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No 62,622 



SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


TIMES 


^‘7 


Fowler’s £20m 


in war on Aids 


By Philip Webster, Cliief PoKtiad Owrespoodent 

A new_ health education combat Aids and to find acme (vcemih, 
authority IS to be established or vaccine. oubfic e 

within the National Health Mr Fowler is to visit the and a £ 
Service to develop the fight World Health Oraamzation the cnu 
against Aids,** the Govern- and the United States and will restxmS 
mem is doubhng to £20 mil- • talk with his counterparts in 


lion the sum it will spend over European countries as part of 
the next year on its campaign. . ■ ■ — - ■■■ 


■: " rd 

* "§4 

-‘311 


The measures, agreed by 
Lord Whitelaw’s Cabinet 
committee on Aids, were an- 
nounced to the Commons 
yesterday by. Mr Norman 
Fowler, the Secretary of Stale 
for Social Services, during an 
aJl-day debate in which be 
issued a stark warning that the 
crisis oookl teach the levels of 
other countries unless every- 
one protected themselves. 

In its pubfirity campaign 
the Government is to employ 
shock tactics, particularly 
aimed at the young. Advert- 
isements prepared for the 
youth press contain such 
warnings as: “Your next sex- 
ual partner could be that very 
special person —the one that 
gives you Aids” and “Aids: 


A total of 34448 cases of Aids 
had been reported in 77 coun- 
tries arotmd the worid by mid- 
November, 77 per cent of them 
m the United States, the 
World Health Orgauizatios 


Mr Fowler promised more 
money for clinics treating 
sexually transmitted diseases, 
more money for hospitals, 
particularly in London, to 
treat the disease and greater 
British involvement in inter- 
national research efforts to 


— 

£12,000 to 
be won 

• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
shared yesterday by 
five readers. Details, V 

nnno 9 


• PortfoSoHsts, 
pages 24 and 29; rules 

and how to play, 
page 39. 

•Today £12,000 can- 
be won - £8,000 in the 
weekly competition 
and £4,000 in the daffy. 


Queues grow 

Government figures show that 
the number of people waiting 
for hospital in-patient care 
rose by 12,000 in the six 
months to March this year to 
673,107 


TIMES BUSINESS lj 


Pound rallies 

The pound shrugged off its 
weakness of the past few days, 
gaining against the dollar mid 
the mark. Tire sterling index 
rose by 0.3 to 67,9 Pfcge25 

1,200 jobs go 

Britain's biggest cement com- 
pany. Blue Code Industries, is 
to cut its workforce by 1,200 
next year — and there will be 
more to go in 1988 Page 25 


from Geneva). 

Of the other countries report- 
ing cases, 32 per cent woe m 
the Americas, 23 per cent in 
Europe, 10 per cent in Aliks, 
9 per cent in Asia and 2 per 
cent in southern Pacific. 

Aids threat ' 2 

FarKament 4 

the international fight ag ^mst 
the menace. 

The £20 million education 
campaign includes: 

• A new round of newspaper 
advertising starting on 
Sunday. 

• A poster campaign at 1,500 
sites around the country. 

• A campaign directed at 
young people, using maga- 
zines, radio and cinema. 

• A leaflet drop to afl 23 
million households in Britain 
early in the new year, 
accompanied by radio and 
television advertizing. 

The BBC and IRA have 
agreed to to cooperate in 
public service broadcasting. 

The most far-reaching 
development disclosed yes- 


executive responsibility for 
public education about Aids, 
and a for larger budget than 
the council, whose current 
responsiblities H win also take 
over. 

Its campaigning win cover 
the whole of the B ritain. Tire 
statutory arrangments which 
exist in Scotland through the 
Scottish health education 
group will be unaffected, al- 
though the two authorities will 
of course collaborate; 

Mr Fowler told MPs that 
30,000 people in Britain were 
infected with the Aids virus. 
The proportion of those who 
would eventually contract the 
disease and die was at present 
put at 25 to 30 per cent, but 
could be higher. 

The Aids disease was fatal 
and incurable, he said. And 
the number of cases would 
inevitably increase whatever 
the Government did. But tire 
spread of Aids could be pre- 
vented and the problem con- 
tained. The Government bad 
an important role bat tire key 
to containing the spread ul- 
timately rested with individ- 
uals own behaviour. 

He said that dear explicit 
language must be used. “It 
may be that some will be 
offended. I regret that, but I 
have to say that I believe the 
greater danger is that the 
message does not get over.” 

He emphasized that unless 
everyone took action the dis- 
ease would spread more 
widely into the heterosexual 
population. The message 
could not therefore be con- 
fined to particular groups. 


Fighting talk: Mr Norman Fowler bunches the anti-Aids campaign in London yesterday 

Brady set | Shultz accused as 

bitter row grows 
over Iran deal 


to talk 
on other 
crimes 


By Ian Smith 
Northern Correpondeflt 


tenday was the reforming of “That means striking a bal- 
ihe Health Education Coun- ance between wanting every- 
cil — a government-funded one of the risks, while not 
body outside the NHS - as a causing unnecessary panic.” 
health education authority di- Ministers were not last 
rectiy accountable to Par- night putting a figure on the 
fiamait. new sums that will be spent on 

The new authority, which - top of the £20 nriRion cam- 
will come iato effect next- paign, but Mr Fbwlcrsaidthat i 
April, will be given the major Omtowed oirp^ge ^caf 7 




a third virus 

from Christopher Thomas, Washington 

New evidence has been year and has been discovered 
found of a third virus which in at least six west African 
causes Aids, rai sing the patients as wdl as in France, 
possibility that tests tied to Belgium and West Germany, 
safeguard blood supplies ag- To complicate the picture, a 
ainst the disease will have to fourth virus has also been 
be refined. . .-.found, but it apparently has 


The virus was discovered in not caused disease among 
several west African patients about 300 people in whom it 
suffering from AMs in Sweden has been identified, 
by three researchers who won Dr Gallo said all the Aids 
the Albert Lasker research and Aids-like viruses were 
award. The virus has not yet under examination to deter- 
appeared in the United States. mine their differences and 
Dr Robert Gallo, a senior similarities, 
researcher at die National On the evidence so for. 
Cancer' Institute, Dr Luc some viruses seem to be high- 
Momagnier of tire Pasteur ly infective while others are 
Institute in Paris and Dr weak. Dr Gallo stiff some 
Myron Essex of the Harvard strains of the same type of 
School of Public Health; sag- Aids virus barely infected ceSs 
gested that more aids viruses under laboratory conditions, 
might be found. while other strains “nm to” 

The new discovery has been the cells, 
labelled SBL (for state barter- “What makes one cause 
iofogy laboratory! 6669 VZ disease , another not, I don’t 
Most Aids cases come from know ” he said. “The answer 
one of the other two viruses so will come in 1987.” The three 
for identified, designated van- scientists said an important 
ously as HIV, HTLV 3 and concern was that the new vi- 
LAV 1. A second virus, roses could escape detection 


1 * ^ j LAV 1. A second virus, roses coma escape oerecnon 

ISOeSKy i nning J LAV 2, was found early this by the existing Aids blood test 


Ian Brady, the Moors mur- 
derer, yesterday broke his 22- 
year sdence and said he is now 
willing to talk to senior police 
officers about other crimes. 
His change of heart has re- 
sulted from letters he ex- 
changed with Myra Bindley 
about the murders after both 
were given life sentences. 

In cMrespondence between 
the two before their relat; un- 
ship ended, Brady made sev- 
eral references to the Moors 
murders and according to the 
solicitor Mr Benedict 
Birnberg, Brady is concerned 
about tire public interpreta- 
tion which might now be 
placed on the letters. 

Five days ago Hindley 
pledged to co-operate in a new 
police search of the 
Saddteworth Moor which be- 
gan on Thursday to find the 
graves of Keith Bennett, aged 
12 anH Pauline Reade, aged 
16. 

Det Chief Supt Peter Top- 
ping, joint head of Greater 
Manchester QD, yesterday 
met senior Home Office staff 
to request that Hindley be 
taken from Cookham Wood 
jail in Rochester, Kent, to 
Saddlewoith Moor. 

Hindley has already identi- 
fied from maps ana photo- 
graphs tire spots where she 
thmks Keith Panline are 
buried, but detectives believe 
a personal visit to the scene 
will refresh her memory of 
events of 22_yeais ago. 

SnowonSaddlewortb Moor 
yesterday forced police to call 
off their painstaking search 

Tire point where they are 
now digging is less than 100 
yards away from where the 
body of 10-year-oki Lesley 
Anne Downey was unearthed 
in October 1965. 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 

at Reagan's senior Admiral John Poindexter, 
were embroiled in the National Security Adviser 


President Reagan's senior 
advisers were embroiled in 
bitter recriminations yes- 
terday over the secret ship- 
ment of US arms to Iran as it 
became dear that for more 
weapons reached Tehran than 
the White House has pre- 
viously admitted. 


Mr Robert McFariane, the ““ 
former National Security Ad- 
viser who went to Iran secretly 

at Mr Reagan's request, at> «“ the rmhtaiy balance be- 
mv/vL. «w»7 ih/. tween Iran and Iraq, and 
sS£ &102 Ttaiply contradicts the state- 
more abonx the operation than- 

he has admittedTHe insisted “ 

that he had kept Mr Shultz S*® - 
informed “reSbatedly and * 

often” about hSTdandestine ammunition supply . 

contacts with Iran. Mr Jim Wright, Democratic 

Mr S hultz, who opposed the Leader of the House of Repre- 
operalion, has ^maintained sentatives, said after meeting 


uiUKawui uib uvuauuu luoii mr-- A fY rtlimi 

he has admittedTHe insisted ^^teHoure 
that he had kept Mr Shultz 525, - J5“ 
informed “repeatedly and ^ onid ?.- t ” .° 


that he was only “sporadical- 
ly” informed about the arms 
supplies and that he had 
“momentary information at 
best” about what was going 
on. 

Mr Mc&riane said that in 
retrospect it was a mistake to 
send arms to Iran. “As a 
senior adviser to the President 


Admiral Poindexter that apart 
from the weapons sent by the 
US, a series of shipments were 
sent by Israel, which bad been 
“given to understand it was 
carrying out the wishes of the 
United States”. 

Mr Wright said 1.000 Tow 
missiles were assembled in 
San Antonio last February and 


I should have anticipated this ^ feoniary and 

ootential outcome. The foil lire Others were shipped separate- 


potential outcome. The failure 
to do so repres en ts a serious 
error in judgment for which I 
accept lull responsibility.” 


“All were paid for by Iran — 
$12 million plus,” he said. - 


Heroin smuggling 
gang is convicted 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


The Stock Exchange has told 
its members they can deal for 
Mr Ivan Boesky. the Ameri- 
can speculator, provided they 
immediately report to it 

Page 25 


TIMES MONEY Jj 


A lot of PEP 

The introdu ction of Personal 
Equity Plans (PEPs) in the last 

Budget has proved so success- 
ful that one company has had 
* 1 8,000 inquiries 
yaafly Money, pages 30 to 37 


TIMES SPORT 1 


Tailend boost 

• England's cricketers, who had 
a dismal day on a sodden pitch 
at Newcastle, were boosted by 
the UnJenders, French. Foster 

• and Small Page 42 

Tyson’s target 

Mike Tyson, aged 20, win , 
become the youngest worid 
, heavyweight champion since , 
Floyd Patterson if he beats 
. Trevor Berbick in Las Vegas 


British Gas shares offered at 135p 


British Gas shares go on sale so that up to 64-per cent of the 
next week at 135p each, shares, worth slightly less than 
valuing the company at £5-6 £3.5 bflDon, will be available 
billion. Mr Peter Walker, the to the private investors. 
Eneigy Secretary, announced Mr Michael Richardson, a 
yesterday (Teresa Poole managing director .of NM 


so that up to 64-percent of the schild expects to see a 15p 
shares, worth slighffy less than premium on the 50p pardy- 
£3.5 balfion. win be available paid shares; which would 
to the private investors. mean a quick 30 per cent 
Mr Michael Richardson, a profit for investors, 
managing director .of NM The issue price, drew im- 
Rothschfld, said: “We have no .mediate criticism 
intention of ballotting and Mr David Steel, the Liberal 

tyyrjng in min d the numbers leader, said that after 
likely to invest for relatively squandering the windfall of 


writes). . Rothschild, said: “we have no 

Payment will be is three intention of ballotting and 
instalments with 50p a share bearing in mind the numbers 


dm» on application. 45p in 
June next year and 40p in 
April 1988. 

More than 7.5 million peo- 


small amounts, we believe this 
also leaves room for large 


North Sea off, Mrs Thatcher 
was “now having to sell off 


the privatization and all cor- 
rect applications should re- 
ceive an allocation. 

The sale has been structured 


investors and for those want- our industrial silver to pay the 

pie have expressed interest in ing several thousand pounds monthly bills.” 

-- -■ -» -*i — worth of shares.” The foil prospectus will be 


worth of shares.” 

Shareholders are likely to 
make an immediate gain on 
any investment NMRoth- 


The foil prospectus will be 
published m The Times on 
Tuesday, November 25. 

Gas goes public, page 25 


Heroin worth up to £200 
million was smuggled into the 
United States, from Pakistan, 
by members of a British ring 
convicted yesterday at the 
Central Criminal Court in one 
of the biggest drug cases ever 
heard by a British court. 

After more than three days 
of deliberations, the jury 
found five men guilty of 
taking part in the ring includ- 
ing Paul Dye, aged 42 jt 
company . director from 
Iver,Bucks,wfao was the cen- 
tral figure in the organization. 

The others convicted were 
Give Williamson , aged 29, an 
electrician from Middlesex, 
who became his 
lieu tenan t^Vter Davies, aged 
30,a bread salesman from 
north London, David Millard, 
aged 37, unemployed, from 
Peterborough and Paul Mur- 
phy, aged 30, unemployed, 
from north London . 

Nazim Ahmed, aged 27. a 
Pakistani, was acquitted of 


Demand for MIS statement rejected 


By Michael Evans and 
Martin Fletcher . 


that the decision by Sir Mi- Martin Fumival Jones, and 
chael to broaden the scope.of other senior ex-members such 
the MI5 affair-bad nothing to as Mr Arthur Martin and Mr 


tonight 


Page 44 


Hume News 

2-5 

Law Repot* 

38 

Overseas 

Ml 

Leaders 

21 


22 

Letters 

21 

• trfc 

16 

Obituary 

22 

B“ths. deaths. 

PlfUtmnt 

4 

aumaaw 

21 

Reljgiaa 

22 

Bridee 

17 

Safe Room 

4 

.. Busia^s 25-w 

Science 

22 

Chess 

17 

Sorias 

fZ3 

Court 

22 

Sport 3MSA* 

'.Crosswords 17.24 

TbtMtttsjae 


Duty 

20 

TV & Radio 

43 

Ettats 

24 

Weather 

24 


w _ ■ ,1 . f . .r uimniNiM uvuAUig tv «ia wu CY1 UiUi 15101(111 CU1U ITU 

JJ? * |5 5c *** Minister. Anthony Simltins, was set in 

Sir Michael tad ordered a motion yesterday. 

3? wriSt police inquiry mto statements Sources said that Sir Mi- 

< w5s ^ made by Mr Nigel West, chad was forced to call in the 

fouUi y > author of a book on Se police because of the sugges- 

despne the ^ security service, which was tian that classified documents 

^by bgxd ^ ^ had been unlawfully handed 

ptied by many-former mem- over and were in a safe. 


bringing two kilogrammes of 
heroin into Heathrow airport. 

Graham Ellis , aged 30, a 
meter reader from west 
London , had already pleaded 
guilty to a smuggling 
charge. Yesterday the court 
was told he had been pres- 
sured not to plead guilty and 
kept seperate from the others. 

The men convicted yes- 
terday were arrested a month 
before the Criminal Justice 
Act took effect, with its pro- 
visions for life sentences for 
traffickers. But after the jury 
returned His Honour Judge 
Rant, QC, said he was consid- 
ering the posibility of consec- 
utive sentences when he 
passes sentence on Monday. 

Five people have been con- 
victed in the United States, 
including Millard's wife who 
was found with three kilos of 
heroin. 

Transit lounge gang 
and photographs, page 3 


Paris meeting 
seals warmth 

today when Mr Dale Camp- „ , . 

bell^vonns, a labour MP, OI retfitlOllS 
revealed that a secondbook by ” „ , . 

a former MI5 employee, the ?SIJS ~ No epoch-making 
late Mrs Joan Miller, is lo be agreements were reached at 
published next week. yesterday’s summit meeting. 

Despite the decision by Sir but Mrs Thatcher and Prca- 
Michaei and the Director of Mitterrand expressed 
Public Prosecutions to investi- their pleasure at their nmilar- 


****** 


Cabinet Secrecy, in the New 1 

wales Supreme Com office .t 

h nt h Vfrc was entirely a matter for Sir 
^ Michael. Mrs Thatchw had 

TSaicher and a r M wtad M1 ^ ^ n 

as&sssss ^ y S aS rfonnar ’ ^ of - 

Commons statement on the _ 

Government's apparent don- The mqimy winch coukl 
ble ^andards over Britain's, potentiauy lead to police 
iij fpWpengg services. questioning of the former 

Bul Whitehall .sources raid direcior-fieneral of MT5. Sir 


sec urity service, which was tian that classified documents 
based on information sup- had been unlawfully handed 
plied by many- former mem- ovcr an> i were in a safe. 
bersof MI5. The twin-pronged MIS af- 

N umber 10 officials said it fair linking the con rt case in 
was entirely a mailer for Sir Sydney to police action in 


Michael Mrs Thatcher had . London gave an unwelcome 
not been consulted, she was new dimension for the Gov- 
merriy “informed”, the of- eminent, already under fire 
finals said. for its decision to fight 

The inquiry which could Publication of the book by Mr 


publication of the book by Mr 
wright in Australia. 

Further embarrassment for 
the Government emerged ves- 


gate Mr West, there was no 
indication that a similar in- 
quiry would be ordered into 
the sources who helped Mr 
Chapman Pincher for his 
book. Their Trade Is Treach- 
ery. Yesterday Mr Pincher 
dismissed as “ludicrous” a 
suggestion in the Sydney court 
that Sir Michael Havers had 
been his principal source for 
his second book 

Judges's suspicious, page 8 


ity of view on a range of issues, 
including defence, the EEC 
and East-West relations (Di- 
ana Gcddes writes). 

After “a beautiful and 
enjoyable day.” Mrs Thatcher 
said they bad seen much of 
each other this year. 

As if to mark the warm 
relations, she said that the 
Prince and Princess of Wales 
would visit France in 1988. 

Spectre of terror, page 6 



l) * i <T**S_ 

0# 


week 


who ran the operation, gave 
details of weapons sent to Iran 
to selected congressmen. 

The cache included 2,008 
Tow anti-tank missiles and at 
least 235 Hawk anti-aircraft 
missiles. The revelation casts 


damns’ 
libel suit 

Mr Robert Maxwell was 
yesterday awarded £55,000 
libel damages against foe 
satirical magazine Private Eye 
which had daimed on two 
occasions in 1985 that be 
financed trips abroad by the 
Mr Ne3 Kirmock, the Labour 
leader, in the hope of ultimate 
ennoblement. 

The damages included 
£50,000 “exemplary” dam- 
ages, and costs were estimated 
at £200,000. 

After a theatrical and 
flamboyant courtroom battle, 
the jury of six men and six 
women took five hours to find 
unanimously for the Czecb- 
bom former Labour MP for 
Buckingham, publisher of the 
Daily Mirror. 

They awarded him £3,500 
in respect of the first article, 
£1500 in respect of the second, 
and a further £50,000 in 
punitive damages Mr Justice 
Simon Brown granted Mr 
Maxwell an injunction ban- 
ning Private Eye from further 
publishing the same or similar 
defamatory words about him. 

Mr Maxwell, aged 63, said 
after the verdict: “I am de- 
lighted that I have been able, 
with the jury’s help, to nail 
Private Eye for the lying organ 
that it is. 

“We have exposed once and 
for all that they will publish 
anything for profit They don’t 
check their sources. . They 
don’t have the guts to 
apologise and when they fi- 
nally do, they say in a court of 
law that some of their apolo- 
gies are insincere.” 

The magazine had alleged, 
in articles written by Mr 
Christopher Sylvester, its 
political correspondent, that 
dr Maxwell had acted as Mr 
Kinnock's “paymaster” and 
financed trips by the Labour 
leader and his staff to East 
Africa. Centra] America and 
Moscow, so that he might 
eventually be recommended 
for a peerage. 

Mr Maxwell daimed. in 
evidence and through counsel 
that the allegation was ma- j 
lirious, offensive, disgraceful 
monstrous and outrageous. 

Private Eye and its former 
editor Mr Richard Ingrams, 
who was not in court for the 1 
verdict yesterday, claimed it 
was true. 

Mr Maxwell said be had 

Lord Bclbof Cokflype was 
not his remaining dream, he 
added. 

Mr Ingrams and Mr Sylves- 
ter spent many hours m the 
witness box and daimed their 
story came from “moles” in 
the Labour Party and at 
Mirror Group Newspapers, 
whom they refused to name. 

• Hie largest awards 
previously made against the 
magazine are thought to have 
been to Sir Janies Goldsmith, 
the industrialist, who won 
£30,000 criminal libel dam- 
ages in 1976, and a further 
£85,000 libel damages in 1983. 

Brian James, page 24 


WmovihgXJ 

FMOumflis i 

• Spectacular 
advances in farm 
technology have 
ensured that there is 
now enough food 

to feed the world. 

But politicians 
have turned this 
success into a 
monster, in Europe 
it is called 
the Common 
Agricultural Policy 

• Warehouses 
are bulging with 
unwanted milk, 
beef and grain, 
courtesy of the 
taxpayer 

• As Europe’s 
leaders struggle to 
find a way out. 

The Times looks 
behind the CAP in 
a week-long series 

• Why Europe 
has its back to the 
wall - and how 
we can slay the 
monster 

• How farmers 
were pushed to 
produce more 
milk --only to see it 
poured away 

• The subsidies 
war: as Europe and 
the US battle it 
out, the Third World 
goes hungry and 
farmers around the 
world face 
bankruptcy 

• The science 
and the profits: how 
increased 
efficiency on the 
land has made 
millions for grain 
store owners 




A share 
in gas 





Tuesday: Tell Sid 
- The Times is 
publishing the 
application form 
plus full 

prospectus to apply 
for shares in 
British Gas 


“La Manga (Mis 
perhaps the most remarkable 
development in all Spain” 

Darfy Telegraph 

Imagne a private parades m Sotfhem Span enabled by Mb and 
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IfsippEigaeoiddnr* by the pools more 
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And that’s only a tiny part of the pleasures 
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^ s ^ two cha*np*orchp golf courses 
■* whch lure Seve Ballesteros bad- whenever 

-r -ir- ~=^ he can take nme off from touring 2S 
■- ' La Manga Club's professional 

- 1 - Anyone for terra? The David Lloyd 
Racquet Centre is one of the biggest and best equpped r> Europe. 

There's the only cnctet oval in Southern Spain. And where else could 
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Come the euerwig and there's a great choKC of restaurants, bars and 
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Ttei'sLaMapgaCiubforyou A uiique worid ofall year round leisure. 

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Address __ 

Telephone 


Postcode 


La Manga Club Limited, Silver City House 
il Brampton Road. London. SVl»3 1BW Telephone. 0» -22b 22 1 b 




I 






HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


Terrorists stage 
show of strength 


Health education chiefs future queried 


By J31 Sherman 


Fifteen terrorists staged a show of Strength in isolated 
border country yesterday to display weaponry and wars 
Loyalist paramilrtarites of retaliation for their attacks oa 
Roman rartii^Hw- 

The Irish National Liberation Army gaum* drore three 
journalists, who were blindfolded, to a remote area near foe 
border between Co Loath and Co Anaagh. 

They were anned with Heckler and Koch naes, Anuafite 

and Rimer weapons, and a UZI Mb-readune gun. 

One of the terrorists read a statement waning 
"loyalists** that If they intensified attacks on the Honan 
Catholic community, the Liberation Army wo uld reta liate. 

The incident occurred without any sign of security taw 
on either side of the border and Mr Ken Magmnisrpt, of- 
ficial Unionist MP for Fermanagh, South Tyrone, sarfit 
gave “the fie" to ahm that there was unproved security 


co-operation. 

New evidence frees youth 

A youth who spent three m onth s in prison accused of 
murdering a t ee na ge girl was released yesterday after new 
evidence showed he could not be the killer. Richard 
Rw r jrlan t i, 17, of Time Tree Road, Narboroogh, 

Leicestershire, had been accused of k il l i n g Dawn 

Ashworth, aged 15, in the nearby village of Enderby last 
July. 

Bat magistrates in Leicester were told tint the person 
who killed Dawn had also kfltei Lynda Mann, also aged 15 
of Narboroagh, three years earlier and that tests showed 
that Richard was not in Lynda's murder. Both 

girls were p^fls of Lutterw orth Grammar School 


The future of the Director 
General of the Health Educa- 
tion Council Dr David 
Player, was the subject of 
speculation yesterday follow- 
ing news that foe council was 
to be disbanded. 

Tussles with ministers dur- 
ing his four years of office 
suggest that it is unlikely that 
he will become head of the 
new NHS health education 
authority. 

The council’s 75 staff mem* 
bers were told that most of 
them would be found jobs, but 
the 10 chief officers, including 
Dr Player, have been told by 
the Secretary of State For 
Health and Social Services. 


Mr Norman Fowler, thatthe 
new body will need to re- 
appoint senior staff and there 
is no guarantee that they will 
be re-employed. 

The counal’s 25 members, 
under the dminnanstaip of Sr 
Brian Bailey, who is also 
chairman of TV Southwest, 
have been told that ibeir toms 
of office, due to be reviewed 
this month, will be extended 
until next April when the 
council is disbanded. No de- 
cision has been made as to 
whether they will then become 
members of the new body. 

In public. Dr Player put on a 
brave face yesterday, although 
evidently concered about his 
own position. 

“I see the new health 


authority as becoming the 
preventative wing of theNHS. 
It is a development I have 
been urging for a number of 
years and the Health Educa- 
tion Council hope to play an 
active and urgent role in 
settingup the new authority” 

Dr Player, aged 57, has been 
both a colourful and ■ a 
controv e rsial figure at the 
council ance he took over in 
1982, having beat director of 
the Scottish Health Eduction 
Group. 

On numerous occasions he 
has met ministers head on 
over policy differences, as did 
his predecessors, particularly 
concerning alcohol and 


In the year he took office he 
took on ministers over the 
appointment of Mr Michael 
Daube, a former director of 
Ash, the anti-smoking cam- 
paign, and a senior lecturer in 

community medicine at Edin- 
burgh Univeristy. 

Dr Player wanted Mr Daube 

to run his public affairs di- 
vision in London. Bat the 
Department of Health and 
Social Seoirity, anticipating a 
dash with the smoking lobby, 
vetoed the position. 


on drug abuse and 


The HEC has also had its 
own share of criticism and 
many organisations, including 
NHS staff fed that it has been 
largely ineffectual and not had 
the necessary teeth to make 
any decisive impact on health 
education. 


Threat to 
society’ 
message 
on Aids 


. .1 . 

^iir 0 ' 




Science Correspondent 


More recently, Dr Flayer 


was warned by the Govern- 
ment to stay dear of the anti- 
alcohol abuse ca m paigners, 
Triple A. Conflicts have also 

arisen over Government cam- 


HEC staff at the council's 
London headquarters, though 
shocked at the suddeness of 

foe news, which they beard at 

midday yesterday, were trying, 
to convince themselves that 
tire new move would give 
health education a higher 
profile and a role in creating 
national policy. . 


Baker blow 





The Government’s £20 mil- 
lion Aids campaign, begins 
tomorrow with explicit news- 
paper advertisements de- 
signed to promote fimdamen- 
taT changes in sexual be- 
haviour in Britain. 

■ The is that Aids 

(acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome) is. a sexually 
transmitted disease which 
threatens all sections of 
society. 

The advertismems are more 
direct and emphatic than ear- 
lier phases of government 


as teachers 


publicity on the disease, but. 

do not use any sexual slang. 

The campaign cautious 
against promiscuity and 
emphasizes that heterosexual 
men amt women, as well as 
homosexual znen, are at risk. 

"Aids is not prejudiced- It 
can IdQ anyone”, one ad- 
vertisement warns. "Don't die 
of ignorance” and "The longer 
you believe Aids only infects 
others, the fester it'll spread” 
are variations on the theme. 

The advertismencs point 
out that 30,000 people are 
infected with the Aids virus. 
There have been 565 cases of 
the disease in Britain so far, 
with 284 deaths. 

Colour posters with warn- 
ing will appear in 

streets at 1,500 locations on 
December 8. Oa that day, a 
campaign will begin in maga- 
zines fra- teenagers and popu- 
lar music papers. It will run 
until February 1987. 

One of tire teenage mess 
advertisements says: "Aids: 
How many people will get it 
for Christmas?” Another, con- 
tained in tire shape of a heart, 
says: "Your next sexual part- 
ner could be that very special 
person”. It is subtitled: "The 
one that gives you Aids” 

On December 25 commer- 
cials will be broadcast on 
radio, with fen Dury, the rock 
m usician, and Paul Gamba- 
crini, the disc jockey, advis- 
ing: "The more people you 
steep with, the more danger 
you’re in.” 

And on drugs, fen Dury 
says: "If you can’t give up 
; injecting, never share a needle 
or equipment” 

Twenty-three million leaf- 
lets will be delivered to house- 
j holds throughout the country. 
They wifi be supported by ad- 
vertisements on TV 


set seal on 


Lawyer Branson 
remand boat sold 


pay package 


A solicitor who mu 
extradited from France to 
face a double murder 
charge was remanded in 
police custody yesterday in 
a private bearing before a 
Sheffield magistrate. 

fen Wood, aged 38, had 
been held in France after 
be threatened to jamp from 
a cathedral tower. 

D«ing extradition be faced 
charges of murdering Miss 
Danielle Ledez, his lover, 
aad her daughter at the 
home they shared in 
Bradfidd, near Sheffield, 
amt a further charge of 
att e mpting to murder her 
son. 


Mr Richard Branson, 
the pop millionaire, has 
sold the Virgin Atlantic 
Challenger n for £1 mfl- 
fimt, to a wealthy Saudi 
Arabian prince. 

The giant powerboat 
beat toagh Atlantic 
weather to win the blue 
riband for Britain, by 
crossing from New York to 
the SciUy Isles in just three 
days, ten boors and forty 
mutates. 

Mr Branson, wbo built 
tiie boat for £1-5 ntiOioa, 
wifi not reveal the identity 
of tire prince. Virgin Chal- 
lenger II will be teat to the 
Mediterranean. 


By Marie Dowd, Education Reporter 


s.'v 


Miners stop work 


A strfte halted work yesterday at the £57 minion coffiery 
Castlebridge, near Dunfermline, which was opened only 
last month. More than 800 miners stopped work in protest 
over disripiiiiary action against men alleged to have cone 
up from the pit before the end of their shift. 

A spokesman for British Coal said: "Production at the 
pit has been hatted. Discussions on what is a petty 
disciplinary matter cannot ta ke place until normal working 
has been resumed under ajoneed coarittatory procedure.” 


Militant 


efiant 


rhe La boar Party's 
tie with the Militant 
ders of Liverpool Couo- 
toofc yet another twist 
t night as tire expelled 
r Derek Hatton (right) 
isted that he was still 
deputy leader erf the 
anti had his efa™ 
by the new left* 
1 leader. 

an unprecedented 
the Labour leader- 
eade plain that it was 
to impose a deputy 
ron thecoma! 
ordered that aD 
irillors purged from the 
rty mast be removed 
office at tire next fall 



Teachers last night rebuffed 
Mr Kenneth Baker, Secretary 
of State for Education and 
Science, by formally approv- 
ing the deal on pay and 
conditions agreed last week- 
end in mite of the Govern- 
ment’s call fora rethink on the 
content of the package. 

Final ratification will not 
take place, however, until the 
agreement has been put before 
union members at the begin- 
ning of next month. 

The move puts unions and 
Mr Baker on a collision 
course. 

He wants to reform the 
career structure of teachers to 
give greater pay differentials 
for senior staff and teachers of 
merit, whereas tire unions and 
their local authority employ- 
ers have finally set the seal on 
their own salary structure 
which is weighted in favour of 
the basic classroom teacher. 

A last-ditch attempt was 
inarlp by some of the smaller 
unions to accommodate the 
Government’s position yes- 
terday but this failed. 

Both rival pay formulas are 
worth average nses of 16.4 per 
cent spread over 15 months, 
but Mr Baker has repeatedly 
threatened to impose his own 
solution if a settlement is not 
readied on his terms. 

Four of the six unions 
signed the final accord: the 
National Union of Teachers, 
the Assistant Masters and 
Mistresses Association, the 
Secondary Heads Association 
and the Professional Associ- 
ation of Teachers. 


The two which dissented 
from last weekend’s draft 
agreement, the National 
Association of School- 
masteis/Union of Women 
Teachers and the National 
Association of Head Teachers, 
remained firmly opposed. 

Mr Baker will now meet 
local authority representatives 
early next week. 

He will seek clarification 



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about why they chose to 
ignore his request for a rethink 
and wifi also want specific 
figures on the extra cost 
implications ofimproved con- 
ditions of service relating to 
maximum class sizes and 
covering for absent co l le a g u e s . 

Mr John Peannan, leader of 
the Labour-controlled local 
authorities, said that the 
Government’s request to re- 
consider stemmed from a 
mis taken view of the manage- 
meat needs of schools. 

"We therefore wish to meet 
the Secretary of State to 
explain why we believe our 
structure to be in tite best 
interests of foe education ser- 
vice and to try to convince 
him to fund central 
government’s share of this 
historic agreement which is so 
beneficial to all,” he said. 

Mr Doug McAvoy, deputy 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Union ofTeacheis, said 
he hoped foe Government 
would see that this was foe 
best way of seeming peace in 
schools. 




Hue served PC Keith Blakelock: The simple message on the plaque in MnsweU Hill, 
London. His widow, Elizabeth, stands in tribnte at the memorial unveiled yesterday by Mr 
Neil Kmnock, the labour leader (Photograph: John Rogers). 


PC was ‘victim of cruelty’ 


But Mr Fred Smithies, gen- 
eral secretary of the 
NAS/UWT, sank “I fear 
schools will rapidly find them- 
selves in despe ra te dmun- 
stanoes as zliadvised bead 
teachers and ill-advised local 
authorities try to get their 
pound of flesh out of this 
aweful bond.” 


By Tim Jones 


Royal guest 
at conceit 


As Mr Nefl Kmnock, Lead- 
er of the Labour Party, un- 
veiled yesterday a memorial 
to foe memory of PC Keith 
Biakdock who was hacked to 
death , during the north 
London riots last year, the 
senior community relations 
officer at Haringey, accused 
tiie organizers of ignoring the 
black co mmuni ty. 


The Prince of Wales is to 
attend a concert in London 
next month, to marie 600 years 
of Anglo-Portuguese friend- 
ship, it was announced 
yesterday. 


However, Mr Michael Win- 
ner, chairman of foe Police 
Manorial Trust, said the 
usual practice of inviting tiie 
mayor, deputy mayor and 
chief executive of foe council 
had been followed and they 
bad attended. 


Hie conceit, at foe Queen 
Elizabeth Haft, on December 
16, will feature the English 
Chamber Orchestra, of winch 
foe Prince is patron. 


Before he perforated foe 
! simple ceremony at Muswdl 
| Hilt north London. Mr 
Kinnock had laid a wreath at 
the memorial in Haringey to 
Mrs Cynthia Jarrett, whose 


death after police raided her 
home, led to the rioting. 

Outside the town hall at 
Haringey, Mr Kinnock met 
the leader of the council, Mr 
Benue Grant, whom he bad 
publicly disowned because of 
remarks made after foe riot 

Mr Grant blamed foe police 
for tiie riots and said they 
"had received a Moody good 
hiding”. 

Yesterday, Mr Jeff 
Crawford, a community rela- 
tions officer, said: "I note with 
regret that there was not one 
black face among those of- 
ficially invited to the 
Blakelock memorial 
ceremony. 

"To be Wont, I treat this as a 
huge snub to Haringey’s black 
community. 1 wonder whether 
the organizers and those pol- 
ice associated with the cere- 
mony really mean it when 


they talk of healing wounds 
and building bridges fra- the 
black community" 

Mr Winner raid that Mrs 
Blakelock and her three chil- 
dren, Mark, Kevin ami Lee, 
had not wanted Mr Giant to 
be invited. 

Mr Kinno ck said that PC 
Biakdock had been tiie victim 

of craefry beyond the scope of 
comprehension 


TV tribute 


A wreath from Mr Nod 
Edmonds, foe BBC television 
personality, and his wife, 
Helen, lay next to foe coffin at 
the funeral of Mr Michael 
Lush, yesterday. Mr Edmonds 
did not attend. MrLustuaged 
25, of Southampton, died 
while rehearsing a stunt for 
The Late Late Breakfast 
Show. 


Television commercials are 
still in production, Mr Nor- 
man Fowler, Secretary of State 
for Social Semces, said yes- 
terday, but they are certain to 
am tain foe same messages as 
other prongs of the campaign. 
The mst advertisement is 
Bkdy to be broadcast on 
December 28. 

Similar advertisements will 
be shown on L500 cinema 
screens from January 5. 

Mr Fowler said: “The 
advertising win aim to get 
oyer straight messages: 'Stick 
to one partner, if you don’t, 
use a condom’.” 

The campaign hoped to 
strike a balance between warn- 
ing everyone of foe risks,, 
while not causing unnecessary 
panic, he said. 


Kinnock hedges 
on N-weapon plan 


Bv Philip Webber, Chief Political Correspondent 


NewCND 
leaflet is 
scorned 


Wapping pay-off 
claims near 2,000 


By Urn Jones 


Mr Neil Kinnock said yes- 
terday that the timetable for 
the removal of American 
nudear weapons from Britain 
under a Labour government 
would be worked out in 
agreement with the United 
States. 

The Leader of foe Labour 
Parly declined to put a precise 
timetable on such a with- 
drawal process before his im- 
portant visit to the US next 
weekend. 


that there were “technical 
questions”. 

Mr Kinnock said: “I'm not 
saying how long that technical 
process is and what kind of 
discussions we need to have in 
order to achieve it. But it will 
be undertaken because the 
United States is not and never 
has been in the business of 
imposing weapons systems 


In an interview with The 
Wall Street Journo/ published 
yesterday, Mr Kmnock said 
that a Labour government’s 
first job would be to shut 
down foe building programme 
far Trident submarines, and 
then to dispose of the rest of 
Britain’s nudear aisenaL 
On tuning Mr Kinnock said 
that an agreement “will have 
to be worked out with the 
United States” and he added 


Defence will dominate Mr 
Kinnock’s week-long US visit. 
He is to make speeches in 
Atlanta, Boston and Wash- 
ington, and will be constantly 
flgtrffd how Britain would be 
defended under a Labour 
government, and what its 
relationship would be to the 
United States. 

In the newspaper interview 
he reaffirmed that a Labour 
government would never call 
on the United States to launch 
a first strike against an enemy 
of Britain. 


A new CND leaflet purport- 
ing to show foe routes used by 
convoys carrying nudear wea- 
pons drew scorn last night 
from defence sources in 
WhitehalL 

Roots “detailed” in the 
pamphlet comprise mainly 
primary arterial roads in 
Britain. One Ministry of De- 
fence official raid the leaflet 
was “somewhat less useful to 
would-be saboteurs of nudear 
convoys than the average AA 


Nearly half the number of 
full-time employees of News 
International wbo went cm 
strike have applied for ter- 


mination payments. 

A total ofS^UO staff who 
-went on strike were dismissed 
for breach of contract 

However, more than 1,100 
of them woe part-time work- 
ers, not wholly employed tty 
the company, and some of 
them worked only one night a 
week fin- News International. 

_ By last night, 1,600 applica- 
tions from former employees 
claiming their share of the £58 
ntiHion offer had been pro- 
cessed tty the company and 
several hundred other Haim* 
were being dealt with. 

The company expects that 
by next week, when the offer 
doses, it wfll have process e d 
about 2,000 termination pay- 
ments. 

Under the offer, former 
employees who had full-time 
positions with the company 


But while the contents of 
the new pamphlet are being 
regarded as “harmless, border- 
ing on the inane”, the philos- 
ophy behind the leaflets has 
worried politicians. 

Mr Gerry Neale, chairman 
of the Campaign for Defence 
and Multilateral Disarma- 
ment, said it was “reprehen- 
sible” that CND should 
attempt to detail convoy 
routes and aims depots. 


would receive £820 for each 
completed year of service, 
with a minimum payment of 
£ 2 , 000 . 

A spokesman for the com- 
pany said: “When we reach 
the 2,000 figure, it vrill in- 
dicate that a majority of our 
former full-time employees 
have ‘voted’ in their own way 
to end the dispute, by taking 
tiie redundancy payments’on 
offer. 

“By any democratic judg- 
ment that will mean it is 
finished.” 


He added: “The part-time 
people, some of whom worked 
only one day a week fin- us, 
have been told that if “they 
accept redundancy money, 
they will be expelled from foe 
unions. 


“In those circumstances, 
they could not continue in 
work for the remainder of tbe 
week at other Fleet Street 
newspapers.” ' 


Pay offer aims 


at prison peace 


The Home Office sought to 
buy prison peace yesterday 
with a £l5,000-a-year salary 
for top-grade prison officers 
choosing to work a regular 49- 
hour week (Our Home Affairs 
Correspondent writes). 

The aim is to do away with 
costly, unpredictable over- 
time, which does not always 
put staff where most needed. 

Tbe offer will be negotiated 
by foe Prison Officers’ Associ- 
ation and foe Treasury will be- 
involved. 

At present, officers work on 
average 56 hours a week, 
including overtime, with av- 
erage earnings of £1 5.000. 

Under foe new offer, they 
would be able to work either 
39 or 49 horns a week. The 
extra 10 hours, contracted by 
an officer for a period of 
perhaps up to a year, would 


bring in £4,000 a year more. 

The starting salary fora new 
prison officer wifi be £8.800 
for a 39-hour week, compared 
with £8,600 for a 40-hour 
week now. 


There will be no chief 
officers, foe equivalent of 
warrant officers, under foe 
plan, bat they will be merged 
with junior governors. 

Tbe pay of tbe present 
governor class is being re- 
viewed by agreement between 
the Treasury and the 
governors’ branch of foe Soci- 
ety of Civil and Pubhc 
Servants. 


Last night, foe- Prison 
Officers’ Association did not 
give the plan the brush-off, but 
unofficially welcomed tbe feet 
that at last detailed proposals 
were available for negotiation. 


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£200m heroin gang smashed in one operatio n 

Heathrow transit lounge 
smugglers used girdles 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


In drug-smuggling the best 
ideas are sometimes die sim- 
plest. For more than two years 
Paul Dye and other members 
of a .multi-million pound 
drujp ring convicted yesterday 
at the Central Criminal Court 
put that principle to best 
effect, smuggling between 40 
and 60 kg of heroin across the 
Atlantia 

One of the largest heroin 
organizations ever uncovered 
by British customs investi- 
gators took advantage of the 
transit passenger system to 
move heroin from Pakistan 
through Britain and the Conti- 
nent into the United States, 
generating up to an estimated 
£200 million. 

For the first time in the 
history of customs operations 
investigators captured an en- 
tire international drug organ- 
ization ranging -across three 
continents from the heroin 
supplier to the couriers, 
distributors and Dye, the en- , 
trepreneur behind the whole 
operation. 

He and the others were 
caught by undercover surveil- 
lance involving investigators 
from Britain, the Netherlands, 
West Germany and the 
United States. Although ar- 
rests were made during the 
investigation the organization 
refused to heed the wanting 
signs and continued to 
..operate. 

Unaware that customs men 
were listening, Dye once com- 
plained to a colleague bow 
difficult smuggling had 
become. 

Eventually Dye plotted to 
finish his operations with a 
spectacular swansong by using 
a Pakistani diplomat and a 
diplomatic bag to move 50kg 
of heroin to the United States 
during a United Nations 
conference. . . 

But be was not quick 
enough. He and other mem- 
bers of the ring were arrested 
around the world. 

In an unprecedented legal 
move four of the gang con- 
victed in the United Stales 
were frown to London to give 
evidence in the triaL 
They described an organiza- 
tion which, competing with 
the Mafia, relied on nothing 
more fancy than £5 Marks & 
Spencer girdles to smuggle 
2kg or 3kg of heroin a trip - 
from Pakistan. . 

The girdles were bought at 
London stores and sent out to 
Pakistan. Dye. and his- aides 
were careful not to cause any' 


" " X 


problems with the Pakistani 
authorities and cut out the 
labels because of the Arab ban 
on companies linked to Israel. 

Tire girdle would leave 
Islamabad around the waist of 
a courier booked to a destina- 
tion which required a change 
of flights. 

_ In the transit lounge at an 
airport such as Heathrow the 
courier would go into a toilet, 
remove the girdle and place ii 
in a briefcase. He would sit 
next to a second courier in the 
lounge carrying an identical 
bag. 

An - exchange wouldtake 
place and. the second courier 
would wear the girdle for the 
second leg of the journey into 
the United States. The first 
courier would either continue 
to an innocent des tina tion or 
return home after cancelling 
an apparent onward flight. 


But early last year customs 
.officers mourned an investiga- 
tion code-named Operation 
Fulmar and which would 
amass more than 700 photo- 
graphs of the ring in action. 

The investigating unit, 
known as the Foxtrot because 
of its call sign, was alerted 
when uniformed customs offi- 
cers became suspicious about 
a number of people going to 
Pakistan. 

In the first overt move of 
the operation customs were 
watching a suspected British 
member of the gang who led 
them to Dye. 

Customs men discovered 
that within the space of two 
years Dye, .described as a 
company director, had moved 
from a s mall flat in Ruislip to 
a Buckin ghamshir e house 
worth more than £150,000, 
paid for with drugs profits. 


Stricter police checks 
to beat couriers 


easterns across the world 
are aware of the ways transit 


be used by smugglers, sock as 
the heroiB ring convicted at the 
Central Criminal Const yes- 
terday, to transfer contraband. 
Bid the officers deny they are a 
loophole. 

Nonetheless hi the after* 
math of the he ron investiga- 
tion customs have looked 
afresh at ways of poBring the 
lounges and increasing the 
nomber of mufenaed officers 
who might monitor pas- 
sengers. 

Mr Ronald Harris, the 
assistant chief investigation 
officer hi charge of the team 
which caught, the faeroco ring, 
sakb “We would argue the 
Imogen are not a loophole. 
Drags have got to pass 
through two customs controls 
at tire source and receiving 
countries.” 


Transit lounges are not 
cont ro l led by customs proce- 
dures and therefore not a 
loophole in the customs 
process. 

The lounges have not only 
bees used for contraband such 
as drags bat also, it is sus- 
pected, by terrorists hi the 
Middle East an d sam e Euro- 
pean countries trying to 
arms on to aircraft for 

The weapons could be car- 
ried from a country, with little 
airport seemity to a transit 
lounge in another country 
where the weapons could be 
transfered to terrorists 
^Pro g™^^»s,awHre^ttotf 

countries and the cocaine- 
growing areas of South Amer- 
ica are suhjert to close customs 
scrutiny in the United Stoles 
and Britain, esc the lounges to 
transfer loads to comiers un- 
likely to be stopped. 


Transit passengers are not 
normally subject to customs 
examination. The system de- 
feats .the well-tried customs 
operation of screening pas- 
sengers arriving from- coun- 
tries such as Pakistan known 
to produce illegal drags. 

The drug was 80 to 90 pa 
cent , pure and 11% bought in 
Islamabad for up to : £5,000 
would be Wrath 52.5 riuDIoo 
once it reached the United 
States. 


Dye drove a JaguarXJS and 
a Triumph, flew by Concorde 
and stayed in the best hotels 
abroad. He described himself 
as a secondhand car dealer 
and pop star promoter. 

He also claimed during the 
trial to have been involved in 
fUnding a rock concert in 
Spain mid said be had plans to 
market the “black box” equip- 
ment for helping drug addicts 
-using several well-known rode 
and roll stars. 

^ ,vvv ' v 



fcuil Dye, ringleader of the mtiraratraestid drag network tra; 


in Operation Fulmar. 
Herndge (top left and 


Cast of characters to toe heroin riot: Motoramed Latif and John H«m& (top 
right): nad Clive WBBamson and Derrick Grcgouy (above left and right). 

Acco 


Customs believe that Dye, 
originally a small-time 
fraudsman, started in drug 
dealing in 1980. Originally he 
bnflt up his business r unning 
heroin from the Golden Tri- 
angle area of south-east Asia 
iu an estimated 40 smalt runs 
from Malaysia. 

By the time customs started 
work Dye had moved his 
business to the heroin source 
on the other side of Aria in 
Pakistan. 

As customs kept watch last 
year they found other mem- 
bers of Dye's organization. 
The arrest at Heathrow did 
not halt operations which 
were ire-routed through the 
Netherlands and West 
Germany. 

Two mare members of the 
gang, one of them John 
Herridge, Dye’s senior 
lieutenant, flew from Amster- 
dam to New York where they 
were intercepted. Heroin was 
found but tire customs opera- 
tion remained secret 
Customs saw Dye himself 
fly out to Pakistan and then to 
the United States, leading his 
trackers to a man called 
Wolfgang Cadogan, the main 
American wholesale distrib- 
utor, based in Arizona. 

Dye and the American flew 
into London where Cadogan 
was stopped by customs carry- 
ing a briefcase with 5134,000 
and a small amount of can- 
nabis. He paid a small fine for 
the drag and was allowed to 
leave. 

Dye continued his opera- 
tions. He stood in the back- 
ground at Heathrow as an aide 
made arrangements with 
KLM for a Pakistani oourier 
to pick up a ticket in Amster- 
dam and fly to Mexico City 
When the Asian arrived in 
July last year at Schipol 
airport in Amsterdam a Brit- 
ish customs officer was watch- 
ing. The oourier was carrying 
2kg of heroin and in Britain 
arrests began. 

Dye was found to have a 
mini-computer which held de- 
tails of his couriers and trans- 
actions. He had assumed the 
record had been destroyed 
when he pressed an erase 
button but be bad simply 
moved the recording tape on. 

In New York, Herridge, the 
trusted senior lieutenant now 
charged by the Drag Enforce- 
ment Agency, named finks in 
foe riw»n including Catdnffm 
and another American contact 
called Phillip Chesters who 
had also been a wholesaler. 

Cadogan was on the run but 
was traced through bis yacht 
Customs knew from papers 
found during his Heathrow 
arrest he planned to register 
the boat under the British flag 
through a company in Jersey. 

From his hiding place m 
Florida he rang the company 
to check the arrangements 
unaware that a customs in- 
vestigator was in the office. He 
was arrrested. 

Dnig Enforcement Agency 
agents and British Customs 
went to search his home in 
Phoenix and one of the Ameri- 
cans answered the telephone. 

The call came from a man 
called Anthony Havel ock- 
Hudson who wasa cornier for 
money from drug sales. 

Unware of the disasters 
overtaking the organization 
Havelock-Hndson fell into a 
trap. He was told two people 
from London were staying in 
Phoenix and the man who 
took his call would go with 
him to meet them. 

Havelock-Hudson assumed 
the men he met, the British 
customs officers, were part of 
the organization and he de- 
scribed bis work. Over a drink 
in the hotel Havelock-Hndson 
developed hiccups. 

He went to the bathroom 
idling his companions “when 
I come back you chaps give 
me a fright”. When he re- 
appeared he was shown the 
men’s identity cards. 

He and John Herridge are 
now awaiting sentence in the 
United States for drug 
offences. 

Cadogan was given 20 years 
and Sylvia Millard, Hemdge’s 
companion , got three years 
for smuggling. Chesters was 
also convicted. 

Cadogan, Herridge, Ches- 
ters and Havelock-Hudson 
were flown to London to give 
evidence. 

Customs provided evidence 
.a gainst foe heroin supplier, a 
man called Mohammed L a t i f , 
who was arrested in 
Islamabad. 

The courier arrested in the 
Netherlands was given seven 
years. In the United States 
agents have arrested a street 
dealer in New York and San 
Francisco. More arrests are 
expected. 



Paul Dye, the head of the 
heroin ring convicted yes- 
terday, is luckier than One of 
the. lowly couriers ; be em- 
ployed in his early days in the 
drug butte. 

Derrick Gregory, now aged 
36, is awaiting trial in a 
Malaysian jail on a heroin 
smuggling charge which could 
cost him his 'fife under the' 
stringent local law: ■ - 

British customs befieve that 
Mr Gregory, from Richmond.': 


Surrey, was used by Dye’s 
early organization when he 
was using suppliers in south- 
east Asia for drugs to send to 
the United States. He was 
caught with more than 500 
grams of henna hidden in bis 
underclothes and shoes. 

Fifteen grams of heroin is 
enough to warrant the Malay- 
sian death penalty, by hang- 
ing, and Mr Gregory was 
caught with more than three 
times tire total amount found - 
on . Bariow - and. ^Chambers, 


who were hanged earlier this 
year. 

Mr Gregory has said he was 
recruited in west London in 
August after getting into debt 
to .criminals-. He was un- 
employed whh a wife and 
family and be was sent to pick 
up a package on the island of 
Pena 

Given some cash and an air 
ticket, he .flew to the island 
thinking be might be involved 
in diamond . smuggling. He 
was instructed by a priton 


there to act like a tourist until 
approached. 

Eventually he was given the 
drugs by a Chinese contact 
and sent of f to Penang airport 
to pick up a ticket to San 
Francisco. Instead of a ticket 
be found the local police 
waiting. 

Since be was arrested his 
lawyers have argued that he 
has a case for clemency be- 
cause of psychiatric disorder. 
A brain scan in Penang has 
shown be suffered from a 
brain iniury as abov. 



New riot gear for 
Manchester force 


Bidding in progress for the Constable painting which was auctioned at Christie's in London 
yesterday for £2,400,000 (Photograph: Julian Herbert). 

Fatal drug 
‘suitable 
sedative’ 

A medical expert told the 
jury in the trial of a GP 
accused of attempting to mur- 
der his patient that he would 
not criticise a doctor for using 
150 mg of the drug pheno- 
barbftone for sedation. 

Mr Hubert Wood, Professor 
of Clinical Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics at Sheffield 
University, was giving ev- 
idence on foe ninth day of the 
trial of Dr John Carr, aged 59, 
of Branch Road, Leeds. 

Dr Carr denies attempting 
to murder Mr Ronald Maw- 
son, a terminal cancer patient, 
by deliberately injecting him 
with a massive overdose of 
phenobarbitone to let him die 

The doctor claims be made 
a tragic mistake and injected 
Mr Mawson whh l,000mg of 
the drug instead of 150mg. 

Professor Wood said he was. 
aware that in some ciiciim- 
stances during the terminal 
care of a patient, pheno- 
barbitone would be suitable. 

The trial continues. 


The Greater Manchester 
police force was given the go- 
ahead yesterday to spend 
more than £1 50,000 to arm its 
men more effectively in the 
event of street riots. 

The area police authority 
rubber-stamped a request 
from Mr James Anderton, the 
Chief Constable, to finance 
the conversion of vehicles and 
extra protective gear. 

Only one representative on 
the authority argued against 
the proposal. Mr Sam Darby 
of Moss Side, Greater Man-’ 
Chester, which was the focal 
point of riots in 1981, said: “It 
seems to me that being 
equipped like this could only 
lead to more provocative 
behaviour by police officers”. 

The authority agreed to the 
spending of £64,817 cm addi- 
tional protective dothing and 
equipment, and a £86,112 to 
convert nine vans into fully- 
protected personnel carriers. 

Extra equipment requested 
by Mr Anderton included 
shields, shin-guards, protec- 


tive vests, and helmets. They 
are for the Tactical Aid 
Group. 

In his report to the 
authority, Mr Anderton said: 
“You are asked to recognize 
that an outbreak of public 
disorder can be precipitated 
without warning, and it is of 
the utmost importance that 
acquisition of the required 
equipment should be treated 
with a degree of urgency" 

A report from foe Greater 
Manchester Police Federation 
said: “We believe we are the 
worst-equipped force in the 
country and that should an 
incident of public disorder 
arise, our members will not be 
properly protected”. 

It said that if the equipment 
was not provided as a matter 
of urgency, there was a likeli- 
hood that officers would have 
to withdraw from civil distur- 
bances, leaving the public in 
danger "and the possibility 
that pans of Greater Manches- 
ter would, at least for a time, 
become *no go areas'”. 



—%€ld~ \ 

Winner to : 
buy new ; 
Beaujolais j 

A maritime arbitrator and a s 
photogrammetrist are among 
the five winners of yesterday's 
Portfolio Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mr Bruce Harris, aged 42, 
the maritime arbitrator, from 
west London, has played the 
Portfolio Gold game since it 
started. 

U I am very smprised be- 
cause I am not designed to win 
at pmw of chance," he said. 

Mi Harris said that he 
would spend some of his 
winnings on Nouveau Beaa- 
johus wine. 

Mr Geoffrey Taylor, aged 
49, the photognunmetnst, 
from St Alban's in Hertford- 
shire, said he was “very 
elated”. 

When asked how be in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, Mr Taylor said: Til 
have a nice Christmas”. 

. Mr George Nedey, aged 44, 
an accountant from east 
London, said he felt “dis- 
belief” when he realized that 
be was a winner. 

He will nse his share of the 
prize money to boy new table 
tennis equipment. 

The other winners are Mr 
Michael Font, aged 56, a 
retired radio producer from 
Bromsgrove. Hereford and 
Worcester, and Mr Terry 
Slater, aged 44, a company 
director from west London. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 

■ ■Vi- 



Mr Bruce Harris, who will 
turn winnings to wine 


Bus attacks 
to be filmed 

A city’s 1 10 double decker 
buses were fitted with closed- 
circuit telev ision cameras yes- 
terday, to fihn vandalism and 
attacks on drivers. 

Film of incidents will be 
used by Derby as evidence in 
any future prosecutions. 


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November 21 1986 


£20m campaign to 
educate public 
about Aids scourge 


PARLIAMENT 




4 h|i* 

fl * 

r v<; \ : 
4 5 

,!*H> .. 


HEALTH 


Details of the long-term and 
short-term publicity measures 
to fight Aids were announced by 
Mr Norman Fowler, Secretary 
-of State for Social Services, in a 
Commons debate on the fatal 
disease. 

He said that there is to be a 
new health education authority, 
within the National Health Ser- 
vice. to educate the public shout 
the dangers of Aids and about 
ways of preventing iL The new 
authority will be reconstituted 
from the present Health Educa- 
tion Council, but will have a 
tugger budget, a greater role, and 
a dear line of accountability to 
ministers and to Partiament 
He also disclosed details of 
the immediate £20 million cam- 
paign to publicise the precau- 
tions needed to avoid 
contracting Aids. 

Mr Fowler outlined an ex- 
panded and intensified Govern- 
ment campaign to educate the 
public through newspaper, tele- 
vision, radio and poster 
advertising, with £20 million of 
funding being made available 
during the next twelve months. 

Other elements of the cam- 
paign would include the launch- 
ing of a youth campaign using 
magazines, radio and cinema, a 
leaflet drop early in the New 
Year to all 23 million house- 
holds. backed by television and 
radio advertising, and a Health 
Education Council leaflet to be 
circuialed to all 1 1.000 pharma- 
cies where they would be free to 
members of die public. 

Talks with the chairmen of 
the BBC and IBA had brought 
agreement to participate in ttae 
campaign with advertisements, 
followed up by a series of public 
service announcements on in- 
dependent television and radio. 

“The advertising will aim to 
get over straight messages: Stick 
to one partnen if you do not. use 
a condom, and for drug 
misusers, do not inject drugs; if 
you cannot stop, do not share 
equipment.” 

The campaign '-must seek to 
change people's behaviour, with 
everyone taking responsibility 
for their own actions. The 
advertising would have to go 
into detail and use language easy 
to understand. 

“It may be that some will be 
o Bended. I regret that, but I 
have to say that I believe the 
greater danger is that the mes- 
sage does not gel over.” 

There was a difficult balance 
to be struck. At present the 
infection was virtually confined 
to the few. relatively small, high 
risk groups. In this country there 


had been 565 cases of which 284 
had died, however it was es- 
timated that there were 30.000 
carriers, of whom 25 to 30 per 
cent and possibly more, would 
contract the disease and die. 

So unless alt took action, it 
would spread more widely into 
the heterosexual population. 
That meant striking a balance 
between warning everyone of 
the risks, while not causing 
unnecessary panic. 

In the long term there was 
need for a new body to cany 

forward the education cam- 
paign. The importance of its 
task and the resources the 
Government needed to devote 
to it made it right to strengthen 
and enhance the role of the 
Health Education CounciL 
“To that end, I propose to 
reconstitute it so as to become a 
Special Health Authority with a 
clear line of accountability to 
ministers and to Parliament.** 
be said. 

Initially the new body would 
assume the current respon- 
sibilities of the Council and 
from an early date it would be 
given the major executive 
responsibility for public educa- 
tion about Aids and it would be 
resourced accordingly. It would 
therefore have responsibility for 
a much larger budget. . 

It would be an integral part of 
the NHS in England and as a 
result would be more responsive 
than an outside body to the 
needs of the service. It would 
have more influence in setting 
priorities for the service and 
ensuring the needs of health 
education and promotion were 
properly recognized. 

The exact relationship of the 
new agency with health educa- 
tion arrangements in Scotland. 

6 I regret that some 
will be offended 9 

Wales and Northern Ireland 
would need to be settled and 
might vary from country to 
country. 

“My aim is that (he Council 
should be reconstituted on its 
new statutory basis with effect 
from April 1. 1987.“ 

A further statement on 
membership, staffing and bud- 
get of the new authority would 
be made shortly. 

The clinics for sexually 
transmitted disMMs were in the 
front line and under great 
pressure, particularly to provide 
the extensive counselling nec- 
essary for people found to be 
infected. 

All health authorities would 
therefore be asked to ensure that 
their clinics were given adequate 
resources to meet the demand. 


Ail districts would be submit- 
ting their plans for dealing with 
Aids by the end of December. 

As more Aids cases devel- 
oped. more districts and hos- 
pitals throughout the country 
would become involved. It was 
crucial that district health 
authorities should prepare 
themselves for that. 

Because Aids was incurable 
and fetal, knowledge of infec- 
tion would have an appalling 
impact on victims ana their 
families. Effective counselling 
systems had been given priority. 

Three centres for training 
professionals in Aids counsel- 
ling had been established and 
funded by the Department of 
Health. Already more thaw 
1,500 counsellors had been 
trained. Tr aining arrangements 
were being farther expanded 
and the department was 
supporting training courses for 
nurses. 

It was imperative that no 
research effort was spared in 
seeki ng a cure for Aids and a 
vaccine against the viru&No 
worthwhile research project had 
gone unfunded and the Govern- 
ment would be discussing re- 
search with the Medical 
Research CounciL There was an 
international effort to which 
massive resources were being 
devoted worldwide. 

“For this reason, I propose to 
make an early visit to the World 
Health Organisation and to the 
United States to discuss these 
matters. I will also be talking 
with some of my main Euro- 
pean counterparts.” 

The Government would do 
all in its power to emphasise to 
the public the seriousness of the 
position and the action nec- 
essary to combat iL Over the 
next few years, however, the 
action needed was action whit* 
could be taken only by 
individuals. 

Mr Michael Meadwr, Chief 
Opposition spokesman on 
health, said resources were a 
vital, element in the campaig n 
and it was important that the 
House be tokl precisely how 
much new, extra money would 
be provided, and for exactly 
what purposes. 

The debate would play a part 
in alerting the nation to the 
potential national crises of the 
epidemic, to secure broad agree- 
ment on the role of Government 
in initiating and carrying out 
preventive measures. 

There was nothing inevitable 
about the general population 
succumbing to Aids. Whether it 
now spread throughout the gen- 
eral population depended on 
people’s readiness to modify 
their behaviour where necessary 
and the willingness and ability 



this year was on the brink of 
exploding like a lethal time- 
bomb could not be resolved 
without a major increase in 
expenditure, not only for medi- 
cal research into a 'vaccine or 
cure, bus for much more wide- 
spread provision of health 
education, screening and advice 
and counselling services. 

Researchers m Scotland had 
found that while the British 
figures were still for short of the 
American ones, the explosive 
spread of the HIV virus was at 
an even fester rate here than in 
New Yoik. In New York, the 
number of Aids victims doubled 
every month. 

A recommendation that dean 
disposable needles should be 
handed out to drag addicts was 
right. Anything that could 
significantly reduce or slow 
down the transmission of a 
lethal virus must be supported. 

It would be wrong to assume 
that most people were incapable 
gf wmlrfng chang ps jn their 

lifestyles when they were con- 
vinced of the necessity of doing 
so. This was already (airing place 
among tpy men. 

It would only come about if 
increased screening fa cil i t i es 
were made available, but mass 


Airlines at loggerheads 


Clash on shared US routes 


Haantoa: No ketnes needed 
from Cons er v ati v es 

of Government to mobilize the 
support measures to help bring 
about that modification of 
behaviour. 

Preventive action by the 
DHSS needed to be matched in 
every region and district within 
the health service. The first step 
should be the appointment of a 
team to draw np a regional 
programme of prevention for 
each region, including regional 
telephone information services 
where a ppr o pri ate. 

Each district should also ap- 
point an Aids prevention officer 
whose duties would include 
liaison with other voluntary 
groups. 

Extra assistance was also 
needed for GPs. They, probably 
more than any other <rinjgii» 
person, were in the front Ime 
and were the most likely to be 
approached first by people anx- 
ious about themselves or their 
relatives. The district health 
authority should take the lead in 
organizing an education pro- 
gramme for all GPs in their area. 

More than three-quarters of 
the Aids cases so far had been in 
Greater London. The burden on 
certain London hospitals and 
services had been corres- 
pondingly severe. London had 


Club ‘said 
no’ to 


Crunch: Mayer crisis coaid 
engulf nation 

been doubly bit first by the 
disease but also because it bad 
fared SO badly iu financial 
terms. 

Adding together ail these 
requirements it was reasonable 
to assume that a minimum 
adequate budget for the whole 
range of p revent i ve measures 
against the spread of Aids would 
be at the present time within the 


range of £50 million to £100 
million. This compered with an 
actual budget allocated by the 

DHSS last year of £1.900,000. 

lopped up ra December last year 

by a further £6,300.000. which, 
as a proport i on of the total 
current NHS budget accounted 
for a paltry 0.04 per cent - 
ridiculous as a prevention 
against what many throughout 
the West regarded as the biggest 
single threat to pobtic health this 
century. 

The dribs and drabs approach 
so far had meant that all the 
relevant services had had to live 
from hand to mouth since Aids 
was first recognized in this 
country. 

No one was suggesting that 
this or any other problem was 
solved by throwing money at h. 
but equally it could not be 
denied that this problem, which 


illusory protection for the gen- 
end public and involve a huge 
waste of public money. It would 
be impossible to enforce and 
would dramatically interfere 
with civil liberties. 

There were widespread 
misgivings among homosexuals 
about seeking treatment because 
breaches of confidentiality had 
occured with distressing con- 
sequences. Every effort must be 
DadetostqiAat 
The Government should take 
early action to protect the 
employment status of virus 
camera who were fit and car 
pable of working. The war 

r ust Aids must not become 
war against those who had 
Aids. 

Neither political expediency 
nor moral objections must be 
allowed to stand in the way of 
any step deemed likely to be 
affective in saving lives and 
preventing any additional in- 
dividuals from contracting 
Aids. 

It was the test by which the 
nation would judge the this 
Government and this par- 
liament “We must not faiL” 

Sir David Price (Eastleigh, Q 
said one of the bluest problems 
in trying to get an agreed 
national pobey was the un- 
certain nature of knowledge 
about the disease. 

There was a desperate need 
for increased fiinding for dinks 
as the number of patients was 
likely to increase. 

Mr JLeo Abse (Torfaen, Lab) 
said the delayed Government 
action was prompted by a major 
miscalculation founded upon 
the belief that afl that was 
needed was a holding operation. 
It was spending a piffling stun 
because it believed the Ameri- 
cans would be sending a cure or ' 
magic potion across the 
Atlantic. 

A significant source of sick- 
ness lay in the soul or the psyche 
of promiscuous heterosexual 


Don Juans and a disturbed 
minority of homosexual men. 
seeking sex from hundreds of 
partners each year. These tragic 
men were literally sex-mad and 

like all mad people, they needed 

help. They did not need senten- 
tious moralising. 

They must be prepared to use 

plain words and to explode the 
taboos of prissy people in the 
Conservative Party and at Tun- 
bridge Wells, knowing that 
blameless men and women, 
among others, would otherwise 
be put at risk. 

This was a national emer- 
gency. There was a need for foe 
Government to turn to all with 
the s kills to help ward off the 
epidemic. 

To relegate psychotherapy 
and counselling to be a mere 
appendage of uie armoury cre- 
ated in the attempt to shield the 
population fro m die epidemic 
was to be doomed to failure 
from the start 

Mr David Crouch (Canterbury, 
O said that more time, effort, 

energy, expertise and money 

6 We need a 
professional 
approach to 
advertising 9 

should be devoted to a search 
fora vaccine. 

The nation was facing a crisis 
of frightening proportions, it 
was no exaggeration to say it 
repres en ted a major disaster 
that could engulf life nation. 

There had to be collaboration 
between the private sector and 
Government This Was not the 
time for secrecy between coun- 
try and companies or between 
companies and government. 

“We are at war with a new 
virus, we must get ourselves in 
this cotmtiy on a war footing in 
tackling this problem.” 

Mr Archy Kirkwood (Roxburgh 
and Berwickshire, L) said Scot- 
land was at risk from the drugs 
community in Edinburgh where 
the situation was out of control 
with some 2,000 drag misusers 
carrying the Aids virus. 

Pushers travelled to the west 
coast to buy heroin which they 
sampled before returning to 
Edinburgh. One of the results 
was that there were now 154 
virus carriers in Glasgow. 

With a drug community of 
between 8,000 and 12.000, Glas- 
gow was on the edge of a 
precipice. One solution would 
be to use the city as a pilot 
project for free hypodermic 
needles for drug abusera and the 
provision of methadone as a 
substitute for heroin. 

The experi m ent could be . 
limited to two yeas and if it was 
found the scheme became a 
magnet for drug abnsers 
throughout Europe it would 
have to be abdondoned. 

Sir Ian Perrival (Southport Q 
said a material factor in the 
spreading of this disease and the 
miseries it caused was that so 
many had strayed so far and so 
often from what were taught as 
the normal moral values cer- 
tainly up until the 1960s. 

Some had set out deliberately 


Powell attacks ‘disease 


By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


Britain's two leading sched- 
uled airlines are squaring-up 
for another dash, this time 
over sharing flights to Amer- 
ica with other European 
earners. 

British Caledonian joined 
with the Belgian flageanier 
Sabena to provide one single 
service. Linking both Brussels 
and Gatwick with Atlanta, 
Georgia. Under the deal, 
Sabena provides a daily 
Boeutf 747 which leaves Brus- 
sels with the passengers who 
have bought tickets with 
Sabena, stops at Gatwick, and 
takes on BCal passengers, 
before flying with a joint crew 
to Atlanta. 

BCal believes that the 
project, which began in Octo- 
ber, is a blueprint for future 
co-operative ventures and is 
the only way of enabling 


European airlines to compete 
with their larger American 
rivals. 

But British Airways has 
objected strongly, saying that 
BCal has forfeited its right to 
be regarded as the British 
airline allowed on the route. 
Instead, they will argue at a 
public hearing, opening at the 
Civil Aviation Authority on 
Monday, that they should be 
given the licence: 

They will argue that BCal 
should be deleted from the 
licence and that BA should 
operate a non-stop TriStar 
service to Atlanta and a one- 
stop service, using Concorde, 
from Washington. 

BCal officials are preparing 
an angry response to the 
challenge, which they win 
aigue is no more than spoiling 
tactics and a gimmick. 


BA has made it plain that it 
will fight for every available 
opportunity to expand its 
route network in the run-up to 
privatization, and will chal- 
lenge any competitor any- 
where in the world. 

• Cathay Pacific, the Hong- 
Kong-based airline, is step- 
ping up its campaign to 
become free of afl British 
licensing control and be rec- 
ognized throughout the world 
as Chinese. 

Britain is responsible for 
negotiating all new air service 
agreements on behalf of Ca- 
thay Pacific became Hong 
Kong is still a British colony. 
But in preparation for the 
1997 handover of the island to 
the Chinese, Cathay is now 
regarded, by foe British at 
least, as coming under the 
jurisdiction of Hong Kong. 


safety visit of colour counting’ 






f*£M 


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i 





i**! > '.Jw 4** 


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Bradford City Football Chib 
turned down an offer for 
safety experts to inspect their 
ground, foe High Court sitting 
in Leeds was told yesterday. 

Mr Arthur Warden, assis- 
tant clerk for special services 
with foe former West York- 
shire County Council, told the 
hearing, which is investigating 
liability for the fire at Brad- 
ford City's ground in which 56 
people died, that foe council 
h?d made offers to non- 
designated clubs to advise on 
safety and inspect grounds. 

The offer was made in a 
letter to football dubs includ- 
ing Halifax Town, Hudders- 
field Town and Bradford City. 

He told the court: “The 
county council made the offer 
so that non-designated dubs, 
which were normally not in- 
spected. could talk to one of 
our safety team”. 

Mr Graham Karran, chief 
fire officer of West Yorkshire, 
said that under the Fire Act of 
1971, football grounds did not 
require a fire certificate and all 
foe fire authority could do was 
to give goodwill advice. 


to give goodwill advice. 

Bradford City, the Health & 
Safety Executive and the 
county council are being sued 
for liability. 

The case has been brought 
by Mrs Susan Fletcher, aged 
34. of East Bridgford, Notting- 
ham, who lost four relatives m 
the blaze, and a West York- 
shire police sergeant, who was 
injured rescuing fans. 


Ruling allows 
coroner to 
retain post 

Lord Hailsham of St 
Marylebone. foe Lord Chan- 
cellor, has ruled that there is 
no question of any inability, 
or misbehaviour which would 
justify the removal from office 
of the Chesterfield Coroner, 
Mr Michael Swanwick. 1 

Complaints had been made 
that Mr Swanwick. aged SI, 
held inquests without notify- 
ing relatives of the deceased, 
and entered verdicts without 
having heard all the available 
evidence. 

It was foe second time the 
case of Mr Swanwick had been 
raised with Lord Hailsham by 
foe policy committee of 
Derbyshire County CounciL 


Red Cross aid 

The British Red Cross is 
giving £1 10.000 in grants to 
fund a small business scheme 
and equip a hospital in 
Colombia to help survivors of 
last year’s volcano disaster. 


Mr Enoch Powell said Last 
night that a Law Society 
document asking solicitors fin- 
details of their ethnic origins 
was “a prize specimen of a 
disease more dangerous than 
Aids”. 

Mr Powell, foe Ulster 
Unionist MP for South Down, 
told a meeting of foe Newham 
North West Conservative 
Association in east London: 
“The disease consists of 
counting people by colour and 
giving out that the purpose is 
to identify — I use the namby- 
pamby word of the Law 
Society — disadvantage in 
those professions or employ- 
ments that is suffered by those 
whose colour is not that of the 
majority of the population”. 

Mr Powell claimed “foe 
disease” was sweeping like 
wildfire through many pro- 
fessions, including the Civil 
Service, the Armed Forces and 
the Church of England. 


He said colour-counting led 
to quotas. “It is not fortmt o us 
that the disease of colour- 
counting is attaining epidemic 
proportions just about now. 

“We are about to have a 
House of Commons in which 
black and brown faces can be 
counted. It will immediately 
be observed that if Mack and 
brown faces are 6 per cent of 
all the faces in the United 
Kingdom, there ought to be 
approximately 40 black and 
brown faces on the green 
benches. 

“If not there has been 
disadvantage, not to say 
discrimination, and a remedy 
must be found. 

“From this scene there is 
now a Gadarene rush to take 
refuge in the dangerous self- 
deception of colour counting. 
It is dangerous because itleads 
straight to the precipice of 
compulsory quotas.” 


He said h was a self- 
deception because no statis- 
tical operations, or com- 
pulsory quotas, could exorcise 
the foreseeable and irrevers- 
ible alteration in the popula- 
tion of large areas of England, 
“nor the use which will be 
made of that population 
change by those who organize 
themselves in the pursuit of 
power, and for the overthrow 
of our existing institutions” 

“Against these . con- 
sequences, there will be no 
remedy unless they are openly 
and candidly acknowledged 
and faced by those in positions 
of political responsibility.” 

The society’s survey asked 
its members to tide one of five 
descriptions. It said its aim 
was “to identity any dis- 
advantage in entry or other 
stages ofprofessional develop- 
ment amongst those from eth- 
nic minority backgrounds”. 



i to destabilize society by oonrot- 
L ing the young with sex and 
f drags. 

c The first necessity was to 

1 recognize the causes. Those who 
i tried to exclude the moral values 

- from the argument were not 
- only failing » look facts in the 
c face but would never get foe 
: answers which they sought. 

* Mr WHEam Haufflton (Central 
' fife. Lab) said it was certain thar 
1 whenever the Conservative 
J Party began to talk about moral 
’ values a general election was 
imminent. People needed no 
' lectures from Conservatives zn 
particular about mailers of foaz 
[ nature. _ . _ . • 

The Government could nnd 
the money when the wfll was 
[ there and it saw the danger as a 
paramount threat to national 

‘ survival. 

! Mr Frank Dobson, an Oppoa- 
tion spokesman on health, said 
plans to contract the network of 
public health laboratories out- 
side London were absurd m the 

present circumstances, 
i Additi onal facilities mu st be 
provided at hospitals and STD 
clinics because the Aids cam- 
paig n was bound to bring more 
people to them seeking advice. 

Words used in private , foot 
everyone understood, m us t be 
used. It would be a good start to 
stop im'^e “condom” and use 
“rubber johnny” and “Durex“. 
One slogan could be“If you 
must have it off, put one on.” 
(Laughter) 

Mr Antony Newton, Minister 
for Health, said part of the 
cam paign would be specifically 
directed at ' young people 
through the magazines they read 
and other media, i nc l udin g ra- 
dio and cinema, which were 
particularly powerful where they 
were concerned. Young people 
must be addressed directly in 
terms tailored to their attitudes 
and needs and foe ways m which 
it might be possible to commu- 
nicate effectively with them. 

It was important to seek to 
avoid a position in which 
carriers were somehow treated 
as lepers or isolated members of 
the community, lost tbeir jobs, 
and ceased to be able to makes 
contribution to society during a 
period when to all intents and 
purposes they were no threat to 
anyone in normal activities. 

The Government's dear 
medical advice was that the 
virus could not be acquired 
from normal social contact with 
Someone who was infec ted . It 
could not be got from shaking 
bands or fctssmg . There was no 
danger in sharing cups and 
cutlery, nor could it be caught 
from public baths or toilets. 

Mr Kenneth Clarke, the Min- 
ister for Employment, would 
launch a booklet for employers 
on Monday which would make 
a helpful contribution to foe 
overall Government cam pai gn . 

The practical problems of 
drawing any distinction such as 
exempting elderly people from 
foe planned leaflet delivery 
would be insuperable. 

The Government would not 
allow anything to happen which 
would jeopardize the provision 
of sensible testing arrangements 
for Aids cases. 


Merchant 
fleet 6 in 
decline 9 

By Rodney Cowton 
Transport Correspondent 

The British-owned mer- 
chant fleet of the 1990s could 
consist largely of ships built 
abroad, registered abroad, 
crewed abroad and perhaps 
even managed abroad, unless 
foe Government can create 
the prospect of profitable 
commercial operation under 
the United Kingdom flag. 

This warning was given 
yesterday by Mr Kerry St 
Johnstone, vice-chairman of 
the General Council of British 
Supping. He said that within 
a few weeks the British-owned 
merchant trading fleet operat- 
ing on overseas registers, 
including the Isle of Man, 
would exceed for the first time 
in tonnage terms that operat- 
ing from United Kingdom. 

This was not only a signifi- 
cant milestone in the 
industry's affairs, but a 
straightforward and inevitable 
reaction to the commercial 
pressures facing it and to the 
acts of omission and commis- 
sion by the Government 
“Our latest forecasts are 
that if present trends continue 
we will see the UK-owned and 
registered merc hant trading 
fleet fall by the mid-1990s to 




..util — 



Mr Powell being interviewed in Nottingham earlier yesterday 

Saleroom 


Mr St Johnstone added: “I 
would think it self-evident 
that no coherent defence pol- 
icy for an island, dependent 
on the movement of goods 
and people by sea for survival, 
can exclude concern for foe 
British ships and seafarers 
who have shown themselves 
so often, and at such cost, to 
be a vital part of our national 
defence.” 


Buyers prefer ‘good British pictures’ 


By Geraldine Norman 

Sale Room Correspondent 

Buyers demonstrated that 
they are only interested in 
good British pictures at 
Christie’s yesterday, leaving 
39 lots, out of 105, unsold in a 
record sale that realized more 
than £4 million. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds' full- 
length portrait of Lord de 
Ferrars, with a landscape 
backround, sold for £297,000 
(unpublished estimate 
£1 50,000-£200,000) to foe 
Heim Gallery and Landseer’s 
picture of “Prince George's 
Favourites” made £176.000 
(estimate £60.OOO-£8O.OOO). 

Landseer's picture was 
painted for the second Duke 


of Cambridge, a Hanoverian 
prince bom in 1819. His 
favourite pony, Selim, New- 
foundland dog. Nelson, and 
spaniel Flora, and his two 
falcons, are seen waiting to be 
taken out. There is a glimpse 
of Windsor Castle through the 
half open door to the yard. 

The Victoria and Albert 
Museum secured a group of 
curiosities, three huge pastoral 
idylls painted by Francis 
Hayman in foe 1740s, to 
decorate the supper boxes at 
Vauxhall Gardens, the 
fashionable venue for evening 
entertainments. 

They had been estimated at 
£5,000 to £8,000 a time. The 
first two cost the museum 


£7,700’ bur they got the third 
at £4,950. 

,.The .sale realized 

£4,165, iso, more than at any 

previous Christie’s sale of 
British pictures, even with 
14 percent left unsold in cash 
terms. 

• Sotheby's finished a 
successful week with world- 
wide sales totalling over $1 1 1 
million. Thursday's New 
York sale of modem prints 
contributed $1,438,855, or 
£1,005.489. with 5 per cent 
unsold, and Old Master prints 
$1,108,580, or £774,689, with 
10 per cent unsold. 

A Matisse lithograph of 
1925,“Nu au Coussin Bleu”, 
made $101,750 (estimate 


$75,00&-$85,000) or £71 J04 to 
a private collector, while 
Rembrandt’s drypoint, 
“Clump of trees with a vista” 
(estimate 
or £57,651 

to a West German dealer. 

•An important collection of 
Sicily and ftrma stamps, 
known to collectors as the 
Alphonse collection, was sold 

for a total of £588,326 in a 

SJSfy sale ’ yesterday and 
Thursday, at Phillips, the 
philatelic auctioneers. 

ir2c£J2 ,re stara P s depict 
King Ferdinand II of Sicily - 

commonly known as“Bora- 
K Prediction for 

bombarding his citizens to 
pulp. 













■*?»jgatex 




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!lfl* 


and bill of rights win 


» 


By Francis Gibb, LegalAfiairs Correspondent 


Mpf! 


Moves' to strengthen citi- 
zens’ rights made two signifi- 
cant advances yesterday. 

first an MPwho has drawn ■ 
sixth place in the ballot for 
private members’ Bills is to 
present one giving individuals 

i rtotittnrv no hi 1 a Tnr.i.ii a.j 


correct personal files held oh 
them by doctors, employers 
and local authorities. 

Second, an attempt to give 
United Kingdom citizens 
their own bill of rights is to be 
renewed by Sir Edward Gard- 
ner, MP for Fylde, who has 
drawn fifth place. 

About 150 Mh from all 
parties are backing a private 
member's Bill to give individ- 
uals a right to inspect and 
correct aO personal files. 

The measure. Access To 
Personal Files Bill, is to be 
introduced by Mr Archy Kirk- 
wood, liberal health spokes- 
man. He has the backing of the 
Campaign for Freedom of 
Information which has beat 
promoting the measure as the 
next step for giving people 
access to personal information 
held on them. 

Yesterday Mr Des Wilson, 1 
campaign chairman, said: 
“This has been our number 
one aim fra- neatly three years 
and we'have finally come up 
trumps". 

The Bill complements the 
Data Protection Act, which in 
November next year will give 
individuals the right to see 
files on them held on comput- 
ers, be said. 

“It will end the absurd 
inconsistency which denies 
people access to personal files 
not on a computer. 

Under the Bill individuals 
would be able to discover 


Settlement 
of £750 in 
race case 


what records are kept about 
them, obtain the mantis and 
correct them if necessary. 

like the Data Protection 
Act they could ob tain com- 
pensation through the courts 
earned by inaccu- 


BiU promoted last year by 
Lord Sca rman and Lord 
Brox bourne, which went suc- 
cessfully through the House of 
Lords but failed to win time 
for debate in the Commons. 

The measure, the Human 


of appeal if records were not 
corrected. 

It would also inrhiA* bene- 
fits and pensions records, 
records of arrests and convic- 
tions, certain immigration 
data and records of credit- 
worthiness. 

Mr Wilson predicted the 
Bill had a high ch^nry of 
success in view of the wide- 
spread support for it which 
has been confirmed in two 
opinion polls. 

A number of employers 
already give access to personal 
records, including IBM, Brit- 
ish Gas, the National Coal 
Board. Swan Hunter Ship- 
builders and some local 
authorities. 

The BBC has agreed on 
principle to let staff see their 
records and the Army allows 
its staff to see personnel and 
performance files. 

Sir Edward’s attempt on the 
bill of rights coincides with 
what may be yet another 
ruling by the European Court 
of Human Rights against the 
Government on Monday in a 
case brought by a Guernsey 
couple over their right to live 
in their own home. 

But it is expected to be 
resisted by die Government, 
which is opposed to any bfil of 
rights, although there is wide 
support among peers and 
among organizations outside 
Parliament. 

Sr Edward is to take up the 




Freedoms BflL would incor- 
porate into United Kingdom 
law the rights and freedom 
protected by the European 
Convention on Human Ri- 
ghts. .. 

It would mean that anyone 
in Britain who thought their 
rights had been infringed 
could seek remedies . in a 
British coua rather than going 
the lengthy and expensive 
route through the European 
Commission and European 
Court in Strasbourg. ■ 

Yesterday a spokesman for 
the Rights Campaign, the 
pressure group which is 
promoting the measure, said: 
“We are delighted that Sir 
Edward has gained fifth place 
and will be giving him all 
possible suppor t” . 

The chances of success for 
the Bill were increasing all the 
time, the t pnlma^iaB said, as 
more and more cases were 
brought to Strasbourg and 
proving to be “deeply embar- 
rassing” to the Government. 

“If die European Conven- 
tion was part of our law we 
would not have to wash our 
dirty linen in public. These 
cases could be sorted out 
speedily in our courts by our 
judges.” 

There is growing support 
among MPs for the BilL Last 
time more than 100 signed an 
early day motion calling on 
the Government to allow the 
BiO time for debate.. 



■HhejjfrraSS* 


* 













Mr Malealni Riflrind, Secretary of State for Scotland, at the launch in Glasgow yesterday of 
a book of quotations from pofitidass, sportsmen and entertainers extolling the virtues of the 
dtv. Proceeds of sales will go to African famine relief (Photograph: Tom KMd) 


Barrister’s racism case fails 


School TV series 
on gays scrapped 


A man who was refused a 
driving job because of his 
Asian origin has been paid 
£750 compensation by a taxi . 
firm, the Commission for 
Racial Equality said yes- 
today. 

The commission said th at ; 
when Mr Chattir Khan told 
Mrs Audrey Edmondson, the 
proprietor of a private hire car 
firm in Newcasfeugoo Tyne, 
of his origin he daubed die 
said: “Pm- really sorry, but I 
cannot afford to employ col- 
oured people because it affects 

my business". - 

Mr Khan, of Sydney Grove, 
Newcastle, who speaks -with a 
“Geordie” accent, was hurt 
and annoyed. It was under- 
stood two white drivers were 
subsequently taken on. 

A settlement was finalized 
through Acas, the conciliation 
service, when the firm. New 
Jes, admitted acting unlaw- 
fully and promised not to 
discriminate in future. 

Mrs Edmondson agreed to 
pay £550, representing dam- 
ages for the injury to Mr 
Khan's feelings, and £200 
compensation for loss of 
earnings. 


By a Staff Reporter 


Mrs Mary Whitehouse yes- 
terday welcomed a decision by 
the BBC to cancel a school 
programme portraying a 
homosexual relationship as “a 
victory for commonsense”. 

Mis Whitehouse, president 
of the National Viewers’ and 
Listeners* Association, said 
she had written a letter of 
protest about the ^programme 
to Mr Atasdair Milne, director 
general of the BBC, after 
receiving a copy of the script 
from an anonymous source 
withmtheBBC 

Mr Mflne lad replied that 
die programmes would treat 
die subject responsibly, but 
declined to cancel the series. 

Yesterday, a BBC spokes- 
woman said die detiaon to 
scrap the programme bad 
been taken by the controller of 
educational broadcasting, Mis 
Sheila Innes, because of a 
change in the social dimate. 

The programmes could no 
longer be used by teachers in 
the intended manner, as a 
starting point for discussion of 
homosexuality, die spokes- 
woman said. 

The drain a, called Mates, 
was described by its producer, 
Mr Roger Tange, as a ro- 


mance. It showed the develop- 
ment of a relationship bet- 
ween two boys, aged 17, who 
.are seen lrissrng . 

The BBC refused yesterday 
to say how much had been 
spent on the series, which had 
been scheduled for broadcast 
in February. 

• Mrs Whitehouse has com- 
pjained in a letter to Mr 
Douglas Hard, Home Sec- 
retary; about a case in which 
magistrates decided that thou- 
sands of books seized in 
Britain’s biggest raid were not 
obscene. 

The hearing was held be- 
hind dosed doors on Novem- 
ber 12 by three magistrates 
sitting at Newham West Court 
in east London. They were 
shown 500,000 magazines and 
thousands more videos and 
books collected on St Val- 
entine’s Day last year in 
“Operation Sweetheart'*. 

Mrs Whitehouse said she 
was concerned about the prac- 
tice, confirmed by a clerk at 
Newham West Court, where- 
by if magistrates decide that 
less than naif of a collection of 
books was obscene the whole 
lot must be deemed accept- 
able. 


Exquisite Designer Furs 


4 Weil 
Send You 
Packing* 

...Ok&F& 





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By Craig Setim 
Mr Rudy Narayan, a bar- 
rister, has failed in an attempt 
to sue the Lord Chancellor for 
racial discrimination. 

Mr Narayan, bora in Guy- 
ana, had claimed at an indus- 
trial tribunal that black 
i barristers at Birmingham 
Crown Court were being paid 
: (ess than their white counter- 
parts for the same legal work. 

He maintainuri that he had 
received less money than a 
white woman banister who 
was his junior, and that be had 

been riisr rinimateri agains t nn 
grounds of race or colour. 


MP given 
apology 
by Yard 

The police have dropped a 
prosecution against the La- 
bour MP for Hammersmith 
North, Mr Clive Soley, and 
apologized for not informing 
him more than a year a gP , 

The MP was taken before 
West London Magistrates 
Court in July 1985 for selling 
copies of the miners* paper in 
a shopping mall, during the pit 
strike. The action was brought 
under a 1916 Act which bans 
the coDection of money and 
offer for sale of articles m the 
street The case was adjourned 
indefinitely . 

Recently Mr Soley de- 
manded that the prosecution 
go ahead or he be cleared 
Scotland Yard said that the 
case was adjourned because of 
an appeal in a similar case 
which was pending, and ul- 
timately successful 

Crash death 
widow wins 
£200,000 

A widow was awarded dam- 
ages totalling £200,000 by the 
High Court yesterday for the 
death of her husband in a car 
crash. 

Mrs Margaret Steer's hus- 
band, Mr Timothy Steer, aged 
35, died in hospital three (fays 
after his van collided with a 
lorry on the A4I near Oxford, 
in February 1985. His three 
children receive £6,000 each. 

Mr Justice Caulfield or- 
dered Mr Thomas Wilkins, 
the lorry driver, and his 
employers, Connell and Grif- 
fin Transport, both of 
Bicester, to pay damages. 

Police name 
ferry victims 

Police have reteased the 
names of two women who 
drowned when their Suzuki 
jeep {dunged into the sea from 
an Isle of Wight ferry boat 
ramp on Thursday. They are 
Mrs Eileen Rose Bond, aged 
42, of Church View Road, and 
Deborah Emmerton, aged 22, 
of Hospital Bridge Road, both 
Twickenham, south-west 
London. 

Lead risk 
for police 

Health checks on police 
firearms instructors, at Hun- 
tingdon, Cambridgeshire, 
show a rise in the lead content 
in their blood caused by 
b reathing in lead particles 
after repeated gunfire. 

Mr Ian Kane, chief con- 
stable, is asking the county 
council for £50.000 to im- 
prove ventilation at the range. 

Intruder finds 
corpse in bed 

An intruder who broke into 
a house in Usleholme Cres- 
cent, West Deity, Liverpool 
fled empty-handed after find- 
ing the body of an elderly man 
dead in bed. 

A Merseyside police spokes- 
man said that a post-mortem 
examination disclosed the 
.man had died -of natural 
causes. 


■ Mr Narayan, who has 
chambers in London, had 
asked the tribunal held in 
Birmingham, to rule on the 
case on the grounds that 
barristers who did legal aid 
woric received their fees 
through the Lord Chancellor’s 
department, and were, there- 
fore, employed by that office. 

In its decision, published 
yesterday, the tribunal told Mr 
Narayan that it did not have 
jurisdiction to hear his 
complaint. 

It said he could not be 
regarded in a legal aid case as 
being employed by the Lord 


Chancellor in court or at 
chambers in a contract of 
service. 

The tribunal report said it 
had limited itself to the ques- , 
tion of jurisdiction. 

It added that discriminatory 
practices were illegal, and that 
they were a matter for the 
Commission for Racial Equal- 
ity. 

Mr Christopher Leonard, 
the Treasury solicitor, applied 
for costs against Mr Narayan 
on the grounds that the bar- 
rister had brought his claim 
“unreasonably”. The tribunal 
rejected his application. 


Sentences 
of four 
in riots 
are cut 

Three youths convicted for 
their part in last year’s 
Broadwater Farm riots in 
Tottenham, north London, 
during which a policeman 
died, had their sentences cut 
by the Court of Appeal yes- 
terday. 

But the Lord Chief Justice, 
Lord Lane, warned: “Those 
who are proved to be or- 
ganizers, u detected, which 
they seldom are, can expea 

heavy sentences". 

He said that organizers of 
any affray could expea to 
receive sentences in the range 
of seven years, and upwards, 
on top of any other sentences 
which may be imposed for 
specific offences such as 
wounding, theft or burglary. 

“The more they are shown 
to have done in promoting the 
affray, the greater must be 
their punishment." 

Together with Mr Justice 
Taylor and Mr Justice Rose, 
the Lord Chief Justice took I 
the view that the five-year 
sentences passed at the Cen- 
tral Criminal Court last June 
on Paul Keys, aged 22, from 
Edmonton, north London, 
and Lester Sween, aged 18, 
from Edmonton Green, were, 
in the circumstances, too long 
and should be reduced to 
three-and-a-half years. 

The seven-year youth cus- 
tody sentence passed last 
month on Mark Macminn, 
aged 19. was also too long. 
Four-and-a-half years was the 
appropriate sentence for his 
part in the affray, which he 
had denied, and could be the 
subject of an appeal against 
conviction at a later date. 

Although Macminn was 
close to the scene, and was one 
of the crowd shouting “kill. 
kilL kill” neither be nor Keys 
took part in the attack on the 
PC the judge said. 

Law Report, page 38 


Critic won 
over by 
Sellafield 

The director of Greenpeace, 
the environment soup, has 
praised Sellafield after paying 
his first visit yesterday to the 
nuclear reprocessing works in 
West Cumbria. 

Mr George Pritchard admit- 
ted that what he had seen, at 
the invitation of the unions, 
had “changed my views". 

Mr Pritchard, whose group, 
has been among Sellafield's ! 
fiercest critics, said there were' - 
parts of the old plant that he 
would still like to see changed, : 
and Greenpeace would be 
producing a repent highlight--' 
ing their observations, to be'- 
passed on to management and , 
unions. 

If changes were made then J 
“maybe there is a future for 
this industry," he said. 

A spokesman for British ; 
Nuclear Fuels, the state- 
owned company which runs - 
the plant, said he was de- ; 
lighted that the visit had ; 
changed Mr Pritchard's per- 
ception of the plant 
• A Whitehaven inquest jury ^ 
decided yesterday that Joseph :: 
Russell aged 74, died from an- ' 
industrial disease caused by ■ 
asbestos 10 years after retiring' • 
from Sellafield, where he had ’ 
worked for 16 years. 

Two former colleagues told ' 
the court that at times Mr". 
Russell’s jobs including : 
sweeping up asbestos dust 
when lagging, was renewed on* -. 
pipes. 

A post-mortem examina- - 
tion disclosed that Mr Russdl ' - 
of Buttermere Avenue, White- -. 
haven, died from a lung - 
tumour. ^ 

Lofty task 

The actor Tom Watt, who . 
plays the part of asthma * 
sufferer Lofty in the BBC1 ~ 
soap opera, EasiEnders , will . - 
switch on Christmas lights at - 
Brixton. south-west London, - 
today and donate his fee to the . 
Asthma Research Council. 


jjfJfB THESE TWO BULLETS WERE 
| ■ FIRED FROM THE SAME RIFLE, 
ill GIVE WAS FIRED INTO THE 
WRIST OF A HUMAN CORPSE. THE 
OTHER, THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 
ALLEGES, WAS USED TO ASSASSINATE 
PRESIDENT KENNEDY; ENTERING THE 
PRESIDENT’S RACK, EXITING THROUGH 
HIS THROAT, CONTINUING ON THROUGH 
THE BACK OF GOVERNOR CONNALLY, 
SEVERELY LACERATING HIS FIFTH RIB, 
EXITING THROUGH THE FRONT OF 
HIS CHEST, RE-ENTERING HIS RIGHT 
FOREARM, BREAKING THE WRIST 
BONE INTO SEVEN PIECES, EXITING 
THROUGH fflS WRIST, ENTERING HIS 
THIGH AND LATER FALLING OUT ON 
TO A HOSPITAL STRETCHER. 

■ THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 
MAINTAINS THAT THIS BULLET WAS 
FIRED BY LEE HARVEY OSWALD. 

■ THE BULLET ON THE LEFT, THAT IS. 


•s±k 


fil* 



H an 


1 

1 




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6 OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 



, WORLD SUMMARY 


Aquino military 
demands changes 

Manila — General Fidd Baimw, die Philippine Anted 
Forces Chief of Staff, said yesterday tint he has called on 
President Aqnbo to replace immediately “incompetent” 
members of her Cabinet (Keith Dalton writes). The call has 
been endorsed by a restive military high command. 

Shortly alter a meeting between Mrs Aqtrino and General 
Ramos, the President's spokesman, Mr Tcodoro BenJgno, 
said that one or two ministers ctmM be replaced and that the 
functions of her powerful Executive Secretary, Mr Joker 
Arroyo, coaid be red need. 

The faction of Mr Joan Ponce Emile, the Defence 
Minister, Is believed to be seeking the dismissal of two min- 
isters. It is reported that General Ramos, to avert a military 
putsch coinciding with Mrs Aquino's stay in Tokyo, agreed 
to present her with the faction's demands on her retm. 

Bata to quit S Africa 

Ottawa — Bata, the multinational Canadian-based shoe 
mannfactnrer, has decided to poll oat of South Africa (John 
Best writes). An announcement from the company's Toronto 
headquarters said an agreetnem-in-prindpte had been 
reached with an mmamed buyer for the purchase of Bata's 
five factories and 20 retail stores in the co u ntr y . 

A spokesman said that the system of apartheid was one of 
a number of factors which entered Into the derision Co get ouL 
The purchasing company was neither ramdian nor Sonth 
African, but the spokesman otherwise did not identify it. 
O JOHANNESBURG: Seven convicted murderers went to 
the gallows is Pretoria Central Prison shortly after dawn 
yesterday, bringing the number executed by hanging is 
South Africa so ter this year to 106, all of them men (Mi- 
chael Hornsby writes). 


Terrorism haunts Thatcher meetine in France 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


The spectre of terrorism 
haunted yester da y's Anglo- 
French summit meeting in 
Paris. As Mrs Thatcher flew 
from London, President 
Mitterrand was attending the 
funeral of M Georges Besse, 
the late head of Renault, who 
was shot dead by militants 
near his home on Monday. 

President Mitterrand, with 
M Jacques Chirac, die Prime 
Minister, and nearly all gov- 
ernment ministers, accompa- 
nied M Besse's widow and five 
children at the simple funeral 
service at Les Invalides, dur- 
ing which he tunned the 

nf the f’nmmjnwifir nf 


the Legion of Honour, award- 
ed posthumously to M Besse, 
to the Tricolour covering his 
coffin. 

In a funeral oration to die 
man he considered his best 
friend, M Audit Gixaud, the 
Defence Minister, said: “We 
are all unhappy, repelled by 
the conditions of your dea t h. 
Georges Besse, France is 
proud of yon. France is out- 
raged. But your work (for 
Renault’s economic recovery) 
has been set in motion and it 
will be continued.” 

Meanwhile the search for M 
Besse's killers continues, with 


posters throughout France 
offering a reward of up to a 
million francs (more titan 

£100,000) for information 
leading to their arrest, and 
carrying foe photographs of 
the two chief suspects, both 
female members of Action 
Direcie, the extreme-left 
group which has chained 
responsibility for his murder. 

Mrs Thatcher is understood 
to have told the French lead- 
ers of her concern. 

After an horn’s frlky with 
President Mitterrand at the 
Bys6e Palace, she dashed over 
the Seine for a brief tetoA-tfite 
with M Chirac at the 
Matignon, foe Prime Muns- 
ter’s Office on the Left Bank, 
before returning to the Efysee 
for lunch. 

Thai was followed by a 
plenary session, attended by 
M Mitterrand and M Chirac 
as well as the government 
ministers involved, which 
covered defence, foreign af- 
fairs, agriculture and trade and 
industry. 

The Bri tish ministers then 
went home, but Mrs Thatcher 
was required for another, 
longer meeting with M Chirac 
before dinner in her honour at 
foe Matignon. 


Kremlin 
still cool 

Bonn (Renter) — West 
Germany appealed to Mos- 
cow for a return to normal 
relations yesterday as the 
Kremlin gave a new show of 
displeasure with Bonn by 
blocking a planned visit by 
a senior aide to Chancellor 
KohL It was the fourth visit 
by West German officials 
to be cancelled by the 
Soviet Union. 

The Kremlin has not 
explained the freeze on 
contacts, but Soviet of- 
ficials have made dear it is 
in response to Herr Kohl's 
comparison, in a magazine 
interview, between Mr 
Milt ban Gorbachov, foe 
Soviet leader and the Nazi 
propaganda chief; Joseph 
Goebbels. 


Loan for 
Santiago 

Washington — The Ex- 
ecutive Board of the World 
Bank has approved a $250 
nullum (£177 million) loan 
to Chile despite strong 
objections by the United 
States and other coiratries 
to the Santiago Govern- 
ment's alleged human 
rights violations (Mohsio 
AO writes). 

The US abstained when 
the loan proposal came up 
for a vote mi Thursday. 
Policy makers feared that 
blocking the loan could 
damage Chile's economy 
and intensify political un- 
rest The British delegation 
voted In favour. The vote 
did cot condon Chile's 
human rights record, a 
source said. 


Greek plant deal 

Athens — The Soviet Union has agreed to boy the foil out- 
pot of an alumina plant to be bnfit near Delphi, dealing foe 
way for a project assailed by environmentalists for its 
potentially harmfhi effects on foe ancient sanctuary (A 
Correspondent writes). 

The agreement, readied in Moscow, ends months of 
negotiations on foe £390 miliion plant, to be built with Soviet 
technical assistance by 1990. The project was threatened 
when Balgaria reneged on a promise to buy 220,000 tons a 
year of alomina.Under the agreement, the Russians took 
over foe Bulgarian share and WDI buy all of the plant's output 
for 10 years in exchange for Greece’s buying eO, natural gas, 
energy equipment and construction machinery. 


Cyclists 
in protest 

De3u — Forty cydists 
led by a Briton, Mr David 
Bergman, left here yes- 
terday for Bhopal, 469 
miles away, to protest 
against slow rehabilitation 
of people affected by foe 
Union Carbide gas leak 
nearly two years ago 
(Kaldip Nayar writes). 

Mr Bergman has been 
ordered for a court not to 
leave the capital nntil the 
settlement of a suit against 
him by the Madhya Pra- 
desh Government that he is 
a spy of the Union Carbide 
Corporation. 


Abortion 

reform 

Madrid — The Spanish 
Government approved the 
text of a decree yesterday 
which will extend 
authorization to cany oat 
abortions to private, as wefl 
as State-run, medical in- 
stitutions, and will do away 
with the req uir e m ent for 
prior approval by a medical 
committee (Hany Debelius 
writes). 

The decree wiQ also air- 
low doctors to carry out 
abortions without the con- 
sent of patients in emer- 
gency cases in which the 
patient’s life is in danger. 


Panic as PLO 
fighters push 
out of Sidon 
refugee camp 

From Robert Fisk, Beirut 


A resurgent PLO fought off 
Lebanese Muslim militia at- 
tacks around the Em Helwe 
Palestinian camp in Sidon 
yesterday, seizing a truckload 
of weapons from foe ShiaAzn- 
al militia, over-running three 
positions held by S unni gun- 
men and shelling the Christian 
village of Magdouche on a hill 
to the south of the city, which 
is under Amal protection. 

It was a day of near-panic 
among the Lebanese militias 
who control Sidon as the 
Pales tinians of Ein Helwe, 
who have grown ever stronger 
during the past six months 
with substantial supplies of 
new weapons and equipment, 
advanced several hundred 
yards outside foe camp to 
capture emplacements set up 
there by foe local Sunni 
Popular Liberation Army 
(PLA) of Mr Mustapha Saad. 

Amal complained that one 
of its ammunition trucks had 
been attacked by rocket fire 
and its crew captured by 
Palestinians as shells feU 
around the centre of foe city. 
The combined forces of Amal 
and Saarfs men, it seems, can 
no longer control the growing 
power of the PLO in Sidon. 

IsraeTs helicopter raid on 
the dty on Thursday was 
further proof that the Israelis 
and the local Lebanese mi- 
litias share a common fear of 
the Palestinians, a concern 
which did not prevent the 
PLA joining forces with the 
Palestinians to shoot at Israeli 
helicopters as they flew low 
over Sidon during the raid. 

One shell — fired by a PLO 
anti-aircraft gun mounted on a 
lorry — almost blew up one of 
the helicopters over the har- 
bour. 


Reports that the Israelis 
have discovered dozens of 
Palestinian guerrillas travel- 
ling into Lebanon on the regu- 
lar passenger ferry from Cyp- 
rus to the Christian part of 
Jounieh have only empha- 
sized foe growing suspicion in 
West Burnt that President 
Amm Gemayel and the Chris- 
tian Phalange militia are help- 
ing the PLO in order to cut 
down the power of rival Leb- 
anese militias. 

The Christian anti M uslim 
militias are already Mum mg 
each other for foe dramatic 
decline in the value of the 
Lebanese pound, a collapse 
that yesterday prompted a 
demonstration by students 
outside the Prime Minister’s 
office in West Beirut 

If they are preoccupied with 
the problems of their econ- 
omy, however, the Lebanese 
have at least had the opportu- 
nity of understanding the 
suffering of others touched by 
the conflict in Lebanon. There 
were two more sad, painful 
appeals on television here this 
week from the famili es of 
hostages — one British, the 
other Irish — who are still 
believed to be alive in captiv- 
ity somewhere in West Beirut. 

The mother of Mr John 
McCarthy, the British tele- 
vision journalist who was 
abducted in Beirut last April, 
assured her son that her recent 
cancer operation had been 
successful and appealed to his 
kidnappers to allow him to 
come home. 

The mother and sister of 
Irish lecturer, Mr Brian Keen- 
an, also appeared on tele- 
vision, asking in thick Belfast 
accents why anyone would 
want to hold him. 


‘First lady’ 
of Japan 
upsets 
status quo 

From David Watts 
Tokyo 

Miss Takako Doi, of the 
Socialist Party, is the first 
woman leader of a major pol- 
itical party in Japan. 

"Women's aspirations, pot- 
ential and capabilities have 
been oppressed. And we 
women are disgusted and 
angry, probably beyond any 
man's imagination,” she said 
yesterday. 

Miss Doi has a reputation as 
an oppositionist who will not 
allow the Prune Minister’s 
party to get away with chched 
images of Japan and its 
people. 

After Britain ami America, 
Japan is foe third country in 
modern history whose gross 
national product exceeds 3 per 
cent of the world's total, she 
observed. 

She implied foal Japan has 
done nothing about investing 
abroad, though it will prob- 
ably account for 4 per cent of 
foe world’s GNP this year. 
“If s only natural that trade 
friction grows,” she said. 

Continual promotion of ex- 
ports causes a steep rise in the 
value of the yen, which had 
brought down investment in 
plant and machinery and 
pushed unemployment up to 6 
per cent, which had become 
comparable with the West 



Miss Takako Doc new angle 
on politics in Japan 


Two million private-sector 
jobs in Russia next year 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


years ago. At one stage, a 
Kremlin official spoke of the 
need to “take risks” by those 
who would be purchasing the 


The number of Soviet citi- 
zens legally employed in the 
embryonic private sector is 
expected to rise from the 
current official estimate of 
JOGJOG to between two and 
three million as a result of the 
new law on individual enter- 
prise which takes effect on 
May Day next year. 

the great majority of foe 
new private workers are ex- 
pected to be housewives and 
pensioners, who will have to 
purchase licences from the 
local authorities and be sub- 
ject to a system of taxation 
assessed on the “usefulness” 
of their woTk to the state. 

These official figures and 
predictions were released at an 
unprecedented press con- 
ference here last night during 
which some of foe most senior 
economic managers in the 
Kremlin fielded a host of 
questions about private enter- 
prise, Soviet-style, for nearly 
two hours. 

Emphasirisg the controver- 
sial nature . of Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov's latest economic 
reform, veteran correspon- 
dents pointed out later that 
such a conference would have 
been unthinkable even two 


new licences. 

Mr Boris Gostev, the jovial- 
looking Soviet Finance Min- 
ister, admitted with disarming 
frankness: “We have never 
had any great experience of 
individual work.” He added' 
that jou rnalists would have to 

wait until next year to see how 
the new law would work in 
practice, as a great deal of 
paperwork bad to be done. 

In the face of a barrage of 
questions, the officials,- inc- 
luding Mr Nikolai Talyzin, a 
non-voting member of the 
Politburo, strove to play down 
the ideological significance of 
the new law, empnasbing that 
even after the increase, in- 
dividual output would amo- 
unt to less than 1 per cent of 
Soviet gross national product. 

Mr Ivan Gladky, the chief 
architect of the new law and 
bead of the state committee 
for labour and social affairs, 
emphasized that there was “a 
fundamental difference” be- 
tween it and Lenin’s famous 
New Economic Policy of 1 921 
— the other main experiment 


with private enterprise — 
namely that the 1986 version 
completely outlawed the hir- 
ing of labour. 

Mr Gladky, clearly enjoying 
his new found fame. Daily 
denied suggestions that tire 
new legalization and en- 
couragement of individual 
enterprise would drain talent 
from state industry. 

All members of the regular 
workforce could only work 
privately in their spare time, 
he explained, and those who 
moved to lesser state jobs in 
order to concentrate on pri- 
vate enterprise would lose 
proportionate state benefits. 

Dismissing any suggestion 
that the law would cause 
sweeping changes in foe struc- 
ture of Soviet society, the 
officials left the impression 
that to the outside eye the 
biggest difference was likely to 
be the appearance of a handful 
of family-rim cafes. 

But. as one American 
journalist remarked after- 
wards, that would be a wel- 
come enough rhsn igp in 
Moscow from the collective 
indifference of the statocon- 
trofled concerns. 


Hungary shelves leadership change 


Budapest (Reuter) - Hun- 
gary, the East Bloc’s most 
market-orientated country, is 
to draft a reform programme 
to revive its flagging economy 
but an; changes in the Com- 
munist Party hierarchy will 
have to come later, the party’s 
propaganda chief Mr Janos 
Berecz, said yesterday. 

Speaking after a Central 
Committee meeting that 
brought speculation of im- 
minent changes at the top of 
the party, he said that busi- 
nesses would be given a freer 
band over their weak forces 
and wage policy. 

“Personnel questions were 
not on the agenda,” he told a 
news conference. “First we 
need a programme and, if the 


programme needs personnel 
changes, then that can be done 
later.” 

Mr Berecz said details of the 
reforms would be presented to 
foe winter session of Par- 
liament next month. 

“We will also have to think 
of the reform - of political 
institutions,” he said, without 
making dear when such re- 
forms might take place. “The 
party will m future not be able 
to work as it has so far. We 
must secure foe political and 
institutional framework fin* a 
good economy.” ' 

Mr Berecz said that new 
price, wage and tax structures 
would be worked out as part of 
attempts to harmonize pro- 
duction and consumption and 


to reward productive labour. 

Rumours abounded that the 
Budapest party chief Mr 
Karoly Grosz, might be pro- 
moted to assistant party gen- 
eral secretary and hence heir- 
apparent to Mr Janos Kadar, 
foe 74-year-dd leader. There 
was even speculation that Mr 
Kadar himself was about to 
go. 

The news conference was 
postponed for 24 boors mid 
the central committee meeting 
went into an lmsriterinltef 
second day. 

Sources dose to the meeting 
said that there was fierce 
debate' over whether eco- 
nomic measures should be 
accompanied by political re- 
form. 


Foreign ministers view farm crisis 

EEC to sell wheat cheaply 


As the EEC fanning crisis 
worsens and budget over- 
spending on agriculture gets 
out of control, the European 
Commission yesterday con- 
firmed that the EEC is to sell 
375.000 tonnes of wheat 
cheaply to Algeria and Egypt. 
The subsidy is described as 
unusually generous. 

The farm crisis will be on 
the agenda of budget ministers 
when they meet under British 
chairmanship on Wednesday 
and Thursday. 

But interest focuses on 
whether the EECs foreign 
ministers tackle the -question 
of agricultural spending and 
surpluses when they meet in 
Brussels on Monday under Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, foe Foreign 
Secretary and president of the 
Council of Ministers. 

Their meeting will set foe 
agenda for the European sum- 
mit in London on December 
5, at which Mrs Thatcher will 
preside. Diplomats say foe 
foreign ministers can scarcely 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 

avoid discussing the budget 
and the farm crisis, seen as 
“the most serious problem 
facing the Community”. 

But some senior diplomats 
say that there is no purpose in 
putting on foe summit agenda 
a detailed discussion of farm 
spending, since foe history of 
EEC summit meetings sug- 
gests that this has not been a 
successful tactic 

It is more likely, they say, 
foal the foreign ministers, and 
subsequently heads of govern- 
ment, would send a firm signal 
to farm ministers for their 
next meeting on December 8 
to ensure that they finally face 
the decisions necessary to 
reduce foe growing food 
mountains, even if such de- 
cisions involve d g rr | aci n 8 
farmers' interests. 

There is nonetheless pres- 
sure from some EEC officials 

— notably in the Commission 

— for the common agricultural 
policy and its failing* to be put 


squarely before the EEC lead- 
ers in London. 

The sale of wheat to Algeria 
and Egypt will cause further 
tension between the Commu- 
nity and the US, which claims 
that EEC subsidi e s for agri- 
cultural exports distort world 
trade. 

The EEC subsidy for Algeria 
and Egypt is intended partly to 
cover foe storage costs in 
those countries before foe 
grain can be sold to con- 
sumers . EEC traders involved 
are probably French, the of- 
ficials say, and the amounts 
involved are reportedly 100,- 
000 tonnes to Egypt and 
275,000 tonnes to Algeria. 

O fficials say this will 
maifg only a small dent in the 
EEC cereals mountain, which 
is estimated at 16 million 
lonnesThe foreign ministers 
wifl also tackle strained trade 
relations between Europe and 
America, as wdJ as Canadian 

thwaK to im pwe high ta riffs 

on EEC pasta. 


