 
essentially Romantic la ngua ge 
In the case of Spring Fire, a 
symphony written soon after 
the early tone poems, lack of 
belief is contagions, for too 
much of the score has the 
splashy extravagance of film 
music. But the Thi rd TSym - 
phony is quite a different 
matter, arid suggests a foody 
and noble endeavour to find 
some creative space between 
Sibelius and Mahler. 

: Paul Griffiths 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 107 

Prizes of the .New Codins Thesaurus wffl 

correct solutions opened on Thursday, N®vember%198fL Entries 
SSS-bB addresS to The rimes tS^SSLisS 

petition. 1 and 


ACROSS 

t Woman’s vote ao- 
_tivisl(1II 
9 Qoickly(7) : ' 

10. Scots mad (5). 

11 Mewl piiocral (3) 

13 Whisky grain (4) 

16 .Friends (4) 

ITMip pressure fine (6) 

18 Not any (4) 

20 Mate (4) 

21 -Rcsaid wilfi caeem 

■ffi) : - . 

22 Laigcexhil»iioht4) 

23 Mediods(4) 

2S TaBtettuce(3) 

28 Praise bvidily (5) ■ 

29 Cassava starch (7) 

30 tout movement 
founder (5.6) 

DOWN 

2 Upto(5> 

3 Whip (4) 

4 Highest male vow 
(4) 

5 Skin (41 - 

6 Russian empress (7) 

7 Baccano-tifcepme 
16.2J) 

8 Edinlnugb hifl (7.4) 

12 Band engineer (6) 

14 Bind (3) 

15 Witchcraft (6) 

19 Coal tar dhuJlanra 

20 Church bend* P) 


M 5 

□ 


Q 

p 2 1 

■ 


24 Coral aide (5) 

25 Him (4) • 


26 Bod ( 4 ) 
.27 Vomit ( 4 ) 


s ?a® N lfcS? "Saw ; *te. 9Cor- 
2" {°??SL ifSinttin »SobS 24 

Kudge 21 Adage 23 Beefy ■ 

$M**$&** W^StKeLAdae*. . 
Baddn^om- 


ACluAx aMj 20 Te«l r--—- 

DOWN: 2ba ¥ B jSf S i 4 ^B 15 Bame »Absmlh MTea 24 
27 Brew _ ^ 


tTheOA’sChfle 
: campaign was 
probably its most 
suaissfiil 
operation. The. 
emphasis<m 
' bribery, 
propaganda, 
economic 
sabotage, 
kidnapping, and 
even political 
assassination, bore 
all die hallmarks 
of a classic US- 
sponsored 
clandestine 
operation} 


PAPERBACKS 


Tho CIA, A For 
by WHfiamBtum 


“I don’t see wiry 
we need to stand 
by and watch a 
country go com- 
munist just be-' 
cause . of the 
irresponsibility 
of its own 
people.” With these words 

Hwiiy Viccinggr IminHwf (he 

Nixon administration’s secret 
campaign to overthrow the 
democratically elected gov- 
ernment of President AHaide 
of Chile: Three years and 
several tens of millions of US 
dollars later Allende was dead, 
his socialist government top- 
pled in a CIA-backed military 
coup. 

The CIA's Chile campaign 
was probably its most snccess- 
fo] operation of recent years. 


- 5 v ; -ES 


-5K jk *'• 

; 








B-rr, 


September 1 1,1973: surnmnded by armed bodyguards. Chilean President Salvador Allende 
enters the palace main courtyard. Minutes later the budding was surrounded by troops and 
bombed in a CIA-backed military coop. Dr Allende is then said to have committed suicide 


The emphasis on misinforma- 
tion, bribery, propaganda, 
economic sabotage, kidnap- 
ping, and even political 
assassination, bore all the 
hallmarks of a classic US- 
sponsored clandestine 
operation. 

Once more, the agency had 
received a sanction from the 
highest levels in government 
to flex America’s foreign pol- 
icy muscles in an area where 
the nation's security was said 


to be threatened, where the 
traditional devices of diplo- 
macy were no longer deemed 
to be efficacious. 

The Chile operation 
emerged from a long tradition 
of similar. American opera- 
tions in the Third World, most 
notably the 1953 coop in Iran 
and the 1954 coup in Guate- 
mala. Italy, Indonesia, British 
Guyana, Laos, Cambodia, 
Cuba, the Congo, Angola and 
Ecuador, all these countries 


have, at one time or another 
over the past 40 years, had 
their sovereignty trampled 
upon by the powerful men 
who sh behind desks at the 
CIA's headquarters at Lang- 
ley, Virginia. 

ft is a sordid, sorry itinerary 
indeed; a story whose leit- 
motiv is the sacrifice of much 
that is moral «"<f humane at 
the altar of American real- 
politiL It is, above all, a story 
shrouded in a conspiracy of 


e, since in all such 
lions secrecy is the nee- 
precondition of success, 
i unravelling of this se- 
«■ “foigonen , history of 
abal interventions since 
cond World War is the 
J challenge to which 
m Blum's study is di- 
. The task is a for- 
ile one, since by its very 
: much of the don- 
ation required to 
miate CIA complicity 
49 instances listed here 
has been destroyed or 
as classified. 

! book therefore relies 
y on newspaper and 
secondary sources. De- 
ltas handicap, however, 
meticulously researched 
indy written exposfe of 
A’s dirty tricks since the 
f was find established in 


particular interest is the 
startling claim that Sir 
)hn Kerr, the Governor- 
feneral of Australia who' 
ssed Gough Whitlam i 
he premiership in 1975, 
CIA agent, whose action 
precipitated by the 
tr’s fears that Whitlam : 
lout to c om promise the 
satellite surveillance I 
i there. j 

: book is a powerful 
ment of the obsessive 
ami-communist paranoia that 
determines the actions of the 
American intelligence 
comm unify. But its major 
shortcoming is that it fails to 
raise the key issue in the 
contemporary intelligence de- 
bate. Given that the existence 
of an intelligence service is an 
integral element in sustaining 
national security, should we 
give it licence to indulge in 
improper, immoral, and often 
downright illegal acts in order 
to defend the very system of 
values which such acts must 
inevitably call into question? 


David Leppard 


DrChartes Bumay, A 


S yon .hare ever wanted, to read ft 
proper account of the two most 
bnwn episodes hi Dr Burney's long 
life, (hen you sbovld look elsewhere 
than -In nds at timer rather sdf- 
consoomfy scholarly book. ‘ 

- Neither -his c on ver sati on witirSam- 
nd Johnson on the madness of their 
nrateal friend, Christopher Smart, 
nor the events snmmndiBg fiie anoay- 
mons pabBcatlon of ms daughter 
Fanny's first novel are here described, 
on the canons! grounds that they are 
too weD known to merit fodnsion. 

. However, although Xo n sdal e is an 
instructive biographer, ftis study is 
u^mssively researched and sound in 
its judgments. It is never sunder Ann 
when exposing Fanny’s dishonest 
memoir of her father — an idealized. 
Moodless portrait, more properly 


called her last novel ~ as the product 
of her “senO* egotism”. 

Burney’s life ia the 18th ceutmy 
was dominated by two scales, the 
musical scale, and the scale of soaety. 
By writing about the former, be 
contrived to hit the high notes of the 
latter —and startled his contemporar- 
ies by snccn tiling . 

'. The first nfan r of Barney's cele- 
brated General History of Music 
(effectively die first of its kfod in the 
English language) was not actually 
published until he bad readied 50, 
more than 30 years after his first 
coming to London. 

The intervening period was sprat in 
relative obeenrity, as apprentice to the 
“avaridons, selfish, sordid and 
tyrannical” Thomas Arne (whose 
defects may be pat down to his early 
legal training), as a not very smxess- 
ful theatrical composer and, for 18 
long years, as an organist in darkest 


Norfolk, playing to the “stocks and 
trees” and “foggy Aldermen” of 
King's Lynn. 

Then came seven years of feverish 
activity that piodaced a book about 
comes, two fact- finding European 
tours, file publication of two enor- 
mously successful accounts of his 
travels and finally, in 1776, the 
appearance of the first part of his 

LatMMto^hborate wtihtoseKing oa a 
book about Handel, he never enjoyed 
a great e r literary triumph — and bis 
prize was membership of the magic 
Johnsonian circle. 

In truth, Barney was a relentlessly 
minor figure, who pursued not great- 
ness bat success, and who at the end 
of his life was honoured more as a 
relic of an earlier age than for his own 
achievement He was the Stephen 
Spender of his era. 

A man of indefati g ab le energy. 


Burney once said that “he had no time 
to be happy” hot he spent his last 
years happily enough, sustained by 
“fhmunery from people fo high rank”, 
and by his memories of a lifetime 
among the coat-tails of the great 
Above all he was “proud in being 
Johnson's successor in His Majesty’s 
bounty” as the recipient of a royal 
pension. 

We do not know which ofhis many 
memories of the famous occupied his 
mind on his deathbed, as. fireworks 
filled the night sky, and London 
celebrated Napoleon’s defeat but 
Macaulay may unconsciously have 
provided a due, when he wrote of 
Fanny's summons to coart: “Not such 
are foe raptures of a Cfrcassfam father 
who sold his pretty daughter weD to a 
Turkish sjave-mereliantJie seems to 
have thought fiiat going to court was 
like going to heaven.” 

TJLR. Stuttaford 




THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 

Estates of 

discontent : 

• 

The arts world is eageriy 
awaiting the outcome oi dis- 
creet negotiations between the 
Duke of Devonshire and the 
British Museum over the pro- 
posed sale of more Old Master 
drawings from his stately 
home, Chatsworth. Two years 
ago, failure to agree on the 
value of 72 drawings led to 
“the sale of the century" 31 
Christie’s, netting £21 million. 

If negotiations break down 
this time, he might noi do so 
well at auction. Collectors 
who paid huge prices first time 
around are likely to be dis- 
mayed at more Chatsworth 
treasures arriving on the mar- 
ket, tarnishing the glitter of 
their original purchases. 

Hair apparent 

King Lear may be sporting an 
untidy stubble when he stalks 
the Olivier next month. The 
problem is that Anthony Hop- 
kins, who is rehearsing for the 
role, is presently the dean- 
shaven media tyrant of 
Pravda. He admits two weeks 
may not suffice to cultivate a 
majestic beard — but he 
expects it to improve with 
every performance. 

• To improve its Gaelic radio . 
service to the Shetiands, the - 
BBC asked the local cotmdl . 
for the names of Gaelic- 
speaking contributors. But it _ 
seems virtually nobody there 
speaks the language. BBC 
Radio Shetiands tells me it 
regularly replaces Gaelic 
broadcasts from the Hebrides : 
with programmes in the 
islanders’ Scots jtialect. 

Black marks 

The Royal Shakespeare- 
Company’s rejection of 
sponsorship from Barclays 
Bank because of its South, 
African connections is causing* 
acute embarrassment to an- 
other theatrical group. 

Since being launched 14 
years ago, by a black South 
African exile, the Temba com- 
pany has prided itself on being 
at the forefront of anti-racist 
theatre. Its present louring 




StfliLite, by A.S. Byatt 
(Penguin, E3J95) 

As Tier safer reads Words- 
worth in the waxting-rooms of 
Family Planning clinics ia 
London, Frederica Potter, 
hungry for sex and intellectual 
adventure, forges her way into 
the social and -academic 
worlds' of France and 
Cambridge. . 

The two sisters, the one 
pandering to die selfishness of 
mother-in-law, husband, . 
child, and brother, the other 
filled with entimnasm for 
Alexander, an unprolific art- 
ist, and Raphael, a sterile 
academic, provide an enesmz- 
ing life fence in a novel fined 
with the “still life” of hypoc- ~ 
risy and selfishness. 

AS. Byatt combines a sense 
of histone retrospection with 
poetic integrity, and the stark 
realities of birth, dea t h, and 
the loss of virginity 

Conflicts between love and 


Victims of life’s realities 


The English team for the. 
controversial Olympiad r in 
Dubai -is a powerful one; 
Tony ' MSes, John Nunn, 
Nigel Short, Jon Spee bn an, - 
Murray Chandler and Glean 
Ftear. I write “controversial” 
since Israel has been exclud- 
ed and-, several federations 
have refused to play in 
protest. These include Nor- 
way,. Holland, Sweden, Den- 
mark and the US Virgin 

- Mauds 

' . Our squad has been some- 
what wakened by a parallel 
decision by Grandmaster 
Jonathan Mestel not .to par- 
ticipate. Nevertheless, his 
replacement, Flear, was foe 
convincing victor of foe GLC 
Category. 13 tournament ear- 
. her this year, and be is a 
formidable reserve. 

•I would say we have a fair 
chance of repeating oar salver 
medal success from 1984 and 
bronze should certainly .be 
wiihin our reach. Gold, 
though, is out of the ques- 
i .tion, since foe USSR ride will 
include the, world's top four 
l players: Kasparov. . Karpov, 
Sokolov, and Yusupov, the 
last-named latter befog ' the 
loser . of foe : C an d i d a te s' 
FinaL ^ : 

On their, day; gut team. 

; members can defeat anyone. 

[ Here, for example, !is a fore 


ambition, motherhood and 
books, society and an ivory 
tower are faced head on, and 
there is a sharp sense of 
progression as Frederica 
changes from gauche teenager 
to sophisticate, and foe reali- 
ties of Stephany’s chosen path 
become slowly apparent. The 
art and fife of Van Gogh 
providing the novel's central 
leitmotiv. Still Life throbs 
with insight and originality. 

The Defence, by Vladimir 
Nabokov (Oxford, £3£5) 

The story of a young man's 
relationship with chess moves 
from the discovery of genius 
to madness. White his mother 
languishes fo bed sucking 
bubble, gam and his lather 
pursues his sprightly aunt. 


CHESS 
A fighting 
chance for 
the bronze 

technical display by our 
Olympic top board from last 
year’s Interpolis tournament 
az Tflburg. 

White: Tony Miles: Black: 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


l jiThin finds on the chess 
board a way of conirofifog and 

d^fendjrcg hitnyrif a gainst life. 

However, as the novel pro- 
gresses, the comforting “Un- 
de Tom” principle goes by tire 
board and fr o m armchair 
psychology foe rea de r is thrust 
into unease.Thc rules of foe 
game begin to invade Luzhin’s 
entire perception of the world, 
so that he remembers his 
professional journeys in terms 
of the tiles in different hotel 
bathrooms and corridor toi- 
lets. Ultimately a tale of 
mental breriedown, The De- 
fence has room for . both 
humour and pathos. A very 
dever book. 


The Sin Eater, bv AOce Thomas 
Bfis (Penguin. £2B5) 

This disturbing concoction of 
lyric and drama manipulates 
the reader's reactions in the 
same way that Rose twists the 
feelings of her complacent, 
narrow-minded relatives. 

The novel, like the Welsh 
cottage, is filled with dis- 
cordant elements which refuse 
to fit into any tidy pattern. 
Married couples seem iH- 
fined, central characters re- 
main strangely absent, 
emotions run riot," and social 
communication fails. Charac- 
ters snipe and get at each other 
despite the encroaching death 
of their father lying comatose 
upstairs. 

In this compulsive novel 
tragedy and grotesque comedy 


are uneasy bed-fellows, as the 
dying man’s cry for water is 
mistaken for a desire to see 
Walker, and the final childish 
trick back-fires with demonic 
consequences 


dash of symbols 


production. Worn Albert, is an 
eloquent denunciation of 
apartheid. 

Unfortunately, it has finaix 
rial troubles and is heavily 
indebted to its bankers; 
. . . Barclays. “We do have a 
difficulty here,” administrator 
Roger Lang fells me. “We’ve 
been trying to switch to an^ 
other bank, but nobody will 
talk to us. Until our deficit is 
paid off, we can’t move”; 
Asked why founder Alton 
Kumalo opened Temba’s ac- 
count .with the bank, he said: 
“I suppose, coming from; 
South Africa, it was the only- 
one be knew.” 


Oriental Tales, by Mar- FOUl pl&Y 

gusrite Yourcenar (Black ’ . 

Swan, £2.95) Westminster City 


White: Tony Miles: Black: 
Victor Korchnoi. Queen's 
Gambit Accepted. 

i m 05 im as 

am d - 

S oft aril • OS W 

TIM M DM Nt« 

9 Wfe RM 10 Otdft am 

After an unusual opening, 
Korchnoi chooses an unchar- 
acteristically passive fine of 
defence, which simply leaves 
White with the clear advan- 
tage of the Bishop-pair fo an 
open, simplified position. 
Instead, Korchnoi should 
have' sought to exploit foe 
loss of time involved fo 
White’s lengthy manoeuvre 
with his ; King's Knight by 
playing J0...Qb6. f ■ plan- 
ning-O-W) 

11 (Safe Km7 UM W 

tt-B M MH4 Bto . 

ism nsr ■ is «m ■ 

17 Me? . KM* HIM M . 

Or l8»J4d4 dis+ 19 KN 
Nxe2 20 Nxg7. and Rd2. 


White systematically gains 
space on the Queen's side. 

to- NM frnS M4 

Black’s main trump is occu- 
pation of d4, but it is of 
mainly optical benefit 

»an iter s m 2 as 

3a M Ngft 31 Kc3 Bm 

SS to M BM W4 

to KM NgS 38 to 

Forcing open the “a” file in 

this fashion is the derisive 
manoeuvre. Once a Black 
target has been exposed in 
this sector, White can. turn to 
the task of expelling the 
Black Knights. 

to- bxto KM NM 

am km saga nm 

Or3L.Nrf 39 Bd5! 

A judicious moment 'to swap 
Bishop for Knight. 


If 41-.Rxa6.42 bxa6 followed 
by ft, winning the King and 
Pawn ending. But the Rook 
and Pawn ending is equally 
hotidess for Black. 

<a*e* : m qm w 

8* KOI Mr ft* KM RMS 

MfcdS oft «r m mr 

« to Jw to Ml MZ 


Black resigns 

Raymond Keene 


Defence, as bridge writers 
endlessly restate, is the most 
difficult part of the game. The 
“switchback”, as I call it, is 
one of the most difficult 
defences to conduct Here is a 
good example. 

Teams. North-South 
Game Dealer North. 

4 as 

• V 87 
0KJ54 
* AK972 


♦ 0982 
9QJI05 
0 873 
4 89 


n ift J107 
W E 

w r e OAB62 
5 l »S4 

♦ K43 
9 A432 
O Q ID 
4 Q J 108 


W N g S 

100) 14 Otol® 

» 34(3) NO 3NT 

No No No - 

Op«*ig lesf 2 * 

(1) MM pwcUon spam ona awe ntf 
osutoy dneritw vim you haw not got, 
rafter than vffltt you MVB, U. no ms 
card major, amt fees tmn 17 point*. 
® Tha nwAt OouWe. showing vaftn, 
nomto^nojuftng tow at vto other 

jo%(ft i* at Many to pan, but 
peons* his oponfaig bid to* conveyed 
no positive kftxfttoon, he takes ft# 
opportunty to ehmr Ms aua 

East won the lead with the 
♦A and returned the 4J. 
Declarer won with the 4K 
and forced out the 0A. As 
foe spades broke 4-4. foe 
defence was limned to four 
tricks. , 


Swan, £2.95) 

These ten powerful tales of 
love, death, art, and spiritual- 
ity resound with meaning and 
yet somehow evade inter- 
pretation. 

Illusion and reality mix, as 
the stories leap from China to 
Greece, Japan to Amsterdam, 
the modern world of story- 
telling to the ancient world of 
myth and fable. 

The tales are filled with a 
sense of dij& vu. of a ritualized 
retelling of myth, and foe 
repetitive structure of fairy 
tales. 

Sabine Dnrrant 


BRIDGE 

The case 
for the 
defence 


Admittedly^ast's play at 
trick two was supine, but the 
winning defence must be 
exact Suppose East finds the 
killing switch to a heart. 
Declarer will doubtless duck. 
The defence roust play anoth- 
er round of heals but if 
declarer ducks again, must 
revert to spades. The 
“swuchback” requires judg- 
ment and accurate signalling. 

Playing standard leads, that 
is to say the fourth highest of 
foe longest suit, a defender 
who unsuccessfully tries a 
switch at trick two will often 
receive an unsympathetic 
scowl from a disappointed 
partner. For that reason, 
many expert partnerships 
prefer “attitude" leads, using 
foe piall cards to stress , the 
quality of the suit that they 
have led in the context of 
their hands as a whole. 

Suppose the bidding has 
been.'- 

South 1NT: North 3NT 
and West holds this hand: 


Westminster City Council's^ 
generous replacement funding 
for the aits, following the 
demise of foe GLC, evidently 
does not extend to collecting 
their rubbish. A row is brew- 
ing over demands that the 
Arts Council pay £600 a year 
for refuse removal — and 
indemnify municipal oper- 
atives for any disaster that 
may befell them on their way 
ro and from its Piccadilly 
headquarters. Lawyers have 
been consulted. One wag sug- 
gested the dustmen form a 
theatrical group and apply for 
an Arts Conned grant. 

Gavin Bell 


♦ J9842 
A 108a 

0 04 

+ J3 

Playing attitude leads he 
should select the 44, which— 
would allow East to find a 
heart switch. 

But if West held 

4AJ94S 

7 10843 

0 Q4 — 

* J3 

he should lead the 42 to 
convey the message foal, as " 
he sees it, spades offer foe 
best and possibly foe only 
hope of beating the contract. 

Jeremy Flint, 


, NOW 
G$NSTEILrtrK>N 
fHjHfTF & EXPERT 

+ Chosen by OM. Tanoshchefiko to 
old his wok as Knparo/s SocokJ 
dimg tharsewn World Championship 
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I 








THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


THE WEEK AHEAD 


■'Saf.jp : 

DANCE 

STAR QUALITY: Dfarshan Singh 
Bftuiler dances in SioWian Davies’s 
The Run to Earth, which has its 
London premiere at the opening of 
the new season of the London 
Contemporary Dance Theatre. At 25, 
tithe and slim, he attracts attention 
in a company that officially has no 
stars. His dancing began at 
Harehills School, Leeds, where 
everyone has to dance. He soon 
stood out not only for his physical 
control but the quiet 
thoughtfulness of his work. Sadler's 
Wells (01-278 8916), Tuesday. 




JAZZ 

TRUMPET CALL: Miles Davis, 
who turned 60 this year, makes no 
secret of his (ust for the pop-star 
status of Michael Jackson or Prince, 
and is more likely these days to be 
aiming his trumpet at Scritti Poirtti 
than at “Stella by Starlight”. 
Unwilling to give an inch to those 
hankering after the classical 
proportions of his Fifties and Sixties 
music, he is playing himself into 
the hearts of yet another generation 
of jazz fanciers. Wembley 
Conference Centre (01-902 1234), 
tomorrow and Monday. 




GALLERIES 

CRY WOLFE: Edward Wolfe 

(seen above in a self-portrait) was 
bom in South Africa, studied at 
the Slade School and became a 
friend of Roger Fry and Duncan 
Grant In the 1930s he worked as a 
theatre designer and created sets 
for the Cochrane revues. A 
biography of John Russell Taytor, 
art critic of The Times (Trefoil Books, 
£24.95) has been published to 
coincide with the first major 
exhibition since his death four 
years ago. Odette Gilbert Gallery (01 - 
437 4973), from Wednesday. 










THEATRE 

LUCE LIVING: Clare Booth Luce, 
now 83, has been a journalist 
Congresswoman, ambassador, 
actress and playwright In the last 
capacity she wrote The Women, a 
biting satire on American high 
society that was first performed 
on Broadway 50 years ago and later 
filmed with Norma Shearer and 
Joan Crawford. It is being revived 
with an all-female cast of 1 8, 
including Maria Aitken, Julia Fbster, 
Diana Quick and Susannah York. 
Old Vic (01-928 7616). Opens 
Thursday after previews. 


BOOKS * 

SPY STORIES: Anthony Blunt 
would probably prefer to be 
remembered as the art expert and 
surveyor of the Queen's pictures 
than as the man who betrayed his 
country. Small hope. He is a leading 
figure in Phillip Knightiey's The 
Second Oldest Profession, a study of 
spies published on Thursday 
(Andre Deutsch, £14.95); a 
biography. Conspiracy of Silence, 
by Barrie Penrose and Simon 
Freeman, is out soon; and after 
that a television play in which Blunt is 
played by Ian Richardson. 


2&j 

m 

L 

.MJ*- 


.i 

mn 


OPERA 

YURI’S GIRL: AsMey Putnam, the 
New York bom soprano, makes her 
Covent Garden debut in the title 
role of Janacek's Jenufa, a new 
production by Yuri Lyubimov. She 
replaces Gabriela Benackova, who, it 
is said, was none too keen on the 
Lyubimov approach. Though Putnam 
sings mainly in America, she mil 
be remembered here for her Arabella 
at Glyndeboume and Lucia for 
Scottish Opera. Her debut at the 




Royal Opera House (01 -240 1066), 


THEATRE ;, ; i| 


OPENINGS 


LILLIAN: Frances de la Tour as 
Lillian Heilman in William 
Luce's monodrama based on 
Heilman's autobiographical 
writings. Sunday previews. 
Directed by Conn Redgrave. 
Lyric Shaftesbury Avenue (01- 
437 3686). Sun at 4pm. Also 
Nov 23. 30. 

SELLING THE SIZZLE: 
Commissioned comedy by 
Peter Gibbs, “about the 
seedier side of selling''. Robert 
Chetwyn directs Dinsdate 
Landen, David Threlfall, Ann 
Beach and Caroline Bliss. 
Hampstead Theatre (01 - 
722 9301). Previews from 
Tues. First night Nov 26. 

GHOSTS: Fast West End 
transfer of the David Thacker 
Young Vic production, 
retaining Vanessa Redgrave 
and Tom Wilkinson as Mrs 
Alvina and Pastor Manders. 
but otherwise re-cast 
Wyndham's (01-836 3028). 
Opens Wed. 

MR & MRS NOBODY: Judi 
Deneh and Michael Williams in 
Keith Waterhouse' s adaptation 
of the George and Weedon 
Grossmith book about 
Victorian lower-middle class 
life and his own "sequel" Mrs 
Roofer's Diary. Directed by 
Ned Sherrin. 

Garrick (01-379 6107). 

Previews (two shows) today. 
First night Mon. 


OUT OF TOWN 


GUILDFORD: The Real Thing: 
Rula Lenska and Dennis 
Waterman head an otherwise 
Australian company in a 
production of the Tom 
Stoppard play. 

Yvonne Amaud (0483 60191). 
Opens Wed. 

LEICESTER: High Society: 
World Premiere of a stage 
version of the Cole Porter 
musical. Adapted and directed 
by Richard Eyre. Cast includes 
Trevor Eve. 

Haymarket (0533 539797). 
Previews from Wed. Press 
Night Nov 25. 


in Hugh Whitemore's intelligent 
stage biography. Haymarket 
(01530 9832) 

MAC8ETK: A welcome return 
for Jonathan Pryce as a 
compelling royal murderer, in 
Adrian Noble's inventive, 
effects-based production. 




THE HOUSE OF BERNARDA 
ALBA: Lorca's last tragedy of 
Spanish manners, robustly 



SELECTED 


WOMAN IN MIND: 

Ayckbourn's latest foray into 
middle-class frustration. Julia 
McKenzie shines as the 
touched fantasist of the title. 
Vaudeville (01-836 9988) 

KAFKA'S DICK: Alan Bennett's 
rather over-ambitious comic 
fantasy about literary detection 
in Prague stars Roger Lloyd 
Pack and Geoffrey Palmer. 
Royal Court 01-730 1745) 

BREAKING THE CODE: Derek 
Jacobi gives a compelling 
account of the pioneering 
computer scientist Alan Turing 


A WINDOW ON THE WORLD: 

BBC survey of 50 years of TV 
journalism which nghtiy pays 
tribute to non-BBC pioneers 
such as Edward R. Murrow 
and World in Action. 

BBC2, today. 8-3G-9.40pm 

THE MAGIC RECTANGLE: 
Robert Robinson on how 
television creates celebrities, 
with Jimmy Saviie, Patrick 
Moore ana a deliciously funny 
dosing sequence that says it 
all. 

BBC2, Tues, 9 -10pm 

BREAKING UP: One day there 
will be a TV series about a 
marriage that lasts. Meanwhile, 
another of the other sort; Dave 
Hill and Eileen Atkins are the 
warring couple. 

BBC2, Wed. 9.25-1 0.20pm 

THE ENGLISHWOMEN’S 
WARDROBE: A thoroughly 
entertaining 40 Minutes in 
which Margaret Thatcher, 
Selina Scott and a teenage 
fatty from Watford ten Angela 
Hum about their favourite 
ctotties. 

BBC2. Thurs, 9.30-1 0.10pm 

SALVADOR DALI: Arena 
profile of the enfant terrftrie of 
surrealism, fleshed out with 
film from the Dali archive. 
BBC2, Fri, 9.30-1 0.45pm 


OPERA 


ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 

Tonight Tues and Fri the new 
Ian Judge Cav and Pag, only 
reservedly welcomed By Paul 
Griffiths; on Wed and Nov 22, 
Graham Vick's powerful 
production of Britten's The 
Rape of Lucretm with Jean 
Rigby and Russell Smythe; and 
on Tnurs a penultimate 
Mikado. Jonathan Miller's all- 
white I920s-style production, 
not to be missed. All 
performances start at 730pm. 
Coliseum, St Martin's Lane. 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

SCOTTISH OPERA: Reach 
Aberdeen on their tour with 
two performances of Graham 
Vick's uncompromisingly stark 
production of Carmen (Wed 
and Nov 22); two of a more 
cosily traditional and very jolly 
folanthe (Tues and Fri); and 
one of Strauss's domestic 
comedy. Intermezzo (the 
production originally conceived 
for Glyndebourne). All 


performances start at 7.15pm. 
His Majesty's Theatre, 
Aberdeen (0224 367788). 

WELSH NATIONAL OPERA: 
Now at Liverpool with the 
vocally superb Lucia di 
Lammermoor on Tues and Nov 
22; two performances of The 
Magic Flute with a strong 
young cast on Wed and Fri; 
and a single Bailo in Maschera 
on Thurs. All performances 
start at 7.15pm. 

Empire Theatre, Liverpool 




GROUP : Their tour of Britten’s 
Turn of the Screw continues 
tonight at Brecon's Guildhall 
(0874 2884); tomorrow at 
Cardiff's Sherman Theatre 
(0222 30451); Tues at 
Swansea's Penyrheol Leisure 
Centre (0792 897039); Wed at 
Lampeter’s Theatre Fefinfach 
(0570 470697); and Fri at Buifth 
Wells Wyes de Arts Centre 
(0982 55255). Michael Rafferty 
conducts, with Kevin West as 
Peter Quint All performances 
start at 7.30pm. 


MISCHIEF: Centenary tribute 
! to Ben Travers opens with a 
dramatization of his novel 
about a middle-aged 
businessman (Freddie Jones) 
who marries a bright young 
thing half his age. 

Radio 4, today, 2-&30pm. 

CHRISTOPHER FRY: Chooses 
his favourite prose and poetry 
in a new series of With Great 
Pleasure (Radio 4, today, 4- 
4.45pm). Tomorrow there is a 
performance of his latest work. 
One Thing Mae or Caedmon 
Construed. 

Radio 4. 2.30-3. 30pm. 

OPTIMISTIC TRAGB5Y: Pop 
punk Toyah Wilcox stars in 
Vsevolod Vishnevsky’s play 
about a young woman 
commissar sent to discipline 
the fleet in the early days of the 
Russian Revolution. 

Radio 3, Tues, 7.30-9pm. 


. FILMS ON TV 


r^ToMCERT^^ 


MAHLER’S RESURRECTION: 

Yuri Temirkanov conducts 
massed forces inducing the 
RPO and Brighton Festival 
Chorus in a performance of 
Mahler's Symphony No 2. 
Royal Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01- 
928 3191 , credit cards 01- 
928 8800). Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

DEL MAR/LPa The LPO is 
conducted by Norman dal Mar 
In Handel's Royal Fireworks 


Orchestra conducted by 
Nicholas Cieobury. Also 
Beethoven’s Egmcnt Overture 
and Symphony No 3. 

Barbican Centre, Friday, 
7.45pm. 







lyrics fuel the purposeful 
ascetic genius of one of 
Britain's greatest guitarists. 


Kim 


Bh 




• Max Wall was doing fumy 
walks when John Cleese was 
still in nappies. He was one of 
the last great comedians of the 
music-ban, a marvellous droll 
and master of the inspired ad- 
lib. In the 1950s his career 
declined but in recent years be 
has built a new one, as a 
character actor and superb 
interpreter of the works of 
Samuel Beckett- Now 78, he 
looks back on an eventful life 
in Aspects of Max Wall (Radio 
2, Wed, I0-10.15pm). 


ic March in 
John Frankenheimer’s gripping 
thriller. „ 

Channel 4. tomorrow, 9.45- 
11.55pm 

THE CALIFORNIA DOLLS 
(1981k Peter Falk leads 




women wrestlers which was 
the final film of Robert (The 
Dirty Dozed) Aldrich. 

B8C2 , tomorrow, 10.15pm- 
..12.10am x 

EXODUS '(I960): Otto 
Preminger’s mammoth 
account of the birth of Israel, 
sp read over two successive 
afternoons. 

BBC2, Wed, 2-3 -35pm and 
Thurs, 2^ .50pm 

FATHER BROWN (1954): Alec 
Guinness in a civilized and 
witty rendering of Chesterton's 
priest-detective by director 
Robert Hamer. 

Channel 4, Thurs, 9.30- 
11.10pm 

GERMANY, PALE MOTHER 

(1979): Writer-director Helma 
Sand ers-Brah ms's sharply- 
observed autobiographical 
drama of a woman's struggles 
in wartime Germany with a fine 
performance by Eva Mattes. 
Channel 4, Fri, 1 1 .30pm- 
1.45am 


Beethoven's Piano Concerto 
No 5 ‘'Emperor". 

Barbican Centre, Silk Street, 
LoMon EC2 (01-62 8 8795, 
credit cards 01-638 8891). 
Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

YANSONS/PHfLHARMONIA: 
Prokofiev’s Symphony No 1 
“Classical" and 
Rachmaninov's Symphony No 
2 are played by the 
Phitharmonia Orchestra under 
Mariss Yansons, and Robert 
Cohen (cello) solos in 
Tchaikovsky’s Rococo 
Variations. 

Royal Festival Hall. Tues, * 
7.30pm. 

ROYAL CONCERT: Antal 
Dorati conducts the RPO in 
Haydn's Symphony No 3, the 
HandeLBeecnam Gods Go A- 
Beggmg Suite, and Sir Yehudi 
Menuhin and Lei and Chen solo 
in Bach's Double Violin 
Concerto. 

Royal Festival Hall. Wed, 8pm. 

WAND/BBC SO: Gunter Wand 
conducts the BBC SO in 
Beethoven’s Symphony No 1 
and Bruckner's Symphony No 
9. 

Royal Festival Ha R. Thurs, 
7.30pm. 

TYLSON-THOMAS: Michael 
Tllson-Thomas with the LSO 
and Pro Musica Chorus 
perform Beethoven's 
Symphony No 9 and 
Stravinsky’s Symphony of 
Psalms. 

Barbican Centre. Thurs, 8pm. 

BEAUX ARTS TRIO: make one 
of their rare concerto 
appearances in Beethoven's 
Concerto in C major for Piano, 
Viofin. Cefio and Orchestra Op 
56 with the Phitharmonia 


Palais, London W6 (01- 
748 2812); Friday, Colston 
HaH, Bristol, (0272 291768). 



• George Benson, with the 
Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra in tew, returns to 
Wembley “in the round”.. 13 
montns after tats last trium- 
phant performances there. Al- 
though the former Wes 
Montgomery protege still reg- 
isters near the top of most 
pedis for “best jazz guitarist”, 
he now bends fats astotmding 
technique and warm voice to 
the mellifluous sonl and disco 
composition that has brought 
mm seen conspicuous inter- 
national success. Four nights 
from Wednesday at Wembley 
Arena (01-902 1234). Matinee 
show Saturday 22. 

KILLING JOKE: After a 
summer of demoralizing delays 
and postponments, the 
ran tings prophets of the 
apocalypse finally hit their 
stride. Wednesday, Mayfair, 
Newcastle (091 232 3109); 
Friday, Manchester Apollo 
(061 273 3775). 


299191); Mon/Tues, 
uddersfield Polytechnic 
, ext 685) 

HERMETO 

PASCOAWSUCKAPHON1CS: 
PascoaL a keyboardist and 
composer, is one of the senior 
figures of Brazilian music. 
Suckaphonicsr led by the 
avant-garde trombonist Ray 
Anderson, play ironic jazz- 
funk. 

Tonight, Town and Country 
Club, 9-17 Highgate Road, 
London N5 (01-267 3334) 

CHRIS BISCOE: Best known 
for his work with Mike 
Westbrook, this underrated 
saxophonist turns out to be an 
interesting composer and 
stimulating bandleader. 
Tomorrow, Triangle Arte 
Centre, Birmingham 
(021 359 3979L Mon, 100 
Club, 100 Oxford Street, 
London W1 (01-636 0933); • 

Tues. Dovecote Arts Centre, 
Stockton (0642 611625); Wed, 
Four Bars Inn, Cardiff 
(0222 483422); Thurs. Queen's 
Hotel, Cheltenham (0242 
514724) . 

BUDDY RICH ORCHESTRA: 
Although there is sometimes a 
suspicion that Rich selects his 
young sidemen from the 


nt rather than graduation 
day at Juilliard, their precision 


playing forms a suitable setting 
for the leader’s extraordinary 
drumming. 

Mon to Sat (Nov 22), Ronnie 
Scott’s Club, 47 Frith Street, 
London W1 (01-439 0747) 


OPENINGS 






. PATRICK fv'ACNrh 
DAVID ... jfMMt 
LANGTON LINDEN 
LIZ ROBERTSON V 


ILLING 
JESSICA 

THE NEW MYSTERY THRILLER 

Adautod Ov QAMIO ROGERS from the original Jet? clay 
RICHARD LEVINSON and WILLIAM LINK 


DIRECTEOBY - .- \ 

BRYAN fORBI S 

with Ni COLA MARK' • " ' DAViD>' ,v ' ’ IAN 

WANT . '-' L CAV EN rf .? G.JLUAM -TYLER 

^Angela douglas; ~ ; 

' Production Desi'er- , •* Lighting *- 

' GOODCNILD / r ■feiENN'feGANE: - : ■ 


Reduced price preview's Tbn’t, Mon & Tues £pm 

Opens Wed 19 Nov 7pm : 

SAVOY THEATRE Frri--.onJ.11C; 

Bn. On., < & ' in.nr 0WI68AW.ee QX- 3 7 Q nZ !■». OtAldUlD 



Floozie and sleuth: Joanne Wbaliey and Michael Gambon pay a fantasy visit to the 1940s in The Singing Detective 

Sweet songs in sleazy bars 


SELECTED 


LONDON FILM FESTIVAL: 
Attractions this week include 
Mumau’s silent classic 
Nosferatuin a restored tinted 
print with live musical 
accompaniment (today, 5pm 
and 8pm); Bertrand Bust's 
nose-thumbing farce Tenuede 
Soiree (Wed and Thurs); and 
Ken Loach’s Fatherland, 
written by Trevor Griffiths, in 
which an East German singer 
reluctantly <35mes to the West 

National Film Theatre (01- 
928 3232) and other venues 
(daily Information 01- 
633 0274). 

SMOOTH TALK (15): 

Absorbing sensitive account of 
an idle teenager’s sexual 
awakening, with a fine 
performance by Laura Dem. 
Directed by TV documentary 


maker Ji 
Renoir (I 


S alient facts about Dennis Potter 
are his bitter-sweet childhood in 
the Forest of Dean, his deep 
affection for the popular songs of 
the 1930s and 1940s and a 
crippling skin disease called psoriasis 
which still, despite the best available 
drugs, lays him low for several weeks a 
year- 

Put these elements together and you 
have the framework for his new six-part 
television play. The Singing Detective. It 
is not an autobiography. Potter's plays 
never are. at least not quite. Bui as so of- 
ten happens, he builds his fiction from 
ihe bricks of his own experience. 

This is most cogent in the central 
character, who has the same skin disease 
as Poner and spends his time in a 
hospital bed looking like some festering 
mummy. He is called Marlow. Philip 
Marlow. If he had been called Chris- 
topher, he ruefully remarks, he might 
have been a better writer. 

As it is. he takes his cue from his near 
namesake (Raymond Chandler's Mar- 


lowe had a final “e") and writes cheap 
detective stories. And not only that. 
When his temperature goes up, his mind 
wanders and he lives out his fantasies in 
a film noir world of sleazy bars and no- 
good dames. 

The suitably convoluted, sub-plot of 
The Singing Detective concerns decep- 
tion and murder and a body fished out of 
the Thames, with Marlow’s alter ego, a 
nightclub crooner, called in to solve the 
crime. 

To these two layers. Potter has added a 
third, in which the hero relives his 
formative years in what seems a fair 
approximation of Potter’s own Forest of 
Dean. His granddad coughs up coal dust 
and there are tensions between an easy- 
going father and a determined mother, 
who. like Potter’s mother, plays the 
piano al the social dub. 

.As in Pennies From Heaven. Potter 
uses period songs to counterpoint the 
story and bring out its ironies. “Don’t 
Fence Me In” from Bina Crosbv and the 


Andrews Sisters soars over the trees as 
tbe boy Philip savours his short-lived 
freedom and “Cruising Down the River” 
offers a lyricism and peace that the 
embattled Marlow will never know. 

Without the music The Singing Detec- 
tive might be hard to take. “Sweet and 
sharp and sad and funny,” as Potter 
decribes them, the songs not only 
provide an escape route for the hero but 
give the audience a respite from what 
would otherwise be a tale of almost 
unrelieved hopelessness. 

Michael Gambon, a television Oscar 
Wilde and currently with the National 
Theatre in the farce Tons of Money, pi ays 
Marlow. Janet Suzman is his ex-wife, 
Alison Steadman his mother and Joanne 
Wh alley from Edge of Darkness has the 
dual role of tbe nurse who soothes 
Marlow’s sores and the night club girl 
who feeds his fantasies. 

Peter Waymark 

The Singing Detective starts on BBC1 
tomorrow, 9.05-1 0.1 5pm. 


husband taking up residence - 
with his wife's new lover. 
Chelsea (01-351 3742), Renoir 
(01-837 8402), Camden Plaza 
(01-485 2443). 


DANCE 


JOEL HALL DANCERS: from 
Chicago return to London with 
two programmes of jazz 
ballets. Opening night (Mon) 
contains two works new to 
London. Season continues 
until November 29. 
Bloomsbury Theatre, Gordon 


-ii i:;:, ok nviM c.': fmz ■ i 1 


ROYAL BALLET: shows some 
of its young casts in The 
Sleeping Beauty this week: 
Bryony Blind this afternoon, 
Ravenna Tucker tonight and 

Co vent Garden (01-240 1066) 

SADLER'S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: gsV&STheSnow 
Queen at the Apollo, Oxford 
(0865 244544) Mon-Wed, 


Swan Lake there Thurs Nov 22 
and today at the New Theatre, 


n 1 1 {» '//K 



LONDON FESTIVAL BALLET: 
visits the Grand Theatre, 
Leeds (0532 45931) Mon Nov 
22 with Frederick Ashton's 
production of Romeo and 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


BARBER DRAWINGS: First 
showing outside Birmingham 
for important collection of old 
master drawkigstrom the 
Barber Institute. The 38 works 
Include examples by Holbein, 
Van Dyck, Turner and Degas. 
Morton Morris and Co, Bury 
Street London SW1 (01- 
930 2825) from Thurs. 

LAURA FABER: Highly 
coloured quality paintings, 
often of New Yom skylines, by 
young British artist influenced 
by Clemente. 

Gattery 24, 24 Powis Terrace, 
Westboume Park Road, 
London W1 1(01-221 8289) 
from Wed. 

G ELIAS: Retrospective of 
graphic art by the 70-yaar-okJ 
Viennese artist Gertrude Elias. 
Midland Group. 24-32 Carlton 
Street Hockley, Nottingham 
(0602 582638) from today. 


SELECTED 


RODIN: Major show exploring 
the dose relationship between 
ihe old master Auguste 
Rodin's drawings and 
sculpture. 

Hayward GaBery, London SE1 
(01-9283144). 

PAINTING IN SCOTLAND: 

by Ramsay, Raeburn 




quality of workmanship and 
inspiration that came out of 
Scotland during Its 
Enlightenment 
Tate Gallery, London SW1 (01 
821 1313). 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


LAND, FAY GODWIN: 

Haunting, mystical British 
landscapes with just a dash of 
romanticism by contemporary 
photographer, Fay Godwin. 
Extraordinarily, man is 
banished from Godwin's 


(bookings" 


FIRST CHANCE 


DECEMBER AT THE . 
BARBICAN: Highlights incite 
concerts with John Wrfliams, 


v-iit:-vic<n i wrvm rs; rv 


Dankworth, Cieo Lalne, Robert 
Tear and Benjamin Luton. 

Also Howard Blake's The 
Snowman, conducted by the 
composer. 

Barbican Centre, Silk Street 
London EC2 (01-628 8795) 
(credit cards 01-638 8891). 

FASCINATING AIDA: 
Performances at South Bank, 
directed by Nica Bums. Dec 
26-30. 

Queen Elizabeth Hafl, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191) (credit cards 01-928 


LAST CHANCE 


JE SUIS LE CAHIER: Over 250 
pages from 45 of Picasso's 
sketchbooks. Ends Wed. 

Royal Academy of Arts, 
Piccadilly, London Wl . (01-734 
9052). 

THE MAN WHO MISTOOK HIS 
WIFE FOR A HAT: Last 
performances of new chamber 
opera by Michael Nyman. 
Today and tomorrow. 

ICA Theatre, Tbe Mafl, London, 
SW1 (01-930 3647). 


For ticket availability, 
performance and 
opening tones, telephone 
the Bombers listed. 
Theatre: Tony Patrick 
and Martin Cropper; 
Radio, television and 
films on tv: Peter 
Waymark; Concerts: 
Max Harrison; Opera: 
Hilary Finch; Filmy 
Geoff Brown; Galleries: 
Sarah Jane- Checkland; 
Jazz: Richanl W Attains; 
Rock: David Sinclair; 
Photography: Michael 
Younc Bookings; Anne 


i 


i 


r 

























1 " ■ 



THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 1 5 1 986 

ENTERTAINMENTS 



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LUNCHTIME SERENADES 

lift • Tuesdays at 7 . 1 Opm 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HAH 


MONDAY NEXT 17 NOVEMBER al 7J0p-m- 

ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY 

Conductor. LASZLO HELTAY 

Bruckner TE DEUM 

Mendelssohn HYMN OF PRAISE 

See Sooth Bank panel for further Jeuik 


s? 

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P PHILHARMONIA 
Q ORCHESTRA 

Principal Conductor. Giuseppe Sinopoli 

MARISS YANSONS 

conduca 

Tuesday Ken 1 8 November at 730 

ROBERT COHEN 

Prokofiev. Symphony No. 1 (Classical) 
Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme 
Rachmaninov Symphony No. 2 
Txteupso.&X, £UAjC?./m£U >,£IZ 

Saturday Ken 22 November at 730 

ELIZABETH HARWOOD 
PENELOPE WALKER 
IAN CAJLEY DAVID WELSON-JOHNSON 
PHILHARMONIA CHORUS 

BEETHOVEN 

Symphony No. 8 

Symphony No 9 (Choral) 

Tate* &X, fl.50, tfJSO, £7. 48 , &, i!2 (oolyL 

• * m • 

Monday 24 Kounnber at 730 

BERNARD HAITINK 
MIKHAIL PLETNEV 

(Pfcase note change of soloist) 
Rachmaninov Rhapsody on a Theme of Pa g ani ni 
Bruckner: Symphony No. 4 

Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 

Tkta= £*.£*, £7MJP. C}0.p2, £1 \L IS 
AvaiUUe too HaO (01-928 3191) CC (01-928 88001 


RAYMOND GUSBAS prewats at ihr ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SUNDAY 30 NOVEMBER at 730 p Jn. 

.BARBER OF SEVILLE OV. 


Y- s 



# 


B WATER MUSIC SUITE 

Grieg PIANO CONCERTO 

Beethoven- SYMPHONY No. 3 (EROICA) 

LONDON PHILHARMONI C ORC HESTRA 

CotxJnoor JAMES JUDD VOVKA ASHKENAZY pano 

fl.iS.tftJiO.XgJg.sq.fl&SO.Ol.W H1D01-928M9I CC. 01-928 8600 




RAYMOND GUBSAtprestaa at It* ROYAL FESTIYAl. KA1X 

SUND AS 28 DECEMBER at 3 pm & X38 pm 

JOHANN STRAUSS GALA 

J JOBAKW STRAUSS CWCHESIRA 

Dircoed fiwn the Violin by JOHN BRADBURV 
. ANI SE JAMES goproo 
GERALDINE STEPHENSON ttamte 
JOHANN STRAUSS DANCERS 
in (be conmtts of xhe period 

Ana’s Life 

r— — :itg.a.nSiwiuiiuo > »Mt™i»' ccdi-mmi 



* IS - 




Royal Albert HaD 

Satorday 6 Docemher at 3M pm and 730 pm 

CAROLS FOR CHRISTMAS 

i»«y MW* EwdinaCUUrM* Bo*|«al Appeel , 
OSIAN ELUS harp TRISTAN FRY percusaon 
TOM ELLIS tenor 

DANCERS FROM THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF 
DANCING; 

ENGLISH BRASS ENSEMBLE 
MALCOLM HICKS oigan ; 

ENGLISH BAROQUE CHOIR; 
HABERDASHERS’ BOYS CHOIR 
London Pro Arte Choir The Wauwtey Smgers 
CoodiKtor LEON LOVETT 

m 

Lort^ N^7 2D (U,^ 2^. 


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SLINDAY5 7 ft 21 DECEMBER « i» pjn. 

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SIR DAVID WILLCOCKS gg | 

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low 6 n hahdb. ORCHESTiu: R. Qoodrean Br./Ffrpcna 
UAK oy AtataaV indudmg Uown e Ftmomone Wetnwra 1 . 11 . 
1 1 1. Concert) op B Noe 3 end 9 lor 2 00 oes.SU. com. Concerto m Clw 

ftrp), 3 ooom. bassoon A com.. Bonua i b m G mm tar sb op 2 Fta 6 

fe es C4.C3 London HMtaet Onmestra 


Monday 


nerd 17 November iu 7 JO p-m. W%»areftall 

London Recital by baHan PlaMH 


CLAUDIO CRISMANI 

■Trodom ■ bounfufly rich end tatpog u»e hy an mifxcMvcly fumaOs and 
H rill—tw in±ruquc-7 (jcfuvadrni ™xj 
USZTi Sfamlnm D IVatcnpo,) Pmurd) Somcb inn Seoxid Yew 


of IMplrtaj^- 

SCRIABIN) Sorom No.Sop5i 
BART Okie Pomo Pin** uvxn Btuchemf* Mr 
13M. O W. f. 4 , 00 . £A 30 Bax Ofi5ocOI-9K 2N1 
Ron Gonudva /KJLWor CdOccn Mana*«nrnt 



Friday acta 21 Nowrobcr at 748 pm WiRUHU* HaD 

Redial by die Czccfa PWb 

RADOSLAV KVAPIL 

■-Hi* r nr ,rm T Jot* *f ho C*wi cowpairw Manaa ... jo o-Pumtc 
rtftimnE." (New Yorit Tnnev 

Works by Mendelssohn, Liszt, janacek, Mardnu and 
Smetana: Caxh Dances 
Dvorak Dmnka and Funaot 

£2aB.£iOB.L*BB.t* 50 Box twice 01-9W2HI 
Seven MnscvTUmor Coacert Ma n*A»mcm 


j gSj l 

lS3sZ2a 


WIGMORE HALL Wntaady^Nartnlari 

the brilliant young soviet pianist 


730 pjn. 


MIKHMLPLETNEy 


GoM Medal Winner-. ^ Tdidhonky CoaqKOwm. Mwcow, 1978 
BEETHOVEN: Variations on a Theme of Saben 
BRAHMS: Sonata No 3; 
RACHMANINOV: Etudes Tableaux; 
TCHAIKOVSKY: Concetti Smtfi ; TfeNuiciacker 

£s £4. Ah LA '"tt” Bbb 9®Ef' 1 L iS. , ^5j' HI 

Mnapnrnft BBSS A TILLETT LTD 


The Wamridt Am Trust. 33 Warm* Sqowe. PMdku. Len d go SWI 2AQ 
Charnmn Milum Grundy AdtamtSOSW CaOmn Ron 

Two reach in Si Gabridli dunb, Warwick Square, SWI 
TUESDAY NEST IB NOVEMBER at BAD pm. 

A redial by (he 

BEAUX ARTS TRIO 

Haydn; Tno hi G Rarefc Trie b A mmor Sdiubeits Tno mEte 
Tididv SO end ft (nc ss £fi£0 
THURSDAY II DECEMBER m, 7 JO pm 

THE CHOIR OF 
WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL 

.Vtottr of Muse. David HiH Oijtait Jatnes O’Donnell 

wob 40 mur mnrmaJ nneuihh from rjw Royal CaSrjrc el Made 

A concert of Vcaetiau Rnem ffletahag atato by 
Gabrieli, MoBtcrcnli and Scfaua 
Tkken: /4.50 aal £bff) 

T Viwt ambblr bom ibe Ad ut umawf, 33 TanritX Squnc, 
London SITIV 2AQ 
Ai&Kerpboof lOI| 8 Vl rHSfc 


aaa barbican hall • 

■■11 8'arbican Centre, Silk St. EC2V8DS. 
Wll 04-638 8591 76288795 . 

Telephone Bookings: I0am-8prn 7 days a week 

Cwrei r^xs»j*d_by Vir Cb'^c«4l<i."<cl ir»C'1yW londoo'. 


tsagff 

IS NO* 

730pm 


5wi(BKMatw*aM9dWnefllyni}Mpmis 

GLBERT a SULLIVAN ODyty Carta. BBC Cancan 65v 
FfaaarGoukBnscona/ Emeomnci MAMd. Cmxtios. 

Piraies if. Pmxancr, Yeomen gl M Caom WanUw. ana m«£ 
PnHote Hs^noooGuotj, lc 

C 11 50 C1C50.C950.C8 C8S0.CSS0 . anOBBC tew 1 


Tumor OPERA SMGAUMG In NUd RDM! MadamyM Mimic AppM 
MNm Fund. Muse trom Faust Cm"*" “ TnNaw». La Tiana'a. 

XOQpn Nabuceo. Aida db. Royal Acadamyol MuaK Optra Cttonn & 

Qreh. Ucboiaa ciaobury /coni) Sotoess 
AD W3K CAS0 _ bon im7i Raymond GwOba,. LB 


Tamar 

KNn 

730pm 


LONDON PHLHARM0WC ORCHESTRA. CftrtMOphar Adey 

icondl Plata Lane (punoi Smaoma; Ow The BanetM 

Handan Muse a* a* Row Fewone Baatlmvwii Pa^. c«ww 

Nob Empfsor Tftjaditctreinr; Synsmany No 6 PaniMtaue 
C11 50 riObO. M M Ca. C 6 50. C5 50 Riymone Gutoa. 


Tua 

UNO* 

lOOpm 


JOHN ull BaatnoMD . 

8 ttai.Os 2 ? Np lb m D Oo ZB 

imacr ifis Stadem&andQAPyg 


SondiM.NOlT m 

ALL SEATS C2 

K3rpa>*aTL!3 


Tua DON LUSHER BIG SAMI 

18 Nov A TFBBUTE TO THE GREAT SWMG BANDS 

Z*epm KENNY BAKtA T05WY WHITTLE. SHEILA SOUTHERN 

C7S0.C630._CS. £3 Dpnx. BotJioa ttouxnvw Lx 


MM WTERHAIIONAL LUNCHTH* CONCEHT. Rytatg Wh, Crtung 
W No* ihiqmii janaBMM F aiama n ipmnoi B n wm a ; Sdtcigo m C nw 
LOOpm Bnrrok. Sonata No 2 . 

ALL SEATS E3. inn RMium fttotageme-d Lre 


■ NO* 

lospm 


BEETHOVEN EVENMG. TMSO. JWm B*an icondj Lotos 

□emMua ANaria [^uno]. Or. No 3 . Piano Careens 

Auretawr Csreea 


NO 4 SymOJKrtV NO ! 

CB.5C, C7. CSSQ. £4. E2S0 


Thu LONDON 57W > H0NY0WIB7RA.IMMal < TlNon-Tno>nat i nrT!. 
20 Nov BanNa MManta. ABrerta Hodgaon. Arthm Davtaa. SOrtorg Deary 
BOOptn Pra Mualea Chtaua. SuMtaky: 5ympnonv of PMimj 
D ataho mn- Sytitahowy No 9 CnoraJ 
erobo. cssc cfe^o. ca. cj to oner s&y*o*ijo,3i f n 


Frt 

21 Nov 

LOOpm 


JOHN UU-Baafftovan Piano Suoata Cycta. benaus no lb m 
Oo43Noi.No20mG.Qp49NaS Nc?*.nF 


G mmor. __ 

Opi8.N02BmA.OpWi 
Under ten students and PAPs C? 


wwrp. 
ALL SEATS C 3 

Harec myrLsc 


FYI BSTHOVEN- PftiataniMniaOrGtiMra. MCtiolas duobtry 
21 Nov icondi Baaux Art* Trio. Baetmxan, Ov Egmom Tn;ie 
7 45pm Concerto S/mohony No 3 Emca Haytnora Gvoodv L/e -n 
£12 SO. £ 11 . EYJO £8 C 6 SO. C5 anx uvnLWcr Am Lr; 


SM 

22 Haw 

BHOptn 


MUSK FnOHS^UN Lore 


i PnNhvmomc Orrttootre Jan 


Lat hlin K u am o icondi C mtaHlo ra/w naa i igLJw broqmc 
Faaa;Fhtual Foe Dance. 3 Ounces horn Tree* CorrenM mai 

O aW r; Espara Ravel: Bde*o Rodripo: Conoeno se A/areue? 

£11 SO CW5C £950 £ 8 . C6.S0. CS SO Baymqrj Gjtta, 


Sun LONDON SYMPHONY tiRCftSTHA Ondo Anbwta .cendt 
23 Nov VUdorta Mullova ivtafcni Marla Ewing isooranc) Ctaotfa EOer 
130pm iiwlboi London Symphony dionia. Dabussy: PnHuce a 
IJpres-trwi (Ton tune Brahma: Vntn Concerto m D Op 77 

DaUunr-LAOemoaeWeAie ttena 

£13 £11 C7.CS ONLY jaw ROMS ComauLw jggjt 


Tua LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. CttaiOKiAbOada.cci^ 

25 No. Rudolf Sertdniptanol l^ndMwomt: O. CatmSejano 
7.45pm PrtKoereus vonge MBtat Pune Concern: No :B m B lUi 
W456 P aMhOtm: Svtnoreny No 7 Soon* SneVVK L-r,»c 
Part w ft*> lorn sneo-LSO Mammal tm CD s? c; only. 


28 NOv 

Z45pm 


IOIIEM ORCHESTRA OF UJHDOH. Jaort Kaopizyk lysna. 

|>MataalCo»naicareta i| wamtar 0» 'Tannnatsermm 

^ Symphony No 


Ctarmel Conoeno NO 2 _. 

C9 5ft.CB5Q.C7S0 C6S0 £5 C4 


SsorsoKOst 
Caotta/flaaoUe 


Tim MONTEVERDI CHOIR. EHGUSH BAROQUE SOLOK75 John 
27 No. EBoiGardUim icondj SyMaMGMur.Omna Montague. Andteny 

ZASpm Rod* Johnson. Cometan Hauptmani. Mozart: Kyne m □ 

nwiot. K341 Svntaremv No 31 nD. 'Pans. Mass m C inxi 
CTI50. CW50. C950. £8 ES50. CSM^_Soons DresccerSamt 


m 

28 NO. 
745pm 


NELSON MASS. Cay ol London Smtonre. Rteted Htcfcox 


Cedfta. Op 27. Serenade (a imoi. hom ana sanngs Op 31. 
HaymtUaumDramoi medon. Soonsomooy 

C9.C7S0. E650.C5.C4.C3 John Lama Constructor La 


Van Walsum Managemen! presents 

INTERNATIONAL LUNCHTIME CONCERT 


ISO 


,\e>- V.TCM-5SDAV « ONE 

S*~ ascwik : C r 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA Bjrhtcart 


Thmsday 20 November S.UOpm 

Pnicrammc aicludo. 

BEETHOVEN 

SYMPHONY No 9 (CHORAL) 

BENT1A V4LENTE ALFREDA HODGSON 
ARTHUR DAVIES STAFFORD DEAN 
MICHAEL TILSON THOMAS conductor 
PRO MUSiCA CHORUS 

Sponsored by GKN 

Seat Prices £10 JO, £8.50, £6.50. £5. £3.50 ONLY 


LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

CLAUDIO ABRADO 

conductor 

Sunday 23 November 7-50 pm 

VIKTORIA MULLOVA 

£13. £11. £7, £5 ONLY 
Tuesday 25 November 745 pm 

RUDOLF SERKIN 

£7, £5 ONLY 

Sunday 30 November 7.30 pm 

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY 

RETURNS ONLY 

For full programme details see Barbican panels above 


Box Office Tel. 0I-63S 8891/628 8795 


Wednesday 19 November 7.45pm 

BEETHOVEN EVENING 

Overture ‘Leon ore No 3’, Piano Conceno No 4 
in G, Symphony No 5 in C minor 
LOUIS DEMETRIUS ALVANIS Piano 
JAMES BLAIR conducier YMSO 

Seau £2.50, £4, £5.30. £7, £8^0 01-638 8891/628 8795 

rl Unilever litter n 


jj St John's Smith Square 


Toned 
IS No. 
7 JO pm 


Moretay 

17 Nd. 
1 pm 


TwwHp 
18 Nor 
7 JO pm 


181 

1-38 P» 


201 

7pm 


T m wtay 
25 No. 
■pm 


idiMneh. conn ttMoa 

mezanoo ~ 

Minnie mu 


?H-\ Dsw.oc Tiui D<r. i,. 1 '. 

■1T2 C.:.-; M;'.;.;-rr: ’.!irr.-vpn'' 

i Ait sii 


_ ORCHESTRA OF LONDON. HfcMM 

FUw 5 Bntw)i Mday jo* CMhartno 

Three L4ta> Mqmk Btam Pasoraruie 

are Domna £<. Q 


■Y.Mufe SCHOOLS cwuSeh ohchestra ■ 

Way Oman muon 5 JotwUtan vans, an Schuant Symphony 

no 5 Raredu: fomaa on LRotnme arme list pert i VMnMre: Tnree 

DtrereorB|lapert)VreurKorgMtguCft( Ct ai .n Tt»(yanoiC3 £2.tl 


daEmr«xiW£CONCBir 

MPCHML PiETNCV ouno 
TdulKoreky: TnM iwch hom op 72 
E2S0 


THE HANOVER BAND Hoy 300 


Ja re Gray 


i titoaor w Mtfvyn Twi 

Itonepwoo Wtba 2 oan a paren i Conewi wmmt Ct/r^oe Abu 

Husan. Pwto Concetto No 2 m Elat Sympnonyre imCiiflari 

£6 50. ESSO iA 60 C350 NetinwiMar 


Bneaemen 

^OEFflCY &ABA pa no ftuaU M Wtt 5l, B»qaWif» OP unt 

Sonaia OmHokE SonJia m Chte Mowwttr ,\iK Pteertxat 

BtmmtuQnloqa: Ro»nMW«her FarCMy TchMtankyiGrarart 
Ftawer WMH (Nutcracten £5 SO. t< 5a E3 50, £250 


TWwrfY COLLEOE dF M1WC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Bernard RaMtacreta MMWt Sympnony no 36 i/hjgtwi 

Staauct Don Juan Bmtolc Concerto tar Orcnasva 1 190) 

Adnaugn tree taPtatii icier 


THE SALOMON ORCHESTRA EddMM CoMMita Cona JMM EJOtan 
kop Caere. Miilmun Omr. ren. John Comwa pass Schubert 

l>arture Ftoorwireta 0644. BMW T4I EidenapiW op 28 Wegner: 

Db wsatuire Act i CS.CS. U The Sehmon acnesea 


STJOHVS Strwh Square 


TUGS NEXT 18 NOV. 7 JO pm 


THE HANOVER BAND 
WEBER 

20M A n n lr r r yAry Birthday Cuaeen 
uidwnta 


4ms 

Pare Cooanri Xa 2 
,-Uapu & Koado Mr pano & an±osa 

MELVYN TAN fonepiano 

See Sc John'* Panel for Tull details 




QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


TUESDAY NEXT 18 NOVEMBER « 7 AS pjn. 

THE LONDON CONCERT CHOIR 

Conductor DONALD CASHMORE 

MOZART CONCERT 

MASS CS C MINOR BC7: CHURCH SONATA K278j VESPERS Ki21 
G«Qiaa Rther. Lana Anderson '«p*i Susan Maeon euoui 
Andrew King nenori Michael Gcoc*e i ba» , Andrew Lucre ■ otpm? 

LONDON BACH ORCHESTRA 

Th*eu: a K, i.4 T5, £5JS. £6.75. £o.W Irooi RFH Boi Office 
01-428 3141 Ocdn Caith 0!-428«8tt)i Aprnc. 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
Tomorrow afternoon 3.30 pm 

TOSCA 

Concert version - with some acting. 

Vivaldi Concertante: 

Riona Faram (Tosca), Robert Crowe 
(Cavaradossi), Leslie Fyson (Scarpia), 
Gyles Stephens, Alan Rice, Thomas Johnson. 

Children of the Royal Opera House. 

Pro Musica Chorus - Conductor Joseph Pilbery. 
'£3-£10. 

01-928 3191. 

Sponsored by Pegasus Holidays 


EXHIBITIONS 


AZULlUOS ore uiohUm Ule her- 
ttw pi Portupal 1600- 1986. 
Thf Mon mirlquirta PXTUblUoo 


in London' OOa Borturpn Cpp- 

mnt oi-ftsa aiai 

218/US. AO 
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MATM4ML tVCSTMUtSTCM AXT 

OSMN1W. Annual ExNSauiem al 
Uw QuUdhan An GMtary 
1721 MmniNr. Open lO am - 
4 pm. 


OPERA & BALLET 


CO M BUm 8 9056 9161 CC 
240 52 SB 

ENGLISH NATIONAL OHM 
Toni, Tur 7.30 Cw* and Pad 


RAYMOND GUBB AY presents 

at the BARBICAN 

TONIGHT at 7.30 p.m. 

MAGIC OF D’OYLY CARTE 

GILBERT and SULLIVAN 

BBC CON CERT ORCHE5TR.A CondwMn PHASER GOULDING 
Kctmnh Saadferd, John Ayldw, Mcuu Reid, 
UicuirDuslin, Vmtaw Tjowj, Lereaiar Damru, 
Purina Leonard and fell chonu 
EiK^a::<o MIKADO. GONDOLIERS. PRATES 
OF PENZANCE, YEOMEN OF THE GUARD, 
KKLAVTHE, aojHMS MN AFORE. 
fS SS.iPrn-iA l 3 4a £10 V>.£H W 
Fronmd ta ^nodiriog with BBC Radio i 


ROYAL onu HBMt Ol f4p 

!«*/ 1911 SMMI MM 8 M 
LAOS % CC. TIC km £l- 
ES2JOO/L 1M0 Mala. IRaBNI £2 
S40lOp«ral WAMMMh4VUI 
on the day 

Toy 230 & 7.30 UK ROYAL 


bum cmmlolo. Of 240 Wig 
mod 7M TO ROYAL OPERA 



TOMORROW at 7.30p.m. 

Smetana THE BARTERED BRIDE OV. 

Handel n „.KOYAi. FIREWORKS MUSIC 

Beethoven PIANO CONCERTO No. 5 

(EMPEROR) 

Tchaikovsky -SYMPHONY No. 6 

fPATr 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORC1 

Cccdft."«: CHRISTOPHER ADEY PEERS LANE pano 
£5.».Lfc.5C 1 tS.±‘> 30.O0.W.LI: « 


FRIDAY NEXT 21 NOVEMBER at 7.45 p.m. 

BEETHOVEN 

Egroont Overture-, Triple Coocertft; 
Symphony No . 3 (E roxca) 

BEAUX ARTS TRIO 

HCLH.UIMOM* ORCHtSTBA Coniua MCHOL1S CLEOSURY 

£5. to 5 a £8. £11. 112-SJ 

alioawkbLoadQn ArUMtx 



SATURDAY 22 NOVEMBER at 8 p.m. 

MUSIC FROM SPAIN 



Falla 

Butt .... 


Rodrigo ...»..• 
Falla. 


Chabrlcr. 


Rare] 


RITUAL FIRE DANCE 

CARMEN SUITE 

. CONCIERTO DE ARANJUEZ 
..THREE DANCES FROM THE 
THREE-CORNERED RAT 
ESPANA 


BOLERO 


LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
rondft^ V' JAN LATHAM-KOENKS ESUhRDO FERNANDO Jorar 
£* SO, LtSB, £8. i<t iLi.iiaW.UI » 


FRIDAY 5 DECEMBER at 745 p.m. 
Christmas Lollipops Concert 

Suppe OV. “POET AND PEASANT* 

Grieg PEER GYNT SUITE NO. 1 

Tchaikovsky.— PIANO CONCERTO NO. I 

Tchaikovsky SUITE ‘THE NUTCRACKER’ 

WaldienTcl THE SKATERS’ WALTZ 

Tchaikovsky ...1812 OVERTURE 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
CoscjK or NICHOLAS CLEOBL'R Y ANTONI PEEBLES pure 
£5 «*. t® SO, £B . 50. £10 SO. £ 11.50 



TUESDAY 9 DECEMBER at 745 p.m. 

BARRY DOUGLAS piano 

1988 Tchaikovsky Gold Medal Winner 

^w£y ENRIQUE BATIZ conductor 

! 9. flu Beethoven — OVERTURE “LEONORENO. 3’ 
Rachmaninov ..— PLANO CONCERTO NO. 2 

Holst THE PLANETS 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

£4. £5, £Z £9. £! I 

Sponsored by DHL Worldwide Eapras Royal PbUharmook 

Orchestra in associatioo with Raymond Gobbay LnL 



SUNDAY 14 DECEMBER at 3 p.m. 

THE GLORY OF CHRISTMAS 

Prog. toe. Handel Lsjjtv Arrival of (hr Quito of Shctu; 
For L'nioL'iMcssab. Bach Air on ihtr G Smnf;. Charta 
,-y^i frtci :hr Chranmi Otstono. jau, Joy of Man's Dcsinng; 
[ P. flPi Bizet Asnu Da. PnrceU Trmnpct Tuix red Au. 

Clarke Trumpet Volusup.'. BachJGoimod Avc Marts; 
Franck Pina Angdicus. Carols for Choir; 



Boy* Choir and Andirece. 
DNCERT ORCHESTRA 


LONDON CONC 

CooduaorPHUJP SLUMS ALBERTO REMEDIOStcaor 
CRISP IAN STEELE-PERIONS inunpet 
LONDON CHORALE RING’S HOUSE SCHOOL BOYS CHOIR 

LH 50. £5.50, £8-50. £1 50. £10.50 



SUNDAY 14 DECEMBER at 730 p.m. 

JOHN WILLIAMS’ 

CHRISTMAS COLLECTION 

Prog me. Handel Valet Music Suite; Rodrigo Coocmto 
de Araoi uez, Vivaldi Coocena rn O for Collar, 
Sammarthii Concerto re F for Dacam RceordenMyen 
Cnaiuu (Theme trim The Decrhunttrk Hamey Chnsorm 
Suite f« Guire and Orchestra. 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conduct aHmxt der RICHARD HARVEY 
£5.£I50.£ia £12.50, £15 


SATURDAY 20 DECEMBER ac 3 & 730 p.m. 

JAMES GALWAY’S 

CHRISTMAS COLLECTION 

Moeart OVERTURE, THE MAGIC FLUTE* 

Tchaikovsky SUITE FROM ■SWAN LAKE* 

Mercadame FLUTE CONCERTO IN E MINOR 

(RUSSIAN RONDO) 
Pins a lekci wo of James Galway’i Christ bus favourites, and 
Car oh for ludrence. choir and or dies ra 
BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA AMBROSIAN SINGERS 
Conductor. JOHN GEORGlADIS 
fb.f750.t1.S0. ill W.£l? 50 
CJnUrou under 16 SOAPs half pcKO(mariaeeoiily) 



MONDAY 22 DECEMBER at 730 p.m. 

KING’S COLLEGE CHOIR 

Mozart.— — REGINA COEU.X27C 

HudeLCHRISTMAS SEQUENCE FROM MESSIAH 
.CHRISTMAS CONCERTO 



Carols Toe Uim e taapmed Choir 
Csroh for Choir. Orcbarni and Audience 
ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conductor • STEPHEN CLEOBURY EDUAN DAVIES soprano 
£5. £6.50. £7. 5a £8 50, £* 50, £10.50 


BOXING DAY 26 DECEMBER at 745 p.m. 

BEETHOVEN 

Egmont Overture 
Piano Concerto No- 5 (Emperor) 
Symphony No. 5 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Cooduaor JAMES JUDD HOWARD SHELLEY pnno 
£5 50. £b SO, £ 8 . £9.50, £10.50, £11 .50 
BotOffia:. 01-628 87^5 CX. 01-638 8991 



BARBICAN TOMORROW at 3 p.m. 

OPERA SINGALONG 

far aid of the Royal Aradreny oTMulc Appeal Fnnd 
Come nd ting yow (avenrltc tnttslc from 
FAUST, CARMEN, H.TROVATORE, LATRAV1ATA, 
NABUCCO, THE TROJANS, AID A and other operas 

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC 
OPERA CHORUS & ORCHESTRA 

Cooduaor NICHOLAS CI-EOBURV 
Guesr solams: JOY MAMMEN « 

DA37D JOHNSTON saw DB 

ALL SEATS £5. SO ham FUU 0I-62887W CC01-6388»I 
Honorary Manafftncnc RAIHMONDGUBHAY UP 


VAN WALSUM MANAGEMENT 

international 
LUNCHTIME CONCERTS 

Wednendays at One at the Barbican 
Opening Concert 1986/87 Series: 19 November 

KYUNG-WHA CHUNG violin 

JONATHAN FELDMAN piano 

Nr pmn /•* Jem!,. 

Full series and subMripuon details available free from the 
Barbican, or Van Walsum Moiuacment, 40 St. Peters Rd, 
London Wti y£H <01-741 5Stil » 


INTERNATIONAL LUNCHTIME CONCERTS aKo ac 
ABERDEEN Mir*: HiH i-iM*3ll3J 

t inn Kwhim *'^7 • /■’ 5 " 1 1 

t.IiTifJTV' |>a’j5[T V\2b *•**"'* 

t'M 

Oil Hil 04oi LUTI'i 

11:1 IIjiI rreiJfiinMs 

llernzj'e 

tapin' JJm/c 07*U2*I~ 


CAMHR1DGE 
h'ASTbOL RNE 
ED1SBLRUH 
HULL 

NEWCASTLE 
NORTH A.MFTON 
SUNIIERLANU 


The Barbican Centre 


THURSDAY 77 NOVEMBER ai 7.45 pm 


MOZART 


Ktrie in D maw, K. MI: Symphony Na II, K. S7 'P*ri»‘ 

Mass in C minor K. 427 ‘Great* 

Sylvia McNair Soprano Dbaa Monngue Alczw Soprano 

VaiJm) Rolfe Johaion Tenur Caiudhn Hauptmaiui B»v> 

.Honuvcnli Chou’ The English Baroque SoJoisis 
John EUot Gardiner, Cooduaor 
| \ V Horn i-Hiioe i'l-rtW h3j 5 TvS Open Ift* me Sundiyii 

MiintrvmJi Choir and Oeehenrtt Lrd. Spwtumed by Orredncr Stank 


MPtflri «HU 27B 8916. 
m OKI Man ol lw r M re# tr Cm 
Today See Theadrra' Section. 


THEATRES 


ABGLPM 836 7611 or 240 T9 13 
M CC 741 9999/836 7388/379 
64S3 CtP Salr* 930 6123 Fire* 
e>u 24ltr 7 day CC24Q 7200 Ibko 
■eel NOW BOOKING TO MAV 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 
Nwnuv a> 7 jo Mac Wen at 2 Jo 
A Oat 4.30 6 OOO 

CkM BdataB Oww Pwr U 4J0 * S' 
"T M HAPFI YT H OW 
M TOWN" S EMwcsa 


AUMMCH Ol 836 6404/0641 or 
Ol 379 6233. Ol 741 9999 Hw 
duerd prir# Bret hm Nov 27 
Own M1M 7.O09BI 

DOtKItHY TtmHBUUM EMOSL 


STEVCM MACnrro&JI 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

DhreVd by mCHA EL SUOMAM 
A Nilinnal TttHlre ProducUoD 
-Humour ol IN beat, a rich imd 
lovinp nrodueiloB- Daily Mau -a 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 



SPORTS 

DIARY 


Wembley 

drag 


Present tension 


Double doubled 


Marcus Williams, editor of last 
year's Times book commemorat- 
ing 200 years of cricket reports, is 
not taking too neat umbrage that 
the title — Double Century — has 
also been chosen for the MCCs 
bicentenary history to be pub- 
lished next spring. There is, of 
course, no copyright in book titles 
and the greater surprise comes 
from the foot that the comprehen- 
sive Bibliography qf Cricket, list- 
ing virtually every cricket book up 
to the end of 1979, has no other 
Double Century. Presumably no 
other such important bodies in the 
cricketing field as The Times and 
MCC have reached such a land- 
mark. 


Tunes of glory 


New Zealand rugby players are 
just sentimentalists. After an ex- 
tremely physical victory over 
France in Toulouse the sounds of 
revelry could be heard drifting 
from the All Blacks' meeting room 
as they enjoyed thetf happy hour. 
What were they singing? An early 
Seventies' hit, Amariuo, the late 
Fifties’ Green Door and, I am 
reliably told. Tiptoe Through the 
Tulips. What will they sing if they 
beat France again in Nantes 
today? Two Lovely Black Eyed? 


Kiwi kith 


The home countries should feel no 
inferiority complex where the AD 
Blacks are concerned. The team's 
last two tours to France have 
included Jamie (“The Trout”) 
Salmon and John (“Kipper^) 
Gallagher, both brought up in 
London. Salmon has won caps 
with England as well as New 
Zealand. Gallagher, though en- 
titled to call himself an All Black, 
has yet to win a cap, but he will be 
among the New Zealand replace- 
ments today. More. Englishman 
Maurice Trapp is to coach Auck- 
land, arguably New Zealand’s top 
province. Taught them all we 
knew, old boy . . . 


Trots 


How can you express your politi- 
cal convictions in a country where 
political rallies are banned? The 
answer is simple: run, don't walk. 
Marches in favour of the former 
president of the Philippines, 
Ferdinand Marcos, are forbidden. 
But his supporters are organizing 
massed fun runs to express their 
enthusiasm for him. 


Star turn 


This week in a Spanish court, 
Barcelona came face to face with 
its dissident West German star, 
Bernd Schuster, who is upset at 
being left out of the squad and is 
fighting an attempt to end his 
contract. Nothing was resolved, 
the dub feiling to produce the 
certificate of so-called unfitness 
which was meant to justify its 
action. Meanwhile, the club teas 
had a £5 million offer for Schuster 
from Marseilles, which it is eager 
to grab. Schuster says he won’t go 
because there is no German- 
language school there for his 
children. The French club says 
that's no problem — be can live in 
Nice or Monaco and fly in every 
day for training by helicopter. 
Schuster still says “nem”. 


BARRY FANTON1 



‘Fre been sweeping op the mess left 
by the queue for Virgin shares’ 


The first anniversary of the Hillsborough agreement is being greeted with latter hostility 
by many Ulster Protestants — among them the historian A-T.Q Stewart 


Give us back our voice 


For the first time in II years 
smoking has been banned from 
the playing arena during the 
Benson and Hedges tennis champ- 
ionships at Wembley. Smokers 
will have to nip out to the 
concourse for a quick puff. Pro- 
tests by players had much to do 
with bringing Wembley into line 
with other indoor tournaments. 
One of the most reasonable points 
was made by the occasionally 
unreasonable John McEnroe who 
said that anybody wanting to 
watch tennis should be able to do 
without a smoke for a couple of 
hours. 


Spare a thought for Australian 
tennis coach Bob Bren who. in 
return fora percentage of the prize 
money, advises, nags and or- 
ganizes a group of players includ- 
ing Paul McNamee, Robert 
Seguso and Scon Davis. He has 
bought presents and flowers for 
his wife's birthday today but 
because the family home is in 
Lucerne and Bob is at WemUey he 
can’t be sure when he will hand 
them over. “It depends where I 
■ am,” he says. "If the guys do well, 
I don't get home, and maybe I get 
divorced. If they lose, I don't 
make enough money to get home 
anyway. Sometimes it seems a no- 
win situation”. 


If I have a grievance a gainst the 
present government it is that it has 
denied us the glamour of 
rallies, of forests of scarlet flags 
and columns of Nack-shirted men 
marching past the Leader while 
huge crowds cheer every word that 
fells from her lips. Shorn of that 
adrenalin-producing excitement, 
the bare facts of tyranny are 
distinctly unappetizing. 

I am quite aware that these 
words may offend some English 
readers. If I lived in Tunbridge 
Wells I think they would offend 
me also. They might even upset 
me a bit ifl lived in Edinburgh or 
Cardiff But. as it happens, I live in 
Belfast, and I believe them to be 
justified. I invite Tunbridge Wells 
to consider the facts. 

I am a British citizen, living in 
the United Kingdom. Yet since 
last November, as a consequence 
of the Anglo-Irish Hillsborough 
agreement I have been governed 
from a heavily-guarded, bunker- 
like building on the outskirts of 
Belfast by men who are not 
responsible in any way to the 
population of Northern Ireland. 

Since it may be the general 
opinion in England that this part 
of the world is inhabited only by 
“anthropophagi and men whose 
heads do grow beneath their 
shoulders”, 1 must make it dear 
that what applies to me applies 
equally to the thousands or Eng- 
lish people who are resident here. 

The bunker is called Maryfidd, 
and it is the headquarters of the 
Anglo-Irish inter-governmental 
conference. It is discreetly hidden 
from the main BeUast-Bangor 
road by trees and grey steel gates, 
and its grounds adjoin the Palace 


wiped off the Statute Book for 
selected groups crfBritish subjects? 

Hee, you may say, “Hold hard. 
Have you actually been disfran- 
chized?" Strictly speaking, no. If 
than should ever be another 
general election l can still vote for 
the politicians of one or other of 
the Ulster parties. Bat they no 
longer have any say in how 
Northern Ireland is to be gov- 
erned. Mrs Thatcher has gone 
over their heads and, in so doing, 
destroyed its political framework. 
The future of Northern Ireland 
will be decided by men with guns 


in their hands, simply because 
there will be no one else to do it 

“Irish policy is Irish history ” 
said Disraeli, “and 1 have no faith 
in any statesman who attempts to 
remedy the evils of Ireland who is 
either ignorant of the past or who 
will not take lessons from it” 
Would that the Prune Minister 
had read this, and i ho lig ht deeply 
about it before signing the agree- 
ment Incredibly, for so shrewd a 
politician, she believed that she 
could solve the Ulster problem 
where Gladstone, Asquith and 
Lloyd George signally foiled. 

There is, however, one possible 
way out of the Irish morass into 
winch she has plunged herself and 
her party. She might allow the 
Conservatives to fight elections in 
Northern Ireland, and urge the 
Labour Party to do the same. 
There is no other way in which the 
rule of Tom King and Nicholas 
Scott can be made democratic, or 
even legal, in the proyinceAt 
present it is under colonial rule, 
since no one living here is even 
permitted to join either of these 
parties, a feet which is probably 
not known to most people in 
Britain. 

Neither the British nor the Irish 
pnlitiral for their 

own good reasons, want equal 
R nt-kh -d tizenshipL and on occa- 
sion they try to censor discussion 
of it. But equal citizenship is a 
civil right, and they have no 
answer to it. Moreover, it would a 
offer us a way out of our sterile ' 
sectarian politics, a way honour- 
able to both communities and one 
placing no bar on their ultimate 
aspirations. 

Let no English politician point a 
finger of scorn at our sectarian 
parties while we are denied it 

The author is Reader in Irish 
History at Queen’s University, 
Belfast 






Barracks army base and a Royal 
Ulster Constabulary depot 

Less than two miles away, in an 
open and picturesque setting, the 
magnificent building which once 
housed the parliament and gov- 
ernment of Northern Ireland lies 
empty and deserted. It was the gift 
of the British people to the people 
of Northern Ireland in 1932. Now 
it is a memorial to the death of 
democracy. And even those who 
might be disposed to criticize the 
democratic record of Stormont 
should reflect on this. 

Democracy has the power to 
cleanse itself Government by 
diktat has no such power. Those 
who govern from Maryfidd are 
not my elected government Half 
of the committee consists of 
British ministers and civil ser- 


vants of the Irish Republic, who 
have no constitutional rights of 
any kind in this territory. 

At this point let me make it dear 
that I have no great personal 
hostility to the Irish Republic, nor 
any desire to interfere in its 
internal affairs. It is simply that I 
do not wish to be ruled by them, 
or. at least, as St Augustine said of 
chastity, not yet I certainly do not 
wish to be forced into an Irish 
Republic against my will since, 


rightly or wrongly, I believe its 
Catholic, Gaelic and anti-En glish 


Catholic, Gaelic told anti-En glish 
ethos would not be congenial to 
my people, any more than it 
would be to most British people. 

Secrecy surrounds all the activ- 
ities of Maryfidd. The identity of 
the civil servants is not divulged 
tod they are completely sealed off 


from the population. They are 
known to include senior officials 


known to include senior officials 
of the republic's Foreign Office 
who are flown by Irish army 
helicopter to a British army base 
inside the border. A British heli- 
copter then transfers them to 
Maryfidd. Their only contacts are 


‘with Dublin and with their For- 
eign Office counterparts. 

Bnt there is something infinitely 
worse. Not one of these people is 
in any way answerable to the 
dectorate of Northern Irdand, 
Catholic or Protestant, Unionist 
or nationalist. Yet they are making 
and enforcing laws which are 
repugnant to the greater part of the 
population. Whether they are 
good laws or bad laws is beside the 
point In this part of the United 
Kingdom democracy has ceased to 
operate. Mrs Thatcher has 
stripped one and a half mini on 
people of their democratic rights, 
and .with hardly a voice in the rest 
of Britain raised in alarm. 

The sodden loss of one’s civil 
rights is a curious sensation, and 
rather frightening. Having lived 
all my life under the British 
democratic system I am taking it 
badly. Gan it be posable in 1986 
that I can be deprived of rights for 
which Parliament fought a civil 
war and executed a king? Can the 
Representation of the Peoples 
Acts from 1832 to 1928 simply be 


Stardom, Soviet style 


I George Urban: Let me put It to 
you that the vessels of spiritual 
escape in Soviet society may 
my well be people like yomeUE 
artfats, especially muskians. 
who can say things through their 
pianos and singing and 
painting that no one else can. 
Galina Vishnevskaya: I agree with 
you entirety. I felt to be that 
symbol with great intensity when I 
sang Leonora in Beethoven's 
Fidelia — the very first time it was 
put on the stage in the Soviet 
Union. I wasn’t at first quite 
conscious of that symbol in the 
sense in which you have just 
expressed it, but as the rehearsals 
went on I realized more and more 
distinctly that this was .a libera- 
tion-opera and it was about us in 
Soviet society. 

The words I was singing about 
freedom, the conquest of injustice 
and oppression were directly ad- 
dressed to my audiences and / was 
the person entrusted by the music 
to impart them. There I was, like 
Jeanne d’Arc, standing on the 
stage of the world, calling on the 
people to release those unjustly 
imprisoned and punish the 
wicked. It was a moment that 
changed my life. 


As a principal singer with the Bolshoi Theatre, 
Galina Vishnevskaya was at the top of Moscow society. 
In 1978 she and her husband, the cellist and conductor 
Mstislav Rostropovich, were deprived of tfadr ritizensfiip 
and now live in the West In conversation with 
George Urban, she discusses the privileges and 
ideological pressures facing artists in the Soviet Union 


had just been snatched from under 
his nose by an unknown cellist 
much younger than himself His 
courting was crude and pas- 
sionate. He would send me his 
adjutants with carloads of flowers: 
ffie invitations to dine with him 
privately would pour in; he would 
telephone to urge me to sing at 
some reception or other or would 
get the Minister of Culture to 
persuade me if be couldn't 


that Stalin admired Beethoven the 
way he admired everything 
spectacular and exalted. But my 
personal feeling is that he could 
tell what a straight play was about 
— a dithering prince or a tearful 
king (as in Lear) were dearly not 
to his taste — but he was less sure 
about music. 

But one can think of another 
explanation. A believing com- 
munist audience could have per- 
suaded itself that Fidelio was 
about the Liberation of Man as 
envisaged by Lenin. . . there is no 
limit to the perversion of the 
human mind ^ to wishful 

thinking 


Did the Soriet audiences 
realize that Fidelio was about 
their ft tie — about foe fate of 
their brothers and sisters who had 
been in the camps by die 
nuUioo? 

. No, they did not. In Moscow the 
sort of people who went to the 
Bolshoi were not your men and 
women of culture. They tended to 
be people who had business in 
Moscow and felt it was good form 
to be seen at the Bolshoi, or men 
and women given tickets ex officio 
and were more or less sent to the 
opera. They were often quite 
irritated by the music which they 
didn’t understand. 

But it wasn’t only the people 
who didn't feel Fideiid's sharp 
relevance to the state of society in 
Stalin's Russia, the party and the 
government didn't either. 

In Russia, operatic productions 
go through various stages of 
censorship. At each stage the 
message, the decor, the diction 
and so on are examined for 
political suitability. Fidelio passed 
every stage of censorship. No one 
felt that Beethoven was addressing 
the Soviet oppressed masses. 


Did yon apply the same 
professional skills and 
enthusiasms to unwanted parts 
as you did to Fidelio or Aida? 

Yes, I did. Often I had to appear in 
some ghastly Soviet opera — 
Muradeli's October or 
Derzhinsky's The Fate af Man — 
where the music was poor and the 
propaganda worse. But I was 
forced to sing or else would not be 
allowed to appear in die parts I 
loved or to go abroad. Once you 
accepted the feet that you had to . 


Albert Hall before the concert 
began and more when the Soviet 
musicians entered the halL We 
were appalled by what our govern- 
ment had done. As soon as the last 
sounds died away I rushed back- 
stage. I found him wafting for me, 
trembling, with tears in his eyes. 
We left at once. Outside the crowd 
sternly parted to allow ns to pass. 
Without looking left or right, we 
went to our car. Somehow we felt 
we were criminals ourselves. 

Benjamin Britten wrote his 
War Requiem specifically wfth 
you in mind in the soprano 
part Yet yon woe not allow ed to 
leave the Soviet Uaioa to ring 
ft. 


Yon were a member of a 
charmed drde throughout your 
Soviet career. Was the cirde 
charming too? 

