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No 62,619 





case 


The Speaker of the House of 
Commons took the highly 
unusual step last night of 
overruling the Prime Minister 
and insisting that the Wright 
spy book case being beard in 
Australia was not sub-judice. 

His decision, winch ap- 
peared to take Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher and senior Conser- 
vatives by surprise, sparked 
off a furious parliamentary 
row, with Labour MPs accus- 
ing the Prime Minister of 
misleading die Commons and 
demanding an apology. 

The political bombshell 
came as Mrs Thatcher’s chief 
adviser on intelligence and 
security, Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
faced tough questioning in the 
Supreme Court of New South 
Wales, where the Government 
is trying to ban .publication of 
the book by Mr Peter Wright, 
an ex-M15 officer. 

The book accuses Sir Roger 
Hollis, the former M15 chief; 
of working for the Soviet 
Union. 

The cross-examination of 
Sir Robert, by defence co unsel 
fighting the ban attempt, 
lasted all day. At one point he 
was accused of deliberately 
misleading the court 
He was persistently asked 
why the Government had 


allowed publication of books Leader of the House, cbal- 
on MI5 by two authors, Mr 1 Jerked Mr Bemanf Weatberill, 
Nigd West and Mr Chapman the Speaker, to rule that Mrs 


Pmdier, but was no w attempt- 
ing to ban the Wright book. 

Sir Robert stuck to the 
Go vernment line that it would 
breach the rules of confid- 
entiality covering all MIS 
personnel. 

The ruling iq the Commons 
yesterday will allow Opp- 
osition MPs to bombard Mis 


Thatcher had misled MPs by 
saying that tbe.case in Austra- 
lia was sub judice. 


Parliament 
Armstrong nHimw^ n 
Sole queried 


4 

14 

14 


Thatcher with - potentially 
embarrassing questions about 
alleged Soviet infiltration of 
Britain's security services. 

The Commons came 
after the Prime Minister was 
questioned about the Govern- 
ment’s court move in Austra- 
lia. 

Mr Geoffrey Lofthouse, La- 
bour MP for Pontefract and 


Tomorrow 


The will 
to win 



Mr WeatheriH said: “As I 
understand it, this case in the 
Australian court is not sub 
judice under our rules.” 

. The Speaker added lateral 
calculated that this might arise 
and therefore I was prepared 
with the answer that I gave. 

Labour MPs immediately 
demanded an apology and 
when Mis That cher initially 
hesitated they urged the 
Speaker to “name” the Prime 
Minister and throw her out of 
the Commons. 

Mrs Thatcher eventually 
told the Speaker that die 
accepted his ruling on sub 
jodice, which meant that any 
questions could be asked 
about the case. But she im- 
mediately made it dear that 
Castieford, said that if Mr- 5 ** 5 *ot answer the 

Wright’s book was correct expected barrage jif questions 
then Mrs Thatcher had misled 
the Commons in 1981 when 
she declared that there was no 
evidence to suggest Sir Roger 
was a spy. 

Mis Thatcher told MPS 
yesterday: “I stand by and 
r ea ffi r m the statement I made 
on that subject The case is sub 
judice.”' 

She said that Mr Wright 
owed a lifelong service of 
confidentiality to the Crown. 

Publication of his book would 
violate thavand therefore Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General, had applied for an 
to block the book: 
are taking place 
and the matter is therefore sub 
juffice,” she repeated. 

But after Prime Minister’s 
question tune, Mr Abu Wil- 
. foe deputy, shadow 


from Labour MPs, on the 
ground that it would prejudice 
national security. 


r Ac *is 

***** 









WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


Spy case 
exposes 
Britain’s 
witness 

From Stephen Taylor 

Sydney 

Britain's top civil servant 
was exposed to uncomfortably 
intensive cross-e xamination 
yesterday in an Australian 
court hearing the Thatcher 
Government’s application fin* 
an order to suppress Mr Peter 
Wright's book on MLS. 

&r Robert Armstrong, the 
Cabinet Secretary, had his 
attention drawn repeatedly to 
what Mr Wright arid his 
publishers, Heanemann Aust- 
ralia, contend is the Govern- 
ment's inconsistent record cm 
publications dealing with 
-MIS. 

When Sir Robert said he 
was unable to answer points of 
law, foe judge hearing the case 
said he was troubled tha t foe 
British Government had put 
Sir Robert up as Its HUlifl 
witness when there were mat- 
ters on which he could not 
assist foe hiring 
During cross-examination. 
Sir Robert was asked whether 
Mrs Thatcher had personally 
approved the publication of 
Chapman Fincher's book, 
Their Trade is Treachery. 

Counsel for foe Govern- 
ment tried to have a question 
on another book, Nigel West's 
A Matter of Trust, heard in 
camera. But the appli ca ti o n 
was rejected. 

Sir Robert said he believed 
it was likely that the book, 
which initially had been the 
subject of a restraining injunc- 
tion, had been published while 
still containing new and secret 
material provided by mem- 
bers of MIS. 

Today the action moves to 
the Court of Appeal, where 
Britain is to ask for leave to 
appeal against an order last 
week that it hand over 
confidential background doc- 
uments on both books, and on 
Mrs Thatcher’s Commons 
statement in which foe said 
Sr Roger Hollis, the former 
director-general of MIS, had 
been cleared of suspicion that 
he spied for Moscow. 

Later in the day, foe cross- 
examination of Sir Robert is 
due to resume. 


MES 



Panic in Wall 
Street over 
Boesky tapes 


By Richard Thomson, Ranking Correspondent 

Share prices on the New 
York stock market 
dramatically yesterday 
nervousness, triggered by the 
investigations into Mr Ivan 
fs insider share dealing, 
turned into panic: 

The Dow Jones Industrial 



Creative conflict 
how sports 
managers foster 
the team spirit 
without 

suppressing the 

talented 

individual 



• The £4,000 prize hi 
yesterday’s Tones 
Portfolio Gold 
competit io n was shared 
by three readers — Mr 
Lawrence Coombs, of 
Leytonstone, 

London; Miss KJM. Kent, 
of the British 
Embassy, Bonn; and Mr 
H. Mavir, of 
Workington, Cumbria. 
Details, page 3. 


29: how to play, 
information service, 
page 24. 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Deal defence 

Sir James Goldsmith de- 
fended his American takeover 
activity before a noisy 
congressional bearing Page 25 

£10m Thames 

Thames Television made a 
profit of £10.26 million in foe 
six months to September 30, 
compared with a loss of 
almost £3 million in foe same 
period of 1985 Ptoge25 


TIMES SPORT 


Salonen leads 

Time Salonen, of Finland, 
driving a Peugeot 205, safely 
negotiated tricky conditions in 
the Lake District to take foe 
lead in foe Lombard RAC 
rally Page 42 


TIMES FOCUS 


New technology between 
Britain and foe rest of foe SC 
must share Information Tech- 
nology if jobs are to be created 
Special Report, pages 20 41 


Home News 2*7 
Owsta 9-14 
Appb 22,2* 
Arts 15 

Bsibs, drafts, 
raanagra 23 
Busins 25-36 
Court 22 

Cwh*m 451&24 
War* 18 
Emus - 24 
Frames 16-18 
UnRepwt 38 


Uutas " & 
leasts 19 

Otntauy 72 

Frafimsi ' 4 
Property 32JS5 
SafeKoflU! Z 
Sda ct 23 

Ssort 3942.44 
Theatres, etc 14 
TV&totfb’ 43 
Itahmftira 23 
Wafer . 24 
WBh 22 


arms 
in 


Geneva 

From ChristopherWalker 
Moscow . 

US and Soviet negotiators 
have agreed to hold a special 
week-long session in_ Geneva 
during foe long Christmas 
recess to discuss nuclear and 
space arms. 

The move is designed to try 
to revive foe flagging post 
Reykjavik momentum of the 
Geneva arms talks. 

But Mr Viktor Karpov, foe 
chief Soviet arms negotiator, 
yesterday expressed little 
ground for optimism that foe 
differences between the two 
sides over Star Wars wouldget 
any narrower as a result of the 
talks, which open on Decem- 
ber! 

Both . sides have claimed 
credit for initiating the extra 
round of negotiations, which 
&& between the sixth and sev- 
enth rounds of the Geneva 
talks. US officials, insist foal 
foe idea was floated by Mr 
George Shultz, foe US Secret- 
ary of State, but Mr Karpov 
said the US had agreed “only 
after* lot of persuasion”. 

The new sourness in super- 
power relations was reflected 
m attacks launched by Mr 
Karpov during yesterday’s 
press conference • 

He accused the Reagan 
A dmi n i stration of “a ample 
and unseemly ruse” tty alleg- 
edly attempting to give the 
false impression that the US 
had put forward new com- 
promise proposals in Geneva 
after Reykjavik. 


nen terrorists 
shot Renault chief 


Action Directe, me ex- 
treme-Left French terrorist 
group, yesterday claimed res- 
ponsibility Ah’ the murder of 
M Georges Besse, managing 
director of the stale-owned 
Renault car company, on 
Monday night Two young 
women shot M Besse outside 
his home in foe Montparnasse 
district of Paris. 

- An. anonymous caller tele- 
phoned police investigation 
headquarters to say that pain- 
claiming responsibility 
the murder and signed by 
the “Pierre Overney Com- 
mando” of Action Directe, 
could be found in the Raspail 
Metro station. . 

Pierre Overney was a Mao- 
ist miKtan f jafled during vi- 
olence at foe Renault Billan- 
court factory in 1972. 

M Besse, aged 58, a father of 
five, was shot by two young 
women, both reported to 
speak French without an ac- 
cent, after being dropped off 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 
foe 


soon after 8pm by his chauf- 
feur 50 yards from his home. 

M Jacques Chirac, the 
Prime Minister, who was 
among foe first on the scene, 
said that he was “horrified by 
this bestial murder” of a man 
“of exceptional quality”. 

Eyewitnesses at first spoke 
of foe assassination being 
carried out by a man and a 
woman in a car. However, 
witnesses have convinced pol- 
ice that two women were 
responsible. They were on 
foot. 

One woman, who lives next 
door to M Besse, said that she 
was returning home when she 
saw two women waiting on the 
pavement, aged between 25 
and 30. One of them said 
“Right, let’s go”, and went 
toward M 


“She fired two shots,” the 
neighbour continued. 

Years iff terror, page 9 
Ideologues of violeoce, page 18 
Obituary, page 22 


New claim of TV bias 


Allegations of extensive left- 
wing political bias in news and 
current affairs coverage are 
ma de against all four tele- 
vision channels in a report 
published yesterday. 

The 300-page document, 
entitled Media Monitoring 
Report . ftflkiw&a year’s mon- 
itoring of 11 series and other 
programmes, organized by the 
right-wing political activist. 


Dr Julian Lewis, a prominent 
. critic of CND, who stood as 
Conservative candidate for 
Swansea West in foe last 
election. 

The monitoring was done 
by Mr Simon dan, a 27-year- 
old freelance journalist. 

Media Monitoring Report 
(Media Monitoring Unit. 201 
Holland P&rk Avenue, London 
W.D), price £12.50. 


The Princess of Wales, setting a fashion trend with sOk 
slacks muter a loose dress, with the Prince when they 
travelled 60 miles into the Saadi Arabian desert yesterday. 


Welcome 
twang from 
the Saudi 
hero prince 

Ftom Alan Hanrihon 
Riyadh 

Sultan Bin Salman looked 
like any of the 100 Bedouins 
around Him, swarthy and 
hook-nosed in Arab headdress 
and tan robe as be strode foe 
half-acre of fine carpets laid oh 
foe sand in. the midst of 
nowhere for a dazzling desert 
entertainment. But he rather 
broke foe spell when he an- 
nounced with a perceptible 
twang “Hi, nice to see you 

Prince Sultan, a nephew of 
King Fahd, is one of Saudi 
Arabia’s national heroes, an 
airforce pflot who became foe 
first Muslim spaceman when 
be flew on foe Nasa shuttle 
Discovery last year. 

Charming and easy under a 
patina of Western manners 
and an advanced lechnologi 
cal brain, he played in a scene 
yesterday that was in its own 
way as extraordinary as any 
Earth orbit. 

Under the blistering noon- 
day glare, camels and white 
Arab horses paraded in their 
finery; falconers proudly dis- 
played their hooded birds; foe 
seems of sandalwood, incense 
and Arabian coffee drifted on 
the hot breeze. And there, in a 
black Bedouin tent under a 
high escarpment of sandy rode 
with no habitation to be seen 
at any horizon, foe Prince of 
Wales .and an astronaut sat 
cross-legged on a rug discuss- 
ing space flights. 

Meanwhile, the Princess of 
Wales, who is not an authority 
on advanced technology, did 
what she does best, which was 
to look fair and outstandingly 
pretty among such a dark male 
horde, dressed in a long pale- 
blue silk tunic with Indian- 
style white trousers and a pair 
of appropriately crescent- 
shaped earrings. 

There was neither cruelty to 
camels, nor unchaining of 

falcons to swoop on dead bait, 
both of which appeared to 
distress foe couple at a similar 
Continued on page 24, col 1 


Left-wing 
councils 
lift ban 
on Times 

By Michael McCarthy 

Seven more local authori- 
ties have rescinded their ban- 
ning of The Times from public 
libraries following the High 
Court’s decision that such 
bans are unlawful. . 

They are foe London bor- 
oughs of Islington and Wal- 
tham Forest, and in foe 
regions, Barnsley, Bir- 
mingham, Manchester and St 
Helens. In addition, Sheffield 
Metropolitan Borough Coun- 
cil has restored The Times and 
other News International ti- 
tles to its libraries, pending a 
meeting of the council's policy 
committee on November 25. 

Ten authorities are still 
m aintaining the ban* im prytfri 
in the wake of foe Wapping 
dispute. They are: Brent, 
Greenwich, Haclmey, Harin- 
gey, Lambeth, Lewisham. 
Newham and Southwark, all 
in London; Knowsley, on 
Merseyside; and Cynon Valley 
in Mid-Glamorgan. 

More than 20 local authori- 
ties, all Labour-controlled, 
banned from their public li- 
braries The Times and other 
News International titles after 
its dispute with 5,500 
printworkere who went on 
strike and were subsequently 
dismissed when foe company 
transferred production to 
Wanting, east London. 

On November 5, Lord Jus- 
tice Watkins declared that foe 
bans imposed by some 
London boroughs were unlaw- 
ful and an abuse of power. 

Brent’s director of law and 
administration, Mr Stephen 
Forster, has claimed foal foe 
decision to ban News 
International's titles from foe 
council’s libraries had “noth- 
ing whatsoever to do with the 
industrial dispute” 

Last night Mr Antony 
Whitaker, legal adviser for 
Times Newspapers, said that 
unless the outstanding bans 
are lifted in the near future, 
legal action will be taken. 

Photograph, page 2 


Hurd to consider firearms amnesty 


it it O: it H it 


A governmeni-spoasored 

working party yesterday de- 
rided a firearms amnesty to 
tace foe huge increase in 
armed raids on hanks, bufid- 
ing societies and cash- in- 
transit . 

Five working parties, 
consisting of business people, 
police and official expats, 
which were set up with Mrs 
Thatcher's backing, suggested 
i wide-ranging anti-crime 
package and reported: 

• Car security will be among 
the selection of dri v ing test 
questions. 

• Uneasiness about “instant” - 
cautions of shoplifters by 
police, . 

• Scope for young people 

being allowed into bars with 
parents to leant how - to 
behave. . . . 

• A. do-it-yourself package of 
home security measures could 
ca« only £31. 

tV. Mr Peter Imben. Dep- 
i - Commissioner of - foe 

■■■■'. . . v =v: 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 
Metropolitan Police, warned raids in the last three and a 


that, because of the emphasis 
on locks and bolts, “we are 
becoming a fortress society.” 
He wants more emphasis on 
teaching children, particularly 
by parents, not to commit 
crime. 

Although foe working par- 
ties are classed as indepen- 
dent, Mr Douglas. Hurd, foe 
Home Secretary, promised 
yesterday that foe Home 0£ 
fice and other, departments 
would consider tire reports. 

“Where we judge it right 
and possible to do so we shall 
implement their recommen- 
dations,” Mr Hurd said. 

There has been an 8 1 per 
cent rise in the number of 
armed raids on High Street 
banks during the three year 
period to 1985 but figures fin- 
foe first six months of 1986 
suggest a further 42 per cent 
increasehy theend of the yean 
About 1400 staff had had 
direct experience of armed 


half years. Nevertheless the 
chances of a bank being raided 
seem comparatively remote, 
the report says. 

Similar figures fin* building 
societies showed a 78 per cent 
increase in armed raids in 
three years to 1985 and a 24 
per cent increase is predicted 
for 1986 on the baas of figures 
in for tire first six months of 
this year. 

There was a 49 per cent 
increase in armed raids on 
commercial cash-in-transit in 
foe three year period to 1985 
while the amount taken rose 
by 59 per cent 

The report of the working 
party, chaired by Mr Ian 
Paterson, Chief Executive 
(Retail Banking) of the Mid- 
land Bank, said there had not 
been a public firearms am- 
nesty since 1968, when 25,000 
firearms were handed in to the 
police: Such an amnesty might 
reduce foe number of firearms 

VI 


available for misuse. The 
Government should consider 
one. 

The group on shop theft, 
chaired by Baroness Phillips, 
Director of foe Association for 
the Prevention of Theft in 
Shops, disclosed a big increase 
in cautioning, which had dou- 
bled in 20 years. 

The group was concerned 
that cautions should not make 
it appear that offenders were 
getting off loo lightly. 

The report on violence and 
licensed premises says that if 
young people are to learn how 
to dank responsibly then 
older family members need to 
set an example. 

The most practical way of 
preventing home burglary is 
through good personal sec- 
urity, another working party 
says. It found that foe DTY 
pace of securing windows and 
doors in an average home 
started ai £31 and range up to 
£159. 


Russians 
say Kim 
is alive 

The official Soviet news 
agency Tass gave further ev- 
idence that President Kim D 
Sung, foe North Korean lead- 
er, was alive and apparently in 
control of his country when it 
reported that he opened talks 
in Pyongyang with the Mon- 
golian leader yesterday. 

President Kim and Presi- 
dent Zhambyn Batmonh dis- 
cussed international affairs 
and condemned the “ag- 
gressive" policies of the 
United States, Tass said. 

Rumours bad been sweep- 
ing Asia that President Kim, a 
close ally of the Soviet Union, 
had been assassinated or over- 
thrown in a military' coup. But 
Chinese television yesterday 
provided the first conclusive 
proof that he was alive when it 
showed footage of him greet- 
ing President Batmonh. 

Kiin appears, page 12 
Leading article, page 19 | 


index dropped 40.5 points in 
the morning to 1,819. At oat 
point trading on the stock 
market was so hectic that the 
“tape” on which all deals are 
recorded was running five 
minutes late. 

Much of the nervousness 
arose from reports that Mr 
Boesky had handed over tape 
igs of conversations 
with other Wall Street traders 
to the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, the US 
stockmarket watchdog. In 
what appear to be a deal with 
the authorities to earn a more 
lenient settlement, Mr Boesky 
has helped with information 
on some of Wall Street’s best 
known names. 

The SEC has issued subpoe- 
nas against Drexd Burnham 
Lambert, a leading New York 
securities house, and several 
prominent Wall Street figures 
such as Mr Carl Icahn, the 
arbitrageur, and Mr Michael 
Milken, credited with invent- 
ing the “junk bond”. 

Mr Boesky has agreed al- 
ready to pay a $100 milli on 
(£70 million) penalty for in- 
sider trading — using 
information to 
profit from share dealing. 

According to reports in foe 
United States, Mr Boesky 
recorded conversations with 
other financiers for a three- 
month period which may 
supply foe SEC with evidence 
of illegal share dealing. 

The SEC has become in- 
volved also in the 
government’s investigation 
into suspected insider trading 
in London, it emerged 
yesterday. 

The two independent 
inspectors appointed by the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry to investigate shar e 
dealings by Mr Geoffrey Col- 
lier have already been in 
contact with the SEC. 


Mr Collier was forced to 
resign as a director of Morgan 
Grenfell last week because of 
share dealing which broke foe 
company’s house rules. The 
deal was executed by the Los 
Apgeles office of Vickers da 
Cbsta, the stockbroker, which 
has obliged foe SEC to take an 
interest in the case. 

In foe meantime, it is 
believed that Mr Geoffrey 
COllier has flown to America 
to help with the inquiry. 

Despite the SEC’S ban on 
further share dealings by Mr 
Boesky in New York, foe 
London Stock Exchange yes- 


Bid to escape 


25 


terday deferred a decision to 
ban member firms from acting 
for Mr Boesky until it has 
more information from the 
SEC As an interim measure it 
has instructed all member 
firms to report any approach 
they receive to cany out 
dealings on behalf of Mr 
Boesky. 

A council member said that 
the Exchange was not suggest- 
ing that Mr Boesky was about 
to act improperly. However, 
foe Exchange wanted to main- 
tain a record of any future 
transactions he carried out 

A DTI spokesman refused 
to say yesterday whether 
information the department 
had received from the US 
authorities about Mr Boesky 
might implicate anyone in this 
country. 

Although most of his deal- 
ings were concentrated on 
Wall Street, Mr Boesky has 
substantial intvestments and 
contacts in the City. 

Meanwhile, the investiga- 
tion into Mr Bcesky’s affaire 
spilled over into the long 
running £271 million takeover 
battle for control of engineer- 
ing group* AE. The company 
is attempting to discover 
whether any of Mr Boesky’ s 
companies are holders of key 
Mocks of its shares which 
could determine the outcome 
of the bid. 


Government on course 
for borrowing target 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

The public sector borrowing 
requirement, central to the 
Government’s economic stra- 
tegy. was just £9 million last 
month, reduced by stroi^ 
corporation tax revenues. 

Indications are that the 
Government is on course to 
hit its £7.1 billion borrowing 
target for this year, with some 
City forecasters predicting a 
sizeable undershoot as the 
proceeds from the privatiza- 
tion of British Gas and British 
Airways roll in. This could 
mean tax cuts in foe spring. 


In spite of foe encouraging 
borrowing figures, the finan- 
cial markets remained ner- 
vous, foe shadow of foe insid- 
er i 

to loom 


The FT 30-share index fell 
6.9 points to 1,271.6. Govern- 
ment slocks dropped by half a 
point and the sterling index 
fell from 68.5 to 68.2. The 
pound fell by half a cent 
against the dollar to $1.4240. 

Spending falls, page 25 


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The mdesi po»iblc cnikvfion dhta>> uwiIjMc Irum Miick — 
The {*1 \I *5 1 ahuwrnuni. 14 Ne» Bon A Si.. London Tci ■ »1-UY4>C 
Full colour catalogue on rtguc-t. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


* * * * * *SL 


NEWS SUMMARY 


January trial for 
Belfast MP 

Mr Peter Robinson, MP for East Belfast and deputy 
“jsner of the Democratic Unionist Party, will stand trial in 
Dnblin next January on 11 charges, ranging from 
assaulting Garda to malicious Hoinay, arising oat of a 
“loyalist incursion kilo Ooatribet, a village fa the Irish 

KepaMfc, test August. 

Mr Robinson, accompanied by his wife. Iris, and tbe Rev 
William McCrea, MP for Mid Ulster, was driven from the 
North in a bullet-proof Mercedes car which was escorted 
from the bunder by members of the republic’s special task 
force. 

’■ During the hearing, at the Special Criminal Court in 
Dublin, Mr Justice Robert Barr was told there would be S9 
witnesses at the trial which is expected to last a week. Mr 
Robinson was remanded on continuing baO of lr£l 0,000 
(£ 8 , 000 ). 

Diesel record for BR 

British Rail has set a new work! speed record for a diesel- 
powered train. A speed of M4-7mph was achieved on 
Sunday on a measured mile of the track between York and 
■ Darlington (Rodney Canton writes). 

British Rail said it bad beaten its own earlier record, set 
in 1973, of 143mph. The new record was established by two 
InterCity 125 power units which, in normal service, operate 
at speeds of op to 125mph. 


Thames’s 
big profit 

Thames Television has 
announced record interim 
profits of more than 
£10 million, after its par- 
tial flotation in June. 

The pre-tax results for 
the half-year to September 
30, which contrasted with a 
loss of almost £3 million in 
the same period in 1985. 
.reflected a big rise in 
advertising revenues. 

Turnover increased to 
£104 JS million. 

The projected interim, 
dividend of 3p was in- 
creased to 4p per share. 


Colliery 

delayed 

A w farawmw application 
for a £400-nmlion colliery, 
in sooth Warwickshire, is 
being delayed until next 
year, British Coal said 
yesterday. 

The new pit is to be 
developed at a site known 
as Hawkhnrst Moor, west 
of Coventry, and a planning 
application was due to have 
been submitted this 
summer. 

Falling oil prices, and 
environmental protests, 
caused British Coal to re- 
consider the scheme. 


Games debt demand 

Liberal MPs are pressing for a select committee to 
investigate Mr Robert Maxwell's Commonwealth Games 
company, which owes 10 largo creditors about £1.9 minion 
(Martin Fletcher writes). 

The company incurred debts of £3.9 million after the 
boycott last August by 32 countries. Ninety small and 
medium creditors had been paid £2 million owed. 

Finney’s 
winner 

. Albert Finney (right), 
was named best actor of the 
year in the London Stan- 
dard Drama Awards yes- 
terday for his role as a 
gangster on the ran in the 
Lyle Kessler play. Or- 
phans, while Jnlia McKe- 
nzie won the best actress 
award as a vicar's wife in 
Alan Ayckbourn's Woman 
in Mind. 

Andrew Lloyd Webber's 
Phantom of the Opera was 
voted best musical, and the 
Royal Shakespeare Com- 
pany took the best play 
award with Lev Liaison 
Dangennses. 



Ministers dismiss Falkland talks offer 


By Sheila Gum 
Political Staff 

Argentina's call for 
negotiations on the Fa 
Islands was dismissed as “old 
wane in new bottles’’ last night 
by Lord Treearne, Minister of 
State for Defence Procure- 
ment. 

His swift denunciation of 
the offer was seen in West- 
minster as further confirma- 
tion that the Government 
believed h was no more than 
propaganda, to coincide with 
President Alfonsin’s meeting 
with President Re agan. 

Argentina's offer to declare 
a Formal end to hostilities over 


the Falklands is considered 
virtually a dead letter in 
Whitehall. 

Deeply unimpressed of- 
ficials completed examining 
the fine print of the Buenos 
Aires declaration yesterday 
with very little hope for 


_ the document had pro- 
posed to end hostilities in 
exchange for Britain dropping 
its declaration of a 150 mile 
fishing protection zone — as 
Buenos Aires initially sug- 
gested it did — there would 
have been considerable 
interest. 

But a close reading of the 


obscurely worded document 
convinced officials that the 
offer remained as firmly 
linked as ever to the 
Falklands’ sovereignty. 

One source said: “We have 
always wondered when they 
would play the end to hostil- 
ities card. Four years after the 
event and so closely tied to 
sovereignty we cannot regard 
this as any kind of 
concession.” 

Speaking in the House of 
Loros, Lord Tregarne made it 
plain that the Government 
saw no change in the Ar- 
gentine Government's inten- 
tion, first and foremost, to 


discuss the sovereignty of the 
Falklands. That was a position 
the Government could not 
accept. 

He also described press 
reports claiming Spain did not 
recognize the 150-mile in- 
terim fishing zone around the 
Falklands as “inaccurate and 
exaggerated". It was in the 
interests of the large Spanish 
fleet to ensure that fishing was 
orderly and controlled. 

He came under repeated 
pressure from Labour and 
Alliance peers to give some 
sign of a willingness to talk 
with President Alfonsin’s gov- 


ernment Lord Cledwyn, La- 
bour Leader, said the 
minister’s dismissal of talks 
was ‘‘offensive a!nd 
unhelpful". 

Lord Kennet, SDP foreign 
affairs spokesman, said if 
Lord Trefgarne was digging 
his feet in on behalf of the 
Government because it did 
not want to discuss some sort 
of shared sovereignty or UN 
trusteeship, then the Alliance 
was opposed to his stance. 

Lord Trefgarne retorted 
angrily: “I am digging in on 
behalf of the people of the 
Falkland Islands” 


Navy hero of 
Falklands 
war severely 
reprimanded 




By David Sapsted 


A Royal Navy captain awar- 
ded the Distinguished Service 
Gross for heroism during lire 
F alklan ds war was severely 
reprimanded at a court mar- 
tial yesterday over the loss of 
secret papers on a Thames 
towpath. 

Captain Alan West, aged 38, 
who commanded the frigate 
Ardent when she was sunk 
after being attacked by 11 
Argentine bombers in San 
Canos Water, pleaded guilty 
at a hearing at HMS Drake, 
Devonport, to five breaches of 
the Naval Discipline Act. 

During the court martial he 
was described as “an 
outstanding officer of his 
generation" by Admiral 
Jeremy Blade, deputy chief of 
the Defence Staff 
The charges arose out of the 
discovery this year of two 
bundles of classified docu- 
ments on a towpath at 
Sonning, near Reading. 

Found by a journalist and 
published by a Sunday news- 
paper, the documents in- 
cluded a discussion paper on 
radical cuts in the Navy's 
surface and submarine fleet 
Captain West, then an assis- 
tant director of naval staff at 
the Ministry of Defence in 
London, had taken 59 pages of 
documents from his Whitehall 
office two days before their 
loss, to work on them at homeL 

Three of the charges related 
to his removing them without 
informing the proper authori- 
ties and not keeping them in a 
security briefcase, a fourth 
accused him of failing to take 
proper care of them, and the 
fifth was laid because he failed 
to inform the ministry im- 
mediately after their loss. 

Lieutenant-Commander 


Patrick Elvin, for tbe prosecu- 
tion, told the five-man board 
that Captain West had put (he 
documents in his coat pocket 
before he went for a walk 
along the towpath on Friday, 
September 12. He was due to 
catch a train from Reading 
and decided to exercise a 
friend's dog to kill time before 
getting the train. 

Captain West put the docu- 
ments in his coat because he 
thought it would be safer than 
leaving them in his briefcase 
in the car. 

Commandfer Shaun Lyons, 
a naval barrister serving as die 
accused’s friend, said that 
when the loss was discovered. 
Captain West immediately re- 
traced his steps, and, Ming to 
find the documents, informed 
the local police who also began 
a search. 

He had intended to inform 
tbe Ministry of Defence on the 
Monday, said Commander 
Lyons. Captain West consid- 
ered there was no point in 
informing it before because 
nothing could be achieved 
until the Monday. 

“Though tbe documents 
were classified, they were not 
operational. Their loss could 
not compromise naval 
operations,” Commander Ly- 
ons added. 

In facL before Captain West 
could inform the ministry, the 
Mail on Sunday had broken 
the story. 

Commander Lyons, who 
appealed to tbe court to 
impose the minimum sen- 
tence of a reprimand, called 
Admiral Black as a character 
witness. 

The admiral, who com- 
manded the Invincible during 
the Falklands campaign, said 



Captain Alan West: lost secret documents, 
that he regarded Captain West He is now delighted he can 


“as an outstanding officer of 
his generation" 

“He is a fust-class ambas- 
sador for the Royal Navy and. 
indeed, the country. 

“He is a thrusting, opera- 
tional opportunist, displaying 
dash and flair but always 
tempered with good 
judgement." 

Commodore' Nigel 
Rettlewell, president of the 
board, sentenced Captain 
West to a severe reprimand 
the second most lenient judge- 
ment the court could impose. 

Commander Lyons said 
afterwards: "Captain West’s 
main feeling is one of relief. 


continue with his normal 
duties." 

• Captain West is unlikely to 
have damaged his promotion 
prospects. 

Navy sources said that the 
severe reprimand would go 
down on his record but under 
the Rehabilitation, of Offend- 
ers Act, the black mark will be 
struck off after five years. 

One source said: “Captain 
West has only been a captain 
for two years and you have to 
be ooe for nine years before 
you can be considered for 
promotion. So by then the 
severe reprimand will have 
gone from his record.” 


Nuclear 
power 
inquiry 

By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

The select committee on 
energy is to conduct an im- 
mediate inquiry into allega- 
tions about the safety and 
costs of the nuclear power 
programme made in The 
Times on November 6. 

Sir Ian Lloyd, its chairman, 
said last .night that the allega- 
tions, strongly denied try the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board, raised matters of such 
importance that it was essen- 
tial the facts were establish e d. 

The first article, headlined 
“Nudear power plants hit by 
corrosion fear”, said that seri- 
ous corrosion had been 
discovered at the two Hinkley 
Point reactors in Somerset 

The front-cage article al- 
leged that this raised deep 
doubts about the future of 
nine rimiliar Magoox stations. 

The second article, head- 
lined “N-pkmt tombs to stand 
for century”, stated that first- 
generation nuclear stations 
would stand for 100 years 
while the reactors “cooled 
down” because the alternative 
was to spend £2.7 billion 
di smantling each station. 

On November 7 the CEGB 
stated that the first article was 
“factually inaccurate, un- 
supported by evidence and 
totally unjustified in the main 
conclusions it draws”. 

The Nodear Installa tions 
Inspectorate had agreed to tbe 
continued ope ra tio n of the 
Hinkley Point reactors subject 
to further inspection, and 
there was no evidence that 
other Magnox reactors were 
affected by this corrosion. The 
30-year lifetime plan re- 
mained unchanged. 

The CEGB also told the 
committee that the £2.7 tril- 
lion decommissioning cost 
covered all the Magnox 
reactors. 

Committee members said 
yesterday that they were not 
pasting judgement on the The 
Timer reports, though Sir Ian 
criticized the newspaper for 
foiling to publish the CEGB 
statement or his subsequent 
letter to the editor. 


Two held 
in £60,000 
counterfeit 
operation 

By Stewart Tendier 
Crime Reporter 

Two men w ere charged 
yesterday with a robbing a 
Scotland Yard detective of 
£60,000 duringa police under- 
cover operation involving 
counterfeit money. 

A third man was sent to 
hospital after the police opera- 
tion ended with officers crash- 
ing through hold windows. 

The two men, who will 
appear before Slough mag- 
istrates today, are Mr Ian 
Stent, aged 39, from East 
Wittering, Sussex, and Mr 
Keith Moss, aged 37, from 
Hampton, Middlesex. They 
are accused of robbing Charles 
Hill of £60,000. 

The operation began after 
London detectives received 
information that counterfeit 
United States dollar bills with 
a face value of $500,000 were 
on sale. Members of the 
Yard’s counterfeit currency 
squad working under cover 
with officers from the number 
nine regional crime squad . 

A police squad broke into a 
hold room near Heathrow 
Airport, as a result of using 
bugging devices. A policeman 
was slightly cot as the men 
struggled with officers, who 
were helped by a police heli- 
copter and dogs. 

Day tripper’s 
railway death 

A postman who often fell 
asleep in tr ains was found 
with multiple injuries betide a 
railway line in London after 
setting off for his home in 
Sittingbonrne, Kent 
Dr Paul Knapman, the 
Westminster coroner, re- 
corded a verdict of accidental 
death on Keith Siddle, aged 
33, who had spent a day out 
with colleagues in Margate. 

Bird deserts 
winter sun 

Hundreds of bird watchers 
have flocked to see a Desert 
Wheater, a bird rarely seen in 
Britain, which has arrived at 
South Walney nature reserve 
near Barrow, Cumbria, 

The bird, a member of tbe 
thrush family, comes from the 
deserts of North Africa and 
the Middle East. 

Million tonne 
record broken 

The 1,090 miners at Bits- 
thorpe colliery near Mans- 
field, Nottinghamshire, have 
produced their fastest one 
million tonnes, British Coal 
said yesterday. 

They passed the one million 
tonnes target six weeks ahead 
of their previous annual 
record 



16, PREGNANT 
AND 

UNEMPLOYED. 
ALL THANKS 
TO THE 

WELFARE STATE 





IF PEOPLE COULD DO MORE WORK THERE’D 
BE FEWER ON THE DOLE 
You can only earn £2 a day from working when you’re 
on the dole. 

Getting a job often means ending up with less money. 
Moving means giving up your council house. 

Couid the social security system be killing the spirit 
of independence needed to overcome poverty? 


WITHOUT THE NHS, WE’D ALL BE 
A LOT HEALTHIER 

Britain is the only country in the developed world 
where heart disease is still increasing. 

Deaths from cervical cancer are still nearly as high 
as 15 years ago, although other Western European 
countries have halved the rate. 

Could it be the NHS monopoly of health care 
has held back an improvement in standards? 


WEDNESDAYS. 8J0 'THE NEW ENLIGHTENMENT KEEP YOUR EYE ON 



Taking 
the final 
furlong 

There was a brief and private 
unsaddling ceremony at St 
Mary’s parish church, Kint- 
bury. beneath tbe Berkshire 
Downs, yesterday (Robin 
Young writes). 

Sir Gordon Richards, the 
first, last and perfect knight of 
the turfi having run his course 
at the age of 82, was finally 
laid to rest. 

It was a private family 
service, attended by some 40 
relatives and close friends. A 
small group of villagers, Sir 
Gordon’s neighbours for tbe 
past 16 years, gathered to 
watch. 

Sir Gordon's home, Duff 
House in the village High 
Street, was just one final 
furlong from the church where 
the local vicar, the Rev Martin 
Gillham, intoned the final 
obsequies. Sir Gordon's 
stocky and diminutive frame; 
in a coffin as plain and honest 
as his Yorkshire brogue, was 
borne the last few yards by 
four pall-bearers. 


■■-JKSrik - *® 



of the pieces of wood, with nails embedded in them, fmoA by police scattered on the 
road near tire News International plant at Wapping, east London, yesterday. 

Nail attacks warning at Wapping 


By Tun Jones 

A police chief warned yes- 
terday that unless print muon 
supporters stopped their 
“irresponsible** campaign of 
attacks against lorries carry- 
ing News International news- 
papers it was only a matter of 
time before someone died. 

The warning was given as 
police displayed three naO 
embedded planks which were 
recovered outside the com- 


pany’s plant at Wapping, east 
London, in the early hoars of 
yesterday morning. 

Deputy Assistant Commis- 
sioner Wyn Jones, of the 
Metropolitan Police, said last 
night: “People who nse these 
weapons hide behind walls 
and throw than into the paths 
of oncoming lorries. 

“Obviously, if a heavily 
laden tony has a tyre punc- 
tured it can swerve out of 
control and severely injure or 


kill a passer by.’ 

Police said later that tv 
wen were arrested concernit 
the ua3 board attacks and In 
been released pending forth 
HSfKiries- 

Former employees of tt 
company, who went on strili 
and were subsequently de 
missed, have beendemonstra 
up outside the plant wins 
The Times, The Sunday Time. 
The Sun and News of tl I 
World are produced. 


Sale room 

Da Vinci notes fetch £2.5; 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


A page of scribbled notes 
and drawings by Leonardo da 
Vinci was sold for a record 
breaking £2.5 million at 
Sotheby’s in New York on 
Monday night 

The seller was Mr John R 
Gaines, whose father founded 
the Gaines Dog Food Com- 
pany and invented that pet's 
delight, tbe Gamesburgher. 
The purchaser was Mr Adrian 
Ward-Jackson, the London 
dealer, acting on behalf of the 
Getty Museum of Malibu. 
California. 

The sale of 46 drawings 
collected by John Gaines since 
1972 was the biggest block- 
buster in the drawings field 
New York has ever seen. Mr 
Gaines himself breeds 
thoroughbreds on the same 
scale that his father fed dogs. 
He has 46 stallions all hard at 
work. His approach to 
drawings was like his ap- 
proach to horses, nothing but 
the best. His runners carried 
the most famous names in art 
history and 26 of the drawings 
set new auction price records 
for the artists concerned. The 


collection made £14.7 million. 

The Leonardo was the best 
of the great master's drawings 
left in private hands. From 
Rembrandt he had found a 
beautiful sheet with landscape 
drawings on each side which 
made a record £660,000 to Mr 
lan Woodner, a collector of 
drawings. Mr Gaines had 
bought it at the Chaiswortb 
sale in 1984 for £432,000. Mr 
Woodner also secured two red 
chalk drawings by Raphael for 
£417,241. 

A sheet with three studies of 
a young girt wearing a fetching 
hat by Antoine Watteau went 
for a record £587,93L It was 
knocked down to a San Fran- 
cisco dealer. Mr Andrea di 
Socebran, who is thought to 
have been bidding for his 
friend, Mrs Anne Getty, 
daughter-in-law of tbe.great J 
Paul, director of Sotheby’s and 
one of the most renowned 
party givers of San Francisco. 

The Getty Museum was 
carefully obscuring its interest 
by spreading its bids among 
different dealers. In this way it 


secured four drawings, the 
Leonardo, a Canaletto at 
£493,103 — doubling the 
presale estimate — a Dela- 
croix at £379,310 and an 
Agostina Carracci at £250,344. 

Other great collectors at the 
sale . included Dr Armand 
Hammer and Mr Peter Sharp, 
of New York, the first owns 
Occidental Petroleum and the 
latter New York’s Carlisle 
Hotel. Hammer bought a Du- 
rer and a Veronese which he is 
expected to be donating to the 
National Gallery in Wash- 
ington. They cost him 
£303,448 each. Mr Sharp 
spent foe same sum to acquire 
a beautiful “Virgin and Child" 
by Fra Bartolommeo. 

• The collapse of the Wah 
Kwong shipping empire, built 
up by T Y Chao, of Hong 
Kong, brought has superb 
collection of Chinese ceramics 
and jades under Sotheby’s 
hammer in Hong Kong yes- 
terday and earned £7.7 million 
in a sitting, more than has ever 
previously been achieved by a 
sale of Chinese an. 

V 


Tories assess 
prison role for 
private sector 

The Government is to exam- 
ine the possibility of introduc- 
ing some degree of 
privatization into foe r unning 
of Britain's prisons, (Philip 
Webster writes). 

The Earl of Caithness. Min- 
ister of Stale at the Home 
Office, who is responsible for 
prisons, is to visit the United 
States early in foe new year to 
look at some of the 20 prisons 
which have introduced an 
element of private 
management 

News of tbe trip will please 
foe Conservative members of 
foe Commons home affair s 
committee, who themselves 
returned from a recent visit to 
the United States 
The minister is to appear 
before foe committee today as 
part of its inquiry into tire 
prison system in Britain. 


SWi 29; Bcigiuifl B Fn SO. 
Canada 52.75. Canaries Pcs 2oO: 
Cyprus TO cents: Denmark Dkr 10 OO. 
Finland Mkk <5.00: France F 8.00; W 
Germany DM 3.50: Qtwanar «On. 
Greece Dr 180: Holland CD 3 SO. lrt»H 
RpOuMIc 400. Italy L 2.700: Luxem- 

.. lt AS; Madeira E sc 170. Maua 

Morocco Dir 10.00; Norway Kr 


300: Tunisia Din 80 00: USA SI .76: 

Vugasbud Dtn 700. 


6e.l 


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4, ^Crfr! 

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V iMSiSiS! 




Mrs Guinness says she 
does not hate the gang 
who kidnapped her 


By Richard Ford 

Mis Jennifer Guinness tofai 
yesterday how she rehearsed 
her own death scene at die 
hands of the hooded gang that 
kidnapped her earlier this 
year. 

She also said, she did not 
bate the four men who hdd 
her for a lc£2 million ransom. 

Throughout the eight-day 
ordeal the strong-willed wife 
of a merchant banker pitted 
her wits against the abductors 
in an attempt to stop them 
killing her. 

Yesterday the fourth mem- 
ber of the gang was Jailed for 
his part in the abd- 
uction. Afterward Mrs 
Guinness, the wife of the 
chairman of the Guinness 
Mahon merchant bank in 
Dublin, calmly recalled the 
events last April, when die 
was snatched at gunpoint 
from her home at Howth, Go 
Dublin. 

During her captivity she 
attempted to build a relation- 
ship with the kidnappers, by 
talking to them about religion 
and her hobby, sailing . She 
refused to succumb to any 
emotional outbursts against 
her captors. 

Mrs Guinness, who gave 
evidence at the trial said she 
believed that if a ransom had 
been paid her abductors 
would not have released her. 

She said she had rehearsed 
the scene when they would 
take her out to be shot and had 
tried to keep talking to the 
kidnappers, “so that when it 
came to the end with the gun 
they would lave to shoot me, 
standing up them’ 1 . 


She said: “It would have 
been me they were shooting 
not some woman they had 
taken." 

Mrs Guinness said she 
feared she would be shot but 
decided to keep very calm, and 

retain personal dignity in or- 
der to survive. 

“It would have been lovely 
to scream, to cry, to yell, to 
hale, but I felt to survive as a 
person l had to keep very 

calm," she said. 

Hie ordeal involved being 
hooded and driven from her 
home, spending nights 
chained to one of her captors, 
chained to a bed and then tied 
to a tree for several hours, but 
Mrs Guinness said she bore no 
haired for her kidnappers and 
IS delig h t ed that of them 
named his , daughter Jennifer 
at her suggestion. 

“I am not a hater. 1 don't 
think the emotions of hate or 



Mrs Jennifer 
talked to 


vengeance are very construc- 
tive. but I don’t actually like 
the people who treated me like 
that" 

Describing her 
as “traumatic”, she adm 
that Ir£300.000 was to be 
dropped after negotiations 
had taken place with the full 
knowledge of the police. But 
Mrs Guinness said she did not 
agree with the payment of 
ransom as . this encouraged 
other abductions. 

Mrs Guinness, speaking at a 
press conference, raid her only 
therapy to help her overcome 
the effects of the abduction 
was filing , walking and 
liQMMWg to Hflggiral muse. 

Mrs Guinness was speaking 
after Brian McNichoO, aged 
49, an unemployed demo- 
lition contractor from Dublin, 
was jailed for 12 years and 
nine months at the city’s 
Circuit Criminal Court. He 
was found guilty of false 
imprisonment and possessing 
afirearm. 

Described by police as a 
“mystery man”, he had only 
become involved in the 
abduction at a late stage, but 
had then bragged about his 
role in organizing it. 
McNicholl had hoped to ob- 
tain half the ransom demand 
after promising to provide a 
safe house in which the rest of 
the gang could hide their 
victim. 

Three other men, John and 

Michael Cunningham and An. 

thony KeBy are already serv- 
ing prison sentences ranging 
from 14 to 17 years for then- 
part in the kidnapping. 


New hope 
on cheaper 
airfares 
to Europe 

By Harvey Elliott 
An Correspondent 

Britain yesterday increased 
the pressure iu the fight for 
cheaper air feres to Europe. 

Air Europe, the charter 
airline belonging to Mr Harry 
Goodman, the holiday en- 
trepreneur, applied for li- 
cences to set up a scheduled 
network to 1 1 European 
cities from Gatwick. 

British Caledonian applied 
for five new routes and prom- 
ised fere redactions of up to 60 
percent over existing levels. 

And Mr Michael Spicer, the 
Minister for Aviation, re- 
affirmed his determination to 
force other countries to agree 
to allow real competition on 
European air routes. 

The most dramatic move 
came from Air Europe which 
plans to fly at least once a day 
to Paris, Amsterdam, Frank- 
furt, Geneva, Brussels, Mu- 
nich, Dusseldorf Zurich, 
Milan, Rome and 
Copenhagen. 

Applications for the licences 
have already been filed with 
the Civil Aviation Authority 
which is almost certain to 
agree. 

British Caledonian put in its 
application for an increase in 
routes immediately it heard of 
Air Europe’s plans. 

Both' airlines are greatly 
encouraged by the determina- 
tion of the Government to 
achieve greater freedom for 
competition. And they were 
boosted still further yesterday 
when Mr Spicer told a meeting 
in Brussels that he was not 
prepared to see the 
Government’s proposals on 
liberalization watered down. 


Drink-drive test case 


Back-counting alcohol level is legal 


By Craig Seton 

A judge yesterday closed a 
potential escape route for 
drunken drivers, by giving 
police the right to “back 
calculate” how much a motor-' 
ist had been drinking, even if 
an alcohol test was avoided for 
many hours. 

In a test case at Birmingham 
Crown Court, Judge Ross. 
QC dismissed an appeal 
against conviction by Stephen 
Gumbley, aged 35, ofBrixton, 
southeast London, who wm 
found guilty of drink driving 
by Birmingham magistrates in 
June, in the first case of its 
kind in Britain. 

Gumbley was convicted al- 
though be was below the legal 
limit when police finally ob- 
tained a blood sample four 
hours and 20 minutes after a 
road accident in which his 
brother, Gordon, died. 

Gumbley was banned from 
driving for a year, fined £350 
and ordered to pay £900 costs. 

He appealed against convic- 
tion on a point of Jaw, 
c laimin g that die Road Traffic 
Act 1972, as amended in 1981, 
did not permit the police to 
“back calculate". He received 
legal aid. 

Police forces throughout the 
country were awaiting the 
outcome of Gumbiey’s case 
and several are now expected 
to prosecute motorists who 
were found to be “over the 


830pm: Gumbley arrives at 
public honse is sooth 
Birmingham. 

lMSpm: Leaves public boose 
with brother, Gordon. 
11.15pm: Gumbiey’s car 
crashes m Qo eeas w a y under- 
pass. Brother killed. 

11.35pm: Police arrive and 
GmnMey refuses breath test 
Arrested and takes to city 
centre police station. 

11.45pm: GmnMey is skk at 

pff gw diftunnii HuplaBw rf 

feeling mwefi. 

1230am: Gumbley takes to 
Again refuses breath 

test . 

3am: Agrees to give Mood 

mapfe, ■. 

335am: Specimen of Mood 
taken. • , 

Kuril" on the bade calculation 
method. 

The court was told yes- 
terday that after a late-night 
car crash in an underpass in 
Birmingham* rity centre in 
May last year, Gumbley, who 
had been drinking with his 
brothers, twice refused a. 
breath test because be felt 
unwell and ' was taken to 
hospital. 

Fbur hours and 20 minutes, 
elapsed after the accident 
before police could obtain a 
Mood sample from Gumhtey. 
but that contained only 59 
milligrams of alcohol per 100 
millilitres of blood — wen 


wi thin the legal Hmh of 80 

milligram* 

But police officers did not 
believe Gumbiey’s claim to 
have drank only one pirn of 
lager. They asked Dr Robot 
Batten, a forensic scientist, to 
calculate what the level in his 
blood would have been at the 
time of the accident. 

Expert evidence given in 
court was that alcohol left the 
bloodstream at the rate of 15 
millig rams an hour in a nor- 
mal healthy adult. 

Mr Roger Smith, for West 
Midlands police, said that 
meant Gumbley would have 
“eliminated” 60 milligram* 
over the four-hour period. 
Added to the 59 milligrams 
found in the sample, his Hood 
would have contained 119 
milligrams at the time of the 
accident 

Hie judge said that the sole 
issue in fire appeal was 
whether as a matter of law the 
police were allowed to in- 
troduce such expert evidence 
in the case under the pro- 
visions of the Road Traffic 
Act 

He said that section 6 of the 
amended Act stated that a 
person who drove . . . “after 
consuming so much alcohol” 
that the prescribed limit was 
exceeded would be guilty of an 
offence. 

It made no reference to the 
way in which that was to be 
established in evidence and 
did not exclude other ways of 


proring how much alcohol 
was involved. 

The judge said that what- 
ever restrictions were placed 
on the prosecution in such 
cases by the 1972 Act its 
ampndpd form “had opened 
the door". 

He ruled that the police, 
therefore, had been entitled to 
call such expert evidence. 

After the hearing Gumbley 
refused to comment but his 
legal advisers said that they 
would appeal to the Di- 
visional Court in London. 

Insp Kenneth Longmore, of 
the Birmingham police centra] 
traffic unit, said the case 
would never have arisen in 
such a unique way but for 
Gumbiey’s refusal to take a 
breath test for such a long 
period. 

Insp Longmore said that be 
had waited for two hours at 
Birmingham General Hos- 
pital to take a test from 
Gumbley. 

The Automobile Associ- 
ation said last night that the 
rejection of Gnmbley’s appeal 
opened up new areas of con- 
cern which required study. 

A spokesman said that in 
certain cases it might be 
necessary for the police to use 
the back calculation method, 
such as after accidents where 
people were injured and sam- 
ples could not be taken im- 
mediately, but in those cases 
the driver should be under 
medical supervision- 


Poll shows 
high cost 
of sickness 

ByJIDSltaman 

Financial organizations are 
paying out millions of pounds 
on health care insurance and 
sickness absence but are doing 
little to help employees be- 
come healthier. 

An opinion poll carried out 
by MORI and commissioned 
by Bupa, the private health 
insurance company, shows 
that 96 per cent of 1 12 finan- 
cial organizations interviewed 
provided some kind of medi- 
cal insurance scheme. But 
only a quarter provided any 
health education at work and 
over a third had no informa- 
tion on the cost of sickness 
absence to their business. 

Figures from the Depart- 
ment of Health and Social 
Security show that more than 
360 million days are lost each 
year through sickness absence. 
MORI found that in those 
companies that could provide 
estimates, the cost of this 
absence ranged from 3—10 per 
cent of the wages biH. 

The poll found that al- 
though 80 per cent of the 
companies recognized that 
there were beahh problems 
which should be faced, 41 per 
cent had no idea what they 
should be 5 pend iP^ to t aain- 
tain a healthy workforce. 

The MORI pofl result was 
announced A a Bupa sympo- 
sium on the cost benefits of 
health care. Mr Leon 
Warshaw. executive director 
of the New York. Business 
Group on Health, told the 
symposium that soaring pre- 
miums in the United Slates 
have priced many smaller 
companies out of the market. 

He raid that American, 
employers are now trying to 
reverse these rising costs by 
introducing modified insur- 
ance plans and asking the 
ctnpioycses to share coos. 


New hunt for moors bodies 


By Ian Smith 
Northern Correspondent 
Police will begin a new 
search tomorrow for two chfl- 
dren believed buried for 20 
years mi the desolate York- 
shire amors made infamous by 
Ian Brady and Myra Hmdiey. 

Tire search results from two 
toHs by the head of Masches- 
ter CID to HhKfley hi prison. 

Four dogs specially trained 
to detect bodies wffl be taken 
to Saddteworth Moors, 10 
nfles north-east of Manches- 

ter to search the bleak moor- 
land for the bodies of Pwfine 
Reade, «g»d 16, who went 
nssag oB July 12, 1963, and 
Keith Bennett, a schoolboy 
who vanished while walking Go 
his grandmother’s home m a 
Manchester suburb on June 
16, 1964, four days after his 
twelfth lii Unlay. 

The bant follows an inten- 
sive 18-mouth re-examination 
of the two cases by senior 
de tec tives from Greater Man- 
chester which culminated in 
die two t Wh made by Det 

Chief Sapi Peter Topping, the 
joint bead of Qlk to Coohbara 
Wood Jaft in Rochester., Kent, 
where HMey is serving a 
sentence. 

Immediately be left Hind- 
ley’s cefi on Monday, Mir 
ToppfHg conferred with senior 
“ i- 1 it 


was agreed enough new bets 
now existed to warrant a 
bother search of the moors. 

After the CD) head made a 
second visit to the prison 
yesterday, he said: “I can 
confirm a search of the moors 
wifi start on Thursday . 

“We have iu mind a partfca- 
lar part of the moots on which 
we wfll concentrate using pol- 
ice dogs. But we estimate that 
the search may take several 
weeks and obviously cannot 
say with any certainty whether 
it will be productive.” 

During their 
jaS, both 
have scorned repeated at- 
tempts by police to persuade 
them to disdose whether more 


bodies are buried on the moors 
and if so where. 

Bnt it is understood Hindley 
has now gone some way to 
confirming detectives’ sus- 
picions of where the missing 
children fie. Just before police 
arrived to tefi Keith Bennett's 
mother, Mrs Winifred John- 
son, about the search, her 
husband was taken to hospital 
from their Manchester home 
with a suspected heart attack. 
Last night, Mrs Johnson said: 
“My husband is seriously 31 
and 1 can only hope and pray 

that tiie new search wfll help 

him fight his battle for fife. 

“All I have ever wanted is 
for Keith to be buried fa a 
proper grave which I can visft 
and (due flowers on."" 



Jailed moors murderers Myra Hindley and Ian Brady 


Maxwell ‘vindictive man’ QC says 


Mr Robert MaxwelL the 
ne ws paper publisher, was a 
“ruthless, vindictive man with 
a vast ego” a High Court libel 
jury was told yesterday. 

Mr Andrew Bateson, QC 
saM Mr Maxwell did not Ufce 
being pricked by a satirical 
ma gazine , he “hated" Private 
Eye and if was his inten tion to - 
a verdict that would “swat 
_ta Gy” its framer editor. 
The comment came during 
the twelfth day of the libel 
action brought by Mr Maxwell 
against Private Eye and Mr 


Richard Ingrams, its former 
editor. Mr Bateson, for the 
defendants, said there was 
nothing wrung in somebody 
making payments to a politi- 
cal parry, or having an am- 
. bition to be a peer and to say 
either was not libellous. 

Mr Bateson, who was mak- 
ing his final speech to Mr 
Justice Brown and a jury, 
submitted that Mr Maxwell 
riiould not be awarded dam- 
ages for his “white knight 
errantry" in bringing a libel 
action fra the protection of the 


political system and its 
integrity. 

Mr MaxwelL aged 63, chair- 
man of Mirror Group News- 
papers, is suing Private Eye 
over two articles in July 1 985. 
He claims they implied that he 
was guilty of attempted brib- 
ery by suggesting that he paid 
for trips abroad for Mr Neil 
Kinnock, leader of the Labour 
Party, in the hope of being 
recommended for a peerage. 

The magazine and former 
editor deny defamation. 

The hearing continues. 



Miss Meryl Unstable, a paper conservator from the Victoria and Albert Mimeum, restoring 
antique Chinese wallpaper at S&Itram House, Plymouth, Devon (Photograph: Nick Rogers). 

Worry over criminal funds 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


A bank would be under a 
statutory duty to report to the 
police any suspicion that a 
customer's funds could be 
derived from a criminal of- 
fence under far-reaching pro- 
posals being discussed by the 
Home Office and the clearing 

hanlrs, 

The Drug Trafficking Of- 
fences Act has already placed 
such a duty on hanks so far as 
the proceeds of drug traffick- 
ing are concerned. 

But both banks and officials 
are rapidly realizing that it is 
very difficult fra banks to 
know that drug trafficking is 
the offence involved when 
there is a suspicion about a 
customer’s account 
Home Office officials are 
therefore studying closely the 
workings of the Act with a 
view to extending the so- 
called “blundering” offence to 


all crimes. Such an extension 
could be included in the 
C riminal Justice Bill which 
has just been published. 

Under the Drug Trafficking 
Act a person commits an 
offence if be assists in the 
“laundering” of money de- 
rived from drug offences, 
while having a suspicion that 
the funds could be tarnished. 

A bank clerk is therefore 
guilty of an offence imprison- 
able by up to 14yeare if be has 
such a suspicion, foils to 
report it and, for example, 
for funds to be 


The banks are strongly op- 
posed to any further extension 
of the “laundering” offence. 
Yesterday a spokesman fra 
one tank said: “It was highly 
dangerous to make it an 
offence not to report a mere 
suspicion under the Drug 


Trafficking Act and this 
should not be extended. 

“Many perfectly honest 
people may be too nervous to 
act; young bank clerks may be 
afraid that they would turn 
out to be wrong. And if they 
don't act, they could find 
themselves liable to up to 14 
years’ imprisonment” 

He added the offence was 
unusual in that unlike almost 
all others in English law it did 
not have to be committed with 
knowledge, but only with 
“suspicion”. 

Although the Drug Traffick- 
ing Act releases tanks from 
their duty of confidence with 
the diem so they cannot be 
sued for breach of confidence; 
they could still be sued, in the 
opinion of one official, for 
defamation if they make a 
mistake and report someone 
wrongly. 



— ^rc/e / — 

A winner 
after only 
four days 

Three readers share yest- 
erday's Portfolio Gold prise of 
£4,000. 

Miss Kathleen Kent, aged 
53, a secretary at the British 
embassy in Bonn, has played 
tiie Portfolio Gold game for 
die past four days. ' 

“I am astonished,” she sain. 
“I checked everything twice 
because I jest could not believe 
my hick.” 

When asked how she in- 
tended spending tiie prize 
money. Miss Kent said: “1 will 
spend some and invest some." 

Mr Hartley Mavir, aged 61, 
a rent officer, from Work- 
ington in Cumbria, has played 
the Portfolio Gold game since 
it started. 

“I was rather taken aback. 
Because I had not seen the 
name of a northerner among 
the winners before,” he said. 
“Bnt I am certainly very 
delighted." 

Mr Mavir said that the 
winnings wifi go towards pay- 
ing for his youngest daughter's 
wedding next year. 

The other winner is Mr 
Lawrence Coombs, aged 32, a 
laboratory technician from 
Leytonstone in east London. 

“I am very elated,” Mr 
Coombs said. He will spend 
bis prize money on renovations 
to the family borne. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Lighter fuel 
goes to China 

A Tyneside firm confirmed 
yesterday that it had won a £1 
million order to export lighter 
fuel to China. The Ronson 
company at North Shields 
also disclosed that it has 
another £2 million order for 
China next year, and a 
£500.000 order to supply fuel 
to Portugal, Turkey and 
, Australia. 

The company employs 100 
people at North Shields. Mr 
Brad Hallett. the manufac- 
turing director, said: “More 
jobs will probably be created 
as a result of the order.” 


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?RS.g;? L’i'g §sss°>> 








chamber 18 1986 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 

PARLIAMENT 



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CT 


&A/ T’l Or 


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Labour rattled 
and dispirited, 
says min i s ter 


lC.~ ^ t>> '■Jorr.ird 

.--^ce 5'a::d 
. * •Vrijh: a: c in 

-••v i.'- •? i! b’f.v ir. 

i:-. C-.i’ i-rT'.rr.er.: is 
■qjunct.jr. :r. i!i.* 
V.'iiw-s Suprem-- 

:rr.\er ?.•■ \ 5 ofticer. 
■Ir.-: his x.-n:i i r s. 

■ ,'iear that ho 
l. ; :c or: ±e .•na:'.:r 

•Tier.. ho tc-nd 


: :."'s oj«:ic_r. *.:mo 

.'rr.: :hJi $,r Roj?r 
_ : 7; . :"?n Ah.T. SI’.C 

. on. :*.> :.V '.-iojie 

■ ?h».* 

x th ir.e 

' <orc by one 

: o... Th: .is: iub 

• *-.r.I::75 iGIisw. 

• 0- iu.VLrc js- 

. •.' : 0 '- :rr. cent's 

ir.- :..e .•.uKwJisa 

.. .:::orc:ng ::< ihe 


F«35 VjE MUSTER 


a biockins position on further 
questions and discussion. 

Wiil you give a clear ruling, 
Mr Sraakcr. that this afternoon 
she has misled the House, not 
cnee but twice, in stating that a 
case before the Australian courts 
is sub.::: dice in this House. 

The SpejvUT: As i understand it. 
this case in the Australian court 
ii. no 1 . sub jndtee under our rules. 

Labour MP* shouted to the 
Prime Minister to apologize, 
then she rose instead to make a 
Vehement on her weekend visit 
io titc L nitec States. 

Mr Nci- Xiacr-ck. Leader of the 
reposition, then intervened: 
Inadvertently. Mrs Thatcher re- 
ferred to the maitcr being beard 
in Australia as a matter which 
was sup judicc. affecting 
proceedings in this House. She 
should avail herself of the 
opportunity to say that it is not 

-r L " 

in spite of Labour proiests. 


: ; ..i? innocence o? 

. - : :r b.r Sr.han Arrn- 
•• :■ ci me ir. f.vo 

; he .be ’ : s n 

• "...-..r. ir.- 1 Govern- 

:':-n:c of her 
. : * • . ; h : ? of ■: ropor- 

T':i On t re rra’u 
. . cuest’ori. .t.5 2 

... , —•* •— f^AP* -lU- 

::es. Mr rig>! 
.. • i.r-ic*: of 

’ i ■'<' Lid vsclste 

T’y' C-tnera! 
. i. J !r :, :r.c.ior. ir. 
: .;v-_r of Nc-. 

• '■ y: : . ?rx?eci n 5> ere 

r ; -.v .* the n atter is 

r ■ "bit iriaer.su 

..v K Mitt C‘*t if-. 5s 

.i:- ••• •••■•. ;d: charge 

vas 

. : .. : f.iit accept ec 

. err er. : a i-.d.i : n : r.K. 

■ mens a: 

. ■. ' r. .•••• e -> r en : b is a:; e red 

• :: : is her 

.. :■ : r : i'w >:Pt*e and 
;-’e - i: 5f shameful 

jy, • i’or. jr.d his 

■■.; .: i be iret.eJ in n;s 

:• . ’ i.*;. • r. : 0 : ■■ err. m *;• n t 

! .oier;?.f • : rrote?.* •. 

• •: >i ■: e. : r r .' t ha v - 

..ri * ‘ ••e:d r erher. ; stand 

; !: • ■: - e n t i made sbeu : 

Orce" • hr. 

. .I:.-; Orpcsiiicn 


V- W 


• ***'• Jir 

Mr Geoffrey Lcftbocse. 
whose QQesnoa began the 
exchanges. 


.rsy. •• -ar: to anv.-er au-es- 
.. r. r-:!a:.rn to the debacle 
:• ei ihe Aur-trelien 

. J.-.J. Pi.: 0:lCC b'jt twice, 

•. r.v.:c :’-c cetejonc s:ete- 
:.tit the pr:ccea:ngs in 
■.yie . ’.rVci. 

?' .-..-t. n !:■ q Hewed io 

..vJ. i; ;:!d. .'fccura?. create 


Mr John BilTen. Leader of the 
House of Commons, rose in- 
stead and asked the Speaker In 
making j cur judgement on this 
matter, would you kindly lake 
account os’ the faa that the 
I'ni'.ed Ivingdom is a party to 
t zc -rase in the Australian 
ccuns? 

The Speaker I prepare myself 
carefully ever}' day for question 
:;mc and 5 took account of that. 
Air Alan ’A iJIiams: That is a 
dear ruling. Would you indicate 
whether, in your experience, it is 
normal practice where an MP 
his misled the House, even if 
inadvertently, that that MP 
v-culd withdraw? 
iS3rs I batcaen J made dear in 
m;. answer that the Attorney 
Genera! has accordingly applied 
in die Supreme Court of New 
Some Wales for an injunction to 
present publication. 

You have ruled that it is not 
v.v.*> juJUv. but notwiihstanding. 

I submit it would be most 
unwise — (Labour protests) — 
indeed, very rash of me as Prime 
Minister of the United King- 
dom Government to comment 
on a case in which the Attorney 
General is a party in Australia 
{Labour protests’. Previous La- 
bour prime minister- have said, 
and i shaft adhere to ;nc normal 
practice of not commenting on 
security manors. 


Mr Kinnock: it is easily seen 
that her comment has not 
satisfied us. Th2t places you in 
an invidious position, Mr 
Speaker, as your judgement was 
so clear. I suggest that further 
refteciion is given to this case as 
the alternative is distraction of 
the House. 

The Speaker: Mr Kinnock has 
made a wise judgement on this 
matter. The two matters are not 
connected. 

Mr Alan Seith (Berwick-upon- 
Tweed. Lt: The position re- 
mains that a challenge has been 
issued to the Chair. Mrs 
Thatcher gave her interpreta- 
tion. You gave your ruling 
which Mr Biffen challenged. 
Mr Andrew Faulds (War ley 
East. Lab): We are not asking 
the Prime Minister to make a 
.statement- We are asking her to 
withdraw the incorrect assertion 
that she made on ibis matter. 
She should be required by you to 
do that. 

Mr Dennis Skinner (Bolsover, 
Lab) said that the issue was 
relatively simple. There have 
been a series of questions in 
which you and an MP. the 
Prime Minister, have been in 
dispute. 

Normally speaking, when an 
MP challenges the authority of 
the Chair they either have to 
withdraw cr leave. "Why is it 
that a backbench MP can be 
called upon to withdraw when 
they challenge the authority of 
the Chair and yet the Prime 
Minister is allowed to gel off the 
hook? 

“2 believe this is a classic 
exampie of where you need to 
show your authority (laughter), 
if you faiL don't expect any of us 
. ™ iCries of “Oh"). 

Mr Speaker: !t is very- unlike the 
honourable gentleman to 
threaten me and the Prime 
Minister has not challenged 
what I have said. I think we 
should have a few hours of quiet 
reflection an this matter. 

Mrs Thatcher I accept your 
ruling on sub judicezs tar as this 
House is concerned. That means 
that any questions can be asked. 

1 know' of no rule which means 
that 1 am circumscribed in the 
way in which I answer questions 
about security. 

Mr Lofthonse: As one of the 
questioners who the Prime Min- 
ister misled with her answer . . . 
(proiests) 

Mr Speaker This seems to be 
an attempt to carry on question 
time. 

Mr Lofihouse: As one of the 
questioners who the Prime Min- 
ister misled with her answer, l 
would gladly accept an apology 
or is the Prime Minister above 
this House and above you 
> ourself? 

Mr Speaker I think the Prime 
Minister has made her position 
very dear. 

Mr Ian Gow (Eastbourne. C): I 
think it would be of assistance to 
the House if you could please 
explain how it is that a matter 
which is before one of her 
Majesty's judges in Australia 
and in a case to which her 
Majesty's Government, is a 
party ." . . how proceedings in 
that case are not sub judice for 
the purpose of this House. 

Mr Speaker. I calculated that 
(bis might arise and therefore I 
was prepared with the answer 
that I gave. 

I must say that Australia is an 
independent country. I will of 
course reflect carefully, as i 
always do, whether I have been 
right in the ruling that I have 
given. If I End that I have been 
wrong, 1 will gladly return and 
make a statement 




jsii 


9-42 


4 / 


The Opposition was becoming 
increasingly rattled, depressed 
and d is pirited with the cha nges 
in the unemployment figures 
and with the national opinion 
polls moving against them, Mr 
John Lee, Under-Secretary of 
State for Employment, said 
daring Gammons _ questions 
when he faced criticism over 
changes in the way the figures 
were drawn op. 

He said that in April 1 979 the 
number of registered un- 
employed who had been un- 
employed for more than a year 
and nore than two years respec- 
tively were 366,700 and 
179.800. In October this year, 
the number of unemployed 
claimants were 1,341,000 and 
844,500. 

Direct comparisons of un- 
employment by duration since 
1979 were not possible because 
of changes in the way the figures 




/ wn 


The Speaker, Mr Bernard Weatherill: A considered response on a difficult issue 

Prime Minister accused 
of sycophancy to US 


The Prime Minister was accused 
by Mr Kinnock of sycophancy 
in her relations with President 
Reagan after Mrs Thatcher 
made a statement on her recent 
visit to the United Stales. 

The Prime Minister, he said, 
severely discredits efforts for 
international co-operation 
against terrorism by endorsing 
the President's approach to Iran. 
Mrs Thatcher said: The main 
purpose of my visit was to 
discuss with the President issues 
of defence and of arms control 
in the light of his meeting in 
Reykjavik with Mr Gorbachev. 

Wc agreed upon a statement 
of our views. 

President Reagan and I agreed 
that priority should be given in 
the arms control negotiations to 
an INF {intermediate-range 
nuclear forces] agreement with 
restraints on shorter-range sys- 
tems. to a 50 per cent reduction 
in strategic offensive weapons 
and to a ban on chemical 
weapons, all to be subject to 
effective verification. 

We also reaffirmed the need 
for effective nuclear deterrence 
as a cornerstone of Nato's 
strategy. 

The President explained that 
the United States would proceed 
with iis own strategic mod- 
ernization programme, includ- 
ing TridcnL 

He confirmed the United 
States' full support for the 
arrangements made to modern- 
ize Britain's independent nu- 
clear deterrent with i rideat. 

We also discussed the situa- 
tion in the Middle Bast I 
thanked the President for what 


the United States had done on 
Syria. We agreed on the need for 
fresh impetus to efforts to find a 
peaceful solution to the Arab- 
Isrnel conflict. 

On Iran, we share the aim of 
bringing Iran back into better 
relations with the West and of 
bringing about an end to the 
I ran- Iraq war. without taking 
sides. The President reaffirmed 
that the United States does not 
pay ransom for hostages. That is 
our policy too. 

We discussed the situation in 
southern Africa following the 
tragic death of President Samora 
Machel of Mozambique. Both 
our governments remain ready 
to contribute to stability and an 
end to violence in the area. 

1 explained to the President 
the reasons for our recent de- 
cision to establish an interim 
fisheries management and con- 
servation zone round the FaTk- 
lands. ! told him that our 
preference remained a multi- 
lateral solution provided that 
the Argentine Government was 
prepared to co-operate. 

This was a very useful visit. 
The agreed statement confirmed 
the Government's policies, 
which 1 set out in my speech 
[last Wednesday] in the delate 
on the Address, for achieving 
balanced reductions in nuclear 
and chemical weapons while 
maintaining and modernizing 
Britain's indetandent nuclear 
deterrent That is a policy which 
is good for the Nato alliance and 
good for Britain. 

Mr Nell Kinnock. Leader of 
the Opposition: During her talks 
with President Reagan, did the 


Prime Minister express support 
for President Ragan's repeat- 
edly stated objective of abolish- 
ing all stategic ballistic missiles 
within 10 years or not? 

Can she explain why she 
thinks that any US government 
would continue to provide an 
800 per cent increase in British 
strategic nuclear missiles by 
supplying Trident when ihe US 
was itself gelling rid of such 
missiles? 

Can she explain why. if die 
wants to remove disparities in 
tiie conventional balance in 
-Europe, as we ail do. she is 
diminishing conventional de- 
fences in order to buy Trident? 

Does she associate her Gov- 
ernment with the position of 
Chancellor Khol that any future 
negotiations on Star Wars must 
lie within the narrow interpreta- 
tion of the ABM treaty? 

Did she seek or receive any 
undertakings from President 
Reagan that the US would 
continue to adhere to the Salt 2 
treaty? 

On other matters she dis- 
cussed. three weeks after rightly 
acting against Syria and rightly 
securing international co-opera- 
tion against her (Syria’s) 
sponsorship of terrorism, it is 
obvious the Prime Minister 
severely discredits such efforts 
by so readily endorsing the 
President's trading with 
terrorism. 

After Granada. Star Wars. 
Libya and now arms for Iran, 
when is the Prime Minister 
going to realize that a special 
relationship is one thing; syco- 
phancy is another. 


were couecteo. 

Mr Jack Dormant) (Easmgtqn, 
Lab): Those figures are a dis- 
grace and an affront to our 
society. They demonstrate more 
clearly than anything else why 
t his Government's economic 
policies are an utter failure. 
When will the Gover nmen t 
realize what a devastating effect 
long-term unemployment has 
on the family? 

Mr Lee: We are slowly winning 
the unemployment battle. Num- 
bers are starting to falL 

There had been a drop of 
7.000 in the latest quarter for the 
long-term unemployed as com- 
pared with a rise of 25,000 a year 
ago. 

"What will not help employ- 
ment is the son of suggestion 
made recently by Mr John 
Prescott (chief Opposition 
spokesman an employment). 
Mr One Per Cent, with his 
famous training levy. Nothing 
would make matters worse." 
Dane Jill Knight (Birmingham, 
Edgbaston, C) said that unless 
the job vacancy numbers were 
I levelled with the unemployment 
numbers a true picture could 
not be obtained. 

Mr Lee agreed. In most areas 
vacancies were increasing and 
last week's figures showed that 
vacancies were at the highest 
level since 1979. 

Mr Edward Leadbitter (Hartle- 
pool. Lab) said the minister had 
talked about the difficulties of 
making comparisons with 1979 
because of the different methods 
of calculating unemploynienL 

The Government knew very 
well the basis of the changes in 
calculating the figures. With 
reasonable methods of compari- 
son it would be possible for the 
Government to put into the 
Official Report wfaaf that figure 
would be, taking into account 
the changes made by the 
Government. 

Mr Lee said the allegations that 
there had been 16 changes was 
misleading and exaggerated. 
Only six had had a discernible 
effect, and details had been put 
into the Employment Gazette. 
Three changes bad been minor 
and some were in the method of 
compilation. Others were to 
correct inaccuracies or resulted 
from procedural changes. 

Mr Mfehael Fallon (Darlington, 
C) said unemployment in the 
North-east fell by 9 per cent last 
month. "Labour should rec- 
ognize the good things, or do 
they prefer high unemploy- 
ment?" 

Mr Lee agreed. 

Miss Jo Richardson, Opposi- 
tion spokesman on women’s 
rights, asked for the percentage 
of women unemployed on the 
dates the minister bad given. 
She also wanted an estimate of 
the number of women unable to 
register because the Govern- 
ment wished to remove them 


EMPLOYMENT 


from the figures of those avail- 
able for work. 

MrLeed said be had not got the 
figures for women. But during 
the last Labour Government 
600,000 jobs in manufacturing 
had been lost- 

• Since the introduction of the 
availability for work test in pilot 
study areas the number of 
people being referred for 
suspension of unemployment 
benefit had multiplied by 20. 
Mr Prescott alleged during 
Commons question time. 

He asked Mr Kenneth Clarke, 
Minister for Employment, to 
confirm press reports that 
70 per cent of those cases had 
then been reversed on adjudica- 
tion. He said all this confirmed 
Labour's view that excessive 
ygai was being used in carrying 
out the tests and people were 
being intimidated off the un- 
employment register and claim- 
ants were made to feel like 
scroungers. 

Mr Clarke said the purpose of 
the new procedure fen 1 testing 
was to determine entitlement to 
benefit and it involved no 
change in the conditions 
governing eligibility for benefit 

Between 3 per cent and 4 per 
cent. of claimants did not pur- 
sue. or withdrew, their claims 
when asked to complete the 
questionnaire and between 
2 per cent and 3 per cent who 
continued to claim after com- 
pleting it bad had their claims 
disallowed by the adjudicating 
authorities. 

Mr Prescott had touched on 
an important safeguard because 
there was a course of appeal and 
the final decision was taken by 
an independent adjudication 
officer. The only people who 
would lose their benefit were 
those who were never entitled to 
iL 

Mr Ralph Howell (Norfolk 
North, O urged the minister to 
give serious consideration to the 
introduction of a universal 
"work fare" scheme. 

Mr Clarke: We are offering 
work and training to all those we 
interview and we are providing 
a quarter of a million places 
under the Community Pro- 
gramme. We are makiiig great 
process. I am not satisfied we 


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oocf Some Labour councils ‘just like Eastern bloc’ 


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v’c.'.-i it the tourism 
<M? ! cr trar. they 


Mr Anthony Steen (South 
Hams. C) said that last summer 
thousands of jobs had been 
geiag begging in his constit- 
uency of South Dc\on because 
you -5 people and those on the 


’ ’ rj- pj rid employ ment register just would 

L’- j-t r-S — ;ur, of r *°- *hem. Many of those 
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: T.i questions 

r.'uspJ ■!•*.* Oppasi'ion 
V i or' for your.j 

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rr.a'ie :i empioy- 
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in^ in from European countries 
:ns:?ad. Could something be 
done about this by next 
summer? 

Mr TrJppien One of our diffi- 
culties in ihe tourism sector is 
that tv* still have difficulty with 
our yc-ung people who perhaps, 
from time to time, get a bit 
mixed up between service and 
senility. 

The "Opposition did not help 
matters by "rubbishing" those 
jobs in tourism occupied by 
young people. He was surprised 
shii Mr John Prescott, chief 
Opooshion spokesman on em- 
ployment. tecs every op- 
on unity to "rubbish" tourism 
iocs. 

ih? Government was trying 
■.«• correct that 2nd he had 
rerently 'nuotuhed a video cam- 
paign. going into 7.500 schools. 
10 :r. \ a corr::i that impression. 
O The English tourist Board 
has launched a campaign to 
promote an awareness o( tour- 
:&m in places other than London 
and the South-east and en- 
courage a dispersal of tourists to 
the regions. Mr Trip pier said 
Simon Coombs (Swindon. 
C ! asked if the minister would 
raise wiiji the chairman of the 
brigjish i ounsi Board the idea 
of important initiatives next 
year to encourage tourists to 
visit ;hc English regions rather 
shan stay in London. Mr Ed- 
Lnyduo l Liverpool. Gar- 
st'rfi. La si said >1 was a fallacy 
that tourism could resolve the 
problem of unemployment to 
any extent, taking into account 
c .tsting unemployment in areas 
such ar. Merseyside. 

Mr Trip pier. He seems to be out 
ofs-.jp with colleagues from his 
o'aji par.y 1 r, the Merseyside 
area. I was in Merseyside only 
>*v.';rd3y and was impressed by 

the number of people who very 
n'.ueh. appreciate ihe devclop- 
''.ten’. ./tourism in the area. 


The following is a summary of 
yesterday's resumed debate on 
the Queen 's Speech. 

Some Laboer conncQs in Britain 
were likened to the regimes of 
Ease Europe by a Government 
minister. People lired in fear 
under these "totalitarian" coun- 
cils, the fear of the knock on the 
door in the tight, Mr Nicholas 
Ridley. Secretary of State for the 
Environment, said. 

Resuming the debate, Mr 
Ridley said that there was ample 

<§ It is a realistic and 
generous provision @ 

scope for better public services 
within the public spending pro- 
vision made by the Government 
if local authorities improved 
efficiency. 

_ Local government was now a 
big spender. This year it ac- 
counted for £38 billion, or more 
than 25 per cent of all public 
spending. It employed 2*4 mil- 
lion people, or about one in ten of 
the workforce. 

“The scale of spending and 
the politicization of its attitudes 
have made it a subject which 
comes too often before this 
House for consideration." 

The Government bad made a 
total increase in public spending 
pnmsica next year of £4.7 bit- 
lion. Within that total, provision 
for local government spending 
has increased by £4.4 billion. 
Provision had been made for aa 
extra £2.9 billion for current 
expenditure alone and an extra 
£1 billion was being provided in 
aggregate exchequer grant. 

*‘!t is both a realistic pro- 
vision. and n generous pro- 
vKioa." 

The settlement assumption 
for most seniorities was for aa 
increase in current spending of 
5.25 per cent against an infla- 
tion expectation cf 3.75 percent. 
Incredibly, the Government had 
been told that this was not 
enough. 

"But is our view it is more 

than enough.'* 

Some of the highest spending 
councils bad the worst serricesL 
There was a vast amount of 
and misuse of .rrsnonvs. 


particularly in Labour local 
authorities. One authority was 
even still paying, in its bonus 
system, to put die collar on a 
horse that pulls the dustcart 
(laughter). 

**3 am not disenchanted with 
the principle of public services. I 
want better services bat I also 
want better value for money." 

Government legislation would 
outlaw the growing practice by 
Labour local authorities of 
potting political conditions into 
their contracts which had noth- 
ing to do with their duty to 
provide efficient services for 
ratepayers. 

A system of local authority 
income based on capita! value 
rates ami local income tax would 
be infinitely more unfair and 
more costly than the present 
system of rateable values and a 
recipe for continuing conflict 
with central government. Eff- 
ective accountability had to be 
the cornerstone of effective local 
government. 

The Government proposed a 
community charge which would 
be much more accountable. Af- 
ter retieviag government grant 
and their share of the unified 
business rate, councils’ extra 
spending would have to be paid 
for pound for pound by the 
community charge they raised. 

"The principle behind the 
system will be that for a given 
level of service, people should 
pay the same bill." 

Many Conservative MPs were 
asking for a Bill for England and 
Wales to be intrcduced tomor- 
row. Such c Bi!! would be in the 
first Queen's Speech after the 
election. 

Town halls had become an 
arena for aggressive political 
posing, disruption, wild accusa- 
tions. threats and fear. There 
was an attack on local govern- 
ment by the Labour Party. It was 
vicious, frightening and delib- 
erate. Everything that local 
government had ever stood for 
was being questioned. 

“I know that people living and 
it or king older these Labour 
councils live in fear. Mrs 
McGoidrick may have been 
reinstated. But other teachers 
ore scared. They think they are 
heine watched hv snies. Thev 


are afraid that chance remarks 
might lose them their jobs. 

“I ara fold that people dare not 
speak out for fear of what might 
happen to them and their Cam- 
flies. It is more like Poland or 
East Germany; the knock on the 
door in the middle of the night. 

"It is totalitariaa, intolerant 
anti-democratic and it employs 
fear to control people." 

No amount of rose-tinted pub- 
lic relations could dispel the 
stink emanating from the La- 
bour town hails. Reform of the 
rates and the re tur n to 
accountability would achieve 
both financial control and an end 
to the stranglehold of the town 
hall despots. 

Dr John Cnnninghani, Op- 
position spokesman on the 
environment, said that Mr Rid- 
ley, the fifth incumbent m seven 
years, had taken up his office 
where his predecessors left oft 
contradictory changes, reneging 
on promises and attacking local 
authority freedoms. His aims 
apparently included keeping 
down rales by tearing up na- 
tional <rage agreements and 
keeping the low paid low paid. 

Too often this Government 
had confused cheapness with 
efficiency, wrongly equating the 
lowest cost with value tor money. 
The extension of st a tutor y 
compulsion on tendering was at 
best irrelevant and at worst it 
would undermine services and 
basic e mployment conditions 

$ I want better value 
for money 9 

and create additional un- 
etaptoyment. 

Contract failures were numer- 
ous because tenders were loss- 
leaders based on cuts in jobs, 
pay and conditions. Complaints 
about standards were wide- 
spread. 

Mr Ridley was already blam- 
ing domestic ratepayers for rate 
increases. But it was the sys- 
tematic withdrawal of govern- 
ment grant which had been the 
biggest single reason for these 
enormous increases. 

The Government now pro- 
posed a medieval poll tax nu- 
^htw) tn i> person's ability to 


pay but related to Us ability to 
vote. Tbe poll-tax proposal had 
been greeted by almost mrirerssl 
condemnation. It would be a 
nightmare to administer and 
esforecement would be im- 
possible. 

Even the Institute of Directors 
had called the proposals regres- 
sive and had highlighted the 
biggest problem as bareancracy. 

The Government's case for 
change was based on incoherent 
and intellectually dishonest 
arguments. 

It suggested that there was 
need for greater central control 
of local government finance 
when there was no macro- 
economk argmnent to justify if. 

A farther argument was that 
change was necessary because 
only just over half the electorate 
were liable to pay rates. In feet 
there were 18 million ratepayers 
in an electorate of 35 milli on and 
of that same electorate, only 
21 millioa paid income tax. 

It was a carious argument that 
these who did not pay rates were 
not properly accountable when 
voting in a democracy, bet those 
who did net pay income tax 
apparently were. 

There was nothing in tbe 
Government's proposals to 
strengthen or enhance local 
democracy or to increase 
accountability: on the contrary, 
more central control would 
riimnikb both. 

Sir Russell Johnston (Inverness, 
Nairn and Lochaber. L) asked 
wfay, if a poll tax would be so 
marvellous, Scotland was to get 
it first. Scotland was not usamly 
favoured with gifts so quickly. 

It was dearly wrong to hare a 
taxation system in which pay- 
ment was made regardless of 
means and which pressed heavi- 
est and worst at the start of a 
person’s life when he or she had 
bought his or her first house, or 
when be was getting towards the 
end of his life. 

Mr John Hcddle (Mid Stafford- 
shire, C) said that a local income 
tax system as favoured by the 
Alliance to replace the rates 
would increase the standard rate 
of taxation by about 14p ho the 
pound. 

Mr Timothy Raison f Aylesbury. 
Qsaid Utah looking back on his 


party's experience since 15179, 
he did not feel that fon- 
damentally they bad got local 
government right in a number of 
respects. 

There had been the endless 
disputes about rate-support 
grant, the growth of central 
control agahxst a background of 
a desire to diminish central 
control, die vexed question of 
rate li mitati o n and rate-capping 
and the great difficulty of mak- 
ing real progress in the aspira- 
tion of reform of the system of 
local government finance. 

Indefeasible and ridiculous 
things were going on, bat they 
should not go on from there to 
wage a kind of generalized war 
on local government. 

Mr Jeremy Hayes (Harlow, C) 
raid that he had almost heard 


corks popping in the Conser- 

9 Government 
confuses cheapness 
with efficiency 9 

retire shires when the Secretary 
of State first spoke abont hitting 
out at the overspeoders 
rewarding pendent authorities. 

Sadly, in counties such as 
Essex, Hertfordshire, Cam- 
bridgeshire and Srnrey, all pru- 
dent, that had not happened. 
The rate-support grant mecha- 
nism was a nonsense, a lunacy. 
Mr Malcom RHfcfad Secretary 
of State for Scotland, said rim* 
abofidoa of the domestic rating 
system was the only way of 
achieving genuine acrountahility 
ami genuine local democracy. At 
a (oral level the only revenue a 
local authority received from the 
local electorate was through the 
rates. 

The system the Government 
was proposing would ensure 
accountability for the electorate 
ami would take into account the 
special efreumstaaoes of those 
on low i nc ome s . 

Not only would it abolish the 
domestic rating system but 
would replace it with a system 

which, however unpopular with 
the Labour Party, would be 
extremely popular to the Scot- 


need to go on from that to some 
compulsory work fere scheme. 
Mr Hugh Brown (Glasgow. 
Provan. Lab): Does he think the 
introduction or the new avai- 
lability for work test has helped 
staff morale? How many offices 
are suffering some kind of 
disruption because of its in- 
troduction? 

Mr Clarke said the pilot 
schemes had been introduced 
with no protests from anybody 
until one trade union and one 
Labour MP tried to turn the 
whole thing into an allegation 
that the Government was 
putting pressure on the un- 
employed. When this nonsense 
had died down morale would be 
restored and officers would be 
able to continue carrying out 
Parliament’s wishes to stop 
paying benefit to those not 
available for work. 

Sir Wflfiam Clark (Croydon 
South, C) asked if Labour's 
proposed I per cent levy on 
employers would increase or 
decrease unemployment 
Mr Clarke said it was quite 
astonishing that Labour's 
spokesman could casually throw 
out such an idea at a by-election 
meeting when it involved such a 
huge increase in employers' 
costs. like other Labour plans, 
such as a minimum wage, this 
plan would cost jobs. 

Figures on 
jobless 
attacked 

QUEEN’S SPEECH 

Mr John Smith, Opposition 
spokesman on trade and in- 
dustry. moved an amendment 
regretting that the Queen’s 
Speech contained no credible 
strategy for securing a continual 
reduction in unemployment or 
for strengthening and moderniz- 
ing manufacturing industry and 
recapturing home and foreign 
markets for British goods. 

He said that, despite the 
Government's blatant attempts 
to cook the figures by 18 
different alterations in the 
collection and presentation of 
unemployment statistics, un- 
employment was frighteningly 
high. The real figure was in 
excess of four million, whatever 
the Government’s cooked statis- 
tics presented. 

Of that total a frightening 
number were under 25: one and 
a quarter million young people 
under 25 were on the dole and 
for many of them the prospect of 
any employment in the future 
must look very bleak indeed. 

The cost to the nation of the 
tmemployment bill was £22 bil- 
lion, a frightening commitment 
in terms of public expenditure, 
let alone the human misery that 
these figures revealed. 

Unless there was some dra- 
matic change in the figures in 
the last quarter of this year, and 
there was no reasonable ex- 
pectation of that, the figures for 
1986 would mean that Britain 
would be in deficit to the extent 
of £5 billion in the balance of 
trade in manufactured goods. 
Under this Government Britain 
went into deficit for the first 
time in its history, and the trend 
was downwards. 


Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Conclusion of 
debate on the Queen's Speech 
(the economy). 

Lords (2.15): Conclusion of 
debate on the Queen’s Speech 
(economic affairs and em- 
ployment). 





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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Army denies excessive 
training as heat stroke 
kills sapper in mud run 


The Army yesterday denied 
that it bad used excessive 
training methods after a ver- 
dict of accidental death was 
returned on a soldier who died 
after taking pan in an aptitude 
test to become a diver. The 
inquest was told he had run 
across mud in “sweltering" 
heat m a deep-sea diving sun. 

Vincent Anderson, aged 19, 
of Southlands, Bath, a sapper 
in the Royal Engineers, was on 
the course at Horsea Island, 
Portsmouth, last July, when 
he and two others lad to be 
taken to hospital. 

Mr John Glanvflle, die 
Portsmouth coroner, said that 
candidates on the course were 
required to exercise in a dry 
suit used in deep diving. The 
suit had no apertures and no 
air circulating inside. They 
had suffered a great deal of 
distress. 

Mr -Martin All wright, a 
meteorologist, said the day of 
the exercise, July IS, was the 
wannest day of the month, 
with temperatures rising to the 
mid-70s and relatively high 
humidity. 

He described ft as “siesta 
weather” and he agreed with a 
relative of the dead man, who 
was sitting in the court and 
who called out that it was 
“sweltering”. 


The jury returned a verdict 
of accidental death. It had 
been told’ by Surgeon Com- 
mander John Buchanan, a 
pathologist, that die sapper 
had suffered heat stroke. He 
said it was posable that if he 
had received instant medical 
attention he might . have been 
saved. 

He said dry suits prevented 
the body’s n ormal cooling 
process from taking place and 
added: “Exercise in a dry suit 
should not be conducted out- 
ride of the working environ- 
ment, which is water.” 

Servicemen had to be 
trained fee added, to the limits 
for wartime service, “but you 
have to be wed aware of the 
limit to which you train them 
and should provide medical 
aid on site if you are pushing 
them towards those Emits”. 

After the hearing, Mr Victor 
Anderson, aged 45, Sapper 
Anderson's father, said be was 
considering consulting a law- 
yer. He claimed his son had 
been waiting late at nights, 
serving in the officers’ mess, 
before joining the course: 

The Army yesterday denied 
that its training routines were 
excessively physical. “The (rid 
days of fierce physical ex- 
ercises and punishments have 
long been eradicated from 


today’s modem Army,” the 
Ministry of Defence said 

“It has to be remembered 
that this rtm was a normal part 
of the routine. 

“There are 152,000 soldiers 
in the Army, aB of whom have 
passed a medical examina- 
tion. It is not surprising that 
there might be someone with a 
problem that has not shown 
□p. It is not unheard of for an 
apparently perfectly fit civil- 
ian of 32 who plays squash 
one or two limes a week, to 
drop dead with heart failure. 

Mr Peter Griffiths, the 
Conservative MP for Ports- 
mouth North, whose constit- 
uency covers Horsea Island, 
said: “There should be much 
greater supervision in this 
type of exercise. 

*T would want to see a 
senior medical officer present, 
who could have the authority 
to call off such a test if die 
conditions warranted ft, and 
an .ambulance on standby 
with resuscitation 

equipment”. 

He pointed out that the run 
in w hich Sapper Anderson 
died was a\ contest “They 
were all highly motivated to 
complete die exercise and 
unlike most civilians would 
not give up if things got too 
tough.” 


Clergymen told there 
are too many churches 


Britain's 45,000 church 
buildings are “far beyond” the 
needs and finances of today’s 
congregations and numbers 
should be reduced by long- 
term national and local 

pl anning . 

This is the conclusion of a 
report by the British Council 
of Churches, which wiH be 
debated at the council’s au- 
tumn assembly in London 
next week. 

Clergymen are urged to foce 
the “harsh realities" that 
many Victorias churches and 
chapels were built to last no 
more than 100 years. 

Hie report quotes a leading 
architect “You can under- 
stand the di fenwria which 
faces us all in Britain, with 
approximately 45,000 fine 
buildings — some the very fin- 
est, even by international 
standards — and perhaps only 
25 per cent of them required 
for their original purpose. 


“Into the bargain, it is sadly 
the case that the right church 
is often in the wrong place.” 

The report says population 
movements from the inner 
city to distant housing estates 
has left many church buildings 
stranded in busy commercial 
centres or nm-down areas. 

Half of the money raised by 
An glican parishes in England 
every year is said to be spent 
On maintenan ce and repairs. 

The report said: “Because of 
the growing gap between the 
deterioration of buildings and 
the mpgna avmlable to the 
churches, it win not be pos- 
sible for any church in Britain 
to preserve all the buildings 
presently owned by the church 
or its congregations.” 

The conclusion is that some 
churchgoers- will have to be 
prepared' to worship with 
otter congregations — some- 
times even in chnrches of a 
different denomination. 


Test-tube 
babies join 
protest 

Twenty test-tube babies and 
their parents gathered at the 
Commons yesterday to pro- 
test at the possiblity of a B3I to 
stop the kind of experiments 
which made test-tube births 
possible. 

For the past two years, 
private members’ Bills to curb 
research on human embryos 
have been discussed by MPs, 
but they foiled through lack of 
time. The ballot to select this 
year’s private members’ Bills 
takes place tomorrow. 

Mr Allan Msddocks, from 
Merseyside, fatter of test-tube 
baby Samantha, aged five 
months, said: “Without this 
research going on we would be 
childless.” 

Mr Kenneth Hargreaves, 
Conservative MP tor Hynd- 
bnrn. who put forward last 
year's Bill, met the parents 


Radio 4 
will be 
‘gently’ 
refreshed 

By Gavin BeO 
Arts Correspondent 

There will be no radical 
changes to disturb the cosy 
familiarity and companion- 
ship offered by BBC Radio 4 
to its largely middle-aged 
audience is the south of 
England. 

This reassuring pledge was 
green yes te rd ay by Mr M- 
.chad Green, who was ap- 
pointed controller of the 

f l w n nri W mmm w 

"The essence of my poficy is 
to evolve slowly, grad sally 
refreshing some parte of tix 
channel with a few surprises 
and experiments. The idea of 
radical change Is simply not on 
for Radio 4 * 

Mr Green said he felt that 
the sews and current affairs 
content was about as 1- 


would like to extend 
of drama and light 
meat to attract new listeners, 
particularly in the youger age 
groups. 

Contrary to a report In a 
Sunday newspaper, there are 
BO hnnwHiate plans tO 
a twice-weekly soap opera to 
rival The Archers. However his 
executives were discussing the 
possflrifity of cowmisiining 


“Without compromising our 

tO ang le plays 

and new writers, I have asked 
then to explore ways of 
developing oar drama. But it is 
still earfy days yet.” 

Mr Green was keen to 
introduce a tittle more music, 
principally in feature pro- 
grammes, and this was also 

»mifa>r i faw wo nn. 

Highlights of his Christmas 
and new year schedule include 
the retail of the early morning 
news magazine. Today* after 
an absence of almost 10 years. 

A discovery by a 

BBC archivist will provide a 
Christinas treat for Goon 
Show addicts - five pro- 
grammes from the 1950s that 
were heard abroad, but not in 
Britain. Spike Mflfigan also 
returns to present his first 
radio series for 15 years. 

A cerebral dash between 
the winners and runners-up of 
Radio 4** Bran of Britain and 
BBC-1 's Mastermind is billed 
for New Year’s Day. 

The drama fine-op is led by 
a series of nine classic British 
detective plays. Features m- 
ctade the Archbishop of 
Canterbury selecting his 
favourite poetry and prose for 
the With Great Pleasure series 
on December 20. 



Peter Gibson working on a replacement for the Rose Window at York Minster, which 
suffered substantial damage during a fire more than two years ago. 


Protest over student grants 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


College lecturers and local 
authorities combined yes- 
terday to deplore the 
“shrivelling" of student grants 
since 1979 which they claimed 
was causing severe hardship 
among those seeking higher 
education. 

In three remarkably 
corroborative submissions to 
the education select commit- 
tee, the Association of County 
Councils (ACC), the Associ- 
ation of Metropolitan 
Authorities (AMA) and the 
National Association of 
Teachers in Further and 
Higher Education all claimed 
that the value of the student 
grant had fallen by at least 20 
per cent in real terms since 
1979. 

But they also argued that 
this reduction had been exac- 


erbated by other factors and 
was “in reality for more 
severe”. 

Two unavoidable areas of 
student expenditure — books 
and accommodation — had 
risen by considerably more 
than the rate of inflation in 
that period, while the “broad 
brush” approach of the grams 
system foiled to take sufficient 
account of particular needs 
and regional anomalies such 
as extortionate housing rents 
-in London. 

And they argued that the 
system of parental contribu- 
tions should be abolished. 
Parents found it “irrational 
and unfair” According to the 
ACC the number of parents 
expected to pay contributions 
has risen from 25 to 44 per 
cent since 1980. but barely 


half met those obligations in 
full 

“Very real distress” was 
being caused to middle-in- 
come parents, the AMA, 
claimed. It argued that all 
students over 18 should be 
regarded as independent from 
their parents and eligible for 
full grants. 

The three submissions 
called for increased govern- 
ment binding, bat made clear 
their opposition to student 
loans. In spite of their “spe- 
cious attraction” as a tailor- 
made financial package, they 
would have“serious educa- 
tional disadvantages” and 
would be more expensive to 
administer than the present 
system refined and simplified, 
the AMA said. 


Save Our 
Snakes 
campaign 
launched 

Conservationists launched 
a campaign yesterday to save 
Britain's reptiles and amphibi- 
ans, which they claim are 
being tortured and killed in 
alarming numbers. 

A report produced by the 
Fauna and Flora Preservation 
Society, with funding from the 
RSPCA and Nature Cons- 
ervancy, found “numerous ex- 
amples of needless mutilation 
and destruction of snakes, 
frogs and toads'*. 

The campaign, called “Save 
Our Snakes", is really an SOS 
for all wildlife not protected 
by animal welfare legislation, 
Mr Paul Vodden, of the 
RSPCA, said. 

Most cruelty offenders are 
prosecuted under the 1911 
Protection of Animals Act, but 
this covers only captive and 
domestic animals. The Wild- 
life and Countryside Act offers 
no protection either for the 
common species of reptiles 
and amphibians at risk. 

• A man aged 32, who suf- 
fered from mental illness after 
being bitten by a poisonous 
snake when he was eight, died 
after jumping in front of an 
express train at Wimbledoo in 
October. 

The jury at a Westminster 
inquest returned a verdict that 
David McGuirk. a machine 
minder, of Devonshire Ave- 
nue, Sheerwater, Surrey, killed 
himself while the balance of 
his mind was disturbed. 

Shark on roof 
must go 

Oxford City Council has 
given Mr Wiuaira Heine six 
weeks to remove an inter- 
nationally famous sculpture of 
a shark from the roof of his 
terrace house in New High 
Street. Oxford. 

Mr Heine presented a 
3,111-name petition in sup- 
port of the 20ft sculpture by 
John Buckley, but councillors 
decided he should not be 
allowed to ignore planning 
regulations. 

Protest halts 
cruise convoy 

A cruise missile convoy was 
halted for more than an hour 
by anti-nuclear protestors 
near Andover. Hampshire, 
yesterday. 

The convoy was en route 
from the Grcenham Common 
base to Salisbury Plain in 
Wiltshire for a training 
exercise. 


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Three hundred and eighty buildings were 
:ntered in the preliminary rounds of the Beta Awards. 
; rom these, 28 regional winners were selected by the 
4 Electricity Boards in England, Scotland and Wales. 

Luton and Simbec emerged as the national 
dinners, but every entrant demonstrated how the 
doption of cost-effective electrical techniques 
ould lead to significant energy savings -and also 
mproved amenities and environment- 
four building, too, could be a winner -just 
>y taking part in next years competition. . 

iend the coupon now. 


tVl-rf tkl j- jppr. ■piut,* 

Please send me i our brochure ie.irunng all the WSe* Bela Award 

— v. inner*. 

Please send me derail*, when available, on how io enter the 19S7 

— Beta Award competition. 

Company Address _ 


Postunlc . 

Please send the coupon to Elainciiy PublUimorts. PO LV>\ 2. l a:: r.»l W.h 
Fcltham. Middlesex TWH 0TG. 


BUILD! 




We’re proud to announce the first two 
national winners of our Beta Award for energy 
efficiency in private and public sector buildings. 

To the new terminal at Luton International 
Airport goes the Beta Aw ard for buildings over 
LQOO square metres. This terminal's air conditioning, 
which incorporates heat retrieval systems, has 
energy running costs which are 34°o cheaper, on 
a volume basis, than for the previous building. 

To Simbec Research Ltd's building at Merthyr 
Tydfil goes the under- L000 square metres Beta Award 
Storage fan heaters, fitted with weather sensitive 
controllers, and small air conditioning units have cut 
energy costs by over 29 L 1o compared with earlier 
buildings using boilers and radiators. 

Its not just the winning. 

Its what you gain before you 
even take part. 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 








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Home Produced Extra 

Lean Fresh Beef Mince 

(1 5-17oz pack) per !b £1,48 £1.28* 


Avocados each 2 8p 


Flora 500g 57p 


Sainsburys Fresh Milk 4 pints 79p 


Sainsbury’s Irish Cheddar per lb 98p 


Sainsburys Dutch Smoked Rindless 

Back Bacon per ib EhdS’ £1.36 


Sainsburys Blended Vegetable Oil iltr 


Sainsburys Potato Crisps 
12x25gbagpack 


Sainsburys Sherries 70cl 


Sainsburys Supreme Dog Food 
Variety 4 can pack 


Salisbury's Supreme Cat Food 
Variety 4 can pack £L 


93p 89p 


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IBA meets next week 
to choose satellite 
TV franchise holder 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


HOME NEWS 




f? . ,.-v- 


1131 




‘flooded’ 


Eleven people will sit down 
m an office in Brompton Read 
opposite Hamods in central 
London next Monday to bran 
a process that will lead in a 
little over three years to the 
introduction of a three-chan- 
nel satellite television service. 

Ten of the group -seven 
men and three women - are 
the members of the Indepen- 
dent Broadcasting Authority 
who next week will examine 
closely the claims of five 
consortia to operate a com- 
plete direct-broadcast-sateLlite 
service for which the franchise 
is expected to be awarded 
before Christmas. The elev- 
enth is Mr John Whitney, the 
IBA's director general. 

At the head of the IBA team 
will be Lord Thomson of 
Monifiefo, the authority’s 
chairman. The authority nor- 
mally is made up of 12 people, 
including the chairman, but is 
Short Of a deputy Chair man 
and one member. 

One of the bidding groups 
has predicted that wi thin six 
years of its launch almost a 
third of homes in Britain with 
television will own a dish 
antenna to pick up satellite 
broadcasts. The award of the 
15-year franchise could lead to 
the creation of 70,000 new 
jobs. 

All the applications had to 
be in by last August and since 


Students 
advised on 
heckling 

Students at University Col- 
lege, Cardiff, were yesterday 
issued with gnideliaes on how 
to heckle political speakers. 

They were issued as disci- 
plinary action was dropped 
against 10 left-wing students 
who shouted down Mr Enoch 
Powell, the Ulster Unionist 
MP for Sooth Down. 

The students faced action 
after their chanting forced Mr 
Powell to abandon a speech he 
was doe to give to Conser- 
vative students at the college 
in October. 

The college said it had 
considered taking the action 
only to safeguard freedom of 
speech. 

Guidelines have now been 
issued jointly by the : s 
university's students' onion 
and the college authorities. 1 
But Dr Alfred I 
Meritzjegistrar, emphasized < 
that if a speaker is stopped J 
from speaking again then i 
disciplinary action vsdd be 
taken. I 

“The college views foe j 
maintenance of freedom of ; 
speech within the fanr as of ,1 
paramount importance,” he 
said. 1 

The guidelines for the con- : 
duct af political meeti n gs say 1 
that college authorities should ’ 
formally notify the union i 
about the visit of a controvert 1 
sial speaker. The mion can 
then advise whether It believes i 
that the meeting should be i 
cancelled. 

If the speaker is allowed to 1 
come, then demonstrators can < 
enter the meeting in an orderly i 
way under union supervision. 

The joint statement says t 
heckling, and then c hantin g is 1 
allowed u» take place IT racist 1 
or sexist comments are made i 
from the platform. 



Mr John Whitney, director 
general of foe IBA 

then staff of the authority has 
tarried out a line-byline scru- 
tiny, ironing out queries so 
that the foil authority will be 
primed on the sort of ques- 
tions to ask next week. Tech- 
nical officers will be standing 
by to offer advice. 

The vetting will be thor- 
ough: if any group foils to 
satisfy the IBA members it 
could be called back for a 
further interview. Initially 
each consortium will be given 
half an hour to make its 
presentation which will be 
followed by a question-and- 
answer session. 

Of the five main consortia, 
industry sources fancy two 
principal contenders: DBS 


Girl threw 
baby boy 
at wall 

A baby died after a girl aged 
five threw him against a hotel 
bedroom wall, an inquest was 
told yesterday. Perry 
Osbourne, aged three weeks 
had been left in his cot in a 
bedroom at a hotel in St 
Leonards, East Sussex, while 
his unemployed parents cook- 
ed a meal in the basement last 
July. 

The baby's mother, Mrs 
Lynette Osbourne, told the 
inquest, at St Pancras, Lond- 
on, that she returned to the 
first floor bedroom and found 
two small giris there. 

“I asked them what they 
were doing and one of them 
said that the other one had 
hurt the baby. I picked him up 
and his face was all grazed.” 

The baby was taken to a 
local hospital and later trans- 
ferred to the Hospital for Sick 
Children, Great- Ormond 
Street, London. He died 35 
minutes after being admitted. 

WPC Deborah Willoughby 
told the inquest that one of the 
giris, aged six, said her five- 
year-old friend dropped the 
baby on to the floor. 

“She put it back in the pram 
and rodeed it hard again. Then 
she got it oat and this time she 
threw it against a wall” WPC 
Willoughby also read extracts 
from an interview with the 
five-year-okl, 

“I said: ‘How many times 
was the baby dropped* She 
replied: ‘five or six’. ” 

A post-mortem examina- 
tion showed the cause of 
death was a haemorrhage with 
a fractured skull- 

Mr Clambers, recording an 
open verdict, said be had 
thought long and hard about 
the case but considered that a 
verdict of unlawful killing 
would be improper. 


Gleneagles lands the 
supreme AA accolade 


Gleneagles Hotel in Perth- 
shire yesterday became the 
only Automobile Association 
Five Star hotel outside 
London. 

The accolade, contained in 
the A4 Hotel and Restaurant 
Guide, published yesterday, 
puts Gleneagles in the same 
category as the Berkeley, 
Cla ridges, the Connaught 
Dorchester and the Savoy. 

Mr Edward Murphy, AA 
director for Scotland, said 
yesterday: “Not only is this a 
particularly significant award 
for the hotel industry, but also 
for the Scottish tourist trade. I 
am glad to say that although 
the name Gleneagles is still 
synonymous with all that is 
best in Britain, the hotel has 


The 

Nanking Cargo 

PORCELAIN RAISED 
FROM THE WRECK OF 
THE GELDERMALSEN 
SUNK IN THE 
SOUTH CHINA SEA 
234 YEARS AGO 


Hu* rmatloHt? Cargo 

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Irvti&vd Ktnn fSd " WflwJy 
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anH Bamfoai. F«wy end 
Siwfl^iapp dffiigns i 1 £3T*>. £!f0 

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aCCji^VITVi'd hy J 

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IMMiDiAlILY Ur. Crisis x*d 
Order Fonr. to- Spink Modem 
Collection Ltd. FREEPOST 
JW5 GMtioae Ro*& Croydon, 

CSV dRP. QiiL-iiDf Art “r 


succeeded in opening its doors 
to a wider clientele, while at 
foe same time improving its 
standards." 

' During the past five years 
£9 million has been spent on 
restoring the hold and on an 
indoor sport and leisure com- 
plex. Earlier this year plans 
were announced for a £3 mil- 
lion equestrian centre opening 
in 1988 and to be managed by 
Captain Mark Phillips. 

Mr Brian Baldoac, chair- 
man of Gleneagles Hotels, 
said: “This is a momentous 
day in the hotel's 62-year 
history and it justifies aS the 
hard work and investment 
foal has gone into this elegant 
budding over foe past few 
years.” 


Bellringer’s 
£1,120 after 
losingjob 

A woman who refused to 
work on Sundays became she 
is a bellriDger has been 
awarded £1.120 compensation 
for unfair dismissal 
Mrs Stephanie Lindhorst- 
Jones. aged 19. of Deva Close, 
Oake&holt Clwyd, North 
Wales, told an industrial tri- 
bunal at Cohvyn Bay last i 
month she had been a 
bellringer for 11 years and 
described it as a commitment 
rather than a hobby. 

The tribunal in a reserved 
decision announced yes- 
terday, ruled that she was 
dismissed unfairly from her 
job. as clerical assistant with 
Aber Building Supplies, of 
Flint. .. . . . .. 

She was dismissed by Mr 
David Hopkins, the managing 
director, “in a fit of pique, 
because she had not agreed to 
work on Sunday - . ■ 


UK Ltd. financed by advertis- 
ing, and BSB (British Satellite 
Broadcasting), which will be 
subscription-based. The other 
three are DBL (Direct Broad- 
casting Ltd), NBS (National 
Broadcasting Service) and 
SatUK Broadcasting. 

Many household names fig- 
ure in the groups - DBS UK 
Ltd has London Weekend 
Television International Saa- 
tdri & Saatchi and Dixons 
among its partners; BSB has i 

O ranarifl- , An g lia TV, Anurt raH 

and Virgin; DBL includes 
Ferranti, News International 
and Cambridge Electronic 
Industries. 

As well as the “big five” 
Independent Television News 
has submitted plans for a 24- 
hour hews service and Stars- 
tream, also known as the 
Children's Channel hopes to 
have its programming in- 
cluded on. the successful 
system. 

Although under internat- 
ional agreements the UK has 
two more satellite chann els, 
foe Government does not 
propose to allocate them until 
foe new service has been 
running for at least three 
years; 

DBS services are not re- 
quired under the Cable and 
Broadcasting Act 1984 to have 
wide range and balance in 
subject matter and sufficient 
time for news.- 


tSS’ r :-M 




**• 




■■■ • ... rAr: 





Princess Anne inspecting foe gmrd of honour provided by HMS Neptune when she visited the Royal Navy's Faslane 
sialipayma base on foe Clyde, as CMef Cw nmandan t of the Women's Royal Navy Service. During her visit the Princess, who 
arrived by boat, opened an ac c ommo dation block for Wrens and watched a submarine attack on an electronic simulator. 

Heseltine seeks more inner city help 

j * i — j. _ r' . ....... . a. 


Mr Michael Heseltine, who 
as a minister was put in charge 
of rebuflding the inner cities 
after the 1981 riots, called 
yesterday for the establish- 
ment of an English develop- 
ment agency to bring new life 
to the inner cities. 

He told a conference in 
London on inner city renewal 
that foe “desolation” of areas 
in foe heart of English cities 
was too big a problem for local 
councils to tackle alone. 

“It’s a question of scale,” he 
said. “Nothing is going to 
happen unless it is led by the 


Government; the responsibil- 
ity lies there. But although set 
up by foe Government, foe 
new agency, modelled on 
similar bodies for Scotland 
and Wales, should be led by an 
industrialist and businessmen 
from private industries. 

“It is only in the private 
sector that you get foe speed of 
decision-malting we need. It 
has an edge to it which, if 
properly regulated and bal- 
anced, is to be admired.” 

Mr Heseltine, who resigned 
as Secretary of State for De- 
fence over foe Westland affair. 


said: “I would want to set up a 
body of people to whom 
would be transferred much of 
foe urban policy administra- 
tion of local government. 

“I would people it with a 
partnership of foe various 
aspects of our society who 
have to cope with foe issue. 

“It would include repre- 
sentatives of the public and 
voluntary sectors. But it 
should be led by people from 
foe private sector because they 
have that decision-making 
ability at speed.” 

Mr Heseltine cited the 


London Docklands Develop- 
ment Corporation which he 
founded while in office as 
having “set alight an area 
which had mouldered for 
decades”. 

He added: “We have got to 
create a balanced, en- 
trepreneurial society that is 
capable of supporting itself” 

The idea that the problems 
of inner cities could be solved 
by encouraging residents to set 
up their own businesses was 
“fatally flawed”. Once they 
became successful they would 
move out, leaving areas even 
more deprived. 


rifle range 

A secret camera allegedly 
caught a managing director 
pouring buckets of water on to 
his company’s new rifle range, 
in order to win thousands of 
pounds in compensation by 
claiming It was prone to 
flooding, a court was told 
yesterday. 

Mr Rodney Wyles, aged 61, 
of Southwell Nottingham- 
shire, denies two charges of 
deception and one of at- 
tempted deception. 

Mr Brian Appleby, QC, for 
the prosecution, said Mr 
Wyles had been paid £1 1,600 
by the construction company, 
Arrowcraft (Dominion) 
Investments, before it became 
suspicious and installed the 
secret remote control camera 

“He was dramatically 
caught in the act putting water 
on the range,” Mr Appleby 
told Lincoln Crown Court. 

Hundreds of photographs 
were taken when Mr Wyles, 
the major shareholder of G 
Smiths (Gunsmiths) of St 
Marks, Newark, Nottingham- 
shire, walked on to foe under- 
ground testing range late at 
night. Several showing him 
throwing buckets of water 
about, were viewed by ‘.he 
jury. 

The jury was told Mr Wyles 
admitled throwing buckets of 
water on to the range, but said 
he was merely “swilling 
down” lead shot 
The case continues. 






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The next generation of integrated circuits will be made from 
gallium arsenide, a material, the experts say, that could be 
as important in the next decade as silicon was in the last. 
Chips made from gallium arsenide (GaAs) will work faster than 
silicon chips, will work at much higher temperatures and will 
have optical qualities applicable in laser technology. 

Their potential is enormous. 

The first University-based Research Centre covering both the 
material and device properties of GaAs has been formed by 
a combination of the resources of University College, Cardiff 
and the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology. 

If your company wants to be in the right place at the right time, 
please dial 100 and ask for Freefone Wales, or send off the coupon. 



about Wales 


Name 

Company name. 
Address 


.Position. 


I 


Send to; Weish Development Agency, PO Box ICO, 
Greyfriars Road, Cardiff CF1 1WF 


TM1B11K2 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 






Car Shown 


Montego 1.6L Saloon 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


WORLD SUMMARY 


Reagan heads off 
Shultz resignation 

Washn^-^QfdefbyPresideBtBEagaBtoradanig 
shipments to Iran appears to hare forestalled theimmediaie 
resignation of Mr George Shnltz, the US Secretary of State. 

^ys in the Adnumstratmn may still be 
numbered (Christopher Thomas writes). 

Although their policy differences have been papered over, 
some laides believe that Mr Shnltz has already detidedtoi* 
*8“ because he sees no prospect of advance on the femes of 
international terrorism ami aims contra!, both of which have 
been tmdermt by recent events. 

• I ^i22R5 S: iP l ^ yl , 4pe,,ceitfoftfcaise 9 nestioBeibe " 

Ueved Resident Reaga n s statement abort swapping 
weapons for hostages, bnt 58 percent sf Americans stiff an- 

Jerusalem protest 

Jerusalem — Shopkeepers in the Old City of Jerusalem 
held a strike yesterday protest at the anti-Arab violence 
which has ernpted every ni ght the minder of a Jewish 
Bible student on Saturday (Ian Murray writes). 

Some classes in Arab schools were also dosed to mark the 
commonitj’s anger at the storings and deliberate damage to 
Arab property. Gangs of young Jews in the Jerusalem 
suburb which was the murdered man's h*™* stoned cars. 
Roads were Hocked by burning tyres. 

In the Knesset yesterday afternoon a series of emerge n cy 
motions on the marder and subsequent rioting were nhiwi 

Envoy to 
Pretoria 

Johannesburg — Mr Ed- 
ward Perkins (left), Wash- 
ington’s new, and first 
Mach, Ambassador to Pre- 
toria, arrived here yes- 
terday just as the three- 
week-old strike at General 
Motors in Fort Elizabeth, 
provoked by the American 
parent company's decision 
last month to sell its Seirth 
African operation to local 
management, collapsed 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

Mr Perkins said only 
that be was “glad to be in 
South Africa”. 

Fear over tax file theft 

Ottawa — Police were gnecrinming a mytt yps te nt« y in 
the bizarre case of a stolen master file wwttwming tax 
information on Id million Canadians (John Best writes). 

The file was recovered in Toronto only a few hoars after its 
disappearance on October 30 had been wwinJ in the 
House of Commons by Mr F3mw MacKay, the Minister of 
National Revenue. 

It contained microfiche records on practically every 
Canadian who paid income tax last year. Officials corid offer 
no immediate assurance that the file, or parts of it, had not 
been duplicated. 

Ndebele Back to 

chief dies school 

Johannesburg — The 
Chief Minister of the 
KwaNdebefe tribal home- .... 
land, Mr Simon Sk&sana, 
aged 59, ene^rf the mam-’ -. 
proponents of “iKtepakd- . 
ence” for the territory, has - 
died in hospital. He had 
been iH for seme time . 

(Michael Hornsby writes). 

Mr Skosana suffered a 
severe rebuff in August .. 
when the Kwal>Webete Leg- 
islative Assembly decided 
not to go ahead with “inde- 
pendence”, scheduled for 
December 11. 



Los Angeles — Ryan 
Thomas, a five-year-old 
Aids victim banned from 
kindergarten., two months , 
ago after biting another 
pupa, mast he allowed to 
return to class, a. Los 
Angeles judge has ruled 
(Ivor Davis write). 

Judge Alicemarie Stotier 
noted: “As weB meaning as 
tiie school has tried to be, 
the overwhelming wrfipai 
evidence preseated to this 
court shows that there is 
notimqz to fear from this 
chad.” 


Children for sale as Lebanese pound plunges 


US experts claim Star 
Wars a waste of time 


By Nicholas Beeston 

British scientists who con- 
duct research into President 
Reagan’s Strategic Defence In- 
itiative (SD1) wflJ be ‘‘wasting 
their time” according to two 
senior American scientists. 

Dr Richard Garwin. a se- 
nior adviser to the US Gov- 
ernment and IBM, and Dr 
Hugh DeWin, a theoretical 
physicist at the Lawrence 
Livermore National Laborat- 
ory in California, also claimed 
that the Star Wars initiative is 
scientifically flawed. 

The two men. who spoke to 
MP« -in London yesterday. 


said researdi among their 
colleagues at the US National 
Academy of Science tins 
month showed that 78 per 
cent believed the prospects of 
a Star Wars defensive system 
bring Mnh in the next 25 years 
were poor or very poor. 

Dr DeWnt said that the 
American scientific commu- 
nity was mounting a growing 
campaign to change the minds 
of the President and the 
American public. 

He forecast that unless 
Washington conceded over 
SDI the superpowers would be 
locked into another costly 
arms race. 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

Ahmed Badr Tawasheh is 
offering to sell his children to 
the highest bidder. His 
advertisement in the Lebanese 
daily an-Nahor is uncom- 
promising: 

“For sale — right children. I, 
Ahmed Badr Tawasheh from 
Kibbeh, offer my right under- 
aged children for the price of 
gening them out of Lebanon 
and giving them the 
necessities of life.” 