French support for ‘single Europe’ 

From Diana Geddes, Paris 


Ratification of the Euro- 
pean Single Act, which lays 
down conditions for a true 
common market in Europe, 
was approved by foe French 
National Assembly in foe 
early hours of yesteiday morn- 
ing, despite an unusual alli- 
ance between communists, 
die-bard Gaullists, and foe 
National Front. 

The Act. which provides for 
the establishment within 
seven years of a European 
market without frontiers, 
permitting foe free movement 
of goods, services, labour and 
capital, was approved by 498 
votes to 35. The measure 
provides for majority voting 
except where vital national 


interests arc at stake. 

The communists voted 
against, while the National 
Front and eight Gaullists, 
including M Michel Debrfc, 
mime minister under General 
De Gaulle, abstained 

He denounced foe “dan- 
gers" of foe Act, and, liloe the 
communists, saw it as likely to 
undermine the independence 
and sovereignty of France. 

However, M Jacques Chi- 
rac. foe Prime Minister, called 
on deputies to approve foe Act 
“by as large a majority as poss- 
ible." 

A former president. M Gis- 
card d'Estaing, said that be 
welcomed the provisions of 
the Act greatly, but called on 


the Prime Minister to propose 
to foe EEC foe establishment 
of a permanent presidency of 
the European Council in order 
to give Europe “a face and a 
voice”. 

M Giscaid, who has let it be 
known that he would be a 
candidate for a European 
presidency, said that France | 
was the only country capable 
of assuming the leadership of 
Europe. 

Introducing the Bill, M Jean 
de Lipkowski, Gauflist rappor- 
teur of foe parliamentary for- 
eign affairs committee, told 
the Assembly that the Act was 
no more than a “modest step 
toward a little more of 
Europe™. 


Credibility is Reagan’s new problem 


What now? President Rea- 
gan. halting and nervous, has 
given his explanation of why 
he seat arms to Fran. Congress 
and analysts remain un- 
convinced. The American pub- 
lic is overwhelmingly opposed. 
The embattled White House is 
frying to calm the furore. But it 
is too i”*** 

President Reagan’s task 
now is to restore his credibil- 
ity, pull together his demor- 
alized team and see wbat 
shake-ups in his G o v ern ment 
are necessary to prevent a 
similar debacle in foe future. 

Already he is receiving ad- 
vice from all quartets. And as 
the concessional inquiry gets 
under way, with all foe 
embarrassing revelations it 
wffl bring in its wake, attention 
is focusing particularly on foe 
hapless National Security 
Council and the way foe White 
House “kitchen cabinet” has 
been conducting foreign policy 
“from the basement™. 

The NSC is accused of 
circumventing obligations to 
consult and report to Con- 
gress, of ignoring experts and 
seasoned poficy-makera and off 
behaving like an 
“pocket directorate”. 

From the basement have 
come such dubious policies as 
foe disinformation cam paign 
against Libya, foe murky links 
with private armies helping 
foe Nicaraguan Contra rebels, 
and now tiw Iranian caper. 

Mr Reagan, fiercely loyal to 
his associates, has assumed 
personal responsibility for the 
Iran operation— which he still 
believes was worth the risk — 
and has made dear that he wiD 
not sack any scapegoats. 

Neither Mr Donald Regan, 
foe abrasive White House 
Chief of Staff, nor Admiral 
John Poindexter, foe low-key 
National Secarity Adviser, is 
now expected to go. But their 


retary of State, having gone to 
the brink of resignation, has 
made dear that he is no 
William Rogers, able to be 
outmanoeuvred Iry a Kissinger 
at the NSC or a Cyrus Vance, 
overshadowed by Braeriaski- 

The S e cret ar y of State, he 
long is foe chief 

executor of foe President's 
foreign policy. 

Others agree. Senator Sam 
Nana, the respected Demo- 
cratic military expert Cram 
Georgia, has called for a group 
of “wise men” to monitor 
foreign policy and to review 
the way it is made. Their job 

Washington View 

By Michael Binyon 

would be to bring real exper- 
tise to foe deasSon-mokag 
process and to prevent foe 
NSC’s getting carried away 
with hare-b ra ined schemes 
that had not first been submit- 
ted to ri go rous assessment by 
those with foe experience of 
international and security af- 
fairs to foresee foe likely 
consequences. 

He said a tittle “hoose- 
deaning” now was the only 
way to stop Confess from 
over-reacting to foe growing 
power of foe NSC over which 


Senators and 
have no con stitution al controL 
Ironically, the wise men he 
would like to bring In are 
mostly former NSC men. 

Foremost among them 
would be Dr Henry Kissinger, 
the man who mere than any 
other built op the power of foe 
NSC and made it foe seflii- 
antonoraons body it has since 
become, aide to contact foe 
kind of covert mission like foe 
opening to China which appar- 
ently set foe pattern for the 
secret contacts with Iran. 

Other might infhub 
Zbigniew Bnteringlri, General 
Brent Scowcroft, NSC advis- 
ers muter Presidents Carter 
and Ford, and James Schle- 
srager, former Defence Sec- 
retary and CIA Director. 

There is no sign however, 
font President n^»ga«t would 
accept such interference or 
that it would please Mr Shultz 
himself. Even if these ob- 
stacles were overcome, fob 
might not be enough to satisfy 
the new Deuoaatically-con- 
troDed Congress, which is 
eager to flex Its political 
muscle and set foe agenda for 
tire President's last two years 
as foe 1988 presidential cam- 
paign gains momentum. 

But clearly Mr Reagan must 
do somefomg soon to repair 
foe damage overseas, as well 


Italy avoids Iran crisis 


By Our Foreign Staff 



Mr George Shnltz, foe See- 


The menace of an Italian 
domestic political crisis over 
President Reagan’s arms deal 
for Iran dissolved overnight. 

Signor Giuliano Amato, the 
Uncter*Secretaiy at the Prime 
Minister’s Office, in a state- 
ment to the Rome Parliament 
yesterday, denied any official 
involvement in illicit arms 
supplies to Iran. Only 40 of 
the 630 deputies were present 
Signor Amato said that the 
Italian Government would 
never supply arms to Iron in 


exchange for hostages and had 
not been asked to do so by any 
other government including 
the United States. A 1984 
agreement restricting weapons 
exports had been substantially 
adhered to. 

Italian press reports that the 
restrictions had been violated' 
surfaced 10 days ago and 
rapidly gathered pace, fuelling 
a controversy that earlier this 
week threatened to bring 
down the five-party coalition 
Government. 


as at home. He patient Mr 
Shnltz, back on board, will 
now have to trudge round foe 
allied capitals, as he did after 
foe Siberian gas pipeline con- 
troversy, soofoing tempos and 
rebflflding trust 

The allies have enough 
other concerns common to 
them all to make the effort to 
put all this behind Hum 

But in the Middle East ft fe 
another matter. The moderate 
Arabs have been yet 

ag ain, by what they see as 
deception in Washington. The 
overt Israeli connection will do 
nothing to assuage their fears 
that the Administration's 
Middle East policy is virtually 
dictated from Jerusalem- They 
find it inexplk&ble font the US 
should have sold arms to Iran 
when even President Reag an 
blamed Iran for the continu- 
ation of the Gulf War and 
insisted that Saudi Arabia and 
the Gulf states should he 
helped to resist the spread of 
Irania n _ revolutionary 
fundamentalism. 

What now can be salvaged 
from the attempt to woo Iran, 
so obviously the big strategic 
prize for flie United States and 
foe Soviet Union alilrg ? Very 
little, it seems. Mr Bmwh 
I nsists that he will continue 
foe contacts with “moderate 
Iranians”, Senator Barry 
Goidwater, voicing foe scep- 
ticism of many here, says that 
there are none. And the 
ayatollahs themselves, with 
nothing but scorn for foe 
Treat Satan”, are even now 
rejoicing in Washington's 

discomfort. 

Such moderates as were 
able to talk to Mr Robert 
McFariane, foe leader of foe 
mission, most now be in fear 
for then- lives. 

^The affair has temporarily 
thrown into confasion all of 
US policy, but foe Admin- 
istration cannot allow Itself to 

be demoralized and distracted 

for too long. 


England in 
‘needle’ 
chess draw 

From Raymond Keene 1 


Dubai 

Eng l an d, the second seeds 
let slip an early 2-0 lead 
against the Olympic title 
favourites and tournament 
loaders, the Soviet Union, in 
yesterday’s needle match here. 
It ended 2-2 to leave the 
Russians half a point ahead 
after six matches. 

The world champion, Gary 
Kasparov, aged 23, beat 
England's top board, Tony 
Miles, and Artur Ynsupov 
defeated Nigel Short. r«*Kef 
John Nunn, on foe second 
board, had crushed Andrei 
Sokolov, and Murray Chan- 
dler bad rapidly overcame the 
resistance of Rafael Vaganian 
after only three hours of play. 

The USSR now has 17% 
points, and England 17. 

Before yesterday’s 
England had shared second 
place with Yugoslavia 
Cuba after five rounds, on 15 
points from 20 games. Ice- 
land, Argentina and Bulgaria 
had 14%, and Hungary 
Scotland 14. 

Yesterday Yugoslavia led 
Cuba 1%-%, with two games 
adjourned. 

In foe previous two rounds 
England had distinguished 
themselves by despatching 
two strongly fancied teams, 
the United States and Hun- 
gary, each time by 2%-l%. 

The English team, silver 
“edaffists m the l984Ttaessa- 
Joniki Olympics, are fancied 
°y experts to have outstanding 
cnances for the silver again. 

. The English women's team 
Jsajso putting up a splendid 
performance. Yesterday foe 
side drew 1-1 with one ad- 
journed against China the 
joint leaders. Again the Soviet 
Union leads, with England in 
joint third pl ace. 









THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 








> k % 

;*:i 


Botha names new envoi 
to Washington and 
attacks ‘revolting’ US 

Fhbb Michael Hornsby, Jtdtaimesbmg 

Souih Africa announced against us for the most absurd states to the nonh of South 

aud sanctimonious reasons: in 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


"yesterday the appointment of 
Dr Piet Koomhof a former 
senior Cabinet mnii^fr res- 
ponsible for black affairs, as its 
Ambassador to Washington. 
He is expected to take up the 
post, probably the toughest in 
South African dipl omac y m 
the New Year. m 

The appointment coincided 
with a scathing attack on the 
Reagan Administration by 
President Botha, who acc us ed 
Washington of behaving in a 
way that was “revolting and 
unworthy of a nation snr* as 
tbe Unitol States”. 

■ President Botha's remarks, 
unusually bitter even by South 
African standards, reflect the 
low ebb to which Pretoria’s 
relations with Washington 
have . sunk since the . im- 
position by Congress of eco- 
nomic sanctions against this 
country in October. 

_Tbe more recent decisions 
of General Motors, IBM and 
other American multi-na- 
tional companies to sell or 
wind up thour operations in 
South Africa have alto helped 
to fuel the anti-American 
mood. 

Opening a new medical 
centre in the Cape coastal 
town of George, Mr Botha 
said the United States had 
“declared an economic war 


so doing, they have yet again 
taken up the sword against us 
on behalf of tire Soviet 
Union” 

He referred to whal he 
termed tbe US Government's 
“insulting plan to send an 

official to South Africa, osten- 
sibly to investigate health 
conditions in terms of its anti- 
South African legislation”. 

Last Monday, Pretoria aw-, 
nouuced that it h^d refused to 
grant a visa to an American 
aid official. Miss Ch ristine 
Babcock, who was to mafa» a 
- report on health conditions 
and malnutrition in South 
Africa's tribal homelands. 

Article 502 of the Anti- 
Apartheid Act, which contains 
the sanctions measures adop- 
ted by Congress, calls for such 

a report to be submitted to the 

US legislature % December 1. 

“The US Government sh- 
ould be under no fllnsion 
whatsoever that we will tol- 
erate such blatant hostility 
and objectionable interference 
in our domestic affair s by 
officially sanctioning an offen- 
sive act of this nature,” Presi- 
dent Botha said. 

“If tbe US Government is 
really so deeply concerned 
about the health conditions in 
Africa, it win find some 50 


Africa where it can conduct 
investigations if its conscience 
allows, fend play a moralistic 
role where it is much more 
n ee ded." 

The announcement of Dr 
Koomhof s appointment was 
preceded by the arrival here of 
Washington's Ambassador, 
Mr Edward Perkins, the first 
Mack American to bold the 
post, which is seen as rnaridn 
the end of the policy c 
“constructive engagement 
and as heralding a return to 
the tense relations of the 
Carter era. 

Now aged 61. Dr Koomhof 
was a Rhodes Scholar in the 
early 1950s, and wrote a 
- doctoral thesis entitled The 
Drift from the Reserves among 
the South African Bantu, 
which prcsdeutiy predicted 
(he mevitaMity of black 
urbanization. 

When he became a minister, 
however. Dr Koomhof joined 
in implementing policies wh- 
ich ignored tire findings of his 
post-graduate research by try- 
ing to reverse tire movement 
of blacks to the towns. In 
1979, he created a stir in the 
US by saying that apartheid as 
the world knew it was “dead 
or dying”. This earned him a 
reputation as a liberal which 
his performance in office 
never justified. 



W^mgacnmd in Sura yesterday, the latest stop on his six-nation 
sampled a potent local pepper-plant drink. Lava, once described by missionaries i 


• as devil worship. 


Russians force out 60,000 Afghans 


By Nicholas Beeston 
The number of Afghan refu- 
gees fleeing their country last 
month quadrupled as a result 
of a Soviet scorched-earth 
policy, a British relief worker, 
who has jest returned from tire 
region, said. 

Mr Barry T^ng r id ge, the 
Christian Aid project officer 
for India and Pakistan, who 
visited Afghan refugee camps 
in Pakistan earlier mis month, 

Said Oirt most familip* <nmp 

from Afghanistan’s northern 
provinces where they said 


Soviet forces had systemati- 
cally destroyed crops and 
other economic targets. 

He said unoffi cial figures 
for October showed that be- 
tween 50,000 and 66,000 refu- 
gees, half of them chfldren, 
had entered Pakistan’s Bah - 
riustan and North-West Fron- 
tier provinces . 

He said the refugees spoke 
of a systematic policy by the 
Soviet occupation forces of 
destroying crops, thereby 
Braking it impossible for fam- 
ilies to survive tire winter. 


Austrian election 


Socialists may be 
coalition juniors 

From Richard Bassett, Vienna 
Austrians go to the polls may upset normal predictions. 

ft is the first is which tire 


The October refugee figures 
are four times greater than the 
previous month. An estimated 
three millioa Afghans live in 
refugee camps in Pakistan and 
a farther 1.5 nriDioa in Iran. 

• ISLAMABAD: The res- 
ignation of President Babrak 
Karmal has removed a symbol 
of tbe 1979 Soviet intervention 
from the public eye days 
before the arrival of a United 
Nations mediation mission in 
Kabul (Renter reports). 

But Western diplomats in 
Islamabad do not see the move 


as signalling any significant 
change in the government's 
policies at home or abroad. Mr 
KarnraTs removal from the 
largely symbolic presidency 
had been expected almost 
daily. 

The announcement miw on 
Thursday night on Kabul Ra- 
dio after meetings of the 
Central Committee of the 
(communist) People's Demo- 
cratic Party of Afghanistan 
(PDPA), and of tbe par- 
liamentary-style Revolutio- 
nary Council. 


Thousands 
flee island 
volcano 
eruption 

From David Watts 
Tokyo 

Thousands of people were 
being shuttled to the mainland 
last night after an erupting 
volcano threatened their lives 
on the island of bm O&hima. 

A rescue centre was set up in 
Tokyo 70 miles away and 
13,000 people ordered off the 
island as two ferries and 29 
boats of the Maritime Self- 
Defence Agency removed 
families. Lava flowed to 
within 100 yards of the 
island's main town, Moto- 
machi, from Mount Mihara 
and smoke and laval rock 
were thrown 1,500 ft into the 
air. It was the worst eruption 
of the mountain since 1777. 

Tokyo television stations 
cancelled normal program- 
ming to carry hours of live 
coverage of the eruption and 
rescue because the island was 
shaken by 70 tremors an hour 
before the main eruption. 

Izu Oshima lies dose to the 
fault line which might cause 
an earthquake in Tokyo. 
Responsible government ag- 
, encies met in emergency ses- 
sion and disaster relief law will 
be applied. 

The mountain bad been 
erupting steadily for the past 
! week but then there was a 
series of violent explosions 
and a fissure 200 yards wide 
! opened up. Later another 
appeared and lava threatened 
the island's airport. 


tomorrow in an election which 
is expected to end 16 years of 
predominantly socialist ggr- 
enunenL 

It Is drabtfid, in tire tradi- 
tion of consensus politics in 
tire country, whether it wfll 
change orach else. 

Idtest mreffidal polls give 
the opposition People's Party 
a lead of 2 per cent. Bat even if 
tire Socialists lose their rel- 
ative majority they may still 
find themselves in govern- 
ment, as tire janior partner in a 
coainion with tire People's 
Party. 

The election wfll con fr o nt 
voters with a number of factors 
new to Austrian politics which 



The two senior poQ rivals: 
Dr Franz Vranztzky, above, 
and Herr Akris Mock. 



Freedom Party is engaged as 
body with foar years or experi- 
ence in government, albeit as 
the junior partners of tire So- 
cialists. 

It is also the first in which 
tbe People’s Party’s somewh at 
lacklustre lends-, Herr Alois 
Mock, is pitted against a So- 
cialist less charismatic than 
Dr ftnmo Kmsky, who retired 
after the last general election 
in 1983. 

Moreover the Greens, for 
the first tore, though split into 
several factions, stand a fair 
chance of achieving their first 
representation in the Austrian 
Parliament. 

The bony is 'that after this 
Mama’ s change of Cabinet, 
which replaced the anfortn- 
nateDrFrcd Sinowitz with Dr 
Franz Ynuritzky, the Austrian 
Cabinet is locking more im- 
pressive than it has done for 
-years. 

Dr Vnuutzky and Dr Peter 
Jankowitsch, bis Foreign 
Minister, have ra a matter of 
months instilled a new air of 
prafesshmalism into a Govern- 
ment which nader Efe SSaowatz 
had become an easy soarce 
ridktde. 

This is, however, unlikely to 
ingre ss voters who, though 
anwiffing to ask. for details of 
any party’s prop-amme, none- 
theless fed that there is some 
vagse need for change. Qntte 
what it will involve and who is 
capable of carrying it ont re- 
main for most Austrians neb- 
ulous concepts. 

In a democracy as young as 
Austria's, where people are 
nsed to being administered 
rafter than governed, the vot- 
ing t om o r row is only the open- 
ing salvo in the battle far tire 
composition of the next Cab- 
inet 

Ultimately tire character of 
the next Government wfll be 
decided by the party commit- 
tees who, once the results are 
announced, will go info private 
debate next week on tbe de- 
laih rf any coalition deal. 


Damascus 
envoy flees 
prosecutor 

Ankara (Reuter) — Mr 
Mohammad Darwiche Baladi, 
the second secretary at the 
Syrian Embassy, left Turkey 
before a prosecutor could 
accuse him of involvement in 
the killing of. a Jordanian 
diplomat. Foreign Ministry 
officials said yesterday. 

A State Security Court pros- 
ecutor said Mr Baladi would 
be one of nine people indicted 
over the killing ofMr Ziyad at 
Sati, the first secretary at foe 
Jordanian Embassy, last year. 

Six of the accused are in 
custody — four Palestinian 


students, a Turk of Iranian or- 
igin and a Jordanian Embassy 
translator, Mr Adnan Musa 
Suleiman Amen. Press reports 
say that he named Syria as 
having been involved is the 
killing. 

The indictment is the first 
official accusation in Turkey 
of Syrian involvement in Mid- 
dle East -violence, but dip- 
lomats say that Ankara is 
unlikely to take further action 
against Damascus. - 
• Diplomatic pressure denied: 
A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man mj d that Mr. Baladi, who 
is in his early 40s, might have 
been recalled by the Syrian 
Government and that Turkey 
had not exerted diplomatic 
pressure for him to leave 
(Rasit Gurdikk writes). " . 


Brain-sale 
scientist 
imprisoned 

From Roger Boy es 
East Europe Correspondent 

The Hungarian doctor who 
masterminded a bizarre East- 
West corruption scan dal in 
which 5,000 human brains 
were sold illegally to a West- 
ers pharmaceutical company 
has been jailed for three years 
and eight months, according 
to official pre s s reports. 

The prosecutor in foe Sze- 
ged provincial court has- ap- 
pealed against the sentence, 
declaring that the erstwhile 
deputy head of the local 
mediod academy, Professor 
Ferenc Laszlo, should also be 
stripped of his doctor’s title. |{j 

The case has shocked* 
Hungarians, who regard doc- 
tors with huge respect. 

• professor Laszlo struck a 
deal to supply pituitary glands 
stolen from crapses delivered 
jo the Szeged academy anat- 
omy department to an Italian 
company and paid laboratory 
workers to deliver several 
brains a week. 

- Over 10 years he ma nage d 
to dispose of some 5,000 
brains, netting at least four 
million forints (£60,000) 
which he said had b enefi ted 
the academy with increased 
supplies. . IBs Italian ■ cus- 
tomers also- covered his. costs 
during trips abroad. 


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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


Whitehall accused over Pincher book 

J udge’s suspicions stun hearing 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Mr Justice Powell stunned 
the MIS book hearing here 
yesterday by indicating that he 
suspected that the British 
Government had secretly au- 
thorized a book with the same 
theme as that by Peter Wright 
which it is trying to suppress. 

The Judge said in no un- 
certain terms that he was 
troubled about the explana- 
tion advanced in the witness 
box over the past four days by 
Sir Robert .Armstrong, the 
Cabinet Secretary, about why 
there was no attempt to stop 

? ubtication of Their Trade is 
readier y. Chapman Fin- 
cher's account of the in- 
vestigation of Sir Roger 
Hollis. 

The Judge's statement in 
the New South Wales Su-' 
preme Court was accom- 
panied by a clear direction 
that he believed that the 
British side had the 
responsibility to remove any 
misunderstanding on his pan. 

During evidence on the 
decision by the Attorney- 
General, Sir Michael Havers 
— who has been described by 
the defence side as one of Mr 
Pincher' s “better contacts" — 
not to try to stop the highly- 
sensitive disclosures made in 
the book, the Judge said: “I 
am puzzled why someone did 
not just hot foot it up the 
Suand with an ex-parte 
injunction and an Anthon 
Piiler order (a sweeping sei- 
zure order to impound every 
copy of the book and the 
manuscript). I find it very 
difficult at the moment to 
think of a reason why it wasn't 
done. 

“If there were no ligitimate 
reasons why it was not done, 
no legal reason why it could 
not be done, then I would find 
myself pushed further and 
further towards the view that 


THE Ml 5 CASE ^ 


the Government knew exactly 
what was being done and it 
wasn't going to take a step to 
stop it. 

“.And if that is so, it is no 
great step towards saying the 
Government authorized it to 
be published." 

On Thursday the court went 
into closed session for more 
than an hour after Sir Robert 
declined to answer in public a 
suggestion that Lord Victor 
Rothschild, a senior Conser- 
vative Party adviser, had pro- 
cured publication of the 
Pincher book. 

The Judge said ;~-rterday it 
had been shown in evidence 
that M15 had proofs of the 
book six weeks before publica- 
tion and gave them to the 
Government 

“I do not see how they could 
have failed (to get an ex-pane 
injunction) — even a lowly 
colonial judge like myself — 
which I shall remain after this 
case," he added to laughter. 

To Mr Theo Simos, QC, for 
the Government who said be 
trusted that the Judge would 
keep an open mind. Mr Jus- 
tice Powell said: “We have a 
long way to go in this case. I 


have a habit whether fortu- 
nate or not J don’t know, 
when I am troubled and 
puzzled 1 tell those involved 
so they have an adequate 
opportunity of removing any 
error or misconception I may. 
be making." 

This development emerged 
from cross-examination of Sir 
Robert by Mr Malcolm 
Turnbull, for Mr Wright who 
has been probing for four days 
on the Cabinet Secretary's 
sworn answer to written 
Interrogatory No ISO on why 

no. action had been taken to 

restrain publication of Their 
Trade is Treachery. 

The written answer, signed 
by Sir Robert on October 6, 
was: “The plaintiff was ad’ 
vised that it had no basis to 
restrain the publication of the 
book." 

Yesterday Mr Turnbull said 
that two joint explanations 
had been offered by Sir Robert 
for Sir Michael's decision: that 
to stop the book the Govern- 
ment would have needed to- 
know the source who had 
leaked highly-classified ma- 
terial to Mr Pincher (and that 
it did not): and that the 


Government was concerned 
to protect the source who had 
given the pre-publication 
proofs to MIS. 

The first explanation did 
not apply, Mr Turnbull said, 
because the Government had 
stopped the Nigel West book, 
.4 Mailer of Trusty when, by Sir 
Robert's own admission, be 
was not sure that the main 
source had been identified. 

The second explanation, Mr 
Turnbull said, did not stand 
up because numerous people 
could have seen the proofs. It 
was “utter humbug" to suggest 
that to disclose that the Gov- 
ernment had the book could 
have identified the source. 

Sir Robert . said he had 
believed it was preferable that 
the Pincher book not be 
published and he would have 
assumed there was a legal 
basis for action to supress it. 

Mr Turnbull put it to Sir 
Robert that he had been 
surprised when be was ad- 
vised that Sir Michael had 
decided against an injunction. 

Sir Robert said: “I was 
resigned, I was not surprised." 

He did not argue questions 
of law with the Attorney- 
General. Mr Turnbull then 
passed a piece of paper to Sir 
Robert, s ugg esting that it bore 


the name of tbfr source who 
had provided MIS with the 
Pincher book proofs. 

“I have no reason to think 
so," Sir Robert replied. 

It was this exchange that 
prompted Mr Justice Powell's 
statement, and after it Mr 
Turnbull resumed his line of 
argument 
“The evidence Sr Robot 
has given concerning tire 
Attorney-General’s advice is 
palpably false,” he said. That 
was unless “the 
General was surrounded 
legal incompetence, which 
am sure is not the case". 

He added: “Why was Sir 
Robert giving false evidence 
in a matter so important as 
this? The natural explanation 
could be that he and the 
Government has something to 
hide." 

Why, he asked again, was 
Gov 


Why union telephones were tapped 


From Onr Correspondent, Sydney 


Sir Robert was cross-exam- 
ined as weD on allegations 
made by Cathy Massiter abort 
telephone bagging in a tele- 
vision programme shown on 
Channel 4 in March last year. 

Miss Massher said in the 
programme, MIS's Official 
Secrets, that while working for 
the security service she discov- 
ered that the telephones of 
some trade muon leaders, Mr 
Mick McGahey, Mr Arthur 
Scargill and Mr Syd Har- 
raway, among others, were 
being tapped. 


Yesterday Mr TnrnbnU 
Mbd Sir Robert What is the 
legitimate concern of a British 
government in tapping a tele- 
phone of an honest trade 
unionist? 

Sir Robert Yoa're talking 
abort Syd Harm way, a com- 
mon ist. It might be desirable 
in soch a situation to discover 
what effect the actions, opin- 
ions or pressure of the Com- 
monist Party were having on 
the conduct of negotiations. 

Tire Communist Party was 


stiff regarded in Britain as 
“one of the organizations 
subversive of pa rl i ament ary 
democracy", and Sir Robert 
said be believed that telephone 
Interceptions were justified in 
such cases. 

He was also questioned 
abort telephone tapping of two 
former National Council of 
CivO Liberties officials, Miss 
Patricia Hewitt and Miss 
Harriet Harman, now res- 
pectively an adviser to Mr Nefl 
Kinnock and a Labour MP. 


the Government seeking to 
sopress the Wright book when 
its main affection had been 
reported widely. The central 
claim, that Sir Roger Hollis 
was a Soviet double agent, was 
hardly novel, was it? 

Sir Robert said that, m 
addition to Mr Wright’s 
breach of his duty of 
confidentiality, the book was a 
"comprehensive” account of 
his service between 1955 and 
1956. 

Mr Turnbull disputed his 
definition of comprehensive. 
“It. says nothing about his 
service in Northern Ireland, 
doesit? 

Sir Robert: I believe not. 

Mr Turnbull: It was an 
important part of his life in the 
service, wasn’t it? 

Sir Robert: I believe so. 

Mr Turnbull: Mr Wright 
has gone to great pains, to 
ensure that there is nothing in 
his book to affect current 
operations of MI5. 

Sir Robert will start his fifth 
day in the witness box after 
the weekend. 



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Guilty plea 
on £5 .5m 
drug deal 

Sydney (Reuter) — Bruce 
Cornwell and Barry Bull 
pleaded guilty yesterday to 
smuggling two tons of can- 
nabis worth $Aus 12 million 
(£5 .5 million) inti) Australia 
from Thailand. 

Cornwell was deported 
from Britain and Bull from 
, Austria earlier this year to free 
50 charges connected with 
heroin and cannabis dealing. 

Fossil found 

Wellington (Reuter) — The 
discovery in New Zealand of a 
50-million-year-old penguin 
fossil, possibly the oldest in 
the world, may help determine 
the origin of tire flightless 
species. 

Snow rescue 

Delhi (Reuter) - More than 
500 people trapped on a 
snowbound mountain road in 
Kashmir province have been 
rescued by air force heli- 
copters and troops. 

Temple fire 

Peking (AFP) — The Tem- 
ple of Enlightenment, which 
dates back to the 1 0th century, 
has been badly damaged by a 
fire caused by a caretaker’s 
negligence. 

Death catch 

Peking (AFP) — Six people 
were killed and 20 were in- 
jured when a floating mine 
taken aboard a fishing boat on 
China's south-west coast ex- 
ploded, sinking six boats and 
damaging 100 bouses. 

Milk ban 

Rio de Janeiro (Reuter) — 
The Sao Paulo state has 
banned imports of milk pow- 
der from Europe until health 
officials carry out radiation 
tests on it. a slate health 
secretariat official said. 




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On the anniversary or me is 

his sister-in-law, Mrs Ethel 
ami Rory kneel before the flame 


of the 1963 assassination ofPresident Kennedy, toother, Edward helps 

Kennedy, to her feet, while two of her daughters Kerry, right, 
flame of remembrance on the Resident's grave in Arlington. 


Economic optimism and civil 
liberties return to Uruguay 


The streets of the 
gaayaa capital have come afire 
after more than a decade of 
harsh military rale. 

From the Plaza de la liber- 
tad to the Plaza de la Inde- 
pendence along the city’s 
main thoroughfare, the pare- 
nts and restaurants are 
crowded with people esqoying 
the River Plate spring. 

Many of the books and 
magazines they boy and the 
film* they watch were banned 
mda the 1973-1985 dictat- 
orship, which put an end to one 
of the longest periods of 
democratic rale in recent Latin 
American history. In the 19 
months since the mflrtary 
relinquished power, the 
country’s three million people 
have returned to their old 
democratic habits. 

In practice, if not always m 
law, the dvil liberties in force 
daring die 29 years of democ- 
racy preceding the military 
coop have been restored by the 
Government of President Jutie 
Maria Sang mn etti. 

In foreign affairs there is 
broad consensus for a policy of 
non- alignm ent- Uruguay’s im- 
age abroad has been improved 
not only by the retain to 

democratic ink bnt also by the 

international prestige of its 
•efgn Minister, Senor En- 
rique Igtesias, the chairman of 
the Gatt talks and a 
candidate to become Unesco's 
next secretary-general. 

"The fbtare is conceived 
here as a betterment of the 
past before the militar y dictat- 
orship,” Senor Jose Maria del 
Rey, a lawyer and imiversity 
professor, said. 

A key reason for the re- 
newed optimism is tire aptnrn 
in die economy. The combined 
drop in world oil prices and 
interest rates and a sharp rise 
exports are expected to 
translate into a 2 per cent 
GDP growth rate this year. 

While modest, it compares 
favourably with last year’s 
zero growth and is a signifi- 
cant improvement over the 2A 
per cent negative gr ow th rate 
Istered in 1984. 
nth real wages rising and a 
high bnt de clining h par cent 
unemployment rate, inflation 


From Eduardo Cte, Montevideo 
Urn- is tire only dark factor in the 


economy. The price index is 
expected to rise by 70 percent 
thk year, abort 15 per cent 
higher than in 1984.. “The 
bask problem," says a West- 
on diplomat, “is how _ to 
maintain the standard of firing 
and the social services on a 
Ihnited economic base and in a 
market that is too small to 
sustain industry." 

Uruguay is an Hgr in.ll ii re l 
c o untry which relies on ex- 
ports of wort, meat, leather 
and dairy products for its 
foreign exchange revenue. 
Observers here say that its 
(store growth will depend 
hugely on bow well it can 
deretop its role as a provider of 
goods and services to Azgen- 



President Sanguinetti: civil 
liberties restored, 
tins and Brazil, its two huge 
neighbours to tire west and 


Brazil, for example, has 
made forge purchases of meat 
in Uruguay this year, a trend 
that is expected to continue. 
The free exchange rate has 
tamed Montevideo into a re- 
gional banking centre, and its 
‘large and relatively well-edu- 
cated middle class is one of its 
main assets. 

The two main opposition 
parties and the labour move- 
ment attribute the economic 
upturn to external factors and 
say that government policies 
have foiled to spar internal 
demand and increase pro- 
duction. 


. The Rente Amplio and Na- 
tional parties, which together 
bold a majority in both Hones 
of Congress, also argue that 
the military continues to ex- 
ercise endue infiaence over 
political life. 

“The dictatorship created 
serious scars in the political, 
economic and social structure 
of the country. The 19 months 
rt democracy have not brought 
abort fimdameotal changes," 
says Sedor Jos6 D’Sia, presi- 
dent cf the PTT-CNT, Ura- 
goay's sole labour organiz- 
ation, which groups together 
47 onions. 

- “We have not been given 
back the social -benefits that 
woe taken away by the dictat- 
orship,” he says, pointing out 
that pension, ^employment 
and health insurance 
sharply reduced during the 
military regime have not been 
restored. 

Sai lor D’E Ba believes that 
tire country should stop m~ 
terest payments on the foreign 
debt and tfi«f the military and 
police budgets should be re- 
duced sharply. 

The military badge* has art 
been reduced significantly, as 
a way of keeping foe armed 
forces calm. Some 3Q£80 men 
remain in uniform, only 
slightly fewer than in Argenti- 
na which has a population 10 
times greater. The defence and 
interior ministries account for 
40 per cent of total public 
spending. 

But the efforts to appease 
the mifitaiy have faffed be- 
cause the Government has not 
been aUe to con v in ce Con- 
gress that it should pant 
former mOHxry commanders 
an rarcoBditional amnesty for 
human rights violations during 
the dictatorship. 

The controversy has para- 
lyzed political life and it now 
appears likely that Congress 
will be dissolved and early 
legislative elections held in an 
effort to break the deadlock. 

“Apart from the issue of 
amnesty, Uruguay is sailing in 
fairly smooth waters at the 
moment and is trying desper- 
ately to be an example of 
democracy in Latin America. 


Ceausescu goes his own way with poll 

Romania votes on troops cut 


Romania tins weekend 
stages an unusual referendum 
to muster support for a 
goverment proposal to cut by 
5 per cent the country's troop 
levels, and armaments and 
defence spending. 

In pursuit of a magical 99.9 
per cent turnout, party ac- 
tivists hare been laying on 
buses for villagers in remote 
areas and rearranging shifts in 
enterprises such as coal mines 
and oil refineries which work 
on Sunday. 

University students will re- 
port to colleges and go on to 
the ballot box. Hospitals will 
have special voting’ facilities, 
so that the side need not lose 
an opportunity to approve the 
cuts suggested by President 
Ceausescu. 

The unilateral offer, as with 
others in the past, is being 
described in the official press 
as historic. The idea was 
floated by Mr Ceausescu in 
September, partly to dem- 
onstrate that he is stiff capable 
of striking independent pos- 
tures within the Soviet bloc 

When leaders of the War- 
saw Pact nations met in 
Budapest in June they agreed 


By Roger Bnycs, East Europe Correspondent 

makes 
before 


on a package of proposals to 
the West — embracing nadear, 
chemical and conventional 
cuts — and suggested a phased 
25 per cent reduction in 
defence spending until 1990. 

This was in line with long- 
standing Ro manian initia- 
tives. But Mr Ceausescu 
wanted the Pact nations to go 
further, and made known that 
he wanted a unilateral gesture. 
He was overruled, and de- 
cided to go it alone. 

The use of the referendum is 
interesting. Although ref- 
erenda have been used occa- 
sionally in eastern Europe, 
especially after the war. there 
is no provision for (hem in the 
Romanian Constitution. 

Romanian reference works, 
indeed, describe plebiscites as 
“suspicious procedure manip- 
ulated by capitalist govern- 
ments". Bui there are three 
reasons for his move. 

first, Mr Ceausescu wants 
to show that Romania's rel- 
atively independent stand 
from Moscow has national 
backing. This enhances his 
importance, attracts Western 
applause - and perhaps 


Moscow think twice 
encouraging internal 

rivals. 

Second, the referendum is 
intended to outflank tire mili- 
tary, which is highly likely to 
be unhappy about the pro- 
posed cuts. Although the de- 
fence budget has been cut 
several times before — the 
1986 budget is already lower 
than that of 1985 - the 
proposals also envisage cuts in 
both personnel and arms. 

The Romanian ge n eral staff 
would be content with a 
smaller army if more funds 
were made available for mod- 
ernization. but this is not the 
case and the officers are 
feding the squeeze. 

ft as expected, the referen- 
dum result supports Mr 
Ceausescu almost 100 per 
cent, he will be able to ignore 
any rumblings in the army. 

finally, the defence cuts 
should free more money and 
manpower for the ailing econ- 
omy. This view is shared by 
the Hungarians, who have 
angued for a more effective use 
of defence spending rather 
than constant expansion. 


Pol Pot’s 
illness’ 
a mystery 

FiomNal Kelly 
Ban gkok 

The whereabouts ofPol Pot, 
the Khmer Rouge leader 
Warned for the slaughter of 
targe numbers of Cambodians 
dunng his years in power, is 
the subject of increasing 
speculation in South-East 

Asia. 

In recent days he has been 

reported seriously ill in China 

in hospital in Bangkok and 
lectures on military 
affairs in Cambodia. 

Reports quoting diplomatic 
sources that he is iflin China, 
™laria, diabetes and 
blood pressure, have 

jeendcmedbyMrMakBen, 

an official of the anti-Viet- 

He said Pol p m m 
conducting classes for mifitaiy 
J»mmandtts in the moun- 
tains of south-west Cambodia. 
~ A ?f n J? r Tfcai official on the 
S7te? ian J border ' however. 

gjr he understood that Pol 

toLr?i h0 - “ ■?>» w ent to 
Hospital i Q Bangkok last 

TTwi authorities have 
maQ e no comment. 


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f%£5va>.?l5' J 


November 22-28, 1986 Q AT^T T 

■ \ V ^ A 7^ A weekly guide 

Hr ■ 1 /\ Y to leisure, entertainment 

ikj/YI U. 

i\ 1 //h 1 and the arts 


Staging a Palace revolution 


?£-. S3 

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sound engineer, it was a chance to 
make radio history. David Howarth, 
who was that engineer, tells the story 






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/ t might have been 
made for us. Hie first 
news came on the 
agency tapes at about 
six o’clock, just after 
the final editions of the eve- 
ning papers. The story was 
ours alone until the morning — 
if we could get it Few people 
are blasfe enough to resist a 
good fire, and this was a 
perfect fire. 1 couldn't find 
Richard when the news came 
in. He was not in Broadcasting 
House so I left messages for 
him everywhere, rang the 
engineer in charge of the 
mobile recording unit 
nicknamed the “laundry van”, 
who simply said, “We'll be 
there”, and drove off in my 
Invicta, taking a senior man in 
News who wanted to come 
and watch. 

We were bound for 
Sydenham in south London 
and the Crystal Palace, which 
had been moved there from 
Hyde Park after the Great 
Exhibition of 1851. Joseph 
Paxton’s dramatic edifice of 
iron and glass had been one of 
the wonders of the Victorian 
age. Now it was ablaze. 

Richard and I had been 
thorough. Among other 
things, we had worked out and 
explored the quickest ways out 
of London, at various times of 
day, to anywhere in the coun- 
try. There were surprisingly 
few of them, seven I think, 
and Sydenham was cm one of 
them. So -ft was easy. I knew 
the short cuts. 

There were police checks 
where traffic was being di- 
verted, but we had been issued 
with press passes and we were 
waved through. As we got 
closer, the streets were foil of 
fire engines aU going beH for 
leather in the same direction 
and 1 joined them; flashing 
through the red traffic lights, a 
driver’s dream. 

It must have been 6.45pm 
when 1 got there and parked 
the car outside a caffe in the 
main road opposite the build- 
ing, which was already Mazing 
magnificently. The laundry ; 
van came in by the same ruse, 
attaching itself to the fire 
brigade. And so did Richard. 1 . 
don't know how he got there; 
but there he suddenly Was, and 
I had never been more glad to 
see him. 

There were scores of fire 
engines already and more 
were coming in all the time, 
but with his journalistic in- 
stinct and skill he almost 


mstantly found the Com- 
mander of the London Fire 
Brigade himralf (“David, Kk 
name’s Firebrace, isn't life 
perfect?^) — not only found 
mm but misted he had to take 
him inside the b uilding and, 
escorted by that dignitary, he 
vanished through its ™ t 


imm 

m 


t «v- .■••ViwW 




I went round the hyj as a 
standby with a lesser fireman, 
just, in case Richard never 
came out again — winch did 
not look unlikely. We aU knew 
what to do without retting 
each other be ready to record 
before eight o’clock and get 
the discs back to Broadcasting 
House ip thm» for the 
o'clock news. 

There was a strong wind 
blowing; in the eddy hrfiiwj 
the building there was a space 
that was reasonably safe over- 
head was a vast arch of 
burning embers. I don't think 
anyone bad thought the Crys- 
tal Palace could burn, built as* 
it was of iron and glass, and I 
still do not know exactly why 
it did. It may have bad a' 
wooden floor, and the iron- 
work certainly had a century 
of paint, and there was putty 
holding the glass: 


m 


ppi 




is; 



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a s soon as one end fell 
yj in it att made a huge 
/ m wind-tunnel with a. 

/ I draught through ft 
like a furnace. It was 
quite impossibte to get in from 
the back, as I had hoped. On 
that side there was a row of 
glass corridors leading down 
to the gardens, and out of each 
a river of molten glass was 
flowing; and solidifying Kfce 
lava when it cooled. 

Further in, iron girders were 
drooping and folding like 
slides of spaghetti dipped in a 
boiling saucepan, aim further 


ms 


m 


0mm 




y- 

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Crystal Mazing the flaming bnOdfags fight ap the sky (inset) tearing a scene jof smoul de ring devastation. At the bright of the blaze, girders drooped above a river of molten 


were there to save the shops 
and houses all around. 

But we did not record. By 


out, in the garden, the trees eight o’clock it was obvious 
were beginning to crackle. I that if we cut discs we could 


got out again pretty quickly not get them away and b 
and ran hock to the caffe and Broadcasting House in 
the ftumdiy van and there was for the news. It would ts 
Richard, deliriously happy, night To start with, m 
black and minus his eyebrows, ami the van were boll 
scribbling ha scripL rounded by a web of ho: 

Typically, he knew the over the road. Nobody 
whole history of the place by unravel them, and we 
then, its vital statistics, who tainiy could not drive 
had designed it and above all them. Commander Hr 
what the fire brigade was was tolerant but he pi 
doing. They had sent out a foot down at that 
first-class cad, which meant Beyond them, the 
that every fire engine in roads were full of fire « 
London was there. 1 don't: and policemen and 
think they were trying by then necessary ambulances, 
to save tiie building— feat was the side roads were al 
going to Imm itsdf out They Mack and blocked by c 





\ V>*- 


SOME THINGS 
NEVER CHANGE 

Our commitment 
to the traditional English 
values and standards of 
service has never changed. 
Next time you're in London, 
experience for yourself 
what our guests 

take for granted. 


not get them away and back to 
Broadcasting House in time 
for the news. It would take all 
night To start with, my car 
aid the van were both sur- 
rounded by a web of hoses all 
over the road. Nobody could 
unravel them, and we cer- 
tainly could not drive over 
them. Commander Firebrace 
was tolerant but he put his 
foot down at that 

Beyond them, the main 
roads were full of fire engines 
mid policemen and un- 
necessary ambulances, and 
the side roads were already 
Mack and blocked by crowds 
of people watching. The an- 
swer came to all of us at once. 
Richard, or it may have bem 
me, timidly ariced the senior- 
engineer, “Could yon hook up 
your amplifiers to a telephone 
line?” 

“Don’t see why not,” he 
said, “if you’ll cany the can. 
Nothing else for it, is there?” • 

By a stroke of luck, a BBC 
man much senior to ns had 
turned up to sec the fun. He 
was the respected S. J. de 
Lotbmifere, head of outside 
broadcasts: Normally, his out- 
side broadcast lines were cor- 
rected and balanced from 


ordinary telephone tines: He 
had no gear with him J and no 
engineers, but we had. We put 
it to him. 

“Nobody’s ever done it, so 
for as I know,” be said. “But if 
there was ever a time to try, 
it's now. If you need me. 111 

share the Marn e." 

So we invaded the caffe and 
rang Broadcasting House, and 
somebody, told the Post Office 
to keep the line open whatever 
happened. Then the engineers 
pulled the telephone off the 
wall and connected the am- 
plifier, mixer and micro- 
phones. It was about 8.40pm: 
20 minutes to go. 

The excitement even got to 
the Control Room at 
Broadcasting House, normally 
the most phlegmatic of places, 
where philosophical calm was 
the rule. I think someone had 
nine the chief engineer of the 
BBC himself. I don't know 
what he said, but it wasn't 
“No”. They could hear us. 
The quality, they said, was not 
good, but they supposed we 
knew what we were doing. 

One of us bad an ordinary 
radio receiver (it may have 
belonged to the caffe) so we 
could hear onr cue, and they 
must have fixed a long lead on 
it, because I could hear the 
programme on headphones. I 
stood in the open with one 
microphone for background 


sound and Richard with an- 
other was in the cafe doorway 
where it was quieter. The 
engineers inside the caffe were 
mixing the two. There were 
several minutes before nine 
o'clock bat we had no time to 
test anything. It was either 
going to work triumphantly or 
fail disastrously. 


r he announcer was 
droning on, the 
usual dreary in- 
troduction to the 
news— and then it 
came, in the most sceptical, 
doubtful and uncertain terms. 
“We hope to take you over to 
the Crystal Palace, where our 
observer has been watching.” 
And in the headphones I 
heard the shouts, the fire 
engine bells and the deep loss 
roar of the flames from the 
microphone 1 was holding. I 
signalled Richard, and he 
started. We were on. It was 
ecstatic. 

That was for and away the 
most exciting and dramatic 
news broadcast there had ever 
been. We knew it was, and felt 
it proved everything Richard 
had been preaching for so 
long. But we could not know 
that night what the high 
command would think, be- 
cause our line was only work- 
ing one way. 

The immediate effect was 


something we had not ex- 
pected, or had not worried 
about. There had been crowds 
before, but the broadcast 
brought out most of south 
London. People who tried to 
come by car were turned back 
miles away, but a million or so 
must have lived wi thin walk- 
ing distance, and walk they 
did. 

They were blocking every 
street crowding every park, 
standing on roof tops and 
craning out of upstairs win- 
dows. That did not please the 
police or the fire brigade, but it 
made a wonderful evening. 

We did another broadcast 
that night in the final news at 
10.15pm. It could have been 
second best but at about 10 
o'clock there was a crisis. 
Richard, of course, was always 
true to BBC tradition; he 
never exaggerated, expressed 
bis own opinion, or relied on 
hearsay. But he was never 
averse to drama if it came his 
way. 

“Urgent message from the 
Chief of the London Fire 
Brigade,” he began. “Anerley 
Hill is dangerous.” Anerley 
Hill is the steep main road 
running down from the west 
end of the Palace. “There are 
fears that west tower at the top 
of the hill may foil It has a 
water tank on top with 
100,000 gallons of water in it 


[he knew the exact figure] and urgent message - please get 

if it fells a huge wave of water off Aneriey Hifl.” 

is going to pour down the hilL The darker was real, but in 


“Please dear Anerley Hill at 
once. Get on to the higher 
ground to the west, or get into 
houses and go upstairs. 1 can 
see the tower from here, and 
hundreds of firemen playing 
their hoses on it, but it is 
smoking or steaming right up 
to the top. So I repeat the 


the event the firemen saved 
the tower. Indeed both towers 
— there was one at each end of 
the building — survived but 
were demolished' five years 
later because of fears that they 
would provide a target for 
German bombers. 

QDnMHomrthlOB 


—IWHI1M1 SATURDAYI 
A first taste of the £5“”* 
new vintage: our . 
expert guide to 
1986 Beaujolais 
nouveau -page 13 


17 Ontand'A^ot 

17 Open 

18 Radio 

17 Kerim 

18 Kock & Jazz 

15 TbnesCoak 
18 Travel 
18 TV & Radio 


Onlyone 
decaffeinated 
coffee tastes 
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Nescafe Gold Blend! 


€' . 

A gale of fresh air in the news room’ 


In September 1936 something 
unexpected happened in the 
BBC A friend said: “There's a • 
new man in News.” What he 
said was an nuderatatement 
The new man was Richard 
Dimbkhy. A gale of fresh air 
was about to blow through the 
news room. A new era in 
broadcasting was about to 




THE MAY FAIR 

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL ; 

Stratton Street, London W1A 2AN. 

Tel: 01*29 7777 Telex: -26252 . . ; 


He was a year younger than 

I* 23 when he jofoedtbeBBC. 
He had been a journalist since 
he left school and was then the 

editor of The Advertiser's 

Weekly, the youngest editor, 
he rianned, in Fleet Street He 
had had the nerve to write to 
the BBC news editor, pointing 
out that broadcast news was 
accurate and ' reliable bat 
deadly dufl. 

Indeed ft was. It an r» me 
from agencies and always 
began with the formula “Here 
is the news, copyright by 
Renters, Press Association 
and Exchange Telegraph and 
Central News.” 

Richard proposed a way of 
making it more evriting - he 
would go out and cover the 
states himself. At first, he 
was hampered by the BBC’s 
demands for superb sound 
qaality, demands which could 
<a]y be satisfied by a seven- 
ton recording van. And he was 
obliged to combine recording 
Us reports on to 12-inch wax 
discs, which then had to be 



>•;> . - -s* 


Breaking the sound barrier Dimbleby (left), Howarth 


seat back to ftoadcastihg 
House or one of the BBC’s 
regional studies. 

All the same, we managed to 
cover a surprising amount of 
news. 

Very slowly, Richard's ideas 
of news presentation began to 
be accepted in the BBC, and 
listeners liked them as wett. 
We went to ship lunches, 
shipwrecks, mining disasters, 
floods — die strange sort of 
things that are counted as 
news in Fleet Street 

I did not always go mi his 


expeditions. I was second in 
wimwiawH of sound recording, 
which meant I was marginally 
too senior to disappear without 
warning. Bat I was there for 
what I might call Richard's 
a potheosis. That was the night 
the Crystal Palace burned 
down. 

It was a breakthrough for 
radio reporting. From now on 
the story came first and perfect 
sound quality second. It was 
accepted that when something 
important happened, Bdnw 
would be there. 


• The Crystal Palace was 
designed by Sir Joseph 
Paxton, a former gardener's 
boy who had designed 
conservatories for the Duke of 
Devonshire at Chatsworth. 

• The Great Exhibition was 
opened by Queen Victoria in 
Hyde Park on May 1 , 1B51 , and 
attracted six million visitors. 

• After the exhibition Closed 
the Government refused to 
allow the Crystal Palace to 
remain in Hyde Park. So it was 
dismantled and rebutft on a 
hilltop site in Sydenham, then a 
rural area of south London. 

The new palace was half as 
torn again as the original, with 
282ft high water towers at 
each end. 

• Among foreign dignitaries 
entertained at tne palace were 
Napoleon III, the Sultan of 
Turkey. Tsar Alexander of 
Russia and the Kaiser. It also 
became famous for plays and 
concerts and spectacular 
fireworks displays. 

• But it was not a financial 
success and in 1909 the 
receiver was called in. Four 
years later ownership passed 
to the nation. 

• After the First World War it 
was the first home of the 
Imperial War Museum, while 
continuing to promote concerts 
and exhibitions. 

• The fire Is thought to have 
begun in a staff lavatory. The 
palace was empty apart from a 
group of musicians who were 
quickly evacuated and no one 
was injured. The cause of the 
fire was never established. 









TTTF TIMES SATT TODAY MnVPA/mFP 99 1Qfi£ 


mu/ 


PERSPECTIVE. 


Why not get another perspective? 

You could be there tomorrow via a dozen 
or more international air routes. 

Catch big game fever. Be mesmerised by 
cities built on gold and diamonds. Marvel at the 
scenic beauty of the Cape and Table Mountain. 

Best of all though, you'll be pleasantly 
surprised by the positive changes taking place in 
South Africa. 

And witnessing that is worth a trip in itself. 
Right now, currency exchange rates also 
make South Africa superb tourist value. 

A 12 night Fly-Drive holiday departing in 
November by scheduled international flights 
costs as little as £530 per person, increasing to 
£777 during December 

We even include free car hire. • 

So exercise your personal right to see. this 
beautiful country for yourself 

You'll be captivated by the magic of South 


a ■ ifUJi A ^puvaceu vy me magic or sc 

SOUTH AFRICA. ^ 1 ^ baA 


satour 


Satour, Td love to have 
wore travel information 
on South Africa! 

My name 

My address 

■ — Postcode 

Send this coupon to SAIDUR. 

^RTeiephone 01-439 966L 


— — — — — - — et s-ii 

YOU’LL COME RACK. AGAIN AND AGAIN. 







' ” . V ‘ ' py. . 


ci^ l^P 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


TRAVEL 1 


IKIR 


57m R 


nights, safari-style 


In the darkness a yard away 
from my right ear, an alarm 
beD exploded. It shattered the 
croaking, rumbling, chattering 
rhythm of the African nigh t 
Ou fside the Ark, a ship- 
shaped building and animal* 
watchers’ eyrie in the Aber- 
dare Highlands of Kenya, wfld 
animals roam in co nsider ably 
more than twosomes it is 
the humans who are safely 
caged in their safari cars and 
game lodges. 

At dusk, doud ranges had 
gathered above that empty 
landscape but the beO did not 
signal 40 days of rain, only 
that the rhinos were mating 
Figures in pyjamas and dress- 
ing-gowns drifted through the 
building towards the viewing 
gallery from which we could 
watch the courtship. A sleepy 
matron, hair in curlers, wished 
the animals had chosen a 
more convenient moment. 

We fixed our binoculars on - 
a floodlit salt lick and saw 
immediately that* the first 
announcement was either too 
late or fer too soon. There was 
a rhino right enough; a gre at 
dark beast of a rhino 
representing one of Africa's 
most endangered, poached- 
upoo species. But beside die 
anim al was its small, plump 
infant. 

Getting out of bed in the 
middle ot the night and watch- 
ing In hushed concentration as 
wild animals wander through 
their natural lives sharpens 
the experience. The tour began 
in the rolling Kikuyu home- 
lands, a stretched version of 
the South Downs, where it was 
difficult, drinking tea poured 
from a silver pot on the 
veranda of the Aberdare. 
Country Club, to grasp that 
the land out there was wild 
Africa. 

Along the rough trade that 
tested the suspension of a 
Toyota Land Cruiser (where 
have all the Land Rovers 
gone?) we were soon among 
.the good, the bad and the ugly 


Ronald Faux drifts over the plains gnd 
sleeps under canvas, on a luxurious 
trail for Kenya's abundant animal life 


of the animal kingdom; 
bush buck, mean-tempered 
buffalo and die unprepossess- 
ing wartbog. The Ark raised 
the curtain on a spectacular 
trip to die Masai Mam game' 
reserve arrang'd by Robin 
Hurtj whose aim was to 
provide a safari that was a cut 
above all others. 

While we were in the 
Aberdares watching the busy 
life at the water-hole, a lorry 

^Preying and preyed 
on in well-ordered, 
totally natural society* 

loaded with a fridge, tents, 
tables and a crew of oooks and 
assistant cooks was already on 
its way to the Mara. We caught 
them up at Governor’s Camp, 
travelling there in a Dakota 
with an deco interior. The 
pilot was proud of the feet that 
his aircraft first took to the air 
half a century ago. “Tremen- 
dous machines,** he said, giv- 
ing the compass a thump. 

The Great Rift Valley, that 
geological axe-blow running 
down Africa separating Nat 
rob i from the broad plains of 
Kenya, slid below. The Da* 

I V- ETHIOPIA l 


gNlakk 

5 ) Rudolph 


lOOmdcs 


Masai Mam 
ESP Game 


, y-iUBjyn 

>NMi 


'Victoria 

TANZANIA MnfcmJ 





DATE RESORT 

■uuigirommeapeciaisis ] 
ACCOM. IWk ll 

20 Dec Lhrigno 

StCApta 

Ct4S 

20 Dec CowmayBur 

2* B/BHotei 

£159 1 

20 Dec Bulgaria 

3*H/BHotal 

£179 

21 Dec Andorra 

2* B/B Hotel 

£169 

21 Dec LaMongle 

S/C Apts 

£161 

27 Dec Coormayetr- 

B/B Pension 

£217 


Prices based on t wee k hofcoays from Gatwick. Ffcghts from Manchester 
Ask f ofwjtrFREE 

agem. WARMNG: Because of the weak pound, most other operators are 
now swchargingi 

.- Mt LON; 01-2299484 

Lm MAN: 061-8317000 

rmsCOn GLAS; 041-2487911 v T> f 

33 Nooog HS Goto, London WIT 3J& 


v*2g&tat° 




‘k l t 



’ Oar French Aips 
skiing holidays are 
great value for 
experts or novices 
V alike. 

Take a scheduled 
flight, or drive -for 
top siding from 
December to April 
at 8 loading resorts 
, with wide choice of 
accommodation. 



BY SCHEDULED FLIGHT OR CAR FERRY 


We wouldn't dream ; . 

of sending you into the 
Serengeti without a flask offca 
(Karl Grey, naturally). 

Even when \ rruVe out in the- bush, wc always 
try to provide some of UfeV little comforts on a 
S*an Hellenic holiday. 

And there are still some places left oa'otir 
14 (lav Big Game and Bird' Safari of Kenya and 

Thmbo, departing on 2nd MndllWl; ’* 

Our safari starts at BfairoK and includes 
Xbe Aberdares, take Kahrasbl, JS3faBtapW«. 
lake Manyara, Screngcti, Sforiogaro and 

finishes at Mom. 

The price w a head, and is fully 

inciudw of llighis, accommodation, meats/ 
excursions and gratuitws- 

For full details and a brochure of this ■ 
unusually *pecucubr holiday, pleaw ghv us a 
rm«on lil-'K3Hblbnr Ml in the coupon below. . 


ymlfi/ • 

!)»«! tklk-iiii. 77 Vvl'O'lwt Si ter!. I uwlonW C l.-' 1PR 

^ Bom rititl*!# ■»* '• *■*•»** 


kota flew between air strips, 
dropping off- passengers and 
cargo, until we readied 
Governor’s Camp- 

Cbarfie McConnel, who was 
Hurt’s man in the bush and an 
encyclopaedia of knowledge 
about the surrounding wild- 
life, drove us to our amp set 
up in an isolated grove of 
trees. It was safari in the did 
style: individual tents each 
with dressing-room and 
porch, a comfortable bed, 
carpet on the floor. Each tent 
had its own shower a bucket 
of hot water suspended in the 
tree brandies above a canvas 
Cubicle. Just pull the c hain 
and scrub until the bu cket 
empties. 

Dinner was excellent, 
served in a mess tent with 
silver cutlery, . candelabra and 
a waiter m evening dress. In 
all we were extremely 
comfortable and secure, part 
of a different age* An armed 
Masai guarded the camp dur- 
ing the night; even $o, we 
found the fridge door scarred 
with teeth marks one morning 
from a hyena which had been 
trying to get at the food inside- 

Drrving around the game 
park over tiie next five days in 


WEATHER EYE 


D s yth w tmpw H iwK 

Coastal regions always In the 


Nairobi in the upper 70s. 
Humidity: Always 
uncomfortable on the coast; 
uplands -no p roble m; 
northern provinces, dry but 
u ncom for tably hot 
Rainfafe Occasional afternoon 
showers on coast Uplands 
mainly dry hut wetter in 
November and December. 
Northern provinces invaridily 
dry and* sunny. 


our open-topped fend cruisers, 
we saw a wealth of animals. 
There were prides of Hons 
slumbering and arrogant in 
the long grass. We raterrupted 
a pair of hons en g a ger in their 
lengthy mating ritual, the 
male looking distinctly heavy- 
eyed after coupling for the 
umpteenth time that day. 

“That's the way with Bans," 

said C h a rl ie. There woe ani- 
mals large, and tall, 

preying and preyed-upon in 
unchanging, well-ordered and 
totally natural society. 

One still dawn we went to 
nearby Little Governor’s 
Camp, where John Coleman, 
balloon captain, was dir ec tin g 
eight tons of hot air into a 
canopy the size of a circus 
tent The tall lozenge of the 
Mara .Rainbow struggled up- 
right until her brightly-col- 
oured stripes were vertical and 
eight of us dimbed into a large 
laundry basket The Captain 
added a final whiff of hot air 
that tipped the balance and we 
left the ground, directed by the 
faintest breeze, out across the 
treetops. The basket brushed 
the upper branches and we 
passed silently within two feet 
of a vulture's nest, the female 
giving us an evil look as we 
drifted by. 

The zephyr carried us at 
walking pace over tire clumps 
of trees bordering a swollen 
river and down to grass-fop 
height the other ride. We 
sailed across the river with the 
brown waters rushing just 
beneath us, over the smooth 
island formed by the back of a 
hippopotamus. Then, with a 
roar, Mara Rainbow rose to 
1,000 feet. Captain Coleman 
turned off the homer and we 
drifted on in silence, the 
sounds of the plain rising to 
us, the flat wilderness stretch- 
ing to every horizon. This was 
the Mara as seen by an eagle. 

The landing was more 
down-to-earth, everyone 
crouched in a foetal position 
in the bottom of the basket as 








Aid»p ii L e.<bixgdwoaiwyw ii doBnAl gaMe thecaunpyL e« i» e 
'LondooThasday morning, necum Moncfay morning. 
WduAigreum airfare, hotel and carhirem New Orleans, Houston, 
Dallas, SanAntonio or Los Angetes. 

Askyoor Travel Agere. Or ring us an (0293) 776979. 

^CONTINENTAL AIRLINES TOURS 


Switzerland 


It takes a Swiss company 
to show you the best of Switzerland. 

For b tg in n e e i or opart* Kuan offers amazing ***** at IB dWara nt 
resorts. ChidwiCW. 2 waa ta tar the price oM.no stogie room a^ple- 
mans - Mesa am jist soma of me speofe "KUONI JOKBT often. 

ft's Switzerland as arty Kuoni can do it 

For joar KUOtti SWITZERLAND tcvchum rnttr or fata- 
pfwa/wrtD Kuan# Trswt Kuam House, Dotting. Sums*. gSgSb 
T«fc <03061 MTO® or aaaywomrt agar*. tgfia# 


Istanbul- Kusa dnd -Bodrum- Parings- Undos- Knlkan 

-Atanyu— Antalya— Mormons- Kos—Kusadasi 

loarneg to 
the Ionian GtieS 

A tempting new departure forSerenissima— 
leisurely tows by tsea uf Aegean islands and tlte 
Anatolian coastline. 

Duri ng your journey on our small but most 
Comfortably appointed ship, you'll berth at the 
quayside in ancient ports and small harbours denied 
to larger vessels, and visit some historic arid 
evocative sites on the Turkish mainland and Greek 
islands. 

To answer your questions will be a Serenissirua 
pies! lecturer, who won't ’lecture' at all but give 
informal chats that will doubtless add a new 
dimension to alt you will see. 

Each two-wrek lour includes a stay in Istanbul, 
one of the worlds most captivating cities. For three 
nights you will stay in a'cnarming hotel in the old 
quarter, and enjoy some of the many fine sights before 

joining the 4 Serenissmia-Tura'. 

Parlies will be limited to between 30 and 40. 
making the atmosphere on board relaxed, 
interesting, and very infumia). Excursions, a 
Serentssima lour manager, lips and Bights, are 

naturally included in your fare. 

For full information on this new Serenissima 
programme, which has eight different iolh> between 
Apnl and October next year, please telephone us oil 
101 j 730 9841; or complete and send the coupon. 


feuntwl* _ 


>• 
V> '? 






Lap of tarary: a Enas and her cob pause lor rcAestiaient at a madily water hole 


wc touched down. Unfortu- 
nately, the ground was 
covered with mne inches of 
flood water into which the 
basket tilted and formed a 
mighty bow wave. “Not as bad 
as my last landing into a field 
that had just been covered in 
pig shiny,” said one passenger 
stoically. The 90-minute 

‘A place of primitive 
luxury, a five-star 
Robinson Crusoe 9 

adventure ended on a patch of 
dry ground where the recovery 
team produced breakfast and 
champagne and a red kite gave 
a superb aerobatic display. 

The tour ended on the 
Kenya coast, just north of 
Matindi, where Vanessa 
Aniere runs the Club Che- 
Shaie, a place of primitive 
luxury or “five-star Robinson 


[Continental 
Motoring I 


CtoolrtcXMK ISOhMrte«ntbu\rtBy ! 
driving distant- of Cabin a nd Hmilnffnr. 

WUhyttir tnHtrW.ymiHbr fyvrno 
frrv laprra^rtlror Infonattlon park {nr 
;br«a 

PrtmfmnannindUfipp.lnrfiKfa- 
hoirl arraoimnctii lonond bmkbd. and 
mum h am m il mwlng with m from 
Datrrlaasiinili]£4 jdutb. Inparty L 

ftr a brnrtiuR* »pr your (raw4 aftrru 
drpbDOr (0US54 706 V. 



THE VERY BEST WiUE uM 
THE VtvlY BEST R£SC*TTt/ 



pYR0|^ 



In the spectacular CapaWan 
resorts ofFoiana Brasov, Snaia. 
and PredeaL 

Prices from £150(1 week 
half boand). ExceBentski-ing for 
aU grades English speaking 
insfructois, equipment for hire. 

Fist class hotels, 
international and local cuisine, 
Bveiyafxes-^ ent e rtainment 
fndusive hofidays from 
Heethrcw/andGa&wlck. 
departing December until tyri. 

See yourTravd Agent for the 
Hourmont School Plan, 
Inghams. Ski Scene and 
Phoenix brochures. 

For Information phone 

01 -584 8090. Write or caH 

Romanian National Tourist Office, 
Dept. TT. 29 Tlsirioe Pbce, 
London. SW7 2HP. 


Crusoe”, as one guest called it 
The dub is a collection of 
bandas — buildings made 
entirely of thatdi - set be- 
neath a grove of casuarina 
trees, dose to a long sickle of 
flawless beach beside the In- 
dian Ocean. It is a warm, quiet 
and a quite extraordinary 
place. 

Vanessa Aniere produces 
excellent food from the most 
primitive kitchen, borrowing 
from an international menu of 
fried seaweed Japanese-style, 
pasta served with delicious 
chilli ofl, small sweet pastries 
called tostades that are a 
Spanish idea using stale bread. 
Fresh bread is bated in an old 
tin trunk sunk in a bed of hot 
charcoal, and the seafood is 
rich in variety with a choice of 
crab or lobster at every meal 
and the benefit of whatever 
guests catch on fishing trips 
from the dub, which can range 
from shark and sailfish to the 
smaller delicades yielded by a 
tropical ocean. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


A 12-day trip to Africa with 
five nights on luxury safari, two 
days in Nairobi ana five 
nfghts cxi the coast, costs 
from£2,067. Flight is by 
British Airways, which 
operates a dafly service 
between London and Nairobi. 
Details from Supertravel, 22 
Hans Place, London SW1X 
OEP (01-584 5201). 


TAORMINA Sicily 

taxmina is an idal choke throughout 
me year. Plenty of sun, superb beaches 
and arctaeotogied sites. Come and 
meet Siciai Representates at the 
Worid fraud Rtatat Otympia. Nw 
25-39, Stand 7207, Grand Hal. For 
Wo ntiaBon and reservations, contact 
ERMA UIW CONSULTANTS, 
cam Hotel (tamaaotatSon, 
9 Beera Mew, London SW7 3HE. 
MOt-584 2841 (24 hr) or 584 7820. 


TRAVEL NEWS 


Breaks with 
tradition 

Short breaks in seven Euro- 
pean cities over Christmas or 
the New Year are being run by 
Travelsccne. Prices range 
from £199 tor three nights in 
Luxembourg at Christmas to 
£393 for a four-night stay in 
Venice over the New Year. 
Other dries indude Paris. 
Rome, Vienna, Amsterdam 
and Madrid, and travel is by 
scheduled airlines from 
Heathrow or Gatwick. 
Accommodation is in four or 
five-star hotels. Travdscene: 
01-935 1025. 

Top of the Channel hops 


French ports are cashing in on 
ike popularity of pre-Christ' 

, mas shopping trips by Britons. 

1 Dunkirk's Auchan hyper- 
market is opening every Sun- 
day between now and 
Christmas and most town- 
centre shops mil also be open 
on November 30. December 14 
and December 21. 

• The Travel Club of 
Upmfnsterwfll again be 
ghing an unconditional 


m its 1987 summer 
programme, it has also added 
a guarantee that it wiD match 
any competitor which 
undercuts its prices on an 
i d e n ti cal holiday. 
Information: 040 22 25000. 

Ruling the waves again 


Canard is marking the return 
to servioe of the QE2 next 
year, after a six-month refit, 
with a 10-day return “maiden 
voyage” from Southampton 
to New Yoik, departing on 
April 29. Prices range from 
£870 to £3.770 and include a 
sightseeing tour of Manhattan. 
Cunar± 0703 634166. 

Philip Ray 



■ ram gentle slopes to extensive off-piste and 
crass-tpuntTy sfcmg, Les Aits has something to offer every 
skier: 'ski ArabliP for faegnmeis rad 'couloir siring" for 
experts. Les Arts: 150 km of ranked slopes and 37.000 acres 
of snow. 

For £109*: A studio fbr4 people, sidutfing ski pass 
for oae week. (Weeks commenting : BA December, fifth and 
17th Jamicy and 25th April). 

For £218“: Stay at the 3 Star Hotel da Gaff at 
Art WX) n a double room fating Hoat-Bknc wfih hoffbood 
and free kindergarten for children from 3 to 6 years old. 
(Weeks coaunencng : 13th December, 3rd, lOrii, I7lh, 24th 
January and 25th April). 

Tamirt(UX)UdrfiespaiDfcftooropentfra-&irls 
Arts offers you a variety of travel arrangements nduding 
our exclusive weekly flight from London Canuck to Cham- 
faery - the airport nearest to Les Aits. 

* Mm par paean pet ntk tocUfeg nfenfny cnsfe|inr(vafi pnaigin. 

For fufl mfraraotion on let ha and yaw free copy of Toorac’s brochure, 
piece retan rfns coupon to : 

Toflort (IK lid, 1978 Brampton Rood, London 5W3 UA 
Tel: 01-S84 3358/589 1918 nr ask your focal ABTA travel ogem. 


Les Arcs^Les Arcs 


People in the know about skiing 
know about Biadon Lines! 


Chalet parties, hotels and 
self catering holidays in 47 
top resorts. Prices from £99 
for 1 week by air. Save £40 
and gain a day's skiing with 
sleeper coach travel. 


from Gatwick. Luton. 
Manchester. Glasgow & 
Edinburgh. 

(01) 785 2200 

Manch. Deps 0422-78121 



RLADON LINES 

TkiLicp^j' ckj[& ^ 


ABTA Ihis 
AIOL n«: 


f 




UlfofifltUC 

CLOTHING 
Feels Better ■ Lasts Longer ■ Goes Further 

VVniB or ‘i^one for your nearest stnctasuir send (or RIGEcdonr leaflet 

K you would like to receive a nw of our new 44 page colour brochure molurfmg Adventure Photography 
article by Leo Ehckinson and photographic competmon. please send Cl with the coupon. 


Pp L E A S E • S E N 
j DFree leaflet □ 4« page Winter 8&B7brocture Cl enclosed 


M l I 



ADDRESS. 


l Sanaa: Mountam Etpupmem Ltd. Leech Street. SoiybnJge. Mmiiitain Fnumment 1 
, SXIS1SD Telephone 061 -338-0733. I 

I suragSTDUivuttiiifcPtunpws | 














THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


TRAVEL 2 



Shona Crawford Poole in the shadow of Mont 
Blanc where convenience bows to good skiing 


Tennis players and promenad- 
es dressed in the height of 
1920s fashion swan about the 
lawns of Cachat's Hotel 
Majestic in Chamonix. An 
Amilcar. or is it an early 
Peugeot, gleams before its 
steps and three flags fly above 
its complicated mansard 
roots. One is a tricolor, of 
course. There is a stars and 
stripes too which, since 
Cachats was an hotel of 
international repute, is only to 
be expected. But the third, a 
red ensign, remains a puzzle 
despite an intimate acquaint- 
ance with the scene painted as 
a poster which now hangs a 
couple of streets away in the 
dining room of the Hotel 
Albert Premier. 

Was the red ensign just a 
mistake on the pan of Mon- 
sieur Faria from whose atelier 
it came, or is there a forgotten 
story to tell? If there is, it is not 
to be found at the Musee 
Alpin. which is housed in a 
few rooms of the once 
magnificent Cachats. 

There, sharing space with 
the broken ropes and battered 
water bottles of mountaineer- 
ing disasters long ago, is a 
photograph of Monsieur and 
Madam Couttefs telescope on 
wheels, which permitted vis- 
itors to view the alpinists 
attempting Mont Blanc from 
the relative safety of the 
town's main street 

Europe's highest mountain 
has long been a powerful draw 
to visitors. In the 1 8th century 
they arrived by horse or mule- 
drawn charabancs via bridges 
so narrow that the passengers 
had to carry the cans across 
them. Now motorways link 
Chamonix with the rest of 
France, and via the nearby 
Mont Blanc Tunnel, opened 
in 1965. with Italy. 

It is these good modem 
roads which make the town 
such an excellent base for 
skiers who prize variety and 
choice above the convenience • 


: iriiy- *• •••.. 
v. riruaS .« i, .‘3Cf 


.... • A. s _ X. ^ \ 


of sliding on to pistes literally 
at the doorstep. 

Five miles up the valley is 
the village of Argenttere, 
famed for its steep, difficult 
and largely unpisted runs. 
That it attracts more super- 
loose, hipless skiers than most 
places, and that on fine days, 
good skiers are prepared to put 
up with long queues, vouches 
for the attraction of its moguls 
and gullies. There is nothing 
for beginners here. 

Chamonix's own skiing in- 
cludes the long, often demand- 
ing descents served by the 
Brevent and Fleg&re lifts, and 
from the top of the Aiguille du 
Midi cable car, the famous 1 8- 
kilometer-long Vallfie Blanche 
run through stunningly 
beautiful glacier scenery. 

Crowding, not difficulty, is 
an off-putting consequence of 
the popularity of this excur- 
sion. Le Tour provides the 
only area locally that is suit- 
able for beginners, and tes 
Houches counts long, wide 
trails through woods among 
its attractions. 

For those who enjoy skiing 
that is more extensive than 
arduous, and prefer a decent 
lunch to a pocketful of nuts 
and raisins eaten while stand- 
ing in a lift queue, Megeve is 
the place to head for. Parking 
in the centre of this big old 
resort of wooden chalets can 
be troublesome, and is avoid- 
able by skiing from Demi- 
Lune. 

Another attractive choice is 
Courmayeur, on the Italian 
side of the Mont Blanc Tun- 
nel. People who knew the 
village before the tunnel 
brought juggernauts through 
its outskirts say it has been 
spoiled. Those who have 
never known it any other way 
enjoy its old houses and lanes 
just the same, and no one is 
complaining about the range 
and extent of its skiing. It is 
not ideal for absolute begin- 
ners but for everyone else 
there is plenty of fun. 



Flying high, feeling free on the slopes of Chamonix, perfect 
for the adventurous, superloose and hipless skier 


The sun often shines on one 
side of Mont Blanc when it is 
dull, even snowing on the 
other. Mountains are notori- 
ous for their cellular weather 
patterns and the best place to 
keep track of them is the 
guides' house, the Maison de 
la Montague. 

Here, in a building so old 
that its walls slope inwards as 
they rise, giving it the appear- 
ance of felling backwards as in 
a bad photograph, true men of 


The Hdtel Albert Premier can 
be booked through Btadon 
Lines' s A La Carte service (01 - 
785 2200) and costs £292 per 
person per week, half board, 
sharing a double room. It is a 
small, family run hotel near the 
centre of Chamonix, traditional 
and with excellent cooking. 
With a Bladon Lines flight and 
a hire car for the week, it costs 


the mountains meet to relive 
old adventures and plan new 
ones. It is a place of crows feet 
and contour lines, and 
camaraderie. 

For all our rescue heli- 
copters and radios, that 
comradeship still matters on 
the mountians. Among the 96 
associations listed m the 
Guide Cantonal is the Chamo- 
nix branch of the Federation 
Nationale des Maitres Chiens 
d'Avalanches. 

from £492, on the baas of two 
people sharing a room and the 
car. 

Europcar (01-950 5050) offers 
Winter Superdrive rates, 
inclusive of ski racks and snow 
tyres or chains from a number 
of locations including Geneva 
airport. Prices run from Swiss 
Francs 427 as week £181) with 
unlimited mileage. 

Falcon (01-221 0088) offers 
seat-only charter flights to 
Geneva from £69 return. 


The sun also shines on history 


J. AfianCtash 4 


Val Hennessy finds 
a more satisfying life 
behind the packaged 
sea and sand of Spain 

When King Alfonzo xm ad- 
dressed the Lord Mayor of 
London at the Guildhall in 
1904. he mistranslated the 
Spanish Estoy constipado (1 
have a cold) and, apologizing 
for his hoarse voice, informed 
the assembled dignitaries "I 
am constipated.” 1 gleaned 
this fact from a Spanish 
newspaper as I sat on the steps 
of Ameria market with a gypsy 
snail-seller to my left and a 
basket of tortoises to my right. 

The sun streamed down like 
treacle, the air smelled of 
squid sizzling in garlic at the 
tapas bar opposite. Mingling 
with carnation -sellers, lemon- 
sellers and a one-legged beggar 
who banged a drum while his 
goat balanced motionless on a 
log, 1 entertained few home 
thoughts from abroad. 

Indeed, 1 was wondoing 
why people are so supercilious 
about inexpensive package- 
holidays? Why they sneer 
when we canny package-deal 
addicts use our half-board 
seaside accommodation sim- 
ply as a place to deep. We now 
hue cars, escape from basking 
Brits and bingo, and potter off 
independently after our buffet 
breakfasts to explore the real 
Spain. 

Aguadulce, a sprawling fish- 
ing town midway between the 
two terribly throbbing Costas 
- Blanca and del Sol —was my 
Intasun-packaged base spring. 

The hotel. Satellites Park, 
offered excellent accommoda- 
tion, good meals, a colossal 
swimming pool, attractive 
grounds planted with mimosa 
and palms, and only a five- 
minute stroll from the Medi- 
terranean and a dean beach. I 
would be lying, however, if I 
did not mention the daily 
dawn chorus of cement-mix- 
ers and pneumatic drills. 
These symphonies of concrete 
construction are inescapable 
facts of Spanish Costa life. 

But it has also been de- 
scribed, by Aldous Huxley, as 
having the sun for a lover 
(3,000 hours a year) and it 
does have a charming, mod- 
ern square where paella can be 
savoured while you watch the 
locals promenade and the 
travelling garlic-seller haggle. 



Standing guard: Akazaba fortress towers over homes carved into the rock at Almeria 


Almeria, five miles away, is 
dominated by the biscuit- 
coloured Alcazaba, a hilltop 
Arab fortress overlooking 
labyrinthine rows of dazzling, 
box-like homes carved into 
die rock. These lime- washed 
dwellings have their doorways 
outlined in turquoise, pink or 
ochre. 

1 spent much of my time 
roaming the alleyways of the 
old town, propping up the 
Lisboa Tapas bar (fried mush- 
rooms, giant prawns and min- 
iature eggs a speciality) near 
Almeria's palm-lined main 
street 1 did not meet anyone 
from Britain. 1 did, however, 
encounter a shoe-shiner who 
squatted perpfcxingly. brush 
poised, over my rope sandals, 
opened his tin of polish and 
hissed “hash?" 

Almeria's main street is 
dosed to traffic on Sundays. 
Toy-stalls, balloon-sellers and 
roller-skating children throng 
the road One of the most 
delightful sights of Spain is the 
Sunday evening saunter when 
elegantly-attired families, sib- 
lings dressed in matching 
clothes, stroll and chat 

A 23-mile drive from 
Aguadulce, past orange, olive 
and vine terraces and up into 
the volcanic hills, where acres 
of yukka plants and pricldy 
pear create a Wild West 


landscape, brings you to the 
Arabian-style village of Nyar 
in the foothills of the 
AlhamiHa mountains. 

Exploring the narrow, 
while- washed streets I came 
across several sheds where 
women work giant looms and 
weave wonderful striped blan- 
kets from dyed rags- In the 
Plaza de la Constitution a 
priest took the opportunity to 
practise his English in the 

Acres of yukka and 
prickly pears create a 
Wild West landscape 

shade of a mimosa tree. We 
drank scalding coffee from the 
Union bar whose unremitting 
telly blared throughout the 
siesta. 

Driving 25 miles in the 
opposite direction is Laujar 
where I bought a picnic of 
fresh olives, goats cheese, 
bread, easy-open tinned sar- 
dines and a bottle of wine, 
stoppered with half a carrot, 
all for £2. 

In the evenings it was 
pleasant to return to Satellites 
Park, to the luxury bathroom, 
to a well-made bed, and to a 
substantial supper. It was 
pleasant, too, to order a “La 
Mumba” — half a tumbler of 


brandy topped up with hot 
drinking chocolate — and sip it 
in the company of sun- 
worshippers with peeling 
noses who were stoking up 
feverishly for a night at the 
Bloody Mary Disco. They 
loved the hotel. They loved 
the pool If they hadn't seen 
anything of Spain, well it was 
only because they didn't want 
to waste the sun. 

Too much of a good thing is 
wonderful they insisted, 
clutching their tins of Nivea. 
And even if the view between 
my hotel balcony and the 
crystal Mediterranean did 
incorporate a vista of high-rise 
development, and Andal- 
hician-style holiday apart- 
ments. and several expectant- 
looking construction cranes, it 
was all so burnished with 
baking sunlight as to appear 
magical to a tourist seeking 
sunshine and travel on a 
shoestring. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Two weeks halfboard at the 
Hotel Satellites Park, inclusive 
of flights and transfers, costs 
from £184 with Intasun (01- 
290 1900). Car hire arranged 
locafly costs from £100 a week 
with unlimited mifeage, 
arranged through local Intasun 
representative. 


OUT AND ABOUT 


T oys and dolls that are more than child’s play 


Sara Driver discovers a museum of fantasy and childhood delights 




The Victoria and Albert Mu- 
seum first discovered children 
during the Great War. With 
wartime restrictions in force, 
many London children who 
normally went to the country 
for the summer were left 
kicking their heels in the city. 
The V & A decided to or- 
ganize special activities for 
their young visitors as num- 
bers increased. 


“The experiment has 
proved so successful" wrote 
the director, “that I hope to be 
able to develop it" In 1923 
the Bethnal Green Museum, 
an off-shoot of the V & A 
which housed collections on 
food, animal products and 
19th-century decorative arts, 
was chosen to bold the 
V & A's first proper children's 
exhibition. 



ABTAAJOL1068 

Phon^f 0444) 459923flCton -Fn 03.00- yf. 1 $ 

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Orphone: (0444) 457730 24 hour drqgriure phone 
Or opener Hall. Qoinpre Road Hama&s Heath. 


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toWtiter 

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For sun or super cities - 

it has to be Italy. 

For Maly -it has to be Citaiia. 
Let our Sun and Cities brochure 
tempt you with city breaks, 
sunshine resorts, fly/coach tours, 
or the fabulous Orient-Express. 

See your travel agent or phone 
01-580 3100 (24 hours) 


XfnHis 

U/f 

Dept TTXA 
Marco Polo House 

3-5 Lansocwne Road. Crovdon CR9 1 LL 



Fifty years later in 1974, 
when Sir Roy Strong became 
director of the V & A, he gave 
the East London museum a 
new purpose and identity'. It 
became the Bethnal Green 
Museum of Childhood. 

The toy," wrote the poet 
Baudelaire, “is the child’s first 
initiation in art.” Refurbished 
and redesignated, the Bethnal 
Green Museum of Childhood 
now houses one of the largest 
toy collections in the world. 
There are about 4,000 toys on 
display from the prize exhibit 
- an exquisitely furnished 
17th-century Nuremberg 
doll's house — through to 
contemporary space toys. 

Today the museum" is one 
vast airy room with tiers of 
galleries round the perimeter. 
On the lower level are the 
doll's houses, a brightly 
painted gift shop and the 
exhibition area. The middle 
gallery houses the main collec- 
tion, which includes about 
1.400 dolls, with one group of 
39 collected by successive 
generations of the same family 
over 150 years. There is a rare 
18th-century Italian mario- 
nette theatre, a Punch and 
Judy booth, board games, and 
collections of model soldiers 
boused in castle-like display 
cabinets. 

On the top gallery are the 
children's clothes and among 
them two 1 8th-centuiy outfits 
made of silk, woven in nearby 
Spiialfields. On the remainder 
of the floor are artefacts from 
babyhood, including lethal- 
looking feeding bottles and 
ancient perambulators. There 
are still the remnants of the 
old collection on decorative 
arts which will be relocated as 
the museum enters its final 



Adoring eyes: Helen Brown comes face to face with some < 


stage of redevelopment over 
the next 10 years. 

At present the museum has 
no cafeteria and lacks a play 
area where children can touch 
and operate toys, but these 
needs should be catered for in 
the future. Educational visits 
have long been a feature, open 
workshops are held for chil- 
dren on Saturday mornings 
and special events are or- 
ganized during school holi- 
days. 

On December 1. the mus- 
eum's Spirit of Christmas — 
Christmas Revelry’ exhibition 
will open to give children a 
glimpse into the joys of past 
Christmas seasons. 

Bethnal Green Museum of 
Childhood, Cambridge Heath 
Road, London E2 (0f- 


980 2415}. Open Mon-TTturs, 
Sat. lOam-Spm; Sun 2.30- 
6pm. Closed Fri. Free. 


TOYS GALORE 


The London Toy and Model 
Museum, 23 Craven Hifl, 
London W2 (01-282 7905). 
Museum of London, London 
Wall EC2 (01-600 3699). 
Exhibition of 200 dote from the 
18th century onwards. From 
Tubs. 

Museum of Childhood, 

Judges' Lodgings, Church 
Street, Lancaster 
(0524 32808). 

Museum of ChBcfliood, 42 
High Street, Edinburgh 
(031 225 2424). 

Burrows Toy Museum. York 
Street Bath (0225 61819). 
Museum of Chfkfiiood, 
Sudbury Hall, Sudbury, 
Derbyshire (028378 305). 
Dewsbury Museum of 
Childhood, Crow Nest Park, 
Heckmondwike Road, 


playtime contemporaries 


r. West Yorkshire 
(0924 468171). 

The Toy Museum, 42 Bridge 
Street Row, Cheater, Cheshire 
(0244 316251). 

The Toy Museum, 18a North 
Parade. Matlock Bath, 
Derbyshire (0629 56380). 

The Precinct Toy Collection, 
38 Harriet Street Sandwich, 
Kent (0843 692150). 

National Toy Museum, 
Rottingdean Grange, 

“ i, EastSu 


■fotongd 

027331 


004). 


ussex 


Arandel Toy and Mffit&iy 
Museum, 23 High Street, 
Arundel, West Sussex 
(0903 882908). 

Warwick Doll Museum, Oken's 
House Castfe Street Warwick 
(0926 495546). 

The Coventry Toy Museum, 
Whitefriars Gate, Much Park 
Street Coventry (0203 27560). 


POETS FOR AFRICA: Literary 
contribution to the Band Aid 
appeal organized by the Poetry 
Society and sponsored by a 
variety of well-known 
personalities Including Spike 
Milligan, Lord Longford, 

Melwn Bragg, Paul Eddington 
and Sean 0 Faofin. Many of 
our best contemporary poets, 
among them Alan Brownjohn. 
Wendy Cope. P. J. Kavanagh 
and Brian Patten, mil be 
reading. 

Riverside Studios, Crisp Road. 
Hammersmith. London W6 (01- 
748 3354). Tonight, 8.30pm. 
Tickets £3. 

RICHMOND: TIMES PAST: An 
exhibition about the local 
history of Richmond from the 
Stone Age to the present with 
photographs, artefacts, 
museum collections and 
•■recreations", such as a Stone 
Age meaL Particularly 


interesting are the exhibits 
describing the evolution of a 
number of sporting dubs and 
the changes in Richmond's 
architecture over the centuries. 
Orleans House Gallery, 
Riverside, Twickenham (01- 
892 0221). Until Dec 14. Tues- 
Sat 1 -4.30pm, Sun 2-4.30pm. 
Free. 

EDINBURGH ANNUAL 
WINTER ANTIQUES FAIR: Top 
quality fair, now in its 10th 
year, with specialist dealers 
from Scotland, Wales and 
England present. Free 
identification service for 
visitors bringing their own 
antiques. 

Roxburghe Hotel. Charlotte 
Square, Edinburgh 
(031 225 3921). Today iiam- 
8pm. tomorrow 11 am-5pm. 
Adult £1, children 30p. 

NOVEMBER FLOWER SHOW: 
Timely displays of evergreen 
shrubs and trees, 
chrysanthemums, orchids and 


late-crooping apples and pears 
plus a small exhibition of 
botanical paintings. RHS 
experts on hand. 

Royal Horticultural Society 
Halls, Greycoat Street and 
Vincent Square, London SW1 
(01 -834 4333). Nov 25, 1 1 am- 
7pm. Nov 26, 10am-5pm. 
Admission £1 .70 Tues, £1 
Wed. 

BLUE PETER POSTER 
COMPETITION EXHIBITION: 
More than 2,000 of the 33,000 
entries to the competition are 
on display in three age-group 
categories. The theme was 
"Giants of Land and Sea". 
Natural History Museum, 
Cromwell Road, London SW7 
(01-589 6323). Until Jan 19, 
Mon-Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 2.30- 
6pm. Free. 

CHINESE FESTIVAL OF 
KITES: Fascinating display of 
decorated kites made since the 
Cultural Revolution (when most 
of the country's antique kites 


were destroyed) by centuries- 
old techniques. 
Demonstrations of these 
traditional methods every 



Cite Art Gallery, 

Mosley Street, Manchester 
(061 236 9422). Opens today- 
Nov 30. Mon-Sat I0aro-6pm, 
Sun 2-6pm. Free. 

TECHN1QUEST: Exciting 
exhibition of some 50 
interactive exhibits - puzzles, 
mirrors, magnets, tricks with 
light - all geared to help the 
visitor to comprehend scientific 
truths. 

Techniquest, St John Street 
Cardiff (0222 395293). Today- 
Dec 23, Mon l-5pm. Tues-Sat 
1 Dam-5 pm. Admission: Mon 
free, Tues, Wed, Thurs pm, 
accompanied child free, 
otherwise adult £1 , child under 
14: 50p. 

Judy Froshaug 


Amsterdam Poster 

For a free copy of an 
attacxM poster < 


... _iour 

f on individual 

indtnivc hobdays to ibi* 
beautiful dcy. write B>— 

Time OffLnL, 
ZaChenerdoae, 
London SW1X7BQ. 


SOUTH TYROL 


An emeflem choice for Wmterspora. 
Spring, Summer and Aununn Holi- 
days- Come and see us at the Worid 
Havd Market -Ofrmpia. New. 25-29. 
Stand 6210, Grand HaD and meet 
South Tyrol Representatives. For 
mfonnanoD ft reservations, contact 


Sotsth Tyrol Representation, 

9 Reece Mews. London SW7 3HE. 
TeL- 01-584 2841 (24 hr ) or 584 7821) 





N‘ 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 




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British wine shops 


are bursting with 


bottles of the 1986 
Beaujolais, but 
. does quantity 
mean quality? 

Jane MacQmtty 
reports 

T his year's Beaujolais 
Nouveau has a lot to 
live up to. Last 
year's superb vintage 
was voted one of the 
best by merchants and drink- 
ers alike who sold and drank 
the region dry. 

Georges Dnboeuf, one of 
Beaujolais* biggest merchants, 
thought it was the finest 
wntage for 40 years, and even 
if others were a shatfe less- 
enthusiastic they still felt it 
was the best for a decade 
Everyone rushed to join the ^ 

Beaujolais bandwagon and to ***** 
date 100 million litres of 198 5 m «. 

vintage have been sold bocqnefc “* *°P fliree nines and (from left to right) The Times 1986 Beaqjolais Noirvean judges, Robin Yonng, Jane 
worldwideL 

This year the wine trade JESSf* Juicy Nouvtau »«1 Wine Ceiiais, and « Ctuad. TM» Nouveau had a 

obviously intends that the “ VOUI? • £°bm Young from The "warrant crimson punrie colour 

reflected glory of the 1985 o As the results of The Times Tl ™*-. SSavLtSSEI EiSO 

vintage will turn Beaujolais 1986 Beaujolais Nouveau test, c Despite tl* eariy start, the B53 hWB» 

Nouveau into the biggest pre- “8 published below dem- final bottles for the testing did tasters this "IfcSt vibrant ^teSandaSetiv active " 

Christmas money spinner of onstrate, my early fears not turn up until lunchtime efcoam fruity Nouveau" frvW^nd had • iSl 

aD time. A record amount of concerning overproduction due to gales m the Channel (Jhfa) both tasted and smelt of named fmit'for 

1986 vintage has been shinned ®nd neutrality have proved helicopters delayed by fog, chsmes. RY found it - 

ss?i2£tf££l& 

JO^ =f wi*s have SKS^SIS ^ 

the British wme traders have, oeenmaae. ™ route, unce again, Le rnimir rinhornhimmioremaii 

it seems; overlooked a vital 
factor: the excellence or other- 
wise of the wine in the bottle. 

My first taste of the 1986 
Nouveau was last month in 
the 0ttte village of Le Bois 
d'Oingt in the south of tire 









ir Jou, 46 PimRco 
London SW1, £2.99 


JMQ. DG: “Ught and thin”, 
but DH was keener "fruit and 
delicacy". 


1986 BenaoWs Nouveau, 

E. Loron; Chepfin & Son, 35 
Row^^o ^Woithl^ ^^ 

end Vkfler, 57 Cambridge 
Street; London SW1, ££34 
"Vibrant purple colour, 
dumb nose and medium fruity 
taste" wrote JMQ. “Jammy 
strawberry fruit” noted DG. DH 
was happier “good fruit, 
stylish finish”. 

1985 Beaujolais Primeur, 
Pierre Ponneto; Army & Navy 
Stores, £2.95 

"Medium purple-red, fresh 
fruity bouquet but dull with it" 
(JMQ). DG agreed: “fight 
Jammy neutral - not 
offensive". DH, however, 
loved this one: "subtle, very 
drinkable — reeking of 
Gam ay". 

1986 Beaufolais-Vfflages, 
Prosper Mafoux; Wizard Wine 
Warehouses, Croydon and 
Kingston upon Thames, £3.79 
"Perfumed, fruity, but a bit 
dull and watery” was JMQ's 
comment RY: 'fragile but 
acceptable”. DG “sound stable 
wine”. 

1986 Piat Beaujolais 
Nouveau; Peter Dominic, 

£249 

JMQ and DH tolerated this 
one. Their comments: "gutsy, 
ackflc" and "not bad", but 
neither RY nor DG had a good 
word to say for it 


, ■ ‘aSSSff** 1 ? ' a 

. * * v28S5^* ' 



u 


MacQtritty, David deave and Dob Hewitsoa, at the tasting 


O j — mu, ■. uni umt v-tuais, «U1U 

flavour? .. Robin Young from The 

As the results of The Times Times. 

1986 Beaqjolais Nouveau test- Despite the early start, the 


elegant fruity Nouveau” 

(JMQ) both tasted and smelt of 


been made. 


auingt in the south of the 8am task of evaluating 28 
region. By the end of the day I different 1986 Beaujolais 
had visited four growers m as Nouveaux wines blind at 
many villages and was wor- Stampers Wine Bar in Kingly 
ned. Tree, much of the wine Street, London Wl,' were Don 
had. only just ‘-finished Hewitson from the award- 
fermenting (the vintage winning Cork & Bottle wine 
started on September 18), but bar group, Master' of Wine 
where was that fresh golpable David Gleave. from The Mar- 


My advice is to taw a bottle Beaujofcus Nouveau est ar- 
or two from our mst three nve »J USL 
categories. Any other Nou- -w -r j • r* 

ara likely to V dOlCt 01 

- ,ointo? m5 *■*•'■"** the judges 


(Calais "appealing and styfish”, DG 
drivers with "sweet attractive 
a clem cheuy-ade fruit” and DH "my 
in kind of Nouveau -fuB of 
“h if flavour". 




— S5SS— -■35ZLS- 

_ Corner andBarrair limited , . 

. wawreKMNjusDiHBHnre ■ 

- Z,. . OBEUiErROWXONDONBClVSQL 
• - • memowcBi-Mnaa ■ -^Tv- ;■ 

TOXXNO-flB 5 B« 2 ICOR 3 llARC 

TREAT YOURSELF TO A 

OUTSTANDING 
BEAUJOLAIS VILLAGES NOUVEAU 1986 
FROM MARC DUDET 


TOP THREE 

1986 Robert Sanaa 
Beaujolais Nouveau; Europe 
Food & Wine, E249, 

Curzon Wine Company, 11 
Curzon Street, London W1, 
£3.59: Colchester Wine 
Warehouse, Cowdray 
Centre, Cotebester,E2. 85 
This "delicious classic 
fresh zesty raspberry- 
bananary* wine (JMQ) is 
.what Beaujolais Nouveau is ail 
about enjoyment Elegant 
and wed-made with an- 
attraefive label Monsieur 
Sarrau’s offering was also 
much enjoyed by DG: 
“attractive and nicely 

perfumed". ... - 

1986 Momtnessfri 
Beaujolais Nouveau; The Old 
Mattings Wme Shop, Long 
Melfotd, Suffolk, EZSS; • 


1986 Pasquier-Desvignes 
Beaujolais Nouveau; Robei 
ft Cooper £2.69 
A notch behind the other 
two this "light lively zingy 
zesty raspberry wine" 
(JMu) is a good ineimenstve 
example of this year s 
lighter style. 

HIGHLY 

RECOMMENDED 

1986 Georges Ouboeuf 
Beaqjolais Nouveau; 
Davisons, £2^9; Le Noz 
Rouge, 12 Brewiny Rood, 
London N7, £2.99; CuHens 
£3.75 

"Light purple colour, 
enjoyable bananary-frulty 
Nouveau with a pleasing 
lemony zingy style'' (JMQ) 
sums the wme up. RY 
found it “soft pleasant : 
drinking". DGwtth "good 
perfumed strawberry fruit" a 
DH "excellent drinking". 

1986 St Michael Do ao j o lah 
Nouveau, CelEer des 
Samsons; Marks & 

Spencer £3^0 

Miles better than last year's 

Marks & Spencer's ottering. 


ttx. 


□ Ftaa add ray v w lo yo or wfew fct nd sand mt e atm or 
your curat Sm3AL 0FFSS. (Pfeasa 

70; COM Ptiner. Conwy a Bwdm linted, tZ Hetatf Boa. . London K1V 30J. 
TtB mas aln m saS by B» tiota# or by dm mss ■ oor lour London wte stupX 

Camay & Bvrtw. 44 Canon Street, tendon B54 Tet 248 T7E0 

Conwy & Barrow. 1M Mows. London EC2M BUR Tet 638 3125 

Crew * Bktw. 190 fensagpn Pafc.toaA London Wtf Ti at 512 

Coates CaK. 45 Londcn Wafl. tendon EC2 Tet 256 5148 


\ A very special 
\ ] Christmas Day lunch 
^Jjbr very special people. 

■J ibu and your family. 

S. Tbisjwr cdebmlea Cbrislmus to 

r ) remember iritb your family and 

frienduitlbe ton on the fork, ichere 
*j (jud-irillandexoMenceare 
\ the tradition. 

\ Hervfroin noon until 3pm on 

/ Christman Day. wu trill enfiy a 
■*s. magnificent laMe d hole menu . 

O spwitilly prepared jbr the occasion fn 1 
J our (ward- ninning Ctys iritb the 

P ipirittfCbridimipiislrery 
much m mind. 

And iritblbe spirit of Christmas 
presents in mhid.Santu Claus will be 
^ there to treat e/vn child under the 

J afiptfhcehV; 

)int can share m Ibe magic t>f the 
jesliritiesfir fiist £40 per bead t buff- 
price Jar children under Hivin' I. 
including uhies throughout the meal, 
service and tax. Trufy amazing mine, 
faserre war family (aide early for 
ourCbristnuis DayHantjuelin 
Ibe Ballroom - by telephoning 
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Ferreira: (n) An ancient tradition 
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Ferreira: (n) A term used to 
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cellar. 


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This Nouveau had a 
"vtorant crimson purple colour 
plus a fresh fruity 
raspberry-redcurranty smell 
and taste” (JM(^. It was 
"elegant and quietly attractive" 
■for RV and had ‘light 
berried fruit’ for DG. 

1986 Sams taffy’s 
Beaujolais Nouveau, J. 

Bwfln; Safnsbury*s, £2£9 
"B righ t c ri m son purple 
colour, richer plummier smell 
and taste with a dean lively 
finish" (JMQ). DH felt it had 
'depth and character*. A 
good buy at the price. 

1988 Tesco B ea i j o ta is 
Nouveau, Arthur Barofet at 
Fits: Tesco. £2J>9 
Pale colour fight zesty- 
lemony fruit” (JMQ), ■fraqile 
colour, delicate" (RY), "light 
soft sweet fruit" (DG). All 
added up to what DH 
dubbed "instant Nouveau”. 

1986 Thorin Beaufeteis 
Nouveau; Peter Dominic, 

£1.99 

This wine had a "fight zesty 
cherry and banana nose 
backed up by a soft fruity 
paiate" (JMQ). A cheap and 
cheerful Nouveau for those 
who don't want to spend more 
than £2. 

RECOMMENDED 

1986 Beaujolais Primeur, 

Cel Her des Samsons, 

OddMns, E2J>8 
JMQ wasn't keen on this 
one but the rest of the panel 
was: DG “good tutor 
style", RY "sherbetty", DH 
“fruit on nose, fragrant 
finish". 


IflvH _ 

Dmnaine aes Braves, Paul 
Ctaquin; Caves de fa 
Madeleine, 301 Fulham Road, 
London SW10, £3.45; 
HMmataon Wine aub, 28 Mid- 
land Road, London NW1, 

EX45 

Blessed with a "smoky- 
fruity smell and taste" (JMQ), 
“attractive colour good 
raspberry fruit'' (RY), and 
"enjoyable, my style of 
Nouveau" (DH). 

1986 Loron Beateolaia Vil- 
lages Nouveau; Wines Galore, 
IBS, Greenwich High Road, 
London, S£10, £3^3) 

This late arrival had a 
"deep purple colour and a fight 
wefl-made fruity-cherry 
taste” (JMQ). 

ACCEPTABLE 


Nouveau, 

& Barrow, 12 Helmet Row, 
London EC1, £3£0 
“Some fruit and flavour" 
noted JMQ. DG was more 
enthusiastic: "soft easy- 
drinking cheny-ade ffurt" and 
DH fonder stfif, "depth and 


flavour — more real Beaujolais 
style". 

1986 Joseph Drouhin 

Wln^Warehwjs^ES.^^ 8 ^ 
Harrods, E425; Caves de la 
Madeleine, £4.45 
Disappointing, considering 
Drouhin's reputation. " Purple 
colour, dosed in nose, 
some fruit, acceptable, not 
exciting" was JMQ's 
verdict. DG found it "fresh but 


tacking fruit" and DH 
"sound". 

1986 Reynter Beaujolais 
Nouveau; Reynier Wine 
Lflxaries ana Bdridge 
Pope, £233 
"Medium purple colour, 
light refreshing lemony fruit but 
a shade dull” (JMQ). RY 
agreed "light, acidic, 
acceptable as did DG 
"light, soft" and DH "sound, 
reasonable”. 


OLD RUEDESHE1 M-ON-TH E-RHINE 



prey 


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EXHIBITION OF 

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J.OMX>\UIY0\R 


The Asbach Story 

It could easily be argued that Ruedcsheim is the 
gateway to that most beautiful part of the River Rhine with 
its vineyards and castles. 

What is beyond dispute is that it Is the home of that 
most sought after German Brandy -Asbach Uralt. For it / 
was here, around the turn of the century that Hugt > M 

Asbach founded his world famous distillery'. 4$ 

It takes five litres of the finest wines to pr< iducc 
one single bottle of Asbadi Uralt. What it also takes is Ljfa* 
the family skill in distilling; the maturing in BmM 

Limr uisin oak barrels: and of course the blending, 
handed d« >wn through generatioas, to create this i j jt 

soft, mcl low, golden brandy. The after dinner B||a 

brandy that isn’t just for after dinner. 

DLsewcr ir in discern i ng restau ranLS and Bia 

off licenci^, or come and see us hea* in Ruedcsheim mmm 
. from Monday to ni id day Friday f< >r a tasting. 

For liirrhcr information write u>: 

Wcinbrenncrci, Asbach & Co. 6220 Ruedeshei m am gggj 
Rhein, Ptxstfach 1 130, West Germany. 





bad) 

ralb 


ibadj 

Iralt* 


Hie Great Brandy 
from the Romantic Rhine 




” WTien you plant a vineyard,you make a marriage. 
JViine kas given me suck pleasure, I kave remained faitkful 

for sixty years. baron- phiuppl de roth* 








W HEN ir comes to undemanding die mysteries of die Vine, few can match the Baroris formidable 
reputarion. MOITON CADET is parricularlv dose to his heart. The range H vintage da ret - full 
. round and smooth. The bbmc Stt. also vintage appellation Bordeaux controlee. is dn; lk4n and fresh. Both /I & 
havc been judged worthy to bear the Barons name. Thcv are wines to come back no. Again and again. 




?«&£■■? :&§ « ?g^8S,B§'¥i5s: gaS5»3- 
















6&-74vfctoria Street 
London SW1 

The above are open Mon-Set 10-6 
Congress House 
23 Orem Russet! Sheet 

London WCI (nr Tottenham Court Road Underground) 
Open Mon-Frl 9.00 - 5.00 
230 Bshopsgale 

London ECS (nr Liverpool Street Station) 

Open Mon-Frl 9 JO - SJO 
107 Fenchurch Street 
London EC3. Open MofrFtt 10 JO - 6.00 

OPENW6 WEDNESDAY 19 NOVERIBER 


London W1 (nr the FWz) i 


Street 

pen Mon-Sal 10 JO-6 . 00 


CLEAN 

YOUR CHIMNEY 
CHEMICALLY! 

No mess mth SAFEBURN - 
Suitable for stoves, open fires 
or wood burners. Especially 
good for awKwardly shaped - 
chimneys. Non tone. 
Prices (me PAP etc): 

1 packet (3 months suppJy)- 
£7.90 2 packets- £15-00. 

Cneoues/PCs or SAE far details 
A/un Valley Trading Ltd 
Rttleworth. Sussex. RH20 1ER 
Tel: 079-882 482 



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True service tree and leaves ami heroes of wild service tree 

A service of 
rare beauty 


The wild service Sorbus 
torminalis is an uncommon 
native tree which grows deep 
within the most ancient Eng- 
lish woodlands and which 
captures the imagination of 
almost everyone who knows 
it. It occurs in every county 
south of a line from the 
Humber to Morecambe Bay 
(except for Leicestershire) but, 
despite its beauty and the feet 
that h uman beings have used 
it in Various ways far back into 
pre-history, it is not well 
known. 

An interesting and attrac- 
tive garden tree, it grows wdl 
in open conditions especially 
on heavy soils. It has the most 
beautiful leaf shape, its central 
lobes elongated and delicately 
toothed, the basal ones at a 
wide angle. Opening pale they 
turn dark and slightly glossy, 
changing richly through the 
autumn spectrum before feU- 
ing. A wild service will attain 
about 30 feet in 10 years, 
growing more slowly to ma- 
turity. It responds readily to 
coppicing (cutting back to the 
base of the trunk) and will 
regrow in a bushy form with 
multiple trunks. 

This is the time of year to 
seek out wild services, not 
only for their beauty but for 
their fruit. -They are eaten 
“bletted” — that is, when they 
have turned brown and soft, 
some while after picking. They 
taste sweet and spicy, some- 
what granular in texture. In 
the past they were widely used 
to oreour beer, and the coun- 
try name checkers or chequer 
tree is said to have given rise 
to pubs of the same name. 

As a word of warning when 
picking any wild fruit, always 
use a good guide book to 
identify trees and bushes cor- 
rectly and to make sure that 
they are safe to eat 

. Services are not difficult to 
grow from seed but germina- 
tion is greatly hastened if they 
are refrigerated in a polythene 
bag of sand and pem for 
several weeks. 

After sowing the seeds in a 
tray or drill outside, protect 
them from mice and birds. 
Seedlings should be pricked 
out into pots of John Innes 
Number Two or left in the 
ground until autumn and then 
planted to a position where 
they can grow for two or three 
years in a nursery bed before 
being transplanted to their 
permanent sites. 

A relative of the wild service 
is our rarest native tree, the 


Witty Pear { Sorbus 
Domestica). It was solely 
represented in the wild fry one 
fine okl tree which grew in the 
Wyre Forest until it was 
vandalized in 1862, but 
descendants in direct line had 
been raised from seed. (Books 
sometimes call it the true 
service but I have never heard 
it spoken of as such.) Its leaves 
are similar to those of the 
rowan and its fruits are larger 
then those of the wild service, 
more the size of a small crab 
apple but pear-shaped. 

It is rarely cultivated and 
still more rarely eaten, but the 
deepy brown service pears are 
delicious dessert fruit as at- 
tested a century ago by Mr 
Burrell, gardener to the Duch- 
ess of Albany at Claremont, 
who in November 1883 “was 
sending good fruit of the pear- 
shaped service for the table”. 
There is also a variety with 
apple-shaped fruits (the 
Pomiformis) which go through 
the most delightful colours as 
they ripen. 

One of the best places to see 
this group of the sorbus family 
is- the Oxford Botanic Garden 
where there are fine old 
domesticas, one apple and one 
pear form (a Wyre Forest 
offspring), and good wild ser- 
vice as well. 

Francesca Greenoak 

WBd service trees are 
available from Notcutts 
Nurseries, Woodbridge, 

Suffolk (0343 3600). 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Plant rad and white 
currants aid prune ac co rd i ng 
to the shape eventually 
required. 

• Tie in the (eaves of red- 
hot pokers fcnfthofla and large 
gunnera to protect the 
crowns, and if necessary 
cover with bracken or 

straw to protect them from 
hard frost 

• Put up bird tables (out of 
cat-reach) and begin to put 
out food, 

• Make sure a# dahlias 
have been fitted and stems 
cutback to 5 inches, leave 
upside down 40r a week to 
drain the stems, discard 
broken tubers and store In 
boxes in a frost-proof 
place, after dusting with 

sulphur. 

• Protect rock plants with 
glass as protection from wet 

rather than frost 

• Clean and oil tools which 
wffl be stored away for the 
winter. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 



SHOPPING 



Fairer deal 
for charity 


NEWSLINES 


by Chwcb & 
V 0 ®*"** ^7^5, sizes 5 to 14, at A 
Jones A Sons, New Bond Street^ W1 

It as the old saying goes, you can 
ten a man by his shoes, why is it 
that so many men take «oc h tittle 
care over the choice oftheirtf? 

Partly, no doubt, it is memories 
of summer holidays interrupted by 
the tedium of shopping for «Hrool 
shoes and being pampered by the 
man with the foot-measure. Many 
men now retreat in terror at the 


loafers, 


Bass Wet _ __ 
Natural Shoe Stores, 
Road, SW3; Neal Street, 


£59.95, John Moore boots, 

Eng's £95, at The Home of Beauty 

WC2 Culture, 34-36 Stamford Road, Ml 


Black patent lace-ups by Johnny Moke, 
£55, sizes 4 to 11, at Johnny Moke, 396 
King's Road, SW10 


Walk 


Brown tussle loafers £59.95, sizes 6 to 
12, summer selection at Bally, 116 New 
Bond Street, WJ, and branches 


• More than 1,000 million 
Christmas cards are sold each 
year, of which roughly a 
quarter are charity cards. But, 
according to the Clarities 
Advisory Trust as little as 8 to 
12 per cent of the purchase 
price will reach the charity 
from cards sold in some High 
Street shops since retailers 
require hefty discounts on 
cards bought in bulk. 


in style 


buying a shirt and 
tie at the xnenswear shop or 
cbainstore. His philosophy: if the 
shoe fits, wear ft. And this style win 
be the one demanded until dis- 
integration strikes again. 

Bnt there are just four simple 
lessons to be mastered before you 
are a proficient shoe buyer. Armed 
with these you should never «p»»" 
balk at enterng a shoe shop. 


Tania Robins gives a step-by-step guide to choosing fine footwear and 
specialist shoe shops, places apparently where some men fear to tread 


Style: • There are three main 
divisions to the masculine foot 
wardrobe: the w alking shoe; the 
casual shoe; and the evening 
The walking shoe is a sturdy lace- 
up. Perhaps the most common is 
the brogue or oxford. The nmniai 
shoe is characteristically the slip on 
loafer in all its forms. And the 
evening shoe is richer a patent 
leather pump ora slim-soled pa tent 
lace-up. 

Construction: The better quality 
men's shoes are made of leather — 
crocodile (Lobb do a nice pair for 
£1,700), ostrich, lizard, suede, doe- 
skin, elephant, kid — but most 
likely you’ll be buying calf Despite 
widespread use of synthetics, 
leather is still the best material fin- 
shoes because ft is porous and 
allows water to escape from the feet 


(as the average pair of feet sweat 
half a pint of water a day, this is no 
bad thing). Leather’s other chief 
advantage is its malleability. It 
moulds to the shape of the foot 
quickly and effectively, giving 
much greater comfort 

Heels and soles can be made of 
leather or synthetics. Synthetics are 
particularly effective at excluding 
water and even the best shoe* 
makers may resort to them when 
malting, fix* example, a sturdy 
country shoe. Leather heels, too, 
will often have a rubber m«t to 
reduce wear on hard city 
pavements. 

There are two principle methods 
of construction used in malting 
good quality shoes: the wetted 
method and the cemented method. 
The cemented method, tradition- 
ally employed on evening shoes 
and lighter weight casual shoes 
(both of which receive less wear), 
is, as its name suggests, where the 
upper is directly attached to the 
sole with gjiuc Cemented shoes 
tend to be less expensive; but 
cannot always be repairoLThe 
particular advantage of the welted 
shoe is its durability and 
repafrabifity. 


Fit The foot is one of the most 
irregular shapes imaginable. In 
childhood this was recognized and 
catered fin- by shoe manufacturers 
- who offered a number of different 
fittings as well as different sizes. In 
America, adub shoes are still made 
in different widths and shoe s are 
properly fitted in the shop. But 
here, even in the smartest shops. 


these services are rarely available. 

So, If you warn well-fitted shoes 
you have two alternatives: you can 
go bespoke or off-the-peg. Britain is 
famous for its high quality, hand- 
made, made-to-measure shoes. 
There are half a dozen shops in 


London which stiQ perform this 
Ltd is the most 


craft. John Lobb 

famous. But this service does not 


come cheap or fast. Shoes start at 
£624 plus VAT, and the queue for 
your first pair is around a year. 

Those las well off or in a hurry 
will have to buy off-the-peg, so it is 
important to know your feet It is 
unlikely that both your feet will be 
the same size. Fit for the laiger foot 
(usually the left) and, if you’re 
unsure of the try on a larger 


size first. Always try on both shoes. 
The aim is a snug fit not a tight 
one. Check that the back of the 
shoe is the correct height ifitistoo 
high you’ll get blisters. If it is too 
low you’ll walk out of iL 

Maintenance: The life of a pair of 
shoes depends on the type, the wear 
and the care. Welted shoes last 
much longer than cemented shoes 
(Lobb report common repairs on 
their welted shoes from 10 to 20 
years on). Shoes will last longer if 
you have more of them. 