I found them to he a dosely knit 
circle of ordinary power-conscious 
men of crude manners, sparse 
education, a worm's eye view of 
the larger world and unspeakable 
conceit They were the tip of the 
Mafia and they didn't make much 


Yon see, Britten's Requiem was 
going to be given its first perfor- 
mance at the ceremonious re- 
consecration of Coventry Cath- 
edral; and there was the nib. 
Coventry had been destroyed by 
the Luftwaffe and rebuilt with 
German money. Our leaders 
didn’t like that When I went to 
see Ekaterina Furtseva, our cor- 
rupt Minister of Culture, she 
explained that the cathedral 
should have been left to stand asa 
monument to the honors of 
fascism. 

What is your own explanation 
of the ban? 

Britten’s Requiem is a profound 
and moving warning against the 




Rostropovich: tears 
over die invasion 
of Czechoslovakia 


of an attempt to conceal it Their 
charm was not immediately ob- 
vious, but their power was and so 
was thrir addiction to alcohoL The 
number of times I had to sing to 
the chomping jaws of our drunken 
leaders is too many to remember. 


futility of war — any war. Worse, 
the reconsecration of the cathedral 
was threatening to undo some of 
the bitterness between the Ger- 
man and British peoples, and the 
Soviet ambition was to keep the 
British and Germans hating 
another.How could that be 
achieved with Galina 
Vishnevskaya of the Boshoi The- 
atre praying for “rest eternal” and 
“light eternal” to “shine upon the 
souls” of all the fallen . 

Then there was another ideo- 
logical snag. The Soviet govern- 
ment keeps the public in a state of 
permanent mobilization. “Peace” 
is a Soviet prerogative - “war*’ 
threatens to come from the West- 
ern side only. Anti-war propa- 
ganda is, in the Soviet view, a 
Soviet monopoly. Coventry 
threatened to break it. 


Vishnevskaya: feeling 
of spiritual escape 
when singing Leonora 


Did the other singers and 
nrasJdans fed that they were 
performing dissident music? 

By the time ft came to the first 
mght most of them fell that this 
was a daring enterprise. After all, 
Fidelio had never been performed 
in the Soviet Union, and here wc 
w«e, one year after the great 
leader's death, putting it on the 
stage with our best forces. But they 
didn’t think we were in danger, 
and we werenX because the 
people s finer senses had been too 
dulled to pick up what Beethoven 
was saying. 


sing it yon couldn't do ft badly. 
Certainly, I couldn't. Rostro- 


povich, too, had this problem. He 
had to perform a lot of rubbish for 
the greater glory of the Soviet 
system. So bad Otstrakh. They 
bated h but couldn't give less than 
their best 


Soviet society takes great 
pride fa “communist morabty" 
which is Victorian and prissy 
by our standards. I find it 
s u rpri sin g that the man who 
was prime minister in that society 
should hare pressed his case 
quite so blatantly in front of your 
husband. 

Ah, but he was the chairman of the 
Council of Ministers! He was our 
master and the rest of us were 
serfs. That was his basic attitude to 
Sava and myself We were, in fed, 
lucky. Under S talin my husband 
would have been sent to the Gulag 
or handed to the executioner. 


But you started rehearsing 
FideEo while Stalin was still alive. 
Clearly the authorities did not 
expect that it would attract his 
displeasure. Why didn't they? 
There was a rumour in Moscow 


Yon relate in your book a 
particularly telling iaddeat — 
Rostropovich's appearance in 
the Royal Albert Hall ou the day 
Soviet troops occupied 
Czechoslovakia. This must have 
made a terrible demand on his, 
and your, sense of belonging. 

It did. especially as Rostropovich 
was playing Dvorak's cello con- 
certo, of all things, in the frame- 
work of a Festival of Soviet An! 
There were demonstrations 
against the invasion outside the 


Yon had, as you tell as in yoar 
book, a carious contretemps wfth 
one of Lenin’s heirs, Nikolai 
AlexamlTwirli Ralpntn j Maw tfl 
of the Soviet Union and Prime 
Minister at the time. He was, not 
to pot too fine a point on it, 
strongly attracted by your ch ar m 
and yoar singing and tried to 
wm your favours. Unfortunately 
for foe prime sinister, yoa bad 
just got married to Sava 
Rostropo v ich. 


Stalin made the famoas 
remark that communists were 
“special people”, bat probably 

he didn’t quite mean it in the 
sense in which yon have 
depicted the Soviet rating class. 
They are indeed “special people”. 
Seventy years ago they occupied 
our land and have kept electing 
and re-electing themselves ever 
since. Their images -are our new 
icons, their wishes our commands. 
They are “special” in the way all 
history's tyrants were special to 
the people who were unlucky 
enough to foil into their hands. 

A longer version of this interview is. 
to appear in Encounter. 


Bulganin was very upset because I fflmf raw 


Woodrow Wyatt 


kSnjdl 


Why it must 
be Nimrod 


Some £960 million has already 
been, spent on the programme to 
equip 11 Nimro d aircraft with the 
GEC Avionics airborne early 
warning system (AEW). If the 
government decides next month 
to buy the Boeing Awacs system 
from America this will be money 
down the drain. Awacs is an 
elderly system. It originated in 
1960, definition studies were com- 
pleted in 1968 and the first 
operational flight was in 1976. 
GEC Avionics were given one 
year, 1976-77, by the Ministry of 
Defence to complete their project 
studies. 

GEC admit to early problems 
with transmitter, and system 
integration, now generally raced 
to be overcome, and are confident 
that AEW could be fully opera- 
tional next year if the go-abeadis 
given. It would have been ready 
sooner, despite the development 
problems, if the contract had not 
been on a cost phis basis. This 
meant time-wasting bureaucratic 
procedures to upgrade inad- 
equately funded testing facilities 
and to doable the power of the 
com pater needed to drive the 
system. Changed specifications 
from the RAF ad d ed to delays. 
Not until February 1986 was a 
dear specification given to GEC 
and rival contenders. Neverthe- 
less AEW is nearly operational in 
little more than half the time taken 
fry Awacs. 

Later technology has enabled 
GECs AEW to collate the massive 
information from the radar 
sweeps about twice as fast as 
Awacs can, thus giving aircraft — 
whether land-based or already in 
flight — crucial extra time to 
pursue and destroy the target This 
newer technology also enables 
Nimrod to detect targets moving 
more slowly relative to its own 
speed than the Boeing by a factor 
of four. To begin with this meant 
that AEW saw so many more 
objects than Awacs that the 
screens blurred; now ft can in- 
stantly remove the “clutter” and 
identify the enemy target AEW is 
less likely to miss targets than 
Awacs and, being later in the field, 
has much more scope for further 
improvements. 

The Awacs system weighs more 
than 10 tons, which is why it 
requires a huge Boeing to contain 
it The GEC radar weighs only 
four tons, allowing it to be carried 
in smaller aircraft lite Nimrod 
and the Lockheed Hercules. This 
gives ft greater export potential 
than Awacs because countries 
needing an airborne earfy warning 
system will prefer the lighter and 
cheaper AEW. 

Export potential is estimated at 


Marshalls of Cambridge, experts 

in Hercules conversion. ' Obvi- 
ously time will be no «port 
potential for AEW if the RAF does 
not buy ft because overseas cus- _ 
tomers will assume that it is not ^ 
the best another gratuitous s 
present to US industry. 

. Only in Britain could a govern- - 
mem thus haver between buying _v- 
home and buying foreign- T™ "■» 
French would put our ©wesson 
with buying foreign into tlte same ^ 
class as our obsession with tbe 
minor sexual peccadilloes of poll- i- 
ririan< , and laugh accordingly. 

If the GEC AEW -is abandoned r 
more than 2,500 jobs will be.losL 
We 4i?n be out of an increasingly * 
impor tant technology forever. The 
£960 million already spent in- ^ 
chides the employment of research -t 
ream* who have collected uiuq- 
itpty vphtphle hxndedae and who, ' 
once dispersed, could not be r 
readily reassembled. : 

Awacs, with its eight Boeings, « 
would cost us a minimum, of 
$1,000 million. Completing the ’ 
Nimrod AEW programme would 
cost around half There is no - 
serious doubt that GEC can .' 
complete AEW, particularly u i it 
must pay a substantial penalty if it - 
does not When ft was allowed to 
have a fixed price target GEC 

speeded up tremendously, freed to ; 
spend money cm development as - 
it thought fit without time-wasting ' 
discussions with tbe MoD. ~ 

Boeing is making extravagant > 
offers of jobs in Britain if its a 
system is accepted. But it could ~ 
not immediately offset the jobs 
lost by GEC Suggestions from . 
Boeing that British firms wouhi - 
somehow be given p re f ere n ce m 
other defence work for the USA - 
organized by Boeing must be ; 
misleading as such purchases 


> vl 


would be subject to Washington’s 
inspection of tenders and known 


of tenders and known 
for US suppliers over 


Naturally Boeing would like 
ritain to abandon the technology 


Britain to abandon the technology 
involved in AEW and tbe poten- 
tial from it for further airborne 
early warning systems with their 
growing civilian applications. It 
would be a classic case of selling 
our birthright for a mess of 
pottage. It is not denied that 
Awacs can do more or less what 
the RAF has at last derided it 
requires, but it cannot do it as cost 
effectively as GEC AEW. 

1 am no expert but I believe that 
when George Younger, the De- 
fence Secretary, and his RAF 
experts next week see in flight the 
demonstration which I saw this 
week at GEC Avionics at Radlett 
they win agree that AEW now 
works brilliantly. It is pointless to 


around £5 billion, which could be . exhort people to buy British if the 


shared between GEC and Lode- 
heed and also bring work to 


government were to refuse to do 
so even when British is best 


Michael Kinsley 


A bad attack of 
social anaemia 


It’s rare for a work of social 
philosophy to have an immediate 
practical impact But The Gift 
Relationship, by Richard Titmuss 
of the London School of Econom- 
ics, published in 1971, changed the 
way blood was collected and 
distributed in the United Stales. 
Titmuss compared the British 
system of voluntary blood dona- 
tion with that in America where 
system in which, at tire time; 
about a third of the blood supply 
was bought for cash. He concluded 
that the voluntary system was 
both morally superior and more 
practical because transfused blood 
in America caused four times as 
many cases of hepatitis as is 
Britain. Titmuss argued that offer- 
ing money for blood attracts 
poorer, sicker donors and induces 
them to lie about their health. And 
the profit motive induces the 
commercial blood bank itself to 
cut comers in quality controL 

Largely because of the influence 
of Titmuss’s book, the US govern- 
ment took steps to discourage 
commercial Mood banks.. “Cash 
Mood” now accounts for barely 2 
per cent of US Wood supply. But 
there has been an intellectual 
reaction. Titmusssaw blood as a 
metaphor for the corruptions of 
capi talism. Lately, market-ori- 
ented scholars have been chipping 
away at his thesis. What is so 
altruistic about giving Wood, and 
thereby denying someone the 
chance to earn $50 who needs the 
money more than you need the 
moral frisson? Blood banks are a 
government-supervised carteL 
The best guarantee of efficiency 
and quality in blood, as in any 
other commodity, would be a 
competitive free market . . . 

Now a third s y st em of blood 
collection is starting to spread, 
without benefit of philosophy. 
This is so-called “autologous” 
blood, which means putting aside 
your own blood for your own 
personal use. Last week it was 
given the seal of approval by the 
American Medical Association. 
Tbe immediate cause of this 
development is, of course. Aids. 

There are few things less worth 
worrying about than rairhing Aids 
from a blood transfusion. Since 
March 1985, all' American Mood 
has been tested for Aids anti- 
bodies. The test is not foolproof 
since the antibodies don’t develop 
until a few months after a person 
is infected. But after the use of 12 
milUon units of tested Mood, there 
is only one known case of a 
recipient contracting Aids. Auth- 
oritative estimates of the risk 
range from one in 250,000 to one 
in a million. 


to buy blood, but to charge you a 
fee for raking your blood and 


To put this in pe rs p e c ti ve, an 
American has a one in 40 million 


freezing it (an approach recom- 
mended by President Reagan). 
Doctors protest in vain that when 
blood is needed it is likely to be ei- 
Iherin an emergency, wfth no time • 
to get the frozen supply, or for 
elective surgery, with plenty of 
time to store fresh blood. But 
reason is taking a baric seat. 

The spread of autologous and 
directed blood is a characteristic 
development of the Reagan era — 
a narrowing of the sense of 
community from society as a 
whole to one’s own friends, fam- 
ily, and self Economically, it’s a 
different land of step backward. If 
commercial Mood is a metaphor 
for efficient capitalism, and vol- 
untary Mood a metaphor for 
benign socialism, autologous 
blood is a metaphor for pre- 
capitalist seif-sufficiency, amen 
every family grew its own food . 
and made its own clothes- Life has . 
improved since then. Philos-, 
ophers . agree that exchange, 
whether tbe capitalist bargain or 
foe socialist gift, makes for greater, 
prosperity and happiness. 

The author is editor of New^ 
Republic. 




chance of dying in an accident for 
every mile he drives a car. If it’s 
five miles each way to tbe hospital 
and he makes four round trips to * 
store blood in advance of an • 
operation, his chance of being 
lolled on the road starts to 
approach the risk of getting Aids if ' 
he doesn’t bother. 

So why is foe medical establish- ■ 
meat encouraging autologous 
Mood? In part to increase the total 
.blood supply. In part because _ 
there are other dangers from ■ 
donated Mood, primarily hepa- 
titis. Although no one is in a panic 
about it, an American's chance of . 
dying from hepatitis introduced 
by a blood transfusion is about 
one in 2^500 — far greater than the 
chance of getting Aids. But foe . 
hepatitis rise has been there all - 
along, and no one was pushing 
autologous blood very hard until 
now. in part, then, the medical 
establishment is pandering to ; 
Americans’ chronic inability to 
think rationally about risk. 

The larger risk in all this is tbe 
erosion of the voluntary system. 
Another ominous trend is the 
growth of so-called “directed 
donations," in which friends and 
relatives collect blood for a spe- 
cific recipient. Doctors argue that 
this blood is no safer than the 
common pool, and possibly less 
safe since donors may be under 
special pressure to hide sexual and 
drug habits. An even crazier- 
development is the re-emergence 
of commercial blood banks — not 




f 



Jv .* - 


A DAY OUT OF THE COUNTRY 


1VJL10 Thatcher’s arrival at „ . 

Camp David today mustwJn *"*?** “mterim deal” which 
like an mtrusiM i”o ‘ W tt ' 0ud ' eave 100 based 
grief as the inquest 0 “ Dn * 


t 

£ W • •. 

i v. ■• 

* • 

S V- • 

£ ui=- 

vL.. . 

£ • 

£*?- 

IV •• 


1*1 K 


arms sales to Iran. But it i s to 
be hoped that such overtones 
arc not allowed to jeopardise a 
meeting which has much more 
pertinent points on the agenda. 

■ & President Reagan has, at 
• best, been extremely ill-ad- 
vised. But although critics 
have not been slow to point to 
the ironies in the American 
position, there can be no 
serious doubt over the 
continuation of Washing-ton’s 
firm line against terrorism. If 
there were, then his decision to 
adopt economic sanctions 
against Syria (partly as a 
gesture of solidarity to Britain) 
must surely have removed 
them. 

Of course, the White House 
has reasons of its own to be 
tough towards President As- 
sad, not the least being Syria’s 
hand in exposing the secret 
dealings with Iran. Whatever 
embarrassment this affair i$ 

. causing President Reagan, he • 
and Mrs Thatcher emerge very 
much on the same side. 

Whether they will find 
themselves s tandin g four- 
square on the other issues 
dominating the Prime 
Minister’s transatlantic away- 
day is another matter.- There is 
still great need for clarification 
of the precise American pos- 
ition on arms control and 
Europe following last month’s 
summit in Reykjavik — and 
Mrs Thatcher is best placed to 
do the job. It was she, after all, 
who on her last-but-one visit 
to Camp David laid down the 
four conditions for British 
support for the president’s 
. Strategic Defence Initiative. 

* In the first place, she should 
make clear European misgiv- 
ings over the prospect of a 
zero-zero deal on Intermedi- 
ate-range Nuclear Forces 
(INF). There is concern (not 
least among the US military) 
that this would leave Western 
Europe dangerously exposed 
to the superior conventional 
forces of the Soviet Union. 
With INF Europe has an 
outward and visible sign of 
American protection. From 
the European point of view the 


on either side, would be a more 
comfortable arrangement 
But if the zero option came 
about the allies would have 
only themselves to blame. 
■ Largely for purposes of in- 
ternal politics, they have con- 
stancy called upon the Reagan 
administration to demonstrate 
the seriousness of its commit- 
ment on arms control, not 
always specifying between pru- 
dent and imprudent measures 
in this regard. Accordingly, 
they publicly supported zero 
option when it was first pro- 
posed in 1981 — not thinking 
for one moment that the 
Russiams at any stage might 
say “yes”. 

- Moreover, there are many 
American Congressmen who 
suspect, not without reason, 
that the Europeans are reluc- 
tant to wave farewell to the 
American missiles because 
they would then feel obliged to 
spend more on conventional 
forces of their own. Britain has 
actually reaffirmed its support 
for die zero option since 
Reykjavik (albeit on con- 
ditions such as banning 
shorter-range nuclear weapons 
which would probably make 
the package unacceptable to 
the Soviet Union.) But how- 
ever perverse it might make 
Europeans appear in Wash- 
ington, the Prime Minister 
should make sure that this 
time the President is in no 
doubt about allied doubts. 

Secondly, she should spell 
out British concern over Tri- 
dent. Whether President 
Reagan agreed at Reykjavik to 
ban aH nuclear weapons or 
simply nuclear missiles over a 
10-year period, this Govern- 
ment must view the prospect 
with unease. It raises once 
again the prospect of leaving 
Western Europe unprotected 
by a nuclear umbrella. It 
would almost certainly pre- 
clude the supply of Trident 
missiles by the United States 
to Britain. It should be Mrs 
Thatcher’s aim today to obtain 
from the President an explicit 
public guarantee that Trident 
will remain available as long as 
the British Government wants 
it 


These contingencies are, of 
course, unlikely to come about 
in the near future, if at all The 
Soviet condition for doing 
anything big on arms control is 
American abandonment of 
SDr — beyond the research 
stage anyway. As President 
Reagan’s determination to re- 
tain SDI is receiving increas- 
ing support from American 
public opinion, it looks as if 
things will stay very much as 
they are for the next two years. 

The other area which must 
concern the Prime Minister 
today is the apparent 
determination of the White 
House to go ahead with plans 
to break out of the constraints 
of the Salt-2 treaty. The im- 
minent modification of the 
'131st B-S2 bomber to carry 
air-launched cruise missiles 
should breach the treaty which 
has been observed (more or 
less) by both superpowers 
since 1979. The White House 
protests that the Soviet side 
has already broken 'it by, 
among other things, develop- 
ing two new ICBMs instead of 
one. 

The US case cannot be 
lightly dismissed. But the 
Americans must ask them- 
selves whether it is in anyone's 
advantage to start a new stage 
in the arms race. Mrs Thatcher 
has already made known Brit- 
ish unease, so far without very 
much impact The Americans 
might be more amenable to 
European anxieties on the 
score of breaching SALT if 
Western Europe in general had 
shown the concern about 
Soviet violations that the Brit- 
ish government has sometimes 
expressed. 

Mrs Thatcher is well placed 
to repeat allied reservations 
about all these issues if only 
because British support for the 
broad objectives of US policy 
remains strong. It is arguably 
Europan em phasis on arms 
control that has led President 
Reagan to go rather further 
than anyone might have hoped 
for — still less expected. But 
this kind of transatlantic mis- 
understanding needs correct- 
ing. The job should give Mrs 
Thatcher an extremely busy 
day away from home. 


It 


t <1 

i a 


A FIGURE-HAPPY GOVERNMENT 




in 


t ^ *VV 

>■ ' : ' * i 

V* ; - 




The Government’s election 
preparations took another step 
^forward this week with the 
' announcement of an en- 
couraging batch of figures on 
the economy. These showed 
some recovery in output, a 
significant fell in unemploy- 
ment and no increase in 
inflation. 

By far the most important, 
at least politically, is the fell in 
the number out of work. 
October’s figures show the 
third successive fell in a row, 
which can be said to mark the 
transformation of a fluctua- 
tion into a trend. Much of the 
improvement is the result of 
tiie Government’s various spe- 
cial employment and training 
measures. But there is also 
some evidence of a revival in 
the economy as exports begin 
to take advantage of the grad- 
ual increase in demand from 
oil-importing countries. 
Manufacturing output shot up 
1.2 per cent in September 
aione. though the intervening 
dip left it little higher than a 
year earlier. Even if there 
remains plenty of scope for 
increasing _ productivity, 
growth sustained at this rate 
would create a good many 
more jobs. 


Yesterday’s figures on retail 
prices are less dramatic but 
better than expected with 
inflation unchanged at 3 per 
cent There is some further 
increase to come, reflecting the 
fell in the pound and the rise in 
mortgage rates. At present, 
however, there does not 
appear to be any serious threat 
to the Government’s record on 
inflation this side of the eleo 
tion. 

While these statistics gave 
the Government a good deal of 
comfort, the reefs lurking in 
the way of its election strategy 
also surfaced this week. The 
pound went through a groggy 
two days as the foreign ex- 
change market reassessed re- 
cent developments in the 
Government’s economic pol- 
icy. 

The contrast between policy 
in Britain and in Germany has 
been particularly stark re- 
cently. An election also looms 
there. But although the pres- 
sure on the Deutschmark has 
been mostly upward, the Ger- 
mans have not sought to resist 
higher interest rates but in- 
stead have allowed them to 
drift up. As to fiscal policy, the 
Germans — fer from adding 
3 % per cent to public spending 


next year — have just cut it by 
nearly 1 per cent. No wonder 
the markets have long con- 
cluded that the mark is a 
sounder currency to hold than 
the pound. 

The Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, made it dear at the 
•weekend that he would not 
hesitate to defend the pound 
by raising interest rates if that 
proved necessary. It may well 
prove necessary. The 
Government’s message is that 
raising public spending next 
year by about £5 billion does 
not imply any relaxation of 
fiscal prudence and that 
borrowing next year will be 
consistent with the existing 
finan cial strategy. The markets 
can be forgiven for a degree of 
scepticism. 

For the time being, the 
pound is still significantly 
above recent levels. This 
weekend’s meeting of the price 
committee of the Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries could provide further 
support if oil producers agree 
on a strategy to bring oil prices 
somewhere near to the Saudi 
target of S18 a barrel. If events 
turn out differently, however, 
the Government cannot afford 
to let sterling drop much 
lower. 


x4 


Ii is generally agreed that a cat 
may look at a long. But may a 
rat look at a Queen? This 
question is less abstruse than it 
sounds, because the thing 
could happen at any moment 

Her Majesty has been obliged 

to send for rat-catchers, for foe 


fourth leader 


long before her Hanoverian 
ancestors, and any suspicion 
that they stowed away on the 
ship bringing King George the 
First to England can therefore 
be confidently dismissed. 

Dismissing the rats, how- 
ever, will be a more difficult 


try blocking up the holes in 
which they lurk, only to find 
that the rats have recently 
done a moonlight flit, 
murmuring u If you knows of a 
better ’ole, go to it”; dogs, • 
ferrets, ultrasonic devices, 

to send for rat-catchers, i^nst ttaTrats’ instinct for matter. The Duke of Weflmg- 

rodents are, it js announreu, w juch for thousands ton got rid of a similar plague 

infesting the park at ban- veare has seen empires even for Queen Victoria (“Try spar- 

dringham, tempted by tne > ^ than ours wax and row-hawks. Ma’am”), but ea- 

leavings of the picnickers. leaving only the rats to gles roosting in every tree at 

If we may say so without scamper about in the ruins. Sandringham might raise 
giving offence. Her Majesty is Nowadays, moreover, you more problems Ahan they 
onahidingto nothing.. Therat ^ get a good Pied Piper for soWf. Of comse. Her Maje^y 
(the kindshe has, if 11 , ove or money, though if there could appeal m the or^nd 

common black rat is correctly g one reading these lines, wc offenders to take awayjvery 
— faim an absolute 


dined Rottus roiius, . presum- 
ably because its first ance^ r 
stammered) has sunned ev- 
ery attempt m history t 
eradicate him. 

we are sure that a 

beau in the breast of every one 

of her rat-catchers, who wrt 
strive to rid her of tta 
turbulent beast, they wdJ fau. 

They will put do ?? 1 p ?! s “I’ 
and the rats will g° b W e i ^£ 
ticking the last dropsofftor 
whiskers with 

baffled, the rat-catchers wiu 


can give — — 

assurance that there would be 
no repetition of the unfortu- 
nate events that took place on 
tiie first occasion; his fee 
would be pa id in foil the 
moment the job was finished, 
and there might even be a 
Royal Warrant to follow. It is 
true that 

Hamelin town’s in Bruns- 
wick, 

By famous Hanover city ..- 
but we can set Her Majesty’s 
mind at rest; the rats were here 


offenders to take away every 
crumb, but when it comes to 
tenacity, the rats could take 
lessons from the picnickers. 
There was also the MP who 
declared “I smell a rat - we 
must nip ii in the bud”, but 
there is no record of how be 
proposed to do it Does the 
Prince of Wales do James 
Cagney impersonations? If so, 
there might be a chance, if he 
were willing to wander about 
the grounds calling out the 
famous words: “You dirty rat, 
come out and fight!” I 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A challenge to 
the Unionists 

From Mr Hugh Munro 
Sir. Your editorial of November 
10 calls on Ulster Unionists to 
abandon their present negative 
policies and to begin to exert 
influence in such Northern Irish 
political institutions as exist 

But what if Unionism is an 
essentially Protestant political 
force, which can only act pos- 
itively if it is given the task of 
governing Northern Ireland in its 
own right without reference to the 
Nationalist majority - and, if this 
is denied, becomes totally neg- 
ative, because it cannot engage is 
compromise without disintegrat- 
ing, thus ceasing to be an effective 
movement? AD available evidence 
points to this. 

Northern Ireland was set up to 
be the political expression of a 
local Protestant majority. The 
present policy is to maintain the 
province in being, bat to do so 
while thwarting that majority 
from expressing itself politically in 
the only way it can. 

Britain can only continue to 
justify her sovereignty for as long 
as Unionism stays in being: yet 
British politicians are endlessly 
urging Unionists to abandon their 
sullen negativity and embark on 
compromise policies which would 
destroy Unionism. 

Can we - dare we — begin to 
consider that Mr Charles Haughey 
may be right; that Northern 
Ireland, considered as a separate 
political unit, makes no sense and 
that all the turmoil and bloodshed 
of the past IS years have contin- 
ued because those in office in 
Britain or Ireland did not dare face 
that brutal, necessary fact? 

Yours faithfully, 

HUGH MUNRO, 

1 Si Kevin's Park, 

Dartry, 

Dublin 6. 

Republic of Ireland. 

November 1 1. 


Funding the arts 

From the Chairman of the Council 
of Regional Arts Associations 
Sir, Claus Moser does the arts in 
Britain no favour by special 
pleading for the Opera House 
( r e por t, November 12). Of course 
we want to see a flourishing 
Covent Garden, but the problems 
Sir Claus and his colleagues are 
feeing are being feced throughout 
the country by every arts organiza- 
tion I know. 

Special treatment of Covent 
Garden will only make it worse for 
everyone else, including opera 
elsewhere. Let Sir Claus fight for 
the arts, not just for special 
privileges. 

Britain is getting far better arts 
than it deserves for the level of 
public investment the Govern- 
ment is malting. The risk now is 
that hard-won successes will be 
brought to nothing, not only at the 
Garden but throughout the coun- 
try. 

Yours feiihfrjJly, 

ROBIN GUTHRIE, Chairman, 
The Council of Regional Arts 
Associations. 

Litton Lodge, 

13A Clifton Road, 

Winchester. Hampshire. 
November 12. 


Outlook uncertain 

From Mr Reg Tail 
Sir, I doubt whether Miss Susan 
Hill's predilection for discussing 
the weather with the help of a 
French phrase book (November 
11) is now widely shared. In the 
days when postilions were struck 
by li ghtning and tweeds were more 
in evidence than bikinis, the 
purpose of Continental travel was 
cultural. 

Now that air conditioning and 
refrigeration have removed its- 
disadvantages, reliable warm 
weather has become the main 
raison d'etre of travel in France. 
Reliability has always been bor- 
ing. 

Yours truly, 

REGTA1T. 

Four Winds, 

Pebble Hill Road, 

Betchworth, 

Surrey. 

November 12. 


BBC under fire 

From Mr Max Krell 
Sir, The former Chairman of the 
Conservative Party, Mr John 
Selwyn Cummer (November 8), 
laments what he calls the BBCs 
total inability to apologised only 
it could occasionally say sorry, it 
could leave infallibility to the only 
other institution which claims it'*. 

Mr Gummer does not mention 
the name of the other institution. 
Presumably he is referring to Mrs 
Thatcher’s Government 
Yours faithfully, 

MAX KRELL, 

13 Leamington Road Villas, WJ 1. 
November 1 1. 


Putting the record straight on tapes 


From the President of the Perform - 
ing Rrqhi Society- 
Sir. Hitheno I have never man- 
aged to peruse an article by 
Bernard Levin to its ultimate 
conclusion. But today (November 
101 1 have pressed on, searching in 
vain for one missing word. That 
word is composer, without whose 
efforts there would be nothing to 
tape. Society has always put 
technological" change — be it 
compact disc or satellite dish - 
ahead of original invention. 

Unlike other commodities, 
music has neither artistic nor 
commercial value until it is heard. 
One of the ways it can be beard is 
through recordings. From the sale 
of their records, many composers 
derhea large slice of their income. 

Mr Levin may be unaware that 
last year, of the Performing Right 
Society's 16.000 writer members, 
over 10.500 received less than 
£250. Latterly their incomes have 
been steadily eroded by taped 
recordings borrowed from broad- 
casts and public libraries. 

Recently, in my local music 
library, 1 stood in a queue at a 
check-out desk reminiscent of 
those at Marks and Spencer only 
the wire baskets were missing. It 
was when my eye lighted upon a 
borrower loaded with a dutch of 
original cast recordings (including 
my own) that I ventured to 
enquire whether be intended to 
tape them. "Only those that 1 
like." came the crushing reply. 

At this point ! recalled a remark 
by my late collaborator and friend. 
A.P. "Herbert, ever vigilant on 
behalf of his fellow writers: "Je 
vats icrire une iettre au Times ”. 
Yours sincerely. 

VIVIAN ELLIS (President, 
Performing Right Society). 

Garrick Cub. 

Garrick Street, WC1 
November 10. 

From Mr Robert Hardcastle 
Sir, Having worked for the past 20 
years or so as an independent 
producer of recorded educational 
material. I was delighted to read 
Bernard Levin’s spirited attack on 
the proposed tape levy. 

Not only is he right to draw 
attention to the absurdities and 
iniquities in practice, but the point 
must be made that the proposals 
are also disastrously wrong in 
principle. For they cut right 
against the grain of English law by 
presuming guilt unless and until 
innocence can be proved. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT HARDCASTLE, 

Lawn Cottage. 

Camden Park, 

Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. 

From Mr Peter E. Andry 

Sir, May I ask Bernard Levin to 

pause for a moment in the midst 


of his apoplectic fit and consider 
one question; if an industry which 
is based on copyright cannot earn 
in full and feir measure from those 
copyrights how can it continue to 
provide what the public wants, in 
the full variety that it is wanted? 

While the enjoyment and usage 
of music, especially in the home, 
has increased greatly in the past 
few years, sales of recordings have 
declined sharply- To quote a 
recent survey, "six times as much 
music is being taped in the UK 
annually than is being bought on 
record and pre-recorded tape". 
(Music Week, November £/. Yet 
Mr Levin damns the record 
industry as "one of the richest and 
greediest of businesses". How can 
anyone thus take him seriously? 

We as a company, like the 
record industry as a whole, have a 
right and a duty to ensure that all 
income legitimately due to us is 
collected and properly used. We 
cannot collect royalties from in- 
dividuals copying our recordings 
in their homes, so the levy system 
has been devised. 

It is the blank tape buyer who 
does the copying. It is the blank 
tape buyer who should pay the 
royalty. And, incidentally, market 
research has very recently shown 
that the majority of the public 
agrees; happily they seem to have 
a keener sense' of fairness than Mr 
Levin. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER ANDRY, President, 
International Classical Division, 
EMI Music. 

30 Gloucester Place, Wl. 

From Mr David Best 
Sir. Looking at the cause of 
"illegal" taping from records may 
be more fruitful than treating the 
symptoms. 

One does not need much of a 
musical ear when listening via an 
up-to-date audio system to tell the 
difference between a commer- 
cially pre-recorded tape and one 
made "illegally" from a new 
record on to a high quality 
"blank" tape. Commercially pro- 
duced tapes are recorded hun- 
dreds at a time, at many times 
normal tape-running speeds on to 
the cheapest quality tape. The 
result is an inferior product. This 
pre-recorded tape is then sold at 
around the same price as a record. 

Surely if commercially recorded 
tapes were produced at the quality 
levels demanded by an increas- 
ingly discerning public a large 
element of the illegal taping 
problem would disappear, and 
with it discussions about the blank 
tape "levy”. 

Yours sincerely, 

DAVID BEST. 

The Garden Flat. 

1 5 Westgate Terrace. SW10. 
November 11. 


Front-line stability 

From Mr Martin Zinkin 
Sir, Your assertion ("War 
psychosis", November 10). that 
“The political wells of southern 
Africa have long been poisoned by 
black Africa's loathing of 
apartheid" is akin to suggesting 
that the political climate in pre- 
war Europe was adversely affected 
by Jewish concern about anti- 
semitism. 

What you call “short sharp 
shocks” were unjustified attacks 
on the sovereign territories of 
Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, 
Mozambique. Zambia, and Zim- 
babwe. In these raids people have 
been machine-gunned in their 
beds, Mozambican women and 
children were killed in an attack 
on a jam factory, and in a 
helicopter gunship raid on Zambia 
several members of 3 football 
team were murdered. (On the first 
of these raids one South African 
soldier was killed. His helmet was 
decorated with swastikas.) 

However, it is the long-term 
campaign of destabilization 


mounted against the front-line 
states by Pretoria that is most 
damaging to the region in politi- 
cal, economic and human terms. 
Impartial observers confirm that 
the Nkomati accord of 1984 was 
honoured by Mozambique, 
whereas the Gorongosa docu- 
ments (published September, 
1985), show that Pretoria did not 
pause in its financing, training and 
supplying of the Mozambique 
National Resistance, and that 
senior South African Defence 
Force officers visited MNR bases 
in Mozambique after the accord 
was signed. 

The basic problem in southern 
Africa, which your editorial fails 
to recognise, is not the attitudes of 
other African countries towards 
apartheid, but that of apartheid 
itself. The hope of peace and 
stability in the region whilst racists 
hold power in South Africa is as 
forlorn as the hope for peace when 
the Nazis held power in Germany. 
Yours faithfully. 

MARTIN ZINKIN, 

45 Anson Road, N7. 

November 10. 


Getting to the top 

From Miss Barbara Manning 
Sir, At the risk of being shot down 
in flames, may 1 suggest that the 
lack of success of British tennis 
players at the top flight of inter- 
national competition is due. 
purely and simply, to a lack of 
personal drive and application? 

One has read of the hours and 
hours of dedicated practice which 
(for example) Chris Lloyd put in. 
under the hot Florida sun, during 
her formative years. 

Obviously a player must have 
the basic talent to start with, but. 
as I know only too well from my 
experience as a musician, unless 
you are a complete phenomenon, 
the I - 2 per cent of talent required 
is wasted if you do not back it up 
with the necessary 98 - 99 per cent 
of blood, sweat and tears (with as 
few of the latter as possible). 
Yours faithfully, 

BARBARA MANNING, 

North Wing, 

GreenhilL 

Bramfield. Nr Hertford. 


Reading lessons 

From Mr Peter Emmerson 
Sir. One aspect of the decline in 
reading among young people, 
which the Secretary of State for 
Education does not mention (fea- 
ture, November 7), is the relative 
unpopularity of English literature 
as an examination subject among 
boys. Despite our strenuous 
efforts to recruit them, out of more 
than 350 A-level students at this 
college less than a quarter are 
boys. 

Crude sexual stereotypes are 
difficult to dislodge from the 
minds of young and old alike. But 
The society that fails to do so when 
they decree that its young men can 
do without the civilizing effect of 
its great literature is a society that 
faces a bleak future indeed. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER EMMERSON, 

Solihuli Sixth Form College. 
Widney Manor Road, 

Solihull, 

West Midlands. 

November 11. 


In common currency 

From Mr John Keytvorth 
Sir, I am writing concerning the 
recent correspondence in your 
columns (October 4, 13, 18, 27. 
November 4, 10) about the earliest 
use of the £ si g n . 

When, in July 1694, the public 
subscribed for Bank of England 
stock the would-be stockholders, 
or their attorneys, made the entry 
themselves in the bank's books. 
Many of the entries — the 
subscribers numbered over 1,200 
- include a pound sign. 

When it is used it invariably 
precedes the a mount in figures 
and, consisting of the letter "L” 
topped and tailed with small 
flourishes and a horizontal line 
drawn through, is in a form which 
would be easily recognisable to the 
man in the street today. 

Further evidence of the cur- 


rency of this symbol is provided 
by the proof of a proprosed Bank 
of England £5 note; engraved in 
1694; the note bears a pound sign, 
but in this case it is above the 
figured amount Unfortunately it 
is unclear whether the positioning 
is stylistic or merely due to lack of 
space. ... 

That this note displayed a 
pound sign is of great significance 
to the current debate because it 
hardly seems likely that the bank's 
directorate would have contem- 
plated allowing an unfamiliar 
symbol to be used on the bank's 
promissory notes. 

This is farther reinforced by the 
existence of a cheque which is also 
in the bank's museum. It is dated 
January 7, 1660/1, and carries a 
dearly discernible pound sign 
preceding the figured amount, 
(Drawn by Nicholas Van acker on 
John Morris of the partnership 


Clayton and Morris, money-scriv- 
eners. it is. incidentally, one of the 
earliest known cheques). 

Perhaps the origins of the pound 
sign preceding the amount (in 
figures at least) lie in the more 
esoteric regions of accountancy? 
Or is the explanation quite simply 
that its conventional position 
obviates any possibility of its 
being mistaken for a figure when 
accounts are being cast up? 

The horizontal line (or now- 
adays lines) drawn through the 
sign to indicate a contraction of 
the Latin word Libra might also 
have served as an additional 
safeguard in this respeCL 
Yours faithfully. 

JOHN KEYWORTH. Curator, 
Museum and Historical Research 
Section. 

Bank of England. 

Thread needle Street. EC2, 
November 12. 


21 


NOVEMBER 15 1922 

The British Broadcasting 
Comnany, a syndicate of radio 
manufacturers and the Post Office 
was formed in October, 1923: on 
December 30 John (later Lord ) 
Reith took oueras it* general 
manager. In that month the 
number of licences uias just over 
35,000. On January 1, 192 7 the 

newly- formed British 
Broadcasting Corporation 
received its first ( 10 -year) charter 
when licences numbered over two 
million 


ON THIS DAY 


BROADCASTING 

BEGUN. 

FIRST MESSAGES LAST 
NIGHT. 

NEWS SERVICE POLICY. 

Broadcasting in ibis country 
officially began yesterday, when 
news bulletins and weather reports 
were sent out from the London and 
M&ncbesrer stations of the British 
Broadcasting Company. The erec- 
tion of the station at the Witton 
Works of the General Electric 
Company, Birmingham, is being 
expedited, and it is hoped to have 
the station ready for use to-night in 
sending out the election results. 
Broadcasting trill then take place 
from three stations, covering a 
Luge part of the country. Other 
stations, not yet ready, are being 
completed as rapidly as possible. 

Sir William Noble, chairman of 
the Broadcasting Company, out- 
lined his plans to The Times 
yesterday evening. “At the 
beginning,” he said, “broadcasting 
wiU be conducted purely from a 
social point of view. Each evening 
there will be given a brief synopsis 
of the world's news, prepared by 
the four Press agencies who are 
acting together to supply the 
company with such a synopsis 
twice nightly. Then the Meteoro- 
logical Department of the Air 
Ministry is supplying us. at any 
rate, with two weather reports. It 
may be that we shall arrange for a 
third report, but that has not yet 
been fixed tip. The first of the two 
reports will be given directly the 
station opens, and the other be- 
tween 9 pm and 10 pm. In addition 
to this news there will be concerts, 
instrumental and vocal and it may 
be that later we shall arrange for 
speeches written by papular people 
to be broadcast. 

ELECTION RESULTS 

“From a business point of view 
there may be some development 
later, but none is contemplated at 
present. For the broadcasting of 
the election results the Press 
agencies will give us simply an 
outline — so many Unionists, so 
many Liberals, and so many Lloyd 
George people, so many Liberals, 
and so on, together with perticu 
lare of Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. 
Asquith, and any of the leaders. I 
have told them that they must not 
go beyond 1 o'clock in the morning, 
in order not to interfere with any of 
the newspapers. 

“We want to work smoothly with 
the newspapers, and we want to act 
in such a way that broadcasting 
may be an incentive to the public 
to buy more newspapers. We hope 
that many people will take up 
broadcasting who otherwise might 
not take a great interest in the 
world’s news, and that, by giving 
them a brief synopsis of events, we 
shall whet their appetite for news 
and thus induce them to buy more 
newspapers. I repeat that we want 
to do everything possible to help 
the newspapers and to get them on 
our side, so that we may be 
mutually helpful. It is for that 
reason that we are not giving long 
reports. 

'I have stated that broadcasting 
must stop at 1 am, so that we shall 
not give any information which 
will not appear in the morning 
papers. No broadcasting will take 
place before 5 pm on Thursday, so 
as not to interfere with the evening 
papers. We have taken everything 
into consideration, and we want to 
avoid anything which would cause 
irritation.*' 

Asked whether, if broadcasting 
had started a fortnight ago, sum- 
maries of election speeches would 
have been issued, Sir William 
Noble said:-“No. that would have 
been usurping the legitimate func- 
tions of the Press. We do not want 
to do that. The whole matter has 
been thrashed out with the Press 
agencies, and we have been entirely 
guided by t h e m ." 

HINTS TO AMATEURS 

Mr. H. Anthony Hankey, ex- 
Fleet Wireless Officer of the China 
Squadron, in a broadcasting lec- 
ture and demonstration given at 
the St. Bride Institute, Fleet- 
street, last night, said that during 
the last twenty-five years the Tange 
of wireless telegraphic signalling 
had grown from a few yards to 
twelve thousand miles 

If a person lived one hundred 
miles from the broadcasting sta- 
tions, it was necessary to possess a 
more sensitive receiver, such as a 
multi-valve type, than if one lived 
within fifty miles, in which case 
two valves would suffice. Within 
ten miles a simple crystal receiver 
would permit of efficient reception. 
If it was desired to entertain the 
family by means of a loud speaker, 
it would be necessary to amplify 
the received signals with the aid of 
a couple of valves in addition to the 
crystal, or to dispense with the 
crystal altogether and use three 
valves . . . 


Murky waters 

From Dr J. J. Grant 

Sir. In the light of the recent 

disastrous pollution of the Rhine 

it would seem that Coleridge was 

particularly prescient when he 

wrote: 

The river Rhine, it is well known 
Doth wash your city of Cologne. 

Bui tell me. Nymphs, what power 
divine 

Shall henceforth wash the river' 
_ Rhine? 

Yours faithfully. 

J. J. GRANT, 

Tithe Bam. 

Shincliffe. Durham. 


/ 




22 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 14: The Duke of 
Edinburgh this morning gave 
the Annual Distinguished Lec- 
ture at the European Council 
and Internationa] Schools An- 
nual General Meeting and Con- 
ference in Montreux. 

His Royal Highness later 
returned from Switzerland in an 
aircraft of The Queen's Flight. 

The Duke and Duchess of 
York today attended a luncheon 
given by the Corporation of 
London at Guildhall, whre 
Their Royal Highnesses were 
received by the Right Hon the 
Lord Mayor (Sir David Rowe- 
Ham). 

Afterwards, The Duke of 
York, President of the Royal 
Aero Club, accompanied by The 
Duchess of York, chaired the 
panel of judges of the 
President's Roles Trophy in the 
Goldsmiths' Haft- 

Miss Helen Hughes and Wing 
Commander Adam Wise were 
in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, President of the British 
Knitting and Clothing Export 
Council, this morning visited 
Gloveraft Ltd, London Road, 
Wellingborough. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for 

Northamptonshire (Mr John 
Lowlher), the Chairman of 
Gloverall Ltd (Mr R. Morris) 
and the Production Manager 
(Mr M. Fox). 

Afterwards. The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, vis- 
ited the Royal Army Veterinary 
Training Centre at Melton 
Mowbray. 


Having been received by Her 
Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant for 
Leicestershire (Colonel Andrew 
Martin), the Director, Army 
Veterinary and Remount Ser- 
vices (Brigadier RJ. Clifford) 
and the Commandant of The 
Centre (Colonel G-R- Durant). 
Her Royal Highenss toured the 
field training facilities, watched 
the 1986 Farriery 
Chaxnnpionships and was later 
entertained at luncheon. 

In the afternoon. The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, 
watched equitation training, 
loured the Veterinary Hospital 
and presented competition 
prizes. 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Mrs Malcolm Wallace, trav- 
elled in an aircraft of Hie 
Queen's Flight. 

The Queen was represented 
by the Right Honourable Sir 
William Hcsdtiae (Private Sec- 
retary to The Queen) at the 
Memorial Service for Miss An- 
gela Bowlby (Chief Clerk, Pri- 
vate Secretary’s Office) which 
was held in St Michael's Church, 
Chester Square, SWI today. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 14: Today is the 
Anniversary of the Bnthday of 
The Prince of Wales. 

The Duke of Gloucester this 
morning unveiled aplaque to 
celebrate the 198S Civic Trust 
Award for the restoration of 
Denmark Hill Station and its 
conversion into the ‘Phoenix 
and Firkin* public house, 
London, SES. 

Lt Col Sir Simon Bland was in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Gloucester was 
repres e nted by Major Nigel 
Chatnberiayne- Macdonald at a 
Service of Thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Reg Goodwin which 
was held in All Hallows by the 
Tower, London, EC3, at noon 
today. 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Mr Daniel 

Barenboim, 44: Sir Geoffrey 
Chandler, 64; Miss Petula Clark, 
52; Mr Andre Deutsch, 69; 
Professor Peter Dickinson. 52; 
Sir Hugh Greene, 76; Mr 
Haxnish Hamilton, 86; Mr Mar- 
tin Hammond. 42; Mr Gregor 
MacKenzie, MP. 59; Mr D. D. 
Rae Smith. 67: Mr Alwyn 
Robinson, 57: Major-General J. 
K. Shepheard . 78; Sir 

Sacheverell Sitwell, CH. 89: 
Canon Eric Staples, 76; Sir 
Roger Young, 63. 
TOMORROW: Mr Willie Car- 
son, 44; the Right Rev Dr C. R.< 
Claxton, 83; Lord Fairhaven, 
50: Canon H. J. Stuart. 60; 
Professor R. C. Sutcliffe, 82: Sir 
Edward Tomkins, 71; Sir John 
Wedgwood, 79; Professor R. A 
Wortley. 79. 

Peter Phillips is nine years old 
today. 


Service Dinners 

The Black Watch Association 
The annual dinner of The Black 
Watch Association. London 
branch, was held at The Duke of 
York's Headquarters, Chelsea, 
yesterday. Lieutenant-Colonel 
F. J. Bunuzby-Atkuu presided 
and Brigadier A.O.L Lithgow 
was the principal guest. 

A message was received from 
Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother, Colond-in-Chicf of 
The Black Watch. 

The Devonshire and Dorset 
Regiment 

Lord Digby, Lord Lieutenant of 
Dorset, attended the annual 
regimental dinner of the Devon- 
shire and Dorset Regiment 
Officers' Association held yes- 
terday at the Army and Navy 
Club. Major-General C T. 
Sh orris, Colonel of the Regi- 
ment, presided. 


Dinners 

International Law Association 
Professor Cecil Olmstead. 
Chairman of the Executive 
Council of the International 
Law Association, presided at a 
dinner held yesterday at the 
Royal Over-seas League. Lord 
Wilberforce, Dr Thok-kyu 
Limb, president, and Sir Gor- 
don Slynn. vice-chairman, were 
among those present 

Anchorites 

Sir Rex and Lady Hunt were the 
principal guests at the annual 


ladies' night dinner of the 
Anchorites held last night at the 
Cafe Royal. Mr Philip Carpen- 
ter presided. 

Coopers' Company 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, were 
entertained by the Coopers* 
Company at their annual dinner 
held last night at the Mansion 
House. Mr J.F. Howard, Master, 
presided and the other speakers 
were the Lord Mayor, Sir 
Trevor Hokiswortb and Mr B. 
AtchJey. 


Marriages 

Mr G.E. Denyer 
and Miss EJ. Lloyd 
The marriage took place quietly 
on Friday, October 31. at St 
Andrews, Kingsbury, between 
Mr Gavin Edward Denyer, son 
of Mr and Mrs G.E. Denyer, of 
Si Albans, and Miss Erica Jayne 
Lloyd, daughter of Mr B. Lloyd 
and Mrs A. Uoyd, of London, 
formerly of Southport 


Mr JW. Jefferson 
and Mis CJ. Parrish 
The marriage look place in 
North Bedfordshire, on Novem- 
ber 14. between Mr Michael 
Jefferson, son of Mr and Mrs 
James Jefferson, of Woking, 
Surrey, and Mrs Caroline Par- 
rish, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
James Capon, of Broom, 
Bedfordshire. 


The slippery subject of truth 


In 1911 the great experi- 
mental physicist Ernest 
Rutherford conducted an ep- 
och-making experiment that 

revolutionized our understand- 
ing of the structure of matter. 

He bombarded a sheet of gold 

foft with alpha particles and 

was staggered by the extent to 

which the particles were de- 
flected through wide angles, 
some of them even doubling 
back on there course. 

Rutherford's astonishment 
bordered on incredulity when 
he said it was as if a 16 mch 
shell had bounced backwards 
from a sheet c £ tissue paper. 
He deduced that the positive 
cteiree instead of being equally 
distributed throughout the 
atom was concentrated at one 
point. Rntherford had discov- 
ered the nucleus of tire atom 
and consequently a whole new 
world of theoretical and 
experimental physics emerged 
which to this day challenges 


Tftb Christ mas hav e a heart for 
the elderly need 



tare in 
the cost of caring 


This Christmas, in our 35 residential Homes and 14 
sheltered housing schemes, MHA will be caring for over 1,400 
elderly people. Each has found security, freedom from anxiety 
and a new quality of life 

But many others— in veryreaJ need themselves— are 
anxiously waiting for the chance of a place with us. Yet every 
extra place costs money. Will you help us to create extra places 
that much sooner? Will you please share in the cost of caring 

for the elderly in need? 
lfyoucan,itwillmeana 
muchhappierChristmas 
for so me next year. 


mai muen sooner' win you pu 

ffrMHA 

¥£THOIXSTtCHESFWTre«H> 

TO: MHA Dept T. FREEPOST. London EC1Y 1NE 


! enclose my donation of IT 


Pfease send me owe infwmaliai about MHA 


Name__ 

Adctess. 


technological wiz- 
ardry to the limit 
This is but one spectacu- 
larly dramatic event amongst 
many in the unfolding drama 
of science. The dement of 
surprise, coupled with the awe 
and respect and wonder it 
engenders is akin to the 
religions sense and It moves 
the philosopher. Kail Popper, 
to describe science as “one of 
the greatest spiritual adven- 
tures man has yet known". 
Scientific investigation reveals 
a world that is utterly different 
from what we ever imagined. 
“Subtle is the Lord" was 
Albert Einstein's aphoristic 
comment on the saprises 
nature has in store for us. 


Those who subscribe to the 
view that science presents us 
with an orderly progression of 
knowledge about the world 
which satisfies our expecta- 
tions need only consider the 
decade that spumed the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries, 
arguably die most dramatic, 
abrupt and unanticipated 
transition in the whole history 
of science. For coop led with 
surprise are problems 
concerning onr ability to grasp 
and articulate the con- 
sequences of revolutionary 
scientific discovery. 

If Emstemian relat i v i ty the- 
ory requires of ns a ftm- 
da m e nt ai c onc ep tual change in 
oar view of the universe^ 
quantum theory throws all oar 
conceptual apparatus into dis- 
array. Neils Bohr, one of its 
loading fathers, commented 
tha t “he who is not shocked by 
qn antnm theory does not know 
die first tiling about it” 

A third characteristic of 
scientific discovery is identi- 
fied by Fritjof Capra in his Too 
of Physics. He is sot alone 
amongst physicists in attest- 
ing to the mystical element in 
the new physics. Many 
contemporary physicists make 
a simOar submission. It seems 
that man's relentless 
interrogation of the natnral 
world has brought him to his 
knees once again, if not in 
worship of its creator, then in 
wonder, awe and humility for 
the world so revealed. 

At yet another level philo- 
sophical questions cannot be 
eliminated from scientific en- 
quiry. We are confronted by 
puzzles regarding the natnre of 


physical .reality, cause and 
eftet, the relationship be- 
tween subjective experience, or 
mental constructs, and the 
alleged objectivity of the 
world. We are still nuclear 
about the natnre of fartnul 
evidence and the ever slip- 
pery subject of truth. 

With such a 
characterisation of contem- 
porary science is te rn s of 
these four elements of sur- 
prise, inherent conceptual 
difficulties, philosophical 
problems and a deep mystical 
content, we find ourselves 
immediately in tire realm of 
religion and theology. Theol- 
ogy has long ocaqned the 
same arena and wrestled with 
tire same problems. 

The element of smprise is 
perhaps the most agnificaut. 
Religion is not primari ly con- 
cerned with the fidfibuent of 
oar expectations or with the 
precise ordering of events that 
nwitp up tire future concerning 
our relationship with God and 
his ordering of the world. 

Institutional rdfgjon may be 
tarred with this brash, as is 
institutional or “normal” sci- 
ence, bnt for scientific know- 
ledge to grow and fur religion 
to avoid stagnation and decay 
there most ever be room for the 
unexpected wind at moments 
in history border on the in- 
credible, Those of us who . 
function from within institu- 
tional religion need to be 
reminded that we have almost 
certainly got it wrong. Hope- 
fully we have got some Hifigp 
right and we tentatively hold 
to them but we must ever opeu 
oar hearts and minds to the 
God of surprise 


As for the mystical, there 
are some refigjoBS apofogj 
who have teen seduced by the 
anti-metaphysical climate- of 
our age into apologisnm for the 
mystical element » reSrion to 
the point of efimiaanpg it 
altogether. Bid ff we following 
the example of Procre ate s and 
cut man down to fit into a bed 
of our own devising then we 
produce a maimed and stented 
caricature of man. 

At tire mteDectnal level 
there are some, theofogh 
who have been led astray 
because they have not rec- 
ognized that the conceptual 
and philosophical probl ems 
which beset us m ok attempt 
to understand and articulate 
major theological issues are 
shared by scientists who re- 
flect oo their discoveries. The 
greatest need of theology to- 
day is to take the philosophy 
of science Lite accent. 

We could well apply these 
four observations to tire scan- 
dal of the resarrectio&. This 
fBHwi pillar of tire Christian 
faith is a stumbling Mock at 
the cooceptthl and philosophi- 
cal level; it is nonsense without 
mystical apprehension: and it 
is always a surprise to winch 
we react with a degree of 
i n q e dn li ty.- We may para- 
phrase Bohr’s, reaction to 
quantum theory: he who is not 
shocked by the resurrection 
does not understand the first 
thing about It Bat it has tire 
rmgofa truth which shakes us 
to tire very foundations of our 


Derek Stanesby 

Canon of Windsor 


Luncheons 

Corporation of London 
The Duke and Duchess of York 
were the guests of honour at a 
luncheon given by the Lord 
Mayor and tfie Corporation of 
Loudon at Gufldhall yesterday. 


Puto de la 

y Hanl or 


Ambassador and Senora 
BeHacasa. Lord and Lady — __ 
Tanworm. Lord and Lady EHod. the 
Private Secretary to the Queen and 
Lady HesemiM. the Keeper or me 
Privy Puna and Lady Mites. me 
Matter of Her Majesty S Household 
and Lady Greening, me CfflOTtrott* 
of Die Lord Chamberlain s Office and 
the Hon Lady Johnston, the Marshal 
of me Dtptomaac Corps and Lady 
Richards, the Deputy Private See- 

Majesty V Horaefiofcf. Sir Patrick and 


Lady Mesney. sar Roc an d La dy 
HunL the Deputy Master of Trmity 

ite^MP. M? 
MaHnaduke and Lady Susan Hussey. 

the Assistant Comptroller of Ute Lora 
Chamberlain's Office, the Vice-Mar- 
shat of the Diplomatic Corps and Mm 
Hervey. Uie Hon Diana MaXgffi. Mr 
Francis Wtmite. the Resident Gov- 

ernor and Keeper of the Jewel House 
of HM Tower of London and Mrs 
MacLeUan. the atertffe, aldermen. 
c o mm on coundimen and Officers of 
the Corporation of London. 


U niver sity College London 
Sir James Lightm, Provost of 
University College Loudon, and 
Professor J. D. Evans, Director 
of the Institute of Archaeology, 
were hosts yesterday at a lun- 


cheon held at the college to 
celebrate the merger of the two 
institutions. 

Guild of Surveyors 
Mr Walter Smith, President of 
the Guild of Surveyois, was host 
at a luncheon hem yesterday at 
the Ciiy livery Chib. Lead 
Shaddeton and Rear-Admiral 
Roger O. Morris, Hydrographer 
of the Navy, were the speakers. 

Master Mariners’ Company 

Captain p D. F. CniirlrshanV 

Master of the Master Mariners’ 
Company, presided at a lun- 
cheon hdd yesterday on board 


HQS Wellington, Victoria 
Embankment Mr Keny St 
Johnston was die principal 
guest. 

Service Luncheon 

Royal Artillery Cooscfl of 
acofZKua 

Major-General R. Lyon pre- 
sided at the Autumn luncheon 
of the Royal Artillery Council of 
Scotland held yesterday at the 
Officers’ Mess, Army Head- 
quarters Scotland, Craigiehall, 
Edinburgh. Lieutenant-General 
Sir Norman Arthur was among 
those present 


Memorial services 


Epworth House. 25 Cfty KlY1DR_Reg. Cj»ty^85M.J 


Sir Reg Goodwin 
The Duke of Gloucester. Presi- 
dent of the National Assocation 
of Boys' Clubs, was represented 
by Mqjor Nigel Chambeiiayne- 
Macdonald at a service of 
Thanksgi vin g for the life and 
work of Sir Reg Goodwin held 
yesterday at All Hallows by the 
Tower. Canon Peter Delaney 
officiated. Mis Mary Tozer, 
daughter, read Sea Ferer by 
John Masefield, Mr Peter Good- 
win, son. read Upon West- 
minster Bridge by William 
Wordsworth and Mr Julian 
Goodwin, son. read If by 
Rudyard Kipling. The Right 
Rev James Adams, Mr Michael 
Harris, NABC, Lord Misbcon, 
Baroness Denington, Sir James 
SwaffiekL former Director-Gen- 
eral of the Greater London 
Council, Air Commodore Allen 
Mawer. also representing Basil- 
don Development Corporation 
and London Docklands Joint 
Committee, Mr Ernest Arm- 
strong. Deputy Speaker at the 
House of Commons and 
Managing Trustee of Muncipal 
Mutual Insurance, and the 
Bishop of Stepney rave tributes. 
The Rev John Cleaver was 
robed. The Lord Lieutenant of 
Greater London was repre- 
sented by Sir Ashley Bramaft 
and the Deputy President of the 
NABC by Viscount Aithorp. 
Others present included:. 

Lady Goodwin (wwowj, Mr Peter 
Taxer (son-ta-lawi. Mrs Peter Good- 
win ana Mrs Julian Goodwin (daugh- 
ters-in-law). Richard Tozer 
’ on). Mrs Joan Howard tstep- 
MT and Mrs W Kerrfdoe. Mr 


and Mrs H BrMpr-av. Mr and Mr* ft 
Poole and Mr and Mr* C Thornton 

CbroUiervUt-iaw and stsxervln-iaw). 

mbs Elizabeth Poole. Mr PUflto 
Thornton. Miss J Thornton. Mr E 

Gold. Mr Jack Carter. Mr Mich__ 
Patmore and Mr John Reekie (vice- 
presidents. NABC). with Mr Tony 
Garrett (chairman). Uetllmanl -Gen- 

eral Sir James Wilson (vtce-chalrnwn 
and chairman of Crown and Manor 
Boys' Club. Haxton 1. Mr Bruce 
Parkinson ivtce-cttairman) and Mr 
Charles Rawilmon (honorary trea- 

surer). Mr J coffee and Mrs Coffee. 
Mr Ian Leslie and Mr Tom PMVn 

ivkMnMau. London FMnaMant 

Boys' CTuinj. with Mr Nett Mattland 
(chairman) and Mr Bofctn Qownand 

i vice-chairman): Lord and Lady Pin or 

Baroness Serata. Lady 

_ Murray Fox. 

Mr Rupert HamWO, Mr mtyd 
Harrington. Mr Tony Banks. MP. Mr 
Emiyn Jones. Mr A B Waters. Mrs 

Ernest Armstrong. Mite C Freeman. 

Mr Arthur Edward*. Mr Tom Ptefllps. 

Mr Kenneth BJessley, Mrs John 
Cleaver. Mtss Jean Muir. Mr Stephen 
Carroll. Mias Dorottor Bigwood (chair- 
man. Inner London Education 
Authority) with Mr Tony Bowen 
(vice-chairman) and Mr M D Sevens 

(principal youth officer): Mr Terry 

Ashton (ge ne r al se cretary. Labour 
party. Greater London region). Mr 

Maude* Stanfmst (representing the 

staff of Die former CSJCi. Mr Donald 
Cheswortb (warden. Toynbee Haiti. 
Mr Raymond ctarke (National Council 

of Voluntary Child Care Organiza- 

tions). Mr Douglas Calloway, (exec- 
utive manager. Conmdssioo far the 
New Towns). Mr John Tocar lOU 
Strandians' Amodat k hil with Mr 
Ceoffrey Cron and Mr. Wafflpg 
Bryant Mr George Woods Outer- 
national Federation of Keystone 
Youth OigontzanaraL Mr w f l 
N ew com be (Army Cadet Force 
AssocaOon). Mr Peter Griffiths 
(London University Court). Mr John 
Ml tenet! (TOC HI. Mr Gerald Walker 

(Bays' BrkMel and representatives of 

Birmingham. Nails worth. Turners 
Court. Downside and Worth, 
tngalestone. Essex. Nort hern Ireland, 
Buckinghamshire. Cornwall. Derby- 
shire. Dorset. Greater Manchester, 
Lancashire. Hertfordshire. Middlesex. 
Surrey. Sussex. Warwickshire. York- 
shire. Brunswick. Oxford and 
Bermondsey. Endeavour and Uoq 
Bays' Clubs: the League of Young 
Adventurers. Dorset Youth Service. 
Femdown Youth Gub and the 
Cathode Youth Servtoe. 


Miss A. Bowlby 
The Queen was represented by 
Sir William Heseitine, Private 
Secretary, at a service of thanks- 
giving for the life ofMiss Angela 
Bowlby held yesterday at St 
Michael’s, Chester Square. The 
Rev D.CX. Prior officiated and 
Canon AJD. Caesar read the 
lesson. Lord Home of the Hirsel 
gave an address and the Right 
Rev W.S. Llewellyn led the 
prayers. Others present 
included: 

Mr and Mrs Richard Watson (brother- 
in-law and sister). Mr Malcolm 
Watson. Miss Fiona Watson: the 
Marchioness of Abergavenny, the 
Countess of Alrhe. the Earl and 
Countess of Meath, the Earl and 
Countess of Portarttogtoo. viscount 
and Viscountess Trenchant. Viscount- 
ess SUm. Lady Home of the HlrseL 
Lord Moore Of WoJvprcofe. Lord and 
Lady Fraser of KUmorack. Lord and 
Lady Hoktemen. Lady Dougias-Pen- 
nanL Lord and Lady Keyes. Lord 
Charters of AmtsOekt Mr John 
Wakaham. MP (Government Chief 
Whip) and Mix Waketum. Lady 
Susan Hussey. Lady Elizabeth 
Creenacre. Uie Han Diana taafegOL the 


Hon Mary Morrison. Ibe Hon John 
Trenehard. the Hon Claud Phraunore. 
the Hon Fiona Campbell. u>e Hon Mrs 
Ovaries Ramsay, the Hon Jidlan 
Byng. the Hon Mrs Cordon Palmer. 
Major the Hon Andrew Wlgraro. the 
Han Mis Mieczkowska. Sir John and 
Lady Graham. Dame Fetidly Young. 
Colonel Si r Henry and Lady May Abel 
smith. Ueutenanr-Cokwel Str John 
Johnston. Vice- Admiral Sir John and 
Lady Lea. Lady Abel Snath. Str 
Rtchard Stranon. Lady Heseitine. Sir 

John and Lady Kinick. Lady (Charles) 

Strong- Str Peter Miles. Rear-Admiral 
Sir Paul Greening. Lady Raeburn. Mr 
Robert and Lady Jane FeDowts. 
Major and the Hoc Mrs John Bowlby. 

Colonel and the Hon Mrs Peter 

WlBUra-Po wleff. 

Mr and Mrs David Boyle. Captain 
and Mrs AloWalr Faroes. Major- 
General Desmond Rice. Miss Helen 
Dorrien -Smith. Judge and Mrs Qirts- 


.. Mr Kenneth Scott. Mr 

Michael Shea. Mr John Hastam. 
Lieut enani-cotonel George Wen. Ma- 
jor Shane BiewitL Mr R o Moore 
(BrttHfi Equttrraeni Company). Mr 
Richard Skinner (Royal Warrant 
Holders Axsoctatlonj. LleuSenanl-Cato- 
nd 8 Stewart -Wilson. Mr John 
T)tman. Mr J Magowan (IBM). 
Liemenara-GotoneJ Terence Crump 
(superintendent. The Queen's Mes- 
senger Service). Lieutenani-Coiomei 
and Mrs D J Da ty. Mr and Mrs Miles 
Huntington- WMMry. Mr Martin Bates 
(Alien and Ovonrt. Mrs Martin 
McLaren and Mr Michael Parker. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr LA. Barnett 
and Mbs DJVL Mrfrin 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian (Stnmpy), youngest 
son of Mr and Mrs AJS. Barnett, 
Penzance, Cornwall, and 
Donna, daughter of Mr and Mn 
WJ. Melvin, Widnes, Cheshire. 

Mr PJHJL B ttri ti 
and Mbs J JDl Fraley 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, younger son of 
Major and Mre RJL Beamish, of 
Woodford Greco, Essex, and 
Joanne, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs D.B. Pooley. ofHoime, 
Cam bridgeshir e. 

Mr NJL Dounag 
and Miss J-fL MacDwame 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs RJ1 Denning, of 
Alveston, Bristol, and Jennifer, 
elder daughter of the late Mr 
G J. Macflwaine and of Mrs 
AJL MacQwaine, of Trearddur 
Bay, Anglesey. 

Mr CJ. Elliott 
and Miss HJJI. ADum 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of Mr 
N.C Elliott and the late Mrs 
Elliott, of Reading, Berkshire, 
and Billie, daughter of Major 
and Mis CJHLG. Allnm, of 
Sennybridge, Brecon. 

Mr A.M. Gordon 
and Miss C Barrow 
The engagement is announced 
between Alastair, son of the late 
Mr Alex Gordon and of Mrs 
Dawn Gordon, of Grandacre, 
Waltham, Kent, «td Qare, 
daughter of Mr and Mra.KJJC 
Barrow, of Restronguet, 
Cornwall. 

Mr J-P.W. Roe 
and Miss LA. Burrowes 
The engagement is announced 
between John, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Patrick Roe, of 
Gamston Manor, Retford, Not- 
tinghamshire, and Lucy, twin 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Bobby 
Burrowes. ofDonington Priory, 
near Lincoln. 

DrP.E. Hxy 

and Miss S. Yazdian-Tehnuri 
The engagement is announced 
between Phillip, younger son of 
Major JS. Hay and Mrs S. Izod. 
of Cheltenham, and Sima, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs H. 
Yazdiao-Tchrani, of Kensing- 
ton, London. 


Mr TjC Hayward 
aad Mbs EJW. Sdanders 
The engagement is announced 
between Toby, younger son of 
Mr W.R. Hayward, of Hever, 
Kent, and Mis S. Price, of 
-Warn ham, Sussex, and 

Elisabeth, rfaiightw of Mr ***** 
Mrs John Scianders, of Hay- 
wards Heath. Sussex. 


Mr RJ. Grande 
and Mira BJULFtsker 
The engagement .is announced 


OBITUARY 

MRS FUMIKO ENCHI 
Powerful writer in the 
Japanese tradition 


Mrs Fnmflco Enchi, the 
eminent Japanese novelist, 
playwright and short; story 
writer, died on November 14, 
at the age of 81 


story. “Himojii tsukthi 
(‘‘The Starving YeaiO. m 
1953. Her long wait most 
certainly have had something 
to do with the feet that her 


She is known in the angto. profoundly humane outlook, 
phone world for her novel, could hanfly _ flourish wider 


between Robert James, younger 
son of Mr and Mis J.E. Grande, 
of Lodge Farm House, 
Berichamsted, Hertfordshire, 
and Bridget Mary, daughter of 
the late Commander J. P. Fisher, 
RN, MVO, and Mrs P. Fisher, 
of Farley, near Salisbury, 
Wiltshire. 

Mr AJML Jackson 
and MissSJE. Welsh 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew Michael, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs M. 

Jackson, of Thames Ditton, 
Suney, and Susan Elizabeth 


only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
RJ. Welsh, of Stour Provost, 
Dorset. 

Mr AXI. Pearson 
and Mira PjG LkptiOwen 
The engag emen t is announced 
between Gavin, rider son of Dr 
and Mrs G-S. Pearson, of 
Sevenoaks. Rent, and Oaire, 
rally child of Mr and Mrs R.G. 
Lloyd-Owen, of Manurion, 
Cornwall. 

MrR.CS.Rao 
and MbsS. Kara 
The engagement is announced 
between Rajkumar, son of 
Lieuteoant-Cokmel Suresh Rao, 
RAMC. and Mrs Rao, of 
Cricklewood, London, and 
Saloni, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Babu Karia, ofChisdhurst, 
Kent The marriage wift take 
place in July, 1987, in London. 

Mr G. Robem-Todd 
and Miss L- Lampson 
The engage m ent is announced 
between Geoffrey, only son of 
the late Mr and Mrs R. Robexts- 
Todd, and Lucinda, eldest 
da u gh te r of Mr M. Lampson, of 
Maresfidd, Sussex, and Mrs 
CJLA. O'Brien, of Headley, 
Hampshire. 


Services tomorrow 


Twenty-fifth 
Sunday after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HC: 
d .30 M. Rev T RadcUite; it Sung 
Eucb. Kr on lings mess* (Mozart;. 
Ousu le et vtdere (Isaac), the Dean: 
-J VS E. Responses (Holmes). Snort 
Sendees (Weelkes). Give nr. O Lord 
(Weeftes): 6 JO E S. ftev D J RusseQ. 
YORK MINSTER; 8. 8 45 HC lO.tS 
Sum Eurti. Canon Ralph Mayland: 

ST^PA UlV°^ I T>^SraL: 8 .HC. 
Responses (Naadort: 10.30 M. JiAiUate 
“ — in Ex Te Drum rvaushan 

iL Rev Michael Beck: JO 

. . _ iSctiubert in GL Jesus Is this. dark 
WWW'S light (Bacfi£ 3 15 E (Baltr m 
BK steal away rTIppetU. Rt Rev 
Kenneth wooQcotnbe. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8. 11.40 
HC uuo M. Coronation Tc Deum 
rvvanooL Set me as a ■*•" 

Dam* cicely Saunders: 3 

Hi. crux Udells (Rog>s-Du .. 

Anthony Harvey: 6,30 ES. Rev Alan 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 
HC: 11 Euch. Mlssa Brevis .In G 
(Schuoerti. H ye love me (TatosL V 
RCv David L .Edwards: 3 Eva 


i tc unm 
a rwaiton). 

gbock ■ 


and Baptisni (Howells in CL O (or < 

cl oser w al k (Sta nford!. . _ „ 

Westminster cathedral: T, a. 
9. 12. 6.30. 7 LM; 10.30 SM. Mlssa 
Papae Marcefli (RaiearUwo. Factam 
esi sUenUum (Dertngi. hsmun 
ammae djgw : 3.3 0 v. _ ^ 
ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL. SotXh- 
warfc: 8. IO. 12. IS. « LAC 11 HM. 
Mass (or Tnree Voice 
Conffiemnu Domuo 
Louis Seem. 

CHAPEL ROYAL. SI. Jama's Palace 
8.30 HC 1116 MP. O now PWUBS ta 
the Kingdom (Harwood), canon A 

^^I^CHAfEL OF THE SAVOY. 

11.15 Sung Eurtj- OBiQfin 

Regale (HcweUs). Veo R E 
ROYAL NAVAL 


racks. SWI: __ . 

GRAVs*' INN ^CHAPEL- 11.18 

£&3roi5re mSPolAPEL: 11.30 M*> 
and Scnrioii. Bated KJH5 iPaiesolnaL 

TOWTR V OF LO&DON. ECy 9 15 HC: 
11 M. Windsor Service (TO HowelB). 
Salvator nuMI iBIowl. Die Chaplain. 


TEMPLE CHURCH. Fleet Street. EC4. 
8 30 HC: 11.15 Morning Prayer. 
Responses Uotui Reading). Te Deum 
Laudamus and CoUefftun Regale 
(Howeusi. Jut iw t Deo i Boyce la aj. 

me Masler. 

ST CXEMENT DANES (RAF Church 1 
WCZ; BZQ, 1215 HC: 11 M. Te 
Deom and juUlate (Stanford la C). 
Rev R N Ken ward. 
chapel royal. Hampton Court 
Palace: B.X> HC: 1 1 M (Brtnen to Cl. 
For 1 went with the muimude (Aston). 
Rev David Painter: 3,30 E tWaison in 
EL Hear my prayer. O Lord rpurcetu. 
Praise to Cod m the highest iCamp- 

m HALLOWS BV THE TOWER: 11 
Sonq Each. Rev Canon SamueL 
ALL SAINTS. Margaret Street. Wl: a. 
6.16 LM: II HM. CWleglum Regale 
(Howells i. Bcbsed bemeLord Cod at 
Israel i Elgar i. Rev C A Reodlnglon. 6 
Evensots and Benediction IMoeran In 
Dl. Oortous and _ powerful God 
(Stanford*. Rev w H Taytev. 

ALL SOULS. Lanoham Place. Wl: 11 
Annual MMKX ServKe. Dr Montogu 
Barter: 6 -JO Rev Ian Bentley 
CHELSEA OLD .CHURCH. Old 
Church Street. SW3: B. 12 HC: IO 
Children's Service: ll M. Prev 
Leighton Thomson: 6 C. Preb Leigh- 
ten Tomwon, 

CHRIST g^LPCH. CHELSEA. SW3: 
8 HC 1 1 Parish C. Rev j Banon: 6 E. 
GROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 
A udiey Street. 8 15 HC it Sung 
Euch. Mesee Basse iPaurt). Lauda 
Stou i Couperin:. Rev A W Marks. 

S8* v sfe''. l f***~- ****■ 

^ N C§bl P n?* mM - 6: 

HOLY TBMTV, Prince Consort 
Road.. SWT: 8 30. 12.QB HC 1 1 
Choral Morning Prayer. Rev Martin 


ST CUTHBBrrS. PhUQoaGh Oardens 
SW5: IO HC 11 Sto) Euch ( Parlte In 
FL Lot ail mortal Oesh. rt^stonore). 
Rev w j Kirtnetrtdc 6 JO Keaung 
serv ice. Rev C Hareei-Copfce. 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Squar e, Wl: 
8 30 HC: 11 Song Euch (Darke 
l he Rector. 

STT JAMES'S. 


1 in AJ. 


. W2: 8 

. of me 

Outet Hour iratowD. WhrtJ as we sal 
ai Babylon (Farrant): 6 E- Snort 
Serv ice (Causton). O Lord the Maker 

stTSSce'S. otetsA s wa t a . i a.i 5 

HC: 10.30 Sung Eucb (LeMiton In DL 
DW S Watson: 6-30 E. save ua. 6 
Lord tBohstowLRev P » wa aon. 
ST MARGAlfej*S. VVo^OLnsler, 

Sd > bmwn. 1 Hrt 

|?S.4S. lgJ»(1662 )HC- JpC tot . 

I 

ST^’MA&'^^ABBOt^ KwatWtoJ- 
R^ e s 

Viard: fc.30 E 1 1 662 ). SWer J3erd- 
sr marys. Bourne Street 


ST STEP HE3VS. O tou c csw r Road. 
SWT: T. 8. 9. LM: 11 lAd. Mtssa Petre 
ego pro te rogart tLoho). Rev Peter 
Lynesb 6 Soietwi Evownt and 
Benediction. Rev Perr-» Boner. 

THE ANNUNCIATION. Bryanston 
Street wl u sm. Mls sa te rha 
fHaatter). cantate ponkno conOcton 
novum (Haaoerk 6 LM and BtSMdic- 

O regem coel) (Palestrina}. Renta b 
coed ( Lott)). A ye Marla (ArcadNO. 
FARMSIREET, Wl: 7.30. BJO. IO. 
ia.lSjA.lS. 6. iS LM; 11 HM. MBtoCff 
§5. Oare CReaceX Beau traorun vtt 

[JJartfordl. 

THE ORATORY. 


m 9 - 


SWT: 7 . 8 . 9 . IO. 12 - 30 . O'SO. 7 IM! 
ll HM. Misoa <to Reoidem tAiwr K>L 
Bea u morhii (MCMdaoliM: 330 v. 

Dom ino (palestruia). 
ETHELpWEDA'S. Ely Place:! 

te Sacerdm rrrotmaiu. 3erae M 


8-30. 12 to HC io 30 Euen. Canon 

Roberts 

ST ALBAN'S. Brooke St. EC1 • 9 30 
SM: II HM. Ptccatominimesse (Mo- 
aartLThou win keep mm fWKlcyj. 
D3S Sherwin: 5 30 LM. 

ST BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT. 
SmdhfieM. EOS-g HC: 1 1 M and HC 
ICaustun). Praise Ye The Lord (Tvei. 
■he Rectoc 6.30 Sung Euch. Wu 
sancu Benedict) (Dom anselm 
Hi^hei). Salvator Munui (TaJJWJ. Ihr 

ST BRIDES. Fleel Street. EG4. 11 
Chni M and Euch. JtAUaie iBoyre m 
CL aortal A^Mietd *n Cj. Canon John 
Qatei: 6.30 choral C. Mag and Nunc 
(Darke in Fi. Th» is the record of 
John iGinoon&i. Rev Wallace Boulton 


9 45. 7 LM: 11 HM. Ma PLfOr llye 

(Mozaru. Canooue de _ Jean Ractoo 
iFaurt). Rev Richard McLaren: 6-30 
Rev Ctovid I l e n d. 

ST Michael'S. Chpsnr 
SW1: 8.15 HC 11 MP. Rev DC L 
Prior: 7 30 informal ES and HC. . . 
ST MICHAELS cornhffl. EC3: 11 
Choral Euch H662): Sacertotei Do- 
mini (Byrd). Mtssa Brevis (Loe opoid 
.Mozanj. Jcsu. _th« . very Owodil 
iBatortowL Rev David Bu xton ■ Evans. 
ST PAUL'S. Ro bert Adam Street. Wl: 
1 1 H C. Rev Ge orge Cassidy: OSO Rev 

ffT^L^^Wihoo Place. SW I; B. 9 
hc ll sowmn Euch. Mias a Bre vg 
(Andrea CabrieUL Let afl the earth <R 
Vaughan wmiaiten. Ego Mn pants 
vivus twiinam Byrxn. Rev Martyn 
Janrtt. 

ST PETER'S. Eaton toWK SWI: R 
1 1 HC (Darke m Ft. n i h o W . O God. 
Our Defender (HftwdHJ. AVB Verum 
r Moza rt r. 6 JO EP MagtoflcM (M until 
In ELWhere Thou rogMSt (SehuMrD. 
ptc 6 John Pearce. 


CtotfBetnlnil 

ST nd 

Ecceta ... — . 

Soiennelle iGuoraant). Salve Regtoal 
(Ncvetloi. Ave Verum (Mozarl). 

.LAPy OF VICTQRIES. Kgtglry- 


a-n H M. MaaEtor 5. M ere 
CB^d). Degonnidts (PaftaetrtnM. 5 

AME3UCANCHURCM in xondon. 

ii. 

6-30. Rev 



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ST ANNE AND ST «WES Oi> 
tneran). Gresham SL EC2: : i HC 7 
too vewn. Cantata 115 . Prof 

SrS5wsW» URC NWS: 9 JO. 

SnESL^rVOT&ELj ciiy Rood. E» 
». Rev Bawd CCWM i. . .. 

J ohn T u 
westm; 
ham Gate. 

Kendoo. 


Onnazaka, trasslaied as The 
Waiting Years in 1971, 
foougb her most powerful 
work may lie among other 
novels which await English 
versions. 

Fumiko Encfai was boro on 
October 2, 1905, the second 
dai^hter ..of a well-known 
linguist, Ueda Kazntoshi. A 
sickly child, she was very 
frequently kept away from 
school But she took advan- 
tage of this to listen to 
fascinating, folk tales' told to 
her by her grandmother, to 
delve deeply into Japanese 
works both classical and mod- 
ern, and. to pay visits to the 
Kabnlri theatre. 

As an adolescent she had 
already formed decided views 
on tiie natnre of love. She 
began her literary career at 21 
with a play, winch was per- 
formed, and followed it with 
several more before her mar- 
riage at the age of 25. 

After the birth of her only 

child thaln niwl that d r?ma 

was not a form wi thin which 
she could express herself with 
sufficient freedom. So she 
turned to fiction, and pro- 
duced several interesting erot- 
ic novels. But a quarter of a 
century passed before she 
became at all widely read or 
critically accepted. 

Recognition came through 
the publication of her short 


the militaristic rule of die 
prewar Nationalists. 

In 1957 came her most 
accessible work, Onnazaka. 
This describes the long endur- 
ance by a stoical woman, 
Toma, of her hideo us a nd 
unfaithful husband. Particu- 
larly memorable are the sav- 
age and vengeful words with 
which she damns him oo her 
deathbed. The novel won her 
the Noma literary prize m 
1957. 

She followed tins with a 
more characteristic work, an 
autobiographical trilogy, 
which is almost certain to be 
regarded as her masterpiece. 
Here she deals in minute 
deta il With her usual theme, 
the vagaries of feminine eroti- 
cism, but the work has so fer 
remained untranslated. 

■ The volumes are: Ake o 
ubaumomo (A Person who 
Steals Red, 1957 y, Kisu aru 
tsubasa (The Wounded Wing, 
1962) and Niji to skura (Rain- 
bow and Carnage, 1958). This 
intensely personal work in the 
candid Japanese tradition, 
showed her to be, as an artist, 
on the level of such writers as 
Toson and Tanizaki - and 
indeed she received for it the 
coveted Tanizaki in 1969. 

She made a notable transla- 
tion into modem Japanese of 
the 1 itii century classic, The 
TaleofGenji. 


RUDOLF SCHOCK 




Rudolf Schock, the noted 
German tenor, died on No- 
vember 13, at the age of 7 1 . He 
came perhaps closer than any 
other singer to bong a succes- 
sor to Tauber, and be bufll a 
great reputation in Germany 
as an operetta singer on stage, 
on television and m films. 

He was boro on April 9. 
1915, at Duisburg, where he 
made his stage debut in the 
opera chorus at eighteen. 
From 1937 to 1940 he sang 
major roles at the Brunswick 
state theatre. 

War interrupted a promis- 
ing career and be was called up 
for the army. But as soon, as it 
was over he returned to the 
stage, now attached to the 
opera house in Hanover. 

He was soon in demand at 
houses of - greater prestige, 
such as the Berlin and Vienna 
etafe. operas, singing in a 
considerable repertory of Ger- 
man and Italian works. He 
came to London, to Covent 
Garden, for the 1949-50 sea- 
son, when he was heard in La 
Traviata, Boheme and Butter- 
fly, all with Schwarzkopf as his 
heroine; also as Tamino. Sur- 
prisingly, he was never invited 
bade to the bouse. 


In 1959 he appeared at the 
Bayreuth Festival as Walther 
in Die Meistersinger, a role he 
recorded at about the same 
time under Kempe's direc- 
tion. Walter Legge, who had 
signed him exdusively for 
EMI when he heard him at 
Hanover in 1945, obviously 
admired his work as he was 
.also asked to take the part of 
Bacchus in a recording of 
Ariadne auf Naxos, conducted 
by Karajan. 

But operetta was increasing- 
ly becoming his metier, and he 
was soon a star of films and 
television singing the works of 
Johann Strauss and Lehar, 
many of whose operettas he 
also recorded. But he never 
entirely forsook the opera 
house, continuing to appear 
from time to time in Vienna. 

■ His voice was fundamental- 
ly lyrical, but he had a strong 
upper register which allowed 
him to attempt more heroic 
parts when candidates for 
them were few and fer be- 
tween. As with many tenors of 
his kind, he could also culti- 
vate a persuasive piano. As an 
actor, he was attractive but 
not specially perceptive. The 
voice told alL 


MR PHILIP HENMAN 


Mr Philip Henman, a -for- 
mer chairman of the London 
Chamber of Commerce, and 
founder chairman of the 
Transport Development 
Group, died on November 8. 
He was 86. 

Philip Sydney Henman was 
bom on December 21, 1899. 
The son of a Baptist minister, 
he early committed himself to 
-that faith 

His first job with a firm of 
Lloyds insurance tankers was 
interrupted by war service 
with the King’s Royal Rifle 
Corps, bat in 1922 he became 
accountant and subsequently 
manager of the newly-formed 
General lighterage Co Ltd 
which operated two barges on 
the Thames. 

Under him the company 
grew and by 1929 he was 
managing director. Buying out 


time he retired in 1969. In 
addition to 1,200 lighters at its 
peak, it operated 4,500 lorries. 

Quiet and self-effacing, 
Henman was a man of un- 
shakeaMe conviction. He es- 
tablished a ivumber of 
charitable trusts and support- 
ed many Christian causes, 
including the British and For- 
eign Bible Society, the Inter- 
Varsity Fellowship, the Africa 
Inland Mission and the 
London Bible College (which, 
jointly with John Laing. he 
helped to found). 

He was a patron of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of 
England ana a benefactor of 
the Royal Society of Medicine. 
He endowed an' overseas lec- 
ture which is named after him. 
He was also High Sheriff of 
Surrey (1971-72), and was 
awarded an honorary doctor- 


the owners he then acquired . _ _ , . . 

wharves, warehouses and road ’ Surrey University, 

haulage services. Going public His wife, Jessie, died , in 
in 1950, it grew rapidly, and 1976. They had one daughter, 
had 80 subsidiaries by the who survives him. 

EDDIE THOMPSON 


Eddie. Thompson, who died 
on November 6 at the age of 
61, was known as one of this 
country’s most accomplished 
jazz pianists. 

He was boro blind in 1925, 


sebeme with Louis 
Armstrong’s All Stars who 
toured Britain. 

. The gruelling experience of 
touring America was valuable 
to him, and he later returned 


and started playing the piano ■ there for a period of ten years. 


while at a Wandsworth school 
for the blind. At another 
school he trained as a piano 
tuner, a job which, as he said, 
stood him in good stead, given 
the state of some of the club 
pianos he encountered later in 
his career. 

His first dates were as one of 
Brian Michie’s discoveries 
and as a Dixieland pianist 
with Freddy Randall's band. 
Then he went to the United 
States as part of an exchange 

THIERRY 
LE LURON 

Thierry Le Luron, comedi- 
an ami impersonator, died on 
October 13 - He was 34. 

He first found feme in 
France following a television 
appearance while still a 
schoolboy. He then left school 
to pursue a career in cabaret. 

He was known for his 
impressions of old crooners 
such as Yves Montand and 
Charles Aznavour, as well as 
politicians, among, them de 
Gaulle and Mitterrand. 

Two years ago he personally 
rented New York’s Carnegie 
Hall for a' one-night show, 
making him the' first French 
comedian to appear there. 
This, he proclaimed, was his 
way of buyirffi a passage “into 
the temple of celebrity.'* " 


Back in Britain he became a 
regular feature at Ronnie 
Scott’s club - his guide dog 
slumbering beneath the piano 
- and be also broadcast on 
television, besides appearing 
at the Wigmore Hall. 

If nor a heavyweight by 
international standards, he 
was nevertheless a nimble 
technician with a quick mind 
and an irreverent spirit. 

He leaves a widow, Mary, 
and a son. 

JUDGE WOOD 

His Honour Judge Wood, a 
circuit judge since 1972, died 
on November 4, at the aged of 
65. 

Ralph Wood was born on 
April 26, 1921, and educated 
at Wilmslow Preparatory 
School, Kina's School, Mac- 
clesfield, and Exeter College, 
Oxford. 

He was commissioned in 
the Somerset light Infantry in 
1941 and served in this coun- 
try. as well as India and 
Manipur. 

He was called to the Bar by ' 1 
Gray’s Inn in 1948 and prac- 1 
tised on the Northern Circuit. 
Deputy chairman of Lanca- 
shire Quarter Sessions in 
1970-71, he had been a Lanca- * 
shire JP since 1970. 


sl 


births, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS 

AND IN MEMORIAM 

1 


■ On 8th October, to 

Riea*.* raptor 

- On hfoventba- a, at Craves- 
mi Hospital, to Judith (nfr 
? a ™ 1 *to 7 s) ana cuv«. a son. joua- 
_ Pan. a h rouw for Chrtafophty. 

- On November 14. to 
Francl ». 

2*™- Oenhl. brother for 

Mtwn and Thomas, 

; O n. No vember 13th at 
ftohertey Hospital. Liverpool, to 
Ma n; ine e Brown) and Jonathan, a 
miauer. Joanna Katherine, a abler 
for Edward. 

COX - on November 9th. to Pamela 
(nee PHcc-Jooes) and MlchaeL a 
»■ William David, a brother for 
cwoe. 

H*®®*-* ■ On 9 November, at S 
Mary^ Hosnital Manchester, to Ju- 
™ (n« Brawn) and Peter, a son. 
Janie s Wilfred Lachlan. 
ffJIj itfm fl . on October 28th. to 
> Auckland. New Zealand, to Ottvta 
(nee Norman) and Timothy, a son. 
NWwtas Patrick, a brother ter 
J ames. Ch arlotte and Thomas. 

■MRDMOE - On November 6th 1986 
to June (nee SUletU and Charles. a 
dMttfrter. Entitle Charlotte, a sister 
ter Matt hew. 

HAKTWLL - On 10th November, to 
Ftowaowfe CBfvenfl and Stephen, a 
son. Chrtatontter Alexander. 

HEASIUR - On November Gth 1986. 
at Cueicfietd HosoKaL to Beverly Gn6e 
Jones) and David, a son. Wayne Da- 
vid- a brother for Sarah. 