It was a terrible, unprece- 
dented sign of the times in 
Lebanon, where the economy 
is collapsing so fast that tens of 
thousands of people are 
becoming impoverished by 
theweek. 

Yesterday, the Lebanese 


pound — which stood at 5J5 
against sterling in 1983 — 
passed the rate oflOO to the £, 
a fell of more than 10 per cent 
in 24 hours. 

Nor was Mr Tawasheh stag- 
ing a public relations exercise. 
He walked into the Tripoli 
office of an-Nahor, pleading 
with the staff to print his 
advertisement on the grounds 
that it would cost lus final 
savings. By last night, a man 
described as a Saudi prince 
and two people in Dubai had 
replied to his appeaL 

In Cairo, the prince, who 
remained anonymous, called 
on the Lebanese ambassador, 
Mr Abdui-Rahman SoLh, of- 
fering to adopt all eight chil- 
dren. A Dubai woman, 
Mawaa Jamaa, said she would 
take in the daughters, while a 


businessman in the same 
country, Abdullah aTShafar, 
said be would do anything he 
could for the children. 

The effect of the economic 
collapse has been immediate 
and dramatic. Repeated warn- 
ings about the fell of the 
Lebanese currency bore no 
relation to the extent of its 
destruction on the market 
yesterday, when the Central 
Bank foreclosed on all deal- 
ings to prevent its timber 
decline. 

In Hamra Street, in the 
commercial district of west 
Beirut, money-changers could 
be seen selling dollars with 
loaded pistols on their desks 
beside them. Not a bank in the 
city was without at feast two 
gunmen protecting its prem- 
ises. Bank robberies have 


become endemic, despite 
assertions by the Syrian 
authorities in west Beirut that 
they will prevent thefts. 

On one wall in Hamra 
Street someone had plastered 
a poster depicting an enlarge- 
ment of a Lebanese £1 note, 
the smallest paper currency in 
the country; and decorated 
with a drawing of the surviv- 
ing columns of the Temple of 
Jupiter at Baalbek. 

‘The death of the Lebanese 
pound,” said the caption 
underneath. And indeed, no- 
thing could symbolize so 
mournfully the demise of a 
currency that once provided a 
financial pillar in the Arab 
world than the reproduction 
of a note which costs more to 
print than it is worth on the 
market 


Lebanese bankers spoke of 
“chaos” in the exchange rates 
when the US dollar passed 
£Leb73 yesterday. There was 
near-panic at some exchange 
dealers as people tried to 
convert their money into dol- 
lars while the rates increased. 

As all but the most staple 
foodstuffs increased in price, 
investors, businessmen and 
landlords found their wealth 
depreciating almost by the 
hour. 

Everyone in Lebanon 
knows the reasons for the 
disaster the absolute failure of 
the much-publicized Chris- 
tian-Muslim rapprochement 
last spring, continued instabil- 
ity of southern Lebanon, the 
rapidly growing power of a 
rejuvenated Palestine Liber- 
ation Organization, and the 


withdrawal of Western politi- 
cal and financial support — 
not to mention the inability of 
the Syrians to fulfil their 
“security plan” in west Beirut 
— has sapped all confidence in 
the currency. 

Even as the money-chang- 
ers were switching their rates 
yesterday, shells were felling 
around the Bourj el-Barajneh 
Palestinian camp in west Bei- 
rut from gun batteries in the 
Mein Hills. The targets were 
the Am a! militiamen besieg- 
ing the camp. 

The artillery was being fired 
by supporters of Abu Mou- 
ssa's Palestinian faction, theo- 
retically loyal to Syria, and to 
Amal. but giving support 
nonetheless to Mr Yassir 
Arafat's guerrillas inside the 
camp. 


Farm ministers 
fail to resolve 
crisis over EEC 
dairy mountain 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 


After two days of talks, 
attempts by EEC firm min- 
isters to agree on crisis mea- 
sures to deal with Europe's 
dairy mountains collapsed 
yesterday with no glimmer of 
compromise in sight. 

The EEC Commission had 
made the soaring milk and 
butter surpluses a test case of 
Europe’s ability to cope with 
the crisis. The ministers* fail- 
ure presents Mrs Thatcher 
with the unwelcome prospect 
of having to tackle the farm 
policy crisis when she presides 
over the EEC summit in 
London in two weeks' time. 

The EEC meeting, chaired 
by Mr Michael Jopling, the 
British Agriculture Minister, 
held a final, late-night session 
in a bid to overcome resis- 
tance to reform in the beef 
sector, a slightly less intrac- 
table part of the Common 
Agricultural Policy (CAP). 

But Mr John Seiwyn Grim- 
mer, the junior Agriculture 
Minister, said that there was 
no more than feint hope of a 
compromise on cuts in beef 
production, and further efforts 
would be made at the next 
EEC Farm Council on Decem- 
ber 8 — the last under the 
British presidency. 

The London EEC summit is 
the highlight of Britain's six- 
monlb presidency of the EEC 
COttncil of Ministers, which 
ends next month. Mis That- 
cher vowed before Britain 
took over in July that reform 
of the CAP would be a British 
priority. 

Some officials believe that 
only heads of government — 
with Mrs Thatcher giving the 
lead — can now override the 
farm ministers' unwillingness 
to take decisions likely to 
alienate European farmers. 

A rival school of thought, 
which appears to have the 
upper hand among those plan- 
ning the London summit 
agenda, is that Mis Thatcher 
would risk a debacle by asking 
fellow EEC leaders to sort out 
the thorny farming crisis at a 
two-day summit. 

“Chancellor Kohl feces an 
election in January,” (me EEC 
diplomat said yesterday. 
“How can he damage lus 
chances of re-election by 
putting German fanners out 
of business?” 

Mis Thatcher's best option, 
such diplomats say, is to 
“brush the ' CAP problem 
under the carpet” and hand it 
over to the Belgians, who 
inherit the presidency in Janu- 
ary. Bnt some officials think 
that Mrs Thatcher's style 


could lead her to tackle the 
CAP head-on. 

The Commission is de - 
manding total dairy trot 
cuts of6 per cent and stiff fines 
fOT millr and butter *iirphig 
production. 

It also wants limited inter- 
vention buying of EEC beef 
with lower prices and strict 
thresholds for beef production 
in all EEC states, coupled with 
a determined beef export 
drive. There is a beef surplus 
of 600,000 tonnes, a mfllc 
powder surplus of a million 
tonnes and a butter mountain 
of 1.5 million tonnes. 

Opposition to reform came 
yesterday from Herr Ignaz 
Kiechle, the West German 
Farm Minister, and M Fran- 
cois Guillaume, his French 
counterpart, both of whom 
run firms of their own. 

In ippiy to Mr Richard 
Cottrefl, Conservative Euro- 
MP for BristoL Mr Henning 
Christophersen, the Budget 
Commissioner, said that the 
Commission did not intend to 
abandon the CAP altogether, 
but its soaring costs bad to be 
controlled. 

On the Anglo-French lamb 
war, M Guillaume warned 
that attacks on lorries carrying 
British lamb to France would 
continue following. the Com- 
mission's failur e to agree on 
the application of a border tax 
to British lamb exports. 

Mr Frans Andricssen, the 
Agriculture Commissioner, 
was said to be furious over 
pom- attendance at the Com- 
mission's Monday meeting on 
the lamb war, but said he 
would still pursue a solution. 

There was also bad feeling 
in talks on another food war — 
between Britain and Ireland 
over beef exports — with Mr 
Gummer accusing the Com- 
mission of discriminating 
against Britain by refusing to 
devalue the green pound for 
beef transactions. 

Mr Gummer said that 
devaluation of the Irish green 
{mat two months ago bad 
given Ireland an unfair price 
advantage and that this, to- 
gether with smuggling across 
the Irish-Ulster border, had 
had a devastating effect on the 
beef cattle industry of North- 
ern Ireland. 

Officials pointed out that 
although currency fluctua- 
tions had worked against 
Britain over Irish beef; they 
had benefited Britain in its 
lamb exports to France, so 
that it was a case of “swings 
and roundabouts”. Mr Gum- 
mer said that the two issues 
were not connected. 



Five of the crew who flew the last successful Columbia shuttle mission in January chatting with another astronaut, Michael 
Coats, second from left, at Cape Canaveral In Florida, where they have began practicing for a simulated countdown. 


Action Directed latest victim 

Seven-year history of terror 


Action Directs, the group 
responsible for the murder of 
M Georges Besse, managing 
director of Renault Cars, is an 
extreme-Left French terrorist 
organization which was 
formed in 1979 from the 
merger of two other militant 
extreme-Left groups. Since 
then, it has responsib- 

ility for more than 50 terrorist 
attacks in France, mostly in 
and arotmd Paris. 

Its targets have mainly been 
military bondings, offices of 
political parties, establish- 
ments with Jewish connec- 
tions and big business. At 
first, tiie attacks were aimed at 
cansag material damage with- 
out actually injuring or Irilling 
people. 

But its tactics have changed 
since January 1985, when the 
group split in two and a new 
and much more violent inter- 
national fa c tio n emerged to 
join forces with the German 
Red Army Faction and the 
Belgian Cellules Couununistes 
Comhatfantes (CCC). It is 
also thought to have links with 
the Italian Red Brigades ami 
the Lebanese Armed Revolu- 
tion Faction (Fail), die group 
responsible for the recent wave 
of bombings in Paris. 

The group claimed 
responsibility for the murder 
in January 1985 of General 
Ren£ Audran, bead ■ of 
France's arms sales division at 
the Ministry of Defence; the 
attempted murder of M Henri 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

Blandin, another senior 
French Defence official, in 
June 1985; the attempted mur- 
der of M Guy Brana, vice- 
president of the main French 
employers' association last 
April; and a bomb attack 
against a Paris police office in 
which Inspector Marcel Bas- 
devant was killed last July. 

It is also suspected of bring 
responsible for the murder in 
April of Mr Kenneth Mareton. 

Amid a feeling of horror and 
indignation at Renault, M 
Aime Jardon, deputy manag- 
ing director, was named in- 
terim managing director yes- 
terday. The executive board is 
to go ahead with a meeting on 
Friday when 5,000 more 
redundancies are expected to 
be announced (Diane Geddes 
writes from Pans). 

British head of the French 
branch of Black and Decker, 
the American tool company. 

The group's ideology and 
aims remain vague. After the 
bombing of the Interpol headr 
q carters outside Paris in May 
it left pamphlets declaring its 
intention “to hit central in- 
stallations which link then- 
political, economic and mili- 
tary strategy, and at the heart 
of which are found the stron- 
gest antagonisms of the inter- 
national proletariat /imperial- 
ist bourgeoisie; to concretize 
the qualitative leap of all 
antagonisms of the masses and 


develop them toward a global 
revolutionary strategy”. 

The following is a list of 
attacks carried out by Action 
Directs over the past few 
months: 

November 11: Three bombs in 
Paris outside French com- 
panies with South African 
links against President 
Botha's visit No one hart. 
November 1: Two bombs in 
Paris in protest at the French 
Government's alleged anti-im- 
migrant polities. One hurt. 
July 21: A bomb attack 
against the Paris headquarters 
of the OECD. No one hurt. 
July 9: A bomb attack against 
the offices of the anti-gang 
brigade of the Paris police, in 
which Inspector Basdevant 
was killed and three other 
policemen seriously injured. 
July 6: Two bombs, one 
against a computer division of 
Thomson, the French elec- 
tronics company, the other 
against the offices of Air 
IJqaide. 

May 16: Gon attack against 
Interpol headquarters outside 
Paris. A police officer injured. 
April 26: Kenneth Marston, 
British bead of the French 
branch of Black and Decker, 
shot dead outside his home in 
Lyons. 

April 15: Attempted 
assassination by two gunmen 
of Guy Brana, vice-president 
of the main French employers* 
association, outside his home 
in the snbarbs of Paris. 


Syrian car 
‘used by 
bombers’ 

From John England 
Berlin 

The Syrian Embassy in East 
Berlin was directly involved in 
a bomb attack in West Berlin 
by two Jordanians, the West 
Berlin High Court was told 
yesterday. 

Ahmed Hasi. a brother of 
Nezar Hindawi. the terrorist 
jailed in Britain for 45 years, 
collected the bomb from the 
embassy about three weeks 
before the attack on the Ger- 
m an -Arab Society's centre in 
the West Berlin on March 29, 
The embassy’s role in the 
bombing was described by Mr 
Hasi in a statement to police 
after his arrest on April 18 
which was read by Here Hans- 
Joachim Heinze, the presiding 
judge. 

Both Mr Hasi and the other 
defendant. Faruk Salameh, 
have confessed to placing the 
bomb. Statements bv Mr Hasi 
which were read in court on 
Monday said that the bomb 
was brought from Syria to the 
Syrian Embassy in East Ger- 
many in February by a man 
named either Abu Ahmed or 
Haythara Sae&An embassy 
car was used to cany the 
bomb. 

• Howe briefing; Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
yesterday briefed East 
Germany’s Foreign Minister, 
Herr Oskar Fischer, on the 
Hindawi bomb plot and 
Syria's involve menu 



it isn’t only traffic wardens it turns away. 


It’s easy to forget that disabled people 
have needs and ambitions the same as you. 

Unfortunately though, other peoples 
embarrassment and fear of their disability 
often prevents them from leading the kind of 
life that you take for granted. 

The Spastics Society is committed to 
changing people’s attitude to disability and 
helping disabled people become integrated 
into society rather than isolated from it 


You can play your part by filling in the 
coupon below, or simply by remembering what 
you’ve read here next time you come across 
someone who is disabled. 

The Spastics Society. L> Park Crescent . London Wl.V lEQ. 

D Please send me further information shout The Spastics Society 

□ I'd like an appointment to discuss a child-adult with tvn.hr: J p-dsy. 

Name 

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The sractcs soccee 


Our biggest handicap is other peoples attitude. 


° k &&? Js-'g « ?§£■§!* 5<S§‘?)5 s iS3S»> 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


says Russians 
involved in 


Afghan torture 


By NkhdasBeestoa 

Soviet occupation forces in ployee.ag 
Af gha nis ta n. working with A£ applied th 
ghan interrogator, have taken and first 
part in the torture of civilian the 
prisoners sin c e their invasion So viet als 

seven years ago, according to a once.” 
report published today by Former 
Amnesty International. asked fori 

Using evidence collected by published 
former Afg han prisoners now ing been 
living as refugees outside tbe wire cable 
.country, the human rights Other fbn 

- group claims that civ ilian included 

■ ■ detainees are subjected negu- sleep and! 

larly to electric shocks, beat- for long pc 

■ - ings and other forms of torture cold watei 
;^and that several people are . Women 

- reported to have died follow- they were 

ing interrogation. the report 


The report, called Afghani- 
stan: Torture qf Political Pris- 
oners, c laim s that people 
suspected of supporting tbe 


ployee, aged 29, recalls: “They 
applied the wires to my fingers 
and first . one- Afghan pulled 
the handfe and after hat the 
Soviet also polled the handle 
once.” 

Former prisoners, who 

asked for their names not to be 

published, also reported hav- 
ing been beaten with dubs, 
wire cables and rubber ImImt 
O ther forms of physical abuse 
inducted being 'deprived of 
sleep and befog made to stand 
for long periods, sometimes in 
cold water or snow. 

Women prisoners said that 
they were also tortured, and 
the report says tint there are 
consistent accounts that 
women were forced to watch 
the torture of male detainees. 

Conditions, in .Afghan pris- 


anfc-communist guerrillas are ons are aim cri ticized, and the 


arrested by agents of the 
Khedmat-e-Etelaat-e-Dawlati 
(Khad), tbe state information 
service, and subjected to tor- 


report says that detainees are 
often kept for long periods in 
solitary co nfineme nt or in 
overcrowded prisons like Pic- 


ture in several centres across e rharfrhi outside Kabul, 


the country. 

Many witnesses said that 
Soviet personnel were present 
when prisoners were tortured 
and that they often appeared 
to be directing the inter- 
rogation. 

In a few cases Russians were 


which was built for 5,000 
inmates but now houses 
10,000 people. 

Amnesty chhm; that, the 
torture and arrests without 
trial are a contravention of 
Afghan and international law. 

The group said that it tried 


in a rew cases Russians were ^ 

a ocre ffd nf ac tuall y taimw part to contact President Gromyko 
in electric-shock torture, nemg of the Soviet Union and Prcs- 
a device to as the *tient Babrak Karmal of 

“telephone” in which wires. Afehanistan about the allegat- 
are g tt p chfd fo sensitive parts ™ ns - There was. no response 
of the body and the handle on fro™ e i t * ier government. t 
a small maebiae turned to iSSS“f^SSL' f ££S£ 


generate electricity. 

One Afghan bank 


Prisoners (Amnesty Internal-, 
tonal, 5 Roberts Place, London 
EC1R OEJ, £2JOX 


Muslims say seven 
helicopters down 


Islamabad (AP) — Soviet 
and Afghan forces have made 
large-scale attacks against 
Muslim guerrilla forces across 
Afghanistan, resulting in sav- 
age fi ghting and hm y casual- 
ties m many parts of tbe 
country, according to western 
diplomatic sources here 
yesterday. ' ■ - 
The sources said that re- 
ports from Afghanistan de- 
scribed heavy fighting in the 
north, south ami east. Thou- 
sands of Soviet and Afghan 
Government soldiers, banked 
by tanks and rercraft, have 
been at t ackin g guerrilla po- 
sitions, they said. 

Some of the heaviest find- 
ing has been in Kandahar, a 
the south-east, where guerril- 
las and Soviet .troops haw 
been involved in streeLbattles 
and many tivffians killed in 
bombardments and air raidsu 
The guerrillas co nti n ued to 
hold most of the city, and 
Soviet and Afghan forces ap-. 
peared to control only the 
airport and foe government 
administra tive area in the city. 
One western source said that 
. the Russians had lost the vital 
12-mile road linking the air- 


port and the city. 

There also has been heavy 
fighting in the surrounding 
region, and Soviet aircraft and 
ground forces lave repeatedly 
attacked villages held by 
guerrillas or thought sympa- 
thetic tO than. . 

More Than 12S ci vilians 
were killed when five or sx 
Soviet helicopter gnnships at- 
tacked Pasfnnal, oulsde Kan- 
dahar; early this month | the 
sources said. Almost 150 Af- 
ghan soldiers had been killed 
m foe fighting, but western 
so urc es have no reports on 
Bonrifla or Soviet losses. 

The gnerriHas app e a red to 
be doing weft, and one western 
source said repots indicated 
foal they had foot down seven 
helicopters. 

Guerrilla officials based in 
Pakistan also report heavy 
fighting around Kandahar and 
say their forces have come 
m«W heavy, air and artillery ! 
attack. . 

Weston sources have also 
confirmed earlier guerrilla re- 
ports of heavy fighting in 
Takhar province in northern 
Afghan i st a n near foe Soviet 
border. 


iRirtnums 


% 



ST. LONDON ~ 


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Christmas CMaiogne now available, price £ 1 . 

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Extra aid to Uganda means a boost for Leyland 


By Andrew McEwen 
; Diplomatic Correspondent 

Britain's £10 million pack- 

S je of additional aid to 
ganda appeared likely yes- 
; terday to lead to sales of 
considerable numbers of Ley- 
l land trucks to foe former 
| protectorate. Whitehall sou- 
rces said . that, negotiations, 
were already under way be- 
tween tb« Ugandan anthorities 
and Leybnd InteraationaL 
President Yoweri Museveni 
of Uganda, who is on an 
official visit to Britain, put 
tracks at foe fop of his 
shopping list when the Prime 
Minister promised him the 

“He was absolutely de- 
lighted — d immediately y 
how he would use foe money”, 
one sonree said. The deal is 
Hkely to have some redirect 
Government support, although 
officially it fa' a purely 
commarialtrauCTfrioa. 

Arrasgereents for Brtiain to 
help a foe repak and mainte- 
nance of huge numbers of 
a nsavta e aMe British vehicles 
in Uganda have beat under 
discu s s i on during foe visit. 

The talks are to be runted 
forward by Mis Lynda 
Ckalker, Minister of Stale at 
foe Foreign Office, who fa to 
fly to Kampala next month. 

Details were being com- 
pleted yesterday on foe supply 
of veterinary drugs worth £2 
million as part of British red. 

The whole of foe £lfrmflfion 
offered by Mrs Thatcher b 
new grant money and in 
addition to foe £36 million 
previously promised, which 
mdndes £22 mflffr in for re- 
pairs to foe Owen Falls hydro- 


- ^ ■ * z V-f 







President Yoweri Museveni 'of Uganda speaking at a press conference in London yesterday. Photograph by Tim Bishop. 


electric plant on Lake 
Victoria. . . 

A sharp disagreement be- 
tween Whitehall and Kampala 
on foe terms mater which 
British mflilar y iim li njflis 
serve in Uganda has been 
solved. 

The Ugandans objected to a 
memorandum signed by ex- 


President Milton Obote which 
exempted instructors from 
penalties under Ugandan law. 

President Museveni yes- 
terday described fob as “an 
affront to our national sov- 
ereignty”. The point 

in talks to overcome Ugandan 
objections was their insistence 
that British soldiers should be 


subject to the death penalty if 
they committed serious off- 
ences. 

“To restore law and order 
they have had to disripline 
their own soldiers very 
harshly, and they were not 
going to make exceptions for 
our men”, a Whitehall source 
said. 


The compromise reached 
was that future instructors 
would be given diplomatic 
immunity and would be at- 
tached to the British High 
Commission in Kampala. 

Future groups will be seat in 
much smaller numbers, tbe 
first leaving early in the New 
Year. 


Brazilian 
leaders 
meet on 
economy 

Brasilia (Reuter) - Presi- 
dent Sarney of Brazil met 
senior ministers yesterday to 
ditnurc adjustments to his 
anti-inflation programme and 
other changes following a 
landslide Government victory 
in national elections in 
Saturday's poll. 

The ruling coalition won the 
governorships of all 23 states, 
the most stunning electoral 
win in Brazil's political 
history. 

The senior partner in the 
coalition, foe Brazilian Demo- 
cratic Movement Party, also 
won an absolute majority in 
tbe Senate and foe Chamber of 
Deputies. 

Officials said that the Presi- 
dent began discussions with 
foe Finance Minister, Senhor 
Dilson Funaro, foe Planning 
Minister, Senhor Joao Sayad, 
and other senior advisers to 
consider changes in the anti- 
inflation programme. 

The anti-inflation drive, tbe 
Cruzado nan, was introduced 
last February and cut signifi- 
cantly Brazil's inflation rate 
from more than 200 per cent 

Prices have risen only an 
accumulated 10.25 per cent 
from March to October. The 
plan gave Brazil a new cur- 
rency, the cruzado, and of- 
ficially froze prices which was 
a spectacular political success, 
credited with helping to bring 
about foe Government’s elec- 
toral victory. 


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12 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


All smiles as North Korean leader greets guest 


Kim appears in 
public to bury 
reports of his 
assassination 


.at 


From David Watts, Tokyo 


Striding down a crimson 
carpet and beaming broadly at 
his visitor from Mongolia, 
President Kim n Sung of 
North Korea looked very 
much alive at Pyongyang air- 
port yesterday. 

Wearing a cap and- three- 
quarter overcoat in the au- 
tumn chill, he walked between 
two wildly enthusiastic rows 
of his citizens waving flags of 
welcome for Mr Jambyn 
Batmonh. Secretary-General 
of the People’s Revolutionary 
Party of Mongolia. 

Film of President Kim. aged 
74, was the main item on 
television news in Tokyo after 
two days of special bulletins 
speculating on whether the 
President was alive. 

In spite of his appearance, 
news of his demise and 
replacement by the Defence 
Minister. Marshal O Jin U, 
was still being broadcast over 
propaganda loudspeakers be- 
hind the demilitarized zone 
separating North and South 
Korea, according to the De- 
fence Ministry in Seoul 
Neither the Defence Min- 
ister nor the President’s son, 
Mr Kim Jong II, were at the 
airport ceremony. 

The Ministry spokesman, 
however, was later forced to 
call a press conference similar 
to the one at which he made 
the announcement of Presi- 
dent Kim’s death on Monday. 
There was, he said, still a 
strong possibility of internal 
strife in North Korea and the 
south must remain vigilant 
The opposition New Korea 
Democratic Party was more 


direct; the Cabinet should 
resign to take responsibility 
for spreading false infor- 
mation. It said that the Gov- 
ernment had used the alleged 
broadcasts as an excuse to 
tighten security. The Govern- 
ment met for the second 
special Cabinet meeting in two 
days. 

Editorial comment in South 
Korean newspapers was also 
critical. The Government 
should be more careful in its 
handling of information in 
future, one said. 

Though reports of President 
Kim’s death were greatly exag- 
gerated, questions still remain 
as to whether the events of the 
last two days signify conflicts 
within the leadership of the 
North Korean Communist 
Party and with the military. 

It is significant that Marshal 
O Jin U has not been seen in 
public for some time, and 
recent reports in Hong Kong 
have said that he was involved 
in a car accident. 

He is the most influential 
figure in Pyongyang after the 
two Kims, and the reports 
broadcast at the demilitarized 
zone that he was in control 
may indicate that he has fallen 
out of favour with the leader? 
ship or that there is some 
disagreement between the 
President and his son who is 
dose to the Defence Minister. 
• PEKING: President Kim 
“looked healthy and fit” when 
he greeted the Mongolian 
leader, according to witnesses. 
He was also ’’talking 
continually” to those around 
him (Robert Grieves writes). 



President Khnj right, greeting the Mongolian leader, Mr Jambyn Batmonh, at Pyongyang. Below, the North Korean 
Defence Minister, Marshal O Jin U, who was reported to have 


taken control and is now involved In a power struggle. 



Colombo ‘agrees’ 
Tamil homeland 


From Kn] dip Nayar, Delhi 


The T amil Nadu Govern- 
ment told the state assembly 
in Madras yesterday that 
“some progress” had been 
made in finding a solution to 
Sri Lanka’s ethnic problem. 

The state government said 
that the talks between Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian 
Prune Minister, and President 
Jayewardene of Sri 1 *nka 
during the South Asian 
Association for Regional Co- 
operation (Same) meeting in 
Bangalore centred on the 
devolution of power. 

The Sri Lanka Government 
is said to have agreed to merge 
parts of the Eastern Province 


-with the Tamil-majority Nor- 
thern Province to make it a 
single -Tamil unit. But leaders 
of the liberation Tigers of 
Tamil Eelam, which controls 
the north, wants the merger of 
the entire Eastern Province 
with the Northern. 

• BANGALORE; The Sri 
l-ankan Foreign Minister, Mr 
Shah ui Hameed, and the In- 
dian Minister of State for 
ExternaL Affairs, Mr Natwar 
Singh, yesterday resumed 
their efforts to end the island's 
ethnic war after Tamil sepa- 
ratist guerrillas rejected pro- 
posals put forward in three 
days of peace talks. 



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Rabin flies 
to soothe 
the Finns 

FromOIli Kfvinen 
Helsinki 

The Israeli Defence Min- 
ister, Mr Yitzhak Rabin, ar- 
rived here yesterday for a 24- 
boor visit to soothe relations 
between his country and 
Finland. 

He met President Korvisto 
of Finland soon after his 
arrival although the visit is 
theoretically private. He will 
also have discussions with his 
Finnish counterpart, Mr Veik- 
ko Pihlajamfiki. 

Yesterday’s talks dealt with 
bilateral matters and the pos- 
ition of Unifil troops in south 
Lebanon. Mr Rabin repeated 
that Israel does not want to 
strengthen the role of Unifil 
near its northern border. 

Last month UnifiTs Finnis h 
commander. Major General 
Gustav Haegglund, challeng- 
ed Israel to allow Unifil to 
prove its capability in the 
Israeli “security zone” in 
south Lebanon, but Israel 
refused. The security zone is 
held by the Israeli-controlled 
“South Lebanon Army” 


Papal tour 
to enhance 
link with 
Muslims 

From Michael Haralyn 

Dhaka 

The Pope is due to arrive in 
Bangladesh early today to a 
finny of white and 
papal flags, a 2I-»m sal*®® 
from the newly rivro an Go*; 
enunent, and * renewed 
opportunity to press for ctow 
ivtodoiis between Cathol i cs 
and Mnslbns. 

Only a tiny P«Pori»“ T 

031 per cent -of Bangladesh 

is Christian, bat even a tea? 
part of 100 mOBon is a lot of 

cmmtry’s 180.000 Ro- 
man Catholics have in the past 
been regarded as ^fore igners , 
and as such have cultivated a 
ghetto m entality - But since the 
1971 war of independence, 
when at least three priests 
were martyred by the Paki- 
stanis, they have been aWeto 
develop closer relations with 

the overwhelming (85 per cent) 

Muslim majority- 
In Khulna diocese in the 


example, joint prayer 

meetings with Christians and 
Muslims are held regularly. A 
Muslim hereditary holy man 
helps to lead the worship. 
Both >«!»■» and Hinduism are 
taught at the National Catbo- 
fcS«5iarj in Dhaka. 

The Pope’s atfitmfe to Mus- 
lims was expounded in Casa- 
blanca last year, when be 
declared: “Christians and 
Mnsfims, we have badly mis- 
understood each other, and 
sometimes we have opposed 
and even exhausted eac h oth er 
in pntonfcg and in wars. 1 
believe that today God invites 
ns to chang e oar oM ways.” 

Nevertheless, Christians in 
Bangladesh have to be carefhl 
not til give offence. 

According to Father Jyoti 
Gomes, hesi of the Christian 
Co mmuni c ation Centre in the 
old town of Dhaka, Christians 
are now allowed to preach and 
propagate their faiti but he 
added wryly: “I don’t know 
what will happen when 
Bangladesh becomes an Is- 
teak repnbUc’’. 

The Pope arrives in the 
middle of the week-long cele- 
brations marking the Prophet 
Mohammad's birthday, and so 
has been steered delicately 
away from the densely popu- 
lated city centre, where local 
mullahs will be holding prayer 
meetings and where a local 
dally, InqUab (Islamic Revolu- 
tion) owned by the central 
Government’s Minister for 
Religions Affairs, has already 
drawn public attention to the 
presence of 110 
missionaries in the cotmtry. 

When the Pope celebrates 
Mass hi this fourth Mnsfim 
country he has visited, it will 
not be in the national stadinm 
m the city centre bat in the 
Army stadinm safely inside 
the military area. . 

The Church m Bangladesh 
had kept a low profile daring 
the martial law regime just 
ended. U “did not say anything 
in public," said one Church 
leader, though it did set Hp a 
Justice and Peace Commis- 
sioa and, just recently, a 
n ati o nal body on hnm«n 


Jerusalem 
concern 
for Jews 
in Iran 

From Ijui Munxy 

Jerusalem 

There is mounting public 
concern in Israel over the fete 
of upto 30,000 Jews still living 
in Iran in the wake of reports 
from refugee sources in Vi- 
enna that they are suffering 
increasing persecution. 

When Ayatollah Khomeini 
came to power in 1979 there 
were an estimated 80,000 Jews 
in Iran. Many appear to have 
left shortly afterwards, fearing 
that they would be victimized 
in the new Islamic republic. Of 
those who left some 15,000 
came to IsraeL 

Over the past three years the 
numbers leaving Iran appear 
to have shrank as new rates 
and regulations have marie it 
more difficult and expensive 
to leave. Many of those 
remaining are understood to 
be old and frightened by the 
idea of leaving their homes, 
despite the persecution. 

The Israeli Government, 
which keeps a close eye on 
communities in the diaspora, 
has been doing its best in 
public to urge Jews to leave, 
and in private has been seek- 
ing ways to bring them out. 

Figures were unobtainable 
from official sources here 
yesterday, but some reports 
suggest that there has been a 
surge of up to 100 refugees a 
week leaving recently, all with 
tales of torture and hardship. 

Most are understood to 
have gone on to the United 
States, and virtually all are 
keeping quiet about exactly 
bow they managed to leave 
Iran. 

Some appear to have 
bought their way to freedom; 
others have made a dangerous 
crossing by land into neigh- 
bouring countries. 

It has been rumoured here 
♦bat Israel agreed to act as the 
carrier for American arms 
delivered to Iran in order to 
obtain permission for Jews to 
leave the country. 

There has been no comment 
on these rumours or on 
suggestions that another se- 
cret wholesale evacuation of 
the Iranian Jewish commu- 
nity has been planned, similar 
to that which brought the 
Fabshas out of Ethiopia last 
year. 

One official said here yes- 
terday; “Israel tries to do 
things to help. It is really a 
matter of life and death.” 

• BAHRAIN: Salvage tugs 
fought to put out a fire on the 
Liberian-registered tanker 
Grown Hope yesterday after it 
was attacked by an Iranian 
gunboat in the southern Gulf. 
All 26 members of the crew 
were taken off without injury 
(Reuter reports): 

Regional shipping sources 
said that the 37,4394m vessel 
was hit by a missile in the 
engine room early yesterday 
morning while en route from 
Karachi to Kuwait 
The sources said four tugs 
had brought the blaze under 
control 


The Pontiff will spend only 
24 hours here before going on 
to Singapore, Fiji, New Zea- 
land, Australia and the 
Seychelles. 


DAVID ROBERTS RA 
THE HOLY LAND 
PRINTS IN ORIGINAL 
COLOUR 

Tbe Connoisseur GsUay 
14-15 Htttoa Arade 
LONDON SWiX 8JT 
TELEPHONE 81-245 6431 


TIMES GUERNSEY FISHERMAN’S SWEATER 


Free Hotels 

Q 03 As an alternative, when you 
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P revious offers for - Times 
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w j m ^ ie ^ s when America was known as the New 
o 4 *u ^ a with a reputation for its spirit of enterprise 

and the ability of its people to make a good deal 


. *. * 7T. 7 ^ulcu ucguuaang, me nanves nanny Knev 
wnat naa Jut them — and in the summer of 1626; probably the 
inost spectacular real estate coup in history took pla ce . 

. Governor Peter Minuit of the Dutch West India Company 
nad the job of buying Manhattan Island torn the Indians. 

After some haggling with Chief Manhasset, the price was 

agreed at 24 dollare* worth of kettles, axes and cloth. 

„ 24 WOuld not ^ one square foot of office space in 

uj j: 811 °® ce Wock in central Manhattan changes ; 

hands for around $80 million. Even allowing for inflation. Minuit 

got himself a real bargain. 


You would think that the Manhattan deal would r emain a 
one-off for ever After all, the Americans would surely never find 
anyone as naive as theindian chief again. i 

But less than two centuries later; they did — 
and this time the loser was Napoleon, Emperor 
of France and (in his early years, at least) 
a brilliant military tactician. ^ i 

In 1803, Napoleon had his mind on ^ 
European affairs (in particular; an invasion 
of Bri tain), so he decided to dispense with 
France’s American possessions. ftr 

He sold the entire Mississippi valley ft// 
an area of 828,000 square miles extending 
from Canada down to the Gulf of Mexico / 

and westwards to the Rockies, for just over i 
27 million dollars. 

Through this deal, known as the Louisiana 
purchase. President Thomas Jefferson doubled the 
size of the United States for only around 5 cents pea* ^^HAk 
acre. HA 

The judgement of the Emperor; on the other jHHil 

hand, never seemed to be quite the same again m jgg§j 


Publishers are notorious for turning down lucrative business 
deals. (For example; ‘Jonathan Livingston Seagull’ was rejected by 
eighteen, while twenty-two gave the thumbs-down to James Joyce's 
The Dubliners’.) 

However; in 2938, one publisher got it brilliantly right. 

On June 1st of that year; ‘Action Comics’ appeared, featuring 
a character by the name of Superman (and, by turns, Clark Kent). 

Tire character seemed to go down quite well, so the 
publisher offered to boy all rights to him from bis creators, 

Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel 

They needed money badly — so they settled for 
the sum of $130, or $65 each. 

Todajt of course. Superman is such big business 
that Marion Brando was able to command $3 millio n 
for his ten-minute role in the first Superman movie. 

If you had seen Shuster and when they realised! 

what they had done, you would believe a man can cay 


Just occasionally however; the seller does come 
out of a clever business deal cm top — as in this 
example of a man who sold an idea to a 
manufacturing company 

i The particular beauty of this (teal lies in the 
L fact that the idea was not one which he could put 
m into practice himself. 
w He simply approached a leading match 

' company and offered to tell them how they could 
[ save thousands of pounds fay means of one 
I change to their manufacturing procedures. The 

ft change would cost absolutely nothing to cany 

■ out — but he would require a substantial 

■ percentage of the savings in return for the idea. 

H Not surprisingly the match company 

H were more than a little suspicious, and turned 
^ft him down. After all, if this idea was so 

HI obvious to an outsider surely they could work 

it out for themselves. 




many astonishing business deals (both good and bad) — but 
perhaps the greatest of them all occurred in 1955. 

In that year, RCA Records paid Sam Phillips, the owner of a 
tiny Memphis recording company called Sun Records, the sum of 
$35,000 for the exclusive contract he had with an 
unconventional young singer with a grossly exaggerated hip 
actioa 

Phillips was happy with the deal at the time. After all, it 
seemed like a lot of money and in any case, the young man had 
only wandered into his studio one day to cut a record on spec as a 
present for his mother: 

But RCA knew what they were doing. In the years that 
followed, Elvis Presley went on to sell over a billion records — and 
is still selling today. 


In 1978, the American bicycle importer Sam Rubin bought a 
3-year-old racehorse for $25,000. 






tme. 


Napoleon did just manage to reach Moscow in his ill-fated 
invasion of 1812 — but it would seem that news of his poor 
American deal did not 

For; astonishingly the Russians went on to become the third 
victims of major land deals with America. 

On March 30th 186X the U.S. Secretary of State, William 
Seward, bought Alaska from Tsar Alexander H for a mere $7.2 
million — thereby acquiring another 586,000 square miles of 
territory for less than 2 cents per acre. 

The Tsar presumably thought that this remote, frozen and 
virtually uninhabited piece of land had nothing at all to commend 
it — and at first, the American people agreed with him, for Alaska 
was known as ‘Seward’s foUy* and ‘Seward’s ice box’ for years. 

In 1896, however; gold was struck at Klondike in the Yukon, 
and since then, over 750 million dollars’ worth has been mined. 

In 1968 , black gold was discovered — and an estimated 100 
billion tons of coal are also lying underground, just waiting to be 
dug up. 


wore irozen 

The frozen wastes of North America again proved to be a 
bargain basement in 1933. 

A young Greek entrepreneur; who had already made money 
importing tobacco into Argentina, had been trying to break into 
the shipping business for well over a yean 

At the time, there was a world slump in the trade. No one 
was making any money - but the young man realised that such a 
situation could not go on for ever and that if he could pick up 
some cheap second-hand vessels new he would be perfectly placed 
to make a killing when things did change- 

Eventually he found just the ships he had been looking for — . 
frozen solid into the ice-packed St Lawrence River in Canada. f§* 

They had been rusting there for two years, and were so foil 

of ice and snow that when he walked tin the upper 
deck of one of them, he disappeared into a 
snowdrift and ended up on the deck below 
Not surprising^ no one else wanted the 

vessels -least of all their owners, me 

Canadian National Steamship Company 

whovrerepiqjaredtol^tbemffor 

their scrap value of $50,000 each, even *4f^f§§gg|| 

though they had cost a total of _ 

$2 million to build ten yew 
Yet despite his scare m the 
snowdrift, the young Greek kept his 
wits about him and^ 
managed to determine 

& thawed. A* the 1hM« pressed and 
■ “ ESwrfworld war increased, so the world shqjpmg 

of the richest men in the world. 


They duly went through the whole factory with 
a fine tooth-comb — but found nothing. By this r i 

time, they were so intrigued by the man’s offer nj: 
that they went back to him and agreed that if he Y 
could save them money he could have the cut he \ 
wanted. ( 

"Just put one striking surface on each ; 

matchbox instead of two,” he advised them. "You’ll ^ 
cut the money you spend on abrasives by 50%T V 

They did — and they did. And over the next J 
few years, the man who sold them the idea made m 
a small fortune. 


Arthur Furguson went a stage further, 
however: He made money by selling things 
which weren’t even his in the first place. 4 Vw 

One morning in 1923, he spotted a 
rich American in Trafalgar Square and H|| 

had a brainwave. 

Introducing himself as the official H 

guide to the square, Furguson explained ^^^H ft 

all about Nelson’s Column, the lions and ^^^H j 

the fountains — and just happened to 
mention what a shame it was that Britain was 
having to sell them off to meet soaring debts. 

The American asked the price. "£6,000 
to the right buyer;” replied Furguson, adding 
that as guide, he had been entrusted with the mSF 
job of malting the sale. 

The American begged him to sell the square to him. At 
length, Furguson consented and went off to ‘agree the deal with 
v his superiors! On his return, he announced that Britain 
was prepared to accept a cheque on the spot 

The delighted tourist wrote one at once. 

Furguson gave him a receipt — and even the 
name and address of a firm who would 
dismantle the square ready for shipping 
— and promptly marched off to cash the 


R Later that summer, Furguson went on to 
sell BJg Ben for £1,000 and accepted a down 
yment of £2£0Q on Buckingham Palace. 

In 1925, he went to Washington D.G, where 
sased the White House to a cattle-rancher for 
its at $100,000 p.a. — with the first year 
in advance. 

type of business deal has a special name, of 
course: xraud. Furguson was eventually caught trying to 
sell the Statue of Liberty for another $100,000 and 
) was given five years in prison. 





J i There didn’t seem to be anything 
.j remarkable about John Henry at the 
! time, and his previous owner was 
J certainly satisfied with the amount, as 
he had bought the horse for only 
^ $1,100 as a yearling, 

jf j In 1980, however, John Henry suddenly 
J blossomed and won $925,000 in prize money, 
j? Then in 1981, he won the inaugural Arlington 
'J Million and became America's Horse of the Year. By 
3 the time he picked up the title for a second time in 1984, 
r he had won the Million again, the Santa Anita Handicap 
twice, the Jockey Gold Cup, the Bal] an tine's Scotch 
Classic and a staggering $6,59 1 ,860 — almost twice as 
much as any other horse in world racing history. 

Sam Rubin can have only one regret about his 
horse, and that is that he has no stud value at all. 
Unfortunately for him, John Henry is a gelding. 


jg^ 10. PC Tips. 

The example of John Henry proves that 
outstanding opportunities do still exist — and without 
doubt, the best deal in office computers at the 
moment is the Epson PC+. 

The PC+ is every bit as powerful as the 
industry standard computer, and just as 
^^^H| flexible. 

It will run all of the huge amour: 

Wagr software designed for IBM PCs (plus, of 

mg course, Epson's own famous Taxi system) and 
will fit happily into any existing IBM network. 

Wr However, it can run the software over 

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and peripherals. 

Furthermore, it is only three-quarters the size, is 
considerably easier to use and is absolutely packed with extra 
features. In fact, it has more built in as standard than any other 
PC on the market. 

As you would expect of an Epson, the PC+ is also 
exceptionally reliable. 

Yet for all this, it costs an astonishing 25% less than the 
industry standard. 

To find out more about this extraordinary deal, either, 
write to Epson (UJC) Limited, 

Freepost, Birmingham B37 5BR; 

call up Prestel *280#; or dial 100 W^BKSSSSBiS 
and ask for Freefone Epson. 

previous nine deals m that more 

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it — but that doesn’t mean you , 

should waste any time in taking 


In the unstable and unpredictable 
world of popular muse, there have been 


EPSON 












14 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


Tough questions in spy book case 

Sir Robert admits he misled court 


Under intense cross-exam- 
ination in the Peter Wright 
spy book case, the Secretary of 
the British Cabinet, Sir Robert 
Armstrong, admitted yes- 
terday that an answer which 
he gave during preliminary 
proceedings had been mis- 
leading. 

Sir Robert was given a 
torrid time in his first day in 
the witness box, in which he 
was testifying in support of the 
British Government's applica- 
tion for an injunction sup- 
pressing publication of Mr 
Wright's book. 

At the same time, the 
answers given by Britain's top 
civil servant to questions on 
legal issues drew from Mr 
Justice Powell, of the New 
South Wales Supreme Court, 
a remark that he was troubled 
that the British Government 
bad put up Sir Robert as its 
main witness when there were 
"matters on which (he) is 
quite iucapable of assisting". 
These questions, the Judge 
suggested, would be better 
answered by Sir Michael Ha- 
vers, the Attomey-GeneraL 

Sir Robert spent all day in 
the witness box under cross- 
examination by Mr Malcolm 
Turnbull, counsel for Mr 
Wright and for the 
Heinemann publishing com- 
pany in Australia. 

The thrust of his question- 
ing pointed to wbat he said 


were inconsistencies in the 
British Government’s de- 
cision to allow publication of 
books on the security service 
by Nigel West and Chapman 
Pinch cr, but to seek to block 
Mr Wright's memoires as a 
counter-espionage officer. 

In the process, Mr Turnbull 
put the following points to Sir 
Robert: 

• That in an answer filed 
earlier this year he had cal- 
culaiedly misled the court in 
suggesting that all secret ma- 
terial protected by the duty of 
confidentiality had been re- 
moved from the West book. A 
Matter of Trust, during nego- 
tiations between the Crown 
and the publishers. (Sir Robert 
replied that be had not in- 
tended to mislead, but ack- 
nowledged that be now 
believed it likely that the book 
did still contain such mater- 
ial.); 

• That Mrs Thatcher and 
MI5 had allowed the Pincher 
book, Their Trade is Treach- 
ery. to be published in order 
that its central theme — the 
disclosure that a major in- 
vestigation had been held into 
Soviet penetration of MIS — 
would be presented by "a 
journalist of known conser- 
vative views”, rather than by a 
left-winger. (Sir Robert re- 
plied: "That's a very ingenious 
conspiracy theory, and it's 
quite untrue.”): 

• That failure to question any 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

of three suspected sources for 
the Pincher book, which 
would have been "a basic step 
for any police constable”, was 
“a sorry commentary on your 
concern for protecting na- 
tional security*’. (Sir Robert 
replied: "I wish it had been 
done.”) 

Mr Turnbull also referred to 
what he termed the British 
side’s use of “weasel words” 
which he said were words 
without meaning, "like an egg 
which has had its content 
sucked out by a weasel”. At 
one stage be asked: "Were you 
selected for this job for viral 
you don't know?* 

At the beginning of cross- 
examination Sir Robert ag- 
reed that Mr Wright had asked 
the British Government to tdl 
him what in his 

manuscript were detrimental 
to national security. It was 
also agreed that much of the 
manuscript was in the public 
domain. 

There then followed this 
exchange: 

Mr Turn bull: “Why would 
publication be detrimental to 
national security?" 

Sir Robert “Our argument 
is that it would be a breach of 
the duty of confidentiality (of 
MIS personnel)." 

Mr Turnbull: “You would 
agree that not all the informa- 
tion in the book would, if 
published, damage national 
security?” 


Sir Robert “I would argue 
that publication by Mr 
Wright, even of material in the 
public domain, could cause 
damage.” 

Mr Turnbull: “All of itT 

Sir Robert “All of it could.” 

At this point Mr Justice 
Powell said he was “straining” 
to follow. 

Sir Robert “The general 
proposition is that all inform- 
ation coming from an inrirfpf _ 
may be helpful to hostile' 
intelligence or a terrorist 
organization.” 

Cross-examination then 
turned to the West book, A 
Matter of Trust, which Sir 
Robert agreed had contained 
structural information and 
organizational charts on M15 
which 1 m said could Hamagp 
the organization. 

Mr Turnbull asked whether 
it was not true that, despite 
omissions agreed by the 
publishers after an injunction, 
the book had still been pub- 
lished containing “extensive 
material which was obtained 
from members of the service 
in breach of their duty of 
confidentiality”. 

This question provoked an 
objection from Mr Theo 
Sim os, QC appearing for the 
British Government, who said 
that ifa reply had to be given it 
should be in camera. 

Mr Justice Powell ruled 
against the objection. 


Sir Robert then replied: “I 
can’t say that it (the book) 
contains such information as a 
matter of fact. But I believe it 
is likely.” 

Mr Turnbull referred to Sir 
Robert's sworn answer on the 
s ame question in a paper 
which was filed during 
preliminary proceedings, call- 
ing it “contradictory” and 
“inadequate”, and how 
he reconciled the diffe rence 

Sir Robert answered: “I am 
sorry if I have misled die court 
in this respect” 

Mr Turnbull: “It was cal- 
culated to mislead.” 

Sr Robert “It was not 
intended. If it has m isfed I 
regret that” 

There followed a series of 
questions on how high troth 
figures in Sir Robert’s scale of 
values, at the end of which Mr 
Justice Powell said he had 
understood Sir Robert to say 
that “he wonkl not wish to tdl 
an untruth, and ha* not done 
so, but that he would not say 
he would be unwilling to 
mislead for file sake of na- 
tional security”. 

The case is due to switch 
today to the Court of Appeal, 
wuere the Government is to 
seek leave to appeal against an 
Order tO produce co nfidential 
documents relating to the 
West and Pincher books. 

Sir Robert's cross-examina- 
tion is scheduled to continue 
later in the day. 


Judge queries Cabinet Secretary’s role 


From Our Correspondent 
Sydney 

The sharpest of yesterday's 
pypiwngw came during the 
afternoon session in die small 
but crowded courtroom when 
Mr Turnbull was cross- 
examining Sir Robert about 
Interrogatory 150 — one of a 
series of written questions 
submitted in advance and to 
which the Cabinet Secretary 
had given a sworn, written 
answer. 

The question was: Was 
consideration given by the 
plaintiff (Sir Michael Havers, 
the Attorney-Genera!) to re- 
straining p ublicatio n of Chap- 
man Fincher’s book (Thar 
Trade is Treachery )? 

The answer was: The plain- 
tiff was advised that it had no 
basis to restrain the publica- 
tion of the book. 

Mr Turnbull put ft to Sir 
Robert that “this was false, 
and false to yonr knowledge”. 

Sir Robert replied: “I don't 
accept that”. 

Why, Mr Turnbull asked, 
had the Government re- 
strained the West book at 
first, hot not the Pincher 
book? 

Because, Sir Robert replied, 
it had known at least one of 
Mr West’s sources, an MI5 
officer in breach of duty of 
confidentiality, but had not 
immediately known Mr Pin- 
cher's. 

Had the Government not 
known that in late 1980 Mr 



Mr Justice Powell: 

6 Sir Robert (Armstrong, left) 
has been pnt np — I don't 
mean that offensively — as 
politically the person to 
answer questions on behalf of 
the Attorney General. I have 
been puzzled why the 
Attorney General did not 
answer them himself. . . . 
There are clearly things which 
Sir Robert has no personal 
knowledge of, yet he has been 
pnt up to answer questions. 9 


Pincher had come to Ti 
nia to see Mr Wright, Mr 
Turnbull asked. 

No, Sir Robert replied. 

Mr Tnmbull appeared in- 
credulous. He said that the 
Pincher book had revealed for 
the first time that an extensive 
investigation had been made 
into Soviet penetration of 
MI5. “The book was a bomb- 
shell was it not?” 

Sir Robert: “Yes.” 

Mr Turnbull: “Can you 
imagine anything more dam- 


Sir Robert: “Few things.” 
Mr Turnbull- “Did the 
Prime Minister express any 
view to the Attorney-General 
about Dnbtication?” 

Sr Robert: “I think she 


accepted the Attorney-Gene- 
ral's derision.” 

At this stage Mr Justice 
Powell interjected that he 
found it difficult to understand 
why there had been action to 
restrain the West book but not 
tbe Pincher book. 

Mr Turnbull went on to 
refer to what Ik termed Mr 
Fincher's “known right-wing 
views,” adding: “I put it to you 
that you and the Prime Min- 
ister and die security service 
allowed Pincher to write his 
book for the issue to come out 
from a right-wing journalist, 
rather than an imfy journalist 
of the left.” 

Sir Robert: “It’s a very 
ingenious conspiracy theory, 
and it’s quite untrue.” 


to ti™ rtip m e 

later, Mr Tnmbull said: “Yon 
did everything m your power to 
assist (toe book's) to 

toe news stands.” 

Sir Robert: “That’s untr u e 
and false.” 

It was during lengthy 
questioning on the Attmaej- 
GeneraTs derision not to take 
action on the Pincher book 
that Mr Justice Powell said: 
“Sr Robert has been put up — 
I don’t mean that offensively— 
as politically the person to 
answer questions on behalf of 
tiie Attorney-General. I have 
been puzzled why the Attor- 
ney-General did not answer 
them himself.” 

The Judge added: “One of 
toe things mat troables me is 


that there are matters on 
which Sir Robert is quite 
incapable of assisting (toe 
court).” 

Mr Theo Smn*, QC, inter- 
jected: “There's no basis for 
that view.” 

Mr Justice Powell “I'm not 
sure. There are dearly things 
which Sir Robert has no per- 
sonal knowledge of, yet he has 
been put np to answer 
questions.” 

The Judge went on to say 
that he thought Sir Robert 
may have signed answer s writ- 
ten by others. In such cases, 
when an answer was qneried 
by the person who had to sign 
it, there was a tendency to say: 
“Shut np you fool and sign.” 

When Mr Turnbull resumed 
cross-examination on Interro- 
gatory 156, Sir Robert said: 
“It’s above my sig na tur e, I 
accept responsibility for it” 

Mr Turnbull “Who wrote 
it?” 

Sr Robert “I don’t know 
who wrote it” 

At a later point, Mr 
Turnbull asked why it was 
that when an i nves ti g a tion had 
narrowed Mr Pitcher's some 
to one of three possible people, 
not oue of them had been 
approached. 

Sir Robert said: “I don’t 
think it occ ur red to me.” 

Mr Turnbull “It is a sorry 
commentary on your concern 
for protecting national sec- 
urity is it not?” 

Sir Robert “I wish it had 
been done.” 


Entertaining a Queen to tea 



Oram Sofia of Spain, left, taking tea with Mrs Nancy Beam in toe White House whSeon 
'arvisit to Washington for toe world premiere of Gian Carlo MenottTs opera Goya. 


Aust rian election 

Rivals blind voters 
with bland rhetoric 

Ftam Richard Bassett, Vienna 

With less than a week to go elected tbe nationalist Herr 
before fire Austrians go to the Jorg Haider as its leader. Dr 
polls, tbe leader of the opposi- Vranitzky has opened the way 

tion conservative People’s r — “ ** — ,; * * i * * * S — ” 

Party, Dr Alois Mock, has 
called for an ambitious 
privatization programme. 

He has demanded a “new 
be ginning with new owner- 
ship” for the country’s heavily 
subsidized state industries, 
but has refused to discuss any 
details. 

The lack of bite to his cam- 
paign is typified by his prede- 
liction for bland generaliza- 
tions, and the call for 
privatization was dressed in 
the non-committal rhetoric 
which is fire hal lmar k of 
consensus politics in Austria 
and which has indelibly 
stamped the election 
campaign. 

Neither the voters nor the 
Austrian press is credited with 
Ibe initiative to demand more 

rfetaiferi information, which is 
just as well as it seems unlikely 
that it would be forthcoming. 

Expressive of this paternal 
approach have been the 
advertising campaigns, which 
rely on c?tn rating the country 
with posters of the antago- 
nists. As polling day nears, the 
portraits become sharper and 
the slogans more b anal. 

Tbe most striking, perhaps, 
is a poster of the Socialist 
Chancellor, Dr Franz Vran- 


itzky, which reads subtly: “If 
you want Vranitzky, vote 
Vranitzky”. With 90 seats, he 
hopes to increase support and 
win an overall majority over 
the People’s Party. 

By terminating his coalition 
with the small right-wing Free- 
dom Party after the latter 


Dr Mode should he fell to win 
an absolute majority. 

Dr Mock, whose posters 
portray him top shirt button 
undone, skipping with chil- 
dren in what many regard as a 
misguided attempt to seem 
younger than his 52 years, has 
so far refused to countenance 
serving under Dr Vranitzky. 

With 81 seats, he has not 
ruled out a coalition with toe 
notorious new leader of the 
Freedom Party, who is believ- 
ed, despite his right-wing 
views on German national- 
ism, to be the most popular 
politician in toe country. His 
posters claim he is “a poli- 
tician of a new style”. Young, 
rich and suntanned, he re- 
sembles a ski instructor. 

Last weekend he riismicpBri 
a grand maiftinn as “bargain- 
ing between a fridge and its ice 
cubes”. 

Though Herr Haider’s Free- 
dom Party feces the threat of 
being ejected from the Liberal 
International on account of 
his right-wing views, he seems 
set to increase toe party’s 
support to more than the 12 
seats it now holds. 

The Greens, who at present 
are not represented in the 
Austrian Parliament, were 
tipped until a few months ago 
to capture at least four seats. 
But internal dissent between 
their leader, Frau Freda 
Meissner Blau, and her more 
left-wing supporters has 
thrown them into a confusion 
from which few observers 
imagine they will emerge by 
toe end of the week. 


Vamimi 
rejected 
as ‘spy’ 

Td Aviv (AP) — Mordechai 
Vanunu, toe technician ac- 
cused of revealing nuclear 
secrets to The Sunday Times, 
once bad a job application 
rejected by tbe top-secret Shin 
Bet security service on psy- 
chological grounds, the Ha- 
arets newspaper reported 
yesterday. 

Mr Vaminu's evaluation by 
the agency as unstable was 
ignored when he applied for a 
job at the Dimona nuclear 
reactor m toe Negev. 

Sweet music 

Melbourne (AFP) — Elton 
John, on tour with the Mel- 
bourne Symphony Orchestra 
has become toe orchestra's 
first honorary life member. 

Best Mends 

Keedysville, Maryland (AP) 
— Sean Ryan Keytos, aged 2, 
found aifterifig from exposure 
more than a mile from home 
in near-freezing weather, was 
saved by four family dogs 
huddling dose to keep him 
warm, police said. 

Death delayed 

Starke, Florida (Reuter) — 
Theodore Bundy, a sex killer 
aged 29, was granted a stay of 
execution by toe Circuit Court 
of Appeals in Atlanta hours 
before he was due to die in toe 
electric chair for killing a 12- 
year-old girl 

Bulgaria drier 

Vienna (Reuter) — Bulgaria 
is to turn saloons and taverns 
into coffee shops and snack- 
bars in a national drive against 
alcohol, the Communist Party 
daily, Rabotnichesko Delo, 
announced. 


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OM! 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 

THE ARTS 


persons 

I owe met as Arab a Petra 
who by day sold Coca Cola to 
blue-rinse Americans and at 
D^ht rererted to his position 
as sheikh of the local tribe. 
“The more money yoa have" 
be said, jangling the day's 
takings, “the more brain-cells 
yoa need to cope vrlcla it” 

| TELEVISION | 

As with money, so with 
television exposure. Ail too 
often the ordinary act of sitting 
before a camera results in a 
dangerous feedback. Victims 
start believing what people tell 
them hi supermarkets. Swell- 
ing into barrage bafioons of 
egotism, they drift loose from 
their moorings and become a 
menace to the whole firma- 
ment. Until, that is, some 
anonymous producer brings 
them down to earth and a 
world of obscurity salted, 
years Eater, with questions like 
“Weren’t yon 

Just as one was ask ing 
oneself Whatever Happened 
to Robert Robinson, the depi- 
lated quizmaster pops up in 
The Magic Rectangle (BBC2) 
with an enjoyable piece of 
“light anthropology” about 
who becomes a Television 
Personality and how they are 
effected by tfcfa dubious 
bouquet. 

As over-articulate as ever, 
and superbly served by the 
editor Alan Lygo, Robinson 
divided the TP world into 
those with character and those 
without Before the Magic 
Rectangle, yon gained an 
audience's attention by doing 
something it could not Now, 
in Macdonald Hobley’s words, 
“if yoa pick your nose on 
teleiisfon, and pick H often, 
yon will become a television 
personality”. As Jimmy Savile 
sagely explained, “just be- 
cause you are famous doesn't 
make you special ... it makes 
you lucky”. 

Judging from Robinson's 
interviews . many stars could 
not make this distinction. In so 
strongly denying they were 
TPs, some implied their iov ; 
pact came about through an 
extraordinary individuality. 
“They trust yon" day- : 
dreamed Esther Ranzten of ' 
the fans who wrote her letters. , 
Nose-pickers apart, those , 
with genuine character — or ■ 
"brain-cetis* 4 — were contemp- 6 
tuans of a medium requiring, 
them to express rather than 
suppress their egos. Recognize * 
j=S Us corrupting influence , , 
Marganita Lasti renounced 1 
the rectangle altogether: Gtb- I 
crs. less fortnnare, were re- 1 







Movingly comic truths 







; 

-■ 





Kind and gentle at heart: Michael Williams, Jodi Dench (photograph by Donald Cooper) 


CONCERT 

Quorum 
Purcell Room 


nounced by it. Sirron Dee 


There are moments in his new 
quartet. Three Nocturnes, 
when George Nicholson 
throws off a self-imposed 
gre\7ie*s and demonstrates his 
undoubted ability to write 
bold, musical gestures. They 
occur principally in the mid- 
dle nocturne, which is brisker, 
better varied and more abra- 
sive than the outer two. The 
clarinettist takes up the bass of 
the family with quirky effect, 
and the pianist has some 
telling virtuosic outbursts. 

I would have liked much 
more in this pungent vein and 
/ess of the earnest do urn ess 
surrounding it — where clari- 
net, violin and ceflo all 
seemed to be playing very 
slowly in the same, alto-tsh 
register, and piano supplying 
innocuous chords. Sulk all 
this clearly carried out the 
composer’s stated “scheme”: 
that an initially discursive 
atmosphere is disturbed by 
irrational elements, before re- 
suming with renewed serenity. 

in an harmonic idiom 
reminiscent of Heme, Tim 
Ewers’s quartet Quadrivhtm 
(receiving its London pre- 
miere} also sounded mdlif- 
| luoasbut undemonstrative for 
too long. However, the raa- 


becama “more farbiMe chan if leri ^ winded powerfully to- 


bed never been”, ttbat, ! 
wonder, will happen to Mr 
Robins mi? 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


wards the end, when the 
contrapuntal lines were pulled 
into . strong chordal pro- 
gressions over an insistent 
cstinaio. ' 

Richard Morrison 


There was a warm welcome 
for Bernard Hai tink on his 
first night as music director 
designate at Covent Garden: 
warmer, perhaps, than the 
orchestral playing quite mer- 
ited, but then this was one of 
those evenings when a calam- 
itous production makes every- 
one generous to the musical 
side of the proceedings. 

Given Yuri Lyubimov’s 
strong feeling for Slavonic 
Angst (there must be a Rus- 
sian word we could borrow) 
and his ability to lake over a 
theatre completely, one had 
hoped for much more from 
this Jenufa, but it soon be- 
came clear that a potentially 
vivid staging was going to be 
killed by excess. The overture 
Jealousy, returned to the score 
as in the recent recording and 
WNO production, is the occa- 
sion for an entire expressionist 
mime in itself and the bare 
stage is backed by a row of fog- 
jets that are over-used within 
the first few minutes. 

And so it goes on. A balletic 
sprinkling of red leaves is fair 
enough, if hardly original, to 
set the first act in autumn, but 
you really cannot have the 
same lovely people coming 
back in white to scatter snow 
at the start of the second act, 
and then returning again with 
green confetti in their bags for 
the springtime finale. 

The revolving doors at each 
side of the stage, too, are made 
to work much too hard. They 
are highly effective at just one 
moment, where Laca slashes 
Jen life's face and they are set 
spinning with the odd red 
square stuck on their white 
sides. But they offer only the 
crudest son of symbolism 
when they are turned to show 


| OPERA 

Jenufa 
Co vent Garden 

black at any mention of death. 
Then again, even supposing 
anything could be gained by 
showing the KosielmCka put- 
ting the baby into the icy river, 
the gesture is not exactly 
strengthened when it is mir- 
rored by six bare-chested 
young men flinging their shins 
to the ground. 

This brutal, bathetic am- 
plification of the obvious is all 
too characteristic of the 
production, but reaches its 
deadening dimax at the end of 
the second act, when Lyu- 
bimov throws in all his tricks: 
flapping doors, crude jolts of 
lighting, powerfully outlined 
crosses. The third act takes the 
religious motif even farther, 
though still without offering 
any explanation for its pres- 
ence in an opera that is as little 
Christian as JanaCek’s Glago- 
litic Mass. 

But saddest is the fact that 
within the flailing extrapola- 
tions and exaggerations there 
are some excellent ideas about 
how to match the sharply, 
featured motits and the rep- 
etitions of Janacek's vocal 
writing with equivalents in 
terms of movement. And, 
when it is not in wild commo- 
tion. Paul Hernon's set is an 
aptly severe background for 
the kind of telling, compelling 
acting that is struggling to 
emerge. 

The two characters who 
remain strong are Eva Ran- 
dom's Kostelnitka and Philip 


Whatever your mistrust of 
male feminism, Keith Water- 
house has done us all a good 
turn by revealing the secret life 
of Mrs Charles Pooler. 

From Mrs Pooler's Diary 
and The Collected Letters of a 
Nobody it emerges that, un- 
known to Charles, Carrie 
hated moving into Brickfield 
Terrace, regarded her hus- 
band's boss as something less 
than God and schemed to 
escape from “The Laurels" 
back to her beloved Peckham. 

To get the foil flavour of the 
drama you need to read the 
Waterhouse archive alongside 
Charles's unsuspecting entries 
in the original Diary of a 
Nobody. This is a tiresome 
process; and Mr Waterhouse 
has now rendered it un- 
necessary by conflating Car- 
rie's and Charles's diaries into 
the best comedy to reach the 
West End this year. 

One thing it proves is that 
Carrie's diary is no mere piece 
of artful pastiche. Side by side, 
there is no telling Waterhouse 
and Grossmith apart — either 
in faultless middle-class 

Langridge's Laca. Miss Ran- 
dov& uses her searing but 
never ugly tone to suggest a 
woman of intense passion, 
acting from disturbed emo- 
tional involvement and not at 
all from embittermeni or a 
sense of moral rectitude. She 
cuts through the nonsense of 
the production without effort. 
So does Mr Langndge. with 
the fine beauty of his singing 
and his modulation from fran- 
tic impotence and frustration 
(his violence at the end of the 
first act is the explosion of a 
latent frenzy) to conjugal 
relaxation. 

Ashley Putnam's Jen life is 
not on this leveL In her acting 
she offers a carefully con- 
trolled display of the role's 
melodramatic range of emo- 
tion, but her tone is strained 
when she puts pressure on her 
voice, and so variety of vocal 
nuance is missing. Neil 
Rosenshein makes a dim im- 
pression as Steva. However, 
some of the smaller roles are 
excellently lively, notably 
Linda Kitchen's Jano and 
Claire Powell's Karolka. 

The orchestra, as I have 
suggested, have some prob- 
lems with JanaCek's rhythms 
and with his more strenuous 
writing, though I cannot think 
why so many woodwind solos 
have to be quite colourless. It 
is also very extraordinary that 
the Royal Opera were not able 
to use Sir Charles Mackerras's 
edition of Janacek's original 
scoring but have to play the 
Kovarovic version. 

The final indignity of the 
evening, the grotesque inno- 
vation of "surmJes" demands 
lengthier consideration at a 
later date. 


The versatile Bryan Fcrbes (right) achieves yet another ambition 
when Killing Jessica, the first “whodunnit” he has ever directed for 
the stage, opens at the Savoy tonight: interview by Simon Banner 

Writing a new chapter 


S ince J94S, when Bran 
Forbes emerged, so to 
speck, from The Small 
Back Room, the some- 
what gloomy film in 
which he made his screen 


debut. he has proved himself between 


EMI. where he was head of 
production for three years. 
Forbes was also responsible 
for such well-liked and well- 
remembered films as The 
Runway Children, The Go- 


to be the British cinema’s pre- 
eminent all-rounder. As an 
actor he did seem to spend the 
first half of the 1950s mainly 
incarcerated in. or escaping 
from, assorted PoW camps. 
But by the end of the decade, 
having gained an Academy 
Award nomination for his 
script for The Angry Silence* 
hi- was as much in demand as 
a writer as for his abilities as 
an actor. He went on io write 
7$ screenplays, and to direct 
and produce as well, while at 




Moon. 


The Raging 


By that reckoning, to which 
should lie added two recently 
written and internationally 
besi-sd:ing novels, the 59- 
year-old Forbes must have few 
ambitions left unfulfilled. But 


he achieves vei one more curtain at the Savoy tonight? 
tonight at the Savoy Theatre “Oh, I hope not", the 
with the opening of Killing director says. “But why would 
Jessica. “Of course. I've di- you think that anyway? Just 


something I’ve always wanted 
to do.” 

Whether audiences will 
share Forbes's enthusiam for 
the project is hard to say, 
though perhaps it is easier to 
predict that the critics will not 
The critics in Killing Jessica, 
itself set in the world of the 
theatre, leave the first night of 
the ill-fazed heroine's latest 
and last play “looking like 
Himmler just after he'd taken 
a cyanide tablet”. So can we 
expea such feces after the 
curtain at the Savoy tonight? 

“Ob, I hope not", the 



d unnits, so I think that it’s by 
the standards of other such 
plays that Killing Jessica 
should be judged. Td say it 


Paul Griffiths 


Whatever Jessica's fete 
might be, however, Forbes’s 
appears more certain. This 
foray into the theatre repre- 
sents his first real break from 
writing for two years, and at a 
time when he has found 
world-wide audiences with 
such novels as The Rewrite 
Man and The Endless Game. 
“In my own estimation", he 
says. “I’ve always been a 
writer. It was journalism, 
short stories and novels that 
led me to screen writing, and 
screenwriting which led me to 
directing, though basically 
I’ve always been driven by 
necessity - the necessity to 
earn my living. When the film 
offers haven't come along", he 
adds (and somewhat implau- 
sibly for someone who was 
reputedly earning as much as 
$1 00,000 a script 20 years 


rected plays in the theatre 
before", he explains, “but 
never a whodunnit, though it’s 


because it’s not Ibsen or 
something? There are a lot of 
people who enjoy wbo- 


O ffers do still come 
in, but not for the 
sort of work he 
wants to do. “1 turn 
down a lot of 
films", the man Fleet Street 
once christened “Mr Clean" 
says, “because they revolt me 
with their violence.” The 
films he has made during the 
last few years. International 
Velvet being one example, 
have not found much favour 
at the box-office. Such soft- 
focus essays in nostalgia and 
romance as Jessie, however, 
an oft-repeated film he made 
for the BBC and which starred 
his wife, Nanette Newman, sit 
happily enough on the small 
screen, and it is in that 
medium that his future efforts 
are likely to be concentrated. 

“J have several projects 
under way", he explains, “one 
of them a film about Scott 
Fitzgerald, but I think they 
will probably all end up on 
television rather than in the 
cinema. I like the editorial 
control you get on television, 
though books an? best. There’s 
only one signature on a novel 
after all. There are very many 
times when I've gone to the 
first night of a film I've 
directed and I've hardly rec- 
ognized il and now it seems as 
usome of the black and white 
films I made have a high 
chance of being coloured, 
which I think is obscene. It's 
all sending me back to my 
desk. I think, and I would love 
to die having written one 
really great novel." 


Spring 1987 


was a very dever piece of *Qh T ve 10 go back to 
entertainment easily as good ™mg in order to pay the gas 
as The Mousetrap , for ex- bills, and vice versa." 

ail “And for me as a director it j“J“ 

turned out to be a vety £ 
complicated play to put on. 1 M “J* 

There were problems of stag- IS? to a d ^5- 

rag and performance which -7^ *™ * 1 % 
have presented a considerable SfVSSf" 

challenge, though I'm pleased once fastened Mr Clean 
with the solutions I’ve come because .they revolt me 

up with. Not that the task is 

over yet anyway, because in r he has made during the 
the theatre the directors job few years. International 

goes on and on. I have to make If'™ . one 

sure that people who come bave not found much favour 

along after we've run a month ? l *be bo*-oftke. Such soft- 

are nil! getting their money's focus «•“** ™ 

worth. And the same", be *«“* “f™- i owev *l 


bmm 

mm 


Now hocking- % 


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J E-tfsfc W-TM* Cr* -* if • ' ** 

•V . Art! * 5 •* 

a I fe slahs tcrto? SaBttelia.l gftg* “-•**•* 


flexible schemes 
and big saving for 
Tosca* 

Faust 

Akfmaten 

Simon Beccanegra" 
DonSknamn 
The Stone Guest* 
Orpheus in the 
Underworld 
Lady Macbeth of 
Mtsensk* 

Carmen 

*newpr« ta cfiuB 

Phone 

01-8362699 

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| THEATRE 

Mr and Mrs 

Nobody 

Garrick 


phrasing, encytopedic know- 
ledge of the brand names of 
the 1880s or ability to build 
marvellous chains of farcical 
incident from domestic ban- 
alities. 

The other discovery is that, 
theatrically speaking, Carrie is 
more than a match for 
Charles. With his pipe, his 
snug job in the City and his 
case of Lockanbar whisky, he 
is a contented being. Came is 
not. Besides resenting the 
cloud of railway smoke in her 
parlour, she has romantic 
yearnings for a gentlemanly 
stationer, and insistent 
dreams of a better life in a 
house with bow-windows run 
in foil accordance with Lady 
Canmell's Vade Mecum for 
the Bijou Household. 

Above all her desires fasten 


on acquiring a “Wenbam 
Lake" ice-safe; which, alas, is 
all she does get in the end. 

From that, you might ex- 
pea a comedy at ihe expense 
of lower-middle-class aspira- 
tion. Neither in Waterhouse's 
text nor in Ned Shemn's 
beautifully judged production 
is there the least trace of a 
sneer. Carrie and Charles are 
creatures of their time and 
place. They are not vulgar, 
and if any judgement comes 
across it is that they are gentler 
and kinder than their modern 
equivalents. 

Michael Williams’s Charles, 
pipe immovably clenched in 
his teeth, generally appears 
from Carrie's viewpoint as a 
dear old thing who can be 
relied on always to wind up at 
the end of the queue. He is 
always popping in with revela- 
tions that she has already 
made, and exploding into 
paroxysms of laughter at puns 
that leave her stone- faced. As 
Mr Williams also has to stand 
in for Lupin, Mr Perkupp, and 
the local tradesmen (merci- 
fully he has been spared the 


impersonation of the Hoi-, 
loway Comedians), his perfor- 
mance is something less than, 
that of an equal partner. 

ft is Carrie's evening, and* 
Judi Dench presents her in 
masterly detail: switching ; 
from endearments to a brisk, 
demand for a new dress;-; 
studying Lupin's intended: 
through narrowed eyes ("her; 
hair, I fancy, is no stranger la- 
the automatic curler"); return-' 
ing sadly from being snubbed 
by the stationer to the cheering: . 
discovering that Charlie has - 
bought her a present — which,.', 
alas, turns out to be the 
invariable bangle. C 

With its plangent parlour' 
song-book en tracts, a de- 
liciously funny mute servant' 
from Penny Ryder, and the;’ 
Royston Express clattering be-'._ 
hind the windows of Julia;.' 
Trevelyan Oman's cluttered 
seu the production makes'.' 
stylish fon of the period. But,; 
underlying everything else, it’ 
is a truthful portrait of 
marriage. 

Irving Wardle : 


Struggling to turn 
the clock back 


j JAZZ | 

Miles Davis 

Wembley Centre 

The final act was like some 
ghastly parody of a Doran 
Doran concert MOes Davis 
and his musicians slid away, 
leaving their synthesizers war- 
bling sonic geometry on the 
dramatically spotlit stage. The 
audience, largely raised on the 
behaviour patterns of rock, 
recognixed this for what it was: 
the classic invitation to de- 
mand an encore. When Davis 
returned, he had changed from 
a glittering bat-winged black 
and silver jacket into a huge 
white blonson encrusted with 
gold sequins; as an aesthetic 
statement, it seemed as signifi- 
cant as anything that had gone 
before. 

Von have to admire the 
spirit that drives Davis, who 
turned 60 this year, to renew 
himself at the fountain of 
youth. Those old-timers who 
believe his current work to be 
shallow and undignified most 
at least recognize that what- 
ever motivates him to take a 


role as a pimp in Miami Vice, 
to boast of his friendship with 
the pop star Prince and to 
appear on stage dressed like 
an accident in Krystle Car- 
rington's dressing-room is the 
very same urge that also 
impelled him towards his 
greatest work. 

Davis and his seven-man 
band performed for two and a 
half hours on Monday night: 
an impressive feat for a man of 
his medical record, afrhongh 
be spent a fair proportion of 
the time parked silently in 
front of the drum rostrum, the 
back of his head radiating that 
old simmering impatience. 
When he did pnt his red- 
lacquered trumpet to his lips, 
he showed that his playing has 
regained power and mobility in 
the years since his faltering 
return from retirement. 

The repertoire was drawn 
almost exclusively from his 
last two albums, two syn- 
thesizer-players carefully re- 
producing the recorded set- 
tings. Dans responded to the 
faster tunes with brusque fan- 
fares that were like having 
lemon juke squirted in your 
eyes, although on “Portia", a 
hovering ballad, “Star Peo- 
ple”, a slow blues, and the 



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It is no wonder that Suzanne 
Vega’s enrolment at the New 
York School for Performing 
Arts (the institution made 
notorious by the television 
series Fame) turned out to be 
a short-lived affeir. For her 
performance, and indeed her 
whole persona, was the antith- 
esis of the gaudy rough-and- 
tumble ethic that requires 
brash extrovert projection, at 
every turn. The Greenwich 
Village area of New York, to 
which she subsequently drif- 
ted, doubtless provided a 
much more suitable environ- 
ment with its coffee-houses 
populated by intense bohe- 
mians with half-finished nov- 
els and scuffed acoustic 
guitars under their arms. 

Yet even this stereotype was 
not entirely applicable to the 
music and personality of the 
waif-tike creature who stood 
on the grand stage of the 


| ROCK 

Suzanne Vega 
Albert Hall 


Albert Hall in a plain Sunday- 
best dress looking as if she was 
singing at an end-of-term 
event in the school assembly 
halL 

Like Joan Baez, Joani 
Mitchell and Rickie Lee Jones 
before her, Vega is essentially 
a folk -singer who has found 
herself embraced by a rock 
audience, and she dem- 
onstrated with “Left of 
Centre” and “Luca" that she 
was not about to bite the band 
that feeds her, as her four- 
piece band made a passable 
representation of the passe 
pop-rock sound favoured by 


Miles Davis: radiating the 
old simmering impatience 

moody “Tutu” he hinted that 
be can stiff, if pressed, con- 
struct elegant and logical 
variations. 

The fit man of 1986 cer- 
tainly never approached the 
emotional impact of the 1982 
palsied waif. Surely , though, it 
can only have been the in- 
terminable saxophone and 
guitar solos, respectively the 
work of Bob Berg and Garth 
ebber. that made two and a 
half hours of Miles Davis — 
once the embodiment of less- 
is-more as a way of life — seem 
like 90 minutes too maav. 

Richard Williams 

Fleetwood Mac during their 
Rumours period. 

More appealing were the 
intense, dreamy arpeggios of a 
new song, “Language”, and 
the delicately observed “The 
Queen and ’ the Soldier”, a 
twisted romantic allegory that 
reminded me of the "short- 
stories of Ursula Le Guin. The 
acoustic “Knight Moves” 
with its repeated refrain of- 
“Do you love me?” was a 
touch on the sentimental side, 
but an a cappel/a version of 
“Tom's Diner” had a more 
pleasingly vulnerable air as ' 
well as confirming the un- 
usually pure quality of her 
voice. Though she is not 
destined to be the next Bob 
Dylan there was a quiet 
authority to her performance, 
and she will be adored by her 
fans for many years to come. 

David Sinclair 



TONIGHT af 7.30 

then Nov 22,26 Dec 4 only 

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"immensely 
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Telegraph 


Cast 

Joan Rigby 
Russet! Smythe : 
Anthony Rolfs Johnson 
Richard Von Allan 
Kathryn Harries 
Alan Ople 
Anne-Marie Owens 
Cethryn Pope 

Conductor Lionel Friend 
Designer Russell Craig 
Lighting Matthew Richardson 


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Credit Cards 

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16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


SPECTRUM 




Young people in Glasgow Hillhead could 
settle the fate of Roy Jenkins at the next 
election. Toby Yoong and Roland Rudd 
went to see how the parties are wooing 
a segment of this huge new national force 


O n the Iasi Sunday of 
every month Roy 
Jenkins sits down in 
bis “pokey, wee 
flat" in Glasgow 
with three people 
young enough to be his grand- 
children. The atmosphere is 
friendly and informal, but the 
three people are not his grand- 
children and the 66-year-old MP 
does not spend his time reminisc- 
ing about his days as Home 
Secretary or Chancellor of the 
Exchequer. 

The three are Charlotte Beattie, 
aged IS. welfare officer on Glas- 
gow University's Student Repre- 
sentative Council: Claire Barclay, 
aged 20. its vice-president: and 
Stephen Gallagher. 19, chairman 
of the university's Social Demo- 
cratic Association. There is only 
one topic of conversation: how 
Jenkins is going to appeal to the 18- 
to 24-year-old voters in his Glas- 
gow Hillhead constituency. 

There are 7.300 such voters in 
Hillhead, a constituency with an 
electorate of 57.016. In percentage 
terms this is below the national 
average, but their number is 
greater than the gap between the 
third and first-placed candidates 
at the 1933 general election, when 
the Conservatives polled 9.678, 
Labour 13,692 and the Alliance 
14.856. 

Hence if Brian Cooklin, the 
current Conservative candidate, 
can win the youth vote he stands a 
chance of winning the seat, while 
the Labour candidate. George 
Galloway, needs to poll only some 
of them in order to threaten 


Jenkins. Clearly, then, in Hillhead 
the youth vote is crucial to the 
fortunes of the former SDP leader. 

In other ways, of course, 
Hillhead is a far from typical 
constituency. The distribution of 
votes between the candidates does 
not reflect the national average - 
it is one of only seven constit- 
uencies held by the SDP. More- 
over. it is a four-horse, rather than 
a three-horse, race, with the 
Scottish National Party in the field 
(though it has yet to choose a 
candidate). Hillhead also contains 
three times the national average of 
voters over 80 years old. 

However. Hillhead does incor- 
porate a high proportion of stu- 
dents. It bouses the great gothic 
buildings of Glasgow University, 
known locally as Gormenghast on 
GilmorehilL Of its 10,000 or so 
students, some 3,500 are on 
Billhead's electoral register. Stu- 
dents constitute about half of the 
IS to 24-year-olds in the constit- 
uency. which explains the 
monthly meetings in Jenkins's 
flat. 

Jenkins, the sitting MP, is not 
the only candidate to take 
Hillhcad’s young voters seriously. 
The constituency appears on the 


National Organisation of Labour 
Students' "hit list" of 32 seats in 
which the number of students is 
greater than the gap between the 
incumbent MP and the Labour 
candidate at the last election. It is 
also the seventh most winnable 
seat for Labour, in addition to the 
ones it holds already. 

The 32-year-old Galloway 
spends a lot of time at the left- 
dominated Queen Margaret 
Union, particularly in the “Biko 
Bar". He also tours Glasgow's 
pubs talking to unemployed 
school leavers in the constituency, 
something Jenkins prefers to do 
during his habitual "walkabouts". 

T he Conservative can- 
didate, Brian Cooklin, 
is the same age as 
Galloway. But, unlike 
the other two, be is a 
local man. He lives in 
the constituency and teaches at the 
local Stonelaw High School He 
claims that, through his teaching, 
he has been alerted to many of the 
problems facing young people in 
Glasgow. Drugs is one of them 
and he has proposed anti-drugs 
motions at the national party 
conference. In addition, he too has 



been building up his links with the 
university. He has approached 
Peter Conkey, until recently the 
head of the University Conser- 
vative Cub, and arranged to 
attend various debates. However, 
given his profession, be has much 
more to do with the university 
teaching staff than with their 
students. 

Despite Cooklin’s efforts the 
overwhelming consensus is that, 
when it comes to Hiilhead's 18 to 
24-year-o!d voters, it is a two- 
horse race. Of the 3,800 18 to 24- 
year-olds who are not at the 
university, most are either blue- 
collar Labour voters or un- 
employed, and among the 
undergraduates the Tories have 
been unpopular since cutting the 
student grant What supporters 
Cooklin did have in the university 
have been alienated by Norman 
Tebbit's disbandonment of the 
Federation of Conservative 
Students. 

The race for the youth vote in 
Hillhead, then, is between Jenkins 
and Galloway. It comes down to 
this: vrill these young Glaswegians 
opt for the respectable elder 
statesman or the ambitious - and 
as yet untried — younger man? 
“Glasgow cannot afford to be a 
retirement home for grand old 
politicians," Galloway told a stu- 
dent newspaper recently. Unfortu- 
nately for him, the persistent 
figure of Jenkins can still be seen 
tramping up and down Glasgow's 
hilly streets. The former SDP 
leader bears all the hallmarks of a 
man wbo regards himself as being 
a long way yet from retirement 



. :;v 


Jobs are a major 
issue with Hiilhead’s 
non-student young - 
bad news for both 
Tories and Alliance 

Steven Carroll left school at 16 
with no qualifications to speak 
of. “I worked for Trash Can (a 
refuse collection service in 
Hillhead) for three weeks but I 
got laid off. They said I wasn't 
working hard enough." Now, 
at 17, after six months on a 
Youth Training Scheme 
course, Carroll has been un- 
employed for two months. 

“I don't want to go on YTS. 
again. Not now it's two-year. 1 
just don't see the point. The 
money's the same as the dole." 
Steven, like most of his 
friends, will be voting Labour. 
He doesn't know who the 
candidate is, just as he doesn't 
know who his MP is. “I hear 
Labour is the best I’ve heard 
that they’ll be getting the jobs 
in." 

The main sonrees of 
employment in Hillhead are 
the Albion Motor Company, 
the Yarrow shipyard, and 
education. The first two take 
on barely any school-leavers, 
and the last requires qualifica- 
tions people like Steven sim- 
ply don't have. However, 
compared to the rest of Glas- 


gow, Hillhead is relatively 

affluent, and unemployment 

among young people is below 
the Glasgow average. 

It was lower stiD before the 
1983 boundary changes when 
the constituency was enlarged 
to include Partick and 
Anderton, mainly working- 
class districts. Consequently 
Roy Jenkins suffered a re- 
duced majority. Of the 3300 
18 to 24-year-olds wbo are not 
at the university, a majority 
will probably vote Labour. 


**I don't intend to rote at 
ail," says Ian McFariane. At 
22 he has got a Job with a firm 
of solicitors. On Sundays he 
coaches the Glasgow Lions 
American football team. He is 
the nearest Hfflhead is likely 
to come to a Yoppy — a natural 
Alliance voter. 

"I voted Labour at the last 
election, bat I really don't see 
the point anymore. I would 
rote Alliance hot they've got 
no manifesto. I don’t know 
what their policies are." 


Though the All iance fares 
badly among Hiilhead's non- 
student young voters, the 
Conservatives do even worse. 
One reason for this is die 
hostility towards the Anglo- 
Irish Agreement Thaw is a 
large Protestant community in 
the constituency which enjoys 
extensive links with Ulster. "I 
voted Conservative last time," 
says Iain Cameron, a 22-year- 
old postman, "but I'm not 
going to now they've signed 
the agreement" 


Student politics in 
Glasgow, Samantha 
Fox aside, is serious 
business. Who will 
win on the campus? 


In March George Galloway 
was asked by Liam Ewing, the 
President of Glasgow Univer- 
sity Labour Club, to ask 
Winnie Mandela if she would 
be labour’s candidate at the 
university's Rectorial elec- 
tions. Though they initially 
responded by putting np ac- 
tress Joanna Lumley, the 
university's Social Democrat- 
Association has now decided 
to support Mandela. Only the 
Conservative Club will oppose 
her. Their candidate b 
Samantha Fox. 

The Rectorial elections, like 
all student politics, have their 
whacky side. Bnt when it 
comes to the constituency 
elections, the students take 
themselves more seriously. “I 
met Roy Jenkins once in the 
House of Commons,” says 
Finlay Smith, a fifth year 
student. “He agreed to see me 
the next weekend but never 
showed np." Paul McCombs, a 
chemistry student, says he will- 
be voting Labour because 
Galloway is everything a good 
Scottish MP should be. “Un- 
like tiie great Roy Jenkins, 


Galloway is always here." 

Galloway already has dose 
links with the students. The 
University Labour Club b one 
of the largest in the coimtry. 
Ata recent meeting addressed 
by Galloway and Labour In- 
dustry spokesman John 
Smith, more than 150 Labour 
students attended, on usually 
large for such an event. 

Despite Galloway's efforts 
the SDP b far from unpopu- 
lar. The university's main 
political forum, the Students' 
Representative Council, is cur- 
rently in the hands of the 
Alliance. Moreover, Jenkins, 
as the MP, has an opportunity 
to hear student complaints 
about grants and accommoda- 
tion during his weekly surger- 
ies on campus. Cooklin, too, 
does his bit to woo the 
students. 

Though he stresses that the 
constituency's elderly popula- 
tion should not be ignored, he 
is sending a newsletter to all of 
the students registered in 
Hillhead. 

Perhaps the best indication 
of just how seriously the 
students take afi this are the 
efforts of each candidate's 
university supporters to get 
their friends to obtain “digs" 
in Hillhead. That way they get 
on to the electoral register in 
time for the next election. 
Consequently, the number of 
students in the constituency b 
increasing all the time. 






CANDIDATES 



Roy Jenkins, SDP/Liberal 
Affiance: Aged 66, former La- 
bow minister. Founder 
member of SOP. MP for 
Hiffitead since 1982. 

"Young people have done 
badly under this government, 
particularly in HHthead. One 
half is suffering from Govern- 
ment meanness to higher 
education, the other half from 
the devastation of un- 
employment Extortionate 
rents are a particular prob- 
lem for students." 

George Galloway, Labour: 
Aged 32, general secretary of 
War on Want tor the past 
three years. 

"Conservatives simply 
aren’t appealing to young peo- 
ple in Hillhead. Compared 
to Labour's Red Wedge it's pa- 
thetic. Roy Jenkins is obvi- 
ously a formidable figure. I 
would not be party to any 
snide observations about his 
career except to say that ft 
is over. I'd tie surprised if he 
fuQy understood the youna " 

Brian Cooklin, Conser- 
vative: Aged 32, only can- 
didate living permanently 
m KiUhead. Teaches at local 
achooL 

Tve witnessed first hand 
many of the problems asso- 
ciated with being young in 
Hillhead. I'm particularly con- 
cerned about drug addic- 
tion. I've participated in various 
university debates. I believe 
that Scottish universities 
should come under Scottish 
control." 




i 

J 



Aids: a world with no hiding place 


In New York, one person in 250 is a 
earner. In Germany, the number 
of cases doubles every eight months. 
How is the world fighting what may 
become the worst epidemic in history? 


Aids is threatening millions of 
lives in more than a hundred 
countries. But while inter- 
national experts call for emer- 
gency action on an 
unprecedented scale, many 
nations seem unwilling — or 
unable — to face up to what 
may already be the greatest 
threat to health in histoiy. 

The disease is now killing 
hundreds of men, women and 
children every day. In the US 
alone, where 1 5,000 have 
already died, the toll is ex- 
pected to reach almost 
180,000 by 1991. The prospect 
for Africa is even more grim. 
At least a million Aids deaths 
are predicted for the continent 
in the next few years. The 
disease is spreading rapidly in 
South America, Europe, the 
Far East and Australia. 


UNITED STATES 

Population 240 million 


The cost of combating Aids is 
expected to reach $2 billion 
(£ 1 .4 billion) a year by the end 
of the decade. Experts predict 
that by 1991 there will have 
been more than 270,000 cases, 
with 54,000 deaths in that year 
alone. By then there will be 
7,000 cases from heterosexual 
contact and more than 3,000 
children with Aids. Up to 1.5 
million people are now be- 
lieved to be infected. In New 
York, one person in 250 is a 
carrier. 

Treating Aids in the LfS 
costs from $50,000 (£35,000) 
to $ 1 50,000 per case. The US 
government has spent 
§277 million (£195 million) 
on Aids research this year, but 
that should be increased to 
$.1 billion by 1990. In addi- 


tion, the US goverment is 
being urged to contribute to- 
wards a further billion dollars 
a year required for education 
and public health measures. 


WEST GERMANY 

Population 60 mMon 


The West German govern- 
ment has spent DM 12 million 
(£4.2 million) on research into 
the Aids virus, and a further 
DM7 million (£2.4 million) 
on a public education cam- 
paign, which included 
delivering leaflets advising on 
“safe sex.” A total of 715 cases 
has been registered since 1982, 
with 337 deaths. More than 77 
per cent were homosexuals. 
The number of cases doubles 
every eight months. 


BELGIUM 

Population 9.86 ntiffion 


Authorities blame foreigners 
who come for treatment for 
boosting the country's cases to 
171. Of 122 non-residents 
being treated, 86 are from 
Zaire and six from Burundi 
Last year the government 
spent 90 million francs 
(£1.5 million) on Aids re- 
search and screening blood 
transfusions. But the budget 
has been cut to 32 million 
francs this year and there are 
no plans for a high-profile 
public health campaign. 


FRANCE 
Population 55 million 


A total of 1.050 cases, includ- 
ing 466 people who have died, 
have been recorded since 
1981 The disease is now 



Guyana 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Panama 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 


Bolivia 
Brazil 
ChSe 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
French Guiana 


CENTRAL AND 
SOUTH AMERICA 


■nnl 



Botswana 

Gambia 

South Africa!:' -V' . •> 

Burundi 

Ghana 

Tanzania I • ■ 

Cameroon 

Kenya 

Tunisia 

Central African 

Malawi 

Uganda HiF . 

Repub Be 

Nigeria 

Zaire llr ■ •/ • 

Congo 

Rwanda 

Zambia |P\ • • 

Gabon 

Senegal 

Zimbabwe 


rJBBRS£3 



M Austria 

Iceland 

Norway 

TwRey | 

** Belgium 

Ireland 

Portugal 

UK F 

Cyprus 

Italy 

Romania 

W Germany fe 

- Czechoslovakia 

Luxembourg 

Spain 

Yugoslavia I 

> Denmark 

Malta 

Sweden 

t&j 

i% Greece 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

is 


How the toll is mounting: shaded areas show how Aids has spread across the world, taking the virus on to every continent 


spreading at a rate of 15 new 
cases a week. Doctors expect 

3.000 to 5,000 new cases in the 
next two years and 8,000 to 

15.000 cases within four. 
Estimates of the number of 

carriers vary between 20,000 
and 200.000. While 85 per 
cent of Aids victims are men, 
the proportion of women is 
growing rapidly. 

Compulsory Aids screening 
for all blood-donors was in- 
troduced last year. The gov- 
ernment is lifting the ban on 
condom advertising. 


ITALY 

Population 57 million 


The government has resisted 
pressure to define Aids as an 
epidemic, despite 345 known 
cases and predictions of up to 
10.000 in the next five years. 
Plans for a low-key publicity 
campaign on sexual habits and 
for the setting up of a research 
“task force” are being 
considered. 


UNITED KINGDOM 

Population 58.4 million 

Britain bas had 548 Aids 
cases, including 278 deaths. At 
least 4,500 others are known 
carriers, but the estimated 
total of infected people is 
40.000. So far the government 
has spent more than £10 mil- 
lion on health resources, 
blood screening, research and 
publicity. Several millions 
more have been spent by 
regional health authorities. 
New measures will involve 
spending at least £10 million 
“and probably much more”. 
Government sources say. in 
the next 12 months. 


CENTRAL AFRICA 
Population about 250 mBtion 


Few of the more than 20 
countries affected gather or 
release figures either of casual- 
ties or project funding. All are 
chronically short of resources 
to fight the epidemic, Kenya, 


Tanzania and Uganda have 
launched public health cam- 
paigns. including blood 
screening. Others, such as 
Burundi, Congo, Rwanda, 
Zaire and Zambia are slowly 
following suit, prompted by 
the World Health 
Organization. 


SOUTH AFRICA 
P opulation 32 mfltion 

So far 43 cases have been 
recorded, including nine peo- 
ple from other African coun- 
tries and there have been 29 
deaths. All the South African 
cases are white males, most of 
them homosexuals. Blood do- 
nors have been screened since 
January and high-risk groups 
are encouraged to take blood 
tests. 


BRAZIL 

Population 125 miffion 


Worst-hit nation in South 
America with 841 known 
cases and 420 deaths, yriih 


8,000 cases predicted in the 
next few years. The commer- 
cial sale of blood is common, 
but there is no screening. 


AUSTRALIA 

Population 15.8 mHBon 

Aids education and research 
funding has been increased 
this year from A59.2 million 
(£4.1 million) to A$1 1 million 
(£5 million). There have been 
310 cases, including 126 
deaths, with LOGO cases pre- 
dicted by 1988 and 5,000 by 
1991. 


JAPAN 

Population 120 miUron 

Medical research on Aids has 
a budget of 900 million yen 
(£3.9 million). Japan has 21 
recorded cases, including 13 
deaths. AH cases have been 
either haemophiliacs (It) or 
homosexuals. 

Thomson Prentice 

Country reports compiled by 
correspondents of 77?e Times 


CONCISE CROSSWORD No. 1 1 10 


ACROSS 

1 Destructive force (8) 

5 Adverse criticism (4) 

9 Sympathetic relation- 
ship^) 

10 Rambler (5) 

21 Expand (5) 

12 School leave (5) 

13 Larix(5) 

15 Lurifcr(5) 

16 Globe (5) 

18 Wants (5) 

20 Strict vegetarian (5) 

21 Digress greatly (7) 

23 Tranquillity ex- 
ercises (4) 

24 Favourable (8) 

DOWN 

1 Admirable quality (6) 

2 Contrary (8) 

3 Individual self (3) 

4 Henry VUl’s sixth 
wife (9.4) 

6 Admire (4) 

7 German cherry 



brandy (6) 

8 Shoals (8) 

II Impressive (8) 
14 Lofty (8) 


15 Inspection (6) 
27 Nimbly (6) 

19 Very curious (4) 
22 Enemy (3) 


ACROSS: l Jmitar 5 Patchy 8 Eel 9 Possum 10 Aspire 11 Gala ■ 
M&gobeMi WVentaw WUnco 21 Airway 23 Se- 
qnm 24 Axe 25 Hymnal 26 Yeoman 

DOWN: 2 Agora 3 Unscathed 4 Removal 5 Plain 6 Top 7 Har- 
vest^ 13 Status quo 15 Amenity 16Curtsey 18 Royal 20 China 23 



Don’t miss the 
second of four 

pull-out supplements on the great British cars of 
the 'sixties. This week: MCE, Morris 1100 and Lotus 
Ban Sprint— original road tests and assessments of 
the cars as current classics. 





At your newsagent 7Sn 






4 










WEDNESDAY PAGE 


Fathers seem to be regarded by the abortion laws as breeding 
bulls that have no legal connection with their offspring ’ 


Like many women who have 
always warned children but can't 
have them, I lake a morbid 
interest in family issues. It is the 
curiosity of the parent manque. 

For example, I have spent the 
past few days puzzling over the 
Norwegian couple, Vivian 
Haandstad and Robert Hercz, 
whose story in the papers last 
weekend took up quite a bit of my 
Sunday^ 

Vivian and Robert, both 24- 
year-olds and from Oslo, wanted 
to get married and. like many a 
progressive young couple, thought 
they would have the baby first 
But three months into the preg- 
nancy. Vivian decided she didn't 
want to get married after all and 
told Robert she was having an 
abortion instead. "Whatever 
happens,” she told him, “I still 
care about you and we can see this 
out together,'* 

Robert’s reaction to this 
declaration was equally heartfelt 
"1 will look after you and the 
baby.” he told her. “Even if we 
part, I will take the baby and care 
for it All you have to do is go 
through the pregnancy and birth.” 

In spite . of her feelings for 


Robert, this idea did not appeal to 
Vivian. She ended the pregnancy 
This ought to have been the end of 
Jhe matter. Norwafan law, like 
BnUsb Uw, gives a father no rights 
in the disposition of his unborn 
child. But Robert decided to take 
the issue to the European Court of 
Human Rights. His challenge win 
be made on the grounds that the 
Court's Convention on Human 
Rights gives everyone the right to 
protect his family's lives. 

This vexing situation reminded 
me of a British case in 1978 which 
involved a married couple who 
had been trying to have a baby for 
IS months. Just when she finally 
feU pregnant, the husband was 
offered a well-paid job in the 
Sudan putting up scaffolding. It is ' 
hard to know what upset the wife 
more, the idea of her husband 
knocking about Khartoum or 
what she considered to be the 
rather meagre house-keeping 
allowance he fixed up for her. 
Whatever it was she decided, in 
the words of her solicitor, that 
**her nerves were shot” and 
booked herself a divorce and an 
abortion. 

Her husband went to court. “I 


feel that the baby is half mine,” be 
said. “All I am asking her to do is 
to have it painlessly delivered and 
then hand it over to me to be 
brought up in the bosom ofa huge, 
loving family;” Unfortunately for 
the husband, the Abortion Act of 
1967 gives no say to the lather in 
respect of the termination of a 
pregnancy. The wife had the 
abortion. 

Feelihgs run high on these 
matters, of course. Speaking 
personally, I don't much like the 
idea of abortion, although I 
wouldn’t recommend abolishing 
it There will always be foolish, 
frightened young gills getting preg- 
nant and looking for ways to get 
rid of the child. I don't like 
sending them off to back-room 
doctors in rubber aprons or to the 
quacks of the knitting needle 
brigade. On the other hand, I do 
think we should stop the fiction 
that the foetus is simply an 
extension of the mother, like a 
kidney or a tooth. A kidney 
remains a kidney, while a foetus, 
unless you brutally interfere with 
it, will become a living human 
being in less time than it takes a 
government to finish a fiscal year. 







And this foetus — this unborn 
child — has a father. 

Glynis Donovan of the 
Women’s Reproductive Rights 
information Service is unhappy 
about the attempts of fathers like 
Robert Hercz to prevent then- 
wives or girlfriends having an 
abortion. “If Robert succeeds in 


making abortion subject to the 
decisions of two people," she says, 
"it lakes away the woman's right 
over her own body again.” 

Of course, I do understand that 
there have been historical periods 
in which women were regarded as 
chattels and had no rights, but I 
think that in correcting this we 
have gone over the top. We seem 
to have entirely disregarded the 
emotional rights of men in these 
matters. Fathers have deep links 
with their unborn children. 

But once you deny the role of 
the father in creating a child, as we 
seem to have done, a vacuum 
arises and the state, the only entity 
that can fill that gap, rushes in. 
Now the state determines who 
may abort a child — and when — 
and while sometimes it is done for 
very understandable reasons like 
rape, physical danger, dire poverty 
or under-age pregnancy, the state 
has also decided it may be done 
for what seems to me rather trivia] 
reasons, tike ■ jeopardizing the 
mother’s career prospects or 
lumbering her with swollen 
ankles. 

Fathers seem to be regarded by 
the abortion laws as little more 


than breeding bulls that have no 
legal connection with their off- 
spring - except when it comes to 
support. Interestingly, the support 
question isn’t one to which 
women's rights groups give much 
heed, but I fear it is one we shall all 
have to lace if we want to see real 
equality. 

A father, after all, is liable for 
child support for up to 1 6 years. If 
a mother's mental trauma at the 
prospect of carrying a child for 
nine months is considered suf- 
ficient grounds for an abortion, 
surely a man's profound mental 
torture at financial responsibility 
for 16 years should be taken 
equally seriously? None of us, 1 
think, would want to see a man 
able to force a woman to have an 
abortion against her will, but if 
guarantees of equality between 
men and women are to be taken 
seriously, shouldn't the society 
that lets a woman kill her unborn 
child for her own convenience 
allow a man to opt out of support 
payments for his convenience? 

As I thought about the problem 
of Robert and Vivian fighting in 
Oslo over the life of their child I 
remembered King Solomon's 


solution when faced with two 
women each claiming to be the 
mother of the same child. Sol- 
omon, you may recall, offered to 
cut the child in half and give each 
woman her share. The first 
woman agreed, but the second 
begged him to spare the child, 
saying she would give up her claim 
to it. Solomon gave the baby to 
her, understanding that the real 
mother would give her infant the 
gift of life. 

1 can't help wondering to what 
slate this society has progressed 
when, under most circumstances, 
whenever the choice is between 
two natural parents — one wishing 
to keep, support and iove the 
unborn child and the other wish- 
ing to do away with it — our law 
awards the child to the latter. 
Heaven knows, I don't want to 
force any unwilling mother to 
spend years bringing up an un- 
wanted child but surely, when 
there is a parent happy to do this, 
the spirit of liberalism and regard 
for the individual should be on the 
side of life? 

Barbara Amiel 

© Tbnu Nowapapart lid IMS 


ni. High society 

and the 
hotel room 





Sydney Biddle Barrows will be 
known for the rest ofherlife as 
the Mayflower Madam. Her 
autobiography, published this 
week, tells of a blue blood 
descended directly from one 
of the pioneering families who 
• sailed to America on the 
Mayflower, who wished des- 
perately to become a blue 
stocking, and wound up in- 
stead - since her father re- 
fused to send her to college — 
in charge ofa highly successful 
New York call-girl service. 

She advertised in papers 
like the International Herald 
Tribune, drawing as her di- 
ems enough film actors, dip- 
lomats, corporation 
presidents, mhletes and soci- 
ety figures to have one police 
officer describe her little black 
book as Who’s Who. Those 
prominent characters un- 
doubtedly slept very badly 
when Barrows’s operation. 
Cachet, was exposed by her 
arrest in October 1984 on a 
- charge of “promoting 
* prostitution". But, to their 
great relief, she has chosen, 
both at her trial (where she 
was fined 53,000) and in her 
subsequent memoirs, to reveal 
the identity of none of them. 
"Just because I’ve been a 
naughty girl, it doesn't mean 
I'm not a lady," she smiles. 

The shock to America, how- 
ever, -was not that the cream of 
society was frequenting the 
bordello, a tradition as old as 
the profession itself, but that 
the woman behind it had such 
an impeccable pedigree. Syd- 
ney Barrows and hear family 
merited a mention in the 
Social Register, America's 
own Debrett. If that family are 
now appalled at the notoriety 
that surrounds them, Barrows 
feels that her father, at least, 
has only himself to blame. 
“He refused to send me to 
college, saying a pretty girl like 
me wouldn't need an educa- 


The girls were all 
hand-picked; the 
madam was blue- 
blooded; the case 
created a scandal. 
Josephine Fairley 
investigates 

tion as Fd be getting married 
soon enough, anyway. There 
was a definite element of Vp 
yours. Daddy” about what I 
did." . 

- Her brief experience 
answering the telephones for 
another New York service — 
“1 was unemployed atthe time 
and a friend said they needed 
help” — prompted Barrows to 
go into the business for her- 
self, determined that her es- 
cort service would be ft cat 
above the rest. Ironically, her 
own family background of- 
fered an insight into the kind 
of partner a wdJ-facded 
businessman would wish to 
spend the evening with; her 
arts,- many of whom are still 
friends - “I think of them as 
my babies, 1 became so fond of 
some of them" — were 
groomed with the finesse of a 
charm school Many were 
financing themselves through 
college or medical school, or 
had office jobs by day: ^just 
nice, ordinary girls who 
wanted some money”. 

“People often ask me if I 
think what the girls did was 
degrading,” said Barrows. “I 
reply, what’s so degrading 
about wearing an $800 suit, 
going over to the Waldorf 
Astoria, walking into a $600-a- 
night suite to meet an articu- 
late and successful man who 
orders up Dam Perignon and 


talks to you for two or three, 
hours? Yon go to bed with him 
and walk away with $1,000 in 
your handbag. Heavens, than 
are giris all over the world who 
do it for a hamburger and an 
evening at the movies - . .” 

A fine-boned, elegant 
woman of 34, she says: 
“Everyone says I must have 
made a fortune out of the 
agency but I really ended up 
with nothing. People think 
I’ve got it hidden under the 
mattress, and the Revenue are 
after me. Any money I make 
no w from the book goes to pay 
off lawyers* fees; -! owe them 
$300,000.” 

Barrows calls herself “very 
much a one-man girl Before! 
ran the business, 1 could never 
figure out why men used caH- 
girls. I had the same con- 
ventional idea as everyone 
else; that they wanted sex. 
What they really wanted was 
someone to talk to, someone 
who had time for them. 

“The kind of men who used 
Cachet were men who would 
come home, and all they’d 
hear about would be what 
little Johnny did in school or 
that the roof needed fixing. 
When they got a girl from me, 
it was a purely selfish experi- 
ence in that they wanted 
someone who was interested 
in them, who would also listen 
and talk to them.” 

It is said that there are two 
responses when you mention 
Barrows's name in Hhe Man- 
hattan society - guilty pallor 
or a supportive rallying cry. 
Her story has captured the 
nation's imagination; but, 
apart from being struck off the 
Social Register, there have ■ 
been few negative reper- 
cussions. 

“Most career women have 
been full of admiration," she 
says. “The ones who have 
disapproved are the women 
who aren't working, who gave 






. • . - -* y / 




Call me madam: bat Sydney Biddle Barrows refused to name the names of those who did 


up to get married and who are 
now terrified of losing their 
meal tickets. Yet they’re pre- 
cisely the ones whose hus- 
bands were calling me. But I 
can't imagine why they fed 
threatened; women have this 
bizarre fantasy that sex is so 
important to men they'd leave 
someone they love for it.” 

Despite her obvious ap- 
titude for running a business, 
she frittered her own income 
away “on $300 sweaters and 
$500 boots, many of which I 
never even wore, and the rest 
of which were stolen when the 
police raided the offices. 1 had 
all my winter clothes stored 


Once upon a floppy disc 


! am Jack Woolley, owner of 
Grey Gables country dub, and 
I have just been through a 
series of agonizing decisions 
about my dog. Captain. 
Should he be put on a diet? 

Now 1 am fretting about the 
New Year Honours List, and 
why i have never been in- 
cluded. Is it because: (a) they 

* think 1 am a peasant? (b) I 

* have not paid anything like 
enough? or (c) the Tories 
cannot be wooed with vulgar 
money? I stare into the green 
screen of my life, press button 
cand find that I have invited a 
local constituency chairman 
m dinner and become in- 
volved in a Hurrt ball. 

This is a computer game: 
one of the new type which 
have no dungeons or dragons 
?[ wtowed blips, bin a hefty 
jMWQ words of tea instead, 
jjsed, on a -popular book, 
Mosaic.- the software House, 
wought out an Adrian Mole 
game last year and have now 
hotaedl by .the BBC to 
produce the one 1 am playing, 
1 5f f5hBh Ws4o|tl7ie.4reAt , «. 
The nearest jhey haw been 





storage: 

^s saasaa 

.•PtHfitylMafoB 5«k & Notts/ 


able to get to a definition of it 
is “interactive soap” . 

I push another button, more 
or less at random, and find ajy 

Peggy .Archer sub-plot ruddy 
interrupted by a stem memo 
from the Controller of Radio 
Four (code name CR4) saying 
“You are not making my life 
easv. The British Veterinary 
Association is de mand i ng an 
apology. M your socks up. 
if seems that making the vet 
put the dog on a diet must 
have been a wrong decision. 
StilL I check my audience 
score and il is U P 10 ^ 

| *^1 ' have upped the audience 
hv another million Titian 
iTninutes, with a nude 
inanv in the swimming pooj 
! and 'the sacking of a drunten 

gardener called I am 

oromcied *o following the 
£~er of Etabtlii Archer. 9- 
,v-**weld femme fautle, the 
darter of Phi? and Jill of 
Brookfield Farm. 


Here the script-writers 
appear to be - going even 
further off the rails: every 
choice is more disastrous than 
the last, and an innocent 
sequence of button-pushing 
has involved me in a plot with 
complaints from NUPE about 
voluntary workers in hos- 
pitals, and another stem 
memo from CR4. 

I also seem to have got 
Elizabeth Archer engaged to 
Nigel Pargeter. Fortunately, 
this gets me another million 
listeners. 

It is a clever game, with 
more paths of possibility than 
I was able to exhaust in a 
morning. The most interesting 
thing is its rather nightmarish 
circular quality: hit a bad 
streak and you can't get out for 
hours, but go round in aretes 
being sacked and reinstated 
and scolded by CR4 end 
always ending up in dead-end 
plot situations where nothing 
happens except old Jethro 
saying “My eye!”. 

It conveys tin sense, of a 
script editor who has de- 
spaired of new ideas and is 
heading for breakdown or 
resignation. Which is funny, 
reallv. for William Smetourst. 
former editor of the "rear 
Archers, wrote the game just 
before he suddenly resigned 
and went to Crossroads. 

Life can be even stranger 
than computer games. 

Libby Pnrves 

© rtnu NtUMNn Ud 


From Wendy Taman, 
Co-Director, Kidscape. 
London W1 

Barbara A raid's article 
’’Teaching Children to 
Complain" (Wednesday Page, 
November 5) raised a mul- 
titude of issues arising from 
three progra mm es recently 
broadcast by die BBC. She 
drew attention to a part of the 
Nemroand programme which 


It showed Michele Elliott, a 
director of Kidscape, with a 
group of schoolchildren in- 
volved in one of the lessons 
contained in the Kidscape 
Primary Kit. 

This hit contains a com- 
prehensive prevention pro- 
gramme for teaching junior 
children ways to recognize and 
deal with a range of dangers 
including toe possibility of 
sexual assault Unfortunately, 
doe possibly to limitation of 
space in the article, the pur- 
pose of Kidscape was tmdear. 

The whole basis of the 
Kidscape approach is that 
children, their parents, teach- 
ers and other professionals are 
all involved in the process of 
prevention. This creates a 
network of trust and enables 
children to share concerns or 
problems with adults dose to 
them. 

This approach was devel- 
oped through a two-year pQot 
study involving over 4,000 
children, parents, teachers 
and others in Britain. Our 
study showed that children 
triO tell about aU kinds of 
problems and fears: about 
bring bullied, approached by 
strangers, or bring asked to 


there in garbage bags, and 
there must be some very well- 
dressed cops' wives walking 
around in New York.” 

Unbowed by either her trial 
or her tribulations, Barrows's 
enterprising spirit resulted in a 
Mayflower Defence Fund Ball 
at the fashionable Limelight 
Club in New York, and a will 
to address her administrative 
and marketing skills to a new 
career. 

In the curious way that 
notoriety can open doors in 
America, she has been asked 
to write a syndicated news- 
paper column, approached to 
host her own televsion chat 


A child’s 
last 
resort? 


TALKBACK 


keep “bad” secrets. The peo- 
ple children most often tell are 
their parents, although in 
some cases teachers or other 
trusted adults are also con- 
fided in. 

Children's safety is depen- 
dent upon responsible adults 
listening to, believing and 

helping children. The 
Kidkape approach, which we 
call “Good Sense Defence”, 
informs and enables children 
and those adults who care for 
them to work together to keep 
safe.The Kidscape programme 
does not mention Chfidfine, 
firstly because It was produced 
long before Chfldline was 
conceived, and secondly be- 
cause Mr emphasis lies in 
children telling someone they 
know and trust. However, for 
some children who have not 
yet had the opportunity of 
bring involved in the Kidscape 
programme or who may not be 
aware of who to tarn to, 
services IQte Chfldline can 
provide a necessary last resort. 

From John Hadjipateras. 
Lowndes Square. 

London SW1 

How sad it is to read Barbara. 
Amiri’s generally dismissive 


show and is discussing her 
own line of ready-to-wear 
clothes. “But what Td love to 
do, most of all, is to run a 
finishing school for corpora- 
tions, grooming executives. 
First impressions are so im- 
portant yet plenty of people in 
this country don’t even know 
how to sha ke hands properly,” 
she explains. “I think it’s 
unlikely, though,” she smiles. 
“How do you tell your boss 
you’ve just hired the May- 
flower Madam?” 

The Mayflower Madam by 
Sydney Biddle Barrows is 
published by MacDonald to- 
morrow at £9.99. 


article “Teaching Children To 
Complain” (Wednesday Page, 
November 5). 

The proposal to provide a 
facility for chfldren, with sepa- 
rate rooms linked by video to 
the courtroom, merits debate; 
there are doubtless arguments 
to be weighed op against the 
obvious benefit for the child 
who is spared the trauma of 
facing an assailant 

Barbara AnriePs description 
of it as “dangerous nonsense” 
betrays a lack of sensitivity 
which is matched only by the 
absence of objectivity in her 
article. 

Is there anything more 
destructive to the family, she 
asks, than having outsiders 
brought in willy-silly to solve 
matters where no laws are 
broken? j 

I think it is excellent to 
tea ch children to complain, I 
and I think Esther Rantzen’s ! 
Childline is a necessary evil, a 
last resort 

Chfldline is not the answer. 
Nor can Michele Elliott's 
programme or any other, no 
matter how well conceived, 
researched and presented, 
eradicate child sexual abase. 
But Barbara Amiel should not 
knock those who contribute 
positively to faring op to and 
offering solutions to toe prob- 
lem unless she can offer a 
more acceptable remedy. 

From Mrs Anne Shells. 

Wellow, nr Bath 

Barbara Amiri's article makes 
no positive statements at alL 
What would she do about child 
abuse? 


BRIEFLY 




..a 

Jr •' " i,; IjrStff ft** fj/ ** 

‘** -***'-■ r ..-.i- JSfifjyf *<>»■/***£ 
XiMkm"?/! f * «/* * * i . 


T Wf0 **»/'** 
wtft*** * 9 * ^#*4 


A round-up of news, 
views and information 


Computer 
crisis line 

As computers play an 

increasingl y important part in 

even toe smallest of offices, 
more and more women are 
bring asked to take on toe 
responsibility of mastering 
complex systems. But accord- 
ing to Jane Davis, director of 
the Small Business Support 
Group, toe high street stores 
which supply the expensive 
hi-tech hardware and soft- 
ware frequently offer little or 
no initiation or expert back- 

Davis learnt from ber own 
experience that a single 
phone call can save hours of 
trial, error and poring over 
impenetrable, jargonized 
manuals. With in mind , 
she has created a hotline 
service for just such instant 
help. The annual fee for the 
service is £40, which indudes 
regular newsletters and a 
subscription to the One-to- 
Oue electronic mftil/telex ser- 
vice. Log on to them at Bank 
Buildings, Kennel Lane, 
Broadway, Worts WTU2 
7DP, telephone 03S6 852641. 

Teenyfax 

The personal ring-binder sys- 
tem pf pages for notes, ad- 
dresses, maps and trivia to 
which many otherwise sbjv 
sible adults have become en- 
slaved, is now set to organize 
the lives of their children. 
Lefax have produced a system 
specifically aimed at teen- 
agers which Includes brightfy- 
cotoured binders, a starter 
pack filing system and a 
school kit The cheapest vari- 
ation sells at £18.35 and is 
available at department stores 
and larger stationery stores. A 
catalogue can be obtained 
from The London Wood Part- 
ners, 9 Murray Street, London 
NW1 (tel 01 485 6266). What 
next - Rfofax for toddlers? 

Pain partners 

Dealing with psoriasis is a 
painful problem that Dennis 
Potter’s Singing Detective 
shares with millions. The 
skin complaint, from which 
Potter himself suffers, can 


strike at any age, often with 
debilitating results. But both 
psoriasis and eczema — which 
between them affect 4 per cent 
of the world's population — 
can be greatly relieved by 
self-help measures. Two 
helplines have been set op by 
Sandra Gibbons of The Alter- 
native Centre to advise suffer- 
ers and their families on diet 
and environmental factors 
which may improve and alle- 
viate the conditions — toe 
psoriasis helpline is on 01- 
351 2726; the helpline 
on 01-938 2645. 

Parent power 

“Dear Miss Manners, Would 
you discuss the etiquette of 
Idssing. parents doing so upon 
toe forehead, cheeks, etc?” 

“Dear Gentle Reader, Chil- 
dren must be kissed regularly 
by their parents, and toe 
cneeks and foreheads are 
excellent target areas. Toes 
are not recommended beyond 
infancy." 

“Miss Manners" has be- 
come America's wittiest ex- 
pert on etiquette, since toe 
publication of her Guide To 
Excruciatingly Correct Behav- 
iour. Now in her role as fount 
of all social knowledge, she 
has compiled a Guide to 
Rearing Perfect Children (Pen- 
guin. £4.95). It is equally 
relevant to British parents, 
who despair just as much as 
Americans of raising children 
with some semblance of social 
grace. Her wide-ranging in- 
sight covers topics such as 
bathroom sins, creative sulk- 
ing, parental passion and how 
to eat ice cream politely. 

Leave it lying around and 
her humour may be enough to 
convince even the most ter- 
rible of teenagers that man- 
ners, Miss Manners's way. 
can be fun. 

Quote me... 






“Although there is less of toe 
’Me Tarzau, Yon Jane' about 
toe Kin nocks, we are being 
ruled by couples and it’s 
really revolting” - Germaine 
Greer. 

J. F. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


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‘Pssst! The riot's to Cell Block Four. 

Pass it on—’ 

Smack 

Gerald Howanh, one of the two 
Tory MPs libelled by Panorama, 
is evidently not one to forgive and 
forget. No fewer than 3J 7 MPs of 
all parties have signed a Com- 
mons early-day motion warmly 
congratulating BBCs Grange Hill 
on its campaign against drug 
abuse. There is but a single 
dissenting voice. An amendment 
tabled by Howanh suggests that 
the Beeb could have performed “a 
better service to the battle against 
drug abuse by refraining from 
showing on the programme scenes 
of children suffering from drugs”. 

• “A great personality, a great 
orchestra, a great evening out — 
HURRY!” The Northern Sinfo- 
nia, whose press release plugging a 
“celebrity” concert is thus headed, 
is dearly becoming over-excited 
about its guest conductor. And who 
is this great personality wielding 
the baton on November 27? Ed- 
ward Heath. 

Political lessons 

The tussle over the future gram- 
mar status of Tiffin School and 
Tiffin Girls' School at Kingston- i 
upon-Thames has its ironies. 
When the motion to abandon 1 1- 
plus selection to these highly 
academic schools was put before 
the council last week, a Tory 
councillor, Paul Clokie, pleaded 
vested interest and abstained — 
allowing the proposal to scrape 
through by a single vote. His 
reason? His marriage last year to 
Hilary Nicolle. headmistress of 
Tiffin Girls' School. Ratification 
of the decision now rests with the 
Education Secretary, Kenneth 
Baker. He could seek, the advice of i 
his minister of state, Angela | 
Rumbold. She stood for Kingston j 
council in 1974, alongside Clokie. ! 
on an “abolish the 11-plus” 
platform. Mr Clokie pleads: “We 
were against the 1 1-plus but not 
against grammar schools.” ; 

PUS 



Reagan loses his invincibility 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Lloyd’s 

snub 

There was a glaring omission from 
the guest list at yesterday's open- 
ing of the new Lloyd’s building in 
the City, attended by the Queen. 
While 5,000 dignatories drank the 
insurers' champagne over a lavish 
buffet lunch, the man who until 
March was its chief executive, lan 
Hay Davison, toiled behind his 
desk at accountants Arthur 
Andersen's. “I wasn’t invited,” he 
told me glumly. Last night Lloyd's 
was unable to explain why it had 
snubbed the man brought in three 
years ago by the Bank of England 
after a spate of scandals at the 
organization. City-watchers left to 
guess at the reasons may well look 
to Mr Davison’s resignation 
announcement warning at what he 
saw as threats to the role and 
independence of the chief exec- 
utive. They are also likely to 
observe, wryly, that it was Mr 
Davison's efforts over three years 
to polish the tarnished image of 
Lloyd's that made yesterday's 
swish ceremony possible . 