To make sure that the 
highest possible proportion of 
the packet price — about 35 to 
55 per cent foOowing deduc- 
tion of design fees and printing 
costs - reaches your chosen 
charity, the dust advises that 
cards are purchased from 
specialist char ity Christmas 
card shops. 


When wet, allow leather shoes to 
dry out away from direct heat. 
When you’re not using them, shoes 
should be stored on shoe trees. 
These maintain the shape and 
facilitate cleaning, which should be 
done regularly with a good quality 
wax polish to keep out the wet. 



FOOTNOTES 


In soles: Manoto Blahnik, 45 Old 
Church Street, SW3, shoes from 


• Interior design trouble- 
shooters Michael Peters have 
re-vamped Dixons* Bond 
Street store which opened 
earlier this month following a 
major fire last year. With 
seven mezzanine levels, the 
store stocks a number of 
special items not on sale at 
other branches, including a 
selection of Leica cameras, top 
model hi-fi units and CD 
systems and a wider choice of 
the new fiat screen televisions. 


Forever lasts: Trickars, 67 
Jsnnyn Street London SW1 , be- 
spoke shoes from £300. John 
Lobb Ltd, 9 St James Street 
London SW1. bespoke shoes 
from £624 + VAT. James Taylor & 
Son, 4 Paddington Street 
London W1, bespoke shoes from 
£395 + VAT. 


£160. Johnny Moke, 396 King's 
' oas from 


Road, SW10, walking shoes 
£32. John Moore, House of 
Beauty and Culture, 34-35 Stamford 
Road, shoes from £60. 


Black suede ei 
at 


, £160, sizes 7 to IOV 2 , 
, SW3 


Sole survfvora: Churches, avail- 
able from A Jones & Sons, 112 
Jermyn Street SW1; 163 New 
Bond Street Wl; 143 Brampton 
Road, SW3; walking shoes from 
£95. Alan AcAfee, 5 Cork Street 
Wl ; 73 Knightsbridge, SW1, 
walking shoes from £69.90. Bally, 
116 New Bond Street Wl, and 
branches, walking shoes from 
£49.95. 


ffigh street heels: Hobbs, 47 
South Motion Street Wl, and 
branches, leather walking shoes 
from £59.99. British Shoe Company 
(subsidiaries include USey & 
Skinner, Dolds, Sax one, Freeman 
Hardy WfflBs, Roland Cartier, 
Curtess, True form, ManfieM), 
leather walking shoes from . 

£21 .99. Next for Men, 62 South 
Motor Street Wl, and 
branches, leather walking shoes 
from £2739. Bertie, South 
Moton Street Wl, and branches, 
leather walking shoes from 
£39.99. 


0 Extend personalized greet- 
ings to their fullest with a 
Gigantagram. This lSft-loug 
paper banner with huge red 
letters gives your own not-to- 
be- ignored message complete 
with hearts and flowers, birth- 
day cakes or Christmas trees 
— whatever fits the occasion. A 
Gigantagram costs £5.95 plus 
55 p postage and packing and 
orders are despatched within 
seven days by first class mail. 
Rush orders for' despatch 
within 24 hours incur £1.50 
surcharge. Tel: Malvern 
(06845) 62661. 


Nicole Swengley 


THE TIMES COOK 


Garlic for a souffle surprise 


I once cooked chicken with 40 
doves of garlic for an exces- 
sively conservative Welsh- 
man who licked fits lips, said 
chicken' had not tasted' like 
that since Tie was a boy, and 
held out his plate for more. 
This traditional dish make* 
the point that plump, fresh 
garlic cooked slowly to a mush 
loses all its alarming pun- 
gency. The flavour left behind, 
is rich and complicated and 
not necessarily immediately 
recognizable. 

So, if a garlic souffle has not. 
passed your lips, don't scoff 
make iL I had wanted to fry 
the idea ever since trading 
Jane Grigson's introduction to 
the Chez Panisse Menu Cook- 
book by the Californian res- 
taurateur Alice Waters. It 
appears in a menu for a Garlic 
Festival dinner, which may be 
taking understandable re- 
action to the blandness of 
much American food further 
than most would wish to go. 


Urn LaadMWr 



I have converted the recipe 
from the American measure- 
ments. If half cream and 
whipping cream are not to 
hand, use SOQml (I8fl oz) 
single with four tablespoons of 
double. 

GARLIC SOUFFU 
Serves six 
For tha trtchamel 


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85g (3oz) unsatod butter 


45g (1 14 oz) plain flour 


350ml p2fl oz} half cream 


250 mi( 8 floz) whipping cream 


Salt 


1 smafl onion peeled and 
quartered . 


2 to 3 doves unpeeled parte 


% teaspoon dried thyme 


4 sprigs parsley 


10 black peppercorns 


For the gaite parte 


2 large heads garlic 


About 120ml (4fl oz) oBve ofl 
About 120ml (4floz) water 


2% teaspoons dried thyme 
2 bey leaves 


To finish 


85g (3oz) freshly grated 
Gruy6re cheese 


I40g (5oz) freshly grated 
Parmesan cheese 


1 heaped tablespoon of the 
gaffe: Rurte 


garni to the bechamel, cover 
and cook slowly for about one 
hour, stirring occasionally. 

Cool the bechamel slightly 
and remove the bouquet rami 
before adding the rest of the 
souffle ingredients. 

For the gariic purfie, break 
up two heads of garlic. Put the 
gariic in a shallow baking dish 
and barely cover with the 
olive oil and water. Stir in the 
thyme and bay leaves and 
season with salt and pepper. 
Bake in a preheated cool, oven 
(140°C/275°F, gas mark 1) for 
about IVi hours, or until the 
gariic is completely tender. 
Baste the gariic often while it 
is baking. 

When the gariic is done, 
strain it from the liquid and 
puree it Stir the egg yolks into 
the btehameL Mix in the 
Gruy&re, 2oz of the Parmesan, 
and a generous tablespoon of 
the garlic puree. Season the 
mixture with salt, cayenne and 
Made pepper and blend wefl. 

Butler some gratin dishes 
(either one 12-inch oval plat- 
ter with a slight tip, or six 6- 
inch low gratin dishes) and 
coat them tightly with a tittle 
Parmesan. 

Beat the egg whites very stiff 
and fold three quarters of 
them into the cheese-garlic 
mixture: The mixture should 
be fairly loose but not runny. 


If it is runny, add more egg 
white. 

Pour the souffle gently into 
the prepared platter ^or in- 
dividual gratin dishes.'Sprin- 
kle with the remaining 

Parmesan and then with the 
rest of the thyme. 

Bake on the top shelf of a 
preheated hot oven 
(23QPC / 450PF, gas mark 8) 
for approximately 10 minutes. 
The platter allows the souffle 
to cook more quickly than in a 
conventional soufifedish and 
provides more browned crust 

The soufife in the small 
gratin dishes will cook in 
about the same time. The top 
and sides of the soufffe should 
be well-browned, the inside 
warm and creamy. 

Serve glazed onions as a 
vegetable with' any plainly 
grilled or roasted meat or 
poultry. 

GLAZED ONIONS 

Serves sor 


900g (2b) small onions 


3 tablespoons ottveoll 


120ml (4fl oz) stock 


1 tablespoon honey 


Salt and freshly ground black 
pepper 


Put the peeled onions' in a 
shallow pan with the oil and. 
stock, cover and 000 k them 
gently until they are tender. 
Uncover the pan, stir in the 
honey and a little seasoning, 
and cook on a medium heat 
until the liquid has evaporated 
to a syrupy glaze. Shake the 
pan to coat the onions on all 
sides. Serve them at once. 

Shona Crawford Poole 


Christmas caiceredpe 

Last week’s Christmas cake 
recipe contained an uninten- 
tional puzzle, with sultanas 
mentioned in the method but 
not the ingredients. The recipe 
works successfully with or 
without the half a pound of 
sultanas that went missing. 


EATING OUT 


At this time of year the 
Thames Valley grows Weakly 
appealing. The mist effects are 
subtle. The dead leaves are 
shiny as rooks. The bare 
branches afford glimpses of 
vistas that are coven in the 
fecund seasons. You to see 
grand houses, you get to see 
the shacks and railway car- 
riages that were weekend 
homes and smallholdings. It’s 
all much more exciting than in 
the summer. From the dining 
room of the Swan Hotel in 
Streatiey you can stare at your 
reflection and the mist beyond 
ft at night 

The grub in front of you will 
be inventive and gutsy: fish 
soup with chilli mayonnaise 
designed to take the top of 


Gutsy Thameside grub 
among the gravy boats 


your head off a yoghurt and 
avocado soup reminiscent of a 
farmyard — an organic, caring 
farmyard of course. Meat 
comes in macho chunks, 
though the machismo is that 
of muscled male models 
rather than of the Buenos 
Aires knife boys. 

Beef fillet, which should 
have been rarer, came with 
shallot purge, bone marrow 
and a sauce which suggested 
Bovril — the meat just about 
stood up to it Veal was less 
successful, quite vanquished 
by Madeira sauce. A souffle 
tasted of nothing in particular 
but was saved by the stew of 
berries with it 

I had expected more of the 
cheese — it is supplied by 
Patrick Ranee whose cele- 
brated shop, the most publi- 
cized village store in Britain, is 
only a couple of hundred 
yards from the hotel. As ft 
turned out only a hard goat’s 
milk cheese called Round Oak 
was beyond reproach. I drank 
a half of an old-fashioned Cote 
Rotie — old-fashioned in that 
it was London bottled by 
Berry Bros. 

Two will pay about £45 
depending on what they drink 
and on what they tip the 
waiters, who have matey ten- 
dencies. By day there may still 
be river mist but your reflec- 
tion will have been replaced 
by a stereotypical Thamescape 



of weir, gaudy Oxford barge, 
weeping willow, copper beech 
and a motor cruiser called Mi 
Amigo Nuevo. 

Mi amigo nuevo is how my 
fivc-year-old twin daughters 
consider the owner of Don 


Pepe; and so would I, had he 
persistently told me of my 
pulchritude and given me 
lollies. This is a Galician bar 
and restaurant which is also 
the unofficial dub of the 
(predominantly northern) 
Spanish community that lives 
around Edgware Road, Maida 
Hill, and Westboume Park. 

The place is bustling, noisy, 
congauaL And it's a good 
place to take children when 
the thought of kiddie-tiffin is 
more than you can counte- 
nance. Also the cooking is 
fine. The great Asturian bean 
stew called fabada which is 
prepared with morcilla (black 
pudding) and jamon serrano is 
worth the detoar. And so is the 
tripe, _ which is prepared 
according to Madrileno rather 
than Galician practice — ft is 
fiery with pimento and succu- 
lent with, again, jamon 
serrano. 


Such thing s as the tortilla, 
the pork kebab, the roasted 
peppers and the octopus stew 
are to be recommended. 
Devotees of sticky liquors are 
well looked after; if you drink 
the excellent San Miguel beer 
and eat in the tapss bar you 
will pay about £25 for two 
adults and two children. In the 
restaurant, which has a nota- 
bly good wine list, you’ll pay 
about £35 for two adults with 
big thirsts. 

Jonathan Meades 


Swan Hotel, StreatJey, 
87373 

fatly 12 
9.30pm 


Berkshire (0491 873737). Open 
daily l2£0-2pm and 7.30- 


Don Pape, 99 Frampton Street, 
Edgware Road, London NW8 
(01-2623834). Open daily 
noon-2pm and 7-1 1pm. 


Al San Vicenzo 
The Al San Vicenzo res- 
taurant, 52 Upper Mulgrave 
Road, Gieam, Surrey (01-661 
9763) is open from Monday to 
Saturday and not Tuesday to 
Sunday as we stated last week. 


1% 


Salt, cayenne and black 

pepper to taste 


Make a roux of the butter and 

flour and cook it gently for 
five to eight minutes. Mix die 
creams and scald them. Re- 
move. the roux from the brat 
and cool slightly before whisk- 
ing in the cream. Transfer the 
resulting bechamel to a double 
boiler and salt it lightly. ' 

Tie the onion, gariic, bay 
leaf, parsley, and peppercorns 
in muslin- Add the bouquet 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1 986 


THE ARTS 


Self-portrait 
of the artist 


In an advert for Alka-Sdtzer, 
Salvador Dali urges the fizzy 
pill on ns because it is a work 
of art, truly one of a kind - 
like Dali”. As Adam Low's 
ironic, intelligent portrait for 
Arena (BBC2) made dear, 
Dali’s greatest creation is 
himself: solicitor's son, sur- 
realist, confidence trickster 
with a moustache of devil's 
horns and a masterpiece of 
showmanship described by 
everyone, including himself, as 
“Dah!ee". 


TELEVISION 


Concentrating, therefore, on 
file man rather than his work. 
Low's film brought Dali to life 
as a Spanish Oscar Wilde. 
“Absolutely nothing** was his 
majestic assessment of what 
he had contributed to Art, his 
whiskers quivering above 
some permanently invisible 
smelling salts. (Withont these 
waxed appurtenances, he 
would resemble a rather af- 
fable waiter.) “Tm a very bad 
painter . . . l*m too intelligent 
to be a good painter.” Which is 
why, bristling with Satanic 
mischief be mast have been 
“so happy** (the words of his. 
epicene business manager) to 
discover an international 
racket of Dali forgeries. It 
compounded a belief, perhaps 
only hinted at, that his entire 
output was fake and that the 
world would do a damn sight 
better to fix its attention 
instead on that mribrgeable 
force, “the divine Dahlee". 

Part of Dali's 
mischiefmaking, wittily 
emphasised in die film, 
seemed to consist in the some- 
times grotesque people he 
encouraged to boy, interpret 
and manage bis work. One 
sequence showed the Ameri- 
can couple who besides owning 


a quarter of his output had 
published a Primer to explain 
his English accent Another, 
from the archive, showed some 
American hostess exhibiting 
one of the maestro's necklaces. 
“Dahiee says everything 
comes from the sky," she 
explained of die design wifo- 
oat seeming to have a due 
what she meant 
Since Dali now refuses to 
emerge from his Spanish 
home, Low had to rely on a 
□amber of archive interviews 
(among them a simply hSar- 
jtoos discussion with Malcolm 

M^geridge). This did make it 
difficult for the producer to pot 
bis own signature os a portrait 
which was good where it ought 
have been exceptionaL While 
gradually coming to under- 
stand the art through the man 
(the Dlnstration of Dab's ob- 
sessions with Millais, soft 
cheese, Vermeer and Gala, bis 
wife, being particularly well 
done), one was left frustrated 
on several occasions by both 
the film's pace and its ex- 
position. We were left with the 
impression of a talented crank 
— tme who, in his last recorded 
uttering, pronounced that “ge- 
niuses must never die”, but 
who, when asked for the secret 
of Immortality, once replied 
that it lay “definitely in the 
hibernation of maltoses”. 


Narrated by John Pitman — 
who more and more sounds 
like a tapir with sums tumble 
— Just Another Day (BBC2) 
was a quirky, affectionate look 
at Heathrow and some of its. 
45,000 staff. While the life 
depicted was unrepresentative, 
imaginatively so, of an often 
infuriating airport, it included 
some memorable portraits — 
notably of two plane spotters. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


H e looks like a handsome 
turkey with his red hair 
and a beard that changes 
from black on his sallow 
cheeks to white on his 
pointed chin. He has thick plough 
lines on his forehead and steady, 
ringed eyes, the green of a parched 
sav annah. He has been consistently 
described as Ireland's finest actor, 
yet once he was Terry Wogan’s 
came raman. His name is Tom 
Hickey and next Tuesday at the 
Almeida be stars in a piece of bold, 
experimental theatre which prom- 
ises to leave no one unmoved 
The Great Hunger , which has 
taken Dublin, Edinburgh and now 
Belfast by varying storms, is a 
conscious departure from Ireland's 
literary tradition. Adapted by Tom 
MacIntyre from Peter Kavanagb’s 
great poem, it depends for its energy 
on incantation and ritual, on gesture 
and dance rather than on verbal 
wordplay. In Hickey's portrayal of 
Maguire — a rural labourer, starved 
by religion, tradition and poverty of 
any sensual satisfaction — this 
energy has left some audiences, in 
HirWpv’s words, “confused, resent- 


Irish incantations 


Tom Hickey, reckoned to be Ireland’s best actor nowadays, arrives in 
London this weekend to star in The Great Hunger, a huge success at 
this year’s Edinburgh Festival. Interview bv Nicholas Shakespeare 


Hickey’s words, “confused, resent 
fill and totally discombobulated”. 

Midway through one perfor- 
mance, a man walked up to the stage 
to protest against “this travesty of 
religion”. His walkout was not an 
isolated incident. While pleased at 
the play's power to disturb, Hickey 
laments what he sees as a drift back 
to the period of the drama’s setting 
(the mid Forties) and a time when 
big, btuiy detectives could be seen 
lining the wall at Dublin's Pike 
Theatre, taking notes about such 
gestures as a condom tolling to the 
floor. “With the referendum on 
divorce” — he himself is separated — 
“it seemed we might be in the 
Eighties at last. It was looking good 
until someone raised the matter of 
who would then own the land. After 
the wonderful Sixties and the 
darkening Seventies, we now want 
the rale book again." This desire 
can also be seen in the theatre 
world. Until the play's extraor- 
dinary acclaim at Edinburgh this 
year “we were regarded as a bunch 
of lunatics in the basement”. 
(Hickey, MacIntyre, and the pro- 
ducer Patrick Mason collaborate in 
the Peacock Theatre underneath 
Dublin's Abbey Theatre). 

On the other side of this coin. 



where Teny Wogan read the news. 
He has -a photo — • “my mother 
tre asur es it” — of foe two of them 
•wearing identical sweaters. “The 
fast woids we spoke were in the 
RTE bar. He fold me of an offer of 
work in England. He said ‘I tnay.be 
going over.* " Hickey rolls his pale 
green eyes and laughs as if to say 
“and how”. 

He, meanwhile, had profited 
from evening drama classes and 
become an institution of his own — 
as Bepjy in The Riordans, RTFs 


long-running series about a forming 
famil y. (Such ' 


_ ly. (Such an institution, in feet, 

that be seems to bave'spent most 
weekends opening fetes on tractors 
he did not know how to drive.) 
Crucial to his development was the 
tuition of Deidre O'Connell at the 
Stanislavski Studio, and lateral The 
Focus Theatre, under whose un- 


in h R ating influence Hickey became 
atiWe 


Boy from the bog: Tom Hickey says his performance has left some audiences “totally discombobulated" 


Hickey recalls a performance at 
Tyrone Guthrie's house in Mona- 
ghan before the local community. 
“It was the nearest thing to a Mass. 
It was not d rama but ritual a full 
conversation between the players 
and the house. One girl who did 
bave difficulty with a plough se- 
quence — in which we use sheets — 
turned to the old man next to her. 
What's all that about, foe asked. Oh, 
it’s seagulls, said the old one, and 
there are crows — look at them." 

When Hickey first started re- 
hearsals for The Great Hunger in 
1 983, his own childhood returned in 


forgotten sequences. “When Ma- 
guire sits on the gate and the gate be- 
comes a horse, I suddenly imagined 
myself back in Kildare, that racey 
part of Ireland where I used to make 
stirrups out of twine, climb astride a 
wall and pretend to gallop." 

Brought up “in the bog of 
Ireland”. 20 miles from Dublin, 
Hickey’s first knowledge of die 
theatre was acting as a Mass 
servant “We had a priest obsessed 
with how many times the bell was 
rang, how to hold the chalice. From 
him I learnt that the space and time 
given to any particular gesture gives 


it its value. Now every time they 
want a perverted deric, they send 
for me.” (He dtes his film and 
television performances in Cal and 
William Trevor’s One qf Ourselves 
and, in the dark past, his part as the 
exorcist in Jeannette.) 


F or all that, Hickey was a 
late starter who began his 
working life as a lab assis- 
tant. In 1961, when RTE 
opened, he betaine a light- 
ing technician, then someone who 
moved cables out erf 1 the way and 
then a cameraman in the studio 


susceptible to Russian and Euro- 
pean traditions. After joining the 
Abbey in 1981 he met Tom 
MacIntyre, the person who after 
O’Connell has most affected his 
acting. He it was who approached 
Hickey with the part of Maguire. 

Once again he tries to describe the 
play. “It addresses spiritual depriva- 
tion, violation, the overpowering 

relatio nship of the mother with the 
Irish male, the timidity of foe Irish 
mate — of any mate — with women, 
and the complicated influence of the 
church among all these strands.” He 
stresses that it is only one of three 
plays in which he, MacIntyre and 
Mason have collaborated; a cyde 
which has given rise to the ex- 
pression The Hurt Mind. Implicit in 
this sobriquet is the suggestion of a 
new movement. “The Hurt Mind is 
our national, self-induced 
paranoia,” explains Hickey in tones 
of mounting lyricism. “The tension 
between whai is beautifully avail- 
able to us through our imagination, 
our dreams, our appetite for mys- 
tery — and what is then taken down 
by savagery.” He raises his 
scarecrow’s bead to the ceiling. 
“The danger is the more you talk 
about it the more you take away 
from it" Staring upwards, the 
furrows deepen on his forehead. 
“That’s all rubbish what I’ve said. 
We just aim to disturb and entertain 
through magic spells and 
incanta ti ons." Our Tel had better 
watch out 


An uncharted talent 



As Richard Thompson's latest 
album Dangerous Adventures 
fades into obscurity after a 
stunning one-week stand at 
number 92, the question of 
why such a gifted performer 
should not be more commer- 
cially successful goes begging 
yet a gain. 

It is tree that these days be 
-looks more than ever like that 
seedy chap in George and 
Mildred, bn t lack of a glam- 
orous rock star image has not 
deprived Mark Knopfler of 
wall-to-wall platinum albums, 
and Thompson is a singer, 
song writer and guitarist at 
least as gifted as the leader of 
Dire Straits. 


ROCK 


Richard 

Thompson 

Hammersmith 

Palais 


The answer became appar- 
ent during a version of “Great 
Ball of Fire", the final encore 
of an expansive, two-and-*- 
haff-hour set Thompson had 
dearly been enjoying himself 
bringing on old friends Htg 


_ Thompson to play 
upright bass on the Ndlle 
Letcher barrefliOBse bines 
“He's a Real Gone Guy", and 
generously giving the floor to 
Pete Thomas, one of two 
gaestmg saxophonists, fin- a 
witlessfy camp rendition of 
Cab Calloway’s “Mhutie foe 
Moocher”. 


But such relaxed bonhomie, 
the “good time" factor that 
counts for so much in wooing a 
wider audience, is simply not 
Ids forte, and the sttfi^ rat- 
gainly version of Jerry Lee 


Lewis’s barnstormer, complete 
with John Kirkpatrick’s in- 
appropriate accordian solo, 
was a patently unsuitable ve- 
hicle for Thompson's talent 

In contrast, his genius was 
radiant daring the tong extem- 
porized cosdashm of “Calvary 
Cross”, his fingers damp in g 
down with a rapid vibrato rtiat 
released coiled duste rs of 
notes like strapping baited 
wire. The shrill fhanting rtiar 
overlaid the folk-funk hybrid 
“A B one Through Her Nose" 
with its mordant unforgiving 
humour, and the roller coaster 
motion of foe despairing 
“WaD of Death”, were no less 
compelling. 

In such bleak intensity lies 
the crnel beauty of 
Thompson’s music; it is an 
equation that has always 
yielded long odds on chart 
success. 


David Sinclair 


CONCERTS 


BBCSO/Wand 

Festival Hall 


TWO FREE COMPACT DISCS 

WHEN YOU TAKE AN OLD VINYL RECORD INTO RUMBELOWS 
AND BUYA NEW COMPACT DISC PLAYER OR SYSTEM. 


Come into Rumbelows and buy a new C.D. player or system, you 
can order a free compact dec, from a choice of Stop cities, because we’ll 
gne you Free Membership of a national CD. mailorder dub. 

Then you choose a further free disc once you've purchased A from 
the club catalogue. 


Well also tdl you what's what, which one and how much. AH the 
expert advice youll ever need (and then some) and a great range of C.D. 
equipment by all the top names at guaranteed lowest prices. Rumbled 
where? Rumbelows. 



The trouble with Gunter 
Wand is foe profound dis- 
satisfaction he makes one feel 
with the work of lesser 
conducting mortals who have 
neither seen so much nor lived 
so long. And if such compari- 
son is odious, then 1 can only 
say that it is hard, very hand, 
to settle for less than the 
clarity and depth of under- 
standing with which Beetho- 
ven and Bruckner were 
recreated last night 
The Beethoven was his First 
and, in many ways, his most 
difficult symphony. To bring 
incisiveness out of its com- 
pression without a hint of 
aggression; to Wot out the 
memory of later Beethoven, 
and listen, as it were, over 
Haydn's shoulder; to know 
how slowly to pace an allegro 
moho to release its vivace: 
these are the questions which 
Wand is able to answer. 

Bruckner’s Ninth, last and 
unfinished symphony, can 
only, perhaps, be adequately 
performed by a conductor 
with Wand’s confidence and 
imagination in relating the 
part to the whole. 

One could write about the 
mobile balance of string parts 
in the first movement's first 
slow melodic arc; one could 
note the unusually rich 
variegation of brass playing. 
But what really counts is 
Wand’s ability to merge the 
motivation of dynamics, 
tempo and orchestration into 
one long-sighted purpose. The 
feet that the usual audience 
ripple effect at points of 
release seemed, for once, to- 
tally absent was a telling 
comment on Wand's 
achievement 

Climaxes were never treated 
as mere marker points; time 
suspended — and Wand fre- 
quently chose to hold it at a 
long, slow distance — was 
□ever time lost Instead there 
was a recreative tension which 
shifted only in kind, not in 
degree, and which made the 
symphony’s last winding 
down seem the only possible 
outcome of its opening. 

Hilary Finch 


Sterile laugh 
at infertility- 


THEATRE 


Dob Conway 


Ashes 

Bush 




Infertility is no laughing mat- 
ter, and neither is David 
Rudkin's quasi-comedy, re- 
ceiving here its first revival in 
London for 10 years. Its theme 
will no doubt appeal to the 
women of the Pill generation 
who spent the first decade of 
adulthood desperately avoid- 
ing, or terminating, preg- 
nancy, and the second decade 
striving with equal despera- 
tion to reproduce. 

Colin and Anne are a pair of 
teachers approaching middle 
age whose efforts to conceive 
have lasted a long two years. 
Most of the first half consists 



Raising tbe temperature: 
Sbefla Gish in Ashes 


of short scenes which recapitu- 
if I 


late their experience of the 
medical recourses available to 
such couples. 

Colin is obliged to mastur- 
bate into a diminutive gin« 
tube and Anne has to supply 
their doctor with post-coital 
swabs for the purpose of 


determining her aridity. Vir- 
ecl of ] 


tually every aspect of their 
lives — diet, clothing, personal 
hygiene, sexual intercourse - 
is regulated, and inevitably 
they feel increasingly taken 
over by prescription and 
proscription. 

One appreciates Mr Rud- 
kin's satire of presumptuous 
experts, and one acknowl- 
edges also the truth of his 
observation, but these re- 
search-happy passages pander 
to the audience’s desire to 
view procreation in human 
rather than scientific terms, 
and the result is, in a word, 
sterile. 

More damagingty. there is 
no attempt to delineate the 
chief protagonists as individ- 
uals; we never really know 
why they want a baby in the 
first place. When Anne does 
finally conceive — an event 
signalled by the triumphal 
descent from the ceiling of a 
urine sample in a brass dish — 


low 

the 

for 

in 


the piece jerks into a sober 
gear, and the ensuing, ul- 
timately disastrous pregnancy 
might just as well concern two 
entirely different people. 

Colin encapsulates a pair of 
mutually antagonistic im- 
pulses: on the one hand, a 
homosexual tendency, which 
he initially fancies mig ht 
contribute towards his ’ — 
fertility potential; on 
other, a lingering desire 
acceptance by his family 
Northern Ireland. 

At this remove, it certainly 
looks as though Mr Rudkin 
was gening two topical in- 
terests for the price of one, and 
Colin s later monologues on 
the Troubles, in which he 
expresses his sense of sev- 
front his inheritance 
and bis succession, flounder 
for a point of attachment to 
tne mam thrust of the play. 

Rob Walker’s crisp produc- 
tion is a mode! of intelligent 
pacing and economical staa- 
^Performance 
of Sheila Gish and Denis 

mUkHJ? P^teWy pack 
this horribly cramped theatre 
itnnl the end of the ran. Sally 
Watte and Richard Kane mop 
up the subsidiary roles with 
distinction, and Peter Avery's 
design manages to be 
clinical and inventive. 


both 


^tin Cropper 






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ll* i* 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NO Y 


a^i: a 


3. 22 1986 



REVIEW 


Drawn by a life of | The qM bull and Bush 


ritual self-sacrifice 


PAPERBACKS 


Against AK Reason by 

Geoffrey Moorho use 
(Spectre, £4.98) 


Tbe 

easy- 


monastic life is never 


Every day one or other of the 
brethren was led into choir 
with a rope round his neck, 
was spat upon and walked 
over by the rest of the 


* 


community as he lay pros- 
e in the 


trate ut the sanctuary, and 
had to beg for his food until it 

was another person's turn the 

next day. 


a Charles de Foucaold was a 
pioneer of the latter sort, a 
Gallic Byron of the religious 
worid in the late 19th century, 
who at 23— “a dashing rake of 
a crack regiment” — was 
cashiered for keeping a mis- 
tress. Rom such improbable 
materia] emerged a imwi with 
a “craving for self- 
abnegation”, who settled qui- 
etly in the Sahara Desert 
among the Tuaregs, wearing a 
white habit with a red heart 
sewn on. Foucaold built a 
mud chapel, taught tbem- to . | 
knit and grow vegetables. , \ 
Fifteen years on he was casu- 
ally shot by a band of p™ng 
tribesmen. 

He had no disciples, but his 1 
writing — describing his piin- 


ROCK RECORDS 


Kate Bosh The Whole Story 
(EMIKBTV1A) 

Wwcfci e M Utter M ad neoa 

: JZLP2J 


Veribue ArSete Conspiracy of 
Hope (Mercury MERH 99) 
SupertrarapThe 
Autobiography of Supertramp 
(A&MTrampI) 

Various Artists Hip Hop 
Electro 15 street Sounds 
ELCST15) 


“We never allowed ourselves 

to think,” recalled Father __ _ 

Ignatius of his community, dole ofembracingfoe lifestyle 
whose principles were scarcely of those in need - led to 
hedonistic. imitations such as the Little 

Geoffrey Moorhouse 


long and hard in Against AH 
Reason , pondering the 
monastery’s history and para- 
doxical appeal with a critical 
eye. And with scrupulous 
sympathy. He surveys the 
religious life in all its forms; 
monks, friars, nuns, brothers, 
sisters — those who live in 
communities and vow to hve 
in poverty, chastity, and 
obedience (one and a quarter 
million people today). 

A central question intrigues 
him. Exclusion or participa- 
tion. Traditional monasticism 
meant a life remote from the 
world’s business. Another 
kind follows Christ’s injunc- 
tion to mix with the lost sheep. 


Brothers and Sisters of Jesus. 
(One such fraternity works 
locally today in Leeds, living 
in a small house with the attic 
as their chapel). Foucaukfs 
initiative out in the wilderness 
helped spawn a counter-tra- 
dition to monastic insularity, 
that of participation. 

Against AU Reason is a 
scholarly, dense, yet readable 
book that covers a huge 
amount of ground. The author 
wears his teaming lightly. He 
describes a fascinating variety 
of existences, mostly remote 
from the average conception 
of a fulfilled life. 


Ch ri stmas is coming and Che 
charts are already staffed faD 
fif compfiatiens, confirming a 
familiar patten of music- 
business marketing strategy. 
Of last week’s top 10 albums, 
no fewer titan five were 
“Greatest Hits” or collections 
of previoBs releases. - 

Like the rest of as, record 
companies and rock stars are 
not averse to tnj money 
tor little or no work, bat this 
suffocating legacy of repack- 
aged recordings MgfcHghK a 
depressing long-term trend to- 
wards ossffication- Cnrreatiy 
Queen Greatest Hits is still in 
the top 50 after 3% years. 

But on a more prosaic level, 
compilations offer good value 
for money (all the “best” 
songs) and, if released at the 
right moment, may draw the 
awkwardly-shaped baggage of 
a lengthy pop career into a tidy 



Perfect packaging: Kate Bush releases a collection of rin g tes, from debut to current hit 


Kathy 

O’Shaaghnessy 


Crime and passion 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


A Taste for Death 

P.D. James (Faber, 

This is a typically 
detective story. It is not 


95) 

English 


exactly in the country house 
tradition, as it is set chiefly in 
Harrow 


No rang Hill and 
Road, but it hinges on wealth 
and class, and the detective is 
cool in the manner ofMargery 
Allingham’s Campion. As .a 
thriller it is rather dnlL We are 
never in doubt about tbe 
villain — the satisfaction 
conies from watching die 
detective find his way to a 
solution which is made pretty 
dear from the start 


The Hard Life by Flarm 
O'Brien (Grafton, £4.95) 

This is traditional Irish com- 
edy. Harm O’Brien is in- 
ventive, his storytelling is 
swift and sure,' making the 
eccentric seem natural and the' 
commonplace hilarious. “Mr 
Collopy presides over his 
house in Dublin, drinking, 
whiskey and dismissing the 
state of the worid. and the 
Catholic view of it, almost as 
if he were in charge of the 
Church’s policy himself 
He revels in circular argu- 
ment, in extravagant state- 
ment. His whole tire, in fact, is 
a celebration of the gloiy of 
talk. Tbe whole novel is tike a 
sort of party — a boisterous 
one at which a tot of Irishmen 
meet fortuitously and rejoice 
in their wiL 

The Black House by Paul 
Theroux (Penguin, £2.50) 

Even DorsA village life may 


have its witchcraft. As Dr 
Monday and his wife return 
from their life in Uganda they 
look forward to - the cosy 
welcome of a rented cottage, 
set in gentle hills and gentle 
weather and near a nice 
English pub. It is not to be. 
The pub is not welcoming; the 
people are quarrelsome and 
the cottage is a bleak house fun 
of indefinable tenors. 

Paul Theroux conveys ex- 
actly the sense of subdued 
threat and insult that belongs 
to village life at its most 
insular. Hebmlds up a story of 
real tenor from the simplest 
elements of ordinary life, and 
describes the discord between 
man and wife that grows from 
unease into lingering honor. 


Thus it Is with Kate Bush, 
otiose album Tbe Whole Story 
notify encapsulates her 12 
best single reteaseymrinding 
die current bit “Experiment 
IV”. 

When “Wathering 
[eights” soared with such 
ease to No 1 ia the spring of 
1978, many observers either 
imaginpd or hoped that the 
success of the panting 19-year- 
old sir] with the caterwauling 
style and preposterous 
dance routines would be a 
short-fired novelty. But de- 
spite some of her not off- 


masmerisms — the 
habyisk gnrgfmg in “Army 
Dreamers” and the strident 
screeching in “Sat in your 
Lap” — she has developed as a 
writer and perforator of some 
. depth. Despite the big produc- 
tion job, “Wow” demonstrated 
a pfeasmg sense of irony whQe 
“Qoudbusting” and “Running 
Up That Hifl” revealed an 
increasingly sophisticated 
sense of rhythm, melody and 
narrative awareness. 

Utter Madness is tiie second 
insdalment of hits by the nutty 
lads from North London, 
following 1982’s Complete 
Madness, and what is tbe 
betting that even now some 
executive is looking ahead to 
an eventual double album 


which wQI be a complete and 
utter collection of repackaged, 
re-released, re-releases? 

By the time of “Driving in 
my Car” and “Our House”, 
which is where this album 
picks up the story. Madness 
had established themselves as 
the superficially happy-go- 
Incfcy pop band who neverthe- 
less drew on an underlying air 
of vandevOliaa melancholy in 
their wittily observed vi- 
gnettes. “Tomorrow's (Jest 
another Day)”, “Yesterday’s 
Man” and “The Sun and the 
Rain” had a downside that 
belied the group’s crazy antics 
in their videos. The ingenious 
horn arrangements and 
Suggs’s deadpan vocal deliv- 
ery were their strangest cards. 


and numbers like “Wings of a 
Dove”, “Unde Sam” and the 
ineffable “Michael Caine” are 
proud mementoes of an 
extraordinary career. 

With The Autobigraphy of 
Supertramp the going gets 
considerably tougher. The 
band, who had a handtol of 
hits in the 1970s - “The 
Logical Song”, “Dreamer” 
and “Breakfast in America” — 
notable tor the infu riating ly 
wooden style of their pianist 
and Roger Hodgson’s emas- 
culated vocals, are still to- 
gether. But raking over this 
Old stuff, together with minor 
embarrassments like “Bloody 
Well Right” and “It’s Ranting 
Again”, puts the finger on a 
musical poise that should have 


expired 10 years ago. 

in tiie two years store Band 
Aid, the charity compilation 
has become a firmly estab- 
lished variant of tbe format, 
and Conspiracy of Hope is not 
bad of its ldnd. Released to 
celebrate tbe 25th anniversary 
of tbe founding of Amnesty 
International, songs Hke Paul 
McCartney’s “Pipes of 
Peace”, Peter Gabriel’s 
“BBra” and Dire Straits 
“Brothers in Anns” art 
grouped around a strong 
theme, jarred oaly by tiie 
curious inclusion of Howard 
Jones’s “No One is to Blame”. 
Only Sting has contri b uted a 
new song, a version of Billie 
Holiday’s “Strange Fruit” 

. with a vocal performance that 
must have threatened to blow 
tbe top off the microphone, 
and there are strong contribu- 
tions from Bryan Adams 
(“Tonight”), Steve Winwood 
(“Higher Love”) and Simple 
Minds (“Ghostdanring”). 

But where the compfiathm 
becomes an art form in its own 
right is in tbe marketing of hip 
hop. So for, few hip Imp acts 
have even made an album, and 
their singles, mostly imports, 
arrive in unreliable dribs and 
drabs. Thus, compilations are 
the best means of access to 
these vibrant new sounds, and 
Hip Hop Electro 15 is worth 
baying for Duke Bootee’s 
extraordinary “Broadway” 
rap alone. Bootee, the man 
who actually performed the 
vocals on Grandmaster 
Flash’s “The Message”, 
romps down New Yolk’s most 
famous street, describing some 
of tiie less widely advertised 
nightlife three, while a bass 
and drum track larch behind 
with confident splendour. 
Kurds Blow «toHawn» his OWH 
message on “The Bronx” and 
Faze One provides the albnm’s 
most apposite tide, “layin’ 
Down a Beat”. 


David Sinclair 


JAZZ RECORDS 


Gene Harris Trio Plus One 
(Concord Jazz CJ-30S) 


Fireworks 

display 


John 


In Another i 
Bayteyi 

This is John Bayba's only 
novel so far. It was first 
published in 1955; and. it 
explores the atmosphere of 
that extraonfinaiy period after 
the Second World war, when 
people in Europe were strug- 
gling to resume normal peace- 
time lifestyles, and to sort out 
tiie postwar-mess. The actual 
events of the story now seem 
rather remote, , because that 
brief and fidgety period be- 
tween war and peace set up 
tensions, that are now. no 
longer meaningful; but ibis 
hardly detracts from the 
noveTs power. As as illustra- 
tion of the ways in which 
conduct their dealings 
perceive their relation- 
ships with each other, this is a 
rare work of art 


Anne Barnes 


Critics paid scant attention to 
the American pianist Gene 
Harris in the Sixties, when he 
was a member of a mildly 
successful trio called the Three 
Sounds. Clearly designed as 
the Blue Note label's response 
to Oscar Peterson and Ramsey 
Lewis, Harris’s little ensemble 
looked out of place among tbe 
roster of grants on the 
company’s books. Even when 
they jomed the tenor saxo- 
phonist Stanley Turrentine for 
an album. Blue Hour , that 25 
years later sounds like a 
classic, they were denied seri- 
ous consideration. 

Yet Harris, now in his 
middle fifties, may soon be in 
receipt of serious critical 
recognition for the first time 
in his career. A few months 
ago, he played a notable 
supporting role in a satisfying 
album by Benny Carter, now 
he reunites with Turren tine's 
tenor saxophone for The Gene 
Harris Trio Fins One, which 
is nothing sort of a revelation. 

Recorded live at a New 
York dub, the album begins 



Authority: Stanley Turrentine 
audaciously by fading up with 
Harris and his rhythm section 
mates, the great bassist Ray 
Brown and tbe drummer 
Mickey Roker, already locked 
into the irresistible strutting 
groove of the inappropriately 
titled “Gene’s Lament”. 
When Turrentine joins in, it is 
with the supreme authority 
that persuades^ me of his 
current pre-eminence among 


(enorists: one minute he is 
nuzzling that warm tone up to 
your cheek, the next he is 
delivering a cuff around the 
ears with blues phrases of 
devastating directness. A ro- 
mantic balladeer on “Misty” 
and a rigorous bebopper on 
“Yours Is My Heart Alone”, 
he too deserves to be rescued 
from the disapproval created 
by a mid-career flirtation with 
the pop charts. 

If Turrentine responds well 
to the good-humoured at- 
mosphere of the session, Har- 
ris is absolutely galvanized. A 
tremendous display of pianis- 
tic fireworks Teaches its climax 
in his solo introduction to 
“Battle Hymn of the 
Republic” where he uses ra- 
bato gospel phrases to build 
such exquisite tension that 
one quite expects Aretha 
Franklin to come wailing out 
of the wings. And when Har- 
ris, Brown and Roker mesh 
together on the bassist’s “Up- 
town Sop” a blues whose 24- 
bar structure gives it a long- 
legged cowpoke lope, one can 
only be thankful that the three 
of them will be arriving at 
Ronnie Scott’s Club on Mon- 
day for what is certain to be a 
memorable season. 


CLASSICAL 

RECORDS 


Messiaen: Piano works vol 2 
HiH/Unicom-Kanchana DKP 
9051 (black disc) 

Reger: Bach Var ia tions; 
lie Sonata no 50 Sedan 
ilM 39562 (black disc) 


Zest for 
rhythm 


Peter Hill's cycle of the 
Messiaen piano works looks 
set to become as much a 
classic of dedicated virtuosity 
as Jennifer Bate's display of 
tbe OT^an works for the same 
recording company. There is a 
similar zest in exactness, a 
keen edge that makes the 
rhythms much more incisive 

than merhanira^ and that 

polishes up the colours with 
unerring precision. 


Canieyodjayd and the Quaere 
etiides de rythme , both dating 
from 1949-50, when 
Messiaen's music -was at its 
most abstract and speculative. 
As Hill shows, however, even 
the most elaborate construc- 


tions are vital sounding ideas. 


ng ii 

Tbe performance of the four 


studies is particularly remark- 
able in showing how the pieces 
cohere, as two vigorous 
dances separated by a slowly 
rotating doud of atomic frag- 
ments (“Mode de valeure”) 
and a new coalescence 
(“Neumes rythmiques”). 


Richard Williams 


In this respect Hill’s 
partnership with his 
BOsendorfer is as complete as 
Bate's with the organ at Beau- 
vais: he uses its powerful, 
clear-speaking bass and its 
smooth or resilient upper 
textures as so many stops. And 
this is the essence of perform- 
ing Messiaen, to conceive the 
piano as a storehouse of many 
separate treasures, not as a 
legato instrument 
The main works here are 


Pianist and music are again 
well matched in Rudolf 
Serkin’s recording of Reger’s 
Variations and Fugue on a 
Theme by Bach. The piece is a 
monumental enterprise in 
identification with tbe past, 
conveying as much regret as 
reverence, as much loneliness 
as power. For Serkin’s dis- 
passionate command one can 
overlook the odd mistakes 
and vocal self- 
encouragements. 


Paul Griffiths 




Cool jazz with a cool drink in the 
Burlington Bar from the keyboard of 
James McKissic the celebrated 
American pianist 

Savour tea in the lounge to the 
delicate strains of the harp with 
resident harpist Katherine White. 

Enjoy sweet violin and piano 
melodies with Eduardo Gallardo and 
Adolph Ziros overyour gourmet meal in 
the Oak Room restaurant .. . 

La rousique at Le Meridieo. 




The very soul of France in the very heart of London. 

J ISC. IV.*, ADU 


lie Vv.lv ” — ' 


BRIDGE 


At the bridge table, the old 
saying nil desperandum has a 
particular application for the 
defence'. The emphasis 
changes only when playing 
Pairs, where overtricks as- 
sume an exaggerated im- 
portance. The following from 
tbe British Bridge League 
Trials demonstrates that, at 
Teams, almost any far-fetched 


♦ AQ10653 
O J7 

O K94 

♦ 72 


♦ K874 

•57 102 
O J 1032 

♦ aq a 


N 

W E 

s 


♦ J2 
<798642 
O A 7 6 

♦ J 94 


Declarer took the diamond 
in hand with the OQ and 
played the 49. West contrib- 
uted an unhelpful 44, and 
East was permitted to win 
with the 4J. 


♦ 9 

V AKQS 

O 085 

♦ K 106 S3 


W 


N 


of- the concession of over- 
tricks. It is a lesson that even 
experienced players some- 
times forget 

BBL Trials. Love all 
Dealer North 

East won with foe Ace of 
diamonds and returned a 
diamond. Looking at all fonr 


No 

NO 


to 

to 

No 


No 

NO 

No 


to 

3NT 


Op wring ted 03 
hands it is easy to see that a 
dub switch would have been 
tbe killer. But in East-West’s 
lead style the 03 could have 
been from a good five card 
suit. 


Jumping to the conclusion 
that South initially held two 
spades, East turned his mind 
to saving overtricks. His 
heart switch proved more 
popular with South than 
West Of course, had he 
switched to clubs, foe con- 
tract would have gone two 
down, and even a pedestrian 
diamond continuation would 
have been good enough. 

Perhaps West’s failure to 
signal could be dubbed con- 


tributory negligence. But ii 
East had visualized foe spade 
position, he should have 
realized that South must hold 
foe AKQx of hearts to 
explain his play of foe spade 
suit. 

Jeremy Flint 



THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 


Right song 
and dance 


Discordant notes are expected 
at a stormy AGM of the 
English Folk Song and Dance 
Society today. Battle lines 
have been drawn following a 
proposal by the national exec- 
utive to sell or redevelop its 
headquarters, Cecil Sharp 
House, to pay off debts of 
around £50,000. Director Jim 
Lloyd tells me the 1930s 
building is obsolete, costly to 
run and no longer fulfil tbe 
society’s needs. 

Not so, argues a growing 
opposition group anxious to 
preserve foe building, which 
houses the Vaughan williams 
library. Since being formed 
last month, it has recruited 
800 members and raised al- 
most £8,000 for a last-ditch 
rescue bid. Lloyd says the 
NEC may be forced to resign if 
its motion is defeated. 


Stop at red 


The self-styled Smallest The- 
atre in the World is the latest 
victim of foe Chernobyl 
disaster. The three-member 
group, presently rehearsing for 
Cinderella at foe Albany Em- 
pire, south-east London, op- 
erates from a 650gc Russian 
motor cycle. Unfortunately, 
foe marhina has ground tO a 
halt due to lack ofspare parts, 
and the factory that malms 
them appears to have dosed. 
Guess where it was? 


The final bite 


Time is running out for foe 
National Portrait Gallery’s 
bid to acquire the adjacent 
former dental hospital in 
Leicester Square to display its 
growing collection of 20th- 
century pain fing; and photo- 
graphs. Chairman Lord 
Kenyon, supported by Royal 
Academy president Roger de 
Gray, has been lobbying Gov- 
ernment “at foe highest level” 
to provide foe necessary 
funds, but without success. 
The deadline for foe transfer 



de Gray and Kenyon 
of the six-storey building is 
next Friday, after which it win 
go on the market, 

I am told private arts spon- 
sors may be found to trans- 
form foe property, but are 
unwilling to fund its transfer 
from one Government depart- 
ment to another. The NPCs 
space shortage is said to be 
acute, seriously compromising 
its commissioning of new 
works of contemporary art. If 
the deal falls through, srand by 
for a gnashing of teeth . . . 


• There is not much 
Christmas spirit among the 
ITV unions. Harry 
Secombe spent three months 
preparing to broadcast a 


from foe troubled Holy 
Land, io a special Christmas 
edition of Highway. But 
tbe trip was calkd off by a 
imtiMi panning dispute. 
Royal David’s dty tins year 
wiD be Loedon. 


Smalls talk 


Queen Victoria would prob- 
ably not be amused by an 
exhibition of holography 
planned by the V & A in 
January. Entitled The Body in 
Question: Knickers and Stock- 
ings, it features three-dimen- 
sional projections of ladies’ 
underwear. . . see-through, of 

Gavin Bell 


CHESS 


After his defeat in foe world 
title match, Karpov bravely 
resolved to plunge at once 
into foe thick of tournament 
fray. The traditional tourna- 
ment at Tilburg in Holland, 
sponsored by foe Interpolis 
insurance group, posed a 
severe challenge 
Karpov has always been 
remarkably successful when 
he has competed at Tilburg, 
but this year the line-up was 
exceptionally formidable. 
The nature of the test was 
heightened by the fed that 
each player would have to 
face his rivals twice. 

As it was, Karpov’s bold 
bid to regain his prestige and 
restore his shattered confi- 
dence went badly awry. The 
former champion succeeded 
in winning only two games 
from H and finished third 
This result does not augur 



White needs to regroup this 
Knight for his Queen's side 
offensive, but now the Black 
Knight can seize an aggres- 
sive post at h4, permanently 


menacm^White’sJKin^ 


ABCDEF6H 
Board after white’s 31st move 


The Black forces gather 

around White’s monarch. 

2i na Her aura m 

23 Ml gS M Ratf bB 
25B57 

Overlooking Black's threat. 
He must play 25 f4! followed 
to safeguard his King. 


^Qf2 


well for Karpov’s qualifying 
jkofov next 


White: Karpov. Black: 

Beliavsky. 

November 1986, Queen’s 
Gambit Declined. 

1 44- 4E 1 o4 «C 

3 «c3 m 4 CSdB teS 

6 BQS 

The Exchange Variation, con- 
sidered so strong at worid 
title level that Karpov and 
Kasparov both tried to avoid 
it wiih 3.~ Be7. 

B _ M7 6 *3 C6 

7 MS NM7 S NO 


Scattering the fortifications 
und wh 


around whites King. 

26 K*e2 M 27 taefi lute 
2Bfn3 tote aims Qte 
30 0*7 Bxb7 SI OcS 


See diagram 

Now Black carries out the 
executioner’s stroke. 

“ 32 Qk5 


ji - 


match with Sokol 
year, but in my view Karpov 
must still i be foe ' clear 
favourite. Karpov’s one loss 
at Tilburg was to his compa- 
triot,. the ferocious Alexander 
Beliavsky. 


Perhaps more dangerous is 8 
Nge2 followed by Qc2 and 0- 


<W. 


10 Qe2 
12 W 

14 d 

11 Rfcf 
■Mite 


0-0 

m 


0*7 


B 041 
ii Id 

■a 
is 

17 . 

is ruz 


If 32 dxc5 d4 discovered 
check wins. 

32 m* finis 33 Qc3 Qt2+ 

WKfll NM 35 Ml Katf 

The final indignity. If 36 
Rxe2 Nxe2+ 

36 Pttrt NfaS 

White resigns 

One of the worst defeats of 
Karpov's career. 

Raymond Keene 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 1 1 3 


Prizes of foe New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday. November 27, 1986. Entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition, I B enning ton Street. London, El 9XN. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, November 29. 1986. 


ACROSS 

] Shampoo packet (6) 
4 Shrewd (6) 

7 Race programme (4) 

8 Vioknl change (8) 

9 Gulag archipelago 

author (121 

15 Hindu natural law 
(6) 

16 High ground (6) 

17 Dressing mirror (7 J) 

23 Choke (8) 

24 Duty register (4) 

25 Rework (6) 

26 Wretchedness (6) 


DOWN 

! Hit with force (4) 

2 Black diamond (9) 

3 Durable (5) 

4 Pallid (5) 

5 Characteristic feature 
IS) 

6 Sycophant (5) 

ID Animated corpse (5) 

11 Push forward (5) 

12 Steatite (9) 

13 Branch junction (4) 

14 Worshipped object 
14} 

18 Yellow orange (3) 

19 Swedish money unit 
(5) 

20 Nick (5) 

21 Small beam (5) 

22 Risque (4) 





■ a 



SOLUTION TO NO 1 1 12 
ACROSS: 1 Herald 4 Hassle 7 Muff 8 
Vermouth 9 Outrank 11 Donor 12 
Knickerbocker 15 Cache 16 Speed up 20 
Resonant 21 Deed 22 Target 23 Hardly 
DOWN: 1 Hammock 2 Refit 3 Divan 4 
Hire 5 Sputnik 6 Ether 10 Ankle 11 
Drone 13 Incisor 14 Rapidly J5 
Carat 17 Pitch 18 Dread 19Gait 


The winners of prize concise No / 107 are 
Mrs BE. WiUts, Columbus Ravine. Scar- 
borough. North Yorkshire: and JA. Gammon. 
Anselm Avenue. Bury St. Edmunds. Suffolk. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1 1071 

ACROSS: lSaffira$ene 9 Hotfoot lOGlatir 11 Ore 13 Malt 16 
Kith 17 Isobar if None 20 Pair 21 Admire 22Exdo 23 


22 Expo 
Powell 

7Chemindc 

_____ 19 Naph- 

tha 20 Pew 24 Atoll 25 One 26 Stop 27Spe» 


Name . — 
Address- 


S 













18 






THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


THR WEEK AHEAD 




ROCK 

MIXED BAG: Elvis Costello, who 
declared recently, “I have no position 
in pop now. I resigned by post”, has 
promised an extraordinary week of 
events. Tomorrow and Thursday, he 
appears with the Attractions; on 
Monday and Friday he performs 
unaccompanied, and on Tuesday 
and next Saturday the concerts 
proceed with the razmatazz of a TV 
game show, complete with a 
spinning wheel to Indicate randomly 
which of 40 possible songs he and 
the Attractions will perform. Rc 
Theatre, London WC2 (01-831 


TELEVISION 

BOOKMARK: Michael Wood of the 
unbuttoned shirt, tight Jeans and 
portentous voice sets off on another 
foray into the past in Domesday, a 
free-ranging tour of English history 
inspired oy the 900th anniversary of 
the Domesday Book. He finds a 
"mirror of the changing life of the 
English people” in, of all places, 
Milton Keynes and draws from Lord 
Hugh Thoimas the view that "Caliban 
will be remembered much longer 
than Churchill”. He even manages to 


FILMS 

REEL LIFE: Erich von Stroheim 
undertook his boldest experiment in 
ruthless realism with Greed, a huge 
film of Frank Norris's novel, 
McTeague, released in 1924 cut 
down to 1 0 reels. The new print on 
parade at the London Film Festival 
may not restore the long-lost hours 
of rootage but it does contain a few 
new seconds. As with aH Thames 
Si tents, there is live musical 


bring in tfrehip^ convoy. Bl 


accompaniment composed by Carl 
“ ' “ ~ 1(01-928 


tomorrow. 


jpm. 


Davis. Queen Bizabeth HaU (i 
3191). Today, 7.30pm, and 
tomorrow, 3pm and 7.30pm. 


THEATRE 

h-SOFT SELL: David Threlfal has 
been giving one of the television 
performances of the year as the 
odious Tory MF, Leslie Trtmuss, in 
John Mortimer's Paradise 
Postponed. Now he is back on the 
stage in Sailing the Sizzle, a new 
comedy by the former Derbyshire 
cricketer, Peter Gibbs. Thretfall plays 
Malcolm, who wanders Into a fancy 
goods warehouse and has an 
unexpected crash course In 
commerce and romance. Hampstead 
Theatre (01-722 9224). from 
Wednesday after previews. 


CONCERTS 


GOLDEN BOY: Mtidiafl Pletnev, odd 

■of the 


medallist and first prize winner \ 
1978 Moscow international 
Tchaikovsky Competition at the age 


of 21, briefly visited England seven 
ago. Now, at last this brilliant 


years ago. _ 

pianist returns for a proper tour. He 
replaces Vladimir Ashkenazy in 
Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody 
with the Philharmonia under Bernard 
Haitink at the Royal Festival Hafl (01- 
928 31 91 ) on Monday and gives a 
solo recital of Beethoven, Brahms, 
and Rachmaninov at the Wigmore 
HaH (01-935 2141) on Wednesday. 


OPERA 

MOZART MAGIC: Karfla Manila, <xie 
of the up and coming generation of 
Scandinavian singers, takes the part 
of Pamina in Wetmesdays revival of 
The Magic Flute. Sh8 made her first 
CoventGarden appearance in 
another Mozart opera, Gosi fan tutte* 
earlier in the year. More debuts 
follow in Europe and America in 
1987. The remainder of the Flute cast 
I is highly international so the 
.promised surtities look to be most 
i *r_ , on this occasion. Royal 


pnaidMii uiw - ■ 

\juwa House, Covent Garden, 
London WC2 (01-240 1066). 


THEATRE 


OPENINGS 


BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS: 
Michael Rudman's National 
Theatre production of the 
semi-autobiographical Neil 
Simon comedy. Transferred to 
the West End with Dorothy 
Tutin, and Susan Engel joining 
the cast. 

Aldwych (01-836 6404). First 
night Thurs. 


night 

A MOUTHFUL OF BIROS: Caryl 
Churchill and David Lan's play, 
by Joint Stock and the 
Birmingham Repertory 
company, is a combination of 
dance and drama about seven 
characters “against the ■ 
backcloth of Euri pedes' The 
Bacchae. 

Royal Court (01-730 1745). 
Preview Wed. First night Thurs. 


THE GREAT HUNGER: Tom 
Marintyre’s adaptation of the 
epic poem by Patrick 
Kavanagh about rural life in 
Southern Ireland in 1942, hi an 
Abbey Theatre production 
directed by Patrick Mason. 
Almeida (01-359 4404). Opens 
Tues. 

Tie LION, THE WITCH AND 
TIC WARDROBE: Third 
Christmas season for Glyn 
Robbins's adaptation of the 
C. S. Lewis children's stc 
Westminster Theatre (01- 
0283). Opens Mon. 


OUTOFTOWN 


BROftOEY: The Prisoner of 
Zends: Christopher Timothy, 
Judy Buxton, Donald Burton, 


Terence Longdon, directed by 
Peter Coe, in warren r 


i Grave's 

adaptation of Anthony Hope's 

K . Churchill (01- 
IDec6. 


MANCHESTER: Wc 
Mobile prize-winning playl 
Jeff Noon, with Reece 
Dmsdale as one of the British 
soldiers stationed on an island 
to which a group of young 
women are sent as 
companions. 


Royal Exchange (061 833 
9833). Opens Thurs. 


SELECTED 



• Vanessa Redgrave attracted 
a hatful of bouquets when she 
opened at die Young Me last 
month in Ibsen's Ghosts. Now 
that David Thacker’s dean- 
limbed production has trans- 
ferred to the West End, a 
wider audience wiD be able to 
appreciate the st r eng t h and 
subtle authority of her perfor- 
mance as Mrs Alvina. 

Wyndham’s (01-836 3028). 


A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM: 
It has taken 23 years to revive, 
but Frankie Howard's lewd 
Pseuddus is riper than over In 
Sondheim's best musical. 
PIccadBy (01-437 4506) 

WOMAN IN MIND: 

Ayckbourn's latest foray Into 
middle-class frustration. Jufia 
McKenzie shines as the 
touched fantasist of the title. 
Vaudeville (01-836 9988) 


BREAKING THE CODE Derek 
Jacobi gives a compelling 
account of the pioneering 
computer scientist. Alan 
Turing, In Hugh White more’s 
intelligent stage bk> ' 
Haymarket (01-930 


FILMS 


OPENINGS 


ROUND MIDNIGHT (15): 
Bertrand Tavernier's loving 
homage to jazz musicians, set 
in Paris during the 1950s. 
Saxophonist Dexter Gordon 
plays the American musician 


(largely based-on Bud PpweH). 

Lumiere 


Here (01-836 0691), Screen 
on the Hill (01-345 3366). Gate 
Nottfeg Hill (01-221 
From Fri. ■ 


CRITTERS (15): Round hairy 
objects with voracious 
appetites escape from a 


maximum security asteroid and 
cause prerfictable havoc in 
Kansas. Mild, sidy fere. 

Cannon Haymarket (01- 
839 1527). From Fri. • 

CROSSOVER DREAMS: 
Picturesque morality drama set 
in Spanish Harlem, with salsa 
Rubdn Blades as a 
lub performer dreaming 
into the big time. 
Directed by Leon ichaso. 

ICA Cinema (01-930 3647). 
From Fri. 


NCESfIS):' 
1 portrait of I 


turbulent portrait of Hfe among 
French gypsies, written and 
directed in 1983 by an Insider 
— Algerian-born Tony Catlif. 
With Gdrard Darmon and the 
octogenarian stage actress 
Muse Dal bray. 

Phoenix, East Finchley (01- 
883 2233). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


SMOOTH TALK (15): Sensitive 
account of an kfle teenager's 
sexual awakening, with a fire 
performance by Laura Dem. A 
promising feature debut by TV 
documentary maker Joyce 
Chopra. 

Renoir (01 -837 8402). 


RUTHLESS PEOPLE (18k 
Enjoyably savage comedy from 
team responsible for Alrplanel 
with Danny DeVito as the 
vulgar moneybags glad to be 
rid of his kidnapped wife (Bette 
Mfcfler). 

Odeon Leicester Square (01- 
930 6111). 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


LEE MILLER: The life in 
pictures of the remarkable Lee 
Miter, whose career spanned 
a large part of the century 
from portrait and advertising 
work during the 1930s through 
to covering the Second World 
War in Europe. 

National Centre of 


Photography, MHsom Street, 
Bath (0225 62841). 


JEAN -PAUL BERGER: Ten 


young 

Frenchman, Berger, who has 
obviously been deeply 

influenced by Cartier Bresson, 
f the: 


The core of the show is the 
Katagarama Festival in Sri 
Lanka. 

lnstitutFran<?ais,17 
Queensberry Place, London 
SW7 (01-589 6211). 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


PORTRAITS: The second in 
the series of three Arts Council 
shows called “Looking into 
Paintings” has portrait painting 
as its subject work by British 
artists from the 17th century 
onwards, including tongue-in- 
cheek (David Hockney's 
"Portrait surrounded by artistic 
devices”). 

Castle Museum,... 

(0602 41 1881-) from 

EYE FOR INDUSTRY: Another 
attempt to buoy up 
British spi r its , by showing us 
howdever our designers have 
been over the last 50 years. 
Organized by the Royal 
Society of Arts, the exhibition 
celebrates those who have 
been designated Royal 
Designers for industry, from 
bomb-makers (Barnes Wallis) 
to dress designers (Zandra 
Rhodes). 

Victoria and Abert Museum, 
London SW7 (01-589 6371) 
from Wed. 


PARROT POT-POURRI: More 
than 100 antique prints of 
parrots from the 18th and 19th 
centuries on show. 

Schuster Galler, 14 Maddox 
Street London W1 (01- 
491 2208) from Tues. 


SELECTED 


RODIN: Major show exploring 
the dose relationship between 
the old master Auguste 
Rodin's drawings and his 
sculpture. 

Hayward Gallery, London SE1 
(01-928 3144). 

MEDIEVAL TREASURY: The 
V&A's top-dass medieval 
collection dusted up and re- 
presented in a rrewty- 
refurtoished environment 
thanks to Trust House Forte. 
Victoria and Albert Museum, 
London SW7 (01 -589 6371). 

PAINTING IN SCOTLAND: 


Paintings by Ramsay, Raeburn 
and Winie, d 


...... demonstrating the 

quality of workmanship and 
inspiration that came out of 
Scotland during its 
Enlightenment 

Tate Gallery, London SW1 (01- 
821 1313). 


r. 


RADIO 


ON MAYDAY: Play about the 

PaulCoptey, who vras in 
Russia when it happened. 
Copley's wife, Natasha Pyre, 
plays the leading role of an 
Englishwoman aboard the 
Trans-Siberian Express. 
Radio 4, tomorrow. 2.30- 
3.30pm. 


THE LOUD AWAKENER: 

Patrick Maiahide as the 18th- 
century churchman George 
Whrtefteld, famous for his 
open-air sermons to 23,000 
people and for setting up the 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Radio 4, tomorrow, 10.15- 
11pm. 

WlfHJOWS: Nicely offbeat 
portrait of one Doris Walker 
Bagg. who for the last 30 years 
has found fulfilment as a north 
London window deaner. 

Radio 4, Tues, 8^0-9pm. 


LONDON BELONGS TO ME: 

Norman Bird, Liz Smith and 
Kate Wffltams lead a four-part 
adaptation of Norman Collins's 
novel about a London 
household just before the 
Second World War. 

Radio 4, Wed, 3-3.47pm. 


A MUSICAL EVENING: A 
series on American opera 
singers opens with Grace 
Bumbry, the flamboyant 
mezzo-tumed-soprano who 
helped to pave the way for the 
recognition of black artists. 
Radio 4, Thurs, 7.4O-8.40pm. 

A MAN WITH CONNECTIONS: 
Radio 3'S Russian season 
ends with Alexander Gelman's 
play on the conflict between 


career and family Bfe. Bill 
mdPn 


Patterson and Phyllis Logan 
play the ambitious husband 
and his suffering wife. 

Radio 3, Fri, 7.30-9pm. 


TELEVISION 


THE TRIAL OF LEE HARVEY 
OSWALD: Yet another attempt 
to arrive at the truth of the 
Kennedy assassination, using 
a court hearing with a real 
judge and reanawyers and real 
witnesses. At the end a Texan 
jury gives its verdict 
Channel 4, tomorrow, 7.15pm- 
12.45am. 


MAY WE BORROW YOUR 
HUSBMDT-.GahamGreem 

French hotel^c^TOS^redby, 
and starring, Dirk Bogarde. 

Charlotte Attenborough, 

daughter of Richard, makes 
her television debut 
rrv, tomorrow, 7.45-9.45pm. 


DAY TO DAY: At last, the 
Robert Kiiroy-S9c show. Ftee 
days a week the former Labour 
MP chews over issues of the 
day with experts and a studio 
audience. 

BBC1 , Mon-Fri, 9.05-9<45am. 



• “Amor”, a dra wi ng by 
Federico Garcia Lorca wbe 
met a premature death at 38, 
executed early in the Spanish 
Cm! War. Hie 
Spanish poet and playwright 
of the 20th century, his pay 
The Basse of Bermuda Alba 
has recently been rerived'ia 
London. He is remembered by 
friends and fellow artists and 
in extracts from his works. 
BBC2, Fri, 930-I(M5pm. 


BACK ON THE FRONTIER: 
Report from South Africa by 
Francis Gerard which tries to 
set the black-white conffict in 
Its historical context Indudes 
an interview with Wtenie 
Mandela, suddenly halted 
when the army cut the power 
supply and detained the crew, 
nv, Tues, 10-30-midnight 


BOTHAM'SOUTI: Reveals that 
lan Botham spent his nlne-and- 
a-haff-weefc ban from first- 
class cricket training as a 
helicopter pilot and driving Ms 
wife up the wall with his 
untidiness and practical jokes. 
BBC2, Thurs, 9^0-1 0.1 0pm. 


OPERA 


ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 
Another new Carmen: tWs time 
David Pountrey offers his 
ideas In a production designed 
by Maria Bjornson. Sally 
Burgess takes the title role, 
opposite John Treieaven's Don 
Jos£, aid Mark Bder 
conducts. Perfor ma nce s this 
week on Thurs and Nov 29 at 
7pm. Graham Vick's powerfully 
austere production of Britten’s 
chamber opera. The Rape of 
Lucretfa, is ore of the best 
things on the operatic i 
this season, with Jean 
Russell Smythe and Ri 
Van Allan repeating their roles 
as Lucretia, TarquWus and 
Coiiatinus. Its last two 
performances, this Wed and 
Dec 4 at 7.30pm. should not be 
missed - even If you think you 
don’t Bee the opera. A feral 
Mikado on Tubs, and Cav& 
Pag on Fri, both at 7.30pm. 
Coliseum, St Martin's Lam. 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

SCOTTISH OPERA: StlD on 
tour and bringing to Newcastle 
their own stark 

an 



..land 

Fri; and a . . 

of Strauss's In t ermezzo on 
Ttkirs.AU performance s start 
at 7.15pm. 

New Tyre Theatre, Newcastle 
(091 232 0899). 

WELSH NATIONAL OPERA: In 

Bristol this week and next with 

a fuH package from their 
autumn tour. 77ieffirjg starts 
on Fri with fltewigofo (7.15pm) 
and Valkyrie (5pm) on 
The week begins with 
inmaschera wfthJosepranu 
Barstow on Tues (7.15pm), 

The Magic Flute with a strong 
young cast on Wed (7.15pm); 
and the superbly sung Lucia <M 
Lammermoor with Suzanne 
Murphyand Dennis O'NeiH on 
Thurs (7.15pm). 

Hippodrome, Bristol 
(0272 299444). 


i UnbaBo 


CARDIFF NEW OPERA 
GROUP: Their tour of Britten's 
Turn of the Scmrcontinues 
tonight at Aberystwyth's 
Theatre-y-Wenn (0970 4218); 
Tues at Newport's Crosskeys 
College (0495 226622); Wed at 
tire Chepstow Leisure Centre 


[02911 

_. jlfi's Theatre EH 
(0554 774057). Michael 
Rafferty conducts, with Kevin 
West as the Peter Quint 


OPERA east: This man 
young professional company 
are touring a FJedermaus 

enthusiastically updated to the 
1980s: this week they visit 
i’s Key Theatre 
tomorro w ; 
Pavflkxion 


Mon (0702 351 135); Bury St 
Edmunds Theatre Royal on 
Thurs (0284 69505); and 
Horsham Arts Centre on Fri 
and Nov 29 (0403 68689). 


JAZZ 


PAUL MOTIAR’ Once known 
for Ns outst a nding drumming 
with the late Bill Evans's finest 
group, Motian now leads his 
own trio, inctotflng the guitarist 
Bffl Frisefl. 

Tonight Trades Club, Leeds 
(0532 620629); tomorrow and 
Thurs, Bass Cief, 1 Hoxton 
Square, London N1 (01- 
729 2476); Mon, Band on the 
WaG. Birmingham 
(061 834 5109); Tues. 
Braunstone Hotel, Leicester 
(0533 891115); Fri. Randolph 
Hotel, Oxford (0844 247481) 


COURTMEY PINE: Overpraised 
he may be, but how welcome ft 


is to see a British jazz musician 
ittentfona 


any attention at afl from 
miss media. And, yes, he 
does have talent 
Tonight, Chapter Arts Centre, 
Cararff (0222 396061); 
tomorrow, Triangle Arts 
Centre, Birmingham 
(021 359 3979); Thurs, Town 
and Country Club, 9-17 
Htahoate Road, London NWS 
3334) 


JOHN TAYLOR: Featuring the 
trumpet of Kenny Wheeler, 
Taylor's rarely heard sextet Is 
an outstanding unit 
Mon, 100 Club, 100 Oxford 
Street London W1 (01- 
636 0933) 


KENNY DAVERN: Anyone who 
thinks that jazz clarinet was 
reinvented last summer by 
Edda Dantefs has not been 
attending to the work of this 
superb malnstreamer. 
Wed/Thurs, Pizza Express, 10 
Dean Street London W! (01- 
439 8722) 



News flash: city worker eats his breakfast as he roller skates to tike office in May 1926 


Nine days that split the nation 


W hen the General Strike was 
called in May 1926, the 
better-off middle and up- 
per classes of Britain were 
convinced that the Red 
Revolution bad come. When the strike 
collapsed nine days later, these same 
people wondered what the fuss was 
about. 

The flavour of the nine days is skilfully 
evoked in a 60th anniversary exhibition 
at the National Portrait Gallery. Photo- 
graphs, newspapers and cartoons not 
only provide a narrative of events but 
say’tnuch about contemporary attitudes. 

The main impression left with the 
exhibition compilers, Robin Gibson and 
Honor Clerk, is that compared with later 
industrial conflicts, the General Strike 
was notably well-mannered. The Labour 
Party and TUC preached caution, fear- 
ing they might have unleashed some- 
thing they could not controL There were 
clashes between strikers and police but 
little serious violence, and die one 
potential tragedy turned out to be no 
more than a minor modern. 


This was the derailment of the Hying 
Scotsman at Craznlington in Northum- 
berland after strikers removed the fish 
plates from a section of track. It was a bi- 
zarre incident from start to fi nish. Tire 
driver, who was a volunteer, was 
sportingly told what had been done. 

He took no notice and drove on. The 
engine and one of the coaches of Britain's 
most famous train duly left the rails. No 
one was badly hurt and passengers 
clambered down from the carriages as if 
nothing had happened. The General 
Strike was rather like than all build-up 
and no finish 

For the miners at the core of the 
dispute, though, the cause was pas- 
sionate enough. When the rest of the 
strikers went back to work, the miners 
felt betrayed and stayed out. The coal 
owners’ demands for a longer working 
week and a cut in wages were forced 
through. There was a deep and lasting 
resentment even if it washed over most 
of the population. 


A cartoon by Bernard Partridge showed 
John Bull with his Union Jade and the 
TUC with a flag labelled “General 
Strike". John Bull is saying; “One of 
these two flags has got to come down and 
it won’t be mine!". 

The cartoon was reproduced in the 
British Gazette* a newspaper put out by 
the Government and edited by Winston 
Churchill. It was essentially a propa- 
ganda sheet, though strike news was 
incongruously mixed with reports of 
cricket matches. 

The left had its newspaper, the British 
Worker ; printed on the presses of the 
Labour Daily Herald. There was also 
Lansbury's Labour Weekly , produced by 
-a future Labour leader, George 
Lansbury. It parodied Partridge's car- 
toon by showing John Bull as a fat 
capitalist supported by a policeman’s 
truncheon. 


Peter Waymark 


With typically leaden huteour Punch 
; the strike was unpatriotic. 


sugpsted that ■ 


The General Strike 1926 isatthe National 
Portrait GaBery, London WC2 (01-93 0 
1552) from Friday. 


ROCK 


SUZANNE VEGA: Ehd of the 
first British tow by foe 
Oeenwich VBage foflda with a 
Marlene Dtetrfcn fixation. 


Tonic 


(0532 439071); tomorrow, 
Manchester Apollo 


(061 273 3775); Mon, Usher 


(031 228 1164k Tues, Royal 
Court Liverpool 

(051 709 4321) 


ALICE COOPER: The 1970s 
madman rattans with a 
gratuitously snakeist horror 
show that wall offend new and 
old moralists affleei 
Tomorrow, Wembley Arena 
(01-902 1234); Tues and Wed, 
Edinburgh Playhouse 
(031 557 2690); Fri, 

Manches ter Ap oflo 

3775). 


(Q61 273 

SIMPLY RED: Now that they 
have conquered America, w» 
they be less wooden in 
performance? 

Tues, Birmingham Odeon 
(021 643 6101); Wed, 
Hammersmith Odeon, London 
W6 (01-748 4081); Thurs, 
Manchester Apotio 
(061 273 377$. 

THE HUMAN LEAGUE: After a 
four year absence. Phi Oakey 
and die girts return to the stage 
with new personnel, but no 

d i ri i w hniiiy 

Wed. Crawley Leisure Centre 
(0293 37431k Thurs, 
thorough University 
263171). 


FILMS ON TV 



• Gut Gable and Jean Har- 
low locked in passionate em- 
brace in Victor Fleming's 1932 
stater Bed Dost (Channel 4, 
today, 2-330pm)L “He treated 
her roogh — and she loved itf* 
ran the pnbthaty and ft was 
perfect teaming Gable, the 
virile romantic vecsos Harlow 
the knowing sex bond). Mary 
Astor completes the triangle 
as a neglected wife. Her 
primness bi deceptive. 


programmed society m which 
people are known only by 
tetters and numbers. 

BBC2, today, 1 0.10-1 1.35pm. 

OUR VINES HAVE TENDER 


GRAPES 0945): Edward G. 
■i and 


Robinson and Margaret 
O’Brien in a gentle stray of 
Norwegian immigran t fanners 
in Wisconsin. 

BBC1, Tues, 2-3-40pm. 

F.LS.T. (1978): Sylvester 
SteBone in a pre-flambo 
melodrama charting the the 
rise and fafl of a unton boss. 
Channel 4, Wed, 9-1 1.40pm. 

NO MERCY, NO FUTURE 
(1981): British television 
premiere of award-winning 
study of a schizophente gfrl by 
the German director Helma 
Sanders-Brahms. 

Channel 4, Fri, 11.30pm- 
1.30am. 


CONCERTS 


ALL BEETHOVEN: Mariss 
Yansons conducts the 
Phahaimonia Orchestra in 
Beethoven's Symphony No 8 

and. with the addition of the 
Phdharmonla Chorus aid 


soloists, Ms Symphony No 9. 
i, South Baik, 


Festival HaH L 

London SE1 (01428 31911. 
Today, 7.30pm. 1 


ALL BRAHMS: Brahms'S 
Tragic Overture, Piano 
Corcerto No 1 (soloist - 
Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich) 
and Symphony No 1. rpo 
under Antal Dorati. Festival 
Halt Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

MAINLY DEBUSSY: The LSO 
is conducted by Claudio 
Abbado in Debussy's Pr&ude 
al'apres^nkSd'unfaune, 
Iberia, the rarely-heard 





D emorsa Be dkje and Brahms s 
Vfota Concerto (Viktoria 
Muflova, soloist). 

Barbican Centre, Sflk Street 
London EC2(01-628 8795). 
T om orrow. 7J 


SOLTI SYMPHONIES: Sir 
Georg Sow conducts the 
London Phffliarmonto in 
Haydn's Symphony No 93, 

Festival Hall. Tues, 7-30pm. 


ABBADO/SERKINrTheLSO 
conducted by Claucflo Abbado 

in Mendelssohn’s Calm Sea 

and Prosperous Voyage 

Overture and Beethoven's 
Symphony No 7. Rudolf Serkin 
solos in MozarfsPiano 

Concerto K 456. Barbican 

Centre. Tues, 7.45pm. 


KASPRZYK/COLUNS: Jacek 

Kasprzyk conducts the Wren 

Orchestra In Wagner's 
TangMuser Overture. 

Dvorak's Symphony No 7, and 
Weber's Clarinet Concerto No 
2. Soloist Michael ColHns. 
Barbican Centre. Wed, 7.45pm. 


DANCE 


LONDON CONTEMPORARY 
Danes Theatre continues its 
London season with the 
premiere (Tuesday) of anew 

work by Slobhan Dawes to 
music by Michael Nyman. That 
is given untfl Nov 29 with other 


works created for the comply 


by Richard Alston, Tom Jc 
and Robert North. Tonight a 
last chance to see tiie opening 

?7 leftuntoEiirtfo^^ 

Sadler’s Weds (01-278 8916) 
untaDecS. 


JOEL HALL DANCERS from 
Chicago continue their London 


Nov 29. Bloomsbury 
Theatre (01-387 9629). 

ROYAL BALLET: This week's 
only performance is The 
Sleeping Seamy tonight with 
Lesley Coffier and Mark saver 
due to dance the leads. 
Covent Garden (01 -240 1066). 

BALLET RAMBERT goes to 
Glasgow (Tues-Nov 29) with 
two profflg rmi e sof^w ra ks ^by 

Bruce, Michael’ctmk, Ashley 


Theatre Royal (041 331 1234). 

SADLER’S WH.LS ROYAL 
BALLET is at the New Theatre, 
Cardiff (0222 394844) today 
with Swan Late, then at the 
ApoBo, Oxford (0865 244544) 
with The Snow Queen (Mon- 


Nov 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


NEW YEAR GALA 
CONCERTS: Booking for 
Tchaikovsky concert (Dec 28) 
with Allan SchIHer as soloist: 
and Viennese New Year Gabi 

tSte ItoyrJ BaSet 01 ” Sadter ’ s 

Royal Albert Haa. London SW7 
(01-589 8212). 

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING 
TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT: 
First West End revival for five 
yP^ofTirn. Rice and Andrew 
Lloyd Webber musical, in 
production by Bffl Kenwrlght 
Opens Dec 16 for five weeks. 

Royalty, Portugal Street 

London WC2 (01-831 0660 ). 


LAST CHANCE 


wtonalthea tups 

TENTH BIRTHDAY: Exhibition 

documenting NTs first decade 
on South Bank. Ends today 
Lyteto FOyer; South Bank. 
London SET (01-928 2033). 

RARE AND ENDANGERED 
BIRDS: Work by bird 
water colourists showing rare 
species. Ends tomorrow. Also 

Land collection of 

for charity 

-^^jiCemre, Street 
London EC2 (01-638 4141)/ 


Lloyd, a 
chWren 


Fw ticket availability, 
performance and 

opening times, telephone 


Patrick 


Theatre: Tc 

and Martini 

Padio, television and 
®™s on tr. Peter 
WajmaripGoacerts: 
Max Harrison; Openu 
Hilary Finch; Fums: 
Geoff Brawn; Galleries: 
Sarah Jane Checkbnd; 
Jazz: Richard WflHams; 
Rock: David Sinclair; 
Photography: Michael 
YOBBJE Bookman Anno 


it 


-**'-•* 




, 


tr " 



*... , - - \ • S * \ 




.s. 


'I*—':. 


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19 




THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


">*0 


- . . -I~: >. 1 -C r' 



i — J- ,«L- 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


]|SS BARBICAN HALL 

iu«M> Barhican Gentre/Silk Si. EC2Y 80S 
Wli 01-638 8891/628 8795 
Telephone Bookings: lOam-Epm 7 days a week 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 




TON IGH T at 8 p.mu 

aMUSICFROM SPAIN 

jS TICKETS at 00.50 ONLY 

*£/ ALL OTHERS SOLD 



■VICTOR HOCHHAUSER presents 
ROYAL ALBERT HALL 

NEW YEAR 
GALA CONCERTS 


SUNDAY 28th DECEMBER AT 7 JO 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

CONCERT 

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
BAND OF THE SCOTS GUARDS 
Introduced & conducted by: ANTONY HOPKINS 
Soloist: ALLAN SCHILLER 

M«Ir Slave, Suite 'The Swan lake’. Piano Concerto No. Z, 
Suite ‘The Nutcracker' 

OVERTURE ‘1812» WITH CANNON 
AND MORTAR EFFECTS 


■KiliiS 

El 



Ql' EHN KL I-ZABHTH MALI 

Kn - 



P PHILHARMONIA 
Cl ORCHESTRA 

^^Prinapal Conductor Giuseppe Sinopoli 
TONIGHT at 730 
MARISS YANSONS 
ELIZABETH HARWOOD 
PENELOPE WALKER 
IAN GALE Y DAVID WILSON-JOHNSON 
PHILHARMONIA CHORUS 
BEETHOVEN 

Symphony No. 8 
Symphony No. 9 (Choral) 

. Tkfceb. LVa. ^4.50, £&S0. LB, £12 (calf, 

* • ft « 

BERNARD HAITINK ■ 

conducts 

Monday Next 24 November at 7 JO 

MIKHAIL PLETOEV 

(Please note change of sbloisrj 
Rachmaninov: Rhapsody 00 a Theme of Paganini 
BnxJsnerr Symphony No. 4 
T«*cnc 0, £6, CJSO, &.£m,&Z£i \ £15 
Monday t December at 730 

BRAHMS 

Serenade No. I 

Symphony No. 4 

AiulaNc iiom Hit |0MBB ildlt tX (01-428 8800} ft apcsD 

Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 


WI CMORE HALL 



ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

TOMORROW at 7.30 

Brahms TRAGIC OVERTURE 

Brahms PIANO CONCERTO NO. I 

Brahms SYMPHONY NO. I 

Conductor ANTAL DORATI 
Soloist STEPHEN BISHOP-KOVACEVICH 

THURSDAY 27 NOVEMBER at 730 

Brahma ACADEMIC FESTIVAL OVERTURE 

Brahms PIANO CONCERTO NO-2 

Brahma SYMPHONY NO. 2 

- Conductor ANTAL D ORA TI 
, Soloist JORGE BOLET 

| S y n m iJ bjr Nantea Telecom 

TUESDAY 2 DECEMBERS 730 

Beethoven OVERTURE. PROME THEUS 

Beethoven VI OLIN CO NCERTO 

Prokofiev ROMEO AND JUUET (EXCERPTS) 

Conductor KURT MASUR 
Soloist KYUNG WHA CHUNG 

Spcaeocedby PA C omo M atGrewp 



JOHNLUJL 

i Tnesday 2 December 7.45 pm 

B EfclH QVHM Piano Concerto No 1 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 2 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 3 

JAMES LOUGHRAN conductor 


' t ill i I tfTTTTTl #7 


£1L 50, £9.SQ. £7.50, £6, M50, £ 3.50 
Sunday 7 December 7 JO pm 

BEETHOVEN Overture ‘Egmont’ 

B EETH OVEN Piano Concerto No 4 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 5 

JAMES LOCGHRAN conductor 
X1L50, £930, £730. £6. £430. £330 


Box Office Td 10-8 every day inc Sun 01-438 8891/628 8795 


NORMAN MtAOMORt LTD. pm*** tke BARBICAN 

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FAIRFIELD HALL CROYDON 

BOX OFFICE UI-MB W»l CREOI tTHONk ■>!-&«) i"*H 

Wednesday 3 December 8.00 pm 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

NICHOLAS CLEOBURY 
RALPH MARKHAM 
KENNETH BROADWAY 

Pbdd Duo 

ELGAR Oamn ~UKfcapnc" 

KA VEL Pavanc pour uqc nJarftr 

SAIKT-SAJENS CRmralal ihc Antmab 
SIBELIUS Kacete Swu 
GER SWnN Ao Amcncamn Ihtr 


BARBICAN WEDNESDAY NEXT 3* NOVEMBER at 745 pun. 

WREN ORCHESTRA 

OF LONDON 

Conductor. J ACEK KASPRZYK 
Clarinet: MICHAEL COLLINS 

WAGNER: Overture, Tarmhfiuser 
WEBER: Clarinet Concerto No. 2 
DVORAK: Symphony No. 7 

C*SO, £ 8.50, £7.50. £650, £5. £4, Bm Office 01-638 8891/628 8795 
A Capital Radio Concert 


The Barbican THURSDAY NEXT 37 NOVEMBER ax 7AS pm 

MOZART 

Kjiie in D minor. K_ 341; Symphony No. JL JL 297 ■Paris' 

Mass in C minor K. 427 ‘Great 9 

Sylvia McNair Soriano Diana Montague .Mwn hopnao 
Anthony RolTcJoimn low Cornelius Hauptmann Bm 
Monteverdi Choir English Baroque Soloists 
John Eliot Gardiner. Conductor 

L* 56 -ill i|>lmmBaiUlfiirlll-fi 9 tH(F*l hAi ««5 O^n Uam-'ro bl. SunJtv, 

Monmeiti Chair nod Orchestra Lid. Sponsored by Dresdacr Bank 


Friday 28 November 7.45 pm 


SCHUBERTIADES 

SOTHEBY’S 

Music Director and pianist 


Thursday 4 December 8pm 

Dmitry Sitkovetsky, violin 

prog incL Schubert Fantasy in C nuyar for violin 

and piano 

Thursday 12 February 8pm 

Mira Zakai, contralto, 

Dominique de WilHencourt, cello 
prog incL Rachmaninoff Trio Elegiaque 

Thursday 26 March 8pm 

Marie McLaughlin, soprano, 

Anne Scolding, clarinet 

prog. incL Weber Grand Duo Concertant 

Thursday 14 May 8pm 

Colin Carr, cello, pupils from. Yehudi 

Menuhin School 

prog. incL Mendelssohn Octet 

Champagne Reception after each concert 

Individual tickets £15 Subscription ticket £45 
For information please telephone 01-735 0138 


j*j St John's Smith Square 






ORCHESTRA Edmon Cotonwr com Jmc Eapen 
*oo GraMH KMlwwoRnca ton -tahn Cornel tun Sriudwt 
Ore-time Rosamundo D64J SMumTtiiEiilenuR-QeiOp X r ti gra r . 
DeWafrura Act l£6 £i.U Tn»- SM*non OtcreBra 



HAYDN 
NELSON MASS 


£L£4,£5.50,£h.5iLi7.5)Sb«rtj f J r n« : .: J L25i).£V5ai1.7'i,i5.i0.£oW ftm jcudiin ftrtwm pwl 


Handel : Zadok the Priest 
Britten ; Hymn to Sl -C ecilia 

Serenade for tenor, horn and strings 

City of London Sinfonia, coodiKted by Richard Hicfcox 

The Richard Hickox Singers 

with Yvonne Kenny, Margaret Cable, 

Martyn HID, Stephen Roberts 

Barbican Centre - next Friday 

Sporaertd by John Lag; cooaraakm Li mi t ed 


ST. JOHN'S Smith Square FRIDAY 5 DECEMBER 7.9) pm 

THE HANOVER BAND 

Musical DireaorAiolin ROY GOODMAN 

WEBER Symphuiy No. 2 

WEBER Coocwmo liar Hum 

ANTHONY HALSTEAD horn 

BEETHOVEN Sys^boay No. 5 
1,130. £150. £5 «.£6S0 tm Box iWkt 01-22 I Obi 


OLD we 928 7616 cc 261 1821 


•fawtec. Mon-Frl 7 30. Wed Mats 
2 JO. sau 6.0 A T 46. <Open» Tue 
at 7.30. 



WlGMOaEHALL Wedneada;Nesi26Novaiibcrat7J0p 

THE KOIXUNT YOUNG SOVIET HAJUCT 

MIKHAIL PLETNEV 

Gd M Meda l Whinec Tctoitovily Coayeritioa. Motcam, i*7g 

BEETHOVEN: Variations on a Thane of Salieri 
BRAHMS* Sonua No 3; 

RACHMANINOV: Emdes Tableaux; 
TCHAIKOVSKY: Goocert Suite, The Nutcracker 
&£4,£3,£2, &nn 301 0ffise/GC0l-Q3S 2141 
Mwgrmrn c IBBS A TILLETT LTD 


FRIDAY 5 DECEMBER 

Weber OVERTURE, OBERON 

Beethovea PIANO CONCERTO Na 4 

Schubert SYMPHONY NOt9 

Conductor KURT MASUR 

Soloist ELISABETH LEONSKAJA 

Muk potAle by Arthur Andcnen & Ofc FaiiBArian 
£J SO. £5. £7. A £1 1.M>,£M Bw Office <01-528 3191} C C (01-928 8»»l 


PBBTBBU n * TT 

SUNDAY 30 NOVEMBER «130 p-m. 

© Rossisd -BARBER OF SEVILLE !OV. 

WATER MISICSUITE 

SS?. PIANO CONCERTO 

Beethoven SYMPHONY N o. 3 CEROiC A) 
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

CmdacacJAMESjCDD VOYRA ASHKENAZY pone 

HffitW» 1»l Ctl 015288800, 

Wednesday. 3 December at 7 JO 

BBC Symphony Orchestra 
^ SIR JOHN PKITCHARD 
DMITRI ALEXEEV 

PROKOFIEV Piano Cooomo Nct 2 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 1 1 The ^ear 1905 1 

U£j.iO.Xj l £8 < i)) SmUJcctfi^^lOl CCP1-92B8KP 

iYS® LONDON SYMPHONY 
l aBa ORCHESTRA ^^^ ^ 

TWO CONCERTS WITH 

KRYSTIAN ZIMERMAN 

GARY BERTINI 

.-nb« 

. TL ESDAY 9 DECEMBER « 7 JO pm 

USZT Piaoo Concerto No. * 

MAHLER ” ! [ ! ! Symphony No- 6 

SLNDAY » DECEMBER wjJ5 pux . 

BRAHMS Pi® 0 Conoerto No. 1 

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 

tjA.fx^oija^pV) . t w3»iiaa 



ROYAL ALBERT HAU. s 

ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY 

Conducran LASZLO HELTAY 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY I* * 2fi DECEMBER M 7 JO 
(Sonuddy coacen iqwBMKd >9 BRAUN ELSCnnC (UK> Lid 

TRADITIONAL FAMILY 
CAROL CONCERTS 
CAMBRIDGE BUSKERS 

SATURDAY ZB DECEMBER at 2i JO 
BRAUN prows 

A CHILDREN'S TRADITIONAL 
CAROL CONCERT 
BASIL BRUSH with DOUG RIDLEY 

John Ph t fa «E M ) Jotra Aflcy paop 
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THE MOUSETRAP 






















































20 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 



Kenneth Minogue opposes the campaign against ‘reckless’ lending 


Peter Brimelow 


SPORTS 

DIARY 

Frances Edmonds 
in Australia 

Test Match 
Special 

After England's comeback win 
over Australia in Brisbane, I was 
looking forward to reporting the 
victory speech by captain Mike 
Gatting. whose hitherto innocu- 
ous, sensational-as-watching- 
paint-dry statements are fondly 
referred to as the “Gactysberg 
addresses.” However, as I fol- 
lowed the all-male press corps into 
the enclosure outside the pavilion 
I was obstructed by a withered Oz- 
Cerberus defending the entrance 
with ferocity. "You cannot come 
in here” he ordered. “You are a 
lady.” There was no answer to 
that. 

Watching the after-match pavil- 
ion celebration in Cinderella- 
exclusion over the picket fence, I 
noted the absence from the cham- 
pagne jollity of two Pom cricket 
correspondents. One, exercising a 
wise discretion, perhaps feared 
that Tan Botham would indeed 
prove to be the “boorish bully” so 
described in his column. The 
other would have been forced to 
gorge himself on his pre-match 
words that there were only three 
minor problems with the England 
team: “They can’t bat, they can't 
bowl, and they can't field”. 

Due reward 

Before the first Test I ventured to 
suggest to the England team's 
disciplinarian assistant manager, 
Micky Stewart, that he should 
scrap the traditional pre-match 
team talk and send his hitherto 
beleagured higher-order batsmen 
to the Queensland Performing 
Arts Centre instead. There, the 
Australian Opera Company was 
putting in a usefully didactic 
performance of Gil ben and 
Sullivan's Patience. The advice, it 
would appear, was taken to heart 

Little wonder 

Few people are upset that the Test 
players’ “dwarf-tossing” com- 
petition has been cancelled after 
protests by the Little People of 
Australia Association. Though the 
practice was condemned by the 
European Parliament 12 months 
ago as tasteless and undignified, it 
continues to flourish Down 
Under. Promoters have even 
found a variation called dwarf- 
rolling, where the unfortunate 
participant is strapped to a skate- 
board and rolled head first into a 
set of tea-pins. 

Bounced out 

I must leap to the defence of 
Middlesex and former England 
Test bowler Norman Cowans, 
who is being sued by the Brisbane 
cricket club Wests for breach of 
contract. Cowans flew back to 
England late last month after 
playing only one and a half games, 
giving flood damage to his 
London home as the reason. 
Perhaps Norman's precipitate exit 
may have been related to the off- 
pitch employment the club saw fh 
to organized for him — bouncer at 
the local nightclub. 

Pious hope 

Perhaps Pope John Paul II should 
make a detour after his visit to the 
Melbourne Cricket Ground later 
this month — a jaunt sponsored tv 
a beer company — and take a look 
at the J unction Oval up the road in 
St Kilda. The jinxed Oval des- 
perately needs a papal blessing, if 
not a complete exorcism. A few 
weeks ago. New South Wales 
captain Dirk Wellham rearranged 
a female fan's jaw with an 
inadvertent swipe of his bat when 
emerging from the dressing room, 
and last week a huge spotlight 
crashed on to a photographer's 
bead for no apparent earthly 
reason. 

• Orright, as they say here in Oz, 

I know no one is going to believe 
this, but there is a rugby player in 
Hong Kong named Rick Shaw. 

Latin leeway 

Everyone in Fremantle, battling 
away for the America's Cup, finds 
the Italian syndicate led by Aldo 
Migliaccio molto simpaiico. A 
crane dropped on their new yacht 
and sack it; their Alfa Romeo car 
ran into a kangaroo and the 
stunned marsupial bopped off 
with the keys: and the dirty work 
needed on their boat is messing up 
up their Gucci-sponsored designer 
uniforms. “We all adore them,” 
Andrew (“Spud”) Spedding, shore 
manager of the British challenger. 
White Crusader, told me, adding 
mischieveously, “We know when 
they are about to tack. They all 
take a final drag and throw their 
cigarettes overboard.” 

BARRY F ANTONI 



Like most readers of The Times I 
have endless credit thrust upon 
me. Banks, credit cards, depart- 
ment stores, even the AA unite in 
offering me apparently limitless 
cash. Since I am not in deep need, 
nor much given to buying gold 
shares from casual acquaintances, 
these offers are barely through the 
letterbox before they hit the bin. 

Occasionally, however, I glance 
at the prose, and it makes me 
cringe: naked appeals to the more 
infantile impulses to grasp what- 
ever one might think of desiring. 
What could be more corrupt than 
a population which ready had 
succeeded in taking the waiting 
out of wanting? Images of gross 
usurious exploitation float before 
the mind. Ought not something to 
be done about it? 

Some people have taken the 
first step towards doing something 
about it. They have invented the 
concept of “reckless lending” by 
those negligent in considering the 
borrower’s circumstances. As a 
stick with which to bear usurers, 
the idea has great promise because 
it fits neatly into other current 
forms of moral thinking. It im- 
pales lenders at home and abroad 
and even promises to explain the 
present condition of the many 
Third World countries suffering 
from earlier orgies of borrowing. 

The short shelf-life of many 
leaders must dispose them to 
favour borrowing as an easy way 
out of trouble; tomorrow’s prob- 
lems always look more manage- 
able than today’s, especially if 
someone else will have to deal 
with them. By contrast, the av- 
erage Briton with his eye on a 
holiday in the West Indies won't 
be able to visit Ms sins on his 
children. He will just be paying 
long after the tan has faded. 
Meanwhile, mortgages collapse 
and credit card debts accumulate. 
Already debt is sliding over the 
threshold of public awareness into 
a public issue. 

It was an observation of Lord 
Melbourne's that nothing so thor- 
oughly frightened him as the 
phrase "something must be done.” 
In so vague a state of mind, he 
thought, people usually did foolish 
things. “Recklessness” in this 
context is so strikingly vague as 
potentially to cover any lending 
that goes wrong. The evil to be 
corrected would not be fraud, or 
misrepresentation, but any judge- 
ment that turns out io be wrong 
about the value of the loan to the 
borrower. One does not have to 
take Cain's view of brotherhood to 
conclude that lenders cannot 
really be saddled with the duty of 
recklessness avoidance and that 
the entire responsibility for the act 
of borrowing must rest upon the 
judgement of the borrower. To 
think otherwise is to construe 
borrowers as less than fully 
responsible human beings. 

Yet in sticking firmly to the 
conviction that every citizen is 
folly responsible for his or her own 
actions, we may be putting at risk 
the very moral standards we seek 
to sustain. There is a career path in 
the activity of regulation which 
runs: invent a concept, define an 
evil, emphasize those actual fea- 



Don’t deny us 
our freedom to 
be foolish 


tuxes of reality which exhibit the 
evil, organize a pressure group, 
and legislation will eventually 
follow. This activity, occasionally 
genuinely needed, is effective 
because it reveals something im- 
portant about contemporary life. 

What is it, then, that is revealed 
in the stirrings for action over 
“reckless lending”? We may put 
the point in the rather quaint 
language that used to be affected 
by the deeper sort of playwright 
earlier in the century: our society 
is living a lie; we are tiving a lie be- 
cause we assume that all our 
fellow citizens are free, indepen- 
dent spirits capable of taking 
responsibility for their own lives 
and for exercising appropriate 
prudence in the conduct of their 
lives. If we do make this assump- 
tion, then the idea of “reckless 
lending” has no force, because the 
reckless lender would be unable to 
find reckless borrowers. 

There's no doubt, then, that the 
regulator who wishes something 
done about this evil has truth and 
reality on Ms side, because there is 
obviously a great deal of incom- 
petent self-management about 
Any proposed reform would deal 
with the moral problem of tempta- 
tion by the legislative device of 
abolishing the tempting object in 
this case instantly available cash. 
But it is obvious that tempting 
objects are many, and that the 
project of abolishing “reckless 
lending” floats on a sea of similar 
judgements and projects. 

One such judgement is that 
certain speeches or actions to 
which exception may be taken are 


“provocative”. Now the idea of 
provocation is indeed a useful one 
in considering what might miti- 
gate the punishment of c riminal 
acts done under intolerable strain, 
but extended to cover an entire 
class of people, it implies that they 
•are too infantile to exercise simple 
the ordinary duties of decorum 
and setf-controL 
Another device for muddying 
the waters of responsibility is the 
kind of victimhood constituted by 
the passive voice. Farmers in both 
Britain and America have com- 
plained that during the prosperous 
Seventies they were “encouraged” 
to take out the loans which they 
now cannot repay. Their situation 
is grim and unfortunate, but our 
sympathy must not obscure the 
fact that in modem societies 
people are constantly being en- 
couraged and incited to (to an sons 
of things, many of them highly 
imprudent, and that the freedom 
we enjoy depends upon a tough 
minded population capable of 
resisting temptation. There is, of 
course, a moral responsibility not 
to encourage people to do things 
they will regret, and some pedlars 
of credit are in breach of this duty. 
The breathless unreality of their 
salesmanship deserves contempt 
But there is no doubt where foe 
final responsibility must lie. 

Sometimes the very practices of 
modem society are thought to 
constitute an impossible tempta- 
tion. To “reckless lending” there 
corresponds foe reckless dressing 
of attractive women wearing mini- 
skirts and flaunting decolletage. 
Islamic countries have solved this 


Tm oat sure — 1 think it’s 
the new Christmas 
Don't drink and drive campaign' 


Is the organization that built the 
£307 million Falklands airport 
necessarily the best body to cher- 
ish a listed 17th century timber- 
framed farmhouse in foie English 
countryside? This is one of foe 
questions that deserves to be 
asked as the Select Committee on 
foe Environment meets to inquire 
into foe Property Services Agency. 

The PSA is that vast limb of the 
Environment Department which 
maintains, famishes and some- 
times designs the buildings used 
by government These are not only 
civil servants' offices. They in- 
clude nuclear bunkers, research 
laboratories, aircraft hangars, bar- 
racks, jails, customs houses and 
courts — and, almost by chance — 
2,000 listed buildings. It is also 
charged with foe care of the royal 
parks and palaces such as Hamp- 
ton Court, the Tower of London 
and Kew. 

Although foe PSA's historic 
buildings role is unlikely to be top 
of foe Environment Committee's 
agenda, bow the PSA treats its 
buildings is a matter of national 
concern. Horror stories about its 
standard of care are legion. 

The burst pipe in foe basement 
of foe Victoria and Albert Mu- 
seum. which smashed porcelain 
cabinets and flooded foe Theatre 
Museum's library, was but foe 
Gotterdammerung of a whole 
Ring cycle of lesser disasters at the 
museum. At foe National Gallery, 
foe recent repainting of the Barry 
rooms in their original colours has 
been marred by crassly positioned 
lighting fixtures. The level of 
repair and maintenance at foe 
Tower of London is totally un- 
suiied to one of foe country’s most 
important ancient buildings, and 
the character of new work, such as 
foe Jewel House, is brutal and 
outmoded. 

Name foe PSA to anyone in the 
historic buildings world and the 
response will be a groan, or worse. 
They could mention, for example: 

The Royal Arsenal, Woolwich: 
A visitor in 1865 described it as 
presenting “sights which stand 
alone and unparalleled in history, 
a glorious spectacle wMch neither 
Greece with her' immense re- 
sources, nor Rome in her Imperial 
power could boast”. It is now “a 
spectacular desert”, according to 
Save Britain's Heritage. 

Within this wasteland there 
remains a core of 18 or so historic 
buildings, some dating from foe 
late 1 7fo and early 18th centuries 
and attributed to Vanbrugh. Of 
these, foe Brass Foundry, listed 
Grade 1, has bees restored but 
internally subdivided into a book 
repository. The earliest buildings 
on foe site, foe two surviving 
pavilions of foe Royal Laboratory 
of (696, stand forlorn and ne- 
glected. James Wyait’s Grand 
Store (1S06-13), three grandly 
detailed warehouse blocks around 
a square, is in a state of near- 
collapse. In foe courtyard there are 
shacks housing books from foe 


Clive Aslet charts the blundering record of 
the government’s heritage guardians 

A listed quango 
due for chop 



Consultant architect William Whitfield with a model df foe Richmond 
Terrace project: a grand design flawed by PSA interior de st ructio n 
British Museum. Emergency 


re- 
pairs are sporadically carnal out 
but no overall strategy has been 
devised to rescue the surviving 
buildings. 

• The former Royal Ordnance 
Depot, Weedon, near Northamp- 
ton: Thisis “another place that is 
stunningly impressive”, says Ken 
Powell of Save Britain's Heritage. 
It was built in 1803, at foe height 
of the Napoleonic Wars, on a site 
that was intended to be the very 
centre of England. Had the French 
invaded, George III would have 
been rushed there and boused in a 
royal pavilion, while soldiers from 
foe barracks could have been 
hurried by canal to whichever 
sector of war needed them most. 

The compound also contained a 
series of four pairs of stunning 
warehouse-like magazine build- 
ings. alternating with single bay 
blast houses. Military activity 
ceased in 1965. Shamefully, 20 
acres of the site were sold by foe 
old Ministry of Works five years 
later. Despite listing, foe royal 
pavilion and barracks were demol- 
ished and replaced by suburbs.-, 
houses. The remarkable magazine 
buildings survived but were al- 
lowed to fall into such a state of 
decay that a report commissioned 
in 1982 stated that repairs would 
cost more than £1 million. In 1 984 
they were sold by foe PSA to a 
property developer and foe site 
has been pul back on the market 
for six times what he paid. 

Neither fop PSA's presumed 


doty to protect foe herbage it owns 
for the nation, nor that of getting 
foe best price for its assets, would 
seem to have been fulfilled. 

• Haslar Naval Hospital, Ports- 
mouth: Originally foe Royal Na- 
val Hospital for Sick Sailors, it is, 
or was, a very handsome listed 
Georgian hospital in the form of a 
U with ends facing the Solent. The 
mam entrance faced the court- 
yard. It has a pedimented 
centrepiece derived from Palladio, 
with mil arched windows linked 
by a stone surround. In its day the 
largest brick structure in Europe, h 
was constructed in 1746-61 by 
Theodore Jacobsen, foe architect 
of the now demolished Fo undling 
Hospital in London and of Trinity 
College. Dublin. 

When it came to extending and 
modernizing foe hospital, foe PSA 
and its architects had foe unspeak- 
able idea of building a new wing 
right across foe mouth of the 
courtyard. The new block is fussy, 
small scale, antagonistic in its 
materials, devoid of geometry and 
decency. Only foe symmetry of foe 
original is respected, just 
& Richmond Terrace, Whitehall: 
The terrace, at right angles to 
Whitehall with an end opposite 
foe Cenotaph, is “an extremely 
rare example of uniform Georgian 
terrace design and a survival of 
Whitehall's domestic history.” 
according to Dan Cruiksbank, an 
expert on Georgian London. De- 
signed by Thomas Otawner in 
1819, it was used during foe 


Second World War by, among 
others, Lord Mountbatten as of- 
fices for Special Operations. But 
after 1945 it was blighted by 
government indecision mid left to 
decay until a campaign by foe 
• national conservation societies 
forced an inquiry in 1972. It was 
agreed that the building would be 
restored, keeping foe rooms on the 
front with their handsome details. 
But Cnukshank comments: “All 
the front rooms were removed 
through a series of tragic 
blunders.” 

The facade is sow being re- 
stored impeccably, under consul- 
tant architects, but b ehin d foe 
facade the terrace has been re- 
constructed to a new plan. The 
character and historic integrity of 
the old rooms with their uneven 
walls has been destroyed. Some 
period details will be repfaced, 
having been preserved in a PSA 
store. Others, such as the best 
chimney-piece, were smashed 
while still in foe budding. 

The PSA is capable of carrying 
out first-class work, particularly 
when under the supervision of foe 
small but expert staff at foe 
Historic Buildings and Monu- 
ments Commission for England 
(English Heritage) or an outside 
consultant arcbitecLThe £17 mil- 
lion restoration of Fort George, 
Inverness, built after Cufloden, is 
admirable. Special projects of this 
.kind, however, are few, and the 
vast majority of buildings receive 
no such expert attention. Budd- 
ings not in the public eye are left to 
rot through lade of maintenance; 
too often, repair and conversion 
work is undertaken without 
consultation. 

This is possible because of the 
system by which government 
buildings are exempted from the 
usual systems of planning consent 
and listed budding control. The 
Grown is above the law. 

At the Royal Society of Arts 
conference last month, Michael 
Heseltine, a fanner Environment 
Secretary, advocated privatizing 
sections of the PSA and returning 
its* management to foe depart- 
ments that occupy them. This has 
already happened with British 
embassies abroad, sow run di- 
rectly by the Foreign Office. 

Whereas museums and galleries 
have export curators capable of 
taking decisions on histone build- 
ings, government departments do 
not. But there is every argument 
far them to employ outside archi- 
tects. A private architect worth his 
salt will fight a philistine client 
until he accepts an architecturally 
plausible solution. The PSA on 
foe other hand. Is constantly to be 
found in a supine pose, agreeing to 
— and perpetrating — travesties. 

An independent architect has 
foe final weapon of resignation. 
The PSA can never resign. It may 
be time it is sacked. 

© Ttowa HMVfMpmw, 1988. 

dive. islet is architectural editor of 
Country Life. 



by separating foe sexes and garb- 
ing women up to foe eyeballs; our 
Western custom has been to rely 
upon male self-controL A parallel 
case is foe reckless flaunting of 
goods in supermarkets, putting a 
heavy strain on on those inclin ed 
to larceny. 

“Recklessness” in these argu- 
ments is thus one face of the other 
side of the coin of freedom: not, 
indeed, a very attractive face, but 
one we had better reckon with 
until we are translated to 
angelhood. Lacking the capacity 
for self-management, many peo- 
ple otherwise enthusiastic about, 
freedom begin to demand protec- 
tion from the evils which usually 
accompany it And there are 
always politicians ready to offer 
foe demanded protection. But in 
politics, nothing is ever quite what 
it seems. 'Compassion in private 
life is one of foe supreme virtues, 
but compassion in politics is 
concerned not with people but 
with classes of people. It is thus 
often the handmaid of despotism, 
wtoch is the propensity of the 
powerful to manage foe fives of 
foe powerless. 

Beyond a certain point, protect- 
ing people by regulating things 
construed as evil enfeebles. The 
idea that offering temptation to 
our fellow citizens is reckless is, 
then, one for which a strong case 
can be made, both in terms of foe 
moral duty not to exploit failings 
and in terms of foe evident 
weakness of human beings. But it 
is in foe highest degree a dan- 
gerous argument For if we suc- 
cumb to ft, we shall soon lose the 
benefits of a society in wtoch we 
are free to eqjoy all mann er of 
marvellous temptations on con- 
dition that, nnlike foe Oscar 
Wildes of this world, we succumb 
to them only sometimes, and 
judiciously. 

© Tfcw Nwpnwn, IBM. 

Kenneth Minogue, Professor of 
Political Science at the London 
School of Economics, is present ing 
The New Enlightenment on Chan- 
nel 4 ( Wednesdays, 8.30). 


New York . . , 

The En glish sing in puts, the Irish 
<n n g at wakes — and foe Jews sing- 
m the SEC {Securities & Exchange 
Commiss ion). Wan Street was 
awash with sick jokes this week as 
foe spreading insider trading scan- 
dal sent waves of selling through 
the market. 

It is tempting to see this 
alertness to the ethnicity of those 
“helping, the police with their 
inquiries” as evidence of erode 

prejudice pervading American life 
— except for the fact that most of 
foe jokes seem to be invented by 
Jews. Similarly, the uproar about 
the use of inside information may 
have more to do with mis- 
conceived law and regulation than 
with some sudden collapse of 
moral standards in the financial 
community. 

Strictly speaking, insider trad- 
ing fa foe buying or selling of a 
stock by those with privileged 
information about it. They might 
be directors or officers in the 
company, or particularly large 
shareholders. Their activities are 
legal if the information on which ~ 
they are acting, such as news about 
sales or earnings, has been dis- 
seminated to the public and if 
their share transactions are re- 
ported to the SEC 

The current insider imbroglio 
has centred (up to now) on the 
activities of “risk arbitrageurs” — 
speculators who specialize in accu- 
mulating shares of companies 
threatened by takeover bids. Often 
they become major shareholders, 
initiate takeovers themselves, and 
even intervene in the management 
of their companies. 

Arbitrageurs are intensely un- 
popular with many important 
people. Incumbent managements 
have been bonified at foe destruc- 
tion of whole ways of comfortable 
corporate life following foe recent 
takeovers of companies that were 
household names in America, 
among them Gulf Oil and the 
TWA airline: American journal- 
ists and politicians, who because 
of this country’s absence of a 
formal class structure tend to 
convince themselves that they 
constitute the elite, are distressed 
by the successful arbitrageurs’ 
rapid accumulation of riches. 

For example. Ivan F. Boesky. 
whose apprension by the SEC 
caused this latest splash, was the 
son of an immigrant delicatessen 
owner in Detroit He graduated 
from the obscure Detroit College 
of Law and came to New York 
because no tog Detroit law firm 
would hire him, to 20 years on 
Wall Street he amassed a net 
worth (assets Jess debt) estimated 
at $250 million. 

It is less dear that shareowners 
dislike arbitrageurs. Takeover of- 
fers frequently represent an 
opportunity for them to sell out at 
prices substantially above those 


prevailing in the market This may 
be inconvenient for company 
managers, but it’s not the com- 
pany managers who own foe 
stock. Arid from an economic 
standpoint — whatever the objec- 
tions raised in an article on this 
page yesterday — takeovers are a 
way in which capital is shifted out 
of unprofitable and into profitable 
areas, regardless of bow much of it 
passes thro ugh an asset-stripper’s 
bank account Otherwise com- 
pany managers have a marked 
tendency to at on cash reserves, or 
to spend them on empire building. 

Unfortunately for arbitrageurs, 
and for the American capital 
markets in general, securities leg- 
islation hero was written after the 
1929 Great Crash in the belief that 
it had been caused by “manip- 
ulation". TMs view was about as 
sophisticated as foe simultaneous 
conclusion by a congressional 
co mmittee that foe First World 
War was caused by “munitions 
kings”. 

■ But the SEC, a ponderous legal 
bureaucracy, has been set up to 
enforce “fairness”. Its definition is 
so rigorous that it has even argued 
that an investor landing at an 
airport, who saw through the 
plane window that a factory was 
on fire, should not rush to the 
phone to sell Ms stock until the 
information had been fully dis- 
seminated. 

The restrictions on insider trad- 
ing reflect a fundamentally non- 
economic theory of information. 
In the grossly idealized case 
above, for example, critics would 
argue that SEC regulation has 
reduced the incentive for inves- 
tors both to find out about fires 
and to sound the alarm by selling 
stock (winch would effectively put 
the information into the market 
place). It has interfered with the 
efBdfaicy of the market, and, since 
the profit opportunities for those 
actually possessing inside infonn- 
atioc are. modi greater when 
information is suppressed, it has 
paradoxically created a greater 
incentive for lawbreaking, just as 
Prohibition made a bonanza out 
of illegal liquor sales. 

Boesky, of course, was also 
actually bribing an investment 
banker to break his employer's 
confidence. But here also there fa a 
bafancing.mechanism in foe shape 
of self-regulation stemming from 
the employer’s self-interest, not to 
mention the law of fraud. 

Ironically, there are investment 
advisory services that have been 
able to beat the market by 
following foe legal insider trading 
reported to the SEC Their 
loudly exp r e ssed view is that foe 
SEC should slop arresting arbitra- 
geurs — and try harder to make 
them file on time. 


The author is a senior editor of 
Forbes Magazine. 


Philip Howard 

Overwhelmed 
by history 


How does one write history these 
days? It was so much easier when 
foe world was simpler And Bela 
died, and Jobab the son of Zerah 
of Bozrah reigned in his stead. 
Herodotus, Father of History, 
Father of Lies, simply packed Ms 
reporter’s tablets and went off on a 
jaunt to gossip about crocodiles 
with Egyptian priests, or sketch 
foe topography of Babylon. 