MLTON ■ On November 9 at the Royal 
Sumac Hospital Brighton, to Debo- 
rah and Adrian, a son Oliver 
Sam uel 

m fiHH B g - On November 6th. to 
State and tan. a daughter. Hera Ma- 
deieta e Rose, a staler for Florence. 

OtfEM. - On November oth 1986. at 
the John RadCUfte Hospital. Oxford, 
lo Philippa (nee Aariter) and Mal- 
colm. a daughter Madeleine Sarah, a 
stat er ter Alexander Duncan. 

O’SULLIVAN - On November 13th. In 
Perth. Australia, to Diana wise 
weHrdey) and FInlan, a daughter. 
Sophie Ettzabelh. a sister for Emily 
an d Te ssa. 

SLATER - On November 11. at .1.20 
Pm. at St Margaret's Hospital. Syd- 
ney. Australia, lo Rosemary and 
i Mark, a daughter. Joanne Mary, a 
v . stater for Kathryn Elizabeth. 

' i SMALLWOOD - on 10th November, at 
St. Thomas'. London, to Tessa (rite 
Richards) and Charles, a son. Nicho- 
las James. 

WRJJAMS - On November Gth. at 
Queen Charlotte's HosplUL to Barba- 
ra (nee Carrie) and Christopher, twin 
daughters Eleanor Jean Elizabeth 
and Fiona Margaret Louise, sisters io 
C atherine. 


DEATHS 


r ♦ 


DUTTON - On November 13th. after a 
short illness. The Honourable Juliet 
Dutton of windrush Manor near 
BurfonL Oxfordshire, the younger 
daughter of Uie 6th Baron 
Sherborne. Funeral at Windrush 
Church at 2.30 pm on Friday No- 
vember 21sL Flowers and enquiries 
to Norman Trotman A Hughes. 
NorthfeaUi. Tel. (0461) 60288. 
FISHER - On 13Ui November 1986. at 
The Abbey. Amesbury. Margaret, 
wife of the late Brigadier A F Flatter, 
much loved mother, grandmother 
and greal grandmother. Funeral at 
Salisbury Crematorium at 12 noon 
on Thursday 20th November 1986. 
Family (lowers only. 

GULLAUMET - On November 12th. 
suddenly at her home tat Sldlesham. 
Betty, beloved mother and mother- 
In-law to Francotae. Guy. Brigitte 
and Pierre and beloved grandmother 
lo David. Philippe. Christopher and 
MlchaeL Funeral Service at ClUches- 
ler Crematorium. Monday 
November 17lb a) 2 pro. Family 
(towers only, donations to NS»CC. 

' 67 Saffron KID. London EC1 N8RS- 

BOPE - On November 1 2th. peacefully 
at home after a long Umeas. bravely 
borne. Brigadier Maurice WeMey 
D.S.O.. aged 86. much loved hus- 
band or Pamela and father of David. 
Service and cre mati on at Bourne- 
mouth an Tuesday November 18th 
at 2.30 pjn-. Enoutrea Diamond A 
Son. TeL (0G90) 72060. 

! MMS -On November 8dt 1986. Han- 
nah Margaret of 68 Staunton Rd. 
H ewUngtam. Oxford, beloved attter of 
John and Gwltyn and aunt of Wil- 
liam and Hanhah. Cremation private 
HATE • On October 27th. Dr. Geof- 
frey. of South Yarn. Melbourne. 
Australia. " Remembered with affec- 
tion and gratitude for bis Hie tang 
service lo Anaesthesia.** 

i ''LONGHORN - On November 9th. 

■- peacefully In hospItaL Malar George 
Arthur Longhorn. R.A. retired, dear 
husband of Mavis, brother of Mabel 
and a dear uncle. 


- On November 13m. In 
hospital, after a long Utness bravely 
borne. Maureen, beloved wife Of Col- 
onel John Mitcham, and mother of 
Anne, Patrick, and Robert and a 
very much laved g ran d m o t her. Fu- 
neral Service ai St Mary'S Church. 
West Dean. Wiltshire on Thursday. 
20th November 1986 at 2-30 pm. 
Family flowers only, but donations If 
desired te. Cystic Fterosta Research 
Trust e/a H A Harrow & Son Ud. 
77 Esicourt Road. Salisbury. Wilt- 
shire. Tet. 10722) 21177. 

MURRAY . on November iztb 1986. 
at St Mary's HospUaL Bristol. Kytda 
Mary. Devoted wife of the late John 
Oliver Murray. MD of Rochester and 
much loved mother, grandmother 
and great grandmother. Funeral Ser- 
vice to be held at Holy Trinity 
Church. HatweUt Bristol on Tues- 
day 1 8th November at 12 noon. 
Family downs only, but if desired, 
donations In her memory may be 
made io The British Red Cross soci- 
ety. Kent Branch, c/o Thomas Darts 
Fimeral Directors Ltd, in 
WhHctadies Road. CHfioa. Bristol. 
BS8 2PB. 

■AMUR - On November 12 th. Colonel 
Jane Rankin w jla.C.. sadly missed 
by all who knew her. Memorial Ser- 
vice al All Saints Church. MUford-on- 
Sea on Thursday November 20th at 
12 noon. Family flowers only, but 
donations If desired, to WJH.A.C. Be- 
nevolent Fund. Conn Headquarters. 
Queen Elizabeth Park. GuUdford, 
Surrey. 

ROBSON - On November 13th 1986. 
peacefully at home. In Eastbourne 
Sroex. Rev. Alan Boyd MA. I Can- 
lab). for over 40 years Minister al 
KchrinsMe. Glasgow. Funeral Ser- 
vice at Eastbourne crematorium, on 
Friday 21st November at 1230 pm. 
Family flo wers only. 

ROBERTSON On November 11th. 
1986. Ruth Monica (nte Waln- 
wrtgbt) in hospital in tier 7Etb year. 
Beloved wife of Major Frank 
Mackenzie (Freddie) of The While 
House. Berwick St James. Salis- 
bury. Dearly loved mother of Robin 
and Martin Thom p s o n, private 
temOy cremation followed by 
Thanksgiving service in Berwick Sr 
James Church at n a.m. on 
Tuesday November 18th, 1986. No 
Dowers. Donations if desired to 
Salisbury Hospice Tnut c/o C 
White. WtahfonL Salisbury. 

SCHUYLER - On 12th November 
1986. peacefully at home In 
MIcfeMon. Gloucestershire and Late 
of Portland. Oregon. USA. Jeanne 
beloved wife of Robert and dear 
mother of Robert and Pamela. 

STOCK - On November 11th 1986. 
peacefully al home after an Illness 
bravely but uncomplainingly borne. 
Ita. Beloved wife of John, dear moth- 
er of JacuueUne. Anne. James. David 
and Anthony and waiHlmuU i w of 
Shane. Laura. James. DantoL Marc 
and Rebecca. Requiem Mass IO am 
Thursday 20(h November at the Sa- 
cred Heart Church. Wimbledon. 
Family flowers only but donations if 
desired to the Invalid Children's Aid 
Association. London SW1W 9SB. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


KMC - Noel Stuart, Woburn. Saturday 
29th November at noon. Bookings 
please to Merchants, ffletchley. TeL 
10908) 79111. 

SAATSOM - William Stephen Bertram. 
Memorial Service lo be held al All 
Saints Church. Stamford. Lincoln- 
shire. at 2-30 pm. 24th November. 

IRAFNELL - A Service of Thanksgiv- 
ing for Uw lire of Hb Hon. Alan S 
Trapnefl will be held in AD Souls 
Church. Longhorn Place. London wt 
on Wednesday 3rd Dec. al 5.30 pm. 


IN MEMORIAM -WAR 


HOLY - In loving memory of Lieut 
George Herbert Patrick Holt Royal 
Armoured Corps, attd. 9th Lancers. 
UDed m action in Italy on November 
16(h 1944. aged 21. Bridget Eliza- 
beth Arm. 


| IN MEMORIAM -PRIVATE^ 


EMC WARR. Musician and scholar 
who died suddenly November 16Ui 
1984. His quiet presence concealed a 
strength of character and depth af 
knowledge with a charming sense of 
tumour that I nsp ir ed all who knew 
him. R e membered with gratitude 
and love by his wife Vida 
MDFHELD - On November 16 1984. 
Doris Elizabeth, tragically after a rid- 
ing accident. Much loved and pearly 
missed by Iwr sans James and Nicho- 
las and their families. 

PARKER - Keith. 16th November 
1984. Remembered with love and af- 
fection tty at) at Carroll School. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


KENT— BnDEIt. On Nov 16 1936 at 
SLGmwt Hanover S«y- W.l. John 
de Rosier to PhyDta Belly. Now al 
MWhurst Sussex. 


Science report 


Fossils may help 
explain ape origin 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


Dr Richard Leakey and his 
mother. Mary, the eminent 
palaeontologists and 

anthropologists, have uncovered 
fossils of two new types of ape, 
which were roaming (he shores 
of what is now Lake Turkana, in 
Kenya. 17 million years ago. 

Reporting their discovery in 
the current issue of Nature, they 
suggest that the finding could 
have an important bearing on 
the origin of the Asiatic and 
African large apes. 

They also indicate that the 
place in which fossils were found 
could mark the start of excava- 
tion of a rich new she far the 
National Museums of Kenya, 
covering a period and an ecology 
hitherto under-represented in 
their searches. 

Other areas around Lake 
Turkana have yielded important 
specimens in the search for 
human origins among the fos- 
sils. 

But the fossil fragments at the 
oew site are estimated to be 
between 16 and 18 million years 
old, belonging to the Miocene 


period and long before any 
evidence of the emergence of the 
immediate ancestors of man. 

Although they came from the 
same plate, a separate report is 
made describing each of the two 
finds. The scientists explain how 
some confusion arose at the 
early stages of the investigation. 

One of the fossils, a cranium 
with a particularly long and 
distinct muzzle, had some 
similarity with a specimen from 
a different she in the same area, 
and was controversially classi- 
fied by Richard Leakey and a 
colleague, Alan Walker, 
belonging to an ape called 
Siraphheaa. 

With the second find oT a 
short-faced ape, and an under- 
standing of the site coming from 
study of other fauna, the 
classification was revised. 

The fossil that led to the 
controversy is now described as 
the new genus A fropit beats 
lurkaneusis 

Nature. Vol 324. p 143 - 148 . 
1986 


Saleroom 


New price record 
for British artist 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


has confinned 
x two days that die 
era is now high 
he modern British 
eld. Sir William 
nee-quarter length 
f the American 
i Brewster entitled 
rial” - because she 
striking one - sold 
,500 (estimate 
>,000) to Leggan's, 
i dealers. It sets a 
a price record For 

limed a series of 
,f the American 
j married Joseph 

II. . . 
t all his paintings 
re runs a thread of 
Orpen invests his 
i a loveliness that 


appeals for reasons other than 
her beauty". Bruce Arnold 
wrote in his book on Orpen of 
1981. 

The other record breakers 
belonged to the same era and 
were also painted with im- 
pressionist vigour in bright 
colours. Sir George Causen's 
"Sons of Toir, a field of 
figures hoeing, dated from 
190! and made £60.500 (es- 
timate £50,000-£70.000). 
Wilfred Gabriel de Glehn’s 
•*TTie Piazzetia , Venice” 
made £44,000 (estimate 
£25,000-£ 35,000) and Doro- 
thea Sharp’s "Children Pad- 
dling on the Sea Shore” made 
£29,700 (estimate £12,000- 
£15,000). 

The sale totalled £1.538.108 
with 10 ner cent left unsold. 



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NEXT SUMMER 
IN 

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OLD CIIFTONMN Sacttty. Tte 
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Md an Wednesday 26lti No- 


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phone Ol 683 977a 


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WANTED 


JEWELLERY. CtoM, Silver. Dtmouda ur- 
gently wanted. Too prices. William). 43 
Lambs Condidl SI WC1. 01 406 8638. 


.. dogmata warned, old or recant 
(Or book. Please write loSOChesson Rd. 
London wid 9QU. 


WANTED Edwardian. Victorian and an 
pa Hi led furniture. Mr Ateiton Ol 9*T 
5946 667-669 Ganatt Lane. EaiMtefeL 
SW17. 

CELLO 19th«x Exceflem condition- Hard 
case + 3 bows. £3.000. Tel: OI 876 
1349. 

c nermv. i ramrec Cookers, etc. Can 
you buy cheaper? B & S Ltd. 01 229 
1907/8468. 

OLD YORK FLASSTONE&. cobble sgtt 
etc. Nationwide iMlwrteL Tel: 10399) 
850039 (Wilts*. 


If you’ve ever called 
The Samaritans, please make 
just one' more calL 


If we've ever helped you, 
now you can help us to help 
others. 

Please remember us in 
yourWill. 


Please call Slough (0753) 
32713 or write to: David 
Evans, The Samaritans, 

17 Uxbridge Road, Slough 
SLi 1SN for further details. 


The Samaritans, 


FOR SALE 


transform your home 
FOR XMAS WITH 
manderac throwovers 

TM» BTtBUc attcnteHre » loow cover* 
DrtoB, Itfr and «*» ur «" W 

dwira for half Bw coat Of coven or 

' rwupboUM-ry 

tutow ivunderaa ramByor arronga 
men carefuny. no ni m nii m romak . 
cn up. Manderacs in lovely aiHme 
UHuna ioow worsted wool cUng to 19 - 
hototary. Tbry Wl" In ta ro* m wl t 
lotBi rata cMra witn iMMDtag 

phimiim from «*«* rod mHUn. 
Three beauntul dniwn lo ettoare 
Iran, no rak nwney WOt guw*nt« 
to you can try turn pi bore, wrtie or 
rtpB to- bcactuiro aod saraptee 10 

MANDERAC LTD DEPT Tl. 
p.O. BOX 302 

WINDSOR BERKS SL4 2UZ 

TEL 0753 850179 
Ring now. 


TOYOTA CEUGA 2.0 GT 
1986 (C Reg) 

Red. 10.000 ntifn. I owner. 
£10.995 

TeL Elton Garage 

Hire purchase and Leax turntable 

061 797 7780 

ISnr UaMi aba matktht 


JUMP THE QUEUE 
XJ6 2.9 

DAIMLER SOVEREIGN. 

Unwanted pmtwoas car. won la a 
ibmMM. debwy mAageonly. ta> 


wflK vat, raad fold li c ence, reed tea ad 


£19.000 Price Guide. 
Tel 0303 69 1 48. 


UUmi» OF MEITLEBED The utUnteK 
repdCB lummre ntcbUM Om of 

EngtaiWV targat oaUccdam «f t7U> & 

IBUi Century period style nmbire. C2 

mfltkui NacM for Immediate dattveey. 


(0491) 6411 IS. Boummtootn <0202) 

293680. TOOriwm. Devon (039287) 

7443. BgrMKV. Oog 10403) 810962. 


AUSTRALUH PAMTBKS -Caflery Di- 

rector from Meibourne is vtaUng 
Luodon and is a Keen cash buyer or ei- 

ceflcm Works of An by pramtaanl 

Austrattan Arttatp pasl& presem. Pteese 

write to Michael ivanyi EM. c/o James 

Kirkman Ltd. 46 Brampton Square. 

London SW3 2AF. 


AT LEAST haw lomo peal for the Chrw- 
mas lire. CwnctOI Pat Dnl 46W. 
Puritan. Briagwaw. Sornmat TAT 
aoQ. toamn 683383. 


ma r nuaUty wool carpets. Al trade 
prices and under, also available 1001 
extra. Large room otte remnants under 
half normal price. Chancery Carpets OI 
406 0463. 

I SCMEDHAYEX Stuttgart. 6fl 6ui 
Grand, serial no. 63120. good condition. 
£3600 ono- TeL 01-736 6676 

SEA7FMDERS. Beal UckMB fOr aO SOld- 
01 it events. Our clients include moat 
major companteo. Cram cards accented. 
01-828 1678. 

TICKETS FOR ART EVERT, Gate. 80 - 
Ugtil Exp. Chois. Les MM. AU theatre 
and sports.Tet 8214616/828- 
0496.A.EX / VIM / Dlnera. 

SOFAS Two 2Vj sealers wilh Iooh covers 
- DuraM'. bi Very goad condition. 
£396 TeteptHiae; 01 963 3676. 

YORK FLACSVOIKS far potto* A drive 
ways. Winter Clearance me. Tel 061 
223 0881 / 061 231 6786. 


FOR SALE 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESIST A CARPETS 

Wlcanders beatmftri natural cot* Wee. 
Extranety nard weermg tnebest mon- 
ey ran liny £8.96 per so yd * vat. 
Merakakm velvet die carpet 14 plain 
l ohnss. Btnu in underlay 12* wide 
from stock. 7 year wear guarantee cor 
name or office. £4.76 per sa yds- vat, 
Pina ttae larged teteetkm of plain car- 
peting la London. 

148 Wandsworth Bridge Rd 
- Parsons Green 8W6 

TeLOl -73 1-3368/9 

Free Ddbnatco-Eapert FitUttg 


A MACNfflCENT VENETIAN 
8 PIECE R0C0C00 
BEDROOM SUITE 

RkNy carved pearoed rod panned with 
skrolf work & Stowers. Cuupoutaioc 
uwkra he 276 an aide Bomhoy chat. 2 
araxtaira. double bed head, a pair of 
bedside obnets A tall nunw. 

£KXO 

0909 45328 


AKTIQUC Otroi fronted ChM Display 
Caatnet. BUM Rosewood £460. Victori- 
an Armchair, carved legs and handles, 
deep buttoned £360. 0772 622090 


jd aa W 123 a 1 x 9 . a&ooo mac*, sw- 

pern common, air con. stereo, usd. 
unmartied. £6.T6a TeL 0466 632B94 
home / 021 236 9647 bta. 


I retx SUITE- uobamcred In Craun 
Hide. 3 Monlta aid. Con £2.600. WtU 
SeU at £ 1 .800 or near after. Owner tm- 
terattnft. 0276 64622 


190 D 1 906 Creg-CUOrtC white wUh HIM 
Interior. Effi. 4.000 ml*. £12.200. TW 
0476 62093. 

XJ6 HE -84 B no- saoegreen. bbeuu DM*, 
ruu me. * rear MU*, new tyres: very 
9004 COndUten. £16.960. TW Ol 722 
574a 


FLATSHARE 


flat, own room. Near HML 

£170 pan red. TW: Ol 888 6664. ' 


tSLEWOtmt Ige dtte bed. share lovety 
fully fitted boo. BR/tUbe. Bartdng. 
£176pau. TeL-01 874 1734 . 


BOW U Own room in pteasam BaL 6 
inlnuies lube. Own thotver on suttc. £60 
pw Tet 01-981 0827 
FOREST HU Prof. M/F. N/S lo share 
garden (UL O/R. C/H. It mm London 
Bridva- JC 40 pw exd. TeL Ol 29l 0148 
Start 1 Professional ftmate/male. own 
room, to share Horary home. £43 pw 
end. Tel: Ol 874 6748. 


RENTALS 


DOCKLANDS Flaw and houses to tet 
throacpmul the Docklands area. TebOl- 
790 9660 

FULHAM. Top door of luxury house and 
use of real, me office faculties. £160 pw. 
01 731 7T3*. 

Ilimunn: M8 Super refurtusheo 2 bed- 
room luxury flat, garage available. 
£146 PW. Ring: 01 340 7408: 

937 9681 The number to remember 
when soaking beat rental properties in 
central and prime London areas 
£I0O/£2 jOOOpw. 

Wt Luxury malstonette lust refurbished, 
read. 2 dbte Promts. K & EL 
washer/dryer. turbo shower etc. £240 
pw. Tel: 957-3964/0722 72639. 


RENTALS 


LANDLORDS /OWNEKS Hr you have a 
duality p r op erty to let Ml us anoul it. 
We Offer a p re ftwrio n al A rcUable 
service. QuraWd Constanana Ol 244 
7363 


EMt FDKHLEY RD NW3 Smooua 4 bed 
fun m atac siett* m c n amang 
neigftboomood. OOt HW. hl W 

reoep. dunag rm. xp both, showers. 2 

WCP. £2S0pw. Owner Tei Ol 6339466 


SOUTH KEMSDMTOIL Gantea rumMwd 
flat. One double bed. Kerep. lOchen. 
Bathroom. Caa CH- £I26ow. Phone: 
01-373 2282 (between 9- loam. and 6 ■ 

a pm). 


HAHKTEAD mn Overtoo wn g Hretn. 
run non. 3 bed Vkt milnonette. OCH. 
ail anptances. Onm. Hoed carpets, new- 
ty-decorawd. sole use of garden. £200 
pw Incl rated. Avail MWL Td Ol 436 
6812. 


AMCTICAW EXECUTtVE Seeks h at 
Hal/hotnei op to JBOOpw Usual fees 
req. PtUHIos Kay ft Lewis. South or tbe 
Park. Chdsea office- 01-362 8111 or 
North of Uie Para. Rcgenra park office. 
01-886 9882. 


CHELSEA Kntghtsbrtdge. Bolivia. Ptm- 
Hco. Westminster. Luxury houses and 
Hats available (or long or snort lets. 
Please ring for currmU USL Cooks. 69 
Buckingham Palace Rd. Swi. 01-828 
8261. 


. flat Hum) bt MylUc 

country qeltlup. o/teoktng Houn A golf 

course, ao ft L-ahaped studio, balc on y. 
idL bthrm/wc. CH. ptwne. Avan now 
fee- I yr. £96 pw. Owner Ol 686 4SS9 
or 883 2321. 


*T JOHNS WOOD OeOMt fitell 1st ill IB hi 
private tae. 2 reran. 2 bedim tl dbte. 1 
S0e). KID. balcony. CHS qw. 2 
mins tube. £200 pw. 01 286 4287. 


DOMESTIC* 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


KP/9IU SUHMC - Btedou Unu are loaA- 
tng for a rep/ guide hr ba wuner. Are 
yon Ruenl in Oerman or ttaltan. aa ad- 
vanced skier and 32-ao yrm of- apod 
PlCtae ram Ol 786 220a 


Cook, lo work In 
Champery. Swba Alps, for winter sea- 
son to run codons service. Tel 01 736 
6611. 


CHALET GniS - Biadou Lines are sun 
looking for a few cnaM girts for Iho 
■86/87 winter season. We need good 
cooks who can create a lively cluuef- 
party atmosphere. Please ring 01 786 
2200 . 


CHALET WH i. to work In sU resort this 
winter, raunred by wall m ta ous hed but 
friendly specialist tour operator. Cook- 
ing OuaHncattona or reievani expenenw 
an advantage. Please ring 01-786 9964. 


' NANNY RDEDi 22+ with expert- 
cure. 2 children (3 years and 6 months! 
in Hampnead home. Nursery dunes 
only, as other staff kepL Two days a 
week and one weekend per month. First 
das* references essential. Reply lo BOX 
Afil. 


DOMESTIC * CATERING 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


CO R C OW-R L E U . Cook bnmedlatety avail- 
able. for dinners lunches and buffet 
parties/ no agents. t«h oi 627 1892 


RENTALS 


nARROW-DH-THC-WLL La roe fully fur- 
l n rated detached nouse m prKaie cMaie 
CamaiMH for Hartow-on ita-HIII end 
Sudbury HHI statWo 6 bodreoon. 2 
hamroone. 3 large reception rooms- 
fully idled MKhcn. uuiiiy room. GCH 
garage, large C3S0 pw Tel Ol 

89Q 4268. 


E Holiday lei iopp Hob- 
day inn Hofei i From 1/12/86 uniu 
13/1/87. Charmingly decorated flat, 
new conversion wiinz bed*. GCH. filled 
MKhen wilh freawr. washmg/dner ma- 
chine Bathroom, reception wild \idro / 
colour TV. Open! no ooto an ohuar-aling 
a? private garden. £200 pw. Tri Ol 
386 6766 


1 near Windsor. 4 bedroom farttw 

house with secluded garden. Lusury 
KUchen/breakfan room. 2 reram Lin 
nirnnned but with fully fmed 
and carpets. Healed pool. £1600 prat 
Telephone. 06286 4636. 


KENSINGTON. WML One bedroom (uni 
flat. Luxury coovcmon with largr itfW 
overlooking garden square. GCH Atail- 

abte up to three monins (ram December 
is. Refs. £275 pw week. negottoWv. 
Ring. 01-957 8W9- 


IU Lovely modern two bedrootned nai io 
let C/H. Fff. carpeted ihrouatiouL prt- 
vaie parhlitg. dose to (simpion/ Angrf 
Very convcnhsnl for proieroonaB worl“ 
ing in Uie City. £150 00 pw week 
TeL-Ol 229 5 COB or OI 609 7825 


TCDDBMTOM Sparlous ramloruhfe fam- 
ily house near par ns and River. 5 
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large modem 
klKhen. CH. garden. 3 minutes siallon. 
£226 pw umg let. Tel: Ol 943 IM6 


OFF BAKER STREET. 2 bedrooms. I rv 
(moos luxury f!4L 34 hour porterage. 
£275 pw. minimum let 6 months. Tet Ol 
894 0620. 


Wl Carden So. Lgc pailo rial. 2 dM beds, 
lux kil. living rm. etc Full furnished A 
eoulpped. £220 pw. Tel: 10342821 4307 


LOVELY STUDIO Sen Idlchen and bain, 
wkly hskpr. lennts ctt. res. png. w Ken 
tube. £96 pw. Ol 381 61 BO AM/PM. 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, central Lon- 
don from £336 pw Pius VAT Ring 
Town Home Apartments 373 3433 
NATFAM Wl Lux lurn maisonette. 3 
beds. 1 rec. new K ft a. new decor ft 
carpels. £326pw. Tel. 0542 712617 
W8 Tap quality lumbated omco/nai. new 
conversion In exretlenl kxaliun £185 
pw. Tel: 01 937-3954/0722 72639. 


TRUSTEE ACTS 


NOTICE Is hereby given pursuant kj $27 
of the TRUSTEE ACL 1926 thal any per- 
son having a CLAIM a»8nsl or an 
interest in the ESTATE oi any oi me 
deceased person's whose names, address- 
es and dearrtpuons are set out Detow Is 
hereby required to send particulars In 
writing of his claim or iniwedio the per- 
son or persons men Honed in rotation lo the 
d ece a sed person concerned pef ore me date 
specified, after which dale Uie estate oi me 
dece as ed wul be dtartbuted by the person- 
al represenuilve* among the persons 
entitled thereto having regard only lo Uw 
claims and interega of widen they have 
had notice 


SCHLESINGER. MRS WINIFRED HENRI- 
ETTA Of OLlVEfi-S COTTAGE. 
BOXFORD. Near NEWBURY. BERK- 
SHIRE died on 4lh September 1966. 
Particulars lo: DAWSON ft CO.. Snllci- 
IDrtSI of 2 NEW SQUARE. LINCOLNS 
INN. LONDON. WC2A 3RZ. before ltd) 
JANUARY 1987. 


SMITH THOMAS ALDYSIUS ol THE 
IRISH CLUB. 82 EATON SQUARE. LON- 
DON 9W3 died on 23 JANUARY 1905 
Particulars lo BRYAN O'CONNOR ft CO . 
boUCUOrtSi of 18726 SOUTHWARK ST. 
LONDON SEI. before 16th JANUARY 
1987 


Cootiaoed from page 19 


THEATRES 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bn Office ft CC 01-930 9832. 1M 
Call 24hr/7 day ec bkga 240 7200 
Eves 7.30 Wed ft Sat mate 2J0pm 


r Nominated Actor of ms Year 
lAurmre Onvter Aworta) to 
“A TRULY MESMERKINO 
PE R FORMANCE" 
S-Tlmm 

BREAKING tbe CODE 


Dir by CLIFFORD williams 

MOVMB AMD ENORMOUSLY 
QUOTABLE” DXxp 


m MAJESTY*. HaymartteLOl- 
839 2344 TUhctmaster CC 379 
6131 First call OC 340 7300 

AMMEW LLOTO WEBBOT* 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Bterkifl 

B u el l W EI CRAWFORD 

_ Baron Steve 


Clalrr Moore Mays Christine 
M certain oerformonon 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Eves 7.46 Mob Wad ft Sat 3 
Postal tags only for Apr K> Oct 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9999 i no Dkg feel nisi Call 
24 Hr 7 Day OC 240 7200 (MO 
DUO FEE) Orp Sates 930 6123. 
Tlrttetmateor 379 6433 


THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
ft DEMS OUILLCY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


APPROVAL” S.Tte 
Mon-Frt 7.30. Mate Wed 2.00 
SH 2.30 & 800 
Subu nmnaloni avail, al doer 
Mon-Frt ft Sal mate 
SCAT* AVAILABLE FROM C7.BO 
Non h sebta A «s April 2S, 19*7 


LYRIC HUBHRM8TH 01-741 
2311. Eves 7 46. Wed Mate 
2 30. sal Mate 4pm TME 
DWODIAL MA CMW M hi Coc- 
teau with MtaXte Badth. 
S ltWO : E ves 8pm 

iUtal WOl JW FESTIVAL. 


LVRK THEATRE SnVImbury 
Ave Wl 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1660. 01-434 1060. 01-734 

6166/7 


hr 

The Nattonol Throws acclaimed 
production of 

ALAN AVCKBOinDrg 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

"Hrarlbreouagiy funny” Odn 
"HUaiious.. . " S. Times 
"A rare evening o I 
ronur mhUaratton” Times 
Evas 7 JO. Mala Wed and Sal S O. 
Crow Sales 01-990 6123. 

Reduced price mate Student ft 
OAP stand-tm 

FOIST CALL MIDI Y DAY 
CC DOOKDKS ON Ol 240 7200 
(NO HOOKBM FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FDR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 


LILLIAN 

A play by Will Lam Luce, directed 
by Corln Redgrave. Tamar and 
State 23 ft 30 M 4pm. 


LYTTELTON V 928 2262 OC 
l National Theatre's proira nt um 
uaori Today 2.16 How pnee 
mall ft 748Tuel SOflowprtM 
mall THE MAOtSTRATE by Pt- 
nerg. Tue. Wed. Thur, Frl 7A8 
TOWS OF MO NEY Frl 10 JOam 
ft ZOO THE PIED PIPER. 


MAYFAIR oi 629 3037 
From Dec IS lo Jan 3 
Twice daily 2 a a d.o 
wed, ft Sate 10.30. 2.0 ft 4.0 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 


MAYPAOI S CC 629 3036 Mtm 
Thu B Frt/Stf 6.40 ft B.IO 

RICHARD TODD u, 

"Tha Baal Tfartber far yaarer 6 M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unabashed winner* £ Can 
“Semallnrur Time, 

BHi THRU 1 1lls YEAR 


J®»«A» 236 S668 Cc 741 
Grp Sales 930 6123 First 
Call «o 7200 .24 Hre V *o3?i 
nrkrtmasirr 379 6433 
Cf»s B om, Sate 6fen ft 8.30 

STEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGRANO! 

“ftAVAGELV coauc FT 
Ptelhralrr food and dnnk 

LAST M WEEKS! 


_ 01-236 

6668 Let CaH 240 7200 379 6433 
741 9999 Grp Sales 930 6123 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Open De c ember 16 for 4 weeks 
only Twice dotty at 2-0 ft 6-0 


RATIONAL THEATRE Sfh Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES raider 
OUVBER/LVrmTOH/ 
COTTESUNL EaccBent cheap 
seals daw of per Is all theatre* 
hum 10 n. RESTAURANT (928 
2053). EASY CAR PARK. Into 
633 0880. AM COM® 


m LORDON Drury Lane wca 
406 0072 CC 579 6433 Eva 746 
Tue ft w LOO ft 7.46. 

THE ARDREWr LLOYD WEBBER 
fTJ. EUOT MUMBAI. 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 


Croup Bootdngi 01-406 1667 gr 
01-9306123. NOW BOOHDM TO 
MAY SD SSDT,UMIiftVMI tor ad- 
ditional hoMMy perils an Dec 22 ft 
Jan 2 at 3pm 


OLD VK 928 7616 CC 251 1B2I 
From 19 Nov. For a limited muon 
only 


FAITH BROOK 


PATTI LOVE 


and 

THE 'WOMEN 

1 aancriy taro «■■ ■« 

by Cure Boothe Luce 


OLIVIER V 928 2262 OC <Na 
ttonai Theatre', open stage) 
Today 2 00 (low price mat) 
Mon. Tue 7.16 AMPUL FARM 
by Orwell, adapted by Peter 
Hall. Preview Mon IQJQam 
Opens Tue 10.30am UK PKO 
PIPER. Wed. TlHir 7.16 last 
oerte FRAVDA - A Fleet Street 
Comedy. Frl ft Nov 22 lo Dec 2 
theatre dosed tor maintenance. 


PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 OC 
379 6433 FR CaH 24Hr 7Day CC 
240 7200 On. Stem 930 6123 


LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET -STEAL ONETsw 

Eves 7 30 Mats Thu ft Sal 2JSO 


unto dm- Interval 

BEAT TW TOUTS ST ENqUM- 
MG FOR RETURNS AT TME BOX 


P H OE NI X 836 2294 ce 240 9661 

DIANA R1GG 
WILDFIRE 

a new p toy 

Directed by FETUS WOOD 
REDUCED PRICE PREYS NOW! 

Opens 18 Nm at 7pm 
1st Can 240 7200 Orp Sales 930 
6123 Mon- Tha 8 Fri/Sat 4 & 8.15 


PICCADILLY 437 4606 CC 379 
6566/ 379 6433/ 240 7200. 
Craun Sates 93061 23/ 836 3962 
tees Bom. Eats 430 ft 6 15 Wed 


PATRICK MMftl 


DEREK HOYLE 

In 


A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED 

THE WAY TO THE FORUM 


PRBICE EDWARD Bov Other 
734 8961 Find CM 2« Hr 7 Days 
cc Booking 1 836 3464 CM Sales 
930 6123. Mon-Sal 7.30 Mats 
Thun a sal 2.30 

CHESS 

Warata a tal tar 
BtUSICAL OF THE 


- To mmy Ksrbirg 
OUVMR AWARDS 


Hew tnMni to Merab 28, 19*7 

MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 

AVAILABLE OK DAY 


PMNCC OP WALKS Wi 9308681 
/2CC Hotline 93O0S44/B/6. Cro 
Sales 930 6123 Keith Prowsr 
741 9999. Ticket master 3796433 
1st Cali 24hr/7day 240 7200 

'ALLO'ALLO 

Wiin me TV SNOW STARS 

Eves 3. Frt ft Sal 9 30 ft B.-OO 
EXTRA PCRFS SO ft 31 DW al 
2 JO 


i 01-734 1166/7/ 

0261/0120. 24hr cc 240 7200/ 
379 6433 CTO Safes 930 6123. 

-THE B EST MUSICAL W 
LONDON" Cdn 

•■A WONDERFUL STAR - Mall 

MAUREEN UPMAN 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

•*n riMdro w«h Mcmtnenr* 
S.Tlinn “4u« wonderful" D£xp 
Mon-Sat 8 Mate Wed 2 30 Sal 6 


ROYAL COURT S OC 730 1746/ 
18S7. OC 24hr 7 day 240 7200 
tbkg fee) UaM 22 Mm. Eves 
Boot, sat Mats 4pm KAFKA’S 
DKX by Alta IomU. Dir 
Richard Eyre. 


ROYALTY 01-831 0660 24M- CC 
240 7200 CC 379 6453 741 9999 
Grotm Sides 930 6123 

JOSEPH 


TKCSMCDLOR DREAMCOAT 
From 16 Doc twice daily at 2-30ft 

7 JO ROOK NOW 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916- IN 
CUB oC 24hr 7 day 240 7200. 
LaM 2_pcrtc Today 2 ft BMW 


A Mtal e al Plop tor Cti Sdran. 


SAVOY THEATRE Ol 836 8888. 
CC 379 6219. 836 0479. Flrsl Dl 
24 nr 7 day d*g reel 240 T20a 
Keith Prowse 741 9999 (Meg fee). 
Red Price Ptovk TWL 6 ft 8Ja 
Man ft Turn 8pm. Opens Wed 19 
Nov 7pm- 

PATRKH MftCm 
MID II 


• KILLING JESSICA 

Tfte Raw Mjp M — F Bri to 

Directed by BRYAN FORM 


COMEDY 01 379 6399 CC 01 379 
6433/741 9999. F1 rat CaU S4Ar 
340 7200 tokg feel. GTO Sates 930 
6123. 

Man-Frl 8. Wed Md 3. Sat 6 ft 
8-30 

THEATRE OF COMEDY CO 
**Thr finest rondr talents" D Moll 

ROOKERY NOOK 

**A SUP- up revival" Ti m es of "the 
most leiebrated of Ben Ttevwf 
farces" SPecfanr 


NQV 2P 

NOW BOOMNQ FOR 


AT MARTRTS 01-856 1443. Spe- 
cial OC No 379 6433. Gvgs 8.0 
Tuen 2 46. Sal 50 and 8-0 

84tfe ye at AGATHA CIBMS l ift 's 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190. 741 9999. FUW CaU 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200 Orp 
Sales 930 6123 

CABARET 

“Tbs sharpest, ■ 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed ft OMreognwhed ta 

GBSon Lyme 

Mon Frt 7 46. Mat Wed 300 
Sal 4 30 ft 8 16 

BO O W NO NOW KltMWD TO 
AFRH. 87 



Today 130. wed 

V Tola Tontohl 

i Man. Tue. 7.30 

mr. Thdta 

1.30. wed 1.30 Mnsama To- 

lUOttl 7 30. Fair M o l d Man. Tue 

7 30. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

-The very best of BrWatn'S 
ramie latent" Dally Mail 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office ft CC. 

836 9987/5646 First CBM CC. 24 

m 240 7200 i dkg feel. Evgs 8 0. 

Mate Wed 2.30. Sat 5.0. OJO. 

JULIA McKENZK 

MJUmK JARVIS 


JOS EF I BItE TEWBfM In 
ALAR AYCKBOURN'S Note Flay 

WOMAN IN MIND 

TMH MUST DE THE FUNNHST 

FLA T JM LONDON, IT IS ALSO 

THE MOST DKTURDHW S Tel 

"ALAN AYCKBOURN IS WRfT- 

DW AT Ml MM" s Times 

“JULIA McKEHZK OWES A 

perfo— ahct : TO TAKE the 

MEATH AWAIT* O Tel 


VICTORIA PALACE 01-834 1317 

Eves 7.30 Mote Wed ft Sal 2.46 
EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December 2629.30 Jan I & 2 
24hr 7 day re bkgs uw extra 
ctiaroc-l on FIRST CALL 240 7200 
“A NKSiT OF SHEER SOtoC ft 
DANCE MAGKT Wkly News 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 9 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL NWHOLA9 
CYDCHAMMC 


MARK WTNT B R to 

CHARLIE GIRL 

CROUP SALES SI 938 (IS 


Ako book. Ttatoftmotfer 379 6433 
or any W K Smith Trave* Branch 


! 834 0283/4 
CC 834 0048- ce TMkatmasfer 379 
6433. From 24 Nov. 

Hri Mtaferi Samoa 
THE UDN. TKmrai ft 

ta CLS. Lewis 

ROYAL CHAJHTY GALA 
27 NOV at LM 

MWTEIIALI. SWI Ol 930 
7765/839 4466 CC 01 379 

6666/6453. 741 9999. OTPS Ol 
8363962. Mon-Frt 8.00 Wed Mat 
UO Baa OjO O ft 83 0 

"the senna is grant joy" 

FINAL 2 WtXKS EROS NOV 22 
THEATRE OP COM ED Y ui ro au l s 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By j.b. mastley 
Di reeled by RonaM Eyre 

NONBRAWTi FOR INI 


WIHISHAU. SWI Ol 9307768/ 
839 4456 OC 01 379 6868/579 
6433. 741 9999. 

JUEJ E E E R ALDMBC 

WALTERS __ JAM ES 

SNOLA JOHN JDamoN 

II* El S I MC UMR 

The Award Winning Comedy 


HAYWARD . 

Souihbank. SEI. ROHM and 
DOYLE FABRLV ExMMttom. 
Adm. £3/£t 60. Recorded tnfo: 
Ol 261 0127. 


I USED TO SCREAM ft SHOUT 
ta Sharman Ma cdo n ald 
Prev i ews 2 Dec - Opens 9 Dae 
7pm Mon-Frt B_ Sat 630 ft IL3D 
Wed mate 5 from IO Dec 

WYNDHAirS 4 836 3028 re 579 
6060/6433/ IM Call 24 lira 7 days 
240 7200/741 9999. Gres 836 
3960/831 2771. Toni 3 ft 8 

JOHN ROSEMARY 

MILLS HARRIS 

In (be NT. pi u l iuMf ol 

THE PETITION 

ta BRIA N CLAR K 
Otrerted by PETER HALL 
Ly 

’ Tims* 

LAST TWO PEHFS 
WVNSMARTS S B36 3028 CC 379 

636B/T7chrtinast*r 3796433/1* 

on 24 hr 7 (toys 240 7200/T41 
9999/Grp soles 930 6123/836 
3962. Eves 7 JO. Sol nuts 3 
For a Ibaiied season rrom 19 nov 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM WILKINSON In 

Tbe Vanns Vta prsdae B sn «f 

GHOSTS 

Bv Henrik Ibsen 
Directed by David Thacker 

raUME VRS 928 63M CC 379 
6433. UnU 20 Dec JULIUS 
r A CS SR Eves 7 JO Frt mat 2. 
WMM VK STUDIO 928 6363 
PAINES PLOUGH In 
PEWCCEIO BOYS ta Jim Mor- 
ns “Comedy ta b B Ns ri ag .. P d 
rissmteead the shew to 
B a yes " cdn. Eves 8nnv 


ART GALLERIES 


7S2ii8tackrna» Tube 1.1 

Wet s ric e * n er leeh br. Autumn 

ExhUNUon. Until 26 Nov.Tue- 

Sal 106. Suns 2-6. AdmJCJ.OO. 


Mean Centre. EC2. 01-638 
4141 . Until 4 Jam DeeW Rete- 
erts 11796-1864): pamUnos Of 
Eiteoee ft toe Near East PLUS 
Uan Rags ta nomadic Fare 
tribeswomen. Tuee - Sat io- 
646. Sun ft 8 Hate 12-6.45. 
Ctoeed Meednye, Adm: £2 ft 
£1. R e d u ced rates tor pre- 


BKfTISH LIBRARY. Cl. RtetaC 

St. WC1. BUM A SONG FDN 


the tafeuasfisasf THE CffT Ef 

MAPS. Man-Sal 106. Sun 
2-306 Adm free. 

NURMI P OST EEPHFBBMEI 

■STS rXEEN TiON. Un m 22nd 

Nn vwnoe f.BUHIWP ft 
■IBM. 6 Duke Street SI. 
James's. SWI. 01-930 9332 
MotvFri HML Sal 10-1. - 

CCA GALLERIES 


17 Prmces Arcane Wl 
Bktad Fetter 
Recent W a t e rcolo u rs and 
screen Pruts. Unit) 16 Nov. 
01-499 6701. 


Motcembf 81 . Tto 2360800. 


ADAM TESIMB sculBturo. 

OUUBM 14 Old Bond SL Wl. 
491 T40B. An exhlMttqn of 


rnrousli November and De- 
cember. Mon-Frt 10-6-30: 

Sate 10-1 

FBSt ART SOCIETY 148 New 

Bond Street W ». 01-629 BI16. 
nm THAULOW. Aten 


1800-1930. ana Ate I IS I 
‘ 1918-19S0. 


THE QUEEN’S 
GALLERY 

BbcM bb Ih b Pa face 

from U» (toyai 


h taw 


iJBOBntfQ da Mid 

10 «» unseat day 
■Ti». SB lf-5. Son 2-5 
Adm Ei. 10. (intmi! nm SOpJ. 
Until JRUry 1887. 


CMLLEHY, St Martin's Place. 
London WC2. Tef 01-930 <662. 
EUZABETH H : PortralU of 60 
years. Adm. £2. Ftonta BCkM 
£6. STASBW THE SELF : Seif- 
PartraU Pholafeaptiy 1B40S- 
1980B. Adm. £1. Mon-Frt 10-6. 
Sal 106. Sun 2-6- 
PKCJUMLLY ftALLERT 16 GOTO 
SL. Wl. 0 09287 6 
DAVID STUFF DriwlMB. 
Watercolours and e irtitnps. un- 
til 22 Noe et wnsr Mon-Frt io- 

SJOSaw 10 - 12-30 

ROYAL ACADEMY. HOCADHX T 
Ol 724 9062 
■ Onen dally 106 Inc Sun. 
(reduced rale Sun. Uun 1.40) 
NEW ARCmreClURK: FOSTER, 
ROP ERS, STBHJNB -THE 
SKETCHBOOKS OF PICASSO 
Ad ns tedo n (tor each oxfimoon) 
£ 2 - 60 . £i 70 rone. rate. 

CC. boaung Ol 741 9999 


— Kina street Sl James's. 

SWI. DQUOLAS ST ANNUS 
PRAT. 1SB0-1S9B. unm 2801 
NmfrtMDtr. Moo- Frt 9306.30. 

TATE CAUCHY. Mmbank SWI. 

Pnl i dl t b liriHl TheOotd- 

cn Age ITU7-1843. UntB 4 Jten. 

Adm. £2.66 SOL LeWITT 6e- 

MCfed prtnte 19TO-B6. Unm 30 

Nov. UPS TURNER PRDZ 

DHFLAY (Award Ob 26 Nov i 

unu 7 Dec. THE LIPCHITZ 

«FT. Unto 10 May. Adm free. 

Whdays IO 6.00. Suns 3 - 6.60. 

R e corded Into. 01-831 7128. 


AT GALLERY, 18 

Thacke ra y a. wa . 7 8883. 
PETER BURGESS - Ptonbogi ft 

Waterroloura. Until 2B Nov. 


CINEMAS 


£ 01-698 8891 
Trkte £3. Stodem Coma £2 all 
peris. Tickets BooUMr Today 
6.16 ft 8.16 RUTHLESS PEO- 
PLE llSL Today 11.00 ft 2.30 
Kkh Oub (InMant Me mb er inipi 
PJLR.TX. (PPL 

CAMDEN PLAZA k > Camden 
Town Tube 486 2443 MEN f 1 5 1 
Film 01226 4 30 6 40 8 66 
CHELSEA COMMA Kings Road 
SW3. 361 3742 MEM I16L Film 
at 2.38 4 30 6 40 8 88 

CURZON MAYFAIR Curzon 51 
449 3737. aea, Lanzmann's 
mom (TO part 1 Today at 
6.46pm Sat/Sun 11 SOam Pan 
2 Sun 11.30am ft 6 46pm 
"There's magta in this tom . . a 
sheer masterpiece" Simone de 

I fep u vgtr. le Monde. 

CUHZON WEST E ND Shaftesbury 
Avenue Wl 439 4806. Mamie 
Smith. Denholm Elltatl. JnN 
Dench ta A ROOM WITH A 
VIEW (PO). FUm at 1.30 (NM 
Sunl. 3.45. 610 A 8.40. 

"A film as near 10 perfection as 
lih possibte 10 conceive" 

AiexawBcr Walker. Std 

L E ICE S TER SQUARE THEATRE 
930 8282 IEnq)/930 76IS 124 
Or term/ Visa/ AmEx Book 


CNMA (PP) In 7Qrara Dolby 
Stereo Sep progs Daily 1 00 . 
3.36 6 IO. 8.60. Late NHM 
Slow Frt ft Sal II 45cm All 
m 


advance. 


. (hr. Ad- 
mbaJty Airiu Tel: 9 30 6844. 
THE ROY AL SOC PCTY OF MA- 
RME ARTISTS, 6 - 17 

Novamber daily. IO - 6pm. 
Aten El. Cone. GOP. 


OALLERT, 25/24 Cork SL Wl . 
Tel : 01-734 6961/2266 Peter 
Curling : ExNMUon of Hunting 
ft Racing ptrlures. 19th Nov- 
6th Dec. Mon-Frt Mo aan - 
600 p m 



Recorded info 01 681 4894. 

Wkdyi 10 - 8.30 Suns 2.30 • 

8.60. Oaeed Fridays : 

WEBME8 ARCHRCCrURAL 
CALLEHV. 36 Store SL WC1. 
Tet: 01- 836 4898. DAVID 

R OBER TS Views of Egypt and 

toe Holy Land Monday ■ Friday 

IOC Sundays. IPi. 

ZAMANA GALLERY. 1 Cromwett 
Oanteno. SW7. 884 6612. IS- 
TMBMJL - A PlwopsiUt 
Journey nmwgh Turkish Ax- 
autecturo. Unto 18 Jan. Toe- 
Sal 10-6 JO. Sun 12-5J80 


Si Marun's 
Lane WC2 379 3014/856 
0691 ROSA LUXEM8URO 
(PP)- Film at 1.00 3JO 600 
8.36 


KN 


236 422 5 HANHAH AND HER 
SISTERS (151 Dally: 3.0. 6 0. 
7 O. 9.0 


1839 

7697) MONA LISA 1181 Sep 
progs Today 3 16 6.00 B.40 
Late NlgM Show Frl 6 Sal 
11.46pm. Ml seats bootuMc m 
advance. Access and Visa tote- 
phone bootdnea welcome. 


(930 61 111 Info 930 4260 / 
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advance. Credit card Hot Line 
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vice. £2.50 seats available 
Monday an perfs 

ODEON MA RB L E ANCN (723 

Mill Wall Disney Picture, 

Prrw nto DASft. TH E CHEAT 

MOUSE DETECTIVE »U> Sep 

prog> Dorn open Dally 2-46 

6-16 7.45. Reduced priced tor 

OAF'S. UB40 holders. Student 

card hojdUto Under I 6 S. 
REMKMK opp. Ruspm So. Tide- 
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FUm al 2.30 4.36 6.48 9.00 <2j 
MEN >181 FUm al 2.16 420 
630 246. 


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i 





THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER IS 1986 


^righ-rkk* O n other side of the Greenham wire 

diplomacy 
draws fire 


Continued from page 1 

paid “ransom** to Iran, but 
had sent the weapons to gain 
“access and influence” there 
and end the Gulf war. 

He said he had not violated 
his own policy against nego- 
tiating with terrorists, and had 
not made concessions to those 
who held Americans captive 
in Lebanon. 

“We did not — repeat, did 
not — trade weapons or any- 
thing else for hostages, nor will 
we," he said. “Those who 
think we have 'gone soft' on 
terrorism should take up the 
question with Colonel 
Gadaffi." 

He said the arms were sent 
in “small amounts” and were 
modest deliveries; they were 
ofa defensive nature, and “my 
purpose was to convince Teh- 
ran that our negotiators were 
acting with my authority, to 
send a signal that the LIS was 
prepared to replace the 
animosity between us with a 
new relationship.'* 

Mr Reagan also said Con- 
gress would be informed now. 
Yesterday it was announced 
that he will bold a press 
conference on Wednesday. 

Iran denial of 
any contacts 
with America 

Continued from page 1 
their rights," Mr Khamenei 
said. “We are not asking the 
United States for ransom. You 
have to give us our spare pans 
which are worth millions of 
dollars and have been paid for 
under the previous regime." 

The statement followed 
upon a similar suggestion 
from the Speaker of the Irani- 
an Parliament Mr Hojaiol- 
islam Ali Akbar Hashemi 
RafsanjanL that the supply of 
further material paid for dur- 
ing the Shah's rule could 
persuade Iran to make inter- 
cessions with those holding 
the hostages in Lebanon. 

Nevertheless, Mr 
Khamenei went out of his way 
to deny any official Iranian 
involvement with the Ameri- 
cans. let alone negotiations 
lasti ng 1 8 months — the period 
alluded to by President 
Reagan. 



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Ploughing through the mud, a seemingly unstoppable mobile launch vehicle on exercise inside the base. (Photographs: Chris Harris) 

By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 



Greenham woman behind the fence: Flight Lieutenant 
Dawn Hewitt, who has an “awesome responsibility”. 


After four years of con- 
troversy about siting anise 
missiles at the RAF airfield 
near Newbury in Berkshire, 
the authorities lifted the cur- 
tain of secrecy yesterday. 

It was, said lieutenant 
Colonel Bob Bras of the 
United States Air Force, the 
day for dispelling myths and 
uncertainties surrounding 
Greenham Common. 

Journalists and television 
crews were takes on a con- 
ducted tour and allowed to talk 
freely to personae! and inspect 
the launch and control vehicles 
making up the convoys that 
attract so mnefa protest 
The 96 missiles, however, 
remained out of bounds, stored 
in six hardened shelters. 

The 501st tactical missile 
wing consists of six anise 
flights based at Greenham. 
Each flight has four launch 
vehicles, each capable of 
carrying four missiles, two 
mobile launch control centres 
and 16 other vehicles. Up to 70 
personnel man each convqy 
including 44 security police, 
some from the RAF regiment 
The chain of command to be 
activated should the convoys 
be deployed for real starts with 
the President of the United 
States and descends through 


Nato — but the final finger on 
the button belongs to men and 
women like Flight Lieutenants 
Mark Carter, Joel O'Bryan 
ami Dawn Hewitt, all aged 24. 

They are among the launch 
control officers and it h they 
who will have to pash the 
green bntton marked 
“Execute” on the control pan- 
els that would send the mis- 
siles winging to predetermined 
targets in the Soviet Union. 

Lieutenant Carter, from 
West Palm Beach in Florida, 
explained that the missiles 
conld be fired only after he and 
a colleague had fed instruc- 
tions simultaneously into their 
computer consoles in the mo- 
bOe launch control centre. 

Lieu tenant Hewitt was die 
first woman branch officer to 
be field-qualified in erase and 
is one of two to be stationed in 
Britain.' She volmiteered for 
the programme after fiuishiiig 
an Air Force-sponsored degree 
in computer sciences at the 
University of New Hampshire 
nearly three years ago. 

How did she feel abort the 
possibility of himAing the 
missiles in a real war? 

“I would do my job. That's 
all I want to say. I don't want 
to discuss my emotions.” She 
had, she said, never met any of 


the women who co n tinue to 
protest outside the p erim e te r 
wire and had no comment on 
their views. 

lieutenant O'Bryan, from 
Brownwood, Texas, added: 
“The responsibility we have is 
awesome but it is not a job yoa 
would do unless you believed 
in the reasons for it” 

'The protests abort cruise 
continue. Last week, a convoy 
returning from exercise tm 
Salisbury Plain was ambushed 
by demonstrators who severed 
brake pipes. 

The commander of the wing, 
whose motto is “Poised to 
deter — quick to react”, denied 
that the planned deployment 
of convoys had been sus- 
pended or delayed. 

But Colonel John Bacs had 
a warning: “My concern is j 
that we could get into a serious 
-accident because of the ir- 
responsible action of some de- 
monstrators." 

The responsibility for deal- 
ing with protesters hi peace- 
time lies with the UK crafian 
police; military guards travel- 
ling with the convoy are not 
armed. 

However, Colonel Bacs 
said, in times of war or tension 
it would be “a d iff ere nt ball 
game” 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,198 Solution to puzzle 17,203 I Today’s events 


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Royal engagements 
Princess Anne. Patron, the 
Royal Lymington Yacht Club, 
attends their annual dinner, 
Lymington, Hampshire, 7.45. 

Princess Maigaret leaves 
Heathrow for New Orleans, 
12.50. 

New exhibitions 
• Recent paintings by Helen 
Firth; The Open Eye Gallery, 75 
Cumberland St. Edinburgh: 
Mon to Fri 10 to 6, Sat 10 to 4 


Tomorrow’s events 


Exhibitions in progress 
Don't Trust The Label: fakes, 
imitations and the real thing; 
York City Art Galleiy, Exhi- 
bition Sq; Mon to Sat 10 to 5, 
Sun 2.30 to 5 (ends Dec 7). 

illustrations by Gallen- 
Kallela and colour photographs 
of Karelian rural life: two com- 
bined exhibitions from Finland: 
MacRobert Arts Centre, Stirling 
University; Mon to Sat 1 1 to 5, 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Nov 29). 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,204 

A prize o/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. PO Box 486 . Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday ’s competition are: Mrs R AspinalL 
7 Bell Busk. Skipton. N Yorks ; Mr K B Roche. 156 Long Lane. 
Walton. Liverpool ; F J Skidmore : 44 Queen Street, Wolver- 
hampton. 


Mon to Fri 10 to fi. Sat 10 io 4 “ , 5 (en £ii 0 X 29 \ 

(ends Dec 41 The Un-pamted La n d s cape: 

Dr Livingstone, Z presume?: 

the life and work of explorer ^ 

Henry Morton Stanley, Na-' 5*^3 *v\V 10-30 to 5 
tional Museum of Wales, Main ^ ends Nov 
Building, Cathays Park. Cardiff; Last chance to see 

Tues to Sat 10(0 5, Sun 2 30 to 5 « — 

(ends Jan 25). 


, Recent watercolours by Ann 
(ends Jan _5). Manly and Dennis Harrison and 

sculpture by Stanley Vereker 
*** Centre, Town HalL Bamp- 
14 High St, West Wycombe; pm, Oxon, 2J0 to 4.30. 

Folk art of Indonesia; The 


Name 

Address .... 



14 High SL West Wycombe; ton, Oxon, 230 to 4.30. 

Mon to Sat 9 30 to 5 30 (ends Folk an of Indonesia; The 
iT j .t r* nvj™. Read Molteno Gallery, The 
■ V°der the Cover of Darkness: Buildings. Broughton, Slock- 
mght pnnts; DLI Museum & bridge, 1030 to 6 
Arts Centre, nor County HalL Looking into paintings: land- 
Durham City; Tues toSat 10 to scape; Castle Museum. Notting- 
5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Dec 24). io to 4.45. ^ 

Profile: The Conscious Con- . 
tract - portrait work by British iVins,c 
photographers 1935-1985; Concert by the Halle Or- 
Mappin Art Gallery, Weston chestra; Free Trade HalL Man- 
Park, Sheffield, Mon to Sat 10 cheater, 730. 
to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Dec 14) Concert by the Takacs String 
Contemporary paintings: 

Burford Gallery. High St, 

Buford. Oxon; Mon to Sun 10 
to 6 (ends Nov 29). 

Last chance to see 

Sickert and Thanet Ramsgate Surrey Chamber Orchestra; 
Library Galleiy. Guildford University HalL GnOdford, 
Lawn. 9 30 to 5. 7.45. 

Moore, Hepworth, Rie and Concert by the New London 


Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow westbound between junc- 
tions 16 (Swindon) and 17 
(Chippenham). M4: Lane clo- 
sures between junctions 34 and 
35 (Rhondda & Ben-Coed). MS: 
Contraflow on the southbound 
carriageway at junction 14 
(B4509 Thor ; bury). 

The North: Ml: Repair work 
with lane closures between junc- 
tions 31 (A57) and 33 (A630 
Rotherham). MJ& Contraflow 
between junctions 6 and 7 
(Thome/M 62). M6: Contraflow 
between junctions 29 and 32 
(A6/M55). 

Scotland: MS: Roadworks at 
junction 15 (Townhead inter- 
change) affecting drivers travel- 
ling to and from Springbum and 
Kirkintilloch, Glasgow. A82: 
Construction work S of Luss, 
Dumbartonshire. A74: Barrier 
repairs and lane closures S of 
junction with A70 (Ayr); 

Information supplied by AA 


Weather 

forecast 

A shallow ridge of high 
pressure will cross most 
of Britain during the dny 
ahead of cloud and rain 
spreading quickly east- 
wards from the next At- 
lantic system. 


6 am to midnigh t 


Concert by the Takacs String 
Quartette; Stan borough School, 
Welwyn Garden City, 7.45 
Concert by the Epsilon Wind 
Quintet; Third Eye Cfenire, 350 
Sauchiehail St. Glasgow. 8. 

Concert by the University of 
Surrey Chamber Orchestra; 
University HalL GnOdford. 













EliT/Hir 

n- -Il ' -*I [f.rf lv TZwmM 


Moore, Hepworth, Rie and Concert by the New London 
Coper; Cleveland Gallery. Vic- Chamber Choir Assembly Hah, 
toria Rd, Middlesbrough, 12 to Tonbridge Wells. 3. 


General 


lEEJESCES M 
K]Q3EZ]E£]C3E£]|^^H 

I gitn mnniTi 

l ien ram mm 


Pursuit of Perfection: Works 
by Charles Rennie Mackintosh; Salisbu 
Aberdeen Art Gallery, School- Lion Hoi 
hilL 10 to 5. 430. 


Salisbury Book Fair, Red 
on Hotel Salisbury, 10.30 to 


430. 

Antony Hopkins: How to be a 
successful! feilur; Northcott 



Mncir ruiwu, now w oc 

music successful! feilur; Nortbco 

Concert by the Amici Cham- Theatre. Exeter University, 8. 

ber Group; Keynsham Parish 

Church. 8. , . ■ 

Concert by the Cambridge AniUVersaneS 
Musick: Rowerfield Arts Cen- 
tre, Portsiewart. 8. 

Piano redial by Dmitri 
Alexeev; Elmwood Hall, 


ACROSS 

1 Charancrs preceding MP 
sob for her (5). 

4 City laid out under big hill, 
initially »9). 

9 Test match? Final defeat 19). 

10 English composer's wrong 
in bar (5). 

1 1 Not a full house before mam 
book writer appears t5t. 

12 Mundane description of 
traveller in space (9). 

13 The rest making upstart live 
outside (7». 

15 Attractive artwork (7). 

18 Some da> for il perhaps? So 
lhe\ say (7). 

20 Satirist finds half The jurv 
bribable (7). 

21 Plain black? Au contraire f 

(4.5) . 

23 Scn^ungc old coin found in 
lift compartment (5). 

25 Boxer's feel. say. slop mov- 
ing bncfly (5). 

26 Veteran bats. c.g. at Lord's 

(3.6) . 

27 Cosmetic device? Yes. had 
owned some (3-6). 

28 Took out old hat (5). 

DOWN 

1 Start fighting to secure some 


TODAY 

Births: William Pitt the Elder, 
Ist eari of Chatham, prime 


brass (4.5). 

2 Fish below end of pier — 
using these? (5). 

3 Dangerously silly way walk 
takes in road (9j. 

4 Liberal supports what's in 
text, for instance (7). 

5 Country in which i touch 
down again? (7). 

6 Borrow travel book, this one 
in Spain (5). 

7 Are you and I said to lead 
race? What a disaster (9). 

8 Convenient for Hungary's 
borders (5). 

14 Authentic 18th century 
character(5.4). 

16 Publicly supported case, in 
short, in a 28 (9i. 

17 From route to Samarkand 
remove a plant (9). 

19 Area inside American bases 
(7). 

20 Flying squad needed to 
catch this thief? (7). 

21 Wood he put round piano 
(5). 

22 Seaside area, sav, involved 
in mast production (5). 

24 Appreciate it mav'be short 
measure (5). 


Queen's University, Belfast 7 minister 1756-61, 1766-68. Lon- 
30. don. 1708: Sir William Her- 

Recital by Ursula Snow (vi- scheL astronomer. Hanover, 
olini and Peter O'Haean (pi- 1738; Aoenst Krosh, ohysiolo- 


oiinj and Peter O' Hagan (pi- 
ano); Brune Park School. 
Military Road, Gosport. Hants. 
7 30. 

Concert by the Gabrieli Con- 


1738; Angnst Krogh, physiolo- 
gist. Nobel laureate 1920, 
Grenaa. Denmark, 1874; Aaen- 
rin Bevan, Tredegar. 1897. 
Deaths: Johannes Kepler, 


sort and Players: Gracie Fields f astronomer. Regensburg, 


Theatre, Rochdale. 7 30. 


many. 1630; Christoph Gluck, 


Concert by the Bristol Choral composer. Vienna, 1787; Geo- 
Society and Orchestra; Colston ige Romney, portrait painter. 


Hall. Bristol. 7 30. Kendal. Cumt 

Concert by the WhitstaUe Hsi, empress d 
Choral Society: Canterbury Peking. 1908: L 
Cathedral. 7 30. actor. Van N 

Concert by the Rochester 1954. 


Kendal. Cumbria. 1802: Tz'o 
Hsi, empress dowager of China, 


actor. Van Nuys, California. 
1954. 


Choral Society: Rochester Cath- TOMORROW 
edral. 7 30. Births: John Bright, anit- 

Concert by the Durham Corn Law campaigner, Rocb- 
Guhcdral Choir with Orchestra; dale. Lancs. 1811. 


Durham Cathedral. 7 30. 

Concert by the Philharmonia 
Orchestra: The Congress The- 
atre. Eastbourne. 7.30. 
General 

Christmas Craft Fair: Tun- 


Deaths: Henry EH. reigned 
1216-72. London. 1272: Lucas 
The- von Hildebrand!, architect, Vi- 
enna, 1745; John Walter, 
founder of The Times. Tedding- 
ton. Middlesex. 1812: Louis 


Concise Crossword page 17 


bridge Wrils Girls’ Grammar 

SSSioW** 1 R<L s ‘ SBSTsSta 

& fiSto: The Mailings, " ^ HoDywood. 1960. 
Bridge Sq. Farnham. 10 30 to 
3.30. 

Book Fair. St Pieter's Church 
Hall. Hatfield Rd. St Albans. 10 
10 4. 

Book Fair. Griffin Hotel. 

Leeds, 10 to 5. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 8. 1 5 am and then again 
at 9 am. 


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Letter from Qatar 

A Princess at 
the male feast 


When the princes of Arabia 
entertain other noble princes 
to a banquet ii is the Islamic 
tradition for .women to be 
excluded from toe feasting 
table. 

It was, therefore, a singular 
honour for the Princess of 
Wales to be seated at dinner 
with the Amir of Qatar, 
Sheikh Khalifa Bin Hamad 
al-Thani, . last night; but it 
was, after all her husband* s 
38th birthday. 

The royal travefling circus 
of the Gulf-moved on yes- 
terday from the mountains of 
Oman to the flat little state of 
Qatar, which spends a gratify- 
ing proportion of its oil 
revenues on British exports. 

Originally it had been in- 
tended that the Amir should 
entertain the Prince ofWaled, 
while the Princess was fed in 
another room by Sheikha 
Rauda Umm Abdullah, the 
second most senior of the 
Amir’s wives. 

When the Amir learnt of 
his guest’s impending anni- 
versary be invited the Prince 
and Princess to a joint ban- 
quet at his home in the 
Rayyan Palace outside the 
capital, Doha. 

There were no Qatari 
women present, only Miss 
Anne Beckwith-Smith, the 
Princess's lady in waiting, 
and the British Ambassador’s 
wife. 

The Amir’s second most 
senior wife, having found 
herself surplus to require- 
ments, took herself off on a 
shopping trip to London. 

The Princess looked stun- 
ning in a fiill-length ice-blue 
dress with diamond necklace 
and earrings, and appeared at 

ease as she sat drinking 
cinnamon coffee before going 
into a meal of mutton on rice. 

Arabian banquets are not 
quite what they sound. Un- 
like those in Britain they last 
for little more than 45 min- 
utes, which is partly ex- 
plained by the complete 
absence of speeches or alco- 
holic drink. 

At least the British royal 
couple are being allowed to 
spend their nights together. 

They are staying at the 
Rumaila Guest Palace, built 
in the 1950s and home to Mrs 
Thatcher during her visit here 
in 1981; but the royal couple 


have been also given toe use 
of toe Amir’s beach villa. 

The Prince and Princess 
arrived from Oman in a 
chartered British Caledonian 
aircraft, stepping into a hot 
breeze that caused the Prin- 
cess to hang on to her haL 
Qatari censors attempted to 
stop the transmission to 
London of press pictures of 
.the moment, because they 
thought it showed her in an 
unflattering light. 

They also attempted to 
stop pictures which, as some 
pictures inevitably do. 
showed members of the of- 
ficial entourage with their 
eyes closed, one of the Prince 
ofWaks caught in the middle 
of an ungainly stride, and one 
of the British Ambassador. 
Mr Julian Walker, appearing 
to stumble. 

The ban was quickly lifted 
after Mr Victor Chapman, 
the Prince’s mess secretary, 
intervened and asked for all 
pictures to be sent un- 
hindered. Qatari officials 
have been sensitive ever 
rinm the publication during 
toe Queen’s visit in 1979 of 
photographs which showed 
her attending an apparently 
makeshift and unregal picnic 
in the desert. ^ 

The royal visit to Qatar has 
its quota of political ^ over- 
tones. Britain is Qatar’s ma- 
jor supplier, with exports 
worth f M2 million last yean 
but the oil price collapse, and 
the feet that Qatar’s modern 
infrastructure is now largely 
complete, mean that toe fig- 
ure is expected to drop to 
£120 million this year. 

Yesterday morning the 
royal couple visited Masirah, 
an island off Oman, to see the 
British Eastern Relay Station 
operated tty BBC engineers to 
said the World Service and 
External Services, received 
by satellite from London on 
their way to toe Arabian 
peninsula and toe Indian sub- 
continent. 

Various claims have been 
made that the installation is, 
or was, an out-station of 
GCHQ engaged on ocean . 
surveillance but Mr Peter 
Lord, toe manager, toid his 
visitors yesterday that it was 
nothing more than an out- 
station of Bush House. | 

Alan Hamilton 



TODAY Sun rises: Smarts: TOMORROW Smnsm: Smarts: 

7.18 am 4.12 pm 7.20 am 4.10 pm 


n 


Ful moon tomorrow 


Moon sets : Moon rises 
6.10 am 3J30 pm 


n 


7-26 am 3.47 pm 


FuB moon 12.12 pm 


Around Britain 


54 dau 
54 dotl 
57 dufi 
57 Clot 
57 raki 
4 57 ram 

3 55 rain 

4 57 rain 
4 57 rain 
3 55 rain 
3 55 rain 
3 55 ran 
3 55 rain 
3 55 rein 
3 55 rain 
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-23 12 54 rein 

.43 13 55 ram 
.75 13 55 rain 
52 rain 

2 54 ram 

3 55 ram 
2 54 rata 
2 54 rain 

2 54 ram 

0 50 rata 

3 55 clou 
3 55 rain 
2 54 doll 

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48 Rafta* r 5 41 Warsaw 

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58 Riyadh a 20 68 Zurich 

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business and finance 













TIMES 


25 

SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MABKFT 


FT 30 Share 

1293.2 (-2.5) 

FT-SE 100 

1644.3 (-0.3) 

Bargains 
25788 (27780) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4295 (+0.0050) 

W German mark 
2.8647 (same) 

Trade-weighted 

68.3 (+0.01) 


Oil inches 
above $15 

Oil prices rose mar 
yesterday, with Nort_ _ 
Brent for delivery next month 
creeping over the $15 a barrel 
level ~in anticipation of an 
agreement at this weekend's 
meeting of the Opec price- 
fixing committee in. Ecuador. 

The committee has been 
called to discuss moving Opec 
back to a fixed-price system 
andan agreement on an S 1 8-a- 
barrel price is expected to be 
reached at the next full Opec 
meeting in Geneva on Decem- 
ber 11. The oil price has also 
firmed in the US as the.onset 
of chid weather in some areas 
has boosted demand for gas 
oiL ; 

; Policy fost, page 26 

Elders cleared 

The acquisition by Elders 
DCL of Courage and other 
assets of Hanson Trust will 
not be rcfenred to -the 
Monopolies Commission. 
The acquisition by Carrio 
Engineering Group of out- 
standing shar es in. J onas 
Woodhdad and Sons is also 
cleared. . . . • 

Unilever hunt 

Unilever officials ^toid 
securities analysts . in Tffcw 
Yorkthaiafttt- disposing 6f 40 
non-core businesses Ionrlast 
three.' years, the compray is. 

in growth 

simply cas&generaszng bus- 
inesses. 

Reuters offer : 

Reuters, 'the mfonna&on 
and news agency, has started 
hs cash tender offer for45 per 
cent of Instinet, the American 
sfaare-dealii% system group. 
The agreed offer, at SSJM 
(£5-74) an Instinct 
would give Reuters control 
Instinet 

US sales dip 

American retail sales mi by 
5 per cent in October, at- 
thtdighi sides other than cats 
wetfe up by - 0 ^ per cent 

Producer prices rose by 03 per 

end. ■ Industrial production 
was unchanged. 

Yes to Coalite 

The bid by Coalite Group 

- for Hargreaves has been 

- cleared by the European 
' Commission, making the offer 
‘ wholly unconditional 

Goodyear talks 

Goodyear Tyre and Rubber 
is in talks about the sale of its 
subsidiary, Goodyear ' Aerb- 

' Corporal ^ art ^ n Marietta 

Bid raised 

Raxiger UK has increased its 
cash offer for Berkeley 

- Exploration to 62p a share and 
taken its stake to 33.4 po'cem. 



rise 


By David SmitVEcouoeks Crerespoi^em 

The rate of inflation held prices, with dessert apples, Ming to 3.5 

pears, lamb and w down in 
drinks and 


at 3 per cent last 
month, rounding off a good 
weac of economic news for the 
Government. City econo mists 
had expected the inflation rate 
to show a small increase. " 

However, the inflation rate 
is likely to rise sharply this 
month because of the 135 
percentage point increase in 
the mortgage rate, which took 
effect from November 1 for 
most borrowers. 

Forecasters expect that the 
pound’s recent weakness will 
push the inflation rale towards 
4 per cent over the winter but 
that the rale win head down 
t em porar i ly in the second 
quarter of next year, possibly 
to coincide with a general 
election. 

The retail price index last 
month was 388.4 (January 
1974 = 100), up 03 per cent 
on the September lewd of 
387.8. 

There were price increases 
for clothing and -footwear, 
particularly women's outer 
wear, and draught beer. The' 
jxice of petrol edged up by 
0.3p to an average of 16&2p a 
gallon for four star. 

But there was a foil of 2.1 
per cent m food 


price. But: 

vegetables, excluding pota- 
toes, rose in price. 

Mr Kenneth Clarke, the 
Paymaster General, said; “I 
am glad'to say that at 3 per 
cent the rate of inflation in 
October was the same as that 
for September. 

“At the time of the Budget, 
the Chancellor anticipated a 
rate of inflation of percent 
for the fourth quarter of this 
year,” he added. 

The Department of Em- 
ployment a p pear s to be in 
agreement. with the Treasury. 
In his autumn statement bh 
week, the Chancellor forecast 
a fourth-quarter inflation rate 
of3K percent. 

This implies a higher rate in 
November and December 
than for last' month. The 
mortgage-rate increase will 
add 0.6 per -cent to the retail 
price index, mainly in No- 
vember but with some spilling 
over into December. 

Tames Cape), the stock- 
broker, expects a rate of 3.4 
per cent this month, rising to 
3.7 per emit in December. It 
forecasts that the rate wiflet^e 
up to 3.8 per cent by March, 


i 3.3 per cent in April 
and May, before increasing to 
more than 4 per cent during 
the summer months. . . 

Britain’s inflation rate of 3 
percent is higher than the 2.5 
per cent average for the West- 
ern industrialized countries, 
but just below the EEC av- 
erage of 3.1 per cent. West 
Germany and the Netherlands 
both have foiling prices, at 
rates of 0.4 and 0.6 per cent 
respectively. The inflation 
rate in Japan is just 03 per 
cent, in the US 1.8 per cent, 
and in France 23 percent. 

The inflation figures were 
welcomed by the Confedera- 
tion of British Industry: “It is 
encouraging news that infla- 
tion is holding steady at 3 per 
cent. This s in line with CBI 
forecasts and reinforces the 
ities open to British 
to win more business, 
both at home and overseas, 
and to create more jobs here in 
the UK.” 

Another measure of infla- 
tion, the tax and price index, 
rose to 1.5 percent last month, 
from 13 per cent in Septem- 
ber. The retail price index, 
excluding mortgage rates, was 
unchanged last month at 3.4 
percent. 



Profits fall 26% 
at Sea Containers 


By Teresa Poole 


Bank reshuffle gives wider 
powers to 



By' Graham Seujeant 
Financial Editor 

-. A new management, rp- 
oigamzation at toe Bank of 
England . wifi give more 
respansibifily to Mr Eddie 
George^ aged 48/ toe director 
in charge of money imuke** 
and gilt-edged saks, wbo has 
'been v widely regarded as a 
future internal candidate for. 



Wall Street 26 
Money Mitts 26 
Foreign Each 26 
Traded Opts 26: 
'C»New* 26 

Tempi* 27 


27 

Stock Market 27 
UskTrasts 28 
Cmaranffiks 28 
ISM Prices 28 
Store Prices 79 


OVtX TOr 

.op- 

erarfons ' m toe. .foreign 
change 1 market, bringing toe 
Bankfa intervention in money 
marfcets, bond markets, ami 
foieign exchange together in 
Mr George's hands, Mr An- 
thony Loehms, toe Bank’s 
overseas director, who used to 
handle - foreign exchange inter- 
vention, wifi continue to be 
responsible for longer-term 

^Mrtjjeoira will also-be in 



Eddie George: holding . 
toe key to Bank inlerrention 

c har ge of a new supervisory 
office covering wholesale mar- 
kets in certificates of deposits 
and currency and gold futures, 
which used to be supentised 
informally and were initially 
included 'in the Financial Ser- 
vices Bfll but then taken back 
info the Bank. Mr George is 


already responsible for super- 
vision of the gilt-edged 
markets. 

The new office will be 
headed by Mr John Townrad 
from the money markets di- 
vision, who will also supervise 
discount houses. 

- • The Governor has also ap- 
pointed his first chief mone- 
tary adviser since the de- 
: in January 1985 ofMr 
i Goodbart, now a 
Lai . the London 
J of Economics. ". 

.. Mr Tray Cbleby, aged 51, 
toe new adviser, has a back- 
ground of day-to-day contact 
with., the market as assistant 
director- in charge of. the 
jnoney markets division (a 
post to be taken over by Mr 
Bill Allen). 

The changes re pres e nt a 
shift of power from the more 
academic side of the Bank to 
those dealing day-today with 
market operators 



Societies’ record intake 
‘distorted’ by TSB float 


ByMartoi Baker 
societies took in a 


record 

month: 


Comparing the effect .of the 
£1.951 billion ...last TSB and British Gas issues, he 
said that, the British Gas 
flotation “would probaly have 
agreateroveraDimpaaonthe 

as - 23S1&S £ sssssasass 


doormats of pe ople whose 
applications for TSB. shares 
were either unsuccessful , or 
who received only a small 
proportion of the shares they 
wanted to buy. . • 

A Building Societies’ Asso- 
ciation spokesman said the 
TSB issue and the forthcom- 
ing British Gas flotation m ade 
itSrery difficult to work out 
the underlying trend”. 

- In other words, toe figures 
represent a numerical peak, 
but are really little more than a 
statistical quirk. 

Mr Marie Boteat, toe BSA’s 


extent to which the offer is 
oversubscribed”. 

A more accurate measure of 
toe true inflow would be half 
the aggregate of the last two 
months, “roughly £700 mil- 
lion per month” the BSA 
said. . . 

Receipts from sources other 
than small investors, . mainly 
the wholesale money markets, 
were £654 mflfion last month. 

Despite the growing trend 
for budding societies to mar- 
ket shares in their branches, 
toe BSA said societies “were 
not in decline as an invest- 


secretary-general, raid the fig- merit medium” 
ures were “massively - 


ures were -massively 
distorted” and he expected 
them to be reduced signifi- 
cantly in the returns for this 
month and next. 


They received £7.705 bil- 
lion from investors last month 
while withdrawals amounted 
to £5.554 billion. 


B&Cinbid 
for Steel 

By Alison Eadie 

British and Commonwealth 
Shipping, the transport and 
financial services group, is 
making an agreed bid for the 
55 percent of Steel Brothers ft 
does not own. 

The terms are two B&C 
shares for one Steel share or 
630p rash, valuing the com- 
pany at £90 million. The new 
B&C shares will not carry toe 
interim dividend of 2.45p net 
' When Mr John Gunn took 
over as chief executive of 
B&C, he said he would be 

r edefining toft company down 

to larger and fewer businesses. 
The offer for Steel is the first 
move in this direction. 

SteeTs two main businesses 
are cat ering and lime quarry- 
ing. Its presence in. aidine 
catering ties in well with 
B&Cs air support services. 

Steel made pretax profits of 
£5.5 millio n in the six months 
to the end of June, only 
marginall y ahead of the pre- 
vious first-half after an ex- 
change rate loss of £1 million. 


Janies Sherwood: need to cut 1,000 more Sealink jobs 


-Mr James Sherwood, presi- 
dent of Sea Containers, 
yesterdayspoke of the need for 
a further 1,000 job losses at 
Sealink over fee next three 
years. 

Announcing n 26 par cent 
foil m the 1986 third-quarter 
net profits to $24.9 million 
(£17.4 milBon) for Sea Con- 
tamos* toe Bermuda-based 
contamer-leasiiig group which 
owns Sealink, be said the 
ferries were still overmanned 
compared with other Euro- 
pean operations. 

Last month, Sealink suf- 
fered a two-week strike over 
the decision to shed about 500 
jobs on the lossmaking Chan- 
nel Islands services and the 
comp an y suspended dividend 
payments on ordinary shares 
to conserve cash. The number 
of employees has already 
fallen from 9,400 to 7,000 
since Sea Containers bought 
Sealink from British Rail in 
1984. 

Mr Sherwood said the 
strike would not affect fomth- 
qnarter results because the $5 
mfllioB (£35 minion) cost of 
the stoppage was the same as 


toe losses which would have 
been made if toe services had 
controlled to operate as before. 

Although toe thud-quarter 
marked a return to profits 
after first-half net losses of 
$263 ntiHraa, Sea Containers 
win mafcg an overall loss for 
both toe fourth-quarto- and 
the foil year became of heavy 
rednadancy costs at Sealink - 
about £19 million for the full 
year — and losses on fee 
container shipping side of toe 
business. 

The group made profits of 
$393 million in 1985. 

In the three months to the 
end of September, the time 
when ferry earnings are at 
their best, Sealink achieved a 
30 per cent i nc re as e in pretax 
profits to 5383 million but 
container asset leasing made 
losses of S34 million com- 
pared with profits of almost 
Sll million in the same period 
last year. 

Overall group net losses for 
the nine mouths to the end of 
September were $1.6 million 
compared with profits of $44.6 


140p price 
for shares 
in Virgin 

By Cliff Feltoam 

The striking price of shares 
offered for sale fat Mr Richard 
Branson's Virgin records and 
entertainments group was yes- 
terday fixed at 140p, valuing 
the i ww ww at £242 milKmi- 

Tbe issue, which attracted 
big crowds of last-mfatute 
inves tors in toe City, was three 
times oversubscribed with 
more than 84,000 
applications. 

The allocation of the 42 
million shares being sold was 
slanted m favour of the small 
investor, with those seeking 
toe minimum 200 shares 
receiv i ng a fuD a ll o tmen t. 

The tender r oute c ho r ea far 
the shares, offered at a mim- 
mmn of 120 p, fottnd some 
in v est or s offering up to £3 a 
share. 

Mr Branson, who Is selling 
shares wrath £20 million and 
whose remaining stake in the 
business will he worth £128 
millioa at the striking price, 
said he was “bmabled” by the 
number of would-be small 
investors. 

Mr Branson, aged 36, op- 
erates an empire spanning 


record shops, recorded music 
and film and video 
distribution. 

He began his business ca- 
reer selling advertisements for 
a magazine from a telephone 
box outside his school library. 
He later moved into mail 
Oder, selling popular records 
before signing up artists of his 
own, fatdnding the Sex Pistols, 
Boy George and Pfafl Collins. 
In fact, staff and artists are 
receiving £3^ mStirai worth of 
shares in the allocation. 

Apart from shareholders 
who receive • the minimum 
allocation, everyone receives 
at least 25 per cant of what 
they were seeking. 

The striking price, accord- 
ing to some City estimates 
yesterday, should ensure a 
healthy market when trading 
in the shares begins next 
Friday. 

Applications made at or 
above the striking price are 
accepted on this basis: 

Applications for 200 shares, 
fofl allocation; for 300 and 400 
shares, 200 .shares; 500 
shares, 250; 600 to 1,000, 300; 
L500 and above, 25 per cent of 
the number sought up to 
maximum of 500,000. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCKMARKETS 

dSjSL 1 872.05 {hA85J* 

Tokyo 

Nikkei DOW 1739050 {-47-97) 

Hongkong: 

: AO 136Z3(-i: 



Co mm erz ba nk 

Brussels; 

General 

Parts: CAC 
Zurich: 

SKA General 544.00 (same) 

London dosing price* -Page 29 

INTEREST RATES 

Lond on: 

Bank Ba* 11 * • • • 

3-month tatarbankl iWift, 

■ ‘ irate 


BP * 1 


prime Bate 7>i%' 

Federal Funds ywV 

3-monftr 7taasi«y_B%S-38-5^g* 
39-ysar bonds 


: CURRENCIES 


Loudon: 

Bfl.42952 

£0M£8647 

£Ffi&3775 
£ YSP231.00' 
E Indexes 
ECU £0.724889 


NewYoric 

S:E1-4315*_ 

£ DM2J3029* 

' £SwFri-6fi2tr 
•CfFFfe&SSar 
* YeM5t«* 
-S:tndeac110.7 

-SDR £0841436. 


main raiCE changes 


I Bar.. 

ABBoctronics 
Octopus P»4». 

Stives Gro 
Associated 
Bedfeam . 

NBrownJnv. 

Stat-Phis Group 
Barton Transport 
Tmhook 
CkBsmdch Res. 

Snowdon & Bridge 
MMT Computing. 
RHMortey Group 
jTBarrftei 

FALLS; 

Mofiana 
Uni ever 

Ganeral Accident •- — 
Grosvenor Square — H: 

priceeamasat4pm 


GOLD 



London FM9 
AMS4Q9JHL( 
dose! 

28ft») . 

Maw Yodc ‘ - - 
Coiti€Dl$407.60-406,1 0* 


NORTH SEAdL 


New Bill aims to strengthen 
Wanking supervision laws 

• By Richard Thomson, Banld^ Correspondent 





The Govennueat yerterday area of partfenlar interest was 
ptofeW. the.- Banking BQ1 the devefopoieflt of etectnmk 
whkh is to form the- new funds traria systems which 
frameworirtor bankmg super- right not. be covered by 
vision. Its fee first legslatim existisg l^islatkm. Legisla- 
to be re tro d uced to Partiament thm on streie areas of banking 
since tire Queen's Speech last had not been changed since 
Tuesday. . . 1879. Developments of EEC 

Mr Ian Stewart, Economic law on hanking also would 
Secretary to toe Treasury, need to be reviewed. 
am nnuced pia«f for an in- The Government was 
de p en d e nt review - body . to spurred to bring up to date the 
examine fee ; laws' m several 1979 Banking Act by the near 
■ areas ofbanking which uaay be collapse two years ago (ti 
outdated or inadequate to Johnson Matthey Bankers, 
cover new banking develop- tout to pxodnee a legislation 
meats. feat dovetailed the new Fmaa- 

. '.IfeBditoUH.'BtoMm^ Services w Act The Bill 
in eo-opemtioowkh toe Ba^ swragtoees toe supemsoiy 
of England, wffi make a ^fuB stIB ? 1 ? re rf hanks m semI 
and coherent review of toe law 

rdatfog to haukfog media- There is to be a new Board 
asms and practices, .takmg ofBanktagSnpenitoNLltiriB 
into account technological and provide independent advice on 
other - developments”, Mr s up ervi si on to the Bank of 
Stewaitsaid: Itwffltake about England. The two-tier system 
a year to - reprat and . could of superrisiou for licenced 
resnlt innew ^pdatiou. deposft taken and basks vdB 
Treastuy officials said . an, be abolished, wife a single set 


of supervisory criteria for all 
deposit taking institutions. 
There wfll be Smite set on fee 
sire of any bank’s exposure to 
indriMual dkPts, and it will 
become a criminal offence not 
to notify toe Bank of particu- 
larly large exposures. 

Hie Bill tightens up toe 
merfaaBwmf or rep o rting infor- 
mation to the Bank’s super- 
visory department. This 
includes powers (ti entry for 
the Bank to obtam information 
it be&eves to be crudaL It wifl 
become a criminal offence to 
report false or mideading 
information to super visors. 

Auditors will have a {pester 
responsibility to check on 
banks’ internal controls and' 
record keeping as weH as their 
statistical returns to snper- 
visors. When * bank runs into 
difficulties, ; auditors wifl be 
reqaacd to “Mow the whistle" 
and report this to the Bank of : 
J^iglawL 


ECC makes hostile 
bid for Bryant 


By Onr City Staff 


English China Clays (ECC), 
the quarries and construction 
group, yesterday fried off a 
hostile £137 million takeover 
bid for Bryant Holdings, the 
housebuilders, after falling to 
achieve an agreed offer. 

Sir Alan Dalton, chairman 
of ECC, said: ”1116 door 
remains open for them to talk 
to us .further, but in the 
meantime we are putting the 
details of our attractive offer 
to their shareholders.” 

The bid men wife a swift 
response from Bryant Mr 
Chris Bryant chairman, who, 
wife family interests speaks 
for about 20 per cent of fee 
equity, said the bid was wholly 
inadequate and would be “vig- 
orously defended". 

He said: "They are offering 
a derisory price. The business 
has been in the family for 101 


years and we want to keep our 
independence.” 

English C hina Clays is offer- 
ing three ofits shares for seven 
Bryant shares, valuing them at 
133p each. But the stock 
market judged that the terms 
would have to be raised and 
marked Bryant stares up by 
4!6p to 149 Vip. 

Bryant shares have risen 
sharply this week after English 
China announced ft was trying 
to arrange an agreed bid. But a 
meeting between the two sides 
broke down without agree- 
ment 

En glish China claims a get- 
together would be sensible. It 
would create a business that 
could build about '3,000 
homes a year, stretching from 
Bryant's base in the Midlands 
to the South and South-west 


State industries’ pact 


By Colin Narbrough 


The Government has 
readied agreement with the 
nationalized industries to im- 
prove their response to recom- 
mendations from the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission, Mr John 
McGregor, Chief Secretary to 
the Treasury, said yesterday. 

He said in a written par- 
liamentary reply that arrange- 
ments for following up MMC 
reports on frequently near- 
monopoly industries were 
generally working well. 


However, fed Government 
saw some scope for improve- 
ment in ensuring that follow- 
up procedures operated as 

in tended and in eliminating 

gaps in reporting progress. 
Statements on an industry's 
p ro gi ess should also be given 
some form of publicity. 

Officials said that the last 
point formed pan of govern- 
ment attempts to open 
nationalized industries to 
more public scrutiny. 


Grand Met 
chief goes 
to Merrill 

By Our City Staff 

Mr Michael On, finance 
director of Grand Metropoli- 
tan, the brewing-to-hote Is 
group, is leaving to head 
investment banking in Europe 
and the Middle East for 
Merrill Lynch. 

But last night he insisted his 
decision to leave the job he 
has held for the past five years 
had nothing to do with a 
recent boardroom reshuffle, 
which involved splitting the 
jote of chairman and chief 
executive held by Sir Stanley 
Grinstead. Mr Allen Sheppard 
was appointed chief executive. 

Mr Orr, who had been 
considered a leading can- 
didate for the post, said: "It is 
just a coincidence that I am 
leaving at this time. I tad been 
talking to Merrill Lynch for 
several months. I thought it 
unlikely that someone like 
myself in his forties who had 
been there for five years, 
would have got ft.” 