MP’s snip 

Eastern Europe has suddenly 
found a place in the heart of 
Robert Adley. the bellicose anti- 
Russian Tory MP. He has just 
returned from Budapest with two 
suits run up by a tailor there for a 
fraction of Savile Row prices. 
“You would never know they were 
made in Hungary,” he purrs. The 
British Men swear Guild does not 
take the matter lightly, however. 
“After all, the Tones did support 
the Multi-Fibre Arrangement to 
give a sem balance of justice to the 
textile industry against unfair 
competition,” a spokeswoman 
fumed. Adley. undaunted, claims 
he is helping British exports — by 
taking his own cloth to be snipped 
by Hungarian hands. 

• John Menzies, the newsagents, 
has found just the shelf for the new 
British Rail timetables at its 
Templemeads station branch In 
Bristol. They're displayed under 
“Hnmour books”. 

In the cart 

Anna McCurley, Tory MP for 
Renfrew West, tells me she has 
had cause to mellow her opinion 
of local councils' direct labour 
forces. Rushing from Glasgow 
airport this week to a meeting, her 
car ran out of petroL Within 
moments she was spotted by the 
crew of a corporation dustcart 
who invited her on board, took her 
to a garage for petrol and then 
back to her car. “They even 
poured it into the tank. They were 
the knights of the road,” she says. 
And no, she did not have the 
courage to tell the binmen who she 
was — or her views on privatizing 
council services. 

BARRY FANTONI 


Washington 

The Teflon has been scratched. To 
America's amazement the aura of 
invincibility surrounding Presi- 
dent Reagan has been badly 
damaged by the Iran fiasco. All of 
a sudden his foreign policy - 
elevated only eight months ago 
almost to the level of a new 
doctrine — appears to be unravel- 
ling. 

There is a growing conviction 
here that the patient executor of 
that policy, George Shultz, has 
had enough and will, sooner or 
later, resign. Early next year, 
according to friends and asso- 
ciates, be will be gone.Reagan, 
ever loyal to his staff, has insisted 
that he will not fire anyone. 

A search for scapegoats in the 
White House itself may not go far. 
It has long been known that the 
president's kitchen cabinet con- 
sisted of men with little experience 
in foreign affairs, ft was the 
president who took the credit 
when America was standing tali. 
And it is he who must now 
squarely accept the blame for the 
series of setbacks that have be- 
fallen him. There is an uncomfort- 
able new twist to the old tannt, 
“Who lost Iran 7* 

Within the space of six weeks 
the administration has suffered 
five major foreign policy setbacks: 
the disinformation campaign on 
Libya, with all the questions of 
White House credibility; the 


Michael Binyon on how the Iran affair has 
suddenly dimmed the president’s aura 


Daniloff affair, ending, despite 
denials, in a swap with a Soviet 
spy; the apparent readiness at 
Reykjavik to scrap all nuclear 
weapons within 10 years; the 
capture of an American merc enar y 
in Nicaragua: and now Iran. 

Critics, releasing their pent-up 
frustrations, are now adding ear- 
lier incidents: the European gas 
pipeline sanctions, the mining of 
Nicaraguan harbours, the botch of 
Bitburg, the dfibSde of Lebanon, 
the instant creation of Star Wars. 

One critic wrote: “You could 
almost call it a White House 
compulsion to disregard the full 
resources of government in de- 
cision-making; to affront Congress 
by violating the spirit, if not the 
letter, of its laws; co take action in 
the face of deep internal divisions; 
to offend one or another key 
branch of the government; to pick 
needless fights with valued allies.” 

In all former crises President 
Reagan was able with charm, 
oratory, political muscle and dog- 


mem to repair the damage. Even 
after Reykjavik, the extraordinary 
concerted attempt to turn what 
appeared a disaster into what was 
called a near-triumph succeeded — 
at least for a while. 


The president, fully believing 
bis own interpretation, was 
cheered on the campaign trail 
when he spoke of the “successes of 
Iceland". Opinion polls showed 
widespread support. 

In Congress the aura of invincibil- 
ity enabled him to 
defeat challenges to his 
foreign poticy: on the arms sates to 
Saudi Arabia and the Contras; the 
House amendments tying his 
hands on arms control. Only over 
South Africa has he been defeated. 

But over Iran, everything seems 
to have deserted him. Congress 
has felt slighted; even Reagan’s 
conservative supporters there are 
talking of a “major mistake”. His 
oratory fell fer short of bis normal 
persuasiveness last week, and his 
televised address was perceived as 
evasive, hesitant, disingenuous 
and self-justifying. He did not, 
people said, lake the American 
people into his confidence. 

The latest poll in the Los 
Angeles Times found that more 
than 40 per cent of those ques- 
tioned said several of Reagan’s 
statements had been only “tech- 
nically true”. More damagingly to 
a man who has built so much on 
his moral authority, 25 per cent 
said his statements had been 


“essentially false". About one in 
five believed that his explanations 
of his dealing with Iran were 
“essentially true”. 

This could not have come at a 
worse time for both the president 
and the Republicans. For Reagan 
is still from the un- 

expectedly severe losses in the 
mid-term elections. He is now 
obliged to defer more to a revived 
opposition in Congress. 

The Reagan revolution has 
slowed at home. Abroad, the 
Reagan Doctrine now looks still- 
born. It will be hard for the 
president, anxious to leave his 
mark on history in his remaini n g 
two years in office, to notch up 
achievements in those vital areas 
where he has suffered the setbacks: 
tire Middle East, arms control, 
relations with Russia, the fight 
against terrorism. 

Other presidents have suffered 
setbacks in their final two years. 
And most people expect that 
Reagan will recover from the Iran 
affair. But it is the cumulation of 
recent failures that is raising 
questions — about his judgement, 
his advisers, his instincts. 

“The Gipper", as he is affec- 
tionately known, may have lost 
too many battles to recover the 
winning streak. Already the cynics* 
are proclaiming the end of the 
Reagan era. “Gipperd&m- 
merung” they call it 


Stephen Segaller explores the background of France’s hard-left killers 


One of the most disturbing 
developments during the 1980s 
has been the emergence of an 
alliance between previously sepa- 
rate terrorist organizations 
throughout western Europe. This 
alliance, involving French, Ger- 
man and Belgian groups, with 
sporadic parallel action from 
Portuguese. Spanish, Italian and 
Dutch organizations, is pledged to 
attack government, quasi-govern- 
ment, international agencies and 
business targets. 

The terrorists’ targets are de- 
cided by their anti-American, anti- 
business, anti-military, anti- 
nuclear, anti-Nato politics. The 
prime mover of this alliance 
appears to be the French revolu- 
tionary group Action Directe, 
which yesterday claimed 
responsibility for the brutal killing 
of the managing director of Re- 
nault Georges Besse. 

Action Directe is a second- 
generation European terrorist 
group. Its roots do not lie in the 
revolutionary fervour that 
accompanied the May 1968 up- 
heavals, but it nonetheless shares 
the same violent political traditon. 

Since it was first heard of in 
1979, it has had only one leader, 
Jean-Marc Rouillan, who has 
shown an opportunistic willing- 
ness to espouse political causes or 
marginalized minorities, primar- 
ily to keep the group alive. Since 
1984, however, its ideology has 
crystallized into a jargon-ridden 
Marxist-Leninism. 

Despite Roui flan's orchestra- 
tion of a series of brutal assaults 
on military, commercial and 
political targets, the French capac- 
ity for romanticizing the most 
dangerous and daring of criminals 
has created about him the myth of 
an intelligent, cultivated art-lover, 
half paranoid and half megalo- 
maniac, who never takes off his 
bulletproof vest 

The reality is far more sober. 
Boro in 1953 in Auch in south- 
west France, Rouillan was a 
student at Toulouse, where he 
became involved in anti-Franco 
protest groups in the early 1970s. 
He allegedly took part in cross- 
border “missions” to strike at 
Spanish targets, and was involved 
in some assaults on Spanish 
interests in France. 

He was arrested in 1974 and 
imprisoned for three years; re- 
arrested in 1979 and imprisoned 
for another six months; and 
shortly thereafter founded Action 
Directe. 

According to one of Rouillan’s 
former associates, the establish- 
ment of Action Directe cannot be 
understood outside the wider 
political context of the radical left 
in France. Rouiflan’s associate 
maintains that the radical left had 
always worked on the assumption 
that the Socialists would never 
gain power by election. 

And the hard left always be- 
lieved that even if the Socialists 
did come to power, as Francois 
Mitterrand did in 1981, they 
would foil to carry out a radical 
programme. It was this doubt that 
pushed the hard-core radicals 
towards military force and 
clandestine activity. The founders 
of Action Directe believed that 
those radicals who stuck to the 
middle ground of legality were 
condemned to impotence, while 
the “real” activists would be left to 
fight the “real” battles. 


I am confused about these squad- 
rons of White Knights that gallop 
around the City and financial 
pages, never once felling off their 
horses. For example, from an old 
Guardian : “Thomas Tilling em- 
erged yesterday as the White 
Knight appointed by Berec to save 
the Ever Ready battery-maker 
from the clutches of Hanson 
Trust” 

' A White Knight seems to be 
Stock Exchange dang for a hero or 
champion, in particular a com- 
pany that comes to the aid of one 
racing an unwelcome takeover 
bid. But the use is extended to 
mean good guys generally. For 
example, from The Times. “The 
Italian Communist Party will take 
its members into the regional 
election campaign next month as 
White Knights dealing with the 
joint evils of corruption and 
reaction.” 

I think that this increasingly 
fashionable cliche is at best illit- 
erate, and at worst misleading. 
What its users have in mind is the 
hackneyed phrase “a knight in 
shining armour”. But a White 


RENAULT 



Action Directe, 
ideologues 
of violence 


But the founders of the move- 
ment confronted a major problem. 
If a Socialist government were to 
monopolize and legitimize all the 
major issues of the day, what was 
left for the hard-core radical? 

Action Directe developed from 
an absence of debate on the issues 
where they chose their targets, 
Nato installations, international 
monetary systems, symbols of 
American capitalism and prom- 
inent international corporate lead- 
ers. Rouillan scorned the normal 
channels of public delate and 
criticism, and maintained that the 
only genuine course of action open 
for a revolutionary was literally 
direct action. 

The theory was at once crude 
and effective. In essence it runs as 
follows. Fust you act, then you 
consider was it well or badly done? 
How was the action received by 
the people? 

An analogy is then drawn 
between terrorism and the media. 


The Action Directe activist be- 
lieves that terrorism represents the 
same approach to political prob- 
lems - arbitrary, dramatic and 
sensational - that the media 
adopt in relation to “facts”. The 
real power is thought to lie not 
with the participants in a given 
event, but with the editor who has 
the power to emphasize coverage, 
write headlines and rtiang a mean- 
ings. 

For ideologues of the extreme 
left such as Rouillan, violence in 
itself is not an issue: the world is 
full of it, they say. The only 
interesting question, they believe, 
is what effect it has. According to 
their extremist logic, an act of 
violence committed fay a member 
of Action Directe is utterly in- 
significant alongside the violence 
inherent in war, state terror, 
hunger, drought and disease; in- 
dustry and commence. 

Action Directe became opera- 
tionally viable as a clandestine 


Sir Lunchalot 

Philip Howard: new words for old 


Knight brings irresistibly to the 
mind of anybody who has read 
Lewis CarroU (which means pretty 
well everybody) a quite different 
sort of figure. 

Come on, you remember the 
White Knight An enthusiastic but 
bumbling old fooL Always felling 
off his horse. Ineffectual, very. 
Always inventing things like boxes 
for keeping clothes and sand- 
wiches in, which he carries upside- 
down so that the rain can't get in. 
Sandwiches and clothes all fell 
OUt. of Course. Sings that haunting 
song about an aged, aged man a- 
sitting on a gate: 

Whose look was mild, whose 
speech was slow. 

Whose hair was whiter than 
the snow. 

Whose face was very like a 
crow.. . 


It is fine Nonsense Verse. I 
think Tennyson echoed its rhythm 
and rhyme in his poem about 
Catullus, “Tenderest of Roman 
poets nineteen-hundred years 
ago ” Be that as it may, if the 
White Knight we know and love 
were to come to the help of a 
company, prudent shareholders 
and directors would get out at 
once, and emigrate if they had any 
sense. 

Protesting about the ambiva- 
lence of While Knights is more 
than an itch to verify one's literary 
references. It is potentially confus- 
ing, because White Knight is also 
used in its endearingly dotty sense. 
“ T believe 1 have made a really 
significant discovery,’ cried Dr 
Oueriey with the infatuated glee of 
a White Knight”: Ngaio Marsh in 
Off fi 7 th His Hard. 


organization following a robbery 
in the northern French town of 
Ctonde-sur-TEscaut in 1979, when 
they stole about 16 million francs 
at gunpoint Al the time there was 
considerable evidence that this act 
of “proletarian expropriation” 
conducted on behalf of the “whole 
revolutionary movement” had 
been carried out with inter- 
national assistance from Spanish 
and Italian terrorist groups. 

International collaboration of 
this kind is not monolithic 
Rather, it is essentially ad hoc 
designed to offer mutual assis- 
tance in obtaining and distributing 
stolen arms, providing passports, 
identity papers, escape routes and 
places of safe hiding. It also lendsa 
thin planriblity to foe movement’s 
pretenskms of proletarian inter- 
nationalism. 

The “proletarian expro- 
priation” of 16 million francs 
enabled Action Directe to obtain 
weapons that were used in 20 or 
more attacks on French govern- 
ment and business targets during 
the following year. As a result of 
an extensive police investigation 
Rouillan was eventually captured 
in September 1980, and most of 
the organization’s principal 
leadership had been rounded up 
by foe end of the year. 

But in May the following year; 
after the traditional but controver- ; 
sial practice of incoming presi- 
dents, Mitterrand declared an 
amnesty for several thousand 
prisoners whose crimes sup- i 
posedly had a political dement ! 
To the amazement of the French 
public Rouillan and other leading 
members of Action Directe were 
freed. 

In March 1982 Action Directe 
published its political manifesto, 
Pour un Projet communiste. As a 
literary work it has no merit, 
consisting of indigestible Marxist- 
Leninist jargon. But its critique of 
world capitalism, and foe particu- 
lar examples singled out for 
vitriolic abuse suggested who 
their new targets were likdy to be. 

The wave of terrorism that 
followed was too much, even for 
Mitterrand, whose amnesty was 
seen by many as at least partly 
responsible for tire bloodshed- He 
went on national television to 
announce the setting up of anti- 
terrorist forces, foe appointment 
of a Minister for Public Security 
and foe proscription of Action 
Directe. 

Action Directe nevertheless 
continued to expand its base of 
activists, domestically and inter- 
nationally, and embarked on a 
new round of robberies and 
murders. By 1984 the various 
component parts of the European 
terrorist alliance had began to 
wage an all-out campaign of 
violence against the mHitary- 
mdustriai targets identified in 
their published political tracts. 

The death of Georges Besse thus 
follows in a long line of assassina- 
tions and acts of violence against 
those targets which the terrorists 
see as the oppressors of the 
proletariat and foe upholders of 
the corrupt and exploitative 
capitalist state. 

Extracted from Invisible Armies; 
Terrorism into foe 1990s (Michael 
Joseph, £15.95). 


And this from The New York 
Times: “The Rangers 7 problems 
stemmed from the habit that the 
team’s general manager had of 
hiring ineffectual cronies to coach 
the dub, and then replacing them 
with himself when they failed — a 
kind of White Knight 
compulsion.” Those New York 
jocks are better-read and more 
careful with their slang than our 
stockbrokers: surprise, surprise. 

Americans, who have no medi- 
eval knights in armour in their 
native history, have their own 
metaphor of approval for good 
guys: White Hat. This comes from 
the native American art form of 
Western movies, in which, 
symbolically, heroes wear white 
hats and villains wear black. 

The Washington establishment 
differentiated particularly the 
Nixon administration between 
White Hats and Black Hats. The 
original Americans, the Apache' 
and Ute Indians, described any- 
body of Caucasian origin as White 
Eyes; but I do not think they 
meant it as a compliment. 


Stephen Plowden 

Wishful thinking 
costs lives 


% 



There is no mystery about foe 
esnufe of motorcycle accidents. 
Most motorcycles are ridden, 
often recklessly, by exuberant 
young men. The way to prevent 
motorcycle accidentals to U mil 
the power of the machines and the 
right to ride one. 

Only 1 per cent of journeys are 
made by motorcycles but 25 per 
cent of fetal and serious road 
casualties occur in accidents in 
which they are involved. In 1984, 
more ih«n 1,100 people were 
iriTtof in such accidents and more 
than 59,000 injured, 18,000 of 
them seriously. These figures do 
not include mopeds. . 

Statistics supporting suffer 
regulation have existed for a long 
time. Official studies carried out 
in 1958 showed that the rate of 
involvement in fetal and serious 
accidents for male motorcyclists 
fell steadily until the age of 50. 
Within each separate age group, it 
rose sharply with foe power of foe 
machine. For example, foe rates 
per million miles travelled for 
men aged 40 to 49 (the safest age 
group) were as follows: 

Up to 60cc 0.9 

61-150cc 1.8 

151-250cc 2.7 

25I-350CC IS 

Over350cc 7 S 

More recent evidence confirms 
that high accident rates continue 
to be associated with youth, 
inexperience and powerful ma- 
chines. 

The Department ofTransport is 
unwilling to accept these un- 
remarkable findings. Instead, it 
has based its strategy on persuad- 
ing young motorcyclists to 
undergo tr aining - Financial sup- 
port to training schemes has been 
offered since 1961 and moral 
support for even longer. The 
department has encouraged a 
rapid expansion of training cen- 
tres, of which there are now nearly 
1,000, and also training in schools. 

There are no statistical grounds 
to justify this concentration on 
training. A study conducted for 
the department at Salford Univer- 
sity between 1971 and 1977 
showed that trained motorcyclists 
had significantly higher accident 
rates than the control group. 
Studies in other countries have 
also failed to reveal any beneficial 
effect of training. 

The Salford findings were ig- 
nored on the grounds that they 
were contrary to expert opinion 
and common sense. The 
department’s paper Safer Motor- 
cycling, recently issued for 
consultation, says: 

“It may not be easy to dem- 
onstrate by objective research that 
motorcyclists benefit from train- 
ing, any more than we can show 
that car drivers do. But common 
sense if nothing else suggests that 
— as with any skilled operation — 
the ability to take charge of a 
vehicle, whether on two wheels or 
four, will be developed more 
effectively and more quickly if foe 


rider or driver receives systematic 
tuition ...” „ . 

This “common sense view 
depends on foe idea that accidents 
are caused by a lack of handling 
skills. No doubt some are, and 
there must be many learner 
motorcyclists wbo have benefited 
from training- But a short training 
course can do little to counter the 
lethal combination of riders who 
enjoy taking risks and a machine 
tha t tempts them to do so. 

The reason for dinging to foe 
idea of training is foe belief that 
measures that would restrict riders 
cannot be entertained. To quote 
foe consultation paper a gain : “The 
government’s aim can be summed 
up as being to preserve and 
enhance all the good things in 
motorcycling — the convenience, 
foe fiin, the excitement — and to 
cut out foe bod — foe appalling 
risks to l ife and limb, the thou- 
sands of deaths and serious inju- 
ries occurring every year in 
accidents involving motorcycles. 
It is hard to imagine that anyone 
would seriously quarrel with this 
as an objective.” 

What is missing is any sense of 
foe government’s responsibilities 
to third parties. Even when foe 
only casualties in a motorcycle 
accident are foe riders themselves, 
many other people are affected 
and the NHS picks up foe bill. 
Thirty-two pedestrians a week are 
killed or injured by motorcycles: a 
young man on a motorcycle is 
eight times more likely to kill or 
injure a pedestrian than a young 
man in a car. 

Here, then, is an outline pro- 
gramme: 

□ Restrict applications for a pro- 
visional motorcycle licence to 
people who have held a full licence 
tor a moped or a car with a clean 
record for at least two years. 

□ Limit foe speed, power and 
weight of machines that even 
qualified riders may use to what is 
required for comfortable touring. 
The m aximum speed capability 
should be no more than foe 
national speed limit; the engine 
size probably no more than 250 cc. 

□ Restrict riders to low-powered 
“learner” machines for two years 
after passing the test A licence to 
ride a larger machine would then 
depend on a further test a 
conviction for a motoring offence 
would automatically lead to its 
withdrawal. 

□ Reduce the need for motor- 
cycle travel by improving the 
existing alternatives of cycling and 


public transport 
□ Create a new alternative by 
recognizing a new category of car, 
a local runabout, for which the 
licensing requirements would be 
no more stringent than for a 
moped and which, like a moped, 
would have a top speed of 30 mpft. 
Stephen Plowden was joint author 
with Mayer Hillman o/Danger on 
die Road: The Needless Scourge, 
published in 1984 by the Policy 
Studies Institute. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Start the Week 
with Haw-Haw 


There seem to be two profitable 
' areas is showbiz at the moment: 
broadcasting nostalgia and 
harking back to World War EL By 
an extraordinary coincidence, I 
have been working on a play that 
combines both. It’s a study of that 
famous Lord Haw-Haw, who over 
the years has been — in my 
opinion — too much viewed as a 
traitor and not enough as a 
professional radio man. He was in 
many ways just a BBC man who 
happened to be working on foe 
other side — at any rate, that is the 
line I have taken in my new 
smash-hit play, Stan the Week 
With Lord Haw-Haw. 

The scene is a small German 
studio in 1944 . Lord Haw-Haw is 
just finishing a broadcast. 
Haw-Haw: ... so what is the 
point of carrying on? Coventry lies 
in ashes — next week it could be 
Basingstoke or Harrogate. My 
friends, I advise you to bring the 
war to a close now. I will talk to 
you again at foe same hour next 
time; till then, Sieg Hefl! 

The studio manager, Fritz, comes 
in. He starts clearing up the 
microphones. 

Haw-Haw: So, what did you think, 
Fritz? 

Fritz: ft was fine. 

Haw-Haw; Not too . . . frantic? 
Fritz: No. No more frantic than 

usual 

Haw-Haw: Yes . . . You know, 
Fritz, I sometimes think we 
should change the whole fed of the 
programme. Get a quite different 
approach. 

Fritz: You mean, tell them that 
Germany is losing foe war? 
Haw-Haw: No, no, don’t be silly. I 
mean, we ought to change foe 
format — after afl, it’s been the 
same sort of programme for three ' 
years now. Just me talking, I 
mean. 

Fritz: You would like to sing in 
future? 

Haw-Haw: Oh. don’t tell me 
you're in one of your moods. A 
biting studio manager is more 

than 1 can take No. I mean 

have a few guests in, perhaps. Or a 
bit of musk. It’s so doomy every 
week, me just saying that we're 
going to bomb somewhere or kill a 
few more of them. I thought, why 
not have someone on who's tost 
written a book, or has a new film 
coming out? 

Fritz: There aren’t, many new 
books or films coming out just ax 
the moment in Germany. 
Haw-Haw: No, well I can see 
that’s a problem, but we could for 


instance have Herr Goebbels on to 
talk about his latest propaganda, 
say. It would be quite a coup for 
foe programme. 

Fritz: Hello, there, Herr Goebbels! 

I gather you’ve just written a book 
about how foe Jews cause all foe 
trouble in the world. Well, you’ve 
just killed off all the Jews and we 
still have as much trouble as we 
used to. How do you explain that? 
Haw-Haw: No, Fritz, that is not at 
all what I intended . . . 

Fritz: Well, until you can think of 
an explanation, well listen to the 
Golden Brownshirts sin g in g their 
rendition of. . . 

Haw-Haw: Fritz! Please! Some- 
times I think you do not take 
broadcasting seriously. For in- 
stance, you have never suggested 
the idea of having a phone-in 
section on my programme. 

Fritz: Phone-in? What ex- 
actly . . . ? 

Haw-Haw: Well, we ask listeners 
in England to phone up the radio 
station with their ideas on what I 
have been discussing. If enough 
people phone in, we could bank- 
nipt Britain with foe phone bills 
and win foe war! 

Fritz: I don't think there’s much 
danger of that. 

Haw-Haw: Of what? 

Fritz: Us winning the war. The 
position is hopeless. Even you 
must see that 

Haw-Haw: What do you mean — 
even me? 

Fritz: You are a typical broadcast- 
ing star. You really believe what 
you say. You believe you are 
important, so you believe your 
message is important as well. 
When the American and British 
armies come pouring across foe 
frontier, you will be bothered 
about only one thing — getting a 
proper s i g n a t ure tune for the 
programme. 

Haw-Haw: That is foe most 
absolute . . . You’re right, ac- 
tually- The programme does need 
a good sig. tone. 1 think you’ve put 
your finger on it. By the way, I 
hope you are recording all these 
programmes. 

Fritz Why? 

Haw-Haw: Because one day there 
will be an anniversary, and they 
will want to repeat all my work. 
Fntz Even if the British win? 
Haw-Haw. If the British win? That 
is treachery! 

Fritz Look who’s talking, ducky. 
(The play continues for another 
two hours of typical in-house - 
chat, getting no- 


V • t 4 


1 


'••rt 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




1 Penniqg to n Street, London El 9X N Telephone: 01-481 4100 

TWO TO TANGO 


Argentine officials have pre- 
sented their government’s ini- 
tiative on the Falkland Islands 
as a “gesture of reconciliation 

and good will.** ft might 
equally be described as a 
diplomatic coup, timed to' 
intensify Britain’s isolation at 
the annual United Nations 
debate on the islands next 
Monday, President Atfonsin 
expected that this country 
would say “no”. Is that in feet 
the right response? 

Argentina’s offer to declare 
an end to hostilities in the 
South Atlantic is conditional 
and overdue. By studiously 
neglecting to do so before, 
Buenos Aires has justified a 
substantial British garrison on 
the islands and inhibited a 
return to peaceful politics. 

In such circumstances, Bri- 
tain's official reaction has up 
to now been scrupulously cor- 
rect While continuing to reject 
the Argentine claim to sov- 
ereignty, it has proposed taiVc 
aimed at resuming normal 
relations and, by reopening its 
ports to Argentine goods last 
year, has taken the initiative 
itself. By its offer to declare a 
formal end to hostilities “at 
the right time” and in the 
context of “global negot- 
iations”, Argentina is be- 
latedly catching up with 
British policy. 

Whitehall is right to be wary. 
The 1984 Berne talks broke 
down as soon as they began, 
when the Argentine delegation 
walked out But by rejecting 
this week's initiative appar- 
ently out of band, the Govem- 


sures this country’s virtual 
isolation at the united Na- 
tions next week. That is not a 
vital matter in itself But, as 
the years go by, the greater are 
the number ofUN decisions — 
on issues tike human rights 
and terrorism — which de- 
pend on countries being fin: 
Britain rather than a Eaip * rf 
The splendour of isolation 
becomes tarnished by 
opportunities. 

There are, moreover, sound 
reasons why Britain should 
want to start negotiations on 
the so-called “practical 
issues”. Despite the optimism 
with which, the Government 
has tried to inject new life into 
the FaUdands economy, pro- 
gress is depressingly slow. 
Clearly, if the islands are ever 
to flourish, they will do so only 
when links have been re- 
established with the South 
American mainland — which 
means, in effect, Argentina. 
Fish conservation, Anglo-Ar- 
gentine trade and the expan- 
sion of British interests in 
Latin America as a whole help 
to explain why this country 
should not throw a rid? the 
chance of serious dialogue. 

To enter into talks does not, 
of course, commit Britain to 
surrendering its position on 
sovereignty. It would be naive 
to pretend that this is not the 
subject which Argentines most 
want to raise. But fear President 
Alfensm it might just be 
enough, at this stage anyway, 
to start negotiations with an 
open agenda. Both sides might 
note that Britain is once more 


merit could be committing a talking to the Spanish about 
tactical error with important Gibraltar without prejudice to 
strategic implications. the position of either power. 

Tactically it once more en- At some stage in the future 


Britain will almost certainly 
have to address the issue of 
sovereignty over the talk- 
lands. Previous negotiations 
reached a serious stage before 
being ended by back-bench 
fury at Westminster. Then 
came the 1982 Argentine inva- 
sion which not only poisoned 
relations between the two 
countries bat made Faik- 
landers themselves the more 
reluctant to contemplate any 
further contact with Buenos 
Aires. 

The issue will not go away 

for even If it is to return, it is 

better to approach it gradually 
after a patient dialogue on 
other issues, than abruptly (at 
whatever distance in the fu- 
ture) after a change of Prime 
Minister in Britain. 

The Government admits 
that those parts of the proposal 
which refer to some of the 
practical issues are — tike 
those in the curate’s egg — 
very good indeed. But there 
remains a suspicion that 
everything is linked to 
progress on sovereignty which, 
as the Prime Minis ter made 
dear yesterday, is not on the 
negotiating table. 

Mrs Thatcher is continuing 
to tread with caution. She is in 
danger of treading with such 
caution, however, that no 
progress will be made at all 
President Alfonsin cannot, for 
political reasons, declare him- 
self a party to talks which 
specifically exclude sov- 
ereignty. The latest initiative 
probably goes as far as he can 
to meet British concerns. The 
British response should there- 
fore be “yes." There is plenty 
of time to say “no” later if we 
need to. 


SUNDAY TRADING AGAIN 


j The move by a group of 
Conservative backbenchers to 
renew the reform of Sunday 
trading laws is a welcome one. 
The present situation is as 
indefensible now as it was 
when the original Government 
bill was lost amid the fan-out 
of the Westland aflair. 

The arguments are the same 
too. Under existing few, gm 
can be bought, but not dried 
milk. Chinese takeaway food. is 
obtainable, but not fish and < 
chips (unless it happens to be 
from a takeaway shop selling 
- something else). A leather 
jacket may be bought if it 
qualifies as a motor-cycle 
accessory, but not as an item of 
* clothing. And so on, and so on. 
^ Not only is the law as it 
stands an ass, but whether it is 
enforced or not is entirely 
haphazard. Some local 
authorities tolerate opening by 
garden centres and other trad- 
ers on Sundays; others make 
selective prosecutions, 
depending on the level of 
complaints. 

Whether the compromise to 
which MPs have put their 
names in the Commons early 
day notion is a sensible one is 
much more doubtful. It seems 
very likely that a change in the 
law to allow garden centres 
^and certain other shops con- 
nected with leisure activities, 
but not shops in general, to 
open on Sundays would only 
serve to introduce a whole lot 
of new 1 anomalies. It could also 
be unfair to traders who sold 
both permitted goods and 
banned goods. 


The Government hopes to 
escape criticism from its own 
supporters by giving support 
to a private member’s bOL But 
it will not escape criticism if it 
encourages a measure that is 
quite impractical 

A better option, if sufficient 
support can be mustered for it, 
is to have another attempt at 
de-regulating an Sunday trad- 
ing. Though the Government 
might have preferred to let this 
contentious subject lie fellow 
with an election not far over 
the horizon,' it can hardly 
oppose a bill on the lines of its 
own faded legislation. Nor is it 
dear that such alrill would fail 
The vote last April was a 
narrow one and probably occ- 
urred only because Govern- 
ment signals were 
misinterpreted. 

Proponents of Sunday trad- 
ing would, however, need to 
work hard to convince the 
doubters. The opposition has 
three main strands. First, there 
is the concern from the left 
that shop workers need to be 
protected from hairing to work 
on Sundays. This is in the 
same category as other well- 
meaning interventions in the 
l ab our market such as the 
minimum wage legislation de- 
signed to protect workers from 
bong able to take the jobs they 
otherwise would. Better a job. 
on Sunday than no job at alL 1 
Secondly, there is the con- 
cern of those who think that 
the traditional English Sunday 
would never be the same 
again. Some may think that a 
wet British Sunday could often 


do with some Evening up. But 
the reality is that deregulation 
of Sunday trading would be 
most unlikely to make Sunday- 
the same as any other day erf 
the week. 

In Scotland they have had 
Sunday trading for years and 
on average about one shop in 
seven stays open. For many 
people, moreover, the 
“endangered” family Sunday 
of roast beef followed by 
cricket on the village green, is 
utterly remote from their 
experience. This is no doubt 
partly why there has been a 
consistent majority in the 
opinion polls in favour of 
allowing Sunday opening. 
Nonetheless, as in Scotland, 
there would probably be strong 
regional variations reflecting 
the differing social traditions 
of rural and urban, affluent 
and less affluent areas. 

■ Thirdly, there is the opposi- 
tion of the Sabbatarians. At its 
most deeply held, this will not 
be diminished by any of the 
arguments about individual 
freedom or deregulation of 
markets. But a compromise — 
permitting trading during the 
afternoon but not during the 
morning — might reduce con- 
cern about church going as 
opposed to observance of the 
Sabbath. 

It would be false to claim 
that the British Sunday would 
remain completely unchang ed 
if such a reform were passed 
into law. It it were to change, 
however, it would be because 
the British had changed first 


....WAS GREATLY EXAGGERATED 


That a long-serving national 
leader can resurface alive and 
apparently well 24 hours after 
be has been reported assas- 
sinated says as much about the 
nature of North Korea as it 
does about the injudidonsness 
of speculation. Its political 
s>su'nt international isola- 
tion, and the particular 
^opaqueness of its official 
communications mean that if 
Kim II Sung were to have died, 
then the loudspeaker system 
along the frontier was as likely 
^ purveyor of the news as the 
North Korean news agency. 

Succeeding months will 
show whether the report of 
Kim's death was calculated 
misinformation — a genre in 
which both halves of the 


threaten his position as leader. 
North Korea’s economy is 
■sta gnating. Long-standing al- 
lies are quietly making ap- 
proaches to the South. And the 
desi gnatio n of his unpopular 
son as heir to the party 
leadership is believed to have 
attracted opposition. The 
eventual fell of Kim did not 
seem so improbable that an 
assassination attempt, or at the 
very least a power struggle, 
could be ruled out. 

The persistence of the 
assassination report for 24 
hours reflects partly custom, 
partly’ geography. Cosed soci- 
eties like North Korea tend not 
to counter rumour with formal 
denials. Perhaps they have 
learned that categorical denials 
onlv feel speculation. The 


Korean peninsula specialize - Korean authorities had 


or whether « was an early 
manifestation of impending 
political change in North Ko- 
r «t The question for the 
present is why the rumour of 
i assassination commanded 


the clock militated against 

them. . . _ . 

By the tune the report or 
Kim’s assassination had 

.. . - — . J readied Europe, the working 

J acB credence and persisted ^ in Korea was over. As the 
I0r SO Irmo orfuw Jf u»e rumour swept ' ho TT " Jt ^ 


The speed of Pyongyang’s 
response illustrates how seri- 
ously the reported assassina- 
tion was taken there. It may 
even be interpreted, in a 
perverse way, as excessive 
protestation and thus forther 
evidence that the days of Kim 
D Sung are numbered. Such an 
interpretation should not, 
however, obscure the feet that 
the assassination report was 
false. It was believed, in the 
last analysis, not only because 
it appeared possible, bat also 
because it made a good story 
and because much of the world 
wanted to believe it. 

Such wishful thinking re- 
flects a widespread hope for 
constructive change on the 
Korean peninsula. It also re- 
flects the belief current in the 

West that Kim H Sung 

to "produce hard evidence, but presents an obstacle to such 


Breaking mould 
on air feres 

Sir. Wtafmore cwfwe^d^aSout 
air feres in Europe after the failure 
oftheiiscent talks (report, Novem- 
ber 12)? Have wc now reached the 
stags when legal proceedings must 
be used to break the deadlock? 

In fee House cm October 16 I 
was assured that the European 
Commission can take action in- 
dependently erf" fete Council of 
Ministers and that the British 
Government also can take action 
independently through article 88 
of the Treaty erf Rome. 

The Commission wrote to 10 
European airlines on July 10 
concerning the liberalising of air 
transport within the Community 
and asking for a reply within two 
months. The airtines asked for a 
two-month extension. It was 
granted and replies should love 
been to hand for the meeting of 
transport ministers on November 
10 / 11 . 

I gather that such was not the 
case. We are told that when 
eventually replies do arrive the 
Commission will “consider the 
position”. 

Sir, we cannot go on like this. 
The proceedings become a mock- 
ery. European air transport is in 
need of a radical overhaul. Faced 
with the feet that many airlines are 
preoccupied with an overriding 
concern to pr o tect their state* 
owned airlines from competition 
we get nowhere. 

So, is our presidency of the 
Council of Ministers, with its 
strong words and high hopes, to 
end with a bleak recital of the 
difficulties preventing agreement 
or have we an alternative? I 
believe that we have: 

I. Mr John Moore, Secretary erf 
State for Transport, could set up a 
special “court” to ensure that 
British airlines stick to the EEC 
free competition rules. 

Z The Commission could im- 
plement its threat of legal action; 
or, in my opinion best of all, 

3. Mr Moore, prior to rctinquish- 
ing the presidency at the end of the 
year could make a statement, as 
president, on the step-by-step 
advance proposed by him on the 
elimination of burners to the 
internal market of the Community 
by 1992 and the fell integration 
therein of air transport. 

Yours faithfully, 

BURTON of COVENTRY, 

House of Lords. 

November 13. 

US arms for Iran 

From. Prcf Emeritus C. P. Beattie 
Sir, ’’We hold these- truths to be ' 
self-evident, that all men are 
created equal, that they are en- 
dowed by their Creator wife 
certain unalienable rights, that 
among these are life, liberty and 
the pursuit of happiness". So reads 
the Declaration of Indepe nd ence. 

The supply of aims to Iran may 
have faali t ated, directly or in- 
directly, the freeing of a few 
American nationals, but what of 
the hundreds, if not thousands, of 
other nationals who will be 
wounded or killed as a result? 

Yours faithfully, 

G P. BEATTIE, 

391a Fulwood Road, 

Sheffield, South Yorkshire. 

From Air Commodore ACL. 
Macfde, RAF (retd) 

Sir, Your leader today (November 
17} makes much of the Prime 
Minister’s having got as much 
assurance from the President as 
she needs about Trident 
If the deterrent, of which Tri- 
dent will be the main component, 
really is British and independent 
why does she need an American 
assurance about it? And if that 
assurance obliges the Americans 
to keep nuclear weapons in being 
that they might otherwise get rid 
of by negotiation with the Soviet 
Union, why is she so satisfied? 

Yours faithfully, 

ALASTAIR MACKIE 
(Ex-Services Campaign for 
Nuclear Disarmament), 

4 Warwick Drive, SW15. 

November 17. 

From Dr Michael Fisher 
Sir, In your leading article today 
you refer to a communique from 
President Reagan and Mrs 
Thatcher as being “full of quid pro 
quos". In view of President 
Reagan’s recent arrangements in 
the Middle East surely the plural 
should be quids pro quo. 

Yours sincerely, 

MICHAEL FISHER, 

43 Tetcott Road, SW10. 

November 17. 


Barriers to voluntary Aids tests 


From Dr D. G. Cunningham and 
others 

Sir, Yonr leader of November 11 
refers to the first meeting of Lord 
Whitdaw’s Cabinet committee on 
Aids. You cr iti c ise this commit- 
tee, _ the Government and its 
ministers for “over-emphasising” 
(sic) health education spending 
and far encouraging safe-sex tech- 
niques, which yon equate with 
condom usage. 

We are suiprised that you 
propose a programme of vol- 
untary screening as a means of 
controlling the transmission of 
Aids. Our opinion is that it would 
at best have only a marginal effect 

As is rightly stated, compulsory 
testing for antibodies to the virus 
would be impossible to enforce in 
our present society. Also, such a 
programme breaches many of the 
accepted WHO (World Health 
Organisation) screening criteria, 
as outlined by Dr Donaldson 
(letter, November S). 

The most telling point, how- 
ever, is that unless unrealistically 
stringent restrictions were placed 
on the freedom of test-positive 
individuals, the spread of Aids 
could not be prevented. 

You appear not to appreciate 
the dire consequences for the 
individual of a positive result. 
How many people are likely to 
submit th emsel ves to voluntary 
testing when the implications to 
them as individuals may be so 
profound? 

Some of the major barriers to 
acceptance of the test are adverse 
psychological effects, the threats of 
prejudice at work or school if 
confidentiality should break 
down, and the act that, at present, 
life insurance and endowment 
policies are unlikely to be avail- 
able to those found to be positive. 

You appear to - have to 
think through all the implications 
of yonr proposal. This viral infec- 


tion is epidemic in most, if not all 
countries and if foreign visitors 
are to be considered for screening 
this would have to apply to 
everyone, including those from 
the United States and other Euro- 
pean countries. Is this logical 
when there are already many 
thousands of infected people in 
the United Kingdom? 

It takes two people, actively 
consenting to intercourse, to 
transmit the Aids virus. The test 
itself cannot change sexual behav- 
iour. By testing and concentrating 
attention on those who are in- 
fected we are only doling with 
half of the problem. Education, on 
the other hand, targets both 
partners. 

Voluntary testing may facilitate, 
but cannot replace, education. 
Health education must be our 
main defence at the present time-. 
Yours faithfully, 

DEIRDRE CUNNINGHAM. 
DAVID MILLER, DON J EF FRIES, 
A J. PINCHING, JOHN GREEN/ 
EDDY BECK. LAU KAI, 

St Mary’s Hospital, 

Praed Street, W2. 

November 13. 

From Dr T.H.S. Bums 
Sir, In the attempt to cope with the 
problem of Aids the Government 
is said to be looking for strong 
words which win malm the point, 
without being too offensive to too 
many people. 

Perhaps the first thing they 
should do is to insist on the 
screening of the following words 
on every TV picture showing a 
couple jumping into bed together 
for a casual sexual experience: 
“Government Health Warning — 
Fornication can seriously Atmagp 
your health.*' 

Yours truly, 

T. a S. BURNS, 

27 Riverbank Road, 

Ramsey, Isle of Man. 

November 12. 


Funding the arts 

From the Chairman cf the Royal 
Opera House 

Sir, I am afraid that Mr Guthrie, 
Chairman of the Council of 
Regional Arts Associations 
(November 15X has misinter- 
preted what I said at the Royal 
Opera House Press conference last 
week. Far from just pleading the 
case of the Royal Opera House, 1 
emphasised *g«m and again that 
my concern was with the arts 
generally. I concentrated on two 
key issues. 

The first was that, with the 
increasing and understandable 
priority proposed for the regions, 
the national companies, including 
Co vent Garden, were now particu- 
larly endangered. The point of 
suggesting a separate grant for 
these companies (via foe Arts 
Council) is jpredsely to achieve 
arts expansion in the regions 
without damaging fee national 
institutions. As President of 
Southern Arts, I need no remind- 
ing of fee importance of regional 
arts. 


Bin of course the key point is the 
size of fee overall arts cake. This is 
why the second point I con- 
centrated on at the Press con- 
ference, as correctly reflected in 
The Times on November 12, was 
wife the (to pm it mildly) dis- 
appointing allocation to the arts in 
the public expenditure distribu- 
tion for 1987-88. 

The Minister for the Arts, Mr 
Richard Luce, dearly fought as 
hard as he could and it is 
astonishing and deeply discourag- 
ing that, in the end, the arts should 
get one of fee lowest of all 
increases, well below probable 
inflation. 

The arts are one of this 
country’s proudest achievements, 
an excellent investment and 
source of world prestige. They 
deserve better than this. 

Yours faithfully, 

CLAUS MOSER, 

Chairman, 

Royal Opera House, 

Coveni Garden, WC2. 

November 17. 


Phrase or fable? 

From Mr P. W B. Semmens 
Sir, Mis Mary Visick (November 
12) is slightly adrift with her 
reference to the nineteenth-cen- 
tury railways in Kent Until 1899 
than were two bitter rivals active 
in the area, the South Eastern 
Railway, and the London, Out- 
ham & Dover, fee latter being 
known as fee “London, Smasham 
& Turnover" or "London 
Smasham & Over”. 

However, in that year, after 
virtually bankrupting each other, 
they entered into partnership as 
fee South Eastern & Chatham 
Railway, which became known as 
fee “Slow, Easy & Comfortable” 

The new joint management 
committee, which was as dose as 
the amalgamation went, wanted to 
establish a new image, and in 1901 
their express passenger D class 
locomotives appeared. 

They looked splendid, wife 
copper cap to their chimneys and a 
huge brass dome cover, while the 
locomotive itself was adorned 
with the most elaborate livery ever 
to be used in this country. 
Although at the time of writing it 
is not actually on display at York, 
the National Railway Museum's 
preserved example; No 737, shows 
off all seven different colours that 
were applied in fee Ashford 
paintshops. 

Yours faithfully, 

P. W. B. SEMMENS, 

Assistant Keeper, 

National Railway Museum, 
Leeman Road, York. 

November 12. 


so long, when ft was 
capable of being refilled so 
Simply. . 

The rumour commanded 
yTedence partly because 
information . gleaned over 
» months suggests that 
£**0 11 Suite’s regime may be 
h-cing difficulties . which 


the United 

Slates, Korea slept. The turn- 
fog world perpetuated the 
falsehood. As soon as Korea 
awoke, the refutation — in the 
form of television news pio- 
lures - was produced. For 
North Korea that was a re- 
sponse of unusual speed. 


change. But wishful thinking is 
a poor substitute fin 1 realism in 
foreign policy. 

If the mistaken credence 
given to the report of Kim’s 
death serves to illustrate the 
dangers of such substitution, 
then it will have served as a 
useful wanting. If it en- 
courages Western countries to 
consider more closely and 
more realistically fee possibil- 
ities of a post-Kim Korea, then 
the error could be positively 
beneficial 


Reagan’s influence 

From Mr Marshal A Phillips 
Sir, John O'Sullivan (feature, 
November 7) argued feat the 
influence of President Reagan, 
. barring some great convulsion, is 
likely to remain foe status quo and 
that even the recent mid-term 
elections, in which fee Democrats 
took control of fee Senate, do not 
doom Reaganism. 

Mr O’Sullivan certainly is en- 
titled to his opinion, but I would 
like to respectfully point out feat 
President Reagan’s personal 
popularity is one thing, his conser- 
vative agenda quite another. 

in election after election across 
America local personalities and 
issues dominated the debate, nor 
Reaganism. Nowhere was this 
demonstrated more cogently than 
California, where the uhra-tiberal 
Senator Alan Cranston was re- 
turned to • fee Senate despite 
President Reagan's three trips here 
to campaign personally for 
Cranston’s Republican opponent. 

If the President of the United 
States cannot persuade his own 
home state, where he was once a 
popular governor, then something 
is amiss in his agenda. 


Yes, people like Ronald Reagan, 
the man. He is a strong-sounding, 
appealing and affable personality 
mixing amusing anecdotes and 
patriotic slogans wife religious 
homilies. But the majority of 
Americans, and most certainly 
young Republicans, do not buy 
the Reagan conservative agenda. 

Young voters may be less 
willing to approve oflaige outlays 
of public foods for social welfare 
programs for the poor, but polls 
show them to be opposed to 
Reagan's agenda of supporting 
prayers in the public schools, bis 
rigid anti-abortion and anti-gay 
rights stance, his military aid to 
the Contras in Nicaragua, his 
attitude rewards South Africa, and 
most emphatically his refusal to 
deal decisively wife toxic wastes 
and environmental concerns. 

President Reagan is like a much 
loved avuncular friend; however, 
when he starts talking Reaganism 
our eyes glaze over and we 
respectfully Took the other way. 
Most sincerely, 

MARSHAL A PHILLIPS, 

1542 North Orange Grove Avenue, 
LosAu«fcs 90046* Gdifbnna, USA. 
November 12 


Thin blue line 

From the Chief Commandant of the 
Metropolitan Special Constabulary 
Sir, Your series of articles on fee 
police (November 10-14) has been 
interesting, but lacking in one very 
major component At no point 
have you made any reference to 
fee Special Constabulary, but at 
fee same time you have referred 
repeatedly to fee lack of numbers 
of police, and to the need for 
public support and understanding 
of the service. 

Such support is given in great 
abundance throughout fee coun- 
try by the Special Constabulary. 
The Metropolitan Special 
Constabulary, for whom alone I 
can speak, undertook 490,000 
hours of duty and training in 1 985. 
This represents 14,000 weeks of 35 
hours, or 269 working years! 
Yours faithfully, 

A A. HAMMOND, 

Chief Commandant,Metropolitan 
Special Constabulary, 

New Scotland Yard. 

Broadway, SWl. 

English in schools 

From Mr W. C. R. Whaltey 
Sir, Mr N. M. Jacobs' letter 
(November 13) suggests that Ani- 
mal Farm is too advanced a book 
for a child of 1 2 to understand. To 
penetrate deeply into Orwell's 
satire may indeed require a good 
deal of esoteric knowledge. On the 
other hand it may be read as a 
fairy tale, wife the inherent lesson 
that idealists in the end prove 
fallible. 

An earlier generation of chil- 
dren were given Gulliver's Travels 
to read, a similar type of satire 
wife rather more difficult lessons. 
Yours etc. 

W.WHALLEY, 

105 High Street, 

Hungerford, Berkshire. 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 19 1852 

The Duke of Wellington (1769- 
1852) died on September 14 and 
was buried under the dome of St 
Paul's, not far from Nelson. 
Sixteen military bands 
accompanied the procession; every 
regiment in the British Army was 
represented. Of the generals at the 
cathedral the oldest, at 84, urns the 
Marquis of Anglesey (1768-1854) 
who, as Lord Utoridge, had 
commanded the cavalry at 
Waterloo and lost a leg while on 
horseback beside the Duke. 


THE FUNERAL OF THE 
I DUKE OF WELLINGTON 

.. It almost seemed as if the 
whole world had assembled to 
witness t)be ceremonial, for the 
people were eve r ywh ere — buflt 
into the walk, swarming in the 
streets, and duetered Khe hives on 
every projection and parapet. 
When St James-street was 
lied, the double view, first, 
eastwards along Piccadilly, and 
then down towards the Palace, was 
singularly impressive . . . 

The entire breadth of Piccadilly 
waB closed in with an wn^nlnff^p t. 
of men and women, numbers of 
jobs, carts, coac he s, and omni- 
buses having been placed in the 
roadway to give their occupants a 
more commanding view. The fine 
of procession now led along the 
region of dubs ... Crockfbrds and 
the Co ns ervative Chib were the 
two buildings which seamed to 
hold the greatest number of people 
and which made the grea t est 
show . . . 

The Oxford and Cambridge 
Club, the Army and Navy, the 
Carlton, the Reform, the 
Travellers’ and the Athenaeum, all 

swarming with occupants The 

Haymarket and Tra&lgar-square 
were, like Waterioo-piace, great 
centres of attraction. At the latter 
point there could not have been 
much less than 40,000 people 
assembled; and the National Gal- 
lery, fee roof of which was covered 
with spectators, borrowed from the 
scene a grace ami animation which 
it never knew before. At Charing- 
cross, as along fee entire route, 
nothing could he more remarkab le 
than the decorous and orderly 
conduct of the multitude, who 
preserved an imposing and expres- 
sive silence as the car went by. The 
humblest man bared his head in 
the same re v eren t ial manner as his 
betters, ami the only cry that was 
heard was, now and then. “Off 
hatsf” ... Ail the cross streets 
feeding out of the Strand presented 
in a still more striking manner the 
appearances we have described at 
earlier points of the route . . . The 
shop windows had been turned to 
account in a most marvellous way, 
and inclosed numbers of full-grown 
people, compressing themselves for 
the occas io n into fee dimensions of 
charity-school children. - - 
The car arrived at the entrance 
to the cathedral about ten minutes 
after twelve, and preparations for 
the removal of the coffin were 
immediately made, but something 
was wrong, or went wrong, and the 
consequence was a delay of nearly 
an hour and a half before the 
funeral procession down the nave 
could be formed. In the interval, 
and while the undertakers’ men 
used every exertion to facilitate the 
unloading of the car, fee entrance 
to the cathedral presented a singu- 
lar and not uninteresting spectacle. 
There were old generals and field 
officers, the illustrious companions 
in arms of fee Duke, enduring as 
best they could fee farce of fee 
searching November wind which 
blew keenly through the open 
doorway of the sacred edifice. The 
distinguished foreigners withdrew 
before it several times, and the 
clergy, who, in double lines extend- 
ing along the nave, waited for the 
service to begin, vainly sheltered 
their faces in their robes. Garter 
and his colleagues stood it out 
bravely, and, after many efforts, at 
len gt h succeeded in lwyh^iiirig 
fee procession. It was a fine and an 
imposing sight to see the muster of 
old veterans at fee entrance during 
this detention — Sir William 
Napier sitting on a kettle -drum — 
Sir Charles moving about with the 
activity of a much younger man — 
Lord Hardinge, also, vigorous and 
foil of life; but, most wonderful of 
all, the Marquis of Anglesey, with 
bald, uncovered head, apparently 
unconscious of the fact that age 
stands expos u re to cold less suc- 
cessfully than youth. The display, 
of orders, stars, and ribands here 
was quite overpowering. . . . 

It was wife regret that we| 
observed the unseemly appearance j 
of the entrance to the cathedral, 
wife portions of the timber-work 
unremoved, and the roughest 
marks of the carpenter painfully 
visible at its threshold- - . . The 
funeral pomp, splendid as it was, is 
nothing, but *h«> mfltion and a fodf 
of mourners will be remembered as 
a historic fact — a shining pr 
that we have not forgotten to value | 
patriotism, and that the memory < 
him who on so many fieidsl 
defended the liberties of his coun-1 

tty is embalmed in the hearts of her) 


flat lax 

From Mr H. £. M. Crowle 

Sir, Mr Wood (November 4) is 
horrified at the installation of 
“slot machine . . . electric plastic 
candles'* in Italian churches, even, 
he writes, in the Cinque Terre. But 
all is not plastic, yet 

My wife and I visited these 
same villages this year and were 
fortunate to be in Monterosso on 
Good Friday evening. At nightfall 
we found ourselves joining a 
procession of most of the inhab- 
itants, who were carrying “living” 
candles through streets that were 
lined with hundreds of “living” 
candles fluttering in improvised 
cups of waxed paper on both sides 
of the roadway. Although strings 
of coloured electric lights had been 
hung aloft in Christmas tree 
fashion, there were also some 
“living” candles on balconies and 
at windows. 


It was unforgettably simple and 
beautiful, unspoilt either by pre- 
mature preparation or, on the 
following morning, by the slightest 
trace of what had just flickered 
into life for that one night of the 
Easter holiday. 

Yours faithfully. 

H. E. M. CROWLE 
24 St Leonard's Road. 

Exeter, Devon. 

From Sir Geoffrey Jackson 
Sir, Our American cousins have 
found the golden mean between 
plastic/electric church candles (Mr 
Wood, November 4) and the 
guttering depredations of wax 
(Mrs Gordon, November 8). Their 
plastic altar candles contain a fas 
cartridge which produces a live 
and dear, pure light. 

The sacred and the propane, as 
it were! 

Yours faithfully. 

GEOFFREY JACKSON. 

63b Cadogan Square, SWl. 


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facing 
Europe 
over jobs 


W bether facing 
terrorists, nego- 
tiating with the 
Americans or 
discussing its 
own internal affairs, the EEC 
has a shaky record on achiev- 
ing concerted action. Even the 
most savage external threats 
seem to highlight divisions 
rather than unity within the 
Community; short-term na- 
tional interest always seems to 
triumph over the common 
good. 

But the long-term challenge 
to the Community’s way of 
life may stem more from 
industrial decline than from 
the bomb and the bullet. 

High unemployment 
throughout the Community 
and a constant failure by all 
member states (with the pos- 
sible exception of West Ger- 
many) to keep pace with the 
US and Japan in information 
technology, suggest that so 
long as the 12 do not hang 
together they shall indus- 
trially, be hanged apart. 

The way forward (if there is 
any) has to lie in co-operation 
across the borders of EEC 
members so that the 
Community's workforce can 
build up its skills and exper- 
tise. particularly in IT, as 
swiftly as possible. 

The action begins next 
week. The People and Tech- 
nology conference and ex- 
hibition, to be held on 
November 25-27 at the Queen 
Elizabeth II Conference 
Centre. Westminster, is the 
first attempt to bring together 
leading EEC decision-makers 
and industrialists to tackle the 
question of how the 12 can 
share knowledge and learn 
from each other's experience. 

Sponsored jointly by the 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion and the Commission of 
the European Communities, it 
is widely considered a signifi- 
cant contribution by Britain 


during its EEC presidency to 
the process of thinking 
Communitaire in the drive to 
upgrade technical and teach- 
ing skills to meet the needs of 
the information technology 
era. 

In political terms, the event 
will be star-studded. Lord 
Young from the Department 
of Employment and Kenneth 
Baker from the Department of 
Education and Science will be 
giving the main speeches on 
each of the two big conference 
days and it is likely that the 
opportunity will be used — at 
least by the Department of 
Education and Science — to 
make some mqjor policy 
statements. 

From the European 
Commission' there will be 
high-level delegates represent- 
ing the 12 member statesi 
Manuel Martin — the 
Commission vice-president 
responsible for employment, 
social affairs, training and 
education — is expected to 
speak on the EEC’s future 
policy on training and the new 
technologies. 

Finally, there will be a 
constant background of lobby- 
ing for money the EEC is 
making available for develop- 
ment work in this area, not 
least the well-upholstered 
COMET 1 programme to 
encourage links between 
higher education and industry 
in new technology. 

This is not the first time the 
impact of the Community has 
been felt on the training scene 
within Britain. Much of the 
funding for the Youth Train- 
ing Scheme, for example, 
comes from EEC coffers and 
there are several small-scale 
local projects which would 
never have got off the ground 
without the financial tacking 
of the Social Fund’s innova- 
tion programme. 

What is distinctive about 
People and Technology is that 



Flying the flag: top, Peter 
Tji ms, director of an Open 
Tech project and, from left, 
Lord Young, Employment 
Secretary, Kenneth Baker, 
Education Secretary and 
Manuel Martin, European 
C ommiss ion vice-president 
responsible for employment, 
social affairs, training and 
education 

The People and 
Technology Conference will 
be held at the Queen 
Elizabeth Conference 
Centre, Westminster, 
November 25-27 


it aims to bring together from 
across Europe, top politicians, 
leading trainers and tech- 
nological innovators so they 
can learn from each other, and 
to foster long-term co- 
operation. 

In other words, and unlike 
some other EEC projects, 
simply throwing European 
Currency Units (ECUs) at die 
problem is not enough. The 
exchange of information and 
expertise is what really 
matters. 

The exhibition also pro- 
vides a great opportunity for 
leading British producers of 
training materials and courses 
to put their poods before a 
European audience. 

Leading players such as the 
Centre for Advanced Manu- 
facturing Technology in Shef- 
field, Interactive Information 
Systems and Macmillan Intek 
will be demonstrating then- 
products alongside some of 
the more enterprising trainers 








from France; West Germany, 
Ireland and Italy. 

Bringing together the best of 
the 12 to share and compare is 
at the heart of People and 
Technology. But perhaps the 
most practical symbol of this 
endeavour is the official EEC 
Euro TecneT network of 
demonstration projects which 
will be taking centre stage for 
much of the conference. 

Euro TecneT is part of the 
EEC's Action Programme on 
IT and training, and its 
particular virtue is that it 
brings together Europe’s real 
grass-roots pioneers of new 
techniques and 

methodologies. 

Nothing could be limber 
from the remote bureaucrats 
of Brussels, for example, than 
the Information Technology 
Centres (ITeC) Consultancy 
Unit, which is based in dingy 
premises in a west London 
tack street. 

But the work being done by 


ITCH is genuinely innovative 
and, as a member of Euro 
TecneT, it now has the 
opportunity to meet and talk 
about other trail-blazing 
projects in West Germany, 
France, Italy and elsewhere so 
that the benefits of its work 
can be pooled and passed on. 

There are more than 70 
demonstration projects within 
the Euro TecneT and several 
will be represented, both dur- 
ing the conferences and in the 
exhibition. 

The projects deal with prob- 
lems that are familiar to a 
British audience even though 
the educational or social con- 
text might be different 

For example; a scheme 
based at St Etienne du 
Rouvroy in France is designed 
to equip young people of 
modest educational attain- 
ments with enough data- 
processing skills to get them 
an office job in finance or 
accountancy. 


If Euro TecneT can start 
pumping out such informa- 
tion across the Community, it 
will be playing a valuable role. 

A great worry for traditional 
engineering outfits — es- 
pecially those of small to 
medium size — is how to 
retain their workers in the new 
IT-linked techniques. At the 
Bfldungswerk der Berliner 
Wirtschaft in Berlin they think 
they have gone some way 
towards solving this problem. 

At a time when there is 
more gloom than hope about 
the chances of industrial 
regeneration and the reduc- 
tion of the unemployment 
figures, it is some small 
consolation perhaps that the 
problem is at root a European 
rather than a purely British 
phenomenon. 

At the People and Technol- 
ogy conference there may be a 
chance to show that the Old 
World is not beaten yet. 


Britain shows 
the way in 

open learning 


One of tire few areas of 
training in which the 
UK an indisputable 

world lead is In developments 
in “open” or “distance” 


Carrying the flag in tire 
Euro TecneT for our achieve- 
ments in this field, on Novem- 
ber 25 and 26, will be tire Open 
Tech project in computer- 
aided engineering based at 
Wariey College of Technology 
in the West Midlands. 

Peter Lucas, the project 
director 1 , said: “We are looking 
forward to the conference but, 
to be honest, I think that oar 
colleagues in Europe wifi be 
teaming more from us than we 
shall from them.” 

What beckons Mr Lucas to 
the conference, however, is the 
chance to start selling 
Wariey 's open-learning 
materials to an EEC audience. 
Tire coarse provides 300 hoars 
of training, including 175 
hours of “hands-on” use of 
industrial software and hard- 
ware. And there is a possibility 
that this could become a big 
seller to western European 
engineering companies. 

Mr Lucas said: “Our course 
is aimed at technicians and 
managers who have had some 
industrial experience but who 
know little about sew technol- 
ogy. We've currently got learn- 
ers from big organizations 
such as GEC Avionics and 
English Electric Valves right 
down to snail companies 
employing just 10 people.” 

The interesting feature of 
the Wariey CAE coarse is that 
when learners sign on, they get 
handed not just books but also 
a low-cost, computer-graphics 
work-station called Hefctor, 
devised by Mr Lucas and his 


Hektor, which can be linked 
to the central Wariey coan- 
puter by telephone line, under- 
lines the way that high 
technology itself is now bong 
used to deliver training in 
high-technology skills. 

Through the Hektor work- 
station, learners are able to 
follow the 11 modules within 
the project (in subjects such as 
computer-aided, two-dimen- 
sional draughting and design, 
three-dbnefisioQai solid mod- 


elling, flexible manufacturing 
systems, and computer 
numerically controlled 
machinery), then take assess- 
ments, which can be monitored 
by the project's staff. 

So though learners are able 
to study in their own time, and 
at their own pace and place, it 
still means that checks and 
tutorials can be made to help 
them individually. 

Warley has set up 2© cen- 
tres around the country, 
through which its learners can 
have access to the CNC ma- 
chines that make up the real- 
life engineering hardware of 
the high-tech era. Though the 
computer work is the exact 
replica of what the learners 
would use in a “real work” 
situation, it is obviously essen- 
tially vital that they should be 
able to see the results of their 
programming achieved in 

Special training 
at a remarkably 
low price 

practice on authentic CNC 
machine tools. 

By making the machine 
tools available on this “pooF 

basis, Wariey is able to deliver 

training in these sophisticated 
and capital-expensive skills at 
a remarkably low price; the 
cheapest module is £60, the 
most expensive £180. 

Of course, costs need to be 
at this kind of level if tire 
medium-size engineering com- 
panies, which desperately 
need to update (heir skills, are 
going to be able to afford tire 


All the signs are that the 
numbers enrolled on the War- 
ley course wOl grow and grow. 
Recruitment so for has been by- 
word of mouth, magazine arti- 
cles. risks and the occasional 
advertisement. But tire People 
and Technology exhibition, at 
which Wariey has a stand, will 
be the first opportunity for Mr 
Lucas to present his materials 
to an EEC-wide audience. 

Once trainers on tire Conti- 
nent can be persuaded to get 
over their initial unfrunQiarity 
with distance-learning, its 
many virtues should receive a 
warm welcome. 



PEOPLE & TECHNOLOGY 

INVESTING IN TRAINING FOR EUROPE'S FUTURE 


★ ★★ 



A MAJOR CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION ON 
EDUCATION & TRAINING FOR THE NEW TECHNOLOGIES 

[ Sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities and the 

I t Manpower Services Commission. 

25-27 November 1986 

Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, Westminster, London. 

A major conference and exhibition on education and training for the new technologies, tackling 
the urgent priority of expanding and improving training in the new technologies within the 
European Community. It will be the most extensive exchange of ideas, of training information and 
techniques and is a major commercial, political and educational event, organised in London 
during the United Kingdom presidency of the EEC 




EXHIBITION COMPLIMENTARY INVITATION 


HOWTO 
GET THERE 


CLCewgfS,,, 


DC. 


Parking v 
Square 


VHtfeflSlrMT S >'*1 ■£ 

,Zf=5k\ 




This coupon entitles you to free 
admission to the exhibition. 


OPENING TIMES 

Tuesday 25th November 0930-1730 
Wednesday 26th November 0930-1730 
Thursday 27th November 0930-1700 


Q 


A QUSNSmLE EVENT 


I *i</ rTJ, 1 l oup 

FURTHER INFORMATION AND ADDITIONAL INVITATIONS 

Joyce Fernandez, Queensdale Exhibitions & Conferences Ltd., Blenheim House, 137 Blenheim Crescent, London Wn 2EQ. 

Td: 01 727 1929. Telesc 261763 DRESS G 


COMMISSION 
OF THE 
EUROPEAN 
COMMUNITIES 


The Commission of the European Communities publishes a 
variety of information, brochures and magazines concerned 
with education, training and technological change. Among 
them can be found: 


- Social Europe 


- EuroTecneT 


- Transition 
programme 

- Interact News 


- Journal of 
European 
network for 
readaptation 
centres 

- Eurydice 


- Informisep 


the main information outlet for developments 
in social affairs at European Level. 

Contact address - Official Publications Office 
of the E.C., L-2985 Luxembourg 

the newsbulletin of the Commission’s 
programme on New Information Technologies 
and Vocational Training. Contact address - 
European Centre for Work & Society, 

P.O. Box 3073, NL-6202 NB Maastricht 

the Commission’s coordination programme to 
assist young people to prepare for adult and 
working life. Contact address - IFAPLAN, 32 
Square Ambiorix, 1040 Brussels. 

information on the Commission’s network of 
district projects for the insertion of disabled 
people into active life. Contact address - 
Bureau Interact, 32 Square Ambiorix, Bte 47, 
B-I040 Brussels. 

news about programmes for the disabled in 
various readaptation centres. Contact address 
- Commission of the E.C., Division V/C/3, 
200, rue de la Loi, B-1049 Brussels 


education information network in the E.C. 
for the mutual exchange of relevant 
information between Member States. 

Contact address - European Unit of Eurydice, 
17 rue Archimede, Bte 17, B-1040 Brussels. 

publication on developments in employment, 
training and related policies in Member 
States. Contact address - European Centre 
for Work & Society, P.O. Box 3073, 

NL-6202 NB Maastricht. 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


21 


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PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY/2 


s charter for success 


* 


Whaiever ihe shortcomings of 
Britain's industrial performance 
there is never a lack of bright people 
coming up with innovative ideas 
Entrepreneurial individuality, rather 
than mass movement, is the British 
forte. 

Dr Reza Ziarati is a Turkish Kurd 
by birth but a British engineer bv 
adoption. Within the loose fhun^. 
work provided by colleges of technol- 
ogy- and the Manpower Services 
Commission, Dr Ziarati has been 
able to carve a niche for his infectious 
energy for engineering training. 

.As head of the Department of 
Engineering ai the Southampton 
Institute ofHigher Education and the 
designer of the Euro TecneT Project 
on Multiskilling for Mechanical En- 
gineers, he is bringing the benefits of 
his original thinking to a Europe-wide 
audience. 

Dr Ziarati says: "For 25 years 
Britain has watched itself falling 
behind its industrial competitors^ 
There has been no lack of awareness. 
In fan there has been a ceaseless 
supply of conferences and official 1 
reports commenting on it. 

“Yet still there is a lack of decisive 


action actually to change things and 
tackle the problem seriously." 

Dr Ziarati is now a pan of what 
could _ be called the Educational 
Establishment, but he believes that 
the educational system has a lot to 
answer for. Even the really gifted 
technology educationists and 
researchers of recent years have not 
often been interested in the practical 
use of their ideas on the factory floor. 

“It was." he says, “more a matter of 
intellectual curiosity than industrial 
application that inspired them." 

So if Britain is to catch the wave of 
new technology before it washes 
finally on to the shores of the Pacific 
Basin, technology-training courses 
need to be restructured along three 
lines. 

“First." says Dr Ziarati, “all tech- 
nology training needs to be taken out 
of the classroom and put into the 
workshop or laboratory. The kind of 
people who want to be practical 
technologists will have their enthu- 
siasm inspired only by working in 
practical surroundings. 

“Second, give trainees and students 
the real thing. Engineering has the 


reputation of being a difficult subject 
to learn. It is not difficult so long as 
students are training through using 
real equipment and dealing with real 
technical problems. 

“Third, forge links with industry. 
An academic establishment is in 
danger of losing its grip on the latest 
techniques unless it is constantly 
refreshed and inspired by working 
with engineers from industry. That 
means having strong contacts with 
local companies so as to undertake 
constantly joint projects with them." 

The proof of his formula lies in his 
own work. From his Southampton 
base he has work going on with 
companies such as Ford, BL, 
Rediffusion, JCB. Tetre-pak. Cam 
Gears. BP, Shell and British Steel As 
often as not, bis department is paid 
through donations of the latest equip- 
ment; that way. despite shortages in 
his budget, he can match the facilities 
of even his most advanced clients. 

For the Euro TecneT. Dr Ziarati is 
running a one-year Higher National 
Diploma course for unemployed 
technician engineers, which has been 


funded by the Manpower Services 
Commission. 

Through intensive “hands-on" 
experience and practical tuition, the 
students are introduced to computer- 
aided engineering and computer- 
integrated manufacture. The results 
have been tremendous. Almost all the 
students have immediately found 
jobs in local industry, providing 
companies with the middle manage- 
ment and supervisory knowledge that 
is essential if new technology is to be 
implemented successfully. 

Dr Ziarati says: “Analysis of the 
labour market in the United King- 
dom has shown clearly that there are 
tremendous ^aps at the higher tech- 
nician level in electrical, electronic 
and mechanical engineering. 

“The load of multi-skilling course 
which my colleagues and I have been 
running needs to be duplicated 
throughout the country if industry is 
to get the skilled manpower it needs." 

At the People and Technology 
conference, Dr Ziarati's talk will be 
entitled New Technology Strategies: 
Education/Industry Partnership. 



§ 


Innovation and energy: Dr Reza Ziarati head of the Department of Engineering , 
Southampton Institute of Higher Education 


“If we are going to get the 
benefits of the information 
age. then we need to improve 
our communications." savs 
Oleh Liber. “With the aid of 
new technology we can do this 
— provided the technology is 
fully exploited." 

Mr Liber heads the 
Information Technology 
Centre (ITeC) Training 
Materials Network (ITMN) 
which is, perhaps, the most 
exciting and unusual British 
project within the Euro 
TecneT network. 

The network is run by the 
Consultancy Unit 
< based at Notting Hill, west 
London). Its work has at- 
tracted widespread interest in 
Britain and abroad and led to 
a reputation for making the 
kind of imaginative leaps 
forward which the informa- 
tion technology (IT) age 
demands. 

As a result, there will be a 
special demonstration of the 
network for the People and 
Technology exhibition. Its im- 
pact could be far-reaching 
because it tackles the fun- 
damental issue of the way IT 
opens up communications on 
an unprecedented scale. 

'Traditionally." says Mr 
Liber, “communications to 
the public have been chan- 
nelled through newspapers, 
book publishers or broadcast- 
ing stations. Now, however, 
the potential exists for ma- 
terial to be put on to data 


Taking the 
creative 
leap ahead 
to meet 
demand 



Bright spark: a trainee elec- 
trician under the Youth 
Training Scheme, which is 
largely funded by the EEC 

bases by anybody then made 
available to everybody who 
wants to access iL 
“You no longer need to go 
through die intermediary of a 


“A trained workforce 
exploits new technology 
an untrained one 
becomes its victim . . . 



Macmillan Intekwas among the 
first arid largest of the MSCs Open 
Tech programme. 

Now it is one of the UK's leading 
providers of Open Learning 
packages for technical skills 
training in industry. These are 
successfully used by many major 
British companies. 

► We will be delighted to welcome 
you to our stand to 
demonstrate our 
quality multi- 
media packages 

to YOU. 

STAND B20 

PEOPLE & TECHNOLOGY 
EXHIBITION 



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centralized unit, which not 
only adds expense but can 
impose restrictions on what is 
being communicated." 

He recognizes that there 
may be long-term political and 
social implications for this 
mass freedom of communica- 
tion, but his immediate con 
cem is to put the technology at 
the service of industrial train- 
ers in IT. 

He adds: “It is moving very 
fast By producing training 
materials in the conventional 
way the likelihood is that by 
the time a book is published or 
software is sold, it will be out 
of date. 

“The answer is for the 
author or trainer to put their 
materials straight on to the 
computer so that it can be 
instantly indexed and 
accessed by anyone else who 
wants to use iL" 

Naturally, the other poten- 
tial users of this system would 
have to be members of a 
network. In Mr Liber’s case, 
the network is made up of the 
175 Information Technology 
Centres (TTeCs) scattered 
around the country. 

ITeCs are perhaps the most 
important contribution made 
by Britain to the task of mass 
education in IT literacy. Aris- 
ing from a one-off project in 
west London (in the same 
premises now occupied by 
ICTUj, the idea of an “open 
entry centre" for training in IT 
skills was taken up by 
Kenneth Baker (then at the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry) and turned into a 
nationwide facility. 

Now ITeCs are to be found 
in most big towns and cities, 
providing courses mainly, 
though not exclusively, for 
YTS trainees. 

Because ITeCs are at the 
sharpest possible end of IT 
training (dealing with adoles- 
cents who often lack any 
formal educational qualifica- 
tions). they are also proving 
the most resourceful and 
imaginative in devising 
appropriate learning materi- 
als. But, as Mr Liber points 
out, there is the danger of 
duplication as each ITeC tack- 
les the problem of producing 
course material for the latest 
bit of software or hardware 
which has appeared on the 
market. 

The answer is the instant 
pooling of materials and this, 
in essence, is the aim of the the 
network project. 

If the aim of creating ef- 
ficient, fast, mutual coopera- 
tion between EEC countries 
on new technology training is 
lo be achieved, then, without 
doubt, it depends on the work 
of people like Oleh Liber. 

“The joke is though that our 
funding is very* uncertain," he 
says. “We may enjoy some 
celebrity status now, but for all 
I know- we might all be out of a 
job this time next year. 

“One of my chief aims at 
the conference and exhibition 
is to meet some people who 
might have some money to 
keep us in business." 


Rare opportunity to lobby audience 


Too many trade exhibitions 
have the tired look of having 
seen it all before. The People 
and Technology Exhibition 
will be different. 

It is being held for the first 
and maybe the only time. 
Among die exhibitors there is 
a feeling of freshness because 
they see the event as a rare 
opportunity to make their case 
to a Europe-wide audience. 

People and Technology is 
not just about selling training 
packages, although there will 
be a lot of that. More im- 
portant perhaps is the forum it 
will provide for politicians 
and officials to lobby Europe's 
top decision-makers on the 
direction of training, technol- 
ogy. and employment policy. 

Foremost among these 
lobbyists will be the EECs 
own Youth Forum. According 
to Richard Doherty, the 
forum's Irish secretary, the 
event is an invaluable 
opportunity to raise the pro- 
file of the youth unemploy- 
ment-new technology issue. 

Mr Doherty says:“People 
under the age of 25 are 
disproportionately repre- 
sented among the un- 
employed throughout Europe. 
In Spain, for example, 45 per 
cent of young people are 
without work 2 nd there are 
similarly high figures in many 
other EEC countries. 


A Youth Forum 
will help to keep 
interests in focus 


“At the same time there are 
skill shortages in the high- 
technology industries and a 
low-participation rate in 
higher education compared 
with America and Japan. The 
problems are plain. It is a 
question of getting Europe- 
wide action to deal with iL" 
Mr Doherty believes that 
the EEC should play a vital 
rote in stimulating national 
governments to take action. 
As local priorities change, it 
needs an organization like the 
Youth Forum to keep the 
issue in focus because it is 
centra] to Europe’s future. 

He says: “There is a need for 
a change of culture within 
schools so that teachers start 
thinking technology right 
across the board. We have to 
generate initiatives for voca- 
tional preparation at the 
school level. 

Another exhibitor thin king 
about Europe-wide qualifica- 
tions is the Business and 
Technical Education Council 
(BTEQ. BTEC is already 
associated with Euro TecneT 
by its validation of several of 
the Euro TecneT projects. But 
the impending reorganiza- 
tions of British qualifications 
through the National Council 
for Vocational Qualifications 
(NCVQ) could open the doors 
for a wider application of 
BTEC awards. 

BTEC’s Tony Hirons 



THE OPEN 
UNIVERSITY: 
TRAINING 
ANS FRONTIERES 


"I he Open L'rjvvr-itv irs.'noc 
mure r.i TVur.ascivvT! 0 

it- 1 inoiivjv tbrvjjih Or*r Let mine 
mi*! bid* :h.’.r i - " I v i r :: 
Frii.’:r or iiufvpr Ard re.cm i 

Ihe hjchf-s' j 

thriii irii.r ji c\i 

USING TECHNOLOGY TO 
TEACH TECHNOLOGY 

ThpOpvn Lrivi-r-.it -..i .visi- 

Aiv- o <■’ 

Ik '-r-if ■iTMpfjjni.d cr.ssv.'K- c: 

rri.r.V i; p or w o rj c ■ \ »*■. .mm.* - 1 1 : J •«.- • 

• ijtv — v •~X ■ 

r*-v- 


nunagemcnl and technology skills at 
;ht-ir own pace, either singly or in 
supervised training groups. 

And the beauty of Open Learning is 
•hat it knows no frontiers. 

ALL THE SUBTECTS YOU NEED 
Emploi en, and students alike are 
raiding ihat the Open University 
siiderstends ihe 'faming needs of 
business and industry today. Open 
Um^er-in course* and training 
-.-hemes cur er general managemenr. 
marketing nuniiwcrurins. computer 
applications robotics, quality, space 
:r."no'irg\ .. i-urprising that 

.is er 2'AV compare w and urbanisation.* 


are already using OU training materials 
in Great Britain alone. 


PEOPLE & TECHNOLOGY 
EXHIBITION 
STAND A14/15 

EEC visitors specially welcome 


Customer Services. 

Continuing Education. 

The Open University. 

Milton Keynes MKT eAA. 

Tel: Milton Keynes u’K'Oto bis? 1 *!” 

THE OPEN UNIVERSITY 


9 


says: “Depending on what 
comes out of NCVQ, we could 
find that there is a correspon- 
dence between the levels of 
our awards and those in the 
EEC so that our Certificates 
and Diplomas could have 
European currency." 

BTEC is particularly in- 
terested in the exhibition be- 
cause it is a chance to show off 
its distance-learning package. 
Open BTEC, which focus on 
updating for business 
managexnenL 

“In general, though, our 
view is that students are going 
to want to make use of lots of 
different learning modes at 
different points in their career. 
By exhibiting at the People 
and Technology Conference, 
we can show that there are a 
range of study methods avail- 
able within the BTEC 
provision." 

If “Into Europe" becomes 
the battle-cry of the British 
exhibitors, none will yell it 
louder than Macmillan Intek. 
Having been created through 
the fusion of money and 
publishing skills from Mac- 
millan and the engineering 
and training expertise of the 
Southtek Open Learning 
project Macmillan Intek is 
now the largest provider of 
technical distance-learning 
material in the country. 

With its focus on basic 
electrical skills, electronics 
and CNC machine tools, the 
company believes it is provid- 
ing material that is very much 
needed. 

The company says its pack- 
ages are aimed primarily at 
ground-level staff and tech- 
nicians who are trying to 
grapple with the transition to 
new technology. 

A combination of work- 
book, computer program, 
videotape, audio-tape and a 
purpose-built practical kit 
works very well, the company 
says, and is particularly help- 
ful for people such as mainte- 
nance staff on shiftwork who 
are often the ones for whom 
retraining is most important 

Currently Macmillan Intek 
has 35 topics available and is 
selling to companies such as 
Kodak, I CL Mars Electronics, 
Lucas and Thorn EMI 
Protech. 

.As far as Hi-Port Systems is 
concerned, the aim of 
participating is to begin 
registering on the European 
training circuit. Hi-Port has 
developed a special keyboard 
training system which is now 
in use with the National 
Girobank, British Telecom, 
Barclays Bank and the AA. So 
having broken into the big 


companies in the UK, the 
move to Europe is the next 
logical step. 

Richard Needham who 
wrote the original Easyleam 
software, said: “We've de- 
vised our own dedicated ma- 
chine. We can then supply the 
software adapted to the 
particular needs of the cus- 
tomer. 

“There is still a lot of fear of 
keyboard skills, but these have 


to be overcome by staff at ail 
levels if full advantage is to be 
taken of the potential of 
computers. Clerical staff, for 
example, often need to be 
equipped with specific key- 
board skills due to the in- 
troduction of computerization 
or word-processing. 

“Our system has been 
shown to produce results to 
European formats. Basically at 
People and Technology we 


want to make the contacts 
with governmental and other 
organizations to explore what 
room there is for co- 
operation." 

It sounds, therefore, as if 
most of the people at the 
conference will have clear 
goals in mind. They won’t be 
there just for a jolly. It will be 
an occasion to make signifi- 
cant contacts and to set up 
serious deals. 


A 

a 

tet 

cr. 

nd 

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Ud 

jse 

:x- 

icc 

ng 

<ei 

ce. 

up 

the 

00 

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J1V 

me 

an 

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get 

the 

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ith 
: a 


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red 

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or- 




EDUCATING FOR EMPLOYMENT 

BTEC offers a range of nationally recognised qualifica- 
tions in a wide variety of subjects, including business & 
finance, agriculture, computing, construction, design, dis- 
tribution, engineering, hotel & catering, information 
technology, management, public administration and sci- 
ence. These courses are run in colleges, polytechnics and 
other centres throughout England Wales and Nonhem 
Ireland. 

There are four main categories of award: First. National. 
Higher National and Continuing Education - which can be 
studied by various methods including full time, pan time, 
sandwich, day and block release and open and distance 
learning. 

As part of its Continuing Education provisions, BTEC has 
also developed a range of short courses, specifically de- 
signed to equip adults for the changing world of work. 

Business and Industry are changing rapidly. New develop- 
ments and technology are affecting everyone's working 
life. BTEC’s modular courses providing work related 
qualifications benefiting both the individual and industry 
and commerce. 

Another recent BTEC innovation is the development of a 
range of open learning packages for business and manage- 
ment subjects under the tiile “Open BTEC - Updating for 
Buisness”. 

For more information on BTEC courses contact: 

BTEC (Business & Technician Education Council) 

P.R. Section 

Central House nnni; 

Upper Woburn Place 8 s* 

LONDON WC1H OHH I »■* IM - 1h •- 
Tel: 01-388-3288 mum BBS IIUIfiniErilKliiigl 




era 

nurw^DOClU 


together we're 
getting there 

You lace fierce competition, fast changing 
technology, new products, new processes. So finding 
and training your human resources is not just sound 
business sense -it's vital. That's where we come in. 
From classroom to boardroom we help you recruit 
more people of the right calibre, and then help to train 
them to levels of skill which match any available in the 
world. 

At EOS we take account of the career 
opportunities resulting from technological change and 
highlight creas of skill shortage. At ElfB our Advanced 
Technology Training Unit identifies skill needs, and finds 
the right training solutions for this priority area. 

Together; we help to deliver the human resources 
UK industry needs to achieve competitive success. 

We operate nationwide - contact us for more 

information: 

EITB/ECIS, 54 Clarendon Road, Watford, Herts. 
WD1 1 LB. Telephone: 0923 3844 1 . 


PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT 1 



WIJH A ST,RING'>,OF<-'SljGCESSEUM 
PROG RA M M t S..: VPS ARF.'THE^ON E v - 
STOP SOL'O IpON P0R .fNTTRACfXlVEs 
t TRAINING WFFDS.'. x' .r^' S 


oil 


Z? : ^RiNG 0273'72&686 OH WRITE TO jjM^THWAlTE AT:- v 

Svps Limited. 22£Ri ghton bqlj'are. ARtGirr on. Sussex bwM 




22 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 18: The Queen, 
accompanied by The Duke of 
Edinburgh, this morning 
opened ine new Lloyd's Build- 
ing. Lime Street, EC3. 

Having been received by the 
Right Hon the Lord Mayor (Sir 
David Rowe- Ham) and the 
Chairman of Lloyd's (Mr Peter 
Miller), Her Majesty opened the 
building and unveiled a com- 
memorative plaque. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh then toured die 
budding, aitm uteri a Reception 
and afterwards were entertained 
at luncheon. 

The Countess of Airtie, the 
Right Hon Sir William Head- 
line and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Blair Stewan-Wiison were in 
attendance. 

The President of the Republic 
of Uganda visited The Queen 
this evening. 

The Right Hon Margaret 
Thatcher, MP (Prime Minister 
and First Lord of the Treasury) 
had an audience of Her Majesty. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of the English-Speak- 
ing Union of the Common- 
wealth, this afternoon at Buck- 
ingham Palace presented prizes 
to winners of the English- 
Speaking Union English Lan- 
guage Competition and after- 
wards chaired a meeting of the 
Fn giith Language Committee. 

His Royal Highness, Presi- 
dent ofWWF International, this 
evening gave the 1986 World 
Conservation Lecture at Logan 
Hall University of London, 
Bedford Way, WC1. 

Brigadier Clive Robertson 
was in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, Chief Commandant, 
Women's Royal Naval Service, 
today visited HMS Neptune at 
Faslane and opened the new 
WRNS Accommodation Block. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty’s Lord- 
Lieutenant for Dunbartonshire 
(Brigadier A. Pearson) and the 
Commodore Clyde (Commo- 
dore Patrick Rowe, RNL 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, attended by Mrs Mal- 
colm Wallace, travelled in the 
Royal Train. 

The Queen was represented 
by the Lord Zuckerman at the 
Memorial Service for Mr Henry 
Moore which was held in West- 
minster Abbey today. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 18: Princess Alice, 


Duchess of Gloucester, as Presi- 
dent, was present this morning 
at a Meeting of the Ladies 
Guild of the St John Opthalmic 
Hospital in Jerusalem held at 1 
Grosvenor Crescent, London. 
SWI. 

Mrs Michael Harvey was in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Gloucester was 
present at the Memorial Service 
for Mr Henry Moore which was 
held in Westminster Abbey 
today. 

In the evening His Royal 
Highness presented the Torch 
Trophy Trust Awards at Simp- 
son (Piccadilly) Ltd, London. 
Wl. 

Lieuteuantt-Colonel Sir Si- 
mon Bland was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
was present this evening at a 
Reception given by the Wor- 
shipful Company of Fanmakers 
at St Botolph's Hall. 
Bishopsgate. London, EC3. 

Mrs Enan McCorquodale was 
in attendanoe- 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
November 18: Princess Alexan- 
dra this afternoon opened the 
new conference facilities of the 
Postgraduate Medical Centre at 
Si Richard's Hospital, Ouch- 
ester, West Sussex. 

Afterwards, Her Royal High- 
ness opened "The Cherries**, a 
Chichester Health Authority 
residential home for mentally 
handicapped children, in Col- 
lege Road, Chichester. 

Lady Mary Mum ford was in 
attendance. 


Princess Anne, Chancellor of 
London University, will visit 
Charing Cross and Westminster 
Medical School at die Reynolds 
Building, St Dunstan's Road. 
W6, on November 28. She will 
also visit the Institute of Dental 
Surgery at the Eastman Dental 
Hospital. 256 Gray’s Inn Road. 
Princess Anne, CbJoneJ-in-Chief 
of The Royal Corps of Signals, 
will attend part of the corps 
committee meeting at regi- 
mental headquarters, 56 Re- 
gency Street. SWI, on 
November 28. She will meet 
members of the headquarters 
staff and have lunch with the 
corps committee members. 

Lady Davtna Windsor is nine 
yean old today. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Peter Kent will be held 
at St James's, Piccadilly, at 
11.30am today. 

A service of thanksgiving for tbe 
life of Lord Crawsbaw of 
Ain tree will be held at St 
Margaret's, Westminster, at 
noon on Wednesday, December 
10. ___ 


Scholarship 

offer 

Two Francis Mathew travelling 
scholarships, worth £750 each, 
are being offered by the Educa- 
tional Charity of (he Stationers' 
and Newspaper Makers' Com- 
pany to Britons aged between 18 
and 35 who are either employed 
in printing, publishing or ibej 
paper industry, or who inte nd to 
make a career there. The 
scholarships are a memorial to a 
former manager of The Times. 

Application forms are avail- 
able from the charity's secretary 
at Pharmacia House. Mid- 
summer Boulevard. Milton 
Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK9 
3HP. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Bask Bruno, 25: Mr Arthur 
Coleridge. 71: Miss Kathleen 
Halpin, 83; Baroness Jeger, 71; 
Professor Anthony King, 52; 
Admiral of the Fleet Lord 
Lewin, 66; Dr P. T. Matthews, 
67; Mr Goald Parcons-Smith, 
75; Sir Cement Pleass. 85; Air 
Marshal Sir Kenneth Porter, 74; 
Sir Bernard Scott, 72 ; Professor 
Margaret T urcer-Warwick. 62. 


Appointments 

Mr D.E J). Johnson, of Market 
Drayton, Shropshire, and Mr 
ILE. Whitfield, of Standon, to 
be Deputy Lieutenants for 
Staffordshire- 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr N.T.G- Galbraith 
and Miss QJL Bnritbwaite 
The engagement is announced 
between Norman, son of the 
Hon Norman and Mrs Gal- 
braith, of Overncwton. Hadd- 
ington, and Quona, daughter of 
Major GG. Brailh waite. of 
Lochmalony, Cupar, and of the 
late Mrs Ann M. Brafthwafte. 

Mr SJ. Cook 
and Miss CMA Holmes 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen John, only son 
of Mr and Mrs Bernard Come, of 
Rainham, Essex, and Caroline 
Margaret Anne, younger daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs John Holmes, 
of Weymouth. Dorset, formerly 
of Whitchurch, Oxfordshire. 

Mr M. Craven 
and Miss SJN. Massing 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mis M. Craven, of Fetsted, 
Essex, and Susan, daughter of 
Mr and Mis AS. Magasiner, of 
Hampstead. 

Mr R. Hambktt 
and Miss SF- Bona va 
The engagement is announced 
between Rex, elder son of Mr B. 
Hamblen, of Alderney, and Mrs 
Eric Goodeve and stepson of Mr 
Eric Goodeve. of East Dean, 
Sussex, and Susan, younger 
daughterof Mis B. Bona ver and 
the late Major R.W. Bona ver, of 
Malta. 

Mr A. Harris 
and Miss A. Butts worth 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, youngest son 
of Mr Bank Harris, of Salis- 
bury. Wiltshire, and Mrs Jean 
Harris, of Sway, Hampshire 
and Alexandra, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs David Butterworth, of 
Boldre, Lymington, Hampshire. 

Mr CT. Rolls 
and Miss FJL Staughbw 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, younger son of 
the late Mr Thomas Rolls and of 
Mrs June Rolls, of West Sussex, 
and Fiona, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs David Staughton. 
of Latimer, Buckinghamshire. 

Mr PJ. Snowden 
and Miss EM. ADcodt 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul Boothby, elder 
son of Mr and Mis Philip 
Snowden, of Wickersley, York- 
shire. and Elizabeth Mary, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Geof- 
frey Allcock, of Southampton, 
Hampshire. 


Marriages 


The Hon JLM. Lopes 
and Miss SAJ*. Baker 
The marriage took place on 
Friday. November 7, in Devon, 
between the Hon Henry Massey 
Lopes, eldest son of Lord and 
Lady Roborough, of Bickham 
Barton, Roborough, near Plym- 
outh, and Miss Sarah Anne 
Pipon Baker, second daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Colin Baker, ofThe 
Glebe House, Peter Tavy, 
Tavistock, Devon. A service of 
dedication win take place later. 

Mr VA. Morrison 
and IVOss P. Chhtndt 
The marriage took place at 
Christchurch, Port Sunlight, 
WirraL on Saturday. November 
15, of Mr Vincent Anthony 
Morrison and Miss Pauline 
Chhtock. 



Mr Jeremy Thorpe with Dame Peggy Ashcroft (centre) and Mrs Thorpe 
Westminster Abbey yesterday (Photograph: Leslie Lee). 


outside 


Service for Henry Moore 


The Queen was represented by 
Lord Zuckerman, OM, at a 
service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Mr Henry 
Moore, OM, CH, held yesterday 
in Westminster Abbey. The 
Duke of Gloucester read the 
second lesson. 

The Dean of Westminster 
officiated, assisted by the Rev 
Alan Luff Precentor, and the 
Rev Michael Thompson, 
Sacrist. Dame Peggy Ashcroft 
read the first lesson and an 
address was given by Sir Ste- 
phen Spender. 

The Right Rev EG. Knapp- 
Ftsher, Canon Trevor Beeson, 
Canon Anthony Harvey and 
Canon r-hartus were 

robed and in the samarium. The 
Prime Minister and the Lord 
Mayor of Westminster at- 
tended. Others present 
included: 

Mr and Mrs R Oannwsfcl Own-tn-taw 
and daughtcrl. MH Mary DanowsM 
(granddaughter). Mrs EPtxabeUi 
H-owarth uttter). Mr August, Peatm 
utenson). Mr and Mrs W J H 
Shepherd. Mr and Mrs John Rood. Mr 


Edward Ford Mrntoy and rwIBiw . Alec 1 
Order of Marti). Sir Rfdimtf Crvo Conn, 
(vxdcera), sar Rear Strong (Victoria and 
Albert Mineral). Mr diaries and Lady 
Katherme Farcan. Mr Hid me Hon 
Mrs J Baleon. 

Mr Michael Cohrtn. MP. t rep r eaen i- 
tng DM Minister for the Arts). Mr 
Patrtc* Carmack- MP. Mr Frauds 

Warner. Mr aod Mrs John Profumo. 

Mr Andre O rtar zy rafc L Mrs B Alteon. 

Mbs Lesley Abaeta. Mrs H Brooke. Dr 
A Borg- Miss L Browse. Mr R Bruce. 

Mrs P Brown. Mrs S Baker. Mr and 
Mrs G Bunihaft- Mr and Mis Anthony 
Caro. Mr R W W Dawe. Professor J 
Hedgecoe. Mr M Havrtoek- Allan. Mr 
P Heron. Dr P Hm, Dr Demtt Farr. 

TGH James. Mrs A M Kenny/Mr P 
Keoia. Professor am Mrs R Orr. Mr H 
M OTerrafl. Mr John Piper. CH. and 
Mrs Piper, Mr D PatUnson. Mr and 
Mrs E Wilmas. Mr am Mrs I M Pei. 

Mr T PhflMps. Mr F Martm. Mr Tom 
Scherer. Dr and Mrs R Rowe, tt- S 
Reynolds. Mr R RoCtas. Mias Irene 
Worth, Mr am Mrs L Waddlngfna. Mr 


Reid and Lefevre. Ne w Ar t 
■■■t. Atricsm Fine Art Centre. 
Pattam How Galle ry Trust- 
Fine Art. Georgeto wn OaDesy O f Art. 
Charleston Tr ust. Cenu e rtroose Arts. 
Munches! sr. Csvattero Ftop Arts. 
Ho«n Mussyn. Cambcrweg School 
of Arts and Crafts. Fi lends of 
Wakefield Art Oaoni and Miaeim£ 
WOdenstefn and , Company . Motyto 

gmamTunur Society. Sonia 
■Dnstad Foundaoans. 
bMOvK Society. Dud- 


Bishop -5 Stanford 
ley Consultants. 


Mrs Paul Arten-Oart*. Mr 

Charles ArdenOark*. Mr am Mrs A 
j Bryce. Mr M J Darroch-Tho mp aon. 
MISS Anna Elusion. 

Members of the PlPkanahc Ooga. 
(he Duke of Beaufort- the E art of 
Snowdon, the Earl of Perm, the Earl 
of Westmorland (Sotheby's). Vbcouot 
Esher. Lord Houghton Of Sowethy. 
CH. Lord Hayne. Lord and L*& 
walsion. Lord Hutchinson of 
LuUIngton. QC. Lord Stewart of 
Fulham. CH- Lady Beaumont of 
Whitley. Baroness Lee of Ashertdge. 
Baroness Btrk. Lord Goodman. QL 
Lord and Lady Cooedoe. Lady (Sark. 
Lady Dunsany. Lady Hot. Lady 
Cordon-Walker. Lady 8li« of 

tt » Im nlfln 

Mr Michael Foot MP. and Mis 

Foot. Mr and Mrs Jeremy Thorpe 

(Britten EstafeL the Hon David and 
Mrs Aster. Sir Georg and Lady SoitL 
Sir Trencliart Cox. Sir Robert and 
Lady Satnstoonr. Lady Spender, str 
Hugh Casson. CH. Sir LeSle and Lady 
Martin. Str Andrew Carnwath. Lady 
DunnetL Lady Cfbbert. Lady Hrady. 
Geoffrey JeOlcoe. Sir WUUam 


J W M Thompson- 

Barraciougli tscuipture department) 
and Professor Alistair Cram (urtat- 
maktng deparanenu: Mr NKhoias 
Sercfa (WTurechanrt Art ChBetyX Dr 
Terry Friedman (Leeds CUy Arts 
GaBertesj. Professor P George 
School of Fine Art). Mr 

wannaroaker antamaBonal L 

sneare Globe Centre) and Mrs 
Wtonnsmufcer. Mr Roger d* Grey 
(president. Royal Academy of Arts). 
Mr Luke Fanner cats Council of 
Great Britain), Mr Alan BownessfTate 
Gallery) with Mr R MorpheL Mr D 
- Fraser-Jenklns and Miss J Conlns; 
MU C Barnett (Friends of the This 
Gallery), canon D H Bishop (chair- 
man. Art In Churches). Miss Nancy 
Balfour (Art Services Grant). Mr HP 
Croorojohnson (The QoeenJ Wert- 
notnster and CM) Service RtOeai. Mr 
and Mrs David Finn (Ruder. Finn and 
Rotman) with Dr and Mrs Ralph 




Theatre Consultants. Casson 
Beckman. David LawiDeaagm. Much 
Kadham Parish Ojuncfl. David Lows 

oSSsT Marter tatemattmaL British 

Nunano Aaoctattan. Giassocte Build- 

Ing Cmtractors. PWffipTaDd Drew 
sSxhe Barker Aasortalcn. Lund 

I ' ■ 

and Scott 
Edwin watsonl 



Keswick. Sir Norman and U*dy rnmm 
Str Janes and Lady Richards. Lady 
Read. Sir Denys Lasdun. Sir Dads 

Foandaaon) I 

[Sir David WTiaon 


Hamilton (Henry M oore FQondatkml 

and Lady 


(British Mueui) Sir David Orr 
(British Council i. Sir Rex Richards 
(Levertuume Trust). Professor Sir 
Hermann Boodl (.Churchill College. 
Cambridge} and Lady BandL Sfr 


DrCl MdLioiock and Dr Jtdm 
McLtmock (Henry Moore dtpic) . Mr 
David Elbotl (Minnim of l^pd^AArt- 
Oxfono. Mr J GPoOart 
M mean. CarobrtdQeft DTE Jfc 
retty of Bumingham Gaaeries sec- 
SSI Mr M Sheppard and Mr M 

anoiOb Mr Peter Murray (Yorkshire 
Sculpture Park). 

(museums officer. City of Wakefield 
fitetrka CouncOL OolatopheT 

GUhew (Leeds CKy Art C^HeryX htt A 

Wetntraub (WeUitraub Gallery. New 

V Mra P Deitz -Morgan (editor. Hudson 
Renew. New * YorkL Mr WUUam 
Withrow (Art CaBery ofOotartoland 
represen tahves of Vfert Dean O Mege. 
Chelsea School or Art. Thomas Gltoori 
Fine Art. Redfeni GaUonr. Mart- 
Fine Art (LondonX C C A 
. Curwen Studio and Ca Ber y . 


Requiem Mass 

Sir Michael Hogan 
Requiem Mass for Sir Michael 
Hogan was celebrated by the 
Right Rev Patrick Casey at the 
Church of Our Most Holy 
Redeemer and St Thomas 
More, Cheyne Row, yesterday. 
Mr Paul d’Ambrumeml read the 
lesson and Sir Ivo Rigby gave an 
address. Among those present 
were: 

LAdy Hosm (widow). Mrs NJgH 
Anthony. Mr David Binchy. Mrs V 
Ingram; Sk Robert Back. Sir John 
aod Lady PreadergasL Sir 



Best. Mr and Mrs J M Rowlands. 
Baron Vara. Mrs Paul d* AmbrumeniL 
Mn Anne Vacs. Mta Shirley Hiss. 
MHa MuHv HUs. Mr John Chubb. 
Mate- H Stanley. Rear- Admiral Brian 
Brayne-Nicfions. Mrs G M Saver. Mr 
Anthony 1 to pper. Mr and Mrs R 

n5r. < ? r e i gq? '-^ -9* 0*3? 

iOTKacU. Mrs RODSt ROUDSDn. Mr 
Charles A 0 King. Ms M P Voder 
(Catholic Women's League. Hong 
Kong) wtth Mrs J w Coakfey and Mrs 
Mary RawUnson: Mr N J 

Mr David Haines 

toraai 

Society of Hoag KonaTahd 
Mn Lindsay. 


Taylor): Mr R ST SSw 

I Qub) and Mr J F Lindsay (St 


Latest wills 

Mrs Annie Sherr, of Prestwich, 
Greater Manchester, left estate 
valued at £1,231,024 net She 
left most of her estate to a wide 
range of charities, including the 
Jewish Blind Society, the 
RSPCA, Salvation Army and 
Age Concern. 

Sir Bryan Harold Cabot Mat- 
thews, FRS, Of Swnffham 
Bulbeck, Cambridgeshire, 
professor of physiology at Cam- 
bridge University 1952-73, left 
estate valued ax £115341 net. 



FREQUENT 


Our 8 flights a week 
leave other airlines 
trailing behind. 



Wednesday Depart 1430 



Tuesday Depart 1900 

When you consider our schedule to Tokyo 
hardly surprising. 

We offer 8 flights a week from the UK to 
japan and we're the only airline to fty twice on 
Saturdays and non-stop on Tuesdays. 

So, travel on a Tuesday and you cut almost 
6 hours off your time in the air. 

All flights take off in the afternoon except 


Saturday Depart1230 Saturday Depart 1430 

for Tuesday's which departs in the evening. 
Thereby leaving ample time after arrival in Japan 
for a meal and a good nighft sleep before work 
the next day. 

And from Paris we have evening non-stop 
flights to Tokyo on Saturdays and Sundays. 

No wonder the others have trouble keeping 
up with us. 



JAPAfV JUR LfNES 


Everything you expect and more 


Luncheons 

HM G eranmtat 

Mr Tim Eggar, Parliamentary 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs, was host at a 
luncheon held yestenlBy at Lan- 
caster House in honour of Sen or 
D. Coidovez, Under Secretary- 
General of the United Nations. 


HM G oramna tt 
Mr Tim Eggar. Minister of Slate 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs, was host at a luncheon 
held yesterday at I a nca s t e r 
House in honour of Senor D. 
Cordovez, Under Secretary- 
General of the United Nations. 

Lord Cledwyn of P&nrhes, CH 
Lord Cledwyn of Penrhos, CH, 
entertained officers and guests 
of the British Veterinary Associ- 
ation at luncheon at the House 
of Lends yesterday. 

Law Society 

Mr John Wickerson, President 
of the Law Society, was host at a 
luncheon held at 60 Carey Street 
yesterday. Among those present 
were: 

Mr Justice Gatehouse. Judra Law- 
rence. Commander _ William 
HiKkleste. Mr J E Can. Mr 
Raymond C Harrts ipreskient. Kenl 
Law s adetyX Mr S R JakoH 
tweatoenL London Softeners Uttsa- 
tk>o Araociatfcm). Mr Duncan OgOvy 
(chairman. Voum SoUcHot* Gj-oupL 
Mr Terence Shaw. Mr Derek 
Bra db era tvfce-PresictonL LawSod- 
L.Mr Jobn Bowron and Mr Ftotrtc* 


Dinners 

Angfo-Spanish Society 
The Spanish Ambassador pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of the 
Anglo-Spanisb Society held last 
ni^t at the Inn on the Puk 
Hotel The Duke of Wei 
chairman, and Sir Ronald 
say, vice-chairman, received the 
guests Mr Richard Luce, Min- 
ister for the Arts, was the guest 
speaker. Others present 
included: 

G eftora de Mr de In Brfacra. On 

DnCbesa of WKBtngtOR. Lady Lindsay. 

Str Jobn and Lady Rodgers. Count 

and O ounfrst de Cabarrus. Sefior and 

Seftora josl Benavides. Sedor and 

Seficn Mirad vetanie and Mr and 

Mrs Ton Bunn. 

Angto-Brazfliaa Society 

Sir Arthur Norman was the 
guest of honour at a dinner of 
the Ando-Brazfllan Society bdd 
last night at the 1 
hotel. The guests were received 
by the Brazilian Ambassador, 
erf the society, and 
Souza e Silva and the 
Earl of Dartmouth, chairman, 
and the Countess ofOartmoutfa. 
Among others present were: 

The Portuguese Ambassador 

Senhora HnflThemldo. Sir David 

Lady Hod. Sir Norman Stam*n. Mr 
and Mrs Charles de ChasBiron- Mr and 
“ QmtHoo. Dr and 




« &2S£% 


Receptions 


Union 

The Duke of Edinburgh pre- 
sented the prizes to the winners 
of the English-Speaking Union’s 
English latigungp competitions 
yesterday at Buckingham Pal- 
ace. A reception was held after- 
wards at Dartmouth House 
when the guests were welcomed 
by Sir Donald Tebbit, Chai rman 
of the English-Speaking Union, 
Mr David (tides, deputy direc- 
tor-general, and Mr David 
Crane. 

Management Consultancies 
Association 

Mr John Lidstone, Chairman, 
and Council members of the 
Management Consultancies 
Association were hosts at a 
reception given at St Stephen's 
Club last night. Mr Michael 
Howard. QC MP, Minister of 
Corporate and Consumer Af- 
feirs, was the principal gnesL 

Meeting 

Royal Commonwealth Society 
Mr Yoweri Museveni, President 
of Uganda, addressed members 
of the Royal Commonwealth 
Society yesterday at the society’s 
headquarters. Mr Derek In- 
gram, deputy chairman, 
presided. 


Air Force Board 
Lord Trejgaroe, Minister of 
State for Defence Procurement, 
presided at an Air Force Board 
dinner bdd last night at RAF 
Bentley Priory. The guests 
indnded: 

Dr CA Bailey. Sir CUHtard Comfort. 
Sir Brian Cutjboa, Air Marshal Sir 
John CurtlsB. Str Codn Figures. Dr J 
w Frad. sir George j«£Fer9on. Mr K 
C MacDonald and Dr a E Stanan. 

Royal Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors 

Mr John Biffen, Lord Privy Seal 
and Leader of the House of 
Commons, and Mr John Ayers 
of the School of Civil Engineer- 
ing at Bradford University, were 
the speakers at the annual 
dinner of the Quantity Survey- 
ors Division of the Royal In- 
stitution of Chartered Surveyors 
bdd last night at Grosvenor 
House. Mr Tony Southgate, 
president of the division, 
presided. 

Healey A Baker 
The P artners of Healey & Baker 
gave a dinner last night at the 
Hall of the Company of Water- 
men and lightermen of the 
River Thames in honour of Mr 
Aubrey Orchard-Lisle in recog- 
nition of his 60 successive years 
of service to the firm. The senior 
partner, Mr Peter S. Winfield, 
presided and Mr Aubrey Or- 
chard-Lisle also spoke. 

St Godric’s College 

St Gothic's College old students 
reunion will be held oo Sat- 
urday, December 6, at 22 Lynd- 
hum Road, London, NW3, at 
5.30 pm. Former students are 
invited to attend. 


OBITUARY 

M GEORGES BESSE 
Ace technocrat from working- 
class Auveigne 




M Georges Besse, killed on 
November 1 7 at the age of 58, 
was one of those outstan d ing 
apolitical technocrats who 
have helped to make France, 
though no longer an imperial 
country, wnd without a mas- 
si ve territory or population, 

nevertheless a genuinely inde- 
pendent force in the wodd. 

An Auvetgnar of working- 
class origin, born at Qennont- 
Ferrand on December 25, 
1927, he went to his local state 
school before winning a place 
at the elite Ecole 
Polytechnique, from which he 
graduated in 1948 the second 
of his year. He then spent 
another two years at the 
equally prestigious Ecole des 
Mines. 

After working first as an 
apprentice mining engineer, 
he moved in 1956 to the 
French Atomic Energy Com- 
mission (CEA), as deputy to 
the industrial director. From 
1958 to 1967 he was managing 
director of the company re- 
sponsible for building the 
factory at Piexrelatte, where 
uranium was to be produced 
for France's first nuclear 
bombs. 

For the next four years he 
was president of the Alcatel 
f fffc CT m m iTwiftfr tinns compa- 
ny, sad from 1974 to 1976 
president of Eurodif (the Eu- 
ropean company for uranium 
enrichment). 

In 1976 he was appointed 
president and managing direc- 
tor of Cogema, the state- 
owned nuclear energy 
company which, among other 
thi n g s, had the controversial 
task of installing a nuclear 
waste factory at La Hague. 

In 1982 he took over the 
newly nationalized Pechiney 
steel company, where he suc- 


ceeded so well in pulling the 
company's disastrous finances 
in order that he was chosen in 
January of last year to perform 
a amilar mirade frrf the ailing 
state-owned Renault car 
company. 

Though he bad been ap 
pointed by the socialist prime 
minister, Laurent Fabius, and 
though the Chirac govern- 
ment that had recently come 
to power made many changes 
in the hig her direction of state 
concerns, Besse was kepi on as 
head of Renault - a recogmton 
both of his exceptional ability 
and of his political 
impartiality. ■ 

Six months after arriving at 
Renault he launched the 
“Besse plan”, under which 
21 , 000 jobs - 20 per cent of the 
workfo r ce over a two-year 
period - were to be axed- At 
the time of Iris death the first 
ri gps of his success were 
already evident. Last year's 
deficit of 10 billion francs was 
expected to be cut in half this 
year, and Besse was hoping to 
bring the company back into 
profit by the end of next year. 

Though known to his asso- 
ciates as “The Emperor”, 
Besse never forgot his back- 
ground and had a simple 
directness that employees ap- 
preciated. At Renault, he got 
rid of the big managing 
director's car and drove 
around in a little Renault 5 
without a telephone. He did 
not hesitate to take off his 
jacket and place himself at the 
wheel of a Renault tractor. Yet 
he was not much of a show- 
man but, on the contrary, 
shunned the limehghL 

He married in 1957 Fran- 
coise Chagot, who survives 
him with their three daughters 
and two sons. 


:4 


& 




LffiUT-COL NEIL McLEAN 



Richard Dimbleby 
Cancer Fund 

Princess Alexandra will attend a 
concert in Westminster Abbey 
on December 16, in aid of the 
Richard Dimbleby Cancer 
Fund, to mark the fiftieth 
anniversary of Richard 
Dunbleby’s first broadcast. The 
Phiiharmonia Orchestra and 
Chorus, conducted by Mr Carl 
Davis, Miss Ida Haendel, violin, 
and Miss Helen Field, soprano, 
will perform works by Sir 
William Walton. Readings from 
Mr Dimbleby's own work will 
be given by Sir Michael 
Hordern. Sir John Mills, Mr 
Peler Barkworth. Mr Alec 
McCowen and Mr Timothy 
West. 


Prince Georg 
of Denmark 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Prince Georg of Den marie 
will be held in Westminster 
Abbey at 5pm on Monday, 
December I, 1986. Those wish- 
ing to attend are invited to apply 
for tickets as follows: Heads of 
Missions to the Vice-Marshal of 
the Diplomatic Corps: members 
of the family, p ee rs, members of 
parliament, friends and repre- 
sentatives of organizations to: 
The Receiver General, 20 
Dean's Yard, Westminster Ab- 
bey, London. SW1P 3PA, 
enclosing a stamped addressed 
envelope. Admissions to the 
service will be by ticket only. 


lieutenant Colonel Neil 
*801/ McLean died on No- 
vember 1 7 after a short illness. 

He was 67. 

NeO Loudon Desmond 
McLean was born on Novem- 
ber 28, 1918, into a distin- 
guished Highland famil y with 
extensive connexions in the 
Far East, and was educated at 
Eton and Sandhurst. Commis- 
sioned into the Royal Scots 
Greys, he was sent out to 
Palertine with his regiment 
sti9 mounted. 

His love of adventure, how- 
ever, inherited pertteps from a 
great-unde, fire Raid Sr Har- 
ry McLean - who deserted the 
British Army to become Com- 
mander-m-Chiefm Morocco - 
led him to abandon regular 
soldiering for guerrilla war- 
fare. He served under Wingate 
in 1941 in the Abyssinian 
campaign, commanding a 
mixed force ofEthiopian guer- 
rillas and Sudanese regitiars. 

Bade in Cairo he joined 
SOE and after a spell in their 
office in Istanbul was dropped 
by parachute into Greece to 
lead the first British mission 
to the Albanian resistance 
movement 

With the fall ofltaly Albani- 
an resistance rapidly expand- 
ed and a more senior mission 
was sent in. The general 
commanding, however, was 
captured by the Germans and 
the different factions of the 
resistance began to fight each 
other. Accordingly in 1944 
McLean was sent back to 
Albania to attempt a reconcili- 
ation between the rival fac- 
tions. Despite many 
adventures and some success- 
es against the Germans this 
proved impossible: 

Mclean was next posted by 
SOE to the Far East and 
became military adviser to the 
British consul-general in 
Kashgar, in Chinese Turke- 
stan. After the war he travelled 
extensively in China, India, 

Iran and the Middle East. He 
alto ^pem smne time studying 
guerrilla operations in Viet- 
nam and Algeria, and in 1949 
i was deeply involved in the 
attempt to win back Albania 
for the Wert - an attempt 
tragically foiled by Philby*s 
treason. 

On his return to England he 
twice contested the constitu- 
ency of Preston South, in the 

M ROGER IKOR 

Mr Roger Ikor, French au- 
thor who won the 1955 Pm 
Goncourt, died on November 
17, at the age of 74. 

He was bom in Paris on 
May . 28, 1912, of Jewish 
arents, and educated at the 
yc6e Condorcet, the Lycee 
Louis-1 e-Grand and the Ecole 
normale sup&ieure. From 
1937 to 1939 he taught in 
Avignon. 

War left an indelible mark 
on him. An army intelligence 
officer, he was captured in- 
Belgium in May 1940 and 
endured four years in a prison 
camp in Pomerania from 
which he escaped shortly be- 
fore the Russians arrived. He 
returned to Paris in 1945 and 
resumed a teaching career. 

His first novel, A trovers nos 
deserts appeared in 1951, but 
it was with the two-volume 
Les FUs d'Avrom - t ranslat ed 
in to English as The Sons a] 

Avrom - that he made his 
reputation. This quarried the 
experiences of his own ances- 
tors, to describe the emigra- 
tion of a Jewish family fr om 
Lithuania to France, and their 
subsequent assimilation by 
French culture. 

Shandy observed, with oc- 
casional Zola-esque flashes, it 
had a scope which made it a 
natural candidate for the Prix 
Goncourt, still then - like the 
early Booker Prize - 


Conservative interest. This 
was a highly marginal seat 
which on the first occasion he 
lost by only 16 votes. 

In 1 954 be won Inverness at , 
a by-election and held that 
seat until 1964. In Parliament ■; 
he was active behind the 
scenes rather than in the 
Chamber, and he was a strong ‘ 
member of the Suez Group. 

In 1962 the Egyptians in- 
vaded the North Yemen to . j 
instal a Republican president 
in place of the imam. A i the 
suggestion of King Hussein of 
Jordan and King Saud of , 
Saudi Arabia, McLean volun- • 
teered to reconnoitre the situa- - 
tion, crossing the whole of 
Yemen from Saudi Arabia to 
Aden and bade on foot, by ^ 
track and on cameL 

He reported to London that 
at least half the country re- 
mained in royalist hands. . 
Thanks to this report the 
Cabinet turned down a pro- 
posal that Britain should rec- 
ognize the Republic as the 
United States had already 
done.' 

For the next five years 
McLean spent much of his 
time in the Yemen as prind- 
pal military adviser to the 
Imam and his supporters. In 
so doing he rendered decisive 
service to Britain in the Mid- , 
die East generally and in Aden 
in particular. His constituents 
in Inverness, however, failed 
to appreciate the importance 
of his work, and in 1964 he 
lost his seat. 

He continued his interest in 
the Yemen until after the 1967 
war, when Nasser withdrew 
his forces and royalists and 
republicans arrived at a com- 
promise peace. 

Thereafter McLean trav- , 
died extensively in North ' 
Africa and the Middle East, 
China and Pakistan. 

In ' recent years be spent 
much time making notes for a ” 
possible autobiography. Yet, ! 
though be achieved a reputa- 
tion m the Yemen little short 
of Lawrence's, he lacked the - . 
diligence to put this experi- 
ence on patter. 

The dashing cavalry officer ■ 
of the late 1930s broke many 
hearts, but in 1949 he married ' 
Dashka Ivanovic whose strik- ” 
ing beauty led to her being 
known as “the peart of 
Dubrovnik". 


undebased by crudely com- 
mercial Considerations. Its 
second volume, Les Eoux 
Af&ies, won the Prix Gon- : 
court. 

Of his later works. Si le ') 
temps.... (1960-69), a roman i 
fleuve in six volumes, was cast V.' T .\ 
on a scale that could hardly ■ 
fail to compel respect, even if 
it showed the compiler of i 
experiences rather than the 
im a ginat ive novelist at work. * 

Ikor was also widely known , 
in France for his essays and - , 
journalism, much of which . « 
dealt with antis emitis m- He 
also wrote - somewhat sketchi- 
ly - on Moligre. 

_ The death from malnutri- - 
tion of the youngest of his five 
sons in 1979 - the victim of 
misapplied notions of macro- 
biotic Zen diet - opened fresh ‘ 
vents for his combative pen. 

A man who wore his mental - 
scars on the surface, Ikor was > 
prone to assail wbat he hated #> 
with a violence which ■ 
somtimes obscured the justice 
of his cause. 

Lady Harmon, wife of Sir 
John Hermon, Chief Const*- - 
ble of the RUC died on ■ 
November 17, at the age of 59. 

She did much work for the . 
families of RUC officers killed 

or disabled, and was president 
of the RUC Widows’ Associa- . 
tion since it was founded. 


. & 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


births, Marriages, deaths 

AND IN MEMORIAM 


For many than cm* in my tans, saying. 
I ora Christ M SMD (Wave 


* 


BIRTHS 


MWEW OF.lOCfBUW - On ism of 
Novnnbcr. to Susan (nAe Strang 
StwUandCriaJn.attenBhter.Eiama 

Partial EStabCltl. 

' ALUM ■ On November 17th. a 
Amerdiom Hospital. to Moira Lacey 
and Jonathan Allum. a daughter. 
Genevieve Clare. a sister for Trtsttn 
and Rosamund. 

BREEN -i fc November m u « st 
Beraanrs Hamm. Gteraflar. to ML 
chart and Anna, a son. Mate Arthor. 
BR0HTIC10 - On November 14th, at 
Yecnrtl DMrtct HospOM. to Shamm 
and MKtaeL a damjoter. Un 
Mlcttene. a ststcr for Sarah. 

BUSH - on November 14th. at The 
Norfoft am Norwich tfosptm. to Sa- 
rah tat* ButtexriD and Simon, a sro. 
Edward Laurence. 

CH E EVEB - On lOttt November, to 
Margaret S ftrfe Spend) and Henry J 
S. a son David Archibald. 

COUMS • On lEth Novonber. at West 
London HosnBaL to Maty otee Can- 

» nlns> and noser, a son. wtBtsm 
George, a brother tor Acme. 
COOLING - On November 12th. lo 
Lynne and rack. a son. Nteholaa 
Edward Alexander. 

DEMOS - On 17th November, to 
Cnrtstabe) tnCoBtrhecto and Made, a 
daughter. ChJoe C brt ri ab et. 

CUB. IMG - On November 16th. So 
Jayne and Chris, a daughter. 
Alexandra Jane. 

GOLDBO W a - Chi October 20m. to 
AUstm tub* Loam) and Davis. noon. 
Arthur. 

CflVMMIl On Zllh November, at the 
Westminster HmottaL to HQary <n£e 
Dobson) and tauL a son. Harry Pam 
Thomas. 

HATHEKEU. - On Novemb e r ISO. to 
Susan (nje Legal) and Nsate. 
daughter. Sarah. 

HOfcJLUM • cm November llth 1986. 
at Stanford Hospital. USA. To Add 
<n£e Mrusek) and Edward, a 
Micheal Eaton . 

JMHAH - On Novander 12th. to Balti- 
more. USA. to Sarah (nee MIcheB) 
and Rune, a daughter . rtmnt«, 
Anne. 2506 Oanden Court Phocntx. 
Maryland 21131. USA. 

LACEY - See AHum. 

LOHT-PfOUJPS - On November 17th 
lo Kathy and GUes. tn Durban. South 
Africa, a son. 