In the days when history was 
supposed to run on royal railway 
lines, as in Sellar and Yea tman, it 
was simplified into Good Things 
and Bad Things: Alfred had a very 
interesting wife called Lady Win- 
dermere (The Lady of the Lake), 
who was always clothed in foe 
same white frock, and used to go 
-bathing with Sir Launcelot and 
was thus a Bad Queen. 

Gibbon, Macaulay and our 
other giant historians dealt with 
vast and complex matters but gave 
them a compulsive course that 
make their histories hard to put 
down even for. foe general reader, 
though Gibbon does eventually 
run out of steam. 

It is not that history is nor being 
written. More of it pours off foe 
academic presses in a year than 
used to be published in a century. 
One trouble with history today is 
that it has become increasingly 
specialized and esoteric for foe 
general reader for example, Early 
Victorian Water Engineers by 
Geoffrey Morse Binnie, published 
in 1981. Or bow about Millen- 
nium Charisma Among the Path 
ans (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 
1976)? Or care for a bite at 
Cannibalism and the Common 
Law, by A.W. Brian Simpson, 
published earlier this year? All 
good stuff no doubt, for fans of 
the subjects. But foe general reader 
would need to be omnivorous or 
very bored to tackle them. 

There are few books for foe 
intelligent general reader in the 
desert that stretches between ro- 
mances for visitors to Madame 
Tussauds and academic works for 
foe specialist Are there any? 

Another trouble is that prosop- 
ography and foe other modern 
historiographic techniques, in- 
tended to make history more 
scientific, tend to make dry read- 
ing, except from the pen of a 
genius like Ronnie Syme or 
Braudel. I suspect that to write big 
history you need a bee in your 
bonnet rather than academic 
objectivity: Macaulay. Gibbon, 
and Tacitus certainly had queen 
bees in their bonnets. If this is 
true, why are Marxist historians 
and other modem historicists, 


who certainly have bees in their 
bonnets and a Procrustean atti- 
tude to their material, unreadable? 
But foe principal trouble with 
trying to write history today is that 
there is too much of it The world 
is no longer run by a handful of 
rulers in Western Europe. And 
there is more to history they days 
than who beat whom in which 
battle, and who succeeded whom 
on what throne — there always 
was, but it was deemed irrelevant 



CMsWfanmfl 

International politics and econ- 
omics from all around the world 
are vital, no doubt But they are 
hard to turn into compulsive 
reading. And that is why people 
who used to read history have 
turned to the comparatively new 
literary genres of biography and 
historical fiction. The life of one 
person, and foe fictional re- 
creation of past time, are more 
alrve than international treaties, 
and more fun to read. They may 
also be more truthfuL 

This confiision about what is 
important in the long eye of 
history also affects us hod-carriers 
of history, the journos. The rimes 
is supposed to be the paper of 
record, but which of our records 
wll be considered significant by a 
historian in a century's time? 
Most of the things we work 
ourselves into a sweat of excite- 
ment about, whether Fudge suc- 
ceeds Mudge as leader of foe 
Neanderthal-Party, what the Bud- 
get will contain, foe Salt talks, will 
seem as remote as and less 
interesting than foe laws of 
Lykouigos in Ancient Sparta 30 
centuries ago. Let us hope that the 
poor Noah, who survives foe 
cataclysm of events to write our • 
MStory, has a sympathetic imag- 
ination to see us as we are, and 
make allowances. 






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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


■6 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: QM81 4100 

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT 


Crisis for destitute homeless 



■* 


children who may be buried on 
Saddleworth Moor, the Moots 
murderers have returned to 
television news bulletins and 
the front pages of popular 
newspapers. Such fascination 
with crimes which, however 
terrible, took place over 
twenty years ago, undoubtedly 
has its morbid side. To dwell 
on cruelty and horror is one of 
the less attractive aspects of 
human nature, but it must be 
admitted that it also one of its 
strongest and most permanent 

features. 

There is also, however, a 
cathartic element in it One 
reason for the sharpness of the 
public reaction to any reports 
involving Hindley and Brady 
is that it reminds us of the 
extraordinary viciousness of 
their crimes. To torture and 
loll peop le for pleasure is vile 
in the extreme but, alas, it is 
not unique. The American 
police have even invented the 
term “recreational murders” 
to describe it But to torture 
and kill children, and to record 
their sufferings for later enjoy- 
ment, reveals a depravity 
which people find beyond 
belief. It is natural both that 
they should be alert to any 
news involving such crimes 
and that they should want to 
be reassured that the c riminals 
have been fittingly punished. 


Hindley’ 
participation in their joint 
crime strikes people as even 
more alarming than Brady’s 
since cruelty to children seems 
a more profound violation of a 
woman’s nature than of a 
man’s. It is certain that she has 
proved the stronger of the two. 
He has “cracked” in prison 
whereas die has maintained a 
lively interest in life, has found 
friends among the prisoners, 
and has assisted Lord Long- 
ford and others to conduct a 
campaign for her release. 

It is, of course, that cam- 
paign which accounts for the 
public’s nervous suspicion 
that any new development in 
the case might indicate her 
parole. Her willingness to help 
the police on this occasion is 
thus interpreted as a cynical 
move either to avoid prosecu- 
tion for any further murders 
that come to light, or to 
convince the Parole Board, as 
she has convinced Lord Long- 
ford, that she is a changed 
woman, deeply religious and 
fit to cmter normal life again. 

She may, indeed, have 
changed in many ways. It 
would be remarkable if she 
had not changed after twenty 
years in which die was able to 
reflect upon her past crimes. 
But the state of psychiatric 
medicine is still sufficiently 
primitive for society to be 
unable to rely on the assur- 


In this regard, the greater 

MR GANDHI’S TAR BABY 


ances of psychiatrists that 
someone has entirely recov- 
ered from a dangerous mental 
state and that they will never 
suffer a relapse. Behaviour in 
prison is not a very reliable 
guide to behaviour outside. 
And when the criminal has 
committed acts as perverted as 
the crimes of which Hindley 
was guilty, we cannot risk a 
repetition. The safety of the 
public requires her continued 
detention. 

That practical consideration 
is not, however, the sole one. 
Hindley should remain in 
prison because she has 
committed crimes which, in 
the absence of the death 
penalty, deserve the exemplary 
punishment of life imprison- 
ment. That is so even if — as 
Christians ' must hope and 
believe possible — die has 
genuinely repented of her sins 
and found some relief from her 
guilt in turning to God. One 
symptom of genuine repen- 
tance, indeed, would be her 
acceptance of the justice of her 
punishment and a willingess to 
hope for God’s grace in the life 
and work of prison. 

To ask that of Hindley, Lead 
Longford notwithstanding, is 
not to refuse to forgive her as 
God instructs us to forgive 
repentant sinners. It is to 
recognise that by her acts she 
has rightly forfeited freedom 
in the everyday meaning of the 
word and can now only hope 
for that spiritual freedom 
which God alone can bestow. 


Tamil guerrilla leaders this 
week rejected for the second 
time in a month the Sri 
Lankan government’s latest 
terms for settling the island's 
ethnic conflict. The Liberation 
Tigers of Tamil Elam, the 
largest of the guerrilla 
organizations, announced in- 
stead that they would set up an 
independent state in northern 
Sri Lanka on January 1. 

The proposed peace terms 
granted the Tamils significant 
autonomy within newly cre- 
ated provincial counriJs. But 
on the question of linking the 
northern and -eastern prov- 
inces to create a: Tamil en- 
clave, the best on offer was a 
hint that the government in 
Colombo would, within IS 
months of an agreement being 
concluded, appoint a bound- 
aries commission to investi- 
gate the matter. 

For the five guerrilla 
organizations who were asked 
to give up their fight for an ’ 
independent Elam this was not 
enough. For President 
Jayawardene, who already 
feces strong political and re- 
ligious opposition to his 
devolution proposals, it would 
have been difficult to offer 
more. 

The impasse will have im- 
mediate repercussions in Sri 
Lanka. Now that the attempt 
to reach a political com- 
promise has foiled. President 
Jayawardene will be under 


great pressure to try a military 
solution. Whenever the politi- 
cal process has faltered in the 
past, the army has been quick 
to step in. And when it does, 
retaliation from the guerrillas 
is swift This means that the 
violence is now likely to 
escalate. 

Much will depend on how 
Mr Rajiv Gandhi’s govern- 
ment in India responds. Pre- 
viously it has veered between 
support for and criticism of the 
Sri Lankan government's pos- 
ition. But its most recent 
public pronouncements com- 
mit it to supporting the Co- 
lombo government. India 
recommended acceptance of 
die peace terms to the guerril- 
las and may be displeased by 
their refaction. 

Ifthat is so, it is possible that 
Mr Gandhi may proceed to 
expel them from their sanc- 
tuaries in south India. He 
intimated such action when 
toe Madras police took action 
against guerrilla establish- 
ments earlier this month. 

The effect of such action 
will, however, be limited. 
Most of the guerrillas have 
anticipated just such action 
and are well prepared. Yet it 
will limit India’s influence on 
any solution to the Tamil 
question and give the im- 
pression that , she is washing 
her hands of the Sri Lankan 
crisis. 

There are those who would 


welcome such a solution on 
the grounds that it is an 
internal problem for Sri Lanka 
and the two sides might be 
‘ better left to slug it out 
between themselves. 

Yet India may be the only 
party which could, by virtue of 
the capital it has bum up with 
both sides, eventually help to 
formulate an acceptable solu- 
tion. For this reason it might 
be better for India to regard the 
breakdown of the talks as a 
pause in the peace process, 
rather than a signal to extricate 
itself from the Sri Lankan 
tangle. 

If India were to encourage 
the Colombo government to. 
offer a partition of the eastern 
province so as to unite the 
T amil sector with the north 
and if at the same time it were 
to exert pressure on the guerril- 
las to accept this partial con- 
cession, the gap between the 
two sides might just be 
bridged. 

It will not be easy, however. 
It will mean handling the 
guerrillas with an ingenuity 
that has hitherto been lacking. 
It will mean asking President 
Jaywardene to accept greater 
political risks than he has so 
far taken. It might, eventually, 
pay off But since the risks and 
the constitutional responsibil- 
ities are President Jay- 
wardene’s, his must be the 
final decision on its practical- 
ity. 


FOURTH LEADER 


You can get almost anything 
by telephone these days, from 
gardening advice to Dial-a- 
Dish in several senses of dish, 
if you can only conned But it 
has been left to the Italians to 
introduce English lessons by 
telephone. The Italian tele- 
phone company SEP has 
started to teach English on two 
direct lines. The beginners’ 
and advanced courses, entitled 
“Yes” and “Hello,” consist of 
150 three-minute lessons for 
360 lire or about 30p each. The 
service has been launched in 
Rome, Milan, Turin. Genoa, 
and Florence, and will soon be 
extended to other cities. The 
accompanying text, book, 
which has just gone on sale, 
gives as Lesson No 1: a 
telephone conversation. 

This is surprising news for 
those of us who thought of 
Italian telephones as the 

equivalent of our Space In- 
vader machines. By their loca- 
tion in the most crowded 
comer of the bistro, by tbe 
treasure hunt to procure the 
necessary tokens* by tbe exotic 
humming and pinging noises 
they make, they have seemed 
primarily a test of skill rather 
than a means of communica- 
tion. 

But if they are going to start 
giving English lessons, we 
doubt whether they are pro- _■ 
dent to begin with the most 
sophisticated and ambiguous 
of English dialers. Telephone 
English is different from fece- . 
to-face conversation because it 
lades the non-verbal aids and 
modifiers; nods and winks, 
raised eyebrows, and for Ital- 


ians the rapidly reciprocating 
hand like a man drying lettuce. 
People who plunge straight 
into an exercise in Telephone 
English without stating their 
names dearly are assuming 
that we ran see them or can 
immediate ly recognize their 
voices which is self-important. 

At a still more advanced 
level, Italian pupils in Tele- 
phone English wffl need to be 
taught how to deal with -the 
inhuman voice of the answer- 
ing machine, with its whim- 
sical or crisp instructions that 
can turn articulate gasbags into 
stuttering incoherents. There 
is an answering machine mes- 
sage in California that goes; 
“You have reached 

the .family. What you hear is 

the barking of our killer 
Doberman Pinscher, Wolf 
Please leave a message after 
the tone.” The Telephone 
En glish speaker who comes up 
with a snappy reply to that 
message is Alpha Plus. 

The management psycholo- 
gists, who have made British 
Airways staff so volubly polite 
that yon want to strangle them, 
have just started to get a grip 
on the telephone techniques of 
big companies. If you ring one 
of them these days, the op- 
erator will say sweetly: “Good 
morning. Sunbeam Extraction 
from Cucumbers Inter- 
national T hank yon for call- 
ing. We will play some music 
while you - are waiting to be 
connected” This is Black Belt 
Telephone English technique. 
It at once puts the caller at a 
disadvantage, especially if he 
has telephoned to .complain, . 


and does not want to be 
thanked for anything. 

At some stags in the course 
the Italian learners in the 
telephone bent are going to 
have to be initiated in the 
Chicken Game, first-to-the- 
’phone-is-a-wimp, of Tele- 
phone English. This is played 
mainly by 1 secretaries and 
assistants, and its conventions 
are as complex as chess. The 
trick is to be the last to get 
one’s boss on the line, so that it 
is the other party who has to 
do the waiting. Status and 
machismo depend upon not 
being the one who is hanging 
on, and the subterfuges used to 
get the other main speaker to 
commit himself to the ’phone 
first are as beautifully intricate 
as the grammar of shall and 
wifl. 

Learners of Telephone Eng- 
lish will also need to master 
the Thurber unseen technique; 
“Well, if I called the wrong 
number, why did you answer 
the ’phone?” At A-Ievel they 
will tackle such problems as 
what to reply when telephoned 
at two o’clod: in the morning 
with the cheerful remark: “I do 
hope I haven’t disturbed you.” 
Answer: the text book reply is: 
“Oh, no; that’s quite all nght I 
had to get up to answer the 
telephone anyway.” 

Teaching English by the 
telephone is a commendable 
and let us ‘ hope profitable 
project. The mistake is to start 
with tbe most difficult of all 
sorts of English. Italians would 
be wiser to imitate us and 
spend the first few years 
learning simpler types of Eng- 
lish, such as Beowulf and the 
Fourth Leader. 


From Dr Malcolm P. I. Weller 
Sir. I should like to draw attention 
to the plight of the mentally Di 
deprived of services. Mr John 
Mowbray, QC, is not quite correct 
in suggesting (November 10) that 
Ban stead was the first large mental 
hospital to close. An earlier case 
was St Wuhstas’s, a specialist 
rehabilitation hospital at Malvern, 
from which the patients were 
removed last January. 

In both cases tbe hospitals to 
which the patients were trans- 
ferred had themselves been des- 
ignated for closure. Horton, 
Banstearfs successor, has now 
been reprieved, but St Wuifstan’s 
successor, Powick Hospital, at 
Worcester, is energetically plan- 
ning for closure in 1988. 

Mr Mowbray and others use die 
term “released” for the com- 
pulsory ejection of voluntary pa- 
tients who have chosen to spend 
many years in a protected hospital 
environment. Of the long-stay 
patients at Friem Hospital, des- 
ignated for closure soon, less than 
2 per cent are detained com- 
pulsorily and many of these are so 
detained under Home Office 
directives. 

hi assessing the numbers requir- 
ing extensive care, so-called high- 
dependency patients, it is not 
sufficient to plan for tbe popula- 
tion of long-stay patients in hos- 
pitals. It is also necessary to 
provide for those equally disabled 
unfortunates who are not in 
hospital but whose needs are 
either barely served by existing 
arrangements or not at a!L 
Last Christmas my son and I 
found actively hafluemating desti- 
tute men who had never received 
any treatment, many not 
any benefits of any kind. These 
mot, who are being “cared for” in 
the “community”, were without 
friends or family support and 
generally without dental or medi- 
cal care. One man with tuberculo- 
sis was sleeping under the arches 
of Charing Cross station on 
Christmas Eve without his 
medication. 

It is this group on whom our 
planning should focus as a matiw 
of the most pressing priority. 


The deliberate closure last year 
of Camberwell Reception Centre, 
the largest in Europe, where one in 
five had tuberculosis and 80 per 
cent slept rough, has been unhelp- 
ful, as has the move to redesignate 
Bruce House as a hotel and 
prevent open access, at a time 
when more than 2,000 common 
lodging houses have recently 
closed in Loudon. 

The bousing by local authori- 
ties, with a statutory obligation to 
the vulnerable homeless, of a mere 
4,000 out of the 70,000 long-stay 
patients discharged since 1954 
docs little to inspire confidence. 
Yours faithfully, 

M. WELLER (Vice-Chairman. 
North East Thames Regional 
Committee for Hospital Medical 
Services). 

Friem Hospital 
Friem Barnet Road, N1 1. 
November 20. 

Cold comfort? 

From the Rep Edward Underhill 
Sir, “TWo million riiilriran ftce a 
jumble sale Christmas”, lamented 
the Leader of the Opposition in 
the debate on the Queen’s speech 
(report, November 13). They will 
not be able to “wear the dbthes 
that other children enjoy”, he said. 

But might this be no bad thing? 
Don’t most children— even in this 
inner-city parish — have too many 
and too expensive clothes? It 
would be better if we all were more 
frugal and sensible in our buying 
of clothes; we would then not only 
have better quality clothing, but 
also would have spare cash to give 
to those in other places that have 
no dothes. 

And, Sir, what is wrong with 
jumble sale or, at least, Oxfam 
tailoring? Recently my local 
Oxfam shop has provided me with 
two shooting suits (£7 each) and a 
22oz weight hacking jacket which 
is, literally, the envy of the 
discerning wherever and when- 
ever it is worn. 

Yours sincerely, 

EDWARD UNDERHILL, 

St George’s Vicarage, 

327 Durham Road, 

Gateshead, Tyne and Wear. 


Funding the arts 

From the Chairman of the Trust- 
ees of the National Portrait Gallery 
Sir, Yon report (November 18) the 
Government’s financial pro- 
visions for the arts for next year, 
which sadly do not take seriously 
into account one of the most 
urgent and long-standing needs, 
namely additional mace for the 
National Portrait Gallery, long 
recognised by government as a top 
priority. 

In recent years the gaudy’s 
collecting policy has been widened 
to include nrajar contemporary 
'figures. This has inevitably inten- 
sified the need for more gallery 
space, which was already acute. 
The work of living artists, which 
we have tried so hard to 
encourage, and the inspirational 
images of the makers of modem 


British history, cannot be dis- 
played for the benefit of our ever- 
increasing numbers of visitors. 

This situation is ironic, since we 
have in. recent years ceded two 
sites to the National Gallery for its 
expansion. It could be solved 
quite simply. The adjacent she of 
the former dental hospital in 
Leicester Square is on offer to the 
gallery for the display of our 
twentieth-century collections. 

This golden opportunity, which 
offers the gallery, Leicester Square 
and the nation so much, cannot be 
allowed to pass. The gallery has 
only until November 28 to find 
the funds before the site is due to 
be sold on the open market 
Yours faithfully, 

KENYON, 

Chairman of the Trustees, 
National Portrait Gallery, 

St Martin’s Place, WC2. 


Root problem 

From the Leader of the West- 
minster City Council 
Sir, I read with mounting honor 
Bernard Levin’s account (Novem- 
ber 17) of how my city council had 
apparently dithered for nearly two 
years while some of his friends in 
Carlton Hill, NW8, had un- 
successfully attempted to resolve a 
longstanding problem concerning 
the roots of a wee [ting willow tree 
in their front garden. 

“What will you do?”, Mr Levin 
asked me. 

First I sought the facts. These 
confirmed the complaint in all but 
minor detail. Next we took im- 
mediate action. At 11 a m. the 
following day permission was 
granted for the roots of tbe 
offending tree to be pruned. At the 
same time, officers were in- 
structed to formally apologise for 
tbe delays and inspect tbe prop- 
erty with the local councillor 
before tbe end of this week. 

A day later we decided to 
rationalise and redefine the duties 
of our tree officer to prevent a 
repetition of this complaint. Sub- 
sequently, new working guide- 


lines and procedures are being 
drawn up and implemented. 

Clashes between householders 
and environment-conscious coun- 
cils such as Westminster are 
inevitable. Naturally, I am sorry 
when we do not get it right every 
time; but we will not stop trying. 
Yours faithfully, 

SHIRLEY PORTER, Leader, 
Westminster City' Council, 
Westminster City Hall, 

Victoria Street, SW1. 

November 20. 

From Mr M. C. Hyde 
Sir, “Woodman, spare that tree” is 
an injunction which any sensi ble 
citizen would ignore if it threat- 
ened his hearth and home, 
particularly if the offending tree 
was not protected by a preserva- 
tion order. Instead of using your 
space to petition Lady Porter, 
Leader ofWestminsterChy Coun- 
cil Bernard Levin should have 
castigated his friends for a singular 
lack of common sense. 

Yours truly, 

M. C. HYDE, 

6a West Grove, 

Greenwich, SE10. 

November 18. 


Grant of arms 

From Arundd Herald of Arms 
Extraordinary 

Sir. My friend Robert Smith 
(November 12) has misdirected 
himself and my colleague, Somer- 
set Herald (October 24) was 
correct. 

The English Kings of Arms are 
authorised by the Sovereign, in 
their letters patent of appoint- 
ment, to grant arms to “eminent 
men subject to the authority of the 
Earl Marshal first obtained” 
(“men” embrace women and cor- 
porate bodies). 

Eminence is basically a matter 
of common sense. In Tudor times 
one finds the phrase “a worthy 
man of good repute and adequate 
substance”: not a bad definition, 
which would rule out a millionaire 
if he did not measure up to the 
other criteria. 

It is erroneous to believe that 
the possession of the lordship of a 


manor automatically carried with 
it a coat of aims. Manors go back 
to SUxon times, well before coats 
of arms were invented. In the 
earliest times and for many centu- 
ries, they were the lowest level of 
administrative and judicial 
authority. Today the rights and 
duties of lords of manors are no 
more than a vestigial echo of their 
past importance. 

Mr Smith also shows a woeful 
lack of knowledge of the wording 
of letters patent granting armorial 
bearings. The object of describing 
a grantee of arms in the letters 
patent is to distinguish one Smith 
from another Smith with suf- 
ficient precision to avoid confu- 
sion between the two. 

Yours faithfully. 

RODNEY DENNYS. 

Arundel Herald of Aims Extraor- 
dinary, 

College of Anns, 

Queen Victoria Street. EC4. 
November 13. 


Over the top 

From Mr Hugh Williams 
Sir, I read with mixed feelings 
your report (November 15) about 
the introduction of surdities at 
Covent Garden. I myself had 
encountered them for the first 
time only a few days previously 
during Glyndeboume’s splendid 
touring production of Simon 
Boccanegra at the Palace Theatre, 
Manchester. My view was that 
although they aided comprehen- 
sion, they undermined apprecia- 
tion and spoiled tbe total impact 
ofa successful performance. 

However, it also occurred tome 
that it would be much better if the 


surtitie screen were used to 
present a thorough synopsis of 
each act, including dialogue ex- 
cerpts, before the house lights were 
dimmed. This would not only help 
understanding, h would avoid 
distraction. It would also dispense 
with the need for operagoers to 
spend the interval scrutinising the 
synopsis printed in the pro- 
gramme — ihe most ami-social 
method of developing eye strain 
that I have yet discovered. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. H. WILLIAMS, 

Head of Broadcasting, North- 
West, BBC, 

New Broadcasting House, 

Oxford Road. Manchester. 


Putting atom of 
truth in focus 

From Professor M. J. Seaton, FRS 
Sir, In an article of November 15 
the Canon of Windsor, Derek 
Sianesby, claims that contem- 
porary science has characteristics 
which lead us immediately to the 
realm of religion and theology. 
Previous articles in your religious 
affairs column have advanced 

similar claims and I think that the 

time has come for them to be 
challenged. 

The canon's arguments are con- 
cerned with the “new” physics and 
in particular with quantum the- 
ory, which was developed during 
the first 30 years of foe present 
century and is by now no more 
new than “modem” an is modern. 

The theory is about atoms, of 
which there are about 50 billion 
billion in every cubic centimetre 
of atmospheric air. Since atoms 
have sizes very different from 
those of everyday objects it is not 
surprising that the concepts re- 
quired to describe them are not 
everyday concepts. 

Quantum theory provides a 
mathematical description of 
atomic phenomena which is quite 
remarkably powerful a point 
which foe theologians often mil to 
appreciate. Far from being narrow 
and esoteric, of interest only to the 
specialist, tire theory is of great 
power in explaining foe world 
about us: why oxygen is a gas mid 
iron a metal; how atoms combine 
to form molecules; the properties 
of chemical compounds; the 
mechanisms by which light is 
emitted and absorbed by matter. A 
large part of modern technology is 
applied quantum theory. 

The Canon of Windsor claims 
that quantum theory contains a 
mystical element which brings 
man “to his knees once again”. I 
find three dictionary definitions of 
foe word “mystical”: having a 
spiritual character by virtue of a 
union with god; of dark import; 
and connected with occult rites. 
None of them, to my knowledge, 
has any relevance to quantum 
theory, and I see no reason why 
one of foe greatest intellectual 
achievements - of humankind 
should bring us to our knees. 

There remains foe “slippery 
subject of truth”, to which the 
canon refers. I don’t think that 
most scientists find it so slippery. 
There is a great deal which we 
know and a lot more which we 
don’t That is what makes science 
so exciting. 

Yours truly, 

M. J. SEATON, 

University College London, 
Department of Physics and 
Astronomy, 

Gower Street, WCI. 

November 16. 

Aids precaution 

From the Bishop of Brentwood 
Sir, In your news report on Aids 
(November 1 8, later editions) you 
mention that the priests of foe 
Roman Catholic Diocese ofBrent- 
wood have been advised to use a 
disposable spoon when giving 
communion to Aids sufferers. 
You omitted to say that this 
advice only concerned those in 
hospital w hen there was barrier 
nursing, and would only be done 
in consultation with foe hospital 
authorities. 

As regards communion in 
church and drinking from foe 
chalice, medical evidence over- 
whelmingly states that there is no 
danger of contracting Aids when 
receiving communion from the 
shared cup. 

In foe present situation it is 
important that we show very real 
compassion and above all that we 
help to overcome misunderstand- 
ings and fears. 

Yours faithfully, 
tTHOMAS McMAHON, 

Bishop’s House, 

Stock, Ingatestone, 

Essex. 

English in schools 

From Mr H. Cunnington 
Sir. In assuring his audience that 
there is no intention of reintroduc- 
ing traditional grammar into the 
English curriculum Mr Baker 
missed tbe point (report, Novem- 
ber 8). It is not its complexity that 
is at fault; it is tbe fact that it has 
no effect on foe way a youngster 
writes. 

Teachers who years ago had to 
administer it in weekly doses were 
well aware that whatever else they 
were doing they were not helping 
their pupils to write a more 
■vigorous or even a more “correct” 
prose. Their views were confirmed 
by research carried out in the 
1960s, and by foe work of linguis- 
tic scientists. 

In 1964 tbe report of tbe 
Secondary School Examinations 
Council on foe examining of 
English language referred to 
traditionally presented rules of 
grammar which have been arti- 
ficially imposed upon the language. 
They have had little relevance to 
usage at any past time and they have 
even less to contemporary usage. 

If there has been a decline in 
standards of literacy I suppose it is 
natural to cast around for such an 
attractively easy explanation. 

It will be interesting to see foe 
terms of reference of the new 
committee. “What pupils should 
- be taught about (my italics) the 
language” has an ominous sound. 

It might augur a return to English 
through exercises. Hundreds of 
schoolchildren have wasted hun- 
dreds of hours in turning direct 
speech into indirect or in scanning 
a passage in search of a zeugma, 
proceedings of the same level of 
futility as paraphrasing Hamlet's 
soliloquies. Is there really a need 
for yet another inquiiy? 

Yours faithfully, 

H. CUNNINGTON, 

4 Hilltop Close, 

Rayleigh, 

Essex. 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 22 1922 

The first scheduled airline flight, 
according to Air Facts and Feats 
(GuiimesB Superlatives) woe front 
London to Paris on August 25, 
J919, landing at Paris two and a 

haif hours after take-off in bed 

weather. The pilot was employed 
by Air Transport and Triad Ltd, 
the first British airline company 
to be roistered, in 1916. The 
national airline, Imperial 
Airways, was formed on April 1, 
1924. 


COMFORT IN AIR 
TRAVEL. 


THE VEN TILATION 
DIFFICULTY. 


OFFICIAL PAMPHLET. 

(By Our Aeronautical 
Correspondent) 

AS those who have travelled by 
aeroplane have a story to teD of 
noise, of frustrated attempts at 
conversation, and of the smell of I 
dope and petroL Some can relate 
disturbing experiences of air-sick 
Others contrast the exhil- 


aration of travelling in an open 
nwhim with the very different 
sem ati o na received is flying in an 


enclosed saloon. Still others de- 
clare that the sense of security 
derived from the walls and ceiling 
of a cabin and a seat in 
comfortable lounge chair out- 
weighs ah the “uplift” inspira- 
tion that is to be got from facing 
foe fierce, fresh air-stream in an 
open aeroplane. The differences 
are foe differences that separate 
ocean travel in a finer anri in 
destroyer. From foe point of view 
of appreciation they appear to be 
physical and psychological. The 
Air Council h»n rfiMMwH these 
mattera and several others, “for the 
information of all concerned**, in 
an admirable pamphlet entitled 
“Medical Notes in Connexion with 
Commercial Aircraft 0 . 

It is pointed out that an aerial 
journey to-day, for the unaccus 
tomed passenger, abnormally stim- 
ulates all hia senses. The abnormal 
stimuli affect the physiological 
processes in many ways which are 
not within the scope of the present 
memorandum to describe; but in 
general terms it may be said that 
they are undesirable and predis- 
pose to air-sickness, dramming in 
foe ears, head-ache, and other 
forms of discomfort complained of j 
by passengers. The problems ofj 
passenger air-travel axe grouped 
thus: Ventilation, heating, odours; 
noise and vibration; sickness in tbe 
air; and general comfort. 

QUESTION OF 

VENTILATION 

The authors of the pamphlet 
point out that the adequate venti- 
lation of the cabins in commercial 
aeroplanes presents considerable 
diffioilties. The reasons for this 


are that foe cubic space that can be 
afforded to each passenger 
naturally very limited, and the 
speed at which the cabin has to be 
carried through the air is such that 
even quite small openings or cracks 
introduce air at a velocity that is 
appreciated as a draught. The 
authors are for the introduction ofj 
fresh air from above and in foe fore 
part of tbe cabin. In certain cases, 
they say. it might be found 
desirable to extend the inlet inside 
the saloon in foe foape of a gauze 
trunk along the whole length of foe 
passenger cabin. Some interesting 
deductions are made from systems 
in use in sleeping-cars on American 
railroads. 

The heating of heavier-than-air 
craft is still a matter of experiment, 
»nd foe system of fitting a high- 
pressure boiler to the exhaust pipes 
is recommended for consideration. 
Discussing noise and vibration and 
the use of silencers, the authors 
state that the problems involved 
are not impossible of solution — 
indeed they are hopefhl — bat they 
require much work, and if this is 
carried out purely from the physi- 
cal side, without due consideration 
for the psychology of the individ- 
ual errors vnR creep in. Sickness in 
the air is here traced to ventilation, 
the proximity of travellers to 
windows, the lateral and fare and 
aft movement of the aeroplane, and, 
certain amount ofl 
app rehension " — the last is what is 
usually called stage fright, a symp- 
tom commonly known at the front 
as “wind-up”. Certain drugs are 
suggested as preventives, but the 
real cure is claimed to lie in an 
improvement in travelling condi- 
tions. Hay-box cookers are recom- 
mended for use in foe cufinaiy 
department. All these are matters 
of first-class importance in tack- 
ling the tough problem of makingj 
flying pay- 


Phrase or fable? 

From Dr Richard West 
Sir, Your correspondent Mr J. N. 
Hare (November 7) speculates 
about the phrase. “Cheer up for 
Chatham, wooden teg are cheap.” 

In foe nineteenth century arti- 
ficial legs were in fact rather 
expensive. In 1862 the Reverend 
Charles H. Spurgeon offered to 
preach to raise money for St 
George’s Hospital on condition 
that a certain patient was fitted 
with a cork leg. 

The offer was accepted and the 
patient fitted with the 1% at a cost 
of £10. However, it was not paid 
for. as Mr Spurgeon then said be 
would only preach if tbe hospital 
also met the costs of hiring St 
James Hall, which the governors 
were not prepared to do. 

1 am. 

Yours sincerely. 

RICHARD WEST, Dean, 

St George’s Hospital Medical 
School, 

Cranmer Terrace, 

Tooting, SW17. 

November 8. 


( 




22 




vttf.»Ha55 


r 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 





COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 21: By command of 
The Queen. Colonel Andrew 
Martin (Her Majesty’s Lord- 
Lieutenant for Leicestershire) 
was present at Royal Air Force 
Cottesmore this morning upon 
the arrival of The President of 
the Italian Republic and wel- 
comed His Excellency on behalf 
of Her Majesty’s. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 21: The Princess of 
Wales, attended by Miss Anne 
Bcckwith-Smith. Sir John 
RiddelL BL Mr Victor Chap- 
man. Deputy Assistant Comm- 
issioner John Cracknel!. 
Lieutenant-Commander Rich- 
ard Aylard, RN. and the Hon 
Rupert Fairfax, arrived at Royal 
Air Force Lyneham this after- 
noon in a Royal Air Force VC10 
aircraft from Saudi Arabia. 


Princess Anne, Chancellor of 
London University, will visit 
Charing Cross and Westminster 
Medical School at the Reynolds 
Building. St Dunstan’s Road, 
W6, on November 28. She win 
also visit the Institute of Dental 
Surgery at the Eastman Dental 
Hospital 256 Gray’s Inn Road 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Lady Traherne will be 
held in Uandaff Cathedral at 
1 lam today. 

A memorial service for Sir 
Norman Chester will be held at 
the University Church of St 
Mary the Virgin. Oxford, at 
noon today. 

A memorial service for Profes- 
sor Dame Helen Gardner wiD be 
held at the University Church of 
[St Mary the Virgin, Oxford, at 
130pm today. 

A thanksgiving service for the 
life and work of William Way- 
land Maxwell will be held at 
Hampstead Parish Church, 
Church Row. NW3, on Friday, 
November 28, at noon. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr S.GJL Bartley 
and Miss DJL Oliver 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs GAS. Bartley, 
of Dartmouth. Devon, and Di- 
ana, younger daughter of Com- 
mander and Mrs M.F. Oliver, of 
Victoria, British Columbia, 
Canada. 

Mr M.R. Beaty 
sutd Miss CLE. Gurney 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs R.W. Beaty, of 
Finedon, Northamptonshire, 
and Caroline, elder daughter of 
the late Mr MJ. Gurney, of 
Stantonbury, Buckinghamshire, 
and Mrs A. Marcham. of Olney, 
Buckinghamshire. 

MrP.O^Smitb 
and Miss RJ. ThrosseU 
The engagement is announced 
between Patrick, third son of Mr 
and Mrs Alan Caiger-Smith, of 
Aldennaston, Berkshire, and 
Robin, fourth daughter of Mrs 
and Mrs Peter ThrosseU. of St 
Breward, Cornwall. 

Mr B.M. Emerson 
and Miss D.E. Meggitt 
The engagement is announced 
between Bruce, eldest son of Dr 
and Mrs D. Emerson, of Cam- 
bridge, and Deborah, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs B. F. Meggitt, also 
of Cambridge. 

Mr MX. GoldhiU 
and Miss CL. Miller 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, son of Jack 
and Grete GoldhiU, and Caro- 
lyn. daughter of Monty MUler 
and the late Margaret Miller. 


MrTJLE. Heywood 
and Miss EJL Griffiths 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy Robert Eyre, 
only son of the late Mrs M. 
Heywood and Captain R.E. 
Heywood, of Brixham, Devon, 
and Elizabeth Rowan, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs G.H.B. 
Griffiths, of Crewkerne, 
Somerset 

Mr M. McGovern 
and Miss JX Todd 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs T. McGovern, 
Bongate, Jedburgh, and Jane, 
elder daughter of Dr and Mis 
l.D.H. Todd, of Didsbury, 
Manchester. 


Mr JJ- Messent 
and Miss F.H. Witt 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian Jeffery, younger 
son of Dr and Mrs JJ. Messent 
of New Malden. Surrey, and 
Frances Henrietta, elder daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs GW. Witt of 
Widmer End, Buckinghamshire. 

Mr NX. Thorne 
and Miss S.V. Skmims 
The engagement is announced, 
and the marriage will shortly 
take place, between Nigel, son of 
Mrs J. Thome, of Westgate-on- 
Sea, and Vicky, younger daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs M-A-Slonims, 
of Harrow. 

Mr P. van Rooyen 
and Miss F.M. Stiles 
The engagement is announced 
between Pieter, son of Mr and 
Mrs CJ. van Rooyen, of 
Kroonstadt South Africa, and 
Frances Stiles, of Verwoerdburg. 
South . Africa, daughter of Mr 
and Mis Peter Stiles, of 
Doriting. Surrey. 


Receptions 

HM Government 
Mr Ian Lang. Minister for 
Industry and Home Affairs at 
the Scottish Office, was host 
yesterday at a reception held at 6 
Charlotte Square, Edinburgh;. to 
mark Energy Efficiency Year. 

Musicians Benevolent Fund 
The Musicians Benevolent 
Fund gave a reception at 
Fishmongers' Hall on Thursday 
to mark the Festival of St 
Cecilia. The guests were re- 
ceived by the chairman and Mrs 
Cranmer and Lord Chelmer 
proposed the health of the fond. 

Service dinners 

Midland Naval Officers’ 
Association 

Rear-Admiral J.P. Edwards pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of the 
Midland Naval Officers’ Associ- 
ation held last night at tbe 
Council House. Birmingham. 
The guests included tbe Lord 
Lieutenant of the West Mid- 
lands. the Lord Mayor of Bir- 
mingham. Mr Justice Mais- 
Jones. Vice-Admiral Sir Derek 
Reffell and Lieutenant-General 
Sir Michael Wilkins. 

Honourable Artillery Company 
Major Sir Patrick Wall MP, 
Vice-President of the North 
Atlantic Assembly, was tbe prin- 
cipal guest and speaker at the 
annual dinner of 2 Squadron, 
Honourable Artillery Company, 
held Iasi night at Armoury 
House. 

Royal Artillery TA and National 
Artillery Association 
Genera] Sir Thomas Morony, 
Master Gunner, St James’s 
Park, presided at the annual 
dinner of the Royal Artillery 
Territorial Army and National 
Artillery Association held last 
night at the RA Mess. Wool- 
wich. The principal guests were 


Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Akehurst, Commander, UK 
Field Army, and Lady Akehurst, 
Sir Peter and Lady Walters: 

Dinners 

King’s College Loudon 
Professor Anthony Mellows pre- 
sided at a dinner held at King’s 
CoUege London yesterday for 
overseas students of the acuity 
of laws. Tbe principal guests 
were the High Commissioner 
for New Zealand and Mrs 
Hariand. 

New Scotland Yard 
Sir Kenneth Newman, Commis- 
sioner of the Metropolitan Pol- 
ice, presided at tbe annual 
reunion dinner of tbe Assistant 
Commissioners’ Mess held last 
night at New Scotland Yard. 

Royal College of Radiologists 
Professor J.S. Mai pas delivered 
the annual Skinner lecture to the 
Royal College of Radiologists 
yesterday at 66 Portland Place. 
Professor Malpas and Sir Jasper 
Hollom. who had earlier been 
admitted to honorary fellowship 
of the college, were the guests of 
honour at a dinner held at the 
college in the evening. Professor 
£ Rhys Davies, president, was 
in the chair. 

Earl Kitchener of Khartoum 
Earl Kitchener of Khartoum 
presided at tbe annual dinner of 
the Kitchener Scholars* Associ- 
ation held last night at the 
House of Lords in this, the 
seventieth anniversary of the 
death of the first earl. The 
principal guest was Mr Philip 
Warner. 

Moreton Hall 

The Old Moretonians’ Associ- 
ation reunion cocktail party will 
be held at International House, 
Si Katharine’s Way, Tower 
Bridge Approach. London, to- 
day from 6.30 to 830pm. 


Derek Hayward 


Man blinded by choice 


Grid does not exist - He is existence - 
and this is no mere quibbling with 
words but a very important distinction. 

To say that God exists is to make him 
an object tike all the other objects which 
exist, whether they be minute like the 
electron or unimagineaWy large like the 
Universe. 

The Hebrews knew this, which is why 
they called him the “I am” and why his 
name Yahweh (however one tikes to 
transliterate it in the Roman alphabet) 
is from the root Hayab meaning “to be” 
or “to make to be” depending on tbe 
initial guttural which are almost identi- 
cal in appearance in Hebrew. 

If God is existence then to say that 
you do not believe in him is nonsense; 
yon exist and you cannot deny that. 
What yon are raying is that you do not 
think that existence - the world as you 
experience it- is of a particular sort, and 
because, on the whole, it is people from 
Christian cultures who claim to be 
atheists, what they are denying is that 
tbe picture of tbe world as the Christian 
church has traditionally presented it is a 
true picture; that is, they do not 
recognize it as one which tallies with 
their experience. 

I believe that this denial is very 
important and one which the church has 
not taken seriously enough, being 
usually just content to assert that “God 
exists and Jesus Christ is his Son”, 
whatever that means to the unbeliever. 

We should rather recognize that we 


cannot know God in any direct way; 
“No man has seen God at any time”. 
We can only infer his nature from what 
we see of ton in his creation, that is, in 
the wotM as we experience it and as it is 
revealed to us by modem science. 

The church must be aide to substan- 
tiate the assertion that God is love and if 
we are unable to show that the Universe 
as it is revealed to us is consonant with 
love, then we are going to have 
considerable difficulty in upholding our 
claim, let alone going on to show that Je- 
sus Christ is the Son ofthis loving God, 
whatever we mean by that (Of course 
we know, or we think, we do, what we 
mean, but it is not always entirely dear 
to the outsider). 

At first sight is looks as though we 
may have some trouble; at earth-level 
“nature red in tooth and daw” does not 
obviously speak of a loving God, nor 
does cancer, and nor, at another level, 
do the quasars and blade boles, or the 
unimagneaMy large spaces of the 
Universe, indeed, we might be tempted 
when we look at them to agree with Sir 
James Jeans that God must be a higher 
mathe matician rather than the loving 
personal God that Christians chim- 

PersonaDy 1 do not thick the task is 
hopeless, but we most define deafly 

misused word irrthe Engti^languags- If 
by love we mean the protective, 
compassionate love that we receive as 
children from our parents, or give as 


parents ourselves, then I think it is hard 
to find evidence that the Universe is 

constructed on those tines. 

But if we think rather of the cost ot 
that kind of love, if we think of love in 
terms of sacrifice, of sefoivmg ratiier 
than receiving, then I believe we shall 
find evidence for it throughout the 
Universe. For self-giving is to subordi- 
nate oneself to someone or something 
else; to put the good of, for instance, 
country above one’s good, to acquiesce, 
in other words, in being part ofa whole 
rather than standing out for one's own 
individuality, and this is precisely what 
we find. 

Nothing in the Universe has any 
si gnificanc e except in so for as it is part 
nf some thing greater the electron must 
be part of an atom, tbe atom part of a 
molecule; the star must be part of a 
duster, the cluster part of a galaxy. 
Nothing can say: “My significance is in 
myself alone”, for nothi ng ha s signifi- 
cance except as part of a greater whole. 

In tbe inanimate and unself con- 
scious world (that is, in every part of the 
Universe until we come to mankind ) 
this subordination of seif is automatic; 
the electron cannot say: “I will not be 
part of an atom” or the star “I will not 
be part of a cluster”. Only mankind' has 
the power of choice, and having it is 
blind to see that the Universe is run by 
love. 

Archdeacon Derek Hayward is General 
Secretary of die Diocese of London. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Derek Spacer, QC, MP, to 
be Parliamentary Private Sec- 
retary to die Attorney General, 
Sir Michael Havers. QC. MP. 
Mr Michael Stem. MP. to be 
Parliamentary Private Secretary 
to tbe Minister of State at the 
Treasury, the Hon Peter Brooke, 
MP. 

Mr Michael Kaser, of St 
Antony’s College, Oxford, to be 
Chairman of the Coo r d in ating 
Council of Area Studies 
Associations. 

Mr D.M. Spiers, Deputy 
Controller Aircraft, to be 
Controller of Research a 
Development Establishments, 
Research and Nuclear (CERN) 
from December 24, in succes- 
sion to Sir Colin Fielding. Mr 
Spiers is also appointed the first 
head of profession of the De- 
fence Engineering Service. 

Dr TP. McLean, Director, 
Royal Armament Research and 
Development Establishment, to 
be Deputy Controller Aircraft 
on promotion to Deputy Sec- 
retary from December 24. 

Mr J.F. Barnes, Deputy to 
CERN, to be Deputy Chief 
Scientific Adviser from Decem- 
ber 24. He is also appointed 
head of profession for the 
Ministry of Defence Science 
Group. 

Dr A.C. Baynham, Director, 
Royal Signals and Radar 
Establishment, to be Director, 
Royal Armament Research and 
Development Establishment 
from December 24. 

Mr NJL Hughes, Deputy Chief 
Scientific Adviser, to be Direc- 
tor. Royal Signals and Radar 
Establishment from December 
24. 

Dr Howard To m Kasim , of 
Wellington College, Crow- 
thome, to be Headmaster of the 
Cathedral School Hereford, 
next September, in succession to 
Mr Barry Sutton, who moves to 
Taunton ScfaooL 
Professor Wallace Peters, 
professor of protozoology at tbe 
London School of Hygiene and 
Tropical Medicine, to be honor- 
ary consultant on malariology to 
the Army in succession to Dr 
D.M. Geddes. who has retired. 


Marriages 

Dr JA Frowd 
and Miss Y. B& 

The marriage took place on 
Saturday, November I, at Bobo- 
Dioulasso City Hall Burkina 
Faso, of Dr Andrew Frowd. son 
of the late D. Bryan Frowd and 
Mrs D. Frowd, and Miss Yactne 
BSl 

Mr S-I. Rogers 
and Miss TA Math 
The marriage took place on 
November 15, in California, 
between Mr Stephen John Rog- 
ers, elder son of Mr and Mrs 
George Rogers, of London, and 
Miss Tracy Ann Muth, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Russell 
Muth, of Los Angeles. 

Dr Stuart Rogers was best 
man. 


Latest wills 

Mr Geoffrey Charles Rowett, of 
Bath, director and general man- 
ager ofTimes Newspapers 1967- 
72, left estate valued £142,590 
net. 


Memorial services 


Air Vice-Marshal D.C.T. 
Bennett 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Air Vice-Marshal D.C.T. 
Benneu was held yesterday at St 
Clement Danes. The Strand. 
The Rev R.N. Ken ward offici- 
ated. assisted by the Rev C. 
Harris and the Rev TJ. 
Thomas. 

Air Chief Marshal Sir David 
Craig. Chief of the Air Staff, and 
Air Commodore Geoffrey Coo- 
per, son-in-law, read the l essons . 
Air Vice-Marshal P.M.S. 
Hedgeland, President of the 
Pathfinder Association, read 
“ High Flight" by John Gillespie 
Magee and Air Marshal Sir Ivor 

Broom gave an address. 

Air vtce-Marshal Bennett's 
orders, decorations and medals 
were borne in procession to the 
Sanctuary by Air Vice-Marshal 
Hedgeland, Mr E Cummings, 
Chairman of the Bomber Com- 
mand Association, and Squad- 
ron Leader P.C. Crouch, 
Chairman of the Aircrew 
Association. Among others 
present were: 

Mrs BeniMl i widow). Mr Tcrtx 
Bennett isoni. Mrs Geoffrey Goo«r 
(daughter!. Mr rusnhi Cooper. Miss 
Talla Cooper am) MBs Nina Cooper 
(qramlctHitfrenJ. Mrt M Bennett. MH 
S Ben cell. Mr and Mr* D Bennett. Mr 
and Mrs P Johnson 
Squadron Leader G C BaBard 
i rep resen n nq the Australian High 
COmnussUneri. Colond M K Kee 
■.representing the Canadian High 
Commissioneri. Colonel N Koiochjn 
i representing the Soviet Air Attache); 
Lord Ersklne of Rerrtck. Lady Eliza- 
beth Greenarrc. Lady Diana 
Moorhouse. the Han Mra GueterMck. 
the Hon Mrs T Brassey. 

Commander Sir Michael Cutme- 
Sevmour. Sir Michael and Lady 
Hanham. Beryl Lady Hickman. Mar- 
shal of me RAF Sir Derrnot Ba>tc. 


Marshal of the RAF Sir Michael and 
Lady Beetham. Air Chief Marsha) Sir 
Michael ArmUage (Air Member for 
Supply and Organization). Air Odef 
Marshal Sir Wallace Kyle. Air chief 
Marshal Sir Kenneth Cross. Air Chief 
Marshal Sir Douglas and Lady Lowe. 
Air Chief Manual sir Lewis Hodges. 
Air Chief Marshal Sir Thomas and 
Lady Kennedy, Air Chief Marshal Sir 
Peter Harding (Air Officer Command - 
irtgln Chief. RAF strike Command) 

and Lady Harding. Air Chief Marshal 

Sir Michael Knight (United Kingdom 
Military Representative lo Nalo). Air 
Marshal Sir Edward Chilian. Air 
Marshal Sir John and LMy CurfiK. 
Air Marshal Str Patrick and Lady 
Dunn. V ire- Admiral Sir Ian and Lady 
Hogg. Lady Craig. Lady Harris. Lady 
Broom. Sir Joseph Lockwood. Lady 
Price. Sir Guy and Lady Lawrence. 

Air vireMamnal and Mrs J E 
Johnson. Air wreMarsnai A v r 
J ohnstone. Air VKe-Marshal A 
Maisner iPoUsh Air Force* assoc- 
a Won'. Air Vice-Marshal H A Cauiard. 

Air Vtcc-Marshat and Mrs S O Burton. 

Major-General H A LasceUes. Mr T W 
Brooke- Smllh •GUld of Air Pilots and 
Air Navigators), Or J W Fozand 
I president. Royal Aeronautical Soci- 
ety) and Mrs Fozara. Captain j Jessop 
(BrIUah Airways l and Mr Jessop. 
nytnq Officer and Mrs T Scotland 
(Pathfinder Force Association In 
Australia!. Group Captain S P Coutson 

(president. Lime Staughron Pathfinder 

Ass o ci a ti on). Mr RW l*wk (Royal 
Air Forces Escaping Society) and Mrs 
LffWK, 

Commander M F Haiton (British Air 
Re5en.0j. AIT Commodore H A 
ET&$ r L lAlr Historical Branch 
iRAFXiMaoi. Mr B J Snook tcnair- 
gwjL Royal Aero aubi and Mrs 
Snook. FugM Lieutenant J J C Qaluey 
fRAF Yarn: ciudj and Mr* oaUey. 
Grou p Captain S A Baldwin (Officer 
commanding. RAF Wvtoni and Mrs 
Baldwin. Mr R b Gibes iceman 

Fairnwrue soon* caTaQbVStfMiirj 

H Allan (secretary): Mr D R Pjr-lfwy 
Phillips imaraqino director. The mid- 

j Gee (chief executive. Huntingdon, 
shire District CouncUi with Councillor 
M F Newman ichatrmaiu: Mr H 
Patrick Holden i co-chairman. National 
Council Of Anil Common Market 
Organizations! and Mrs Holden. Mrs E 
Cummings- Mrs PC Crouch. Mr 
Raymond Baxter. Group Captain and 

Mra A Carey. Dr F E Jones. Prolessor 

and Mra ■ McIntyre. Mr and Mrs a 
S abine. Mrs M Birkin. Mr Michael 
SlKTSfcy. MP. Mr and Mrs W Johnson. 
Mr and Mrs D Carr. Mrs P Wright. Mr 
and Mrs R Steele and Mr and Mrs C 
Banks. 


Professor Sir Stanley Clayton 
A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Professor Sir 
Stanley Clayton was held yes- 
terday in the Chapel of King's 
CoUege Hospital. Tbe Rev John 
E White officiated and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Richard Clayton, 
son. read the lesson. Professor 
R.W. Beard. Si Mary’s Hospital 
read from Pilgrim 's Progress by 
John Btmyan and Professor Sir 
Malcolm Macnaughion. Presi- 
dent of the Royal College of 
Obstetricians and 

Gynaecologists, read from the 
works of John Donne. Mr 
Michael BrudeneU. King's Col- 
lege Hospital, gave an address. 
Among those present were: 

Mr and Mr* Christ odCkt OUeranshaw 
uon-in-Uw and daughterr Professor 
Dewhurs (institute of 
Oo&ietncans and Gynaecologists). 
U»dy Macnaughion. Sr John and 
uwyPcel. Dame Josephine Barnes 

iNammai Association ot Family PUn- 

pmq DotJyrj). gj r Rustam and Lady 

Feme Mr John Cofflnson i (Usenet 

trnendjriMijagn-. Camberwell Health 

AuthortBH Mr Leo nard C ottcm (dean. 

ZUktw (chairman, consultants corainS- 
DOm J Hpyc* (midwifery ser- 
vtmL Mja .Angola Forster (principal. 

physiol her any) and Mra C 


school of 


Jbslln (nurses 
Mr D 8 L 
College of ~ 


(secretary. Royal 
is. also w p MB it- 

„ Mr David Evan* 

■R°y at CoUege of surgeons of Eng- 
land). Professor John Newton (Bir- 
nungharo Univeraiw and Bunungtuni 
and Midland* Ohvetrl clans and 
Gynaecologist* Society). Mr Tom 
Lewis i Guy *9 Horn* tali, mbs Margaret 
Staddon. Professor and Mra Charles 
Cray. Mr G D Pinker. Mr* M 
BrudeneU, Mra S w MCOHUnd. 
Protwsor G ChamOertaln. Dr and Mra 
V Hal), Dr D Dovtv*. Prafe&sOT 
Mervan Smith. Professor A G 
cunllffe. Mr J G Yutea-Ben. Mr j p 
Pryor. Mr Ralph Kmg. Mr A J HbtML 
Mr and Mra R T Booth and Mr Stuart 
Mawaon. * 


lt§§7l 

to* 



The Rev Etied Hughes inspecting a new mosaic outside St Peter’s Church, Pentre, Mid 
Glamorgan, which is to be dedicated by the Bishop of Uandaff tomorrow. The ceremony is 
tbe dinux ^ the £150,(NN) restoration of the dinrch, which is known as catiiednl tbe 

Rhondda”. The mosaic was designed by Anthony Noble, of Cardiff. 


Science report 


New hope on transplants 


Doctors at tbe Necker hos- 
pital for sick chiMrea in Paris 
have devised a new way of 
preventing tbe refection of bone 
marrow transplants, when treat- 
ing leukaemia in rhMivn . 

There are about 1,000 new 
cases each year in Britain. Tire 
only treatment, together with 
drug or radiati on therapy, is the 
transplant of bone marrow tissue 
from a donor. 

Doctors have to find a donor 
with histologically compatible 
(HLA) bone marrow, which is 
very difficult Otherwise the 
donor’s bone marrow has to be 
cleaned, bat this process, which 
involves re m ov ing dangerous 
cells responsible for the graft 
versus host reaction, is ex- 
tremely complex. 

So far 200 non-identical HLA 
grafts on uammo-defident chil- 
dren have been performed 
throughout the world. A study m 
14 European medical centres 
shows that about three quarters 
of the grafts nsing ideatical 
HLA bone marrow are success- 
ful and a success rate of two 
thirds Is achieved with non- 
identical HLA bone marrow. 

Dr Alain Fisber, working with 
Arefessor CZaade GrisedB at the 
hospital has devised a new 


By a Special Correspondent 

treatment to prevent the refec- 
tion of non-identical HLA bone 
marrow. It was successfully 
tested on seven children suffer- 
ing from caitu lino-deficiency or 
from osteopetrous, an abnormal 
densificatiQn of the braes. 

Tbe treatment consists of 
injections of monoclonal anti- 
bodies. Fire of these children are 
still alive today and their bane 
marrow has been completely 
regenerated and is nrodHCiiift 
blood cells normally. Two of tire 
children died of viral infections. 

Dr Fisher made his discovery 
by observing a rare hereditary 
disease in which an adhesive 
protein on tire surface of the 
normally protective T-ceUs of 
the body is missing. This results 
in a complete lack of protection 
a the patient, whose immune 
sys tem is enable to attach 
foreign cells. 

Dr Fisber and his team stud- 
ied the protein, called 18AI 
and they succeeded in manufac- 
turing a monoclonal antibody 
that latches on to that surface 
molecule and inactivates it. The 
T-ceDs are no longer able to 
attach tire foreign bone marrow 
cells. 

The new treatment prevents 
tbe host versus graft reaction, 


whereas drags such as 
cyclosporine pt eve n t the graft 
versus host reaction. In view of 
the excellent results achieved so 
tar Dr Fisber says that this 
treatment wffl be tested at a few 
weeks’ time on children suffer- 
ing from acute leukaemia and 
aplastic anaemia, a disease in 
which the red blood corpuscles 
are very gready reduced because 
the bone marrow does not 
regenerate them. 

Tbe disease is often fetal and 
the only treatment Is blood 
transfusions and bene marrow 
trausplanis. 

Dr Fisber hopes that other 
monoclonal antibodies will be 
developed to prevent the rejec- 
tion of odcr grafts. Indeed Dr 
.daade Mawas at the 1NSERM 
immunology centre ia Mar- 
seilles, who took part in the 
developing of the LSA1 
monoclonal antibody, b testing a 
hybrid cefl Cram which is mauu- 
hetned antibodies that block 
interleukin CL 

Interleukin II stimula t es 
helper T-cells and Itiller T-ceUs 
aad plays an important part in 
he rejection of kidney grafts. 
Six patients are now testing the 

t reatment under the supervision 

of Professor Soolion in Nantes. 


Northern Ireland 
gallantry awards 


To be Additional Members of 
the Military Division of the 
Order of tbe British Empire: 

Malor RW M Baker, urat WO U 
(acting WO I) P J Baro n. I ntel! Corns: 
Major R McM Bonar. UDft Major M S 
Buck. Army Air Coras: Maxv m 
C ount*. UDR: WO OGJ Crofts. Royal 
Coras of Sonia: Major M A L 
Cummins, udr: cam r s e McKay. 
UDR: Major £ F Painter. RCT: Major 
K A Peacock. Prince of Wales's Own 
R esurient of Yorkshire; Cap! (acting 
Major) p j Samson. wrac ; cam D D 


Royal Anglian Regiment, wo U P H 
Curtis. Kited Coras: Cam (acting 
Major) A M Donaldson. UDR: S/Sg( A 
J U Dowm. Scots Guards: Lt-Cd (now 

OH) J J F Field. Devonshire and 

Dorset Regiment: UCW C B FWier. 
Royal Rnunni o< FtanferK Sgl P J D 
Fleming. Roval Military Potfce: LI -Cot 
R H J Forsyth. Prince of Wales’s Own 
~ " "of Yorkshire: L/ Cm J A 

RCT: Cpl M A Oejmalrv?. 

Royal Array. Medical Coras: Cam A J 
3 GBson. Queen's Own tnghiamiers 


Samson. WRAC: cam 1 

Smith. Royal Coras of Signals: Major 
t Quartermaster) D W SpaSllng. Royal 
Anglian Regiment: cam M K Watkins. 
RAOO Major M J Watson, prince or 
Wales's Own fteptmau of Yorks hir e ; 
Capi K H Webt>. UDR. 

HRTT1SH EMPIRE MEDAL (MILI- 
TARY DIVISION) 

cm w J Barton. UDR: S/Sgt T A 
Bowen. King's Own Royal Border 
Regiment sgt N S Oa^orcL UDR: 
8 /Sgl mow acting WO IDS J Firth. 

tntefl Corps; S/Sflt R G Hdmn, Green 

Howards (Alexandra. Princess of 
Wales’s Own Yorkshire Recurrent): 
Sgt (now S. Sotl J M HJggtTSuke of 
Edinburgh's Royal Regiment (Berk- 
shire and wuiahlrefc s/Sflt (now WO 
m T J Hynes. UDR: S.’Sm K C 
pflqrinv Inlet) Corps. Sgt T R 
StreftJe. Rival Engineer?. 

GEORGF MEDAL 
Major m J Davison. RAOC. 


R D 


THE QUEEN’S 
MEDAL __ 

Private (now acting Son C 
H: WO 


GALLANTRY 


Parachute Pe 


. Bruce. 
II M A 


eounenl: W _ , . . . . 

Oirtsty. Royal En gunwis. WO BJLA 
Earey. ftAOC. Chat M W Qnwcson. 
RAOC: S/sot t McOueeo. Paracute 
Regiment: Sgt M Shearer, 1 7/21 at 
Lancers (now UileU Coras). InleU 
Corps: Sgt inow acting S/sot) C 0 
wi mains, inteii Goto: .Cast _ww 
Major) C V A WUltain*. Irnell Gens. 

QUEENS COMM ENDATION FOR 
VALUABLE SERVICE IN THE AIR 
sgt w R Qrtinmv i3th/i8Ui Royal 
Hussars (Quran Mary's Own). 


IN DESPATCHES 

.i-Cot S G Adlinoton. Green hl 

(Alexandra. Princess of Wales's Own 
Yorkshire Roqnnent); L-CW j F 

WFLaJT land REME?&H S K EBaSoSl 


RCT: Cpl M 
~ra£ M«Sca! - 
G GBison. Qu 

i^anULr?' ftayaToorpa 'agnate: Lj- 
Coi O de V w Hayes. Royal Orem 
Jackets: Major D M Houoway- Royal 
Engineers: Lt A HUBhO. UDR: WO □ J 
T Hughes. Parachute Regiment PD- 

(now acting S/i 
Engineer*: Cj 

Engine er *: S, „ — . 

MaJor P Udeymao. Royal 

b ’a' Martin. RAOC: Sgt H J 
Hews. Royal Green Jackets; U 
(acting Cant) s A Mawhy. WRAC 

McC^m cy. U DR: Major N 6 SuteT- 
Intel) GOTO Co) w M Morna Staff 
late Royal Regiment of ArtdJery: Sgr 
(now S/Sg) P A Myers- _ Royal 
Regiment or FwOtart: Sflt P P arnen. 
Prince of -Wales'* Own Hwlm gM.y 
Yorkshire: Cam N D Beta. RAOC: u- 
Coi K E Reid. A raw Air Come: U-Col 
J G Retth. Parachute AegimmL MSJtr 
GT Robey. Great Howards (Alexan- 
dra, Princess or Wales’s own York- 
shire Regimen D: Sgt O Roe*. UDR; U- 
0)1 H C Smlin. Royal Corroof 
Transport: Sgt W J Smowte. unR- 
Major S R Stanf ortjrucV Royal 
Oven Jacket*: U-Gol M RJ5t8ch^rt- 
son. Raya) Coras ot SHmlKS/SgtBJ 
Swift, Parachute Regiment : Major C F 
Tomkn, ------ 

Major ._ 

Whitfield, 

Royal Com of Transport. 

NAVY PERSONNB. 

THE QUEEN'S GALLANTRY 

MEDAL 

cpl p Evans. RM. 

MENTION in DESPATCHES 
Lt T J Dnt. Royal Martiie^CPO C W 
HKkliteoftom, rn:. W car. H J 
Lraralng. RN; CPO Airman tAirg aA 
Handier; J McC Mann. RN: CPU T P 
O'Brien. RN. 


Parachute Regiment: Major y i- 
eld. REME; Sgt T C WnghL 


loner Temple 

Mr Stephen Lewis Langdon and 
Mr Olauuui Sowande have been 
elected Senior Masters of the 
Bench of the Inner Temple. 


Middle Temple 

Chief Justice William H. Rehn- 
qtiisu of the United States, has 
been elected an honorary master 
of tbe bench 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Mr Boris Becker, 19; 
Mr Jon Cleary, 69; Mr Tom 
Conti, 44; the Hon Sir Hum- 
phrey Gibbs, 84; Mr Terry 
Gilliam. 46; Sir Peter Hall, 56; 
Sir Andrew Huxley, OM, 69; Mr 
R. P. R. nifie. 42; Mrs Billie 
Jean King, 43; Professor K. B. S. 
Smeflie, 89; Mn Pat Kjoechlin- 
Smytbe, 58; Sir Michael Walker, 

TOMORROW: Professor C 
Adamson-Macedo, 64; Mr Rob- 
ert Buhler, 70; Mra Anne Burns, 
71; Colonel A. M. Gilmoor, 70; 
Mr Michael Gough, 69; Profes- 
sor G J. Hamson. QC. 81; Sir 
John Hennon, 58; Mr lew 
Hoad, 52; Air Chief Marshal Sir 
Michael Knight, 54; Mr Chris- 
topher Loguc, 60; Mr Maurice 
Lush, 90; Miss Diana Quick, 40; 
Sir Peter Saunders. 75; Sir Peter 
Strawson. 67. 


Luncheons 

Diplomatic and Commonwealth 
Writers Association of Britain 
Sir David AkeraJones, Chief 
Secretary of the Hong 
Government, was the {guest 

honour at a luncheon given by 
the Diplomatic and Common- 
wealth Writers Association of 
Britain held yesterday at the 
Royal Horseguards Hold. Mr 
John Osman, president of the 
association, presided. 

British Institute of Innkeepmg 
Mr David MeHor, Minister of 
State, Home Office, was the 
principal guest at the annual 
luncheon of the Council and 
Companions of die British In- 
stitute of 'Innkeeping, held at 
Brewers* Hafl, London, last 
night. Companions who at- 
tended were Mr M.N.F. 
Cottrell Mr E. Ridehalgh. Mr 
C.E. Guinness and Mr MS. 
Macdonald. Mr CR Tidbuiy 
presided. 


OBITUARY 
MR DON JAMIESON 
Newfoundlander turned 
Canadian 


.v 


Mr Don Jamieson* who 
died oh November 19 ai tbe 
age of 65, was the. most 
important Canadian . politi- 
cian to emerge from the 
province of - Newfoundland. 
He began his career as a bell- 
bop at the Newfoundland 
Hold in St John's and folded it 
as Canadian High Commis- 
sioner in London. 

Donald Campbell Jamieson 
was born on April 30, 1921, 
into a poor home by the 
railway tracks in the dilapidat- 
ed south side of St John's. As 
the eldest of six children, he 
left school early to become the 
family breadwinner, his father 
having dOled. 

His quick wits and natural 
talent for communication 
caused him to gravitate into 
broadcasting. During the war 
be was a broadcaster with the 
Canadian aimed forces, and 
after it he built up, with a 
partner, a radio and television 
artwork in Newfoundland. 
From this he made a substan- 
tial fortune. 

When, in the late 1940s, the 
question whether or not New- 
foundland should cease to be a 


Yet be continued for some • • 
time to develop his business ■ 
interests until, in 1966, he was *- 
persuaded to enter politics. 
Elected as a Liberal to the 
Ottawa fcarfiamenti he was 
soon a mini ster under Pteere 
Trudeau, holding in succes- “ 
sion four cabinet posts. From 
1976 to 1979 be was Minister 

for External Affairs. - n 

. In the latter year be re* „ 

turned for a time to provincial 

politics, in an attempt to 
revive the liberal Party's 
fortunes in Newfoundland. 
Though elected himseftj the ' 
attempt was a failure. 

In 1983 he was appointed 
High Commissioner in 
London, where his term of 
office was cut short after two 
years by a change of govern- * 
meni in -Canada. Though he 
expressed some distaste for 
the diplomatic “cocktail "• 
circuit”, he was a popular . 
envoy. 

Since his return to Canada 
be had been working on his 
memoirs and writing a weekly ■■ 
newspaper column. 


boshyl brows. But Ms most 
being hotly debated, Jamieson feanne was his 

voice, which was once de- 
scribed as “like an Atlantic 
gale bouncing off a tin roof”. 
He was an excellent raconteur 
and his speeches were always 
enlivened with good stories. 

He is survived by Ms wife, 
Barbara, and by their son and 
three daughters. 


was among the strongest and 
most eloquent opponents of 
the federal policy, even to the 
extent of arguing in favour of 
an economic union with tbe 
United States. But when, by a 
narrow majority, Newfound- 
land voted to become a prov- 
ince of Canada, he accepted 
the decision. 


MR THOMAS 

Mr Thomas Howie, Princi- 
pal of Paisley College of 
Technology since 1972, and a 
man ofintemational repute in 
the field of technical educa- 
tion, died on November 17 at 
the age of 60. 

Thomas McIntyre Howie 
was born on April 21, 1926, 
and educated at Renfrew High 
and Camphill Secondary 
schools before going cm to 
Paisley Technical College, and 
what is now Strathclyde Uni- 
versity, where he took an 
external London degree in 
engineering. 

After a period from 1947 to 
1950 as a civil engineer with 
the Clyde Navigation Trust, 
be took a temporary lecture- 
ship at Paisley College, where 


HOWIE 


he was to spend the rest of Ms 
working life. 

He contributed much to its 
growth from a small local 
institution with eleven teach- 
ers to a centre of technical 
learning with a staff of 750. 

He was also - busy as an 


external examiner; on the 
Council for National Academ- 
ic Awards; and on the educa- 
tion and training side of the 
Institution of Civil Engineers. 

In 1977 he led a British 
Council team of academic 
administrators to Nepal, and 
as a result was put in charge of 
a World Bank-sponsored 
project designed to improve 
higher education there. Pais- 
ley staff contributed a good 
deal to this, and Nepalese 
academics paid return visits 
far study. 

Howie also had admirers in 
China as a result of discussion 
tours there; and Chinese aca- 
demics recently visited Paisley 
to discuss , higher education 
with him. 

He was a good communica- 
tor, astute as well as witty and 
charming. To his academic 
reputation he added prowess 
in sport: football, cricket, bad- 
minton and curfing. 

He leaves a widow, Cather- 
ine, and three sons. 


DR H. G. ALEXANDER 


Dr Heinz Gustav Alexan- 
dra 1 , a distin guish ed German 
newspaper correspondent in 
London for nearly 40 years, 
and president of tbe Foreign 
Press Association (1969-1971) 
died on November. 19 at the 
age of 72. 

He was bom in Berlin on 
March 31, 1914, and educated 
in Berlin and Hamburg. 
Forced to emigrate in 1933 he 
found refuge in Chechoslova- 
kia where he studied law at the 
German university in Prague. 
He obtained his doctorate in 

1938. 

He began his journalistic 
career on the Prager Tagblatt 
and as political correspondent 
in Prague of the British news 
agency. Exchange Telegraph. 

When Hitler occupied 
Czechoslovakia in March 

1939, he fled to Latvia and 
resumed his work for Ex- 
change Telegraph from Bu- 
charest as Balkan 
correspondent Shortly before 
the outbreak of the war he 
managed to come to England 
where he was interned in 1940 


but released in the same year 
as a “friendly alien”. 

• Daring tire war he contin- 
ued his work for Exchange 
Telegraph and also worked for 
the Ministry of Information. 
In 1948 he became the first 
foreign correspondent of the 
new West German news mag- 
azine Da- Spiegel, and added 
to the prestige of the postwar 
German press corps in 
London when he was elected 
president of the Foreign Press 
Association. 

In 1959 be published a book 
in Germany on the state visit 
of the German Federal Presi- 
dent Theodor Heuss in Octo- 
ber 1958, Zwisehen Bonn and 
London (between Bonn and 
London). Its thesis was that a 
new era of Anglo-German and 
European partnership was 
then beginning. 

The Federal Republic 
honoured Alexander in 1978 
with the Cross of Merit First 
Class. His wife, Lica 
Polazkova, whom he married 
in London in 1939, survives 
him with their two sons. 


MR HERBERT ECKSTEIN 


Mr Herbert Eckstein, 
FRCS, formerly consultant 
paediatric surgeon to the Hos- 
pital for Side Children, Great 
Ormond Street, died on No- 
vember 5. He was 60. 

He was bom into a distin- 
guished medical family, Ms 
father and grandfather having 
been professors of paediatrics 
alDfisseldorf 

The family left German 
the 1930s to settle in Ti 
where his father helped to 
establish the paediatric de- 
partment at Hacettepe 
Children's Hospital in 
Ankara. 

Eckstein was educated at 
The Leys School Clare Col- 
lege, Cambridge, and the Mid- 
dlesex HospitaL He became a 
British subject in his youth. 


posts at 
Hospital, 
ai Great 


in 


He later had 
Addenbroooke’s 
Cambridge, and 
Ormond StreeL 

In 1958 he was invited to 
become the first consultant 
paediatric surgeon in Turkey, . 
and established a new 
paediatric surgical unit at the 
Hacettepe HospitaL 

He returned to Britain in 
1961, eventually becoming 
consultant at Gnat Ormond 
Street, and at Queen Mary’s 
Hospital CarshaJton. 

He published Surgical Pedi- 
atric Urology (1977), an admi- 
rable textbook on operative 
urology which be edited with 
HobenfeQner and D. Innes- 
Wiliiams. 


He leaves a widow, Maria, 
and two sons and a 

MAJOR D. H. HAWES 


Major Derek Harington 
Hawes, who died on Novem- 
ber 7, had a distinguished and 
varied career in India up to 
1 947 .and later in hospital and 
health services management. 

Bora on May 2, 1907, he 
went via Wellington College - 
and Sandhurst into the Indian 
Army, and spent seven years 
with the 14th Punjab, Regi- 
ment 

-In 1934, he Joined the 
Indian Political Service and 
had spells of duty in Indore, 
Kashmirand Hyderabad; also 
as under secretary and later 


count, under the title “Four *- 
Days of Freedom’’, in 
Blackwood’s Magazine 
(No.1588), of a journey .by - 
train from Ludhi ana to 

fwzepore on August 18-19, - 
1947; only his courage and -* 

leadership prevented the mas- 
sacre of the passengers by - 
marauding Sikhs after the - 
tram had been derailed. f 
lifee many others who left 
India after Independence, he 
started a new career and did 
distinguished work, first for 
tWii years with King 
Edward s Hospital Fund for 


deputy secretary in the politi- London, and SconiraeaM 
caf department of the Govern- f or thirteen years (1962^5? >1 
ment of India- as director-general of the £ " 

On the transfer of power in ternational Hosnital 
1947. he. was in Lahore as Federation. «°spital 

recretary to the Resident, He married Drusifla w»v in '*• 
Punjab States. Many wfll re- T932. She sunSn ^ith - 
member the. homing ac- their two daughters arfosmL ? 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


JggljTg 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ASKEW - 09 November 14 th. to Locy 
tn 6 « tendenooJ and PauJ. * daoafa. 
ler. Maty Ctivtly. a stater ror 
Tbotcas- 

BATES • On Novonber lOtn. to Hilary 
infe B«wtfW aj»d Rtchart. a ctenob- 
nr. BcOmtt MaryareL 
HUM - On Oetotw JUt to Parma 
KtacMn aad EramBowie. a son. 
Benedick George Hamf*. a brother 
for ortepfto. 

MASON ■ OB November ISth 1986 .io 
Sana and Adana. * son. Uwfl Beta 
mefcardaon- 

On Novendwr 2001 , to 
CtaTMfe and Jamie. a m 
CHAPMAN - OoMwanbar um. to 
Malta toie Samper) and Un.-a 
dBoghlerrSaOrina Stewart Burden, a 


mm 

M , f . Ora.^ 

KEEtxiSjra 


i ?HP3m 5 ■' CSr ..3 


BU 1 BDAYS 


ANCESTRY 

Contact 

the team with me beat 
atperteoce WarW-vAde 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTI IBA 
TEL: 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 


FOB SALE 


YOITLL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES At 
RESISTA CARPETS 


FLATSHARE 



QSttMAM LAWYER IML 77 ). non smoker, 
in Lonaon. fire™ January te June 87 . on 
Britton Coaaai renown*, seek* nt» 
te*wbte ream, in nW*c hone as 
owing goesi. uuuattM ana ore- 
ferred. Ktnnr write! Stephan 
H*tro*rtog. Hardbcrgrtraw 26 . 6941 
AMomacb I. west Genaany- 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


iWiumus an n*a/Mi te su- 
ra**. US* a bmi destinations, 
P WMM THUI: O! 730 2301 . AST A 
IATa atol 


U JL HOLIDAYS 


u»urr vnut lor rental over IMW VMT 
week rot nmtP c u iB Decemotr XL 108 ft. 
at twauutm Knranouitar CoQ*. Five 
ftar MnnmrrnlM. Wear SB*. Fife. At- 
raremdaMA sleeps up in six. Guests 
rare run brawns at indoor sports cane 
pin, r Mine rals ran outdoor Man 


EjprjgjlS 

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-■ - i t i M i il 

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Ibnwn Croon swe 

TebO 1-73 1 -3368/9 
me EsaeoatesLxoert nttfcw 


A MAGNIFICENT VENETIAN 

8 PIECE ROCOCCO 

BEDROOM SUITE 

Hdly atved placed and pained *■& 
serefl Wtnfc ft flowers. temprissas 
•oricrobe 276 cm wide Bombe ebes. 2 
r— •I™ 5 ", double bed bead, a par rf 
beftlide c a b ioo s ft wrt minor. 

0 JOD 

0909 485328 



TSs tBfS Jg * 19 * y j° Pgn- UeffiM*. £660 art- week. T«L ( 0411 22 t 
Mted ^Ag apart sleeps 2 / 4 . Tel: ttmto go^ tdiyn inel o r toai) 339 8497 




icwmnr - On NovernlMr 20 th. to 
Gwe lute Rtobto) and PtdBp, ■ ml 
Eider. 

mural ■ on Nmate 19 . to 
Su sann ah (Bun) fete Vatffl and 
Weft, a scnX Mlrh asr Win ), a brother 
lor PMBpm. 

HHWH -Pum - On NovBRtoer 
2 laL «o PWHnpa fete AMw) ad 80 . 



WtdOb D.TjG. 107881 887086 . 


svp/aML «d3o Penn CB&y a b amor 
omen to Aus/NZ. Ol-MM 7371 


“SSKYS* WWIdw^KteoteW, 


wide. Ot-teT MOO 


WM «. f «!»■■'« <n « 4 i 1111 . ruvonae- House mum muiwm vn- 
TnwclwlM. Mb. AM UWj sarep* 4 / 8 . From £]OOpW. 0905 

**" W1 " * FUPjCdOU Lam. 2 M. 2 bum. hpriv 
Atoiawauot. fropl MINI 2160 p.w views 

Mp/mouMUios. D/Wtti. w/macn. Mor- 

„ W< Sadie 27. 01-748 3627. 

ft. Amu Fran £468. 01-604 7871 

ABTA. 

MIIBIUA Luxury villas dvallaMa 
tbreuBtioiU Uae year- Per broourt, Tel: 
U owicn Home* 01 *3B 8962. 

Av an pat r um* tmtn tn* cm or 
Moreb. Superb two bed. non raam- 
meM In ANTIBES. SOUTH OF 
FRANCE. £400 per inaHh IiiiIiUiihiiu I 
moMtai Tel: as» 412098. 


UK TOWN. IV p iiH fm she roam t i n a n e 
■Mur Indue nmil. kS o — crai views. 
AvaiiabH Jsmury /February monc 
01-452 8280. 


DenoMful wm Mum ItOOM. SUttaUP 


country CMWAM £66 pw. 
T 0 HM 6 O 9 O 561 . 


tnettSS- On Novembor 19 th 1986 . 
at the Portland Hospital. London. 10 
Ptppn and Tony, a son. Harry 
OwrtesPhBfe. 

WALTON On lflth No wn dw . at 
HeximnL. to Sarah fete Rrm) and 
Peter, anas. 

WOTE - Oo 8lJt Nowanher. at Qtwcn 
Oiwtoor'* Hospital, to OiMe and 
David Wh»e. a daughter. Clara 
TWoan. rtster to Tatata. 


JOHNMNfc WUMC OB Nowemher 12 m 
odeti y at . Truro. Gordon joiinsoo to 
Joa Vfltae toee Bairtngmno. 


win take ptara at a Met date. 

FftOCrCLANKE - On 200i November 
1986. MNor Betty Pacrt-Oarfee. 
M3JE_ w.rjlc. (Bent), or Come 
Abhas. Dorset and formerly of Ltttte 
PartL. BrtnrpAcai. Ftawral Sendee aa 
Cerne Abbas Parted Chord] a 
Wednesday 26th November nt 12 
noon, followed by Interment. How- 
ecs may be aent to Gramtay Funeral 
Sendee. 16 Prince* Steed. Dorctes- 
ler. OotseL 0306 62338. 

■tvni-fe 17m November at Rye. 
PhHIn (OKU. devoted husband of 
Belly- brother, cf John, ana laved 
unde of Richard and Anne. Crema- 
tion win be private. 


Tofcdwr we ebb bra it. 

Wb tod orcr one tod of aB 
r UMich mm the p eettmi o n and, 
cure of cancer in the UK. 

Hdpuihy — Jdiddo —i B B 
or make a le ga cy He 

Oncer. 

Research 
Campaign 


ra 1 

k* 


UMO ano Tel: 0767 50604 
sumwcM. Ben tfcMts ror an sofai- 
otB ewah. Our rltentt taewse most 

whn awma. cwaiwrtiitnn ta . 

01-628 1678. 

luan rat any cvsnt, con. sw- 

Hrt>* E». Cbeso. Las Ml au a nte 
and sparU-TM: 321-6616/828- 

0496JL£X / Vba / omen 

•“iff Ynin n snrtimss mwi te i s n il Ne- 
Uonwwr dsthsnes. Teh (03801 800039 
iwrao. 


DEATHS 


f-yrfc l rg c p l 


STRAFFORD - On November 20m. 
widtMtrty a) home. Orrell HaroUton. 
lo ved hiteh—l Ihtber and wandfa- 
■her. Funeral at SL Mary's. Part: 
Itoad. Cambertiy at 2J0 pm Novem- 
ber 27th. Fandly Oowen only. 

VOtH WW -On Novem b er 19- borta 
Dumtaa. heftmad widow of Alfred, 
od sister or Kennam and Mant. Fu- 
neral service at Bournemouth 
Cremator) w. O an a hi rter. Mon- 
day. NowemlMr 24. at 1.46 pm. 






HMAUnN . AMamorM Senrtcn 
for gramm a r Robert S h add tH n. 
C&E~ wffl he held on Saunter 6th 
PocesabB L nt 2J0mn. In fee Unfver- 
stty Qutrdi ofSL Maty the Virgin. 
Oxford. 


L 3 TmZ 7 £±I 1 I 


TOi 


Wm 


.er.- J 



C A MP KIA - Sub LT. Mgd. rot Lost 
overboard HALS. Truncheon 23 rd 
November 1966 . Remembered with 
• love Renay. 

SPW AMIS, in memory of dear WiIHil 
W ho died at Oxford, on the 23 rd No- 
vember 196a 

KNKK - Graonw wmian. 
20 / 11/1924 to 21 / 4 / 1 98 a. Vtr 


Hooligan or Stereotype? 

Football violence, aid btfies being mugged, cars 
written off, homes ransacked - is this your view' 
of crimes committed by teenagers today? 

But most crime is more mundane: around 90 % 
of teenage crime is non-violent and 50 % is 
petty theft 

For most young 'criminals' committal to courts 
and prison is no answer. Up to 85 % reoffend: 
they become trapped in a criminal career. 

Since 1976 Rainer has pioneered vital 'last 
chance* alternatives to Care and prison for 
nearly % miBan teenagers. Rainers’ small-scale 
community-based projects focus on specific' 
ffKfivkfcjal needs helping to build self-esteem 
and respons 3 tfity. They successfully divert 
young people from crana. 

But we need your committ e d support. Please - 
send your donation, or for more information to 
Chris Naylor, RAINER FOUNDATION. 232 
Tootey Street. London S £1 2JX ( 01-403 
4434 |. And hefp the teenager behind the 
stereotype. ■•'.■* 


Co nti nued ft— 


THEATRES 


U WUPM den wracio Book auMi» 
MtOO COOocMr. 4 J- 4 S. SL MteVS BOWL 
Eabap. LOB0OB WB SBQ. 

TWO HA*P — HU 1 C *obd na ho pra y Ma- 
IM tables by W.M. Cox A San*. 
H enptewt uti Ohgmy PMmO resro- 
cturttoas. Beauty ul workmoMteo. Bona 
m BStoa* l wfli seat 12 icon doo* 
down) £ 8 &a 1 wtfl sort 10 'era daw 
down) ngailnuitiLSca toreten.Ol- 
208 6027 . 

VMUMS TWO UM Pneaefi vieHm. Con* 
BPUlrawl Lyon 1925 No 88 £ 6 lOOO. 
aiartes Jocoaot Porte 1862 £ 4 . 500 . 
B081 u w nuueab. raunrathr sunabte far 
PMtattal nutodiM. Tel 01-238 
7952 

Mumipte UHiHW Ptono. y n a w i oB 
ally bawd. £ 14300 . Tteenh a nw Bristol 
741937 

LV«XC(WTFteaiaath.OKclKUaaUI- 
llea. £ 2 . 800 . CIJOO new. « mink cwd. 
Never warn. 0.000. T«t 079 373 460 . 

UumVMUnTOK.CatT.Viaen 
£ 49 . videos nrem £ 99 . 9 * Lower Stone 
Street. SWl. 7300933 . 

snaniAT Medium eread mo 87263 . Eo- 
vnxRttan rosewood case. Good 
eoadmoa. cuoo. 0293 22278 

TO Ute FLAB 8 T 0 NES for polios & drive- 
ways. Winter nrorenrr nb. Td 061 
223 0881 / 061 231 678 & 






WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 


FLATSHARE 


PUTNEY HU Larar hot aot See* prte male 
309 to mare wtui anotber. O/R. CH. 
N/S Bref erred. Garage. £180 pern + 
MO*. Tat 01-788 9066 ' 
HJIC I M PtTia to. O/R. M/F to Share 
bae with doctor Nrstadoa Garden CSS 
. gw. cans. 0S-8S8 0663 eves/wkend* 
K1S Room In brand aew luatiy IML rtdae 
TtBiettc Lane tube. £49 gw 01-809 
8982. 

mu Ctrl, own room b» bonny M. TV. 
CM. Video. OomnUI garden*. £66 PM 
■tee 01-401-6841 




Cr 


Pal' Bramah Funeral Send ees . 
C ro wbcrourti. Phone; ( 08926 ) 5000 


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UBOUUMlPO 


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24 


Brian James casts his eye over a conflict of drama, humour and tears 

No heroes in the Theatre of the Snide 


Suggesting flat Mr Robert 
Maxwell, tbe emigre publisher 
long in love with tbe British 
Way of life, had tried to bribe 
his way to a peerage has cost 
tbe satirical magazine Private 
Eye nearly £250,000. 

Alter deliberating for five 
boms yesterday, working their 
way through a sort of Idiotfg 
Guide to verdict-making pro- 
vided by Mr Justice Brown 

(was the artide defamatory? If 

No, proceed no farther. If Yes, 
goto . . .)»jury ofshcmenand 
six women awarded Mr Max- 
well a total of £55,000 in 
damages for two artzdes in 
which he was libelled. Private 


of the 15-day 
(muted at £195,000. 

Mr Maxwell naturally was 
jubilant He would donate the 
£55,000, be said, to charities 
far children and also to help 
combat Aids. He seemed ener- 
moasly pleased with his fol- 
low-up remark: “The money 
f uming from one Infected or- 
gan will go to help cere 
another”. He repeated this 
several tunes. 

He also said that be felt the 
decision would betp all those 
thousands of people, their 
families and friends, who had 
“suffered from being targeted 
by these reckless attacks” He 
had proved, he said, that 
Private Eye neither “checked 
its farts, nor had tbe guts to 
apologize when it was wrong. 
They were peddlars of lies and 
filth”. Good knockabout staff. 

Mr Richard Ingrams, the 
magazine's editor at the tone 
of the article and stfll its 
chairman, ^ shown himself 
fairly adept at this sort of stuff 
bet was now anacconntably 
not around to say anything. He 
was said to be reflecting amid 
other calmer words in his 
wife's bookshop along the 
Thames at Wallingford. 

Bat it was entirely in keep- 
ing with die often bizarre 
atmosphere of this case that 
the comedian Mr Peter Code, 


Eye, occupied part at th e 
waiting horns giving pressmen 
two interviews — he couldn't 
stay to the mid. he explained, 
bring off to see his mum, bid 
be could say now what his 
thoughts would be if his sole 
won. Or again if they lost. 
Solemnly, it was all duly 
noted: 



The protagonists: Mr Richard Ingrams, former editor of Private Eye, left, and Mr Robert Maxwell, the plaintiff 


For a win, Mr Cook could be 
re p orted as being “rather more 
pleased than Punch". Against 
a defeat his words could be 
reported as follows: “We shall 
now bring oota hamper edition 
to pay for it . . .and I don’t 
think we are in any more 
danger now than we have been 
for 25 years.” 

Coaid the Eye stand dam- 
ages like this, even with one- 
third of its £1 nriDkm-plus 
income set aside for filial 
cases? “Of course. Bat I still 
don’t see what we said wrong.” 

What Private Eye said 
wrongly, of coarse, was t hat 
Mr Maxwell had paid for 
several foreign trips for the 
Labour leader, Mr Neff 
Krnaoch, in the hope it would 
gain him preference on Labonr 
fists for a peerage. 

But the wicked sk21 in the 
canard was, of course, that it 
would have been wideley be- 
lieved. Mr Maxwell, a man 
who didn't so orach try to join 
the establishment as redesign 
himself to merge into in it. has 
shown such a love of British 
institutions (he bought himself 
a football dob, several na- 


tional newspapers and adop- 
ted a number of lost Good 
Canses) that the notion that he 
might be desperate to enrol in 
another had a treacherous 
superficial attraction. 

Oddly for afi his efforts, he 
Is not as loved as he may like. 
As weD as having his fortune 
(they say be controls £500 
million) intact, he would liked 
to have walked into tie Strand 
yesterday an mdonhted hero. 
Alas it cannot be. For many of 
the most stinging fines — “he 
is a ruthless and vindictive 
man, possessed of a vast 
ego. . .a man who has framed 
a national newspaper mto tbe 


6 It had been 
the School 
Braggart 
versus the 
House 
Sneak 9 


Maxwell Family Album” — 
woe aimed at bis head during 
the three-week ran in Court 11 
of this epic production in the 
Theatre of the Snide. 

On many days, it was 
standing room only and those 
standing included stars of the 
legitimate theatre like Mr 
Cook, and of the media ar- 
cuses like Mr Peter Jay and a 
lordly scribble of Fleet Street 
editors. 

There was c— flirt, the de- 
licious hue of a dislike-faden 
encounter between two ir- 
redeemably unpleasant men. 
Early on, Mr Maxwell filled 
the witness box with his balk 



There 

peciaQy on that day wbea Mr 
Maxwell was sa mmaa e d from 
his seat by news of the disaster 
to one of the helicopters flat 
his companies owe: he flew at 
once to Scotland to branch an 
appeal. This was Maxwell the 
Mti wpan, an authentic real- 
fife hero who, the jwy learned, 
had been awarded the Military 
Cross and comnrissjoaed in 
the field. 

There was humour — some 
of it in tentio na l as when 
Justice Mr Brows, reacting to 
toe plea that Mr Ingrams was 
tired from Us stmt is the 
witness box, drawled: “Ob, 
but I looked him np m Who's 



est step through his self-made 
fife. Only Mr Ingrams’s 
g rapering acolytes looked 
imderwhrimed by the redftaL 

During Mr Ingrams’s own 
long haul giving evidence, Mr 
Maxwell was seldom absent: 
he sat hatf-smifiiig, with those 
dark brooding eyes fired on 
his enemy, looking fi fee noth- 
ing so much as a well-fed 
python wondering whether he 
could after afi manage to 
ingest another whole goat 


Who and there he pres Us 
recreation as litigation"; some 
perhaps less intended as when 
Mr Andrew Bateson QC for 
Mr Ingrams, protested at the 
reading of a tong fiat of 
pterions Eye apologies “The 
is pore mnd-sfingragT Col- 
lapse of stoat parties. ■ 

There were tears when Mr 
Maxwdl spoke aboi l : U si fiffl- 

had been ased by the magazine 
in one of its plies against the 
tycoon. And a frisson of 
Wicked Wizard threat when 
Mr Maxwell's tdsvMoa Inter- 
view, in which he bad vowed to 
“swat Ingrams like a fly” was 
quoted. 

The theatre, like afi 
drama, also provided ' 
Nothing was more i 

than those two long days when 

Mr Ingrams stood fa the box 
under assault by Mr Richard 
Hartley, QC (for Mr Max- 
well), who worked through a 
list of 53 previous apologies 

published by Private Eye. 

Mr Hartley rammed home 
the key phrases in the apolo- 
gies offered after items on 
Laly Havers (“complete fab- 
rication”), Sr James Gold- 
smith (“quite tratrue”), Mr 
Jocelyn Stevens (“pure in- 
vention”), am embassy official, 
Mr Guidon Kirby (“gravest 
defamation . . .totally false”), 
Mr Cedi Ptotinstm (“without 
slightest foundation”). 

Cross-examined on tbe 
magazine’s sources for these 
discredited stories, Mr In- 
grams insirted they came only 
from respected and authori- 
tative journalists whose word 
ft had never occured to him to 
doubt. He that gave a battal- 
ion-strength role call of Fleet 
Street’s Finest, the 2fat Foot 
aad Month, as ft were: Nigel 
Dempster, Paul Foot, Peter 
McKay, PoDy Toynbee A 
payment of £20 per item was 


The only element 
from this land prod action of 
“Cap’n Bob Meets Merciless 
Dick” in Court II, finally, was 
any glimpse of an authentic 
hero-Tbe jury was fortunate in 
that it only had to made a 
it in law — there 
have been no conceiv- 
able way to jndge between the 
two mi likeahifity. It had been 
toe School Braggart versns the 
House Sneak. 


New body 
to head 
anti- Aids 
campaign 

Conthued from page 1 
all health authorities wore 
being asked to ensure that 
sexually transmitted disease 
clinics were given a dequa te 
resources to meet the de- 
mands of Aids. Allocation of 
resources to health authorities 
will take account of the needs 
of hospitals to treat Aids 
patients, he said. 

MPS were told that do 
decisions had been taken (Hi 
proposals for compulsory or 
voluntary screening. Mr 
Fowler spoke of the practical 
difficulties of embarking on 
largfrscale screening of res- 
idents or visitors to Britain, 
and the fear that any element 
of compulsion might drive 
people away from seeking 
advice or help. 

He said that the challenge of 
Aids would last for several 
parliaments, probably for the 
rest of the century, mad there 
should be as much common 
ground as possible between 
the political parties. 

Later, winding up the de- 
bate, Mr Antony Newton, the 
Minister for Health, disclosed 
that Mr Kenneth Clarke, Min- 
ister for Employment, will on 
Monfay send a booklet to 
employers te ffi ng them flat 
there is no risk involved in 
day-to-day social contact with 
Aids carriers, including at the 
workplace. 

Mr Newton said that it was 
important to avoid a situation 
in which carriers were treated 
as lepers, and lost their jobs. 

Mr Michael Meacher, the 
Labour chief spokesman on 
health, condemned the Gov- 
ernment’s response so far as 
being “too little and too late” 
and said that a tnmunnm 
adequate budget for counter- 
ing tbe spread of Aids shook! 
be between £50 million to 

£100 million. 

Mr Meacher said that the 
Aids problem was this year on 
the brink of exploding like a 
lethal timebomb- Faced with a 
death rate whifa could rise 70- 
fold in the next five years, and 
with costs for nursing Aids 
victims possibly tiring to 
£300 million, any under-pro- 
vision for prevention, 
counselling and research fatal- 
ities would be “die grossest 
form of fake economy”. 


Constable 
sells for 
record 
of £2.6m 

By Geraldine Norman 

Safe Room Correspondent 

Constable looks fike ousting 
Turner as the most expensive 
artist of the British sdmoL His 
“Flatford Lock and MAT sold 
fo £2,640,000 at Christie's 
yesterday, setting an auction 
price record for his work. 

Trustees of tbe Tate Gallery 
had. decided to make an ab- 
out effort to acquire his 
“Opening of Waterloo 
Bridge” said to be valued at 
£4 million.- 

“Flatford Lock” depicts the 
home of Constable’s fatter 
and a stretch cf tte river Stour 
where he grew up. It was his 
first picture commissioned by 
the Royal Academy and gives 
promise of his pioneering 
impressionism. 

It was bid fo by Agnew’s, 
the Bond Street dealers, who 
were thought to be acting for 
Mr David Thomson, son and 
heir of Lord Thomson of 
Fleet. His remarkable Con- 
stable collection is split be- 
tween his father's home in 
Kensington Palace Gardens 
and Canada. 

Agnew's said tte picture 
would be staying in this 
country. Agnew’s is believed 
to have been acting for Mr 
Thomson when at Sotheby’s 
on Wednesday it paid 
£159,500 for a Constable 
cloud study. 

Until this week no Con- 
stable printing had made 
more than £345,600 at auc- 
tion, and the appearance of 
two simultaneously has posed 
a problem fo tbe National's 
collection. It had to pass on 
Constable’s first Academy ex- 
hibit fo tte sake of a more 
famous work. 

“The Opening of Waterloo 
Bridge” seen from Whitehall 
Stairs, June 18 1817, measures 
seven feet and depicts tte 
opening of the Bridge by tte 
Prince Regent. Constable con- 
ceived the idea of tte picture 
in tbe 1820s 

Treated with impressionis- 
tic brushwork — it was 
dubbed “unfinished” by his 
contemporaries — the high 
tonality of the painting so- 
impressed Turner on varnish- 
ingday at tte Academy that he 
added a bright red buoy to tte 
seascape 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Sotatiou to Puzzle No 17,204 Sofatioa to Puzzle No 17,209 


anaraia irn.in.iQjaj 

□ aanQuon 
jEiiiaaanaa rinnan 

□ □□□□□□□ 

tiDHoa rjaaaanaao 

□ □ n □ a 
ijEwnana ijnrinantj 

□ a a □ □ □ 

cjanaana 
□ a m □ □ 

liiDdDtjDDQQ tdiDtriBQ 
araQCJQoan 
fJEiaaQ LiQEJQQClEtSn 
3QBQC1QIIQ 

LiniaBnnaaa unman 


i for the 

first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Companion. PO Box 486. 1 Virginia Street. London El 9DD. 
The winners and solutions will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday’s competition are: B Hughes, 
Nubian Cottage, High Street, Chieveley, nr Newbury, Berks: D 
Macdonald, Birchaown. Hardenhuish Lane. Chippenham, 
Wilts: A Limb, 10 Kingsley Close. Cropton, nr Wakefield, West 
Yorks. 

Na me._ 



Address. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,210 



ACROSS 

1 Exchange blows for a bit (5). 

4 Pylhia for one set om to 2 
divide the mob (9). 

9 Michael’s place on the 3 
Dvina river (9). 

10 Derived from a number at 4 
frequent intervals (5). 

11 Scots marry and/or repre- 5 
sent the old county (4,3,8). 

12 Muslim chief accepts eater- 6 
mination schedule (6). 

14 Obstruct new can reversing 7 
in the farm (8). 

17 Set spiel distributed in lei- 8 
ters(S). 

19 A denial by a literary cor- 13 
poral - an unidentified one 
(6). IS 

22 City once named after a 
rock? (5,10). 

24 Help to make a curtain, say 16 
151. 

25 Ruling odds 1 call stimulat- 18 
ing (9). 

26 Neat guide to craft? (9). 20 

27 Sounds like a little girl, this 

supernatural servant (5). 21 

22 

DOWN 23 

1 Cabinet supports step de- 

Conase crossword. 


to make flights secure 


Strong currents encountered 
by river champions (51 
BiB. the port authority 
eccentric (71 

In which to worship a deity 
in Pennsylvania? (6). 
Unhealthy rainy parts of an 
ancient region (8). 

Circus proprietor who’s new 
to an island (7). 

Set down soldiers in har- 
bour (9). 

Two characters from 22 dn, 
or one from 1 1? (5). 

Dispose of bird protected by 
the best people (9). 

Eg US politician eager to 
upset Establishment lead- 
ers? (9). 

See about novice — one in 
mmeworkers' dement (8). 
Gossip makes up story 
about Recbabize king 17). 
Someone's tin god making a 
retread (7). 

Individual appearing in it is 
all there! (6). 

Guy’s remains? (5). 
Agreement about leaving a 
French island (5). 

page 17 


Today’s events 


New exhibitions 

Christmas Lights; Cleveland 
Gallery, Victoria Rd. Middles- 
brough; Tues to Sal 12 to 7 (ends 
Jan 31). 

Etchings and drawings by 
Tieko Mori Dolores Montijano 
and Charies Gautier; Great Bam 
Gallery, Paridands, Gt Linford, 
Mahon Seynra; Mon to Sat 10 to 
4 and 7 to 10 (ends Dec 13). 

American Cartoons; Victoria 
Art Gallery. Bridge Street. Bath; 
Mon to Fri 10 to 6, Sat 10 to 5 
(ends Jan 3). 

Box of Delights; Grape Lane 
Gallery. Low Beteigate, York; 
Mon to Sat lOto 5 (ends Jan 31). 

Five Years with The Face’: 
5th anniversary of Tte Fore cult 
magazine; Library Gallery, 
Guildford Lawn, Ramsgate, 
Mon to Wed 9 30 to 5, Thur 9 30 
to 5, Fri 9 30 to 8, Sal 9 30 to 5 
(ends Dec 23). 

Looking into Paintings: Por- 
traits ; Castle Museum, Notting- 
ham; Mon to Sun 10 to 4.45 
(ends Jan 1). 

Christmas exhibition of land- 
scapes; Sladebrook House, 222 
English com be Lane, Bath, Mon 
to Sat 10 to 6, Sun 2 to 6(ends 
Dec 7). 

Last chance to see 

Paintings by Moira Meel- 
boom: Ntcol Centre. Brewery 
Court. Cirencester, 10 to 12 30. 

Rembrandt; Whitworth Art 
Gallery. Whitworth Park. Man- 
chester, 10 to 5. 

Sculptures and drawings by 
Soksri Douglas Camp; MDton 
Keynes Exhibition Gallery, 555 
Sflbury Boulevard, 10 to 5. 

Music 

Concert by tbe Sheffield Barb 
Society; Sheffield Cathedral. 
7.30. 

Conceit by tte Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Gufldford 
Cathedral, 7 30. 

Recital by the Choir of 
Dunfermline . Abbey; Durham 
Cathedral 12 15. 

Concert by tte Choir of 
Ripon Cathedral Ripon Cathe- 
dral, 7 30. 

Concert by the Harrogate 
Choral Society; Royal Hall, 
Harrogate, 7 30. 

Recital by Geraldine Allen 
(clarinet) and Gavin Mole {pi- 
ano); Carlisle Cathedral 7.45. 

Concert by the Cambridge 
Philharmonic Society; College 
Chapel Cambridge, 8. 

Concert by fo Bristol Bach 
Choir and the Bournemouth 
Sinfonietta; Colston HaD. Bris- 
tol 7.3a 

Concert by Cecil fan Singers; 
Church ofSz James the Greater, 
Leicester, 7.30. 

Concert by the Chester Music 
Society Choir and City of Ches- 
ter Symphony Orchestra: Ches- 
ter.CaihedraL 7.30. 

Concert by the Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra; City Hall 
Glasgow, 7.30. 

Concert by the Wolver- 
hampton Chamber Orchestra: 
Grammar School. Wolverham- 
pton. 7.45. 

Talks, lectures 

A View of craft matters, by 
Tanya Hamxfc Plymouth Arts 
Centre. LooeSu 2.30. 

P.D. James, leading crime 
writer, talks about her very 
successful career Public li- 
brary. Parker Lane, Burnley. 3. 

General 

Book Fain Athene um Rooms; 
Bury St Edmunds, 10 to 5. 

Craft workers Craft Fair: De 
La Wanr Pavilion, Bexhffl, 10. 


Tomorrow’s events 


Last chance to see 

Thomas Hornon 17th century 
landscape artist. National Mu- 
seum of Wales, Main Building, 
Cathays Park, Cardiff, 2 30 to 5. 

18th, 19th and 20th century 
paintings; Gallery by the Park, 
West Hill Gisburn Rd, Barrow- 
ford, Nelson, 10 to 5 30. 

William Scott; The Scottish 
Gallery of Modern Art, Bedford 
Road, Edinburgh. 2 to 5. 

Masterpieces of 20th century 
photography, from the Gruber 
Collection, Museum Ludwig, 
Cologne; Corner House, 70 
Oxford St, Manchester, 22 to 8. 
Music 

Concert by the Regional 
Youth Chi or and Schools Or- 
chestra; Tail Hafl, Kelso, 7.30. 

Harworth Organ Enthusiasts; 
David Hamilton (compere) & 
Julie Haigh concert, Harworth 
Social Welfare Hafl, White- 
house Road, Bir co tet , 7 30. 

Concert by tbe Orchestra of St 
John Smith's Square, Hexagon, 
Queen's Walk, Reading, 7 3a 

A recital of traditional muse' 
of China with Li Lisha (Chinese 
latex Holywell Music Room, 
Oxford, 8. 

Concert by the Harmonic 
Society and Oxford Symphony 
Orchestra; Town Hall Oxford, 
3. 

Recital by Ian Partridge 
(tenor) and Jennifer Partridge 
(piano); BaroGeld Theatre, Exe- 
ter University. 8. 

Concert by tte Leipzig 
Gewandhaus Orchestra; St Dav- 
id’s Hall Cardiff. 7.30. 


Roads 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births George Eliot, Chdveis 
Coton, Warwicks, 1819; George 
Gissang, novelist, Wakefield. 
Yorks. 1857; CecD Sharp, 
founder of the English Folk 
Dance Society. London, 1859; 
Jean- Baptiste Marchand, ex- 
plorer, Thoissey. France, 1863; 
AadreGide. writer, Nobel laure- 
ate 1 947, Paris, 1969; Charles de 
Gaulle, general president of 
France 1958-69. Lille. 1890. 

Deaths: Sr Martin Frobisher; 
navigator, Plymouth. 1594; 
Robert CBve. Baron Cite, 
London, 1774; John Thaifess 
Defane, Editor of The Times 
1841-77. Ascot 1879; Sir Ar- 
thur SoUfran. London. 1900; 
Jack London, novelist Gkrn 
Ellen. California, 1916; Sir Ar- 
thur Eddington, astronomer. 
Cambridge. 1944; CS. Lewis, 
writer. Oxford, 1963; AUons 
Huxley. Los Angeles, 2963; 
John F- Kenned y. 35th presi- 
dent of the USA 1961-63, was 
assassinated at Dallas, 1963. 

Juan Carlos de Bourbon was 
sworn in as the king of Spain, 
1975. 

TOMORROW 

Births: John Wallis, math- 
ematician, Ashford, Kent, 1616; 
Franklin Pierce, 14tit president 
of the USA 1853-57. Hillsboro, 
New Hampshire. 1804; James 
Thomson, poet, author of “Tte 
City of Dreadful Night”. Port 
Glasgow. 1834. 

Deaths: It (Agnolo) Bronzino, 
painter and poet, Florence, 
1572; Thomas Tallis. London. 
1585: L’Abbe Prevost writer, 
author of Morton Lescnui. 
Chantilly. 1763; Friedrich *ou 
Struve, astronomer, Leningrad. 
1864; Andre Malraax, Paris, 
1976: Sir Arthur Wing Pinero, 
playwright, London. 1934. 




€ 

9. 

\/d^olU 

w'u- 




— tjmu/ 

For readers who may have 
missed a copy of Tie Times this 
week, we repeat below tbe 
week’s Portfolio price changes 
[today's are on page 29). 


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Roles and how to play, page 39 


Weather 

forecast 

A vigorous depression in 
mid-Atlantic win move 
NE towards W Scotland, 
with a very strong W to 
SW aiistream becoming 
established over the Brit- 
ish Isles. 

6 am to wild nig ht 


London, SE, central S, E, te 
England, East Anglo, Mdtends, 
Borders, Edinburgh, Dundee, 
Aberdeen, Moray Ffettc Sunny 
intervals, scattered showers; wind 
SW strong locally gale; max temp 
8CJ46F). 

channel Mends, SW 
WOles: Rather cloudy, 
blustery showers; wind w strong to 
gale; max tamp 8C (46F). 

N Wales, Nw T contralto England, 
Lake District, We of Hen, Qfas- 


fefltag as snow on hills; wind SW 
gale; max temp 7C (45F). 

SW Scotland, Northern Ireland: 
Mainly cloudy, blustery showers, 
some prolonged, fating as snow 
later; wind SW tele; max temp 7C 
(45F). - 

Oriuiey, Shetland: Cloudy, out- 
breaks of rain, heavy at limes, 
turning showery; wind SE veering 
SW strong to gate; max temp 6C 
(43F). 

Outlook for tomor row and Mon- 
day: Sunny intervals and 
showers tomorrow, more 
doud and rain spreading ”E on 
Monday. Very windy and rather 
cold. 



High Tides 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

TOMORROW 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridga 

4J/ 

M 

5JJH 

65 

LantonBridgn 

b.15 

65 

55 3 

8.1 

Aberdeen 

4^4 

35 

427 

57 

Abort* m 

557 

35 

tr.19 

30 

Amnmondi 

946 

10J8 1020 

102 


1058 

105 1058 

9.7 

BaUast 

2.13 

25 

254 

35 

BaUast 

351 

28 

351 

35 

Career 

!MO 

WJJ torn 

05 

Can** 

10-13 

95 10.43 

91 

Demoport 

&28 

45 

8j48 

45 

Daw port 

353 

43 

230 

43 

Dover 

1X7 

BO 

152 

S.7 

Dover 

257 

63 

P.A0 

54 

FabDOUb 

7-56 

4.7 

&1R 

45 


853 

46 

950 

41 

Gtaagow 

Harafai 

351 

230 

42 

38 

353 

352 

47 

35 

/Mnaiwm 

Harwich 

453 

3.11 

41 

as 

457 

245 

45 

38 

KT-' 

1.14 

9*1 

47 

8.1 

137 

9.17 

45 

65 

Hoptoad 

252 

1058 

45 216 
53 1050 

47 

53 

thaoDtabm 

JU8 

7.7 

9.11 

75 

tifijw nmh m 

959 

73 1052 

69 

Left 

546 

45 

655 

46 

Later 

657 

45 

656 

45 

Liverpool 

1-59 

75 

2.12 

85 

Liverpool 

2.43 

75 

350 

7.7 

Lowestoft 

00-00 

25 1252 

P.1 

LoMMft 

1242 

23 

155 

25 

Margate 

2.40 

44 

3.12 

43 

teargrto 

352 

43 

4.00 

41 

ROtonl Haven 

9.10 

55 

955 

55 

tOfordHavan 

953 

S3 1056 

S3 

Hawquay 

ao3 

55 

859 

55 

Nawqnay 

8.48 

55 

952 

S3 

Oban 

801 

ZA 

aoi 

51 

Oban 

956 

35 1007 

99 

Pcmamo 

731 

45 

754 

45 

huinaneu 

8.10 

48 

240 

43 

Portend 

9.15 

15 

6.44 

15 

Portend 

9.45 

1.7 1058 

14 

FartmouA 

228 

40 

231 

40 

Portsmouth 

2(0 

39 

3.16 

35 

Stoowiisam 

153 

5.4 

2.04 

55 

Stoorahara 

23b 

65 

2to 

49 

Souetanptoa 

1.49 

35 

155 

35 

Soeatanpten 

238 

33 

246 

38 

SfttBVOl 

9.12 

8.1 

oat 

7.6 


956 

7.7 1056 

7.3 

Tens 

657 

45 

7,03 

4.7 

Tees 

749 

43 

754 

45 

WHen-on-Nxe 

220 

3.7 

256 

35 

OTnrmnWu 

258 

3.0 

341 

35 



b-Mue sky: tettue sky and doo d: c* 

dowry: 0-avmasE Hoff UM K to- 
la*!: . mtat-mtet r-ratn; s-snow; Bv 
ttiundentonn: nattowas. 

Arrows show wind mnaka. wind 
speed (mpb) ctrcJed. Tempe ratu re 
centigrade. 

lighting-up time 

TODAY 

London 433 pm to 7.01 am 
Bristol 4,43 pm lo 7,11 am 
““ ‘ -25pm to 7.34 am 

. 4.33 pm ttj 7.18 am 

550 pm to 7.17 am 

T OM OBHO W 

London 4,32 pm to 7.03 am 

Bristol 4.42 pm to 7.1 2 am 
EdMwtf) 423 pm to 7 56 am 
Mancheste r 452pm to 7.20 tga 
Fan zi nes 4.5B pm 18 7.19 am 


Waymotoh 

Exmouth 

Torquay 

Fafewrth 


fab ,10 


Abroad 


MHMtt&ClDUfc&drtEdKf. ton & toff r, s, son; sn. snow, t thunder. 

C F 


Yesterday 

^wamaies at nscuay yestmay: c, 

dood: (, talc r. mto; s. sun. 

C F c F 

Bttast I 439 Guomwy f 948 

B^mgbatn s 643 Inverness f 134 

gfrdtpooi s 643 Jersey f t05Q 

846 London c 745 

, .» 745 ITiodalar a 541 

£*"*” ** {B -I® W ewc ni B a s 43S 
Gtaagow fg -130 tTnUmny f 748 


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Mot’dria 
Atfm 
ArasTcfen 
Athens 
Bahrain 
Barbate' 
Batcdna 
Bdmt 


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c 17 63 Cologne 
t 21 70 C’phagn 

I 22 72 Cortu . 

s 18 64 OtWOa f 4 89 IIMrtuu 

c 6 43 Dotxovnlt f 13 55 MexfcaC * 23 73 S 


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f 4 38 Matege 

f 17 63 m55T. 


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a 18 64 Sattong 

9 18 toSPitear 


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Flame* 
Frankfort 
f 13 55 Aatth* 
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Beta 1 5 41 BttetoH 
Betmoda* f 30 66 ftonK 
f IS 69 tnnsfercfc 


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BetfMl 


NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 


Printed by London . Post rPrtm- 

3 1 Virginia Sitml 

London El ?XN ana by 


ersi limited oi 1 
London El dXN and by News 
Scotland Ltd.. 124 Portm&n street 


Klnnlns Park. Glasgow G 41 1 EJ. 
Saturday. November 22. 1906. 
Registered as a newspaper at the Poet 


Buriopd 
B Aires* ; 

Cabo 

SKI*' 

Chtonca 

Chicago' 

CfaUHCft 


e 13 55 
C 6 43 Jeddah 
e T 45 Oo’bum- 
6 2 36 KaraeS 
( 24 75 L Patau 
X 23 73 Lisbon 
s 28 82 Locarno 
s 21 70 L Angels* 
UouHnbg 
a 18 SI * - - ^ 


f 18 64 
C 12 54 
f 5 41 

I 21 701 

9 9 48 

S 18 64 

e 4 39 Nadee 
£ 23 73 N baH 
r 7 48 KYorr 
S 13- 56 Men 
(fata 

c 21 70 Paris 
S 29 84 FsMas 
I 21 70 Pratt: 
f 16 81 
r 745 


I 846 

r 23 73 
I 31 88 
s 848 
f 28 84 
c 337 
a 9 48 
f 16 61 
c 17 63 
8 20 « 
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8 IS 58 


3 37 RiBttoJ 

6 43 Myadir 


* denotes ■pstraday’s flguras am latest avaHbie 


Seoul 

d 8 48 
C -5.28 
c 0 32 
r 5 41 

1 24 75 Tamper 

I 19 66 Tri cwv 

» £4 75 Tenerife 

Tokye . _ M 

s 15 81 Toronto* sn -2 28 

C -1 30 Tnrat C 17 63 

I 11 52 Valencia s 17 63 

9 9 48 Uene’ver c 10 50 

8 26 79 Venice r 11 52 

f 5 41 Vienna c 4 39 

f -a 28 Warsaw f 8 45 

s 19 66 WaafaW 

C 26 79 Wtfntol S IS 58 

t 24 75 Zorich t 8 * 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 



STOCK MARKET 

: - 

FT 30 Share 

1274.2 (+14.4) 

■Si, 

■ 

FT-SE 100 

1624.9 (+14.2) 

Bargains 

34762(271 62) 


USM (Datastream) 
129.09 (-0.01) 


THE POUND 

■ 

US Dollar 

1,4195 (+0.0085) 

> -’**• 

W German mark 

2.8653 (+0.0255) 


Trade-weighted 

67.9 (+0.3) 


Panel date 
for Opax 

-The takeover panel yes- 
terday confirmed there would 
be a full panel meeting on 
Monday to consider the ap- 
peal by Datafin and the in- 
dependent directors of 
McCorquodale against the 
executive's ruling that Norton 
Opax had won the bid for 
McCorquodale. 