Mr Orr, aged 49, was a 
senior director of SG War- 
burg, the merchant bank, be- 
fore joining Grand Met- 
ropolitan. He is taking on fee 
positions of managing direc- 
tor, Merrill Lynch Europe and 
Merrill Lynch Capital Mar- 
kets in New York. 

Mr Orr, who was probably 
earning around £90,000 a year 
at Grand Metropolitan, is 
likely to receive a considerable 
increase in his new job. 

His place at Grand Metro- 
politan wifl be taken by Mr 
Clive Strowger. 


CONSISTENT INVESTMENT 
PERFORMANCE 

Enmisring money ro an investment manapemenr company i> a 
decision which no investor, insrirnrional or individual, rakes lightly, 
lr’s enrrusred to Garmiore because... 

'We are independent. 

We do nor act as market makers, nor Jo we provide corporate 
finance advice - each investment decision is made impartially, based on the 
intrinsic merits of the proposition. There are no conflicting considerations. 

We deliver real investment performance. 

Our unit trusts, pension hinds and investment trusts feature 
regularlv in the top quamle of their various secrors. ‘What Investment' 
named us Fund Manager of the Year for 1985 and in Hong K’ong, the 
‘South China Morning Tost’ paid us the same compliment. 

Pension Funds need dedicated management. 

Our managers always seek the best investment profile for each 
pension fund under management, producing consistency over the long 
term - the true perspective for pension funds. The Garanore median is 
well into the top quartije of rhe WM Company performance survev over 
the last one, three and five years. 

We are global inour thinking. 

Gdimiore has always been committed to providing truly 
international investment itianagement 

Today we offer a range ot 21 authorised unit trusts, which invest in all the 
major markets of the world. There are Girt more investment otiices in the 
LAv, Japan, USA and Hong Kong, employing a wealth of local expertise 

and experience. 

We are long established. 

Our predecessors were among the first investment management 
houses to offer international equity investments in the shape of 
investment mists. 

Today Cartmore manages £710 million in nine highly successful 
investment mists. 

We are imaginative. 

Gartmores innovative approach ro international investment led 
to the launch of the Jersey-based Capital Strategy Fund Limited in May 
1984 - the first open-ended ■'umbrella'’ company to provide investors with 
equity, specialised and currency deposit sub-funds, trading daily ar net 
asset value. It has attracted investors from more than 50 countries and its 
performance has been impressive Assets now exceed USS 275 million. 

The reward! 

Consistent investment performance. For all investors, the onlv 
real measure of success. 

% For further information on Gartmores wide range of funds and 
services, please contact Jo Durrant on (01) 623 1212 or write to her at 
2 Sl Mary Axe, London EC3A 8BR 

OVER £2.6 BILLION UNDER GROUP MANAGEMENT 

Gartmore 

l.ARTMORE INVESTMENT MA-VAUEMEXT LIMITED 


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*" 7 ~- - 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


Blacks tights issue 
set to raise £3m 


By Lawrence Lever 


Blacks Leisure Group yes- 
terday announced a £3 million 
rights issue on the back of 
interim results which showed 
half-year pretax losses of 
£790.000 as opposed to £1.25 
million in the corresponding 
period last year. 

The rights issue was sign- 
posted earlier in the week by 
the new management, which 
provided a £1 million rescue 
package for Blacks last month. 

The company is offering six 
new ordinary shares at 3p each 
for every five existing shares, 
to raise £3 million net of 
expenses. 

Blacks' shares, which stood 
at S'Ap before the announce- 
ment, closed at 8p. 

The rights issue will in- 
crease the company’s market 
capitalization by almost 70 
percent. 

Mr Bernard Garbacz, the 
new chairman and finance 
director of Blacks Leisure, 
said the money would be used 
to increase supplies to the 
company’s shops. 

“We've got the customers - 
we'll use the money to ensure 
that the suppliers send the 
goods in." he said. 

The company will use part 
of the rights issue to clear 


unpaid bills and the balance to 
cover its working capital 
requirements. 

The management says it is 
confident that the company 
will bejable to "build and 
expand." 

Mr Garbacz and the other 
members of the rescue con- 
sortium are taking up their full 
entitlement to shares under 
the rights issue. This repre- 
sents 37.4 per cent of the issue. 

Other shareholders have 
agreed to take up 15.01 per 
cent of the issue and the 
balance is being underwritten 
by Charterhouse Bank. 

The company made a trad- 
ing loss of £213,000 in die six 
months to August 31 com- 
pared with losses of £834,000 
in the same period last year. 

The half-year pretax losses 
to August 31 take account of a 
£1 17,000 profit on the sale of 
the company’s remaining tex- 
tile quota. 

In addition, the losses in- 
clude an extraordinary debit 
of £296,000 made up of bank 
charges, a £25.000 loss on the 
sale of a subsidiary, and 
£78,000 in costs associated 
with the offer for the company 
by Sears which was sub- 
sequently withdrawn. 


Britain is first with 
policy on removing 
N Sea oil platforms 


WALL STREET 


By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 

Britain has become die first 
oil-producing country with a 
cohesive policy on what to do 
with the big offshore plat- 
forms once the oil runs out. 

The Petroleum Bill, in- 
troduced by Mr Peter Walker, 
the Energy Secretary, yes- 
terday, will cover the dis- 
mantlement and abandon- 
ment of oil wells, gas wells, 
and pipelines in the North 
Sea. 

The first platform to reach 
the end of its productive life 
will probably be an oil plat- 
form — as yet unnamed by lire 
Department of Energy — in 
the central part of the North 
Sea. 

Gas-producing platforms in 
the southern basin in the 
North Sea will be next, but it 
will be weD into the next 
century before the break-up of 
the big structures in the north- 
ern waters of the British sector 
starts. 


fr 


■ 






Peter Walker safety checks 
while dismantling rigs 

The legislation means it is 
likely that the smaller struc- 
tures wil be removed while the 
larger structures will be par- 
tially dismantled to economic 
levels. 

The Bill will provide for 
safety checks during the dis- 
mantling work, to specify anti- 
pollution checks and to allow 
inspections while the work is 
going on. 

Changes to the royalty pay- 
ment structure in the industry 


will also allow the Energy 
Secretary to authorize repay- 
ment to the oil companies to 
meet part of the costs of 
dismantling. The Bill also 
confirms changes made to 
safety-zone legislation in the 
Queen's Speech and the inclu- 
sion of the territorial waters 
around Northern Ireland in 
the present offshore licensing 
regime. 

The Department of Energy 
also published yesterday the 
Coal Industry BilL which au- 
thorizes further government 
aid to British Orel until its 
break-even target of 1988-89 
and also extends rights of 
representation in the industry 
to all employees. 

This proviaon reflects the : 
promise made by Mr David ! 
Hunt, the minister responsible , 
for the industry, that members , 
of the Union of Democratic j 
Mineworkers should enjoy the 
same statutory rights as mem- 
bers of the National Union of 
Mineworkers. 


Fitch in £12m takeover Ten USM firms join main market 


Fitch Lovell, the big food 
company, is making a takeover 
offer worth £12.3 million for 
Snowdon & Bridge, a whole- 
sale dfsfribntor to the catering 
trade. 

Directors and shareholders 
owning 51 J per cent iff the 
business have agreed to accept 
the terms of 187p a share. 

Snowdon & Bridge was 


• BALDWIN: Figures in £000 
for year to April 30. Turnover 
was 2,509 (2,210), pretax profit 
was 84 (7 loss), tax 41 (1). Profit 
for the year was 33 (26 loss). The 
company is confident that the 
acquisition of the Beever Con- 
crete Group will have a bene- 
ficial effect on the trading 
activities for this financial year. 

• BUCKLEY’S BREWERY: 
Half year to September 27. 
Figures in £000. Interim divi- 
dend was 0.9p (O.Sp) and turn- 
over was 6,645 (6,022). Oper- 
ating profits were 740 (S99). 
Pretax profit was 557 (481), tax 
was 122 (108). Earnings per 
share were 2.88p (27.72p). Vol- 
ume sales of beer, in line with 
the national trend, were lower. 
The company launches a new 
beer, JB bitter, at the end of this 
month. The dividend is payable 
on January 5. 

• S1EBE: Acceptances of the 
rights offer of 31,220,913 new 
ordinary shares have been re- 
ceived in respect of 24,085,313 
new ordinary shares (77.1 per 
cent of the shares offered). The 
7,135,600 new ordinary shares 
taken up have been sold at a 
price of 374peach for the benefit 
of shareholders who did not take 
up their entitlement 


floated on the Unlisted Securi- 
ties Market last year at 97p a 
share. Turnover in the half 
year to July 31 was £11 
nuUion, and pretax profits 
were np from £365,000 to 
£575,000. 

The company supplies a 
wide range of food and non- 
food products to hotels and 
restaurants, factory canteens 
and schools. 


By Lawrence Lever 

Ten companies quoted on 
the Unlisted Securities Market 
graduated to foD listing in the 
third quarter of this year — a 
record number according to a 
survey published yesterday. 


of a total of 496 floated on the 
USM by September 30. 

Feat Marwick Mitchell, the 
accountant who compiled the 
survey, says that companies 
are leaving the USM to main- 
tain liquidity. Mr Alan 
Comber, of Peat Marwick, 


This brings the number of said: "The benefits of a public 
companies leaving the USM quotation — marketability, 
for the main market to 71 out tapping the markets for new 


SO M PA7 mV. : NE'.VS v; < 


• WHITBREAD INVEST- 
MENT: Half year to September 
30. Interim dividend was L60p 
(2.37p), payable on January 9. 
Income was £5,133,304 
(£3,923,303), revenue before tax 
was £4.192.284 (£3,773,663). 
Tax was £1,221,078 
(£1.135,540) and earnings per 
share were 4.71p (4.18p). The 
company’s brewery investments 
will continue to perform well 
and net revenue for the year 
should show a satisfactory in- 
crease an last year. 

• OUTW1CH INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Figures for the six 
months to September 30 in 
£000. Interim dividend was 1.2p 
(1. Ip). Total income was 2.600 
(2,373). Net revenue before tax 
was 2,378 (2,204). Earnings per 
share were 2.66p (2.33pk Direc- 
tors haveissued a document to 
shareholders which sets out die 
recommended proposals for the 
partial unitization of the com- 
pany and the creation of Strat- 
ton Investment Trust. 

• FLEMING JAPANESE IN- 
VESTMENT TRUST: Total 
assets as at 30 October were 
£153,630.151 

0 BELLWAY: Of the 5,760,688 
new ordinary shares offered, 
more than 90.35 per cent have 
been taken up. 


• TELEMETRDL- Mr Roy 
Cotteriu, the c hairman, said at 
the annual meeting “We are 
trading dose to our plan and 
steps have been taken to reduce 
our operating costs without 
damaging our ability to service 
our customers’ requirements 
and to develop the new range of 
products that will be required." 
He added: “Order intake has 
improved in each month of the 
last four and November is 
progressing welL" 

• LWT (HOLDINGS): Figures 
in £000 for the year to July 27. 
Final dividend was 12_465p, 
making 18.15p (14.4p). Turn- 
over was 157,802 (159,458), 
pretax profit was 13.700 (5L276) 
and tax was 6,087 (4,156). 
Extraordinary debt was 192 
(137). Earnings per share were 
42.93p (23.0 lp). 

9 HUGHES FOOD GROUP: 
The group has agreed to acquire, 
for £450,000, a coldstore at 
Pentrebach, Merthyr Tydfil, for- 
merly occupied by Sterlings 
Frozen Foods. It has obtained a 
Government grant of £200,000 
and intends to increase the 
capacity of the existing cold- 
stores and to construct a freez- 
ing facility of 500,000 cu ft to 
handle 30 to 40 tons of frozen 
food daily. 


For’ 




For Europe, Schroder s 



1 YEAR +74 o 3 YEARS + 165% 5 YEARS + 317° 1 


There is an unusual level of 
agreement among fund managers 
that Europe offers potentially 
the most attractive investment 
prospects for 1987. 

Astute investors will bear in 
mind that “Europe" is not one, but 
a number of stockmarkets, each 
offering its own opportunities, 
each requiring its own specialist 
knowledge. 

Schroders know’ the markets 
Our multi-lingual investment 
team is as much at home with 
brokers in Raris as it is with 
bankers in Madrid. Oti. sophis- 
ticated network of economic 
intelligence in Europe is as long 
established as it is highly 
respected. 

The Schroder Advantage 
Schroder European Fund was 
one of the first European unit trusts 


to be launched in 1981. Even at 
that time the market intelligence 
to which it had access was 
considerable, based on the 
Schroder Group's long-standing 
presence in European financial 
markets. 

The result has been strong and 
consistent growth over more than 
five years - and well justified 
prospects that this trend should 
continue into the future. 

Across the Markers 

The Fund, an authorised unit 
trust has access to all the markets 
of Europe and may spread, or 
concentrate its portfolio as 
Schraders’ market intelligence 
dictates. 

The aim is capital growth 
through selective investment in 
European blue chips, smaller 
companies and specialist niches 


such as financial services, 
industrial automation and office 
equipment 

Investing in European 
Success 

Simply complete the coupon 
below and return it with your 
cheque (£500 minimum) or 
telephone our dealers on 
0705 827733. Units will be 
allocated to you at the price ruling 
on receipt of your application. 

(On November 12th, 1986 the 
offer price of Income Units was 
I32.8pxd with an estimated yield 
of 0.95%, Accumulation Units 
137.1p). 

Remember that the price 
of units and any income from 
them may go down as well 
as up. 

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| — Personal Financial Planning Service ijPwtfbfio Management Service 

1 •_ Schroder Personal Equity Plan 


j'NlT- ; r?US" ■ 


Jtv MANAS irftftNT 



cash , status, aqitisitians, em- 
ployee share schemes - all 
depend on liquidity.” 

Many smaller companies 
were concerned that the new 
methods of dealing in shares 
heralded by Big Bang would 
affect their liquidity. 

These fears so for appear to 
be unfounded as there are now 
more market-makers prepared 
to deal in gamma stocks. 


Dow edges 
upward in 
early trade 

New York (Renter) - De- 
spite some fears of a follow- 
thnmgh <rf Thursday’s fatures- 
idafed selling, the market 
to regain some of its 
composure iu early trading 
yesterday. It shewed a less 
frantic decline in early deals. 

SefteMhan-expected eco- 
nomic figures produced mod- 
erate downward pressure. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which was down 
about 10 points nearer the 
opening, strengthened to 
1,864 Jm, up 2L40, at one stage 
later in the morn i ng. The 
transport «nd«c was down a 
mere 0.25 at 834.00 and the 
utilities in 4‘ fatnr down 0J7 at 
209.70. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor's 500-share index 
showed a gain of 0.08 at 
243.10 while (he New York 
Stock Exchange composite in- 
dex was down 0J3 at 140.00. 
• Lockheed Corporation was 
once again the subject iff 
takeover speculation as de- 
fence and aerospace analysts 
discussed likely suitors and a 
potential price for the com- 
pany, according to market 
observers. 

Lockheed, which rose 2*h on 
Thursday, was up a further 4 
to 5iy 4 early yesterday. How- 
ever, the corporation's chief 
finanriai officer denied that 
the company was in talks with 
anyone. 

In another development, 
Unisys Corporation and 
Honeywell said that Hon- 
eywell would acquire the 
Sperry Aerospace Grog# from 
Unisys lor $1,025 billion 
(£716.8 minion) in cash. 


AMR 

ASA 

Ailed Signal 
AfliedSre 
AflsChfmrs 
Alcoa 

Amaxlnc 
AnVtdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCynm'd 
AmSPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSrntd 
A mTet aph 
Amoco 
Annas Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland OS 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BbsTstNY 
Bankamar 
Bk of Baton 
Bank of NY 


Breton 

Bg Warner 


Burton (nd 

Button Ntn 

Burroughs 

CmptxwSp 

Can Pacific 

CatwpSar 

Catena* 

Central SW 

Champion 

Ctass Man 

ChmBfcNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 


Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 


ClmbiaGas 
Cnter tn Eng 
ComwtthEd 
Cons Eds 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CntrlData 
Coming Gl 
CPC tap 
Crane 
Curtiss WH 
Dart & Kraft 
Dears 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser bid 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Coro 
EmersonB 
Exxon Coro 
Fad Dpt Sis 
• Even J* 


Firestone 28% 
Fsi Chicago 31% 
FstiMBMP 53 
FstPemC 9 
Fort 56 

FTWactwa 3854 
GAFCOrp 41 
GTE Carp 81* 
GsnCorp U* 

Gen Dy'mcs 73V 
GenEfearic 7644 
Gen met 17% 
GwiMto 42* 
Gen Motors 7044 
GnPbUtny 23% 
Geaesco 37% 

lSS ,flP8c 3£ 

Goodrich 46 

Grace 55% 
GtAtt&Tac 2214 
Gf’hnd 32>4 

GrurmnCor 28% 
Gulf A West 6554 
HatruMJ. £1* 
Hercules 57% 
i H'lett-Pkrd 4t 

rar £2 

iTS&e. 5ft 

IBM 120 

INCO 12% 

Int Paper 7154 
imTelTflt 53* 
Irving Bank 48% 
Jhnsn&Jhn 6854 
Kaiser Alum 1654 
Karr McGee 30% 
KmblyCkk 80 
KMart 52 
Kroger 32% 
LTSf.Cop 2 
ueon 80 
Lockheed 47 
Lucky are 34% 
Man HTwer 4454 
MamBeCp 2% 
Mapco 5654 
Marine Mid 47 
Mrt Marietta 89% 
HM qq 27% 
McDonalds 6114 
McDonnell 79% 
Mead 57% 

Merck 105% 

IfinstaMng 110 
MoWOfl 39% 
Monsanto 76% 
UcsganJ-P. 82% 
Motorola 35% 
NCR Carp 45% 
NUndstrs 4% 
NetDIstlre 45% 
Nat Med Ent 20% 
NatSmcndt 10% 
Norton Sih 83% 
NWBancrp 37% 
OccktntPat 28 

Sl 

Owens-i 42% 
PacGasB 24% 
Pan Am 5% 
Penney J-C- 84% 
Ponnaoil 71 
PaotBCQ 27% 
il.feBlLkHnacloM.lN 


» * V 

28% PRmt ST 0“ 

34 % PhelpeDge 20 %* 21 * 
52 % PWtoMre 68 % 

9% Philips Pet 10% 10% 

57X PDtarokl W «* 
38% PPG md 68% 

41% PWBmM 7S» 

62% P6SE4G *2% «% 
82% Raytiwon 64% teA 
73% RynkJsMet 47% 47% 
78% Rockweo int 42% 42% 

18% ROjral Dutch 91 90% 

42S4 StSwreyB 61% 61% 
72% Sara Lee 68% 69% 
24% SFESopaC 34 34 

S5S SchTbeiger 33% 34- 
38% S cott Pap er 62 64 

58% O o aare m B25t 63% 
45% Sears Rhcfc 42 43% 

47% SheB Trans 54% 55 

19% Singer 41% 4214 
56% Snratidn Bk 64% 

22% Sony 20% 20% 

32% SthCalEd 34% 35 
26% SWstnEM 10754 10^4 
65% SWOUOtao 49 49% 

42% StertngOra 45% 47% 

58% Stereos JF 3654 36% 

41)4 Sun Comp 57% 57% 

72% Tetedyne 306% 328% 
26% Tenneco 39% 39% 
57% Texaco 36% 36% 

19% Texas ECor 31 30% 

122% Texas bus 115% 118 
12% Texas Utils 33% 33% 
73% Textron 63% 67% 

54% Trams Cor 43% 43% 
48% TRW tec 90% 91% 

70 UAL felC 57 57% 

16 % UntewrNV 220 % 223% 
30% UnCarttde 23% 2354 

80% Un PacCar 61% 

53% Utd Brands M 

33% USGCotp 39% 38% 

IK UWTechrWl 44% 

80% USXCorp g% 24% 
45% Unocal 26% 27% 
34% Jtmvftdter 47 47% 

44% WtnerLinbt 53% H% 
2% WtifcRB® 106% 1W 
57% WstghseB 57% 58% 

I 

63 Xerox Corp 58% 58 

8054 Zenith 20% 21 

58% 

107% 

111 % 

CANADIAN PRICES 

84% AgncoEag 29 28 % 

36% AtaiAtoro 42% 4» 

46 AlgomaSO 13 12% 

4% Can Pacific 15% 16 

47 Cominco 13% 13% 

26% Con Batfvst 28% te 
11% ncr/9dCan 28 27 A 

84% HdsnBMn 24 2454 

39 knesco 31% 32% 
2854 knporialOi 48% -»9 

46% In fee 39% 39% 
43% ByifrustCO 29% 29% 

43% Seagram 86% 88% 

24% SealCo 19% 19% 

5% ThmsnN'A' 2854 28% 

86% VatttyCorp 2J0 2£5 
74% WCT 13 .13 

29 Westo 30% 80% 

piaoratf* 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


• GBC CAPITAL: Total assets 
as at October 31 were Cao- 
S227.6m. 

0 PLUMB HOLDINGS: USM 
placing - Scrimgcour Vickers 
announces the placing of 2.5 
million ordinary shares at 90p a 
share. At this price the market 
capitalization is £ll.3miUion. 
Pretax profit and exceptional 
items rose from £338,000 in the 
year to January I 1982 to 
£81 7,000 for the year to January 
26 1986. This was on turnover 
up from £7.8 milli on to £18.9 
million. Profits for the half year 
to July 26 1986 were £529,000 
on turnover of £9 million. The 
forecast pretax profit for this 
year is £1.3 million (53 weeks). 
The 2.5 million shares being 
placed represent 20 per cent iff 
the enlarged issued share cap- 
ital; 300.000 of the shares are 
being issued by the company 
and 2 million are being sold by 
existing shareholders. 

• RAUMA-REPOLA OY: The 
company has signed a prelimi- 
nary agreement for sale of hs 
Uoaha plywood mill and 
Riihivuori sawmill to Metsali- 
iton Teollisuusoy. There are a 
number of points to be resolved 
before the final contract is 
signed. 


Three Month Staring Man 

Dec 86 B&69 

MarB7 89H1 

Jin 87 - 89-28 

Sep 87 89-25 

Dec 87 N/T • 

Mar 88 N/T 

Previous day's total open Interest 14452 

ll W MO W ) oU W WQ M u 

Dec 88 9392 

Mar 87 9355 

Jon 87 9186 

Sap 87 83.61 


US Treasury Bond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


ShortCfl 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Long GK 

Dec86 

Mar 87 

Jm 87 

Sep 87 

FT-SE10G 

Doc 86 

Mar B7 


Ctoso EatVol 
80.74 2358 

89.01 S10 

8929 86 

89.27 29 

BSU3 0 
88.78 0 


Prantous day's total open Intarast 28329 
KLS4 93-90 93.92 2042 

9337 93-93 93.96 1423 

93.68 93.86 93. B8 317 

93.66 93.61 93.S5 81 

Previous day’s total open interest 4731 
97-14 96-S& 97-07 4303 

96-06 96-05 36-13 35 

— — 95-16 0 


Previous day's total open Interest 900 
95-52 9535 95-40 115 

9542 0 


Previous day's total open tetereat 17494 
10606 106-16 10842 10604 18189 

108-16 106-16 106-10 10609 24 

N/T 108-09 0 

N/T 0 

16320 1 ° to, T raak* 1 ,ro, ^ 7 2706 

168.70 186.70 16620 166.45 20 


MONEY MARKETS 


FkslDcaansa Last Daa iinga . LMtDectarekm For Satneawnt 

Oct 20 Oct 31 .tan22 ^2 

Nov 3 Itov 14 Feb 5 febiB 

Nov 17 Nov 28 F8b 19 Mar 2 

am opSoos ware Mm o«l OK 14/11/86 Mecca, Bawdy. Banjo* Squfltend 


Cantnoreidal Estates, Brito*, Votax. 
Put Conroy Pets, Blacks Labum. 
Put & Cat STC. 


yTfFOREIGN EXCHANGES 

A- A 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's range 
Nov amber 14 
N York 1-4240-1 -4610 
Montreal 1^722-12796 
Amsdani3L2327-32488 
Brusseta 59 59-59-63 
Cphoan 10^255-1^561 
■DubEn 1.0495-1.0569 
Frankha122615467ffi 
Lisbon 21125-212.64 
Madrid 192.78-193.70 
hfiten 198123-199150 
Oslo 105485-10.7179 
Parts 95785-0.4257 
Sfkhbn 9.8950-95101 
Tokyo 22953-231.72 
Vtefina 20.1 BOO- 20 2559 
Zuridi 22735-25880 


1X290-1.4300 
15763-15798 
35327-35382 
5957-5950 
105337-105528 
15516-15625 
25827-25879 
211.7621254 

192.76- 193.12 
198153-1987.70 
105780-10.7179 
95781-9^023 
95880-95991 

230.77- 23123 
202204-202S5B 
25735-23788 


056955prem 152-1. 

a44-034pi«ni 
1 %- 1 %pr«n 
20-1Spram 


1 %- 1 %prem 
78-12Sdte 
6-42HS 
Zpram-i dte 

2 ^-IKpran 

T^-lMprem 

9%-8%pram 

1%-1%pram 



6»-5%prem 


28K-24S prem 
4%-4%prorn 


fb ife l iifl l iid aj coiaparedwtlh 1975 w»« ap at 685 (day%roge 662-6651 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


EURO IHONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dotor 

7 days 5«i*9 
Smith 6 , ife9 ll w 
DeatBCtowrii 
7 days 4 *m-4'i» 
3mnth 4aia4 "ie 

French Franc 
7 days 7%-7% 
Smith 8%-8% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days US-1 
3mnth 
Van 

7 days 4>w-4'w 
Smntti 4%-4% 


GOKLS40825-408.75 


654-5% 

65% 

6'i*5».fe 

5-4 

4%-4% 

4%-4% 

7%5% 

854-8 

6 %- 8 % 

254-154 

3'iv2 , *i» 

a»w«i« 

454-3% 

454-4% 

414-4% 


bUerimnk (%) 

OvemlghC open 13 ck»o 1054 

1 weak 10%-10M 6mnth ll^m-IPw 
imnth lO^Mt-IO'^sflmnth H'w-IPit 
3mmh 11 54-1 1 ’w 12 m* 11 »w- 11 »ib 

Local Auttority Dspoata (%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

limtihlOK 3im* 10% 

Bmn* 11 12m* 11 

Local Aultimlty Bonds (%) 

IrmOi 11%-1154 2mn* 11%-11% 

3 ran* 1154-10% 6 ninth 1154r-10% 

9 ninth 1154-10% 12 m* 11-10% 

Storing CDs (%) 

1 nwith 10 ,, i*-l6 ,, ift3mnth 1P.»-11<ia 
Bmn* 1154-n 12mft 11'w10"» 

Marcnsnu 

Immn 8555.00 3mn* 650555 
6mn* 555550 12m* 610555 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austral* — 
Australa dofiar ___ . 

Bahrein rinv 

Brazil cruzado ' 

Cypros pound 

Fnartnorica 

Greece drachma 

HongKcnodo to 

Mia rupee 

Iraq dinar — 

Kuwait rinarKD — 

Malaysia dotor 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand doitar . 
Saudi Arabia riyal .— 
Singapore dotor _ 

Sou* Africa rand 

UAEdkftam 

UoydsBanlc 


_ 1.6244-15314 

— 22113-22148 

— 0534505385 
20.01-20.13 

— 0.72000.7300 

— 7.0075-7.0475 

— 19555-19756 
11.1408-11.1494 

1850-1670 


— 11416004200 

— 3.73005.7400 

— 1180.0-1230.0 
27803-2.7731 

— 5530055700 

— 3.13195.1357 
__ 3.16745.1838 

— 52090-52490 


Australa 

Canada , — 

Sweden 

Norway.— 

Denmark 

West Germany 
Swttrertand — 
Netherlands — 
France 


Spain 

Austria 


.15535-15565 
. 21925-2.1935 
. 2513026150 
.0545605460 
. 15840-15845 
. 85375-69425 
7487675025 
. 7582675875 
.2013020140 
1.688615698 
2573622745 
8590665950 
18206182.15 
, 13935-13945 
_ 41.7641.83 
. 7.79867 7995 
. 14646148.70 
13456135.10 
— 14.11-14.13 


i aapplad by Bardaya Bmk HOFEX and EstoL 


L O N D ON'T RAD E D OPT (O N S 


$ 406.06409.00 (2284.00-288. 
Sovereigns* (newt 
S 965097.00 (EB7566600 ) 
Platinum 

S 53350(073.40) 

■Excludes VAT 


TREASURY BILLS 

Applets: &4562M atotBCfcCTOOM 

B&: £97545% received: 99% 

Last week: £9758% received: 221% 

Avge rets: E166388% last wk £105680% 
Next week: E100M replace DOOM 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate for 
interest period October 8, 1986 to 
October 31. 1988 industre: 11237 per 
cam. 


Base Rates % 

Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11 
Dtseoom Market Leane % 

Ovemtatu Wrtr 1 1 Low 9% 

Week toed: ID 
TVeesury Bflb (Discount %) 

Buying Soiltog 

2 nmtn 10% 2mmn 10% 

Smntti 10"i» 3mn* ItPw 

Prime Bar* Sts (Discount %} 

1 mn3> 10S-16'\n Zmftti fO^a-lOfe 

3 mntfi UF'n-16 l 7z6mnth 
Trade BOs (Dfecouit %) 

imnth 11 % 2 moth 11 »>« 

3mn* 11« 


Alied Lyons 

C31G) 


Cons Gold 

r8B5) 

Counauida 

r3i2j 


Com Union 
(*289) 

Cable & Wire 
(*305) 


Grand Met 
(*4S6) 


Settee Jan Apr JM Jan Apr Jgl 

300 30 40 48 8 11 17 

330 12 22 30 23 26 33 

360 2 11 — 47 SO — 

000 107 123 — i 11 - 

650 68 83 105 12 27 33 

700 35 48 87 30 50 60 


Thom EM 
C4S5) 


550 157 177 — 3 10 - 

-800 110 134 146 6 17 25 

75 970 112 20 30 45 


280 37 50 62 2 6 9 

300 24 35 50 B 12 15 

330 11 IB 31 23 26 31 

260 22 29 37 6 12 15 

260 10 18 27 17 24 27 

300 5 11 17 34 38 43 

300 23 37 43 13 23 30 

325 12 25 — 28 38 — 

350 4 13 — 45 53 — 

375 2 — — 73 — — 


27 32 38 2% 


180 13 20 26 

200 S 10 — 

360 108 113 — 

390 80 85 — 

420 55 67 80 


9 13 16 

22 26 — 
1 3 - 

1 % 6 — 
6 12 17 


Brit Aero 
(*486) 

BAT tods 
(*464) 


Barclays 

(*473) 

Brit Telecom 

(198) 


CsBs Puts 

Series Dec Mm- Jan Dec Mar 

500 30 50 70 15 27 

550 6 23 42 47 50 

600 3 14 — 93 93 

420 73 85 100 2 5 

460 42 57 70 10 18 

500 16 30 47 27 37 

550 4 15 — 67 72 

330 85 — — % - 

360 35 55 - 1% 7 

390 15 32 45 10 17 


Series Nov Feb May Nov Fab 

420 68 88 98 K 8 

460 28 60 70 1 14 

500 3% 38 48 18 29 

360 108 118 — % 1 

390 76 88 86 % 1% 

420 46 67 73 % 8 

460 9 35 42 3 18 

460 15 45 57 3 12 

500 1 22 35 32 35 

550 1 8 17 82 BS 

180 18 27 33 % 5 

200 1% 12% 20 5 15 

220 Y, 5% 12 24 26 


6 ran* 11»» 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Avis Europe (2S0p 
BCE (38p> 

Baker Harris Srefr 



460 

27 

40 

55 

20 

28 

35 

fCT 

950 

140 

158 


5 

13 



1*1064) 

1000 

95 

118 

— 

10 

25 


1050 

56 

lb 

110 

•& 

42, 

48 


1100 

31 

60 

85 

50 

70 

74 

Land Sec 

300 

40 

49 

57 

1% 

6 

6 

r337) 

330 

20 

27 

38 

6 

12 

16 

380 

5 

13 

18 

28 

28 

33 

Marks 6 Spen 

160 

20 

Z9 

36 

3 

4 

S 

(•194) 

200 

8 

15 

23 

10 

13 

17 

220 

2 

a 

11 

27 

28 

29 

SheO Trans 

850 

125 

145 

182 

4 

14 

70 

(*956) 

900 

85 

108 

125 

14 

27 

36 

950 

48 

70 

90 

30 

S3 

58 

Trafalgar House 

260 

30 

38 

47 

3 

12 

12 

1*284) 

280 

18 

2/ 

38 

13 

IB 

23 

300 

8 

16 

24 

26 

29 

33 

TSB 

80 

5 

9% 

11% 

4 

6 

7% 

(*79) 

90 

2% 

4 


12% 

13 

14 

100 

% 

2 

— 

22 

22 

— 


Cadbury Schwpps 160 23 32 37 


Guinness 

(341J 


Ladbroke 

(*373) 


Midland Bank 
(*570) 


Berry , Birch&Noble (1 15p) 
Blenheim ExHb (95p) 
Bflston&Battarsea (1030) 
Brake Bros - (125p) 
Cttygrove (i00p) 

Great Southern (135p) 
Guthne Corp (150pJ 
Harrison (I50p) 

Interfink Express (I85p) 
Lon Assc Inv Tst (14p) 
Lloyds Chemist (I05p) 


Beecham 

T430) 


Series Dec Iter Jw Dec Her Jun 

360 74 82 — 1 3 — 

390 45 55 68 3 8 14 

420 S 41 48 11 21 28 

460 6 22 33 37 46 52 


MSter & Santhouse (105p) 
Newage Trans (75p) 

Ctoarto (H5p) 

Rotunda (95p) 

SanoeH Perfcms (I35p) 

Scot Mtge 100% «SS 
TSB Gram (1C0p) 

Thames TV (1S0p) 

Trees 10% c91 *96.50 £5 
Whtoney Mac Kay (160p) 
woortons Better (l04p) 
Yerverton (38p) 

Yorkshire TV (125p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

BeUway F/P 
Blue Arrow F/P 
Br. Benzol N/P 
Brown Kent F/P 
Qswtck N/P 
FR[ Group F/P 
Norfolk Cap F/P 
Patrocan N/P 
Reriand N/P 
Siebe F/P 

(Issue price in brackets). 


Blue Circle 
T650) 


De Be ers 
(*773) 


200 32 41 51 1 3 6 

220 17 27 38 5 11 14 

240 4 17 22 14 17 24 

280 24 36 45 3% 7 13 

300 — 24 31 — 18 22 

307 7 — — 16 — — 

SO 105 115 130 2 6 9 

700 60 70 85 6 13 23 

750 27 45 60 27 37 50 

600 65 83 95 6 15 22 

850 . 30 52 65 20 32 40 

700 12 — — 60 — — 

650 140 155 — 4 20 — 

700 100 130 145 13 35 50 

750 68 100 115 30 50 55 

800 32 70 95 55 70 85 

300 38 ' 50—1% 4 - 

330 20 30 50 12 IS 18 

360 8 18 38 28 34 34 

240 5? 34 41 5% 11 is" 

260 7Y, 20 29 16 21 28 

280 4 11 18 33 35 39 

300 2 5 — SI SI — 

900 43 87 114 20 40 35" 

950 18 60 87 47 BS 75 

1000 7 40 63 92 100 110 

1050 4 24 — 140 145 — 

1 60 48 51 ~ W 1 _ 

180 28 3211 39% % 3ft 5 

200 11% 18 24 3i> 8 11 

220 3% 8 14 18 IB'A 21% 


Veal Reefs 
(*83) 


180 5 18 23 2% 10% 
200 1 10 17 20 23 

300 42 50 58 1 5 

33) 13 32 35 3 15 

380 1% 14 18 25 32 

300 116 — ~ % IT 

330 85 - _ % _ 

360 55 - - % - 

330 45 58 65 1 5 

360 15 33 43 2% 13 

390 2 18 25 20 25 

130 29 35 42 % 4 

JS ’S 29 35 1 7 

160 6 21 24 S 14 

S00 73 SO 103 1 5 

550 23 49 57 3 18 

600 2 18 27 33 40 

480 58 77 W 1 S~ 

500 20 48 58 2 15 

MO 2 17 27 35 40 

600 % — — 85 — 

ItS ’S Z 7 »* 2 T 

180 2 14 19 9 15 

200 1 8 13 28 30 

600 94 110 127 % 12~ 

650 45 72 87 - 2 25 

700 9 45 57 15 47 

750 1% — — 84 „ 

70 13% 17 21 i 4W - 

80 4 ID J5 1% 8 

90 % 5 10 8% 13 


Series Nov Mar jyg Nov Mar 

l£nrbo 200 44 51 54 i 2~ 

(*244) 218 28 - _ \ 1 

236 9 — _ J _ 

»0 - IB S - 15 

Seriee Ncv Feh May Now Fab i 
Tr 1114% 1991 in 1% 2*16 «« i* ia 

CC1S1J 102 a w 1% I8, g 2K 

104 %• I'm 3' ib »>■ 

Tr 11%% 03)07 106 1*ib 3 4 % 2% 

rZ108) 108 s ia 2?tu 3 ? w 3% 

us y i* i'* 5'i* 

112 'ia '»i» h m g;,, 

jw >.« % i»„ a B*!; 

Nov Dec Jan Feb Nov Dec Jwn 

FT-SE 1525 120 — — — J Z ~ 

todex 1550 95 97 m — 1% 7 is 

(-18401 1575 70 75 » - 4 M 2 

J800 44 57 67 — 9 23 30 

]825 25 4Q 53 63 16 33 43 

1650 12 27 38 47 28 47 SB 

ItS I ’ 7 30 35 « S 70 

1700 2 10 — — Rfl 7*s 


November 14, 1986. Total contineto 27283. Cafis 23340. Puts8943. 

FT-SE Mex. C«Bx955 . PntocBSI 


* u wiertying security price. 





4 





>*J* » 


“ t- ; _ . «» 

•k-J ; ; V J ^ 
si 


’ : *a, 


-..V Jtt-. 


— -ttKANpa 


i*. 


tx ;- 
r> 

I!:. >i ■ 


i. 


/ . 
i- 


«K5i 


5k 

X 

£ 

<c 

:i 





7 








.x. *r*T\‘ ~ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


27 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


- jivwftBwn mi ncrwm 

ConsGold back in spotlight 

as profit-takers shy away 


Coi y .S^M S a fS5 arol Le0nard 

the mining njumotwaS^l ? adc ? 1 °P ll<>ns - Several ]ead ~ 
again at the centredf 12? mvesfoient houses am 
speculation yestodSy 2 SS to^havc buflt upferge 

stores held rock-steady at 
LIP below the 


esinthe 

pc ttot a deal may soon be 


profiwakmg that dealers tod 
anticipated failed to 
materialize. 


Meanwhile, foe flurry of 
in ConsGold has also 
to focus on 


* ?P*SL "?« trading at a <4» m *h^™ 


Grismess Peat, the financial 
services house, finned 2p to 
89p amid renewed takeover 
speculation. This time there is 
said to be an oiler coming 
soon at the 120p level 
The caO went out to inves- 
tors from brokers’ offices yes- 
terday to take profits' in 
Uaflera, the Anglo-Dmdt 
housbold products group, 
which earlier this week 

“**- were oamne at a ,4*;-, .u- — v* - : i ^ JZfSW9 t K BBKM a B SSS^ sa,i wwiaiwrt8)gsf.^gi cheered the market with some 

low of 409p, but the troubles 287o look cto^atfftiuL too betier-than-expected third- 

m South Africa have since °° quarter figures. They showeda 

focused attention on the near f - rise in pretax profits of 22 per 

aSS$£A-S- Sffi2S£? pnnwfw Brothers, dynetnie rnan^t a* V c= 

fortune abroad someofhls ^ some of Jar earlier Britian’s biggest glass nano- which should increase tire m New York.*^ 

Hei* nowbeina troneri .« P^- V* fJ-SE 100 index, facturer. cfiSbed 14p to 555p, profile of the group in the S S to 

hid for th ? 10 wfocb started the day seven on amthuied specolaxkm that Chy." ISSSLSSf . r 1 ,. 

SroSA^Am^SS? hwer, managed to BTK has a 4.9^OToake. Guinness jumped 9p to SK 

^oscyrat 0J down, at 1,6443. On Monday the'oompaxiy wffl 344p on sup^rt Sead Sf its Kg, 01 ^^ 
may tow already ltoSFiro 1 t 2 <,cx ctosed annoUDCe * *0 per cent in- ADR&cflity which his dne to pSEL ^ 

Trafalgar House to h™ <lown ^ atI>2g3 - 2 - 



COMMENT 


BA keeps the flag flying 
and saves its share sale 


_ to buy 

• Renewed insttotiooal 

Ttorek^v f^S&L buying fiftedTiphook, the . 
Ho,Sh a ?i25i container and tafoerrentel 

House has been looking round groan, 15ptoaneakof350i> 

S^ a ,?^ a S5 n f iti0n ' 

“«rt month. Mr 
5? Montague, ctoinaan, says 
earhertlus to group is operating at 87 
W suited ? “my have percentatil^ra^i 

dSorl^iS ^J TOp ?2 ““““ttonSflW containers.- 
developer, the onceover, but Next stop 400 d? 
was thwarted by the hmmShmmwwm 

fell in its own share price. Applications for shares in 

The sale of ARC to Trafel- ~ 


per cent m- ADR facility which 
crease in the price of its glass get on November 20. 
products in Britain — which Vanx Group finned 3p to 
should give an unexpected 453p. Talk is ttot Wolver- 
boost to margins and nnther bampton & Dudley and 
help fend off any predator. Pleasurama win launch a joint 

>rand Metropofitan, the bid, with Wolverhampton tak- 


Brokers such as Wood 
Mackenzie have now changed 


• Interim resnlts from 
Metal Box, the metal can and 
plastic bottle maaufae- 

hotri to brewery ^oup.dflpped ing the brewing interests mid ^S^annSeSe 511011111 
5p to 456p, despite appointing Pieasmama the hotels. Co- market Most brokers are 
a new group finance director, incidentally, both Wolver- for of £& 

Mr Clive Strowger. The tompton and Pteasarama toSwmiffion tot latest word 
appointment is being seen by store the same stockbroker, »s ttot the tin mice cei- 
the City as a very positive the James Capd. lapse coaid have given an an- 

move, and a somewhat Kennedy Brookes, the hiwvcttomarmtK 

Smpr i5? g c ^ lip g *P Mario Franco w Wheelers SSres b feSoiJp^to 
soon after Mr Alan Sheppard, restaurant chain, also yj^n J 

the group chief executive, rumoured as a possible bidder ^ 


Je? P *° R“ haixi ' Branson, moved his right hand man, Mr for Vaux, jumped 17p to 304p their stance on the shares and 

three times fen Martin, from Watney to in late trade on takeover are urging clients to sefl. 

mg the deal with ARCprob- subscribed, but experienced a bead the company’s US opera- speculation of its own. There Unilevershares which have 

ab ly c o mm a nding a pnee-tag disappointing debut m the tkms. Mr Strowger formerly has been talk in the catering been touching new heights this 

£4U0 imoffiaal grey maiketOeve- ran Grand Met’s Express trade for several weeks ttot week, fefl27p to £19.98. 

Ihe speculanon surround- fend Secaritoes, the licensed Dairy subsidiary. someone has been building a Analysis are still not ruling out 

mg ConsGold has been dealer, was quoting them at a Mr Daniel Leaf brewing stake: Dr S Singh yesterday a possiMe store-split at the 

bnmght to a head this wok middle price of 147p, just a 7p analyst at Wood Mackenzie, announced that he owned yearend. 

with _nevra of heavy Swiss premium to the 140p striking the broker, said: “Mr 130,000 shares - less than 1 The high street retailers 
support lor the shares in price. - Sheppard is showing signs of a per cent of the company. “ ... 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


OKar Cfe*g» 


% P/e *80 HU to* C o m p — y 


m oaf pro 


YU 

% WE 


363 283 ; AEM-Lyons 
174 12BLa8QA-MR 
483 Z78 BTR 
491 361 .BAT 
672 449 BHdWi 
640 680 Bn 
450 356 -Saacham 
726 526' Uftia Ckdb 
383 293 OOC 
289 17D Boots 
606 423 6 Aa roap a c a 
709 530 BTRatratam 
280 177*1 Br Talacoai 
193 98 BritoS 
354 256 Butan 
368 277' Cftb 6 Vttatoas 
196 156 Cadbuy Sdmppao 179 182 


313 816 
156 160 

262 297 • 
462 487 • 
470 477 
738 746 
426 431 
647 852 
332 836. 
229 232 
480 485 
BBS 700 
196 200 
164 168 
268 272 
303 310 . 


338 259 Com Union 
704 409 Cera GDttMft 
3Z7'i 262 CourtauUa 
438 318 noa op 
650 408 Haem 
954 7D1 Gah AccUaot ■ 
226 158 QEC 
11>« 756*. (Saxo 
462 328 Qraid Mat 
11V7Z1 <3US ‘A 
954 720 ORE 
385 235 GJKN 
355 275 Gtimaaa 
215**141 


267 270 • 
890 897 • 
311 314 . 

332 336 ' 
650.-S56- a ' 
826 832 -* 
183 187 
906 915 - 
455 480 . 

10*»TO*» • 
.786 772 • 
248 251 • 
340 345. 

206 207 . 


-1 

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-8 

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+2 

+3 


-a 

-1 

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46 

42 
-4 

43 
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13:6 43 144- 708 
AS . ZB 173 1,800 


43 

-15. 

-3 

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48 

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623 483 Hawfcar an 
11*1734 tapChraM . 
583 33S **11"" 

98 &3 206 0900 a»1 312 LadMUa 

184 40 12.1 I960 348 276 Land SttaaWas 

201 09 08 561 288 133 LagM 6 Ban 

217 .09 108 310 484 293 Lloyds 

17.1 40 174 1400 as IBS Lonhro 

300 46 02 2J»0 231 163 Maria 6 Spancar 

141 42 127 004 599 417 MUM 

lOI 44 15.1 0200 593 426 WDM 

234 48 102 1700 578 428 POOOfrd 

484 70 70 2000 248 162 Ptoaaay 

107 54 IIO 0800 942 718 PnaMal 

90 . 80 44 5.600 934 146 Racal Bad 

60 25 HO 1000 goo 605 Raddt Ootman 
60 22 160 2200 562**345 HauM 

87 40 21.1 504 791 511 ffTZ 

174 85 .. . . 1400 897 782 Royal Ma 

380 50. . 180 1,100 428 344 Sataatwiy (J) 

a a - 30 105 1000 14S*z102 Soars 

43 .18 280 1.100 415 321 Sadga** Gp 

! 64 15 240 236 970 ,653 Shod ... 

340 -41 200 • 882 168 .90 SIC 
41. 83 115 9000 772 620 Sun ABenca 
200 22 100 1200 81** 77^ TBS P/P 

185 20 164 2200 420 286 lneo 

300 -20 .147 347 529 374 ItanBI 

425 so 223 217 349 248 Tratatgar Houaa 

170 72 84 ^ 209 138 Triathouaa Pona 

103 30 130 440b 20*a 13*slMatsr 

47 23 183 4200 a» 216 UU B UciO a 


414 

420 

• 

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214 

81 

92 

178 

10*i IPb 



484 

43 

112 

1400 

508 

513 


+i 

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25 

105 

275 

370 

375 


+ 2 

154 

AS 

175 

049 

835 

338 


-5 

144 

AS 

225 

yann 

235 

240 

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12 a 

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304 

358 

415 

422 


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25 a 

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67 

299 

243 

245 


m m 

17.1 

72 

124 

583 

193 

196 

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834 4400 

80S 

572 


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37.1 

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21.1 

1200 

500 

507 


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27.6 

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54 

292 

515 

520 

• 

-3 

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144 

171 

174 

178 


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4.1 

1&0 3700 

803 

810 


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534 

105 

172 

178 


+2 

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184 3400 

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480 487 
282 285 
184 187 
194*20 
237 240 


250 42 354 968 


suffered another early shake- 
out, but finish ed above their 
worst levels of the day. Marks 
aad Spencer dipped 2 p to 
194p as a line of one million 
stores went through the mar- 
tot at I93.jp: A total of 4.6 
million shares were traded. 

Oil shares continued to inn 


recent moves by Saudi Arabia 


rumours that Saudi Arabia 
was considering a cut of one 
millio n barrels a day in its 


There was selective support 
for the big producers but 
prices generally closed below 
their best levels of the day. BP 
finned lp to 694p as almost 
two milli on shares were 
traded, while SheD lost an 


-3 

-** 

-1 


1 H X *« eariy Up lead to finish only 
«K 5J £ 1a 3 1-5P up at 954jp as 716,000 
i38b s.7 128 330 shares changed hands. 


In a couple of days. Lord King, 
chairman of British Airways, will 
reveal half-time profits for the present 
year. No one is expecting anything 
other than grim news. It has been a 
nightmarish year for everyone who 
makes a substantial pan of their living 
from flying passengers on the usually 
lucrative routes across the North 
Atlantic. 

Monday’s statement is likely to 
show profits at the pretax level down 
from the £200 million or so of last year 
to perhaps £130 million or a touch 
more. Not on the face of things an 
auspicious precursor to privatization, 
now scheduled for early next year. 

But the reality behind those 
is rather different. The significant 
story of a disaster-strewn 1986 is that 
it could so easily have been as bad for 
BA as it turned out to be for some of 
its American rivals. In that event, 
there would have been a profits fell of 
catastrophic proportions and it is 
most unlikely that Downing Street 
would have given the nod to a January 
flotation at all. 

Most heartening for those who 
recall the BA of old, is that the present 
management reacted in a way not in 
the least characteristic of a state- 
controlled industry. It was hard- 
headed and financially sound and 
showed a fine degree of style. Laid 
bade, but not supine: 

Problems came at BA in a torrent in 
April, the very first month of the new 
financial year. Virgin’s airline, signifi- 
cantly not induded in the flotation of 
Richard Branson's empire, signalled 
an impending price war when it 
announced £100 reductions on pack- 
ages to the US. Then BCal asked the 
Civil Aviation Authority to sanction 
lower feres on transatlantic routes. 

The next few days saw the start of a 
series of terrorist attacks that deci- 
mated traffic between North America 
and Europe throughout the spring. 
They began with the bombing of a 
Berlin nightclub, followed by an 
attempted rocket attack on the US 
embassy in Beirut. A week later 
President Reagan’s patience snapped 
and Libya was bombed. In the 
aftermath, TWA cancelled Rome- 
Athens-Cairo services after an attack 
on one of its aircraft and Colonel 
Gadaffi declared Britain to be a 
legitimate target as well as the US for 
retaliation against the US air strike. 

April drew to a close with the foiled 
attempt to bomb the El-Al jumbo jet 
at Heathrow, the Chernobyl disaster 
and disclosure by the US travel 
service that half the Americans plan- 
ning visits to Europe in March, April 
and May had decided to cancel and 
holiday elsewhere. 

Not surprisingly, this led to the 
sharpest downturn in business BA has 
ever experienced. In May, cancella- 
tions were coming in fester than new 
bookings. Revenues were sharply 


down. Analysts say that BA lost 
around £50 million of revenue in die 
first quarter of its current financial 
year. 

The knee-jerk response to such a 
setback would have been to rush out 
cut-price measures in an effort to 
snatch market share from rival air- 
lines or simply to hang on to the 
margins and blame the problems on 
the rest of the world. BA decided 
instead to market its way out of the 
mire. 

The “Go for it America” campaign 
cost a mere £4 million yet it yielded a 
rich harvest. The basic ideas were 
two-fold: to restore confidence in 
Britain as a safe destination for US 
tourists and to pre-empt similar 
efforts by other airlines. 

The lottery to give away 5,600 free 
seats on flights to Britain gained 
millions of dollars worth of TV 
network time. More than a million 
people responded in the hope of 
winning prizes such as free use of 
Concorde for a day, a £100,000 
Harrods spending spree, a five-year 
lease on a London town-house or a 
Rolls Royce. BA chose a couple of 
lucky winners from each of its 15 US 
destinations to meet the Prime Min- 
ister and the airtime when they were 
interviewed on their local TV stations 
was again worth millions. 

The results of the campaign were 
spectacular in financial as well as 
marketing terms, ha May, according 
to analysts, BA was down 25 per cent 
on its revenue budgets. By September 
the gap had shrunk to 7 or 8 per cent. 
Had it remained at the springtime 
levels throughout the whole of the first 
half-year, interim profits would have 
been in the £80 to £85 million range. 

That would almost certainly have 
scuppered any thoughts of an im- 
minent flotation. BA has no chance in 
the winter months, when it just about 
breaks even, of making up any first- 
half profits shortfelL There is thus no 
way that the airline could have been 
privatized for anything like the £1 
billion or so- that the Treasury will be 
looking for in January. With an 
election in the wind, there would have 
bom substantial political risk in 
privatizing at anything that could be 
construed as a give-away price. 

The decision therefore to mount the 
“Go for it America” campaign in 
effect saved the flotation from yet 
another postponement It also dem- 
onstrates just how for BA has travelled 
from the bad old days when a for less 
commercial approach to the bottom 
line was the order of things. The 
airline business is notorious for its ups 
and downs. That the present manage- 
ment is capable of swift and sure 
response when disaster strikes should 
help the flotation no end. 

John Bell 

City Editor 


MAI bids 
£24m 
for LCAH 

} By.Lawreace Lever 

The fortunes ofLondon and 
Continental Advertising 
Holdings (LCAH), foe trou- 
bled outdoor advertiser, took 
a new twist yesterday when 
MAI, the financial and media 
gram launched a £24 million 
fed for the company. . 

MAI has built a 2235 per 
cent slake in LCAH. It op- 
poses the reorganization plans 
and £7.4 mill wi n rights issue 
announced by LCAH earlier 
this month. 

These plans mean the 
replacement of four LCAH 
directors with people from 
Piccadilly House, the invest- 
ment group, and a 29 per cent 
stake in LCAH for Piccadilly. 

MAI is offering LCAH 
shareholders 120p cash or 27 
MAI shares for every 100 
LCAH shares. With MATs 
share price felling slightl y ^on 
the news, the shares offer 
values LCAH shares at 112p. 

MAI has- told the LCAH 
board that whatever the out- 
come of LCAH’s proposed 
1 1 Op rights issue it will under- 
write the offer at I20pa share. 


Coffee price 
in further 
£130 plunge 

By Richard Lauder 

The coffee price was hit fry 
another dramatic collapse yes- 
terday with the market adopt- 
ing a bearish view of foe 
actions being taken by Brazu, 
the world’s largest p roduoe r- 
January robusta fotores on 
the London Commodity Ex- 
change slumped £130 to 
£2.045 a tonne fora net loss of 
£280 on the week. 

Prices had rallied onTnurs- 
day after three days of fells on 
reports that Brazil would 
halve the amount of conee 
made available for export next 
month, although on Montoy 
it had said it would oner 
discounts on those sales. 

Traders are inclined to be- 
lieve that Brazil has irfenty_ of 
coffee to sell and are wimed 
that stocks it boughun Europe 
two months ago might re- 
enter the market rather than 
be shipped home 
Warnings of former tans, 
seemed to-be bome put when . 
prices opened sharply lower m 
New York last night- . . 



(■ TEMPUS ) 

confuses the 
issue 




Poor bid McCorquodale 
shareholders. They are sf“' 
on tantalizing potential 

its, having seen their si 
come up from a low of 140p 
this year to a high at 307%p. 
But they most be totally 
confused ay to whether or 
how they can feto those 
profits. 

The tactics of the com- 
pany’s biggest shareholder, 

Mr Robert Maxwell, self- 
styled champion of the small- 
er shareholder, are muddying 
the waters at the eleventh 
hour. 

Having assorted his 19.1 
cent stake to die Norton 
offer, he is now trying 
to force the rival Datafin 
management buyout team 
into increasing its 3! Op a 
store cash offer. If he suc- 
ceeds Datafin will secure his 
additional 3 per cent. 

His horse-trading looks 
like scuppering die Opax bid 
and, according to the Opax 
camp, could scupper the 
fed too. 

has pointed out die 

dangers of management buy- 

outs in contested fed situa- 
tions. Datafin needs 90 per 
cent acceptances before com- 
pulsorily buying the rest of 

foe shares. Anything less than 
90 per cent and it would have 
to seek court approval to take 
McCorquodale private. 

Opax is sitting on a near-!5 
percent stake and could try to 
block such a move, if its fed 
lapses Alternatively, it might 
have to assent its stake to 
Datafin Just to cover its fed 
and underwriting costs. 

McCorquodale sharehold- 
ers have to decide what to do 
before next Friday, when foe 
Opax offer doses. Both bids 
have risks a t ta che d. 

The Opax cash offer of 
303 . 3 p a share is less than 
Datafm’s, and its paper offer 
of 310.3p is vulnerable: Opax 
stores have retreated from a 
high of 155p to 133p, partly 
on fears that the company is 
taking on too much. 

Tbe level of dilution for 
Opax shareholders is hefty 
and foe danger of losing all 
McCorauodak’s senior man- 


Norton v McCorquodale 

lMcCOHQUOOALE^ I 



H 280 


240 


200 


KINNOCK □ 


STEEL □ 


TEBBIT □ 


‘MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT ’ NOV 


160 


company like Qtox- The.- 
Opax .shares, cohla suffer a 
prolonged period of stagna- 


tion when 3 % times the 
number now in issue flood 
foe market. 

Datafin cash at 310p, or 
perhaps higher. , looks a better 
bet, but .only if the offer 
succeeds. If both offers lapse 
the shares will drop, below 
300p. 

Sharehokfers should hang 
on and read with care the 
offer document from Datafin. 
Mr MaxwdTs intervention is 

^m^ment^^^^UJarity 
the issue of acceptance levels. 
It should also contain the 
advice of Ktonwort Benson, 
adviser to the independent 
directors at McCorquodale. 

The indejTendent directors 
are supporting the buyout* 
but they should spell out their 
reasoning more clearly. 

Tricentrol 

As the weds stretch into 
months and there is still no 
definitive announcement on 
the disposal of its North 
American assets, the City’s 
patience with Tricentrol is 
near breaking ptunL Its 
credibility with investors is at 
a record low, and there 
cannot be many companies 
with so few friends among 
analysts and fund managers. 

TricentroTs third quarter 
results are delayed. They 
should have come out on 
Thursday, but are unlikely to 
appear until early December. 
This is because the company 
wants to show its third quar- 
ter results on foe basis that 
foe United States assets are 
sold, showing the consequent 
improvement to ilk balance ■ 
sheet. 


Shorn of its US interests, 
Tricentrol looks more vulner- 
able as a potential takeover 
target Debt will stiQ be a 
formidable obstacle to any 
takeover proposal, however. 

■ The £53 million which the 
sale is expected to raise will 
reduce TricentroTs debt to 
about£140 million (including 
£463 millio n of convertible 
loan stock). But the assets, 
which Tricentrol bought 
when the oil price was high, 
are bound to incur a write-off 
from book value now they arc 
being sold when the oil price 
is low. The debt equity ratio, 
therefore, is likely to remain 
stubbornly above 1:1. 

There is speculation ttot 
Tricentrol has been trying to 
make itself more bid proof by 
seeking a friendly investor to 
buy a significant share- 
holding. There are only two 
shareholders with declarable 
stakes in Tricentrol — Trafal- 
gar House with about 6 per 
cent and Enterprise Oil with 
4.9 per cent of the equity and 
25 percent of the convertible, 
giving it potentially more 
than 10 per cent of the 
company. 

Tricentrol is still as good a 
strategic fit with Enterprise as 
it was when Enterprise ac- 
quired its interest However, 
some of the urgency may 
have gone out of Enterprise's 
need to make an acquisition. 
Since buying Saxon Oil it has 
made other small purchases 
and has been aggressive on 
farm-ins. Even a company 
with the financial strength 
would have to swallow hand 
before * contemplating 
TricentroTs debt. 


If your party loses, what will 
the others do to your investments? 

Read what they say in 


the December issue of 

THE PRIVATE INVESTOR. 

Only The Private Investor concentrates the cream of 
financial journalism, City thinking, and political 
opinion in a polished Quarterly specialising in serious 
private investment. 

It examines in depth - and in accessible language - 
the short, mid, and long term trends that affect your 
investment judgement. Nothing else quite like TTie 
Private Investor exists in financial journalism. 

Nothing else assembles the political, financial and 
economic background with such authority. No other 
source gives you so perceptive, informed and 
effective an investment briefing. 

Political intentions are laid bare. 

Financial and legislative undercurrents, as well as 
topical news, are revealed and analysed. 

Economic forces are assessed, future trends 
projected. 

The Private Investor is designed to provide a 
complete briefing each quarter on the investment 
environment: a uniq ue and literate basis on which to 
plan investment strategy. 

Available exclusively cm Subscription 
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) : 

To: The Private Investor, FREEPOST 2, London WIE 8EZ. 

Please accept my subscription of £12.50 for (Hie year’s issues Address . 
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Articles in the 128-page 
December edition include: 

Policies for Investment and Growth 

Kinnock Steel Tebbit 
Consider their strategies, then plan yours 

PnrE Profit from the Chancellor 

Nigel Lawson and’Sir Nicholas Goodison 
on bow to get dividends without taxation 

Regulating the City Jungle 

Sir Kenneth Berrill, Chairman SIB 

Privatisations 

An alternative point of view 
Bill Keegan, Economics Editor; The Observer 

Commodities 

How to make money out of gold, 
diamonds, platinum - and even tin 
David Green, Daily Telegraph 

Chinese Walls 

Will the silence be breached? 

Anthony Hilton, Gty Editor, The Standard 


IN YOUR MARCH ISSUE 

Edward Heath and Jim Callaghan lead a 
distinguished list of contributors from politics, 
financial journalism and the City. 


The p r i va t e investor 

The essential quarterly briefing 

The Private Investor, FREEPOST 2, London W1E 8EZ 


Name, 




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cc. 

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28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


e-J rmw Chng Via 


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AUJEOOUNBARUMT TRUSTS 
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japan Fund 

Pacific Trust 
Amer Spd Sas 
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SfenaMr Go's 
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131. Rnacury Punrmern. London ECU 1AY 
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Finance & Property 707 75 5 . 

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PcrtfoSo “St UK 485 50.1 


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3. Oanflniae Sc 
031-225 2581 [Outers. 


. . 15S 
159 
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BO America 
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BALTIC TRUST MAMAOSB 

25,-28 Ateannarta Street London W1X 4AD 

01-491 0295 

47.0 500 +04 050 

224 234 -03 248 

1084 1110 +15 0 08 

451 400 -06 3£8 

061 915 +04 143 

40 4 5<5 -0.7 352 

168 21 2 .. 1050 

345 372 -0.1 154 

414 4459 +05 155 


American 
Aiotnslan 
Japan B Genera) 
High Income 
fnmmattene/ Trust 
tnoorra QSi Tn 
Gits 8 Fixed In 
Global Markets 
Special Stuanons 


BARCLAYS UMC3RN 

Unicom Home. 252, Romtoni FU E7 

01-534 65*4 


Japan 1 
DO A 


America E90 94.79 

Aua Accum 1914 191.7 

Do Income 1262 1358 

Capital 69 6 718 

Exempt Trust 416$ 44280 

ExK Income 741 7689 

fimmaW 230.8 2442c 

500 2865 281.7 

Ganarai 1374 145.19 

GBt a Fbad me 494 525c 

1 & Gan Inc 1574 1685 

) Acc 159.? 1E04 

Grow* Accum 1769 187.1 

Income Trust 3382 asBffl 

Leisure Tree) 608 862 

Special Situations 1424 151.1 

Recovery 195.4 20679 

Trustee Find 1055 1115 

Unh Tacn Accum 5*2 575 

Do tacoma 532 568 

WmtawMo Trust 150$ 1562 

V Tat Inv Fin) Aoc 33*.fl 35*0® 

Do Inc 2135 2253 © 

BAmm RJND 3UMAOER& 

PO Bee 156 BMMrtwn. Korn BR3 
01-855 9002 


+0.4 ix 

+08 050 
+1.8 090 
-1.0 105 
-62 429 
-05 5.72 
-Z0 60S 
- 1.8 121 
-14 128 
-041044 
+1.4 000 
+15 040 
-14 031 
-28 390 
-02 1.45 
-0.7 239 
-14 282 
-14 105 
+01 019 
+01 0.19 
+04 1.17 
-5.0 345 
-12 145 


Australia 
Eastern 
Eouftr Income 
Europe 
Growth & me 
Japan Spactaf 
Japan Sunrise 
Fkst Europe 
FW Japan 
Alt N Amor 
Hnt Sirrier Ctft 


ifi 


8630 
702 
57.6 6120 
1314 1403 
661 87.1 
1034 1103 
502 9490 
1181 1234 
044 BO e® 
516 55.1 
G0.6 7069 


BABIUNGTIM IMNAGEMEHT 

16 r anc hmen Sl London EC3 
01-823 MOO 

Amer Smir Co UK €80 G68 

Do Accum 87 4 71.1 

Erxopaan Inc I0a7 HM2 

Do Accum 1219 mfi 

Fund of Imr Tr MC 211 207 

Do Accum 27.8 261 

1871 1771 
2267 2413 
103.4 1085 
1704 1755 
922 973 
18S.6 1954 

108.1 111.9c 
1114 117.9c 
2284 241 4 
230 4 2431 

961 101.6 
964 1001 
504 535 
594 624 

132.1 


4X0 

+67 030 
+04 0J0 
-05 540 
+13 150 
-04 1M 
+05 0.10 
+03 0.10 
+1.4 050 
+03 1.10 
+03 1.10 
.. 070 


General Inc 
Do Accum 
on Yield me 
Do Accum 
YMd Inc 
1 Accum 
Ini Roc Inc 
Do Accum 
inc 


x: 


TO, 

TO5& 


Acuxn 

Spec me 


N American me 
Da Accum 
Pecdlc me 
Da Accum 


Co 5 Inc 
Da Accum 
UK Eqrfiy Got me 
1 Accum 


1*60 15739 
>324 7405c 
813 BS.7 
362 1015 
261 266 
481 468 
384 407 
384 410 


Da 

--- - - * ■>- “W-A- leraa 

nOrKmu) IKH VC 

Do Accun 
KB Sirrier Co'a Ine 1914 17049 
DO Accum 2101 2205 

KB HMi Yield me 1321 1394c 
Da Acosn 2208 232.9 


+04 149 
+01 1.B3 
+1.0 145 
+13 1.45 
.. 015 
+01 016 
+06 0B5 
+09 035 
-0.710 09 
-051083 
+04 528 
+1.7 528 
+04 1.99 
+14 1.99 
+3.1 023 
+10 039 
+07 0.68 
+0.8 068 
+05 0.73 
+05 073 
♦1.4 055 
+14 ora 

+1.7 133 
*07 152 
+0.7 1.62 
+0.1 1.10 
+0.1 1.10 
*0.1 191 
. . un 
♦04 1.77 
+01 1.77 
+03 541 
+04 541 




&d Otter Cmg YU 


BROWN 8MFL4Y 
9-17, Penman 
0444 +BBH4 

Rnanettl 

SraSat Co's Acc 

Do rnwma 
wpi rnceme 
bKCma 

Man PaRRMo me 

Da Aw 

Natlfi American 
Orient 


nd. iiaye w a Hewn 


191 1389 
S345 25049 
1408 180.10 
Si» 701 
763 91.79 
834 670 
1063 113 1 
Ml C32 

824 8659 


-07 041 

-V .. 
-05 049 
-03 9.79 
+25 471 
-04 107 
-1.1 . . 
+01 140 
+09 024 


509 541 .. 3 m 

2243 Z33.7 +01 164 

3667 3708 +4.1 184 

10*3 109.4m . . 4.77 

1863 1954 .. 4.77 

133.7 1363 .. 1.72 

1773 1863 .. 1.72 

41038 I07B .. 031 

El 034 1359 .. 241 

CaFWDMAMMKRS 
121. Won HdDcm. London WC1V BPY 
01-242 1143 

CS Japan Fund 81 .9 87.1 +04 045 

CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
r. agmgfcWBy. tetonpiey. NAS 0MB 


ReAMsMpInc 
Ganeni me i*i 
Do Accum M) 
Income =uno (3) 
Do Accum [3) 

hrt Inc 72} 

Do Accum 12) 
SmaBer Inc IS) 
Do Accum (5) 


Grown 

mcoma 

Far East 

Morn American 

Global 

European 

Japan 


2924 3094 
342.7 3803 
0281 2414 
1513 180.1 
61 6 546 
553 564 
S74 31.1 


+0 4 25S 
+13 670 
+4.B 036 
+04 057 
404 083 
+04 137 
+14 010 


CAPEL (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Bor Ml Berta Marta London EC3 7 JO 

01-621 0011 

COPW 382.1 38538 +07 143 

metten 3314 29938 -13 138 

Norm American 2969 3191 +04 090 

CAT&R ALLSN 

1- Kfttg waaam Sl EC4N 7AU 

01-813 8314 

GBt Truss 961 9548 -041218 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FWANCS OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
0 Fora Street. Loncon EC2Y 5AO 
01-588 1815 

inr Find 41345 . . 440 

Fixed mt 13625 .. 1073 

Daposh 1000 . . 1020 

CHASE MAMMTTAN FWB MANAGERS 

SraoL London SS2V 5DP 


01 

S 6 C Special Sis 583 595 

CHAMma official MVEsnratr fund 
0 Fore SVML London ECZY SAG 
01-588 1315 


mesne 

Accum 

Oaoojft 


33149 

£11.0383 

1000 


CLERICAL MEDICAL IMTTRU8T 
MANAGERS 

Narrow pram. Bristol BS2 OJH 

0800 373393 

Arner Growth 248 254 

Equity HI01 m co nw 43.4 4B0 

Eutombi Grown 300 31 88 

Grmaral EttuHy 369 414 

Gm 4 =bod W Gth 264 263 

Gm 4 Fbad me 224 2648 

index Securntes 239 252 

Japan Grown 307 34.7 

Peragrsa GO) 243 ZS5 

cowry ut managers ltd 

161. CtWBBSfete. London EC2V BED 
0I-7J8 1999 
Energy That 
Extra income 
Financial 
CM Stnnaj y 
Growth rnr eaj neni 
tnooma 1 Grown 


506 502 
•lias 175.70 
1361 1790 
M.7 574e 
2944 301.4 
414 44.18 
1804 1811 
1064 11448 
1176 1244 
2331 2355 
81.8 852 
2967 3108 


■Imeneaa Grown 
Nth Amor Growth 
MB Recovery 
Smaior Co's 
Global me Tar 
Special Sts Aoc 
CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVOS 
Crown House. Woking QU21 1X3V 
04882 9333 

High Inoome Trust 9464 28008 
Growth Trust 2207 2369 

American Trust 1303 1385 


DRUSAOSI UNIT TRUST MANAOSta LTD 
RMOta. Surrey RH2 BBL 
07372 12424 

UK income 474 510 -08 447 

UK Drawn Acoan 444 514 -C® 243 

CO DM 489 515 -00 0«3 

Ejrcnmn Growth 554 59.9 -61 1.33 

PactSc Growth 510 507 +04 . . 


+01 I4D 
-04 450 
.. 000 
-04 0BD 
-02 340 
-02 950 
-02 240 
+00 090 
-02 050 


-01 344 
-0.4 542 
+01 032 
-04 149 
-4.1 253 
-05 441 
+02 084 
-61 1.42 
+03 012 
+4,7 150 
+03 340 
-30 148 


-25 458 
-34 3JW 
+08 072 


EFM UNn-TRUST MANAGERS 
4. MetvKe CrajcenL Edntxxrm 
O3>-220 3*92 

American Fund 703 7858 +01 190 

Capa*) Find 101 0 107.0 -0.4 158 

Granin & Inc Fin) 1295 137.8 -14 453 

K i Oat Fund M7.fi 11458 -09 690 

rriodonal Fund 2CS3 2168 .. 143 

RasaurcM Frxw 255 27.1 +01 037 

ai«r Jap Co'a Fnd 335 361 +0.4 .. 

Tokyo Find 1594 1701 +04 000 

(Ext Amer [21 1400 15008 .. 688 

fen) Japan (31 1075 1104 .. 019 

(Ex) riocHc (4i 3120 3206 +140 031 

&l SmaBar J*> (4) 1M5 2050® +07 010 
EuroAjM 264 300 ..631 

EAOU STAR UNIT TRUST MANAQSM 
Bath Road. ChoBanham. Gtouoaattr GLS3 710 
0942 921311 

UK Roland be 705 744 

Da Acorn 71.8 760 

UK Growth Actual 861 935 

UK Hgh Inc me 860 72.18 

N Antuncan Accun 89.1 767 



HMW he Accum 2SU 3S7J8 -63 4 » 
DOInocma 1865 211.18 -27 44B 

GbWfikcd Mmit 92* 870 -0.7 9 *4 

DO IntO d ia 7S.4 K.4 -07 B.44 

trti Amorist Accam 1384 1*748 +** £-« 
Far Eael Tj) Accum 1M5 17*58 +10 0« 
Euro Tit Aetna 189.7 18058 *02 >20 
Omni Trust 2390 29428 -60 640 


T. B |4ur«rtM PoiriMY H0" London EC4R DBA 
01-823 4880 
USSfasflwCbi 
Cacstal Fund 
UK mcoma Fund 
Far E xam 1 1 Fund 
Oronaas ftsme 
Reed a ce ra m 

Natural Rae Fund 


F lr nn da B Fund 


741 7928 +03 B2S 
1104 117.1 +83 0-4 

735 804 -14 4« 

764 761 +03 040 

794 815 +2^ 3JS 

M S 58.4 -08 900 

512 S£5 +13 318 

864 905 -02 250 

475 909 -0’ 257 


FSINVEBTMBfT MANAGERS „„„ 
190. West George SL Gtaagow G3 2PA 
041-332 3132 


BUansad Oh he 
Do Accum 
mcoma Gth me 
Do Accum 
Service Co's km 
Do Aecnn 


140 


150 


445 4750 
45 4 4638 

41.1 43 7 

43.1 454 

31.1 5*48 

52.0 5554 .. .. 

RSSJTY WVE31M9rr SHW1CES LTD 
Fhrar wan. Tantmaoa. tub tor 
0732 381144 

107 1 114.48 +10 088 
35.4 3758 +0.< *44 
5B5 509 


Amor 

Amor 

Australia 


SIB 


+10 073 

30.7 SL58 +05 ia 
437 485 +05 000 

M0 38 to +05 697 
265 297 


FrEH me 

□It & Fixed hi: _. 

Growth A inane' 90S 1067 

Japan Special Sts 350 415 

Japan 1363 1460 

Managed Int 1360 147.7 

Max Income Equity 82.1 8A5 

Protaesaotei Gm 32.8 3*9 ...- 

Sautn East Asia 39.1 41.78 +09 

Sendai Sts 1724 1869 


-001007 
.. 4JJ7 
+09 .. 
+G.1 .. 
+1.7 001 
.. 619 
+0.1 640 
+09 055 
+04 084 


:: S 

:: lao 


lit 

f21 

252 

la 


FLESMtQPKMBm 
6 CrotiSy Sg. London EC3A BAN 
01-838 5968 

Amartcan Exempt ESCB 0 372.10 
Japan Exempt E4189 4261 
Am Property T« 5100000 

Property True: £20269 O 

FRAMLMGTON UNIT MANAGEMENT 
6 LoMen Wol Btdoa. London Wa6 London 
EC2M 5NO 
01829 5191 
Amer S Gen me 
Do Accum 
Amer Tnnamfl hic 
D o Accum 
CnM Tit me 
do Accum 
Conv 8 GM Inc 
Do Accum 
Extra Inc tm inc 
Do A lbum 

Do Accum 

H Growth Fd Inc 

Do Accum 

Japan a Gen me 
Do Accum 
MondUy mcoma Fd 
Racowy 
Do Aon im 
European me 
Do Accun 
Financial me 
Do Accun 

FREND9PROVIDCMTMANAGBI9 
FMiam End. DMMng. Sunny 

03« offices 
FP Equity D*W 
Do Accum 
FP Fuad mi Diet 
Do Accun 
Sraw ar a am p Dm 
Do 


win p yi H 
2270 2*1.0 
2110 22*0 
2190 232-4 
20*4 21628 
2490 20648 
890 964 
117.4 12*0 

197.0 1760 
1810 IB! * 
120 0 127 0c 
1268 1340c 
194.* 17688 

132.0 19628 
868 966 
830 9*0 
830 87.B8 

1480 1580 
1512 170.4 
862 630 
M2 980 
482 500 
490 90S 


I960 2062® 
3303 35O0A 
1022 1067® 
1268 1286® 
1715 ISi.84 
ITS* 1863® 


+15 

+15 

*<61 

+35 

-07 

- 1.1 

•02 
-15 
-1.7 
-03 
- 1.1 
+02 
+04 
+1* 
♦ 1.7 
-04 
-02 
-00 
+08 
+08 
+07 
+07 


-65 

-59 

-09 

-10 

-62 

-63 


fussmcourt 

Puoac Tnnm longsway WC2 
01+405 4300 


Capital 
Gross Inc 
Mgn YMd 


3494 35030 
1510 154.1 
2180 227.9 


S3 

699 


+01 I.TO 
-00 2J0 
-07 2.70 
-19 600 

* 7 'n£ 


OTIRUT MANAGERS 

601 Floor. 6 Doronshtre So. London EC2M 4YJ 
01-293 2575 DesSrrg 01828 9431 
Amu Sped® Sits 8*2 885 

UK Cap Fnd me 1010 1075 

Do Accun 1467 1S61 

Income Fund 713 864 

Kristen Exempt 1868 1915 

InMIBItaral 1767 1868 +61 

US a General M.7 804* +02 000 

Tech a Grown 840 885 +01 1.10 

Japan 8 Gmral 2312 2480 +2.4 010 

Far Eon A Gan 1200 127 2 +22 0*0 

European Fund 2SB0 28 82 +*7 033 

Germany Fund 745 79JM +15 090 

mo me rund S07 540® . . 4.(50 

QARTMORK FUND MANAGERS 
2 Sl Muy Aw. London EC3A BSP 
01823 121 2 DMOng 01823 5799 DaMMg 01823 


American Trust 
AustmOan Truer 
Brash Tst Accum 
Do OlSt 

Conxnodny Sbxra 

European Tn®t 
Extra Income Truar 
Far Eax tam Trust 
Fbed mnraM Fund 


972 B64 
261 275 
B2X 864 
540 579 
7*0 765 
550 567 
488 51.7® 
1489 1552® 
2S0 285® 


Far Ea'jem Accun 1040 1U2 


Eurco-xm accun 
UK Qm T H me 
Do *ccua 


975 963 
50.7 539 
52 2 564 


-05 617 
-09 612 
-02 619 
-02 *54 
+02 072 
+05 051 
+01 123 
-04 912 
-06 654 


anwwtce fund maw anew ltd 
A drrtn Centra. Hexagon Homo, 26 W oma n 
Rood. Ronton) RMI 3LB 
070888986 
Endurance 


1105 1175 


EQUITABLE IMIS ADMM9TRATKBI 
35. Fomam SL UanoiestDr 
091-236 5835 

EqatatM PrXcan 759 80.4® -1.1 642 
HWi mcoma Trust 752 eoo® -00 507 
iw & Fhad Inr 482 513 -03 625 

TM 01 hi* Trastt 67.7 72.0 +01 1.70 

Special SB 10* 745 790 -09 637 

Wn Amer Trust 80S 6*4 +03 105 

Far Emm TM# 91.0 985 +08 047 

Inti Growtn 569 57.1 +02 105 

EQUITY a LAW 

SL George Hse ConxmOon SL CtMntry CV1 
190 

0203 553231 

UK Grown Accun 1400 150.1* -67 691 
Do Inoomo 1283 1304® -23 351 


imi Hoed Ini Tet 2*7 290 
Globe) Fund Accum 1B64 1040® 
Do Ml 17*5 10*5® 

Goto Shore Trust 182 170e 
Hedged Amartcan 3i5 S37 
High mcoma T.ur 1450 1535 
Hong Kuig Trust 350 330 
income Find 701 835 

Insurance Agendas 4932 5105 
Japan Trust 1300 1372 

Mmeatd Exantn S7.1 2B75® 
oa BBiergy Trust 364 387 
a. Tram 985 1050 
C-RecTM 764 91.0® 


+04 003 
+03 024 
-0.7 101 
-08 I.Bt 
+05 1*S 
-01 038 
-00 617 
+00 O0Q 
-0.11084 
-02 871 
-03 D0O 
-04 030 
+00 108 
.. 050 
-15 851 
+10 aw 
-05 309 
-045 202 
-01 000 
-66 644 
-02 2SO 
-00 001 
-04 073 


OOVSTT<J<MII) IM7 MANA^ENT 
WindMsur Hse. 77. London WML London EC3i 
ID* 

01 888 5620 

im Growth 868 889 . . 1.16 

Amattom Grown 867 109 +00 089 

Amartcan Inc 720 TtA +02 451 

European Grown 2392 2530® +05 0.43 
Odd a Mtnarab 489 51.7 +10 097 

Japan Growth 155.7 1885 +05 . . 

ORE IMT MAHAQERS 
Royal Exchange, EC3P 3DN 
01-688 9903 
□m a Fixed Ini 
GrowBi Equsy 
Guantui 
N American 
Padflc 

Proparly Stare 
Srreaer Companaa 
Trust 


1004 112.7 
197.0 2D95S 
27Z2 2960 
1470 1500® 
2485 2964® 
2745 2505 
2185 2310® 
2710 2870 


-1.0 953 
-25 6CB 
-42 253 
+10 104 
+61 009 
-0.1 107 
.. 108 
+32 058 


GUMC3S MAHON UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS _ 

PO Box 446 32 St Mnry-eVH*, Lonuen 6C3® 
3AJ. 


ragh ma 
N Amer Tow 
Recovery 
GO TRW 


01 -SS 9333 

505 540® -00 803 
1161 1200 +63 027 

2268 941.1* . 611 

. ... 35 A 36.7® -0.4 850 

St Vincent me 818 80S -04 133 

Si vmeare us Om 750 790 +1+2 673 

TwnpteBarSmCo'* 1802 190.1 .. 144 

BMP Gfi TM 400 40.1 . . 090 

HAMHCS BANK 15WT TRUST MANAGERS 
Premier UT Aanh 6 Rayteigh Rd, B r e ra wood 

0277 217918 

Hameros Mr Ofa 1387 1484 -03 159 

Hemoroa N Amar M.9 TOO® -0i 052 

HasMrasvkpBFE 1265 I0Q0® -CS 0A8 
- - - - B7J 869 +04 003 

10*0 111.0 . 002 

502 564® +06 1.22 

mo 860 904® -00 480 

59 7 865® -01 551 

815 085 -04 159 

54 1 57 8 +15 0E7 


Fieri** UT xamms trauor $, na yw rqh Rd. KutWri 

0277-217238 

SSSSSTcJ? 


anar 8 ^ 


HU»I mcoma Til 

ISIfSihrtimc 


^^ffco-a 

lEL*ir 

1 he 



1087 11S0® 
£04 567® 
815 MLS® 
655 693 
8*B 990 
2763 2907® 
404 509 
1045 HIM 
1710 1820 
1530 1830® 
910 5*9 

202 41.7® 

70S Til 
832 892 
111.4 1180 
903 8*1 
1B03 10*1® 
835 970 
147.7 isr.la 
2885 9O70C 
1090 1190 
1701 1990® 
1752 1964® 
1880 1790 
1g| 1510 
785 B14® 
460 480 
1004 1080 
364 379 
1168 1264® 
1360 MOO 

197.1 1883 
3763 3920® 

131.1 1360 
963 S72e 

1264 1290 
I860 1717 
880 883c 

IBS-7 1867® 

1190 1250c 


+1.1 085 
-02 001 
+02 122 
-07 109 
-10 102 
+1.1 092 
+0S 444 
+00 009 
-0.9 409 
-00 202 
-03 904 
-09 909 
.. 001 
+02 652 
+05 001 
-00 642 
-10 *79 
+09 10S 
-1.7 64f 
-34 64B 
-14 3.80 
-07 008 
-04 001 
-00 001 
+10 004 
+05 085 
+01 952 
-00 249 
+02 6*0 
+02 *72 
-10 130 
-13 130 
.. 689 
+04 1.72 
+07 089 
-1.1 *79 
+07 004 
+00 123 
+68 135 
+01 60S 


■BM Rood. Croydon 
8011 - 


KU SAMUEL WBT TRU9T HAMMERS 
NLA Towar _ 

01-988 4355 01 
Bfflten Thai Units 
Capua) hum unta 
' Trite! IMta 


Eratoean Tnat 
Ffcr East Truer 
Ftnxncad Dust 
GBt Fbed W me 
Do Growth 
High Yield TruM 
Income Tnat 


540.1 5710® -61 618 

1013 1032 -12 677 

1865 2030® +30 227 
1490 158.1 +22 058 

12*0 1410 +1.7 ff-SB 

3700 3064 -1.0 675 

264 270 -021044 

*02 465 -02 B OO 

680 707c -07 4JM 

eaa esi® -62 *as 

1360 1440 +10 100 

300 400 +01 006 

37.7 380® +04 10S 
1607 1 97.8 -65 615 

BB4 B30® -04 103 

95.1 1Ca7 -00 651 
240 250 +03 097 

■B FUND MANAGERS 

36 Querm Anns Gate. London SWTH 9AB 
01-222 tOOO 

IB* Brit & O'saaa 1399 1470® . . 1.70 

fit me Plus 57.T 91.1® .. 920 

191 Decrial Growth 58.8 B6i® .. 15C 

mvoamwri TM Fnd 769 h 2M .. 640 


KEY FUND MMUOm 

35. FauntMn SraoL Mancheeter 

(03038) 93384 

Equity a Gen 45.1 461 e 

S7 fixed bri Fund 915 060 
Higher me 1262 1305 


Japan Tech TM 
Natural Resources 
Seamy Trust 
Smeller Ccs 
3podal Sts 
US Snalar Cos 


imamaflonel 


507 54.1 
2763 2912 


-07 108 
+071003 
-08 402 
.. 325 
+10 1.00 


HJEWWOflT BENSON 

-8E2 SARIwmCN MOMT 00 LTV 
L a C UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
Ptaroy Houbo, Gopthal Aire, BC2R 7BE 
01-5M 2900 

mcomo Find 441$ 4505 
tenmeuonei 3 Gen 2S*B 2601 

LEOAL1 GENERAL UMT TRUST. 
MANAGERS 




652] 

*98 

103 

0.79 

604 

138 

229 

152 

1.12 

7.06 

OE8 

209 


LLOYDS BANS UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Regtecan Dpt Goring-E^Se* WortMng, W 
Suaaex 
0444 *59144 

C M enree 

DO Acoan 
Energy M 
Oo Accun 
Extra Income 
Do Acaxn 
□ornxm GBi me 
Do Accun 
bractne 
Da Acoan 
tad Tacn 
Oo Accum 


0277 
Emtey Dtatribubui 
Do Aocun 
Do mcoma 
European 
Far Eastern 
Git Tram 
O'saaa Erpity 

Natural Res 

N American Tn*l 
UK Special Shs 
aria n t M lui Bl Braid 
Japanaaa Tst 
Muagad Tsi 


2710 2861 
4280 4S72 
810 067 
762 81.1 
1107 117.9® 
890 7 63® 
84.4 998 
704 745® 
822 87 A 
6*5 868 
480 *80 
401 512 

47.1 S01 


Do Aeon 
N Amsr a Got 
Do Aeon 
PacHc Baste 
Do Accun 


1822 I960® 
3280 349.7® 
5*4 570 
609 6*7 
1812 1720C 
2910 3104c 
733 770® 
70S 761® 
2710 2861® 
5463 5900® 
1870 1807® 
1968 2094® 
703 91.1 
765 810 
10*0 111$ 
1163 1205 
1369 1440 
1410 1500 


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Do Accun 2169 2368® 

Worldwide Growth 206* 221.7 

Do Accun 2969 3110 

UK Growth Fund 482 512 

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169 KU AswaJl 
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2*0 130 Frandi Cora no 130 

136 65 RawUa 128 130 

348 210 Funs Scan 'A' 343 3*8 

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165 155 GmT SnuHiain Iffl 163 -1 

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42 7 NCOSOP IT’j 39 

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166 K£ Hcxton Hydraiun 155 173 +< 

158 110 Raimm ftoncOan 1 1B 122 ®+1 

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103 66 Wrjfied 92 97 +2 

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74/78. Fkabunr taa wanL London EC8A IJO 
01-486 2777 riwl»ffD1-BSB 0478/9 
UK SpadaiM TTua® 

Growth GDI 589 SB9 -ai 2J7S 

Snmta Co e 1432 1509 -Ol 198 

UK Mmol Faahxaa 834 B89® -02 1.78 
Do Accun 874 837® -Ol 1.78 


General Funds 
(JK Growth 

Managed In* 


37$ 399® 
589 835 


Mgh a ica ma Funds 
Extra Inc 579 BID 

GM 2*2 259 

tec 4 Growth 20E.T 2t*.m 

Nat Wgh tec 1979 2007® 

Prat Stares 


179 107 

Sector SpedaM Fuide 

147.7 1507® 
409 409 
58$ 839 
612 602 
154 18$ 
603 OBJ 
49.7 48$ 
42$ *6.1 


God 

Do Acoan 
mi uneure 
Prop Enarea 
Unhr Energy 
Wbrtd Tm3i 

Exempt ftatto 

Exempt 

Ovaraaes Growth Find 
Amar Growth 104$ 

AuM Growth 77.1 

European Part 909 

Do Accum 91-1 

Euro Sntalar 169 

Far Em 589 

Horei Kong 31$ 

infl Grown 382 

M R oc OTMT 1099 

japan Awl 7*9 

Japan Santa Coo 152 
US am* Co 699 

On Accum 707 


-04 291 
+02 291 


-03 79* 
-02 69* 
-19 440 
-09 533 
.. 998 


+09 198 
-02 1.14 
+29 099 
+0.1 096 
-Ol 090 
+09 062 
.. 082 
-01 090 


959 851® -1.1 393 


1107 +04 198 

01-0 +03 193 

064 +0.1 OJH 

807 +02 090 

179® +0.1 077 
903 +04 010 

334 +0$ 195 

405® +OI 1.17 
1189® +02 047 
7B.fi +09 ODD 

162 +0.1 aoo 

742® +02 000 
759® +02 090 


Overseas Inc o ma Fundi 

501 599® -09 594 
603 049 +02 496 

95.4 884 +02 *09 


M i«fpi tnc 
US income 
Do Accun 

NEL Treats 
Nabtor G» 
MLAUMT TRUST 
99-100 SandNig IUL 
0822 674751 
MLA Amartcan 
MLA Seram 
MLA mtemeDotuH 
MLA a® unit 
MLA taoome 
MLA Bxopeen 


87.7 894 -0410.13 

_jusMBNrr 

MaxtMena. Kart ME14 iXX 


259 254 
33.7 357 

57.1 609® 
21$ 235® 
41.6 4*0® 

31.1 32$ 


Sr Georges Way. 