MACLEOD - On November 16th. to 
Karen (nde Templeton) and Colin, a 

» son. Richard James Fraser, a brother 
fo r Sarah a nd Fiona, 

McWrarVR ■ On November 15th, at 
St Maty's. Paddington, m Clare code 
Gadsden) amt bin. a daughter. 
AnnabeUe Louise. 

MILLER - On November iztb to Judy 
(nee ElHogton) and Dominic. a son. 
OUs Jack, a brother tor Rufus. 
MOfnasON-BOJ. - On November 
I7ih. in Newcastle, to Penelope and 
Julian, a. son. Charles Retard 
Fra uds. 

BAWBSTER - On November 14th. to 
Juliet (nte MOner) mid Richard, a 
son. 

POCOCK - On November 16th. to Jo- 
anna Mary (n fee Fox) and Math 
Edward Le Feuvre. a son. Thomas 
Raymond Le Feuvre. 

UTAH -On November 17th 1986. to 
Paula (nee Hatgh) and MtchaeL a 
so n. Ol iver Luke. 

BOOTES - On 14th November, at The 
British MUHanr Hospital. Hong Kong 
(o Jackie u»*e Marsha® and Allan, a 
son Alasdalr John. 

TREVOR-JONE5 - On November I60L 
at the Couni ess of Chester HosUtaL 
to Adm (nfie Cheemam) and Rohm, 
a daughter. Ctere EBabeth. a skier 
lor Louise. 

SWJOLCOTT ■ On 14th November, tn 
Botswana, to Jeanette and Chris, a 
daughter. tfaylor Louise, a Alter tor 
Samantha. 


revive nutty, l Ngv pnHer- S maOron 

«- MeraiSw I E. husbeat of EnM 

Mary, fattier of Mrigery Hyde and 
Ivor. F noeral 1 LOO am Friday 2 isl 
U nited Reform Church. Aato Kem. 
wham Crematorium «. noon. 
Rowwi to ,ODp Street. 

Ash. Kent E nq u iri es 0727 64287. 


3 


- On 18lh November 
1986. peacefully at Ms home to 
Chattonl sl peter. Robert John 
ComweO aged 32 yearn. Beloved 
husband of Christine mid father of 
Sarah and Moafcnw. A Bear son of 
James and Kathleen and a dear 
brother of ChrtsUn*. Requ i e m Mass 
wilt tote Mace at fit Joseph's Qmreh. 
Ausfenwood. Gerards c*ok. Bucks, 
on Friday 21st November at 12 . | 
won. Flowers may be vast to: H.C. 
Gtootead Ltd of Chanted SLPeter. 
Bucks. 

I CROFT - On November XGth 1966. 
John Mktael OAL The ftetodsr Di- 
rector of The National Youth 
Theatre of Great Britain, in accor- 

ttenoe with Ms wishes the fteiemi is 

private. H desired, donations Ur. The 
Naaooet Youth Theatre or 54,- York 
Way. London. Nl. A Thataaglvtoa 
Service win be bald at a later date. 

Lera - On November 17. piau/nty at 
home. Laurence Ctonde deKfemer 
(Toby) Em MJL ML. B. Chtr. 
very mucb loved husband of Marie- 
tta (Jerry) and dearly loved tether or 
Carolyn and Anne. Funeral service 
at The Church of SL Pate and 'SL 
Peter the Grate. Nonhgatv. Chfcbes- 
ter on Tuesday November 25 at 
11.16 am. followed by private cre- 
mation- Family Qowera otey. 
Donations, if wished, 10 SL WBOTcTs 
Hospice. Grasvenor Road. CMcestsr. 
Enqutries to Edward White ft Son. 
CMchester 782156. 

ULLOWAY . On 17th November. 
6ateteBb> at aomft James Xhmcan. in 
nfc 80th year. Funeral private. No 
•towers, bat dansUons to Multiple 
Sclerosis Society. 

SHJ-ESPC- On 18th November 1986. 
at Cr a kgal h an. Khmtord. Robert 08- 
lespteCBLE.. aged 88. tether on Ann 
and Donald. Fund private, no 
Qowera cr tetters Hens*. 


• On November 17n» 1986. 
auddeedy at home. John McKame 
CJ4JL. MAE.. P.hD. of Dune HHL 
Cnterbath. Surrey. Brioved husband 
tetogndur. levinq father of RnaUnd. 
DtnakL Aten amt Andrew and 
grandfather to June*. Sarah. John. 
Hrien. Matthew and Sarah. Ftmera) 
Private.. 

KANT - on November 6 1966. al 
Bryn - htewr. Pnagimb. ■ Eton 
Khayatt. Formerly or Cate. Egypt, 
Wlte of John Pint, safer of Mrs. 
Frederick RoeBwr of New York and 
London and the late Mrs. Albert 
RtnauBries of Otadwyne. PA. FU- 
nezM Services were held tn The 
Chgreh of the Redeemer. Bryn 
Maw. Monday November to 1986. 
Mem o rial gifts to : The Mu seu m of 
ArL Bi rmin gham. Alabama. USA. In 
her name wffl be aBOieehted. 


23 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


R.C. Priesthood/ 
Religious Life 
VswgimlA.C)wte«i 

cwwWteWamrReayoiauiraiM/br 
llie Pnenhoed are invited lo lake part 
In a reireai al Autagun Came. 
MMUmw. Kmloi 29m DKnte H 
M Jabuuy. 

DMaUsttan Vocaoanamce. The 
t teie Ho use. ABtorisncame. 
Mimto ne. neat Trt Mtektoar 
10022)673054. 


• OB November 14th 1986. 
wddemr at her home. Ebrie Rose 
Pouam in he- 82nd jw. 


-On November SSBa 1986. 
peacefully at Moukferd. Maigvet. 
daughter of the late Admiral and Btes I 
A.T. powiett of Franfcton. Rugby, 
aged 9« yen. Fmaenl Service to 
take mace on November 20th at 
Mnteford. St John The Baptist 
Church at 2^0 pm. touotved by cent- 
mtttai « Oxford Crema t orium. 
Family Sowers only, pfeose. Dome , 
tans, tf derirod. tor Friends of The 
Ekteriy. The OM vicarage. , 

Mounted may be sent to C&rb HL 
Lovemove. 114-116 Oxford Road. 
Reading 

REYNOLDS -On 4th November, in the 
BriSrii HoanttaL Utaon. Alien Hutfi 
(Boancer) rBF aged 83. Brioved 
nusbesvl of EmQy. nearly tewed fa- 
ther of Martin. Hugh. Ann. EBrabeth 
SIMes. NdKdai and much lowed 
grandfather and gnat mandtother. 
Memorial Mem on Saurday 29th | 
November at St Jamei 
Ptaoe. Londoo wt at 12 nooeu 


BROWM. MAHV EVEUVK BROWN ottw 

wtee DAKYEyfXYK BROWN eOurwlm 

EVELYN BR OWN Spteater late or Tha 

Chism nac. tenter Ptaen. hrmw, 

lnateaN7 dM te MteaCeB ea POt Deorov 

fTMfm maul WTMQ 

OAVES ronalekSn^h M«m 
Me Of as >iat will Rom. Newsome. 
KHMamgL YeriuMn dted at HtKktef* 
flakt « S7th April 1986 


HAWKER m BRACE. QWENETH 
MARY HAWKER nee BRACE. Widow 

tear Fite 3 . udev View am. The 

Hoon. Bridsnartb. SMMkt dted 
Bridgnorth om 17th May 1906 

Estate terns mooes 
HKKS BeeTUHNER. ELSE MAY HKEB 

naa TURNER. WMwr Wed 47 Da wM 

Way. Mnptea. Itamoahfr 

bsteS B taba on ut Mr 1965 

i e»M« about fioooai 
KNOTT DM JOWSTOW ot fa eiwUgILE 

KABOAHET CUZAaCTH KNOTT Other- 

w he ELIZABETH MARGARET KNOTT 

JOHNSTON Mberwtse RE 

i of so SL Gaorses Drive. 

idoo swi died i 

Site May 1980 

PEACOCK. WILLIAM THOMAS PEA 

COOi tala of 7 



■ - On November lOtti 1986. 
MldHity at fate homa. Chrises Man- 
stons. NDrtbownam. Halifax. West 
Yorks. Arthur Gordon, aged 63 
years. Former Chatman and Man- 
aging Director of OH. GtedMll mid 
Sons lid. HaHfax. The dearest hus- 
band or ouvfa. loving toiher of 
Mwttn. amsOne and David, a dear- 
ly loved grandpa and much loved 
brother of Jocriyne. Service at SL 
Matthew's Church. Northowrara. 
Halifax, on Friday 2 1st November at 
X.46 pm. Prior to crema t ion at Park 
Wood. EHand Att engutries to: Law- 
rence Funeral Service Ltd. Tfcfc 
(0422) 64094. 

"MDLAIjl - on 16th Novoeber. 
PtacefOQy at her home in n»«tdn 
Gladys, widow of Bertie Headtem. 
ftrio va d sister o f Dora. Hgnymd/£ 
Cremation at Potebrnn-^ 
Friday 2ist November at itwh 
Flowers jo Mummery FJ3.. Sl Dew 
onshtre Rd. Bextiffl on Sea. 

JOfMSTON- On November 17lh 1966. 
peacchdtty at home. KenbeB < _ 
mivuMi of Trade, father of Thorny. 
Guy. Christine and WlHiwn i. _ 
Ganfer of Ms tour Brand children. 
Cremation private. 


On Noramber 14tti it 

jsny Fkandszefc (Gsorge) bekwed 
husbaml of jane and dew fetter of 
Adam and James. Service at Pomey 
Vale Crem a tori u m an Friday 2ist 
November at 9.15 am. Famfiy Bow- 
en only plane, hut dnomkma if 
desteaL to Friends of St George’s 
Hospital. London 8W17. 

R08CXT0N - On November 14th. at 
home. Urate Anne, in her 20th 
year, dearty loved daughter of Jtra 
and Jean md Otter of Hajnteh cre- 
metioo privat e . Mem orial S er v ice to 
Lady Ctemal of SL Albans Abbey, on 
Saturday November 29th at 12-50 
pm. Family flowers only- Pt wH c na. 
If desired, to Princess Ctnda Chil- 
drens Ward. Royal 
HospUaL Sutton. Surrey. 


£42500 

A4ALLWOOD BENE CO RRE 
SMALLWOOD. Stenttcr tete of NeOwmr 


to reply to the Trwuuiy SoScfiar (H.VJ, 

(Mere Ante's Chamber*. 28 Broadway. 

London SW1H US. thOiao wtUeh Um 


If you served wtth 
fhgM tteirtmimi Jim NevQte du ri ng 
Operatao Grapple, pfease phone Ms 
brother on 0933 312414. 


1 Fta>d tof tam to srovter TENS' 

RBChinre forte resteof pteo m coudl. 

ton ia« te aring, .mo was a tote^M 

Gonauere. ptan lo The vi*9H 
Treyp aady. Cntenren. MBL aa. nsw| 
Broad 8L. tnadre GC2M UM. ^re| 


On November I7tb 
1986. In tds 80th year peacefully at 
h o me Forest Hour HtmBwad. Sur- 
rey. Jack Allen 

husband of PaL devoted tether of Pe- 
ter. Christopher. GUllati and ^-nen 
and a tovtng Grandfather- Funeral 
Service at St P e ter’s Church. 
Hambietau. Surrey at 10^0 am Fri- 
day 21st November followed by 
private cremation, to may flowers 
only please. 

MD - On Nwu —uh— - 16th. 
peacefully, at tte Princess A»* Hos- 
pice. Esher, wnoam Thotnaa Edwin 
devoted and much loved huaband of 



wrae to BOX J04 


brottwr 0680 20051S dr 


BIRTHDAYS 


DAVn WARRENS is 21 today. Cuv 
gratntaflonsl Have a truly womteriut 
day. with all my love. Hedy. 


r-Nfe Shove. Pattence 
of EtenswriL Suffolk- Connate on 
third to - century. Love and thanks. 
Don. HBary. Hujjo and Os. 


On November 10 th. 
PeacefUBy at home. Alan, drer In»- 
band of Tonti and moch loved step- 
father of SMriey mid Firry. •Owtte 1 
to W« gnmdch&dran. GJUC. to gen- 
erations of ban at sl Attvns 
RMttogdeen. Service at Wonhing 
CTanakxium. Flndon on Friday No- 
ventoer 14th at tl ul Etendries to 
Chakxafl Bros, stmdni. snsseoc. 
TeL (0903) 8126567 


Frame. Servic e on Thursday 20th I "2I^S?»m?Otetor^MS?' 
November at JLOO pm al Randalls I ^ss non Non™, ctetty. Lte. Mart*. 

Park Crematorium. Leatbrehead. No I r 

I [ servioes 

WRMS - On November tfltfa 
1986. Eva MabeL aged 82 years, of 
The Old itaarage. Newcastle Ave-. 

e. Worksop. Notts. Funeral I LET US TRACE . 

2.00 pm. Enqmrfes to E Heaton and I >Utateaebaamimoaidaryoreiteaity 
Sea Ltd. Retard (0777) 703802. 


MARRIAGES 


verrher quietly 
Maurice to Neila. 


On 12th. No- 

|D FAnhiipgh 


DEATHS 


i 


ABEROWMBY - On SUMtey Novem- 
twr loth 1966. s uddenly . hot 
peacefully at Atastrean- House. 
Tariand. Edward George formerly of 
London Metropolitan Water Board 
and late of Stuart Tower. Maldst 
Vale. London, beloved brother of the 
lair Margaret Kbtg and Andrew Ab- 
cr crumby sendee a t Aberdeen 
Crnnaiorlum. Hariehead (East Cha- 
pel) on Friday November 2lst at 1J0 
pm. All friends respecttUHy invted. 
No flowers please but donaflons In 
lieu to The Royal t 'Sr Farce Benevo- 
k-nt Fund, or the Royal Life Boat 
Institution. 

ARGLES - On ISUi November 1986. 
'■jddeoty tn London. Capckht Lionel 
ft/dbaai Lendon Antes. CAE.. 
3.S.C. Royal Navy, aged 78. Adored 
lather of Jllbon. Anthony and Sosas 
and proud grandfather and great 
grandfather. Cremation Eastbourne 
Friday 2 la November at 42X1 pm. 
All ettcoires to Messrs. Hatne &Sons 
on Easibotinte 27801. 

ABMTA8C - On November 17th 1986 
suddenly at none. Richard Nod 
Marshall. Funeral pr i v ate . Service of 
Thanksgiving to be aianurt laser. 
BARLCY - On November 14th 1986. 
Stanley wman aged 82 years, dear- 
Li loved tv all Ms family. Funeral 
Service M QecKenham crematortum 
nn Tuesday 2Stb November to 12 
noon. No fknvera by rcuuesL dona- 
tions to Bromley HospUal Cardiac 
Monitor Appeal. 

BELL - On November 16th. peacefuOy 
at ms sleep in a Chepstow HospnaL . 
Christopher, aged 76 years of 'Oriel* 
House, man Court. Ulan. Chepstow. 
Gwent. Beloved husband Of Yob 
into Hitbne). Master at Llandovery 
Cotfeg* for 2S years. Funeral Service 
Saturday 22nd November at 1200- 
oaoft al ttir Parish Church of St 
^.DroPol s . men. CbcpeHow. FamUte 
T flowers only Dooatkms. if so desired 
lor (he Fabric Fund of Sl Debitors 
Church may be sent to PfiUlp 
BtoldUy and Sot Ltd. 8 Station 
Rood. Chepstow. Tri Chepstow 4989 
or Nrtherend 348. 

CARVER - On November 17ttu al 
home Group fispnnti Antony 
Courtenay Power Carver. Funeral at 
si MaroareTs. Qtfhnark on Friday 
NmnnotT 2tsf st llDOam. FJowes 
io Mr Lever. TeffonL Nr Sidbtanry. 
witts or donatfoos to Royal Air Force 
Benevotent Funds. 


On November 
18th 1986. peacefully after abort m- 
CynQda. beloved wife or 
Mtohaei (Of EHdBefands. Selkirk) 
and dearty loved taodNr of HaotetL 
Pamela and Fiona. Funeral Service 
to Sl Giles CafhoifcaL EdtabOriBL an 
Friday 21 November at ^12 noon, ftd- 
iowad by p rivate cremation.' Burial 
— frr IT— to Thr IHohtiiiMiT rim 
By flowers only. 

UMHUME - On November tathaf- 
tra-a short fltnm. Eisanor Mangret 
Btee MareaL wBSs of the late Or 
EGA LongrMfle nr Manor RowL 
Sanosonr. MS* toseo mother of 
Rob and.Ed. Private pt— Pirn <to- 
nattant if desired Rr MIND. c/o 
WBCaM&PartDere.22ChmUMd . 
Rood- SaRafaury. 


-On November 17m. proex- 
fnliy after an Qtnere bravely borne. 
Eric Alttcd. Much loved and sadly 
mis sed. Qemanon at West Harts Cte- 
maKrt m tt Canton, at 10L30 mn on 
Friday November 2 ul FamOy Sow- 1 
ere only, but donataos so Mont Ver- 
non WH 10 raid, via mm Sum | 
Price. 8 Park HBL London WS2JN. 

STOOOART - On No v ember 16th 
1986. peacefully at home- Amy Mar- 
McteOn. daughteraf the tateDr 
and Mrs A R Sioddart of York and 
very dew sister of Catherine, fonur- 
ty for nmqr genre an thesteff of St 
Paul's Ctrla SchooL Service af St 
ManTs Sttertegum. Shssar on 2lrt 
November at 3uIS pm. fifaowed by 
cremation at Worming. 4.00pm. 
Tandy flo w er s only. Engutries to H i 
D Tribe Ltd. Wramtaig 34616. 


Write today Ser tree broch u re and 


WINDSOR ANCESTRY 
RESEARCH CTT14) 
Motadtottoi Homa. VKtorte SI 
Wtodser. Bate SLA 1HE 
Ttf : 07S5 8871 Sl 


SAE 14 nawirhwp m. SW3. 01-367 
0066. Em area, oi soa 4142. Hah 
mews rate. Mm 4 mg tn damn 

: Otfr HXVXX Gtve wUh 


,, .. ^ . iwobaius 

tacUue tare tasring poor aareonal 
me a i a ut aa ytepare at me Uic. jun 
phone 0233 89202. 

MLfota Ctrs LU srasnnsam erexfcu- 
lp vuae ao cwn e iiia . Prate ot-sn 

F. tAve or Mwnaea. ab aem 

. -D*eC4Q16)2S AMoaSoa 

tete London wbl net at -938 tasT 


• On November isth. at 
SL JmanYODnvenLMto Great, aged 
73 year*. Very R everend Canon 
RonaU CwL former Parish Priest 
of SL StentetemL Dutoerton. Soeaer- 
srt. FUnerat awTHegotem Masa at SL 
Stardstaus - CaQicOc . Church. 

. Dutoreton. on Tbesday 2Sm Novem- 
ber at 11-30 am. No flowers. 
tan a ttons tf wtehed. to the Parkdi 
Pried for- the upkeep of SL 
Stenbteus. 

■MRW - On November 16th. Mator- 
Ceneral James Mansragh Went- 
worfb.ua. OBEl.tete am Cavalry, 
aged 84 years, of Great Meadow. 
Hanteeden- dear inaband of the tote 
Jean. Flmeral Monday 24tft Novem- 
ber 2-30 ton at SL Peter's. 
Hamueden. Fbmfly flo ws o toy. 
D onations, if desired, to Army Be- 
nmdcsBFund.4lQueeuBMe.SWl. 

- On 


ISOt Navenjber. 
James, of Radnor House. Hay-on- 
Wye. widower at Margaret and 
lamer of Peter and Atom. Service of 
Interment atSL Man's- Hay-otWye 
at 12 noon an Friday 21st Novem- 
ber. Memorial Service, also at SL 
Mary's, at 3 pm on Wednesday X4tti 
January 1987. 


MAYNARD ■ On Novemb e r 17th. 
Muriel violet fMoQyL peacetafly in 
hospital with her tem By round her. 
beloved wifc of Abater, mother of Ve- 
neua and Sandra, grandmother of 
SonMe. Toraufl. Rupert. Marina. 
Jocetro. Caspar and BacbeL Ftmenk 
at Hoty Trinity. Prince consort 
Road. London SW7 on Monday No- 
vember 24th at U.OOam. No 
flovmre. Donations In lieu to National 
Society for Omcer Rebec. 30 Dorset 
Square. 

W cC LO t KY- On November loth, very 
peacefully to The Royal Hampshire 
County HospUal. Winchester. Arthur 
Leicester SL Auhyn. wYCUr. RAF. 
RetU MJLCS-. I_A_C-P-. DJPJL. 
DA Dearly loved faudnnd of Dore 
thy . Sender and crematton has taken 
place privately. . 


On 14m Nowtbe i 1986. 

. neau]fi*li> after an Qtoeas borne wflh ; 
rtiareri i rrt n te c ou rage and styte. Eve- 
tyn Mary, widow of Bill Weston. 
Much loved teandmotber. itepmn ttt- ] 
riead. Fuxtenl Service. 1 
SLJotat's ChapeLOKfontCreinatori- 
an 1 1 am Friday 21st November. 
FbmQy Dowers only, by reqnesE Do- 
nations. if desired, to tbe NSPCC. 



On November 140- M 
Coffndsie HosptaL peacefully after a 
long BbMee. Leslie James to bis 8141 
year. Much loved husband of Joan. 
Devoted father of David and Richard 
and totting mmxifother of Andrew. 
FopeM at toeakspear Crranatoritnn. 
RoWto-at 11 JOam onMoreksy No- 
vendisr 24th. Fhmfly flowers ordy to: 
JA Massey and Sons: 16 Lowlands 
Road. Harrow. But do st afloas If de- 
sired to Cotindale HospUal League of 
Friends. 


teScnn i ta . Tec OI 272 8201. 

GPMTAL CWs sreoaro Uaharouw ewisc- 

01-607 7908. 

hi 

68 Maunx 
Wt. Teleph o ne 01-493 

9937. 

A LOAM vaa a money back qaa ram —t 
i^-OOoto 2 3 0 .000 «n pwtotoseecn- 
ray. APR IBM varwree. rm 
redoadancy cover o<nr- Free Xte 



MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A Munnrlal Service foe 
Mr ton CampbeB Q.& wflf be held at 
Lincolns ton Chapel London W2. on 
Tbursdoy December «ih at 12 now. 


Alien for foreroc OOtee) swronal inter. 
Vtews.7 Sedtey PL Wt. OI *99 2BG6. 

cmswevAMcaM ay may aaouare scuo- 
m JEiao + vat aad saaeard 
dtebiawnmn riag 02«« 31939B. 

■"J®*- Landro SChooJ or Bnsee and 
CUA os KteSB Hoad. SW3. 01-689 
7201. 


A ouaufiM yukte wtui Mercedes win 
took after you aB day lor £60- CaB Pant 
on ot-4" 




CHI B— M W - Thomas 
Prgjnfid ciA.r with thasksgtvtng 
and to proud memory of my hasband 
Thomas, deep a bi di ng tove. 1931- 
1969. 

MLVnt - Nan. Remembered wBb 
love. 


WOLS4T WIL- Hama stody tor OCE. 
Drorees aoadoa BA BSc. LLB. War- 
wick MBA), profeatee. PnanectuK 
DCBL AL6. Wttey H«B. OdOM 0X2 
6PR. Tri: 0868 62200 (24 MU. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


MMABUMBM- Gregor Grant and 
Hbaheth Dudgeon were married to 
SL CTtristoohert CbmctL NaKuro. 
Kenya on 19th November 1936. 
Thanks be to God. 


KLP PIT KEU 
MLB A IEV 
QRFMKA 6 E IB 


tatch IW Mir on BBC 1 tewmat 

9^5. Itaejoor donsara B DWa 
Otphanags (BA Rod) and seed Wc 
Orpbanifis Centre. Dept X Trtstar 
H««n» Z7. PQ Bor 6. 
topod. Mddksex TW6 ZJR. 


FOR SALE 


YOLTLL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

Wlmnderabmalihd ntteal cerii taes. 
Etdrematy bard wearing me bee) mon- 
ey ant bay £8-96 oar eg yd ♦ vat. 
Itrnfcrian p 8* carpet 14 plain 

cais«. Bate to tmdertay isr wue 
Bum stock. 7 year wear gnarsmm for 
ben* cream. C*7S per n yd + vat. 
Ptu toe largmi re t e rt lon of stale ear 


TdbOl -876-2089 

Rea aantoi mst nfliae 


BIZET DOING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
CHOPIN LISZT 

Benreree tedude Mariam* 
Om prime ant ba roararal. 

MARKSON PIANOS 

SAkeeya. nwi 
O l 936 8682 
Antony Race, sets 
01 864 4S17 


CASH IN ON 
HIGH PRICES 

ter sriBDfl yam 


GANCE 


01-242 3151 


dtittoa *utt*» m iwbnwiy i 

ML Nrittebad. eorHate 

(0491) 641I1S. Bournemouth (0202) 
293080. TteAem (039287) 7443. 
Berkeley, cm (0463) 810962. 

vt maty «vaat careers. At trade 

* room mm remoaoee IOO*t 

4554n JM " ^ 

HCKATOH STYLE (Mug Table*. Cham. 
tedrian ndi and dodn. catateanes from 
WHMam TUirnau. crouch Lane. BonsuMi 
Green. Keen. 0732 88327& 
aemaSAY OUC t ere* someae* n> ann- 
ual TTmee Mnwanater dated toa very 
day may were bare. £12JS0. 0492- 
53I3CC. 



rater (able. ZR6lEfita 

CCndO i On. C30O TCb Ol 789 6062. 
CATS, CM2S, La Mtaue Phnns. AM 
theatre aod rood. Tri 439 1763. AD Qa- 
tar credit ate. 

oues WAN CM Prints tor sate: tnrirt 
framed £48. For deteBe sbotae: 10602) 
713211 


ELATSHARE 


nr 


OVRBSEAS TRAVEL 


.... om. Prof F. N/& 24k. to 
share tux na. W MCH. viere. CH. 2 
one hr. Idee) coy / wxnd. Baa d v*. 
Tel: Ol 602 1162 (6.30 pad. 


q-APHAM. Un. 2 OM bed. (uny fur- 
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Porter, security. 2 Mm BR £180 pw. 
T« 01-304 4583 


ITS ALL AT 
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PUBLIC NOTICES 


■AIM VALE W9 Preferably female. 
Fuay fare-, w. machine. CH. o/R. Near 
TObe. £48 uw. TeC OI 328 9B6I Vic- 
toria Pam. 


WB 1/2 pirts share bzxory flaL 6 mtas to 
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PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The enurch Oeetmseettirew have 
prepared a ftoft patlonu scheme 
moutdine for a declaxaaan of redundancy 
in respect of the parish church at AD 
Souls. Leteesfer. betop one of toe panto 
chtrehea ofthp pansn ofThe Holy SWriL 
Leicester (Leicester tflnrrar c and ■ draft 
redtmdsBcy scheme tor the appropriattoo 
of toe redumtau church of markmre. ah 
S aints, and (he tend annexed or belonging 
thereto (Blackburn dtocemL oeefea of the 
draft scheme may be nuntnart Bora toe 
Church Comiideskwrm. I MUtbank. 
London SWip iiz (n whom any mre- 
serdauons shoted be sent wtttdn 28 days 
of UW publics nor nr me noure. 

LEGAL NOTICES I 


Wt Comtet a Me Urge room lit ms mate 
TV. OL i eater person. suU prof em. 
rate MteriFri. CSSpw. Ot 933 6220 


WASHINGTON BALTIMORE 

TRAILFINDERS 


BAMM3 CUWIi Prof person 23 +-. M/F. 
lax ra te sonrfte (wtth peecnl. own 

ream. £40 pw + Um. Tcii oi-228 0448 

after 6.30 pan. 


1 1*1 ns it to EsrisOdd 

ri ihn n 8W IT. Room twVtttertanrouaae 
overtook to* playing flrid*. Would sun 
teghty M deprodonl prof perso n , share 
tori Ubte M/S £40 p w. tndustve of 
riec. CH and C*£W. mnl nrooUaWe lor 6 

3o£'3»i < a** B7 * 6 ® 4 * ***** Wlo,>e 

MEMSMCTOM Profvsstoaal m/f. 30-40. to 
share heavy owner oocvnnsrs nsL I 
mta snogs* Ken KMh Tom. uaacnfuBy 
fUroMMd. dM brdrtn. wtth m-snilreua 
views, own ten™. Fan roof terrace 
svdte Share honsrttaaper for ItC 
Ctoaotne 6 reundry. 24 hr pheets an- 
swertee servtce £128 pw .-01-937.7836 
i.APemss e osawowu Prof r.“ n/s. to 
share mahooene. Five nuns ttdie. O/R. 
C/H. £40 pw. exetuteve. Day »t 01-262 
1272, t w t i un n 3210. 

Ptmanr HIM person to share spacious 
fled, tarpe o/R. nr tube, use of private 
tensds court. £200pcm rod has. Tet 
070 8478 tplter 7pm). 

A BM CT , SOIL Qepe ep n> a ne—mtee. 
Prof F. non^motwr to share Bat. O/R. 
CH. £48 pw. exclusive Day tab 01-846 
9864 or eves 01-878 8473. 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. W«D 
estop I n trodu ct ory service. Ptee act tor 
APPC 01-689 6491. 313 Brompum 
Road. SW3 

FULHAM WB M/F 26a. o/r. attractive 
tsroe Mato clem to etedSRfr 
£171 pa ad + asaae 
Tri: Ot 385 6336 eva 


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THE MATTER of P ROTECH 

PROJECTS LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER of THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1948 

Nonce K hereby 9hren that ms credltara 
of me above-named Company, which la 
brine votonardy wound up. are reauired. 
on or Wei* me (11 Bth day of Dec e mb e r. 
1986 . lo send In Otrir fun Owtstun and 
surnames, thetr addresses and ducrip- 
b- rut pm t tL U tars of tnetr dtttb or 
res. and (ha names and addresses of 
toelr S oau t ma Of anvx tn Use iteUer M cned 
Mtcbaei J. Isaacs PCA of 3rd Floor. Peter 
Hoote. Oxford Sheri. Manchester. Ml 
BAB the LtenaOator M the said Cenwany. 
and. if so reauired By node* tn writtno 
from the said ug u M M or. are. personally 
or by their aonatore. to come In and prove 
thetr debts or cSaUwi at such tune and 
place as shall he s o sc tfl ed In such notice, 
or to default thereof they will be excluded 
(roe the benefit of any dUtribuOan made 
before such debts are proved. 

Dated IMS 5th day of November 1986 
MICHAEL J. ISAACS 

Ug utdaeor 

THE MATTE R of JAMESCALES 
LIMIT UJ 
AND 

IN THE MATTER Of THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1986 

Notice B hereby given Diet the creditors 
of the above-named Company wtdrh is be- 
ing votuntardy wowuPup. are reoutred. 
on or before the ft )! 9th day of December. 
1966. to send In thetr full Christian and 
lames, thetr a d dr e sse s and descrip- 
tions. fUQ particulars or thetr debts or 
a), and the names and addresses of 
thetr SotUetoriKif avi to toe underdoned 
KEITH DAVID GOODMAN. FCA of 30 
Eastbourne Terrace. London W2 6LF the 
Liquidator of the said Company, and. tf so 
required tty natter in wnunp from the said 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


NEW LOW FARES _ 

AMMAN £236 KUWAIT £336 
BOM/DEL £566 NEW YORK £265 
CAIRO £206 BALTIMORE £278 

DAMASCUS £246 ROME £106 

DUBAI £546 SEOUL £605 

FRATUJTT £ 66 StN/KUL £420 
HONC KONG £490 8YD/MEL £690 
ISTANBUL £170 TAIPAI £870 

KARACHI £285 TOKYO £890 

SKYLOHD TRAVEL LTD. 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON Wl. 
TEL: 01-439 3631/8007 



UP UP & AWAY 


ILICLOdM. 


Unitenlampert arfton tuned. £460. MIM 
Condition, 01-483 0148. 

SANTA** BALE AT TOM. Col T. Vs tram 
£49. videos troth £99. 91 Lower Sfeonr 
Street 8W1. 7300933. 

ISO always 

Brochure. Tet «w>m 

71137 34 br an s aphon s . 

gg PUIHO XHNMiMOP 

over 1 year (APR 09»L tow merest 
rales over 2 years (APR 9^ss) A 3 years 
(APR 1244k) wraten aaocaOoa. Free 
Cririootie. soa Hiatipate Road. NWS. 
01-267 7671. 
afowtitea 
run rate. * rear bolts, new tyres, very 
good MteUUon. £16-960. Tri Ol 722 
5740. 

tSOD uaf. White, red vrioia- In te rior. 
6000 mis. FSH. S/R. 100 watts stereo. 
Many extras. £12000. TM^Udcnetot 
20162. 

SBO B 1906 C re*. Cteotec wtatte WKI1 bhte 
interior. ESR. 4000 nds. £12-200- Tri 
0476 63093. 


WANTED 


Bangkok. Kong Kong. Sydney. 
Europe, ft The Americas. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 ShaftcAtoy Avenue 
London W1V7DO. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10. (KM 3.00 


WINGSPAN TRAVEL 

FLIGHT SAVERS 

Barcelona £99 Munich £89 

Faro 009 New York £289 

Frankfort £74 Nk* £99 

Geneva £79 Paris £74 

Katebte* £74 Rome £99 

Lot ABeetes£299 Toronto £199 

Madrid £99 Venice £ 9B 

MBan £86 Zurich £ 79 

AVOID nSAPFGINTWNr 
BOOK FOR XMASNOWI 
Many More Routes AnBMr 
ABTA - 01 405 7082/406 8042 

NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

E23S 


SPEEDWING'S 
SANTOS SPECIALS 

CHRISTMAS A N.YEAR FLIGHTS 
£140 
£13* 
£139 
£184 
£149 

u dan. nirflnii nwinyi, fanned 
aiaiktainn to boot non! 
SPEEDWINO 
01-639 JJ*8 

ATOL IC4 


DISCOUNT FUGHTS 

O/W Rut 
Sydney £420 £7M 

Auckland £420 £773 

Los Angela £178 £340 

Johor £246 £483 

£220 £360 

Rio £2X2 £504 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 


Heitors, to come In and prove ItMir detote or 
ririms « such ante and place as snail be 
toed in such nonce, or to default 
thereof they win be excluded from the 
benefit oi any dKtrtbutton nw before 
•mi debts are promd. 

DATED this 7th day of November 1986 
KD. GOODMAN 


DOUALA £420 

SYDNEY £780 

AUCKLAND £785 
HONG KONG £550 
£330 


JOUUFK3/HAH £485 
NAIROBI £390 

CAIRO £230 

LAGOS £380 

DEL/BOMBAY £350 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

-IffinfS Ream SL Wl 
IB; 01-437 BJS! 

Late 8 Group I 
AMEX/MSA 


P Ofl i n c. i nncOTiD 


WAIREB Nora weuutB tans. Stote oondt- 
Uon and once. Nina Han 521 wen 
atenoaie. 'Bedford. ONo 44146 USA. 


BOMBAY 

CAIRO 

□FIX 

FRANKFURT 
HONG KONG 
STANBUL 


KARACHI 
OBD LAGOS 
CSS MIAMI 


unimaartanL Any dkanes. TsL Ol 482 
4021 Hiy ten. 


£85 SEOUL 
C4B0 SYO/UEL 
£170 TOKYO 
3KVLQHD TRAVEL LTD 
2 D O BIAN STREET. LONDON Wl 
Tot 01-439 35211 


£330 

dQ5 


hiry mim. A of! m lw t lrww 

«*C. 01 9467685dsy.cn 78V omevas 
n C ALAD O Large. wcrttoQtwp track Ate 
wanted. Reply to BOX J24 


Printed furniture. Mr Aritten 01 947 
5946. 667-669 Onus Lane. EteteBeid. 
SW1T. 


FLATSHAHE 


Monma WLL- m/f. *•*. own roam to 
■noderataf. c/h. tv. Walt. Mato. Nr 
Tube caSBpnt toes. Eves oi 727 4664 
•fa*- rat- M/p. o/r. n/s £200 pem 
t trite. Nr tube. Tab 01-821 OSOJ af- 
ter 6 o .io. 

easy going Hdy pereoo to share new- 
ly dec North OtePttsm house, term 
a. £60 pw BBC. Tec Ol 386 1065. 


mt Tram S p ertanri N York £249. 
LA/San FTnn £339. Sydney /Melbourne 
£769. AH direct drily dlghzs DBTtalr 150 
Jcnsum StreeLOl 839 7144 


COSTCO ITIJtS OM IB Bbte/bris to 
rope. USA A mnr 
P Hanm a l Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


MO fK KTO RO U I U L R e ge nt St. Wl. Ol 
734 S3G7. A8TA/AIOL 


i. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


LOWEST FARES 

Para £69 N YORK 

Raakfnn £60 LA/SF 

Lsgos £320 Maori 

Nairobi £325 StoXSPMe 

Jotxax £460 Bangkok 

Cano Offt Kmundu 

Drf/Bani 035 

Hoaf Koax OIO 


6YD/S 


28-r. own roan. £176 paa- Tet oi 678 


£636 Perth £566. An tnrior 
io Aon/NZ. 01-684 7371 


«Wt PIW f. a/Y. CH. to ten* ftaL Oaraa- 
ntent for W retrod 6 cayX 66 pw tor. 

547 2893. 

Prof female. 26+. O/R to 
_ mixed hoe wtth pda. N/S 
£160 pem ad. Ol 946 4724 aft 6pm. 
M10 Lunay S/C 1st floor BaL sottsMi 
a nwrite . CM. TV. i ipstiliiu react 

_Ti ecc. Ck» to 

tube. £100 pw. Tri. 01 881 3468. 
IOND Near river. Ltege room, to 
Pr of Wion N Person. Non tepo 


DtSCOUOTED « SMOtto FARES Wcrtd- 
wkto. Tri (I.T£ I07S3> 867036. 


£275 
£3)5 
£320 
£420 
£335 
£440 
£350 

.. r £CS 

Nip Dococots Area sa IP * CU Cbm 

SUN & SAND 

21 S-rihre SL London Wl 
01-439 2100*437 0537 


WINTER SPORTS 


JOHN MORGAN SKI 

Fanltoltr ehalri patties 
(Tom £169 pp 

Phone (0730) 66561 or 
01-499 1911 or see your 
travel agent 


JU*T FRANCE - Swer value self cam-tog 
«W holKteys tn the beat French resorts. 
Rtatg for new brochure now. 

Tel 01-789 3592. 

ABTA 69266 AIM 1383. 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
NO. 007090 Of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
PORTON INTERNATIONAL PUC 
AN D 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY CtVEN tori lire 
Order of the Hign Court of Justice 
[Chancery DtvWoai dated 28th October 
1986 coonrudng the reduction of me 
capital of the above-named company trocn 
£71 ,086.961.81 to £66^23^02^1 was 
rt pinned by the Rrotetrar of Cenunnire 
on 13U> November 1986. 

Dated tMs 19m day of November 1986 
Norton. Rose. BottereU A Roche 
Ke m p ,o o House 
C a t uura ue Street. 
London EC3A 7 AN 
Rri: DBA/63/11181071 
SoMri to to for the above-named Company 
IN TIE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
NO. 006646 Of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
HUC3N GROUP PUC 
AN D 

BY THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thal the 
r of Uw High Court of Justice 
(Chancery (Mvteioni dated ZOth October 
1986 confirming the redaction of Die 
capital of the above-named Company from 
£43^60.000 to £29.106X00 was regis- 
tered by the Reg tebar of companies on 
13ih November 1986. 

Dated Pits 1 9th day or November 1986 
Norton. Rose. Battered a Roche 
Keftunan House 
Camomile Street 
London EC3A 7 AN 
Ref: DBA/65/K10&20S 
SoM dwre for the above-named Company 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1966 
INTERCONTINENT AL DREDGING 

COMPANY LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN pursuant to 
Section 688 of The Companies Act. 19» 
that a Meeting of me Crete tori of me 
above named Company will ne new al 33- 
34 Chancery Lane. London WC2A 1EW 
on me 2 day of December 1986 at U.oo 
In the (or moon for the purposes men- 
tioned in Section 689 and 590 of the 
Companies Act. 1983. le:- I The nomina- 
tion of a Uguutator 2, The apnointinenl of 
a Committee of Inspection Proxies to be 
used al Uic me wing must bp longed at the 
Regi s tered Office Of the Company situate 
at 33-34 Chancery Lane. London WCZA 
1EW not later than ms 1 day of December 
1986. 

Dated Bits 1 1 day of November 1936 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 

TP. GREEN ALL 
COMPANY SECRETARY 


QUEBEC 


RAILWAY 


wide, lri/economy. 01-387 9100 


CENTRAL 
COMPANY 
CAPITAL STOCK 
m preparation For the payment or the 
half-yearly tevriend dm January IS 1987 
on the above Stock, the Transfer Books 
wiu be ctosed al 3.30 pan. on December 
12 and wtu be re-opened on December 18 
1986 

D R. KEAET. 
Aaustant Secretary. 

60 Ftomury Sauare. 

London. EC2A IDO. 

November 19 1986 

T RANSW OR LD PRQ QUCTR LIMITED 
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN pursuant lo 
Section 688 of the Companies Act. 1986. 
Him a MEETING of the credOors of the 
above named Company wtu be new at the 
offices of LEONARD CURTIS A OD.. situ- 
ated M 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Wednesday tbe i om 
day of December 1 986 at 1 1 .00 o’clock In 
tbe forenoon, for the purposes provided 
tor in Sections 689 and S9a 
Dated me loth day of November 1986 
J. ADMKAAL 

Di rector 

DOMESTIC & I 
CATERING SITUATIONS I 


£160 . 

rive. Oi ma 2S92 mtatos j cwApFUam wondwtoe. Haymarket 

otl*. Prof M/F to 1 m am 1 3M 

share large cent r»i heated (laL own 
room, garden, close to Tube / BR. Idem 
torCtty . £46PW. 01 3E8 0688 (after 7). TA4MMMA. StCXLY £1 36 Special “LATE 

ItaBT Ote. Prof. F. N/S. to share BWOS" waiter offer tdbootaed wutdi. 
In hnory Bat (colour T.V_ 7 days of departure!. Price luBv loci, 

w/rnaai * dryer, tetephoo ri . £43 pw rtn. CatwtefctopM (every Wed. 1 lam), 

ead. Tri. Ot 608 8676 after 6 ML transfers. A/Tax. 7 MOMS 868 to twin 

WMfTUte O/R. to cut Lendon home of room wHH Drih/»nower and wc. 

prison. Moo- Fri tor Prof Mate. 

43 yn rrilatde. guff* A baa proud. Rria 
ML Tri: 0273 699076. 

Prof M/P. n/s to 
snare atari fiaL own targe room. C/H. 
era know. gdn. £80 pw tari. Tri Ol 
947-92 26 after 4 ml 
BATTERSEA Prof M/F. rinta rtn to 
beaut ilaE moo- tri. Gosa transport & 
shops. £SOpw. Phene: Lyn Ol 609 8292 
06 r t orat a wH ar cay. Prof m/f 26*- to 
share mod hut borne wflh garden. £46 
gw exs. Tel: m 476 4663 totter 7 gsnL 
own dbte rtn to luxury IUL 
_ m achine, drier. 3 mins tube. 

£86 pw OCL Tri 01 731 3722. 


nights fr £179. Stogie * £16wk. NO 
HIDDEN EXTRAS. Offer valid UP 26 
March *87. ISLAND SUN 01-222 74S2 
AST A/ ATOL 

NAP ww cram 

Neter knowtngty under sotaL we bent 
any fare, on any anas, any where to the 
world Discounts on holeb. Credit cards 
wel co me Eattna Travel. ART A. Try us. 
Tel 01 579 7775. 

TAKE I* OFT lo Parts. Amsterdam. 


Science report 


When ozone can be carcinogenic 


By Pearce Wrigfaf; Sdence Editor 


While there is axxxiety about 
the destruction of the protective 
la*cr or ozone in the upper 
atmosphere, which filters hann- 
tu! ultraviolet rays, research is 
the United States has revealed 
Stands of ozone when iris part 
uf contaminated urban air. 

The new evidence comes 
from Columbia University Cd- 
tege of Physicians and Surgeons 
and it follows earlier studies 
showing that as a poUutam m 


die exposure of cdkofhamsters from high doses makes if seem 
and rats to high doses of ozone. likdy that small amounts of 
The results by Dr Borek and her ozone can be carcinogenic. Just 
colleagues are published in the as ozone’s toxic effects are 
latest issue of the journal enhanced by exposure to other 
Carcinogenesis. air poDuzants, such as carbon 

... .. I Wi , _ monoxide, its cai qmg e nic ef- 

fee® TO ** eahaxxKd, by 
posed to 30otn five tunes toe ^^1^ 

<^Kay humans experience in 


ASTHMA XMAS APPEAL 

We are embarking on new research in our 
resolve to help Britain’s 2 miHion asthmatics. 
This disabling, life-threatening disease causes 
some 2,000 deaths each year. We fight to cure 
asthma. We need £250,000 urgently and 
depend on voluntary giving. Please send 
generously to Hugh Faulkner, ASTHMA 
RESEARCH COUNCIL (Tl), Freepost, London 
Nl 2BR (no stamp needed). 


The ozone found naturally in 
the stratosphere keeps toe 
Earth’s temperature from rising 


snaggy cities such as Los An- 
geles, where a large proportion 
of the air poEutkm isia the form 

^Zt^VTSS - Of j55hi gM^u«tolaS 

breathing difficulties and xng out harmful nfawrofa rays, 

headaches. conductix^ expmmene vtoa Ozoue xefc^ed when hydrocar- 

iower levels of ozone that bons from iossO fuels, such as 


Bouen. Boulogne ft Dieppe Time OS. 
2a. Cheater dote. London. SW1X 7BQ. 
01-236 8070. 

: CALL (or ooma of the beat fab In 

Olghri. abutment*, hotels and car trim. 

Tri London Ol 636 5000. MmOMSter 

061 632 2000. AH Travel Adviaory 


TRAVEL Ctwngaprrtabiano in FXrri and 


*** WXST - MEWt SOcrfri often on 
groups. RING FOR A DEAU Ateo other 
ritttztogly low pnees starting at £59. 
atk tor a cony of our bumper Brochure. 
<01 ) 786 9999. Abta 69266 Atot 1383. 


ABE YOU 4 JANUARY SKIER? Phone 
Powder Bvroe Itret for real value for 
money aad beat service. Ot 223 060L 


FREE, FREE. FREE. Free Lift Passes. 

Free Insurance. Free children-* bouaays 

fonder 16) on many dates. Hotels & apes 

(tom Gaiwtck A Manchester irotn Cl 19. 

8M Freedom. Ol 741 4686 * 061 ZS6 

0019. ATOL43E. 

JANUARY SKI SKOALS from SM Lea 
Atpes to VertAer. vutars. Merlnei A 
Mrgrves. Tel OI 602 9766 

LA CLUCAZ. French Ski ChaieL Resident 
staff. Superb, trad, accom. S/tat ago. 
Tri 102423 609696 lOtyV 602776 
«v«s». 


WANTED 


Dr CAratiaBorek, a professor ^ • bons from ibssO fuels, such as 

of pathology atCohimbSThas ^^^ i j^ dosriyt0typi ' gasoline, r^ts losunDgfat ahdrt 

suggested evidence of cancer- caJ human coses. s also implicated m the sod 

causing effects. It comes from Dr Borek said toe evidence rain damage : to trees. 


University news 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

AMtane rad Modem Jeweoery. wautxs. Sever and Plate. Ftntmre. Brans. 
eumetaLlvwtea. Jade. Pewter. Ctocks. Pauunea. Porearin. Gteo. OM Dofls. Ttors 
and Teddy Beat rtc. AnUouo ft Ore teecrs CMhea. Pristey ra 
PBKhwork Qtdlts. nmstan. Costume JeweBery. Lace. Linens, eg w— — — bom. 
Old niracai bases ft inrirumena and an other uavoM aitfctea. hamdah c» 
tar return for Jewritety and outer AHUM n«p« nunwroa cam 

tar expert ran rail on yon. or caB personally wltttani obBgaBen. 

Oust Mon ■ sal 900 . SJO pm*. 

Green Antique GXterfe*. 1X7 Kenrington Church Start: 

Lfittdon W8 7LN. Tri Ol 229 9618 
(Also to New York) 



w Evraou (oral medlrtne and 

United Medical and 

of Cujrs are) a TTwtass'a 


[ ft 


Londoo Woonon (medical physics) 

Appointments to chain Royal Postgraduate Medical 

P i Barnes (thoracic medicine) School; M H Vacoub 
Cardiaihoracic Institute: A (csrdiothoracic surgery) 
Horwtch (radUnhcrapy) Is- Cardiotooradc Institute. 

Confcrroent of ude cf professor 

2 LBFSSS 5BS wgw 

ics) Birkbec^ CoffeEC' B I cSt* and St Thomas s Hospitals; C J 

(SSJ^or^taiS * Sr* (c**diOvasaiter un- 
Charing Cross and Westminster 
Medical SchooL 


WOTFER SPORTS 


I MoDett canayua 

owntMinr as apouea to egnattp#} 
LMted Medfaral and OrtMal Srtmois of 

aS^SSast morass* HrapaaiK s 
Nedlt oatMouar riruEture) t&staioe 

0f R C ? C ?U R ^^« J*eSg!}** » 
bMtKtna of C anc es Be* 
J Shaw uMdtenl micre- 
London Unarm el Medical 
<r e n ew * aliv e 


) 


W 


T E Stacey (child health) St 
CeoiBe’e Hospital Medical 
School: W H T Vaughan ffan- 
*wv of an) Birkbect CoikgK R 


Medical School; T W Stone 
(oearosBeBces) Si Georg’s 
Hosxxtal Medical Stood. 

hTCUiENT OF TITLE OF 


^ Sanw (BuroenO f 

.Sri 

Taylor (dev 

atry> (nstmito of 
Liverpool 
Grants 


(luowcdar _ 



JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££‘S 

LOOK AT THESE AM4BNO OFFERS FOR 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
Don. 2«h/2m December 


Save cm 
SAVE £89 

SAVE £68 

SAVE £108 
SAVE Clio 
SAVE £166 

SAVE £108 

_ WEB TOE W0QE9T CHOICE ON SMS 
Catenae ft CBriet Parnm m 47 of Etacepe^ too ranvte 
OX-7BB 2300 ABTA 16723 

ATOL 1232 


VAL trtSEHE 
CMnwMrinK 

F» 

£249 

Chalet Hotel Crete* Breaches 

FB 

XZ49 

COWMAYCUR 

Qhm Marcum 

FB 

£199 

MERBEL 

Chart La Grange 

FB 

£199 

Chaw Barfval 



Aigtsna Acte. 

8C 

£149 

STANTON 

Chalet ftaadi 

ra - 

£199 


Offering Hold. 
MUteh Dari. 
0422 78X21 


Feres Aussie. NZ. S. Africa. USA and 
Portugal wftti accom. Tri 01 6651X01. 
ABTA 73196. 

XMAS. Winter. Summer. Algarve. Toner- 
. Greece. Turkey. SMtn. Egypt. Sri 
nka and mnny more bob/mgha. 
Veoiufa: 0742 331 IOQ ATOL 2034. 

BICA (Ugbtg wEb Matxswner deur 
m ft 400 South Africa ft New 
tend. Tri Travel centre. Bteckburn 
<0264} 63267 ABTA 73196 

M AMERICA. LOW con RlgbB e* 
KUo £485. Lana £496 rtn. Also Email 
Group Holiday Jeuroeyaleg Peru from 
£3601 JLA 01-747-3108 
LOW FARES MWMRK - USA. N/S 
America- Far Eat. Africa. Abrine Aped 
Art Trayvate- 48 Mriwari Start. Wl. 
Ot 680 2928 fVtea Accepted) 

DKAOt Seal arte lo USAGmbbean- 
Eaa-Auatratta. CaU fee 

Praf redonH ABTA IATA CC ee ra pte d . 
TM OX 264 6786 

HEW YORK, LA.. USA. WoratwUe deso- 
nadoas Ter fee Ch repea l tore*, try ua 
I at. RKtonond Travel. 1 Duke street, 
forf unond Surrey. ABTA 01-940 4073. 
*•£., loci wire sir seats 

Noi/Dee/jamNoi ximbl day uirtnge. 
C109 AST A/ ATOL Vh-g Travel. Ol 
247 1962. 

V ALEXANDER. C nrla t mm evauaUilty. 
GatwKa/Las Wnns IB Dec £227. Ma- 
laga 22 December. £179. 01 723 8964. 
Abta A lot ArrFwA fHa 

HOLLAND. DaHy fBadS. £36 O/W. £S6 
Rtn. Frankfort tan £69. Maude Jet. 
01 379 3522 

HONC WBNB E48S, Sft R SttO K £369. 

Singapore E4S7. Other FE cues. 01-684 

66 14 A BTA. 

LOWEST Ah- Fries. Europe and world 
wide. Ol 836 8622. 

Travel 

LOWEST Air Fares. Scheduled Europe 4 
worldwide. Med star Travel, oi 92F 
3200 

mfTER MM Eteedalc prices In CXrprue. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga ft Te- 
nerife. Nov ft Dec. I*n Wood Homtays 
01 734 2S62. 

UJCJUnE. Faro. Malaga ete. QRKmd 
Travel ATOL 1783. Ol-a8l 464 1. 
H ore het w 48641 

raXAN C o ncorde. Jan/Fro 87 to 
Barbados. Anbgil ric Bpeclri BrtCo- 
0244 41131. 

EUROPE EWORLD UK lowest tees on 
oianer/soiedUM na. rum FHgM OX 
651 OlffT. A# Atm 1895. 

FIRST / Cl >■ (Tj i Concorde Dterounted 
feres. Dumas Travel. 01-488 90il 
ABTA 

ALOARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The (Inert bout's for rental. 73 St 
James SL SWi Ol 491 0802, 

TUMSA. For your holiday where Ns sta 
summer, ran IW oar broctiw* now. Tu- 
nrean Travel Bnrenu. 01-373 4411. 
ML Uri Cim. lowed fores on mrior 
ri hco m efl carriers. 01-984 7373 ABTA 
■SA, rWRANir i Ol 441 1111. 
Travrtwtw. Abta. AM. 


SKIWORLD TOP 8H RoottB. 

Prices from £69. ABTA. Brochure; Ol 
602 4826. 


MAMMY reauired (or 
sughlly iracy family of 2 < mostly i ador 
able utue girts aged 2 im 4. 6 oogs ana 
mar chirkms and nones. Most of too 
Ume u> large Surrey country house, bul 
youm nreo a Bassoon, alus and sun inn 
loiion. Driving IKt-nceati advantage. Re- 
ply lo BOX B20 . 

PfUKM CHI Cordon Btesa style cool 
reauired for Cnnstmas through New 
Year in Suffolli country house Salary 
negotiable. Oilier help kepL Experience 
essential Tet. 01 -191 3340 levesi or 
10284) 828S59 (w/e>. 

i wanted for French Alps. 
Cart 0464 S4899 b. 

EXP COOKS ren SU Seasons smaa 
Chute’ . Franc* tor Geneva) 
Ol 731 7989. 

Jma jfttfa rt bare taur rafts 

■ tar 2 SrriS Srf jratw-eoBaSM* 

SITUATIONS WANTED^ 

FLUENT FRENCH. German. Italian. En- 
rifth. Swbs lady seek* opportunities 
based m London, a years experience tn 
senior pasta arts in lounsm ft bote) bua- 
Reptv to BOX H83 

CMALftV-KiHL Rons Ram cerWlcated- 
raldenl Wesudrater area seeks Derma. 

. Tel: 01-621 9264. 


To Plaice Your 
Gassified Advertisement 

Please telephone the appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and 6 p.m. Monday to Friday, 
or between 9.30 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saturdays. 

Private Advertisers 
01 481 4000 

Birth. Marriage and Death Notices 01 481 3024 

Birth and Death notices may be accepted over the telephone. 
For publication the following day please telephone by 1.30 pm. 
Marriage notices not appearing on the Court & Social page mav 
also be accepted by telephone. 

Trade Advertisers: 

Appointments 01 481 4481 

Public Appointments Ol 481 1066 

Property 01 481 1986 

7 f T c, u 01 481 3989 

U.K. Hobdays Ol 488 3698 

Motors 01 481 4422 

Personal OI 481 1920 

Business to Business Ol 481 1982 

Education OI 48 1 1066 

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London El 9DD 

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You may use your Access. A me ft. Diners or Visa card. 


5 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDA Y NOVEMBER 19 1986 

Princely I Queen praises futuristic tower of gto 
welcome _ — 


comes m 



Continued from page 1 
but decidedly second-rate 
desen entertainment laid on 
for them in Qatar last week- 
end, and which they left half- 
an-hour early. 

The Waleses appeared fas- 
cinated and delighted by the 
Saudi effort, which was staged 
with great style. 

Nearby, the motorcade of 
Rolls-Royces and open red 
Chevrolet police cars sat 
parked with their tyres half- 
buried in the sand, as though 
attendant upon some superior 
Californian beach party. But 
even sheikhs in Mercedes are 
not immune to getting bogged 
down and requiring a push; 
the royal party took ihe 
precaution of returning to the 
metalled road in a four-wheel 
drive. 

In the lunch tent, they sat on 
the ground and picked at 
whole roast sheep from low 
tables, nibbling succulent ol- 
ives and red dates. The 
spaceman's father, who is 
Governor of Riyadh and was 
host for the occasion, had 
clearly spared no effort to 
assure the royal couple that, 
despite the curious affair of 
the errant Crown Prince 
Abdullah, they were honoured 
and welcome guests in Saudi 
Arabia. 

Indeed, the royal tour of 
Saudi bears the hallmarks of 
having been upgraded to little 
short of a state visit, with King 
Fahd himself insisting that he 
gives the first banquet for the 
Prince of Wales, and all stops 
being pulled out to make the 
visit a success. 

There was never any serious 
question of it being anything 
else, for too much is at stake in 
Saudi-British relations, which 
are currently exceptionally 
warm despite incidents like 
the leaked letter from the 
former British ambassador 
and the deportation of British 
nurses for drinking. 

Saudi relations with the 
United Stales have cooled 
because of the increasing diffi- 
culty of getting arms sales 
through Congress, coupled 
with what the Saudis rwgard 
as excessive US support lor 
Israel, right or wrong. 

The Saudis, being few in 
number, require state-of-the- 
ans weaponry to defend their 
long coastline against poten- 
tial aggressors from Iran to 
Ethiopia. 

Britain has been selling 
aims to Arabia since 1929, 
when thev concluded a deal 
for four’de Haviiland bi- 
planes. 





Sid its heating and ventilation ducts are on the outside. (Photograph: Chns Hams) 


The Queen speaks at 
the opening ceremony. 

£165m HQ 
for Lloyd’s 
is opened 

The Queen yesterday of- 
ficially opened the new 
£165 million home of Lloyd’s 
of London insurance service, 
at Lime Street, in the City. 

She unveiled a plaque dur- 
ing s ceremony at which the 
5,000 guests included Mr 
Richard Rogers, the building s 
designer, Mr Paul Chanson, 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, Mr Robin 
Leigh-Pemberton, Governor of 
the of England, and Sir 
David Rowe- Ham, the Lord 
Mayor of London. 

The Lloyd’s Lntine Bell 
sounded twice to signify the 
opening of the 12-storey metal. 
gfags and concrete structure. 

The move there was nec- 
essary because the insurance 
service outgrew its old base in 
the same street 
Mr Peter Miller, chairman 
of Lloyd’s, said during his 
welcoming speech to the 
Queen that the new base was 
“an exciting contrast to so 
much of the boring modern 
architecture in this modem 

City.” ^ 

Parin g her speech, the 
Queen said: “The bunding is 
without doubt a l andma rk, 
both in terms of the skyline of 
the City and in the history of 
Lloyd’s. 

“I believe it to be significant 

that Lloyd’s, steeped as it is in 
tradition, should occupy a 
building which is so dearly 
forward-looking." _ 

The building, which took 
five years to construct, is 
Lloyd’s fourth base in 60 
years. 

Diary, page 18 


Thatcher batting 
but is it cricket? 


The Prime Minister was 
involved in a row with Mr 
Kinnock. Mr Roy Jenkins, 
and many oilier Ians, in ‘the 
Commons yesterday about 
ihe controversial Australian 
tour of Sir Robert Armstrong, 
ihe England captain. . 

Essentially, ihe tour is the 
“bodvline" affair in reverse, 
in die first test now being 
played in the hallowed Syd 
ney courtroom, it is me 
Australian attack which is 
using unprecedeirtly brutal 
tactics. not England, the 
home bowlers are insisting 
that the English team stops 
trying to prevent the rene- 
Je Pom. Mr Peter Wnghu 
ii um publishing what he likes 
about Sir Roger Hoiks, the 
deceased captain of MI5 - 
the famous England 
gentlemen’s XI. Apparently, 
Sis Mr Wright is claiming 
lhat Hollis was really on the 
other side during all the big 
tests which the team played 
against the Russians. Labour 
MPs do not see it this way. 
Not for them is Sir Robert 
Armstrong the victim. He is 
the villain. 

As with the notorious tour 
of 1932-33, they see England 
as using the dirty tactics. 
They nearly always do. 
According to Labour, Sir 
Robert has blatantly used the 
vicious “security" attack. He 
does not deny that But he 
says it is within the Long- 
accepted laws of the game. 
Labour reply that that may 
well be true, but they ask: is it 

SP The issue finally reached 
the Commons yesterday. A 
working class England fan. 
Mr Geoffrey Lofthouse 
l Pontefract and Castleford, 
Lab.) exercised an 
Englishman’s time-honoured 
right to take someiing all the 
way up to the Prime Minister. 
At question time, he told Mrs 
Thatcher that, if Mr Wright's 
memoirs were correct, then 
she misled the House in 1981. 
That was when, after an 
investigation by a retired 
England captain — Lord 
Trend, one of Sir Robert 
Armstrong's predecessors - 
she said she was satisfied that 
Sir Roger Hollis had always 
played a straight baL 
Mrs Thatcher replied that 
she stood by that statement 
But then she said that the 
match being played in Syd- 
ney was sub judice. Mr Roy 
Jenkins, that great old stylist 
who now turns out for the 
SDP, got up to ask whether 
she appreciated “the increas- 
ing ludicrousness" of the 
match which England was 
playing in what he called “the 
Australian courts/’ 


Then came a few graceful 
strokes of the kind lhat used 
to delight the crowds on our 
county grounds during hts 
hevdav. He spoke without a 
helmet, ft was a reminder of 
nobler age. “Speaking as the 
Home Secretary who re- 
ceived the Trend report and 
who believed in the strong 
probability of the innocence 
of Sir Roger Hollis, and as an 
admirer of Sir Robert .Arm- 
strong. who serv ed me in two 
capacities, I deplore the fool- 
ish mission on which the 
Government has sent him. 
For all its elegant phrasing, 
this was a straightforward 
attack on the England selec- 
tors “What is the chance of 
the Rt Hon Lady recapturing 
her sense of proportion on 
this issue." he asked- 
The Prime Minister replied 
that Mr Wright owed a 
service of "life-long, 
confidentiality" to his old 
team. She repeated that it was 
all sub judice. She claimed 
that this meant that she did 
not have to answer any more 
questions about the tour. It 
was this lhat really produced 
the row. Mr Alan VVilliams. 
an Opposition spokesman on 
Commons affaire, intervened 
to ooint out that it would be 
onlv sub judice for the Com- 
mons if the match was being 
played in an English court 
The Speaker, who now- 
found himself dragged into a 
quarrel about international 
sport, replied: “As 1 under- 
stand it. this case in the 
Australian court is not sub 
judice under our roles 

This delighted the Labour 
benches. One after another, 
starting with Mr Kinnock. 
they could now get up on 
points of order and demand 
that the Prime Minister ad- 
mit that she was wrong. Mrs 
Thatcher remained seated. 
Mr John Biffen, the leader of 
the House, appealed against 
the light He asked the 
Speaker to bear in mind that 
the British Government was 
party to a match in Australia 
which was still going on. This 
produced further uproar 
among Labour supporters. 
They demanded to hear from 
Mrs Thatcher, noi Mr Biffen 
— who is only secretary' to the 
selection board. The Speaker 
replied lhat he prepared for 
question time every day and 
stood by bis ruling. 

Mrs Thatcher go: up and 
changed her position. She 
said lhat what she meant _was 
lhat it was “not normal" ;o 
com menu Sometimes one 
wonders whether she really 
knows anything about 
cricket. 


^RyiAJtQN SERVICE 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
The Queen holds an Investi- 
ture, Buckingham Palace. 1 1 ■ 
The Duke of Edinburgh, 
Colonel, the Grenadier Guards, 
holds a reception for the Grena- 
dier Guards Regimental .Associ- 
ation branch secretaries. Buck- 
ingham Palace, 12 noon: and 
later, as President, the Central 
Council of Physical Recreation 
and the Institute of Sports 


Sponsorship, attends a dinner. 
Grocers' Hall. London. 7. 

The Duchess of York attends 
a recital in aid of the Courtauld 
Institute of .Art Fund. St James's 
Palace. 7.30. 

Princess Anne, Chancellor. 
London University, visits Birk- 
beck College. Malet Street, 
WC1. 4.30; and laler attends a 
dinner given by the Marketing 
Group of Great Britain, the 
Meridien Hotel. Piccadilly. 
7.30. 

The Duke of Gloucester at- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,207 



5 

7 

a 

-flp 

y 

— 


% 


□ r 






WL- 


m 

— 


m 

-p 

— 




BR 

HH 


i 

25 





rT 


“ 

— 


across 

I Piece of music by which 
noodles may be taken in 
( 10 ). 

6 What a bespectacled girl 
examinee nevertheless aims 
to get (4). 

9 Return of penny demanded 
by Simon's pieman ( 1 0). 

10 Mineral a hospital clinic can 
supply (4). 

12 Mark as a form of money 
(4). 

13 Can a rod of iron (but noi 
for nothing) enforce such 
laws? (9). 

15 Secret mum repeated 14-4). 

16 Corporation has article ac- 
cepted by periodical (6). 

18 Verses written as returning 
to port (6). 

20 Jo’s bottle? (8). 

23 Bring into effect with a loot 
19). 

24 A doctor's bookmaker (4). 

26 Instrument — not a true one. 
we hear (41. 

27 Add one's mite to study 
what is due to Caesar ( IQ). 

28 Type of good man with a 
heart of gold (4). 

29 A far from sedentary music- 
lover (10). 

DOWN 

2 Journalist's contribution is 
not original (4). 

2 Extraordinarily cool set of 
cats (7). 

3 Actors version of w hat's 


heard in the gallery’ (5,7). 

4 First of many styles in it 
appears shameless (8). 

5 State loses a river to this one 
( 6 )- 

7 A brain with a difference 
describes the phoenix bird 

(7>- - o 

8 Used to tell the exact ume? 

(M). 

1! Like one-party government 
complete with Italian 
heretic (12). 

14 Biblical account books (10). 

17 Top part of the course to 
little Mary 1 8). 

19 Nightingale's song “heard In 
ancient days by — and 
clown” ( Keats) (7). 

21 Magniloquent — nothing 
like Billy Burner (7). 

22 Routed to lake this di- 
version (61. 

25 Stand in the altogether, say? 
(4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.206 


Concise Crossword page 26 



tends ihe Royal Concert Festi- 
val Hall. South Bank. 7.45. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, 
Vice Patron, Queen's Cub. 
attends the club’s centenary 
banquet, Palliser Road. W14, 
7.45. 

Princess Alexandra attends a 
reception held by the Psychiatry 
Research Trust, the new Lloyd's 
Building. Ume Street 6.30. 

New exhibitions 
The Kessler Collection: paint- 
ings by Modern Masters: 
Leicestershire Museum and Art 
Gallery, New Walk, Leicester; 
Mon to Sal 1 0 10 5.30, Sun 2 to 

5.30. closed Fri (ends Feb 1). 

Exhibitions in progress 
Bill Tidy: drawings 1957- 
1986: Ciiv" Museum and .Art 
Gallery. Foregate St. Worcester; 
Mon to Fri 9.30 to 6, Sat 9.30 to 
5. closed Thurs and Sun (ends 
Dec 6). 

Music 
Organ recital by Allan Wicks: 
Durham Cathedral. 7.30. 

Sullivan and the English Tra- 
dition: concert by Joan Self 
(soprano). Martin Yates (piano), 
Angela Needham (clarinet) and 
The St Martin's Singers; Mu- 
seum & .Art Gallery, Chequer R. 
Doncaster. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Wayne Mar- 
shall: Birmingham Town Hall, 
I. 

1 by tL . 

Symphony Orchestra with Barry 
Douglas (piano): Winter Gar- 
dens. Bournemouth. 7.30- 
Cardiff Festival of Music: 
Recital by John Williams; St 
David's Hall. Cardiff. 7.30. 

Concert by the Northern 
Sinfonia with Natalia Gutman 
(cello): St Cutnbert's. Carlisle. 

7.30. 

Talks, lectures 

Don't Trust the Label: Second 
Thoughts - Whodunnit?, by 
Richard Green: York City Art 
Gallery. 7.30. 

Probabilistic Risk Assess- 
ment: The Chernobyl accident, 
by Dr. J.H. Gittus: Large Lec- 
ture Theatre. Physics Pointing 
Building. Birmingham L'niver- 

sity. I i- 
The New Forest, by A.H. 
Pasmore: Salisbury and South 
Wiltshire Museum. The King's 
House. 65 The Close. Salisbury. 
2.30 

Riddle Memorial Lectures: 
God's Word and our Words - 
rules and words. b> D.Z. Phil- 
lips. Newcastle University. 5.30. 

Aspects of Portuguese Cul- 
ture: post revolutionary ar- 
chitecture in Portugal. b> 
Tomas Taveira: John Hansard 
Gallery. The University. South- 
ampton. 7.30. 


The Literary Editor s selection ot Interesting books pubfistwd this weak: 
Florence. Rome and the Origins of the Renaissance, by George Holmes 

Human Rights and Human Diversity, by AJLM. M Mne t M acmiMan. E25) 

jane Austen, by Tony Tanner (Macnhflan, £20. paperback ES.95) 

Mahler's Unknown Letters, edited by Herts Blaukopf, translated by 
Richard Stokes (Gonane:, £25) 

Phfflp Larkin & English Poetry, by Terry (MacmiJjanJ^® 

Phoenix Frustrated, The Lost Kingdom of Burgundy, by Cnnstopner Cope 
(Constable. £14.95) 

Russian Studies, by Leonard Schapto (Co&ns HarwU. £15) 

Secrets of Strangers, by Afice Thomas Ellis & Tom Pitl-AJkens (Duckworth, 

The Essays of Virginia Wood. Volume 1 1904-1912, edited by Andrew 
McNeiffie (The Hogarth Press. £18) ^ ^ k. n»i. n 

The Faber Book of Contemporary American Poetry, edited by Helen 
Vendler (Faber. £9.95) ™ 


Parliament today 


New bocks — hardback 


Anniversaries 


Births: Charles I. reigned 
1625-49, Dunfermline, 1600: 
Bertel ThorwaHsen, sculptor, 
Copenhagen, 1770; Vicomte 
Ferdinand de Lesseps, dip- 
lomat promoter of the Suez 
Canal, Versailles. 1805: Hiram 
Bingham, archaeologist, Hono- 
lulu, IS 75: Paul Hindemith, 
composer, Hanau, Germany. 
1895. 

Deaths: Nicolas Poussin, 
painter. Rome. 1665: Theobold 
Wolfe Tone, Irish republican, 
com milled suicide. Dublin. 
1798: Franz Schubert. Vienna, 
1S2S: Sir William Siemens, 
metallurgist, London. 1883- 

President Lincoln delivered a 
speech at Gettysburg. Pennsyl- 
vania - "... government of the 
people, by ihe people, and for 
the people, shall not perish from 
the earth. “. 1863. 


The pound 


Bank 

Buys 

2.285 

21.20 

62.70 

2X4 

1130 

7.47 

9J5 

2XS5 

245-00 

11.40 

1.10 

206040 

243.00 
3X7 

11X0 
230- DO 
3.70 
159-00 
1028 
2.49 
IXS 

873.00 


Australia S 
Austria Scfc 
Belgium Fr 
Canada S 
Danmark Kr 
Finland Mkk 
Franca Fr 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong Kong S 
Ireland Pt 

Italy Lira 

Japan Ten 
Netherlands GkJ 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
Soutn AfncaHd 
Soon Ptt 
Sweden Kr 
Swiuefland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 

Ra»s lor small de norm nation bank notes 
only as suwMfd bv Barclays Bank PLC 
Oiiieren; rates acpiy to haveners 
cheaues and other foreign currency 
Dus mess. 

Retro! Price Index; 383.4 

London; The ft I ride* closed down 6.9 at 
1271.6 


Bank 

Sens 

2.165 

20.00 

59.10 

1.95 

10.70 

6-97 

9-2S 

2X25 

212-00 

10.90 

1X4 

1960X0 

229X0 

3.19 

10X0 

208X0 

3.10 

1B9.00 

9.73 

2-35 

1.415 

710X0 


Roads 


The Midlands; Ml: Road- 
works continue between junc- 
tions 27 and 28 (Heanor / 
Mansfield): delays at peak peri- 
ods. M5: Contraflow between 
junctions 4 and 5 ( Bromsgrovc / 
Droitwich). A449: Contraflow 
at Crown Lane, Hartlebury, 
Hereford and Worcester; also a 
speed restriction on this stretch; 
care required at all times. 

Wales and West: M5c Various 
lane restrictions and closures 
affecting both carriageways be- 
tween junctions 20 (Ctevedon) 
and 27 (Tiverton). A30: Contra- 
flow operating on the Camborne 
bypass, Cornwall. A3 1: Traffic 
restrictions and delays at Ashley 
roundabout between Ringwood 
and Wimbome. Dorset. 

The North: M6: Various lane 
restrictions and preparation for 
a contraflow between junctions 
29 and 32 (Preston/M55): ex- 
pect delays. M63: Construction 
work continues at Barton 
Bridge. Greater Manchester, 
various lane restrictions and slip 
road closures: avoid if possible: 
long peak hour delays. Al: 
Roadworks and contraflow be- 
tween Felton and Harecrag. 
Northumberland. 

Scotland: M8: Roadworks 
causing congestion for traffic 
heading in and out of Spring- 
burn and Kirkintilloch. Town- 
head: avoid A7J: Traffic 
controls in Irvine Rd E of 
Munro Avc. Kilmarnock. M90: 
Roadworks between junctions 3 
(HaJbrath interchange) and 8 
(Arlary interchange). 


Weather 
forecast 

A cold front over southern 
and eastern England will 
move slowly southeast- 
wards as a ridge of high 
pressure extends across 
the British Isles. 


| NOON TODAY Pimmwo it shown in miffibm* toONTSWarr n 



Occluded 

M Bd.antrtiq 


6 am to midnight 


Christmas post 


Commons (2.30): Conclusion 
of debate on the Queen's Speech 
(The economy ). 

Lords (2.15): Conclusion of 
debate on ihe Queen's Speech 
(Economic affairs and employ- 
ment). 


Today is the latest recom- 
mended posting date forChrisi- 
mas air mall to Si Helena. 

La :est recommended dates 
for surface mail are fixed by the 
Post Office after taking account 
ofavj.|jh)e shippping deadline 
requirements of overseas ad- 
ministrations. 

A special leaflet. Chrijwius 
.i/ji/ f'.-Sf. giving details of 
iaicsi recommended posting 
dates lor Christmas mail by air 
and surface, is now available 
free of charge from post offices. 



London, SE England, East An* 
gGa, Channel Wand* Cloudy with 
outbreaks of ram, becoming dry 
during the afternoon with sunny or 
dear intervals; wind SW fresh or 
strong becoming northerly tight or 
moderate: max temp IOC (50F)- 
Central S, E, 5W England, E 
Midlands: Becoming mainly i 
the morning with sunny or 
intervals; wind northerly Sght or 
moderate: max temp IOC (50F). 

W Midlands, Wales, NW Eng- 
fand. Lake District, Isle of Man: 
Sunny or dear intervals, perhaps 
some showers; wind NW Baht or 
moderate; max temp IOC (50F). 

Central N, NE En gla nd: Mainly 
dry with sunny or dear periods: 
wind N tight or moderate: max temp 
9C(48FV 

Borders, Edinburgh, Dundee, 
Aberdeen, SW Scotland, Moray 
Firth, Northern Ireland: Sunny or 
dear periods, a few showers, with 
sleet or snow on the mountams; 
wind NW moderate; max temp 8C 
(460. 

Glasgow, Central Highlands, NE, 
NW Scotland, Argy*. Orkney, Shet- 
land: Heavy showers, with sleet or 
snow on the mountains, some 
sunny intervals; wind NW or W, 
moderate or fresh occasionally 
strong; max temp BC (46F). 

OuBoofc for t omorrow and Friday: 
Showers in (he N, maWy dry hi the S 
but becoming dandy with rain in the 
N and W later on Friday. 

n 

Bl M Moon sets Moon rises: 

10X3 am 5.28 pm 
Last quarter November 24 

Lighting-up time 

London 4.37 pm to 6X7 am 
Bristol 4.46 pm to 7X6 am 
Edmtwgh 4.29 out to 7.29 am 
Man chester 437 pm to 7.13 am 
Penzance 5.03 pm to 7.13 am 




High Tides 


b-Muc sky: bc-ttfue sky and cloud: c- 
ctoudy: oavercaab i-fog: d-dnzzte: h- 
Moi: mist -mist: r-raln: s-snow: Iti- 
UiundcrsMnn: iwhowers. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed (mptii circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

London Bridge 

3.04 

68 

3.19 

Aberdeen 

2.27 

35 

2.42 


8.30 

12.6 

B.50 

Betast 

12.10 

Z2 12.31 

CardtH 

ais 

11.7 


Devooport 

655 

5.4 

7.12 


12,15 

6.4 12-21 


V2b 

5^ 

642 


2.08 

4.6 

2.02 


1258 

3.9 

1 16 

Hotytwed 

11X6 

55 11.56 

Hull 

7-37 

6.9 

745 


707 

6.6 

7 21 

LeMh 

3.47 

b.2 

4.08 

Uwnpool 

12.15 

8.8 1228 


1047 

23 1058 

Margate 

1.02 

4.6 

1-21 

Buford Haven 

7.28 

6.b 

748 


6.18 

B5 

6.33 

Oban 

642 

3.6 

7.09 

Penzance 

554 

b5 

8.12 

n lu fi mv* 

7.57 

21 

3.25 


1259 

4.4 12.46 

Shareham 

12.12 

5.9 12.19 




12X5 


753 

9.1 

754 

Tees 

455 

5.1 

5.08 

W'hon-on-Nzo 

1252 

4.0 

1.09 


Tide 


HT 
6.B 

4.0 
12.2 

3.4 
1T.3 

5.1 

6.4 

4.9 
4-fl 

3.9 
5X 
6.8 

8.4 

51 
88 

2.4 
46 
63 

6.4 
3.7 
5J? 

1.9 

4.4 
58 
4.3 
8J 
53 

._ .... 4.0 

1m=3-2E08fL 


Around Britain 




Son rises: Sweats: 
735 am 4.07 pm 




WevtoouA 




MorxUy^Sarurnay 'raeord your dally 

^AaS^iwse 1 1®®**!* to determine 
your wwnlv Portfolio 'JS?*- 
H vour loial nuicnes the tnwanw 
ww-Uy dividend I Wure you hJ ve won 
oumqhi or a share of Ove prow money 
for tnal wee*, ami rn ro d claun 
your prize as ln«ru r tgn_ BeK>w 

Tshmhma The Timaa Portfolio dani 
PofWIP Jfcggjy.gS 
jja pm- •? p»a Owyjt** ot mm jatm 
Mfchec The T»am» WlWk [ OtuMwa. 
No can Oe oeoeptod ouw d s ISni 

h °You must hair vour card with you 
wnen you leMHWr . ■ ... 

II you are urwoie to leirphone 
someone else can claim on vour henair 
Pul they must ruse vour card and cau 
The Times Porrfooo claims Unc 
sn-wn the snpultiied times- 
no rcsoonsintlny «am or a c ce ideo 
for failure » comaet The claims Office 
tor any reason witfun U»e stated 

n °ThP atwve instructions are ap- 
pticuoie «o both oauy and weekly 
dividend claims. 


Torquay 

FMnouth 



Ua, 



Sun Rain 

Max 


in 

C 

F 



hrs 

in 

C 

F 

X 

.01 

11 

52 bright 

Guernsey 


.08 

12 

54 

as 

• 

It 

52 

sunny 

ScWytohra 

4.7 

30 

13 

55 






Newquay 

43 

21 

11 

52 

4.8 

.14 

to 

50 

showers 


X 

.56 

10 

50 

55 

■ 1H 

11 

52 

sunny 

Tenby 

4 

36 

10 

5(1 

. 

.10 

12 

54 



0.1 

10 

8 

4K 

5.1 

.39 

12 

54 


Douglas 

ai 

.21 

7 

45 

34 

36 

12 

54 

ram 

London 

4H 

.05 

11 

52 

2.9 

.33 

12 

54 

had 

B-hani 

4.0 

X9 

8 

4ti 

32 

50 

11 

52. 

showers 

Bristol (Ctrl) 

2.9 

1b 

9 

48 

3.1 

.24 

11 

52 

showers 

Cartfff (ChQ 

2.3 

36 

9 

46 

3.6 

.13 

12 

54 

showers 


3/ 

3/ 

9 

46 

41 

.15 

1? 

54 


BT>OOl Ahot 

28 

.02 

9 

48 

43 

.12 

12 

54 

simny 


3X 

04 

7 

45 

2.0 

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33 

.02 

7 

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11 

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showers 

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2.0 

.03 

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.14 

10 

50 

ram 

CariWe 

02 

.06 

7 

45 

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19 

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0.4 

30 

5 

41 

4.2 

.03 

X 



Prestwick 

0.6 

.39 

7 

45 

43 

.10 

10 

50 bnght 

Gtaagow 

2.5 

30 

7 

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42 

19 

ii 

52 bright 

Tbee 

09 

13 

8 

48 

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36 

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showers 

Belfast 

4.7 

- 

7 

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sunny 

sunny 

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cloudy 

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hail 

showers 

thunder 

ST 

ram 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

had 

had 

Showers 

had 

bright 


Yesterday 


Abroad 


Temperatures al nwdaay yesterday: c. 
doud; f. fair. r. ram; s, sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast I 4 39 Guernsey r 12 54 
B’rmghem S 846 taramesa S 439 
Blackpool 1 846 Jersey r 1254 
Bristol 11050 London 11254 
Crmaff r 1050 HTncuter s 745 
tmsmraii a 541 Newcasfle s 843 
Glasgow s 541 musway t 745 


MDQAY: c. doud: d. drizzle; f. lair; fg, log; r. rain; s, sun; sn. snow. t. thunder 


Our address 


Alaccki f 
AkroUri s 
JUax'dria c 
Algiers c 
Amst’dm f 
Athena & 
Bahrain 
Barhads- I 
Barcema s 

Beirut 


C F 

20 68 Cologne 

20 68 Cphagn 

21 70 Corfu 
IB 64 Dublin 

9 48 Dubreimft 
16 61 Fara 


Inlormalion for inclusion in The 
Times Iniormanon wn w should he 
vm lo" The tdiior. i I IS. The Times, 
PO Bin 7. 1 Virginia Street. London. 
Cl 9XN 


irrriMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED, 
rose Pnmed oy Lonoon Post (Prim- 
m,l Limilco or 1 Virmma SareeL 
London El 9XN and by News 
Scotland Ltd-. 124 Ponman Street. 
KJ no roe Part*, Qmww Cel _1EJ 
Wednesday. November 10. 1986. 
nevsiered s a newspaper al tne Post 
ounce. 


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BonJe'x s 
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Brussels C 
BrJdapst I 
8 Am' s 
Calm f 

CaoeTn I 
Cwanca & 
Chicago" 

Ch 1 church c 


29 84 Frankfort 
16 61 Funchal 
Geneva 
5 41 Ottrattar 
10 50 tfekunhi 
27 B1 Hong K 

14 57 hmshrck 

15 59 Istanbul 
12 54 Jeddah 

9 46 Jo’&ura" 

10 50 KaraeN 
26 79 LPahnss 
21 70 Lisbon 
23 73 Locarno 
IB 84 L Angela* 

Lraembg 

15 59 Madrid 


C F 
C 10 SO 

f 8 48 

S 20 68 

e 6 43 NMbVne 
a 18 64 Mexico C* 

s 20 88 

c 12 54 

I 9 48 

c 18 64 

5 10 50 

6 20 68 

c 4 38 

e 19 66 NOoN 
1 8 46 N York* 
f 11 52 Mice 

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f 28 62 P*rts 
S 28 82 Poking 
c 20 66 Perth 
s 15 59 Prague 
c 13 55 Reytqvft 

Rhodes 
f 7-45 Riode J 
a 12 54 TUyetSt 


C F 

s 17 63 Rome 
s 20 66 Salzburg 
th 15 59 S Frisco 1 
I 14 57 Santiago' 
s 22 72 S Paulo* 

11 


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1 34 Stash* rg 
9 46 Sydney 


c 24 75 Tangier 
s 16 64 Tetaviv 
S 23 73 Tenerife 
c 12 54 Tokyo 
s 19 68 Toronto* 
s 5 41 Tisris 
C 11 52 Valencia 
s 9 48 VancVer 
S 30 86 Venice 
f 9 48 Vienna 
t -1 30 Warsaw 
a 19 66 Washton* 
5 26 79 WoTnton 

w 2? 81 Zurich 

dendes Monday's Rosa-es are latest awaJabte 


f IB 

s 11 
d 29 
c 8 
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C 17 
s 19 
c 13 
I 22 
S 16 
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C 17 
f 16 
c 6 
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c 7 
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c 13 

s 10 








BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


25 

SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1271 .6 (-6.9) 

FT-SE 100 
1617.5 (-11.1) 

Bargains 

23762(26451) 

USM (Datastrei 

129.99 (-0.11) 

THE POUND 


Wall Street fear 
over contents 

tapes 



US Dollar 

1.4240 (-0,0045) 

W German mark 

2.8651 (-0.0105) 

Trade-weighted 

68.2 (-0.3) 



Shops call 
for rethink 
on credit 

By Ow City Staff 

After recovering more than 
£9 million on about 19,000 
overdue accounts in the 
to August 31, the West Ri __ 
Trade Protection Association 
calls for a more responsible 
attitude towards consumer 
credit. 

M r Jack Barritt, president of 
the association, says it is well 
placed to provide the nec- 
essary support 
He sees a significant trend 
in house repossessions rising 
to 16,800 in 198S; a 13 per 
cent rise in household electric- 
ity cut-offs; and a 12 per cent 
rise in gas supply turn-offs. 

The association produced a 
deficit of £4,365 on trading 
operations, but investment 
income was £3Z387. 

Settlement 
at Lloyd’s 

Lloyd's names who were on 
syndicate 868/35 in 1979 will 
be receiving a cheque at tire 
end of the month folio wing 
the settlement of Alexander 
Howden Underwriting Ltd's 
fAHUL) legal action against 
former syndicate underwriter 
Mr Colin Han. 

AHUL. the syndicate 
owner, has recovered £1.67 
million. Names who wrote a 
£20.000 line on the syndicate 
will receive £1^0O. Mr Han 
was expelled from Lloyd's last 
month and fined £175,000 
with £ffiX0Q0 costs for! dis- 
honest. misappropriation of 
syndicate funds. . 

Siemens stable 

Siemens, the electrical 
group and West Germany’s 
second-biggest company, an- 
nounced 1985-86 pretax prof- 
its of DM1.5 biffion (£522 
million), Httle changed from 
the previous year. It proposed 
paying an unchanged DM12 
dividend. Foreign business 
slipped 2 per cent to DM24.9 
billiondoe to the weakness of 
the dollar and a faD in demand 
from oil-exporting countries. 

Metal Box up 

Metal Box yesterday an- 
nounced pretax profits for the 
half year to the end of Septem- 
ber 1986 up 24 per cent to 
£38.6 million. Turnover was 
slightly down at ££565.6 mil- 
lion compared to £569.3 mil- 
lion in the first half of last 
year. An interim dividend of 
i.7p was declared. Tempos, 
page 28 

TSB success 

The offer for sale of 49 per 
cent of the shares in TSB 
(Channel Islands) at 7(h) each 
was oversubscribed. The basis 
of allocation will be an- 
nounced today. 


Mr Ivan 
graced American 
said to have 
evidence 
by taping confidential 
conversations with business 
associates. 

The tapes could implicate 
some of Wall Street’s biggest 
names in the investigation 
into US in s ider trading. 

American newspapers re- 
ported that Mr. Boesky re- 
corded conversations for up to 
three months to earn a more 
lenient settlement These 
recordings are expected to 
provide irrefutable evidence 
of others’ participation in 
illegal trading schemes. 

Separately, high-level Wall 
Street officials confirmed yes- 
day that Mr Boesky’s case is 
jarded as “a financial 
Watergate” that will shake the 
foundations of Wall Street. 
One sud: “No one 
where it will lead. Fear 
rampant” 

Speculation continued that 
the US Government's in- 
vestigation is now focused on 
the investment health of 
Drexet, Burnham, Lambert 
1 Inc. and its activities on behalf 
of corporate raiders. Mr Mi- 


Frora Bailey Morris, Washington 


is 


chael Milken, the man cred- 
ited with masterminding the 
use of Junk bonds in take- 
overs, is reported to be a 
target. 

Mr Boesky operated one of 
the most sophisticated 
information networks on Wall 
Street, officials said. As a 
routine, he spoke to finan- 
ciers, speculators, corporate 
officials and others involved 
in the hectic world of 
takeovers. 

Share prices in New York fefl 
shandy yesterday as worries 
abort the impact of the Boesky 
case grew. At one stage the 
Dow Jones index was 40 
points down, before recovering 
slightly to stand at 1,830 in the 
early afternoon, down 30 
points on the previews night 

According to the latest re- 
ports, he secretly taped 
conversations on his home, 
car, and office telephones to 
provide federal officials with 
evidence which will help him 
to escape prison. 

In settlement of civil dam- 
ages he has agreed to pay SI 00 
million (£70.02million). 
There is an outstanding charge 
against him. 


These were supplied by Mr 
Boesky and Mr Dennis 
Levine, the former investment 
banker charged in May in the 
first insider trading complaint 
to rock Wall Street. 

Mr Boesky routinely spoke 
to corporate raiders such as 
Mr T Boone Pickens, Mr Carl 
Icahn and other investors 
active in takeovers. The pub- 
lic records of private losses 
filed in connection with the 
takeover cam p ai gn in 1985 
against Phillips Petroleum- 
Company reveal a dose 
relationship between Mr 
Boesky and Mr Icahn. 

There were also reports 
yesterday that the SECs net 
could widen to include finan- 
cial officials in Europe and 
perhaps Asia. 

Easier, h was learned that 
federal officials have already 
issued up to 12 subpoenas to 
well-known investors and 
Wall Street companies. 

The tension on Wall Street 
escalated after reports that the 
US Securities and Exchange 
Commission is working from 
information on tapes and in 
affidavits. 



SEC called in to 
Collier inquiry 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Foreign Each 28 
Traded Opts 28 
Share Prices 29 
Uslt Trusts 36 
CoammUtfes 38 
USM Prices 38 


Wall Street 
Co News 


28 
26 

„ 27 

SudMalaZ} 
Tempos • 28 

Money Mrirts 28 


The US Securities and Ex- 
change (Y i m m ig si ftfl has be- 
come involved in the inquiry 
into suspected insider dealing 
by Mr Geoffrey Collier, it 
emerged yesterday. The 
Department- of Trade and 
Industry, which began an 
investigation into the share 
dmlings, has already been in 
contain with the SEC which 
has become in volved because 
the deal was conducted 
through the US. 

The two independent 
inspectors appoi nted ob Sun- 
day to conduct the DTI in- 
quiry are already also looking 
into other share deds' carried 
out by Mr Coflier. They have 
been given very wide powers 
to investigate Mr Collier 
“and/or persons associated 
with him." They are in dose 
touch with Morgan Grenfell, 
where Mr Coluer used to 
work, and Vickers da Costa, 
winch executed the share deaL 

It is believed thar Mr Coffier 
flew to the US yesterday to 
help in the investigations, and 


that Mr Michael Cassell, 
senior executive in the Los 
Angeles office of Vickers da 
Costa, is currently in London. 
Mr Cassell is helping Vickers 
da Costa with its own inquiry. 
Mr Collier is under investiga- 
tion for buying shares in AE 
shortly before the announce- 
ment of the agreed takeover by 
Hollis early this month. The 
share order was executed by 
the Los Angeles office of 
Vickers da Costa. Mr Collier 
was forced to resign as a 
director of Morgan Grenfell 
Securities last week because 
the deal broke Morgan's house 
rule against using outside 
brokers. ... 

Vickers da Casta is part 
owned by Citicorp, the US 
bank, and is an associate 
company of Scrimgeour 
Vickers, the London stock- 
broker and market maker 
which s wholly owned by 
Citicorp. Since the deal came 
to light last week Mr Cassell 
has not been at his office in 
LosAngdes. 


AE seeks identity of 
US shareholders 

By John Bell, City Editor 

The bdeagured engineering was announced he had been 


group AE is making strenuous 
efforts to discover the bene- 
ficial owners of sizeable blocks 
of its shares which may be 
crucial in the outcome of tire 
£271 million takeover bid for 
control of the company. 

It has served notice on the 
Wall Street investment house 
L F Rothschild to disclose the 
identity of several million AE 
shares purchased recently. So 
for it his had no answer. 

AE and its advisers are also 
pursuing enquiries. to find out 
whether a sizeable stake in tire 
company is now owned by 
disgraced financier Ivan 
Boesky either through his 
British company, Cambrian 
and General Securities, or his 
American companies. 

Mr Patrick Evershed, a 
partner in the London stock- 
broking firm of Laurence 
Keen said yesterday that since 
Turner & NewalTs first bid 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


New York 
Dew Jones 
Tokyo 

NikkSi Dew ... 
Kong Kong: 


. 1821.711-38*1)" 
17Z7333 (+65-38) 


2249.97 (+7 

Gen 

Sydney; AO 1214.81-11 S) 

Frankfurt ■ 

Co m merzbank . 1975-2(4^3) 

Brussels: - 

General 3884.95 (+30.5§ 

Pari* CAC 379-1 M# 

Zurich: SKA Gen 544.01+1.40) 

London: FT. A BOMBf-O^*}" 

FT. 6«s $1.32 " 


Ctownfl prices 


1HM1) 

Page 29 


INTEREST RATES 

London: Bank Base: 11% 

&nwnai tntertwn* 11 s-ii 1 *** 
3-month dtgtfe MtettPs- 
buying rate 
ti& Prime Sate 

Federal Funds . 

34north Treasury Bis S3fr&3ft% 
30-year bonds iOTw-IOO m* 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: Si .4240 
£: DM2-8851 
LSwFrZ3831 
& FFr9.3770 
£: Yen33l.S8 - 
tnaex.685 
ECU £0.725742 


MtwYoriC 
& £1.4232* 
&DM20 13S’ 
SrSwfrt.BTSET 
*FFi*5915" . 
£ Yenl 82.75 
fc *00*111.2 
SDR £0841014 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


D Crouch 
Goodwin 

Hardys & Hanson 

Mortand &Co 
Unflevar 



Chelsea Man 

Campari tat 
IC Gas 


Mercury tnt 
Sturge Holdings - 

CML"' 

Harrison 


411pt+21pj 
«22pf+ir ■ 






Insurance- 

Bros. 535p(-1' 

MK Efaetric Group — 374p f-l2p] 

Gos'A* 1028p(-l2p) 

Consolidated Gold — 651p(-13p) 
Prices am as at 4pm 


GOLD 


London Firing: 

AM 5388.00 
dose $391 
275 JO J 
NcwYoric _ 
Comax S381 JO-391 .70* 


DO 

1 JO (£274-50-' 


NORTH SEA OIL 


g nagp (Pec ^pm $15 . 15001 


£25} 


informed that a block 
amounting to more than 10 
per cent of AFs equity has 
passed through Seligman Har- 
ris, one of the joint brokers to 
Cambrian and General. 

Mr Peter Lester of Seligman 
Harris’s New York office re- 
fused todiscuss how many AE 
shares he had purchased on 
behalf of Boesky companies. 
“We have a rule here that we 
do not discuss our clients’ 
affairs,” he said. Mr Lester 
admitted that be had spoken 
to Mr Evershed recently. 

At one stage in the long 
running battle by engineering 
group Turner and Newafl for 
control of AE, it was reckoned 
that companies associated 
with Mr Boesky may have 
held, through various com- 
panies, as much as 15 percent 

At present T & N and its 
associates own just under 30 
percent ofAEand T & N says 
that holders of another 14 per 
cent of the engineering com- 
pany intend to accept its offer. 

Mr Robert Maxwell's tim- 
ber and furniture group, Hol- 
lis, is making an agreed offer 
for AE and owns just short of 
11 per cent. It was not dear 
last njght if any of toe Boesky 
holdings are frozen. 

If so, h could affect the 
outcome of the bid in favour 
of AE. 


SE fails on 
arbitrage 
policy 

By Lawrence Lever 

The Stock Exchange yes- 
terday foiled to decide how it 
should instruct its members to 
respond to any approach to 
deal for Mr Ivan Boesky, the 
Wall Street arbitrageur who 
feces a S10Q million (£7Q 
million ^penalty for insider 
dealing. 

Meanwhile, the Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry, 
which has received informa- 
tion from the American Sec- 
urities and Exchange Comm- 
ission about Mr -Boesky, said 
that his activities may im- 
plicate people working in the 
British securities business. 

A DTI spokesman said that 
be could not reveal the precise 
nature of foe information that 
was passed by foe SEC be- 
cause it was “confidential". 

The Stock Exchange council 
put foe question of Mr Boesky 
on its agenda at its routine 
council meeting. 

After foe meeting it an- 
nounced that that it could not 
decide until It had full details 
of the restrictions placed on 
Mr Boesky by foe Securities 
and Exchange Commission. 

Any firm approached to 
deal for Mr Boesky should 
refer to the Stock Exchange for 
guidance, the Exchange said. 

In addition to the record 
penalty Mr Boesky feces, he 
has been banned from securi- 
ties d ea lin g in the United 
States. 

Mr Boesky is known to have 
substantial interests in Britain 
even though the majority of 
his arbitrage business was 
founded on Wall St takeover 
activity. 

He owns 12 per cent of foe 
the ordinary shares and 72 per 
cent of the capital shares in the 
quoted Cambrian and General 
Securities Trust 
He resigned as chairman of 
this trust after foe news of his 
insider dealing penalty. 


Sir James: urged US not to catch “the European disease” 

Goldsmith defends 
US takeover bid 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 
Goldsmith yes- In his own defence, presenting 
record of his accomplish- 


Sir James 
terday delivered an im- 
passioned defence of Ins role 
| in US takeovers, saying that 
Us company was dakfaig np 
the entrenched “corpocracy” 
which is tntdenmniiig Ameri- 
can competitiveness. 

In a crowded room and 
before a largely hostile 
C on gre ss ional committee, Sir 
James said that America was 
in danger of catching 
“Europe's disease” which 
killed entrepreneurship on the 
Continent 

“I am Enropean and I have 
seen European industry and 
creativity destroyed by what I 

calln trian gular aHianrp nf hig 

muons, big government and 


“If yon follow and catch the 
same disease then you have 
caught the Enropean disease,” 
Sir James said. 

He testified before die US 
House Monopolies and 
Commercial Law Sub- 
committee which conducted 
an unusual hearing Into Sir 
James’s proposed $4.7 billion 
(£3.29 billion) takeover of 
Goodyear Tyre and Robber 
Company. 

The hearing was 
with Goodyear emj 
representatives erf US corpora- 
tions, and lobbyists intent on 
stopping the wave of takeovers 
by corporate raiders, particu- 
larly foreign ones. 

Sir James testified at length 


a 

meats in America. 

He dted a 1982 acquisition 
of the Diamond International 
Corporation, formerly Di- 
amond Match Company. It 
had strayed from its core 
business of forest products. 

Sir Janies said that in four 
years be was able to turn the 
company around by selling off 
major divisions which later 
became profitable. 

“Who the beU are you and 
what do you know about the 
tyre business?" asked Mr 
John Seiberifog, the Ohio 
congressman whose grand- 
father founded Goodyear. 

Sor Janies replied font be 
was a “active investor? who 
had a specific role to play in 
streamlining management of 
companies in which he had 
interests. 

Goodyear, according to Sir 
James, lost its way in 1983 
when it left its primary busi- 
ness of malting tyres and 
moved into the energy 
business. 

Noting that he had line of 
credit of approximately $2.7 
Mition and already owned 
more than 11 per cent of 
Goodyear’s shares. Sir James 
said he woahl restructure 
management and strip away 
the non-essential companies in 
order to make Goodyear a 
leaner, better focused busi- 


Government 
borrowing 
falls sharply 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 
The public sector borrowing iag in supply expenditure. 


requirement, now foe corner- 
stone of the Government's 
economic strategy, was just £9 
million last month, compared 
with £2.09 billion in 
September. 

For foe first seven months 
of the 1986-87 financial year, 
the PSBR was £5.7 billion, 
compared with £5.3 billion in 
the same period of last year. 

However, foe Government 
will benefit from the privatiza- 
tion proceeds from British 
Gas, British Airways, and next 
month’s redemption of £250 
milli on of British Telecom 
pr e fe rence shares in the 
remaining months of foe 

financial year. 

Supply expenditure in foe 
April-October period was 3.25 
percent up on a year earlier, in 
line with the Treasury’s orig- 
inal spending targets for the 
present year. 

Treasury officials said yes- 
terday that the planning total 
for public spending had been 
revised up in foe autumn 
statement because of compo- 
nents of spending not indud- 


of foe local 


in 

notably that 
authorities. 

Revenues in October bene- 
fited from buoyant corpora- 
tion tax receipts. This 
contrasted with September, 
when there was a repayment 
of advanced petroleum rev- 
enue tax to the oil companies. 

In foe first 10 months of this 
year. Inland Revenue receipts 
were running 4 per cent up on 
a year ago, while Customs and 
Excise receipts were 10.75 per 
cent higher than last year. 

The Treasury is anxious to 
stress foe continued buoyancy 
of non-oil tax revenues since 
these are likely to form the 
basis of foe argument for tax 
cuts in the March Budget. 

Central government 
borrowing was negative by 
£200 million last month, com- 
pared with positive borrowing 
of £2.53 billion in September. 

Local authorities repaid 
£100 million last month, and 
have now repaid £100 million 
net so far in this financial year. 

Veil of stringency, page 28 


Record profits of £10m 
reverse flow at Thames 


By Lawrence Lever 


Thames Television, the lar- 
gest British commercial tele- 
vision company, yesterday 
announced record mid-term 
pretax profits of £10.26 mil- 
lion, in its first set of results 
since its highly successful 
public flotation in June. 

The reversal of Thames's 
interim results from a corres- 
ponding £2.96 million loss in 
1985 is attributable to foe 
growth of total ITV advertis- 
; revenue and the increase 
Thames's share in this 
revenue — from 14.7 per cent 
to 16.3 per cent. • 

Turnover for foe six months 
to September 30 was up by 
29.1 per cent to £104.5 mil- 
lion. 

The company is paying an 
interim dividend of 4p — in 
line with its prospectus fore- 
cast of a minimum of 3p. 

Mr Hugh Dundas. foe 
Thames chairman, said full- 


year profits would be 
"substantially ahead" of last 
year's £14.6 million. 

The company is still consid- 
ering whether to exercise its 
option to purchase a 10 per 
cent stake in the new ITV 
Superchannel at a cost of more 
than £4 million. Thames's 
option expires on December 
31. 

Mr Richard Dunn, foe 
managing director, said that 
Thames had a number of 
concerns about its parti- 
cipation in the SuperchanneL 
which aims to broadcast foe 
cream of ITV and BBC 
programmmes by satellite 
throughout Europe. 

Not least of these concerns 
was foe extent to which 
Thames’s film library — val- 
ued by some sources at £56 
million — should be commit- 
ted to foe project 

Tempos, page 28 


Staveley No.2 in US 


By Alexandra Jackson 

Staveley Industries has con- The new subsidiary will be 

given a $5 million interest free 
for 


ditionally agreed to acquire 51 
per cent of Weigh-Tronix. foe 
American company, for $10.4 
million (£7.28 million), the 
company announced 
Staveley will simulta- 
neously merge this business 
with its 56.9 per cent owned 
US subsidiary. National Con- 
trols Incorporated thus 
improving its position in the 
weighing machines market 
from number four to two. 


loan for five years. Both 
Weigh-Tronix and NCI are 
quoted on the Nasdaq ex- 
change. 

Pan of foe deal is to be met 
by foe placing of 1.6 million 
new Staveley shares at 350p. 
The new shares represent 9.8 
per cent of foe existing share 
capital of the group. The 
balance will be met from 
group internal resources. 


$95m deal 

Debron Investments has 
conditionally agreed to pay 
$95 million in cash for 
Guilford Industries, which is 
traded on foe over-the- 
counter market in the US and 
quoted on Nasdaq. 


Hillsdown buy 

FGUsdown Holdings has ac- 
quired 51 per cent of Wirral 
Foods, a canned meat pro- 
ducer, for £928,200 in cash 
and shares. The remaining 49 
cent will be acquired over 
years. 


LIG interim 
profits 
up to £1 2.2m 

By Oar City Staff 

Pretax profits at London 
International Group, foe near- 
monopoly supplier of con- 
doms in Britain, rose from 
£10.5 million to £1 2.2 million 
in the six months to Septem- 
ber 30 as turnover rose 15 per 
cent to £128.9 million. The 
interim dividend was raised 
from 1.5p to 1.75p. 

LIG is considering in- 
troducing a prophylactic 
aimed at homosexuals, in 
view of growing concern about 
Aids ana medical opinion that 
protectives can help to pre- 
vent its spread. 

Mr Alan Woltz, chairman, 
said LIG would await the 
results of its marketing ex- 
ercise in The Netherlands with 
a new, thicker condom called 
Duo. 

UG was investing heavily 
m Aids-related product re- 
search but he said estimates of 
the disease's effect on condom 
sales had been exaggerated. 

Mr Woltz said LIG backed 
foe Government's Aids educa- 
tion campaign, which will 
include television advertising. 

Tempos, page 28 


Steinberg lifts Mercury stake 

By Onr Banking A line of 5 million Mercury asked to be a director, and no 


Onr Banking 
Correspondent 

Mr Said Steinberg, the U S 
arbitrageur* yesterday ap- 
peared to have secured around 
14 per cert of Mercmy Inter- 
national, foe City financial 
conglomerate, with another 
round of share baying which 
sent the share price up 21p to 
41 lp. 

The move could presage a 
showdown between Mercury 
and Mr Steinberg, who is now 
the company's largest share- 
holder by some way. It also 
lakes Mr Steinberg dose to 
the informal 15 per cent Emit 
radon 

shareholdings in “British 
banks. 


A line of 5 mill km Mercury 
shares were bought through 
Alexander, Laing & 
Cndcksbaak, the stockbroker, 
which would not comment on 
the buyer. A Mercury director 
said yesterday: “*We cannot be 
totally certain that Mr 
Steinberg was the buyer, but 
we would be surprised if he 
was not. He did art warn ns or 
consult as first. We do not 
know what he wants to do with 
his stake." 

When Mr Steinberg first 
began baying shares in Mer- 
cury, the company made it 
plain that he was not a 
welcome shareholder. Mr 
Steinberg may, however, now 
press for a seal on the board. 
“So far, Mr Steinberg has not 


asked to be a director, and no 
one has suggested that he 
should be one,” Mercury said. 

A month ago, Mr Steinberg 
tore ap his agreement, made 
last year with Mercury, not to 
take his shareholding above 
10 per cent. Mr Steinberg said 
that he was not ■impressed by 
Mercury's performance and 
wanted measures taken to 
enhance the company's share 
value. Mercury's shares have 
outperformed foe market by 
20 per cent over foe last 
month. 

Mr Sternberg's intentions 
over Mercury remain unclear. 
The possibility that be may 
bid for the company cannot be 
dismissed. 



ir 

‘Nv J < ^ 



“We’re going to invest in commercial property, Foskett. 

Nip out and buy some, will you? Office bbeks, warehouses, factories 
and shops —you know the sort of thing. North, south, 
north east, anywhere Arid take your time . Take all day, if you like . . . 



You won’t need all day, Mr Foskett. 
It only takes a minute to contact us. We’ll 
be happy to advise you on all aspects of 
commercial property 


investment. 


Buying and selling, 


King 

& 



01-493 4933 


leasing, portfolio valuations, rent reviews, 
building sunwing and management . . . 
from any of our offices in London, 

Birmingham, Edinburgh, 
Leeds, Manchester 
or Brussels. 


§ 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




Insider dealing inquiry 
slows early trading 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 

Knitwear 


New York (Reiner) - Wall 
Street share prices were lower 
in moderate early trading 
yesterday. 

The widening investigation 
of the latest insider trading 
scandal to hit Wall Street kept 
many investors aerroas and 
pressured stocks that rose in 
recent weeks on rumours of 
takeover or restructuring. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which fell 13 points 
on Monday was down 338 
points at 1.857.14. 

Declining issues led shares 
by a margin of two to one on a 
volume of 16 million. 

The transporation average 
was up 0.13 at 82938. utilities 
at 209.29 were up 0.05. while 


stocks had slipped 0.68 fo 

735.90. 

Elsewhere, the Standards & 
Poor's 100 index was down 
0.17 at 228.97. The S and P 
composite was down 0.40 at 
242.81. 

Gillette, which received a 
takeover bid from a group 
including Revlon, fell l J -i to 
65 «*. 

USX was down to to 2tto, 
Safeway was down to to 61 t /r, 
Eastman Kodak was down to 
to 64 7 /ni Pepsico at 2714 was 
down V s mid Goodyear was 
down % to 45%. 

Niag Mohawk at 17% was 
unchanged and so too was 
AT&T at 25W. Another non- 
mover was Air cal Inc at 13 7 /*. 



in likely to cut 
rowth forecast 



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Amax Inc 

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Gen Motors 

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Georgia Pac 

37% 

Amoco 


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44% 




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15V. 

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sum Trans 


Tokyo (Reuter) — Japan is 
likely *lo admit defeat oyer 
attempts to revive its sluggish 
economy and will cut its 
growth forecast next month, 
according to government and 
commercial bank economists. 

Japan's economic growth, 
they said, remained slow in 
the J uly-September quarter, at 
best only matching the 0.9 per 
cent increase in the previous 
three months. 

One senior government 
economist said figures due out 
early next month were likely 
to show the economy grew 
between Vz a per cent and I per 
cent in the third quarter. 

If that is correct, the Eco- 
nomic Planning Agency will 
probably lower its forecast of 4 
per cent growth for the year 
ending next March, another 
government economist said. 
In 198S/S6. the economy grew 
4.2 per cent. 

The original forecast last 
December assumed a yen/dol- 
lar rate of 204. The yen has 


been much stronger than that, 
cutting into Japan's exports 
and forcing companies to 
slash capital spending plans, 
private economists said. 

A Bank of Japan official 
said the impact of the strong 
yen on manufacturing had 
been more serious than ex- 
pected and outweighed the 
benefits of cuts in interest 
rates and import prices, 
particularly for oil. 

Until now, the Japanese 
government has refused to 
alter its official forecast, say- 
ing h needed time to assess the 
impact of interest rate cuts 
and government moves to 
stimulate domestic demand. 

Analysts said the Prime 
Minister, Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone, was worried that a 
reduction in the forecast 
would lead to American com- 
plaints that Japan was not 
doing enough to stimulate its 
economy. 

But several government of- 
ficials said the Economic 
Planning Agency had little 


choice but to reduce the 
forecast if it wanted to retain 
its credibility. 

One Finance Ministry of- 
ficial said the prediction 
would probably be lowered to 
about 3.5 per cent, from 4 per 
cent. But that would still be 
much higher than private 
sector forecasts of about 2.5 
per cent. 

A government official in- 
volved in helping to draw up 
the forecast said it was un- 
likely to be reduced to below 3 
per cent, despite the private 
predictions. 

When it announces the new 
forecasts next month, the 
Planning Agency is also ex- 
pected to increase dramati- 
cally its forecast for Japan's 
current account surplus in the 
present fiscal year. 


EEC to integrate networks 


m bx 

I Ed 
iSeil 
Otto 

K7 

imp 

ne 

X) 

i 

E Cor 
Inst 
unis 
n 



Telephone and tele- 
communications equipment 
throughout the EEC is to be 
integrated and standardized to 
give telephone users within 
the community access to a 
range of sophisticated 
services. 

Mr Giles Shaw, the indusny 
minister, who was chairman 
of a meeting of EEC industry 
ministers looking into the 
subject, warmly welcomed the 
decision yesterday. 

He said integrating EEC 
telecommunications systems 
would “take a little while," but 
the result would bring enor- 
mous benefits to business- 
men. private users and 
equipment manufacturers. 

He added that the move was 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 
symbolic of EEC and British 
determination to complete the 
internal market by 1992. 

EEC officials said the new 
system should be in operation 
by 1 988, but it would be up to 
the 12 national telecommuni- 
cations authorities, including 
British Telecom, to co-operate 
on the technical details, at an 
estimated additional cost to 
Lhe EEC of £5 billion. 

The new system is known as 
the integrated services digital 
network (ISDN). 

The EEC is to use the 
experience of the Bundespost, 
the West German equivalent 
of British Telecom, which has 
developed ISDN techniques 
in collaboration with Siemens. 

It makes use of. existing 


Half-time profits soar at WCRS 


WCRS Group, the old 
Wight Collins Rutherford 
Scott (Holdings) and Britain's 
second largest advertising 
agency'- produced pretax prof- 
its of £3.5 million for the six 
months to October, compared 
with only £547.000 for the last 
first half. 

Turnover was up from 
£25.8 million to £143.5 
million. 

The results included a four- 


By Alison Eadie 
month contribution from 
HBM-Creamer, a leading 
American advertising agency 
and public relations con- 
sultancy. four months from 
FCO. a London consumer 
agency, and one month from 
Della Femina Travisana, an- 
other American agency. 

There was strong organic 
growth in Britain, the com- 
pany said- 

WCRS announced the ac- 


quisition of Siebert/Head. a 
British package design con- 
sultancy. It will cost between 
£1.26 million and £2.1 million 
depending on profits between 
now and 1989. 

The interim dividend was 
raised to !.85p from 1.0?p. 
The outlook for the second 
half is strong. The company 
expects to make more inter- 
national acquisitions and ex- 
pand into marketing services. 


ADVERTISEMENT. 




n u i ui i t C?*? PLtD 


DC J 


• INFRARED ASSOCI- 
ATES: Figures in £000 for the 
half year to August 3 1. Turnover 


To mark the acceptance of two 
million telephone exchange lines 
of System X. Plessey and GEC 
have presented a gold plated 
System X line card to British 
Telecom. 

A further two million lines 
are currently beingdelivered by 
Plessey and GEC. 

These four million lines so 
far supplied to British Telecom 
represent 20 percent of itsplan- 
ned replacement or the UK’s 
public telephone network. 

During the Iasi twelve 
months, in the U K alone, orde rs 
have been placed for 2.2 million 
lines of System X“ putting it 
third in the world-ordering 
league lable for digital public 
switching. 


£2m ISDX 
network 
for Oman 



was 1,608 (1.285). Pretax profit 
was 371 (347). Earnings per 
share were 3.12c (3J8). No 
interim dividend. Orders re- 
ceived in the first six months 
were 40 percent higher than for 
the same period last year. The 
company is proceeding with its 
expansion programme envis- 
aged in its placing document. 

• RIVERMEW RUBBER ES- 
TATES B£RHAJ> There is an 
interim dividend of 10 per cent 
(less 40 per cent Malaysian 
income tax) in respect of the 
financial year ending December 
31. 

• GALACTIC RESOURCES: 
The company's working capital 
increased from $2,086 million 
in December 1985 to 512.533 
million for September 30 1986. 

• LONDON SECURITIES: 
Figures in £000 for the six 
months to September 30. Turn- 
over was 990 (480k pretax profit 
was 5t 1 (loss 157) and earnings 
per share were 0.28p (a loss of 
0.1 Ip a share). The board is 
confident about future prospects 
and the company has entered a 
period of prosperity. 

• NATIONAL HOME 
LOANS: The company has 
appointed S G Warburg and Co 
to arrange a £200 million loan 
facility. The new arrangement, 
in addition to other banking 
faciliues. is designed to support 
the company's growing mort- 
gage business. 

• CONCENTRIC: The final 
dividend is 2.94p. making 4.50p 
<3.70p) for ihe year to Septem- 
ber 30. Figures in £000. Sales 
were 58,445 (55,761), pretax 
profit was 3.286 (2J51) and 
earnings per share were )0.S6p 
(7.4 5p). The chairman, Mr Tony 
Firth, reports that all areas of the 
business are trading well for the 
year. 

• S & V STORES: Figures for 
the six months to July 31. No 
interim dividend. Turnover was 
£18.164 (17,708) and pretax 
profit was £526 <35 3). The 
results indicate a significant 
increase for the year. 

• BA&JLOW RAND: Final 
dividend was 56c. malting 80c 
(70c I for the year to September 
30. Figures in rand millions. 
Turnover was . 14,622.7 
(12,240.7), pretax profit was 
1.082.9 (841.2) and profit after 
lax was 645.5 (S46.1). Earnings 
per share were 312.3 (164.9). 
The group traded well this year 
in spite of the economic and 


A £2m communications network 
to link the ait land and sea forces 
of Oman is lo be provided by 
Plessey, following nine monthsof 
negotiations. 

The network will employ 
several inter-working Plessey 
ISDX exchanges involving 
some 6.000 telephone lines, 
with the possibility of further 
exchanges when the network is 
expanded. 

The contract is ihe biggest of 
its type won by Plessey in the 
Middle East It will involve 
Plessey engineers in its instal- 
lation and maintenance. 


EXPORTMARKET 


Plessey and GEC are working 
closely together to win System 
X orders in (he export market. 
Opportunities are being acti- 
vely pursued in the Far East. 
Middle East South America 
and the Eastern Bloc. 

Plessey recently made tele- 
communications history with a 
live demonstration of two 


Mr. Ken Lille) left Pleve) Major 
Sjmcids chief s\emli*e. and 'It Tim) 
Snoad erntrr ra jiticine director ur 
GEO. Tel ephnni- Sviichins Group, 
makcthrirjtrini presentation (a 
Mr. Clin- Foxell. Rrili*h Ti-tectno's 
managing di rmor Tor E mtf net-ring am] 
Procuremenl. 


System X digital telephone 
switching systems operating 
over thousands of miles, en- 
abling all the facilities to be 
demonstrated to visitors lo the 
Plovdiv Trade Fair in Bulgaria. 


WAVELL READY 
FOR RHEME ARMY 


Newiandin|E0t^H 


A Plessey P-SCAN Microwave 
Landing System (MLS) has 
been installed at London 
HeathrowAirportbylheUKCivil 
Aviation Authority. 

The system will be used for 
trials within the programme by 
the Interna tional Civil Aviation 
Organisation (ICAO) to gain 
experience or MLS in a busy 
airport environment. 

This forms purl ol an 
extensive UK technical ami 
operational evaluation of MLS. 


UK CAA and technical trials 
have already commenced at the 
Royal Aircraft Establishment. 
Bedford. 

However, a considerable 
amount or work remains to be 
undertaken by 1C AO and its 
working panels, particularly the 
All Weather Operations PaneL 
on technical and operational 
aspects or both the ground and 
airborne equipments. 





recovery 
hit by 
imports 

By Teresa Poole 


Fletcher King set 
for flotation 


By Jodltb Huntley, Commercial Property Correspondent 
Fletcher King, the West Fletcher King on a p/c ratio of 


The fragile recovery of the 
£1.4 billion British knitwear 
industry is threatened by a 


record surge in Imports, the 
Knitting Industries Federation 


It might be raised to 75 or 
$80 billion, from SSI billion 
forecast last December, one 
government official said. The 
1985/86 surplus totalled $55 
billion. 


technology to enable subscrib- 
ers anywhere in the commu- 
nity to plug into services such 
as fox, high speed computer 
data, enhanced voice quality 
circuits, and eventually video 
and image transmission. 

The EEC officials predict 
reduced costs as a result of the 
integration. The next phase of 
integration after ISDN will 
involve optical fibres and 
satellites instead of exisiting 
copper cables. 

The main aim oflSDN is to 
ensure that the EEC can 
compete with America and 
Japan in the telecommunica- 
tions market, which is ex- 
pected to be worth £140 
billion by the end of this 
decade. 


A Wji dll irmimil in uprraliun. 


Plessey has completed the latest phase of Wav ell. (he Murid's first 
computer system fur improved tactical command and control on the 
baltiefield. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Thi.-» was achieved wiih ihe 
recent handover iu ihe British 
Army of the 32nd vehicle fined 
with WavJI cutup mem. 

Ii fulfils the £45 million 


STANDARD APPRO \CH 


MLS is scheduled to become 
lhe preferred ICAO “standard 
approach aid' in 1998. 

Two Plessey P-SCAN cis- 
terns have been delivered to the 





The height of high technology 


production order placed by the 
Ministry ut Defence in Novem- 
ber. 1983. for 16 tracked and 16 
wheeled vehicles equipped 
wuh the Uju-K system. 

Must of th ese v chicles w ili be 
bjsed in Germany with the 
British Army ufthe Rhine and 
will use the Pumiigjn trunk 
comm uni vaiiopj. »> stent, also 
iunr.lrjJhi Plessey. 

T u.il value uf Plessey work 
lor W.,v;li ;i» u.ste amounts to 
£80 rii limn. 


Rush & Tompkins; Mr Ian 
Richards becomes local con- 
struction director of the 
company’s operation in ihe 
South-east. 

J Henry Schroder Wagg & 
Co: Mr M Wilson Snyder has j 
been appointed a director, 
operations. Mr Rupert M 
Caldecott becomes a director 
and. additionally, a managing 
director. Schroder Sec unties 
International. 

Cigahoiels: Mr Willy 
Bravrand has been appointed 
managing director of the Mi- 
lan-based operation. 

Polyco! Division of 
Atociiem UK: Mr Da rid 
Gresham is appointed chief 
executive. 


Knittin g Industries Federation 
said yesterday. 