The panel’s executive had 
ruled that Opax had not been 
acting in conceit with an 
investment institution — the 
Kuwait Investment Office — 
which was a core underwriter 
to the Opax bid and had been 
buying McCorquodale shares 
at prices above the Opax offer. 

Pmdential-Badbe, adviser 
. to Datafin, announced also 
. that it had bought more 
McCorquodale shares on 
Thursday to take its stake to 
18.9 per cent 

Geest 30 times 
subscribed 

The offer of stares in Geest 
was subscribed 30 times; with 

1 10.00 applications received. 
Apart from priority applica- 
tions which are allotted in full, 
the share aDocation is: For 200 
to 1,000 shares, a weighted 
ballot for 200 shares;. 1,500 to 
2,500 shares, a weighted ballot 
for 300 shares; 3,000 to 8,000 
shares, weighted ballot for 400 
shares; 9,000 to H,0Q0 shares, 
400 shares allocated; 12,000 to 

19.000 shares, 500 shares allo- 
cated; ' 20,000 shares and 
above, about 3.4 per cent of 
the application lip to a maxi- 
mum of 100,000 shares. 

Rothmans up 

Pretax profits at Rothmans 
International, the cigarette 
and brewing group, rose from 
£58.8 million to £73.8 million 
in the six months to Septem- 
ber 30 on turnover down from 
£744.8 million to £725.5 mil- 
lion. The interim dividend 
was raised from 22p to 2.5p. 

Tempos, page 27 

Rover tender 

The Rover Group is invit- 
ing tenders for the purchase of 
its Llanelli radiators opera- 
tion, a supplier .of radiators, 
heat exchange equipment and 
seat frames. Tenders are to be 
delivered to Hill Samuel by 
December 12. ... 

S hanghai rush 

Peking (Reuter) Thou- 
sands of Shanghai citizens 
lined up to buy 27 milbon 
y uan (£5 million) worth of 
bonds on their first day of 
issue, an official newspaper 


1,000 people fonued outside 
bank branches for the bonds, 

issued to raise capital for an 

ethylene plant 


Monty Mrkts 26 Tempos 27 
Wall Street 26 Stack Market 27 
Traded Opts 26 DnhTrasfcs 28 
Forties udi 26 C t Hiwm d iK es 28 
Co News 26 USM Prices 28 
27 Share Prices 29 



TIMES 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


Rooke confident of £5.6 billio n company launch 

British Gas to go 
public at 
135p per share 


By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 


British Gas shares were 
yesterday priced at 135p each, 
valuing the company at £5.6 
bfilion. By 3pm, underwriting 
of the share issue had been 
completed. 

Sir Denis Rooke, the chair- 
man, welcomed the start of a 
new era: “My colleagues and I 
look forward to the new 
challenges and we are braced 
to meet them." 

Payment for the shares will 
be in three instalments with 
50p per share payable an 
application, 45p in June next 
year and 40p in April 1988. 

A spokesman for NM Roth- 
schild, the merchant bank 
adviser to the sale, said he 
expected a premium of about 
15p on the fully ‘paid price 
when dealings start on De- 
cember 8. This would mean a 
30 per' cent premium on the 
50p partly paid shares. 

At the 135p offer price, the 
shares wiH sell on a forecast 
gross yield of 6.8 per cent But 
for individnal shareholders, 
the phasing of instalments, 
coupled with gas vouchers will 
mean a return in the first year 
of 21.6 per cent 

If investors choose bonus 
shares, these phis foe dividend 
payments mil give, an eff- 
ective average return of 11.4 
per cent a year for three years. 

On the forecast pro forma 
profits of £884 mUlIon for the 
year to the end of March 1987 


— up from £831 million — the 
price to earnings multiple is 
9.7. 

“The price has been set to 
ensure the country, receives 
proper value for a major 
national asset and to ensure 
the success of the issue," Mr 
Anthony Alt of Rothschild, 
said. 

Some City analysts had 
been looking for a price of 
130p and yesterday agreed 
that a premium of more than 
. 15p was unlikely. 

Mr Arthur Hepher, oil an- 
alyst at Scrimgeour Vickers, 
the stockbroker, said: “The 
price is a touch on the high 
side but 5p is not crucial either 
way. The Government wanted 
the mgrimimi possible.” 

More than 7.5 million peo- 
ple have inquired about the 
issue and about 5.5 million 
British Gas customers have 
registered for the Customer 
Share Scheme. 

Surveys have revealed that 
55 per cent of those interested 
in baying shares would choose 
bonus shares rather than 
vouchers. 

• The share sale, which the 
advisers expect to be over- 
subscribed, has been struc- 
tured so that there will be no 
need to ballot applications 
and all private investors who 
apply correctly will receive an 
allocation. 

Up to 64 per cent of the 


shares, worth slightly less than 
£3.5 billion, win be available 
to private British shareholders 
under . a claw-back 
arrangement. 

The costs of privatizing 
British Gas, the largest share 
offer so for, are likely to 
emerge at more than £100 
million, including £70 million 
■for underwriting and sub- 
underwriting foes. 

Mr Michael Richardson, a 
managing director of Roth- 
schild, said the underwriting 
foe was a “quite remarkably 
low” 0.175 per cent compared 
with 0375 per cent in the 
British Telecom flotation. 
Sub-underwriters were paid 
1.25 percent. 

But the pricing of the issue 
immediately prompted criti- 
cism from opposition parties. 
Mr Tony Blair, Labour’s Trea- 
sury spokesman, sai± “Even 
at this price die shares wiD be 
traded at a premium that 
could cost the British taxpayer 
£400-£600 million on the tost 
day of trading, or £20-£30 per 
household in Britain**. 

Mr David Steel, the Liberal 
leader, said: “Most of the lucre 
to be gained wiD end up in the 
pockets of the money men in 
the City.” 

The full prospectus for the 
British Gas share offer will be 
published in The Times on 
Tuesday and the offer doses at 
10am on Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 3. 


Lawson lifts pound 
to strong recovery 

- By David Smith Ecoeomics Correspondent 


The pound recovered 
strongly yesterday afterthe 
Chancellor, Mr Nigel Lawson, 
repeated his tns reluctance, in 
the Commons this week, to 
see it foil further. But dealers . 
said that the October trade 
figures next Tuesday are of 
crucial importance for 
sterling. 

The pound rose by 80 points 
to SS1.4195 against the dollar, 
and by 3.5 pfennigs to - 
DM2:8661 The sterling index 
rose by 0.3 to 67 A 

Gilt-edged stocks rose by 
around naif a point on av- 
erage, after the sharp fill 
earlier this week. However, 
money market rates held toe 
higher levels established ear- 


lier this week; despite indica- 
tions toat toe {federal Reserve 
Board may be considering a 
cut in the US discount rate. 

The trade figures have now 
taken on a key role in the 
markets* assessment of the 
prospects for sterling and the 
economy, with some op- 
erators tearing a return to the 
balance of payments con- 
straints of the 1960s. 

City forecasters expect toe 
current account to have re- 
mained in deficit last month, 
probably by £100-200 utipkm, 
implying a trade deficit of 
£700-800 million. 

This would represent a 
small improvement oh toe 
August and September figures. 


Ocean Transport wins 
its takeover battle 


By Richard Lander 

Ocean Transport and Trad- 
ing, the shipping, freight and 
distribution group, has es- 
caped the clutches of Mr Ron 
Brierley, toe New Zealand 
entrepreneur, whose final 
£306 milli on takeover bid fell 
for short of success last night 
Mr Brieriey’s offer of 260p 
cash for each share received 
acceptances from investors 
holding only 83 per cent of 
OTTs equity to add to toe 
29.4 per cent his EEP (UK) 
company had picked up in the 
market. OTT shares feH 13pto 
238p on news of the foiled bkL 
OTTs dogged defence was 
bolstered by solid support 
from M&G Investment 
Management which took its 
stake to 13.8 per cent during 
toe battle. . 

Mr Bill Menzres-WDson, 
chairman of OTT, said that be 
never had any doubts that toe 
bid would feiL “Now we can 



Ron Brierley: wiD retain 
his OTT stake 

g et fraffr to T unning the busi- 
ness. We have a number of 
things to do.” 

A spokesman for Mr 
Brierley, who is planning to 
obtain a London listing for his 
master company, Brierley 
Investments, said that he 
to retain his' stakein 
TT. 


Hollis set 
to raise 
bid for AE 

By John Befl 
City Editor 

Mr Robert MaxwelFs Hollis 
Group is ready to raise the 
terms of its cash alternative 
ofier for AE, the engineering 
group, from 260p to 28Qp per 
share. 

The improved offer will be 
made if certain substantial AE 
shareholders give it their back- 
ing by Tuesday night 

The other terms and 
condi tons of Hollis’s offer 
would remain unchang ed 


according to a statement from 
AE last night. 

Metoawhile, Turner & 
Newali is taking legal action to 
recover costs and damages in 
connection with its first take- 
over bid for AE, which foiled 
narrowly in September. 

The circumstances of toe 
failure led to a month-long 
investigation by the City 
Takeover Panel AE*s advis- 
ers, Hill Samuel and 
Cazenove were censured by 
the panel for foiling to disclose 

O fftain shares dealings and the 

Panel gave permission for 
T&N to mount its current 
£271 million bid. 

T&N said yesterday that it 
had issued a writ in the 
Chancery Division of the 
High Court claiming damages 
for negligence and or breach of 
contract against AE, its mer- 
chant bankers Hill' Samuel 
and its brokers Cazenove and 
Co, and Hill Samuel Group. 

In addition the writ claims 
damag es for breach of statu- 
tory duty against H31 Samuel 
Group and HID Samuel and 
Co. 

TAN’S costs for the first bid 
were about £6 million, while 
the second takeover bid values 
AE at more than £20 million 
above the level of the first- 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


1871.77 (+11.1tr 


NewYcxfc 
Dow Jones _ 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 1748958 (+186AZ) 

SydrogAO 1346.1 (+152) 

Commerzbank 20139 (+26.7) 

Brussels: 

General 3855-37^+*98j 


Paris: CAC 


388J 


Zurich: SKA Gen 
London: FT. A 
FT. Gifts 


553.10 (+9.50) 


dosing price* 


Page 29 


INTEREST RATES 


London: Bank Base: 1 1% 

3rmonttv Interbank ii?t-11 6 »e% 
34nontfi eUg Me • 

buying rate 

US: Prime Rate 7%% . 

Federal Funds _ 

3-month Treasury BiBs 5.35-5.33% 
30-yaar bonds lOCft-IOO’-'K* 


CURRENCIES 


London: New Yocfc: .. 

fc.J1.4195 S: £1*422^ 

£:DM2J653 ■ $:DM2.tB3p* ; 
£: SwFf2JJ92S St SwFrt.685T 
fc FFr93829 S: FFr8.8225- 

£~Yofl232.66 & YWH64.10* . 

£tnttoc675 S: tndaicin.5; 
Fnu £0.729544 SOT£!(kB5CK3 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


(USES: 
Fothorgin&H 


241p.(+63p; 


„ Bros. 621 R(+ 

Tozar Kamstoy 137p 

CfiHbrds Dairy fffl p 

Atkins 273P 

AB Ports : 285p 

Brit& Coranweatlh — 

BET 

Pearson . 

Erie! 



PWS interTMtionti ... 

Land Secs. : 

NMC Investments — 

Cons Gold — 

toeenwichRes. — 

Steel Bros. — 

Curacy Pet — - 


_575p(+9p) 
_ 401 p (+16p) 
» 306p t+16p) 
. 339p(+11pj 

SIS 

:l«i 


FALLS: 
Beeeham 
BTR 


422p(-3p; 


286p 


Porter Chadbum . 330p (— Iflp) 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 


S«?S3.oSmS0&7075- 

271J25)' 

Ncm/ Yoric 

Coroex $38000-38050* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


15.00) 


1,200 jobs to go 
at Blue Circle 


By Alexandra Jackson 


- Britain’s biggest cement 
manufacturer. Blue Circle In- 
dustries, confirmed yesterday 
that It is to reduce its British 
workforce by 1,200 during 
1987. And there will be more 
redundancies in 1988. 

City observers estimate that 
. total job losses could be more 
than 2jm. They calculate 
that this could cost the group 
at least tTtj mfllinn in redan- 
dancy payments before taking 
Account of associated costs.. 

The redundancies, riming 
the whole business, wiD in- 
clude employees from manu- 
facturing, distribution and 
regional offices. . 

Bfne Cirde employed &940 
people in . British cement 
manufacturing at the end of 
July; The restructuring will 
induce the workforce by about 

25 per cent over two 

Earlier torn year Bine 

paaotmeed pMs to reduce toe 


somber of its drivers by a third 
to 600. 

The import of cheap ce- 
ments was one of toe reasons 
given by Blue Circle for toe 
need to restructure its cement 
operations. 

Sir John MDne, its ch a ir - 
man, said: “We genuinely fear 
imports.- There is no doubt 
that, unless product per em- 
ployee improves, we sh all 
continue to be vulnerable.** 

Blue Circle, which produced 
7.8 milli on tonnes of cement 
last year, enjoys a 58 per cent 
share of toe market But Sir 
John pointed out that demand 
in toe British cement industry 
is static and that the market is 
increasingly competitive. 

He added: “Leaving aside 
the short-term cost of this 
programme we will save a 
minimum of £12 Bullion a year 
as a result of these initial 
redundancies.** 

Tempos, page 27 



Sir Denis Rooke: ‘looking forward to the new challenges’ 


Half-time profits 
treble at NMC 


By Lawrence Lever 


NMC Investments, the 
revitalized packaging group in 
which the Saatehi brothers 
have a 28.6 per cent stake, 
yesterday announced that 
half-year pretax profits had 
jumped from £223,000 to 
£759,000. 

At the same time the com- 
pany is buying two packaging 
companies for a maximum of 
£25 million. The news sent the 
share price raring ahead to 
doseat 200p,up 16p. 

Last February toe Saatehi 
brothers, Charles and Mau- 
rice, purchased 51 per cent of 
the company along with Mr 
Norman Gordon, an insur- 
ance broker and the current 
chief executive of NMC, at 
16pashare. 

The acquisitions an- 
nounced yesterday wiD dilute 


toe Saatehi brothers’ holdings 
to about 20 per cent . 

Mr Gordon said yesterday 
that the company aimed to 
become “a major packaging 
group concentrating on the 
service-orientated and high 
value added sector.” 

NMC is payings maximum 
£14 million for Bux Group, 
which has net assets of £6.5 
million and made profits be- 
fore tax of £1.76 million in its 
last financial year. 

In addition h is buying toe 
Barker Group of companies 
for an initial £3.25 million 
plus a further maximum of 
£7.75 million depending on 
profits. 

In July this year NMC 
bought Interpoly, a security 
wrapping company, for £8 
miDion. 


Gatt agrees new rules 


SE rules out a 
ban on acting 
for Boesky 

By Lawrence Lever 


The Stock Exchange yes- 
terday decided against ban- 
ning its members from dealing 
for Mr Ivan Boesky, toe 
disgraced American 
arbitrageur. 

Firms are lo be allowed to 
act for Mr Boesky provided 
they immediately report all 
deals to the Exchange’s 
surveillance department. 

Die terms ofthe Exchange's 
ruling mirror those of the 
American Securities Commis- 
sion which will allow Mr 
Boesky to continue dealing 
until April 1988. The 
Exchange’s lawyers have de- 
cided that the SEC ruling does 
not limit Mr Boesky only to 
deals which wind up his 
affairs. 

Meanwhile, a spokesman 
for Cambrian and General 
Securities, the UK investment 
trust formerly run by Mr 
Boesky said that the SEC had 
served a subpoena on the 
company asking for details of 
its trades going back to 1978- 
The board of Cambrian was 
yesterday kicked in a meeting 
to determine its future. 

Laing & Cruickshank the 
brokers were reported as act- 
ing for 25 per cent of the 
shareholders m Cambrian and 
trying to line up US securities 
houses to buy aU or pan of its 
portfolio. 

Speculation was mounting 
in toe City that the Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry 
has re-opened several cases of 
suspected insider dealing in 
toe light of information sup- 
plied to it by toe SEC on the 
Boesky affair and the DTTs 
tough new powers to investi- 
gate insider dealing. 

It is understood that several 


cases referred within the past 
three years by the Stock 
Exchange are being re- 
examined. 

A spokesman for toe DTI 
refiised to comment yesterday 
However, he confirmed that 
the new powers to question 
evidence and take evidence on 
oato could be used on any old 
referrals. 

Meanwhile, the the DTI is 
becoming increasingly con- 
cerned that Mr Collier’s 
lawyers will argue that the 
publicity means that Mr Col- 
lier could not have a fair trail 
if a charge of insider dealing is 
bought. 

Mr Collier’s solicitors have 
requested toe DTI to supply 
full transcripts of all radio 
interviews given by Ministers 
concerning toe Collier affair. 

The DTI made special 
arrangements last Sunday to 
ensure that no officials saw Mr 
Collier when he was inter- 
viewed at the DTTs offices by 
the two specially-appointed 
DTI inspectors . 

The Government’s concent 
over the potential adverse 
effects of publicity was high- 
lighted when Mr Paul 
Channon, toe Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry, 
yesterday refused a request 
from toe Labour MP Mr 
Robin Cook to give an assur- 
ance that Mr Boesky’s insider 
dealing did not extend to the 
London markeL 

Mr Channon said that toe 
information was confidential 
adding that “investigations 
stand much more chance of 
being successful if they are 
conducted in the full glare of 
publicity.” 


Congress attacks 
deal by tbe SEC 

From Bailey Morris, Washington 


Geneva (Renter) — Twenty 
nations yesterday agreed to 
new rules on toe award of 
government contracts to busi- 
ness enterprises, an accord 
intended to open toe field to 
more international com- 
petition, the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade 
(GATT) said. 

The agreement, to be im- 
plemented on January 1, 
1988, will require signatory 
nations to post details erf 
contract awards - including 
tbe price - within 60 days. 

Conditions for awarding 
recurring contracts will be 
tightened, while time limits 
for making bids on tenders 


wiD be extended from 30 to 40 

Of S3.5 billion (£2. 14b) of 
procurement awarded yearly 
by toe 20 signatory nations, 
about $2.5 biUion worth are 
directly covered by toe accord 
said a spokesman for GATT. 
Most of the balance is for 
defence contracts, he added. 

Signatories include Austria. 
Canada Belgium, Denmark, 
France, West Germany, Ire- 
land, Italy, Luxembourg, toe 
Netherlands, the United King- 
dom, Finland, United King- 
dom on behalf of Hong Kong, 
Israel, Japan, Norway, Singa- 
pore, Sweden, Switzerland 
and toe United States. 


Congressmen, angered by 
reports that Mr Ivan Boesky 
was allowed to profit last week 
on information about his own 
case, said yesterday they 
would hold hearings in Janu- 
ary on toe deal be negotiated 
with the United States 
government 

The proposed hearings are 
psut of a groundsweU of 
criticism against the Securities 
and Exchange Commission in 
political and financial circles. 

However, the Treasury sec- 
retary, Mr James Baker, said 
toe Administration would re- 
view regulation of tbe securi- 
ties industry in response to toe 
Boesky scandaL 

He said: “The executive 
branch has an obligation to 
review this issue given the 
likelihood that Congress will 
propose new legislation on 
insider t raining .” 


However, he said, the 
Administration itself was not 
in favour of new legislation. 

Mr John DingelL chairman 
of the House Committee 
which has authority over toe 
SEC, said he was angered by 
reports that the Commission 
allowed Mr Boesky to sen an 
estimated $440 million (£309 
million) in shares days before 
be settled his insider trading 
case. 

“Tbe SEC chairman, Mr 
John Shad. wiD be hearing 
from us about this matter,” 
said Mr Dingell, chairman of 
the House Energy and Com- 
merce Committee. 

“Why they let this trans- 
action stand is toe first ques- 
tion I wiD ask,” said 
congressman, Mr Ron Wyden 
of Oregon, also a committee 
member. 


Dull start 
for Virgin 
shares 

By Omr City Staff 
Shares in Mr Richard 
Branson’s Virgin Group made 
a disappointing market debut 
yesterday. 

Set conservatively at 140p 

after tbe tender issue was three 
times oversubscribed, they 
hovered at about that price aD 
day and closed at 139'Ap, 
denying profits for the stags. 

Morgan Grenfell and War- 
burg Securities, advisers to the 
issue, were heavy buyers ofthe 
shares, although spokesmen at 
both companies denied that 
the purchases were part of a 
price-support operation to 
prevent toe shares slipping to 
an embarrassing opening day 
discount 

Mr Roger Seelig, a director 
of Morgan Grenfell, said: “We 
were buying for some 20 to 30 
institutions. Our securities 
people had collected buying 
orders in toe face of toe 
normal sales from smaller 
holders on toe first day. But 
there was no arm-twisting and 
we tod not take any shares on 
to our own books." 

Towards the end of the day 
his company was bidding for 
shares at 140p, lp above any 
other mar ket- make r. 


LCAH £7.4m 
rights issue 

London and Continental 
Advertising Holdings' 
shareholders yesterday nar- 
rowly approved a £7.4 miDion 
rights issue, which gave a 29.9 
per cent stake and manage- 
ment control to Piccadilly 
House, an investment group. 

However, MAL a rival bid- 
der, said that it was en- 
couraged by soundings taken 
from independent sharehold- 
ers and that it would be 
pressing ahead vigorously 
with its £28.3 miDion bid. Its 
cash offer bas been revised to 
1 18p per share, after the 1 lOp 

pphis i'KJie, 


PEPs. Listen 
before vou leas. 


i Here’s a short, simple and free 
k explanation of how a Personal 
Equity Plan can work for you. 
Prepared jointly by Fidelity 
and Douglas Moffitt, 
Financial Editor ofLBC, it 
’ explains how you can invest 
up to the full Government 
"allowance of £2,400 each year in a PEP. 
Or become a share owner for as little as £35 a 
month. All tax-free. 

Remember, the price of shares and unit trusts can go down as 
well as up. 

Send for the Fidelity PEP ‘Action Pack’ and find out about our 
special 1% discount, if you take a Fidelity PEP before December 19th. 

Simply complete and return the coupon, or call us now. The 
lines are open from 9am to 5 pm every weekend and from 
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Callfree Fidelity 0800 41 41 6 1 


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Please send me my Fidelity PEP ‘Action Pack' 
without delay. 




25 

SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


Saint-Gobain 
sale likely to 
raise £924m 


Paris (AP-Dow Jones) — 
Shares in Saint-Gobain SA. 
France's state-controlled glass 
and building materials group, 
will be sold to the private 
sector from November 24 at 
Fr3l0 (£32.91) a share, the 
economics ministry announ- 
ced yesterday. 

The Saint-Gobain sale, 
which launches France’s plans 
to denationalize 65 state-sec- 
tor concerns over the next five 
years, will cover 28 million 
shares, raising almost Fr8.7 
billion (£924 million) for the 
government 

Saint-Go bain has a total 
43.8 milli on chares, some Of 
which are held by state-sector 
banks, which are expected to 
seO their stock later to a group 
of “core” industrial operators. 
Based on the total number of 
shares outstanding, a [nice of 
Fr3 1 0 a share would value the 
group at almost Frl3.6 billion. 

The Frl3.6 billion valua- 
tion compares with a mini- 
mum price of Frl2 trillion set 
by a state privatization 
committee for which Saint- 
Gobain should be sold. 

The economics ministry 
confirmed that 10 per cent of 
the shares offered in the 
privatization would be re- 
served for Saint-Gobain em- 
ployees. These shares will be 
sold at a 5 per cent discount, 
although employees who hold 
the shares for at least two 
years will receive a 20 per cent 
discount 

The ministry said that 5.6 
milli on shares, or 20 per cent 


• BROWN SHIPLEY HOLD- 
INGS: Interim dividend 3.75p 
(3.5pX 

• AM BRIT INTER- 

NATIONAL: AL through Am- 
brit Development Corporation, 
a newly formed American 
subsidiary, has established a 
joint venture with Blue Ridge 
Transporation Corp, with each 
party owning 50 per cent. The 
partnership will develop a 19 
acre waterfront residential prop- 
erty, purchased for $1,735,000 
(£1.213^87), in Indian River 
County, on the east cost of 
Florida. The development 
should be completed within 18 
months. AI and Blue Ridge have 
each provided $350,000 in cash 
to finance the acquisition, with 
the balance provided by a 
Florida bank. 

• GUINNESS: An over-the- 
counter market is to be created 
in New York, with each Ameri- 
can depositary receipt (ADR) 
represen dngfiveordinary shares. 
Mr £ Saunders, Guinness chair- 
man, said the company will 
begin filing for a listing or 
quotation after the publication 
of its 1986 financial statements 
in April and have its ADRs 
listed or quoted in the US by late 
1987. 

• NORTH KALGURLI 
MINES: After its Aus$(64.7 
million (£74 million) . rights 
issue, the company says it will 


of the total, would be sold on 
the international market. 

The remaining 19.6 million 
shares would be allotted 
through a public offering on 
the Paris bourse from Novem- 
ber 24 to December 5. 

The terms of this offer 
guarantees that orders from 
individuals will be fulfilled in 
their entirety up to a limit of 

1 0 shares. Ordere of more than 
10 shares may be partially 
fulfilled if demand for the 
shares exceeds supply. 

The government plans to 
give one free share to inves- 
tors who hold 10 shares for a 
minimum of 18 months. 

The government also an- 
nounced that holders ofSaint- 
Gobain's 8 million non-voting 
shares would be able to trans- 
form their securities into regu- 
lar common stock. The terms 
of this exchange allow holders 
to buy voting rights for their 
shares at FrlO each. Trading 
in non-voting shares was sus- 
pended at Fr307 each on 
November 3 to avoid undue 
speculation in their relatively 
thin market. 

Saint-Gobain posted con- 
solidated net income of Fr753 
milli on for 1985 on revenue of 
Fr67.888 billion. The group 
expects a net income of about 
Frl3 billion for the 1986 
financial year. 

The group expects its 
consolidated revenue for 1986 
as a whole to be at least Fr76 
billion. For the first nine 
months of the year, turnover 
totalled Fr58-5 billion. 


Courtaulds 
in£ 28 m 
bid for 
Fothergill 

By Alison Eadie 

Courtaulds, the textiles, 
ch emicals and industrial prod* 
nets group, has la unched a 
£28J2 million cash bid for 

FothergOI & Harvey, which 
mlrM advanced materials, 
coated and uncoated engineer- 
ing fabrics and electrical 
insulatio n, 

Courtaulds approached 
Fothergfll last week to try and 
secure a board recomnreoda- 
tioa but the Fothergill board 
made it plain that it wanted to 
retain its independence. 

Fothergill directors yes- 
terday called the bid 
“opportunistic and completely 
unacceptable*'. 

Courtaulds is keen to ex- 
pand its advanced materials 
division and believes that 
regrouping into bigger units 
with greater resources to 
spend on research and 
development is the best way to 
deal with the Swiss, American 
and French competition. 

Advanced m ater ial*, which 
substitute new and mainly 
fibre-based materials for old 
iwflfy rials such as metal, have 
particular weight-saving 
application in areas like air- 
craft and raemgeus. 

Fothergill made pretax prof- 
its in the six months to Jime 
28 of £1.1 million, a decrease 
on the previous half year’s 
£14 million. 

The terms of the offer are 
22Sp cash for each share. 
FothergfiTs shares rose 68p to 
246p and Comtaulds 7V4p to 
323 Vzp. 


Nigeria and banks 
in £i.5bn debt pact 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Nigeria has agreed terms 
with its main' creditor banks 
on a debt rescheduling 
agreement 

The agreement — to re- 
schedule $1.5 billioh of debt 
due by the end of 1987 - is to 
be sent to all Nigeria’s creditor 
banks for approval over the 
next few days. 

Supported by the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund and 
the Worid Bank, the agree- 
ment includes new lending of 
$320 milli on. Nigeria’s 300 
creditor banks will have until 
December 12 to respond to the 
steering committee. 

The terms of the agreement 
grant Nigeria a four 


■ a ’l ( i I) BN 


****?:•»* 


per cent above the London 
inter-bank offered rate. 

Barclays, Citibank and 
Banque Nationals de Paris are 
co-chairmen of the the steer- 
ing committee of 1 1 commer- 
cial banks which negotiated 
the rescheduling. 

As well as the rescheduling 
of medium-term debt, the 
agreement involves $2 billion 
of letters of credit, which will 
be repaid between 1988 and 
1990. 

The Rank of England has 
been closely involved in help- 
ing Nigeria out of its diffi- 
culties. At the time of the 
annual IMF meeting in Wash- 
ington and Nigeria's establish- 
ment of a two-tier foreign 


Repayments will be over six together a bridging loan for 
years from April, 1990 at 1.25 Nigeria. 


Heath shareholders 
back Fielding buy 

By Onr City Staff 


C E Heath shareholders 
yesterday backed tbeir board 
and voted for the £71 million 
acquisition of Fielding Insur- 
ance by a majority of almost 
two to one. 

The result meant the auto- 
matic lapring of the contested 
£173 million offer from FWS 
Holdings. 

During the meeting winch 
was less acrimonious than 
expected, the board was asked 
to explain the stock market’s 
no confidence vote in the 
acquisition and why Heath 
shares had plummeted from 


more than 500p to 46 Ip before 
the terms of the acquisition 
were a nnounced. PWS had 
offered much better terms. 

• Mr Derek Newton, chair- 
man of Heath, satd that 
although PWS offered 

arilfmiPtirnlfy hi g her Mm ing s , 

it was believed that the quahty 
of those earnings was inferior 
to those of Fidding 

Heath share price closed at 
464p, the exact level of the 
placing of 7.3 per cent of the 
combined company by the 
vendor Hambros. 


COMPANY NEWS 


¥ 


be well placed for further expan- 
sion- The company is projecting 
gold production of more than 
130,000 ounces in the year to 
next June (1985-86 93,309 
ounces). 

• BSS GROUP: Result of the 
offer to shareholders in connec- 
tion with the proposed ac- 
quisition of Manor Buildings 
and Plumbing Supplies: accep- 
tances have been received in 
respect of 723.066 new ordinary 
shares of 20p each, representing 
18 percent of the 4.02 1,331 new 
shares offered to existing 
shareholders at 230p a share. 

• BLACK ARROW GROUP: 
Figures for the half year to 
September 30, comparisons re- 
stated. Interim 2p (1.75p) pay- 
able on January 2. Figures in 
£Q00s. Turnover 8.260 (5,967). 
Pretax profit 1,019 (736). Tax 
333 (276). Minority interests 90 
(nil). Earnings per share 9.03 p 
(6.97p). 

• JERSEY GENERAL INV- 
ESTMENT TRUST: Results 
for the six months to October 
31. Gross interim dividend 
5.75p (same), payable on 
December 22. Turnover 
£1,316,525 (£1,239.548). Ex- 
penses £77.305 (£69.229). In- 
terest payable £544,370 
(£486,038). Income before tax 
£694,850 (£684.281). Tax 
£139,017 (£133.875). Earnings 
per share S.89p (5.83p). 


• BANCO ESPIRITO DE 
LISBOA: Morgan Grenfell is to 
arrange the bank's forthcoming 
£100 million certificate of de- 
posit insurance programme. 
The new sterling programme 
will be used to fund the loan 
book of the bank’s London 
branch. 

• INTERNATIONAL THO- 
MSON ORGANISATION: 
Results for the nine months to 
September 30 in £000s. Sales 
1,307 (1,371). Pretax income 
1 19 (146). Income taxes 37 (56). 
Earnings for the period 80 (88). 
Earnings per common share 
27.3pf30.Ip). 

• BARRACK MINES GOLD: 
The chairman. Mr Denis 
Horgan, says the company has 
moved “towards the now 
foreseeable attainment of our 
objective of producing in excess 
of 100,000 ounces of gold per 
annum in our own right”. 

• HAWK INVESTMENTS: A 
profit, of SAus5.45 million 
(£2.46 million) has been 
achieved, against SAus2.87 mil- 
lion the previous year. 

• CHESHIRE WHOLE- 
FOODS: Six months to Septem- 
ber 30. Interim dividend 2.03p. 
Figures in £000s. Turnover 

.4,1 10 (3,195). Pretax profit 402 
(280). Earnings per share 5.35p 
(3.79p). 

• THOMAS LOCKER: Half 
year to Septembe r 30. Interim 


dividend 0.375p(same). Figures 
in £000s. Turnover 1,424 
(14.399). Pretax profit 568 
(934). Profit after lax 308 (527). 
Profit attributable 299 (467). 
Earnings per share 0.75p 
(l.I7p). 

• ARENSON GROUP: The 
chairman, Mr A Arenson, says 
in his annual report that 
Arenson International, the com- 
pany’s main subsidiary, has 
strengthened its position 

• JOHN CROWTHER 
GROUP: The company has 
entered into agreements tor the 
acquisition of the fully fexh- 


Threa Routt steritaj 

Dec 86 

Mar 8/ 

Jun 87 - 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Mar 88 

Previous day's total t 
Three Month Enoda 

Dec88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 


_ 88.74 

_ BSjOI 
_ 88.14 

- 88S7 

„ 88 75 

i Interest 15752 


entered into agreements tor the 
acquisition of the fully fash- 
ioned knitwear division of 
Atkins Bros (Hosiery), John 
Mason and Sons, Stagslax, Wag- 


gon Properties and 85 per cent 
of Robert Michaels Holding at 
a total cost of about £7.53 
million net 

• FULCRUM INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Second interim divi- 
dend in lieu of final dividend 
3.6p>, making _5.8p (5.6p) for the 
year to October 31. Gross 
revenue — dividends and in- 
terest received — 354,816 
(284.929). Net revenue before 
tax 271,257 (198,036). 

• WALKER AND STAFF 
HOLDINGS: Half year to 


ant Gift 

Dsc 86 

Mar 87 

J i*i 87 

Long Qftt 

Dac86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sap 87 

FT-SE100 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 — 



LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


8&S 

Low 

8880 

8883 

EstVoi 

1846 

88.77 

8889 

B8J1 

773 

89.12 

89.08 

8988 

280 

89.17 

to.11 

69.11 

140 

89.03 

8883 

8887 

42 

88.75 

88.76 

88.75 

2 


Prsvtous dayTt total open bnarMt 24S81 
9408 94JOO 94-07 1331 

94.1 S 94J06 84.14 2838 

94.05 9356 94.05 276 

53.82 83.73 9331 177 

Previous day’s total gpan Merest 3298 
99-23 8W» 99-18 4431 

9628 98417 98-24 268 

97-27 Q 

""pTevtaueday 1 * total vpan Int ere st 807 
85-40 9680 95430 54 

. 95-32 0 


Previous day’s total open Merest 18472 
107-16 106-18 106-22 23075 

107-18 106-28 106-28 1951 

10648 0 

Previous day's total opanMoMt 2918 
16240 160 dO 16160 650 

185.15 162.65 16440 11 


Soft Drinks. Sound Ddfutan, Conroy Pet MarMwafti S ee s . . Potymarfc International. 
Greenwuk Resources, Pavion (atsmadonai. Tazar Kemsiay ft MUbmm. Control 
SacsjMantic Resources. Amend, Rfley Leisure. RMta, pnotrtc Props, 

Put ft Cab Greenwich Resources 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Staffing index compand vriOi 1875 wse op at 67 3 (day’s range 67JF6UQ. 


OTHER STERLING RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina auBtreT 
Australia deter _ 
Bahrain dinar—. 
Bred cruzado* _ 


MONEY MARKETS 


J 


147 (108). Earnings per share 
4.48p (3.04pX 


MLA INTERNATIONAL TRUST 

A truly international spread which 
has grown 42,5% in 12 months 


BaMRataa% 

Cteannfl Banks 11 
Finance House 11 

Discows Makat Loans % 

Oremun Hue iox low 10 
Week fixed 10 

TreaswyBMs (Discount %) 

Buying SeOng 

2mntfi10°i# 2mnffi 10* 

Smnth 10 *^b Srarth io*'jj 

Prime Bw* 8ns (Discount %) 

1 mnth lO^w-IO^Manrnm 10 Q w- 1 W 
3 mnth 10 u w-10 ,, w6mn!h 1flUw-10"u 

Tied* Ms (Discount 
Imn&ilVie 2 mnth 1l*i« 

3 mnth 11’n 6 mnth 11 

kkvbanlt (ft) 

Overnight open 9% dose 11 
1 week I0ft-10ft 6 mntlt UK-1196 
Imnth I0*wl0**i«9mrth n*-ll* 
3mnth 1lX-11»se 12mih lift-lift 

Local Authoifty Deposits (ft) 

2 days IQ 7 days 10 

1 mnth 10"ia 3 mnth 11 X 

6mnth 11X l2mBi lift 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 4tws 554-6’ is 
3mmh 6* *-5“,. 


7 days 4ft-4ft 
Smnth 4V4ft . 
rfencfi none 
7 days 7ft-7ft 
3 ninth B-754 
Swim Franc 
7 days 7K-7 
3 mnth 3' 6 i*3 ,s t* 
Van 

7 days 4*4% 

3 mnth 4"i*4* IB 


Sft-Sft 

6-5% 

64 

4%4% 

4K-4% 

7%-6% 

7*ie-7 , i* 

8K-BK 

1ft-» 

3-254 

ia"w»» 

4%-3% 

4K-4K 


Finland marita 

Greece drach ma 

Hong Kong dote _ 

Indi a rupe e — 

traqdkiiar 

KuwattdharKD 

Malaysia dollar 

>J ire iffl nWft _ 

New Zealand doter . 
Saudi Arabia rtyai _ 
Singapore dote — 
South Africa rend — 

UAEdrtiam 

TJoyds Bank 


— 1.6235-1.6304 
_ 2 1893-21926 

053054X5345 

1941-1943 

— 0.725041.7350 

— &9885-7.Q295 
_ m7S-i97.re 

11.0123-114216 
— _ 1840-1660 

n/a 

_ 04135^.4175 

— 3-58OO3L0BOD 

1185-1235 

_ 2.7229-2.7354 
_ 5^790-6^190 
_ 84195600993 

— 3.1474-3.163B 
_ 6170642105 


Denmark 

WestGertneny 
SwOzeriand — 

Ne t he rtg ri a 

Franca — . 


Hong Kong . 
Portugal JL 

Spain 

Austria - 


, 1 3470-1-3580 
. 2.1905-2.1915 
26045-2.5085 
0.6450-08455 
1.3884-1.3889 
8368666710 
7.6040-7.6090 
7.6Z75-7.6325 
20170-20180 
1.6833-1.0843 
22780-22790 
&6O3O-&608O 
16368-163.78 
1397.0-13886 

- 41 8841.93 
7.7925-7.7835 
149^0-14960 
13&J5-1S5L6S 

- 14.19-1421 


I srepfted fay Barclays Bra* HOFEXand Extei 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Local Authority Beads (ft) 

1 mnth 1159-1 IX 2 mnth 11%-11X 

3 mnth 11K-1T Smnth 11M-1I 

9mnlh lift-11 12 mth 1154-11 

Starting CO* (ft) 

rnre iO'3,s.iO"iiSmn8i llhf-ll 1 ** 
6 nsith 1154-11% 12mm 11K-11V4 
DoftarCOenu 

1 rrvJth 64S-6.00 3mnfli 565-560 
6mnfti 560-565 12 mth 665660 


TREASURY B^LLS . 

Applets; E3206M cfotattCtOOM 

BcEs 7635% received; 2% 

Last weeJc £97 345% received: JSS% 
Avga rate: £106556% last wk £1063883 
Nad week: 2100M replace £10(34 



LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


MLA International Trust invests 
for capital growth in the world’s 
leading stock markets and 
strongest currencies - it has 
notched up gains of 42.5% in its 
offer price in the last 12 months. 
The Trust has grown by 1323%* 
since launch in March 1983. 

This outstanding performance 
is due to selecting the right markets 
worldwide at the right time. 

1986 has been an excellent 
year for Japanese stock markets and 
for the Yen but other areas of the 
world have also contributed to the 
Trust's success. For example, 41% is 
in Europe, where markets are 
currently predicted to be set for 
further growth. 15% is in the USA, 
still one of the world's strongest 
economies and set for continued 
recovery in the future. The Trust 
also has a significant weighting in 
Hong Kong. 

This spread of investment is 

poised to benefit from growth 

wherever it occurs in the 
world's major markets. 

Top investment 
management ^ 

Although past performance yoi 

is no guarantee for the future, thr 

MLA International Trust is tax 

managed by one of Britain's *h< 

top unit trust management — 


EUROPE 41% 


JAPAN 

AND FAR EAST. 
5 31% 




A regular growing 
return on your investment 


If you invest £3,000 or more, you could enjoy 
receiving regular tax-efficient withdrawals from 
your investment. This extra benefit is provided 
through Muni payer International. MLA’s own 
tax-efiicient scheme. For full details, please tick 
the box on the Application Form. 


CboiKEVTIinvftaainltu] charge d 5*v 
tuchmJcd hi [rtf trffrr pncc. Jxd *1 tnmiul 
— u pnau ctuigr ot I'toiptua vxriof 
the capital idlor ot the Trust Fuad This 
is drdunrd half-yearly bom the valur of 
ihe Tnni Fond lo mem the espemes al 
thr Managers 

I nm ro c di aries Coormuion n paid to 
recognised unennedsanea. ram oraJiabfc 

OB JF^UOT. 

PtoftBdoit Nn locotnr MD be 
dsD^aied twice * year on 3lst May and 
30lh November 

DeaBr^i Urdu arc sallied and dealt m 
daily Any omen mU be dealt mth at the 
prtcr raJoig on the date of receipt al 
nsoanJaiB Prices and yield are usually 
pnhttshrt m thr ruuncial Times and 
Time 

Setting naliKTbtdl your untis. simply 
siCT the unn ceruliwie and rerurn it in 
the Managers, who mu send you a 
chrqnc within seven lwriuos days Units 
wilt be booftht back at not las than rhe 
lad price cilruLned in accoidame with 
the ionmib conuaied >n the Trust Demi 
Tost The Hum pays no capital gun. ua 

un its miesUnents Unithvldm pay no 
■apnal fmn ton unless thnr yearly total 
el capital jpnn exceeds L^.300. 

The ux nunreunon comatned in this 
advertisement is based on our p n i m 


iNutenln l<Wh| u nder^tandini; of Inland 
Km Tt**C praewt- and current rax 
k-pslJUim 

The Trus* Deed: The Managers and 
Trusier ate penoiticd under the terms of 
the Trust Deed to nccuie, at a burn 
date, a Suppletnemal Deed in allow the 
nnniig or purchase id Traded Call 
Options or the purchase d Traded Put 
Opiwns on hehall of the IVosL In the 
event d hiuirr rtunpn to currmi 
legnlailon by the Seorury m Slate (or 
Trade and Indusne whKh make pnmsion 
lot the wnruiK or purchase or drolinc hy 
the Mattapers or the Tnisrrc on hetulf o( 
the Trust ol or tn currency futures or 
uponus ur lorward nctianjr contracis 
winch air rradrd on a RrTipMnrd Mori 
Eactunpr or Kecnpnnrd Upnon 
EKhanjte ur other currency t? it tuner ux 
marker, the Manaprrs may make sunaMe 
amendmems to the Trust Deed without 
the consent of the unithnMers. 

Ynmcci Midland Bank trust Quotum 
Untiled. 

Men aRuit MLA fail Tniit Kuupnmii 
(beirtfta rradliiK name ui MLA Inirsimrot 

ManjRfo-ri Lnmi-.sl|VM.| k S| ^indlirtu 

ftoad. Manblonr. Kcni TIL 14 ITT 
Tef 0«22t74;s| KcpstcudMo Ct ’K6I 
ttHAUndl fccprurrrd Oltice 23. OU 
Quean Strert. LondoD 5W1 9IIS 


teams, who are already masters of 
the UK market - MLA General Trust, 
which invests primarily in British 
shares, has grown an average of 
31.5%’ a year since launch in June 
1976. It is the top-performing UK 
general trust of all over a 7-year 
period. (Source: Money Management, 
November 1986.) In addition, MLA 
International Trust has a strong 
showing in the top 15 of its sector 
(source: Money Management 
November, 1986). The Trust has 
grown by a total of 132.9%’ since 
launch in March 1983. 

*0n offer- to-bid basis, tarfudatg reinvested income. 


How to invest 

; \*t X -j Yott may buy units at the offer price 

i ' \y ruling on receipt of your remittance. 

' -, i ; 'jsJf The minimum investment is £500. 
\i.J[ -[Jr Simply fill in the Application 

15% Form below and send it to the 

Managers with your cheque for the 

foil amount you wish to invest. 

A contract note will be issued 

•rawing and your unit certificate will be 

imroctmant despatched within six weeks, 

investment y ou should remember that the 

re. you could enjoy price of units and the income from 

ent withdrawals from them can go down as well as up. 
a benefit is provided However, the Managers are 

such that you have an excellent 

opportunity to see your money 
grow in the MLA International Trust. 



AAed Lyons 
(■312) 

300 

330 

360 

20 

8 

2 

32 

18 

8 

42 

23 

10 

30 

55 

2SL. 

15 

33 

58 

22 

88 

BP 

(■694) 

600 

650 

700 

105 

66 

30 

118 

80 

47 

98 

60 

2 

12 

30 

10 

29 

50 

35 

60 

Cons Gold 

550 

130 

147 

_ 

3 

10 


(*670) 

600 

90 

112 

125 

10 

22 

30 


650 

65 

82 

95 

28 

44 

5b 


Com Union 
C2B1) 


Fixed Rata Staffing Export Finance 
Schema IV Average reference rale for 
Interest period October 8. 1986 to 
Ocwtjer 1986 Inclusive; 11.237 per 
cont. 


T RECENT ISSUES ] 


EQUITIES 

Avis Europe (250p) 231 'a -1 'a 

BCE (sap) 43 

Balter Harris Sndr <170p) 196 

Btenhekn Exhlb (35p) 140 -1 

BteJonftBattereea (103p) 143 

Brake Bros (12Sp) 152+2 

OrtTOTOVB (lOCfc) 88-2 

Da«*l Cs fl30p) 156 

Gordon RusseR (I90p) 206-1 

Great Southern (135p) 166 -1 

Guthrie Cot (I50p) 187 

Harrison (150p) 161 

hrterfink Exprejs (185p) 207 -1 

Lon Assc tnv Tst (I4p) 6 

Lloyds Chemist (105p) 130 +1 

Lonft Metropolitan (I45p) 171 +1 

Mecca Ltfsure (13Sp) 146<» + 2 '* 

Miner & Santhouee (105p) 178 -2 


Grand Met 
r452J 


380 

100 

105 


390 

72 

78 



420 

47 

57 

72 

460 

23 

37 

50 



Brake Bros (125p) 

gXS'fe) 

Gordon RusseR (I90p) 
Great Southern (135p) 
Guthrie Corp (I50p) 
Harrison (150p) 


Interlink Express (185p) 
Lon Assc fcw Tst (I4p) 
Lloyds Chemist (I05p) 
Lonft Metropolitan (I45p) 
Mecca Leisure (I35p) 


Plum Hldga {90 p) 
Quarto (lib) 

Rotunda (S5p) 

Sandea Perkins (T3Sp) 
Scot Mtge 100 % 


Fnryour in/hrmahun. tie offer price on JQlh Xor ember I •3H6 xas eiOp xJ 
and tk f estimated puss ament yield, Q.&ptj 

j— Application Form , 

I MLA INTERNATIONAL TRUST j 

I To: MLA Unit Trust Management, 99 Sawtopg Road, I 
Maidstone. Kent. M£l 4 1 XX Tel: 0622 674751 I 

l/We wish to lores S tn MLA Inicnuiional Trust ar the ofler I 

1 price ruling on date ol receipt of these Instructions. I enclose a cheque I 

I made payable to MLA Unit Trust Management. [Minimum £500). 1W* j 
I declare ihjt 1 am 'we are over 18 ! 

J Plcasr tiJtbmrl you require tnconw to be rrinvracdui furrber unm.D I 
' l am an existing MLA Unitholder 5f£S’NO ' 

I Name — : (Mr.Mrs.’Mtss. Title) j 


San Mtge 100% #25 
TSB Group (100p) 
Thamea TV (I90p) 

Won (140p) 

Whmney Mackay fl60p) 
Wooftons Better (104^ 
Yetverton (38p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Blacks Leisure N/P 
Blue Arrow F/P 
Br. Benrel N/P 
Cook Cwm N/P 
Hswtck F/R 
Nortoft Cm F/P 
Pevocan f/p 
R etfand N/P 
Sebe F/p 
Waddhgton N/P 
(Issue price ki brackets). 


69 
130 
95-1 
171 -2 
£19 

3174 -24 
1374 
168 
86 
39-1 


Jujar 

rai) 

600 23% 
550 6 
600 1 

47 

20 

12 

63 16 32 38 

35 55 58 63 

— to 98 — 

Thom EMI 

C46S) 

420 60 

460 30 

500 10 

550 3 

67 

46 

20 

11 

90 2% 5 10 

62 12 23 30 

42 37 47 52 
- 83 88 - 

Tosco 

(-384) 

330 57 

360 ‘ 27 

43 

— % — — 
S3 3 10 13 




BrftAero 
(-489) • 

iljg 


BAT kids 

T4S6) 

380 no 
390 80 

420 55 

480 32 

87 

63 

38 

-— 3 4 - — 

75 5 10 20 

S3 22 28 37 

Barclays 

r489) 

460 40 

500 20 

560 6 

52 

30 

15 

65 14 24 30 

42 35 43 50 

— 82 85 — 

BrftTatacam 
risq • 

180 23 

200 10% 
220 4% 

29 

18 

10 

37 5 9 12 

2* 16 18 24 

— 28 33 — 

Cadbury Schwpp 

riai) 

180 32 

180 15 

200 9 

35 

22 

14 

41 5 5 10 

28 10 14 18 

— 21 26 — 

GtAmess 

(325) 

300 40 

330 22 

360 11 

42 

25 

14 

54 8 11 16 

35 20 28 30 

23 47 50 52 

Ladbroka 

f3S1> 

330 47 

360 28 

390 14 

55 

36 

20 

63 4 8 12 

43 15 29. 27 

28 35 40 43 

LASMO 

nsaj 

130 30 
140 23 
160 . 14 

36 

29 

19 

— 47 — 

34 9 12 14 

22 20 23 2S 


500 77 

550 40 

600 14 

95 

56 

23 

107 5 12 22 

65 20 30 37 

36 55 80 82 

n 

460 63 

500 38 

550 12 

75 

48 

23 

90 r 10 13 

60 18 27 30 

33 53 60 65 


5+4 

384 

% 

8+2 

13 

25 +14 
48 
38-4 
375-10 
16 


BTH 

(*286) 

280 

300 

307 

17 

4S 

29 

16 

35 

25 

5ft 

25 

9 

21 

15 

28 

Bass 

650 

95 

10b 

115 

2 

6 

1? 

(-741) 

700 

48 

65 

80 

6 

15 

28 


750 

20 

37 

55 

33 

43 

53 

B)ub Ctrcta 

600 

57 

77 

90 

6 

12 

18 

rwsj 

650 

27 

53 

65 

25 

32 

37 


5i£turur<.1»l Tel Nu 

-I»r 4 T 7 ' 1 . IM * ai -rn *wA jn*l< -fjrjfrivi Iw ni»-.:axr.r L. 

on ,..uuM[ m itw fmiNt J MJiil Ml V.bj Tm,i Mjru>y-icn.' iv 4 r-rrtrf nl 
ih-. ImnrirJ I'WiOVi 

WPORTV«T- WTmr ermanua 41 &. II voo prrttr. n» can BUM lor 
rtrnLa ux^ttkWm ■liMmil, wwb Mmatupr, lumaUBaal FVftv? tU 
lw> tardrtMk.Q 

n-.HHiNAt lt;.’tuN t TJLJB Jvi Wik Ih, IMnMnul land Nl Pn-ond rtnvni 

Pkj— l,h K", If— >v* ill . Q 





• NORSK DATA: Matra Data- 
systems, which manufactures a 
range of Norsk Data Systems 
equipment under licence, and 
Thorn son-CSF have sigHed an 
agreement for die development 
of Norsk Data System applica- 
tions for indusirial. military and 
aerospace requirements. Maira 
Dausysteme will supply Norsk 
systems to Thorason-CSF 
subsidiary, Cimsa Sinira, over a 
tiirec-year period. 


700 10 — — 82 — — 

Da Bears 
(*743) 

■ 

1 

125 

100 

75 

50 

115 

95 

75 

6 

18 

45 

80 

23 

45 

70 

100 

80 

.60 

115 

Dixons 

r323) 

300 

330 

360 

28 

12 

2ft 

42 

20 

12 

56 

38 

26 

3 

16 

38 

7 

IB 

40 

12 

24 

42 

GKN 

(■259) 

240 

260 

280 

300 

26 

12 

4 

1 

38 

24 

15 

7 

44 

29 

19 

4 

12 

to 

44 

B 

16 

30 

44 

12 

21 

33 

daxo 

900 

35 

77 

no 

17 

38 

50 

CS101 

950 

12 

50 

82 

57 

64 

75 


1000 

3 

33 

60 

96 

105 

110 


1050 

2 

21 

— 

145 

145 

— 

Hanson 

160 

39 

42 


ft 

1ft 


C197) 

180 

to 25ft 31ft 

IK 

4ft 

6 


toO 

7ft 14ft 

to 

8 IZft 14ft 


. 220 

1ft 

Bft 

10ft 

24 

26 

27 


mtan Mar Jun Sep Ite Jtm Sap 

200 46 49 — 2 7 — 

220 28 33 38 9 13 16 

2*0 IS 21 2S 18 24 26 

280 7 11 - 33 37 - 


Nov Feb 


% 

2 


1’ui 

3>u i 

4ft 


1*w 

Pi. 


4% 

5ft 


Ut» 

IK 

5 ft 

6 

6* 

» 


1 J 1« 

TK 

7K 

(Pi* 

»*6 

ft 

% 

9ft 

9ft 

10 

>!• 


n a 

lift 

lift 

11« 


Tr 1144% 03/07 


Nw Pec Jen Fob Now Pec dm Feb 

FT-SE 152S Wff — . — — 1 — — — 

irete* 1550 75 77 90 — 154 9 16 — 

C1S21J 1575 50 80 72 — 4 18 23 — 

1600 27 46 56 73 10 28 33 40 

• 1625 12 82 <2. 57 23 38 48 - 63 

1650 S 2 30.« 38 63 S3 67 

1675 2 14* 2033 60 68 7883 

1700 1 .1 — . — « 90 - — 


Nowmbor 21,1986. Total contracts 29271 . C«»S 20067. Puts 9184. *UBdert rt i g sac«fty prico. 

FT-SG Wtt CSftS; S64 , fttfsttSS ' pneo 






























.. .. ' >1 

A # t 

Sr ■ !■ 

'. Si ' V 


- r. • . i , 
.> . : * : ■ ? 
*■ .• -y 
•*■ • J • T' 

r •! ?! 

, -i' 

4c V 


- S' 

. . 

1 »* ' m 

c. 


’ ■j 


•: «? 


.( %> -. ■ _ 


i: 






J.-c — _f 




■ *1 - . r • • - ■ — ■ — 



THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


27 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



of merger with UB 



By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


Dealers were feasting them- 
selves yesterday on the grow- 
ing prospect of an agreed 
merger between two of 
Britain’s biggest food 
mano&ctuieis. 

There is talk dial Cadbury 
Schweppes, the confectionery, 
son chinks and food group, is 
thinking of getting together 
with United Biscuits, of 
McVitie and Crawford's 
cream-cracker fa me . Both , 
companies are being contin- 
ually tipped as potential take- 
over targets and earlier this 
year United tried unsuccess- 
fully to merge with Imperial 
Group before Imps was swal- 
lowed up by Hanson Trust in a 
£2.6 billion bitterly contested 
takeover battle. 

The possibility of a merger 
between the two companies 
has been muted before, but 
speculation increased sharply 
as Cadbnry 


yesterday 

Schweppes! 


. iweppes jumped 6p to l80p 
as almost 10 million shares 
changed hands. United fin- 
ished the day Ip firmer at 
235p. 

A merger between both 
companies would be seen in 
the City as a purely defensive 
move designed to deter un- 
wanted predators. Sir Hector 
Laing, chairman of United, 
would put up fierce resistance 
to any unwanted approach. 
But be may content himself 
with Cadbury which would 
result in a new food and soil 
drinks group valued at £2 
bfflion. 

Dealers are already 


speculating about a possible 
cross-holding being buOt up 
by both rides as the prelude to 
a merger. 

Bid fever dominated the 
rest of the equity market with 
a number of the old favourites 
back in demand. Some new 
twists in existing struggles 
were also evident Mr Robert 
Maxwell, publisher of the The 
Daily Mirror. , continued to 
dictate the pace of the battle 
for control of AE by inaeas- 
ing the cash offer offiis bid for 
AE to 28(h>. That compares 
with the 271pbring offered by 
Fomer & NewalL Bat the 
news came to late to affect the 
AE share price which dosed 
Ip firmer at 267p. 

■The market was further 
mcouraged by the rise on Wall 
Street, which was showing 
sains of almost 12 points by 

• There are signs flf recov- 
ery in Wottiwurth, 3p op at 
648p and still an deipmBBd 
by the near 5 per cent stake 
heM by Dixons. The group 
has met a number of brokers 
and ftnd ma nag er s and 
gpod news may be in the pipe- 
line. Dixons paid abort 
670p for its stake and another 
bid is not ruled out. 

mid-morning. It caused a 
surge in new-time buying for 
next week’s new account and 
by the dose the FT 30-share 
index was at its highest level of 
tire day, np 14.4 at 1274.2. But 
it has nevertheless fatten 43 



points daring the' course of a 
volatile acconnL The broader 
based FT-SE 100 index fol- 
lowed a similar pattern and 
dosed 14.2 points higher at 
1624.9. 

Among blue chips Hanson 
Trust, which again had.one erf 
the highest volumes of the day 
ft 6.2 million, firmed 2p to 
197p, Id 5p to 1054p, Glaxo 
lOp to 9l0p and Lucas I Op to 
453p_ 

The renewed mood of op- 
timism failed to rub off on 
Virgin, the record and pop 
music empire of Mr Richard 
Branson, winch began deal- 
ings yesterday. Despite heavy 
buyim* by its advisers, Morgan 
Grenfell and Rowe & Pi tman^ 
in what was said to be an 
attempt to support the price; 
the shares touched I37p, a 3p 
discount to the 140p striking 
price before returning to I40p 
by the dose. A shortage of 
institutional in teres t in the 
stock was blamed. 


The next big new issue was, 
however, faring somewhat 
better. As British Gas an- 
nounced that it would be 
selling its shares at 135p each, 
they were being traded at a 
middle price of 161p on the 
unofficial “grey" market. 

• One of the best perform- 
ed yesterday was Cenrey 
Petroleum, leaping lOOp to 
545p, after jmbGcation of Its 

drllingnqMMt showing"* 
"substantial mineral" 
deposits. The shares were 
first mentioned in this col- 
umn oa November 13, at 350p 
a share. 


Guinness, thei stout and 
whisky group, unproved 5p to 
326p, and could soon be 
seeing farther rises, according 
to C5ty analysts. Its shares are 
expected to be given a signifi- 
cant boost over the next few 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


Me* 


dfr YM 


d to YU 


36S 283 
174 12B 
463 278 
491 381 
572 449 
840 680 
450 356 
726 526 
383 283 
289 170 
608 423 
709 580 
280 177 
193 98 
354 258 


MtaHjon 

ASDA-MH 

BTR 

BAT 


Dao c hrai 
Bus Circle 
BOC 


Br A e ro spa ce 
Br Petrataun 
'a Br Telecom 
BrttoB 
Burton 


369 277 CeHB & Wtatas 
196 168 Cadbuy Schwann 
338 257 Com (Man 
704 409 Com QoktfleMc 
327’: 252 Courtmdds 
438 318 Moons Op 
650 408 Rsora 
954 701 Gen Acddem 
225 158 QEC 
11’* 738^ Glaxo 
462 228 Grand Met 
11**721 QUS 'A 
954 720 ORE 

386 236 GfKN 
355 276 Gulnnus 
215 'i 141 


BM Odor 

Ctfga 

ponea 

i 9 

. P/E 1090 


i Law Gonqmaf 

flU 

Odor i 

area 

paras 

% 

P/E 


306 

313 


+3 

1&6 

*A 

M2 

379 

| 023 

403 Hawfcw Sttflay 

414 

420 

■ 

+4 

21 A 

5.1 

93 

254 

150 

154 


+4 

45 

an 

165 

2,100 

| 11 '•734 Imp Chan Ind 

10‘s 10*2 



AAA 

49 

119 

3900 

285 

290 

• 

-3 

9J 

34 

201 

3500 

583 

335 Jaguar 

903 

508 


+i 

12.7 

29 

104 

3X4 

455 

460 

• 

+8 

1&4 

4j0 

125 

2500 

391 

312 Lodbraka 

358 

383 


+3 

164 

4 J 

173 

298 

468 

475- 



28.1 

OO 

65 

1,100 

348 

278 Land Seasides 

338 

341 


+12 

145 

43 

227 

2900 

738 

748 


+15 

21.7 

Z3 

155 

1500 

288 

133 LwltOn 

237 

242 

• 

+5 

123 

5.1 

309 

8300 

422 

427 



17.1 

4J0 

177 

2.100 

484 

293 Uoyda 

425 

432 



260 

59 

89 

129 

642 

647 


+10 

30 j0 

4 J 

9.1 


283 

183 Lontoo 

235 

237 


-1 

17.1 

73 

113 

738 

331 

334 


+1 

-14.1 

4£ 

12.7 

2500 

231 

163 Marks A Spencer 

188 

189 

• 


53 

31 

224 

2900 

225 

228 


+4 

106 

4 J 

145 

2500 

599 

417- MMknd 

550 

557 



37.1 

SJ 

209 

3Z7 

485 

480 


+7 

234 

4 a 

103 

1500 

593 

426 Nat West 

480 

497 



275 

59 

53 

2100 

680 

695 


+5 

408 

7 JO 

75 

3,700 

576 

428 P40DW 

502 

507 

• 

+9 

260 

59 

149 

907 

182 

196 



107 

55 

115 

4500 

246 

162 Ptsnsy 

168 

170 


+2 

7A 

43 

124 

4900 

1» 

161 



9a 

&a 

45 

2500 

942 

718 Prudent* 

788 

785 



Mj 

49 

523 

340 

268 

272 


-rf 

8.1 

an 

152 

3200 

234 

146 Racal Beet 

186 

170 


+2 

43 

29 

173 

2100 





1&0 

4.7 

175 

6500 

900 

605 Reddt Coknan 

795 

802 

• 

. . 

23* 

39 

173 

62S 



- 

+7 

07 

45 

21.1 

9500 

562'i345 Reutars 

530 

53S 


+2 

5l4 

19 

403 

158 





17.4 

6.7 


3200 

791 

511 HTZ 

688 

675 

• 

-2 

31.4 

4.7 

89 

378 

665 

672 


+15 

«n 

52 

19l1 

2200 

967 

782 Royal Ira 

806 

815 

• - 

.. 

3&6 

49 

66.6 

533 

324 

327 


+10 

AS 

Z9 

11S> 

4500 

426 

344 Satnstwy (J) 

412 

416 


+4 

84 

29 

249 

235 






15 

235. 

.928 

14SVKB Sears 

127 

1284 s 

+24 

5 JO 

39 

189 10900 

55 3 

558 


+8 

84 

15 

247 

789 

415 

321 Seogwtek Op 

360 

385 


+6 

17.1 

4 J 

173 

: «i3 


810 


43 

30 

45 

203 

42 

970 

863 She! 

9 55 

960 


+10 . 

514 

54 

94 

780 




+4 

6.1 

34 

112 

3400 

168 

86 STC 

156 

160 


.. 

2.1 

13 

14.7 

1,100 


91% 


+10 

win 

22 . 

195 

1500 

772 

520 Sm ASance 

620 

627 


.. 

27-5 

44 

563 

349 

460 

455 


+10 ' 

.105 

35 

152 

3400 

81 *4 TO* TSB PIP 

76**78 


.. 

.. 

. . 

.. 









402 

49 

zos Tesco 

302 

3B7 


+4 

69 

23 


309 





42£ 

65 

22.1 

' 285 

529 

374 Thom EM 

486 

472 


+2 

259 

53 

343 

B38 









348 

248 Trafalgar House 

290 

293 


+11 

189 

65 

89 

3900 

258 

261 

• - 

+10 

17A 

65 

07 

1500 

209 

139 TrusthouM Porta 

169 

172 


+2 

79 

49 

189 

2900 

322 

327 


+4 

103 

32 

125 

4700 

! 204 mUnDarnr 

20’- 

>204 


+U 

B0-1 

39 

189 

377 

196 

198 


+2 

SJ 

25 

175 

6200 

1.288 

216 UtdBtscUtt 

233 

238 


+1 

1390 

59 

127 

555 


weeks because of the introduc- 
tion of an ADR facility in New 
York. Although official deal- 
ings in ADRs will not begin 
until next summer, at the 
earliest, its sponsor, First Bos- 
ton Credit Suisse, the Ameri- 
can finance house, started 
making an over-the-counter 
market in them on Thursday. 

“It is known as a pink 
sheet," says Mr Daniel Leaf 
l ea din g brewing and leisure 
analyst at Wood Mackenzie, 
the broker,“aixi it means thgi 
the stock is now more acces- 
sible to American 
institutions.” 

Guinness unveils its year- 
end figures on December 10 
and Wood Mackenzie is look- 
ing for profits of £235 million, 
potting the stock on a p/e of 
just under 12. Its 1987 forecast 
of £462 million had been 
ahead of the field but most 
other broking firms are now 
raising their forecasts to that 
leveL 

Elsewhere among breweries 
Vsnx, the independent brewer 
based in Sunderland, leapt 
21p to 444p as new-time 
speculators rushed into the 
stock amid talk of a bid during 
the next account. There has 
been persistent talk over the 
past couple of weeks that 
Wolverhampton & Dudley 
and Pleasurama might launch 
a joint assault, Wolver- 
hampton taking the brewing 
business, and Pleasurama the 
hotels. 

“It’s a sitting target,” com- 
mented one market man. 
“Unlike most small regional 
breweries there are no family 
blocking stakes and no two- 
tier voting structure.” 

Brokers estimate that it 
could have a take-out price of 
up to 600p a share. 

Bass improved 12pto 740p, 
Moriand lOp to 375p and 
Grand Metropofitaa, where 
there is still talk of a possible 
consortium bid, climbed 1 Ip 
to 454p, with 3.4 million 
shares going throug h the 
market 

Kennedy Brookes, the 
Wheelers to Mario & Franco 
restaurant group, (tipped 2p to 
29 Ip after announcing its 6.43 
per cent stake in Goldsmiths, 
the jewellery, hotels and insur- 
ance group. The move, by 
Kennedy Brookes, is being 
interpreted by the market as a 
defensive one, with Brookes 
itself surrounded by specula- 
tion that h might soon be a 
takeover taiget It could have 
good cause to fed concerned — 
one buyer picked np a line of 
500,000 shares yesterday. 

Devefrish, the West Country 
brewer, has been mentioned as 
a possible predator. Gold- 
smiths shares went up 18p to 
252p. 


COMMENT 


Sid will be delighted 
to receive the news 


At Last it can be told. The distinctly 
un-nbiquitous Sid must surely have 
been deliberately incommunicado 
while enjoying a quiet celebration in 
advance of the British Gas share sale. 

For Sid and millions like him, the 
terms announced yesterday look 
mouth-watering. Small investors be- 
ing offered either bonus shares or gas 
vouchers will see some highly attrac- 
tive short-term returns on their initial 
down payment of SOp a share. 

The arithmetic is probably beyond 
the capability of Sid, even armed with 
a pocket calculator. But ascribing a 
cash value to the £10 gas bill vouchers, 
taking account of the fact that the 
shares are paid for in easy instalments 
and that a dividend is payable within 
12 months, the first year’s return to 
someone baying 400 shares represents 
21 per cent gross. 

Doing similar sums, those opting 
for the alternative share bonus after 
three years will see an 1 1 per cent rate 
of return, assuming that dividends 
and share price remain unchanged. 

It will come as no great surprise that 
the mechanics of the sale have been 
devised so that there is every chance 
of a worthwhile premium. 

Given all the hype, the issue could 
be subscribed a couple of times over. 

A twice subscribed issue would 
leave long-term holders of Gas shares 
very much short of their ideal 
portfolio weightings when first deal- 
ings commence. 

Some 20 per cent of the issue has 
been allocated for overseas investors, 
and half the remainder earmarked for 
the small private investor and half for 
the institutions. Yet if the issue is 
oversubscribed, there will be a claw- 
back in favour of the small man. Sid 
and his chums could wind up with as 
much as 64 per cent of the issue. 

Barring a market collapse, private 
investors look to be in as close to a no- 
lose position as it is possible to be. 
For, if the stock opens quietly, 
professionals will move in; first to 
make up their appropriate portfolio 
weighting, secondly to switch while 
Gas shares look attractive to other 
energy sector investments such as 
Shell and BP. 

On current analysts* forecasts. Shell 
sells for a prospective yield in the 6 
per cent region while BP sports a 
higher anticipated return of around 
7.2 per cent British Gas, on the I35p 
fully paid price, will yield 6.8 per cent 
Yet there is a quality argument which 
says that Gas could justify a yield 
closer to Shell’s since its profits are for 
less vulnerable to a short-term decline 
in the oil price. 

At this stage then, it would be fair to 
guess that professionals will be buyers 
of British Gas shares at anything up to 
14Sp to 150p. That should be seen as a 
floor level for the shares in their fully 
paid form. 


As with the TSB issue, there is every 
possibility of over-enthusiasm taking 
the price beyond that level. Again like 
the TSB, private shareholders will be 
trading among themselves until the 
shares come back to th e poi nt where 
institutions move in. TSB touched 
99p in first dealings and they have 
now returned to a much more 
reasonable 77p. 

For those who are attracted by the 
loyalty bonus of one flee share for 
every 10 held, such short-term consid- 
erations are of marginal interest. But 
in the longer term, British Gas looks 
capable of performing reasonably 
well. There is a substantial one-off 
boost to profits next year in prospect 
due to a lagged response to lower oil 
and gas prices. 

British Gas agrees prices with its 
suppliers based on prices averaged 
over a historic period so that the 
benefits of cheaper oil come through 
slowly. Most analysts reckon that on 
both historic cost and current cost 
accounting bases, profits can average 
growth of 20 per cent up to 1990. So if 
Sid takes the long view, he should find 
the exercise worthwhile. If he is 
speculative, he could make a 25 per 
cent turn on the partly paid price. As 
he might have said himself not a bad 
little earner. 

Own up on asbestos 

There is a strong feeling dejtt-vu about 
Turner & NewalFs reluctance to go 
into details of its current exposure to 
asbestos-related legal actions or in- 
deed to make any provisions in last 
year’s accounts for any future claims 
which might arise. 

Followers of the demise of the giant 
Manville Corporation will recall that 
it too was remarkably unspecific 
about the extent of its own exposure a 
few years ago. Since then Manville has 
filed for re-organization under Chap- 
ter 1 1 of the US Federal Bankruptcy 
code, which allows insolvent com- 
panies to continue trading while they 
devise a plan to pay off their creditors. 

In its 1981 annual report, Manville 
said it had substantial defences to 
asbestos actions brought against iL 

In September this year though, 
Manville clarified the position. It 
reckoned it would be paying more 
than $2.5 billion (£1.74 billion) into a 
trust for victims over the next 25 
years. T & N says its problems are 
nothing like so bad and Manville’s US 
business was vastly bigger than 
T & FTs. Yet the refusal to tell AE 
shareholders about likely exposure to 
the inevitable future claims must be a 
factor when they consider whether to 
accept T & N’s bid terms. 

John Bell 

City Editor 


in 


lent 
icing 
r to 
imal 
con- 
sys- 
>r to 
EEC 
ban. 
imal 
con- 
bat- 
cept- 

idely 
lers, 
mcr 
dies, 
cuts, 
im- 
witfa 
on a 

-•rage 

of 

cent 

ages. 

:iion 

triple 

ights 

cent- 
. the 
uni- 
o be 
uila- 

. al- 
:eets 
.the 
the 


$ 


Imry close 
to bid 
agreement 

By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 

Imry Property Holdings, the 
company controlled by Mr 
Arnold Lee, his family in- 
terests and the directors, “is 
believed to be dose to sealing 
an agreed bid for the com- 
pany, thought to emanate 
from a private property 
company. 

Imry first announced that 
bid talks were under way in 
July and the market has been 
waiting for the details. 

Mr Arnold Lee, 1011/8 
chairman, said yesterday; 
“We are very far advanced 
with our talks but there are 
still some matters to be set- 
tled. The price has been 
agreed.” 

imry’s last stated net asset 
value was 4Q2p per dare and 
its property portfolio was pot 
at £933 million. 

The company saw rental 
income rise but pretax profits 
fall slightly to £1.31 million 
because of the refurbishment 
of the former Turriff building 
on the Great West Road, west 
London, now let to Wang, foe 
computer company. Imry has 
developments in foe United 
States as well as in Britain. 


B & C alters 
bid terms for 
Steel Brothers 

British & Commonwealth 
Shipping, foe transport and 
finance group, has made its 
offer for Sfeel Brothers a cash 
bid, with a share alternative 
rather than foe other way 
round. 

The change comes after 
B & C bought 1.4 per cent of 
Steel, which specializes in 
catering and lime quarrying, 
for 630p cash. A similar cash 
offer is tradable for all of 
SteeL 

The alternative is two 
B & C shares for each Steel 
share. ‘ • 

• RTVTJN; The company has 
completed the sale.of its Penanh 
Road. Cardiff property to the 
existing tenant, the Co-op*, 
native Retail Services, for £1.65 
million. Ii has also completed 
the sate ofhs Thoinr property m 
France for £1.076 million to : 
finarab Investment Co. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Roth m ans coming out of 
rationalization smoke 


Rothmans International 
appears to be surfacing after 
being lost in a smoke of 
rationalization cos&Almost 
£80 million was taken above 
foe line in . the past two years 
as cigarette operations, 
particularly in West Ger- 
many and Britain, were ruth- 
lessly pared in the face of 
declining markets. 

Rothmans operations are 
now on a rising trend for the 
first time in three years,- with 
pretax profits up by I2l5 per 
cent to £73.8 million in foe 
six months to September 30. 
Cigarette profits rose in conti- 
nental Europe despite lower 
volumes and were also higher 
in the Far East, although the 
stronger pound cancelled out 
this advance. 

Prospects also look consid- 
erably brighter in Canada, 
where a fierce cigarette price 
war appears to be over mid a 
merger of operations with 
Philip Morris awaits govern- 
ment approval. 

The other leading Car 
nyfian price-cutting victim — 
brewer Carting O'Keefe — is 
atan makinga strong recovery 
after an almost total collapse 
of profits last year. The 
luxury goods associates — 
Du nffiD and Cartier — con- 
tinue to go from strength to 
strength with a 23 per cent 
rise in operating profits in the 
first half 

As a recovery stock, 
-Rot hmans still appears- to 
have further to go. Mr Nyren 
Scott-Maiden, analyst at 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd, 
yesterday raised his full-year 
pretax profits, estimate from 
£150 million to £160 million, 
before any further 
rationalization costs that may 
result from foe Canadia n 
tobacco merger- That forecast 
■puts foe shares, up 8Vip to 
1 65%p. on a very reasonable 
p/e ratio of 7.5 with a 6 per 
centiplus yield to boot 


ROTHMANS INTERNATIONAL *B’ 
SHARE PRICE 



1983 


1884 


1985 


1986 


Arbitrage 


Hands up those who know 
the difference between nsk, 
market or classic arbitrage? 
Given that Mr Ivan Boesky, 
•"king of the arts", is now in 
disgrace, many would con- 
sider that* all types of ar- 
bitrage are shady. - . • - V 
, = In Britain, what used to be 
practised- In- the. name of 


arbitrage was buying and 
selling South African gold 
mine shares, quoted on both- 
foe Johannesburg and Lon- 
don Stock exchanjys. 

The idea was to take 
advantage of price discrepan- 
cies between the two different 
markets, with the- sale and 
purchase often taking place 
simultaneously, thereby lock- 
ing in the discrepancy. For 
. ease of reference this can be 
called classic arbitrage. 

Risk or market arbitrage 
are generally the same thing . 
They reflect the fact that 
arbitrage now encompasses 
taking advantage of price 
discrepancies in related 
stocks quoted in the same 
market, often in a takeover 
situation. Options are heavily 
used in support to hedge risk 
and maximize returns: 

The common characteris- 
tic which distinguishes ar- 
bitrage from pure speculation 
is that it is a dosed trans- 
action. Not necessarily risk- 
free, it differs from pure 
speculation- in that no leg is 
left in the air. 

Insider dealing is not ar- 
bitrage. Nor is .“green- 
mail mg " — taking a stake in a 
company and threatening foe 
board into the hands of a 
white knight, hence increas- 
ing the value of the stake. 
Greenmail rather than black- 
mail because it is backed by 
doBara. 

At the moment it would be 
impossible for anyone to 
raise money for an arbitrage 
fund as James Capri and 
Basque Paribas did in June, 
when . they gathered £100 
million for their Paribas Con- 
corde Trust. 


Blue Circle 

Blue Circle’s shares rose yes- 
terday despite the announce- 
ment of a substantial 
redundancy programme. 

It would be pleasant to 
ihwik that far-sighted inves- 
tors were keen to benefit from 
a soon-to-be-profitaWe Brit- 
ish operation. However, it is 
far more likely that they are 
piling in on the back of 
Adsteam’s 6-3 per _ cent 
shareholding. (Adsteam is foe 
business owned by the en- 
trepreneur, John Spalvins). 

Mr Spalvins's intentions 
are and these is talk of 
a concert party. However, if 
Mr Spalvins wants to 
“greenmail” BO into selling 
its Australian business, it is 
strange that he has not yet 

approached them. 

However, from Blue 
Circle’s point of view, this is a 
a welcome diversion. Despite 
virtually halving hs British 
cement workforce in foe past 
1 0 yean foe business is still in 
a fbriom stale. 

Imports keep prices down 
while the common price 
agreement makes it hard to 
take a more imaginative 
approach. 

The big question is how 
and when will these redun- 
dancy costs be faced By 
rights they should be excep- 
tional If they are taken this 
year's profits will be well 
below £100 million but foe 
pill will have been swallowed 
If not, the misery will drag 

In the meantime, those 
who are bored with waiting 
for foe light at foe end of foe 
tunnel will he happy for 
others to stoke up the train. 


If you’re about to invest in a pension plan 
make sin e it’s the best on the market. 


TARGET 

Manager! 

Fanil 

$54,325 


SCHRODER 

Managed 

Fiinil 




ALLIED' 
Dl'NBAU 
Managed 
I'll ltd 

$ 31,22 b 


JTQI 1TAB1.E 

AV illi Profits 


$34,029 


scorns h 
widows 
W ith Profits 


$35,846 


BBR Wmm 
yaSOJEsd* 


ALBANY 
1 JFK 
Multiple 
Fuad 

$36,221 


mm mm 


Value of Pension Fund over 10 years to 1st April 1986. 

Source: Money Management, August 1986 

Assumes 120 monthly premiums of S 100 'Amount Invested (Allowing for tax relief al 30%) 


** Target soars head and shoulders above-all 
rivals in I he pensions field 94 


The Times, Satnrday 28zb Jannaxy 1985. 

If you're self-employed or the director of a 
private company, youH know all about the tax 
advantages of investing in a pension plan. 

\bur biggest problem will be selecting the 
best from the rest. Obviously, the most important 
factor will be the size of your pension fund when 
you eventually retire. 


** Indeed the best performing ebntrart in t he’ 
Siinev was linked to Til r** elVManiiged Fund* 


The Daily Telegraph, Saturday 31sl December 1983. 

All too often, this decision is taken as a result 
of comparing projected growth figures, whereas 
the only realistic basis for comparison is achieved 
growth. The table above compares the actual 
results of an investment in the Thrget Personal 
Pension Plan - linked to the Target Managed 
Pension Fhnd - with two 
leading with profits 
policies and three other 
unit linked plans invested 
in managed funds. 


TARGET 

TARGET GROUP PLC 


** Tariff M.ina^-d in unqm*si.iuriahly th<- 
Stev<*€rain of investment perl'oLinanc v 


Money Management, October iggj. 

What it doesn't show, however, is that the 
Target Plan has out performed all other personal 
pension plans over the last ten years 

Whafis more, only the Target plan provides 
you with a guaranteed loanback facility* enabling 
you to draw on your investment whenever you 
like, with no additional management charges. 


Prizofor the most Outstanding performance 
of the decade must still g‘o toTarget Managed 99 


Money Magazine, February 1986. 

And, with Target you're not committed to 
keeping up a regular payment. You may vary the 
level of your investment to suit your personal 
circumstances. Except, of course, with a growth 
record like ours, we think you'll want to invest 
more rather than less. To find out more, fill 
out and return the freepost 
coupon below, or ’phone 
0296 394000 and ask Tor the 
Client Services Department. 

■Sih»*l iri Iml ol prauan and JCCfBUhU 1 from; 



UNIT TRUSTS ■ LIFE ASSURANCE • PENSIONS ■ FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 


Name. 


Please let me have further details of the Target Pension Plan. 
-Occupation 


TTfZ2f11 


Address. 


-Postcode. 


_3osl TeL No.. 


Send to: Dept. MF, Target Group PLC, FREEPOST, Aylesbury, Bucks HP19 3YA. 


y 

i 


3 


? S &&'? i&g ^ g g g » ?g?£f)gjiR'¥8S: IS3S*> 














BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


BW <Mor cmg no 








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FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


£ jWjipiBw 

75 C Agftt 
M 21 ft£nrt 
im aantai 

24 evMrHi 

if- ifTS «■ 

iigiu 

«3 BE BuMw 
773 375 ru BMa tfl i 
Hi 81 Fnaffi 


223 183 cr _ 

7*4 75 Goan BTi M| 

440 33} HN 
W 09 MIS 

s*s srar 


n BIMM 
B 37 late 
125 70 UMi Hamm 

61 32 LWn fan 

B S3 Lemur 

7’*Uc4 ton Bp 
SB 73 Lam Can 
140 96 IM&OpkaK 
198 133 into Beet 

£ SaPffi? eny 

327 100 iMMtam 
'SO 101 mmcen 5 tte 
IS 45 MmitlMMl 
IX 54 MM 

36 71 KMDn 
176 92 IMMPtauM) 

35 5 Item 


306 W MenJow Fan 
MS 143 tea law* 

23 123 IM T4K 
96 75 jjWWW 

1 

i0i t35 am Ih* 

s%ssr* 

]igr< 

S’SSSSS. 

43 Jl tew rat te 

11S 162 Mr 1 Sj<— 
193 ISO MHaafl Brum 
23 IX MMVaU 

a n urns 
238 101 MonvM Gp 
17* 3? telCM 

166 na Hanna 

57 S 

23*3 IS Mon (MMQ 
215 S3 HmWikMHi 
162 IB HuMMi 
367 335 MHVCfam__ 

71 6 teCrMAS 

S'i O'] Down 
at M 

90 70 Do «S 
76 70 Nmgefwv 

21 6 MUM 

£ sssa 

173 83 NaaM HM 

48 M m 6M 6 6 m 


65 90 

ns .. 

105 110 41-2 
SB 57*3 -1 

m & 

£ :: 

*Z7 a? * - 

3« in -a 

iio g> 

57 62 .. 

ins ire a -5 
73 78 +1 

® «• .. 
IS (8 - 1 

IS US " 

l5 W7 +3*1 

122 127 *+Z 
CD 63 a-1 
« a -i 
25 30 * 

1ft W7 -I 


203 -4 

■ -2 
27 • -2 
9 m-2 
no -TO 

s:-. 

127 

125 >2 

112 

237 14 


G« 

sue 

FOB 

Dec 

EXCHANGE 

IJui new and Co report 
AH (From C. Czamlunr) 

135^-35.4 


_ _ 1502-490 

Is 

1S20-5Z4 

15&00&4 

Oct 

Dec 

150058.6 

1624-61D 


WO 105 .. 

118 IX -1 
IM «7 *+1 
51 54 -1 

16 17 + 1 ? 

78 83 

IB » • .. 
30 240 9-8 
n’t m +i 


ns.. 

70 00 

a 7i 
It 13 +1 

191 HI -8 

4S 50 
157 182 «-i 
21 34 


IM 107 57 14 137 

1ft A • .. II 29 219 

11*. +'• 523 

ffl'i u u 

345 r -5 27 DJ 523 

SO 4»-2 1.1 23 425 

SK«" 79 ID 275 

IBS II U lU 

a-i u u u 

135 140 +2 23 17 292 

5 9 -I 

£ W -1 15 £9 30.1 

wS - *. 880 u 

43 43 -2 17 U U 


Vofc 

143 

GAS OB. 

Dec 

1253SO0 

Feb 

Mar 

132-00-31.75 

- 1779M5 

17425-23.75 

S— 

Jun 

Jul 

123JXW05D 

1200021.00 

1Z4D0-19D0 


.. 9R» 


COMMODITIES 


Vet 2200 

Tone — Eerier 

SILVER LAME 

Caft 377-50-377150 

TlweMontfw.38eXB-988.00 

Vol 2 

Tone Qnl« 

88. VETt SMALL 

Osh 3770037800 

Uvea Months. 388.00-389-00 

va m 

Tons Idta 

ALUMNMM 

Cash 788.00*78700 

-naeaMontfw . 799^0-79950 

Vrt 1600 

Tone Staadv 


Shaap nos. up 9 jB %. aw. 


272 +34 

m -5 
113 e+1 

as -3 

W -* 

W 1 - 

m +> 

TO *46 
318 +7 

* :? 

« 4 


ws At 11 


prica, 161.19p(+0*11) 
Ptanas. n/e%. one. 
pnca.n/a 


unoTOCdH pneft 
OOldH Tnmrnvr fitfves 
Prica In 1 par mettle ame 
Sivar In pane* pw troy ounce 
Rotfotf Wetf A Oa. Ud. raport 
COPPER GRADE A 

Casfi g«iiin gjfl.fla 

Throe MonUre . 952J»-952£0 

vd aoo 

Tom Swely Steady 





Supp6«0 via Commodity 
MarkstSanncasLW 
ffiAVT FUELOIL 
Oec 735-76.75 

.•*1 . 75 .0-7900 


..-in, 


Cash 905-00408.00 

Three Months - 93350-33350 

vol 150 

Tons ■- Qutot 

LEAD 

Cash 339.00-34000 

Three Months . 32S.0CX328.5O 

Vol 1400 

Tone — Berety Steady 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 535.00-545-00 

Vol NO 

Tone Mie 

ZMC HIGH GRADE 

Cash - 56000-561.00 

Three Montfw . 554JXJ-S5O0 


Avaraga (aamt prieaa ai 
lapnaanMve mean on 


GB: Cafflo. S2S2p per kg hv 

Siac^aep IGUSp per ha* 
(+4.44) 

GK Pbs. 7&29P per kg Ite 


LOM 


EXCHANGE 

Ltoe Hg Ondracl p. par fclo 

Month 

Open Ckna 

Nov 

1008 100-0 

Fab 

9&3 960 

- - 



Pig Meat vofcS 

■7'' 

-r ' ■ - •7T r H 


> MM ><S£M\ 

Urn Canto Contact - 


p. par Wo 

MonOi 

Opm Cion 

Nov 

9SL5 950 

Feb 

9&0 98j0 

Apr 

1010 1010 

Jun 

• 1000 1000 



FUTURES 



g par tonne 


lonth 

Open 

Close 

sb 

112D 

1110 


151.0 

1500 

by 

171.0 

1700 


S50 

850 

sb 

1010 

920 

” 

VOi: 937 


UFFLX 


OMi. Freight Futures Ltd 
report SID par tana point 


* bsL dead careasa wdght 
Englaod and Wdax 
Canto nos. down 17.1 %. am. 



LONDON GRAIN FUTUteS 

E par tonne 


Wheat 

Barley 

«ertfh Ctoso 

Close 

tov 10800 

109.10 

\an 110.15 

111.45 

ter 11305 

11305 

fey - 11506 - 

11405 


case nos. down 10.1 %> ave. 
price. 9ft39u(+5^H 


Hrgh/Low 

Ctosa 


Jan 87 7240-720.0 

7210 


Apr 87 7600-7560 

7560 


Jd87 6610-6580 

6580 


Oct 87 

742.5 


Jan 88 

737.6 


Apr 88 — 

8600 


0588 — - 

7150 


Oct 88 — 

Vofc 171 lots 

Open interest: 2011 

8650 

1 

TANKS! REPORT 


High/Law 

Ctoso 

| 

Now 86 8300-9300 

930.0 


Doc 88 

10650 


Jan 87 — 

10350 


Mar 87 1040-1040 

10350 


Jun 87 — 

10500 ' 


Sep 87 — 

10750 


Vofc 8 iota 

Open Merest 24 



Spot market commentary: 


Tanker index: 



9300 down 60 on 20/11/60 


Dry cargo Index: 

7060 down 40 on 20/1 1788 




•• 




































.. 1' 






— d-C-. 


* • v , 


I '• » 
' : t 


>z : v ; H 


I 


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'***.' '.* ■■■: 
. ^ -ii v 

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■: % 

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. i *• /■. 


• . 
j . 







THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


29 



-VM- 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements, on this pqgr 
only. Add them up to give you your 
overall total and check this against the 
daily dividend, figure. If it matches, you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you ate a 
winner follow the dam procedure on the 
back of wur card. You mist always have 
your card available when daimiqg. 


N*. Q spray 


fan 


Gainer 


Oxford bvtnmiero 

[ Electricals 


Jons S&oud 

l Electrical* 


Baker Pcrtaa* 



Allied CoDoida 


““ 

Kcfacy lnd 



Van 

[ PrcwuMa 


Burnett & Haflam 



Allied Lyon 

Breweries • 


Bozer ICH) 

Industrials A-D 


. Did (Mcinfl 

Qectrials 


Baraxmood Bren 

Ibeiouka 


Blue 

Building Reads 


Maanhy 

ladunmls L-R 

. 

mcc 

Ekcolab 


Joseph (Leopold) 

Banks. Discoaat 


Hj.nllira 

Banks. Discount 


latate Bonne 

industrials E-K 


Sbn+ley . 

lodnuriaH SZ 


Datgety 

Industrials A-D 


Uml Box 

Indimuili L-R 


MK Bea 

FlEPtriwif 


Moartem 0ohn) 

BuOdLnx Roads 

— 

Bunco 


(tanftaOt (HaUOx) 

terfUfej Roads 

French (Thomas) 

Indostrials EX 


Brauhwaiie Grp 

Indwurials A-D 


Broken Htfl 

IwtmariaH A-D 


Tesco 

Foods 


Trashome Fane 

Htxris,CxETers 


Wootwonh 

Papery. Stores 


Oil Scare* 

ea 


1st] 

Electricals 


Copu Vlydta 

Dcapery. Stores 


Cas&nsa 

Industrials A-D 


Reed tat 

Industrials LA 


De La Rue 

Industrials L-R 


Scot Heritable 

Indunriab S-Z 


Geos Gross 

Raper.ftn&A(fv 


Jarvis (J) & Sons 

BuildiaB, Roads 


Biuebiid Conf 

Foods 


Reed Executive { 

Industrial! L-R 


ASDA-MFI 

Foods 


Newmark (Loota) 

Electricals 


«Ham (3) 

bdusuials A-D 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Buying for new account 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on November 10. Dealings ended yesterday. §Con tango day next Monday. Settlement day December 1 . 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Where stocks have onjjr one price quoted, these am akfdte prices taken datyr at 5pm. YieW, change and P/E ratio are catenated 

on the infclcBe price 

Wlwie stocks have orty one price quoted, these are middle prices taken daft atspm. View, change and P/E redo are calculated oo the middle price 


Please take account of any 
minus signs . 


| Weekly Dividend | 

I Please make a note of your 

1 for the weekly dividend of 

tafly totals fl 

| today’s newspapa. 



1 


TIE 

MED 

TUI 

FB 

SB 


L 



- 



J 

BRITISH FUNDS 

ZI 


Htfi taw 9m* 


taL 

Prtca CWq* y£$L 


Rad. 


Years} 


SHORTS (Under Five 

103 «%fitei 13UW IBB? 
100% flVWTMH 10q% TBB7 
98% S2'.Exta SIX 1SB7 
992% 8S%Ejh* IBM 1987 
933. BSSFM B%% 198607 
1 01’. 95%T7to» H>W 1887 
97'. SP.TIm 3% 1987 
104% MbllMH t2% 1987 
BS% 823. TUm 7Mb 198MB 
104V MUl IBM 1898 
1023. e%Tlta*C9%» 1988 
9**. WiTIM 39b WMt 

ices sz’.'ohi Mb na ■ 

ICT7H BBVTreo* 11Mb ISM . 
IOSS OS’. Trmaa TOMS tsar 
104% S3 ExA 1M ISM 
in'. 94% Em* 19%K 1988 
107V 903. E Kft Wb ISM 
83*. M'lTw 9* 198MB 
icy. BP. Tam C9%% 1989 
92 82*. Tin) 8W 1908 

114'. K8 Tim 13*1990 
96*. 78’>Enfl 2%* ISM 
10T. MlBtei 11% 1990 
113% 100 E*B tH* 1990 
OS’. 7SSTTSM 9W 1990 
700% B8%T not B'*W 1W70O 
100% 62*. TlSM 10% 1890 
88'. 78% 8a 2*5% 1990 
95'. ttATfOM C10W 1991 
112'. 99 1MM 11Mb 1991 
94'. 84 '> Find SMb 1987-01 
11 IP. 97%EttJl 11% 1911 
88% 78%'DMa 3W 1891 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 


100% .. 

t6Z 

1U0 

99% .. 

103 

KL9 

«% .. 

25 

-fl 

98% .. 

105 

113 

98% 

66 

68 

«%•■■ 

HU 

TVS 

96% +% 

J- 1 

8L1 

mo% .. 

1U 

113 

Mb .. 

«0 

105 

88%.. .. 

106 

113 

97%0 .. 

TOO 

113 



1183.108 Ttaa 12%% 1892 
1073. 81 ’.Pm WW 1982 
109% OB'. TtmCIDMb 1992 
1(7% 100% Each 12Mb 1992 
123% 102% Eld) Q%% 1992 
106 fiSVTrm 10W 1883 
IZI+lCOHTrws 12>iW 1998 
91’. 79'. Fund «* 1899 
128 lK%Pm H*«W 1993 
1M'i104%Pm MMb 1904 
122% 97%E*S» 12%% 1084 
127% 106% Each T3Mb1894 
IBS*. 88% Trim 9% 1W* 
120 100% TOPS 12% 1896 


T2S 

WJ - — 
120 tii 
12 A 11J 
1Q2 113 

.. _ 113 11J 

78% 71*. QM 3% 1990-95 73% +% 4.1 . 73 

110% SI'.ExA 1985 93% +% Ito 115 

128 102% Pm 12%% 1996 108% +% 115 115 

183% lltlPm M% 1996 IIP. +% UA 11 J 

103% BTaltwa 9W 188288 87% 4*. 103 115 

142% 114 Pm 15%% IBM izr. +% 12J 117 


10#. +% 
91% +% 

an +% 

■RE*. +V 
107% +%. 
83% *% 
104% +% 
82% +% 
1ttP.*4% 
TW% +% 
104% +% 
109 +% 

BT< +% 
101 % +% 


122 TU5 
US « A 
US 115 
115 115 

125 115 

UJ 11 A 

i ’a 

a 


130% 104% E«3t 13%% 1898 

84% 74%Rdn«l 3% 1898 
109% 88% Cow 10% use 
131 IDftiTreta 13Mb 1M7 
112% 93 Em* 10%% «97 
uni. 79% Pm 0% ran 
142% 118% B« js% 1S97 

88% 71 Tim 6%% 19954 
10T. 88% ExCC S%% 1MB 
148% 122% Pm 13%* 1998 
124 >101% fell t»1M 
107% 87% Pm 9Mb 19M 
126*3 103. Ext* 12’.% 1989 
114 33% Pm 10Mb IBM 

112% 91 Cow fl>Mb 19M 
133% 109 %Pm warn 

M 84% CoW 8% 2000 
111% 90% Pm w% 2001 
1093. « COW Warn, 


ms ao% Com lowaoa 


112*3 91% Prn W% 2003 


80'.- 47% Fixw) 3%W 1989-04 
108% 07% Com fl%% M. 
108% 87% Cow IWaB 
117% 94i.Exci> 10%% 2005 
134%t08'*pm 12 %W 2003 -05 
95% 76% Pm 8W80BZ-08 

107% BB'.CDW 9%W 2006 
127% 103% Pm 11%% 2003417 
94% 80% Pm A'jWSO® 


+% 

78% 4% 


12.1 115 

85 — 


186 f09%Eacn 12% 2013-17 m%»f% 


91% +% 

109 

113 


123 

113 

MU +U 

■ 11.1 

113 

B<% .. 

103 

112 

f rr* +v 

125 

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78% .. 

02 

VLB 

89% +% 


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113 

103% +% 


113 

MU +% 



105% +% 

T13 

113 

96% 4% 

113 

112 

OSU0+U 

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112 


11J 

113 

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113 


106 

111 

90% +% 

103 

113 

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122 . 

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92*4 +1% 

100 

113 

103% +*« 

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113 

90% +% 

103 

113 

92% 4% 

103 

113 

115% +U 

113 

113 

102% +% 

113 

112 

82U +% 

103. 

109 

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1D.7 

107 

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■ J ■ 

108 



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103 



108 

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113 

11.1- 

61% +% 


107 



11.1 

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107 

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103 


■hi 

105 

11710+% 

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UNDATED 

48% 87%Oonmi <Wb 
42 32i.VUrUi3%W 
52% 44'; Com 3'’% 

34% 3% Tims _*W 

29% a cmoiiw 

29% 23% Tim 2*1% 

INDEX-LINKED 
125 103% Tim B. 2W 1M 
TDB 98'r Tram 0. 3% 1990 
122 lDf%Pm 8. 2W 1988 
107% 95'.PmlL2%WMB1 
107% 93'rPm U'lW 2003 
110% 

106% 92% Tim D5%W 2009 
111% 97 Tim a2%% 2011 
94%. 79% Pan H5%% 2013 
102% 87% Pm 12%W 9BU 
99% BOS Tim MW. 2018 A 
10* 88'jTmi 02%% 3020 


38% 4% 104 

33% 04% 10-4 

4S% -% 7.7 

26% +% TO* 

233. 4% 105 

33% 4% 106 


107% 

119% 

98% 

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«p. 

96% 

101 % 

86 % 

92% 

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4% 

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21 35 

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25 U 
3-1 45 

a.t 4.1 

25 45 

32 35 

35 35 

32 37 

02 37 

25 37 

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S’ 115 

S'S 

75 a 
a 115 
471 511 

57 58 
537 547 
116 130 
fi 55 
13% 14% 
519 543 
23G 756 

27% a% 

2DJ 206 
215 2® 
182 197 
W'j U% 

a a 
11% 12’. 
s a 


0+H 

-% 

*6 

0+1 

-% 


*% 

+11 


BID 60 
870 93 

460 48 

200 377 

540 718 
64 38 
628 93 
170 48 

345 47 
E90 92 

400 75 
BO 366 
115 97 


170 213 


100 TB 
230 54 


120 42 

551 68 

314 47 
260 17 

IS 10 

U6 17.1 
IH 30 


60 

528 


+W 

+1% 

+11 


+12 

-9 

©ta’ 

+2 


460 94 

H 9L7 
540 96 

160 12 2 
42 85 

BiO 125 
230 93 

171 61 

30 15 

120 54 

T75 135 
1.1 33 

17 68 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


33S TO AC 
27( (36 AE 
116 iivAtamdoi 
193 11s Aotatod 
141 (01^ Ai a STO B 



323 S33 .. 

265 267 

15 16 
150 IS -3 

<Z7 ia 0-1 
»% S3 0-% 

215 280 0+1 

4SS 487 4fi 

167 TO 

U5 WB -I 

IBS TO 

117 118 *2 

208 200 +3 

72 77 -1 

3D 97 0+5 
206 - 0+4 

TO 104 


WMtaaod (Jaw) 



1076 40 TZJ 
304 

666 66 72 

38 10 12J 

17 32 162 

112 
ZU 
M 
70 
67 
64 
70 


» ^ 
26 ID 4 
56 67 
31 166 
40 175 
37 (31 
4,1 S3 
64 (19 

71 122 

36 158 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


1 72 145 Arad 
2« TO AtSK Boat 
39 3D Ahic Haarw 
330 ZUbfitaUrUC) 

73D 565 Bnai 
500 4% CtJfcs (So) 

383 ZB5 Do A' 

2H H5 EUAPA- 
378 S6 Hvm AMMO 

E .S mwaC—e ei 

B2 404 

21% WJtan bnotadm 

980 *45 rv*«« 

TO 11? Pn mumJ i Su’d 

466 io tuUSLte 


*03 


4.4 
62 
67 
140 
366 
114 
+3 114 


+9 


21 

90 


0*3 140 

-% 129 
0+3 «4 

0 .. 60 
0 . 225 
0*2 220 


20 1X5 
15 US 
70 1811 
<4 1X2 
V Wl 
20 Wl 
38 137 
24 226 
66 157 

B *' 

Si ,7J 

20 1B5 
38 SJ 
40 U3 
66 130 


OIL 


Q7 82 

1 li 

rre Ho 

21% 5 

iff 

75 4? 
ISO 88 

H’*g 

TO S3 

s a 
ss a 
£0 200 


Ana Eaeqn 
fflJDKRj 
uwt 
Br Pcmm 
Bosol q* 

Bi Booh 
Biym 
MW 
Bumah 

crtetCmi 

Court 

Ctantesl 

gm 

Gate Eaagr 
GtawnNi 


I3D IM +2 

2S 27 +Z .. 

I S +1 - 

*5 99 .... 

fl90 893 ♦* 466 

13 14% 

415 CO 0 

s R 

iso IS? +1 


70 76 

160 72 MJ 


3ta 345 0+10% II 


93 SX 42 


W IB 

*8 

TO 161 

.* * 


-1% 

*3 

+% 


53 1QE 
30 61 111 

71 63 86 
.. . 722 

2.1 4J 50 
121 76 62 


47 172 
BJ 
02 94 
22 MS 
63 88 

1.8 sa 

30 185 

28 IS'X 

B 3 ? 

10 345 

51 71 

07 5U 
34 145 
50 12* 

17 112 

31 97 
28 166 

H & 

S4 ZJA 
7 A (48 
.. 2iJ 
M 195 
88 61 

n ii 

38 224 

28 115 
*6 167 
.. 170 

70 18 

22 168 
50 102 



— {field 


DAILY 

DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

Claims required 

for 

+40 points 
Claimants should 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required 

for 

+124 points 
ring 0254-53272 


T»& 

"0i Lew Cornuay 

a a Stem _ 
uo 9 Bwnmtte 
11 % nnate 

152 a *ma 

563 271 WJ Gta 
7% V/CC 0* 

54 9 bias 

9 4%jKte» 

29 9 KCADttag 

2*3 85 LA»0 

300 99% Dn um 

zi a tetet 

4 ISta Later 04 
7 2 %nrs*te 

»'J ll'jDd Sao 

110 28 Mmol 
113 MUPteoa* 

*1 2t Prana 

6*% a taa [wa 
ore G53 Sate 

185 123 State 
97 18 Smerten 
23% U'.m Etate 
19 8'iltate 

153 41 Trams) 
m SB limn Sam 
2TS ® Ml 

60 9'iHtoateta 


Pi« 

ea tme 

~ 8 -r 

46 
IS 


G mi'. Via 

Eh age e>j p > P.t 

J 3 3A 1XS 

-a 29 SJ 

-% . t 


ia to ■+! tifi ib* ia 


-% 


% 


588 SBB 

44 47 

5% 7 

id a 

152 158 *% 

TO 170 0-2 
12% M 
21 M 

8% 4% 

39 « +4 

52 a 

<7 52 +4 

37 37% -% 

84 64% 

as 95a 49 

TO TO 0 .. 
X 32 

11 12 

15 (I +1 

es « 

1*5 150 


ZU 40 148 


ft 


J7J 


38 


XI 19 4£ 

26b bS 70 
230 

226 IS .. 
SI.4 64 64 

IL * 2A* 

" 113 

fttrii z * 

220 


157 158 0+4% 75 U 40 
■ 60 +1% .. .. 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


IS 127 CMHQtga 
107 75 Fotay pmj 

481 325 MnanOtahta 

see am bum 

37 28%JKtafMta) 

2B3 183 LOOM 
86 34 QCMP WtaBl 
283 1® PatasonZOOl 
280 UO D3 A 
213 12B Po*r %(* 

GO ® Son Dny 
US 545 Mte 
224 B( Tata lanAy 

271 153 vita Ora 


1*0 (45 

■ 91-1 
455 «7 -2 

*80 485 0-3 
33% 34% 0 .. 
236 237 -% 

77 82 -1 

Z75 2B0 0 .. 
275 280 0 . 
173 ITS 0+5 
57 a 

E3Q 653 0+H 
138 IM +12% 


106 

76 

(25 

69 

66 


285 

63 

236 r 

259 

54 

363 . 

178 

50 

126 

17.1 

72 

117 

35 

<5 

MO • 

03 

33 

7.1 

03 

33 

7.1 : 

75 

43 

13 

2ZJ 

35 

136 -- 



495 . 

107 

41 

121 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


245 2D2 AMM Mrs 
is TO Ateson Con 
57 *5 Aaxora in 

256 225 Assoc taa 
TO a BttartOrte) 
2C TO Baras. 

flgfr 2^2 Ba m 

310 230 EPCC 
IBS U5 Bann 
673 TO and 
930 720 Coma Can 
225 197 Cacraja 
375 250 QtateUnTO 
II* 25* 5* 

178 130 DCHasaiPam 
770 3® EuaJypea Flip 
31 172 FataCDB tad 
465 318 FbteD»01 
217 S3 Gaos Enas 
327 173 &M Grates 
277 85 Good (tenons 
32S TO Kaaargwi 
13! IH Lopar 
4B5 173 LbM HG 8 B 
31B 1C UcCoteask 
275 83 ManOTani 
155 IS Mac Oca 

s muz* 

BBS 513 & lm ■ 

985 570 Sam i mm 
150 a 00 63*001 

SSSSTvaS 

215 125 VtelPoM 

6 OWn 

as in gteawiH) 
300 230 Bteinwi 
sa 320 woe 


215 220 
IM 116 0 .. 
49% 50% 

2C 248 
110 115 0-5 
182 1B5 0-1 
£77 284 0 . 
233 ZC 0-3 
187 172 -1 

137 200 0+1 
920 Offl +30 

2 M 215 
305 375 
2 ® m -1 

132 137 0 .. 
TBS 775 +10 

Z72 Z75 0+1 
3T5 325 +2 

93 96 +4 

177 182 
137 1C 
317 322 +2 

118 123 
348 353 *3 

235 305 
1C 148 0-2 
1Z7 02 +7 

17% - 04% 

a a 

8*5 855 

« 6X5 638 +12 

Plf 105% 106% +1 

280 2B5 0 .. 
208 713 0-2 
147 157 *2 

a a +2 

187 197 -3 

2B7 30* 

500 508 4 


40 

19 

252 

-? f . 


26 


. “ 

1 N 

12 

1.4 

%*» 

86 

2b 

14 7 


43 

3fl 




54 

761 




16* 


200b 

43 

196 

4 ■ 

76 

*1 

426 

- 


23 

703 

■ 

95 

16 

30 b 


126 

66 

?1J 


X9 

1.1 

84 



44 

120 

MW 

39 

?fl 

13* 


71 

09 

132 


118 

43 

171 

,r 

96 

26 

17.4 

A 

43 

45 

258 



U 

177 


70 

50 

236 

> - 

HU) 

31 

117 

. ■ 1 

57 

47 



96 

27 

707 



&8 

156 


61 

42 

T84 


57* 

44 

113 




Of 

*— 

1?9 

15 

194 

N _ • 

22S 

16 

a? 


96 

65 



47 

17 



106 

11 

86 


17 

(.1 

31.1 

4 



166 

j 

76 

41 

163 


97 

32 

148 


68 

14 

- 



MtePro 

Eras Of Laois 
Fbb Data 


88% M'lAbm 
84 68 State Lon 

83 70 AW 
211 155 Artrgui Sks 
SS 275 Anb 
146 92 Saloon 
302 2*8 Rtoaft 
595 *« Bn**d 
188% 1*7 ft Lm) 

176 1C Baton 
5* 40 QMIDUaa 
IBVIOO CAtA 
283 223 Cx>k comm 
330 133 cuter Pts 
HB TO CwBDMoal 
«S 335 CMsnMd 
171 >31 Qtea Mtok 
295 196 Conti 
22 M aoojl Ms 
MO TO Canty X tea 
TO 150 Cony IT 
280 220 
7SS EDO BtaM 
20 9 Dm 

175 125 Esqbs X Aoaocy 
1» 71 Ejbwi Taa 

120 105 “ 

U4 in 
IM ® 

7D 36 
223 170 
TO MB 

H% 11 m ia a oB Gp 

400 S* Hateo Caasyte 
<95 410 Ita Mi ta ra 
*85 360 DO A- 
*5 34%H*npu TB 
253 130 Karan Cost 
395 233 Hatecoer 
70 *6bHoogl&g Lnd 
425 Z70 any 
320 155 Jaraiyn 
320 2C4%laaa Prop 
348 278 LMSmtem 
8B1':356 tan X &Sn TB 
266 1*7 Da 6%* 

305 2U laiite Step 

w 151 unshapPrap 

353 288 LMb 
380 275 

173 » Utoansy 

115 !»:%iieKiv Sas 
M 44 Uotanati 
2® 125 Uarototam 
640 1B7 Mavr Es 
10%£H mmwj 
7® 384 MooSta 
106 82 teWmlAXJ) 

22% U'sllteDte 
OO 73 HtaCMntei 

93 43 Potato 
SB 255 PnotM 

2G5 72%Pne*r Unas 
272 17B Prop A tan 
in 107 Pna Map 
1 ST TO Prep Snarly 
13% S'.lbSte 
368 TO taotep 

uo ra RWtfi 

645 313 7 

297 215 RteT 
103 78 ScBMB 
IBB 145 ~ 

183 1C 
445 2B0 
173 144 

94 a 

MS 65 

SB fi Tten Cadre 
MB in Tataonl Part 
2® 95 UK LM 

6S5 875 Warn 
875 *75 Wound 
TO 125 dtere 
32% I7%wabb Ite) 
ire 1C WteXCMtay 


81 BI% 
72 77 

70 n 
195 20 s 

335 345 
115 123 
288 292 
442 *52 
IB TO 
170 172 
S3 53 
99 TIC 


-1 

0 .. 

-5 

0-4 

0-2 

0+2 

+1'i 

+1 

-1 

-2 


-2 

0-5 


-1 


IBS TO 
4*0 463 
146 151 
257 2G2 

18% a — % 
124 127 
170 175 
240 260.0+10 
850 670 
13 14 

130 tS) 

102 H6 -1 

IS ists 

112 IM 
60% GZ 
212 216 
TO 200 
234 233 
14% ■ 

352 312 
455 466 
430 440 
C 44 
22a 133 
370 330 

54% a 

365 375 


-% 


0-2 



8 30% 
178 


03b 

05 

567 



38 

149 


79 

39 

164 

* „ 

24 

12 



43 

13 

124 


64 

54 

12.7 


174 

60 

14 7 

- 

1*5 

33 

Mil 

- 


23 

15B 


05 

56 

at 


15 

79 

22b 


?0 

78 

<18 

. 

7S 


257 

. v 

26 

M 



an 

46 

515 

- 

179 

40 

16b 


961 

60 

713 


i 4 

26 

24b 




36 


77 

XI 

793 


55 

3? 

59 


69 

26 

567 


ao 

36 

127 



' 31 

51* 

_ 

G7 

07 



37 

34 

??* 


12.1 

74 

C9 

- 

57 

50 

IZb 




87 

- 

109 

61 

to; 

- -• 

101 D 

1 51 

m 

’ 

21 

16 

444 


66 

71 

Tip 


136 

30 

765 


136 

21 

799 


16 

37 

9*6 


Si 

22 

773 


161 

46 

M2 

. 

81 

22 

802 


29 

10 



107 

37 

148 


145 

A3 

2Z7 

- 

90 

16 

22 2 


93 

41 



67 

24 

753 


79 

4b 

200 


10* 

33 

236 


IL7 

A A 

221 


7.1 

42 



52 

45 

167 


31 

6b 

199 

w 

43 

19 

173 ' 


57 

10 

5/7 


143 

14 

134 


71 

09 

110 


77 

79 

UA 


173 

08 

4X1 


1.7 

1.7 

MJ 


23 

79 

133 


129 

47 

M6 


04 

74 

456 


4? 

25 

34* 


36 

77 

247 


01 

09 

476 

a 

57b 

13 

301 


01 

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14 

07 

561 


12 2 

49 

132 


61 

69 

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29 

17 

292 


83 

48 

182 


115 

SA 

712 


60 

33 

161 


06 

03 

049 


15 

73 

256 


17.1 

73 

117 


779 

22 

39? 


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37 

277 


33 

75 

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or 

23 

5)0 


Cl 

63 

HL1 



SHIPPING 


625 248 AtaOQBfPnB 
368 713 ft rnnvrwitoi 
358 TO CakdoM 
9* 51 feta Uom) 

aa fts Grag 
76 54% jama (JQ 

12% 4%b* 

41 2G Hanoi Docta 
255 TO Dan Import 
576 42B P1QM 
173 6E Aamn (Itota) 
360 127 rwreab 
3® 3E0 Tantata Scot 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


3® 

2® FB 

355 

3G5 

0 . 25 

2 J 

HU 

JOG 

14b Giro Bran 

170 

174 

0 .. M8 

63 

ML? 

45 

32 Hasten So* 

a 

40 

.. 07 

16 


718 

TO tauten Harato 

TO 

203 

69 

45 

106 

82 

MB 


V 

1» 

72 

142 

44 

0 .. 55 

63 

39 

21.1 

96 

157 

118 Snog X Ftata 

138 

14) 

.. 129 

93 

64 

273 

ia apB 

225 

2® 

*2 64 

XS 

282 


1 TEXTILES 


5U 245 AtodTta 
300 153 A ttm Brei 
U7 125 Bata (Jatai) 

115 86 hdwilti 

36 W tea 
744 125% Br Kotor 
127 77 fttea X Larb 
7b% 6t% Cora 
327% 252 COKtads 
(62 (ZB Omaha (J) 
m an itaHa 
42 Stean 
07 Ommote 
S Dm Ud 

S E» IJ® 

a Gated Braaoum 
33 Hcboti tatacte 
87 ngm 
38 kenitete) 

47 Jontog IS) 

83 LOTS* 

2D6 138 Lteds 
124 64 Law 

Wl 72 Ms 13} 

1U Ti btaaar [fega| 

23 « (Orton 

m 94 wm -a* 

49% m Rated 

155 TO GEET 
138 72% Stare 
162 133 Site 
70 46 SnMaapI 
33% 11 saddtad *A 
TO SS Talna Jaasy 

223 it> T SSS» 

(09% TS’.-Taatai 
350 2U YWMi 


2S5 275 
270 275 
167 170 
TO TO 

IS 137 
1(5 118 
87 88 

823 324 
157 19 
215 210 
48 51 

130 140 
ED S 
63 M 
TO 114 

a c 
126 128 
125 1» 
106 109 
153 1S8 
TO <95 
122 l?4 
a 97 
1® TO 
s a 

131 13S 
44 15 
TO 142 
110 113 

’£ ff 

SO 31% 
137 140 
?i3 as 
1® «n% 
250 270 


+5 107 

+12 TOT) 
.. 6 S 

• .. 62 
+1 

0+1 Sfib 
7.1 

67 

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0-2 48 

+4 68 

07 


+7 


+2 
+2 
• .. 
+3 
+1 
• .. 
0+2 
— % 
-1 


+1 

•rt 


40 166 
37 168 

4.1 66 

75 fi 

63 83 
61 268 

64 

23 100 
28 128 

41 117 
74 94 

46 as 

77 67 

7.1 83 


50 

43 

60 

BO 

60 

1.4 
62 
67 

li 

75 

36 

7.4 
30 

OS 

66 

50 

100 


39 1IJ0 
33 247 
*£ KL4 
3 5 TZ7 

4.1 120 

1.1 167 
85 (0£ 
65 (48 

146 
51 IBS 
ifi W3 
54 00 

12 90 

S3 tor 
50 61 

62 >0 
*0 173 
53 VOS 
18 at 


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ban. 
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dies, 
ents, 
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with 
on a 

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283 

287 -.10 

77 

27 

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305 a -10 

81b 

27 

213 

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285 

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502 

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437 

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250 -1% 

129 b 

SJ 

115 * 

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503 0fi 

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170 

71 

42 

265 


330 

340 .. 