0438 366101 
Grown Unto 751 BOO 

OH & Fixed mt 10*4 loai 
Mgh income Unas 1158 1229 
1W Yield OH Llm 501 501 
tefl Growth tMB 1300 144$ 

N Amartcan lHte 724 78$ 
Far Era) Urtts 919 BOB 
Strata Cm Fund 719 784 
mCAPUWrTRUBT 
Urieom Ham. 252. Roretord Rd. E7 
01-234 6644 

Manca® 138$ (449® 

MERCURY FUND MANAOER8 LTD 
33. King YMtan SL EG4R BAS 
01-EB020HJ 


+OI 094 
-05 209 
.. 097 
-021 155 
-05 511 
-09 07S 


2$1 

792 

293 

nw 

048 

023 

090 

220 


-29 493 


Amer Grown 
Oo Accost 
Amar tome 
Do Accun 
Euopeon OMrih 
Da Acoan 
Gteurai 
Do Accun 
OB1FM 
Do Accun 
mcoma 

DO Accum 

m w m wi on a l 
Do Accun 


87$ 1UL6® +03 1.12 
102.1 1000® +03 1.12 
S29 553® 

859 801® 

1302 1402 


TO 


3 Accun 
Bfo a rara 
DO itecua 
Exnpt DM 
Exaropl Accum * 
BteO Inoome Fund 


+04 3JS 
+05 395 
+19 191 
+1.7 191 
-2$ 296 
-3.7 206 
-09 693 
-09 033 
-03 493 
-09 *63 
+99 1J» 
+07 198 
+29 OHO 
+27 000 
-1$ £94 
-21 2 $« 
.. 287 
.. 287 
+19 088 
+19 398 


1451 1614 
2449 258.1 
400$ 4239 
619 61.7 
017 82.1 
84$ 804 
04$ 00.7 
2626 2779 
X258 344$ 

1779 1821 
161$ 1039 
15*3 2IOM 
214$ 227.4® 

243$ 2407 
377 6 387$ 

727 M$ 

Oa Accun 81.1 858 

iOOLANDBAIK GROUP UMT TRUST 

MANAGERS 
CourhvoodHee. sever Sl Hoad. Snanald 81 SRO 
0742 769842 
Casta mcoiwi 
Do Accun 
Com mod ity 6 Gan 
Do Accum 
Extra Inc 
Do Accun 
GM 6 Fixed tec 
Do Accun 
YWd 
Accun 
mcOta 
Do Accum 
Japan & Padhc 
Do Accun 
N American Ira 


-1$ 294 
-1.7 254 
+08 280 


"ft' 


779 B28 
105.7 1123 
120$ 137.1® 

18*0 10S$® +1$ 288 
501 SI M -04 90B 
889 728® 

509 52$ 

828 88$ 

154$ 16*3® 

268$ 2853® 

173$ 1839 
2379 304$ 

m iih 

117.1 1242 e 


-05 090 
-25 270 
, -0$ 270 
-19 075 
-28 575 
-20 396 
-0$ 396 
+05 006 
409 090 
+08 1.18 


162 Hope Street, Gtaedow G£ SUH 
0<1 £81 92EB 

1228 1321 +06 287 

264 4 282$ +19 123 

$13$ 2223® -19 198 


-59 390 
-3.7 390 
+09 MO 
+09 1.10 
+06 080 
*0.1 1XQ 
-02 060 
.. 1.10 


45 aaeaenuth Sl SC3P 3W 
01-623 4200 Em 288 
NR UK 1927 8114® 

DO Accum $a*£ 349$® 

NFI Ormans ®l.l 6809 

Do Acaun 700$ 8021 

Fir East Aoc 028 857 

American ACC 02+ 04 

CU BPe tn Acc 527 604 

WrtMdeAcc 66$ S89 

NORWICH IIT MANAGERS 
RO Box 4. Norwich NR1 »Q 


GrawThi 

Mum 


El £26 1281 -017 393 

138$ 1459® +04 123 


W W mgl M ER TRUST MWMBWT 
82 Curam StaM. London EC4N 6AE 
daa R i g t 01-238 3SB5/8/7/8/W0 
tetun e aoral Growth 140$ 1509 
tacome 9 Qrowih 625 839® 


Worldwide Rec 


Japan Grown 
r limpaui Growth 
UKODWSl 
tacMc Growth 


86$ 100.1 
351 354 

54.1 

719 . ... 

63$ 579 
404 424 
349 364 
672 819 
105$ UZJJ 


Do Accun 
PEARL TRUST 

oSaluf* w wcivT® 

GroMth Fond tee 
Do Accun 
mcoma Fund 


+04 035 
-OS 398 
-02 005 

+01 .. 

579® +07 090 
728 +01 003 

-02 193 
+011 .. 
+02 72S 
-01 198 
196 


ma Eo*y me 
DO Accun 
urn TruM me 
Oo < 


804 96$ -07 £43 

1359 1449 -19 243 

1239 1309® -1.7 378 

1367 1479 -Ol 198 

1409 1408 -01 196 

130$ 1869 -29 29* 

2889 2*04 -21 284 


PtRPETUNLUMPrT H UST 
40 H an Sw at Hroley On Than® 
0481 576B68 


IrM Grown 


tVor ld wtee Roc 
Amer Growth 
feat EmeraCo'a 
Far E*M Grwth 
Eunpeui GM 


2759 285M +08 070 
1819 2055® -1.7 *98 

1324 1027 +03 193 

00.7 7*4 +03 092 

79.0 £E9 ..034 

009 @33 +09 OT6 

525 839® .. 1$8 


PROLMC UMTIRUST MANAGERS LTD 
BIWgjM* London EC2 


01-247 : 


Mgh teema 
Cora 6 GM 
Fir Eaaaam 
North Men 


181.7 1299® 
828 60S® 
927 1059® 
1706 1825 
1319 1419® 
88$ 7*4 
1167 1233 
909 859 


81-68. ek*d HR. Bard Essex. KU 2DL 
01-478 3377 


Hoboin EtMQf 
Eunpoan 
HcMarn Ctwara 
Me 


+19 098 
+02 4-24 
+03 693 
+34 OOt 
+1$ 098 
+03 ITS 
+09 090 
-02 *87 


214 


4021 4255® -09 
1021 11490 +04 

G29 539 -04 

844 821 -04 

103$ 1099 +02 

009 1053 +14 

77$ 9Z9® +01 

Hanaro 5 mc Sta 6*4 68.1 -1$ 

Hobam UK anwfll 81.2 03$ -13 

HoBtam CHt Trust 1773 135.4 -09 

Honom Sn* Cos 420 519 -02 


sr* 1019 1029 +02 078 

B 009 1053 +14 OlOS 

N Areartcsn 77$ 929® +01 cm 

' £0* 
298 
290 
£21 


31-46 GmehteB SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-800 4177 

QuadmiU Ganeni 4389 4849® .. 293 

Ckataam (ncome 2489 281$ .. 5.18 

Quatnre u Fd 4039 +22* . . i$o 

Ckjedrnre Recovery 28*7 280$ .. £40 


si BwtiHne Lsnei London BC4P 40U 
01-380 5458 


NC mcoma 
NC Japan 
NCMHar UK Co 
NC Ckitau Ana 
NC Amartcan he 
Oo Acoan 
NC Scuta cot 
NC Stair Eu 
NC Examp) 


87$ 824® 
1B23 1339 
513 544® 
849 827 
2B2D 3000 
307$ 327$ 
1*39 1527 
CO'S 1824 203.7 
£1189 12*9® 


-1.0 *08 
+1.1 091 
-19 192 
+04 1.82 
+1$ 1.M 
+1$ 1.18 

-02 191 
+09 096 
.. 02 1 


ROWAN UNIT TRUST 

36 King Wtam SnoL London EC4H BAS 
01-838 £678 


Ntfi YMd 
tahta 

fixed 


For East (2) 


3279 2319® 
7219 7389 
172$ 1720c 
4269 4349 
153$ 15*$ 
1020 1099 
mb esac 


STni 


ROYAL LR FUND MANAGEMENT 
Now Hal Place, UaerpraX 198 3KS 
□SI-227 4422 

Trud 819 649® 

not 729 813 

Git Trust 24$ 227 

US TruM 344 363 

Padflc Baste Tst 444 428® 

20 CWtal SL London EC2 
01-820 0311 

Eatey DM 115$ 1ZL7 

Do Aocum 1629 1724 

MMi teoome Trust 900 953® 
Do Acoan 1089 1122® 

US Growth S3. 1 62.6 

Do Aocum 003 839 


ROYAL LONDON UNIT TRUST MANAOBU 
RmI London Houaa. Cum malar COI IRA 
0206 578115 

85$ 814 ..092 

177.4 1828 .. £18 

51$ 549® .. 952 

80$ 854c .. 492 

994 1069® .. *23 

882 839® +0$ 093 
1129 1128 -19 1$Q 


+19 193 
.. £16 
.. 792 
.. £17 
-00 £87 
-891494 
.. 095 


-09 £80 
+OI 140 
-02 085 
.. 198 
+03 040 


192 

192 

*44 

444 

09J 

092 


Amartcan Growth 
Captal Aocum 
GM tecoros 
Htyi Inoama 
mcoma A Grttvvfli 
Japan Growth 
Sputa Site 
SAVE A PROSPER 

22 W u era n Rd. Hondorj RMI 3LB 

(Rcwdord) 0788 80 98 8 

Amar Hie 6 Grown 86$ 739® 


Captal Utnfls 
Cmradty 
Eurapesn Growth 
FtaandrU Seca 
Renan Unta 
YMd Unta 




hi ra ai man i Du«r 
Japan Gnwn 


1059 111$ 
521 819 
1179 1221c 
928 105.1 
187$ 1921 
166$ 177.1® 
BO 1003 
32.1 57.9® 
859 181.7 
11*2 1214 
301 3£0 

13£9 141$ 
151$ 180$ 


+0$ 8$B 
+0$ 293 
+08 192 
+1$ 090 
-03 133 
-1$ 494 
-1$ 497 
-09 280 
-OS £47 
+09 aoo 
+08 690 
+0.1 £96 
-02 242 
-19 4.18 



tis, 

IMmraM Growth 


SCHRODER UNrTTHBr 
Enur prei He use. PprnmatlOi 
0705 827733 

1368 1423® 
81.7 873 
128$ 1349® 
130$ 13&2® 
510 527 
41$ 439® 
489 48$® 
181.6 1821 
1187 138$® 
Da Accun 16*2 17*6® 

Jap Sm» Co’s Ac 1319 1489 
smg 6 MMOy ACC 701 749c 

Strata Cone Acc 135.1 143$ 
aracta 38a mo 102.3 1093® 

Do Accun 1973 11*2® 

TUtyo Fund ted 2183 232$ 

Do Accun 220.+ 2344 

US errata 003 Ac 522 525® 

UK Era*? Ine 1053 1119 

Da teas* 163$ 173$ 

Fdr Ebm QM ACCem 600 839 
Brin tac 629 628 


AuMTOifl ACE 
^npata me 
Do Accun 
GM 6 fixed he 
Odd FuM feic 
Oo Acoan 


-23 078 
.. 087 
+07 030 
+07 093 
-03 21* 
+1.1 1.71 
+1.1 1-71 
-19 4-83 
+19 029 
+14 028 
+1.1 OOO 
<08 077 
-Ol 1.17 
+OI 0.99 
+02 099 
+19 OOO 
+09 090 

+03 un 

-03 334 
-04 224 
+08 090 
-0$ 748 


33-36 GrocacBcren a London BC3V OAX 


01-623 5778/8711 
UK Entey too 
Do *^i 
Euro tm mo 
Do Acc 
GUM Oil Ira 
DO ACC 

Maraged Erompi 
Padfe: Beam 


p frj + 

25$ 269 
27$ 26$ 
27$ 29$ 
284 302® 


+02 49S 
+0$ *93 
+8$ 040 
+02 040 
+04 035 


1127 12*7 
234 249 


303® +0$ 036 


SCOTTISH EQUTMLE _ 

26. St Andrawa Sr. Erartrugn 
031-866 8101 

mo mcoma Unta 151$ isi$® 

Do Accun 2224 2439® 

scottoh ift snsanawre 

12 St Andrawa So Ednawgjh 
031 225 2211 

UK Eqofcy 1788 7813® 

American 1521 1869® 

Pacta 191$ 204.7® 

.European 258.1 277$® 

SCOTTISH MUIUALRHStnlEHT 


109. wncard SL Gtaagrar G2 SHM 
041-848 6108 


UKEquty 
GM 6 Fbrad 
UK Srrdr Co'a Eq 
Ewopoan 
N Am* 

Pacta 


189$ 1809® 
106$ 1184® 
150$ 1605® 
2121 2228® 
1173 132a 
166$ 1874® 


SCOTTm UNtr TRUST 
20 ChartotM 8q> EMndi 
031-226 4372 

pacta 873 713 

WortJ Growth 320 41$® 

N American 33$ 35$ 

mcoma Ran e&7 4 u* 

Eucpaai *28 49$ 

N Altar M 27.6 223® 

UK aowih 31.1 321® 

Extra Inc 327 3*6 

SCOTTISH VKDOW3 

PO Box 90£ EdmOugh B41B 5BU 

IB1-855 6000 

238$ 248$® 
2724 2B9LB® 




30. Clly no London EC1Y 2AY 
01-838 8 


8011 
Amar Tech 8 Gan 

Fnd 


_ Growth 
AlBtefeen Melon 
Strut CD’s 
japan Tech 8 Gan 


Ban 
UK GanatU 
Euro Growth 
Eud Income 


1063 113$ 
204.7 2120 
172$ 18*0® 
21*1 22BJW 

<2.1 44$ 

7*2 79$ 
419 4*8 

1064 11$$ 

a&$ sou® 
5520 59*3® 
359 379c 
*07 43$ 
46$ 48$ 


STAtBMRDUFE 

sl Edumwgii sc 2xz 


mcoma Unta 
Do Accum IMa 


269 

281 


269® 

299® 


.. 850 
+05 1.00 


290 

290 


-83 193 
+OI 1-28 
+1$ 095 
+19 092 


-22 229 
-19 898 
-07 £62 
+19 886 
.. 144 
+1.7 040 


+0$ OHO 
-48.1 277 
+02 003 
-04 491 
+06 091 
+01 192 
-05 £00 
-03 548 


-88 294 
-49 £84 


+07 264 
+19 890 
-44 494 
-5$ 148 
+04 0.16 
+04 198 
-02 197 
+0$ OOO 
.. 693 
.. 885 
-09 $93 
+02 032 
+ 0 $ *00 


-04 £55 
-04 £65 


STEWUir, W0RY UNIT TRUST 


269$ 286 3 

S49 88$ -Ml a.n 
7*B 723® +1.1 083 
1374 MOD® +2-0 Ota 
87.6 M9 


Japan 


Da Hel n yaM 
Prof Stare W 
UK Captal 
— «■ 


Wbrtd income 
WoriOwm caps* 
V Ex ®_ 
Acoan (3) 


-1$ 429 
+0.B 0.10 
.. 092 
+05 093 
+1$ 093 
.. 9.78 
-09 133 
-06 068 
+ 0 $ 0.10 
. . *37 
-07 1 14 
.. 196 
.. 1.88 


959 10T.7 

II £ 

17$ 16|* 

72.1 727 
624 819 
47$ 50$ 

624 62«® 

1470 157$ 

EM Exp)' 884 94.1c 

DO Acoan (3) 16 86 17 73c 

THORNTON UtCTMANAOTOLTP 
Rant H00H 18 Rnhuy Cho* tcreon tew 
701 

01-37+ 43B8 

Ftf East 6 Gan «« g* 

Jam a Gen 3L£ 55.* 

hUtAiner 6 Gan 808 5*4 

OrtanM Inc _ ■ ■ 

PrataTotai Sf$ 

Tiger 71$ 764 

uffAG-n 41-7 44$ 

Onenw Aoc 239 25.1 

M UNIT HUBT MANAGERS 
£ ft^ Mary ura. London EC3A BBP 

SWteta Co'a 821 70S .. 090 

eSnrau Houi*? Pudato Do*. London EC+V 
3AT 

01-048 1250 

Aaerman Growth 484 45.1 +0$ 050 

' 61$ 522 -38 237 

459 421® .. aio 

62-1 621 -06 436 

47.6 509 -0+ 691 

489 428 +0.1 012 

3*6 223 -05 £35 

g<!.S 2-12 -33 295 

503 53.7® +03 081 
6*1 682® -0.1 2.18 
. 704 81.7 -Ol 196 

TynM Manager! Lai 401. 5L ochn Street 
London ECiV+OE 


+04 076 

-0.1 on 

+05 082 

-09 090 
♦03 097 
-07 £26 
+01 £99 



663 

3127 

Growth Acc ng 

F4r Butam 1607 

«"■' iS 

959 


w^Tmc ff 

iRSKta ^4 

Nth Amer Gm Ira 1187 
Prate r uru a me 112$ 

arraa Co'a Dte me 609 

SmM COI me 2034 

1 me 107$ 

uk 1 nmwirur 

UK 



TOSc 

3379® 

1227 

308.6® 

1939 

829 

1159® 

87.7 

525® 

2521 

1784® 

827 

796-7 

21190 

12 * 8 . 

1199® 

63.6 

215$ 

1139c 


+09 1.46 
-59 390 
+09 1.02 
-2.1 535 
+06 02* 
-0$ 011 
-10 7.11 
-041193 
-04 878 
-28 495 
-19 £71 
.. 070 
- 10 $ *95 
+02 197 
+01 Oi!4 
+0.11OS3 
-01 272 
+ 1$ 199 
-05 £17 


132.1 1294 —1.8 

1603 1109 +1$ 

1274 135.1 +07 


^^K^^OtatagUnaOl- 


45. Cherlolta Sq. Eidnhurgn 
031-236 3271 


2279 242*0 
257$ Z744® 
15*7 1849® 
1360 14*8 
1323 1474 

587.7 6320 

805.7 8563 
3223 3433® 
341$ 383.4® 

633 673a 
63$ 87.7a 
1759 18*9 


+29 £06 
+29 298 
+19 £05 
+19 080 
+1$ on 
-49 *98 
-07 498 
+1$ 077 
+1$ 077 
409 021 
+09 021 


Raid 

Do Acoan 
Do Wthdrawol 
Aaantai Fund 
Do Aocun 
ana* Rax) 

Do Accun 

European Fund 
Do Acoan 
Japan Fuel 
Do Accun 
Saints PPP 
SUN ALLIANCE 

8ui AHuxra Has. Hors ham Sussex 
0*08 56235 

Equity Dual Aoc 3899 4 1 £2 
N Am TruM Ara 81 9 627 

Fir East Dust AOC 879 02$ 

Wort*** Bend 619 6J$ 

Bxupoan 542- 57.fi 

SUN LIFE OF CANADA __ 

294. C odta ig^ Pta^ tandon 8W1Y 6BH 


-80 £58 
+09 197 
♦05 097 
+04 853 
+02 192 


Dealing 1 
UK meoma 
Do Grourth 


220 

3*9 


389 

229 


-03 *70 
-04 £99 


1880117 TRUSTS LTD 

Kan Nona* Andover. Haifa. SPIO IPG 

028* 66788 DeaTgx: 026* 83432/3/4 


mo 
Do Accun 
Ext* Income Me 
Do Acuaw 
(tenant! UnM kxs 
□0 Accun 
GM 8 fixed Inc 
Do Aocran 
mcoma 
Accun 
Pacflc me 
Do Accun 

w me 

Do Acoan 
S a u crad Oppa Ine 
Do Acoan 
Natual Has 
Do Acoan 


118$ 1259 
134$ 1323 
1174 1249 
140.7 1407 
1589 1702 
2639 2803 
459 489® 

689 nas® 

222.1 2389 
3489 3585 
175$ 1664 
1BO0 162$ 

3324 363.6® 

4139 4399® +0.1 1.11 
BM 889. -09 191 

72$ 780 
580 589® 

589 B19® 


+09 193 
+09 l $3 
-19 594 
-19 594 
-29 296 
-4$ 296 
-09 893 
-05 893 
-29 *41 
-49 *41 
+00 096 
+09 098 
+ai 1.11 


-08 191 
+09 198 
.. 198 


TARGET TWarMANAOBV 
Target Houaa. Gatahouaa no Ayteabury Butfce 
(0296) 38*00* 

A mar Eaglo 
Auondbn 


0*000 

757 804 
219 229 
Conwnocay 32.0 873c 

Energy 290 31.0 

EqiXty • 127.4 1354 

European Spec Sa 114$ 121.6 

Extra Inoama 117.1 1244 


+02 000 
.. aio 

-02 103 
.. 191 
-19 £83 
+08 087 
+07 5.73 


1884 188$ -1$ £32 

_ 2749 2ȣ3 -13 332 

MMlYMd 2069 2223 -20 *30 

Do Accun 2139 227$ -20 *86 

410 43$ -04 349 

419 430 -04 249 

1389 147$ -1$ 4.13 

2113 2209 -19 4.13 

83$ S74 +02 191 

639 67.7 +03 1.91 

18235 8MS® -016 297 

£82.89 6*50 -015 297 

ASM «B1 ABB <5) 1215 129$ +19 232 

Do Accun 1223 1303 +1$ 222 

Fir EM 6 GUI Inc 5*1 57$ +07 OOO 

DO Accun 5*1 57 6 +07 000 

Euro Raid me *ai 51$ +0 $ bls« 

Da acc 48.1 51$ +03 09* 

HAIU IEYUW7 TRUST MANAGERS 
WWtSty MbUML 7. B a iontW Sq. Londcn EC2 
01-829 1532 

66$ 759 +06 140 

113$ 1T99 +03 0*0 

730 773 +03 040 

840 90$® -00 530 

125$ 1203® +1.0 010 
1032 1189 -04 £00 

300 383® +03 OlO 

483 610 +01 130 

UK That 1339 141.7 -1.7 £40 

Eisopaan Grown 66$ 819 +05 030 

HongKong 28$ 389 +04 IJO 

WAVERLEY ASSET MANAQBHBfT 
13. Charlotte Sq. ErMxxgh 
031-225 1551 

Auatntan GUd 279 200 +81 015 

PacHc Bote £09 223® .. 030 

cenatan Bel OBl 580 62. B® +00 007 

Gknla Mae Fnd <1030 1070 +02 7.80 

HWITHODALEURrTRWTMIIIKIERS 
2 Honey Lw EC2 6BT 
01-6089088/6 . 

Shi Qtd GD Fund 683 894 ;. 000 

US Oort Bond Fd <514 919 .. .. 

CTn tan p ar .. .. 

WWU30R TRUST MANAOERa LTD 

nnmhnr Horne, 8£ Ktegewny. London WC2B 
6SD 

01-405 8331 

Cum A Ftt+v 494 529® +0.1 748 
Seta 58$ 599 +02 *92 

CkSwM 530 574 .. £15 


Grown me 

Do Aocun 


Accun 
Special Gib 
Do Accun 
Trireme 

DP Acoan 

Amar 8 Gen 
Do tan 
Matter PortMo 
Do Accum 


Amarictei Treat 
For EaM A Gan 
ma Qrowtti 
income Trust 
Japan Grow* 
Small Co m pute t 
Tactmomar 


Uk prices in this 
section refer to 
Thursday's trading 


• Ex dhridomL c Cum dhndoid. fc Cum 
stock apBt a Ex stock spirt, n Cum nf 
{any two or more of atxme). 8 Ex aU (any 
two or more of above). Deaflng or 
valuation days: (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Wednesday. (4J Vwrsday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. (21) 2nd Thursday ol 
and 3rd Wednesday ol 
20th at month. (24) 3rd 
month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (28) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesday of month. (28) 
Last Tfxraday of month. (29) 3rd working 
dayof month. (3Q)18lh or month. (31) 1st 
working day of month. (32) 20th ol month . 
(33) in day of February. May, August 
November. (34) Lost wortrir ~ 
moroh. 
month, 

Wc 

Wednesday 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account (42) Last day ol 
monoi.743) 2nd and Mh Wednesday ol 
moMh. (44) Quarterly. (45) 8th ot month. 
(48) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


member. (34) Last working day of 
Utah. (35) 15th of mon0L (3Q 1W> of 
onth. (37) 2ist ol month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
'ednesday ol month. (40) Valued 


iMVESTu’ENT TR'jS'S'.’ " ■ 


1966 

ifcyi low (unxi 


Pm* 

M Drier 


boss 
dre YM 

Cage peara % P/t 


IZ7 1CC:MH 
BO 730 Afcra 
150 124 Arav That 
<W 333 Ara ktm Sec 
<72 94 Atamc Asms 

139 110 Brian 
254 194 Beuy 

W. SS'iBr tan 
a 33 fc Eoart SK 
*63 *15 Br tn 
1D3 gj fcara 
855 755 Cor® t m3 
250 118 Cratmi J»m 
157 135 DaflyW 
W3 128 Oa Cv 
368 JIB DnjUn Coes 
1B1 151 Durfaxi fir Etet 
772 562 Dixvtm Juan 
3H 195 DtXXMLm 
117 sa Efixi Horn AS54t 
162 US ErWMpi 
414 S3 Sbcoic Gen 
169 146 Enjfcsh xa 

102 95 ErgbllScK 

®J so &wir 

119 103 F t C Manca 
224 t42 FAC Panic 
13 BfiFirst Cteruu 
3*3 2B7 fira Stol lew 
565 *ac TlBwno tawrion 
1«3 i*5 RtfangCtew 
3+5 303 Baring ErnrpOl 
U3', M'xPeteq FV 6a 

140 103 FNowig FWpx^ 

733 614 ~ 

174 ?a 

156 123 . . 

1E2 1*0 FUnoTea 
1*6 107 fteren Unwartal 

103 68 fir C? 

109 88 G9C Cnxal 

232 1U cr Jxan 
3? 138 Semi Fmb 
XW 275 Gsrenl Qxs 
Ml 115 QtWxrSM 

rza sr on 

152 177 Goes Made 
23* 138 Gown OrentA 
282 215 femSmor 
435 2** Grtwaar 


L07H3QN COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 

C W Joynaon and Co report 
SUGAR (From C. CzomBKnr) 

Doc 134.8-324 

Mar ._.... 146-4-46$ 

May 149.8-49.6 

Auq - . 152.8-52$ 

Oa ISS 4-55.2 

Dec 1S9 6-57.4 

Vofc 2906 


1996 

Hxti In* ttawaw 


Pnw 

M Dm* 


Gnus 

®» ft 

CM* oent* ^ P/E 


IZS 


+1 

10 

20 

240 

325 

215 

SrasMBi Houaa 

300 

320 

• -IS 

64 

17 

84U 

fr- 


310 

10 

402 

215 

156 

KuXnis 

ZOB 

210 

-2 

84 

11 

140 



*4 

£1 

38$ 

TH 

IIM 

Ms Fund 

■ ll. 

118 




39 

*00 


&6 

22 

K7 

850 

5*U 

bwea ai Suctsti 

■ . 

845 

+5 

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10 

130 

112 

+1 

09 

00 

8*/ 

26* 

2*4 

X» Of 

■ // 

275 

©+1 

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hi 

132 

135 

• +1 

101 

10 

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132 

honr & Sow 

■ [' 

16/ 

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60 

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242 

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10 

07 


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81 

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70 

40 

281 

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107 


10 

1$ 

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07 

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145 

119 

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143 

145 


10 

70 

465 

470 


2LS 

40 

303 

300 

23/ 

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■'<v 

300 


118 

41 

99 

101 


3$ 

1$ 

460 

758 

in 

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90 

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31.4 

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80 




147 

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170 

128 

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410 

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267 

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63 

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50 

1$ 

468 

243 

156 

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2*3 


17 

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101 


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20 

610 

65 

50 *3 Nutting kre 83 

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71 



1$ 

10 

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271 

185 

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240 

242 

-4 


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117 


+1 

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611 

36* 

278 

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353 

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09 

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61 

20 

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26 

29 




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330 


-1 

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215 

m 

+3 

40 

12 

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+1 

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103 


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102 


10 

10 

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38 

358 

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44 

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310 



120 

4.1 

35.1 

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35 

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40 

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♦fr 

00 

1$ 

IX 


♦i'a 

1.* 

1.1 


OB 

336 

RarBum 

432 

437 

-1 

171 

19 

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M* 

+1 

16 

20 

524 

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1*7 

RTit? & Hoc 

162 

185 


drib 

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637 

ua 

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S.7 

08 


283 

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Rww Pure 

m 

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114 


1/1 

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50 

32 


287 

317 

RDfiOCD 






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10 

14 

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238 

181 

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15* 

157 

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11 


382 

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37i 

376 

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7.1 

10 

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1*8 


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1.4 

707 

15*x 11 


15>x 





101 'a 

TOZ 


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24 

GU 


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a Win 

157 





SB 

no 





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737 

540000 


m 




ZDS 


-2 

20 

10 


85 

IS6 

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81 

63 



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210 


29 

1.4 


127 


San Exjtxm 

125 

126 




313 

sis 


1708 


in 









158 


-1 

14 

21 

05$ 

39 

*02 

Scar M«e 

555 

553 


120 

2$ 

125 

>76 

+‘i 

53 

4$ 

321 

323 

J45 

Sax Nx 

328 

325 


70 


151 

152 

-*3 

40b 

20 

472 

fit 

57U 

Stas* am 

743 

748 


2B0 

10 

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■-1 


13 

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94' 

w 

tacsTaaf sanon 93 

94 

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54 

21 

640 

82 

57 

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20 

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+3 

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116 

• . 

1$ 

20 


3X3 

46.1 


484 

228 


487 


31$ 

13$ 

640 

32$ 

RL7 

30.1 

35.1 


636 

47.1 

16$ 

98$ 

<sa 

l 23 

580 


U- 1 

339 

32.7 


57$ 

U.i 

88$ 

921 

65.7 

<SL1 

W$ 

360 

ii 





* 


Class 



1986 



in 

YU 



Lbw Comwra 

Bti 

Ote 

Dige 

mm 

X 

P'f 

IX 

55 ITR CB» 01 ten DM EO'j 

61 ■. t 


lib 

Sl 

766 

724 

155 TO ms & Gee 

*19 

2*1 1 

• +1 

Hi 

■u 

4/S 

149 

IQTaTO taaol ta 

IV 

141 

+t 

SS 

41 

B0 

103 

BB ™ North Amirta 

» 

101 

-1 

20 

10 

90 

1 07 

TI8 TO Pacta Satin 

161 

M* 

+•» 

IA 

IU 


20* 

45418 projar* 

66*i 

68 

»-*t 

10 

20 


116 

99 TO Tra^ 

114 

116 

+1 

£6 

7$ 

54? 

182 

IS Tit TiuCsss 

17/ 

1HU 

-i 

00 

14 

390 

168 

135 Torate Or 

101 

1U 


Eib 

50 

961 

juy 


304 

307 

-i 

U9b 

19 

660 

385 

300 Thug Sbcwj Cab 

370 

390 





225 

157'iTnoi. onwac 

222 

725 

-i 

65 

15 

SSI 

156 

112 Titan 

15J 

156 


40 

10 

444 

» 

303 

79 Tretewa ®c 

217 LGOtiwduni 

64'x 

aa 

88 ' 
288 

® .. 

17.1 

9$ 

300 

11 

7 1 

BU 

51 

35 Kfo® me in 

38 

40 

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*0 


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33 VtargtaUucH 

4U 

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70 

7$ 

198 


53 Wffltoool 

62 

65 < 

®-i 

73 

10 

310 

112 

BO’iWten 

HUfi 

112 

+'i 

13 

11 

634 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


£ 3y«ta«raM Expteu 
75 42 Marta 

38 21 Bateau! 

154 128 entente Mnra 
Z* IST.tMy Mel 
M'. :5>. flo 'A' 

158 137 Bam 
178 9S Eaa Ton 
2B0 187 Exn> 

113 68 taistteo 
768 375 FnmSaten 
110 01 FraS Ga 
223 ID 67 Mu 
r. re Goctt 
JO’. 490 HMteson 
218 1SJ KH 
440 330 HN 
305 190 U g G 
382 252 Ma ca —i tan 

1 S,?§TO toTa 

208 152 STM 


Uft 


asPx - -1*. 

71 74 +» 

26 Tt 

148 149 •+>, 
18*. SO'. 

17lr 19 
154 157 
175 I7B 

232 Z33 •+« 
110 115 • 

m m .. 

IDS 110 • 

207 212 -1 ' 

ITS 177 

»5 W. 

M5 168 -3 

417 418 ®-a>i 
273 280 -6 

288 232 -1 

124 120 
31'. 33 -h 

164 167 +1 


14 
.. 8 

80b 

mo 

700 

50 

4$ 

7.1 

03 

120 

71 

4$ 

25 

22.1b 

120 

25.0 

81 

2B» 

05 


10 SO 
.. 73Ji 
*0 17 4 
85 1*1 
£9 12$ 
as 36 0 


20 140 
L7 1i3 
65 115 
20 150 


2$ 317 
00 55 


100 60 12 


GOiyiMODiTiES^fc,;^: 



Vol- 2338 

COFFEE 

Nov 

Jan .... 

Mar 

May 

JiA 

S«P 

NO* 

Voh . . - . 


2080-2070 

_ . - 2050-2040 

1980-1975 

1990-1985 
. .. 2015-1990 

... 2020-2000 

20302000 

. area 

SOYABEAN 

Dec 136.0-32.0 

Fe& 134 $-340 

Apr >34.533.4 

Jun .... 1310-30 5 

Aug ...129.8-29 0 

Oct 133O30.S 

Dec 135.0-32.0 

Vol: 23 

INTERNATIONAL. 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
Suppled va Commodrt y 
Market Services Ud 
ICAVYFUELCW- 

Dec 7800-80.0 

Jan KL50-82J} 


Feb 79$0-B3.0 

Mar 74.00 


47 



...— 133.00-32.75 
137.0036.75 

— 139.00-38.75 

134$034$5 

1320031 SO 

135.00-30.00 

137.0030 DO 

— 139.0030.00 
— - 140.0030.00 
4223 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 

Unofficial prices 
OffidM Turnover figures 
P»k* in E per metric tonne 
SNwrm pew per trey ounea 
Rudolf Wolf & Co. Lid. report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 910.50-91 1.50 

Three Months . S3350-934.00 

Vol 4750 

Tone Steady 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 889.00391 00 

Three Months . 91330-915.00 

ym — 500 

Tone Quiet 

LEAD 

Cash 332.00333 00 

Three Morons 32S5033650 

Vol - — -3150 

Tone Steadier 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 547.00-557.00 

VOl Nil 

Tone — — Idle 

ZWC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 581.00-58330 

Three Months . S6S .00-5 70.00 


vet 


1300 

. Steady 


SILVER LARGE 

Cash 

Three Months . 

Vol 

Tone 


404.00-405.00 

414.S041S.50 

N8 

Oust 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 

Three Months . 

Veil 

Tone 

ALUMINUM 

Cash 

Three Months . 

Vot 

Tone ... 

NICKEL 

Cash 

Three Months . 
Vol 


Tone 


404.00- 405.00 
4f4.SG-61S.flO 

NB 

Me 

797.00- 798.00 
807 50-60800 

9800 

Berely Steady 

__ 2530-2540 

— 2565-2575 

— 132 

Quiet 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 

Average fatswek prices at 
nronraantertive raritets an 
November 14 

G8: Cattle. 92$4p per ka hw 
Ht-75) 

CB: Sheep I6&54p per log* 
7B£Bpperkgl» 

^ est deed carcase wetsm 
England and Wales: 

Cattle nos. up 18.1 %.avo. 


. i nos. down 163 ■%. ava. 
price. 165.1 &p( +3.23) 

Pig nos. up 2.0 %. a«. 
price. 7859W+1 $3) 

S cotland. 

Cattle hog. up 95 %, ave. 

price. 90.8Spf-a.38) 


Sheep nos. down 33.7 %. awe. 
pnee, i6l.05pi-l.04) 

Pig nos. n/a %. avs. 
pnoe. n/a 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 

Live Pig Contact p. per kilo 
Month Open Close 
101.60 101.70 


Nov 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 


96.30 Unq'ted 

97.30 Unq'ted 
9IL50 Unq'ted- 
95.00 Unq'ted 


Vol: 9 

Pig Meat veto 

LONDON HEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Live Cattfe Contract 


Month 

pLperkto 

Open 

Close 

Nov 

9600 

96.60 

Feb- 

98.00 

98.00 

Apr 

99.00 

99X0 

Jun 

100.00 

100.00 

— - 

— 

... 









mwwmmmm 

m.mmrn.- 

VtftO 

LONDON GRAW FUTURES 

Gpertonmt 


Month 

Wheel 

Barley 

Close 

Close 

NOv 

108.00 

109.05 

Jan 

U0.70 

111.75 


113.65 

113.&S 


115.60 

114.60 

Jui 

117.SQ 


Sen 

101.60 


Volume: 
Whea _.. 


._. ffiS 

Ssrtey 



47 


LONDON POTATO 
FUTURES 


Month 

Feb 

& 

Nov 

Feb 


E per tonne 

Oped Close 
11230 111.00 
153.50 151.80 
174.00 17ZL20 
8£50 as.oo 
99.00 9S00 


Vol: 973 


BfFFEX 

CLN J. Frelgtit Futures Ltd 

report £10 per taka point 
freigia indeot 
Hrgh/Low Close 
Jan 87 738.0-736.0 738.5 

Apr 87 780.0-777 J) 775 J5 

Jut 87 687.0 

oa B7 780.0-780.0 777.0 

Jan 88 . ... 780.0 

AjfJP 875 0 

Jut 88 762J5 

Oct 88 ESS.O 

Vol: 58 lots 
Open interest 2012 

TANKER REPORT 
High/Low Close 
Nov 86 940.0-940.0 940.0 

- 1040.0 

if? 87 1057i5 

— 1057.5 

‘•aP 87 1060.0 

VOL' !2tora 
Open Interest 24 

Spot martial commentary: 
Tanker index: 

915.0 up 20.0 on 13/U/86 

Pry cargo index 1 

779.0 ctawm 05 on 13/11/86 


■■■ ■ 

( l}rj»6'J152> 





- ^ >•# / ' . syV-w® — • * ■ 


i»ii« 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Investors wary 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end next Friday. §Contango day November 24. Settlement day December 1 

§Fbrward baqgains are permitted on two previous business days. 




^NMMr 


its 

./ “T* 
an us 



ER 15 1986 


mmm 


AND FINANCE 



2* 

54 

no 

20a 

10 

114 


90 

40 

07 

98 

14 

40 

Htf 



no 

24 

39 

no 

50 

# 

£S 

tzi 

no 

287 

u 

127 

70 

zo 

204 



780 

95 

27 

MO 

KM 

70 

95 

188 

37 


70 

35 

17.1 

03b 

20 


50 

57 

UB 

13 

70 

zu 

7.1 

33 


no 

20 

135 

25 

34 

497 

58 

52 

117 

M3 

30 

« 

05 

50 

45 

133 



no 

315 

J4 


07 

10 





180 

91 

04 

32 

52 


Ml 

SO 

35 

U 

47 

31 

157 

40 

110 

SB 

40 

90 

TU 

43 

04 

104 

40 

94 

08 



70 

42 

UO 

74 

77 

04 

7.1 

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no 

70 

74 

119 

21 

17 

770 

54 

70 

158 

94 

90 

04 


ZOO m Import Dm 
22 faloumd 
» 91 Mi 
ut n rate 
Ml 75 bWlM 
125 75 UHpms 
MS OVlMm 
0 H» SBVUMMrflflq 
S3 2J2 Utar 
540 291 Vdm 
UB 86 WMa 
195 HO HUB 
ZOnni'iMbKM* ■ 
anns 
2 BS m m. 

» m Mi Mm 

MS UB 
99 29 

H4 m Mutant Mt 

m in mums 

sea zb mapaai 

im m SBr 

231 174 MK« 

sov wiw— 

Itt SB TUSMt 
ra 71 MB 

75 M mm Hi D— « 

295 » MM1H RMM 

SI IB SSESs 

IB Q5 Mm (tamt 

WO H8 VMM M 

uo no ut 


D 0<iMBMtNi 
123 59 talMOi Bp 

na n vu«n 


m 201 *5 

uv ir> 

59 61 >1 

IM m *1 
175 177 «f 
KB KB 
tjfr 20 -V 
8#V . . 

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06 no -5 
141 M7 +1 
113 .. -V 

jsi iB -t 

139 162 .. 

M7 152 .. 

ms nr *a 
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100 tC2 *-2 
200 202 -4 

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275 265 .. 

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mr in •+? 


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75 U tU 

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71 72 70 

23 li 250 

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tJa 17 IM 
51 XI 397 

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u u as 

43 si S 

7J “ gjg 

36 14 197 

70 94 93 

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44b 49 99 

U '21 1U 

11 44 110 


1» „ 

H8» U> COOW 


a a sum _ 

12 a oiitaw ta 

IS* 99 MM 
593 271 CDi> 

74 44KC04 
54 22 bn 

a 4VJidwn 

a « kca oubo 

m a LAsuo 
300 994 Do IMS 
21 9 Hm Com 

a is imimmQi 

7 2VOMU 
374 IT'jt* SUtil 

1H 3$ fessal 

113 44VPWaon 
41 21 Prmv 

544 43 Itajai Esxis 

aro «sa aS 

115 123 SBOUt 
V U Bourn 
234 11'iTll emu 
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tSS 41 Irani 
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218 M UUwr 

tt 29VWMM* 


41 44 .. M U N 

52 57 20 54 

04 ■ +4 

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99S 597 -2 SO 42 147 

» » a v. 

10 12 -1 V. I •• 37 

124 14 -4 .... 19 

a . 27 +1 

*? ^4* tP 21 40 '40 

3 & 4 * “ “ & 

BP« 83*. -4 22S 30 , . 

S OB *1 510 94 24 

193 *44 U U MO 

31 S .... .. &1 

E 8 ♦ 4 .... no 

a n 4 

78 71 414 7.1 • 121 It 

W? 152 *4 ... ..223 

155 157 M-5 70 44 40 

56 9 -a 


— hMHrfUi 


fit 

2*6 banM 

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315 

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148 


76 

221 

171 fan 

172 

177 




114 

296 

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297 

777 

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89 

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1 Oh MUM 

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130 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


“TOPRATE IN 90-DAY ACCOUNTS” 

Momington 90 




NEW 

NET 

RATE 

iVariablcj 


9 - 83 % 


Compounded 

Annual 

Rate 


* Minimum £1,000 * immediate access 

* No-penalty withdrawals rf £10,000 remains 
or 90 days notice given * Dividends paid 
half-yearly. 


Momington Building Society j 

Nobody rates you higher j 

158 Kentish Town Road. London NW52BT. Tel: 01-4S5 5575. | 
Please send my application form 


Edited by Martin Baker 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


The mystery of the missing shares 


^Auttorbad for Investment by Trustees. Mentor* of the Bufcfag Safeties AmocMmJ 


BES TAX RELIEF 

(CAPITAL CAINS TAX FREE) 

COUNTY INNS PLC 



An asset backed chain of traditional public 
houses and off-licences in the prosperous South East. 
The Inrawffl be free bouses providing real ales 
and excellent food. 


★ First two public houses already ★£243,000 initial investment 

acquired: Sikes Country House, committed by Management 
Maidenhead, Berkshire; fens and Wiltshire Brewery Company 

Brasserie .Ware, Hertfordshire ★Early public quotaoon of shares, 

★ Experienced management. subject rq BES rules 

backed by ihe purchasing rower ★Investors will receive quarterly 

of the Wiltshire Brewery Company progress repents 

Issue of 2, 500, 000ofdina^sharesaraprioeof£1.00per share, payable 
m fall not later dun loth December 1986. Please complete ana posr 
coupon fora lull prospectus. 

spanned by 

Baltic 

Asset Management Limited 

Ibccnied Dcakrm Sesames) 

25/26 Albemarle Street, London W1X 4AD0 1-493 9899 
BES HOTLINE 01-491 0295 

The udentaeinmr dna not anatwe m offer to adnofc far shots 


To: Close Registrars Ltd, 803 High Road, Leyton E10 7AA 
Please send me a copy of the prospectus without obligation. 

MR/MRS/MISS/MS 

ADDRESS 


The Official Receiver at the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry has been “absolutely 
inundated" with calls from 
anxious customers of the two 
Share Shops that were dosed 
down by the department last 
week. The department itself 
granted the Share Stops the 
licence required to deal with 
the public. 

Telephone callers are now 
being asked to write in as the 
Official Receiver cannot cope 
with the number of telephone 
inquiries. 

Morcver, many customers 
of the Share Shops, who 
bought shares through the 
licensed dealers several weeks 
ago, have still not received 
their share certificates. 

Inquiries with the company 
registrars, who maintain share 
registers for companies and 
issue share certificates, reveal 
that in a number of cases the 
Share Shops have received 
money to buy shares — but the 
registrars have not received 
the transfer forms in the time 
scale normally expected, and 


these are necessary for the 
certificates to be issued. 

The Share Shops were 
dosed down on Friday last 
week after complaints to the 
department from customers 
over the settlement of their 
orders. The department had 
also become concerned be- 
cause creditors of companies 
related to die Share Shops had' 
filed petitions to wind them 
up. The Share Shops were run 
by the City Investment Cen- 
tres (CIQ company, part of 
the Ravendale Group run by 
Ghander Singh. 

The Share Shops in Finch- 
ley Road and New Bond 
Sheet, London, offered inves- 
tors the chance to buy and sell 
shares at net prices — without 
paying commission. Ironi- 
cally, shares they offered to 
deal in included popular gov- 
ernment privatization issues 
such as British Telecom, 
Brito il and Cable & Wireless. 

One Times reader, a Not- 
tingham accountant, tele- 
phoned the Finchley Road 
shop on September 26 to buy 
100 Britoil shares at I16ftp 



The Share Shop in Finchley Road: now closed down 


each. He said: “I sent the 
cheque off on October 1. I’ve 
had no share certificate. I did 
chase them up. They told me 
it lakes four to six weeks to put 
these things through. I've now 
spoken to the share registrars, 
Nat West, and they say they 
have no record of my having 
bought shares.” 

National Westminster 
Bank’s registrars department 
pnflimains a share register for 
Britofl. NatWest’s registration 
manager, Ted Shepherd, says 
the bank has received a num- 
ber of inquiries from anxious 


Share Shop customers. “One 
person who had sold shares 
but not received his money 
wanted us to put a stop notice 
on the share register, to make 
sure his name wasn’t taken 
offi” he said.“We can’t do this 
without having a court order.” 

Several people who bought 
Britoil shares but did not 
receive their certificates have 
been told by NaiWest that it 
has no record of them. It 
seems the Share Shops have 
not sent NarWest the required 
“bought transfer forms” for 
these- customers. There is a 


similar picture at Lloyds 
Bank’s registrars department, 
which maintains a registe r for 
British Telecom shares. 

CIC was a licensed dealer La 
securities. As such it is not 
part of the Stock Exchange 
and therefore none of us 
customers — if they have lost 
money — will be able to make 
a riahn qq the Exchange's 
compensation fund. 

Two years before the 
department’s investigators 
moved into the Share Shops — 
and long before the depart- 
ment granted CIC a licence — 
Dr Oonagh McDonald, La- 
bour MP for Thurrock, wrote 
to Paul Channon, then an 
Under-Secretary of State, 
about Ravendale Securities, 
another company in Mr 
Singh’s ' Ravendale Group 
along with OC She had 
already said in Parliament: “ft 
is high time that the depart- 
ment was prepared to examine 
companies such as Ravendale 
and make sure they do not 
operate at other people’s 
expense.” 


In her letter to Mb' Channon, 
who is now Trade and In- 
dustry Secretary, she asked 
whether he was aware of 
“extremely serious” allega- 
tions already J made in the 
media about Ravendale 
Securities. 

The F inancial Services Act, 
which will' introduce an in- 
dustry-wide investor 
compensation scheme _ for 
investors, win not come into 
effect until late next year at the 
earliest. 

The final paragraph of Dr 
McDonald’s letter to Mr 
Channon has a prophetic and 
ironic ring when one considers 
the Share Shops' customers; 
whose deals in Britoil, 
Telecom and other 
privatizations have not been 
fulfilled: “The Government 
cannot have it both ways — fay 
promoting the sale of shares to 
individual shareholders, and 

yet foiling to protect those 
very - investors from the 
shares.” 

Lawrence Lever 


A package to keep the 
shareholders happy 


( BRITISH GAS ) 

More than five million people 
are already certain to buy 
shares in Biitish Gas, accord- 
ing to the marketing men 
behind the issue. 

More than one in three 
adults are interested in the 
shares, while applications on 
behalf of the children and 
family are welcome. And the 
application forms will not 
even be published until a week 
on Tuesday. 

Roughly a third of the 16.5 
million customers of British 
Gas have registered their 
priority status — the last day 
for doing so was yesterday — 
but every subscriber who 
wants a substantial bolding 
should be more or less sat- 
isfied. There will be none of 
the Trustee Savings Bank 
lottery about the British Gas 
sale. 

The aim is dean to attract 
as many shareholders as pos- 
sible into the issue, and to 
induce them to hang on to 
their shares. 


Anthony Alt, of the organiz- 
ing bankers, N.M. Rothschild, 
has said he would welcome 
subscriptions from all the 
customers of British Gas. And 
the inducement to stay 
committed? This week Mi- 
chael Richardson, managing 
director of corporate finance 
at N.M. Rothschild, produced 
figures purporting to show a 
return of more than 20 per 
cent for the small investor 
who opts for gas vouchers. 

The total benefit for those 
who commit the minim um of 
£50, the first instalment of 
three for £1 50 worth of shares, 
and hold them for a year will 
be a £10 discount on the gas 
bill, and a dividend on the 
share of £5.63. The voucher 
will be sent out in July 1987, 
just after the second payment, 
probably of £50, has been 
made. For an outlay of £100 
the net benfits will be £15.63, 
which amounts to more than 
20 per cent, according to N.M. 
Rothschild. 

The bank says that because 
the second instalment will be 
paid in June, an average of £25 


wifl be paid out throughout 
the year. 

Even if you do not like the 
bank’s mathematics, the pack- 
age of benefits is still attrac- 
tive. Mr Richardson says the 
high yield is designed to 
encourage people not to sell 
straight away. 

There is also a bonus of one 
share for every 10 held for 
those who hang cm lor three 
years. Mr Richardson believes 
this should . encourage 
shareholders to remain loyal 
and not sell immediately, or 
“stag” the issue. 

Although the flotation has 
not been priced yet — the 
organizers will wait to judge 
market conditions before 
deciding how much to ask — it 
seems quite dear that British 
Gas will be cheap enough to 
tempt the masses. “You can 
hype people up to inquire, but 
in the end you must get the 
price right,” says Mr 
Richardson. 

There is a school of thought 
which says that privatizations 
are always going to be attrac- 



tive. Some say that all the 
investment talk of the 
“fundamentals” which affect 
ordinary share flotations, such 
as the competition faced by 
the company, the quafity of its 
management, the ukely future 
demand for its products, is 
really superfluous in the con- 
text of the privatization. 

Some might say that the 
issues will never foil because 
the Government simply can- 
not afford them to do so. 

But who knows? If the £4.5 
billion worth of shares set 
aside for British Gas employ- 
ees* customers and other pri- 


vate investors are priced too 
dearly no one will buy them. 

When the application forms 
finally do appear in the papers 
a week on Tuesday, the pagan 
festival of consumption 
known as Christmas wul be 
upon us. British Gas shares 
may well provide the answer 
for the fimwieifli Santa Clans. 
Like the TSB, British Gas will 
welcome applications made 
on behalf of children. 

One key difference, though, 
is the probability that the 
substantial investor wanting 
several thousand pounds’ 
worth of shares wffl be better 


satisfied with British Gas. 

First dealings in the shares 
will be at 230pm on Decem- 
ber 8 after that morning's 
announcement of the basis on 
which dares will be allo- 
cated-. This will be before 
letters of acceptance are deliv- 
ered. Quite understandably, 
foe company does not want to 
wait for letters; as this would 
take first dealing s into Christ- 
mas week. 

Imagine the fim investors 
can have, hoping their letter of 
acceptance will be delivered 
before the middle of January. 


Martin Baker 











































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More hopes on 
the home front 

'gUpE^SiSSlvm 

KEK^SaHwS* 


^SS5sa5S-“ 

^^fwllw'as^S- 

mis compares with an estimated 
mcrease of 1 2.5 per cent fS^** 

But for all we know the forecasts 
a '^.optimistio^Sntre 
a fall in the mortgage 

rateof around 1 per centre 

P®hoo oetween Januerv and 
March 1 987. This would help house 
pnces. but will it happen? p 

On the other hand we have 

aSS , “ Iand ’ wWch has been 
scraping along the bottom for 

EE* to* 10 - and estate agents 
SSSRE-y Bi^ey believe me 

Sl?Sf2l! r- and vaJuBS may 

have been too steep. A good 
tafvest this year, the gentle rise in 

inflation and a general renewal of 
interest in farmland may send pri c e s 
on the upward path. 

Property victims 

■ The real victims of roaring 
house price inflation are thefirst- 
time buyers. It is they who must 
scramble for the infamous first rung 
of the property ladder. The 

PMraa 391 ' 


^\\V- 


■-4ft 


TtQuras. in London the average is 
a Dream-taking £58,073 - hardly the 
sort of price most young couples, 
let alone individuals, wiff be able to 
afford easily. 

Nationwide Building Society has 




Two more societies 
building up for 1987 


Two more leading building 
societies are striding bravely 
Into next year's new world. 
This week both the Bri tannia 
and die Bristol £ West soci- 
eties received formal approval 
from members for the adaption 
of new powers ander the 
Bniklaig Societies 1 Act which 
comes into force next year. 

The Britannia, Britain’s 
seventh biggest society, has 
taken on board more am- 
bitions plans than the Bristol 
A West Britannia members 
will be offered new services in 
consumer lending (the ability 
to make unsecured loans, 
including overdrafts is prob- 
ably die key freedom estab- 
lished under foe new Act), and 
share dealing. Insurance ser- 
vices will be extended, bat aO 
new services will be introduced 
“gradually”. 

The Bristol & West's plans 
do not yet seem to be ftrily 
formulated. The society wfll 
“by no means” role oat un- 
secured lending, but regards 
foe introduction of a cheque 
account as “unlikely 11 . Rel- 
atively few societies seem keen 
on cheques, or “paper money 
transmission” as foe market- 
ing men so pithily term it 

Of the big societies only 
Nationwide appears really 
enthusiastic about cheques. 

The Halifax has said k 
wishes to avoid paper money, 
which is expensive to handle. 
It wants to start on the next 
generation of money trans- 
mission — foe automatic tell- 
ers, or holes in foe wall, and 


direct electronic debiting. The 
latter is more commonly 
known as EFTPOS (Elec- 
tronic Funds Transfer At 
Point Of Sale). This servde is 
just be ginning to be tested in 
certain supermarkets and at 
the petrol pumps. 

The move to share dealing is 
partiicularly interesting. Soci- 
eties such as the National A 
Provincial, and now both the 
Britannia and the Bristol A 
West, dare to market an 
alternative form of investment 
in their own branches. 

Building society members 
an to be offered the opportu- 
nity of saving into the medium 
of shares and unit trusts 
instead of foe solid, de- 
pendable (and perhaps 
sUgfatiy dull) deposit account. 

The NAP's c ommi tment 
seems the strongest. It mil 
make research directly avail- 
able to its customers through 
electronic links with its 
broking partoers. Bristol A 
West, on the other hand, wQl 
start off wfth a pilot scheme in 
just two branches, and no 
research material wfll be avaB- 
able directly to the public. 
Instead a representative from 
brokers Laing A Cnrikshank 
wfll be on hand to advise. 

The society is net prepared 
to say which two brandies will 
start off foe scheme “for 
competitive reasons” 

The year 1987 certainly 
looks set to be competitive 
enrwgh far the building 
societies. 

MB 


This School Fee 
Trust Plan could 
slash your 

costs. 



School fee plans are not all the same 
as so many parents might suppose. 

Our new School Fee Trust Plan, 
linked to a trust with charitable 
status, will provide a head start in 
providing for school fees in the years 
ahead* 

That trust basis, combined with 
our first-class investment track re- 
cord, is the answer to your problem. 

And, what’s more it is My 
recommended by the National 
Independent Schools Information 
Service. 


I QAeapual«ini;nSpreo*lil^thea>aovtrapcnod. mnaam ^ if] 


KuarlMrMnfkgsL 


Dug olBuifa 



AaMI*3 


I The Equitable Life 

L mm —You gain because we’re different.* — - 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


just published a handbook aimed at 
first-time buyers. All the sweet 
joys of property buying are carefully 
explained - the stamp duty, the 
legal fees, the ceiling on tax relief, 
and the wonderful common law 
system in England and Wales which 
perniHs gazumping and promotes 
ruthlessness (the Scots have a much 
better system). 

The book is dearly written and 
well laid out. First-time buyers with 
Nationwide will at least know the 
delights they can expect from their 
Initial property transaction. 

Pension shares 

■ Pensions, of course, are about 
to become portable, ft must be so — 
we have been tow from official 
sources. But where on earth, 
assuming they do become less 
immobile than at present are we 
supposed to carry them? The 
Henderson investment managers 
have an answer, we should leave 
it to them to ten us. Small pension 
schemes with as little as £5,000 
to invest will be offered the choice of 
nine tax-exempt unit-linked 
pension funds. Henderson says 
there are about 10,000 small 

~ . «s^«\ ^ 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


schemes in Britain, but only 33 per 
cent of these bother to invest in 
shares. “We believe that trustees of 
a large number of self- 
administered schemes would like to 
move into this arse but Jack the 
expertise to do so,** says David 
Payne, of Henderson. 

After the initial minimum 
commitment of £5.000 further 
investments may be made in 
tranches of £1 ,TO0. An 
administration fee of 0.75 per 
C8nt per year is charged annually, 
and every fund carries a front- 
end charge of more than 5 per cent 

Midland offer 

■ Midland Bank has introduced a 
new service for customers aged 55 
and over, replacing the existing 
Retirement Service, which was 
introduced as a precursor to free 
banking generally. The package is 
caked Fifty-Five Plus. It includes 
free financial and investment advice 
(under the Financial Services Bill 
only independent intermecSaries win 
be obliged to give "best advice") 
and an "interest only*' loan for home 
improvements or repairs. The 
Thomas Cook subsidiary wffl be 


I UIFi 

according id ■ nnsjQvveMm .Ot 

EIGHT UAtHf/M /fT j — 


used to provide travel discounts, other natt is used to provide 

and both private health care and growth or income. The charges on 
assistance with home security investment bonds ere s irniar to 

devices will be offered. these on unit trusts, but in general 

Another feature wifl be access to investment tends are more 
the bank's Premier Savings Account attractive for the higher-rate 
which pays a net 2 per cent on taxpayer, 

balances of £5,000 or more. If the 

55-plus person wishes to save a .... ,. , 

monthly amount in one of Midland's PrOilTIC DF&aJCtS 

unit trusts the bank will aBow a — Ar% _ f , Qr . . 

gasjESr USSffSisr 

prose who are members of the Most European share m a mats have 

RetoeinnK Servtro will be already come a lonq way rather 

automaticaBy transferred to the qirckiy (hence the Gadarene rush to 

new scheme. launch European funds), but 

Prolific insists there is money to be 
made. 

The emphasis of the new fund 
will be on France and West Germany 
with smaller commitments to the 
Dutch. Italian, Spanish, Swiss and 
British markets.The offer price of 
units will be 50p until November 28, 
with a 1 per cent discount on the 
initial charge of 5 per cem. The 
annual levy will be 1 per cent. 

Derails: Prolific Unit Trust 
Managers, 222 Bishopsgate, London 
EC2.M4JS. 


'xnwfk- 


A real Gemini 

■ Lloyds Bank too has been 
doing its fair share of re-vamping. It 
has just relaunched a life 
assurance-linked investment bond 
rejoicing in the name of the 
Gemini Bond. The bond is available 
to anyone between the ages of 18 
and 80, with a minimum investment 
of £2.000 and a maximum of 
£100,000. Half the money is invested 
in any of 16 fife funds (minimum 
commitment £500 per fund), and the 




I How ? 

* By advising which investment gives 
the mosr income. 

* By reducing your income tax bill. 

* By making your capital grow to 
increase income in the future. 

Knight Williams has specialised for many 
years in identifying income investments 
for retired people. Send for full details. 

KnightWilliams 

I Independent Financial Advice 1 

33 Cork Street, London W1X 1HB 8 
01-409-0271 ■ 

I Name J| 

“ Address * 


f| Members of FIMBRA ^ 

^ Offices in London & Leeds ^ 




Advice to the unwary abroad in the City, or 

WHY THE METEOROLOGICAL 

OFFICE SHOULD 
BE STAFFED BY GIRAFFES. 

EjlgglHE sun blazed down on the scorched savannah. The dry grass rustled like 
7g| W* sandpaper in the hot breeze. Overhead, the sky was porcelain blue. But the 
JyLyt giraffe was donning a sea-green sou’wester. A sunbathing lion opened a 
quizzical eye and started to roar with laughter. A pack of hyenas cackled hysterically. 
Undeterred, the giraffe tugged on his wellies, one, two, three and four. 

Gnus gnudged each other, whispering and giggling. The giraffe pooh poohed 
their jibes and unfurled a sober black umbrella. Still, the other animals broiled 
in the sun. Elephants sported smart new trunks. A long-legged camel shyly adjusted 
the bikini top on her humps. But — ■ - ' ' — 

the giraffe was studying the skies. 

And, sure enough, a little 
black cloud came scudding in 
from the west. Then another. 

Then another. Until at last the 
sky above was as black as ink. 

With a violent crack, the clouds 
split open. The sunbathers were 
bathed in a torrent of rain. 

As they scurried for cover, 
awash with mascara and suntan 
oil, the giraff e reflected on the 
advantages of being the tallest 
animal of them all. From his lofty 
vantage point, he’d been able to 
see the clouds gathering on the 
horizon. 

Like the giraffe, Mercury 
Fund Managers benefit greatly 
from their stature. With the vast 
resources of Mercury Warburg 
at their disposal and their net- 
work of offices all over the world, 

Mercurycancommandasuperior ~ — — - — — 

view of international stock markets. So there is no one better equipped to detect the 
slightest shift in the economic climate. 

For watertight advice on our ten unit trusts, please write to : The Client Services 
Director, Mercury Fund Managers Ltd., FREEPOST, London EC4B 4DQ, (01 280 2800) 
or contact your usual financial adviser. 

MERCURY UNIT TRUSTS i 

Investment by Mercury W arburg Investment Management Ltd / 


■ s' 't- :vss •JK'i 


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32 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


\ 


Investing with a portfolio 


( UNIT TRUSTS ) 

With the number of unit trusts 
on the market multiplying 
fester than a family of rabbits, 
there is no shortage of choice 
for the investor. Almost any 
tests can be accommodated, 
be it for high income or capital 
growth, a broadly based 
investment or one that is 
highly specialized. 

But unless you know exactly 
what you want, this wide 
variety can be merely 
bewildering. Ifyou are putting 
together a portfolio, should 
you choose from the offerings 
of just one company, or 
divereify? Should you stick by 
your initial selections through 
thick and dun, or aim to 
switch your holdings accord- 
ing to circumstances (? 

The so-called “funds of 
funds'*, which first appeared 
last year, can relieve some of 
the problems. These are unit 
trusts that invest entirely in 
other trusts, thus offering a 
kind of management service 
for investments as small as 
£500. The drawback is that 
they can be invested only in 
funds run by the same com- 
pany. so there is limited scope 
for diversification. 

For those with larger sums 
to invest, several unit trust 
groups offer a full portfolio 
management service. Even so, 


investment may still be exclu- 
sively in their own range of 
funds. They do. however, offer 
a more personal touch than 
the fund of funds, as the client 
may choose his objective as 
between income, capital 
growth or a combination of 
the two. 

Alternatively, only a por- 
tion of the portfolio may be 
invested in-house, and the rest 
in funds of other companies. 
This wider choice, though, has 
to be paid for by way of a 
management fee, whereas an 
in-house package is usually 
managed free of Charge- 

Portfolio management ser- 
vices are also offered by 
independent intermediaries. 
These,- of course, are not tied 
in any way to one particular 
company's funds. 

Moreover, they usually 
offer a choice between a 
discretionary service, where 
the managers make all the 
decisions, and an advisory 
one, where they give a guiding 
hand. Most unit trust com- 
panies, on the other hand, 
operate only discretionary 
services. 

Another difference is in the 
minimum account which is 
accepted. With the unit trust 
groups, this is commonly 
£10,000, and may be as much 
as £50,000. Among the inter- 
mediaries, £5,000 will often 


suffice, and some have no 
specific minimum. 

In both cases the client will 
be kept informed of the 
progress of his portfolio via 
regular valuations, generally 
Quarterly or half-yearly. Some 
companies also send out mar- 
ket reports or newsletters, and 

The client is kept 
informed of progress 

may offer ancillary services, 
such as capital gains tax 
calculations. 

The costs of portfolio ser- 
vices fell into two categories. 
First, there are management 
fees, which can vary quite 
si gnifi cantly between com- 
panies. Some have a flat rate 
regardless of the size of the 
portfolio but most charge a 
percentage of its value, which 
can be as much as 1 percent or 
as little as 0.125 percent. 

It can also make a difference 
whether the fee has to be paid 
in advance or in arrears. If for 
example, you are charged a 
year in arrears, foe portfolio 
value should (one hopes!) 
have increased meanwhile. 
On a percentage basis, then, 
the fee will be higher than if 
you had paid in advance. 

At least, though, yon can 
feel that you are paying for 
results. 


The other cost component 
is the charges on the trusts in 
which your portfolio is in- 
vested. Units in a trust are 
bought at an offer price, and 
sold at a lower bid price, the 
spread representing an initial 
charge. So every time a switch 
is made, some value is im- 
mediately lost. 

Unit trust groups frequently 
offer a discount on the offer 
price when an “in-house” 
switch is made, both on their 
own services and to inter- 
mediaries. The latter may also 
rebate some of the commis- 
sion they earn on purchases to 
the client. Even so, there is 
still some residual cost. 

This can pose something of 
a problem for portfolio man- 
agers. Too much switching 
leaves them open to the charge 
of “churning” — turning over - 
the portfolio more than nec- 
essary for the sake ofthe front- 
end fees. On the other hand, 
loo little activity would sug- 
gest they were not fulfilling 
their role of management 

The difficulty can be greater 
for the few intermediaries who 
do not levy a management fee. 
They make their money from 
commissions, so they are open 
'to influence not only in how 

often they switch holdings, but 
also in which trusts they 
choose, as commission rales 
are not uniform. 



The proof of the pudding is, 
of course, in the performance . 
achieved. If the portfolio 
shows healthy gains, the 
investor will probably not be 
too concerned how they were 
come by. 

So do the managers do a 
better job than you could do 
yourself? There is not, in feet, 
a geat deal of information 
available on performance 
.within portfolio services. 
Companies are naturally will- 
ing to highlight their success- 
ful periods, but if you intend 
to invest for some years, 
consistency will be more 
important. 

During the past five years, 
the magazine Planned Savings 
has run a monitoring exercise, 
involving intermediaries. 
They were asked la . construct 
two portfolios, one aiming for 
capital growth, the other for 


income, with an initial invest- 
ment of £10,000 in each. 
Because real clients wonki be 
impossible to standardize, 
these are dummy portfolios, 
but the ’switches made are 
intended to reflect the 
company’s actual strategy. 

The results, which have 
been continually monitored, 
offer mixed' conclusions. 
Some managers have un- 
doubtedly done well, while 
other performances are notar 
bty patchy. 

Perhaps most - tellingly, 
seven of the capital growth 
portfolios' now stand at a 
lower value than if the original 
holdings had been left intact, 
which goes to show that a 
good choice at the ’outset can 
sometimes prove menu eff- 
ective than any amount of 
management thereafter. . 

: Liz Walkington 


PEPs. Listen 
before yo 


Fidelity would like to offer 
you the simplest explanation of a 
Personal Equity Plan. 

A cassette. 

This free investor’s guide has been 
prepared jointly by LBC and ourselves. 

Answering key questions, Douglas 
Moffitt, the radio station’s Financial 
Editor, tells you what a Personal Equity 
Plan is. 

How it works. 

And explains the tax-free savings 
you can make. 

Hear how the Government has created 
an opportunity for every adult in Britain 
to share in the profits of the U.K. Stock 
Market 

Completely free of all tax. 

And how Fidelity, one of the world’s 
largest investment groups, can help you 
take advantage of this opportunity to 
the full 

“ To gain the tax 
advantages , how long does 

my money have to stay in? * 

Besides providing you with easy listen- 
ing, we’ll also send you some easy reading. 



PEP ‘Action Pack'. 
Read how you can invest 
up to the full tax-free allowance of £2,400 
a year or as little as £35 a month. 

In shares in some of Britain’s most 
successful companies. Blue chip 
investments like British Telecom, , 
Sainsbury, Hanson Trust and Jaguar. 

“Can I take out more 
than one plan? ” 

Companies with excellent growth 
and profit expectations. 

And of course the more profits your 


Callfree Fidelity 

0800 4141(31 


Ifi Biiir z\ 

,r uSw To: Fidelity Investment Services Limited. 

?i!5 ~ "1 River Walk, "Tonbridge; Kent TN9 ] DY. 

,»• Please send me my Fiddjry/LBC PEP 

Cassen e and my 'Action Pack' without delay. 

Full name: 

Mr/Mrs/Miss 


Address- 


Postcode. 


Jeg FideUty J 


lake, the more tax savings 

you make. 

Remember Fidelity has one of the 
best investment records of any unit trust 
group in Britain today. 

Right from the start we have been 
among the innovators in the development 
ofPEPs. 

After you’ve read your ‘Action Pack’ 
and listened to the cassette there may still 
be more questions you want to ask. 

“Some servings plans have 
hefty penalties for early withdrawals 
— what about PEPs ? ” 

Just pick up the phone to our PEPs 
advisers on our Callfree number from 
9a.m. to 5 p.m. every weekend and from 
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. from Monday to Friday. 

Because so many people have already 
shown interest in our PEPs, we are 
offering a 1% discount to every applica- 
tion received before December 19th. 

Amid all the noisy sales clamour for 
your PEP investment money wouldn’t 
you first like to hear a quiet, reasoned, 
unbiased voice. 

On tape. 


B 

a 

Ha 

M* 

Mar 

Prop 

pen. 



MAKING MONEY MAKE MONEY 




Where you can 
put all those 
‘excess’ profits 


A small businessman's 
iiii«»mnan: “My company 
is approaching its 
year-end. It will 
probably make a 
taxable profit of 
about £20.000 after I 
have drawn my nsaal 
salary. What should 
I do with this 
‘excess’ profit?” 

DANBY BLOCH and 
RAYMOND GODFREY 
explain some of 
the options 

Most owners of small limited 
companies tend to wait until 
after the year-end and . the 
audit before they do their tax 
p lanning . But by then most of 
the opportunities have been 
missed. Decision-making time 
is a month or two before the 
yearend. 

So if yoar company's 
accounting period is, say, 
December-31, you should be 
producing some management 
accounts right now, even if 
only on the back of an 
envelope. You should then 
take them along to your. 
accountant and perhaps even 
use this article as an agenda 
for the various main options 
that are open to you. . . . 

As with all financial plan- 
ning, there is no universally 
right answer for everyone. The 
decision will depend on im- 
portant fectors such as how 
much you need to bufld up the 
business, your lax rate, how 
dose you are to retirement 
and. whether there are other 
shareholders. . 

OPTION 1: Leave ft hi the 
company. If you leave profits 
in the company, they .are 
normally subject to corpora- 
tion tax. Profits of up to 
£100,000 are taxed at 29 per 
cent (the same level as basic 
rate income tax). Profits 
above £100,000 and below 
£500,000 are taxed at a mar- 
ginal rate of 36.5 per cent; 
above £500,000 die rate comes 
down to 35 percent. So if you 
do decide to reinvest the 
profits the immediate tax 
leakage is not too serious. 

Many companies should re- 
tain some profits. By doing so 
you build up reserves for 
capital expenditure and show 
a sense of financial commit- 
ment to the enterprise, which 
ought to please the bank 
manager. If you are thinking^ 
of selling foe. business one day, 
boosting its capital value 
could also prove to be a good 
investment in the longer term. 

In any case, your taxable 
profits probably will not co- 
incide .with your cash' surplus 
— if any. For example, you 
may spend £4,000 on buying a 
van, but the taxman will not 
allow you to write off more 
than 25 per cent of that m the 
year you purchased it There 
are various other items of 
expenditure which cannot be 
set off against tax at all, such 
as entertaining^ 

Against keeping the money 
in the company is the feet that 
it is basically locked in there 
until you liquidate or sell the 
company or until you are 
prepared to pay income tax in 


order to get your acc um u late d 
profits ouL 

OPTION 2: Salary or taws.. 
You could draw the profit out 
as income for yourself This 
will probably involve paying 
income tax of between 29 and 
50 per cent, depending on the 
level of your allowances and 
other income. Higher rate 
income tax does not apply 
until your taxable income, 
that is, after allowances, 
reaches £17,200. 

In addition, there are .Na- 
tional Insurance contributions 
(NIC). This year the 
employee’s NIC is up to 9 per 
cent of remuneration with a 
maximum of £1333.80. But 
the company as employer 
would also have to pay 10.45 
per cent National insurance 
contributions aad with no 
upper limit. 

Despite the NIC penalties, 
you might consider drawing 
some money out of the com- 
pany in this way if yon were a 
29 per cent taxpayer. It would 
at least mean you would" 
liberate foe funds from the 
company — even if you had to 
reinvest it -in order to help 
finance the business. 

‘ If you are a very high rate . 
taxpayer, you might draw 
some funds and invest them 
into a business expansion 
scheme. That way, you would 
wash out your income, and if 
die investment is successful, 
-you would collect your cash 
and profits in, say, five years 
time. There is usually, how- 
ever, a time interval between 
handing over the PAYE in- 
come tax and getting it back in 
the form of relief on the BES. 

In any event, you should 
make sure that your spouse is 
being properly paid for his or 
her services to the company 
and depending on his or her 
tax rates, you could makes tax 
saving and quite possibly a 
National Insurance savfog as 
welL Do not fozget that you 
must be able to justify this 
expenditure to the Revenue. 

OPTION 3: Pension. There is, 
of course, one investment the 
company can make direction 
your behalf, without any tax 
charge on you or the company 
and also without any National 
Insurance contributions. This 
is an employer’s contribution . 
into a pension scheme fbrjou. 
Very substantial sums in-rela- 
tion to income can often! be 
-invested and most people 
have not remotely reached the 
Revenue’s limits. _ . 

Moreover, whether you 
have a small self-administered 
pension scheme or an insur- 
ance company plan, it is now 
normally possible to use the 
funds as a basis for borrowing, 
either by you personally on by 
the company. For example, a 
company can usually borrow 
up to 50 per cent of the 
pension fund in the form i 
unsecured loan — although it 
would have to pay a coi 
dal rate of interest 

So you can invest m ydur 
own pension without nec- 
essarily having to starve yqur 
company of cash. 




Wlnkwortk 

MORTGAGES 

SCHEMES CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 

r 4 times Income or 4 + 2 for joint 
- applicants 

100% mortgages with no upper limit - 
all legal costs added to mortgage 
r No evidence of income required fbr 
loans tar qualifying applicants - 
Re-mortgages tar qualifying purposes 

Ring 01-235 0691 
For full Information 
Open until 8pm today 

Winkworth 
Financial Services 
25a Motcomb Street 
London SWl 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 


The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


L 


For further information and the current prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to: Robin Fuller. 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242. St. Julian's Court. St. Peter Port. Guernsey^ 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey ((MSI) 26741. 


Name 


Address 


ASI 


N M ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT 


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FAMILY MONEY/4 


Bristol calling expats, 
nave you cash to spare? 



Z£ dKSSSTOLMJt) W£?T ARE 
PAW A/ff H-?l e /e~-P(&>rTD(S," > 


SAVINGS 


Throughout this month puz- 
“3 d Spasish television v£w_ 
te\ng bombarded four 

SMten SF* ^ 30 ^Sb- 
5S£j jfd.yenisemem for a 
British building society sav- 
nigs account The 30-irond 
commercial, however, is not 
directed at the natives, but at 
Bnions who have gone to 
work or retire m the sun. 

The exiles are being 
tempted to invest their spall 
rash *n the Bristol & West’s 
new Overseas Investors Bond. 
Jt pays 11.37 per cent and it 
comes tax-free, thanks to re* 
cent legislation which allows 
banks and building societies to 
pay interest gross to non- 
residents. 

The Bristol & West’s cam- 
paign is likely io spearhead a 
dnve by other big building 
societies for the savings of 
overseas Britons. The tele- 
vision promotion is being 
backed up by other advertise- 
ments in publications serving 
the expatriate market, it is 
beipg relayed from Gibraltar 
to southern Spain - and there 
are', reckoned to be half a. 
million Britons living in 
Spam. 

Tie building societies can 
do with every fresh source of 
funds they can find. Receipts 
havel shrunk worrying) y in 
recea months. 

NoW a survey commis- 
sioned by the Trustee Saving 
Bank discloses that 4.3 million 
saver^are seriously thinking 
of taking money out of build- 


ing societies and investing it 
elsewhere. 

Some are being tempted 
directly imo the stock markets 
by easy money privatization 
issues. Others are responding 
to persistent comparisons 
from the unit trust industry 
showing unit trusts to be 
much better - long-term 
performers than building 
societies. 

The expat market was 
opened to building societies in 
the March budget when the 
Chancellor Nigel Lawson gave 
them the go-ahead light to pay 
interest to non-residents with- 
out deducting basic rate tax. 

As non-residents are not 
normally liable to pay UK tax, 
accounts on which tax was 
deducted at source and not 
recoverable were things to stay 
away from — and most expats 
did. Gross payments, how- 
ever, which mean three or 
more percentage points extra, 
are another matter. 

A building society now of- 
fers an attractive resting place 
for money awaiting the 
owner’s homecoming, es- 
pecially if he or she plans to 
buy a home. The saver ranks 
for mortgage preference if 
funds happen to be short. 

The Bristol & West, for 
example, gives a mortgage 
priority of five times the 
average savings balance over 
the previous 12 months, other 
considerations being in order. 
The minimum investment in 
the Overseas Investors Bond 
is £1,000. 

Surprisingly, building soci- 
eties have been slow to re- 


spond to the tax concession. 
Although many were quick to 
set up special schemes, there 
has been little serious attempt 
to promote them. The Bristol 
& West initiative should spark 
o there into action. 

To have interest paid gross. 


expat savers have to sign a 
fulfil the 


declaration that they 
requirements of non-res- 
■ idency. These are com- 
plicated, and if not complied 
with could result in a tax 
clawback. 


The building society pro- 

declara- 


vides the necessary 
lion farm, but it is not 
responsible for checking 
anyone’s resident status or for 
recovering tax. The rules are 
explained in a booklet, IR20, 
which can be obtained free 
5-om any Inland Revenue 
office. 

Building society sharehold- 
ers going abroad can transfer 
their existing savings imo an 
expatriate account Those 
coming home should let the 
building society know as soon 
as their resident status is 
resumed so that the tax treat- 
ment of future savings can be 
adjusted accordingly. 

Interest is credited gross 
from the day after departure to 
the day before the dale of 
return. But to qualify for the 
tax concession, anyone going 
abroad to work full-time 
under a contract of employ- 
ment needs to be away for a 
full tax year - April 6 to April 
5 — not 12 calendar months. 

So it is worth timing, if 
possible, the dates of leaving 
and returning so that a full tax 



year can be started as soon as 
possible, especially if the con- 
tract is not expected to last 
very long. By mistiming the 
dates, it is possible to spend 
nearly two years abroad with- 
out qualifying for non-res- 
idency status and the lax 
advantage that goes with it. 


tag a snap visit home may not 
be able to get his hands on 
cash as quickly as he needs iL 
For most people, money in 
bigger societies is probably 
more accessible. 


Because of their financial 
strength and promotional 
power, the bigger building 
societies are most likely to 
capture the major share of 
expatriate savings, but as with 
home savings, the best interest 
raxes are usually found among 
the smaller fry. The returns 
offered are linked to both the 
amount of cash invested, and 
access to it 


To get the best of both 
worlds it may be worthwhile 
keeping emergency money in 
one of the big societies, such as 
the Halifax, where cash is 
obtainable even in non-work- 
ing hours through a wall 
dispenser. 


Table 1: BEST RATES FOR NON-RESIDENTS 


The separate tables set out 
the terms and conditions of 
expat accounts offered by the 
top five building societies, and 
the best payers — the latter in 
order of withdrawal notice 
required and minimum 
investment at November S. 




Notice 

Mtn £ 

Interest 

Paid 

Gatewa 


Instant 

•1 

11.50 

Yearly 

Coventr 


Instant 

1,000 

-11.85(12^0) 

Vi 'yearly 

Peckhari 


Instant 

2,000 

12.4(12.73) 

Vi-yearly 

Hampsh 

re 

Instant 

5,000 

12L25 (12.62) 

Yr-yearty 

Skipton 


Instant 

1 0,000 < 

12.25 

Yearly 

Surrey 


Instant 

10.000 

12.00 (12-36) 

K-yearty 

Propert/' 

bwners 

Instant 

20.000 

12.04 

Yearly 

Britarmia 

\ 

Instant 

25.000 

12.10 

Yearly 

Hampshire 

28 days - 

500 

12^5(12.62) 

% -yearly 

Portsmouth 

30 days 

500 

1^17(12^4) 

Vi -yearly 

Homesdale Benefit 

60 days 

500 

12-04(12.40) 

54-yearty 

Civil Service 

60 days 

1,000 

12-04 (12.40) 

%-yearly 

Scarborough 

60 days 

10,000 

12.70 

Yearly 

Staffordshire 

60 days 

10,000 

12-46(12.74) 

VS-yearty 

Staffordshire 

60 days 

25,000 

12.75 (13.03) 

%-yearty 

Staffed Railway 

90 days 

500 

12.68(13.08) 

Vi-yearly 

Bfrminjham M/dsWres 

90 days 

1,000 

12.68 (12.96) 

54-yearty 

Momirgton 

90 days 

1.000 

12^4 (13-62) 

Vi-yearly 

Birm Nidshires 

2-yrterm 

2£00 

13.03(1332) 


Portsrtoutfi 

3-yr term 

500 

12.71 (13.11) 



A snag" with smaller soci- 
eties is that even with instant 
access available, they have 
comparatively few branches, 
and an overseas worker mak- 


But for people working 
abroad and hoping to build up 
as much as possible to come 
home to, the interest rate is the 
top priority, and there is quite 
a difference between one soci- 
ety and another. 

For instance, as the table 
shows, at the Mornington 
1 2.48 per cent on money at 90 
days’ notice compares with 
1 1.7 percental die Woolwich. 
But at the Woolwich only 
£500 is necessary while the 
Mornington requires £1,000 
minimum. So to keep on top 
of the market it is necessary to 
keep moving money as the 
account builds up. 


Joe Irving 


Source: Chase da Vere 

Table 2: BIG FIVE GROSS PAYMENTS 


Notice 

Min£ 

Interest 

Paid 

Abbe* National 

Instant 

500 

- 10^7 

Yearly 



2,000 

10.70 

Yearly 



5,000 

11.04 

Yearly 



10,000 

12.00 

Yearly 

Alliarce Leicester 

Instant 

1 

10.50 

Yearly 



2,500 

11.00 

Yesvly 



10,000 

11^0 

. Yearly 

Halrfat 

Cardcash 

1 

8-03 

% -yearly 


Instant 

2,000 

10.50 

Yearly 



500 

10.37 

Yearly 



2,000 

10.70 

Yearly 

■ 


5,000 

11.04 

Yearly 



10,000 

11.37 

Yearly 


90-Day 

500 

11.71 

Vi-yearly 

Nationwide 

Instant 

1 

10,000 

11.00 

11-50 

Yearly 

Yearly 



25,000 

12.00 

Yearly 

Wodwich 

90-Day 

500 

11.7(12.04)* 

K-yeariy 

Souroe: Chase da Vere 

i — ■ 


33 


Don’t Slow 
Down The Rate 
Y ou Spend 
Money Speed Up 
The Rate 

You Make It 


In one ve.tr. Prudential's North 
.American Trust has risen 39.5%, the 
best performance in the sector. The 
Japanese Trust, an impressive 105.0%. 
.And the European Trust. a remarkable 

1072%: 

Of course you must rememberrhar 
the price of the units and the income 


from them can go down as well as up. 

Bur if you'd like to find out more 
about the success of these trusts and 
the others in our range, send us the 
coupon. 

We've paid the postage. So we've 
increased your spending power a lirtle 
already. 


i\ I mr 1m-: Mjnij'-r* L:J . FKH’FOST. Ili'.vd H'!l. iiford, bv<» ICl 2DL fNo vuntn Holror* 

* 1-NniMMS 


frCirr.'d.J P 1 t 2 x: x-nd nv -nor* informal un ahour Hiiibnm L'mi Tru*.i*. 
Nitii . 




Ajdri- 


. fto'i.vdc . 


PRLDENTTALlt' 


71 5D I 


PruJcnwl Lint Tru.: Mounts UmrrJ - Ntmhrf .i|:hr Lmi Ticm A 1 yawl ion. 


I 


Mu-.. Mw Mru.'i 


Henderson European Income Trust 


The Land of Opportunity. 

wrm NO ONE BETTER TO TAKE 

YOU THERE. 


Just because you 
live off your business 
doesn’t mean you can 
retire on it. 


It's a sad fact, but most businesses don't 
support their owners retirement 

No matter how hard you work, your 
business is unlikely to maintain your present 
standard of living for more than a few years 
of vour retirement. 

Fortunately, London Life's Retirement 
Prosperity Plan can help you retire in the 
manner to which you're accustomed. 

Monthly contributions to this scheme 
quickly accumulate in a tax-free fund (you 
can choose from a wide range of investment 
funds). And because London Life pays 
no commission you can be sure that every 


available penny is being invested on your 
behalf in foe scheme. 

Even if your financial circumstances 
alter; well allow you to change your usual 
contributions without any penalty. 

Then,' when you retire, foe fund will pay ■ 
you a lump sum, again tax-free, and a 
regular income which you can add to the 
money left front your business to provide 
a comfortable retirement 

For further details, fill in our coupon or 
phone Sally H31 on Freephone 0800 717111 
And start working for your retirement 
before your business stops working for you. 


RET I 


R EM E N T P R O S P E R j f Y PLAN 


To: New Business Department, 

The London Life Association Limbed. 
FREEPOST. 100 Temple Street 
Bristol BS1 6 VI. 

/No Stamp Required), 


Name 


Address 


Postcode 


1 would like w know more about 
London life Retirement Prosperity Plan- 




Date of Birth 


. Home TeL NVu 


» <w tdOff Ufe Business Tel No- 



Europe, in terms of total return promises some of 
the most rewarding investment opportunities. 

Henderson with probably London’s most 
experienced European investment team, now offers its 
European Income Trust. 

With falling inflation, European governments 
boosting local industry and, generally, a much broader 
parriciparion in European stockmarkets by domestic and 
international investors, we believe now is the 
ideal time to consider an income orientated fund. 

Henderson European Income Trust is 
invested to provide an estimated gross annual 
income yield of 4.44% (14.11.86) 
plus an excellent expectation of 
capital growth. 

This trust complements 
Henderson’s existing 
European portfolio, from 
which the Henderson 
European Trust, measured 
over the last ten years comes 
first for performance in comparison 
to other European trusts. (Planned Savings 1.11.86.) 

The experience that has produced this unrivalled 
record has determined the mix between high yielding 
equities, bonds and cash which will comprise the portfolio 
of this new Trust. 

Minimum holding is £500 or £25 per month 
through the Henderson Investment Builder Account. 

And of course, with no one better than Henderson 
to manage your European investment, there’s no better 
time to start than the present. 


FIXED PRICE OFFER OF 50.9p PER 
UNIT UNTIL 21ST NOVEMBER 1986 
We are making a fixed price offer of 50.9 pence 
per unit until 21st November 1986. After the fixed price 
offer closes, units may be bought at the current 
daily price. 

You should remember that the price of units and 
the income from them can go down as well as up and 
you should regard any investment as long term. 


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Should ifw unit offer price mow by more than J 1 during the livid price period the 
after will he closed and units will tv allocated at ihe price ruling on receipt • •) arpfic titon. 

Distribution of income will for paid on 31s .N larch and 3Cth September, the lir-s p.i; meni 
being on 31st March 1987. The estimated spov* annua! yield ih4.44 ; : iM.II.Xu. 

Contract notes will be issued and unit cenihcates w ill be pro\ ided »i i:hin ci-ht « eek% 
of payment. To sell units endorse your certificate and Send it to the nunaccrs pa- nvm 
bused on th«f ruling bid price will notirulh be made within sesen w<»rkin_- da;. ■>. 

Unit Trusts are not subject to capita! gains tax; moreover a unit holder will not put 
this tax on a disposal of units unless his total realised spin* from all source: in thk tax v t.ar 
amount to more than £6,3 DO tl^So Tj. Prices and yield* can be found -Lul l in the national 
press. 

An initial charge of 5'^: nt‘ the asset* (equivalent of 5 : ; of the issue price I L nude 
bv the managers and is included in the price of the units tv hen issued- Out of the initial 
charge, manager* pay remuneration to qualihal inurmieduriev rain- available on requot. 

An annual charge of l : s fplu* \AT> on the value ui the Trust will be deduct. J trerni 
the gro» income to cover admhusration cost*, with a provision in the Trust Deed Ti ■ 
increase this io a maximum od on giv inj; three months n mien notice to the unis fodder*. 

Trustees: Midland Bonk Trust Company Lii, 11 Old Jew rv. London L'CIK SDL. 

Managers: Henderson Umt Trust Management la J., 2b Finsburv Square. 

London EQA IDA. 

A mentivr ol the Unit Tru*i Association. 


|t- Hi- -n t 


in: ’Ir 


I-S-.I.WIWI Vut. 

Irn-l i: ihi- Im.l p hi 

il nj-itiii-m l.innu-ii If 
t W* •' l-ll l«- U1M.-.I 


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i-bri.iii.iu* miiniiniinis 5 ~T.>inilv:H«tiiKTioitt.iir.ipi-anln.-.iini- 

>■: K pvr mill an.l ..-ncl.i-.- .1 ,-k-ilm- p.11 ahl>- r.. Hi-n Jui^.n L'nn Irn-i 
; 'Hi >• i*(» hau iii-i ntiomv rem'c-icii plvJ-ciiik.O 


. pn m-mli , minimum in ilu HinJi-ruin Lur.fvan Incline Inn 


I ui 

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.■ Ion lih'.ijui l"r i hi Mr -1 ni. inih ■ inn*lnii-n' yj» .ihl-. l, , hlcn.li-r-.iil L'nii Iriio Mana^cnii-nl Lmni-'-f- 
li ,.ii lion to nuke .uKs.^oi-ni pjirtiint, •' ill K nlll l<> i-iu un iiinpf ol ilu* mupi'ii. 1 ‘lilv *ifld 
.■riii-.lii^iu-. il •■■11 -* i-I. ii.ih>i--i l, nil. 1 lump --uni jml 1 ni.imhb -ul>vripi|i.ii. Tin- ultw mil il.ni- Ji- 
3 pm. in 1 11J.it \onnibi-r -I'l !•'*»• 3 tier :iu .l.m .ilihr- .«IIit nmi . i>-iII K .v aihhl. ai tlu-Jiilv qm-ieJ 
.1-. Jimoi jppliL.ini-. niioi M-jn jiiJ jii.ii'h lull nam.'* an.l ajtlri-.ii • ttpii.iiili. 