In the past two months, 
British knitting companies, 
which employ 82,60®, have 
made 900 redundancies and 
short-time working has incr- 
eased. 

Imports of knitted outer- 
wear — which includes sweat- 
ers and pullovers and is the 
largest sector of the market — 
doubled in the second quarter 
of this year. 

That brought the increase 
for the first half to 52 per cent, 
compared with a marginal 
improvement in exports. 

At the annual meeting of 
KDP, the president, Mr Lars 
Helgeson, also blamed the 
redaction in the value of the 
dollar. 

He said it was “a cause of 
considerable dismay when onr 
customers, as a consequence of 
exchange rate vagaries, switch 
more ©f their sourcing back to 
the Far East.” 

Imports from Hong Kong, 
Taiwan, and South Korea have 
shown large increases this 
year. 

Mr Helgeson said that the 
record jump in imports had 
happened despite the back- 
drop of heavy investment in 
new technology which enable 
British companies to respond 
quickly to market demands. 


End-based firm of commercial 
estate agents is to come to the 
market via an offer for sale of 
2.26 million shares, represent- 
ing 33.3 per cent of the 
company, at 175p per share. 
This capitalizes the firm at 
£11.86 million. 

The directors, the present 
partners of the company, will 
retain 66.7 percent 

Fletcher King follows Baker 
Harris Saunders Group, the 
firm specializing in City of 
London property, to the stock 
market- But unlike Baker Har- 
ris it has a wide geographical 
spread of business and a range 
of institutional investment cli- 
ents, some of whom would 
have liked to buy the 33 per 
cent 

The offer for sale price puts 


15.3 times, a figure estimated 
by the company's adviser, 
Lazard Brothers the merchant 
tank and Cazeno ve, the stock- 
broker, to ensure that the 
shares, due to start trading on 
December 2, go to a premium. 

Fletcher King is forecasting 
pretax profits of £1.1 5 million 
for the year ended April 30. 
1987, based on its half year to 
October 31 which showed 
pretax profits of £530.000. 

The firm has shown a 
compound increase in profits 
of 30 per cent a year over the 
last five years. The yield for 
the foil year will be 3.6 per 
cent and an interim dividend 
of 3p per share will be paid. 

The offer will raise £622JSQ0 
net of new money. 


Government ‘shares in 
North Sea confidence’ 


By Our Own Correspondent 

The Government yesterday that 58 exploration wells were 


Halifax takes 
over Ulster 
estate agency 


From Bob Rodweli, 
Belfast 

The Halifax Building Soci- 
ety is to acquire Northern 
Ireland's largest estate 
agency, Brian Morton. 

The acquisition vrOI take 
effect next February at the 
start of the society's new 
financial year and after the 
Building Societies Act be- 
comes law. 

It is the second step in the 
Halifax's plan to establish a 
network of 200 estate agency 
offices throughout Britain by ! 
die end of next year. 

It has announced already its 
impending acquisition of 
Henry Spencer's 20 estate 
agency offices in Yorkshire 
and Lincolns hire. 


sought to instil new con- 
fidence in the battered North 
Sea oil industry. 

Mr Alick Buchan an-S mi th, 
the energy minister, said it was 
fashionable to knock the in- 
dustry, but some forecasts of 
job losses in oil and associated 
industries were “incorrect and 
irresponsible.'' 

He told delegates at the 
West of Scotland Oil Con- 
ference at Glasgow: “Of 
course, we face difficult times, 
particularly those business- 
men supplying goods and 
services the industry de- 
mands. But all is not doom 
and gloom; there wifi continue 
to be many opportunities 
open to tough, competitive 
companies." 

Mr Buchanan-Smith said 


started this year, only Three 
fewer than in the same period 
last year. Appraisal wells num- 
bered 33, against 40 in 19S5. 

He said he had approved 1 2 
new developments this year, 
including Conoco's £650 mil- 
lion V Fields and British 
Petroleum's £760 million Vil- 
lages Fields. 

"This is hardly the story of 
an industry in retreat. Looking 
ahead, the deadline for tenth- 
round licence applications is 
fast approaching. The prime 
objectives of the round are to 
maintain the momentum of 
exploration activity and to 
provide the potential for 
developments in the 1990s to 
replace existing fields as they 
start to decline. 


Epic buys £6.5 million 
property portfolio 


By Onr Commercial Property Correspondent 


The Estates Property Inv- 
estment Company has bought 
a £6.57 million portfolio of 
properties from an unnamed 
vendor, which will be paid in 
the form of 4.16 milli on new 
Epic shares, representing 16.7 
per cent of the company's 
issued share capitaL 
Baring Brothers, the mer- 
chant bank, is to place the 
shares with institutional and 
other investors at 158p per 
share. 

The properties, throughout 


Britain, show an income of 
£777,765 a year and have been 
individually valued as being 
worth £6.99 million. 


• Hammerson Property Dev- 
elopment and Investment 
Corporation and Guaranty 
Properties have sold 825 acres 
of their 2,000-acre land bank 
in Mississauga, a suburb of 
Toronto, to a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of the Orlando 
Corporation for CanS44 mil- 
lion (£2122 million}. 


COMPANY NEWS' 


political pressures that freed 
South Africa. 


South Africa. 

The group has substantial 
cash holdings and if these were 
to be offset against borrowings 
within the companies con- 
cerned. the debit equity ratio 


would improve to 42 per cent 

• SHARE DRUG STORES: 
Mr Alan Prince, chairman, is 
confident that the drug store has 
an increasing role to play in the 
high street Nine new stores 
have been opened this year. 

• TYSONS (CONTRAC- 
TORS): Figures for the six 
months u> June 30. Turnover 
was £14.1 10.736 (£11,461,162). 
Loss before tax was £67,915 
(£419,607 loss). Loss per share 
was 1.36p (6.39p). The reserves 
at December 31 1985 have been 
adjusted to reflect an accounting 
error in 1985 audited accounts. 

• SAC INTERNATIONAL: 
Final dividend i.3Sp, making 


and earnings per share were 
14.4p (12_lp). Prospects in 
Britain remain good with activ- 
ity expected to continue at a 
satisfactory leveL Overseas, no 
immediate improvement is ex- 
pected in the group's traditional 
marets. 

• NEW CAVENDISH ES- 
TATES: The company has ac- 


quired from Stirling Properties 
39,153 ordinary shares of Brad- 
ley Court at £2.50 per share 
costing £97,883. The company 
has subscribed in cash for 
138,694 new shares at £2.50 
each, costing £346.735 in brad- 
ley court. 

• ABBEYCREST: For the 12 
months to August 31 there is a 
second interim l.Sp. making 
2.5p for the period. A final for 
the four month period to 
December 31 is to follow. The 
group is changing its year end to 
reflect its operating cycle. 

• NORSAT INTERNATION- 
AL: The Canadian satellite 
communications company, has 
reached agreements subject to 
regulatory approval for the pri- 
vate placement of 550,000 
shares at CanS0.60 a share. 

• LAWRIE GROUP: For the 
half year lo June 30, with figures 
in £000. A pretax profit of 2,019 
(4,352) was recorded on turn- 
over of 2,864 (3,124). Group 
operating profit, excluding in- 
terests in Bangladesh, was 454 
(821), investment and other 
income was 1.458 (1,377). profit 
on sales of fixed assets was 1 10 
(2,174), interest payable and 
exchange losses were 3 (20), 
minority interests were 2 (2) and 
earnings per share were 55.27p 
(!42.38p). 

• MEPC: The Drapers* Com- 
pany, in partnership with 
MEPC, has acquired the existing 
lease of 25 Austin Friars, 
London EC2. MEPC is to be 
granted a lease of 127 years 


2p for the year ending August 
31. With figures in £000, turn- 
over was 20.127 (16,076). Gross 
profit 3,900 (3 .395) administra- 
tion costs 2,154 (2,086) interest 
payable 87 (167) profit before 
tax 1.659 (1,095) tax 647 (468) 
earnings per shares 8. 1 5p(5.9lp. 

• DIPLOMA: Dividend 4p 
(same) making 5.25p (same) for 
year to September 30. Figures 
£mil lions. Turnover 93.2 (92.3) 
profit 1 1.8 ( 1 5.5) share of related 
companies profit 0.7 (nil) pretax 
profit 12 J (1S.S) tax 4.9 (6.5) 
minority interests 0.4 (0.6) net 
profit 7.2 (8.4) extraordinary 
items after tax debt 0.1 (0.9 
credit) earnings per shares be- 
fore extraordinary items 13. Ip 
<15.9p). 

• MMT COMPUTING: Final 
dividend was 3-2p (2.8p) mak- 


ing Sp (4p) for the year to August 
31. Figures in £000s. Turnover 
was 2^*40 ( 1 ,464). profit was 7 20 
(432), tax was 273 (192) and 
earnings per share were 22.4p 
<12p>- 

• CIVIL MICROSYSTEMS: | 
For ihe six months to Septem- 


pennimng redevelopment once 
the building has been vacated. 

• AGA: The company has an- 
nounced the acquisition of area 
companies, of Hammond. In- 
diana. The company does noi 
forsee any big changes for 
Hammond, which has 50 
employees and had sates of S9 
million in 1985. 

• FLETCHER CHALLENGE: 
The previous offer has been 
withdrawn and a new offer 
submitted in the name of a 
wholly-owned subsidiary to ac- 
quire the shares in N Z Forest 
Products. The terms provide 
flexibility for acceptances below 
a 51 per cent shareholding. 

• COURTNEY POPE HOLD- 
INGS: The company has ac- 
quired a metal finishing 
company. Better Electro-Plat- 
ing, and its associate company 
Banel Platers (London) 
for£250,000 of which £100.000 
will be satisfied by the issue of 
ordinary shares in Courtney 
Pope. 

• AEGON INSURANCE 
GROUP: The company has 
launched a Euro-yen 5 billion 
yen/dollar dual currency bond 
issue. The bonds have a five 
year maturity and are not 
callable before maturity. The 
coupon is 7 per cent per annum, 
payable in yen. and the issue is 
priced at $101 7-8 per cent. At 
maturity the bonds will be 
redeemed in US dollars at the 
fixed rate of $162.5, giving a 
redemption amount of approxi- 
mately $30.7 million. Proceeds 
of the issue will be used to re- 
finance existing short-term debt. 

• TOD: At the annual meeting, 
the chief executive, Mr John 
Lind, reported that results for 
the first quarter of the new 
financial year were in line with 
expectations, with good pros- 
pects based upon recently se- 
cured new contracts. 


ber 30, with figures in £000 
turnover was 3,416 (2,824). | 
pretax profit was 902 1678), lax 
was 343 127!), minority interest 
debt was 35 (35) attributable to 
shareholders 524 (372) and 
earnings per share were 6. Ip 
(4.3p). 

• MX ELECTRIC; Figures for 
the 26 weeks to September 27. 
Interim 3,7p f3.4p)L Figures in 
LraiUion. Turnover was 66.1 
(60.0). net operating costs were 
57.5 (52.7). net interest payable 
was 0.2 (0.5), profit before tax 
was 8.4 (7.8), tax was 3.0 (3.3) 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 


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LENDING 

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I 


^ III 

s - ! dtnc e ' 


1 • ! i 


*f. • 1 
' ■ i i I \ r-. 
' 4 1 ' **••• 



Congress 
takes on 
economic 
‘invaders’ 

The case of Akron, Ohio 
against Sir James Goldsmith 
was weighed yesterday in an 
unusual Congressional hear- 
ing that could become the first 
chapter in a political cam paign 
against corporate raiders. 

Ostensibly, the 
about Sir James’s $4.7 
(£3.29 MDion) takeover offer 
for Goodyear lire & Rub ber 
Company, the world's largest 
tyre company. 

But in reality, the braes are 
much broader. The dty of 
Akron, home of Goodyear, 
regards if as a battle against a 
“foreign invader" who threat- 
ens the area’s economic life. 

Foreign “invaders!* are now 
a hut of economic life in 
America. In response to the 38 
per cent drop in the dollar 
since 1985, foreign takeovers 
and corporate investment have 
increased dramatically, 
amounting to $15 billion so Ear 
this year. 

Terrorism’ 

Unknown in this Mid-west- 
ern city two months ago. Sir 
James has snddenly become a 
household word. His ware* 
appears on hamper stickers 
and at football rallies as 
Akron mobilizes to fight the 
takeover. “Who is to say he 
will not move the rest of omr 
jobs overseas," said a Good- 
year worker, me of 12,000 
employed at the headquarters. 

Leading the offensive is Mr 
Robert E Mercer, Goodyear's 
chairman, who regards the 
raids as a form of “economic 
terrorism." He chums no com- 
panies, not even well-managed 
ones, are immune. 

His argument and those of 
ether corporate officials, nota- 
bly Mr Andrew Sigler, chair- 
man of Champion 
International Corporation, 
have fallen os sympathetic 
Congressional ears. 

Both men claimed the mas- 
sive “restructuring" underway 
in corporate America is 
damaging long-term US com- 
petitiveness as companies sen 
off profitable units and accu- 
mulate enornousdebts to fight 
off takeovers. 

Sir Janies and Ids partner. 
Sir Gordon White of Hanson 
Industries who has invested 
$200 million in the Goodyear 
venture, daimgri predators 
have a salutary effect, saying 
takeovers shape op stagnant 
management and protect 
shareholders’ investment. 

Curbs 


The hearing yesterday by 
the Congressional . sub- 
committee concerned with 
commercial law, is regarded as 
the opening salvo in a Con- 
gress campaign to be branched 
next year attest raiders, 
investment tankers, arbitra- 
geurs and others involved in 
the takeover game. It conld 
result in new crabs on take- 
overs in response to corporate 
appeals and insider-trading 
investigations. 

One of Akron’s leading 
witnesses is its mayor, Mr 
Tom Sawyer, a Democrat 
recently elected to Congress. 
Decribing Sir James as 
“villain", be said Goodyear 
was “under siege and oar 
communities and citizens are 
caught in the crossfire." 

Mr Mercer was equally 
severe in his assessment. Last 
month, he told Goodyear 
employees: “Once 

company’s stock has been pat 
into play as a result of a raid 
attempt and the accompanying 
speculation, it is necessary to 
sacrifice both ora* long-term 
plans and oar current assets, 
to narrow ora business foots 
and shorten the time-frame for 
stock perforance." 

Goodyear, which is in the 
throes of a massive restructur- 
ing, has put up for sale more 
than $15 billion in assets and 
raised money to buy beck 20 
million of its own shares, or 18 
per cent of those outstanding. 
Staff will be cot and plants 
dosed. 

Dismembering 

“We hope to emerge with 
more of the company intact 
than if we simply left ora fate 
to a group which aught well 
dismember Goodyear," Mr 
Mercer said. 

Throughout the debate. Sir 
James has maintained a low 
profile, agreeing to a mora- 
torium while Goodyear pur- 
sues its restructuring. He las 
even promised to work with 
the company if k succeeds m 
boosting Goodyear’s dare 
price and focuses onthe main 
business of tyre making. 

Bat the assault on Goodyear 
and other companies which 
are considered well-managed 
is creating a backlash against 
takeovers. 

Goodyear, fra example, has 
a competitive cast structure, 
better- tban -2 verage return on 
equity and uses stale-of-theart 
technology. 

The fact that it oust now 
focus on a short-term strategy 
at the expense of its longer- 
term goals is of concern to 15 
officials worried about deriia- 
ing US competitiveness. 

Corporate managers have 
shifted almost completely so 
short-term survival tactics, in 
the Opinion of Mr Fat Choate, 
author of foe best-strung 
book. The fflgk~Flex Society. 
“They nsrc too busy fighting 
Wan Street to fight Japan." 
faosaid. 

Bailey Morris 


Trusthouse shares advance 
on speculative interest 


By Michael Clark and 
Carol Leonard 

- Tiusthosse Forte, the hotd 
end leisure giant, yesterday 
stood out like a sore thumb 
among the alpha stocks. It 
rose lOp to 174p-on specula- 
tion that one of the big 
Australian corporate raiders 
was trying to build a stake. 

The tale is not new, bat the 
level of turnover on such a 
quiet day suggested them was 
a little more truth to it than 
the usual ramp. By the close of 
business almost 10 million 
shares had changed hanri$ and 
a careful eye cm the SEAQ 
trading screen revealed one 
buyer of 1. 2 millio n shares. 

During the past month, a 
number of stories have en- 
gulfed the shares. There have 
been reports of heavy Ameri- 
can buying and rumours that 
the panel of trustees was 
liquidating part of its bolding. 

Yesterday’s story was that 
either Mr Robert Holmes d 
Court, the Australian finan- 
cier, or Mr Ron Biierley, the 
New Zealander, (no one was 
sure which) were trying to 
build a near 5 per cent stake. 
However, talk of a full-blown 
bid seems to be out of the 
question. 

Lord Forte has emphasized 
that he is in no rush to. 
relinquish control of the 



share! 

**E5*“ 

ABLE AND WIRELESS: 
r . J&DUE FOR RERATING? 

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV 


group. He has the backing of 
the trustees, who own SO per 
cent of the shares, and the 
Forte family. The Forte family 
owns 25 percent. An agressive 

9 Moran Tea held steady 
at a new peak of 795p helped 
by a 62 per cent increase in 
the dividend to 20p. Pretax 
profits for the year to Jane 
30, were £639,000 compared 
with HA million. Conver- 
sion of its warehouses at 
Wapping and Bridewell 
Place wffl boost profits in foe 
present year. 

bid would be a formidable 
task and certain to founder on 
such a vast show of solidarity. 

Elsewhere the stock market 
had one of its quietest days 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


19K 

Hjflt i Low Company 


.Me* 

M Offer 


CVgt pence 


YM 

% 


P/E *000 


174 126 
483 278 
491 381 
572 449 
840 680 
450 356 
726 526 
293 
289 170 
600 423 
700 53Q 


ABetHjons 

ASDA-MR 

BTR 

BAT 

BardayB 

Bass 

Bonham 

Sw Cfecto 

BOC 

Boon 

Br Aerospace 
Br Petroleum 


306 313 
160 154 
287 292 
462 467 
465 472 
725 735 
425 430 
627 632 
332 335 
222 225 
470 483 


280 177b Br Tatocam 
133 33 art#* 

354 36 Bulon . 

369 277 Cable 0 Wksian 

195 158 Cadbury Schweppes 176 

336 259 Com (Mon 285 

704 409 Cons GoWfMdS 658 

327 '2 252 CouRwMs 309 

438 318 Dixons Op 

660 408 Raona 

954 701 Gan Acckfett 

228 158 GEC 

1147564Gtoxo 
482 328 Grand Met 
11*2721 GUS 'A 
954 - 720 GRE . 

385 235 GpCN 

355 275 Gufemns 

215*2141 Hanson 

Hswkar Sticfiay 
bap Cham tod 
Jaguar 
Ladbrote 
UmtSaatMm 
tagst&Gan 
Lloyds • 

Lotto 

Marks A Spencer 
MUM 
Nat Warn 
P & O Dfcd 


823 403 
11 **734 
583 335 
391 312 
348 276 
288 133 
48* 293 
283. 183 
231 163 
599 417. 
593 428 
578 428 
246 182 
942 718 
234 146 
900 805 
562*2345 
781 511 
987 782 


Prudential 
Ratal Sect 
Recidt Caiman 
Routers 
RTZ . 


194 196 
183 165 
260 264 
300 307 
179 
268 
658 685 
309 312 
320 324 
543 548 
80S 812 
178 1B2 
885 905 
440 445 
10*B IQ's 
7B3 770 
249 252 
325 330 
192 194 
414 420 
‘ 10*10*2 
505 510 
388 373 
328 - 331 
232 237 
423 430’ 
299 241 . 
189 192 
560 587 
495 502 
502 507 
168 172 
795 802 
170 174 
800 807 
527 582 
673 680 
818 825 


-5 

-5 

-3 

-2 

+5 

-5 

-6 

-2 

-10 

-1 

-2 

-4 

+2 

-1 

-2 

-12 

-6 

+3 

-15 

-2 

~8 

-*• 

+i 

-5 

-7 


+10 

■2 

-S 

-3 

-5 

-2 

+2 


-7 

-5 


135 

45 

95 

1&4 

28.1 

21J 

17.1 
305 

14.1 
10L1 
234 
485 
107 

93 

85 

65 

BJ 

17j4 

355 

95 

45 

84 

30 

8.1 
205 
135 
305 
425 
175 
103 
6l7 

215 
4 85 
12.7 
165 
145 

123 

255 

17.1 

53 

37.1 
275 
2S5 

72 

385 

43 

285 

54 
313 
365 


35 

35 

45 

60 

35 

45 

45 

43 

45 

45 

75 

55 

5.7 

25 

22 

45 

65 

S3 

35 

13 

15 

42 

35 

22 

35 

25 

55 

7.1 
31 
35 

5.1 
45 
25 
45 
4 A 
52 
55 

7.1 
35 
65 
55 
55 

42 

43 
25 
35 
15 
45 
4 2 


142 831 

165 1500 
202 2200 
115 1500 
85 306 

155 315 

172 2500 
85 215 

127 1500 
14.6 2500 

10.1 958 
75 2500 

112 8300 
44 1500 

18.1 1500 
165 2.700 
202 1200 

.. 1500 
185 921 

105 368 

225 904 

243 642 

203 446 

112 2500 
183 591 

145 2500 
142 890 

222 60 
62 841 

124 1300 
172 22500 
92 126 

115 575 

105 221 

17.7 183 

221 1,700 
292 475 

65 82S 

11-8 1500 
228 2300 
203 317 

52 829 

145 489 

126 4500 
527 338 

182 1.200 
174 715 

40.1 352 

80 i.ioo 
674 331 


428 344 Satosbuy (J) 

408 412 


BA 

20 

2X8 

243 

1484102 Scare 

1234125 • 

-14 

SO 

43 

IRQ 

3400 

415 321 Sedgwick Gp 

356 360 


17.1 

4it 

17.1 

400 

970 653 Shel 

950 956 

-5 

51.4 

5j4 

94 

677 

168 86 STC 

•158 152 

. , 

2.1 

1-3 

1+9 

609 

772 520 Sun ABancs 

840 647 

-3 

275 

43 

5&0 

86 

81’* 77** TSB P/P 

77479 

. # 


. . 

• . 


420 265 Tbsco 

382 387 

-1 

8J9 

23 


382 

529 374 ThQfB Sfl 

475 482 

-a 

25J0 

5 2 

35 3 

266 

348 248 Trafalgar Home 

278 231 


189 

S3 

72 

745 

209 139 TfXjfflfiouse fofW 

172 175 

+10 

73 

43 

17 2 

9400 

20V 13'iUnflew 

19410^* 


60.1 

ai 

184 

646 

269 216 Utd Biscuits 

233 236 

-i 

1316 b 

S3 

1Z7 

384 


since Big Bang. Traders were 
pre-occupied with speculation 
about the possible reper- 
cussions of the Geoffrey Col- 
tier and Ivan Boesky affairs. 
There were guessing games 
throughout the City as to 
which arbitrageurs, fund man- 
agers and stock brokers might 
be involved 

Market men were trying to 
find out the share holdings of 
Cambrian & General Invest- 
ment Trust, where Boesky was 
chairman. They watched with 
interest as volume in Hanson 
Trust shares touched 21 mil- 
lion. taking 7p off its share 
price to 193p. on the bade of 
further US seQing. 

At the end of the trading 
day, the FT 30 share index was 
down 6.9 at 1271.6 and the 
broader-based FT-SE 100 in- 
1 dex was i 1.1 lower, at 1617.5, 
its lowest level of the day. 

Wall Street did little to help. 
It opened almost 8 points 
lower. 

Gilts saw little action and 
closed £% easier at the long 
end and £ft easier in the 
shorts. The introduction 
the Treasury of two £5 
milli on taplets of index-finked 
2001 and 2020 stock had 
almost no effect Index-Jinked 
stocks dosed unchanged. 

Among blue chips British 
TetecommHnica fions eased a 
penny to 196p, BTR dropped 
5p to 290p. Grand Met, 5p to 
443p and Than EML 3p to 
479p- One of the few to move 
higher was Brirham. the 
pharmaceutical group. This 
was ahead of its results due on 
Thursday. 

Cable & Wireless, the elec- 
tronic and telecommunica- 
tions group, finned a couple of 
pence to 304p, with Z7 mil- 
lion shares going through the 
market after a “buy" circular 
published by Morean Grenfell 
Securities. Grenfell forecast 
pretax profits of £355 million 
for the year to March 1987 and 
£430 million for 1988. 

Mr Richard Goodwin ana 
Mr Martin Mabbutt. two an- 
alysts at Mozgan Grenfell, said 
there was a long-term case fra 
buying Cable & Wireless on 
fundamental and trading 
grounds.“We believe the 
group is one of the highest 
quahty technology stocks in 
the UK." . 

Kwik Save Discount has 
been a firm market ahead of 
full-year figures due next 
week, and at one stage it hit 
275p. The market is looking 
for pretax profits of £42J> 
million, compared with £35.9 
million last time. 

But confidence has been hit 
recently by whispers that 
Tflney, the Liverpool broker, 
and a close follower of the 


shares, had turned bearish. It 
seems Tflney has downgraded 
its estimates for this year from 
£49 million to £47.5 million. 
The shares closed unchanged 
at254p. 

Aitken Home, the be- 
leaguered financial services 
group which fought off an 
unwanted bid from Mr Nick 
Oppenheimer’s Tran wood 
Group, finned 2p to I41p. Mr 
Lee Ming Tee, the wealthy 
Malaysian businessman, liv- 
ing in Australia, increased 
his holding in the company 
with the purchase of an extra 
550,000 shares. This brings his 
stake in the company to 5.53 
million, or 12.15 per cent of 
the total issued share capital 
The shares are standing I4p 
above their high for the year 
and dealers claim the group 
looks vulnerable to a bid. 

Mr Ron Biierley, the New 
Zealander , has stepped up 
pressure on Ocean Transport 
& Trading where be is bidding 
more than £300 milli on. 

His IEP Securities has 
picked up an extra 3.98 mil- 
lion shares at 260p a share 
through Hoare Go vert, the 
broker. This takes his holding 
to 3432 million, or 29.96 per 
cent. Ocean, which claims Mr 
Biierley is trying to pick up the 
company on the cheap, re- 
sponded to the news by clos- 
ing 0.5p softer at 251.5p. 

Mr John Spalvins’ Adelaide 
Steamship has been adding to 
its holding in Coates Bros, the 
family-controlled minting ink 
group. Adelaide has bought a 
further 200,000 ordinary 
shares. Mr Spalvin now 
speaks for 2.46 milli on or- 
dinary shares, or 14.4 per cent 
of the votes, and can call on an 
extra 23.4 million Don- voting 
shares (20.6 per cent). 


• Astra Holdings, foe 
pyrotechnics manafadraer, 
was a fraction easier at 17p 
yesterday, bat word is that the 
company is about to an- 
nounce the £5 mOlioa ac- 
qnisitfoa of an American 
firework firm. Some of its 
directors, who took control 
in July, are now hi the US 
negotiating foe deal 


LCP was one of the few 
retail stocks to gain ground. It 
gained Ip to I89p as its battle 
to fight off the unwelcome 
£149 million bid from Ward 
White continued. 

Ward White eased 2p to 
316p. Henderson Crosthwaite, 
the broker, has published a 
circular on the matter. It 
predicts that Ward White will 
probably have to raise its offer 
by £10 million and the cash 
alternative by lOp to I80p- “If 
the deal goes through at 
anything like the present level 
we will be buyers of Ward 
White,” Mr Tony Cooper, an 
analyst, said. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Labour’s cloud could 
have a silver lining 

While public opinion polls indicate assets below the Hattersley limit; to 
that the Labour Party has a chance at restore some of their appeal, they 


might take the path of unitiziatioEL 
The great paradox is that winding 
up or unitization might well profit 
shareholders more than continued 

management under the investment 
trust format 


the next general election, the stock 
market will focus more on what 
Labour’s programme, known or 
guessed at would mean for the value 
of quoted securities than on the 
market implications of a third 
Thatcher administration. Con- 
ceivably. Labour might mean the end T est for rPPTllatnrC 
of the capitalist world as we know it * 1UA 1C & UAatU15> 
but, if experience is any guide, money Global 24-hour securities trading of 
is made as well as lost when Labour necessity opened the prospect of 
gets its ham fists on the controls. global insider trading. The wide- 
Thereare, for example, two ways of fan&ng investigations into alleged 
looking at the fate of investment trusts “^der dealing now being pursued by 


should Roy Hattersley replace Nigel 


Roy 

Lawson. Close to Mr Hattersley's 
heart is the (superficially) clever 
scheme dreamed up to succeed ex- 


the US Securities and Exchange 
Commisssion in the wake of the 
Boesky settlement will inevitably 
been seen as part of the same world as 


change controls. Simply to bring them t * ie Department of Trade & Industry’s 
back in the old form would be futile. ?f «s new powers to inquire into 
the intention is to deter the Ppsable insider dealing by Geoffrey 
export of and to invite its t-ollier and/or associated persons. 

return through penalties, specifically The different methods used under 
the loss of tax benefits when mstitu- the different systems will therefore, 
tions (and individuals) choose to have also come unde r scru tin y a s we ll as the 
more money invested overseas t han extent and quality of cooperation 
the Government thinks fit between the DTI and the SEC. The 

To enjoy existing tax advantages, j a ^ er will act as a testbed for 
you would have to limit your overseas international collaboration, but at this 
investments, as a proportion of your confidentiality rules. The in- 
total investments. The favourite Quest or mutual congratulation will 
guess, which Labour will not confirm, come ^ ater - 

is 5 per cent, the proportion of assets The difference of style is already 
held abroad before exchange controls apparent. The SEC is an official 
were scrapped in 1979. The second alternative to the non-statutory 
requirement, directed at institutions. Securities and Investments Board and 
ra to put money into a new National its City self-regulating organizations 
Investment Bank which Labour - - 

would set up to c hafin g?! subsidized 
loans to smaller companies. 

Investment trusts, like pension 
funds, insurance funds and unit trusts, 
would face hard choices. They would 
have to justify to themselves, and to 
those whose savings they are respon- 
sible for, investment overseas above 


such as the Stock Exchange, which 
bring in the DTI in areas potentially 
involving the c riminal law. 

Yet the SECs hitherto secret deal 
with Mr Boesky, which has already 
produced results and great volumes of 
information for wider investigation, is 
unlikely here. The separation of 


the Hattersley limit. Loss of tax regulators has already led to the DTI 
benefits would make the initial return com m S in after the resignation of Mr 
lower than the return av aila ble on an CoUier , which made that very 
equivalent investment at home. The different affair public, 
instant penalty on miscreant invest- 


ment trusts would be loss of exemp- 
tion from capital gains tax. 

Investment trusts in the proscribed 
category would also be classed as 
foreign shares and as such might carry 
those who held them above the 
Hattersley limit and thus liable for 
loss of tax benefits. 

How in practice would trusts be 
likely to respond? Brokers Kitcat & 
Aitken have come up with some 
possible answers. 

No trust, with the possible excep- 
tion of those carrying heavy tax losses, 
would want to pay CGT.Trusts 
specialising geographically would 
have nothing left to offer and rather 
than shift to huge discounts, wind up. 
The general trusts might have no 
alternative but to bring their foreign 


The DTI and its inspectors have 
certainly styarted fast. But, operating 
on the methods used for companies, 
the DTI has brought in ad hoc 
investigators who are merely expected 
to operate as full-time as possible. We 
clearly do not face the spectacle of a 
long, leisurely and definitive report 
which will be published so late as to be 
historical But the original hope for a 
report within days rather than weeks 
already seems to be dissolving under 
the complexities of a wide-ranging 
investigation. 

The importance of the current 
investigation lies principally in its 
effect on the culture that determines 
the day-to-day behaviour of people in 
the securities business. For that 
purpose speed and maximum public 
discussion are vital. 


Veil of stringency over 
rise in Budget deficit 


The public-sector borrowing 
requirement, which last 
month came in at just £9 
million, has become the only 
remaining totem of the 
Government's economic po- 
licy 1 . 

Monetary targets have been 
aB but abandoned, the public 
expenditure planning totals 
have become movable feasts, 
and, according to the evidence 
of Treasury officials to the 
Treasury and Civil Service 
Committee earlier this week, 
there is no target for the 
exchange rate, either formal or 
informal. 

This leaves the PSBR as the 
anchor of economic policy. 
The Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, in a curiously Vic- 
torian phrase, has said the new 
spending plans unveiled m the 
autumn statement will result 
in “not a penny piece of 
additional borrowing”. 

This is, of course, a 
meaningless statement. For 
one thing, it may be the spring 
tax cuts, rather than the 
autumn spending increases, 
which result in additional 
borrowing. 

For another, the PSBR is 
difficult to predict and, as the 
Treasury has frequently re- 
minded us, the PSBR is the 
difference between two very 
large numbers. And so no- 
body, not even Mr Lawso n, 
can say with any certainty 
there wfll be no addition to 
borrowing next year. 

Apart from the difficulty in 
forecasting it, the PSBR is not 
pod measure of the fiscal 
deficit. Distortions, some of 
than through the deliberate 
device of selling state assets, 
mean that the tree budget 
deficit is some way away from 
the PSBR. ■ 

The public-sector financial 
deficit has been on an upward 
trend since 1981-82. This, . 
strangely enough, -was the 


BRITAIN’S BUDGET 
DEFICIT 

152** 

13*5 0 

Hq 

UL0* 

&36 



TbePubfic Sector 
financial deficit £ bflfion 

Treaswy projoamns 
- C<y forecast 


4 


point when the Government 
was supposed to have aban- 
doned, for ever, foe use of 
expansionary fiscal policies to 
boost the economy. In feet, it 
appeared to mark the point 
when, after a sharp contrac- 
tion in the deficit, the Govern- 
ment decided thai enough was 

enough. 

The autumn statement con- 
tained an admitted expansion 
of the public sector deficit, by 
the device of adding to the 
targeted proceeds from asset 
sales. 

A larger addition to the 
deficit is, however, expected 
when the final figures for the 
1 987-88 financial year become 
available, some time wefl after 
the next general election. 

The public sector financial 
deficit has increased from a 
low point of less than £6 
billion in 1981-82 to a coal- 
strike boosted £13.8 billion in 
1984-85. This year, the deficit 
appears to have settled down 
to aboni £12 billion, although 
the City consensus is for a 
sharp rise in 1987-88, possibly 
to £15 billion. 

These figures cast a very 
different light on the Govern- 
ment's apparent financial 
stringency. According to cal- 


culations by Goldman Sachs, 
the cyclically adjusted finan- 
cial deficit, after contracting 
sharply in the period from 
1979-80 to 1981-82, has been 
expansionary since then in 
every year apart from 1985- 
86 . 

The calculations show the 
Government applied a fiscal 
stimulus equivalent to 0.4 per 
cent of gross domestic product 
in 1982-83, 1.5 per cent in 

1983- 84 and 0.5 per cent in 

1984- 85. In 1985-86 there 
appears to have been a mis- 
calculation and an over- 
correction for the effects of the 
miners' strike, and there was a 
fiscal contraction equivalent 
to 1.6 percent of GDP. 

The economy, as Keynes- 
ians might have predicted, 
suffered from tighter fiscal 
policy, and foe famous pause 
in economic growth, which 
began in the second quarter of 
1985 and lasted until the first 
quarter of 1986. resulted. 

Now, the Treasury has rec- 
ognized that the hairs hirt can 
be uncomfortable, and expan- 
sionary fiscal pohey is once 
more the order of the day. 
Calculations, again from 
Goldman Sachs, suggest a 
fiscal stimulus equivalent to 
LI per cent ofGDP this year, 
followed by one of 0.7 percent 
ofGDP m 1987-88. 

The public-sedor borrow- 
ing requirement once fitted 
into the framework of the 
Government’s economic pol- 
icy fairly neatly, through the 
relationship between borrow- 
ing and broad money, sterling 
M3. Now, the main function 
of the PSBR is to appear as 
confirmation of the Govern- 
ment's financial rectitude. But 
this is not a job foe PSBR does 
very well. 

David Smith 


This advertisement is published by J. Henry Sc hr oder Wagg & Co. Limited on behalf of IEP (UK) PLC. 

The Directors of IEP (UK) PLC are the persons responsible for foe information contained in this advertisement. To the 
best of the knowledge and belief of the Directors of IEP (UK) PLC (who have taken all reasonable care to ensure that 
such is the case) foe information in this advertisement is in accordance with foe facts arul does not omit 

anything likely to affect the import of such information- Each Director of IEP (UK) PLC accepts responsibility 
accordingly. 



IEP (UK) PLC 
Cash Offer 


for 


Ocean Transport & Trading pic 

Value of our offer: 

260p 

Ocean share price: 

25 lp 


An associate of 


IEP (UK) PLC has purchased 

29.96 per cent. ' 

of Ocean’s shares 

i 

Final dosing date of our offer: 
Friday 21 November 1986 


•The Increased Otter is ObbLwB not be inmased ad wffl remain open until 1.00 p.m. on Friday 21 November 1986 unless 
it has become or bees declared unconditional as to acceptances by then. IEP (UK) PLC reserves the right to cxicnd foe 
Increased Offer until 1 .00 p.m. on 23 November 1986 and to revise or increase Or extend foe Increased Offer in the 
event of a competitive situation arising or of securing the recommendation of foe Ocean directors, t IEP Securities 
Limbed. 

The Ocean share price is foe dosing price at 3.30 p.m. on Tuesday 18 November 1986- 
# IEP Securities Limited owns 27.1 per cent, and has agreed ro purchase a further 2.86 per cent. 


or- 


i 


gig-’? iU3£»>- 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE MINISTRY OF 
THE NAVY OF THE 
FEDERATIVE 
REPUBLIC OF 
BRAZIL 

BRAZILIAN NAVAL 
COMMISSION IN 
EUROPE (BNCE) 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
TENDER NR. 069/86 

Notice is hereby given that the Brazilian Naval 
Commission in Europe with offices au 

170 Upper Richmond Road 
London SW15 2SH 
Tel: (01) 7S8 8111 
Tlx: 918851 

is accepting tenders for the rendering of forwarding and 
Clearing Services, on behalf of the Brazilian Navy. 
The following events will take place at the above 
address: 


Order Date 

os. 12.86 


Time Event 


Isi 


2nd 


10.12.86 11:00 


3rd 


15.1186 


Latest date for submission of 
qualifying documents as well as 
the actual lender. 

Opening and authentication of 
the sealed envelopes containing 
the lenders by the Commission 
of Tender and the 
representatives of the interested 
parties, whom are invited to 
attend. 

Award of the winner tender by 
the President of the BNCE. 

The details of the exact nature and extent of the services to be 
rendered arc given at the BNCE or. at request, by post. For further 
information you may require, please contact Mr. J.R. Dias, ext 33. 


Oscar Moreira da Silva 
President Tenders 
Commission 


MONEY & GOLD' 


Period rates ended die day 
little changed, though there 
was some firming in the year 
interbank rate. This was 
mainly prompted by a weaker 
pound, bat overall markets 
were fairly quiet. Sterling CDs 
ended little changed. The 
trend towards higher base 
rates contmned to underlie 
markets, bat dealers are al- 
most totally devoid of any 
fresh factors which could 
prompt fresh activity. 

Bes»Re1es% 

Oainng Banks 11 
Finance House 11 
Discount Marital Loans % 

Overnight Halt 10’i Low 5 
week feed: 10%-S 
Treasury Stas (Drscourn %) 

Buying Seeing 

2mntn IK Smntn 10% 

3mn0i 10" i* 3 mmfi 10»« 

Prime Bank (Discount s -^ 
imnBi 10*4-10% 2 mrrth IOU-IO^d 

3mnth 10= 3 i^10 :l J.-6mftth 10"r»-i0V 
Trade BIBS /Discount “W 
1 mnth 11% 2mnth 11% 

3 moth 11"jr 6mrtfh 11*.* 

Interim* (%) 

Overnight open 10% dose 10 
Iweek10%-10% Smnth 11%-ir.i 

1 ninth 10%-IOU 9mnth 11*4-1 IX 
3mmh HX-ll’ie I2rrth 

Local Authority Deposits {%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mntn 10% 3 mnth 10% 

6 mnth 11 12mth 11 

Locei Authority Bonds (*> 

h 11V11K “ 


2 mntn 11%.11X 
6 mnth 11V4.11 
12mth IIS-fT 

3 mnth iii«-li>m 


3 ninth £95-5.90 
12 mtfl EJ&6JM 


1 mnth 

3 mnth 11%-11 
gmrafi ffK-1t 
Staffing CDs pK, 

1 mnth l0V.-l(y 
6 ninth IIVII'n 12mth Il'.e-IO** 
DoBarCOapy 
1 mnth 6.00-555 
6 mnrh 5.95-590 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


DoBm- 

7 days 5* a --B 
3 mntn 6 , i*-S'Sii 

Deutschmark 

7 days Aiis-e'is 
3 mnth 414-4% 
Ranch Franc 
7 days 7V7% 
3mmh 8%-7% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days IK-7. 

3 mnth 4-3% 

Yen 

7 days 414-4% 

3 ninth 414-4% 


1 mnth 
6 mnth 
eaS 

1 mnth 
6 mnth 
cal 
1 ninth 
6 mnth 
cal 
1 mnth 
8 mnth 
COB 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 


654-SX 

6-5% 

6' .8-5*18 
5-4 

4»i8-4*t« 

414-4% 

714-6% 

714-7% 

8>ie-8'tB 

1 VS -Vi 
3%-3 
4-3% 

4%-4% 

414-4S 


GOLD 


GokfcS39t. 00-391 .50 
Krugerrand" (per coini- 
S 3SL5M9130 (£272.75-274.75) 
Sovereigns* (new): 

$ 91.7592.75 (£64^58590 ) 
Ptttmum 

$489 .00 (£343.75) 

-Excludes VAT 


ECGO 


Fixed Rata Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate lor 
interest period October 8. 1986 to 
October JT 1985 Inclusive: 11237 per 
cent 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FtotDeafrigs LastDoatoga Lwl Deetarallen ForSKOement 

Oct 20 Oct 31 Jan 22 FBb2 

Nov 3 Nov 14 Fet>5 Feb 16 

Now 17 Nov 28 Feb 19 __ CtMW 

Cal cpttoM were taken out ok 16/11/86 uxvha Phoenfat Prop- Swnd M L 

tnee meeone L oetwtwt m, Thomson T-Una. RegmtaesL Oiestfuau mmon, 

McCarthy & Stone, JFB, TSB, Conroy Pars- MereanSe House. LRC. Wiggi ns Gr oup . 
Goldsmiths. Helical Bar. Goodwin. Amend. Pofly Peck. AutfiotfOfllc. Meapfl Grertfafl, 
EgBnaton, Control Sees, Greenwich Res_ Geers Cross. 

Put Phoerux Props. 

Put & Cat Phoenix Props- Burton. Equity & Qbh, Sound Dithraon. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Huwe Month SlaiWig Open 

DSC 66 ZZ 8671 

Mar 87 8820 

Jun87 8MS 

Sep 87 89-27 

Dec 87 89.01 

gg 88.72 

Revkxa day's total open Merest 14583 
Three Month EurodoSar 

Dec 86 9328 

Mar 87 94*1 

Jun 87 93.93 

Sep 87 93.70 


USTreeauryBond 

Dec as 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Short GCt 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 — 
Jun 87 


98-30 

9605 

N/T 


95-32 

N/r 

N/r 


High Low Close &yw 
BB74 88.67 §8.71 2231 

8827 8829 8822 £4 

8631 8823 8823 91 

8931 8937 5S.M 30 

Mire H.72 88.75 12 

33.98**** tow o^nterera^iaS 

94JM 9329 94.00 1695 

3194 3390 33-90 401 

S370 SW6 , 33-86 248 

Prenous day's total open Interest 4386 
934E 95-17 98-24 4137 

9MS 95^ |M1 ^ 

mmres?85< 


9534 




95-38 


107-28 

Mar 87 107-31 

Jun 87 


F?S 


87. 


Dec 86. 
Mar 87. 


:1fl0 


Sff 

162.80 

185.50 


107-29 

1084)1 


107-27 107-28 274 

107-28 0 

"“previous Sts total opmjnter^ 2796 
162.60 161 JSO 16190 393 

165.50 16480 1B4T0 35 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's range 

rinvihni in N a ve nrira r 18 1 month 3. _ 

N York 1.4190-1.4245 1.42351.4245 0.75-0.45prem 2.00-1. gOpram 

Montreal 19632-19711 19683-19711 06WL35prem 195190pretn 

Ants'dan39358-39470 3935539400 ZJKjxvm S-4pnyn 

Brussels S92-59.79 5893-5954 30-l0prem 70-40prem 

Cphgsn 109225109830 10937l-ia8518 2%-1%prem 53% I 

Dub* 19504-19554 1.05251 .0538 22-310& 6£M 

Frankfurt 29641-29745 29641-2.8682 IJ-IHprem 4%41 

Lisbon 21197-213.11 21294-213.11 70-llMs 

Madrid 192.7519393 18295193.16 1553*S 34-12409 

Mian 198295199390 198295196895 par pram 5-lprarn 

Oslo 10.6850-1 0.7265 10.711510.7265 2 %-3%di s 9-1ftfc 

Paris 09750-94100 9978599946 69prem 7%-5%prem 

SW*n 9 8890-9.9025 9980599946 IVIprwn 5%-4%pn*n 

Tokyo 23195232.02 2315523191 1 Vi V. pram 4%-3Vxam 

Vienna 20.152Q93 251520.19 10%-9%pram 29%-25%prem 

Zurich 23892-23990 23892-23890 IVIKprem 4%-4%prem 

Storing Mn compared win 1975 eras down at 689 (day's range 682-689). 

OTHER STERLING RATeST DOLLAR SPOT HATES 

Argentina austral* 1935519419 Iretafld !' 3 £5'1'?5!2 

Australia doear 29105Z2137 Si^Xjre 2 1«S -2.1M5 

Bahrain dear 09325053® UsSy:* 290&06045 

Brazl cruzado* 199520 07 Australia 

Cyprus pound CX7295-0.7395 Canada 1-383M-3836 

FSiand nwfca 7.01957.0690 Sweden — 793057.3350 

Greece drachma 1959519790 Norway 7.53057-5350 

Hong Kong dollar 119921-1 1.1007 Denmark 7.61757.6225 

inda rupee 1B951570 West Germany 291552.01 6S 

Iraq (Soar n/a Switzerland 1.67651.6775 

Kuwait dinar KD 041504J.41§0 Netherlands 22 7 8529 7 75 

Malaysia doflar 169053.7100 France 6^87556020 

Mexicopeso 11851285 Japan 162.8516290 

NSrSaSSdotoT..— 27552^7679 1395513955 

Saudi Arabia riyal 5J00559405 Beigium(Cornm) 419541S3 

Singapore doSar 3.11753.1207 Hong Kong 7^^-79025 

SouihAfnca rand 3.1734-31900 Portugal 

U A E dnham 5.1905-59305 Spam 135.7513590 

IJoydsBank Austria 14.17-14.19 

Hates ai^pSed by Barclays Bank HOFEX and ExtaL 



STEL RAD BOILER 


GENESIS PACKAGING SYSTEMS 


BEER SPHERE 


METAL BOX HAVE PACKED 
A LOT INTO SIX MONTHS 


It has been a productive penod for Metal 
Box since last April. 

A period that has seen many of our packaging 
ideas come to fruition, the result of our decision 
to develop new markets using our technical 
expertise, product innovations and commitment 
to research and development 

Our 'Lamicon' squeezy bottle is now on the 
market, being used by major manufacturers of 
tomato ketchup. But perhaps more importantly 
for Metal Box is that Lamioon's potential is as 
great as the range of sauces that are available. 
Atrip to any supermarket will confirm that. 

Another of our products which opens up an 
equal number of possibilities is the PET 'Beer 
Sphere '. Coming in three sizes, the Beer Sphere 
can hold anything from 10 litres to 30 litres of 
been cider or soft drinks. Its light and tough 
properties will help it go down well with the off- 
licence trade as well as with the clubs and wine 
bars and incidentally provides access to a new 
market for Metal Box. the on-trade. 

in hardware and DIY shops the Polycan' 
plastic paint cans will be very much in evidence 
and soon consumers will also be seeing a lot of 
the new 'Lamipac' plastic processable food con- 
tainers appearing on supermarket shelves in 
this country. 


In the USA. construction has now started 
on the first 'Genesis' Packaging System plant in 
Pennsylvania. The joint venture with Alcoa will 
manufacture the new generation of high barrier 
plastic food packaging developed by the Metal 
Box research and development team. 


SUMMARY OF RESULTS 

>**->** J99t %-c* 

ir' I Lr» 

Tumwer 

66S6 I 569 3 

■todies FvcH'l 

4H>9 1 -1 4 

irteiw 'Pen 

IS Ji 1 noil 

Po.il bofoKC Ijuien 

i 

EjmingSMT '--w 

10 l c i 


1 | 1 53c 


Extracts from the Chairman's statement: 

Profit before tax improved by 23.7%. 

Earnings per 2Sp share rose by 34.7%. 

We have also been active in our other key 
business sectors. 

Stelrad. Europe’s leading central heating 
subsidiary has extended its range by developing 
a high efficiency boiler that does not have to be 
fixed to an outside wail. 

in Florida. USA. Clarke Checks, the Metal 
Box security printing operation, has opened up 
a new plant for producing cheque books. Clarke 
now has 15 plants in 10 states employing over 
900 people. 

As you can see. we haven't been idle in the 
past six months. And we are strongly committed 
to even greater activity in the coming years. 


The half year ended 30tt\ September 1986 
followed a year in which many changes were 
made to operations, organisation and strategy. 
It has been a period of developing our existing 
businesses, evaluating our future opportunities 
and achieving some growth. The Board believes 
that the strategies now being implemented, 
coupled with the benefits of the reshaping of 
recent years, provide the basis for further 
profitable growth. 

A leaflet setting outthe Interim Resuttsand 
comments in more detail will be despatched 
shortly to the shareholders. 

release fill in the co-jper lor a cooy o» l be Metal Box ] 
Interim Results ar*c send it to. Trie Company Secretary 
Meiai Bo* pic. Queens House. For bury Road. Reading 
RGl 3JH. or telepnone (0734» 581 177. 

These results will be availsHe l*om November 25lh 1986. 


Name. 


Address. 


Metal Box p.i.e. 

Opening up the future 



r TEMPUS ) 


Plastics could mould 
Metal Box’s future 


Thanks to the boffins at 
Metal Box, your children can 
now squirt tomato ketchup 
around the room by squeez- 
ing the bottle rather than by 
shaking or hitting it. 

The plastic “lamicon” bot- 
tles, which can be transported 
without refridgeration, are 
part of the new generation of 
products at Metal Box. 

Metal Box leads the field 
with its technical prowess 
and is at the forefront of new 
product development This 
enhances trading perfor- 
mance and allows the group 
to charge others for the use of 
its expertise. 

Plastics account for only 
half the business that metals 
generate but twice as much as 
research and development 
expenditure. New ventures 
have been financed mainly by 
cash generated in the more 
established parts of the busi- 
ness. These include Genesis 
Packaging in the US. 

Metal Box’s 50 per cent 
share in Gen eris, which is 
costing $50 million (£35 mil- 
lion), should earn $ 14 million 
a year by 1990. 

There is vast earning? 
potential in Retainer, a plastic 
drinks container. The likeli- 
hood of empty drinks cans 
ending up in a hedge or ditch 
is high and this has prompted 
the concern of the US 
environmental lobby. Its 
objections are delaying the 
development of the Retainer. 

Metal Box has invested a 
modest £4 million in the 
retainer project which repre- 
sents a 25 per cent share in 
the joint venture with Gen- 
esis. However, as a re- 
generation plastic container 
product, it has a high profile 
and news of its progress tends 
to have a disproportionate 
effect on the share price. 

Presently, Metal Box is 
benefitting from the legacy of 
the old regime and the £140 
milli on spent on rationaliza- 
tion and reorganization over 
the past five years. 

However, Dr Brian Smith 
has made quite an impact in 
his first year at the helm. The 
City expects him to take 
Metal Box into the future 
with a full range of profitable 
products. 

Although the group has a 
solid base, earnings potential 
of many of the new products 
remains to be proven. 

Metal Box should make 
£80 million this year, which 
gives earnings per share of 
20p. The shares are under- 
valued, and are likely to 



remain so until the the new 
generation of products begins 
to put money in the bank. 

London Int 

London Internationa! is try- 
ing to dampen some of the 
Aids-related hysteria that has 
pushed its shares to record 
highs Its interim results were 
at the low end of expecta- 
tions. partly because the ef- 
fect on condom sales so far 
has been exaggerated. 

Moreover, the events surr- 
ounding Libya and at Chern- 
obyl also made it a gruesome 
period for Royal Worcester 
Spode, LKTs fine china com- 
pany. 

Profits in Britain fell 
sharply as well-heeled Ameri- 
cans spent the summer at 
home. Although things have 
improved in the second half 
full-year profits from RWS 
are likely to be less than last 
year’s £3.6 million. 

The failure to net Wedg- 
wood might not turn out to 
be such a disaster, especially 
as it earned LIG £8 million in 
one-off profits. 

ZJG still has much in its 
favour. The monopoly for 
condoms will prove good as 
the Government anti-Aids 
campaign gathers pace, while 
the expansion of the photo- 
processing division in Europe 
should take the sting out of 
the foie china downturn. 

However, there is a case for 
trimming full-year pretax 
forecasts slightly from the £28 
million pencilled in before 
yesterday. 

This puts the shares, down 
8p to 239p, on a prospective 
p/e of about 1 7. which looks a 
little high for the time being. 

Thames Television 

As public debuts go, Thames 
Television can hardly be 
beaten. Floated with an offer 
price of 190 pence in June, a 
17 limes oversubscription 


heralded an instant premium 
of 26 per cent. The shares 
closed yesterday at 323 pence 
— 3p down on the day. 

The stags have long since 
cleared out with the share- 
holder register down from an 
initial 48,000 to around ihe 
20.000 mark. 

Yesterday's impressive set 
of results augur welL In 
contrast to the prognosis in 
the prospectus, the April 
rfo an ff - in the Exchequer 
Levy had a positive impact 
on the mid-term results at 
Thames. 

The decline in the charge 
on domestic profits from 66.7 
per cent to 45 per cent has 
outweighed foe imposition of 
a new 2Z5 per cent charge on 
overseas ea rnings . 

Thames has benefited not 
only from a market upturn in 
television advertising but an 
increase in market share, 
from 14.7 per cent to 1 6.3 per 
cent 

This is the most important 
fector behind foe turnaround 
from mid-term losses of £2.9 
million to profits of £10.2 
million. It represents a return 
to foe early ’eighties when 
Thames' share was 17 per 
cent 

Overseas sales from 
Thames Televirion Inter- 
national were, however, 
prominent in the second half 
of last year and likely to be 
similarly successful in foe 
corresponding period this 
year. In which case the Ex- 
chequer levy will bite, pos- 
sibly resulting in second half 
profits showing a slight de- 
cline on 1985 figures. 

Pretax profits for the full 
year are likely to be around 
£22 miHinn. Ass uming a tax 
charge of 37.5 per cent this 
produces a p/e ratio of 1 1.4 
with foe shares about 323 
pence. 

Although not a a short- 
term bet but there is still 
scope for further improve- 
ment in the shares. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUmES 

pi 


Avis 

BCE (38pj 
Bakar Harris Sndr (170p) 
Blenheim Exhto (95p) 
Bfteton&Battersea ffOSp) 


Great Southern (I35p) 
Guthrie Gorp (I50p) 
Harrison (15Clp) 

Interfink Express (1B5p) 


15B 
234 
43+'* 
IBB 
141 +3 
145 
150+4 
90 
153 
162+1 
169-1 
161 
209 +3 


Lon Assc Irw Tst (14p) 
Lloyds Chemist (lu5p) 
Manborougfi Tech (11 Dp) 
Mecca Leisure (I35pl 
Miter & Santhouse (105p) 
Newsge Trans (75p) 
Quarto (115p) 

Rotunda (95p) 

Sandefl Perkins (1350) 
Soot Mtge 10Q% *25 
TSB Gray (100p) 
Thames TV (190p) 

Treas 10% c9l *9690 
Whmney Mackay C180p) 
Wdottons Better (i04p) 


6’2 +1 
128-4 
144 
-1 He 
184 
71 
130 
100 
174-1 
£19 
78'a 
324-2 

-*4 
168-2 
86 


Yefcarton (38p) 
Yorkshire TV <125p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Blue Arrow F/P 
Br. Benzol N/P 
Cook Cwm hl/P 
Bewick N/P 
FR[ Group F/P 
Norfofc Cap F/P 
Petrocan N/P 
Radtand N/P 
State F/P 
Waddtngton N/P 

(Issue price in brackets). 


34 

182-3 


384-2 
Ihr -•* 
15 
1'« 
292 
23'» 
4-1 
45-2 
385 
16-5 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Sartos 

Jan 

tale 

Apr 

Jal 

Jan 

putt 

_*e. 


Afied Lyons 

300 

25 

35 

43 

9 

14 

22 

mv 

330 

9 

20 

2b 

28 

32 

3/ 


360 

2 

9 

— 

53 

5b 

— 

BP 

600 

107 

123 


2 

11 

__ 

C693) 

BSD 

66 

83 

105 

12 

27 

35 


700 

35 

48 

67 

30 

50 

50 

Cons Gold 

560 

12S 

147 


3 

10 

__ 


600 

Hb 

110 

120 

9 

22 

32 


850 

47 

77 

00 

32 

44 

57 

Courtaulds 

260 

56 

67 

— 

1 

2 



1*310) 

280 

36 

49 

61 

3 

b 

9 


300 

24 

33 

48 

8 

13 

18 


390 

10 

17 

29 

2b 

28 

31 


260 

20 

27 

35 

7 

13 

15 

1*267) 

280 

9 

17 

25 

19 

25 

28 


300 

4 

10 

16 

36 

40 

43 

Cahie&Wka 

300 

22 

33 

43 

14 

25 

30 

(*302) 

32S 

11 

21 

— * 

30 

40 



350 

4 

11 

— 

50 

52 

— 


375 

2 

— 

— 

7b 

— 

— 

GEC 

160 

27 

32 

38 

2% 

5 

7 

P81) 

180 

13 

20 

26 

B 

13 

18 


200 

5 

10 

17 

24 

26 

28 

Grand Met 

380 

95 

100 


1 

3 


(*445) 

290 

65 

75 

— 

2 

6 




420 

45 

00 

70 

9 

18 

20 


460 

23 

37 

47 

27 

35 

40 

K» 

950 

12S 

143 


5 

14 


P04£9 

1000 

83 

105 

— . 

13 

28 



.1050 

4/ 

7b 

98 

28 

50 

57 


1100 

25 

50 

73 

58 

78 

85 

Land Sec 

300 

32 

42. 

51 

1% 

7 

11 

(-329) 

330 

IS 

24 

33 

9 

16 

IS 


360 

4 

11 

14 

32 

35 

38 

Marks 4 Spen 

180 

16 

26 

34 

3 

6 

10 

nm) 

200 

6 

13 

21 

11 

14 

17 


220 

1% 

7 

10 

30 

31 

32 

Stiefi Trans 

650 

n 

n 

160 

4 

15 

22 

C955) 

900 

82 

105 

123 

14 

28 

38 


960 

47 

68 

87 

30 

57 

60 


260 

25 

34 

43 

3 

13 

15 

(*280) 

280 

15 

25 

33 

14 

18 

23 


300 

7 

18 

S3 

30 

33 

37 

TSB 

80 

5 

9 

11 

4 

6 

TV, 

(78) 

90 

2tt 

4 

8% 

12% 

13 

14 


100 

% 

2 


22 

22 



Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jen 

Dec 

Mar 

Jim 

Daacham 

360 

17 

78 



1 

3 


(*427) 

390 

41 

50 

66 

3 

B 

14 


420 

18 

3b 

46 

12 

23 

29 


460 

5 

16 

30 

40 

45 

52 

Boots 

200 

28 

40 

47 

1 

3 

6 

(*225) 

220 

11 

25 

34 

5 

12 

15 


240 

3 

1b 

21 

18 

20 

24 

BTR 

280 

19 

32 

38 

3% 

9 

14 

(*291) 

300 

— 

21 

2/ 


19 

25 


307 

5 

— 

— 

19 

— 


Bass 

650 

95 

105 

125 

2 

B 

10 

(*732) 

700 

50 

65 

80 

6 

15 

25 


750 

23 

40 

56 

35 

43 

56 

Blue Circle 

GOO 

55 

75 

9? 

8 

17 

25 

(-634) 

550 

25 

45 

58 

30 

42 

45 


700 

10 

— 

— 

70 

— 


Da Basra 

650 

106 

125 



6 

23 


(*735) 

700 

75 

100 

115 

17 

45 

fin 


750 

45 

75 

90 

40 

70 

60 


800 


50 

n 

80 

100 

115 

Dixons 

300 

3? 

44 



1% 

6 


(*325) 

330 

13 

23 

42 

15 

17 

97 


380 

3 

13 

X 

36 

38 

40 

GKN 

240 

18 

30 

38 

7 

12 

16 

(*250) 

260 

7 

17 

26 

17 

2? 

27 


280 

3 

8 

17 

34 

38 

40 


300 

2 

4 


52 

52 


Glaxo 

900 

3? 

72 

105 

23 

43 

55 

(*902) 

950 

10 

48 

80 

57 

70 

82 


1000 

4 

32 

58 

105 

110 

12 0 


1050 

2 

19 


155 

155 


Hanson 

160 

38% 

42 


% 

1% 


H96) 

160 

19 

25 

31 

1% 

4% 

6 


200 

bY: 

12% 

19 

7 

12 1454 


220 

1% 

6 

10 

24 

26 

27 





38s 



Puls 



Series 

Dec 

L3 


Dec 

Mar 

Jen 

Jaguar 

(-509) 

500 

28 

48 

68 

17 

28 

35 

550 

7 

22 

40 

El 

52 

57 


600 

2 

12 

— 

95 

95 

— 

Thom EMI 


70 

83 

EEH 

2 

5 

9 

(*480) 


40 

SS 

68 

12 

20 

22 


1b 

28 

4b 

32 

40 

4b 


550 

4 

14 


72 

77 


Tesco 


60 





% 

_ 



(*385) 

360 

30 

50 

— 

2% 

8 

_ 

390 

10 

28 

40 

12 

m±A 

25 


420 

3 

12 

23 

38 

43 

47 



eg 

ra 

m 


m 

May 

Brit Aero 

420 

63 

80 

90 

•A 

9 

15 

(-482) 

480 

23 

48 

60 

% 

18 

25 



1 

KJ 

40 

20 

3b 

43 

BAT tods 

360 

95 

108 



% 

1 

__ 

(*456) 

390 

Hb 

7H 

85 

% 

1% 

4 


420 

X) 

bb 

67 

% 

7 

12 


460 

2 

28 

38 

7 

20 

28 

Barclays 


m 

42 

55 

1 

13 

23 

(*470) 

500 

i 

20 

35 

35 

37 

4b 

550 

i 

7 

15 

62 

B7 

90 

Brtt Telecom 

180 

16 

24 

30 

% 

5% 

8% 

(*195) 


K 

10% 

19 

R 

16 

19 

220 

% 

4% 

11 

26 

29 

31 


19 

30 

34 

% 

6 

8 

n7B) 

180 

IK 

17 

2? 

3 

11 

1b 


200 

1 

9 

13 

22 

2S 

28 

Guinness 

300 

30 

42 

47 

% 

6 

10 

(329) 

330 

4 

27 

30 

4 

El 

25 


380 

V4 

12 

17 

3b 

40 

43 

temm 


96 

__ 


% 



330 

68 

— 

— 

% 

— 

— 


380 

38 

— 

— 

% 

— 

— 

Ladbroka 

330 

40 

59 

62 

1 

5 

7 

(*369) 

3B0 

10 

32 

42 

1% 

15 

22 


390 

% 

18 

22 

25 

30 

33 



29 

35 

39 

K 

4 

7 



19 

?fl 

33 

% 

8 

10 



3 

18 

22 

5 

16 

19 

Mktand Bank 

500 

87 

90 

10? 

1 

5 

12 

(*565) 

550 

18 

47 

57 

2 

IB 

25 


GOO 

1 

17 

27 

40 

42 

bU 

PSO 

«60 

*45 

8? 

73 

1 

fi 

10 

(-505) 

500 

6 

35 

48 

2 

20 

30 


550 

1 

13 

22 

48 

55 

65 


600 

% 

— 


98 



Racal 

ISO 

13 

24 

34 

» 

8 

11 

(172) 

T 80 

V, 

13 

19 

10 

15 

22 


200 

% 

7 

13 

30 

32 

36 

RTZ 

GOO 

no 

97 

115 

% 

17 

25 

C67G) 

650 

30 

58 

75 

2 

27 

44 


700 

3 

37 

47 

77 

52 

65 


750 

1 

— 

— 

77 

— 


Veal Reels 

70 

10 

15 

18% 

1 

5 

6% 

(*79) 

80 

1% 

UK 

17% 

3 

9% 

11 


SO 

a 

3% 

8 

12 

14 

16% 


Series 

Nov 

Mar 

Jun 

NOV 

Mar 

Jon 

Lonrho 

200 

41 

49 

S3 


2 

7 

("240) 

218 

23 







236 

bH 

— 







240 

— 

17 

22 

_ 

16 

24 


255 

1 



16 



Sorias 

Nov 

Fab 

ST 

Nov 

Fob 

5e7 

Tr 11%% 1991 

100 

Ittw 

2% 

2% 


13.1 


(*£101) 

102 


% 


1*m 

7% 

2* re 



’ Iff 

v u 

1 

3*ib 

3% 

«*ie 

03/07 

106 

K 

2« 

3% 

“m 

7% 


(*£106) 

108 

% 

1% 

41 >» 

7% 

3% 

4% 


110 

*18 

1% 

2 

47- 

5 

5% 


112 


"* 


6% 

BH 

7% 



1 1© 



8% 

B>.* 

8V 


116 

>18 


. U, » 

10% 

10% 

0% 


Nov Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Nov 

Dec 

Jai 

Feb 


F7-SE 1 525 

Index 1550 
06201 1575 

1600 
1625 
1650 
1675 
1700 


TOO — 
75 80 
50 60 

27 43 

13 33 
8 82 
3 15 

1 




9 — 


90 



2 

7 

16 

_ 

70 

— 

5 

16 

25 

— 

50 

— 

14 

27 

37 

— 

40 

50 

25 

42 

50 

55 

SO 

37 

42 

58 

65 

73 

21 

30 

65 

70 

80 

82 

— 

— 

68 

90 

— 



18. 1966. Total contracts 15592 . CaKa 8780. Pets 24372. 

FT-SE Index. Calls: C94. Pste 1012 
V 




tlndarif te g aacwrity price. 













£p s $SU'V& > 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 




~ ( 8icld— 

_ ftom your portfolio card rh y fr your 
eigfai stare pnce movements. Add Uiea 
141 10 give you your overall Total. Check 
Ibis against the daily dividend figure 
publafied on dus page, if it matchesyoa 
”°P o utright or a share of the total 
duly pro money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure 00 the 

teck ofy P ar must always have 

your cam available when cbwrwing 



— ^old' 




nTriTTMCt ki'M av» 


li -imiliT-«a«» 



© Tinea Ne«»apcn United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£ 4,000 

Claims required for 
+30 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


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Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £&000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


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225 235 56 26 64 

458 482 +1 125 27 212 


8 0 +1 T 9 12 

94 +1 56 61 


123 81 F opt, 
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SO 36 M6 
209 22 186 


FINANCE AND LAND 


230 H5 BBMr Tic 
22 18 CMh 

263 229 Qatar 

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«5 132 SyBEk 
207 153 Utada 
WO 02 Ra Hon* I 
105 75 00 69 

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220 234 8-1 
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302 304 8 -1 125 46 152 

240 2B0 -5 153 52 BB 

140 144 -I 59 42 146 

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167 170 -1 

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210 2M +f 126 59 TOO 

MO M2 43 54 45 105 

10 MB .. HJ 78 115 

2£D 265 -5 U U W 

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156 19 712 

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IB 111 Can OB 131 a .. 3(2 36 MB 

11'«736ya*i» 900 S03 +2 209 22 189 

344 194 Omf 302 304 8-1 129 4J 152 

505 2S0 E^Kn MO S 4 1U 52 95 

182 KB 140 144 -1 50 42 143 

312 ffl6 Sam 264 2K7 -2 «fi M tifl 

180 1S3 000 167 170 -1 

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232 134 Had B» 21D2M+61265ST00 

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CHEMICALS , PLASTICS 



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CINEMAS AND TV 


30 2J3 Man TV ’A' 
417 305 Cam TV 
52 27 &mmo 
20 178 HIvT/V 
470 33 LW7 Sdg» 
3B3 1» Sot TV 
276 MS TVS H/V 
58 31 TWH^ 

341 S3 TbwwTV 
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150 «* WWV W 
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320 334 -a 169 46 168 

407 4H -1 

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474 477 +3 259 54 111 

3E0 383 8-1 159 44 T16 

257 270 +1 14J 66 OJ 

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325 9 nmaoAam SU 325 8-3 

128 85 tan* Bio* KB 113 8 . . 

400 ai Ti nata l HtanpOl 387 672 +3 

m 119 M 160 HI -b 

315 in bam 17S Wf +2 

295 J40 jjdoons Boon* 2« 250 
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515 473 Jotra* Qb«i 498 50B -2 

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140 3ZVU0WSA9Rmm m 118 
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490 500 -2 304 50 13.7 

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74', 25 1 , a-b M 55 M 

31b 0 a+b 16 53 22.4 

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110 SJ AHn 


Eltl M3 46 IBS 

230 S -3 21 09 X.*' 

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179 66 121 
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503 135 Jajjsr SI7 510 -2 

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KB 1 Wimv 


156 95 BmCMrtn) 92 

248 153 Brnoa 1BZ 

3K 2*2 km, Mmta Z78 

310 230 BPCC 245 

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673 168 Bunt 197 

630 72B canu Caw 900 

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770 390 EutaygoaPW) 745 

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465 318 Ffchfrsta 313 

217 63 Gttra Gran 86 

327 173 SoU BnaKa 183 

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318 H6 Hassfpdsj 315 

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485 173 lm»bt 347 

312 MO UcCowaWi 306 

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PROPERTY 


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iDbSiO tamkgh 
780 384 M c uta w 
UB 83 UllllB PM 
S', UbUtaraK 
130 73 tatCmnta ! 

93 43 ParUta 


255 72bPn« t— n, 
272 I» Bap I Urn 
UO HJ7 p«p feta 
137 He Prop StaMy 
13b BbR0M 
368 HO feWM 
190 70 fb fa 

645 313 ft— B—i 
297 715 ft*n 5 Tamm 
HQ » Sea Un 
ISB 145 SWd Gp 
183 M2 Sky* &KK 
4C 260 Stab* 

173 144 SB* Stct 
94 86 saetty 

232 85 SoMtmid Bn— I 

59 45 In Cat** 

250 198 Tr— n Rttk 
200 95 IK land 
8» 675 nancr 
67S 475 — rdort 
t» 125 wats 
32 b 17b*wa(taj 
178 M3 am fSny 


105 106 -1 

108 113 a+1 

£ !S 

sspft.a 

188 190 +1 

238 2X0 +Z 

393* 313 Jl 

s sr 5 

zS & ? 

380 ao -5 

&& :* 
ao g 

ot a -2 
m m 


BT, 10b 
70 780 
97 ho a .. 
21 0 8 .. 
u* 106 a .. 
78 0 
Z73 275 8-1 
235 245 *3 

270 27Z +3 

MB 168 -2 

132 135 
II IP. 

315 325 8 .. 
117 120 +3 

600 805 8+B 

aw aa 

H 92 a .. 

170 10 +5 

in W3 +5 

405 415 

157 162 

8*88+1 
275 279 -2 

5* 0 
20 235 8 
195 205 
860 STD 
700 750 
1JT 134 +2 

0 31 -1 

173 178 8+3 


66 21 220 
1X5 29 286 
Tl| XI 310 
16 35 90.7 

IB 1J 2X6 
111 39 146 

ai XI 616 
29 1C .. 
107 17 148 
145 44 220 

96 IB 2Z3 
93 <0 

E.7 X4 777 
79 45 2X0 

1ft* 33 2X1 

15.7 45 Zl.fi 

71 41 

52 45 WJ 
ii si ni 
43 16 1X7 

57 ID H6 
143 I.* 136 

7! 09 118 

TJ 76 Mfl 
173 ftt *ai 

1.7 16 533 

23 ZB IU 
12B 47 147 


05 HI 616 
16 ZS 256 
17! 73 117 

279 32 39 2 
24J 3* 259 

33 15 36.1 

07 Z3 505 
1X1 89 1D.1 


SHIPPING 


SS 248 ASHcBrftaa 
30 213 Br C— — 
356 10 aa— 

9* Si Mwltannl 
603 40 Gag 
78 54bJKOOC (J) 

IZb *bL** 

41 Z Wnsy Docks 
255 10 Own T— n 
578 429 P600U 
173 85 Attman (Mtttr i 
30 127 TMkoak 
390 30 Ton— I Saa 


20 32 -2 

310 313 8-1 
267 290 #-1 
63 06 

495 505 8 .. 
0 6* -I 
7 8 +'.- 

35 *a +4 
&! 252 -b 
50) 506 8-5 

iB in +i 

345 3B +5 
370 30 +5 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


431 as Dana <25 435 1X1 21 173 

3GB 290 FB 355 365 8+5 95 27 104 

206 ms a*n» earn i7o ,7* m-z 14353107 
45 S feadtai Sira 37 M +1 07 16 . . 

218 MS Ltntatt Honm 197 202 U *5 107 

82 5*',— M 1 Aden H 72 4.4 63 21 1 

MS 8? PBQrd 138 MZ # . SS U 16 

157 IU Saw fi Rdar 10 M2 .. IU U U 

273 156 S— Z25 20 +5 84 26 2X2 


TEXTILES 



588 246 MM Ten 
300 153 tarn Sera 
117 125 BM* PttaU 
115 86 Boekron v»i 

36 16 EWM 

144 18':fr Monat 
127 77 Bedim a limb 
76’: 61 bCoa# 

327 >: 252 CMWutt 
« ^ CwtatM 
276 213 OaSOI 
0 *2 S*ann 
140 67 IkicaBM 
S3 Z Dal MS 
m « Ha* u—\ 

113 e Geki Baatton 
57 33 Hktte PMEcad 
t +7 87 B u — ft 

710 38 fcgrapiMNI 

114 47 JKSW (S) 

198 53 iron 
ZB 138 Uett 

JZJ 64 LSta 

S RjBAw 

23 W Mb 
i» 8* Partaod v 
«b 30 fetactf 
155 K9 SEET 
IX 72b S—n 
«2 133 S—r 
70 <s SnafenmiRj 
Mb 11 SnSM 'A' 
m % Team tasty 
2Z3 85 TBrtttSCre 
109b TibTocn! 

30 MS varayd! 


255 275 +Z 

256 Z3 -2 

MB 173 

TCI 104 a-1 
33 3S 

'35 137 • . 
IU 116 
B7b 

310 311 -b 

m 10 a+s 
212 214 -1 

43 51 +2 

131 133 -1 

73 76 

MS 114 -1 

42 45 

123 IX +1 

127 137 +2 

1D7 110 a-1 
W5 J» *43 
187 192 
111 113 +2 

94 97 a+2 

96 HU a-3 
22'.- ZP: +': 

137 IX »2 

*5 46 

140 1*3 +1 

110 113 +1 

136 IX a 

65 68 -1 

27b 3 

137 1*0 -2 

?12 217 

in mb #-■• 

230 Z» 


10.7 49 U6 
TOO 35 161 
U 43 68 

62 8D 120 
. .382 

Bin &3 12 

7! 6! 266 

57 »4 

93 36 ILLS 

40 20 121 

89 42 115 

07 1.4 394 

29 45 a!s 

50 XT 65 
79 7! tl 

SO 39 118 
43 13 30 

59 46 Mi 
69 li 126 
00 *2 125 

1.4 13 37 

U 85 138 

67 65 146 

. . . . Mi 

89 60 176 

25 55 121 
79 5* 8! 

35 32 90 

74 64 1ft: 

39 58 81 

38 62 75 

68 *9 in 

68 59 134 

1 C 6 36 Z! 


i 2 28 

ZZ & : 


ft s - t * r .« . 7i 

417 « 306 7.1 149 

w n * u y 44 

M W»-a 186 il IftJ 

W fi -lb 39 50 QB 

™ W .. 7! 63 ll 

S 33 -I .. 7+n 

48 fi -lb XI 43 56 

* » -ft n.\ 5 u 

ta A r2 , 


TOBACCOS 


491 3Sl SAT 
VO MS Cmn 
UO 135 CJU 
107 1C tes ra a i f 


4H 40 a -4 10.4 46 116 

135 14 

US JdO 

IS 04 -b SI SS S! 


• & dwidwicS a Ex afl b Forecaa dtvWend ■ smarm 
caymans passed t Price ai aapension g ftwitemi ants 
yntd exclude a special payment k Pra«i«rger Rguas n 
FofBcasi aarnings o Ex oonr t E* rij(ms * Ex snip or 
share spfat 1 Tax-free . . No ngn&cant data. 















































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THF TTMFS WFDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 198 


THE TIMES UNIT-TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BO ncm Ong YM 


Bo Offer Chrg W 


Offer Chng 


Bd Offer Ox's 


Sc OHa Chng YU 


Bd on* Cfmg YU 


So oner Cn»J Yld 



UMn Fund 2225 2S76» . . £D6 

DO toxm 252-2 206 .. 108 

Do WffMrmrt 1616 1BI.M . . £OB 

Ausnfan Fuvl 130.0 1367 -80 DM 

Do Acctffl 132 2 141.1 -Clfl 0*4 

BmnFunC 3220 827.0 -1333 AM 

Do Acaffn B07.1 650.7 -02 *# 

EuKfXtm Rad 223.0 3**6e -08 075 

Do MO«n 3410 3843* -«.1 075 

Jkwi Rod 822 883* -05 021 

Do fasam 82JS 0O7a -05 021 

SaXM PPP 1753 lM3 . . . ■ 

BUN ALLIANCE 

Swi AKmHM.Honl1Mi.SuHW 
0403 

E^itT Trim ACC 387.1 409.6 -05 £65 

M ABI TiuU Aee 81 0 845 *03 138 

Hr EM 7nm ACC 843 B&8 -13 052 

Wona-MV Bond 508 54.1 -05 833 

European 645 575 401 l5Z 

8UHLFE0FCANADA 

23.4. CoOotvr StrooL London SWTY SBH 

DvaAig mOl-830 2882 

UK Inoanu 24.7 382 -02 478 

DaGrowm 237 252 -02 002 

TSB UNn* TRUSTS LTD 
Xmti Housa. endow. Ksta. SHS IRQ 
0284 5B788 Dwtoga 0264 63432/3/4 

Anenan fee 1184 1235 -15 155 

DoAsnai 1223 T302 -2-0 1-55 

Bon moons me 1175 1202 *02 528 

Do Acarnl 1410 150.1 +04 525 

Gsnsrsi Unff me 1805 1705 +05 254 

00 ACCUB 2543 2812 +1.0 254 

QBIHsdme 452 47 IS +02 95B 

Do ACOJOI SOB B3.4S +02 069 

Income 222.4 236. So +03 441 

Acorn 3485 388.16 +08 441 

PscSc me 1733 184.4 -25 057 

DoAceum 1785 190.4 -2.1 067 

Ins me 3292 3502* -03 1.13 

DO Accun 4095 435.0S -4.1 1.13 

Seuaed Opps me 8U 0.7 401 131 

OoAccum 723 775 401 131 

NStMRH 505 SW4 .. 158 

Do Accuai S85 815* .. 158 


401 131 
401 131 
.. 138 
.. 138 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Monday's trading 


• Ex dnndend. e Cum dividend. k Cum 
stock split. s Ex stock spirt m Cum ai: 
(any two or mow of above). a Ex ad (any 
two or more a! above). Dealing cr 


Hdubs, QtMhaae Hd. AyMaay Buds 
384000 

Atm EW» 743 79-1 402 008 

Aumndsn 20.7 213 -05 0-10 

Owtnatty 803 BSD* -I.T 125 

Energy 23.0 313 .. 131 

E*rty . • 1285 1353 -03 354 

Bnpesn Bsc Stt 114.1 1212 -15 087 

Bum means 1175 1343 -02 523 


month. (22 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (231 20th ol month. (24) 3rc 
Tuesday 01 month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (26) 4th Timcay ol 
monm. (27) 1st Wadnesdayof month (231 
Last Thursday of month. (29) 3rd working 
day ot monm. (30} I6tn sf month. (31) T si 
working day of menth (32; 20m of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August 
November. (34) Last wxtanq day of 
month. (35) 15th of month. (36) 14m cl 
month. (37) 21st ol month. J38) 3rd 
Wednesday ot month. (33) 2nd 


Wednesday ol monm. (40) Valued 
mommy. (41) Last Thursday of Smcfc 
Exchange account (42| Last day ct 
morah. (43) 2nd and 48i Wednesday al 
month. (4£) Quarterly. (451 6th ol month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 



1 1906 

(Hi 

&w >ta 

n«gn lo» CnmaRy 

Bb Ottr 

OivgMfe b ^ P.t 


42 i7'>hmtta* 

133 89 M* [HO 

73 SS F4MDMI 
85 31 ByMi 

2SS too Rcpa 
£0 X HojO (H 
08 00 MINM 
240 IX Frvsdi Co«n 
138 (5 MUMto 
361 2W F*r SMB A 
160 M QtiKP 
IX 70 Get JQ*S1 
47 X GM/fknm 
85 72 Gabon Ijrcns 

188 MB Sllfil 
«*] 11 EMM Horn 

U 32 Qt*M Bg, 

186 O’ GoMa mm 
155 X flood**] AM 
129 as florid (LttttBI 
91 58 Grawtt Sutxa 
1E5 195 6na SoDBsn 

IX 110 Gom Snwtl 

40 19 fionSi Qfca 

135 Bl'iSnswaor Sq 
190 160 GOMmy ASxac 
98 SB HmxMn Houaas 
30 m MnlAm 
258 IBB Knrioci Eunp> 

47 26 HMBl On 

4E0 383’iHWM 
335 293*1 DO 'A' W 
I® HQ'jNsaWJW Woe 
415 1« MsWi*: 

205 45 MMd Pal 

91 (1 HA Emomn 

42 7 HOOSM 

MO IDS Hodpm 

175 10S HBh HMMffaa 

13 110 HrArao Preecttn 

X 22 ttataFoed 
14 IYHsM BK 
105 115 IfeMr Sav 
255 IBB MnMTKh 
2X 160 BBTST 

h ii mk , 

115 44 bn Seal Emggr 

KO 66 HaW . 

353 IX NnCM T«S 
210 205 wafotbra 
32 21 mu (ha L) 

330 zn jsPdSm 

IX 116 feaM 

K8 in Joura 8 -too 

120 73 jrttnsanvs P*n 
to 40 just RdMr 
33) s nr 

92 67 KM (John) 

33) 220 Ktryon StCB 

S3 a xsMi Syrian 
113 9 m -TM 


113 67 IFAM 85 90 

EB 37 LadM 60 66 

125 70 Lotts Hasans 107 ic a +5 

50*1 32 Lana to* 5S MY .. 

110 S3 tarn* _ X 97 *2 

285 71-local ta G O W * 

92 73 uegs CM XX 

MO 85 lori Prtavdv 1C J17 . . 

198 IX Loom BoJ 103 in a-2 


82 17 Invttr PH - 

» 77 «facw4Caiy x SB 

327 IX NUT amp 322 332 

in rat i*um*i8Ks no no 

T2S e Uarefc lam s « 


in ia e-z 

37 X 


... IIUMi 8 .— 

•25 *5 UnZlIMM S « +4 

IX 5* Uaraat IX 130 • 

95 71 Uara On 72 77 -1 

}7B X U*W Itorm ISO 182 4-3 

35 9 MMne » 19 +1 

1W Ml Mnlar ay 1W 115 

306 IX tfeadnr Fam 292 297 

ix 143 Ifeca L*an M4 l« -1 

220 IX Mott Toes ia IX • . 

* 75 lUMn M B4 

22 9 Uaoary Cob* X 2 

75 13 H as C M H Mdgi V X -» 

101 IX Mmsar-SWM 111 1» 


U 4.4 87 

i BJ 7J 
51 103 

81 188 
40 11.7 
18 3l| 
02 1 « 
7J3 M4 
b £2 145 

U H VS 

w ai u 

17 d si 

14 1.1 382 


IX IX • 14 1.1 382 

ia 182 *3 4.7 £9 216 

10 19 *1 

110 115 43 35 OS 

292 297 54 15 25 

M4 M5 -1'* .. 

125 IX • • . 4J0 II 98 

04 *7 • .. 4A 5.1 XT 

50 2 .. 232 .. 30 

27 32 -I 58 107 20 


JM 3i> Usridsm MAbs 355 366 

138 9S IfeJftttM 115 12 

102 7i ink 74 re 

95 58 IMmKJdM) B 70 

760 39 Warms KD #40 

2X X McrttM CO W 

«7 22 Mann 3J » 

420 231 SOWS BBS 410 429 

IBS IS MB* 6 MM 582 106 


193 160 MMM tons IH to 

220 IX tksr torts M5 IX -II 

J7 13 

130 101 MngM Go 100 WS 

124 02 IWc t Cm 110 IX 

13B 11B WMW IX IX m 

57 3 MW ffi) S 55 +1 

23*J 15 Mans (Man) 18 « 

215 X Mm Marta* 73 X 

192 125 Maarfn IBS MS • .. 

367 135 MM Cons 259 SG5 • 

21 6 %. 0 4M Hu ItS 14 4-1 

5*» 0»i Do Wren 1*i 3 

24 14 Mm Entt Pn*a U 21 

90 io db Kh rax 

75 71 Hengc Tm 89 72 


in m as 20 ia.7 

355 3® 7i 21 71J 

115 125 S3 U 160 

74 ns. 07 40 11.1 

B X +2 17 £5 185 

EX 640 U 07 434 

130 132 *-l 57 43 110 

01 35 -V 10 SO 151 

410 429 3* 09 31.4 

182 IX 02 17 3*4 

IX 163 -2 16 U 35 1 

U5 195 -10 70 47 «0 

100 105 20 10 181 

110 IX U U 140 

a 10 4. 83 40 . . 

S X +1 £5 40 150 


10 17 .60 

73 78 15 40 92 

im 195 • .. 43 12 MG 

250 285 • .. U W 142 


75 71 Usage Tim 
21 B MaMc 
13 91 Itanrii 
in 45 A*t»n 
173 83 Mascot HoaN 

« 14 WSm6C« 


» 21 ... 90 

H 72 50 70 80 

IX IX T’. «* 31 170 

,S £ mi IE a ,?• 


are middle prices taken daily at 5pm. Yield, 


75 

X 

V 

IB 

306 

in 

41*4 23 

143 

» 

255 

150 

79 

50 

ai 

IX 

nab 8z 

52 

10 

a 

17 

H2 

X 

100 

a 

X 

23 

110 

Ml 

2B0 

tx 

X 

11 

3« 

a 

116 

2* 

70 

X 

72 

a 

201 

115 

24S 

GS 

IX 

re 

143 

93 

132 

IX 

308 

19 

103 

X 

43 

IB 

a 

X 

in 

35 

40 

5 

res 

X 

52 

22 

78 

-W 

<2 

1* 

ISO 

70 

07 

X 

MJ7 

S3 

103 

39 

116 

181 

IX 

79 

as 

73 

46 

M 

T3S 

104 

178 

75 

«5 

IH 

131 

71 

15 

7 

355 

253’ 

% 

«' 

2® 

188 

IX 

1*5 

«J1 

SO 

173 

110 

23 

IX 

236 

IX 

177 

96 

«0 

33 

IE 

113 

Jl 

11 

108 

as 

n 

48 

a 

a 

99 

S3 

71 

a 

220 

85 

108 

71 

■V 17' 

S3 

5t 

2§ 

i“ 

250 

ISO 

200 

in 

134 

in 

13 

in 

MS 

s 

I4G 

re 

3B 

19> 

205 

115 

180 

01 

1*5 

34 

272'iiaO 

Z33 

S3 

X 

< 

IX 

113 

X 

28 

IBS 

IX 

500 

270 

ITS 

80 

260 

W 

70 

43 

SB 

420 

213 

V 

413 

330 

X 

SI 

100 

35 

100 

X 

IK) 

75 

IB 

14 

X 

a 

IX 

ia 

HI 

IX 

1II> 

4V 

27'. 

10*1 

40J-I 

93 

X 

*0 

89 

80 

26* 

151 

220 

149 

X 

03 

4 

4 

19 

116 

X 

TO 

97 

X 

a 

39 

104*5 75 

61 

10 





i 06 

46 

IS 

s 




305 

310 +2 

43 

1.4 

26* 

41 

«1’i 

£1 

51 

11J 

108 

116 

4A 

4.1 

129 

ISO 

rtd 




40 

53 • .. 

43 

64 

123 

IS 

133 

S3 

40 

1£D 

205 

200 -3 




X 

60 

. . « 

1 .1 

256 

23 

S< +-1 

■ 

.. 

42 

IX 


47 

26 

155 

R3 

107 

33t 

1 £0 

77.5 

2B 

X +1 

17 

55 

73 

102 

W7 

43 

41 

W7 

143 

1*8 e-2 

37 

£5 

224 

10 

T9 




27 

a 

2V 

10.4 

II 

33 

a -2 



46 

X 

70 -3 


'i!s 


63 

X -1 

ID 

60 

175 

1® 

4.4 

25 

126 

IH) 

IM +5 




77 

e 9*2 

is 

36 

Vll 

in 

115 

36 

32 

126 

is 

132 

43 

33 

144 

185 

IX 

63 

34 

137 

95 

100 




X 

33 +2 

■ 


63 

*5 

50 -2 

<6 

6b 

156 

W 

113 

14 

13 

16.7 

IB 

21 ■+* 

. . • 


49 

TOD 

IDS ® .. 

73 

73 

66 

4* 

48 e .. 

04 

09 


» 

X +1 

£9 

52 

161 

15 

17 -1 



1X7 

117 

120 +3 

0.1 

0.1 


X 

a 




97 

100 

23 

26 

4£7 

97 

IE 

43 

43 

t£l 

IB 

112 -1 



- 

IX 

1J4 +'i 

2D 

22 

164 


78 e . 

32 

42 

226 

10 

19 -2 




124 

128 • . 

43 

34 


9* 

99 e . 

5.7 

56 

75 

M3 

145 -2 

46 

12 

126 

125 

IX 

3D 

36 

237 

270 

& •: 

£9 

13 


X 

85 

AS 

06 


TOO 

240 

46 

£0 


170 

in *5 

£9 

1.7 


X 

ffl -1 

06 

1.4 


105 

115 -5 

57 

U 

133 

215 

23 • 

66 

40 


ZX> 

2ii e+i 

51 

£4 


170 

177 e+2 

43b 

£5 


38 

X +3 

17 

45 

113 

1» 

IS -J 

43 

26 


U 

15 





1M *3 




65 



54 


24 

27 




w 

SO -z 

40 

45 

133 

57 

62 

47 

70 


232 

207 -5 

66 

£5 

293 

S3 


290 

30 


29 

X • . 




57 

82 9 

46 

S3 

186 

m 

SB.:- 

31 

12 

M3 

m 

7-6 

a 

48 

16 

125? 





lip 

127 -3 

£« 

16 


ltfl 





225 

2X a +2 

75 

33 


90 

100 

77 

61 

95 


315 

40 

15 



MS 

£1 

13 

15) 







US -1 

71 




7*2 •+•> 

36 

16 












IS 




111 


» 










500 





80 -S 



166 


253 -1 



72 

77 • .. 



1£6 


Sffl • . 



390 

ilS 

46 

40 

67 

SS 

07 e-i 









9 


23 




HO a . 

33 

31 



•2* -l 

04 

74 









57 

3* 



■82 • >2 















355 i .10 

2 J 




SS ° 

90 

a? • .. 

1.1 

£1 

464 

2» 

rs 

30 

270 







68 -1 

37 

15 

M3 

137 

143 

23 

18 

205 

33 

» 







x!g 

5? 

s -i 


60 

100 


no 


45 

ited 

?0 D7 15 ti 

on the middle pries 


■ 

Grass 


1986 

Prce (f* VI 

3 -T I 

1 Mpi Loe Cotwbv 

BO OHe CHqr sene* ; 

Pt j 


16 25 

242 

18 16 

401 

44 32 

366 

65 23 

626 

05 06 

640 

35b 26 

500 

16 07 


25 46 

7B4 

07 ID 

814 

72S 43 

301) 

33 33 

472 

14 19 

353 

05 02 


£6 65 

160 

54 43 

326 

16 03 


14V 02 


60b 36 

37 2 

06 06 

60S 

530 34 

*86 

64 15 

663 

53 13 

*64 

£0 £0 

016 

13 16 

662 

£0 22 

616 

£1 06 

067 

Ol 06 


56 45 

317 

62 15 

864 

7.4 IS 

37.1 

25 <1 

351 


122 S DR CKy Of Ion DM 
294 IS iR Inf 6 Gai 
*« lOObTR MMI ta 
HO X 7R ftott Arnsm 
147 110 Tfi Pxtc Batt 
204 4BVTR Rnaiy 
118 98 TO Tai 
182 IX TO TruOMB 
m us Trait Ba 
309 237 TttrgrMrtDn 
*0 300 Thtog Stcaad Op , 
226 157’]hn Octane 
Iff 112 Trtra 
M 79 Trtttmlsc 
303 217 LSDnoaran 
51 S VWfncTs 
B2 33 VANg (taOSCM 
74 53 Mslpod 

112 0O*jf«ai 


U 2.4 56.4 
40 26 411 

17.1 XI 77 
9J 11 99.7 
10b 40 
£9 72 190 

12 17 31 C 

20 £1 632 



f FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


7.76 18 722 
84 28 560 
10 10 


126 

23 

76 

24 

264 

16 

433 

46 

£0 

25 

33 

26 


47 

WiMttEana 

40'. 







*2 

flFEfe 

70 

TS 

-3 


ID 


X 

« 

Brand 

a 

n 



710 


120 

Brtam Anon 

HW 

IX 

•♦IV 

60b 

40 

175 


Mai 

HP. 

TO’- 



Ml 

15*. DO A’ 

17'. 

10 




i £5 i 

IX 

137 

BKOa 

IS 

IX 

-i 



$6 1 


» 

Eag Tnat 

177 

in 






167 

Ess 

2£ 

237 

-s 





» 

Entaaoi 

110 

116 




1*6 1 

ire 

375 

61 

srr 

725 

107 

reo 

112 


129 

7.1 

13 

66 

193 ; 

116 



ST KiiiBifln 

ZBJ 

212 




1S6 


BOMB (DAM) 

IX 

174 

-i 




I0V480 

Hmttnm tenet 

10V 

TO’. 

2Z10 

71 

203 




192 

IX 








423 

*27 





3& 

1BU 

MAG 

2E7 

773 






252 

Iferrafe Hovsc 

303 

303 




56 


Ufa 

PtedelvvTSi 

IS 

177 

♦i*i 

05 

04 



Do Wkran 




206 

IE 

Smb Hew Cent 

IBB 

1® 


106 

S6 

S3 


Feb 

ii 9 . 

80.00-82JJ 1 

MdT 

— . 7600605 1 


COCOA 

Dec 

Mar 


1481-80 

1512-11 

1537-36 

1569-58 

1580-78 

1610-06 


3025-2020 
1971-1970 
1925-1920 
1S2S-1920 
1970-1960 
1980-1960 
2000-1950 
8204 


1335-31.0 
133.7-33.0 
1335-33.0 
1300-295 
1268-28.0 
131 5-30.0 
134.0-31 0 
1200 


COFFEE 

No* 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Jui 

Set) 

Nov 

Vol: 

SOYABEAN 

Dec 

Feo 

Ajjr 

Jun 

*jg 

Oa 

Dec 

voc 


INTERNATIONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
Suppaed wa Conai mai y 
Maxet Semens Ltd 
HEAVY PUS. OH. 

Dec 79.00-81.0 

Jan 6250-63.5 


GAS OB. 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb _ 

Mar 

Or”” 

Jun 

JtB . 

13055-3080 

- 134^5-34.00 
_ 135.75-3530 

- 13150-3100 
_ 128.75-2^25 

1Z7.75-21.00 

- 128 BO-1 £00 

- 126.00-11 00 

V* 1930 

LONDON MET. 

AL EXCHANGE 

Unofficfa 

al prices 

ti : 

l-.l 





STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 887 00-890.00 

Three Months. 914.0G-914.50 


Cash 338.50-337 00 

Three Mourns . 329 jxwas.so 


ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash S72JXF57250 

Three Months . 560 00-567 00 


COMMODITIES 1 


Vol 2000 

Tone Barely Steady 

SKVER LARGE 

Cash 38860-389.50 

ThreeMonma. 3995IMOOSO 

Vol 2 

Tone Quiet 

S&.VB1 SHALL 

Cash 3B 8J M 88 50 

Three Months . 399.50-400 JO 

Vol — Ml 

Tone Me 

ALUHMUM 

Cash 783 JO-794. 00 

Three Months . B05 50-806.00 

Vol 1950 

Tone Barely Steady 

NCKEL 

Cash 2555-2565 

Three Months 2596-2800 

Vol 240 

Tone Qwet 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 


Average laMtcfc prices al 
rap rovw nativ e ma rt ce ts oo 
Nowaafeai 18 

G& Caffle. S£30p per leg Iw 

&au 170.19p per kg- 
(+348) 

C»PJgs.7738pperkglw 
*esL dead carcase weight 
E ng la n d and Wales: 

Cattle nos. up 7 2 V a ve. 
price. 90-55 d(-1 .08} 

Sneep nos. down 169%, are. 
price. 171.6601+4.17) 

Pc nos. up 7.0%, awe. 
pnee. 75.77p(-0j8) 

QaaffeiuL 

C«6e nos. up 9.4%. are. 
price. 96. 13p( -068) 


9wep nos. up 19X) %, aw. 
price. 186.07p(+Z48) 

Pig nos. up 7.1 V awe. 
price. 80.14p(+i.i5) 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 

Live Pig Contract p. per kSo 
Month Open Close 

Now 1D1.4 

Fed 96l5 

Apr 96.8 

Jun 96.5 

Aug B5.5 


LONDON POTATO 
FtrruiES 


Voi:0 

Pig Meet veto 

UMON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Lhe CatOa Contract 
p. perkfto 

Month Open Close 



LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
E par tonne 

Wheal Baney 
Month Cose Close 

Now 10890 109 20 

Jan 110.85 111.70 

Mar 113.50 11395 

May 115.75 11495 

JlX 117^0 

^ 101.50 101.45 

Wheat ^ „..._284 

totor..- — 57 


n 87 
»r87 
187 

387 
n 88 
ir88 

Jul 88 760.0-760.0 

388 

Vol: 273 WS 
Open Interest 2015 

TANKER REPORT 
HJgh/Low Close 
Nov 88 910.0-910.0 


Jun 87 — 

Sep 87 1078 

vat 10 tots 
Open merest 24 
Spot martlet commentary: 
Tanker Index: 

910.5 down 59 on 17/11/86 





































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


groveside homes 


WBL&Zmv&S: 


TOP FLATS 


hi a • of- Vi a i] 





4 Bedroom Houses from £209,000 and you can live 
within one mite of Big Ben 
ar Regents Bridge u 

■ Gardens & 

• Site Sales Office 
(off Rita Road) 

Open 10-5 me Sun 

Telephone . K irffXjtpfr. 

01-73 5 7733 


STREATHAM 

SW16 


2 and 3 Bedroom Houses ShowHouseopen 

&om£60,999 Telephone 

■ 1 Bedroom Flats 01-6777875 

from £48,500 




MM 



m 

Vgrf* 

SW18 


2. 3 and 4 Bedroom 
Mews Houses 
from £72.000 

Show House open 
Telephone 

01-8708576 





BPS 



PLYMOUTH WHARF 

ISLE OF DOGS 

2 Bedroom Flat Cotneaod discuss a person 

c «i Ann to person deal with 

£81.000 Amelia Saver 

Show House open Telephone 



Telephone 

01-5380524 




200 YARDS TO PRINCE 
OF WALES DRIVE AND 
BATTERSEA PARK FOR 
JOGGING AND TENNIS 


ji,i 1 L 

■nii . '.iiMj' fcTt'Y- 

Sa jf.vT.4 f ‘ -tt? . 



DRUCE 


STEPHEN 

MORGAN 




OAKLANDS 

CHESSmGTON 

4 Bedroom Detached ■ . ££ffi£3E3£ 
Houses 5how House open 

from £118.000 Telephone 

. 01-3914589 





L oitviM »»;*; w; i xtn , \ ■ « ail 

■ riTTi * T 4V\ ,T iifiu ■] 


MORTGAGES & REMORTGAGES 

100% MORTGAGES AVAILABLE « A inn A ii 

» + 2 x INCOME (PROFESSIONALS) ^ *7S% ofcj 1 ^ 

10% REDUCTION ON PAYMENTS III ■ V /O 

[1ST YEAR) FIXED OPEN MON-FRI W7 

HIGH FniJlTV m BOOL {11.8APRI .. - 


• 100% MORTGAGES AVAILABLE | 
•4 + 2 x INCOME (PROFESSIONALS) 

• 30% REDUCTION ON PAYMENTS 

(1ST YEAR) . m 

• HIGH EQUITY TO 80% . 9 

• NON STATUS TO 70% 

NUMEROUS SOURCES BEST RATES 
EXECUTIVE APPOINTED TO SECURE 
YOUR HOME PURCHASE . 


BARKY WINSEE 01-486 8308 


« 75 % (Mifejafe } 

FIXED OPEN MON-FRI 9am-7pm I 
(11.8 APR) SAT 10ara-2pm I 

CALL US NOW I 

ON OUR HOTLINE I 

01 - 4868305 -/ 


NARROW STREET, LONDON, E14. 
City 2 miles: Canary Wharf % mile 
Docklands first new development of 
16 LUXURY RIVERSIDE HOUSES 

£360,ooo-£45o,ooo 

Freehold 

SHOWHOUSE OPEN DAILY 

ll. 00 am- 4 . 00 pm 


COTTESMORE GARDENS, KENSINGTON. WA 

A rare opportunity to acquire me Freehold of a aupert) South facing family house situated 
to the popular Victoria Road restdenttai area. 3 Rna Reception Rooms: 7 Bedrooms: 2 
Bathrooms z Cloakrooms, plus sett contained statt flat of 2 rooms, kitchen and 
bathroom. Central Heating. Attractive garden. For sale at substantial price. 

ST. UEONARD’S TERRACE, CHELSEA, S.W.3. 

Factog South over Burton Court Gardens, a fine Freeflow house with garage and private 
paflung tor 2 care. 2 Superts Reception Rooms: 3 Bedrooms: 2 Bmnrooms: Studio, phis 
sett contained Rat of 2 rooms, kitchen and B athroom. Potential root garden. Freehold lor 
sale £89S.(XX).00. to tochxte exceSent carpets, curtams, eta 

CADOGAN LANE. S.W.1 

A mttnnim Town House with garage and oH-sttew parking for 1 car. Entrance H&U: 
2 Reception Rooms: 4 Bedrooms: 2 Bathrooms: Cloakroom: Kitchen: Centra) 

Low 


29. LOWER BELGRAVE STREET, SW1 01-730 9148 


■■■FAmBRlAR HOMES WBm 

Past Historic, Future Perfect 

at King George Square, Richmond^ 



! Chester lick l Sz.ty 


01-5815234/01-5842391 



Flats from £100,000 

Mews Cottages £207,000 

Town Houses from £272,000 

For defails phone 01-940 0325 

Sales Office 
open 7 days 
each week 



INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 


9 o 

HIGHBURY GRANGE N5 


12 New*? 
devoted 3 

-storey town 
houses in 



IMAM LEY HOUSE UTCUUttlVtr IMPOM I WI 


THE 

PENTHOUSES 

BRISTOL HOUSE, 

80A SOUTHAMPTON ROW 
BLOOMSBURY WCl 
★ VIEW TODAY 12-7PM * 

1 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
PRICES FROM £ 118,000 

EXCmNG NEW DEVELOPMENT 
CSOWWNG REFURMMSD PERIOD 
BUILDING CLOSE TO OTY AND 
WEST END 

125 TEAR LEASES 


JOINT SOLE AGENTS 


.01-485-4444 


81-629-5604 




fijtlosi 'jjb 


J 


ESTATE AGENTS 

VIEW TODAY 2 -5 pm 



Fnr quick sale needed at 
leas man market 
valuation. Superb first 
Boor luxury flat One yaer 
old. in prestige Fairoew, 

BmVlage Development 
2 bedrooms, lounge, 
luxury fitted kitchea, 
bathroom. Gas CH. F&fad 
carpets. Many exkas. 
CT2JO0 or nearest otter. 
01 977 4453 Evenings. (T) 



Vaarfaa today 


22-24 COMERAGH ROAD 
BARONS COURT 
LONDON WI4 

An opportunity to view Ths ttoique development of 
nine I and 3 bedroom apartments, 

• which have undergone complete renovation, 
located n ths sought after position. 

FEATURES INCLUDE: 

• Private wn becomes otd gardens. 

• Security entry systEfn 

• High standard a f finish throughout mdtuSng fitted 
carpets, gas central h ea ting, etc 

Prices from £62^00 - £135,000 

A development by Kin^tons Homes Limited. 

BRIAN LACK A CO. 

8 Ladbroke Grove. Holland Park. London Wt I. 

S=Tel: 01-229 8881.! 


DE GROOT COLUS 

Rirr U wi Viiot - Priced Foe luuuctEair Sale 


STATUS MORTGAGES 

CURRENT RATE - iO V\j 


•WV UPTOt'HMPup * ur. V. 

‘*r « UP TO * IAU0.WHI & \ . 

LOW START INTEREST AVAILABLE. 


non-status mortgages 


• NO income, b:ink or cxisrirn: lenders rel'erences 
required. 

• REN IORTG AGE lor any suitable pu rpi'nc. 

Up to LISvuuhi avjibblc. 

• Loans up tu 7ti“- ol purch-iM- price nr vulu.irii.in 
(whichever is lower). 


Phone Emma Hydc-Parier or Ronuine Allum on 
(i I -651 4085 or write to Devonshire Em-mcial Si rs ice*. 
Devonshire House. I Devonshire Srrevr, 

London WIN IFX. 

Dhvonsj))r.i;^ 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


CThEPAflt'cE.' EPSOM : SU.MEri(Tl,<» r . TELtPHONEr CPSOlftpIIiTj 41(03 . 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And get the benefit of your equity 

* Installing Genual Heating 

* Refurbishment of your property 
* Extension of your p ro perty 
* School Fees * Buying a Car 

* Going on a holiday etc. 

(1*0 iecs payable! 

NOS STATLS MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europe’s Leading Mongage Brokers 

15. BcrVeW? Street London W1X 5 YE. 

TeL- 01-629 505 1/2 TELEX 28374 


ROOT STBffT. 8 W 7 
* tee. net arrwe tato, w i 


BEAUFOST 5 T 8 EET. SW 3 . 
k wy M aaontt 3 n> Dew ttt 


degM Dooms Recqaen Run. 3/4 eeufy madanead «* vat (tor. 
BanooRK Double Reeetfeon tosn. Large DreUe teamen Roam- 2 
Suty/Bed 4. ndea/8reaUsi Me Btoroons Kmen/Biakfta 
teem BMmam: CkstaMet 125 Room Matted tattoo nr 90 ton 
ran £249500 £1691)00 

C 8 MUV SAflOBB. SW 7 . rMOTm _ tTnm . ^ 
teOBMntaB bea4Wly n ttrtitthed CMmaiSE SIRSI. SWt. 
xanaatt si tbs pnme toeattn. 3 5 Homy pnd bmi hnse reoamj 
BettoooK 2 BaBsoomc Hec e ptsw eocnpaa onaerauttn m sutfn 
teem lurey Fated BttwtEVen lor esosecam ■*> 3 Has a ran ip 
nSQIUO » enjBC borne, freehold £350.000. 

CHELSEA OFFICE 01-352 1006 


SHMCon’MCNws.smcma 
bed ratted g ro u nd floor snrt 
with 90 Q South tocnoboicta 
o/b Mode. Ufl/porHr. Sp&aow 
receo roam w#b flreabce. 2 
good st»d bwti, (Ub> ued m* 
kttehen and bathroom. An sew. 
91 near lew. £ 85 X 00 ONCX 
Ol 289 6635/794 SUM. 


MM Newly decorated 2 bed. 
moand/knwa- oro on d m#Uav 

me. tmtawaf pMami ter 


ana. Coltooo style send dst. 9 
h e cfcmd . 2 no. lye uu/ doer, 
rutty moden ue ed. Gan. over- 
looking vBlage wen, bacUno 
an pork toad. Oflm tn ram 
Of n 4& OOO. Tel: Ol MA «60 
today or alter 6 m meutn. 


For Sales & Purchases 
for pnees m lo £S0.000 
we chaise £360+ VaT & 
disbursements. 

Rurretts SoSeitins 

01-248 0551. 


toMtoM m SW 6 Sbmfltog 
wwiy mod iw or imanr w- 
to« tan hoc tn » flmcl cut de s*c 
3 able bed,, law m em* * 
miw. oneb w»d tic. 
rWko/uony rm. dMfltttt 
town 2 Mn if eaudte* ««"- 
an rti. uned oivtu. IIMJOO 
r/U Somrr £ MdWbtt 381 
3693 

m pumm Mm wt s 

Horry. 5/6 bed. 2 bom + sop 
wc odtarmr eiwuma i fop tt- 
wtitai, cedar. SW an dm 
ssaeoao oi-rsa iso* 



mne Max. mb m» tn. w- 

MiMf oa rttoa ■?<»• 

Imna oaa te cooaumv 2 Itoto 
BRA Rec. Mod KMC 1 Z 1 jn 
£ 136.000 Furfl andante ay 
dewmanoa i Bed Dai ad- 
um RK. K 4 B £ 9 aooa 
WMbaays «9 Wtt. Cm tm 
ffl»m 

aumiMm. carot, m. 
SisicrD 1 (Md XX Roar Oat in 
aodtfd die rood etta to CMy. 
railway * tube Lo» 
recvPBan/UL dMe bnttni. lax 

6 MO. anude Mxaw- Wl yor- 
w «»ke . LwebeCXSOp 
SKtttttHtaSfONi. 


KYK MRK E Bafe W2 Med 

pr& ttt. mc cam. 2 brx 2 
BMa. Balcony. Roof Odn. For- 
Swe. 74 OT Me. £ 199 . 000 . 
SeAyeno. Boexitte oi-nai 
OS 48 / 8 SO 4829 - 

a—waitol Oe^wra 
wl 1m rewifiy ««- 
we MO- m rm. warm. 

leanwnttdmuwarcfcjijji w. 

Ha cn. 7i yr He. tiiuao 

mo. Ol 589 0973 Owner. 
Mnv» HK. MB. CnredDB (m 
btMtt- flh are* Odd 
KMEionre.adiieMtt.dtt 
non. n tar. tom + aaa. 
* 19^008 oau- PW pernor, 
aa OIdH 8926 


OAUK FARM. 
RV5. . 

fteny tax bod. ttwa wans. F/R 
mn. S-tacan 40 ton odn pin 
8110119 . Itoderresed. bot naafe 
some EutttiQQ. toot sal bewa 
■Xtob. «n etas rant 
£ 130000 . 

BAR6JUI PRICE. 
Teh 01-287 3453. 


LUXURIOUS WJ Flat- M-wty rw- 

fidtratiod A rcradstad. ready to 

wnUt-tnioL S Bedrooms. Saov 
roooi. Fony FXted. XUOmsi & 
RocenCon. Regnre Park. UR ft 
Porterage £ 200.000 for ante* 
sale. Lane 98 yean. Tel: 0992 
40817 . 


MMM VALE W 9 . com 

luxury tnlerlor desloned 2 floor 
penmooe. 36 It double reeen. 3 
bo*. 2 Mare 11 en sonei. luxu- 
ry Odty fmM kliefisi. law roof 
terrace. n*y rated catyett. 

. M67 JOOO- Mgvrara EWB 01 
289 0104 / 6063 . 


auaNunusw.9pKto«.Mht 
nwaixaMitoek Oil medarnwd 
lo btai atamurd. 2/3 bed- 
ram. oooote receMHn. C.H. 
ReobadcaaiF grind at 
dSOjOOO. Trt. 01-289 1847 
WWW -*■ w/ondjt 01-486 7111 
idcy) 


N*. S/c 2 bed Sat. Newly dee. 
new kH + Baxn cppHanm 18 ' 
toao MKuay. Laeti/w. 89 
yn.- £160000. 003 9012. 

•ow ES. 3 beo naL Tredegar Sfl 
nauorvaucn area £ 88300 . Dr 
Eaen -TM 857 8866/980 2S33. 

IWUMM.iaU-Wll. Qnnntng 
i bed Bda ftai. Low outgoings. 
W y ba. £ 72.600 7 BT 3090 . 

**W# New 2 BedfM wWi Soato 
Carden. C 64 ,Ooa S C Boland 
ft CO 221 2616 . 


FULHAM SW6 

I dbl bedroom garden fiat 
wry secure convened bone, 
brae reap. fiiHy fined IdL 
GCH. reoemly redecocaKd. 
87 yrs lease . £ 69. 930 md ae - 
pets. c o i t ai n s & a ppl i anc es. 

TefcOl 385 7337 


01 228 


RWa. HAM PS T E AD. £1 IS, OOO. 
OutcK saw. seouttrai sunny 
imwwW. Three bedrooraa. 
Reception KUrben/dtnar. TDM 
bamraom. Cas (enm heattog. 
Roof lerrace. Excellent rendi- 
tion. 118 yore. No Meats. 



KENSINGTON BOKDE2S SWS Gmoad Door naonre ttrato ta a 
toy coonwoa posmen. 4 ttnr tab. bubroom. stma rm. rank rm ’ 


lARt Ume C 2 & 0 W 

PIMLICO SWI Anractiue 2 bed atra home at top ol Dm oma nod w 
"ittto 2 mixa of al amrnrtjci and Rrvt* ftaracs. Lspc rccep. knraea 
roof trace. 

nmjao 

KN1GKTSHB0CE SW1 4 bed 4th floor xamuid is pr trug e 
OnrJ opn Ka i tntriookiag Hyde Part, large 417 laa w a area, tatrtm. 
toflnoM X 2 d — er ras *4 yr tar Farther deads oe appheroao. 
KENSINGTON W| 2xi Soar EnaSy fin a magbt a ha tocaoo. 3/4 
bedt. 2/3 tecqx. tnracn tttakta rm. 2 taunoons. 

<249 JM 

GODDARD & SMITH 
01-930 7321 


non. 118 years, no 
P hone: 01267 8448. 



OFF EATON SQUARE. Beautiful, 
ty reiiatwM bouse in private 
mews. -L- mm d ouble recpL 
thntog rm. a beds. 3 bams £2 « 
suite), guest dealt, new fauy flt- 
Mbum. Istttnaaftvertlpea. 
no Ascnts. Lease riaid 
£430000 7 »: 01 - 937-1193 


IWl® Large garden flat in aolet 
street. 2 mereom. kaingc. 
kudwn. oatmom «nd separate 
Mtlet and shower room. CH 
mw. Lons hate. LOW 
o ra pnCngs. Needs iH wn Rn 
£ 92260 . View W apnoiniinmi 
only. Ring $70 8172 


HARLEV *T, MT 1 . Exceflau selec- 
bon Of 1 . 3 ft 2 bed Rate. 
£ 75000 - £ 300 . 000 . Tatabhone 
WIUB Head & Eve 637 san. 
UMMIUH, WB. SBpeth S/A 
bed we. Easy u ran. 2 baths, 
roof am £385000 tteetmM . 
WHks Head ft Eve. 657 8471 . 
LITTLE VENICE 3 bed 1 (VRM 
private & Com gdn.lfnmac ren- 
dition be 122 yrs £ 189:900 
Eft* ft Co Ol 628 8626 . 
MARVLEBBW NWrt Sshtshm of 
fbK. 12 4 3 wraoems. Pnm 
£ 56.000 yrs leases. Noml- 
nm otugoings. Afiens 288 0648 
IMmmO ECL. Fceeiwid peri- 
od bouse. 5 bed. studio, rebar 
Parity refortxstird. tan Lerner 
ft CO: 01 58 S 4378 , 

ST MMM Mfbad 1 W6 (fad to p/b 
W W g w a Woes. Modemard. 
newly derara ied. C M. C 73 J 00 . 
Tel: Ol 482 6090 . 

ST JOHNS WOOD Smetana man- 
skm flat. 4 Beds. 2 Baths. Bath 
ft Cttrra. 8b yean. tl^-SOO, 
495 99 01 . Eras 870 4705 m. 
IHRRDO 3 brarei flu tn p rein- 
ttous Warwick Sonar* S nuns 
wait tube. £ 188 * 000 . 
WlHkworm Ol 828 1786 . 


IULFMEHU 1 RUSH. Fiffty mod 
urr hse. Lge lanraeaoed pabo 
•On- 3 dole beds. 24 n Inge. Sep 
diner, uo lot srp wc. Cat CM. 
Small cellar- Lne left s sura ge. 
Ouiri SL out only 2 mms lo bus. 
lure. £ 140000 . 01-749 2863 . 


WRWRtWT Sunny arcMted de- 
agnM ftsc sutuig roam, dining 
era*. dMe bed. lux l r Miatra 
and bam. GCH. Quick rate 
066000 an© Trt Ol 609 6666 
IhlerOl 623 2323 ere ai Irtov 


RTKSTME COURT Wi. Cn- 
man ual * 3 dble beds. S rerep. 2 
bath. Known/ arwwrt rm. 
needs mdstmo. 87 yr tse. aid 
Or, 24 to- porter. £ 220,000 for 
auefc sale. Tel: Ol 722 0979 . 


tmoous STUMO FWL 
Hurtmttrani SW 6 £ 49 , 960 . 
20 x 16 ' studio nnuxiUL sepa- 
raw bed area, full batorm. cme 
Tune. 731 4448 IT) 

SMTXO. btenar 3 bed Mats. Large 
nm 3 oeos. bam. m shows'. 
kU. rioak. tod CM. 97 years. 
£ 179 . 000 . HOLMANS. 570 
6781. 

W. K OttR f ft TOH. Huge new 2 
bed craxvemop. Own entrance. 

Gas CK. corns bam. na uun- 
en. Carpets. 99 yr lease. 
£89200 oao. 01 206 09S9. 
BLOOMS 8 UTT WCl I tratrosm 
not m p/b Mock. 999 year 
hate. £ 62 . 980 . Tel: Ol 307 
B 466 ien« 5 /v*Ken 6 si. 

EAUNB. Canen flat. 2 reccp 
im. owe beorm. mo xn. 
balhcm, gas ctv Own Mi lacrep 
gdn. £ 69.600 l/h 01 998 1238 . 
EALBtC - Huge. 2 bedraotned. 
tten flat Fused tetrhen ex. 
87 years koar. £ 79 . 998 . Tel: 
Ol 998 5709 

FULHAM 4 bed randy bouse. 
CJoee lo an BmemUcS. Lovely 
manaoeabie garden. £210000 
01-736 S 887 . 

FULHAM Lovely . reaoous 1 bed 
Rat on sound near with peew. 
£ 64.980000 FH- Tel 602 3820 


C'ulmis 


HISBURY HODS. Bexfttufty 
raswed 5 bed Viaonan grogrey. 
Recto Z7* 12. Nr Tube. 034.73} 
f/H. 

ST. PM&S ST. NT. FExAxs Meres 
house sa * craraui ttixticaceo 
saanfl teceo 2 D « 12 ', Boa* 
re enw. gao iQBdai D27 kq f/H 

BArwfflORT St mnaadBR 3 m 

masonest n sumg peroa 
rnoerty. < 0 h amen, penod 
(earns. T1 39550 1/H 


01-354 3777 


FULHAM. Luxury 2 bed DaL re> 
npnoii teueneo/ dinner. HWi 
ceiling, central ttauig. over 
Mora-in gardens at (rod. targe 
new MHO M rear E 8 LOOO Tel 
01 370 4868 or Ol 573 2972. 


BOUSCSOAT - tone Canal. SL 
JOIUW Wood area, steel mil 
and super orucrare. beeum ul)y 
appotmed. Mams Uecu nJly. 
Telepnone. Central neaimg. 
Sauna. £ 33.000 negoUMe. 
T«: Ol 724 3664 




Attractive 
Riverside Fiats. 

Prestigious 5 yr old 
tfevQtatxnwM Budl around 
a yacm manna. Adjacent 
an Syon Parte and 

ovenookxig the Rwer 
Thames with Ksw 
Gartens beyond- 1-4 
bemomed Btos currently 
aeHoMo 

£50000- £110500. 

SELWYR ESTATES. 
01 560 & 06 Q/ 7 S 73 


HAMPSTEAD NW3 

First time advertised, a snmniog flat in this new 
development in Wen Heath Road. Beautiful]; Designed 
and arranged as a duplex on ground and fir» floor. 
Offering Communal 2 Acre Landscaped Garden, Private 
Car Parking. 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, Living room. 
Dining room, Fined Kitchen and a Sunn; Balcony 
overlooking cfac beauty of Hampstead. 

Situated only minutes walk from the Heath and the High 
Street. 

£425,000 NEW 125 YEAR LEASE 
TEL 81-794 7733 





ESTATE FULHAM 

Magrtieem lolly maunnsed 6 
oeaoonin muse, 3 amroung rz 
en suatj. annum urge ommg 
room, 4 noen ttawcos, Kac ojm 
Oak kacran. ikreg loom, uuy 
reom. consenratyy, Pbq «m 
cttvibb rt 
HOIK 731 W 22 
WORK 351 5657 


W11 

2 mirotts uvJefijminfl, 10 itri- 
utes oy tool Kenstunon Gameos 
PteenoW. Four suwev soaoouS 
nouse. Elgin oedrooms Tm teitv 
mows Or snore or. Fox la lets 
new wawa Gaol decor®** at- 
o« large gaioen. GCH. Otf soeei 
pat tong (ho sate 

£260,000 
Tek 01-229 5011 


RHNCHMORE HILL R21 

rt awwn o oonaws corner 
nous*. 3 Ige numcw on rms. 6 
oearms. hrayy tatwre. tatehen 6 
nwmoignn Launray ft atrw out- 
Owwngs Fuhr tteo awimm 
pool encsossa on 4 soes, os 
gga S onwa. mature pons. P r op- 
eny easuy dunoes nra granny 
accomrn etc. Planning perma- 
son or proiassnnai usu. 
pprat . nnit 

Teh 0707 2 64145 


SWi Very attractive south wot 
toeing 2 nd and 3 rd floor nvu- 
sonrtte. 0 bu 6 rate mmum. 
larar Kuerten with dlrung area. 
3 beds and 2 bams. £i 76.000 
Ttt Ol 828 0040 


RARW C AM EC2. Spaetom W 
floor 1 dm Dei lacing south 
over rawn. 1 19 yr Be Pars- 
ing pvausMc. £ 92.000 Frank 
Harm ft Go: 537 0077 . 