61 

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370 

380 

129 

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TOBACCOS 


401 3S1 MT 
ISO 106 C«raA 
(80 TO Corel 
157 127 AUMI4B V 


453 *57 0+5 164 40 11.9 

132 TO 

ir 117 .. .. 

TO IK *6 93 SB S3 


• Ex dividend a Ex as b Forecast dnndend e Interim 
payment passed I Pnce at sinpensior. 3 Dividend and 
weid exchce a special payment k Prs-merger figures n 
Forecast earnings o E* om« t Ex nants 9 E» scrip or 
snare sp&l t Tax-tree . . No signifcant data. 




S§.&? ;&•§ ilggis’ fi ?g^OSSS'?0£ I 5 b > 







30 



Delta 


Investment Company 


United 


I Incorporated under the laws of the Bahama. 
Islands as a company limited by guarantee. J 

An open-ended Investment Trust listed on 
the London Stock Exchange 

The company objective is high capital puwth. achieved by 
taking advanoo: of the size and diversity of the American 
market through mrostment primarily in medium and smaller 
.sized companies which haw developed strength in 
management, finance and product. 



Extracts from the Chairmans Statement 

At the time of writing die relationship between the smaller 
stocks and "blue chip" issues is the lowest since 1975. 


Growth since 

30.7.74 

31.7.85 

Net 3sset value per share 

+611% 

+18% 

Dow Jones Industrial Index 

+ 130% 

+31% 

Standard & Poors Composite Index 

+ 191% 

+23% 


The proposed tax reform, currently before Congress, benefits 
the consumer and service related sectors where your 
Company is largely invested. 

Equities should benefit from a period of sustained moderate 
growth, low inflation, and a high level of liquidity. 

For a copy of (he latest Report & Accounts of Delta 
Investment Company Limited, please contact the investment 
advisers: 

Brian Hadland. Kkhnroct Grieveson Investment Management, 
10 Fenchurch Street. London EC3P 3LB. Tel: 01-623 8000. 
Telex: 888531. 



CAE 

For information 
write lo 

Pkondence Capdol Find FVwagos 

FREEPOST London W 12 88R. 


PROVIEENCE 
IIDL 


% 


or cat ns NOW! 

Dtal 100 and ask for 
FREEFONE Providence Captoi 


THE UNIT TRUST PEOPLE 


Edited by Peter Gartland 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


It’s a bargain 
— so don’t spoil 
the share form 


Yesterday was so-called Im- 
pact Day for British Gas, the 
day when Sid and IS mDKon 
other inquirers found out that 
shares in the biggest ever UK 
share flotation woold be priced 
at 135p - 15p below the 
maximum of 150p that the 
Government’s financial advis- 
ers had talked about wfaen the 

Gas Pathfinder Prospectus 
was published three weeks 
ago. 

At 135p a share and just 
ova four billion shares on 
offer, the initial market 
ca pitalisa tion wil] be £Sj6 
billion. 

It was shrewd investor 
psychology on Mrs Thatcher’s 
part to torn an equivocal offer 

mtn an whwImibhI bargain. 

The arithmetic works out in 
such a way that on the basis of 
payment by instalments, a 
dividend forecast of 5JS3p per 
share and the sweetener of 
Gas vouchers, the gross yield 
works its way up to a highly 
attractive 21.6 per cent, based 
(xi the flotation price. 

It was enough for Neil 
MacLeod, of stockbrokers 
Capel-Cure Myers, to say his 
firm would recommend private 
riipnf* uo go ahead with their 
applications, whereas at 150p 
Mr MacLeod would have been 
“in two minds about it**. 

The grey market did not 
taka long to mate up its mind 
either. Yesterday afternoon 
Cleveland Securities was 
offering to buy 50p partly paid 
British Gas shares at 60p. 

On the ins talment mechan- 
ics, apart from the 50p to be 
paid at the outset, the second 
instalment of 45p is due in 
June 1987 and the final pay- 
ment of 40p in April 1988. 

Apart ftixn the millions of 
UK private investo r s likely to 
become shareholders, many at 
then far the first time, de- 
mand from ovoseas has been 
what one British Gas adviser 
milt “haedibiy high** es- 
pecially from the United 
States and Japan. 

The intention is that over- 
seas demand should not be 
satisfied by sacrificing the 
home-grown variety. Mer- 
chant bank NJVL Rothschild, 
which is orchestrating tike 
flotation, said yesterday that it 
fully supported the official 


line, which is that every 
private investor applying for 
shares will receive an alloca- 
tion. There is no intention to 
ballot 


uavaiws I 


srauEAatEflM 

y t m /trmrstme&f 



It does look highly likely 

then that overseas demand will 
be scaled down. It also seems 
likely that huge ap plications 
from UK private investors 
(say, 10,000 shares) wffl be 
substantially satisfied. 

By fii morning a million of 
the IS mini- p rosp ec t uses re- 
quested by members of the 
public should be dropping 
through letterboxe s aO over 
Britain. Delivery of the 
irmiiniin 63 wtiHon should 
be completed by the middle of 
next week. 

And, if yon think the British 
Gas media blitz is over, you’re 
wrong. Next Tuesday the full 
prospectus will be pubfished in 
various newspapers, including 
The Timer. The prospectus 
trill also be available in clear- 
ing bank branches and post 
offices from Tuesday. 

When you are fill ing o at the 
prospectus keep firmly In 
mnrf dre most connnop mis- 
takes that people make and 
avoid them yourself. Do 
remember to sign the cheque 
and the application form and 
do not attempt more than one 
application per per son . The 
authorities amid get very 
nasty if you do. You have until 
10am on December. 3 to get 
your application in. 

One final thought fllnstates 
the huge scale of this opera- 
tion. Some bright spark in the 
British Gas Stere Inform a ti on 
Office has worked out that if 
afl the prospectnses woe bud 
end to end they would stretch 
from New York almost to Los 
Angeles. pg 


Proof from PEP pioneers 



Credit for pioneering work 
where it’s due. 

In his 1986 Budget state- 
ment on March 18, Nigel 
Lawson announced a new 
concept in individual invest- 
ment — the Personal Equity 
Plan. 

In the morning papas on 
March 20. Fidelity Invest- 
ment Services was not only 
advertising its intention to 
offers PEP but inviting people 
to write in for further details. 

At that stage Fidelity, along 
with the rest of the finanemf 
community, would not have 
been able to tell you the 
difference between a PEP and . 
a tin of dog food but its 
enterprising spirit has dearly 
paid off In the past 10 days 
alone, since moving its 
marketing activity into top 
gear. Fidelity has had 18,000 
PEP inquiries from the public, 
reports the managing director, 
Barry Bateman. 

Eight mont hs on from the 
conception of PEPs, Fidelity’s 
initial enthusiasm is begin- 
ning to be mirrored by its 
competitors, several of whom 
displayed reluctance to em- 
brace the PEP’S charms. 

That early resistance among 
City institutions was based bn . 
several factors. First, they 
said, the entire concept was 
only a half-hearted attempt to 
popularize capitalism be- 
cause, unlike the Loi Memory 
system in France, Loi Lawson 
gave no tax breaks to investors 
at the pay-in end of the 
investment chain. Secondly, 
because the Chancellor 
wanted investors to have di- 
rect exposure to share invest 
meat, there was to be no place 
for unit trusts. This total 
exclusion zone has now been 
modified. 

The institutions also aigned 
that PEPs would be 
horrifically expensive fin: 
them to administer. In short, 
they gave the definite im- 
pression of wanting the whole 
thing to go away. 

The mood, now has 
changed. Fears remain about 
the cost of servicing PEPs and 
the feeling still exists that tax 
breaks at the outset would 
have turned the concept into 
something really worthwhile. 
Nevertheless, progress on 
costs has been made. Most 
significant of all in this respect 
is that it isa PEP requirement 
that a copy of the annual 
report and accounts of every 
company invested in must be 
sent to the individual 
investor. 


Both Fidelity and Save & 
Prosper report agreement with 
a number of huge companies 
that those companies them- 
selves will bear the distribu- 
tion cost of animal reports. 
There is satisfaction, too, that 
a role has bees found for tout 
trusts. In S&Fs case, foe 
marketing director Paul 
Bateman (no relation to his 
Fidelity namesake) confirmed 

that his company’s PEPs unit 

■ 



Barry Bateman: 18JM0 inquiries 

trust option will allow access 
to all S&Fs 28 unit trusts. 

Most important of all is foe 
grudfcing acceptance among 
some institutions that if they 
do not get in on the ground 
floor, maybe having to treat 
PEPs as a toss leader in the 
early stages, they may have to 
pay a high price to get in at a' 
later stage. The feet that 
muscular organizations such 
as the Prudential and 
Schroder have signalled their 
intentions without, as yet, 
colouring in the detail lends 
considerable weight to this 
view. 

A Personal Equity Plan is a 
scheme whereby from January 
1 everyone aged 18 and over 
will be able to invest up to 
£2,400 a year (or £200 a 
month) in a PEP. 

Reinvestment 
without tax 

The money yon put in will 
be invested in ordinary shares 
ofUK companies listed on the 
Stock Exchange, USM com- 
pany shares, and unit and 
investment trusts up to 25 per 
cent of the total amount 
invested. 

Provided the PEP invest- 
ment is held fora minimum of 
between 12 months and two 
years, any capital gains and 
reinvested dividends will be 
entirely free of tax and will 
continue to be so for as long as 


foe investor keeps his PEP. 
Clearly, foe longer foe invest- 
ment runs foe more the tax 
relief will build up. If the 
investor pulls out before the 
minimum period has elapsed, 
he will lose foe tax reliefs and 
any ca pital gain *nd dividend 
income will be taxed in foe 
usual way. 

Although the scheme is 
open to all adults, foe Chan- 
cefloris on record as saying 
that it is specially designed to 
encourage smaller savers; and 
particularly those who may 
never previously have in- 
vested in equities. . 

' Plans will operate on a 
calendar year baas. An invest- 
ment will be treated as having 
entered a plan in the calendar 
year mwfich it is first used to 
buy shares. To quality for the 
lax exemptions, it must then 
remain within the plan for the 
whole of the next calendar 
year. 

If an investment is made on 
December 1, 1987, and used 

to buy shares on the same day, 

it forms part of the investor’s 
permitted allocation of £2,400 
for 1987. The investment 
must be retained within the 
plan throughout the following 
calendar year 1988, and the 
earnest it can be realized 
without the loss of tax exemp- 
tion win be January 1, 1989. 

The investment will be ' 
handled by an authorized PEP 
manag er who may be, fin- 
example, a stockbroker, a 
bank or a fond management 
group. But the investor him- 
self will own the shares and all 
the rights, including voting 
rights. It win be up to the 
investor to choose whether to 
make the investment de- 
cisions himself or to give foe 
plan manager authority to act 
for him. ■ 

Plan managers will buy, sell 
and hold investments and deal 
with foe Inland Revenue, 

Including making the BCO 

essary claims for tax relief 
More than 100 films have so 
far applied to be plan man- 
agers, a level of interest which 
clearly delighted Mr Lawson 
this week when he chided 
those who “couldn't wait to 
predict that this initiative 
would never get off the 
ground”. 

With more than 100 firms 
signalling their intentions in 
this way and only a handful of 
them made public so far, it 
looks as if December will be 
deluge month for PEPs. 

Apart from Fidelity and 
S&P, among the main plans 


that have been made public 
are those from Hill Samuel, 
FS Assurance, stockbrokers 
Sheppards & Chase and 
Charles Stanley, and the four 
big dealers,. Barclays, Lloyds, 
Midland and National 
Westminster. 

There are several scheme 
per mutations, brand names 
and charging struct ure s, and 
although they all naturally 
enthuse about their own 



Rod Bateman: trust option 

investment performance there 
is link doubt that at foe start 
of the PEPs era, financial 
advi sers will steer clients into 
PEPs contracts as much on the 
basis - of administra- 

tion as investment potential 

John Greener, of Richards 
Longstaff says he will write to 
his 10,000 efients in mid- 
December with one firm PEP 
rec omme ndation for 1987, 
and one only. Mr Greener 
reckons that on the basis of a 
notional 100 points out of 
which he will “mart* PEPs, 
marks out of 40 will be given 
according to reliable 
administration. 

In the long term, of course, 
investors and their advisers 
win be content to live with 
mediocre administration pro- 
vided foe investment goodies 
live up to their promise. 

The envy of its 
competitors 

The front runner on both 
semes must be Fidelity. Its 
unit trust performance has 
consistently kept it among foe 
top fund management groups 
since it was set up in the UK 
seven years ago and hs 
smooth administration is the 
envy of its competitors. 

That is not to say Fidelity 
wffl have the PEPs field 
entirely to itsd£ but it will be 
the benchmark by which oth- 
ers are judged. 

Peter Gartland 


UNIT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


IF 


Bd Otter Onq no 


AETNA LIFE M3URAMCE 

401. a Jcttn Street London EC1V 4QE 

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hit Fad HB Fd ACS 1823 1818 
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FfcM hit Dtp Aceura 
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3178 3348 
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3100 3284 
5040 5305 
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01-493 9889 

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Far Eartwn 335.1 S527 

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BARCLAYS LOE 

2S2. Ronrtort W, London E7 9J8 

01-534 5644 

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375.1 3948 
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191 ISA 

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1798 1887 
2156 227-0 
1900 2000 
2884 3132 

282.1 2789 

239.1 2StJ 
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1183 1288 

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aid Eire Reno Ac 1109 1178 
an Aren Pore Ac 1115 1185 
use S4= 1105 1185 

Da 2 725 788 

COY OF BfUJIHUTEH A88URMKC 
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Managed Find dad 423.1 

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830 1043 
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EM CMp Fred 1185 1230 
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01-588 1212 

EWWMMIMe mo 1305 


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Hud Inhrest Fred 2T95 : 
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OM Depodt Fred 1733 
m Auufca Raid 2379 
Far East Fond Z738 
Europe Fred 232.1 

txamadonai tad 2B20 
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Hxt —1 BXL PorKlfl BH4 1QA 
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UfeCoah Aocun 1185 1249 

UK Eg Accun 1724 1815 

Stamretre Accun 194 1879 
UMAud ha Accun 1184 1247 
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0158 710 


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OT PUT For E(0t 203.1 2139 
OTPhnNupiAuer ISB.I 1466 
QT Ptan UK 4 GE 0(39 2609 
07 Ran WbddnUa 2830 2979 


+ 0.1 

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01088 0411 


AdtSacooroa Rood, Croydon CR9 SOS 


UK Eouhy 
fixed hd 


Cenh De poad 

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japan 

Japan Sore Con 
Buopaon 


1119 1T7.7 
181.1 1330 
1049 1131 
949 989 
1082 1119 
1074 1131 
1037 1082 
98.1 938 
1287 1299 
1219 1279 
1123 1132 


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199.1 2097 
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1003 115.1 
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1609 152 
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2985 9115 
3825 3712 
381.1 401.1 
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2153 2305 
2809 2737 
3832 3888 
4325 4334 
1299 1385 
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188.7 2075 
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1731 M75 +0.1 

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Hidttl CM 1235 1382 


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Fred 3H4 m 2 

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Food 2837 2124 

JIT 221.1 2329 

Property UMU 3539 3745 
FfevdeJ Fund 2355 2474 
Managed Srln ‘A’ 2535 2827 
Ba*C 1843 2045 


Managed (Ha 

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Money Sartre W 1722 1814 
Money Unto 221 2 2329 

BjBty Fred 3139 3303 

Rod Inrew t tad 1885 1875 

Waxed Sacs FUnd 1037 1083 

Euopore Fred 4409 4843 
NetuM Raa tad 147.1 1643 
Fhr Ear tad 3825 3815 
Snelr Ctfa tad 2845 3104 
Special an Fred 287.1 2489 
ManCuTBBcy tad 1604 18U 
ipun Teen 1*5.7 1534 

BHPEHULUR! or CANADA 

W tS Ltta Hooea. Lredon Road, 
571255 

Qrandi tad M 254.7 2BJ 
Uon Lahnd Man 241.1 2539 
IHtUntodFbadhd 2903 2109 
IMiUnhadSacCap 1897 1775 
Una unred eq Fd ass ssi4 
LMUreadfinopFd 1775 1985 


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MrSsd Sum 3 257.7 
QotoTMmgad 3 2849 

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OaBal Creft 3 1193 

tc Sarin 3 8324 


1889 

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2749 

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1754 mi 
1114 1179 


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1043 1109 -49 


LEOALS GENERAL I 
2 MureAoro Htt. Hi 
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1029 1084 
1084 1153 
1299 T3B2 
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3889 4081 
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949 805 
1081 1139 
2889 2809 
H19 3702 
2369 3144 
3987 4206 
1567 TCS9 


BN5 18E 

+ 0.1 

+81 

+ 0.1 

+03 

-89 

-119 

-39 

-44 

+15 

+ 1.1 

-15 


+03 

♦04 


UBALA QBOAL PNOPniV 

11. Qu ean W e a London EC«N ATP 
01-248 8678 

L & G (28) 1GL5 1894 


100. Toma 
0272 27BT78 

Xffrere 

Atred 

Waxed Stock 


SMNL BriTOL B81 SEA 


ES7 1 

MUM a 
wax Sore A 
inia rn aa on M A 

Property P 
DaporeP 
(Axed P 
Index Ootk P 
wnu aua i p 


3020 

232.1 
1724 

303.1 
1187 
1E7.7 

103.1 
907 
1035 
1025 
1005 
926 
1081 
3689 
2286 
1782 
1689 
2821 
1234 
182.7 


-75 

-29 

+05 

+U 

-as 

+02 

-09 

-19 

-15 

+ 0.1 

+02 

-13 

+03 

-06 

-85 

-29 

+81 

+09 

-12 

+45 

-13 


mno MAMCH eaiBt omj up 

Wnseoa Pan. Ererr EXS IDS 
UK S21&5 
In* Thai Cep 
Do Acaan 


Do Aeeum 
■Ftaed imaras Cep 
Do AttU* 
SafifCm 
Do Acore _ 
mamasaoK are 


4105 -81 

4815 -34 

1233 -81 

MU - 

1389 -25 

1S29 -85 

1957 -AO 

2315 . -45 

mi -05 



90 Offr Qwg YU 



are 2835 

MM ms 

au 

. j iaa 

FWd h am iai4 
Fixed tat MOM 1145 
Deport! CM 1227 

Departs HM 1073 
PMMNQALUH 


4279 4845 
1881 2085 
2004 2113 
4881 8173 
I FMld 2279 305 


3084 3293 
2779 2947 
2107 234.1 
3785 40*3 
2087 223.1 
Bare hdSw tad 1781 1813 
« Fund 80 8873 2824 





+185 

-43 

-05 

-439 


-95 

-07 

-63 

-81 


HoBorn Bus. EON 8M 

01-403 9222 

1783 1887 -14 


Mmunmoi 
28 CflOOM fibeec, 
01420 0202 0788 

K SSZtiU 

S&tod 


■MHMIU1I 

London EC2A 4HX 



ASSPare 8 

Orowrti 


Oanenodto 
Etta hro 
Fhr Easam 


'Cos 


8204 3375 

2864 2005 

4881 B213 
2819 2885 
4399 4622 
+onn 2400 

1345 M1.1 

1185 1282 
775 82.1 
1SLS 1380 

19(5 1913 

1829 1025 
888 685 
1882 1880 
1483 1545 

1888 2079 

888 nas 

182JS TS29 

1817 T7U9 

2081 2155 

1885 2181 
484 479 
1205 1287 

1780 1885 

■7.7 824 

888 877 
1089 1154 

1573 - 1885 
1037 1002 
IBM 1789 
1435 1814 

1889 1781 
904 2563 

019 987 
3105 3279 
387 385 
2019 2129 
2539 2879 
2888 9005 
1199 1185 

*9*9 CTl? 

274.7 2254 
264.1 2709 


-0.1 

-97 


+041197 
+19 860 

-25 .. 
-37 .. 
-15 .. 
-49 .. 

-36 .. 


-38 

-74 

+ 1.1 

-7.1 

-49 

-37 

-09 

-03 

-87 

-85 

-04 

+19 

-36 

-35 

-37 

-39 

-20 

-19 


-56 

-39 

-13 

-4.1 

-19 

-65 

-65 

-27 


KYM.UK 
New Hal PM 

061-227 4422 
floyrt SMrtd Fred 


LB0 8H8 

nu 6273 


-73 .. 


Meio ort l tad 

egdtftart 


-32 .. 
-4.1 .. 

-13 II 

+85 .. 
-19 .. 

-80 .. 




Royal LSa Unll LMad 

207.7 2189 

. _ 261.1 2649 

Property Fred 1581 1575 

t re uaftaM tad 2865 3114 

PncMc Breti tad 1865 ITU 

LMM area Fred 1280 1SE7 

GK Fred M87 18(4 

Mreeytad 1253 1*17 

UVEAFTUSPGI 

1. F WbuY Are LondonJOU 207 
0708 80888 

UtwFW 3725 3849 -04 .. 

Dago** FtW (25 2229 2959 +03 .. 

Oft Fred 2887 28*4 -35 .. 

Qtabrt EW tad 1285 1835 -13 . . 

. 1*8] 55.1 5B4S .. .. 

tad BU PM -13 ... 

SCHM087I UPC 


-15 

-40 

+03 

-29 

+09 

-85 

-73 

-07 

-05 

-93 

-39 

-81 

+15 

+05 

-15 

-39 

-73 

-27 

-75 

-88 


0705 927738 

a ?m 




7815 7*1.1 
2783 SOU 
3783 3881 
2079 2187 
2353 2*76 
no B £67.7 
2280 3400 
1383 1439 
324.1 3+1.1 
1581 181.1 
3699 3749 
2SCL3 2834 
2(34 2383 

topon finrttar . 2181 22 U 

OgreM 1 Urt 1239 1324 
BreSrCmpprire XU 3179. 
TMcretad ‘ 3237 3*07 

UK "t*y mwh a»n 

CCM VMtfdMM 3363 3629 
sqrey PMrtOO&p XQ4 S2S.7 
KrtrerePerwon 28» 7779 


Cfci Rxedt* 

unsa Aocun 



18 a Andmoo Sq. Sdttoatfi BC 1VE 
081928 2211 



100 a Wren a* Qtaagou 08 GHN 
041448 8321 

Pm Fred (36) 8084 8844 

SCOTTBH MUTUAL PCVESIMEKTS 


T153 

Fred 1223 

Fred 1279 
1845 

Fred 2039 

6 M> 6 Fnd bit tad 1004 
bxtotUrtrtd tad 981 
MamaBonrt Fred 1819 
Norm American W 1104 
PacMotad 1807 

Property Fred 1024 

» '£5 


121 9 
1287 
13*7 
1181 
2145 
1067 
1013 
1809 
1189 

1834 

1089 

1289 

M13 


-15 

-15 

-29 

+02 

+84 

-19 

+06 

-02 

+14 

-81 

-25 

-27 


oat Aixtren Sq. EHap B+2 2YA 
03+988 8181 


itad 

1479 1666 

■4U .. 


1819 1705 

-15 .. 

mrenrttairt 

1789 18U 

+02 .. 

Proprey 

1119 1179 

-09 .. 

tad manat 

106.1 1198 

-15 .. 

Inert* Untcad 

■LB 10*6 

+19 .. 

care 

1149 1205 

+09 .. 


po box sib. Edhreutfi am sau 
OIOBBBOOO 

bar Pol 1 4885 .. .. 

lav M 2 4352 4681 .. .. 

htv pm 3 4237 4481 .. .. 

torcaah 1819 IKLO .. .. 

Mrodtad 2344 2*85 -45 .. 

Equhy Fred 2784 28*7 -87 .. 

Property tad 1 * 2.1 t*07 +81 .. 

MHorelrert Fred 9C73 2809 -14 .. 

Ftaad hnarart tad 1733 1885 -27 .. 

Indaxari SKxh tad 1124 1194 +1.1 .. 

Ctob Fund 1345 MM +02 .. 



BM Otter Cmg YM 


Hop FM Accun M85 188s +02 .. 

tadhdFBAcC 1805 1589 -14 .. 
W tad Aocun 2881 300.1 +29 .. 
h wre Fred Accun iaojj 138s +09 .. 

mdx+jM Sea Aoc H84 1153 -15 .. 

Pen Para AoootiK 7884 -81 .. 

tap Megs AceoMd 3881 3854 -49 .. 

— ii25 1134 +02 .. 

«BS 1481 -35 .. 

111.1 1179 +02 .. 

1145 1215 -15 . . 

1322 130 3 +14 .. 

1135 1185 +81 .. 

884 mS +88 .. 


i Money 

i hdwhd 


■m i9« war 


I78L 


422.1 4444 -43 .- 

2187 227.1 +81 .. 

_ 581.1 5807 -37 .. 

W Accun 1879 1874 -45 .. 

Index t to ced Accun 1088 1153 +1.18 .. 

drtl4«BB tSSJ 5214 +41 .. 

Anr Etay Aocun 1*84 2088 -35 .. 

US Bondi Accun 1389 1455 +37 .. 

repen Aocuo 2160 2284 -39 

PncWc Aocun 137.1 1*44 -03 .. 

Ar Guton Acorn 4084 *079 -134 .. 

HtomeOrert Accun asu 3827 - 12 .. 

USDdlreAccm 1009 1063 +05 .. 

Yen Acore 1285 1386 +07 .. 

fixuCBr Accun 1187 12S0 +09 .. 

Drertortui tad H39 1809 -305 850 

Bo op ore 1079 11U +07 .. 

181 LH LTD 

Kaene Houe e. Andover, Hreta, 8PM IPS 
0284 58788 

Mragadtad 1481 1807 -80 .. 

FYoparWtad _ 1186 1288 .. .. 

Read kdanat Fund 1189 1345 -15 .. 

Money tad 1179 1343 +0.1 .. 

Eqrtytad M79 089 -35 .. 


)S 



nOS 1185 
779 31.1 
■89 1053 
1589 1849 
629 881 
1879 1875 
1649 1829 
1284 081 

_ 2187 2308 

hrernaprert EqoAy 321.1 3380 


-32 

-35 

-15 

+03 



jSSioreS w re? ms 

3682 3739 -55 

2425 2899 -37 

2884 3088 -46 






IKtar tad 32U 3 as 

rtreYJrtd FM 3889 *17.1 

8*1 EdgMftm 2285 2(07 

2372 2489 
2314 2885 

... 2779 2826 

Oo Aocun 363.1 3716 

PujreurtAu 1317 1607 

Hrerterocp act 1379 1483 

TVMMU.AS8URANC3 
401. St John Start, . 

• London 8CIV 4C£ 01937 8484 
3109 
6240 


zkg? 

9* 

|U 

3» iirga Z 

BtoMngda 

t>NM4 

Star Mngd 5 


KTOrtMia Bond 

suropwri. 

8U8UFE OP CANADA 

^0 wr rfc " w “- 

Qroren acoour 7881 

Managed Account 484.1 
Erx^ty Accrew 5«6 

Mogd tad Accun « 2.1 2029 
toro tad.AeauM 2(85 25W 


+39 .. 
42 .. 
-88 ,. 
-19 .. 
-24 .. 


2010 
5240 
4789 
2303 

210+ 2215 
1816 T7Q0 
2882 8809 
1577 1885 
1281 1317 
10U 1110 
8615 8845 
1B52 2065 
1105 1184 
2065 2175 
5+S 2255 
1877 ITU 
2010 2J15 

V AMnU B H UFE ABB 

ana nreo Memo am sba 

R»d 4119 4339 .44 .. 

M tad ref~x Jy^2 

tad W reaeltad 3044 3208 
2875 2817 

218.1 2275 
1617 1587 
138.7 1425 

210.1 2*12 


-07 

-85 

-7.7 

-06 

+ 0.1 

-05 

-4.1 

+ 2.1 

-49 

-45 


NSSreS"F? 

Bn tad 


-187 
-2 A 
-108 
+OI 
+02 
- 1.1 
-15 
+19 


The prices in this 
■ section refer to 
Thursday's trading 










n eei 


’•.C- 


i r\‘«t 


A few pages on 
pensions at £1.65 

■ Checrfcy practice awAivi a# 


■ Chet'kypraptice award of the week must 

' "‘iSSSlSS Sodety, which has 

' aguKte to the new regulations on 

' * atsaosure ot infoi iifatlon toocftm fl i t ftf w i 
! v scheme members. 

blurb 


rft ftMLLYI&?Pm> 
HZ CWi'AftORDIHtr 
MtycnjrMQRb'iHtr 


JLflfW? 

UP 



*tho British Gas "Sida"; fhb week has 
..wi^^ed aresurgence of activity among 

y-Tiib of tiie best offerings are Rosemary 
£ Burr's ThO Share Book (2nd edition), which I 
*.been ipdated to take account of the . . 

„cbarges inyoivBd in Big Bang and the new 
k^nvenor protection laws. andNeB Staplev's 
ZV* Stock Market A guide for thepmrata 
^Mive&tar. Also newly published arxT 


£500 million requests 


■ National Westmins te r's autumn offer of a 
(L5 per cent mortgage discount for all new 
borrowings has attracted app8cat»ons for 
loans totaBtng more than £5d0 million during the 
past two months. The offer doses at the end 
of December and funds lent from tins year's 
£1.5 bason allocation already total more . 
than £t bffllon. 


"market is 5tt>Money Saving Ideas, wtih tips 
-*pn saving money on shoppteg bffis, heating 
"costs, travel and entertanimant 
For the more tachnic&afy minded. Financia] 
Times Business Information has pubfished new 
editions of its handbooks - Executive 
Pensions and Sa/f-Ermfoyad Pensions, both of 
, which analyse in detail the muttitude of 
competing pension plans which are marketed 
, by foe insurance companies. 

_ Details: 77w Sham Book and 500 Money 
Saving Maas, W-93S 4550; The Stock Market 
A guide for the privatB investor, 0223 66733; 

. Executive Pensions and Self-Employed 
- Pensions, 01-251 9321. 


Point to remember 


■ The Bristol & West Bufrfing Society 
called. Last week we said the society f s 
exp a triate offshore savings account offered 
a return of 11.37 per cent We dropped a <Sgit 
somewhe r e along the way —the figure 
should have been 12J7 per cent 


Gash, not cuddly toys 


Forest favourite 


-■ A company called Fountain Forestry, 
which specializes in forestry management, is 
'■currently trumpeting the virtues of its 
. favourite investment increasing numbers of 
individuals, companies and prwessiona! 
partnerships are turning to forestry investment 
' it says. This trend, says Fountetfn, is a 
reflection of the increasing demand and price 
^for the end product the taxation 
. arrangements and what it calls the hidden 
» bonus - the opportunity to fish or sail on 
your own waters, bM-watch, shoot or enjoy 
other outdoor pursuits. 


decided to eschew the piggy banks and cuddly 
toys that commonly go with children's 
savings accotmte. Instead youngsters wffl 
receive booster payments of £Z50 when 
savings reach targets of £50, £1 00, £250 and 
£500. in addition to the normal rate paid on 
the account the net return over the year on 
£100 {which would automatically receive two 
booster payments) would be 1 1 39 per cent, 
says the Yorkshire. 


The Golden offer 


it’s aU explained in The Growing Investment, 
avaBabte free from Fountain (01-631 -0845). 


YoustimtimcHHm . . 

WlrK ?EU9VJ fiflA MftMBt 






■ There wfll always be some who swim 
against the tide, particularly if the waters are as 
dangerously competitive as those of the 
mortgage market As almost every other 
borrower raises its loan rates the 
Cheltenham & Gloucester has managed to 
undercut Its own— at least for the low-risk 
borrower. 

The society has reintroduced its Gokfloan, 
for endowment or pension-linked mortgages of 
£50,000 or more, the rata charged is 12 per 
cent nominal, compared with the society's norm 
for endowment mortgages of 1235 per 
cent Apart from the relatively high quality of 
borrower who wiH take out loans of £50,000 
or more, the C&G protects itself by offering to 
lend up to a maximum of three-quarters of 
the property’s valua 


Guiding video 




■ A video guide for smaB businesses on 
unfair-cfcrrassal legislation and good 
employment practice is avafebie on free 
hire from the Department of Employment's 
sraafl firms centres regionally. It expiates 
industrial trfomaJ procedures and gives 
guidelines for taking on new staff, 


In Europe, 

IT T AKE S experience 

TO PUT THINGS 
IN PROPORTION. 



Europe has got a lot going for ii. In recent 
years. European governments have become more 
' axicemcd with boosting industry and encouraging 
die development of newer, more efficient plants. 
And as a result, European company profits have 
begun to rise substantially. 

But it stands to reason that, from now cm, the 
prospects for substantial capital growth -from what- 
ever ate of company - are more likely to-Ee with 
those European shares which have not yet been dis- 
covered and traded up by the average inamxrional 
buyer. Tim’s where Henderson’s European Trusts, 
and in particular the Henderson European Smaller 
Companies' Trust, come m. 


In our opinion, there is substantial further 
growth sriD in the pipeline, which is why we recom- 
mend tins trust as the one to invest in today. 


HOW TO INVEST 


SMALLER COMPANIES 
ARE NOW CATCHING UP 


In any bull market, larger companies mow 
hret and snuHer companies catch up btet This has 
happened in Europe. If other markets are a guide, 
h could continue for mate some rime. 

However, it takes an investment manager 
with depth of experience and a wide range of 
contacts across Europe tx> be able i to ( .P m P £ ®? 
murine European grow* stocks ahead of the fadd. 

Those are exactly the kind of shares which 
you wiD find in the Henderson European Smaller 
Companies ThistkponfoEo. 


You can take advantage of Henderson’s 
extensive European expense either through direct 
investment in die Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Thist; or alternatively, in the other two 
HentEson European Trusts. {Rill details of these 
trusts can-be obtained by telephoning Vicky Law 
on 01-638 5757.) 

To invest now in die Henderson European 
Smaller Companies Trust at the fixed offer price of 
111. 5 p simply complete the applicaffan formbdow- 
and retumntogptherwith your cheque, either direct 
or through your professional adviser to arrive not 
liner than Friday 28th No v embe r 1986. 

You should remember that the price of unhs 
and the income from them can go down as well as 
up, and you should regard any investment as long 
term. 


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 


LONG EXPERIENCE 
IN EUROPE 


Henderson has been managing investments 
internationally for over 50 years . "We Save over £5.2 
bfflion under inan 3ggnent.^fe haw been mvemngm 

Europe for over 15 >-eais and oowmanaae weH o ver 

£750 mflfion jkxoss aS die European snxknarktts. 




fit of an unusuafly witfe spread. Henderson European 
Smaller Companies ’Busts portfolio s currently 

spread between 12 European countries - a wider 

nrfur Fwnnen smaUa- companies truss. 


ALREADY UP 109% 
SINCE LAUNCH 


Since its bunch on 28th January 1985, the 

Henderson European Smaller ComwnjesTrUCT has 
Anwn an increase of 109®: OB an offer to bid basis 


■Stoold the an after porr imt by mate tkm 
daring itw fixed pricr period the after » B be dasd and unit*' 
be iltooied ai ibe price ndmson receipt of ippfeuwn. 

An inioal cfair pe o( Wfioci the assets (equivalent o* S-: 

cl die asac price) is made hyibenuniSCTs when uniis an; issued. 

OuLo( the m*ia] charge, inuagn pay rtnwitnwn to qualified 
mte m ied ar yes; tares awiibMc on requeg. 

An ratal charge oi iWo (pins VAX) on the value o» the 
TnajwTUbciWuacdbmmthcffOcincanieiocaveradininfan- 
tian co5B wall a provwon in die Trua Deed b> jncreax ihb in a 
imanaMB of 2=: on p» bir 3 months vrioen twice to wi o buUcrs. 

D aw t buu omtrf iiKome wifl be paidoo KJdi December. 
The carters esdmaied anmd yield o0J)9»l (2L’ 11/86). 

Contract nones wiO be issued and unit certificates vill be 
pr ov ide d wBa eight weeks of payrneTH.Tbsril miuetidurH'spur 
GeniAeaic and send it ip the maiujjcrs; nm bated on the ndmr 
bid price *■31 noemally be made vdtia 7 wortingdaei. 

Uiu Time arc not subioct to capo) Rains as; mnreutre, 
a uoiriwlder *-31 noi pay ihh ux on a tfisposal oi tuns unlcv- his 
tout rcabrd pins fmm all ‘oourcra in the u\ year amountio mmr 
dun SbJOO (1986/7). Pnccs and yiebK can be found Ja3> inibc 
.FinanaalTimcv 

Trustee.: Midland Bank Trua LuL 11 Old Jeien. 
EC2R 8DL'- 


Henderson tunmean smaucr 

shown an increase of 109®: on an rib- nbti basis 
including net ne-imcsKditKome. (17.1L86). 


■ Manapen: Hendmtm Urra Tras Maoaqancn LuL. 
26 rimbuey Square. London EClft IDA. (Rcpwrretl Ltflxi i. 
Rcy^traiivn Number: S5b26) England. 

K member of the Unit Tn« Aaodataou. 


V„ j 1 1 ^, -r BM Miiumnent Lid™ Dtalmu Dcp a rni Mn , 5 Kaifckb KuaJ, Hwum, Bremwuod, Em CM 1 1 IAA. 

To; Henderam jjOC, „ dw Hemlnvm Eunpian Smaller Gunpanio Tru-a ai the fowl prior .d 

» Hendenwn Unit T*. Lim«d 1« wM. mluu- «U 

^ nrr mnmh (mimmiim S25.I n/ihe Hinders* <1 European Smaller Companies Trust, and enslose 

momhs one^ncm pavilc •« WManap-mcm Unwed. DcuiCm bow a, nuke sohw- 

'" Wl ' ** JVAibW ' “ ^ ^ 

price. Joint ap^toms nuol dpt ami math tall name, andaddrevsessparairk. 

Mr ■MrvMiss.Tule IttWWlWMsUm lull). I 


Si^Ul ure — — — - — — — 

Mi hufrsdwiJ. Vi* i««'» : i — — , , 

Tlfo oHtr is not as aibtie to wafaw 


Henderson European Smaller Companies Trust 
Henderson Unit Trust Management Ltd. 


U* | jt 


[E TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Good names with good prospects 



LLOYD’S 


The opening this week 
of the new Lloyd’s 
budding by the Queen 
has focused attention not 
just on the 

controversial building but 
also on the question of 
becoming a Lloyd’s name. 
ALISON EADEE 
reports 


The Queen pointed out iu her 
speech the significant 
contribution made by Lloyd's 
to Britain's balance of pay- 
ments. A sum of £1.87 billion 
or one-sixth of total net over- 
seas earnings by financial 
institutions was contributed 
by Lloyd’s underwriters and 
brokers in 1985. 

Although names — wealthy 
individuals whose fortunes 
underwrite Lloyd’s insurance 
policies— doubtless take pride 
in Lloyd's national contribu- 
tion, they are more interested 
in the size of foe cheque they 
receive every year. 

Names usually participate 
or have shares in several 
syndicates with the amount of 
business they aze allowed to 
write tied in a proportion of 
two to one to the amount of 
wealth they put up. 

While it is always dangerous 
to talk about average returns 
at Lloyd's, foe general trend 
seems to be improving mark- 
edly after a prolonged period 
of soft rates, fierce com- 
petition and poor returns. 

The 1 983 results, foe last to 
be published as Lloyd’s ac- 
counts are three years in 
arrears, were a mixed crop. 

Marine syndicates earned 
names an average return of 
£1,338 for every £10,000 share 
on a syndicate. At the top of 
the ratings marine syndicate 
741 paid a cheque of £4,199. 
At foe bottom names had to 
pay their agents more than 
£ 2 , 000 . 


Non-marine results were 
poor with an average loss of 
£668 par £10,000 share. The 
worst results were horrible, 
even excluding PCw, with 
some names being called on to 
stump up £4,000 or more. 

The outlook for the open 
years of 1984 and 1985 is one 
of steady improvement Apart 
from special incidents, such as 
the high number of aeroplane 
crashes in 1985, which will 
affect aviation syndicates, all 
areas of business have seen 
rates hardening which should 
feed through into more prof- 
its. 

It therefore follows that now 
is a good time to join Lloyd's, 
although the Jeremiahs are 
already predicting the next 
downswing in rates. 

About 3,000 new names 
have signed up to start under- 
writing from January 1 next 
year. They will receive a new 
booklet produced by Lloyd's, 
which is more comprehensive 
than anything produced 
before. 


The ability to make 
money work twice 


reality should have for more 
liquid assets before joining. 

The advantages of being a 
name stem largely from foe 
ability to make money work 
twice. Names have to deposit 
half the wealth they show with 
Lloyd's as cash, gilt-edged 
stoats, equities or bank guar- 
antees. The deposit continues 
to earn impost or dividends 
while providing the base for 
underwriting. 

The real boon from 
membership is for high tax- 
payers. Pure underwriting 
losses can be offset against tax 
meaning 60 per cent taxpayers 
□ever pay more than 40 per 
cent of their underwriting 
losses. 

As underwriting losses are 
usually covered by investment 
income except in rough mar- 
kets, the name would make a 
profit anyway. The Inland 
Revenue still allows tax relief 
against underwriting profit 
regardless of investment in- 
come. 

Non-taxpayers and those 
without the ability to recoup 
money from other means 
should question hard whether 




While the 1 987 names have 
already made their decision to 
join, many more will be 
weighing the pros and cons. 
The new booklet, which 
should be available next 
month, will be a great help 
both because of its general 
details and its sizeable finan- 
cial facts section. 

The booklet contains a 
health warning listing some 
obvious and some less ob- 
vious helpful hints about the 
nature of Lloyd's. Most im- 
portantly, prospective names 
should remember that they are 
liable for their entire personal 
wealth and not just the 
amount they show as a basis 
for underwriting. 

The minimum is £100,000, 
but by today’s standards this is 
barely a wealth test. Names in 


they are the right material to 
join. It is possible to join and 


join. It is possible to join and 
run into several years of losses 
before making a profit 

As membership alone is 
fairly pricey— there is a £3,000 
entrance fee, an annual 
subscription of 0.85 per cent 
of business written and an 
annual contribution to the 
Lloyd's central fund of 0.45 
per cent of business written in 
foe previous year — all names 
should have a good cushion 
against bad tunes. 

A good spread among syn- 
dicates writing different 
classes of business is also a 

roarket^The present thinking 
is 45 per cent on marine 
syndicates, 35 per cent on 
non-marine, 10 per cent on 
aviation and >0 per cent on 
motor. 

A limit of 10 per cent of a 



Imposing: the building where millions are made for Britain 


name's total underwriting 
capacity on any one syndicate 
is also considered prudent. A 
further hedge is to take out 
stop-loss insurance policies 
which limit the effect of bad 
losses. 

The choice of agent is 
crucial and is the hardest to 
make, because so much de- 
pends on personal recom- 
mendation and personal 
impressions. Some names 
may feel more comfortable 
with a members' agent, which 
does not run syndicates. Oth- 
ers may want to be part of a 


larger members’ and manag- 
ing agency group. 

Finally, the inquiry into the 
adequacy of investor protec- 
tion at Lloyd’s being con- 
ducted by Sir Patrick Neill 
may recommend changes in 
the arrangements for names. 
First sight of the inquiry's 
findings are expected just 
before Christ mas . 


It remains to be seen 
whether Lloyd's will have to 
aJterits new booklet to take Sir 
Patrick's recommendations 
on board. 



JAPAN 20-0% 


U.K. 14.8% 


OTHERS 6.3% 


CASH 20.8 % 



JAPAN 1.0»o 


EUROPE 44.1% 


AUSTRALIA 10.7% 


EUROPE 43.1% U.K. 9.7% 


A comparison of foe Oppenhelmer International Growth Trust portfolio at 1st June 1986 and 1st November 1986. 

an interval of six months. 


An actively m 
internationa 





Recently world stoekmarkets have been rewarding 
for investors. Many unit trusts investing in specific countries or 
sectors have performed well 

Some investors have sought to maximise performance 
by switching from one country to the next using these mtire 
specialist trusts. 

However making money from switching unit 
trusts is becoming more difficult in the present 
uncertain markets. 

Some professionals are beginning to advise 
caution. In today's stoekmarkets the chance for - J 
• further growth is l>est gained by stockpicking around 1 

the world. 

Active management is required to take full 
advantage of opportunities because they can be hard 
to find and short lived. 


Oppenheimer Trust Management Ltd- Mercantile House. 
66 Cannon Street. London EC4.N 6AF.. 

Alternatively if you wish to buy units over the 
telephone, call our dealers on 01-236 3883. For further 
information call 01-489 1078. 






Oppenheimer International Growth 

The Oppenheimer International Growth 
trust differs from man}- others because it does not 
just pay lip service to active managemenL 

As the comparison above shows, the £50 
million portfolio can undergo major reconstruction 
over a relatively short period- sometimes w ith a broad 
spread of holdings around the world, at other times 
with a heavy emphasis on one or two sectors or regions. 

Track Record 

This responsive approach to active manage- 

Ttmi ment has been rewarded bv con- 

Va hie of £1.000 

Invested over tfte sistent performance over the 

short, medium and long term. 
The fund will take pru- 

lyear £1^57 dent risks m the search for 
2 years £1.726 . ry,,. 

3 years fa^HS above average returns. I his 

5 years £4.569 aggressive stralegv may result 
^ in the price of unidgoingdown 

as well as up. but should pro- 
vide substantial rewards in the medium to long term. 

About Oppenheimer 

Weare a Lk’.unit trust management company 
with over £250m under management, l-ust 'car our 
European GrowthTrusl was the top performing of all 
authorised unil trusts in the L'.K. Our range of 10 unit 
trusts have ail made money for investors over the last 
'ear? 

Howto Invest 

To invest simplv complete the coupon and 
send it with vour cheque, minimum £1-000. to 





lyear 

2 years 

3 years 
5 years 
7 years 


£L457 

£1726 

£1015 

£4,569 

£6,937 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

OBJECTIVE 

CattJI growth from wemMonai roe$rtnem« n whatever txuvrv ara3 
market vcio> prorate the g/eaesi pmenia i me esunaeagr-Ks curem vent 
pa. 0 ccui«dB>ion traj*. are issued wtoch nun, ar< mcome.aflet me 
deOuatm of ia» and fees, e dulonul <a*» aaoeu (o the caMai of me tiixar aid 
tw aetnbufeO- 

RtSft 

The once of ams. ana Ihe H'ccro from them, ma* goaonnae-nvlasijc. 

IWI trusts should be mewed as metkum 10 icnn nvesmenu,. 

CHARGES 

There at e wo «v» Res-- 

- Indel charge <y .«rovale« to 0 » the offer pncei eeluded «Mhe 

pree of tints iromrwnn may be pad lo ouakfiea imeimeoiS’e* horn the. 

cnargei 

- I'*) annual management lee i .van deducted tror. income produced oy me 
lynd <oi captai * were e reufficieti mcotnej. 

HOM TO BL'Y AMD SELL UMTS 

Smpy compete ana return the coupon lb the address shown endobetg 
yeueneoue. 

(jMsmlaeMfcgni;* UtcpcupeuaAnBanreeecA of vn* apoheanonand 
a camraa note w* oe despatched *iuiin one weeh. A certificate wd totow once 
payment has beer, made 

Mju may sel you units OX* 10 the managers on any ww hne day at I he tM 
pnee rusng on reces* CA nsiruaion by letter or tettpnofK lo our defers on 
01136 3885 A contract noie wd be issued lo confirm Ihe transaction. Pavmem 
is notmaify made wwi seven days of the managers meME property competed 
documentation 

MINIMUM INVESTMENT'S 

Lumpsum nvesunm £LQ0O.aadHsul invest mem I^aO.martttty savrgs 
subsenpum 150 per month. 

PRICES AND YIELDS lor M Oppertreener Urtt husls are putifenea duty n 
die Fronoal Tunes. The Times and Pie DaAy Mefrach. space pemwutE mewne 
accumulation denes xv 20m Fetmery « 20W August vciety Dw Irusi us 
auinorseooy the Department pi JfadeandtaftistTy nApri J972 

TAXATION 

Un* trusts are eiemot ft out any tar iaONy on cantal garts. Honeior. cfaenis 
da rave a tabtty 10 capeai gans tax I. after seang tt»r ixms tfw reahsed 
capital ga*is from a sources exceeds me annual exemption i£6J£(ifor meiax 
year J9S6/S7). 

MONTHLY SAVINGS PLAN 

Imestors may af So sutKCr 4>e m monmiy rnsiamcros via the Cooenneonei 
Morowy Savmgs Aaomr imrmjri 150 per nwmnj For oeiafe nth tne t»» on 

the coupon. 

MANAGERS 

OwenhefiM h»sr .Vtanatsment Lftixea. MtrcarVA* nc-use. M Camon 
Sheet. London EC JNfiAE Regtslcredm England No 14M1E-L 

TRUSTEES 

LfewdS Bank Pie. 71 Lorntrad. London EC3P 3ES. 



THE OPPENHEIMER INTERNATKMiAL GROWTH TRUST 


Tcr.MaiSeirtg Depart ment Dooctmeffttei Trust Management Ltd. 
Metcjititie House. Gernpn Sheet. Umaan EC-N ^ae. 


10 years £10^36 


tWe »Htfi to W tor unis n me Opoefinerar inter national Growm Trust 
at me otter pree on recast of tns apptc a p pn . ite a (Hk. tNese umis i-.ere 

prcea at 157 3 oence ««tti an armcpaiea gross wed ol 03& 1 '.' et 20 1186.1 

•l.'Vte enefcise a cneeue for We sum of ( j ummimb £ 1000 ' 

payiJte 10 •OcMwem'W tryx MaMfiament Lumtec.' 

*^b.i4c OoL-rp avluyrp apgrpp .«<_■ 

Regiaiaon octas .please use bloo. capitals. 



Sunams-s ,JWr.-Mis-Vtes>_ 


Pncwm'ainiuti. 


Ittllte cut: Oljdrt aai*UlJ0nt.at' must j^ncna*vepar die 
utwr erf turn 


■SOCHCE'PLA.vr(EDWuFNGS.wrfieiArtofiertotWiimr.neincWTieiemvestediP 

1 st NovemBef 1386' 


Phrase uck e jou »sn :o it-cenc mto (tiotmatan on 
TheOooerttertier WetiwuonaiGiciniittusl O 
TheOppenhentet Monthly Saimfis too i« [~1 

tnuBii car cart, c-imr tNi -rvy*. r 0 >oio 



OpprabridHT 

Fund Maragerec: u a 




'8 as? »el fi i&s5 u > 













TTfF TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 



A not returrf of over 125% to original investors, since launch* 


The Fund was created to enable investors to participate in the fast expanding European equity 
markets with the identification of “Special Situations" as the guiding investment principle. 

We are delighted to be able to report that the net return to original investors, since launch 
on 19th April 1985, has folly justified the optimism we then expressed. 


STOCK SELECTION 


THE NEXT ADVANCE 


The Fund looks to provide investors with an 
opportunity to benefit from the growth in 
European markets and the potential to 
substantially outperform them. 

■I ‘Special Situations': The fund manager 
selects companies for the portfolio 
where exceptional circumstances suggest 
that the share price is too low relative to 
the market. 

■ Undervalued Stockmarkets: Invest- 
ments will also be made in particular stock- 
markets when theyappear to be undervalued 
compared to other markets or when share 
prices in general do not appear to reflect 
potential growth in earnings. 


After a dull start this year, European 
economies are now strengthening. The outlook 
for 1987 suggests a continuation of firm 
domestically- Jed growth. Wearenow banning 
to witness the beneficial effects of foiling oU 
prices, lower interest rates and negligible 
inflation on consumer spending. Companies 
are increasing their capital to finance future 
growth and domestic cash flow is rising sharply 
in response to the increasing popularity of 
equity investment. Target European Special 
Situations Fund is ideally positioned to 
take advantage of these developments. 

Please remember unit prices can go down 
as well as up. Your investment should be 
considered long term. 


THE SEARCH FDR’EEliFORMANCE 


HOW TO INVEST 


Last year proved to be a time when the 
greatest increases in share values occurred 
in some of the best known stocks. As Euro- 
pean markets were ‘discovered'’ by fund 
managers the world over, it was frequently the 
household names which attracted the most 
interest 

However, we believe that for the remainder 
of 1986, it could be medium sized under- 
researched companies able 
to demonstrate the strongest rwi a yw^Tpy-yi 
performance, as professional j[ /\ |\1 ¥l~X 1 


investors begin to appreciate T . pr.PT ip pi r 
the modest valuation of hAKOhl UKUU F HLL 


To invest in Target European Special 
Situations Fund, please complete the appli- 
cation form below and post it together with 
your cheque to the freepost address or phone 
our dealers on Aylesbury (0296") 394000. 

Fbr your guidance, the offer price of unite 
on 10th November 1986 was 119.9p, with ah 
estimated gross annual yield of 0.68%. 

If you retain the services of a profes- 
sional adviser, we suggest 

v-w-i that you contact him 

< I ■ ■ i/ immediately regarding this 

iJkz offer. 


these stocks in comparison 
to their growth potential 


OMIT Til 


■ Sourc* OPAL sUUsUcs. AU figures quoted 
are nlTer 10 bid. iwt income reinvested, in 
lOih November LOSS. 




C ENEEAL LNFOEStVnON 

The mbuou taldsl lammcnt In Target European Special 
si m . rlne . Fond M iSOO. Sctu m wi IniWMiUBiftf Mdf ifilW 
or amv. Halt* dealt ite pncw aatf /i«W !■ fwMiebfd <UUr 


TmTusKTrui Manager* Limited, FBBEP 06 T, London BC 4 B 4 EH j 


AvpUeadaaa trill be acfcnawMged. A contract note wfllbr 
Ucpitctcil op rwripl of joor nppllcmacti ml a certificate far the nnlu 
jon bcM trill be leased aiottnd 42 Ooja after ibe» om pnidwwd. Unin 
m be hU bra± te tfar RUwffen at ■ price m* than U» Md price 
rakaUHdta accordance iriUidaFertMaier trad* rrgnladaoeaad a 
rbatw trill be despatched "tlhln 10 tmr» ** receipt o* tinned 
certUtcaie. 

An Mdalebar«v arm la iBriadtd la Ite offer price aTaalu 
(ihllaa Deed aDotta ffar U9S) Reaaeeradoa a paid to qualified 
Jmrnordiarirt front this rhargt- BnlraaraiJeMcoppB resow. Ad 
aaaoal charge off 140 (pi as V ATJ aa a valor of ter fODd la ded Dried Ires 
tbe FowT» form laeacae. (Tbe Tnui deed allow. for I .SOS). The Fuad 
acrwaalattoa dal* to M Maj aad oallfaaUen al that dair ramie tbeir 
incme uk ararber and manager*' report db tatJaly. PI we note that 
fa of fa nail union il ia Uv offer price of salts. M dUMmtri. 

Tr u ce . Kldlaad Beak Trust Company Limited Andium; 

I ~ il ”|— ■ ■- ** it ■■ ] 

tents te r ed Is England No. H4754G U Tkritel Haase. GatebixMe Hoad. 
Aylrsbory. Backs KPI93EB. 


SWeteshitvinw*. S u,TSr K «Eampeai 1 

____J Special Motions Rind 

l minimum SSOOIal ih«* price rating on receipt of ths application. 

make your chequr payable lo Target Trust Managers Limited. 

TT/22/17 


Mt pnifevotmal adv»T i*_ 


Pleasesend details of how lo exchange shares, (or unit trusts 


nrnw I 
j I tick | 


■ TiuiM Trust Managers Limited: a member nf the Unit Trust Asaotiaikm. • 




THERE’S ONE 














If you think you’ll get your fingers burnt. Gateway have some 
soothing alternatives. 

Star 60 offers 9.00% net* p.a. (equal to 12.68% gross to basic 
rate income tax payers) for a minimum investment of just £500. 

You can withdraw your money on demand and only lose 60 days’ 
interest on the amount you take out. With 60 days' notice you lose no 
interest at all. 

The Gold Star account pays a healthy rate of interest rising to 

8.75% net* p.a. for investments of £10,000 or ■ 

more. With a minimum investment of £1 you 
have instant access, with no penalties. 

And, if you do get burnt, we’ll always 
be there with a simple remedy. 


BUILDING SOCIETY 


Ftmjsmdv rifV "Ba»: LXeircifTeu* oad 


SAVING MADE SIMPLE 


Gateway Building Society. Durrington Lane. Worthing, West Sussex. BN13 20H. 


FAMILY MONEY/3 




A broader view 




In its annual report, American Express 
announces its ambition: To be the world 
leader in financial and travel services.* How 
will that be achieved here? John Roberts 
explains in his second article on the 
changing role of financial institutions 


From his office on the 22nd 
floor of a central London 
office block, the chief general 
manager , John Stuart, has a 
commanding view, overlook- 
ing. for instance, the private 
gardens of Buckingham Pal- 
ace. But his vision of how 
American Express will partici- 
pate in the r-hartg*-< now 
sweeping Britain's financial 
services seems limited. 

Opportunity Is not lacking. 
Nor could you accuse Ameri- 
can Express of being inflexible 
and too set in its ways. Indeed, 
criticism of the company on 
the other tide of the Atlantic 
has been largely that the group 
has too frequently changed its 
mind. 

Of the decision, to seO an 
interest in cable systems, the 


Insurance offers 
with statements 


report fbr the last full financial 
year admitted: “Using 20/20 
hindsight, it was probably a 
mistake for us to invest in 
cable systems. Their potential 
as a distribution system for 
financial and travel services 
never panned out" 

The company also sold 59 


per cent of the property- 
liability insurance group. 


liability insurance group, 
Fireman's Fund. 

Americas Express card 
holders will be familiar with 
the efforts to sell them insur- 
ance with shoals of promo- 
tional literature — unkindly 
known by some as “junk 
maiT — accompanying their 
monthly statements. 

Though these leaflets extol 
the policies from various com- 
panies as very favourable 
opportunities available to 
card members, the rates 
quoted are no different from 
those quoted generally by the 
same companies for the same 
policies. My own monitoring 
over a number of years has 
shown that never did the 
policy offered represent the 
best value. Exactly the same 
cover was to be had at lower 
premium rates elsewhere. 

Mr Stuart did not dispute 
this, but said: “We are con- 
cerned to market reliable 
insurance products, so we do 
not take risks on the provider 
tide.” 

I pointed out that the 
comparisons I had made were 
with companies of standing 


whose balance-sheet ratios 
were every bit as strong. 

He told me: “When we 
package up an offer we talk to 
the supplier so that we are 
offering something we know is 
suitable to the needs of our 
card members as a group. But 
products can become 
commodities. 

“Competitors can design 
the same product and then 
choose to undercut on price 
We are doing it on a very 
selective scale to a particular 
small section of the popula- 
tion, so we are not in die 
economics of mass marketing. 
We are not on the marginal 
pricing end of the business. 

“It may be in our interest to 
move into tbe provision of 
insurance.” 

There, American Express is 
being forced into a derision. 
While admitting the scope for 
it, Mr Stuart has no immedi- 
ate plans to deal in shares 
through those travel agency 
outlets in prune shopping 
centres and only “might” 
promote mutual funds to 
some card-holders. “We have 
introduced some gold card 
holders to Shearson Lehman,” 
he said. 

The Financial Services Act 
will require the group either to 
sell the policies of a single 
insurance company, declaring 



••= v* 1 . 






» kl'‘ ; x ;*:* i- 

* : •< 

W .#t : 

**f*it, 

$!:■:.* N.V , 


v:' : ,v- r: 



'-'t >•*-.»• 
it. 


Growing concern: the London 
office Mock where American 
Express is based. Thinking 
positive: John Shout, right 


Card-holders could 
double in a few years 


itself tied to that, or to be a 
broker, in which case it might 
use proper efforts to give best 
advice regardless of whether it 
has signed up a deal with the 
particular company. 

Moreover, its advice would 
need to be directed to every 
individual's circumstances, 
rather than those of card- 
holders as a class 

It is likely either to buy an 
insurance company or to set 
up its own, perhaps as a 
subsidiary of the insurance 
business in the United States. 

Mr Stuart is much more 
positive about how American 
Express will be pursuing more 
UK customers not only in 
terms of increasing the num- 
ber of us holding the green and 
gold cards but in various 
forms of lending. And here 
Am ex is highly competitive. 

Already a million-strong, 
the green card-holding 
population could double in 


the next few y$ars as Ameri- 
can Express for the past . two 
years has moved down-mar- 
ket to swell the numbers both 
of holders and of outlets 
accepting the green card. 

Originally, in 1963, the 
company was represented as 
the prerogative of tbe senior 
executive engaged in inter- 
national business, but it is 
now being more heavily pro- 
moted for personal speeding 
by younger people on their 
way up in the world — the 
“yuppies”. 

At the same time, instead of 
being confined, for instance, 
to the more expensive haute 
cuisine restaurants, it is now 
accepted, for instance, al Little 
Cheft, which are more noted 
as catering for families and 
commercial travellers titan 
gourmets. 

Mr Stuart sai± “The lend- 
ing side is our main develop- 
ment area. We have die most 
credit-worthy customers in 
the country." 

A natural evolution from 
the use of a charge (not credit) 
card for travel was to offer 
instalment loans for holidays. 
From there it is blossoming 
ont carefully into mortgages. 

And whereas it is not a 
credit card — tile account sent 
every month must be settled 
in full — the gold card now 
includes the automatic right to' 


... * 

r 

t;.*- - v 

* * 


s ms'-.fzzrr-'.w- 








an overdraft of at feast 
£10,000 at Lloyds and some 
other banks. More can be ar- 
ranged according to individ- 
ual circumstances and the 
interest rate is set at 2.5 per 
cent above tbe bank's base 
rate, tbe attractiveness of 
which will depend on the gate 
of your relations and negotiat- 
ing ability with your existing 
hanlr manager. 

Furthermore, for all card- 
holders the autonomous fel- 
low subsidiary, American 
Express Bank, now offers an 
unsecured overdraft of be- 
tween £1,000 and £5,000 on 
completion of a simple form 
and without the need for. an 
interview. The charge is 
equivalent to a 19.5 annual 
percentage rate, which is 
about 7 per cent below what 
you would pay to get similar 
amounts of money from Ac- 
cess or Bardaycard. 


& 


i 


TUI 



;T » 

i‘. % : 


“All you need , to be an investment genius, 
is a rising market and a short memory” 


At times like these, you might prefer to have your 
investments managed by a team of seasoned professionals 


who have seen it all before. 


If this is how you feel, you ought to be using 
. The Master Portfolio Service. 


This is a unique arrangement run by sensible people 
who are at least as concerned about not losing money for 
clients as making it, and can demonstrate the success 
of this philosophy. 


is * < i ■ i ^ 


For full details, telephone or write to Nicolas Bowater. 
The minimum investment is £50,000. 






CAPEL-CURE MYERS 

Members of the Stock Exchange 
01-248 8446 or 0800 400 495 (Evenings and Weekends) 
65 Hoi born Viaduct, 

London EClA 2EU and Edinburgh • 

Telex: 886653 PROCUR G 


Member of the ANZ Group 


• r- -• - 

-p ■px'p 

% vij 








r : ^ 
4. ; i 











v-r'"-';- 


■ ■ — - - - 



THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 





• . •< 

'Wr, 
'''&*! :\ . . 


:^7 r “ 
■■■ «- 't 


*V£ •, ■„ 

' *• >4 ~ V 

b.y. 



-s •< 


• ' . ■ <Vvi- 'r^. 

" . ..> ^ 

-• > ££•«> •« : • u’» / v<7 



lifft , 


,r *r 

•f ? . jj-.-.. 

f <1l .: 


v<*7 *>*S* 

- •• ••• v- r " ‘ 



INSIDER TRADING 


THE INSIDE STORY 


Ivan Boesky, fined $100 million for 
crooked stock trading: now the 
shock-waves are reaching the City. 




FROM NO-HOPERS 
TO SUPERMEN: 

ENGLAND'S 

CRICKETING 

TRANSFORMATION 


How to beat the AU-Blaeks: 
out-macho them 


W ■> 
■M 
l?>&> 

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THE SUNDAY TIMES 


NEWS IN 



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5 SECTIONS . 108 PAGES . A COLOUR MAGAZINE . ALL FOR 50p 





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34 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


“The 25 ‘Penny’ ^ 
Shares most likely 
to double in 19871 

The Penny Share Guide is now into its ninthyearof continuous 
publication and of course devotes all of its day and all of its 
research to the study of 'penny shares' - which to buy. when to 
leave alone and which just could be the next Polly Peck. 
Peatland Industries or Parkfield, all of which started life off 
as 'penny 1 shares before rising by quite literally many thous- 
ands of percent. What you may not know is that yon would 
have read aixnit these shares first and only in The Penny Share 
Guide whilst they were still 'penny* shares. 

You must remember, of course, that ‘penny* shares are not 

a place for your emergency savings, but that said, there is no 

doubt that the well -advised private investor can get far more 
mileage for his money in the “penny' share sector of the 
market. For our part we have put a lot of time and effort into 
our selection of the 25 ‘Penny* Shares most likely to double hi 
1987 and who knows, the next Polly Peck could well be there. If 
you would like to see what could well be a study of major im- 
portance for the rest of this bull market, pi ease send off for free 
details TODAY. Mmbertflhr Barium Crimp pit 


to Faun Share Guide Ltd.. 3 Fleet Street, London EC4Y LAU 

Name. * 

Address 


Post Code. 


Td. 


.sx*yiij 


HIGHER 
INTEREST RATES 


S-M£= |3Hg aim 


90 DAT SHARE 


Ifintnum fanranxta <500 


mb KSs 13-4M 


3 YEAR SHARE 


Unmum bniesanea *500 


1*0*- ITUs 0-7I& 


y—,— M ■■--IBM. mfctfV— jrlaratHCradlfcilmMMAcniiw MnMm««uWUr 
'Gran »!•» loo RMt £>ntMrlorImnanc«l)vTnr>l«a 

Head OOcfc 176 to nln n Ho ld. Morth Bad. rw I u aotahP029Dl. 

Tekpiunt (07051 693311. 

5>rtsmouth Building Society 

Ann oam wd u&i goo ODD 

Hi iB«« ^mjgBBjgg!8wysga»WBguw 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


How the gold bugs were bitten 


It has not been a good 
week for gold bogs? those 
fans of the mystic 
metal who have been 
telling us that a new 
bull market Is here 
to stay, reports 
RICHARD LANDER 

After some years of silence, 
the bugs finally began to be 
heard again in mid-year as the 
gold price started to move up 
swiftly from the $350 an 
ounce level. Various reasons 
were cited as gold broke 
through the $400 barrier to 
touch $440 in early October. 

They included a huge in- 
crease in demand from Japan 
for the Emperor Hirohito 
co mm emorative coin; worries 
over a resurgence in inflation; 
apparent cricks in the long- 
running bull phase on the 
world's equity markets; and 
renewed fears over the ability 
of the Third World’s debtors 
to repay their loans. 

No one ever accused a gold 
bug of running out of 
arguments! 

On top of this came South 
Africa's well publicized politi- 
cal turmoil by far the West's 
largest source of gold. The 
reasoning went that the South 
Africans might retaliate to 
sanctions by cutting off sup- 
plies of platinum, which 


contributes far less than gold 
to the Pretoria coffers bat over 
which the country has a far 
greater supply stranglehold. 

Platinum prices, therefore, 
soared above $600, draughts 
gold in their wake, and ironi- 
cally for proponents of sanc- 
tions, giving a mock-needed 
boost to South Africa’s 
economy. 

But since October, precious 
metals prices have started to 
slip bade, and this week saw 
gold slide below $400 and 
platinum below $500. Once 
again, the two metals had 
shown their ability to make 
monkeys out of incautious 
investors, particularly those 
who leave it late to jump on 
bandwagons. 

There are still plenty of 
people around ruing the day 
they bought krugerrands when 
gold hit a record $850 in 1980. 

Keith Smith, managing 
director of Moccatta & 
Gokiamd, one of the large 
London bullion trading 
houses, says the market has 
simply ran out ' of steam 
because the flow of good news 
— such as the purchases by 
Japan — has dried up. 

“Gold was back in fashion 
for a while, but now people are 
slightly bored,” he said. “The 
South African problems are 
getting no real pobtidty and it 
now seems apparent there will 


be no disruption to platinum 


“ft doesn't seem that any- 
thing tragic is going to 
happen.” 

Mr Smith is forecasting a 
fairly dull period forgold with 
little price movement either 
way. 

“It should daw back over 
$400 but I can't see it getting 
to $450 ” he said. “The week 
before last we saw good selling 
at $410 and I would have 
thought it unlikely that selling 
programme had been 
completed."But, as he admits, 
the gold market can be full of 
surprises, and tbe metal reacts 
as much to investors’ emo- 
tions as to the more fun- 
damental factors of supply 
and demand. On both semes, 
believes David Williamson, of 

‘Demand good, the 
omens look good 9 

metal traders Shearson Leh- 
man Brothers, gold still has a 
long way to go. He is sticking 
by his mid-year prediction 
that the current market phase 
will take gold up to $500. 

“Demand has been good, 
especially for the new Ameri- 
can ‘Eagle* coins, and al- 
though there is talk of 
increased Soviet supplies. I 


don’t think they'll want to 
break the market,” he said. 

As for the more intangible 
factors in the gold equation, 
Mr Williamson said the 
omens also look good, potnt- 
ingto the Ivan Boesky msider 

trading scandal which gave the 

NewYoik and London stock 
markets the jitters this week. 

He said: “There seems to be 
enough disappointing /news 
c oming in the financial mar- 
kets to make people look at 
the alternative haven which is 
gold.” . ^ 

A common explanation tor 
the recent downward trend in 
gold among investment advis- 
ers is that gold had risen loo 
far, too fast, and was due for a 
correction- 

The size of the drop has 
surprised some fund man- 
agers. “We thought it would 
hold above $400 and we’re not 
quite sore why it colla p sed ” 
said Peter Bucher, of 
Waveriey Asset Management. 

But he is encouraged by the 
way gold has stayed above the 
$385 “dango* zone” which 
price chart followers consider 
crociaL ... 

“We're still optimistic and 
in the longer term we believe 
the trend is upwards,” he sahL 

Waveriey is unusual in that 
it invests solely in shares of 
Australian gold mining com- 
panies. This meant that the 



fund, started is February 
■1984, spent a long time on the 
wrong ride of the tracks, as the 
Australian dollar tumbled and 
the gold price did nothing/ . 

. In July, the fund received 
one of those double miracles 
that investment managers arc 


started rising and the Austra- 
lian dollar began to recover 
against the pound. The result 
Waveriey’s offer price almost 
doubled from 153p to 29-2p 
by the end of October. 

The consolidation in the 
gold price has had an effect 
since then and the offer price 
is now 28.4p. A sharp drop in 
share prices last Monday was 
too sudden to avoid, es- 
pecially as the markets in 
Australian gold firms, some of 
which are little more than (me 
man and a plot of land, can be 
very difficult to get out of 


quickly when thing s turn soar. 

. Another manager who has 
pat a good deal of his fund’s 
money in Australia is Rupert 
Carne$y T of Henderson 
Ad ministratio n. He points oat 
the shares are better value 
than North American produc- 
ers and are devoid of the 
political risk of the Sooth 
African mines. 

Another plus point is that a 
much-mooted Australian gold 
lax now seems likely to be 
dropped or introduced in a 
diluted form. - 
_ Mr Caracgy also remains 
optimistic; saying: “I expect 
gold wiB get back to $400 
within a- few weeks and the 
shares should p erf o rm well 
when the price has dearly 
bottomed out There is quite a 
lot of money waiting on the 
sidelines to go into both the 
metal and the shares.” 



Top crop, but bottom prices 


France's most 
important wine auction of 
the year, the Hospices 
de Beaune in tbe heart of 
Burgundy, showed a 
dramatic drop in prices 
last Sunday. 

CONAL GREGORY 
explains 

The auction was for both red 
and white Burgundies from 
the Cote de Beaune of the 
1986 vintage, which had only 
just completed their second 
fermentation in cask. 

The large crop of good 
quality wine in Burgundy — 
arguably the second most 
important investment wine 
after daret — ensured both a 
larger volume craning under 
Scene of sliding prices: Hotel Dieu at Hospices de Beaune .the hammer but prices not 



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dkrimilar from those of J983 
and 1984. In both those years 
688 and 636 pieces respec- 
tively (tbe traditional Burgun- 
dian volume) were sold at 
auction and only 555 last year. 
Last Sunday 714 pieces were 
auctioned, the largest volume 
since 1973. 

Prices for the red Bur- 
gundies fell 44.65 per cent on 
average and by 27 per cent for 
tbe whites, an average of 41.41 
per cent Although there was 
keen international bidding for 
the Hospices wines, which are 
sold for charity, the prices 
have a persuasive effect on 
both the wine trade and 
auction prices generally for 
this key sector. 

Claude Bouchard, head of 
Bouchard PSre et FBs, owners 
of the largest area under vine 
in Burgundy — 92 hectares or 
more than 226 acres, told me 
before the auction that he 
expected a price reduction. 
His whites are 

For elegance it 
takes some beating 

well balanced and show real 
Chardonnay fruit that prom- 
ises well for six or eight years 
of development. The 
Bouchard red Burgundies had 
good colour and a delicacy in 
the Pinot Noir fruit, such as 
the Pommaid Premier Gru 
and Beaune Marconnets. For 
elegance, his 1986 Beaune 
Graves “Vigne de FEnfant 
Jesus” will lake some beating. 
For firm style, a potential 
auction room favourite, con- 
rider his single vineyard Nuits 
St Georges, Cos St Marc. 

Owing to the extra crop, the 
French authorities have 
permitted an additional per 
cent to be dedared under the 
Appellation Contrdfee status. 
The two exceptions are 
Volnay AC and Volnay 
Santenots AC where the yield 
was reduced through heavy 


hail storms on Jane 16. To 
compensate the latter, the 
“extra” yield permitted has 
been raised to 50 per cent and 
80 per cent respectively. The 
final yield for Bouchard's red 
Burgundies was almost 49 
hectolitres (each of 1 1 dozen 
bottles) per hectare apart from 
red Beaune which was 56.92hl 
per hectare. 

The presale tastings - a 
marathon which attracts 
investors and trade buyers 
from around the world and 
included James Long, buyer 
for ''Grand Metropolitan’s 
International Distillers and 
Vintners — indicated wines for 
relatively early maturity, 
probably within eight years. 
Bidding was similajty inter- 
national, with a distinct pres- 
ence from Japan. There were 
fewer North American buyers, 
largely on account of the value 
of the US dollar, now only 
6.567 French francs, (and 
9.332 FF to sterling). 

Japanese buyers included 
Suntory and Takasymaya. Al- 
though many French houses 
purchase on btihalf of UK 
agencies and diems, there was 
successful bidding from 
Switzerland (one of the major 
buyers of investment Bur- 
gundy), The Netherlands, 
Denmark, West 'Germany, 
Ere, Belgium, the United 
States and Italy. 

Theoretically the final price 
per lot at the Hospices is when 
the candle expires but it is re- 
lit if bidding is still going 
briskly! This tradition was 
mastered by buyers on behalf 
of UK merchants such as 
James McCabe Lt, of Belfast 
(purchasing PommanL Cyrot- 
Chaadronk Patens of Alder- 
mans Dnve, Peterborough 
(purchasing Savigny-les- 
Beaune, Fbmeret), Hilbre 
Wine, of Gibraltar Row, 
Liverpool (Anxey-Duresses, 
BoiDot), and Yorkshire Fine 
Wine, of Nun Monkton, York 
(Corton Charlotte Dumay). 


Tbe Scottish & Newcastle 
subsidiary, Christophers of 
London, was snocessful with 
two lots — a classic white in 
Meursanlt-Charmes de 
Babezre de Lanky and a fine 
red, Corton Charlotte Dumay. 
Hotels such as The Bench 
Horn in Berkshire and 
London's Inn cm the Park also 
secured lots. 

Other British buyers were 
J.W. Lees, of Greengate Brew- 
ery, Manchester (with one of 
the finest reds in the sale, 
Beaune Nicolas Rolin, named 
after the founder of the auc- 
tion), F. and E May, of 
London, and Buckingiara 
Vintners. 

There is keen demand in the 
auction rooms here when 
Hospices wines are resold 

Michael Broadbent, Master 
of Wine at Christie's, reports 
sales in the last year of such 
wines as Nuits St Georges, 
Cuvee St Georges 1969 at 

Coming under 
, the hammer _ 

£140 per dozen bottles and 
Neursault, Genevribres, 
Cuvee G Baudot 1973 at £26 
per magnum. 

' Merchants quoting limited 
stocks of Hospices wines that 
have been shipped include 
Berry Bros and Rudd (3 St 
James’s Street, London SW1A 
1EG) with 1982 Beaune, 
Cuvee Brunet at £11.70 per 
bottle and 1973 Beaune, 
Cuvfie Nicolas Rolin at £28.50 
a fnfl gnnm, both including 
VAT. 

Burgundies come under the 
hammer here next Wednesday 
at tbe Cafe Royal run by 
International Wine Auctions 
(with no buyers’ premium), 
December. 3 at Sotheby’s in 
London, next Friday at Lacy 
Scott’s in Bury St Edmunds 
and on December 4 and 18 at 
Christie's in London. 


BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

The GreshamTrust 


Management Buy-Out 

BES Fund - 

Gresham Trust p Lc, an established 
Business Expansion Scheme FundManager . 
and investor in Management Buy-Outs, 
is now launching an approved investment fund \ . 

under the BBS to concentrate in the field of 

MANAGEMENT BUY-OUTS 


The BBS legislation offers investors income tax 
relief at their highest marginal rates arid the chance of 
igh investment return free qf Capital Gains Tax. 


The particular attractions of Management - 
Buy-Outs undo- the BES are fully set out 111 the 
FUND MEMORANDUM 


Fbr a copy of the Memorandum 
and application form contact 
Gresham Trust by phone, or return 
the coupon below completed or 
with your bumness card attached. 
Participants should recognise that 
investment in unquoted companies 
carries higher risks as well as the 
chance ofmgher rewards. 


Applications to subscribe will be 
accepted only on the terms arid con- 
ditions set out in the Fund Memor- 
andum. The minimum investment is 
£2,000 mid the maximum is £40,000. 
Applications, which - will he 
treated in strict order of 
receipt, most be received by 
19 December 1986. 



^ \ H U i i 8 ^ % 5 £ 1*. Mf 


r 

\ 


Ttt'U j 

Tb: Gresham 'frnstplc. 

i FREEPOST, (No stamp required) London, EC2B 2NA - j 

[ Telephone: 01-606 6474 

1 Please send me a Memorandum inviting 
participation in the Gresham Trust 

Management BirvOut BES Fund Name 

1 

‘ 1 

| Address _ 


1 

1 

1 

Frwt-code 

1 

1 GrashaxMTVustpJjc. is asuhskiiary of Eagle Star Holdings PLC. .* ' 1 

j Gresham Barrington Hoioe GreriwmSo^Lo!M^BC2V7HE. .' | 




UJ 'V&Pj 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/5 





: > r , R5 

:.=S 

•.' v * 


uces 


There is nothing tike a bad 
home-made will for kee ping 
lawyers in dover. People can 
leave money to whom they 
wish, provided, they are saw! 
and not under pressure when 
they do it The problems come 
only with the ambiguity 

Ernest Digweed, a religious 
red use from Portsmouth, had 
no doubts about where his 
money should go when he 
died. He left it all to Jesus 
Christ, to await his return to 
earth. When Mr Digweed died 

challenge!? 0 the will on the 
grounds that the will’s pro- 
visions showed he was insane . 

In feet, he had been in- 
volved in a long and lucid 
correspondence about just 
where the money should be 
. invested until Judgment Day 

— and the courts rejected the 
relations’ application. 

The family then had a 
collective brainwave. Under 
the Statute of Limitations, if 
money is left to a particular 
individual who does not 
appear for 80 years - like an 
unborn grandson, for instance 

— it ultimately reverts to the 
state. 

His family tried to insure 
themselves a gains t the ride of 
the Second Coming occurring 
within 80 years of Mr 
Digweed’s death, but alas, 
even Lloyd’s underwriters 
would not take the business. 

Few wills contain such ex- 
otic provisions, although one 
man recently left his all to the 
Russian government Earlier 
generations of “Diggusteds, 
Tunbridge Wells” may have 
provided their mite to reduce 
the National Debt, but that 
has died out Leaving £50,000 
to scale down die public sector 
borrowing requirement does 
not sound anything like as 
good. 

The law generally protects 
your right to eccentricity. But 
people who have been finan- 
cially dependent on you can 
apply to the courts for 
“reasonable provision” from 
what you have left, if they do 
so within six months of your 
demise. 

Wives and families are the 
obvious claimants but a mis - 


iress or perhaps even a kept 
man might qualify as well, 
provided he or she retted on 
you for financial survival. Kit 
what “seasonable provision” 
means in practice depends 
very much on the details of 
every case. 

It is lack of clarity, not lack 
of provision, which brings 
most wills to court Stati on ers 
usually stock will forms, 
which are fine so long as your 
intentions are dear, but can 
cause problems otherwise. 
The biggest difficulties have 
come from wills which are 
completely home-made. 

Toe phrase‘s to Mother**, 
for instance, led to one classic 
court case. The man who 
left these final instructions 
had known his wife as Mother 
—just as his children did. But 
rt took a court to settle that the 

money should go to her 

More recently, someone left 

The legal formalities 
are quite simple 

a large sum to cancer res e ar ch, 
but he combined the two main 
charities in the field in the 
n am e of a group he laid down 
should receive the money. 
Once again it caused expen- 
sive confusion. 

The legal formalities to 
making a will are relatively 
simple. Once you have com- 
pleted it, you have to sign die 
wil] in front of two witnesses 
who then sign It in turn in each 
other's presence. The simplest- 
mistake people make is to 
allow someone who is to 
benefit from the will to act as a 
witness. 

If that happens, he auto- 
matically loses his right to 
benefit from it, although it 
does not make the rest of the 
will invalid as it did in the 
past 

What is more, yon will need 
an executor who winds up the 
estate, paying off any debts, 
collecting the assets and fi- 
nally getting probate (or the 
legal right to pay out) once any 
tax has been paid, before he 
finally distributes what you 
have left. Soficftois will do it 
and so will banks, although 
with differing degrees of 
efficiency. 

It can be a long and time- 


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(A 

3 

Z 

0 

CO 

lil 

J 

a 

3 

0 

0 

< 

K 

0 

L 


All Investments 
are not created 
equal. 

This one Is elite. 

ft has two bonuses. 

The first is the valuable 
investment bonus on offer. 
The second bonus is that 
your money goes into a fund 
which invests only in 
companies run by the gifted 
elite of the business world. 

People like 

Lord Hanson of Hanson 
Trust; 

Lord Rayner of Marks & 
Spencer; 

Sir John Egan of Jaguar; 
Alan Sugar of Amstrad; 

Sir John Harvey-Jonesof ICL 

Regency Life and their 
investment managers, 
KJeinwort Grieveson 
Investment Management, 
have chosen a core of 
30 people. 

people whose rare skills 
have enabled them to build 
and run highly successful 
companies, with winning 
share performance. 

If you have not received an 
advance announcement of 
this 'Bite* investment ring 
this number now-at no 
charge. 

Well put you in touch with 
one of the specially 
selected advisers handling 
the launch of the Elite Fund. 

the ELITE fund 


a snag 


consuming bore. If you choose 
a friend it is vital to ask him 
before ghang him the job if he 
is not a beneficiary already. It 
is perhaps worth allowing for 
his trouble in what you leave. 
Finally, you should always 
date the will 

If muddle is one threat to 
your intentions, inflation is 
the other. People ofte n make 
wills with what looks like 
generous provisions for their 
amities and then leave a small 
residue elsewhere. 

Inflation gnaws away at the 
value of most legacies and, 30 
years hence, the last in the 
queue may coifed the lion’s 
share of what yon leave. The 
answer is to provide legacies 
in terms of a p rop ortion of the 
estate, and not as fixed lump 
sums. 

The one move which invali- 
dates any win is getting mar- 
ried, unless the wiD was dearly 
in “contemplation of 
marriage”. Without that vital 
clause , your previous single 
person’s win is invalid and 
what yon leave is distributed 
as though you had never made 
a will at aU. 

Divorce win ensure that 
your ex-wife — or husband — 
loses any benefits and is 
treated as though he or she 
had died before you. 

You can always change a 
wiU once you have made it, 
although once again yon will 
need two independent wit- 
nesses to sign the amendation. 
Codicils — the legal version of 



You K wcls mensERs smrsimE 


IT ftUTO HISCIM 


‘A great step forward’ 
for rights of shoppers 


a? 


a PS on a letter— allow you to 
make gifts to extra pepple or 
organizations, without 
disturbing the main lingq of 
what you have decided. 

But mqjor chang es of mind 
need a new win, which should 
state that it is revoking the old 
one — and, above all, be dated 

Incidentally, the estate of 
anyone who dies intestate and 
without any dependants goes 
to the Crown. 

Finally, the people who are 
going to benefit should know 
where the will has been kept, 
when they need to see it. The 
crucial point before making a 
will is to buy a copy of the new 
publication (Wills and 
Probate, £6.9S, from 
bookshops or from the 
Consumers’ Association at PO 
Box 44, Hertford SGI4 1SH). 


It provides a good, rel- 
atively simple guide to the 
whole business. 

How much win solicitors 
charge for drafting a will? It 
depends on bow long it takes 

Tax postponed, not 
tax avoided 

and how complex it is, but 
many outside London treat 
wills as a loss leader and will 
keep charges down to perhaps 
£35 or £40. But it may cost 
£100 or more in London. 

But the will is often only 
part of foe story. Tax may rear 
its ugly head once your estate 
is worth £71,000 or more. 
Inheritance tax does not apply 
to what you leave to your wife, 
or to a charity, bin leaving 


money to your wife may well 
mean that it is not so much a 
tax avoided as a tax post- 
poned. It will be payable on 
her estate when she dies in 
turn. 

You can give away £3,000 
to any one person every year 
without coming into foe tax 
net at ail and make as many 
small gifts of up to £250 as you 
like. After that, generosity and 
survival are two tax-beaters, 
although splitting your estate 
with your wife can also cut 
your family’s eventual tax 
bills dramatically. 

But if you are thinking of 
such measures, you will need 
to get professional advice 
anyway. 

Tom Tickell 


Consumers will no longer have 
to prove a manufacturer's 
negligence when dawning for 
damages for fenlty products, if 
foe Gove r nment has its way. 

Under the Consnmer 
Protection Bill, published this 
week by foe Department of 
Trade and Industry, producers 
will be a aromatically liable for 
ilamag pc mnarf by their duff 
goods. 

But, says the department, it 
has to be dear that foe defect 
in the goods caused foe dam- 
age and this wffl place “a 
heavy but necessary burden of 

proof* on tbe consumer. 

Nevertheless, the BDI has 
been welcomed by the 
Consumers’ Association “as a 
great step forward”. 

The association comments: 
“Suppliers will be respon si ble 
for insuring that foe goods 
they sell are safe.” Hades' foe 
Bill, producers, importers, and 
"own brooders’ are liable for 
damages.” 

Yet the association is wor- 
ried by an exdoskm from the 
BiD which its legal adviser, 
David Tench, describes as 
“absurd” Manufacturers will 
be able to escape liability liar 
“development risks”. 

If it can be proved that at the 
tune of m a nufacture foe state 
of knowledge to pinpoint a 
defect did not exist, then foe 
producer would not be Sable. 

The department says this 
provision was inserted to pro- 
tect product innovators who 
did everything reasonable to 
ensure a new product was safe. 

But Mr Tench counters: 
“Two of foe most innovative 
countries in the world, foe 







David Tench: ' absurd ’ 

United States and France, 
have strict liability laws.” 

The Bin’s scope covers 
death or personal injury or 
damage exceeding £275, with 
no maximum limit on damages 
set- But it also excludes from 
its jurisdiction utilities, other 
than gas, water and electricity, 
primary agricuftaral goods 
and professional liabilities. 

Yet foe BUI will also make ft 
an offence to sell goods which 
do not comply to a general 
safety requirement. 

This replaces the current 
system of regulations for 
particular types of goods, 
thought to be inflexible as new 
products are continually 
appearing. 

Rod Momson 


Should you invest 
in the Commodity Markets? 

After 120 years, our 
advice isyes. But with caution 


Trading m Commodities knot, we hasten to add, 
for every one . 

True, spectacular profits can lx made from 
buying and selling Commodity contracts. 

But one fact remains. Until now, the Commodity 
markets have always been a relatively high risk area. 

So much so that we, as brokers, have always 
been reluctant to recommend the markets to any but 
the most substantial and weB-irfermed investor. 

Instead, since 1866, we have concentrated our 
Commodity broking skills on advising leading 
professional and corporate investors in the City and 
worldwide. 

Tbday, however, the markets have changed. 

.Developments, such as our Private Managed 
Accounts and Traded Options, now give you two new 
ways into the market with die crucial advantage 
that your initial investment can be as low as £5,000. 

Each route into the market creates the scope Jbr 
maximum profit but with levels of protection from 
risk that were unavailable until now. 

Andeachisfittiy backed by the quality of 
broking expertise previously reserved for our major 
corporate clie nts. 

Yet even this is only part of the story. 

Since we began trading over 120 years ago we 
have seen the markets grow dynamically. 

Commodities worth bShons of pounds are now 
traded every day. (The turnover on die Commodity 

markets now for surpasses that ofthe world's major 
stock markets combined). 

The markets are tndygfobal and new oppor- 
tunities have opened up for the private investor. 

The question now is" Which route should you 

take into these rewarding markets?”. 


'Mil V * >/ i 1 UU2 


Our Private Managed Accounts are designed 
specifically for investors who would, feel more 
comfortable knowing that their investments were 
being handled professionally 

At the highest level, your investment wHl be 
controlled by one of our senior Account Managers. 

He, in turn, is supported by the Private Client 
Depa r tm e n t 's experienced Investment Managers. 

Together, they aim to create maximum profit by 
being able to trade in over 50 Commodities 
anywhere m the world. (Needless to say, you will not 
be obBged to take receipt of any actual Commodity). 

Being free to move from rising market to rising 
market means we are able to develop a balanced 
portfolio of inv est ment sfbryou. 

Tb this flexibility we add a second safeguard in 
foe firm tf a two-tier management system. 

Our Account Managers are further supported by 


each ofwhom is a specialist in a particular market 
sector caid each has a well documented track record 
for producing substantial profits aver many years. 

Those prefits often dwarf the returns you are 
probably making from your equity holdings or Unit 
Trusts. 

The Investment Managers monitor the world’s 
markets continually via sophisticated computer 
links. 

They follow price movements on a minute-by- 
minute basis and identify trends as they develop. 

In this way.you not only benefit from their proven 
expertise but can also safety delegate the burden of 
watching the markets that most interest you. 

At the same time, you are spared the time- 
consuming chore of administration and paperwork. 

In its place you wHl receive a monthly statement 
detailing aH transactions made on your behalf 

Full documentation concerning your accounts 
are held at the offices qfRudolfMidff'and you may 
of course inspect them at any time. 


Traded Options are for investors who prefer to 
control their own investments. 

You have the freedom U> make your own trotting 


investment and the balance of your account 

This, linked to die fixed commission rate system 
explained below, means that you win always know 
the full extent of your financial commitment at any 
giventime 


Transaction charges do vary throughout the 
industry and it is vital that you compare rates before 
selecting a broker. 

Unexpectedly large commission charges can 
only eat into your profits or, worse, add to any loss. 

To avoid this we have introduced a fair an d fixed 
commission rate that covers all Traded Options 
transactions. 

It covers not only the purchase but also the 
eventual sale qfthe Option. In this way you know the 
full extent of your commitment before you begin to 
trade. 

For our Private Managed Accounts a second 
system comes into play. All fees and commission 
levels are dearty stated and agreed with you before 
we begin trotting on your behalf. 


Simply return the coupon below or contact the 
Private Client Department on 01-626 8765 and ask 


decisions but always with the advice and expertise of for Paul Fingtand, Director of Private Client 


tiie Private Client Department to guide you. 

Traded Options give you the o ption but never til 
obligation to buy a particular Commodity at 
a fraction of its quoted market price (known as the 
Premium). — 

Thus, the potential for maximum profit 
stays intact but any potential loss is 
totally limited to the Premium paid and is 
determined before vou make each 
transaction. 

Together with you or your financial 
advisers die Private Client Department wUl 
develop a trading strategy tailored precisely 
to your individual investment aims and 
resources. 

Only once a particular trading approach 
has been agreed wiU we begin trading on 
your behalf. 

Our experienced Account Managers will 
constantly reviewyourtradingpositions. They 
win alert you to new opportunities as they 
arise And they wiU, of course, inform you 
of advene market trends as they develop and 
advise you when to move out of one sector 
into another that promises more profit 

As each transaction is made, you 
witt receive a contract note detailing each 


Services, who wUl ensure that you receive full details 
e qfthe range ofbroking services we provide for 

the private investor andhowthe markets can work to 
your advantage. 

The Private Client Department 
of Rudolf mff 

Tb.- Rudolf Wolff de Co Lid, The Private Client Department. 

Freepost, Lortdon EC3B 3LQ. Please send me further information 
on the services provided by the Private Client Department. 

I am particularly interested in (Please tide appropriate boxes): 

n Private Managed Accounts □ Traded Option Accounts 


Address. 


.Postcode. 


Telephone number (at \wr discretion ) . 


A Member of the Association ef Futures Brokers and r-\ -/ fj 
Dealcrsandthe Association for Futures Investment 

SudtdfWdff& Co Ltd. Plantation House. 

31-35 Fendutrch Street, London EC3 MSDX. Telephone 01-626 8765. 



1 


rt SS.3 S.j- 











36 





Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 


The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


For further information and the current prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to: Rubin Fuller. 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242, St. Julian's Court. Sr. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481) 26741 . 

Name 

Address . . 


i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

. i 
. i 


TWF TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/6 


- 25.000 


Maxonom 


How to cash in without huge costs 


How can we take 
money out of our family 
company without 
incurring National 
Insurance 
contributions? 

DANBY BLOCH and 
RAYMOND GODFREY 
offer some advice 

Them am now several ways of 
taking money out of private 
companies without incurring 
National Insurance contribu- 
tions (NICs). The most widely 

used approach is to pay divi- 
dends instead of salary or 
bonuses to shareholder-direc- 
tors — hut it can involve some 
snags. 

The contributions have be- 
come a significant extra bur- 
den on employees’ earnings. 
The employee pays NICs on a 
rising scale up to a maximum 
of £25.65 per week, that is, 
£1,333.80 a year. 

Potential burden 
to the employer 

The employer too pays 
NICs on a sliding s dale 
depending on the level of 
earnings. But where they ex- 
ceed £140 per week, 
employers' NICs are now at 
the level of 10.45 per cent 
without any limit on salary 
level. 

Thus, if you are earning 


£ 10,000 a year, the employer's 
N ICs are £ i .045 and if you are 
earning £100,000, the 
employer’s NICs will be 
£10,450. This is clearly a 
considerable potential burden 
but it really became so only 
when the Chancellor Nigel 
Lawson abolished the ceiling 
on NICs about two years ago. 

The self-employed arc not 
burdened in this way. For 
them, the maximum liability 
is usually £653.31 Class 4 
contributions and £195 Class 
2 contributions. So if you can 
switch some of your earnings 
to a self-employed basis (not 
necessarily an easy task) you 
could gain. 

Another approach is to use 
fringe benefits, for they are 
generally not subject to NICs. 
For instance, you could ar- 
range for the -company to buy 
a holiday for you or you could 
have a company car rather 
than a private one. 

You would not perhaps 
save any tax with these ploys 
(although you might) but you 
could cut the NIC bilL How- 
ever. you should avoid the 
company taking over any 
liabilities you have ahead)' 
incurred — any goods or 
services paid for by the com- 
pany should have been or- 
dered by the company. 

Likewise, you should avoid 
any "unusual pay practices”. 
Quite what that means is open 
to some debate. Probably it 


should be just taken as a 
warning against pushing the 
approach too for. You should 
not take an excessive amount 
of remuneration through 
perks and you should not 
enter into any exotic arrange- 
ments. So fringe benefits have 
their legal as well as practical 
limitations. 

The dividend, however, has 
now become a very attractive 
route for many small com- 
panies to pay their share- 
holder-directors. 

When a company pays a 
dividend to a shareholder, it 
has to pay advance corpora- 
tion tax (ACT) of 29 per cent 
of the gross dividend and to 
pass over the net dividend to 


to the Inland Revenue and a 
net dividend of £7,100 to the 
shareholders. 

The company's corporation 
tax liability on £10,000 is 
£2,900, because profits of up 
to £100,000 are taxed at only 
29 per cent. 

But at the same time, the 
ACT paid by the company 
also acts as a tax credit for the 
shareholder and covers his 
liability to basic rate income 
tax on the gross dividend. So 
the £7,100 will only suffer 
higher rate income tax in his 
hands. There is, if you remem- 
ber, no investment income 
surcharge now. 

So, for a small company, 
paying a dividend to the 


the shareholders. As the name 
suggests, this ACT is normally 
an up-front payment towards 
the company’s corporation tax 
bill for the period. 

For example, if the 
company’s profits are £10,000, 
all of which is to be distributed 
as a dividend, then the com- 
pany will pay ACT of £2.900 


shareholder has. to all intents 
and purposes, the same effect 
as paying a salary. It is 
effectively deductible against 
the company’s profit and it 
involves no extra lax liability 
on the employee. But it saves 
NICs. So where are the snags? 

You need to check that your 
company really does have 


profits of£100.000 or less. The 
excess above £100,000 is taxed 
at 36.5 per cent corporation 
tax. So the company would 
have to pay an extra7.5 per 
cent corporation tax in addi- 
tion to the 29 per cenl ACT to 
the extent the profits exceed 
£100,000. This might still be 
worthwhile in comparison 
with the 10.45 percent NIC— 
but only just. 

The £100,000 limit has to be 
shared between associated 
companies — that is, broadly 
where there is a common 
shareholding of 50 per cent or 
more for every company. So, 
for example, if you owned a 
majority of the shares in every 
one of four companies, the 
£100,000 wnatl company limit 
would be shared equally 
among them, that is, £25,000 
profits each 

There could be another snag 
where the shareholder-direc- 
tor is a married woman. This 
could be a problem because 
the dividend as investment 
income would be added on to 
her husband's income for 
income tax purposes. In con- 
trast, a salary or fee ran be 
taxed separately as ear nin g s . 

Where there are outside 
shareholders (especially if 
there are children) dividends 
might be inconvenient A 
dividend would provide more 
income for such outside 
shareholders than either you. 


or perhaps they, might want 
■ There can be unwelcome 
inheritance tax consequences. 
Bv paying dividends, you 
coukl be boosting the value of 
the shares in the longer term 
for inheritance tax purposes, if, 
you are keen to pass down the 
company to a younger genera- 
tion. However, the value of a 
minority interest in the com- 
pany (less than a 50 per cent 
holding) is likely to be rather 
more greatly affected by divi- 
dend payments than a major- 
ity holding. 

Finally, by reducing your 
salary and director’s fees, you 
are reducing your pensionable 
remuneration. This will limit 
the amount that you can put 
into a pension scheme or 
arrange as life cover under 
your pension scheme. 

Nevertheless, in very many 
instances, paying dividends 
out to small private com- 


The bias against 
earned income 


panies can be highly NIC- 
effective and the tax 
may easily linn 
out to be negligible or non- 
existent The feet is that there 
is sow a bias against earned 
income in favour of invest- 
ment income and it is as wdl 
to take advaiflage of it while it 
lasts. 


INTEREST. 

RATES 

ROUND-UP 


Cunwit account -no interest 
Deposit accounts - seven 
notrea required tor wtfxfc- — 
Barclays 5 per cent. Lkwds 5 per 
cent Mkfland 5 per cent. NaWtest 5 
per cent National Girobank f per 
cent Fixed term deposits £10.000 
to £24599:1 month 7J75 per cant 

3 months 7525 per cent o months 
7525 per cent (National Westmin- 
ster* 1 month 7.475 per cent 3 
months 7.475 per cent 5 mantes 
7.475 per cent (Mdtend). Other 
banks may differ. 

MONEY FUNDS 

Fox* Net OMR Tataphooe 

Attanftm* 

oontNyfnc. 7.68 7.9* 0163800TO 
BotScottnd 7X8 7.93 016288060 
BadaysHgmrRaM 
dopant Axouft 

eTS?&9» 7.X3 7J2 OT 808 158? 

naooo&owr 7.63 7.S6 016261567 

Carer Men cal 756 753 0158SZ777 
Otter* 

UMWlfttn* 7X0 7.55 01 581 1422 

KCTkust?4qr aao an m 29683n 

HudamMotM* 

Marie* 

Account 7.08 7.93 


Return tax-tree end faked to 
changes in tee RataQ Prices' Max. 
Supplement of &00 per cent in the 
first wear. 3 25 per cent in tee 
second. 3S0 per cent si tee third. 
AJSO per cent m tee fourth end 500 
-per cent in tee fifth. Valve of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased m Nowmber 1981, £146.66 


■ 388.4 . (This new RPf 
figure is not announced until the 
tfird week of Vm toBortog monte). 
National SnfaQs Certificate 
32nd issue. Return totally free of 
income end capital gate tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual Hemet rate over 
the fiveyaar term of &75per cent 
maximum investment £5.000. 
General e xte n si on rate for holders 
of ear tier issues which have 
reached rnterfty h 8J0 per cent 

ttetimf Serfage Nearly Han 
A one-year regular savings ptan 
cornering Mo four-wear savings 
certificates. MMrnem £20 a month, 
m axim u m E201L Return over five 
&B4 per carrt, tax-free. 

- " accepted from 


lHUitatDap.7.85 100 
fthUGA 7 JO 753 


758 753 


Own 

LtGli 

UU3HICA 
MUnrfHXM 
ggJOmMB 745 756 
£10500 and omt 7 JO 753 
NteWttttflgh 
HSpecRetena 
sjffiws^is 753 755 
£10000 & Over 7JS 758 
Money 
Account 

_ [(moo am 751 

_ __-£1O000 7.10 7.19 

RqpiBofScoftnd , 
ftwafcm Account 7J5 758 
S&PQd 750 7J8 
Schroder Warn 
E2500 to £3599 651 7.13 
om £10500 7.10 75* 

ww - a a 

7J8 759 
7-day 753 755 
7 -d» 757 7J9 

tan Trust 
1 month 


018389757 
013883211 
01 628 1500 
Ol 8204608 

074220099 

074220999 


017231000 
01 72S10OQ 


§**8382 through stockbroker or 


01 

01 2389382 


0316570201 
□7081 


Nation* Savings Deport Bond 

hSrvmm inv estme nt £100, maxi- 
mum £100.000. i n terest 11.25 per 
cent variable u six weeks 1 notice 
crofted annuatiy without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three months' 
notice. Haft in te re st only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Local Authority Yeerfing Bonds 
12 months fixed rate inv estments 
interest lifts pet cent basic rate tax 
deduct ed at sown (can be re- 
claimed by non-taxpayer), minimum 
investment £1,000, purchased 


0705927738 
0795827733 
01 238 08® 
012360352 
0272732241 
027 27322*1 1 

mmamd 


I I fl fM iM WTTT'In 

Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
higher rate tax p ayer s may have a 
further BaURy on maturity. 1,2 & 
3yrs General Portfolio 9-1 per cent; 


756 753 5752281181 

CNAR -Canpondad NttAonod Rata, 
is «s the taast bvkMMb st ta flms of 
: to press. 

Deborah Bam 

National Ca rin gs Bade 
Ondteary Accounts - if a minimum 
balance of £100 maMeteed for 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent interest 
P5- for each compfetB monte where 
Balance is over £500, otherwise 3 
per. cent Investment Accounts — 

11.75 per cent Interest paid without 
deduction of tax. one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100,000. 

National Savings Income Band 
Minimum investment £2000, maxi- 
mum £100,000. In terest 11 .25 per tv nv 1-2 per- 
cent variable at six weeks' notice share rate. Rata 
paid monthly without deduction of 
lax Repayment «3 months’ notice. 

Penalties m first year. 

National Sav in gs toJ em d tacone 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income for first 
year, 8 per cent , Increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices 
Index Cash value remains the 
same, income taxable, . 

Three months' notice of i 

Minimum inve stme nt of £5,000 in 
multiples of £1,000. Maximum 
£100,000. 

National Savings 4tli tadex-Unked 
Ce rti fi cates 


finahce/Credft 
percent. 

Local stetantty town brt bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rale investments, 
Merest quoted net (basic rate tax 
deducted at source norweeiten- 
able) lyr Leicester 7.48 per ceflXS- 
4yre Kndeea 838 per cent, mta tar 
£500; 5-7yre Hereford fi Worcester 
7.75 per cent Iran <rw £1,000; 8yra 
Vale of Glam orga n 6.13 per cant; 
mmbw£500;9&10yrs621 percent, 
min tnv £1,000 

Further derate available from Char- 
tered Institute of Pub8c Finance & 
Accountancy. Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am aid 230pm) 
see aboPrestei no 24806. 

OnSnary share accounts - 630 per 
cent Extra Merest accounts usuat- 
1-2 per cent ova orefinery 
rate. Rtees quoted above are 
those most commonly ofteied.lnr»- 
vidua) buftfing societies may quete 
different rates. Interest on al ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax 
Not rectaknable by non-taxpayers. 

Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by RothscftSrfs OH 
Coot international Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no chogB 
Is mada for switching currencies. 
Starting loci percent 

USdolar- 551 per cert 

Yen 350 per cent 

OMaric 354 per pent 

French Rwjc 6J5 per cent 

Swiss Franc i J7 per cant' 


Sad to say, much of Europe has 
become renowned for its stockpiles. 

Now though, something rather 
more agreeable is on offer. 

A pile of money. 

Getting your hands on a stake is 
simple, just invest in our Continental 
Europe Growth Unit Trust. 

It’s the latest in a successful line of 
Lloyds Bank Unit Trusts investing at 
home and abroad. 

Take our German and Japan 
Growth Unit Trusts, for example. 

Launched last year, by 28 October, 
1986, they had enjoyed capital growth 
of 49 2% and 50.0% respectively. (Thar’s 
on an offer to bid price basis with net 
income re-invested.) 

While short term performance is 
not necessarily any guide to long term 
future growth, the outlook for our 
Continental Europe Growth Unit 
Trust is equally as bright. 

The French, Italian and Swedish 
economies have all performed impress- 
ively this year. Our portfolio aims to 
include equity investments in the com- 
panies of these and other continental 
European countries, as appropriate. 

Naturally, therefore, it will also 
include some of the world's most 


successful companies. BMW Nestle. 
Heineken. Pernod. Volvo. Olivetti. 
Household names, one and alL 

The price of units, and the income 
from them, may go down as well as up. 

But we see every reason to 
be optimistic. 

Customers and non-customers 
alike can purchase units by filling in 
the form on the right. (Until 
5 December, the initial offer price will 
be 50p per unit.) 

Alternatively, call in at any Lloyds 
Bank branch. Who knows, before long 
you could be moving mountains. 

Of money, naturally. 

general information 

The Tmsr Deed allows up ro 25<c of the Fund to be imested in 
the Second Marche of the Paris Bourse. The Managers may a!«* 
wish to invest on any other Continental European second-tier 
market as may be authorised by the Department of Trade and 
Industry from rime to time. The Managers have die right to rime 
char buying and selling of currency to cake maximum advantage 
of foreign exchange markets. They will use currency loans and any 
mans which may be authorised by the Department of Trade and 
Industry to hedge the currency nsk if such action is considered de- 
sirable. The Managers may deal in authorised traded option mar- 
kets should these become available in Continental European secur- 
ities. 

Based upon the initial offer pnee of 50p. the estimated gross 
starring yield will be under IQ per annum. (After i December 
1986 unin may be bought ar die offer price then prevailing.) The 
Continental Europe Growth Unir Trust is a specialist unit oust 
and the performance is likely to be more volatile dun a more 
broadly based fund. You should bear this in mind when deciding 
what proportion of your investments should go into the crust. 

The price of units and die income from them can go down as 
wellasup. 

Contract notes will not be issued for the initial offer. Certifi- 
cates will be despatched at unit holders risk normally within six 
weeks of receipt of your cheque. 

We offer investors Accumulation Umrs where net income 
is automatically ir-imestrd. or Income Units where- income is 
distributed annually on 20 December (or slightly earlier). The 


first income distribution wfll be on 16 December 1987. 

CHARGES 

The offer price includes an initial-charge of 155. The annual 
charge is 1%- (pus VAT) of die value of the oust, which is deducted 
from the deposited property. 

(The Trust Deed provides chat the annual charge may be 
increased to a maximum of 3% by giving nor less dun 3 months 
nonce to unitholders.) The Managers retain the small rounding 
adjustments. The Managers pay remuneration to qualified inter- 
mediaries. Rates available on request. 

Unir prices and yields arc published daily in leading national 
newspapas. Units can be sold back to the Managers at notless than 
the minimum bid price ruling on receipt of your instructions 
calculated to a formula approved by the Department of Trade and 
Industry. Cheques are normally forwarded within 7 days of reed pc 
of renounced certi fi ca tes . 

. Managers Lloyds Bank Unit Trust Managers Ltd. (a member 
of the Unit Trust Association). Beg. Office: 71 Lombard Street, 
London EC3P 3BS. Registered in Er^jland No. 883670. Ti 
Alliance Assurance Co. LaL 

To. Lloyds Bank Unir Trust Managers limited. FREEPOST. 

Gori ng-by-Sea, West Susser BN/24BR. 

^ 1/We wish to invest in units of the Continen- 
tal Europe Growth Unit Trust ar SOp per unit 
and enclose a remittance payable to Lloyds 
| Bank Unir Trust Managers Ltd. 


Until i December 1966 your investment will bear JOp per unit, 
thereafter units may be bought at the offer price then prevaiP" 
ing. The minimum initial investment is £JDQ. Additional unit 
purchases must be for not less than £100. 

Accumulation Units, with income ir- invested, will normally 
be issued. If you prefer Income Units, with income distributed 
annually, please rick hetc-'P 

1/ Wc declare that 1 am/we are over 16 years old. Date of Birth if 

aged between 16 and 18 (Joint applicants must sign 

and azxach name and addresses separately.) 


Signatures)- 


-Date. 


Mr/Mes/Miss/Titlc/ Forenames. 


BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE 


Surname- 


Address- 


-Postcode 


l: 


Thu oSfr i * cot auilthk- ro rrudnutof the Rcpublu of licLmd. 


Lloyds 

Bank 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


AM* | 

i 


^NMROTHSCHUD ASSET MANAGEMENT , 


RETIRED? 


WE (JUAMW^^ME 


MAXIMISE YQUR 


How ? 

* By advising which investment gives 
the most income. 

* By reducing your income tax bill. 

* By making your capital grow to 
increase income in the future. 

Knight Williams has specialised for many 
years in identifying income investments 
for retired people. Send for full details. 

KnightWilliams 


Independent Financial Advice 

33 Coik Street, London W1X 1HB 

01-409-0271 
Name. 


Address 


I 

i 
i 
i 

«* «niUMU K UCCUS m 

T la/nmm 


Members of FIMBRA 
Offices in London & Leeds 







-o 


1 


‘V 










PP 
■ 1' :./* 

' ■ •’.*» 


■ "> 




■■■■ 1 1 : 

lever* 

■ '■■•■ *. * 

•. -.--re 



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]\l*» 


FAMILY MONEY/7 


Lessons from a company that raised £lm 

( BES overlap in the . investments that it did notget the sales that which operates its own brew- This means that investor 

its business plan originally 


ti: 


The Business 
Expansion Scheme is not 
a passport to riches for 

investors, even if they do 
get tax relief of tip to 
60 per cent on their 
investments. 
LAWRENCE LEVER 

explains 

The latest salutary warning 
that tax breaks do not guar- 
antee profit comes in the 
managers 1 ’ report on the 
Buckmaster Development 

Fund. 

This fund was launched in 
1984 and raised £1 million, 
which was invested in seven 
companies. It is managed by 
Cremt Suisse Buckmaster & 
Moore, the stockbrokers. 

Halfway through its five- 
war life there are now only 
four companies left — the 

other three being in the course 

of liquidation. 


These companies accounted 
for £483,600 of the original £1 
Bullion. In other words 48 per 
cent of the investments have 
been written ofC 

One of the surviving com- 
panies - in which £76,800 was 
invested — is in HI 
According to the m anages* 
report its survival “depends 
Upon a major i nfi r einn of 
funds but as of this date we are 

‘Working very hard 
for tbe investors’ 

unable to predict whether 
support wifi be fo rthcoming *’ 
Eric Edghill, one of the 
man a ger s of the fund, says be 
is “working very, very hard to 
make something for the 
investors” Mr EdghlB, who 
was not . involved until 18 
months a go, is “optimistic 
that people will get their 
money back ultimately, taking 
into account lax relief'. 
Fortunately there is no 


overlap in the investments 
between this Buckmaster fund 
and a second one launched in 
198S. 

There will not be any more 
Buckmaster BES funds in the 
fbreeeable future. In common 
with some, but by no means 
all, BES fund sponsors, it has 
not found it economic to 
market BES funds. 

The Buckmaster report does 
not contain a statement of 
how much in expenses and 
fees the managers have re-' 
ceived. 

According to Mr Edghfll, 
these are very modest The 
fund took a 5 per cent -front- 
end load fee and 
nothing else to the. fund, 
investee companies pay it 
directors' fees if (hey have a 
Buckmaster director on the 
board. 

The reasons for the failures 
are, Mr Fdghill says, many 
ami various. It seems in the 
case of one of the companies 


Other BE$ funds have suf- 
fered ' liquidations and BES 
investors are warned of the 
dangers of investing in un- 
quoted companies. However, 
to lose dose on half of 
investors' money in two and a 
half years is a sorry record. 

Company aims to 
develop a chain 

Meanwhile, for prospective 
BES investors not deterred by 
the' risks, County Inns, a pub 
venture sponsored by Baltic 
Asset Managem ent, is looking 
for up to ELS ' million. The 
minimum amount it needs to 
get off the ground is £500,000. 

It has already exchanged 
contracts for two premises and 
wants to develop a chain. It 
has dose links with the Wilt- 
shire Brewery Company, 


which operates its own brew- 
ery and recently raised £17 
million itself from a number 
of City institutions. 

Two directors of County 
Inns are directors of WBC, 
which will receive an annual 
management fee of £75.000 as 
well as supplying d rinks to 
County. Philip Keane, from 
Baltic, says of ihe close links 
with WBC: “We actually think 
they are. an advantage to 
County Inns. The company 
will nave an independent 
managing director and other 
independent representatives 
on the board.” He stresses that 
the pubs will not be obliged to 
take only WBC beer. 

The management of County 
Inns, including WBC, is 
putting its money where its 
mouth is with a £243,000 
investment in the company. 
There are options over 27.5 
per cent of the company for 
the managraieat and spon- 
sors, exercisable at a mini- 
mum 75 per cent premium. 


This means that investors 
will retain the benefit of the 
first 75 per cent of uplift in the 
value of their shares before 
suffering any dilution. 

The prospectus gives no 
figures for the trading record 
of the two premises for which 
County Inns has exchanged 
contracts, Mr Keane says lat- 
est annual turnover in one 

Yon most invest 
at least £500 

case was more than £350.000 
and in the other more than 
£300,000. 

He will not say what profits 
they both made, but says he is 
confident County Inns will 
maximize its potential. 

The minimum investment 
you can make is £500. Details 
are available from Baltic Asset 
Management, 25-26 
Albermarfe Street London 
WIX4AD (01-493 9899). 



Commissions could 
fall to end the debate 


One of the still out s ta n ding 
and most controversial aspects 
of the new financial services 
rules - the question of 
commissions yon pay to inter- 
mediaries on life assurance 
and unit trusts — came a step 
closer to being resolved this 
week. 

The Life and Unit Trust 
Regnlatory Organisation 
(LAUTRO) has oottined die 
rates of commission which it 
considers intermediaries 
should charge. 

They do not appear to 
herald a huge reduction in 
commissions. Bnt surrender 
values — the amount a policy is 
worth when rallied in early — 
should increase as a result. 