A.lori-« 










Mi I', 


■ .um.ll kill 1 -rt 1 


L. 


Hu* oiur 1* noi a> jiIjMi 01 rc-.idim.nl 1 lie Kipublu 01 

Henderson European Income Trust 


Henderson. The Investment Managers. 



•f-.-r 







THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/5 


The exotic alternative 


(fcUBOBONDS ) 

Bored with gilts? Nervous 
300111 sterling but eager to 
receive a secure; regular in- 
come? Then an exotic new 
portfolio management service 
investing in Eurobonds could 
be the answer to your 
problems. 

The scheme is offered by 
Hoars Govett (Channel Is- 
lands) Ltd, die onshore stock- 
broking subsidiary of Hoare 
Govett in London. 

“This is a unique service 
which allows the substantial 
private investor to participate 
in the sophisticated Eurobond 
market, 71 says Andrew Bu- 
chanan, a partner of Hoare 
Govett with responsibility for 

running the scheme, “it gives 
him the potential for achiev- 
ing attractive growth and in- 
come at a relatively low level 
of risk.” 

The only “catch 71 is that you 
need to have at least $50,000 
(about £35,000) to invest 

The scheme is made pos- 
sible by the marriage between 
Security Pacific, a large West 
Coast US bank, and Hoare 
Govett one of Britain's top 
stockbrokers before Big Bang. 

“We use information pro- 
vided by Security Pacific's 
bond-dealing teams in 
London. They use computer 
models and can give us up-to- 
the-minute prices on most 
Eurobond issues,” says Mr 
Buchanan. 

Investing in these offshore 
instruments may sound 
daunting, but essentially there 
is nothing too complicated 

Quotes available 
from the banks 

about a Eurobond. A bond is a 
certificate of indebtedness 
bearing interest at a fixed rate, 
or a fixed proportion to other 
rates, and repayment at a fixed 
date. 

A Eurobond is an inter- 
national bond issue under- 
written by an international 
syndicate of banks and sold 
principally, and at times 
exclusively, in countries other 
than the country of the cur- 
rency in which the bond is 
denominated. 

Eurobonds are always avail- 
able in bearer form. This 
means the bond is presumed 
in law to be owned by the 
holder. This, in turn, gives 
anonymity. Interest is paid 
free of withholding tax and 
other taxes at source. 

The bonds are traditionally 
issued by governments, public 
utilities and blue chip com- 
panies. Investors who wish to 
sell their bonds can usually get 
a quote from one of the 
underwriting banks. 

The Eurobond market 


Started in the 1960s and now 
raises capital at the rate of 
$200 billion a year. That 
compares with the £6.2 billion 
of new equity issues on the 
London Stock Exchange last 
year. Eurobond turnover was 
$125 trillion (a million bil- 
lion) last year, against $476 
billion for equities and gilts on 
the London Exchange. 

Hoare Govett's scheme of- 
fers two types of account the 
income account and the total 
return account The income 
account is for investors who 


option of the holder. "Zeros” 
are securities that pay no 
interest the investor pays a 
discounted amount of the face 
value of the bond and receives 
the full amount on 
redemption. 

Warrants are certificates at- 
tached to bonds and give the 
holder the right to buy the 
bond at a given price. That 
price will be higher or lower 
than the issue price, depend- 
ing on how the investor thinks 
the bond will trade. 

“We're fully aware of the 



It’s a deal: transactions at finance house Goldman Sachs 


are looking fora steady, secure 
income. 

Clients are given the option 
of investing in any combina- 
tion of sterling, US dollars, 
yen or Deutschmark bonds, 
with a minim uzn of £J 0.000 or 
currency equivalent in any 
one currency. Currency splits 
can be changed at any time if 
14 days' notice is given. 

The bearer character of the 
bonds and the offshore loca- 
tion of the scheme should 
ensure that the interest paid 
will be free of withholding tax. 
U is up to the investor whether 
the interest paid on the bonds 
is declared — all income 
should, of course, be declared 
for tax purposes. 

Within this tax-free frame- 
work investors will be given 
the opportunity of investing in 
Bulldog bonds. These are 
sterling-denominated bonds 
issued by foreign borrowers in 
the UK domestic market. 

They have a significant 
advantage over long-term UK 
government securities (gilts) 
in the availability of longer 
maturities (up to 30 years) at 
prices closer to par (the bond's 
issue value). 

The total return account is 
for more adventurous inves- 
tors who want to maximize 
their interest income and are 
willing to accept a higher level 
of risk. To achieve this, Mr 
Buchanan reserves to the right 
to invest up to a maximum of 
25 per cent of a particular 
portfolio in a more varied 
range of instruments, such as 
convertibles, zero coupon 
bonds and warrants. 

Convertibles are bonds that 
can be exchanged for shares in 
the issuing company at the 


‘downside risk of using such 
instruments,” says Mr Bu- 
chanan, “but well only use 
this option sparingly and with 
great care." 

The scheme is aimed at two 
types of investor UK res- 
idents who do not want to 
create a UK tax liability by 
investing in gilts, and UK 
citizens living abroad who will 
not have to confirm their 
exemption from UK tax every 
three years. 

To maximize the risk for 
investors, only investment 
grade bonds will only be 
included in client portfolios. 
These are bonds given top 
credit ratings, by Moody's and 
Standard Poors, the 
Euromarket's credit quality 
control agencies. “There will 
be no racy bonds in our 
portfolios, 1 ' says Mr Bu- 
chanan. “We're not interested 
in the junk bond markeL" 

Another attraction for 
investors is possessing their 
own portfolio of bonds. The 
only alternative for most 
investors is to buy a stake in 
one of the unitized Eurobond 
funds run by the offshore 
subsidiaries of UK merchant 
banks, such as Lazards. 

To be able to provide the 
service, Hoare Govett needed 
to build up enough funds to 
perform block trades, [hiring 
the past five years, the Euro- 
bond market has become al- 
most wholly institutional. 

Although Eurobonds are de- 
nominated in amounts as 
small as $5,000, the Associ- 
ation of International Bond 
Dealers in Zurich says the 
minimum trade in the US 
dollar bond market is in units 
of $25,000. 


“If we hadn't managed to 
build up enough funds to deal 
on an institutional basis in 
blocks of between a half and 
one million pounds it 
wouldn't have been possible 
to get the fine dealing margins 
needed to make this a viable 
undertaking," says Mr 

Bu chanan 

So far Hoare Govett has 
attracted more than £3 mil- 
lion, which Mr Buchanan 
claims gives him the flexibility 
and liquidity to manage the 
portfolios. 

What's in it for Hoare 
Govett? Commission is 
charged at a flat rate of 0.5 per 
cent on all tansactions. with 
the exception of Bulldog 
bonds where normal Stock 

trasuoihe unitized Eurobond 
funds, there is no expensive 
management charge, just a 
straight administrative charge 
(minimum £125, maximum 
£250 a year) to cover servicing 
expenses. 

The professional character 
of the Eurobond -market 
makes it a tough market for 
the small investor. But the 
Securities and Investments 
Board (SIB), shortly to be- 
come the City’s new watchdog 
under the long-awaited Finan- 
cial Services Bill, is not over- 
worried. 

“In drawing up our rules we 
very much have the small 
investor in mind. Any firm 
authorized to deal in securities 
and giving advice to clients in 
the UK must supply informa- 
tion as to their circumstances 

Caution from the 
merchant bankers 

and expertise. I'd expect any 
investor to hear more than 
just the bare feds," says a 
spokesman for the STB. 

Mr Buchanan provides an 
initial valuation of the ac- 
count after one month, a semi- 
annual report giving ail trades 
during the past six months, 
the details of dividends paid 
and any growth in the capital 
value of the bonds. 

Despite the detailed 
information provided by 
Hoare Govett and the dose 
watch kept by the SIB on 
securities firms, many UK 
merchant bankers caution that 
this is not a scheme for 
amateurs. 

The Eurobond market has 
traditionally been unregu- 
lated, not subject to the dic- 
tates of any central bank or 
securities commission. “Euro- 
bonds are high-risk, high- 
reward instruments.” says one 
banker from a top UK mer- 
chant bank. “Essentially they 
are for the speculator." 

Anthony Barry 
and Richard Morgan 


Weather terrific, 
wish we could get 
our money back 


% -w 


( HOLIDAYS ) 

Wanted: excitable, preferably 
immature person wfrfc lurid 
imagination and. healthy dis- 
regard for the truth. Will be 
required to promote package 
holidays. 

Originally package holidays 
were quite ordinary affairs, 
offering a sunny resort an 
average-standard hotel by the 
sea and an excursion trip or 
two. These holidays are still 
on offer and are very popular 
but nowadays the range of 
package holidays is for wider. 

There are specialist com- 
panies which cater for the 
high-ihcome brigade. They 
offer exotic trips to the Far 
East or the chance to re-live 
the Raj. For wealthy honey- 
moon couples, why not try an 
unforgettable and romantic 
trip down the Nile — sign on 
the dotted line and send a 
cheque for £2,000 a person, 
extras not included? 

The competition lor busi- 
ness is fierce and in an attempt 
to get a share of the markeL 
tour operators are sometimes 
tempted to go a little over- 
board with their brochures. 

Copywriters have a field 
day; their pens have never 
been allowed to run so wild. 
What about the restaurant 
which had “international five- 
star cuisine with every con- 
ceivable choice available"? Or 
the hotel “built in this heav- 
enly and idealistic setting, the 
stun that dreams are made 
o£T? 

Holidaymakers who dream 
of lark-tongue, peacock-pie 
picnics on a bank of floating 
water lilies would probably 
finish up disappointed. 

Even the ordinary package 
without the trimmings is a 
costly item. Looking through 
the cheaper brochures, you 
realize that husband and wife 


and their two children, trying 
•to get a bit of sun. would be 
hard-pressed to have change 
from £1,000 for their I4«day 
trip to the Mediterranean. 

Choosing and booking the 
holiday can often take place 
many months before the es- 
timated departure date. Ear- 
lier this week, at the 36th 
convention of Association of 
British Travel Agents, it was 
reported that the demand fin- 
early booking was almost 
double last year's. 

Qearty people like some- 
thing to look forward to — it 
mates those winter months 
easier to bear when you can 
look at your suitcase and say: 
“Only 145 nights to go." 

These two factors - the cost 

False statements 
- in Hie brochures 

and the anticipation of the 
holiday - may well explain 
why judges often take a 
sympathetic view towards 
people who feel they have 
suffered from the proverbial 
.holiday disaster, the one that 
went wrong,' where the post- 
card to your nearest and 
dearest does not say: “Having 
a wonderful time, wish you 
were here.” 

The most common com- 
plaint against tour operators is 
that they make false or 
misleading statements in their 
brochures about the .facilities 
on offer. Normally the exag- 
geration or lies relate to the 
hotel or resort 

They never tell you about 
the motorway when you read 
about the “quiet and tranquil 
village where you will be able 
to relax away from the hustle 
and bustle of traffic.” 

It is obvious why the tom- 
operators do this. The more 
attractive the package, the 



The paradise is sunny but not always too comfortable 


more likely it is that you will the main dish. The Jacksons 
choose one of their holidays, found the food repulsive and 

But if you feel cheated, do they wished they had never 
not just write an angry letter to gone away, 
the tour operator. Think about cieariy the Jacksons had 

going to court because you not ^ w h at they bargained 
may well be able to recover f or and on their return home 
substantial damages. they issued court proceedings 

Take, for example, the case claiming damages for breach 
of Jackson v Horizon Holi- of contract, including an 
days Ltd. Mr and Mrs Jackson amount for the mental dis- 
booked a package holiday to tress, annoyance, discomfort 
Sri Lanka with Horizon Holi- and disappointment they had 
days. The brochure described suffered- 
their chosen hotel as having Nonna j| y it is hard to get 
excellent accommodation, dzma&es for menta] distress. 

fLSSAZ Holidays hava P^d an 

MR Yon could try the 

and wc. conciliation scheme 

There was (in the brochure — 

at least) a mini-golf course, a exception because the courts 
swimming pool and a beauty recognize that a tour operator, 
salon, together with cocktail when printing a misleading 
lounge and gift shop. As a statement, should realize how 
bonus, tbe hotel also said it upset customers would be if 
would arrange that the room they received bad treatment 
for the family's children had a The Jacksons were awarded 

door adjoining their room. half the cost of their holiday 
The Jacksons’ holiday was a together with £400 compensa- 
disaster. The hotel had no tion for their distress and 
mini-golf course, no swim- disappointment 
ming pool and no beauty Potential litigants should be 
salon. The room given to the warned, however, that a court 
Jackson children was close by. vail not award substantial 
But the added bonus included Hq niagfts unless there is a tery 
black mildew grouting on the real Joss of enjoyment and 
wall- mental distress. 

Tbe hotel was not of luxury if you r solicitor considers 
standard. The bed linen was that it is not worth goirg to 
dirty when they arrived at the you should think about 

room and was not changed trying the conciliation and 
during the course of their stay, arbitration scheme specially 
There was no lavatory paper set up by Association of 
in the WC. Worst of all was British Travel Agents to deal 
the cooking. There was no with disputes between holiday 
choice of dishes. makers and tour ope-ators. 

On some occasions, cuny Details ran be obtained from 
(delicious, but hardly ABTA on 01-637 2444. 

Jeremy Vaughan 



&G PLANNED 


E 




pe 




An opportunity to invest for 
growth and income with one of Britain^ 
top performing unit trust groups 


The aim of the new Prolific European 
Growth & Income Unit Trust is to provide 
both capital growth and income, mainly 
from a broad spread of European equities. 
To achieve an initial yield of 3 0 *— 3 1 z'hj, 
which is higher than is normally available 
from European shares, die fund will also 
invest in convertible issues. 


Against a background of low inflation and 
failing interest rates, the advent of a more 
international approach to investment has 
meant thatsharc prices in most of die European 
markets have doubled over the past fcw years. 

And vet, by international standards, the 
Continental markets are still relatively small. 
Forexample, the two Largest markets- France 
and Germany -still represent only lT t, » and 
23 n o of GNP respectively l see below I. 


European Stock Market Capitalisations 

as a percentage of GNP 


W 


Germany 

23% 



Switzerland 


USA. 54% 


UK 71% JAPAN 74% 


At the same rime, economic prospects in 
Europe remain good and, with many of die 
benefits of lower energy prices and the full 
fruirs of industrial rationalization yet to come 
through, corporate profits should continue 
to grow strongly over che next few years. 

We believe, therefore, diJt with privatiz- 
ations and other new share issues adding to 
the number of attractive investment oppor- 
tunities in Europe, prospects tor capital 
appreciation are excellent. 


A Balanced Portfolio 

The core of the new Prolific European 
Growth & Income Unrr Trusr portfolio will 
initially be in Germany and France, with rhe 
balance in Switzerland, Holland, Italy. Spain 
and also the U.K. 

We arccmphasismg Germany because 
low interest rates, negligible inflation and 

— ; the recent collapse in 

KltlOnS the oil price provide a 

backdrop agatnsr which 
— Haiu many companies look well 
20 % placed to achieve sustained 
™ growth. In France, the out- 

A look for o irpurate profits is 

Spam amongst die hot in Europe, 
and pm atizanrms and other 
measures to encourage wider 
_____ sharemvnershiparecreating 
% a rccvprn e market environ- 

30636 mem. 


Anticipated initial composition 
of the Trust 



Invest today tor a ITiscount 

To invest in die new Prolific European 
Growth & Income Unit Trust, simply com- 
plere die Subscription Form below and send it 
to us with your cheque made payable to 
Prolific Unit Trust Managers Ltd. 



Units wifi remain on offer at a fixed price 
of 50p until 28th November, 1986, and a I*hi 
discount in tbe form of additional units will 
also be given on all investments received by 
that date. Thereafter, units may be pur- 
chased at the offer price ruling on the day 
wc receive your instructions. 

Please remember char the price of units and 
the income from them can go daw n as well as 
up. pamculirty ov er the short term. 


Gescral Information 


Curmav b «*** 

.urrera, 

BUvhcpcrnrBrittomrnnc'O'B-*- 

-najrf Ofriom- TnK ^ 

jmHi.rticJ umi nuwv 

iWn-YkH* 1 DteAono" 

.Airf-ntd Jail* aaJ t- 1 * ** 

be. p" 

strict -lb MarJi. w®- 


The animal i lurac ■■■ P«'|*lih\ AT mill lx 
liuluacJ n. an ihc in.i.nti- ■ ,i itir Time but 
mac innuw in a nunmum ”, it ihiw 
itkmtli.' nun, rni uiuihiiUlfr. 

To tefl your uaits. lain ,-axt h? •- 4J bt.'L in 
ilic SluUttr.-ni Mi hiNnn . da, j, |(k btJ 
prn'c itilmi- no re. opt > .» ,v*,, iinmKtn.'O. 

PjvtTXnt -.ill a-uilli hr m.ik Wlltllll lai 

n.-irCin]: ■!*•% nf iccijw t.Hir irrmimnl 

rfinlitiic 

TVuhcc: Clu-c Minkin in Tru-ltf. Ltd 

Tilt umi. anJ the Ira-* hj>. mu Km 
rep-tcTtJ unJci i he arp-vnai.. l s i, Cl . 
Limn V.nirJinili.unir.mj, iv.ih. -■n-ir.l. 
viM'ir JUneiiildiioil. ■« mJix .il. mil., 
fj iirniat’ S prrti.it 

MnujjcTvPrmuK LrwTnis simjpn Lid.. 
222 BntotaKIlE. Lnadno EC2M 4IS. 

Td:0iJ4'^M4,,iuliMdi i iii a, 

Prolific Financial Management PLC. 
RfpuKKiim yifJli-1 vya.iM 
KcpiKi<<ltVbii A- ihnii 


SUBSCRIPTION fORM 

• ProKftc European Growth .. 

To: Prolific l'mt THkt Manager. Ltd (Adosiimtntiurt Centre). Smmofigate, KeodiL 
Cambria LA*) 4 BE. 

l-'We wiib mimaiX (nm £5001 in the Protffk European Growth 

& I ixo roc l'mt Trait ji the Irani price of 50p per linii. I am. Wc an. ma IK trars of apt 
<1* f"-‘ Jo. " iH fv.pr.ji. jv r-'OB a/ owti. pii al I lufftwi/vrt mntti In 

2ftl> Si'w/v, I'li cram b rrtnrti ulir Iftb .Vm»tvr IIW nil hr mtjtlt V the 

arf.Tfru. ndiiMMrbi Ja, rf'n.ffpt..' 

Mi Oui raninin.c.iiuJ, pji ahl. In I'mlrtn L'mi Tnw ManacrT- LiJ .i-.enduxd 
I am not - Vine ut u» hit's [xi am 

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Aunrailic'.llr Air. Mi- . 

hunun*.i ■' in mil . ■ . 

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n.a.ftnii.nMMiiaHii Ripvhi. ■■lli.Uml 

fsRrolific 

Prolific Unit Trust Managers Led 


NC0ME PORTFOLIO 


For many people the most Important aspect of investment 
is income. If you need an income which will grow, unit trusts 
can be ideal. And the table on the right illustrates M£ri3s 
successful record of providing an increasing income. 

The M&G Planned Income Portfolio is based on five unit trusts, and 
providesten income distributionsspread overtheyear. Atl 2th November 
1986 the estimated gross yield on the Portfolio was 5.36%, over 35% 
higher than that of the F.T. Actuaries All-Share Index. Income is paid net 
of basic-rate income tax. . 

The incomefrom thefour older trusts in the Portfolio has risen nearly 
three-and-a-half times since the Extra Yield Fund was launched in 
1973. Past performance is no guarantee for the future, but the income 
from this Portfolio is expected to continue growing in future years. 
With a Bank or Building Society deposit however, the income can vary 
only in line with the general level of interest rates. 

In addition to generating income totalling £15,500, an investment of 
£10,000 in these unit trusts on 2nd January 1974 would have grown to 
£52,747 by 12th November 1986. In contrast a comparable Building 
Society deposit would still be worth only £10,000 and income from it 
would have totalled just £11,809 over the same period. 

However, you should rememberthatthepriceof unitsand the income 
from them can go down as well as up. This means that unit trusts are a 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you may need atshort 
notice. ! 

The five funds described here are all designed to produce above 
average and increasing income. 


Annua) income 1 from an investment of £10.000 


Year 

Building 

Society 

Four M&G 
unit trusts 3 

1974 

£ 900 

£ 560 

1975 

£ 871 

£ 676 

1976 

£ 842 

£ 752 

7977 

£ 850 

£ 875 

1978 

£ 779 

£ 1.020 

1979 

£ 996 

£1,154 

1980 

£1,200 

£1.316 

1981 

£1,056 

£1,338 

1982 

£1.003 

£1,345 

1983 

£ 825 

£1,390 

1984 

£ 849 

£1,479 

1985 

£ 907 

£1,678 

1986 

£ 73V 

£1,917 

1 NOTES: 1 


DIVIDEND FUND aims for a yield about 50% 
higher than that of the F.T. Actuaries Ail-Share 
Index, from a wide range of ordinary shares. 

HIGH INCOME FUND andEXTOA YIELD FUND 
both aimfora yield about 60% higherthanthatof 
the F.T Actuaries All-Share Index, from portfolios 
of ordinary shares. 

, CONVERSION INCOME FUND a ims to provide 
a similar return, but its portfolio of ordinary shares 
has a strong bias towards smaller companies. 


BflERN/mONAL INCOME 

FUDaimsto provides high 
and growing income from 
an international equity 
portfolio, though exchange 
rate fluctuations may af- 
fect our ability to increase 
the payment in every year. 


1 Not of tax to a basic- rate taxpayer. 

2 Based on the Building Societies 
Association's recommended rate of 
return +1%% on fully paid shares. 

3 £2.500 invested in each of M&G 
Dividend, High Income, Extra Yield, 
and Conversion Income Funds on 
2nd January 1974. {M&G International 
Income was notavailable until 1985.) 

4 Estimate for the year. 


M&G Securities Limited, Three Quays, Tower HHI, London EC3R 6BQ. 
Telephone: 01-626 4588. 


READ THIS TABLE BEFORE 
INVESTING 


Launch data 
Lima! price 


Price of tacooM urits at 12tfa Nov. 1986 
Estimated curreat gross yieU 


% rise in Fend off er pri c e since bnaefa 


Si nse in FT. All Share Indn over same period 


Distribution dams 


DIVIDEND 


452.7p 

4,95% 


+805.4% 


+666.5% 


15 January 
15 July 


Barclays Bank 
Trust Co. limited 


April '69 
50p - 


346.9p 

5.32% 


+593.8% 


+402.2% 


31 January 
31 July 


Oydsstiate 
Bank Pic 


CONVERSION 

INCOME 


Feb. '73 
50p 


204.2p 

5.74% 


+308.4% 


+322.1% 


EXTRA 

YIELD 


Nov. '73 
50p 


246.4p 



Coins & Co. 


1 May 

1 November 


Barclays Bank 
Trua Co. limited 


INTERNATIONAL 

INCOME 


May'85 

50p 


65.3pxd 

5.29% 


+30.6% 


+29.6% 


1 June 
1 December 


Lloyds Bank Pic 


PricesandyieidsappeerdailyintheFinanetalTimes. The difference between the “offereef price (at which you buy units) and the "bid" price 
(at which yog sell) is normally 6%. An initial charge of 5% is included in the offered price and an annual charge of up to 1% of each Fund’s 
value - currently %% (except International Income, which is 1%) - plus VAT is deducted from gross income. Income is distributed on the 
appropriate dates net of basic rate tax You can buy or sell units on any business day. Contracts for sale or purchase will be due for 
settlement 2 to 3 weeks later. Remuneration is payable to accredited agents; ratesareavailableon request All the Fundsare wider-rangs 
inve s tments and are authorised by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry. 


FROM £2,500 


DO NOT SEND ANY MONEY. A contract note will fie sent to you 
stating exactly how much you owfiand thesattiement data Yourcer- 
tificalewill follow shortly, 


FUUFOfgNAUElSI 


Mininan . investment TO: M&G SECURITIES, THREE QUAYS. TOWER HILL LONDON EC3R 6BQ. 
M MY dm Fund; £508. rs 1 


PLEASE INVEST a total of L= I (minimum £24)00} in income 

unin of thefollowing Funds, divided asmdcaied. al the pricendingon recapi of dnsapplicaOQR 
(II no split is indicated, your investment wH be spread equally between the five Funds.) 

Miwara» £500 in any ens Fund. 



Registered in England No. 90776 Reg Office as above 
This offer Is ml evallabte to residenisof the Republic ol Ireland. 


THE M&G GROUP 























































MWWSWTABLE 


- - 

g ■^* r ** a [ ii i 1 , « i ✓ 

JK / 




Tomorrow, start reading the story 
the government tried to stop 

m * ■ 


T his remarkable account of Anthony BJunfs 
duplicity now reveals just how deeply hit- 
network penetrated the British 

Establishment. 


' 4 *Ar/y 


Now at last you can read it - 
only in The Sunday Times. 





***** 






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— ,*f!y Ju> I "r<* 






















THE SUNDAY TIMES 

BETTER THAN A MONTH OF OTHER SUNDAYS 


PACES • A COLOUR MAGAZINE- ALL FOR 50p 


::?r. v- - - 















36 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


CAPITAL SHARES 


NET P.A. 


GROSS EQUIVALENT P.A/ 


llICHK.m.SPh IXTIBKVI'WI 1 11 
IMMEPI.-1 1 E At CESSAMH-Klh 

\KI> AMU HKQl'KH* W >KUl* Iff 

• liiU'siiiH'iii'xil LHMMHi v »r m< uet.iin *l.|.V¥. 

IK'I |UI. 1 1 |1 1 |Y.I Iflll From 

fi.'i't-iii,,. i.n,- |«_i 

Ami 1 *»■<>■« ih>\ 

lc\i-l i In* r.ni i% K. t,T<v. not |a..i.(l lJkl ,, ..iil*»v> 
ojiiM.-ck'iif imt-iiiJKiii LLimn. 

• A C.r>]u •>]><» hi t;iMii^U4 1 

m*i k .in i-vmii your ii< rnnni. 

• Aciu'iiut It, ink «i|iiiflin !<>i sciilni!; ih.iioi talk. 

• \1 iilnlnui.il'. mi ili iii.nn! Midi iHiki«"l 
llllfll**-l.+ 


LION SHARES 


iNpei lid IvMK l 


NET P.A. 

13 - 17 % 

GROSS EQUIVALENT P.A. ;: 


K\ I RA Hlt.H l\ 1KKK.S l~ 

M >K Lt I’KKI* Hi J.\ 1 KSl Ml N VS 

• Kmi.iiiiu.-iis! i 1)1 null i ILVf*. .Ilnur On'k-n 
( )nlin;in Sli.iu^uiii*. 

• ha s|Ki.-failimi. , siiiw.*iiislii»iii LTiiHiiipu.il (Is. 

• VViihHciw.ilsuiulL-ni.iiiflMiiii'Hili '.Ml, Lin 

hisfiil iiiuwiiA 

• Ni>]i'ii.ili\ mi uiilnli.ivu|s»lKir l*iih nulls* 
m Tin is sit* eii. 


•WlHir,,. r-IMfclj, KlJi l.ilr Inlrx 

r»i |bH,Lniu.ilh 


* h-ki nr>««niUiiM >1 in j* • ■••■I 

., 1.4)1,, \l—. 1 HI- l.li.i«.,4l.,<n, II* nI<|, «,,»,• ll»,|.jffl»H,ll , Hnnlu,ii 11- 

i* il. 

PJi-.ii*.- m-ii>I mil* IuIIiIcmiIn, 

•1 t.i|,ii.ilSluu-iQ l j. ,n .sh jr*i 1 -Sj.h - ti.il 1 mil- 1 □ i J i* L .1i.ip|>nipri jUI 


1 , i: 4 ..Iii-Im.-,i huilihn^>iH.i, 

:m . HU K|11S 1 . 1 .lichruli.uii.1 •>■*• 1,1 -Vi 1I1K 







CHELSEA 

BUILDING SOCIETY 

It’s what the Lion stands for. 


Mi. Dili'. i <il l.lMli 

■mil ihi* RiiiMhii^ 
S|« it nr* \«~ni.hi, 



\*«Kr*irc«l tMMI 
iiiiUiHti t liiplA- 
JnriiH(simniiklii 
Tni 4ns 


sunErBULuiwMm’ 

SURREY GOLD 

6 Months' notice Account 

Limited Issue 

9 . 85 % CAR 9 . 62 % NET 

Investments of £20,000 to £105,000 maximum 

Details and application form from Branch S' Development Manager 
Surrey Building Socefy, 216 High Slreel Dorking, Surrey RH4 IQR 
Telephone Dorking (03061 682640 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 11.00% 

Adam & Company -.11.00% 

BCC1- -11.00% 

Citibank Savings* 12.45% 

CaisoWated CnJs 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank.- —11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co - ....11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 11.00% 

ILoyds Bank..— - 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotiand..-11 00% 

TSB —11.00% 

Citibank NA -...11.00% 

f Mortgage Base Rale. 


FAMILY MONEY/6 


How to hunt down a big earner 


What is so special 
about a “special 
situation*? 

The prospects 
for a singular 
type of unit trust 
are examined 
by ROD MORRISON 

With world markets becoming 
more volatile and analysis 
predicting lower rates of 
growth, unit trust managers 
are starting to stress their 
stock-picking abilities. The 
days of the easy financial 
killing are probably over. 
Profits have to be hunted 
down rather than picked from 
the trees. 

“Special situations" unit 
trusts look for the unique 
opportunities — companies 
on the verge of industrial 
breakthrough, takeover pros- 
pects — to make money when 
the rest of the market is 
stagnant. 

In Chase de Vere’s latest 
Unit Trust Outlook booklet, 
Prudential and Legal & Gen- 
eral recommend that at least a 
quarter of the standard unit 
trust portfolio should be 
placed in their UK-based, 
stock-picking, special-situa- 
tion funds. 

Both believe the UK market 
still has potential. Prudential 
comments: “During the next 
year we believe that the under- 
lying strength of the economy 
will reassert itself." But it 
adds: "We expect uneven 
performance^ in the short 
term." 

.The Pro’s special-situation 
fund manager. Ted Williams, 
has (he job of keeping up 
performance while the market 


wavers. He believes there are 
enough opportunities to make 
money, because "it has been 
speculative activity which has 
kept this market going, with 
overseas money moving in 
and out every week”. 

Legal & General shares the 
overall market optimism. But 
as if to illustrate the risky 
nature of special situations, 
the fund has slumped in the 
past month. The fund man- 
ager Dave Bradbury explains: 
"With special situations, it is 
going to be a rough ride.” 

With these funds, much 
depends on tbe manager's 
ability. They invest in any- 
thing from takeover situations 
to long-term recovery stocks. 
But however good the man- 
ager, be or she will not get it 
right every time. “If I did I 
would be iu tbe South of 
France by now,” says one 
manager. 

So while recogniaing the 
part special situations can 
play, Peter Edwards, of Pre- 
mier Unit Trust Brokers, does 
not believe tbe y should figure 
too strongly in a portfolio and 
is sceptical about why they are 
being pushed now. He says: 
"We have seen this before 
when markets waver. The 
managers talk their book by 
saying it is a market for 
selecting stocks and that, of 
course, they are the best 

“What they do not stress is 
the speculative nature of these 
funds by definition. It would 
be fairer of them to say,*We 
are cautious about London 
due to political uncertainties 
or whatever and in the current 
■ climate money can be made 
from special situation'. But 
potential investors should be 



Peter Edwards: sceptical 


made aware of the added 
risk.” 

Target’s UK special situa- 
tions fund provides a good 
example. It performed well 
until the bottom dropped out 
of the fund’s second line oil 
stocks in 1985. Tbe managers 
could not sell themvand the 
fund is still left with one or 
two. To meet redemptions, it 
had to sell the good quality 
stock. 

The fund manager, Chris 
Hills, explains: “One or two of 
our stockbroking contacts 
were not as good as we were 
led to believe.” The fund is 
much more careful with small- 
er companies now, be says. 

Id an attempt to redeem tbe 
fund’s name, Mr Hills says the 
special-situations fund is 
likely to receive “all the best 
ideas” but he is still not happy 
with its liquidity level of 1 per 
cent He adds: "The lesson 
from Big Bang is that prices 
are volatile in the short term 
and high liquidity is needed to 
take advantage." 

But at Fidelity, the UK 
special-situations fund con- 
centrates on long-term, invest- 


ment in companies with, for 
innanns, new management or 
products. The marketing 
director, Mary Blair, admits 
the fond can add to a 
portfolio’s risk but “equally it 
does not move with the mar- 
ket, which can be an advan- 
tage when the market is 
felling”. 

Fidelity is, in feet, rather 
fond of the special-situation 
unit trust It has a Japanese 
fund which is traded much 
more aggressively as the mar- 
ket is itself more volatile. And 
there is also an American fond 
which follows foe British 
model but as the US market 
now favours foe standard 
growth funds it has not 
performed. 

Dr John Gurney, Allied 
Dunbar's American special- 
situations manager, explains: 
“This will continue for the 
next few months as investors, 
are playing safe with what they 
know at present, foe large 
reliable companies.” Hie mar- 
ket, says Dr Gurney, has seen 
a good deal of take-over 
activity at all levels which has 
been exaggerated by tbe pros- 
pect of new tax laws in foe 
New Year. 

Though special-situation 
funds can invest anywhere in a 
given market, many follow a 
set pattern. Henderson’s UK 
fond, for instance, is split 
three ways into long-term 
small company growth stocks, 
large holdings, short-term 
trading situations and other 
special situations. 

The group also offers a 
Japanese fund but again it is 
traded more aggressively to 
take advantage of that 
market's peculiarities. 



Mary Blair advantage 

William Gaunt, of Hender- 
son, explains: “The market is 
volatile and is currently react- 
ing to movement in the yen." 

A weako* yen is better for 
exporters, and for litis fond 
Henderson selects stocks that 
are more volatile. 

Target also operates a three- 
way split with its UK fund. 
But the company’s European 
special-situations fond, run by 
Morgan Grenfell, is not strait- 
jacketed by any investment 
constraints. Tbe fund man- 
ager, Sally Baraer, believes 
tha t “Europe will not see a rise 
of more than 15 per cent over 
the next 12 months but in- 
dividual stocks such as retail 
firms in Germany will offer 
terrific opportunities." 

Fund size is important in 
dete rmining investment strat- 
egy. In general, the bigger the 
fund, foe more difficult it is to 
switch position qucildy. The 
Pru fond is valued at £30 
million, so it cannot be traded 
particularly aggressively. 
However, . MIM Britannia 
market-features trust is only 
£2 million and it actively 
trades blue-chip companies. 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


Banks 

Current account - no interest i 
Deposit accounts - seven 
notice required for withdrawals. 
Bard ays S per cent. Lloyds 5 per 
cent. Midland 5 per cent NatWest 5 
per cent, National Girobank 5 per 
cent. Fixed term deposits £10,000 
to £24,999 : 1 month 7.375 per cent 
3 months 7.625 per cent, 6 months 
7.825 per cent (National Westmin- 
ster): 1 month 7.475 per cent 3 
months 7.475 per cent 6 months 
7.475 per cent (Midland). Other 
banks may differ. 

MONEY FUNDS 

Fund Met CNAH Tdaptm 

Aiftan Kuna 


mcrtttyinc. 7.68 7-9* 
Bot Scotland 746 7.93 
Barclays Hlpar Rata 

EI.OOO^^ 4 7.13 7.3| 
ElOOOQ&OWr 7.63 75S 
Cater Alencafi 7.56 7X3 
COtta 

Money Mkt Plus 7.30 755 
HFCTrust 7-Cay 850 168 
Henderson Money 
Market 

Cheque Accort 7.86 7.83 

L6GMiM.oep.7as ago 

LtoydsnCA 7.70 7.M 
M&GMCA 758 753 
Midland HICA 

£2D0O-£9599 745 756 

H 0,000 and wer 7.70 7S3 
Nat West Mgh 
mtSMcHasarva 


018388070 
01 82B8060 


016281587 
01 826 1567 
01 5U 2777 

01581 1422 
01 238 8301 


01 6U 5757 
01 388S211 
016261500 
018264588. 

074220989 

074220999 


High And Rising Income FromThe 


World s Leadings 


Capital Growth 



International Income 


The objective of the new (. lerical Mcdicjl 
Inrmurionjl Income Trust is m prov ide j high jnd 
rising income, plus cnpiul gnmtli. by investing in 
the worlds k-aJing vctiimniks. 

The launch of this trust is tiun-lv tor the 
serious investor: it pros ides access tu the income 
and growth prospects id markets siieh an Japan. 
Europe, the Kir East and the USA .wd the tlevinihiv 
to reduce emphasis on the l IK sbmild pojiuc.il 
uncertainties suggest it. 

A Flexible Portfolio 

The portfolio will O'jisisi »-.| vt/iuric-.. bonds 
and fixed interest securities and nuv lines' in 
approved second tier markets as well as principal 
ones. A wide geographical spread is envisaged but 
the Managers may. if market conditions die rate, 
place emphasis on a single eeonono. 

9n?FNGTH In Management 

Clerical Medical Unit Trust Managers Limited 


Trust 


is a subsidiary of Clerical Medical and General file 
Assurance Society, who are active in world finjncul 
markets, with total funds under management now 
exceeding L3.1WHJ million. A reputation for 
consistently successful investment management has 
been built m er 162 years and continues ro be a 
pome objective today. 

Howlb Invest 

Units are on offer at a Fixed Price of 25 p until 
November 2K»h with an estimated gross initial yield 
of v.i*" »pa. I luring this period, a Bonus 

Allocation of units will be given to those investing 
£1.0(10 or more. 


"Ib invest, return the coupon with your 
cheque, or simply telephone your order of units on 
our tree Lmklinc number below. 

Remember that the price of units, and the 
income from them, may go down as well os up. 
You should regard your investment as long 

term. 



'rn- 


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i nrisi.qs .» cT 1 % ■ rJl>»iki Th'iHlim 


CLERICAL 

MEDICAL 

U N I T T R-U STS 

Consistency • Strength 
• Experience ■ 

M ' 'I'-lr I I^lf.l A.WSU.--J " - 

-I... . .'7K' "" V— 

• » j,, i. \ji, ■ . i v : ’ ,l 


Public 
Offer 

1 % 


,, l h nr M ., 11..' k^i 7:4.. ■ ' iV. : 

l..t ■-▼». il M. os II -m If! 1 MjiVi - l I RM IVisT l«n.MtlMol RsJi'Vlt 

I Wi wrJi in ifisc»l i r. m mum:, < ihi- v_lcm;jl MrJi.jl Interiurienjl 

rni-.i ji tVliscJp.-ni u".-- ■•- 2 : r rrran: \:ur \mcinher 2Sih. l u Sh the rubm: pnsc «i)! 
jppl-. TIi Js,- M.nJ :m Jitjii.i-:- ■'h.irj; l ..hjnje S:!»hk[]I.'iw Tnisl Saxnn^-. SvheiiUfllj 
ihhcr l lc ■I Mcdu'jl ( nir Tru -l _ 

Sl-KVAMI- MR. MRS Miss 


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h>rciu>r. 

iK.NAl l KJ 


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'ON I NT'ESTMFNT S 


iM LIXKL1NE E 0800 373393 



n 


WXO&SBB 7-63 7 JBS 
naoCOiowr 7.75 7SB 
ftjpartfairaar Money 
Manaownwit AccoirB 
uidar EIOjOOO 733 7.38 
ta £10000 749 7 .69 

Royal Bol Scotland 
Premura Account 7.75 ?J98 
SAPCaS 7 JS0 7.78 
SctaotiarWagg 
£2^00 to £3^9 6.91 7.13 
am £10000 7.10 734 

TUat&Rteyol 7X1 7M 
TiR 7-day 759 7.78 
TWcWcaf 7.79 042 
Tjnoafl 7-day 753 7.85 
l*T7-dn 757 7.79 
Wutarn Trust 
1 month 758 753 

CNAR - CorvouikM Nat Amort Rato. 
Bourns its tha Matt svafcbfe at the tkre of 
gong to press. 

Research: Daboah Bna 

Nation* Savings Bank 

Ordinary Accounts — Ha minimum 
balance at £100 maintained for 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent interest 
p 5 . for each complete month where 
balance Is over £500, otherwise 3 
per C8nt Investment Accotffits — 
11 .75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax, one month’s 
notice of withdrawal, maximum, 
in vestment £100.000 . 

National Savings Income Bond 
Minimum Investment £2,000, maxi- 
mum £100,000. Interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 
tax. Repayment at 3 months' notice. 
Penalties m first year. 

National Savings Indexed i nc om e 
Bond 

Start ratB monthly income for first 
year, 8 per cent . increased at end of 
each year to match increase In 
prices as measured by Retail Prioes 
Index. Cash value remains the 
same, income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal. 
Minimum investment of £5.000 in 
multiples of £1,000. Maximum 
£100.000. 

National Savings 4th Index-Unked 
Certificates 

Maximum investment - £5,000 
excluding hokfings of other issues. 
Return tax-free and Bnked to 
changes in Hie Retail Prices Index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent in the 



‘No go, oU boy — the 
cora pater’s an die blink* 

first year. 325 per cent In the 
second, 3-50 per cant m the thkd, 
4.50 per cent in the fourth and 6.00 
per cant hi the fifth, value at 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased In November '1981, £146.66 
, including bonus and supplement 
September RPI 387.8. (The new RPI 
figure is not announced until the 
tfwd week of the (blowing month). 

National Savings OartBoata 
32st issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual Merest rate over 
the five-year term of 875 per cent, 
maxbmjm investment £5,000. 
General extension rate for bold ere 
of earlier issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.70 percent 

National Savings Yearly Pin) 

A one-year regular savings 
converting into four-year sa 
certificates. Minimum £20 a 
maximum £200. Return over .five 
years 8.84 per cant tax-free. 

(For appficationa accepted from 
30.1086) 

National Savings Depoaft Bond 

Minimum Investment £100, maxi- 
mum £100,000. Interest 11-25 per 
cent variable at sbr weeks' notice 
credited annually without deduction 


of tax. Repayment at three months’ 

notice. 'Half Merest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Local Authority Yeaifing Bonds 
12 months fixed rate Investments 
interest 11 per cant base rate tax 
deducted at source (ca n be r e- 
claimed by noo- taxpayer). minimum 
Investment £1,000, purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 

Guaranteed Income Bonds 

Return paid net of base rats tax; 
higher rata taxpayers may have a 
further habfflty on maturity. 1.2 & 
3yrs General Portfolio 9.1 percent 
4yrs General PorttoUo/Prafiajm Life 
9.1 per cent; Syrs New Dirertion 
Finance /Crecfit L Commerce 9-30 
percent. 

Local authority town hal bonds 
Fated term, fixed rata inv e stments. 
Interest quoted net {besfc rate tax 
deducted stsoirca non-redaim- 

^reKffktees^OT^wrcarti^Hw 
£600; 5-7yrs Hereford & Worcester 
7.75 per cent; min mv £1 .000; 8yrs 
Vale o f Qtam organ 8.13 per cent, 
mlninv£SO0;9&10yrs621 percent 
mm inv £1,000 

Further detaBs available from Char- 
tered Institute of Public Finance & 
Accountancy, Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am and 230pm) 
see also Prestai no 24808. 

Budding Societies 
Ordinary share accounts - BOO per 
cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered, ftxfi- 
vldual bidding societies may quote 
dffferant rates, interest on all ac- 
counts paid net of base rate tax. 
Not radaimabta by non-taxpayers. 

ForaHpi currency dapoaRa 
Rates quoted by RottischBd's Old 
Court International Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made for switching currencies. 
Staffing 10.03 per cent 

USdoflar 552 per cent 

Yen 358 per cent 

D Mark 3,84 per cent 

French Franc • 8.74 per cent 

Swiss Franc 156 per cent 


FINANCIAL 
PRODUCT OF 


iCtna's Gilt-Edged Bond has just been voted BEST 
FINANCIAL PRODUCTOFTHE YEAR by the Financial 
Weekly Martin Paterson Award panel coming first in every 
category, including- 

Value for money and investment performance 
Innovation and relevance to current market needs 
Quality of product and technical design 

THETIMETO BUY AETNA'S GILT-EDGED BOND IS NOW 
Because; 

• Gilts are giving about STreal return over the current rateol inllation- nearly 

the highest ever- 5 1 above average real return over rhe last ten years 

• Phillips & Drew Fund Management have produced fund performance ot over 
12° better rhan the F T Government Securitres Index. * 

• There is NO FRONT-END CHARGEand NOCAPITALGA1IMSTAX. 

• There are H UGE COST SAVI NCS over direct i nvestment 

• There rs 10" a year withdrawal facility FREE of basic rate tax 

LOCK INTO THE HIGH REAL RETURN FROM GILTS TODAY! 

IliwL'K-lnNW^wvO-nr'n'. U'l ail it lohn micci KCIV JQt R«; r«,i iiix,-i-'i> 

IhimA.ui 2ft ^ Ht> :,i 1 (0 


L 



^' r,d > n ^ *nielop<.- rf ddreSbed to /Etrid Life Insurance Comnani, Ltc 

^ our Customer Cam Con ne - dial 100 <m J .he SSSTor K 

FREEFONEXtH. The cent re i-- open m to Spin each weekcLiv H 

Please send me nu FREE Guide to Gills and details >.4 the .-Etna GILT-LOjED BOND to 
' “ '' — — — ... Urtect binti - ’ 




p-.iU.Nb: 


..ir.f -i ,j-ii .,1 Pr.-oey.Mi.ridl ^J-. ner_ 



Pil'., 

v nirufi, p-n i...n &l-.j , v n-.I -. 

'i-.- -jii.il-. .-i.4t"j-ar» 

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(her 


*344 










THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 1 5 1986 


FAMILY MONEY 17 


With Christmas Day only a 
few weeks away, noV7 a J 
•deal time to consider a sai? 
mgs account for any young- 

L whom you are buying 
a gift. Not only wiu children 

appreciate the attractive rSS 

of presents that aceoaSS 
°r 3 special ten? 
or building soaety accounrfor 
the young, but they wiU have 
the personal aspect of their 
owt account and passbook. 

Just as the clearing banks 
market, packages for undn* 
graduates, so an increasing 
5 building societies 
and banks have developed a 
marketing sector for children 
The interest rate is quoted net 
°r tax, but the poor fiscal 
position is counter-balanced 
by getting youngsters to 
understand saving, find it 
run and want to see pocket 
money appreciate. 

Perhaps the most appro- 
priate account for a child 
where tax will not be deducted 
is the Post Office National 
Savings Investment Account, 
whose rate increased on 
Wednesday to 11.75 per cent. 
It can be opened with a £5 
minimum but requires a full 
month’s notice of withdrawal 
and has none of the special 
aiiraciions. 

The National & Provincial, 
Peckham and Portman Build- 
ing Societies lead the interest 
field with 8.25 per cent net. 
N &P's Junior Savings account 
has three rates and this is for 
children with funds of £5,000 
and .above. After the Trustee 
Savings Bank, which offers 
only 5 per cent, this society 
has the lowest rate of 5.75 per 
cent for the bulk of the 
youngsters who have up to 
£500, A gift, such as a baseball 
hat. is given when £100 is 
passed. 

Peckham’s Jumbo Savings 
account is much more fun for 
children aged five to 16. It 
includes free membership of 
the junior section of the Royal 
Society for the Protection of 
Birds, the World Wildlife 
Fund and the Royal Society 
for Nature Conservation. This 
gives the youngsters free ad- 
mission -to sanctuaries and the 
chance to takepart in nation- 
ally organized projects and 
competitions, provided the 
child saves any amount be- 
tween £> and £50 a month. 
Details are obtainable from 
Peckham Building Society, 
Cray law House, ! Copers 
Cope Road. Beckenham, Kent 
BR3 1 NB, or branches. 

Portman's Young Genera- 
tion account also pays 8-25 per 
cent. On opening the child 
receives a gift pack which 
includes an animal set with 
the emphasis on woodland > 


Saving is a real gift 
on Christmas Day 


scenes. He or she also is sent a 
calendar every year. 

Five societies pay 7.5 per 
am - Britannia, Chelsea, 
i Derbyshire. Market 
Harborough and MeJton 
, Mowbray. The Brighter Sav- 
ings account with Britannia 
lets the child choose from a 
selection of gifts such as a 
purse, a wallet, a torch and a 
financial folder on joining. 
Piggy savings banks are com- 
plimentary. Chelsea Kids ac- 
count has introductory gifts, 
and the Derbyshire's Young 
Savers sends a birthday card 
and Christmas card — the 
birthday one includes a 
competition. 

Market Harborough's main 
children’s account, the Junior 
Saver, pays 6 per cent and 
includes a quarterly news- 
letter, gifts on joining (growth 
chart, pen, balloon, badge), a 
free ticket to Twycross Zoo, 
and a birthday card. The 
higher 7.5 per cent is for a 
regular monthly savings 
account. 

Melton Mowbray's Young 
Savers Club has a minimum 
£5 on opening, and a gift bag, 
containing a present appro- 
priate to the age of the child 
(ranging from a bib to a digital 
pen). Birthday and Christmas 
cards are sent and com- 
petitions held. 

The clearing banks offer 
lower rates. The top two are 
Lloyds and National West- 
minster on 7 per cent Lloyds 
has the Black Horse Young 
Savers for a £1 minimum 
deposit and complimentary 
moneybox but no gifts or 
cards. NatWesfs Piggy ac- 
count is so named as the child 
saves for ceramic pigs, sent 
when £25 is saved every half 
year. On opening the child 
receives the first pig. pencils, a 
chart and a plastic wallet. 
Three magazines a year and a 
birthday card are mailed. It is 
£3 to open an account 
The Midland's Griffin Sav- 
ers offers 6.4 per cent For a 
£10 deposit there is a sports 
bag containing a geometery 
set a project folder, a badge, 
an Oxford Dictionary, a 
savers* card and a home bank 
file. It also offers a birthday 
card and a magazine every six 
months. 

Barclays has a Supersaver 
acount paying 6 per cent with 
a quarterly magazine. There is 
a free introductory pack 


CHILDREN’S ACCOUNTS, QUOTING NET PER CENT RATE 

8.25 National & Provincial 1 , Peckham, Portman ■ 

7.75 National & PromdaP 

7.5 Britannia, Chelsea, Derbyshire, Market Harborough 3 , Melton 
Mowbray 

7.25 Mareden 

7.2 Haywards Heath & District 4 

7.0 Anglia, Leeds Permanent Lloyds Bank, National Westminster 
Bank, North Wiltshire Ridgeway, Scarborough 

6.75 Colchester, Haywards Heath & District 
6.4 Midland Bank 

6.25 Bristol & West Norwich A Peterborough, Vernons 

6.0 Abbey National, Barclays Bank, Birmingham Midshires, 
Bradford & Bing ley, Cheltenham & Gloucester, Gateway, 
Greenwich, Halifax, Lancastrian, Mansfield 6 , Market Harborougn, 
Tipton & Coseley. West Bromwich. Woolwich Equitable, 
Yorkshire 5 

5.75 National & Provincial 

5.0 TSB 

'Minimum £5,000 *£500-£4>999 savings 3 For monthly savings ‘Minimum 
£500 5 Pius bonuses 


including a ruler and pen. It is 
worth knowing that if the 
moneybox at £3 is purchased 
on signing up. h contains a £2 
voucher to be credited to the 
account 

Two societies offer accounts 
above 7 per cent the Marsden 
(Russell Street, Nelson BB9 
7NJ) and Haywards Heath & 
District (The Bread way, Hay- 
wards Heath RH16 3AE). The 
Junior Income share with the 
Marsden, which you can open 
for £1. attracts 7.25 per cent 
and a free moneybox. The 
Busy Bee Children's Club 
Savings Scheme of Haywards 
Heath offers 7.2 per cent on 
£500 and above, with a lower 

6.75 per cent below this sum. 
At the age of 18. the account 
becomes an investment share. 

A birthday incentive is pro- 
vided by the Anglia. It adds an 
interest bonus, taking the net 
rate to 7 per cent in total, just 
before the birthday, and a 
statement is sent during the 
birthday month. There is a 
membership wallet which in- 
cludes a notepad, a pen and a 
target savings chan. In addi- 
tion to a magazine three times 
a year, the Anglia Top Saver 
Club introduces youngsters to 
a new hobby’ with a "start 
collecting” gift. 


Among the big societies, the 
Leeds Permanent offers the 
best rate at 7 per cent for its 
Young Leader account, it can 
be opened for£I. The Bristol 
& West's Snoopy account pays 

6.25 per cent with a badge, a 
balloon and a cardboard cut- 
out of Snoopy and his house 
on joining The Snoopy 
money box. which costs about 
£4 in shops, is £1.50. A parent 
or godparent may like to top 
up savings with stamps of the 
character hich costing from 
5fip to £5. 

North Wiltshire Ridgeway 
(IS Commercial Road, Swin- 
don SNI 5NP| and the Scar- 
borough pay 7 per cent on 
their Junior accounts. Both 
send birthday cards and the 
Scarborough also gives a pen 
on joining. 

Colchester's Kitty Club 
gives a hexagon-shaped 
moneybox and a badge to the 
child joining, paying 6.75 per 
cent on the savings. It sends a 
Christmas card. .As an en- 
couragement to save, a T-shirt 
is given when the account 
reaches £10. 

The combined Norwich and 
Peterborough has a no-friUs 
money tree account which 
pays 6.25 per cent, the same 
rate as the Vernon (26 St 


Pwergaie. Stockport) with us 
Junior Savings account. On a 
birthday the child receives a 
Vernon Bear card 2 nd a 
surprise gift. It can be opened 
with £5 ifihe child is under J 6. 

Paddington writes twice a 
year to children in Chelten- 
ham & Gloucester's children 
scheme with their interest 
calculation, and on their birth- 
day invites them to collect a 
gift from their branch as the 
marmalade sandwiches did 
not go m the post. Although i: 
pay’s only 6 per cent, children 
like the idea of Paddington 
looking after their savings. 

Abbey National Junior Sav- 
ers adopted Mickey Mouse as 
its emblem in 1979 and issues 
a quarterly magazine with 
small gifts (puzzles, balloons, 
pencils, writing books; on 
opening. It pays 6 per cent, 
like Birmingham Midshires, 
which gives a free money box. 
Both societies send binhdav 
cards. 

For the teenager. Bradford 
& Bingley's Money Manager 
Account is ideal. The current 
pack includes a free tape with 
investment advice inter- 
spersed with pop music. There 
is also 2 d vice on insurance, 
tax and related financial mat- 
ters. Like the society's Acorn 
account, which is designed for 
children under 14. it pays 6 
per cenL In Acorn, children 
receive a complimentary 
money box on joining and 
have a card on their birthday. 
The gift vouchers can be 
cashed or credited to a child's 
account. 


■■ js j>-. 








Jiratr. 1 : 


; » « 


ft! 


The Gateway’s Junior Saver 
sends certificates when a child 
has saved £50 and £100 
respectively. The Greenwich 
Adopt-a-Duck scheme is 
novel: the youngster has free 
membership of the Wildfowl 
Trust for an initial deposit of 
£10. Every time an investment 
is made the child receives a 
card for a colourful wall chart. 

I Both these societies pay 6 per 
cent, as does the Halifax with 
its little Xtra Club). It has a 
fill! membership pack includ- 
ing 2 mobile, a colouring book 
and a moneybox in the shape 
of a house. A quarterly maga- 
zine and a birthday card 
ensure regular reminders. 

Both the Yorkshire and 
Mansfield (Regent House. Re- 
gent Sum. Mansfield. Not- 
tinghamshire NG18 1SS) give 
additional sums beyond the 
basic 6 per erni when savings 
targets are met. The Yorkshire 
adds £2.50 when £50, £100, 


£250 and £500 are reached on 
its Future Key account for 
those under 16 years. The 
Mansfield adds £1 when £25 
has been saved and £2.50 
when £50, £100. £250 and 
£500 are reached under its 
Bonus Five Young Savers 
account. Neither gives 
moneyboxes or issues cards. 

Finally, for attractive sym- 
bols. the Woolwich Equitable 
has a Henry the Cat money- 
box and free quarterly maga- 
zine. A birthday card is also 
sent to members for its 6 per 
cent Woolwich for Kids 
account. 

Iacidentlly. if a society does 
not have a branch or agency 
near to the child's home, it is 
normally willing to send gifts 
by post.’ which means there is 
no disincentive in choosing 
one with more favourable 
terms or better offers. 

ConaJ Gregory 



Animal incentives: Nat West 
offers ceramic pigs, Jumbo 
promotes the Peckham 


It isn'i t only food mo untains 












Ml 













mm 2 









' '* 


99% of 

unit-linked 
personal pension 
policies will cost 
you dearly. 
Here’s 

one that won’t. 


Unit-linked personal pension policies can be a 
class it vestment. But you may have to pay a high price to 
meet the insurance company’s costs or commission to an 
intermediary. . 

Some will cut your investment by as much as jO so in 
the firsr vear, or even in rhe first two years- 

Others will apply the first year or two years 
contributions to ‘miliar or so called ’capital’ units which 
bear high charges year-on -year. 

If you increase your contributions, then tne same 
charging process is applied to the extra money you have 

decided to pay. • i- 

Bur unlike the others, The Equitable has no policy 
charg«,no 'initial' units, and no ‘capital’ units to eat mm 

yourinvestmem. .... , , 

What's more The Equitable offers additional bonus 

unitstodiosewhosaveatleasr£500ayeat, 

And our management charges on the underlying 
investment funds are commendably low. ■ 

So with The Equitable your money has a head sort. 
Couple it with high tax relief and our investment record - 
and you have the mosr attractive route to financial security 

in retirement. ... , 

One of the reasons our pension policies do not cost 
von dearly is chat we do nor pay commission. So please 
contact us direct on 01-606 661 1 or send me coupon. 

To- The Emiirablr Uk.FR£FPOST,4 Coleman Street. tWon EC2B2JE 
I’d wTdcmnrhinhCTdcuifaionThe EqunabM 

□ I am irlfumplovcd: D 1 am .an employee iumr a company pension 
idioms □ I warn to top up benefits from my company * 

Name (Mr^MrVMtsO — _ — 

AJdna — ■■ **— 1 


Tel; f Office) 


Founded _ " " I 

The Equitable Life j 

__ — You gain because we're different.— — I 



Sad to say, much of Europe has 
become renowned for its stockpiles. 

Now though, something rather 
more agreeable is on offer. 

A pile of money. 

Getting your hands on a stake is 
simple. Just invest in our Continental 
Europe Growth Unit Trust. 

It’s the latest in a successful line of 
Lloyds Bank Unit Trusts investing at 
home and abroad. 

Take our German and Japan 
Growth Unit Trusts, for example. 

Launched last year, by 28 October, 
1986, they had enjoyed capital growth 
of 49.2% and 50.0% respectively. (That’s 
on an offer to bid price basis with net 
income re-invested.) 

While short term performance is 
not- necessarily any guide to long term 
future growth, the outlook for our 
Continental Europe Growth Unit 
Trust is equally as bright. 

The French, Italian and Swedish 
economies have all performed impress- 
ively this year. Our portfolio aims to 
include equity investments in the com- 
panies of these and other continental 
European countries, as appropriate. 

Naturally, therefore, it will also 
include some of the world’s most 


successful companies. BMW. Nestle. 
Heineken. Pemod. Volvo. Olivetti 
Household names, one and all. 

The price of units, and the income 
from them, may go down as well as 
up. But we see every reason to 
be optimistic. 

Customers and non- customers 
alike can purchase units by filling in 
the form on the right. (Until 
5 December, the initial offer price will 
be 50p per unit.) 

Alternatively, call in at any Lloyds 
Bank branch. Who knows, before long 
you could be moving mountains. 

Of money, naturally. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Tour Deed allows up re ‘ of the Fund to be invested in 
the Second Marche of the Pan; Bourse. The Manager* mav also 
wish to invest on any other Connnenral European wond-ncr 
marker as may be authorised bi the Department ol Trade and 
Industry from rime ro nmc.The Manacrf have rln- nehr ro rime 
rheir buying and selling of currency ro rake maximum advantage 
of toragn exchange market;. The v will use currciic\ loan . and any 
means which may be authorised bv the Department of Trade and 
Industry to hedo? rhe curcencv rid: if -uch action i> considered de- 
sirable. The Manager* mav deal in authorised traded option mar- 
kers should these become available m Continental European secur- 
ities. 

Based upon rhe injrial offer price of ‘n'p. che esrimaced erov.x 
..ramn£ yield will be under I*, per annum. (Auer ' December 

unit; mav be bought at rhe offer price then prevailing.) The 
Continental Europe Growth Unit Tm>r »■> a specialist unit rrn>t 
and rhe performance is likely ro be more volatile chan a more 
broadly based fund. You should bear rhis in mind when deciding 
what proportion of vour investment > should go into the emsr. 

The price of units and the income from them can go down as 
well as up. 

Contract notes will nor be issued tor the initial offer. Cemh- 
c.ucs will be despatched ar unit holders risk normally vvirhin six 
week- of receipt of your cheque. 

We otter investors Accumulation Unit, where net income 
is automatical!! re-ini cued, or Income Units nherc income is 
distributed annual lv on JO December (or slichrlv earlier!. The 


first income distribution will be on IS December l'»S7 
CHARGES 

The otter pnee includes an iniml charge of . The annual 
charge »s 1* . I plus VAT )ol the value of the tru .t. which is deducted 
from rhedepi'ited property. 

(The Trust Deed piuvidcs rhar the annual charge mav be 
increased to a nucinuim ol by cmng nor le» than 5 months 
nonce r*> unit holder,.' The Managers reran) rhe -mail rounding 
adnistments. The Managers pai remuneration to qualified inter- 
mediaries. Rates 3 \ ail able on request. 

Lhnr prices and viclds are published dailv m leading nanon.il 
new .paper-, t- : n its; an be sold back to the Manaeersar nut less rhau 
che minimum bid price ruling mi receipt ot vour instructions 
calculated to a formula approved by rhe Department of Trade and 
Iridustrv. Cheques are normally forwarded within 7 days of reeeipr 
ol renounced certificates. 

Managers: Lloyds Bank Llnir Truer Manager-. Ltd |a member 
of rhe Unit Trust Association l Rep Office: 71 Lombard Street. 
Loud - hi EC.*P . ; BS. RejistereJ in England No SKfeTiX Tniitecj.- 
Allianee As.nraiiceCo Ltd. 

To. Lloids Bank L'mr Trust Managers Limited. FREEPOST. 

Gonnc-by-Sea.WVst Sussex BN 17 fllR. 

| |" We wish to invent in umrsof the Conrinen- “f ^ 

j tal Europe Grow th Unu Trust at ^'p per unit £ I 

j and enclose .1 remittance pavablc ro Llovds — * 

Bank Unit Tnisr Managers Ltd. ! 

. llmiJ ? LVcember IMSts i our nn esrment will be at Wp per unir. . 

I rherealter units may be bmichr at the offer pnee rhen prevail ■ I 

I in j. The minimum mirial mve-rment is i%Hi. Additional unit . 

purchasCMnu.sr K' for nor less rhan ill Hi. J 

■ Accumulation Units, u uh income re- invested, will normally i 
| be issued If I'm prefer Income UtliCi. with income distributed \ 

i anuualli. please tick here Q j 

1 We declare that I am. we are over 16 vwars old. Dare of Birth if | 

| ajedbcniecn In and l.s {Joint applicants muxt^ien I 

I and attach nimu and addrcuca separatelv. | ' | 

! Sicnaturel;’ Dare ! 


Mr Mrs Miss Title 'Forenames. 


Surname. 


BWilK CM’IT.'iLs f’LL^E 


.PosTCodi; 


| H« »- '■ n-'l JUlD-lc I. tnrRrpuMi, Jr.bnd 

K/ST1 K 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 






38 


T 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 



An 

outstanding 
growth record 

Since its launch in April 1983, our ?adfic Trust has 
proved itself to be an exceptionally profitable investment, 
showing a growth of 146.9%* as at 13th November 1986. 

Up 77.5% in just one year 

In fact the trust has been going from strength to 
strength. Over the year ending 1st November 19S6, it grew 
by an astonishing 77-5%,+ putting it among the leaders in 
Far Eastern trusts. 

The trust’s aim is long term capital growth through 
a portfolio of shares covering such countries as Japan, 
Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore. Areas which offer 
exceptional opportunities to the astute investor 

Why has this Pacific Trust 
done so well? 

Quite simply because our investment team is highly 
selective in what it chooses and when, lake Hong Kong 
and Singapore. In Hong Kong, property prices are 
soaring and exports are buoyant, so these are the sectors 
we re in. In Singapore, another volatile market, the 
economy looks set for an upturn and we’re increasing 
our stake after missing the bad patch. 

However, die major economy of the region is, of 
couise, Japan where over 50% of the fond is currently 
invested. 

A rosy future 

Here again it pays to be selective. The recent 
strength of the yen has caused problems for Japans 
export industries, but we see attractive opportunities in 
the home market 

A major programme of public works — such as the 
bridge across Tokyo Bay — is going to stimulate the 
domestic economy Along with felling oil prices, this 
should benefit die retail and consumer goods sectors, 
where our portfolio is concentrated. - 

Wfe also have our eye on the growth economies of 
the future, particularly Korea and Thailand, where we 
axe poised to increase our holdings. 

As at I3th November; the offer price of units was 
261.3p xd and the estimated current gross yield was 
0-09% p.a. 

2% Bonus 

The minimum investment is 250 units and, provided 
we receive your application by 24th November, well 
throw in a 2% bonus as well in the form of extra units. 

Remember that the price of units, and the income 
from them, can go down as well as up. 

Offer to bi tQffer id bid with rcuncurd income per Planned Siting* vaoscci 

iHM 

To Guardian Royal Exchange 
Unit Managen Limited, 

NLA Tower, 12-16 Addiscombe 
Read, Croydon CK9 6BP. 

Telephone: 01-688 9903. 
Rcg.No.915719 


Rwigal Infor ma tion 


Applications wiUbe 


acbjt»'WjKd on div of nxetp. 
Certificates folk** mbm 
42 diw 

IWimierarion ariBbcaad 


qualified memniaiKS. 

Rues are ratable on rarest. I 
Income, lew income cut, a I 
reinvested n [he Thai a«- ■ 

minihlv mwrvals Umdwiders I 
ate sent tax wudiers and details 
of then revised uratholdmgs 1 
cn ilst May and- 30th Noamber | 

each teat . 

Reports on fhc progress cf die I 
"Bust are included n*fi each (ax * 

voucher docribittxXL | 

M gggSSS charges as 


permitted bv the Thai Deed are 
i nuxoDisn mitral cha rsx fi 5*1 I 
and a maxmiutn annual chaise I 
bt II (plus \OT|. In coder to | 
beep the chaises as hjw as | 
possWc. die annua] service 
chaipt based on the value of I 
dw ‘Bust and detfactni (ram iu | 
maxne. is W (ph» VATI 
Should these charge* be vaned. I 
u least 3 months nonce »t0 I 
begnen I 

arieesaadvMbb amcracwd I 


IAU? enclose 
my/our cheque for 

for in vestment in GREPacife: Trust at the 
current offer price upon the terms of the 
Trust Deed (minimum initial investment 
250 units). 

I/VUe hereby instruct you to register die 
holding as set out below. 
lAVfe authorise the rein vestment of my/ j 
our income in the purchase of further I 
units. 1 

BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE. 

Surname— — 

1 Please suit: Mt/Mrs/Ms/Mail 

forenames in fidl ■ 


Address. 


JtaacoJc- 


St^nature- 


daily m the nactonal press. 
Repurdaes. Uncs can be 


cashed ar axn time at the W 
puce rakig on receipt of 
B si nj c ao n s to sefl. Rryinetu wiD 
rtcmuDv be made nruneiatEt? 

upon neceiprof the renounced 

cemftcatds). 

UteThntte tt Bant 


"Bus: Company Limited. 

The itgagm are Cim efa n 
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Limited. NLA Tbs*e IZ -16 

AidB«*»be Read. Croydon 

OWfBH 

s omber of dteUnfar 1w 



1 In the CMC at jror h>Uen jQ 

iras S5P-I 

1 




ES 

RE 


• . A 

< ^ 

■ i 



FAMILY MONEY /8 


Prudence in pursuit 
of the yuppies 


If yon are yotmg and 
monied yon are a 
desirable commodity 
to the financial services 
sector. In a new series 
JOHN ROBERTS looks 
at what the finance 
companies are doing to 
attract the yuppies’ 
attention, starting with 
me of Britain's best 
known institutions, the 
Prudential 

Prudence remains a key word 
at the Prudential- Even while 
adopting a new logo depicting 
Prudence, which along with 
Justice, Fortitude and Tem- 
perance is one of the cardinal 
virtues, the chief executive 
Brian Corby acknowledges the 
dangers of the market-place. 

He says: “The culture here 
continues to be the virtues of. 
the group — security, strength, 
size, reliability, fairness, but 
with a group which is con- 
fident of those, they can breed, 
a sense of complacency. Peo- 
ple start to tlunk that God 
owes us a living. We need to 
introduce dynamism.** j 
The Prudential is Britain’s 
largest insurance company. It 
has more than £21 biQkm 
funds under management, 
holds neatly 3.5 per cent of all 
British quoted shares and runs 
a field force of 12,000 “men 
from the Pro” visiting five 
million customers a month. 
Its sheer size means that its 
lightest step makes a big 
impression. 

The Pro decided to get 
serious about unit trusts and 
within months had 4 per cent 
of the market. 

A relatively new mortgage 
service — on-lending money 
from Citibank — was launched 
in March. It has already 
committed £200 million and 
looks to be haded towards 
£500 million a year. It was late 
in imitating Lloyds Bank and 
others in buying estate agents, 
but within six months it has 
developed by acquisition the 
country's third largest chain. 

The attraction to the Pro of 
estate agencies is in lowering 



The company’s 1986 logo 

and finally a high quality of 
service. The quality of service 
in the financial sector — and 
Tm not excluding the Pruden- 
tial — has not always been as 
good as it could or even ought 
to be.” 

But the Pro has in many 
people’s eyes been the insur- 
ance equivalent of what 
Wool worth’s was in stores — 
low quality at low prices sold 
to the poorer members of the 
community who are price- 
conscious. 

Most of these five million 
homes the men from the Pru 
visit every month are in what 
marketing people and social 
scientists term the C, D and E 
social groups. Will it try to sell 
a wider range of financial 
services to those people whose 
propensity to save is marginal 
or try to shift the emphasis of 
its business towards better-off 
As and Bs? 

Despite — or perhaps be- 
cause of — his original pro- 
fession as an actuary, Mr 
Corby confessed himself un- 
comfortable talking in terms 
of As, Bs and Cs but added: “If 
I have a vision about the Pru it 
is that no one should enter 
into a transaction in the 
financial services market 


without at least thinking of the 
Prudential. That means the 
whole range of financial ser- 
vices except money trans- 
mission which the banks 
provide quite adequately.” 

That flies in the face of 
conventional marketing wis- 
dom, for in failing to focus 
closely on selected sectors of 
the public, it is in danger of 
trying to be aD things to all 
persons. Mr Corby accepts 
that. 

He says: “It is a ride that we 
cannot avoid. We are too big 
to go for the niche approach. . 

“Instead we can hope to 
respood to what different 
types of customer want in 
terms of bow they buy finan- 
cial services — some through 
estate agents, some through 
our field force of 12,000 and 
others through the intermedi- 
aries such as insurance bro- 
kers and other professional 
advisers. So instead of 
segmenting the market we 
segment the marketing.** 

Financial supermarkets do 
not feature in the Prudential’s 
plans for the forseeable future 
because it sees no evidence of 
customer demand for them. 
There is no inherent aversion. 

Similar thinking keeps the 
group from setting up as a 
retail stockbroker but that 
could change, although Mr 
Corby cautions: “We have 
seen rising stock markets for a 
long time and Tm always 
uneasy whenever ideas of this 
kind are launched on the back 
of rising markets.** 

That is as far as you would 
expect any senior executive at 

w 



*The mortgage and 
insurance together’ 


the high and rising age profile 
of its customers. “To many 
young people, the Prudential 
is their father’s or 
grandfather’s company.** says 
Mr Corby. “Here we get to the 
younger first-lime buyer and it 
is wholly natural that while 
they are buying the house they 
should at the same time deal 
with their need for a mortgage 
and for insurance.” 

The argument is familiar in 
the financial services sector 
today, but although there may 
be marketing benefits to the 
Pro, whal added value apart 
from convenience does this 
offer the customer? 

Mr Corby says: “The cus- 
tomer wants good value prod- 
ucts and although no one can 
always expect to give the best 
value, we can hope to offer 
three things: good value for 
money; that in turn will 
depend partly on cost control; 



Traditional Pnc now looking for the younger market 


HO 

' CQVFr, . 



Why 

Dealercall 
means a 
great deal 
to 9,000 
investors 

Deatercall is the biggest and most efficient share dealing service in 
the United Kingdom. Here^s why. 


171-245 3696. 



How it works 

• You apply for an investment limit to suit 
your dealing requirements. 

• We send you your personally 
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•To buy and sell shares you call 
Dealercall on 01-242 3696 with your 
instructions. 

• Hoare Govett Dealercall negotiates 
the best price available and reports 
back to you. Simple/ 


What it offers 

• A high interest daily deposit facility 

•A free nominee facility to reduce 
paperwork. 

• Limits are accepted for transactions 
over £5000. 

• A pre-recorded commentary on 
market movements. 

• Our standard commission rate is 
1.25% plus VAT. and our minimum 
commission :s £12.50 plus VAT 


For further information and an application lorm send tmfie coupon below. 


THE SIMPLE AND RELIABLE WAY 
TO BUY Am SELL YOUR SHARES 


Oeatercall Ltd rs a mwtwol The Grot* E.cnarvje.md a 
srtsKKffvaftrte HtHreGrorrftruncui SemnesGrauc no 


Nicholas HtmloHe. B e nlrmtl Ud^ H eron House. 
318-325 High Hotbom, London WC1V7P8. 

Tel: 01-4040344. 

Please send me former information and a 
Deten r m B imr p u nt opening term. 


Name. 


ftutCo*. 




Brian Corby: ‘Dynamism* 

the Pru to go in expressing a 
view of stock markets. Its 
enormous power in UK eq- 
uities is almost legendary. For 
decades, the first port of call 
for a broker hamfling a new 
issue or other operation need- 
ing market support would be 
the pink landmar k in Hi 1 
Holbom. If you could say 1 
Pm was underwriting the 
issue, there was every likeli- 
hood it would go weU. There 
are a number of respected 
players in this field today. 

In selecting which financial 
services to oner, the theme at 
the Pro today is to be cus- 
tomer-driven, sait will almost 
certainly offer a Personal Eq- 
uity Plan facility. There one 
detects an 'element of anxiety 
not to make the mistake of 
past management which failed 
to expbit the mortgage boom. 

Mr Corby admits: “Wrth 
hindsight, we should have 
arranged to lend other 
people's money. Now — late 
into the market — we are 
acting as intermediaries. We 
shall review in time whether 
to generate funds to lend 
directly ourselves.” 

That would involve either 
starting or buying a b uilding 
society, which will become 
possible from next year. 

From there, would it not be 
a logical extension of financial 
services to make shorter-term 
consumer credit or hire pur- 
chase loans to some of those 
five million homes visited 
monthly? 

“Thai point we "have not yet 
readied but it is not far away. 
We don't generate the appro- 
priate funds,” says Mr Cbrby. 


‘A need to breed an 
active approach 9 


“Nothing coukf be more 
demanding to our reputation 
Than to pile into a new service 
and fail to deliver, so there 
must be limits on bow many 
new ventures we can under- 
take, There is the ride of one 
part of the product range 
destroying the credibility of 
another. 

“I have a vision of the Pru 
of people in one part of the 
business being perfectly happy 
and confident in promoting 
and selling products from 
another part. We need to 
breed that type of active 
approach.” 

Changing the culture of a 
corporation with 30,000 
employees has been a major 
management task long before 
the new image logo was 
launched with armies of staff 
— about 7,000 in all — 
convoyed into London for an 
audio-visual ballyhoo 
presentation. 

“We had to maintain the 
momentum of change," Mr 
Corby explains as if apologiz- 
ing for his role in it alL “We 
had been building up the idea 
that the customer is im- 
portant, not the Pro. The new 
logo was a symbol and cat- 
alyst People go out a few 
inches taller but we have to 
keep that momentum going. 

“We’ve got to keep the 
qualities which got us where 
we are — security, size, 
reliability that we won’t sud- 
denly change our policy, 
whether towards our staff or 
on investment 

“But we need more 
enthusiasm. 

“In the 1950s, 1960s and 
1970s the Prudential was 
responding, sometimes 
slowly, to what was happen- 
ing. In the 1980s we have to 
anticipate the changes, shap- 
ing our own future. But the 
Prudential wouldn't be bere if 
it hadn’t had those qualities 
also at some time in its past” 

John Roberts 


Deal that is best 
when a mortgage 
is at its worst 


When the time comes to 
convert, ask yqnrself four 
questions to guide you m 
maipn g the decision. Are the 
company's prospects good? 
Will there be other chances to 
convert? When the last 
conversion date passes ana 
the convertible becomes a 
straight fixed interest loan 
stock, will its pride fall? If you 
convert, will the loss of in- 
come be acceptable to you? 

Convertibles can be bought 
from several sources since Big 
Rang t or through unit trust 
groups, such as F ramlingt o n , 
which specialize in convert- 
ibles, or a mixture of fixed 
interest stocks. The costs of 
buying loan stocks direct 
(quotes here from Phillips & 
Drew) are: 1.65 per cent on the 
first £7,000, and 0.55 per cent 
on the next £7,000, with 
minimum commission of £20 
on sa le s and £10 on purchases. 

Convertibles and 
their prices 


A rise in interest rates is bad 
-news for home-owners and gilt 
investors but it works to the 
advantage of those with cash 
on deposit Dearer mortgages 
are naturall y unwelcome, but 
gilt investors suffer because 
deposit accounts will offer 
higher interest than these 
fixed rate returns: 

Thus, a rise in interest rates 
pushes down the demand for 
fixed interest securities, such 
as “convertibles", a special 
type of company security. 

Convertibles have a built-in 
“extra” over normal loan 
stocks. They give the holder 
the right to convert loan stock 
into ordinary shares of the 
company at or within certain 
future dates. If the holder does 
not convert before the last 
date, the stock reverts to a 
normal fixed interest loan 
stock. 

Companies issue convert- 
ibles when they need .extra 
capital and bank borrowing 
costs are high. They replace 
high-cost secured loans with a 
lower fixed rate stock. Such an — » ’ ™ 

issue works out cheaper than a ’ V AT at 15 per cent and stamp . 
rights issue which must u sn- doty at 0 .5per cent are extra. 


any be pitched lower than the 
share price and may also need 
a dividend hike to attract 
buyers. 

So much for the advantage 
to companies of convertibles, 
but what is the attraction for 
the buyer? Simply, the 
convertible offers fixed in- 
terest and the option ofbuying 
a company share. 

The conversion rights can 
be at a premium, or a discount 
to the underlying share. As an 
example, assume you pay £80 
for £100 nominal of 8 per cent 
stock, which gives you the 
right to convert to 50 ordinary 
shares at a time when their 
market mice is lOOp. 

If you exercise this right, 
you are paying £80 to buy 50 
shares equal to a cost of 160p 
per share This is 60 per cent 
over the market price — far too 
expensive a way into the 
ordinary sharp s. 

Any rise in the share mice 
brings down tbe premium and 
causes the convertible to rise 
also, though usually much 
later. One of the advantages of 
the convertible is its use in a 
bear market. The fixed in- 
terest supports the price even 
when the underlying share 
price itself is falling. 


Some current convertibles, 
their price and premiums (at 
November 8) are given below. 
The first two are convertible 
preference shares where, as is 
usual interest is quoted net. 

Automated Securities: 5 per 
cent 2000-2005; offer price 
1 16pj yield 6.2 per cent; terms 
58.824 shares for £100 nom- 
inal of stock between May 31, 
1986, and 1999; conversion 
premium 17.4'per cent 
Guinness: 5.75 per cent 
1996-2006; offer pnee 106p; 
yield 7.6 per cent; terms 28 
shares for £100 of stock on 
March 1. 1990, annually until 
March 1996; conversion pre- 
mium 9.41 per cent 
Hanson Trust: 10 per cent 
convertible unsecured loan 
stock 2007-2012; offer price 
I33*fcp; yield * 7.5 per cent; 
terms 58.14 shares for £100 
stock from February 28, 1990, 
to 2007; conversion premium 
7:8 per cent 

jatomtienai L afa nrg 7.75 
percent 1 998-2003; offer price 
105p; yield 10.8 per cent; 
terms 76.932 shares for £100 
stock from September 30, 
1988, to 1998; conversion 
premium 12.8 per cent 

Jennie Hawthorne 




DO NOT BUY 
ANY UNIT TRUST 


Unti Y<m*m Contacted Ua - It WH Pay You To Do So 




UNIT TRUST 

PORTFOLIO SERVICE 

Mmmiwm ca000 

Full detarts contained in totostl 
issue of the 
CHELSEA VIEWPOINT 
Telephone or Write 
tor your free copy now. 


CHELSEA FINANCIAL SERVICES LTD 


0cpeftf 

TELEPHONE 
YOUR ORDER 
NOW 



r. 


27 4 Fulham Rd, London SW10 9EW 01-351 6022 



PETERS ASSOCIATES 


BUILDING 
SOCIETY 
BONUS BOND 




/O 

NET : 


Mifc.-M'JM INVEST?-/ ENT ONLY 


Asters Associates offer an exceptional investment opportunity 
in association with one of Britain’s leading Building Societies 
• and Cannon Assurance Limited. 


1 YEAR GUARANTEED BUILDING SOCIETY RETURN 


♦ Theperfeacombination — 

Bidding Soaetystabdity and the 
opportunity to profit from the 
inwrtmenr potential of prime 
residential property 

* Part of your mwstrnern placed 
with a leading Building Society 
yoking a guaranteed return, over 
1 year equhaieftt to 20% net*. 

# Balance of your investment placed 
nr the Cannon Heritage Re siden ti al 
Property Fund, an exerting new 
investment opportunity 

* At baucratetax. 


CALL 01 -225 2877/8 
NOW FOR DETAILS AND 
RESERVATIO N NUMBER 

j FaenAasoaaws financial Services, 
1 30 fees Street. London 9Ni 2 ND 
, Please send me deafe of the 
I BuWdmgSooety Bonus Bond. 


Name: 


Address 


Offer mustdose 12th December 
1986 — Or at E3 million. 


Postcode 


w 


Amount to invest E 


Pars of both 


1715111 


5111 1 


This advertisement is issued in compliance with the Regulations of The Stock Exchange. 

JJ^Natioriwicle 

/^i Building Society 

(Incorporated in England under the Building Societies Act 1874) " 

Placing of £20,000,000 II Vi per cent Bonds 
due 23rd November 1987 

Listing for the bonds has been granted by the Council of The .Stock Exchange. Listin* 
Nat,0nwlde Building Society are available in t£ 

LSSiSSE Umd0 ” ^ ' mtil 13* Novella* 


Fulton Prebon 
Sterling Ltd., 
34-40 Lndgate HID, 
London EC4M 7JT 


Chase Manhattan 
Securities, 

Portland House, 

72/73 BasinghaH Street, 
London EC2V 5DP 


18th November 1986 

Rowe & Pitman Ltd., 
1 Finsbury Avenue, 
London EC2M 2PA 

15th November 1986 






“ lt,r Pnct 


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“ : • THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER IS 19S6 

!"!!?NiTHEONLY REPRIEVE FOR THE FRENCHMAN WHOSE HEAD IS ON THE GUILLOTINE COUI 


Familiarity may have 

bred a contempt too 
saucy for the French 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 | ■ -y-fe SPORT/LAW 

HEAD IS ON THE GUILLOTINE COULD BE A WIN OVER THEIR ALL BLACK EXECUTIONERS 


Zealand testhe reputation offerings 

tennis yesterday afternoon^ J22J* an ^ . Da “ 5 Charvei 
rare moment ofWatfon ak a &*!;!? Six' 8 *® **“ 
demanding tour draws tn h* ^sbes) at centre. 

eEmaTfie bits am^JS 5S*"* •« not 


ouaax. ne nits a mean flo* -j . , .... — . 

s^ywe, an the of Charvef * 

with a gusty wind behind it season s five 

and all the ^vantages would bons championship. 4 


to lie with his AD What they lack for a flnld 
. , when they meet France same, however, is a continuity 

m toe second international, m a n . New 7w>i»mi have 
and final tour game, here Hobbs, their captain, to pick 
“wav- „ up toe pieces and the rapidly 

It ha^ I think, surprised the raatnnng Brewer. If France 
New Zealanders that the a wide jp 
opposition they have en- refy on their hat 
countered during their seven incomparable S 
matches has not proved bfe into feherh 
stronger. and give the ba 

Th at in no wise detracts get across field, 
from the wanting Lochorewffl ; s 
lave given his players when nii-St 


t, Nantes 

yean by the time this 
afternoon’s exercise is over. 

Ob this tour New Zealand 
have* averaged 30 prams a 
mafrh amt 'had they 
some obvious opportunities, 
they could have re gi stere d 
around that figure in the first 

An interesting feature of 
that wnw was fee check 
placetf upon Kirwan, the 14- 
stone wing who has achieved a 
reputation so swiftly that it is 
easy to forget he is rally 21. 


play a wide game they must . 

refyonthart^SlTS ^ £* 

lraxmiparable Sella, to breathe 

life mto fehering movements pynj so fast asofeas 
and give the back row timeto 


It is worth remembering 


mbs position and can be held 
by determined tackling. He 
has scored two tries omy on 
tour; today would be an 
wmuffwtf time to pTOVC his 


they concluded bainS ^the row, Erbam exedtent time tqjroyc his 

SntreSuS^SS^ J?Sy i S g J“- ,A ? B i5S wo^touoyunofi&lwodd 

morning; he has considerable £ the thud time m eight ranking. 

resoectfor Frw*rh\w«?*~ day*- He came on as a Amrag fee observers here 

v w^_ ™SVi rcnlacemmt vmf liftK. win he niw Rmvbmrk mul 


saLMussa 


in Toulouse last week cries, 
inevitably, went up for the ** 

head of Fouroux, partly be- 
cause of his coaching policy, 
partly because of his mediocre 
record. It would be typical of EVanra 
fee French to change horses in 
midstream with fee World s ““®f 
Cup only six months away; I a 
do not think they wfll do so P jjrf? 
but victory here would hdp p «22 
Fouroux enormously. 

I doubt if he will ^t it New n 
Zealand have a better idea of » 


Amongfee observers here 
wiQ be Give Rowlands and 
Tony Gray, the manag er ay»d 
coach respectively of the 
Welsh Work! Cup squad. 
They will be taking an early 
look at potential opponents, 
tho ug h neither France nor 
New 7>»iai«d are in their 
World Gap group. ' 


TODAY’S TEAMS IN NANTES 



their enemy now, since nearly 
all of last week’s French side 
had assiduously avoided play- 
ing against them in other tour 
games. 

It is the All Blacks who field 
an unchanged side which has 
won once and recognizes the 
areas in which i m provements 
can be made, in scrummaging 
and, perhaps, in taking the ball 
wider rather than rating John 
Kirwan in a battering-ram rote 
dose to the scram, where 
France’s big hack row can 
reach bin* 

France tried to play a 
physical, set-piece-dommated 
game in Toulouse and lost 
They are better equipped to- 
day to play m a more expan-: 
rive style— theyha vest stamd- 
off half Frantk Mesnei, who 


France 

S Blanco 

(BMi) 

PBerot 

(Agao) 

P Sofia 
POT) 

DCharwt 

{Toulouse) - 

EBonneval 

fToMouH) 

FMmmI 

(RadngCUg 

PBerbizier 

(Aflen) 

POodarts 

(BJsnte) 

DDdmca’ 

(Agm) 

J-POarent 

(LourdM) 


FuHBack 
Right wing 
Ftightcentro 
Loft centre 
: Left whig 
Standoff - 
Scrum half 


Hooker 


N Zeala nd Loveridge: plays for Harlequins against Oxford University 


ICCrowtey 

(TWmkg 

JKfewan 

. (Auckland) 

J Stanley 

(AuekMucS 

A Stone 

(B>y o( PMy) 
CQreen 
tCanWtkajJ 
F BotiC 

(norm nanxxji/ 

DKMc 

(Auckland) 

SMcDowofl 

(Auckland) 

S Fitzpatrick 

(Auckland) 

J Drake 


Laidlaw’s return 
provides hope 


By Ian McLaochlan 


ECtamp 

* 

Flanker 

M Brewer 

6 

(Tation) - 

ALorfeux 

• 4- • 

Lock *• 

(OtoBd 

MPfarca 

4 

- (Alx-tatodn^ 

■1 Condom 

5 

Lock 

. (WnMnprr) 

awiMttoa 

5 

' (Staottz) - 

DErbani 

7 

Flanker 

(Auddmd) 

J Hobbs' 

7 

.. 

L Rodriguez 

'8 : 

. No8 

(Canlerbary) 

W Shetfmd . 

8 


(MontFonand) 


r !■ 1 1, 1 1 ^4 

(Psonn twixxi) 

-- ...... • .■CapMiD 

SStoydom(SoumAMca) . 


Jed-Forest, the only team in 
the first division of the 
McEwan's National League yet 
to register a pointare hoping 
that their international scram 
halt; Roy LaidJaw, will reurrn 
today and inspire them to 
victory. However, Jed-Forest 
fam no easy task as they travel 
to Millbrae where newly-pro- 
moted Ayr are confident of 

maintaini ng tfiejr nn )y y pwi ran. 

Five other Scottish inter- 
national players return from 
injury today — Hunter (Selkirk! 
Wylie (Stewart's Melville), 
Milne (HeriofsX Callander 
(Kebo) and Gavin Hastings, the 
watsonian captain. 

None of these win be more 
welcome than Wylie, who has 
been sadly missed by the. injury* 
s tricken Stewart’s MeMUe, ax' 


Law Report November 15 1986 


Withdrawn case no bar to extradition 


Regina- v Governor of 
PcufouviDe Prison an^ An- 
other, Ex parte Her bage (No 
3) 

Before Lord Justice May and Mr 
Justice McGowan 
[Judgment November 10] 
Where procee d i ngs against a 
defendant were withdrawn cm 
an application by fee prosecu- 
tion before justices, the justices; 
had never begun an inquiry into 


Mr Alan Newman for Mr issue of a warrant for his draw the first complaint did noc 
otiaae in the application for ex traditi on to fee United States, amount to an acquitlaL The 
dkaal review^ Mr Herbage in This was the applicant's fend order involved no more than the 
non in the application for application fora writ of habeas consent of the justices that fee 
tbcas corpus; Mr John Spokes, corpus. He contended feat, question of the guih or irmo- 
C and Mr Christopher Wilson- under section 3(3) of the 1870 ceoce of the defendant in fee 


habeas corpus; Mr John Spokes, 
QC and Mr Christopher Wibon- 


This was the applicant's fend order involved no more than the 
application for a writ of habeas consent of the justices that the 


00 tended feat, question of the gam or mno* 
V3) of the 1870 ceoce of the defendant in the 
VI of the Treaty, summons should he withdrawn 
le ccriin gs in re- from their cognisance, that is, 
removal to the that theyshould not adjudicate 
could not be upon it. There was, therefore, an 
ie proceedings in absence of adjudication.'. . . 
Tieft Act arance “But, at the same time, it is 
tested upon. common knowledge that pro- 
that point it was cess is allowed to be withdrawn 
to refer to one of in many cases where the 
mites cited: R v prosecution do not desire to 
eAAaftfil964]2 .proceed, and in my judgment 
case turned on where withdrawal in that sense 


for the Governor of Act and article' 


defendant 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so ' held in 
dismissing applications by 
Alexander waham Herbage, for 
a writ of habeas corpus ad 
subjiciendum directed to fee 
Governor of RsntonvfiDe Prison 
and byway of judicial review for 
an order of prohibition directed 
to the Secretary of State for the 
Home Department prohibiting 
him from iss uin g a warrant 
p ur sua n t to section 11 of the 


f „ . lkT TTT rjiz QB 420). that case tinned on where withdrawal tn that sense 
fee Costs in Criminal Cases Act takes place, that is to say where 
US Extradrtum Treaty (SI 1976 1952> ^ ^ of the fee prosecution is allowed to 

NOZ144J. withdrawal of proce ed i n gs be- withdraw orocess before, in the 


Pentouville Prison and fee US 
Government; Mr Nigel Planing 
for the secretary of state. 

LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
feat fee argum ents in both 
applications were based fim- 


had never begun an mquiry mio applications were based fim- Tn 
fee offence and section 3(3) of dam cn tally ■ on . the same „ rrr , 

the Extradition Act 1870 was no mwadt anting from the pro- 
bar to the issue of a warrant of visioiiS/-<rf sSon 3C3) of fee 
extradition in respect of fee Extradition Act 1870 and fee n« 


extradition proceedings in re- from their co 
spec! of his removal to the that theyshov 
United States could not be upon «. There 
initiated until the proceedings in abs en ce of adi 
respect of fee Thm Act ofirace “But, at the 

had been adjudicated tyon. common kno 

In relation to that point it was cess is allowed 
only necessary to refer to one of in many a 


The applicant’s case was that 
the preconditions set out in die 
Act and in the Treaty to fee 
initiation of extradition 


1952, and fee effect of the the prosecution is allowed to 
withdrawal of proceedings be- withdraw process before, in the 
lore justices in. so fer as it case ofa trial, the trial is started, 
•ffrrtrA awards of costs under and in the case of an inquiry, 
that Act. _ before the inquiry is begun. 


Lord Parker, Lord Chief Jus- there b then no provision in the 


P™***^®* Pf? iSLSSr tice. said (at p426): “I do not Costs in Criminal Cases Act 
ugfied » ■o.™;* h *-., d g e g K>1 L think feat... when the case was 1952 which win enable the 
pmsi^ to fee usual fcm of called on, the time ever came accused to recover costs.” 


extradition proceedings had 
been unlawfiiL 
In the proceedings far judicial 
review it was said that any 


1870 Act frarfee surrender of the ^ttompt by the secretary of state 


applicant to fee US Ckivern- to a warrant for the may sit on an offence 

meat until after he had been sanendaoftheapplranltotbe — , J ‘ 

tried in respect of an o Hence of jjS authorities would be nnlxw- 
felse accounting conttaiy io jy ^ that the. preconditions 
section 17(iya) of fee T hen Act were not satisfied. 

agfrtgssss j-s eiis 

-j v. mi Octoba 3, 1985 to answer a 
The 1870 Act piyxyides _ by ^ alleging an offence under 

section 3:“(3) Afugruveaiii^ £££on l^lKa) of the Theft Act 
inaJ who has been acc used o f the prosrorftiotfS 

some offence witbm Engfcsb anptication, the justices granted 
jnrisdirtioO potjxtag the op ft^vc to withdraw fee charge, 
fence for which fats surrender is .- .. . . . , , ft 

asked . . . shall not be surren- The applicant was ranrestot 
dered until after he has been and; ultimate ly on M«rch_jL 

dischaiged, whether by acquittal l986 theBo wStreet Stipgndiary 
OTM^^ration of bn sentence S 

«■ otherwise.” .pheant m custody to await the 


surrenda of^ tile applicant to fee 
US authorities^ would be unlaw- 
ful in drat the. preconditions 
were .not satisfied. 

The applicant had appeared 
before the Winchester Justices 
on October 3. l985toanswa 
r ) iary jilli y n g an offence undg 


when fee magistrate began to It aeemed quite dear that the 
inquire into any offence . . . view e xpre ss e d by the Lord 
[Section 60) of the Magistrates Chief Justice in that passage. 
Courts Act 1952] clearly when appbed mutmis muumdis 
cont e mplates that a magistrate to the statutory provisions in 
midi is section 3(3) of the 1870 Act or 


an indictable offence without article VI of the Treaty made it 


beginning the inquiry into it” 
The successor to section 6(1) 
of the 1952 Act was section 5 of 


dear that the contention that 
any extradition should now be 
deferred because of the action 


the Magistrates' Coons . ■ Act feat .was ta ken before the Win- 


1980 which so fer as relevant 
was in the same terms. 

The Lmd Chief Justice 


section 17 (l)(a)offee Theft Act contm-ed: “There is little 
1968. On die prosecution's autbari y on this matter, but I 
application, the justices granted derive considerable assistance 
fail (O withdraw the cborsp: ton an Irish case in 1912, Rex 


fer as relevant Chester Justices and because 
terms. there bad been no fina l 

Chief Justice deter min ati o n of the proceed- 
ten: is little “S 5 before the justios was a 
s matter, but I contention which could not be 
able raacftmcg sutetantiated. . . . 

K-h* 1012 The applications would be 


The applicant was rearrested 
and ultimately on March 21, 
1986 the Bow Street Stipendiary 


. (McDonnell) p Tyrone Ju s ti c es 
q 1 912] 2 ER 44). Mr Justice McCowan agreed. 

“In that t Panes CB sad: Solicitors: Barker Austin, 
*Id my o pmift n, the permission Stepney; DPP; Treasury Solic- 
given by the justices to with- itor. 


Employee restrained from working for rival 


. rn*»V 
1 ^ v;'f 

t * 5f ; ' 


Erening Standard Co Ltd v 
Henderson 

Before Lord Jcstice Lawton and 

Lord Justice Balcotnbe 
- [Judgment November 7] 

Employers were granted an. 
. interlocutory injunction tore- 
strain an employee from wotk-. 
ing for a rival during his 
contractual notice period as tong 

as they continued to provide 
him with remuneration and 
other contractual benefits , with- 
out iinauing that he performed 
any services for them. 

The Court of Appeal allowed 
an appeal by the ptamttfis. 
Evening Standard Co Lid, 
a gainct fee refusal of Mr Justice 
Evans on October 28, l9S 6, _to 
restrain the de fe nda nt , Mr Petg 
Robert Henderaon. mtfgjudg- 
ment or fintber tuder, from, 
inter alia, undertaking emptoy- 
ment wife any present or in- 
tended future competitor of me 

piain tiffe. 

Mr Anthony Boswqod, QC 
and Mr Nicholas $tadten ifor fee 
pkmtp f ^ Mr Midiad ftindlc 
for fee defendant 
LORD JISTICE TAWTON 
said that fee defendant itodbeen 
employed by the |daintim«riJ 

years, since 1979 as in odnctfo n 
manager, on tbdr evening 
newspaper. 


His contract of employment 
provided: “it is understood feat . . 
your entire service are to be mjimctioo agamst an employee 
devoted to fee interests of the under a contract for persona) 
company ... and that on no services to enforce a negative 
account ate yon to engage in oovemmt, if tte consequence 
work outside*’. would be tojjut fee employee in 

llU>#< ’ . tiie position of either having to 

During 1986 i t became i mo wu on worJting for the employers 

that a rival newspaper pub- qt starving or being idle. 

The plainriffe decided feat 

sacJsasasK 

It was obvious that if the rime as his mtifee, if in p roper 


But it was trite law feat suffer damage which it would be 
employers coukl not get an difficult to quantify. On fee face 


The plamiifih decided that 

oneway outoffeatpiubfem was. -- — _ ,. ^ 

to offir tapay the. defendant his in ravour of granting the mjuno- 

salary and provide the other 'lion- ■ 

contractual benefits until such There woe a number of 
time as his notice, if in p roper problems to be solved m this 
form, would have nmom. branch of the law, such as what 

Another ofier by the plamti£& wa neant fcy Mtews. N ow- 


of it fee defendant should not be 
allowed to do fee very thing 
which be had contracted not to 
dtx . 

The order of the court must 
not reduce fee defendant to 
starvation or idleness but feat 
was overcome by fee plaintifis* 
offer, and at the presort stage 
the balance of convenience was 


proposed newspaper could ob- form, would have nm can. 
tain the services of a n expen- Another offer by fee plai 
epced production man a ger such feat they would be win 

as the defendant as soon mil bavothed^ndarrtworkii 
started it would benefit that fe^ during the notice p« 
paper. and, as fee defendant 

tn September 1986 fee defeu- continued to; work sina 
dant tofifec plaintiffr. that he letter ofia^Mtion. ilwa 
wished to tcnnmaiehia contract impossible that he could d 
on November 7, 1986, riving Tbe phintiffo had no 
two months’ notice instral of 12 cepted fee dricndanl’s re 
months' notice- which be was ation of tbe contract, and i 
required to give -under his fee law, so fer as fee Cot 
contract.;;;. - Appegwas a^oned^ tta 

It.bccriMjcopwiLfeat fre «w 
leaving ^irmtier.to jom fee 


them duriH fee notice period. * J3 *£2?JZ 

and, as the defendant had employees to break the* coo- 

Sadnned to; woe k since his “* 

letter of reswnation. it was not ot ^ 5r a _, „ ___ 

impossible that he could do sa . JJSE 

ti-. nhintM* i«h- ton of confidential miornia- 

tioii, as fee law stood they could 
«ap their fingers at their old 

kMiteCVimiTf employers. That was a most 

unSKirysitMtHm.aiid.it 


leaving m tarter, tojoa urn 
proposed rival papa. plan- 
rfffs applied for an injunction to 
mssffl him doing so during fee 
period: for which his. contract 
ought to nut. ; 


Appeal was concerned, feat the 
pbm tife could consider fee 
contract to be still in existence; 

The court had to decide fee 
frainneg of convenience. Xf the 
defendant left today and took 
himself off to the rival paper the 
plaintiffs would und oub t edly 


was time the court examined the 
matter fully. 

- Lord Justice Bateombc deliv- 
ered a concurring judgment. 

Solicitors: Stanleys & Simp- 
son Noth; Lovell White & 
King. 


fee**- 

JT' 


Selectors hoping 
to find merit 
in leading games 


By Gordon Allan 


The various divts»aal selec- 
tors, who chose their teams next 
weekend, win be out and about 
today with a special interest in 
fee two John Smith's merit table 
A marches — at Bath, where 
Coventry are fee viators to the 
Recreation Ground, and at Sud- 
bury, where Wasps play host to 
Leicester. 

The divisional c hamp i o nship 
starts on December 6 when 
play the Midlands, l*v 
season's champions, and the 
North play the South-West. 
Both the leading contenders for 
the position of hooker for 
London — Simmons (Wasps) 
and Otver (Harlequins) — have 

ankle injuries. Simmons’s {dace 
today is taken by Bowers, who 
used to play for Leicester; Sharp 
books of Otver for 

Harlequins against Oxford 
University at the Stoop ground. 

There are two other changes 
in tbe Wasps* team. Rose for 
Effison at No 8 and John Bonner 
for O'Leary in the second row. 
Youngs, who has had a torn 
hamstring, returns at scrum half 
for Leicester, the only change 
from the side which deprived 
Nottingham of their unbeaten 
record last Saturday. 

Bath hope to be unchanged, 
which means that Sagoe contin- 
ues on the left wing m place of 
the injured Trevaskts. But 
Wifeey is standing by in case 
Robinson, the flanker who had 
to travel to a funeral yester da y, 
cannot get f wfr tn 
Egerton, the England squad No 
8, plays in Bath's thud team 
ana a spell of bade trouble. 

Coventry, whose injury list is 


A chance 
to put an 
end to cup 
hostilities 

. . . , By a Correspondent 

longer than most, have Paul „ . 

Thomas, the flanker, fit a gaif 1 Three years on from fee 
Incidentally, James, who is “Battle of Treotchy", everyone 
deputizing for Saunders on the connected with fee Rhondda 
Coventry wing, reminds many Valley dub. presently edebrat- 
people, by his appearance and ing its centenary, is topmg that 
style, of Rodney Webb, fee the Schweppes Cup. first round 
forma Coventry and England will give them fee chance to re- 
international — not a W establish congenial relationships 
comparison for somebody in with CanfifT today, 
only his second, frill, senior On December 17, I9o3,lne 
game. two dubs became involved m 

Loveridgc, the forma AH one of the most controvetsaj 
Blades scram half, plays his find cap matches ever at the junior 
frill match for Harlequins chib’s Oval ground, resuh^ m 
against Oxford University, fee international referee. Qrve 
Woodhonse. the man whose Norfing. sending off four 
boots he fills, is on the bench. {Haven. 

Stileman over from Three of them came from fee 

Ashworth at lode. Treorefcy ranks while Gudin; 

Cambridge University, who who went on to win the. trophy* 
meet Blackheatb at flang e lost the services of th eir prop. 
Road, indode Wass — formerly Jeff Whitclbot. Of fee infamous 
of Nottingham and Rosslyn quartet, only Wbitefbot and the 
Park at No 8 and Pyrgos, who Treorchy beck row forward, 
has appeared at full back for John Phelps, remain; Chris 
Richmond, at stand-off half Jones, the prop, is serving a 
Wass isa b aniste r, so the laws of second life ten and the hooker, 
rugby should be chicken-feed to Hywd White, has emigrated to 


him. 

Devotees of fee county 
championship have plenty to 
occupy them. Yorkshire and 
Durham are unbeaten in the 
north and play each other next 
Saturday. Northmaberfand, who 
meet Cambria today, solve a 
problem at stand-off half by 
enlisting none otter than Alan 
Old. who is on the wrong side of 
40 and now teaches at Morpeth. 
Johnson, tbe regular Northum- 
berland half bade, is tired of 
county rugby and prefers to play 
for Goofoxth against Morpeth; 
the otter candidates for the 
position are injured. 


TODAYS TEAM NEWS 


home to their near neighbours, 
Edinburgh Academicals. The 
home side's injury problems 
continue, however, as Brewster 
and Simpson drop out of the 
park. Aca demicals have Weir 
making his debut at scrum half 
in place of fee injured Dun; 
Album is at fnQ bade and 
Rendall at hooka while Jeremy 
Richardson returns from 
suspension to fee second row. 

Hcriofa are at home to the 
champions, Hawick, who make 
one change with Mallin taking 
over from Bannerman on fee 
left wing. Tbe Goktenacre side , 
have the three MUncs in the 
front row and they will make 
things difficult for the Scottish 
fa ptain, Colin Deans. Heriot’s 
also switch McAslan to centre 
wife Steven moving onto fee 
wing. Marshall replaces Russell 
at stand-off half 

Keiso retain Hogarth at scram 
half for their home game wife an 
unchanged Glasgow Academi- 
cals side. The bonier chib also 
have their B international prop, 
Waite, returning from injury 
and they are beginning to show 
fee kind of form which makes 
them genuine title contenders. 

Watsnuians. who lost then- 
unbeaten record last weekend,, 
switch Carmichael to the wing 
to aooommodate H as tin g s at fail 
back. They travel to Netherdale 
where they have never won a 
league match. Gala, however, 
are not the team of old and are 
again forced to make c han ges. 
Nicholson partners Smith ax 
kick, Thomson comes in to 
hook and Moncrieff fills the left 
wing position. 

Boroughratrir and West of 
Scotland meet in Glasgow with 
only pride at stoke as both sides 
have bfff* disap pointing this 
season. West have strengthened 
their Line up by including Millar 
and Riozzi in the pack wife 
Drummond at frill back. 
Boroughmuir are un chan g e d, 
which means that there is still 
no place for their international 
prop. Rowan, who fills in at 
hooka in fee second XV. 


Faldo left 
trailing 
by Azinger 

Hawaii (AFP) - Paul Azinger 
made good use of an old puna 
as he scored a second round 65 
to move into a two-stroke lead 
in the $600,000 fsuzu Kapalua 
international tournament yes- 
terday. But Nick Faldo, of 
Hertfordshire, who had feared 
the firskroond lead, could man- 
age only a 71 and was level, in 
third place, on 139 with Tom 
Putter, who bad a 68. 

The putter which Azinger, 
who has twice been a runner-up 
in tournaments this year, re- 
trieved and pm into his bag less 
than a fortnight ago helped fee 
26-year-old Am eric an to five 
birdie putts of between two and 
six feet in tengfe as he played fee 
front nine m 31. He then 

crowned his seven-under-par 

round with a putt of 15ft on tbe 
last hole. 

Davis Love m, fee rookie 

who said he had changed in and 
oat of his rain gear 50 times in 
the frequent light showers, 
chased Azioger for the $150,000 
first prize after a second round 
69 which left, him on 137. Bob 
Tway, the US PGA champion 
and player of fee year, couid do 
no better than a 76 and trailed 
on 150, along wife the defending 
champion, Marie O'Meara. , 
LEADHO SCORES: Sacred mad: (US 
unless sattot 135: PAzrmr. 70. K. 1ST: 
0 Low B. 68. 69. 139: N Faldo (G8L 68. 
H: T Pumar. 71. SB. tea A Bean. 7Z. 6S. 
141: u HuBMrt. 7X 68; B Crtnsfw. 76. 
BS. 142: H dark (G8), 72. 70: C Sttdter. 
74. 68: 0 Pootey, 73, a. 143: 0 tsfaii, 74. 
m. Otter Brf&fc 149 lS Lyfc. 78. 73. 

Lora defends 

BananquiUa, Colombia (Reu- 
ter) — Miguel Lora, of Colom- 
bia, makes the third defence of 
his World Boxing Council 
bantamweight title here tonight 
against Alberto Davila, United 
States, who at 32, is eight years 
older. 


Nottingham v Saracens 
At the request of the Mdtands 
divisional selectors Nottingham 
play Hodgkinson at hd back. 

Byron goes on thawing and Jones 1 

replaces the injured Hartley in 
tte centre. Tta unofficial word is 
that David Hoidstock, 

Nottingham's tooling try scorer last 
season, is joining RetvnondL 

Waterloo v Ldn Irish 
MacNeB is bound for the Unitod 
States on business, so 0‘DonneQ 

moves to fuH beck in the 
London Irish side and McGrath 
comes into the centre. MacNeH 
may be unavaflabla ifeti the 
London Scottish match on 
November 29. 

Bristol v London Welsh 
Justin Ford plays instead of the 
Mured Russel at No 8 for London 
Welsh and Morgan replaces 
Keating in the back row. Bristol are 
unchanged. 


Gloucester v Broughton P 
Marment is at fuB back tor 
Gloucester and Tim Snath, usually 
a fid back, stands In ter Mor- 
gan on the right wing. Gloucester 
tave recruited GtonvOa. a lock 
forward, from Stroud. 

Moseley v Rosslyn Pk 

Boyle, the Lions lock, has Ms 


Denhardt who has a head injtxy. 
Jeavons, anther former Lions 
forward, end Payne (wing) have 
also been catod up. 

Ldn Scottish ▼ Richmond 
Macfdm, Camptaff-Lamerton 
and Weir retun to the London 
Scottish pack: Mack&i, tta cap- 
tain, from a business trip to South 
America. CamptaH-Lamerton 
and Weir after injury. Richmond ate 
unhanged. 


Selectors alter plans 
on account of protest 

By George Ace 

Expected widespread disrup- the final Irish trial at 
tion throughout tbe , pro vince Lansdowoe Road on December 
today on account of the Loyalist 20. 

protest at the Anglo-Irish Agree- The Irish selectors’ views of 
ment has affected several sport- fee various back-row pennuta- 
ing fix t ur e s - all Irish League dons available should make for 
football matches have been interesting reading, thou^i if the 
postponed — and forced the name ofMorrow is missing, as it 
Ulster rugby selectors to alter is from fee Ulster team, one can j 


idans. 

Originally they had intended 
watching fee six senior league 
games scheduled for today be- 
fore convening to choose the 
side for next Saturday's game at 
Ravenhill wife Leinster. But 
wife four matches already ruled 
out — NIFC v Collegians, 
Malone v Ballymena, Academy 
v City of Deny and Portadown- 
v Queen's University — and 
doubts hanging ova fee otter 
games, they announced an un- 
changed Ulster side from that 
which defeated Co nn acht last 
Saturday at Ravenhill. 

That decision was predictable 
with the team running in eight 
tries in a comprehensive 37-6 
win ova the westerners. That it 
is the best side available remains 
a matter of opinion and it 
certainly heightens interest in 
fee com position of fee teams for * 

GOLF ~ 


only assume he must be suffer- 
ing from semmpox! 

ULSTSt (v Latoster, Ravonta. Nommbor 


Canada. 

“What we are hoping for is 
fine weather, a good game for a 
crowd of between 3-4,000 and a 
return to normal relationships 
with the CanfifT dub,’* the 
Treorchy secretary, Bryan 
James, said. 

As well as that, Mr James 
could also have added a victory. 
So far this season, the dub's 
100th birthday celebrations 
have featured wins over 
Abenillery and Newbridge, a 
draw wife Aberavoa, and a 
close-run affair against 
Bridgend. 

By their own admission, Car- 
diff are not playing well and 
have won only twice away from 
home. So a return to Treorchy, 
where they won 31-4 three years 
ago, is not a trip for the cup 
holders to relish. 

Tbe first round of the cup 
traditionally gives the village 
sides fee chance to tackle the 
country's diie and, while 
Treorchy are attempting to even 
the score with Cardiff further 
down the valley, Pontypridd win 
have to be at their very best to 
beat Romney. 

A small dub on the outskirts 
of Cardiff, Rumney have twice 
beaten first-class opposition be- 
fore and confidently believe 
they can add Pontypridd's scalp 
to their collection. Struggling 
Pontypridd have won 10 of their 
19 matches this season but have 
failed to impress 

Other first-class sides who 
will lace stern challengers will be 
Penarth (at Old mtydbus), 
Crass Keys (at Carmarthen 
Athletic). Ebbw Vale (at 
Uantrisant), and Brid g e n d (at 
Vardrc). Newbridge and 
Aberavoa, who meet Seven Sis- 
ters and Tumble, at least have 
home advantage- 

Newpert face a long trip to 
laagbam p fee botoe of Dylan 
Thomas. No one expects New- 
port to lose bat there are still a 
many at the dub who remember 
what happened in the first 
round six years ago to the day. 

In the same part of the world, 
they lost 4-0 at Pendawdd to 
provide tbe tournament wife its 
bigscsl ever upset. 

ROWING 


Floodlight 
finish for 

lone). N Cwr (Aitfa), P M a MtiWW 

Welsh detav folffS OWS 


Welsh delay 

The Welsh Rugby Union 
have deferred the appointment 
of this season's three-man 
intaaational panel of referees. 
One change is certain as Eea 
Rowlands has annonneed his 
retirement and the other two 
members of the present paael, 
Clive Noriing and Derek 
Be van, are likely to be chal- 
lenged by Gareth Sfremonds j 
and Winston Jones. 


-W-^ -a -w— f will be floodlights near fee 

Baker-Finch goes s s 

O equip themselves With warning 

w » _ _ lights for what could be a 

clear in searen 

Last year Nottinghamshire 

d* _#*• J * _ J County Rowing Association not 

Xd’Yl* T1YCT only won the Head but also had 

lUi 11191 TlVWW J four crews in fee first 10, which 

Melbourne (AP) —lan Baker- and Hgbtning-fra* greens for a They^ntiseto tetefthefore 
Inch, of Australia, opened up a round of 70 ^1 a total of 139, aJg,Sfe quads including such 
iree-stroke lead at the balfrray four shots adnft of' Baka-Finch, ^ ^, e smith?Kiught, 

tase of the Australian Open who is seeking his first tour- r mmhS. 


Melbourne (AP) — laa Baker- 
Finch, of Australia, opened op a 
three-stroke lead at the halfway 
stage of the Australian Open 
championship after a second 
round of 69, three mida par. 
yesterday. Baker-Fmch goes 
into today’s third round at nine 
unde r par, oo. 135, and his 
closest challengers are the New 

Zealander, Greg Turner, who 
equalled fee par of 72 to remain 
six under on 138, fellow Austra- 
lian. Rodger Davis, and Magnus 
Persson, of Sweden. 

“These have been tbe best two 
days I've ever played from tee to 
green." Baker-Finch said as be 
left the field floundering when 
he scored three successive bird- 
ies from fee 1 0th to the 12th 
holes. 

Davis and Persson each 
scored 71 to move level with 
Turner, who had shared the 
overnight lead with Baka-Finch 
afta their opening rounds of 66. 
Bernhard Longer, of West Ger- 
many, conquered swirling winds 


By Jim Rail ton 

A record 525 crews have 
entered fee 32nd Head of the 
River fours race (sponsored by 
Fullers) ova the three-mile 
course from Barnes to Putney 
Bridge today (2J0). 

Tbe entry, which is almost 
100 up on last year, has taken 
fee organizers by surprise. It 
promises to be a contest not 
only between crews tel also 
against the gathering dusk. 

It is intended to send the 
crews off only seven seconds 
apart as opposed to 10. There 
will be floodlights near the 
finish and tbe last 100 or so 
crews have been warned to 
equip themselves with warning 
lights for what could be a 
hazardous journey back to club 
houses afta fee race. 

Last year Nottinghamshire 
Cbunty Rowing Association not 
only won fee Head but also had 
four crews in fee first 10, which 
is quite some acbievemenL 
They promise to be to the fore 


I j> r fcj| | and Clift combination 
*^^J!irSid f te C ta^irohlejns and fee world lightweight silver 

foura 

mRSSC!? Aarons challenge is expected 

&om the Tideway Scullers 
You can mate up four shorts in who induce Dough 

3?' A* l9SS CamSSn 

raid. The defending champion, Hiam ninn inthisevenL 

Greg Norman of Ausiralo, de- There are' 15 pennants to wi 

in fee quadruple sculls, togetiu 
c alm er, carry mor n ing, con- >hp miwi snH nwiKc fom 


in the quadruple sculls, together 
wife tbe eoxed and coxless fours 
hk 71 ft him and some outstand- 

££^32? SKr— ing crews following Britain’s 

Successes in the world 
seven strokes behmd the leada. championships this year in the 

hunt 

The coxless four favourites 
must be Thames Tradesmen 
with Olympic and world medal 
winners on board — Beattie. 
Clift. Cross, and Stanhope. 
There is a substantial university 
challenge too wife fee univer- 
sities of Oxford and Cambridge 
entering 10 crews between them 
> ii ^ f n all of which consist of Boat Race 

tin the family 6°^ 

, • Last year Cambridge Unrver- 

lot in a group four strokes off sity won the coxed fours, 
the lead. Oxford's c halleng e in this event 

Kenny Knox, of the United this year is likely to come from a 
States, moved up to third spot, crew wife two American post 
firing a course record 65 for a graduate freshmen on board 
total of 137. who are no less than Olympic 

The defending champion, worid champion in coxkss fours 
Tsuneyuki Nakajtma, of Japan, Lyons, and Penny, an Olympic / 
top of the prize money list for bronze medal winner in eights./ 
fee Ja p anese PGA tour this The Tideway Sculletf 
reason, polled out of fee event women's quad pose a stre' 
because of shou lder pains. threat wife three world sj 

leaomq scQfjE&ta&M OzaM 67. M: medal winners — Bond, w 

i^®!huL£?i!p! and Ho dies — in duded ty 

wan) eg. as. lift d crew. A noteablc feature f J 
race is feat 121 womens / 

&££% imnifij / 

pw*) 70, 74; j-M CtaatiMi (Srt 7i. 73. year. / f 






Ozaki keeps it in the family 


Gotemba (AFP) — Japan's 
Massshi Ozakj sank an 
and five birdies here yestei^y 
to share fee lead wife his 
compatriot, Yasuhiro 
Funatogawa. afta the second 
round of fee Taiheiyo Club 
blasters. 

Funatogawa rolled in four 
birdies and did not drop a shot 
on the 7,107-yard, par-72 
Taiheiyo Cub course in central 
Japan to earn a second round 
total of 135. 


*J U 1 M WHi UtU uut UiUU a MIUL I . r . 

n fee 7,107-yard, par-72 ^ 

aiheiyo Club course is central LEAoS«wa^Mn^Rr sa 
*P“ J® •“ a second ronnd 87. 68. ia!^It?it® 

>tal of 135. 72.65. 131:1 Aokl 71.67; HMo)dno7t. 67: 

Oraki, Irept his fomfly in the Qratan^SS ^Tftlli v 


picture after younger brother 

Naomichi, who led after fee first 
round, slipped to a 73 and was 


left in a group four strokes off 
the lead. 

Kenny Knox, of the United 
States, moved up to third spot, 
firing a course record 65 for a 
total of 137. 

The defending champion. 


7 i 68 - Ml: G J. Blind 
ZA P, -ua s Brintarse {Set 70. >2: J 
Wpwiain fGB) 68. 74. 14*0 
(SwB)70.74;J-MCtaraM(Sp)71. 73. 


pa cent t 




SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 - 


****** SL 


$'i 'i 


RACING: DAVID ELSWORTH SET TO TAKE THE WEEKEND'S TOP PRIZES AT ASCOT AND NEWCASTLE 


Brown poised 
for a repeat 
performance 
at Ascot 




y«r<vn,f?i 






By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


When that effective jockey 
Colin Brown rode the first 
treble of his career at Sandown 


Park a fortnight ago Desert 
Orchid and Course Hunter 
were two of the contributors. 

At Ascot today Brown is 
hopeful that the same two and 
Floyd (2L35) will be help him 
complete another three timer. 

Following that fine win at 
Sandown Desert Orchid is 
taken to win the H & T Walker 
Goddess Chase even though 
his weight includes a 71b 
penalty. 

The word at Sandown was 
that Desert Orchid, trained by 
David Elsworth, would be 
better for the race, yet he still 
managed to beat Very Promis- 
ing by seven lengths when in 
recent of 251b. Last Saturday 
Very Promising went on to 
highlight the form by winning 
the Mackeson Gold Cup at 
Cheltenham. 

What his Sandown race 
showed was that Desert Or- 
chid is every bit as effective 
over 2Vt miles, which is 
today's distance, -as he is over 


Berlin also goes well when 
fresh, but is arguably best on 
softer ground than this and 
over only 2 miles. 

It would be difficult to over- 
exaggerate the ease with which 
David Murray-Smith's ex- 
Irish eight-year-old Course 
Hunter won at Sandown. To- 
day I think he will be capable 
of beating Castle Warden in 
the Rip Handicap Chase at a 
difference of a stone. 

Floyd, my selection for the 
Snow Hill Handicap Hurdle is 
a bold front runner who 
managed u> win the Imperial 
Cup at Sandown and the 
County Hnrdle at- 
Cheltenham, in the space of 
six days two yeans ago, before 
injury forced him on to the 
sidelines last season. 



Irish cheers greet 


® :u'i 
\Vliit 


By Mkhad Seely 

RaiKsns btsh cheers of de- - the Doncaster sales 14 months 



v,;r mm ' 

#. * «.*- 

i 



fight Kneeled Ibn Mqed-in the 
nrpiaffiiitig enclosure at Ascot 
yesterday after Chuck Spares’* 
talented . four-year-old had 

, r- D-vr ih. a T 


beaten Gave Brief in the A-T. 
Cross Hurdle. Aonoch, the 134 
favourite, was only a remote 
dthd when R»ning at the final 
flight. 

“We thought be was a good 

Thing ” nirf the wnUUDg OWDCT, 

Galway-bom Pat O’Donnell, 
“after all he’s won wdD at 
Newbury and was Betting lfflb 
from his main opponent." 

John McLaughlin rode an 
inspired race on Ibn Majed. 
Afier dictating the early pace, 
the jockey slowed down the 
gallop racing into Swinky Bot- 
tom. He then asked his mount 
to quicken twice, first at the 
fourth flight from home and 
again at the second last. 




-i . ';4 


ago. 

Mercy Rimefl was also 
thrilled with the performance of 
Gave Brief the winner of the 
1983 Champion Hurdle, who . 
has won yesterday’s race first;- 
time out in each of die past two. 


Jayne Thompson, the National 
Hunt rider, died in hospital 
yesterday frm fetfarin recored 
to a raring frill. Biport, page 3. 


After a couple of runs on the 
Flat he should be fit enough to 
expose any flaws in Prideaux 
Boy, My Dominion, Oppidan, 
and J imsintim e. 

While conceding that 
Skygrange, Teletrader and 
Yeoman Broker have all 
shown a Jot of promise, 
Skygrange particularly, I have 
no intention of looking further 
for the likely winner of the 
Kennels Gate Novices Hurdle 
than the recent easy Newbury 
winner Robin GoodfeBow. 

French Union is napped to 
win the Manicou Handicap 
Chase. David Nicholson's 
eight-year-old can record his 
third success of the season 
even though be will be meet- 


only 2 miles. 

Of course it is perfectly 
possible to make out a good 
case why Charcoal Wally 
should beat both Desert Or- 
chid and Berlin. After all, he 
did in the Aride Challenge 
Trophy at Cheltenham in 
March. 

But I'm convinced that 
Desert Orchid is a much better 
horse when he is compar- 
atively fresh. 


Desert Orchid can gain another coarse victory at Ascot today m the H Sc T Walker Goddess Chase ; 

ain Dawn era a stone Elsworth can take the A ILaam /»n>t >*wwl Tvicli 
nns than at Chdten- Foodbrokers and P rimmla I CUu vOU lllijll 


Log Captain Dawn on a stone 
worse terms than at Chelten- 
ham eight days ago when there 
was seven lengths between 
them. 

In theory, that gives Cap- 
tain Dawn a great chance of 
getting his revenge, bat I 
prefer French Union who is 
comparatively fresh and 
seemingly improving all the 
time. 

While St William, who won 
this race twelve months ago is 
weighted to beat Far Bridge, 
who finished last in last 
Saturday's Mackeson I am 
loathe to desert French Union 
in this instance. 

At* Newcastle David 


Elsworth can take the 
Foodbrokers and Primrula 
Fighting Fifth Hurdle with 
Robin Wonder, who reminded 
us last Saturday what a smart 
horse he is when winning at 
Cheltenham. Tom Sharp and 
Bailydurrow are his obvious 
dangers. 

Why Forget (1.15) and 
Fergy Foster (1.45) are my 
other principal fancies at 
Gosforth Park. 


Flat season in style was: 

_ . horse and u 


From Our Irish Raring Correspondent, Dnbfin 


Finally, following that stout 
effort against Vino Festa at 
Sandown Jhapsnze looks the 
one to be on for the EBF 
Ellington Handicap Hurdle at 
Warwick. 


Earlier (hi* OnaUf 

Hamdan Ai Maktoum won the 
Melbourne Cap with Ait Tabg. 
At Leopardstnwn this afternoon 
his colours can ugato be saccess- 
fcd carried fa the Nove mb er 

Pamtii^|> fcy Allwn nn tfi, fiiwl 

day of the Irish Flat season. 

Like At Tabu}, he too started 
his career at Newmarket with 
Ton Thoauon Joses, and has 
always looked like a horse 
mu oeed time and a distance. 
On his most recent appearance, 


to Ireland, Afikaaa fadsbed third 
to Boggy Peak at Downpatrick 
staying an very s tro n gl y . 


The obvious dangers to 
Alhaan mast come from those 
horses that pci fann e d with 
cred i t fa the Irish Cesarewftch. 
The wiener of that- co n test; 
Orient Bose, is an abs entee fa 
today's fine np of 27. Bat the 
second, Finuant, Olympic 
Times, third, and Boro Quarter; 
fourth, all rn*. 


This manoeuvre won Ih £ 
race, as Gaye Brief was travel- 
ling easily tinning mto the home 
straight; bm then found the 
weight and pace tffflmg and was 
finally beaten ax lengths. 

"Inis ought to pot ns on the 
map," said a delighted Spares. 
“I've always said he was a good 
horse and now he’s proved it 
again. Well come back here for 
the Long Walk Hurdle in 
December. Hen then have a 
small prep race before the big 
one, the Stayera Hurdle at 
Cheltenham." 

The trainer is the son of 
‘Bregar’ Spares, who rode Arc- 
tic Prince to victory in the 1951 
Derby. He has 15 horses m his 


-Why shouldn't I be ptewL"; 
she said, “he was giving a lot o£ 
weight to a fit horse. He needs a 

distance nowadays and Til b ring 

him back here for the Long. 
Walk Hurdle and then to Uk . 
Festival for the Waterford Crys-; 
tal Spares’ Hnrdle in due 
course." . _ _ 

The tragic death of Jay**. 
Thompson muted. the natural' 
exuberance of c has i n g folk, but 
it was nevertheless a marvellous ■ 
afternoon's sport. 

Stan Meflar showed us a 
fa tore prospect for the Chelten- 
ham Gold Cop when Gareth 
Charles Jones rode Ten Pins to 
victory over Joint Sovereignty, 
whose chances of winning were ^ 
ruined by the attentions of a ' 

loose horse, Cocaine, at toe final;- 

fence in the Hurst Park Novices. 


Derby- He has 15 horses u his 
chaige at Aslockxon. in Not- 
tinghamshire and did remark- 
ably wefl when be gave only 
2,500 guineas for Ibn Mqed as a 
Flat- racing ‘reject from Alec 
Stewart’s Newmarket yard at 


“The Sun Alliance wfll cer-- 
tainly be his main objective this 
season", sa id Elaine Meflar, 
“He got a suspicion of a leg two 
seasons a go, Ski we gave bona, 
long rest. He’s a class boise with : 
Gold Gup potentiaL” . 

Earlier in the day Steve Smith 
Pfrfw had given a . spirited , 
exhibition of his own particular 
brand of forceful jockeyship 
when driving Welsh Oak home 
three- len gths dear of Norton 
Crass in the Charles Davis 
Handicap Chase. 

And Tim Thomson Jones, the - 
c ham p io n amateur, also gave a-, 
fine display of skillful', 
horsemanship when restraining, ' 
the headstrong Just For The 
Crack before beating their only 
surviving opponent Critic Ham- , 1 
let in the Punch Bowl Amateur , 
Riders Chase. 





ASCOT 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


H ft T WALKER GODDESS CHASE (limited Handfcap: Grade it 
£18,584: 2m 40 (7 runners) 


212 -211 GOLUB! HSinri 1 C) J GWord 7-100- 

214 «UZ QEEA G Hobtaairi 7-W8 MnGi 

216 30P- SWUNG CMW0 A Water 10-100 

VUsi 


1.00 Robin Goodfellow. 

1.30 FRENCH UNION (nap). 
2.05 Desert Orchid. 


2.35 Floyd.. 

3.0S Course Hunter. 
3.40 Problem Child. 


• Michael Seely's selection: 2.05 Desert Orchid. 

The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: 1.00 YOEMAN BROKER (nap). 


303 32212-4 CHARCOAL WALLY (C) (J MureoR R Hodges 7-11-7 J I 

304 U2320-1 DESERT CRCHD (CO) (R Swrtdge) D Elsworth 7-1 

305 01111-1 AMBER KMIBLER (D Shorten} H Wharton 7-11-6 (7«x) S T« 

306 111023- BEHM (N MBs) N Gasaies 7-11-0 D 

307 H»F2-11 IflJUi BATOR (D) (Mis OJMtaon)FMntar B-10-7 (4«x) PSo 

308 U0/31FP- CHURCH WARDEN (C) (J Moraton) D Muray-Smiflt 7-107 ROi 

309 21 UMP- COOL DCOSHN (C PMM) Mbs SHUT 9-10-7 O 

1S8& Uaiy PranMng 7-11-7 P Scudamora (B-f) 0 Nfcfwteon 7 ran 


CBflMM 

S YoBkton (4) 

D Brawn 

P SuJniini 
, RP un woody 
Q Bndlay 


05 6-1 
83 F7-4 
80 5-1 
• 99 3-1 
93 7-2 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

i.O Easter Festival L30 Royal Gambit 2.0 
Glennie. 2J0 Tenzing. 3.0 Puldca M^or. 330 

Sand castle. 


GAmreSS 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103(12) 00432 TBC3RHW (COJF) (Mre JRyfoy)BHaU 9-100 


B«Mt(4) 


Rocttamt number. Draw In brackets. Six-figure and distance winner. Bf^beaten favourite hi lataet 
form (F-fetL P-piOed up. U-wseated rider. B- race) Owner hi brackets. Trainer. Age and 
broucftit down. 5-sapped up. R-refused}. Horae's weMiL Rider plus any aOowence. The Times 
name (B-Mnkera. V-visw. n-taod E-EyeshWd. C- Private HanrCcappec's rsnng. Approximate starting 
course winner. D-cfistanca wemor. CD-come price. 



BE i il ( 11 - 10 ) best effort 

soft Feb 1 .* 

4t £2477, 

Anractton 

M when beatkig Arctic 

beet eftottet aeasonwheo besSng PotoM pi-3) 10 




Going: chase course- good; hurdles course- good to firm 


13 KENNEL GATE NOVICE HURDLE (£3£5& 2m) (9 runners) 


102 3-1 TCBMQ0DDFBX0W (Mbs BSwbe)G 8 aMng 3-11-6 

103 O0B-F1 SKYGRANGE (J Green) J Jenkins S-11-6 

ID*. 02220-1 TBLETRADER (CO) (JHoara)R Hodges 5-1 1-6 

103 202-1 YEOMAN BROKER (Mm H Alwen) J Gifted S-11-6 

106 HMN(QWafedhWaring)GPnM5-11-1 

110 31FQP KNOCK HARD (D) (BhitMd Manor Farms) J Franocme 7-11-1 — 

111 L0RDY BOY (D SengeT) D McMson 3-11-1 R 

112 3- POWYS (RE A Bolt LttJ) F Winter 6-11-1 P> 

116 0000/0 TOWS WHAISttNAME (T Staddan) W R YUSants 6-11-1 ! 

1 S 8 S: HOMEWARD 5-1 1-11 C Brawn ( 1 SQ Mrs N Sretti 8 ran 


~ GBradtoy S7F7-4 

J White 99 3-2 

BPowal 9010-1 

RHone 999 6-1 

C Brawn — — — 
— . BdeHaan — — 
, R Dunwoody — 12-1 
PScndMwan 91 7-2 


235 SHOW HILL HANDICAP HURDLE (£8.700:2m} (8 runners) 

401 100141- PRBEAUX BOY (CD) (CROKh)Cfkrae»i 8-12-7 .MBo«fcy(4)-«'9B04 

402 0111RV FLOYD TO (MWMaiODeeworth 6-1 1-1 C Brown — 5-1 

403 00110-1 JMSMTME (D) (U Devkw) R Brazkigian 5-10-4 (4ex) RDraiwoody 96 6-1 

405 111013- MY DOMNKM (Ciq (T Rarosdan) M McCOOrt 4-10-2 ! B Rie ri 9SF3-1 

408 021109- OranDAN p pire C HeaVi) O Shenraod 6-100 S Sherwood 92 8-1 

412 3113/2 MARUON (DJJF) (Mrs M Graft!) MesSHeB 5-10-0 GBradtoy 91 7-1 

415 1111=2-0 |MERir(D)(G Sandora) A Moam 6-100 G Moore 8312-1 

420 31000- COPSE AMD ROBBERS (D) (Mrs KHuteHnsoa}J Jenkins 4-10-0 J WHM 7910-1 

1995c PRBEAUX BOY 7-11-9 H Davies (4-1) C Roach 7 ran 


Going: good 

1.0 lOMBOLTON NOVICE HURDLE (£1,089: 
2m 100yd) (22 runners) 

i & 

4 344- 

5 

6 

7 . 

9 

10 

11 0 - 
12 

13 pos- 

ts m2 

19 MO- 

17 - 

18 • 

2D 

21 -029 

22 OB- 


34 Rovef To Do, 94 Golden MtastmL J1-4 Gtonrua 
10-1 Gee-A,»-1 SraRngCawaOer- 

£30 RACMG POST HANDICAP IWRDLE (£1,440: 
2m 5f 50yd) (10) 

■ 1 FRR- DAHC 1 NQ SOYHBGN K Mongan 7-12-2 — K 

5 TSfSBBmRSSZSStF 4 




S S3 ■SSSSM ategaA^ gS 

13 000- ARCONAOA P J Joow B-1 M — -C” 


ID Hwn 5-136 


FORMS 


continued Ms knprawoment wftn a 71 win rarer paiaraaei t 
25.23nin).TEL£niADER(11-QwBBanlinprassiw9wi> 
andcfistance(C2461,finn.Oct29 > 1 12 ran) on seasonal debut. YH 
proved rarer lf» Summer wtwn an easy 1 S victor rarer Briton Yor. 
Now 6. 13 ran). L0RDY BOY (10-13) showed someprorni 
9W 3rd to (kxnandfflitB ( 11 - 10 ) rt Sandown (2m. E356S. I 
oi 20 to Befl Founder (10- 9) in a Lngfield nonce hurtfla 
season. S elec B e n. SKVGHANGE 


good, Nov 5.21 
Vfarrastarlasttk 


JBareestar last time H 

ns Mlmpreesfce a winner from Trie Bakewefl Boy (10-1^ here rarer Course 
112 ranlor seasonal debut YKJWW BROKBI ( 10 - 1(8 seemed to hiwelm- 


. SKYGRANGE (10-12) 
m 21. £3219. good. On 
0-13) here rarer Courae 


3J5 Rff* HANDICAP CHASE (£6,415: 3m) (6 runners) 

501 022D-22 CASTLE WARDEN {CD) (M Shone)-) Edwards 9-11-13 P Barton 

502 07111FO- BOLAWB CROSS (CO) (ShaiMi A Abu Kbarnstn) N Gaso le o 7-11-13 P Oc ud w era 

504 1240OV IEANARAGHA 8 M(Mra WTutoChJS Malar 9-11-6 M Hanfegtoa 

506 19FFD4 MCIH!nilOII(D)(PDulosae)PDiitaeeaM 1-0 RDomtoody 

507 11341-1 COtBISE HUH7d (P Buh) D Murray-Sraith 3-10-13 (4 ok) C Brawn 

GOB 312/2P-P DON SABREUR P Peaimra) D Pearman 9-10-10 GRraJay 

1995: CASTLE WARDEN 8-1WP Barton (7-2) J Edwards 4 ran 

SAD AURELIUS HURDLE (3-Y-O: £3,837: 2m) (10 runners) 


96 6-1 

• 99 64 


1 JO MANICOU HANDICAP CHASE (£6,368: 2m) (5 runners) 


201 131FF-3 SOMBUTO BJ) (R McDonald) R McDonaU 7-11-10 ASMngar 97 6-1 

202 111132 CARTON DAWN (D) (P Hoptara) J GMtortl 10-11-0 RRowe 97 7-2 

203 UQOjnO FAR BRIDGE (CO) (Duka of AftoH) G Baking 10-10-12 G Bradtar • 99 F94 

204 3230-11 RSKH UMON (D) (Mrs C Sotei) D NSchglson 8-10-10 (4ox) Rtkarwacdr 93114 

205 330302 ST WU1AM (D) (W Moraaxnbe) R Hodgas 9-1 06 BPntrel 97 5-1 

1985: ST WILLIAM 6-11-6 P Hobbs (10-1) R Hodgee 5 ran 


901 30B21 BRBfT RWERSBE (CO) (? Mason) GBtedteg 118 6 

Bradtey 82 91 
leKeown W99 F56 


Htterin — — 1 

805 00 DUFF (J Jooaph) D Ssworth 11-1 

606 0 HOROWITZ (R DcwsatQ R Hwtop 11-1 RD 

C Brawn — 91 
■moody — 191 

607 JAZEIASfG Cooke) NCataghan 11-1 1 

610 PRAHE OYSTBI Doray) 0 Stiarwood 11-1 SS 

tenphy 

henraed — 91 

911 00 PRO*** 4 *”™ (• r. TViMfirat 1 1.1 .. ... . 

J Bryan 

612 00 RHODE ISLAM! RED <V)(J Bruton) A Moors 11-1 

513 SPROWSTON BOY (G Wbttinfl) P Keiewsv 11-1 

SMOOrO — ■ 

RRmra — 191 


27 906 

28 P 

7-2 Eastar F9sfival,4>1 Breakfast Car, 92 TMan, 6-1 Pa A 
Pry, YHd Hope. 10-1 Fddw, 13-1 DaBas Snritti. Eye Ftatoer. 

1 J30 TETWORTH NOVICE CHASE (SU360: 3m) 
(7 runners) ■ -■ 

2 0-14 ARTFUL CHARLEY (D)Jto*^rR&geraWS- 1 1-10 

JJIMefn 

4 O- ELVBISanaNAI6gtttigMeB-11-3 HOaswal 

10 METHS WALLOP Jobber 9-11-3 BMnragi 

11 000- HHmHrS TOWSI G HUJbard 7-11-3 _ 

212 7M ROYAL GAtMir J CaBort 6-116 

13 SALMON 3 F9B B3I Ms PTntrwriiy 6-116 

BrPTDwariay 

14 OOP- SPmYBff PW Haris 3U6 R Stonge 


19 24PSAN0YI 

17 1MQ LfTTLE 

18 010 - BW0FA~IUI»YHJGilta^5-lM 

21 -ma 8 BKMDV R Cutis S- 10 -Q 

22 0909 FULL OF LOVE Ms A Lea 7-406 
52 Balywest 3-1 Bit OfA Dandy. 11 -ajenring. 8-1 Uttte 

Katrina, Smwyla. 10-1 Dndng Srarerafau Strajr Shot 

3J> BBIFORD HANDICAP CHASE (£1,632: 2m 
200yd0(7) 

2 w wflOranAJQRWoawwoodS-ri j, 

< 02P4 SMART RS^-Y R Hodges 6-11 -7 ; E Morphy 

1 p “ - * 

B 4822 1 M BOY W Kama 7-10-1 

11 -44P PALATMATE 6 HartQW B-1D6 „J Barto w 

12 OOP- TOY JRACKT Forster 9-1 30 Lflaraa*W 

‘ 74 MaWto Road, 5-2 Maid 0 < Moyoda, 11-2 Ptoka Major, 

8-1 PMafinSeTllnBoy* «>-1 Smart Reply, 16-1 Toy Track. 

130 jOMBOLTON NOVICE HURDLE (£1,073: 2m 
100yd) (12) 

. a 249- ARTESWMMVWtoan 4-10-10 


9 60- ■A P AOCRADOughton 4-10-1 

10 MUELYRteRDidwi 4-10-10 

11 006 WORAPOWATA 

13 RAPPAHAWOCK P 

s °t ssssatfsgUm 

17 300- iwuxne PRMCE K Stone 4-10-10 S 

18 UPTON WENT! Forster 4-10-10 LHanrey 

20 0 JOLTS ORLM Ryan 4466 

22 TUNHNJScflMp 4-106 — 

23 -20 SAND CASTLE SMMor 5-11-7 
. 2-1 Sand Caaflei 7-2 ScHemmar, 11-2 Arteskxn. The 

Lodge Prince, 10-1 JoTa GH. Tunkto. 14-1 others. 


|C U aw 9 ire(7)l 

^HP Doable I 

IC.toBessI 


4-5 Rani Gambit. 74 Artful Charita. 14-1 NeOier Waflop. 
16-1 Speedy Bee. 20-1 Rbymiar'sTowar, 29-1 Salmon Spbwier. 

2JD HACEH OFFOBD HANDICAP CHASE (E3.199: 
2m 51) (5 runners) 

21 112F GLENHUC (O T Casmr 9-11-10 EBodteyW 

26 444 ROYAL TO DO (WJJTFraMW 19-106 — LKamyM 


Course specialists 


21 1t2F GLENHUE (Q T Casey 9-11-10 E PudMayW 

29 444 ROYAL TO DO fCJDJTFtntor 10-106 — L Honey W 


from 51, 137%. 

JOCKEYS: J MeUrrtRn. 6 toMw ra from 7S rides. 76%; J 
Baritra 6 ftara Bl&fl* (CWy two quaMer^. 


*• P P 


: THAWHORN 114 F Berry (74 fav) T Cwtoetry pre) 8 ran 

Course specialists 


FORM 



TRAINERS 

Winnera Runners Percent 


JOCKEYS 


^Mrtor 

NGMeteo 

F Winter 

6 

6 

25 

23 

34 

144 

26.1 

17.8 

17.4 

OEtearerth 

9 

59 

153 

DMchoaon 

11 

83 

133 






Percent 

21.1 

16-8 

84 




r 

WARWICK J 

12.45 Be 
2.15 Hi 

Selections 

By Mandarin 

spoke: 1.15 Sunny Reef ].45 Roaspeter. 
usabillioa. 2.45 Gold Tycoon. 3.15 

Junpatm 

e. 3.45 Deep Prospect 


245 BONUSPRWr NOVICE CHASE (£1387: 2m 
4^(16) 

2 -291 AMECE IBs 8 Jeans 8-11-5 
5FS4S- BOWDEN I Dudgeon 8-11-6. 

70409- CHAIBJEW COTTUE N Handeram 6-11-5 


NEWCASTLE 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.15 Why Forget 
1.45 Fergy Foster. 

2.15 Robin Wonder. 


2.45 Prince Bubbly. 
3.15 Norton Warrior. 

3.45 Half Brother. 



Gofagsgood 

12.45 ST MARY’S TRIAL HURDLE (£2,422: 2m) 
(7 runner^ 

1 V BESPOKET Forster 5-11-S HOartaa 

2 1 13- VrtXMX ! H T Forster 5-11-1 — _K Moo af 

31000- YOUNG MCH0LA8N Handaraon 5-10-12' 

SSeteiEcdM 

. 4 -293 COLdB- JAMEB (BF) Mre S 0fewr44Q-S 


8 -ORB CONS TABLE KELLY tea J Barrow 9-116 MBoatoy (4) 

11 69F. FI1ZGAYLE (MX ffiztnp 8-11-5 PMekanto 

12 PM- BAY RASCAL 0 Shenmod 7-116 

13 102: GOTO TYCOON JSMerta 

14 im GRMKWiMCTB 

15 0F6 HAWORTH PARK G Ham 7-1 1-5 

21 304> RH) lOCK Mrs M Babbage 8-11-5. 

22 9P-9 SAMS FREW Us J Barrow 5-11 

23 043 SPARTAN Oman-JKtag 1311-5. 

» P04J STICK OF ROCK (NZ) D Barona 6 - 
25 2F4- TREYTORDT Fnslar.O-ll-S 

27 WUEAUJTM OErer 6-11-4 

28 000- BOCA SUPHBAP Bate* 6-114 
11-4 Gold Tycoon. 7-2 Anfeoa, 6-1 CbarikTs Cottagn. 7-1 

) Spartan OrtariL 8-1 StecJcot Rock. 10-1 TreytaRL 124 ribara. 




Z45 STEEL PLATE & SECTIONS NOVICE CHASE (Qualffier: £2^55: 
2m 120yds (5 runners) 


5 MAFimnu J9RM9 4-1M fltewran JaarnaW 

6 2F2PAH1S MATCH J Jorafcw 4-1 0-5 : — HJnMnfr) 

7 TUDOR JUSTICE (K A Bristnm 4-106 HBteboana 
94 Bespoke, 114 Young Mchotas. 4-1 Paris Match, 9-2 

Ootonat June, 9-1 Wood gal e. 16-1 oBwra- 


Lltlf 


By Michael Seely 

1.15 WHY FORGET (nap). 1.45 Preben Fur. 


Going: good 

1.15 JOHN SMITH'S BREWERY HANDICAP CHASE {£2360: 3m) 
(4 runners) 


1 PO04OO AUCKLAND EXPRESS (M Ttoapsan) V Thompson 8-114 - M-MIhaaMM W 

3 000496 GEHNAHO(P warm) MNaugWon 6-11-4 MHarmnd 

4 300044- MH CHRIS (COL 44 Foods Ltd) M Naughtun 7-114 Ctteaa* 

5 1U14U1 PRINCE MM8LY (JBwbwo)M Antson S-114 RMartayfT) 

0 116122 SHARP SONG (J Lathan) T Faktwrn 5-1 14 .CFakMiret 

1995: Ns Monapoodtag race 


1.15 WHLERSEY SBJJNG HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£330: 2m) (16) 


3 (V)D Barons 7-11-7 
McOourtS-11 


2 jrr»a. BnmHOS OF GOLD tPI Ondaoandent Twlnrt Jlmmt Rttqarald 7-11-7., MPwywr 97F74 

a 030016 WHY FORGET (CD) IP Piter) w a Stephenson 10-10-10 RLatito «69 94 

4 32330P- THE OtVtoEH (Q (Exore the tela J Arikan) Mrs T Cridsr 8-10-7. CHawMns 90 92 

6 33313-1 SHiNT VALLEY (CD) (J WateyJ I Jordwi 13-106 (8ex) B Stony 94 3-1 

1985: No cemspondbig new 



3.15 EBF ETTINGTON HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£1,752: 2m 5f) (8) 

4 JP4t 

5 000- 
9 12P- 

7 000- 

8 092 

9 900- LEVAJITWE ROSE M Pipe 6-106 

. 10 060 Bt GOUHASl TTtOH G Do«05 5-106 A Webb 

ii any ah em— belie JC owon 6-100 dSotom. 

116 Jlmpmm, 4-1 Asa &adee, 96 Wfaany Bum, 5-1 : 
Unarai. 10-1 Leventtaa Rose, IB-1 others. 




form (fr^Kte ^ ^iSkSnaedw toi^l^aw^d to 

31. 9 ran). 

SetocflOK WHY PORGET 


ntoeirabestre- 

SaENT VALLEY 

221 10, good, Oct 


1.45 W M. SWALES HANDICAP CHASE (£3,074: 2m 4t) (6 runners) 


3.15 COMEDY OF ERRORS NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-tt £1,175: 2m 120yd) 0* runners) 

1 p ALBERT THE GREAT (I Rcxtdan) R Gray 10-10 S Chariton 

2 ALL A DREAM (F Bartow) J Partaa 10-10 M H a rare a nil 

4 GREBiARCHSUR Moody) Mrs JRamsden 10-10 Q Harter 

5 HURMCAIC KiraYfE St George) MWEasurby 10-10 GMUDotoS — 4-1 

6 2 HORTON WARRIOR (MaJJ Unlay) MHEanwby 10-10 : L»pr — F54 

7 RAFFLES ROGUE (BRostronjM Camacho 10-10 ■ Dwyer — 12-1 

g SPACE TROOPER (JTumoy)TFaMurat 10-10 CFiJrtiarat — 10-1 

10 TOGDALE (Mrs MTaytoUMWEasteray 10-10 : PTMt — 12-1 

13 VETAJEMORA (R ArtXflhnoQW Pearce 10-10 NOHRONWR 

17 4440 KAMPHALL (C COry) Mtes Z Grata 106 — — — 

18 LOVE YOU ROSY IP S»a) Mrs G R wretey 106 PWweoW — 6-1 

19 B MEGANTS MOVE (RBtotqjJeftaaon 106 MHM M-1 

20 - TANYA'S MBICESS (Mrs JWaggoOJN waggott 106 Mtoe T Wa ggaB (7) 

21 YORK PLACE (F Bartow} A Robson 106 Ottotton — 16-1 


3^5 WflVBlSrrY OF WARWICK TURF CLUB 
NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£953: 2m) (25) 


16 POP 

17 P-F9 

18 00P- 

20 -0P0 

21 40)0 

1 14 Kitty Wren. 76 H-Tech Boy. 96 llatere ud , 0-1 Sumy 

Root 8-1 Moon Melody, 10-1 Atenarry, 12-1 atm. 


□UMPram DAY PBurgamo 5-11-7 JS 

HWP SQUAD R Hodges 7-116 SEi 

SteP T ASCeiTG Baung 4-11-5 AChwrt 

raVTOSHQD PARK Cltakiws 5-114 X 

JE LLEAR RWOaftraaa 4-11-3 Patarl 

BAYTOWN COKES Moran B-11-1 CPU 


— ^ 1^5 BtC RAZOR HANDICAP CHASE (£3,785: 3m) 


a 111319 / JUBBROOK (CO) (MraMNowWRMH Easterly 9-116 LWyar — 6-1 

4 111 IW TRAVELOWEN(P Pteeriw A Stephenson 9-116 — — 14-1 

7 T 211-01 FStGYFOSTSI (CO) (FSootariW A Stephenson 9-106 RLmb WBB 114 

8 23F/44-1 FOR GOOD (CEO (Lord Cadogan) N Cramp 9-106 C I tewh l na 95 4-1 

q H44P6 PREBEN FUR (CXLBF) (W Peacock) G Richards 9-106 PTate 99F2-1 

14 2120*4 LIVERPOOL RAMBLBI (T Suiuiwrflald) J OBver 7-106 JKKtaano Bfl 7-1 

1895: PEATY SANDY 11-126 Mr A Dudgeon (96) Mtas H Hamilton 12 ran 


1985: SAY GUNNER 116 C Grant (4-1) Denys Snath 15 ran 

3.45 CORUNNA HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,339: 2m 120yd) (18 runners) 

1 00/ SAGE HAWK (Mbs R Gray) R Gray 7-12-7 Utarar 

3 0111F6 OLDMCX(J Hanson) J HwwonS-116»_ M Dwyer 60 -~ 

a DMIVO HALF BROTHER (TRamsdBi) MW Eaaterby 4-1 16 GMcCmat 97 0-1 


3 446 ARDSir SPY (CO) RArngMge 9-11-7 _ 

9 210- CO HTWEn P) T Foraar 19-10-10 SartS 

9 F30- BC AAEJOOY CT N Handwaoq 9-102 S Srtttl Ecdaa 
10 D-11 ROUSPEIER DMetateon 9-W6 — W Hitoteey s (7) 


BAYTOWN COKE 9 Morgan 6-11-1 c Prince (71 

UNBEATABLE TOP-EX OGarefeCo 5-11 6 j _ 

SHOTHQO I R Jonn 6-116 

M!SSS^ e SSS!fs S= T£S& 

OAK FUMAjmFWaiwyn 4-10-12 KMooWrt 

FRAME OF POWfa £D) Jmaiy Ffizgsnafc] 3-10-11 , 

H Mm 

SWEET START Glhoraer 8 - 10-11 COdnoadin ‘ 

MBAK Mrs BWartM 6-10-10 JMwonffl 

OSCOVBt GOLD E^KBridgNlW 5-10-7 . 


46 Rouapater, 9-1 Arttent Spy, 96 Co Member. 9-1 
(ndaaetody. 




2.15 FOOD BROKERS & PRIMULA “FIGHTING FIFTH* HURDLE (Grade 
It £3,554: 2m 120yd) (10 runners) 


5 311110 TR0MER08 (BF) (Mrs J Park) Denys SmMh 9116 C 

G 113R0 SFWTEBRAW (CTO IP SuBWlJMH EaBWt>y R -1 *6 L 

7 111096- SAMrOPADHE(CDKr Ramadan) W Storey 4-116 A< 

10 DIEXMO BALLYAftoY ( 8 FJ (W Manners) W A Stoptienson 4-1 VO R 

11 2021-13 BH>ECUHiOSnY(DLenda)JSWIison «.l 16 T< 

12 491031- RAMPANT (Mrs R Barr) RBatr 7-10-13 

13 0/012-00 COWIAUOHT GOEEN (P Macktani) t Vickers 910-10 — 

14 12U132 SMART M BAACK (BR (W SteMmson-Yaytor) G Rteharda 4-106 t 

15 012060 FLYING SQUAD (CO) (Mm J BoodWOwl Mis J OoadWIow 8-106_ J K I 

19 081416 mVOUR-BY-POHTtlME (CO) (J OTttra) Met S Austin 4-10-7 

17 00021-0 MATELOT(BSonw*ertWB)M HaugMon 4-106 M Haw 

19 R22106 QUALITY PRMCE (Mrs W Clump] M Arison 5-106 RMad 

19 100236 TAX CODE (JRamsden) NOnanp 8-106. CHa 

20 6160 NKtefT GtCST (BF) (J Rddeaj P ManeHb 4-106 — O 

21 030020/ LTTTLE TEMPEST (Mrs G Young) Mrs A Bel 7-106 SO 


. C Great fl 9-1 

- LWyar *3 — 

ACaaraO W9» 9-1 
. R Lamb 97 8-1 

TO DDR 93 7-1 


2.15 GLEN INTERNATIONAL LADY RIDERS ONLY 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,617: 2m) (11) 

2 209- DflWTY RULES OMS Meflor 5-1M — LenaVtacawt 


2 209- OrntYRIUS 
6 000- WINDBREAKS! L. 

9 421- BUMBL ES FOLLY 6* □ Barans 5-106 Ita T Dsaie ^ 
9 464 TOTONIAN ram* 7-106 — wranJam«i(7) 

11 131P RABAB B JJOW fo J thteon 4-W6 MreGReas 

12 TT23 RSWG BOVERaiaH (D) J Parish 91 94 

13 0232 FSRLY NEWITO ERJuCtaiB-W^!^?!!^?— 

14 ZOO HASTY MPTOTT Robson 7-190^ Hsa R Lock (7) 

15 061 0anSKM(BJ))MaNSDiim4-106(4«i4 . 

' Least Lena (7) 

16 096 aaimECOCKSnWJEMdgar 4-HMJ _ 

17 1)00- ROCKMAN Mrs PRW 9106 !^Tpr5?SI 


A Moore 91910 Carter ■ 
9) D Banjns 5-108 IWaaTI 


— — 

PTacft 991=9-2 


26 029 DARK CONIC J King 5-106 

Zl CWf GODLORO T Tsyfer 6-106 _ 

29 OOP- NOBET BAY MraSOtear 7-194 

30 094- FLEET BAY THaM 9191 __ 

31 909 SRALLAAL Mbs A Ktea 7-106 

32 OOW SUPER SPARK S Ctvtsnn 7-11 

33 009 WBJ.’S WMMQR G Ham 4-190 

34 0P6 OUET STAR P DariS 5-106 

S PO-O MORE ONE WAY RParfcw 9190— W 

35 BM BYROC BAY R Conte 9190 RMoGHa 

r 76 Swift AapanL 96 Frame « Power.M 

Fraod Squad. 91 Dart Comte, 10-1 others. 


Course specialists 


17 1)09 RDCWAN Mrs Pfflgby 9190 IfisPngbyffl 

7-2Brenbto8FbBy.4-l CBmentton. S-T Rtetog Sorarekm, 9 
1 BanPyne s Pride, 7-1 infinity Rules. 91 atharsT 


iiSXnjSgr ° nU ' n D, ‘ " 

K 69 rides. 1 S EmBh 

Ecctes. 6 tram 66.9.1%. (Only two qutMara). • 



, to be ridden by 

leads the British 


Candy trained Minstrel Star. 


IfaUai 

• Just . a Flutter (Bruce Ray-: 
mood) and Haanf (Richard 
Hills) go for toe Premio 
Benardelli over one mile where 


• War Brave (Willie Carson), . 
Tarib (Richard EGDsX Matou 
(Willie Ryan) and Abu Musfah' 
(Geoff Baxter) should make ai 
bold attempt at a British one- 
two4hree in the Premio Umbria ’ 
(6fL Among thtdr nine rivals are 
kxalhopesDu)rfori(BruceRay-: 
mond) and Gimme Reasorfe 1 
(Ray Cochrane). 










-■•1 «s 

iitg 

•a 


<*» **. 
«L 




*_.? :S 


41 § 

¥3 

■;;<■« 


V :c 
■4 :* 


• * *■•;:» 
:; .-' %5 

“*T- UlM-KM 


"i 1 !' 


racing 


Ground is 
the key for 
top British 
challenger 

hope in- the Washington DC 
• imcrnaticraa] at Laurel part 
tonight, and should «> wen 
provided he can handle the 
ground. 

The, griding showed signs of 
£P n £ m S to his best when 
pushing second to Sine Blade 

in 'the Qbeen Elizabeth II Stakes 

at Ascot and he followed that un 

Broad Brash, who was third 
rojhe Kentucky Derby and 
Prealcnros and winner of seven 
outof 12 other races this year, is 

the probable favourite. He has 
yet to race on turf; however, and 
u not certain to start unless the 
ground dries izn_ * 

In his absence. Palace Music, 
who only just foiled to m rh 
Last Tycoon in the Breeders’ 
Cup Mile, would be the public's 
fancy but this ex-French colt is 

another who is not at his best on 
soft ground. 

.Southjec beat Shardari on 
yielding . ground in the 
Rothman’s International in 
Canada test month and must 
bold . good prospects even 
though this'Hip is three furlongs 
shorter. 

An interesting contender is 
the Polish trained Korab, un- 
beaten in four outings in Eastern 
Europe tins season. He is one of 
three invited runners, Palace 
Music and the Rothma n third 
Royal Treasurer are the others. 
Yves Saint-Martin gained Ms 
only win in the race 24 years ago 
when Match upset Kelso. The 
Fren chman may have the best 
outsider" in Double Bed, a 
disappointment behind Trip- 
tych in the Dubai Champion but 
a good second to Park Express in 
the Phoenix Champion before 
thaL 


LAUREL PARK 


Going; soft 

MS B«a wm i 

INTERNATIONAL (Grade 

wwaRMB 


SPORT 


41 


• Vi 


« S' 

t - 

%*■**“ 

«■ 

Wl 








msbe? 

k im&c 


r.\ 


m < 


. x r 


jr otrrr 
® 'l' *•' 

ra- ;»* 

T : 


m *■■■ 

«N * ' 

t . is. 

lb :w 
».*■ 
v- 


j J 


WASHINGTON 
fc 

runners) 

. Wt^tewham 
4-900St mran» 1 

2 111 KORAB A WeflCfcJ (POD 4-90 
M McMcM 3 

3 163 APELDOORN P Barite (FQ4-9-C 

4021 raBminEajWM 114 

5 349 UEUTBiANreSmHTSj? 

4-9-0 RDautofi 
6123 PHEHEB MSTER R Da Stasio 
6-9-0 C Amman 8 

7 112 DERBY WISH W Mott 4-90 
CAoUayS 

8 831 WOLLASTON J Cantov 490 
ON8torJM14 

0120 DOUBLE BED F Daman (fif 

■ 3-8-10 YSMMtonto 2 

10 211 BROADBRUSH R Start 98-10 

VBnctU7. 

11 123 ROYAL TREASURER JDmr 

(Cml 3-8-10 4 UumH 

12 221 SOUIHJET A Rome. 3-8-10 

13 112 DANCE OF LWEMMRgr 9910 

PDpytt 

14 731 STOWRONTIffi LOOSER . . 

Btfand£5jm)391D 

3-1 Broad Brusn, PaUcm Muafc, 5-1 
SouBqeL M ‘ Dam Ol -Life. 
Teteprompiw. W-1 Double Bad, Premier 
Meter. Storm On The Lbdse.25-1 Koran, ' 
Ro^ -ltamaw; S3 ■ 

UeutaanCff LaiV WdObsIou (HI 3 
cambina4).'Apaidaam. , _ "*;• /.■• /. 

Yesterday’s 

results 

'Ascot' 'T'^ 

OetoK chase oouiw-- good;, laadtoe- 
Boodrofirm 

1 JO pm tale) 1 . MR MRKER(R Rom, 
W-1l-2):2.GwtwnBof(H Davies. 11-2t3, 
“protection (Stave Knight, 3-1). ALSO 
RAN: 7-4 lav Prime Oats (Btfc). 12 Alto 
Cumulus (41b). 16 Ctad*. Gotf* 

«M. 7 ran. «. nk. XL2HL 10L J GWorti 
hrion. Tola: eaio: eatao, eaao. dr 

£2250. CSF: £31 .35. . 

1 JSOm eh) 1, JUET FOR.THE OHAOC 
(Mr T Thomson 



FOOTBALL: LOGIC DEFIED AT HIGHFIEI n nnan 


S 




opens on the 

stage 



; By Cfive White 



Jtoted tiie dismissal of Dot 
M adcay as manager, only the 
most incurable optimist 
would have jpven them any 


But they. did. And only a 
madman would have forecast 
that a third of the way through 
the new season they would 
have suffered fewer defeats 
than thQ champions them- 
selves. But they have. 

Coventry, have been defying 
logic ever since they rose to 
the first division under Jimmy 
HUTs exuberant leadership 19 
seasons ago. But suddenly the 
first division's great 
artists have taken to the high 
wire It is hard to believe that 
today they come to White 
Hart Lane to face Tottenham 
Hotspur . as genuine 
championship contenders. 

Those teams who : could 
afford it would have tried to 
buy their way out of the kind 
of trouble Coventry found 
themselves in. insiwnH largely 
for financial reasons, Cov- 
entry decided to stick with 
what they had, which meant 
that instead of employing a 

new manag er they iterilfo l 1 1 > 

share the job between George entry, first 
CurtiSythe .managing director, defence. *T 
and John 'Stitat, the yooth 
coach, promoting Sfllett to 


as Ogrizovic, and 
has shored up the 
of the defence; We’re 
also more aggressive in 
utidfidd.” Only Arsenal and 
Luton have conceded fewer 
goals. 

On the management side 

there are now four former 
Coveahy players, apart from 
SHlett and Curtis, there is 


whom. Printer and Houchen, 
have not even figured in the 
season’s success after pre- 
season romries. 

Baskalrf, they have made 
only one change to last 
season’s line-up, the ao 
quisidan for £50,000 plus two 
reserves of Rotherham 
United's Emerson, 
nicknamed “DuracdT be- 
cause of his grqf yr hair a pH 
woikrate. Silleit said that his 
first task was to put a smile 
back on the face of the 
-There seemed to be a big *»ng both halves of the job. 
Hack cloud over the dub so I on ȣ f P , tdi and bdand.the 
brought some humour back leudedupbangngmy 

intoibe t raining All the dub’s head against the waH Now all 


Mick Coop, the reserve man- 
ager, and Mick Kearns, the 

reserve coach. - 
Sharing the load of manage- 
ment suits Silleti, who says he 
has tried before, at Hereford. 


bubbling now." 

He then got the players to 
talk frankly about bow they 
wanted to play the game. 
“Regis said be wamed the baU 
to feet It suits him to ptey it 
shore and that suits me. I 
haven't got any time for the 
long game. Besides, - Regis 
hasn't got. the best pair of 
hmgs in the world. Now he's, 
playing better than ever.'* 
Sutett, a defender in his 
playing days with Chelsea, 
Plymouth Argyie and Cov- 
to work on the 
ppen to believe 
in a s tr o ng backbone. We're 
lucky to rave such a good 


the 


I- deal with is the playing. 
George looks after the con- 
tracts and talks to the press 
after each game and lets me 
unwind.*’ 

It was for 
opposite reason that 
Bnririnshaw left the dub 
whom SUett. visits today. By 
comparison with Tottenham 
Hotsjpur, Coventry are still a 
faceless side; But h has hs 
compensations. “It’s a good 
time to go to White Hart Lane. 
They’ve got three players 
coming back from midweek 
internationals with knocks 
ami cuts while we've had a 
free week” 



THE TTW* UTmijD ? > nrTpprg ^ :w 



•'V. M/1®-, vr., 

‘ ‘ 


- • 


Coventry’s Cyril Regis, playing better than ever. 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Aston Villa (18) v 
sea (19) 


CheJ- 


%r 


Maxtcbes- 



iwmsan Jones, 8-11 fwk 2, CaUc 
t (Mr S Cowley. 13-21 ALSO RAN: 
7-4 Gian MW fw). 8 ran. 4L K Baflw* 
East iway. Tote21J». DP E1S0.CSF: 
£4.1i 

2.10 Bm dri} 1; WEL8H OAK fS SaOh 
5-1); 2, Nertao Ctdm (L WJw. 


seven months tor 
.who have doubts about 
Thompson Spink and rtrt 
(both virus). Dude,TBcOvered 
from a knae opefatkm, could play . 

Ms festtaaguegame for 
ChsteeB since August 30. 

Leicester Oty ' (17) v 
Everton(8) “ ■ “ 

Heath is restored to Jho Evsrton 
attack and Adams conies into 
mkffleid. Watson, who haa 
missed tar games, may be 
subetfUitaL WBkhisor is ruled 
out Leicester, wkhout Osman, 
bswewaistt back from •; 
suspension. 

Loton (5) r Nottfawbain 
Forest <2) 

Orfenss, absent for three weeks • 
with a hamstring fnMy« ^ avalabe . 
asaretheStembrotbarsand 
from - 

tooefe. Praece is mfed outbya 
trtn oe lnMy ^WaB^.Twtiowaa - 
rrtooi ttfe Bi|pmdi21 . 

, IHTo ptoy in an tinebangad 

" ChjE <21) T 
Charlton Ati>letic(l6) ' 

' Bolder itokes his debutfor. 

Charlton Si goal in John*'* absence 
andMBfrose and rtmpfwsy. 
return from injury- City give fitness 
tests to McNhb and Cuments,^ ' 
whohasa vkus. Redmond has 
joined foe !7r . ;ad- 

Newcastle United (22) v 
Watford (13; 

Newcastle recau: # 

18, in foeabaenoa of foe injured 
Stewart Watford are ' 

■unchanged. 


Norwich 
terUtd 

Putney makes Ms first 

aranoe for Norwich at home in 
i of the suspended Crook, 
and Barham contest the 
substitute siot Sivebaek 
returns for united after injury and 
Wood, a teenage reserve 

forward, is included in a squad of 
14, 

Qaeen’s Park Rangers 
(15) v Oxford UtriOO) 

Hardwick, the Oxford 
goal ke eper, plays onto Ms second* 
game of the season after a 


Telford poised to 
savage Burnley 


By Paul Newman 




Bates, 


74? 


♦ 


CP SCtdBKRi 7-2 t- 
ALSO RAN: 72 JMav KMwfbrt 
. 15-2 Owtnis ATOum (8to, 12 Brtoht 
4s (400. 20 TointeaUiaen m.7 ran. 
31, ML a. CtSL D Gandoto mWima. 

Tote: efiiO; £2.10. £200- DF: £650. CSF: 

£20.04. 

240 fflm 4f MM) 1.1BN MAJED (U 
McU»wJ*t Mfc 2. G»lte,8W^P 

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Dickinson stable 
onthedoubte. 

Monica Dickinson, the 
trainer, and her jockey Graham 
■Bradley hrought off' a short 
jfoced tfouble wilh Royal Greek 
and. Hand. Over, both of whom 
staiied : 2-J - on . firvonrites,- at 
Market Rttsen yeaentey: 

Bpyal Greek, the aH way 
winnCT of the George Novices 
Hurdle, is one of the fastest 
horses. in. the Harewood team. 
John Renton, his owner, hopes 
the. Jridhw will prove an arie- 
rruate^repbdcrflMit for another 
of His horaes. Ddius vritogam^l 
three victories .before breaking-, 
down so barfly at the.Odteu“ 
ham Festival meeting tbat he 

wattinabfetorace-agmn-L 


Sootbampton (14) v Arse- 
nal (3) 

Rowers is oetto plays Ms 
second league game for 
Southampton in place of 
ShWon. Dennis is doubtftiL Arsenal 
Sfxoufcfbe unchanged for the - 
jewenth consecuttoegama. 
Nichoiaarand Robson are sffl 

recovering from injory. 

Tottenham • (11) ' ▼ Cov- 

eiitryOhr (6) 

To tte nham delay a decision on 
whsfoer to play Hoddte witti a 
protective bandage on his head 
injury. PO(sfon, agad IS. is pofesd 

to make Ms debut in defence. 
Coventry should be unchanged. 
Wimbledon (12) v West 
Ham United (7) • 

West Ham, the only skJe in the 
division unbeaten away, give a late 
test to OiTs back injury. 


Steplwnson, 
eoftbeinjuR 
tare • 

Deiii’s appointment 


(Rgums fe psraoAnte Mteme least* 
positions) 


The Arsenal vi 


riairman 


David Dem has emerged as the 
newmanontheFootbaD Lea g ue 
Manag ement committ ee. ~ Hc 
said on. his appointment “I’ll do 
everything in my powers to hdp 
the game overcome hs cmrent 


The League vacancy came 
when the Luton executive direc- 
tor John Smith resigned over his 

club's ‘home fens only’ crowd 
experiment. ■ 


Dean, aged 40, and Arsenal 
vice-chairman since 1 983, 
seven votes ahead of 
Geoff Smith (six), 
Manchester United's Martin 
Edwards (five) and the Aston 
.Villa ffr qjrraan DOUg Effis, With 
three. One first divisiOD dirij dkl 
not vote. 

^*1 feel I can contribute to the 
Management Committee,'* 
Dem added. 


FA CUP 


Telford United, . non-] 
football's most feared FA Cup 
giant-killers,^) into today’s first 
round proper with their man- 
ager, Sian Storton, warning: 
“We are better than ever.” 

Barnley, Cop finalists as re- 
cently. as 1962, are Teifonfs 
visitors this' afternoon as the 
Shropshire dub ~ attempt to 
e h im their tenth League scalp in 
the last five seasons. Barnley are 
lying nine places off the bottom 
of die fourth division, having 
lost six of their eight away 
games. Telford, unbeaten at 
home, are third in the GM 
VaushaD Conference after a run 
of nine league games without 
defeat 

, “Although they haven't wan 
anything yet oo the evidence of 
our recent games this Telfoid 
ride is even better than the one 
that got to the fifth round of the 
Cup two years ago,” Storton 
said yesterday. “We must be the 
padest side in non-league foot- 
ball, we're more balanced than 
we used to be and we're also 
better organised and 
disciplined. 

“The lads are so confident 
that it almost frightens me. They 
would fancy their chances 
against any League ride at the 
moment. They mustn’t get com- 
placent. but I'd rather see them 
ut this sort of mood than feeting 
apprehe ns ive." 

Telford will be without 
Trevor Storton, the manager’s 
brother, who is Cup-tied, and 
John Stringer, who is injured, 
but two members of previous 
Cup campaigns are ready to 
return: Liam Halton, a defend- 
er, and Colin Wtihams, scorer of 


several vital Cup goals. 

Altrincham and Enfield, the 
other two regular giratplrillers of 
recent years, both face non- 
league opposition today, but the 
draw is still littered with poten- 
tial upsets. 

Stockport Comity, bottom of 
the fourth division, and Bach- 
dale, third from bottom, look 
1y vulnerable away to 
i Town and Naneaton 
Borough respectively. 

Nuneaton, however, will be 
deprived by injury of four first 
team players, including their 
player-manager, Jimmy 
Holmes, the former Coventry 
City and Tottenham Hotspur 
defender. “We’ve bad a 'lot of 
bad luck with injuries lately, but 
I'm quietly confident about this 
match," Holmes said yesterday. 

One of the newcomers is Peter 
Shearer, who moved to Nunea- 
ton from Rochdale earlier this 
month. Everton Out will also be 
playing against his former club, 
having left Rochdale four sea- 
sons aga 

WcaUstone, who ran into 
form last wedc with a 6-0 victory 
at home to Nuneaton, are Ekdy 
to pose problems for their 
visitors, Swansea City, but 
learned yesterday that injuries 
wiD deprive them of two play- 
ers, Steve Rutter and Paul 
Miller. . 

“We could have done with a 
full squad,” Brian Hall, 
Wealdstone’s manager, said. 
“Swansea deserve their place 
near the top of the fourth 
divirion and win provide a real 
test for us." 

Two former winners of the 

Cup, Wolverhampton Wander- 
ers and Cardiff City, face diffi- 
cult ties away to Choriey and 
Ton Pentre respectively. 
Charley, however, have bad to 
switch their tie to Bolton 
Wanderers because of fears over 
the safety of their ground. 


Top games 
planned 
by League 

The. Italian and Spanish 
Leagues could bring repre- 
sentative teams to England next 
season to play the Football 
League as part of its centenary 
celebrations. 

Matches which could bring 
players like Diego Maradona. 
Michel Platini, Michael 
Laudrop, Hugo Sanchez and 
Jorge Valdano to provincial 
grounds such as Okl Trafford 
and Goodisan Park would be a 
coup for the' world’s oldest 
football league. 

Few details of the Centenary 
celebrations have yet been 
finalised, but league officials are 
sifting through a number of 
possible matches to mark the 
occariomA four-nation tour- 
nament adding the West Ger- 
man Bundesfiga is another 
possibility. “It is a big occasion 
and we want to mark it in an 
appropriate way," the Football 
League secretary, Graham Kelly 
said. 

One definite “fixture" is a 
Charity Fun Run to be staged at 
all 92 dubs on September 27, 
1987. Supporters would be in- 
vited to run alongside their 
favourite players and raise cash 
for local charities. 

Clough backs 
Luton scheme 

Brian Gough has backed 
Luton’s controversial ban on 
away supporters on the eve of 
Nottingham Forest’s to Kenil- 
worth Road. Although the For- 
est manager has made a plea to 
his dub’s suuportere not to turn 
up, five Forest directors are 
boycotting the match because of 
Luton’s members only 
restrictions. 

Home Office Minister David 
Mdlor will an end the match to 
gain fust land experience of the 
scheme. 


Football v Mrs Thatcher 

Macfarlane taken 
to task by 
FA chairman 


BERT MILUCHIP 
(right), the Football 
Association chairman, re- 
plies to NeH Macfarlane 

I Bust take issue with the 
sorry chapter of inaccuracies 
and half-truths m the extract 
from Nefi Macfintaatfs book 

■Sport amd Politics published in 
Tftc Tima on October 29. They 
cannot be allowed to ga 
unchallenged. 

Mr Macfarlane seeks to don- 
oustrate that football cares little 
and does less about hooliganism. 
This is mter nonsense. 

At home, any police office- 
will tell yen that, thanks to the 
efforts of the dabs, the Football 
Association, the Football 
‘Lcagne and the police, the 
incidence of vio le nce among 
football supporters is well past 
its peak. 

Grounds are fenced and prop- 
erty segregated- All first and 
second division dabs have 
dosed-dreok television surveil- 
lance systems, thinks to an 
initiative taken by the football 
authorities well before the 
Pbppfewell Report appeared. 

Looking lo the frame, the FA 
condones to poor more and more 
money into its and 

educational programmes and 
into its community recreation 
projects. 

Overseas, we combine to do 
all within oar drenmscribed 
powers. As a result of the 
Brussels tragedy, the FA im- 
medmtely and without prompt- 
ing withdrew its dubs from 
European competition. We take 
no tickets for England away 
matches and we actively dis- 
courage our supporters from 
travelling. 

What has been the contribu- 
tion of Mr Madhrtane and his 
colleagues? 

At borne, “introduce identity 
cards." This is presented as a 
panacea for all of football's tils, 
and when we dare to express the 
castiois view that a compulsory, 
universal scheme might weD 
achieve nothing but kill off 
professional football once and 
for afi, we are accused of 
dragging our heels. 

Overseas? Nothing. “Sony, 
we can’t confiscate passports." 
The dull resignation I am ac- 
cused of displaying in November 

1981 was, in feet, an te- 
passioaed plea to Government to 
help ns in our attempts to control 
supporters going to Spain for the 

1982 World Cnp. That there was 
little trouble in Spain, or in 
Mexico four years inter, is 
thanks, in my view, to the efforts 
of the FA and despite Mr 
Madarfane’s indkrons ontbnrst 
against Bandog Bobby. 

It takes a disaster 
to start dialogue 

The initial attitude of the 
current administration to foot- 
ball boofigaxrisoi is illustrated by 
the speed with which they 
disbanded the very useful work- 
ing party which had been set up 
by Demos Howell in 1974. 

NeO Macferlane's working 
group of 1983-4 produced a 
report totally without reference 
to the football authorities and 
containing some of the most 
absurd recommendations I hare 
ever seen. As Mr Macferiane 
says, it needed the Brussels 
disaster to get ns our first 
meaningful dialogue with the 
higher levels of Government, 
after the present administration 
bad been in office for some six 
years. 

Yet to accept our former Sport 
Minister's version of events, yon 
would conclude that he had been 
running the game for much of 
that time. There were, indeed, 
serious inadequacies in the 


mgragSaalSoa of the Lirapool ▼ 

Javentns match in May 1985. 

I have no intention of pointing 

the finger at anyone, as it is an 
inescapable fort that these 
failing s wnnld not have mattered 
if the fens bad behaved 
themselves. 

I do object most strongly, 
however, to Mr Macferlane's 
claim that he had shown UEFA 
the potential danger. The FA 
and Liverpool FC had already 
conducted a thorongb investiga- 
tion of arrangements and had 
already raised the same issues — 
and many more — with UEFA 
and the - Belgian authorities be- 
fore Mr Macfarlane’s 
intervention. 

The coupling of the deaths in 
Brussels with those at Bradford 
ts quite disgraceful. The fire at 
Bradford was a tragic accident 
that produced the necessary 
response in terms of designa- 
tions under the Safety at Sports 
Grounds Act. The issuing of 
safety certificates to third and 
fourth division clubs has had the 
foil and unequivocal support of 
the FA, despite the financial 
hardships involved- 

Treasury takes 
but gives not 

Mr Macferiane makes a great 
deal of die financial mismanage- 
ment. as he sees it, of football 
dubs. He is on dangerous 
ground. 

Last year the Treasury took 
something like £200 minion out 
of the game in Pools Betting Tax 
alone. Not one penny went back. 
He talks very possessively ef the 
money in the Football Trust and 
the Football Grounds Improve- 
ment Trust. These are fends 
created voluntarily by the Pools 
Pro motets’ Association, after 
consultation with the football 
authorities, for the devdopraitf 
of the game by whatever means 
the trustees see fit The Govern- 
ment contributes nothing. 

The reference to Gary 
Lineker's transfer fee does noth- 
ing .bat demonstrate an ip- 
norance of the facts of life m 
football. Setting aside Lineker's 
subsequent transfer to Barce- 
lona — at a substantial profit for 
Evertoa and representing a not 
inconsiderable export — it does 
not show the game’s wealth. By 
the time that money has filtered 
down to the lower reaches of the 
League, there is predoos little of 

it ten per club to allow any major 
ground improvements to take 
place. 

Mr Macferlane's comments 
about Luton Town and Millwad) 
provide a final indictment of his 
grasp of football’s problems. 
“Shun the dubs", he says, bet to 
what purpose? They are not the 
people who canse the trouble 
and Luton, despite what Mr 
Macfarlane says, had never 
been involved in any sort of 
trouble before this match. 

It is right that Ted Croker's 
fhaifewgp to the Government 
about “your hooligans" should 
have caused such consternation. 
Of coarse, it was not intended to 
be taken literally, but a lasting 
solution to the problem can only 
be found if football and Govern- 
ment ad together. That makes 
Neil Macferlane's Ql-jndged, iU- 
remembered and unfounded at- 
tack all the more regrettable. 


TRAMPOUNING 


The height of control 


The Hetmesetas World Cop, 
which takes place this weekend 
at Crystal Palace rational qports 
centre, has attracted foe largest 
ever entry sqice this annual 
event first took place seven 
years ago. 

Over SOcompetitots from 15 
Countries’' will be ■competing, 
incfriding the. present men’s 
world champion, Lionel Piotine 


from- France, and both last 
yeatis Hennesetas- world cup 
champions, Andrea Holmes 
from .Great Britain and John 
Hansen from Denmark. 

The United Stajes are repre- 
sented . by the present- US 
women’s - champion. Tami 
Cobbs, and other national 
champions competing indude 
Utf Anderason from Sweden. 