CONNAUOHT ST Mtt Nrwty n- 
rurbtsned Ira floor flat 
overtoofemg souarr. 3 beds. 2 
bams. CH. 46 yr lease. 
£ 180-000 01-831 1051 O. 


HYDE PARK SQUARE Luxurious HAMR.TOM TERR NW 8 2 bed Kt 
2 nd Door Itu. 2 cmna m . 2 flr 01 impnasive nre. rera lined 

bains, tounoe. kitchen Mr. »e. GCH. New «e £ 129.000 

awms dtscanino ouver Firsi lor early sale. S0» 33 M 
LiOO .OOO. Can 01724 696 S- 


JOttlT FDRCHASE. Prtvate buy- — VAlr ^ 

er. nWi £ 250.000 Cash, seeks 
another cash buyer for Kan! 
purchase of nouse. Holland 

Pom orere- ww to OMdiDOinio K2 en - 

mauftnettcs. Td Oi «73 CCTb csSijoo, Tat ot 22 u 5 t> 56 . 


RECEMTS PARK Ormonde Ter- 
race. Very anrwove audio fttl 
in penod building Fanusrie 
naraain - must rail nuu veai 
lease £61 500 Tel 6«M> 5410 


REOUretED Hotels. Houses. Man- 
sion Mores ft Fiat, m 
Kwditwndqe. Brkaavta A 
Mayiatr. For quack sue call 
now Mourad Falatc 584 7727 


SOtna Eaton Place - Sunny 2 
Oea (Ul require, tome mod on 
3 rd door, p/b Mock with (tn 
L» « yrs. £ 128.000 Ol 409 
0714 I CM 


CORNWALL CUES W||. Lux 1 
brttnfl 1 iciaran nw. CH. quich 
sue. £ 68 . 000 . 01 229 3066 



RECSMTS CT Li rue venire 
Maprtrf 3 bed duplex in new 
Wort. 2 nan. 2 balh. enmmu 
nal gdns Mil. v preanotB. lease 
198 yrs nmn ebr & co oi 

626 8626 Open DU 8 pm. 

WARWICK AVE Ume Venice 
Spar 4 bed 2 recepi nse. on 3 
floors. One. patre gdn am»H 
drive. FH E 289 OOO Eure ft Co 
Sot, Aenfe . Open tiB 8 pm Ol 
625 8626 . 

MUIMHlIUUretoma Dflr 
Bed Area. P/B premp e bfk. 2 
die Bed flat. 125 yr be. Priced 
for tanned sale £ 99 . 350 . sole 
Agents Bucknse 01-651 
0648/660 4829 . 

ka rg a h c The village. NWl. 
New. luBy m ft enuipBed. 2 
bed. lux flat. £82 JX». Devetop- 
*rs pure, unfuin. £ 7 9.9951 
0403 92242 . 

BO. ORA via. wmon Cresnstl. 
MaraW tondty maaenctK. £ac 
cund. ACT dine reeep. 4 b«dm. 3 
bam (2 en suitei ku/b’M. 40 * 
rdof lerr. £ 590 , 000 . 22 l 7882 

CHEULTOM BD, EW 5 . £269 960 
Bnpru sn aaous Vietonsn use. 5 
P ott m s. 2 uomrrra reception, 
lorae idteton/ wrektet. 30 * 
*WW I. 731 444 B m 


QUEElfS GATE. Close Hyde 
Park. Luxury modernised nal. 
S Pro. rrcennon. ammo had. 2 
baths, gum IVC. rtpagped 
taichen. st o rage . 71 year km 
£ 299.600 01-957 6088 iaayt 
Ol 581 5525 revesj 
HVCB COURT SEl. tty 
Bucxrture Bnaoe- macSous 2 
bed rial in moo dreejopment 
having large terrace oTookmp 
Thames. 90 yr Be. CH. and 
C.H.W. e parking. £139 600 . 

ftank Hw-rtg A Co. 467 0077 . 

HBTXM 1 IU. Ocram using 
Rxntxned wtth modem anteni- 
bcs. Lnrji uijuioy renmxsRM. 
maaousA b. SH». 3 %nnr 
dm 11 mansion rue ire 79 v K 

C54&000. Hunter Estates: 01 

828 2146 . 

FULHAM SUM. lively vie lerr 
hte nr nvw 2 reeps. a bed,. 5 
taltt. superb U. onguui fea- 
tures. Immaculate order. IM 
rorpeta. curuus. £ 198.000 
F/H . T« 01 -731 2289 
“"WTB TERRACE, W 2 . 
SrttetinitM Mgtttty »ord I ft 2 

hrorm Cam m eteoant bow 
bnm ed_ Period mono. Pnrrs 
from £ 66 . 000 . New lpm „ 
Piw. * fV» Oi are ms 



MARBLE ARCH. 2 bed duotek. 
pesa pouuon. Si Cnran fMw 
Long lease £ij ?.000 Tel: 
<04201 65324 or 01 723 7720 


W 2 t Mews freehold nr. Marble 
Arch. 2 dM oearms. i srrer. ■ 
recep, unoa conn. Great pnien- 
uai. £186.000. Trt:78tt 7779. 


XAVSWATZ 3 I W 2 1 bedroom 
dal. car park and garden. 
£09.000. Tel. 01 969 0773 


WOLLAMP PARK SpacMiK 1 bed 
IU rrauinng same 
ttmUmiutiM. Great notentuu 
Iona Me. £7o-6o0 Sole agents 
WAiinun Porter 605 1 133. 

HVOC PARK, W2. Grad flr Mat tn 
porterage Mk. 3 Deds. 2 reenn. 
If kil. 2 balhs. 47 yr tte. 
£196.000 ono. Palace Proper 
UO? 01-480 8926 

ISUKCTON BORDERS Sutwrb 
warehouse convmwn. 1 Soa- 
OPUS flata '*tlh ContmeroaF 
studios front £80.000. Coffins 
Resort! tut 53 a 1821 

LITTLE VEtttCt W0 itoonifteld 
Roadi Garden flat wun ptten- 
ual lo eaiend ■ in need rt mad. 
Good Ute qdn (lJdOO0.H#». 
are Esiaies. oi 289 oioa/bsss. 

LITTLE VENICE 3 bed ! rerrw 
pni etc A Com w, Ipunac 
rorennon ke 122 its £189.030 
EJIP A CO 01 623 8626. Open 
ui spm 

MAIDA VALE aitrar ISI floor 2 
bed Pal with bm. \ fcianan 
rirnrtoce and real nanw free 
Priced (or quick uH> EPJ.OSO 
Tel. 28e S7SB or 963 *>e>S4 

MAIDA VALE LAUDERDALE 
MANSIONS Sunrrb 3rd floor 3 
Bed mansion Hal with fonaf 
Comm Guns. £1 17.000 Forced 
Sate. 286 9412 \t\CH |TL 


rnnlipini ore m»vt pwe 


















































PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 



HOBART SLATER 



BELfiSAVE MEWS WEST. S.W.L SnCtfuS 4 
eonwr Mews hu l«tt> caage} on mo Hoots only wdh 

tomtit fienMe xx&nwaUxkiv and *dfe siatttttO 
petnsann lot Extra Root. A reamed. 32' l' Staged 
reap mr Fined kit 4 Bedrn&. 3 Bah/shorer nns: 

Ctoaks: 3J Garage 

Irerai 57 yew. X458ISG3 OHCBS BiHTS) 

KDOraffON StfiST. 5-W.L Bngtit n»M 1st Item flat 
n exctasve aevetoBmem sunoum&ng deh^dM 
btaSszst&s gdns. Weal Md a tone or tettng 
investment ; Beams; ftecec room; Kit Batanr. 
lease 76 |«n OM.7SI 

ONSLOW GABOBI&. SOUTH KEISMGTEHL S.WJ. An 
dea aed a terra - A Bf^nt (op flow Hat (with Ui) Win 
character and charm, m we> rafwtxsfceri butting. dose 
to good Inal sfto«*ng aid transport. 2 Bedrooms: 
Batumi: V shaoed racep mr Kir Utt Oafly porter M 
OB Ot Entewhom. lowso 62 TEARS. HB5JBB0 


581 : 8277 -:V r : 9246 


m 


DONNE PLACE SW3 


SSSSnStSSteSwScaai wl Kownendoe utenxre: HMW.4 I m: 21 Whs. slwro. dotes. 

holm wPSS^SS £4»ixaWfeNT; 

SSSSf <araa ° “.*»*■ dmto. tam-oon. 3/4 (mb. 
wtv OB CH senoJCR FieeBdA {276.000. «0n5. 

g^SJS^afS start «■». a sns*. «. ham. « n 85 ya. E64«0 SOLE «OTTS 

cthoiwb m me: Btfmw. d»* "«• *» **""8 W*"*- «***■ 2 "a*- 2 
t20 v-s. ElriSa SOLE AGOTT& 


L recm W. 2 hede. Wh. »d «■ CH ® V»s. £t«4»S. SOtf AGam 


54/56 ixjwer Sloane Street - Lrin<kmSWl 

01-730 8762 Rentals 01-7308652, 


DanielvShuthf 

I 1 'i.- ( i 54*.fe? 


st Jeters boss 
carlthi mu 

Two substantia) mid-l9tb cerrtury 
semt-detached houses suitable as 
tanriy houses or for convwstoa 
Accommodation in each house is on 4 
floors and comprises 12 rooms plus 
kitchens and bathrooms. 100 ' rear 
gardens. Leases 83 ' j & 76 years. 
£425.000 each. 


PotenbaBy very attractive semi-detached house 
requiring modernisation with South-facing rear 
garden. 5 Beds; 4 Recaps; 2 Baths: Kit; Integral 
Garage. Lease 81 yre. £425.000 

SELS1ZE BDAD 

Mid terrace period house. Requires refurbish- 
ment or conversion subject to consent Close 
Swiss Cottage. 9 rooms, garden. FREEHOLD 
£185.000 


jsism <:r-Vi 

fames.fSt SW 0\m0: 6641VS: 



MW 

OFFICE 

El. FASHIONABLE LOCATION For thh 3 Bedroom 
Town House. 28* Lounge. Fitted Kitchen. B at hroom. 
Cloakroom. Central Healing, Double Glazed WMom, 
Integral Garage. £140,000. 

El 4. VIEW THE THAMES From the MapiHicent 
Lounge of this Newly Constructed Spto Level 
Apartment 3 Bedrooms, fitted Kitchen, Bathroom, 
Shower Room, Central Heating. £140.000. 

El. HOW SOON CAN YOU MOVE? To this Superb 
River side Apartment 2 Bedrooms, Lounge with 
Balcony. Luxury Kitchen. Bathroom. Central Heating. 
Undergr o und Parking. Video Entry System. £148.000. 

El 4. ROOM TO RELAX and enjoy the Water Side 
setting of the 2nd Floor Apartment 2 Bedrooms. 19' 
Lounge, fully equipped Kitchen. Luxury Bathroom. 
Central Heating. Garage, Entry Phone. £130,000. 

El. EXECUTIVE APARTMENT In Warehouse 
Conversion. 2 Be dro om s , one with en-sutte Bathroom. 
Separate Shower Room. Dressing Room, 21‘ Lounge, 
fitted Kitchen. Uttty Room. Central Heating. 
Basement Parking. £166,000. 

E14. PRIVATE MOORING is only one ot the many 
features offered in titis attractive 1 Bedroom Bat 
Large *L' Shaped Lounge with Balcony, fitted Kitchen. 
Charming Bathroom, Heating. £99,000. 

ET. IF YOU UKE IHDWUH1MJTY Then you Must 
View this 15 year old Town House. 2 Fitted Bedrooms, 
both with en- suits Bathrooms. 38' Lounge, 2r Dining 
Room, feature Spiral Staircase, Cloakroom, Hoof 
Terrace. £ 160 , 000 . 

El. PtED-A-TERRE In Ideal location tor toe City. 
Bedroom, attractive Lounge. Fitted Kitchen. Bathroom 
with coloured suite. Double Glazed Windows, Heating. 
£75.000. 

PHONE US NOW FOR LATEST LIST OF 


iTUH 4 I.V I Is'fl a ;Tl]w3 III I 


“OVER 400 GROUP OFFICES'* 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


'0H53W5W 



NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 





CANON&URY. N1 
Pdboroudi Lodge. A darning 
son-del taroiy hse m ■ranac order 
lavnr) bean sympatnencaDy 
renovated by present owners. 
Master bfldrmran sun bad. 2 
twit ter beds. 2 nd bm thro' recap 
121 ' x 14') etudv/ted. W/bWast rm. 
land* m. entity. dotera. CH 
Secluded s-taoug gee El 95.000 
f/h jam Sale Aaerts ridden 
Matthews 226 1313 Hottto* 
Oesato 228 016a 

ISLINGTON, N1 
Early Vfckron 3 floored seml-dei 
house lovingty restored with an 
original features. 3 garages on a 
couiysa 050000 F/H Vew today 

HIGHBURY. 16 

MagrtScsrt Upper UasoneW m 
sen-del house in wide see-land 
■BMten&at swat deal tor Cay & 
W/end. Inxiacdate enter Mh 
penod teaturea. Recap rm 23tt x 
MIL WALrtng rm. 4 txdms. 2 
bathons. gee Ch. Roal terrace 6 
cammuM use a west bang 
garden. C135JJOO UH. 

BARNSBURY, N1 
A suporo matsonstte m die heart 
at the Bamsttery Cansenttrao 
Area with easy access City A 
w/end. Renovated to a high 
standard by the presant owners 
(Mamma features. 2 beds, thru' 
recap &BH x 12ft). BUM krtenon. 
bath. CH. Patio & mshre garden, 
etaoooo l/h a sw f/h. 

HIGHBURY, N5 
Attractive Veteran house dose 
ai a me mi es & transport Oty & 
W/and. WU maoitamed. 
retamng taetures. 3/4 beds, 
k'atn. 2 bates, sap WC 2/3 
recaps, kitchen, part CH. Cdtar. 
Wesi Uemg spden F/M. £127500. 

BARNSBURY, N1 
A newly u o i w er ted upper 
nmsonrta dd the 1st 2rd A »p 
floors of this penod property queoy 
sAuated In the heart tH tee 
Bamatvy Conaervoaon Area dose 
all anwukes 4 transport Oty £ 
W/end 3 beds. 2 bath, recap. (Mad 
Uehen. CH. E123MD L/H. 

CLOSE CITY 

A supertay restored Victorian 
house 200 yards from Wdi St 
Common & with easy access 
Cdy- 2 bads- bath. Root lenoca 
(201t x lOfty 2 In t ercom recaps, 
kit Famay im. CH. Mature wood 
garden. E1O54J00 F/H. 




TOWNHOUSE 
ON RIVER 

Chfswicft 

Modem, luxurious interior. 
4 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. 
Private garden, garage. 

Private sale. 
£197,000, offers. 
01 995 6745. 


, JORTOAGE & 

i^NFMGIA^iLQVlGE 




• MORTGAGES • 100 % advanced up to 

E120.0C0* 3Vix main income plus • lx secondary 
income • 3 i xjoinr Incomes taken • non status 
a REMORTGAGES Foranv reason, eg: 

• Home improvements • Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* Large Leisure Purchase. 
Oo3t caravan. eccJ * second House. (UX or 
Overseas) • Matrimonai Settlement 

• Consolidate Exisdna Borrowings 

a COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops. Factories. Etc. 

o PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 


r * J ■■TSi. 



USE MY TIME 
to find your 
perfect property. 

Call Catby O'Brien 
at 

Hunters 

Property Search: 
01 834 4689. 


CBLlMTOeS MUM Fulham 
SW6. The heel VKUdan Muse 
in the area. C nrulti ay restored 
IO original condition. -wlDi 
sulncd pan window* & doors 
ttnougnoui. OdouMo B edr o om s. 
S large Hvtna rooms, mooem 
titled kuctien. aep wc. Victorian 
Bateroont. S ladag oarden 
£260.000 TetO 1-736 7841 


MABDA VALC W9. Ctegani ratsed 
around Poor Mauai rial rac- 
ing pack. Evdlnri de co rating 
order retaining many original 
features. 3 bedims. 2 reerps. 
Ml baihrm & sen wc Rear bal- 
cony overlooking co mm unal 
Lwdtcaoed gardens. LIE&SOO. 
123 year Mase.ai 734 8466 rxt 
373 9.306pm. 


HW3, PARUAMENT Htt2_ 
£75.000. Quick sale. Meat 
Hampnrod Heath. DrBgMfu! 
sunny Oal One bedroo m . Re 
ctsiMi. EMra under eaves 
steep! no area. Kudiai Cos cm 
ml heating- Ms roof larxc. 
Stunning extensive views. 
Share freehold. No agents. 
Phone: 01-267 8448. 


HIOVC PH W4L Nr River. Union*- 
Converted roach hoove In need 


tdn're sr«.'i' 
■■ UCTy JOPJ-3 
'-iv« wrcnr«.*>-e. 
terfr-PafriSTSteff!- 


5 LUXURY APARTMENTS 
1, St Georges S«j SW1 

* SHOW FLAT OPEN * 
lltua - 3fND daily 

Ellis and Co are delighted 10 offer for sale a selection 
of 2 bed roomed flats and 1 penthouse, overlooking 
sought after garden square. Offering a high specifi- 
cation to include: fully fitted kitchens, bathrooms, 
carpeting, video entrance phone, and LIFT to all 
floors. GCH. Sensibly priced between £125.000 - 
£145.0001 Penthouse £230,000. 1 10 year leases. 

Jtaglljjj £ttiS ELUS& CaSl^LptoB 

-«a 


HOUSE mmTKHGU 

CONVEYANCING £145! 

(plus VAT and dis bur sements) 
WHATEVER THE PRICE OF THE HOUS E on auy rcode an al nte 
ot pn n-h.ro-. Services ioctuded in our complae Gzed/piice puta p - 

• Conveyancing anywhere in England and Wale* 

• 24 Sow personal or answer phone service 7 day* a week 

• Free colour brochure provided 

• Up la HW“« mortgage arrange d with fife assurance 

• Qconbons given vennllj or in writing 

• No need 10 “take time off worf on this system 

• Personal, professional and friendly service 

• For mo rtg a g e wcrfc on a sale or purchase £20 phis VAT ana 
charged 

Phone Charles Ro s enber g & Co 
SOLICITORS 
•U.7IS9S20 
Quote Ref CRMS 

56, Bury New Road, ftcsnrich, Manchester M25 BJU. 

You'll it ptomouly rurpmeJS 


MORTGAGE or REMORTGAGE 


AMG 



FREE CONVEYANCING 

by established firms of W.l. solicitors 
ON TYPICAL £60,000 
PURCHASE YOU WOULD 
SAVE UP TO £700 


95% UP TO £500,000 

70% NON STATUS up to £250,000 

(no proof of income required) 

LOW START SCHEMES 
Pavments start at 7.88% pJL. 

100% UP TO £100,000 

3 x JOINT or 
3.7 x SINGLE income 




40A High Street, Hampstead, NW3 


occupation of the island for a total of 66 
years between 1712 and 1802. Menona 
then returned to Spanish jurisdiction 
under the Treaty of Amiens. 

Residential development in Menorca 
is verv low-key and has, so fir, been 
carefully controlled. The planning 

Pueblo style of living 
has been created 

authorities encourage the design ot the 
leisure complexes to follow the tra- 
ditional Menorcan style of cluster Mocks, 


IT— ...rr ■ 


courtyards or swimming pools. 

The low-rise buildings look best with 
old-fashioned red day-tiled roofs and 
ro ugh - finis hed whitewashed walls. Ju- 
dicious use of slatted wooden doors and 
shutters and carefully placed archways 
can all help to create an established 
pueblo style of living on a development 
that is virtually new. 

One scheme currently meeting all 
these criteria is the Menorca Country 
Gub at Playas de ForneDs on the 
northern side of the island. This delight- 
fully tranquil residential complex, set in 
150 of mostly diffiop rural acres 
interspersed with sandy coves, has 
planning permission for an eventual 900 
units grouped around “ g reen zone” 
areas. 

So fir about 220 homes have been sold 
- 150 are already occupied, while the 
sales made off-plan are due for comple- 
tion next summer. A further 40 or so 


building some two- and three-bedroom 
villas. aQ with terraces and gardens, for 
completion next summer.” 

The focal point of this scheme, apart 
from its superb location, is the dub h$el£ 
into which all owners may purchase life 
membership for £1,200, entitling their 
famili es and house guests to use all the 
facilities available. These include swim- 
ming pools, surrounded by sun taracing, 
Jacuzzis, tennis courts, mini-goi£ a 
gymnasium, a restaurant and bar — and a 
diving school 

The Menorca Country Gnb produces 
all its own shrubs, cacti and flowers from 


doubt this “instant landscaping” facility 
is an important factor in achieving the 
scheme’s established feeL 

The dub’s plans indude the creation 
of a summer holiday village alongside 
the dubhouse and heated indoor pools. 

Current prices range from £27,000 for 
one-bedroom apartments, from £40,000 
for two-bedders and around £60,000 for 
a three-bedroom unit The two-bedroom 
and three-bedroom villas are from 
£47,00 and £65,000 respectively. 

Payments for off-plan purchases are as 
follows: 20 per cent deposit, three staged 
payments of 20 per cent each during 
construction, and the final 20 per cent cm 
completion. Mortgages can be arranged 
for np to SO per cent of the value of the 
property through Banco Hispano 
Americano or Banco de Bilbao, both of 
which will take the proposed purchase as 
collateral 

The company is running three-day and 


Mahon-based Ftncas la ida, the supply 
tas virtually dried up. 

He says: “During the past 15 years, 
many UK purchasers have been convert- 
ing such properties buz an unconverted 
rural property today, with, say, a quarter- 
acre of land, wfli cost between £35.000 

There is obvious scope 
for improvement 

and £40,000. In good condition, a three- 
bedroom, two-bathroom home, with its 
own well septic tank drainage and 

.nA knlf Sfl wMnfhnH tL-lll 


sell for anything between £70,000 and 
£150,000.” 

Fincas la in association with 
Folkard & Hayward, is selling a semi- 
converted farmhouse in the hamlet of 
STJestra, a 15-minute drive from Ma- 
hon , asking £46,000 for the two-bed- 
room, one reception-room home, which 
is set in just 600 square metres of land. 
There is no mams water and a telephone, 
so the property obviously offers scope for 
improvement 

At the nearby hamlet of Bimparrell a 
converted three-bedroom, two-bath- 
room farmhouse, with half an acre of 
land containing fruit trees, which has 
both a septic tank and a telephone, is for 
sale, fully furnished, for £72,500. 

Details: Fincas la isla, Sa Ravleta 22, 
Mahon, Menorca (010 3471 3659851 or 
Paul Raymond, Folkard & Hayward, 20 
Crawford Street, London WIH 2AR (01- 
935 7799). 


KHALEEG VHVESTMEHTS LTD. 


EATON SQSWl 4 sjmr n» in .Hid 2nd flr. 2 both. - race r * * . 2 tilths, icr. 
tally lined kitchen. jmiaK lift. uMait« wm fc ntB C i l 6 yean £2S$JX » 
FTTZCEOHCE AYE W14 rcrcnllv icfrtaM flu 25 ft cmramr ML 3 beds. 
2 reoratk 2 taftt fciutica. lift. 63 -.ran i 170000 
SC4J2SDUE PLACE W8 Btcuhukjng 2 tal i ga r w nete an Srti Br. of mad 
0 /b black, nay, cwdfrnl secant). ID yean. £230000 
CROMPTON 001111 SW3 unmod 3 bed. kitchen, reccpuon. tiuta/**- «P 
oe. 34 yon £130X00 plm a studio room £1000 34 

jjSjjjS and CO 

^ 01 225 0625 


BE AUFOR T ST, 
CHELSEA 

I 870l dunning large Victorian, 
end of tenace, Emily boose, 
with onpnal ftarnres. 4 
bedroom 3 b uluixnus . 2 taig 
lecepuoa. on 4 floors, garden. 
Needs npdatiag. 

Offers mr 
£35*.«O0 freehold. 

Tel: 01 351 7133. 




WBkSwvfti 1 tied garden fid b> 
oaobt altw ana. £89.9 80. 
London Property F. 938 2222. 


ttOLLMID PARK- Sunns' 3rd 
floor fkri In esutelslied mairoon 
block ovcnookuig tns* lined av- 
enue DU bed. hx- lounge wtui 
open fire, kitetica. bathroom, 
lull with imed cupboards aoO 
entry phone, per. Ok 78 yaw 
lease £SSLOOO TeLOt 803 8748 


LMoaaeKS souue mi. 

Iciiv views from every win- 

How of Uk> ateaettve 3rd Door 

Hal . a beds. nog., kiicfm. 
tuih. hall. Ufi. CH. tow krna 
charges, share of (Toenold 84 
years lease. £125.000. 727 
544J Ofi. 831 9161 a 267 tWV 


lUHSKCltM Pled a lerre. sitt- 
rtde for business ertertaiiung. 
X.97.QCO. Tel. Ot 584 44Z3. 


CHEUCA 8tHdL Spacious dudlo 
flat m aural sauare. Fntea kneh- 
en. gas ceno-al beacno. 
wardrobe orea. C6S.OOO. Jjcr 
Sns Prooensr Sarvlcev. 351 
5633 open every day Ul 7pm. 
DmBKORE ODM SW7 kimer 2 
looms K + B + patio ♦ bus of 
WX- Peaty w move Into. 87 
yr lease £125.000 Graham 
NU r to 581 4105 
RSDCUFFE GUOCMS Finn 
floor ISal. 3 beds, large recep- 
tion. Kitcheo/brcakUsl room, 
hath, lease las yr £127.600 
Tot Ol 488 270 8 



Wit Holland Park. Sliming entire grand floor apt In 
beautiful pond buftfog. 3 beds. 2 bates (1 en suite). 26 ft 
dtaring fin, 21 ft daring rm, consenattwy, ML utiSty rm, ige 
ent im. Outstaying orarital flreplacas and c oni uiig . 65 ft 
gtfn. Low o/g. Lease 35 yrs. £435,000. 

W14. Elegant town bouse dose Ken High SL 5 beds. 2 bates 
(1 ensuite) w/ jacuzzL 30 ft drawing rm, fining rm, 
nt/teraktest mi. 60 ft gdn. F/H £370X00. 

W1. Seymore Place. Spac 2nd flow art in P.fi. block. 3 
beds, rat \qe JdL tote, W.C. £110,000 tor quick sale. 
W1. Marylebone Late. 2 bed nas. Low o/g. Long lease. 
£98.000. 

W1. Elegart and spacious 4ft floor apt in prestigious Mayfair 
block, f bed. rec. Mt and bath. High eatings aid many 
orifrinaJ features. Lift and porterage. Lease 89 years. 
£140/100. 

01-486 2321 


KAY & CO 

WESTBOURNE GDNS, W2. 1 bed. 1 rec, Midi. bath. SS2JS0. 
LUXBROUGH TOWER. W 1 . Very tgu studto wtto baJcony, 
kticft/tiaOi. 115 yrs. £56^00. 

PARK ROAD. NW1. branacutate 1 bad flat Sft. porter. CT A SOT 
HOLLAND PARK AYE, tfll. Spacious, bright 1st 0 2 bed M. 
CIHUMOl 

SEYMOUR PLACE, W1. Large 2 bed. IS both. Aft, pater. 
C1MJ00. 

PORTUAN MANS. BAKER ST, W1. 3 bads. Ige rec. Mtcft/bato. 
112 yrs. Bargain £134£00. Must sea, owner going abroad. 
BOUVBBE PL, W2. A beautiful int deagrtd Froefcoid Itoum. 2 
beds, 2 roc, 2 baths (en suKeL £179^0. 

DORSET CT, W1. Baaurtul 1st Boa int dasgnd 2/3 bad. 1/2 rec, 
2 bato. 90 yrs. £195.000. 

MQHTAGtE SOU, W1. 3 bed. 3 bath, dbf* rec. 2275400. 
BAKER ST. W1. A ottinntng. spacious Bat Modem Woe*. LJft and 
pater. 4 bed. e bath. 28 ft reception. 110 years. Often sound 

For fun details 488 6338/9 


Contact us on 04862-70818 


fc-i. ■ ■■ Bu f 


HOLLAM) PARK kumv 2 l>«5 
oar (ton IW wuh urge rvero. 
baOirm. a nwcr rm & DOed 
KIlcncn/brNMasl rm. 

£ 1 50000 for bulck sale. Ol 221 
3778 iw/ndt eves) No AgeOB 



EATON HOUSE 
UPPER GROSVENOR STREET 

Second Door Oat in Eldon* Area jnt off Gnatrcoa S quire. 
Laifte L ** 1 »rt rTi reception. Large Master bedroom pka I other 
Doobte N Hm rni Manta Bedroooj with shower room, Sparioas 
fined tethroam, ptas cnest ctoakroom, Neff fitted iriirfr™ hft. 
CeattaJ bearing, 24 hour Pa tei age. in pood decorarirc order, SO 
j rare lease. For rariy c oni pfl rfket. Vacant bow. 

(HIM 

01 439 9051 ext 22, Office boors. 


B8YARST08 C00RT, GE0B6E ST, VI. 

Gegant newly reftjrbtahad 2 bedroom. 2 batoroom fiat h prestige 
biockwth own mewa entrance, toga Bring iwxs. new ftM mod 
ktirttoa Ready to now kv 2228000- 

FBST AMOK EQ0ALS 

A soperts 4 bedroom M to WesMnster wth luge Bring room. 3 
eneui te be throoro e . hAy tetad Mchen and many other f a cB t tee 
eaaspoo. Talaphone and aae tor pourseffi 

Tel: 01-221 2221 


HIGH SPECIFICATION 

1, 2 and 3 baboon HranM qnrtnMA k toW 
nl rtMM p onwse but Mack mr Sloan Am SV 


; ; Taylor Dixon Porter 

■■ fWCHMOUD SF-IOG j Clrr^c 
;! ;2i_R:CH70f.S«3AL- •7Vj;ci<s7;Hii>iT' TV;f?fa 
il * ; TELEPHONE Ct-S?i'! 125J2 


BriPfiESStVE S bed seire circa 1906. Drawing, lounge/ 
dining, ktt/b'fast, utSty, cflom. 3 dbte beds, 2 sgte tads, 
bathrm. veranda. 70ft garden, garaga CxceB en t Location. 

noofloo 


01-997 0264 




Building better homes 
for Londoners 


rt&Tivenda 


BeautifuBy ttecorated 
double frontad tarr ac ed 
residence featuring lowety 
o ral outi oo k- 3 b edims, 
bathrm, 2 racop rnts, 
Ktt/b'fast rm. Ige gdn. 
Dbie g toi og. gas ch. 

F/H £139^50- 

348 8131 


Wit. chanMng mews house. 2 
douMe acds. r toutite r e c s a uuik . 

Mtct UBi 4iuS Wlsvon. mra 

Freetraw EI99JWO Tn as 935 
6524 or 0747 811081. 


PCLMAM WWObswi oucc. 2 
bee. ground Stour Iks overtook- 
tag private garden. £130000. 
T«; 01-203-1438. 


HAMPSTFAD HEATH 

SOLF AGENTS 


■:)'.li.r]"F 


pied-a-terre or smaB borne in beaotiftd concfition. 2 
bed*, 1 bath, 1 shower, 3 recaps, fitted kit, balcony and 
garden- Viewing e s s enti a]. Price an app&arian. 

FITZROY 
TEL: 01-431 0184 


WEST PUTNEY. DetigbUriL us 
siaolUi araaiclwti OM Manse in 
Co m ct i alie n area . 8 bi ds, 3 
irae. lot/ tii usx. iu mu » nn. 3 
tiatee. C Joak. cellar. GCH. Sr 
(Mid W-lacmg oon. Cgt ann 
off at parkins. F/H C299.9S0 
far antefc ndr Ol- 788 4079 


MITOtSCA Park - Victorian 
iwoae wan a a o n w e beds. 2 
batiu. uiniQr area, large Wtrtv 
ca. Ian. cellar 4 gas cemraj 
taatins. ExcefteM acoMS to CBv 
rati Wch End. 060000 free- 
hakL Tel Ol 622 5278 




'»> U i * 'u p' J u ■ 


CONVEYANCING 
£2304- VAT A DISBURSBHBIT8 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

WE CAN ALSO SELL YOUR HOWE THROUGH OUR ESTATE AGENCY 
OEftfllWHT 

WteTTEH QUOTATIONS & DETAILS SUFPUED UPON REQUEST. 

CORNILUE & CO 




01-729 4360 



WOTT1MOTBL SWt Eredtott vatat pM-a-tBie n sm0 quw pwposs 
bu* Hock. Bed/Sttlmg ft* Wt Gate. 125 yra. 6R ElOQps. 252J00. 
■ rtSHWBlEa . Sin Probably tea best ftti k> tt*s ten Mode. 
Acc roa ched dmOy bom tee unpesalve (oyer. 2/3 Betts. Ffece/Drtng. 
Study or Bed X Bate WC. Kit 24 br porter. CH- £169^00. 

SOUTH KEMMROL 8W7 Spacnn penttnae m OratiU txderwte 2 
Wen tadne Ternca* 4tr Racn. 4 Beds. 3 Balia. Luay Wt Bb CH 
Lift. Parer 124 years. £495000. 

Ol 222 7020 



jem 


lenllal Roof Terrace 99 yr lae. 
£.140.500. Tel: Ol-aai >242. 
v*w Sunday, or 01-003 7319 
Weekday* m. 


Think.. . 

i Collins 

Residentia 

A huge selecuxi ol 
properties avattable 
from C 37 .000 - £350.000 
throughout Docklands 

Open 7 days a week 

01-538 1821 
28 Skyflnes. 

Lime Harbour 
London E14 STS. 


BU or DOCS. Brand new » 
pert, 2 OCd flat with water 
ikw Ch. may rm idt. Oar 
fa Docwand* uran Roltwsy. 
£133000 01 815 9220. 

LWC M London docklands. Plate 
A houses to view In an adtfen 
new sovlrorcwnl (ram 

£6000 0 Tel. Pams & QgM 
01 .987 4473 

QUICK SALS Hie of Does »m- 
we Me. Modem. 3Md. 2 taro, 
raid terrace house, pda parking 
specs. JS9BJDOO Ol BIS 1592. 


Extiwste 3 sarerdWs fronted 
Vloonai s«m RdG CH. Oifl 
trabm. 6 bads, tope Ut/ 
Aw. hn bate, toe ah taig 
gta. £199SS F/H 
WCHCLAS SHEPH5H) 
01-3484481. 


■mu rt N6. Beaunrni nxnry 
Geotraan. 2 Bed. fini Door oar- 
pose bum flal In ouwt ctase. 
with oaueny. Luxury tails, 
room swim gold rtrange. fufly 
fitted kitchen. Including hob 

and spill level oven. Mnunra 
from village. Cn CH. Garage. 
Ldvety gkrdm FH. mAOD. 
Tel 01 348 sets. 





BUCKHEATH 



ma 






HKATKAM BLL ■ S/D Edwardi- 
an house 6 large beds. 2 tatta. 
1 cmulte. 3 toon, gas central 
boating. 2 recta, fined kitchen 
and iMUty room, gar de n 
£178.000 Tftt Ol S77 6480 


Moda nli ed 2 bed FlaL With 
yard. Large recran. Recently 
oec. Carpeted. Gen. dW g. 
C66.O0aTBl Ol 228 4295 


»"1* Cawe tube and mainline. 
Two lux lib bed flats. Gas CH. 
Carpels. Sojraro nntefT. £67800 
•aot Tel: cn-584 192a 


DULWICH 


ARLHIILCT dei gned mod 4 bed 
del muse, is* (rang nu. sepdtn- 
tng rm. flited ul 2 mite. 
donXrm. so ban. easy gdns. 
woodland setting, views on 
row. nr BR. schools, taw*. 
£130000 TO: 01«70 4200. 




W.WBH won Ring lea- setoc- 
ttoo ol houses and Oats. Tm 
V oDott- & Vodcer Ol 761 6223. 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


ST flMHMRS. TwtckCHMm. 
EJradsB end or tetrace wan 
onp felines. Two beds, two 
reeem. ten. Bath. GCH. Garage. 
Oarden. £89.900. Freehold. 
TO. 01-891 2252. 


' i n ra I. ™ s*i 






IIAMP JH A ■ t Beteoe Park. 
NWJ Sta TId ta 2 bed IM. huge 
tomga with ui i su b otemg. bd 
coay. fi tad fcflcfien. OCR 
perfect dec order. £139:000 
town tea. TO « 722 0455 


tlllOIM am, SWB. Last re- 

manang Mews houee to superb 

ttevriopnmrt. 3 beta, ff M wnb 
HelT apptanqw. garage, gantai. 
£t20.0oo. Tit «aaa rn 


with greet prerimsl 5 room s . 
tobfren. w.c. i OOfl garden. 
£79^96 Alan Fraser 587 1004 
TOteSLET*. SHU. esod 3 betam 
fase. dbic recta rm. ige Mt/b'M 
rm. weal gdn. £106 000 for 
outek rate 874 4959 . 


Ml 

■ iC. 1 







to ., 


■Jv ■■■-- -■ 


m 


BB5SZ3 


.racep. partita £112000 B» 
hold. TefcOl 946 5737. 
tiiiftMH (Sarah) A send del 
•* tad Uemty house data 
£98.760 F/H- TO67B 189001 




























































developed for residentiar purpose®. 

The cottage retains its period 

and stands wea bacfc from 

Crabtree Lane behind a high brick wafl 

in a ganten of nearly haif an acre. It has 
been well renovated and has two or 
three bedrooms, double reception room, 

around £350,000. 

■ The MaUhouse at Ropfey, 

Hampshire, is a Grade u fisted country 
house dating from the 17th century, 
with Georgian additions, and recent 
enprovements. The house, in nearly 
eight acres, including a swimming pool 
terms court and paddocks, has four 
reception rooms, a main bedroom sutte 
and six farther bedrooms, and looks 



From mansion to wreck to nunslon again: Ancestor Haase in Mayfair 

The £10m house of lords 


Eggar’s Alton office is asfctan more 
ftan £450,000. 

North London thatched 

■ Not only is a country cottage for 
sale in Fulham. Wmkworth's Palmers 
Green office in north London, a part 
best-known for its 1930s semis, is 
offering two houses unusual "m the 
area: one timber-framed, the other 
thatched. 

The Coach House on Cannon HBfl Is a 
19th-century, timber-framed, bricfc-infifl 
house with a weatherboard exterior. 

All five bedrooms, and the sitting room 
and dining room, have the original oak 
beams exposed in the ceilings, although 
the house was completely rebuilt in 
^19503. The asking price is 

The thatched three-bedroom property 
on Cannon HID is part of a period house 
split some years ago. The thatch is in 
good condition, having been replaced m 
me last five years, and the house, with 
a 60ft garden, is for sale at £1 95,000. 

■ The Pavtton on the Links, a house 
which inspired Robert Louis Stevenson’s 
work of that name and overlooks the 
Island of Fidra, which may, say the 
agents, have been his Treasure 


Edinburgh is askmg more than 
£175^)00 for the 20-acre estate. Near 
MuMeM golf course, the historic 
house has four reception rooms, a 
master bedroom and four further 
bedrooms, and a guest or staff cottage. 

Long and short of it 

■ The Long House in Strand Street, 
Sandwich, Kent, is a Grade U feted house 
of timber-frame construction, dating 
from the 17th oentary, and situated in the 
centre of this Cinque Port- ft has three 
i reception rooms and five bedrooms, with 
.an attached self-contained fiat known 
.as the Short House. 

Alexander Himt of Strutt and Parker's 
Canterbury office describes It as one of 
the most attractive houses in ' 

Sandwich, adding: “It is bound to create a 
lot of interest not only to people In 
east Kent, but posstfxy to golfers and to 
those who have to fraweiamssd” , . 


By Christopher Wannan 

Property Correspondent 

Ancaster House, in Chesterfield Gar- 
dens, off Curzon Street, Mayfair, used to 
be plain Number 8 until its total 
renovation and bunrhing on to’ the 
market today. 

It might have been renamed Islington 
House alter the MP Sir John Dickson- 
Poynder, later Lord Islington, who 
bought the house in 1899. The house 
remained in the family until 1959, but 
the name was not thought to be strong 
enough for the palatial property. Thus it 
is Ancaster House after Lord Ancaster, a 
fellow MP, who occupied it while Lord 
Islington was abroad as Governor of 
New Zealand. 

This is an example of the meticulous 
approach to the project of restoring the 
bouse by Peter Lukas for Wingate 
Property Investments. 

It was designed by John Wtmperis, 
described by Pevsner as “the most 
successful architect in Mayfair for the 
houses of the French Renaissance style'’, 
and was built by Charles Fish in 1 873. It 
is possibly the largest freehold single 
family residence in Mayfair. And priced 
at £10 million it is also one of the most 
expensive. It is well below the £37 
million, paid by the Saudi Arabian 
go venxment for Crewe House in Curzon 
Street for its embassy, hut more than the 
price of inore than £8 mflli nn paid earlier 
this year for Nuffield Lodge, the 
Derimus Burton villa in Regent’s Park. 

The house had strong connections 
with English political life, but at other 
stages of its life it was the Ladies’ Carlton 
Club, professional chambers occupied 
mainly by politicians, and in the 1940s 
and 1950s the Chesterfield Officers' 
Club. 

Mr Lnkas says the house was a wrack 
when work started 18 months ago, and 
that has cost £2.5 million. A new 60ft 
staircase has been built, supported by 20 
tons of seel, and 12 tons of marble have 
been laid in. the entrance haJL The 


original design for the hall was copied by 
computer and sent to Italy to be cut 

The first two floors of the house axe 
Grade n listed, and the five reception 
rooms include a vast ballroom of double 
height decorated in French rococo style. 
The ballroom has mirrors at either end 
decorated with silver leaf standing above 
matching 17th-century English fire- 
places, and three large chandeliers. The 
elaborate mouldings and cornices in the 
reception rooms nave been repaired or 
replaced, since much had gone, and the 
atmosphere is one of considerable 
opulence. 

The bouse in all covers 22,000 sq ft, 
but above the first two floors the 
decorations have not been completed, on 
the assumption that the purchaser will 
want to plan them. There are two master 
bedroom suites and eight further bed- 
room suites, with supporting kitchen 

Institution or embassy 
Is likely to boy 

accommodation, four staff bedrooms 
and a recreation room. The house has 
full air conditioning, a passenger lift, 
piped video and stereo systems and a 
paved rear garden. 

Outtons and Aylesford are the joint 
agents, and Robert Robinson, head of 
residential property at Duttons’ Mayfair 
office, says: “There are few opportunities 
in afl of central London to acquire a 
freehold property of this size which has 
been totally reconstructed and refur- 
bished to this exceptionally high 
standard.” 

He believes that potential purchasers 
are more likely to be an institution or ah 
embassy rather than a private 
individual. 

Andrew Langton, of Aylesford, Hsts 
four major features: its size, its restored 
condition, location in the heart of 
Mayfair, and the fact that it is freehold. 
“It is impossible to find a «intilar 
formula to match these ingredients and 
in my opinion fins really does make 
An carter House quite exceptional,” he 
says. _ . 



ST GEORGE'S HILL 

Possibly the five finest building 

plots in the country. 

Those five plots are set in the very best part of the exclusive 
St George's Hill Estate, near Weybridge in Surrey with its 
private golf course and tennis dub, enjoying outstanding 
views, peace and tranquility and yet within 30 minutes of 
Waterloo and Central London. 

The Abbotswood site is one of the last major development 
opportunities to become available on the Estate. These five 
superb plots range from 1 acre to almost 2 acres in size and 
provide a rare opportunity for individuals, developers or 
builders to buy a plot and have an outstanding Country 
House built to their own or suggested designs and 
specifications. 

Illustrated colour brochures available from:- 
Mann A Co, 7/9 Baker Street, Weybridge, Surrey, KTI3 8AF. 
Tel: (0932)57077 

John D Wood & Co, 23 Berkeley Square, Loudon W IX 6AL. 
k Tel: 01 -629 9050 (RelDCM/MPB) 




MORTGAGES 
WITHOUT CEILINGS 
OR FLOORS. 


Stow^HHtto-WM A mites, Cheltenham IS mitos, 
London 55 mites. 

Superb fractional style Country House hi 
defig h tful, elevated situation- 

3/4 reception rooms. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 
(one en-sUte). Guest/Staft flat Central heating. 

indoor swimming pool. Double garage. 

6 excellent loose boxes- Modem term buHdings. 
Outdoor manege. CotswoU bam wtth 
planning potential. Level pasture land 
witii B5 or 69 acres. 

For sale as a mho/e or in 2 lots. 


Bernard Thorpe 


Park Street, Stow oo the- Wold, Gtos. 

Teh 0451 30731 
1 Queens drew, Cheltenham, Otoe. 
Teh 0242 39202 



At Midland there are no limits 
on how much we laid. And no 
matter how large or smell the sum 
you want, or whether yon want a 
repayment or endowment mort- 
gage, you pay the same flat rate, 
currently 12.5% (APR 13. 1 % )* 
We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times an 
applicant's income (or twice joint 
applicants' combined incomes). 
And you don't even have to be a 
Midland customer. We offer a 
mortgage certificate to prove we’re 
prepared to lend, and we also move 
fast It all adds up to a better 
mortgage. 

# MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

Th/vn. tka 

O Midland Bulk pk 1986° 


Any questions? 

Get ns oo our new mortgage 
‘Hotline’ - on 0742 761231 
daring office hoars. W?TI be 
talking as well as listening. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield SI 1AZ. 

•Interest rates are variable but are 
correct at time of going to press. 


Wei! make you feel 
■ more at Home: 



RIVERMEAD COURT, 
MARLOW 

Jusi released u ibeopen market, the sfaow^icxrsc mtd fbi of ihis 
presupoui nverede development by Cosuin Homes (Southern! 
Ud- suualcd within a short walk of the Town yet enjoying lovely 
communal gardens and extensive riverside terrace. 

SHOW HOUSE: Small private garden. 3 beds. (2 with wardrobes), 
bathroom, ckok/sbower room, lovely in floor sming room with 
superb balcony, dining room. Hilly fitted and equipped Lichen, 
gas ch. db*c gbzrag. carpets, curtains, light fittings and alarm. 


superb balcony, dining room. Hilly fitted and equipped Lichen, 
ftactoiidf ffsSjOOO^ carpei5 ‘ curB ' ns - I** 11 finings and alarm. 
SHOW FLAT: Featuring high ccHings on the 1st floor. 2 beds 
(both with wardrobes). Lux bathroom. 15ft kii/bfhfl rm. superb 
tWc aspect Uvivg no. ps CH. dWe gfaz. carpets, curtains. fight 
fillings and alarm. £J«300 L/H. 

Communal Sairiilc T.V. Ample parking. 10 year NHBC. 
moonngs and contents available by negotiation. 

Sok Agents. 



5 West Stmt, Martov. Bocks 0628-17537 1 . 


SAVILLS 


BERKSHIRE — Wraysbury 

WnratunSurion Jamils. llhttriaHJniimua. M2? 1 mile 
Hetuhmi'ArrponbmiltZ. 

Interesting house wiih magnificent walled ^arden. 
3 reception rooms, fatdhen/breaklas room, 4 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms. oJ central hearing. Garaging. I ary stores. 
Attractive garden. Paddock. 

About 3 acres. 

FOR SALE BY TINDER ON THURSDAY 
1 ITH DECEMBER. 1986 AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON. 
(Unless previously soldi. 


20GrosvenorHiH Berkeley Square. London WlX CHQ 

01-499 8644 


COUNTRY 

HOUSES 

ASSOCIATION 

LIMITED 


CAREFREE 

RETIREMENT 

Private apartments for long-term 
Occupation are available in . our 
historic houses each of which is sat 
within extensive private grounds. 

The properties are easfly accessible 
and are situated in Kent, Surrey, 
Sussex, Essex. Oxfordshire, 
Berkshire. Wiltshire and Devon. 

All have been tastefufly converted to 
provide luxury String whilst retaining 
their ; original character and 
atmosphere. 

Alt services including meals, 
cleaning and heating are provided 
by Resident Admtoistrators. 

Write or telephone for ourfflustrated 
brochure. 



SCOTLAND 

PORTMAHOMACK 

Unique conversion of 18th Century 
harbourskte building in tranquil fishing 
village of Portmahomack, Easter Ross. 

The development has created 6 
apartments each with 2 dble. bedims. 
They are fully furnished to a very high 
standard inc. coloured bathroom suites, 
fitted kitchens & appliances. 

Prices are from £20,000. 

For further details telephone: 

041 333 0101. (17 



££ UNTON VILLAGE, WETHERBY 

Uwds 12 mites. Harrogate 8. York 13. A1 2 miles. 
X teWsMy a pp ointed Tudor style d e tecte d 
rashfeacn. of hie tallest quaBty. dose to ton 
naira ol Ns exetawre rirage. 

3 BXceHem reception rooms with exposed beams, 
tavrshly appomed breakfast kitchen, luxufy master 
bedroom with tour poster bed', en suite dressing 
room and bathroom. 3 further douflte bedrooms. 
2nd ba th room. Double garage. Deflattfid gardens. 
Heffon £147.500. 


BERNARD THORPE AID PARTNERS, 


29 Hai fcat Square, Wothertw 
LS22 4LQ 0937 63987. 


SUSSEX PROPERTIES 


FOREST LODGE 

Lodge in Ashdown Forest for 
modernise non in Hi acres. 
Auction Zbth Nov. Guide 
price. 

«2sjmb 

CHELWOOD GATE 
Convened bam cottage. 4/i 

bedroomv toun&c/dimng 
room, scope far further con- 
version. targe garden. 
c*>jeo rsj, 


FOREST ROW 

Choice spacious counin ho- 
use. wing. 3 bedrooms. 2 rec- 
eptions. adjoining Ashdown 
Forest with 2 acres delightful 
grounds. 

4148AM RSJ I 

FOREST ROW 

Short walk from » ittage. spa- 
cious 1950's 4/5 bedroom fa- 
milt house. Garden, garage 
£J35JH)0 RJI9 


POWELL & PARTNER 
FOREST ROW TEL (034282) 2261 


Superior New Homes in Hook 


At Uridon Heights. Holt Lane. Hook. Cowin 
Homes are proud 10 announce the availability 
of only three; four bedroom detached houses. 

tacb oi these luxurious homes feature: en suite 
bathrooro or sho«ver room to master txdroom; 
onedwwrirobes. choice of colour bathroom 
suite; full gas cereal healing: tulty fitted kitchen; 
arteaed ceihngs and coving to main reception 
rooms; panelled inside doors and some have 
Tudor elevation*. 


Prices ate Horn £11 3,500. 

For fall details contact nor selling agents. 
Pouhers. fa Grand Parade. Hook, telephone: 
Hook 10256721 J717. open 7 days a week. 
9.00am ■ 5.30 pm. or ou> Sales Representative 
on site, telephone Hook 10256721 3180. 
open 7 days a week. \ 1D0 am- feOOpm. 


Costain 

Only Three Remaining! U An1 „ c 

AS price* qvatoijir correct ri tee afpk« la pm A lUlliVO 



UMMaMd.lfaka.UWIU TVS Marlow miMi 



THE EXE VALLEY WOODLANDS 

394 ACRES IN 8 LOTS 

Situated in North Devon, 8 high yielding conifer 
woods planted between 1959 and 1971. Lots 
from 21 to 92 acres. Prices between £13,500 
and £80,000. 

Full particulars and our fist of over 100 woods 
from: 

JOHN CLEGG & CO. 

Forestry & Agricultural Surveyors, Valuers 
The Bury, Church SL, Chesham, Bucks. 

Teh (0494) 784711 


WHATCQMBE HSE, 


mk 



LM.i: 


LO 

■Cl 



Spac del ms with magrificant 
mew. HaH. 3 raceps, «/ 
breakfast im, iftffiiy, dotes, 
master bedrmsuite, 3 hitter 
beds, fatter bah/shewror rm, 
full CR Dble garage, stores, 
states. 9 actEsgdn, paddock 
& pasture. 

VP Auction to Bridport iTtt 
Dttentocr. Apply; 

R B Taylor & Sens* 
IB35 23474 



| Prowling ]] 


AT WORCESTER 

A presrro? devdopmern of 
luxury, dnacbed. 4 bed. 
houses and 3/4 bed 
bungalows on the southern 
outskirts of Worcester. 
Within easy reach of the 
city centre and the 
motorway network. 

Ah dwellings offer superb 
blVfiuccI kitchens, 
double Hazed window 
mutt. (iiD gfecen. big, 
moa have doable garages. 

Prices £5HJOO.£T7^M 

Fufly-fimtehcd show 
borne to viewal St Peters 
Park. Broom Hall Bath 
Rd. Worcester. 

Open 7 days a week. 

Cndnct Asa Garind 
ou Wamster 
(0905) 350418 «r 
Matron 106045) 60501 
24br service. 


and double garage. 
£89,000 

Anthony Hickman 





SEVEMOAKS 4 MLS 

(toe off. traditional style new 
detached tee to sought after 
vAtoge of Blasted. 4 bedims. 2 
batmffis. 3 reentoon. kitchen, 
efts, gas CH. ma m. gdn. 
Early ocoyation- £179.500. 


LEKESTEB / KOKTIMim 
Larue moofrnbnl tarmnouse. 4 
reccuUam. lO Mrwms. 2 
b a thro om s. Standing In 7 acres. 
wtUi loose boxes, bams elc. 
£188.000 ToLIOSS B»6t SOS 


STWATrOWD UPON AVON, IO 

mars. Country railage, mte- 
nook. 4 beds. Farmhouse Ml- 
Chen. Acre land. GocmervaSMn 
area. £1 1 0XIOO 05643 2484. 


timreiniHUli New m srym 
del 3 bed bo use. C OX sue, snd 
9dns. easy access shops, train. 
V* i. EB6JJOO. Tel 0263 T7E60. 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 
REGISTER 

Tbc only monthly national catalogue of old and historic 
homes lor safe. 

Bovine or cofffvxx 

The Historic Buildings Co, 

PO Box 150. Chobham GU24 8JD 
Tel 09905-7983/6128 


REGENCY BRIGHTON 

Luxury period reshhntir with nugnificnn accommodation in the 'Art 
Deco' Kyle in ibe heart of Drigtuoa short dinancc rianon. sea from 4 
Aomin*, l ipm bmlding in glorious crescent with residents puking, nr. 
oaas of deennoc with Italian marble balhrooms. incmlfate circular 


oass of degamx whfa Italian marble bathrooms, incrotfate circular 
jmehew thmiiatic rec e p ti on ares with chrome spiral w|1 — sun 
terrace, gardens, double j^azmg. GAS CJf. burebr abrmed. internal 
oueremns. In London, the pnee i» could be £5MXUXK 


mtereoms. In London, the price i* cotdd be iouuUW! 

SUMMARY OF ACCOMMODATION 4 I *e beds. 3 tmique baths + 
sbwr rm laD en snheL son tnr. Separaie LrG/F flat with 1 bed. lounge, 
kh. bed. £140.000 u> indude fined catpefa. 

KEITH BEAUMONT FP.CS- 19 DireUing Road. Brighnm. 
Tet 685733/699700 


SCOTLAND 


NORTH WEST 


1 





LMUXAND: Unlaw tradtHoul 
quaUtv conversion by wtatfer- 
raere rvttreromt/tioUdAy home. 
Christian family divUttng prop- 
erty UUo 2 moependent wmgi 
each with 3 beds, i baths etc. 
Communal snorts fbeuwes 
lovely views. Offers over 
£100.000 Tel: (0202) 841490 


OXFORDSHIRE 


m country Life. Set in 16*6 
acres c f comurnany owned 
hnwtape. h mile 

TrouUSuSmon Bum. Entrance 
haa. larpe lounpe. dining rm. 
KUchtn. batnrm. CH. Freehold 
£85 000 ono Tet Q642 JOOT3 


OVERLOOKING Chew vanes . 
Qiarmne Bradsione 4 
bettroomed hvngdow. 2 rec-v- 
Hon rooms one with open ftrp 
Place. crocknooniJuxury ldRh- 
en. utility room. 2 bathrooms, 
central heroins and due ouz- 
ins- Obte oaraue. swimming 
ooot. all In Vi acre MM 7 mile* 
south of BrtsMI £128.000 
F/lMtd. Tei. 07618 SI2 


ALVEWTOICE UanuMitrv Grade 
n toted dtmhouse u tmo vii- 
uge centre, coauMwiy 
restored. 2 beds. 2 tntautH 
y* heaat war cam. sarong 
LOW Hdn s L lBEOtP 
Tettosan 43301 



CT AkJbANS a dm terraced Be- 
’enter hour <» tenanitm 
area. Lounge- fitted lokhcn. 



■MPORTAKT tflMUH de- 
tached nouse. Stroero annul 
canawow Muo mod eons, a oua- 
HU Wdrooros. 2 baths. S receg 
Panorazctc mews, u acre Qtaet 
private tocanon. aosr cfly cen- 
tre hut dufe* access MS. Otlmt 
over £00.000. Tet; Wonm 
40905) ^55489. 



Swirewrounr & osumiry. B*au- 


ptdnied family house set u lies* 
over an acre and offering total 
wduAn in a beautiful rural 
setting on me outskirts of tw 
village- Suetanted offers unti- 
ed. Tet Flan fr Mead. Ktega 
Langley 0CS77 622 IS 


WU vefws. American Exec I HADLEY MOOD Super EtfwanlJ- 


epHL CZ4&0OO. 0905 BSBH60 


leaving. £135.000 tmo. C m 
10691) 712720/01-5034157. 


on a tva mdenre. COe. CXW. 
£«ojjoo. Reply to BOX a as . 


NR.PENTON 
HOOK LOCK 

tobitet LALEBAM 
AND STAINBS 
Riverside borne, 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 
20’ Kitchen. Integral 


hem* reduced price. 
£142300 Freehold 
Tel: LANGFORD DALES 
<0932) 781118 


ttWOKHK mu imieaeuiaie. 

newly decorated, bads aDom- 
M. a beds. 5 rpew. semL New 
tadh in tatshen. new carpets, 

oarage- Prime poffilon, 
£138.500. Eemutas and week- 
*»Kte 01 994 9629. 


ST MARSAftm Nr sin. odn flat 
2 neons. 2 Beits. CH. ktt/bain. 
£67.980 01-891 0876 eves. 


OXFORD 

- City Centre 2 miles 

i ban conversion & .5 new 
pfopCftiB r rtn H i n i 0 
superb courtyard settrag. 

SH0WHOUSE OPEN iO-S 
SATURDAY & SUNDAY. 
13-5 MON. WED. THUR. 
FRL TEL OXFORD 864373. 

BUCKELL & BALLARD 
New Homes Dept 
Td Oxford 240801. 



NR TAUNTON M$ 8 miles. Close 
to pleasant image. 4 
bettroomed family bouse wim 
ahrowtag 5 teMrcwmcd 


SURREY 


WANT A 

PrtMsng Career with 
Btacknoraa Aganoes 9 We 
need a sn^ri, confident 
person to negotiate lugti 
quality residanbnl tonmgs m 
North Surrey Area. Good 
Salary 5 Company car. For 
appheabon form mg Jocfoa 
on 03727 43966. 


SS SNAMLEY atOH, Midway be 
barn in good add set m 1 acre I omtomm RuiMfnni 


af garden amt paddock. 
£130.000. TeL OaS*a&27£l 


MIBnBOmtti 17m Omfte 

ry conaee StataWfa holiday 
home. Ccnuaci rwo bade. No 
ganten. Ftsmshun ootlanai 
£26.950. T«: wrn 254516 
tw/tnds and after 6 utn eiea). 


a O nB pmi comnrr tuea WM C entrai ugM 5 fdorey 
town house between Witney “togfan taw; 5 recaps. 7 
and Famngtfon. 4 beds. 3 2^ fOOl 

rrcey. large kitcnea/breakfas liMixu. Tft <02251 64124 
room FuU CH. 3tnaD waned 
■amen, ege^oo. TO Td 
850065. 


STANDLAKE tdjrtbr ttucctwd tot 
uge wpffh River fremaoo 
i wind rush) and many perwd 
teahires. 3 Beds. Strong Rm. 
Duung Rm. KH. LhUty. 
Shower/curm- Baik FoH CH. 
Summer House. Lovely Can 
tegaing to Rtvcr. Meat none or 
weebroaer. Very easy aired 
A/M40. £89.000. BuckMI 5 
Ballard 0993 56>6. 

OXFUItO. 3. bedrmd bjumolow In 
shcUemi tocanon m North Ox 
ford. Ideal rouremeni home, 
awjsswa small wvdro 4 w 
Pfltlii CtTO.OOO Styt m Si 
wru Uocfc !fa. King Eawart! sl 
O xford- Tti 0865 244457. 



tween GnuiMgh and Culldfonl 
t Wmertoa3Snunuies> Crurar 
urhntere. ramptetete- up to date 
and fatted In a htgh standard in 
secluded 1 acre grounds 6 
beds. 2 bouiy. halL 3 reception 
rooms Snu lfc w e luitwii. utm ■ 
Dr CSX CH Doubt* ofaano- 
DouMe tBraoe/ffudlo. For tale 
Freemw: Joiht Sole Agents 
Mrwmw Mas: Bawraock. 
Cranlenh lOosat 273891 * 
W en*. Cggnr. Cnoddgh i0453t 
273SZ& 


W CUtLWOffO tWaiertoo 30 
Mtns) Attractive ft spactous 
(amity artonnnodatton m 
toiMii oner locanon 5 beds. 2 

reew. Studv/ptayreom. Itj« 

knttwnfbreauaa rm. batnrm. 
mh**""" awCH.goregc.se- 
ehid*d •- act* s^rdnv 
£180.000 Tel. 0483 892955 


TMAWSS mVEKMOC Bunowov.- 
3 DHirMim i ail w«ti Rnrr 
ttnwi. touiwe • (A wtootang Wt • 
er. bainroorc. kficheo. utuiu- 
room. Ige loft. 'Mansard' roof 
Hardstanding (pi- 4 cars. £44n 
laDprenti tawned n&rden rw 
£140000 ono i07tWi 61780 


Coa tamed an next page 




























































TTTP TTMFS WFDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


rT r \T MERIDIAN 

\* ■ jy HOUSING ASSOCIATION 

• These 1 & 2 bedroom luxurious retirement properties include Resident Warden 
Communal facilities 'Twenty four hour Alarmllntercom system -Landscaped gardens 


□ STORRJHGTO,\- SUSSEX 

WHITE HORSE COURT Prices, tawn £50.500 

□ MIDDLET ON -OS-SEA • SUSSEX 

ST. NICHOLAS COURT. , Prices from £41.000 

□ EAST WITT ERI.XG-SUSSEX 

ADMIRALTY COURT. Prices From £38.500* 

□ SOUTHBOURXE-SUSSEX 

MERRIVALE COURT. Price* frtnn £40,500 

□ EASTBOURXESUSSEX 

RUN LEY COURT Prices from £41.950* 


□ \EWBURY-BERKS 

MARSHALLS COURT. Prices from £44.250 

□ W/TNEV-OXON 

RIVERSIDE GARDENS. Prices from £52.950- 

□ WOOTTON BASSETT- WILTS 

THE MULBERRYS Prices from £47.950- 


fBOURNE-SUSSEX □ NORTHLEACH-GLOS 

ALE COURT. Prices from £40.500 WALTON HOUSE COURT. Prices soon to be released 

OURNE-SUSSEX □ OVERTON-HANTS 

\ COURT Prices from £41.950* MILLSTREAM COURT. Prims soon to be released 

'These scheme* unit hjve 2 hevl pr«>penie* available 
For further details post this coup. in w.jih sour name unU address tu: 

MERIDIAN HOUSING ASSOCIATION LIMITED 
Aldwych Hi mse Madeira Road-WW Bv flee t- Sum: i KTI4 hDA Tel: Bv fleet MN.12.315IKI8 





MENORCA 
COUNTRY CLUB 



PUWSD€ 

fORMQIS 

EraUMMHWRIxiAN 

menaeoswri 






MENORCA THB YEAR 


WITH ALL THE FAMlDf 


. *«■ ' i t i i I § 1 




EAST MOUSEY tU 67.000 Exec- 
utive 4 bed. a bam mnbni 
OoiwadtUclM home. Qutel 
enl du me. Double Icndn e>- 
rage. Sunny warden. 
Outstanding order. Mdvffle A 
CO 01 979 0971 


RIVERSIDE Property Weybndge 
Surrey. Slews mw waw na i 
Tnst land. 3/« bedrooms. 3 
baDnom/sbower rooms, di- 
rect river iranoae with tending 
stage- Quick sde £120.000. 
Tel: 0939 43903 


-Tt r; 


m mm 







1 aoe IB tftamwg gamer 

to sensa&onaly beaaflul tamttand. 
Uomterapted views to DSdiing 
Beacon. Ottos m region ot 
E175JXJ0. Only sows buyera 
tatted. ftwaB sale. No agints. 

Ring 01-499 7219 
(office tan) or 
(07918) 4392 
(an otber foes) 


K King &Chasemore 


NR MIDHURST - 

On the Rmr Both* 
Restored anriDd uraier mill 
prowdmg g wacwr home end 
incorporating rm*h of the old mfl 
macbmery 4 beta . .2 (cap ture. 
Mcb en . baft- cteata. par ape, hum. 
Scope to bather accommoStton 
(subject in comcrn}. Rna taracs 
and * *ra grounds wOi tdfl 
pond, fistm rirtts. 

Apply Nuni ones: 

<873881) 2456 


Hampton & Sons 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 



Buying abroad? Combine Business with Pleasure - 
Stay in one of our stunning apartments in this mast beautiful 
development m the Balearic* 

Don't take our word tor it - read the property correspondents 
Direct night from Gatwick £ ISO pp (Petoneted when you Buy] 
Free accommodation for 7 days and car tor 2 days. - 
New Years Eve party plus mps. 

Can us far fufl details, brochures, etc Contact: 
M enor ca Country Club. Sheppcrton Marina. 

Felix Lane, Sheppoton. 

Ta:f0932| 243104/243168. 


COSTA DEL SOL SPECIALISTS 


Use our years of experience to guide you. Com- 
plete choice of villas, townhouss, apartments. 
Weekly four-day inspection trips £75 per person 
in November. 


/. ’i’BERiAM PROPERTY ASSOCIATES 
i u htc'i: R o 3 d . • T a : l:i Surrsy ’. ToJ: 073 1. C 339 C 2 




PARAISO SPORTS PUEBLO 
MARBELLA 
WESTSIDE 

2 8 3 Bedroom luxury apartments 
Guaranteed rentals. Mortage avaHabto 
LEISURE FAOLmEB INCLUDE: K^h,tonnfe5, swimming, 
□adds terete, sauna, jogora tracks, hydrospa, Nautilus 

play area creche, kwrwe, fiar grffl, restaurant Also 
concessional golf at 0 Paraiaa. 

Tel: 351 3668. 





r vi; f wti >v j 1 1 

SUNDAY 23rd NOV. 1 1 am Tm 

0562 8851 SI licuchtiK 


ANDORRA 

(Kdnms(lnteMter»te9 

. CYPRUS 

3 neb satadte of *» & gM h flat Note ro «M to** 
oonsbuebon. tedtst poattte ebetae. Prtees Iran njJMt. 

AO ttST hfllP ftmnitnr ixK. Ltd. 25. Mctuna SI. London SW1 SSI 

Ta* 01 322 anas. 




Filkins -The culmination of tbe thoughtful development ofa Coiswold stone 
manor house in the picturesque village of Fifkins. 10 high quality apartments - 
will provide spacious and wdl filled accommodation with the benefit of 
mature gardens, tennis court and car parking. 

Prices from £89,500. 999 year lease. Sole Agents 
High Street, Barford. Oxfordshire 0X8 4QJ (099 382) 2058 

RARE CHANCE TO SELL AT AN .ABOVE AVERAGE PRICE 
Hampton & Sons have received an urgent request to find immediately a 
CHOICE COUNTRY ESTATE with fine main house with 8-10 bedrooms, a 
superior guest house, staff cottages and up to 100 ACRES 

Area: I hour horn the West End - M40/M4/M3/A3 
Client's representatives now in UK - all details as soon as possible please to 
P.E Hutchings. Hampton & Sons. 6 Arlington Street 
London SWIA IRB. Tet 01-493 8222 
Commission Requited 

St. James’s Office 01-493 8222 LondooSWlAlHB 






EAST SUSSEX. A convened runt 
none Susses born m o nonibr 
dDwiUand vUUge. Direct access 
to south Downs. 3 beds etc. S/c 
annea/nudJo. Sm a ll garden. 
Reduced for WOi abJasJOO 
Hass A CO (0323) 841814 



am hm CSUin m oSen. 
(0273) 26833. 


£69.96a TO 108739 673036 


UNIQUE coach house converted 
turn or century, mumsm in pk- 
nneabue West Son vtUage of 
Ftndoa. On* » worttuno. 
Maudlne eanon. 4 beds. 3 recn. 
KK. Bath. DOW grge. Od world 
gdn. £ioaooa Tel: 0273 
41 7706101 or Flndon 3260 IH). 


svnn SUSSEX style country 
house hi over 3 acres on Use 
Surrey /Sussex hOTOer. QW« 
cation 3 j 600 mare foot. 8 
beds. 3 bathe. 3 rtam wrtb 
(Bled kitchen. utOlty. £275,000 
DCS- (0403721 2949 anytime. 


WALES 


f AWHO USE and hundtnga wHh 
6 acres at land- Tuedww. etec- 
tmty and own water randy. 
Common mes. SocchMsnor 
v«Hwb over vale of Ctamoroaa 
and sea. Close to M4. £Ga.OOa 
Tet 0666-79-203. 


£46.000 ono. 0341 280189. 




SPACIOUS 

and Mwfeol detached 5 bed- 
roomed lamdy house set at 19 
acres id seduded ganfeBS and 
paddods. Stables and outlaid- 
age and aarapng (ot throe cam. 
IH boas London. 3 large reap- 
non moms and consenototy. 

£245,000 

Tet 02214 5681 







SOUTH OF 
ENGLAND 


I J. 




The EsfBNi Goartyatd 


loedn WB 4LT. 
Tat BV937 4511 


II— —4 

I Haiti 

rrzrmM 


J 


j CLOSE CNUEKUIDE / SMndon / 

i - - a -i 


GENERAL 


Buy direct: horn bidder 
aparts from £20,000. FuS 
management & rental 
satvtos. Cfsa Andorran 
Props Ltd, 5 Princedale 
Road. London W11 4NW. 

T(H 01 221 6843. 


ovnsvxs Htanoui tanr- 
ance e ir iu wd d Uotf*. 
EMM warded bailey. Cuuns 
Mid tn starttmi. Aim Mamr Bb- 
flurance nr UJt. regmered 
vtMda wah Annul Quo 
card. Tet (04862} 70787. 


teserta. VHla by ara 4- 2300 M 
M land. UL 130 mtmen fnwdbB 
£66.000). 340 1481 nm/cve* 


SWITZERLAND 


MUHIlmilX. Luxury oorawnt 
ue eWuW M hO UW. IJ tn SFB. 
Odmmes SadcRon. 93 Part- 
way. London Nwi. Ten oi-aas 
8311. 

SKI KSORTS. Apartments and 
chalets In vman and Haute 
Nendaz. Odoroa SoUdton. 93 
Partway. London nwi. Tet 
01-486 8811. 


PORTUGAL 




0992-552231 




Preperty pcrttoSa vtes. apts. 
tamtams tor ramaNan. m du 
Paces from £251000 - E25DJOOO. 
C u mp t e he BSiw service bee 
at charge, 
for brodm te 

(8925) 411882/38302 
(24 tvs) 


ALGARVE 
Rehedf Rees R better! 

enes from E3SJ000 • EXD.OOJ 
for hrodiie. phone nr unto 
(12), Stqdtea BaacreB 


COSTA 


BENALMADENA 
NER JA 

VIHas/ Puehtos/ Apartments 
Now & resale 
Wide piice range 

SOLYANA 
PROPERTIES LTD 
FREEPOST BS 666 
THORN BURY 
BRISTOL BS12 2BR 
Tot (0454) 414141 
(24hrs) 


Crown Marine 
Apartments 


MALLORCA 

The most desirable scasde 
property in Betas, Own Ma- 
rine enjoys a sbBtterM 
southern aspect, located be- 
tveen the two m^or traditional 
hotels m this lovely resort. 
Minutes fitun Palma itself. 
Cram Mam is also dm to 
golf cones, terms courts an 
nestles. At Crown Mame you 
hew a chain at two and three 
bedrooms, tape living room* 
■nth unfotpertabU warn, two 
M ft re o m e, rfned btcbea and 
private parking, hi addition 
mere « two poos, set tn 
magnificent landscaped 


Crown Marine the ideal invest- 
ment in resort Siring. 


WIDEST CHOICE 
ALONG THE 
COAST 


COSTA BLANCA 



GonLimry raaon troantafi 
m La Atenga & VKonartn 
rroncMepu at raaaonatte 
pnees. tnspecoon Btfns 
ananged. 

01-396 5710 (MaHfcxflJ 



PtIHAN 

Darry 

(Ptaraotiom) Ud 




» 4-.t 

f 



rUENOWOLA. FMatatB 2 bed 
tmCh Drool am. Ma unU k M t 
views. £37300 Tet (0789) 
293111. 


TORRIEVEJA AREA 

Coata Blanca, Spain. VHas, 
a p art m en t s , chalets for sale 
from ElOjOOO to £80.000. 
Wa represent only buSdars 
of good repots. 

Free advice. 
CostBvtee Ltd, Cdege 
Farm. PidoxND. Bedford. 
Teh (0525) 718123. 


ntUtl B POUXNSA. MUra. 
Lux Maraiwnb. awfen pools, 
nrw ooir course. M CIBjOOO. 
K. Mcouum o-scas. Tet 
<0626) 64086. 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Mabga to Bzcposa. We ran 
offer wide range of new 
properties near bead) or 
mhud. £21000 - 050.000. 
Rcpter impcqion Bights. 
for IndR trir jiam r 
fll-SH ACS. 


HOUSE OfdrtooMne new ooW 
course Jt ocqmn mor 
Estepana Oosto Del SoL 
AocanodahM 6 in c omfo rt. 3 
b edroo ms , a b athroom * , roof 
terrace. DeCaUs eon Cnortcy 
(D2S7Z) 7SM6 JC4SLOOO 


RCC UST Of p riva tely (or sale 
properties Bvmwhoal the Medi- 
terranean ITOn flOXXXX 01- 
891 6173 A» -542 9088 . 

NOtSJL Boolllifl 2 bed vltta. pri- 
vate gas. pool gnaw TV. 
£3&aoa Ttt 07789} 293186. 


<-:• 


7T 






MARBELLA 

Remriniag weds in 9 one & 
two beAm tombBe flats for 
sale as a whole. 158 wts of 
ton] already 9*1 2 fe* 
have Utd avaaMgS ly wi th 
no weeks aObcaied. Further 
derate from & often m 
132. Wldxey law, 
Slfftpfl. WAOBrete 
B91 3UL 


room aportnuox. m me 
msUsUHB Don Carts 
attsntsskm. Prtvatf acorax to 
Orach, own iwtaatao pod. 
panoramic sea view. £S73O0. 
TeL (0689) 63619 


IIHO tl tOOO IVBOVHM 

pataca, lactap aea. SuuwA 2 
room. 1 wm a v ai lab le tor 
ever; ltLOaopF ANCE3. 84 rue 
SLCtnrtes. 78016 Pars. France 

MW M W g will cuw e wt price 
£90004-. accept £6800. mat 

I POaWbK. Tet 091 262 6306. 

TUDUrt STM. Lax Umesharv 
b un p al ow i 2 Whs (tin £1.795. 
Brochm. 021-746 9806. 

/ KHcngp oramw roo <w> 
nlHKd. £00000. Teh 0934 
418843 ■ • 

** LAND FOR SALE 



saute. MDcenoa- Land tor sale. 
Owe to and on sen. at baroaln 
rates. Plots alto on Milos Sim- 
ply Stoma Holidays. 01-573 
1933. 


ISLAND FOR SALE, approx 8 
acre*. Louth Rtf Ireland- Ru- 
ins. FMiunp. Shooting. No rales 
DrtaHs. send sjl*. Garstde. 
Blur Haven BaBaraoti Lonau 


RENTALS 



BRUCE 


SUFFOLK BuBding rid OJ>P. 4 
bed ohbw- Aaprast 78 A by 61 
(L Lovely rum poduoa. a miles 
Pbs. 14 mfles Bury- St- Ed- 
monds. £19.780 ono. TO 0379 
898100. 


:pa=tn==;= 


COURT, WS 

‘ “ to avatoria unfumtetef/or qarseir 



OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 



.ST.JA.VlcS'HOySE.,13 KENSIN'CiTON SOUAKS. . 
LONCO^ V.'B • •• - . .. Cl -S37 33C7-'337-56Sd 


THEGUJfTTR BOAD SWM ETOM PLACE S«1 n 
Fast Horn spB Imol flat. 2 douMa Ground te its mono® toeatan.2 
beds. 2 bulls, study, mud ML £375 doohte beds. 2 bafc mote, tow 
dlw. raceptai, nraton kSdwn. E550 

EEamM CARDENS SW3 l» __ __ 

knmamiaKi irrasorem. 3 double SLAflHHJRN STBKT SW1Q 


nil. rnCHpwv mooHui mhoml twu 

EEamM GARDENS SW3 l» __ __ 

hrmcoM iRuonette 3 double SUflMURN STRKT SW1 fl_ 
bens. 3 baths ansuttc. 3 mops, fmctm house 3 beds. 2 bafts. 2 
kx/tnak. UfL AvxtaM 0 moMbs raceps. Wctirn. £250 p.». 
at £600 p.vr. 

ORR-EW1NQ ASSOCIATES 
TELEPHONE: 01-581 8025 


SOTffMT. OOOOMBS New 
«ed dec 3 bai tetndae over- 
kmtang Quay. Due rec. bdh. Mty 
ltd kn mm machines, genkn. 
pkog. El 60 p.w. 


non BO. &W.ML Hfetf ton 
tewn la B in rnmac dec onto. 3 
due beds. 3 recap. 2 bafts (1 en 
state) hdty fitted ka vntti Ml 
maewes. mol terrace. £450 p.w. 


“1 CAN PERSONALLY 
RECOMMEND EL 
BOtANKO" 

Traltiw »oa«rL dejnsai of 
rise gjoup wio aeaRd a beulhi 
dEvefcawm of apartmaas in 


-l can p tftray itcoDtnnd 
B Boramco because l taw made a 

ny permanent hera." 

Fto a tree brodaue -TfeURJL 

Bmoiier on (Bl-ZSb 930b 


CYPRUS 




TEMEHFE. For sale tor would 
consider long let) d ir ect from 
owner, raciusnre fraenoia prun- 
mies. besnoMm mounlaln and 
coastal locations, away from 
mass tourtu am. owner in UK 
from asm Nouneer. Fen- fur- 
(her tntoRnmon: <03021. 

787918. 

SOUTH. Thr best de- 
JWiw i WanSan MSguM CMf 
Cow* ovmoohing sea. or su- 
pert properties by Kurt Konrad. 
Mbwii to new Marina, nr Lao 
Americas. Tet Own Sol Proper- 
- bm 107721 25687 «24 tin) 
ABOPA mem b er Free broctmre 


CANARY ISLANDS End bft tam- 
er offers tend AM coostTuaion 
an the beeuWfm Mi dc La Pal- 
ma. Intormattou; Apartarto 41. 
Tazacaito. TenarHe. Onwta. 



COTE D*AZ0R 

B7JBBB fad VJtT-ar Ca 


cosher and to 
bed taunge wot 
orewded to ah 
Luxury 6-berth 


208 Cantertxsry Rd, 
Home Bay. 

Kent CTB SUB. 
(0227) 372589/32427. 


KMEHrsattSE. in ganten 
souse dose Hyde Park. 2 
bedro oms . recepL K & B. Lilt 
porter, C.H. £300 pw. 

HOLURO PARK. 3 beds, recent 
K & B. Use of brae garden, lit 
porter. CJL £310 pw. 

BIRCH 


M firnGTOH . Modem Interior 
desiered Rat 3 beds, recent K & 
2 B. £400 pw. 

KLB8AHA. AttracBve mews 
house. 3 badrooms. 2 recaps. K 
& 2 B. £450 pw. 

& COs 


01 734 7432 


PRANCE. Cctfff Juan, bnmaru- 
late 2 room apanment. atr 
eondWooed. douoie gtazm. 
limy NiipaM Mtcnen. luxury 
ruHirooro. terrace. 200 n (ram 
ImoOi & snaps. £06X100. Photo- 
vupns av^tlsMe. Tet (042873) 
4266 after 6pm. 


FRANCE • Ail rwpons - cartages • 
enmeotm from CiO.OOO. FT 
nance avatiaote. Brochura. 
vmotef ud 01-486 £733. 


VlLLAQUESTi 


A large selection of 
vBas and apar t ments. 
Costa del Sot 
Majorca, Tenerife. 
New and resales from 
£15,000 bargains to 
super luxury. 
Inspection flights 
arranged. 


01-842 0063 


PORTO HYDRA PILLAGE 
Satsway to the btoads 
Lundy dim lim Wdl llBPt 
and mommas avaiisaie. lull 
fiMMU MM from £23.000. 
Warner WMU UO. 

177 uamen w. 

KifTQSIOIl, 

Surrey 

01-546 9465 




MAYFAIR. 2 bed. 2 bath fiat 
Part®, ea 5 pw. 

HOLLAND PARK. 2 bed. 2 
bath. Newly decorated. £260 
pw. 

SLOAHE SOUWS. Bright 2 
bed. 2 bath. £375 pvr. 

491 7822 


MAYFAIR, 

W1 

Luxury Studio, 1 » 2 Bad 
opts sanrtead 6 days pw. 24 
hour porterage. 
f or utetrtig telephone- 






If this is what you are looking 
1 i I |V~~ tar -we wanted it lor yorf 

DrW wtehs ^^ ,59fl * 

I I properties irom 

I I £150- £1500 pw- 

81-225 1B22 81-M69447 

U I 1C (CMasEA) cumnm 


Property Manage ment Services Ud 


UUffiUJHOtylBUIfn We have and reqtere totter pr u per ti e s « 
KENSWGTON/CHaSEA. MAYFNR. WIMBLEDON A ALL CENTRAL 
AREAS. We offer a professional, efficient but very persona service. Why 
not nng us now? 

Mxna snare associates 


KW2 kiunac 3 bed to in PB Mock suit 3/4 no Co Let £17D p.w. 
NW11 SUPERB UN-FURNEHH) funky home adjtont Heahs eden- 
siiw. 4/5 beds. (He recap, Hand (finer, garage and garden. Gas CH. 
£575 (nr. 

M3. RaufeiBS Pose, in private Cld-Oe-Sac. Menaw detached property. 
5 beds. 3 recaps, toby mod tteben. garage wtogenta. Gas Si £575 

Tel: 01-825 8811 


.MASKELLS 

1 ESTATE ACENT5 
DBAYCOTT PUCE SW3 Brand 
aew ground floor canwson. 
double bedroom. sMnp/d&big 
room. loMiang nd baft . AwateMe 
now. Long tot. ESSO p.*. 


Bngre Boacnus Mem horn. 4 
bedrooms. 2 l iAttu o nr s . 2 
iBcrobnc mans, good L HU jbl 
mol terrace and garage. AsaStede 
now. Long M £800 p.w. 

107 WALTON STREET 


F.^RRAR I 

STEAD * 

lJqtvn ^ 



I. l.C.a iHE3i—l 


01-223 8111 


CHELSEA SW3 
Knflcm dirt Boor nat 






barnard 

marcus 


WLFORD SONS, SW3. Starewg 
toenor desaned fla dose to 
Steane Sq. Master bed ensota 
bah. 2nd bed & baft, tor racn. 
dn nn. H taL £400 fm. Lwg Ca 
let 

PIMLICO OFFICE 
01 834 7316 



32 




wm 


m 























































































ily VSP. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


RENTALS 


CHESTERTONS 

^ — R !; S I D E N T I A l . — ^ 




,Tr' Wa'j'M 


•EMIBfflERS 

APARIUBfT 


Macro* 8 cwmi umoR.CoM. 
KmtaronOfSc* 
ovfer 7244 

HAPPING, El 


n K I ci 46 

to UWb Venice. W9 l A smart I lomaaMa 2 bed 


El 46 BLH. 

2 bed at wtti stunning 


n, uno «BnKB. wsl a smart muhw 4 dm nm m sttmng 

owned by a jfc y cl Taw r Bndpe. 5 am tira | Amaztog mem houM. oak 
sarrttteBec Wg want. a RWtaWtDoct I beams & atone woridng 

tads, (go «to racqp. ctaoner. DDcWsrafs ONe*: frm&ca. Ami ami ferrSW. 


DnckiMKfs OMcra 
01-538 4821 

PUTNEY, SW15 




ttoptaca. Aval semi hsiashetL 
2 bads, dbto recap, k & b. 
Avafebta 6-12 months. 


OPENING 

SOON 

IN 

BATTERSEA 


THE LARGEST RESIDENTIAL LETTINGS AGENT IN LONDON 



Horner 

MAKING AU THE RIGHT MOVES 



Offices tt COMMA. Ester, Horahom. 
OxshotL Sunningna. wayOridpe. Wimbledon 
rod Woking 


(Tel: 81 946 6262) 

TO LET 

PUTNEY SW15 

A furnished charming town house situated 
dose to the River Thames in a Quiet 
cu HSe-sat the property is conveniently 
placed far commuting to the West End and 
CRy w&i District Line and Frequent British 
Rafl trams to Waterloo. Qas central 
heating, fitted carpets throughout and 
telep»xmecormec^2rBC8F«k3rirooms,3 
bedrooms, bathroom and shower room. 
£1.300 PjCjh. 




FURNISHED RENTALS 

CHESHAM MEWS, SW1 SLOANE COURT WEST, SW3 

Excaptionaiy attractive 2 bedroom Superb Interior Designed flats, minutes 
mews house in Central Belgravia, from Stoane Square. Accommodation:- 
AccommodaMon:- 2 bedrooms. 2 2/3 badrooms, 2/3 bathrooms. 2/3 

bathrooms, 2 reception rooms, garage, reception rooms, use of communal 
£450 per week gardens. 

From £600 per week 
A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 


6 Arlington Street, London SWlA 1RB 


01-493 8222 


Quraishi 
Constantine 


LONDON’S LEADING RESIDENTIAL LETTING AGENTS 
offering that personal & professional service 

GROOM PLACE SW1 OAKLEY STREET SW3 

Beautiful maws lawn co ii MoM y SMsaOond knertor designed musoneae 
reiumtshBd super location views over lust avstaue m me heart of Chelsea. 3 
Beigravs Square. 3 twds. 2 baths. 1 iaaKd Bedrooms. 3 ba th roo ms (1 ansdte) double 

msUB, shower mi. (Srvng nn, reception, recaption vdtti original features bea utHu a y 
targe kitchen «Hh machines, patia restored, dntng ram. super lachan 

£450 pw designed tor perfect hostess, root terrace. 

„„ Avan to company tenant for G morehs only. 

MARBLE ARCH W.1 8S00 pw 

ipactous & efegant hat set m weB wnwv SW15 

i ^ Attract.* 3rd « (»q M in pixb. with 

is. «bb s recaption. study. betcony. 3 batkooms. doubts recaption. 

fia ftwoo” wMij ecuai abO a shower room, 
mm an ropro nces. balcony. Long B Witten wtm appSancafl. gmge. 


MARBLE ARCH W.1 

Bright, spacious « ofegant hat set m weB 
managed Hock. Nawty daconaed- 2 
bedrooms, double recaption, study, 
bathroom with shower, w x. vrefl planned 
kdchen wrih all apptancfls. balcony. Long 
COM- 075 pa 


SUTHERLAND STREET S.W.1. SWISS COTTAGE NWS 

Vory attractive nsisOMtto on throe floors. Superb conversion flat just refurbished to 
Very ctoaa Puntico kibe 3 betkooms. 2 nigh standard. 2 badrooms. dining room, 
p atmoo ms p ensure) large receptor- H receptor, bathroom wBh Shower, ff kkchan 
wtrfwn with appl iance s. No children. Co let with machines. Aval now tor 6 month + co 

only- £220 p« lot etas pmw 

TO ALL UUtMjMWSfOWMERS 

d you have puaflty property to let In prestigious London areas, tel us first tor action. 
PROPERTIES IN MANY OTHER AREAS ALSO AVAILABLE 


270 Ear/s Court Rd, SW5. 01-2447353 



PEMBERTON & CLARK 


12 FINCHLEY ROAD, ST JOHN’S WOOD, LONDON NW8 6EB 
TEL: 01-588 5999 

322 m CT JOH NS WOOD. NW3 - Newiv modernised and 
reo^Lfii flu hShjwrv? jY’JSftfif 1 * " ■ l spaooua fiat on 9th floor P/B block with superb 

recep. hi kiL baih/wc. GCH & CHW. £225 pw. baih/wc.&j|fy fit^L^uesi 

interiw I dKipxd^' b^naTon^ftwWB bScfc^ LOUDOUN ROAD, .NW8- imposing detached 
receps. 2^baths, mod kiL* 

C h#W 90 *■“*' “*) !«■ ****** * Denise Bailey with yoar specific 

enquiry and you wffl be guaranteed a East, efficient aad prafesswnal serrice. 


NATHAN WILSON & CO 

64 ROSSLYN HILL, LONDON NW3 1ND 
LETTING DEPARTMENT 


SMAIDA VALE W9 
EjuwsiWy etamated 1 bs^[ and 
sniny wl « styadi.flB(r 
arewrenn. 2 beds, t tab sow 
kvel recaono n_ EroletH MtttBi 
and balcony. £225 pa. 

722 7101 

PSHFS&S® i 

nttmonq tU affi 

ouwtai^thepartanflp^ 

garden w _pJu>. 2 doabki 
teOrMmtt . ? reception moms, 
renroom. fit hum. bxeucm 
sureay Long tk» W. £150 p.a. 

225. 1072 

HOLLAND MUX W11 
vreny 3 beoraom base. Oocbie 

recap wn Rnyl«. Lana tady 

lot. tatk and efts. EfB piT 

727 7227 


li Plaza Estates 


Anscombe 
& RingJand 

^Residential leftings 


For Co let. Oxaup accara ■> 5 
M/i Mh maun* or a tcO 

house wnh oarage, hay 
■*q unwed lotctwn. sunny root 
inrace. irom caoopw. Tck 01 
set svsa (tr nemsary. ukase 
I mvp message, 


EUGC OF CMELSCA BriaM 2 oed- 
Mnkn Dan. new ranmMk 
g» can. e/vvasher. 1/dryer. 
wash m/r.m/wBW.fr/rreaer 
etc Short or tone kl. £300 ow 
Tel- OI 3B2 1690 or Ol 581 
06M5 


■EMI A BIIICHOFF for luxury 
pronmice in S» Johns Wood, 
regents Park. Mama vale. 
Vw» Con 5 HWMtk Ol- 
5MC. 7M,I 

2 BCD newly ran* FF Flat . Near 
Rarom Court Tube Avail end 
Nov Corawnv let only 
CIOOpw 01493 4990 

KENSINGTON WS. MaenUlnnl 
views Lux uMurn Interior df- 
-Ucoed 3 bed. 9 reren. a bom (tal 
in punned woefc- Evrrvihuw 
Brand new Avail now lor tong 
ro let. CK and H.W Inc £470 
pw Bucnanans: ffii 7767 


Btratoad flr flat n blk wtt 
W 8 pomr. 2 dbie bHtUathni 
rami. (MettCBp an. IptikPi 
nacbSKS. 1325 par aid CW/OflU 

HUR 
SkiAff — 

01-MI 7B46 


35-7243100 0f-5ct 7S-J6 


^v/Zl'ld/S 




Benham 

&Rceves 


RMWSTEMHCEATS 


NMUCrarenpOL. 1st or Oat be- I ' 

Mad Kmek nop Wtm I Wt WW lk M. iktpwl Mews 
ewna pkm* window onto 
8o~ dMaa rm. 3 beds. 3bMfc»+ 
tartan team u ados. Porter 
and Bfl. Co LX. C4COo.w. God- 
dard 6 Sadm Ol 930 7331. 


MNJLAMD VUXA6 RD W14 WeU 
rexUMintMvkhctnM 
OK. Larye 2 docue bedrooms, 
recap, ftaty ohm mi and bam. 
Co/VH £375 rw. toe CH Sc 
CHW Aiwuna Town. 329 9966 


PALACE 

PROPBITIES 

We hne • aqmb sakana at 
pnandiy Bspeacd ttimuaed and 
■Anastad pngaraH m cany fins 




GO 
OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE VWUTMG 
COMPANY TENANTS 
WANTING TO RENT 
YOUR HOME IN 
CBKIRAL/SW LONDON 

Buchanans 

Letting A Kanaanoant 
01-3517787 



CtHtSdS, SW3 2QZ 



FARRAR 

STEAD 

JGm 


Manor dsnonM ana bad M. 
Gupertih aqdppod. S22S pw. 


Ctamaag nawly decorsMO tun 
bad uai min new f/t 
uni n* pw. 

hu mm w oina . ani 

Sjnctoto Bght m bad M 
cammual gamaa and mkow. 
Cannd hBUng nkjdad. £250 
pw. 

RHflHKT SHEET. 9R3 
Snsmwg gman Ca. DnM 
te w t iaa n unolVVtadF- ksenor 
da s gnad C300 pw. 


01-370 4329 





C nniauuM Puma 737 3060 


WX. Tooffly reno v ated mews 
Kyle bouse «nt» f aife 5 oou- 
He. 1 stngk bedroom. 2 
bathrooms, hrw reoept/nmer. 
hw mk wub au mot w aas . un- 
lurnatwd. £420 vw. Haycock & 
Ox 584 6005. 



FUyiKir Luxury new modem 
Mock, r eception. Wcte n v barn- 
room. 2 double badro o ms. OH 
awaOaoie for company im. £160 

Per weak TetOI 878 4316 


UKSWeTOM ML Nawty dec 3 nocum Mtare swia 
"SUL*" 0"? qywd kmM/ShSro maSt 

Wtwd ponxM Mom. ipe new. a uur Boltoos. 1 raceoc. I 
2 twms^Wto cktoh-K m* targe dbla bed. axcal Uliaad ' 
ha " F FUTO Pw. Ca let. Gao. 

Cap* 01-321 8858. JonUn; OX 351 0821. 



yuaroRD 


SERVICED FLATS 

Snpobl J2. 3 + 4 bed bdTi oiaWy 
IMS in KngMsbndgs and Kensng- 
ton tor start/iH or kmg/l « tram 
E2D0 pw. lor ware Hires. 

727 6SS3 
AYLESFORDS. 


EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

Personal help in selecting from over 500 prestigious 
properties. 

Ranging from Studios from £150 per week to five bedroom 
Ambassadorial residences up to £3000 per week. 
Booklet - ‘Guidance Notes for Tenants' available on request 
— — 4/6 St Anns Terrace PAi TAAA 
Mmmmm St Johns Wood NW 3oO iUOO 



□ Sturgis 

m 


BBSBMM. S.VL1. 
brnnacuretB 3rd floor Uat 
Lqb reepp. 1 bedrm. battvrn. 

cwnn. Mt with el machkiM. 
Root tatr. £350 gw. 

SOOTS KOSMSTON. SJL5. 
kMeriordBsgned brand new 
flat Hacsp wdh gafloriad 
deling rm, 1 bedrm. bothrm, 
dtom . Ml wkh afl machfcips. 
£275 p.w 

COW’MT l£TS ONLY. 

JBy Mama ar Aft WggMs 

91 2M 7(41 


1 U Lb i 

CHELSEA SW? 


w%m 



rr 


, " 477 i 


QWHB8H0K MW S Jokax 
WBai ExEdUere brend new 3 beds. 
2 bobs Mws bsa. Co in. £275 
p .w. aan . 

OOBEMBWnr WZ, soperti I bed 
apt n abb. ReanvTBMetL Ca lei 
only, eisb&w. aiu>. 
OSWOHTHT RD NW St iabre 
Wed. 2 beds in com. IMy dec 
fi maths HOI at Ca let £240 p.w. 
HAD. 

nesens NIK NW1 2/3 bed tat 

S Lage dream «ep wdi upon 
pbre. Fuff of character. Pm. 
Co let only. £385 p.*. 
01-935 0746 


SERVICE FLATS 

Ih Prestige Baikfing 
Off Beigram Square 
Lease 5/7 yoes 

Idea) unfurnished company 
flat 2/3 bedroom, full 
services (re. catering}. 
Also furni shed fla t, tease 3 
months minimum. Turin 
beds, siQng rooms, bath. 

Apply; Manager 
3 West HaUtin SL, S.W.1. 
TeL' 01-235 4793 


writ Knuamoii swr 

Lame (harnnng doubto fronted 
Mawa house newly dec and 
ftwn to v Md> ansidm. Oo lew. 
2 db. 2 roc 2 baDv oaragn- 
£475 p.w. Aytedord 727 6663 


uensmaum. Col T V. 24 tar Sw. 
Teles. CbBMMB Atwrtnunla. 
Ol 573 6506. 

UNmnwl.a bed OL TV and 
wiaidng imCWna. £330aw r*r 
cluctva. Tat Ot-937 6739- 

nontW bread new 1 DM thro 
fW. CH. 1X3. V. near txaar 
ClOOpw MM 952 6306 


SJtDKHHZTOH. Outas 3 rm rial 
lor |/ 2 . Mew decor. T.v. am / 
«™» ASORDW. £156fM>. 584 
8267/ 998 7320 1-7DCB. 

CKUCA 2 bed OaL Quiet at 
dec order. CxTOpw nraTM-ol 
3B2 8975 or 584 HIM 
CMMNCK.4 Dod.2 rocep tomuy 
bouse nr tube. Co let £225 pw. 
Buchanans; 361 7767. 



rCBUMUIUN Spacious comfort- 
able famuy Use nr parva and 
Rtwer. 5 bed. 2 bam. Ibyr mod 
fcHchcn. CH. garden- 3 mow SbH 
don. £228 pw- Lona M. Td: Ol 
943 1986. 


WEST MUSCT. Hamnone. 3 bed 
couagt newly fiwa lM to 
hHOmt standard to let for im » 
Gman very private, boasumi 
wdUng Aporow £300 pan. Fur- 
ther detain 103081 68327 


AVAUJiau NOW Loxury Hats 6 
■mum * £200 - £ 1 .000 per week. 
Tec Burgess sat 6136; 


Wlc sonny studio flat K 6 B. 
Immac. run- £110 pw. Tel: Ol- . 
636 7481 


K. Heady lovoty 1 double bed- 
room. recent K * R £140 pw. 
Hancock A Co: 084 6863. 




■WISS COTTAGE. Luxury 4 
oemuoiuod nwea u town 
home. Newly decorated. Fufiy 
fWTUUwd. 2 bomroon n . taaae 
lounge/ dbdBB room Mr condi- 

Ooned). lufly filled known/ 
morning romn. 8 nuns mp s n l s 
Park. io mini Oxford arcus. 
Available nowt £*26 pw. Com- 
pany W Tel Ol 458 3582 


Cresenl opposite Hamm. 2 
bed. 2 bam. 2 recaps, anfar- 
mmed luxury Rat Private 
ent ranc e, potto. Parking. Casn- 
puty Let i year or tanger. 

™-' 01^84-3487 or 
073081 -5287 


r m GAPP cManaooneni ser- 
virot) Ltd rowdre propertm e> 
Cram. South and West Lon- 
don Arras lor wading 
apul trams M 01 221 8838. 



ww ofl fun a muses 

avail, a read for dtpiomais. 
enecinivos. Long A ebon Ms In 
mi areas. UpOwnd & Co. 48. 
ABmnarle SI Wl, 01-499 6334- 


DOCKLANDS Flats and bouses to 
kd throughout the Docklands 
area. Te) *3 1-790 9660 

TOL HAM. 3 bed town home off 
Kings Rd. £200 pw. Buchan- 
ans; 361 7767. 


sw»s cottage Houmy m 
ump Monday tarn HoieD. From 
1/13/86 mrtfl 13/1/87. 
Charnungiy decorated ftaL new 
ea ti M wucMi wftb 2 bods. GCH. 
rated knehen with Rvaer. 
washtog/inver machine. Bath- 
roocn. reception with video / 
colour TV. Opening onto sn ex- 
hdaratlng 82* private gardov 
£200 pw. Tet 01 686 6766. 


BATTERSEA P4JIK Luxury s/C 
2 bed garden Bat Mt 2/3. Near 
to m and JKBM. £186 pw. TU: 


0304 360019. 


MUVTOM OWMSI SWIOl 
Newly dec 2 bed RsL 1 reciPL 
to« and bath. £160 pw. cK 
JoNtm 01 551 0821. 


A WEST END Flat and Howes 
Uv lo For Sale/Let. DavH 
Wodfe Ol 402 TUI. 


W1I Wrtirt mM mews na 
2/3 ttedi. Z bains. Recent- Ro 
•err. Huge tot. apa. £210 p« 
Dec to July- T« 727 2593. 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 















?ia*:>xf k vJt tV 1 rfW ,ir 


Stockmarket 

Whizz? 

A really fiiscinating apenlqg oasts for a 
bright perceptive person to join this high- 
powered exclusive " ftortfoBo Management 
Company as a Junior Executive. Ybu will be 
immersed hi an extiling international world 
of mega-deals and trained to monitor stocks 
arid shares on IBM PC No previous experi- 
ence required - justaposftive. powerful will 
to meet the challenge of this intriguing new 
job. Age 17+. Salary neg. Plod out more on 
01-493 5787. 

GORDON-YATES 


Rr m a un e fl i C now kaui 


SEC/ADMIN 




The Leading Hotels of the World, a marketing 
consortium of some 210 deluxe hotels, require 
an experienced secretary/adminstrative 
assistant for their London office. The work is 
varied and win involve the appficant with Public 
Relations, advertising and operations. 
Efficiency, accuracy and level-headed ness are 
vital, as is a good speaking voice and smart 
appearance. 

Applications In confidence:- 
Andrew Byrne, Oper a tion s Manager Europe, 
The Leading Hotels of the World, 

15 New Bridge Street. London EC4V 6AU 
or telephone 01-583 4211. 



ADVERTISING AGENCY 
IN COVENT GARDEN 

Needs as experienced secretary to look after an 
Accounts Director. Shorthand and worn processor 
i Apricot) skills are necessary. Knowledge of 
Advertising Agency procedure wodd tic m 
advantage. Tire right perscre win tie working within 
a group that handles some of .the bes t Hu e chip 
business u> business accounts in the wood. 

Sag Tm& BeS 
Oft 01 240 5241. 


and enSiusostic 




requred tor Oaptom and 
Fulham offices. Good 
typing swas and wa away 
tod&tiwfthttepuMfc 


TD £10,000 

Areyooa WopT%?Our 
Cfcerfl is trie ottncia at 
an empatry prasapois 

w i envoy. busBaa 
assatstat far dealsifl 

icA tmponrt Ceems. 
KB/GD 8WB-. 


SENIOR SEC/PA TO CHAIRMAN 

Ctamran ol busy ExMftion Des-pc Qmp»y raquires an oKean. 
dtamuu. fast, asonmool aed ganardy bti&n Secmaty RA. 
SmoTiftniw aw dam » ttBaam mi M oaetssey 

arata,sM,t JUNIOR 

SECRETARY/TYPIST/ 
PERSON FRIDAY 

ifaiMulsoreftVORffltKRnnaltypb badHOfai our TV Productoo 
Encabm. Fob on tfle gnood. eosnun tanas and attfty to ms»i about 
ifani Ths is not a |Qb hr fl« brad type. 

Fornne iotoreBUn and uanange ao nenft* gfaase conaa 
te Isa Howsas. Buaon ma n ra on a i Di 054P 


DssontBl Smanr 
negotiable naa. (fang 
FWkwd & Hiy-wdirete 
6.30pmon PS $439. 





Your dance to fato an es- 
tBbfished (1 M3) Publisher. 
UK Sales WrwBr reijwes 
tanMnrkng. versatite 
cheerful seosay. 

wease semi c.tf.witinetw 
of anfficafam fa 

K BeanL s a 
&T. BHsfant,- HH 
4.RhtardfaaeSL |Wr 
Loadatt WL IflHl 



Publishing 

to £7,500 

Bright enthusiastic Colk^e Leaver soi^tu by 
die dynamic young marketing department of 
this world leader in magazine publishing. 
Super TSfest End-based position requiring 
seff-motivation, an outgoing approach, 
excellent command of English and accurate 
shorthand/ typing (80/50). Age 18-22, Please 
call 01-493 5787. 

GORDON-YATES 


Recnutnov Cnsaiunn 


TRI-UNGUAL PA to £i5,ooo 



Use your fluent Spanish, good Frencti 
and Gennwi and City experience to take 
die next step with mis Trust Management 
Co. Limited secretarial - lots of 
international Raison acfridn duties. 55/90 
skills needed. 

COUNTRY ESTATES mooo < 

This extremely sociable professional 
associ a tion seeks a secretary/office 
manager. Assist with parliamentary 

lobbies, attend meetings and Raise 
extensively with ttiefr members. Your 
Junior secretary wfll ease the workload. 

60 typing & audio skifls. WP training 
given. 

Phase cad Jed Ostatm. Blues Rkfauttat, 

Aan Friend or Debbie Bettanttefi. Earty/Ma 
miiafatmnHK cm be arranged. 

mnm amirn 


s®™ | Highly Dynamic 

*«* a* a to £^,000 

• mg Jr Excellent opening for a hard-working, 
irofesBkxta! 'vk higli-flying eo-getter. The company is small, 
etary/offlee growing fost at the leading edge of ‘big bang' 

expansion. As Sec to MD you will operate in a 
beriLYow fast-mming. challenging environment. Bene- 

VP training fits, like prospects, are exceptional. West 

End-based. Languages useful. A- level Graduate 
.Wff* **; education essential. Skills 100 70. Please call 

“fiy/™ 8 01-409 1232. 

temraraMi R^i-niitniiiiiOiiKiiii.iin. ihwshm 


STONES THROW 
VICTORIA 


SECRETARY 

BnSd yonr career 
in the Property Market 

We are a fast npao&tlt new company based in Hampstead, 
dealing in new homes mnrteung. 

We are Currently looking far an attractive Secretary aged 21-25 
who has word processing experience and ideally is fiunitkir with 
Estate Agency work. 

For a bright, efficient and cathuiMgie individual t y eer 
prospects arc excellent, plus a salary of £9250 which will be 
reviened after 6 months. 

Telephone Kill on 01-722 8898 . 


SALARY to £10,300 
9-5, STL 

FULL MEDICAL CARE 


5 WEEKS HOLS 
PENSION SCHEIE 
SOCIAL CLUBS 


Tl^lrtttmaho na lOaGo.t3dBCtetBdtotte~^»p<gt«s&o Wi ca" 
so train on Itiast IBM Word Processor and ftaaitMe naff 
systems. Bffoy teanwaork and arisd r ao wml ti i ftiw . 
Shorthand, typing, deal with denes, meetings, trtuai 


£9-10,000 

Watonwan f 
ncgnexshr wafl- 
pretHWOPA/Secswiih 

gooff nobs n Mnm 
wneff&stsndafaopiB 

nine manor Design IWJ, 


CONFIDENTIAL 

SECRETARY 

With audio/shorthand required for 
Company Secretary of small firm of 
surveyors in Wl. The job also involves 
woriang for two other surveyors. Excellent 
salary for the right applicant 
Ring 01 4W 5511. 

(No Agencies) 


CENTRE FOR POUCY STUDIES 

Seeks assistant to Krector of Studies - responsible 
for fiaison with poWcians and academics, arranging 
conferences anti general atimnstration. Secretarial 
skWs essential. Starting saiaiy £10,000 pa. 

Write with C.V. to lire Brooke, CPS, 

8 WBfred Street, London SW1E ffL 


LOVE + TATE APPTS 01-283 0111. 


DO YOU LIKE A 
CHALLENGE? 

Secretary required for busy Sales department of brae 
conference production company good Shorthand IS 
typing esse n tia l phis ability to work on own. 

Good prospects. 

Salary 9JMUM + 

Ring OX 740 4444 
















































36 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


Secretaries 

Mediterranean Coast 

Tax protected salaries 


Jawaby Ol Service has been 
established by the Libyan Oil and 
Petrochemical Industry to provide an 
across the board service, including 
recruitment to individual operating 
companies. 

We are currently seeking qualified 
female secretaries. Applicants should 
be aged 35-45 years with typing/ 
shorthand speeds of 60/120, issued 
by a recognised secretarial college or 
equivalent establishment Experi- 
ence of word processing will be an 
advantage as well as previous 
involvement at management level, 
preferably in an overseas 
environment 


An attractive benefits package is 
offered inducing: 

• Excellent Tax-free salaries ferity 
rerrattable 

• Free furnished accommodation 

• Medical Cover 

• Generous leave with air fares paid 
to point of origin. 

If your qualifications and experience 
meet our requirements please write 
for an application form or send full c.v. 
(with recent photograph) quoting job 
reference: GSI, to Recruitment Co- 
ordinator: Umm AF Jawaby Oil 
Service Co. Ltd., 33 Cavendish 
Square, London W1M 9HF. 


JMARBYOIL SERVICE 


LOOK INTO THE FUTURE 

Whether you are just sating out on a career or looking lor a trash slat we can heb. By attortag a 
friendly and protessianar service. we wfl make it enter tor you upbn your ftitse. We haw a. wha 
variety o< cunts in Mil the West-End and me City Inducing Designers. Punishers. Theatric^ 
Agents. Bankers and stockhrofcerv. So. wherever your Interests fie, wq can give you an opportunity 
to use your secretarial sk«a in the emtonment which suits you beat 
Look forward to the future with us by ringing: 

437 6032 






RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


THE SPICE OF LIFE 
Up To £ 12,000 

This job has everything; variety, languages, PJL, travel. As the 
invaluable right hand to the young, gregarious Chairman, you will 
be tire focal point of this international video company. No two 
days are the same whether you axe setting up press launches, 
sorting out an administrative problem, recruiting or getting an 
overseas client to the right restaurant. Secretarial skills of 100/60, 
‘A’ levels and a fluent European language are essential- Age 25-30. 
Please call 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SECRETARY FOR GROUP SALES 
AMD MARKETING DIRECTOR 

Tifihui fines c£10£00pa 

The SutcHfe Catering &oup, which is a P&0 Compare, operates over 1 ,000 
staff restaurants throughout mainland Britain. In 1885 it created a new Sales 
and Marketing Department, which is beg in ning to have a profound impact on 
the Business. 

The Marketing Director needs a professional secretary, familiar wBh modem 
office systems, who po ss esses the foUowfeg key characteristics:' 

Lively, intelligent and very presentable; Experienced and enthusiastic with 
word processors ami personal computers; Organisation^ and typing skffls; 
tote to work with regional companies and agencies to co-crcfinate marketing 
activities. 


We are located in a beautifully appointed office, beside Tumham Green tube 
station and near the Chiswick High Road shops. 

Please write, enclosing a CV, to: Peter Davies. Group Personnel & Treating 
Director, Sutcliffe Catering Groin Ltd.. Mulkner House, Flanders Road, 
Tumham Green, London W4 INN. 


RESEARCH SECRETARY/HEAD HUNTERS I \~ZZ/J/ A Cf/ A 

Dnp r»f riiA iMriino h^uri hiinfprc opnprafpH rpcparrh inJn rhp Jpflriino I 


One of the leading head hunters 
in the UK seeks a rather exceptional 
Secretary who has a bright personality. 
The job will involve approaching and 
liaising with the top executives 
throughout the country. A large 
proportion of your work will be self 

Specialists for the 18-25 year olds 

p!a] 

to Young 
Entrepreneur 

The Chairman and Chief 
I Executive of a growing London pic 
seeks an exceptional PA with good 
organisational, numeric, typing and 
shorthand skills . 

Must have the ability to work 
under pressure and accept variable 
hours. 

Preferred age mid-twenties. 

In return, a minimum salary of 
£10,000 p.a. plus car and other 
benefits is envisaged depending on 
experience. 

Please reply to Box No J21. 


SECRETARIES WANTED 

An export company specialising in branded food 
products having opened new offices in Botley, 
Oxford have t he following vacancies: 

RECEPTIONIST 

able to operate British Tetecon Cheetah and Puma 
telex machines. 

SECRETARY TO EXPORT MANAGER 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 

Only quaSflsd personnel with proven experience need 
apply to Freyval Products international Ltd. The Lodge 
Building, North Hlnksay Lane, Boday, Oxford. 


LOTUS 123 OPERATORS 

are invited to come along for 
an informal chat on 

THURSDAY 20TH NOVEMBER 

between 530 and 8pm to 

Kelly Girl 

163 New Bond Street, London, W1. 

Tel: 01 493 3051. 

To discuss trie exciting opportunities we have 
for long term bookings in a prestigious 
Mayfair company. 


generated research into the leading 
British companies. This post would 
ideally suit a graduate who has 2-3 
years' secretarial experience. 

Excellent skills requir- 01-4999175 
ed. salary indicator JgflSSgSSJm. 

£11,000 at 25. imm 

APPOINTMENTS LTD 


SECRETARY/PA 

The General Manager of ai expanding Dnvetopa 


smart and 

Construction Company requires a mature audio secretary 
with atfirinistralNe ana Meptane experience who is apatite 
of running the office in tis absence. Stafttand heipfu. tret 
not essential. Word Processing experience an advantage, 
tftaugti training can be given The vacancy is based at the 
Company's brand new Head Office, 1 minute from 
Tottenham Kale station on the Victoria fee. The successful 
applicant mO have their own office and free car parting is 
provided. Salary negotiable. 

Please apply with fufl C.V. te- 

Ret RKP, P.0. Box 54. 

Ashley House, 

Ashley Road, 

Tottenham Hale, 

London N17 9LZ. 


HOLDER AND MATHIAS 
PARTNERSHIP 

A LEADING UK 
ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE 

require 

AN EXPERIENCED 
AUDIO SECRETARY 

IrMqNrOffiuYM 


I 1 rVr 


We « ofleriSR • sahqr af BjMO p*. : 


Please reply in writing with your G V. to: 
Mrs E Thomas, Holder & Mathias 
Partnership, 

53 Mount Street, London W1Y 5RE. 


iiw i i 


cJEMOfi 

RIBA Services is a small cheerful comp- 
any of the Royal Institute of British 
Architects near Oxford Circus. The 
Technical Director needs a secretary 
with excellent typing and administrative 
skiHs, audio, no shorthand. Interest in 
computers/WP essential. Work varied. 
‘A’ levels an advantage. 21 days holiday 
and LV*s. 

Ring Chris Buttom 
01 580 5533 ext 4518 
(No Agencies) 



!/ NIGHTSBRIDG C 
A SECRETARIES L~ 


WESTMINSTER SCHOOL 

A vacancy will arise in January for the position of 
Head Masters secretary. School experience desir- 
able. with initiative, resilience and commitment 
Salary to be (focussed. 

Applications with CV and the names and telephone 
numbers of two referees by Monday 1st December 
to: 

The Head Master, 
Westminster School, 

17 Deans Yard, 

London SW1P 3PB 
(01-222 6904) 




■ [i I 


.. JBlX* 


£9,500 AT 21-t- 




Mi h m cbI I i w opp vrt unUy tor ■ 
well-apaken and educated 
secretary 10 M|a, total 
wwftBMm m Octcckx level. 
Lob of faw conan. m uatwg 
City gents. otganvsing 
itineraries etc. Fabulous 
offices, sports dob. free top- 
class restaurant. 10% 
discount on holidays plus 



liiii i*' .' 1 .71 


Requred for Chancery 
Lane Solicitors. Must be 
waB spoken, 
presentable and able to 
deal with dents in a 
friendly but efficient 
manner. A co m p e Mhie 
salary wilt be offered. 
Contact 

MRS. T. W1DLAKE 


KENWR1GHT & COX 
38 CHANCERY LAKE 
LONDON WC2A 1EL 

TEL: 01-242 0672 


/MHXA&ADVBmSffiG 


FINANCIAL PR - £12,000 


' / / Exciting opportirity to assist Director of 

/ / estaWshed PR conaitancy in setting up new 
' / finsicial PR department He is looking tor a good PA 
/ who he can delegate to. You must nave at least 4 
/ years City experience and ai interest m hrgti technology. 
' Age 25+. 100/60 

PERSONNEL - £12,000 

Successful pubfisbmg company with a positive, go-ahead 
management need an experienced Pereomel/Admin Officer to 
develop new systems wiOan a varied rote which includes 
rea utt mant n ai i fain n u personnel records and Industrial 
Relations. Age: Late afs. 

DESIGN & PUBLICITY - £9,000 

Production Depaitmant of educational book publishers involved 
in the deskpt and promotion of new books are! software 
packages wed a bright young secretary. Plenty of scope for 
involvement and learning. Age 21 +. Sails: rusty/60. 

RECEPTION - £8,750 

Ad agency hi Knqbtsbridge need an experienced receptionist 
with nranacuaite pr esentatio n . No skifis required. Age: 244-. 

. •% 

491 8775 

Becraltnnt Consultants 


REALISE 

YOUR POTENTIAL 

C. £12,000 + BONUS 

This is a rare opportunity to consolidate 
your excellent organisational s k ills a nd 
knowledge of the City. 

Our chert, a highly motivated 
American stockbroker, seeks a well 
educated Jftto set. up and run a new 
division within an established company 
in LC2. Languages and 
shorthand are ■==. 

advantageous and fast QCT7D 

hminaPSSPiiHal. 


01*6310479 


typing essential. 
Age 22-30. 


ARE YOU A BRICK? 

Variety, fim and team work make this a super job 
as Partnership Secretary in a go-ahead firm of 
Architects in Victoria. You are totally responsible 
for the payroll (13 staff), control of bank accounts, 
invokes, VAT retrerns, personnel records, office 
imrintenanrr and some secretarial support to a 
creative team. Your ent h usiasm, effi c i ency and 
sense of ham o ur will make this the job for you. 
Skills 80/60 + WP. Age 25-35. Salary to £11,000. 
Please ring 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ADVERTISING 

Cool, dever unflappable secretary for forerun- 
ners in the field. A confident contributor wffl have 
the skffis necessary to smoothly cope with top- 
level clients, a Wang and a vary stimulating 
workload. 

The right person will probably have some advert- 
ising experience and wH be looking for more 
'mvotoment. They wfll be rewarded wtth a good 
salary and perks so generous as to indude a 
doming allowance and a bonus. The previous 
secretary really proved herself and is now an 
account executive... 


Susan Beck 


EFFICIENT & 
PERSONABLE 
SECRETARY 

Required to organise 



RECRUITMENT 
01-534 6242 




PERSONNEL 




AUTUMN 

SPECIALSI 

BOOMING) to £15,000 

Take slock and go for broke with this marvellous 
opportunity n tee City. A Contract Clerk will use their 
knowledge and experience of the market to make that 
mark after the t»g bang. Ref: (L) 562/45005. 

MANAGING! to £11,000 


and saftsfwmf role as the School's Registrar Bed. 
Ref. (A) 551/2001. 

UP-MARKETING! £10,000 

PA to the Chatman of Fabric Designers. A young, 
kvefy erawonment for a warm personality matched by 
good organiz a tion and administrative amities. Ren (A) 
551/45012. 

COURTING! to £10:000 

Judge for yourself, this is a busy Secretarial position 
with a ftim of So&dtors where tumour and efficiency 
are never suspect Audio and WP will be useful for 
Ref: (A) 551/02003. 

CARING! to £9,695 

As PA to the Departmental Chairman in this famous 
hospital, your Administrative and Typmg abflfty wu 
ean a range of benefits not normally associated with 
the medical world. Ref: (D2) KS/U2005. 

TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! TOO! 
Phone or call m NOW! 


19/23 Oxford St W1 
131/133 Cara St EC4 
185 Victoria St SW1 
22 Wen n w ao d St EC2 


C 




let 437 9830 
Tet 626 8315 
Tet 828 3845 
Tel: 638 3846 

Herruilmem Caa>uhanis 


PA In 
Admin 


ers 


£12k + 
banking 
benefits 


This forward thinking international 
investment bank has an opening for an 
experienced secretary to combine PA work 
with office administration. The ability to 
screen a very busy boss will involve you in 
liaison with department beads and give you the 
scope to handle your own areas of 
responsibility within the administrative 
function. The position requires a firm but 
pleasant manner, the confidence to handle 
several projects concurrently and good WP 
skills. 


Age: 25-35 

-RECRUITMENT 

e-C 0 H P A N F 


SEC/ADMIN 

c£9,000 

The Leading Hotels of the World, a marketing 
consortium of some 210 deluxe hotels, require 
an experienced secretary/adminstrative 
assistant for their London offfee. The work is 
varied and wB involve the applicant with Public 
Relations, advertising and operations. 
Efficiency, accuracy and level-headedness are 
vital, as is a good speaking voice and smart 
appearance. 

Appfieatkxts in confidences 
Andrew Byrne, Operations Manager Europe, 
The Leading Hotels of the World, 

15 New Bridge Street, London EC4V 6AU 
or t e l e p h on e 01-583 4211. 


EQUITIES ASSISTANT 

WITH FRENCH 
to £11,000 

Thenew Far East Equities team of a major CHy firm 
needs mo enthusiastic assistant to organise tiwm 
Tbare will be some secretarial backup but most of your 
tame will be spent basing with overseas cHnn*^ 
translation work and collating mri editing research 
material. If you want to progress, are in your earty 20s 
and can cope with a hectic but eqjoyahle atmmq jw rp 
phase can 568 3535 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


PERSONNEL 

£9,000 PLUS 


An excafl ant opening to join a highly successful 
international company (Charing Cross), assisting a young 
professional Personnel Officer, who is extreme* keen to 
j nvofo you in a> aspects of the day to day personnel 
function. Ideally you are between 22 - 28. have accurate sec 
skfite and would welcome the opportunity of bang a vefy 
progressive team where your organising abSties wR be 
stretched to the fuL Worfctag cont ftl on s are superb and 
benefits are exceGenL 



Caff Mefanie Lafng 
Of 631 f54TRec-Cons' 

PrkeOcmiesm 

ftfUrtnersLU 


SENIOR SEC/PA TO CHAIRMAN 

Chdrman rt busy ExtOidon Design Company mains an effort, 
gamino, tet sqwlnca! and gesenfly brflbm Sacrctay PA. 