LAUTRO is proposing to 
limit conmrisskms to 25 per 
cent of the premiums paid. On 
regular pr emiu m policies the 
25 per cent would be charged 
for an initial period followed 
by a fiat rate charge of 2^ per 
cent on all premiums paid tmtH 
the policy matures. 


Insider dealing should 
not panic the outsiders 


( SHARES ) 

“Insider dealing” is the buzz 
phrase in theGty. There are 
now two cases of suspected 
insider dealing under in- 
vestigation by the Department 
of Trade and Industry. 

There is also the case of 
Ivan Boesky, the -flamboyant 
Wall Street financier, who is 
paying a $100 million penalty 
fin- the offence in the United 
States and who had substan- 
tial investments in Britain. 

It is hardly the kind of news 
to inspire confidence in the 
stock market at a time when 
the number of private 
shareholders is rising so rap- 
idly under the influence of the 
Government's privatization 
programme. 

For several reasons, how- 
ever, there is little cause for 
private investors to worry 
unduly. 

Insider dealing — profiting 
from dealing in shares on the 
strength of privileged 
information — is usually open 
only to those involved in the 
financial world. 


The Stock Exchange: no worries from those insider deals 




BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Mam & Company 

BCCI 


Citibank Savings]-. 
ConsoWtied Ms- 
Co-operative Bank. 
C. Hose & Co. 


Hong Kong & Shanghai. 
Lloyds Bank. 


.11.00% 

.11.00% 

. 11 . 00 % 

12.45% 

— 11.00% 
_1U00% 
....11.00% 
—. 11 . 00 % 
_11D0% 


Nal Westnanster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland— 11.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Gtita* NA 11-00* 

f Mortgage Base Rate. 



There is a lot 
of it about 


Ivan Boesky: fined heavily 


The indications are that 
there is a lot of it about Bnt 
most of the time it probably 
affects only specific stocks for 
very short periods of time. 

The typical stamping 
ground for foe insider dealer is 
the take-o ver bid. 

It is amarine how often the 
sh me price of a target com- 
pany rises on the stock market 
just before the bid is 
announced. 

But insider dealing prob- 
ably has no long-term in- 
fluence on share prices, which 
will continue to be determined 
by fundamental investment 


Cut A 

Hole In This 
PaperACu 
Might Make 
A Mint 


In one yeac Prudentials North 
American Trusr has risen 39.>%. the 
best performance in the sectoc Our 
Japanese Trust, an impressive I(K0%. 
And our European Trust, a remarkable 

107.2%: 

Of course, you must remember 
that the price of units arid the 
income from them can go down as 
well as up. 

But it you cut our the coupon, w ell 


send you details of these mists and the 
others in our rangp, the results of 
which were sure you’ll find refreshing, 

| To: Prudential L'rot TruM MaruCtr- Lid,. {Sjj£sT "l 

FREEPOST, niord HilL Mbd.E»«* v, j 
! lQI JDL (No usinp require J.) j 

Hw «nd me mow inkjrmjnon about HolEwm . 
I L’mi Tnws. iym/3 

j Name ] 

| Add IT" --in 


.Pom coii. 


U 


PRUDENTIAL^/ 


j 


‘IfeLwivt i- v- hLp-v i-Mvmhwotihr l'« Ir.ni.to,. 


values such as the company’s 
earnings performance. 

Insider dealers dodge in and 
out of shares. The ordinary 
stock market investor should, 
most of the time, be looking 
for relatively long-term 
investments. 

He or she may want to take 
advantage of temporary blips 
in the share price — however 
inexplicable they are — to buy 
or sell, but they are unlikely to 
make a difference to the long- 
term performance of his 
shares. 

Naturally, no innocent per- 
son likes to be taken advan- 
tage of by those unscrupulous 
enough to miaisp their privi- 
leged position. 

But in the nature of the 
stock market, most insider 
dealers will be trading with 


other professional investors 
rather than private investors, 
who own a relatively small 
proportion of the market. 

The worst that may happen 
is that you sell your shares for 
a smaller profit than you 
might have done if you had 
known what the insider dealer 
who bought than knew. 

Yon can ax least calculate 
exactly what you are making 
on the deal before you do it 

It is not as bad as being sold 
a faulty washing machine by a 
dishonest salesman. And it is 
certainly not as bad as being 
sold dud or fictitious shares by 
those dishonest share sales- 
men who cold-call unwary 
investors from Amsterdam or 
Madrid. 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 





Tt most be the silly season — we’ve had a letter from the In- 
land Revenue congratulating me on my handwriting' 


L1UTRO is suggesting that 
intermediaries can earn a 
maximum of 3 per cent 
commission on sales of unit 
trusts - in line with current 
market practice. 

This will also apply where 
an intermediary switches his 
client from one nnit trust into 
another. 

For stogie-premium bonds 
LAUTRO suggests a 4 per 
cent initial charge followed by 
a charge of 0.5 per cent in the 
following four years, as op- 
posed to the current one-off 
commission payment of 5 pa 
cent. 

Under rales put forward by 
the Securities and Investments 
Board, intermediaries who sell 
life assurance and unit trusts 
of companies which subscribe 
to the LAUTRO agreement 
will not have to disclose to 
investors the amount of 
commission they are earning. 

Instead they will be subject 
only to “soft disclosure" 
requirements, telling investors 
that their commissions are in 
line with the LAUTRO 
agreement. 

Intermediaries will have to 
disdose only the amount of 
commission they are earning 

High value for 
surrender 

where they sell a policy from a 
company which is not party to 
the LAUTRO agreement. 

The practice of spreading 
premiums over the life of 
policies means that, broadly 
speaking, commissions on 
endowment and whole life 
assurance will be slightly 
lower for s tort-term polices 
and higher than currently paid 
on longer term policies. 

Spreading commissions 
over the life of the policy 
should also lead to higher 
surrender values. Commis- 
sions os the short-term self- 
employed policies will be 
considerably red need. 

■ And, in the case of term 
assurance, commissions will 
be margina lly less mi longer 
terms and more for short-term 
policies. 

LL 


TSouf.L Vlnn.1* Un^iTjui "* j 


r.-ir.i ■•id 1 


High And Rising Income FromThe 


Capital Growth 



International Income 


The objective of the new G erica) Medical 
Internationa] Income Trust is to provide a high and 
rising income, plus capital growth, by invesung in 
the worlds leading economies. 

The launch of this trust is timely for the 
serious investor: it provides a cces s to the income 
and growth prospects of markets such as japan, 
Europe, the Far East and the USA and the flexibility 
to reduce emphasis on the UK should political 
uncertainties suggest it. 

A Flexible Portfolio 

The portfolio will consist of equities, bonds 
arid fixed interest securities and may invest in 

approved second tier markets as well as principal 
ones. A wide geographical spread is envisaged but 
the Managers may, if market conditions dictate, 
place emphasis on a single economy. 

Strength In Management 

Clerical Medical Unit Trust Managers Limited 


'■ . y j. t> 

■ c'-.' 


Trust 


is a subsidiary of Clerical Medical and General Life 
Assurance Society, who are active in world financial 
markets, with iota! funds under management now 
exceeding £3,000 million. A reputation for 
consistently successful investment management has 
been built over 162 years and continues to be a 
prime objective today. 

How To Invest 

Units are on offer at a Fixed Price of 25p until 
November 28th with an estimated gross initial yield 
of 5.0%pa. During this period, a Pi> Bonus 
Allocation of units will be given to those investing 
£1,000 or more. 


To invest, return the coupon with your 
cheque, made payable to Clerical Medical Unit Trust 
Managers, or simply telephone your order of units 
on our free Linkline number below. 

Remember that the price of units, and the 
income from them, may go down as well as up. 

You should regard your investment as long 

term. 

f‘. V UAL INI i «PM \T|i »\ 

T'ini f rs.r'. aM VtU.ot; I nn- - TV praei nl uni. xr jMiWijihrJ 2 jiI< mThrliri- . 

tiojTfciJ Tin**- -nJ Tclrpaph. NarU*wvr The Tmn . jrJ h*ur Ml 

TiT»» It itidi'-i -.-II 'for ulklk spppli Miniplrtr rii iniirxririvinih' k *J 

> 'iw Li (ins Jie aid trium if in ihr Vlvuerr Vm n iQ ft %cnr |hi lull Kkl Idht. hh 
Mitt* nfev •« I hr in muf ■ i niftuiir ir*.l>r ih jnd j uiB S 

I'rvji Jtd wifoivni-n mukirf Jjv . .«i mnr» 

• lurpr* - i4 * . •» ■•■itJotMin lb* tlflrt Pixi -ir*hr unit . J|»1 jn 

nn>aili-hifj\ .ii Ul •mjimimhli ■•lira value a hi 

limj h iri.Di Ik- TllM lr< roret the tk Tnnfo . jivl Miiu :- i 

lhr Toi'l| t -vJpnni| j <id a«ii«<iiimii] .|uip r w Batiniuu, jniuui 

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HAr'Ian'm 

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- WiJLnJ LiiiTro.i i umpjin LinninL Ni>Ll]iMti.|npJi>ii!i Jl T’l 



CLERICAL 

MEDICAL 

UNIT TRUSTS 

Consistency - Strength 
• Experience ■ 

Orral MrdhJ Lim Trim Mamirii Lnmnt hrpwnd Su lfiUf.91. 

Urrohrf Offoc (. IW Ifbhi I whrA MfirJ lAwiuTt M CbruL 

Mcfoil jm! bfvnl Lrr lUtisAr 5««ncii. Njch* lln Braid B 52 tUH. 

Bristol. 


()\Q 


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Left For 


0 


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ik it ■■pen in roiJi-ni. ■■! Ihr KcpuHw n' SirUibl 

Tn «.'lrn> jI Mrilhi! L'nii Tnr»i VLinaivo LmnlrO. FREfrOST . BRISTOL RNJ L'AtJ. 

I We Wish ro tmesi L 'minimum i'aOOl in the Clencii Medio! Inienurioail 

(OkVme Tram jt ihe fixed pnee otter oi iSp per unit. Alter Ntnembcr ih'th. HSt’ ihe rulmjj! prke will 
appL. fluse semi me drutls ol: Share Bvdunyr Scheme □ Unit Trust Siring SchrmeQ 
Other Clerical Medical Unit Trusts □ 

SURNAME t MR,'MRS MISS 


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nm si imimtt » k t 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


SIGNATURE 


DATE 


OLMOKF 



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^ ' LINKUNE . 


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„ J*?' V* ^V*1 * ^ 




38 LAW 

Court of Appeal 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 

Law Report November 22 1986 Queen’s Bench Divisional_Court 

Wider justification defence available No duty on council 

farwell v Pressdram Ltd and The defendants denied that wasKule or no reference w> them ^ tonious jki was done with nVATTliln 

□other (No 2) the words published or the mthearfccU. milty tawwledge for ttemouve ill 1 1 IriClC SllvVvil 

C^oon bore or «re mder- ' f . .7“ “ r IVT 1UV r __ _ 


Affray sentencing 
guidelines 


Regina v Keys and Others 
Before Lord Lane. Lord Chief 
Justice. Mr Justice Taytor and 
Mr Justice Rose 
[Judgment November 21) 

Guidance on sentencing in 
cases of affray was given by 
Lord Lane. Lord Chief Justice, 
when giving judgment on ap- 
peals against sentence by appel- 
lants involved in the 
"Tottenham riots” in October 
I98S at the Broadwater Fans 
Estate, north London, during 
which Police Constable Keith 
BlaJkefock was killed. 

The appellants were Paul 
Keys, aged 22. and Lester 
Sween. aged 18. of Edmonton, 
who were sentenced at the 
Central Criminal Court respec- 
tively to five years’ imprison- 
ment and five years' youth 
custody by the Recorder of 
London, Sir James Miskin. QC, 
and Simon Mark Mac Mi an, 
? ged 19, who was sentenced at 
the same court to seven years' 
youth custody by Judge Deni- 
son. QC. 


R v Luiimor, ([1973J Crim LR 
127). r u 

At the other end of the scale 
came the people who had, so to 
speak, been on (he edges of the 
affray. 

Acts of the individual partici- 
pants could not be taken in 
isolation. Even though a 
particular defendant himself 
never actually hit an opponent, 
never threw a missile, never 
physically threatened anyone, 
nevertheless — even ifhe partici- 
pated simply by encouraging 
others by shouting insults and 
threats, he thereby helped to 
.promote the affray. 

He, accordingly, had to take 
some share of the blame for the 
overall picture. It scarcely 
needed stating that the more he 
was shown to have done in 
promoting the affray the greater 
had to be his punishment 

As Lord Janice Sadis said in 


Maxwell v pressdram Ltd and 
Another (No 2) 

Before Lord Justice Nourse and 
Lord Justice Ralph Gibson 
[Judgment November 18] 
Where a publication alleged 
that the plaintiff in a libel action 
had paid for the foreign travel 
expenses of the Labour Party 
leader and that allegation was 
found to be incorrect, the defen- 
dants were still entitled to put 


The defendants denied that 
the words published or the 
cartoon bore or were under- 
stood to bear or were capable of 
bearing the meaning alleged by 
the plaintiff, or any meaning 
defamatory of him. 

Further or alternatively, the 
defendants asserted that *The 
words complained of . - - are 
true in substance and in feet”. 
The paruculara relied upon in 
support of the plea of 


dants were still enuuea to put support of the plea or 
before the jury a defence of justmetion were set out in seven 


R v Caird ((1970) 54 Cr App R 
499, 507): “Those who choose to 
take part in such unlawful 
occasions must do so at their 
periL The present case was one 
of a long-lasting concerted at- 
tempt of grave proportions by 
aggressive force of numbers to 
overpower the police, to embark 
on wrecking, and to terrify, 
citizens engaged in following 
peaceable and lawful pursuits. 

"Any participation whatever, 
irrespective of its precise form, 
in an unlawful or notous assem- 
bly of this type derives its 
gravity from becoming one of 
those who. by weight of num- 
bers, pursued a common and 
unlawful purpose.” 

The Lord Chief Justice said 
that where, as in the instant 
««g. there had been not only a 
concerted and major affray but 
also a prolonged and vicious 
attack upon the police, any 
participant, however slight hiS 
involvement might have been, 
could expect a sentence of at 
least 18 months to two years. 

The carrying of weapons, the 
throwing of missiles and so on 
ought properly to be reflected in 
an increase in that minimum. 

Their Lordships emphasized 
that they were concerned only 
with affray. If a defendant was 
convicted of other offences, 
such as wounding or arson, or to 
have manufactured, thrown or 
been in possession of petrol 
bombs, different considerations 
would apply. 

On the other side of the coin, 
if there wasa plea of guilty, then 
a proper discount should be 
given for that, particularly if 
there had been cooperation with 
the police and an admission of 
guilt in the early stages of the 
investigation. 

His Lordship considered the 
individual appeals and stated 
that the sentences on Keys and 
Sween were each reduced to Vk 
years and on MacMinn to 4¥; 
years. 

Solicitors: B. M- Bimberg & 
Co. 


Mr David Wolchover, as- 
signed by the Registrar of Crim- 
inal Appeals, for the appellants 
Keys and Sween; Mr Terry 
Munyard for the appellant 
MacMinn. 


The LORD CHIEF JUS- 
TICE. giving the judgment of 
the court, said that, concerning 
the appeals in respect of affray, 
the facts constituting affray and 
the possible degrees of participa- 
tion in it were so variable and 
covered such a wide area of 
behaviour that it was difficult to 
formulate any helpful sentenc- 
ing framework. Even if one 
succeeded, it was equally diffi- 
cult to fit any particular case 
into the framework. 


The crime of affray might 
range from the comparatively 
trivial rowdy scene sponta- ' 
neously arising, for example, 
outside a public bouse at dosing 
time, terrifying for a short time 
but soon over, up to the sort of 
lengthy pitched battle going on 
for hours which took place at 
Broadwater Farm, with scores of 
casualties, arson, looting and all 
that those matters emailed. 


Their Lordships were not 
concerned in the instant case 
with the level of sentence to be 
imposed in the case of the less 
serious spontaneously arising 
cases of affray. 

In the case of a very serious 
affray, where it was clear that 
there was at least some measure 
of preparation, organization and 
central direction, the- organizers 
and ringleaders, if they were 
detected — which would seldom 
be the case — could expect heavy 
sentences. They might be in the 
range of seven years and up- 
wards. apart from any sentences 
imposed on them for specific 
offences, such as wounding with 
intent or the like: see R v Pilgrim 
((1983) 5 Cr App R (S) 140) and 


justification on the wider 
ground that the plaintiff had 
nevertheless made substantial 
contributions to the Labour 
Party with an improper motive. 

The Court of Appeal so held, 
in an interlocutory appeal by the 
defendants. Pressdram Ltd and 
Mr Richard Ingrains against 
rulings by Mr Justice Sunon 
Brown in a trial before a jury, in 
a libel action brought against the 
defendants by the plaintiff, Mr 
Robert Maxwell. 

The court allowed the appeal 

S inst the judge's first ruling 
t the defendants' plea of 
justification was not supported 
by evidence fit to go to the jury, 
but dismissed the appeal again st 
the judge's second ruling that 
there was sufficient evidence in 
support of the plaintiffs claim 
to exemplary damages to justify 
the leaving of that part of the 
claim to the jury. 

[On November 21 the jury 
found the libel proved and 
awarded £55,000 damages and 
costs to Mr MaxwelL} 

Mr Andrew Bateson. QC and 
Mr Desmond Browne for the 
defendants; Mr Richard 
■Hartley, QC and Mr Thomas 
Shields for Mr MaxwelL 


sub-paragraphs, but the defen- 
dants had called no evidence in 
support of them. 

What remained of the plea of 
justification was that the plain- 
tiff had made available and 
offered to make available to the 
Labour Party, funds under his 
control by way of cash dona- 
tions and fiiwtirial support for 
particular projects and pur- 
poses. 

U was also formally admitted 
tha t the "plaintiff has at all 
times sought considerable pub- 
licity for himself and his activ- 
ities, including his political 
activities in supporting the La- 
bour Party” and that “when the 
plaintiff acquired control of 
Mirror Group Newspapers Ltd 
in 1984 he fulfilled a long- 
standing ambition of his to 
become a national newspaper 
proprietor". 

As a result of the defendants' 
failure to produce evidence in 
support of the more important 


was tittle or no reference to them 
in the article. 

If the defendants were to 
succeed in the appeal they bad 
to make good the contention by 
reference to both articles read 
together that die wider meaning 
was one which a reasonable jury 
could give the words after being 
properly directed that it was a 
meaning they could property 
bear. 

The specific allegations of 
making the' payments for the 
trips mentioned were not true. 
The defendants, white saying 
that the article as a whole was 
not defamatory, wished to argue 
that if defamatory at aU, the 
proper meaning which the jury 


the tortious act was done with 
guilty knowledge for the motive 
that the chances of economic 
advantage outweighed the 
chances of economic or physical 
penalty. 

The judge had deckled that 
there was sufficient evidence of 
recklessness to be left to the jury. 

The judge held that when on 
July 24, 1985 the plaintiffs 
attempted and failed to get 
injunctive relief a large number 
of copies had been sold and 
others were unrecoverable, bat a 

substantial number could have 
been prevented from distribu- 
tion. 

Ax ,hat stage the only step- 

taken by the defendants to 


therapy for child 


Regjaav Oxfordshire Educa- 
tion Authority, Ex parte W 


Before Lord Justice May and Mr 
Justice McCowan 


should ai^h to it was that the’ ensure the truth of the article 
plaintiff was ambitious to be a was apparently to ask the 
peer and was improperly seek- source, whom they had declined 


[Judgment November 21] 

It was not irrational ofa local 
education authority to have 
concluded that the provision of 
speech therapy far a child, who 
needed it in order to benefit 


LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
that, although it was eg* djac 
die applicant needed five ses- 
sions of speech 

in older to benefit from hi s 
education, in view of the tact 
that the sp eech therapy serntx 
had been, transferred in 1974 to 
the National Health Service, 
parliame nt had to be taken 
to have enacted the 1981 Act 
with that knowledge, and of the 
fact that a joint departmental 


peer and was improperly seek- 
ing to achieve that through 
patronage of the Labour Party, 
and self-publicity created by 
control of the Mirror Group. 

They wanted to argue that 
possible defamatory meaning in 
order to give themselves die 


source, whom they had declined 
to name in the present proceed- 
ings, whether he was maintain- 
ing fris story and prepared to 
give evidence in support of it 
It would be for die jury to 
decide whether that amounted 
to a sufficient taking of the 


fully from his education, was . circular had stated that speech 
“nan-educational provision” therapy was rum-educational 


and not “special educational 
provision” and that it was 
therefore not under a duty under 
section 7(2) of the Education 


Act 1981 to provide soda ther- 
apy for the child. 


chance of persuading die jury, if obvious steps which were then 
there was evidence to support it, necessary- 
that they bad justified the sting The defendants had con- 
tended that when the issue of 


that they had justified 
in the fibeL 


The plaintiff sought to have injunctive relief was heard fry 
that possible defamatory mean- die court, publication was aL 
ing removed from consideration ready complete and that exexn- 


in case the jury shook! he 
unfairly misled into settling for 
a less serious meaning than the 
words plainly bore and even 
into thinking that the defen- 


sbookf be 


plaxy *i*magt!K could only be 
awarded if the plaintiff proved 


apy for the child. 

Furthermore, the authority 
had no power or discretion to 
make a grant to pay for such 

therapy. 

The Queen's. Bench Di- 
visional Court so hekt, dismiss- 
ingan application by a boy aged 
trin e, fry his mother and next 
friend, for judicial review by 


allegations in their particulars of dants had justified a grave libel 

i« - #«ri — Ihi ew w s o f hmn 


that a defendant had guilty way of dateahons (i) that the 
knowledge when he made the Oxfordshire . . Education 
publication. Authority’s decision that the 


LORD JUSTICE RALPH 
GIBSON said that the plaintiffs 
claim was for damages for two 
libels published in Private Eye 
in articles on July 12 and 26, 
1985. 

The plaintiff alleged that the 
first article contained words 
which in their natural and 
ordinary meaning meant and 
were understood to mean that 
the plaintiff had acted or was 
acting as paymaster for trips 
made by Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
leader of the Labour Party. to 
East Africa, Central America 
and Moscow, and was thereby 
guilty of bribery or attempted 

The second article included a 
cartoon showing what was in- 
tended to be understood as the 
likeness of the plaintiffs face in 
the horn of a gramophone and 
Mr Kinnock's face on an atten- 
tive dog. 

With reference to the second 
libeL the plaintiff alleged that 
the words and cartoon in their 
natural and ordinary rr ming 
and/or by way of legal innu- 
endo. bore or were understood 
to bear the meaning that the 
plaintiff was guilty of bribery or 
attempted bribery. 

The reference to innuendo 
was made by tire special facts of 
the first article having been 
printed and, it was suggested, 
read by many readers of the 
second. 


justification (The Times 
November 12. 1986) the judge 
struck out the defence of fair 
comment and the question 
arose as to what really remained 
by way of defence in the action. 

The defendants asserted that 
the fust article if defamatory at 


by proving something different 
which they had not alleged. 

His Lordship agreed with tire 
judge that in the first article 
alone there was scant reference 
to self-pa Wicity or to exploita- 
tion of the plaintiffs position as 
controller of tire Mirror Group. 


ail, bore a lesser and a wilder There was no more than the 


defamatory meaning. 

The “lesser” meaning was 
that tire discreditable conduct of 
which the plaintiff was guilty 
was not anything as serious or 
extreme as bribery, but rather 
that he should be regarded as 
having made tire relevant pay- 
ments with the lesser improper 
motive of seeking to influence 
Mr Kinnock to recommend him 
fora peerage. 

The “wider” defamatory 
meaning which the defendants 
contended the ■words were ca- 
pable of bearing was that the 
plaintiff had an ambition to be a 
peer and was improperly seek- 


ing to achieve that by patronage 
of i tie Labour Party and by the 
self-publicity which be created 
through his control of tire 
Minor Group. 

The defendants sought to 
justify such wider meaning by 
reference to and reliance not on 
payments for Mr Kinnock’s 
foreign travel but on other 
payments of £38.000 to the 
Boundary Commission Fighting 
Fund and £44,000 to the Labour 
Party at the 1984 Party Con- 
ference. 

The judge had held it was not 
open to tire defendants to allege 


reference to the plaintiff as 
publisher of tire Group. 

However, the wider meaning 
contended for was one which 
the words of the first article 
could reasonably bear. The 
allegation of payment for for- 
eign travel of Mr Kinnock in his 
capacity as leader of the Labour 
Party was not so distinct from 
patronage of the Labour Party. 
It was dear that when the two 
articles were read together, the 
wider meaning was one which 
the words could reasonably 
bear. 

It was not possible to say 
whether or not the jury would 
reach the conclusion that the 
words bore that meaning, but it 
was for them to decide. 

The second matter of appeal 
was the judge's ruling that there 
was evidence fit to go to the jury 
in support of the plaintiffs 
claim for exemplary damages in 
relation to the second article. 

The principle was that exem- 
plary damages could only be 
awarded if the plain tiff proved 
that tire defendant, when he 
made the publication, knew that 
he was committing a tort or was 
reckless as to whether it was 
tortious or uot, and derided to 


However, h could not be said 
that as a matter of. law a 
de fendan t who had published 
part of an issue of a magazine 
and was not proved to have 
made that publication with the 
guilty mind required for proof ot 
a right to exemplary damages, 
was thereby protected against a 
finding of liability to pay exem- 
plary damages with reference to 
further publications in the same 
issue with r e feren ce to which 
there was evidence of that gmliy 
action. 

Lord Justice Nourae agreed. 

Solicitors; Wright Webb 
Syren; Nicholson, Graham & 
Jones. 


Authority’s derision that the 
speech therapy which he needed 
was non-edueztianai provision 
was irrational, and (ii) alter- 
natively, that, if the authority 
been to rim 

speech therapy was not special 
educational provision,- it had 
failed to consider whether it had 
power to make a grant for 
private speech therapy and, if it 
had snch a power, whether it 
should exercise it. 


Mr John Frid for tire ap- 


pro vision, it was impossible to 
say »*»«« the authority's decision 
that speech therapy for the 
applicant was non-educanonai 
provision was irrational. 

The authority's power under 
section 81 of the Education Act 
1944 and regulation 4(a) of the 
Scholarships and Other Benefits 
Regulations (1977 SI No 1443V 
to gian t s id "enable a child 
to part in school activities 
did not empower the authority 
to pay for spe e ch therapy for the 
app l ic a nt. 

He was able to participate; tire 

fact that he would be able to 
participate more effectively if he 
had more speech therapy did 
not bring- the provision of such 
therapy within that power. 

Likewise the apparently very 

wide power under section 1 ll(I> 

of the, Local Government Act 
1972; under which a local 
authority could, for example, 
make grants for the buDding ofa 
new school laboratory or a ■ 
gymnasium, did not empower it 
to pay for speech therapy for a 7 
pa rticular child 


QC and Mr John Steel for the 
authority, Mr John Laws fire tire 
Secretary of Stale for Education 
and Science and the Secretaxy of 
State for Social Services. 


Mr Justice McGowan agreed: 


Ownership of taxi licence plate 


ChaUoner v Evans 
Before Lord Justice Croom- 
Johnsou and Mr Justice Peter 
Pain 

[Judgment November 13] 

Although a vehicle with a 
hackney carriage licence had an 
enhanced value it was not 
possible for tire proprietor of a 
licensed hackney carriage to sell 
the vehicle but retain ownership 
of the licence plate. 

Consequently an offence was 
committed under section 40 of 
the Town Police Clauses Act 
1847 when tire defendant stated 
in a requisition signed by him 
for the purpose of renewing the 


missal by Crawley Justices of an 
in fo r mati on pre ferred against 
the defendant, David Leslie 
Evans. 


Mr Robin Campbell for the 
prosecutor; Mr Geoffrey 
Grtgson for the defendant. 


licence, that he was the propri- 
etor of a hackney carriage be had 


as part of the wider meaning of publish because tire pro sp ect s of 
the article anything about self- material advantage outweighed 


publicity or the plaintiffs con- 
trol of the Mirror Group as there 


the prospects of material loss. 
What was necessary was that 


etor of a hackney carriage be had 
sold without the plate. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held, allowing 
an appeal by the prosecutor, 
Arthur ChaUoner against a dis- 


LORD JUSTICE CROOM- 
JOHNSON said that the 
characteristic of a hackney car- 
riage was that it bad to bear a 

S ee attached to it in a particn- 
exposed position, carrying 
tire number is which the car- 
riage was licensed. 

The plate was issued by the 
district council under section 55 
of the Local Government (Mis- 
cellaneous Provisions) Act 
1976. Therefore at all material 
times the plate remained the 
property of the district council 
and there was no guarantee that 
it would be renevred. 



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Solicitors: Teacher Stem ■. 
Selby: Mr P- J. Floyd, Oxford; - 
Treasury Sofrdtor. ” 


It was dear that for the time 
being the possession of a licence ' 
had money value of a sort 
because it carried the expecta- 
tion of getting the licence re- 
newed when it expired and of 
entitling the vehicle to trade. , 
There had grown up a practice ' 
which converted that value ! 
from the possession of a plate 
into a market of substantial 
value and money changed hands ■ 
for the plate. 

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finding that proprietorship of - 

the licence piste remained with : 
the defendant after he had sold 1 
the vehicle, and charged his - 
buyer a “renf* of £30 a week for 
the con tinned use of the plate: 

Mr Justice Peter Pain driiv- ? 
ered a concurring judgment 
Solicitors: Mr M. J. Kemp. 
Crawley, Bnnstows, Horsham. 







hat 






































39 


5 


% 





RUGBY UNION: THE PERENNIAL PROBLEM OF PECKING ORDERS 



■ v 


r. A 

■1% 


Inevitable conflict of 
interest between 
divisions and En glan d 


TENNIS: SHRIVER REACHES FIFTH CONSECUTIVE SEMI-FINAL 


• 7 

' 

- ■ .. . ■ c 

■ ■ . 


- . -*k 

--3t. 


While England's leading 

dobs have done much, in the 
last fortnight, to establish 
some kind of pecking order, 
the divisional selectors have 
been busy esta blishing their 

own peeking order of pfayers. 
At the same time they have 
been balancing the needs of 
the England selectors against 
their own conceptions of a 
team ‘which will win next 
month's Thun EMI di- 
visional championship. 

The two requirements do 
not necessarily coincide. Last 
season, far instance, the Mid- 
lands —eventual winners of 
the. - championship — played 
the Coventry combination of 
Steve Thomas and G raham 
Robbins at scram half and 
No. 8, which left no place for 
Dean, Richards of Leicester. 
Robbins went oh to play for 


En gl and but was superceded 
by Richards who is now the 
leading candidate in his pos- 
ition for England's world cup 
squad. • 

So it is in the North this 
season. The divisional backs 
work out at Moriey tomorrow 
but John Carieton, the QneH 
cen tre who is a member of the 
national squad, is not among 
them. The four centres called 
upon are Simms, Clough (both 
of whom played for England 
last season). Carting (Durham 
University) and John Buckton 
(Saracens), even though the 
choice of the last-named 
seems somewhat preci pitate. 

Buckton, brother of OrrelTs 
Peter, has suffered from a bade 
problem which has prevented 
him from playing any first- 
class football this season. He 




plays today, for Saracens* 
third team E prinfff Imperial 
College, London, and hopes to 
ease Us way back into the first 
team over the next fortnight. 
The divisional championship 
begins two weeks from today. 

Will the North pick Peter 
Williams at fuD back? They 
have had little enough 
opportunity of watching him 
this season and may be in- 
clined to choose his Orrefl 
colleague, Langford, who was 
one of their few pins marks 
last season, wwgrwMi Similarly 
in the pack where they may 
prefer a balanced pair of locks 
— say, Orwin, now. restored 
to Yorkshire, end Dooley or 
Bainbridge, rather tium the 
two Fylde giants together. 

At least they know that Rob 
Andrew is to play for them. 
The Wasps stand-off half had 
been hovering between his 
native area, the North, and his 
present domestic area, 
Londom but has opted for the 
North, for whom his play last 
season ensured that he was 
picked for England ahead of 
Barnes (Bath)Jt needs no 
crystal ball to foresee the two 
men playing opposite one 
another at Waterloo on the 
first weekend of the 
championship. 

AD four divisions are re- 
quired to have lodged their 
teams with the Rugby Foot- 
ball Union at Twickenham by 
December 1 so the clubs, in 
the meantime, must make hay 


Cornwall 

revive 

splendid 

memories 

By David Hands 

There is a splendidly old- 
fashioned ring about Cornwall v 
Gloucestershire at Redruth. In 
times past, when the county 
championship meant more, 
doucesimhire have been taken 
all the way by their Cornish 

hosts and the same win be hue 
today as the two sides search for 
a semi-final place in this 
season’s Thom EMI county 
championship. The draw for the 
semi-finals wifi be made next 
Friday. 

The place in the English game 

Ihat the riimtipiniKhi p UOW 

occ u pies was emphasised fay 
Macko’ Page during the week in 
which his North Midlands 
upset Warwickshire. last 
season’s champions:- “It is not a 
dead duck,”he said. “There is 
still a role for county rugby but 
at a lower level than hitherto. 
Nobody should be p re ssur ed to 
play in it but it can be an ideal 
proving ground for emerging 
talent, a stepping-stone for am- 
bitious players. It . can also be 
great fun, as North Midlands are 
proving. Fox many of our 


on big grounds. The semi-final 
is now a very exciting pros p ec t 
for us.” 

Middlesex (the London 
champions) and North Mid- 
lands will watch the results from 
the south-west and the north 
with interest. Cornwall, with 
wins against Berkshire «nJ 
Somerset, have but to to draw 
against Gloucestershire to be- 
come area champions and they 
have Keast, the Redruth prop, 
fit a p*»n. B utts, their stand-off 
half; will come up against 
colleagues from Loughborough 
University, Howard and Allen, 
who play in Gloucestershire's 
threequarter line. 

In the north, unbeaten York 



Mandlikova loses 
her temper and 
place in last four 


From Barry Wood, New York 


Hana Mandlikova’s explosive 
temperament cost her a place in 
the semi-finals of the Virginia 
Slims Championships here as 
she was defeated 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 fay 
born again American Pam 
Shriver. 

Sh river, aged 24, has now 
reached five consecutive semi- 
finals after reassessing her game 
following criticism from her 
friend and doubles partner, 
Martina Navratilova at the US 
Open. Ironically she then lost 
three of those tournaments to 

Navratilova, and fares her again 
to contest a place in Sunday’s 
best -of-five- sets final. Shriver’s 
only other defeat was to 
Mandlikova last week in 
Chicago. 

A week can be a long time in 
tennis. In a classic confronta- 
tion, the match in fTitrwg o 
ended with ibe players bugging 
each other at the net in mutual 
respect. But just a few days later 
their re-match concluded with 
the Oech totally losing control 
over a number of duteous line- 
call decisions. 

In a performance that re- 
minded one of McEnroe rather 
than Mandlikova, the third seed 
thrashed the net with her racket, 
used four letter words, and 
finally received a warning from 
the New York umpire Paul 
Sullivan when she hit his cfaair 
during a change-over. At the end 

of the mntf-h , inclraft of chairing 

hands with the official, she 
threw a piece of paper or tape at 
him. 

Many considered her com- 
plaints, if not her actions, 
justified, however. One call m 
particular was crucial and be- 
cause of her excessive reaction 


could have cost her the match. 

Having won the first set. she 
was then serving for the match 
at 5-3 when a volley which 
landed on the side-tine was 
called out. That gave Shriver the 
game, and from then on the 
contest was over. Mandlikova 
all but gave up her fight and 
Shriver rediscovered an aggres- 
sion that had been missing up 
until then. 

“I don't want to take anything 
away from Pam. but I fed I was 
playing my best tennis at the 
beginning and I felt I was bang 
cheated.” Mandlikova protested 
through a statement read by a 
public relations official after the 
Czech had refused to attend a 
post-match press conference. “I 
can fight to a certain moment 
but then it's just too much.” 

Shriver knew the crucial calls 
had been wrong. “She made an 
unbelievable volley and it 
landed plumb on the line, and 
then 1 heard “out, game”. What 
you do then is feel rotten and 
take the game. You can’t do 
anything about it and it happens 
all the time” she said. It is 
unlikely that Shriver would 
react in the same way as 
Mandlikova, .although she used 
to let bo- emotions get the better 
of her. Now, she has a fresh 
attitude to both her game and 
her approach to it. 

“I feel I realize now that a 
tennis match is just a tennis 
match and if I don't win, what 
the bee," she said. “I'm also 
trying some new things. I used 
to uy them in practice but then 
get shy on a match court.” Her 
willingness to try fresh ideas 
comes from comments made by 
Navratilova. 



Mandlikova: a performance reminiscent of McEnroe cause of her excessive reaction Navratilova. 

Why looking to the past may secure the Wightman Cup’s future 


Searching for a balance of power 


Nancy JeSett, chainaan of the 
Wightman Cap committee of the United 
States Tends Association (USTA), said 
yesterday that at its next meeting, in 
March, the committee would consider a 
suggestion that the United States twin 
should be restricted to players born in 
today’s eqnnalent of (be 13 original British 
colonies. 

USTA staff have already identified the 
players who woaM be cffgibte for a team 
restricted to the East Coast colonies which 
became a confederation of independent 
states in 1783. 

The most obvious candidates would be 
Pam Shriver (Maryland), Bennie Gndnsdk 
and Kathy Jordan (Pennsylvania), Terry 
Phelps (New York), and Barbara Potter 
(GtunertiatfX These players wmdd be too 
good for the present fon strength of 
Britain, bhfmndd be more vulnerable than 
a team drawn from the United States as a 
whole. 

The series was began in 1923, and the 
United States lead 48-10. In the last eight 
contests, they have won 50 matches and 
lost only six. Three weeks ago a United 
States “reserve” team inflicted on Britain 


SNOOKER 


their heaviest defeat at home for 34 years. 
The competitive nature of the event — 
which used to be its heart and still should 
be — has become a rick joke of declining 
interest to the public and the media, 
though an unreasonably kind American 
critic asserts: The biggest difference is 
the nunfai attitude. Year girls have gotten 
so down on themselves.” 

On both sides of the Atlantic there is a 
complacent assumption that competitive 
Oops can be tolerated as long as the series 
prod aces popular public spectacles that 
make money for the two national associ- 
ations. It has also -become accepted 
practice for the USTA to choose a team by 
working down the rankings until it finds 
five players who are available, fit, and 
interested. 

The most familiar p r oposal for changing 
the format is to confront the United States 
with an all-European team, as is Ryder 
Cop golf- But at present that would break 
the Anglo-American link because British 
players would not be good enough to get 
mio the European tewn*- 

• Shirley Brasher, who played for Britain 
from 1955 to I960, stresses the importance 


of genuine competition, but does not favour 
tire 13-cokmics idea. She suspects that a 
United States ander-23 team might tem- 
porarily be justified. Angela Barrett, who 
played Wightman Cup tennis from 1953 to 
1964, says tf the 13-cokmies scheme: 
‘'That could make it more interesting 
because it would give the US an outside 
dance af winning occasionally.” 

Another former Wi ghtman Cap player. 
Sue Mappin, now the national team 
manager, points out that the series has a 
distinctive and enduing status, unlike 
other more sporadic events outside the 
usual run of tournaments. “It’s probably 
inevitable that we are going to lose nine 
rtaiM out of 10,” she says. “But in future, 
there will be winning British teams — 
otherwise our programme of development 
isn't working.” 

The Lawn Tennis Assoc iation often 
disc usses the competition's future infor- 
mally gpH, next month, will do so formally. 
Bat any initiative for a revised formal 
would almost certainly have to come from 

‘ h * USTA - Rex Bellamy 

Tennis Correspondent 


BASKETBALL 


Exciting possibilities 
in unusual line-up 


The stakes are raised 
in the Prudential Cup 


By Sydney Frisian 


MOTOR RACING 


Formula Three 
series to 
be extended 

Next season's British For- 
mula Three championship, 
again to be sponsored by Lucas 
Electrical, , is to be extended, by 
three rounds to 19. but only two 
races will be on the Comment, 
compared with three this year 
(Norman Fox writes). 

Three of the rounds will be at 
Brands Hatch where there will 

also be a non-championship 

evem over the weekend of 
October (0 and II. Each 
championship round will be 
worth £4,000 in prize-money, 
except for a sup po r tin g event at 
the Formula One British Grand 
Prix which anil have £5.000 in 
PriaMnoncy. The season’s final 
race will be at Thruxton, which 
hosts four rounds. 

Andy Wallace, the winner of 
this year's Formula. Three 
championship, competes an 


Prix, together with several past 
and present Formula One driv- 
ers. including Johnny Damfries. 
1987 championship: March: fc 


The fane-up for the third 
round of the Tennents United 
Kingdom Championship, which 
is to be resumed today at the 
Guild Hafi, Preston, has a 
slightly strange look about it.- 
The second reed, Joe Johnson, 
the world champion, and the No 
4 seed, Dennis Taylor, are 
missing, Johnson having been 
beaten 9-1 on Wednesday by 
John Parrott and Taylor 9-2 
earlier in the week by the 
unseeded Wayne Jones, of 
Wales. 

The total of 16 players left in 
the competition shows an even 
balance between the more fen- 
ded players and those who came 
through at longer odds. 

In the top half there could be a 
quarter-final meeting between 
Steve Davix, the No. 1 seed, and 
Willie Thorne whom Davis 
defeated 16-14 in last year’s final- 
after Thome, who seemed well 
on his way to victory, stumbled 
on an easy blue and left the gates 
open for Davis. 

In the second half Alex 
Higgins could meet either Eu- 
gene Hughes or Wayne Jones in 
the quarter-finals but Higgins 
must first beat Mike H alien, 
whose confidence has grown 
after his convincing 9-4 victory 


HOCKEY 


overTony Meo. Higgins was 3-5 
down to Dave Martin but 
Higgins seemed in pretty good 
shape at the end when he won 9- 
6 . 

The bottom half seems fuD of 
exciting possibilities with Neal 
Foulds, the winner of the BCE 
International, confronting 
Jimmy White, the Rothmans 
Grand Prix winner, for a place 
in the quarter-finals probably 
against Cliff Thorbum, of 


Tony Knowles feces Terry 
Griffiths in what could be an 
absorbing match after then- 
recent argument over the type of 
pocket best suited for snooker, 
the larger ones advocated by 
Griffiths or the less generous 
type preferred by Knowles. The 
winner here will await the 
outcome of the match between 
Parrott and Steve Longwortb. 

THIRD ROUND DRAW S Daws v D 
Reynolds: T Drago v W Thoms: A Higgins 
v M Hatstt E Hughes v W Jams C 
ThOJtxim v J Spencer N Foulds v J White; 
TKnowies v T Griffiths; S Langwoflh v J 
Perron. 

TODAY’S WATCHES: S Deris v □ Reyn- 
olds (ID and 7.15k C Thorium v J 
Spencer (1 J) and 7.15). 

TOMORROW T Drags v W Thome (2.0 
and 7.15); N Fouus v J WW» (2JD and 
7.15). 


By Nicholas Hartiog 

There will be more of a occasions 
sudden-death element than some n 
usual about the Prudential Na- programn 
lional Cup tonight at Bracknell Michael \ 
when both of the two remaining terday. “S 
quarter-finals take place. be to our 

The games, featuring BCP problem.: 
London and Caklerdale Explor- are not of 
ers. on the one hand, and Happy them for 1 
Eater Bracknell and Team “What 1 
Polycell Kingston, on the other, show the l 
mark the beginning of the last around tl 
chance for Channel 4’s attempt there will 
to make a viable and entertain- action, alii 
ing programme out of the sport, only justs 

It wifi be with a different, and launch ba 
they hope more successful for- it has not ’ 
mat, that Channel 4 restore relation to 
basketball to the screens early has not 
on Monday evening in the first American 
of a series of four magazine-type and growr 
programmes. Go 4 It. culminat- ences have 
ing with the cup final at the up." 
Albert Hall on December 15. The p 

Although dips from both change, b 
tonight's games and from the main the s 
two previous quarter-finals, in introducin 
which Sharp Manchester United former cot 
and Portsmouth reached the last and Ports 
four, will probably be shown, the comnr 
the station will be less depen- Byrd enlisi 
dent than usual on the action this time, 
being of the highest calibre since hope to at 
there will now be more features, half miilic 
“In trying to present viewers gramme, 
with the live second half of Wilmot “« 
games as we did in the past on bst chance 


occasions we got caught with 
some real duffers.” the 
programme's director-producer, 
Michael Wilmot, explained yes- 
terday. “Showing live games can 
be to our benefit but it can be a 
problem. From now on if games 
are not of quality we won't show 
them for the game’s sake. 

“What we are trying to do is 
show the best of basketball from 
around the world. Obviously 
there will be a lot of American 
action, although their season has 
only just started. We want to re- 
launch basketball, which while 
it has not been a total failure, in 
relation to American football it 
has not been too successful. 
American football has grown 
and grown but basketball audi- 
ences have only maiginally gone 
up." 

The programme might 
change, but the personnel re- 
main the same with Simon Reed 
introducing Danny Palmer, the 
former coach of Crystal Palace 
and Portsmouth, to help with 
the commentating, and Alton 
Byrd enlisted for a coaching slot 
this time. Between them they 
hope to attract up to one and a 
half million viewers to a pro- 
gramme, which, according to 
Wilmot “is almost certainly our 
last chance”. 




Oil 

^ rw 

ffml 





Army showing progressive ideas 

By Sydney Friskin 



The Army Hockey Associ- 
ation, who have been sponsored 
for the next three years by the 

Royal Bank of Scotland, are on a 
campaign to become the first of 
the Services teams to have an 

artificial turf pitch. Their im- 
mediate aim is to convert the 
shale pitch at Aldershot into a 
sand-filled artificial surface. 

As Services champions, the 
Amy are entitled to play in the 
Comity Championship, and 
they are taking a strong side to 

Birmin gham tomorrow to {day 
Worcestershire in the prelimi- 
nary round of the competition at 
the Fox Hollies Leisure Centre. 

Ian Je nning s, who has been 
capped seven times for England, 
will be at centre half for the 
Army, whose attack will be led 
by Jolly, with Gordon who has 
10 England caps in close sup- 
port They will need to be extra 
sharp to penetrate the solid 
Worcestershire defence which is 
well fortified by Steve Taylor, of 
Slourport, in goal and Aldridge 
at ftilfbaeje. 

R wktnghams hlre are relying 
on the same team tint defeated 
Hampshire 3-2 in the South 
semi-finals test week for their 
preliminary round match 
against Yorkshire tomorrow at 
Abbeydale Park. Sheffield. The 

o 


Buckinghamshire centre-for- 
ward. Baji Flora, will no doubt 
be closely marked by Hughes, a 
member of the En gland World 
Cup squad, at half-back for 
Yorkshire. 

Somerset, a: home to Essex in 
the third of the day's prelimi- 
nary round matches tomorrow 

at the Imperial Ground, at 
Knowle, near Bristol, have 
called on three players from 
Firebrands — Purchase, Phil- 
lips, and Thomas — all fast and 
resourceful in attack. Essex, 


with several old Lougbtonians 
including Glad man, Ashton, 
and Camilleri in their squad, are 
not short of talent and should 
offer a strong challenge. 

Ken Partington, who is in the 

Worcestershire team for 
tomorrow’s County Champion- 
ship match, will play for Slough 
today in the premier division of 
the Pizza Express London 
League. If the pilch at Slough is 
unplayable, this match will be 
transferred to the all-weather 
pitch at Langley. 



fTZM 



iljlpl 

in 


11 ittr 1 




Changes under consideration 


Changes in the playing struc- 
ture and organisation of the 
game are being considered by 
the All England Womens 


Hockey Association though* no 
major alterations will be im- 
plemented until the 1988/89 
season. 

The most radical changes ore 
likely to involve the territorial 
matches, with the question 
whether there is stiDthe need 
and room in the programme for 
territorial teams and tour- 
naments as we know them 
today. 

Tomorrow and on Sunday, 


By Joyce Whitehead 

ying srnic- four of the five territories will 
m of the finish their county tournament, 
sidered by and only the west will be left 
Women s playing the following weekend, 
though* no The eight eastern counties will 
ill be im- play at the University of Essex 
! I9S8/S9 in Colchester, where the out- 
come could depend on the 
hanges are Sunday's match between Suffolk 
territorial and Essex. Kent, though, must 
question really be the favourites. 
















■ lI 









ijLij 








• Kettering Town, who were on 
the brink of extinction 18 
mouths ago. have announced a 
pre-tax profit of £2,900 for the 
year ending on June 30. 

* 




















PS 

PS 




yd 
















1 ! 















?«&&'? hbbBt « ?§f€P S<s s s saas»> 


















40 


SPORT 


RACING: COVETED NEWBURY PRIZE MAY GO TO WEST COUNTRY 

Improving Broadheath has the 
right credentials for Hennessy 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

Broadheath's recent victory 
at Wincanion. for which he 
has not been penalized, gives 
him a first rate chance of 
winning the coveted Hennessy 
Cognac Gold Cup at Newbury 
today and he is my nap. 

Consider the bare facts. At, 
Win canton he beat I Havent- 
aligbt by four lengths at level 
weights. Before that I Havent- 
alight had dead-heated with 
Arctic Beau when giving him 
41b. Now Broadheath and 
Arctic Beau will be racing off 
the same mark. 

Broadheath had Charter 
Party 16 lengths behind in 
fourth place at the Somerset 
track. Admittedly that was 
Charter Party’s first race of the 
season whereas Broadheath 
was running for the third time. 
Nevertheless. I maintain that 
this is an enormous leeway to 
make up in only 10 days, 
especially as he will be meet- 
ing Broadheath on Sib worse 
terms this time. 

For all that. Charter Party 
seems bound to be concerned 
in the finish on ground he will 
relish, especially as be had an 
operation in the summer to' 
improve his breathing. 

Even before that operation 


Charter Party was capable of 
giving the subsequent Whit- 
bread winner. Plundering. 9lb 
and a 20-length hiding over 
miles on soft ground at 
Cheltenham in Apnl In the 
circumstances, Plandering 
seems to have it all to do 
today. 

I remain convinced that 
Charter Party would have 
finished second in the race a 
year ago if only he had not 
taken the fourth last fence by 
the roots and paid the full 
penalty for his carelessness. 
And that second prize may 
well be the best that his 
connections can expect now if 
Broadheath runs up to his 
Wincanton form. 

The other good bet for a 
place could be Door Latch, 
who finished third in the race 
12 months ago on his seasonal 
debut. Recently Josh Gifford's 
eight-year-old unseated his 
rider four from home at Ascot 
when still in contention. Nose 
the worse for that mishap 
now, he is said to be in 
particularly fine fettle. 

Everett, who is owned by a 
member of the Hennessy fam- 
ily, was fended for the race 
three years ago. He was a tired 
horse when he fell at the 
second last on that occasion 
and I maintain that he is a 


better horse on better ground. 

On a point of handicapping, 
there should be little or noth- 
ing between Stearsby, The 
Langholm Dyer and Strands 
Of Gold. They finished first, 
second and third respectively 
at Liverpool last spring and 
have been assessed strictly 
according to that one run with 
The Langholm Dyer now 
meeting Stearsby on 31b better 
terms for 1% lengths and 
Strands Of Gold 61b for 4% 
lengths. 

Of the three. I now prefer 
Strands Of Gold, from Jimmy 
Fitzgerald’s in-form stable. 
But he is no Galway Blaze, 
who landed the spoils for 
them in such style 12 months 


Church Warden, the hero of 
the moment at Ascot a week 
ago, is still Sib out of the 
handicap, even with a penalty; 
and races of this nature arc 
seldom won in such 
circumstances. 

No matter bow he gets on 
aboard Strands Of Gold, Marie 
Dwyer can make this another 
memorable visit to the Berk- 
shire track by winning the 
Gerry Feilden Hurdle on 
Hmnberside Lady and the 
Hopefid Chase on C o meragh 
King. 

Fifth in the Champion Hur- 


dle, Humberside Lady will be 
meeting River Ceiriog on 1 31b 
better terms than when she 
was beaten five lengths by him 
in the Scottish Champion 
Hurdle at Ayr. 

Comeragh King, who has 
won both his races over 
hurdles this autumn with ease 
bordering on the unbelievable, 
looks the sort to do even better . 
over fences and I fancy his 
chances greatly. 

Romany Nightshade, al- 
ready a winner twice over tire 
course and distance, looks the 
likely winner of the North 
Street Handicap Chase follow- 
ing that 12-length win at 
Windsor three weeks ago. 

At Market Rases, you do 
not need to be blessed with 
vivid imag ination to picture 
Monica Dickinson and Gra- 
ham Bradley enjoying a field 
day with Badsworth Boy 
(1.15), By Hie Way (1.45), 
Dan Hie Millar (2.45) and 
Royal Greek (3.15% 

The high spot at Ayr will be 
the reappearance after his 
summer break of that grand 
old local favourite. Peaty • 
Sandy, in the Joan Mackay 
Handicap Chase: Whether he 
will manage to beat the Scot- 
tish National winner Hardy 
Lad, fit from a recent run, is a 
matter for conjecture. 


■. ^ . ^ • A 1";* v ■ ' • 



NEWBURY 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 ( 12 ) 00*38 TUESRMlICnnF) (Mrs JRytatfBHal 9-10-0 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Pucks Place. 

1.15 Humberside Lady. 

1 .50 BROADHEATH (nap). 


2J.0 Comeragh King. 

2.50 Romany Nightshade. 
3.20 My Helmsman. 


By Michael Seely 

1.50 STRANDS OF GOLD (nap). 2J2Q Comeragh King. 2.50 Romany Nightshade. 
The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: BROADHEATH. 


Going: soft, hurdle course; good to soft, chase course 

12.45 SPEEN NOVICE HURDLE (Div I: £1.840: 2m 100yd) (13 runners) 

101 13 LODOONUU(BF){»sJ Mortal) DNteWtaon 4-11-7 

102 0- BILLY’S BRIDGE (PMattgan)J Jenkins 5-11-0 

103 0PQ300- BRUM BABY (P Kearney) J Sayers 5-11-0 

104 EXPANSIVE GESTURE (Mrs JO’NflflQMre I McKte 5-11-0 

105 0 ROCHE (8 Doody} J Wbbber 5-114) 

106 FRENCH HABITAT (N Warwick) P Davis 4-11-0 

109 2 MOLOJEC (BF) (Mrs P Cm) A Bailey 5-11-0.. 

112 00-2 PUCKS PLACE (J Beitrage) N Gasaiee 6-11-0. 

115 31- SIR'S AT THE GW (Mm P GiJ«nga) J Gilford 5-1 1-0 

116 SITnNG BULL (MtesW Redman) JJenidns 4-1 1-0. 

118 0 SURGE <B)(CJerdein) Mrs J Pitmen 5-11-0 — 

122 UP- WAV UHOER (Lady E Nugent] O Nugent 6-11-C 
124 NEARLY HEDMA (Lt-Gol R Pony) N Mttrfwl 4-10-9 

138& TTCKITE BOO 5-11-7 P Scudamore (Evens lav) DNichoison 13 ran 
CADU LOODON LAO (1 1-3) finished 61 3rd to Federal Trooper (11-0) at the tast meettog here (2ml OOy, 
runm E 1434 . good to soft Nov 12. 1*ranl BOLTS BRPfete an lr»m Import < 11 -*) finished afaom in 
1 0 tt to Raise Your Hand ( 1 1-4) or Ms one outing over hurtles at Fakytiouse (2m. £1380. soft. Mar 31. 18 ran). 
BRUM BAY (10-101 was beaten 2S by Mr Mbs (10-10) at Whunton (an. £842. soft Dec 26. 14 raid. 

MOLOJEC nft-10) found a short haadtad to Camden Bale (10-12) at Windsor fita 30y. £1122. good. Nov 8 . 

22 ran). PUCK’S PLACE ( 11 - 0 ) led 2 out before IHaNng 81 aid to Robin Goodtofow (1 1-0) on seasonal debut 
here (atnlOOy, £2059. good. Nov 5, 21 rani. SURBE( 11 - 0 ) was around 231 7th toMad About Ya (11-5) hare (2m 
lOOy, £1440. good to soft. Nov 12, 15 ran). O nta ctt o n. MOLOJEC 



1.15 GERRY FBLDEN HURDLE (Grade II: £6,764; 2m 100yd) (7 
runners) 

201 003121- RIVER CEIRIOG (R McAIpkie) N Henderson 5-11-6 SSmKiEecta S3F24 

202 121/04)0 BEAT THE RETREAT (A Foster) JJenktaS 211-3 JWMIb — 25-1 

203 110120 MYDOMMON (CD) (T Ramsderi) M MeCOurt 4-11-3 GMcCoat 7214-1 

205 1112(12 BARMBROOK AGAM (QftBF] (M Davies) 0 Bsworih 21 1-0 RAmott 86 13-2 

206 010- BEECH ROAD (TGeaka)G Baking 4-11-0 K Moony 5020-1 

209 U141- STERNE (Mrs W Tidocft) S Mela 4-1141 HHentagtoa 75 10-1 

211 4D1012- HUHBERSBE LADY (Huntwside Enterprises) G Hrtfer 5-10-12 M Dwyer *99 2-1 

1585c GALA’S MAGE 5-11-0 R LKdey (9-2) Mrs M FSmeB 8 ran 

CODM RIVER CERIOG (123) won9titxnMJMBERSnEIJU>Y(1l-Q) hi the Scottish Champion Hurdte 
rvnm at Ayr( 2 m. £5145. goo4 Apr 18. 7 ran). MY D0AB90N pertained cfismafiyon reappearance but 
(11-0) ran a good race when 1 113rd to Canute Express (11-9) at Liverpool (2m 51. £5665 jtxxJ to soft. Apr 4, 15 
ran). BARNBROOKAGABf is in good form tMssaaaaiand(t1-3) beat No-0-Tun(>1-1{7fl2l tare on season) 
debut (an Heap H, £3330. good. Oct 24. 9 rani. BSCH ROAD (10-10) wB need to congon from a 2541 Tauiton 
success over Hot Earl no4in1 985/6 (an It Aiv H. £524. haavy, Dec Z7. 16 ran). STEIME (11-0) loaked to be 
on the upgrade judging by a 201 Cheltenham victory owr Yale ( 11 - 7 ) (an, £2212. heavy, Apr 17. 14 ran). MM2 
BER9DELADY previously ( 11 -Q beat Kesfin ( 1 1-11) In a very conipeWve Ascot hancscap hwtfe (an, S143, 
good. Apr 9. 15 ran). SMac— c HUMBERSIDE LADY 


1 JO HENNESSY COGNAC GOLD CUP HANDICAP CHASE (£17,448: 
3m 2f 82yd) (15 runners) 


301 11134P- RUN AND SNP (J McCarthy) J Speadng 6-120 

302 21011-4 CHMUBt PARTY (Q (Ms J Mould) DMchotaon 8-11-7 

303 3302P-1 EVERETT (K Hennessy) FWaiwyn ii-ii -7 

305 233HWJ DOOR LATCH (H JJoafiJ Gifford 8 - 1 1-1 

306 341 P-30 MAORI VENTURE (CD) (H J Joel) A Turns! 10-10-13 — 


40F21-2 FUMXRMG (Mrs M Valentine) F Winter 0 - 10 - 12 . 
11311-2 STEARSBY (BF) (T RnrSdan) Mrs J Ptanan 7-10-8- 
2PP13-1 ARCTIC BEAU (C) (P Venn) Mse J Thome 8-10-5— 
338-181 BRQAOHEATH (M Marsh) D Barons 9-10-5- 


ROwnmodr 
— SSMston 

R Rowe 

I Knight 


G McCmst 
-HI 


88 13-2 
8410-1 
91 8-1 
8816-1 
87 8-1 
8210-1 
S3 121 
P Metals 099 7-1 

F 1 F 02-1 THE LANGHOLM DYER (EdMwgh Woolen M3) G Rktafds 7-10-3 Pita* 90 7-1 

11323-1 STRANDS OF GOLD ( Inde pendent Twine) Jfcnmy FtegaraM 7-103 M Dwyer S7F5-1 

80 33-1 
86 21 

75 221 
73 221 

76 421 


307 

308 

309 

310 

311 

312 

313 0/4PPF-3 TRACTS SPECIAL (L Ames) A Ttanefl 210-0 L Harvey (4) 

314 M31FP-1 CHURCH WARDEN (J Monster) D Murray-SmMh 7-120 (Seat) C Brown 

315 1U2F11 QUICX TUP (J O’Corma) J O'Connor (ire) 7-10-0 (5ex) MrDtrCanor 

316 4/T1F04- THE CATCHPOOL (D B9) N Gasetoe 7-120 — KHooney 

317 F32-U12 TWO COPPERS (S Hunt) LKennard 11-120 B Powell 

1965: GALWAY BLAZE 2120 M Dwyer (11 -2) Jimmy Ftagerafd 15 ran 

i Bn (120) m tt race lest year, with MAORI 

10-2) In contention when faBng 4 out EVERETT 

, . .... n .„«aranCB when beating Casile Warden (127) 3 at Kampton(3m, 25994. good, Oct 18, 7 

ran). STEARSBY (ii -10) not knoc ke d about when M 2 nd to Stave ( 10 -CT at Chepstow (3m. good to soH): 

oi paretakneM start toot season ( 1 1 - 6 ) beat THE LANGHOLM DYER (1 1-3) 1 HL wMi STRAWS OFGOLDni- 
6 ) another 31 beck in 3rd at AMree (3m II NovCh. £5033. rood. AnrS. 11 ran). Pnevtoualv STRAWS OF GOLD 

( H -4) &Tisrwd a head 2nd to Cross Master ( — 

4) a further 5ftl away 6 th, THE LANGHOLM 
up at CheBenham (3m Nov Ch. £27260. 

DYEB 02 im beat PLUNDERBIG 

b eta Ste nt Valley (120) a head at 
ARCTIC BEAU <1Q-0)15KI back in 3rd tad 


FORM 

(11-4) won on reappearance when beating Castfe Vfonfon (127) a i 



, good to (km) i 

Hal start last st 

I (11-7) out of die firsts when winning the 1 


R ac ecard nonpar. Draw in brackets. Six-figure 
form (F-feB. P-putad up. U-unsaated rider. B- 
brougm down. S-sfcped up. R-ratused)- Horse’s 
name (B-bHters. V-vfsor. H-hood. E-EyeshtekLC- 
corase whaler. D-dfcaance winner. CDcourae 


Qoeomy Boy (right) jumps the last stride for stride with M Climb in yesterday’s BMW Series Ffoal at Newbury. 
Queensway Boy won by lVi lengths but had to survive an objection and a stewards’ inquiry (Photograph: Hugh Soutledge) 

Queensway Boy gives trainer 
most valuable prize of career 


B Want (4) 


7 -? 

and ast a noa winner. BF-beesan faworito in latest 
race). Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
w Um i L Rider plus any a Bo wanca. The Timas 
Prtva» Ha ra tap psr’s raStog. Appn w kntae starting 
price. 


. , i ». £24809. 

(11-10)41 back in »d wtw 

prosstve when beating I 

Wncanton (3m if. £38)4, good to soft. Nov 13 . 7 ran) . C 

final oukriq of tast season whan beating PUMBSBNG (114Q 201 to 



had MAORI VDmJte 

kn- 
ot 
in 

(3m 21, heavy). CMBtCH 


401 8)82422 BALLYTREMT p4re G MoKsy) M Olvar 211-0 

402 32DPP0 BULY BUVS (C Popttam) C Popham 211-0 

403 2324=32 BRAUNSTQN BROOK (MraE Boucher) DOughton 21 1-0. 


405 

407 

412 


WARDEN (127) successful on reappearance when beating Baffin (1 1-0) 1 YA at Aacot (2m 4f. £18584, good, 
Nov 15. 6 ran). Setacita BROADHEATH 

2.20 HOPEFUL CHASE (£4,142: 2m 4f) (10 runners) 

RDnmmfe 0 99 22 
_ SMcNsB 74 — 
H Davies 81 121 

33211 COMERAGH XMQ (A Budge Equine Lid) Jkiwny RtzgerakJ 7-11-0 M Dwyer — F5-4 

(142 OEWSPRVBOr (DTP aromJFlYWer 211-0 PSe u O u m — 21 

3011-23 FOYLE FSHERMAN (Mra K Hufchbwxi) J Jenkins 7-11-0 J White 94 21 

140002 PLAYSCHOOL (R CotSe) D Barons 6 - 11-0 PMcteCs 

413 0ty2F32 PROUD PHjBRH (L ady Btecker) J Webbv 7-11-0 GMemagk 82121 

415 48P- SALBNJRST (Satalust Paper) G Balding 2114) KHooney 

416 4210-43 TARCOHEY (R Whittle) P Cundel 211-0 A Gannon 83 — 

1985: HE BRECHEH 211-0 S Sherwood (22) O Sherwood 7 ran 
BAP18 BALLYTRENT (11-0) fini s hed a 71 tad to Ulan Bator (11-5) on his rampearanoa here ( 2 m «f. 
runm £247a,good.Nov5,9ran).BftAUNSTONBROOK(11-8)wasbeeianWbyBacktestAtaey(11- 
Qwta TARCONEY (1143) a tather 19 beck in 3rd. here (2m 160y. £3106, good. Nov 12 , 8 ranL COWMOH 
luNG (lO-CD was en aaqr wtaier war hwaes. tfw lettar at UtknelBr. betang Whtaty Go GOQ24B 121 (tat 4f, 

£3404. good to soft, Nov 13, 15 ran). FOYLE FtSHBtMAN (11-4) was a 22nd to Olympic Prize (11-4) wfth 

TARCOfeY(11-4)finrshing a dststtAth after a bad error in the eeny stages, at Aseotlta), £2929. firm, Oct 29, 
5 ran). PLAYSCHOOL is a decent handfcw hunter wfn lastyear P2fllMat Cettlc F^ht (12<5 at Ctapttm 
(3m, £8659. good to soft, Nov 30, 15 ram. PROUD PBjGRIM (11-2) finshed II 2nd to Ton Caxton (11-0) at 
Windsor (2m 40y. £1769. good, Nov 8, 16 ran). SalsrHnir FOYLE FdgRMAM 

2^0 NORTH S TH EE T HANDICAP CHASE (£3,629: 2m 160yd) (8 rurmera) 

SOI 4FU-124 UTTLE BAY (Mra S Catherwood) G Richards 11-1 1-10 PTtafc 

503 3811/11- KYOTO (B Monkhousq J Jaddna 21 1-3 

504 44023F OUR FUN (P Hopkins) J Gifford 21213 


505 1/21302 JO COLOMBO (B CBitafi Mrs W Sykes 11-1210 

506 224021 ROMANY MGHT8HADE<0» (Mra R SttadJT Forster 12129 . 

507 3130/12 DESTtaY BAY (C) (G Johnson) N Henderson 2124 

508 0DU3Q/4 RWERfBEM(C Bowen-CoVusqO Sherwood 21M — ; — 

509 012-243 DOUBLETON (B) (A Fort) L Kennart 2120 — 


>4 22 

87121 

90 21 

91 — 


SMontaad 
_ H Davies W99F2-1 
dee 92 7-1 
S Starwood — 121 


1965: ADMBML'S CUP 7-120 B da Haan (9-4) F Winter 7 ran 
rnou UTTIE BAY (1212) wae vfriualy knocked onr tv OUR HJH (122) who IMatlhe tost ftaca in 
rwnffl the Meckeson a tortnitat ago pn 4f.E14395.goodto1bni.Nov8.il ran)buttaayedon tobe 
12 k. 1 4th to Vtay Promising (11-13) KYOTO (127) won first time up at Newton Abbot last sea son be att r w 

^LDecT. 


Vtay Pi 

Leodagrance ( 1 1 - 1 ) an 
effort last soman when a 


■i 3). KYOTO (12-7 
(2m 5f. 

w tonerfro m MMM 


|3 ran). Last ifcne out ROMANY NWHraHA DE(12G) m ade aflwtiant 

9or (&n 40y, £1582. good, Nov 8. 5 ran). DEST W Y BAYIBH 

though dtequa»tod and placed 2nd to Troiona ( 10 - 6 ) at ( 

neck dMded them. Selection: KYOTO 


I (1219 1 

-(11-7) atChatantam (2m, £4319. soft, t 


.JOOOLOHBOI 


3 Jffl SPEEN NOVICE HURDLE (Div U: £2,074: 2m 100yd) (21 runners) 

602 
604 


606 

607 

609 

610 
611 
613 

617 

618 

619 

620 
621 
626 

629 

630 


634 

635 

636 


1421 FH56HAL TROOPER (C) (P Bonner) Mrs J Ptawn 5-11-7 . 
3202-10 RAZOR SHARP (S Dobson) G Pram 211-7. 


0 ABOU-AZatMMadgwfckjMMadgwkdtA-ll-a, 


97 FSS 
CCn(fi 88 — 


4 ALTO CUMULUS (Mrs A Pnriaroon) N Otseiee 4-11-0. 


AMadgirick 


2 DUKE OF CA1BRJDGE (A Richadl) H Ottad 4-11-0. 
FUJI CONSULTANT (J Long) J BoslBy4-1HI. 


FOWtTHTtlOORfTRamsderg A Baiey 4-11-0. 

01 QHESIRmGE(UfiicdGpHoUng4S Motor 7-1 1-0 
BBHAN HAL (Mrs R Waters) P Welwyn 4-11-0. 

0332- LBMAST (B) (6 Lodge) J PBTOB4.11-0U 


2 MBBWSg>BtaendBkQDaoomleMA-ll-0. 


OfPOO- W?AVe4QSMB)(S Cooper) GIQndersley 5-1 1-0. 

4 MY HBJSSMAN (G Hubbard) J Gtffoil 5-11-0 

022 RANDOM CHARGE (P Da WBds) J Jankns 21 1-0 


0 SOlinraWS (Southern C«mran)JG8tort 4-1 1-0 

TALLANSTOWN BOY (Q Sweeney) N Henderson 211-0. 

0 YELLOW CARD (A Annftago)ONtno(90rt 211-0 

BORSIGEAL (Lady LyeflJJ Webber 2129 

3 DOLLY (J Bird) A Moor* 4-129. 


• 99 — 

. R Chapmen (4) 83 — 

__ M Bosley (4) 

. GMcCocrt 

— « 

.StawKniMd 94 — 

1(4) 

. C 

- R 

. J WhNa 93 7-2 


. — EMophy —121 
HkRWMti(7) — 21 
. RDemmxfy — 21 
- G 


0P02 KEB6E-BEE(D Havers-Clark) A Chantoeriahi 2129 
POOOO f PERFECT D01BLE (D ABen) D Bsworth 21" ~ 


G Moore 80121 

^ AChamtariski — — 
„ Lena Vtoceot — — 


1985: ACCURACY 4-129 B RaBy (13-35 G Baktag 11 ran 

CADM FEDBtAL TROOPH1 (11-0) was a ca n fo rt a bfo 41 wkner from The West Awake (11-0) 
rwnffl mirMi)nnm«teni»ffil434 good to soft. Nov 12, 14 ran)- RAZOR SHARP, 8th to Signalman test 

— ■■*— u — alUttaiatar(2ni,£68S.good 

- into 4lh behind the promle- 

... J A NM IM J GC (1210) wise 

Ifltl 6th to Goodman Point at Ungfiald £548. good. Dec 21. idranL umtsr(1210) 41 2nd to Hasty 

Gamble (11 -4) at Devon ^2m If. £744. good to soft. Aprils ran). RANDOM CHARGE (11-0) fab - 2nd. beaten 'n 
by Med About Ya|ll-3)hera(tail00y. £1440, good to soft. Nov 12, 15 ran). DOLLY (1 0-9) was 221 back bi3rt 
to Oitnenskm (1 t-Q at Hum|don(2n.SS8& good to soft Nov 10, ISrarj. Staedtoo: RANDOM CHARGE 


- ------ It, in 

tone, was adlstanttad whan left In lead to win by 3 bom Rfchard UonheartOMlat 

tofinn.Oct11.11 ran). E*-trtsh ALTO CUMlBJ»(l-0) was only beatan7%lien^ai 

ina Mr Pistar (11-0) at Ascot (2m, £ 2219^^000 to firm. Nov 14, 7 rani. DUXEOFC 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 

W km a ra Runners Par Cant 
T Raster 13 61 292 

F Winter -ta 1SS 242 

0 Nictiobon 33 158 202 

O Sherwood 5 24 202 

JJaracns 13 73 194 

Mrs J Pitman S 26 192 


JOCKEYS 



Winners 

Ridas 

Par cm 

S Sherwood 

8 

37 

21-6 

P Scudamore 

41 

193 

212 

H Davies 

SB 

142 

19.7 

SSnttiEcctes 

19 

131 

145 

R Roan 

17 

145 

11.7 

Stave KnigM 

6 

66 

9.1 


AYR 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.30 Pat’s Jester. 

1 .00 The Cider And Bun. 

1.30 New life Connection. 


2.00 Santopadre. 

230 Hardy Lad- 

3.00 Oaken. 

3.30 Glass Mountain. 


Going: soft 

1&30 CULROY NOVICE HURDLE {3-Y-O: £685: 2m) (12 runners) 


2 

4 

5 

6 
7 
6 

10 

it 

12 

16 

18 

19 


1 GODOUKW(D)(ExclieUeQW storey 1213 

BMSEY BOY (Mss Z Green) Mfas Z Green 127- 


ACamfi 96 F5-2 


CAROUSEL ROCKET (A SaccorrandtO R Whkakar 127- 

0 CASUAL HMS (BP) (J Montem) G Riehwds 127 

bBNALTO U Bitadii) Dsnys Smah 127 . 


TGDoe 


GREB88LLS BOY (J O'Connor) P Monteitti 127 . 

NEXT DANCE (J McQueen) M Naughton 127 

3 PATS ASTER (RP Adam Ltd) RAtan 127 

ROYAL HOUSER fF Lee) FH Lee 127 


C Grant 
DNolaa 


44« KAMPKALL (G Oram) MbaZ Green 122- 
BO NEGAITS HOVE (R EBoH) J Jefferson 122 
RaPD STAR (P MomaHn) P Monteth 10-2 


.. SHoOend 
. 5 Chariton 


— 121 
— 21 
— 13-2 


•99 21 
— 21 


— 121 


1965: ABSONANT 129 Mr P Mven (7-4 fav) Mrs G Revaley 9 ran 


D Jones (7) — — 


1-0 RVEWAYS NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,335: 2m) (13 rurmera) 


2 000232 

3 000222 

4 833200 
B 28/B002 
8 000002 
9 2024-20 

F3203 
030300 


MLESIAN DANCER (D) (I DalgUshlWFakgriert 211-7 JKU-— 

TARTAN TORCHUQHT (Edhburgh Woden MB) G Richards 211-6 J R Quinn (7) 

HAZEL BANK (W McNnfay LBfl P UontodJi 7*11*1 D Nolan 

PROUD CON (H Proud) J Chartton 7-11-0 R l 

SKY BOOT ( Mrs B Ro blnsai) E Carter 7-1213 — 

PLEDGDON GRSN (R Ademson) V Thompson 21213 . 

BROWNHBJ. IASS (A Paton)RGoidto 5-1211 

KATY QUICK (F Bertow) M Naughton 21210. 


RUSTIC TRACK (N Buckle) Denys Smkh 21210. 
<»W DOCTOR CHESNE (R RcUStm) W McQM 4-126 
000031 

838043 I 
(MUM 


Mr M Thompson (4) 

B Storey 

M Hammond 

conn 


THE CRIER AND BfM (R Hurai) W Storey 210-8. 
COPY WR/TB) (B) (H Jackson) R Gray 2120. 
PRINCE BUBBLY (J Bennett M Arison 2120. 


J! 

. A CarroD 


86 21 

92 7-2 
8814-1 

14-1 

91 — 

93 — 

94 21 
91 12-1 
96121 
82 — 

•99F3-1 


S Chariton 

— 84 21 


ISBSe N* ceaeapanctag roc# 


1.30 THNN5NTS SPECIAL HANDICAP CHASE (£5.106: 2m 4f) (6 runners) 

3 ^^^BCTIONICO^ CB McABan) W A Srophanaoi 7-11-10 Rtaata 

MOORE (OWW Cak*> JOOvar 12129 

WftOWCUM (CO) [Ewart Eng Ud) G Richards 7-10-9— 

Z338P-3 TUB nnnm tr- m ■ .u. . .. - ^ 


4 

j. M—, , »"•* "_*— i— r !=-»—* em, lw) o nicwa i- iv-a— .... 

, n*Div»ra((Ui)(E«ireiha tm JAftfcen) Mrs TCMder 2127 


JKI 
Jl 

. TGOUD 
C Grant 


.. — * **' wiiwaj oavsrr 12-10-0, C Grwd 

11 COBLRVALLIANT (D) (R Adamson) V Thompson 210-0 .— Mr M Thompson ( 4 ) 

final ARGMBnt 21 1-6 P Trick 121 1 fev) G RUaida 9 ran 


•99F2-1 
« 4.1 

93 21 
90 21 
— 121 
83 221 


ZO MONTGOMERIE HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,624: 2m) (12 runners) 

111/202 GUISBOnOUSH TOWN (D) (Mss E Curtis} G Cabsrt 211-10 C 

200332 HB-YMSAR (W McMattv) W Rock 211-10 

100200 SONNY ONE SMME (CO) (DKhh)P Alan 211-8 R 


110024 SANTOPADRE (D)(T Ramadan) W Storey 4-11-2. 
1102 COO. STRIKE (D)(T Knarias)G Moore 21210- 


1 
2 
3 
6 
9 
10 
1Z 

15 

IS 028264 DARK TRR (Ms SBaudouk^J Johnson 21 21. 

18 182)031- BLAYMST (CO) (V Shields) TOaig 1210-0 

19 121233 ABSONANT (CO) (Mrs A Show) Mra G Revatey 4-1 0-0 . 

20 100260 YELLOW BEAR (D) (H BoustMCQ J Perkes 4-120 


A Carrel 099 


311030 WARWICK SUITE (VjCO) (P Darios) M Naughton 4-129 . 


201322 SMART M BLACK (WStovsnson-Taytor)CrBchsrts 4-IOT , 
3022-30 STRB« PLAYER (D)(F Lee) FH Lea 4-123. 


92 21 
« 21 

87 21 
F21 

83 — 
91 122 
97 4-1 
97 121 

88 12-1 
87 — 

. B Storey 89 — 


S Chariton 
- Jl 
. 81 


1965: CENTRE ATTRACTION 2120 P Tuck (4-1) G Rfebarts 4 ran 

£30 JOAN MACKAY HANDICAP CHASE (£2£50: 3m 110yd) (5 runners) 

1 10F11-O THE HONKER (CO) ffPMMcOoPBghUrilW A SMphe aa a i 212-5 Rl 

2 014112 reA7YSA*BJT(CIR (Sfiss H Hamtaon) Mss HHaraBton 12-120 _iir A Dudgeon 

3 1P431-3 HAffflY LAD (C) ffJra J LGEgan) B WSOBCr 9-1 1-7 

7 0P4211 GHINDB«(CmCNeec9wmsButehoittE Carter 2125 (4e*J Ml 

10 418PP-2 ROYAL JET (3 FMrbatrtt G FtaMM 2120 C( 

196& THE THMKER 7-10-8 K Jama 14-1 W A Stephenson 9 ran 

3JJ MAUCHUNE NOVICE CHASE (£1^42: 2m) (5 runners) 

1 9PHM1 OAKEN (Wto of Statartanfl Doiyi 8ndBi 5-12T Cttaat 

4 004202 AUCKLAND EXWESS (M ThaapsOt) V Ttwmpaon 211-3 - taMThowpeon W 



By Michael Seely 

Aubd Png buided the rich- 
est prize erf her three-year 
training career at Newbury yes- 
terday when AJku Webb drove 
Queensway Boy past At post a 
length and a half hi front of FeB 
Climb to win the BMW Series 
Final. Bat it was a fhD 20 
minutes before the annance- 
ment canae that the stewards had 
overruled an objection by Kern 
Mooney, the jockey on the 
runner -op, for “c arrying me 
right-handed from halfway tip 
the run-in’'. 

“It nffl be a tr a v esty of justice 
if I don't get this,” exclaimed 
Mooney dramatically after- 
wards. However, the more 
realistic asthorifies took the 
commonsense view that al- 
though interference had un- 
doubtedly occurred, it had been 
accidental and had not affected 
the result 

Miss King was elated to hear 
that the piaemgs were In remain 
mattered. “That’s not only the 


biggest race I've ever won," said 
the 28-year -old Stratford-on- 
Avon trainer, “it’s also the first 
miner Fve had on a g r o u p one 
trade. Inqipusefberehadtabe 
a drama as that was my 13th 
winner.” 

Both Queensway Boy and FeB 
Climb had been kicked together 
in a hard fought battle from the 
Sib fence from home. Fergy 
Foster, the 7-4 favourite, moved 
op smoothly in the straight bat 
fitSed to stay the three mdes and 
weakened quickly an the Oat m 
dead-heat for third place with 


Landau. “I thoBgbt the boy rode 
him wrfL” Winter centmaeiL 
“Don’t fbtgct that Conqarriug h 
a Limipaietfie novice and that 
he’s sfffi got a tot to lean.** 
Two frnces.frsm hone in dm 
Jacky Upton Handicap Chase 
Wister looked all set to land a 
durable when Peter Scudamore 
sent AdmhaTs Cap op to chal- 
lenge Premier Cbariir. Bat Us 
Ob penalty then took its toll as 
Baade Beggan drove Premier 
Charlie dear to win by five 




the senior jockeys who 
rode in fee fraal pronounced the 
Newbmy going to be soft. And 
after vrinuibgthe Oaafkkt Con- 
djthwal Jockeys* Handicap 
Chase with Conquering, Fired 
Winter said: “Hrt a foil mother 
to Plradang ray Hennessy 
rawer. And If the pound 
doesn't become any worse, he’s 
cot a meat chance." 

Conquering was handled with 
sympathy and streng t h by Guy 


is a marvrikms Ud 
horse,” said Michael 
Hmchdfile, the winning trainee, 
“He's been placed in his last five 
races. IVe now bad two winners 
and three placed hones from the 
six ramen -rve had since I 
moved to Lrtcombe Regis." 

Epsom stables won two races 
during the afternoon. John Jen-; 
kins capturing the first division 
-oftbeFfceshmaa’s Novices* Hnr» 
die with Ricmar and Reg 
Akehnrst the Natrfret Handi- 
cap Hurdle wfth Jovea light. 


: Ti'S ^ 


MARKET RASEN 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 Kitty Wren. 1.15 Badsworth Boy. 1.45 By 
The Way. 2.15 Bigsun. 2.45 Dan The Millar. 3.15 
Royal Greek. 


Going: good to soft 

12.45 KORGE SELLING HANDICAP MUX£ 

(£642: 2m) (20 rumors) 

2 128 GODS Wftl. 09 BRWmood 7-11-10 

CMctaoffd (7) 

3 260 nmOYKlWaR T CririMt 1211-9 — JDDariro(7) 

4 820 SAUNSON BOY nDIJPSnei 211-7 T«M 


620P- TOMMY BUMNEil Bfe HRaairo 2114. 

7 -430 GQLDORATION AM P Upun "11-Tl-O JAfcataM 

12 002 AIEXCM OICE Mra M Boron 7-1212 CSrett 

15 -838 GOOD BIVESTMENTB LbmB||n 2129 RPuwy 

16 1*0- JUKEBCtt JnWYftLD) J DDyra 2127 

17 0M TRUE M Dtemftn 2127. 


18 3411 KnTYWRBI(BJ))G BOO 2127 (7ox) 


21 OT- fflMIKR A HNwr 1210-4 _ 

24 4/2 OUR mEIENDGRWCto 2122 

25 ■« IteSA KB OR K Mormn7-122 
28 MO JUSTGRAYLE(ftD)las 


GRovatoy 7-120 


PMEOamatt(7) 
~ - DFWmt. 
SJOYtoB 
KRyaa(7) 


32 

33 


LADY ROMOHA F Lera 21M . 
AVRAEAS R Manta 7-100 


PMmffl 

MrNSnMfn 
DStara 


145 ‘GraTTAR* GRAND NATIONAL TRIAL 
HANDICAP CHASE {£4*045: 4m 2Q (3) 

1 1-T1 BTTHEWAY Mra MDckicocn 2126 ^ax).G8RKtay 

3 882 BW OOMY B ANK G Roe 11-1213 HrC Larotai 

9 am IBBBIP) Q Mare 11-120 M tana 

1-3 By The Way. 100-30 Broony Bank, 11-2 Maiarak. 

2.15 RAILWAY NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£1,385: 3m) (16) 

1 2131 GALAVfOObflnjNaton 212-2 S Woods (7) 

2 221 CHRttTMASHQlLir Ma G Rawtey 211-11 (7es) 

PlimM 

4 3440 PEARL HBKHANT Ms S Braprf 21W>_ G f ~ 

5 4340 SIIWADLaa 54213 

6 322 MAC CHARLEY P Garage 21211 

7 BP-4 tSGSUN D Iflchabcn 21210 „ 

8 802 FRAMCSBOREEHJtaravRtzgerakl 21210 — 


10 084) HOBOUmOES R WQodhaura 4-104 


12 MO ANOT HBI NOR FOLK BMcMtaoo212l 

14 POP 5AVQt£VRE5LFtaTy21M M 

16 042 CHART FMDBt A SnOi 4-120 

17 9PW HOLLOW LAUGH MBBBs 2100 0 

18 0430 GOLDOI BAVARO T Caktaefl 210-0 $ 

20 002 HABKAL M OM ENT NBsaaft 2104) 


. TWsB 


i 


(7) 


C Ira 2120, 
7-104). 


, KRyea(7) 


34 84)0 BYROC BOY R Curtis 2164 

35 0008 ASCOT AGAM (B) J PSratti 121 00 G 

36 0P2 CASSANDRA’S DREAM R Wtitakar2HM)- 


^ l rg 5SS 
w 


Jute Bax, Jimmy, 121 Just 


ooxny ( 
Grape, 


Mass Md, 12-1 attara. 


1.15 CHASE HANDICAP CHASE (El .525: 2m) (3) 

1 OP- BADSV0H7H BOY (CD) Ms MDMttaa) 11-12-7 

GBndtay 

2 223 K AHBtOMO RE (CD) M H Eaattitiy 21211 LWyar 

6 UP4) raHYPICXfCOjj Ugh 2120 S. 


Evens Karenotnoe. 24 Badsworth Boy, 21 Jimm y p ic k. 

Course specialists 


TRAMER& Mrs M Dickinson. 10 wtaners from 18 runnars, 
55 JB*i M H Eastaroy, 28 from 95, 27^4%: G Moore. 7 from 27. 
25L9%; Jimmy Ftemrald, 28 from 123. 22iWs J Jefleraon, 8 
from 39. 205%: J BteKU, 20 from 166, 20JnL 
JOCKEYS: G Brattay, 11 winners from 28 rides. 393V & 
Johnson, 18 from 142, 12.7%; M Bren na n. 20 from 214, 95%. 
(Only three quaMara) 


22 P2P HAPPY M30 

23 0P80 DEMON XMG 
13-8 Chr ta ftn as HoOy, 11-4 Bigsun, 4-1 Griawood. 7-1 

Golden 8avard, 121 Hoboanas, 16^ rttara. 

2j 45 RH} LION NOVICE CHASE (£4,479: 2m) (8) 

1 1221 SHARP SONG TFralust 211-1 — 

2 -308 BmBMM DOWN N Byudt 7-129 MBm» 

3 014- DA N THE M 8JLAR Mrs M Oicfciraon 7-129- Q Bradtav 

42004 DOnPEEAR (BQ J Jeftorepo 2129. 

5 021 DOteT AfWOYHE R Whitaker 210-S- 

B Sfi/P JAYS GREY J BteKtaO 2129. 

81221- SMQLECOTE Iks P Shr 210-9 

9 4342 SKVra SNOW Mrs EScoft 2104. 


KBoarod. 
Gl 


21 Dan The MBar, 24 Stogtoooto, 4-1 Sharp Sotg. 6 - 1 - 
Don't Annoy Me, 12-1 Dick ’E* Bear, 121 oltars. 

3.15 MARKET RASEN NOVICE HURDLE (£1 ,83ft I 
2m) (19) 

*1 Dkkknon 4-11-7 B Brectay 

1 STARWO OD gRC Trtder 4-11 -7 ZT—- 

2 COPPER KMeb Metataon 5-11-4^ W Hatami (71 
» PUPTHEC OINLW a r taHl Mm 211-4-,^ Jlfamta 

0 WWTWICE D Lae 211-4 -IZTT—- 

_ J^jreCOATT Barron 211-4 PDitaffl- 

0 L0BD YB ° YD Metafoon 211-4 RBeggoi 




^■LUWNATEJLafi II l M 
022 KIHLSMjTAXuatb 211-4. 
SWIFT 8HARKR Casey 7-1 1-4B 


if* . 

-•V 


4 

P-1 nilWEROFTMTL. 

ZB 3 NOCREDmiTYB! 

34 020 CBM GIRL RWbodhoura 21213. 

S fofA WPTOW GRACE WWattpn 4-126- 
38 WOHHVBlFCi—a-iim 
40 NMOOLAEVE J Gkwar4-129l 


KDooter- 

.JBwkro v 


C Ew Chap man 211-4 


. SJOWMI 1 

. 0 ! 


SJohnon 




CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Selections 

By Mandarin 
12.30 Hurricane Henry. 1.0 Patrick’s Star. 1.30 
Fortina’s Express. 2.0 Mr Sponge. 230 Wild 
Argosy. 3.0 Jody's Boy. 


6 002133 QE7691AL CHAMX2S (Mrs J Brac&xxna) J Bredtame S-11-3 
8 034432 B2AWHB4SKr(HFrouttJCar«kmMf-3. 


. Mr J 

R 


84 74 
•99 21 

94 7-2 
9BF2Z 
80 7-1 


•93F&4 
86 21 
— 21 
— 4-1 
22 


11 003023 TOWIVGE (Mra JMtaj Mre JGoodtaOow 7-1 1-3 — B Storey 

1985: OOWAN HOUSE 211-3 K Jones (7-8 JHav) W A SfophanaM 8 ran 

&30 GRUNWICK NH FLAT RACE (£721: 2m) (16 owners) 

3 BOTANY BLADE (K Hanson) MAvtson 4-1 1-5 — — 121 


1 

2 

3 

5 

6 
7 
9 
11 
12 

13 

14 
16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


B.VM0T0N (Mrs G WoBort) T Waited 4-11-5- 


N Uracli (7) — 


0 FRESH VP LD LAD (SCOBMl Farm LttJJSWtaon 211-5 MBwHby (4) 

2 GLASS MOUNTAIN 03 WWahomJT SB 4-11-5 CKo8M(7) 

0 GUTWBES GORSE (R Gokfle) R Golds 21 1-6 HrC Scop* (7) 

JUST DBMS (A RScft) D Yeoman 4-11-5 Mr D Baiter (7) 


MBffMUM BP (T Cimtfmi i i) T Omnta^ram 211-5. 
OIBfrANA (A F Stage Ud) Jimmy Ftagera»d*-11-6.. 

SOUTH SUNRISE (Mrs T Tate) TTats 4-11-6 

0 STROMAR(E Kennedy) JSWtson 4-1 1-S. 


. J O’Qanaaii (7) 

R Faboy (7) 

WSMptana(7) 

rPMa cto grartW 


TAHTANTRADOiAIK Mteata Wooten k«0 □ RtoBrfls WM CDs mis (7) 

23 nSUNG R06EY (D Todd) H Wtartan 4-114) TPWMtop) 

GOLDBt OATS (Mra VPariOJCfrorten 211-0 MrLHudaon 

MAtgWABBJJEM Smati) JSWteon 4-11-0 MrJJ M cL are n 

__ Mr D McCain Iprfti 

D Jackson (7) 


PASSAGE TO FREEDOM (M Jump) D McCain 211-0- 

3 RU8ADA8K (M Mtchet) Mrs G Hawley 211-0 

198SsNoca«ro *pMteBfl lte9 

Course specialists 


21 

21 


— F3-1 

— 121 

— 7-8 

— 121 


— 122 



MNrim 

Rumors 

Percent 


JOCKEYS 

Rides 

131 

Par Cant 
20.6 

J*nmy FtageraM 

9 

29 

31 

iea 

23.0 

173 

R Lamb 

Wmnera 

27 

G Richards 

45 

256 

17.B 

C Grant 

22 

159 

13.6 

Denys Snath 

15 

5 

96 

41 

155 

125 

TG Dun 

19 

146 . 

120 

MNauafaon 

10 

96 

10.4 

Only Quafifiore 







CHCUS BEAR R Satas 11-0- 

D EADBO LT A Robsoi 11-0 

4 EXPERT WITNESS BMcram -c 
00 FARAWAY LAD D Ringer 114). 

F HELEN BOVRoiThomMan 11-0 

4 HURRICANE HBOTY MWEattvtiy 114) 

0 CMEVE7 LADY RWMatar 168 RHatfiatofT) 

COME POUR TW MMEHIMraton 109 _D ' 

0 IMRSLEYSUPHSEMsJfimlOft 


LADYLAPAZNTHder 106- 
LOVE AT LAST EAtate) 10-8 _ 


NTioMar 


I INSS BECCAW Hater 106. 
OURNOORAJPtaialOOi 


mCESSMTOOMSIAOChwmnlOa S 

SKELTON MW Baffirty 706 A 

FP StMCTOARDBI N Ctambertain 129 

TONICS W Storey 106 


NMrfSonmdc 

10030 Paus 


Going: good to soft (chase); soft (hunffes) 

12^0 GOATHLAND NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 
£685: 2m) (20 runners) 

1 124 CUHSSANNUOJW MH Eastern* 11 -8 D 

Z 01 PAULS SECRET uSfy Denys Stem 11-8 A Si 

4 BURHAAM N TW4BT114). ‘ ‘ 

6 
8 

10 
11 
12 

14 

19 

20 
21 

23 

24 

25 

26 
27 

31 

32 

33 

22 Cumbrian Mfe 3-1 Hurfcarw Haray, 

Socrw, 21 Gcpon mtna&s, 2T dwvat Lady. 121 o&teB. 

1J0 CLEVELAND SELLING HURDLE (£984: 2m) 

( 10 ) 

5 B2 JANE’S BRAVE BOY DOraraaa^lf-?.^. A Skfoow 

6 /OO JOHNNY FffiMCHMN A ratoon 211-7 

ShanaJancsfTl 

.9 -ODD 1ME YQMKR J Parkas 4-11-7 RT “ 

15 

17 

18 
19 
21 
23 

24 Parties Star, 11-4 Fanny RoMa 11-2 The Yompor. 2i 
Nipper Smith, 121 Rymos, 121 Dorm Venture, 221 omara. 

. Course specialists 

TRAINERS: R Brews. 6 wmora from 19 runners, 3i£%: N 
Twiktar. 5 from 16. 31 J%: M H EMKby. 17 Iran 64.226%: M W 
Easwr t g, 11 from 54. 20 -4%: U Naughton, 6 from 42, 14B%: 
-Birnny H trgprakf , 6 from 57. 102%. 

JOCKEYS: C Kawtes. 16 artmora from 96. rides. 16.7%. (Only 
onaqu^Scr). 


Ott PA1WCJP8 STAR (BX4Jnany Hhgandd 21210 

J J Qqvhv 

P OOH yg f TWE N TWdir 2105 — SKaigMey 

EASTER N HBGHTSMNautatel 2106 R Strang* 

OQ WPPERa«IHWJSntev?106 ~- 

U RVMOSmw Storey 2105 KTaatan 

0 SWALLOW THE (B)Roi Thompson 2106 — 

222 FANNY RO&BKlADaiya Safoi 2100— ASMhhO) 


Y0RB HANDICAP CHASE (£2,456: 

3m 300yd) (8) 

1 404 ROBTMAW EXn&98 W A Sttphonson 1211-13 

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8 W HEAUmOpr^l^^^ ■: 

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5 0FP8 POUR OF EACH V Hal 21 1-7 I 

. 6 oou GBMARO M Naughton 6-11-7 Mr AOteay .. 

8 000 HffiAYLAD R tettaga .. 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVFMRFR 79 1 Q8fi 


SPORT 


41 


RACING 


Mi 



Triptych to fly 
the European 
flag in Tokyo 
showpiece 


— j-e- 


V.V. 



es trains 
“ 4 ‘ catf 


Triptych, not the best but by 
;fer the toughest top-das? per-, 
former in Europe this season, 
looks the pick of an inter- 
national field for the Japan 
Cup, ran over 1% mite ^ 
■ Fochu racecourse, Tokyo, 
early tomorrow morning. 

* The race. Which is due off at 
&2Dr m GMT, has drawn a 
-field of 14, equally divided 
between home-trained and 
foreignhorses. 

, Tnptych was never going 
iwell enough on the Santa 
:Ahfca dirt to play a part in the 
Breeders’ Oip Classic, is 
-which she finished sixth, be- 
hind Skywalfeer but the 
remainder of her record this 
ryear is exceptional 
,• She will be ridden by Tony 
Cruz, who partnered her for 
the first time when she beat 
Celestial Storm and Park Ex- 
press in the Dubai Champion 
States. Two weeks previously 
she lad run one of her very 
best races when beaten 1% 
lengths and half a length by 
Dancing Brave and Bering in 
the Arc. 

Although Bonecrusher Is an 
absentee, there will be strong 
Australasian support for 
Waverfey Star, another New 


Zeala n d -bred, who won the 
official trial, the pitte-furiong 
Fuji Stakes, at Tokyo two 
weeks ago. 

Jupiter bland, whose sea- 
son has so far been restricted 
to two races by injury, leads 
the British challenge. He did 
not reappear until October 25 
when be defeated Verd-An- 
tMue by 1% lengths in the St 
$umm Stakes. A proven trav- 
eller, Jupiter Island has sound 
place prospects. 

He is preferred to Alfcz 
Mxlofd, who beat Baby Turk 
and Moon Madness in the 
Europa Preis last time. Two 
moderate German colts were 
dose up in that tight finish 
and tiie form may not be as 
good as it looks at first sight 

.American horses woo the 
first two runnings of the Japan 
Gup but their subsequent 
record has been less imposing 
and their only representative 
this year. Flying Pidgeon, has 
not found peak form in recent 
outings. 

Carotene, the Canadian 


A 


c halle nger, ran a dose third to 
Bonne He in the YeDow 
Ribbon, at Santa Anita, two 
weeks ago and could prove 
each-way value. 


JAPAN CUP FIELD 


Gofaat&ni ■ 

&20 JAPAN CUP (Grade b £382,775: 1m 4f Turf) (14 runners) 

JSSSSESSSSSSSSi 


tn 


■ i 

2 

3 3TT120 TOHfrWAYCSra.Afl| 

4 131100 KU 8WRO ICMOtA Abel rNntonoIaWra 

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7 imil JUSABUfl OfTTaunoda) K *tactt4-8-13j 

8 333310 THPITCH(ACtom)PEfancons(Fr)444. 

9 110121 WAvmersrMjnHhzMDCrsuNwifl 
IS 001531 AJPTira mJUCJUTd Taratocl^ C Bra 

11 n«W ■UQWBAttp rOd^HRSSfaWJ 

12 U10M gallop PYNA<Mefitanraraanraro 

13 toum AUEZHLOn^^MGlSwodfl 

14 0-1011 SAKIBtA TUT AKA 0 (Safaga Conanercal 


IS-6-13- 


1KSM4S-1&_ FKo|tail4 


Bartres well treated 

By Our Irish Baring Cor re sponde n t 


t a 
ea- 
ten 


In his younger days ; 
hurdler, Bartres was an 
peciaDy wild individual 
schooling over fences has 
sobered him up and he is 
developing into a very i n t e rest- 
ing hand trap chaser. He will be 
hard to beat in the £018,000 
Ftetria EBF Chase over two 
miles at Navan this afte r noo n as 
the bandicapper appears to have 
treated iron with wnphr 
generosity. 

On his comeback to racing 
after a summer byKrft he easily 
defeated Another Brownie at 
Ponchestowa but the race on 
which I prefer to judge 


abitity was the Power Gold Cup -match. 


that Bartres has not kept stride 
with him. 

Smartside should win the 
other big handicap, the 
HR 10,000 Navan Supporters 
Troytown Chase over three 
miles- Eddie Harty has done 
well this season with Smartside 
who beat Dahmore on virtually 
the same conditions at Galway 
when the. pair were a long way 
dear of their rivals. 

. Lots were drawn and at the 
Racing Board in Dublin yes- 
terday to determin e the rules 
that wonld go to die visiting 
Australian jockeys in the first kg 
of the Irlm Annulinn jockeys’ 


at Fatryhousein Aprfl. 

He went dear on the run-tn to 
beat Boro Quarter by six lengths 
at a difference of fib and now 
gets 131b from his victim. Brno 
Quarter has improved 

but there is no reason to beheve 


The team of four visitors is 
Jed. by the reigning Australian 
champion jockey, Peter 
Delaney, and he has d r a w n one 
of the better fended runners 
Bold Tavb, in the Dnnsany 
Handicap RunSe. 


FOOTBALL: EXPERIENCED LEADERSHIP THE KEY TO SUR PRISE LEADERS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND DIVISIONS 

Arsenal in a rush to exploit Shoe-string Royle 
the vacuum at Liverpool moves upwards 

with stylish touch 


RACING RESULTS 


in can i 
Sherwood, 1 
6-1 


Newbury 

(o soft (Chess com# soft 
hdto) 1, MCMARjS’ 
(R 


to (piA. ftoter Nomad 
ClWOioal Sunrise. 
.Wik±knaweLao(pial 


, a. 2XL G Wcftar* et 
£3.10; £1.10, £1.50. 


2. Mnp J ncfc (S 
AlSo fS^S JMov 

Forcafto (55), Satan (4th), 8 Mouratfibta. 
9 Basically Better. 10 Mjtoary Clock, 
Eaflte Destiny. IB Rivers Nephew {Bert. 

'ffitaews “ 


Rue St 
Owne ra pwfc. 

IS m. 10L 3. *L U «L J Jenkins at 
Epsom. Tatar £4.70; £1 JO. £220, £4.101 
DftEI 050. CSF: £51.65. 

UDBneMl, CONQUERING (8 
Landau, 4-5 fafc 2, Gasta Aa Utoea 


Prtofc. 50 WBr ( pu >. 


.A 

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4 

at 

Lsnbown. Tote £1^40. OR £1-50. CSF: 
£ 2 . 11 . 

Zfl 0mch} 1, CWEBeWAY BOr^ 


,iJ!aa) 

Srewstete; Tote 

ojodrezulcsr rasa. 

&0 (2m 4f fade) 1. HO0TECH (T 3 Dim. 
1M1^ 2. BreterM Hammond. 20-lfc 
3. SefOMd w {Mr M^hompson. 25-1). 
ALSO Twt 11-3 Rrmamort W 14 
Leader, 20 Ctomr Fo*y («t>)T SO 
Goadfelow's Rffly (5tt\), Pareaw Rem- 
66 Busied Spring, 
ester Hay Dqutw You 
Lock TT Pop (pi4 Major Rouge, 
_ . Old Kins Oote guL Falcon 

Cni 16 ran. NR: Aden ApofcTia.rtt.12L 
10L 4L J S WDean et Ayr. Tote £200; 
£1.10. £1.70. £6.10. DR £470. CSF: 
£20.44 

3L30 (2m 4f ch) 1. CENTRE ATTRAC- 


11-2 Leweado n Princa. 7 

Kfeoi 6 


12 

25 

.10 


sii* 


ran. NR: Gold Bearer. 1J5L IS . 

2»L not recorded. Mss A 
Stratford-Upon-Avon. Tote; £19.10: 
£224 8440, Ferjw Foadtwmd «nSaei 
both 9Gp. DR £13724 C8R £19924 
Tricast wffli Foray Poster £19454. wttfi 
Rig SM E463.T4 After a stewards’ 
Inquiry the rasuK Hood. 

1, JUVEN 


ALSO 

Wfardsoff (4th). 5 Ran. 6L » 
ffichards at Gmteok&TDtK SZJOO;; 
£1.10. OF: £2. lu. CSR £404. 
FtecepetESJS. 

Nottingham 

to soft Quailed: 


a 


1245 rail fKfie) 1. SOLENT LAO 
Mxae. 5-1): ~ 


U 


230 An 41 t2Dyd MU 1. 

UGKT (S Smkti Bate 9Tfc 2. 

hn Repel toy (4W. 5 Battle Wng {5d4 
PantoRSoe (*46 Tenzing. VteoF^. 
14 CeWc Flame. Jade And Diamond. 


7-4 l tev%|£ra 


(N Canon. 16- 
jr. 42). ALSO 


TMderJBV 
■Renovedon 




Model RjpB, IE Joy Rkto. 12 im 10. A 
hd. 3L 4L 2L R AkWwrst te Epsom. Tote: 
£!3J6ft £3.74 £404 £724 lift E 
CSF: £121.71. THeast: £3.61451. 

3JB (ah 4t CtA 1. PRBHBt CHARUE f 
J Baggan, 11 - 2 ); 2. Artedrafe Cro L 

fietaw Lad («fei. 9-2 The CouOy Skxie 
(5mv 5 ran. a. Tl 15L not recoded. M 
WnctSOTe st Newptay-Toe: £740; £144 
£220. DF: £11 .90. CSF: £24.04 
320 (2m 100yd hdle) 1. DOHMC B 
Dowflng. 20-1): 2 nu Bn aten Coart (D 
Browns. Iff “ * 

MO-ALSO 

Hot Gem, Runteo ReteS on 

A shlngo n Grove {504 Monun . 

20 Genoon, PmS Bar (pu). 25 Cram- 
ming, 33 The Leggett Grecian BncL 13 
raa 2HL 3L iff*, SLJftNlI 
Irenww. Tote £1440: ttTO, tZSD. 
£1-44 Oft £5434 CSft £152.14 _ 
Jackpot not wqr; Plecaepot:£tXL4S 

Ayr 

Going; good ID coft 

I ran Ch) 1, SXARUGKr LAD « 
b. S-4): 2, Anofter Penm (DTeito.2- 
Ai 3, Quay MM (M Bow**, W). 


jr. Tote: £4.14 £3 -04 £400. 

DF: £2494 CSR ££224 After Stewards’ 
taquby, dMft etood. No bkL 
1.15 (ftn CM 1, SPARTAN OBBff K 

Tnucor (pul 12 ran. 10L ML 14 24 J 
1 aemdon. Tote: £410 pteora 

£270, £2.14 Dft £9414' CSF: 
.Ttlcast £28467. 

— 

"a, is 


3-21 3. GfaatertCBnwn. Evens 
)WM 11-2 Princa Same (4ft). 8 


a 


SairjOrm 

UmericK, 


12 




^2j^WE»rW*M 9.J 

PtofC Gtwtl 2>ti- ALSO RAftM 

' 20 Mr KeDy . Trweto. 

(or). so aiack.spwB. 

_ jay*lm(5in).RiJQQsd 

Ban* MHO. BMfeoaiJe. Gold Pratt. Hha 
tekeftSi 4 ran. NR! Watotey WL *L 
ia 1 &.H. hi J s WflGon at kp. Wee 
£1-6fl : £ 1.14 £ 1 A 0 , £494 Dft £1 JO. 
CSF: £272. 

M Cm « txM 1 . TOPLBGH [D Nofal 

M VBRL7trH 

"J» BA » 

. .. Teucer. 20 Oceyns. 

SSBUabBUBtiT 

lARflBfliASnE 

aorok naaft! 


Chetnya Brig (f). 12 
Border Perl 9x4 16 TeuC 
AnmieSlhLSBiraBmi 


AndSubwtna 

nS? 

HflWoa Tote: £3JX); £1.14 £I-W* £a3 °- 
0RS2MLCSF:aJ2. 

2.15 (ten cM 1. MOUNT OLIVER g 

MflCteirt. Ml 4 

snurpe, 2-1). 3 ren- NR; wooaend 

QMwasor- 7L dU. M Scudemwe j# 
HosrwWw. Tote: win £1J4 Dft £1-50- 
CSF: £4-12- 

- ““ 11-2 KWh 

0f8teW.2S 

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M&. 11^ ALSORAtL 8 Danrefley 

S1J0: S2JJ0. £1Jt4 Dft 
£454 

0tBft SLSO, £ AM. rajBLDft gl-TO- 


By Ctivc While 

Arsenal have their eyes on 
lan Rush. But before Arsenal 
supporters start reaching for 
the champagne I should add 
'that not even the Hig hbury 
coffers amount to that much; 

Rush's move to Juventus for 
the sum of about 500 Hats is 
already confirmed. No,' Arse- 
nal arc just watching and 
waiting for him. to leave 
Liverpool - in the lurch. 

The new League leaders, in 
common with not a few other- 
interested parties, cannot even 
contemplate the idea of 
assuming the champions* 
mantle until Rush takes an 
extended leave in Italy. Only 
then will Liverpool be vulner- 
able as Kenny DalgHsh, the 
manager, is left with a vacuum 
even greater than that caused 
by Souness’s departure. 

It is then that the tikes of 
Arsenal's young pretenders 
will lay claim to their title. 

David O’Leary, who al 28 is 
still old enough to be an unde 
to at least half the Arsenal 
team, said yesterday; "Liver- 
pool will appreci a te alt the 
more next season, just how 
valuable Ian Rash has been to 
them. When we lost 2-1 to 
them at Anfidd earlier in the 
season he was die difference 
between thetwo sides. There's 
one lan Rush." 
e feet that the Gunners 
do not have Rush, or anyone 
tike him, squeezing their trig- 
ger but instead two of the 
youngest marksmen in the 
first division, if not the 
League/ says much for their 
progress Hus season and that 
of theti equally inexperienced 
manager, George Graham. 


But to expect it to continue at 
its present level is unreason- 
able. Quinn, Hayes, Adams 
(all 20), Groves (21) and 

68fiistdivisi 

at the start of the season. 

Managers, like second-hand 
car salesmen, often make such 


outrageous claims that one is 
dissuaded from believing too 
much, but there is a straight- 
forward honesty about Gra- 
ham and when he insists that 
his team are not good enough 
yet, one is inclined to go along 
with turn. O’Leary said; “The 
last third of the season is when 
experience counts. That's why 
Liverpool are so good. Our 
young lads haven’t been 
through that barrier yet. 
They’re going to be tired. If we 
can finish in the top four or 
five it will be a great education 
fin: than and a bedding down 
for a real title challenge next 
season.” 

In his 13 years at the dnb 
O’Leary has had his share of 
disappointments in die league 
after listening too closely to 
the false dreams of the media 
and supporters. “We were fop 
two years ago and seven 
points clear but we finished up 
seventh. I often think of that 
now. There’s a long way to go. 
Anyway we've got a manager 
who won’t let us get earned 
away. We’D make a big deal of 
it if we’re still there around 
Easter. 

"We’ve always looked good 
on paper, but somehow this 
season we’ve got consistency 
and you have to put that down 
to the manager. He seems to 
have come through in the way 
that Venables has done: He’s 
obviously picked the brains of 
everyone he's worked with — 
Venables, Mee, Sexton and 
Howe. He’s not that different 
to Don but he Iras driven, 
home the matter of scoring! 
goals. ' Our training is much 1 
the same except that -under 
Don we used to do a lot oflong 
distance running. We don’t do 
that anymore. It’s all 20-yard 
shuttles. 

“People talk about our 
defensive record this season 
but we had 25 cleen sheets last 
season so we haven’t changed 
overnight. We’re very well 



By Peter Ball 


OXeary: past disappointments provide present impetus 

balanced in defence. Our full 
backs can attack and defend 


With his deau-cot, youthful 
looks and smart blue striped 
suit, Joe Boyle looked more like 
the archetypal young, upwardly 
mobile executive than anyone's 
idea of a football manager. But 
after four years apprenticeship 
In the job, he Is rapidly emerging 
as oar of the brightest young 
talents hi the game. 

Leadi n g the second division in 
November is of course no gnar- 
antee of success, as Royle 
dis co vere d a year ago, when 
Oldham embarked apon a se- 
quence of taking only one point 
from 10 games, pkmgmg from 
second to 19th before finally 
recovering to ead the season a 
respectable eighth. There are. 
however, good grounds for 
beOeving that his squad is 
stronger this year, and his own 
statement that Oldham have not 
met a better team than them- 
selves is easy to believe. 

That is a considerable com- 
pliment to Boyle and his player 
coach, WtBie Donachk, a dose 
friend from their days together 
with Manchester City. Although 
football dubs generally have 
had to tighfeu their belts, few of 
their rivals for promotion are 
nm on the same shoe string as 
Oldham. Royle has buOt a side' 
from the bargain basement, with 
five free transfer players in his 
squad. 


and Tony Adams ("he’s the 
one to take over from 
Butcher*) and I complement 
each other nicely. The big 
difference on the field is the 
way that George has got 
everyone to work so hard in 
getting the ball back when we 
lose it We quickly put the 
opposition back under 
pressure 

“Defensively and in mid- 
field we are going to be a 
match for anyone in the 
country. But m attack we 
don’t have the fellah who 
might get 25-30 goals a season. 
That’s all we need.” So say 90 
per cent of the first division. 


Arsenal (I) ▼ Maa City (19) 
Arsenal, who lava dropped two 
points in fluir tost seven games, 
mate their first change in nine 
because of anfde injury to Groves, 
Afflnsonor 

Merson, who has never played a 
League game, wfl take over. 
Varatf (ankle) b vary doubtful far 
City but Baker should be back. 

Charted (16) v S’o’tim (15) 
ChaffionsreteefytoracaU 
Johns, Peate and Pearson after 
four consecutive defeats. 

Gbebea (20) v Newcastle (22) 
Curie, out since August with a . 
knee injury, is set to taka over from 
the suspended McAHster. 


WEEKEND TEAM NEWS 


jandMendham 
thigh. Crook; however, rations 


after suspension. Bne rso n relume 
in piece of Painter for Coventry. 
Man United (21) v QPR (14) 
United wB be imchangad 
despite the return to fitness of 
Strachan, who wffl probably be 
substitute. Rangsra. however. 
edcLeea 


despite Goddens i 
Coventry (8) ▼ Norwich (6) 
on loan from 


Liverpool, mates ids debut for 
Norvwch who are vvitftotd five 
senior players, the latest being 


welcome back l 
missing five games with grofo 
trouble. Fereday’s hamstring 
has also mended. Gavin Peacock, 
thesonofKaHh,theG3fingham 
manager, is 'mdudedin 
the squad, as is another 
teenager. Magtdre. 

Nottm F (3) ▼ Wimb’n (13) - 
Jones, signed from Weaidstone 
this week, could go straight ktto the 
Wimbledon team n 
place of Gaffiers. Other Cork or 
Fashanu wU be dropped 
because of lack of goals. Gordon or 


Wise wffl be the replacem ent 
With Pearce stffl unwell with a virus 
Forest mb be unchanged. 

Oxford U (11) v Totfm (9) 
ArdOes b poised to start his 
first league game since ApriL 
Demy TnonteBii the Htafy 
re^cementfor Huston who had 

m^veeSjC^mma plays despite 
breaking his nose last week. 
Coate and Close are also ki the 
squad. Oxford 
wil be unchanged if Briggs 
recovers from an AcMHes 
tendon injray. Whitehurst may be 

Sbeff Wed (10) ▼ Luton (4) 
Madden wffl return after 
suspension for Wednesday if 
Kng^it has not recovered mom 
'flu. Luton, seeking their first win at 
Hilsborough in 16 wars, wffl be 
unchanged since Hal 
and Preece are stffl injured. 


Eight victories m the last 10 
unbeaten games has relieved 
the pressure on Graham to 
find that rare individual. But 
his refusal to part with £1 m for 
one player has meant that his 
dream of discovering some- 
one in the lower divisions may 
have to become a reality. 

Scot goes French 

Nancy (AFP) — Ray Stephen, 
Nancy’s recent signing from the 
Scottish dub, Dundee, trill 
make his debut for bis new club 
here on Saturday. Stephen’s 
registration with the French 
League has been completed and 
the dub have been given the go- 
ahead to ineltida him in the side 
for the first division match 
against Toulouse. The former 
Scottish under-21 international, 
who will be 24 next month, 
looks set to take over the 
midfield place held for Peter 
Hannich, one of the dub’s 
summer signing from Hungary. 
Hannich has been largely dis- 
appointing since the start of the 
season, as the dub have slipped 
to third from bottom of the 
table. His Hungarian colleague, 
Antal Nagy, is set to return to 
the heart of the defence, and 
under French League rales, a 
dub can only field two foreign 
players at any one tune. 