FOR THE RECORD 


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MOTOR RALLYING 

Points ruling 
frustrates 
leading drivers 

By David DaffieU 

For some of the Lombard 
RAC Rally drivers and service 
crews making their way to Bath 
on a . dull, dark rainy Friday ii 
was a sharp contrast to their last 
confrontation in San Remo four 
weeks ago. There^ a scrutineer’s 
action set in tram a series of 
events which led, to foe dis- 
qualification of the three 
Peugeot 205T16’s for what was 
said -to be illegal bodywork. 
Despite a successful appeal that 
the ndnsiop was wrong, FISA.' 
the world motorsports govern- 
ing body, have not yet passed a 
ruling ' regarding the points 
scored. That decision wfl] be 
made on December 20. 

Joha Kankunnen, the leader 
in the World Drivers’ 
Championship, was driving one 
of the . three cars excluded from 
completing the rally. He had 
been in second place. His closest 
challenger, Markku Alen in a 
Lancia Delta S4. was in fourth 
place. Team orders conve- 
niently arranged that Alen won 
and moved up to only two 
points in arrears ' 

Relaxing in his Bath hotel 
Joha Kankunnen said foal he 
had just heard the decision. In 
his opinion, this was to ensure 
that foe four wheel drive cars 
would have to compere in the 
Olympus rally in America. Bar- 
ring accident, Kankunnen and 
Alen should finish dose together 
in the RAC But as Jola 
Kankunnen said: ‘‘The RAC is. 
very difficult We cannot prac- 
tise on the stages and make 
pace-notes. Even the top drivers 
can roll at least onceJ* 

Alen has the greater experi- 
ence in the RAC but even he 
went offfoe road lastyera-on his 
way to second place. It will be an 
interesting event - with more 
than the glory of winning. the 
RAC at stake. 


CRICKET: CROWD TROUBLE TAKES THE SHINE OFF VICTORY 

West Indies take the series 


West Indies, set to make 149. 
had to work hard before they 
won foe third one-day inter- 
national with three balls to spare 
here yesterday. Pakistan bowled 
with far more determination 
than they had shown earlier 
with the bat but West Indies 
finally won by four wickets to 
take a decisive 3-0 feral in the 
five-march series. 

After lingering morning dew 
had delayed the start, reducing 

the match to 45 overs per side, 

Pakistan again found the fast 
bowlers too much for them. 
West Indies always paced their 
effort smoothly but two un- 
necessary ruD-ouls, and a first- 
ball dismissal for Richards, did 
nothing to help them. 

They also had to contend with 
an 31-man oered crowd, who 
frequently flashed mirrors in the 
son, bringing two hold-ups. and 
another stoppage occurred when 

fruit was thrown on to the 
outfield. Saleem Jafier was hit 
on foe leg by one object and 
went off briefly for treatment. 
The match continued after a 
loudspeaker wanting that it 


From Richard Streeton, Sialkot 

would be abandoned if there 
was any repetition. 

There was a capacity 30,000 
crowd and police also estimated 
another 20,000 people were 
outside, unable to grt in. Tear 
gas was used at one point to 
disperse them. Another incident 
saw 10 people injured, including 
five with fractured limbs, when 
the branches of a tree they had 
climbed for a better view col- 
lapsed and they fell some 20ft. 

West Indies lost Greenidge to 
Jailer's first ball before Haynes 
and Richardson added a metho- 
dical 78 together. As foe spec- 
tators became increasingly 
unruly, Richardson ran himself 
out when he attempted an 
impossible single to Mian dad in 
the covers. Haynes went the 
same way when be was sent bade 
by Logie and foiled to beat 
Tauseef s throw from mid-on. 

Next baJL Richards aimed a 
lazy looking cut against an off- 
break from Sboaib and was 
bowled. Dujon. though, never 
hesitated to make strokes and 
straight-drove Shoaib for six to 
bring up the 1 00 in the 34th over 


and taler hooked Imran for 
another. 

Dujon and Logie put on 56 in 
1 1 overs before Dujon, trying to 
end foe match in a hurry, was 
bowled by J after. Harper mis- 
booked and West Indies needed 
three from the last over to win. 
Marshall pushed Tauseef for a 
single before Logie on-drove the 
third ball for four. 

Earlier, Mian dad, whose care- 
ful 34 included 22 singles, 
stayed 23 overs but made little 
effort to take command as 
wickets fell arround him. By 
their own standards, West In- 
dies did not bowl particularly 
well as 22 widcs testify. Some 
lusty Mows from Manzoor Elahi 
and Ejaz Ahmed, making his 
international debut, brought 36 
in five overs near the end — 
without them, Pakistan's total 
would have been dismaL 

PAKISTAN 

Fttzwgn-uz-Zaman c Greendge b Waish 4 
Short) Mohammad c Dujon6 watsli _ 7 

Rama Raja tow b Bertamn 13 

Javsd Mtandad b MarstaB 34 

Abdul QadkDHaroer 2 

Imran Khan c and bWafch s 


Women back at Lord’s 


Aimed b Marshall 
Bahi not out , 


..... 19 

.24 


Women’s cricket teams wiD 
pfaqr at Lord’s for only the 
second time when the Austra- 
lians risk England next year. 

The first women's match ta 
take place- at headquarters be- 
tween also involved Australia 
and Englandf h the Wooten’s 
Cricket Assotiatfotfs golden jo- 
bilee year, 10 years ago. Eng- 
land scored an eight wkket win 
in the one-day intennoooaL 

The first of .force one-day 
internationals between the coun- 
tries has been pencilled In for 
Lord's oo Jnly 16. The Austra- 
lians wffi also pkty three Test 
matchesru England in Augustas 
vdl as a fail programme of 
connty matches. 


But the WCA need to rase np 
to £50,000 to fond the Tint 

Utri-vfte, the diet food com- 
pany who backed last season's 
series against India, have de- 
cided not to take op their option 
of sponsoring aext year’s series. 

Australia beat Fn gtay i 2-1 in 
a five match Test series and 3-0 
in one-day internationals when 
foe countries last met “Down 
Under" in J984-8S. 

ONE DAY MATCHES: My 1ft Lord's: .My 

22 : CvMfonb Jute 2& Cntataj. Test 
matches : August 1 . « Firs T«t 
(Wwctsitr Ceasty Gnmad): August 21 - 


24: Second Tea (CoffiSftfaua, YontiUrr); 
Atjsott a - Sft mb m i .• hm Test 

(Hew). 


tSafim Yousuf nateut 3 

Extras (6 i.ft 8, w 22 nog 33 

Total (7 wtts, 45 were) 148 

Tauseef Ahmed and Satan Jatter <Sd not 
bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-25, 229. 3-70, 4- 
77,5-101.8-104.7-140. 

BOWLING: Marsha* 9-2-29-2. Gray 9-1- 
28-0; Welsh 9-1-38-3; BMj&nrin 9-1-19-1; 
Harper 90-25-1. 

WEST NOES 

CGOwftidoa IbwbSrfm Jafter t 

DL Haynes ran oul 38 

RBRIchanfson runout 38 

A L Logie rot oul 2S 

IVARfctmtobStaafc 0 

tPJ Dujon bSataiJaJfer 38 

RAHapercManmorblmran i 

MD Marshal rot out ...... 

Extns(b7.w3.nbl) .-...ii 

Total (6 wkta. 44£ Owns) 151 

W K R Beniamin. C A Wttsh and A H Gray 
(to rot bet 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1, 2-72 988. 4417. 
5*143,6*148. 

BOWjJNG: Imran 84091: Satan JWterB- 
1-292; Taumt 93-1 -290: (fear 9930- 
0: Shoal] 7-931-1; Uenxwr 3-990. 


BOWLS 

Experience 
wins out 
for Wood 

By A Correspondent 

Coatbridge, near Glasgow, be- 
comes foe world capital of 
indoor bowls every February 
when it hosts _ the world 
championship. This week it is 
the venue for foe CIS Scottish 
singles finals. 

National championships are 
big occasions these days, and 
players who have played under 
foe glare of television lights are 

at a distinct advantage. 

Willie Wood made foe most 
of his greater experience when 
be met Leslie Smith, aged 28. of 
the Newton Stewart dub in their 
semi-final match. 

Smith drew well to the jack 
and kept the score within 
bounds, but Wood's repertoire ■ 
of running shots enabled the 
Edinburgh man to retrieve sev- 
eral adverse positions^. 

Wood's late father — William 
Edward Wood — won the Scot- 
tish outdoor singles title in 1967. 
Willie junior was defeated in the 
1970 final, and is hungry to win 
his first national singles crown. 

Wood built up a healthy 13-8 
lead which Smith narrowed to 
13-1 1. It was then that Wood's 
34 years' experience made ail 
the^iffetence. Me won five ends 
out of six, dropping only a single 
when the stubborn Smith saved 
game on the 17fo. 

In the end it was an unfortu- 
nate slip from Smith which gave 
the Wood the winning shot. 
Wood wilt play either Gouriay 
or McGhee in Sunday's final. 

RESULTS: Singles sem-hnal: W 
(Edflburgh) M L Soffli (Newton S 
21-12 Junior semi-final: R Carats 
burgh) u f McCartney (Wool 
Wanon (East Kflbride) bt 
(AucfcHeck). 21*12 



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42 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 1986 


BOXING 


Bugner wins 
but bitter 
Bey blames 
the judges 


Sydney, - Joe Bugner, the 
36-year-old former British, 
Commonwealth and Euro- 
pean heavyweight champion 
completed stage two of his 
comeback in comfortable 
fashion with a unanimous 
points decision over Ameri- 
can David Bey at the 
Entertainment Centre last 
night. 

Each of the three judges 
gave Bugner the bout by a 
clear margin but Bey and his 
handlers were clearly upset 
with the decision. 

Bugner, who now lives in 
Australia, won a unanimous 
decision which was bitterly 
disputed by Bey. 

“The judges beat me, 
Bugner didn't," Bey said. “I 
wasn't regarded for my 
aggression.” 

But Bugner said he was sure 
the American corner would 
revise their thinking alter 
seeing a replay. 

“I did a good job. I made 
him look like an amateur," 
Bugner said. “It's a shame 
they are disputing the de- 
cision. They are turning a 
good fight into a fiasco. When 
they see the fight again they'll 
realise I won fair and square,” 
he added. 

Bey continually tried to 
rough Bugner up inside, but 
Bugner’s left jab kept him out 
of trouble and piled up the 
points. 


Bugner finished strongly, 
decking Bey with a combina- 
tion in the last round. “He 
caught me,” Bey admitted, but 
one round doesn't make a 
fight. 1 won six rounds and I 
gave him four." 

Bugner looked much 
sharper than in his first come- 
back victory over American 
James TUlis in September and 
dominated the bout for most 
of the 10 rounds. 

Bey threw plenty of punches 
but not for long enough in 
each round and Bugner was 
able to take many of Ms blows 
on the arms. 

Bugner upped his record to 
59 wins, 1 1 losses and a draw, 
while Bey slipped to 15-4 after 
suffering his fourth defeat in 
five outings. 

Bey, from Nketown, Penn- 
sylvania, a former world tide 
challenger, had never pre- 
viously lost to a fighter ranked 
outside the top 10. 

Bey's manager, Rob 
Russen, who had protested 
about two of the appointed 
judges before the fight, bitterly 
disputed the decision. “My 
worst nightmares came true," 
Russen said. “The judging was 
worse than I imagined." 

Ali three judges were 
Australians. Brian McMahon 
carded it 99-94 to Bugner, 
while John Wright bad it 97- 
94 and John Cauchi scored it 
100-94. 



Stand and deliver. David Bey doubles up after a finny of body Mows from Jo 


ICE SKATING 


Streatham pair’s 
strong challenge 


By John Hcnnessy 


Nine couples have entered for 
today's British Ice Dance 
championship at Nottingham. It 
is many yean since we had such 
strength m numbers, an indica- 
tion that, if we lack the former 
glitter ofTorviD and Dean at the 
top of the tree, the roots at least 
arc healthily established. 

Sharon Jones and Paul 
Askham, trained by Joan Slater 
at Altrincham, defend the title 
they won last year and are 
pursued principally by Elizabeth 
Coates and Alan Abretti. the 
Streatham pupils of Diane 
Towler, herself a former world 
champion. 

Cbates and Abietti. in their 
second season together, ad- 
vanced to second place last year 
and must harbour the hope of 
succeeding to the title, though 
modestly and sensibly they are 
beating no drums of big am- 
bition. “We shall just go out 
there and do our best,” Abretri 
says. “After that it’s up to the 
judges." 

In international competition 
this year Jones and Askham 
have finished third in both the 
St Ivd at Richmond and Skate 
Canada. Coates and Abretti, 
much less - experienced, were 
seventh in Skate America, a 
comparable c om pe titi on, bin a 


laudable second in' the weaker 
field of the new Fiqi event at 
Frankfurt. 

Unlike Askham and Jones, 
tire Streatham couple's pro- 
grammes have not been publicly 
displayed here but they were, 
apparently, well redeved in 
Frankfort. They are using the 
same music for their free dance, 
the Gershwins' overture to 
Twiggy’s My One And Only, but 
with completely new choreog- 
raphy. “It's a fight-hearted, fun 
thing," Abietti says, “bubbly 
and lively. We're going to enjoy 
ourselves and hope the spec- 
tators wifi, too.” 

Askham and Jones revealed 
an accomplished original set 
pattern at Richmond which 
should serve them well today. 
Their free programme, however, 
seemed still in its embryonic 
stage, not surprisingly that early 
in the season, and the judges will 
be looking for a more finished 
product today. 

Coates and Abretti, in turn, 
are the targets of Danielle Biss 
and David Crofts, of Lee Valley, 
whom they overtook last year. 
Two places are open to Britain 
in the European championship 
at Sarajevo in February, only 
one in the world championship 
in Gncirmati a month later. 


SWIMMING 

Rivals to 
answer 
speed call 

By Roy Moor 

Adrian Moorhouse, Britain's 
leading breast-stroke swimmer, 
eager for top class racing opposi- 
tion to sharpen his speed, 
should not be disappointed 
today. 

Opposing him over 100 me- 
tres at Cumbernauld in Scotland 
wifi be. Rdf Beab and Bert 
Goebel, of West Germany, 
whom he defeated when win- 
ning the world tide last summer 
in Madrid only to be disquali- 
fied, on a technicality. Beab and 
Goebel were ultimately placed 
fourth mid fith respectively in 
that final 

Both Germans have been 
showing such good form this 
season that they have their eyes 
on setting a new world short- 
coarse best time for die event, 
which stands to Beab at 60 JO. 
Moorhouse was the previous 
holder at 60.58 seconds 

Zara Long, the youngest 
member of Britain's team at the 
Los Angeles Olympic Games 
two years ago, has had to 
withdraw from the Scottish 
meeting because of Achilles 
tendon injury. The trouble 
developed following a road- 
running training session. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Bread and butter 
is welcome relief 


By Keith Mnddin 


There is brief respite from the 
shattering disappointments of 
international Rugby League as 
the dubs return this weekend, 
with some relief to the bread 
and butter championship pro- 
gramme. While file Australian 
whirlwind blows through 
Humberside against Hull, the 
first and second division pro- 
continue and there are 
in the 


These Trophy matches pro- 
vide moments of glory which 
may prove to be short but sweet 
for two amateur sides. This 
afternoon the Cambrian dub, 
Milkjm. expect a crowd of 
between 3,000 and 4,000 for 
their home tie against the first 
division dub. Wakefield Trin- 
ity, and may fancy their chances 
against a team which has yet to 
wm a first division game. 

Tomorrow the amateur side 
from Hull, Myson, travel to the 
second division ground of 
Batley, a match which promises 
poor financial reward and only a 
small outside chance of victory, 
however, the amateurs will en- 
joy their crowded hour • of 
glorious life, win or lose. 

The Australian squad at Hull 
will be without regular inter- 
nationals in the captain, Lewis, 


Kenny, Dunn and Lindner, but 
there is no point in expect in g a 
miracle from HuR who will no 
doubt be swept aside just as 
Great Britain and father dob 
sides have been. Ironically, the 
decline in Hull's fortune m the 
past two seasons have coindded 
with the loss of the very player 
whowin be inspiring the Austra- 
lians tomorrow, the briniant 
scrum half; Peter Sterling. 

In the first division the 

Outs tanding iMlfhfgweSt Hd. 

ens patting their unbeaten, 
record on foe line at CHdham, 
Widnes and Bradford Northern 
contesting second place, 
Warrington at Leeds and Wigan 
no doubt coasting through a not 
loo demanding local derby with 
Leigh. 

There are exceDem games in 
the second division, with 
promotion battles in Hunslet v 
Runcorn Highfidd, Swinton v 
Doncaster and Whitehaven v 
Blackpool Borough. 

MiUward reward 

The Hull Kingston Rovers 
coach. Roger MiUward, capped 
29 times by Great Britain at 
stand-off half last night became 
the fifth winner of the Rugby 
League 'Writers Association 
merit award 


HOCKEY 

Staffs turn 
to speed 
and s kill of 
Sherwani 

By Sydney Frisian 

Imran Sherwani, England's 
Work! Cup outside left, will lead 
foe Staffordshire attack in 
tomorrow's Midlands final 
against Worcestershire at Feny 
Park, Birmingham. A splendid 
artificial turf pitch should pro- 
vide the basis for a fast . and 
exciting game. 

Both sides have qnaKfied for 
the rounds of foe 

county championship, bat apart 
from the prestige of bring 
Midlands champions, the win- 
ner earn the right to play in foe 
quarter-finals. The losers will 
qualify for foe preliminary 
round on November 23. 

SherwanTs speed and skills 
will .be potent' factors in a 
Staffordshire team whose de- 
fence is held. together by Gib- 
bon, a superb striker of short 
comers. He is weB s up por te d at 
foe back by Brayshaw from, foe 
England under 21 squad. Chris 
Mayer, of Cannock, also from 
Eng land’s junior squad will be at 
outside tight . 

W or cester sh ire, who were 
beaten in the semi-finals last 
year by Devon after extra time, 
have the edge in experience with 
Lamb, Maflett, Knott, Ken 
Partington and Nissar 
Chandhry, all capable of turning 
the fortunes of a game. . 

The e as t semi-finals and final 
are being played at Colchester 
where Hertfordshire for their 
morning match against 
Cambridgeshire, have included 
the five St Albans players, 
Haffiday, Hayward, Rowley. 
Wisher and Port, who were at 
Dortmund, last week for a 
tournament which St Albans 
won after beating Rafetberg 8-7 
in the final. No matter how 
many dhangwi Hertfordshire 
mate they are unlikely to drop 
their resourceful forward Andy 
Law, who scored both goals 
from penalty strokes in the 2-1 
win over Essex last week. Spiers 
(Cambridge City) and Ward 
(London University) should 
add sparkle to the Cambri 
shire forward line. 

Essex retain seven Old 
Loughtonians including 
Gladman for foe other semi- 
final also in the morning against 
a well HgTafwd Norfolk side 
who have won aD their matches 
so for. The final win be played at 
the same venae in the after- 
noon. Kent lean heavily on 
Bromley's - players for then- 
south semi-final against Berk- 
shire at Canterbury. Kent have 
called on Richards, King, 
Coombes, Barnett and Berry 
whose experience will count 
against a much improved Berk- 
shire tWHTI- 

David Faulkner, England's 
World Cup right back, wul beat 
fnsidi* right for Hampshire in 
the other southern semi-final 

against R uriringhanwhir f. St 

Slough. Faulkner's cool 
authority will be needed to 
counter the skills of B^i Bora 
and Imtiaz who have done 
much in recent weeks for the 
restoration of the old Bodes fizz. 


YACHTING 



to modify in 
N Zealand’s wake 


Fremantle (Reuter) - 
America’s Cup challengers are 
Main modifying their boms in 
their efforts to cope- with un- 
predictable winds and die seem- 
ingly invincible New Zeal and . 

After the dose of die second 
series yesterday, foe unique 
glass-fibre New Zealand xs 10 

? liras dear of foe New York 
adit Club’s America U which 
in turn is IQ ahead of Demos 
Canner’s Stars and Stripes. 

But, with 12 points for a win 
in next month's third challenger 
round robin, foe series remains 
open. With an 18 -day break 
before the fond and final chal- 
lenger series the fleet-is assessing 
its mistakes *nd successes- in 
the last 23 races. Weather will be 
uppermost in the syndicates’ 

The second round was w 

sailed in pred ominant ly Edit white Crusader is also altering 
which caught all but the bcr i™. 


“For those of us that have beat 
here for quite some time, the 

' weather is doing exactly whain 
should be doing. He added: 
“Those who haven’t spent foe 
time and effort sorting it out are 

P8 Se ^m^ermmd behind 
Australia's 1983 cup victory, foe 
Alan Bond syndi c ate exec utive 
director Warren Jones, com- 
mented: “ There was no waywe 

were going to tell any foreign 
syndicates that it doesn Tt blow 
20 knots here all year round." 
While foe top three are making 
relatively minor a dj ust men ts for 
the third round those tower 
down the order are involved in 
more d rastic **b art g*^ Canaria U 
and Heart of America, both of 
whom have a tot of leeway to 


winds whi _ 

New Zealanders and New York- 
ers by surprise. 

Conner, in particular bad set 
iris Stars and Stripes, a heavy 

weather boat, for winds m die 15 

to 25 knot range — rather than 
four to rig ht knot breezes. He 
lost twice in successi o n this, 
week , in light winds and only 
regained winning form in modi 
stlffer -conditions 

yesterday.Conner’s syndicate 
reckons November’s weather to 
have been rniwf"” 1 -- But the 
New Yorkers maintain the vari- 
able conditions are exactly what 


of their hulls and keels. Britain's 


her keek 
White Crusader's skipper 
Harold Cndmore, sixth on 43 
points' bat only three behind 
Stars and Stripes, said: flbe 
nice ttiwTg is that effectively 
there’s four of us an level 
pegging. There’s just the other 
two guys wfao’ve put their noses 


• Dennis Conner has resumed 
his onNew Zealand's 

unconventional challenger for 

the America's Cop. Conner said 
he remained unconvinced 
KZTs glass-fibre hall was legal. 

“I don’t think the controverey 

they expected amf New Zealand over that hull is finished yet," he 
skipper Chris Dickson, said: raid. 

Three more casualties 
in transatlantic race 

By Barry PkkfhBll . 

The first leg of the BOC 
Challenge- from Newport to 
Cape Town proved almost as 
calamito us with three yachts 
damaged in collisions at the 
start, die rescue of one Ameri- 

ran sailor.after his yacht sank, 

, the persistent gales in an hgury to another and tales 
north Atlantic had bat- - of knockdowns, a dismasting 
and three retirements caused 
by rigging and rudder failure. 

Australian John 

BkkUecombe, now recovered 

night for the whereabouts of JgJ 1 

Lmc Caradec and his maxi- ftwwarf batch of his 60 footer 
stised ratarnaran Royafe, the .ACI Crusader, s hould rrach 
early pacesetter in this bans- - Cape Town in a weel^s tune 


As the 19 remaining 
competitors in the BOC sin- 
gle-handed round the world 
yacht race prepared to set but 
from Cape Town today on the' 
second . 6,900 mile stage 
through the southern ocean to 


tered three more soloists 
competing in, the Route de 
Rhura race into submisson. 
There was also ooncem last 


atiantic race to Guadeloupe. 

The latest casualties in- 
clude, Thierry Caroni who 1ms 
headed fin* Lisbon after his 


but Richard McBride, of New 
7i»aiand who lost a month re- 


nggmg his yacht Neptune's 
Express in Brazil has been 
slowed further by a damaged 


a u., LEAHNQ POSITIONS; Route do Rhum 

peied by ranems Boucher. totewqe to Guadeloupe): I . Floury Miction 

and Thierry Ledoux aboard vb ■ (njjtopa cogion) 2.722 2. 

r • Cataalment Laftarie St Mchel (Oflvfer 


Seagull who has retired to La 
Rodiefle 


Record snatch 

Sofia (Renter) — Nku Vlad, of 
Romania, set a world record of 
200.5kg in foe snatch in foe 
100kg category the world 

weightlifting championships 
here yesterday. He bettered the 
previous record of 200kg, held 
by Yuri Zakharovich, of the 
Soviet Unionl 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER FIXTURES 


34 untoss stated 

FOOTBALL 

FA Cup 
First round 

Aldershot v Torquay — 
Bath v Aylesbury . 


Scottish premier division 

Celtic v Dundee Utd 

Clydebank v Rangers 

Dundee v Motherwell 

Hamilton v Fafldrk 

Hearts v Aberdeen 


Bish Stortford v Colchester 
Bournemouth v Fareham — 

Bristol C v VS Rugby 

Bromsgrove v Newport 


St Mirren v Hibernian 

Scottish first division 

Dumbarton v Clyde 


Caernarfon v Stockport (230) — 

Chester v Rotherham 

Chorisy v Wolves (at Bolton) — 

Darttord v Enfieid 

Exeter v Cambridge 


Famboro v Swindon (at Swindon) 

FricWay v Altrincham 

Halifax v Bolton{&0) 

Hereford v Friham 

fettering v Gl Bingham 


Duntanmftiev Queen of Sth 

Forfar v Airdrie 

Kflmamock v Brechin 

Montrose v Morton 

PartickvEFSe 

Scottish second division 

Atoton v Cowdenbeath 

ABoa v Arbroath 

Berwick v Stenhsmufr 


Middlesbrough v Blackpool - 
Motts Co v Carlisle 


Nuneaton v Rochdale — 

P Vale v Stafford 

Preston v Bury 

Runcorn v Boston 


E Sttrfing v Stirling 

Meadowbank v Snt Johnstone , 

Queen’s Park v Ayr 

Raith v Stranraer 


Scuntnorpe v Southport 
Stough vBognor 


Southend v Halesowen 

Spennymoor v Tranmere (2^30) 
Telford v Burnley 


QM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Chelten- 
ham « Nonhwfch; Dagenham v Barnet 
Scarborough v Sutton Utd. 
YAUXHAlCopel LEAGUE: Planter <*. 
vMok Barking y TooUng and Mftchm; 
Carstmton v Duiwkh Hamlet Croydon v 
Bromtoy: Hayes y St Afoans H tt crtn v 
WoHni 


Beaconsflald v Hanwafl OUf: Cortnttten- 
Casuais v Pwmant Baridngteda v RedNfl 
(2.0); Danson v Bransdawn (2.0k 
tonhwood v Southgate: Ulysses v 
Edgware (20); Yaaring v Crown and 

Manor. 

BUILDING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Braintree v Chatteris Colchester Utd v 
Wisbech; By* Great Yarmouth: Goteston 
v March Town utd: Harwich and 
Parfceston v Utattant Watton v Tlptree. 
Laague Cape Second round: Htaton v 
Ctacton. 

BEDFQBOSHBE SENIOR CW* Astarit 
Co-Op v Barton; Biggleswade v Amptttit 
Eaton Bray v Latowpn: ShB&ngton v 
Vauxhafl Motors; 61FC (Luton) v ration. 
SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Ftat <S- 
vtatoK Hafaham v Shoreham (2.15k 
Horsham YMCA w Wick; Utfetampion * 
Paacehaven aid Tetsoomba (2.15k RUR 
e Sacond round (£0) ' 
Eastbourne Town 

Bnages: Haoaocte v SUey; Haywards 
Hearn * Oakwood: maimss said East- 
bourne * Lanctog; PortftoW v CHchestar. 
Whiuhawfc * 6 *bs Grinstead. Lsagua 
Cr*>: Brat rant LSUe Common AWcn * 
BingsssHM K.01 

ESSEX ! F*«r CUP: SwfMid nuut 
Burnham * Ford utd: East Ham v 
Ctwtmsford Res: East Thurrock v Carney 
Island; Halstead v Brls“" 
Sawbridgovrorlti v. Makhno 
Bowwk W thani v Brentwood. 

HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAGUE: 
Prnml a r dhitaton (2^Mt Abingdon Town * 
Faufenfc Morocco v Blaster pUk Penh* 
y Shortwood; Pegasus Juniors v Yate: 


Samereat * Comwal _ 
(at Taunton, 2J0) 
Susaax w Her tfo rd sh ire 


(at Bognor. 230) . 

John Smith’s Merit Table A 
Bath v Coventry 

Wasps v Leicester (230) 

John Smith’s Merit Table B 

N o rth ampto n v Bedford 
Waterloo v London bish (245) • 

Otto matches 

Bbiringham v Loughborough Students— 
BrarfortandBingfey vW^B(Sald(230)- 

Bnstol v London Wash (230) — 

C a mbrid g e LWrorstty v Btackheath 

Esher v Plymouth 

Exeter v Lyii “ “ 



Harlequins v Oxford UnwocBty 

(at amp Memoriri Ground. 230) 
HarroQMB 9 Oman (M B. — , 

HudderafiaJd v HaarSngtay (230) 

Lhraroool St Helens v RounSwy (2^—. 
London Scottish v Rjchmood (2la^—__ 
ManchestHT v Vale of Luna (2^5) - 


Mortoy v Nuneaton (£30- 
Morpeffi * Gosforfli (230). 

_ . l p a f L 


Moaetoy v Roaaiyn 
Nottingham v Saracens. 
Oitay v Sheffield (2.15) J 


Ton Pentra v Cartflff — 
WafsaH v Chesterfield - 
Weaktetona v Swansea 
Waling v Maidstone — 
Whitby v Doncaster — 
Wigan v Lincoln 


Woking v Chelmsford . 
Woodford v Orient . — 
Wrexham v Hartlepool 
York v Crewe 


First division 

A Vila v Chelsea 

Leicester v Everton 

Luton v Nottingham F 

Manchester C v Chariton - 

Newcastle v Watford 

Norwich v Manchester Uto . 
OPR v Oxford 


Windsor and - 

ontbe v Hendon: Yeovi v Harrow. 

riMtoon: Bteericay v Epsom and EwaO; 
Boraham Wood v Layton/Wingato; 
BrackneB v Laaihwtirad; FtocHm * 
usdenhead Utd; Kingsbury v Wantotoy; 
Laytonstone Mord v Hampton; Oxford C»y 
* Steuenaga Boro; Souhwfc* v Uxhndge; 
Stainas « 'Grays: Tltouty w Iambs; Wafton 
and Hsrahani v BaaHdon. Second tBwUon 
north: Avetey v Saffron Walden; 
BerkhamstM v Ware; Clapton v Cotter 
Row; Haringey v Chmftam; Harlow * 
Ratahanu Hertford v Wmnhoa (330); 
Hornchuroh v Trim: Ltechworth QC v 
WOlvanon. Skdmi r teM on wtetr. 
Carnborlay v Metrapoitan Potea: Chtofbnt 
St Paw V Barataad; Ctwrtsay v Fatthsn: 
Doridng v Rackwefl Heath: HareMd v 

Souttuw: Hor sh am » Moteaey; Hunoartoul 

v Eaatboune Utd: Nnabury v WhySaata: 

Petarsflaid v Egham: Rdtfp Manor v 

MwfQWa 

FOOTBALL COMBBUTIOH: Arsenal V 


Sato ¥ Preston Gnssst*w«sj245)_ 
Waat Hartepoal v Ha&ax (IZfljlH. 
HcEwan’s Scotfisb 
i (2-30) 
rvJed-Forest 


Oxford Hawks v Troians, 
bury v Old Becceh a mlans; Heme Bay v 
Thames PoWBchnic; Lloyds Bank v 
TOnbri^jB; Maidstona v (feavesond: 
UddMWi v CAd WaamsonesTs; Old 
Bordenlans v Marden Russets; 
Sevanoaks v FoBrasfona Opt Wottt*» v 
SoutfrBaxons. rarMa aeir , Bedes, Bock* 
and Quo: Aylesbury v Reading Unhr 
Btosatar v Amorsham; Gamanto Cross v 
NPL: Hawn v Harrow Town Swans: Old 
ItachamTSqdovs v Hendon; PofytDdMci^ 
Bradonfl; Sunfiwy v Oiy Oxfaid- 

BASKETBALL 

PRUDENTIAL NATIONAL CUP; Quartor- 
Gnat Hetnel/Waiford Royals v Ports* 
nwufo OiW CARLSBBIG NATIONAL 
LEAmJE FrtJ dMstotE IMxsHBr RJdare 
¥ Team Pohpcol tOngoton (Mk Sharp 
Mancheatar united v Draper Tools SoJetrt 
Stare (8-Ofc Rag Vanty Sundartond ¥ 
BPCC Dntiy Rams (730). Sec on d <fl- 
¥iaio« Btosmaro Port v Just Rentals 
Rhondda (83). 
WOMBYS NATIONAL CUP: Guartar- 
flnat Stockport UmwoBb v Enfield (8J). 

HANDBALL 

BRITISH LEAGUE: Tryst 77 V Umpool 
(Cumbemaukt. 215). 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

TOUR MATCH: Hufl y AuStraSara. 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHY: 
PmMoaiy ro u nd : Baflay w Mys 
R3tB;Woil u ngtonv HudderefleM^3 
STONES BITTER CHAMPIONS* 
Casttetord v Salford (330); HaHn ¥ Hufc 
Leeds ¥ Warrington; Oldham v & I M o r a ; 
Widnes v Bradford: Wigan vLbMl 
SECOND UlVISIOte Baum v uawntwy 


- ICE HOCKEY 
NORWICH UNION CUP RNAL: fife 


9;Yort(¥Rochdato(2.iq. 

BASKETBALL 

CARSUBOto NATIONAL LEAGUE: Seo 
end dMakitc CSS Centurions Colchester 
¥ Teem WUsafl (4.0}; Oldham CaWcs v 
Just Rwrtate Rhondda (230): Swindon 
Rakara v Towor Hanteb 
WOMEN’S NATIONAL 
ftaato: Tern Payed Kingston ¥ BCP 
London (4.0): London YMCA 
NoHhingftnm WUents 
amptonv Chamos Swl 

HANDBALL 

BRIT ISH LEAGUE: BUcanhaed ¥ lOrkby 

Sated (3.0fc Salford* Bt -82 

Eagtes ¥ Waives PON (1. . 

Cannock v Lricsstar Great 


Avon Nortfi- 


bbd ▼ lunoiy 

Great Dana* 


Southampton v Arsenal . 
Tottenham v Coventry 
Wambtedon v West Ham 

Second divisioii 

Barnsley ¥ Derby 

Blackburn v HuU 


Beomrth v Oamtfridne Ctty: Crawtoy v 

1 Safisbunp Dudley v Folkestone (at Stour- 
txioge); Gosport • WBeonaX; ReddMch y 


Shepshed » 


Bradford v Huddersflekf , 
C Palace v Ipswich ~ — 
Grimsby v Sundertand - 

Leeds v Oldham — 

KflBwaB v Birmingham — 

Plymouth v W BA — 

Reading v Brighton 
Sheffield Utd v Stoke 


WlfrwyvMwBChurch.^ 1w» ™«r 
BartouryY Bridgnorth; Bteton v Rushdem 
.Coventry Sporftw * Buckhitpwn: Forest 
USnipp— s««nni ¥ Sutton Coktaekt; 

aouoestan Leantegacnro 


uranmn » wjinonn uwii*rjcn » 
MBs Otoe Merthy T*dH ¥ Letoastor Utd: 
Moor Green ¥ Ifadneaford: WnBng- 
borough « Stourbridge. S om hatn dL 


borough - — 
ifden: Ashford » nw 
Dor uh aatap OowAtti v 


Shrewsbury v Portsmouth , 

Multipart League 

Burton v Rhyl 



Gainsborough v Workington 
Horwtah v Macctestieid — — 

HydevGoata 

Marine v Buxton 


Oswestry v Borrow 

Vftaonv Moesiey 

Wcjrksop v S Liverpool 


GffiMhtm: Norwich v MBwtot Ports* 
mourn v Orient Southend yCPR; Watford 
v Tottenham. Second art s totr : Bourne- 
mouth ¥ Bristol Rovers; Brighton y 
O ivtndo n : Colchester v Northampton; 
SouthampMn v Crystal Pataca; Tottan- 
hsm v Branford; Oxford utd v Soutfwod; 

WimtJtodon y R^rm., ^ 

LONDON SPARTAtr LEAGUE Printer 
d Mteon: Amanham v Waaham Abbey; 


Raynsrs Lane v Abingdon Utd; Sharpnaa 
y Hounslow Viking Sports ¥ Thame: 
Wafingford y Supah nar m : wantage y 
M orris Matora. 

GREAT MLLS LEAGUE: Protear «- 
¥bteR Barnstaple v Frans; Bktoford y 
C tondowm CMppanham v Bristol Manor 
Farm: Dawfeh v Meflcsham; Exmoulh a 
Chant; Ushaard » Paatejn; Mangotsfiekl v 
Ctavadon: Safiash v Plymouth Argyte: 
Taunton v Weston-super-Mara; Torring- 
ton v Radstock. 

NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: P ro te ar dMafoa: Brakfrw v 
Rodnvefl; Desharough ¥ Si NaoTE 
MMnytxsuugh v ateefing: Long Budtoy 
v Bourne; N ort hai nuiun Srintyar v 
Hotwach: Rataxts v Baktock; S and L 
Corby y Woottoa 

CtafeUCT COUNTIES LEAGUE: Pro- 

gssgiaag^? 

MaJSrm? ^coonties 

L E AGUE: First dri tee Sincough y 
H oaaandale: CNharoa > ContftooruCur- 
zon Ashton v Accrington Sturfw; Ftoat- 
wood ¥ Winstarrt iv m v RadcMIs 

GtaMOp; StatvtMdga Cattle » tetk Town. 
“^BROUGHS NORTH ER N -LEAGtS: 
g“£*5«Hfohw Auckland y Gretna; 
Cheste Na-Streei v BMh Spartans New- 
emte BHie Star y Tow Law; North Sntektt 
CA.-^uto^artk y Badtegton: 

COUNTED EAST LEAGUE: 

„ — .-Jaton: Armthorpe Welfare v 

HarroffllK&rfparvAareston: BenteyVW 
» Long Eaton; Brim v Boston FC; 
Ronufraa Oob v NtirS) Fteriby; Entey v 
Giteatoy. 

RUGBY UNION 
Thorn EJW Comity Chatnptooahfo 
Cheshire v Yorkshire 


Honor's FP v Hawtek. 
KalaoY Glasgow/ 
Safldrk v Mefross- 


Fhwrs 
m 


German Tornado s (IJfi: Warwick Jaguars 
St Pamra 0Jft8adfoid 


University; 
Mn* Dock! 


(at New Brighton. ZSO) 
Cumbria ¥ Nonhunbertand 


(at Workington. 215) 
Dorset and Wtts v Oavon — — 
(atSafcbuiY.230) 
Duham v Lancashte 


(at West HarttapooL 2SQ 

am aUHraito v Batkshtra 

(at Ctwhonham) 


Si aw a ffS-MaMte FP ¥ EdnbUtgh Acad- 
Wtet of SooSand w Botougfanuf— 

SC HW EPPES waSH CltP: PM rend 
. Abetavon v Tumtte- 
I vTonyretafl: Briun Ferry y 
is; Oaerph^y V Pwgcoad; 
Carmarthen Athletic v Cross Keys: 
Cwmtfflery » Aberaman: Laugharra ¥ 
Newport Llanbaran v Wrexham; Uan- 
trisant ¥ Bsbw Vale: Marthyr v UeneC; 
MHord HaYon ¥ Gtarnorgan WfanderenK 
MoimMn Ash y Govmnm Nantyffyflon v 
Oto P wag fli Mus : Naytond t Gtofc Naatti 
Atttebc 
Bridge* . 

lm Old BBydtets y Pbnartti: RnMe 
Dock Quins v WhUand; PB Hamore v 
Aberavon Quins: PontytMswn v Dumont 
P ontypo ol v Bedwaa | 

tojmKBsSSjBMwafriaxteTayyi^'V 
Btafrut Tondu v UanMteBt Tredegar v 
(3JJk Troorchy * CW ». 
v Liandowory. Tytorstovm ¥ 
Haverfordwest Vardre v Bridgend. 
RUGBY LEAGUE 

JOHN, PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHY: 
preteilnaiy round: MHom v WtocsfiaU 

pao). 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE 
(ZlSt Planter dhrtakar GuUtord v 
Btackheath; Richinond * Reading; 
T e dding ion v Bromtey. League: BecS- 
anham v Hourntow: Cvntxidcn UnNeraky 

v Hounslow; Caitoridga Untearefry ¥ 

Surbiton; Oufwitfi v Oxford Unnreraty; 
London University v Hampstead; Maidan- 
head v St AlbBts; Mid-Sgrrev v Stou^t 

Old Kingstonians v Puriey; Sr 

Spencer Tuba HB v Cbaam; I 
Hawks ¥ Wimbledon 
NORWICH UNION EAST LEAGUE: Pre- 
tsiar {SwtsteR: ESshop's Stortford v Brate- 
wood; Btoeharts v WMNI; Bury Bt 
Edmunds y BroitoounK Cambridge City y 
S t Naots: Chelmsford v Old Loughfontona; 
Ford v fpswidc Ha rta s tan itegptos v 
Bedfo rd; NorfoSc Wanderer* v mar- 

kSaSu^ V LAGER SOUTH LEAGUE: 
Planter dkwtef t Anchorians v Lewaa; 
Chchestte v Havenc East Grinstead v 
Eastoota; Fareham v OkS Taunotens: 
Gore Court y Timbrxtae Watte tooan 
Gymkhana v Lyons: Knriow v Bogncn 


fCHEKEN LEAGUE; Ffrst 
Bfackpoto SaagiBs v Madway Baare 
Kiricctody Kemrote v RM u nond ~ 
(7.15): Lee Vatey Lions v itvfaa 
(5.Q. 


VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 
LEAGUE; Mtett tfrat dktetofle Colchester 
¥ Liverpool CMy (439); 050 Poota v 
Redwood Lodge (5315; Sp*rk Crook Log 
y Portsmouth Heatnai flJoj. WOmen’i 
first division; Spark ¥ Bradford 
MytHbreakar A3Q. 

OTHER SPOUT 

BOWLS: Lfatety Trophy ftyfoor county 
chaw piontfi W : Hnrt nwnd: 

GYMNASTICS: .QgW* vwman v 

5th2o«: National Bt- 

Bruce Cup (tf Queen's 

Furs Head of flfw 
SKATMG; Tubom nx dance. 

slype (stN . 
SQUASH RACKETS: Sotant Gpanj tour- 
nament (Lea-on-Soto nq. i dreifoBtqn 
Country Cfab Ctaw taumnanr (South 
Humberside). WRAF ¥ Wrexham (RAF 


YWoteart iam pton 
CoOaga v Laiceatv B (3.0). 

HOCKEY 

COUNTY CHAMFtOHSW: 
nafc Saffaretahire y Worcas 
Park, Bkutegham 230). 
finals: Norfolk v Essex: I 
Camfafctoasture (Castle 
11.®. Boat (230). Sc 
Kerrf v Berkshire (C 
Buqtdnghamshira ¥ Han 
1.45). Nort h: Cumbria ¥ 


Stafford Olympics v 

kfiternkfiin 




2Dk Lancashire v OwNita 
Sol lew, 2® Yorkshire v Dur- 


■’llwN EAST 
COUNTY CHAIIVIONSWtl 


: Tennants UK Opan (at Pres- 

CTaUwprO: C m uberne u ld maoting 
TRAMPOUWNG: Wdr« Cup com- 
pifcortes (at Crystal Pafaoa) 

TmiteE Bwison and Hadgas Champion- 

stdpe (at Wembkiy) 

TOMORROW 

FOOTBALL 

•Oefooriab unless stated 

FA Cup 
First round 

Bristol R v Brentford 


ITY CHAMPfONSHS^ East Sate- 

: CembridMsfiire » Essex; Kartfotd- 

shiravNoitaet(nAarboRxigh, tTJB-Tldal 
(2(fi. Sofofo Budcfaghte^tta y Mdtto- 
&ax(MG HSi, 215V 

ICE HOCKEY 
HBHEKEN iwnne n 
Ayr Brains v Cleveland 

Durham WSaos ¥ 

Warriors (6.1 55: Sol 

Rockets Fin 

Acaa y M ed wa y Bear* (530); Peter- 
borough Pirates ’v trvlna Wings (&30t 
Southsnpton VMngs ¥ Bourreunoutfi 
Staffs Sundarand Chiefs 

jnBBdcattp&Q? 





VOLLEYBALL 
ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 


Darfington v Mansfield — 

N oi tl iam pta n v Petarttorough — Cornyy 

First efivision 

Uvarpod v Shaft Wed {235) 

GM VAUXHALL COKFERBICE: 

haad « Kddarmtoster. 


OTHER SPORT 

MODERN PENTATHjON: NaHonri BF 
glhtan c h a romonsh fo (at UncaW 
MOTOR RMLWN& Lombard RAC 
[BattvHsrroqate) 

RACKETS: fioof Bran Cup (to Queen's 
dub) 

ROWING: Kingston Sn*B 
SQUASH RACKETS: Sot 


Open tourw 
Lee-on-SotantL Kentlngton 
Open toumamant (to South 


TRAMPOLHWk WOrid CUp Antes (« 
Crystal Ptoase) 

TBM& Bensoimd Hadgas ohampion-. 
Shto (At Wamblay) 

WMSUtFBRk Intend 
ships (at Rutland Wat*} 


tpflvfer 

Mouasy) 2378; 3, Ericsson (Bnaioraron) 
ASSft 4, TAG Hauer (Mffu Bh*) 3JJ0S. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Gontlncd from fetiag page 

SATURDAY 



LAND Utete&OANOrttwni Ireland Re- 
sntts 5.15330 Northern irafand 
News U6ant-1-10 News and wa to har. 
SOLANO 5.15pre&20 South A 
East (Londoi ^-- S port Satoi A Wato 

E/Uathar&^i regiona-Ffoglonai 
Nows and Sport 

ttw Myetarons tl JO-t-SJack Hof- 
bom 120 Scarocrowand Mrs IQog 215- 
246 Please Sfrt-OOO Marching 


border taagafas 


American Haro 135 Sbnon and Si- H 
men 21 5-245 PfaasaStrl CLOB Ctosa. 


CENTRAL 

Jobttadar 1L0P BpMatwoma n 1130-1 


Vtm Runaway Mnd 215- 
weigbt Baxkn (Job BUoik 

Bejfl 1-L30 Fteu IOOTObs < 

Brown) 


215245 Heavy- 
v David 


SS2S (J,m 

JWHTOfll 


Central 


CHANNEL ASSSBSSH? 


wor» 215-246 PtoOM Ski 1200 
Bob Martey to thaSvita Barbara Bowl 
1 JXiaw Weadwr. Cfose. 

GBAMPiAN affffi^M 

The FaB Guy 1 J0Mwnm2.1fr245 
Ffaosa Slit tUB Reflector* 1206 CtaM. 
GRANADA As London ax- 

capfc 11Ji6-T2O0Tar- 
an taOBtonlc Wbman 21&24E 
Heavywteght Bootes (Jo* Bugner y DavM 
Bay) lUOFttiEBDtwnto Macon 

CtKintiy(1B7Qpaok Note) 1.15am 

Ctosa. 

HTV WEST 


11JKM200HM 

fis saw 


ShnonindStoian 


HTV WALES 

1246am Cup Rutoqr 1245-1246 
Htic Strip ee (iflgi) (Bffl Murrey) 1246 

the Whaafod Warriors n2S Btoft* 

1130-1200 ApMn Scarlet and the 

IJOTheFtelQiwZUF- 

PfaaaaSfrt 1205 Lara Ctol 

Warned. Dead or Aim -036 Ckna. 

days 1135-1205 Q#pe2153SE 
Pfaase 8M GJD5 Newspoct&IO Btock- 
IWf 245 5.5P Tito A-Team 1130 
The Sweeney 12 1 5a m Fostsofot 1236 
WaaOwr. Ctosa. 

OoffSanSSSa-lwIis 

Pfaam S« 1200 Bob Mstay at the 
Santa Barinra Bmri I35ara Company^ 



IhtendT iJW-tajss 


1130 


ULSTER tfjoS^OCThTSweat 
S^SlSSSSspadto 

OteppaaQtXJB —N awa. 

Sxo 

^l^ttoaitei 1230aiiSra ny 

ESEBSSEP' 

gtetf friCavalcada 2X10 Tha Great 

FteKOoBateqm63p Naaaw-730 

htowytMon 735 YrWytGardd Dart 

SUNDAY 

mw^~ 


,1215toB-i230 Nawa and weather 
NORTHE1RI RniLAND 1L06am- 
lt3S Parepecttan. 1135-120Sam Rev- 
olution to tna Ctasaraom7 1206- 
,1210 Now* and weattnr. 

RRC WALES. Same aa lor ^ BBC2 
'Ssss national network except for 
200pm 4 to Quiday Sports Special 

130pm The Beverley HBUfles 13S 

Wstoher 130-200 Rairfng Diary 200 
The Fal Guy 630-630 Bufceye 
1200 Tates from thoDarftede 1230am 
watting to the Light ctosa 


9S^r®TJ MHBturnoftr,aAn * ,l0 P 8 

6XW-630 Bufiseye 1230am Ctosa 

CENTRAL 

Theatre l2 aa«iJoMWsr 130 

OOB80QW1 

E251 1 - 00 Rancais 

Vo« WOThe Doknen Bidders 

■SSSKsaSSSA. 

Comedy Tonght 1250m Watohar. 

GRAMP IAN foLondona- 

a a a ™ Br .™ capt 03fr03Q Dfa- 
"H5«oon1130 Atifome 1130- 
l^iATajcti cd Musk: 130pn-130 
gnntag Oteook 238 Max Jefta; 

GRANADA Ast0nd0fiex - 

aw.ywn oBtn- I 

CarKH^mera 630 Down to Eirfii 530- 
«J0a4fotee1200^ Comedy Tontfrt 

iffvwgsrsasaa^ 

HTV WALES *- htv wct 

s5ass , s^ ,J * a5, ” 

SCOTTISH _ 

gssas^^asasa; . 

^^t»port1200LSS««35oai 

CfOSG 

tfoggweodi^rtemPostsctfotPoetbBg 




) 630 OH News 


j rtJDO Com edy 
Company, close 

Aa London ex- 

836630 Halo 




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124 00088 

gjOBui^ ii t ao^SSteSfea 

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SATURDAY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER IS IQgfi 



ijSd£i 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Davalle and Elizabeth Larard 



43 


SUNDAY 



s2»SS?TflR 


brief. Miisi^ir;, tSSJ* 1 * its 


.noi.told about ^Se 

aiRi^fcadSSS 

■ I^tL^ 105120 ^ 

“•» wfa o finds a 
sameness in the songs: I see 

“»eans, bui I pan 
comply with him when he 
says that the songs could be 

aa*** Tne Uoyd 

Webber show to another witb- 
out anyone being much the 
wiser. The phantom quality of 
the private man behind the 

;5? “ol!? 1 ^Pered with in 
Alan Bensons beautifully or- 


8““ed documents . 
of phantoms, Uoyd Webber's 
latest musical which features 
one of them is accorded .a 
substantia! slice of tonight’s 
running time, the long, crucial 
scene between Beauty and the 
Beast being lopped off at 
exactly the right diff-faangmg 
moment. . ” 

• Best of the rest Jonathan 
Dimbleby’s Journalistically 
well researched documentary 
Television and Foreign 
. 8.30pm), 
anamaker shining 
right in PanuEse 
(C4, 9.00pmX 

PeterDavalle 


and Zoe 
tragically 


AndrewUojJ Webber: the story of his life in music is toW 
i tonighrs r 


mi 


i Sooth Bank Show special (FTV, 10-OOpmj 


BBC 1 


850 


FpvHy-Nesa (r) 855 The 


; 940 Saurday Superstore 
. presented by Mite Read, 
witn actor and singer Nick 
Kamen; magician Paul 

Rarttzan with the latest 

newsoftheChfldiine 
service, which He*p3 

« St®? 1 *! ^ trouble. 

12J5 Grandstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 
programme is: (times are 

approximate) 1220 
Cricket HJghflghts qf 
second day's play 
between Australia and 


Boland: FootbaU Focus 


i Bob Wilson 
1250 News summary and 
weather. Grandstand 
conttouecb 1255, 145 and 
240 Racing from Ascot 
1.10 FbotbaB; 1.40 and 
2.15 Motor Radnor Shefl 


Ofls Raliysprfnt; 
i Semi-fir 


BBC 2 


9.00 CMtst 

220 FftwPSfar (1948) First of 
a double MB starring Dick 
PowelL !n this melodrama 
' ■ haptaysabored 

insurance mao who finds 
himself in trouble when a 
r, with whose 
the has been 
j an affair, gets out 
of fafl. Also stars Lizabeth 
Scott Directed by Andre 
de Toth. Followed at 340 


445 


Tennis: Semi-final of the 
Benson and Hedges 
Championship; 340 and 

. 155 Ice Hockey: Norwich 
Union Cup Final; 340 
Half-times; 44S Final 

Score. 

5.05 News wtth Jan Learning. 
■Weather. 5.15 
S port/Re# onal news. 

540 Roland Rat- The Series. 

5.45 DoctorWho. Part 11 of the 
14-eprsode adventure Tha 
Trial of a Time Lord. 
(Ceefax) 

6.10 The Noel Edmonds Lata 
Late Breakfast Show. The 
whlriy wheeler makes a 
free raH drop from a secret 
location tn the west of 
England. With musk: from 
Duran Duran. 

740 Every Second Counts. 
Comedy quiz show 
presented by Pad Daniels. 

7.40 W-de-HD The camp 
controller Is threaten 
the team with dsmi 
unless things improve at 
the camp, (ceetax) 

• 8.15 Casualty. An Asian boy 
breaks into a house and 
gets drunk, and his friends 
try to revive hkn wOh pep 
pffls. He dies on the way to 
hospftaL-wtiicti is than ' 
threatenedwith legal 
action by the boy's terrify. 
(Ceefax) - 

345 itew»«W«poit,WlttvJan^ 
Learning; weather. 

940 Rtec Looker (1981) '* • . i 

SterringAfoert Honey and 
James Coburn. A thrUter, 
in which ttvee models <fie 
in strange circumstances. 
The plastic surgeon who Is 
the main suspect trim to 
discover why. Directed by 
Michael Crichton. 

1040 Bodyline, the last episode 
of the five-part story about 
the MCC’s 1932 tour of 
Australia, (r) (Ceefax). „ 
12.15 The Rockford Htes. (r) 

145 Weather. 


_ Powell arid 
Rhonda Fleming. A thriller 
in which a tough man 
determines to avenge Ms 
prison sentence, 
settingout to track down 
the real robbers and their 
hauL Directed by Robert 
rarnsn. 

The Sky at NighL Patrick 
Moore and DrDavkJ Clark 
discuss the btzane nature 
Of the SS433 star, (r) 5,15 
Laramie. Western series. 


645 


740 


MaaClab. 

Coverage of the Canberra 
Cruise's world Bridge 
Trophy. 

645 Cricket First Test Richie 
Benaud introduces 
highlights Of the second 
day's play in Brisbane. 
NewsView with Jan 
Leemlng and Moira Stuart 
Includes the week's news 
in subtitles. Weather.'; 

740 Saturday Review 
presented by Russel 
Davies. The RSC is shown 
* rehearsing Macbeth at 
Stratford; Jonathan r 
who plays Macbeth, 
about the play with Sneed 


Cusack (Lady Macbeth) 
actor Adrian Noble. 


and director 
• Ptusaprofleofthe 
American magazine LMa. 

640 Television and Foreign 
Reporting. A review, 
written and presented by 
Jonathan Dfmbleby, of 50 
years of television 
coverage of world events. 
James Cameras. Richard 
DimWeby. Man Whicker, 
John Plgsr arid Sir Rottn 
Day are some of the 
reporters teduded. 

9.40 RaUy Report 86. A preview 
of the route of the - • 
Lombard/RAC RaMy. 
which starts tomorrow. 

1040 FkmAFUnny DktyUttie 
• W •' War (1M3)n»mng 
.. ^ y tFederioorLuppt Alra^- . . 
comedy from Argentina, . 
which won ah award at the. 
1984 Berlin Festival- ttts 
aetbil 97A when . ^ 

pcStic^ factions.' Cwected 
By Hector OHvera. (With 
subtitles) ' 

1140 international Tennis. The 
Benson end 


TV-AIY1 


Mke 


6L55 TV<wmcriftoduced 
Morris. Wbather at 
newsat74(^ sport at 
7.10. 

740 The WMa Awake Ctab 
introduces the winner of 
the Song for Christmas 
Ckimpat Bon inaldofthe 
Leukaemia Research 
Rind; latest home video 
releases; winners of the 
Short Snooker 
Championships; and the 
finaBsts of the Junior 
Superdanee 
Championships. Guests 

are the oomedy trio; 
Morris, Major & The 
Minors. 


ITV, LONDON 


945 No 73. Entertainment for 
children 1140 Knight 
Rider. 

1240 News with John SucheL 
1245 Saint sod Graavaie. 1240 
Wrestling from 
Loughborough Town Ha9 
140 Airwoff. Ketwnca and fas 
town become involved in a 
South 


2.15 


Shi Part one of 
the 1974s comedy series, 
starring John Akterton as 
a hwMss young teacher In 
conflict with Ms notorious 
class, (r) 

2.45 Ice Skating. The Tuborg 
British Ice Dance 
Championship. 445 
Results. 

540 News with John SucheL 

545 Blockbusteim. Goteral 
knowledge pub- 545 The 
. A-Team. 

640 B&qd Dote. A lighthearted 
look at what happens on 
Wind dates. 

7.15 Satwday Gang. Comedy - 
and muffle from Gary 
Wlmot Hale & Pace, and 
Kate Robbins. 

746 3-2-1 featuring Soria 
Gaynor, Lyn ffaul. The 
Searchers and the Rockin' 
Bwries. (Oracle) 

846 News and sport with John 
SucheL - 

940 Unnatural Causes. The 
second in a series of 
thritors features Patricia 
Phoenbc as a bed-ridden 
■ mother of two adult softs, 
one of whom returns after 
having dis^jpeared when 

' a ytkaig girt was fbuid 
dead In a nearby wood. ■ 
(Oracle) folowed by L.WT 
News headlines 


1040 The Andrew Uoyd 

y.Metvyn 


Webber Story. 
Braggpressnte a South 
BankShow special, 
devoted to the fife and 


work of the composer. 
(Work. The 


1140 (MgariceatWi 

second of a new series 


Championship, 
from Wembley, 


CHANNEL 4 


Dragon. 

iofme 


945 A Question of Economics, 
Part 5. Why is the 

against public 

yet ^ 

orrowktgm 

form of morto^re, cracflt 
cards, etc.? 

SL50 4 What if s 

1040 The Heart of the 

The eating habits of 1 
Chinese, m 1145 
TTesstae Hunt (r) 12L20 
Isattra the Slave Girl (r) 
followed by Worid of 
Aoimatfoo. 

145 (%snnel 4 Racing from 
Ne wc astle. Brough Scott 
introduces the 1-f5. 1.45, 
2.15 and 245. 

340 FDacLfl Abner (1969) 
starring Peter Palmer, 
LesHe Parrish and Stubby 
ad on A! 


Kaye. Mustoaf based on 
Capp'8 comic strip 
characters, in which tha 
hiilbflties of Dogpateh, 

' Kentucky, try to save their 
comm urrtte from becoming 
an A-bon» test site. 
Directed by Melvin Frank. 

545 Broakside.{r) (Oracle) 

640 Rijritt to Reply. Des 
O'Connor defends his 
show against viewers' 
accusations that it 
contains foul language, 
obscenity and tasteless 
humour. 

640 The Great AustraBan Boat 
Race. The Americas Cup 
elimination races. 

740 News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
Days. Robert Kee 


Interviews Anthony Kenny, 
Baliot, about his 


Master of BalfoLi 
book, The Road to 
Hillsborough: the Shaping 
oftheAngMrish 
Agreement; plus a feature 
on the anniversary of Guru 
Nanak, the founder of the 
Sikh religion. 

740 Strangers Abroad. The 
last programme In the 
series tolls the story of Sir 
Edward Evane-P r itc ha rd, 
the feat trained 
anthropologist to work in 
Africa. 

840 Recferfcfc. Continuing the 
. series on a year In the life 
of Newcastle University. 
(Oracle) 

Paradise 


940 Paradise Postponed, (r) 
(Oracle) 

1040 HH Street ffluas- A cop . 
klUer is still at large, and 
the officers become 
increasingly nervous. 
(Oracle) 

1140 Who Dares Wins^nother 
in the repeated series of 


the off-beet oomedy show, 
ts. The first of 


MF jmecftum wave). StM 
VHF (see below) 1 

Nbws on the haft-hour I 


.Stereo on 


■until 

1240pm, than 240,440, 540, 
740,940, 1240 midnight 
240 YouH never be 16 again 
(history of the British teenager) 340 
The American Chart Show. 

Direct from New York. 540 

ISoin^oiTOitfl^doSeiand the 
Commotions) 740 Simon Mayo 
940-1240 Midnight Runners Show 
(with Dixie PeachT VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 62 44tem As Radio 2 
1.00pm As Radio 1.740- 
440am As Racfio 2 


News on the hour until 140pm 
then 3.00, 640, 7JNI and hourly 
from 1040. Haadtinaa 640am, 
740. Sports Desks 1142am, 
1042pm. . 

4.00 David Yamafl 640 Steve. • 
Truetora 845 Davkf Jacobs 1040 
Sounds of the 60s 11.00 Afoum 
Tht« (Peter Clayton) 140pm The 
News Huddfines 1^) Sptxt on 
2 Indudes Tennis, (Benson and 


j; e'’’ (S^Test Second day) and Racing 

K « g_5J. .3 r Jr. -s from Ascot 540 Sports Report 

-C:-; Classified resists 640 Brain of 




Sport 1 986 640 Dontaop 
Now— 1 


ut 


.. -jrf. 

— , . ra^'^tF 

a**- : • " 



-tfs Rmdatioh740 Beet the 
Record (Keith Fordyce) 740 
The Magic of D*Oyiy Carte. 
HighBgms of GUwrt arte 
SiSivan operetta (from Barbican 
Hall). Soloists' tedude Vivian 
Tierney. Lorraine Daniels, Patrida 
Leonard, Meston Reid, Kenneth 
Sandfard and Alistair Ddnkta 230 
String Sound (BBC Ratio .. 
Orchestra) 1045 Martin Keiner . 
1205am Dave Gefly 140 Bffl 
RanneOs 340-4.00 1 
Orchestra. 


WORLD SERVICE 


740 News 7X0 


• v»-< : 

'i rf-Viv- 


OJQONawsdMki. 

T V an tyMPou Hours 740 . „ 

lea 7 M Network UK a40.New> AM 


ReffBCtions B-IS A 3dh Good ShowMO 
' wall 


> si i 





New 948 Revtev of the British Beet 

sssuaiASSS 

1100 New 1149 New mom 6ri“*» 
1115 BXtneen C^anM Soto fund 
1140) «J» Radio StowmS 0-15 
MiMmck 3 1248 Sports RTOdM UO 
New 149 Twenty-Four Houre.,140 

KSWK 

Raito Newsreel 3.15 Saturday 
440 News 44B Cpmtwentw Ate I gteUP - 

Sms* 

1140 New -1140 Commentary nM 
Nature Notebook 1140 AnytNng Bow 
1240 News 1*» taM j® 
t2JS Radio NawmS1 1240 PW 
WHk: WTO LMT240 New 
rt the Brash Press 3M yggg ” _? • 
Cepten Cook 240 ttien W*2g«N»» 
349 New about Britain 3.15 From w 

ssss 

OUT. .... 


Regional. TV: on facing page 



1145 Six of Hearts. The 
a six-part series using 
tframa, documentary , 
music and comedy to 
describe the fives of six 
homosexuals. 

1245 The TWBJght Zorte. Two 
stories of the sipematural 
from the late 1950s and 
early 60s. 



Simon Callow, as Mkawber, and Cofin Harley as David 
in part five of David Copperfiek[ (BBC1, 5.50pm) 


• Not all the dialogue 10 
Dennis Potter’s new and un- 
settling drama serial The Siog- 
ing Detective (BBCl, 9.05pm) 
is as bleakly pessimistic as the 
sentiment — “ Vomit is the 
only thing that can come out 
of people's mouths” - uttered 
by the skin-peeling heap of 
blotchy flesh to which Michael 
Gambon's hospitalized 
thriller-writer has been re- 
duced. But it is not a pretty 
tale, however you look at it. 
And its plotting, so far at any 
rate, is tortuous. So be 
warned. Its compensations in- 
clude the song-and-dance 
routines (set to popular songs 
of the Forties) that recall 


Pennies from Heaven, Potter s 
eariier, unforgettable, 
experiment in multi-styled 
drama. 

• Best of the rest John 
Frankenheimer's gripping, rf 
somewhat overwought mih- 
tary-poliikal thriller Seven 
Da vs in May (Channel 4, 
9.45pm) with 2 cast heavy 
with big box-office names of 
the day: the first of two 
Everyman films about LSD 
(BBCi, 10.15pm) with some 
remarkable footage about the 
effects of a hallucinogenic 
drug; and the English version 
of Rinuky-Korsakov's opera 
The Golden Cockerel (Radio 
3, 730pm) 


rjr 


PJ>. 


BBC 1 


845 


Flay School 9.15 Articles 
of ifalth 940 This la tha 


Day. A service from a 
viewer’s home. 1040 
Asian Magazi ne. 

1040 TaMng Business 

Business Advice for those 
whose second language is 


Italian conversation 
course. 1140 France 
■duetto. Last of five ferns 
on modem France. 11.45 
TeMoumaL News from 
the French television 
station, Antenna 2 

1210 Sign Extra. For the 

hearing impaired. 1245 
Farmtog. A profile of an 
Oxfordshire vet who uses 
homeopathic methods of 
treatment 12J58 Weather 

140 This Week Next Week 
Discussing the 
forthcoming Thatcher - 
Reagan talcs are MPs 
Timothy Renton, Denis 
Healey and David Owen; 
plus a prafee of Glenys 
Kinnodc200 EattEnders. 
(r) (Ceefax) 

340 Film: Khartoun (1966) 
starring Chariton Heston, 
Laurence Olivia- and 
Ralph Richardson. An 
historical epic about 
events learang to the 
assa ssination of General 
Gordon. Directed by Basil 
Dearden. 

545 The Making of the Royal 
Variety Perform anc e, 
1985. Dramas backstage, 
from first rehearsal to the 
Queen's arrival 

540 



ncy first aid series. 


640 News with Jan I 

Weather. 6^0 Songs < 
Praise with the Salvation 
Army. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Twenty Years of the Two 
Ronnies. High Sghts from 
the comertians' shows. 


840 


BBC 2 


940 ft fri x 

945 BaHy Report 88. The first 
stage of this year's RAC 
Lomb ard R aw at 
Badminton. 


10.15 Wacky Races Cartoon (r) 
1045 The AH New Popeye 
Show Cartoon (r) 1040 


1210 


200 


440 


250 


i’ Way- Episode 
12 (Ceefax) 

News with Jan Leenting. 

Ultaftthnr 

9,05 The Singing Detective. 
The ftst of a six-part 
musical serial by Dennis 
Ponen the world of 
- - mingled fantasy and reality 
of a writer of cheap 
detective fiction, immobile 
in hospital suffering from 
psoriasis. Starring 
Gambon, with Patrick 
Maiahide and Joanne 


WhaDey. (Ceefax) 

nan. The first of a 


545 Test Match: second day. Until 
745am ' 

955 Weather. 740 News 
746 AubadeTHandel (Zadok 
the Priest anthem). Bgar 
(Serenade mEmbrark • 

. Johnson (The 

Temporirar), Byrd (Sermone 


145 


Bga Ontroductfon and 
AHeogro Op 47), Debussy 
(La mart. 140 News 
Kafian Song Book: Arisen 


1 Johnson 
Settmgs of Italian 


btando), Larsson 
(Wkitefs 


150 



WoodS), 

(UebestreumNoS: . 
Curzon), Cantetoube (Hymns 
dans raurore, with 

Frederica von Stada), 
Rodrigo (Fttacta para 
. ungenWtomtxe,withBotwfl, 
guter). Bax( 

• and’ _ 
arrangement of The 
Turtle Dove. 940 News 
946 Record Review: Includes 
Roger Nichols's guide to 
recordings of Stravinsky's 
The Firebird 
10.16 Stereo Release: 

. ffiiS?SS&c«.No 

liwRhKhtjnsana, 


rin London: Brace 
Boa plays the American 
composer in these 

reconecfions 0! a vWt in 
1933 

210 Schubert Piano Sonatas: 
Martino TMmo plays tha . 
Sonata in C, D 279, and the 
Sonata in A, D 684 
340 Fftn ana oafiet music 
Includes Denisov's baBet 


suite tspoved, and 
Shostakovich f 


(Pribaoutki, with 
soprano), Mosotov (Iron 
Foudry) 

1145 Viofin and Piano: 
TomotadaSohand 
Dennis Lee. Beethoven 


(Sonata hi F„ Op 
2S^prhig}. Chausson 
fPoema), Waxman 


1246 


(Carmen Fantasy) 

Cleveland Orchestra 
(under Masste). Bertka . 

1 CetiM overture). 


1 fid scores 

for Pirogov, and The Young 
Guard. BBC SO, and 
. Lithuanian State SO 
540 Jazz Record Requests; 
with Peter Gaytan 

545 Critics' Forum indudes 
comment on Tons of 
Money at the National 
- Theatre, the play Love 
. Match at on BBC2 and The 
Faber Book of 
Contemporary American 
Poetry 

655 Chromatimelodtune or, 

James Sinclair Orchestra, 
Yale Theater Orchestra, 
American Brass Quintet, and 
. soloists 


Iona Brawn (viofin), Josef 

Suk, (viola)- Direct from 

West Germany. Part one. 

Rossini (Thieving Magpie 
overture), Mozart (Smfenia 
Concerianta in Eflat • 
major, K 364) 

745 The Seasons of our Lite: 
Marion Bailey, Ronald 
Pickup and Peter Orr read a 
poetry anthology 
845 Concert (continued): ■ 

- Dvorak (Symphony No 9J 
940 Saltykov's WOrttfc 
Edward Da Souza to 

three tales by MMwU 
Saltykov-Shcnedrin. (1) 

The Two High Officials 
9.15 Shostakovich: Borodin 
Stiring Quartetrtay the 

Quartet No 9. Part one 
9-45 Russian Literary Trends: 
Mary Seton- Watson talks 

about modem censorship 
1045 Concert part two. Plano 
Quintet, Op 57, with 
Peter Donohoe, piano 


10X5 The Six Senses: Be Not 
Afraid. With hthe Barrow 
- Poets 

1140 Stockhausen: South 

German Ractio SO (under 
Peter Oetvos) play Mfactur 
1140 Handel Cantatas: Manca 
pur quanto sai; Mantra y 
tutto; Care selva. With Safiy 
Bradshaw (soprano), 
Robert 1" 


fharpsichord), 
Boothby 


740 BBCW^hSOi 
Mariss Ya 


f (gam be) 

1158. News. 1240 Close 
1245 Test Match Spsda!; First 
Test, third day. Until 
245am 


On tong wave (s) Stereo on VHF 
555 Shipping. €.00 News Briefing; 

Wemier. 8.10 Prelude (8) - 
640 News; Farming. 650 
Prayer. G5S Weather; 

. Travel 

740 News. 7.15 On Your . 
Farm. 7X6 in. 


750 


1 to 

Earth (Weekend gardening). 

755 Vreatftec.Traval 
840 News. 8.10 Today’s 


1227 Radio Active. "Stop that 

« Crime UK". « . bmttow?. 

140 News 

1,10 Any. Questions? Nigel 
Lawson, MP Roy Jenkins 
MP, Frances Marred (leader 
ILEa) and Am Leslie 
Ooumafist) answer audience 
gtvsttons. From Oxted in 
Sunray. Chairman: John 
, TTmpson . 

240 News; The Afternoon - 
Ptay. Mischief from a 
novel by Ben Travers, 


640 News; Sports round-up. 
645 Stop the Week with 
Robert Robinson. 

Includes a song by Instant 


Sunshine (sj . 
740 Saturday Night 


8.15 Sport on 4. Indudes 

news about the Test, and 
ttu Bensbn and Hedges 
tennis championship at 
- Wembley. 

8.48 Yesterday in Partement 
857 Weamen Travel 

940 News * 

B4E Breakaway (traveLand 


leisure) - 

i Stand. 1 


950 News Stand. Michael 
Watts reviews the 
weeklies. • • 

1045 The Week in ' , ' 

. Westrifinrior.wlthdufia 
Langdon, Politics] Editor Of 


1040 Loose Ends (wtitt Ned 


1150 Fram .OurOwn 

Correspondent Life and 


1200 'New&iMoney Box. 

Prese n t ed by Loute#' 


Cast Includes Fre ddi e Jones, 
Melinda Walker and tan 
Lavender (s) 

340 NewajTravel; 

International 
. Assignment. BBC 
correspondents report 
4,00 .With Great Pleasure. . 
Christopher Fry presents 
a sel ectio n of.hb favourite 
prose and poetry. With 
- Sarah BadeL 
445 The Bpeciafist Reading 
byGtiristapher 

Godwinfrom Charted Sale's 
ctoslc about a privy 
bulkier. 

540 The Living WOrid. Derek 
Jones vrnts the Vfedfowl 
Trust at Sflmbridge on its 

40thannfversary. 

545 Week emfing. SetWcal 
sketches. 550 SWpt*»fl 
1 . SS Weather; Travel ■ 


, _ t Theatre. 

Blue Moves, by Mark 
Brennan. Drama atiout two 
missing women. With 

Christopher Ravenscrsoft as 
tiie private eye. Also 
- starring Hzabeth RWer and 
Alan MacNaughton. 

'840 Baker's Dozen. (Richard 
Baker). 

940 Thriller! Deep and Crisp 
TbrillX^aottek Read by 

Bin Paterson 958 
Weather 

1040 News . 

10.15 Evening SerWce fa) . 

1(130 ^^^aSntfSS 


issues. • _ • 

1140 Soenca Now. (Georgian 

Fenv) 

1140. Racdb Times Comedy 
. Parade. Brian the Wise, 
by Ewart Hutton. With 
Robert Giertswr and Jon 
Glover In the cast ■ ' 
1200 News; Weather. 

VHF (available in England and 
8 Wales only) as above 
except 555-640ani 
-weathenTraveL 


10.15 Everyman. The 

two-part investigation into 
the use of the drug LSD. 
1140 Revolution in the 

Ctassroom? A look at the 
newGCSE 
1140 Internat io nal Tennis. 
Highlights of the Benson 
and hedges Champion ship. 
1215 Weather. 


Show Cartoon (r) If 
The Charito Brown and 
Snoopy Show. Cartoons 
1055Bkie Peter (r) 

1140 The Cuckoo Stater. 

Episode three of the fow- 
paut drama. 

WfrtctaaB. Chris Serto 
presents the first of a new 
series of classic video and 
film dips, beginning with 
the late Percy Thrower, 
the gardener, in The 
Planet Earth. 1.10 No 
Unfits, (rt 

International Tennis. The 
Benson and Hedges 
Championship. 

special. Highlights 
of Oath v Coventry. 

5.10 Muffle in Camera. 
Shostakovich Piano 
Quintet in G Minor, played 
by The Borodin Quartet, 
with pianist Peter 
Donohoe. 

550 Thinking Aloud. Are we 
essentially the same or 
different? Philosophers 
Martin Hoffis and Quentin 
Skinner and writer Tort 
Mol discuss tha question. 

640 The Mooey Pro gra mme 
includes a report on the 
opening of the naval 
dockyards to commercial 
management the 
changing image of maB 
order catalogues; and the 
trade in members of golf 
dubs on the Japanese 
stock exchange. 

7.15 Did You See . . . ?7he 
are Casualty, 
and 

Rectorick. Plus a report on 
television violence. 

8.00 The Natural World: Have 
Fish Had Their Chips? 
Julian Pettifer investigates 
the worid of fishing, past, 
present and future. 
Lovetaw. Women in 
Japan, Egypt Italy and 
Hungary discuss their 
experience of divorce. 
Cricket First 

TestHtohflghts of the third 
day's pay between 
England and Australia in 
Brisbane. 

1045 Rafly Report 86. A report 
on the start of this veer's 
Lombard RAC Rally. 

10.15 Fane The Californio Dots 
(1981) starring Peter Falk. 
VlcW Frederick and 
Laurene Lartdon. The 
entertaining adventures of 
two women wrestlers and 


850 


940 


their fast-talking manager 
istharo f 


up against hard times as 

they tour the Industrial 
towns of mkJ-WBSt 
America. Directed by 
Robert Aldrich. Ends at 
1210 


ae 

a- 

ice 

=2 

ce. 

up 


TV-AM 


655 TV-am begins wim Sunday 
Comment; 740 Are You 
Awake Yet?; 745 WAC 
Extra. 

840 David Frost on Sunday 
includes Derek Jameson 
reviewing the Sunday 
newspapers; (Guests?) 


iTV/LONDON 


945 Wake Up London 

940 Film: Mystery at Caitto 
House. (1981) Three 
children find adventure in 
a deserted old house. 
Directed by Peter Maxwefl. 

1140 AMedfeattonon 

Remembrance. (Oracle) 
11*45 Dangerous 
Journey. Story based on 
Pilgrim's Progress. 

1240 Weekend World. WHJ the 
conflict between Kenneth 
Baker and the teachers 
lead to chaos in schools? 
Matthew Parris interviews 
teachers' union leaders 
Fred Smithies and Ron 
McAvoy. 

140 PoBce Five. 1.15 The 
Smurfs (r) 140 Getting 
On. A profile of Kazuo 
Otino, the Japanese 
dancer. 

240 The Human Factor. A 
reconstruction of what 


happened when an 
limner's to 


airliner's four engines 


failed on a flight to 
n 1982 


Australia In 

240 LWT News headlined 

followed by The Big Match 
Live. Liverpool v Sheffield 
Wednesday. 

440 The Return of (he 

Antelope. Adventures of a 
group of Lilliputians. 540 
Butiseye. 

540 Sunday Sunday. Gloria 
Hunniford and guests 
Jeremy Beadle, Max 
Bygraves, Windsor 
Davies, Anne Diamond 
and Dickie Davies. 

640 News 6.40 AppeaL 

645 Highway from the Charnel 
Island, Sark 7.15 CMcfe 
Ptay. 

755 F3nc Juggernaut (1974) 
starring Richard Hanfs 
and Omar Sharif. A race- 
against-time thriller sat on 
board a transatlantic Itoer 
on which several bombs 
have bean planted. 

' Directed by Richard 
Lester. (Oracle) 9^5 News 

1040 Room at the Bottom. 
Comedy series, starring 
James Boiam. (Oracle) 

1040 L WT Naurs headlines 
followed by Making tt. A 
documentary following 
three young musicians 
through thefr first yBar as 
professionals. 1240 
California Highways. 
Touring America's west 
coast 

1225 TheNewSquwhonaires. 
Big band dancs music. 

1250 Night Thoughts. 


CHANNEL 4 


945 Sunday East! 
programme for/ 
viewers followed by 
Dea waraln , a drama serial 
sat in a Pakistan vtr 
moo The World This Wc 


r. whose; 
include Rt__ 
McNamara, former US 

Defence Secretary- 


11.00 Woreffl Qu mm k tfl B (1^ ^ 


1140 The Waltons IS 
The Tube (r) 


240 Pobta P ro g ra mme for 
children. With guest 


Mactiwr Jeffrey. 

Rsaeb.Thei 


240 Fine Naseeb.The most 
popular Indian film of 
1 981, starring Amitabh 
Bachchan, hero of the 
IrtcGan cinema since the 
1970s, and Rishi Kapoor, 
it teHs the story ofa 
conflict over a lottery win 
that divides four once- 
dose friends. Directed by 
Manmohan DesaL (In 
Hindi with English 
subtitles). 

5.10 News Summmy and 
weather followed by The 


Business Promanune. 
a look at the 


Indudes a I 
advertising behind the 


British Gas flotation; plus 
Denis 


an Interview with Sir 
Rooke, British Gas 
chairman. 

6.00 American FootbaB. 

Denver plays San Diego. 
7.15 Nasser. The last 

programme covering the 
career of the iate 


nt of Egjgit* based 


on interviews 1 
Egyptian journalist 
Monamed Hassanem 
Heikal, a dose friend of 
Nasser's. 

8.15 Beyond Reasonable 
Doubt An investigation 
Into tha evidence of those 
sentenced for the 1974* 
IRA pub bombings, whom 
many now believe to be 
innocent; and the case of 
Annie Maguire, accused of 
running a bomb factory 'm 
London, who was jafied on 
deputed forensic 
evidence. 


and Ava Gardner. An 

absorbing potttica! mystery 

drama to which a marine 
discovers a plot to mount 

US |»^dentK^ted by 
John Franksnhelmer. 

1155 FBm: Footsteps (1974) 
starring Gemma Jones, in 
this sinister fern, a lonely 
woman whose hearing to 
highly sensitized as a 
result of a mugging 
assault hears footsteps in 
her daiapidated boarding 
house and believes she 
has witnessed a murder. 
Directed by Alan Parker. 
Ends at 1240. 




MFJmecfium wave)5terao on 
VHF (sas below) 

News on the half hour unti 
1150am. then at 250pm, 350, 
450, 750, 950 and 1250 
midnight 

640 Mark Paga 640 Peter 
Rowel 1040 Mace Read 1250pm 
Jimmy Savffl's Qfd Record' 

Ctiub (1982 78 end 70) 250 The 

Retunr of Bob GekJof - 

Musician (Part 2) 350 Radio 1 More 
Time 440 Chartoustere (Bruno 
Brookes) 540 Top 40fflruno 
Brookes) 740 Mark Blen witt 


Reauast Show 940 RobUe Vincent 
1140-1240 The Rankin’ Mb 


Miss P 

(with Culture Rock). VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 & 2 440am As Ratflo 
2. 5.00 As Radio 1 . 12 ,00-4 OOwn 
As Radio 2. 




MF (medium wave) JStereo 
VHG (see Radio 1J 
440 David Yamafl 640 Stave 


Truetove750 


Good Momira Sui 
Melodies for Yi 


'ou (BBC Concert 

Orchestra, and Richard Baker) 
11.00 Teddy Johnson 240 Barmy 
Green 340 Alan Defi 440 
Robert Docker at the piano 450 


Charts 


. 'Adams Singers) 

Chester with Simday Soapbox 
740 The GrumbtaWBeds 750 
Come to the Ballet (with 
Connac Rigby) 850 Sunday H 
Hour (from Mayfield Parish 
Church, Edinburgh) 940 Your 
Hundred Best Tunes (Alan 
Keith _ 

10.45 Brian Dae at tha 
1145 Sounds of Jazz 


Clayton) 140am Bis Renefis 
.340-4401 


I A Little Light Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 


640 NswsdMk 640)740 Nun 74S 
Twenty-Four Hows 750 From Our Own 
Conw p ondam 750 Wwps 840 
Nun 849 TMfldont 415 The 
PtoMurt't rows 94B Review ot British 

Prasss 9.15 Science hi AcunaeSWMors 

at Ham 1040 Nun 1041 Short Stay 
10.15 Onskri Rscntt Reviews 1050 
Sunday Service 1140 News 1140 News 
About Britain 11.15 From our won 
Correspondent (unta 1150) 1240 Ptay of 
the Week: Mng Leer fnarted 1130) 140 
News- 149 TwenKJFour Hours 150 
Sports Roundup 145 Send! Jones Re- 
quest Show fochjdmg at 240 News 
Summary) 250TheBetrottuid 340 RKfio 
NswsreW 3.15 KrtatTWlotBl Recital 440 
News 449 Commentary 4.15 Seeds ot 
Crtmmattv 445 Lmnr from America 540 
News 546 Reflectfaffi (urns 5.15) 840 
News 849 Twenty-Four Hours 650 
Sunday Had Hour 940 News 941 Story 
Pleasure's Yours 1000 News 


«U» vayagaa ot^Ca ^m^Ooo k; 10.15 


Book CMw mao rta netat Review 
1040 Reflections 1048 Sports Roundup 
1100 News 1149 Commentary 11,15 
Lenar tram America 1150 Canadian 
Novel tun News tun News About 
Bream 12.15 Redo Newsreel 1250 
Roflglous Sendee 140 News 1.01 Q.K. 
Cne ae rtnn 146 Music of Weber 240 
News 249 Review ot ihe fetash Press 
215 Peseta's Chores 250 Soenca in 
Action 340 News 349 News About Brttan 
115 Good Books 350 Anything Boss 
440 N e wetta a l c 450 Scoop (urn 4.45) 
645 RecoRfing of the Week. AS Hedm ha 
CMIT 


e 




555 Test Match: third 
in Brisbane. Until7. 
6u55 Weathar. 7.00 News 
7J35 Beecham Conducts: 
London Phfihamiorfic 


Lobgesang. and 


recor d ings of works by 
Berfioz (Roman Canfival 


London! 
ffickox Singers/soloists 
Afiaon Hargan. Janet 


Caucasian Poems: Julian 
Glover and Jans Leonard 


read new translations tij? 


Baker. Simon Ga^JMartyn 


overture) , Verdi fRItoma 
r>ida: with Eva 


vinertorj 

Turner), SibeQus (Vtoiln 
Concerto, with Heifetz), 
Defius (Brigg Fair), VercB 
(VegBammo invan due 
noth, Macbeth, wftfi aimrt 
.Terry, and Franck), and 
Brahms's Symphony No 2 
.940 News 

945 You- Concert Choice: 

BJzst (Fair Maid of Perth 
suite). Mrs H H A Beach 
(VioSn Sonata In A minor, 
Op 34, with Sftrarstein mid 
Kafish), Ravel (Una 
barque sur !' ocean. Mtrolrs, 
with Coiterd, piano). 
Copland (Bffly the Kid baHet) 
1050 Music Weekly: includes 
an interview with Martino 
Tirimo on edtitog Schubert 
and a tflscussion on 
music teaching In schools 
11.15 Tatiana Nikolaeva: the 
pianist performs the 
Bach Goldberg 
Variations, BWv 988 fr> 

140 From the Festivals: 
Spitalfiekfs 1988. 

Brahms's Alto Rh) 

Mozart's Mass in I 
minor, K 427, and Liszt 
motets i 
enwachenden 1 


Hll and Stephen 
240 Glazunov and Gflere: 
Hanson String Quartet 
GBazunov Quartet No 3, 
Gasre’s Quartet No 2 
3.45 Roussa! and Faufe: 
Roussel (Symphony No 
T) and Faurt (Chant 
funerake) 

455 Scarlatti and Beethoven: 
Beethoven (Quintet to E 
flal. Op 18) and Scarlatti 
sonatas Inducing the G 
minor, Kk 450, and the D 
minor. Kk 396. WHh Nina 
MBdna (piano). Nell Black 
(oboe), Thaa King 
(dariren, Graham Sheen 
(bassoon), Anthony 
Halstead (twm) 

550 Animal Farm: Fresh 
Fields and Pastures 
New. Cofin Tudge on 
developments in 
European agriculture 
6.15 Liszt and tha Piano: Kyn 


and 


WOo PaBc (piano) plays 
Hungarian Rhapsody No 10, 
Ballade d- Ukraine. 


Hungarian National Melody 
sSTandH 


NO! 


I Hungarian 
Rhapsody No 11 
650 Tamara: USSR So (under 
Svettanoripiay 
Balakirev's symphonic poem 
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SPORT 


First puMfched in 1785 


Carrick 
steps 
into the 
breach 

By Peter Ball 

Yorkshire have changed 
their captain for the sixth time 
in nine years. After a half-hoar 
discussion, the county's gen- 
eral committee yesterday ap- 
proved the dismissal of David 
Bairs ton and the appointment 
of Phil Carrick as his succes- 
sor by a 12-7 majority. 

Carrick. aged 34 and the 
vice-captain, had been ex- 
pected to succeed Bairstow 
when it became known the 
wicketkeeper's tenure was in 
doubt, and the cricket commit- 
tee were solidly in favour of the 
change with only one dissent- 
ing voice. Brian Close, the 
chairman of the cricket 
committee, however, con- 
firmed that several other 
names had been discussed and 
the vote on the general 
committee suggests that Car- 
rick. who is only on a one-year 
playing contract, will come 
under close scrutiny. 

Close refused to accept that 
an appointment for a player on 
only a one-year contract was 
unusual. “That has never been 
any different bnt it is up to him 
now to do the job well." 

Much will depend on the 
response of Bairstow, who had 
not been informed of the 
decision last night Close be- 
ing unable to contact him after 
the meeting. Bairstow was 
known to be reluctant to 
relinquish the captaincy, 
which Close felt was in- 
compatible with his 
wicketkeeping duties, and al- 
though Bairstow has kept his 
own counsel, he may well 
reconsider his position with 
the county. 

Close said he was not 
concerned about Garrick's own 
form last season, when the 
slow left-arm bowler took only 
31 championship wickets, and 
36 first-class, at over 43 nms 
apiece. His fielding also 
brought criticism from some 
quarters. 

“I felt that his bowling 
knowledge will be important, 
given that is the particular 
department which has not 
been as good as it ought to 
have been. The real clincher In 
the decision was experience, 
particularly in the field.” 

Bairstow 's closeness to Boy- 
cott means the decision will be 
seen as a further indication of 
the committee's desire to close 
the book on an era. The side 
had little success under 
Bairstow, and the county hope 
that players who felt restricted 
by the presence of Boycott, 
particularly the younger play- 
ers, will now blossom in a freer 
environment. Many people 
will watch with interest to see 
if that really happens. 

Rebels win 

Ondtsboora (AFP) — The 
tonring rebel Anstralian team 
cruised to a comfortable vic- 
tory in their first match of 
their Sooth African torn 
against the Southern Cape 
provincial side here yesterday, 
with both the captain Kim 
Hughes and John Dyson hit- 
ting centuries. 

SCORES: Australia 319 (or 2 (50 own: 


England acquire 
timely resolve 
to turn the tide 


England put their recent 
horrors behind them when the 
first Test match began here 
yesterday. After being put in 
to bat, they turned what had 
threatened to be ill-fate into 
good fortune. With bad light 
and rain allowing only nine 
overs after tea. they ended the 
day on 198 for two. 

The innings was held to- 
gether by Athey and given its 
impetus by Gatling, when he 
came in at the fall of the first 
wicket, partly in the hope of 
bringing Gower a change of 
luck. Then, after Athey and 
Gatling had added 101 for the 
second wicket. Lamb and 
Athey made an unbroken 82 
together for the third. 

At the finish. Athey was 
within reach of becoming only 
the fourth England player to 
score a Test hundred in Bris- 
bane. 1 say England player, as 
distinct from English man. 
because Greig was one of 
them. The others were 
Hendren and Ley land. That 
there have been so few must 
account, to some extent, for 
England's poor record here. 

Athey played the innings 
that Boycott might have, one 
based on application and de- 
cent method It was as timely 
as it was resolute, and re- 
quired a good deal of hard 
work in the morning, if not 
quite all it would have done 
against an attack of more 
genuine quality. Australia's 
one vintage contribution to 
the day was the evening 
thunderstorm — one which 
until the early 1950s, before 
pitches were covered, would 
have left us with all the 
excitement of a sticky wicket 
today. 

England's choice of two 
spinners had to be seen as an 
indictment of the form of their 
faster bowlers. They will come 
in useful even so.' should the 
ball tu