Sense and charm arvesawrial plug a Mae— I awl necetsay 

StttOn wit 

JUNIOR 

SECRETARY/TYPIST/ 
PERSON FRIDAY 

Wfc aart OT , important sacra u tM type bada« far or TV Pmka«n 


£12,000+ . 

MORTGAGE 

The Head of Trading ha prest- 
ipas tii te m ati onar cite Bank 
rsQubes a rwnartabte Sec/PA 
with inrtiative and dy na mi sm . 
Mature approach with flnan- 
ce/bartdng experience and 
the ateBty to adapt, orofetse 
and panrapale thorouaWy at 
this senior level. 

Stafls 100/70. Prrtit share, 
bonus, etc etc. 

01 430 1551/2653 


P.A./SECRETARY 

TO LEGAL COUNSEL 
-EUROPE 

Our Legal Counsel for Europe needs an outstanding 
and highly -motivated audio PA/Secretaxy to help 
him or ganise dbd nn this small bet busy 
based at our European headquarters in 

Hounslow. 

H!v«.n>n» professional secretarial skills are a must, 
and you mil be methodical and well-organised as 
weD as experienced. You rely on your own initiative 
and judgement, but you can be innovative and are 
ready to learn as wdL The. right person will welcome 
the of fresh responsibilities. 

Well -presented, you will deal co mfort ably with all 
levels of staff and management. 

High W/P skills are essential preferably Wang. You 
will probably have foreign language capability 
(Preach preferred) and some shorthand, as well as 
previous legal experience. 

This is an exciting opportunity for someo ne who 
will enjoy getting closely involved in the teamwork 
of running this friendly department and its varied 
qnH interesting international case load. 

An excellent salary is offered and a benefits package 
including free life assurance and 8.UJA medical 
insurance. 

Please apply in writing eadosiag your c.v. to Gffl 
Pearce, Rockwell Interna tioaal Limited. Central 
House. Lam prim Road, Hounslow, Middx TW3 
1HA. 




Rockwell Internationa! 


01-5849033 

tm nrsuAnowu. 
SCflETWML 
HEcauroe*! 




01-5848931 

£0rt»S;=:SGs: 
«sx'S£.-4.'a 
lCfi2S»S ft! 


Skills: 80/60 

(TtfT 5 GARRICK STREET 
C0VENT GARDEN 
H Y TEL- 01-S3I 1220 


£12,000 Advertising, Set Up - C. Garden 
£10,000 Publishing - Knightsbridge 
| £10jS00 Advertising HnancaJ - EC4 
I £12,000 Banking (French) - W/E 
£12^00 Headhunters - W1 
I £12,000 Banking (German) - City 
| £12,000 Banking (Fr. + German) - City 
r £11,000 PR - SW1 

£13,000 P.R. - West End 

I £13,000 OR - Knightsbridge 
| £12,000 US Investment Banking - W/E 
£15,000 Int Banking - SW1 

£13, (MX) Personnel - West End 

| For these and many other normal 
secretarial/P JL positions please call us for an 
1 interview until 6.30 pm. 

i i 


Work for all seasons. 

• Immediate work 

• Competitive rates and a holiday poo. 
scheme throughout the winter 

• The pick of the best assignments in 
London 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone Sally Dowson 
today for the latest 
assignments 
on 01-439 0601. 


kTfPrflSlPf 


Wfmm 



1 DIRECT0F 

:S ! SECRETARIES;' 

DAW 

AN! 

The earb' bird wB 
leading American 
the Director of Ini 
easy but it will be a 
that hra hectic life r 
equal !mif m his [ 

Your rapoa*a>flitie 
secretarial duties yi 
division's mimmirti 
staff within the Grc 
this could be the 

TV CHORUS 

D £15,000 ! 

catch this top position with a 
lank. As Personal Assistant to 
duration Systems life wont be 
warding. You wiU have to ensure 
uns smoothly and be prepared to 
erfeetkmiem- 

s wfll be wide-ranging. As well as 
m will be the cornerstone of the 
ntire function, managing other 

If you are a true professional 
lerious move you need. 

01-629 9323 


PUBUSHERS WC2 
SECRETARY/PA 

To Mrrtn Director. The job covers every aspect of 
Admur/Personnel and requires SH and WP skills, 
erergy, nitiative, discretion and above all cheerful 
enttogasm as you will be fuHy involved. Usual fringe 
benefits. Salary c £9,500, age 28-48. 

Please write with full C.V and current salary to: 

Sh^a Newmaa, S Bow St, Loudon WC2E 7AL 




JAPAKSE 
FRENCH GERMAN 

Top Gty salaries tor three 
finanoaXy-onentatad 
PA/aecrrtBries with 
Japanese (no shonhand). 
or French (Engftsh 
shorlhandj. or Gorman 
(txxh shorthands if 
pcffisKAs). These pools are 
lor people who have a 
omsWarabie degree of 
experience, Waaty h toe 
Cay, and who are looking 
tor a vttal. de rea ntfing and 

rawanfing rcie in busy 







Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 



STRUCTURE 2000 





01 4QS 07.44 

































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


MEDIA-F 1 NANCE-ADVERTISING-SALES-PEPS 0 NNEL- MEDIA- FINANCE 

I Work in % 

| Television a 

g £ 10,500 i 

3 r f f * electric, the surroundings ? 

S A P*Pt* friendly, talented andbuSt. o 

» Jt s a good place to be. Zj 

| , 77 “ ««w« 8 r of the sales learn needs a PA. mho 5 

O. maamies real involvement and plenty of client contact. If fu 

£ Ster^eef 5 ** ■ JW “ ***** T *” S M *° arrm & m O 

S Skats: 100/60 Age: 23-28 & 

§ HAZELL- STATON I 

z RECRurms^T specialists < 

Z 8 Golden Square, London WL £ 

r- Tel: 01-439 6021 E 

MEDIA ‘FINANCE- AD VERTISING-SALES-PERSONNEL-MEDIA- FINANCE 


CREME DE LA CREME 


City 

£ 11 , 000 + 

An international investment 
company in EC3 needs a secretary/ 
receptionis t with good skffls (90/60) . 
to greet cfients and provide 
secretarial support to a smal team 
of brokers. Excellent presentation 
vital Age mid-late 20s with a 
minimum of 2 years relevant office 
experience. _ 


Magazines 


The promotions director of a 
consumer magazine publishing 
house needs a PA- who enjoys 
setting systems and working 
under pressure in an interesting fast 
moving environment Excellent 
typing; shorthand useful. Age 2S+. 


^siilSi 




PERSONNEL 


High Flyer 

£12,000 

Superb career step for a tip-top, capable 
perfectionist. He is a leading business figure, 
fest-moving and totally dedicate! to achievement 
at the highest level. You will handle complex 
diary/travel arrangements, highly confidential 
projects and a constant schedule of public/ 
private matters. Some travel and weekend 
working included. Hours variable on rota. Total 
commitment and excellent skills (100/60) 
essential. Age 22-28. Please call 01-409 123 L 

Recruitment Consufante MMMMfeteMte 


WORD PROCESSING SUPERVISOR 
£13,000 

wrtte DlgM Dacmate expertise using "AM in one" and 
WP plus software. You wffl be responsbto far a smal 

Sasjrasst Exce,temi i -'* 1 » 

Please contact Jane Seffly 

0FHCE 

—SYSTEMS— 

RECRUITMBMT 

—SERVICES— 

emMumiwiin&nifn&fcorag 

US SutalMy taw Inman WC2H BAD 
WrtKinaDt^WWM 


'snsnare- 


i T» « •* cwfetar am 
: top* 9m Montm of tte 
Tte mm K 


r PA/OFFICE MANAGER NS 
£11,000 + Mon Subs 

O x your senior leid exper i en ce 10 help run (be high 
icch division of rtiis famous name tnsk. Supervise the 
rarfckad of ibc department's secretaries, liaise with xnior 
ma na ge m e n t end co-ordinate (be bead of department's 
buy echednte . 100/55 skills and WP experience needed. 
Age 25-501 

MARKETING THE CITY 

£11,000 

T he hncrnKapcal division of this high profile 
investment company needs a seif saner to provide 
PA/seercrsrial support bo their senior executive. Co- 
onKnaie extensive itineraries, develop diem rotations and 
eotoy a fast moving and often pressurised atmosphere. 
100/60 skills and WP needed . Age 2S+. Please telephone 
*i Ml 3551. 

* Elizabeth Hunt * 

V feauSmeritConsulorits /. 

Ns. 23 CoBege Hi London EC4 vjZ 


TELEVISION 


Excellent opportunity for 
Bwofem a m m saw level lor a 


/S NO SHORTHAND^. 
ff £10,500 > 

B" 1 ,: *** he * n of tl“ End, ioin this 

“nmttmsi Company *s xaeary/PA WoncoTihri? 
Your MgantsanDtul stalls will be utilised to the 
ftdL Enjoy a high teeh office and cxcdlciu bewfirc 
**c and feta yroriy^S 
aim and WP espenen u t urdw* 

WORLD OF DESIGN 

£10,000+++ 

T his famous interior and product design comoanv 

of ™ 

"T? «»«*»■ Experience of a ratm environment is 
natal to enable .you to get involved immediately xUdie 


g/60 skSb and WP needed, te 

• Elizabeth Hunt - 

St ReauamentCbnsutants / 

B Gicssvenof Street LcxxtonWl sY 



New Opportunity 
in Recruitment 

Due to an exciting expansion 
programme in the West End, 
we are looking for career 
orientated people who will 
respond positively to manage- 
ment opportunities. 

if you can work well in a hectic 
environment, and can cont- 
ribute as part of a professional 
recruitment team, telephone 
us now for an interview in 
confidence. 


SECRETARY/PA 

Practice of Property 
Agants specializing In 
shoeing centre 

developments throughout 
the UK require 
Secretacy/PA to 2 young 
• surveyors, based in 
attractive modem Mayfair 
office. WP exp. ess. 
Salary neg. ujl 



SALES/ 

SECRETARIAL 

Enthusiastic. flexible salts 
person opt* el good Mno 
required by Dooms Tilts. 
Applicants staid be mpMd to 
span tune between a super 
showroom a South Kmsmgton 
and Bstereea office. . . 

An/joan S?223 5555 


HARLEY STREET 


kif ; H4i 1 


requires experienced 

SECRETARY/PA, 

wtth a eence of lumioir, 
for busy Mmsfeg practice. 
- Vtey good salary. 

01-935 0213 




secure your race on my winth team 

It you haws efficiont SHORTHAND, OR AUDIO 
strife and are aged 20-35. I wit look attar you! 
Espeoafe In demand are secretaries wWr 
* IBM Dtaptaywritar 
■ WANQ/WANG office assistant 
■* Decmata m 

For TCCBAIE& and ferfear datete. ptasae phone 
JIHJE NORTHEAST on 829-4343. Roe Cana. 

TMOHANOVEFI STREET. LONDON W1RSHF 
■■i TELEPHONE; 01-023 4343 


2 SECRETAIRES 
BUJNGUES 
LONDRES 

MftMpn de yin jeeme et dynamuae tedmche 
deaz secretaires nfingoes (wiglri^fru ^ mM ) pour 
leor service oommerciaL Une preference sera 
accordfe aai amdiriates mteessees par le via et 
cap aMe s dYrtflaer ka machines de txaitgm»»nt. «jp 
teste, tder. etc. 

Safaizee competitifa et Butzes avantages. 

Candidature et &v. a adxesser a 
Mroe dare McLean, Berkznann Wine Cellars, 
12 Breneiy Road, Londni N7 9NH 


Telphone Wendy 
Ul 493 3675 


CHANNEL YOUR INTERESTS! 


teiemsion and film production companies. If you 
enjoy a busy environment and meeting interesting 
people , one of the following could be for you: 

SECRETARY: To handle and extend ettret hwa™*™ Wotd 
proceasiug rnxir i mu 1 w a wn t ml . shoetband an advantage. A 
ch afe ag ni g and uteresting position. Salary cJS^OO. 

RECEPTIONISTS To operate nnriy insialled Monarch 
switchboard, deal with diantB and assist with typine. Safaiy 
c-£8j»a 

InanBik apportrarity far people with ina guntio n «xl ab3ity to 
grow with a smaH company. 

Fhv fanter ioioraaiion pka« call JtaSdi BsndaE, Tbe PnxhxuM 
Crime, 74 Newnan Street, London, WL TekphmB 580 778L 


ASSISTANT FOR 


MANAGEMENT COMPANY 

We are a small, expanding investment 
management company based in EC2 and require 
an intelligent, young assistant with excellent 
educational background. We want you to be 
numerate, a competent typist and able to help 
with general office administration. Good salary, 
prospects and working conditions. 


Send CV in writing to: 

AGn S. Kennedy, BOX 102, C/- The Times, 
PO Box 484, London EL 


CAREEK 

DESIGN 

I. I M l T K I> 

ART GALLERY £10,000 

Marvellous opportunity for a bright secretary 
to train within the publishing arm of this major 
an gallery. A young exciting environment for 
an experienced PA. (90/50 skills) aged 24-40. 

EUROPEAN/LANGUAGE PA £9300 

Co-ordinate new business projects organise 
media mailshots, liaise with TV companies 
whilst providing reliable administrative and 
secretarial back-up. Knowledge of French. 
German or Italian. 

. For further details contact 
Diane HD ton or Karin Parnaby 
on 01-489 0889/01-236 2522 


RECHUmnSNT CONSULTANTS 
I GROVELAND COURT. BOW LANE. LONDON BC4M 9EH 
TELEPHONE 01-489 0689 


CONFIDENTIAL 

SECRETARY 

With audio/shorthand required for 
Company Secretary of small firm of 
surveyors in Wi. The job also involves 
working for two other surveyors. Excellent 
salary for the right applicant. 

Ring 01 499 55! 1. 

(No Agencies) 


SECRETARY/PERSON FRIDAY 

Wen established Printing Company in SW3 
regukes organised secretary/person friday 
with enthusiasm, willing to wont on her own 
and use her initiative and charm when dealing 
direct with customers. No shorthand required 
but accurate typing and good telephone man- 
ner essential. Some experience preferred. 

Salary cBjOOO 

Contact Rose Freeman 01-352 1870 


J. Moss 
Baker Street 
486 6144 

A. Accini 
Victoria 
834 5745 


P. Hart 
Kings Road 
730 9211 

R. Hutchins 
Challoners, 
Victoria 
628 3845 



‘ BROOK STREET * 


SENIOR LEGAL SECRETARY 
£10,800 

Experienced with conveyancing providing secretarial 
support to a Senior Partner using the Wang OIS WP. 
Liaising with cfients. dealing with appointments as well 
as the day to day running of this busy office. STL, tour 
wears holiday, two salary reviews per year. 

Please contact Michele Tyne 

OFFICE 

—SYSTEMS— 

RECRUITMENT 

—SERVICES— 

DOiniiniuwL 
iwraw k» na iuommc cma 

1)5 SlutatMV tar loader. UCH SAD 
raepfKmrOMJiAoo, 


MAYFAIR PROPERTY COMPANY 

requires bright well presented secretary for 2 
partners. Good secretarial skdls essential including 
fast aucSo/typing and previous WP experience, 
preferably Olivetti, but will train. 

Age 25+. Salary C.E3.D00. 

Telephone 629 8989 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


KING’S COLLEGE 
LONDON (KQC) 

University of London 

KING'S COLLEGE LONDON (KQC) i* one of (he 
larger multifacutty schools in the Urriversay of 
London. 

There is a vacancy tor a SECRETARIAL ASSISTANT 
m the Office of the Principal of tbe CoSege at the 
Strand Campus, London, WC2. 

Good shorthand and typing sMBs are required. The 
work is varied and interesting for Bomeana who 
enjoys meeting people, and is able to deal 
responsibly with c onfide ntial matters. 

Salary within the scale JKL370 - £7,661 par annum 
Inclusive. 4 weeks annual leave plus Bank Holidays 
and additional days at Christmas and Easter. 

Applications Inducting a fufl curricutum vitae should 
be sent tm 

Assistant Personnel Offta. 

King's College London (KQC), Norfolk Btibfing, Strand, 
London. WC2R2LS. 


CHESTERT0NS 

^ — R K S 1 l> E N T l A L V - / 


SECRETARY WANTED 

Age 16-23 to work in a friendly but busy office. 
An extrovert with outgoing personality and 
accurate typing. WP knowledge helpful but 
training given. Salary negotiable 



EXECUTIVE CREME 


DESIGN CONSULTANCY IN 
HIGHGATE VILLAGE 

requires a 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/ 
ADMINISTRATOR 

of consultancy based in 

tugnffn* Village aeekx a Personal Assistant to handle roanv 
aspects of tbe ousineai. The person we seek will have p»a 
vpttebwotd processing skills, some bookkeeping knawted^. 
tbe ability 10 name with cfients and communicate with peopie 
at all tews, an excellent telephone manner and above all a 
calm unflappable personality. 

Good working conditions and a salary cuEULOOO p-a. are 
onereo. 

If yo u are interested in this chaUenginE position please send 
S wr to oP art L Mbx *?b P™* M°nsan Associates. !0 
gnadbent Close. 20 - 22 Hjgfagaie High Street, London Kb 


CONSULTANTS 

£17,000 

Due to expansion this established W.1 Professional Sec- 
retapM Agency oilers opportunties to experienced manag- 
erial interviewers aid temp controllers. Successful cand- 
idates, with initiative aid motivation, can expect an excellent 
ngh basic salary phis commission. 

For further information please telephone between 1900-2200 
firs any weekday evening; 

01-723 5330 



PA SHORTHAND SECRETARY 
FOR OUR SENIOR DIRECTORS 

AGE 23+ EC3 

A very senior postion has become available in 
our Lloyds reinsuring company. The ideal 
applicant will have excellent secretarial skills, a 
pleasant and confident personality, with good 
telephone manner and be able to work on their 
own initiative. Any European languages would 
be a great advantage. Hours of work 8.45am - 
5.45pm. Minimum salary £10.000 + fringe 
benefits. 

For more details please contact 
Lynn Membry on 01 488 1488 
(No agencies please) 


LEGAL PA/SEC 

U.S. law firm's London (Mayfair) branch office, 
seeks to add experienced and enthusiastic legal 
PA/Sec; Must be available for occasional 
overtime; excellent typing skills and WP 
experience essential; shorthand desirable; client 
contact requires pleasant presentation. 

Write with CV to 
Wald, Harkrader & Ross, 

21 Upper Brook Street, 

London WIY 1PD. 

Salary ajue. 


AffTHOHY tfOFFAY 
GALLERY REQUIRES 
PA 


M/SN/ttE tor tour Dir et 
anuD CQ. 0*tn sffitee to 
f i-j o oo jJT Q42& PPC AGV. 




witti a mauntum of 3 years 
top level experience. Sense 
of humour, flexibility and 
willingness to work as part 
Ota team essential. 
Graduates with languages 

and art gallery experience 

prefered. Salary £12,000 pa 

Please apply in writing to; 

Aatbosy iTOffw Gallery, 
9 & 23 0enag St, 
New Bond St, 
Loodofl WI. 

No feteptan cafe. 

No agesdas 


Video 

Prodacticn 

Preside position admg as 
PA/ Sec lo CKurman a tte 
successtid video rwodudion 
co. Organise launches, ent- 
ertain ment Some travel. 
CX12.000 

Film Production 

A he^fii wttfmg PA/Sec to 
assist MD and production 
manager. Handle posi prod- 
uction work, organise eve^<- 
thmg and everybody. 



As Personal Assistant to the 
CtBffman of an mtemational 
law firm, socialising m tte 
entartanment worid. you 
mil be tasponsttite for ms 
personal ami business 
affairs. As there is extensive 
dent liaison, it is mportail 
that you are well spoken 
and well ptBsented. Legal 
experience in your 
back-grouid aid nuneracy 
are ifr^jortant attributes. 
Skflls 110/60 plus WP. Age 
28-45 (rec cons). 

01-499 0092 

Senior 

Secretaries 



I PERSONNEL 

GOING PUBLIC” 

E1Q.OCO + 

A top PA with some siiHthand 
is mrnred lor oik A the >zf- 
gest computer c o m pa u iea wno 
are now gong public. You will 
run the sales department oi 
Uu division hi iwms oi aver- 
seemj the oner secretanes 
ana reautow new suH Vout 
PA nulls whi be used By two 
too Directors who need £ 
IuqMv prpiessiotHi aporaaeti 
to handle tdev chems and <r- 
gamse ptesenutuns ai semor 
level. 

GaB Lm Satf sow on 
01 B31 8566. 

jHgfefifrAgafe 

VNfMtAlOE WTTObOCWV. fitoV 


‘5p»cu[cit^U .Ih*-..”'" 


PROMOTIONS 

CO. 

PA SEC 

£11,0 80 + 

Sop f iisbc a tBd PA to went 
wen aw > up Executives, 
tecoms Totaiy Hwwvod witti 
^1 aspects of sales 
promotion, organise and 
attend sooai -vents, good 
skiPs. 

Phone dare 
01 SC23012 

STAFFPLAN 
REC CONS 


ComiiiKd oe Ben page 






















LAW 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 

Law Report November 19 1986 


SOUL OF 


!< i iuN 


©£17K 


The tonatpg Director d cur cbed. a meter British 
Merchant Bank is locking ter an executive secretary. 
Hesior^mo\^m^n^instoeaml^nnins 

jrfc-ifeS Of the JErtSafSfl 3TC travels atoatf 
frequent!;., on wt*ch 'Xcescnshs secretary 
perkmsie FRfunctcn or a s behalf. her tots 
<9r&7 conasf O'" arrange itese oys. aiKXstenpg 
hrs office amt some secretarial work tcrmdi 
stwrttendacdtypmgarenee&d 
The successM applicant w3tt3ue a uorm 

approachaUs personalty, a sense of Oscrehon ant 
3 smart appearance, m order 1c xtastntertgce 
between the MD. dents and ether members of fi# 


bank /& indicator 2635. Salary indudes exedert 
banking benefits. 

Please telephone 01-439 6477 


* 


■. V . • ■.• 21 '/. 

>,.• ■ v . V ..v - 


FASecresnal Recrmoseat Goasahants 



■ ! -v'-:^3KSg 



secretary 


LONDON EC2 


£12,000-£l4 r 000 
+ MORTGAGE SUBSIDY 


PRIME INTERNATIONAL BANK 

For this appointment we invite applications from candidates aged 25-38 
educated to A’ level or equivalent with fluent German and excellent secretarial 
skills, inducting German and English shorthand. The duties include- the full 
range of senior secretarial work, including afl correspondence, arrantpng 
meetings and travel and it is vital that the successful applicant has the ability to 
deal tactfully with staff and visitors at all levefs. A mature outlook, 
straightforward approach, good communication skills and personal 
presentation are the qualities we seek as weH as initiative and the abiBty to work 
as a team. Initial remuneration is negotiable Cl 2,000-EI 4,000 plus excellent 
benefits. Applications in strict confidence under reference GSES679 to the 
Managing Director- 


A challenging new position 



RICHMOND £11, 000-215, 000 

Our client, an international group with TVO c£50m. seeks an Administrative 
Assistant for their new U K. office. The successful applicant will have several 
years' experience of working in an irrtemationa! trading environment, be ready 
to accept new challenges and happy working in an office on their own without 
supervision. After establishing the office from scratch, responsibilities will 
include issuing instructions at a senior level on letters of credit, moving funds 
internationally, settlements, invoicing and the book-keeping for these 
transactions. Wordprocessor experience is essential and there must be the 
flexMty to work as a PA to the Chief Executive during his visits to London (4 
months p.a.) and to act as housekeeper tor the officefflat This position calls for 
a high level of discipline, self-motivation and resilience. Initial remuneration is 
negotiable, accortfing to age and ability, £1 1 ,000-£1 5,000 + pension + BUPA 
Applications in strict confidence under ref AA1T 678/TT to the Managing 
Dtrecton- 


CMnHi.-Jmsn9l EXECUTIVE SECSETARES LIB. pSaSQflTMEnT CQHS0LTANTS), 
35 NEW BROAD Snm.IXMmEttNIMf. 

IBBMRfe 01-588 3588 or 01-588 3576. 1ELEL 887374. HU NO; 01-256 3501. 


OBGMUmOM BEQBHES ASSBTANCE 09 BECROmiES!: n2flSTaB t f3!S B1-SS8 7539 


£20,000 

PERSONNEL 

MANAGER 

You have the IPM qualification, 
are 30's and can provide the 
full personnel function for a 
major investment bank with 60 
staff in their Central London 
offices. 


ADMSN 

£15,000 


As Admin assistant to the 
Admin Director of an American 
Bank in SW1 you will be 
responsible for travel 
arrangements, furniture, 
premises and stationery as 
well as providing secretarial 
support to him. SH and WP 
skills. 



£12,000 

PA 

Organise the office and M.D. 
of a software co. Start-up City 
office of a large co - so you will 
handle your own corres- 
pondence and admin for whole 
office. Sh/typing and WP. 


£12,000 

+ BONUS 

You are mid 20's - early 30's 
and lively, organised and 
adaptable, as secretary to the 
2 dept heads cf an investment 
bank. SH and WP skills. 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


Temporary Controller of the Year 
1987 

E10.000-E12.000 pa plus 
generous /competitive profit share 

We are a Secretarial Consultancy nearing 
our tenth anniversary. Ours is a reputation 
for no-nonsense permanent recruitment 
services applied with consistent regard 
for the mutual needs of our candiates and 
clients. We now wish to appoint an 
experienced Temporary ControBer for the 
New Year. You may require a change 
from the high street 'job shop’ image or 
may only possess provincial experience 
to date. Whichever is the case, you wW be 
able to demonstrate to us that you can 
become the consultant of the year as a 
result of your determination and success. 
For a confidential chat please contact Ian 
Archibald on 01-491-1868 to 6.30 pm 
each day. 


01-491 1868 


% 


JOT f UCtfT SCatTALttS 

Sec/PA to Chief Executive. 

Ultra modern office in Tolworth. 
£10,000 pa. 

Tri-tingual Secretary. 

(English/French/German) for Chairman in 
W.1 £12,000 + benefits. 

Young Dynamic Secretary 
for Chairman of Wimbledon Company. 
£10,000 pa. 

Please phone Carol Wisby in first 
instance on 947 0319/879 3180 


OFFICE MANAGER 
WEST END LANGUAGE SCHOOL 
£11,000 

This responsfole position offers a challenge to 
the energetic and assertive. Organisational, 
administrative, and secretarial/WP 
skffls/exoerience essential. Confidence (based 
on experience) that your performance 
improves under pressure is vitaL 
Apply, enclosing C.V„ to: 

LudHe Barha, 

Central School of Etv&sh, 

1 Tottenham Court Rd, London W1P 90 A. 


PRIVATE SECRETARY 

£ 10,000 


Temple 

sense and sense of humour essential. Clean driving 
licence an advantage. 

Apply in writing with C.V. to BOX B13. 


BILINGUAL FRENCH/ENGLISH W1 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
C £12,000 

MD of International Investment Managers 
requires experienced bilingual secretary who 
will be a key member of a small committed 
team. Salary and benefits negotiable. Full CV, 
inducting current salary to: 

J Bristow, 

Apax International (UK) Ltd, 
103 Mount St, 

London W1Y 5HE. 



FABRIC DESIGNERS 
£10,000 at least 

Ttas is a wry interesting 
buwwss-they design tables (or 
mterax dope's aid posh 
shops. (And yen can buy dev 
sntfl at nds prices'). 

They are expandng «oy quxkty 
and so prospects to oat on 
rapMfty are exceOnt Hake a 
name h> youreefl xi the MD's 
oHnrionang urespondtoce 
end so on. Mce one. 

Phone 01 434 0038. 


TOUGH COOKIE 
UP TO £124100 

These commoaty traders He to 
tank at (fttJwfees as toe jtr 
clu r a ctar s Wach s why they say 
®ry need a strong oerwrultfv to 
run thee office m (Mont Sheer 
(They seemed He race guys to 
us!). 

Some tamsarity with book 
keepng would hrap. However you 
look at it a very dynanac posenm. 
lyaifMwuBrBuptDd. 

cal 01 434 0030. 

The rewards wff be tentfe 
100/60. 


(■■■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

1 

m 

HfiHBE CMSCW 8 S ? 


£11,500 + BACK 

SENIOR PA 


BEKFfTS 

An ooenuxs secnor enwat to 

£11,000 


iik extra orttaaiy success at tins 
US tank seeks an energetic 

SamnnsB. ptsn wd develop aQ 
B*J swreural sufl. Datagsa 
wmnds. wgsrtse pmwiw. 
open (finely to a sen or 
gwatauun and a stnxt mu 
your hp-lop sMs. professional 


conanned secretary wfio a I 
Ousbuss ntneed. «*xn and abta 
lo (earn the rapes n a lugbly 
senstne deparOnaiL Stable 
wortteeJujrauxfcQnftdera 
mama ano exceitam persona) 
presamausi are as vital as 90/60 | 

auuda and amor ayta. 


sUs and WP Goman useful 

Aga 25 plus. | 

seeks good nfer-genaal 


To complete the 

sMs 


picture, 

pteasa corasct | 

« SoUa Wunetexr w 


Rosemary Whitfield or | 

goVI-ttlMSS. 


Lindsay Anderson 



on 01 631 0902 1 


* 

■frUiGSAW* 

W Sellers Kf 


£11-12,000 + 

Expanding Finance Mar-1 
toting Consultancy urgan-fl 
tiy seeks: 

AO ?0N ASST /SEC 
to Joint MD, Admin &l 
Technical. Handle accou-| 
nts, DP input, ccxrespon-J 
dance, tel admin, etc. 

MARKETING ASST/SHC 
to Joint MD, Sates & Mar- 
keting. Liaison with ev- 
ents and suppfors, mar- 
keting and sales support, 
admin, reception, etc. 

Very attractive package 
and prospects for confi- 
dent experienced profes- 
sionals, 25+ . Applications 
win be forwarded unopen- 
ed to our cflarn. Please 
fist companies you do not 
wish to apply to. Write 
with detailed CV, under ( 
ref UK/FIN/6241 to: 

ARA International, 
17/19 Maddox Street. 

London Wifi 0EY. 


NON-SECRETARIAL ) 


Ghkstertons 

• — i i> t. n i i ,h- ij 


NEGOTIATOR 
RESIDENTIAL LETTINGS 

Come and join u$ and you will be working with die 
market leader As London’s largest Residential Agent 
we have expanded our network afl over London and we 
are seeking experienced Negotiators to fill key positions 
in our Company 

The successful candidate will be flexible, determined 
and adaptable and will have had experience in a related 
field. 

Please apply in writing to: 

Christine Davis, Chesterton* Residential 
Area Director -Lettings, 

116 Eensingbm EE&i Street, London W8 7KW. 

A SUBSIDIARY Of HOJ DEYTUL PROPERTY SOVKES OD. 


clerks with woken Dikto 
E nmh/Ctraan and oar or roe 
follawsrw: 

FWKWSaaaMi/ttiXxB r«riM- 
lor hotel group. salary 
cJ&soo Ring for mart oetaib 
PARAGON la NG CONS. Ol 
660 7036 



_ Wen 
known Property Company tn 
wi. seeks person w® poiae 
and natural esurtn for (Mr lux- 
urious reception. Working urim 
ww other, too wfll handle the 
Stay day-to-day wmuMn. 
and of course, meet and greet 
the clients. Some typing. Age 
20-26 years S83-IOM W«r- 
edltn Scon Recruitment. 



three other receptlenbts. 
typing inrotved but post super - 
vtoory awritnce ee eentf at . Age 
36-49 £8.500. BeTMOetle of 
Bond Striae CRec Cans) 01-629 
1204. 



£17.000. 377-2666 or «S9- 
4344 WordPtus - The WP 


PART TIME 
VACANCIES 


Teas at tSsa Top| 

£12,000 + SgiHBS 

As senior PA in a sm at 
English Merchant Bank you 
writ have the opportunity to 
mouM tws role mtD a cemrai 
one. and wffl he n a positron 
to know exactly whs rs 
going on. 

As wed as normal PA dunes, 
you wta control the day to 
day actmhss of the Execu- 
tives display a rnrjh level of 
knowfedga about the rank's 
activities and help organise 
the marketing. In a young, 
fevefy enwror-ment you win 
fuwe your own office and 
the oppcnurJty to 
you own systems. 

Age. 25-36 Sk*s 90/50 

City Office 
60 0 0285 


CONSERVATIVE MP REQUIRES 
Secretary to work 3 days per week. 

Previous parliamentary experience not needed. 
Must be able to wont on own initiative- Good 
shorthand, auefio and WP essential. Preferred age 
over 25. £8,000 per annum phis generous hofidays. 
Reply with CV to: 

Box No. J25, 

Times Newspapers, 

P.O. Box 484, 

Virginia St, 

London, El 9 DO. 


ANTIQUE lff « ni London WI 
rmulm tun dim 
P lease appor **toi t 
Reptv to BOX E70 . 



PWT-TM ... 

noiarM lor mmuiaang lab <n 
oro g.- ny nunageneni la suX 
Oidapa based lira GoX re- 
sponsrolc-. smart mamed wm 
OOOd 2040 wMi wnWIX 
mm and abraiy to solve wopk 
I and property praNns wWwu 
’ ran. MornUigs only. Sa.SOO pa. 

I Td Ol 3B1 9329. 

P WT-TWZ SEC 

B and uirHtmn _ 

Bond and mb experienced 
xcc to come In 4 nays pw week 
and « bom per day. lok o f 
variety and Xn-oivvpKnL Sala- 
ry JL5.BO per hour. Coca typing 
essenti al Pl ease i we poone Oi- 
495 S7B7 Gordon 
CnnsnlpinB 


AOCnOHS - Mn-dBK Sec SOUaM 
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GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


Second^ 

attendance order unlawful 


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Enfield London Borongb 
Council v Forsyth 
Before Lord Justice Ralph Gib- 
son, Mr Justice McNeill and Mr 
Justice Kennedy 
[Reasons November 18] 

Where parents had been 
served with a school attendance 
order and prosecuted for foiling 
to comply with it contrary to 
sections 37(5) and 40(1) of the 
Education Act 1944, that order 
was spent, and any subsequent 
failure by the parents to fulfill 
their duty under section 36 
would require service of a new 
attendance order. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held, giving 
reasons for dismissing, on Octo- 
ber 30, an appeal by way of case 
stated by the prosecutor, the 
London Borough of Enfidd, 
from a decision of Wood Green 
Crown Court (Judge McMullan 
with justices) which allowed an 
appeal by Mr and Mis Thomas 
Forsyth from their conviction 
by the Edmonton Justices of an 
offence under section 37(5) of 
the 1944 Act. 

Mr Geoffrey Stephenson for 
the appellants; the respondents 
in person; Mr David Calvert- 
Smith as amicus curiae. 

LORD JUSTICE RALPH 
GIBSON said that Mr and Mrs 
Forsyth were the parent of a 
rhiid aged about 12 and there- 
fore of compulsory school age: 
see section 35 of the 1944 Act 
By section 36 h was the duty of 
the parents “to cause the child to 
receive efficient full-time educa- 
tion . . . either by regular atten- 
dance at school or otherwise". 

For a time the parents foiled 
to carry out their duty. On 
February 22, 1984, the London 
Borough of Enfield, as local 
education authority laid 
informations against the par- 
ents, alleging that having had 
served upon them a school 
attendance order dmpd January 
12. 1984, requiring them to 
cause the child forthwith to 
become a registered pupil at 
Chace School they had since 
January 13, 1984 foiled to 
comply with the requirements 
in tint order, contrary to section 
37(5) and 40(1) of the 1944 AcL 

On March 15, 1984 the par- 
ents were convicted of the 
offence and the justices imposed 
a fine of£5 on each of them and 
ordered each to pay costs of £20. 
On that occasion they pleaded 
guilty. The child had not been 
registered as a pupil at the 
school and it was not contended 
by them »h«r the child was 
receiving efficient education 
otherwise than at schooL The 
parents did not comply with the 


Order after those modest fines. 

The appellants, who as local 
education authority were by 
section 40 of the 1944 Act atone 
empowered to prosecute any 
offence under section 37, 
considered further proceedings 
to be appropriate in order to 
p rocur e for the child the educa- 
tion which Parliament had en- 
acted he should receive. 

The second proceedings, with 
which the Divisional Court was 
now concerned, were com- 
menced by informations laid on 
May 24, 1984, alleging with 
reference to the same school 
attendance order of January 12, 
1984, that the parents did "on 
and since March 19, 1984, foil to 
comply with the requirements 
of the school attendance 
order . . 

On January 1985 die respon- 
dents were again convicted by 
die justices. On that occasion 
they pleaded not guilty and 
contended, as they were entitled 
to do under section 37(5), that 
they were causing the child to 
receive efficient full-time educa- 
tion otherwise than at school. 

They foiled to demonstrate 
that defence to the satisfaction 
of the justices. Sentence was 
deferred until July 12, 1985 to 
*nahie alternative arrangements 
to be for the child's 

education. On July 22, 1985 the 
justices imposed fines of £250. 
together with an order to pay 
costs of £425. on each pa r e n t 

On the parents' appeal to 
Wood Green Crown Court 
against conviction and sentence, 
they succeeded on a preliminary 
point of law that having been 
once convicted under section 
37(5) of failing to comply with 
the requirements of a school 
attendance order, they could not 
in law be convicted a second 
time of failing to comply with 
the same order, notwithstanding 
the fact that they had persisted 
in their failure to comply with 
those requirements. 

The question for the Di- 
visional Court was whether 
Parliament had given that 
powerand discretion to the local 
education authority in respect of 
one school attendance order or 
whether, before recalcitrant par- 
ents could be prosecuted a 
second time, the local education 
authority had to go through the 
process laid down by section 37 
for service of a second or 
subsequent school attendance 
order as a necessary foundation 
for a further prosecution. 

The condnsion reached by 
the crown court was right. Upon 
the true construction of the 
provisions, after conviction of a 
parent for failure to comply with 


the requirements of a school 
attendance order there COVJQ x 
no second prosecution in re- 
spect of a continuing failure 
with reference to the same 
school attendance order. 

The court's reasons were arc 
as follows: 

The requirement imposed oy 
a school attendance order was to 
produce a result. When the 
result bad been produced the 
requirement had been complied 
with and the order was spent. 
The duty to comply with the 
requirements of the order was a 
continuing duty but when per- 
formed, no duty under tnat 
order remained to be per- 
formed. 

As to the offence of fading to 
comply with the requirements 
of such an meter, applying the 
wards of Mr Jtzstice Mann in 
Bradford City v Preston (un- 
reported, July! 1, 1985. DC) and 
in conformity with Lord 
RoskilTs reasoning in Hodgetts v 
ChiUem District Council ( The 
Times March 19, 1983) it was a 
conti nu in g offence in the sense 
flmi failure was a continuing 
condition; flic form of the 
information on the first 
prosecution of Mr and Mrs 
Forsyth was correct in alleging a 
failure to comply “on and since 
January 13, 1984", but section 
3 7{S) created only one offence of 
failure in regard to any particu- 
lar notice. 

The court reached that 
conclusion upon the construc- 
tion of section 37(5) in its 
context and it could not find in 
that section or in any other 
-provision of the Act any ground 
for implying a power in the 
education authority, or jurisdic- 
tion in the court, to prosecute or 
to convict for a second offence 
with reference to one school 
attendance order. 

It was necessary to consider 
the sequence whidi led to the 
making of an order under 
section 37. It started with the 
education authority forming the 
view that a parent was failing to 
perform the section 36 duty of 
causing the child to receive 
efficient full-time education. 

The education authority had 
to serve upon the parent a notice 
requiring him to satisfy the 
authority within a period of 
time. The parent bad either to 
identify the school the child was 
attending or show bow other- 
wise the child was being edu- 
cated. 

If upon receipt of the parent's 
reply, the education authority 
were not satisfied that the child 
was receiving such education 
the authority were under a duty 
to serve a school attendance 


order if it was thought expedient 
that the child attend school. 

The order to lie served upon 
the parent was tun left to the 
discretion of the education 
authority, it could only be an 
order requiring the parent to 
cause the child to become a 
registered pupil at a named 
school (secuon 37(2)). 

The actions by the parent 
necessary to cause a child to 
become a reghaered pupK con- 
sisted only of causing the child 
to attend ’the school Registra- 
tion as a pupil was carried out by 
the proprietor of the school 
under section SO of the 1944 Act 
— in this case the local education 
authority. 

After being so registered a 
child might cease to be a 
registered pupil for various rea- 
sons including non- attendanc e. 

Despite service of a school 
attendance order requiring a 
parent to c a us e a child to 
become a regi s tered pupil al the 
named schooL the parent could 
not be prosecuted under section 
39(1 J by reason of failure of the 
child to attend regular}? at die 
school unless and until the child 
was a “ registered pupil” there. 

The sanction for not sending 
the child to the school, so that 
foe child became a registered 
pupil, was prosecution for the 
section 37(5) offence. 

Section 37(5) demonstrated 
the importance a ttached by 
Parliament to the principle that 
the parent was to be free to 
provide his child with education 
otherwise, than at school pro- 
vided he could satisfy the educa- 
tion authority or the secretary of 
state or the justices that the 
education so provided was up to 
the standard required by the 
AcL 

If. when a school attendance 
order had been served, the 
parent complied and the child 
became a registered pupil then 
the order was spent and there 
could be no prosecution for 
“failing to comply with the 
requirements'* of it. if at a later 
date, and in however short a 
lime, the child should cease to 
be a registered pupil at the 
named schooL 

There could then be no 
prosecution under section 39 
because the child would no 
longer be a registered pupiL 
There could be no further 
prosecution under section 37(5) 
until in accordance with the 
procedure laid down, a new 
school attendance order had 
been served, because the parent 
bad not failed to comply with 
the requirements. 

Solicitors: Mr W. D. Day. 
Enfield: Treasury Solicitor. 


Reasonable use of highway for protest 


Hirst and Another ▼ Chief 
Constable of West Yorkshire 
Before Lord Justice GhdeweD 
and Mr Justice Otton 
[Judgment November 7] 

Where a court was satisfied 
that a person had without lawful 
authority wilfully or deliberately 
caused an obstruction in his use 
of the highway, the .court was 
not entitled to convict him of 
obstruction contrary to section 
137 of the Highways Act 1980, 
without further bang satisfied 
that his use of the highway was 
unreasonable. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court accordingly al- 
lowed an appeal by case staled 
by Malcolm Hint and Lorraine 
Agu against die decision of 
Leeds Crown Court on Novem- 
ber 5, 1985 (Mr Recorder J. S. 
H. Stewart. QC and two jus- 
tices), whereby they dismissed 
the defendants' appeal against 
their convictions by Bradford 
Justices on July 2, 1985 for 
obstructing the hig hway in the 
course of a demonstration on 
behalf of animal rights. 

Section 137 of the Highways 
Act 1980 provides; “(1) If a 
person, without lawful authority 
or excuse, in any way wilfully 
obstructs the free pass age along 
a highway be is guilty of an 
offence . . .”. 

Mr James Wood for the 
appellants; Mr Rodney Grant 
for the prosecutor. 

LORD JUSTICE GUBE- 
WELL said that the appellants 
were members of a group of 
animal rights supporters who 
went to Bradford oty centre on 
January 19, 1985 to exhibit 
banners bearing slogans and to 
offer leaflets to passers-by. 

They stood in a spacious 
pedestrian precinct outside a 
shop which sold furs, either 
offering leaflets or holding a 
banner, or standing in support 
and in concert with those doing 
so. 

Agu was arrested for conduct 
likely to cause a breach of the 
peace (a charge which was not 
proceeded, with and later 
charged with obstruction). Hirst 


and three others then stood in 
the entrance to the shop where 
they had gathered to protest at 
the arresL They were no longer 
distributing leaflets. 

They reused to move when 
asked by a police officer to do so 
and were then arrested for 
obstructing the highway. 

It was submitted for the 
appellants in the crown court, as 
now, that their use of the 
highway was reasonable and 
that to secure a conviction the 
prosecution had to prove that 
the use was unreasonable. 

It was submitted for the 
prosecutor, relying on Waite r 
Taylor {{1985) 149 JP 551). that 
unless the appellants' presence 
on the highway was for the 
purpose of passing or re-passing 
along it, or for some purpose 
incidental thereto, their pres- 
ence constituted an unlawful 
obstruction. 

The crown court considered 
itself bound by Waite v Taylor 
and found that to stand on the 
highway offering leaflets or 
holding banners was a not a 
lawful use of it 

Nagy v Weston ([19651 1 
WLR 280). was the leading 
modem authority and binding 
on the court. It did not apply as 
rigid a test as that in Waite v 
Taylor. 

Lord Parker, Lord Chief Jus- 
tice, in Nagy v Weston (at p284) 
set out the proper treatment of 
questions arising under an 
identical section: “excuse and 
reasonableness are really the 
same ground . . . there must be 
proof that the use in question 
was an unreasonable use. 
Whether or not the user 
amounting to an obstruction is 
or is not an unreasonable use of 
the highway is a question of fact. - 

“It depends upon all the 
circumstances, including the 
length of time the obstruction 
continues, the place where it 
occurs, the purpose fix which it 
is done, and — whether it does 
in fact cause an actual 
obstruction . . .". 

That dictum was subsquenlly 
approved, albeit obiter, try Lord 
Denning, Master of the Rolls 
(dissenting) in Hubbard v Pitt 


([1976] QB 142. 174); and by the 
Court of Appeal in Hipperson v 
Newbury District Electoral 
Registration Officer ([1985] 1 
QB 1060, 1075E). 

. That was also, the way in 
which 'Mr Justice Tudor Evans 
dealt with the matter in Cooper v 
Commissioner of Police of the 
Metropolis ((1985) 82 Cr App R 
238, 242) where he said: “a 
member of the public hasa right 
to pass and repass along a 
highway and to do everything 
which is reasonable thereto . . . 

“However, if as a matter of 
fact and degree a member of the 
public's use of the highway is so 
unreasonable as to amount loan 
obstruction, then an offence 
under the Highways Act 1980 
may be committed ... h is a 
question of fact and degree in 
every case . . 

His Lordship agreed with Mr 
Justice Tudor Evans in that 
case. If that were not right a 
variety of actions which often 
went on in the street such as the 
distribution of free periodicals 
and advertising material at sta- 
tions, might be the subject of 
prosecution under section 137. 

Some activities such as street 
trading were lawfully authorized 
because permitted by statute or 
licensed, but many others were 
noL 

The question in such a case 
was whether the prosecution 
had proved that the defendant 
was obstructing the highway 
without lawful excuse — that 
question to be decided accord- 
ing to whether the use was 
reasonable or unreasonable. 

The user had to be inherently 
lawful to constitute a lawful 
excuse for what would otherwise 
be an obstruction. Unlawful 
picketing in pursuance of a trade 
dispute would not be reason- 
able. 

The correct approach in deal- 
ing with such issues was first to 
consider whether there was an 
actual obstruction. Unless it was 
de minimis any stopping on the 
highway would prima Jade be 
an obstruction. 

The second question was 
whether the obstruction was 
wilful or deliberate. 


Finally, had the prosecution 
proved that the obstruction was 
without lawful authority or 
excuse? 

Lawful authority included 
permits and licences for market 
and street traders and collectors 
for charity. Lawful excuse em- 
braced activities lawful in them- 
selves which were reasonable. 

The court did not consider the 
question of reasonablesness of 
user in the present case and the 
conviction would accordingly 
be quashed. 

MR JUSTICE OTTON. 
agreeing, said that the courts 
had long recognized the right of 
free speech and the right to 
peaceful protest on matters of 
public concern, subject to the 
need for peace and good order. 

In Hubbard v Pitt <[ 1 976] QB 
142, 178-179) Lord Denning, 
Master of the Rolls said: “Here 
we have to consider the right to 
demonstrate and the right to 
protest on matters of public 
concern. These are rights which 
it is in the public interest that 
individuals should possess; and. 
indeed, that they should exercise 
without impediment so long as 
no wrongful act is done . . . 

“As long as all is done 
peaceably and in good order, 
without threats <Sr incitement to 
violence or obstruction to traf- 
fic, it is not prohibited I 

stress the need for peace and 
good order. Only too often 
violence may break out: and 
then it should be firmly handled 
and severely punished. But so 
long as good order is main- 
tained, the right to demonstrate 
must be preserved . . 

Although Lord Denning was 
dealing there with the grant of 
interlocutory injunctions, the 
passage was ofimportance when 
considering whether persons 
such as the appellants h«rt 
committed the c riminal o Hence 
of wilful obstruction where there 
was a statutory right of arrest 
without warrant 

Solicitors: Rhys Vaughan, 
Manchester, Crown Prosecution 
Service. Wakefield. 


Solicitor’s duty of care to third party 


AJ KaodarivJ.R. Brown & Co 
Before Mr Justice French 
[Judgment November 10] 

A solicitor who had authority 
from his client to give an 
undertaking for, inter alia, the 
protection of a third party owed 
a duty of care towards that third 
party because the third party 
was within his direct contempla- 
tion as someone likely to be so 
closely and directly affected by 
his acts or omissions that he 
could reasonably foresee that 
the third parry was fikely to be 
injured by those acts or omis- 
sions. 

Accordingly, the plaintiff was 
owed a duty of care by the 
defendants, her husband’s solic- 
itors, who had undertaken that 
his passport shook! not leave 
their possession since the whole 
purpose of the undertaking was 
to protect the plaintiff and her 
two children against any further 
attempt to remove the children 
from the jurisdiction. 

Mr Justice French so held in a 
reserved judgment in the 
Queen's Bench Division when 
he dismissed an the facts the 
plaintiff’s claim for damage* in 
respect of the costs incurred in 
attempts to recover the children 
in Kuwait and also for the 
shock, distress and physical 


injury she suffered by reason of 
the assault she sustained ou 
June 7, 1981, and of the 
kidnapping and loss of her 
children on the same date. 

Mr T. Scott Baker, QC and 
Mr Alexander Dawson for the 
plaintiff; Mr Robert Seabroolc, 
QC and Mr Stephen Miller for 
the defendants. 

MR JUSTICE FRENCH said 
that the plaintiff's former hus- 
band absconded from Bristol to 
Kuwait with their two tiny 
children in particularly disgrace- 
ful circumstances, and the plain- 
tiff had never seen the children 
since. 

She claimed he was successful 
in removing them by reason of 
the negligence and/or breach of 
contract on the part of his then 
solicitors, the defendants. They 
had acted or failed to act in 
relation to his passport, which 
included the names of the 
children and which was depos- 
ited with them, in such a way 
that be was in a position to 
escape from the jurisdiction 
with the children. 

On Ow question whether the 
defendants owed the plaintiff a 
duty of care, the defendants 
urged that only when a solicitor 
had undertaken some personal 


obligation dearly defined as to 
its nature and extent could such 
a duty a arise. 

Further, it was undesirable 
and contrary to public policy as 
creating a conflict of interest in 
the solicitor, whose paramount 
duty was to his client, to find a 
duty to exist save in circum- 
stances analogous to those in 
Ross v Counters ([ 1 980] Cb 297). 

They also contended that 
their sole duty in the present 
case was not a knowingly to take 
any step which would deprive 
their undertaking of its force, 
including a duty to take reason- 
able care that the passport ■ 
should not leave their pos- 
session. It was not conceded, 
however, that any breach of that 
admitted duty sounded in tort: 
it was a duty owed only to the 
court. 

In his Lordship's view they 
did owe a duty in tort to the 
plaintiff to take reasonable care 
that the passport should not 
leave their possession, and they 
owed the further duty to take all 
reasonable steps io prevent 
harm coming to the plaintiff 
from any failure to comply with 
the undertaking. 

Solicitors' unde r taking s very 
often involved a conflict; they 
commonly undertook to retain 
money which otherwise they 


would be bound to release to 
their clients. The (diem none the 
(ess benefited in that a trans- 
action was enabled to proceed 
which otherwise might not pro- 
ceed at all or, if at all with 
greater complication and diffi- 
culty. 

The very giving of the under- 
taking in the present case cre- 
ated a conflict but it also 
conferred on the husband a 
benefit in that without it he 
would not have enjoyed access 
to his children. 

It which his Lordship 
doubted, those conclusions 
amounted to an extension of the 
principles expressed by Sir Rob- 
ot Megarry, Vice-Chancellor, in 
Ross v Counters, at pp322-323, 
it was an extension he did not 
hesitate to make. 

His Lordship concluded that 
the duty existed in tort only and 
not in contract as wefl. 

From consideration of the 
events and the evidence in the 
case, his Lordship concluded the 
defendants were in breach of the 
duty of care, bat he found, with 
some regret, that the damage 
suffered by the plaintiff was not 
a natural and probable con- 
sequence of the breach of duty. 

: Solicitors:' Sevan Hanc ock. 

Bristol; Wansbroughs, Bristol. 






tl* 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


SPORT 


RUGBY UNION 


WHEN IT COMES TO KICKING MORALITY OFF THE PARK ENGLAND’S LITTLE TERRORS ARE A MATCH FOR THE BEST 



Oxford’s altered Children at play in the School of Cheats 

script unlikely to 
deter Stanley’s XV 


* * v 0/k 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspoodent 


MAJOR R V STAMJEVS XVfc J-B Lefond 
Chti and France* 8 Pannock 
kQ, S 11 — d a y (aim and Eng- 
Y Ronant (Racing Ctub^n under-' 





NORTH MbUMKfc O Cmn (P*- 
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Uttwids Pofca). J 


■^is toe tune °f year when move which, if the occasion is 
Oxford Um v ««ty lose their right, migbtbe unveDed. 
** B ^^5 v S- l ? K 5fc ,,,ai ***- If Oxford can get a share of 
jor R V Stanley s XV and then the ball (and most of their 
proceed to lose to Cambrutae at opponents have woaby virtue 
Twictenham. Tins term, few- of a greater physical forward, 
ever- Oxford have abend the presence) their hades may not be 
smjTU they approach the second overshadowed. Muffin is amotw 

^ ^ in Britain and Rydon, 
of the Bowring Bowl and their his anostcataliaus partner, is 
play thus for this season has developing a healthy reputation, 
indicated they have no intention «r .v. ViJ-. n« 

onetUngsro Another of the Thom EMI 

They should, of course. kwe to fiKL ‘ 

Stanley's XV at Ifitey Road 
today, in a match sponsored by 
Yaimichi International, such w 
the international talent stacked 
against ihem ten they have £^r-}2Jf 
attracted some appreciative J°LjJ“L 5f 

poises from the dub sides they 
have met this season. They are 
able. ( 00,10 name the same side “* °“ &?****■ 
beaten by Harlequins at the Neath Midlands have already 
weekend although Griffin, the to Warwicksh ire 1 4-3 in a 
captain, who injured a hip in Midlan ds group game. They 
that gn™. win wait until this have Hobbs in their back row 
morning before testing bis a °d bring Regers, the Hereford 
fitness. wing, and Thorp (Birmingham 

Stanley's, however, have had University) into their three- , 
to their original side, quarters against a Warwickshire 

Wilson, the former All Blades tafe which fields an afi-Cov- 
wing, broke a finger in a charity entry pack, now that Farrington 
game and is replaced by 15 restored as hooker after the 
Pennock ofRkhznond. Charvet, completion of bis suspension, 
the French centre, is unable to major RVSTAM£rsxfej-B Latent 
play so HaEbday keeps his place 
and Stagier, the Richmond lode, 
occupies the place originally 
given to Cutbbertson 
(Harlequins). 

There is another change, in 
the from row where Stuart 
Evans (Neath) has withdrawn, 

Goodwin also of Richmond 

WXAHK O GH, (BJr- 

mentis caused iby the absence of mingti^APanaM 
Robert Jones (Swansea), whose (BtrAngtan 
illustrious- substitute is 
Loveridge, the former All Black ^ M 
scrum half now playing with -- 

Harlequins. There will be an 
exacting duel between Lynagh, 
the stand-off half from Queens- 
land, and his Australian cot- UUBluutl „ M11D1! _ _ 

league, Calcraft, from New ^^‘SffiSurtiJSBSSc 
South Wales, who plays m K*, dhTi* ‘■KS sy pEnefanrfc o 
Oxford's bad: row. Indeed there Ifcfcs, c spsa; c i— wrn i p . P 
are rumours that Calcraft has 
been teaching ids young col- * 

leagues a new Australian penalty 

Fitzgerald is back 

ByGenseAre 

Ctaran Fttzaaald, who tost to finish on the lonng side. He 
his place and with it the had proved bis pomt and pro- 
captaincy of the Wand team «*ded to lead Ireland 1 to a 

that defeated Romania in Dub- SSf fJSSSS»4 TriSe 

I in recently^eturns to the repre- S hM P^ l °Sgte p 1 - f*“ 1 fl . J'SR 

S?m^d“ e ££ S SSSck 

issfe A cSS2t 

against Munster in the Inter- foar championship 

Provincial Championship with *■“**' , 

only the wooden spoon at stake. On Sanuday, Ireland's most 

But there is much more at stake successful postwar ca pttm ge ts 
far FitTflemld. what may be ms last oppwtu- 

tzgeraid. ^ • ’ ■ • jity of stdMg a for a 

It was at this same va me t w o -lace in the final Irish trial neat 
years ago that mz&rMaanc An Aririltat tendon 

'SfS injury nded him out .of 
ws for from fiiwmed as an rr mnarfr t's games gainst Lrin- 
Wano payer. . • ^ : - ster and Ulster when foe 

Fitzgerald had tost bis place in .Westerners conceded 78 points, 
the Irish side after sustaining a Frc^zald wHl relish the chal- 
bead injury against W ales at bat one must have 

Lansdowne Road and despite reservations as to whether 
being declared fit by the IRFu : enough rcmanis in the locker for 
medical adviser for the foflow- jjjat middle of the front row 
ing game against England, Ins p^c* hi the Ireland team to 
replacement against Wales, become a reafity once again. 
Harbison, was retained with the Connacht, severely hit by 
captaincy going to the No. a, bauries, make three changes 
Wilie Duggan. Harmson kept from the team defeated 37-6 by 
his place for the final game Ulster at Ravenhill and switch 
against S cotl and , which the j 0 bu oDriscoB from the flank 
Scots won 32-9, and even allow- to No. g. 
ing for that result, few anno- coMuam H ono— (taMMmfc b 
paled Fiugerald regaining hrs 

P ,3CC - cSnaA^wSrafe, C 

But in the first lnter-Provm- iscCwtfcr (UCGfcT o«iqr (LararownW. 
dal of the following season at £ 

Thoraond Park, he led Con- 5fi 
nacht with all bis old fire and « 
fiiry and in the cirf was unlucky O' 






1 f i 



t- 


MuraBty on the field is dealt a mortal Mow: Police, players and spectators join In the melee at Leeds cm April 27, 1971. This was the moment that the rot set into the national game 


J immy Tarbndc, a popular comedian, 
used to have a joke, wefl aired on 
television: “If at first you don’t 
succeed - cheat” There were times 
in the past 20 years when it could 
have been the motto of English football, in 
which legality had become anything you 
could get away with. 

Viv Anderson, the Arsenal and England 
r%ht bade, is a pleasant, cheerful and 
dedicated professional. A thoroughly good 
Wnkft, his fans and those who work With hint 
would say. Last Wednesday at Wembley 


WARWICKSHIRE (Coventry uniass 
stated): S IMI (Butara Bung C LmA» 


SBS^STM SSS&p 

i iiiu ynW; p uiMit 


depths last season when Ireland 
lost all four diaiiqrionship 

gw meg. 

On Satozday, Ireland's most 
successful post-war captain gets 
what may be his last opportu- i 
aity of gfatkrng a Haim . for a 
placers the final Irish trial neat 
month. An Achilles tendon 
injury nded him. . out of 
Connacht's games against Lon: 
«ter and Ulster when foe 
.Westerners c onc ede d 78 points. 
Fitzgerald wHl relish foe- chal- 
lenge bat one most hove 
reservations as to whether 
enough remains in the locker for 
that middle of the front row 
jdace in the Ireland team to 
become a reality once again. 

Connacht, severely hit by 
injuries, make three changes 
from the team defeated 37-6 by 
Ulster at Rsvenfaill and switch 
John ODriscoB from the frank 




yards from England’s goaL Anderson in- 
stantly picked up the ball and punted it back 
| to Chris Woods, thus ensuring that Yugo- 
slavia could not quickly benefit from an 
award given them against an England 
infringement 

The referee did nothing. Indeed, the 
alarming situation is that few among the 
60,000 crowd would have said that anything 
unusual or wrong had happened. Football is 
conditioned, around the globe, to habitual 
rh taring We in England used to daim it was 
tiie foreigners who cheated. Now, almost 
every .professional cheats, in some form or 
other, in every match he plays: at the very 
least, appealing for throws and goal-kicks 
which he knows are the other way. The 
corruption goes all down the line to the 10- 
year-olds. England have little moral justifica- 
tion for protesting about Maradona’s handled 
goal when they regularly break the laws 
themselves. 

Seeing youngsters imitate 
the professional players 

Who has forgotten Roy McFarland pulling 
a Polish forward off the ball by his neck at 
Wembley as England vainly tried to qualify 
for the World Cup finals in the autumn of 
1973? 

Last Sunday Ralph Coates, the former 
Burnley, Tottentem and England winger, was 
oat watching his son play in a teenage league 
match in Hatfordshire. A boy did exactly the 
same as Anderson had done at Wembley. The 
referee a gain did nothing. We are into the 
second generation of schoolchildren for 
wham cheating is an unwilling code of 
conduct And it is worse than that 

Coates, recently appointed as co-ordinator 
of sport for Barnet Borough Council nnder 
the Manpower Services Commission scheme, 
is appalled by what he finds around the 
primary mid secondary schools of North 
London and Hertfordshire. 

“The behaviour and the language, not just 
among boys but parents, coaches and 
managers, is dreadful,” be says. u I*ve been 
abused by some men whom I’ve challenged 
about their behaviour on the fine. They react 
i differently ifthey recognize that I used to be a 
well-known player. K can be so bad that I 




FOOTBALL 
IN CRISIS 


The age of decadence that was 
ushered in at Leeds a decade and a 
half ago has spawned a code of 
misconduct among children that 
even grown-ups find frightening, 
David Miller, our Chief Sports 
Correspondent, reports 


the last of the breed of old-fashioned wingers 
who was increasingly obliged to “do a job” in 
midfield. 

“The gamesmanship, perfected by Leeds 
under Revie, used to grieve me but I saw my 
job as entertaining and being kicked gave me 

<k, .Jnmalin tn nlau kotlPT ” hp C9VC 


can't take my daughter to watch. I saw one 

managpr r unning up and down the fore, 

shouting at the referee, while drinking from a 
can of beer. 

“If someone doesn’t do something we’re 
not going to have a game left. More and more 
boys are turning to other sports. If s a social 
problem, the parents have a vital part to play. 
Many of them are good and deplore the 
language.” 

Yet what chance have those parents who 
have integrity, or their children, when every 
Football League match for the last 20 years 
has been defiled by supporters chanting 
“You’re going to get your effing bead kicked 
in” and bright, young, forward-thinking 
playwrights and directors give us endlessly 
the same trash on television? 

The definitive moment of moral corrup- 
tion in English soccer, from which point the 
domestic game moved steadily downward, 
was on April 17, 1971, not unsurprisingly at 
EUand Road. Leeds United under Don Revie 
stood for everything that was reprehensible in 
Sport from gamesmans hip to physical 
intimidation and were blatantly beyond the 
effective control of either the Football League 
or Football Association. Astonishingly, the 
FA appointed him national manager and duly 
paid the price. 

On that day in 1971 Leeds lost 2-1 at home 
to West Bromwich, a critical set-back in their 
challenge for the championship alongside 
Arsenal Ray Tinkler, foe referee, who bad 
poorly handled an often illegal game, allowed 
West Bromwich a goal by Astle during which 
Suggett was offside; but not, Tinkler argued 
afterwards, with theoretical justification, 
affecting play. 

Four Leeds players immediately and 
unforgivably manhandled Tinkler, inciting 
the crowd. It was only when spectators 
invaded the pitch, also intent on attacking 
Tinkler, that foe Leeds players changed their 
demeanour and protected him. Revie and his 
chairman, Percy Woodward, disgraoefuHy 
suggested that Tinkler’s performance— which 
I have to say was lamentably inadequate — 
had justified the crowd's reaction. 

The Leeds players should not only have 
been suspended by the FA for a month or 
more but should have been prosecuted by foe 


police for provoking public disorder. Leeds in 
general, and in this match in particular, set 
foe tone of national moral decline and it is no 
surprise that this club is now obliged by foe 
police to stage all-ticket matches away from 
home in an attempt to prevent their 
spectators travelling anywhere. 





itayU M Us^CStwnjal 
Am (Ditfn University}. J 
(London Mstfl. 


YACHTING 


Coates: appalled by Juvenile gamesmanship 
The leading FA officials in 1971 were 
Andrew Stephens, Harold Thompson. Arthur 
McMuQan, Vernon Stokes and Denis Fol- 
lows, the secretary; Len Shipman was 
president of foe League. All were conscien- 
tious men but their failure to get to grips with 

the evident crisis, and the failure of those who 

followed them, has meant that a great sport is 
rotting into decay among the present genera- 
tion who know no better. 

“I realty didn’t notice when I was playing. I 
was caught up in foe game,” Coates admits, 
“but now I see ft in every match. 1 see foe 
responsibility the professionals have, a duty 
to clean up their acL If only we introduced foe 
rugby rule, where you push a free kick lOyards 
forward if someone interferes with a free kick, 
players would realize they have a duty to their 
team, not only to themselves.” 

Coates played four times for Alf Ramsey 
and eight times in the under-23 team, one of 

TENNIS j 


There's a lot of people who don’t go to 
‘professional 1 football because of what they 
see on the pitch.” 

Coates, having quit football as assistant 
coach to Paul Went at Orient, was given his 
chance to come back into sport by Max 
Callar, Barnet’s director of technical services. 
He tours foe schools, advising on coaching 
and behaviour, and is involved in several 
sports as well as working with the over- 5 Os 
and with women. 

He wrote to the FA, the League and the Pro- 
fessional Footballers* Association telling of 
the decline he has found but received no more 
than acknowledgment “It doesn't help wheo 
you see foe governing bodies publicly arguing 
with each other,” he says. “Of course, there is 
a connection between bad behaviour and the 
boredom and frustration which comes with 
unemployment I'm just pleased to be able to 
try to put something back in foe game. But 
why hasn't so much more of this been done 
before, collaborating with the education 
authorities foe way I am encouraged to do?” 

Should the Football Ground Improvement 
Trust with its £8 million a year income from 

A national campaign for 
morality on the pitch 

the pools, be doing more to correct attitudes 
within foe game? Richard Faulkner, foe 
deputy chairman, points out that foe articles 
of the trust do not restrict it to making 
stadiumssafer. There are £2 or £3 million a 
year available for foe grass roots. 

A national campaign on morality on the 
pitch is more important at a time when the 
game is tn crisis than providing new all- 
weather play areas on which 1 1 -year-olds can 
emulate foe kicking and mutual abuse of their 
elders. 

When Coates was a boy he used to cycle 
with friends for more than half an hour from 
Hetton-le-Hole in Durham to watch Sunder- 
land, They would arrive, park their bikes on 
the wall outside foe stadium, pay their 
sixpence or shilling, and be handed down 
over foe heads of foe adult spectators to a 
place in the front on foe fringe of foe pitch, 
where they would watch the likes of 
Shackletoo, Fleming and Fond in awe. 

When it was all over and a 40,000 crowd 
had departed with not a policeman in sight, 
they would collect their bikes, untouched 
outside the stadium, and cycle home. 
“Nowadays," Coates says, “you're even 
frightened to go as an adult." 

CRICKET 


Russia knocking on 
international door 


Australia IV fights back to 
clinch a thrilling victory 


Australian Pakistan make an 


By David Hands 


It is iffiBaA to ignore foe 
rentiral rise of Russian regby. 
just as the Romanians have 
caught oar attention during foe 
last decade. Though contact 
with foe USSR at senior repre- 
sentative level has been virtually 
uoa-existau, as far as the four 
home cou ntri es are concerned, 
that is a situation which may 
change before foe 1980$ are 
over. _ . 

Pat Moss, foe Irish Rugby 
Union secr e t a ry, watched them 
beat. Italy in Genoa at foe 
weekend, though he was t hereto 
formalize dumds of commu- 
nication with the Italian Federa- 
tion; while John Burgess, next 
year's president of foe Bn|% 
Football Union, has watched 
their gradual rise over foe last 
30 yens because of hugn e ss 
contacts he has with foe Soviet 
L'ahn. 

Indeed Mr Burgess, durinnan 

of foe RFU’S coaching awmit - 
lee, has done s on* c wfhh g ® 
Moscow and prepared a paper 
mi Russian rugby for foe RFlTfe 
information some tea yean ago* 
Since there la an overhaul of 


England’s representative 
matches fa progress, it would not 
be sarprisiag to find foe Soviet 
Unton cropping sp as oppmOw 
at B team level far foe near 
fixture. . ... 

The coaching committee has 
recommended fc much more inte- 
grated programme ofseatorand 
B grade internationals, foe first 
of which is foe game against 
France at Bath next February, 
foe day before foe five nations 
championship match between 
foe two countries. Anofore 
“back-to-back” B grade match 
may be mranged before fob 
season’s end. 

“What we are among for — 
and a Is by no wans cat and 
dried yet - b to g* «woB team 
gums with established conn- 
tries and two with w hat y on 
might call eaiergmg countries, 
where we are tooktog to*”** 
FERA - tody. Spas®* 
possibly Portugal,” Mr Borges 
qaiA. “it will enable us to get 
closer to them over foe years- 
Rightly wrongly we hare 
Soodoff FIRAa l don’t think 
that's a good thing.” 


vince there u an oreraam w 

Hawick stay unbeaten 


By Irb McLgachign 


Hawick. fbBow 
won battle with 


ibeir hard- 

EeriMs last 


weekend, remain the only un- 
beaten side in foe McEwans 
league fust division. The bor- 
der side also have the distinc- 
tion of bring foe highest scorers 
in all seven divisions with their 
smnd-offhalf, Colin Gass, bead- 
ing ihe individual table with 87 

points. 

Marshall Wright, foe former 
Dollar Academy and Scottish 
Schools international full back 


try-scoring table with seven 
thanks to the four touch-downs 
he had last Saturday gainst 
Glasgow’ Academicals- 
Jed-Forest have moved off 
the bottom of the first division 
la foe second division, 
Kilmar nfldk add Massefoargh, 
on 12 points from seven games, 

have opened a four-point gap 
fiora Stating County, Donfenn- 
hoe and RorrobeBo, who all 
have eight. At foe bottom, 
LanghBru are oo two points with 


Second attempt for Cup games 


The two remaining fjjrsx- 
rtnmd Schweppes Welsh Cup 
games - Poniyberem v 
Donvani and Old latydaos y 
Penarfo — win be played this 
Saturday (David Hands writes). 

They were called off last week- 
end because of waterlogged 
pitches. The winners of both 
games have a treat in store, with 
second-round ties on December 


> |^ Alan Bond’s 
flagship, Anstra- 
■ tia IV, salvaged 

k W some [Hide for 
■ 9 .:;/a the syndicate 
V. with a magnifi- 
cent recovery 
: ‘ against Kooka- 
burra IT to win by 15 seconds — 
foe biggest margin in foe closely 
fought race. Up foe final beat 
Kookaburra threw an astomsb- 
in& 41 tacks at Australia. IV. 

Proportionally, that beats 
any thing seen at Newport and 
on a leg by k* baas the race, 
characterized by some of the 
most ferocious tacking duds 
that have so fer been seen in foe 
Antrim ’s Cup trials, was foe 
closest yeL Kookaburra at- 
tempted to make op for a slight 
upwind speed deficiency by 
continually probing tacks into 
the Australia IV defence. 

Up foe third beat into a 
freshening tireeze of about 15 
knots, the two yachts fdl into a 
titan tic dud. Peter Gitmonr’s 
crew threw 37 tacks at Australia 
IV. Wifo their right-hand side 
advantage Cohn BeasheTs czew 
answered every one. Mow for 
Wow, and kepi their lead. One 
extra tack wss almost the mar- 
gin. as foe latest of Ben Lexcen’s 
designs roonded the buoy a boat 
lengxh-and-a-half ahead. Crew- 
work on both boats was superb, 
with the exception of Damian 
Fewsteris foredeck crew on 
Australia IV. • 

Hu brutal labour of hauling 
the 24-ton boat through foe. 
wind and resetting foe huge 
genoa was taking an average of 
seven seconds. In. the famous 
final leg of foe matrix between 
Australia H and liberty at 
Newport, there were 46 tacks to 
each boat bul foal was on foe old 
course with each leg four miles. 
On the new right-leg Olympic 
cotase each sector is 3.2 ante s. 
In comparison, yesterdays 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 

s defector could have walked 
i- between the two decks. Weather 
i conditions were perfect, if light, 
r Flat blue sob mid a lighisuc- 
e knot sea breeze from SSW, 
i- greeted foe yachts at foe start 
y with eight minutes of foe start 


respectively. 


SECOND aotfl© DRAW; ftoniytwram or 
DuovaflJ a Maesng; Pwcoso y Safl h 
WHSS Fofee; E&tW Vale v BeOttau 
WMsmt v Pnrawrttt n Hantan v 
Br mu aa ri : Ton® v Ltenaffi; awwa aa 
utuanar * Ma myfltoa : Mwup y * 
riinff* 1 ' C wmB M a y « jttmnam; Crass 
S7cmic : &ton Fwry yPcntypoot 
Nm* * Kgfflrionfrssc . Uwhyy v 

Glamorgan MUXteS’ NwtWtP V 
eSSSSrc S—™* vow ***** or 
PensttK NayttM * ttatew*"- 


to go before foe rod thing, wss 
not far short of the He rculean 
tussle between John Bertrand 
and Dennis Conner. Most of foe 
time Kookaburra II and Austra- 
lia IV were close enough to have 
lobbed as insult from one to the 
other. 

Daring the first three min ut es 
of foe pre-sunt eftdiug they 

were locked so tightly together, a 


period gone, both yachts were 
lying dea d in the water, head to 
wind. Kookaburra O was to 
leeward. At nine they .gybed 
downwind and then, with 30 
seconds to foe gun, rounded np 
on split tacks and headed for the 
fine. G Amour was going for foe 
ran end and reached it, sailing 
fast, while Beasbri, at the helm 
of Australia IV, was nine sec- 
onds behind and beading for foe 
committee boat 
Just across foe line G Amour 
took a dangerous gamble. He 
tried to *?ek straight across 

ahead of Australia iv, thus 
turning his time advantage into 
a cnmmflnrfing position on the 
right of the coarse that he could 
use to dominate the match. He 
narrowly failed, _ 

Tima and %ain up foe first 
beat Gilmour, aged 26. from 
Perth, pushed a tack at Beashei 
until 20 minutes up the kg 
Kookaburra’s reward came- 
Gilmour crossed a boat-length 
' ah^ntt, having gained haif-a- 
second on each thrust, and was 
ahl«» to round foe top mark nine 

seconds in front- Downhill, 
Australia IV gybed herself into 
the favoured inside berth and 
also seemed to possess a little 
more hull speed. 

Fight and grit can do wonders 
for a yacht on the beat but 
downwind only speed and pos- 
ition count Al foe bottom mark 
both teams were flying a protest 
flag, nn the second beat Beasbri 
was aMe to do what he loves 
best, protect foe right of the 
course. Kookaburra punched 
away but foe nine-second lead 
held by Beashd at foe first 
leeward kept the two boats 
apart One hundred ^ metres from 
the buoy there was nothing 
between foe yachts in time but 
Kookaburra ll was obliged to 
make an extra two tacks to fay 
foe mark. • 

The margin was 12 seconds at 
foe buoy. Australia IV has a 
reputation for speed cm a reach 
bat at the gybe mark foe delta 
(time between the two compet- 
itors) ‘had not changed. At the 


bouy the sail-handling took the 
breath away. Two spinnakers 
crashed down in unison with 
not a square metre of nylon 
touching the sea. 

The two subsidiary races 
started in fascinating style. Both 
South Australia and Steak ’n’ 
Kidney won their starts and first 
leg* against senior boats. South 
Australia rounded the first 
windward mark 10 seconds 
atwad of lain Murray on Kooka- 
burra HL In a heavyweight 
tacking duel up foe first leg, the 
Adelaide boat more than held 
her own in the light airs. 
Downwind she held her margin 
for foe first run but thereafter, in 
a building breeze, Murray’s 
superior firepower pot him in 
front to win by more than a 
minute. 

Steak ’if Kidney led Australia 
m around the first mark by 14 
seconds but downwind she was 
overhauled by Bond's light-air , 
flier. Nevertheless, the final 
delta was once again just over a I 

minnlft j 

The Royal Perth jury met for | 
more than four hours on Mon- 
day night before rejecting j 
Australia TV's version of events | 

from Sunday’ race. Kookaburra 
m had her backstay and mast- 
top instruments carried away. 1 
aftera collision between the two , 
yachts. 

The jury found that both 

boats were beating, with Austra- 
lia IV on port and K3 on 
Starboard. Kookaburra passed 
ahead and tacked on top of 
Beashei, who immediately 
luffed up and lacked on to 
starboard, his bow colliding 
with the Parry boat’s stem. The 

S rated that Australia IV (the 
ng yacht) had failed to keep 
dear of Kookaburra in (the 
yacht on a tack) as required by 
Rule 41.1. Australia IV lost the 
two victory points which went 
to Kookaburra IIL 

DEFENDER SSMS RESULTS: AiHtraSa 
IV bt Kookaburra n. 15see Ausrata ffl ut 
Stack TfKjdney. Iran I3sec Kookaburra 
n a SousiAussaia. 1:09. 

DEFEND® SERIES TABLE 

w l R» 


option for 
McEnroe 

Melbourne (AFP) — John 
McEnroe, suspended until foe 
beginning of December, bas 
requested a wild card in case, he 
decides to contest the Australian 
Open here in January. Colin 
Stubs, the tournament director, 
said the former world No. 1 had 
asked for a wild card to be 
reserved to keep his options 
open for the tournament, which 
will be played on grass for the 
last time. 

Since returning from a seven- 
month lay-off, McEnroe has 
won four tournaments but was 
also suspended for insulting an 
umpire in Paris. However, be 
apologized for his poor game 
when he was beaten by Pat 
Cash, of Australia, in the first 


impact at last 

From Richard Streeton, Hyderabad 


Kookaburra IB . — 

toKratt iv 

KookaounaU — 
AusnatetR — — 
Souti AustraEa 
Steek - n’ Kknay — 
TODAY’S RACES; 


18 1 27 

14 S 20 

13 S‘19 

7 12 10 

4 IS S 

0 19 0 

AuoraMa iv v Seutn 


Australia. Koouburra n v Auuraaa ill; 
Steak 'n' KhSney v Kookabura BL 


tournament in London fast , 
week. j 

Stubs said McEnroe was not 
sure whether he wanted to play . 
in the Australian Open. 

Seeds have 
an off day 

Johannesburg (Reuter) - Two 
seeded players, Jimmy Arias, of 
foe United States, and foe local 
player. Christo Steyn. were 
surprisingly beaten in the first 
round of foe South African 
Open tournament here on Mon- 
day night 

Arias, the seventh seed, fen to 
foe unseeded West German, 
Michael WestphaL 6-7, 6-3. 6-3.. 
Steyn.the No. 8 seed, lost to 
another unsettled player, Amos 
Mansdorf, of Israel, 7-6, 6-1. 

RRST ROUND: M WBStpn* (WQ) M J 
Anas (US. 8-7. 00. BO; A Mansdfflt (isi) 
Ct C Sleyn (5A), 7-6, 6*1. 

• HOUSTON: Two out of foe 
three seeded players competing 
in the first round of foe 
WCTtournoment here on Mon- 
day weir beaten (Reuter re- 
ports). In all-American matches, 
Paul Annacone. the No.7 seed, 
was tfiminaied by Bill Scanlon 
and Scott Davis won against the 
eighth seed, Gary Donnelly. 
Raroesh Knshnan. of India, foe 
No. 5 seed, needed no aces in his 
6-3, 6-4 victory over another 
American, Jim Grabb. 

FIRST ROUND: W Scanlon (US) bt P 
Annacone (US). 7-6. 8-4: S Davo (US) bt G 
□onosfly (U5W 7*6. B-3: R Knsfman fin#£) 
blJ Grabb (US). 6-3. 6-4. 


Pakistan, showing tremen- 
dous determination and spirit, 
won foe fifth and last one-day 
international here yesterday to 
deprive West Indies of a clean 
sweep in foe series. West Indies, 
who were set a target of 203. 
never found any momentum 
and were beaten by 11 runs. 
Among several unhappy failures 
for them was another by Viv 
Richards, who was out first balL 

For a long time it seemed 
West Indies were pacing their 
innings with customary ef- 
ficiency. Gree nidge failed, but 
Haynes and Richardson looked 
completely assured as they 
added 91 in 24 overs together. 
Against the spinners, however, 
they were unable to score as 
quickly as they wished 

Haynes, who matte 59 and hit 
four fours and a sbu was out 
when he was caught by Miandad 
off foe bowling of Shoaib. foe 
Pakistan off-spinner- That 
brought Rickards to the crease, 
but he was soon on his way back 
to the pavilion. 

Earlier on Richards, who 
called correctly for the first time 
in 10 tosses on this tour, might 
have felt it was his day. First 
ball, however, be pushed for- 
ward to Qattir and was ieg- 
before. 

Logie, a occ-day expert and 
the man in form, came in next 
with West Indies still looking 
foe probable winners. He and 
Richardson added 50 in right 
overs with just foe right mixture 
of daring and care that the 
situation demanded. Only when 
foe two fast bowlers returned for 
their final thrust did foe scales 
tilt firmly towards Pakistan. 

Logie was out when he mis- 
hooked against Saleem and top- 
edged a catch to Maezoor in a 
fly-slip position. Then, at the 
other end, Imran dismissed 
Harper and Richardson wifo foe 
first and sixth balls of foe 42nd 
over. Harper was beaten by 
race, while Richardson's 33- 
over stay ended when he hooked 
and Shoaib judged the catch well 
on the square -leg fence; 

On foe first ball of foe next 
over Shoaib, in roughly the 
same place, held a huge bit from 
Benjamin against Saleem at 
deep extra cover. Gomes had 
been held back while the run 
chase was on and be and Dujcn 


were unable to work the miracle 
now needed, with 21 still re- 
quired from the last over. 

The hosts made 202 for six 
from their 45 overs, the innings 
gathering momentum after a 
slow start during which they lost 
both openers while making only 
24 in the first 15 overs. 

laved Miandad and Rameez 
Raja started foe improvement 
with a third-wicket partnership 
of 61. But it was the two 
youngsters, Manzoor and Ejaz. 
who put on 54 in seven overs for 
the fifth wicket, who trans- 
formed the pattern. Then 
Imran, whose strokes included 
two sixes, and Yousuf added a 
further 52 in the final five overs. 
• More than 50 armed police 
escorted a motorcade taking the 
West Indian and Pakistani 
cricketers about 1 10 miles from 
Karachi to the match in Hyder- 
abad because of frequent 
kidnappings by bandits in Sind 
province. 

PAKISTAN 

Safi A6c Harper D Richards 10 

Shrub Mohammad c Richardson 

b Paaaraon 3 

Ramne? Raja stumped Duton b Harper 32 

Javea Miandad b Benjamin 30 

Manzoor Bam c Patterson 

b Rchanlson 31 

Haz Ahmed ran out — IB 

mran Khan not out 27 

SaSm Yousuf not out 23 

Extras (b 3. & 15. w 7. nb 3) 28 

Total {Gwta. 45 overs) — 202 

Abdul Qadir. Tauseel Ahmed and Sawn 
Jafterdldnotbal 

FALL Of WICKETS: 1-ia 2-24. 3*5. 4- 
B5. 5-138. 6-150. 

BOWLING: Patterson 93-46-1; Watth 6- 
2-25-0: Richards 9-1-24-1; Benjamin 9-0- 
35-1; Harper WM9-1; Rttwdson 1-0-4- 

WEST INDIES 

CGOreeradgecdadlr 0 Mansw ... 13 

DL Haynes c Miandad bShoaA 59 

RBRcharCSOnc Shoaib P Imran — 70 

I V A Richards Ow 0 Oadir 0 

A L Logie c Manzoor b Jailer 16 

R A Harpers Imran — § 

P j Dujon new out ... 6 

W K R Benjamin c Shoafc b Jbilter 0 

H A Gomes not out — 8 

Extras flb 16. w2. fib 1) 1? 

Total 45 twora) 191 

CA Welsh and BP Patterson did not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS* 1 - 31 . 2 - 1 22 . 3-122. 4- 
172. 5-172. 6-175, 7-175 
BOWLING-, trftran Kh» G-1-S7-& Satet 
Jafler 3-1-37-2. Mamaor Etthi 7-V30-1: 
Tausaef g-i-3M; Oaar 8-0-21-1; Snoab 
2 - 0 - 12 - 1 . 

Results in thttone-dar series; 
fine W3St Indies won *t * our *‘£2^;™. 
Second; West Indes won on faster ran 

rsto 

Thud: West tadias not \ By 
Fourth; West indws «« hy 83 raw. 

Fifth: Pstason mon By i! runs 
Series rasuie west Indies won 4-1. 


*. 


lk 


l 


V 






40 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


RACING: STRANDS OF GOLD FAVOURITE FOR A FITZGERALD CUP DOUBLE 

A fitter Forgive’n Forget set 
for a repeat performance 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Forgive’n Forget the win- 
ner of the Edward Hanmer 
Memorial Chase at Haydock 
Park 12 months ago. is hoping 
to win the same race today 
before having a crack at the 
King George VI steeplechase, 
for the first lime, at Kempion 
Park on Boxing Day. 

Although he has only two 
opponents this afternoon, his 
task is still anything but easy. 
Cybrandian. who finished sec- 
ond to Forgive'n Forget re- 
cently, is again one of his 
rivals. 

In the Charlie Hall Me- 
morial Chase at Wetherby IS 
days ago there was only half a 
length between them at the 
end with Forgive’n Forget just 
gelling the upper hand in the 
closing stages. Today. 
Cybrandian will be receiving 
eight pounds more so the 
advantage now lies with him 
in theory. 

However. I do not propose 
deserting Forgive’n Forget 
who has often been seen at his 
best on the Lancashire track 


where he has now won three 
times. 

At Wetherby he looked the 
more backward of the two. 
Also whilst Cybrandian was 
skipping along merrily in 
front, Forgive'n Forget was far 
from foot perfect making mis- 
takes at the seventh fence, the 
third last and the last. 

With the benefit of that 
race, and a better display of 
jumping on ground he will 
relish, Forgive'n Forget may- 
make it again today but 
probably only just. 

Otherwise it should pay to 
follow that stylish jockey Gra- 
ham Bradley riding A Sore 
Row < 1. 30): Hand Over (3.00) 
and Tonights The Night (3.30). 

A Sore Row. the winner of 
his only two chases last sea- 
son. could not run after Janu- 
ary because of a cracked shin 
bone. He is now reported to be 
in fine fettle and is capable of 
giving weight and a beating to 
his three rivals this afternoon 
beaded by John's Present. 

Fresh from easy wins at 
Bangor and Market Rasen. 


Hand Over is preferred to 
Innocent John for the Wigan 
Novices Chase. 

At Worcester, the Fred 
Rirnell Memorial Novices 
Chase is being run for the fifth 
time having been won twice 
by that late and great trainer's 
widow, Mercy. 

Today I expect Gala's Im- 
age to take the prize back to 
Kannersley for Mercy Rimell 
again. Gala's Image was far 
better than any of his rivals 
over hurdles and looks pre- 
cisely the type to do even 
better over fences. 

Today's nap though is en- 
trusted to Bigee in the Aga 
Handicap Hurdle. Last year 
this race was won by a horse 
carrying a penalty and now I 
think that there is every 
likelihood of the pattern being 
repeated. 

Having watched Bigee run 
away with his first race of the 
season at Kempton, in the 
style of an improved horse, I 
expect him to continue his 
winning ways. What is certain 
is that he will relish the soft 


S ound, and he is preferred to 
ot Handed who is also 
penalized for winning a lesser 
contest at Forrtwdl. 

Merry Jane and that other 
mudlark Record Wing look 
the other dangers. 

Penalties would not stop 
those other recent winners 
Severn Sound (1.45) and 
Celtic Save (2.45) either. 

Troy Fair, my selection for 
the second division of the 
Rayburn Heritage Novices 
H indie, will have derived 
plenty of benefit from bis 
recent winning run on the Flat 
at Doncaster after his 
summer’s break. 

•The funeral of Jayne 
Thompson, the jockey, will be 
held at Stainforth Parish Church 
on Friday at 10am. She will he 
cremated at Doncaster Crema- 
torium. Jayne, 22, died last 
Friday from injuries she re- 
ceived in a fall at Catterick on 
November 8. 

• Ray Goldstein, the jockey, 
rode the 100th winner of ins 
career on Miss Maina in the 
TattersalXs Mares Only Novice 
Chase Qualifier at Windsor on 
Monday. 



A Sure Row can open his account today in the Standard life Chase at Haydock Park 

Open market for Hennessy 


Ron And Skip, top weight In 
Saturday's Hennessy Geld Cop 
at Newbury, has been left in the 
race by mfrtake and Charter 
Party now beads the weights. 

Charter Party was iminrky in 
this contest last year when he 
fell at 18th fence in the race won 
by the Jimmy Fitzgerald trained 
Galway Blaze. 

Strands Of Gold, the favour- 


ite, will be 
FNgeraM and his si 
Mare Dwyer, their second vic- 
tory in the contest. 

Falk* Walwyn, who wan the 
first running of the contest with 
Mandarin and added a further 
six winners in the race's 38-year 
history, is represented by 
Everett. 


MKn»-op:Riin And 

8yr-l2st-CKb, Cbsrtmf Party S-TJ-7, 
JK3 1 1-1 1-7, Cybtaodtea 9-1 V2. Door 
tateta 8-11-1, Stood Vanttre UMO-13, 

£w 1 ffi o$ 11 Tracy* 1 Spodat 9-10-0,1 
Chords tem 7-8-4, Tfto Ctachpocl 7- 

fi, The Intel! pnaMB 1 1 -fic Qvmav or 
Gold. 7 Charter Party; Cfacm* Wanton, | 


HAYDOCK PARK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Guide to our in-line racecard 


1.00 Arrow Express. 
1.30 A Sure Row. 

2.00 Forgive'n ForgeL 


2.30 Record Harvest. 
3.00 Hand Over. 

3.30 Tonights The Night. 


By Michad Seely 

1.30 A Sure Row. 2.00 FORGIVE’N FORGET (nap). 


Going: soft 

1 J0 WEAVERHAM NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 2m) (19 runners) 


1 

2 

1 ARROW EXPRESS (D JankJnsi D Rmgw 11 -3 ~ 

DMvpiqr 

• 99 

FB-4 

























8-1 



M Pappar 



13 


P Leach 



16 


A Stringer 


83 
















21 





23 

F30 TUMBA (Racegoers Otib Owners Group (1964)) K Otivar 11-0 - 

J K Kittens 

IS 11-2 






30 

F KNIGHTLY DtA [R Camnqion) K Bridgwater 10-9 

- W Worthtogton 



— 


33 


97AND0N IIU (R Matey/ J WB son 1 M. 

1985: NORTHERN RULER 11-0 C Grant (7-2 (t-fav) Denys Smith 20 ran 


CABM ARROW EXPRESS (10€) has me best teim of thoaa to have nm.buano 
rwniH Windsor ( 2 m 30y. £81 D. good, Nov 8 . 20 ran). QUAUTAIR KING (10-11 
when 4Vil 3rd to Windbound lass (11-5) at Wolverhampton (2m. £922. linn, No* 10. 1 

,andKNIGHTLYDUM10-7)upwtmmepo 
s though m need ot me race when 171 7m to ( 
w behind at Wetherdy (2ro, £3457, go od to 
l ot 3 to Bakierma (10-9) el Perm ( 2 m. £B8E 


[Hot Gam (10-10)41 at 

t Wolverhampton (2m. £922. firm. No* 10. 16 ran) wUhCOUTUHE 
COLOR (10-8) never pronunent and tailed otf, and KMGHTLYDtA (10-7) up wtm me pace before fatem at me 
5ft. Previously QUALfT AIR IQ NG(lO-7) ran as though in need of me race when 171 7th to QURRAT ALAIN (10- 
IQ^wttft FRED (yH OWFW (IP-7) even further ----- 


IRK FIGHTER (11-0) was a tad 00 off last i 


soft, Nov 1, 15 ranj. 


£685. farn. Oct 8 , 3i 


TUMBA (10-12) was prominent earty when B'M 5th toGodaunov(10-12)Bt Kelso (2m. £2009. good. Nov 12. 19 
CHANCE HO-12) not knocked about and never closer. 


ran) with GRAND 
Selection: ARROW EXPRESS 


1.30 STANDARD LIFE HANDICAP CHASE (£3,739: 2m 4f) (4 runners) 

1 12FI/11- A SURE ROW (CO) (Mrs A Wallace) Mrs M Dickinson 7-11-10 GBndey B5F04 

3 1111F-0 JOHNS PRESENT (0) (P Oenrng) R Holder 8-11-8 P RfctaKfa 97 13-2 

5 341211/ BUCKO (Mrs PMacCam) Jimmy Fitzgerald 9-10-11. — — M Dwyer — 15-8 

6 12441-3 KING JO (BF)(0avlti Timothy LW) Mis Mttme# 6-10-10 GMcCout #89 92 

1985: POETS CORNER 7-11-10 M Dwyer (100-30) Jimmy Fitzgerald 6 ten 

CADM A SURE ROW saw the racecourse only Wnco last season, on me second occasion (11-6) scoring 
lUniil an untroubled Z5I victory over Biiandar (11-10) here (2m 4t Nov Ch. £2458, aott Jan 18, 7 ran). 
JOHNS PRESENT (10-9) looked m need ol the outing when just over 28 5m to Voice Ot Progress (11-5) at 
a, Oct 24. 7 ran). Best effort f 


Newbury (2m 41. £5998. 


i fast season (11-9J wften beating Akram (10-6) XI al 
Newton'Abbot (2m, £2965. heavy. Jan 16, 9 rant BUCKO (10-10) last saw the racecourse when beating 
Jmftrook ( 1 0 - 1 0 ) a head at Wmhaiby (3m Nov Ch , £1 620. good. Nov 84. 9 ra^Kl NG JO (1 1 -5) ran n though a 
longer trip woted suit when 1 J«l SratoYacanj (11-5) at Newbury (3n4t. £3798, good. Oct 24.9 rank 


JOHNS PRESENT 

Z0 EDWARD HANMER MEMORIAL CHASE LIMITED HANDICAP (£6£85: 3m) (3 
runners) 

1 13U43-1 FORGIVE *N FORGET (CD) (T K*roe) Jimmy Fitzgerald 9-12-0 (2ox) — H Dwyer 9S F5-6 

2 1/22PP-2 CYBRANDIAN (D) (I Bray) M H Easterby 8-10-12 LWyor e 99 8-4 

4 11F/P-F0 TRAVEIOWEN (D) (P Piter) W A Stephenson 8-10-7 RLmnb — 33-1 

1985: FORGIVE H FORGET 0-124 M Dwyer (2-10 Jimmy RtegeraW 3 ran 


CADM FORGIVE'N FORGET ( 11 - 10 ) over 
rvmm {1 v,i at Wetherby pm, £9428, 
FORGET (12-0) finished 3K 1 3rd Co Dtmri Run (12 
- - - ".£54900 

( 10 - 6 ) at 


overcame same serious 


mistakes to beet CYBRANDIAN 


when 251 5m to Ferny Hx 
Selection: CTBRANDIAN 


L 3m 21. £54900. good, Mai 
Newcastle 


103 (12) 04M32 TOESFORM (CDJBF) (Mrs JRyteyJB Hal 9-100 

Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Six-figure 
form (F-Jefl. P-puled up. U-unseatad rider. B- 
brtxjgfit (town. S-sSppad up. R-retused). Horae's 
namelB-btinkers. v5£or. H-hood. E-EyestMlC- 
course winner. Distance winner. CD-course 


B West (4) 88 7-2 

and distance winner BF-baatan favourite in latest 
race). Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
weight. Rider plus any atowanca. The Times 
Private Handcapper's rating. Approxi ma te starting 
prica 


Z30 STANDARD LIFE HANDICAP HURDLE (£2.113: 2m) (8 runners) 

1 00034)0 CrURLOTTFS DUNCE fpDJBFi (Mra N Wasttroofi) M H Easterby 6 - 11 -fl — — 88 5-1 

2 030002 PETER MARTW(VJ)) (PH Lee) PH Lae 5-11-8 SHoBsnd • 89 F5-2 

4 11202-0 ROGQ? NICHOLAS (D) ftfts □ HoOmray) H Wharton 7-11-3 M Bremen 32 112 

7 42032-1 RECORD HARVEST (D) (Lt-Col R Woden) M H Easterby 5-10-13 (7ta) „ L Wyor 9411-4 

8 OOOOOP- SOKE RUkCHHtE OH (WO'Qantun)JFltzGerakS 7-10-12 M Dwyer 

10 0D1324- UKKERSTAFFE (D)(J Griffin) MW Easterby 5-1 0-4 PTtx* 86 10-1 

13 031243 PRICEOFLOVE (D) (J Calvert) O Moffatt 910-Q K Teetan 9010-1 

14 0032-0 SH.VEH PROSPECT (B) (Mrs K Deftly) R HoOftshead 5-104) PDmr 80 — 

1 S 8 & L O Broadway 7-10~6 K Teetan (6-1) D Moftsf 9 ran 


FORM RECORD HMWEST (20451 held oft fast 
rwn "l NICHOLAS ( 11 - 2 ) 7X1 tamer 


back and i 


t finishing PETER MARTIN (11-5) by 1JM with MGER 
CHARLOTTE'S DUNCE (11-10). presently out ot form, 
lav 1. 17 ran). Previously PETER MARTn (102) a v«™ 

. .up at Sandown ( 2 m. £11854. good. Mar 8 , 19 ran). 

FMCCOVUVE (10-12) 5X1 3rd to Smart in Black (104) in a eompettova hendteap hurdte at Carlmel Cm if, 
E1738. good to firm. Aug 23. 11 ran). S 8 .VEH PROSPECT (10-1 2) beaten a long way by Erostin Rider (10-1 gin 
a novice ev ent at W olverhampton (2m 41, £2478, tern. Nov 10 , 8 ran). 


SMecttaft PETER MAJT71N 

3.0 WK3AN NOVICE CHASE (£2£9(k 2m 41) (5 runners) 

2 02F3-11 HAND OVB1(P) (Mrs MHaggas) Mrs MDUdnson 7-11-4. 

3 EMC MNOCafT JOHN (J Hanson) W A Stephonson 6.11-0 

5 21142F TAROOGAirS BEST (J Ennis) R Peacock 8-11-0 

7 2P0PPP- QUAUTAIR PMHCESS (Quafitair Eng Ltd) K Stone 5-10-9 
B 4TO230 SPARTAN NATIVE (DBraraton) AW Jonas 6-1 09 


. GBnxSey B99F1-2 
. J Hanson 91 4-1 

PTtock 83 8-1 

. A Stringer — 33-1 
SJOTInN 7012-1 


1985c STRATH LEADER 7-114) P Barton (4-1) J Edwards 5 ran 


. _ . rani. INNOCENT 

( 11 -D at wamarty (2m 41. E2442.soft Nov i. 6 ran). TAHOOGAirs 
_ jwhanfefling3outlnraoawonbyOekan(i1-4)atSed 
2Xf2nd to Ranshaw Wood (10-9) at Ludtow (2m 4t, £1495, 

Selection: HAND OVER 

3.30 BOUNGE NOVICE HURDLE (£1,251: 2m 40(16 runners) 


BEST ft 
JSty(1l4 


1-5) waschaT 
- 0 } had finished 


3 

4 

5 
8 

11 

15 

16 
17 
IB 
22 
25 
28 
30 
35 
38 
38 


IF MARCELLJNA (BF) (Mrs A FfcntoylE Alston 4-11-2 — 
ALMQNDBURY (Mrs S Brook) M W Easterby 5-11-0.. 
0 BALLMGLANCE (R Layland) R Laytand 4-11-0. 


MAtStm>(7) 
_ A Stringer 


030-3 BQRDB1 RAIBLER (BF) (R Tyrar) G Richards 6-11-0 

DO- CITY ENTERTAMER (A Haddock) Mm C Pnsttethwalte 5-11-Q- 

00-0 WGH BIGE GREY (J Stone) K 0«w 5-1 1-0 

42000-4 HI EXCEPTIONAL (F H Lea) FH Lae 4-f 1-0 

040- LAD BACK (RWhaeleriG Moore 5-1 1-0 

04F- LORD SUN (JThorM D Moffett 4-11-0 


PTock 

- M Dwyer 
. JKHnane 
_ S HcCand 


_ y Itamm o u d 

KTeMan 

LWyer 

RUteb 

REGAL STEH. (Steel Plate 8 Sections Ltd) R HoOnshead 8-11-0 P Dover 


Q I N0KURU (J Hanson) J Hanson 8-11-0 

0/ PARK PRMCEfW A Stephenson) W A Stephenson 5-H-0- 


• 9BF04 

91 5-2 
84 6-1 
78 — 
7713-2 

7010-1 

— 7-2 


P-P SSERtAN DANCER (J David AbeqpFeigan 6-11-0. 
THE MSSISSWPIAN (M Eddey) M Ecktey 5-11-0- 


TDMGHTS DE MGHT (J Poynton) Mis M Dkktoson 5-11-CL 
AforSSSt£T(DSingBby)Ateisbowne4-iOB 


S Jots au n 
AOTtagm 
GBradtoy 


■ MBrisboomn — - » — 


19K: PREACtOR’S GBH 8-109 P Crouqher (12-1) K BaBey 16 ran 


jnlharaca won by Farifna Wood (11-0) at 
I beat The Oder And Bun (11-1) 201 at Car- 
1-0) found BtUe from the 2nd last whan 55M 


3rd to Christmas Hofly(ll-Q) « CarttefeOm if, £865. good to sott/Nov 10.21 ran). CITTENTERTAINER (11-0) 
ran as itiough this rfcsance would suit when 61 5m to Donna Farms “ ‘ 


_ OB)atWMnrby(2m.ES4a,goodtoso(L 

Doc 26. Sr»j). WGHHJGE GREY (11-2) madB a ted nBStakaatffwIasf «Wwn 20 >iI 6 P 7 to Tawny Sf*lf ( 11 - 2 ) at 
Newcas1la(2m,£1084,goodtofirm.Oct29.13ran).rMEXCBrTiaNAL(11-0)ranonatonepacawtien5)U4tlt 
to Royal Greek 11 14»« Market Rason (2m. £1811. good. Nov 14. 18 rare. TOMOfTSTIflEMaHT (11-3) not 
seen out since 18 W 7th to Darnel Martin (12-1) to a 'bumpers' event at Naas ( 2 m 31, £2760. son, Nov 30. 
ran). 

Salecfkn: MARC&UNA 


l (2m 31, £2760. SOIL 


20 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


(2m 4t. £3075. good, Nov 15, 6 ran). 



Winners 

Runners 

Percent 


Winners 

Rides 

Percent 

Mrs M Diteonson 

6 

IB 

33a 

MOwyer 

11 

4b 

24,4 

MPrpO 

6 

20 

300 


11 

45 

244 

14 

54 

25.9 

G Bradley 

8 

40 

20.0 


13 

64 

20-3 

CHawkkis 

5 

44 

11,4 

GRfctante 

6 

5 

58 

68 

102 

741 


Orty Quakers 




.WORCESTER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Z45 RAYBURN SUPREME HANDICAP CHASE (Cl .892: 3m) (10 runners) 


1.15 Ca hirer Hardware. 
1.45 Seven Sound. 

2.15 BIGEE (nap). 


2.45 Celtic Slave. 
3.15 Gala's Image. 

3.45 Troy Fair. 


Michael Seely’s selection: 2.15 Patrick's Fair. 

The Times Private H an di capper’s lop rating: 2.15 BIGEE. 


Going: soft 

1.15 RAYBURN HERITAGE NOVICE HURDLE (Div I: £1,014: 2m 41) (25 runners) 


FF- AB8ETBRANEY (Mrs E Sfis) P Cundoll 7-114)., 


AOonnan — — 










7 

CHARTER HARDWARE (Charter Radng ml) Mrs J Pitman 4-11-0 . 

— _ HRten 

— 9-2 





12 

PPOft- FMfl EXAMBB1(W McManae-CoiesIWMcKenziB-Cotes 8-11-0.. 

- Mr B Towers 


75 

0 GREY GENERAL (J Scobtoj M Ofver 5-11-0 

JOuggen 

— 14-1 

17 

0 JUST SMOKEY (A Cartwright) W Morris 4-1 i-O 

W Morris 

— — 

20 

21 


C Llewellyn (7) 







23 

26 




UFOO ncco STAH (B) (A Sterne) J M Bradtey 4-1 1 -0 — 

G Dairies 


29 

30 
34 

PP- SM tECTOR (C Bis) S MeHar 7-11-0— 

SUNSHINE SAM (The Lady Vosoyl T Forstar 6-7 1-0 

2000-P2 VIRGINIA PAGEANT (Mis® L Gray) F Gray 4-11-0 

- GLendm(4) 
HDnfee 

E Murphy 

— 12-1 
94 11-2 


36 003-PP COMEDY PRMCGSS (C Salcombe) M Tata 4-10-9- 

39 PPPO- KHARAB BS4 (F Btoo-Barraty R Dtckin 5-10-9— 

40 064)0 MISS CHR1STOPHS1 (G Davis) R Holder 4-10-9- 

41 P0042-0 


KDORAVE DEVIL (□ North) K Bishop 4-1©-9_ 
SCALE MODEL (J Roper) J Roper 4-10-9. 

45 PO/OPP-P SURELY (D Bartxu) A James 5-10M9 


43 


OP 


, C Smith 

C Jones 

P Murphy 

BPowofl 

. Mta S Other (7) 
— G Joan 


1385c AUSTRIAN CORPORAL 7-10-10 R Demis (33-1) P Bowdon 21 ran 


41-IOPO OAKLAND JASON (D)(0 Dawes) Mrs W Sykes 8-1 1-7. __ 
F9U22-3 MZ (Mrs GMcFerran) I Dudgeon 8-11-6. 


RJ 


1.45 RAYBURN NOUVELLE HANDICAP CHASE (£1 ,724: 2m) (5 runners) 

B 414PP-1 FiNNESKO (Mrs Z dark) S Christian 8-1 1-12 (5ex) . 

9 

10 
12 
15 


SMenhnd 
P Barton 


P2-2111 SEVERN SOUND (D}(J M Bradtey) J M Bradtey B-11-1 (lOex). 
042032/ BirrrCW BOY (B) (Mrs J Sahsr) N AySrie t3-fO-IJ 


MMctante — 


95 7-4 
M 20-1 
(99 5-1 
98 F5-« 
»4-t 


1965: SILVER CUFF 8-10-7 H Davies (3-1 fay) J Thome 10 ran 

2.75 AGA HANDICAP HURDLE (£4,409: 2m 2f) (12 runners) 


3 

04111-3 

30314-4 

410F40 

02410-1 

001/401- 

PATRICK'S FAN) [W Slater) R Peacock 10-11-7 

P Scodamore 

83 

8-1 

6 

9 

13 










92 

7-1 



91 5-1 
OS 12-1 

16 

4/0210- 

OFtt- 

04031- 

1043-P0 







21 

RECORD WING (3mafl Actms Racing Ltd) D Haydn Jone$ 8-io-B - 

- RJBaggan 
_ CSatitii 

89 

B4 

8-1 

25 

37 




40/001-0 

IWLTStiREYEOMAN(J Sawyer) P Hayward B-lOO 

CMarn 

89 

— 


■ Auuvrwvt* «.iru« c soimumvi re-1 ravi o stwrwrwl 19 ran 


2 

3 

8 

9 

10 

11 

15 

17 

IB 

20 


1222241 GAM5AY ABF) (E Brown) Mrs J Pitmen 7-11-7 

312F0-1 CELTIC SLAVE (D) (B HaByer) T Forster 9-11-4 (5aK) . 

21 FI 34- BARGlU.(D)(MrsJFov4ar)F Winter 7-11-3 

301 PI 0- MAYANNCOR (G Wfragg) 0 L WUams 8-10-9. 


3441-4F LAURENCE RAMBLER (S Tmdafl) S Metor 12-10-7 , 

113143- BROWN VBL (Mrs A Lam) RArmytage 11-10-7 

F1U212/ LE GRAN BMIN (Mrs A Pofiard)J King 8-10-5 

2F213-F GOLDEN HORNET (K Dunn) K Dunn 6-10-T 


4iyi- CONEY GLEN (Mrs D Joyce) V R Bishop 10-I04L. 


2214/F UP AID DOWN (G) (Mrs G Maxwefl) J Giftord 11-10-0 . 


9611-2 

L Hanmy (4) M9F5-2 

— P Srnd—ore 98 4-1 

R Crank 9110-1 

GCtarinJenes 92 — 
isG Aimytnga(4) 97 7-1 

SMrNeM 

R Strange 97 10-1 

G — nauh 9t 10-1 


1985: GAMBR 7-10-12 P Scudamore (11-3) D kScfnlson 14 ran 


3.15 PRED RIMELL MEMORIAL NOVICE CHASE (£3,410: 2m 4f) (18 runners) 


4 0323/020 

6 000412 

7 02/202- 
9 0FP040- 

12 0-ZBD4B 

13 1023P2- 

14 OOOPO- 

15 000P-20 

18 00000-F 
22 OPOOO- 
27 0/ 

34 001- 

35 3B-0PPP 

36 0030/20- 

37 142228/ 

38 2002-23 
40 021010- 
42 OOF-U 


BEACOHSBJE (U Bracks) J Breaks 9-10-12 

DEEP AUBURN (Mrs N Parish) J Parish 7-10-12. 
DEVtNER (S TtedaO) S Meflor 6-10-12. 


M Aten (4) 


DOUBLE BARREL (W McKanztoCoiB^ W McKonztoGotos 10-10-12 Mr B Town 
FOXE^ CASTLE (B)(K Dunn) KDurm 6-1 0-12 R Strong* 


GALA'S IMAGE (ShaKh Al Abu Khamsm) 3%e M Rkne4 6-10-12 SI 

GRETTA'S LEGACY (ROaWes/J Old 6-10-12 C (Jmm&rn (7) 

INTO (A Foster) Mss A FtrrUss 8-10-12 8 Wright 

JUVBOLE PRMCE (Mngtey 6 CaSmr 06s Ubc9 M Otivar 8-10-12 JOoggm 

NED LAWLESS (Mrs M RKhantson) J OU 6-10-12 A WMb 

SAMBY DRAKE fG Thorp) E Lee 9-10-12 ...... BDowtagf/} 

TORY HU. LAD (Mrs P Fox) J Far 6-10-12 SMoora 

TOWN SPECIAL (B Buroarsfl D Tuckar 7-10-12 SMcMsM 

VtVAOUE (R Baker) Mrs J PBman 7-10-12. 


WYFORD (Anne Ekictiass of westndn&ter) T Forster 9-10-12 . 

ACE OF SPIES (A Jacobs) NhsGE Jones 5-10-11 

MEESON GRANGE (J WSeon) F Jordan 5-10-11 

VTOOOLBGHPR«CE(ABaUeyjCTrt«Srw5-tO-11™_ 


— 14-1 
•9911-2 


75 — 
— FW 


— 9-1 
77 — 
92 3-1 


H 

. J 
. CSatti 


Bqw 97 4-1 


1965c SB.VER WOO 6-10-12 R LMay (8-2 tev) Mrs M Rjras0 18 ran 


3^5 RAYBURN HERTTAGE NOVICE HURDLE (Div II: £1,034: 2m 4f) (19 runners) 


4 

5 

6 
9 

14 
18 
IB 
19 
21 

23 030 

25 240340 

29 032300- 

30 

36 PP/Q 
36 PPOPfOO 
38 OOOO/O 
40 33-21 PD 

42 O/POPOO 

43 


R Holder 

F winter 

JOkJ 

D Nicholson 
J Spearing 
T Forstar 


BOOTHS BOY (Mrs J Booth) B Smart 5-11-0— 

BROTHERLY (A Tayksr} A Taytor 5-1 1-0 

0 BUCKSKINS BEST (D Holder) R Dkddn 4-11-0. 
D- DAVY'S WEIR (Mrs R Lacy) J Gittord 
ICE RMK (T Hughes) Mrs J Borrow 5-1 1-0 

JOE JAFFA (N Sriiiffl) N Smith 5-11-0 

U LYNWOOD LAO (G Price) G Price 5-1 1-0 


BPoweB 


Mr A Taytor 

C, 

HI 


— 132 

— 4-1 


MAMORA BAY (Mra E Hbchfeis) Mrs J Pitman 4-11-0- 
PLEATED (P Hopkins) J King 4-1 1-0_ 


MrWWetngi 
C Price 


ROYAL HERO (Mrs F Bowden) P Bowden 5-11-0-. 
SHBELDAHS (B) (D Goodenaugh) K Bishop 5-11-0. 

TROY FAIR (RMcAlpine)J Edwards 4-tl-O. 

VMPOL (K Dum) K Dim 9-11-0 . 


S McHaM — — 


CLAYHRJ. (DRL (H John Irish) P Hobbs 5-10-9 . 
FFAffl WEN (W Gnflkhs) J D Thomas 7-10-9. 


GOLD EN BUN TB4G (M Maddo x ) H Voorspuy 5-10^ - 
LADY FIREPOWER (R NqhUngale) R HoUar 4-10-9- 
RUDANSCA (Mss H Cope) B Vorjn ft- 10-9. 


70 8-1 
55 10-1 
•S9F7-4 


_ J Horst (7) 

. MRckmg — — 
.NCotaman ID 5-1 


RDeonisro 

_ S Earle (4) 
D 

_ R: 


GMTON BAYARD (Mrs M Otver) w OUver 5-10-9. 


198S: IOLOIMO 5-11-0 K Burke (B4 lav) A Jarvis 22 ran 

Course specialists 


INTERS 




JOCKEYS 



rare Rumors 

Percent 





17 

60 

28.3 

PScudamore 

36 

212 

17.0 

11 

SO 

2Z0 

H Dawes 

SB 

189 

14^ 

12 

62 

19.4 

SMoreftesd 

15 

150 

10.0 

23 

122 

183 

A Webb 

8 

94 

83 

13 

71 

183 





18 

124 

14JS 


Only Quafifiers 




• Peter Scudamore, ihe leadingNational Hunt rider, was troubled by a back iqjuiy 
sustained in a fell at Wincan ion Thursday, missed a winner ai South well yesterday. 
Scudamore felt sore after riding schooling yesterday morning, and said,“It was ob- 
vious my back was not right so I decided lo see a physiotherapist and I will be back 
vJrline n* Wntrpri^r tnrtav " hn from hie r-ar totpnhnm> sfiw mvivtnv hv a tmwH 


O’Connor’s Quick 
Trip to Newbury 

From Our Irish Racing Correspondent 

Jim O'Connor, owner of a coach to make the journey over. 


pub in KiUinick, a small village 
in County Wexford, has his first 
runner outside Ireland with 
Quick Trip, the sole Irish chal- 
lenger far Saturday's Hennessy 
Gold Cup. 

Quick Trip has been trained 
in the style of Red Rum, on the 
strand, since joining O'Connor's 
stable early in the year. He has 
gained three victories, including 
his two most recent starts. 

His biggest success to date 
came in the Guinness Munster 
NationaL at Limerick, where he 
got up in the last stride to short 
head the top weight Boro 
Quarter. 

Quick Trip was ridden by 
O'Connor’s sou David, an ama- 
teur rider, who has made a name 
for himself as one of the up and 
coming jump jockeys in the 
country. 

His other son, Warren, who 
goes to scale at a mere seven 
stone, has ridden seven winners 
on the Flat as an apprentice this 
season. 

Quick Trip will certainly not 
lack far vocal support on Sat- 
urday as O'Connor reports that 
22 or his regulars have hired a 


His trainer gives him a very 
good chance indeed. “He is a 
superb jumper who stays very 
weU,” he says, “and in my 
opinion he has been thrown in 
at the weights with the nine 
stone and one pound allotted 
him in the original long 
handicap.” 

For his victory at Umerick be 
picked up an additional five 
pounds but he should still give a 
good account of himself. The 
long term objective is next 
year's Ain tree Grand NationaL 

In London today, Lord 
HemphOL the senior steward of 
the Irish Turf Club, and Mr 
Larry Albns, director of litter- 
national Sports Marketing, 
Bndweiser. will host a press 
conference al the Cafe Royal to 
promote English interest m the 
second entry far next year's 
Budweiser Irish Derby due to 
dose on December 10. 

The guaranteed value of the 
race has been increased by 
IR£5 0,000 to £500000 and yes- 
terday Lord Hemphill was at 
Saint-Cloud, near Paris, engaged 
on a similar exercise amongst 
French owners and trainers. 


British hopes fail 


Magfetnos, the mount of feic 
Legrix, proved too good far the 
British challengers Glory For- 
ever, Thameen, My Im ag inatio n 
and Good Saving, ra the 
Criterion de Saint-Cloud 
yesterday. 

Legrix had Magistro s m last 
place in the early stages, along 
with the favoarite Dastau, but 
aiade good progress round the 
home turn to lead two furlongs 
out from the weakening Gtay 


Forever, who eventually came 
fifth. 

Magistras stayed on well to 
win by a length and a half from 
the fast-fiuishiiig Sir David with 
Groom Dancer, who held every 
chance 150 yards out, a head 
back in third. 

My |mngiimrion.theraoimtof 
John Had, plugged on to be 
sixth. Thameen, the final ride 
far Tony Murray was eighth. 


Casa Knipe on form 

upe, who 
faurth to 


promising fourth to Hardy Lad 
in the Scottish National this 
year, showed all his old sparkle 
with a runaway success m the 
Dick Brewrtt Memorial Handi- 
cap Chase at Sedgefield 
yesterday. 

Howard Brown, the amateur 
rider, was registering his first 
win in a chase, rode a good race 
on Casa Knipe. Holding the 
horse up in the early stages and 
then kicking on along the back 
stretch for the last time, showing 
in the lead with five fences stiU 
to jump. 

Don Lee, the Kirkbymoorside 
trainer, explained: “He has 
taken a hell of a long lime lo 
come to his best buz he’s back 
now and will be aimed at all the 


long distance handicap chases." 

Cottage Leas, the 7-4 favour- 
ite, was a well beaten third. 

St Gabriel, who beat Maladhu 
by one and a half lengths, in the 
Comforth Amateur Riders Nov- 
ices Hurdle, was heavily sup- 
ported from 7-2 to6-4favocnite. 

The winner is owned, trained 
and ridden by Tommy Tate; 
from Otiey, who explained: "St 
Gabriel injured a und leg last 
year but he is a very fist jumper 
and fencing will be his aim-" 
Empire ^tey, 5-2 favourite, 
beat Valentinos Joy by two and 
a half lengths in the Racing Post 
Top of the North Novices 
Chase; The winner, ridden by 
John Hansen, only joined 
Thirsk trainer Robin Tate's yard 
after being bought for 2,600 
guineas at the Don caster Sales. 


Results from two meetings 

Sedgefield 


good 

■LO Cm 41 Ik*o) 1, DME AND A 
DOLLAR (Mss D Jones. 12-1 K 2. F teuw 
Rote (C 6-1 5 3. Pt% AtMrtc 

(P Niven. 5-1). ALSO RAN; 6 Gfean Grey 
(491). 16 Jay-Boa Windows (pul 25 
FaJasha (SttiL 33 Koda Khan. Litear 
Romance. Bebop Baby (pul 9 ran. 3L 20L 
2ftL 31 30L A w Jonas at Oswestry. Tota 
£8.10: £1.3). £1.10. £1.50. OR £820. 
CSR £1920. Winner bought in (or 860 
gns. 

1.30 (2m eft) 1. GOWAN HOUSE (R 
Lamb, 11-10); 2, Canos Attraction (P 
Tuck. 5-6 ta«£ 3. Beaten Lad (D Dutton. 
10-1). 3 ran. NR: FotokL 41 121. W A 
Stephenson at Bishop Auckland. Tola: 
win £240. OF: £1.10- CSF: £235. 


Bracken (404. 10 

Crawaooppar 8 ran. IkL 

12L D Burchett at Suka-on-TranL Tote: 
£4.60; £1.10. £2.00. £1-40. DF: £1090. 
C9R: £28.70. 

Ma) 1. DOWNTOWN 
01KA«*hpSiraBLfih4 taffc 3. FR»^- 
Rol (M Bastard, 7-05 3, Domal Dm (8 
DwSng, 14-1). ALSO RAN: 92 SeasonM 
E" fear. 7 Song Of Christie ff), 8 Saw 
Sprtte Mth). ^ Neshooa fflthj. 14 
Aescutepius (pu). 16 Cony Cone. 25 
Hooton Lane, Gaflant Native (5th), Hot 
Potato (pu). Dream Once Mora tan, 
Ans*. Minnies Dipper (pu). 16 rw. 1*5 
gnwra . Ne neeft. a 41. DU. 6t 30L f 
J ordan at Leominster. Tote: EL50; szm, 
£^3a ^9a OF: £7JO. CSF: £11^8. 

£ 86 . 10 . Winner was bought in tor 
ZTOOgns. 


Brwwn 

Coftigo 

RAN: 4 Randarehr ipu), 20 Busk Fuzz 

— otTyrefcoj.e ran. 15L a. il. 

_ Lee at KtdcbyrnocxsUe. Tote: £4.80; 
£1.70, El .7a DF:£a3a CSF: £1081. 