Power debate 

The Chelsea chairman, Ken 
Bales, will join the Everton 
president, Philip Carter, and the 
Oldham chairman, Ian Stott, on 
the Football League’s three-man 
team to meet the Football 
Association next week and dis- 
cuss the distribution of power 
between thetwo football bodies. 


At the same time he has 
known throughout his stay at the 
dob that Oldham have to sell a 
player a year to survive. His 
ability in that area has bees 
coosamate, with transfers bring- 
ing in £13 million during his 
four years in charge. Last sea- 
son, Mark Ward, whom be 
spotted playing for North widi 
Victoria and bought for £9,500, 
and Mickey Quinn, who came 
from Stockport for £50,000, 
were sold for handsome profits. 

It wonM frustrate many man- 
agers, bet Royle accepts with oat 
complaint, Us pnhi hnmour 
snrfaring as he remarks: “The 
people 1 feel sorry for are oar 
fans. They no sooner take to 
get their chant 



Joe Royle: bright talent 


That hmaonr served Royle weO 
in a playing career with more 
than its share of highs and lows. 

As a powerful centre forward 
wish a surprisingly Mate 
touch be ran the gamut of 
experiences from the early 
championship days with 
Everton to relegation with both 
Bristol and Norwich, his six 
England caps befog « poor 
reward for his taleat. 

Voted player of 
the season 

■t 

He confesses that he went off 
the rails for a time. “I had just 
won my second cap against 
Yugoslavia in 1972. In all 
modesty I had an o u tst a ndin g 
game, and the press were string 
1 was the centre forward Eng- 
land had been waiting for. Two 
games later I was foiarad. I had 
two discs taken ont of my hack, 
and by the time 1 came ont of 
hospital, Everton had a new 

m anagtw anil Wnl^ T jilrfrfn rri hart 
arrived to play in my place. “For 
the last year or so I was at the 
dnb I was a bad profesaonaL I 
don’t think it would have hap- 
pened if Harry Cattericfc or ms 
assistant, Wnf Dixon, had still 
been there, because they 
wouldn’t have allowed it." 

In the end, redemption lay in 
his own hands after a transfer to 
Manchester City. Possibly be 
never quite recaptured the 
sharpness of his yoath, but be 
regained his England place for a 
time and in his last foil season at 
Norwich, daring the ride's 
relegation year, he was voted 
player of the season for the 
supporters, a bittersweet tes- 
tament. After one and a half 
games m the second dirisioa, he 
sustained a cartilage injury 
which ended his playing days. 

The lack of playing experi- 
ence outside the Brat dhisiaa 
could have proved a handicap 
when be went to Oldham, but ms 
ability to spot and nnrtme talent 
suggests Oat it has not. Nor 
have his footballing convictions, 
which were schooled at Everton, 
and lead him to insist on a style 
not always considered appro- 
priate in the helter-skelter sec- 
ond division. 

“I know I'm biased, but that 
Everton team were the most 
attractive I’ve ever seen. When 
we won the championship we 
didn’t jnst win the first division, 
we paralysed it with oar football, 
and I think that is the way to 
play. 

A p as sion at e Merseyrider, 
whose general good hamour 
disappears when the present 
stale of his city is raised, Royie’s 
beliefs extend to behaviour as 
well as ability. Discussing the 
unlovely of a leading 

player with one of their promo- 
tion rivals, Royle said: *Tf one of 
my players spat at an opponent 
he’d be finished at this dnb. I 
could not triante that.” He and 
his players are proving there is 
no need to resort to such 
methods to be successftiL 


Ptecmwt £211-90 


A national 
network 
is created 

ByJabnGoodbody ■ 
Sports News C o rrespondent 

. Britain are to set up a network 
of national centres to co-or- 
dinate information on the latest 
developme n ts in sprats coach- 
ing. Miss Sue Campbell, the 
director of the National Coach- 
ing Foundation said yesterday 
that the 1 2 centres in Britain ana 
in Northern Ireland should be 
operational by May 1987. 

"In partnership with national 
governing bodies and coaches 
we believe we can ensure that all 
coaches — voluntary and pro- 
fessional — have access to a 
■professionaT training system," 
Miss Campbefl told delegate* on. 
the finql day Of the annual. 
conference of the Central Coun- 
cil for Physical Recreation in 
Bournemouth. 

The centres, many based in 
educational establishments, will 
allow coaches to use informa- 
tion from the foundation's 
headquarters in Leeds. Coaches 
wffl also be able to scrutinise die 
lalwq dfffrils OH thrir own 

television sets at home. Latest 
research from home and abroad 
will be selected in Leeds andd 
then fed into a new viewdata' 
system for coaches on TresteT. 

The foundation, which is 
funded by the Sports Conned, 
have set up programmes of 
study packs and videos at -a 
fonar JeveL Some have already; 
been incorporated into- many, 
national governing, body 
preliminary awards such as lawn 1 
twmis, skiing, martial am and 

croquet. 

A krvd two programme aimed 
at chib coaches consists of 13 
four-hour courses. Each course 
focuses on one general aspect nflj 
coaching like 'Developing 
Endurance' . Level three has 
right different 20-boor courses 
on such topics as *Spom Injury! 
Prevention*, ‘The Mechanics of| 
Sport’, and ‘Peak Performance’, 
lltey contain information from 
such areas as . physiology, 
psychology and are relevant to 
most sporting disciplines. 


BADMINTON 


Criticism on every 
front for Baddeley 


By Richard Eaton 


Steve Baddeley retained to 
the scene of his Commonwealth 
Gaines gold medal triumph in 
the Meadowbank Stadium yes- 
terday and reached the quarter- 
finals of the Famous Grouse 
Scottish International 
Championships — but not be- 
fore there had been some anx- 
ious moments in the aeroplane 
and some firm criticisms from 
England manager, Paul 
WhetnalL 

Baddeley, Helen Troke, 
Dairen Hall, aryt their manag er- 
aim-agent. Ciro Gnigiio, were 
in the air for half-an-hour 
ending Edinburgh Airport, 
apparratly because the wing- 
flaps jammed and they could 
not get down. When they did 
there fire-engines following 
them down the runway. “Yon 
realize then that they haven’t 
told you everything," said 
Baddeley. “I was a bit worried." 

The England No. 1 was also a 
little below his best in beating 
Hamid Klauer of West Ger- 
many, 15-11. 18-16, and Lex 
Coene of the Netherlands. 15-8, 
15-11, but then he was unhappy 
about the 10 a.m. start. So was 
WhetnalL "Putting him rat at 
that time is like throwing a main 
attraction to the dogs." 

Earlier Whetnall had also 
made a quiet complaint about 


and Hall, the English 
natronaT champion, being in the 
same half of the draw, which is 
against IBF regulations. It was 
too late to change this and the 
draw probably favours Hall that 
way anyway. "Bm it could have 
been important, and might be 
next time," said WbetaalL 

The Scottish Badminton 
Union does, however, have 
canse to be pleased. The 
Com monwealt h Games has had 
such a beneficial effect upon tire 
sport that tickets sates have 
doubled. The Union also has, 
with a prize fund of £10,500, 
and a strategic position as the 
last World Grand Prix event of 
the year, one of the best events it 
has ever had, and arguably one 
of the best eight tournaments in 
the world. 

Several outstanding players 
have come to make a last-ditch 
attempt to qualify for next 
month's world grand prix finals 
in Kuala Lumpur. Hall im- 
proved his chances of doing that 
by reaching the quuter-nnals 
with a 15-7, 15-9 win against 
Scotland's Kenny MidcDaniss, 
but Gillian Gowers’s hopes were 
dashed when she lunged and 
twisted an ankle against Barbara 
Beckett, of Ireland, forcing her 
to retire. 


Swede advances 

Bergen - (AP) The No. 2 
seed, Jan Gunnarsson, of Swe- 
den. beat Peter Moraing, of 
West Germany. 6-3, 6-4 in the 
second round of the $50,000- 
Bergen Open tennis tournament 
on -Thursday night. Gunnars- 
son, who lost fast year in the 
finals of the Bergan Open, 
advanced to the fast eight and 
win play Mcono Oosting, of the 
Netherlands, the No. 8 seed, in 
the quaneMi&afe. 

In Thursday night's Iasi 
match, sixth-seeded Dan 
Goldie, of the United Slates, 
beat Grant Connell, of Canada 
1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Goldie will play the 

mzteeded Peter Fleming, of the 


United States, in the quarter- 
finals. 


The statistics that are 
crucial to the future 



By Conrad Voss Bark 

Salmon reals in Scotland are 
Ekefy to go ap again for the 
coating season, though not more 
daa about three to five percent 
In some rivers they may be hdd 
at or near present levels. The 
increase b based portly on 
increased costs as writ as on (he 
results for fins year. 

Reports coming in from many 
Scottish rivers have been, on the 
whole, very good, in spite oflong 
periods of low water. It has been 

a variable season, a bit odd at 
times, but there have been very 
few who would say there have 
not been a lot of fish around. The 
north does not seem to have done 
quite so weU, nor the west for 
that matter, but the east coast 
rivers have done very well, 
though in patches. 

When the ran was good it was 
ve»y good indeed, (tie experi- 
enced Tweed angler is reported 


to have said that when the fish 
came in after being held up by 
low water he had never seen so 
■any. They were then in hage 
numbers. The November ran, 
however, has been moderate 
though one week say 40 to 50 
fish shared between four rods. 

The Oykel seems to have done 
extremely weU with the lower 
beats getting a record nmnber of 
fish. The Tay had the driest 
September for years but n ever- 
thefess gone good sized fish 
were taken, one or two weU over 
30D> and one' I heard of was over 
401b. Tire Ewe and Loch Maree 
reported a poor September with 
hardly any fate rim of sea front, 
whereas Loch Hope was faD of 
both salmon and sea trout and 
the Aitnahaira Hotel had a 
record mouth. Thai is how it 


Lack of rain npset most of the 
English fishing as well daring 
September and October, though 
there was a good ran of fish in 
the high water after the season 
' dosed. Thr same stray from Usk 
and Wye. But many more 
salmoa have been reported 
Nitwi from fiw Exe >***■ has 
been heard of for a nmnber of 
years. 


RACKETS 

Tonbridge 
pair in 
last four 

By William Stephens 

The young Tonbridge first 
pair, Jonathan Spurting and 
Rupert Owen- Browne, readied 
die quarter-finals of the Nod 
Bruce Cup in spectacular fash- 
ion when they eliminated the 
Eton third pair, the brothers 
David and Christopher Pease, 
15-5, 15-5, 15-1, 15-1 at Queen’s 
Chib on Thursday. 

Owen-Browne. who won the 
Public School’s Singles 
Championship in 1984 and is 
playing in his first senior com- 
petition, served with venom and 
won many points in the rallies 
with his whiplash backhand, 
white Spurting ( losing finalist 
with Graham Cowdrey m 1983) 
applied fierce pace on the 
forehand side. 

The Eton first pair of William 
Boone and Tom Pugh, winners 
in 1984, then defeated Eton IV 
(Andrew Beeson and Richard 
Bonsor) 15-5, 15-7, 15-1, 17-14. 

Beeson and Bonsor are a well 
established and steady pair, 
more noteable for their suc- 
cesses m North America, but 
they lacked practice and could 
find no answer to Boon's 
aggression. 


Curren defeated 

Johannesburg (Reuter) — The 
unseeded Australian, Broderick 
Dyke, created a surprise in the 
South African Open tennis 
championship when he beat 
South Africa-born American, 
Kevin Curren, 6-3, 4-6, 7-S in 
the final second round match. 
Earlier, the top seed, Andres 
Gomez, of Ecuador, defeated 
Pieter Aldrich, of South Africa, 
6-2, 3-6, 6-3 and the fourth seed 
Johan Kriek, another Sooth 
African-born American, beat 
Christo van Rensburg. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Expletive deletes 
rueful Graham 


By Colin McQmUan 


Robert Graham, the England 
junior captain and as clean-cut a 
young sportsman as you could 
wish to meet, yesterday found 
himself standing outside a first 
round court at Redwood Lodge, 
Bristol, effectively disqualified 
from the Intercity national 
championships for audition. 

Perilously poised at match 
point 1-8 down in the fourth 
game against Tain Saleh of 
Merseyside^ the Essex 18 year 
*1 was refused a penalty point 
ippeal by r efer ee Roger Roberts 
ud reacted with predictable 
rotation. 

Rather than use the four letter 
expletive common among 
iquash players as an expression 
}f deep disappiontmem, Gra- 
mm, who earlier this season 
3p1ed for a year of professional 
squash before taking one of 
several available university 
places, reached into a wider 
vocabulary and came up with 
his own alternative, the ex- 
pression “excrement" 

Mr Roberts was having none 
of that. He declared the match 
concluded in favour of Saleh 
and told Graham: “I am award- 
ing the match for that word.” 
Later the referee insisted that he 
actually penalized Graham a 
single point for dissent which 
had the effect of finishing the 
match at 9-1 to Saleh in the 
fourth game. 

The Merseyside player was 
himself one of England’s young 
hopefitis until a baa leg fracture 
pul him out of the game a couple 
of years hack. Now aged 21, 
Saleh has trained all summer 
with Malcolm Wfllstrop. the 
coach who gave him his start at 
the now defunct Walton HaQ 
chib. 

“That was the strangest win 


yet," Saleh said. “It was a 
completely well-behaved match 
with no previous incidents. 
Robert is just not the sort of 
player who needs that sort of 
heavy treatment. Probably if he 
had used the normal four-tetter 
word nobody would have 
noticed." 

In fact Saleh himself was 
under pressure in the third game 
as Graham cracked his way to 6- 
1 after taking the second 9^4 and 
narrowly losing the first 8-10. 
suddenly became very tired in 
the second and third games,” 
Saleh explained. “Then I started 
lifting the ball into the air and 
floating it about a bit slower and 
Robert started to make 
mistakes." 

Those mistalcfls fed the Eng- 
land junior captain to the edge 
of the precipice in the next 
game. His careful selection of a 
most proper word elevated him 
beyond normal court language 
and straight into the void of 
dis taster. 

“1 can’t believe that really 
happened," Graham said later. 
“I was in trouble because of my 
own play but I have won before 
from that position. 

“Both of us used worse lan- 
guage once or twice earlier in the 
match. You do in the beat of 
bank. Zain even threw his 
racket across the court in anger 
when be lost the second game: 
We were not even warned for 
any of that- 1 have never been 
penalized or disqualified before. 
U is very disappointing." 

RESULTS: MeKZSatetiMRGrafiam, 10- 
4 4-9. 9-6. 9-1; D Harris bt A Kaoud, 9-0. 
WL&-1: D Paareontt A Fotay. 9-5. 9-3.9- 

3: P MUimton br A Owyar. 9-1 1 49. 9-7: A 

Jaski U ff^arson, 9-1, 8 - 0 , 94L Wttntn: 

j Parker bt D Dues, 4-1. 9-2. 9-5: B 
UB 9 *b bt A Roberts, 9-4. 9-2, 9-0; L 
Scatter U A Cumow, 9-3. 9-2, 9-2; M 
Howtos bt S WitgM. 9-2. 9-1. 9-3. 



FOR THE RECORD 


BADMINTON 

FOOTBALL 

SQUASH RACKETS 


EOMBURtM ton (Mum Scotttsti ■_ 
waoattdt w plB Mh fe s pilaad u wt a nfcSMM- 
umfc Mac Stoics: First ro u n d: S Baddstoy 

' M H KtauerjWQ). 15-11. 18-14 LGomo 


15-14 144 T 



. . « A 

Orton 

154J 
1W. IS* 

15-14 15-11; M . _ 

' ' 15-5. 7-14 1*ft D HaM (&»B). 
. . . 194 15-5: K MMcSiiiilja 
bt R Gbdwfti fScottBnrQ, 154 *5-4: R 
MJcnettftojm MUAb*i«(eig). 154 irf-i: 
V Kumar JM bt U JotarascnTswaj. ivi4 
15-1. 15-& P Mvsan {Dan) bt C Rees (Wan. 
154 154 A NWMJ fag) tt A WNte (Sarf 

15- 11, 18-17: M STWl (Eng) R 5 QffiWMig 
(3M). 18-14 17-14; J NfSmtfl pan) » P 
jomssantSaiB). 154 164 USamosamaM 
bt A Ga&gter (Scot}, 4-15. 15-11. 15-2: 3 
Amnnwwi (Swe) tt M Netosen (Dent. 15-9. 

16- 9. 


FACUftHratimndi . 

Waot drt o na l (apan atari 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Fm S*kfe ! 

Utd 0. Evanon 4 
AC DELGO CUR Banana 2, Hemet Kemp- 
^ ' 4 Ln*tan<Whgatn a, HanUon 1; 

town v'OiWnch Harato. * Tfcu,y ' , 
EASTERN JUMOR CUP: 9> eo w d mood: 
Cotchenrlftda HkchkiTMn3. 

CAIRO: African Cup-Wknera* cop Pint 
Hml leg Nattnal (Ggypfl 3. Sogwa (Gabon) 


SCHUEfl£fLS«ttzait a« t Hm i wa afcSwta 


flmteJKnan 

8. 9- 1 :S Davenport (KZ)H 

59.95.59.9- 1- 


at prtx tournament Ooanar- 
(Pak) tt P Kenyon (GBL9-1.10- 
DpOrttNZ) tt G BrtWfQB). 9-3. 


TENNIS 


CROYDON; LTA Women'* Indoor 


C BaWcuoUtottfl,54 jMjS ScMder 


R Rajcbrtova (Cz). 7-5. 
Ouentrac, 6-4. 5< 


¥<tan T&SiS 


GOLF 


RACKETS 


SCHOOLS HATCH Matam 
and GNLunQbt Rugby (JGP 
Brown). 17-14. 1-1416-9, 158. 1 


A Hanmen 
andRS 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


STONES ana CHaimokshiPi Second 
dftfefes Hatfla to toM 4 StaWNd 12. 


CHALLENGE MATCH {Royal Barista): 

Awoettfenof &* mMn»D»lop(ACM 

namKtwq: 6 FMiBMson fflotf MustratBdl 

andJFemon {B0C1 roved C Banks and 

A Cutaway: f (Son) and D Dawes 


to REngHsti and P Mad to. 
BfeMon (EseQ and R Mu 
Aafooabon) last to S &am ant 
and % M WSmb - 
VVMbnto(Wnmtoto 
andRBraodon.3and2. 
3X.Dimtop2X. 


FtoafcScftJMrtt 

5-4 ITnntito samHtoto: D 

RtWur and S SeMdw (mm H BJfeni 0 

(Bods) and J Falon (Sussex). &1. 2-8. 6-2 V 

Lake and C Wood (GB) bt U Pawft and A 
vopat (WGL 6-2. 51. Fkto Lake and Wood W 
Kstotaar no Scftfrto. 6-7. 6-2, 7-5 



jOHAieeSaUMt SouM African opaa 
ctiOTpnratripc: Men’s wnqfer. Prtt 
Second iwiSM Anger (US) WS GfccfcstMl 
(15). 57. 51 . 6-Z: A Oomez (ECU) M P Aknn 
0A). 6-2. 3-d. 6-3; D VemeMSAJ M S iron dor 
Meta (SA). 53. 54 : E Edwards (SAItt W 
Mastf (Ausl. 5«. 54; j Kriek (US) tt C van 
Rensburg (SAJ. 54. 58. 7-4 B DyM (Aus) Dt 
K Curran (SAL 53. +8. 7-5. 


Quote-- Snots: R Uants 
i r (SAL 51. 6-4 D « 
da Swann (SAL 54 84. 


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a 

ta- 
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O M 







THE TIMES S 




42 SPORT /BROADCASTING 


CRICKET: BATTING FAILURES SHOULD NOT CAUSE SERIOUS CONCERN 


England suffer on awkward pitch 








»7Jd»nU 


From John Woodcock 

Cricket Correspondent 
Newcastle. New Sooth Wales 

It would be unwise to make 
too much of the fact that 
England lost their first eight 
wickets for only 106 runs 
against New South Wales here 
yesterday. The); found a slow 
and awkward pitch (not to be 
mistaken for a sticky one), and 
were up against as good an 
attack as Australia's in Bris- 
bane or die one they are likely 
to field in the second Test in 
Perth in six days time. Thanks 
to their tail wagging, England 
eventually made 197. where- 
upon, in reply, New South 
Wales could manage only 15 
for two in 21 overs. 



ITBotham c 
PH Edmonds b 

B N French not out 

N A Foster c and b Lawson 
GC Small bHotend 

Extras f b 3, Hj 2, rtf) 3) a 

Total — 1S7 

FALL OF WICKETS- 1-16. 2-51. Ml. 4- 
74. 5-75. 6-78, 7-1 06. 8-1 06, 9-142. 10-167 
BOWUNG; Lawson 15M2-2; Glbart 5- 
1-16-0; HoOand 27-3-ll^M: MNNV13’ 
4-31-2: Matthews 18-6-33-3: Waugh 50- 
12 - 0 . 

NEW SOUTH WALe&RrsttaOtoOS _ 

S M Small c Edmonds b Entfwrey 8 

M A Taytarst French bEmburay 4 

R G Holland not out — — — — - 1 

D M Wttham not out 0 

Extras (to 1. nb 1) 2 

Total (2 whts) 15 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-12, 2-15. 
BOWLING: Sma» 6Wft Mw 
Emtourey 64-5-2; Etenonds 6-4-4-0. 
UmptawcR French and A Marsfafi 

Conditions were not unlike 
Derby on a bleak April day. 
Broad and Slack each had a 
cup of hot tea at the first break 
for drinks. At lunch, the 
England manager congratu- 
lated the curator for getting 
the match off to a prompt start 
after all the rain there had 
been, and be was right to do 
so. But the pitch was still 
damp enough, especially at 
one end, for New South Wales 
to be glad of the chance to put 
England in. 

It was bard lines on 
England's batsmen, especially 
Slack and Whitaker, not find- 








End of a 14-nm innings which took 50 mrautes, as the England aD-roonder, Botham, is caught by Taylor 


ing something more congenial 
for batting Such is the itin- 
erary that, outside the Tests, 
there remain after this only 
two first-class matches before 
the tour ends in mid-Feb- 
ruary. For anyone not in the 
first side there is going to be an 
awful lot of hanging around, 
unless a decision is taken to 
vary the one-day team. 

Even Botham spent 50 min- 
utes making 14 yesterday. 
Broad made a consciencious 
31 in the first two hours before 
being leg-before playing no 
stroke. Slack got his head 
down for 65 minutes before 
hitting across the line of a full 
length ball; Athey was leg- 
before when applying himself 
fully and Gower was caught in 
the covers when barely apply- 
ing himself at aJL 


Whitaker must have left 
wishing he had put the bat 
more firmly to the ball after 
giving a return catch off one 
that came very slowly from 
the pitch; Botham left con- 
vinced that the low slip catch 
to which he was given out, off 
a Holland leg break, had not 
carried to the fielder. Emburey 
survived as long as be played 
his paddle shot; upon desert- 
ing it for the forward prep he 
was caught at silly point off 
bat and pad. 

At 106 for eight after 53 
overs, England's display had 
had nothing much to recom- 
mend it But Foster followed 
his 74 not out against Queens- 
land in his only previous first- 
class match with a sensible, 
hard-hitting 25; Small had fun 
driving and hooking Lawson 


and Whitney, and French, 
with an admirable 38 not out, 
should have improved his 
chances of getting his Test 
place back. 

When be first played against 
an England touring side. 21 
years ago. Holland's six overs 
cost him 58 runs. He experi- 
enced then what many 
bowlers already knew, that 
Mike Smith with his eye in (he 
made 164) could seem almost 
impossible to bond too. Yes- 
terday Holland conceded one 
run fewer in 21 more overs, 
his leg rollers seldom straying 
from the good length spot. 

For the moment, though, 
the Australian selector in 
attendance was probably more 
interested in Lawson, who had 
a tidy opening spell without 
looking quite the bowler he 


Miandad averts potential disaster for Pakistan 


From Richard Streetira, Karachi 


Two late wickets taken by 
West Indies redressed the bal- 
ance in the third Test match 
here yesterday after a day which 
mostly went Pakistan's way. It 
also brought the first con- 
troversy for the Indian umpires 
officiating in this series, with 
Marshall, the player involved. 
Contrasting batting by Javed 
Miandad and Ramiz Riga 
seemed to have kept Pakistan 
on the right path as they set out 
to try and build a first-innings 
lead. 

Dusk was beginning to fall 
and the evening onslaught from 
local mosquitoes had started, as 
West Indies suddenly made 
their late 

brra kthrough. Miandad, without 
being rash, put on 111 for the 
third wicket with Ramiz Raja. 
Miandad was out when Gomes 
flattened the stumps with an 
accurate throw from cover as 
the Pakastani attempted a quick 
single. He had hit five fours and 
a six. Shortly afterwards, the 
crucial wicket of Imran Khan, 
leg-before for one. was snapped 
up by the off spinner, Clyde 
Butts, for his first Test wicket 

Ramiz, curbing his basic in- 


Mefc-off an doss stated 

First division 

Arsenal v Manchester C - 

Chariton v Southampton 

Chelsea v Newcastle 

Coventry v Norwich 

Manchester Utd v QPR 

Nottingham F v Wlmtriedon — 

Oxford v Tottenham — _ 

Sheffield wed v Luton 

Watford v Leicester 

West Ham v A VIDa 

FA TROPHY: ThW qaaffytag round: 
MacduMd V Grantham: Gainsborough 
Trinity v Matlock; Hyde Utd v Mosztey; 
Newcastle Bhis Star vAHretan (2.1 5); Tow 
Law v Rtiyt (2.15): Hednestord * More- 
cambe; Conaen v Leek: Barrow V North 
Shields: Whttby v Soidhport Slyth Spar- 
tans v South Liverpool (3.15^ WWJloy Bay 
v Gooie; Bedingtan Terriers v Crook; 
Barking v Croydon; Kings Lynn v Nimea- 
ton Borough; Ayteahury Utd v Leicester 

Utt Wern&cy v Crawler. WBenhaB v 
Ashford: Htaran v Cailwn Attr Staines 
v Boreham Wood: Atvechurch v St Atoens 
CRy: La a therhe a d v Shepshed Chart- 
erhouse; Le am ington v Cambridge City. 
Corby v Fisher Am; Slough v Tooting and 
Mtcham: Canterbury city v Harrow Bor- 
ough: Grays Afli v OuwWi Hamlet 
Tmutmdge v Maidenhead Utd; Merthyr 
TydB y Windsor and Eton; Fareham 


di nations, remained to the close 
when he was 42 not out after 
four hours unremitting con- 
centration. Pakistan, finished at 
157 for four wickets in reply to 
the West Indies’ 240. With the 
pitch still mostly reliable, the 
match remains nicely poised, 
though Pakistan must secure the 
lead they seek if they are to win. 

Marshall, during the morning, 
had dearly disagreed with Mr 
Reporter’s rejection of several 
leg-before appeals against the 
Pakistan opening batsmen. In 
the early evening, he openly 
argued when he was no-balled 
by the same umpire. 

As Marshall and the umpire 
talked, Richards, the West In- 
dies captain, ran from slip to 
join in and the other umpire, Mr 
Ramaswamy, also took part in 
the discussions which held up 
the game for seven minutes. 
When play resumed Miandad 
was run out from the first bail 
bowled and some of the tension 
evaporated. 

After play ended, Mr Re- 
porter said be had complained 
to Jackie Hendriks, the West 
Indies manager, about what had 
happened. He criticized Mar- 




- 



Miandad: dogged innings 

shaft's attitude both before 
lunch and later when he was no- 
balled and said be was also 
dissatisfied with Richards's 
reluctance to warn Marshall 
about his behaviour. 

Mr Hendriks had said he 
would speak to the players and 
promised there would be no 
repetition of such behaviour. 
Pakistan took the first trick 
when Imran and Abdul Qadir 
captured the last three West 
Indies wickets in the opening -40 


minutes, with only another 28 
runs added. 

Pakistan made their cus- 
tomary poor start when Mar- 
shall, in his fifth over, had 
Mobsin Khan held at first slip. 
Mobsin aimed what seemed an 
unnecessary attempt at an upper 
cut as a ball soared over his 
bead. 

In this series Pakistan's first- 
wicket stands have now brought 
12,2,0. 3 and 1 9 and once wain 
they still had not readied 30 
when the second wicket fdL 
Mudassar Nazar played forward 
ax a baft on his legs bul it moved 
away and clipped his middle 
and off stumps. Miandad had 
only scored a single when he 
edged another brute of a ball 
from Gray, Jow but calcbable, 
past Richards at first slip. 

After this, Miandad and 
Ramiz began to play really well 
in their different ways. Neither 
Harper not Butts, both Guya- 
nese, incidentally, showed the 
same steadiness as Tauseef and 
neither could extract the same 
turn as Qadir bad done. Butts is 
tall and slim and from a distance 
is not dissimiliar in looks and 
method to Lance Gibbs, another 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL AND OTHER FIXTURES 


super-Mara: Wokingham » Dorchester 
Bridgend* Smash (Sri. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: PWWtor dMstOiE 
Bromsgrow v Bedwtft: Chatmsfort v 
Witney: Darttord v Folkestone; Reddirch v 
Gosport Worcester v Dudley. Mdfand 
division: Boston v Gloucester city: 
Bridgnorth v WeSn^jorough; Forest 
Green Rovers v Halesowen: MBe Oak 
Rovers v VS Rugby; RusMan v Moor 
Green: SKartndge v Coventry Sporting; 
^lrtrm fntrlftnlrl y PnrtrinQ tn r n Tin mtwin 

(Melon: Andover v Ruislo; Burnham and 
HSrgdon v Chatham: Dunstable v Has- 
tings; Ertth and Belvedere v W oottf oid. 
Foote v Dover Ath; Thanet v Wsierloow9e: 
Gravesend and Northfteet v SheppOy Utd. 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: BangorCJty v 
O swes try. Burton v Witten: Buxton v 
W orksop ; Caernarfon v Horwich; Chortey 
v Marks. 

DRYBROUGHS NOfmCRN LEAGUE: 
FkstdrafeffiEasmttonv Brandon (2.1S): 
Gretna v South Bank; Hartlepool v 
spenrymoor; Fetertoe v Cheater-ie- 
Street 

BASS NORTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: RrMdMaton: Accrington Stan- 
ley v VY in s fo d Utd; Ctofteroe » Reetwoo* 
Conaaon v Raddifie Bam; Eastwood 
Haney v Leytend Motors; Qossop v 
Burscough; Irian v Curzon Ashton: 
Roseendato Utd v St Helens. 

NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier dMstat Boston v Bnc&ngton 
Town; Bridlington Trinity v Bortov VW; 
Oeraoy Utd V TfacWay; Eastwood v 
Brigo; Gnsetsy * Parsley Cent; Harro- 
gate v Pontefract Cot Long Eaton Utd v 
fertey; North FenHw v Betper Sutton 
Town v Am uho rpe Welfare. 

DURHAM CHALLENGE CUP: Second 
ntWOmkisra roaxt BHnghBin Synthona v 
Ryhope CA. Replay coundon v Esh 

vaSS&LL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier tfi- 
vtaion: Bfahcp'a Storttard v Wycombe 
wanderers: Bog nor Regis v Brotntey 
Hendon vKtnostoman: Walthamstow Av® 
v Yeovfl; Wormorg v Hayes. Fret (Melon: 
Baatoon Utd v Ffichtey; E»»cm end Ewafl 
v Ttfcury; Hampton v Bracknefl: Lewes v 
KintobufV; Leynn/Mngaw v Oxford City: 
Sourhvnc* v Leytonstona and Ittord: 
Stevenage Bore v BAencay Uxmxtoe v 
Watai and Hercfcam. Second dMsk» 
north: Barren Rovers v Hertford: 
Cheshzm Uia v Avetoy Coder Row » 
Hemal ii enyste ad : Letchwonh GC v 
vauxhafl Moreis: Ranham v Berk- 
hffiirsted; Tnng v Roystori; Ware V 
Chaahwrt. Second dv»oo eoaHt East- 
bourne Utd v Hareteid Utd; Egham v 


Second division 

Brighton v Btackbum 

Derby v Sheffield UW 

Huddersfield v Plymouth 

Hull v Bradford 

Ipswich v Barnsley 

Oldham v C Palace 

Portsmouth v Grimsby 

Stoke v Reading 

Sunderland v Shrewstuy 

WBA v Mfflwafl 

Cantfntoy Feltham v Patersfield utd: 
FtackwaU Heath v Chaltont St Pmen 
Mstow v Hungwford; Met Pofice v RuisSp 
Manor; Motesey v Chertcey: Southai v 
Horsham; Whytaeate v Docking; WoWng v 
Newbury. 

FOOTBALL COMBMATlON; (2.0): Luton v 
Portsmouth; Reatkng v Cheisaa: Sout- 
hampton v Wrist Ham; Tottenham v 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: (2JQ: Pre- 
tider cMsiotc Amerah am Town vCorm- 
Wan Casuds (3X1); Beekton Utd v 
Brtmsdown Rovers; Crown 4 Manor * 
Edgware: Danson v No rthwcod: RetfiB v 
Hanwett (3.0); Southgate Ath v Beaaxrs- 
Bflkt Utd; Ul ysses vYSdhg. 
SHmOFFlRSH L£AGUE(2S(» Aids v 
Newiy Garrick v Crusaders; Cfiftonvise v 
Lame; Os 

Coterak-jo: . .. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Firat 
driMc Cantoridro Utd v Watford; 
Chetsos v ArseneL GOtogham v Ctwrtton; 
MB wM v Futom; Orient v Ipswicii: QPR v 
Norwich: Tottenhem v Portsmouth: South- 
end v West Ham. Second (Rvtsiac 
Bournemouth v Crystal Palace: Luton v 
Brentford: Northampton v Brighton; Ox- 
ford Utd v Southampton: Reading v 
Coktoestar Swindon v Tottenham: 
Wimbledon v Southend . 

BUILDING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Branham Alh v Stowmarknt Btxy v 
Hlston; Colchester Utd v Chatteris; Great 
Yarmouth v New ma rke t Lowestoft v 
Manto Town Utd; Soham Town Rangers v 
Haverhill Rovers; Sudbury v Watton Utd: 
Thedord v FeSxsfowe; Wisbech v 
Gorieston. 

SUFFOLK PREMIER CUP: Hot rouxt 
replays: Letston v Brantham; HaverhB 
Rovers v Fotocstnve. 

NEW GROUP UNITED COUNTES 
LEAGUE? Premier e fl v ia fon: Ampthd v 
Braddsy: Baidocfc v Stamford: Bourne v 
Narthamptan Spencer kthflngborough v 
Artasey: Rotten v Lodi BucUw; Rothwell v 
Si Neot'r. Spalding v Oeetarough; 
Stodoid v s and L Corby Woodon v 

COUNTES LEAGUE: Q.0): 
Chum Trophy: second monk Cob- 
ham v Mennam; Core v Wrgme water 
Fadeigh Rovers u chobham; Famham 
Town v Maiden Vafo; GodaMng Town v 
Oajeigh; Mafosn Town v Hartley 
Whitney westttd v Ash Utd. Prereiar 
Aeswre BAe (Wevtvidge) v Kotley Tcniti: 
rrtirtn Green v OUpswai 
mEA T MB±S WESTERN LEAGUE: PTO- 
«*J*netare BrtsW Manor Farm v 
Banttapte: Chnariham v Lbkaord Aft; 
Ctevectat v Mmeheed; Ctandown v 
Emnouth: tarisii v Radstodi team-. 

» Mete ham: Mangotsflekl Utd v 
wfoforet Paufton Rovers v Bristol City: 

?5SSffHSP e v ^ Tartnson ¥ 

HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAflUEl 
premier dMatoft (Z30 unless stated); 


Thirt division 

Bournemouth v Chesterfield 

Brentford v Blackpool 

Bristol C v Rotherham 

Bury v Swindon 

Carlisle v Fulham 

Chester v Bristol R 

Darlington v Wigan 

Doncaster v P Vale 

GtJSngftam v Notts Co 

Mansfield v Baton 

Newport v MkkfBsbrough 

York v Walsall 

bourne Town (2.0); Wick v Three Bridges. 
ESSEX saeon LEAGUE: Brentwood * 
Eton Manor Canvey Is land v Maldorc 
East Thurrock v East Ham; Sawbr- 
ktoworth v Ford Utd; Stansted v Burnham: 
Witham v Chelmsford. Lee a t e Cop: 
Second aomdi Woodford v Puffieot 
ESSEX 9EMOR TROPHY: Second raut± 
BrigWngsea Utd v Heybrtdge SwfftK 
Cwton v Saffron Walden: Homchurh v 
Barkingside; Pennant v Heriow: Wtvenhoe 
v Halstead: Bratrtfree v Bowers Utd: 
Karwldi and Parkesfon v Oacnn; Tretree 
Utd v Waltham Abbey. 

ARTHURIAN LEAGUE: 
division: Old Carthusians v Old 
Matvemians: Old Chotmotaana v Old 
Repfonians; Old Etonians v CMd Brent- 
woods: Lancing OB v Okl CMgweHans. 

RUGBY UNION 
Thom/EMI County ChempionshTp 

Berkshire v Somerset 

(at Reading, 2.30) 

Buckinghamshire v Devon 

(at Aylesbury. 2J3Q) 
Cornwall v Gloucestershire 
(at Redruth, £30) 

Dorset 5 Wats v Oxfordshire 

(at Wimbome, 2-30) 

Hampshire v Sussex 

(at Basingstoke. 2J0pm) 

Lancashire v Cumbria 

(at Vale of Lune. Z30) 

Northumbedand v Cheshire .... 

(at County Gnd. Gosforth, 2.15) 

Yorkshire v Durham 

(at Morfoy, 230) 

John Smatr's Merit Table *A' 

Leicester v Moseley 

John Smith's Merit Table V 
Waterloo v Rosstyn Park (2.45)— 
CLUB HATCICS: (230): Abereven v 
Ponrypool (3.0V Bedford v Coventry (3Jft 
BkJeforti v Exoter pm Biackheath v 


Fourth (fiviskm 

Aldershot v Rochdale 

Burnley v Lincoln 

Cambridge v Peterborough — 

Northampton v Exeter 

Preston v Southend 

Stockport v Cardiff 

Swansea v Hartlepool 

Torquay v Hereford (230) 

Tran mere v Crewe (3.15) 

Wolverhampton v Wrexham 

v WUKE; Twickenham v Old Kmobur- 
■ans; Upper Clapton v Barclays Bark; 
Uxbridge v Harrow. 

CORNWALL MERIT TABLE: PBnryn V 
Penzanca/Newiwu Truro v Camborne. 
BUSH MTER-PR0VMCUU. CHAMPION- 
SMR Ulster v Leinster (at RawnhB); 
Munster v Connacht (at Thomand Park). 
Club —chess Baiymena v Armagh: 
Dungannon v Coleraine (at Alroaft Park. 
BettasQ; GYMS ¥ Academy; tnstontans t 


Nealh: CanSff v Uaneft ( 


Di; cross Keys 
Dtxfumoty v 


Moms Motors v Sharpness; Pegasus Jnrs 
v Raynere Lane: Shon wo ofl utd v 
Houn*iw: j Supermarine * Mcntn 
Ttiarne LPd v Watongford (3PK Yate v 
Penna. 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Fksf d- 
vfston: Bwgass HOI v Shorahant; ctveft- 
ester City v Peacehaven and Tefoeombe 
Q.0t Haywards Haem v todhurst and 
Eaemg Uid £0); Horsnam ymca v 
Alunwb MMtan v Uttohampt on ejft 
Landng v PortfUd: wntenawk v &s£ 


Sheffield; Btfm Vale v Nonhampor; 
Exmouth v Launceston; Gosforth * Brad- 
ford; Kafifax v Sato; Harlequins « Cam* 
bridge Unvy (at Stoop Memonal Ground); 
HsMtogiey v Harogawr Hufl & ER v 
Hartepooc KencW « west Hartlepool 
Liverpool St Refer* v HuddwsOefd. 
London Irish v Gloucester; London Scot- 
tish v Oxford Unvy London Wtrtsh v 
Newport Newtxfoga v Srfogenc (SjOL 
New Brtgtonn v Vale of Lune 
Nonmgham v Bteiwuham pH Nun— n 
v Stroud: Orrafl v (mastBc Pontepndd v 
Penaoi (3.0); RouxSsy v Northsm; 
Rugby v Oxford: Saracens v AbertiKery; 
South Wales Pcflca v Bristol; Swansea v 
Rchmond (3.0): Tredegar v Ma«Wg (3.0); 
WakefteU v Fykte; W^pa v Met PWce. 
McEWANS SCOTTISH NATIONAL 
LEAGUE: First division: 12 . 0 }: 
Borouqhmutr v Meirase; Ednburgh Acads 
v Selkirk.- Gala v Kaiser, Giasgtw Acads y 
Stewart's Mel FP: Haw ick v Ayr; Jed- 
torest y West of Scotland Wateomarts v 

SCHWEPPES WELSH CUP; Rret reuMfc 
Postponect Old Kydisns v FBrwm. 
MIDDLESEX CUP: TMrd round: Grao- 
hoppare v Handon; tjnrtxay v MM rt t 
OW ABtxXStomarte * Rurate (W (Wfflro v 
Eiing: OM MMaBana v OW Gayttxtorw 
Orieate FP v Hampstead: Sudbury Cowt . 


CBy Of Deny; Fortadown v WB tetu te k. 
Coaegians v Old Wesley: Malone v Aida; 
Queen's University v Old Betvedere. 
RUGBY LEAGUE 

WHfTB)£AD TROPHY BITTER TMRD 
■ITBMATIONAIj Greet Britain v Austra- 
lia (at Central Perk, Wigan, 2.15)- 

BASKETBALL 

PRUDENTIAL NAHONAL CUP: anartar- 
ftteta (at Bracknell): BCP London v 
Caldardato Explorers (6-0>; Happy Eater 
BrackneU Pirates v Team Prtycatf Kings- 

StRL^BtG NATIONAL LEAGUE find 
dtetefore Draper Tools Solent Stare v 
Hemte/Wattord Royals (8.0)- Second c5- 
viskm: Oldham Cettts v Lambeth Topcats 
ffl.0k Plymouth Raiders v Swindon Rakers 

Swns^kSSrERS TROP W: te atonte 
round: Petertxxough Jets v BPCCRams 

fJE AO IE; Fi ret gg fo m 
Stockport Louvoflte r Typtooo ShafMd 

j^^ (S KA'nOftAL CUPt Sesat-finat 
Sharp Manchester United v Lambeth 
Jixibt Topcats (520). 

BOWLS 

MCCARTHY AM) STONE BBOORCUB 
CtWmONSHP: F*v*Jom± VfcBty v 
Anxc Why Vafley v Richmond; Ftetee v 
Preston: Dartford v j^ phere; B ounds 
Green v PatMngiprt; Tow artantte y GoF 
Chester: Vtaterial^wrt) vCh rotoMi ler: 
Exorta v Torbay; Cotswotd v Nonh aw n; 
WMNmtohts v lets: North Watsham v 


fc. ji 

\ 1 ^ ' 1 . ■ » 


Notbnghamv Rugby; Bassedawv Boston; 
Sian ley v Cunbria: Darlington v 
Hartlepool. 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE 
(2.15); ft s wl ar tfvtetore Hounslow v 
BfoOTteatti; Slough v Bromlm. Urea 
Beckenham v Reading: DiMchylUSS 


H* London Untv v Waybridge Hawks 
MK* Bnhaafl .tongs tefens Wd- 
Surey v Wbnbfedon; Purtay v Taktegtorc 
SI Albans v Rtownret Southgate v 


Cheap; Spare* * Hampstead; Suoxkxtv 
Oxford Urm. 

NORWICH UNION EAST LEAOIE: Pre- 
mier cfivbion: Brentwood v Hatleston 
Means; BraxtourM v BfoehatUe 
ChefrEBtord v Ipsrecri; Fort v Buy SI 
Edmunds; CM Logghtonmns v Norfolk 
wanderers; Peterborough Town v 
Bishop's Stanford; Si Necks v Berfofxt 
Wesaattv Cambridge City. 

MeEWAfTS LACK SOUTH LEAGUE; 
Premter dri takac Bogngr v Fareham: 
Easterns v Oxford Hawks; Havant v 
Marion Lewes v Gore Court Mens * 
Chichester; Old Tsuntontane v 
Anchorum; Trptanv v Indian (temuiana; 
Tunbndge Ghts v East Grtrwead. 
MMd teae ^ Berio, Bucks A Oscar 
Amarsnam v Poiyte c tsk c Bracknell w 


GM-Vauxhall Conference 

Altrincham v Kettering 

Bath v Enfield 

Boston v Weymouth 

Cheltenham v Gateshead 

Frickfey v Scsrboro 

Maidstone v Telford p— 

Northwichv Dagenham 

Sutton U w 1C minster 

Weekfstone v Runcom 

Wefflng v Stafford 

Qorrerda Cross; C3ty of Oxford v Hjwk 
H arrow Town ^rana v Aylesbury; Hendon 
v Sunbur. hPL v QU Mer cha nt Teytans; 

WOMOTC ^^MfW TY CHA MPMNSHg*: 
East (at UnNereit y of Essex. Ooftfiestery 
Norte* v Kent nOuCg: Sufic* v 
H untemdo nri A ra (10.3$ UncobBtere v 
Hertfordshire (1T3«; ttDTtokfo^rkov 

JSS£ST«f , t. , ^S 0 f 

O xfo t ifeWra (2J0). 

LACRQSRg 

BRJNE NORTHERN LEAGU E: Brel r»- 
vtsSorc Ashton v Maflon Btankny * 

LEASlte: Senior 
BaaBasecond round (1^45): Buckhurat HB 
rCMntrttoe IMv: EnMd v HBtaoft 
Hsmpsre^v Oxfoed Uite London Univv 
Kenton. Second cMsfoa p Lffl .Beck- 
enham v Betlt; HBcrott A v Orptnao": 
Ifitchfo v Purtey A; Kenton A v Croytton. 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROVALBMK OF SCOTLAND NATfQNAL 
LEA GUE: H u n’s drat tfvlstcxc Capital Oty 
v raw iw [7JJk Dragon are Leeds r 

vOK Poole 020); Polontev Spark 
Crook Log (7.0): Redwood Lodge v Malory 
CroftonLC (jM- Womwt’s M tevMan: 
Southsea Scorptons v Sato (4-15). 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS: McrMe’S CteteW 
country international (Gateshead). 
BAD MINTON: Fa mous Gb " 

G?S*^^^Wtenlc — 

(Wsrwxoy Cordarance Certfre). 

HAWBMXi Four nations tournament 

Brace Cup (Q u eer s 
duh. West Kert^ngton). 

ROWING: Hampton junior small boats 
head: vesta VWnter A Veterans Regatta. 
SQUASH RACKETS: Inter-City fSkxtel 
C hanv kn aH m fTempte Mwtk, E Metep- 
SNOOKBt Tennerea UK Open tour- 
namera. final ataaea (Quid HaU, Preston). 
SW WWfl^Y oikshira Bank cfoen raeej- 

wllaiTUnW Women's Bridsh Open 
Championships (Ciystai Palace MSC). 

TOMORROW 

FOOTBALL 

First division 

Evarron vUverpool _(3 .05)- 

SOUnCRN LEAGUE: Premier dfmtorc 
Stwpshed v Far e ham. 

RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATOfc IxndscfowneVFf Berbtr- 

i»wfflut*a Z2XH ■ 

CUiS MATCH: Vale of Lune v Preston 
Grasshoppers (2.30}- 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

STONES BITTHt CHAMPtONSHCP: Bar- 
row v VAgan (230t Bradford v OUwn 
(3L3D1C Fe a rher s tone v Casttefort (330); 
Hub IDt v Wakefield: Leigh v I 
St Helens « HU(; Sdford 
Warrington v Halifax. Second iDWilre 
Blackpool v MaftSfiM (£3® Bnmfav y 
Futoam &3JJ): Deuobtxy 


















preAMfPTfrff* ‘<1 


was. The left-armer, Whitney, 
bowled usefully off a very long 
run. Whitney headed the first- 
class bowling averages here 
last year and wifi be remem- 
bered for having been called 
into the Australian team for 
the last two Tests in England 
in 1981 when he was having a 
season playing ror 
Gloucestershire's second XL 

But by England's nine, 10 
and jade, the New South 
Wales bowlers were mostly 
treated with some disdain. 
When Foster, French and 
Small were in, runs came at 
nearly three an over; die day’s 
other 75 overs, when the 
batsmen were baiting, yielded 
only 121 runs. 

Frances Edmonds Sports- 
Diary, page 20 


when the Intern a ti on al Olympic 
Coaau tree (IOC) acted last 
month in Laasamte, was a prime 
example of Ak maHBi ftirfty. It 
was as though Britain had 
forgotten overnight ose of the 
most central points that they 
were there in Lansaane to prove: 
that we still have dmnify and we 
know how to lose. The British 
managed, in their reaction to 
defeat, to appear petty and 
smaD-tinie, instead of esuafngap 
with a sm3e and saying they 
would be bade to try again. 

Dick Palmer, the general 
se c re ta ry of the British (Hynpic 
Association and aewly-ap- 
po iat ed director of the IOC 
Solidarity fond, knows better 
tbm anyone in British sport how 
we are now viewed overseas. It is 
net, despite u ni versal nostalgia 
for oar former, often oatstand- 
ing. leaders, awaiting oar return 
with open arms. Yet, when 
Palmer tried to explain this to a 
CCPR andience, many of them 
anther understood am- really 
wanted to know. Their insularity 
was embarrassing. 

Britain iaib to penetrate the 
tanks of i nt ern at ional admin- 
istration die way it once did 
because it is parochial makes 

fittie attempt to understand the 
many, and varied, aspects oi 
foreign menta lity , and relies too 
heavily on its old-fashioned 
qualities of style rather than an 
a c cep ta nce of new fd—c. 

Above all, it tails because of 
its n tfff —l ratif—oKcnin — the 
jealousies and frictions between 


cfl, has fevdered. 

Deals Howell points oat that, 
ever. 10 years. British 
r e presen tation, to elected inter- 
national bodies has dropped toy 
halt from 82 ont of 398 to 46 oot 
of 416. S i mrft m ae o nriy. com- 
Hoc representation has 
risen from 41 to 64, and 
Latin /Spanish Mattet has 
gone pp dramatically from 16 
porous to 68- Britain does still 
retain die headquarters base in 
five sports — athletics, bad- 
mhiMj table km", tennis and 
yachting- • 

A reflection of 
foreign policy 

Yet it is no longer tree, if it 
ever was, that British admin- 
istration is superior. There is a 
positive resistance to British 
jrrfl niw «» in parts of the third 
world on a c co tmt of onr colonial 
past. 

Daring the first 60 years of 
this centre?, British offici a ls 
were internationall y prominent 
because Britain Imd initiated 
many of the sport s . Along with 
other European sports-ori- 
entated countries, we enjoyed 
the dominance of what was then 
a small and select dnb. Now the 
Africans, for example, are not 
unreasonably intent a altering 
ftp fwfanw of f l e eted nowee 
Hwt their 45 Olympic-affiliated 
countries have only 15 members 


Even within the 


^dT" We ^ 

relationships with 
numbers timn does Bntam. _ 
Too often we are seen* « 
sport as a reflection « ■■■ 
K»poBcy.Kqtoroctt»« 
Sotek Africa exists m sp«t as 
gw* •$ to Pteritom ent,. a nd 

PaJmer has sport boors trrac . to 
persuade . sporting/polrticnl 
leaders to Africa that the major- 
ity of formal British 
ai toimhtra lion * oomj &&** 
xzamst any schedMCfl con»- 

JSSS - «* oppo ^d to «a- 

dfrhtnal fieetos to command 

CTCT Hf — with, and n,a«a 


Ainca. 

Qor fonner windd p rocanro ce 
was not only a 
British sport but 
foreign policy- We Imre mo red 
into a new era, and rim nt* 
surprising thatwe ate feeting the 
ptoch- , . ^ 

B iiuungha m. stt least, pto 
Brkala'sltat bach to the ring, 
bat nothing could have bees 
worse for onr international im- 
age rtmt Edinburgh, under- 
financed and wl nn g v to g . about 
thebffis. 

“Good leaders have to serve 
before they can rale,*’ P*to»r 
says. “The oafy lt V T* 
more fato seats occupied by 
Latins wiH be by ttreeBent 
achievement in competition, and 
by the proper support, financial 
and moral, of those who are seen 
to have a possibility of efection. 
That won’t happen if we krep 

.» .• g *- aa * I ” 









UWBI 75?iMTT?i! 


%uTTFTir??Ta» 



\i if.ii r M % i ^ 1 1 i > ^ 

mSIBB 


Lk.'.i-.iiLV.iJ.flRSl;. 


Guyanese. Miandad had his 
measure, though. 

WEST MDE&Rrst tarings 
C G Greenkfoe c Safcn Yousuf b 

Mudassar 27 

D L Haynes tow b knran — 3 

R B Rtrardson C AsH b SiRni Jsftar 44 

HA Gomes tow bOsrir 18 

-I V A Ricrtartts c Ramtz b Tauseef _ 70 
tPJ Duron cSalim Yousuf bOadr— 19 

R A Haper tow b Imran 9 

M D Marshal b Tauseef ■ — 4 

C G Bixts tow b Qacfir 17 

AH Gray cinranb Qadir 0 

C A Walsh not out— 0 

Extras (b14.tol1.nb3.w1) — 29 

Total — 240 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14, 2-55. 3-34. 4- 
1 10, 5-172, 6-204, 7-210. 62Z7[»234, ID- 
234. 

BOWUWG: trraan 19^32-2 Safcn Jafiw 
15-5-34-1; Mudassar 4-0-15-1; Gate 32- 

3- 1 07^ Tauseef 17-7-27-2. 

PAXBTAttRrst tarings 

Mudassar Nazar b Gray 16, 

fttotefo Khan cRrtaireb Marshal _ 1 

Ramiz Raja not out 42 

Javed Mtendad ran out 76 

*tairan Khan tow b Butts 1 

Aaif M^taba not out 6 

Extras (b 4, to 6. nb 2, W 1} 15 

Total(4wtcte) 157 

Qasfen Omar, tSaim Yousuf. Abduf Qadk, 
Safim Jattar and Tauseri Ahmad to bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-19.2-29.3-140.4- 
145. 

BOWLBtG: Marshal 16441-1; Gray 13- 

4- 2S-1 ; Harper 5-0-28-0; Wdsb 11-2-17-0; 
Butte 13^34-1. 

Umrires: P D Rsportsr and V K 
Ramaswamy. 




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REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 

t!W9 ^ lll> *" >llia> 1 m m 





SATURDAY 





ANGUAtfiS SSfSSSSR^ 

1L30-1ZB0 Jack Hotoom -L2Dp»- 






Scotfish prowicrtfivMon 

Aberdeen v Rangers 

CeKcvFaMrfc 

Clydebank v Motherwell — 

Dundee Utd v Hibernian — 

Hamilton vSt Mirren — 

Hearts v Dundee — — — 

Scottish first dfoMon 

Airdrie v Dtnfenattne 

Brechin v Partick — -- 

Clyde v KHmamock — 

E fife V Dumbarton — ■■ — 

Morton v Forfar — 

Queen of Sthv Montrose - 

Scottish second (fivision 

Abion v St Johnstone 

Ayr v Afloo — — — — 

E Stirling v Berwick 

RaHh v Meadowbsnk 

Stenhsmuirv Arbroath — 

Stiffing v Cowdenbeath — - — — — 
Stranraer v Queer’s Park 

paot Doncaatar v CarfWe 
v Swtafon Rochda 

Runcorn v Huddarafiatt —~ 

Batfoy; Wortdogfon v York (23CQ. 

HOCKEY 

MEN’S COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
ft ritatf iis iy round: Somerset v Essex 
(Bristol, 1.30); Worcestershire v Army 
(Birmingham. 2.0); Yorkshire v 
Buc fcin t ^a wsrira (ShetSeld. 1 JO). 

REFRKEHTATTVE MATCH) UMfer 21: 
Army v Berkshire (Woklrighsn, 2.1Q. 

PIZZA EXPRESS LOUDON LEAGUE; 
Cambridge Unwaretty v Pixtoy. 

wouars county champmnswp: 

East (at Unhwfttty of Essex. GoMteBMip 
SuffoK v Essex pCLO); Norfefc v Ltaoota- 
shira(l(L30kHertford8hrev Cambridge 
stb* (11-30); Himttngdonahirt v lunl 
(1 Z0t Essex v LmeotMlfire 
HuiangdotaWravC a mbridga ari re 
South (at Ostam Abbeyk Middk . 
Buddngtem ah tra (100): Surrey v Borte 
shim (LOV Sussex v ifampshra (Z30f. 

BASKETBALL . 

CARLSBHm NATIONAL LEAGUE: CBS 
Cofchester tf Group Clavetend {*xn. 
WOMENS LEAGUE: nm dMataiE Teem 
Potyceff (Onston v BCP London '<2&k 
London YMCA v Avon Nort ha mpton (2iw; 
Nottingham WHdcats'v Chamos Svrtfts 


Marehtag Praise, Ctomdown. 

BORDER 

American Hero L2M.1S KrigW Rkf- 
er IZaOma Ctoaodowa. 




m NNEL^iS^S^ 

world UOpm-2.15 AtaM>IM2GDBai 
Live and Dengnoua— TOn Lizzy 1J» 
Cknadowa 






. . . -x . . . » - . .jt-rw. -J -i- I 


fr*rit 

t 

rt 

ilLLa 




JUNIOR NATIONAL CUP; SemHIoab 
East London Royab v Team Pofrcafi 
WotpionfLO). 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BAMC OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 

LTAOUC- Marfa «ui tlMaitiu. 

Leeds vOSCRMfoOALivoipodrckyv 
Speedwel Rwanor nSfrCapm Gto * 
Potato (2.0). Women’s flat dMetaK 
Arsenal v ^ile n.30) Bradford v Btr- 
nwi^gsn PPG (13)); Spartc v Spee dw eB 
jiMO): Southsea Scorpions v Southgate 

OTHER SPORT 

HANDBALL: Rote otto ns tournament 
(Dewsbury) • • : 

KARATE: Brftoti Federation National 
Ch WatOM ttoj (Crystal fttoce NCS) 
RACJc rra Nori Bmcn Cup (Queen’s 
CMj.westKenstamnn). 

SNOOKER: Temwnts UK Open tour- 
namenL ftari sagu(GuBd Hal. Preston) 
SQUASH RACKETS: tnnx-Cfty NabOrtN 
ctrenponriapa (T bmpla Meada. Bristol) 




' i - ' ■ ' L \ 
























1 r 




SUNDAY 




SI 




^»<^>SdCamena.BL0Gt30 




RraMnutes .1 


; J , J , l il lU - 

■ 1 - ‘ tSCCL ! 










Snwcw.iraoParo- 





















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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1 986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


,? r ; vi ; 

■ , «•. 


. ■ f » 

x! 


■ £ 


• Just when non-sporting 
viewers thought they had 
safely come through BBC 
Television's ament 50th 
birthday celebrations without 
having to endure one of those 
compilation programmes ev- 
ery other sectional interest has 
had to put np with, comes 
Fifty Not Out (BBCl, 
9.15pm), two hours of sport- 
ing highlights. BBC publicity 
department talk about pre- 
: senler David Coleman stirring 
a thousand memories tonight 
A slight exaggeration. More 
likely a couple of dozen. Bm 
what names LBJankere-Koed, 
Red Rum, . Bannister, 
LonsboTOQgh, Coe and Cram, 
Korbut, Torvill and Dean, 

. Cassias Gay. If nan-sporting 


830 FamBy-Nsss. (t) 635 U» 
Moppet BaMM. 

930 Saturday Superstore. 
Among the customers are 
Mfctnst Wbod who has 
; news of the new 
Domesday project; and 
Tim Fumiss with news of 
man’s exploration of 


( CHOICE 3 

types can be persuaded to tune 
in, the inducement could be as 
sample as the deshe to find out 
who the commentator was 
. woo had to eat his hot 

..•Last night’s Arena film 

about Dali win have left you 
in a state ofhigh excitement at 
the prospect of seeing' its 
companion portrait of the 
Spamsh film director Btmnel 
(BBC2, 8.30pm). 

• Radio choice: belly-laughs 
Ben Travels (Radio 
4,2.00pm) and polish from 
frederiA Lonsdale (Radio 4, 
/.00pm). 

Peter Davalle 


2-05 Rta: The Greet Lie- 




l *m. • > 


Krov Mennhin, his wffe Aime and son Aaron: Sonth Seas 

Voyage, repeated on Channel 4, U)0 


Charlotte Attenborough and Dirk 
Borrow Your Husband ? (hi 


arde: May We 
7.45pm 




12.15 Grandstand Introduced by 
Desmond Lynam- The 

Focus; 12.40, 1.10 and 
145 Racing from 
Newbury; 1235 News 
summary and weather; 
1.00 Boons: 

wetterwelgras Daren Dyer 
' and Trevor Grant at York 
Halt; 1.25 TtempoMng: 

the hermeeatas wona 
Cup from Crystal Palace; 


iraws, George Brant, and 
Mary Astor. Sentimental 
“» of a man who merries 
m haste, cBvoross, and 
then weds the girt of Ms 
dreams. When he goes 
missing during a tnp to 
South America, the first 
wife announces that she is 
prying his child. Directed 
_ ■ by Bfmund Goutfng. 

330 Laramie, western 


635 TV-am presented by Mfte 
Morris, weather at 638; 
news at 74Xk sportat 
7.10. 

730 The Wtde Awake Ctobu 
This 100th adhlon includes 

highlights from the 

previous 99; and pep 
group Amazula 


CHANNEL 4‘ 


925 A Question of Economics. 
Parr sax.fr) 830 4 What 
It’s Worth, (rl 1030 The 
Heart of the Dragon. Port 
six explores CMnese 
attitudes to crime, (r) 11.11 
TneeieeHuntin 
Cambridge. (r>1220 
Isaura the Slave Girt. (rt 
IjOO South Sees Voyage. Kror 
and Ann Menuhin with 



230 and 335 Rugby 

Leagues &eat Bmam v 

' andAOO &woS«; 
Tennants Ureted Kingdom 
Championship; 3 j 50 Half- 
times 435 Final score. 
535 Newa with Jan Looming. 
Weather. 5.15 
Sport/regiona] news. 

520 Roland flat -The Series, 
worn guests Frankie Goes 
to HoSywood and Alexei 
Seyto. 

5.45 Doctor Who. Part 12, with 
Colin Baker, Bonnie 
Langford, and Honor 
Blackman. (Ceefax) 

6.10 Al Creatures Greet raid 
Smstt. Siegfried and 
James have enlisted An the 
RAF and awati their cafi-up 
date.(rt 

7.05 Every Second Counts. 

The last edition ot the . 
comedy quiz show 


740 rt-de-HC Peggy and 
Gladys get the sack after 
rebuffing file amorous 
advances of the Camp 
ControBer.fCeefax) 

8.10 Casualty. This week the 
casualty department has 
to deal with a drunken 
Welshman; a down-and- 
out wino wtth afttogtes; 


440 Championship Snooker. 
Round three action In the 
. Tennants United Kingdom 
Champ ionship, 

B30 Inte rnati o na l Bridge Chrtx 

featuring Arturo Franco 
fltah^ ZS Mahmood 
(Pakistan); Christian Mari 
( France ); and Ro bert 

7.00 ItawsViMrw^ijan 

Learning and Moira Stuart 

Weather. 

740 Saturday R e view 
Introduced by BusseB 
Davies. Opera: Laos 
Janacek’s Jenufa. is 
dmeussed by H)ah 
Moshinsky, Kathryn 
Harries, and Claire 
Tomafin; Art a profile of 
Gilbert and George who 
have been. Ibr the second 
time, short-fisted for the 
Turner Prize. 

8L30 The Ufa and Time of 
Don Luis BtraeL The 
story of the celebrated 
Spanish f&ntfirector 
tracing his Bfe through 
Spain, Mexico, France, 
and America, and 
inctuflng a contribution 
' from perhaps his favourite 
actress, Jeanne Moreau. 


925 No 73. Fun and games for 
the young 1 LOO Knight 
Rfder.(rt 

1230 News with Nicholas Owen. 

1235 S ai nt and Qraavt la review 
- the week's footbefl news. 
1230 Wresting from 
Loughborough Town Hal. 

120 Clips. Bobby and Poncti 
search for a couple of 
high-speed thieves 215 
Prase* Sirt A young 
teacher battles with a 
class of unruly pupils, (r) 
245 Waft 

Presents. A 19© Oscar 
wfnner. Three Little Pig9.fr) 

255 FBm: The Corsican 
Brothers (1984) starring 
Trevor Eve. A made-fbr- 
television version of 
Dumas’ tale of family 
vendettas fti eartv 19th 


and a boy with hte fingers 
stuck fn the hanrfleoars of 
hts beyda. (Ceefax) 

930 Newa and sport With Jan 
Learning. Weather. 

9.15 Fifty Not Oat David ’ 
Coleman introduces a 
nostalgic review of fifty 
years of BBCTolevitrion’s 
sports coverage Including 
the 1948 Olympics •’ ■ 
featuring the flying Dutch 

lady, Fanny BJankers- 
Koen; the Stanley 
Matthews PACup Final; 
Roger Bannister In action; 
Red Rum’s three Grand 
Nationals; and the 


I Fan: THX 1138 (1970) 
starring Robert Duval and 
DonaUPleesenca. 
Science fiction adventure, 
set in a 25th century 
subterranean worn where 
everybody teoertrofled by 
computer s and drugs. But 
THX1138 and Ms MS- 
programmed mate, UM - 
3417. have been 


their drug Wake and are 
developing feafings of 
their own towards one 
another. Directed by 
. George Lucas. 

1135 FBa: A Boy and Me Dog 
(1975) starring Don 
Johnson and Jason 
Robartia. Another science 
- . fiction tale, thistime set to 
the year 2024, .. 
toimetfiatelay after the - 
Fourth Woria War. One of 
the survivors of the 
holocaustis an 18 -year 
oW with a dog that can 
speak Engfistt and alert 
h© master to hidden 


445 Resulte Service. 530Nm 

535 Blockbusters. 

535 The A-Team. Part two of 
the three-episode 
adventure m which 
HannibaL BA, and Face 
are wrongfufiy charged 
with the murder of a 
colonel. 

630 Blind Date. 

7.15 Beadta’s About The first 
- of a new series In which 
Jeremy Beadle plays 
- practical Jokes on mnoosnl 
members of the pubfic. 

745 The Price is Right A new 
series of the game show. 

845 News and Sprat followed 
by Big Fight Preview. A 
kook forward to 
Sunday’sbout between 
Trevor Berbick and Mike 
Tyson. 

935 Unnatural Causes: Lost 
Property by PeterJ 
■ Hammond. Miranda 
' Richardson, John Duttine, 
and Louisa Heaicar star in 
this tale of a vicious - 
murder to a former 
Victorian schootoouse. 

1035 GmSows wadfines 
tofiowed by FBm: Hts 


id by FBm: Hts 
ra 11984) starring 
Uncft and Jutiann 


Robert Urid) and JuGarme 
Phffips. Amade-fcr- 
tefevtskxi drama about an 
ambMous typist who' 

becomes the mistress of 
asWent 


nttie-lmown islands in the 
South Pacific, (r) 

230 FBm: Red Dust- (1932) 
starring Clark Gable, Jean 
/ Harlow and Mary Aster. 

Comedy drama about a 
mbber ptantation managei 
who fads for a prostitute 
on the run and then the 
neglected wife of the 
plantation's engineer. 
Directed by Victor Fleming 
330 FBm: Rascal Dazzle* 

(1 981 ) A compflaaon of 

highlights from films 

starring The Lrffle Rascals. 
) Narratedby JenvLewts. 

535 Brookslde. (r) (Oracfa) 

830 Right to Reply. 

Tefevision'B coverage of 
Aids is accused of being 
inaccurate, homophobic, 
bigoted and moraRStic. 
Among tne accusers is 
Oral MJflan among the 
k defenders is Jonathan 

DlmbteDy. 

630 The Great Austrafian Boat 
Race. The America's Cup 
efimlnation races. 

730 News summary aid 
weather foBowed by 7 
Days. Sir Anthony 
Parsons, formra British 
Ambassador to kan, 
discusses the morality of 
the secret ante deals; and 
D.Z.Ph3tos, Professor of 
Phlosophy at Swansea 
University, talks about tire 
work of the Welsh poet, 
R.S.Thomas. 

730 Ed gMand. A documentary 
about modem crofting to 
cMabrate the centenary of 
the first Crofting Act 
830 Redbrick. Part eight 
examines the activity 
surrounding the election of 
Student Union officers. 
fOrade) 

930 Pavadtae Postponed. 

(r) (Oracle) 

1030 WU Street Kue*. Furtkr 
orders me arrest of a - 
number of fallow officers 
on corruption charges. - 
1130 Who Dares Wins. Off-beat 
cemedv series. 

11.45 SteSfReana. A profle of 
a gay package holiday 
representative based to 
.Greece. . 

1 1245 The Tw*ght Zones 

Cavender is Coming. The 
tele of a failed angel who 
is given a second chance 
to win Ms wings. Followed 
by Kick the Can in which 
an old man has an idea 
teat wB ratable him to 


935 Playschool 9.15 Articles 

of Pal 111. Rediscovering 

refigkxrs beief 930 TI& la 
thaDay. A simple religious 
service from a viewers 
home in Cumbria. 

1030 Aston BEMazine 1030 
Maas Unfimfted. 
Compante s ' suggestion 
schemes, (r) 10 TS 5 
Buongiomo MaltoL Lesson 
six. (n 1120 Lyn 
MarafraTs Everyday 
Yoga, (r) 1130 went 
Programme. The effects 
of poverty on the standard 
(Set (r) 1145 Telaiownalfr) 

1210 See Hear. For tee hearing 
impaired 1235 Farming. 
Ross Muir examines 
Finland's forestry industry 
to sea if trees could 
become an attemative 
crop far Scotland's 
beleaguered farmers. 
1258Weather. 

130 This Week Next Week. 
David Dimbiaby reports 
from Washington on the 
reaction and criticism of 
President Reagan's 
admitted arms deafing with 
Iran; and on how 
Americans saa tees* 
co m mit ment to Europe 
230EastEndeT S .fr) 



330 Match of the Day Uve. 
Everton v Liverpool at 
Goodison Park. 

455 approximately Cartoon 
Double BBI 

535 Domesday. The first of a 
new series in which 
Michael Wbod searches 
for the roots of English 
history. 

530 DavIdCopperfieCeL 
Episode six and an old 
schootfriend. Stserfarth. 
re-enters David's fife. 
(Ceefax) 

620 Save a Life. Emergency 
first aid. (Ceefax) 

630 Newa with Jan Laerreng. 
Weather. 

640 Songs of Praise from 
Leeds Parish Church. 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Twenty Years of the Two 
Ronnies. Vintage comedy 
from Messrs Barker and 
Corbett, (r) (Ceefax) 

830 H o w ard s ' way. The final 
episode of tee drama 
serai. (Ceefax) 

835 News with Jan Leemtng. 

9.10 The Staging Detective. 
Episode two and Janet 
Suzman joins the cast as 
Marlow's ex-wife who 
causes him to break out in 
a cold sweat when she 
visits htoi in hospiteL 
(Ceefax) 

'1020 Everyman: The Fail of 

LSD. The second and final 
programme in the series 
cm tee history of the 
halucegemc drug LSD. 

1135 ChampfoRsMp Snooker. 
Third round action In the 
Tennems United Kingdom 
Championship. 

1235 Weather. 


News on the half-hour until 
1130am. then at 230pm, 330 
430,730 930 and 1200 
midnight. 

63Daa Mark Page 830 Petra 
PowaU 1030 MBcb Read 1230pm 
Jkny SavBe’s dd Record' Quo 


Williams and Stephen 
Clark; and psychologist 
Nicholas Humphrey. 

630 The Money P rog ramme. 
Paul Burden investigates 
the pros and cons of the 
British Gas privatization. 

7.15 Did You See-? The 

Singing Detective: Arena's 
Salvador Dali; and New 
Faces of 88, are discussed 
by Douglas Hurd, Marina 
vaizey, and Clive James. 

830 The Natural World: Why 
Doga Don’t Lflce ChHB - 
But Some Like ft Hot. 


what tickles the palates of 
men and animals. 

830 LovetowiFamfiy Ties. This 
last programme of the 
series examines the larger 
groups that form around 


Jimy Sa vfte's *010 Record' Out 
(1 984. 78. and 72) 230 Vintage 
American Bandstand Tlhe 
Doooto Brothara) 330 Radio 1 
Mora Time (John Pratt 430 
Chartbustras (Bruno Brookes) 530 
Top 40 (Bruno Brookes) 730 
John Paei with the Request Show 
930 Rouble Vtocemi130* 

1200 The Rankin' Mss P (Cukors 
Rock). VHF Stereo Radios 1 & 

2— 430am As RacHo 2 530pm As 
Radiol. 1230-430amAs Radk>2 


WORLD SERVICE 



Regional TV: on facing page 


On longwave, (s) stereo on VHF 
S35 Shipping- 630 Ktews BrieBng: 
Weather. 6.10 Prelude (s) 
music 

630 flaws; Farmtog. 630 

Prayer. 635 Weaffw; 

Travel 

730 News 7.10 Today's 
papers. 7.15 On Your 
FImt. 745 to Perspective ■ 
(reHgfous affairs with 
ftowmaiy Hath*) 73Q . 

Down to Earth 
^jardeteng) 7 JES Weather; 

630 News. 8.10 TocteYs • - 
papers. 8. 15 Sport on 4 
YvWCttff Moroaa840 
Yastrattoy to PerUamenL 
837 Wetohor Travel . 

930 News 

936 Breakaway gravel and _ - 
toiaure program me), with 


oemHonm, 

9L5D Neustand. Mfchaef Wfetis 
reviews the weeklies. 

1035 The'Weekin 

Westnanstw. Presented 
by JuOa Langdon of the 
Muror." ■ ■ • 

7030 LOOS* Ends with Ned 
Shrarinandstudto 

1130 SwOurOwii • 

Correspondent Lite and 
poBtics abroad* ■ 

1230 News; Money Bote. 
Presented by Louse 


Bolting. ' 

1237 Radio Active. The in- 
house documentary. - 

130 News 

1.10 Any Questions? Sir ■ 
-Marcus Fox MP.Munus 
Magnusson, Diane Warwick 
andtin Rt Rev Robert 
Wfflams with an audience in 
Ripon. North Yorkshire- ' 

• (rt 135 Shipping. 

230 News; The Afternoon 
Ptey. A Cuckoo in the 
Nestlran tee novra aid play 


by Peter King. Whh. Joan . 
Hickson, Freddie Jones 
and lan Lavender in the cast 

330 SSwTffiwfc.-' 
mtematiatei 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 
430 wifflGreat Pleasure. . . 

Michael Parkinson 
presents a selection of fils 
favourite prose and 
poster. With Geoffrey CdBns 
and Carol Drinkwater. 

445 Feedback. Christopher 
Duntisy witn comments, 
complaints and queries 
■ ^xaflthe BBC. 

530- ram of the Book. Theism . 
version of CMver Twist 
VWh Criristopher Cook (r) ■ 
525 Week' Ending: Satirical 
- sketches. 630 Shipping. 

-5.55 Weateer. Travel 


630 News; Sports Roundkp 
625 Stop the week wtth 
■ Robert Robraon. With a 
song from Instant Sunshtoe. 
730 Sacirtey Ntght Theatre: 
OnApprovaJ,by 
Frederick Lonsdale. Cast 
. fraudos Dtiicw Gray, 

Michael Denson and Jil 
Bennett (s) 

830 Baker’s Dozen, with 

Ricnard Bauer. 

930 ThrBtert Deep and Crisp 
and Evan, by Peter 
Turnout Episodes. Read by 
Bfif Patterson. 258 . 

Weather 

1030 News 10.15 Evening 
Service from St Paw’s 
Church, Birmingham (s) ■ 

1030 Soundings (religious and 
moral impticationa). 

11.00 saence Now (Pew 
- Evans). 

1130 Carrott's Crash Course ' 
on the Cable Car 
Comics: Pan 1; Jasper 
Carron in San Francisco. 
1200 News; Weather. 1239 


jvB&ae in England and 
i wales only) as above 


Weather Travel 430- 
630 Options: 4.00 Global 
-Visage 420 The State of 
Industry 530 The Oldest AOy 
(Portugal). 830 For Aqul 



940 Lovetow in Britain: A 
Public Debate About 
Private Uvea. The state of 
marriage and the famfly in 
Britain is discussed by, 
among others, Dr Anthony 
Clare, Ken Livingstone, 
Germaine Greer, end 
Hugh Montefkxe. (Ceefax) 

1040 Fait Back Roads (1981) 
starring SaBy Field and 
Tommy Lee Jones. The 
story of a prostitute who 
teams up with an ex-boxer 
when they discover the 
prospective cherrt 
knocked-out by the man is 
a policeman. They decide 
It would be diplomatic to 
leave Alabama and the 
film follows their 
adventures as they make 
their way to CaBfamia. 
Directed by Martin RitL 
Ends at 1220. 


636 Weather. 730 News 
736 Tudor Churcn Music 

Hium: The SfetoenJt Tallis 
(Three versions of Ctorffica 
me Peter fan Shaw, 
organ), Tafts (40-part motet. 
Spent in alium nunquam 
habui: Tafts Scholars), and 
Byrd (Mass for three 
voteas Hffltard Ensemble) 
830 Vienna Octet Beethoven 
(Septet Op 20), Britten 
(Stofonteda, Op 1)330 News 
935 Your Concert Choice: 
Berkeley (Serenade (Or 
Strings, Op 12 LPC^. Bruch 
(KW Nttfrefc Casals, cello 
and LSO), Vaughan Wlftams 
(String Quartet NO 2 
Music Grotto of London), 
Chopin (Pano Concerto 

No 2 Marguerite Long/Paris 
Conservatoire) 

1030 Muse Weekly: with 

Micnael Olver. Includes 
an interview with the 
baritone Ruud van der Meer. 
11.15 MkhailPietnav: piano 
rscxtaJ. The 12 pieces 
from Tchaikovsky's Op 72 
1220 From the Festivals: 

Norwich Festival of 
Contemporary Church 
Music. With utoir of 
King’s CoBege, Cambridge. 


Britten (Rejoice in the 
Lamb), Kenneth Leighton 
(Gloria, Missa da Gloria, 
Op 82). Stephen Dodgson 
(tis Almost One) 


On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Shipping. 630 News Briefing; 

Weather. 6.10 Prelude 
630 News; Morning Has 
Broken (hymns)- 635 
Weather: Travel 
730 News. 7.10 Sunday 
papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samajhiye. 745 Befls. 
738 Tumirib Over Nbw 
L eaves. 7-55 Weather; Travel 
830 News. 6.10 Sunday 
Papers. 8.15 Suncfey 
(raWous news and views). 


SUNDAY 



930 Ceefax 945 Open 
Uni ver si ty. 

1035 Blue Peter, (r) 1125 The 
Cuckoo Stecae. The final 
episode, (r) 

1130 Wtadmitt. Ctips from 

television programmes on 
tee theme war end peace. 
1230 No Limits. Rock 
music programme fr) 

140 Rugby SpectoL Highlights 
of Ulster v Leinster. 

220 This Week in the Lords. 

330 FBm: Dodge City (1939) 
starring Errol Flyrm. 
Western adventure about 
a cattleman who decides 
to bring law and order to a 
notriousiy wild town. 
Directed by Michael 
Curtiz. 

440 Music in Camera. Mayumi 
Fujikawa ( violin) and the 


( CHOICE ) 

• Diifc Bogarde acted both 
wisely and unwisely in 
associating himself with May 
We Borrow Your Has hand 7 
(TTV, 7.45pmX He is in his 
efement in the observational 
role of the mature man who 
secs an immature girl losing 
her husband to a couple of 
predatory homosexuals in 
out-of-season Antibes. The 
mistake Bogarde made was to 
write the screenplay. Graham 
Greene's original short story 
did not present the man-girl 
relationship as autumn yearn- 
ing for spring. That is what 
Bogarde does with it, and it 
takes a lot of swallowing to 


$35 TV-ora begins with Sunday 
Comment; 730 Are You 
Awake Yet? 725 Woe Extra. 
830 David Frost on Sunday. 

With Cfive James and 
Nigel West. 


Orchestra, conducted by 
Janos Furst, perform 
Mozart’s Concerto in b flat 
(K 207) 

5.10 Championship Snooker. 
The Tennants United 
Kingdom Championship. 

530 Thinking Aloud. The 

question of animals’ rights 
is discussed by 


925 Wake Up London. 

930 World Championship 
Boxing. The bout between 
Trevor Berbick and Mike 
Tyson. 1030 WBd Rides. 
The thrills of American 
rotter coasters. It) 

11.00 Morning Worship from St 
Saviour s, Dartmouth. 

1230 Weekend World. How 
should tee West deal with 
Iran? 130 PoBce Five. 
1.15 The Smurfa.fr) 

130 Link. A debate on now 
words can affect disabled 
people's lives. 

230 The Human Factor. The 
story of a grotto of men 
and women who left their 
homes and temifies to help 
those fleeing from the 
Hungarian revolution. 

230 LWT News headlines 
followed by Film: The 
Electric Horseman (1979) 
starring Robert Radford. 
Jane Fonda and Valerie 
Perrine. A champion 
cowboy, reduced to 
promoting a breakfast 
cereal, makes off with the 
horse ha works with in the 
commercials. They are 
followed by a television 
newscaster who smeOs a 
great human interest 
story. Directed by Sydney 
Pollack. 

430 The Return of the 

Antelope. Adventures of a 
trio of Lilliputians in 
Victorian England. 

5.00 BuSseye. 

530 Sunday Sunday. (Soria 
Hunniford's guests include 
David Frost, Julie Walters, 
Andy Williams, and 
Andrew Lloyd Webber. 

630 News with Nicholas Owen. 

640 Highway. Sir Harry 

Secombe visits Aide may. 

7.15 Chiefs Play. 

745 May We Borrow Yow 
Husband? Dirk Bogarde's 
adaptation of a Graham 
Greene stray about five 
people staying in a smaH 
note! in tee South of 
France. (Oracle) 

945 News. 

1030 Room at the Bottom. 
Comedy series starring 
James Boiam. (Oracle) 

1030 The South Bonk Show. 
What is the reason for the 


believe that such a worldly- 
wise writer (the Bogarde role) 
would see the incredibly naive 
gill (no matter how beguil- 
ingly played by Charlotte 
Attenborough) as anything 
but an object for pity, not for 
love. 

• A idUcr’s gun having made 
it impossible for Lee Harvey 
Oswald to stand trial on the 
charge of murdering President 
Kennedy, LWT have done the 
next best thing: stage the Dial, 
with real lawyers, real 
judge, real witnesses (Channel 
4, 7.15pm). At nearly 5'h 
hours, this must be rated 
Channel 4’s most remarkable 
marathon for a drama. 

Peter Davalle 


CHANNEL 4 


925 Sunday East Magazine 
programme for Britain's 
Aslan communities. 
Followed by Deewarafn. 
Drama serial set in a 
visage In Pakistan. 

1030 The world This Week 
introduced by Chantel 
Cura 1130 Worzel 
QummkJge. (rt 1130 The 
Waltons 1230 The Tube. 
fr> 

230 Pott's Programme for 
children. Tne guest Is John 
Duttine. 

230 FBm: Jai Santoshi Mae 
(1975) A mythological film 
which was responsible for 
the creation of a 
nationwide cult devoted to 
an obscure regional folk 
deity, Santoshi Maa. 


— 5_ 

■ t 

0 ft 


deity, Sar 
Starring H 
and Arab 


Kan an Kaushal 
a Guha. Directed 


followed by Symphony. 
The first or a new series 
on the works of composer 
Howard GoodalL 
12.00 Sex raid the American 
Teenager. American 
teenagers discuss sex. 
1230 MghtThoumits. 


1.15 Kanchett: Georgian State 
SOurdar Dzhansug 
Khakhklze play the 
Symphony No 6 
145 Capricorn: Mozart (Flute 
Quartet in D. K 285), 
Gurko (Winter Music}, and 
Janacek's Concertino, 
240 English Chamber 
Orchestra (under 
Menuhin), with NeP Black 
(oboe), JosM-uis Garda 


back on tee Children In Need 
appeal. 936 Weather 

930 News. 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.18 Latter From America, by 
Alistair Cooke. 

930 Morning Service (from 
the Meteodist Centre. 
Bromsgrove, 
Worcestershire) 

10.16 The Arcnere. Omnbus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick Of The Week. 

» ret Howard's 

ms from lest week's 

programmes fr) 

1215 Desert Island Docs. 

Jonn Ridgeway, 
adventurer, Is Michael 
PtrKteson's castaway 
(s). 1255 Weather 
130 The World This 


TOC^NaE&Ra^oIrl D53kH2^a5m: 1 <^*Hz/ 275 m; Radio 2 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1215kHz 

VHF 97 * ^ ,54SkH?/194m VHR ’ 5 -* BBC 


(yioffn). Bach (Branasnourg 
Concerto No 3 and No 1), 
and Otx» d'amore. Concerto 
in A. BWV1055 

330 Gubaldulina and Rrsova: 
works by tea two Soviet 
women composers, with 
Brodsky Quartet, John 
consane (piano), Timothy 
Hugh (ceflo), Graham 
Barber (organ), Paul 
Silverthome (viola), John 
Orford (bassoon) 

425 Carl Marta von Weber 
BBC SO (under Simon 
Jdy).with BBC Singers. 
Lynne Dawson 
(soprano). Susan Mason 
(mezzo). Mark Tucker 
(tenor), John Hall (bass). 
Mfssa Sancta No 2 . 
Jubetinesse 

530 ThBtne and Variations: 
MlchaalGleraiy's 
translation of Samoa 
Alyoshin's ptay 

62S Liszt Mid the Piano: John 
Bingham plays 
Hungarian Rhapsody No 12 
FivelJttte Pieces, and 


weekend: News. 

200 News. Gardeners' 

Question Time visits the 
borough of St Edmundsbury 
inSufrok. 

230 The Afternoon Play. On 
May Day, by Paul 
Copley. Post-Chernobyl 
drama. Cast includes 
Natasha Pyna, Chnstoptar 
Farbank and Garerd 
Green (s) 

330 Talking About Antiques. 
Barnard Price and David 
Battle answer listeners' 
questions. 

430 News; The FOod 

Programme write Derek 
Cooper (Thanksgiving 
dinners) 

430 The Natural History 
Programme, Vaknflt 
Thapar on tigers 

5.00 News; Travel 
S35 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnson visits 
Huddersfield. 

530 Shipping. 535 Weather 

630 News 

6u15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour, wtth Sally FoWman 

730 Pendenras. by 

Thackeray. Part 5 of an 

eiortt-part dramatization. 
With Hugh Dckson and 
Dominic Guard (s) 

830 Bookshelf, with Susan 


by Vijay Sharma. (In Hindi 
with English subtitles) 

445 World Alive: Spain. A 
series on tee natural 
history of Spain. This 
programme focuses on 
the mountains of 
Andalusia where some of 
the animals would be at 
home In Scotland and the 
forests of Germany; 
others are defmately 
Mediterranean, fr) 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Business Prog ra m m e 

§ resented by Susannah 
towns and lain Carson. 
There is an interview with 
the Chairman of Fiat, 
Giovanni Agnefli, who talks 
about his takeover of Alfa 
Romeo; his relationship 
with Ford in Europe; and 
about the level of over 
capacity in tee European 
car market Plus, a report 
on the first stage of 
France’s priv a tiz a tion 
process. 

6.00 American Footbafi 
presented by Frank 
Gifford and John Smith. 
HighJi$its of tee game 
between New England 
Patriots and the Los 
Angeles Rams. 

7.15 The Trial of Lee Harvey 
Oswald. To coincide wtth 
tee 23rd anniversary of the 
assassination of President 
Kennedy, a trial- that- 
nevra-was^Betorea 

12-man jury selected by 
the DaBas Federal Court 
computer, actual 
witnesses face cross 
examination by two of the 
United States's most 
formidable criminal 
lawyers -prosecutor 
Vincent T Bugiiosi, who 
secured the conviction of 
mass-murderer Charles 
Manson, and defender 
Gerry Spence who has not 
lost a jury trial tor 17 
years. Ends at 1245. 


Hungarian Rhapsody No 13 
730 York Winds: 

performances of Ferenc 
Farkas's Ancient Hungarian 
Dances, Vffia-Lobos's 
Quintet In the forms of a 
Chores, and Stravinsky's 
Pastorale 

730 Cardiff Festival of Music 
1986: part one. Lefczig 
Gewancteaus Orcnestra 
(under Kurt Masur), with 
Christian Funks (vtoftnj and 
Jumjakob Timm (cello). 
Brahms (Concerto in A 
minor, Op 102, for violin, 
ceto and orchestra) 

835 The Living Pdec readings 
from hts own work by 
Alien Cumow, 

625 Concert (prat twoj; 

Schubert Symphony No 9) 
930 John Cesken and 

Richard Rodney Bennett: 
Jane Manning (soprano), 
with Richard Rodney 
Bennett (ptano). John 
Casken (Ta Orana, 

Gauqtn), Bennett (A Garland 
for Marjory Fleming) 

1030 The Berth LecturaTord 
McQuakey on Hard 
Cases and Bad Law (i) 

1030 Britten performs Mozart 
The ECO (under Bntten) 
perform foe Piano Concerto 
No 27, with Clifford Curzon. 
1135 Minder John McAndrew 
reads tee story ty Elatoe 
Evelelgh 

1125 Russian Orthdox Chant 
1137 News. 1230 Close. 


HHL 

830 A Look Inside, i 

Pakweather continues an 
examination of the British 


72, 

id’s r 

the | 

on * 
in 


I ly 

Id 


prison systwn. 
News,- A Matter 


930 News; A Matter Of 
Honour, by Jeffrey 
Archer (3). with Michael Yra 
and Simon Ward (s) 

930 Law In Action, presented 
by Joshua Rozanburg. 

936 Weather; Travel 

1030 News 

10.15 The Sunday Feature: The 
Loud Awskener. The 
story of George Whitfield, 
revdtutnnary clergyman 
of the 18th century. 

il.QO Seeds of Faith: The 
WofW is Wild. Dr Sheila 
Cassidy reflects on her 
experiences with tea 
Chureti m Chte. 

11.15 In Committee. Pater Hffl 
on tee work of 
Parfiranenr 3 select 
committees. 

1200 News; weather. 1233 

VHF A^teiabJeta England and 
5 Wales only) as above 
except 539&00ani Open 
University: 7.10 Open 
Forum 730 Into the Open. 
430-630 Options: 4.00 
Museum Choice. 430 Oaks 
andAcoms. 530 
Employment Counselling. 
530 Buongiomo ftaiial 



» el » YSfr-SF SJIITV RS: IS.S5 B > 







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44 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22 1986 


SPORT 


Quick-fire Tyson 
set to usher in 


boxing’s new era 


From Srikumar Sen, Boxing Correspondent, Las Vegas 


In the crowded lobby of the 
Hilton, the publicity video for 
the Trevor Berbick-Mike 
Tyson world title bout runs on 
day and night. Gamblers do 
not notice the Bickerings on 
the screen, but boxing fens 
watch mesmerized as Tyson 
knocks out opponents in 
quick succession. It is like 
watching that Find-the-Lady 
man in London's West End. 
You think you know how it is 
done. Tyson's hands are as 
quick. 

Tyson against Ratliff, 
Tyson against Ribalta, Tyson 
against Sims. What a fighter! 
But who is this? Berbick 
against Bey. The fens want 
Tyson to come round again. 
Tyson is their champion — 
Berbick almost an after- 
thought 

In their minds, the fens 
have already made the un- 
beaten 20-year-old New 
Yorker the winner of today’s 
World Boxing Council bout at 
the Hilton Center. Everything 
certainly seems to point to 
Tyson becoming the youngest 
ever world heavyweight 


Berbick, a minister of the 
Moments of Miracles Church, 
Las Vegas, fights back with 
words, but the unbelievers are 
not moved They are not sure 
which of the two Bertricks wffl 
emerge today: the “drugged” 
one that lost to S T Gordon or 
the alert one that surprised 
Pinldon Thomas and lifted the 
title? Yesterday Berbick was 


Trevor Berbick 


6ft 


Bom: Port Anthony, 
Jamaica. Ape: 32. 

w 

2&tn. Reach: 78in. 
(normal}: 42in. Chest 
(expanded): 44m. Biceps: 
15in. Forearm; 13in. Waist: 


37in. Thigh: 24Jn. Cart: 16*n. 


Neck: 17Tn. Wrist 7'Aln. Fist 
13in. Ankle: iffin. 

Record: Contests 37; wins 
32. losses 4, draws 1, 
stoppa ge s 23. 


Mike Tyson 


Bom: Brooklyn, New York. 


XT 


eight 2181b. Height 5ft 
' “ ‘ 71. Chest 


champion, beating Floyd 
' >f 21 


Patterson's record of 21 years 
10 months and 26 days. 

Patterson, too, was discov- 
ered by Cus D’ Amato. Like 
Tyson. Patterson did a spell in 
a correctional school as a boy. 
Patterson, too, was under 6ft. 
And Patterson won his title in 
November. Further, Tyson is 
the only challenger to start 
favourite since Joe Louis be- 
fore the Braddock fight in 
1937. No wonder the fens 
believe they are going to 
witness the second coming of 
Marciano, Louis and Demp- 
sey all roiled into one. 

Everybody wants Tyson to 
usher in a new era in boxing as 
Muhammed Ali did 22 years 
ago. It would be good for the 
game, good for the two 
remaining contests in this 
series to unify the three world 
titles and absolutely marvel- 
lous for the promoters. One 
wonders how Don King, one 
of the Dynamic Duo putting 
on this show, is thinking. His 
son Cari manages Berbick. 

At every press conference. 


11 Yt in. Reach: 

(normal): 43fft. Chest 
(expanded): 45ei. Biceps: 
16in. Forearm: 14. Waist 34in. 
Thigh: 27in. Calf: 18. Neck: 
19#in. Wrist 8in. Fist 13in. 
Ankle: llin. 

Record: Contests 27; wins 
27, stoppages 25. 


looking a bit like the 
“drugged” one because he was 
receiving medication for a 
“desert throat”. 

Because of Berbick’s 
wounded pride the champion 
is expected to give a good 
account of himself People are 
even worried he could ruin 
everything by winning. He has 
the heart and the skill to 
succeed And it is unlikely he 
will suffer from the “Joe Louis 
syndrome” and freeze, as have 
others, through fear when 
Tyson fixes his small dark 
eyes on him. Berbick showed 
Larry Holmes no respect and 
ended that great champion’s 
run of inside-the-distance vic- 
tories. 

Berbick knows Tyson will 
come looking for him straight- 
away, there being no feelmg- 


out period for the challenger, 
who wants to roll quickly into 
what D' Amato used to call 
“intuitive” fighting — to bring 
up the right uppercut then 
bring down the chopping left 

So long as Berbick can keep 
away from those shots and 
box he can win. Tyson has bad 
trouble with boxers who know 
the ropes, men like Green and 
Tillis. They use their experi- 
ence to last the distance. 
Berbick is a for better boxer 
than them. However, he does 
tend to retaliate when hurt If 
he does that he could risk 
taking that right Uppercut or 
the left hook, which are deliv- 
ered with maximum leverage, 
Tyson being short for a heavy- 
weight and throwing his 
punches upwards. 

In fighting bade Berbick’s 
boxing can get loose. As he 
throws bis punches he is wide 
open to the right hand coming 
up. But Jose Torres, another 
D’ Amato champion and now 
chairman of the New Yoik 
Athletic Commission, warns 
Tyson: “Berbick is very persis- 
tent and has a good jab — he 
beat Pinklon Thomas with it” 

But Tyson's trainer, Kevin 
Rooney, says: “We shall go for 
an early knock-out, hopefully 
in the first round. If that 
doesn't happen. Mike wifi 
wear him down by the 
seventh.” The soft-spoken 
Tyson, who has never pre- 
dicted a victory in his 27 other 
bouts, has told his friends 
back home in the Catskills: 
“He’ll go in six.” 

As D' Amato said: “When 
someone like Mike believes in 
himself as much as be does, 
his actions in die ring are no 
longer calculated, but become 
intuitive. Once they are intu- 
itive. nobody can beat him.” 

On this Judgement Day, as 
the fight has been labelled by 
the promoters, everyone will 
be waiting for the first big 
punch from either side — 
especially watching out for the 
Tyson uppercut It is the most 
frightening punch I have ever 
seen. According to Ribalta, 
Tyson hits harder than Joe 
Frazier. One must fear for the 
fighting preacher. 


Berbick: Preaching to the unconverted 


Wembley defence 
for Honeyghan 


Lloyd Honeyghan, the un- 
disputed world welterweight 
boxing champion, is to defend 
his crown against the Ameri- 
can, Johnny Bumphns, at 
Wembley Arena in January or 
February. Mike Barrett, co- 
promoter annonneed in 
London yesterday. 

Barrett and Mickey Duff, 
fellow promoter, won the right 
to stage the 15 mends battle 
with a 265,000 (£187,677) 
dollar purse offer. “Mickey 
made a dash to the 1BF 
Headquarters in America to 
beat the noon deadline and we 
came tort top,” Barrett said. 
“The fight wffl be onder IBF 
rules but for the midfepeted 
world title. 

“As for the exact date that 
will aot be known until tete- 
vision arrangements have been 
sorted out The fight will be 
shewn live in America. 


“Honeyghan is dearly a 
very hot property and it is 
bound to create big interest. 
We look to pot an quality 
fights and there is no doubt 
that this is certainly going to 
be one of them.” 

Honeyghan's success in 
beating Don Curry to share 
the undisputed championship 
title with Marvin Hagier saw 
him win a best sportsm a n 
award presented by The 
London Standard, and within 
a fortnight of packing up that 
award, he fought off fierce 
competition to be voted sports- 
man of the year by the British 
Sportswriters Association. 

He became an overnight 
world sporting star when he 
b atter ed the highly-rated 
Curry, who was previously 
h h he ated , into submission in 
six rounds at Atlantic Oty on 
September 27. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Great Britain’s pride at stake 


By Keith Maddin 


The French referee, Julien 
Rasc ag neres. could be the 
most important person at 
Central Park, Wigan, this 
afternoon when Great Britain 
and Australia meet for the 
third and final time in this 
year's series, sponsored by 
Whitbread Trophy. 

Although Australia have al- 
ready clinched the series with 
their two sweeping wins at Old 
Trafibrd and EUend Road, 
there are World Cup points at 
stake for both countries this 
afternoon, and no holds will 
be barred in the confrontation. 


There is a possibility, always 
‘a series. 


Ability. 

inherent at the end of 
that some of the players may 
well seek to settle personal 
scores. Some of the more 
aggressive British players may 
wish to prove to the Austra- 
lian supermen that there are 
areas in which the British can 
still hold their own. If this 
happens, M Rascagneres 
could have his hands full 
keeping order, since there 
have been several flashpoints 
in recent dub games against 
the Kangaroos. 

Hopefully these emer- 


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gendes win not arise, or will 
be quickly dealt with by the 
officials and captains, allow- 
ing the teams to i)lay out a 
game which is vitally im- 
it for both teams' World 
_ progress. 

Great Britain’s pride is at 
stake at Wigan this afternoon 
following the demoralizing 
thrashings in the first two 
internationals. The Great 
Britain coach, Maurice 
Bamfbrd. has made several 
changes, some of them en- 
forced in an almost desperate 
attempt to field a team ca- 
pable of giving the Australians 
an acceptable contest 

Into the side come the 
Widnes loose forward Harry 
Pinner, his team mate at 
Widnes, winger John Basnett, 
centre David Stephenson 
(Wigan), who is third dunce 
after tire injured Duane and 
Marchant, the peppery 
Warrington scrum half Andy 
Gregory, and the powerful 
second row forward, Chris 
Burton, of Hull Kingston 
Rovers. 

The Australians are without 
their second row forward, 
Noel deal, who has a broken 
arm, but Mai Meninga, the 
burly all-purpose player, steps 
up from substitute, and so 
good are the tourists in all 
departments that Clea) is un- 
likely to be missed. 

The Australians will cer- 
tainly be going all out to make 
another undefeated dean 
sweep of international and 
dub games. Brett Kenny, the 
centre three-quarter, said: 
“We are determined to win 
this one to pick up vital World 
Cup points. Even though we 
have won the series there will 
be no letting up in this one.” 
These are ominous words. 

After the game there could 
be an announcement from the 
Wigan dub that they have 
agreed terms for the signature 
of the world's current best 
player, the Australian stand- 
off half and captain, Wally 
Lewis. 


WORLD CUP RESULTS: Naw Zealand IB, 
AuaraJto 0 (Auttmft Great Britain B. 
New Zealand 6 (luetoj: Franca 0. New 
Zealand 22 (Rerpaarty; Franca 10. Great 
Britain 10 (Avfcnort Australia 32. New 
Zedand 12 (Brisbane); Papua New 
Gutnae 24. New Zealand 22 (Pan 


»62< 




N Zealand 
Australia 3 

G Britain 2 

P n Guinea 2 

France 2 


P W 

5 2 


P A 
80 62 
94 42 
IB 16 
36 84 
10 32 


Pta 

9 


GREAT BfOTAM: J 


Basnet? {HfctaesJ, G Schofield D 
Stepnanaon (Wean). H QB (Moan); A 
MylerCNictnsaL AGrewy (Ytarmngtonfc 
K wnd (CasdefanO DWtaata*** (Hd 
KR. rapt). L Crash* (Hufl). C Batten {Hut 
KR1, A Goodway (VMgan|, H Ptaa ar 

P*gan). 

AUSTRALIA; G Jade D Stasrar, B 
■Canny, G Miea, M O’Connor: W Lewie 
IOM.B Storing; P Own, R Stanton*, G 
to*#*, a tSm g, * Matings. R 
Lindner. 

Refer** J Rascagneres (Frame). 


RUGBY UNION 


Extra powers to 
discipline rebels 


By Paul Martin 


The South African Rugby 
Board has taken new powers 
that, it claims, would allow it 
to take firm action against any 
provincial union that 
organises rebel tours without 
proper authority. 

Details of the new regula- 
tions, which according to the 
Board's diairman, Dr Danie 
Craven, were passed without 
dissent at This month's annual 
meeting, have been sent to tire 
International Rugby Board 
(IRB) in London. 

At last month's acrimo- 
nious IRB meeting South 
Africa's delegates claimed 
they had been kept in the dark 
over Transvaal's plans for the 
New Zealand Cavaliers tour 
and had no means of control- 
ling the actions of their 
provincial onions. The IRB 
hart instruc ted the South "Af- 
ricans to put this right 

The SARB's executive now 
has the power to expel — 
rather than, previously, only 
suspend — provincial unions 
who breach amateur regula- 
tions or the SA board's own 
constitution, though an ex- 
pelled union can be reinstated 
after an appeaL The executive 
can also now recognize an 
alternative body to represent 
the expelled area's interests. 

Most significantly, the exec- 
utive can “take any steps 
against any member whose 
actions, in its sole opinion, are 
detrimental to the best in- 


terests of the Board or the 
game”. 

Exactly the same power to 
take steps against provincial 
unions harming the interests 
of the game already existed at 
the time of the Cavaliers’ lour. 
The Times has (earned. The 
previous rule cm this point 
was identical except that the 
word “sole” has now been 
inserte d. 

According to the IRB Emer- 
gency Committee chairman, 
Harry McKibbin, the exis- 
tence of that rule was not 
revealed by the South African 
delegates last month, who 
protested powerlessness. 
Nevertheless be desoibed the 
new regulation as “a step 
forward — they must now 
surely be masters in their own 
house.” 

He added: “Now they will 
have no excuse for not taking 
full responsibility if any un- 
authorized tour is arranged. 
We cannot be fobbed off 


again. 

Other International Board 
representatives urged the 
South Africans to use their 
existing powers to investigate 
and discipline the Transvaal 
Rugby Union for its role in 
this year's rebel tour. 

South African rugby and 
commercial interests con- 
firmed this month that they 
hope to bring out a British 
iMm or an Australian 
squad, or both. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Showdown 
at Bath 


Bath, the winners of rugby 
union's John Player Special 


Cop for the past three years, 
for ! 


are heading for a showdown 
with their assistant coach, 
David Robson. Oub officials 
are seething over reports that 
Robson had recently been to 
watch the Australian rugby 
Teague team on behalf of the 
dub. 

Any attempt by a club to 
improve playing techniques 
by direct contact with rugby 
league is is contravention of 
union rules. 



Hashes: scored a centary 

Schilder wins 


** * * * **■ 




is set to serve 


up the real thing 


By CTree White 


Whatever poverty the 
is pleading in some of 
affluent areas of foe country it 
is still thriving in bankrupt 
UverpooL Despite foe pres- 
ence of BBC television cam- 
eras at Goodison Park 
tomorrow and, dare one say, 
the monotony of a sixth 
Merseyside derby in 1 1 
months a crowd of 48,000 is 
expected — a record for a 
televised game. 


Brown in which departments 
they were stranger. “AH. of 
them”, he replied. He said that 
their performance in beating 
Norwich 6-2 was the best be 
had ever seen by a Liverpool 
side. “And we didn't play that 
badly. Liverpool were oat of 
this world. They took their 
goals against us whereas we 
gave them to Everton.” 


dearly there is no sub- 
stitute for foe red thing — and 
football in Liverpool is the 
real thing. By Thursday 
45,000 tickets had been sold 
for a match which for once 
will not figure the league 
leaders, though it may do by 
the end of the afternoon. 


For the past two seasons the 
Evertonians have been able to 
compete on a level footing 
with the “Reds? even though 
they have won only once m 
their last six meetings. It is a 
reflection on the depth of the 
Everton challenge these days 
that they can consider victory 
over the old enemy while 
without four full inter- 
nationals, Reid, Bracewdl, 
Van den Hauwe and Stevens, 
as they have been all season. 
Encouragingly, the first three 
are due to play in a reserve 
game next week. 

Everton’s ability to climb as 
high as seventh while weighed 
down by numerous other inju- 
ries, too, has earned Howard 
Kendall and his staff the 
admiration of foe first di- 
vision . Ken Brown, whose 
Norwich Oty side conceded 
four goals at home to the 
“depleted” Everton in mid- 
week, sai± “Howard has done 
really great 

“1 would have thought they 
would miss Reid, particularly 
after the World Cup he bad, 
but they have coped 
marvellously. They work a lot 
harder than possibly Everton 
normally do and they still 
have a tot of flair in people like 
Sbeedy” 


Everton, nevertheless, can 
afford to overtook foe 
__ of Watson, the former 
Carrow Road favourite and a 
Liverpudlian, who will prob- 
ably find himself on the 

substitutes' bench again to- 
morrow after recovenngfrom 
injury. More fortunate should 
be Adams, the young wide 
midfield player whom Ken- 
dall as tute ly in the 

dose season when tie folly 
realised the extent of the 
injury problems. It wifl be 
Adams's 21st birthday tomor- 
row and there are no prizes for 

guesting his ideal present. 

Kendall's chief concern re- 
mains with foe opposition and 
in particular that man Rush, 
who is three goals short of 
equalling Dixie Dean's derby 
record o? 19 goals. Having hit 
five against Everton already 
this season, albeit in die 
Screen Sport Soper final, that 
target is not as unattainable 


tomorrow as one might be for 
a normal human. Kendall was 
asked recently how Ire in- 
tended to deal with Rush. 
“Thai’s easy” he replied, “the 
nearest five players". 


Brown is in a perfect pos- 
ition to evaluate foe 135th 
derby (the law of averages is 
respectfully maintained at 47 
wins each) since his team have 
suffered to the tone oflO goals 
a g ain st foe two Merseyside 
clubs in the last three weeks. 
In favouring Liverpool I asked 



putting 
on the 



ByMitcbeHPbtts 


They were *B there at 
Sandora Park. Nat, that is, 
the likes of Peter Scudamore 
and Richard Dsnreody, fa t 
Tack Nkfciaus, Sandy Lyle, 
Grog Norman, Lee Trevmo, 
Se v eri a no Ballesteros ad 
Benfoanl Langer, to name bat 
a few. ‘ 

For sat* a gathering of goU 

personalities to be at ance- 
trm± trader foe leudea Nona- 
her sky is mrimaginahte naffl 
one realizes that they are d 
six foot tall cardboard art- 
rats. 

Greg Nonaan has* for in- 
stance, stood staring im 
space this week , at foe 
Spahfiag stand at foe Inter- 
national GoffTradeexhibctian 
organized by hntergdf Europe 
Lmrifcl for the British Goff 
Industry Association. 

Bat Dave Friz, ofAbSeue, 
Texas, was there and ia 
person. He is a taH nan, 
bg r riing with ent hi siasn,wfca 
has attempted te reroiatioane 
petting, foal infernal gnu 
within a game, with an «- 
orthodox jogifenmiL 

Pelz, who left Us job jit 
NASA tnta^tdris, devel- 
oped a patter which has time 
bads set one behind each other 
between its face sad back. The 
trto&te is font the United 
Stales Goff A ss oc i a t ion hire. 
rtptmwd that one fern of fee 
Priz potter is illegal as wrilaa 

unorthodox. 

He was given foe afrdear 
fora version which has a face 
of 5% inches but foe otter 
version, which has a faceofZK 
inches, wiB take him hack fete 
the American court room this 
whiter. The USGA say tint h 
contravenes theft rate 4M 
fend foe dab head from bed to 
toe mast measme more than 
the dab from front to back. 
The Friz patter measures 4 
7/8fo baches from frost to 

“AH I want to do is hefo 



ru : ■ 



fa- 

s' 






Williams’ dismissal 
costs him £400 


get more enjoyment from 
: game,” Peiz said. “The 
are interpreting fee 
rule dfe e a to to how it is 
writ te n. Bert foe rales of gaff 
are bigger than the powers ri 
today. They didirt right write 
them. It is mur trie! by jury 

and I have no dsahe that I wffl 

win.” 

Norman is probably paid in 



By Chris Moore 


Billy McNeill, the Aston 
Villa manager, laa night car- 
ried out his threat to get tough 


wife undisciplined players by 
~ " '* ” full back, 


fining the dub's „ 

Gary Williams £400 for being 
sent off for the second time 
this season at Southampton 
on Tuesday. 

McNeill is also understood 
_ j have issued written 
warnings to his captain, Allan 
Evans and Steve Hunt who 
were both booked in the 
Littlewoods Cup tie at The 
Dell, and are now just one 
point away from saispension. 


ing or appealing against tire 
fine because I deserve ft. I was 
totally in the wrong and 
realize I let everyone down. 
But I have teamed my. lesson 

and hav e told the boss it won’t 
happen again.” 


the regkm ef £125^00 to play 
Spalding risks hut that money 
is wefi spott as he wffl en tic e 
for dnb {nofessfenafe to stock 
Spahfiag equipment as de- 
mand increases from members 
c unria ced that they, too, can 
conquer with such dabs in 
their hands. 


r: \ 7 


fr- • • 

i - 

u .. 


Villa welcome bade Steve 
Hodge this afteraooQ follow- 
ing his clash of heads with his 
England team colleague, 
Glenn- Hoddle at Wembley 
last week which left him 
ne eding nine stitches in a cut 
above the eye. 


The Villa manager was 
reluctant to . be drawn into 
discussing “internal” disci- 
i linar y measures. Bat after 
ining Williams a week’s 
wages, 'McNeill sairt “The 
player is his own wont enemy . 
Wife his talents he should be 
imnrffing on the door of an 
international place. But he has 
got to team quickly bow to 
control his temper, though I 
he wflL” 


But Frol Birch, Simon 
Stainrod and Gary Shaw are 
all ruled out, and Tony Daley 
needs a fitness test on an ankle 
this moming.“West 


injury tins morning. West 
Ham are always a lovely team 
to play against,” McNefll 


enthused. 


am certain 


Williams, who keeps his 
place in an injury-hit Villa 
side at West Ham today, 
readily admitted his guilt last 
nighL “After going ten years 
without being sent of it’s now 
happened to me twice in a 
couple of months and I am 
cheating myself” said the 26 
year old defender, who in 
addition has also been booked 
three times this season. 

‘But I won't be comptain- 


“Tbey’ve toughened them- 
selves up a bit over the last few 
seasons but their principles 
are stfll the best ones. They are 
now capable of competing 
against the best so we should 
get a fair indication of how 
well we are doing.” 

Villa will again operate with 
a sweeper, though McNeill 
insists that wffl not detract 
from their own performance 
as an attacking force.“We 
used the same system at 
Southampton in midweek and 
created more chances than 
they did. Both our full hades 
are happy with it because they 
like to get forward and the 
system allows them to do so.” 


Carded off 


Luton Town, who installed 
a controversial supporters' 
membership card system in a 
move to ban troublemakers 
from their ground, have with- 
drawn a fen's card for mis- 
behaving on his way home 
from an away game. He is the 
first Luton s upporte r to have 
his membership withdrawn 
since the scheme started this 
season. Luton spokesman 
Colin Moore said the fen was 
fined £100 


Rebel leader 


kim Hughes hit a century to 
spearhead a run spree by his 
Australian rebel cricketers on 
the first day of their three-day 
match against Orange Free 
State in Bloemfontein 


Ausotian XI 313 tar 5 (K j 
Hughes loo. J Dyson 7% 


Simone Schilder, of the 
Netherlands, won the LTA 
women's indoor tournament 
at Croydon by defeating 
Karine Queutrec, of France, 6~ 

4, 6-4. British honour was 
upheld by Valda Lake 
(Devon) and Clare Wood 
(Sussex) who won the doubles 
title, defeating Schilder and 
Digna Ketelaar. 6-7. 6-2. 7-5. KHSJ 


League plans 

The eight venues and team 
managers for the new Mort- 
gage Corporation national ten- 
nis league, starting next 
February, were announced 
yestetday. The managers have 
until January to submit their 
teams of six. from which four 
most be nominated to play in 
a particular match. 

VENUES AID MANAGERS: 

~ McDonald}. Heston 


(AJanWteon). 
Telford (Alan 


Aston Vfla IStuart Cteedl. 


CRICKET 


Delay on 


Boycott 


Derbyshire yesterday pui 
foe offer of a contract to 
Geoffrey Boycott “on boUT so 
that they could check whether 

thftr mam fn y ) , faoBofoam, 

would be prepared to play 
alongside foe former York- 
shire and Eogtead opeaer. 



Lining up: Pete's potter 


That was the dear indica- 
tion which emerged from a 
two-hour - meeting of 
Derbyshire's cricket commit- 
tee feOBgh their chief exec- 
utive, Roger Feanaan, was 
briefed to issne only a short 
and non-committal statement 


Pearman said: “The cricket 
committee has discussed the 
general situation about foe 
possibility of signing new 
players, including Geoffrey 
Boycott. There can~ be no 
farther movement ou this 
situation because of certain 
other things which have to be 
resolved firtf." 


And ft feat the International 
Grif Trade show that the real 
nuts and bolts business en- 
folds with manufacturers 
displaying to fete dub pro- 
fesnionals and dis tributo rs foe 
equipment whkh will be anifl- 
abiem 1987. 

Mike Ricketts, the market- 
ing manager (UK) of Wftaoa 
Sporting Goods, points eat 
that foe youngs te r s are not 
being forgotten. He said: “We 
have two new models, both 
autographed by Bernhard 
longer, mid one of them is a 
junior set for starters befrem 
the age of 10 and 13. Bernhard 
was personalty consulted an 
design and he is oveijoyed 
wife tiie result. .* 

Shaager beBeve they hoM 
the tramp card in foe Euro- 
pean market with Ballesteros 
endorsing fear range which 
includes a new XTC heel and 
tee .model and a triple wedge 
system with varying loft an- 
gles rf 52 per cent, 55 per cent 
and 58 per cent for trouble 
shots. 

. New ideas, gnamiritg, call 

teem what yon win, abound, 

with Ron Channon, of 
GoHtech Shoes, feat 
.his new spikeless models wffl 
help a goffer to swing better. 

There are graphite shafts, 
go-farther bails, go-ftjgher 
balls, Indoor meth- 

ods, engjne-powered golf carts 
aad thro, Wefloes, which Is a 
new product for golfing com- 
fort. They are worn foe 
shoes and over foe socks and 
they apparently keep yon-feet 
warm and dry mid “help you 
conce ntrate on your game.” 

It probably seems that, with 
half a dozen purchases, it is 
possible to slice a similar 
number of shots off your 
handicap though ft is also 
worth recalfing, before you 
invest, that writworn adage: 
“Goffers who. know buy frmn 
their wo.” 





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