230 (2m Ch) 1. BIPRE WAY 
Hansen 5-2 IM Z Valentinos _ 
Peppar. 5-lt 3, We* Link (R Lamb. 9-feL 
AiS& RAN: 7-2 Tartan Twfflghl m. 8 
Perfect image (OH). 10 Mighty Mark (4th). 
11 SB* ToSn fitfl. 33 Lumber Quay. 8 
ran. 2*L ia 1XL 1»L 2»L B Tate a I 

Think. Tots: £060: £1.60, £1.60. S22B. 

OR£2140.CSF:ei4J’a 


2.15 0m 110yd cM 1. 

Sherwood. 15$); 2. 

Boatey. S-1 fc 3, Owen Gtontknrer ,, 
Cofcnwv 7-4 fas). ALSO RAN: 6 AUcb\ 


3D (2m fidle) 1 . ST QABREL (Mr T Tato, 
6-4 lav): 2. HMaAu (Mr Aitaew Robson. 
Mt 3. Swpea (MSS F Tate. 33- f L ALSO 
RAN: I5£&ey Card. 8 Night Vtavior 
(4H8. 9 Strtetiy Bacon (6th). 14 OouMe 
une, Ha^u-drie. 16 Crack-frJIin. 20 

Runager. 33 Another name. Ascot Acoki, 

Oarate, Dun Water toe* Mtoter KaofW* 
Country Rhythm. Lighter Shade. Mwejo. 
IBraa m 1M. hSbi. KLT ToteatOSey. 
Tote: £3.10 : £1S0, £180. £m DF: 
£SSD.CSF:£SS4. 

AW pn hotel 1, MONT QUEST (D 
Nolan, frlh 2. Jody's Boy (Mr S SwJera. 
12-lfc 3. sreamd (S Chariton. 

12-lC ALSO BAN: 11-10 lav Atidnsons 

(h* 7 Di*a ai DoBs (4thL 10 IwraM 

iSdi}, Northern Rfver (5tfiL IZAieWReFiad 
(puL Laugh-A-iwnute. 20 CHchham Lad. 
25 Frosty Touch. 33 Karel. Kings Koft 
toil). Carbutad Bay- 14 ran. NR: 

^^5S«eflh raift 

£3.40. ea.10. £2.60. "DF: £27 W. CSR 
2101.79. Trtcaet £1D67^1. 

Ptocepofc £10030 

Southwell 

Galas: good to soft 
1.T5 (2m 74yd Ch) 1, KILSYTH <M 
ftwHhy. «■«: 2. price Of Ptaea p. 

(BPiawicrersa 

m*&> fll r»r U«W foul 8 RHms 



12 


2^8 (2m 41 hdto) 1. 

Barton. 5-4 lav); 2. 

Cra*, 20-1); 3. » 

MOT Rgto M . SO RAN: l0880Saant 

ManuaU Bsea-s brage (8th). 1S2 In 

AnSwtoiB. Shannon BefiK 

^ * 

3.15 Om 110yd CM 1. SANfNCUFFE 
BOY GMantred. 6-11; 2. Prince Mettte- 
•** ?* Dwyer. 7-2); 3, Graen Gone <C 
HawMns. 35 - 40 tav). ALSO RAN; 4 

ss5»°«st l rs TS&fM 

). 25Mr Bun touL 50 Caii 
II ran. 
_ Tote: 

— 218.10. 

CSR £2824. 

345 pm hdte) 1. CRUDEN BAY (S 
Johnson. 7-4 toft 2. Bokt Rrataricfc (MIk 
T Dads, 16-1): 3, EntoM kb (m 
B rtsboume.14-1). ALSO RAM7-2 Purple 
Rssh. S.Rsrehtoo (4th). 10 Cte Mat n 
Draw The Une ^0. 14 Khaati Hawk. 18 
Btd. 33 Whai Win I 
iran.7L5Lnk.20l. 



IKSBJ 

ra 

. StTmeky (6th). 20 Ajrah 
Wav^aneraUd(t)Tl2i 

4L P Felgaw at Meini 


£220: ET50. £380. 22-50. DR 
CSR £3036. Trkast £29894. 

Ptocenet: C17S5 


remis 

Change of 
attitude 
brings its 
reward 

From Barry Wood 
New York 

Bcttina Bvoge drew inspira- 
tion from a tournament eight 
months ago to defeat Kathy 
Rinaldi 7-5, 6-4 in the opening 
round of ibeSl minion Virginia 
Slims finals here yesterday. 

A doubles player in the finals 
that marked the end of the 19SS- 
86 season in March, the West 
German could only watch bar 
more successful colleagues con- 
test the coveted singles title. “I 
watched everyone else play and 
was determined U> play here 
myself," she said. 

A of attitude to her 

game — *T decided 1 would do n 
right or not do it at alT — meant 
that she was able io realize her 
ambition. A gritty performance 
against Rinaldi saw her con- 
nn ue her recent run of ssccess. 
Miss Bunge's assessment of her 
game afterwards summed up 
her attitude since March. "1 
knew l wasn't going to get 
anything by playing so-so and 
became a little more 
aggressive,” she stated. 

Melina Gurney, aged 17 and a 
Californian playing for the first 
time at Madison Square 
Garden, was far less overawed 
by her surroundings titan 
Manuda Maleeva who, al- 
though only two years older, has 
vastly more experience. But at 
17 everything is an adventure. 

“I wasn't nervous at all,” Miss 
Gurney said. “When I was 
wanning up during the day- 
music was playing and it was 
really exciting.” Her Bulgarian 
opponent could barely walk on 
court **I was shaking all over 
and for the fust three or four 
games I couldn't put the ball in 
court I don't remember being 
so nervous before.' 1 

Thai enabled Gurney to 
establish herself in the match 
and vary her baseline game with 
the odd volley or drop-shot Bui 
Maleeva had fully recovered her 
composure by ihe second set 
and was able to romp home 6-4, 
6-1. “When 1 settled down 1 was 
able to hit deeper and deeper.” 
Miss Maleeva said. “I really 
warned to win very badly be- 
cause it's ray first wfa in three 
championships.” 

RESULTS: Staten: Rret round: M 
Mtomvs{Bun WMGufneyflJSl 6-4. 6-1: 
B Bungs (WC9 bt K Rmakk [US). 7-S. 6-4. 
DwUu: FMt round: C KoMe-)Osch 
(WG) and H Sukova (C2) U S 
Parkhomenko and L Sovcftenko (USSR). 
2-6. 7-6. 6-2. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Duane fit 
to face 
Australia 

ByKehiiMaddin 

Ronnie Duane, the Warring- 
ton centre, will be fit to take ms 
place in the Great Britain side to 
' ry Australia in the thud and 
_ al international at Wigan on 
Saturday. Doubtful after suffer- 
ing a back injury in 
Warrington's match at Leeds on 
Sunday. Duane yesterday re- 
ported fit to Maurice BamfonL 
the Great Britain coach. 

There are, however, doubts 
about the reserves. John 
Fieklhouse, the St Helens for- 
ward, and Tony Marohant, the 
Castieford centre, both have leg 
injuries and Bamford will give 
them fitness checks today before 
deriding whether to select new 
reserves. 

The British squad will as- 
semble today at their pre- 
international headquarters at 
Shaw Hill Country Club. 
Chorley, and will have their first 
training session at Wigan this 
afternoon. 

Mark Elia, the New Zealand 
centre who has been the subject 
of representations to the New 
Zealand League by St Helens, 
will play bis first game for the 
dub against Hull on Sunday. St 
Helens have been upset by the 
fact that Elia arrived from New 
Zealand a month ago with a 
hamstring injury, and has since 
been unable to play. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


SPORT 


*i 


BOXING 


GOLF 


TENNIS 


I *' • 


V 


V 


x 


i 


Heavyweight 
series gets a 
long overdue 
kiss of life 

From Srikum&r Sen Bffdng Correspondent Las Vegas 
TTw heavyweight series to Witherspoon won a pulling 


unify the world champion- 
ship, which for the most part 
of its four main contests has 
lollopped along at its own pace 
with no clear pointers to who 
will finish on top, has sud- 
denly taken on a sense of 
urgency with the entry of an 
unbeaten Mike Tyson, aged 
20, of New York. 

Tyson, who has a record of 
25 knockouts in 27 bouts - 15 
of those in the first round — 
aims to be the youngest world 
heavyweight champion ever. 
Floyd Patterson holds the 
record, winning the title in 
1956attheageof2l years and 
10 months. Tyson, who is just 
5ft 1 1 ‘Ain against the 6ft-plus 
of the three champions — 
Trevor Berbick (World Box- 
ing Council), Tim 
Witherspoon (World Boxing 
Association), and Michael 
Spinks (International Boxing 
Federation), meets Berbick, 
aged 33, a Jamaican-born 
Canadian, here on Saturday. 

Three champions have 
changed in the series: Berbick 
took his title from Pink! on 
Thomas, Witherspoon his 
from Tony Tubbs and Spinks 
his from Larry Holmes. This 
youngster intends to bring 
some continuity into the 
weight class. 

If he succeeds against 
Berbick, his next bout will be 
against the winner of Tubbs 
and Witherspoon, who find 
themselves in a mid-Decem- 
ber rematch because of drugs 
irregularities on the part of 
Witherspoon in their first 
encounter. Though 


and pushing contest, it was 
decided by the WBA that 
Tubbs ought to be given a 
second chance after 
Witherspoon's defence against 
Frank Bruno. 

Then if Tyson wins Main, 
and it is a big if as both 
Witherspoon and Tubbs are 
big, strong and cany heavy 
punches, he meets Spinks in 
the final contest Tyson’s 
manager, Jim Jacobs, has it all 
woiiea out so that his boxer 
can comfortably break 
Patterson’s record. Tyson has 
until May 25, 1988, but Jacobs 
said: “Mite wiD be world 
champion before his 21 st 
birthday in June. Ninety days 
after Berbick, he will take care 
of Witherspoon or Tubbs, and 
90 days after that take care of 
Spinks,” Jacobs said. 

After lifting the final crown. 
Tyson inteods to defend regu- 
larly at 90-day intervals. Like 
the Lord High Executioner,. 
Jacobs has a little list of 
opponents. He has put them 
in two categories, A and B. In 
the A group are the likes of 
Holmes and Thomas, and in 
the B, Bruno. “Although 
Bruno is not in the A list, he is 
top of the B," Jacobs saidL 
However, that does not mean 
Bruno must wait his turn.. 
According to Jacobs, Tyson 
could well make his first 
defence against Bruno. Tyson 
and Bruno are friends. They 
met in the Catskills, where 
Tyson lives. “Mike sparred 
with Bruno. The bout would 
go on in London. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

Washington outlast 
‘awesome’ Montana 

By Robert Kirley 


Somebody once said that 
statistics were for losers; Joe 
Montana, a winner by anyone's 
standards, can appreciate the 
concept. On Monday night in 
Washington, the quarterback of 
the San Francisco 49ers was 
starting his second game since 
returning from spinal Him- sor- 
cery. Playing while cinched np 
in a protective flak Jacket, he 
was, to use an expression popu- 
lar at his home base in Califor- 
nia, totally awesome. Never- 
theless, his performance was not 
sofTicient to prevent the 
Redskins' 14-6 victory at Robert 
F Kennedy Stadium. 

The numbers? Montana com- 
pleted 33 of 60 passes for 441 
yards, indoding 12 completions 


to Jeny Rice for 204 yards. His 
attempts and yardage set dub 
records, bat he was unable to 
lead the 49ers to a touchdown. 
Montana threw three intercep- 
tions and fumbled once to set op 
the Redskins' first score in the 
game. 

George Rogers, of .Wash-, 
iagton, gained 104 yards in 24 
carries; indoding a one- yard 
plange in the first quarter that 
gave him his fourteenth rushing 
toachdown this season. The 
mark is the best in the National 
Football League. The Wash- 
ington quarterback. Jay Schroe- 
der, completed 17 of 40 passes 
for 170 yards, including a 27- 
yard third-quarter touchdown 
toss to Gary Oark. 


HORSE TRIALS 


Series rewards improved 

By Jenny MacArthm 


The richest prize in one-day 
eventing was announced yes- 
terday when the sponsors 
MacConnal-Mason Mercedes 
disclosed their plans for a £5.000 
accumulator lo be awarded at 
ihe end of the 1987 series. 

Altogether the sponsors are 
putting £50.000 into the series 
which consists of nine events 
beginning with Cookham in 
March and finishing with the 
final at Rotherfield Park in 
August. The winner of the 
accumulator receives £3,000 
with the runner-up getting 
£1.250 and £750 going to the 
third placed competitor. This 
represents an increase of 500 per 


cent on the accum ulator on offer 
when the series was launched 
four years ago. 

Lucinda Green, the former 
world champion and a previous 
winner of the accumulator prize 
said yesterday she welcomed the 
increased prize money, particu- 
larly as it now extended to third 
place. One-day eventing is the 
backbone of the sport of horse 
trials and Mrs Green applauded 
the feet that the money was 
going where it is most needed. 

Rotherfield. the flagship of 
the series, expanded into a 
three-day event for the last two 
years but will now revert to a 
one-day event. 



Winner: Tony Jacklin con gratula tes Diane Bailey, the woman golfer of the year (Photograph: John Sogers) 


Bailey is 
poised for 
top honour 

By Mitchell Platts 

[Mane Bailey, who led Great 
Britain and Ireland to an un- 
precedented victory in the Cur- 
tis Cup on American soil last 
August, is on the threshold of 
making history again. 

Mrs Bailey could be given the 
ultimate reward for her sterling 
effort in Prairie Dunes, Kansas, 
by being offered an historic 
third term as captain of the 
British Isles women's amateur 
team for the defence of the Cup 
in 1988. 

She said: “It would certainly 
be an honour and I would 
obviously be tempted to accept 
But the 1988 match isa long way 
off and the selectors have yet to 
meet to discuss the matter!'' 

Mrs Bailey was in London at 
the Basil Street Hold to repre- 
sent the team and to receive on 
us behalf the Avia Watches 
Woman Golfer of the Year 
award. 

Tony Jacklin. who captained 
Europe lo their Ryder Cup 
success against the United 
States last year, made the 
presentation and said: “It is a 
tremendous privilege for me to 
be here. It was a most marveW 
lous victory and I. as much as 
anyone, appreciate how difficult 
it is to go over there and win. 
Let’s hope the Ryder Cup team 
can continue the trend in Amer- 
ica next year." 

Mrs Bailey added: “I am 
absolutely thrilled to receive the 
award on behalf of the team. I 
must admit when Tony 
Jack! in's team won the Ryder 
Cup I was watching the TV and 
the tears were streaming down 
my face. Tony led the way for 
us: his victory gave us the 
inspiration and determination 
and. most important, the belief 
that we could do it." 

The Great Britain and Ireland 
team, which became the first 
side to win a major golf team 
event on American soil, com- 
prised Lilian Behan, Karen Da- 
vies, Claire Hourihane. Patricia 
Johnson. Mary McKenna. Belle 
Robertson, Vicki Thomas and 
ill ThomhilL Elsie Brown was 
the vice-captain as the United 
States were beaten 1 3-5. 


Michael Stevenson on Lancashire^ new captain 

‘Yosser’ Hughes lands a 
job he never asked for 


i 


Life can hold problems for 
those who are basically remem- 
bered for one thing. Prince 
Obolensky scored a great try and 
no one recalls his hundreds of 
others: and, for one glorious 
week. Joe Johnson became 
infinitely more famous than 
Steve Davis. 

Lancashire's new captain, 
David Hughes, or “Yosser" to 
his colleagues, comes in the 
same category. During a Gillette 
Cup semi-final against Glouc- 
estershire at Old Trafford in 
1971 Ihe dosing stages were so 
benighted that there was no 
chance of seeing the fast bowling 

Victim of the 
one- day game 

of Procter and Davey. The lights 
in the Warwick Road station 
shone bright and Hughes, mani- 
festly inspired took 24 nuts off 
the 56th over (a four through 
extra cover, a six overiong-on. a 
two through the covets, a two to 
wide long-on. a cover-driven 
four and another six overiong- 
on), to snatch an unlikely vic- 
tory and leave John Mommore 
with advanced shellshock. 

Last season Hughes played 
virtually no first-class cnckrt 
and many people must ha™? 
wandered whether his career 
was over. He played for 

Lancashire's second team with 

his old friend Alan Ormrod. the 

s 

iaSSSSa have h^npvej, 
the county s vote of aporovai 



frequent; but he bad played 
county cricket for 14 years 
before he registered his first 
championship hundred, which 
was scored against Warwick- 
shire and Willis, who had 
reduced Lancashire lo 141 for 
five. U occupied only 165 
minutes. 

Hughes's appointment fol- 
lows another sad season at Old 
Trafford. culminating in the 
departure of Jack Bond and 
Peter Lever. Clearly the emer- 
gence of Folley as a slow left- 


Communication a 
first priority 


1 


Hughes: seeking revival 
speaks volumes for the esteem 
in which they are held. 

As a slow Icfi-armer. Hughes 
was (unlike Jack Simmons) to 
some extent a victim of the one- 
day g3me. A natural flighter of 
the ball, he hovered between 
styles according to (he varied 
modes of the game, so that the 
success his ability demanded 
eluded him. 

His balling and his fielding 
were quite another matter. The 
blistering pace and brilliance of 
Clive Uoyd as a cover point 
disguised the fact that Hughes 
was one of the bej: all-round 
fielders in the game, equalft at 
home close to or away from' the 
wic'.;cl- His batting blossomed 
as opportunities became more 


armer means that the new 
captain need not bowl unless he 
wishes and the batting talent at 
his disposal should be more 
than adequate. A question mark 
hangs over the future of Lloyd, 
who will be captaining the Rest 
of the World during a three- 
week tour of England: this in 
addition to several business 
interests. But probabh both 
Lloyd and Patterson will be 
available for Lancashire next 
summer. 

Both Hughes and the new 
coach. Ormrod. arc desperately 
keen to aid the revival of 
Lancashire's fortunes. Along 
with John Savage, the former 
Leicestershire and Lancashire 
off-spinner, a greatly respected 
coach, the team of three seems 
quite up to the job. As Ormrod 
put it: “Perhaps our first priority 
will be communications be- 
tween the club authorities and 
the pteyers. People just must not 
go around not talking to each 
Other.'' 


BADMINTON 


Players protest at prize cut 


ling 
j rid 


ing the world No. I, Morten 
Frost, of Denmark, are com- 
plaining to the International 
Badminton Federation about 
the reduction in si ogles prize- 
money levels for next year's 
World Grand Pm finals. 

Among them is the European 
and Commonwealth champion, 
Helen Trokc. whose mother and 
manager. Diana, is writing a 
letter to the IBF on behalf of be 
English players involved. These 
include the Commonwealth 
champion, Steve Baddeley: the 
England No. 2, Nick Yates; and 
the former English national 
champion, Fiona Elliott. 

Frost, who is based in 
London, has already made a 
verbal complaint. “1 am 
shocked," he said. “We had no 
warning of it I shall put up with 
it for one year, but if we cannot 
negotiate something belter after 
that then 1 shall have to consider 
whether in future it is worth- 
while going to ihe finals." 

The threat also is that other 


By Richard Eaton 

leading players may have doubts 
as to whether they will go to the 
Grand Prix finals — something 
which has particularly been 
concerning Baddeley. All five 
players are concerned about the 
effect on the morale of already 
hard-worked singles players, 
who attract the most publicity 
and therefore presumably the 
most sponsorship. 

The reduction has, however, 
apparently been done at the 
request of the four players' 
representatives, two of whom, 
Steen Find berg and Gillian 
Gowers, are doubles players. 
Furthermore the overall level of 
prize-money for the finals, 
about $100,000, remains 
roughly the same, while the 
percentage given to the three 
doubles events has increased 
slightly. 

The IBF can reasonably argue 
therefore that they have to 
consider views that are ex- 
pressed through official chan- 
nels and purport to be the 


opinions of the majority of 
players. 

Unfortunately the drop in 
singles prize-money seems to be 
— allowing for the compensation 
of an increased bonus pool for 
final league piacings — in excess 
of25 percent. Complaints could 
tbus have been predicted, which 
is a pity because the World 
Grand Prix circuit, originally 
sponsored for $3 million over 
three years, and the finals have 
been one of the most exciting 
developments in recent times. 

Miss Troke, meanwhile, has 
called the reductions “ab- 
solutely disgusting", and Badd- 
eley has described them as “a bit 
rich". The most cogent argu- 
ment has been forwarded by 
Ffosl “The game is getting too 
social." be said. “The singles are 
paying for the mixed doubles to 
come into the Grand Prix. It is a 
significant drop in prize-money 
that is involved and we must do 
everything in our power to get it 
changed. 


SPORTS POLITICS 


Cost-cutting threat 
to future of CCPR 


The rivalry between the 
Sports Council and the Central 
Council of Physical Recreation 
comes to a bead today. Just as 
the CCPR open their annual 
conference in Bournemouth, 
their future will be discussed at a 
meeting in London between the 
Government’s Public Accounts 
Committee and John Wbeadey. 
the director of the Sports 
Council. 

The Government are con- 
cerned that there is both 
duplication of effort and exces- 
sive administrative costs at the 
CCPR and have taken the 
unprecedented step of asking 
Wheatley to appear before the 
committee, who examine all 
aspects of Government 
spending. 

The committee wifi be asking 
Wheatley to justify the Sports 
Council's demand for £40.984 
million for 1987-88 to fund 
British sport. This compares to 
£36.984 million for the present 
year. The Sports Council have 
been told that their planning 
budget next year should not take 
into account any increase bo- 
cause of inflation (presently 
running at 3.5 per cent), a dear 
warning they are likely to re- 
ceive the same amount as this 
year or. in other words, a cut of 
about £1.3 million. 

But 1 understand the Govern- 
ment arc again to raise the 
subject of the CCPR. which they 
fund through the Sports Coun- 
cil. The CCPR. whose president 
is the Duke of Edinburgh, take 
an independent line and have 
not been loath to criticize 
Government policies. They 
have campaigned vigorously 
over such general topics as the 
decline of team sports in schools. 


By John Good body 

and the sale of playing Gelds for 
development- 

The uncertain status of the 
CCPR has led lo a series of 
attacks. Last February the 
Environment Committee stated 
in an official report “Wc see no 
significant role for the CCPR 
other than to represent the 
collective views of governing 
bodies. We do not see why the 
CCPR should be financed from 
the public purse. It would be 
desirable for the Heads of 
Agreement (drawn up in 1 972 to 
define their limits of 
responsibility) between the 
Sports Council and the CCPR to 
be re- negotiated to phase out the 
grant" 

In July, the National Audit 
Office pointed out that the 
CCPR had refused to aDow the 
Sports Council to undertake any 
value for money audit of their 
activities, despite receiving 
nearly £1.5 million in grants 
between 1972 and 1985. But 
since 1985. the CCPR have 
agreed at least lo display their 
expenditure for examination. In 
the year ending this month they 
have asked the Sports Council 
for £623.700. a sum which has 
still to be agreed. 

A natural way for the Sports 
Council to meet their financial 
obligations to all the governing 
organizations of sports and also 
their administration of the six 
national centres, a topic which 
will also be discussed today, 
would be to reduce drastically 
the Government grant to the 
CCPR. This might eventually 
lead to the extinction of the 
CCPR and the end of an 
independent voice in British 
sport. 


SKIING 


Swiss set tough course 


Milan lAP) — Technically 
demanding courses have been 
prepared lor next year’s world 
championships at the Swiss 
resort of Crans Montana, or- 
ganizers said yesterday. 

Bubi Rombaldi. vice-presi- 
dent of ihe organizing commit- 
tee and technical director of ihe 
championships, said the down- 
hill and giant slalom courses 
have been re-designed and 
modified "to make them more 
technical and difficult". 

“At present we have sun and 
no snow." he said. “But tracks 
will be snowy and perfect by the 
start of the competition.” 

The championships are 
scheduled from January 25 
through fu February 8. Ten 
world lilies — five for women 
and five for men — will be 21 
slake. Rombaldi said the Swiss 
downhill ace. Peter Mueller, 
who inspected ihe modified 
downhill track, called it terrific. 


“We designed it for a victory 
of Swiss skiers." Rombaldi said 
wilh a smile. “The steep giant 
slalom course, with large bends, 
could be good to Italian 
athletes." He added that the 
downhill course for the women’s 
race “is not very last but very 
technical". 

Rombaldi and other Swiss 
officials spoke at a news con- 
ference in Milan. The men's 
downhill will be nm down the 
3.670-melre long Nalionaie 
track, which drops 98 J metres. 

The “Chetzcron" track, with a 
length of 1.207 metres and a 
drop of 389 metres. will host the 
men's giant slalom. 

The men's and women's sla- 
loms will be held in the bottom 
part untie Nalionaie track while 
the women's downhill will be 
run down the 2.45 1 -meter long 
Mont-Lachaux track, dropping 

fcSj mnirw, 


Exmoor 
radar 
inquiry 

A public inquiry next 
month will determine whether 
Exmoor is to have its 
controversial dome-shaped, 
early-warning radar station. 

After earlier being rebuffed 
by the Exmoor National Park 
over a proposal to have the 
station built on Five Barrows 
Cross, the South West Water 
Authority now want it sited 
1.560 feet up on Castle Com- 
mon. Shoulibarrow. 

The national park authori- 
ties have turned down the 
proposal on conservation 
grounds, saying it would be an 
unacceptable intrusion into a i 
remote part of the park and ! 
contrary to the structure plan. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley, Sec-i 
retary of State for the Environ- 
ment, has ordered the inquiry 
at Dulverton on December 8 ! 
and it is expected to last for a 
week. 

The water authority wants 
the station as the last link in ! 
their early warning chain 
• The long-standing gap in 
the West Country weather 
reporting service between U - 1 
fra combe and Weston super | 
Mare will be plugged with the 
building of Minehead's new 
weather station by Christmas. 


Tesco store 

Tesco have been given the go- 
ahead for a new multi-million 
pound superstore employing I 
380 people on the outskirts of | 
KJngs’s Lynn, Norfolk. 


Hobbs will not sell 
herself short in a 
last bid for the top 


By Sue Mott 


Being named after some 
small goblin in a fantasy forest 
is not the ideal route to 
stardom. Especially when 
you’re bent on adding the 
glittering sheath of glamour to 
your public image. Hohbitt 
definitely has a problem. 

Actually Anne Hobbs is the 
name, but for so long has 
Britain's No. 3 female tennis 
player been in piimsoles and 
plights on court, she has 
become comfortably, affec- 
tionately known as Hobbitt 
and the epithet will not ! 
Neither will the concept 
she won't manage to win 
anything, ever, especially now 
at the advanced age of 27. 

To a0 these irritants Hobbs 
reacts with no consternation 
whatever. As far as she is 
concerned her peak is fast 
approaching, the public are 
desperate to adore a successor 
to Queen Virginia and 
Wimbledon is there to be won. 
“No, it's not too late for me." 
says the woman who has never 
been beyond the last 16 in the 
singles of any grand shun 
event 

She is nothing if not a 
fighter. One who Hsts ter chief 
attributes as hard work, 
dedication and guts. Ms 
Nastase she is not “One of the 
lads,** is the consensus from 
the Press room, but she proved 
in this year's Wtghtman Cup 
in London that she still has the 
potential to do more than buy 
pints in the post-match bar. 

Britain were a sorry sight 
losing, and not even bravely, 
one rubber after another. 
Annabel Croft nursed injured 
feelings (pressures iff being 
Britain's No. 1, she saidL 
Sara Gamer had an injured 
toe. Suddenly, into this fu- 
nereal procession, Hobbs was 
summoned as chief pall 

bearer. Sbe was required to 
play singles against the 
world's No. 12. Bonnie 
Gadusek, and sbe had about 


Getting to grips 
with the sponsors 


two hours to prepare. “I felt 
mad, but I just went out there 
and brought the best out of 
myself,** she said, “1 knew I'd 
have to play at my peak and I 
certainly did. That was the 
best Td played all year." 

She lost, but from the red 
draped boxes that bung in 
tiers around the Albert Hall 
rang rapturous applause. 
There is nothing, particularly 
after popping sponsors' cham- 
pagne. that warms the British 
spectating heart more than a 
gallant loser. And failing to 
capitalize on that one-set 34) 
lead has had a positive effect 
on Hobbs. She believes it 
conld be the start of a surge to 
come, to the women's top 20 at 
least. 

An important step along (he 
way will be a new sponsor to 
provide much-needed cash to 


help transport her coach, 
Chris Braduam. to the major 
tournaments. To ibis end 
Hobbs is turning to glamour, 
although, she admits, less 
readily than the likes of Croft, 
—to whom modelling comes as 
a natural alternative to win- 
ning tennis matches. As with 
everything else, Hobbitt is no 
slouch. 

This is, after all. Ms 
December in the famous 
WLTA calender we are talk- 
ing about. She has already hit 
potential sponsors with a 
beautifully photographed 
portfolio extolling her virtues 
and produced by her brother- 
in-law. So far the response has 
been disappointing. “Not a 
♦sing le reply," she Mid calmly. 

Her next ploy will be the 
personal approach, lunching 
with people who matter and 
letting them get to grips with 
her f riendly personality while 

Determined not to 
be an also-ran 

she; hopefully, gets to grips 
with the £10-15.000 she needs 
to boost her career. 

Her modest success so for 
has already reaped her gen- 
erous support from Le Coq 
Sportif (clothes). Prince (rack- 
ets), Lotto (shoes) and Toyota 
(car - red and sporty with her 
name on (be side). She has a 
new bouse in Barnet, currently 
swarming with interior deco- 
rators, and took home about - 
£60.000 in prize money last 
year. This, however, is not 
enough. 

Hobbs insists that sbe has 
not sacrificed all semblance of 
normal life just to be an also- 
ran in British tennis. 

“My social life is 
horrendous," she said. “It’s 
impossible to hare one. You 
have a good time and that's iL 
I suppose if 1 say H's like being 
a sailor everyone will think 
I'm a slut bat f do enjoy 
meeting people. 

“I'd like to settle down and 
have children one day, but if 1 
chose that now I'd feel as 
though I'd wasted all this time. 

In those precious years to 
come her ambition to win fame 
and Wimbledon is supple- 
mented by the more pragmatic 
need to find a doubles partner. 
Her former successful pairing 
with Jo Duric has been 
thwarted by her ex-partner's 
desire to concentrate on sin- 
gles. Another tennis mate, 
Wendy Turnbull with whom 
Hobos reached the final of the 
US and Australian Opens, has 
gone off with Hana 
Mandlikova. 

Not being silly. Hobbs likes 
the idea of Steffi Graf, but is 
ensure of success. “Hopefully, 
I’ll get someone on the 
rebound." she said. That is the 
spirit The Hohbitt spirit that 
continues to enliven Britain's 
tennis scene even la its darkest 
days. 



Hobbs: a fighter who is more than a gutsy substitute 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Norman in the firing line 


Ross Norman, the New Zea- 
lander who caused a sensation 
test week when he wrested the 
world championship away from 
the mighty Jahangir Khan 
learned yesterday something of 
the psychological burden he has 
assumed after years of second- 
ary pursuiL 

Playing at first string for 
InreiCily-Gannons. the team he 
led to the American Express 
premier division championship 
Iasi season. Norman, aged 27, 
found himself embroiled in a 


By Colin McQuillan 

return to the daily round of 
professional competition which 
suddenly carried enormous 
consequences. 

It was the new world 
champion's first appearance for 
intetCiiy-Cannons this season, 
a mandatory outing qualifying 
him for team selection in the 
second half, and his first match 
since ending Jahangir’s five- 
and-a-balf year reign at Tou- 
louse. He freed Kelvin Smith, 
an Australian ranked Ifth in the 
world, who moved to England 


Cash boost for grand prix 


The world grand prix circuit, 
launched less than a year ago. 
will cany prize money of 
$743,000 (about £523.000) in 
1 987 — a 27 per cent increase 
over this year. Next year's 
circuit will comprise at least 19 
events in 16 countries, com- 
pared with 16 events in 14 
countries tins year. 

Negotiations to find a sponsor 


for die circuit have been under 
way for some months and Greg 
Pollard, joint chairman of the 
men's International Squash 
Tournament Council, who con- 
trol the grand prix. feels con- 
fident lbs; a major agreement is 
not for away. 


“All ihe signs 
PnUsid c-tjrl. 


are there." 


Inspired by their cooqi 
hero, the British Rail spot 
team smartly dipped tile wings 
of their British Airways spon- 
sored opponents, winning 5-0. 
Norman, having pocketed the 
first two games 9-1. 9-2, in 
precisely i 1 minutes each, be- 
came nervously involved in a 
32-irunute third game which he 
eventually relinquished to 
Smith 10-9. 

The measure of Norman's 
play was better reflected in his 
efficient three-minute 9-0 recov- 
ery to win the fourth game and 
the match. 

The lesson will be reinforced 
in precisely similar terms today. 
Norman and Smith left Can* 
non s Club. London, immedi- 
ately after their match lo catch a 
flight to Zurich, where thev are 
drawn against each other in the 
first round of the Swiss Masters. 

Norman is scheduled to 
progress to an immediate return 
clash against Jahangir in the 
Swiss final on Mondav. 





42 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


FOOTBALL 



Forgei Brian Gough: he is 
not playing. That will be part 
of Trevor Cherry's pre-match 
advice to his Bradford City 
players before today's 
Linlcwoods Cup tie against 
Nottingham ForesL 

“Brian is the first name 
people think of when you say 
Nottingham Forest but it's 
their players we have to 
concern ourselves with. We 
mustn't have a complex about 
him.” said Cherry, who spent 
most of his playing career 
under a similarly high-profile 
manager. Don Revie. He also 
had a brief spell under Gough 
at Leeds. 

“By the time they go out 
they will know Brian isn't the 
one they have to worry 
abouL” Cherry added. “Forest 
have got where they are in the 
table thanks to some very- 
good players. It's them I'll be 
talking about.” 

In sharp contrast. Gough 
will not bother with a pre- 
match talk. “This is one 
occasion when a team talk 
isn't necessary 1 . Our lads 
shouldn't need me to tell them 
what Bradford can do to us,” 
the Forest manager said. 

“Brighton made us work to 
win over two legs in the 


second round and Crystal 
Palace nearly knocked us out 
in the last round. We expect 
Bradford to be even tougher.” 

Cough, who originally ob- 
jected tc* playing at the Odsal 
Stadium 24 hours after the 
Australian Rugby League 
tourists, has delayed naming 
his team because bis left back 
Stuart Pearce is struggling 
with a virus. Bradford have 
the record signing. Mark 
Leonard, ineligible, so they 
recall Ian Ormondroyd to 
their attack. 

Second division Bradford 
have an added incentive, be- 
cause victory would give them 
s fifth round place and the 
chance of a home lie to mark 
their return to Valley* Parade. 

“We can’t wait to get back.” 
Cherry said. “We are grateful 
to the’Odsal people for having 
us here since the fire but the 
pitch is poor by football 
standards and it's been a 
horrendous time." 

Norwich entertain Everton 
with Wayne Biggins in for the 
injured Dave Hodgson and 
defender Ian CuNerhouse ex- 
pected to recover from a rib 
injury. Everton 's only doubt 
concerns England midfielder 
Trevor Steven. He is still 


Time is running out 


Hopes of saving the fourth 
division side. Halifax Town, are 
looking bleak. Calderdale coun- 
cil have turned down two 
survival plans which were put 
forward by developers who 
wanted to buy the ground from 
the council. 

The council are not willing to 
sell the ground but are prepared 
to offer a long lease to a 
developer who wants to turn it 
into a sporting complex with 
Halifax Town staring put. but 
only if he gave a guarantee that 
it would always be used for 
sport. 

Only two days remain before 


Friday's adjourned meetings of 
shareholders and creditors when 
a resolution to wind up the club, 
which has debts of more than 
£400.000. is likely to be put. 

• Bristol Rovers have sold their 
training ground for £250.000 to 
pay off their debts. A con- 
sortium of 20 supporters have 
put up the money aod under a 
lease-back arrangement the 
third division club will have the 
opportunity to buy back the 
ground in five years. Denis 
Dun ford, the dub chairman. 
said: “Without this arrangement 
to pay off our creditors the club 
would have to fold.” 


FA and League set up 
committee 


jomt 


The FA yesterday agreed to 
set up a new joint committee 
with the Football League, who 
want a bigger say in the running 
of the professional game. The 
decision was taken by the FA's 
executive committee, but they 
have yet to decide who will 
represent them on the new body. 
and no dale has been set for its 
first meeting 

Phil Carter, president of the 
FoorbaJJ League, who is also on 
the FA executive committee, 
denied that there was any 
danger of a split between 
football's two ruling organiza- 
tions. “We are not trying to 
divide them. This a welding 
together of the two organiza- 
tions to make us more effective 
in the running of football.'' he 
said. 

• Scarborough, of ihe GMC- 
Vauxhall Conference, have 
clinched a prestigious fixture 
against finnish league cham- 
pions hjk. The match against the 
finnish side will take place on 
April 1 and. in addition Scar- 
borough have arranged to play 
first division Sheffield Wednes- 
day early in the new year. 

another Conference side. Ket- 
tering Town, who were on the 
verge of bankruptcy 18 months 
ago. have announced a pre-tax 
profit of i.900 for the year 
ending june 1986. 

Cyril GingelL chairman of 
Kettering, said: “What has hap- 
pened here over the last 18 
months is proof that if every- 
body works together, a football 
dub can become a viable 
proposition. 

"We have no debts and our 
success owes a great deal to the 
efforts of the supporters.” 

• Shamrock Rovers provide six 
players for the Republic of 
Ireland's Olympic qualifying 
match against Hungary at 

Milliown today. 


TEAM: O'Nett (Durulaft). Kenny (Sham- 
rock Rovers], Ecctes (Shamrock Rovers], 
Harrison (parry City). Coady (Shamrock 
Rovers). Doom (Shamrock Rovers). P. 
Byrne (Shamrock Rows. King (Derry 
City). Keogh (Dundalk), m. Byrne (Sham- 
rock Rovers). Gaynor (Limerick city). 

• Bristol Rovers have called up 
2 5-y car-old midfield player 
Tarki Micallef for tonight's 
postponed FA Cup first round 
tie with Brentford. He has been 
chosen because the winners 
meet Cardiff City in the second 
round. 

Micallef was a free signing 
from the welsh dob in the 
summer and yesterday Bobby 
Gould, the Bristol Rovers man- 
ager. said: “The chance to meet 
and put over one on his old dub 
could be just the incentive he 
needs to produce a first class 
performance.” 

Micallef. the Cardiff-born son 
of a restaurant owner from 
Corfu, agrees. “I was terribly 
disappointed when they let me 
go following their frill to the 
fourth division.” he said. 

• The former Coventry City. 
Spurs and Republic of Ireland 
defender Jimmy Holmes has 
resigned as manager of Nunea- 
ton Borough, of the GM- 
Vauxhal! Conference. He took 
over at the Warwickshire dub 12 
months ago. but resigned after 
Monday night's GMAC Cup 
defeat at home to burton albion. 

E Germany top 

Halle. East Germany (AFP) - 
East Germany went to the top of 
Group Three in the European 
Under-21 Championship when 
they beat France 1-0 with a 58th 
minute goal from Forster here 
yesterday: cold, windy con- 
ditions made it difficult for 
either side to play good football. 
The Germans, who drew 0-0 
awav to Norway in their first 
match, have three points and are 
followed by France and the 
Soviet Union, who both have 
two. 


...• ••• .i. •* • 

V>« .«&■*$. 

■.v*‘ : * : » * . am 


troubled by a foot injury. 

If he is ruled out Adrian 
Heath could drop back allow- 
ing Paul Wilkinson to regain 
his front line place. Neill 
Pom ion and ex-Norwich de- 
fender Dave Watson are also 
in the travelling party. 

Coventry call up Ian Painter 
to face visitors Liverpool be- 
cause Dean Emerson is cup- 
tied. Signed from Stoke in the 
summer. Painter has played 
only one senior game. 

The coach, John SiKletu 
issued a pre-match warning to 
the double champions and 
four time winners of the 
competition. “The fear has 
gone out of our dressing room. 
Liverpool have not played 
against a Coventry team like 
this one before. We are no 
pushovers any more.” he said. 
“This Coventry team will fight 
like you have not seen it fight 
in a long time. It's up to them 
to stop us. If they are to beat us 
they will have to play their 
hairiest match of the season.” 

Kenny Dalglish, the Liver- 
pool player-manager, has 
added himself. Paul Venison 
and John Wark to the 12 who 
played in Sunday's 1-1 draw 
with Sheffield Wednesday. 

Duxbury 
to stay 
at United 

The Manchester United man- 
ager, Alex Ferguson, has ac- 
cepted Mike Duxbury’s request 
to stay with the club, though he 
had not realized that the former 
England full back was on the 
transfer lisL 

Ferguson said yesterday: “l 
don't think anyone knew he was 
listed. I certainly had no know- 
ledge of it and it was never 
mentioned to me before. ! am 
delighted to keep him here. He 
has done very well since I came 
and I was happy to agree to his 
request- He is definitely part of 
my team plans.” 

Ferguson has also had talks 
with United's leading scorer. 
Frank Stapleton, who has been 
on a weekly contract since the 
start of the season. The Republic 
of Ireland forward has recently 
been linked with a number of 
Continental clubs. 

Ferguson said: “I want to keep 
Frank and I will having further 
talks with him next week. He 
knows I want him to stay.” 

Apparently. Stapleton is now 
willing to sign a new contract. 
He sakl: “If the details of my 
contract can be sorted out I will 
be happy to stay with United. It 
is not just a matter of the length 
of ray contract it is the whole 
concept of the filing.” 

One problem Ferguson has 
yet to settle is who will pay the 
bill for an unauthorized trip by 
the United midlfield player. 
Remt Moses, to Amsterdam. 
Moses visited Richard Smith's 
clinic there for treatment on a 
damaged ankle and about 
£7,000 is still owing for the 
treatment. 

So far United have refused to 
accept responsibility for the 
unpaid amount and Ferguson’s 
predecessor at Old Traiford, 
Ron Atkinson, threatened not 
only to make the player pay the 
bill, but also to fine him. 

Ferguson said: “I am piggy- Ln- 
the-mickile and ] want to know 
the exact situation. I have beard 
from both sides and at the 
moment I feel the player could 
be wrong. But he doesn't see it 
that way. Perhaps we can reach a 
compromise, I need him to play 
with his mind concentrated on 
the game and we need to do 
something quickly." 

Bonmeville blow 

Swi moo's second division 
Rugby League title hopes have 
suffered a setback with the news 
that the New Zealand winger. 
Mark BourneviUc, will be out 
for at least three months with a 
broken arm sustained in his 
third outing for the club against 
Doncaster on Sunday. 



Great Wall game: Bobby Charlton, once the superstar of the West, meets two rising stars of the East daring a work-ont oo 
China's famous landmark. Charlton is visiting China for the forthcoming China Coke Cap international youth tournament 


Tbits succeeds in 

OS' 

etting his man 


Jimmy Quinn, (he Blackburn 
Rovers forward, has been trans- 
fer-listed at his own request. 
Quinn had a frustrating World 
Cup with Northern Ireland in 
Mexico, where he was unable to 
play because of an instep tendon 
injury which has haunted him 
ever since. In 16 games for 
Blackburn this season he has 
scored only four goals, two of 
them from the penally spot 
“i came back from duty with 
Northern Ireland last week fed- 
ing frill of confidence and look- 
ing forward to Saturday's 
game.” Quinn said yesterday. 
“But once again the stick 1 got 
from some of the crowd was 
terrible. They even started dur- 
ing the Jrick-in and crier that 
never left me alone. 

“You have to be thick- 
skinned or stupid to put up with 
it and I am neither. But what- 
ever happens from now an I wilt 
still play ray heart out lor 
Blackburn Rovers.” 



By Chris Moore 


Birmingham City, to conjunc- 
tion with the West Midlands 
police, will be implementing 
stringent security measures to 
counter any threat of crowd 
trouble at this weekend’s home 
game with Leeds United. In the 
corresponding fixture IS 
months ago a young fen died 
after violence flared at St 
Andrews. 

Birmingham have already 
brought forward the game to 
Friday night and announced 
yesterday that tickets for the 
match would not be on sale after 
5pm tomorrow. Leeds have 
already sold their allocation of 
2,000 tickets to official members 
of their supporters' club. “Any- 
one who has not bought a ticket 
by Thursday night will be 
refused entry to the ground.” the 
Birmingham secretary, John 
Westmancote. said. 

As a result Birmingham are 
certain to suffer finacriaJIy. 
“That is unfortunate, especially 
as we are not anticipating 
trouble. Bui we are not prepared 
to take any chances,'* 
Westmancote added. "A similar 
stance was adopted when Leeds 
visited Millwall earlier in the 
season and there was only one 
arrest at that match — a Millwall 
fan.” 

Collins for US 

Phil Collins, the England 
speedway international, is to 
ride in California next year afier 
becoming disillusioned with 
British speedway. The Cradky 
Heath rider hopes that a spell in 
the States will enable him lo 
rediscover his enthusiasm for 
the sport. “People will say I am 
doing this for the money, but 
lhai is noi the reason.” Collins 
said. 


Guy Tbijs. the Belgium man- 
ager. last night wor. his battle 
with Bayern Munich for (he 
release o’f his goalkeeper. Jean- 
Marie PfefF. for to oight's Euro- 
pean Championship qualifying 
match against Bulgaria in 
Brussels. 

Bayern had wanted the Bel- 
gian captain for last night's West 
German Cup tic against Fortuna 
Dusseldorf, but they conceded 
defeat when Thijs issued PfafT 
an ultimatum: “Play for Bel- 
gium or never play for them 
again.” 

It is the second time in a 
mouth the flamboyant P faff has 
been at the centre of a dispute 
involving Thijs. Outstanding at 
the World Cup in Mexico, 
where Belgium finished fourth. 
Pfcff was left out of the previous 
Group Seven qualifying match 
against Luxemburg for “un- 
acceptable criticism” of another 
player. 

Although Bayern reluctantly 
agreed rsoi to select Pfaff for last 
night’s match, their manager. 
Uli Hocness. was critical of the 
Belgian attitude. But Albert 
Roosens. secretary-general of 
the Belgian football union, 
stressed that Pfaff had no choice 
to make. UEFA rules. Roosens 

Maradona bid 

Munich (API— The Argentin- 
ian international, Diego 
Maradona, is ready to move to 
Bayern Munich when his con- 
tract with Naples expires, a 
West German newspaper re- 
ported yesterday. 

“If Bayern Munich make a 
good offer, we are ready to go 
along with the deal,” WinSned 
Estraann, a spokesman for 
Maradona's sponsors, was 
quoted by the Munich-based 
Abendzotnag newspaper. The 
paper said the dnb were pre- 
pared to pay more than DMlOm 
(abont £3.520,000) for 
Maradona. 

— * 

said, stipulated that a player 
selected for an international had 
to be released 48 hours before 
the gome. 

For his part. PfefT was re- 
lieved tee issue had been settled. 
“It was between Bayern and the 
Belgian union and nothing to do 
with me.” be said. “Fra glad it's 
all over, but 1 would have played 
both games if allowed.” 

With that issue out of the way, 
Thijs is faced with a number of 
other problems. Erwin 
Vandenbergh, the forward, is 
ruled out with a thigh injury, 
while Nico Claesen. the Totten- 
ham Hotspur forward, has suf- 
fered a loss of form since his 
move to England. Claesen is 
likely, however, lo retain his 
place in the Belgian attack 
alongside Desmet. 

The Belgians crushed Luxem- 
bourg 6-0 in their Iasi meeting; 
but they wifi find the Bulgarian 
defence less accommodating. 
Despite their disappointing 
showing in Mexico. Bulgaria are 
a difficult team to break down, 
as they proved in Glasgow two 
months ago when they held 
Scotland lo a goalless draw. 


France, the European cham- 
pions who need a victory against 
East Germany in Leipzig to- 
night if they are to have any real 
chance of going to West Ger- 
many in two years* time to 
defend their title, have given a 
priority lo defence. Henri Mi- 
chel, the manager, has made 
three changes from the side 
beaten 2-0 by the Russians in 
Paris last month for the Group 
Three qualifying match. 

The biggest surprise was the 
choice of a central defender, 
Yvon Le Roux, to play in 
midfield in the place of Jean- 
Marc Ferrari. Michel had been 
expected to opt for Gerald Passi 
— outstanding for his club. 
Toulouse, in a European Cup 
match with Spartak Moscow 
last month — but has erred 
instead on the side of caution. 
Patrick Battiston returns as 
sweeper in place of Philippe 
Jeannol and Fabrice P ouUain 
replaces Luis Fernandez in 
midfield. 

Gernd Stange, the East Ger- 
man manager, delayed naming 
his side yesterday while he 
waited to see how three injured 
players — Stahmann, Pastor and 
Thom — responded to 
treatment. 

Little has gone right for 
France since they returned from 
the World Cup. So far they have 
lost two and drawn one of three 
games and have yet to score a 
goal. And history is not on their 
side tonight, having lost their 
last two matches in Leipzig. 

Meanwhile, Boniek. dropped 
last month, is set for a 
controversial return to inter- 
national action when Poland 
meet The Netherlands in 
Amsterdam. The Roma for- 
ward, who has been Poland’s 
outstanding player for a decade, 
was left out of the team which 
beat Greece 2-1 in tbeir opening 
Group Five tie in Warsaw 
because he could not tram with 
the squad before the match. 

But Lazarek. the manager, 
has gone back on a pledge that 
players unable to join pre-match 
training would be left out of the 
squad. Although there are ru- 
mours of ill-feeling in the squad 
over Lazarek's about-turn, he 
has turned to experience and 
recalled Boniek together with 
another World Cup veteran, 
Wojcicki. who plays in defence 
for the West German dub. FC 
Hombmg. 

Of the two, Wojcicki is likely 
to be the most heavily-em- 
ployed. The Dutch, level with 
Poland on two points after their 
1-0 victory over Hungary in 
Budapest, possess a dangerous 
forward line led by the prolific 
Marco van Basten — winner of 
the “golden boot” as Europe's 
leading goalscorer last season. 

Fortunately for Poland, van 
Basten wall play without the 
support of his equally deadly 
partner. Wim KiefL The Torino 
forward, leading scorer in Italy 
this season, was badly injured 
during his club’s UEFA Cup 
triumph against Hungary’s 
Raba Eio Gyoer two weeks ago. 


Caernarfon 
to make 
decision 

A decision on the venue of the 
FA Cup second round tie be- 
tween North Wales part-timers 
Caernarfon Town and York 
City is expected to be an- 
nounced today. Caernarfon’s 
compact ground at the Oval has 
no safely features and the belief 
is it could not cope with a game 
of this significance. 

Caernarfon's chairman, the 
builder. Anon Roberts, said: “It 
seems to be even betting on 
three options — to play the game 
at Caernarfon, to borrow the 
nearby ground at Bangor City or 
to switch the venue to York.” 

During a busy schedule today. 
Roberts has a meeting lined up 
with the police and he is waiting 
to learn the terms that Bangor 
City want 

Top two play 
out dull draw 

Montevideo (Renter) — 
Uruguay's dassk derby between 
Penaroi and National brought 
the fens flocking back to the 
Cenfmrig stadium for the first 
time CTree the World Cap finals. 

The cou nt ry's two biggest 
dobs, who recently threatened 
to resign from the league 
championship over an economic 
crisis, woe watched by (OJKIO 
supporters, many of when had 
stopped going to matches after 
Uruguay’s poor World Cop 
performance. 

But Uruguay's debt-ridden 
top two dabs, playing at the site 
of the first of urngaay’s two 
World Cup triumphs hr 1930, 
did tittle to persuade supporters 
to come back for good after a 
disappointing score of 0-0. The 
draw kept National three points 
ahead of the champions, 
PenaroL 

Five-a-side 

kick-off 


Budapest (AP) — The first 
official international indoor 
five-a-side tou rnament or- 
ganized by FIFA opened here 
yesterday with qualification 
games. 

Group A comprises Belgium, 
Hungary, Spain and Peru. In the 
B group are Brazil, The Nether- 
lands. Italy and the United 
States. 

The matches are being held at 
Budapest’s new sports stadium. 
Qualification matches wifi con- 
tinue today. Tomorrow round- 
robin matches will be played to 
determine the overall winner. 

Under FIFA rules, the matches 
consist of two periods of 25 
minutes each with a 1 0-minute 
interval between halves. 


MOTOR RALLYING 

The Forest 
sorts the 
wood from 
the trees 

By David DoflfeM 

It was the third longest stage 

of the Lombard RAC Rally th at 
separated the leading contend- 
ers yesterday. Five seconds bad 
covered the top four cats over- 
night. Only 3S seconds behind 
the leader, Jimmy McRae, in his 
MG Metro 6R4. was seventh 
overall. It was that close — until 
the roads on stage 30 in the 
Grisedale Forest high up on (he 
hillside overlooking. Coniston 
Water claimed two of the top 
four cars. 

Mikael Ericsson, she over- 
night leader in bis Lancia Delta 
S4. punctured and dropped to 
third. Juba Kankkunen rolled 
his Peugeot 205 T16. Despite 
to the roof and rear 
wing, he was able to con tin u e 
and e merged in fourth place 
2min 29sec down on the new 
leader. Timo Salonen, with 
Markku Men’s Lancia Delta S4 
in second place. 

The drivers are not allowed 
pre-practice on the RAC special 
and tackle the roads 
without detailed pace notes- The 
RAC information manual de- 
scribes the 19 miles in Grisedale 
as a “very difficult stage”. 
Kankkunen would agree- He 
had looked very relaxed before 
the stage, having taken the lead 
after stage 24 in Castle O'er. 

Castle O'er had been tackled 
just as dawn was breaking. 
Second man overall at Edin- 
burgh. Timo Salonen raced 
through the two right-hand 
bends of the road surrounding 
the Castle O’er mound, shower- 
ing spectators with stones mid 
mud. He was obviously trying 
very, very hard. 

First car on the road had set 
off from Edinburgh at 5am to 
cover the 50 miles to the Craig 
Forest stage which had a slight 
layer of snow. Maricku Aten in 
his Lancia Delta S4 and Juba 
Kankkunen in the Peugeot both 
punctured in the Craig Forest 
but lost little time driving out on 
the “flat”. 

Not so lucky was tenth-placed 
Per EkiuncL He lost around 
three minutes when a tear tyre 
on his MG Metro 6R4 punc- 
tured. He drove about three 
miles on the rim. his flailing tyre 
removing the rear mudguard 
and the vibrations seriously 
damaging the drive system. 

He lost further time betore the 
next control as mechanics re- 
placed the differential He still 
seemed relatively cheerful but 
said that the balance of power 
between the front and rear 
wheels was not right and he was 
having difficulties. 

He was not the only one in 
trouble. Russell Brookes, who 
had looked very pensive before 
the special stage 30 at Grisedale. 
stopped his Opel Manta 400 
with engine problems. Stig 
Blomqvist's Ford RS200 had 
already been retired when the 
engine overheated. Unlucky 
thirteenth overall at Edinburgh 
was David Gillandeis, whose 
MG Metro 6R4 was sub- 
sequently seen on a tow trailer 
with a piston through the engine 
block. 

Originally 150 cars left Bath 
on Sunday. There were still 1 1 1 
in the rally at Edinburgh yes- 
terday morning. It wifi be a 
3.30am start from Liverpool for 
today's final leg to Bath and the 
result is still unpredictable. 

LEADWGFOSmCNS(afta 32 stages* 1. 
T Sefonm (Bn. Pauneot 205). 3hr 24mn 
29S8C Z M AlemtBn. Lancia Delta), 
334.38; 3. M Ericsson (Sure. Lancia 
Date). 325-34; 4. J Kanfckuwn (Bn. 
2051327.32: 5. M Sundstrom 
Wt205).32&21;6. TPcraJjGB. 
0. 33832: 7. K Grondfl! (Swe. 
Ford RS200), 328.43: 8. J McRae (GB. 
Metre 6B4). 33132; 9. H Demuth (WG. 
Audi QuattroL 3:4335; 10. H Ttworon 
(Rn. Metro 6R4). 3:44.3. 

Llewellin 
fined by 
stewards 

David LteweHm found himself 
£120 worse off yesterday morn- 
ing after being fined by die rally 
stewards. The Welshman, aged 
26, was interviewed fry York- 
shire police on Monday after an 
alleged traffic offence during the 
rally in which be was said to 
have sped op the central reserva- 
tion in an attempt Jo avoid a jam 
on the A 1. 


ATHLETICS 

Top four 
on the 
right track 

Four alhletes who share 
Olympic ambitions and an 
infectiously ambitious coach 
assembled in Edinburgh yes- 
terday to discuss a possible 
sponsorship deal with a new 
Scottish marketing company. 
But if negotiations for that deal 
were not completed, the athletes 
were at least able to lake 
advantage of the Meadowbank 
park to put on an impressive 
training session. 

The alhletes involved are Liz 
Lynch, the Commonwealth 
10.000 metres champion, fellow 
Scots Lynne MacDougall and 
Limey Macdonald, and Dave 
Moorcroft. of England, the for- 
mer world 5.000 metres record 
holder. Ail arc guided by John 
fo: 


Anderson, a former Scottish 
national coach. 

Anderson was guarded in his 
comments regarding the pro- 
posed deal, but hoped it would 
provide the support necessary 
for preparation for the 1988 
Seoul Olympics. But he was 
typically enthusiastic over the 
form of his athletes in the 
training session. “That's the best 
session she has ever done,” he 
said of Miss MacDougaJL. the 
Strathclyde University psychol- 
ogy graduate who reached the 
1,500 metres final at the 1984 
Los Angeles Olympics then 
spent 1985 on the sidelines 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


Socialist bloc agree to 
participate in Seoul 


Albertville. France (APj — 
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the 
president of the International 
Olympic Committee, said yes- 
terday that all the 19 countries 
of the Socialist bloc - including 
North Korea — have agreed to 
take part in the 1988 Olympic 
Games in Seoul. 

Their participation was long 
in doubt because of a North 
Korean threat to organize a 
boycott of Seoul unless half the 
events were shifted to the North 
Korean capital, Pyongyang. 
Samaranch came here directly 
from a conference in East Berlin 
attended by the sports ministers 
of the 19 countries, including 
North Korea. 

“I can tell you that 1 now have 
the assurance that all the Social- 
ist countries will be present in 
Seoul.” Samaranch told report- 
ers. He described Cuba's agree- 
ment to host the 1991 Pan- 
American Games in Havana as 
“very good news for the Olym- 
pic movement”. 

Cuba was one of the countries 
which had threatened to boycott 
the Seoul Games, so its agree- 
ment to host the Pan-American 
Games virtually ruled out a 
Cuban boycott of Seoul three 
years earlier Olympic officials 
explained. 

The IOC awarded the 1988 
Games exclusively to Seoul at a 


1981 session in Baden-Baden, 
West Germany. 

The Communist bloc presum- 
ably voted against Seoul in the 
secret balloL but raised no 
immediate objections to the 
majority decision. North Korea 
later demanded a half-share of 
the Games, although the Olym- 
pic charter specifies that the 
Games must be held ie a single 
country. 

The two Kerens have met 
repeatedly under Samaranch's 
auspices to settle the dispute. 
But although South Korea of- 
fered to transfer four events — 
table tennis, archery, one 
preliminary football match and 
one bicycle race — lo North 
Korea, the talks have thus far 
failed to reach final agrcemeiU. 

Samaranch was in Albertville 
and neighboring Cham be ry to 
meet officials of the region 
chosen lo organize the 1992 
Winer Olympics. 


The Liverpool professional 
cyclist Joey McLoughlin, Bri- 
tain's first winner of the Milk 
Race for 10 years, has been 
awarded the sport's top regional 
honour, the golden cycle trophy, 
by the British Cycling Federa- 
tion (Merseyside division). 


YACHTING 



extends his lead 


Philippe Poupon. the French 
skipper of the British-designed 
trimaran. Fleury Miccon VHL 
extended his lead a further S3 
miles over his nearest rivals in 
the disaster-ridden Route du 
Rhum singe-handed trans- 
atlantic race yesterday. Having 
reached the relative safety of the 
trade winds, he now holds a 
commanding 250-mile advan- 
tage at the halfway stage of this 
race to Guadeloupe. 

The Canadian. Mike Birch, 
sailing the 80ft catamaran TAG 
Hcucr. gained 32 miles on 


By Barry Fft&thzfl 

Poupon as he enjoyed strong 
reaching winds south of the 
leaders when the latest gale to 
sweep across the fleet moved 
over the Azores yesterday, but 
the Frenchman subsequently 
covered him. 

The latest to report problems 
in a race that has already Jed to 
the loss of one skipper and six 
boats and seen 10 others limp 
into pert in varying stages of 
disrepair, is Florence Arthaud. 
one of two women entrants ir 
the race. She is heading for the 
Azores after reporting rigging 


difficulties aboard her cata- 
maran, Energi • et 
Communications. 

LEADING POSITIONS (with mfles to 
GiBtteioupel: 1. Hw*y Miction VtH (P 
' . 1 .819; 2, CatdaUnient Laiterie St 
I Moussy), 2JJ72: 3, Ericsson (B 
. _ 2.095: TAG Hauar tM Birch). 

2.112; S. Hitachi (L PBen), 2.291- 

Sharon Jones and Paul 
Askham (Altrincham), whe 
successfully defended their title 
at the British ice dance 
championships at Nottingham 
last weekend, bead Britain’: 
challenge in European and 
world competition next year. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

UNIT ED ST ATES: Nation* Urog-je (N7LJ: 
WStoncton RacsJcis M. Sai Fiancees 
*9srs& 


CYCLING 


PARIS: Six-ear rewr Fl»eJ msirfta: 1 . S Vaflst 
(riimsp ®8ri>*Auai. M3sn; 2 c Morel ffti 
and A Doyle (GEj 61: 3. ? Moser m» and G 
BcnteratH {Ul.cnolap. 150:4. J Mutter iS ertzl 
*W S Jono one Up. lift s. E Dwtde 
(8aQ and G Frank (Dem. one lap. 71. ft U 
FreviUr (Sw3i and o G ogpr i3*!tzj, one i^p, 


SQUASH RACKETS 

70UR& Fnocx Camo^x teWPattBaat 
Jaeher Khan (Pak) bt S Hatetcno (SAL B-1D. 
9-2.9-4,9-ft 


FOR THE RECORD 


TEHNIS 

HOUSTON: WCT men’s Sc mu moot Rnl 
round (US unless SOIsUh A Agass* K G 
Micnmra (Can). 60. 6-2: E Tcttsdwr bt C 
Hooper 7-6, T -€. S Oates bi G DomeSy. 7 -& 
W B Pasrcg D! K flacti, 5-3. 6-*; D RooOwto 
B1 u Pwtsffl. ft4. 5-“. tM; R Knshnan (Inoai 
mj Grabs. 6-2 ft4:BScereanbtPAi»acane. 
7-S. 6-4: G Hamas bt M Wastennotma. 4-6, 7 - 
6.6-0. 

CBOTDOH: LTA « C« ian *3 Indtxr w i n - 
mens Sfcigtas: Second fottad: S Srfbvan 
iEsso<; t» R Sa 


FOOTBALL 


Saseck pug). C-ft 6-4. 6-3; J 


Alexander (Coni M R wtaser (WG). w to, C 
Banner. [Mem 1 MB Borneo (Beds). 6-3. 6-2; S 
SoWCar (N«nj bt E EkbloinfSw*l, 6-1. 6-3; K 
Qiintrec Fri W J ssmon (Sussex!. 3-6. 63, 
6-Z S {Aifca) « C ivcod (Surftwi, 

4-5. 6-1. 7-6. R HnitfBTOW (C=* b! E 
Mjmukcvo (USSRI. 8-4. 6* V Uo»0 (Devon) 
M S ftet!»ea iKamj. 6-4. 6-2 

POWER LIFTING 

THE HAGUE: Dtarid chHqjlmbip: Heavy- 
wo£M Uasx 1 . U Ha8 (US), 980kg (ZlSSbs). 


EASTBERUN: European du** 

otsup: Gnmp Three; East Gorid w I. 
Franca 0. ' 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: OPR 2. Fuhsai 

VAUXHALL OPEL LEAGUE: ftwi dMsfcm 
north: vamdiaB Motors 3. Ware 1 . 

AC o aco CJP: Seem rand: Croydon Z 

H OTM4. 

REPRESENTATIVE HATCH: Army XI 1. 
Oxford LMVMMV2. 

ARMT QUADRANGULAR TOURNAMENT: 

3385! MS ^T 8 **** 


RACKETS 


vasnmMnsauM 

Ewwutt log to M J Lowrey and C E F frvtra. 
15-7. 15-18 15ft 15-7. 16-17. 10-15. IMS T 
Jook and J FteUfior W 0 McCausfcaW and J 
H J Behnenu 14-17, 1V9, 15-1, IB-12, IB-12. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FA Cup 

First rotmd replays 
Boston v Runcorn.... 


Bristol Ravers v Brentford (7.45) _. 
(rearranged from yesterday) 

Cambridge Utd v Exeter (7.45) 

Maidstone v wailing 

Uttlewoods Cup 
Fourth round 

Bradford C v Nottm Forest 

Coventry v Liverpool 


RUGBY UNION 

THORN BW COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
1 Gram: Huai: North Mkflands v 
csJiira (at Mostay, 7.15). 



Norwich v Everton 
Fufl Members’ Cup 
Second round 

Reading v Ipswich 

FME FARE SCOTTISH LEAGUE: Praator 


1 v CMebank; Dundee 
t FaMrK v St Mirrsn; 


Unrtod * HamBton; . 

Hibernian v Cflfflc; Motherwell v Hearts: 
Rangers v Dundee. 

OLYMPIC QUAUFYMG TOURNAMENT: 
: ol Ireland v Hungary (at Mffimm, 


Reputtci 

DubSnj. 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Brighton v 
Arsenal (2.0); Bristol Rowe v Watfcxrt 
Crjsal pafaca v Mfwnfl (at Tooting and 

CENTRAL LEAGUE (7.0 k First (fivtsfcxx 
Asian Vflta v OUran; ~ 

Sheffield 


Barnsley v Preston: Bolton v Scunthorpe: 
Fort Vale v Partington; Btacftjwoi v 
Doncaster; Notts Ccwity v Stoke. 

VAUXHALL -OPS. LEAGUE: AC Petal 
Cup: Second rand: Sauthwttk v Maklan- 
heaefc Yeorti vChesham. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: B » DeBow Cop: 
Leicester United « Shop&hetf; MRe Oak 
Rovers v Coventry Sporting. 

GREAT RALLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Ptv- 
rater Aristae Chard v Bristol Manor Form 
(7.45). 

NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Prarata dMatoa: Long Buatoy 
vWootton. 

BIHLDMG SCENE EASTERN LEACtfe 
Town v Grantham; SkMwnaricet v 


1 neuora. 


GM ACCEPTANCE CUP: Rtw round: 
Farsham v Bath; Gateshead v Southport | 
ARMT QUA DRANGULAR TQURIlAiBMy 
fat Borriont 

(2S% Royal Engineers v 


OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY: Pizza Express London League: 
London University v Cambridge Utwnr- 
oity; representative match; Army v RMA 
Sandhua (at Sandhurst 130). 

MOTOR RALLYING: Lombard RAC Rati* 
(Liverpool to BathV 

RACKETS: Noel Bruce Cup (at Queen's 
Club). 

RUGBT LEAGUE: Stones Bitter 
Championship: Vfataflekl v Barraw. 
SNOOKE R: Tennants UK Open (at 
Preston). 

SQUASH RACKETS: RAF v UK Ore 
Servic es (at Moteton-in-M arei a 
TBM& LTA women's tournament (at 
Croydon). 

Clearing a hurdle 

Chinese judges of track and 
field events will take English- 
language examinations to qual- 
ify to officiate at international 
athletics events, the Chinese 
Track and Field Association 
said yesterday. The oral and 
written exams wifi be given to 
judges .who will take part in the 
1990 Asian Games and other 
track meetings, Lou Dapeng, the 
association vice president, said. 

Needham move 

Surrey have released all- 
rounder Andy Needham at his 
own request Needham, aged 29. 
joined the club’s siaff in 1977 
and was capped last year. 





-5 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Davalle 
and Elizabeth Larard 



A day of break-ups and break-downs 


• It may be true that that ggC 
Television is not creating a 
precedent by splitting Otto 
Preminger’s movie Exodus in two 
(part one, BBCI, 2.00pm, with 
pan two tomorrow). But because 
this back-breaking of aims has 
happened before does not 
mat the practice is right. If 
Preminger had not shuffled off 
this mortal coil earlier in the year 
it would probably have been him’ 
not me, who would be tan™ the 
BBC to task. The feet that Exodus 
fells a long way short of being a 
movie, classic is neither here nor 
there. It was conceived as a tale 
that goes from A to Z, without 
needing a day’s intermission when 
it reaches Whatever dramatic 
jmpset it has is cumulative. 
Dividing it into two may suit the 
scheduling purposes of the BBC 
but it does not suit the film, it fe 
not a serial, and ought not to have 
been treated like one. 


I CHOICE 


# Its title. Breaking Up, is the 
only connexion between Nigel 
wiffiams's hew four-part drama 
serial (BBC2, 9.25pm) and my 
moan about Exodus . What is 
being broken up in Williams’s tale 
is the domestic scenery against 
which a 13-year-old lad lives out 
his troubled days. Mother and 
fether are going at each other like 
hammer and tongs. Small wonder 
that the boy's housemaster in 
Producing the school Hamlet, tdis 
the youngster that his Ophelia 


Haynes), the parents (Eileen 
Atkins, Dave King) and the 
humane academic (Alan Bennett) 
• I feared, initially, that The Visit 
(BBCI, 9.35pm) was going to be 
another broken-backed film, like 
Exodus. Part two of Desmond 
Wilcox’s documentary about a 
Bangladesh orphanage that has 
been adopted by British Airways 
staff, begins by reiterating much of 
whai we learned last week in part 
one. Happily, this recapitulation 
does not go on for long, and very 
soon we begin to sec the frill extent 
of the physical, financial and 
emotional commitment that these 
BA crew members have made so 


xsessstssi 


particularly like about Williams’s 
senpt is its capacity to swing us 
back and forth between absurdity 
and heartache without making us 
fed giddy or disorientated. There 
are four strong performances in 
episode one, by the lad (Tim 


6.00 Ceefax AM. 

6-30 Cartoon » 

7.00 Breakfast Time wfth Frank 
Bough, Safly Magnusson and 
Jeremy Raxman. National and 
international news at 7.00. 
7.30. (LOO, 6.30 and 9.00; 
regional news and travel 
information at 7.15. 7.45, 8.15 
and B.45; weather at 7.25, 
745, 845 and 845. 

9.05 The End of the Pier Show. A 
40 Minutes programme about 
the old-style pier theatre at 
Cromer, one of the few 
remaining in the country, (r) 
9.45 Advice Shop. Margo 
MacDonald with some advice 
on dealing with the local DHSS 

10-25 PhilQp Schofield with new of 
children’s programmes. 1030 
Pfay School whfi Wayne 
Jackman and Janet Palmer. 
10-50 Henry's Cat Cartoon (rt 
10.55 Fhre to Eleven. Sased 
Jaffrey with a thought tor the 
day. 

11.00 Day Out A tour of th8 West 
Country with Angela Rippon, 
from Sham Castle in Bath to 
the village of Rode, (r) 

11.30 Open Air. Viewers' comm e nts 
on yesterday's programmes. 

1245 Airport 86 - Live. The 
programme follows Paula 
Paterzan, air stewardess, on 
her flight Also featured is the 
D & D Cell at West Drayton; an 
interview with woman pilot Jffl 
Devel in, ftymg instructor and 
First Officer on Viscounts; and 
OHver Smaflman talks about 
Ns fear of flying. 13L55 
Regional news. Weather. 

1-00 News with Martyn Lewis. 
Weather. 1.25 tfaghboms. 
Weekday soap set In a 
Melbourne suburb. 1-50 Little 
Msses. A See-Saw 
programme. 

2.00 FBm: Exodus (I960) starring 
Paul Newman, Era Mane "Saint 
and Ralph Richardson. Part 
one of an opic basedon Leon 


llris's best-setter cm the 

founding of Israel. Directed by 

Maryon Davts’s em 
first aid series. (r) (C, 

3*50 Pinny's House read I 

Thonse. 440 Animal Fair with 
Don Spencer. 4JDS The 
Adventures of BuflwinJde and 

Rocky. Part three 4.10 
Heathcfiff and Co Cartoon 
senes 4.35 Hartbeat Tony 
Hart sgulde to picture-making. 
5-00 John Craven’s Newsround. 
S.05 The Cuckoo Sister. The 

R35 BknfoiUiBin 1>ma 

6.00 News with Nicholas Witched 

6^ssr^^- wea ^- 

7.00 Wogan. Guests are Francesca 
Annts, Michael Wood and 
David Essex, with music from 
Go West 

7-3S The Clothes Show. Make-up 
for Selina Scott by Stephen 
Glass; advice from Jane 
Lomason skin care for men; 
and contributions from 
designer Jeff Banks and model 
Patricia Hodge, (r) 

8.00 Dallas, JR returns froma 
meeting with the mercenary 
Calhoun and receives a vary 
disconcerting Valentine. 
(Ceefax) 

8*50 Points of View. Barry Took 
reads letters from viewers. 

&00 A Party Pofiticai Broadcast by 
the Conservative Party. 

9-05 News with Julia Somervifle and 
John Humphrys. Regional 
news and weather. 

9-35 The Visit. Part two (Ceefax) 

(See Choice). 1 

10-25 SportsnigM introduced by 
Steve Rider. FootbeS: 

Highlights from Liverpool v 
Erarton; and Spurs v 
C amb ridge United; Cricket A 
report on the final day of the 
First Test between England 
and Australia; Lomberd/RAC 
RaBjC Final stage report 


continue. A serious crisis, briefly 
mentioned last week, concerns the 
need to acquire new site for the 
orphanage before the little charges 
are evicted. This becomes the 
heart of the drama in tonight's 
concluding film, and the remark- 


BBC 2 


9-00 Ceefax 

9.15 Daytime on Twoe Scotland's aH 
Industry (r) 945 Caefax 1040 
For the wry young (r) 10.15 
Two bridges spanning 200 
years of development (r) 10.38 


able climax is staged in the 
presidential palace with the BA 
benefactors, sundry British en- 
voys, and Desmond Wilcox him- 
self, in attendance. 

• Musical highlights tonight in- 
clude the studio re-staging of Kent 
Opera's highly acclaimed 1984 
production of Tippett’s opera 
King Priam (Channel 4, 9.00pm), 
with Rodney Macann in the title 
role, and strong support from 
Janet Price and Sarah 
Walker.. ..Radio 3 carries the 
whole of the Royal Concert from 
the Royal Festival Hail (7.55pm), 
with the Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra and two violin soloists, 
Yehudi Menuhin and Ldand 
Chen. It is a fine and popular 
programme, predictably climax- 
ing with Elgarian pomp and 
circumstance. 

Peter Davalle 





ifll IpIStii 

'mm; 



Dave King 


■ fa Hi 


and Tim Haynes as the son in Breaking Up, BBC2, 9.25pm 


1TV/LONDON 


11 -40 How 


1242 


12JZ5 Jobs 12-30 


. 11.40 Rhoda. American comedy' 

series storing Valerie Harper. 
1246 Weather. 


Maths: Statistics (rt 1245 j 
in pubHc transport (r) 1248 
Spanish (r) 1.10 issues of Law 

2.15 Winter Festival in Sweden 

245 Sports Afternoon. David lefee 
introduces a newtopx^l 
series, which this week 
features Test cricket from 
Australia and international 
tennis. 345 Regional news and 
weather. 

4.00 Pamela Armstrong. Chat 
show. 

4J35 To the World’s End. Scenes 
and characters along the route 
of London bus No 31. With 
music by Cad Davis, (r) 

5-30 Cover to Cover presented by 
Jin Neville. Reviewers are 
Stephen Fry, Tom Davies and 
Clive James, whose book of 
poems Other Passports ® aiso 
discussed. Other books 
reviewed stb In These Times, 
essays by Bernard Levin; the 
New Yorker Book of Cartoons 
and Dona Flor and Her Two 
Husbands by Brazilian Jorge 
Am ado. 

6.00 FBm: The Law and Jake Wade 
(1958) A Western starring 
Robert Taylor and Richard 
WfcJmaric Marshal Jake Wade 
helps an outlaw, ha one-time 

E ar, to escape from fan but 
himself forced back into 
an outlaw IKb. Directed by John 
Sturms. 

725 Cricket First Test Hfc 

of the final day’s play between 
Australia and England. 

7.50 RaflV Report 86. Live report on 
the final staoes of the 


9-25 Thames news headBnes. 

9-30 Schools: Maths, (r) 9.42 The 
making of TV programmes 
949 Junior Maths 10.16 
Physics ejmsriments 1033 
Poetry 11 in China's cultural 
revolution 11422 Exploring 
sound (r) 11.39 French: a 
restaurant In Parts. 

1240 Tha Giddy Game Show (r) 
12.10 Our B ack y ar d (r) 
Spin-Offs. Tim Brooke-Taylor 

explores the countryside 
around Rochester including 
the churchyard on the marshes 
where Charles Dickens set 
Great Expectations, and takes 
a cruise on the last working 


7.00 TMs la Your Life with Eamorm 
Andrews. 

7.30 Coronation Street The Rovers 
Return presents a cabaret, and 
GaH Tdsley gets some useful 
advice from AITs sokeitof. 


CHANNEL 4 


2-20 Their Lordships’ House. 

... — _ -ay* 

e in tire House of 


K i steamer. 

si 


— at One Indudes an live 
interview with the Prime 
Minister at Downing Street by 
Leonard Partdn. 1.20 Thames 


1.00 


1-30 A Country Practice. MecScal 
drama serial set In rural 
Australia 3L30 Farmhouse 
Kitchen. Grace Mul 



Ratty. 

8- 30 OutofCourt A senes about 
law-makers and law-breakers. 
Presented try David Jesse! and 
Sue Cook. 

9- 00 Hawkeye operates 

on a very kraiortant patient an 
finds himself revered for his 
medcalsktts by General 


a 

Scottish fish soup, and 
prepares fresh mussels with 
parsley and game. 3J» Take 
the High Road 345 Thames 
news headlines 3 JO Sons and 
Daughters. 

440 Thomas Bw Tank Engine and 
Friends. Narrated by Ringo 
Starr 4.10 The Telebugs A20 
S.WJV.LL.O.W. A series in 
which David BeUamy explores 
everyday Ufa. Today he joins 
young investigators in the Lake 
District, becomes a giant 
Pooh-stick and gets a special 
pair of shoes fitted by a 
blacksmith. 445 Hold Tight! 
includes Brookside stars 
Simon O'Brien and Shetegh 
O’Hara. 

5.15 Blockbusters. BobHoiness 
presents another round of the 
general knowledge quiz game 
for teenagers. 

545 News with Alastair Stewart 
640 Thames news. 

6-25 HelpfViv Taylor Gse presents 
the latest community action 
news. 

645 Crossroads. 


840 Strike K Lucky. Game show 
featuring the latest technology, 
presented by Michael 
Barrymore. 

840 FuB House. Domestic comedy 
series about two couples 
sharing the same house and 
mortgage. (Oracle) 

9.00 The Equaflzer. McCall Is called 
in to help a man who has 
become a victim of mob 
vfcrtencewhlia trying to raise 
some extra money for his 
family. (Oracle) 

1040 Party PoBtical Broadcast 1 
the Conservative Party. 

1045 News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Sandy Gallic 
Weather foUoweo by Thames 
new headlines. 

10-35 FBm: Calendar Girl Murders 
(1984) starring Tom Skerrttt 
and Robert Culp. A made-for- 
te levision thriller about a series 
of murders of centre page girts 
in a monthly magazine. 

Directed by Wiliam A Graham. 

1245 That’s Hollywood. C6ps 
featuring Mickey Rooney, 

Frank Sinatra and James 
Dean. 

1240 Night Thoughts. 


TV- AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Richard Keys. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 640, 
7.00, 740, 840. 840 and 940; 
financial news at 545; sport at 
6.40 and 7.40; exerases at 
6-55 and 9.17; cartoon at 745; 
pop music at 745; and a video 
report at 845. The After Nine 
guests include Jane 
Rossmgton from Crossroads; 
plus an investigation into a naw 
technique for testing human 
allergy. 


245 Film: Laxdale Hair (1953) 
starring Ronald Squire, 
Kathleen Ryan and Raymond 
Huntley. A Bntish- 
comedy in which a group of 
rebel Hebridean Isiancters 
refuse to pay their road fund 
licences until a new road and 
pier are provided by the 
authorities. Directed by John 
Eidridge. 

4.00 Mavis on 4. Mavis Nicholson 
presents the second of 
Predicaments, today devoted 
to the sublet of Infertility. 
Three people discuss the 
emotional difficulty of coming 
to terms. 

4.30 Countdown. The challenger is 
amateur guitarist Stella 
Haffenden-Smtth from Hitch in, 
Hertfordshire. 

540 Hogan's Heroes. Vintage 
American comedy senes about 
‘ group of resourceful AHed 
if-war. 


VARIATIONS 


BBC I wauMnwai. 

sKMaHKuur 

gjpm Tt» Beyond within. Nonnraa 

12-10 Mem- EM1LAND; 835pm-730 Re- 

| gtonal news nagazna. 

BBC2 udwhus 

ANGLIA 


B36AD0UII 


6.00- 

1230am Joy Vi My Soul 


a group of ra 
prisoners-of- 
The Abbott a 


945 


MitchelLlrt 

BretirfegUp. 

pansbyNwe 


Pa h 1 Newman: one of the stars uf Otto! 

Part oae can be seat on BBCI, 2.1 


i fihu Exodus. 


.A drama in four 
pans bylVigel WHHams starrtnt 
Eileen Atkins, Dave King, Alan 
Bennett and Tim Haynes. (See 
Choice). 

1040 The Trouble wftti Sex. Dr John 
Sketchtoy, a psychologist who 
is himsefi homosexual, 
counsels Bcfo. a 28-year-old 
teacher (played by An 
Hooper) who tor years has 
suppressed his true sexuaBty. 
He is now facing the (Stemma 
of how coming out w61 affect 
his soda! and professional life. 
1040 A Party Pofitical Broadcast by 
the Conservative Party. 

1045 Newenight 1140 Weather. 


,jks> 

■w 







We’re celebrating 21 years of 
manufacturing and installing Lri 
top-quality double glaring nation- 
wide and we’d like you to join in ' 
the fun! 

We’re offering unbeatable 
discounts throughout Britain's 
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and patio doors! 

Celebrate with us- post 
rhe coupon or FREEFONE 100 
TODAY. 


I ANNIVERSARY OtZO/V 

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ini pnt&. 


|BUY NOW- PKt IN 1987 T| 
(FREE SURVEY & DESIGN <fi 


POST. TODAY NO STAMP NEEDED 
lb: Alpine (Double Glazing) Co Ltd, FREEPOST, 
Manchester M16 8HH. 

f ] Please send me your j j Please arrange for 

: i free brochure. L~J a free quotation. 


Name 1 Mr/Mrs/Missi : 


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. Postcode 


lilREElO YEAR GUARANTEE^ 


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it’ fiw h- FREE' *U$T PJiOS't .‘v0 Mitu-ngjCB.ua 

1 7 jiSZ ASK fORAlPIXc sgfH •' 

Vp.K h:un a jjv. ■ ■■ / 


aUne 

laouchdiBina 



^W5BRU : 


21 YEARS 
OF 

EXCELLENCE 




540 the Abbot! and Costello 
Show.* Bud and Lou drive to 
Las Vegas where they get 
involved with race track touts. 
640 Family Ties. American 
domestic comedy series. 

640 In Time of War 1939-1945. The 
films Suteect for Discussion, 
made in 1944 for the Ministry 
of Information was one of the 
first to discuss venereal 
disease publicly, and A Youth 
In Crisis is a 1943 analysis of 
drug abuse and alcoholism 
740 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons and Nicholas Owen. 
Contains a report on the future 
of the parliamentary select 
committees system. 

740 Comment. Donald Stewart, 
president of the Scottish 
National Party and MP for 
Western Isles Is giving this 
week's political view. 

840 Five Women Photographers. 
The final part of me senes 
features Helen Muspratt. who 
travelled around Russia alone 
in 1936. 

840 The New EnfightanmenL 

Professor Kenneth Mmogue of 
the London School of 
Economics presents the 
second of six programmes 
examining the Ideas and 
philosophies underlying the 
present worldwide return to 
classical liberal economics, 
tonight co nc entra tin g on 
welfare provision. 

940 Kmg Priam. A television studio 
version of the Nicholas Hytner 
production for Kent Opera of 
Michael Tippett 1 s opera. 

1140 Film: Backroads (1977) 
starring Gary Foley and Bill 
Hunter. The first British 
showing of an Australian film in 
which five strangers, whites 
and aborigines, are thrown 
together in the outback of New 
South Wales. Directed by 
PhHjp Noyce. 

1240 TTieir LoTOships’ House. Ends 
at 12.45 


Boost mows 3jM WBiam Hoes-Moog at 
Home &30-440 Tha Yohiq DoctofsaOO-MS 
LooAaiDuna Woonssday iU5am wsam- 

er. dose. 

g ENTRAL ^^r.?aUr 

IZJthm-IXD SomeQang is Treasure 
1»-1 JO Central Maws 1 J0-2J0 Ham 640 

Crossroads ejs-yja Central News 
12JSa m Thai vaw Arangos 1 JS Cantrel 
Jooflnnor 2^5 Ctosa, 

1^0 Snort Story Theatre 2ao^30 Action 
on Drugs ProHani Page SpBoal 3J0-4JX) The 

; Young Doctors &40-£SCiiafuM Report 
toUowaa oy. Canary HWXMOJJS Two-Gettw 

g gAMPi an ^ 

lywood North Maws SOF&aS 

Norm Tongnt 12L25ma News ana WPathar 

GRANADA 

wmnere 1 J0-1 JD Granada Reports 1 JO 
Ranatf am HopKvti (psesasad) 2J2S4JS 
Grenada Rttxxts 3J0-440 Tho Young 
Doctors LOO Oanada Raporta 0^5 Thh is 
Your Rignt &30-7 J» Crossroads 

Hiy WEST HgSSSgg, Tm 

ins-UO MTV Nona 1-3O-2J0 Scaremw 
and Mrs Kmg aoo-fiJS HIV News 

HTV WAI Ffft AstfTVWeatflx- 
T» ! y captsaopM-aaswMBs 

at Six. 

SCOTTISH AsUmdonexcapc 

- f 1 ,Jn 1230-140 Gardanlng Tana 
1-til Scotun News 1 JO Lwa at One-Tiwty 
2J0-2J0 That's HMywood 100 A Country 
Practc® 3JS-4-C3 Poem try Sortey 
Maraean 6J0 ScoOand Today &3S-7.0O Cross- 
roaos l2^Sam Law Can 1130 Close. 

TSW A 8 LwxJon excapt 12J0pm-1 
-LS3S. QaTOans tor All L20-1 JO TSW Naws 
225-Z30 Home Cookary CtoB B.1S Gus 
Honaytxm‘5 Magn Btnndaya &20-S.45 Cross- 
roads SJ0-7.00 Emmerdala Farm 122Sam 
Postscript 

TVS ^ Ed«tan excapt; 1230pm-1.00 

- * - * The Sullivans i jo TVS Na«vs M0 
Snort Story Theatre 2TO-2J0 Acnon on 

Dregs— Proonm Page SpsdtU3JB-UM TVS 
News to tewe d ay Tha Young Doctota 
a0O^35 Const to Coast 12-2Sam Company. 
Ctosa. 

nNETEES ^;^^^ 

Urn who ijo Regional News 120 Where 
p>a Jobs Are &40-&35 Normam uto iZ2Sam 
Alona But Not Lonaly 123S Ctosa. 

ULSTER «wcapc_1230- 

~ 140 Sam imnu to Treasure 

1-20 Luntmme 3J0-4JO WU. waa Wand 

YORKSHIRE 

Lunomma Uve 1J0 Catenoar News 130- 
230 Tha Baron &00-&35 Calendar 1220am- 
630 Mote Box. 

S40 lllOSdxxXs 1146 Interval 1235 
- Flm ConvXa 99 (WBJ Hay) 135 ThaV 

Urdsnos' House 230 Countdown 230 
Strangers Aoroad 330 Pnm-fc-Yotxsall 4.10 
Ftolabaiani 430 Guto Goch A Matwan 435 
YSmyrth 530 Bflctowcar S30 Five Woman 
PhoKjgrapneis 530 Brookstoa 630 Mavis 
on4 730 Nawwfcflon Saith 730 BIbs Ar Fyw 

830 Roc ’Roi To 530 Hal Straaon 9.15 
Fftn: The Other Victim (1981 ) 1135 ma Naw 
&»flhtenm8nt 1135 A People's War 1235 
Close. 


or- 


MF. nwfium . Stereo on VHF 
(see beiow) 

News on the half-hour from 
640am until 840pm then at 1040 
and 1230 mkJmght. 

540 Simon Mayo 740 Adrian 
John 940 Simon Bates 1240 
i) 


1235 Simon Mayo 340 1 

Wngm 540 Newsbeat (Frank 
Parmdgs} 545 Bruno Brookes 740 
Janice Long 1040-1240 John 
Peel. VHF Stereos Radios 1 and 2> 
440am As Radio 2. 8.00 Folk 
on 2 840 The Spinners and Friends 
940 Listen to the Band 1040 
As Radio 1 . 1240am-440atn As 
Radio 2. 


■VX*J 


MFJmedkjm wave). Stereo cm 
VHF (see Radiol). 

News on the hour. Sports 
Desks 145pm, 242, 342, 442, 
545, 642,545 (mf only), 9^5. 
4.00am Cofin Berry S^) Ray 
Moore 740 Derek Jameson 840 
Ken Bruce 11.00 David 
Penhaiigon 14S David Jacobs 245 
Gloria Hunntford 340 David 
Hamilton 545 John Dunn 740 Folk 
on 2 (LOO Soccer Special 


to the Band If — 

Aspects at Max Wafl 10.15 PBter 
Sarstedt snos 1040 The Seven 
i. PBter Hamn's guest is . 

jrd Heath MP. 1140 Brian 

Matthew 1.00 Charles Nova 340- 
440 A Little Night Musta 


WORLD SERVICE 


ttons 5.15 Ctosacal Record Rewaw 830 
Jva a Mmurs 930 News 836 Renew cl 
the Breen Frees 9.15 WOnd Today 930 
Financial News 930 Look Ahead 945 
Lyrics and Lyrtcets 1030 News 1031 
Ommtiua 1040 Jazz Score 1130 News 
1138 News Aoout Britain 11.16 Street 
Ufa 1135 A Latter from Watoa (until T130) 
1230 Rada Newsreel 12.15 MasteiixeaB 
in Mtatture 1235 Fwmmg Wand 1248 
Sports Rcxmdup 130 News Uffl T 

four Hours 130 Devetopmeffl *81 

Outlook i45 Report on Religion 330 
Raffle Newsreel 3.15 writers at Home 
330 tang Sireer Junior 430 News 439 
Commentary 4.15 Rock Salad 445 Worn 
Today 530 News 539 A Inter Item 


545 Test Match: First Test 
645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Concert Arnold (English 
Dances. SetliLPO), 
Casteeuiovo-Tedesco 
(Gititar Concerto No 1: 

John wa6ams/HX)) r Satie 
(Lbs trote valses 
distingu6es du predeux 
ctegoutfc Brownrldge, 
piano). Ravel ( Daprmls et 
Chioe, Suite No 2J 3 ans 
Orchestra). 840 News 
845 Concert (contd): Schein 
(Suite No 16 m A minor. 

A Musical Banquet 
Hespenon XX). Dvorak 
(Piano Quintet in A, Op 81: 
SchnaDa/ProArte 
Quartetl, BBss (Dance of 
Spring, Bndal ceremony. 
Dance of summer from 
Adam Zero: LSO). 940 
News 

9-05 This Week's Composer 
Tchaikovsky. Was I not a 
little Made of grass ? (sung in 
Russian bySoderstrom), 
and PranoTno In A minor. 

Op 5(fcBar odln Trio 
1040 Peterson-Berger May 
Carnival in Stockholm 
(Stockholm PO). Lawn 
Tennis (Stig Westerberg, 

piano). Symphony No 2 
1045 Bournemouth Wind 

Quire: Lowes (Quartet), 

and Triehansee (Partite in E 
flat) 

1140 Matinee Musicals: BBC 

Concert Orchestra 
(under Ashley Lawrence), 
witn Michael Thompson 
i). Catherine Dubois 
d). Ansea (Plymouth 
overtua), Franz Strauss 
(Nottumo,0p7),AJan 

Abbott (AKa Cacda) and Lso 

Norman (Intemwzzo for 
strings), Muss 
(Scherzo to Bl 
Jorovitz 


The Ftraotro. (r) 

4.00 Choral Evensong: from 
Blackburn Cathedral. 

445 News 

540 Midweek Choice: Hahn 
(La baide Beatrice 
d'Este suite: Pans 
Orchestra), Telemann 
(VJote Concerto in G: Ulrich 
Kbch/Lucame Festival 
Strings), Bacn (Chaconne in 
D minor, BWV 1004: 
Michelangefl, piano), 

Pagan! m (Variations on 
Carnival in Venice: 
Accardo/Chamber 
Orchestra of Europe), 
Simpson (Quarts! No 9: 
Detote String Quartet) 

7.00 Deout John Hanoom 


740 


ITwanw- 
■88 230 


Rfleorqwgotma week 11130 nbws 1039 
Mono Today UL2S A Umar From wun 
1030 Financial Nows 1040 RaBacnons 
1046 Soorts Rotfioup 11.00 Ncnub 1139 
Commamanr 11.15 Good Books H30 
Nwntrack 2 - Top Twenty 123Q News 
12.09 daws About Etomm 12.15 Reap 
Newsreal 1230 ittw Sosst Junior T30 
hews 1.01 Oudocw 130 Wsregude 140 
Book Choice 145 Body Talk 100 News 
239 Renew or the Btash Press 2.15 
Network UK Z40 Assignment 330 News 
939 News Afxxn Brttmn 3, 15 world Today 
330 Tha Seeds oi Cnmiwiity 430 
NwMdask <30 cuseieai Recoro Renew 

(urM 4 45) 6-k5 Worto Today. M timesth 

carr. 


Samt-Saens ( 

de concert), Kodaiy (Dances 
from Gaianta) 

1240 Ways of FtiMMom: tazz to 
Russia. Illustrated talk by 
John Fordham. 1.00 News 
145 Concert Hafl: Gordon 

Ferqus-Thomoson 
(ptono). Balakirev (Sonata In 
B flat minor), Gknka (The 
lark). Rachmaninov (Etudes- 
fabteaux, Op S9: Nos 8 and 9) 
2.00 ScnnmKe Ouatets: Eder 
Quarter play the No 3 
245 Ditetti musreaii: Italian 
earty barooue wind 
music. Taverner Players to 

wonts by Btagto Marini, 

Dono CastoBo. etc. 

240 Record Review: includes 
Roger Nrcnote's guide to 
recordings of Stravinsky's 


Wanderer, D 649: Do- 
Wanderer an den Mood. 

D 870; and Die Sterne, D 
9391 Wolf (Gesange des 
Manners), ana Du pare 
(Lamemo: La manor de 
Rosamonds) 

Exporting me Past 
Stephen Games 
investigates tne export of 
British history to the US 
745 The Royal Concert. 1988: 
from Royal Festival HaU. 
Royal Philharmonic (under 
Dorati). Yehudi Menuhin 
(violin), Leianc: Cnen (viofin), 
Trumpeters of Royal 
MfBtaiy School of Music. 
Part f. Gordon Jacob 
arrangement of Fanfare and 

National Anthem; 

Beecham arrange mem of 
The gods go a'beggtng;; 
Haym (SyrnphonyNo3), 
Bach (Concerto in D 
minor for two violins, BWV 
1043) 

840 Six Comments: foreign 
radiobroadcasts 
9.10 Royal Concert (part two): 
Debussy (Fanfare 
d'ouverture. La Rol Lear, 
orch Roger- Ducasse), . 
Chausson (Poems), Delius 
(Walk to the paramse 
garden), Bgar (Pomp and 
Circumstance March No 4) 
1045 Guitar muse: Leo 

Wtoszynskyj plays works 
by Jacques de Samt-Luc, 
Son, Gareth waiters, 

andWoflgang Mucraplei 
1040 Castles: poetry and 

11.00 ChamjMTMusS: 

Oirauan Biackshaw 
(piano) plays Schumann's 
Humoreake, Op 20, and 
Debussy Praiuoes, including 
Laterasseoas 
audiences du cialrde (une 
1147 News. 1240 Close 


Q 


• iV".. C i 


On tong wave, (s) Stereo on VHF. 
545 Stopping. 640 News briefing; 
weather. 8.10 Farming. 

645 Prayer (sj. 

640 Today, tod 6.30, 740, 

840 News. 6.45 
Business News. 646, 745 
Weather. 7.00, 840 
News. 745, 845 Sport. 746 
Thought tor tne Day. 845 
Yesterday to Parliament. 

847 Weather, travel. 

940 News 

945 Midweek with Libby 
Purves (b) 

1040 News; Gardeners' 

Question Time. 

Listeners' questions from 
Essex (r) 

1040 Morning Story: Miss 
Lavender, by Brenda 
O'Bvme. Read by WBUam 




the town plays host to 

leading musicians from 

ail over the world tor the 
eighth annual 
Contemporary Music 
Festival. 

540 PM. News I 


1045 Daily Service, from St 
Paul's Church, 

Birmingham (s) 

1140 News; Travel; with Great 
Pleasure (new series). A 
selection of Christopher 
Fry's favourite prose and 
poetry. With Sarah Badel (ri 
1148 TaikJna Toys Knuckle 


Weather 
640 News, Financial Report 
6JH) Round Britain Quiz. Irene 
Thomas and Eric Kom 
versus Fred Nteholls and 
Jack Jones. 

7,00 News 
7.05 The Archers 
740 In Business. With Peter 
Smith. 

745 The Perth Lectures 1986. 
Law, Justice and 
Democracy by Lord 
McQusky (3). Hard 
Cases and Bad Law. 

8.15 Analysis. Chris Cvlic 
examines the future 
teeing Australia - an "Island 

nf Manninnfle 11 


of Happiness". 
940 Thirty Minute T 
The Positive Ac 


.With 


'aBclna ' Toys Kn 
DownStonkera. 
BobSymes. 

12.00 News; You and Yours. 

Consumer Advice. 

1247 A Matter of Honour, by 
Jeffrey Archer. The 
second of seven episodes. 
With Michael York, 

Simon Ward, and Tom 
Chadbon(rXs). 1245 

Weather 

140 The World at One: News 
1.35 A Party Political 

Broadcast, by the 
Conservative Party. 

1.40 The Archers. 145 
Shipping 

240 News; woman's Hour, 
todudes an interview 
with playwright actress and 
ambassador Clare Booth 
Luce. 

340 News; The Afternoon 
Play. The Frog Princess, 
by Anne Goring. With 
Patricia ftoutiedge, 
Constance Chapman and 
Nicholas McArdle(s) 

347 Time for Verse. Poetry 
about children growing 
up. Presented by Rot 
F ulter.Readors: Anthony 
Hyoe and jui Baicon 
440 News 

445 File on 4. Major issues at 
home and aoroad. 

4.45 Kaleidoscope Extra. 

There's more to musical 
Huddersfield than tne tamed 
choral society and 
Messiah; Michael Berkeley 
reports bow this week 


i Theatre: 

» Approach, 
by Louise Spencer. With 
A M « en ?3f Morgan (rxs) 

940 One Man and his Newt 
David Bean recounts his 
meetings with animate and 
the people who ehensh 
them. 

945 Kalei d oscope. Includes 
comment on Wildfire, at 
the Phoenix Theatre, and the 
David Roberts Exhibition 
at the Barbican. 

IMS A Book at Bedtime. A 
House tor Mr Biswas, by 
V S Naipaul (Part 6). 1049 
Weather 

1040 The world Tonight 

11.15 The Financial world 
Tonight 

1 140 Today to Parliament 

12.00 News; Weather. 1243 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only] as above 
except 545-64Qam 
Weather; Travel. 11.00- 
12.00 For Schools: 1140 
Singing Together (s) 

11.20 Junior Drama 
Workshop (s) 1140 
Reading Comer te) 1140 
Poetry Comer.145* 

3.00pm For Schools: 145 
Listening comer [s)245 
240 


(Poetry) 240 using 
Unemployment. 540-545 
PM (continued). 1Z30- 
1.10am Schools Night-time 
Broadcasting Dance 
Workshop. 1240 Action 
workshop (S). 1240 
Shaping the Action (s). 



isiS-'? fSBBgy ft 










WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 19 1986 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 


sight 





England bad a banl hot, 
long and ultimately rewarding 
day here in the first Test 
match against Australia yes- 
terday. It was made Tor them 
in the first hour and the last in 
each of which they look two 
wickets. .As a result, they will 
be very disappointed not to 
win today. With five second- 
innings wickets standing, 
Australia are 35 runs ahead. 

For much of yesterday the 
temperature hovered around 
the 90° marie, and if there was 
a stiff breeze, rising at times to 
a strong wind, to temper the 
heat it was still a grand effort 
on England's part to show no 
signs of wilting. As in 
Australia's first innings, the 
spinners, especially Emburey, 
played an important part, 
bowling 63 of the day’s 102 
overs and nagging away at the 
batsmen’s nerves. 

Australia found in Geoff 
Marsh the anchor they were 
looking for. It says a lot for 
him that he. too. never lost his 
concentration. Before the start 
of play Ian Chappell, the 
former Australian captain, 
was to be heard urging the 
Australians to be more pos- 
itive in their handling of 
Emburey and Edmonds. 

In the event. Jones got out 
in trying to be and Marsh 
made' little attempt at it Nor. 
ready, did Ritchie, who added 
1 1 3 for the fourth wicket with 
Marsh. With only 50 minutes 
left, these two seemed to have 
taken Australia well within 
reach of survival. 

Marsh's hundred was his 
third in only his tenth Test 
match, and his first at home, 
and it took to 19 hours the 
time he has batted against the 
Englishbowling in the last 12 
days. If you are wondering 
how he plays, try thinking of 
two of Australia's most recent 
opening batsmen. Dyson and 
McCosker. He is from that 
same deliberate mould. Per- 
haps the nearest he came to 
being out was when he was SS 
and one of Gower's quick 
under-arm returns, made as be 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Brisbane 

as a bone. Nor was it as worn 
as some are after the traffic of 
three days' play. It was at its 
very best for batting, said the 
local pundits. 


ran in from the covers, was 
within an inch or two of 
running him out. 

Batting in a helmet in these 
conditions, as Marsh did. 
must have been like having 
one’s head in an oven. When, 
upon reaching his hundred, he 
took the helmet off, he was 
dose cropped and looked as 
though he had been under a 
shower. . , 

England's one piece ofluck 
was with the weather. There 
had been a confident forecast 
of afternoon showers and at 
2.30 word came that it was 
raining hard down the road 
(which could mean a couple of 
hundred miles away in 
Australia) and would be doing 


ENS&AND: Fnst twin 
13S. C W J Athey 76, 

Gower 51). 

AUSTRALIA: Hrai 
BtaahemSS not out, G 
DiHoy five ter 6SL 

Second tarings 
□ C Soon few b Botham — 
G R Marsh not out 


456 (l T Botham 
,DI 


248 <G R J 
55; GR 


Marsh 


14 

108 


D M Jones st Richards b Emburey — 18 

■A R Border c Lamb b Emburey 23 

G M Ritchie flnt b DeFmtaa 45 

G R J Matthews c sad b CBay 13 

SR Waugh notoot 12 

extras (t> 8, lb 5, nb 2) - 10 


Total (5 wkts) 


243 


fT J Zoabrer, C □ Matthews, M Q Holies 

and B A Reid In bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-24, 2-44, 3-92, 4- 

205,5-224. 

BOWLING (to date): Botham 12-0-34-1; 
Dffiey 16-5-3S-1; Emburey 30-13-7*2; 
DeFrwtaa 10-1-40-1; Edmonds 24-8-46- 
0; Gening 2-0-2-0. 

Umpires: A R Crater and H W Johnson. 

so at the “Gabba by four 
o'clock. When four o'clock 
came, we looked like getting 
another 10 minutes' play at 
the most; but the clouds broke 
up and in the end there was a 
full day. lasting until 5.30. 

England had taken the first 
hour by a distance. Australia 
the second after a hard strug- 
gle. After playing through the 
opening half hour as though 
they had all the answers, much 
as bad happened in their first 
innings on Sunday, Australia 
suddenly faltered. Each day. 
for the benefit of television, 
Tony Greig tests the pitch 
with' a variety’ of instruments. 
Until now, it had always been 
moist; yesterday it was as dry 


Persistence pays off 


By close of play Marsh had 
batted for a total of 19hr 
20mrn against England al- 
ready this season — and been 
dismissed by three deliveries 
out of 839. “I knew my job was 
to still be there at the end of 
play,” Marsh said. He hit a 
century for Australia's Under- 
19s at Lord's in 1977. 

“I concentrated mi scoring 
ten runs, then another ten and 
so on. Whenever I felt my 
concentration slipping 1 took a 
tittle walk away from the erase 
to gather my thoughts. This 
century as the one I really 
wanted because the other two 
Test hundreds were made 
abroad, in New Zealand and 
India. The fact that Dad was 
watching me for the first time 
in a Test match made it even 
better.” 

“There is a lot of cricket left 


in this Test and, if we bat well, 
we can get a draw out of it," he 
said. 

“This was the Test hundred 
I wanted,” Marsh said. “My 
other two have been abroad 
and it's extra special for me 
because Dad was here to see 
it” 

The spinner, John 
Embnrey, aged 34, who picked 
np two wickets for 78 inns 
daring a marathon 39-over 
stint today, said: “I am sure we 
can do it now. Ideally, we 
would like to get the final five 
wickets before lunch tomorrow 
and then knock off the runs by 
tea. Hopefully, our target will 
not be much more than 120. 

“It was a day when we had 
to keep plugging away and the 
wicket of Greg Matthews just 
before the dose was very 
useful." 


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But in the eighth over of the 
rooming Botham had Boon 
leg-before with a break-back. 
The England players remem- 
ber Jones for having won a 
one-day international against 
them when the lights were first 
switched on at the Melbourne 
Cricket Ground in Februaiy 
of last year. More recently — a 
few weeks ago, in feet — be 
scored a doable hundred 
against India in Madras. 

Yesterday be drove Botham 
for a couple of early fours, not 
quite off the middle of the bat, 
and then hooked DeFreitas 
well for another. But it was all 
a little frenetic, and as in the 
first innings he was never 
remotely at ease against 
Emburey, who had come on as 
soon as Jones came in. In 
Emburey's fourth over, Jones, 
advancing uncertainly, was 
stumped. This was a missable 
chance, though past the out- 
side edge of the bat, and 
Richards did well to accept it 

That was 44 for two. By 
lunch Marsh and Border had 
added 46 together, playing 
pretty well No one, 1 am sure, 
can have been more pleased 
with Marsh's form than his 
captain, who has had, too 
often, to carry Australia's 
batting almost single-handed. 

Yesterday Border looked 
the less secure of the two. like 
Jones, he seemed conscious of 
Chappell's advice, twice tak- 
ing something of a chance to 
drive DeFreitas to the extra 
cover boundary. A quarter of 
an hour into the afternoon. 
Emburey produced his best 
over of the day. first under- 
mining Border and then 
dismissing him. One ball 
pitched outside Border’s leg 
slump and passed over the top 
of the off with Border playing 
no stroke; pushing forward to 
the next. Border was picked up 
at silly point off bat and pad. 

That was Emburey's 99th 
Test wicket and England's last 
success for nearly three hours. 
While Marsh continued to 
play his game, Ritchie settled 
in, a nice, natural player with a 
good enough temperament to 
have scored a hundred in a 
Test match at Trent Bridge: 
His strokes are delightfully 
made. The most notable of 
them was a straight drive for 
six high into the Clem Jones 
Stand. 

For the most part, Ritchie 
relied on watchful defence. 
When he used his feet, which 
he does very well, it was to 
attack the bowling. The last of 
the day's three drink intervals 
had just been taken, and it was 
already a wonder that the 
threatening storm had not 
broken, when DeFreitas, with 
his first ball since the middle 
of the morning, bad Ritchie 
leg-before. 

With a boundary to square 
leg off his first ball, Greg 
Matthews put Australia 
ahead. Marsh then reached bis 
hundred. 

So long as Matthews was 
there and only four wickets 
were down, Australia could be 
said to have had a reasonable 
day. When, with a quarter of 
an hour left, Dilley caught and 
bowled him off a mistimed 
leg-side stroke and a leading 
edge, they were back needing, 
as they had been at the start of 
play, an exceptional perfor- 
mance to save them. 


Moriarty 

operation 

Richard Moriarty, who took 
over as captain of Wales 
during last summer's tour of 
the South Pacific, is almost 
certain to miss this season’s 
Five Nations daampionship 
(David Hands). The Swansea 
forward went to hospital yes- 
terday for an examination of 
the shoulder he dislocated at 
the weekend and will return 
there at the end of next week 
for an operation to correct the 
damage. 

It is the third time he has 
dislocated the shoulder but if 
his recovery period means he 
will miss playing for Wales 
this seasorube should at least 
be fully fit before their world 
cup squad is chosen. 

Moriarty, aged 29, has been 
capped 16 times by Wales, 
mainly as a lock though he has 
played in the back row. He 
took over the captaincy of his 
country when David Pick- 
ering (Llanelli) was injured 
playing against Fiji In June 
and had to return home. He is 
also captain of Swansea, for 
whom he has played regularly 
this season both in the second 
row and the back row. 

This latest misfortune occ- 
urred during his club's cup 



Bailed out Jones, of Australia, is removed by a 

Change not 
in the air 
at Lord’s 


HmWM 

\ Richards 


By I vo Tennant 

Recommendations to 
change the structure of county 
cricket are not expected to be 
accepted by the Test and 
County Cricket Board at their 
winter meeting on December 
1 1. This means that four-day 
matches are not likely to 
become a part of the 1988 
county championship. 

The TCCB held a consul- 
tative meeting at Lord’s yes- 
terday to consider, among 
other matters, the Palmer 
Report's investigations into 
English cricket which was 
published earlier this year. It 
appears the status quo will be 
maintained in domestic 
cricket. 

“There was support for 
some four-day cricket but 
perhaps not enough for it to be 
included in the 1988 fixture 
list,” Alan Smith, chief exec- 
utive designate of the TCCB. 
said. “There was not a lot of 
backing for doing away with 
one of the two knock-out 
competitions and I do not 
think there is likely to be any 
change in the amount or 
limited-overs cricket played 
on Sundays.” 

The need for better coach- 
ing at junior and school level 
was also discussed. “The 
county representatives are 
more aware than before that 
they have responsibilities for 
the development of young- 
sters as cricket is not now 
played so much at school,” 
Smith said. “They intend to 
have more consultations and 
discussions with repre- 
sentatives of leagues and ju- 
nior bodies in the months to 
come." 

While it is evident that on 
several issues there was a 
difference of views, no de- 
cisions will be taken until the 
meeting in December. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


win at Tredegar on 
Saturday.Moriarty’s left 
shoulder will need to be 
pinned and the tendons short- 
ened to strengthen the limb. If 
all goes well he should be 
playing again by early March 
but Wales, who beginS the 
championship against Ireland 
on January 17, conclude then- 
programme on March 21, 
against Scotland. 

Applicants 

Telfond and the Aston Villa 
Leisure Centre are among the 
applicants for one of the eight 
places in the new National 
Tennis League to be launched 
in February. Telford, who 
have appointed former British 
Davis Cup player John Paish 
as their captain and resident 
coach, have also named the 
former Derby County and 
Welsh international foot- 
baller, Alan Durban, as their 
manager. 

“We are in the market to 
sign the best available foreign 
player," said Paish. “We have 
everything planned and our 
objective is simple — to win 
the League.” 

Challengers 

Sharon Jones and Paul 
Askham (Altrincham), who 
successfully defended their ti- 
tle at the British Ice Dance 


Aberdeen want Porterfield 
as successor to Ferguson 


By Hugh Tayknr 


Aberdeen sprang a surprise 
last night when they named 
Ian Porterfield as the man 
they want to succeed Alex 
Ferguson. The former Roth- 
erham and Sheffield United 
manager was offered the post 
after be had been interviewed 
by the Pittodrie board which 
consists of Dick Donald and 
his son Ian and be is expected 
to accept the position soon. 

Although Porterfield, who 
played for Raith Rovers and 
Sunderland, had an impres- 
sive record at Bramall Lane, 
his name had not been men- 
tioned among the list of 
possibles for one of the 
country’s plum jobs. 

Among those who were 
thought to be about to be 
asked to consider joining 
Aberdeen were such major 
managerial stars as Jim 
McLean of Dundee United, 
Billy McNeill of Aston Villa 
and Jock Wallace of Seville. 

After long consideration 



Porterfield: right qualities 

however the canny 
Aberdonians came to the 
conclusion that Porterfield, 
even though be had been 
sacked by Sheffield United at 
the end of last season, had all 
the qualities to succeed in 
Aberdeen, still gloomy at the 
departure of Ferguson and his 
co-manager, Archie Knox, to 
Manchester United. 

“We feel be can be the right 
man for us,” Ian Donald said. 


SNOOKER 


Werbeniuk may be 
forced to quit circuit 


By Sydney Friskin 


Bill Werbeniuk, of Canada, 
who was eliminated from the 
first round of the Tennents 
UK Championship at Preston 
said, after his 9-5 defeat by 
Dene O'Kane, of New Zea- 
land, that he might have to 
quit the circuit. 

Werbeniuk complained that 
the intervals beween the 
qualifying rounds and the 
final stages of open tour- 
naments were much too long. 
He made particular reference 
to the Dulux British Open 


championships at Notting- 
ham last weekend, head 
Britain's challenge in Europe 
and World competition next 
year. 

They will compete in the 
event in Sarajevo, from Feb- 
ruary 3-7 along with Eliza- 
beth Coates and Alan Abretti 
(Strealham), with Danielle 
Biss and and David Crofts 
(Lee Valley) as reserves. Then 
they will go to the World 
championships in Cincinnati, 
from March 9 - 15, when 
Coates and Abretti will be the 
reserves. 

Valuable 

New York (AP) — Roger 
Clemens, whose 24-4 record 
led the Boston Red Sox into 
the World Series, on Tuesday, 
was named the American 
League's Most Valuable 
Player, the first starting 
pitcher to the win the award in 
15 yeans. 

Cycle award 

The Liverpool professional 
cyclist, Joey McLoughlin, 
Britain's first winner of the 
Milk Race for ten years, has 
been awarded the sport's top 
regional honour, the golden 
cycle trophy, by the British 
Cycling Federation. 


tournament for which the 
qualifying rounds were played 
in October, while the tour- 
nament proper does not start 
until February next year. 

“It is bard for an overseas 
player to come over and play 
in these circumstances, for 
before he knows where he is, 
his season is over. I've got 
January, February, and March 
to do nothing, and you just 
can't make a living this way,” 
he said. The system, he added, 
was generally geared to help- 
ing the people at the top, and 
ignoring those at the bottom 
of the scale. 

Werbeniuk, who in three 
seasons has fefien from eighth 
to 24th in the world rankings, 
is out of the Mercantile Credit 
classic and Dulux British 
Open. He won only one match 
in the 1984-85 season, but 
improved somewhat last sea- 
son by reaching the last 16 in 
the Credit Classic and the 
quarter-finals of the British 
Open. In the 1985 Embassy 
World Snooker Champion- 
ship he made a break of 143. 

Wayne Jones, of Wales, 
ranked 56th in the world, took 
the first three frames off the 
former world champion, Den- 
nis Taylor, in their second 
round match. Jones was 
supported by breaks of 43, 46, 
and 50; but Taylor, recovering 
his touch, made a break of 47 
and soon cut the lead to 3-2. 
At the end of the afternoon 
Jones led 6-2. 

Tony Meo and Mike Hallett 
were involved in the fastest 
match of the afternoon. Meo, 
though slightly more fluent, 
was always a frame behind, 
and eventually levelled at 3-3. 

MONDAY'S RESULTS: First nxm± j 
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“and we hope he win make up 
his mind quickly.” 

Porterfield, an astute wins 
half with Raith Rovers and 
Sunderland, became the hero 
of the En glish north east town 
after an outstanding display in 
the 1973 FA Cup final when 
he scored the winning goal to 
beat Leeds United. 

Although he was surpris- 
ingly dismissed by Sheffield 
United he was held in die 
highest respect by his fellow 
professionals and became a 
name to conjure with in 
Yorkshire football circles dur- 
ing his highly successful reign. 

“He is a tremendous 
worker,” Donald said. 

But Porterfield will have to 
be much more than that to 
impress the Aberdeen 
supporters, who have been 
accustomed to all the honours 
in a decade of the most 
glorious success in the dub’s 
history. 

Hay gives 

Celtic 
a warning 

By Hugh Taylor 

Celtic players will take the 
field at Easter Road tonight to 


their manager ringing in 
their ears. Although they are 
leading the league, having 
taken 22 out of the last 
available 24 points, and are 
visiting opponents whose for- 
tunes are at their nadir, David 
Hay demands that the premier 
division champions stay on 
guard. 

“We must remember that 
Easter Road has never been a 

he*recaDed. (certainly theblg 
Celtic following travelling to 
Edinburgh have sad memories 
of how Hibs dismissed their 
favourites from both the Scot- 
tish and Skol cups last season. 

So gloomy is the picture at 
Easter Road, however, that 
there appears little hope of a 
result tonight to brighten the 
sad faces of the dissatisfied 
home supporters. Not only are 
Hibs left without a manag er 
several players may be miss- 
ing because of a wave of 
infliMiiTa . 

Rangers, too, should stay 
firmly in contention in their 
race for the championship, 
although their task is more 
formidable than that of their 
Glasgow rivals. Dundee, their 
opponents at Ibrox, have 
played more relaxed football 
this season and as a result find 
themselves among the elite 
who aspired to honours. 

Of the championship 
hopefuls. Hearts of Midlo- 
thian are feeing the most 
worrying challenge. They are 
away to Motherwell, a side 
now starting to believe in 
themselves and the methods 
laid down by their manager. 
Tommy McLean. Hearts will 
bave v to show the determina- 
tion and fighting spirit winch 
enabled them to beat Aber- 
deen on Saturday if they are to 
win at Fir Park. 


Trying 
to give 
up a bad 
habit 

By John Geodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 
Cigarette sponsorship of 
I sports events, currently worth 
nearly £10 mSUon, may come 
to an end because of the latest 
moves to bar th e teiev isiBg of 
competitions supported by to- 
bacco companies. 

The Independent 

Broadcasting Authority 
(XBA), with the I*iy com- 
panies, is c o nsid e ring the 
“phasSeg out” of sports events 
sponsored by tobacco com- 
panies. Brt they will make no 
decision they bear the 

results of negotiations between 

Dick Tracey, the Sports Min- 
ister, and the Tobacco _ Ad- 
visory CoandL 
The ISA's moves wotrid 
dnefiy affect horse racing and 


tor exposure of sports events 
they sponsor. 

Most of the big events 
supported by tobacco com- 
panies, Eke last week’s Ben- 
son and Hedges tennis 
toaraaraent at Wembley, are 
screened by the BBC for whom 
a spokesman said yesterday: 
“We hare contracts with a 
nmnber of sporting bodies who 
stage everts sponsored by 
companies. We will 
fiiffil those agreements. 

"But we win watch the 
USA's moves with interest and 
Eke them we are awaiting the 
outcome of the talks between 
the Sports Minister and the 
Tobacco Advisory CoanriL” 

The BBC has already Im- 
posed strict new regulations on 
the organizers of televised 
snooker amt tennis tour- 
naments, prohibiting the use 
of distinctive colours asso- 
ciated with tobacco companies. 

Sport of sporting 
new colours 

This came into force tor last 
month's Rothmans Grand 
Prix snooker tottnament in 
Reading. Last week, the usual 
gold of the Benson and Hedges 
billboards round the Wembley 
hhimw comt was changed to a 
curious shade of pmk and the 
BBC seemed to be doing its 
very best not to mention the 
sponsors. - 

Television adv e r tisin g of 
cigarettes has bees banned for 
20 years but critics maintain 
that sponsorship of sport has 
been used to circumvent the 
h a n. Mr BfU Cotton, the 
managing director of the BBC, 
has said that. "BBC airtime is 
being used to sell cigarettes. 
The BBC has to respond to the 
unease s urr o unding the effect 
tobacco sponsorship has on 
smoking habits among the 
young.” 

Any moves to eliminate the 
televising of tobacco-spon- 
sored sports ereots will delight 
the British Medical Authority, 
who has repeatedly cam- 
paigned fin- an end to ihilring 
sports events — and their 
healthy image — with 
tobacco. 

IflTV and BBC were to stop 
screening these events, the 
tobacco companies would al- 
most certainly withdraw their 
sponsorship^ spokesman for 
the Tobacco Advisory Council 
agreed yesterday; "That is a 
fairly reasonable assumption. 
Tobacco companies are not 
sponsoring events ont of 
altruistic motives, 

"As far as we are concerned 
the sport wants the sponsor- 
ship. The public wants the 
spoils events and we want the 
exposure, ft seems a fair deal 
all round. 

"If tobacco companies do 
not get the proper recognition 
it is not worth it when they are 
putting up six figme sums. 
This applies to all sponsor- 
ship, not jnst tobacco 
companies. 


’Vast effect 6 over 
20 years on cricket 


"There is no doubt that 
tobacco companies have had a 
vast effect on cricket over the 
last 20 years. Donald Cut of 
the Test and Co unty Cricket 
Board has said that cricket 
would now be a less pro- 
fessional game without the 
impact of the John Player 
League and the Benson and 


wages have risen and the 
competitions have generated 
more hiterest 

"I suspect that the television 
mrnmmes are reacting to the 
sniping by the anti-smoking 
lobby. Last week the BBC 
seemed to have got themselves 
into a twist at Wembley. There 
was not the traditional colonr- 
ing of gold ami you had to be 
on your toes even to see it was 
the Benson and Hedges 
tournament.” 

In 1974* the Tobacco Com- 
panies agreed to increase an- 
nually the amount of 
i!«n» ssiiip only by the rate of 
inflation. As sponsorship of 
sport soars tius.year. towards 
£150 million, tobacco com- 
panies are getting a smaller 
and smaller part of the busi- 
ness. By the end of the 1980s 
cigarette sponsorship seems 
likely ' to have disappeared 
from sport altogether.